The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01610

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
"Jewish Floridian
' .<
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
33 Number 50
Miami, Florida, Friday, December 11, 1959
Two Sections Price 20
pte and tile blend into an harmonious view, enhanced
gh abundant use of stainless steel in cornices and letters,
lew Mt. Sinai Hospital is eight stories high.
tpect 3,000 at Mi
inai Opening Sunday
See Mt. Sinai Hops it a I Supplement Section C
Sn Founders Pages 14-15 and 16 A
ting for some 3,000 persons is being prepared for the dedication
Bnies which will officially open the new Mt. Sinai Hospital of
Miami on Sunday at 2 p.m.
|near-$10 million medical in-
eight stories high above
ae Bay on Collins Island
liately adjacent to the hos-
[old site at 4300 Collins ave.,
en its doors after ten years
lining.
Jewish Floridian this weeK
its entire Sec. C to details
to the old and new Mt.
lospital.)
|ilding and planning commit-
IS been headed by J. Ger-
i-ewis, and included A. J.
Is, Joseph Rose, Joseph M.
Jack Canter, and David
pps. Upward of 58 percent
cost of the building was
subscribed by Mt. Sinai Poun-
ders, donors of $50,000 or more.
The Sunday program will open
with an invocation prayer by Msgr.
Father Barry, of St. Patrick's, Mi-
ami Beach. Sam C. Levenson,
Founder, trustee and chairman of
the opening committee, will act
as master of ceremonies and intro-
duce dignitaries present.
Miami Beach Mayor D. Lee
Powell will present greetings.
Baron de Hirsch Meyer, Founder
and first president of Mt. Sinai
Hospital, will receive a plaque in
Continued on Page 9-A
Mi Declares Jewish Move
Suburbia Not 'Escapist'
UN Renews Old Palestine
Conciliation Body as Lone
Israel Records No' Ballot
JTABy Direct Teletype Wire
UNITED NATIONSThe General Assembly's special political committee adopted a resolution Tues-
day prolonging the life of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for three more years, and reacti-
vating the Palestine Conciliation Committee. A total of 71 delegations voted in favor of the entire res-
olution, none opposed, and only Israel abstained from voting. In a separate vote on the fourth para-
graph of the resolution, which called for reactivation of Arab refugees as provided in a 1948 UN resolu-
tion, Israel cast the single vote in*------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
opposition, and 17 other delega-
tions refrained from giving this
proposal their approval.
Acceptance of the resolution by
the General Assembly plenary ses-
sion is now considered a matter of
routine.
Israel announced its position
on the resolution prior to the
balloting, but withheld its state-
ment justifying its stand until
the voting was completed. Mi-
chael S. Comay, head of the Is-
rael delegation, then told the
committee that his delegation
regarded it as "significant" that
a large number of other delega-
tions "have expressed this mis-
givings on Paragraph Four and
hive abstained on the separate
vote."
While the Israeli statement was
a general review of Israel's posi-
tion on the refugee question and
the broader issue of Arab-Israeli
relations, Comay reserved his fire
for the paragraph of the resolution
reactivating the Conciliation Com-
mission.
"A renewed reference to the
Conciliation Commission in the
year 1959," he declared, "must
take account of the evolution of
United Nations policy since 1948,
when the commission was estab-
lished of current international
thinking on the problem of the
contemporary realities in the area,
and of Israel's own record and un-
dertakings. By any of these tests.
Paragraph Four is devoid of real-
ism. It looks backward instead of
forward, and is more likely to im-
pede constructive solution than to
achieve one.
"We cannot accept the view that
such a paragraph is justified be-
cause it has been lumped together
IEW YORK(JTA)Dr. Albert L. Gordon, prominent Boston rab- -
sociologist, took sharp issue this week with charges ^^^JSSSS^SS^S^^
[moving to the suburbs to "escape" their non-white city neighbors, j ^ rnments It must be re-
puthor of the sociological study, "Jews in Suburbia," addressed the j
innual meeting of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith.
more important" changing*----------------
Continued on Page 7-A
JAVITS JOINS FRACAS
Rosenwald Charges Warburg
Distorts Role of UJA Funds
NEW HAVEN, Conn.(JTA)All the money that the United Jew-
ish Appeal raises is given only to welfare organizations for humani-
tarian needs, and "none of it is given anywhere else," William Rosen-
wald, noted American Jewish leader and national chairman of the UJA,
declared here last weekend.
* 'The support which American
Jews give to the UJA carries
with it no endorsement of the
"policies of Israel's Government,
foreign and domestic Whet this
support does say in the most elo-
quent and meaningful terms is
that the Jews of America under-
write the human needs which
the UJA was founded to meet.
Stressing that UJA funds have
been used to save and rebuild
the lives of Jews in need or dan-
ger throughout the world, Mr.
Rosenwald commented that Mr.
Warburg "could not have been
more reckless of the facts as
they apply to the UJA, than he
was in his address last Friday
night."
The United Jewish Appeal has
raised funds in annual drives since
iV'nuftuML Tile President 1939- when J* was brought into be-
uoitid #dys
Shell Stay
As Minister
JTABy Direct Teletype Wire
JERUSALEMPresident Ben-
Zvi formally entrusted Prime Min-
ister David Ben-Gurion Tuesday
with the task of forming a new
government after the President
completed the required consulta-
tions with all parties winning in
the November elections for Is-
went to the Prime Minister's home
for the action because the Prime
Minister has been feverish since
Monday, and was expected to re-
main in bed for the next two or
three days. He will continue his
efforts to form a new government
from his home.
MeanwNle, Golda Meir has
agreed to continue in the next
coalition Government as Israel's
Continued on Page 16-A
and economic factors ac-
for the move to the suburbs
tth Jews and Christians, Dr.
>n said. He predicted, how-
that the "escapists" among
; moving out of the cities will
rithin the next decade that
are fewer places to which
" Dr. Gordon spoke in op-
n to the criticism voiced last
at the General Assembly of
RJnion of American Hebrew
regations by Marvin Braiter-
[ a Baltimore attorney.
daring that the "escapist"
Be leveled against Jews Is
irranted, Rabbi Gordon said:
hough it is true that the
re to suburbs may constitute
ppism for some people, there
! merty other far more Inv
Continued en Page 6-A
IMPACT OF US. AID PAGE 6-A
Nasser Steams to Hide Empty Kettle
JERUSALEM-(JTA) United
Arab Republic President Nasser is
trying to divert attention from his
difficulties in the Arab world by
announcing his opposition to Is-
rael's implementation of the Jor-
dan River irrigation project, Is-
raeli circles declared here this
week.
Nasser was reported by Cairo
dispatches to have issued a state-
ment opposing Israel's irrigation
project. Observers here, however,
are of the belief that he is in des-
perate need of an anti-Israel issue
to cover splits inside the Arab
bloc.
His plan to stem Syrian oppo-
sition to the merger with Egypt
in the UAR are understood to
have run into great difficulties.
The Egyptian ruler also fears
the effects of the reported move
by Iraq to revive the plan for a
"fertile crescent," e move that
would join together Iraq, Jor-
dan and the Syrian region of the
UAR.
Meanwhile, In Jordan, Israel's
first submarine, the 800-t6n "Tan-
in," left the British Naval Base in
Portsmouth harbor on its 16-day
cruise to Israel. The submarine,
manned by a full complement of
56 officers and men, was fully
armed with thirteen 2-000-pound
torpedoes and "ready for com-
bat."
The day of departure started at
7:30 a.m. when the Tanin's crew
took up stations aboard the vessel
while frogmen carefully inspected
Continued on Peg* 11-A
ing to aid Jews persecuted by Hit-
ler. In more than two decades it
has provided monies for the feed-
ing, shelter, migration and re-
establishment of oppressed and
distressed Jewish populations
throughout the world. UJA funds
have aided 2,700,000 persons, help-
ing to resettle 1,300,000 of these in
free lands throughout the world,
Continued on Page 7-A
WILUAm KOStMWALD
a rlVHIM ef9VffS


Pag* 2 A
^JemtsttHrwidhr


U.S. Praises UN Emergency Fo
' MIRDNMVONSThe United States Gorernment is pre-
*4 XarKW Kmirgeacy T*rt |vd to cnil nh Um*rl ~
minting the Gata Strip border be UJIEF" IMP eapiaaia a tot*] of
tween Egypt and Israel, as well as J9.WC.000 cover.ni nearly haif of
the shores of the Gulf of Aqaba. I NET* BttWW budget for next
has -done ita job magnificently, year,
the United Stales delegation de-
clared Sore this week, but "unfor-
wnatelv. the peace in this area"'
has not as ret been "assured for
all times."
Tiis statement was ma;'e in the
eneral Assembly's Adminis-
trative aad Budgetary Committee
by Coagressmaa James G. Pulton,
whs is the American delegate in
that group. He iwiii nil that the
Secretary General Dae. Ham-
rrartkjVd to'd tha committee, in
urging that Ms UNCF budgetary
fiavras far iMt he adopted, that
tha coats far meinfenanee of tha
Emaramcy Force ere noadsd to
nawre "continuing ejuiet along
the entire Bordortina hetwaen Is-
rael tod Egypt."
th-
Hollywood Beth
El Plans Building
Ihavti

cf Mum; has been named'
al contractor, accordtag to
Malm an Teeaple president.
Mr bad Mrs. Harry Le&aS baqaamh S2S 000 to Jewish Na-
tional Fund. The c~-~. osflnhhnn. a Nachkdi is Israel becr-
; ".'-.- N-.rr; r r d exec_-
'e bflOBd cJaaanuau. recerres the boxroeal froca LefkaB at ra-
ce-: r.T
LONG OISTANCI
SevHrky Seeking
MOVERS *?""
MW FTf-gPS He- v~4 e- J.
ftaaiihiin Bafti.
ytaa. gastsa :: aahar
04AL JE IJ53
K. lielwnan & Soo,
s cou-m atn. avjuas kkb
~ s
dtp, conductor of
the 1'iuversity of Muni Symphony
Orchestra, is seeking tenon. ban-'
tones and basses lor a Mare ceo-
cert priai slatiii of Bertiec' "Dan>
cf Faust "
He toad the committee
while there had been few
incidents in the
were situations which, in
sence of restraining
could hare had nrloea
ccs far overshadowing the effort
Beth El of Hollywood. "^J?~*^,f2^ ..*" "*
new S500.000 sanctu- ** eT Torre
and school build tne parent circumstances."
"*" continued Mr TTaiiiaiihjiili. "it
s impassible for -tie : to foresee
when the operations of the Force
might be brought to an end with
TV new budding will include a out rskuig loss of the progress
aggrapacity sanctuary and 400- tWf fu maif Mr --------r-Tj-rl
* m ** ^,nbw,c ,o <>neni "
-h Holy Days '**" bis roosisJenUj fme leader
aad special occasions. The social ship of the Force.'' As usual when
hall includes a stage, dress.n- UNEF m
rooms and kitchen. There will he
eight standard-size classrooms in
the school building, and one dou-
ble-sue classroom or molti-pur-
pose room.
Ala* inchided are library, rab-
bi's study, offices and steraee
rooms. The sliuclwe
fully air-canditianad. All
oa*. fumimiwaa. aevine, of
straofa, miiewan and parting
ar*. as wall as
PILES
NEWfj
Wi; hoot St
TAUV5 SniT41
-MEssJaij
/''"' *B-amn
"!
was
Aaduaans for vocalist* win be
held at The university's Beaamoat
Hall ea Satarday from H to 12
aaaa aad I to 5 rn
SCIENTIFIC* *
PEST
CONTROL
the Uaa-
fl -. V > > :-*-t _>*f j r e
or write to the lertersty of M-
asai rjamauaj. T O Box gafi Co-
ral Gaties at. a later Chan Friday.
The land consists of
mately 11 acres with S feet front
age on lath are and 7TM feet in
depth, nhich was donated to the
Temple by the Mailman family ~
early ia 1967.
Irrrag Karach.
Smith and Korac
has been retained as architect
SlNCi leoi
'Ml rafSPfcrioa
ML 3-M21
fl'Wpira
Bt -
1 '
In -! taw
- X
-
- '
t.
tl-
*v*1 m aan
- i atS
^ cbeW3t
rVeserigf iog |
NOiV \h T^rOMoggJ
AJt-coaarrioaa,
aatAKO IUa UCJhfJ
mcatmmn,
c:*fwrroj
350 UKCOUi I
ps je va
Imtr. Wall sin an. I
723 IIMCOU
Pbem Jf Mff
gcvusrs'
of the firm of %'~ ""fllP
I Miami BesrH 'pOllaf pn 'Sit fJPT
Moot MSwph L teckgvdcy
VI IHSTAll
GIA5S
FOR LfTSBT Pf RPOSE
JTI
nTaTmTf FIATC
MASS
jVJ^ LU CLASS AJO M*2Kflt WORKS
----1 tllS-rn. am ST. Carm aV^. faaat n !.))
ilEPHOM'S HEBREW: **
BOOK STORE
L'St Kin Oraot
1
1
t _
AW,
a i-ttfs
JANITOR SEE'.
r?irx en
I.inn CV
iKlasta ** -
A A -
nx-ci tUoJi' i
ai s
PLr.
armxusu
HTAsl
?--*,
'snCLi errs a-a .ovcltics J
JUtaaaahl-eai; *
______ *
rotliaa with Oar Mcary Satisfied Q>*'
AanTfgsw IgCATRTM KB TOgt CUIIIUnaff
C0ULT0N BROS;
Cgrna Wwy ft S.W. 27tli Arg.
TOACOMn
M0S.W.I
PAUHEITS MIAMI MOHUMBJT CO.
"Miggai's tgg.ig. Mg.gri.l DgUrs"
Wiry Pirf Mtn? Raj* far km
O-rySlS-00
!
i Am
( a-gtX2


December 11, 1959
+Jeisti ThrHltr
\
np*
^1
Free Corsage Now Available for Mother
On the Occasion of Bar or Bas Mitzvah
Page 3-A
Proud mothers whose sons and
daughters are about to become
Bar or Bas Mitzvah now have
cause for additional pride. For
on this important day, they can
put their best foot forward with a
special touch.
Won't mother look more stun-
ning than ever if she wears a
corsage on this sanctified occa-
sion?
Of course, she will, and The
cal figures on hand to pitch in for Mt. Sinai Former
Frank Clement, of Tennessee (riqht), was the latest to
[raise $300,000 in a two-night stand. He is greeted here
r. and Mrs. Tom Kravitz, of Bay Harbor Islands
:ientists See Interchange
stween Soviet and Israel
AVIVProf. Vaaili
tschensky, of the Moscow
I Science Academy, pre-
here that a relaxation
id tensions would bring
[cultural and personal rela-
etween Israel and Russia.
king at a special reception
[Russian Embassy for Soviet
|es to the International Bi-
Conlerence held here,
Blagovitschensky said that
PNOTISM
IND SELF-HYPNOSIS
of the mind and body mirac-
1 responds to Hypnotherapy.
combats bad habits; Smoking;
king; Insomnia; Female Oisor-
[Complexes; Nervous Tension;
of Confidence; Overweight;
ncy; Allergies; Etc. Improve
lf mentally and physically.
. W. H. APPLEBY, Ms.D.
Only Hypnotherapy Clinic
I.W. 42nd Are. HI 8-8033
Copyright 1959
FREE TO READERS
>F THIS PUILICATIONI
he expected soon an exchange of
cultural missions between the So-
viet Union and Israel.
Another Soviet delegate. Dr.
Natalie Konko, said she felt com-
pletely at ease during her stay
| in Israel and had gained much
' from her studies of everyday
j life in Israel.
There is reason to believe that
I representatives of the Supreme So-
j viet in Moscow would accept an in-
I vitation to visit Israel, if such a
I bid were to be extended. David
Hacohen, Israeli member of the
Interparliamentary Union's presid-
ium, declared here.
Hacohen made-this state-
ment upon his return from a visit
to the Soviet Union, where he was
accorded high official honors by
\ the Russian city of Gomel, the
r place of his birth. He had gone to
Russia as a member of a delega-
i tion from the IPU which had held
its annual congress in Warsaw.
Arts League Will
Install Officers
Miami Beach Music and Arts
League will install officers Satur-
day evening at the Roney Piaza
hotel.
Commissioner Charles Hall will
install Herman A. Binder presi-
dent; Daniel Broad, Louis B. Ho-
berman, Louis Siegal. and Harry
L. Webb, vice presidents.
Gustave Freeman, executive
secretary; Max P. Feld, treasurer;
Florence Rothman, corresponding
secretary; Ruth Freeman, record-
ing secretary; Lenore Hauer, fi-
nancial secretary.
Citations will be awarded to
George S. Engle, of the Coconut
Grove Theater; Lisl Beer, Miami
artist; and Gustave Freeman, Mi-
ami Beach, for service to the
League.
Dr. Arturo di Dilippl, manager
of the Opera Guild of Greater Mi-
ami, will direct a concert of higfi-
lights from Carman and La Gio-
conda. H. T. (Dutch) Shulenberg
is master of ceremonies.
Jewish Floridian is now making i:
possible for mother to have that
corsage free.
"Corsage for You"* is 'the name
of a new feature of The Jewish
Floridian. These are the simple
rules to follow in order to receive
your free corsage:
Address a postcard to "Cor-
sage for You," e/o The Jewish
Floridian. P.O. Box 2973, Miami
1, Fla., at least 14 days prior to
the date of the Bar or Bas Mitz-
vah ceremony. List the follow-
ing details:
Your name, address, and
tele-phone number.
Name of the confirmand.
Dale of tha Bar or Bas
Mitzvah. ~
Place where the ceremony
will be observed.
The corsage will be presented
free of charge through the cour-
tesy of The Jewish Floridian by
arrangements with the Blackstone
Flower Shops.
'a
' W
.-I
Je
1 I
fflrararfl3,?fa'3mum
r Hebrew-English Calendar
11 dates and days of the week
[September, 1937 to Septem-
161. Helps you to find Yahr-
^tes at a (dance.
your free copy, write to:-
f. Heinz Company, Dept. J2,
Pittsburgh 30, Pa.
To Lite in Hearts We Leu re
Behind Is lo Live Forever!
4'(Vfct- PALMER,$
5 MEMORIALS
"Miami's Only
Jewish
Monument
Builders"
Scheduled Unveiling*
SUNDAY, DEC. 13th
Mr. Hebo Cemetery
n'.iYER YEDUN, 12:45 p.m.
Riibhi frvmg Le'nrman
"May Their Souls Repose
m Eternal Peace1"
ARRANGEMENTS BY
PALMER'S MIAMI MONUMENT CO.
Complete and Dependable Title Service
M
IAMI TITL
<* Qkttact Co.
34 YEARS OF TITLE SERVICE IN DADE COUNTY
ESCROWS ABSTRACTS TITLE INSURANCE
Tine Insurance Policies el
Kansas City Title Insurance Ce.
Capitol, SarpJes Reserves
Exceed %iflO0flOO
TELEPHONE FR WW
"d 129 SHORELAND ARCADE
(A.ao K^jTrffg *?^r-,..rltv Trust Company BldQ.)
UF Division Picks
Insurance Exec
Murray M. Sheldon, Miami Beach
insurance broker, has been named
head of the Miami Beach Insur
ance Division of the 1960 United
Fund campaign organization, it
was announced here by Eugene
Weiss, Miami Beach UF chairman.
A veteran of three UF cam-
paigns, Sheldon is responsible for
soliciting contributions from among
Beach insurance men for the sup-
port of the Fund's 300 health and
welfare organizations during the
coming year.
Sheldon, who lives with his
wife- Sally, and two children at
4505 Adams ave., came here in
September, 1945.
He is a member of the board of
directors of the Civic League off
Miami Beach and the Godfrey j
Road Assn., a member of Hibiscus
Lodge of Masons, the Miami Beach
Chamber of Commerce, and a life
donor member of the Jewish Home
for the Aged.
Sheldon is past treasurer of the
Bayshore Golfers Club, past chan-
cellor commander of Miami Beach
Lodge Knights of Pythias, past
chairman of the Insurance Divi-
sion of the Combined Jewish Ap-
peal, and a recipient of the coveted
designation, C.P.C.U., presented
by the American Institute for
Property and Casualty Underwrit-
ers.
He is now serving as exalted
ruler of the Miami Beach Elks
Lodge.
Afghan Sm&rM7U4*Z\
Open 6:45
IE AN CABIN"
r KlMlUE BilJtW
n'9" ,u, .....> _
"' ihoefc.,."
t u**f tearu*mrre
sJttffcwKHtyroiis
CORAL GABLES
45 Miracle Mile
EDISON CENTER
6200 N.W. 7th Ave.
HIAUAH
165 Hialeah Dr.
LITTLE RIVER
7964 N.E. 2nd Ave.
ALLAPATTAH
1736 N.W. 36* St.
MIAMI BEACH
1261 Washington Ave.
DOWNTOWN MIAMI, 51 E. Flagler St.
WEEKENDS FREE WITH
the EASY car wax \
IRVING MATLIN
M & M DISTRIBUTING CO., Inc.
135 S.W. 22nd Ave. FR 1-0101
Sole Distributors of Wax Seal Products at Your Local Service Station
GOLFERS
Gain Confidence with
NEW GRIPS
All Styles Available
Reshafting Refinishing
Alterations
/-OEEQ 142J P0NCE'
WWrrJC0Mt GABlES
NOW YOU DIAL
FR 3-4605
for
vjewisti ftcriciiar
LOW COST
HOME LOANS
To Buy, Build or Refinance
laqalrles Invited No Obligations
Celebrating oar 25th Anniversary Year
"One of the Nation's
Oldest and largest"
IZ/ade Federal
t/AviNGS and Loan Association of Miami
(0SIPH M LIPI0N, Hresideni
5 Convmhnt Offices Serv* Dado County
RESOURCES EXCEED 140 MILLION DOLLARS


Page 4-A
*Jen 1stfkrMtMi
FridaY-DtoiBd*
Jewish Floridian
OFFICE and PLANT 120 N.E. Sixth Street
Telephone FR 3-4605
Teletype Communications Miami TWX
MM 396
FRED K. SHOCHET......
LEO MINDLIN ..............
.. Editor and Publisher
......... Executive Editor
Publtahed every TrMmr rise* lr by The 'wl*J"lft
t N K BUth Street. Miami 1. ",rt*5^"*^jr2 Jl
coon.i-claM matter July 4. !. t Poet Omo of Mtaau.
Florida, under tie Act of March I. 1..
The Jewish MfM haaWB<.rtti. 'i2iih,u1?tt: Jt?
Jllim.. Seven Art* Featae* >* W*rWwae Newe
Serv.ce. Netienal SS.tonal Am*.. *."''."" _*"'
t^lLH-J..^ Newaeapeea. e1 the Flrf. -r A>
The Jewl.n F1ordl* doee mot ruaimntee the Ka.hn.th
of the menvhhhdtoe adTertleed Ha colum
From Stock Exchange Fraud
To Anti-Semitic Mercury fa*

r| MAN IN
i
y ARNOLD FORSTlR
ISRAEL BUREAU
MX Ben Yehuda Td Aviv, Israel
RAY U. BINDER _______________ Correspondent
SUBSCRIPT
Om Year SSW
ON
RATES:
Three Year. 10SO
Volume 33 Number 50
Friday December 11. 1959
10 Kislev 5720
Mt. Sinai Dream Comes True
Ten years of dreaming, and as many years
of intricate planning, come to fruition Sunday
afternoon when the new ML Sinai Hospital of
Greater Miami will be dedicated.
From the first Ml Sinai on lower Alton nL.
to its most recent site in the former Nautilus
hotel to the mammoth near-13-nullioQ-dolaar
medical institution now gracing Collins Island
in an eight-story tower of beauty above Bis-
ccryne Bayall this encompasses a story of
)oint cooperative endeavor by the men and the
events they shaped that takes 16 pages of this
week's issue of The Jewish Floridian to tefl in
words and pictures. (See Sec C*
Suffice it to say here that the new ML Sinai
Hospital at Greater Miami is a tribute to the
Jewish community and- the leaders who first
dreamed of iL who saw it through the difficult
stages of an architect's blueprint and who
levmgry watched jt nse brick by brick on the
Miami Beach horison. It is a tribute, as well
to the men and women at vision and means
I* endowed it with their gifts end contribu-
ang al v:>.:.w; er.-f..
Greatsr Mxxmi Jewry may weD be proud
of that most mi achievement Benehrtng
km hm mm Y $. > -^:^: --i iaBBajg_|
prc^orns w-X be all of Dade counrv. Id whose
*vx* the hospital ts pledged.
Thousands or men ana women throughout
the area will Sunday see for ihoniaalias one
at the hnest medical inifmgautir. m the South-
ed rest easy m the coafart and knowledge
hechh of the commentry h which they five.
Boundary of Self-Hatred
Hew far mi self-hatred go? The American
I Msaem receo*tf -^ gpj
to grve the State Deoartmec
The Councils m
the sUne sat back and piekH .
hostess had given Turn. It was called the Amen*
the man opened it with anticipation. He b,HM "
Mercury for years; he recalled, with foodr^. mL1?" "vja
been a provocative, challenging magazine cd.tH h7l"W,i
Mencken, and pubfashing th. works of such ilSJ* '
wood Andersos. Sinclair Lewi, and Carl Sandbure ***
As he tamed page after page, the man was fire. -
angered The pogosof the American Mercury-JLJS.??
imaginative writing-were sow filled with son^L^S*
anti^eiwuc lies, wild charges of international^!**
and allegations that Jews .re motivating force7?LS
swindles, corruption, sad wsrs. lontt b**
The passenger wrote sa angry letter to an airline ,**-,
why it exposed customer, to such claptrap tv^ nm^i" *>
the fact*. He discovered that the airline r^TS****
American Mercery: t had been sent ,n un..,bceifl:
fliKbt serviee department, without kaowiedse of itTa.^!!*1
the Mercery aboard its planes to fill up magazine racks*
In the past few years, the American MernirThat -^
creep into quite a few places uninvited. Under tiL ~L?2*1
Russell Maguire. it has developed into oae of the m^SZfi
Semitic publications in the United States. ^^
MAS OUTIAWID N 16 STATIS
Ckst approaching the unsettled
Israel-Arab status and the refugee cruestioo,
aperaViuRy. ore gnats another matter.
The estahinhment of Israel occurred in
a UN era which saw positive American lead-
ership without sxruivocanao- The aiihaniiiietal
Israel-Arab haasse emerged over the years in
ail its am mow moan trig as American leader-
ship bowed to expediency. The more mis no-
tion, and th* Western Powers generally *-
cined to 11 km me Armistice Agreeme
IN EXTRIMIST CIRCLES, it is more widely qootssset-J
then mostlany other periodical of it. type As ui t*7r
?"." i1*** oo the good name of iktdSii
Aiaerican Merrwry-ead tsades on other names a< well r*.
plained of the imautborued use of his same as a coaSL?.'
masthead of the Nevemher issue of the Mercury He astoT
to remove his name forthwith, before orculatw. of the ili^
his protest, the November issue of the nuganne apoeardl
Br.dges as s "contributor." ~~
In the spring of 1KB. radio conuaestator Fuhoa Lenta
staunch conservative, refused persuasion to the MercaTjT
one of his broadcasts. He refused, he said, because el T
Semitic tendencies and flavor- of the sBagazme's edlstaj
But the Mercury went aheadperssisaon or no-asd rears
broadcast in its Jane issue
Lewis said that he agreed with William Buckler r
the National Review, "in havasg no desire, whatsoever uhTi
ated with the American Mercery, as long as it pursue at\
editorial policy, whsch poficy I consider to be b-.-.t |.ibianH
UTespoasahie." mM
T** rsatiafi of s csatldsanal ssemoraaduai frost Bscaal
*"'" tor Xauoaal Review were pnated in the Jab igl
Mercery. Beckiey s cesaaHBMcation. dated Apr 195, Taraffl
the Natsonal Review would not carry sa As masthead any si- h[
listed oa the m.rtaiad of the Assericaa Mercury. BadunB
aoted that the editors of the National Revx tare iinliskiij
solved net to wnte for the Mercery aaul auaageses ckasget uCl
STAMaUgg SIT Of
OCKLtY POINTCO OUT that several frequent c stiismi
Nataoaal Review hod aiillia |
that the latter s sdstorisl
for the Merrsry ate I
ai-
taey
troL and
at they
the tane the artiries were wrutea aaf
BBaSBsNal
* ?> aw
editanal mstenal'
the Assericaa Merrsry danag iw .
toaeatessher. ISM. revesh bttle'Jat*!
It n,a in i a censes hodgepodge-at
of vuaficataoBs whose -rrediesu i
varied aao-Seauu
set of in nan
cftea:


r, December 11, 1959
fJewlstrhridltori
ER TO THE EDITOR -
Page 5-A
)L Official Raps Mindlm Column
t*r i .a
)R, The J*wih Floridin:
public speaker always wel-
evven the smallest indica-
nt his message has had an
upon his audience. In this
pt only am I grateful to Leo
for devoting a whole col-
[(Jewish Floridian, Nov. 31
ritique of my recent prescn-
on Germany before the reg-
nard of the Anti-Defamation
Be in Miami Beach.
dear that my "on location"
ssions did not coincide with
lage-of Germany. That's not
ected, since some of my ob-
lions are in sharp contrast to
Ulihg and long-retained con-
[ on the subject. Therefore, an
jpl on his part -to refute me
ic presentation of facts could
>R, The Jewish Floridian:
eport in your recent news col-
told of President Eisenhow-
establishing an "Equal Oppor-
Day.v" During that week, Dr.
ice Eisendrath, addressing
conference of American He-
Congregations held at Mi
[Beach, asked that every con-
tion establish "special com-
es to promote equal opportu-
tfor all mankind."
out wnk prior to these in*
sting actions, a group of ded-
d South Florida rabbis mot
established a program to en-
rags employment of the
Jicapped. While I am not in-
tied as to whet steps will be
I am of the impression
there will be sermons on
humanitarian program. Al-
fit Is my understanding, em-
yer members of congrega-
will be asked to enlarge
their own Wring of the
i1
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have generated a fruitful discus-
sion.
Very regrettably though, Mr.
Mindlin engsgod in personal cen-
sure which, I am afraid, was not
so much promoted by a failure
or communication on my part as
by his deep-seated prejudgments.
They led him to insinuations
which impugn my sincerity of
purpose.
What have I done? I related
some episodes from which indi-
vidual Germans emerge as human
beings. I dared accentuate some
trends indicative of a sincere de-
sire on the part of Germans, offi-
cial and private, to come to grips
with the past and restore their na-
tion to the civilized world. I advo-
cated a more: sober approach, to
-ar
handicapped in plants, business
establishments and institutions.
What a. glorious background do
we, as Jews, possess from which
to seek for ourselves the degree of
equality we ask for others.
Prior to the adoption of a pro-
gram on employment of the handi-
capped through B'nai B'rith, 5th
District, E. Albert Pallot, then
president-elect, asked that a sur-
vey be made. This survey was to
determine just to what extent were
Jewish employers of this nation
presently cooperating with the
program.
In the Greater Miami area dur-
ing the month of October, 1956 over
45 percent of all handicapped and
older persons placed in employ-
ment were placed with firms with
"Jewish-sounding names." Despite
this greater number of placements,
the ratio of Jewish employers-
based on the total, persons em-
ployed in the areawas but 18
percent of the total. Other cities,
namely Baltimore, Richmond,
Cleveland, Pittsburgh and Phila-
delphia, were also tested. In every
instance those with "Jewish-sound-
ing" names were hiring the handi-
capped and older workers in far
greater number.
When details of this survey
were placed before Pallet, he ad-
vised that he would sponsor the
program of employment of the
handicapped through committee
action in the various B'nai B'rith
lodges of the district.
When the program was adopted
in District 5, Pallot, then president
Dr. Sol Neidlich, and now presi-
dent Aaron Tollin were extremely
pleased with its progress. Later it
was adopted as a national B'nai
B'rith project. Now, we are in-
formed, it has been recommended
for international adoption. It is as
though we are of one mind.
LEO AXLROD
President-elect, World
Committee on Employ-
ment of the Handicapped
AS FOR KIDNEY ACTION
AND STONE FORMATION
------1
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j formation of kidney and bladder stones Is to
DRINK ENOUGH WATER
Eight or more glasses of sparkling clear Mown-
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for proper kidney action.
N0H4AXATM
Nationally distributed for over 75 years |ut
as it flows from the famous spring near Mot
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VEUGHTFUl TASTIHG
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Phone FR 3-2484 301 S.W. 8th St.
the German question (as did Jews
who must be acceptable to .Mr.
Mindlin, such as Prime Minister
Ben-Gurion and Dr. Nahum Gold-
mann) for the sake of strengthen-
ing the constructive forces in the
new Germany.
Mr. Mindlin says some of my
"facts" made him and 6ome listen-
ers "wince." Maybe so, but winc-
ing may be the first stirring of
new thought that upsets old preju-
dices. If he has no stronger argu-
ments at his disposal, I rest my
case, certain that the overwhelm-
ing majority of my listeners were
with me.
JACK BAKER
Director, Foreign Information,
Anti-Defamation League
New York City

General chairman Abe Aronovitz (far right) leads campaign,
leader's (left to right) Sam Luby, E. Albert Pallot, David Stuzm
and Harry Markowitz in song. They promised to sing a guar-
tet if the building fund campaign for the Cedars of Lebanon
Hospital went over half of the million dollars, first phase goal
by Dec. 1. The $500,000-plus mark was tallied this week.
L'CHAYIM!
To Jews Who Helped
Build America
AARON LOPEZ
1731-1782
The name of Aaron Lopez rests secure in history as a founder
of America's power in foreign trade. Before the Revolutionary
War, he sent to sea from Newport, R. I, the New World's larg-
est fleet of merchant shipsbringing commerce and wealth to
the colonies. A fervent patriot, Lopez went against the British
at the cost of his fleet and fortune. He lived out his life in
Leicester, Mass, where he founded the Leicester Academy.
Only the Calvert Hand of Skill blends the perfect whiskey
for making your L'Chayim!
Calvert is a whiskey of such clear quality
that it is cherished in far more Jewish homes
than any other branddomestic or imported.
Calvert's full strength is matched with re-
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/
I
J



Page 6-A
rJmlsli nirkBa*)
Friday-D^mbi
'ESCAPISM' DEWED
Jewish Suburbia Seen
As Response to Change
r.ity'" of minority group members.
K.rman said. "But the leaders ot
I kal irinded groups should rec-
vi-n-.te the (aet that the fir>t re
ity of a family head.
whether he belongs to a minority
group or not. is to look out for the
economic welfare of his family
to see that they pet their bread and
butter. It seems to me that equal
if not greater emphasis should be
placed by volunteer agencies in
the civil r chts field on equality of
opportunity in employment for all
minority group "members."
At an earlier session "some per-.
eeptible decrease" in discrimina-
tion against employment of Jews
he life insurance industry was
Continued from Patje 1-A
portant reasons why Jews began
moving to suburbs, not the least
of which ere the factors associ-
ated with the increasing number
of marriajts, larger families.
changing housing needs, imerov-
ed economic income. better
transportation end the desire for
improved status."
He added that "1 is proper,
however, to advise the minority
who "escape" to the suburbs in or
der to avoid contact ith non
Rm that the invasion of erst-
while white neighborhoods by non-
whins is only just beginning The
improvement in opportunities (or
non whites to acquire better odu reported. Bowever, the report em-
cation. technical AUK better jobs ohasired that "the ancient habit
and higher status, "makes inevi: still pers
able their o-.re for better hous Th^ ADL report revealed that;
ing and living conditions." he as- the liberaliration in employment
scrted. of Jewish executives has taken
Pr Cordon noted that there are place primarily in sales functions.
some people. "Jews and non-Jews but that there still appears to be
alike, who will attempt to run from I "clear pattern of discrimination
it all for awhile." He then predict against Jews" m home office po-,
ed that within another decade sitioos. "In the branch offices, pn-
there will be fewer places to which marily concerned with selling in-1
-escapists" can run. -What I have sirranee. 6 2 percent of all execo-|
said." be added, "with respect to tive employees are Jewish." the,
non whites applies equally to those report said "But in home offices. JERUSALEM (JTA) Israeli
who are seeking to flee from com only 3 6 percent are Jewish." circles charged Monday that prom-
munities Into which Jews are mm-- The ADL report, based on a ises of massive American econons-'
mg. We will all have to accept the study of seven major life insur- >c aidexpected to exceed $100.-'
.- fact that we shall have to ance companies which are a pnn- 000.000 during the coming year!
ccme to terms with reality. cipal factor in the industry, was had emboldened President Nasser
t* rg Ferman. executive vice Presented at the opening session of the United Arab Republic to a
man of the Presidents Com ,f l,s 46,n ,nnu*' *t.ng < the ?*

New officers and board members of the Baron
de Hirsch Loan Fund convene to outline plans
for the coming year. Leo Eisenstein (seated
second from right) is president of the agency
which is one of the oldest beneficiaries of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation. Also seated
are Maurice M Young, treasurer; Dr. Michael
Goodman, executive director of Jewish Voca-
tional Service; and David M_
Standing are board members frviaqU
Ben Giller, Morris Hoffman, Lloyd
Charles Hertzoft Judge Frederick N.
and Bennett M. Lifter. Not shown am
president Leo Robinson, secretary Sknarl
Pred. honorary treasurer Harry SnoTi
board member Al Quadow.
U.S. Aid May Make Nasser More FriskJ
mittee on Government eontrac's.
Savoy Hilton hotel. The studv
pitch of bellicosity against1
Israel and threats that he would.
meeti i lound *"** that, even among k*/,0* g*J"* !**' *?" pn>l
emptee. ,h* 3 ***** ""ployed ^>"g with its Jordan Valley .m-
SkSW still the most basic and in *>> home offices, two- gatioo plans.
crucial problem faced bv minor tv ,h,r tered" in jobs as President Nasser, it was said
tret .'c*uarie>. dxtors. lawyers, or ac- here, considers the American aid.
hence could not be'which has already begun to flow
d as administrative, front into his country", as an indication
MB] r. equal:-
.....> in employment
ition and n
he dig-
ISRAEll RELIGIOUS STORE
ui ssutnr samjts rot
srmeoGuts t lextu soatn
1357 WASHINGTON AVL
Jl 1-7722
: policy mak-ng e
It netei that branch offices
most apt to hire few* %Vre sales
-re to be made in cities with larce
Jewish populations Five of the
-panie- udied have both1
home offices and salt- branches
rrater New York In the New
of extreme American eagerness to
improve relations with the UAI
Me, thereto* e, does not expect
the United States to make any
mov to head off the new anti-
Israot Kate drive ho has
launched.
Informed Israelis tTnrtsstd con-
York sales branches of these five t**t if Washington contrnoed
conrpan.es." the report said. "10 to Pnr dollars into Cairoand
percent of executive personnel are *ome press reports today indicated
Jews; m the home offices, onty'that the Aaaertcaa aid total might
reach nS0JM.aV*-witlkot obtain-
ing from Nasser any agreement on
his part to avoid injury to Western
interests in the Middle East, the
net effect would be creation of
new difficulties in the Middle East
Nasser, they noted, had not only
Parted a new campaign against
Urael but had also raised the
"Jerusalem question" in an effort
to make trouble for the Kingdom
of Jordan. Only the Soviet Union
they said, would profit from fur
ther disturbance in the area.
bntime f Spriwfs Villas
Carriage Ctab at Miami Springs
\Ulas Will feature i., ..._.
will feature jaznime start
g this weekend, as the Salt City
S*x come m to begin the
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** key dub
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eu at the
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l


ceraber 11. 1959
__________+Jewist> fhriUtr
\enwald Raps Warburg Speech
Page 7-A
lied from Pafl* 1-A
rfsracl and the United
ild. who from 1955 to.
lie general chairman of
impaign, named the
ies which receive funds
UJA. He said these
rst, the Jewish Agency:
the "philanthropic or-
UJA national chairman i funds
Th.
said alto that any mumHlau Lu IZT- '" "*"1 Wr *uch *+
An^HcanJowtJinXr^ | *2LT2S*? JL-!!*-*
to close its doors to further
reignty. "It is Israel's rfLTZi ry W,M '* "*
of newcomers in Is-,
(stressed "this is a vast,
ig housing, farm settle-
rial service and other
to the refugees whoi
imed in."
open or close its doors as it
chooses," he added. He stressed,
however, that the major force
responsible for the mass influx
which has the responsi of refugees from European and
the transportation and' Moslem lands into Israel "has
been the inner urge on the part
of Jews, living in fear under do-
grading disabilities, in an atmos-
phere charged with danger to
their physical security, or under
conditions which make it impos-
sible for them to live as Jews."
The UJA leader stressed that it
was the policy of the organization
to aid Jews to go wherever they
have a free choice to go. He point-
ed out that UJA funds had helped
tens of thousands of Jewish refu-
gees and displaced persons to
come to the United States, Canada,
Australia and other areas. He add-
ed, however, that "Israel has been
the only haven to which Jews can
go in large numbers. In fact, it
stands unique as the only haven in
the world for large numbers of
refugees."
Mr. Rosenwald pointed out that
the burden of receiving nearly 1.-
000.000 Jewish refugees into Israel
since 1948 has not been borne by
American Jews alone. He declared
that Israel "itself has been called
upon every year during the pas!
decade to pour millions and mil-
lions of pounds obtained from Is-
rael'^ own heavily taxed people
into helping absorb the newcom-
ers." j.
He told his audience "for Israel
to have barred its doors to these
people and Mr the United Jewish
Appeal to have withheld its help in
transporting these Jews to Israel
would have violated every decent
instinct that we, as Jews, possess."
Earlier in the week, Sen. Jacob
K. Javits, New York Republican,
asserted that charges by "Arab
propagandists and other critics"
that contributions to the UJA were
"tantamount" to contributions to;
the Government of Israel were
"baseless." He spoke at a meeting
of the Men's Club of Temple Israel
in Lawrence, L. I.
Senator Javits told the Man's
Club in Lawrence that "contrary
to what is charged, th* United
Jewish Appeal does not raise
money for th* State of Israel. Its
Rosenwald said, UJA
"th* American Joint
Committee, which
and rehabilitation pro-
25 countries outside of
4* added that th* JDC
ducts special welfare
Israel known as Mal-
f behalf of th* sick, th*
th* handicapped immi-
lsra*l."
^d recipient of UJA funds.
is the New York Assn.
kmcricans, which has the
ity for Jewish refugees
to America and who
[the New York metropolis
The fourth UJA bene-
rccent years has been
Ilias Service which re-
ps who are able to im-
o countries other than
i leader declared, "when
lutes to the UJA he does
Be understanding that his
il! l>e used for humanitar-
ases-ilbr rescuing lives,
i.ng the homeless with a
residing health to the
uivinj^hope to the aged
[handicapped, for provid-
Intralned with vocational'
for giving fellow Jews
[the basic necessities of
Jald stressed that the phi-
efforts of the United
^licy "to help others less
than ourselves, both by
nditure of governmental
by private philanthropy.
i." he pointed out, "has
tied the implication that
Isarily support the gov-
; of the countries in which
|ple who receive this help
example, when the Uni-
gave the Russian people
High the Hoover Relief
; no one suggested that
stituted endorsement of
Ism in Russia."
fcONG DISTANCE
LOVING
rULvm lines -
[points in the country
KATES CHEERFULLY
WITHOUT CHARGE
K*H.H.VAK
prss, inc.
N.W. 24th Avenue
196 MIAMI
overseas relief in 25 countries
and the resettlement and reha-
rhfs
Since
go to Israel,
n* largest percentage of UJA
funds is spent there."
^Commenting that the UJA was
"as indigenous to American phi-
lanthropy as it is to, Jewish philan-
thropy," Sen. Javits said that the
UJA was "a voluntary association
whose essence is voluntary giving
by Jews all over the country and
in other lands through their local
community organizations, and at
the behest of their local commu-
nity leaders." The pattern which
guided the UJA, he said, "is as
American as the town meeting. It
is the same general pattern as that
followed by Catholic and Protest-
ant philanthropic and missionary
organizations."
To Welcome New Members
Some 130 new members will be
welcomed into the congregational
family of Temple Beth Sholom at
a special service in their honor on
Friday evening, according to Zach
ary F. Bailey, membership chair-
man. Rabbi Leon Kronish has pre-
pared a special ritual for the oc-
casion, and an Oneg Shabbat will
be tendered the new members aft-
er the service. Hosts are Mr. and
Mrs. Alvin B. Lowe. Judge Harry
Arthur Greenberg is Temple pres-
ident.
Detroit Social Club
Detroit Social Club of Greater
Miami will have its 11th annual
Chanuka party Monday evening,
Dec. 21, in the Rubaiyat room of
the Algiers hotel. Cantor Meyer
Gisser, of Temple Zamora, will
bless the candles and present a
musical program.
1
M
Gov. LeRoy Collins proclaims Dec. 21 to 27 as Yeshiva Univer-
sity Week in Florida. With Gov. Collins is Ruby Diamond, a
Yeshiva sponsor. Sunday, Dec. 27, will mark the Greater Mi-
ami celebration of Yeshiva's fourth annual Charter Day Din-
ner.
Israel Lone Dissenter at UN
Continued from Page 1-A
peated that Israel is not a party
to such an understanding. My
delegation has therefore voted
against this paragraph and ab-
stained on the resolution as a
whole."
Comay stressed that the Is-
raeli vote did not "imply any
reservation" regarding the man-
date and operations of UNRWA,
and explained that-Israel had
restrained from supporting the
resolution for other reasons.
He pointed out that "while no
substantial "progress has been
made in solving the refugee prob-
lem, at least the only possible di-
rection in which to solve it has be-
come clarified over many years of
international experience with it."
The main solution, he declared,
"lies in the integration of the refu-
gees into the economic life of the
Arab world and their final absorp-
tion among their Arab brethren."
YOUR
MONEY'S
WORTH
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Young families with growing incomes and growing children will be desirous
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Florida Home Realty Sales, Inc., 5360 Palm Ave., Hia.
Eve. and Weekends TU 7-7913
\
\



Page 8-A
+Je*ist>ncrktkwi
UF Division Picks
Beach Attorney
As '60 Chairman
Joseph W-. Melek. attorney, has
been named chairman of the Mi
ami Beach Apartment House As*'n.
n of the United Fund of
Dade County, it was announced
here h* Eugene Weiss, chairman
of the Miami Beach campaign or-
ganization.
Malek will be responsible for the
solicitation of contributions from
apartment house owners for sup-
port of the Funds 300 health and
welfare services during the com-
ing >ear.
Worfcino with MUM in the cur-
rant drive will be Murray Boren-
liwi. Morris Honor, MUMon Kahn,
ij Rubmowrti, Isidore Kup-
Irvine aaaaaaasnaa
Leonard G. Egert president of the Cancer Institute at Miami
presents annual report which represents the '^"l* direc-
tor's scientific and medical report for 1959. to Dade County
Medical Assn. president Dr. John Reiser. Egert said Wednes-
day that a dinner honoring Dr. Ernest Ayre will be held
in January.
i Mates, a practicing attorney on
Miami Beech for the past 11
Family Service Testifies Before Senate;
Executive Urges Social Security Change
Jewish Family and Ch.ldren's
board and staff participat-
ed workshop confer
BM on aging held by the Wel-
fare Planning Council of Dade
at Dupont Plasa hotel
in the bear week a!
Park of the D. S Sen
-. on Prooien
the Agec
V:ce chairman c: ering
the workshop .
JFCS r>\ard. and Seymour -
JFCS staff director of 9 for
r P.-epie The Welfare 1
stag Council workshop was staf.'ed
- cxecu-
the Senior (
tea's Division of the Coucc
It was developed tw establish
B*Sf* community itfitwit
ef the nttdi of Hm e^ir* pip.tj.
tion of Dado county; () to pro-
vide rtiww with rhe epperruni-
t for moktno retommiwdstions
to We ittmtj of the aping; (3)
to prepare reports for present*
ren- at not Senate Subconucwt-
tee heaf
Jewish Family sad Childrens
Senrice participants inclndei: Dr
Stanley Margoshes. JFCS board;
^'jeg. essaarmaa of the section,
! beard member Martin Fine,
embers Ah-in CasaH
Irvm Koraca. Section oa social
ras chaired by JFCS
i nty of Miami School of Law.
He is a member of the board of
directors of Miami Beach Apart-
ment Assn. and co-chairman of the
City-County activities committee
of the Association.
He is a member of the Junior
board member Daod P. Catsman. Chamber of Commerce of Miami
nee chairman, jiyaieai Siegei: Beach. Miami Beach Civic League.
corrmttee members from the Miami Beach Bar Assn., Temple
JFCS board. Mrs. Leon Eisenmaa. Emanu El Men's Club. Footlight-
KnIrd^ess!erWre** ***' aub "*-* *"* Mu*c
he sectjoo oa income mainte Am L****. "* Breakfast Opti
nance, participants were JFCS mist Club.
board member Joseph Gassen and.
representing the National Assn. of
I Workers. JFCS executive
director Albert Comanor Vice
-man cf the section on em-
ployment was Dr Michael Good-
man, executive d.rector of Jewish
Vx-ational Service. In the section
on nursing homes was Arthur Ka!
at director. Jewish
Home for the Aged
The first day of hearings before'
the I S. Senate Subcommittee
heard reports from the cha.rmen
of these workshop grseau to Sen.
Pat McNamara and Sen. Jenamcs
Randolph
Invited directly by the senator-
ial comm.ttee to make a pre**:
tion on health problem! and financ-
ing of medical care for the aged
was JFCS executive director Al-
bert Comanor. who toad the com-
mittee that "although mere have
been great advances in the tech-
nical and scientific aspects ef
health care, very little has so fas-
been done to distribute these ad-
vantages to the aging population.'"
He said the problem ef self-es-
teem and status "is so important
that the idea of medical indigence
las to be repudiated m our
hj and proposed "a
save health program which wil
assure full health care to all indi-
viduals by applying the .
ef group payment and tax
or the principles of compulsory na-
tional health hueraace to a total
range of brash measeres "
This
by an o
Lodge Meeting
Features BBYO
Monthly evening meeting of Mi-
ami Beach Lodge of aVkai B'rith
will be held Wednesday evening at
the Algiers hotel, according to
Irving Scfaatzman. prrifctest
The meeting will feature the
B'nai BVsth Yooth Organization.
Four members of AZA will debate
on an urgent topic, and BBG
members will ting and dance.
Mitchell Sandweiss. president of
the Youth Council, will deliver an
address.
President of the Greater Miami
BBYO board of directors Jack M.
Fink is in charge of arrangements
for the program.
The meeting will also be a pre-
Chanuka party. Canter Israel
Reich, of Temple Emanu-FJ. will
sang.
Red Denies
Anti-Sei
PARIS- JTA,_Ge.
here that Jew, ejj
viet Union" but th* _
number of elderly pan
to do so.
Gen. Drazunsky, sW-J
**d the national Si
French Jewish Coseaw
the Union of Jem s_
nd Mutual Help,
ports of an arson
Rosh Ha-nana at an.
bwb of MalakhoTka, L
lived near the raban\'
Denying other caaijj
Jewish discriminaaaW
viet Union, the Geaem a
own case as an rxaaplc oft
sttuhiaos for Rusnm Jtvsi
to the highest posts tat h
Russia He added ke a ka
jhave his passport aanaalj
Jewish nationality.
dr. MfefTsofi m Ltdmt
"Spinoza', r nlietu"
the topic of a lecture bj Dt|
ham Wolfs on FrkliY.
the Blackstrme koM. Tan
mark the fifth leehgt a n
on "Lift ;r.d Philoaophr t( I
Spinoza Question and am*!
nod will follow.
Hold Sisterhood Metta,
General ire*- r* t tat]
' hood '. -rae' ml
Wednesday erenJag. Mn.
Lerroar rc-ijent
o*
BO I
iaa to the Social
Security Act. and further extoe>
of imtol
Jock Robin eras honored
ot the Oneg Sbabbctt foilow-
of Titoreth Israel Northside
easts. Mr. and Mrs. Harold
Robin. 2250 SW 28th at. on
the oocamon of has retmtn
from a tour of duty with the
U.S. Air Force. Jock eras
the Cut Bar Mihrexxhs
rdereth Israel which his
r"'1i helped found.
Caissue cafled for greater so
cial welfare activity sn many dkree-
uons m behalf of the aged. These
woeJd extend the kinds of services
in which Jewish Faaury and Caul-
dren's Sen ice is psoneermg m the
South snore generally T human the
her ef services stnUit ay the
agency- he toU the committee.
Jewish Famuy and Ctoldrea's Ser-
vice is a United Fend and Greater
Miaaai Jewish Federation benefi-
ciary.
Single Men's and
seas and Professional
Isaached Wednesday at the North
Dade Branch ef the Greater Miami
Jewish Comaransty Center. leaM


iber 11, 1959
+JewlsUFk)ricUari
*#?**&
of his friendship for Israel and his support of
tBond campaign. Roman Catholic Archbishop Ber-
Beil (center), of Chicago, receives a 4,000-year-old
re pitcher from the State of Israel. The presenta-
by Israel Ambassador Avraham Harman (right),
at a banquet attended by more than 2,000 leading
, at which Archbishop Sheil was honored as Chi-
9 Israel Bond "Man of the Year." At left is Col.
rey, of Chicago and Miami Beach, banquet chair-
[ honorary chairman of the Greater Chicago com-
f Israel Bonds.
ult to Invest Millions
lew Egypt Auto Plant
-(JTA)The Renault
concern has promised
', 8,000,000 pounds ($22.-
new plant for con-
assembly of Renault
pt, the Cairo Radio re-
lay-
recently cancelled a
assembly of its Dau-
at the Kaiser-Frazer
jifa, Israel, in order to
yal of its name from
Bycott ef firms doing
Israel.
Radio said that Ren
fentatives in that city
[that Renault had not
the car assembly oper-
Ua but had also broken
commercial tics with
usalem it was reported
g--------------------------
Monday that several Israel Minis-
tries wore studying the possibility
of establishing a government-own-
ed automobile plant to help fill
the gap created by the cancella-
tion by Renault of assemblies in
Israel. Such an enterprise, if it
jnaterializ.-s. would be along the
pattern of development companies
in Israel in which the Government
makes the basic investment and
then invites private investors as
partners, the report said.)
Goodman Group
Plans Meeting
Next regular meeting of the I. R.
Goodman group of Hadassah will
beJield..on Wednesday evening at
the Barcelona hotel.
Miss Polly Gershon, president,
will discuss the Festival of Cha-
nuka. Program chairman Misss Lil-
lian Goodman, will show a Hadas-
sah film, "The People of Israel
Live."
Miss Frances Lebon will high-
light "Youth Aliyah," major pro-
ject of Hadassah, which to date has
saved the lives of over 90,000 chil-
dren in Israel.
The group will also have a night
club party at the Casablanca hotel
on Saturday evening. In charge of
reservations is Mrs. Irving Bern-
stein, chairman.
Mt. Sinai Opening
Slated Sunday
Continued from Pag* 1-A
recognition of his contributions to
the hospital.
Program will also include an ad-
dress by Sam J. Heiman, president
of the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration, and Max Orovitz, presi-
dent of the hospital for the past
12 years.
Rabbi Irving Lehrman, spiritual
leader of Temple Emanu-El, will
offer the dedicatory prayer, and
Rev. Wally Scott, pastor of the
Congregational Church of Lincoln
Road, will present the benediction
A special dais will be erected
en the north side of the new build-
ing, on which about 80 personali-
ties, including the mayors of Mi-
ami and Miami Beach and mem
bers of Miami Beach City Coun-
j cil and Metropolitan Commission
j will sit together with state repre-
' sentatives and invited guests.
A special reserved section for
i invited guests, Founders, trustees,
| members of the medical and ad-
ministrative staff, and department
beadi will accommodate about 350,
while nearly 2,500 seats will be
oprn to the general public.
>up to /Meet
iHebrew-speaking group
liami Beach, will meet
lening at Temple Ner
|>b Spielman, secretary,
Theodor Herzl and
RNJA'S
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s) 1






Page 10-A
-JmistrkrkMan

Ambassador's entourage arriving at the Dip- A. Cantor, general chairmen of the Greater
lctic Ball last Saturday at the Fontarnebleau Miami Israel Bond committee. William Born-
hotel is greeted by Dennis James (left), tele- slein. chairman of arrangements (or the ball,
vision star. Lett to right are James. Ambassa- and Jacob Sher. honorary chairman ol the
dor Avraham Harmon. Samuel Oritt and Jack Israel Bond committee.
Indian Succeeds
2,000 Turn Out in Glittering Fj
To Welcome Ambassador HarmaiitS
Glitter and glamor, highlighted ion of "in. ,.
by Hollywood and television and ren andfc^:"l
tars and noted rxraonaliUes in y ^n.
government and the socialworH V1* "'P^matic aj
prevailed at the Diplomatic Ball under au- Saturday night as Greater Miami "mi ,,,ral Bond co*/
opened its arms in a grand flourish, d',lori '" Cantor ttH
to welcome Israel's new Ambas cJjairmen. Jiot, g^
sador to the United States, Avra- chairman' Mrs. Ma, J^j
ham Harman. at the Pontsineblcau I"*" ef he WJj
hotel. Mrs Anna Brenner J
Nearly 2.000 persons filled the K'.on^SVi*'
Grand Ballroom to join in one of | chairman of Vfi'
the most elaborate greetings ever ors. The arranJZ:1
extended to a visiting dignitary, for the ball wMh2j
Taking part in the gala event were Bormtein. Mrs. 3k|
In introducing Amilii ador
Harman, Jack A. Cantor and
Samuel Oritt, general chairmen
of the Oreater Miami Israel
Bend committee, repotted that
Miami was again leading til ci*-
ii in rha United Stares in par
canraaja rate of increeaed bond
sales ever the previous year.
Miami had previously wen this
distinction last year.
G.and Lady of the Diplomatic Ball last Saturday at the Fon-
tcineblecu hotel was Joan Crawford (center1. Academy
Award-w.nmig star of motion pictures. Here she chats with
Dennis James, noted television personality, who was master of
ceremonies ct the event, and Charlton Heston. star cf MGM's
Ictest spictacular. "Ben-Hur."
Brccrk'n lo ?'c!v: Lecd Orchestra
When Ba-
Glazoun< \
to be |
hii M.ami Beach I
in N
be bit s*cor
He red soloist at the
.
: Nov. 8.
In aduiiion. be will conduct the
Burns to UN Post
UNITED NATIONS(JTA)-The
General Assembly Sunday ap-
proved the appointment of Maj.
Gen. P. S. Gyani of India, as com I
mander of the S.OOO-man United!
Nations Emergency Force, sta-'
tioned on the border between Is- i
rael and Egypt and at the Strait'
of Tiran. Gen. Gyani will succeed!
Lieut. Gen E. L M. Burns, ol'
Canada, who uill become the Can
adian representative in the disarm
sment talks, scheduled to begin
early next year in Geneva.
Gen. Burns, whose resignation
was announced last week headed
the UN Emergency Force since it.
formation in 1956 to facilitate the
withdrawal from Egypt of French.
British and Israel troops. Secre-j
tary Gen. Dag Hammarskjold paid
tr.bute to the Canadian's leader-
ship in molding the UN troops into
a "unique and pioneering peace
1 rce.**
The UN Assembly also voted in
favor of continuing the UNEF
The resolution authorises the Sec-
retary General to spend up to
$30.000000 in 1900 for the continu-
ing operation of the Force and
I ro\ uies for the crediting towards
50 perct-u aj next year's mtn
of all voluntary- contribu-
tions pledged this year.
; grand hostess, assutetf
of 100 women.
Tha tvaninj'i I
d a "Hollyw**
| as arriving auHhagl
let wera inttrvitwid an
** by Johnny-Cwn, |
ni Jama*. Serving Bl
cert* for Miss iu ,
war* Samuel T. Stain".
Waiti. Official escort, (J
ton Heston w*rt Jick |
and Jack Pepick.
Tak.ng part in the i
gram were Dr. Inty]
spiritual leader ofTes|
El. who delivered the 1
Ambassador Harman expressed
"the gratitude of Israel for the
support which Miami's Jewish
community has given to Israel-
economic progress through pur
chases of Israel Bonds."
Among the personalities who Rabhi Yaakov G.
took part in the festivities were Congn ition Beta
Charlton Heston, star of Holly ?*v' 'he grace ate i
wood's latest spectacular film. Rahhl L^n Kmuh,dl
Ben-Hur;" Joan Crawford. Acad- Be,n Sbolom, who jonejl
emy Award-winning motion pic-j,or "n^ 0 i" U* I
ture star; Johnny Carson and Den- of Ambassador Hansa.
nis James, television personality-
Johnny Desmond, popular singM? ,
star; Senor Wences. injernation- Ambassador Harmanm|
ally-famous ventriloquist; Stella lomatic represeatilhe#.j
Stevens, starring in the movie ver than a score of uOoav,
A HEROIC CHAPTER
IN JEWISH HISTORY
I *nry of tk* liar whra the Rnnm
ll (patl .,
torn ol ittt grot hoaat of Hat.
e civir orchestra at the free
admission concert which becin.-
8 13 p.m. This will be th ... ~ ~
concert r the Workmen s Circle
-er throu
May.
Program ii. cim
ure to RuIan and
: \ :i phony
No. 40 in G Minor. anJ "Ffcalan-
dia.' by Sibelius.
CADE FEDERAL SAVINGS ccewrh
r. INSURE i $10 000 by mci
I ttia F*drl
'Oi.e J the Nat
Oldest and largest'
Dade Federal
t/AviNos ond Loan Association o> Miami
XJSirf U llfiOK P-evde-'
5' '"^^^r^r^s^e*
Convenient Offices Sent* Dode County
RESOCRCES EXCEED 140 MILLION DOLLAKS
Groups to Instoll
' installation dinner dance
by Workmen's Circle
eakmg Branch 1050 .if
Mia'ni rcle Eng-
lish-Speaking Branch 1059 of Mi-
Besch on Sunday at the Al-
|Mn hagaj.
Master of ceremonies will be Al
Shukat. and Phil.p We-.ner wdl in
stall the new officers for the com
mg year.
Officers to be installed are:
Branch 1050 Miami chairman.
Mrs Philip Werner: vice chair
man. Mary Weis>. financial secre-
tary. Harry Scbuliiner; treasurer
Mrs John Layton; recordukg sec-
retary. Mrs. Harry Schuldmer
corresponding secretary. Ida Pos
ton: hospitaler. Mrs. Sam Groav
man.
Branch 1059 of Miami Beach-
chairman. Mrs. Max Greenberg;
tirst vice chairman. Mrs Abra-
ham Haiduck; second vice chair-
man, Stanley Brady; financial sec-
retary Louie Jay sob; treasurer.
Mrs. Isadore Newman; recording
~retary. Mrs. Harry Green; cor
responding secretary. Mrs. Louie
.^; "Bd oc,*, e Abraham Sir.
CoWwiB Ow> tmtknm
Goodwill Croup of Greater Mi-
ami, will give a luncheon and card
P*rty Thursday noon, Dec 17 at
1947 W. Flagler st '
tmm thr Rtwbi. immJ
*j JaJca **d s mtaiiad
whi tut loojs low iltwr
J mm; hit *mory in ife*
: nor. htsanxitr
loo for kaMMdul
l)tpKV
mi ikit ptenn by Ik*
SanombnakM
ffa>a IUrrn).
t
n
tAJJf MOMfT rot TOW MVOMTf CHAtlU T IaIT *
NoM 'l^a>JJssr- Theatre Wtyl H is wortfc a *
earest dtf what* K is phryasff. Sptcrt caasi*trtti-J*
H greeps. Per l.rthir insssaiatiia. writ* t. tw*
US
Mtk "w*
(WRDIIN HESIOff-.IMX HtWIfflB +
mam memom-am****** a*
_____oOiH mm >^-
shou ATnmmi n mim rams
LINCOLN tSB;:
-----------------.^ JEWersos U**
THEATER *-**,
WtD. IVt.
DIC. 23rd
" ll" "*


mber 11. 1959
* k**i*t nrrrnK*n
Page 11-A
mmsn $mr n*i w*y
results of recent annual meeting
iter Miami chapter, American Jew-
^ittee are (left to right) Philip Hecker-
Lorber, Mrs. Seymour Liebman,
3n Schwarz, James R. Katzman, Mrs.
Itevens, Paul Klein, Dr. Alan A. Lip-
lour Samet, Mrs. Charles Finkelstein,
ifolfson. and Jack I. Green, chairman
rkshop committee which featured
"Spotlight on Youth" as this year's theme.
Also participating but not shown were Allen I.
Freehling, Dr. Peritz Scheinberg, Dr. Robert
Litowitz, Lee Ruwitch, Mrs. Harold Rand, Mrs.
David P. Catsman, Melvin B. Frumkes, Dr.
Samuel Ersoff, and Dr. Marcia G. Klein. Youth
participants included David Yellen, Jay B.
Hess, Stu Fabric, Henry Edgar and Steven
Slepin, all University of Miami jtudents.
igion in Schools Rising Concern
of the American Jew-
Ms Speakers Bureau
reported "great con-
religion in the public
lie Jewish community,
ress Speakers Bureau,
fcreated to disseminate
about separation of
threw Book Store
kSHINQTON AVF.
each JE 8-3S40
Religious Supplies for
Schools A Private Vie
A DOMESTIC GIFTS
church and state, has placed speak-
ers before IS Jewish organizations
and synagogues in the Greater
Miami area.
Several instances of sectarian
practices in the public schools have
been revealed to the Congress
speakers. The examples given
"very closely parallel" the prac-
tices cited in the Chamberlin and
Resnick cases against the Dade
County Board of Public Instruc-
tion, according to the bureau.
The speakers alto reveal that
while Jewish audiences r* con-
cerned with the problems and its
it Us Solve Your
IANUKA Probf1
ems
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effect on their children, there
is a need for further study of the
constitutional issues involved in
the separation principle."
Congress Speakers Bureau in-
cludes Edith Broida, attorney;
Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan, regional
director, Yeshiva University and
vice president of the South Florida
Council; Benjamin Fogel, attor-
ney and chairman of Commission
on Law and Social Action; Mr.
and Mrs. Chapter; Jack D. Gor-
don, president, Washington Feder
al Savings and Loan Association,
and vice president of the South
Florida Council; Herbert L. Hei-
ken, attorney; Rabbi Leon Kron-
ish. Temple Beth Sholom, and vice
president, South Florida Council;
Haskell L. Lazere, Southeast reg
ional director, American Jewish
Congress.
Mrs. Lillian Mamlet, chairman.
Commission on Law and Social
Action, Florida Women's Division:
Bernard S. Mandler, attorney and
chairman. Commission on Law and
Social Action, South Florida Coun-
cil; Mrs. David Muskat, president,
Florida Women's Division, and vice
president, South Florida Council;
Bernard B. Segal, president, Mr.
and Mrs. Chapter; Murray D
Shear, attorney; Tobias Simon, at-
torney; Harry B. Smith, attorney;
Lewis Sternshein, CPA, treasurer
and chairman of the administra
tive committee, South Florida
Council; Harold Tannen, attorney;
Rabbi Benno M. Wallach, Temple
Sinai; and Mrs. Milton Zoloth.
chairman. Commission of Commu-
nity Interrelations, South Florida
Council.
tmanu-EI Theater Group
Temple Emanu-El Players is a
newly-formed theatre group which
will present dramatic and musical
plays under the auspices of the
Temple. First meeting of the group
will take place on Sunday evening
in Sirkin Hall.
Mr. Business Man
& Mrs. Housewife
The Jewish Home for the
Aged Thrift Shop, needs
your furniture, appliances,
clean clothing, luggage,
drapes, lamps, dishes, pots,
pans, silverware, sheets,
fvdsDreads, etc.
All proceeds coin* ** e
maintenance of our dntmjuhhttl
residents,
THE HOME THRIFT SHOP
5737 N.W. 27th Ave.
Telephone NI 3-2338
Please Coll i' 'or Plck-oe.
-Belief izraws Na&sr Euiess^..
To Hide Egypt's Discontent
Co vinued from Page 1-A | carryin? Israel's navy flag and
.w u..ii u ,t drew up on the pier facing the
the hu- m what an Israel staff of caraouffaged submarine. As the
, !l^0mary Precau"( colors were raised on the deck,
tionary measure. Seaman Yeh()uda Ha; a [
One hour later, the crew of the ,A v
cieto,. okm,.; .w ..Di, .. .'oM Yemenite cook, intoned in the
^ ,'u,*,e',. lhf, *ah"v' ^ip's gallery an informal blessing
paraded through the British base for the ship.s voyage
Young Adults
Elect Officers
Eleanrre' Pato has been elected
president of the Young Adult Jew-
ish Council of Greater Miami. The
Council, sponsored by the Greater
Miami Jewish Community Center,
represents eight young adult or-
ganizations in the Greater Miami
area.
Miss Pato, who represents the
Beth David Young Peoples'
League on the Council, is a public
school teacher. Other Council olfi-
cers elected with her are vice
president, Howard S. Heyman, ol
Miami "Y" Young Adults; record-
ing secretary, Eleanor Hankin, of
Miami Junior Hadassah; treasur-
er, Barbara Gritz, of North County
"Y" Young Adults; and parliamen-
tarian, Esther Ehrens, of Miami
Junior Hadassah.
Commander Yosef Dror, cap-
tain of the Tanin, arrived on the
pier, accompanied by the com-
manding officer of the British
naval bate. After inspecting the
Rafiav crew and a British guard
of honor. Commander Dror was
piped aboard. Col. Yaval Nee-
men, the Israel military attache,
and Lt. Cmdr. Nathan Sofer, the
naval attache, assisted at the
ceremony.
Another crew under the com-
mand of a lieutenant from Kibbutz
Ein harod, is being trained in Eng-
land for the final takeover of Ila-
hav, the second submarine pur-
chased from the British. The crew
of the Rahav, like the crew of the
Tanin, is a true cross-section of
Israel's pcpulation. They include
Jews from North Africa, Persia,
Poland, native-born Israelis, and
South Africans. All of them are
volunteers.
t


Page 12-A
Jml&fhrMkxn
Friday
Browsing With Books: Y HRARY M1NPUN
For the Lost Europeans, All RowlsJLeadijo.
H
THE LOST EUROPEANS. By Emanuel Lifvinoff. 21? p*-
New York: The Vanguard Press. Inc. $3.95.
OW AFTER TEN years there begin to'appear the fir-t
throes of ar.istic agony. Fiction, always susceptible
to a cultural time-lag in the race with reality, is starting
to come to grips with one of the mapr moral problems of
0O> age. for Jews and non-Jews alike. That i- the problem
of Germany, and if one would put them down as coldly and
dispassionately as possible, the questions would go like
;his who i> guilfyl how may they be judged? who shail
hate, and for how loaf? in whose hand is vengeance, and
what form shall it take? They are the kind of questions for
which a collective answer can only be framed in the
terms of art: art is perpetually concerned with morality,
morality is both the father and the child of art.
Born in London's East End. Emanuel I.itvinoff writes
of todays Berlin with much of Isherwood's sharpness and
with the same sort ot intimacyan eye for the tattered de-
tail, an ear for the wrong note. "Here at the sick heart
>i Europe there is a desperate gaietv; white apartment
Capitol Spotlight: By MILTON FRIEDMAN
house* have risen on the ruins of Jewish dwellings, neon
1, [hti kilitter on the Kurfurslendamm, the music is loud
and vulgar To Berlin comes Martin Stone, who had left
as a child fourteen years previously. He cames hoping to
remain indifferent, but his first encounter with a G"nn
crumples the veneer: So they still look at a J*W R
thai." and the dammed hatred floods in.
Novelist Litvhwff parallels three stories, embodyin*
three kinds of hatred There is Goldberg, who survived
Auschwitz, who went to Israel and came back to live to
Berlin among the people he loathed. Why? Because hate
was for him his remaining passion, the only thing which
kept him alive, which tied him to people. "Hate. Between
him and the Germans there would always be this Obses-
sive iniimacy." But Goldberg's hatred could bring nothing
but destruction.
There is the aging homosexual Hugo Krantx, also a
Jew. once the toast of Berlin's theater world.- He has
spent the post-war years searching compulsively for the
beautiful German whom he had loved and who had be-
traved him. Putxi von Schlesinger. He was reputedly
Hungarians Admit Anti-Semitism Still Exists
Washington
WESTERN RADIO monitors
amazed lecently when the Hun-
garian Home Service departed from the
party line by openly admitting the exis-
tence of extensive anti-Semitism in Com
munist Hungary.
The third anniversary of the Hun-
garian upr:>:nc found anti-Jewish senti-
ment at a high level. Anna Balls, a Budapest government
radio commentator, made startling admissions. She said
>he was "embarrassed but compelled to admit that many
Hungarians -sully others because they are Jewish "
Miss Balla made an expose .eldom heard in Commun-
atatoa. She revealed that "a few days ago, an acquamt-
Otonoos Wtmjmm By EUAHU SALPETBc
Unmet Needs Aired
;
Jerusalem
PIVE HUNDRED and eighty mil
-oa dollars sounds like quite a
lot of moaey. It is. even if it
id over a period of ten and
one half years. Yet that was the
amount received by the Jewish
Agency from Jewish donations
. mainly from the I'JAduring the
period of Oct l. IMS to Mar. 31. 19S9.
But the sum spent by the Agency on the recep-
tion, settlement and absorption of the close to one
miluon immigrants and on servicing the debts in-
curred in the process was almost twice as much
SI. 181.000.000. to be exact. Part of this difference
came from participation by the Israel government
and from German reparations. Part of at is stil
owed by the Jewish Agency to various banks and
institutions.
This debt is again part of the "unmet needs"
but only a minor part. The larger part is not visible
on hooks, but it is estimated to be in the vicinity of
Stoo.oao.000 The "unmet needs" are the houses
which have not yet been built far the teas of thous-
ands of immigrants who sull live in ma'aherot and
other temporary buildings. They are the livestock
and the tractors promised to the new settlers to
make their farms fully self-supporting. Tbey also
include the loans promised to the artisans and small
manufacturers among the newcomers to enable
them to open workshops. Sometimes the "unmet
needs" represent the difference between a hard life
and a fairly decent one. sometimes they form Ike
the tragic gap between desperation and hope, be-
tween the sense of futility and the vision of a bright-
er future.
The "unmet needs" hare
the ten years of
efforts of world Jewry and tl
could not keep up with the
requirement of mass ahanrptisa. One
maathrr Jews outside Israel, and partsralartv
ican Jews did all they ecuM and whethei the Israehs
of Lvmg in
But the fact remains that the
here and they must be met.
Mow. for the first time, there is a
the flow of immigration, since the
Mvds" V*
hato
of
of
ads of Jews would lake to come to Israel, are i
Every Israeli hoses that the doors wtt
suss, hut in the laatuae the ahtiUa of those
who have already arrived must he tamplitid. both
fur the sake of those already here ami to prepare the
far the reception af those yet to conae. Maw
the -unmet aseds" at the central subject
by toe sixth ii nan il study Busman of the
I'JA which has armed i
. of mine, on reading about this impending talk on
anti-Semitism in the radio program, approached me." The
acquaintance said. "It is a pity to harp on that subject
so much there is no point in reiterating again and
again the history" and significance of Jewry Let us drop
the subject Anti-Semitism is not dangerous today .
most people keep it up as a habit."
The individual who tried to dissuade her from broad-
casting against anti-Semitism, said Miss Balla, was not the
only Hungarian who takes prejudice "so lightly."
Miss Balla revealed that in today's Hungary, "one
often hears things like: We loathe the Jews because they
all aspire for leading positions. They do not work at the
lathes; they want to get away from hard physical work."
She heard it asserted "that all department chiefs are
Jewish at the ministries as well aa at councils or enter-
prises." When she asked the anti-Semite how be suffered
from the fact that his departmental chief is a Jew. he said
"none at all. but be objected in principle."
Miss Bala addressed a question to Hungarians: "Would
you consider it just if someone were to be removed from
h.s position as the bead of a department solely because
he was a Jew*" She said the real issue should he: "Is
be suited for the post? The issue is decided not by racial
affiliations, but by skill and honesty in the job. toward
his fellow human beings, toward society."
After probing the nature of anti-Jewish prejudices in
present day Hungary. Miss Balla concluded that "anti-
Semitism is a complex thing." She said "I know many
people who are not really anti-Semites hut profess anti-
Semitism by sheer force of habit. They find it quite nat-
ural if their best friend happens to be a Jew."
Perhaps to appease its critics, this radio appeal for
tolerance included anti-Jewish aspects. Jews of the "rul-
ing class" were attacked. They were charged as equally
guilty as nch non-Jews m scaprgoating 'the little Jew" to
"cover up their own tyranny and divert the people's
wrath."
The broadcaster illustrated the point that Jews cannot
he lumped together as a homogenous lot Citing Hun-
garian examples, the broadcast said the public should
know "that Simi Krausx. the notorious (Jewish) hanker.
cannot he measured with the same yardstick aa the small
backstreet grocer, or Baron Manfred von Wain as a little
weaver, though both are Jews.".'
An appeal was made: "Let us not judge people by .
the shape of their prof.le but by their character." Such
reference to an allegedly "Jewish" profile indicated that
the broadcaster, how ever intentkmed. harbored an ilnnsnl
of racist stereotype.
To some extent, the broadcaster apologised for sadaag
with the Jews. She said "some people anight interpose:
there they go again defending, whitewashing the Jews.
Bat we are not defending the Jews;
pamnry aad
wftrtwB Tn aai it.-
BOtB SMtXAl
dead. Hugo knew he wa, not; he u^,
name. For Putzi. in their inev^hj?'
all the German, who were SK,"
"andaa. by UUing the .tew* Z?
deWroy something the> feared ar
The* moral inferiors. it -;
had sought to destroy hi. mor,| lnSJ
with the one per-on who reminded iTSl
it." For Hugo, this can ^mTJ^
many betrayals; he is freed. LZlA
alive, he was a danger ,., l'utzi_io3
he was the only one who knew hi. ,
Martin StoLe-agair.M his will ^J
and bitter hatred-falls in love withal
one of the truly innocent, herself u J
the war. It is the only relationship in i
not perverted. Even th, ugh ithus.
it if left, literally, partly ,n the J..
gainings, to a birthplace-lor in |i,
first Man and the first Woman, so omaN
pain of one is the pain of the other I
give each other every day of our lim.-
Thus Mr. Litvinoff has made i ca
five answer, but one which stretches U
of hope. To hate collectively is "ffifl-'jj
death, he says. To hate those Ibksv
lo remain vulnerable to them. One can i
at the beginning.
The author has made this sUbaT!
pages of bitter, collective criticism of G
germinates here more \ intently that
Europe. The Nazis couldn't have |
Germans What right have I to .,
... If you were born a Jew in EOropj j3
inside you from the cradle All roads hit]
I believe every one of them. It is to It.I
as a writer and as a man of asriln _,
believes in his affirmation It is his aaswU
be that it is the only one.
LhfmKO Post: ty SJUtl
On Protecting
|OR THE FUST tatl|
t ry of lae U*nl
t of basic roles to I
Ito guarantee |
lill peoples to eiercsy
lind preserve their I
|rules -K.uJd apply U
jiarticuiarry to aeam^
Coiled Nai.oas, includir.,; the Soviet
such rights have been flasranUf deaatl
million Jews in the direct orbit aU'
The rules are included in a SO.WWajJ
discrimination in religious rights iaf|
Indian social scientist. Dr Arc* '
of the Human Rights
IW* on prevention of difcxtouital
The U-member committee **]
sailing in their individual capacities,F
their governments. Judge Philip rlalpaM
a weU-kaown Jewish communal***
ican member of the subcommittee. T*j
states are represented Rimoa ins iJ
there are two members ^Pf"*"* ^
Lebanon aad the United Arab Bern**
Dr. Knshaaswami is the
rapporteur on religious ^crmiM?V
based on reports be ha- rtcemdft-l
eats of every one of the 82 a*wi
UN. Oa Jan. 11. the subcomnrfjees-J
aanual tbreeweek session. ***,,
sader Dr. Krtshnaswarn. study- aj"j
iag to note the Soviet Cnion > rears-
puipeiid set of basic rules.
I. oae section of ku "* +
ao.es that, in some r'!n affect the right af Jews to 1
May be Sharply
Tttt "RENAULT AFFAIR- as
aag revtihentmaa ia the Uadtoa
Slates Amencaa Jewish
are alertaag coaamaaities to the
ttoa by the Reaaua Company af ito
tract with the Earner Praxer firm ia bv
r*eJ as a result af Arab pressure The
Itopliattiai af the mvnaase af
by the
ia the
.ill
mam srsnrti have aho been *eatbj r
ams orraaisatiaas to hue ** *** ^-*i
extent affect toe sale af
the Preach firm Is trying
wTj^ Ji'yAg^"-*. **"'
aad the Jewah War Vatoraaa. Such
atoSaaai***
aaelatAB*


n 11, 1958
ices This Weekend
Jm-lsti fkrHiir
Page 13-A
_ 7801 Carlyle ave.
[Isaac Ever,
uttirday 8:30 a.m.
that Connects
W 19th av.
paxwall Silberman,
[Saturday 9 a.m.
ler: Rabbi 8. Uebto.
ks and Superstitions
, i SW 3rd ava. Con
Ysakov Roeanberg.
mpson.
munlay 0 a.m. Bar
pn ..f Mr. and Mrs
Itephen, son at Mr.
.1".
rmh ava. Orthodox.
-hiff.
[Saturday 8:30 a.m.
nationA Conquer-
ii2250 nw 2nd ava.
kbl David W. Her-
n Fein.
trinon: "The 8tory
unlay 9 a.m. Bar
son of Mr. and Mrs.
boh.
Prairie ave. Or-
I. Loui* Rottman.
Saturday 8:45 a.m.
brltual Oenerator."
r* -
i301-311 Waahlngton
Rabbi,Tibor Stem.
Mimctin.
Saturday 8:30 a.m.
r.r Isaac, son of Mr.
flVrlsteln. Sermon:
139 NW 3rd ava.
935 Euclid ava. Or.
Jo-nh H Rackovaky.
Saturday 8:30 a.m.
hoi for a Visa." Ser-
servlce: "Unappre-
ETZ CHAIM. 408
flox. Rabbi Chaim
turday 8:30 a.m. Ser-
Iml Realizations."
----
[JEWISH CENTER
BaaaaaaVH
*
BBBBBaBBBBBBB)
CANbltUGHTING TIMt
10 Kislev 5:12 pan.
|L^oinera/i'oi
vsa ir-nrv
t : I
b iv) napjotea
Ik mtfn D-aiin -
f V TT t
bn ^ nnan
ra ttfty ^ti|D
pKitr nmaa
... Ji T
tori- .I^DK^n
}n nwfa' "sjfaa
?tf iSimana
nrrira. rVfc|D
itpa .-a^lnn
mo mainm
proa /r-ana
nnnx d-^x
n-inian ,dd,,,?17
i -i
.ainxn
T
[ Aleicham Yeer
hout the world, from
tnos Airesare cel-
.jear the hundredth
|e great Jewish writ-
peichem.
of Israel there live
Billion Jews, and of
^6o, we are celebrat-
Meichem Year."
heatre is presenting
par several plays by
iniorist, among them
I'lkraan," The Minis-
Uon and Culture ar-
fcxhibition of Manu-
and other personal
lem Aleichem, which
Hcept of the beloved
nality.
Brit Ivrit OUmit)
^45m HE'5,hT8 CE"NTER. 18160 NW
KtaKk^MfcF- ,8a,urdy >.m. Bar
Mltz\ah. Michael, of Mr and
of Mr "and ti,r-"bam: StanUy, "
or Mr. and Mrs. Louis Slrotta.
XAGLER-GRANAdX" SO NW Slat
Shoter0T:V?tlVe: Rabbi '"5
VHdtl ,-Can,0,r Fred Bernstein.
\<,.\\U.i ",".'' 8:1S "m Sermon:
He IIrIoub Showmanship." Onee
Shabbat hosts: Mr. and Mr* IrvinS
Wexler; Mr. and Mrs. Bills Shmea
WSrayw V"-"-" M,UV"
Wexler. Mincha 5:15 p.m. Bar Mitz-
vah: Robert Rosenberg.
FT. LAUDEROALE EMANU-EL. 1801
E. Andrews ave. Reform. Rabbi
Levins. Ran,on- Cantor Sherwln
Hf^REWA9ADEMV- 18 Or-
thodwx. Rabbi Alexander Groaa.
HIALKAM REFORnTjEWISH CON-
?veEQAT)0N- 11S0 w- th at.. Palm
H2L.tYWO?D~EMPLE SINAI. 2030
Polk st. Conservative. Rabbi David
Shapiro. Cantor Yshudah Hailbraun.
ISRAELITE CENTER73175 SW 24th
tor Conservstive. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Louia Cohen.
'H*Mr till and 8:13 p.m. Sermon:
The Tie that Ik Pnaeen." Onen
Shal.hat hoats: Mr. and Mrs. Philip
Kli'hman, in hunor of their anniver-
sary.
KNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid ava.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lenrtiem.
Cantor Abraham Seif.
Friday .'i p.m. Ijite services begin
at 8:15 p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m. Ser-
mon: "Dream of t "ur Life." Bar Mlts-
van: Danny, son of Mrs. Anna Purdo.
----
MIAMI HEBREW CONGREGATION.
1101 SW 12th ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Herschell Saville. Cantor Joseph
Salzman.
Friday 1:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. Ser-
mon: "Applied Religion."
MONTICELLO PARK. 184th st. and
NE 11th ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Max Lipshitz. Cantor Ben-Zion
Kirschenbaum.
Friday 8 p.m. NeW members to be
eonaeeratsa. Sermon: "Should Syna-
gogues have Prerequisites for Mem-
bership?" Saturday 8:45 a.m. Bar
Mltsvah: I.ee, son of Mr. and Mis.
Kenneth Gross.
---------
NORTH DADE CENTER. 13630 W.
Dixie hwy. Conservative. Rabbi
Henry Okollca.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m.
-----a-----
NORTH 8HORE CENTER. 620 75th at
Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abram-
owltz. Cantor Edward Klein.
Friday 1:15 p.m. Sermon: "Flight
from Wrath." Saturday 9 a.m. Bar
Mltsvah: Howard, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Milton Malt. r. Sermon: "Week-
ly Portion."
SOUTHWEST CENTER. 6438 SW 8th
at. Conservstive. Rabbi Maurice
Klein.
Friday 8 p.m. I'nlted Synagogue
Youth to participate. Sermon by
Idele Hlen: "The tlates of Heaven."
Saturday 8:30 a.m. liar Mltsvah: Rob-
ert, son of Mr. and Mrs. Bernard
Miller.
TEMPLE BETH AM. 5950 N. Kendall
dr., S. Miami. Rerorm Rabbi Herbert
Baumgard. Cantor Charles Kodner.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "Kick-Backs
In TV, Radio, Politics and Industry."
----
TEMPLE BETH EL. 1645 Polk St.,
Hollywood. Reform. Rabbi Samuel
Jaffa.
Friday B.'IS p.m. Sermon: "Of What
Use Is Prayer'."' Saturday 10:43 a.m.
Rar Mltsvah: Robert, son of Mr. and
Mrs Harry Mogy.
TFmbi.f th SHOLEM of Holly-
wood. 1728 Monroe st. Conservative
Raobl Samuel Lerer. Cantor Ernest
Sehreiber.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM. 4144 Chaw
ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kroniab
Cantor Davlo Convlser.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: A Reply
to 8lr Julian Hurley." Saturday 10:4..
a.m. Bar Mltsvah: Shedon. son of
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Isaacs.
--------
TEMPLE B'NAI SHOLOM. 16800 NW
22nd ave. Conservstive. Rabbi
Sheldon Edwarda. Cantor Ben Oross
berg. ... .,
Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: Jacobs
Ladder and You" Ones Shabbat fol-
lowa.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 1701 Washing-
ton ave. Conservative. Rsbbi Irving
Lehrman. Cantor Israel Reloh.
Friday 8:30 p.m. Dr. Lehrman to offi-
ciate. Quest speaker: l>r. iv.iiald
Mlchaalson, director of Hlllel Founda-
tion at the University of Miami Bat-
urdav 9 a.m. Sermon: "Weekly I or-
tl.m." Par MlUvab: Bteven,
Mr. and Mrs. William W.isman: MI-
ObaaL sun of Mr. and Mrs. William
Marmorsteln.
Teen-Agers Blow Misconceptions Sky
High as Early Marriage Hit Hard
.. A lot of common misconccptionjfcnore independence in thoughts,
bout the way teen-agers tftlnhi hctions, dress7tc, but find itiiard
M'pm nvnlnrlorl Cllrtrlnn Pa*nHnnn I*_ _______ il ii .
DR. JOE HAIL
. leaf* of values
Dade School Chief
Urges Youth Keep
Eye on Traditions
There are more moments in
youth than at any other time of
life when the "soul glimpses the
eternal," and teen-agers should
strive to put these ideal visions to
work before age wears them down.
This was the message brought by
Dr. Joe Hall, Dade county school
superintendent, to 300 delegates at
the sixth annual teen-age conclave
of the Greater Miami Jewish Com-
munity Center Sunday. Subject
was "Values of Today's Teens."
Dr. Hall told the youthful gath-
ering that each generation is count-
ed upon to do its share in continu-
ing to make the world a better
place in which to live.
"In making your own contri-
bution," he said, "you must mea-
sure your seal* of values by what
has gone before." Ho urged that
youngsters keep in mind the vital
tradition of "life, liberty and the
pursuit of happiness."
The keynote address was follow-
ed by a series of nine simultane-
ous workshops where the dele-
gates had their chance to express
views on many subjects tied into
the main theme. All workshops arc
led by members of the profession-
al staff of the Center. The session
on "Status-Seeking" called upon
Rabbi Herbert Baumgard, Temple
Beth Am, as a special consultant.
The assemblage represented over
700 members of 31 clubs of senior
high age, sponsored by the Center.
At the opening gathering, the dele-
gates heard executive director
Efraim H. Gale make note of the
*were exploded Sunday afternoon,
when young people were given the
chance to sound off for themselves.
Three hundred strong, they reprc
sented 31 clubs of the Greater Mi
ami Jewish Community Center of
senior high age, at the sixth an-
nual teen-age conclave at the Sans
Souci hotel.
Discussing "Values of Today's
Teens" at nine different work-
shops, these delegates used a free,
democratic atmosphere to blow
sky-high a great many standard
cliches about the ways in which
they are supposed to think. They
gave vent to a variety of opinions
on such timely subjects as status-
seeking, conformity, adult values,
teen-age marriage, and othersall
preselected by their own planning
committees.
What did they come up with?
Here are some of the more unusual
reactions (with Which most
agreed):
* Teen-ag* marriages aro the
exception, hardly the rule. Some
mature few may bo able to make
it work, if thoy seek out counsel
beforehand. Most are no* ready
for it, have no idea what mar-
riage really entails, aro not yet
sure what they really want. In
general, for the majority, it's not
a good idea.
Marriage on the college level
is all right, if the wife is willing
to work to help the husband
through school. But, after gradua-
tion, the woman has the right to
expect that her husband will sup-
port her; she should have to work
no longerher place is in the
home.
Values of the adult world are
too materialistic; friends should
be chosen for what kind of people
they are rather than because of
their money.
The tourist attractions of the
Miami area have an unhealthy ef-
fect on teen standards, and fre-
quently, teens will try to do some
of the "verboten1' things simply
because parents are so anxious in
urging them not to.
Youth would like to express
to escape the pull of ""nfeaTir"?;
they may run with the crowd to be
popular, but know that this is not
?ood and are troubled by it. They
are searching for answers.
Toons recognize that every-
one seeks sten, adults end
youth alike. This is normal to
them, but how you do it is what
counts; they feel that finding
one's own set of values is most
important.
Delegates frowned upon the
kind of behavior at social func-
'ions that gives both the individual
snd the party itself a bad name.
They mentioned improper dress,
vulgar behavior, and leaving your
date as the worst "reputation-
damagers." Also on their list of
"hings in poor taste was bringing
alcoholic beverages to the party,
since there must be something
wrong with a party that needs such
stimulation. They agreed that par-
ents should be present at parties
in the home, but not actively so.
They did not see the need for using
hotels for expensive "glamor"
functions.
Finally, they reversed the com-
mon plaint that parents don't sym-
pathize with youth, by stating that
teens need to understand their
parents better. They felt that par-
ents need to set definite rules foT
them, but these rules must be ap-
plied consistently and not con-
stantly shifted or forgotten if they
are to be effective.
TEMPLE ISRAEL. 137 NE 19th st
Reform. Rabbi Joseph R. Narot
Cantor Jacob Bormtein.
Friday 8:1 r, p.m. Sermon: "Hhonlcl We
Abolish Our Religious School. An
Interpretation of ynaRoa-ue schools be replaced by
com inn n 11 y -sponsored schools.
TEMPLE JUDEA. 320 Palermo ave
Liberal. Rabbi Morria Skop. Canto'
Herman Gottlieb.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "The
Changing l-'.imlly." I'amlle IllessliiK.
Mrs Bonnie Falrbaaka and Mrs. Ben-
jamin I'doff. Saturday service for
Minyonalrea 9 a.m. Temple service
10:30 a.in
TEMPLE NER TAMID. 80th st. ant
Tatum Waterway. Modern Tradi
tional. Rabbi Eugene Labovitz. Can-
tor Samuel Gomberg.
Friday 1:18 p.m. Sermon: "The Aued
and Religion Psychiatry and Relig-
ious Practices." Saturday 8:43 a.m.
TEMPLE SINAI NO. MIAMI. 12100
NE 18th ave. Reform. Rabbi Bennc
M. Wallach.
Frldav S:ir> p.m. Sermon based OB
"This" Is My God." by Herman WouK.
----
TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB. 5i
Flamingo Way. Conaervative. Rabbi
Leo Heim.
Frldav 1:16 p.m. Sermon: "Analysing
Jaeobe Dreams." Onf Shabbat
hoats: Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Gross;
Mr and Mrs. Charles Klrsch. Satur-
day 1 a.m.
TEMPLE ZIOfsTT 5720 SW 17th at.
Conservative. Rabbi Alfred Wax.
man. Cantor Jacob Goldfarb.
Friday 8:30 p.m. Sermon: "Departure
and Arrival" Saturday 9 a.m. Rar
Mltsvah: Klllot, son of Mr. and Mrs.
David Wlnlt.
current United Fund campaign.
Stating that fhe Center receives
support from the Fund, as well as
the Greater Miami Jewish Feder-
ation, Gale asked that club mem-
bers give their full support to all
requests for assistance from the
Fund during the drive.
The conference took place at the
Sans Souci hotel. Robert Stone and
Leonard Wolfer were co-chairmen.
Judith Goldstein was staff coordi-
nator. The afternoon was conclud-
ed with a dance.
No. Shore Rabbi
Talks Wednesday
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz, spirit-
ual leader of North Shore Jewish
Center, will be guest speaker Wed-
nesday evening at Beth David
Congregation.
Rabbi Abramowitz will speak as
part of Beth David's lecture series
program sponsored by the congre-
gation's Adult Institute.
The North Shore spiritual leader
will discuss "Attitude of Conserva-
tive Judaism Toward Zionism."
The one-hour lecture is scheduled
for 9 p.m.
Temple Judea
Plans Meeting
Victor Reiter, president of Tem-
ple Judea, has announced comple-
tion of plans for a congregational
meeting on Dec. 20 at the Temple.
Program will include a report of
the recent convention of the Union
of American Hebrew Congrega-
tions.
Miami attorney Ben Essen will
be the guest speaker, and talk on
"Meet My Grandfather."
TIFERETH ISRAEL. S500 N. Miam
ave Conservative. Rabbi Harry L.
Lawrence. Cantor Albert Glantz.
Frldav 8:30 p.m. Sermon: "Our Songs
Of Pralae." Saturday 9 a.m.
TORAH TEMPLE. 1284 West ave
Traditional. Rabbi Abraham Caeeel
YOUNG ISRAEL^ 18750 NE 10th ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Sherwin Stauber.
Friday p.m. Saturday 9 a.m Ser-
mon: "Our PastOur Future.
ZAMORA JEWISH CENTER. 44 Za
more ave. Conservative. Rahhi B.
Leon Hurwitz. Cantor Meyer Gisser.
Frldav I p>. Sermon: "Symbols and
.,!,.* of Judaism." Saturday
8:30 a.m. Sermon: "Journev of I-Ife.
Rabbi Marius Ransom, of Temple Emanuel, Ft. Lauderdale,
is shown with gubernatorial candidate John McCarty, of Ft.
Pierce, at the Men's Fashion Guild of Miami Beach dinner at
the Diplomat Country Club. Rabbi Ransom, president of the
Broward County Ministerial Assn., gave the invocation and
benediction at the annual dinner. McCarty was guest speak-
er. The Men's Fashion Guild contributed $10,000 to the Mt.
Sinai Hospital development fund, and announnced an award
of five University of Miami scholarships at the banquet.


Page 14-A
*jelstfk+l<1lnr)
Friday,]
$50,000-or More-Was Their Contribution to Mount
Dan B. Kuskin. leonarl Wien is chairman of the fund today. _.
Founlors of Mt. Sinai, donors of $50,000 or ..... have contributed 56 to 58 percent of ^VJJV*
the hospital's construction. Chairman of Founder- I. Jacob Sher. On ^J3'*"**%TS
Mt. Steal Founders w.ll number 65. When Initially conceived the rounders group, composed of 12
donor*, anticipated growing to less than half that n imber. ._,_ Th. will he
F.ach Founder la designated with .hat dMm -non by a sculptured head .n bronv These will be
placed on permanent v,ew in the hospital's auditor um. Founders and trust**, of Mt. S.na, include.
I ^--- _, >|i F^'md""
pvl triistnn "% is n.e-t'v
ChB',*"*1*n n' '*** !..>** ~f Tn-*nc.
trial Na'1"""! B',"V of y:s- and
North 9r B--V of Naetei
Beach. *n* rus *-' **ra 'i
state Cer'ifi-,1 Puhiic Account-
ant organizations. Abeaa iv mar-
red to tno former M-rtha Uir.
The coon] h"'ve th're chil 'rei.
l.inda, Marceila and Leonard, jr.
% a
Mrs. Aliea E. fafaj' tTlWIllai
Mrs. Adams is the widow of the
late inventor of the dial tele
phone She resides in Miami
Beach and New York, and has
been contributing generously to
medical research. At present.
she is lavin-j th groundwork for
the creation of the Adams Foun
dation.

Sam Mar*Founder and trus-
tee Blank president of Nation:
al Brands. Inc.. Stale Beverage*.
Inc.. National Wines. Inc. and
chairman of the hoard of South-
ern Beverage- He has been a
director of the American Na-
tional Red Oman, Miami Com-
munity Chest and Miami Cham-,
ler of Commerce. Wank has
been active in numerous other
.mirations as a trustee for the
I'niM r- imi and Greater
Miami Jewish Federation. B'nai
II nth and Blka He is married
to the former Beatrice Miller
The couple have three children.
Mr- SI Mrs San-
I Kramer, and Jerome Blank.

Jack a. Camai Pounder and
trvsiee Cantor is a wcl! known
real estate and insurance brokar
in' n lo-chair-
man of the Greater Miami Israel
Bond committee.

Jack Carncr Founder and
trustee. In the construction bu>i
ness. Camer al- me t.i
pursue his hobby of collecting
fine art- Formerly of Rye
N V Carner was tir>t pres.dent
of the Commu agogue of
Rye anil is honorarv president for
life. He r | Miami Beach
w.th his ejata, EWan, and sons
Richard and Stephen, who are
also in the construction business.

Ma* V. C9*n Founder. Pre-.
dent ot Hamilton Homes in Ham-
also of Brookwood
Mart Je< pany
Peteco. Inc.. and Tvrinbrooi
Cogen was born in London
land, has been a resident of Mi-
ami for the past e Hi
is a member of Temple Israel
and ed to the former
Ireht Jaffa. They hate
two children. Mrs William W.
Binder and Pete- Michael Cogen.
a a
Benjamin F. DanbaumFoun-
der.

Put Fasfce Founder. Presi-
('("' of the \eiy l'-i'o-"i and
Tpwel Supply Co.. Faske was
born in Sonmn ille. NY Four-
teen years in Miami, he isa Ma-
son. Shnncr. F'k. a member of
the Exchange Cluh. and treasur-
er of the Hope School for Re-
tarded Children Married to the
former Ruth Shapiro, they have
one daughter. Ronni.

Abraham C. Pim Founder.
Currently president of Peerless
Milk. Inc.. Fine is a member of
the Elks Club, and is active in
Temple Israel and Tnaaple Beth
Sootam Married to the former
Marnoret ^retaliate, they has*
one daughter.

Samuel Friedtim-i F~mder
a"d tru*ee he aln "ves as
vice o*esdent. Friedtand is
chairman of the board and foun-
der of Food F'i'- Store* Ire., and
is president of Food Fair Proper-
ties. Inc He is chairman of the
hoard of trustees of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, mem-
ber of the board of directors of
the Jewish Home for the Ac,ed.
Fellow of Brandeis University,
member of the board Miami
raxpaj/i I n.. chair-
man of the board of the Dania
Beak, member of the citizens'
board of :h University of Miami.
Fnedland was one of the foun
dcrs of Temple Emanu-EI. and
has served as its president for
more thai ten years He has
| other community
eh as chairman of me
O mbined Jewisn Appeal, co-
chairman of Bonds for Israel
Inter ABlerieaa Center Authority.
resident of Phila
la. Fnedland now lives at
Miami Beach wr.h his wife. Hat-
tie

Mac Cache- Founder Gache
is president of a publishing bouse
in New York.

Mrs. Rose Gache (Mrs. Mac)--
Founder

Lee Carrara** Founder iln
Memonami Mr. Gerngross was
a tneaea of Mt. Sinai Hospital
until he returnei to New York,
where he died several years ago.

Meees Ginsberg Founder and
former trustee until his death in
l*5;i
Abraham Goodman Founder
and trustee. Goodman, a grad-
uate of New York University, is
president of H. Goodman and
Sons. N.Y.. and treasurer of the
Foster Grant Company. Leomin-!
ister. Mass. He is vice president
of the Zionist Organization of
America, treasurer of United
Israel Appeal, and president of1
the Brandeis Youth Foundation.
Goodman has resided at Miami
Beach, with his wife Mollie. for ;
seven years. They have three
sons, Leonard, Philip and Morris.

Dr. Mvris GoodmanFounder
and vice president of the board
of trustees. Until 1936 a med-
ical internist, he has been active
in merchandising since than.
Formerly Assistant Clinical Pro-
fessor at New York University. I
Ike is author of several articles:
on internal medicine and heart |
disease. Dr. Goodman is married
to the former Eleanor Tomkon-
agy. and has two children, David |
and Mrs. Natalie Laebman.

Pawl M. Gordon Founder and .
trustee. Gordon was a practicing '
attorney in New York, and is a
Fellow of Brandeis University.
He is founder of the Jewish Fed-
eration of New York, and was
pre-ident of Temple Israel in
Long Island. N.Y. He is the
builder of the Institute of Human
Relations in New York. A resi-
dent of Miami for six years, he is
a member of Temple Beth Sho-
loni. and is married to the form.r
Hattie Steinberg.

3. Harvey Greenspan Foun-
der. Greenspan is a native of
Russia. He came to this country
in his early boyhood and has be
come an internationally renowned
business man. He is a member
of Temple Emanu-EI.

Mrs. $. Hirvey Grunipin
(Jean Krieoer) Founder. Mrs
Greenspan is the daughter of Mi-
ami pioneers. Her parents were
co-founders of Beth Jacob Con-
cregation She is a member of
Temple Emanu-EI.

Nathan S. Gumenick-Founder
and trustee.
Left to right are Max Orovitz, president of Mi Siaaii
with Sam Friedland and Dan B. Ruskin. durinq_J
pital'n recent rund-raiaing affairs. Friedland bo,
more than a quarter of a million dollars to the!
Officers, Trustees Paced
Drive for New Instil
The dedication Sunday, 2 pjn, of the new Mt. Sail
Greater Miami is the culmination of ten years of pUmuk(
community.
Bringing to fruition the details that went into tit
near-510 million medical institution (see Sec. C) am M
and women here, whose gifts and
arduous hours of labor made the
achievement possible.
Spearheading the effort
Max Orovitz, president: Samuel
Friedland. first vice president
Dr. Morris Goodman, second vice In addition to tram]
president: J. Gerald -Lewis, third Founders, also sotsJ
vice president and chairman of the board are David P. (
planning and building committee: A. Chaikin, Sam A.I
Dan B. Ruskin, fourth vice presi- J. Heiman. Airou 1
dent and honorary chairman of the Lefo irt. Mr- w^l
Development Fund; Leonard Wien. Stanlej C. M>ea Ml
fifth vice president and Develop- Joseph M. Host, Jdti
ment Fund chairman. 'Harold B. Spaet. Cidf
Carl Weinkl*.
Gordon, assistant i
were Harris, treasurer, nil
Lipton. assistant'
Hecht. jr. Founder
*d trustee A native of New
York. Hecht has been a resident
of Miami for 16 years, residing
previously in Jacksonville. Fla.
He is president of the West Flas-
ler Kennel Club and chairman of
the hoard of the West Indies
Fruit Company.
Hecht has been affiliated with
the United Fund. Variety Child
ren" Hospital. Greater Miami
Jewi-h Federation and Brandeis
Unn-rsitv He is a member of
Temple Beth Sboiotn. Hecht is
married to the former Florence
i. and they have three child-
ren. Uabelle. David and Barbara.

Leon B. Jacobs Founder and
trustee. Jacobs is chairman of
the board of Robert M Green
ad Sons. presklcM of Jacobs
Realty C^rporatiosi. Alexander
Realty Company.~Xing and Queen
Corporation, Safeway Corpora,
boo. Safeway Realty Corporation
ef Peonsylvaraa. King and
Sn^are Corporauon. and Jacobs
Safeway Corporation.
He is married to the former
Dorothy rltrsch. and they have
two children, Mrs. James M
Wosfson and Mrs. Anne
his brothers, Sidney and Irwin.
in the Sena It Company of Amer-
ica. Poole Silver, Gracious Liv-
ing, and Gracious Homes. Kane
has served as president and treas-
urer of the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation, and is currently
a member of the Executive Com-
mittee of the board of governors.
In 1953, be served as chairman
of the Combined Jewish Appeal.
Married to the former Eileen Gil-
man, they have three children.
Priscilla Ann. Carol Sue, and Da-
vid Paul.

Benjamin M. Kane Founder
and trustee. Kane is founder of
the Senak Company of America.
Grace Holmes Club Plan. Gra-
cious Living. Interstate Equip-
ment, the Benjamin N. Kane
Foundation, and is the former
owner of the Mercantile National
Bank. Bern in Russia, Kane was
a registered pharmacist. His
philanthropic interests are well-
known in Providence, R.I.. wbe.e
he was a resident before coming
to Miami in 1924 His wife is the
former Esther Markensohn. Their
children are Sidney A. Kane. Ir-
win E. Kane, and Howard Kane.
Howard Katie Ft
trustee Kane has active ister-
n Florida real estate u as-
sociated with his father in the
^ t ?assrs.
a chantabie
He as
Semwei Ktan Founder. Re-
tired ten years ago from genera!
contracting hinrii in New
York. Kann at active in many
philaothroptc programs. He was
a ember of the lnwood Country
Cub in Lone Island and the OW
Oaks Countrv deb. Purchase..
\ Y A resident of Miami far
nine years, hu wife is the termer
Shirley Siiverman, of New York.

Saawuet G. Keyweil Founder.
Keywell has been active for
many years in Miami Bench's
hotel industry. He commute*
between Miami Beach and De-
troit to attend to his hutinan
mfi
Kiew
?r.
tired and a resides t^
the past sctss jam!
Mason. Shnacr. 0.1'
active member cf Tot
Married to the tosrj
Wei-brout. they uJ
Theodore R. andf

Benjamin C. Un-j
Kline i> owner sal
Miami Beach's ami
tel Earlier m MttT
ed the first fi"
Baltimore and spa
years. PreskJosfl
Ma>ter Mason, a P*
Kline is also v*
Tall Cedars of Lrta*
director of ** *
Chamber of CantJ
mer profeahoail "T
er. Kl.ne marori
ria Oastar. TMfHJ
Jerome.

Samoa! C.
aDd trustee. I^^
in real estate !
resident of *
Kenn.i Cluh *J
rt T, ~pic Israd r
ber of We*:n*
- Keserat*
Hew York. '
ftrme.
LeveMaacassag
his soclcha
farmer Mrs. ^|
teveesm't **

ade* o i-h PsjwV **
ke He ?#!
hu beeakaraB-J
Lewuka.**
art l**Z?L
end ShtajJ^fl
red u


imber 11, 1959
JewlslinorldHan
Page 15-A
fg committee for Mt.
tal.

irman Founder and
brn in New York City,
been a resident of
tor 30 years an*
President anj director
safional Lank of
Ch for 20 years,
in active interest in
bcrman is a former
Miami Beach and is
srving as vice mayor,
iember of the i
jdition to' affiliations
Jcs Beth Jacob, Beth
lanu-El, and* the He
cmy.
Upton Founder,
reasurer of the board
1'resident of the
ral Savings and Loan
the J. M. Lipton Insur-
cy, lipton has found
ticipatc in B'nai B'ritli,
lasons, Shrine, Amer-
and as Vice presi-
mple Emanu-El.
Iso a past president of
i.i Savings and Loan
rid was in 1951 fund
of the Dado County
Married to the former
|h, t|jev-;Jiave two ehil-
1J and Airs. Marshall
Lowenstein Founder
te. lowenstein is chair-
he board of M. Lowen-
[Sons. lie is a member
ird of Hillside Hospital,
at Hospital, New York
Jitcd Jewish Appeal,
rk Jewish Federation,
rDefamation League,
tie recipient of an hon-
gree from Clemson Col-
t., and is an honorary
if in New York. He is
er of the Metropolis
I Club, N.Y., and Wcst-
pitry Club, Miami, mem-
le Cotton Exchange and
Itic Club of New York,
btein is also a member
|le Emanu-El, N.Y., and
resident of Miami Beach.
i a rried to the former
ferry.

B. MacDAMM, jr.
MacDonald is presi-
| Mid-West Trailer Corp-
America. He has been
in Mt. Sinai Hospital
years. He is a mem-
Gorce Country Club.

larkowitx Founder.
It of Markowitz Brothers,
nechanical contractors,
|tz is a native of Pitts-
Fa. He is a member of
lhange Club, Chamber of
fee, and of Temple -Beth
Married to the former
cus, they have two child-
fcrvin and Mrs. Janics
M. Mason Founder.
In of the board and pres-
i the Taylor Construction
Itn-ii. Mason is also chair-
Ithe board of the Williams
lams Industries, Inc., of
fleans. He is on the board
ernors of the National
p's Cardiac Hospital,
bf directors of the Palm
Towers Corporation, board
pors of the Gensbro Hotel
ption, and the board of di-
of the Bank of Dade
He is past president of
pth Florida A.G.C. Born in
Ky., Mason married
ner Agnes Fine, and has
s, Stuart J. and M. Walter
da Hirsch MeyerFoun-
trustee. An attorney, he
fcmber and past president
Jar Assn. of Miami Beach,
ce president and a current
[member of the citizens'
bf the University of Miami,
(resident of the American
Committee, national vice
|nt of the American Jewish
Ittee's Institute of Human
m.
Is a member of Artus, the
Blague of Miami Beach,
ISigma Rho, Elks, Kiwanis,
\ New Comen Society, Hu-
fcociety of Dade County.
Is also active in the Opera
[of Greater Miami, a direc-
Ithe United Fund, vice pret-
?f the Jewish Home for the
Aged, organizer and first presi-
dent of Mt. Sinai Hospital. His
wife is the former Polly Lux.

Jack MillarFounder.

Jacob and Fannia'MtlWIm
Founders in the name of their
late son, Saul Mindlin. in-
Mindlins came to Miami from
Brooklyn, N.Y., in 1951. where
he was founder and president of
the Manhattan Fur Dressing
Corporation. Known in Jewish
educational circles in New York,
he was a founder, long-lime offi-
cer and trustee of Beth El Con-
gregation of Brooklyn. He is a
Mason.
Their son, Saul, died Aug. 21,
1958, at the age of 37. He was
a national executive in the Vet-
erans Administration, in 1951 ap-
pointed by former President
Harry S. Truman to the Presi-
dent's Commission on the Health
Needs of the Nation. Illness
shortly (hereafter, from which he
never fully recovered, interrupted
his career.
The couple have another son,
Leo Mindlin, executive editor of
The Jewish Floridian.

A. J. Molasky Founder^ and
trustee. Formerly president oi
Food Center, Inc., Molasky is
president of B'rith Sholom in
St. Louis, Mo. He is a Mason,
an Elkan Elk, active on the board
of directors of the Meadowbrook
Country Club of St. Louis, and an
officer of the Westview Country
Club. Married to the former
Esther Goldstein, they have
three children, Stanley, Mrs.
Maurice Frankel, and Peggy,
wife* of Dr. Leonard Schulman.

Ban NovackFounder. Novack
is executive president of the
Fontaineblcau hotel.

Max Orovlti Founder. Orovitz
is president of the board of trus-
tees.

Victor PosnerFounder. Pos-
ner is a nationally-known build-
er.

Lea RatnerFounder and trus
tee. Ratner is board chairman
of the Lee County Land and Title
Corporation, president of Leeco
Gas and Oil Company, and holds
extensive land holdings through-
out South Florida. He formed
the Lehigh Acres Building Corp.,
Ratner Manufacturing Company,
Glenn Chemical Company, and
the Leonard Carpet Manufactur-
ing Company.
He is a member of Temple
Emanu-El, and formed the Na-
tional Foundation of the Susan
Ball Memorial Fund of the City
of Hope. With his brother, Wal-
ter, he formed the Ida Ratner
Research Fund of the City of
Hope. Married to the former
Esther Richman, their children
are Joel, Ronald and Ira.

Allan B. RosanFounder.

Samuel H. Ro$tFounder and
trustee. Rost is president of
the Miami Crown Liquor Distrib-
utors. A resident of Miami for
the past 25 years, Rost is mar
ried to the former Libby Epstein.
They have two children, Mrs.
Jewel Talley and J. Leo Rost.
*
Dan B. RuskinFounder, trus-
tee and vice president. Ruskin
is co-owner of the Public Gas
Company, president of the Scott-
Perry Corporation, vice presi-
dent of Rusoro Corporation, O &
R Assets, Inc., vice president of
Gator Corporation and Mrst
Florida Mortgage Corporation.
He is a member of the board
of the Community National Bank,
an honorary president of Greater
Miami Jewish Federation mem-
ber of the board of directors of
the Miami Heart Institute, and
a member of the citizens board
of the University of Miami.
Ruskin is married to the for-
mer Mollie Kaplan, and they
have three children They are
members of Temple Israel <*
Miami, and have resided in Mi-
ami for 35 years.
*
Max Schlossbars Founder.
PrSdent of the Max 8ehktorg
Company, he is "f v ^
Yorker, but lived in Chicago
Sere he developed his ironu
steel and scrap business. During
Typical view of Mt. Sinai's corridors on pa- of the building. Color and design vary on
tient fliors. In the center is the nurses'Work- each floor. On the ceiling are the boxes of
ing area, accessible through five doors and the doctors' visual call system,
facing all patient rooms located to the outside
World War II, Schlossberg serv-
ed in Washington, D.C., where he
was a consultant on scrap metal
Married to the former lone Mc-
Claflin. they have two children,
Mrs. Paul Becker, and John Sch-
lossberg.
a a
Sam Schwartz Eounder.
Schwartz is owner of Wolfie's
restaurants on Miami Beach.

Jacob SharFounder and trus-
tee. Sher, retired 'businessman
and former president of West
Flagler Kennel Club, has been a
resident of Miami for 35 years.
He is a member of Masonic
Lodge, Shrine, Elks, founder and.
member of Westview Country
Club.
He was president of G-eater
Miami Contract Bridge League
and treasurer of Florida Thor-
oughbred Breeders' Assn. Sher
is a member of Beth David Syn-
agogue, and is married to the
former Mary Fowler.
He has been affiliated with the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, Jewish Home for the Aged,
Dade County Community Chest,
University of Miami, and other
Dade county organizations.

William D. Singer Founder
and trustee. Chairman of the
board of the Royal Castle Svs-
tem, Singer has been actively
associated with the Florida State
Road Department.
Among his many philanthropic
affiliations has been the Com-
bined Jewish Appeal which lie
headed for two years. Born in
Columbus, 0., he is married to
the former Esther Goldberg.
They have three children, Law-
rence E., Mrs. Marvin L. Jacobs,
and Mrs. Richard Stone.
*
Harry Sirkin Founder and
trustee. Sirkin is prominent in
building and investment circles,
as well as in philanthropy. He
has served as president of the Mi-
ami Beach Jewish Center-now
Temple Emanu-Elon executive
committee of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, president ot
Vaad Hakashruth, board mem-
ber of the Hebrew Academy,
Bureau of Jewish Education, and
Jewish Social Service Bureau-
now Jewish Family and Child-
ren's Service. He is married to
the former Sarah Tamarkin.
Their children are Milton, Adele,
Alexander and Leon.

Arthur Jack Spencer-Founder.
Now retired, Spencer was active
in the coffee business. He was
born Dec. 23, 1889 in New YorK
City and attended Yale Univer-
sity He is a resident of Miami
for ten years. He formerly re-
sided in New York City.
Joseph R. SteinFounder and
trustee. Until 1935, Stein was
the owner of a retail department
store. Currently he is in thf
wholesale liquor business. Stein
is a Shriner, Mason and member
of B'nai B'rith, the Variety Club
and is active on the citizens' com-
mittee of the University of Miami.
He is a former chairman of the
Florida State Racing Commis-
sion. Before coming to Miami
with his wife, the Steins made
their residence in Lake Ciiy, Fia.
Their two children are Shirley
Goifine and Marshall Stein.
*
Isaac Stern Founder. Stern
is a former newspaper owner of
Philadelphia.

Carl Susskind Founder and
trustee. He is president of Carl
Susskind, Inc., and Belford
Trucking Company. A graduate
of New York University, Suss-
kind has resided here for 19
years with his wife. Martha, and
they have two children, Harry
and Willa Sue. He is a member
of Temple Beth Sholom.

Ben TobinFounder. Tobin is
president of the Hollywood Beach
hotel. He is married to the for-
mer Iris Maxwell.

Arthur Harold UngarFounder
and trustee. Ungar is founder
of Ungar Buick Company. He
was chairman of the Stadium in
Greenville, Miss. He has been
director and member of Orange Bowl Committee. A resi-
dent of Miami for 40 years, Mrs.
Ungar is the former Marcelia
Marshall. Their children are
Mrs. Leonard L. Abess and Mrs.
Jerome C. Hofmayer.
*
Maj. Albert WarnarFounder.

A. W. WaxanbergFounder and
trustee. From Omaha, Nebr.,
Waxenberg was president of Wax-
enberg and Company, which op-
erated two department stores.
President of the Chamber of
Commerce of Moline, 111., he is
a winter resident of Miami. He
is a Mason, Elk, and active in
Miami's Temple Israel. Married
to the former Mary Grady, they
have one son, Jack Waxenberg.
*
Carl Wainkle Founder and
trustee.

Leonard A. Wian Founder,
trustee and vice president. Wien
is a hotel operator and real es-
tate investor. He was a president
and director of the Cancer Insti-
tute, member of the citizens'
board of the University of Mi-
ami, and board of governors of
Continued on Page 16-A
TO THE NEW
Mt. Sinai Hospital
New York Bakeries
Inc.
THE FINEST OF
BREAD, CAKE AND PASTRY
JEfferson 1-7117
1349 Washington Ave.
MIAMI BEACH


Page 16-A
^JcnisHhrkMnn
Outstanding Citizens' Award Committee
Sifts Nominees for Tuesday Presentation
The 13th annual Pad* county
Outstanding Citizens" Award'
will be presented Tuesday at a
special luncheon, according to
Sanford M. Swerdlin. chairman of
the awards committee. This is the
oldest continuing award of it<
kind in the entire area.
Honored guests at the luncheon
will be the recipients of the award
in past years. A man and woman
will be selected for the current
award, to be presented at the lun-
cheon.
Judna* a*. Frd K. Shoctwt,
ditor and swbiisftar o* Th Jew-
Mi Floridian; Ralph Renkfc.
vice avwsManr in chars* mi:
WTVJ-TV; Georff* &>**>? man-
aging ditor, Miami Herald; and
Swardlin.
Each of the past recipients of
the award has been invited to sub-
mit a nomination, and civic and
fraternal groups of Dade county
are also invited to submit nomi-
nations.
Among early nominees are J N.
McArthur. well-known community
ieader; Mrs. Robert Z. Greene,
national chairman of the Damon
Runyon Auxiliary: and Richard B.
Gerstein. State Attorney.
As in past years, patron of the
affair is Joseph M. Lipton. presi
dent of Dade Federal Savings and
Loan Assn. and B'nai B'rith.
Swerdlin said the luncheon will
be held at the Everslades hotel,
beginning at noon
Among the other members of
the award committee are Sidney
H. Palmer. Sholem Lodge. Ed
Ml Sinai Hospital Founders
Continued from Pago ISA
the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration.
He is a member and past presi-
dent of Pi Lambda Phi social
fraternity He also was a mem-
ber of Florida State Hospital Ad-
1'ouncil. Wien has resided
in Miami Beach for 23 years
and is a member of Temple
Emanu-El.
He is married to the former
Marjone Feterson. and they have
three children. Carole Perhnut-
ter. Josephine and Leonard, jr
Mrs. Wien serves as chairman of
the Women's Division of the Mt.
Sinai Development Fund.

Lawn WaHxn Founder and
trustee. Widely-known for his
business and philanthropic activ-
ities. Wolf son has been and is
still actively associated with auch
organizations as president and
chairman of the board of the
Merrit-Czupman A Scott Corpor-
ation, chairman of the board of
the New York Shipbuilding Cor-
poration, chairman of the board
of Capitol Transit Company, of
Devoe and Raynoids Corporation,
preaadent of the Newport Steel
Corp.. and Utah Radio Production
Company.
He is a partner in National
Theatre Enterprises. Bay Thea-
tre, and in Allied Enterprises.
He is chairman of the board of
trustees of the Wotfson Family
Foundation. Inc He is a member
of the Woodmount Country Club.
Washington. DC. of Westview
Country Club, of Jefferson Island
Onto, of Economic Club o!
York, and Gridiron Club of the
University of Miami.
He has held office as member
of the board of directors of the
Georgia Stwdent Education Fund,
and board of directors of Boys
Estate in Brunswick. Ga. Mar-
ried to the former Florence Ruth
Monsky. their children are Mar-
cia Elise. Stephen Paul. Gary
Warren, and Martin Daryl Wolf
H
Mitchell Wolfsan Founder and
trustee. Co-owner of Wometco
Theatres and president of tele-
vision station WTYJ. Wolf son is
a native Floridian. born in Key
West. He is a former mayor of
Miami Beach, and has served on
.:> Council. During World
War II. he was awarded both the
French and Belgian Croix de
Guerre and the Bronze Star.
He has been a director of Mi-
ami's YMHA. Miami Beach
Chamber of Commerce, has serv-
ed as president of the budget
board of Dade County Commun-
ity Chest, was vice president, di-
rector and chairman of the board
of directors of the Motion Pic-
ture Theatre Owners of America.
He is a member of th Miami
Beach Rotary Club. Mason. Elk
and Sbriner. He is also, a mem-
ber of the Variety Club, vice
president of Westview Country
Hub. Ashevdle Country Club.
and Harmonic Club of New York.
He is married to the former
Frances Cohen. Their children
are Louis Wotfson. II. Mitchell,
jr and Frances Louise.
JOSXM UPTON
Klein. Robert Lewison. Ronald Lip-
ton. M. L. Clements. Irving Saal.
Joseph Ra'yvis and Staaley Caidin.
Organizational nominations for
the award should be sent to the
Outstanding Citizens Award Com-:
mittee. 819 Seybold bldg.. Miami
32, Fla.
In making the awards, primary
consideration is given to the over-
all contribution made by the men
and women nominated to the gen-
eral good and welfare of the com-1
munity of Dade county.
Carillon Mows Ad AfMcy
E. J. Scheaffer and Associates
Advertising Agency has been ap-
pointed by the Carillon hotel to
handle the hotel's nat.onal adver-
tising account.
Israel to Issue
New Stamps
JERUSALEMAll Israel
postage stamps and air letters will
be withdrawn Jan. 1 when new
ones are issued following the start
of circulation last week of new
Israel money. The new legal ten
der la based on a division of the
Israel pound into 100 agorot in
stead of 1.000 prutot. The pruta has
been the smallest unit of Israeli
currency since the establishment I
of Israel.
The new banknotes became legal
tender this week, but will not en-
ter circulation through the banks:
until next Sunday when they will
progressively replace present bank
notes at par value exchange. The|
Post Office said transitional:
stamps will be issued starting
Jan. 1 until completion of printing
of the new stamps and air letters
Old stamps and air letters will be
exchangeable far new at any post
office.
I
Decoration of the new currency
bears modern figures, including a
girl soldier on the half-pound note
The reverse sides have Biblical
and archaeological themes. The
ten-pound note shows a scientist
with a teat tube, while the other
side depicts a Dead Sea scroll
opened at a verse from Isaiah
"comfort ye, my people."
Wefr Direct,,!
Mon.hlv ^1
,tvfn,n8 SarfZ.1
featured spe^J
>watt. director o(m5]
ami Planmne vTjl
George W. VuntZj
German. Kennit,, '
Crown.
GoldoRey
She'll Keep |
Centtow.^,
; Foreign "hlia. j
r***al*. it wm )M
?vary tan as*.
M Mtiri^
assurances inn ,
David BerMknoi U,
be no interferes^ a,
authority ai Porejl
any other Minuter ft
It was reported tfc]
had repeatedly t
activities of the L
as tantamount u>u
Foreign Ministry's i
She was aswre) I
member other thai
Prime Minimi
ted to make foretj j
ments and that as I
fields relatiag to
would be utea
proval.
I
1
aflfieis
OPEN ALL NIGHT
COMPLETE HALLMARK SUNDRIES CMamTsa
GREETING CARD MTBfT MKMn
DEPARTMENT KBOMCAU
asm HOWARD
CHOCOLATE JOHNSON'S
SHOPPE ICE CREAM
Phone JE 8-5538
1664 ALTON ROAD
EACH
$ GORDON
FUNERAL HOME
FR 3-3431
RaUL. M4w
718 S.W. 12th km.
When you open a savings account at
either of Flagler Federal's two conver>|
ient offices youll receive one of these i
beautiful gifts* Free. o /&
WITH NEW ACCOUNTS OF **BO OR MRE!
1. GE ELECTRIC CLOCK with ailj.aUalai alarm ... Acearota and *"*"
t ARPEGB PERFUME BY LANVINPwswa saw in brifwl goad and ba*s
. GENUINE DBTECTO BATHROOM SCALE in awanatatal bathroom whUt-
WITH NEW ACCOUNTS OF -lOO OR NjjJJ'
BEAUTIFUL 16-PC. 8BT OF CHINA M-PC. TABLEWARE ***'^jf^*
ELECTRIC COFFEE PERCOLATOR* f TSBTOAIA" GLASSES M* w j
CARAFE QUART THERMOS BOTTLE.
FREE TRANSFER OF FUNDS fro- *r*^**1%C
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OP MIAMI


Jack and Barbara Gordon-he's the Washing-
ton Federal Savings and Loan president-back in
town at their Palm Island home after serving as
sponsors for the dinner tribute to Eleanor Roose-
velt by the Advisory Council of the Democratic
National Committee at the Waldorf Astoria hotel
_^_ in New York on Monday ... The dinner honored
.oosevelt on the occasion of her 75th birthday Other Flor-
[ present: Gov. LeRoy Collins, Francis T. Whitehair and for-
fen. Claude Pepper Incidentally, the Israel Bond com-
of Hollywood, Fla., honors Mrs. Roosevelt this Sunday at
Dllywood Beach hotel ...
_ was the right kind of daya cool dayfor a knit fashion
Eat the third annual Temple Ner Tamid Sisterhood candle-
g ceremony at the Fontainebleau Mrs. Louis Cohen
tot, lovely in black, with a white feather hat, and pleased to
Jon Roy's wife, Myra, with her Myra chose a long-sleeved
bll-shirted shirtmaker Mrs. Nat Stein in pink and Mrs.
in Holland insight blue were co-chairmen of the day
'ht: Mrs. Murray Shaw, who broke a leg in Europe, refused
the occasion, and arrived on crutches.

Ifth Note: Mr. and Mrs. Al Roscoe announce the arrival of a
ler, Julie Marlene, on Sunday, Nov. 27, at Mercy Hospital
'die, who weighed in at 6 lbs. 6 oz., is the first grandchild born
| and Mrs. Ben Auerbach and Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Roscoe
lie new mother is the-former Phyllis Auerbach Dad is
lie advertising department at Burdine's.

isy Gertman doing her Couneilcttc presidential work from
at home in Coral Gables Susan's just undergone sur-
pn her kneeaftermath of her summer vacation Mom,
Sam Gertman, is president of the Greater Miami Section of
Ell .
fcnnie Grossinger has promised to be in Miami to honor her
friend, Charles Fruchtman, at Yeshiva University's annual
1 here Dec. 27 at the Fountainebleau The dinner will mark
ra's 73rd academic year, and pay tribute to Fruchtman .
r. Leonard Finn around town in a stunning checked coat and
King "U send me!" Delia and Max Applebaum eating
kes last Saturday a.m. with their pert granddaughter .
from Nob Hill, San Francisco, signed by Sally and Harold


p. and Mrs. Samuel (Anna) Rossnick, of 563 W. 53rd St.,
celebrated their 48th wedding anniversary with a recep-
Temple Tifereth Jacob The Rossnicks were married
York City .
bey have three children, five grandchildren and one great-
child Their children are Mrs. Bernard (Gertrude) Lowen-
S13 Cutlass ave.. Treasurer Isle; Dr. Gerald Rossnick, Bay-
[N.J.; and Robert Rossnick, Forest Hills, L. I. .
ana is on the luncheon committee of the Tifereth Jacob



kck Robin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Robin, 2250 SW 28th
bs just returned to the States after being stationed with the
Dree in Japan for two years Jack was in the service for
[and one-half years ... He plans to enter the University of
majoring in business administration .
family reunion was held over the Thanksgiving holidays,
he Robins' daughter, Estelle, a student at the University of
|a, also in town to welcome her brother home .
lie Robins are charter members of Tifereth Israel Congre-
. Harold was its first president, and is now on the board
Bctors Mrs. Robin is a piano and accordion teacher.

ove Thy Neighbor" That's the motto at 7920 East dr.,
I tenants take a turn at giving a cocktail party Last week,
lid Mrs. Alfred Maas acted as hosts, while the Phil Grays en-
nod several days ago on their return from the Bar Mitzvah of
grandson, Joseph A. Miller, in New Rochelle, N.Y. High-
bf the evening was a surprise birthday cake for Phyllis Parry
pc-baked by a bachelor tenant Hmmm .
riends will be honoring Albert Grossman. 2025 SW 19th St.,
Jay evening at the Biscayne Terrace hotel on the occasion of
fOth birthday ... He was among the organizers of Temple
Minyonaires and Goodwill Group here .
heldon Kay, who once sold papers on the street corners of
on, N.J., returned to his hometown last weekend as a Miami
ng executive Occasion for the brief jaunt was the Bar
Ih of his nephew, Larry Feinberg.

Jore on Bar Mitzvahs: Walter Flaste will long remember last
Say ... In the morning, he was Bar Mitzvah at North Shore
Center, and in the evening he was host to his friends at a
at the Montmarte hotel .
he teen-agers looked chicsome in white jackets, and one in
red ... His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Irving Flastemom stun-
cocoa laceand their older son, Ricky, greeted their own
|s, too .
iicille Bursten, smart in sequined white and escorted by hus-
|Leonard ... Dr. and Mrs. Herman Mechlowitz the center of
py group ... Mr. and Mrs. Bart Cohen leaving early to get
other party in North Miami .
Jso: Dinner dance reception in honor of Louis Rose Steinberg
1 occasion of his Nov. 28 Bar Mitzvah at North Shore Jewish
... His parents, Dr. and Mrs. Benjamin L. Steinberg, 1230
pt.. Bay Harbor Islandshe's vice president of the North
PTAchose the Flamenco room of the Barcelona hotel .
ut-of-town guests included his maternal grandparents, Mr.
Irs. H. Lubet, Pittsburgh, Pa.; paternal grandmother, Mrs.
| Rose, Philadelphia; Dr. and Mrs. Isidore Rose, Philadelphia,
lr. and Mrs. Wayne Steinberg, Des Moines, la. In all,
pests turned out to wish the Bar Mitzvah well.

lorrie Braunstein is now Mrs. MUton Schwartz ... The couple
Jiting from Gotham Town at the Beau Rivage It snowed
*e Raymond Rubins, visiting Del's brother, Sidney Gelfand,
pte Plains, loved every flake ... It was a Thanksgiving weeK-
Wth Del's son coming from Harvard to say hello to everyone
us time it's a girl, making six granddaughters and two grand-
er proud Ted and Ruth Pritikin.
it.-til
oman s
"World
' "dfewish Floridian
Miami, Florida. Friday, December 11. 1959
Section B
Fred Shapiro, Susan Cohen, Marlene Weiss,
and Danny Charnau, of Beth David Congre-
gation, Miami, are placing Chanuka gifts in
a box which will be sent to Israel through
National Council of Jewish Women's Ship-A-
Box program. This year the Greater Miami
Section of Council joined the 30 Jewish schools
affiliated with the Bureau of Jewish Education
here in their service project
Council's Ship-A-Box Program Will
Gladden Hearts of Israeli Children
Ship-A-Box program, service pro-
ject of the National Council of
Jewish Women, is preparing Cha-
nuka gifts for children in Israel.
Pupils of 30 religious schools af-
filiated with the Bureau of Jewish
Education of Greater Miami joined
in Council's program this year to
assist in the happy project.
The children were asked to
bring a gift to school last Sunday.
Mrs. Edward Weiss, Section
chairman of Ship-A-Box, and her
committee of 40 women, drawn
from Council's eight divisions-
then collected, packed and pre-
pared for shipping over 100 boxes
containing paints, brushes, cray-
ons, construction paper, skipping
ropes and dolls. These useful tools
for play and learning, which are
unavailable for purchase in Israel,
will be sent to the Ministry of Ed-
ucation for distribution in the kin-
dergartens there.
Mrs. Samuel Gertman, president
of Greater Miami Section, has re-
ceived a "thank you" letter from
a kindergarten teacher in Accre,
showing what Council's Ship-A-
Box program means overseas:
"I was very happy to receive
your lovely gifta parcel of toys.
My kindergarten is situated in the
city of Acre. We have about 40
children, most of them from poor
families. Practically their only
contact with toys and games is in
the kindergarten.
"The children come from homes
where seven or more people live
together. The mother's first con-
cern is with food, and her means
do not permit her to provide toys
for the child.
"Thus the kindergarten has a
most important task in this neigh-
borhood: to give the child a warm
corner where he can spend a part
of his day at play and at work.
"I send you my deepest thanks
for your help in fulfilling this task.
The children receive the toys with
enthusiasm and joy. and if they
were able to express this in writ-
ing, they, too, would send you their
thanks and appreciation. Since
they cannot, I shall do this in their
name and in mine. Thank you."
Sporting their costumes for their roles as hostesses at the cock-
tail party sponsored by Temple Beth Sholom Sisterhood on
Saturday evening are Mrs. Harry B.' Smith and Mrs. Arnold
Gottfried. (See story Page 3-B.) .
Cancer League
Meets on Friday
Women's Cancer League of Mi-
ami Beach will hold its December
luncheon meeting at the Monte
Carlo hotel on Friday. Mrs. Sidney
Ohrbach is in charge of reserva-
tions. Mrs. Micky Kraus is presi-
dent of the organization.
Arthur Burrell, vice president of
the recently-organized Men's Can-
cer League of Miami Beach, will
be guest speaker. Burrell is man-
ager of Hirsch and Company, and
has been a resident of Miami
Beach for 25 years.
The men's group will cooperate
with the Women's Cancer League
of Miami Beach to raise $50,000 for
a Cobalt machine at Mt. Sinai Hos-
pital of Greater Miami. For their
first fund-raising event, the men's
group has scheduled a golf tourna-
ment Dec. 16 at Bay Shore Golf
Course.
The Women's Cancer League's
first major fund-raising event will
be a luncheon at the Eden Roc
hotel on Jan. 6.
1 1
-.1
'



Page 2-8
-JenMflvrXMnn
Homemakers Find Herring Delicacies
Lighten Holiday Entertainment Menu
Fxfr.n no's, parties, "drop-in" Hires of hard-cooked egg*, cucum-
tii*c*. tacktaiMwnr treats, are bert, radishes or pickles. Jus
part an .'-parcel of the homemak- fore serving, place 1 or 2 Vila
er-hostew' assitmments during the Creamed Herring Fillets or Partv
hnstk-buttte Of the approaching Snacks (fillets in light wine sauce)
holui.i\ SCUM. 'O center of each canape. Garnish
,le food which has serving platter with parsley sprig<
made a name for itself as a fea- and radish roses.
Hired attraction en hoi day menus
is herrin." Equally at home on a "Help-Yourself" Hors D'Oeuvrei
variety of occasions, holiday hos- Arrange crackers and fancy
Ms are natal this tangy delight shaped breads on tray, flanked on
with increasing frequency.
Il^^,
4ft
1
.^re.!,uatti
--Jig -*

e h Iota,
Page
I
LJ*eJ
cither side by serving bowls.'Fiji n .1^!*? <
Lone a favorite among many one serving bowl with Vita Party strips ?"* P'l"ne,lto|
of the world, herring's Snacks (herring fillets in li.ht wine
To help with ideas. fk|
Year's Day. to assure good luck
throurhout the year.
Two top favorites among her-
ring productsspecial at holiday
time and "staple" with smart hos-
M the year roundare import-
ed fillets in sour cream sauce, or
I with parsley Ul _
. or with v.ta ^omenHwUAi
Fish fillets prepared in a variety of ways and served on
tempting platter to tease the most discriminating taste.
Study Group Meets Tuesday
i Group meetinj of the
r Miami chapter o; the
I in e n '
ConamittN, w.l! be held Tuesday.
10 a.m.. at the home ai Mr-.
steam. 9641 Broadview ter.
Earlier meeting was held las'
week at the home of Mrs. William
MaxwtH, group chairman.
PHYLLIS tTOLFF mjyt:
Ah-h-h... Kasha!
DSttfLMMu
"v or r*siifc^"
A "hoimishe" standby
... for old-fimy good Kasha
Vamethkes, Kasha Knishes, and
other treats. Loss than 2> a serving I
Aim *, WoHT, Cm,
W01W1 Kufn 'N Oar, .. .
Send for ntff KASHA COOK BOOK]
HYIUS WOUF, rW Y. N.. y*
LEVtNSON S FOOD SPECIALTIES, tec leg). I C-.Wtiut.r,
IK* E. irth STREET. M ALEAH. FLA. PHONE TU MS71
ON SALE AT
kwik < iiiik
peoples
fame has now become firmly es- sauce); the other with Vita Her-
tabllshed m Amer.c.i. Its deserved | ring in Sour Cream Sauce. Place pared'a
popularity stems from two causes : party toothpick in each fillet; let and Easv vfw'l
its unique flavor, a treat to guests guests serve themselves. Meals and V yi*>
jaded by run of the mill arrays of ... i tessc's how tnViLjH
cocktail canapes; and its never | Seafood Tartlets j f,sh Drodlir,, ;E~n*M
ending versatility, a treat for host Plan on at least three small flakv werJ ', ? ^fa
Bd host. I tart shells for each guest. Make The"book U wi^?!
Bv wav of a traditional folklor- she"-' home, if you've a favorite ,,,h |"j*g
note with holiday meaning: many recipe or buy at pastry shop. Fill .-, Editor JertSi
nat.onalities eat herring on New shell with a Vita Creamed Box 2373 M arm Fb
Herring F.ilet. sprinkled with pa-
prika and garnished
or water cress sprigs.
sliced lunch herring (drained) cut Inn rental
into bit-size pieces, garnished with My God," by Hermit I
Vita stuffed green olives, halved meeting Sunday of ik{_
in licht wine sauce. Each possesses Or use Vita Party Snacks, garnish- Miami chapter af fbafl
a distinctive flavor, yet they can j ed with chopped Aives or shred- can ORT at the DcoajjT
be used interchangeably in reci-
pes. Add to this their time-saver
quality: fillets are ready to serve
from the jarand with min-
imum effort they can be "dressed
up" for appearance at the most
laviah party.
Here are some party-minded,
easy-to-prepare sening sugges-
tions fc r the harried holiday hos-
t<> >>'k;ng for a delicious and
different appetizer, snack or hors
d'oeuvre to pique the gourmet pal-
atestraight from the experts in
the kitchens of Vita Food Products
Incorporated, world's largest im-
porters and packers of herring,
and a wide variety of other fine
fi-h products and gourmet delica-
cies:
Party Tid-Biti
Use bread and crackers of vari
ous shapes (cooky cutters will cuf
thin slices of bread into assorted
fancy shapes). Cover with thin
SAY "WELCOME"
IN THE
TRADITIONAL WAY
/
Si*'
**\
HERRING

The delicious Vita Herring that so
often graces your family table also
bids your guests a warm and ioyous
"welcome". Enjoyed by your family
and friends for its richly traditional,
old world flavor. Vila Herring is part
of the heritage of hospitality always
found in the American Jewish home.
KOSHER ZION
199% P9* Hit H099CTS
UVEl SABSACC
> nMaeVoiTOS
PASTtaju
tOtSCM*
ITUMM KUCaTBSm. SVfMMHITS I OTjajajK
KOSHER ZION
SAUSAGE COJUPANY OF CHICAGO
15, See* Water Market, Carnage I, NOae*.
NEW
DAIRY MEAL
TREAT
JUST HEAT "N" EAT
SE
Cheese
Ravioli
IN SAOCe
VITA-the height of a meal or a pant
pan mw ? mou mir*... ***
^rtlt.lt.HH.

In Miami it $
FLORIDA-FOREMOSi]
DAIRIES
far Home Delivery
Phone FR 4-2621
The tree* mom in dei'y 9"***
FRANK J. HOLT. Man9*t
meatless] {tETIEY TEA IN A GWSi
hy *..d Chef Bey-Ar-Oee.
Teooer Httl
filed w-tfci
EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTORS OF THE SOUTH
COASTLINE PROVISION CO.. INC.
B BSCAVNE STWEET. MIAMI BEACH
PHONES: JE M, JE 1-6231
MERMAN *. ^AT OEAWR
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a* oeJ tftafiaa way. Thrifty,
Net AhoM IU a ear**- Bock


jy, December 11, 1959
'Jewisli Fkrk/inn
Page 3-B
N. Shore Ladies
In Review Series
North Shore Jewish Center Sis-
terhood is sponsoring a series of
three book reviews of recently-
published best sellers.
The books, to be reviewed by
Rabbi -Mayer Abramowttz, -ere
"Lotus Eaters," by Gerald Green,
Jan. 13; and "Status Seekers,"
Vance Packer, Feb. 10.
First in the series was Wednes-
day on "Eva," by Meyer Levin.
Presentation of the reviews are
at the North Shore Jewish Center,
620 75th st. In charge are Mrs.
Helen Cardoza- Mrs. Abraham
Towbin, and Miss Libby Rosen.
sami Beach chapter of Hadassah shares the joy of Henri-
la Szold'Day with the children of the Variety and Cerebral
slsy Hospitals. Shown here are the coordinator of the pro-
:t, Mrs. Harvey Salomon, and Mrs. Robert Perlman, fund-
ising vice president, with the puppets they will present to
children. On Monday, 3,700 women in the 11 groups of
Le Miami Beach chapter will attend luncheons throughout
\e city to celebrate the birth of the founder of Hadassah, the
pte Henrietta Szold, and to raise the necessary funds to main-
Hadassah's medical institutions in Israel.
Women Plan Varied Events
thai chapter of B'nai B'rith
jmen will meet Tuesday evening
I the Deauville hotel.
Juest speaker will be physician
author Dr. Jacob Sarnoff.
.. discuss his book, "Better Liv-
j." Question and answer period
follow.
he chapter also plans a party
the Casablanca hotel Saturday
ening, Dec. 19. Mrs. Flora Sinick
[ chairman.

fiami Beach chapter will meet
^esday noon at the Sea Gull hotel,
rne chapter also plans a "Night
[ New Orleans'* at the Blackstone
itel Sunday evening, Dec. 20.
is. Revy Balkin is chairman.

lorth Shore chapter will meet
lunch and a "White Elephant
Sale" at the Eden Roc hotel on
Thursday noon, Dec. 17.
Cosmetics will be keynoted at
noon at a Monday, Dec. 21 meeting
of the chapter in the Washington
Federal Savings and Loan bldg.,
Normandy Isle.
Rabbi Lipschiii to Speak
Possibility of establishing a
community code will be discussed
by Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz, in the
course, "Marriage and the Fam-
ily," on Tuesday, 8:30 p.m., at Con-
gregation of Monticello Park.
Rabbi Lipschitz, who meets with
both a pre-confirmation teen-age
group, as well as the United Syn-
agogue Youth, on Sunday morn-
ings, from 9:30 to 10:45 a.m., will
convey the feelings of adolescents
toward the adoption of a teen-age
code on parent-child relationships.
Beth Sholom Sets
Auction, Dinner
Saturday Evening
Two of the hostesses who will
serve at a cocktail party preced-
ing the dinner and auction spon-
sored by the Sisterhood of Temple
Beth Sholom on Saturday evening
are Mrs. Harry B. Smith and Mrs.
Arnold Gottfried, both members of
the Married Couples Club of the
Temple.
All Temple affiliates will cooper-
ate with the Sisterhood in this spe-
cial function, which is open to the
public. Proceeds will go to the Sis-
terhood's religious school subsidy
fund.
In charge of the project is Mrs.
D. Murray Sonnett. Mrs. Charles
Silvers is chairman of the mer-
chandise committee, and Mr. and
Mrs. Harold Granoff are in charge
of dinner arrangements. Chairman
of dinner reservations is Mrs. Ba-
jamin Berlin. The auction and din-
ner are scheduled for the Temple
Auditorium.
George Jacobson will be chief
auctioneer. Austin Burke will as-
sist Jacobson. Jay Jacobi and Joe
Drucker, both of whom have serv-
ed as auctioneers at local charity
functions, will also assist. Mrs.
Howard H. Miller is Sisterhood
president.
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1500 Main Hwy. HI 5-1511
Mats. W# NOW THROUGH DECEMBER 13
HI 5-2581
Eve*. Ex. Men. 9:30
Sunday*: 7:30
I
PAT O'BRIEN
in
FATHER OF THE BRIDE
by
CAROLINE FRANCKE
Beted on tha Best-Selling Novel
by
EDWARD STREETER
with
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Trent Dolan
and
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December 15-20
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Ticket Ag.nclee: CORDELIA'S, 1B W. FI.Qler St.. Miami
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LUNCHEONS DINNERS SUPPEtS COCKTAIU
Rmervotioni: R'ph HI 5-2581
Dade Women Host
Foreign Students
Dade Business and Professional
Women's Club held a holiday sea-
son program at its regular dinner
meeting at the McAllister hotel.
EntiUed "Getting to Know You,"
the meeting was presented by
Mrs. Laverne Cole, chairman of
international relations committee,
and Mrs. Anne Padawer, chairman
of Pan-American friendship com-
mittee, with Mrs. Clara Plager
acting as coordinator.
Present were students from the
International Club of the Univer-
sity of Miami, with Harold West-
gaard, of Norway, president, as
master of ceremonies and moder-
ator.
Students sang, danced, played
instruments and told stories of
their homeland. Included were
Achmad Rashed, Jordan; Luiz
Hamada, Lebanon; Rafael Rozi,
Israel; Alam Khandker, Pakistan;
Miss Jennie Bisharah Dade presi-
dent, in a sarong of the type worn
by women in Pakistan; Pathemt-
ket Bhadrechantena, Thailand;
Richard Tamkeraley, Brazil; Sylia
Bercevitz, Guatemala; and Eddie
Rapp, Canada.
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TREATMENT TO CORRECT
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2395 CORAL WAY, MIAMI, FLA.
HI 8-5219





I


Page 4-B
+. Jen tit fhttJItM
Jewish Flondiun Excltutrc
Ymi M.
c
ARRIAGE COUNSELOR
. iff Samuel Cf. Uiling
Miami's Nationally Famous Marriage Authority. LrcruRBR and Author
Samuel G. Kling is recuperating from illness. His column resumes next week.
Einstein Group
Meets Monday
Regular meeting of the Albert
Einstein group of Hariassah will
be held on Monday at the Voyager
motel.
MiL'hlignt of the meeting will be
a candle lighting Chanuka cere
mony. and the 99th anniversary of
the birthday of Hadassah founder,
Henrietta Szold.
Guest speaker in connection with
the Hadassah Medical Organiza-
tion will be Dr. Christopher Cor-
rie, clinical psychologist for Uni-
ted Cerebral Palsy, who will dis-
cuss "Your Child and Discipline."
It's coffee-time in Dade county because the membership drive
of Hebrew Academy Women is on. Shown here are Hebrew
Academy Women's president Mrs. Joseph Shapiro looking on
approvingly as those on the membership committee are pour-
ed their coffee at the home of Mrs. Rose Lobel on Miami Beach.
Seated and serving is Mrs. Irving Firtel. chairman, to Mes-
dames Abraham Steinberg and Leonard Rosen, co-chairman.
Council Divisions Hear Speakers
Members of Bay Division of Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women
heard Rabbi Joseph K (apian, of
Temple tdath Yeshnrun, prei
"An Orthodox Point of \.
I*)
R''h' Mid lh.it and ad-
hutments made in Jewish la*
muM come from world rabbii
authority and any oilier changes
cannot be accept I
Dr. Irving Lehrman. of Temple;
Emanu-EI. speakine on "Jewish
faithConservatism." called it tbd
only American product in Juda '
ism. the others having been
brought from Europe.
"As the youngest movement in
Judaism, it is a 'middle of the
road' policy needed for the new'
life in the new world." he declared, i
Rabbi Joseph R. Narot, of Tern-]
pie Israel, presenting Reform Ju-'
tiaism's message, said that ritual
in the Reform movement" is ml
commandment but a symbol,
snd as such implies the right to
reject or midify it or even in-
vent new rituals.

Thomas Duff, marriage counsel-
or, told members of the Islands
Division of the NCJW at their
meeting that if people made as
rreat an effort in their marriages
a they do in their friendships,
"then would be less boredom in
marriage, and less breakdown in
tal relations." Duff suggested
'hat education in family relations
should start in elementary schools
rather than in college. The larger
percentage of divorces is among
people who do not go to college."
he said.
a
Bernard Mandler. chairman of
the Southern regional Commission
on Law and Social Action of the
American Jewish Congress, speak-
ing at Sunset Divisions meeting,
declared that religion in the pub-
lic school is a personal problem
which concerns everyone, regard-
less of his or her religion.
"In Dade county and In the State
of Florida, there is a statute which
requires reading from the Bible
every day." he reported. 'There
is no such thing as a non-sectarian
Bible. The celebration of different
religious holidays makes for sepa-
ration among children."
Handler stressed that "no one
wishes to take God away from
children." but that "the proper
place for religious teaching is not
in the public schools."
Fashion Show
At Beth Sholom
Mrs. Jean Lehman, president of
the Federation of Jewish Women's
Organizations, will be chairman of
the day at the open meeting of Sis-
terhood of Temple Beth Sholom
on Wednesday, according to Mrs.
Charles P. Feinberg, vice president
iiwcharge of programming.
A report-fashion show will fea-
ture the program. Mrs. Murray
Gilden will serve as fashion coor-
dinator, and Mrs. Joseph Friedman
will be commentator.
Participants in the program will
be Mesdames Leon Kronish. Har-
vey Kramer. Charles P. Feinberg,
Sol S. Pine, Howard H. Miller.
Michael Mersel, D. Murray Son-
nett, Samuel Oritt, Norman J.
Ruts, J A. Cantor. Zachary f.\
Bailey, Thomas Gerard, Harry B.
Smith, Arnold Gottfried. Robert ;
Goodman. Varvm Meitus. Harry
Greenberg. living Bern and Wolfie
Cohen.
Mrs. Howard H Miller is Sister
hood president, and Rabbi Leon
Kronish is spiritual leader of Beth
Sholom.
Pioneer Women
To Hold Meetings
Mrs. Milton Green, president of
the Greater Miami Council of Pio-
neer Women, has called a regular
meeting for Tuesday, 1 p.m., at
-the Miami Beach Federal Bank
bang.
Mrs. Ruth Uliss Wagner, presi-
dent of Club Tikvah, announces a
membership luncheon Monday at
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Nat
Wagner, 1435 SW 14th at. Mrs. Mil-
ton Green, Council president, will
be guest speaker.

Miami Beach's new Club Elath
will hold r Chanuka Festival Wed-
nesday, 8 p.m., in the Miami
Beach Federal Bank bldg., Lincoln
rd and Washington ave. Mrs. Eva
Levinson is in charge of the pro-
gram.
Golfers to Play
For Cobalt 'Bomb*
At least 25 pros and 175 amateurs
are expected to take part in a
charity golf tournament Wednes-
day at the Bayshore Golf Course.
The tourney is sponsored by the
Men's Cancer League of Miami
Beach.
Otto Fenias, director of the four-
ball, best ball tourney, said eight
pro golfers have already been
sponsored to play. These Include
Ed Furgol, Buck White, George
Bernardin. Sonny Rouse, Pat
Rouse, Billy Girard, John Smith
and John Conti. Several local
businessmen plan to sponsor at
least 17 other professionals.
Micky Kraus, president of the
Cancer League, said that some
$10,000 is expected to be raised in
entry fees, and Walter Winchell
has announced that the Damon
Runyon Cancer Fund will match
dollar for dollar proceeds of the
event for purchase of a cobalt
X-Ray machine for Mt. Sinai Hos-
pital.
- FridQj^cetnW,
Choi Group Aiesfj.,
Regular meeting -
Kjoup of Hadistrf 1"* |
Monday^evening Jj Jl
motel. Meeting w,i| \ *l
form of a Ch'aXtnH,
take-off o the pl^; .
be You^r^SSV^
president, and UN V^
^dhousech.^;-.
iwwM Shterk-4 **,,
T^n.WCDdn"daj' Sl]
Temple. Recemiy-comptaYsi
2LwaMr colr,nd *a
Mrs. Morris Skop nffl |W
play The meeting will abt ft.
a Chanuka workshop by Vni
man K. Gottlieb. Trsd2auiiL
decorations and custom lij
shown and explained.
ARISTOCRATIC
T/H/ESwrssFiAVonf
H take* Alpine pashm and Swiss
cheoe-maJum skill to product las
nut-aweet, diMioctivt flavor of
SwftM bright proem OfwytraChstaa,
Dcbciout with cracker* and fnuL
Com slijbuy more thaa ilniiaHs
rhrim sail ynii tasw tin aUfcnmsl
Swiss Knight
T/ie Original
PROCESS GRUYIRI CHIISI
Bfkur Cholim
Chanuka Fete
Bikur Cholim Kosher Convales-
cent Home of Greater Miami will1
hold a Chanuka celebration Wed-
nesday noon at the Algiers hotel.
Mrs. Edward Eikin. president,
said the celebration would feature
i a candle-lighting ceremony.
I Participating will be Mesdames
Mary Hershorn. Eva Leopold,
Helen Homstein, Anna Rosenfield.
i Mary Sley, Gussie Rosenthal, Ath-
j la Mesirow, and Mr. Nathan Roth.
I Marshals will include Joseph
Kaiser and Mrs. Kalmen Shapiro.
j Mrs. Victoria Roe, director, will
present membership certificates.
Religion is Television Topic
Rabbi Tibor Stern. Beth Jacob
Congregation, and Rabbi Henry
Okohca. North Dade Jewish Cen-
ter, will be participants in the tel-
n program. "Still Small
Voice," over WCKT. ch. 7. Sunday
at 10 a.m. Subject will be "Relig-
ionAre There Any Substitutes'"1
Rabbi Morton Malavsky, Israelite
Center, will be moderator.
Women's Groups
Plan Meetings
Next regular meeting of the
Anne Frank chapter of B'nai B'rith
Women will be held Tuesday noon
at the Park Lane Cafeteria on Co-
ral Way.
I
B'nai B'rith Women of Miami
will hold their annual Anti-Defa-
mation League workshop Tues-
day. 10 a.m.. at Hillel House. A
film. "Immunizing Our Children
AEainst Prejudice." will be shown.
This will be followed by a discus-
sion led by Mrs. Bernard Sup-
worth.

Gilbert J. Balkin chapter of B'nai
B'rith will present its annual Cha-
nuka party for children on Tues-
day, Dec. 22.
GEFILTE
FISH
HAS ITS TASTY FUCI
ON YOUR
"WANT-TO-PWT
MINUS
It's Horowiu-MargirHea,(f
f course, who brings you tat
aristocratic delicacy. Gconj
fish made w ith choice
PIKE and WHITE FISH
exclusively from cool North
era lakes... blended tradiuos-
} ally with the other wi
ingredients of home-i
gefiltc lish. So fluffy...
luscious... w ith homey
shimmering jelled sauce.
Sisterhood Card forty
Tifereth Israel Sisterhood will
hold a luncheon and carB party at
the Canter, 6500 N. Miami ave.. on
Tuesday noon. Hostesses are Mrs.
Hetty Newman. Mrs. Pearl Kant.
Mrs. Frances Geverti and Mrs.
Sarah Jarlow.
&
/*
er^
MOHR PCOHaT UK
n*sshiat,calont-tnia
Grater's Kosher Meat Mkt.
441 8.W. 17 AVE. MIAMI
Fret Delivery FR 9-6266
FREEZER ORDERS PILLED
Open Thursday till 9 pjn.
You'll also enjoy *"
Horowitt-Margaret*
Gefilte Fb*..-
ui jumbo or snack-**
poraoits...^*ctar* (
jelled sauce...top*">*""
l^aoVbythebaiencf -
andc*hKoil>ffI Sugarlne
sworn THAN SKU
Tit MO raoa VA1M
UM0UI MUMIII
MMMkul-
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if*1*
AT roOO STORIS EVIRyw
7200 N.W. Vhh Av.nua
SIN/.
Distributed by HI GRADE FOOD CO^ Q% ,**


:ember 11. 1959
+Jmlsii Florid fan
i. JACK ABUM
lack Ablin
Hostess
ck Ablin will open her
42 No. Bay rd. to all new
ers and life trustees on
fioon, Dec. 17, in behalf
reater Miami Women's
Jewish Home for the
Ablin Memorial bldg.
iic at Douglas Gardens
fcte to Mrs. Ablin's late
luncheon and book re-
Irs. I. M. Weinstein are
ernoon's program.
^vid Phillips, life chair-
Irs. Sol Silverman, pres-
welcome guests. Mrs.
fanenbaum is assisting
ips with reservations.
ORT Chapters
Slate Programs
Special ORT Sabbath services
will be held .Friday evening at
Temple Beth Sholem, of Holly,
wood, with Rabbi Samuel Lerer of-
ficiating.
The service will lake"note of' the
contribution of Organization for
Rehabilitation Through Training to
the upbuilding of indigent Jews
throughout the world.

Northwest chapter of Women's
American ORT held a membership
tea this week at the Balmoral ho-
'tel. Featured were an award-win-
ning documentary, "Mellah," and
a fashion show by Mai Marshall.
In charge was Mrs. Dan Sternlicht.

North Dade chapter of ORT will
hold a book review program Thurs-
day evening, Dec. 17, at the First
Federal Bank bldg., 9th ave. and
125th St.
Abraham Gittleson, education di-
rector of Monticello Park Jewish
Center, will review "This is My
God," by Herman Wouk.
Mrs. Norman Morgenstern is
president of North Dade ORT.
Program is dedicated to Jewish
Book Month.

First prize for girls went to little
Ellyn Pat Solis, six months old,
of 622 NE 80th St., whose red hair
and hazel eyes stole the show in
the Charming Child Contest spon-
sored by the Southeast region of
Women's American ORT at a ba-
zaar at Hibiscus Auditorium last
weekend.
First prize for boys went to six;
year-old David Wilkes, of 8859 Em-
erson.
Judges were Mrs. Arnold Perl-
stein, director of the Women's Di-
vision, Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration; Lawrence Thompson, Mi-
ami Herald columnist; and Myron
Kaplan, publisher of Turnpike
Guide.
Page 5-B
Miamian Gifts Beauty Shop
w
'octal
iith a Flair...
THE
lEAUVILLE
tie Catering Facilities
[that Special Parly
i in an elegant fashion
piliin a luxurious
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ct your good taste.
)NFIRMAT!ONS
[RECEPTIONS
WEDDINGS
BANQUETS
MEETINGS
PARTIES
Tete-a-tetf
or a Rala
rcK'liration
Lwith 3.500J
guests .
BILL
rGOLDRING>
CATERING
WKCTO*
p*rvised Kother
(ring Available
INE: UN 5-8511
.'UAN 67th r0 !.9thST',.
'AMI-BEACH
DAVID WILKtS
Beth Israel
Ladies to Meet
Monthly meeting of the Sister-
hood of Beth Israel Congregation
will be held Tuesday noon in the
synagogue.
Miss Doreen Sakrais, formerly
of New York City, who has appear-
ed at numerous Bonds for Israel
functions at the Fontainebleau and
other hotels locally, will head a
musical program. She will be ac-
companied at the piano by Mrs.
R. Sakrais.
While in New York, Miss Sakrais
played the lead in "Ruth and Na-
omi."
Rabbi H. Louis Rottman, spirit-
ual leader, will discuss the historic
aspects of Chanuka. Members
celebrating their birthdays during
the month of December will be
hostesses for the meeting.
Mrs. George Hechter is presi-
dent, and Mrs. Alexander Mosco-
vits is program chairman.______
INS SATURDAY. DEC. 12th
PARI-MUTUEL BETTING
U.I. 1 AT DANIA
(\
fATIOMSi Miami n MM ft. urauuu iHiiwn w MMI
Women Presidents
On Agency Tour
New presidents of women's or-
ganizations have been invited on a
bus tour of health and welfare
agencies served by the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation.
The four-hour inspection trip,
which was rained out several weeks
ago by Miami's five-inch tropical
storm, will be held Thursday, Dec.
17, from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., it
has been announced by Mrs.
George Simon, chairman of the
educational project.
"Nearly 200 leaders of top wom-
en's groups made the trip last year
and were so exhilarated with what
they saw, that we are repeating the
program in 1959," said Mrs. Jean
C. Lehman, president of the spon-
soring organization.
Air-conditioned buses will leave
promptly at 9:30 a.m. from the of-
fices of Federation, 424 Lincoln In.,
Miami Beach, and proceed to the
new Mt. Sinai Hospital, the Great-
er Miami Jewish Community Cen-
ter, Jewish Home for the Aged,
and other Federation agencies.
The presidents will be encouraged
to ask questions of their guides,
who will be executive directors of
the various agencies. At Douglas
Gardens, Dr. Michael Goodman,
executive director of Jewish Voca-
tional Service, will conduct a tour
through the sheltered workshop.
Arthur Kalish, assistant execu-
tive director of the Jewish Home
for the Aged, will take the group
through the newly-constructed pa-
vilions and the University of Mi-
ami research laboratory on the
grounds of the Home. Other guides
for the tour will include Louis
Schwartzman, executive director
of the Bureau of Jewish Education;
Maxwell Fassler, supervisor of
Jewish Family and Children's Ser-
vice; and Emanuel Tropp, assis-
tant executive director of the
Greater Miami Jewish Community
Center.
When the doors of the new Mi.
Sinai Hospital of Greater Miami
open, its facilities will include a
fully-anuipped beauty shop.
The shop has been presented to
the hospital by Albert Hirsch, of
Royal"Palm Beauty Supply Com-
pany, and will be operated on a
profit basis by the Ladies' Auxil-
iary of the hospital.
fiirsch previously donated a
Similar shop to the Jewish Home
for the Aged. He is a past procWn
dent and board member of the
Temple Israel Men's Club, on the
charity committee of the Shrine,
vice president of Jewish Vocational
Service, and board member of Mi-
ami Beach Music and Arts League.
.'
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I

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SIX ACRES ON THE OCEAN AT 98th STREET MIAMI BEACH


A


Pago 6-B
*Jmi*M***w
Friday,
D*^.
- Maret, Apple
Exchange Vows
In a double ring candlelight cer-
emony on Sunday, Dec. 6. at the
Seville hotel, Miss Marlyn Apple,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Max M.
Apple, 3230 SW 65th ave., Miramar,
Hollywood, became the bride of
Ronald Maret, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Arthur Maret, 1050 92nd st.. Miami
Beach. Rabbi Yaakov Rosenberg
officiated at the 4:30 p.m. rites.
Maid of honor was Arlene For-
ster. Bridesmatron was Mrs. Mi-
chael Edelman, and matron of
honor was Mrs. Lloyd Siegmeister.
Best man was Jay A. Weisberg.
Ushers were Ronald Apple, Mi-
chael Edelman. Bernard Gissen.
Lewis Stone, Harry Jones and Roy
Cole.
The bride selected a traditional
wedding gown of silk organza over
taffeta, featuring a fitted bodice,
scooped neckline appliqued with
chantilly lace and reembroidered
with seed pearls, and cap sleeves.
The very bouffant skirt terminated
in a chapel train. Her two-tiered
French illusion veil fell from a
cap of imported chantilly lace and
seed pearls. Her only piece of
jewelry' was a strand of pearls,
with long white gloves compliment-
ing the ensemble.
The bride carried white orchids,
stephanotis,
on her croom'
The bride is a graduate of Miami
Beach High School, and attended
the University of Miami Mr Ma-
Ardmort
MtS. 10NAID MAKIT
carried white orchids. -# .
and hiy-of.the-v.iiey Miss Schlesinger
i's Bar Mitzv.h Bible. ... -- am
Now Mrs. Rephun
Miss Claire M. Schlesinger be-
came Mrs. John Rephun in cere-
ret is a graduate of Miami Beach monk,s Sund ^ 6 .^ s.
High School, and spent three year, (j ho(ol
with the Air Force in Africa. At
at, he is in bu>ines.s on Mi-
ami Beach.
The bade is the daughter of
Mrs. Thi re NE 22nd ave. No Miami Beach.'
The couple arc honeymoon in Jamaica. I'pon their Schlesinger.
return they svill make their horn.- j^ proom is the Mn of Mr and
in North Miami Beach. Mrs. Max Rephun. 350 Washington
------------------- ave.. Miami Beach.
Orah Chapter Meeting Newlywed Mrs. Rephun is .
ftegttlu meeting of Orah ch.ip- Ic,ra?u",e. ?f GJOTfl' Washington
ter of Mlzrachi Women's Oryaniza- H'sh j*"1 ,n New ^,ork C'ty and
tion will be held at the Miami Co- JJ^E^JS""1 CoUe*e of Muslc
lonial hotel on Tuesday evening.
Blasensteins Take
Caribbean Tour
Mr. and Mrs. Jerrold Bl.senstetn
will live at 1421 NE 171st st.. No.
Miami Beach, following their hon-
eymoon tour of the-Caribbean.
The former Roberta Lynn nd
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Sol Blas-
enstein. 20340 NE 15th ave., No.
Miami Beach, exchanged 8 p.m.
wedding vows Saturday evening,
| Dec. 5. at the Empress hotel. Rab-
bi Yaakcv Rosenberg officiated.
Tbe bride, who is the daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. William V. Lynn,
300 NE 172nd St., No. Miami Beach,
chose a taffeta gown with ap-
1 pliques of lace flowers and se-
quins. She carried a cascade of
two white orchids with stephano-
tis on a white satin and lace Bible.
Matron of honor for her new sis-
ter-in-law was Mrs. Arlene Venxer.
Renee Gold was maid of honor.
Sherrie Venxer acted as flower
girl.
Best man for his brother was
Bernard Lynn. Ushers included
Allan Lynn, Alan Venzer, Leonard
Breslaw, Alan Dome, Gilbert Weiss
and Alvin Friedman. Stuart Paul
was ringbearer.
The bride is a graduate of John
Adams High School in New York,
where she was a member of Arista
Society and the Drama Club.
The groom graduated from Mi-
ami Beach High School, attended
the University of Florida, where
he was a member of Tau Epsilon
Phi fraternity. He is vice presi-
dent of the Petroleum Products
Corporation of Pembroke. Fla.,
and active in the Army Reserve.
Reception followed the wedding
ceremony at the Empress hotel.
ts. nnoia
W*rnr-Khr
ausaanm
M*S. miUAM
Weingarders Will Live in Ft. ft
Priscilla Merle Davis and Wil-
liam Robert Weingarder exchang-
ed wedding vows Sunday, Dec. 8,
at the Eden Roc hotel. -Rabbi
Henry Okolica officiated at the 7
p.m. ceremony.
The bride is the daughter of Mr.
Gue.ts invited.
INVITATIONS
We idimg
!., Atifiy.fc
BmMhnmk
Cmiirmtthm
Monogrammed
Ac METRO MIAMI PRESS
2353 Ceral Way Msmm Ml 4-0532
in New York
The groom is a graduate of the
I'niversity of Miami law school.
He was stationed in Germany with
the army for two years as a chap-
lain's assistant.
Reception followed the ceremony
at the Sterling. The couple will be
at home at 2901 Sheridan ave. after
Dec. 16.
Cha-Cha Demonstration
Sisterhood of Temple Beth Am
will hold a "Latin American"
dance on Sunday evening at the
Temple. Cha-Cha will be demon-
strated by Rubin Dulberg. Mrs.
Bernard Lash is chairman.
A-1 EMPLOYMENT
DOMESTIC HELP
DAY WORKERS
Ph. FR 94401
Sportscaster Dm m Talk
Clure Mosher. WCKT ch. 7 sports-
caster, will be guest speaker at a
meeting of Temple Sinai Brother-
hood on Thursday evening, Dec.
17, at the Temple.
MIAMI CONVALESCENT HOME
M-Hour Numna Service
Special Diets Strictly ObMrvcd
All Rooms en Ground Floor
"CMfrawy
iscerfed"
lit.
1*51
Jewfth Style Cooking a
Spacious Grounds
Reasonable Rates
Specializing in Cora to the Elderly and Chronically Iff
335 S.W. 12th AVE. Ph. FR 4-5437 & FR 94273
110 AWN, Mrerter "B
Torah Membership luncheon
Annual paid-up membership
meeting of the Torah group of Ha
dassah will be held Monday at
Pythian Hall, 4601 W. Flagler st.
Mrs. Irving Hauptman is chair-
man of the smorgasbord luncheon
affair.
and Mrs. Hymen Davis. |
Glades dr.. N. Miami.'
is the son of Mr. WflBail
garder Ft Pierce, ind tod
line Weicgarder, X. Mini]
Matron of honor u 1
ley Brown. Gary Wanj
best man for his
The briilc. who cbotetj
chantilly lace ton,
school.- in Wilton,
she formerly resided.
The groom is an i
Ft. Pierce furniture Map
Dinner followed the
at the Eden Roc. Aft
throughout the state, tail
will live in Ft. Pierce.
Mis, i
Covered Disk Sappar Sunday
Temple Sinai '39-ers will hold a
covered dish supper and card party
Sunday evening at Temple Sinai
of North Miami, 12100 NE 15th ave.
.R0NAID
W0tID'S ACCOfMM I
NOW AVAILAfls]
For Parties, Lurches*^
CAU 10 A.M.-ltMsl
MA 14Sr
miN HEINS'
WI RAVI SAHSMCrOwftr SMVI0 SAflMTH SHKl l
SLENDERIZING I BEAUTY SALON
UOOCR46 MASSACC STEAM IATMS
2*4 AUAAtMA CstCU, COtAl CAIUS
We specula* I
Maissae *"
BtrsitiS. *-_
Muscular
personalized service at the
blackstone flower shops
where you get more for
your money ... un 6-1233
24-kovr iarrka except rash hashona ami yam kippar
Zeigers Mark
Hotel Opening
The Zeiger family celebrated the,
opening of their Ritz Plaza hotel
in Miami Beach with a dinner for j
an overflow number of guests and
invited friends.
The Zeiger cuisine, operating un-'
der the supervision of the com-
munity of Vaad Hakashruth of
Greater Miami, is one of the prin-
cipal features of the Ritz Plaza
hotel operation this year.
Newly refurbished lobby, public
rooms, and the decor of the din-
ing room featured the dinner event
in honor of the Zeiger family.
*<"** Ma Sisterhood
v *?Fred Blank, president of
North Dade Sisterhood, announces
a membership meeting Monday
evening in Popiel Social Hall
Chanuka program has been plan
ned. according to Mrs. Henry Gil
bert, program chairman.
BRACE SERVICE
Us traces latasatatrt. Car*lf*'
Past f felite lapairh Tresses EJosti* $te*ag'
GEORGE W. PIPER HI 3-3437 1739 COW
ORGANIZATIONS AND CLUBS INVITED
CARIBBEAN STAR SHIP CO., Ltd. Nassau.
Betas*
DiffMMT
narma
-Caribbean Star
The Millionaire's VecM
nOJ milltWWWW
e-DAY CRUISE-WEEKLY
AN liai.....frees $le-Se re fleW*
NRST SAIUNG CHRISTMAS CRUISE "#;
SECOND SARJNO NEW YEAR CRUISE *
RIMINI NASSAU ILIUTHRRA fWf.JJr
RRC S3 ML IS U BBC 27 "*
- DRPARTURE DATRS t A*|
iAR, 1JL St, Pat. JL 1R, 17. M "*t '* *^ J
- RaawMfl PtaMaf Makf CM T ear. **
RESERVE NOW! Ca* UN 5-7l
OHO COLLINS AVR. MIAMI BW"



Efmber 11. 1959
*Jewlsti Fkrldlfor)
Page 7-J
rppietaum
ie Saturday night in
Grand ballroom of
lincbleau hotel was just
as one would expect
^lomatic BalL Honoring
bassador Avraham Har-
evening was complete
lal reception line, dipio-
tocol, visiting consuls,
politicians, and glit-
rie stars.
ien in the audience
lilly impressed with
[Heston, and men and
like fell under the spell
ous Joan Crawford. Es-
to the stage was Jake
ss Crawford wore a
white satin short for-
a low-scooped neckline
It and back, and pearl,
and bugle beads en-
Jin embroidery, which
like a ribbon from the
the hemline of her
pr bodice was fitted and
cut in a full circular
ick Katzman was grand
nd led the beautifully-
iiromen who greeted the
jom the red carpet en-
the doors of the Grand
She was in a fushia-
[Balanciaga import ball
ts. Max Weitz, Women's
|chairman, chose a misty
_ gown embroidered in
ed bugle beads. Mrs.
hick was in a heliotrope-
ered satin ball creation.
Black chantilly lace over apricot
tafetta was the choice of Mrs.
Samuel T. Sapiro.
Mrs. Sam Heiman selected a
muted honey beige satin short
formal brocaded with-gold. Her
bodice featured an asymetrical
drape from one shoulder to the
waist, and her skirt was gathered
into a full harem hem. The gown
had its own matching great stole.
Mrs. Ben Novack wore a pure
silk warped print in tones and
shades of browns, with a gold
thread brocade. Her tulip-shaped
bodice flowed to a full short
skirt. The same fabric lined a
white satin evening coat.
From Tallahassee, where her
husband is a Justice in the State
Supreme Court, Mrs. B. K. Rob-
erts chose a floor-length satin
gown in porcelain blue. Self fa-
bric roses were appliqued to the
dress, and foliage was embroid-
ered with silver-lined bugle
beads.

|u|RS. Leon Kaplan was in a
"* carmen red silk chiffon
which featured a Grecian draped
bodice, latticed cummerbund ef-
fect, and full skirt. Wife of the
consul from Mexico, Mrs. Rafael
Spindola, set off her dark beauty
with a black chantilly lace gown.
Busy greeting guests and mak-
ing introductions were the wives
of the general chairmen of the
Greater Miami Israel Bond com-
mittee. Mrs. Jack A. Cantor wore
JMuravchick Eyes June Rites
Mrs. Abe Muravchick,
ke Wales dr., announce
ement of their daughter,
t Leonard Grand, son of
Irs. William Grand, 1220
nia ave.
Je-to be is a graduate of
ach High School, attend-
iversity of Alabama, and
I is a senior at the Uni-
[Miami, where she is ma-
elementary education.
nember of Delta Phi Ep-
^ity, and served as treas-
organization.
Ijnd is a graduate of Mi-
i High.School, the Unl-
Miami School of Busi-
|inistration, and the Uni-
Miami School of Law.
ember of the Florida Bar
tified public accountant,
[he is associated with the
ernard B. Davidson.
I wedding is planned.
a gold lame gown, and Mrs. Sam-
an1 VLSSAr&ai Mian" Beach Mizrachi Plans Testimonial
In Honor of Mrs. Brenner Sundy Eve
ge-colored silk drape
from the neckline to the floor,
which gathered to a poui on one
side. ,
wUMhrJThanmoSseAhvLWere lKere JHM** chwtejr oUtoaabi ner for her many philanthropic
ch Id en wm soSn Te lWrr^e SS2n Wi" give a testim> civic, and religious contribution:
Mn AhrL". married, birthday party for Mrs. Edythc to the Greater Miami Jewish con-.
Deriwefnkle hT .ill r "". (JSeFh' Bre"ner Sunday' 6 pm' mUnity 0ver the vears"
a woven oolkl H u a ""*? at the Sterlin hoteL Mrs" Bretmer e to Mi
dr^pe of saUn wen t'the Kto The party will honor Mrs. Bren- j !, to recuperate from >
siege of pneumonia, and settled in
while the gown was cafe-length.
Mrs. Serbin's floor-length gown
was a white silk satin sheath,
with a bodice of reembroidered
ribbon lace and a crushed cum-
merbund.
Mrs. Ann Jacobs, known pro-
fessionally for years as Mary
Ford, wore a white chiffon short
formal with the bodice of white
iridescent sequins. Her matching
shoes and beaded handbag were
bought on a recent trip to Paris.
Mrs. Mac Mermell selected an
iced sky blue silk organza. Her
full skirt featured a reembroider-
ed silk satin applique in a butter-
fly motif. In an oyster white sat-
in short formal was Mrs. Marion
Sibley. Dark ranch mink trim
created a caplet effect on the
bodice, and her skirt was the
controlled fullness of the bubble.

IlJRS. Melvin Richards chose a
" charcoal silk organza short
ball gown, with a fitted bodice,
bateau neckline, and full skirt
composed of tiers of ruffles.
Welcoming the holiday season
was Mrs. Stanley C. Myers in a
deep eggnog-colored Italian lace
gown. The pattern was reem-
broidered in gold, and had match-
ing colored silk organza inserts
at the waistline.
A flower printed gold lame
from Hong Kong was Mrs. Louis
Glasser's floor-length formal. Al-
so from the Orient was Mrs. Rob-
ert Haverfield's ming green dy-
nasty brocade.
Honorary chairman of the Is-
rael Bond Women's Division is
Mrs. Anna Brenner Meyers. Her
floor-length gown was a silver
grey satin with pink leaves ap- -
pliqued around the scooped neck-
line. Self covered miniature but-
tons went down the front to the
hemline, and she also wore long
matching gloves.
N
EXT week is our Fashion
Supplement, with exciting
fashion announcements, pictures
of social activity, and stories
about some or the major social
functions planned for the next
few months.
IS MT POSSIBLE .
TO GET A GOOD MY CLEANING JOB IN ONt HOUR?
bob guarantees that net only will H at a good job, hot the
EST MY CLEANING YOU EVER HAD (Regardless of Price).
Including DRAPES SLIP COVERS
SUITS $1.00 PLAIN DRESSES $1.25
REDMAN'S CLEANERS
2922 Coral Way, Miami, Florida
MONDAY thr SATURDAY 7:30 >*
BIKUR CHOLIM KOSHER
CONVALESCENT HOME
MOH PROFIT NON-SRCTARIAN
SUPPORTED BY YOUR COMMUNITY
[Strlot Sup.rvi.lon of th. Orthodox Vaad Hakaehruth of Florida
1 Rabbi Or. laaac H. Ever, Director
24-HOUR NURSING DOCTORS ON CALL
)IRTS OBSERVED CONGENIAL SURROUNDINGS
**n iQwmnn t rwmsamot rmnoor buiidimq
iHloi Avt. Ph. JE 2-3571 MtamlBaoth
Mrs. Roosevelt
Due in Hollywood
The community of Hollywood
will honor Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt
at a dinner of tribute Sunday eve-
ning *at the Hollywood Beach hotel.
The dinner will be sponsored by
the Hollywood committee for
State of Bonds in recognition of
Mrs. Roosevelt's outstanding "ser-
vice to humanity and to democ-
racy."
Maynard Abrams, well-known
Hollywood attorney, city commis-
sioner and civic leader, is chair-
man of the committee of sponsors
for the dinner.
Ben Tobin, Hollywood business
and civic leader, will serve as of-
ficial host. Tobin is owner of the
Hollywood Beach hotel.
Three of the community's out-
standing leaders will be honored
with special presentations. They
are Samuel Barskin, Max Cantor
and Harry Rich.
The dinner will honor Mrs.
Roosevelt as "one of the greatest
women of our times," pointed out
Tobin. "In her efforts on behalf
of the oppressed and underprivi-
leged and as one of the early par-
ticipants in the United Nations.
Mrs Roosevelt has helped to bring
the nations of the world much
cloaer together," Tobin added.
Mrs. Roosevelt will come to
Hollywood1 personally to accept the
tribute. The former First Lady
has been a friend to the cause of
Israel for many years, and helped
establish Israel's independence 11
years ago as United States repre-
sentative at the United Nations.
Mrs. Joseph Brenner was
honored at the recent fourth
annual Jewish National Fund
banquet. Dr. Zev Kogan,
Southeastern executive direc-
tor of JNF, lauded Mrs. Bren-
ner as a true "Ayshes Cha-
yil." Her children, Mr. and
Mrs. Benjamin Meyers and
Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Bergad,
were among guests at the
function, which also marked
her 84th birthday.
Parent-Teacher
Confabs Here
Allapattah. Since there was no
synagogue in the area, she and her
husband organized a Minyon in
their home, borrowed a Tora!.
from Beth David Synagogue, and
turned over all proceeds from
holiday services to Beth David.
The Brenners later moved to SW
3rd ave., where they helped t<
build and became affiliated witli
the Miami Jewish Orthodox Con-
gregation today known as Beth
El. In 1940, the couple moved
againthis time to Miami Beach,
and found themselves lending a
hand in the construction of David
Witman Hall of Beth Jacob Con-
gregation.
Mr. and Mrs. Brennerhe passed
away several years agoalso sa-
in on the planning meetings with
Dr. David Andron, first presiden!
of the Hebrew Academy, offering
their assistance in the establish
ment of the Academy, where sh
is still an active member.
Since its inception 34 years ago
Mrs. Brenner has been active in
Mizrachi, and organized the Mian;
Beach chapter, of which Mrs. Pau-
ine Groundwerg is president todav
DUPLEX APT. FOR RENT
Deluxe, new, spacious, 1 bedroom,
Ultra-Modern kitchen, new 12 ft.
refrigerator, separate dining room.
Free washer & dryer. WI S-S307
"Your Child's Development" was
the theme of the week-long parent-
teacher conferences held at Con-
gregation Monticello Park's nur-
sery school.
Under the leadership of Mrs.
Sidney Kay, head teacher, parents
of each class met every morning
for discussion on the physical, so-
cial, emotional and religious de-
velopment of the child and a pres-
entation of the school's program
by the staff.
The conferences have become a
semi-annual part of the school's
program and serve to acquaint par-
ents- with a knowledge and under-
standing of how teachers and par-
ents can complement each other's
activities for the child's growth.
Kosher Bakery For Sale
ONLY KOSHER BAKERY
IN MIAMI
Phone HI 4-7871 or HI 3-2807
t-
ROOM AND BOARD
FOR ELDERLY PEOPLE
STRICTLY KOSHER. REASONABLE RATE:
Warm Atmosphere Car Service
MRS. H. LEVIN
1S4S EUCLID AVE. JE 1-3741
YOUR LETTER .
WILL LOOK BETTER ON
Personal Stationery
25 MONARCH SHEETS with
Matching ENVELOPES for only
$1.50
Sales Tax and Postage Included
SHAPIRO
415 LANGFORD BLDG.
______Phone FR 9-0955 I
jjil;IAHiUlJ.lJilf|:J(j,| SOCIALITES Of MIAMI
STARTING DECEMBER 11
DANCEStvery friday, Saturday, Sunday and Monday
Dance to HERMAN BATARD'S Latin-American Orchestra
ADMISSION $1.50 MEMBERS FREE
DeLIDO HOTEL, Collins Ave. at Lincoln Rd., M.B.
Plenty of Parking Available
Single Men and Women Welcome (over 28)
CHARTER MEMBERSHIP NOW AVAILABLE
FOR INFORMATION PHONE JE 4-4644
"Dignify and Sociability at its Finest"
INVITATIONS
WEDDINGS,
BAR BAS MITZVAHS
PERSONALIZED STATIONERY,
MATCHES,
NAPKINS, ETC.
An Ideal Chanuka Gift
HANNAH B. SCHER
ALL YOUR PRINTING NEEDS
ENGRAVING, EMBOSSING, PERSONALIZED
PRINTING & COMMERCIAL
Phone HI 4-4602


Paqe 8-B
+ tri*t fhrMton
Frid
T.
tfle finest
^food's
rjte finest
^%i
Pearly Gait
by Hal Pearl I
FRIDAY NIGHT
DINNERS
Of TRADITIONAL
EXCELLENCE!
Served with Sacra-
mental Wines and All
the Trimmings, with
Special Emphasis on
Courtesy, for which the
Monte Carlo is famous.'
MOt GHEENSTEIN. Catering Mgr.
MsONf: UN 44721
On Tm ocean at Mtm ST.
MIAMI BIACH. FLORIOA
Monte \xmo
\
I
}
i
RCSORT HOTEL
FOR TH= ATTENTION
OF LOCALITES .
EXPECTING FRIENDS
Make Reservations Now
for Yevr friemds at Ike
Plymouth -
Adams Hotel
At 21st Street Miami Beech
doll,, par person
doubl* oci'o.
to Jan. 24 th
IHCIUoH'G IAIS
33 CUT Of 140 HOOMS
650
Vchenettei Available
CALL JE 1-0351
Wtiner Memajtmtnt
Please .
Do not thin* me cc.
BUT
I'm ot rp BEST
STOECK1 ItS
Steaks J3'5
j
MO t
Tlot AVI. ON TM TKA*.
IS*. 8tt. St.)
OUR SPECIALTY
NICE, THICK, JUICY
PRIME RIBS OF BEEF
-AND Till vur MIT in town;
MMQUfT fACIUTHS
Candlelight Inn
1131 Commodore Finn
Cocormt Grove
HENRY LEITSON. Mar-
LUNCH Dinni* O) lurriB
ffi AMNGttf
ORDERS TO TAKE OUT
PHONE UN 6^303
| JT UIA Ml > AC*
Ursesf fmmily Trade im fkwUm
ON 7ftti ST. CAUSE*AT
*>-
if
AX3GLSI bKOS R>f
^ rsr'
NAMES MAKE NEWS: Recent visitor to Miami Beach was Mr*.
Mike Stern, wife of the author and overseas reporter. She spent some
ime with her sister and brother-in-law, Lillian and Murray Baron, com-
ing from her long-time residence in Rome (15 yean). Her writing
-pouse is still in Italy, putting the finishing touches to his latest book,
The Voluptuaries." This will be his fourth tome. In addition, hea
.inishing up a screenplay, his first, to be produced by a major com-
pany. He'll join his wife, son and daughter in New York for the boli-
Jay season.
How many members of the Miami Beach Library have noticed the
many changes for the better? First of all, you'll rarely find a local
public library with as wide a selection of the latest fiction and non-fic-
tion. One of the reasons for the improvement is the work -of Reba
(Mrs. Jack) Oaner, chairman of the MB. Public Library advisory board,
working in close cooperation with Oscar Everhart. the chief librarian,
who's done a tremendous job since taking over two years ago.
Look for a highly entertaining evening at the dinner and auction
sponsored by the Sisterhood of Temple Beth Sholom tomorrow. High
lights will bo the appearance of veteran auctioneer George Jacooson,
assisted by the men's clothing exec Austin Burke. I
Julian Spievack. four-state rep of Omega watches, spends a lot
of his time, between road trips, enjoying golf at Baysbore. Often see
him with Food Fair exec Red Lubin.
The Jack Gordons, of Palm Island, attended the dinner honoring
i Eleanor Roosevelt at New York's Waldorf Astoria Monday.
The Hal Peltons seeing much of Joan Crawford while she was in
town. Pelton and Miss Crawford's late husband, Al Stecle, former
| Pepsi-Cola exec, were close friends.
Even the cold weather couldn't keep away Miami Beach's M.D.
brothers Drs. Ralph. Bernard and Alex Robbins from the first local
outloor fi^ht in quite a while, at Miami Stadium recently. Mebbe in
union there's warmth, too.
Susan Ann Holtzer. of Hialeah. recently named Miami Beach's
"Miss Serviceman"s Center." is' engaged to Henry C. F. Neverman.
whom she met at the center two years ago. He's stationed at Homestead
Air Base.
* *
BOTH SIDES OF THE BAY: 'Father of the Bride." starring Pat I
O'Brien, holds over at the Coconut Grove Playhouse through Sunday.
Ofl Tuesday. "An Evening with Hildegarde" will make its bow there.'
It's a one-woman show starring the internationally-known supper club
star, who'll oder her incomparable songs and impressions.
Now comodionno mak.no hor local bow is Phyllis Oillor, of TV.
She's teamed in Fontainebieous La Rondo show with singer Don
Comoll. we 1*4 no wn on the local scene.
M> Fair Lady." starring Michael Evans and Diane Todd. pops up
at the Miami Beach Auditorium on Feb. 2. playing through the 20th,
aj fmu tickets now at the Auditorium box office.
* *
COLORFUL FIGURE: Wonder if the Hon. Baruch Benson Benjamin
is goi ake a stopover in Miami while on his rift* to Jowi-h con-
tend the nation' He's one of the more colorful figures in
w>rki Jewry, representing one of the oldest and most unusual Jewish
groups extant, Bet* Israel in Bombay. India. The 21.000 some-odd
member, of that community, the largest in India, with only 25 400 Jews
in the Btiri country The original members of today's community ar-
rived in Ind.a more than 2.000 years ago when a ship from Egypt was
wrecked and left only seven men and seven women survivors In the
years between, intermarriage with Hindus caused many of the Utters
customs to be adopted by the Bene Israelites, including the banning of
rat!!? ^ n fServance of the Hindu Protubmon .gainst slaughtering
_^ t Benianun- wh0 **> President of the Jewish Welfare
Assn. of Delhi and Northern India, and former Under-Secretary of Com-
merce and Industry Nehru's cabinet, was reported seeking rabbi
m this country to "come to the spintual rescue of those unfortunate
remnants in country of 370 million." otiuimw-
- y" OW: J^k St.yin, coowJer-chef of the Ch.rcoal
^root 2LWPtM .."J*- 16' v*1"*** completelTVenosated dm
charcoal ^J^ZZi ??" *"** ""^ *+
^-'Td.^^
The Derby Inn, on Biscyne bird. oasTth. rUL r
Southern duhe. ake you dream about^ TJ^^^' *"*
c-KNt.b,.. fr^ Hw. colKKtHw. nf iCtll^^TwilTZS
The Royal Hungarian restaurant on Miami Beach i. th. .____ ^
many parties sponsored by local clubwomen the scene of
Irving Hoffman, the realtor talkine r ^.
..ween mouthful, of Moo Goo G.i^.tXM^chu^L^l^
oU,er realtor, who find, Al Goldman's apoT. J5S5u dSTcJ-S I
i KID STUFF: D.il*m.tinee performnc? of P,noec*k," a
, Ue month .re being held at the P.ed Piper iPUyhmJuTJ^l o"""*
Shows st.rt. 230 Rth Foreman. dirSorS toT^Z T 5"*'
M t.king re*rv.tions from ,n typTTchildrinl^ *Acad*",J'.'
I Scout part.es. birthday, and clubs <***, groups, including

TO DINE OR
TO DINE N0T
ft 11SUTSL*
f ABOUT WH||,QW,T,0M
Coanplet. Dlnnori
pn.M.95
Mew H.ooin, m.. ,
OPENING SOON
Charcoal Steak Hi
WATCH FOR OPENING
HOME OF FINEST PRIME STEAKS
JACK STAYEN Owner-Chef
AND HIS PARTNER
(Big Klu) TED KLUSZEWISKI
WILL GREET YOU OPENING DAY
Charcoal Steak Hi
211 22nd STREET MIAMI BEACH
Reservations JE 2-2613
OPENING FRIDAY, DEC.
Preseafiof
THE SALT CITY S
Featuring NICK PALUMBO
Nightly at the CARRIAGE CLUB
MIAMI SPRINGS VILLAS' TJS? '
The Royal Hungarian ->uo 4 catS
fOf THf FINEST IN KOSHER CUISM
731 Washington Avenue Telephone |
YCXTRE CORDIALLY INVITED TODAY TO
NICK & ANTOINETTES
IESTAURANT
Cuciao Casalinga
~Heai itmilmm Hmme #'**!
WINE and BEER FREE PARKING
1624 N.E. 1st Court Phont FR 1
U. 1st Aea. & 2ed A**, Nor* W la* $U
ervtwa Daily froai o-m.un. treat 41
HAROLD PONT and IftVIN CORBON
GORDON and PONT
WM. W. Stt. ST, MIAMI ^_ 'fiOL m
of Bafted leearM Aseadothw r r-
- bar farrzvARS -


11, 1959
-Jmlsli lUiiHtr
tion Committee Proposes New Quarters
a new site by
Jewish Federa-
ninent Wednes-
of governors
at the Algiers
ort by the Fed-
eration committee on permanent
headquarters.
- th*. rtwt wiiv ecomnond
?ho purchase o* a parcel of land
t 1317 Biscayne blvd., recently
mada available by Bessemer
Troperttat, Inc. Tha site is lo-
cated on the northeast corner
of Biscayn* blvd. and Mac Arthur
Causeway, and covers a large
part of the block, extending east
to N. Baythora dr.
According to Stanley C. Myers.
chairman of the Federation com-
mittee, there is an existing-build-
ing on the land, two floors of-which
a*e air-conditioned, and *y*Hild be-'
immediately available for occu-
pancy. There are adequate park-
ing facilities on the site itself.
Page 9-B
A site committee voted unani-
mously last Friday to recommend
purchase of the parcel which it
considers "one of the choicest lo-
cations in the Greater Miami
area."
Federation is currently in quar-
ters at *24 Lincoln 'hi.'"tmtil its
move some two years ago, it oc-
cupied the entire mezzanine floor
of 420 Lincoln rd.
lor
You" is a new feature of The Jewish Floridian.
i for the asking, and will be presented to each
ir Bas Mitzvah. For details on how to receive
see story, Page 3-A.
Kaplan
in will become
Saturday
tiUOT
iestaurant
mMNG
:20th
bars on the Beach
1IALITY FOOD
DINNERS
Prices
igton Ave.
1-9182
NTIS
TEL
/voow
FRIDAY
DINNER
Traditional Style
$275
\URSt DHMOtS
ftVINf t SELTZER
>llins Ave.
- JE 1-0381
FINEST IN
UAL CUISIHE
JN 6-0121
ERVENOW!
lOSNIR'B
# trktly
I CABANAS
147* nun, mm turn
KOSHER FOODS
[from *1.35
[7 Main Courses
iltzer A Knishes
DELICATESSEN
hington Ave.
J'ly Catered
irs Call
42655
morning services, Dec. 12, of Beth
Israel Synagogue.
Shlomo is an eighth grade stu-
dent at the Hebrew Academy. He
is the son of Rabbi and Mrs. Jonah
E. Caplan.
Rabbi Caplan is representative
of Yeshiva University in the Flor-
ida area and spiritual leader of
Temple Adath Yeshurun, No. Mi-
ami Beach.

Elliot Winit
Temple Zion will be the site of
the Bar Mitzvah of Elliot Winit
Saturday morning, Dec. 12, with
Rabbi Alfred Waxman officiating.
Elliot is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
David Winit. He attends Rockaway
Junior High School, and completed
his studies at Temple Zion relig-
ious school.

Samuel Rosenstrauch
Rabbi David Herson will officiate
at the Bar Mitzvah of Samuel Ros-
enstrauch on Saturday morning.
Dec. 12, at Beth Emeth Congrega-
tion.
Samuel, who is the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Stanley Rosenstrauch,
will chant the entire service. He
attends Thomas Jefferson Junior
High, where he is a member of
the hand.
Participating in the service will
be Benjamin Newmark and Sam-
uel Grayson. Bernard Breitbart,
Beth Emeth president, will present
the Bar Mitzvah with a certificate.
Tuhin Chapter to Meet
Robyn Tubin chapter'of the City
of Hope will meet Thursday eve-
ning, Dec. 17, at the Voyager mo-
tel.
stein will be celebrated Saturday,
Dec. 12, at Beth Jacob Congrega-
tion, with Rabbi Tibor Stern offi-
ciating.
Meyer is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Sam Perlstein, 727 2nd st. He is
an eighth grade student at Miami
Beach Junior High, where he plays
in the school band and belongs to
the Library Patrol.
e
Howard Malter
Rabbi Meyer Abramowitz will
officiate at the Bar Mitzvah of
Howard Malter on Saturday morn-
ing, Dec. 12, in North Shore Jew-
ish Center.
Howard is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Milton Malter, 7282 Gary ave.
He is a student in the religious
school of North Shore Jewish Cen-
ter, and attends Nautilus Junior
High.
Steven Weisman
Steven Weisman, son of Mr. and
Mrs. William Weisman, will be-
come Bar Mitzvah during Satur-
day morning services, Dec. 12, of
Temple Emanu-El. Rabbi Irving
Lehrman will officiate.
Steven is an eighth grade stu-
dent at Nautilus Junior High, and
attends Temple Emanu-El relig-
ious school.
STEVEN
SHELDON
MEVE*
S4MUEL
ONLY THE NEW PACKAGE
PLAN IS YOUR BEST BUY
Any 10 days now to Dec. II- $70
Any 10 days, Dec. 18-Jan. 18$135
Any 14 days, Dee. 18-Jan. IS$175
Any 21 days, Dec. 18-Jan. 18-S235
FULL MONTH 31 Days $350
Kosher meals Inel. per person Dbl.
SPECIAL DISCOUNT10% it
atay a month or longer.
o------------
Oceanfront & Oceanview. Corner
Rooms, one price, none higher.
o-----------e
FREE 21" TV in every room. FREE
PARKING and many other fta-
tores Apartments Avadable.
Dietary Laws trictly observed
Under Supervision ot Rabbi Dr.
I. H. Ever, religious services on
premises.
o------------o
Steaks, roast daily at no extra
charge. Salt & Sugar Free Diets.
O------------
Private Beach A
Pool on the Ocean
1741 COWNS
Miami Beach
Miami Office
JE 1-5711
Also Open
Sum. A Eves.
[mSkyurV*'
Hoi*/" t**0<*"A
Mr. and Mrs. Rosenstrauch will
host the reception following, which
will also mark their 16th wedding
anniversary.

Michael Marmorstoin
Michael Lawrence Marmorstein
will become Bar Mitzvah during
Saturday morning services, Dec"
12, of Temple Emanu-El. Rabbi
Irvine Lehrman will officiate.
Michael attends eighth grade at
Nautilus Junior High and Temple
Emanu-El religious school.
Reception in hi honor will be
held Saturday evening at the Bar-
celona hotel.
oo
Sheldon Isaacs
Bar Mitzvah of Sheldon Isaacs
will take place Saturday morning,
Dec. 12, at Temple Beth Sholom.
Rabbi Leon Kronish will officiate.
Sheldon is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Milton Isaacs, 3737 Chase ave.,
and the grandson of Mr. and Mrs.
Bernard Rakoff. He is a student
in the confirmation class of 5721.

Sam Woxlor
Flagler-Granada Jewish Commun-
ity Center will be the site of the
Bar Mitzvah of Sam Wexler on
Saturday, Dec. 12. Rabbi Bernard
Shoter will officiate.
Sam is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Irving Wexler, 325 SW 62nd ct
and attends Kinloch Park Junior
High. He is the grandson of Mrs.
Bettie J. Martin.

Meyer Porlttoin
Bar Mitzvah of Meyer I. Perl-
Mental Health Program Due
"What Hope Group Psychother-
apy Can Offer" will be the subject
of a film showing and discussion
by Dr. A. Lester Stepner, direc-
tor, Out-Patient Services, The In-
stitute, Jackson Memorial Hos-
pital, on Tuesday evening in the
auditorium of the Miami Public
Library.
Ritz Plaza m
invites you...
mtmy IAWS
ouaro
RESERVATIONS;
MRS. HOFFMAN
JE 1-6881
ON THE OCEAN
at 17th ST., MIAMI BEACH
DINNERS $1.95
From ? *'
OPEN DAILY from 4 to 9 p.m.
S- OPtNAU
=rom T-----r** YEAR
CATERING FOR ALL OCCASIONS
frtePark UN 6-6043 Air-Cond.
Under Orthodox Vaad Hakashruth
Y'ALL
com:
Empire Kosher Restaurant
1357 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach
7-COURSE DINNERS from '1.35
FREE WINE AND SELTZER
UNDER PERSONAL MANAGEMENT OF SOPHIE KING
Telephone JE 8-1391
CATERING TO PARTIES OF ANY SIZE
.AAAAAA-AAA.4VA*a1
m
TIDES
ON THE OCEAN ot 12th ST.
We ore fcoppy to
announce
that our strictly
kosher dining,
room is now
open to the
nubile. Res.
call JE 1-01
MIAMI
IslACH
i\*
S,0y p,,ce
Moderate Prlc
", Please AH
Tart" "- W.
$2.50 up sr2,"0,
Noon to 10 WJ-
The DERBY INN
Music Nighty
fle REVLIN HOTEL
KOSHER DINING ROOM
Kosher Dining Room Now Open to the Public
DELUXE DINNERS from $1.65
* Unit Rabbinical Supervision of too Orthodox Vaad Hakashruth
Rabbi Dr. I. M. Ever
Collins Ave. at 13th Street
Ph. JE 8-1545
OPENS SATURDAY, DEC. 12th
BESERYATIOHSl MUW Mitt N. UUIIMMI IIU.|II HA Mill
-. i


age 10-B
+Jewistrk>rldlan
Sen. Jennings Randolph, of the U.S. Senate to right) Mrs. Minnie Gray. 77, Miss Essie
Committee on Problems of the Aged, visits Rosenberg. 68, and Mr. and Mrs. David Reiser,
Douglas Gardens with his staff and other offi- 85 and 87. respectively,
cials. Pictured with Sen. Randolph are (left
Senate Group Visits Aged Home
"Douglas Gardens is an out-
-landing example of effective com
iiunily planning. It could well be
j model for all other homes for the
iged throughout the country. The
'cadership and administration can
ndeed be proud of what it has ere
.ited and developed at Douglas
hardens "
These were the words of Sen.
Jennings Randolph, who visited
Douglas Gardens in connection
vita the U.S. Senate hearings on
Ol.
itimrics
MRS RAE JOSEPHS
IWMll !>ec C
vear. ago f:.,m N. ,_
lOOtO* her hu.liand
award, son. Ruben, two daughter^
there, including Ike
.rank. Miami Bea.h s,ru, were
n Funeral Honif. with
ln *". -N>bo Ometery.
SAMUEL BERGSON
t, of 410 Tamlami Canal rd.. retired
ice president ,.f the Public National
>nk ,.f New Y.,tk. died I >e.
IS? vr>- W>r"r "' (fm Monti-
-llo \ 1 Imring World War II
helped tran.late Russian. Pol tall
M '.erman document* for the PS
vernment Surviving are hi. wife.
-rtrude. on. Sydney three daugh-
.Vi *,r2\ I*t11* Llndher. Mr.
l-lene Rimm and Mm Manlv n
treeter. right grandchildren and
great-grandchildren Service.
loT J*, f V '.!:,r''"n Funeral Home.
*lth burial In Ml. Nebo Cemetrr>
MRS. ESTHER HIRSCH
t'Jf J*1 TS2 "* **** Iv- !
am. her. eight year, ago from Ne
rorfc Burrhrtat .re two ... in
Hiding Saul. Miami Beach. two
i! iC V ",>r'"h" Service.
hIT..iiai.2 "'' Mem.ni
napel. Alton rd. .
SATISFYmC TOOT
DUPIST DESWES FOE
UUTY AND DHJUITY
. The Vl.ta offer, f.mlly
memorial estate, on tieautl-
ru"y l;" rk like
freedom
' in memorial* and
ill det.ill.
problems of the aged held in Mi-
ami- last week. A group of more
than 40 community leaders and
federal and local government of-
cials accompanied Sen. Randolph
and his staff as he toured the Jew-
ish. Home for the Aged here.
Son. Randolph stopped to chat
with a number of rmdtnli ho
mot on tho tour. In tho Physical
Thoropy Department, ho was
told by one resident how she had
boon rehabilitated, and was row
walking for the first time since
a stroke four years ape.
An SOyear-old man. afflicted
with Parkinson's disease, also in
physical therapy, extended his
shaking hand to Sen. Randolph and
remarked. "You will see, I will
make it "
"I have never seen more cour-
ageous people than those at Doug-
las Gardens." he declared. "That
' the Home provides rehabilitation
opportunities to make life once
again meaningful and satisfying
for older people is deserving of the
highest praise."
Arthur Kallsh led the tour with
. vice presidents David Fleeman.
, David Phillips, and board mem-
bers Irving Korach. Martin Fine.
Sam Resnick. Julian Weinkle and
Harry Altman, representing the
i Home.
The Home is a beneficiary agen-
cy of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and the United Fund
of Dade County.
a THE VISTA
11 Flamingo PUm.Hi.leak.JaV
fawaosTUT-ssu
CONDOLENCE BASKETS
FMsmr fMcifp
mi DEUVEIED WITHIN
- rw MOOT -
FRUIT CIRCUS
1691 S.W. FlfMjIcr Ttr.
PHONE
Cr FH 3-9275FB 1-2511 Hildegar de Follows
O'Brien at Grove
"Father of the Bride" a stage
comedy detailing the uproarious
incidents involved in a family when
a daughter prepares for a wed
dine, went into its second and final
week at the Coconut Grove Play
house Tuesday.
In the parts of the father and
the bride. Pat O'Brien and Karyn
Kupcinet give farm and chuckling
performances, with Toby Wing
providing teamwork as the k**
ng and understanding mother.
Moat en tho Playhouse apende
as a special pro-holiday season
engagement is "An Evening
With Hildeg.rde." limited one-
week engagement opening Tues-
day, Dec. 15, and playing through
Sunday, Doc. 2*.
Hildegarde recently appeared at
the Drury Lane theatre in Chicago
with the same revue, where she
received rave notices and a stand-
ing offer to return every year.
The "incomparable" chanteuse's
Beach Hadassah
Marks 'H'-Day
Here Monday
Miami Beach chapter of Hadas-
sah celebrates "H" Day Monday
noon. Meetings will mark the 80th
anniversary of the birth of Henri
etta Siold, founder of Hadassah.
...
Brand* it group will have a
luncheon at the Fontainebleau ho-
tel.

Deborah group will have its
luncheon at the Eden Roc hotel,
with a fashion show by Martha.

. Hersl group will meet for lunch-
eon at the Eden Roc hotel, with
a fashion show by Wilma.

Israeli group will hold its lunch-
eon at the Algiers hotel. Guest
speaker will be Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz and Cantor Edward
Klein.

Emma Lazarus and Esther
troupe will have a Joint celebra-
tion at a luncheon at the Carillon
hotel. There will be a fashion
show from the Boutique Shop, and
entertainment by Terry Haven.
__
Hannah Seneech group will have
its luncheon at the Saxony hotel,
and the program will include an
original skit by Mrs. Gersbon Mil-
ler.

Shatoma group will hold its
luncheon at the Barcelona hotel,
and guest speaker will be Mrs.
Samuel Z. Sakrais.

Henrietta Ssold group will have
I its luncheon at the Algiers hotel.
A musical program is planned,
featuring Mrs. Olga Bibor Stern.

Stephen S. Wise group will have
its luncheon at the Deauville hotel.
Guest speaker is Rabbi Morris A
Skop. A musical program is also
slated.
first big supper club success in
New York was at the Versailles.
There will be matinees during
Hildegardes run, on Wednesday
and Saturday, as usual.
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE LINDEN
FICTITIOUS NAkTc LAW
1? ll-U-H.l/1
Pre-Chanuka Supper Slated
Temple Tifercth Jacob Sister-
hood will have a pre-Chanuka fam
ily supper at the Temple. 951 y<-,.
mingo Way, Hialeah, on Sunday a-
6 p.m.
LEGAL NOTICE
rtcfifRJOs NAMf LAW
NOTH K IS !
ike an
m. o.wi,.i-ikii.-.i. ,i.iring KaK, ,N TM ,
flobV^
nt IMS N \V 3ih btl | |
Ida Ini. n U to reel
-ith thr clerk of the Circuit i
l"ad.- ia.
n.i i.i:vin.
tier
GOLDMAN 4 OOMlH i KIN
Attorni Registrant
2.1HJ We.t Flat;
.Miami. Florida
II 11-'
M
IN CIRCUIT COURT
OAOE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IN CHANCERY No. 5.C1IS39
KAY I. HBN8RUD
\.
I'Al.l. C HENSRfD '
MOTICI TO DAMS I
l^ike Trailer Co in
l>avu> Lake, North Dal
Tou are ordered t" to roui muni.
lo above atyled bill of eomplal
Clerk of mid court i.nd fain
\V. Wood atty. for oUlntlff,
i.'.OO R.W. i4lh St.. Miami. Phi
of Mtme. on or tn-fore Jan'y 11, !'.,
or Mil will be taken u
Doted Dec. 1S.
K II. I.KATHBRSIAS, Clerk
(aeal) KM. I.VMAN, D <"
U ll-:-li. l '
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 44S07-6
IN RE: Eatat.
JOb'EKA TAL'SKK;
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTES
AND FINAL DISCMARGE
NOTICE 1. here>b> (tlv.n that 1 ha\.
filed my Final Report and I
f<>r Dl.Iril.utlon and Final I'
a. Executrix of the eatatu of J'
TAUSBIO, dereaaed: and that on th.
Ith day or January. ItOU, will w,l>
to the Honorable County Judge, of
I>ade County. Florida, for approval of
aid Final Report and for Diatrliiuii. r.
ami final dlaeharse a. Executril '
the estate of the above-name.l dece-
dent. Thla th day of December. !>
(iERTRCDE RF:i8. Executrix
of the EaUte of Joaefa Tau.Mjt.
I*1T* .1
KCRT WKI.I.I8CH
Attorney for Executrix
lu Coasreaa Bulkllag
Miami, rnorld.
__________________________. H/U-is-K. l :
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN ANO FOR OADE
. COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
No. BSCtMey
VIRGIL W. WEUXIS. Plaintiff.
SEL*MA D. WEL.DDN. IMendant
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: ZCT.MA L. WKIJHIN.
UM Marahall Street.
Abilene. Texaa
Tou ZELMA L. WBI.DOS. Il
Marahall Street. Abilene. Texaa. are
hereby notified that a Bin of Com-
palnt for Divorce ha. been Hied
acalnat you. and you are required to
aerve a cojDT of your Anawer or
I'laadlaar to the IIRI of Complaint on
the plaintirra Attorney. ENOl-ANI'-
F:R TENDR1CH. 311 IJncoln Road.
Miami- fkiark. Florlaa and file the
original Anawer or Pleading In the
offlce of tbe Clerk of the Circuit
Court on or before the 11th day of
January. ISO*. If you fall to do so.
Judfrn.at by default will be taken
aeaiaat you for the relief demanded
la tho Bin of Complaint.
This notice aaalf be published once
each weak for four consecutive week.
In THE JEWISH FliORIDIAN
DOKE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, thla 7th day of December,
A.D. 1*5*.
E. B. L.EATHERMAN. CMrk.
- Circuit Court. Dade County. Florida
(seal) By: K M. LTMAN
Deputy Clerk
FJNOI.ANDER TENDRICH
S1I IJncoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida
JE S-I441
Attorneys for Plaintiff
U/11-ll-tS.l 1
CERTIFICATE OP CORPORATE
DISSOLUTION
IN THE NAME AND BY THE
AUTHORITY OF THE STATE
OF FLORIDA
TO AH. TO WHOM THE8E III
SF.NTH SHALL COMB GREETINGS
Whereaa. MuKKlS RPISEI.MAN
MIAMI BEACH. PLORIDA: I- '
GOLD. MIAMI BEACH. FM^'UII'V
A Ot>LJ. MIAMI BF.\|-H F
IDA: 1^.1 IS 81-EI.MAN. MANHAT-
TAN. N,T did on the 11th da]
AprlL A.D. lOil. cause to be Incor-
porated under the prerlaioes of Chap-
ter OM. Florida Statutes. GOLD IN-
VBT1IENT CP.P.. a corr"
with It. piinrlpej phu-e of buslasas
.1 KfRPRirtK. DADE OOUNTT. In
the State of F'orida. and whereas tbe
roper officers of such corporation
did oa the ISth day of April. A 1'
ISM. cause to be filed In the office of
the Recretarv of State of the 8Ute of
Florida a Certmcate of Amendment
changlne It. corporate name to SI'FM.
MAN I'liVSTHI'iTltiN CORP.. sad
whereas tbe .tnefchohtera of suck cor-
poration did on the sth day of Decem-
ber. All !:. ranee to be filed In the
office of the Secretary of State of
the state ..r Florida, a Coeaeat of all
the .tookSolder, under the e*o*loO
of said Chapter OsS. Florida Kt.t
*howia the dlasoiatloa of such ror-
1-iratloB.
th'refore. the Secretary of
Stale doe. herebr certtfv the fo-e-
mlac and that be Is sail.fie-t that
*" requirements of law haee been
roapUed tth '
IN WITNESS WHERJOOP. I hare
bereunte set my kaad and hare
affixed the Great Seal of tbe State
of Florida, at T>t>ahanaee. th
ttal. ihta tbe FIPTH day of
DFJCEMBER. AT' ISM
*m R A tTRAT.
ItyUiBJ Secre^r, of -
1 KORaUM F. :
1 Attorasy f a I
ItSS Liacebi f
, Mum llewk a, I
NOTIttl
FICTiTIOOl!
. Id B HI
th-- uaderaHMil
|.j.-u;e. uats B
KMKHALD API
H.rdlns Aw.. I
:.. resliter adi I
of the Clrrall CaS^
Florida. _____ J
BSSSR tU
HARRT Zl-KBl!a|
Attorney f Onjf
4M Uncokt B4-.
NOTICII
FICTiTIOWl
N< 'TICBISBr
the d*n*'*V.i
bujunes. nar"!
Mil UTKT 1ST
KY Ml'SIC CO.
MF1NT CO.. UK
VENDING CO. S<
u. Intss*J-i
ith the ChrtfJ
NOTICI J
FICTITIOUM
NOTICE B nT-
lhe u"*"^**]
o* A-A-A PS^I"
press t i*;j
" .'".'STf*^
AtfrJ
mu
Mie""-
?Jfcw**1


eember 11. 1959
SAL NOTICE
Jcn>lst) fk>rMinn
Pace 11-B
. '
riCE UNDER
|OUS NAME LAW
HEREBY GIVEN that
Id, ii. filing to engage In
r the fictitious name of
[DECORATOR*, at 6885
., Miami Intends to reg-
m wiih the clerk of the
fof I'Mill' County, Florida.
BOL GOLDSTEIN
LYONS
[ Applicant
Blvd.
11/20-27. 12/4-11
iTICE UNDER
(lOUS NAME LAW
l...li,.l:Y GIVEN that
lug to enK.igc In
the ficllUoui name o
A.-ii IT fctDOKI
\v. 3rd Avenue, Miiimi,
s to register said name
oi the mint Court
Florida.
U.S. Sole Owner
fr'TN
t | Owner
Building
L>l 1-1:.
______12/11-18-25,1/1
)TICE UNDER
IOUS NAME LAW
HEREBY GIVEN that
ped, desiring to engage ,!
pi the fictitious num.' c.l
,'N BAR at 7305 Bird
Fla., intends to
ie ui of Hide County, Florida
JACK A BtLJAC
Sola owner
CARS
V Applicant
It St.
________12/11-18-25. 1/1
|OTICE UNDER
IOUS NAME LAW
Is HEREBY GIVEN that
Bed, dialling to engage In
a.i Hi.- fictitious name of
I'REf ISION ENHRAV
c,.unt>, Fla.. Int.mis
I ild name with the Clerk
ii c, nt of Dude County.
tEN. INC.. a Fla. Corp.
S'ole i iv
"i:< ivs' IN
Applicant
Trust Bldg.
12/11-11-.'
:e TO CREDITORS
)UNTY JUDGES' COURT
FOR DADE COUNTY,
IDA IN PROBATE,
No. 477&5-A
ITAIi: oi--
'KRITE 1X>RETTA
I.l>. I
|ltors ami .\ll Persona Ilav-
or Demands Against Bald
each of you, are hereby
B demanda which you, or
Fou. may have against the
IARGUERITE LORETTA
ed late of Dada
nda. to the Honorable
|Kes of Dada County, and
in their offlcee in the
itirttrmise In Dada County.
thin eight calendar months
late of the firm publication
Kid claims or demands to
i legal address of the claim -
be sworn to and presented
or same will be barred.
geml..... I, A.D. 159.
ItUKKIN, Administrator
Ihe Estate of M AROUERITK
ARNOLD, Deceased.
BUSKIN
Marguerite Lnretta
11/11-18-25. 1/1
5IRCUIT COURT OF THE
fH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
?a. IN AND FOR DADE
ITY. IN CHANCERY,
No. WC11473
WILLIAMS,
Iff.
'W-TELL DEAR a/k/a
CASTM.I. RUSSELL
lUSSBLL. husband of
.11 Dear a/k/a Bi
,Ahd If any of the
a< I I h refrdanta be dead, tha
grantees, credltoi s,
c aiming Interest b ,
Inder or against tha abovi
r^feitd&nts; the unknown
any oi the above named De-
ti I II | ;iri lee know n or un-
or claiming to have
tif!.- or Interest In and to
fins described property alt-
an.l being in Dada County,
,:>-wlt:
i IS, ,.f bunciie PARK,
felon, according to the Plni
lecorded In Plat Book 50.
Jof the I'ublic Records of
intv. rToTM
nils.
ICE BY PUBLICATION
THICK. C VSTEl.l. DEAR
i DEATRICE (" UJTELL Rl'S-
land JESSE RUSSELL, hue-
I of i:. iatell i "ear
Beatrice Caatell Russell;
if any of ilie above n uned
Tlanis he dead, the heirs,
e,-grantees, creditors, and
Irtles claiming Interest by,
|h, under or against the
] named Defendants; the un-
spmise of any of the aboVe
Defendants and all par-
iwn or unknown, having or
pig to have aay right, title
(rest In and to the fidlowlng
bed property situate, lying
king in Dade Countv. Florida,
: Lot ft, Block 26, of BIN
1ARK. a subdivision, accord-
the Plat thereof recorded
ft Hook 50, Page 20 of the
Records of Dade County,
tND EACH OF YOU. are
otlfled that a complnlnt for
Jm nf forged deed has been
tlnst you. and you are re-
serve a oopy of your answer
|lngs to the complaint for
f>n of for-ed deed on nlaln-
ttrnev, RMANUBL I EVEN
' ne Building, Miami
la. and file the original sn-
I'l' sdlne. In the office ,,f the
the above styled Court on
the nth day of January,
If you fall to do so, judg-
II he tiken against you fur
demanded In Ihe complaint
at Miami. Florida, this Srd
fcemher. A
I: C'erk.
court. Dade Countv. Florida
K \! I.YM VN.
it! Clerk.
12/11-18-25. 1/1
WEHU
** mm LEONARD
LEGAL NOTICE
"Gentlemen, I suggest we lower the entrance
fees so that our poorer Jewish brethren in town
can belong."
Ctfr. I tit, iMfrt MlUI,
LfcO*.L NOTICfc
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undarabfnad, desiring to engage In
bualness under the fictitious ii.mi. of
ESQUIRE BARBER SIKH' al 1527
Ppnca da Leon Blvd.. Cora] Oablea,
V\a., Intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
JOSE L'RRELT
GARY ORTEGA
Sole Owners
WALTERS, MOORE \- COSTANZO
Attorneys for Applicants
1008 Ain.-liv Bldg.
11/20-27. 12/4-11
Dania Jai-Alai
Opens Saturday
Dania Jai-Alai Palace kicks off
its 1959-60 season on Saturday
night, with 11 action-packed games.
Newcomers to the 36-man roster
are headed bv Echave, youn'j
cesta swinger from Manila in the
Philippines. This front court ace
is expected to move right into fea-
ture game competition, and judg-
ing from his terrific record at
Manila Fronton, he is certainly
ready to acquit himself admirably.
Five other newcomers will join
the old stars such as Bari, Isasa,
Ignacio, Laca, Ondarra and Eche-
verria.
In doubles competition, the
brothers Carej and Careaga
should provide tha opposition
with tha sternest fast. Careaga,
one of tha finest front court
players in tha world for yaars,
returned to Dania with an im-
proved service. Carea, on tha
other hand, has shown a vastly
improved backhand to go with
his forehand, considered to ba
one of the strongest in jai-alai.
The singles competition also
shapes up extremely tight. Last
year, Isasa beat out Ignacio for
the top position, with Ondarra a
close third. Ondarra, singles title-
holder in 1956-57 and 1957-58, ap-
rircui't' fc'''t' i'i <"" '''' Kjortda | nears ready and able to win back
By: **Sv8^: Jtta singles championship.
Besides the exciting cesta bat-
tles again this year, Dania also
has its gourmet restaurant open
nightly. Closed circuit TV enables
guests in the restaurant to watch
every game while enjoying the
cuisine.
Post time on Saturday is 7:45
p.m.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 59C11147
IN THE MATTER oK:
MAJ.il E I. CLARK.
NOT+CIE,'tO APPEAft""""
TO: ALBERT M. CLARK,
Residence Unknown.
You are hereby notl led that the
undersigned MARIE I. CLARK will
n the u^'h tin- -.f December al tin-
hour of 9:00 A.M. or as soon there-
in, it ;..- ouunx i can appiy
to one nf the Judgea oi t ie above
styi.-d cnuit for a Ifeenaa to manage,
take charge of and control her pr .,'-
erty. nod to become a free dealer In
every reapeot.
MARIE I. n auk.
_ '' Itloner
DEOROE X. MacDi INELL
M'1 i aay for Pal tl mar
5M Ulscayne lltilldlng
Miami 32. Florida
____________________________ 12/11-'R
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
No. 59C10826
VEROIN'IE PRANCES SI'IRTOS,
Plaintiff,
vs.
Tlll-O SI'IRTOS,
Defendant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO: TIIKO SI'IRTOS,
Jis W. 24th Street,
New York City. N.Y.
VOf ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED that
suit for divorce, and in the alterna-
tive annulment, has been brought
against you, and you are tc file your
Anawer or other pleading in Ihe office
of the Cleric of the above court and
serve a copy upon the plaintiff's at-
torney. OEOROE N. MacDONBLL,
on or before the 2Sth day of Decem-
ber. l'i!': otherwise the complaint
will be taken as confessed liv you,
DATED, this 13th day of November,
A.D., I
B B. I.EATIIKRMAN,
Clerk of the Circuit Court
(seal) By: K. M. LTMAN,
Deputy Cli rk
________________ H/2U-J7. !2/4-,1
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, IN CHANCERY,
No 59C11366
BSTELLE NAMBR,
Plaintiff,
vs.
VICTOR NAMER,
Defendant,
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: DR. VICTOR NAMER
Bellevue if i^iiitai
i'Ttli Street and 1st Avenue
New Yurk 1. N'.Y.
You VICTOR NAMER are hereby
I thai a Hill of Complaint for
Divorce has been fried against you.
and you are reqalred to serve a copy
nf Mini Anawer or l'l. adlng to the
Hill of Cinnplalnt on the plaintiff's
Altonievs, (JO I.D.MAN & C,ol,D-
STi:iN. 1303 W. Flaeler Street. Mi-
ami, Fla., and file tin original An-
awer or Pleading in the office of the
Clerk of tin- Cirr'ilt Court on or be-
fore the 1th day of January, i960.
If you fall to do so. Judgment bj de-
fauit win ii.- taken against you for
the relief demanded In fhe BUI of
Complaint. ., .
This notice shall he puMIhed once
each week for f'.-jr consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLOR-IDl N
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami,
Florida, this 3','th day of Wovembar,
AD ItSt.
LBATrTBRHAN, <- -k.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREI'.Y (S1VBN that
the underslKiied. -I,-siring to engage In
huslnem under the fictitious name of
GENERAL CARPETS at :. North
East 115th Street, North Miami, Flor-
ida Intends to r> name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
WILLIAM A. MAHER
Sole Owner
CLYDE E. FOSTER, JR.
Attorney for William A. Maher
11/20-27.12/4-11
(sea
|] 4-11-1S-2S
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 48085C
IN RE: Estat. of ____
I.M.I.IAN K. LEWIS,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and AH Perapna Hav-
ing Claims or Demand! Agalnat bald
Ton are hereby notified and re-
quired to present any claims amiI oe-
manda which >..,. may have alnat
tin- estate of LILLIAN K.VVma
deceased late of Dade <"ount. Flor-
ida, to the County Judges of Dade
Cotinlv, and file the same In their
office.-'in the Countv CourthouajIi
1-iH.le Countv. Forha. within eight
c^dendar months from the oat' of the
first publication hereof, or the same
WlFlrb.et publication November 27 IMS.
i/ J. fSERALD UBfriS. aa-**f%"
of the estate of Lillian K. Lewis,
HEl<;rFRTdE. KAIT-MAN
Attorney f"r.F*ef,ulor
129 duf'ont Building
Miami 32. Florida n/TJ ]2/4.n.18
m tuc COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
,N,NTANOFOR DADE rOuNTY.
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 48110-B
IV RE: Estate of
BELLE O'BRIEN
used.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All *5&a%i
lng Claims or Demanda Against oaiu
^rou*:are herebv notified and re-
quTred uTprJf^nt any claims anddej
,Lnd. which v..;, m-^;.-,';!
susaar &f%d*.o,-
b6 /ftrrto'RflTHT LEVFY Erecutrlx
'of ihe l-St-' V*"-
nen J- Ehrllcn
.'Tvdee.. PMlldlng
Miami 32. Florida 12/4-11-18-23
To Discuss Heart Ailment
"Heart Ailment and How to Pre-
vent It" will be the subject dis-
cussed by a local physician Mon-
day at a meeting of the Men's Club
of Knesseth Israel Congregation.
Walter Lebowitz, president, said
that election of officers will be
held.__________
Temporary Officers Elected
Barry Kantor has been elected
temporary president of the Young
Adult Group of MonticeUo Park.
Other temporary officers recently
elected are ttae Meschaan, vice
president; Risa Kantor, treasurer;
Sandy Dweck, secretary.
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE HEREBY OH EN that
the underalgned. derfring to engage .n
tafasAa^rifSKr a.....ua
rrii,iVrAs*.;. nX'^Vh'o,:":-';':
or !i.e client Court of Dade County,
!av,-NO R-M.TY OORP.
(a New York Corp.)
Sola Owner
I .PON FI-ST-KIN
attorney for Applicant___
.....I '''' Minml Ki-lS-JS
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
Ne. &9C11Z51
(TEOROE FURMAN,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MAPY FURMAN,
Defendant.
8UIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: MARY .FL'RMAN
50 Division Avenue
Brooklyn, New York
You MARY FURMAN are hereby
notified that a Bill of Complaint for
Divorce has been filed against you.
and you are required to serve a cony
of your Answer or Pleading to the
Bill of Complaint on the plaintiffs
Attorney, RAYMAN DUIIIO, 902
Alnsley Bldg., Miami 32. Florida nnd
file the original Answer or Pleading
in the office of the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court on or before the 2Sth day
of December, 195S. If you fail to do
so, Judgement by default will be taken
against von for the relief demanded In
the Hill of Complaint.
This notice shall, be published once
each we.-k for fmir consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH -l .1)1111'IAN
DONE AND ORPEftED nt Miami.
Florida, this :'lth day of November,
A.D. 1959.
K II l.i:ATHFR*IAN, Clerk.
Circuit Court. I lie in".. Florida
Rj : K. M. LTMAN,
oltty Clerk.
ll.W MAN K Dime,
" .' Alnsley Bldg.
Miami 32, Florida
.money, for "iurii ._
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
CHARLES ii HARRIS Correotlve
F.otwear at SIS Washington Avenue,
Miami Beach, Florida intends to reg-
later s i'1 name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida.
CORRECTIVE FOOTWEAR. INC.
Charles B Harris, President
MARVIN 1 WIENER
1111 Alnslev Bldg. Miami 32. Fla.
Attornev for Corrective
Footwear, Inc. ^^ 1J/4.u.,g
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVBN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
PELICAN BAR ft ORII.L. at 7818
Northeast Second Avenue, Miami.
Florida Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
JOHN C.ENONI100%
LEWISON AND FREED
Attorneys for Genonl
H West Flagler 8treet
Miami. Florida n/2n.27, 12/4.U
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
. ^Jwi&lhJUkiirJiiMrain
solicits your lrgal notices.
We appreciate your
patronage and guarantee
accurate service at legal
rates .
nial FE& 3-405
for messenger service
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
bnatneea under the fictitious name of
DADE RECORDS at number #7M NW
2 Avenue In the City of Miami. Flor-
ida intends to register the aald name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Dated at, Miami, Florida, this 17th
day of November, 1959.
MARIdN RFCORD CORPORATION
EUGENE LEMLICH
Attorney for Applicant
11/20-27, 12/4-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the ri name of
FI/iRII'A BUNSHINE ESTATE at
18715 Blsoayna Boulevard, Miami,
Florida intend to regieter s:iiii name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
I.YWIAY. INC.
a i-'i-' Corp,
LAURENCE DISK IN
Attornev for IV '
1140 N.E. 163rd Street
. -27. 12/4-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious niune of
R. A. M. INDUSTRIAL AND TRAD-
ING COMPANY nt I860 N.E. 2nd
Avenue, -Miami, Blotida intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
OUBTAV R. MAYER
WBLLI8CH, DnUOHERTY & ZAIAC
Attorneys for Gustav R. Mayer
11/20-27. 12/4-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business iinili r the fictitious name of
Ti?T\S TOTEM OIVFRSIFTESD IN-
VESTMENTS at 10823 Blscayne Blvd.,
Miami, Dade County, Florlua, Intends
to register said name with the clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
TEXAS TOTEM DIVERSIFIED
INVESTMENTS
MALSPBIS A: BAKER
Att-rneys for Texas Totem
Diversified Investments
11/20-27. 12/4-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
COLLECTION BUREAU OF AMER-
ICA at IT-1 S !:. 163rd Street. North
Miami Bench. PlOrlda, Intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Flor-
ida.
J. C. FRUSCIANTE. Sole owner
I I J'i-_!7. It 1-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
PARTS SUPPLIERS INTERNA-
TIONAL al 1820 B.W. '-I Avenue, Mi-
ami Florida Intend to n
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dfde County. Florida.
DWAYNE V. COX ft
LUCIA E. COX
Sole Owners
II 'IT, 13 4-11-18
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
bUBlneaa under the fictitious name of
ALAN APARTMENTS at 0a Bay
Drive, Miami Beach. Florida Intend to
register s.ild name with the C'erlc of
the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
HIMEN FEVSTER
REBECCA FENSTER
KOVNER MANNHEIMER
Attornevs for Hlmen Fenster
and Rebecca KSur ^^
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
AZUR OF MIAMI at 490 North East
112th Street. Miami 38, Florida In-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
ROBERT E. FRAZER
CLYDE E FOSTER. JR.
Attorney for Robert E. Fraaer
11/20-27, 12/4-11
ATTENTION ATTORNEYS!
CORPORATION OMIT WETS
Lowest Prices Quickest Delivery
in South Florida
Call THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN at
FR 3-45
A
i
ll
>,
i
..:;

i
i

A


Pag 12-B
+3elstntrktkHi
UNDER THE STRICT AND CONSTANT SUPERVISION OP
THE ORTHODOX VAAD HAKASHRUTH OF FLORIDA
RABBI DR. ISAAC HIRSH EVER. DIRECTOR
POOO FAIR KOSHER MARXm a
PLEDGED TO OlVe THE BEST OUAUrj?
AT THf LOWEST PRICE OR YOUR MON|y|
I
4
meat andvRQuLtry
Quantity
Right*
Rsrved
tun
the completion of another Food Fair Kosher Market
IN WESTCHESTER SHOPPING PLAZA
CORAL WAY AT S.W. 87th AVENUE
Watch for the Gala Opening Soon!
PRICES
EFFECTIVE
ALL
WEEK
Make your meed one to remember by servbj
your family the finest Kosher Premium
Meats at the lowest prices ever!
CHUCK
STEAK
BABY RIB
Lamb Chops
SHOULDER
Lamb Chops
ib 89c
lb. 79c
Necks or Shanks B 23c
lb. 59c
LEAN TRIMMED
FLANKEN
TRIMMED BONELESS
Cross Rib or Shoulder
ROASTS
rs
89
: ft
LB.
Our Coral Way Kosher Market Open Sunday 8 A.M. to 3P^
163rd ST. SHOPPING CTR.
NO. MIAMI BEACH
19th ST. at ALTON RD.
MIAMI BEACH
2091 CORALM
MIAMI
MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS YOUR EXTRA BONUS AT FOOD


fewish Floridian
Florida, Friday, December 11, 1959
i-llBMum niiililirM.mil PMiniimiimii u i
Section C
Ten years of Jewish community planning
will be fulfilled Sunday at dedication cere-
monies of the new Mt. Sinai Hospital of Great-
er Miami. For details of the program, see
Page 1-A.
-1- I ii :iM.'i!.r;i'!.:r::::,-.:. ,:
HMMMMII BMMM MMM
rf
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v
n
11
IL
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1 r M ft -'''M 1 "i
- fc. ..' r 1 airr 1
^^^^^ IS i i
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>a^tj>< >-"




Ami anaaaai
NEW MT. SINAI HOSPITAL OF GREATER MIAMI THE CULMINATION OF A DREAM.
lew Mt. Sinai Hospital Opens Doors Sunday
Jew Ml Sinai Hospital, which
II open its doors Sunday, rep-
ents the largest community
Dject ever undertaken in Flor-
I. Behind it is an investment of
ler $9,000,000 in what can be
isidercd one of the most ad-
[need hospitals in the nation,
iuilt on the former Collins Isl-
i, Miami Beach, its entire sur-
|ce of 30 acres is now part of
mainland through fill-in from
Iscayne Bay.
[Smith and Korach, A.I.A., were
architects of this colossus of
icrete, steel and tile which
ok six years of planning. Dr.
erman Smith, nationally-known
spital consultant, from Chica-
, 111., assisted in designing the
jtcility. Taylor Construction Corn-
any, of Miami, were the build-
h.
[One of the main considerations
planning the new Mt. Sinai
nspital was to reduce as much
possible the cost of mainten-
ce of the building itself. Thus,
Jctural and decorative tile has
sen used in abundance2,500,000
peces and a washable wall cov-
ing vinyl-covered fabric has
een used in all patient rooms.
Floors throughout the building
re covered in vinyl tiles, with
exception of the surgical
reas and the auditorium, where
"scial floors were installed.
AH corridors in the service
reas and all patient floors are
Jed, with working areas marked
p yellow walls, while color in
tient areas change from floor
floor. All services have been
Dstalled on the main floor. Dom-
Kating consideration for this ar-
[ngement was the possibility of
T>re expansion of these depart-
Bents.
aaBMWBM:";' "^ *
mhmmmmmm
^/* Special Jewish jj-loridian i^upph
evnent
The near-$ 10,000,000 new Mt. Sinai Hospital of Greater Miami, representing the
culmination of ten years of planning by the Jewish community here, will be dedicated
in long-awaited ceremonies Sunday. The Jewish Floridian presents this special Mt. Sinai
Supplement as a commemoration of the event. In its pages will be found a history, by
word and picture, of the men and women whose devotion to the task of presenting
Greater Miami with a medical institution comparable to the finest in the nation has
persisted in the face of great obstacles demanding equally great self-sacrifice. Their
vision, energy and contribution of countless man-hours of work and funds are the legacy
bequeathed to the Greater Miami Jewish and general communities in the form of the
new Mt. Sinai Hospitalits research, healing and teaching programs ardently aspiring
toward the eradication of human disease and suffering from the face of the earth.
The building is centrally air-
conditioned by a 750-ton unit. In
order to overcome the danger of
mass infection through recircu-
lation of air, the different areas
of the hospital are fed by 40 aux-
iliary units. Every room is indi-
vidually air-conditioned and heat-
ed. The length of air-conditioning
ducts alone exceeds 11 miles.
Main Floor
On the main floor are the im-
posing Main Lobby with its large
decorative murals and Gift Shop,
Information Desk, and Admitting
Offices.
Also, a Contemplation Room,
where waiting or bereaved visit-
ors may sit quietly with their
prayers and in comfort.
In addition, the Out-Patient
Clinic, in new-cheerful surround-
ings, located at the northwest
corner of the building, with a
separate entrance from the out-
side, and tb* Emergency Depart-
ment, with its huge facilities of
three operating rooms, three ob-
servation rooms, and four treat-
ment rooms.
Doctors will have their own
entrance, where they will find a
dial-in system to make their
presence in the building known
to telephone operators.
The Blood Bank has its own
separate entrance room on the
outside, but can also be reached
through a corridor from the
main lobby.
Adjoining the Admitting Office
is the Cashier and the Bookkeep-
ing Department, with its own
safe and night depository.
Beside the Out-Patient Pavilion
and the Emergency Department,
this functional core is integrated
by the X-Ray Department, to in-
clude a Cobalt Room and one of
the most modern X-Ray research
units available in the United
States.
A service corridor connects all
three departments with Surgery
Hall, made up of eight operating
rooms, where the latest in equip-
ment has been installed. One of
the larger rooms has been equip-
ped especially for heart surgery.
A closed circuit color TV sys-
tem connects the department
with the 326-scat auditorium to
be used for teaching purposes,
as well as for public gatherings.
The new Pathology Laborator-
ies on the main floor offer all the
equipment and space necessary
to execute the daily load of hun-
dreds of tests being made by doc-
tors and technicians.
Another center of research here
is the Cardio-Pulmonary Labora-
tory, with roomy new quarters
for catheterization and pulmon-
ary investigation.
The main kitchen, serving pa-
tients and employees, is also lo-
cated on this floor. Probably the
most modern installation of its
kind in the entire Miami area, it
will introduce the operation of
Meals-on-Wheels carts, having a
hot and a cold compartment. An
elevator and two dumbwaiters
will speedily transport the food
carts to the patient floors.
Visitors can look forward to
longer visiting hours soon to be
announced. For their comfort,
the Women's Auxiliary will oper-
ate a new Snack Bar, beautifully
decorated in blue tile and wormy
chestnut.
Elevators
Patients and the public will find
out that it takes only 14 seconds
to go from the Main Floor to the
top Eighth Floor, thanks to a
battery of six autotronic eleva-
tors, four for public use, and two
for service. Elevator doors have
been provided with an electric
eye.
Maxzanln*
A small mezzanine, with ac-
cess from the Main Lobby, in-
cludes the Personnel Offices,
Employees Health Office, and
the Social Service Department,
which will also have a delegate's
office in the Out-Patient Clinic.
Second Floor
In addition to the Administra-
tive offices of the executive di-
rector, the assistant director and
the Nursing Administration, this
floor contains the Medical Li-
brary, Medical Records, Cardiol-
ogy Department, Pharmacy, Cen-
tral Supply Department with its
own sterilization plant and For-
mula Kitchen, and the Employ-
ees Cafeteria to be operated
Continued on Pago 6-C
'


Page 2-C
*: kn i f rkrkfian
Fricl
y.
Formative Years: From Mt. Sinai's Begmnb
|u|T.*Sinai Wspifal'took rfcrt in
" 1945, when 17 men and wom-
en, recognizing the need for a
Jewish hospital in Miami's ever-
growing community, decided to
mobilize general support for the
idea. The group was composed of
Sam Blank, Baron de Hindi
Meyer. Mrs. Max Dobrin, Sam-
uel Priedland, Moses Ginsberg.
Abraham Goodman, Dr. Morris
Goodman. J. Gerald Lewis. Stan
ley C. Myers, Max Orovitz, Monte
Seiig, William D. Singer, Alex
Van Straaten. Carl nMuua,
Henry D. Williams. Mitchell
Wolfson. and Arthur A. Ungar.
On Apr. l. 1946. the group be-
gan to function as the first board
of trustees, with Baron de Hirsch
Meyer as its chairman. Mt. Sinai
Hospital was chartered by the
State of Florida as a philan-
thropic institution and recognized
as a voluntary community hos-
pital operated under Jewish aus-
pices to serve the South Florida
area population, regardless of
race or creed.
Dan B. Ruslrin directs placing of sign on old Alton Road Hoe-
P'ta '^JrLi946- ^ ^ding was the forerunner of the
near S10.000.000 mammoth Mt Sinai to be dedicated Sunday.
Internal Medicine A waits Move
Vt Sinai Hospitals Department of Medicine
is anxiously looking forward to moving into its
now quartan, which ttIn certainly attract many
new pannt> eager to take advantage of Amer-
ica s newest and most modern hospital."
Dr. David Nathan, director of the depart
ment for the past nm, >ears. speaking of the
future, can find only praise for the tremendou.
Ml antages and conveniences of the new buildink
so well equipped with the most modern facilities
tor medical care."
~\ nr vr7v.Ul' ',h/ Pro8ress abot to be achiev-
,, m Pred,cls an inevitable increase in
;a,fenMoarSanel' "" ** *
Among the new equipment which will tw
nade available .tontTTlE' *? *
-IlTr^- ne on each P-tient floor
suffer^ /SL,n"Sedlafe,y Pa,ien,s who >
suffer a sudden heart catastrophe The built in
oxygensupply ln all pat.en, rooms wuTfaX "
the procedure, eliminating ,U low of time oh
served in the past when heavy oxygen bottles had
to be rolled through the corridors.
For Mt. Sinai with its heavy load of cardiac
eases, this will be just another step to augment
its enviable record of treatment, surgery and
research established over the years in this field.
Dr. Nathan has one big objective in mind
when he speaks of "his" hospital: to educate the
entire house staff to act as a team, ready to coo-
front any unforeseen situation which may arise
in the treatment of a patient. "Whatever the
hour, day or night, our physicians are ready for
any call, to take care of any need."
According to Dr. Nathan, one of the
Pital s prime considerations are patients admit-
ted on a charity basis. Not only will they share
the same conveniences installed without discrim-
ination in all patient rooms and areas, but they
will receive the same kind of care by the finest
medical talent available anywhere.
"We are striving to achieve an ever increaa-
Conrinuad an Pas* 15-C
mit- I
^>4 ^ign of *Pro
>grcss
In August, 1948, the "group took
title to a SS-bed hosp.tal which
had been operated by the Navy
during the war. The City of Mi
ami Beach, recognizing the hon-
est effort and the seriousness of
its backers, approved sale of the
building at a price of Jioo.ooo
though other bidders had offered
up to $165,000.
On Jan. 11, 1847. the Alton Road
Hospital was opened and began
to serve the community at near
capacity.
Already in progress at the time
was a campaign to raise $2,500,000
for the costruction of s 200-bed
general hospital. During the op-
eration of Alton Road Hospital, a
committee examined numerous
potential sites for a new building
but aU possibilities were dis-
carded when the Nautilus Hos-
pital, at 4300 Alton rd., was relin
quished by the Veterans Admin
istraUon as a surplus.
The building, though it had
been a hotel before being con-
verted into a veterans hospital,
seemed ideal for the needs of Mt!
Sinai. In March. 1948. Max Oro-
vitz was elected president of Mt.
Sinai Hospital, succeeding Baron
de Hirsch Meyer. Negotiations
were launched for acquiring the
Nautilus property, and in De-
cember. IMS. again through the
efforts of the City of Miami
Beach, the site was officially
turned over to Mt. Sinai.

Conversion Project Begins
IJW began emerging the mui-
'titude of plans and dreams
for a new community hospital
and medical center. A building
committee, including Dan B.
Ruskin. chairman. J. Gerald
Lewis. William D. Singer. Carl
Weinkle. and Mitchell Wolfson,
was named to supervise the larg-
est conversion project ever un-
dertaken in the Miami area. The
board of trustees was expanded
to 27 members, and committees
were organized to expedite the
opening of the hospital. In March.
14, nine physicians were select-
ed on a community-wide basis to
confer on appointments to the
medical taff. and in June of the
same year, the board of trustees
appointed Samuel Gertner as ex-
ecutive director.
On Dec. 4. 1949, dedication "cer-
emonies were held for the 25S-
bed general hospital which since
then has been known as the Mt.
Sinai Hospital of Greater Miami
In converting the former hotel
into a hospital, the trustees se-
TAL
CONSTRUCTION COMPANY
Smith, naUoB.5iH
s,on *M achie,*,.
some $2,500 ntr iL i
t' "> the cowtaSJ* J
Smith was to fe
gain to act u i
new Mt. Sinai Hoi*
Ten months ant,,
Sinai received tat
f the American
geons. and withm"
was granted apsnw.
American Medical am]
faming of utttrao
Covering aen.^
land and two sauli .
nonh of the ti gl
Miami Beach, it ine_
Pital and auzilizrj"
swimming pool oa
docks and It
dances tor hospital i
Collins Island
Condition*
THOUGH the
old Nautilus Hottfyl
accomplished it w
from a satisfactory,
for patients. doctors i_
tstration. This beast C,
med itely. Lacking ssu
diticninc. proper
tern for an incrcisjij
medical equipmetf"
facilities, and the
munications setup a {
stitut.on requires 1
Only 147 day* tHk]
ing. Max Orovitz
he was studying pbsjl
construction of i net I
Collins Mandthe
a new dream for the I
men who over the
would coatrihste
hours of free work,;
of dollars in gifts.
The first annual Rant I
ing the year 1950 offatfi
figures: 6.570 paWtti i
nearly 5.000 eater*!
ment; 541 births:
served; nearly 3.M
performed. Some 11
the patient load bad b
ed free of charge.

Many 'Firsts' Sestij
IN later years, the ussa1
in show business sssWj
ed to the long list of i
who gave their stnxel
the community by bdsgl
Continued an Fittlvj
A Division of
NEW YORK
LOS ANGELES
MIAMI
SAN JUAN, P. R.
This is the core of one of the six nurses' stations.
the Maternity Department station.
CONGRATULATIONS..
HYGENATOR PILLOW CLEAKIHG CO I
JACK YOUNGER
1279 N.W. 27th Avenue


n 11, 1959
MtnMnrriri&ui
Page 3-C

*
PAINSTAKING CREATION OF ILLUMINATED TILES
^Danish Artist Brockdorff Three
Years on Symbolic Mural in Lobby
chack von Brockdorff, noted Danish muralist, puts
juches on Mt. Sinai Hospital's giant lobby decor,
Mains a background of 12,000 pieces of stained
ud
When the doors of the new Mt.
Sinai Hospital open for the first
time, visitors and well-wishers
alike will be greeted by a glow-
ing sight of artistic beauty.
The work, centered on the
South Wall of the Founder's
Lounge, is a mural abstraction,
dedicated to Mt. Sinai Hospital
and the medical profession long
before the first brick was laid on
its foundation. It is the child of
sculptor-painter Herman Schack
von Brockdorff, an artist who
conceived the project three years
ago with mind and heart, but
who did not know until eight
months ago that his would be
the commission to execute it.
Born in Denmark in 1907,
Brockdorff came to the United
States in 1929. During the years
between his arrival and his first
visit to Florida in 1947, his cre-
ativity centered around painting,
a career he was to pursue even
through the war years with the
Merchant Marine. It was while
in the service that the art of
Brockdorff was to receive its
first official recognition by the
United States.
The Office of War Information
selected two of his paintings to
be exhibited in the National Gal-
lency Room Facilities Enlarged to Take
| of a Constantly-Rising Patient Load
Sinai Hospital's en-
arge sign proclaims
." And to the doc-
lir-cs, the hundreds of
sn. and children who
this door, all are
sesall are in im-
bed of medical atten-
patients are trans-
. Sinai Hospital by
during the period of
Many are picked up at
[of an accident, but a
Imber are those who
emergency in their
emergency facilities are
transfusions, elec-
^ams, an iron lung,
|en tent. These are just
the physical installa-
ause the most impor-
f a hospital is the con-
Bsence of doctors, most
Specialists in various
Sinai's staff is avail-
able at a
minutes.
patient's side within
Each year Mt. Sinai Hospital
handles more than 10,000 emer-
gency cases, slightly more than
half of them the result of acci-
dents according to the following
statistical analysis:
Traffic Accidents .... 6.8%
Personal Injuries ___ 30.0
Industrial Accidents .. 5.5
Fractures ............ 5.9
Poisoning ............ 0.5
Burns ................ 2.1
The other half of the emergen-
cy patient load is constituted of
cases of general chronic illness,
cardiac cases, obstetrics, and
gynecology patients. More than
90 percent of the cardiac cases
are conveyed by ambulance in
which oxygen can be adminis-
tered to the patient until he
reaches the safety of the hos-
pital.
>ngratulations...
from
LORIDA JUICE
ORIGINAL
ORANGE BLOSSOM BRAND
2700 N.W. 2nd Avenue
FR 3-7447
Every day as the hours go by,
all is quietnothing seems to be
happening in the Emergency De-
partment. Suddenly, the quiet is
broken. Ambulances stationed at
the hospital's Emergency en-
trance speed away; a taxi ar-
rives bringing a patient; a pri-
vate car stops to unload a bleed-
ing child; or a police cruiser dis-
charges the victim of a traffic
accident. Then things really start
to humnurses and doctors seem
to appear out of nowhere, ready
to handle any contingency. The
clerical staff goes into action as
each admission must-be recorded
properly in its category.
Four emergency operating ta-
bles may seem a great many. But
there are occasions when three
times that number are needed.
Now, to the satisfaction of both
the Greater Miami community
and the doctors, new Mt. Sinai
Hospital's Emergency Depart-
ment has three operating rooms,
three observation rooms, four
treatment rooms, a waiting room,
and all the other facilities it has
needed for so long.
In the case of emergency pa-
tients, though 58.7 percent of the
cases are dismissed or transfer-
red to their homes under the su-
pervision of a private doctor,
roughly 23 percent have to be ad-
mitted to the hospital for further
clinical observation and treat-
ment. This accounts for about
one-fourth of the daily patient
load of the hospital.
For the nurse who sits behind
the information desk of the Em-
ergency Department, the day
brings a continuing change of
tears and laughter because, in ad-
dition to the drama caused by ac-
cidents and sudden illnesses,
there are also the lighter mo-
menta with their happy endings.
A loo* at the records reveals
such entries as "fell while taking
photos at the edge of the pool."
The do-it-yourself male also is a
frequent visitor of the Emergen-
cy Room, after being "hit on the
head by a fluorescent tube" or
"suffering scalp lacerations be-
cause he forgot to take the ham-
mer off the upper step of a lad-
der before trying to fold same.
All these are classified as peraao-
al injuries, as are the 24-yearoId
Mule who suffered injuries to
her right knee while dancing.
lery of London and then at the
Museum of Art in Glasgow, Scot-
land. The paintings, "Rolling
Home" and "Palermo After the
Invasion," were later published
in the pictorial essay, "Art in the
Armed Forces."
In 1947, following four one-man
shows in New York, two first
awards for painting in national
group shows, and a popular
award in which he totalled 2,500
votes, Brockdorff came to Mait-
land, Fla., on a Fellowship at the
Research Studio.
It was at the Research Studio,
a colony of residents and artists
dedicated to experimental and
contemporary arts, that Brock-
dorff was to be introduced to ce-
ment as a medium of expression.
His mentor was the founder, the
late Andre Smith, a famed arch-
itect under whose direction the
entire foundation was decorated
in cement.
Earlier, while aboard ship,
Brockdorff had learned the dis-
cipline of the exacting artist
through his work on wood and
linoleum cuts. This discipline was
to stand him in excellent stead in
his new career as sculptor, one
which was to eventually lead him
to the work which now graces
the Founder's Lounge.
Begun in May, Brockdorff has
worked seven days a week, ceas-
lessly and untiringly. For while
the mural is the focal point, there
are also the walls which surround
it, all of them molded painstak-
ingly in cement and coated with
sand in a highly technical proc-
ess. Using tones of yellow and
white, each mold took one and
one-half hours to make and one-
half hour more to pour. Yet von
Brockdorff modestly notes that
he poured as many as five a day
addi-
and has accomplished, i
tion, a total of 260 tiles.
In his approach to the mural,
Brockdorff chose the abstract
rather than the representative
method. Wanting to avoid over-
scntimentality, he searched for
a richness in his art that could
be most clearly expressed with-
out resorting to the maudlin.
In his own words, Brockdorf,
who in November, 1959 was
awarded the Craftsman's Cita-
tion of Honor by the South Flor-
ida chapter of the American In-
stitute of Architects, says of his
mural:
"It is an abstraction. I decided
to incorporate, through symbols
of my own and established sym-
bols, Florida and the activities
most important at Mt. Sinai Hos-
pital. To indicate the low and
flat land of the state, I decided
to use the horizontal straight
lines. The jagged horizontal lines
symbolize the ocean and water.
A golden sun can be seen in the
left hand corner, and a shimmer-
ing silvery reflection of the moon
in the waters can be seen in the
upper right hand corner.
"Palm foliage is indicated by
the triangular yellow pattern-.
Another triangular pattern rep-
resents such plants as the cen-
tury plant and Spanish bayonets,
or other pointed foliage. Also all
over the state the most common
trees to be seen are the pines
and the palmetto palms. Tho
straight erectness of these are
symbolized in the vertical lines."
The center of attraction is the
circle in the middle with the blue
background. The blue color sym-
bolizes hope and security. The
two letters M. and S. .in the star
of David stand for Mt." Sinai Hos-
pital.
WE ARE PROUD TO SERVICE THE
NEW AAT. SINAI HOSPITAL .
ARNOLD'S LOCK & KEY SERVICE
EXPERT LOCKSMITHS
4018 Royal Palm Ave.
7416 Collins Ave.
MIAMI BEACH
JE 8-4505
UN 5-2734
Congratulations ...
E. E. SAMUEL
INC.
DEX-O-TEX NEOPRENE
TERRAZZO FLOORING
1675 N.E. 49th Street
NE 4-6737
(


Pago 4-C
+Jewls* ncrktian
Max Orovitz: Captain of a Community Vi<
;$10Mrliii
*
IN the life of a successful man
stand out his moments of tri-
umph. For Max Orovitz, a strang-
er to defeat, one of his many vic-
tories was reflected in the gleam
of his eyes and in his smile when
he entered the auditorium of the
new Mt. Sinai Hospital on the
evening of last Oct. 7 to preside
over the graduation exercises of
29 nurses, alumnae of Mt. Sinai
Hospital's School of Practical
Nursing.
This was the first public cere-
mony to be held in the new hos-
pital, which he had envisioned
more than 10 years ago. of which
he had dreamed during many
years of uncertainty and which
he. in conpunction with many de-
voted Miamians, have transform-
ed into reality.
Max Orovitz was part of the
original group of 16 men and one
woman who set out in 1946 to give
Miami's Jewish community the
hospital it so badly needed. He
was secretary of the charter
members when Baron de Hirsch
Meyer was the official spokesman
for Mt. Sinai. In his early forties
at the time. Max Orovitz was
enthusiastic and fearless in fur-
tlnrinc the aims of the project.
Elected president of Mt. Sinai
Hospital in 1948. he led his group
through ;.ll negotiation! with the
ernment and the City of Mi-
ami Beach to obtain the old
Nautilus property
:i Alton Road Hospital
MAX OK0VITZ
. dtdicattd leadership
IN MEMORY OF SAUL MINDLIN
Contemplation Room Offers Serenity
For Bereaved or Anxious Visitor
A hospital never closes its doors.
At night, its thousands of lights
are turned on to continue throb-
bing like the pulse of a giant
creature standing guard. Pro-
tector of the well-being of the
community in which it stands, the
hospital is a stage on which are
played the dramatic acts of a
city's aspiration for health and
medical progress.
In this sense, a hospital con-
tains within its walls the seeds
of despair, sudden happiness __
and sudden tragedy. The gamut
of human emotion is portrayed
in its wings, for here men art
born, battle the unwelcome in-
vasion of illness, triumphantly
return to health, and even suc-
cumb.
Gathered about the hospitals
patients is the best in medical
scientific knowledge. Also stand-
ing on the sidelines, unable to do
anything but hope, pray and of-
fer encouragement to their loved-
ones are parents, husbands,
wives, children their dreams
in the hands of the skilled phvsi-
cians. their silent meditation
filled with the determined belief
that all will be well.
The new Mt. Sinai Hospital of
Greater Miami, in its planning
stages, determined that some-
thing should be done about add-
ing to the comfort of those on the
A corner of the beautifully-paneled Contemplation Room,
dedicated in memory of the late Saul Mindlin by hi* parents]
Mr. and Mra. Jacob Mindlin, of Miami.
sidelines about making avail
able to the waiting family, the
hopeful parent, the anxious hus-
band or wife, the bereaved father
or mother, an atmosphere suit-
able to personal prayer and med-
itation.
And so was born the idea of a
Contemplation Room that would
cross the borderlines of individ-
ual religious belief that would
serve as a center of spiritual
solace for men of all creeds ex-
periencing the universal emotion
of anxiety and hope.
The Saul Mindlin Contempla-
tion Room will be a proud part
of Mt Sinai Hospital when the
hospital officially opens its doors
to Greater Miami on Sunday.
The visitor, on coming through
Mt. Sinai's magnificent entrance
way, will find the Contemplation
Room to the left of the lobby.
The room shares a divided corri-
dor with the hospital's Blood
Bank.
To be beautifully appointed with
ruRs. draqes, and cowhide leather
seating of properly muted shades
the Saul Mindlin Contemplation
Koom f e a t u r es cherry wood-
pane led walls, ceiling to-floor
cathedral windows, and a cer-
amic planter bin in which vUl
grow nearly wall-high trees.
The room has been dedicated
by Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Mindlin.
of Miami, in the name of their
Ute son. The Mindlins came
here in 1B51 from New York
following his retirement as foun-
V.l Pr?^.dent Manhattan
fur Dressing Corporation, and
where he w., known ,n Jewish
educational affairs.
The $30,000 Founders gift
memorializes Saul Mindlin, who
ted Aug. 21, 1Q08 at the age of
57 la 1952. shortly before what
wm to become a lengthy illness
cut short his blossoming career
Saul Mindlin had been appointed
Continued on Pag <
closed and Mt. Sinai* Hospital
opened its doors in its new quar-
ters, with 200.beds available. Max
Orovitz expdessed his gratitude:
"Mt. Sinai," he said, "has been
an uphill struggle all the way. It
has been only through confidence
and unity of purpose of the com-
munity thai the hospital is a real-
ity today.
"It is the biggest single endea-
\-or the Jewish community has
contribured to Dade county. I
feel that every cltlsen in the
county, regardless of race or
color, will feel the benefits for
many years to come."
And from Washington came
the following telegram: "It Ts a
fortunate thing for the entire
community that you are able to
open today a new hospital dedi-
cated to the glory of God and the
relief of human suffering regard-
less of religion, allegiance or per-
suasion. It gives me great pleas-
ure to send hearty greetings to
all who take part in the dedica-
tory exercises wit.h an earnest
prayer that the hospital will grow
and prosper and ever extend the
sphere of boneficient influence.
Harry S. Truman, President of
the United States."
THUS. Max Ororita raid the cor-
' nerstone to the beginning of
his dream: a bigger and better
Mt. Sinai. Only 144 days after
opening the doors, Orovitz an-
nounced his group's intention of
building a 300-bed structure on
Collins Island, adjacent to the
old Nautilus hotel, then serving
temporarily as the cere of a hos-
pital city.
Countless were the number of
board meetings, of special com-
mittee meetings, hours of fund-
raising, negotiations and efforts
to convince his friends, his busi-
ness associates and the many
leaders of other civic organiza-
tions that his dream was right,
that a better Mt. Sinai was need-
ed, and that it should not be im-
prisoned by smallness of thought.
And as the years went by. Max
Orovitz was reelected year after
year as president of the board of
directors. For- he was the man.
willing and able, to make the de-
cisions. It was he who knocked
on many doors and opened many
hearts to the cause of Mt. Sinai
Hospital.
And at the end of IMS. when
h* Mlhoueta,,
"gainst the bac,
ync Bay ingjS
he said: "We fj,
ttan ever that on.
nupiration. more
of Its full ru
nearer."
*1
THE day ha,
ho had a
winder through \\t\
corridors of the ,
Ho-p.tal. to admin''
beauty, and those k.
thousands WB0 win M
future be t.hey p,^
or doctors, will oa_
winner's smile on Mai
face.
For if he had not os*j
hi to make the
Sina: Hospital a reality h.
would be engraved *}
book of his communitrii
Max Oroviti ha ,.
'lorful career key]
civic minded citizen, Hi
a successful busatsssJ
A native of Pelhaa.1
vitz. 55, received a ]nu
from Emory I'niverettM
arr: jmitheu
He passed the first ban
tion given in this state!
practiced law,
ad to business
Orovitz was an offiorJ
City National Bank
Later, he became
the Alfn I Destin Co
it mer with Jlauk-j
and ,i members!!
of that organization
owner of Public Gail
director of the Nona!
and i director and j
General iMelnpmesl-f
As one of tbe
in the State of
has int. rests in an
factory there,
Ing force of a __
plored for oil and
first oil well in Iwl'
ation has expanded tt!
and has added to tfet i
development of the I
He 3n i "ther assocutm
owners re-poosibla.fcjJB
struct ion of the M*^|
Aviv and two othen a*
In addition to Ore**
business interest- it '
an active participant*!
nity affairs He wirt4
of the drive for fundsto
the Merrick bldg *t '
sity of Miami. He M
of the I diversity oils
of trustees and a
education commUtet
chairman of the b*W
Continued on P*]
CONGRATULATIONS ..
NEW MT. SINAI HOSPITAL .
A NEW AND BETTER
Unconditionally Guaranteed
ROOF COATING
FOR TILE AND GRAVEL ROOFS
Created and Applied Only by ;
Giffin Industries, Int.
PROTECT COOL INSULATE BEAUTIFY Y0'
STAYS ON STAYS WHITE
CALL TODAY FOR FREE ESTIMATE
HI 8-2651
Serving rtof.d* *o 30 Yoo fno IoHioOHI **' '
NO JOB TOO SAAALL NO JOB TOO


amber 11. 1959
*Jewlsti florid ton
Page 5-C
#< I

rJ II
iJlll
&
a
it
i
nun
.ii

PROGRESS CONTINUES

Old Mt. Sinai site at 4300 Alton rd.
. ; .


,

J*4 '
V-.
elevator bank, going from the main
f, leads to the Information Desk (at right),
the window of the Snack Bar (at left)
and leads to four public autotronic elevators
to the seven upper floors.
rective Healing Program Devoted
Constant Regimen of Teaching
|er the direction of Dr.
Fleming, the Depart-
fof General Surgery of Mt.
[Hospital is dedicated not
corrective healing but to
stant program of teaching.
Bd by the cream of the na-
current and future sur-
the department is com-
of three sub-specialties,
include Thoracic and Car-
Plastic, and Proctological
ry.
Ch section is headed by its
who, in turn, directs the
|Ues of the members of his
Sinai Hospital is approved
liree-year residency in sur-
Following the approval of
[internship, doctors selected
raining in surgery receive
essive training. With it, the
ised responsibilites and du-
tventually qualify them to
rm major surgery under the
vision of the hospital's at-
mt staff.
caiim< of this residency and
>g program, Mt. Sinai is
year able to "service" a
number of the community's
py cases. Known as "serv-
patients, they occupied,
to the opening of the new
Mai, 15 beds devoted to Gen-
surgery. With the new hos-
approximately 15 addition-
is will be made available.
Is the premise of Mt. Sinai
ptal that in order to train
Blent surgeons, thdse doc-
elected must have a certain
nt of work to do themselves,
ultimate goal is to qualify
len in surgery. To do this,
must be an expansion in
te patients which will bring
with it the opportunity for a four-
year program. More patients
mean more material for a pro-
posed increase in the resident
staff who can then branch out to
qualify for the sub-specialty sur-
gical groups.
Since it Is teaching hospital,
the s**ff of Mt. S'nal has unani-
moulv agreed that, in addition
to their work with service na-
tients. every private case be dedi-
cated to its teaching program. It
is through their association with
the private Datients that in-
terns and residents win the prac-
tical knowledge of basic physiol-
ogy and predominant pathology.
It is encouraging to note that
most private patients at Mt. Sinai
offer enthusiastic help. They ap-
preciate the attention and care
and often are greatly responsible
in pointing the way towards indi-
vidual discoveries which might
have passed had they been iso-
lated cases treated by a single
doctor. This is training on its
highest level of stimulation.
A typical day's activities
emanating from Dr. Flemings
Department of General Surgery
is charted as a "Schedule of
Rounds, Clinics and Conferen-
ces." Beginning at 7 a.m., resi-
dents and interns make their
morning rounds which can be fol-
lowed by Operating Room assign-
ments or clinics. Among others,
there are clinics in Urology, Tu-
mor, General Surgery, and Ortho-
pedic. Gross Surgical Pathology
is a twictMfaily session. Atten-
dance at Staff Surgery is sched-
uled, as are rounds in Urology,
Orthopedic and Private Surgical.
Medical, X-Ray, Resident Paiho -
oy, rumor, and Surgical Pathol-
ogy conferences are carefully
scheduled to afford a maximum
attendance. Evening rounds by
residents and interns wind up the
teaching-practice day.
To avoid any area for error,
Dr. Fleming's office further re-
leases carefully annotated charts
and schedules. These are the
schedule of Assignments, broken
down to monthly "Service Assign-
ments," which name the doctors
in charge and his staff in atten-
dance. On this schedule is also
noted the monthly breakdown of
doctors in charge of Private
Rounds. Thoracic Surgery, Proc-
tology, Plastic and Neurosurgery,
each a sub-section of General
Surgery, has its own yearly
schedule noting which doctor is
in attendance for a consecutive
two-month period.
There is a Schedule of Night
Duty in the Emergency Room,
which clearly specifies the hours
and the names of each intern,
resident, and resident on call. In
the event that the man of first
call cannot because of illness or
other reason be on duty, the man
on second call automatically as-
sumes responsibility. Further,
the department clearly charts a
monthly schedule declaring who
of the attending staff will be re-
sponsible for specific areas.
These might include such classi-
fications as "on service," "grand
rounds," "Surgical Clinic," "Tu-
mor Clinic," "Animal Lab," or
"residents pathology confer-
ence."
In any hospital, the intern is a
graduate of medical school just
beginning training. The resi-
Continuad on Paga 15-C
JAe. .Nautilus loteljja:..
Increasing Medical Needs
Speed Plan for Expansion
/ REATER Miami's increasing-
*~ ly heavy demand on the
services of Mt. Sinai Hospital,
the growth in the hospital's med-
ical programs, and the necessity
of planning ahead led early to a
close level of cooperation for
joint planning between Mt. Sinai
and the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation.
From its earliest days Mt. Sinai
had established its own Blood
Bank. The Korean conflict im-
pelled hundreds of people to do-
nate blood for shipment to the
war theater.
Federation, central fund-raising
and planning body for Greater
Miami Jewry, could be told that
the third year of operation show-
ed 20 percent of the hospital's
beds occupied by the medically
indigent on a free or part-pay
basis. A total of five research
programs were started, and as
a result of its participation in
Dade county's health program,
Mt. Sinai was the first hospital
here to receive a $10,000 X-ray
unit for free chest examinations
of patients and visitors.
Mt. Sinai received full approv-
al of its School of Technology
from the American Medical Assn.
and the American Society of
Clinical Pathologists at the start
of 1953. A day later, Jan. 16, the
Lawrence Foundation of New
York presented a $30,000 grant
to Mt. Sinai for the study of pul-
monary diseases.
The hospital is on a constant
march of medical progress.
Leading Greater Miamians, rec-
ognizing the need for special
support, were led in April, 1953,
by Jacob Sher and S. C. Leven-
son, who presented the hospital
with a check for $20,000, thus
permitting the purchase of new,
modern X-ray equipment. Months
later, in November, the United
Order of True Sisters presented
an Isotope Laboratory to the hos-
pital.
In September, 1954, another
forward step was registered as
Mt. Sinai received approval by
the A.M.A. for residency training
in obstetrics and gynecology,
and only weeks later the hospital
affiliated with Florida State Uni-
versity for training college stu-
dents in dietetics.
Plans to build a new hospital
on Collins Island progressed, and
groundbreaking for the new
structure was set for early 1956.
Plans at that time called for a
300-bed hospital, to include the
finest modern facilities.
But the existing quarters had
constantly to be adapted to keep
up with current need and never-
endging progress. A Cardio-Pul-
monary Laboratory was estab-
lished to provide more accurate
diagnostic work-up.
And coordination of the hos-
pital's activities with the Jewish
Home for the Aged, Jewish Fam-
ily and Children's Service and
other organizations, demonstrated
Continued on Pag* 10-C
CONGRATULATIONS .
NORTH MIAMI HARDWARE &
BUILDERS SUPPLY CO., INC.
Max Luber
680 N.E. 127th Street
Jack Waxenberg
Phone PL 1-3663
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
NEW MT. SINAI HOSPITAL .
EMMERS CAN CO.,
INC. ...
HOUSEWARE & GLASSWARE
DIVISION
6250 N.W. 35th Avenue
OX 6-0350

I


Pag 6-C
+Jmist>fk*'*Maun

Partial view of one of the six patients' day beds in case of an emergency or epidemic,
lounges. lacing west and offering a spectac- Furniture here will be cheerful and multi-
ular view across Biscayne Bay. The room has colored,
been equipped to become a ward with four
New Mt Sinai Floor-by-Floor
Continued from Pag* 1-C
around the-clock. Here are the
locker rooms for men and worn-
< l mpkgn i I, the office of the
Women's Auxiliary, and the Pa>
t.int.-' Library.
A beautifully-decorated Board
a u.ll be used for the period-
and the
many committees roponsible for
the operaUon of the hospital.
Third Floor
This is the first patient floor
and contains a complete Mater-
Department, i de-
livery rooms, five labor rooms,
three nurseries, a MSped nurs-
ery fr laolittna, a demonstra-
tion room for parent education
in baby care, and a fathers'
room.
PHOTO CREDIT
Frontispiece and photo-
graphs in Uus Mt. Sinai Hos-
pital Supplement are by Ar-
thur DeGutz. of Ardmore
Studios. Miami Beach.
There are two four-bed wards,
with 4" expectant mothers capa-
ble of accommodation here.
The ranee1 working area on
this floor is typical of all other
patient floors, featuring a trian-
gular shape in the midst of ail
patient rooms, with five exits in-
to the patient area. In addition
to the nurses' station with its in-
formation desk and the nurses'
\u ti i VaMtl Call control board,
the area contains tables for
charting, a doctor's did
nected to the central
dictati. 'i lyaten in Medical Rec-
the Head Nur-.es office, a
nur-.s lounge, a pantry equip-
paJ vital stainless steel shelves
or linen and supply, phis two
medication rooms for storage of
medicines and bandages.
Recessed wall space abounds
for the storage of stretcher beds
and wheelchairs.
As for a typical patient room,
five color combinations are fea-
tured, all in soft pastel shades.
Walls are covered with a vinyl
fabric. On the wall is a two-way
aluminum lamp (one for each
bed), a central oxygen and va-
cuum outlet, telephone. Nurses'
Call system with its microphone
and loudspeaker recessed into
the wall, a high voltage outlet to
permit the use of portable X-Ray
equipment in each room, and a
thermostat regulating the room's
temperature.
The patient's bed is all electric-
automatic, with pu-sh button con-
trol, thus eliminating the nurse's
cranking the patient up and
down.
Fourth Floor
This entire floor is dedicated
to help those who cannot pay for
" ical or hospital care. Its 85
beds are located in five 5-bed
wards, three 4-bed wards, 23 two-
bed and two 1-bed rooms.
A public waiting room and a
patient's day lounge complete the
facilities located around t h e
nurses' working area.
Fifth Floor
Pediatrics, care for sick chil-
dren, is located on this floor, and
six of the rooms can be super-
vised by television from a spe-
cial additional nurses' station.
Here, the nurses' working area
includes a treatment and confer-
ence room.

Congratulations...
ALL PAINTING and
DECORATING
GODDARD PAINTING
CO.
Painting & Decorating Contractors of America 1884
PAINTING DECORATING
THOMAS GODDARD H. R. COOPERAAAN
PL 1-2493
450 N.W. 71st Street
---------- ***** ad Seventh Floors
These are identical patient
floors, with private and semi-
Pnvate rooms, pat.ent capacity
changeable according to the sea-
son's requirements.
CifJtth Floor
This floor is dedicated to the
private paUent. who can afford
to pay for added facilities not es-
sential to general patient care.
Taough all rooms on the floor are
identical m size and equipment
to all others in the building 16
front rooms have private ter-
races closed off by sliding glass
ooors Each worn has a small
refrigeration compartment t o
store the patient's own food or
o*her perishable items.
Each room will also have its
own television set. with bedside
control and pillow speakers op-
tiooal in other parts of the hos-
piiai.
Communication*
A Pneumatic tube system with
rtations connects as many de-
partment* in the building Doc-
tors will receive the.r c.U, Jeer
a noiseless system with 46 sta
Uons distributed throughout the
bu.ldmg. flashing Lrie. *
numbers. The Nurses' Call ,
tern permits communication be-
** the patient and nurse.
Friday
CULMINATION^^'
Achievement j?<
Of Unrivalled fi
By Greater Midi
gARLY in 1957 Mt. Sinai Hos, i ,; lncd
With free shots for medi, .. ., ,"%*&
and in February South Flo, *P
Center was opened at Ml. Sina. I i?!"*
luted for the first tin.e Flon.la V4 i ^jj
ph.I.acs in cooperation with the National He^Sfl
Medical news was made again at Ifi ziTti
J. Harold Klock. D.D.S.. who J co^ftA
Department, presented hr,/,ue'^21
patients, henceforth to be know., :,. ,he ..jJJJgP
And the high regard Mt. Sinai received j. t|T!!_
was again reaffirmed as it was pr -entrt i wS
a new scries of grants given I,. 1 V *W|
in the Greater Miami area-$54.55u Foua^l
In the meantime, deliberations by the hni J
consultations with national author,,,, and 2k, J
led to a change in plans and two stones 5,Tuff
prints for the new Mt. Sinai Hospital iTSJCl
patient capacity to the 400-bed range. "
Consequently, estimates for the building mk
revised, and as confidence prevailed in leadanajTw
of m oiUlioo dollar, was set as the goal Kfi
Fuad. Taylor Construction Co. o! Miami wu **]
take the job. and on Monday. Julv 15. 1957 tbTfaJ
were on the scene at Collins Island
Colossus of Concrete Rites
IN September of the same year, the fund drift |
way mark, reaching $3,300,000. and in ren*.
port a nee of the new facility under construda*.
received a $40,000 grant from the IS Public &_
to be used in the installation of new cardio-pulawmil
facilities.
When, in November, open hot is? was held on tki
tion site, more than 2,500 persons came to get a gtaaaa|
the new Mt. Sinai was going to look like.
The year's end again snowed increases in pauaui,
Emergency and Out-Patient Department volume. 3
In November. 1958. Leonard A Wien succwAH
Ruskin as chairman of the Development Fund. Fat
was geared to a maximum, the newlj created Woeartj
reached and surpassed its self-set goal of CSAMtf
barked on a second program to reach the half-i
mark.
Before the year came to a close, the hospitill
85.000 mark in patient admission-, in addition to tat^
treated in the clinics and emergency. Thus, the i
enlarged facility was stressed more and more.
As the colossus of concrete, tile and steel on
neared completion, an all-out effort was underitkaM
munity to subscribe the total cost of the building. *f
and technical facilities. Hardly a week went by
Foundercontributor of $50,000 or more joining I
Leon Lowenstein, textile magnate from NewYM
been a constant contributor to the hospital's rcjenrnu
nated $250,000 to endow the Nurses' Residence, t*
Continued on Paoe 12-C
MIAMI BEACH FEDERM
Salutes the New
MT. SINAI HOSPITAL
. Another sign
of progress
in the
community .

MIAMI BEACH
FBDBJ
SAVINGS *MU* Aao<*T
i Office*: Uataaa lose WM*j


mber 11, 1959
^J^isi>ncrioUa>f7
Page 7-C
**"~
i
^ modern sterhzation equipment forms izat.cn. materials of all kinds, including plas-
,entral Supply m the new Mt. Sinai tic ones, can be properly sterilized for the
Designed for steam and gas steril- hospital's many departments.
DAN RUSKIN MARJORIE AND LEONARD IWgj
elopment Fund Sparked Erection
10 Million Medical Institution
kg of a multi-million dol-
lital takes precisely that
dollars and more dol-
md-raising in a commu-
Greater Miami involves
Is of people who .have to
J, thousands who give
u sands from whom the
las to be collected. The
ktinn.il effort to do the
|d hardly be imposed up-
administrative depart-
ready overburdened with
a hospital.
pril 23, 1955, Dan B. Rus-
tn serving as chairman of
ppital's building commit-
a past vice president of
|anization since 1952, was
pd chairman of the newly
Development Fund. As a
campaign chairman of
nbined Jewish Appeal of
feater Miami Jewish Fed-
Ruskin brought with him
bwledge of fund-raising.
a goal of $4,000,000. esti-
fat a time when costs for
Mt. Sinai Hospital were
I on a 300-bed, six-story
re, Ruskin immediately
^head to form campaign
tees to solicit initial gifts.
\io weeks after his appoint-
he was able to report
in excess of one million
subscribed mostly by the
l's trustees.
arles Werblow, chairman
doctors* fund committee,
^e first to report the full
of physicians and sur-
of Mt. Sinai. Since May 17,
his committee has raised
toward its later-set goal
million dollars.
lay 22 of that year, 51 per-
the Greater Miami area
MABJOKIC AMD UONARD W/EN
. energetic husband-wife team
BAN I. KU5KIH
tint cMrm
had joined a campaign commit-
tee:
For Miami Beach Leonard
Abcss, Sam Blank, Jack Carner,
Irving Cypen, B. F. Danbaum,
Ben B. Gaines, Samuel Gertner,
Mrs. Louis Glasser, Mrs. M. J.
Goldin, Dr. Milton S. Goldman,
Sam Goldstein, A. J. Harris, Leon
B. Jacobs, Howard Kane, Dr. Vic-
tor Kugel, J. Gerald Lewis, Mar-
cie Liberman, Dr. Louis G. Lyt-
ton, Dr. David A. Nathan, Max
Orovitz, Dr. Kurt Peiser, David
Phillips, Albert Pollack, Sam
Resnick, Joseph Rose, Dr. Ben-
jamin B. Rosenberg, Mrs. Fannie
Sclig, Harold Spaet, Joseph R.
Stein, Dr. Milton F. Travers, Carl
Wcinkle, Dr. S. Charles Werblow,
Leonard A. Wien and Louis E.
Wolf son.
For MiamiJoseph Lipton,
Dr. Morris Goodman, Aaron Kan-
ner, Sidney Lefcourt, S. C. Lev-
enson, Stanley C. Myers, Dr.
Harold Rand, Herbert Scher (de-
ceased), Jacob Sher, William D.
Singer and Arthur Ungar.
For Coral Gables Meyer
Baskin, Sam Heiman and Harold
Thurman.
For Hollywood-Stanley Bec-
ker man and A. J. Diamond.
Many of these names appear
today on Mt. Sinai's honor roll of
Founders. Others have kept on
working for the hospital, raising
thousands and thousands of dol-
lars among members of their
communities, here and abroad.
Slf-S*t Gool
By the end of 1955, pledges had
readied the amount of 775*0.
After a reappreciatwn of work
done, Ruskin announced fhe ap-
pointment of Howard Kane and
Isadore Hecht, jr., as chairmen
of the Initial Gifts Division, and
Carl Susskind took the responsi-
bility of heading the commercial
committee with a goal of $1,250,-
000. Leo Chaikin served as his
co-chairman.
Simultaneously, Leonard A.
Wien was named to head the
committee on hotels, motels and
apartments. Wien had previously
shown his caliber as a fund-raiser
as head of Mt. Sinai's annual jub-
ilees, designed to cover the hos-
pital's yearly operating deficit.
At the time of his appointment
,he had also headed the Beach Di-
vision of Miami's Community
Chest; he was then as now a vice
president of Mt. Sinai and a gov-
ernor of the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation.
When the new building's
groundbreaking was set, Ruskin
again reshuffled his "cabinet,"
and Leonard A. Wien was upped
to the chairmanship of the Initial
Gifts Division, while Jacob Sher
became chairman of the Found-
er's group formed by those who
had contributed $50,000 or more
to the hospital. Their portraits
in the form of bronze busts will
be on permanent exhibit in the
new Mt. Sinai.
At that time, 23 men had at-
tained this status. As the new Mt.
Sinai is about to be opened, their
ranks have swollen to 65, and
there's little doubt that Sher's
self-set goal of 75 will be reached
in the near future.
To further step up the drive,
a professional division was cre-
Continotd on P9 1-C
Portrait of a Philanthropist:
Samuel Fried/and and Mt Sinai
In the annals of local and na-
tional philanthropy, Samuel
Fiii'dland's -name is legion. His
DO) uibution of upward of a quar-
ter of a million dollars to the new
Mt. Sinai Hospital significantly
aided the institution in the ful-
fillment of its dreama dream
now embodied in the building
which is to be dedicated Sunday.
As chairman of the board and
founder of Food Fair Stores, Inc.,
Samuel Fricdland heads the sixth
larsest retail food chain in the
United States. He also heads as
its president, Food Fair Proper-
ties, Inc.. a real estate corpora
lion designed to develop shopping
centers in this eountry.
In February, 1957, Fricdland
received the annual award of the
Florida region of the National
Conference of Christians and
Jews for "distinguished service
to the cause of Brotherhood."
Presently serving as trustee
and vice president of Mt. Sinai
Hospital, chairman of the board
of trustees of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, member of
the board of directors of the Jew-
ish Home for the Aged, member
of the board of directors of the
Dade County United Fund, Fel-
low of Brandeis University, mem-
ber of the board of directors of
the Miami Beach Taxpayers
Assn., and chairman of the board
of the Dania Bank, Friedland has
contributed continuously to the
welfare of the community.
He is one of the founding
fathers of Temple Emanu-El on
Miami Beach, and has served as
its president for more than ten
years.
Friedland has also figured
prominently as a contributor to
educational institutions. He or-
ganized and is president of the
Food Fair Stores Foundation,
which this year will grant more
than 300 scholarships to young
men and women at leading uni-
versities in the United States,
among them:
SAMUU MIDLAND
. noted philanthropist
Harvard University, Yale, Co-
lumbia, Johns Hopkins, Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania, Brandeis,
Temple, St. John's, and the Uni-
versities of Miami and Florida.
These scholarships are awarded
to outstanding students, employ-
ees of Food Fair and their child-
ren, and to members of the com-
munities in which Food Fair
Stores are located. Food Fair
Stores was cited by "Who's Who
in America" in recognition of its
"substantial contribution to high-
er education in America."
Friedland also serves as na-
tional vice chairman of the plan-
ning committee of the Jewish
Theological Seminary of Amer-
ica.
Since his move from Philadel-
phia to Miami, Friedland has
been active in community af-
fairs, having served as chairman
of the Community Chest drive
for Miami Beach, chairman of
the Combined Jewish Appeal, co-
chairman of the Bonds for Israel
drive, and a member of the
board of directors of the Inter-
American Center Authority.
CONGRATULATIONS...
ENFIELD'S
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PROFESSIONAL - - AMATEUR
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CHALKBOARDS BULLETIN BOARDS
LINEN & TRASH CHUTES
INCINERATORS
1652 Lenox Avenue
JE 1-9790
A.
-
'I



U
\l
i
'
A 4
m

1"


Page 8-C
+Jewlsi>norkMan
Friday,
Women's Auxiliary
Sparks Nursing School,
Other Medical Projects
Women's Auxiliary of Mt. Sinai
Hospital may be proud of its rec-
ord of service to the hospital, as
well as the patients who use the
hospital's facilities.
Providing volunteer services in
many departments of the hospital
is only one of the many important
functions of the Auxiliary. But
even more important, the wom-
en's group realized from the be-
ginning that the need for good
nursing care is the most vital
part of its program. With this
idea in mind, the lit. Sinai School
of Practical Nursing was formed.
The entire financial support of
the school is the responsibility of
Auxiliary members. The school
is supported by the Snack Bar
and the Gift Shop, run by volun-
teers of the Auxiliary. Another
important feature is the provi-
sion of scholarships to the School
of Nursing by the Auxiliary.
In a volunteer capacity. Mrs.
Morris Goldin. chairman of the
advisory board to the school, has
been closely affiliated with it
from its inception. It was during
her presidency that the school
received its first national recog-
nition and accreditation and still
remain! the only school in the
State of Florida to be accredited
by the National Assn. for Practi-
cal Nursing Education, accredit-
ed by the Florida State Board of
Nursing, as well as the Veterans
Administration.
When the first class in Practi-
cal Nursing was formed in Sep-
tember, 1951. there were six stu-
dents enrolled. This past fall, the
school accepted 50 students. Aft-
er the initial year, four students
graduated. Today, there is one
class each year.
Mrs. Carmen F. Ross, director
of Nursing and Nursing Educa-
tion, has been head of the school
for the past six years, during
which time she has seen over 150
students graduate.
With the advent of the new
building, the graduates can look
forward to working in the new
hospital under the best and most
modem facilities. In this atmos-
phere, the best possible patient-
care can be given while training
with the most up-to-date equip-
ment.
From a report issued at the
time of the 1959 capping cere-
monies, this explains the reason
for the many devoted hours of
service to the School of Practical
Nursing given by the Women's
Auxiliary of Mt. Sinai:
"The Women's Auxiliary of Mt
Sinai feels that its support has
made possible one of the finest
practical nursing programs in
the country, that it helps safe-
guard the patient and nursing
Max Orovite. president of Mt. Sinai, recently board of trustees of the hosoitol is.
honored the women who over a span of ten Kautfman. Mrs. Harold Sonet m'
years have presided over ML Sinai Women's Goldin. Mrs. Louis Glasser Mrs mL?i
note and Mrs. Philip Lefkowitz. who?*
years have presided
Auxiliary. Left to right, and in the order of
their office tenure, are Mrs. Max Dobrin,
founder-president and a member of the first
holds office in her second term.
care not only st Mt. Sinai Hos*
pital but throughout the coun-
try, since many of the graduates
return to their home communi-
ties."
Mrs. Philip Lefkowitz. presi-
dent of the Women's Auxiliary of
Mt. Sinai, reports that in addi-
tion to manning the Snack Bar
and Gift Shop, the women, known
as "Pink Ladles,'* also serve in
many other capacities and de-
partments In the hospital.
Among other duties, they work
at the Information Desk, phar-
macy. Blood Bank, library, as
nurses aides, nursing da
vettes, and in the Out P_
Emergency Uiniei. TtoL
given many hours of faMi
vice46,000 hours in ~
look forward to their
activity in the nee fed
the Mt. Sinai Hospital
Federation Plans for Community Health
Greater Miami Jewish Feder-
ation is the community's central
planning and fund-raising organ-
ization. Mt. Sinai Hospital is one
of the major local affiliates of
Federation.
The history of Mt. Sinai Hos-
Reddy is "good medicine"
at MT. SINAI HOSPITAL
Reddy Kilowatt your electrical servant -
works for Mt. Sinai Hospital, just as he does
for every modern business and every modern home.
Keeps on the job 24 hours a day and does his
chores in the cleanest possible way.
Saves valuable man-hours ... in kitchens, labs,
laundry and everywhere. Performs wonders
at the flick of a switch.
There's no match for Reddy still the biggest
bargain in town
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT CO.
HELPING BUILD FLORIDA
pital would not be complete with-
out mentioning its close ties with
the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration.
From the very beginning. Fed-
eration has contributed in ever-
increasing measure to the hos-
pital's yearly income in order to
help cover the operational deficit
resulting from the care of the
medically indigent.
It is not a conincidence that
the majority of Mt. Sinai's Foun-
ders and trustees are active in
the Federation in which several
of them occupied the presidency.
When plans were presented for
the new building, it was Stanley
C. Myers, then president of Fed-
eration, who came forward to an-
nounce that the project would be
sponsored Jointly by Federation
and ML Sinai.
When fund raising for Mt. Sinai
began to detract from Feder-
ation's annual Combined Jewish
Appeal, a joint decision was
reached in October. 1W. which
was hailed as "a great forward
step in the unification of com-
munity fund raising and cooper-
ation in the family of Federation
acencies toward improved plan-
ning for the health and welfare
needs of Greater Miami."
Noting the joint action. The
Jewish Floridian in an editorial
stated that "this may tbjJ
contribute to knitunj tit I
that has unfortunately
the minds of many
who consider tbenuehaj
pital people' rather thai
of the total Jewish
Indicating the extent 1*1
eration a-sistance to kV,
are these eloquent fipmsj
183.000: 1951. $93,000: 19311
664; 1953. $114.581 St:
$125.00402: 1955, $18,*
1956. $151,666.66; 1987,
166.87; 1958. $198,000.
It is principally here ttatl
eration's yearly eoatrflisijj
being applied: to enable sir
to perform the ctmtasslM
ice for which it was belli
which it is pledged in ib|
expanded environment.
As one of seven Fl
health, welfare and
agencies in Greater Mi*e\j
Sinai Hospital is an
community planning
ordinated mani.er for 1st I
development of
J.--7-I
its funds and projraau
li.'y the totality of P
spons.bilr.v toward tb*
ment of Jewish We I
coun:>
Congratulations...
METRO
TILE
COMPANY
CERAMIC TILE CONTRACTOR
DECORATIVE TILE
COIAMMCIAL RESIDENTIAL; ;,l
T
2451 N.W. 77th Terrace
OX 6-0711


n 11. 1959
^JewlslifhrSdgaui
VUtKD COWK DISIGN
Taking Beauty
[s Hospital's Interior
kerior facade of the new Mt. Sinai Hospital is breath-
Ope, those who see the interior for the first time
equally revealing new concept in hospital color and
Ible for so radical a change in this specialized field,
Ultant and decorator, Mr. James, of Ft. Lauiierdale!
' i career in New York where he graduated from the
ol of Design, Mr. James went on to Havana, Cuba,
ork caught the appreciative eye of Miamians. It
t that he found himself decorating the finest homes
enis in South Florida,
lai Hospital proved to be his first real challenge,
lediately, Mr. James decided his approach would be
Tie legend that a hospital must be "grey," not only
t in feeling.
hospital I have known has been drab, sterile and
I wanted Mt. Sinai to suggest an open arm welcome
" saying, 'sit down and relax; everything is going to
ftr rather than to depress their spirits was what
|had in mind when he selected the Herman Schack
rff mural which graces the South Wall of the Foun-
Uneasiness would immediately be dissipated,
momentarily forgotten, When patients found them-
\g this glowing and stimulating work.
the patient a "lift" was what Mr. James was after,
cision was to do it with softly pleasing pastels. The
Irne a study in easy blues, yellows and antique white.
Itient Room, which often accommodates those who
rd private medical attention, would be done in the
iir of orange, yellows and whites,
rgeons' Lounge was designed in color and feeling to
comfortable livingroom while the Board Room would
air of business comfort with its bleached walnut
accented in green, texturized fabrics, and gold
fof the eight floors is different in color scheme from
The patient rooms are never repeated within easy
Maternity Wing, new-born babies will find their first
jred in blue. Their proud dads will await their arrival
pectant Father's Room, a comfortable salon done in
liti- and beige with the added touch of a closed circuit
[system to show their offspring as soon as feasible.
Eighth Floor, which is the top floor of the hospital, is
the "Country Club." Ambulatory patients will find
Dm furnished in Italian Provincial complemented by
s' selection of wormy chestnut walls,
fames wanted td please rather than shock. That his
I been well-received is evidenced by the admiration of
ve ventured into what might have been a concrete
eptk institution, but who found, instead, a hospital
ends its welcome in subdued and restful colors.

right are Cyril Lewis, purchasing agent for the
^ Sinai Hospital, examining drapery material
Jr. James (center) and Joe Rose, member of the
kg and planning committee in charge of furniture.
Page 9-C
GAVE US MUCH PLEASURE TO
[RTICIPATE IN THE BUILDING OF
IE NEW MT. SINAI HOSPITAL !
SAUL MINDUN
to Mtmoriam
Early Years
Continued from Pag* 2-C
Sinai Hospital. For five consecu-
tive years, Ed Sullivan acted as
master of ceremonies of the Mt.
Sinai Jubilee to raise hundreds
of thousands of dollars. Last Oc-
tober, he wrote: "Congratulate
everybody for me on the 'new*
Mt. Sinai, and tell them all that
I've never participated in any
charity effort which gave me
greater enduring pleasure."
*
QN June 1, 1951, registration
" was opened for the School
of Practical Nursing. Exactly one
month later, seven medical school
graduates started intern train-
ing. Medical research, centered
in the Pathology Laboratories Of
the hospital, also received great
impulse with the appointment of
Dr. Maurice Lev as director of
laboratories in August, 1951.
Weeks later, Mt. Sinai opened its
tumor clinic, and on Sept. 12 of
the same year, the Department
of Physical Medicine and Reha-
bilitation began to function.
Two months after its opening,
the School of Practical Nursing
was accredited by the National
Assn. for Practical Nurse Edu-
cation as the first school in Flor-
ida to receive this distinction.
As the second year of the hos-
pital's operation came to an end,
8,052 patients had been admitted
over the 12-month period, and
5.086 patient visits were made at
the Out-Patient Department.
In early 1952, Mt. Sinai added
cytology testing to its examina-
tions. On Jan. 9, medical history
was made with the formation of
the first tnam of cardiac sur-
geons, thus making Mt. Sinai the
first hospital in the State of Flor-
ida to be able to offer the com-
munity such a service.
In March, 1952, following the
promise to serve the community
irrespective of race or creed, Mt.
Sinai awarded staff privileges to
the first Negro doctor, in the
person of Dr. Aubrey Warren
Henry, who until this day has re-
mained on the hospital's roster.
And in May of the same year a
24 bed wing for Negro patients
was added to its facilities.

rt Lauderdale Glass Co., inc.
N.E. 4th Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Contemplation Room
Continued from Page 4-C
by then President Harry S. Tru-
man to the President's Commis-
sion on the Health Needs of the
Niion.
Max Orovitz, president, says
that the Founders gift was the
first of such magnitude to be
made for the establishment of a
memorial at Mt. Sinai.
Saul Mindlin was a graduate of
Townsend Harris Hall, New York,
and Brooklyn College, where he
received the AB degree with
honors. He was a member of
Phi Beta Kappa.
In 1941, he joined the Navy
Department in Washington, D.C.,
rose rapidly through the ranks,
and by 1944 was an assistant to
George Keenan in the War Pro-
duction Board, an advisor to then
President Franklin Delano Roose-
velt. At the conclusion of World
War II, Mr. Mindlin was assign-
ed to the Veterans Administra-
tion as national chief of the
psychiatric division in prosthe-
tics.
In this capacity, he was instru-
mental in developing the pro-
gram and drawing up the gov-
ernment contracts that later
brought the Menninger Founda-
tion of Topeka, Kans., into the
VA hospital system. He was a
chess-playing friend of Drs. Wil-
liam and Karl Menninger.
In this office, he also wrote up
and saw through Congress a bill
that raised the pay of physicians,
dentists and nurses in the Vet-
erans administration. The bill
was designed to induce medical
personnel to remain with the VA
system after their training per-
iod.
Appointed by President Truman
to the President's Commission on
the Health Needs of the Nation
in January, 1952, several weeks
after he turned 30, Saul Mindlin
fell ill shortly thereafter.
His brother, Leo Mindlin, exec-
utive editor of The Jewish Flor-
ldian, survives him in addition to
his parents.
Into the Saul Mindlin Contem-
plation Room at Mt. Sinai Hos-
pital each year will come thous-
ands of persons seeking solace
and faith through meditation. The
life and work of the room's name-
sake properly symbolize its cen-
tral intent.
COOPERATION NOUD
Cooperation of the Publicity
Department of Mt. Sinai Hos-
pital of Greater Miami is here-
with acknowledged in the prep-
aration of this Jewish Floridian
supplement marking the dedi-
cation of the new hospital on
Sunday afternoon.
Congratulations from . 1
CHANTICLEER INC. TI 1
ICED FRYERS and FOWL ---
CALIFORNIA TURKEYS L 1. DUCKS -"-'
CORNISH GAME HENS ;~~?
Delivery W. Palm Beach to Key West *
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CONGRATULATIONS .
GONDAS CORPORATION
MACHINERY
151 N.W. 54th Street Phone PL 7-5531
CONGRATULATIONS...
HEYWOOD-
WAKEFIELD
HEYWOOD WAKEFIELD
FOR
THE FINEST IN AUDITORIUM SEATING
, A Few of Our Recent Installations
Mt. Sinai Hospital Carib Theater Congregation Beth Tfilah
Temple Beth Am Beech Theater Beth Jecob Congregation
Gulfttream Park Circle Theater St. Joaeph' School
Cutler Cove School Temple Zion Miami Jai Alai Fronton
SEATING AND FURNITURE FOR EVERY TYPE INSTALLATION
SYNAGOGUES CHURCHES SCHOOLS
HOTELS MOTELS CLUBS INSTITUTIONS
FLORIDA DISTRIBUTORS
F. E. VAN HOESEN CO.
SEATING PRODUCTS OF DISTINCTION FOR FLORIDA
1001 N.E. 82nd Terrace Miami 38, Fla.
PL 1-2484
i
*


Page IOC
+JmisMcrklkHi
Frid
lay.
DR. MAX DOBRIN
Out-Patsent Department
Grows With Medical Need
When the i.ew facilities, to be known as the S. Harvey
Greenspan Out Patient Pavilion, will open its dean, patient-
will find the most modern and the iv rtment of
its kind in the entire Southeast area.
When Mt. Sinai's On) Patient hepartment was CBaatad on
July 1. 1950. 1.888 patients were treated dttrtttl the l.r-i -i\
month- al bahment. At that time, ihiee clinic-
leal, Surgical and Obstetric logfcal wart ninctfan-
tag.
By the end of 1901, its first full year. 5.086 patients \i-itei
the di (Thick had been enlarged by the addition of a
Tumor Clinic. In 1980, by the end r, 11,297 patients
r.ad been attended in it clinics
In less thsm 10 yean, nearly 80.000 ti have been
served by the department, greatly handicapped by narrow quar-
ters and other problems.
Some History in Retrospect
When Pr Max Dobrin. director of the Out-Patient Depart-
ment of Mt. Sinai Hospital, braved s heavy rainstorm to make
his first visit to the new quarters, it turned out to be THE day of
his life. The kind eyes under his bushy, white brows acquired
a young lustre, his voice exhaled emotion as he said again and
again: "But this is wonderful, simply wonderful I"
Dr Dobrin and his wife have been residents of Miami for
35 years. "I remember." he say-, "that J. Gerald Lewis (Foun-
der, trustee and chairman of the building and planning commit-
tee for the new facility! was our Bn when we came here.
"The years went by. but about 14 years ago, I don't remem
ber exactly the day. the necessity of a Jewish hospital for our
area was discussed by some of my colleagues In my livingroom:
and it w.i- my wnc who wrote down the names of the 17 people
most likely financially to support such an idea, the same 17 peo-
ple Mho months later were to become the first trustees of the
future Mt Sinai Hospital And my wile was to be one of them."
Dr. Dobrin. became the first chairman of the medical board
when the Alton Road Hospital was opened.
At that time, only a -mall number of people used to come
to us as out -patients." But when the Nautilus property was
conxerted into Mt. Sinai llt-pit things began to change.
Modal in Dad* County
When he sat down after a long walk through the inter-
minable corridors of the new Mt Sinai, revealing at each turn
Be* wonders of convenience and technical progress, he said "I
am so glad tfted Finally, we have the cheerful sur-
roundings, the dignified rooms in which the patient, regard-
less of hi- economical status, will ha\c a greater feeling of se-
curity, where he will know in.-tinctiv11\ that he will receive the
best medical care, and for receiving it will form a better opnion
at himself as member of society
All tiled in yellow, with yellow and black vmvl tiles cover-
ing the floor- Mt Sinai's new Out Patient Department is one
ot the finest anywhere and a model in Dade county.
With the addition of an Eye Clinic and an Ear. Nose and
Throat C lime, the department will have a total of 17-General
Medicine Heart Obstetrics and Gynecology. Pediatrics and
Well Baby. Orthopedics. Surgery. Tumor. Periferal Vascular
Gastro-Enterotogy, Dermatology, Chest. GenJto-Urtaary Dia-
betics. Endocrinology. K\e and Far. Nose and Throat.
"We are doing a lot for the community." Dr. Dobrin as-
sert- "llutwc cannot stagnate. I have plans, and I like to
talk about them What w,- need, what this community needs
badly, is a Clink for Mental Hygiene and a Day Mental Therapy
Clinic, where patients can be attended for a full day's length
under the supervision of specialized nursing personnel I know
that progress takes time, and it takes money. But I am sure
that some day my ideas and those of others wiU be translated I
into reality, for the benefit of many."
WE ARE PROUD TO HAVE FURNISHED
ALL THE MILLWORK
FOR THE NEWAAT. SINAI HOSPITAL
CONSTRUCTION
PRODUCTS
CORPORATION
BUILDING MATERIALS
6865 N.W. 36th Avenue
OX 1-9180
r
?*&.
j*. "I

ii
-"*
a**"'
Mt. Sinai Hospital has one of the largest air- patient areas. At left are the wt*
conditioning plants in Dade county, a 750-ton which feed the huge tanks instah
unit (right) which feeds 40 auxiliary unite and hospital'a roof. "
also operates refrigerators in the kitchen and
Sinai's Progress Continues
Continued from Pag* 5-C
that M; Sinai was rendering the
community invaluable service.
On April 18. 15. Mt. Sinai re
c. ived a $250,000 grant from the
Wolf.oon Family Foundation, and
Max QrovitX, hospital president,
announced that the money would
be used in the then-beginning ex-
pansion program.
Dvlopmnt Fund
ftAYS later, cost of the planned
" 300-bed facility was estimat-
ed at H.000.000 and the Mt. Sinai
Hospital Development Fund was
organized under the chairman-
ship of Dan B. Ruskin to raise
the required amount. Ami as pre-
liminary studies came to an end.
the appointment of Donald G.
Smith and Irving Korach as arch-
itects was announced by the
building committee, which later
exhibited the f.rst scale model to
South Florida business and civic
leaders.
At a dinner attended by 300.
more than a million dollars in
initial gifts was pledged by hos-
pital trustees and members of
the community.
Stanley C. Myers, then presi-
dent of the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation, told the assem-
bled that the new hospital was to
be a joint project of the Federa-
tion and Mt. Sinai Hospital.
While public attention was fo-
cused on the project, the hospital
continued its internal expansion
with the opening of the first
hemophilia Blood Bank in the
State of Florida, and the National
Hemophilia Foundation estab-
lishing a fellowship for research
at Mt. Sinai.
By October, contributions to
the building fund had reached
1.775.000 and the Development
Fund established its own offices.
Hefore the year came to an
end. the hospital received a $109.-
100 grant from the Ford Founda-
tion, and the Bayshore Exchange
Club of Miami Beach established
a $10,000 research fellowship at
Mt. Sinai for the study of Cardio-
vascular Pathology.
Honors were bestowed on two
members of the staff, as Mrs.
Carmen Ross, director of Nurs-
ing Education, was selected by
the National League for Nurs.ng
to -erve on the national boar.I
to draft examination series, while
Mary Wernersbach. chief phar-
macist, was elected president of
the Florida State Hospital Phar-
macists and vice president of the
American Pharmaceutical Assn.
of Southeast Florida.
IN May, 1956, Mt. Sinai again
' set the pace among the area's
hospitals by creating the first
Hospital Dental Clinic for which
equipment was donated by the
Miami Beach Rotary Club. The
same month also saw a high hon-
or bestowed upon Mildred Ann
Vogel. director of nursing, who
received the Mshoney Award for
achieving group integration at
Mt. Sinai Hospital.
In the meantime, the drive for
building funds continued with
the creation of additional com-
mi'tees, and well-known person-
alties like Leonard A. Wien. Carl
Susskind. Howard Kane and Isa-
dora Hecht taking active part in
the drive.
Later in the year, Leonard A.
Wien was appointed chairman of
the initial gifts division of the
Development Fund, in charge of
raising $2,000,000 for the ntw hos-
pital.
Best Wishes to the new
MT. SINAI
GOIDKIST POULTRY GROWERS
2181 N.W. 10th Av.ni*
Congratulations
to Mt. Sinai..,
OWN Oil
SUM
A HOME!!
You'll Save PtaJ
on Cooling
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if it's Insulated
with
owenscornKI
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ASK ASOUTOUKW*!
FIREPUtt]
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iber 11. 1959
*Jenisti fhridTiajn
i
THE NEW UROLOGY WING
the Best Operative Program
order to give the best pre-operative and
rrative care, it is hopod that the day will
vhen all urology cases will be assigned to
6a of the hospital which will be designated
rology Wing."
is the anticipation of Dr. Solomon B.
Ian. director since its inception, of Ml. Sinai
lal's Urology Department.
Goldman, reflecting on the past, recalls
d" days at Alton rd.. when the department
improvise equipment, rooms and proced-
[Today, with the development of new facili-
more bed capacity, he hopes that more
fists will bring their cases to the hospital,
increasing the work done and the size of
rology medical staff.
viewing 1he newly-installed equipment. Dr.
lan sees a decided change from their former
when space limitations forced urology to
the major operating rooms with the other
-pressed surgical departments. Where once
Jepartment had one Cystoscopy Room, now
are two. One of these can be converted for
use in major surgery. In the suite, there is the
added convenience of an adjacent dark room for
the development of X-Rays.
One cystoscopy table will be equipped with
electronic and hydraulic mechanisms. This will
allow the doctors to place the table in the varictv
of positions necessary for urolotiic proeedurcs. '
Similar to the other departments at-Mt. Sina;,
the Urology Department takes an aclive part in
training the house staff and surgical residents.
A signed to them to augment and enhance their
general surgical training, the Urology Department
periodically shares grand rounds with the D-
pnrimont of General Surgery. It is the hope of
Dr. Goldman that one day a Urology Residency
program will be established.
Every member of the department is certified
by the American Board of Urology or is qualified
to have such certification in the reasonably near
future,. This greatlv reflects the competency
of the department. Further, most of its members
arc on the urology staff of the University of
Miami School of Medicine.
..iuUWKJ'I'IJWhi; .kiii.til.lli.liiHi.iiii'.' |i": MM Ml
.....i=i :'N mi."-
thology Laboratories: Heart of Sinai's
iplex Healing and Research Activities
I Pathology Laboratory plays
but little known role in
ire of the sick. It is intimate-
solved with the questions of
nature, progress, prognosis
[course of treatment of ill-
The pathologist, director of
laboratory, is a medical doc-
I v. ho is basically a consult-
|>n patient problems. Through
[knowledge and direction of
plcx laboratory facilities, he
the physician answer these
Itions.
Mt. Sinai Hopital, the Path-
Laboratoriea are directed
[T)r. Jerome Benson, who
Its out that pathology is a
Vh of medical science con-
led with the cause and mech-
of disease. The pathologist
It be versed not only in the
fial techniques of his own
ratory, but must also have a
king knowledge of all branch-
t>f medicine.
I thology La born ton os h ave
vn from a dusty back room
into a large well-organized
irtmentalized center, where
^imens of tissue, blood, urine,
al fluid and other body sub
|ces are studied for their cel-
r, biochemical, and bacteri-
lical characteristics. In the
Sinai Hospital of 1949, some
tests were performed. In
I. over 200,000 tests have been
tormed to answer the ques-
ts mentioned here.
OR. JikOtnt UNSOH
. department head
' The pathologist has many func-
tions. He must be a physician, a
teacher, an administrator, and
an investigator. As a teacher, he
is responsible for the constant
post-graduate education and re-
education not only of residents
in his own department, but also
of the interns, residents and at-
tending physicians on the hos-
CONGR ATULATIONS .
and
BEST WISHES
to the new
MT. SINAI HOSPITAL
Mmerican savings
U\j AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI IEACH
AT MIAMI BEACH.'S ALL-AMERICAN CORNER
LINCOLN ROAD AND WASHINGTON AVENUE
ADJACENT FREE PARKING JE 2"5566
SHEPARD BROAD. Chirmin
pital staff. As a teacher, he offers
guidance in the proper selection
of diagnostic tests which may be
performed, and he organizes and
conducts daily conferences for
his own and the hospital staff in
general. These conferences are
conducted in the auditorium, lab-
oratory areas, offices and autop-
sy rooms. He presents to the staff
examples of daily diagnostic
problems which may help phy-
sicians solve present and future
problems. He is also on the fa-
culty of the University of Miami
Medical School. -
As an administrator, the path-
ologist must maintain control of
the quality of laboratory work by
constantly checking the accuracy
of the many laboratory technolo-
gists and clerical personnel, by
making certain that proper
equipment is purchased, develop-
ed and maintained, and by par-
ticipating jointly in conferences
with other physicians toward the
achievement of the highest level
of medical care for patients. The
The pathologist almost auto-
matically finds himself involved
in the consideration of same re-
search problem, usually based on
his daily experience with medical
or surgical patients. The deci-
sions of the pathologist are fre-
quently crucial in that the entire
course of a patient's life may
change based on his opinion.
Training, experience, education
and reeducation are essential for
the pathologist to carry out his
grave and complex responsibili-
ties. With the opening of the new
Mt. Sinai Hospital, the work load
of the Pathology Department will
increase.
The problem of the availability
of medical technologists is -of
major import. High academic re-
quirements coupled with tremen-
dous expansion of nationwide
hospital facilities have created
this shortage. In order to main-
tain the technological staff, Dr.
Benson believes in training his
own at the hospital's School of
Medical Technology, which is ac-
credited nationally by the Amer-
ican Society of Clinical Patholo-
gists.
The course offered by the'school
is one of one year's duration,
during which time the student,
who must have three years of col-
lege before entering, rotates
through the various departments
of the laboratory where he learns
the various techniques under the
guidance of Dr. Benson and his
technological staff. Following this
year of training, the student takes
fen- examination given nationally
to qualify him as a Registered
Technologist. With such techni-
cal help, the Pathology Labora-
tories can achieve their mission
of service to the patient.
Page 11-C
H

Left to right are Mrs. Mac (Rose) Gache, Mrs. Alicia Adams
and Dan B. Ruskin, honorary chairman of the Mt. Sinai Hos-
pital Development Fund. Both are Founders of the hospital,
with individual contributions of over $50,000 each.
Congratulations Good Wishes
WE ARE HAPPY TO SERVE YOU
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619 Washington Ave.
MIAMI BEACH
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738 ARTHUR GODFREY ROAD, MIAMI BEACH
PHOTOGRAPHERS FOR MT. SINAI HOSPITAL SINCE 1945
OUR SINCERE CONGRATULATIONS
ARTHUR DeGUTZ
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CONGRATULATIONS...
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WHOLESALE
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Page 12-C
Sam Levenson as Donor
And Worker in the Birth
- .. M ...
Of a New Medical Center
* Jewish fkrldton
WM
Civic leaders can be divided in-
to three categories: Those who
can contribute financially to a
cause, but cannot spare time to
Work for it; those who can work
but cannot contribute their dol-
lars; and those who are fortu-
nate enough to do both things
give and work. In this third cate-
gory falls Samuel C. Levenson.
Founder and trustee of Mt. Sinai
Hospital of Greater Miami, who
was selected by his colleagues to
head the opening committee.
With not much time to go. Lev-
enson and the members of his
committee, Sam A. Goldstein,
Paul Gordon. David Phillips.
William Singer. Carl Susskind
and Carl Weinkle. set out to work
to make the occasion a success.
For Sam Levenson. working
for the hospital was nothing new
For him it was always giving and
working from the day back in
April. 1952 when he was elected
to the board of trustees of Mt.
Sinai Hospital.
A resident of Miami since De-
cember, 1924. Levenson was for
many years active in the real
estate and investment field. Ob-
serving him in his philanthropic
work, his youthful vigor and
alertness hardly indicate that he
considers himself retired" from
business.
Vitally interested in Mt. Sinai's
progress, his donation of $20.0001
together with his associate and!
brother-in-law, Jacob Sher, In
1953 enabled the hospital to ac-
quire the most advanced X-Ray
equipment, improving its diag
noetic and research facilities.
When fund raising was started
in 1953 for the new Mt. Sinai Hos-
pital. Levenson became chair
man-of the-week with an enviable
record m the history of the De-
velopment Fund then headed by-
Dan B. Ruskin. He has remained
on the executive board of this
hospital division throughout the
years.
Shortly after he was elected
president of Temple Israel, mem-
bers of his congregation offered
a testimonial in his honor in rec-
ognition of the many years of
service he had given to the needs
of his community. The dinner,
which was held in the Temple's
Contribution of J. (;,
lewis1 fcV the Reali,
Of Sinai's Opening Sui
SAM UVIHSON
. rifa/ly JaftrtStW
Wolfson Auditorium, netted $136.-
500 in new pledges and brought
contributions of members of
Temple Israel at that time to an
unequalled $2,135,000, which rep-
resented about 30 percent of all
monies pledged for the hospital's
building fund.
When the founding leaders of
the new Mt. Sinai Hospital en-
visioned the structure which will
be dedicated Sunday, their ulti
mate goal was, simply and to the
point, the finest hospital that
could be built.
That they have been success
ful must be credited to such lead
era as J. Gerald Lewis, Mt. Sinai
Founder and trustee.
Chairman of the building com-
mittee, Lewis was named to this
important position after being
represented in various other de-
partments of the hospital. A resi-
dent of South Florida since 1918.
Lewis is counted among the 17
persons of the original organiza
tion whose dream for the Mt.
Sinai of today began in the "yes
terday," when even the Nautilus
EFFICIENT RECORD SYSTEM TillS THf STORY
How an Active Blood Bank Grew
The story of the Blood Bank of
Mt. Sinai Hospital is as dramatic
as any Hollywood spectacular.
The story would begin in 1949
with the hospital's opening. Dr.
A. R. Hollender, an ear, nose and
throat specialist, was elected
president of the medical staff
and appointed Dr. Mark B. Cir-
Continuod from Pag. j\-C
Mrs S. Harvey Greenspan contributed a quarter of a million
dollars to dedicate the Out Patient Pavilion
Big Moment at Hand
M2 AJ'Ce A.dams' *idow of "* >t inventor of the dial
tmn of&Z^nH ,h f,rS' WOm" ,0under *ilh contrib.
^hr!* t d Waf soon J0,ned bv Mrs Mc Cache while
n fund tadlw, mad<, b, (ou,|er5, "JJ '"""
Little by little, the new structure acquired life A. --
in endless succession, as ^engineers and^ti^ desc*nd*d
manned their stations, and the neTm^L ^ "'.mL"'*8
S1 ^; ^ z ss Set b 2=
The big moment is now at hand
lin. a dermatologist, chairman of
the Blood Bank.
Dr. Cirun recalls tnose early
days with great pleasure. For
while they were filled with the
frustrations of a carelessly unin-
formed public, there were peo-
ple and personalities whose help
he will never forget. One of
tbem, Herman Marcus, was a pa-
tient at the hospital, also em-
ployed in the meat department
of Food Fair. Marcus wanted to
be the first donor. With this in-
itial offer. Dr. Cirlin began the
work of the Blood Bank.
At Mt. Sinai, space was limited.
What could be spared in 1990 was
a small room, a table for bleed-
ing, a tiny area for refining the
blood, a small desk for a part-
time clrk, and a filing cabinet.
This had been the Emergency
Room.
Today at Mt. Sinai Hospital,
the Blood Bank is set up with
one of the most efficient record
systems ever evolved.
Under the guardianship of Dr
Cirlm's assistant. Mrs Ann
Hausman. these records are. in-
deed, as thorough and as care-
fully kept as those of a U. S. cur-
rency bank. There are credits,
debits and balances. Every pro-
cedure is listed.
There are organizational ac-
counts and individual accounts.
The smallest procedure is care-
fully entered in the file upon file
of ledgers. There are varied col-
ored inks to denote "deposit"
"withdrawal." "transfer." And
each has its own particular mean-
ing, each telling its own personal
story of blood that was one day
needed and used, or is now on
deposit for use in the future.
Commercial, fraternal, and
cine organizations maintain
chairmen of their own blood
banks. Drives, such as the one re-
cently of the Elks, brought out
more than 400 donors. Credit for
this blood is placed against the
organization's account. Should
one of its members, or one of bis
immediate family need blood,
his is the privilege of drawing an
unlimited supply, without charge.
In the case of individual accounts,
blood is deposited to the credit
of the donor as he gives it He
can draw upon it to, the limit of
his credit.
By its very nature of iramed
acy. the Blood Bank Is operated
on the principle of "taking goods
out of one pocket to put them into
another." Blood is only good for
21 days, and there is rarely the
room for error that blood will be
Continued en Page 14-C
{compliments of
AITRO WORK SHOPS,
INC.
h
hotel had not jttl
into focus.
To imagine the i
which accompanied ail
sinn of so impress*,)
is. according to Leu|
the building of 11
tial home. Maktsr/1
any hundred maatoj
and you begin til
problems.
The enormous jot I
earliest stages rtal
plans were praoafl
prn.al II was keaHkaf
pan-on between 11
pital aatomiti
end. For the
tions which mat'
would have first lo|
to the medial
ing area this would!
Detail upon detal
mulled over, agreed
ed. New problem
others ceased to -
piece of equipment !
proved, each item
maximum amoaatll
and durability.
Out of the nowasM
advent of the Julu M
way, a pronouncena>l
now make the sttlL
"Collins Island." Mil
part of the miinlaMf
revision of the
was forced, new eatrjf
changes in ldscM
ing areas.
It is estimated '"J.
when the buildioi M
committee Uudcbn W
a total of 162 meetnf!
averaging from *T
to two hours eiet-
include the earhw"
rectors meetinpL
merahlf ho""****!
visit.- to other *>
liminary session*
A full time J* *]
tion. Lewis hi tjg
effort toward UV **
original goal.
CONGRATULATIONS
SOUTHERN ELECTRICAL
INC
LIGHTING FIXTURES BJCTRICAL SH"*
WHOLESALE
67 N.W. 10th Street P*""*


11. 1959
Jmlhti FhrkMam
Page 13-C
FOR ORTHODOX OBSERVANT JEWRY
\. Facilities List Kosher Kitchen
I the great sources of satisfaction for
|ws of South Florida is that Mt. Sinai
Intains for those who observe Die-
hseparate and strictly Kosher Kitchen,
supervision of Rabbi Kalmen Sha-
who live by Orthodox principles in
ne can be assured of the same con-
a patient.
Sinai for the past ten years, Rabbi
ills the early days when the rabbinate
Miami hailed the hospital's decision
these facilities. Max Orovitz, presi-
Sinai, recognizing the importance of
facilities available, lent his instant
[the Kashruth program.
Mt. Sinai Hospital, a specific area of
has been set aside for Rabbi Shapiro's
All equipment is geared to the inde-
fice of "Dairy" and "Meat." Over-
doors separate these kitchens from
and it is from this point in the hos-
patients who live by Kosher principles
ill find their meals served in the com-
rity that these principles will not be
Miami's most modern kitchen has the
latest equipment for steam cooking, mix-
ing and meat cutting, with plenty of work-
ing space and a special area devoted ex-
clusively to kosher kitchen facilities.
.,,,,,..,,.,,.; ::'!"!ii';i,riiiiiiii'n:r:iia,i!,ruii


of the Gloria and Leon Lowen-
bs' Residence taken from the edge
rimming pool. The building has 72
studio apartments and will accommodate 138
members of the Nursing Department.
luel Gertner: Mt. Sinai Executive Head
Gertner, executive di-
Mt. Sinai Hospital of
[Miami dedicated him-
fade ago to a "Mt. Sinai
rank with the finest in
New York, he received
Ror of Education and
of Arts degree from
jinia University in 1928.
did post graduate work
fork University and Co-
Jniversity. Starting in
social worker with the,
rnt of Health and Wei-
ew York City, he ad-
|d the position of direc-
istrator of the depart-
iary. 1945, he was named
director of the Syden-
pital in New York City,
left shortly after to be-
fistant director of Beth
p'spHal of New York.
September, 1949 when
he accepted the position and as-
sumed his duties as executive di-
rector of the Alton Road Hospital,
-with his first task being the con-
version of the Nautilus property
for hospital use and the subse-
quent transfer of patients to the
building.
This marked the beginning of
an herculean task. It was the be-
ginning of the building of a team
doctors, nurses, administrative
assistants with one goal in
mind: to make Mt. Sinai a hos-
pital dedicated to patient care,
research and teaching.

A Coordinate Tam
Without research, without
teaching, thi. would flot have
been the kind of hospital- the
community expected.
Securing the recognition of Mt.
Sinai Hospital by the American
Medical Assn. for the training oi
CONGRATULATIONS..'.
FRANK SNARY
SWIM POOL SERVICE
SERVICE & EQUIPMENT
MAINTENANCE
N.E. 4th Court Phone PL 7-5741
iAMUtL GfNINtt
. higher tlaaiardt
Leon Lowenstein Endows
$250,000 Building Slated
As Residence for Nurses
This story should start with
"Once there was a winter visitor
to Miami Beach ." Seven years
have passed since Leon Lowen-
stein, president of one of the
world's largest textile enterpris-
es, presented a check for $5,000
to Max Orovitz to permit the es-
tablishment of Mt. Sinai Hospit-
tal's first research project on ar-
teriosclerosis.
Leon Lowenstein ever since has
given money and time to Mt. Si-
nai Hospital. The textile magnate
whose father was born in West-
phalia- Germany, and whose mo-
ther came from the Isle of Wight
in the English Channel, is not a
man who likes to think in terms
of tradition. He opines that every
man has to be educated "to care
for the other fellow" and that
this principle applies to nations
as well as to individuals.
"I started out giving $250 each
year to help others," he recalls.
By now, millions of dollars have
been distributed by his Founda-
tion.
When, during one of his winter
visits to Miami Beach he heard
about Mt. Sinai Hospital's expan-
sion plans which included the
building of a nurses' residence,
he immediately embraced the
project.
Ready for occupancy during
the present month of December,
the building has spacious rooms,
including a library- The three
floors are served by an elevator,
and each studio apartment has
a fully equipped kitchen-refrig-
erator unit which can be hidden
behind a folding door. A large
dressing room with closet space,
shelves and drawers leads into
the bathroom. The building is
centrally air-conditioned; furni-
ture is modern and cheerful.
LEON lOWENSTE/N
. earing for others
Large picture windows opening
on Biscayne Bay offer a wonder-
ful view.
The hospital's Olympic sized
swimming pool is now part of
the nurses' residence recreation-
al area. A special parking lot for
59 cars completes the installa-
tion built at a cost of over $250,-
000.
And when Jan. 3. 1960 comes
around, a formal opening of the
premises will be presided over
by Leon Lowenstein, who will
dedicate the beautiful building to
his wife Gloria, "the Belle of At-
lanta," whom he married in 1936.
And the "Gloria and Leon Lowen-
stein Nurses Home" will become
the residence of 138 wonfen in
white who learned "to care for
others," which is the motto of
their benefactor.
interns and residents was funda-
mental.
In his second annual report
dating back to 1952, Gertner
stated that "in an organization
as complex as the modern hos-
pital, diligent and coordinated
work is the key to progress. To
the patient in the operating room
the skill of the surgeon is vital,
but the necessary assistance of
the anesthetist, the scrub nurse,
the laboratory technician, the
pharmacist, nutritionist, and
many other skilled and unskilled
workers cannot be overlooked.
"The ever-increasing patient
load at Mt. Sinai Hospital has
meant ever increasing stress up-
on this teamwork, which is es-
sential to save lives and restore
health to the patients we serve."
In the growing years of Mt.
Sinai, Gertner's administration
had to conform many times to
financial limitations, which re-
tarded but could not hinder the
progress of the hospital's de-
partments.
*
Constant Progress
Much progress, however, was
made in adjusting the hospital's
limited sources towards better
patient care.
That on his busy days he still
found time to fill such posts as
trustee of the Florida Hospital
Assn., be a member of the board
of directors of the Florida Blue
Cross, become a vice president
and later a president of the
South Florida Hospital Council,
is just another indication that
Gertner fulfilled his mission.
In the new building, Gertner's
job will be still greater. But his
past success indicates that he
will devote himself to work in im-
proved surroundings with a larg-
er "team," for a still bigger goal:
to set new standards in hospital
care for the hospitals of the na-
tion.
Congratulations...
DEVOE & RAYNOLDS
CO., Inc.
Vinyl Wonder-Tones 87 Spar Varnish
Wonder-Pruf Wonder-matic Colors
Vinyl Masonry Paint Alkyd Flat Wall Enamels
Mildew and Fume Resistant
House Paints
2127 N. Miami Avenue
FR 3-2026
k


Page 14-C
+Jmi*t> rkrkHnn
Mt. Sinai Development Fund Contribution
Continued from Pag* 7-C
ated within the Development
Fund under the co-chairman-lup
of Aaron Kanner. Sidney Lef-
court, and Dr. Meyer Egg]
to solicit pledges from lawyers,
accountants and dentists in the
Greater Miami area. Two weeks
after' ground had been broken,
pledges had swollen to $2,373,000.
Revision of Plant
On December 3, 1956. a gala
dinner at the Fontainebleau ho-
tel brought $355,000 in pledges,
thus bringing the total over the
three million dollar mark.
In the meantime, practically
every civic organization on Mi-
ami Beach had contributed in one
form or another to the hospital's
progress, notably the Rotary
Club, the Kiwanis, the Bayshore
Exchange Club, Miami Beach
Men's Fashion Guild, the Order
of True Sisters, and many, many
more.
By March, 1957. Ruskin an-
nounced that funds totaled $3.-
250.000. But in view of Miami's
continuing growth, a revision of
building plans had to be made.
Instead of a 300-bcd structure to
cost four million dollars, a 417-
bed hospital was envisioned, add-
ing another two floors to the
planned six, and enlarging con-
sequently all of the basic service
areas.
Estimates tor the construction
itself had to be raised to $7,000.-
000. and in August. 1957 a new
campaign was mapped by Rus-
kin. which put Wien and How-
ard Kane, then retiring president
of the Greater Miami Jewi-h Fed-
eration, at the head of the Initial
Gifts Division
Changes took place in other
committees as Sam Goldstein be-
came successor to Susslrind and
Chaikin as head of the Commer-
cial Division, Named by Ruskin
to serve with Goldstein were Jos-
eph L. Arkin. George A. Bert-
man, Joseph Cohen. Samuel E.
Schwartz. Aaron Kravitz and
William A. Weintraub
A total of 38 Founders were
among the (OeftH who witnessed
the unveiling of the first 16
bronze heads sculpted bv Da-
vid Newman, and Dan B. Ruskin
was able to announce that funds
had increased to $3,600,000 as
1957 came to a dOM
In June. 1958. Harold L. Dun-
sky. until then assistant city
manager for State of Israel
Bonds in Chicago, was appointed
executive director of the Devel-
opment Fund, and new offices
were established at 924 Lincoln
rd.
Women-* Auxiliaries
In the meantime. Mt. Sinai
Hospital Women's Auxiliary,
which had contributed heavily to
the hospital's campaign, an-
nounced that it set itself a goal
of $250,000 to endow the Matern-
ity Floor in the new building.
Mrs Philip Lefkowitz, Auxiliary
president, appointed past-presi-
dent Mrs. Morris Goldin as liai-
son chairman for the project.
Less than three weeks later,
Mrs. Leonard A. Wien was per-
suaded to become chairman of
the project.
At this moment. $475,000 of the
overall half-million dollar goal of
the Auxiliary has been raised by
Mt. Sinai's women.
As the doctors' committee was
able to announce the fulfillment
of its goal of $500,000. it also ac-
cepted the responsibility to dou
ble its pledges which at this time
stand at $850,000.
By the end of October. 1958.
Ruskin. after heading the hos-
pital's fund-raising effort for four
years, handed his job over to
Wien, and became honorary
chairman of the Development
Fund. The husband and wife
team of Leonard and Marjone
Wien began to make history.
The Gifts Swell
The Women's Division got
into action with a "Tribute to
Godmothers" luncheon w h ic h
netted the first woman Founder
in the person of Mrs. Alicia Ad-
ams, widow of the late inventor
of the dial telephone. Mrs. Sarah
Czech became first founder of
the Maternity Wing with a con-
tribution of $25,000. Total of the
women's affair amounted to $168,
000, thus c\ Ibiaj the di-
,.ns original pledge of $250,-
000. Days later, Marjone Wien.
in announcing the remit, pledged
herself and her friends to raise
an additional $250,000 for the
equipment and furnishings of the
Maternity Department.
At the Founder's Dinner of
April 25, 1959, a total of 53 had
obtained the rank of "Founder,"
and the first woman Founder was
joined by a second in the person
of Mrs. Rose Cache.
In May, 1959, the Jacob Mmd-
lin family announced a donation
of $50,000 to perpetuate the mem-
ory of their late son, Saul. Mt.
Sinai's first Founder memorial.
During the lull of the summer,
plans were laid for a "women's
special." a "Blessed Event," at
which more than 600 women fill-
ed the Fontainelileau hotel's ball-
room to record pledges exceed-
ing $160,000.
After the count. Mi. Sinai had
223 "Godmothers" (at a $1,000
each), and more than 800 had
pledged life-membership to the
Women's Auxiliary, their $100 in-
dividual contributions marked
for the Development Fund.
A Greater Miami fund-raising
committee was formed, headed
by Aaron Kanner and Maurey
Ashmann. Their campaign is still
in progress as this story is writ-
ten.
As 1959 draws to a close, as the
doors of the new Mt. Sinai Hos-
pital are about to open. Leonard
and Marjone Wien. leaders of the
drive, can look forward with high
hopes to reach their goal.
CARPI0-PULM0NARY LABORATORY
New Vistas of Aid in Battle
Against Major Human Ailment
When the Cardio -Pulmonarv
Laboratory of Mt. Sinai Hospital
began its functions in July, 1955,
the staff consisted of a total of
three, including its director. Dr.
Philip Samet. Today, four years
later, the department has quad
rupled its staff and given to the
world a roster of important
medical findings
Concerned with research and
teaching, the department's sub-
jects for study are most often re-
ferred by physicians in private
practice. At t.mes. patients come
from the service area or that
part of the hospital set-up to ac-
commodate those whose cannot
afford the services of a private
physician. In addition to its reg-
ular beds for service patients.
Congratulations...
AL & NAT ZALKA
CERTIFIED
POULTRY and EGG CO.. Inc.
"Over a Quarter of | Century in Miami"
WHOLESALE and EXPORTER
POULTRY, EGGS and DAIRY PRODUCTS
s DISTRIBUTOR
BLUE RIBBON PRODUCTS
HOTEL end RESTAURANT PURVEYORS
FRonkfifi 9-0675
41 N.W. 10th Street
five research beds are set aside,
available free to the medically
indigent.
It is in the research depart-
ment that patients with various
types of heart and lung disease
are carefully examined and stud-
i-d It i> here that their medical
history is taken, that they under-
go physical examination, that
X-Rays and cardiograms are ae>
corded.
Dr. Samet, an assistant profee
sor of physiology in medicine at
the University of Miami, devotes
a minimum of 15 hours a week.
very week of the year, to the
teaching of the hospital's house
staff. Developed has been a med-
ical and surgical team consist-
ing of Dr. Samet and Dr. Robert
Litwack, of the university's school
of medicine. Patients with con-
genital and acquired heart dis-
eases are selected and their sur-
gical treatment carried out. Dur-
ing the past four years the work
by the team has shown a steady
increase in both traffic and in
findings.
The move to new Mt. Sinai '.ias
brought a new look to the Cardlo-
Pulmonary Laboratory. Formerly
boused in three and a half rooms
over a spread of 580 sq ft., the
labs are now located in seven
.rooms, touting 2.850 sq. ft. For
the staff of two technicians, a
nurse and a secretary, plus a
Physician who is usually a re-
search Feuow in Cardiology from
the university school of medi
erne, there will be, for the first
time, vastly improved working
conditions.
Offered win be the opportunity
to expand the number of prot-
ects and with it the ability to
render a service to more pupli
Some 180.000 worth of equipment
already exists In the lab. But new
m"L*^LJ^H *> for
seen processing as the coeatse*
ad analysis of rad% MU,t
ses. analysis of heart and pres-
ssres. and analysis of blood ...
es. A "treadmill" bee been aetf
ed to ttody ^ ntxamB
tjwis who are physically er-
Chung.
W
Sarah Csech. first founder of ML Sinai Hospital's
Wing, shown with Jacob Sher. chairman oi the
Group.


I
Dr. Philip Samet in his Cardie-Pulmonary Laboratry.
Growth of the Blood
Continued from Peso 12 C
overstocked and its important
use lost.
As such, there Is in constant
use a system of interchangeable
credits with other hospitals. At
times, blood is sent to different
hospitals in the nation with a
credit hsted toward the future
account of the hospital which
provides it.
There are occasions when a
bank's "assets" may be quickly
depleted as in the recent case of
a woman who used 32 pints in
one day. The demand is always
great, the blood is used rapidly,
and there are few times when it
is outdated.
During the past year, almost
a thousand more pints were used
over that of preceding years.
Used chiefly in surgery and
sometime before in preparation,
blood has become a prune requi-
site in the treatment of anemia,
leukemia, accidents, and shock.
To keep the books of the Bank
always in the black. Dr. Cirlin
is constantly on the go, often to
the detriment of his own private
practice A consUBt
is his wife. Emily. k-i
from the initial d| U
courtship has worsts' m
at his side. Promptly, i
a.m. on Sundays, beBsI
pie are enjoying ^y *l
terrupted rest. Mrs. Oriel1
with her husband to "
place in the Blood Basti
actively participates m H
cessing.
On the mobile edbj *
times have operated a
ing sun. at others in ten*".
eight tables are taken jam
pads, linens and the
equipment necessary
the blood Last year. *'
units were in u^J^sl
this year is s connda
crease.
The story of the
actually has *%
Mrs. Cirlin, to Mrs.*"*!
Dr. Jacob Neber *
meats bematolopst <
technician Mary Jo m
the other n*"b ^
new hit Sinairep**"^
step forward in th**
WE ARE PROUD TO HAVE
INSTALLED THE
CUTLER MAIL CHUTES
FOR THE NEW MT. SINAI HOSPITAL
O. 0. BRINSON
2872 N.W. 34th Street **>" *


11. 1959
*b"isl IhiiHtr
io/ogy Via the Motion Picture
tion picture, long a
entertainment and
will with the open-
new Mt. Sinai Hos*
an important part
of the Department
gy.
direction of Dr.
rich, introduced will
Cine Fluoroscope,
X-Ray in actual
pictures, such vital
irts of the body as
jnd the coronary ar-
w the first time,
be X-Rayed in mo-
will speech and
Bfects. A library of
films will be developed which
will allow for the teaching of
fluoroscopy to house staff, in-
fcrni and resident doctors
without the need to expose the
patients.
The Cine-Fluoroscope is but
one of the new innovations
which will characterize the
equipment of Radiology. For-
merly housed in a crowded 10
rooms, space in the new build-
ing will offer 29 rooms with
an accompanying 40 percent
increase in diagnostic equip-
ment.
Three divisions mark the
work of the Radiology De-
partment. X-Ray diagnosis
finds the cause and identifies
t.te disease,. The Radiq-Tler-
apy Division offers X-Ray ma-
chines and radium for the
treatment of tumors, can-
cers, and allied diseases.
Found in the Radio-Isotope
Division are the devices for
the correction of thyroid and
cardiac conditions.
In addition to its active
work wil.h patients, the Radi-
ology Department devotes a
great deal of its time toward
the teaching of the hospital's
house staff and the training
of X-Ray technicians. In its
"* iuJ!--:i.i"imniii .--in rrMrirau nmm -_ _
rial
Miimiriiiivi i :'.:' i.....HHMPM

Continued from Pago 2-C
Ration with other local agencies to offer
lunity medical care at par with any
pital in this country," he explained,
ire constantly engaged in research. Our
es are studying the abnormalities of the
lungs by means of special equipment,
tie various diseases affecting the cardio-
circuit.
ML Sinai is proud to have in its new
the physical facilities for open heart
special team is working on the pro-
will require further acquisition of
cial equipment,
lical research will solve many of our
problems and will result in prolonging
Ian of the people. We, the doctorsand
lat I can speak for all of my colleagues
rs available to give our time to promote
ind better health."
Jathan, a Mt. Sinai staff member since
^ion, is proud of the subdivisions working
jurisdiction, and their respective heads
e: Cardiology, Dr. Victor Kugel; Cardio-
ry Physiology, Dr. Phillip Samet; Chest
Dr. Seymour B. London; Gastro-Entei-
Chester Cassel; Allergy, Dr. Nelson
ermltotogy,. Dr. Lewis Capland; Neuro-
ry. Dr. Bernard Goodman; HemStology,
Neber.
Ese men and the doctors in their 95 divis-
all dedicated specialists," he explained.
ecords and achievements in their .fields
. of the history of Mt. Sinai Hospital, part
listory of thi community which today
Awaits Moving Day
M. DAVID NATHAN
. special team
with the opening of the new Mt. Sinai Hospital of
Greater Miamihas laid the foundation for a bet-
ter tomorrow."
rective Healing and Teaching Program
Lied from Pago 5-C
It have completed
internship of one
Irs.
tending staff member
i doctor in practice who
the hospital his private
He is in charge of
teaching, and in order to qualify
for an appointment on the attend-
iiic ing staff, the physician must take
or assignments in teaching the
house staff.
Mt. Sinai is one of the few pri-
vate hospitals in the state that
offers approved internship in sur
gical residency and training.
ngratulations...
JOHN LOWE
BAULKING
COMPANY
288 N.W. 108th Street
PL 8-7895

The intern assigned to surgical
services is informed that he will
spend a determined number of
days in General Surgeryinclud-
ing Thoracic, Neuro, Proctology
and Plasticin Urology, Ortho-
pedics and in Pediatrics. His as-
signment, be it clinic, operating
room or other functions, is made
by the chief resident.
With each new case, he be-
comes a student of surgery under
a resident to whom he is directly
responsible and who in turn, as-
surors the responsibility to the
chief for the intern's work.
The intern is cautioned to re-
member that "to each patient
coming in for a surgical proced-
ure, this is the most important
event of his life. He should be
made to feel that he has put hjs
life in the very best and sincer-
est of hands."
In charge of the residents at
Mt. Sinai is Chief Resident Dr.
Chang-You-Mu. In addition to
his responsibilty of directing the
activities of his resident staff, he
has himself experienced every
type of major surgery.
Operating on a third year level,
within the realm of the Chief
Resident is the charge of the en-
tire surgical house staff, includ-
ing residents and Interns. He
prepares their monthly schedule
of assignments and submits it
for approval to the doctor. He
supervises the work of the assis-
tant residents, and through them,
the interns assigned to surgery.
He makes daily rounds, is respon-
sible for the care of all staff pa-
tiets, of the clinics, and for staff
consultations.
Page 15-C
department of 20, research
and investigation is a continu-
ing programas its participa-
tion in medical and surgical
conferences; often, Dr. Wid-
rich is called upon to exhibit
the department's findings in
talks around'the country."
That these activities will in-
crease is indicated by the de-
partment's practical recogni-
tion in terms of the purchase
of its new equipment. The
Cine-Fluoroscope is but one
addition. Installed, too, is the
Cobalt Bomb, a therapy ma-
chine whose radio-active iso-
tope cobalt derivative is plac
ed in a container and pro-
duces X-Rays similar to that
obtained from a two million-
volt X-Ray machine. High
kilo-volt Radiography has been
set up, which allows for X-Ray
examination of patients with
much less X-Ray dose or ex-
posure to the patient. An Im-
age Amplifier which discards
the dark room and fluoro-
scopes patients instead in an
ordinary lighted room will
tend to reduce the apprehen-
sion of patients and at the
same time make for more ac-
curate diagnosis.
Dr. Widrich, a former assist-
ant professor of radiology at
Ohio State University's Col-
lege of Medicine, has been as-
sociated with Mt. Sinai for the
past four years. With the in-
creased facilities, equipment
and functions, he feels the De-
partment of Radiology is on a
threshold bright with future
discovery.
BEST WISHES
VENETIAN ITALIAN ICES
WATER ICES
466 S.W. 17th Avenue
FR 3-1968
Congratulations...
BILL OVERTON
FENCE
CONTRACTORS,
INC.
Covering the State of Florida
2455 N.W. 76th Street
OX 1-2672
CONGRATULATIONS
TMI
MIRACLI WEDGI
OVERHEAD DOOR COMPANY
OF MIAMI. INC.
MIAMI 38, FLORIDA
SALE SERVICE INSTALLATION
7501 N.E. 3rd Place Phone PL 8-5513
1*25 S.E. 6th Ave., Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., JAckson 2-3092


Page 16-C
+Je*i&.ntrMk*n



Captain of a
Continued from Pago 4-C
tec of the Community Chest in
1946, 147 and 1948, and also .,
director of the organization i 1
many years.
Lff was president of the Great
er Miami Jewish Federation
from 1945 through 1947. and sin re
then was mad* an honorary pres-
ident, lie iaV* a Mason and a
Shrinar.
OrovJtz lias been a president
of TWnple Israel of Miami and
a director of the citizens' board
JheUnitaAfil
vnmm of <
1858.
Aside from tj
b,usins. rtimk1
sUunch fanulii
ned to the fc,
^ fiber ol m
ren Jimw ^"
He maiauan a
rii- nd hi$ ,
Beach for
Keeping the community informed about ML
Sinai Hospital's progress is a constant pre-
occupation of the Women's Auxiliary and
Nursing Department. Here they cooperate in
the presentation of the Mt. Sinai story at the
Ocean Front Auditorium. Left to right are Pink
Ladies Tracy Auspitz, Kay Daspin and Lillian
Shaw. Center is Mrs. Carmen Ross, director of
Nursing and Nursing Education. Student
nurses, now licensed practical nurses, are
Wanda Cluett, L. Wilton, Barbara Hawley.
Mary Dizon and Ruth Adslui.
Busy Nurses' Director to be Even Busier
These arc hectic days for Car-
men Ross, who is Mt. Sinai Hos-
pital's director of Nursing and
Nin-in. Education. Bestdesyher
obligations to supervise the run-
ning of a hospital in full opera-
tion, -he has to schedule her day
and nightt to hold training -
sions with her present staff an.I
many newcomers in the new
building, to orientate them in
their new surroundings, and to
familiarize them with the many
technical facilities which they
will encounter and which are des-
tined to make the nurses' hi i
Aster.
Actually, in the new huHrltnr
each floor is a hospital in itself
in which the nurses' working
area is condensed in a triangle
forming the core of the patient
floor.
Each patient will pull a string
to be connected by the nurses'
audio-visual call to the nurses'
station. The nurse*-, on the other
hand, can talk at will to the pa-
tient without visiting his room
Part of the Internal setup
are the head mines' oflice. a nur
at1 loOBfC, two medication and
drug room- one examination and
conference mom, and the stain-
less steel shehes for linen and
other supplies, plus storage space
I r wheelchairs and stretcher
bed-. There is also a completely
equipped pantry
Mrs. Ross became associated
with Mt Sinai in 1952. and late
in November. 1953, she was ap-
pointed director of Nursing Ed-
ucation, after having been a nur
sing education consultant and
public health coordinator with
the Tuberculosis and Health
Assn., and having acted as ad
>r to approximately 56 scr-ools
of nursing and hospitals in the
Greater New York area.
At the time, she was also
teaching preventive medicine in
evening classes a' the University
of Miami. She holds a BS de-
gree in n irsmg Education and
an MA degree from Columbia
I'nivcrsity.
In December. 1955. a high
honor was bestowed on Mrs.
Ross, when she was selected as
one of a half dozen nurses
throughout the nation to draft a
state examination series for prac-
tical nurses.
In her new environment, she
will head an enlarged nursing
staff, as well as a vastly-increas-
ed student body. The area of her
domains will have tripled their
surface.
Congratulations...
KARL FREll
STONE and MARBLE
MARBLE PARTITIONS
DRESSING BOOTHS
2842 S.W. 61th Avenct
MO 1-2697
.
lAJith Jhe {-compliments of
IPCC
HOSPITAL SUPPLY

CORPORATION


Full Text

PAGE 1

n 11. 1959 ^JewlslifhrSdgaui VUtKD COWK DISIGN •Taking Beauty [s Hospital's Interior kerior facade of the new Mt. Sinai Hospital is breathOpe, those who see the interior for the first time equally revealing new concept in hospital color and Ible for so radical a change in this specialized field, Ultant and decorator, Mr. James, of Ft. Lauiierdale! i career in New York where he graduated from the ol of Design, Mr. James went on to Havana, Cuba, ork caught the appreciative eye of Miamians. It T that he found himself decorating the finest homes enis in South Florida, lai Hospital proved to be his first real challenge, lediately, Mr. James decided his approach would be Tie legend that a hospital must be "grey," not only t in feeling. hospital I have known has been drab, sterile and I wanted Mt. Sinai to suggest an open arm welcome saying, 'sit down and relax; everything is going to ftr rather than to depress their spirits was what |had in mind when he selected the Herman Schack rff mural which graces the South Wall of the FounUneasiness would immediately be dissipated, momentarily forgotten, When patients found them\g this glowing and stimulating work. the patient a "lift" was what Mr. James was after, cision was to do it with softly pleasing pastels. The Irne a study in easy blues, yellows and antique white. Itient Room, which often accommodates those who rd private medical attention, would be done in the IIR of orange, yellows and whites, rgeons' Lounge was designed in color and feeling to comfortable livingroom while the Board Room would air of business comfort with its bleached walnut accented in green, texturized fabrics, and gold fof the eight floors is different in color scheme from The patient rooms are never repeated within easy Maternity Wing, new-born babies will find their first jred in blue. Their proud dads will await their arrival pectant Father's Room, a comfortable salon done in litiand beige with the added touch of a closed circuit [system to show their offspring as soon as feasible. Eighth Floor, which is the top floor of the hospital, is the "Country Club." Ambulatory patients will find Dm furnished in Italian Provincial complemented by s' selection of wormy chestnut walls, fames wanted td please rather than shock. That his I been well-received is evidenced by the admiration of ve ventured into what might have been a concrete eptk institution, but who found, instead, a hospital ends its welcome in subdued and restful colors. right are Cyril Lewis, purchasing agent for the ^ Sinai Hospital, examining drapery material Jr. James (center) and Joe Rose, member of the kg and planning committee in charge of furniture. Page 9-C GAVE US MUCH PLEASURE TO [RTICIPATE IN THE BUILDING OF IE NEW MT. SINAI HOSPITAL SAUL MINDUN • • • to Mtmoriam Early Years Continued from Pag* 2-C Sinai Hospital. For five consecutive years, Ed Sullivan acted as master of ceremonies of the Mt. Sinai Jubilee to raise hundreds of thousands of dollars. Last October, he wrote: "Congratulate everybody for me on the 'new* Mt. Sinai, and tell them all that I've never participated in any charity effort which gave me greater enduring pleasure." • • QN June 1, 1951, registration was opened for the School of Practical Nursing. Exactly one month later, seven medical school graduates started intern training. Medical research, centered in the Pathology Laboratories Of the hospital, also received great impulse with the appointment of Dr. Maurice Lev as director of laboratories in August, 1951. Weeks later, Mt. Sinai opened its tumor clinic, and on Sept. 12 of the same year, the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation began to function. Two months after its opening, the School of Practical Nursing was accredited by the National Assn. for Practical Nurse Education as the first school in Florida to receive this distinction. As the second year of the hospital's operation came to an end, 8,052 patients had been admitted over the 12-month period, and 5.086 patient visits were made at the Out-Patient Department. In early 1952, Mt. Sinai added cytology testing to its examinations. On Jan. 9, medical history was made with the formation of the first tnam of cardiac surgeons, thus making Mt. Sinai the first hospital in the State of Florida to be able to offer the community such a service. In March, 1952, following the promise to serve the community irrespective of race or creed, Mt. Sinai awarded staff privileges to the first Negro doctor, in the person of Dr. Aubrey Warren Henry, who until this day has remained on the hospital's roster. And in May of the same year a 24 bed wing for Negro patients was added to its facilities. RT LAUDERDALE GLASS CO., INC. N.E. 4th Avenue Fort Lauderdale, Florida Contemplation Room Continued from Page 4-C by then President Harry S. Truman to the President's Commission on the Health Needs of the Niion. Max Orovitz, president, says that the Founders gift was the first of such magnitude to be made for the establishment of a memorial at Mt. Sinai. Saul Mindlin was a graduate of Townsend Harris Hall, New York, and Brooklyn College, where he received the AB degree with honors. He was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. In 1941, he joined the Navy Department in Washington, D.C., rose rapidly through the ranks, and by 1944 was an assistant to George Keenan in the War Production Board, an advisor to then President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. At the conclusion of World War II, Mr. Mindlin was assigned to the Veterans Administration as national chief of the psychiatric division in prosthetics. In this capacity, he was instrumental in developing the program and drawing up the government contracts that later brought the Menninger Foundation of Topeka, Kans., into the VA hospital system. He was a chess-playing friend of Drs. William and Karl Menninger. In this office, he also wrote up and saw through Congress a bill that raised the pay of physicians, dentists and nurses in the Veterans administration. The bill was designed to induce medical personnel to remain with the VA system after their training period. Appointed by President Truman to the President's Commission on the Health Needs of the Nation in January, 1952, several weeks after he turned 30, Saul Mindlin fell ill shortly thereafter. His brother, Leo Mindlin, executive editor of The Jewish Florldian, survives him in addition to his parents. Into the Saul Mindlin Contemplation Room at Mt. Sinai Hospital each year will come thousands of persons seeking solace and faith through meditation. The life and work of the room's namesake properly symbolize its central intent. COOPERATION NOUD Cooperation of the Publicity Department of Mt. Sinai Hospital of Greater Miami is herewith acknowledged in the preparation of this Jewish Floridian supplement marking the dedication of the new hospital on Sunday afternoon. Congratulations from 1 CHANTICLEER INC. TI 1 ICED FRYERS and FOWL --CALIFORNIA TURKEYS L 1. DUCKS -"-•' CORNISH GAME HENS ;~~? Delivery W. Palm Beach to Key West *— 1071 N.W. 21st Terrace FR 1-4758 CONGRATULATIONS GONDAS CORPORATION MACHINERY 151 N.W. 54th Street Phone PL 7-5531 CONGRATULATIONS... HEYWOODWAKEFIELD HEYWOOD WAKEFIELD FOR THE FINEST IN AUDITORIUM SEATING A Few of Our Recent Installations ———— Mt. Sinai Hospital Carib Theater Congregation Beth Tfilah Temple Beth Am Beech Theater Beth Jecob Congregation Gulfttream Park Circle Theater St. Joaeph' School Cutler Cove School Temple Zion Miami Jai Alai Fronton SEATING AND FURNITURE FOR EVERY TYPE INSTALLATION SYNAGOGUES CHURCHES SCHOOLS HOTELS MOTELS CLUBS INSTITUTIONS FLORIDA DISTRIBUTORS F. E. VAN HOESEN CO. SEATING PRODUCTS OF DISTINCTION FOR FLORIDA 1001 N.E. 82nd Terrace Miami 38, Fla. PL 1-2484 i



PAGE 1

fewish Floridian Florida, Friday, December 11, 1959 i-llBMum niiililirM.mil PMiniimiimii u %  i Section C Ten years of Jewish community planning will be fulfilled Sunday at dedication ceremonies of the new Mt. Sinai Hospital of Greater Miami. For details of the program, see Page 1-A. 1 I ii :iM.'i!.r;i'!.:r::::,.:. ,: %  HMMMMII BMMM MMM rf u v n 11 IL l^i 1 %  : %  V .£ %  i f ^P *• 1 1' I %  1 r M %  ft -' %  '' M 1 "i %  •fc. ..' r 1 airr 1 ^^^^^ IS i i : --# a III J %  j —. *., .*. "j 111 HP %  >a ^tj> < >-" % % % % %  AMI %  anaaaai NEW MT. SINAI HOSPITAL OF GREATER MIAMI THE CULMINATION OF A DREAM. lew Mt. Sinai Hospital Opens Doors Sunday Jew Ml Sinai Hospital, which II open its doors Sunday, repents the largest community Dject ever undertaken in FlorI. Behind it is an investment of ler $9,000,000 in what can be isidercd one of the most ad[need hospitals in the nation, iuilt on the former Collins Isli, Miami Beach, its entire sur|ce of 30 acres is now part of mainland through fill-in from Iscayne Bay. [Smith and Korach, A.I.A., were architects of this colossus of icrete, steel and tile which ok six years of planning. Dr. erman Smith, nationally-known spital consultant, from Chica, 111., assisted in designing the jtcility. Taylor Construction Cornany, of Miami, were the buildh. [One of the main considerations planning the new Mt. Sinai nspital was to reduce as much possible the cost of maintence of the building itself. Thus, Jctural and decorative tile has sen used in abundance—2,500,000 peces— and a washable wall coving —vinyl-covered fabric— has een used in all patient rooms. Floors throughout the building re covered in vinyl tiles, with exception of the surgical reas and the auditorium, where "scial floors were installed. AH corridors in the service reas and all patient floors are Jed, with working areas marked p yellow walls, while color in •tient areas change from floor floor. All services have been Dstalled on the main floor. DomKating consideration for this ar[•ngement was the possibility of T>re expansion of these departBents. %  aaBMWBM : ; "^ % %  MHMMMMMM % %  ^/* •Special Jewish jj-loridian i^upph evnent The near-$ 10,000,000 new Mt. Sinai Hospital of Greater Miami, representing the culmination of ten years of planning by the Jewish community here, will be dedicated in long-awaited ceremonies Sunday. The Jewish Floridian presents this special Mt. Sinai Supplement as a commemoration of the event. In its pages will be found a history, by word and picture, of the men and women whose devotion to the task of presenting Greater Miami with a medical institution comparable to the finest in the nation has persisted in the face of great obstacles demanding equally great self-sacrifice. Their vision, energy and contribution of countless man-hours of work and funds are the legacy bequeathed to the Greater Miami Jewish and general communities in the form of the new Mt. Sinai Hospital—its research, healing and teaching programs ardently aspiring toward the eradication of human disease and suffering from the face of the earth. The building is centrally airconditioned by a 750-ton unit. In order to overcome the danger of mass infection through recirculation of air, the different areas of the hospital are fed by 40 auxiliary units. Every room is individually air-conditioned and heated. The length of air-conditioning ducts alone exceeds 11 miles. Main Floor On the main floor are the imposing Main Lobby with its large decorative murals and Gift Shop, Information Desk, and Admitting Offices. Also, a Contemplation Room, where waiting or bereaved visitors may sit quietly with their prayers and in comfort. In addition, the Out-Patient Clinic, in new-cheerful surroundings, located at the northwest corner of the building, with a separate entrance from the outside, and tb* Emergency Department, with its huge facilities of three operating rooms, three observation rooms, and four treatment rooms. Doctors will have their own entrance, where they will find a dial-in system to make their presence in the building known to telephone operators. The Blood Bank has its own separate entrance room on the outside, but can also be reached through a corridor from the main lobby. Adjoining the Admitting Office is the Cashier and the Bookkeeping Department, with its own safe and night depository. Beside the Out-Patient Pavilion and the Emergency Department, this functional core is integrated by the X-Ray Department, to include a Cobalt Room and one of the most modern X-Ray research units available in the United States. A service corridor connects all three departments with Surgery Hall, made up of eight operating rooms, where the latest in equipment has been installed. One of the larger rooms has been equipped especially for heart surgery. A closed circuit color TV system connects the department with the 326-scat auditorium to be used for teaching purposes, as well as for public gatherings. The new Pathology Laboratories on the main floor offer all the equipment and space necessary to execute the daily load of hundreds of tests being made by doctors and technicians. Another center of research here is the Cardio-Pulmonary Laboratory, with roomy new quarters for catheterization and pulmonary investigation. The main kitchen, serving patients and employees, is also located on this floor. Probably the most modern installation of its kind in the entire Miami area, it will introduce the operation of Meals-on-Wheels carts, having a hot and a cold compartment. An elevator and two dumbwaiters will speedily transport the food carts to the patient floors. Visitors can look forward to longer visiting hours soon to be announced. For their comfort, the Women's Auxiliary will operate a new Snack Bar, beautifully decorated in blue tile and wormy chestnut. Elevators Patients and the public will find out that it takes only 14 seconds to go from the Main Floor to the top Eighth Floor, thanks to a battery of six autotronic elevators, four for public use, and two for service. Elevator doors have been provided with an electric eye. Maxzanln* A small mezzanine, with access from the Main Lobby, includes the Personnel Offices, Employees Health Office, and the Social Service Department, which will also have a delegate's office in the Out-Patient Clinic. Second Floor In addition to the Administrative offices of the executive director, the assistant director and the Nursing Administration, this floor contains the Medical Library, Medical Records, Cardiology Department, Pharmacy, Central Supply Department with its own sterilization plant and Formula Kitchen, and the Employees Cafeteria to be operated Continued on Pago 6-C



PAGE 1

December 11, 1959 +Jeisti ThrHltr \ np* ^1 Free Corsage Now Available for Mother On the Occasion of Bar or Bas Mitzvah Page 3-A Proud mothers whose sons and daughters are about to become Bar or Bas Mitzvah now have cause for additional pride. For on this important day, they can put their best foot forward with a special touch. Won't mother look more stunning than ever if she wears a corsage on this sanctified occasion? Of course, she will, and The cal figures on hand to pitch in for Mt. Sinai Former Frank Clement, of Tennessee (riqht), was the latest to [raise $300,000 in a two-night stand. He is greeted here r. and Mrs. Tom Kravitz, of Bay Harbor Islands :ientists See Interchange stween Soviet and Israel AVIV——Prof. Vaaili %  tschensky, of the Moscow %  I Science Academy, prehere that a relaxation id tensions would bring [cultural and personal relaetween Israel and Russia. king at a special reception [Russian Embassy for Soviet |es to the International BiConlerence held here, Blagovitschensky said that PNOTISM IND SELF-HYPNOSIS of the mind and body mirac1 responds to Hypnotherapy. combats bad habits; Smoking; king; Insomnia; Female Oisor[Complexes; Nervous Tension; of Confidence; Overweight; •ncy; Allergies; Etc. Improve lf mentally and physically. W. H. APPLEBY, Ms.D. Only Hypnotherapy Clinic I.W. 42nd Are. HI 8-8033 Copyright 1959 FREE TO READERS >F THIS PUILICATIONI he expected soon an exchange of cultural missions between the Soviet Union and Israel. Another Soviet delegate. Dr. Natalie Konko, said she felt completely at ease during her stay | in Israel and had gained much from her studies of everyday j life in Israel. There is reason to believe that I representatives of the Supreme Soj viet in Moscow would accept an inI vitation to visit Israel, if such a I bid were to be extended. David Hacohen, Israeli member of the Interparliamentary Union's presidium, declared here. Hacohen made-this statement upon his return from a visit to the Soviet Union, where he was accorded high official honors by \ the Russian city of Gomel, the r place of his birth. He had gone to Russia as a member of a delegai tion from the IPU which had held its annual congress in Warsaw. Arts League Will Install Officers Miami Beach Music and Arts League will install officers Saturday evening at the Roney Piaza hotel. Commissioner Charles Hall will install Herman A. Binder president; Daniel Broad, Louis B. Hoberman, Louis Siegal. and Harry L. Webb, vice presidents. Gustave Freeman, executive secretary; Max P. Feld, treasurer; Florence Rothman, corresponding secretary; Ruth Freeman, recording secretary; Lenore Hauer, financial secretary. Citations will be awarded to George S. Engle, of the Coconut Grove Theater; Lisl Beer, Miami artist; and Gustave Freeman, Miami Beach, for service to the League. Dr. Arturo di Dilippl, manager of the Opera Guild of Greater Miami, will direct a concert of higfilights from Carman and La Gioconda. H. T. (Dutch) Shulenberg is master of ceremonies. Jewish Floridian is now making i: possible for mother to have that corsage free. "Corsage for You"* is 'the name of a new feature of The Jewish Floridian. These are the simple rules to follow in order to receive your free corsage: Address a postcard to "Corsage for You," e/o The Jewish Floridian. P.O. Box 2973, Miami 1, Fla., at least 14 days prior to the date of the Bar or Bas Mitzvah ceremony. List the following details: • Your name, address, and tele-phone number. • Name of the confirmand. • Dale of tha Bar or Bas Mitzvah. ~ • Place where the ceremony will be observed. The corsage will be presented free of charge through the courtesy of The Jewish Floridian by arrangements with the Blackstone Flower Shops. %  a W .-I Je •1 I fflrararfl3,?fa'3m um r Hebrew-English Calendar 11 dates and days of the week [September, 1937 to Septem161. Helps you to find Yahr^tes at a (dance. %  your free copy, write to:f. Heinz Company, Dept. J2, Pittsburgh 30, Pa. To Lite in Hearts We Leu re Behind Is lo Live Forever! 4'(VfctPALMER,$ 5 MEMORIALS "Miami's Only Jewish Monument Builders" Scheduled Unveiling* SUNDAY, DEC. 13th Mr. Hebo Cemetery n'.iYER YEDUN, 12:45 p.m. Riibhi frvmg Le'nrman "May Their Souls Repose m Eternal Peace 1 ARRANGEMENTS BY PALMER'S MIAMI MONUMENT CO. Complete and Dependable Title Service M IAMI TITL€ <* Qkttact Co. 34 YEARS OF TITLE SERVICE IN DADE COUNTY ESCROWS ABSTRACTS TITLE INSURANCE Tine Insurance Policies el Kansas City Title Insurance Ce. Capitol, SarpJes Reserves Exceed %iflO0flOO TELEPHONE FR WW %  "d 129 SHORELAND ARCADE (A.ao K^jTrffg *?^r-,..rl t v Trust Company BldQ.) UF Division Picks Insurance Exec Murray M. Sheldon, Miami Beach insurance broker, has been named head of the Miami Beach Insur ance Division of the 1960 United Fund campaign organization, it was announced here by Eugene Weiss, Miami Beach UF chairman. A veteran of three UF campaigns, Sheldon is responsible for soliciting contributions from among Beach insurance men for the support of the Fund's 300 health and welfare organizations during the coming year. Sheldon, who lives with his wifeSally, and two children at 4505 Adams ave., came here in September, 1945. He is a member of the board of directors of the Civic League off Miami Beach and the Godfrey j Road Assn., a member of Hibiscus Lodge of Masons, the Miami Beach Chamber of Commerce, and a life donor member of the Jewish Home for the Aged. Sheldon is past treasurer of the Bayshore Golfers Club, past chancellor commander of Miami Beach Lodge Knights of Pythias, past chairman of the Insurance Division of the Combined Jewish Appeal, and a recipient of the coveted designation, C.P.C.U., presented by the American Institute for Property and Casualty Underwriters. He is now serving as exalted ruler of the Miami Beach Elks Lodge. Afghan Sm&rM7U4*Z\ Open 6:45 IE AN CABIN" r KlMlUE BilJtW n '9" u > ••"'• ihoefc.,." t u**f tearu*mrre sJttffcwKHtyroiis CORAL GABLES 45 Miracle Mile EDISON CENTER 6200 N.W. 7th Ave. HIAUAH 165 Hialeah Dr. LITTLE RIVER 7964 N.E. 2nd Ave. ALLAPATTAH 1736 N.W. 36* St. MIAMI BEACH 1261 Washington Ave. DOWNTOWN MIAMI, 51 E. Flagler St. WEEKENDS FREE WITH the EASY car wax \ IRVING MATLIN M & M DISTRIBUTING CO., Inc. 135 S.W. 22nd Ave. — FR 1-0101 Sole Distributors of Wax Seal Products at Your Local Service Station GOLFERS Gain Confidence with NEW GRIPS All Styles Available Reshafting Refinishing Alterations /-OEEQ 142J P0NCE WWrrJ C0Mt GABl ES NOW YOU DIAL FR 3-4605 for vjewisti ftcriciiar LOW COST HOME LOANS To Buy, Build or Refinance laqalrles Invited • No Obligations Celebrating oar 25th Anniversary Year "One of the Nation's Oldest and largest" IZ/ade Federal t/AviNGS and LOAN ASSOCIATION of MIAMI (0SIPH M LIPI0N, Hresideni 5 Convmhnt Offices Serv* Dado County RESOURCES EXCEED 140 MILLION DOLLARS



PAGE 1

n 11, 1959 %  M tnMnrriri&ui Page 3-C %  PAINSTAKING CREATION OF ILLUMINATED TILES ^Danish Artist Brockdorff Three Years on Symbolic Mural in Lobby chack von Brockdorff, noted Danish muralist, puts juches on Mt. Sinai Hospital's giant lobby decor, Mains a background of 12,000 pieces of stained ud When the doors of the new Mt. Sinai Hospital open for the first time, visitors and well-wishers alike will be greeted by a glowing sight of artistic beauty. The work, centered on the South Wall of the Founder's Lounge, is a mural abstraction, dedicated to Mt. Sinai Hospital and the medical profession long before the first brick was laid on its foundation. It is the child of sculptor-painter Herman Schack von Brockdorff, an artist who conceived the project three years ago with mind and heart, but who did not know until eight months ago that his would be the commission to execute it. Born in Denmark in 1907, Brockdorff came to the United States in 1929. During the years between his arrival and his first visit to Florida in 1947, his creativity centered around painting, a career he was to pursue even through the war years with the Merchant Marine. It was while in the service that the art of Brockdorff was to receive its first official recognition by the United States. The Office of War Information selected two of his paintings to be exhibited in the National Gallency Room Facilities Enlarged to Take | of a Constantly-Rising Patient Load Sinai Hospital's enarge sign proclaims ." And to the doclir-cs, the hundreds of sn. and children who this door, all are ses—all are in imbed of medical attenpatients are trans. Sinai Hospital by during the period of Many are picked up at [of an accident, but a Imber are those who emergency in their emergency facilities are transfusions, elec^ams, an iron lung, |en tent. These are just the physical installa%  ause the most imporf a hospital is the conBsence of doctors, most Specialists in various Sinai's staff is available at a minutes. patient's side within Each year Mt. Sinai Hospital handles more than 10,000 emergency cases, slightly more than half of them the result of accidents according to the following statistical analysis: Traffic Accidents .... 6.8% Personal Injuries 30.0 Industrial Accidents .. 5.5 Fractures 5.9 Poisoning 0.5 Burns 2.1 The other half of the emergency patient load is constituted of cases of general chronic illness, cardiac cases, obstetrics, and gynecology patients. More than 90 percent of the cardiac cases are conveyed by ambulance in which oxygen can be administered to the patient until he reaches the safety of the hospital. >ngratulations... from LORIDA JUICE ORIGINAL ORANGE BLOSSOM BRAND 2700 N.W. 2nd Avenue FR 3-7447 Every day as the hours go by, all is quiet—nothing seems to be happening in the Emergency Department. Suddenly, the quiet is broken. Ambulances stationed at the hospital's Emergency entrance speed away; a taxi arrives bringing a patient; a private car stops to unload a bleeding child; or a police cruiser discharges the victim of a traffic accident. Then things really start to hum—nurses and doctors seem to appear out of nowhere, ready to handle any contingency. The clerical staff goes into action as each admission must-be recorded properly in its category. Four emergency operating tables may seem a great many. But there are occasions when three times that number are needed. Now, to the satisfaction of both the Greater Miami community and the doctors, new Mt. Sinai Hospital's Emergency Department has three operating rooms, three observation rooms, four treatment rooms, a waiting room, and all the other facilities it has needed for so long. In the case of emergency patients, though 58.7 percent of the cases are dismissed or transferred to their homes under the supervision of a private doctor, roughly 23 percent have to be admitted to the hospital for further clinical observation and treatment. This accounts for about one-fourth of the daily patient load of the hospital. For the nurse who sits behind the information desk of the Emergency Department, the day brings a continuing change of tears and laughter because, in addition to the drama caused by accidents and sudden illnesses, there are also the lighter momenta with their happy endings. A loo* at the records reveals such entries as "fell while taking photos at the edge of the pool." The do-it-yourself male also is a frequent visitor of the Emergency Room, after being "hit on the head by a fluorescent tube" or "suffering scalp lacerations because he forgot to take the hammer off the upper step of a ladder before trying to fold same. All these are classified as peraaoal injuries, as are the 24-yearoId Mule who suffered injuries to her right knee while dancing. lery of London and then at the Museum of Art in Glasgow, Scotland. The paintings, "Rolling Home" and "Palermo After the Invasion," were later published in the pictorial essay, "Art in the Armed Forces." In 1947, following four one-man shows in New York, two first awards for painting in national group shows, and a popular award in which he totalled 2,500 votes, Brockdorff came to Maitland, Fla., on a Fellowship at the Research Studio. It was at the Research Studio, a colony of residents and artists dedicated to experimental and contemporary arts, that Brockdorff was to be introduced to cement as a medium of expression. His mentor was the founder, the late Andre Smith, a famed architect under whose direction the entire foundation was decorated in cement. Earlier, while aboard ship, Brockdorff had learned the discipline of the exacting artist through his work on wood and linoleum cuts. This discipline was to stand him in excellent stead in his new career as sculptor, one which was to eventually lead him to the work which now graces the Founder's Lounge. Begun in May, Brockdorff has worked seven days a week, ceaslessly and untiringly. For while the mural is the focal point, there are also the walls which surround it, all of them molded painstakingly in cement and coated with sand in a highly technical process. Using tones of yellow and white, each mold took one and one-half hours to make and onehalf hour more to pour. Yet von Brockdorff modestly notes that he poured as many as five a day addiand has accomplished, i tion, a total of 260 tiles. In his approach to the mural, Brockdorff chose the abstract rather than the representative method. Wanting to avoid overscntimentality, he searched for a richness in his art that could be most clearly expressed without resorting to the maudlin. In his own words, Brockdorf, who in November, 1959 was awarded the Craftsman's Citation of Honor by the South Florida chapter of the American Institute of Architects, says of his mural: "It is an abstraction. I decided to incorporate, through symbols of my own and established symbols, Florida and the activities most important at Mt. Sinai Hospital. To indicate the low and flat land of the state, I decided to use the horizontal straight lines. The jagged horizontal lines symbolize the ocean and water. A golden sun can be seen in the left hand corner, and a shimmering silvery reflection of the moon in the waters can be seen in the upper right hand corner. "Palm foliage is indicated by the triangular yellow pattern-. Another triangular pattern represents such plants as the century plant and Spanish bayonets, or other pointed foliage. Also all over the state the most common trees to be seen are the pines and the palmetto palms. Tho straight erectness of these are symbolized in the vertical lines." The center of attraction is the circle in the middle with the blue background. The blue color symbolizes hope and security. The two letters M. and S. .in the star of David stand for Mt." Sinai Hospital. WE ARE PROUD TO SERVICE THE NEW AAT. SINAI HOSPITAL ARNOLD'S LOCK & KEY SERVICE EXPERT LOCKSMITHS 4018 Royal Palm Ave. 7416 Collins Ave. MIAMI BEACH JE 8-4505 UN 5-2734 Congratulations ... E. E. SAMUEL INC. DEX-O-TEX NEOPRENE TERRAZZO FLOORING 1675 N.E. 49th Street NE 4-6737 (



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jy, December 11, 1959 'Jewisli Fkrk/inn Page 3-B N. Shore Ladies In Review Series North Shore Jewish Center Sisterhood is sponsoring a series of three book reviews of recentlypublished best sellers. The books, to be reviewed by Rabbi -Mayer Abramowttz, -ere "Lotus Eaters," by Gerald Green, Jan. 13; and "Status Seekers," Vance Packer, Feb. 10. First in the series was Wednesday on "Eva," by Meyer Levin. Presentation of the reviews are at the North Shore Jewish Center, 620 75th st. In charge are Mrs. Helen CardozaMrs. Abraham Towbin, and Miss Libby Rosen. sami Beach chapter of Hadassah shares the joy of Henrila Szold'Day with the children of the Variety and Cerebral slsy Hospitals. Shown here are the coordinator of the pro:t, Mrs. Harvey Salomon, and Mrs. Robert Perlman, fundising vice president, with the puppets they will present to children. On Monday, 3,700 women in the 11 groups of Le Miami Beach chapter will attend luncheons throughout \e city to celebrate the birth of the founder of Hadassah, the pte Henrietta Szold, and to raise the necessary funds to mainHadassah's medical institutions in Israel. Women Plan Varied Events thai chapter of B'nai B'rith jmen will meet Tuesday evening I the Deauville hotel. Juest speaker will be physician author Dr. Jacob Sarnoff. .. discuss his book, "Better Livj." Question and answer period follow. he chapter also plans a party the Casablanca hotel Saturday ening, Dec. 19. Mrs. Flora Sinick [ chairman. • • • fiami Beach chapter will meet ^esday noon at the Sea Gull hotel, rne chapter also plans a "Night [ New Orleans'* at the Blackstone itel Sunday evening, Dec. 20. is. Revy Balkin is chairman. • • • lorth Shore chapter will meet lunch and a "White Elephant Sale" at the Eden Roc hotel on Thursday noon, Dec. 17. Cosmetics will be keynoted at noon at a Monday, Dec. 21 meeting of the chapter in the Washington Federal Savings and Loan bldg., Normandy Isle. Rabbi Lipschiii to Speak Possibility of establishing a community code will be discussed by Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz, in the course, "Marriage and the Family," on Tuesday, 8:30 p.m., at Congregation of Monticello Park. Rabbi Lipschitz, who meets with both a pre-confirmation teen-age group, as well as the United Synagogue Youth, on Sunday mornings, from 9:30 to 10:45 a.m., will convey the feelings of adolescents toward the adoption of a teen-age code on parent-child relationships. Beth Sholom Sets Auction, Dinner Saturday Evening Two of the hostesses who will serve at a cocktail party preceding the dinner and auction sponsored by the Sisterhood of Temple Beth Sholom on Saturday evening are Mrs. Harry B. Smith and Mrs. Arnold Gottfried, both members of the Married Couples Club of the Temple. All Temple affiliates will cooperate with the Sisterhood in this special function, which is open to the public. Proceeds will go to the Sisterhood's religious school subsidy fund. In charge of the project is Mrs. D. Murray Sonnett. Mrs. Charles Silvers is chairman of the merchandise committee, and Mr. and Mrs. Harold Granoff are in charge of dinner arrangements. Chairman of dinner reservations is Mrs. Bajamin Berlin. The auction and dinner are scheduled for the Temple Auditorium. George Jacobson will be chief auctioneer. Austin Burke will assist Jacobson. Jay Jacobi and Joe Drucker, both of whom have served as auctioneers at local charity functions, will also assist. Mrs. Howard H. Miller is Sisterhood president. GALA FIFTH SEASON COCONUT GROVE PLAYHOUSE 1500 Main Hwy. HI 5-1511 Mats. W#


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Page 4-B +. Jen tit fhttJItM Jewish Flondiun Excltutrc YMI M. c ARRIAGE COUNSELOR iff Samuel Cf. Uiling MIAMI'S NATIONALLY FAMOUS MARRIAGE AUTHORITY. LrcruRBR AND AUTHOR Samuel G. Kling is recuperating from illness. His column resumes next week. Einstein Group Meets Monday Regular meeting of the Albert Einstein group of Hariassah will be held on Monday at the Voyager motel. MiL'hlignt of the meeting will be a candle lighting Chanuka cere mony. and the 99th anniversary of the birthday of Hadassah founder, Henrietta Szold. Guest speaker in connection with the Hadassah Medical Organization will be Dr. Christopher Corrie, clinical psychologist for United Cerebral Palsy, who will discuss "Your Child and Discipline." It's coffee-time in Dade county because the membership drive of Hebrew Academy Women is on. Shown here are Hebrew Academy Women's president Mrs. Joseph Shapiro looking on approvingly as those on the membership committee are poured their coffee at the home of Mrs. Rose Lobel on Miami Beach. Seated and serving is Mrs. Irving Firtel. chairman, to Mesdames Abraham Steinberg and Leonard Rosen, co-chairman. Council Divisions Hear Speakers Members of Bay Division of National Council of Jewish Women heard Rabbi Joseph K (apian, of Temple tdath Yeshnrun, prei "An Orthodox Point of \. I*) R '' h Mid lh.it and adhutments made in Jewish la* muM come from world rabbii authority and any oilier changes cannot be accept I Dr. Irving Lehrman. of Temple; Emanu-EI. speakine on "Jewish faith—Conservatism." called it tbd only American product in Juda ism. the others having been brought from Europe. "As the youngest movement in Judaism, it is a 'middle of the road' policy needed for the new' life in the new world." he declared, i Rabbi Joseph R. Narot, of Tern-] pie Israel, presenting Reform Ju-' tiaism's message, said that ritual in the Reform movement" is ml commandment but a symbol, snd as such implies the right to reject or midify it — or even invent new rituals. • • • Thomas Duff, marriage counselor, told members of the Islands Division of the NCJW at their meeting that if people made as rreat an effort in their marriages •a they do in their friendships, "then would be less boredom in marriage, and less breakdown in tal relations." Duff suggested 'hat education in family relations should start in elementary schools rather than in college. The larger percentage of divorces is among people who do not go to college." he said. • a • Bernard Mandler. chairman of the Southern regional Commission on Law and Social Action of the American Jewish Congress, speaking at Sunset Divisions meeting, declared that religion in the public school is a personal problem which concerns everyone, regardless of his or her religion. "In Dade county and In the State of Florida, there is a statute which requires reading from the Bible every day." he reported. 'There is no such thing as a non-sectarian Bible. The celebration of different religious holidays makes for separation among children." Handler stressed that "no one wishes to take God away from children." but that "the proper place for religious teaching is not in the public schools." Fashion Show At Beth Sholom Mrs. Jean Lehman, president of the Federation of Jewish Women's Organizations, will be chairman of the day at the open meeting of Sisterhood of Temple Beth Sholom on Wednesday, according to Mrs. Charles P. Feinberg, vice president iiwcharge of programming. A report-fashion show will feature the program. Mrs. Murray Gilden will serve as fashion coordinator, and Mrs. Joseph Friedman will be commentator. Participants in the program will be Mesdames Leon Kronish. Harvey Kramer. Charles P. Feinberg, Sol S. Pine, Howard H. Miller. Michael Mersel, D. Murray Sonnett, Samuel Oritt, Norman J. Ruts, J A. Cantor. Zachary f.\ Bailey, Thomas Gerard, Harry B. Smith, Arnold Gottfried. Robert ; Goodman. Varvm Meitus. Harry Greenberg. living Bern and Wolfie Cohen. Mrs. Howard H Miller is Sister hood president, and Rabbi Leon Kronish is spiritual leader of Beth Sholom. Pioneer Women To Hold Meetings Mrs. Milton Green, president of the Greater Miami Council of Pioneer Women, has called a regular meeting for Tuesday, 1 p.m., at -the Miami Beach Federal Bank bang. Mrs. Ruth Uliss Wagner, president of Club Tikvah, announces a membership luncheon Monday at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Nat Wagner, 1435 SW 14th at. Mrs. Milton Green, Council president, will be guest speaker. • • • Miami Beach's new Club Elath will hold r Chanuka Festival Wednesday, 8 p.m., in the Miami Beach Federal Bank bldg., Lincoln rd and Washington ave. Mrs. Eva Levinson is in charge of the program. Golfers to Play For Cobalt 'Bomb* At least 25 pros and 175 amateurs are expected to take part in a charity golf tournament Wednesday at the Bayshore Golf Course. The tourney is sponsored by the Men's Cancer League of Miami Beach. Otto Fenias, director of the fourball, best ball tourney, said eight pro golfers have already been sponsored to play. These Include Ed Furgol, Buck White, George Bernardin. Sonny Rouse, Pat Rouse, Billy Girard, John Smith and John Conti. Several local businessmen plan to sponsor at least 17 other professionals. Micky Kraus, president of the Cancer League, said that some $10,000 is expected to be raised in entry fees, and Walter Winchell has announced that the Damon Runyon Cancer Fund will match dollar for dollar proceeds of the event for purchase of a cobalt X-Ray machine for Mt. Sinai Hospital. FridQ j^ cetnW, Choi Group Aiesfj., Regular meeting „, Kjoup of Hadistrf 1"* | Monday^evening „ Jj Jl motel. Meeting w ,i| \ *l form of a Ch'aXtnH, take-off o„ the pl^; •. be You^r^SSV^ president, and U N V^ ^dhousech.^;-. iwwM Shterk-4 **,, T^n. WC D dn daj !" Sl] Temple. Recemiy-comptaYsi 2L wa M r col r nd *£a Mrs. Morris Skop nffl |W play The meeting will abt ft. a Chanuka workshop by Vni man K. Gottlieb. Trsd2auiiL decorations and custom lij shown and explained. ARISTOCRATIC T/H/ESwrssFiAVon f H take* Alpine pashm and Swiss cheoe-maJum skill to product las nut-aweet, diMioctivt flavor of SwftM bright proem OfwytraChstaa, Dcbciout with cracker* and fnuL Com slijbuy more thaa ilniiaHs r hrim sai l ynii tasw tin aUfc n ms l Swiss KNIGHT T/ie Original PROCESS GRUYIRI CHIISI Bfkur Cholim Chanuka Fete Bikur Cholim Kosher Convalescent Home of Greater Miami will 1 hold a Chanuka celebration Wednesday noon at the Algiers hotel. Mrs. Edward Eikin. president, said the celebration would feature i a candle-lighting ceremony. I Participating will be Mesdames Mary Hershorn. Eva Leopold, Helen Homstein, Anna Rosenfield. i Mary Sley, Gussie Rosenthal, Athj la Mesirow, and Mr. Nathan Roth. I Marshals will include Joseph Kaiser and Mrs. Kalmen Shapiro. j Mrs. Victoria Roe, director, will present membership certificates. Religion is Television Topic Rabbi Tibor Stern. Beth Jacob Congregation, and Rabbi Henry Okohca. North Dade Jewish Center, will be participants in the teln program. "Still Small Voice," over WCKT. ch. 7. Sunday at 10 a.m. Subject will be "Religion—Are There Any Substitutes'" 1 Rabbi Morton Malavsky, Israelite Center, will be moderator. Women's Groups Plan Meetings Next regular meeting of the Anne Frank chapter of B'nai B'rith Women will be held Tuesday noon at the Park Lane Cafeteria on Coral Way. • • • I B'nai B'rith Women of Miami will hold their annual Anti-Defamation League workshop Tuesday. 10 a.m.. at Hillel House. A film. "Immunizing Our Children AEainst Prejudice." will be shown. This will be followed by a discussion led by Mrs. Bernard Supworth. • • • Gilbert J. Balkin chapter of B'nai B'rith will present its annual Chanuka party for children on Tuesday, Dec. 22. GEFILTE FISH HAS ITS TASTY FUCI ON YOUR "WANT-TO-PWT MINUS It's Horowiu-MargirHea,(f f course, who brings you tat aristocratic delicacy. Gconj fish made w ith choice PIKE and WHITE FISH exclusively from cool North era lakes... blended tradiuos} ally with the other wi ingredients of home-i gefiltc lish. So fluffy... luscious... w ith homey shimmering jelled sauce. Sisterhood Card forty Tifereth Israel Sisterhood will hold a luncheon and carB party at the Canter, 6500 N. Miami ave.. on Tuesday noon. Hostesses are Mrs. Hetty Newman. Mrs. Pearl Kant. Mrs. Frances Geverti and Mrs. Sarah Jarlow. & /* er^ MOHR PCOHaT UK n*sshiat,calont-tnia Grater's Kosher Meat Mkt. 441 8.W. 17 AVE. MIAMI Fret Delivery FR 9-6266 FREEZER ORDERS PILLED Open Thursday till 9 pjn. You'll also enjoy *•" Horowitt-Margaret* Gefilte Fb*..ui jumbo or snack-** poraoits...^*ctar* ( jelled sauce...top*">*"" l^aoVbythebaiencf andc*hKoil>ffI


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Page 4-A Jen 1stfkrMtMi Frida Y-DtoiBd* Jewish Floridian OFFICE and PLANT — 120 N.E. Sixth Street Telephone FR 3-4605 Teletype Communications Miami TWX MM 396 FRED K. SHOCHET LEO MINDLIN .. Editor and Publisher Executive Editor Publtahed every TrMmr rise* lr by The '• wl *J"£lft •t N K BUth Street. Miami 1. ,rt *5^"*^jr2 Jl •coon.i-claM matter July 4. !•. t Poet Omo of Mtaau. Florida, under tie Act of March I. 1.. The Jewish MfM ha a WB<.rtti. •'••i2ii h u 1 ?t t : •Jt? Jllim.. Seven Art* Featae* >••*• %  W*rWwae Newe Serv.ce. Netienal SS.tonal AM*.. *.•"•''."" _*••"•' t^lLH-J..^ Newaeapeea. e1 the Flrf. -r— A—> %  The Jewl.n F1ordl* doee mot ruaimntee the Ka.hn.th of the menvhhhdtoe adTertleed • Ha colum— %  From Stock Exchange Fraud To Anti-Semitic Mercury fa* r | MAN IN i %  y ARNOLD FORSTlR ISRAEL BUREAU MX Ben Yehuda — Td Aviv, Israel RAY U. BINDER Correspondent SUBSCRIPT OM Year SSW ON RATES: Three Year. 10SO Volume 33 Number 50 Friday December 11. 1959 10 Kislev 5720 Mt. Sinai Dream Comes True Ten years of dreaming, and as many years of intricate planning, come to fruition Sunday afternoon when the new ML Sinai Hospital of Greater Miami will be dedicated. From the first ML Sinai on lower Alton nL. to its most recent site in the former Nautilus hotel to the mammoth near-13-nullioQ-dolaar medical institution now gracing Collins Island in an eight-story tower of beauty above Bisccryne Bay—all this encompasses a story of )oint cooperative endeavor by the men and the events they shaped that takes 16 pages of this week's issue of The Jewish Floridian to tefl in words and pictures. (See Sec C* Suffice it to say here that the new ML Sinai Hospital at Greater Miami is a tribute to the Jewish community andthe leaders who first dreamed of iL who saw it through the difficult stages of an architect's blueprint and who levmgry watched jt nse brick by brick on the Miami Beach horison. It is a tribute, as well to the men and women at vision and means %  I* endowed it with their gifts end contribu%  ang al v:>.:.w; er.-f.. Greatsr Mxxmi Jewry may weD be proud of that most mi achievement Benehrtng km hm mm Y $—. > -^:^: --i iaBBajg_| prc^orns w-X be all of Dade counrv. ID whose *vx* the hospital ts pledged. Thousands or men ana women throughout the area will Sunday see for ihoniaalias one at the hnest medical inifmgautir. m the Southed rest easy m the coafart and knowledge hechh of the commentry h which they five. Boundary of Self-Hatred Hew far MI self-hatred go? The American %  I Msaem receo*tf -^ gpj to grve the State Deoartmec The Councils % %  — m the sUne sat back and piekH hostess had given Turn. It was called the Amen* the man opened it with anticipation. He b,H M Mercury for years; he recalled, with foodr^. ML 1 ?" "vja been a provocative, challenging magazine cd.tH h7l" W,i Mencken, and pubfashing th. works of such ilSJ* wood Andersos. Sinclair Lewi, and Carl Sandbure *** As he tamed page after page, the man was fire. angered The pogosof the American Mercury-JLJS.?? imaginative writing-were sow filled with son^L^S* •• anti^eiwuc lies, wild charges of ••international^!** and allegations that Jews .re motivating force7?LS swindles, corruption, sad wsrs. lontt b ** The passenger wrote sa angry letter to an airline ,**-, why it exposed customer, to such claptrap TV^ nm^i" *> the fact*. He discovered that the airline r^TS**** American Mercery: t had been sent ,n un..,bceifl: fliKbt serviee department, without kaowiedse of itTa.^!!* 1 the Mercery aboard its planes to fill up magazine racks* In the past few years, the American MernirThat -^ creep into quite a few places uninvited. Under tiL ~L?2*1 Russell Maguire. it has developed into oae of the m^SZfi Semitic publications in the United States. ^^ MAS OUTIAWID N 16 STATIS Ckst a pp ro a ch ing the unsettled Israel-Arab status and the refugee cruestioo, a p e raV i uR y. ore gnats another matter. The estahinhment of Israel occurred in a UN era which saw positive American leadership without sxruivocanaoThe aiihaniiiietal Israel-Arab haasse emerged over the years in ail its a m mo w moan trig as American leadership bowed to e x pedi enc y. The more mis notion, and th* Western Powers generally •*cined to 11 km me Armistice Agreeme IN EXTRIMIST CIRCLES, it is more widely qootssset-J then mostlany other periodical of it. type As UI t*£7r ?"." *• i 1 *** % %  %  • oo the good name of iktdSii Aiaerican Merrwry-ead tsades on other names a< well r*. plained of the• imautborued use of his same as a coaSL?.' masthead of the Nevemher issue of the Mercury He astoT to remove his name forthwith, before orculatw. of the ili^ his protest, the November issue of the nuganne apoeardl Br.dges as s "contributor." ~~ In the spring of 1KB. radio conuaestator Fuhoa Lenta staunch conservative, refused persuasion to the MercaTjT one of his broadcasts. He refused, he said, because el T Semitic tendencies and flavorof the sBagazme's edlstaj But the Mercury went ahead—perssisaon or no-asd rears broadcast in its Jane issue Lewis said that he agreed with William Buckler r the National Review, "in havasg no desire, whatsoever uhTi ated with the American Mercery, as long as it pursue at\ editorial policy, whsch poficy I consider to be b-.-.t |.ibianH UTespoasahie." m M T** rsatiafi of s csatldsanal ssemoraaduai frost Bscaal *"'" tor Xauoaal Review were pnated in the Jab igl Mercery. Beckiey s cesaaHBMcation. dated Apr 195, Taraffl the Natsonal Review would not carry sa As masthead any si- h[ listed oa the m.rt a i ad of the Assericaa Mercury. BadunB aoted that the editors of the National Revx tare iinliskiij solved net to wnte for the Mercery aaul auaageses ckasget uCl STAMaUgg SIT Of •OCKLtY POINTCO OUT that several frequent c stiismi Nataoaal Review hod aiillia | that the latter s sdstorisl for the Merrsry ate I aitaey troL and at they the tane the artiries were wrutea aaf BBaSBsNal % > aw editanal mstenal' the Assericaa Merrsry danag iw toaeatessher. ISM. revesh bttle'Jat*! It n,a in i a censes hodgepodge-at of vuaficataoBs whose -•rrediesu i varied aao-Seauu set of i n n a n cftea:



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r, December 11, 1959 fJewlstrhridltori ER TO THE EDITOR Page 5-A )L Official Raps Mindlm Column t*r i .A )R, The J*wih Floridin: public speaker always welevven the smallest indicant his message has had an upon his audience. In this pt only am I grateful to Leo for devoting a whole col[ %  (Jewish Floridian, Nov. 31 ritique of my recent prescnon Germany before the regnard of the Anti-Defamation Be in Miami Beach. dear that my "on location" ssions did not coincide with lage-of Germany. That's not ected, since some of my oblions are in sharp contrast to Ulihg and long-retained con[ on the subject. Therefore, an jpl on his part -to refute me ic presentation of facts could >R, The Jewish Floridian: eport in your recent news coltold of President Eisenhowestablishing an "Equal OpporDay. v During that week, Dr. ice Eisendrath, addressing conference of American HeCongregations held at Mi [Beach, asked that every contion establish "special comes to promote equal opportutfor all mankind." out • wnk prior to these in* sting actions, a group of ded%  d South Florida rabbis mot established a program to enrags employment of the Jicapped. While I am not intied as to whet steps will be I am of the impression there will be sermons on humanitarian program. Alfit Is my understanding, emyer members of congregawill be asked to enlarge their own Wring of the •i 1 OXYGEN UNITS •nil Priee *6.95 fREE Prompt DELIVERY >rt


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Pago 4-C +Jewls* ncrktian Max Orovitz: Captain of a Community Vi< ;$10Mrliii IN the life of a successful man %  stand out his moments of triumph. For Max Orovitz, a stranger to defeat, one of his many victories was reflected in the gleam of his eyes and in his smile when he entered the auditorium of the new Mt. Sinai Hospital on the evening of last Oct. 7 to preside over the graduation exercises of 29 nurses, alumnae of Mt. Sinai Hospital's School of Practical Nursing. This was the first public ceremony to be held in the new hospital, which he had envisioned more than 10 years ago. of which he had dreamed during many years of uncertainty and which he. in conpunction with many devoted Miamians, have transformed into reality. Max Orovitz was part of the original group of 16 men and one woman who set out in 1946 to give Miami's Jewish community the hospital it so badly needed. He was secretary of the charter members when Baron de Hirsch Meyer was the official spokesman for Mt. Sinai. In his early forties at the time. Max Orovitz was enthusiastic and fearless in furtlnrinc the aims of the project. Elected president of Mt. Sinai Hospital in 1948. he led his group through ;.ll negotiation! with the ernment and the City of Miami Beach to obtain the old Nautilus property :i Alton Road Hospital MAX OK0VITZ dtdicattd leadership IN MEMORY OF SAUL MINDLIN Contemplation Room Offers Serenity For Bereaved or Anxious Visitor A hospital never closes its doors. At night, its thousands of lights are turned on to continue throbbing like the pulse of a giant creature standing guard. Protector of the well-being of the community in which it stands, the hospital is a stage on which are played the dramatic acts of a city's aspiration for health and medical progress. In this sense, a hospital contains within its walls the seeds of despair, sudden happiness and sudden tragedy. The gamut of human emotion is portrayed in its wings, for here men art born, battle the unwelcome invasion of illness, triumphantly return to health, and even succumb. Gathered about the hospitals patients is the best in medical scientific knowledge. Also standing on the sidelines, unable to do anything but hope, pray and offer encouragement to their lovedones are parents, husbands, wives, children — their dreams in the hands of the skilled phvsicians. their silent meditation filled with the determined belief that all will be well. The new Mt. Sinai Hospital of Greater Miami, in its planning stages, determined that something should be done about adding to the comfort of those on the A corner of the beautifully-paneled Contemplation Room, dedicated in memory of the late Saul Mindlin by hi* parents] Mr. and Mra. Jacob Mindlin, of Miami. sidelines — about making avail able to the waiting family, the hopeful parent, the anxious husband or wife, the bereaved father or mother, an atmosphere suitable to personal prayer and meditation. And so was born the idea of a Contemplation Room that would cross the borderlines of individual religious belief — that would serve as a center of spiritual solace for men of all creeds experiencing the universal emotion of anxiety and hope. The Saul Mindlin Contemplation Room will be a proud part of Mt Sinai Hospital when the hospital officially opens its doors to Greater Miami on Sunday. The visitor, on coming through Mt. Sinai's magnificent entrance way, will find the Contemplation Room to the left of the lobby. The room shares a divided corridor with the hospital's Blood Bank. To be beautifully appointed with ruRs. draqes, and cowhide leather seating of properly muted shades the Saul Mindlin Contemplation Koom f e a t u r es cherry woodpane led walls, ceiling to-floor cathedral windows, and a ceramic planter bin in which vUl grow nearly wall-high trees. The room has been dedicated by Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Mindlin. of Miami, in the name of their Ute son. The Mindlins came here in 1B51 from New York following his retirement as founV.l P r?^. dent Manhattan fur Dressing Corporation, and where he w., known ,n Jewish educational affairs. The $30,000 Founders gift memorializes Saul Mindlin, who ted Aug. 21, 1Q08 at the age of 57 la 1952. shortly before what WM to become a lengthy illness cut short his blossoming career Saul Mindlin had been appointed Continued on Pag •< closed and Mt. Sinai* Hospital opened its doors in its new quarters, with 200.beds available. Max Orovitz expdessed his gratitude: "Mt. Sinai," he said, "has been an uphill struggle all the way. It has been only through confidence and unity of purpose of the community thai the hospital is a reality today. "It is the biggest single endea\-or the Jewish community has contribured to Dade county. I feel that every cltlsen in the county, regardless of race or color, will feel the benefits for many years to come." And from Washington came the following telegram: "It Ts a fortunate thing for the entire community that you are able to open today a new hospital dedicated to the glory of God and the relief of human suffering regardless of religion, allegiance or persuasion. It gives me great pleasure to send hearty greetings to all who take part in the dedicatory exercises wit.h an earnest prayer that the hospital will grow and prosper and ever extend the sphere of boneficient influence. —Harry S. Truman, President of the United States." THUS. Max Ororita raid the cor' nerstone to the beginning of his dream: a bigger and better Mt. Sinai. Only 144 days after opening the doors, Orovitz announced his group's intention of building a 300-bed structure on Collins Island, adjacent to the old Nautilus hotel, then serving temporarily as the cere of a hospital city. Countless were the number of board meetings, of special committee meetings, hours of fundraising, negotiations and efforts to convince his friends, his business associates and the many leaders of other civic organizations that his dream was right, that a better Mt. Sinai was needed, and that it should not be imprisoned by smallness of thought. And as the years went by. Max Orovitz was reelected year after year as president of the board of directors. Forhe was the man. willing and able, to make the decisions. It was he who knocked on many doors and opened many hearts to the cause of Mt. Sinai Hospital. And at the end of IMS. when •h* Mlhoueta,, "gainst the bac !" ync Bay ing jS he said: "We fj, ttan ever that on. nupiration. more of Its full ru nearer." • *1 THE day ha, ho had a winder through \\t\ corridors of the „, Ho-p.tal. to admin'' beauty, and those k. thousands WB0 win M future be t.hey p,^ or doctors, will oa_ winner's smile on Mai face. For if he had not os*j hi to make the Sina: Hospital a reality h. would be engraved *£} book of his communitrii Max Oroviti ha ,. 'lorful career key] civic minded citizen, Hi a successful busatsssJ A native of Pelhaa.1 vitz. 55, received a ]nu from Emory I'niverettM arr: jmitheu He passed the first ban tion given in this state! practiced law, • ad to business %  Orovitz was an offiorJ City National Bank Later, he became the Alfn I Destin Co it mer • with Jlauk-j and ,i members!! of that organization owner of Public Gail director of the Nona! and i director and j General iMelnpmesl-f As one of tbe in the State of has int. rests in an factory there, • Ing force of a __ plored for oil and first oil well in Iwl' ation has expanded tt! and has added to tfet i development of the I He 3n i "ther assocutm owners re-poosibla.fcjJB struct ion of the M*^| Aviv and two othen a* In addition to Ore** business interestit an active participant*! nity affairs He wirt4 of the drive for fundsto the Merrick bldg *t sity of Miami. He M of the I diversity oils of trustees and a %  %  education commUtet chairman of the b*W Continued on P* ] CONGRATULATIONS .. NEW MT. SINAI HOSPITAL A NEW AND BETTER Unconditionally Guaranteed ROOF COATING FOR TILE AND GRAVEL ROOFS Created and Applied Only by ; Giffin Industries, Int. PROTECT COOL INSULATE BEAUTIFY Y0' STAYS ON STAYS WHITE CALL TODAY FOR FREE ESTIMATE HI 8-2651 Serving rtof.d* *o 30 Yoo fno IO H IOO HI *••*' %  NO JOB TOO SAAALL NO JOB TOO



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age 10-B +Jewistrk>rldlan Sen. Jennings Randolph, of the U.S. Senate to right) Mrs. Minnie Gray. 77, Miss Essie Committee on Problems of the Aged, visits Rosenberg. 68, and Mr. and Mrs. David Reiser, Douglas Gardens with his staff and other offi85 and 87. respectively, cials. Pictured with Sen. Randolph are (left Senate Group Visits Aged Home "Douglas Gardens is an out-landing example of effective com iiunily planning. It could well be j model for all other homes for the iged throughout the country. The 'cadership and administration can ndeed be proud of what it has ere .ited and developed at Douglas hardens These were the words of Sen. %  Jennings Randolph, who visited Douglas Gardens in connection vita the U.S. Senate hearings on Ol. itimrics MRS RAE JOSEPHS IWMll !>ec C vear. ago f:.,m N. ,_ lOOtO* her hu.liand award, son. Ruben, two daughter^ there, including Ike .rank. Miami Bea.h s,ru„, were n Funeral Honi f with ln ". N>bo Ome tery. SAMUEL BERGSON t, of 410 Tamlami Canal rd.. retired %  ice president ,.f the Public National >nk ,.f New Y.,tk. died I >e. IS? v r >W > r r "•' (fm Monti-llo \ 1 Imring World War II • helped tran.late Russian. Pol tall M '.erman document* for the PS vernment Surviving are hi. wife. • -rtrude. on. Sydney three daugh.Vi ,r 2\ I t 11 Llndher. Mr. l-lene Rimm and Mm Manlv n %  treeter. right grandchildren and great-grandchildren Service. loT J*, f V '. : ,r ''" n Funeral Home. *lth burial I n Ml. N ebo Cemetrr> MRS. ESTHER HIRSCH t'Jf J* 1 TS2 "*• • **** Iv %  am. her. eight year, ago from Ne rorfc Burrhrtat .re two ... i n Hiding Saul. Miami Beach. two i£! iC V ",> r '" h Service. •hIT..iiai.2 %  "••''• Mem.ni napel. Alton rd. SATISFYmC TOOT DUPIST DESWES FOE •UUTY AND DHJUITY The Vl.ta offer, f.mlly memorial estate, on tieautlru "y l; rk like freedom %  in memorial* and ill det.ill. problems of the aged held in Miamilast week. A group of more than 40 community leaders and federal and local government ofcials accompanied Sen. Randolph and his staff as he toured the Jewish. Home for the Aged here. Son. Randolph stopped to chat with a number of rmdtnli ho mot on tho tour. In tho Physical Thoropy Department, ho was told by one resident how she had boon rehabilitated, and was ROW walking for the first time since a stroke four years ape. An SOyear-old man. afflicted with Parkinson's disease, also in physical therapy, extended his shaking hand to Sen. Randolph and remarked. "You will see, I will make it "I have never seen more courageous people than those at Douglas Gardens." he declared. "That the Home provides rehabilitation opportunities to make life once again meaningful and satisfying for older people is deserving of the highest praise." Arthur Kallsh led the tour with vice presidents David Fleeman. David Phillips, and board members Irving Korach. Martin Fine. Sam Resnick. Julian Weinkle and Harry Altman, representing the i Home. The Home is a beneficiary agency of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation and the United Fund of Dade County. a THE VISTA 11 Flamingo PUm.Hi.leak.JaV fawaosTUT-ssu avu> Lake, North Dal Tou are ordered t" to roui muni. lo above atyled bill of eomplal • Clerk of mid court i.nd fain \V. Wood atty. for oUlntlff, i.'.OO R.W. i4lh St.. Miami. Phi of Mtme. on or tn-fore Jan'y 11, !•'., or Mil will be taken u Doted Dec. 1S. K II. I.KATHBRSIAS, Clerk (aeal) KM. I.VMAN, D <" U ll-:-li. l IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. 44S07-6 IN RE: Eatat. JOb'EKA TAL'SKK; NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTES AND FINAL DISCMARGE NOTICE 1. here>b> (tlv.n that 1 ha\. filed my Final Report and I f<>r Dl.Iril.utlon and Final I' a. Executrix of the eatatu of J' TAUSBIO, dereaaed: and that on th. Ith day or January. ItOU, will w ,l> to the Honorable County Judge, of I>ade County. Florida, for approval of %  aid Final Report and for Diatrliiuii. r. ami final dlaeharse a. Executril the estate of the above-name.l decedent. Thla th day of December. !> %  (iERTRCDE RF:i8. Executrix of the EaUte of Joaefa Tau.Mjt. I*1T* .1 KCRT WKI.I.I8CH Attorney for Executrix lu Coasreaa Bulkllag Miami, rnorld. H/U-is-K. l : NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN ANO FOR OADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY. No. BSCtMey VIRGIL W. WEUXIS. Plaintiff. SEL*MA D. WEL.DDN. IMendant SUIT FOR DIVORCE TO: ZCT.MA L. WKIJHIN. UM Marahall Street. Abilene. Texaa Tou ZELMA L. WBI.DOS. Il Marahall Street. Abilene. Texaa. are hereby notified that a Bin of Compalnt for Divorce ha. been Hied acalnat you. and you are required to aerve a cojDT of your Anawer or I'laadlaar to the IIRI of Complaint on the plaintirra Attorney. ENOl-ANI'F:R TENDR1CH. 311 IJncoln Road. Miamifkiark. Florlaa and file the original Anawer or Pleading In the offlce of tbe Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before the 11th day of January. ISO*. If you fall to do so. Judfrn.at by default will be taken aeaiaat you for the relief demanded la tho Bin of Complaint. This notice aaalf be published once each weak for four consecutive week. In THE JEWISH FliORIDIAN DOKE AND ORDERED at Miami. Florida, thla 7th day of December, A.D. 1*5*. E. B. L.EATHERMAN. CMrk. Circuit Court. Dade County. Florida (seal) By: K M. LTMAN Deputy Clerk FJNOI.ANDER TENDRICH S1I IJncoln Road Miami Beach. Florida JE S-I441 Attorneys for Plaintiff U/11-ll-tS.l 1 CERTIFICATE OP CORPORATE DISSOLUTION IN THE NAME AND BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA TO AH. TO WHOM THE8E III SF.NTH SHALL COMB GREETINGS Whereaa. MuKKlS RPISEI.MAN MIAMI BEACH. PLORIDA: I' GOLD. MIAMI BEACH. FM^'UII'V A Ot>LJ. MIAMI BF.\|-H F IDA: 1^.1 IS 81-EI.MAN. MANHATTAN. N,T did on the 11th da] AprlL A.D. lOil. cause to be Incorporated under the prerlaioes of Chapter OM. Florida Statutes. GOLD INVBT1IENT CP.P.. a corr" with It. piinrlpej phu-e of buslasas .1 KfRPRirtK. DADE OOUNTT. In the State of F'orida. and whereas tbe %  roper officers of such corporation did oa the ISth day of April. A 1' ISM. cause to be filed In the office of the Recretarv of State of the 8Ute of Florida a Certmcate of Amendment changlne It. corporate name to SI'FM. MAN I'liVSTHI'iTltiN CORP.. sad whereas tbe .tnefchohtera of suck corporation did on the sth day of December. All !:•. ranee to be filed In the office of the Secretary of State of the state ..r Florida, a Coeaeat of all the .tookSolder, under the e*o*loO of said Chapter OsS. Florida Kt.t *howia the dlasoiatloa of such ror1-iratloB. th'refore. the Secretary of Stale doe. herebr certtfv !•• the fo-emlac and that be Is sail.fie-t that *"• requirements of law haee been roapUed tth IN WITNESS WHERJOOP. I hare bereunte set my kaad and hare affixed the Great Seal of tbe State of Florida, at T>t>ahanaee. th ttal. ihta tbe FIPTH day of DFJCEMBER. AT' ISM *—m R A tTRAT. ItyUiBJ Secre^r, of 1 KORaUM F. : 1 Attorasy f a I ItSS Liacebi f Mum llewk a, I NOTIttl FICTiTIOOl! Id B HI th-uaderaHMil |.j.-u;e. uats B KMKHALD API H.rdlns Aw.. I :.. resliter adi I of the Clrrall CaS^ Florida. J BSSSR tU HARRT Zl-KBl!a| Attorney f Onjf 4M Uncokt B4-. NOTICII FICTiTIOWl N< 'TICBISBr the d n *'*V.i bujunes. nar"! Mil UTKT 1ST KY Ml'SIC CO. MF1NT CO.. UK VENDING CO. S< „u. Intss*J-i ith the ChrtfJ NOTICI J FICTITIOUM NOTICE B nTlhe u"*"^**] o* A-A-A PS^I" PRESS t i*£;j .'".'STf*^ •Atf£r J mu Mie""% Jfcw** 1



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Jack and Barbara Gordon-he's the Washington Federal Savings and Loan president-back in town at their Palm Island home after serving as sponsors for the dinner tribute to Eleanor Roosevelt by the Advisory Council of the Democratic National Committee at the Waldorf Astoria hotel _^_ in New York on Monday ... The dinner honored .oosevelt on the occasion of her 75th birthday Other Flor[ present: Gov. LeRoy Collins, Francis T. Whitehair and forfen. Claude Pepper Incidentally, the Israel Bond comof Hollywood, Fla., honors Mrs. Roosevelt this Sunday at Dllywood Beach hotel ... was the right kind of day—a cool day—for a knit fashion Eat the third annual Temple Ner Tamid Sisterhood candle%  g ceremony at the Fontainebleau Mrs. Louis Cohen tot, lovely in black, with a white feather hat, and pleased to Jon Roy's wife, Myra, with her Myra chose a long-sleeved bll-shirted shirtmaker Mrs. Nat Stein in pink and Mrs. in Holland insight blue were co-chairmen of the day 'ht: Mrs. Murray Shaw, who broke a leg in Europe, refused the occasion, and arrived on crutches. Ifth Note: Mr. and Mrs. Al Roscoe announce the arrival of a ler, Julie Marlene, on Sunday, Nov. 27, at Mercy Hospital 'die, who weighed in at 6 lbs. 6 oz., is the first grandchild born | and Mrs. Ben Auerbach and Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Roscoe lie new mother is the-former Phyllis Auerbach Dad is lie advertising department at Burdine's. isy Gertman doing her Couneilcttc presidential work from at home in Coral Gables Susan's just undergone surpn her knee—aftermath of her summer vacation Mom, Sam Gertman, is president of the Greater Miami Section of Ell fcnnie Grossinger has promised to be in Miami to honor her friend, Charles Fruchtman, at Yeshiva University's annual 1 here Dec. 27 at the Fountainebleau The dinner will mark ra's 73rd academic year, and pay tribute to Fruchtman r. Leonard Finn around town in a stunning checked coat and King "U send me!" Delia and Max Applebaum eating kes last Saturday a.m. with their pert granddaughter from Nob Hill, San Francisco, signed by Sally and Harold p. and Mrs. Samuel (Anna) Rossnick, of 563 W. 53rd St., celebrated their 48th wedding anniversary with a recepTemple Tifereth Jacob The Rossnicks were married York City bey have three children, five grandchildren and one greatchild Their children are Mrs. Bernard (Gertrude) LowenS13 Cutlass ave.. Treasurer Isle; Dr. Gerald Rossnick, Bay[N.J.; and Robert Rossnick, Forest Hills, L. I. ana is on the luncheon committee of the Tifereth Jacob kck Robin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Robin, 2250 SW 28th bs just returned to the States after being stationed with the Dree in Japan for two years Jack was in the service for [and one-half years ... He plans to enter the University of majoring in business administration family reunion was held over the Thanksgiving holidays, he Robins' daughter, Estelle, a student at the University of |a, also in town to welcome her brother home lie Robins are charter members of Tifereth Israel Congre. Harold was its first president, and is now on the board Bctors Mrs. Robin is a piano and accordion teacher. ove Thy Neighbor" That's the motto at 7920 East dr., I tenants take a turn at giving a cocktail party Last week, lid Mrs. Alfred Maas acted as hosts, while the Phil Grays ennod several days ago on their return from the Bar Mitzvah of grandson, Joseph A. Miller, in New Rochelle, N.Y. Highbf the evening was a surprise birthday cake for Phyllis Parry pc-baked by a bachelor tenant Hmmm riends will be honoring Albert Grossman. 2025 SW 19th St., Jay evening at the Biscayne Terrace hotel on the occasion of fOth birthday ... He was among the organizers of Temple Minyonaires and Goodwill Group here heldon Kay, who once sold papers on the street corners of on, N.J., returned to his hometown last weekend as a Miami ng executive Occasion for the brief jaunt was the Bar Ih of his nephew, Larry Feinberg. Jore on Bar Mitzvahs: Walter Flaste will long remember last Say ... In the morning, he was Bar Mitzvah at North Shore Center, and in the evening he was host to his friends at a at the Montmarte hotel he teen-agers looked chic—some in white jackets, and one in red ... His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Irving Flaste—mom stuncocoa lace—and their older son, Ricky, greeted their own |s, too iicille Bursten, smart in sequined white and escorted by hus|Leonard ... Dr. and Mrs. Herman Mechlowitz the center of py group ... Mr. and Mrs. Bart Cohen leaving early to get other party in North Miami Jso: Dinner dance reception in honor of Louis Rose Steinberg 1 occasion of his Nov. 28 Bar Mitzvah at North Shore Jewish ... His parents, Dr. and Mrs. Benjamin L. Steinberg, 1230 pt.. Bay Harbor Island—she's vice president of the North PTA—chose the Flamenco room of the Barcelona hotel ut-of-town guests included his maternal grandparents, Mr. Irs. H. Lubet, Pittsburgh, Pa.; paternal grandmother, Mrs. | Rose, Philadelphia; Dr. and Mrs. Isidore Rose, Philadelphia, lr. and Mrs. Wayne Steinberg, Des Moines, la. In all, pests turned out to wish the Bar Mitzvah well. lorrie Braunstein is now Mrs. MUton Schwartz ... The couple Jiting from Gotham Town at the Beau Rivage It snowed *e Raymond Rubins, visiting Del's brother, Sidney Gelfand, pte Plains, loved every flake ... It was a Thanksgiving weeKWth Del's son coming from Harvard to say hello to everyone us time it's a girl, making six granddaughters and two grander proud Ted and Ruth Pritikin. it.-til oman s "World "dfewish Floridian Miami, Florida. Friday, December 11. 1959 Section B Fred Shapiro, Susan Cohen, Marlene Weiss, and Danny Charnau, of Beth David Congregation, Miami, are placing Chanuka gifts in a box which will be sent to Israel through National Council of Jewish Women's Ship-ABox program. This year the Greater Miami Section of Council joined the 30 Jewish schools affiliated with the Bureau of Jewish Education here in their service project Council's Ship-A-Box Program Will Gladden Hearts of Israeli Children Ship-A-Box program, service project of the National Council of Jewish Women, is preparing Chanuka gifts for children in Israel. Pupils of 30 religious schools affiliated with the Bureau of Jewish Education of Greater Miami joined in Council's program this year to assist in the happy project. The children were asked to bring a gift to school last Sunday. Mrs. Edward Weiss, Section chairman of Ship-A-Box, and her committee of 40 women, drawn from Council's eight divisionsthen collected, packed and prepared for shipping over 100 boxes containing paints, brushes, crayons, construction paper, skipping ropes and dolls. These useful tools for play and learning, which are unavailable for purchase in Israel, will be sent to the Ministry of Education for distribution in the kindergartens there. Mrs. Samuel Gertman, president of Greater Miami Section, has received a "thank you" letter from a kindergarten teacher in Accre, showing what Council's Ship-ABox program means overseas: "I was very happy to receive your lovely gift—a parcel of toys. My kindergarten is situated in the city of Acre. We have about 40 children, most of them from poor families. Practically their only contact with toys and games is in the kindergarten. "The children come from homes where seven or more people live together. The mother's first concern is with food, and her means do not permit her to provide toys for the child. "Thus the kindergarten has a most important task in this neighborhood: to give the child a warm corner where he can spend a part of his day at play and at work. "I send you my deepest thanks for your help in fulfilling this task. The children receive the toys with enthusiasm and joy. and if they were able to express this in writing, they, too, would send you their thanks and appreciation. Since they cannot, I shall do this in their name and in mine. Thank you." Sporting their costumes for their roles as hostesses at the cocktail party sponsored by Temple Beth Sholom Sisterhood on Saturday evening are Mrs. Harry B.' Smith and Mrs. Arnold Gottfried. (See story Page 3-B.) Cancer League Meets on Friday Women's Cancer League of Miami Beach will hold its December luncheon meeting at the Monte Carlo hotel on Friday. Mrs. Sidney Ohrbach is in charge of reservations. Mrs. Micky Kraus is president of the organization. Arthur Burrell, vice president of the recently-organized Men's Cancer League of Miami Beach, will be guest speaker. Burrell is manager of Hirsch and Company, and has been a resident of Miami Beach for 25 years. The men's group will cooperate with the Women's Cancer League of Miami Beach to raise $50,000 for a Cobalt machine at Mt. Sinai Hospital of Greater Miami. For their first fund-raising event, the men's group has scheduled a golf tournament Dec. 16 at Bay Shore Golf Course. The Women's Cancer League's first major fund-raising event will be a luncheon at the Eden Roc hotel on Jan. 6. 1 1 -.1 •



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Page IOC +JmisMcrklkHi Frid lay. DR. MAX DOBRIN Out-Patsent Department Grows With Medical Need When the i.ew facilities, to be known as the S. Harvey Greenspan Out Patient Pavilion, will open its dean, patientwill find the most modern and the iv rtment of its kind in the entire Southeast area. When Mt. Sinai's On) Patient hepartment was CBa at ad on July 1. 1950. 1.888 patients were treated dttrtttl the l.r-i -i\ monthal bahment. At that time, ihiee clinic-— leal, Surgical and Obstetric logfcal wart ninctfantag. By the end of 1901, its first full year. 5.086 patients \i-itei the di (Thick had been enlarged by the addition of a Tumor Clinic. In 1980, by the end r, 11,297 patients r.ad been attended in IT clinics In less thsm 10 yean, nearly 80.000 ti have been served by the department, greatly handicapped by narrow quarters and other problems. Some History in Retrospect When Pr Max Dobrin. director of the Out-Patient Department of Mt. Sinai Hospital, braved s heavy rainstorm to make his first visit to the new quarters, it turned out to be THE day of his life. The kind eyes under his bushy, white brows acquired a young lustre, his voice exhaled emotion as he said again and again: "But this is wonderful, simply wonderful I" Dr Dobrin and his wife have been residents of Miami for 35 years. "I remember." he say-, "that J. Gerald Lewis (Founder, trustee and chairman of the building and planning committee for the new facility! was our Bn when we came here. "The years went by. but about 14 years ago, I don't remem ber exactly the day. the necessity of a Jewish hospital for our area was discussed by some of my colleagues In my livingroom: and it w.imy wnc who wrote down the names of the 17 people most likely financially to support such an idea, the same 17 people Mho months later were to become the first trustees of the future Mt Sinai Hospital And my wile was to be one of them." Dr. Dobrin. became the first chairman of the medical board when the Alton Road Hospital was opened. At that time, only a -mall number of people used to come to us as out -patients." But when the Nautilus property was conxerted into Mt. Sinai llt-pit %  things began to change. Modal in Dad* County When he sat down after a long walk through the interminable corridors of the new Mt Sinai, revealing at each turn Be* wonders of convenience and technical progress, he said "I am so glad tfted Finally, we have the cheerful surroundings, the dignified rooms in which the patient, regardless of hieconomical status, will ha\c a greater feeling of security, where he will know in.-tinctiv 11\ that he will receive the best medical care, and for receiving it will form a better opnion at himself as %  member of society All tiled in yellow, with yellow and black vmvl tiles covering the floorMt Sinai's new Out Patient Department is one ot the finest anywhere and a model in Dade county. With the addition of an Eye Clinic and an Ear. Nose and Throat C lime, the department will have a total of 17-General Medicine Heart Obstetrics and Gynecology. Pediatrics and Well Baby. Orthopedics. Surgery. Tumor. Periferal Vascular Gastro-Enterotogy, Dermatology, Chest. GenJto-Urtaary Diabetics. Endocrinology. K\e and Far. Nose and Throat. "We are doing a lot for the community." Dr. Dobrin assert"llutwc cannot stagnate. I have plans, and I like to talk about them What w,need, what this community needs badly, is a Clink for Mental Hygiene and a Day Mental Therapy Clinic, where patients can be attended for a full day's length under the supervision of specialized nursing personnel I know that progress takes time, and it takes money. But I am sure that some day my ideas and those of others wiU be translated I into reality, for the benefit of many." WE ARE PROUD TO HAVE FURNISHED ALL THE MILLWORK FOR THE NEWAAT. SINAI HOSPITAL CONSTRUCTION PRODUCTS CORPORATION BUILDING MATERIALS 6865 N.W. 36th Avenue OX 1-9180 r ?*&. j*. •"•I ii -"* a**"' Mt. Sinai Hospital has one of the largest airpatient areas. At left are the wt* conditioning plants in Dade county, a 750-ton which feed the huge tanks instah unit (right) which feeds 40 auxiliary unite and hospital'a roof. % %  also operates refrigerators in the kitchen and Sinai's Progress Continues Continued from Pag* 5-C that M; Sinai was rendering the community invaluable service. On April 18. 15. Mt. Sinai re c. ived a $250,000 grant from the Wolf.oon Family Foundation, and Max QrovitX, hospital president, announced that the money would be used in the then-beginning expansion program. Dvlopmnt Fund ftAYS later, cost of the planned 300-bed facility was estimated at H.000.000 and the Mt. Sinai Hospital Development Fund was organized under the chairmanship of Dan B. Ruskin to raise the required amount. Ami as preliminary studies came to an end. the appointment of Donald G. Smith and Irving Korach as architects was announced by the building committee, which later exhibited the f.rst scale model to South Florida business and civic leaders. At a dinner attended by 300. more than a million dollars in initial gifts was pledged by hospital trustees and members of the community. Stanley C. Myers, then president of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, told the assembled that the new hospital was to be a joint project of the Federation and Mt. Sinai Hospital. While public attention was focused on the project, the hospital continued its internal expansion with the opening of the first hemophilia Blood Bank in the State of Florida, and the National Hemophilia Foundation establishing a fellowship for research at Mt. Sinai. By October, contributions to the building fund had reached •1.775.000 and the Development Fund established its own offices. Hefore the year came to an end. the hospital received a $109.100 grant from the Ford Foundation, and the Bayshore Exchange Club of Miami Beach established a $10,000 research fellowship at Mt. Sinai for the study of Cardiovascular Pathology. Honors were bestowed on two members of the staff, as Mrs. Carmen Ross, director of Nursing Education, was selected by the National League for Nurs.ng to -erve on the national boar.I to draft examination series, while Mary Wernersbach. chief pharmacist, was elected president of the Florida State Hospital Pharmacists and vice president of the American Pharmaceutical Assn. of Southeast Florida. IN May, 1956, Mt. Sinai again set the pace among the area's hospitals by creating the first Hospital Dental Clinic for which equipment was donated by the Miami Beach Rotary Club. The same month also saw a high honor bestowed upon Mildred Ann Vogel. director of nursing, who received the Mshoney Award for achieving group integration at Mt. Sinai Hospital. In the meantime, the drive for building funds continued with the creation of additional commi'tees, and well-known personalties like Leonard A. Wien. Carl Susskind. Howard Kane and Isadora Hecht taking active part in the drive. Later in the year, Leonard A. Wien was appointed chairman of the initial gifts division of the Development Fund, in charge of raising $2,000,000 for the ntw hospital. Best Wishes to the new MT. SINAI GOIDKIST POULTRY GROWERS 2181 N.W. 10th Av.ni* Congratulations to Mt. Sinai.., OWN Oil SUM A HOME!! You'll Save PtaJ on Cooling and Heating W| if it's Insulated with OWENSCORNKI FIBERGLASJ BLOWN INSt Call PL fl FOR FREE EST ASK ASOUTOUKW*! FIREPUtt] COMfUTHY *- Ready to UgHI CRASTRBJ WSUUTK* 300 N.E. 75*



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Page 8-A +Je*ist>ncrktkwi UF Division Picks Beach Attorney As '60 Chairman Joseph W-. Melek. attorney, has been named chairman of the Mi ami Beach Apartment House As*'n. n of the United Fund of Dade County, it was announced here h* Eugene Weiss, chairman of the Miami Beach campaign organization. Malek will be responsible for the solicitation of contributions from apartment house owners for support of the Funds 300 health and welfare services during the coming >ear. Worfcino with MUM in the currant drive will be Murray Borenliwi. Morris Honor, MUMon Kahn, IJ Rubmowrti, Isidore KupIrvine aaa aa aasn aa Leonard G. Egert president of the Cancer Institute at Miami presents annual report which represents the '—^"l* director's scientific and medical report for 1959. to Dade County Medical Assn. president Dr. John Reiser. Egert said Wednesday that a dinner honoring Dr. Ernest Ayre will be held in January. i Mates, a practicing attorney on Miami Beech for the past 11 Family Service Testifies Before Senate; Executive Urges Social Security Change Jewish Family and Ch.ldren's board and staff participated workshop confer BM on aging held by the Welfare Planning Council of Dade at Dupont Plasa hotel in the bear week a! Park of the D. S Sen -. on Prooien the Agec V:ce chairman c: ering the workshop JFCS r>\ard. and Seymour JFCS staff director of 9 for r P.-epie The Welfare 1 stag Council workshop was staf.'ed cxecuthe Senior ( tea's Division of the Coucc It was developed tw establish B*Sf* community itfi twi t ef the nttdi of HM e^ir* pip.tj. tion of Dado county; (•) to provide rtiww with rhe epperrunit for moktno retom m iwdstions to We ittmtj of the aping; (3) to prepare reports for present* renat not Senate Subconucwttee heaf Jewish Family sad Childrens Senrice participants inclndei: Dr Stanley Margoshes. JFCS board; ^ %  'jeg. essaarmaa of the section, beard member Martin Fine, %  embers Ah-in CasaH Irvm Koraca. Section oa social ras chaired by JFCS i nty of Miami School of Law. He is a member of the board of directors of Miami Beach Apartment Assn. and co-chairman of the City-County activities committee of the Association. He is a member of the Junior board member Daod P. Catsman. Chamber of Commerce of Miami nee chairman, jiyaieai Siegei: Beach. Miami Beach Civic League. corrmttee members from the Miami Beach Bar Assn., Temple JFCS board. Mrs. Leon Eisenmaa. Emanu El Men's Club. FootlightKnIrd^ess!er Wre ** ***' aub %  *-* *"* Mu c — •he sectjoo oa income mainte Am L****. "* Breakfast Opti nance, participants were JFCS mist Club. board member Joseph Gassen and. representing the National Assn. of I Workers. JFCS executive director Albert Comanor Vice -man cf the section on employment was Dr Michael Goodman, executive d.rector of Jewish Vx-ational Service. In the section on nursing homes was Arthur Ka! at director. Jewish Home for the Aged The first day of hearings before' the I S. Senate Subcommittee heard reports from the cha.rmen of these wor ks h o p grseau to Sen. Pat McNamara and Sen. Jenamcs Randolph Invited directly by the senatorial comm.ttee to make a pre**: tion on health problem! and financing of medical care for the aged was JFCS executive director Albert Comanor. who toad the committee that "although mere have been great advances in the technical and scientific aspects ef health care, very little has so fasbeen done to distribute these advantages to the aging population.'" He said the problem ef self-esteem and status "is so important that the idea of medical indigence las to be repudiated m our hj and proposed "a save health program which wil assure full health care to all individuals by applying the ef group payment and tax or the principles of compulsory national health hueraace to a total range of brash measeres This by an o Lodge Meeting Features BBYO Monthly evening me etin g of Miami Beach Lodge of aVkai B'rith will be held Wednesday evening at the Algiers hotel, acc ordi ng to Irving Scfaatzman. prrifctest The meeting will feature the B'nai BVsth Yooth Organization. Four members of AZA will debate on an urgent topic, and BBG members will ting and dance. Mitchell Sandweiss. president of the Youth Council, will deliver an address. President of the Greater Miami BBYO board of directors Jack M. Fink is in charge of arrangements for the program. The meeting will also be a preChanuka party. Canter Israel Reich, of Temple Emanu-FJ. will sang. Red Denies Anti-Sei PARISJTA,_Ge. here that Jew, ejj viet Union" but th* number of elderly pan to do so. Gen. Drazunsky, sW-J %  **d the national Si French Jewish Coseaw the Union of Jem s_ %  •nd Mutual Help, ports of an arson Rosh Ha-nana at an. bwb of MalakhoTka, L lived near the raban\' Denying other caaijj Jewish discriminaaaW viet Union, the Geaem a own case as an rxaaplc oft sttuhiaos for Rusnm Jtvsi to the highest posts tat h Russia He added ke a ka jhave his passport aanaalj Jewish nationality. dr. MfefTsofi m Ltdmt "Spinoza', r nlietu" the topic of a lecture bj Dt| ham Wolfs !" on FrkliY. the Blackstrme koM. Tan mark the fifth leehgt a n on "Lift ;r.d Philoaophr t( I Spinoza Question and am*! nod will follow. Hold Sisterhood Metta, General ire*r* t tat] hood '. -rae' ml Wednesday erenJag. Mn. Lerroar •rc-ijent •o* BO I iaa to the Social Security Act. and further extoe> of —i mt ol Jock Robin eras honored ot the Oneg Sbabbctt foilowof Titoreth Israel Northside easts. Mr. and Mrs. Harold Robin. 2250 SW 28th at. on the oocamon of has retmtn from a tour of duty with the U.S. Air Force. Jock eras the Cut Bar Mihrexxhs rdereth Israel which his r"'1 i helped found. Caissue cafled for greater so cial welfare activity sn many dkreeuons m behalf of the aged. These woeJd extend the kinds of services in which Jewish Faaury and Cauldren's Sen ic e is psoneermg m the South snore generally T human the her ef services stnU i t ay the agencyhe toU the committee. Jewish Famuy and Ctoldrea's Service is a United Fend and Greater Miaaai Jewish Federation beneficiary. Single Men's and seas and Professional Isa ac he d Wednesday at the North Dade Branch ef the Greater Miami Jewish Comaransty Center. leaM



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Page 2-8 -JenMflvrXMnn Homemakers Find Herring Delicacies Lighten Holiday Entertainment Menu Fxfr.n no's, parties, "drop-in" Hires of hard-cooked egg*, cucumTII*C*. tacktaiMwnr treats, are bert, radishes or pickles. Jus part an .'-parcel of the homemakfore serving, place 1 or 2 Vila er-hostew' assitmments during the Creamed Herring Fillets or Partv hnstk-buttte Of the approaching Snacks (fillets in light wine sauce) holui.i\ SCUM. 'O center of each canape. Garnish •,le food which has serving platter with parsley sprig< made a name for itself as a feaand radish roses. Hired attraction en hoi day menus • • • is herrin." Equally at home on a "Help-Yourself" Hors D'Oeuvrei variety of occasions, holiday hosArrange crackers and fancy Ms are natal this tangy delight shaped breads on tray, flanked on with increasing frequency. Il^^, 4ft 1 .^ re ,ua tti %  -• %  Jig -* %  e h IOTA, Page I LJ *eJ cither side by serving bowls.'Fiji !" n £.1^!*? <• %  Lone a favorite among many one serving bowl with Vita Party strips ?"* P l ne,lt o| of the world, herring's Snacks (herring fillets in li.ht wine To help with ideas. fk| Year's Day. to assure good luck throurhout the year. Two top favorites among herring products—special at holiday time and "staple" with smart hosM the year round—are imported fillets in sour cream sauce, or I with parsley Ul or with v.ta ^omenHwUAi Fish fillets prepared in a variety of ways and served on tempting platter to tease the most discriminating taste. Study Group Meets Tuesday i Group meetinj of the • r Miami chapter o; the I in e n ConamittN, w.l! be held Tuesday. 10 a.m.. at the home ai Mr-. steam. 9641 Broadview ter. Earlier meeting was held las' week at the home of Mrs. William MaxwtH, group chairman. PHYLLIS tTOLFF mjyt: Ah-h-h... Kasha! DSttfLMMu v or r*siifc^" A "hoimishe" standby ... for old-fimy good Kasha Vamethkes, Kasha Knishes, and other treats. Loss than 2> a serving I Aim •*, WoHT, Cm, W01W1 Kufn 'N Oar, .. Send for ntff KASHA COOK BOOK] •HYIUS WOUF, rW Y„. N.. y* LEVtNSON S FOOD SPECIALTIES, tec leg). I C-.Wtiut.r, IK* E. irth STREET. M ALEAH. FLA. PHONE TU MS71 ON SALE AT KWIK < IIIIK peoples fame has now become firmly essauce); the other with Vita Hertabllshed m Amer.c.i. Its deserved | ring in Sour Cream Sauce. Place %  pared'a popularity stems from two causes : party toothpick in each fillet; let and Easv vfw'l its unique flavor, a treat to guests guests serve themselves. Meals and V yi > jaded by run of the mill arrays of ... i tessc's how tnViLjH cocktail canapes; and its never | Seafood Tartlets j f, sh Drodlir ,, ;E~ n *M ending versatility, a treat for host Plan on at least three small flakv wer J ', !" ? ^fa Bd host. I tart shells for each guest. Make The"book U wi^?! Bv wav of a traditional folklorshe "-' home, if you've a favorite ,,, h |"j*g note with holiday meaning: many recipe or buy at pastry shop. Fill .„-, Editor JertSi nat.onalities eat herring on New •* shell with a Vita Creamed Box 2373 M arm Fb Herring F.ilet. sprinkled with paprika and garnished or water cress sprigs. sliced lunch herring (drained) cut Inn rental into bit-size pieces, garnished with My God," by Hermit I Vita stuffed green olives, halved meeting Sunday of ik{_ in licht wine sauce. Each possesses Or use Vita Party Snacks, garnishMiami chapter af fbafl a distinctive flavor, yet they can j ed with chopped Aives or shredcan ORT at the DcoajjT be used interchangeably in recipes. Add to this their time-saver quality: fillets are ready to serve • from the jar—and with minimum effort they can be "dressed up" for appearance at the most laviah party. Here are some party-minded, easy-to-prepare sening suggestions fc r the harried holiday host<> >>'k;ng for a delicious and different appetizer, snack or hors d'oeuvre to pique the gourmet palate—straight from the experts in the kitchens of Vita Food Products Incorporated, world's largest importers and packers of herring, and a wide variety of other fine fi-h products and gourmet delicacies: Party Tid-Biti Use bread and crackers of vari ous shapes (cooky cutters will cuf thin slices of bread into assorted fancy shapes). Cover with thin SAY "WELCOME" IN THE TRADITIONAL WAY / Si*' **\ HERRING The delicious Vita Herring that so often graces your family table also bids your guests a warm and ioyous "welcome". Enjoyed by your family and friends for its richly traditional, old world flavor. Vila Herring is part of the heritage of hospitality always found in the American Jewish home. KOSHER ZION 199% P9*£ Hit H099CTS • UVEl SABSACC > nMaeVoiTOS PASTtaju tOtSCM* ITUMM KUCaTBSm. SVfMMHITS I %  OTjajajK KOSHER ZION SAUSAGE COJUPANY OF CHICAGO 15, See* Water Market, Carnage I, NOae*. NEW DAIRY MEAL TREAT JUST HEAT "N" EAT SE Cheese Ravioli IN SAOCe VITA-the height of a meal or a pant pan MW % %  ? %  %  MOU %  mir*... *** ^rtlt.lt.HH. In Miami it $ FLORIDA-FOREMOSi] DAIRIES far Home Delivery Phone FR 4-2621 The tree* MOM in dei'y 9"*** FRANK J. HOLT. Man9*t MEATLESS] {TETIEY TEA IN A GWSi hy *..d Chef Bey-Ar-Oee. Teooer Httl filed w-tfci EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTORS OF THE SOUTH COASTLINE PROVISION CO.. INC. B BSCAVNE STWEET. MIAMI BEACH PHONES: JE M, JE 1-6231 MERMAN *•. ^ AT OEAWR *** m js en***' •a* oeJ tftafiaa way. Thrifty, Net AhoM I U a ear**Bock



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Pag 6-C +Jmist>fk*'*Maun Partial view of one of the six patients' day beds in case of an emergency or epidemic, lounges. lacing west and offering a spectacFurniture here will be cheerful and multiular view across Biscayne Bay. The room has colored, been equipped to become a ward with four New Mt Sinai Floor-by-Floor Continued from Pag* 1-C around the-clock. Here are the locker rooms for men and worn< l mpkgn i I, the office of the Women's Auxiliary, and the Pa> t.int.-' Library. A beautifully-decorated Board a u.ll be used for the period• and the many committees roponsible for the operaUon of the hospital. Third Floor This is the first patient floor and contains a complete MaterDepartment, i delivery rooms, five labor rooms, three nurseries, a MSped nursery f„ r lao l ittna, a demonstration room for parent education in baby care, and a fathers' room. PHOTO CREDIT Frontispiece and photographs in Uus Mt. Sinai Hospital Supplement are by Arthur DeGutz. of Ardmore Studios. Miami Beach. There are two four-bed wards, with 4" expectant mothers capable of accommodation here. The ranee 1 working area on this floor is typical of all other patient floors, featuring a triangular shape in the midst of ail patient rooms, with five exits into the patient area. In addition to the nurses' station with its information desk and the nurses' \u ti i VaMtl Call control board, the area contains tables for charting, a doctor's did nected to the central dictati. 'i lyaten in Medical Recthe Head Nur-.es office, a nur-.s lounge, a pantry equippaJ vital stainless steel shelves or linen and supply, phis two medication rooms for storage of medicines and bandages. Recessed wall space abounds for the storage of stretcher beds and wheelchairs. As for a typical patient room, five color combinations are featured, all in soft pastel shades. Walls are covered with a vinyl fabric. On the wall is a two-way aluminum lamp (one for each bed), a central oxygen and vacuum outlet, telephone. Nurses' Call system with its microphone and loudspeaker recessed into the wall, a high voltage outlet to permit the use of portable X-Ray equipment in each room, and a thermostat regulating the room's temperature. The patient's bed is all electricautomatic, with pu-sh button control, thus eliminating the nurse's cranking the patient up and down. Fourth Floor This entire floor is dedicated to help those who cannot pay for ical or hospital care. Its 85 beds are located in five 5-bed wards, three 4-bed wards, 23 twobed and two 1-bed rooms. A public waiting room and a patient's day lounge complete the facilities located around t h e nurses' working area. Fifth Floor Pediatrics, care for sick children, is located on this floor, and six of the rooms can be supervised by television from a special additional nurses' station. Here, the nurses' working area includes a treatment and conference room. Congratulations... ALL PAINTING and DECORATING GODDARD PAINTING CO. Painting & Decorating Contractors of America 1884 • PAINTING • DECORATING THOMAS GODDARD H. R. COOPERAAAN PL 1-2493 450 N.W. 71st Street ***** ad Seventh Floors These are identical patient floors, with private and semiPnvate rooms, pat.ent capacity changeable according to the season's requirements. CifJtth Floor This floor is dedicated to the private paUent. who can afford to pay for added facilities not essential to general patient care. Taough all rooms on the floor are identical m size and equipment to all others in the building 16 front rooms have private terraces closed off by sliding glass ooors Each worn has a small refrigeration compartment t o store the patient's own food or o*her perishable items. Each room will also have its own television set. with bedside control and pillow speakers optiooal in other parts of the hospiiai. Communication* A Pneumatic tube system with rtations connects as many department* in the building Doctors will receive the.r c.U, Jeer a noiseless system with 46 sta Uons distributed throughout the bu.ldmg. flashing Lrie. numbers. The Nurses' Call ,£ tern permits communication be**• %  the patient and nurse. Friday CULMINATION^ ^' Achievement j?< Of Unrivalled fi By Greater Midi gARLY in 1957 Mt. Sinai Hos, i ,; „ lncd %  With free shots for medi, .. ., ,"%*& and in February South Flo, *£P Center was opened at Ml. Sina. I i?!"* luted for the first tin.e ,„ Flon.la V4 i ^jj ph.I.acs in cooperation with the National He^Sfl Medical news was made again at Ifi ZITTI J. Harold Klock. D.D.S.. who J co^ftA Department, presented %  hr,/, ue '„^21 patients, henceforth to be know., : ,. he %  ..jJJJgP And the high regard Mt. Sinai received j. t |T!!_ was again reaffirmed as it was pr -entrt i wS a new scries of grants given I,. 1 V *W| in the Greater Miami area-$54.55u Foua ^l In the meantime, deliberations by the hni J consultations with national author,,,, and 2k, J led to a change in plans and two stones 5,Tuff prints for the new Mt. Sinai Hospital iTSJCl patient capacity to the 400-bed range. Consequently, estimates for the building mk revised, and as confidence prevailed in leadanajTw of m oiUlioo dollar, was set as the goal Kfi Fuad. Taylor Construction Co. o! Miami wu **] take the job. and on Monday. Julv 15. 1957 tbTfaJ were on the scene at Collins Island Colossus of Concrete Rites IN September of the same year, the fund drift | way mark, reaching $3,300,000. and in ren*. port a nee of the new facility under construda*. received a $40,000 grant from the IS Public &_ to be used in the installation of new cardio-pulawmil facilities. When, in November, open hot is? was held on tki tion site, more than 2,500 persons came to get a gtaaaa| the new Mt. Sinai was going to look like. The year's end again snowed increases in pauaui, Emergency and Out-Patient Department volume. 3 In November. 1958. Leonard A Wien succwAH Ruskin as chairman of the Development Fund. Fat was geared to a maximum, the newlj created Woeartj reached and surpassed its self-set goal of CSAMtf barked on a second program to reach the half-i mark. Before the year came to a close, the hospitill 85.000 mark in patient admission-, in addition to tat^ treated in the clinics and emergency. Thus, the i enlarged facility was stressed more and more. As the colossus of concrete, tile and steel on • neared completion, an all-out effort was underitkaM munity to subscribe the total cost of the building. *f and technical facilities. Hardly a week went by Founder—contributor of $50,000 or more— joining I Leon Lowenstein, textile magnate from NewYM been a constant contributor to the hospital's rcjenrnu nated $250,000 to endow the Nurses' Residence, t* Continued on Paoe 12-C MIAMI BEACH FEDERM Salutes the New MT. SINAI HOSPITAL Another sign of progress in the community MIAMI BEACH FBDBJ SAVINGS *MU* Aao<* T i Office*: Uataaa lose WM* j



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11. 1959 *b"isl IhiiHtr io/ogy Via the Motion Picture tion picture, long a entertainment and will with the opennew Mt. Sinai Hos* an important part of the Department gy. direction of Dr. rich, introduced will Cine Fluoroscope, X-Ray in actual pictures, such vital irts of the body as jnd the coronary arw the first time, be X-Rayed in mowill speech and Bfects. A library of films will be developed which will allow for the teaching of fluoroscopy to house staff, infcrni and resident doctors without the need to expose the patients. The Cine-Fluoroscope is but one of the new innovations which will characterize the equipment of Radiology. Formerly housed in a crowded 10 rooms, space in the new building will offer 29 rooms with an accompanying 40 percent increase in diagnostic equipment. • Three divisions mark the work of the Radiology Department. X-Ray diagnosis finds the cause and identifies t.te disease,. The Radiq-Tlerapy Division offers X-Ray machines and radium for the treatment of tumors, cancers, and allied diseases. Found in the Radio-Isotope Division are the devices for the correction of thyroid and cardiac conditions. In addition to its active work wil.h patients, the Radiology Department devotes a great deal of its time toward the teaching of the hospital's house staff and the training of X-Ray technicians. In its %  %  *• •iuJ!--:i.i"imniii .--in rr Mrirau nmm „, -_ rial Miimiriiiivi i : %  '.:' i HHMPM • • Continued from Pago 2-C Ration with other local agencies to offer lunity medical care at par with any pital in this country," he explained, ire constantly engaged in research. Our es are studying the abnormalities of the lungs by means of special equipment, tie various diseases affecting the cardiocircuit. ML Sinai is proud to have in its new the physical facilities for open heart special team is working on the prowill require further acquisition of cial equipment, lical research will solve many of our problems and will result in prolonging Ian of the people. We, the doctors—and lat I can speak for all of my colleagues— rs available to give our time to promote ind better health." Jathan, a Mt. Sinai staff member since ^ion, is proud of the subdivisions working jurisdiction, and their respective heads %  e: Cardiology, Dr. Victor Kugel; Cardiory Physiology, Dr. Phillip Samet; Chest Dr. Seymour B. London; Gastro-EnteiChester Cassel; Allergy, Dr. Nelson ermltotogy,. Dr. Lewis Capland; Neurory. Dr. Bernard Goodman; HemStology, Neber. Ese men and the doctors in their 95 divisall dedicated specialists," he explained. ecords and achievements in their .fields of the history of Mt. Sinai Hospital, part listory of thi community which today— Awaits Moving Day M. DAVID NATHAN special team with the opening of the new Mt. Sinai Hospital of Greater Miami—has laid the foundation for a better tomorrow." rective Healing and Teaching Program Lied from Pago 5-C It have completed internship of one Irs. tending staff member i doctor in practice who the hospital his private He is in charge of teaching, and in order to qualify for an appointment on the attendiiic ing staff, the physician must take or assignments in teaching the house staff. Mt. Sinai is one of the few private hospitals in the state that offers approved internship in sur gical residency and training. •ngratulations... JOHN LOWE BAULKING COMPANY 288 N.W. 108th Street PL 8-7895 The intern assigned to surgical services is informed that he will spend a determined number of days in General Surgery—including Thoracic, Neuro, Proctology and Plastic—in Urology, Orthopedics and in Pediatrics. His assignment, be it clinic, operating room or other functions, is made by the chief resident. With each new case, he becomes a student of surgery under a resident to whom he is directly responsible and who in turn, assurors the responsibility to the chief for the intern's work. The intern is cautioned to remember that "to each patient coming in for a surgical procedure, this is the most important event of his life. He should be made to feel that he has put hjs life in the very best and sincerest of hands." In charge of the residents at Mt. Sinai is Chief Resident Dr. Chang-You-Mu. In addition to his responsibilty of directing the activities of his resident staff, he has himself experienced every type of major surgery. Operating on a third year level, within the realm of the Chief Resident is the charge of the entire surgical house staff, including residents and Interns. He prepares their monthly schedule of assignments and submits it for approval to the doctor. He supervises the work of the assistant residents, and through them, the interns assigned to surgery. He makes daily rounds, is responsible for the care of all staff patiets, of the clinics, and for staff consultations. Page 15-C department of 20, research and investigation is a continuing program—as its participation in medical and surgical conferences; often, Dr. Widrich is called upon to exhibit the department's findings in talks around'the country." %  That these activities will increase is indicated by the department's practical recognition in terms of the purchase of its new equipment. The Cine-Fluoroscope is but one addition. Installed, too, is the Cobalt Bomb, a therapy machine whose radio-active isotope cobalt derivative is plac ed in a container and produces X-Rays similar to that obtained from a two millionvolt X-Ray machine. High kilo-volt Radiography has been set up, which allows for X-Ray examination of patients with much less X-Ray dose or exposure to the patient. An Image Amplifier which discards the dark room and fluoroscopes patients instead in an ordinary lighted room will tend to reduce the apprehension of patients and at the same time make for more accurate diagnosis. Dr. Widrich, a former assistant professor of radiology at Ohio State University's College of Medicine, has been associated with Mt. Sinai for the past four years. With the increased facilities, equipment and functions, he feels the Department of Radiology is on a threshold bright with future discovery. BEST WISHES VENETIAN ITALIAN ICES WATER ICES 466 S.W. 17th Avenue FR 3-1968 Congratulations... BILL OVERTON FENCE CONTRACTORS, INC. Covering the State of Florida 2455 N.W. 76th Street OX 1-2672 CONGRATULATIONS TMI MIRACLI WEDGI OVERHEAD DOOR COMPANY OF MIAMI. INC. MIAMI 38, FLORIDA SALE SERVICE INSTALLATION 7501 N.E. 3rd Place Phone PL 8-5513 1*25 S.E. 6th Ave., Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., JAckson 2-3092



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Page 12-C Sam Levenson as Donor And Worker in the Birth .. M ... Of a New Medical Center Jewish fkrldton WM Civic leaders can be divided into three categories: Those who can contribute financially to a cause, but cannot spare time to Work for it; those who can work but cannot contribute their dollars; and those who are fortunate enough to do both things— give and work. In this third category falls Samuel C. Levenson. Founder and trustee of Mt. Sinai Hospital of Greater Miami, who was selected by his colleagues to head the opening committee. With not much time to go. Levenson and the members of his committee, Sam A. Goldstein, Paul Gordon. David Phillips. William Singer. Carl Susskind and Carl Weinkle. set out to work to make the occasion a success. For Sam Levenson. working for the hospital was nothing new For him it was always giving and working from the day back in April. 1952 when he was elected to the board of trustees of Mt. Sinai Hospital. A resident of Miami since December, 1924. Levenson was for many years active in the real estate and investment field. Observing him in his philanthropic work, his youthful vigor and alertness hardly indicate that he considers himself •retired" from business. Vitally interested in Mt. Sinai's progress, his donation of $20.000 1 together with his associate and! brother-in-law, Jacob Sher, In 1953 enabled the hospital to acquire the most advanced X-Ray equipment, improving its diag noetic and research facilities. When fund raising was started in 1953 for the new Mt. Sinai Hospital. Levenson became chair man-of the-week with an enviable record m the history of the Development Fund then headed byDan B. Ruskin. He has remained on the executive board of this hospital division throughout the years. Shortly after he was elected president of Temple Israel, members of his congregation offered a testimonial in his honor in recognition of the many years of service he had given to the needs of his community. The dinner, which was held in the Temple's Contribution of J. (;, lewis 1 fcV the Reali, Of Sinai's Opening Sui SAM UVIHSON rifa/ly JaftrtStW Wolfson Auditorium, netted $136.500 in new pledges and brought contributions of members of Temple Israel at that time to an unequalled $2,135,000, which represented about 30 percent of all monies pledged for the hospital's building fund. When the founding leaders of the new Mt. Sinai Hospital envisioned the structure which will be dedicated Sunday, their ulti mate goal was, simply and to the point, the finest hospital that could be built. That they have been success ful must be credited to such lead era as J. Gerald Lewis, Mt. Sinai Founder and trustee. Chairman of the building committee, Lewis was named to this important position after being represented in various other departments of the hospital. A resident of South Florida since 1918. Lewis is counted among the 17 persons of the original organiza tion whose dream for the Mt. Sinai of today began in the "yes terday," when even the Nautilus EFFICIENT RECORD SYSTEM TillS THf STORY How an Active Blood Bank Grew The story of the Blood Bank of Mt. Sinai Hospital is as dramatic as any Hollywood spectacular. The story would begin in 1949 with the hospital's opening. Dr. A. R. Hollender, an ear, nose and throat specialist, was elected president of the medical staff and appointed Dr. Mark B. CirContinuod from Pag. j\-C Mrs S. Harvey Greenspan contributed a quarter of a million dollars to dedicate the Out Patient Pavilion Big Moment at Hand M2 A J' Ce A dams idow of "* >t inventor of the dial tmn of&Z^nH !" ,h f,rS WOm ,0under ilh contrib. ^hr!* t d Wa f soon J0,ned bv Mrs Mc Cache while n fund tadlw, mad< b (ou ,„| er5 "JJ '""" Little by little, the new structure acquired life A. —-in endless succession, as ^engineers and ^ ti^ desc nd d manned their stations, and the neTm^L ^ "'.mL"'* 8 S 1 ^; ^ z ss SET b — 2= The big moment is now at hand lin. a dermatologist, chairman of the Blood Bank. Dr. Cirun recalls tnose early days with great pleasure. For while they were filled with the frustrations of a carelessly uninformed public, there were people and personalities whose help he will never forget. One of tbem, Herman Marcus, was a patient at the hospital, also employed in the meat department of Food Fair. Marcus wanted to be the first donor. With this initial offer. Dr. Cirlin began the work of the Blood Bank. At Mt. Sinai, space was limited. What could be spared in 1990 was a small room, a table for bleeding, a tiny area for refining the blood, a small desk for a parttime clrk, and a filing cabinet. This had been the Emergency Room. Today at Mt. Sinai Hospital, the Blood Bank is set up with one of the most efficient record systems ever evolved. Under the guardianship of Dr Cirlm's assistant. Mrs Ann Hausman. these records are. indeed, as thorough and as carefully kept as those of a U. S. currency bank. There are credits, debits and balances. Every procedure is listed. There are organizational accounts and individual accounts. The smallest procedure is carefully entered in the file upon file of ledgers. There are varied colored inks to denote "deposit" "withdrawal." "transfer." And each has its own particular meaning, each telling its own personal story of blood that was one day needed and used, or is now on deposit for use in the future. Commercial, fraternal, and cine organizations maintain chairmen of their own blood banks. Drives, such as the one recently of the Elks, brought out more than 400 donors. Credit for this blood is placed against the organization's account. Should one of its members, or one of bis immediate family need blood, his is the privilege of drawing an unlimited supply, without charge. In the case of individual accounts, blood is deposited to the credit of the donor as he gives it He can draw upon it to, the limit of his credit. By its very nature of iramed acy. the Blood Bank Is operated on the principle of "taking goods out of one pocket to put them into another." Blood is only good for 21 days, and there is rarely the room for error that blood will be Continued en Page 14-C {—compliments of AITRO WORK SHOPS, INC. h hotel had not jttl into focus. To imagine the i which accompanied ail sinn of so impress*,) is. according to Leu| the building of 11 tial home. Maktsr/1 any hundred maatoj and you begin til problems. The enormous jot I earliest stages rtal plans were praoafl prn.al II was keaHkaf pan-on between 11 pital aatomiti end. For the tions which mat' would have first lo| to the medial ing area this would! Detail upon detal mulled over, agreed ed. New problem others ceased to piece of equipment %  proved, each item %  maximum amoaatll and durability. Out of the nowasM advent of the Julu M way, a pronouncena>l now make the sttlL "Collins Island." Mil part of the miinlaMf revision of the •• %  was forced, new eatrjf changes in ldscM ing areas. It is estimated %  "J. when the buildioi M committee UUDCBN W a total of 162 meetnf! averaging from *T to two hours eiet %  include the earhw" rectors meetinp—L merahlf ho""****! visit.to other *•> %  § liminary session* A full time J* %  ] tion. Lewis hi tjg effort toward UV ** original goal. CONGRATULATIONS SOUTHERN ELECTRICAL INC LIGHTING FIXTURES BJCTRICAL SH"* WHOLESALE 67 N.W. 10th Street P*""*



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Paqe 8-B + tri*t fhrMton Frid T. tfle finest ^food's rjte finest ^%i Pearly Gait by Hal Pearl I FRIDAY NIGHT DINNERS Of TRADITIONAL EXCELLENCE! Served with Sacramental Wines and All the Trimmings, with Special Emphasis on Courtesy, for which the Monte Carlo is famous.' MOt GHEENSTEIN. Catering Mgr. MsONf: UN 44721 ON TM OCEAN AT MTM ST. MIAMI BIACH. FLORIOA Monte \xmo \ I } i RCSORT HOTEL FOR TH= ATTENTION OF LOCALITES EXPECTING FRIENDS Make Reservations Now for Yevr friemds at Ike Plymouth Adams Hotel At 21st Street • Miami Beech doll,, par person doubl* oci'o. to Jan. 24 th IHCIUOH'G IAIS 33 CUT Of 140 HOOMS 650 •Vchenettei Available CALL JE 1-0351 Wtiner Memajtmtnt Please Do not thin* me cc. BUT I'm ot rp BEST STOECK1 ItS Steaks J3' 5 j MO t Tlot AVI. ON TM TKA*. IS*. 8tt. St.) — OUR SPECIALTY — NICE, THICK, JUICY PRIME RIBS OF BEEF -AND Till vur MIT in TOWN; MMQUfT fACIUTHS Candlelight Inn 1131 Commodore Finn Cocormt Grove HENRY LEITSON. MarLUNCH • DINNI* O) lurriB ffi AMNGttf ORDERS TO TAKE OUT PHONE UN 6^303 • | JT UIA Ml > AC* Ursesf fmmily Trade im fkwUm ON 7ftti ST. CAUSE*AT *>£if AX3GLSI bKOS R> f ^ rsr' NAMES MAKE NEWS: Recent visitor to Miami Beach was Mr*. Mike Stern, wife of the author and overseas reporter. She spent some ime with her sister and brother-in-law, Lillian and Murray Baron, coming from her long-time residence in Rome (15 yean). Her writing -pouse is still in Italy, putting the finishing touches to his latest book, •The Voluptuaries." This will be his fourth tome. In addition, hea .inishing up a screenplay, his first, to be produced by a major company. He'll join his wife, son and daughter in New York for the boliJay season. How many members of the Miami Beach Library have noticed the many changes for the better? First of all, you'll rarely find a local public library with as wide a selection of the latest fiction and non-fiction. One of the reasons for the improvement is the work -of Reba (Mrs. Jack) Oaner, chairman of the MB. Public Library advisory board, working in close cooperation with Oscar Everhart. the chief librarian, who's done a tremendous job since taking over two years ago. Look for a highly entertaining evening at the dinner and auction sponsored by the Sisterhood of Temple Beth Sholom tomorrow. High lights will bo the appearance of veteran auctioneer G eorge Jacooson, assisted by the men's clothing exec Austin Burke. I Julian Spievack. four-state rep of Omega watches, spends a lot of his time, between road trips, enjoying golf at Baysbore. Often see him with Food Fair exec Red Lubin. The Jack Gordons, of Palm Island, attended the dinner honoring i Eleanor Roosevelt at New York's Waldorf Astoria Monday. The Hal Peltons seeing much of Joan Crawford while she was in town. Pelton and Miss Crawford's late husband, Al Stecle, former | Pepsi-Cola exec, were close friends. Even the cold weather couldn't keep away Miami Beach's M.D. brothers Drs. Ralph. Bernard and Alex Robbins from the first local outloor fi^ht in quite a while, at Miami Stadium recently. Mebbe in union there's warmth, too. Susan Ann Holtzer. of Hialeah. recently named Miami Beach's "Miss Serviceman"s Center." is' engaged to Henry C. F. Neverman. whom she met at the center two years ago. He's stationed at Homestead Air Base. BOTH SIDES OF THE BAY: 'Father of the Bride." starring Pat I O'Brien, holds over at the Coconut Grove Playhouse through Sunday. Ofl Tuesday. "An Evening with Hildegarde" will make its bow there.' It's a one-woman show starring the internationally-known supper club star, who'll oder her incomparable songs and impressions. Now comodionno mak.no hor local bow is Phyllis Oillor, of TV. She's teamed in Fontainebieous La Rondo show with singer Don Comoll. we 1*4 no wn on the local scene. M> Fair Lady." starring Michael Evans and Diane Todd. pops up at the Miami Beach Auditorium on Feb. 2. playing through the 20th, aj fmu tickets now at the Auditorium box office. %  COLORFUL FIGURE: Wonder if the Hon. Baruch Benson Benjamin is goi ake a stopover in Miami while on his rift* to Jowi-h contend the nation' He's one of the more colorful figures in w>rki Jewry, representing one of the oldest and most unusual Jewish groups extant, Bet* Israel in Bombay. India. The 21.000 some-odd member, of that community, the largest in India, with only 25 400 Jews in the Btiri country The original members of today's community arrived in Ind.a more than 2.000 years ago when a ship from Egypt was wrecked and left only seven men and seven women survivors In the years between, intermarriage with Hindus caused many of the Utters customs to be adopted by the Bene Israelites, including the banning of rat!!? ^ n f Servance of the Hindu Protubmon .gainst slaughtering _^ t Benianun wh0 %  **> President of the Jewish Welfare Assn. of Delhi and Northern India, and former Under-Secretary of Commerce and Industry ,„ Nehru's cabinet, was reported seeking rabbi m this country to "come to the spintual rescue of those unfortunate remnants in country of 370 million." OTIUIMWy"— OW: J^k St.yin, coowJer-chef of the Ch.rcoal ^root 2L W P t M .."J*16 v* 1 "*** completelTVenosated dm charcoal ^J^ZZi £?££?" *"** ""^ *+ ^-'Td.^^ The Derby Inn, on Biscyne bird. oasTth. RUL r Southern duhe. ake you dream about^ TJ^^^' *"* c-KNt.b,.. fr^ Hw. colKKtHw. nf iCtll^^TwilTZS The Royal Hungarian restaurant on Miami Beach i. th. ^ many parties sponsored by local clubwomen the scene of Irving Hoffman, the realtor talkine r ^. ..ween mouthful, of Moo Goo G.i^.tXM^chu^L^l^ oU,er realtor, who find, Al Goldman's apoT. J5S5u dSTcJ-S I i KID STUFF: D.il*m.tinee performnc? of P,noec*k," A Ue month .re being held at the P.ed Piper iPUyhmJuTJ^l o"""* Shows st.rt. 230 R„th Foreman. dirSorS toT^Z T 5"* M t.king re*rv.tions from ,n typTTchildrinl^ %  Acad *" J'.' I Scout part.es. birthday, and clubs <***, groups, including %  TO DINE OR TO DINE N0T %  ft 1 1 SUTSL* f ABOUT WH||, QW,T, 0M %  Coanplet. Dlnnori PN.M.95 Mew H ooi n, M.. „, OPENING SOON CHARCOAL STEAK HI WATCH FOR OPENING HOME OF FINEST PRIME STEAKS JACK STAYEN Owner-Chef AND HIS PARTNER (Big Klu) TED KLUSZEWISKI WILL GREET YOU OPENING DAY CHARCOAL STEAK HI 211 • 22nd STREET MIAMI BEACH Reservations JE 2-2613 OPENING FRIDAY, DEC. Preseafiof THE SALT CITY S Featuring NICK PALUMBO Nightly at the CARRIAGE CLUB MIAMI SPRINGS VILLAS' TJS? The Royal Hungarian ->uo 4 CATS fOf THf FINEST IN KOSHER CUISM 731 Washington Avenue Telephone | YCXTRE CORDIALLY INVITED TODAY TO NICK & ANTOINETTES IESTAURANT Cuciao Casalinga ~Heai itmilmm Hmme #'•**! • WINE and BEER • FREE PARKING 1624 N.E. 1st Court Phont FR 1 U. 1st Aea. & 2ed A**, Nor* W la* $U ervt w a Daily froai • o-m.—un. treat 41 HAROLD PONT and IftVIN CORBON GORDON and PONT %  WM. W. Stt. ST, MIAMI ^_ 'fiOL m of Bafted leearM Aseadothw r rBAR farrzvARS



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n 11, 1958 ices This Weekend %  Jm-lsti fkrHiir Page 13-A 7801 Carlyle ave. [Isaac Ever, uttirday 8:30 a.m. that Connects •W 19th av. paxwall Silberman, [Saturday 9 a.m. ler: Rabbi 8. Uebto. ks and Superstitions i SW 3rd ava. Con Ysakov Roeanberg. mpson. munlay 0 a.m. Bar pn ..f Mr. and Mrs Itephen, son at Mr. .1". rmh ava. Orthodox. -hiff. [Saturday 8:30 a.m. nation—A Conquerii2250 NW 2nd ava. kbl David W. Hern Fein. trinon: "The 8tory unlay 9 a.m. Bar son of Mr. and Mrs. boh. Prairie ave. OrI. Loui* Rottman. Saturday 8:45 a.m. brltual Oenerator." r* -— i301-311 Waahlngton Rabbi, Tibor Stem. Mimctin. Saturday 8:30 a.m. r.r Isaac, son of Mr. flVrlsteln. Sermon: 139 NW 3rd ava. 935 Euclid ava. Or. Jo-nh H Rackovaky. Saturday 8:30 a.m. hoi for a Visa." Serservlce: "UnappreETZ CHAIM. 408 flox. Rabbi Chaim turday 8:30 a.m. SerIml Realizations." • [JEWISH CENTER BaaaaaaVH BBBBBaBBBBBBB) CANbltUGHTING TIMt 10 Kislev — 5:12 pan. |L^oinera/i'oi vsa ir-nrv T : I b iv) napjotea IK mtfn D-aiin f V TT %  t bn ^ nnan ra ttfty ^ti|D pKitr nmaa ... Ji T tori.I^DK^n }n nwfa' "sjfaa •?tf iSimana nrrira. rVfc|D itpa .-a^lnn mo mainm proa /r-ana nnnx D-^X n-inian ,DD ,,, ?17 • i -i .ainxn T [ Aleicham Yeer hout the world, from tnos Aires—are cel.jear the hundredth |e great Jewish writpeichem. of Israel there live Billion Jews, and of ^6o, we are celebratMeichem Year." heatre is presenting par several plays by iniorist, among them I'lkraan," The MinisUon and Culture arfcxhibition of Manuand other personal lem Aleichem, which Hcept of the beloved nality. Brit Ivrit OUmit) ^45M HE '5 ,H T8 CE"NTER. 18160 NW KtaKk^MfcF, 8a,urd y >.m. Bar Mltz\ah. Michael, „,„ of Mr and of Mr "and ti ,r -"ba„m: StanUy, "„ or Mr. and Mrs. Louis Slrotta. •XAGLER-GRANADX" SO NW Slat Shoter 0 T: V ? tlVe : Rabbi %  •' %  %  5 VHdtl ,Can,0 r Fred Bernstein. % %  \<,.\\U.i ",".'' 8:1S m Sermon: He IIRIOUB Showmanship." Onee Shabbat hosts: Mr. and Mr* IrvinS Wexler; Mr. and Mrs. Bills Shmea WSr ay w V"-"-" M,UV Wexler. Mincha 5:15 p.m. Bar Mitzvah: Robert Rosenberg. FT. LAUDEROALE EMANU-EL. 1801 E. Andrews ave. Reform. Rabbi Levins. Ran,on Cantor Sherwln H f^ REW A 9 ADEMV 18 •• Orthod w x. Rabbi Alexander Groaa. HIALKAM REFORnTjEWISH CON?ve EQAT)0N 11S0 w th at.. Palm H 2 L .t YWO ? D ~ E MPLE SINAI. 2030 Polk st. Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro. Cantor Yshudah Hailbraun. ISRAELITE CENTER73175 SW 24th tor Conservstive. Rabbi Morton Malavsky. Cantor Louia Cohen. 'H*M r till and 8:13 p.m. Sermon: The Tie that IK Pnaeen." Onen Shal.hat hoats: Mr. and Mrs. Philip Kli'hman, in hunor of their anniversary. KNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid ava. Orthodox. Rabbi David Lenrtiem. Cantor Abraham Seif. Friday .'i p.m. Ijite services begin at 8:15 p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m. Sermon: "Dream of t "ur Life." Bar Mltsvan: Danny, son of Mrs. Anna Purdo. • —— MIAMI HEBREW CONGREGATION. 1101 SW 12th ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Herschell Saville. Cantor Joseph Salzman. Friday 1:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. Sermon: "Applied Religion." MONTICELLO PARK. 184th st. and NE 11th ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max Lipshitz. Cantor Ben-Zion Kirschenbaum. Friday 8 p.m. NeW members to be eonaeeratsa. Sermon: "Should Synagogues have Prerequisites for Membership?" Saturday 8:45 a.m. Bar Mltsvah: I.ee, son of Mr. and Mis. Kenneth Gross. • NORTH DADE CENTER. 13630 W. Dixie hwy. Conservative. Rabbi Henry Okollca. Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. a NORTH 8HORE CENTER. 620 75th at Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abramowltz. Cantor Edward Klein. Friday 1:15 p.m. Sermon: "Flight from Wrath." Saturday 9 a.m. Bar Mltsvah: Howard, son of Mr. and Mrs. Milton Malt. r. Sermon: "Weekly Portion." SOUTHWEST CENTER. 6438 SW 8th at. Conservstive. Rabbi Maurice Klein. Friday 8 p.m. I'nlted Synagogue Youth to participate. Sermon by Idele Hlen: "The tlates of Heaven." Saturday 8:30 a.m. liar Mltsvah: Robert, son of Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Miller. TEMPLE BETH AM. 5950 N. Kendall dr., S. Miami. Rerorm Rabbi Herbert Baumgard. Cantor Charles Kodner. Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "Kick-Backs In TV, Radio, Politics and Industry." ——• TEMPLE BETH EL. 1645 Polk St., Hollywood. Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffa. Friday B.'IS p.m. Sermon: "Of What Use Is Prayer'."' Saturday 10:43 a.m. Rar Mltsvah: Robert, son of Mr. and Mrs Harry Mogy. TFMBI.F TH SHOLEM of Hollywood. 1728 Monroe st. Conservative Raobl Samuel Lerer. Cantor Ernest Sehreiber. TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM. 4144 Chaw ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kroniab Cantor Davlo Convlser. Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: A Reply to 8lr Julian Hurley." Saturday 10:4.. a.m. Bar Mltsvah: Shedon. son of Mr. and Mrs. Milton Isaacs. • TEMPLE B'NAI SHOLOM. 16800 NW 22nd ave. Conservstive. Rabbi Sheldon Edwarda. Cantor Ben Oross berg. ... ., Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: Jacobs Ladder and You" Ones Shabbat followa. TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 1701 Washington ave. Conservative. Rsbbi Irving Lehrman. Cantor Israel Reloh. Friday 8:30 p.m. Dr. Lehrman to officiate. Quest speaker: l>r. iv.iiald Mlchaalson, director of Hlllel Foundation at the University of Miami Baturdav 9 a.m. Sermon: "Weekly I ortl.m." Par MlUvab: Bteven, Mr. and Mrs. William W.isman: MIObaaL sun of Mr. and Mrs. William Marmorsteln. Teen-Agers Blow Misconceptions Sky High as Early Marriage Hit Hard .. A lot of common misconccptionjfcnore independence in thoughts, •bout the way teen-agers tftlnhi hctions, dress7tc, but find itiiard M'pm nvnlnrlorl Cllrtrlnn P a* nH n nn I*_ il ii DR. JOE HAIL leaf* of values Dade School Chief Urges Youth Keep Eye on Traditions There are more moments in youth than at any other time of life when the "soul glimpses the eternal," and teen-agers should strive to put these ideal visions to work before age wears them down. This was the message brought by Dr. Joe Hall, Dade county school superintendent, to 300 delegates at the sixth annual teen-age conclave of the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center Sunday. Subject was "Values of Today's Teens." Dr. Hall told the youthful gathering that each generation is counted upon to do its share in continuing to make the world a better place in which to live. "In making your own contribution," he said, "you must measure your seal* of values by what has gone before." Ho urged that youngsters keep in mind the vital tradition of "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness." The keynote address was followed by a series of nine simultaneous workshops where the delegates had their chance to express views on many subjects tied into the main theme. All workshops arc led by members of the professional staff of the Center. The session on "Status-Seeking" called upon Rabbi Herbert Baumgard, Temple Beth Am, as a special consultant. The assemblage represented over 700 members of 31 clubs of senior high age, sponsored by the Center. At the opening gathering, the delegates heard executive director Efraim H. Gale make note of the *were exploded Sunday afternoon, when young people were given the chance to sound off for themselves. Three hundred strong, they reprc sented 31 clubs of the Greater Mi ami Jewish Community Center of senior high age, at the sixth annual teen-age conclave at the Sans Souci hotel. Discussing "Values of Today's Teens" at nine different workshops, these delegates used a free, democratic atmosphere to blow sky-high a great many standard cliches about the ways in which they are supposed to think. They gave vent to a variety of opinions on such timely subjects as statusseeking, conformity, adult values, teen-age marriage, and others—all preselected by their own planning committees. What did they come up with? Here are some of the more unusual reactions (with Which most agreed): Teen-ag* marriages aro the exception, hardly the rule. Some mature few may bo able to make it work, if thoy seek out counsel beforehand. Most are no* ready for it, have no idea what marriage really entails, aro not yet sure what they really want. In general, for the majority, it's not a good idea. • Marriage on the college level is all right, if the wife is willing to work to help the husband through school. But, after graduation, the woman has the right to expect that her husband will support her; she should have to work no longer—her place is in the home. • Values of the adult world are too materialistic; friends should be chosen for what kind of people they are rather than because of their money. • The tourist attractions of the Miami area have an unhealthy effect on teen standards, and frequently, teens will try to do some of the "verboten 1 things simply because parents are so anxious in urging them not to. • Youth would like to express to escape the pull of ""nfeaTir"?; they may run with the crowd to be popular, but know that this is not ?ood and are troubled by it. They are searching for answers. • Toons recognize that everyone seeks sten, adults end youth alike. This is normal to them, but how you do it is what counts; they feel that finding one's own set of values is most important. • Delegates frowned upon the kind of behavior at social func'ions that gives both the individual snd the party itself a bad name. They mentioned improper dress, vulgar behavior, and leaving your date as the worst "reputationdamagers." Also on their list of "hings in poor taste was bringing alcoholic beverages to the party, since there must be something wrong with a party that needs such stimulation. They agreed that parents should be present at parties in the home, but not actively so. They did not see the need for using hotels for expensive "glamor" functions. • Finally, they reversed the common plaint that parents don't sympathize with youth, by stating that teens need to understand their parents better. They felt that parents need to set definite rules foT them, but these rules must be applied consistently and not constantly shifted or forgotten if they are to be effective. TEMPLE ISRAEL. 137 NE 19th st Reform. Rabbi Joseph R. Narot Cantor Jacob Bormtein. Friday 8:1 r, p.m. Sermon: "Hhonlcl We Abolish Our Religious School. An Interpretation of p.m. Sermon based OB "This" Is My God." by Herman WouK. • — TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB. 5i Flamingo Way. Conaervative. Rabbi Leo Heim. Frldav 1:16 p.m. Sermon: "Analysing Jaeobe Dreams." Onf Shabbat hoats: Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Gross; Mr and Mrs. Charles Klrsch. Saturday 1 a.m. TEMPLE ZIOfsTT 5720 SW 17th at. Conservative. Rabbi Alfred Wax. man. Cantor Jacob Goldfarb. Friday 8:30 p.m. Sermon: "Departure and Arrival" Saturday 9 a.m. Rar Mltsvah: Klllot, son of Mr. and Mrs. David Wlnlt. current United Fund campaign. Stating that fhe Center receives support from the Fund, as well as the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, Gale asked that club members give their full support to all requests for assistance from the Fund during the drive. The conference took place at the Sans Souci hotel. Robert Stone and Leonard Wolfer were co-chairmen. Judith Goldstein was staff coordinator. The afternoon was concluded with a dance. No. Shore Rabbi Talks Wednesday Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz, spiritual leader of North Shore Jewish Center, will be guest speaker Wednesday evening at Beth David Congregation. Rabbi Abramowitz will speak as part of Beth David's lecture series program sponsored by the congregation's Adult Institute. The North Shore spiritual leader will discuss "Attitude of Conservative Judaism Toward Zionism." The one-hour lecture is scheduled for 9 p.m. Temple Judea Plans Meeting Victor Reiter, president of Temple Judea, has announced completion of plans for a congregational meeting on Dec. 20 at the Temple. Program will include a report of the recent convention of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations. Miami attorney Ben Essen will be the guest speaker, and talk on "Meet My Grandfather." TIFERETH ISRAEL. S500 N. Miam ave Conservative. Rabbi Harry L. Lawrence. Cantor Albert Glantz. Frldav 8:30 p.m. Sermon: "Our Songs Of Pralae." Saturday 9 a.m. TORAH TEMPLE. 1284 West ave Traditional. Rabbi Abraham Caeeel YOUNG ISRAEL^ 18750 NE 10th ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Sherwin Stauber. Friday % %  p.m. Saturday 9 a.m Sermon: "Our Past—Our Future. ZAMORA JEWISH CENTER. 44 Za more ave. Conservative. Rahhi B. Leon Hurwitz. Cantor Meyer Gisser. Frldav I P %  >. Sermon: "Symbols and .,„!,.* of Judaism." Saturday 8:30 a.m. Sermon: "Journev of I-Ife. Rabbi Marius Ransom, of Temple Emanuel, Ft. Lauderdale, is shown with gubernatorial candidate John McCarty, of Ft. Pierce, at the Men's Fashion Guild of Miami Beach dinner at the Diplomat Country Club. Rabbi Ransom, president of the Broward County Ministerial Assn., gave the invocation and benediction at the annual dinner. McCarty was guest speaker. The Men's Fashion Guild contributed $10,000 to the Mt. Sinai Hospital development fund, and announnced an award of five University of Miami scholarships at the banquet.



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11. 1959 •Jmlhti FhrkMam Page 13-C FOR ORTHODOX OBSERVANT JEWRY \. Facilities List Kosher Kitchen I the great sources of satisfaction for |ws of South Florida is that Mt. Sinai Intains for those who observe Diehseparate and strictly Kosher Kitchen, supervision of Rabbi Kalmen Shawho live by Orthodox principles in ne can be assured of the same cona patient. Sinai for the past ten years, Rabbi ills the early days when the rabbinate Miami hailed the hospital's decision these facilities. Max Orovitz, presiSinai, recognizing the importance of facilities available, lent his instant [the Kashruth program. Mt. Sinai Hospital, a specific area of has been set aside for Rabbi Shapiro's All equipment is geared to the indefice of "Dairy" and "Meat." Overdoors separate these kitchens from and it is from this point in the hospatients who live by Kosher principles ill find their meals served in the comrity that these principles will not be Miami's most modern kitchen has the latest equipment for steam cooking, mixing and meat cutting, with plenty of working space and a special area devoted exclusively to kosher kitchen facilities. .,,,,,..,,.,,.; %  ::'! %  %  !ii';i,riiiiiiii'n:r:iia,i!,ruii %  of the Gloria and Leon LowenBS' Residence taken from the edge rimming pool. The building has 72 studio apartments and will accommodate 138 members of the Nursing Department. luel Gertner: Mt. Sinai Executive Head Gertner, executive diMt. Sinai Hospital of [Miami dedicated himfade ago to a "Mt. Sinai rank with the finest in New York, he received Ror of Education and of Arts degree from jinia University in 1928. did post graduate work fork University and CoJniversity. Starting in social worker with the, rnt of Health and Weiew York City, he ad|D the position of direcistrator of the departiary. 1945, he was named director of the Sydenpital in New York City, left shortly after to befistant director of Beth p'spHal of New York. September, 1949 when he accepted the position and assumed his duties as executive director of the Alton Road Hospital, -with his first task being the conversion of the Nautilus property for hospital use and the subsequent transfer of patients to the building. This marked the beginning of an herculean task. It was the beginning of the building of a team —doctors, nurses, administrative assistants — with one goal in mind: to make Mt. Sinai a hospital dedicated to patient care, research and teaching. • • • A Coordinate Tam Without research, without teaching, thi. would flot have been the kind of hospitalthe community expected. Securing the recognition of Mt. Sinai Hospital by the American Medical Assn. for the training oi %  CONGRATULATIONS..'. FRANK SNARY SWIM POOL SERVICE SERVICE & EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE N.E. 4th Court Phone PL 7-5741 iAMUtL GfNINtt higher tlaaiardt Leon Lowenstein Endows $250,000 Building Slated As Residence for Nurses This story should start with "Once there was a winter visitor to Miami Beach ." Seven years have passed since Leon Lowenstein, president of one of the world's largest textile enterprises, presented a check for $5,000 to Max Orovitz to permit the establishment of Mt. Sinai Hospittal's first research project on arteriosclerosis. Leon Lowenstein ever since has given money and time to Mt. Sinai Hospital. The textile magnate whose father was born in WestphaliaGermany, and whose mother came from the Isle of Wight in the English Channel, is not a man who likes to think in terms of tradition. He opines that every man has to be educated "to care for the other fellow" and that this principle applies to nations as well as to individuals. "I started out giving $250 each year to help others," he recalls. By now, millions of dollars have been distributed by his Foundation. When, during one of his winter visits to Miami Beach he heard about Mt. Sinai Hospital's expansion plans which included the building of a nurses' residence, he immediately embraced the project. Ready for occupancy during the present month of December, the building has spacious rooms, including a libraryThe three floors are served by an elevator, and each studio apartment has a fully equipped kitchen-refrigerator unit which can be hidden behind a folding door. A large dressing room with closet space, shelves and drawers leads into the bathroom. The building is centrally air-conditioned; furniture is modern and cheerful. LEON lOWENSTE/N earing for others Large picture windows opening on Biscayne Bay offer a wonderful view. The hospital's Olympic sized swimming pool is now part of the nurses' residence recreational area. A special parking lot for 59 cars completes the installation built at a cost of over $250,000. And when Jan. 3. 1960 comes around, a formal opening of the premises will be presided over by Leon Lowenstein, who will dedicate the beautiful building to his wife Gloria, "the Belle of Atlanta," whom he married in 1936. And the "Gloria and Leon Lowenstein Nurses Home" will become the residence of 138 wonfen in white who learned "to care for others," which is the motto of their benefactor. interns and residents was fundamental. In his second annual report dating back to 1952, Gertner stated that "in an organization as complex as the modern hospital, diligent and coordinated work is the key to progress. To the patient in the operating room the skill of the surgeon is vital, but the necessary assistance of the anesthetist, the scrub nurse, the laboratory technician, the pharmacist, nutritionist, and many other skilled and unskilled workers cannot be overlooked. "The ever-increasing patient load at Mt. Sinai Hospital has meant ever increasing stress upon this teamwork, which is essential to save lives and restore health to the patients we serve." In the growing years of Mt. Sinai, Gertner's administration had to conform many times to financial limitations, which retarded but could not hinder the progress of the hospital's departments. • • Constant Progress Much progress, however, was made in adjusting the hospital's limited sources towards better patient care. That on his busy days he still found time to fill such posts as trustee of the Florida Hospital Assn., be a member of the board of directors of the Florida Blue Cross, become a vice president and later a president of the South Florida Hospital Council, is just another indication that Gertner fulfilled his mission. In the new building, Gertner's job will be still greater. But his past success indicates that he will devote himself to work in improved surroundings with a larger "team," for a still bigger goal: to set new standards in hospital care for the hospitals of the nation. Congratulations... DEVOE & RAYNOLDS CO., Inc. Vinyl Wonder-Tones 87 Spar Varnish — Wonder-Pruf Wonder-matic Colors — Vinyl Masonry Paint — Alkyd Flat Wall Enamels — Mildew and Fume Resistant House Paints 2127 N. Miami Avenue FR 3-2026 k



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Page 2-C *: kn i f rkrkfian Fricl y. Formative Years: From Mt. Sinai's Begmnb |u|T.*Sinai Wspifal'took rfcrt in %  1945, when 17 men and women, recognizing the need for a Jewish hospital in Miami's evergrowing community, decided to mobilize general support for the idea. The group was composed of Sam Blank, Baron de Hindi Meyer. Mrs. Max Dobrin, Samuel Priedland, Moses Ginsberg. Abraham Goodman, Dr. Morris Goodman. J. Gerald Lewis. Stan ley C. Myers, Max Orovitz, Monte Seiig, William D. Singer, Alex Van Straaten. Carl nMuua, Henry D. Williams. Mitchell Wolfson. and Arthur A. Ungar. On Apr. l. 1946. the group began to function as the first board of trustees, with Baron de Hirsch Meyer as its chairman. Mt. Sinai Hospital was chartered by the State of Florida as a philanthropic institution and recognized as a voluntary community hospital operated under Jewish auspices to serve the South Florida area population, regardless of race or creed. Dan B. Ruslrin directs placing of sign on old Alton Road HoeP ta '^JrLi 946 ^ ^ding was the forerunner of the near S10.000.000 mammoth Mt Sinai to be dedicated Sunday. Internal Medicine A waits Move Vt Sinai Hospitals Department of Medicine is anxiously looking forward to moving into its now quartan, which ttI n certainly attract many new pannt> eager to take advantage of America s newest and most modern hospital." Dr. David Nathan, director of the depart ment for the past nm, >ears. speaking of the future, can find only praise for the tremendou. Ml antages and conveniences of the new buildink so well equipped with the most modern facilities tor medical care." ~\ nr v r 7v. Ul h / P ro 8 ress abot to be achiev,, M P red,cls an inevitable increase in ;a,fenMoar S anel "" ** %  Among the new equipment which will tw nade available .tontTTlE' *££„£? -IlTr^ ne on each P-tient floor suffer^ /SL ,n "S edlafe,y !" Pa,ien,s who •> suffer a sudden heart catastrophe The built in oxygensupply ln all pat.en, rooms wuTfaX the procedure, eliminating ,U low of time oh served in the past when heavy oxygen bottles had to be rolled through the corridors. For Mt. Sinai with its heavy load of cardiac eases, this will be just another step to augment its enviable record of treatment, surgery and research established over the years in this field. Dr. Nathan has one big objective in mind when he speaks of "his" hospital: to educate the entire house staff to act as a team, ready to coofront any unforeseen situation which may arise in the treatment of a patient. "Whatever the hour, day or night, our physicians are ready for any call, to take care of any need." According to Dr. Nathan, one of the %  Pital s prime considerations are patients admitted on a charity basis. Not only will they share the same conveniences installed without discrimination in all patient rooms and areas, but they will receive the same kind of care by the finest medical talent available anywhere. "We are striving to achieve an ever increaaConrinuad an Pas* 15-C mitI ^>4 ^ign of *Pro >grcss In August, 1948, the "group took title to a SS-bed hosp.tal which had been operated by the Navy during the war. The City of Mi ami Beach, recognizing the honest effort and the seriousness of its backers, approved sale of the building at a price of Jioo.ooo though other bidders had offered up to $165,000. On Jan. 11, 1847. the Alton Road Hospital was opened and began to serve the community at near capacity. Already in progress at the time was a campaign to raise $2,500,000 for the costruction of s 200-bed general hospital. During the operation of Alton Road Hospital, a committee examined numerous potential sites for a new building but aU possibilities were discarded when the Nautilus Hospital, at 4300 Alton rd., was relin quished by the Veterans Admin istraUon as a surplus. The building, though it had been a hotel before being converted into a veterans hospital, seemed ideal for the needs of Mt! Sinai. In March. 1948. Max Orovitz was elected president of Mt. Sinai Hospital, succeeding Baron de Hirsch Meyer. Negotiations were launched for acquiring the Nautilus property, and in December. IMS. again through the efforts of the City of Miami Beach, the site was officially turned over to Mt. Sinai. • • • Conversion Project Begins IJW began emerging the mui%  'titude of plans and dreams for a new community hospital and medical center. A building committee, including Dan B. Ruskin. chairman. J. Gerald Lewis. William D. Singer. Carl Weinkle. and Mitchell Wolfson, was named to supervise the largest conversion project ever undertaken in the Miami area. The board of trustees was expanded to 27 members, and committees were organized to expedite the opening of the hospital. In March. 14, nine physicians were selected on a community-wide basis to confer on appointments to the medical taff. and in June of the same year, the board of trustees appointed Samuel Gertner as executive director. On Dec. 4. 1949, dedication "ceremonies were held for the 25Sbed general hospital which since then has been known as the Mt. Sinai Hospital of Greater Miami In converting the former hotel into a hospital, the trustees seTAL CONSTRUCTION COMPANY Smith, naUoB.5iH s,on *M achie,*,. some $2,500 ntr iL i t' the cowtaSJ* J Smith was to fe •gain to act u i new Mt. Sinai Hoi* Ten months ant,, Sinai received tat f the American geons. and withm" was granted apsnw. American Medical am] faming of utttrao Covering aen.^ land and two sauli nonh of the ti gl Miami Beach, it ine_ Pital and auzilizrj" swimming pool oa docks and It dances tor hospital i Collins Island Condition* THOUGH the old Nautilus Hottfyl accomplished it w from a satisfactory, for patients. doctors i_ tstration. This beast C, med itely. Lacking ssu diticninc. proper tern for an incrcisjij medical equipmetf" facilities, and the munications setup a { stitut.on requires 1 Only 147 day* tHk] ing. Max Orovitz he was studying pbsjl construction of i net I Collins Mand—the a new dream for the I men who over the would coatrihste hours of free work,; of dollars in gifts. The first annual Rant I ing the year 1950 offatfi figures: 6.570 paWtti i nearly 5.000 eater*! ment; 541 births: served; nearly 3.M performed. Some 11 the patient load bad b ed free of charge. • • • Many 'Firsts' Sestij I N later years, the ussa 1 in show business sssWj ed to the long list of i who gave their stnxel the community by bdsgl Continued an Fittlvj A Division of NEW YORK LOS ANGELES MIAMI SAN JUAN, P. R. This is the core of one of the six nurses' stations. the Maternity Department station. CONGRATULATIONS.. HYGENATOR PILLOW CLEAKIHG CO I JACK YOUNGER 1279 N.W. 27th Avenue



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•mber 11. 1959 k**i*t nrrrnK*n Page 11-A mmsn $MR n*i w*y results of recent annual meeting iter Miami chapter, American Jew^ittee are (left to right) Philip HeckerLorber, Mrs. Seymour Liebman, 3n Schwarz, James R. Katzman, Mrs. Itevens, Paul Klein, Dr. Alan A. Liplour Samet, Mrs. Charles Finkelstein, ifolfson. and Jack I. Green, chairman rkshop committee which featured "Spotlight on Youth" as this year's theme. Also participating but not shown were Allen I. Freehling, Dr. Peritz Scheinberg, Dr. Robert Litowitz, Lee Ruwitch, Mrs. Harold Rand, Mrs. David P. Catsman, Melvin B. Frumkes, Dr. Samuel Ersoff, and Dr. Marcia G. Klein. Youth participants included David Yellen, Jay B. Hess, Stu Fabric, Henry Edgar and Steven Slepin, all University of Miami jtudents. igion in Schools Rising Concern of the American JewMs Speakers Bureau reported "great conreligion in the public lie Jewish community, ress Speakers Bureau, fcreated to disseminate about separation of threw Book Store kSHINQTON AVF. each — JE 8-3S40 Religious Supplies for • Schools A Private Vie A DOMESTIC GIFTS church and state, has placed speakers before IS Jewish organizations and synagogues in the Greater Miami area. Several instances of sectarian practices in the public schools have been revealed to the Congress speakers. The examples given "very closely parallel" the practices cited in the Chamberlin and Resnick cases against the Dade County Board of Public Instruction, according to the bureau. The speakers alto reveal that while Jewish audiences r* concerned with the problems and its it Us Solve Your IANUKA Probf 1 ems SEND A SUBSCRIPTION TO THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN fo Someone You Want to Please .. \A Gift Card Seat with Each Subscription" [very Jewish Family in Greater Miami Should Be Reading This Weekly! 'HE JEWISH FLORIDIAN (Is a medium wherein the Jewish people can give sion to their charitable, social and cultural enterL to their national life and institutions, to their 3us life and its various manifestations. \BSCR1BE NOW FOR A FRIEND OR RELATIVE ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION $ 5.00 3 YEARS SUBSCRIPTION 10.00 above amounts entitle subscriber to all weekly I issues as well as copies of special editions. Address Subscriptions and Remittances to the CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT lail This Coupon Today! SEND THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN TO • STATE "eie Eecloee CHANUKA OirT CAKD Bearing My Neme CHECK ENCLOSED FOB $5.00 (1 Yl.) $'000 (3 Yr.) 5DRESS: THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN P.O. BOX 2*73 MIAMI I, FLA. effect on their children, there is a need for further study of the constitutional issues involved in the separation principle." Congress Speakers Bureau includes Edith Broida, attorney; Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan, regional director, Yeshiva University and vice president of the South Florida Council; Benjamin Fogel, attorney and chairman of Commission on Law and Social Action; Mr. and Mrs. Chapter; Jack D. Gordon, president, Washington Feder al Savings and Loan Association, and vice president of the South Florida Council; Herbert L. Heiken, attorney; Rabbi Leon Kronish. Temple Beth Sholom, and vice president, South Florida Council; Haskell L. Lazere, Southeast reg ional director, American Jewish Congress. Mrs. Lillian Mamlet, chairman. Commission on Law and Social Action, Florida Women's Division: Bernard S. Mandler, attorney and chairman. Commission on Law and Social Action, South Florida Council; Mrs. David Muskat, president, Florida Women's Division, and vice president, South Florida Council; Bernard B. Segal, president, Mr. and Mrs. Chapter; Murray D Shear, attorney; Tobias Simon, attorney; Harry B. Smith, attorney; Lewis Sternshein, CPA, treasurer and chairman of the administra tive committee, South Florida Council; Harold Tannen, attorney; Rabbi Benno M. Wallach, Temple Sinai; and Mrs. Milton Zoloth. chairman. Commission of Community Interrelations, South Florida Council. tmanu-EI Theater Group Temple Emanu-El Players is a newly-formed theatre group which will present dramatic and musical plays under the auspices of the Temple. First meeting of the group will take place on Sunday evening in Sirkin Hall. Mr. Business Man & Mrs. Housewife The Jewish Home for the Aged Thrift Shop, needs your furniture, appliances, clean clothing, luggage, drapes, lamps, dishes, pots, pans, silverware, sheets, fvdsDreads, etc. All proceeds coin* £* %  %  e maintenance of our dntmjuhhttl residents, THE HOME THRIFT SHOP 5737 N.W. 27th Ave. Telephone NI 3-2338 Please Coll i' 'or Plck-oe. -Belief izraws Na&s£r EUIESS^.. To Hide Egypt's Discontent Co vinued from Page 1-A | carryin? Israel's navy flag and .w„ u..ii u ,t drew up on the pier facing the the hum what an Israel staff of caraouf f aged submarine. As the !l^ 0 mary P recau ( colors were raised on the deck, tionary measure. Seaman Yeh()uda Ha; a [ One hour later, the crew of the A v „ • „ cieto,. o„k m ,.; .w„ ..D„i, .. .' o M Yemenite cook, intoned in the ^ ,' u ,* !" !" e ',. lh f, ah v ^ip's gallery an informal blessing paraded through the British base for the ship s voyage Young Adults Elect Officers Eleanrre' Pato has been elected president of the Young Adult Jewish Council of Greater Miami. The Council, sponsored by the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center, represents eight young adult organizations in the Greater Miami area. Miss Pato, who represents the Beth David Young Peoples' League on the Council, is a public school teacher. Other Council olficers elected with her are vice president, Howard S. Heyman, ol Miami "Y" Young Adults; recording secretary, Eleanor Hankin, of Miami Junior Hadassah; treasurer, Barbara Gritz, of North County "Y" Young Adults; and parliamentarian, Esther Ehrens, of Miami Junior Hadassah. Commander Yosef Dror, captain of the Tanin, arrived on the pier, accompanied by the commanding officer of the British naval bate. After inspecting the Rafiav crew and a British guard of honor. Commander Dror was piped aboard. Col. Yaval Neemen, the Israel military attache, and Lt. Cmdr. Nathan Sofer, the naval attache, assisted at the ceremony. Another crew under the command of a lieutenant from Kibbutz Ein harod, is being trained in England for the final takeover of Ilahav, the second submarine purchased from the British. The crew of the Rahav, like the crew of the Tanin, is a true cross-section of Israel's pcpulation. They include Jews from North Africa, Persia, Poland, native-born Israelis, and South Africans. All of them are volunteers. t



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mber 11, 1959 ^J^isi>ncrioUa>f7 Page 7-C **"—~ i ^ modern sterhzation equipment forms izat.cn. materials of all kinds, including plas,entral Supply m the new Mt. Sinai tic ones, can be properly sterilized for the Designed for steam and gas sterilhospital's many departments. DAN RUSKIN MARJORIE AND LEONARD IWgj elopment Fund Sparked Erection 10 Million Medical Institution kg of a multi-million dollital takes precisely that dollars and more dolmd-raising in a commuGreater Miami involves Is of people who .have to J, thousands who give u sands from whom the las to be collected. The ktinn.il effort to do the |d hardly be imposed upadministrative departready overburdened with a hospital. pril 23, 1955, Dan B. Rustn serving as chairman of ppital's building commita past vice president of |anization since 1952, was pd chairman of the newly Development Fund. As a campaign chairman of nbined Jewish Appeal of feater Miami Jewish FedRuskin brought with him bwledge of fund-raising. a goal of $4,000,000. estifat a time when costs for Mt. Sinai Hospital were I on a 300-bed, six-story re, Ruskin immediately ^head to form campaign tees to solicit initial gifts. \io weeks after his appointhe was able to report in excess of one million subscribed mostly by the l's trustees. arles Werblow, chairman doctors* fund committee, ^e first to report the full of physicians and surof Mt. Sinai. Since May 17, his committee has raised toward its later-set goal million dollars. lay 22 of that year, 51 perthe Greater Miami area MABJOKIC AMD UONARD W/EN energetic husband-wife team BAN I. KU5KIH • tint cMrm had joined a campaign committee: • For Miami Beach — Leonard Abcss, Sam Blank, Jack Carner, Irving Cypen, B. F. Danbaum, Ben B. Gaines, Samuel Gertner, Mrs. Louis Glasser, Mrs. M. J. Goldin, Dr. Milton S. Goldman, Sam Goldstein, A. J. Harris, Leon B. Jacobs, Howard Kane, Dr. Victor Kugel, J. Gerald Lewis, Marcie Liberman, Dr. Louis G. Lytton, Dr. David A. Nathan, Max Orovitz, Dr. Kurt Peiser, David Phillips, Albert Pollack, Sam Resnick, Joseph Rose, Dr. Benjamin B. Rosenberg, Mrs. Fannie Sclig, Harold Spaet, Joseph R. Stein, Dr. Milton F. Travers, Carl Wcinkle, Dr. S. Charles Werblow, Leonard A. Wien and Louis E. Wolf son. • For Miami—Joseph Lipton, Dr. Morris Goodman, Aaron Kanner, Sidney Lefcourt, S. C. Levenson, Stanley C. Myers, Dr. Harold Rand, Herbert Scher (deceased), Jacob Sher, William D. Singer and Arthur Ungar. • For Coral Gables Meyer Baskin, Sam Heiman and Harold Thurman. • For Hollywood-Stanley Becker man and A. J. Diamond. Many of these names appear today on Mt. Sinai's honor roll of Founders. Others have kept on working for the hospital, raising thousands and thousands of dollars among members of their communities, here and abroad. Slf-S*t Gool By the end of 1955, pledges had readied the amount of 775*0. After a reappreciatwn of work done, Ruskin announced fhe appointment of Howard Kane and Isadore Hecht, jr., as chairmen of the Initial Gifts Division, and Carl Susskind took the responsibility of heading the commercial committee with a goal of $1,250,000. Leo Chaikin served as his co-chairman. Simultaneously, Leonard A. Wien was named to head the committee on hotels, motels and apartments. Wien had previously shown his caliber as a fund-raiser as head of Mt. Sinai's annual jubilees, designed to cover the hospital's yearly operating deficit. At the time of his appointment ,he had also headed the Beach Division of Miami's Community Chest; he was then as now a vice president of Mt. Sinai and a governor of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. When the new building's groundbreaking was set, Ruskin again reshuffled his "cabinet," and Leonard A. Wien was upped to the chairmanship of the Initial Gifts Division, while Jacob Sher became chairman of the Founder's group formed by those who had contributed $50,000 or more to the hospital. Their portraits in the form of bronze busts will be on permanent exhibit in the new Mt. Sinai. At that time, 23 men had attained this status. As the new Mt. Sinai is about to be opened, their ranks have swollen to 65, and there's little doubt that Sher's self-set goal of 75 will be reached in the near future. To further step up the drive, a professional division was creContinotd on P9 1-C Portrait of a Philanthropist: Samuel Fried/and and Mt Sinai In the annals of local and national philanthropy, Samuel Fiii'dland's -name is legion. His DO) uibution of upward of a quarter of a million dollars to the new Mt. Sinai Hospital significantly aided the institution in the fulfillment of its dream—a dream now embodied in the building which is to be dedicated Sunday. As chairman of the board and founder of Food Fair Stores, Inc., Samuel Fricdland heads the sixth larsest retail food chain in the United States. He also heads as its president, Food Fair Properties, Inc.. a real estate corpora lion designed to develop shopping centers in this eountry. In February, 1957, Fricdland received the annual award of the Florida region of the National Conference of Christians and Jews for "distinguished service to the cause of Brotherhood." Presently serving as trustee and vice president of Mt. Sinai Hospital, chairman of the board of trustees of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, member of the board of directors of the Jewish Home for the Aged, member of the board of directors of the Dade County United Fund, Fellow of Brandeis University, member of the board of directors of the Miami Beach Taxpayers Assn., and chairman of the board of the Dania Bank, Friedland has contributed continuously to the welfare of the community. He is one of the founding fathers of Temple Emanu-El on Miami Beach, and has served as its president for more than ten years. Friedland has also figured prominently as a contributor to educational institutions. He organized and is president of the Food Fair Stores Foundation, which this year will grant more than 300 scholarships to young men and women at leading universities in the United States, among them: SAMUU MIDLAND noted philanthropist Harvard University, Yale, Columbia, Johns Hopkins, University of Pennsylvania, Brandeis, Temple, St. John's, and the Universities of Miami and Florida. These scholarships are awarded to outstanding students, employees of Food Fair and their children, and to members of the communities in which Food Fair Stores are located. Food Fair Stores was cited by "Who's Who in America" in recognition of its "substantial contribution to higher education in America." Friedland also serves as national vice chairman of the planning committee of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. Since his move from Philadelphia to Miami, Friedland has been active in community affairs, having served as chairman of the Community Chest drive for Miami Beach, chairman of the Combined Jewish Appeal, cochairman of the Bonds for Israel drive, and a member of the board of directors of the InterAmerican Center Authority. CONGRATULATIONS... ENFIELD'S CAMERAS PHOTO SUPPLIES PROFESSIONAL AMATEUR Binoculars — Telescopes Recording Machines 503 Lincoln Rd. ; M.B. Phone JE 1-3451 1339 Biscayne Blvd. Phone FR 3-7676 Congratulations... FIORIDA DISTRIBUTORS CHALKBOARDS BULLETIN BOARDS LINEN & TRASH CHUTES INCINERATORS 1652 Lenox Avenue JE 1-9790 • A. 'I U \l i A 4 m •1"



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Page 14-A *jelstfk+l<1lnr) Friday,] $50,000-or More-Was Their Contribution to Mount Dan B. Kuskin. leonarl Wien is chairman of the fund today. •_. Founlors of Mt. Sinai, donors of $50,000 or ..... have contributed 56 to 58 percent of ^VJJV* the hospital's construction. Chairman of FounderI. Jacob Sher. On ^J 3 £'*"**%T S Mt. Steal Founders w.ll number 65. When Initially conceived the rounders group, composed of 12 donor*, anticipated growing to less than half that n imber. .„_,_ Th. will he F.ach Founder la designated with .hat dMm -non by a sculptured head .n bronv These will be placed on permanent v,ew in the hospital's auditor um. Founders and trust**, of Mt. S.na, include. I ^-„-- _, > |i — F^'md"" pvl triistnn "% is n.e-t'v Ch B *"* 1 n n '*** !.. %  >• %  ** ~f Tn-*nc. trial Na' 1 """! B' "V of y : s- and North 9r B--V of Naetei Beach. *n* rus *•••-' **ra 'i state Cer'ifi-,1 Puhiic Accountant organizations. Abeaa iv marred to tno former M-rtha Uir. The coon] • h"'ve th're chil 'rei. l.inda, Marceila and Leonard, jr. • % a Mrs. Aliea E. fafaj' tTlWIllai Mrs. Adams is the widow of the late inventor of the dial tele phone She resides in Miami Beach and New York, and has been contributing generously to medical research. At present. she is lavin-j th groundwork for the creation of the Adams Foun dation. • • • Sam Mar*—Founder and trustee Blank %  president of Nation: al Brands. Inc.. Stale Beverage*. Inc.. National Wines. Inc. and chairman of the hoard of Southern BeverageHe has been a director of the American National Red Oman, Miami Community Chest and Miami Cham-, ler of Commerce. Wank has been active in numerous other .mirations as a trustee for the I'niM rimi and Greater Miami Jewish Federation. B'nai II nth and Blka He is married to the former Beatrice Miller The couple have three children. MrSI Mrs SanI Kramer, and Jerome Blank. • • • Jack A. Camai Pounder and trvsiee Cantor is a wcl! known real estate and insurance brokar in' n lo-chairman of the Greater Miami Israel Bond committee. • • • Jack Carncr — Founder and trustee. In the construction bu>i ness. Camer alme t.i pursue his hobby of collecting fine artFormerly of Rye N V Carner was tir>t pres.dent of the Commu agogue of Rye anil is honorarv president for life. He r | Miami Beach w.th his ejata, EWan, and sons Richard and Stephen, who are also in the construction business. • • • Ma* V. C9*n— Founder. Pre-. dent ot Hamilton Homes in Hamalso of Brookwood Mart Je< pany Peteco. Inc.. and Tvrinbrooi Cogen was born in London land, has been a resident of Miami for the past e Hi is a member of Temple Israel and ed to the former Ireht Jaffa. They hate two children. Mrs William W. Binder and PeteMichael Cogen. • a a Benjamin F. Danbaum—Founder. • • • Put Fasfce — Founder. Presi('(•"' of the \eiy l'-i'o-"i and Tpwel Supply Co.. Faske was born in Sonmn ille. NY Fourteen years in Miami, he isa Mason. Shnncr. F'k. a member of the Exchange Cluh. and treasurer of the Hope School for Retarded Children Married to the former Ruth Shapiro, they have one daughter. Ronni. • • • Abraham C. Pim — Founder. Currently president of Peerless Milk. Inc.. Fine is a member of the Elks Club, and is active in Temple Israel and Tnaaple Beth Sootam Married to the former Marnoret ^re ta l ia te they has* one daughter. • • • Samuel Frie dtim-i — F~mder a"d tru*ee he aln ••" %  ves as vice o*esdent. Friedtand is chairman of the board and founder of Food F'i' Store* Ire., and is president of Food Fair Properties. Inc He is chairman of the hoard of trustees of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, member of the board of directors of the Jewish Home for the Ac,ed. Fellow of Brandeis University, member of the board Miami raxpaj/i I n.. chairman of the board of the Dania Beak, member of the citizens' board of :h %  University of Miami. Fnedland was one of the foun dcrs of Temple Emanu-EI. and has served as its president for more thai ten years He has | other community eh as chairman of me O mbined Jewisn Appeal, cochairman of Bonds for Israel ea Ml fifth vice president and DevelopJoseph M. Host, Jdti ment Fund chairman. 'Harold B. Spaet. Cidf Carl Weinkl*. Gordon, assistant i were Harris, treasurer, nil Lipton. assistant' Hecht. jr. Founder *d trustee A native of New York. Hecht has been a resident of Miami for 16 years, residing previously in Jacksonville. Fla. He is president of the West Flasler Kennel Club and chairman of the hoard of the West Indies Fruit Company. Hecht has been affiliated with the United Fund. Variety Child ren" Hospital. Greater Miami Jewi-h Federation and Brandeis Unn-rsitv He is a member of Temple Beth Sboiotn. Hecht is married to the former Florence i. and they have three children. Uabelle. David and Barbara. • • • Leon B. Jacobs Founder and trustee. Jacobs is chairman of the board of Robert M Green ad Sons. pr esklcM of Jacobs Realty C^rporatiosi. Alexander Realty Company.~Xing and Queen Corporation, Safeway Corpora, boo. Safeway Realty Corporation ef Peonsylvaraa. King and Sn^are Corporauon. and Jacobs Safeway Corporation. He is married to the former Dorothy rltrsch. and they have two children, Mrs. James M Wosfson and Mrs. Anne his brothers, Sidney and Irwin. in the Sena It Company of America. Poole Silver, Gracious Living, and Gracious Homes. Kane has served as president and treasurer of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, and is currently a member of the Executive Committee of the board of governors. In 1953, be served as chairman of the Combined Jewish Appeal. Married to the former Eileen Gilman, they have three children. Priscilla Ann. Carol Sue, and David Paul. • • • Benjamin M. Kane — Founder and trustee. Kane is founder of the Senak Company of America. Grace Holmes Club Plan. Gracious Living. Interstate Equipment, the Benjamin N. Kane Foundation, and is the former owner of the Mercantile National Bank. Bern in Russia, Kane was a registered pharmacist. His philanthropic interests are wellknown in Providence, R.I.. wbe.e he was a resident before coming to Miami in 1924 His wife is the former Esther Markensohn. Their children are Sidney A. Kane. Irwin E. Kane, and Howard Kane. Howard Katie — Ft trustee Kane has active istern Florida real estate u associated with his father in the •^ t ?a£ssrs. a chantabie He as Semwei Ktan Founder. Retired ten years ago from genera! contracting h—inrii in New York. Kann at active in many philaothroptc programs. He was a %  emb er of the lnwood Country Cub in Lone Island and the OW Oaks Countrv deb. Purch a se .. \ Y A resident of Miami far nine years, hu wife is the termer Shirley Siiverman, of New York. • • • Saawuet G. Keyweil Founder. Keywell has been active for many years in Miami Bench's hotel industry. He commute* between Miami Beach and Detroit to attend to his hutinan mfi Kiew ?r. tired and a resides t^ the past SCTSS jam! Mason. Shnacr. 0.1' active member cf Tot Married to the tosrj Wei-brout. they uJ Theodore R. andf • • Benjamin C. Un-j Kline i> owner sal Miami Beach's ami tel Earlier m MttT ed the first fi" Baltimore and spa years. PreskJosfl Ma>ter Mason, a P* Kline is also v* Tall Cedars of Lrta* director of ** %  Chamber of CantJ mer profeahoail "T er. Kl.ne marori • ria Oastar. TMfHJ Jerome. • Samoa! C. — aD d trustee. I^^ in real estate %  • %  %  resident of Kenn.i Cluh *J rt T ~ p ic Israd r— ber of We*:n* Keserat* Hew York. ftrme. LeveMaacassag his soclcha farmer Mrs. ^| teveesm't ** • ade* o


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imber 11, 1959 • •JewlslinorldHan Page 15-A fg committee for Mt. tal. • •" • irman— Founder and brn in New York City, been a resident of tor 30 years an* President anj director safional Lank of Ch for 20 years, in active interest in bcrman is a former Miami Beach and is srving as vice mayor, iember of the i jdition to' affiliations Jcs Beth Jacob, Beth lanu-El, and* the He cmy. Upton — Founder, reasurer of the board 1'resident of the ral Savings and Loan the J. M. Lipton Insurcy, lipton has found ticipatc in B'nai B'ritli, lasons, Shrine, Amerand as Vice presimple Emanu-El. Iso a past president of i.i Savings and Loan rid was in 1951 fund of the Dado County Married to the former |h, t|jev-;Jiave two ehil1J and Airs. Marshall Lowenstein — Founder te. lowenstein is chairhe board of M. Lowen[Sons. lie is a member ird of Hillside Hospital, at Hospital, New York Jitcd Jewish Appeal, rk Jewish Federation, r Defamation League, tie recipient of an hongree from Clemson Colt., and is an honorary if in New York. He is er of the Metropolis I Club, N.Y., and Wcstpitry Club, Miami, memle Cotton Exchange and Itic Club of New York, btein is also a member |le Emanu-El, N.Y., and resident of Miami Beach. I a rried to the former ferry. • B. MacDAMM, jr. — MacDonald is presi| Mid-West Trailer CorpAmerica. He has been in Mt. Sinai Hospital years. He is a memGorce Country Club. • • • larkowitx — Founder. It of Markowitz Brothers, nechanical contractors, |tz is a native of PittsFa. He is a member of lhange Club, Chamber of fee, and of Temple -Beth Married to the former cus, they have two childfcrvin and Mrs. Janics M. Mason — Founder. In of the board and presi the Taylor Construction Itn-ii. Mason is also chairIthe board of the Williams lams Industries, Inc., of fleans. He is on the board ernors of the National p's Cardiac Hospital, bf directors of the Palm Towers Corporation, board pors of the Gensbro Hotel ption, and the board of diof the Bank of Dade He is past president of pth Florida A.G.C. Born in Ky., Mason married ner Agnes Fine, and has s, Stuart J. and M. Walter da Hirsch Meyer— Fountrustee. An attorney, he fcmber and past president Jar Assn. of Miami Beach, ce president and a current [member of the citizens' bf the University of Miami, (resident of the American Committee, national vice |nt of the American Jewish Ittee's Institute of Human m. Is a member of Artus, the Blague of Miami Beach, ISigma Rho, Elks, Kiwanis, \ New Comen Society, Hufcociety of Dade County. Is also active in the Opera [of Greater Miami, a direcIthe United Fund, vice pret% f the Jewish Home for the Aged, organizer and first president of Mt. Sinai Hospital. His wife is the former Polly Lux. • • • Jack Millar— Founder. • • • Jacob and Fannia MtlWIm — Founders in the name of their late son, Saul Mindlin. inMindlins came to Miami from Brooklyn, N.Y., in 1951. where he was founder and president of the Manhattan Fur Dressing Corporation. Known in Jewish educational circles in New York, he was a founder, long-lime officer and trustee of Beth El Congregation of Brooklyn. He is a Mason. Their son, Saul, died Aug. 21, 1958, at the age of 37. He was a national executive in the Veterans Administration, in 1951 appointed by former President Harry S. Truman to the President's Commission on the Health Needs of the Nation. Illness shortly (hereafter, from which he never fully recovered, interrupted his career. The couple have another son, Leo Mindlin, executive editor of The Jewish Floridian. • • A. J. Molasky — Founder^ and trustee. Formerly president oi Food Center, Inc., Molasky is president of B'rith Sholom in St. Louis, Mo. He is a Mason, an Elkan Elk, active on the board of directors of the Meadowbrook Country Club of St. Louis, and an officer of the Westview Country Club. Married to the former Esther Goldstein, they have three children, Stanley, Mrs. Maurice Frankel, and Peggy, wife* of Dr. Leonard Schulman. • • Ban Novack—Founder. Novack is executive president of the Fontaineblcau hotel. • • • Max Orovlti— Founder. Orovitz is president of the board of trustees. • • • Victor Posner—Founder. Posner is a nationally-known builder. • • • Lea Ratner—Founder and trus tee. Ratner is board chairman of the Lee County Land and Title Corporation, president of Leeco Gas and Oil Company, and holds extensive land holdings throughout South Florida. He formed the Lehigh Acres Building Corp., Ratner Manufacturing Company, Glenn Chemical Company, and the Leonard Carpet Manufacturing Company. He is a member of Temple Emanu-El, and formed the National Foundation of the Susan Ball Memorial Fund of the City of Hope. With his brother, Walter, he formed the Ida Ratner Research Fund of the City of Hope. Married to the former Esther Richman, their children are Joel, Ronald and Ira. • • • Allan B. Rosan—Founder. • • • Samuel H. Ro$t—Founder and trustee. Rost is president of the Miami Crown Liquor Distributors. A resident of Miami for the past 25 years, Rost is mar ried to the former Libby Epstein. They have two children, Mrs. Jewel Talley and J. Leo Rost. • • Dan B. Ruskin—Founder, trustee and vice president. Ruskin is co-owner of the Public Gas Company, president of the ScottPerry Corporation, vice president of Rusoro Corporation, O & R Assets, Inc., vice president of Gator Corporation and Mrst Florida Mortgage Corporation. He is a member of the board of the Community National Bank, an honorary president of Greater Miami Jewish Federation member of the board of directors of the Miami Heart Institute, and a member of the citizens board of the University of Miami. Ruskin is married to the former Mollie Kaplan, and they have three children They are members of Temple Israel <* Miami, and have resided in Miami for 35 years. • • Max Schlossbars — Founder. PrSdent of the Max 8ehktorg Company, he is • "f v ^ Yorker, but lived in Chicago Sere he developed his ironu steel and scrap business. During Typical view of Mt. Sinai's corridors on paof the building. Color and design vary on tient fliors. In the center is the nurses'Workeach floor. On the ceiling are the boxes of ing area, accessible through five doors and the doctors' visual call system, facing all patient rooms located to the outside World War II, Schlossberg served in Washington, D.C., where he was a consultant on scrap metal Married to the former lone McClaflin. they have two children, Mrs. Paul Becker, and John Schlossberg. a a Sam Schwartz — Eounder. Schwartz is owner of Wolfie's restaurants on Miami Beach. • • • Jacob Shar—Founder and trustee. Sher, retired 'businessman and former president of West Flagler Kennel Club, has been a resident of Miami for 35 years. He is a member of Masonic Lodge, Shrine, Elks, founder and. member of Westview Country Club. He was president of G-eater Miami Contract Bridge League and treasurer of Florida Thoroughbred Breeders' Assn. Sher is a member of Beth David Synagogue, and is married to the former Mary Fowler. He has been affiliated with the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, Jewish Home for the Aged, Dade County Community Chest, University of Miami, and other Dade county organizations. • • William D. Singer — Founder and trustee. Chairman of the board of the Royal Castle Svstem, Singer has been actively associated with the Florida State Road Department. Among his many philanthropic affiliations has been the Combined Jewish Appeal which lie headed for two years. Born in Columbus, 0., he is married to the former Esther Goldberg. They have three children, Lawrence E., Mrs. Marvin L. Jacobs, and Mrs. Richard Stone. • Harry Sirkin — Founder and trustee. Sirkin is prominent in building and investment circles, as well as in philanthropy. He has served as president of the Miami Beach Jewish Center-now Temple Emanu-El—on executive committee of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, president ot Vaad Hakashruth, board member of the Hebrew Academy, Bureau of Jewish Education, and Jewish Social Service Bureaunow Jewish Family and Children's Service. He is married to the former Sarah Tamarkin. Their children are Milton, Adele, Alexander and Leon. • • • Arthur Jack Spencer-Founder. Now retired, Spencer was active in the coffee business. He was born Dec. 23, 1889 in New YorK City and attended Yale University He is a resident of Miami for ten years. He formerly resided in New York City. Joseph R. Stein—Founder and trustee. Until 1935, Stein was the owner of a retail department store. Currently he is in thf wholesale liquor business. Stein is a Shriner, Mason and member of B'nai B'rith, the Variety Club and is active on the citizens' committee of the University of Miami. He is a former chairman of the Florida State Racing Commission. Before coming to Miami with his wife, the Steins made their residence in Lake Ciiy, Fia. Their two children are Shirley Goifine and Marshall Stein. • Isaac Stern — Founder. Stern is a former newspaper owner of Philadelphia. • • Carl Susskind — Founder and trustee. He is president of Carl Susskind, Inc., and Belford Trucking Company. A graduate of New York University, Susskind has resided here for 19 years with his wife. Martha, and they have two children, Harry and Willa Sue. He is a member of Temple Beth Sholom. • • Ben Tobin—Founder. Tobin is president of the Hollywood Beach hotel. He is married to the former Iris Maxwell. • • Arthur Harold Ungar—Founder and trustee. Ungar is founder of Ungar Buick Company. He was chairman of the Stadium in Greenville, Miss. He has been director and member of


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Page 14-C +Jmi*t> rkrkHnn Mt. Sinai Development Fund Contribution Continued from Pag* 7-C ated within the Development Fund under the co-chairman-lup of Aaron Kanner. Sidney Lefcourt, and Dr. Meyer Egg] to solicit pledges from lawyers, accountants and dentists in the Greater Miami area. Two weeks after' ground had been broken, pledges had swollen to $2,373,000. Revision of Plant On December 3, 1956. a gala dinner at the Fontainebleau hotel brought $355,000 in pledges, thus bringing the total over the three million dollar mark. In the meantime, practically every civic organization on Miami Beach had contributed in one form or another to the hospital's progress, notably the Rotary Club, the Kiwanis, the Bayshore Exchange Club, Miami Beach Men's Fashion Guild, the Order of True Sisters, and many, many more. By March, 1957. Ruskin announced that funds totaled $3.250.000. But in view of Miami's continuing growth, a revision of building plans had to be made. Instead of a 300-bcd structure to cost four million dollars, a 417bed hospital was envisioned, adding another two floors to the planned six, and enlarging consequently all of the basic service areas. Estimates tor the construction itself had to be raised to $7,000.000. and in August. 1957 a new campaign was mapped by Ruskin. which put Wien and Howard Kane, then retiring president of the Greater Miami Jewi-h Federation, at the head of the Initial Gifts Division Changes took place in other committees as Sam Goldstein became successor to Susslrind and Chaikin as head of the Commercial Division, Named by Ruskin to serve with Goldstein were Joseph L. Arkin. George A. Bertman, Joseph Cohen. Samuel E. Schwartz. Aaron Kravitz and William A. Weintraub A total of 38 Founders were among the (OeftH who witnessed the unveiling of the first 16 bronze heads sculpted bv David Newman, and Dan B. Ruskin was able to announce that funds had increased to $3,600,000 as 1957 came to a dOM In June. 1958. Harold L. Dunsky. until then assistant city manager for State of Israel Bonds in Chicago, was appointed executive director of the Development Fund, and new offices were established at 924 Lincoln rd. Women-* Auxiliaries In the meantime. Mt. Sinai Hospital Women's Auxiliary, which had contributed heavily to the hospital's campaign, announced that it set itself a goal of $250,000 to endow the Maternity Floor in the new building. Mrs Philip Lefkowitz, Auxiliary president, appointed past-president Mrs. Morris Goldin as liaison chairman for the project. Less than three weeks later, Mrs. Leonard A. Wien was persuaded to become chairman of the project. At this moment. $475,000 of the overall half-million dollar goal of the Auxiliary has been raised by Mt. Sinai's women. As the doctors' committee was able to announce the fulfillment of its goal of $500,000. it also accepted the responsibility to dou ble its pledges which at this time stand at $850,000. By the end of October. 1958. Ruskin. after heading the hospital's fund-raising effort for four years, handed his job over to Wien, and became honorary chairman of the Development Fund. The husband and wife team of Leonard and Marjone Wien began to make history. The Gifts Swell The Women's Division got into action with a "Tribute to Godmothers" luncheon w h ic h netted the first woman Founder in the person of Mrs. Alicia Adams, widow of the late inventor of the dial telephone. Mrs. Sarah Czech became first founder of the Maternity Wing with a contribution of $25,000. Total of the women's affair amounted to $168, 000, thus c\ Ibiaj the di,.ns original pledge of $250,000. Days later, Marjone Wien. in announcing the remit, pledged herself and her friends to raise an additional $250,000 for the equipment and furnishings of the Maternity Department. At the Founder's Dinner of April 25, 1959, a total of 53 had obtained the rank of "Founder," and the first woman Founder was joined by a second in the person of Mrs. Rose Cache. In May, 1959, the Jacob Mmdlin family announced a donation of $50,000 to perpetuate the memory of their late son, Saul. Mt. Sinai's first Founder memorial. During the lull of the summer, plans were laid for a "women's special." a "Blessed Event," at which more than 600 women filled the Fontainelileau hotel's ballroom to record pledges exceeding $160,000. After the count. Mi. Sinai had 223 "Godmothers" (at a $1,000 each), and more than 800 had pledged life-membership to the Women's Auxiliary, their $100 individual contributions marked for the Development Fund. A Greater Miami fund-raising committee was formed, headed by Aaron Kanner and Maurey Ashmann. Their campaign is still in progress as this story is written. As 1959 draws to a close, as the doors of the new Mt. Sinai Hospital are about to open. Leonard and Marjone Wien. leaders of the drive, can look forward with high hopes to reach their goal. CARPI0-PULM0NARY LABORATORY New Vistas of Aid in Battle Against Major Human Ailment When the Cardio -Pulmonarv Laboratory of Mt. Sinai Hospital began its functions in July, 1955, the staff consisted of a total of three, including its director. Dr. Philip Samet. Today, four years later, the department has quad rupled its staff and given to the world a roster of important medical findings Concerned with research and teaching, the department's subjects for study are most often referred by physicians in private practice. At t.mes. patients come from the service area or that part of the hospital set-up to accommodate those whose cannot afford the services of a private physician. In addition to its regular beds for service patients. Congratulations... AL & NAT ZALKA CERTIFIED POULTRY and EGG CO.. Inc. "Over a Quarter of | Century in Miami" WHOLESALE and EXPORTER POULTRY, EGGS and DAIRY PRODUCTS s DISTRIBUTOR BLUE RIBBON PRODUCTS HOTEL end RESTAURANT PURVEYORS FRonkfifi 9-0675 41 N.W. 10th Street five research beds are set aside, available free to the medically indigent. It is in the research department that patients with various types of heart and lung disease are carefully examined and studi-d It i> here that their medical history is taken, that they undergo physical examination, that X-Rays and cardiograms are ae> corded. Dr. Samet, an assistant profee sor of physiology in medicine at the University of Miami, devotes a minimum of 15 hours a week. •very week of the year, to the teaching of the hospital's house staff. Developed has been a medical and surgical team consisting of Dr. Samet and Dr. Robert Litwack, of the university's school of medicine. Patients with congenital and acquired heart diseases are selected and their surgical treatment carried out. During the past four years the work by the team has shown a steady increase in both traffic and in findings. The move to new Mt. Sinai '.ias brought a new look to the CardloPulmonary Laboratory. Formerly boused in three and a half rooms over a spread of 580 sq ft., the labs are now located in seven .rooms, touting 2.850 sq. ft. For the staff of two technicians, a nurse and a secretary, plus a Physician who is usually a research Feuow in Cardiology from the university school of medi erne, there will be, for the first time, vastly improved working conditions. Offered win be the opportunity to expand the number of protects and with it the ability to render a service to more pupli Some 180.000 worth of equipment already exists In the lab. But new m "L*^LJ^H %  %  > for seen processing as the coeatse* ad analysis of rad% MU t ££ ses. analysis of heart and presssres. and analysis of blood ... %  es. A "treadmill" bee been aetf ed to ttody ^ ntxamB „ tjwis who are physically erChung. W Sarah Csech. first founder of ML Sinai Hospital's Wing, shown with Jacob Sher. chairman oi the Group. %  %  I Dr. Philip Samet in his Cardie-Pulmonary Laboratry. Growth of the Blood Continued from Peso 12 C overstocked and its important use lost. As such, there Is in constant use a system of interchangeable credits with other hospitals. At times, blood is sent to different hospitals in the nation with a credit hsted toward the future account of the hospital which provides it. There are occasions when a bank's "assets" may be quickly depleted as in the recent case of a woman who used 32 pints in one day. The demand is always great, the blood is used rapidly, and there are few times when it is outdated. During the past year, almost a thousand more pints were used over that of preceding years. Used chiefly in surgery and sometime before in preparation, blood has become a prune requisite in the treatment of anemia, leukemia, accidents, and shock. To keep the books of the Bank always in the black. Dr. Cirlin is constantly on the go, often to the detriment of his own private practice A consUBt is his wife. Emily. k-i from the initial d| U courtship has worsts' m at his side. Promptly, i a.m. on Sundays, beBsI pie are enjoying ^y *l terrupted rest. Mrs. Oriel 1 with her husband to %  place in the Blood Basti actively participates m H cessing. On the mobile edbj times have operated a • ing sun. at others in ten*". eight tables are taken jam pads, linens and the equipment necessary the blood Last year. *' units were in u^J^sl this year is s connda crease. The story of the actually has %  *% %  Mrs. Cirlin, to Mrs.*"*! Dr. Jacob Neber meats bematolopst <• technician Mary Jo m the other n*"b ^ new hit Sinairep**"^ step forward in th** WE ARE PROUD TO HAVE INSTALLED THE CUTLER MAIL CHUTES FOR THE NEW MT. SINAI HOSPITAL O. 0. BRINSON 2872 N.W. 34th Street **>"•



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Pag 12-B +3elstntrktkHi UNDER THE STRICT AND CONSTANT SUPERVISION OP THE ORTHODOX VAAD HAKASHRUTH OF FLORIDA RABBI DR. ISAAC HIRSH EVER. DIRECTOR POOO FAIR KOSHER MARXm a PLEDGED TO OlVe THE BEST OUAUrj? AT THf LOWEST PRICE OR YOUR MON|y| I 4 meat and v R QuLtry Quantity Right* Rsrved tun the completion of another Food Fair Kosher Market IN WESTCHESTER SHOPPING PLAZA CORAL WAY AT S.W. 87th AVENUE Watch for the Gala Opening Soon! PRICES EFFECTIVE ALL WEEK Make your meed one to remember by servbj your family the finest Kosher Premium Meats at the lowest prices ever! CHUCK STEAK BABY RIB Lamb Chops SHOULDER Lamb Chops IB 89c LB. 79c Necks or Shanks B 23c LB. 59c LEAN TRIMMED FLANKEN TRIMMED BONELESS Cross Rib or Shoulder ROASTS rs 89 : ft LB. Our Coral Way Kosher Market Open Sunday 8 A.M. to 3P^ • 163rd ST. SHOPPING CTR. NO. MIAMI BEACH • 19th ST. at ALTON RD. MIAMI BEACH 2091 CORAL M MIAMI MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS YOUR EXTRA BONUS AT FOOD



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"Jewish Floridian .< Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY 33 — Number 50 Miami, Florida, Friday, December 11, 1959 Two Sections — Price 20 pte and tile blend into an harmonious view, enhanced gh abundant use of stainless steel in cornices and letters, lew Mt. Sinai Hospital is eight stories high. tpect 3,000 at Mi inai Opening Sunday See Mt. Sinai Hops it a I Supplement Section C SN Founders Pages 14-15 and 16 A %  ting for some 3,000 persons is being prepared for the dedication Bnies which will officially open the new Mt. Sinai Hospital of Miami on Sunday at 2 p.m. |near-$10 million medical ineight stories high above ae Bay on Collins Island liately adjacent to the hos[old site at 4300 Collins ave., en its doors after ten years lining. Jewish Floridian this weeK its entire Sec. C to details to the old and new Mt. lospital.) |ilding and planning commitIS been headed by J. Geri-ewis, and included A. J. Is, Joseph Rose, Joseph M. Jack Canter, and David pps. Upward of 58 percent cost of the building was subscribed by Mt. Sinai Pounders, donors of $50,000 or more. The Sunday program will open with an invocation prayer by Msgr. Father Barry, of St. Patrick's, Miami Beach. Sam C. Levenson, Founder, trustee and chairman of the opening committee, will act as master of ceremonies and introduce dignitaries present. Miami Beach Mayor D. Lee Powell will present greetings. Baron de Hirsch Meyer, Founder and first president of Mt. Sinai Hospital, will receive a plaque in Continued on Page 9-A Mi Declares Jewish Move Suburbia Not 'Escapist' UN Renews Old Palestine Conciliation Body as Lone Israel Records No' Ballot JTA—By Direct Teletype Wire UNITED NATIONS—The General Assembly's special political committee adopted a resolution Tuesday prolonging the life of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for three more years, and reactivating the Palestine Conciliation Committee. A total of 71 delegations voted in favor of the entire resolution, none opposed, and only Israel abstained from voting. In a separate vote on the fourth paragraph of the resolution, which called for reactivation of Arab refugees as provided in a 1948 UN resolution, Israel cast the single vote in* — opposition, and 17 other delegations refrained from giving this proposal their approval. Acceptance of the resolution by the General Assembly plenary session is now considered a matter of routine. Israel announced its position on the resolution prior to the balloting, but withheld its statement justifying its stand until the voting was completed. Michael S. Comay, head of the Israel delegation, then told the committee that his delegation regarded it as "significant" that a large number of other delegations "have expressed this misgivings on Paragraph Four and hive abstained on the separate vote." While the Israeli statement was a general review of Israel's position on the refugee question and the broader issue of Arab-Israeli relations, Comay reserved his fire for the paragraph of the resolution reactivating the Conciliation Commission. "A renewed reference to the Conciliation Commission in the year 1959," he declared, "must take account of the evolution of United Nations policy since 1948, when the commission was established — of current international thinking on the problem — of the contemporary realities in the area, and of Israel's own record and undertakings. By any of these tests. Paragraph Four is devoid of realism. It looks backward instead of forward, and is more likely to impede constructive solution than to achieve one. "We cannot accept the view that such a paragraph is justified because it has been lumped together IEW YORK—(JTA)—Dr. Albert L. Gordon, prominent Boston rabsociologist, took sharp issue this week with charges ^^^JSSSS^SS^S^^ [moving to the suburbs to "escape" their non-white city neighbors, j ^ rnments It must be reputhor of the sociological study, "Jews in Suburbia," addressed the j innual meeting of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith. more important" changing* Continued on Page 7-A JAVITS JOINS FRACAS Rosenwald Charges Warburg Distorts Role of UJA Funds NEW HAVEN, Conn.—(JTA)—All the money that the United Jewish Appeal raises is given only to welfare organizations for humanitarian needs, and "none of it is given anywhere else," William Rosenwald, noted American Jewish leader and national chairman of the UJA, declared here last weekend. — 'The support which American Jews give to the UJA carries with it no endorsement of the "policies of Israel's Government, foreign and domestic Whet this support does say in the most eloquent and meaningful terms is that the Jews of America underwrite the human needs which the UJA was founded to meet. Stressing that UJA funds have been used to save and rebuild the lives of Jews in need or danger throughout the world, Mr. Rosenwald commented that Mr. Warburg "could not have been more reckless of the facts as they apply to the UJA, than he was in his address last Friday night." The United Jewish Appeal has raised funds in annual drives since iV'nuftuML Tile President 1939 when J* was brought into beuoitid #dys Shell Stay As Minister JTA—By Direct Teletype Wire JERUSALEM—President BenZvi formally entrusted Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion Tuesday with the task of forming a new government after the President completed the required consultations with all parties winning in the November elections for Iswent to the Prime Minister's home for the action because the Prime Minister has been feverish since Monday, and was expected to remain in bed for the next two or three days. He will continue his efforts to form a new government from his home. MeanwNle, Golda Meir has agreed to continue in the next coalition Government as Israel's Continued on Page 16-A and economic factors acfor the move to the suburbs tth Jews and Christians, Dr. >n said. He predicted, howthat the "escapists" among ; moving out of the cities will rithin the next decade that are fewer places to which Dr. Gordon spoke in opn to the criticism voiced last at the General Assembly of RJnion of American Hebrew regations by Marvin Braiter[ a Baltimore attorney. daring that the "escapist" Be leveled against Jews Is irranted, Rabbi Gordon said: hough it is true that the re to suburbs may constitute ppism for some people, there merty other far more Inv Continued en Page 6-A IMPACT OF US. AID PAGE 6-A Nasser Steams to Hide Empty Kettle JERUSALEM-(JTA) United Arab Republic President Nasser is trying to divert attention from his difficulties in the Arab world by announcing his opposition to Israel's implementation of the Jordan River irrigation project, Israeli circles declared here this week. Nasser was reported by Cairo dispatches to have issued a statement opposing Israel's irrigation project. Observers here, however, are of the belief that he is in desperate need of an anti-Israel issue to cover splits inside the Arab bloc. His plan to stem Syrian opposition to the merger with Egypt in the UAR are understood to have run into great difficulties. The Egyptian ruler also fears the effects of the reported move by Iraq to revive the plan for a "fertile crescent," e move that would join together Iraq, Jordan and the Syrian region of the UAR. Meanwhile, In Jordan, Israel's first submarine, the 800-t6n "Tanin," left the British Naval Base in Portsmouth harbor on its 16-day cruise to Israel. The submarine, manned by a full complement of 56 officers and men, was fully armed with thirteen 2-000-pound torpedoes and "ready for combat." The day of departure started at 7:30 a.m. when the Tanin's crew took up stations aboard the vessel while frogmen carefully inspected Continued on Peg* 11-A ing to aid Jews persecuted by Hitler. In more than two decades it has provided monies for the feeding, shelter, migration and reestablishment of oppressed and distressed Jewish populations throughout the world. UJA funds have aided 2,700,000 persons, helping to resettle 1,300,000 of these in free lands throughout the world, Continued on Page 7-A WILUAm KOStMWALD %  • a rlVHIM ef9VffS



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amber 11. 1959 *Jewlsti florid ton Page 5-C #<• %  I r J II iJlll & a it i nun .II PROGRESS CONTINUES Old Mt. Sinai site at 4300 Alton rd. ; %  — %  J*4 V-. elevator bank, going from the main f, leads to the Information Desk (at right), the window of the Snack Bar (at left) and leads to four public autotronic elevators to the seven upper floors. rective Healing Program Devoted Constant Regimen of Teaching |er the direction of Dr. Fleming, the Departfof General Surgery of Mt. [Hospital is dedicated not corrective healing but to stant program of teaching. Bd by the cream of the nacurrent and future surthe department is comof three sub-specialties, include Thoracic and CarPlastic, and Proctological ry. Ch section is headed by its who, in turn, directs the |Ues of the members of his Sinai Hospital is approved liree-year residency in surFollowing the approval of [internship, doctors selected raining in surgery receive essive training. With it, the ised responsibilites and dutventually qualify them to rm major surgery under the vision of the hospital's atmt staff. ca IIM< of this residency and >g program, Mt. Sinai is year able to "service" a number of the community's py cases. Known as "servpatients, they occupied, to the opening of the new Mai, 15 beds devoted to Gensurgery. With the new hosapproximately 15 additionis will be made available. Is the premise of Mt. Sinai ptal that in order to train Blent surgeons, thdse docelected must have a certain nt of work to do themselves, ultimate goal is to qualify len in surgery. To do this, must be an expansion in te patients which will bring with it the opportunity for a fouryear program. More patients mean more material for a proposed increase in the resident staff who can then branch out to qualify for the sub-specialty surgical groups. Since it Is teaching hospital, the s**ff of Mt. S'nal has unanimoulv agreed that, in addition to their work with service natients. every private case be dedicated to its teaching program. It is through their association with the private Datients that interns and residents win the practical knowledge of basic physiology and predominant pathology. It is encouraging to note that most private patients at Mt. Sinai offer enthusiastic help. They appreciate the attention and care and often are greatly responsible in pointing the way towards individual discoveries which might have passed had they been isolated cases treated by a single doctor. This is training on its highest level of stimulation. A typical day's activities emanating from Dr. Flemings Department of General Surgery is charted as a "Schedule of Rounds, Clinics and Conferences." Beginning at 7 a.m., residents and interns make their morning rounds which can be followed by Operating Room assignments or clinics. Among others, there are clinics in Urology, Tumor, General Surgery, and Orthopedic. Gross Surgical Pathology is a twictMfaily session. Attendance at Staff Surgery is scheduled, as are rounds in Urology, Orthopedic and Private Surgical. Medical, X-Ray, Resident Paiho oy, rumor, and Surgical Pathology conferences are carefully scheduled to afford a maximum attendance. Evening rounds by residents and interns wind up the teaching-practice day. To avoid any area for error, Dr. Fleming's office further releases carefully annotated charts and schedules. These are the schedule of Assignments, broken down to monthly "Service Assignments," which name the doctors in charge and his staff in attendance. On this schedule is also noted the monthly breakdown of doctors in charge of Private Rounds. Thoracic Surgery, Proctology, Plastic and Neurosurgery, each a sub-section of General Surgery, has its own yearly schedule noting which doctor is in attendance for a consecutive two-month period. There is a Schedule of Night Duty in the Emergency Room, which clearly specifies the hours and the names of each intern, resident, and resident on call. In the event that the man of first call cannot because of illness or other reason be on duty, the man on second call automatically assumes responsibility. Further, the department clearly charts a monthly schedule declaring who of the attending staff will be responsible for specific areas. These might include such classifications as "on service," "grand rounds," "Surgical Clinic," "Tumor Clinic," "Animal Lab," or "residents pathology conference." In any hospital, the intern is a graduate of medical school just beginning training. The resiContinuad on Paga 15-C JAe. .Nautilus loteljja:.. Increasing Medical Needs Speed Plan for Expansion / REATER Miami's increasing*~ ly heavy demand on the services of Mt. Sinai Hospital, the growth in the hospital's medical programs, and the necessity of planning ahead led early to a close level of cooperation for joint planning between Mt. Sinai and the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. From its earliest days Mt. Sinai had established its own Blood Bank. The Korean conflict impelled hundreds of people to donate blood for shipment to the war theater. Federation, central fund-raising and planning body for Greater Miami Jewry, could be told that the third year of operation showed 20 percent of the hospital's beds occupied by the medically indigent on a free or part-pay basis. A total of five research programs were started, and as a result of its participation in Dade county's health program, Mt. Sinai was the first hospital here to receive a $10,000 X-ray unit for free chest examinations of patients and visitors. Mt. Sinai received full approval of its School of Technology from the American Medical Assn. and the American Society of Clinical Pathologists at the start of 1953. A day later, Jan. 16, the Lawrence Foundation of New York presented a $30,000 grant to Mt. Sinai for the study of pulmonary diseases. The hospital is on a constant march of medical progress. Leading Greater Miamians, recognizing the need for special support, were led in April, 1953, by Jacob Sher and S. C. Levenson, who presented the hospital with a check for $20,000, thus permitting the purchase of new, modern X-ray equipment. Months later, in November, the United Order of True Sisters presented an Isotope Laboratory to the hospital. In September, 1954, another forward step was registered as Mt. Sinai received approval by the A.M.A. for residency training in obstetrics and gynecology, and only weeks later the hospital affiliated with Florida State University for training college students in dietetics. Plans to build a new hospital on Collins Island progressed, and groundbreaking for the new structure was set for early 1956. Plans at that time called for a 300-bed hospital, to include the finest modern facilities. But the existing quarters had constantly to be adapted to keep up with current need and neverendging progress. A Cardio-Pulmonary Laboratory was established to provide more accurate diagnostic work-up. And coordination of the hospital's activities with the Jewish Home for the Aged, Jewish Family and Children's Service and other organizations, demonstrated Continued on Pag* 10-C CONGRATULATIONS NORTH MIAMI HARDWARE & BUILDERS SUPPLY CO., INC. Max Luber 680 N.E. 127th Street Jack Waxenberg Phone PL 1-3663 CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW MT. SINAI HOSPITAL EMMERS CAN CO., INC. ... HOUSEWARE & GLASSWARE DIVISION 6250 N.W. 35th Avenue OX 6-0350 • I



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11, 1959 -Jmlsli lUiiHtr tion Committee Proposes New Quarters a new site by Jewish Federaninent Wednesof governors at the Algiers ort by the Federation committee on permanent headquarters. th*. rtwt wiiv ecomnond &f ho purchase o* a parcel of land •t 1317 Biscayne blvd., recently mada available by Bessemer Troperttat, Inc. Tha site is located on the northeast corner of Biscayn* blvd. and Mac Arthur Causeway, and covers a large part of the block, extending east to N. Baythora dr. According to Stanley C. Myers. chairman of the Federation committee, there is an existing-building on the land, two floors of-which a*e air-conditioned, and *y*Hild be-' immediately available for occupancy. There are adequate parking facilities on the site itself. Page 9-B A site committee voted unanimously last Friday to recommend purchase of the parcel which it considers "one of the choicest locations in the Greater Miami area." Federation is currently in quarters at *24 Lincoln 'hi.'"tmtil its move some two years ago, it occupied the entire mezzanine floor of 420 Lincoln rd. lor llins Ave. JE 1-0381 FINEST IN UAL CUISIHE JN 6-0121 ERVENOW! lOSNIR'B # trktly I CABANAS 147* nun, mm turn KOSHER FOODS [from *1.35 [7 Main Courses iltzer A Knishes DELICATESSEN %  hington Ave. J'ly Catered •irs Call 42655 morning services, Dec. 12, of Beth Israel Synagogue. Shlomo is an eighth grade student at the Hebrew Academy. He is the son of Rabbi and Mrs. Jonah E. Caplan. Rabbi Caplan is representative of Yeshiva University in the Florida area and spiritual leader of Temple Adath Yeshurun, No. Miami Beach. • • • Elliot Winit Temple Zion will be the site of the Bar Mitzvah of Elliot Winit Saturday morning, Dec. 12, with Rabbi Alfred Waxman officiating. Elliot is the son of Mr. and Mrs. David Winit. He attends Rockaway Junior High School, and completed his studies at Temple Zion religious school. • • Samuel Rosenstrauch Rabbi David Herson will officiate at the Bar Mitzvah of Samuel Rosenstrauch on Saturday morning. Dec. 12, at Beth Emeth Congregation. Samuel, who is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Rosenstrauch, will chant the entire service. He attends Thomas Jefferson Junior High, where he is a member of the hand. Participating in the service will be Benjamin Newmark and Samuel Grayson. Bernard Breitbart, Beth Emeth president, will present the Bar Mitzvah with a certificate. Tuhin Chapter to Meet Robyn Tubin chapter'of the City of Hope will meet Thursday evening, Dec. 17, at the Voyager motel. stein will be celebrated Saturday, Dec. 12, at Beth Jacob Congregation, with Rabbi Tibor Stern officiating. Meyer is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Perlstein, 727 2nd st. He is an eighth grade student at Miami Beach Junior High, where he plays in the school band and belongs to the Library Patrol. • • e Howard Malter Rabbi Meyer Abramowitz will officiate at the Bar Mitzvah of Howard Malter on Saturday morning, Dec. 12, in North Shore Jewish Center. Howard is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Milton Malter, 7282 Gary ave. He is a student in the religious school of North Shore Jewish Center, and attends Nautilus Junior High. Steven Weisman Steven Weisman, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Weisman, will become Bar Mitzvah during Saturday morning services, Dec. 12, of Temple Emanu-El. Rabbi Irving Lehrman will officiate. Steven is an eighth grade student at Nautilus Junior High, and attends Temple Emanu-El religious school. STEVEN SHELDON MEVE* S4MUEL ONLY THE NEW PACKAGE PLAN IS YOUR BEST BUY Any 10 days now to Dec. II$70 Any 10 days, Dec. 18-Jan. 18— $135 Any 14 days, Dee. 18-Jan. IS—$175 Any 21 days, Dec. 18-Jan. 18-S235 FULL MONTH 31 Days $350 Kosher meals Inel. per person Dbl. SPECIAL DISCOUNT—10% it atay a month or longer. o • Oceanfront & Oceanview. Corner Rooms, one price, none higher. o -e FREE 21" TV in every room. FREE PARKING and many other ftatores Apartments Avadable. Dietary Laws trictly observed Under Supervision ot Rabbi Dr. I. H. Ever, religious services on premises. o o Steaks, roast daily at no extra charge. Salt & Sugar Free Diets. O • Private Beach A Pool on the Ocean 1741 COWNS Miami Beach Miami Office JE 1-5711 Also Open Sum. A Eves. [mSkyurV*' Hoi*/" t**0<*"A Mr. and Mrs. Rosenstrauch will host the reception following, which will also mark their 16th wedding anniversary. • • Michael Marmorstoin Michael Lawrence Marmorstein will become Bar Mitzvah during Saturday morning services, Dec" 12, of Temple Emanu-El. Rabbi Irvine Lehrman will officiate. Michael attends eighth grade at Nautilus Junior High and Temple Emanu-El religious school. Reception in hi honor will be held Saturday evening at the Barcelona hotel. • oo Sheldon Isaacs Bar Mitzvah of Sheldon Isaacs will take place Saturday morning, Dec. 12, at Temple Beth Sholom. Rabbi Leon Kronish will officiate. Sheldon is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Milton Isaacs, 3737 Chase ave., and the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Rakoff. He is a student in the confirmation class of 5721. • • • Sam Woxlor Flagler-Granada Jewish Community Center will be the site of the Bar Mitzvah of Sam Wexler on Saturday, Dec. 12. Rabbi Bernard Shoter will officiate. Sam is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Irving Wexler, 325 SW 62nd ct„ and attends Kinloch Park Junior High. He is the grandson of Mrs. Bettie J. Martin. • • • Meyer Porlttoin Bar Mitzvah of Meyer I. PerlMental Health Program Due "What Hope Group Psychotherapy Can Offer" will be the subject of a film showing and discussion by Dr. A. Lester Stepner, director, Out-Patient Services, The Institute, Jackson Memorial Hospital, on Tuesday evening in the auditorium of the Miami Public Library. Ritz Plaza M invites you... MTMY IAWS ouaro RESERVATIONS; MRS. HOFFMAN JE 1-6881 ON THE OCEAN at 17th ST., MIAMI BEACH DINNERS $1.95 From % %  ••*' OPEN DAILY from 4 to 9 p.m. SOPtNAU =rom T r ** YEAR CATERING FOR ALL OCCASIONS frtePark UN 6-6043 Air-Cond. Under Orthodox Vaad Hakashruth Y'ALL com: Empire Kosher Restaurant 1357 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach 7-COURSE DINNERS from '1.35 FREE WINE AND SELTZER UNDER PERSONAL MANAGEMENT OF SOPHIE KING Telephone JE 8-1391 CATERING TO PARTIES OF ANY SIZE %  .AAAAAA-AAA.4VA*a1 m TIDES ON THE OCEAN ot 12th ST. We ore fcoppy to announce that our strictly kosher dining, room is now open to the nubile. Res. call JE 1-01 MIAMI IslACH i\* S, 0 y p,,ce Moderate Prlc ",„ Please AH Tart" "W. $2.50 UP s r2," 0 Noon to 10 WJ The DERBY INN Music Nighty !" fle REVLIN HOTEL !" KOSHER DINING ROOM Kosher Dining Room — Now Open to the Public DELUXE DINNERS from $1.65 Unit Rabbinical Supervision of too Orthodox Vaad Hakashruth Rabbi Dr. I. M. Ever Collins Ave. at 13th Street Ph. JE 8-1545 OPENS SATURDAY, DEC. 12th BESERYATIOHSl MUW Mitt • N. UUIIMMI • IIU.|II HA Mill -. i



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Pago 6-B *Jmi*M***w Friday, D*^. ines.s on Miami Beach. The bade is the daughter of Mrs. Thi re


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Page 6-A rJmlsli nirkBa*) Frida y-D^mbi 'ESCAPISM' DEWED Jewish Suburbia Seen As Response to Change r.ity'" of minority group members. K.rman said. "But the leaders ot I kal irinded groups should recvi-n-.te the (aet that the fir>t re ity of a family head. whether he belongs to a minority group or not. is to look out for the economic welfare of his family— to see that they pet their bread and butter. It seems to me that equal if not greater emphasis should be placed by volunteer agencies in the civil r chts field on equality of opportunity in employment for all minority group "members." At an earlier session "some per-. eeptible decrease" in discrimination against employment of Jews he life insurance industry was Continued from Patje 1-A portant reasons why Jews began moving to suburbs, not the least of which ere the factors associated with the increasing number of marriajts, larger families. changing housing needs, imeroved economic income. better transportation end the desire for improved status." He added that "1 is proper, however, to advise the minority who "escape" to the suburbs in or der to avoid contact ith non RM that the invasion of erstwhile white neighborhoods by nonwhins is only just beginning The improvement in opportunities (or non whites to acquire better odu reported. Bowever, the report emcation. technical AUK better jobs ohasired that "the ancient habit and higher status, "makes inevi: still pers able their o-.re for better hous Th^ ADL report revealed that; ing and living conditions." he asthe liberaliration in employment scrted. of Jewish executives has taken Pr Cordon noted that there are place primarily in sales functions. some people. "Jews and non-Jews but that there still appears to be alike, who will attempt to run from I "clear pattern of discrimination it all for awhile." He then predict against Jews" m home office po-, ed that within another decade sitioos. "In the branch offices, pnthere will be fewer places to which marily concerned with selling in1 • -escapists" can run. -What I have sirranee. 6 2 percent of all execo-| said." be added, "with respect to tive employees are Jewish." the, non whites applies equally to those report said "But in home offices. JERUSALEM — (JTA) — Israeli who are seeking to flee from com only 3 6 percent are Jewish." circles charged Monday that prommunities Into which Jews are mm-The ADL report, based on a • ises of massive American econons-' mg. We will all have to accept the study of seven major life insur> c aid—expected to exceed $100.-' .fact that we shall have to a nce companies which are a pnn000.000 during the coming year—! ccme to terms with reality. cipal factor in the industry, was had emboldened President Nasser t* rg Ferman. executive vice Presented at the opening session of the United Arab Republic to a man of the Presidents Com ,f l,s 46,n ,nnu *' !" *t.ng < the ?* New officers and board members of the Baron de Hirsch Loan Fund convene to outline plans for the coming year. Leo Eisenstein (seated second from right) is president of the agency which is one of the oldest beneficiaries of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. Also seated are Maurice M Young, treasurer; Dr. Michael Goodman, executive director of Jewish Vocational Service; and David M_ Standing are board members frviaqU Ben Giller, Morris Hoffman, Lloyd Charles Hertzoft Judge Frederick N. and Bennett M. Lifter. Not shown am president Leo Robinson, secretary Sknarl Pred. honorary treasurer Harry SnoTi board member Al Quadow. U.S. Aid May Make Nasser More FriskJ mittee on Government eontrac's. Savoy Hilton hotel. The studv pitch of bellicosity against 1 Israel and threats that he would. meeti i lound *"** that, even among k*/, 0 !" g*J"* !" *' *?" pn>l emptee. ,h 3 ***** *— ""ployed ^>"g with its Jordan Valley .mSkSW still the most basic and in •*•>>• home offices, twogatioo plans. crucial problem faced bv minor tv ,h,r tered" in jobs as President Nasser, it was said tret .'c*uarie>. dxtors. lawyers, or achere, considers the American aid. hence could not be w hich has already begun to flow d as administrative, front into his country", as an indication MB] r. equal:> in employment ition and n he digISRAEll RELIGIOUS STORE ui ssutnr samjts rot srmeoGuts t lextu soatn 1357 WASHINGTON AVL Jl 1-7722 : policy mak-ng e It netei that branch offices most apt to hire few* %Vre sales -re to be made in cities with larce Jewish populations Five of the -panieudied have both 1 home offices and saltbranches rrater New York In the New of extreme American eagerness to improve relations with the UAI Me, there t o* e, does not expect the United States to make any mov to head off the new antiIsraot Kate drive ho has launched. Informed Israelis tTnrtsstd conYork sales branches of these five %  t**t if Washington contrnoed conrpan.es." the report said. "10 to Pnr dollars into Cairo—and percent of executive personnel are *ome press reports today indicated Jews; m the home offices, onty'that the Aaaertcaa aid total might reach nS0JM.aV*-witlkot obtaining from Nasser any agreement on his part to avoid injury to Western interests in the Middle East, the net effect would be creation of new difficulties in the Middle East Nasser, they noted, had not only Parted a new campaign against Urael but had also raised the "Jerusalem question" in an effort to make trouble for the Kingdom of Jordan. Only the Soviet Union they said, would profit from fur ther disturbance in the area. bntime f Spriwfs Villas Carriage Ctab at Miami Springs \Ulas Will feature i. !" ,— ..._. will feature jaznime start g this weekend, as the Salt City S*x come m to begin the Parade of top i %  key dub .nter eu at the !*"**"** UFI MSNAMCT CO. m m V m *••"• *•* *. H V. "m IST* I?* ~ A T 4. \ \ S Ms S.W. 3rd aeeaaw. ftW • *4eH ar %  *-Wtl GOttON R00RN6 AND J |TAlW0tKINC: NOW YOU DUI FR 3-4605 THEN TO TEL AVIV TWs is TeJ Arlv*g Golden Jnbilee Year, and a golden opportunity for yea to enjoy *Jytn* at its Inest KLM will -peed yon non-step"s the Atlantic on a luxuriovs. foreagine DC-7C < Kosher foods available on all Mights). Then go direct lo TeJ Aviv. Or turn yowr trip into • grand tour with the KLM stepover plan Tisit London. Paris. Viefu*auRosse.aadahoss ef other historic cities-at no extra east! *od trip te Tel Aviv: MTT ?. UJmm Fi-t Class. •**te froaa Hoasioa sd New ***• %  •See year traveJ agent or c.U KLM: —In, i Hc-eJ, MS N E .5?* Stf^t. MsmasL Florssn. l



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Page 8-C +Jewlsi>norkMan Friday, Women's Auxiliary Sparks Nursing School, Other Medical Projects Women's Auxiliary of Mt. Sinai Hospital may be proud of its record of service to the hospital, as well as the patients who use the hospital's facilities. Providing volunteer services in many departments of the hospital is only one of the many important functions of the Auxiliary. But even more important, the women's group realized from the beginning that the need for good nursing care is the most vital part of its program. With this idea in mind, the lit. Sinai School of Practical Nursing was formed. The entire financial support of the school is the responsibility of Auxiliary members. The school is supported by the Snack Bar and the Gift Shop, run by volunteers of the Auxiliary. Another important feature is the provision of scholarships to the School of Nursing by the Auxiliary. In a volunteer capacity. Mrs. Morris Goldin. chairman of the advisory board to the school, has been closely affiliated with it from its inception. It was during her presidency that the school received its first national recognition and accreditation and still remain! the only school in the State of Florida to be accredited by the National Assn. for Practical Nursing Education, accredited by the Florida State Board of Nursing, as well as the Veterans Administration. When the first class in Practical Nursing was formed in September, 1951. there were six students enrolled. This past fall, the school accepted 50 students. After the initial year, four students graduated. Today, there is one class each year. Mrs. Carmen F. Ross, director of Nursing and Nursing Education, has been head of the school for the past six years, during which time she has seen over 150 students graduate. With the advent of the new building, the graduates can look forward to working in the new hospital under the best and most modem facilities. In this atmosphere, the best possible patientcare can be given while training with the most up-to-date equipment. From a report issued at the time of the 1959 capping ceremonies, this explains the reason for the many devoted hours of service to the School of Practical Nursing given by the Women's Auxiliary of Mt. Sinai: "The Women's Auxiliary of Mt Sinai feels that its support has made possible one of the finest practical nursing programs in the country, that it helps safeguard the patient and nursing Max Orovite. president of Mt. Sinai, recently board of trustees of the hosoitol is. honored the women who over a span of ten Kautfman. Mrs. Harold Sonet M' years have presided over ML Sinai Women's Goldin. Mrs. Louis Glasser Mrs ML?I note and Mrs. Philip Lefkowitz. who?* years have presided Auxiliary. Left to right, and in the order of their office tenure, are Mrs. Max Dobrin, founder-president and a member of the first holds office in her second term. care not only st Mt. Sinai Hos* pital but throughout the country, since many of the graduates return to their home communities." Mrs. Philip Lefkowitz. president of the Women's Auxiliary of Mt. Sinai, reports that in addition to manning the Snack Bar and Gift Shop, the women, known as "Pink Ladles,'* also serve in many other capacities and departments In the hospital. Among other duties, they work at the Information Desk, pharmacy. Blood Bank, library, as nurses aides, nursing da vettes, and in the Out P_ Emergency Uiniei. TtoL given many hours of faMi vice—46,000 hours in ~ look forward to their activity in the nee fed the Mt. Sinai Hospital Federation Plans for Community Health Greater Miami Jewish Federation is the community's central planning and fund-raising organization. Mt. Sinai Hospital is one of the major local affiliates of Federation. The history of Mt. Sinai HosReddy is "good medicine" at MT. SINAI HOSPITAL Reddy Kilowatt your electrical servant works for Mt. Sinai Hospital, just as he does for every modern business and every modern home. Keeps on the job 24 hours a day and does his chores in the cleanest possible way. Saves valuable man-hours ... in kitchens, labs, laundry and everywhere. Performs wonders at the flick of a switch. There's no match for Reddy still the biggest bargain in town FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT CO. HELPING BUILD FLORIDA pital would not be complete without mentioning its close ties with the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. From the very beginning. Federation has contributed in everincreasing measure to the hospital's yearly income in order to help cover the operational deficit resulting from the care of the medically indigent. It is not a conincidence that the majority of Mt. Sinai's Founders and trustees are active in the Federation in which several of them occupied the presidency. When plans were presented for the new building, it was Stanley C. Myers, then president of Federation, who came forward to announce that the project would be sponsored Jointly by Federation and ML Sinai. When fund raising for Mt. Sinai began to detract from Federation's annual Combined Jewish Appeal, a joint decision was reached in October. 1W. which was hailed as "a great forward step in the unification of community fund raising and cooperation in the family of Federation acencies toward improved planning for the health and welfare needs of Greater Miami." Noting the joint action. The Jewish Floridian in an editorial stated that "this may TBJJ contribute to knitunj tit I that has unfortunately the minds of many who consider tbenuehaj pital people' rather thai of the total Jewish Indicating the extent 1*1 eration a-sistance to kV, are these eloquent fipmsj 183.000: 1951. $93,000: 19311 664; 1953. $114.581 St: $125.00402: 1955, $18,* 1956. $151,666.66; 1987, 166.87; 1958. $198,000. It is principally here ttatl eration's yearly eoatrflisijj being applied: to enable sir to perform the ctmtasslM ice for which it was belli which it is pledged in ib| expanded environment. As one of seven Fl health, welfare and agencies in Greater Mi*e\j Sinai Hospital is an community planning %  ordinated mani.er for 1st I development of J.--7-I its funds and projraau li.'y the totality of P spons.bilr.v toward tb* ment of Jewish We I coun:> Congratulations... METRO TILE COMPANY CERAMIC TILE CONTRACTOR DECORATIVE TILE COIAMMCIAL RESIDENTIAL; ;,l € T 2451 N.W. 77th Terrace OX 6-0711



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ceraber 11. 1959 +Jewist> fhriUtr \enwald Raps Warburg Speech Page 7-A lied from Pafl* 1-A rfsracl and the United ild. who from 1955 to. lie general chairman of impaign, named the ies which receive funds UJA. He said these rst, the Jewish Agency: the "philanthropic orUJA national chairman i funds Th. said alto that any mumHlau Lu IZT'" "*" 1 Wr uch *—+ An^HcanJowtJinXr^ | *2LT2S*? JL !!*-* to close its doors to further •reignty. "It is Israel's rfLTZi ry W,M '* %  %  of newcomers in Is-, (stressed "this is a vast, ig housing, farm settlerial service and other to the refugees whoi imed in." open or close its doors as it chooses," he added. He stressed, however, that the major force responsible for the mass influx which has the responsi of refugees from European and the transportation and' Moslem lands into Israel "has been the inner urge on the part of Jews, living in fear under dograding disabilities, in an atmosphere charged with danger to their physical security, or under conditions which make it impossible for them to live as Jews." The UJA leader stressed that it was the policy of the organization to aid Jews to go wherever they have a free choice to go. He pointed out that UJA funds had helped tens of thousands of Jewish refugees and displaced persons to come to the United States, Canada, Australia and other areas. He added, however, that "Israel has been the only haven to which Jews can go in large numbers. In fact, it stands unique as the only haven in the world for large numbers of refugees." Mr. Rosenwald pointed out that the burden of receiving nearly 1.000.000 Jewish refugees into Israel since 1948 has not been borne by American Jews alone. He declared that Israel "itself has been called upon every year during the pas! decade to pour millions and millions of pounds obtained from Israel'^ own heavily taxed people into helping absorb the newcomers." j. He told his audience "for Israel to have barred its doors to these people and Mr the United Jewish Appeal to have withheld its help in transporting these Jews to Israel would have violated every decent instinct that we, as Jews, possess." Earlier in the week, Sen. Jacob K. Javits, New York Republican, asserted that charges by "Arab propagandists and other critics" that contributions to the UJA were "tantamount" to contributions to; the Government of Israel were "baseless." He spoke at a meeting of the Men's Club of Temple Israel in Lawrence, L. I. Senator Javits told the Man's Club in Lawrence that "contrary to what is charged, th* United Jewish Appeal does not raise money for th* State of Israel. Its Rosenwald said, UJA "th* American Joint Committee, which and rehabilitation pro25 countries outside of 4* added that th* JDC ducts • special welfare Israel known as Malf behalf of th* sick, th* th* handicapped immilsra*l." ^d recipient of UJA funds. is the New York Assn. kmcricans, which has the ity for Jewish refugees to America and who [the New York metropolis The fourth UJA benerccent years has been Ilias Service which reps who are able to imo countries other than i leader declared, "when lutes to the UJA he does Be understanding that his il! l>e used for humanitarases-ilbr rescuing lives, i.ng the homeless with a residing health to the uivinj^hope to the aged [•handicapped, for providIntralned with vocational' for giving fellow Jews [the basic necessities of Jald stressed that the phiefforts of the United ^licy "to help others less than ourselves, both by nditure of governmental by private philanthropy. i." he pointed out, "has tied the implication that Isarily support the gov; of the countries in which |ple who receive this help example, when the Unigave the Russian people High the Hoover Relief ; no one suggested that stituted endorsement of Ism in Russia." fcONG DISTANCE LOVING •rULvm lines [points in the country KATES CHEERFULLY WITHOUT CHARGE K*H.H.VAK prss, INC. N.W. 24th Avenue 196 MIAMI overseas relief in 25 countries and the resettlement and reharhfs Since go to Israel, n* largest percentage of UJA funds is spent there." ^Commenting that the UJA was "as indigenous to American philanthropy as it is to, Jewish philanthropy," Sen. Javits said that the UJA was "a voluntary association whose essence is voluntary giving by Jews all over the country and in other lands through their local community organizations, and at the behest of their local community leaders." The pattern which guided the UJA, he said, "is as American as the town meeting. It is the same general pattern as that followed by Catholic and Protestant philanthropic and missionary organizations." To Welcome New Members Some 130 new members will be welcomed into the congregational family of Temple Beth Sholom at a special service in their honor on Friday evening, according to Zach ary F. Bailey, membership chairman. Rabbi Leon Kronish has prepared a special ritual for the occasion, and an Oneg Shabbat will be tendered the new members after the service. Hosts are Mr. and Mrs. Alvin B. Lowe. Judge Harry Arthur Greenberg is Temple president. Detroit Social Club Detroit Social Club of Greater Miami will have its 11th annual Chanuka party Monday evening, Dec. 21, in the Rubaiyat room of the Algiers hotel. Cantor Meyer Gisser, of Temple Zamora, will bless the candles and present a musical program. 1 M Gov. LeRoy Collins proclaims Dec. 21 to 27 as Yeshiva University Week in Florida. With Gov. Collins is Ruby Diamond, a Yeshiva sponsor. Sunday, Dec. 27, will mark the Greater Miami celebration of Yeshiva's fourth annual Charter Day Dinner. Israel Lone Dissenter at UN Continued from Page 1-A peated that Israel is not a party to such an understanding. My delegation has therefore voted against this paragraph and abstained on the resolution as a whole." Comay stressed that the Israeli vote did not "imply any reservation" regarding the mandate and operations of UNRWA, and explained that Israel had restrained from supporting the resolution for other reasons. He pointed out that "while no substantial "progress has been made in solving the refugee problem, at least the only possible direction in which to solve it has become clarified over many years of international experience with it." The main solution, he declared, "lies in the integration of the refugees into the economic life of the Arab world and their final absorption among their Arab brethren." YOUR MONEY'S WORTH Don't put it off put it on Re-Roof ** WRITTEN •UARANTH I • LICENSED INSURED I PAYMENTS ARRANGED -AT root mricr Re-Roofing & Repairing New MEDICAL Offices WASHINGTON FEDERAL Miami Beach PALM SPRINGS PROFESSIONAL BUILDING Corner W. 49th St. (N.W. 103rd St.) and W. 8th Ave., Hialeah For Free Istimota PHONE OX MOT ACME SUPPLY CO. 2670 N.W. 75th ST In Hialeah's Most Exclusive Locale" IDEAL OPPORTUNITY FOR MEDICAL SPECIALISTS THESE NEW OFFICES offer the medical specialist, Ophthalmologist, and other professionals an opportunity to locate in exclusive Palm Springs, in Hialeah, in the city that is Dade County's second largest with over 70,000 residents ... the offices will be only one and a half miles east of the new Palmetto expressway, the hub of the densely populated Palm Springs area. Young families with growing incomes and growing children will be desirous of finding and getting their medical care close to home The new Professional building is adjacent to a spanking new 300,000 square foot shopping center with national tenants. FEBRUARY OCCUPANCY. WRITE, PHONE OR WIRE FOR COMPLETE DETAILS Florida Home Realty Sales, Inc., 5360 Palm Ave., Hia. Eve. and Weekends TU 7-7913 \ \



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Page 16-C +Je*i&.ntrMk*n Captain of a Continued from Pago 4-C tec of the Community Chest in 1946, 147 and 1948, and also ., director of the organization i 1 many years. Lff was president of the Great % %  er Miami Jewish Federation from 1945 through 1947. and sin re then was mad* an honorary president, lie iaV* a Mason and a Shrinar. OrovJtz lias been a president of TWnple Israel of Miami and a director of the citizens' board JheUnitaAfil vnmm of < 1858. Aside from tj b usin s. rtimk1 sUunch fanulii ned to the fc, ^ fiber ol m ren Ji mw ^" He maiauan a rii nd hi$ Beach for Keeping the community informed about ML Sinai Hospital's progress is a constant preoccupation of the Women's Auxiliary and Nursing Department. Here they cooperate in the presentation of the Mt. Sinai story at the Ocean Front Auditorium. Left to right are Pink Ladies Tracy Auspitz, Kay Daspin and Lillian Shaw. Center is Mrs. Carmen Ross, director of Nursing and Nursing Education. Student nurses, now licensed practical nurses, are Wanda Cluett, L. Wilton, Barbara Hawley. Mary Dizon and Ruth Adslui. Busy Nurses' Director to be Even Busier These arc hectic days for Carmen Ross, who is Mt. Sinai Hospital's director of Nursing and Nin-in. Education. Bestdesyher obligations to supervise the running of a hospital in full operation, -he has to schedule her day —and nightt to hold training sions with her present staff an.I many newcomers in the new building, to orientate them in their new surroundings, and to familiarize them with the many technical facilities which they will encounter and which are destined to make the nurses' hi i •Aster. Actually, in the new huHrltnr each floor is a hospital in itself in which the nurses' working area is condensed in a triangle forming the core of the patient floor. Each patient will pull a string to be connected by the nurses' audio-visual call to the nurses' station. The nurse*-, on the other hand, can talk at will to the patient without visiting his room Part of the Internal setup are the head mines' oflice. a nur •at 1 loOBfC, two medication and drug roomone examination and conference mom, and the stainless steel shehes for linen and other supplies, plus storage space I r wheelchairs and stretcher bed-. There is also a completely equipped pantry Mrs. Ross became associated with Mt Sinai in 1952. and late in November. 1953, she was appointed director of Nursing Education, after having been a nur sing education consultant and public health coordinator with the Tuberculosis and Health Assn., and having acted as ad >r to approximately 56 scr-ools of nursing and hospitals in the Greater New York area. At the time, she was also teaching preventive medicine in evening classes a' the University of Miami. She holds a BS degree in N irsmg Education and an MA degree from Columbia I'nivcrsity. In December. 1955. a high honor was bestowed on Mrs. Ross, when she was selected as one of a half dozen nurses throughout the nation to draft a state examination series for practical nurses. In her new environment, she will head an enlarged nursing staff, as well as a vastly-increased student body. The area of her domains will have tripled their surface. Congratulations... KARL FREll • STONE and MARBLE • MARBLE PARTITIONS • DRESSING BOOTHS • 2842 S.W. 61th Avenct MO 1-2697 —. lAJith Jhe {-compliments of IPCC HOSPITAL SUPPLY CORPORATION



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Page 16-A ^JcnisHhrkMnn Outstanding Citizens' Award Committee Sifts Nominees for Tuesday Presentation The 13th annual Pad* county •Outstanding Citizens" Award' will be presented Tuesday at a special luncheon, according to Sanford M. Swerdlin. chairman of the awards committee. This is the oldest continuing award of it< kind in the entire area. Honored guests at the luncheon will be the recipients of the award in past years. A man and woman will be selected for the current award, to be presented at the luncheon. Judna* a*. Frd K. Shoctwt, •ditor and swbiisftar o* Th JewMi Floridian; Ralph Renkfc. vice avwsManr in chars* mi: WTVJ-TV; Georff* &>**> &f managing •ditor, Miami Herald; and Swardlin. Each of the past recipients of the award has been invited to submit a nomination, and civic and fraternal groups of Dade county are also invited to submit nominations. Among early nominees are J N. McArthur. well-known community ieader; Mrs. Robert Z. Greene, national chairman of the Damon Runyon Auxiliary: and Richard B. Gerstein. State Attorney. As in past years, patron of the affair is Joseph M. Lipton. presi dent of Dade Federal Savings and Loan Assn. and B'nai B'rith. Swerdlin said the luncheon will be held at the Everslades hotel, beginning at noon Among the other members of the award committee are Sidney H. Palmer. Sholem Lodge. Ed Ml Sinai Hospital Founders Continued from Pago ISA the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. He is a member and past president of Pi Lambda Phi social fraternity He also was a member of Florida State Hospital Ad1'ouncil. Wien has resided in Miami Beach for 23 years and is a member of Temple Emanu-El. He is married to the former Marjone Feterson. and they have three children. Carole Perhnutter. Josephine and Leonard, jr Mrs. Wien serves as chairman of the Women's Division of the Mt. Sinai Development Fund. • • • Lawn W a H xn — Founder and trustee. Widely-known for his business and philanthropic activities. Wolf son has been and is still actively associated with auch organizations as president and chairman of the board of the Merrit-Czupman A Scott Corporation, chairman of the board of the New York Shipbuilding Corporation, chairman of the board of Capitol Transit Company, of Devoe and Raynoids Corporation, preaadent of the Newport Steel Corp.. and Utah Radio Production Company. He is a partner in National Theatre Enterprises. Bay Theatre, and in Allied Enterprises. He is chairman of the board of trustees of the Wotfson Family Foundation. Inc He is a member of the Woodmount Country Club. Washington. DC. of Westview Country Club, of Jefferson Island Onto, of Economic Club o! York, and Gridiron Club of the University of Miami. He has held office as member of the board of directors of the Georgia Stwdent Education Fund, and board of directors of Boys Estate in Brunswick. Ga. Married to the former Florence Ruth Monsky. their children are Marcia Elise. Stephen Paul. Gary Warren, and Martin Daryl Wolf %  H Mitchell Wolfsan— Founder and trustee. Co-owner of Wometco Theatres and president of television station WTYJ. Wolf son is a native Floridian. born in Key West. He is a former mayor of Miami Beach, and has served on .:>• Council. During World War II. he was awarded both the French and Belgian Croix de Guerre and the Bronze Star. He has been a director of Miami's YMHA. Miami Beach Chamber of Commerce, has served as president of the budget board of Dade County Community Chest, was vice president, director and chairman of the board of directors of the Motion Picture Theatre Owners of America. He is a member of th Miami Beach Rotary Club. Mason. Elk and Sbriner. He is also, a member of the Variety Club, vice president of Westview Country Hub. Ashevdle Country Club. and Harmonic Club of New York. He is married to the former Frances Cohen. Their children are Louis Wotfson. II. Mitchell, jr and Frances Louise. JOSXM UPTON Klein. Robert Lewison. Ronald Lipton. M. L. Clements. Irving Saal. Joseph Ra'yvis and Staaley Caidin. Organizational nominations for the award should be sent to the Outstanding Citizens Award Com-: mittee. 819 Seybold bldg.. Miami 32, Fla. In making the awards, primary consideration is given to the overall contribution made by the men and women nominated to the general good and welfare of the com1 munity of Dade county. Carillon Mows Ad AfMcy E. J. Scheaffer and Associates Advertising Agency has been appointed by the Carillon hotel to handle the hotel's nat.onal advertising account. Israel to Issue New Stamps JERUSALEM——All Israel postage stamps and air letters will be withdrawn Jan. 1 when new ones are issued following the start of circulation last week of new Israel money. The new legal ten der la based on a division of the Israel pound into 100 agorot in stead of 1.000 prutot. The pruta has been the smallest unit of Israeli currency since the establishment I of Israel. The new banknotes became legal tender this we ek but will not enter circulation through the banks : until next Sunday when they will progressively replace present bank notes at par value exchange. The| Post Office said transitional: stamps will be issued starting Jan. 1 until completion of printing of the new stamps and air letters Old stamps and air letters will be exchangeable far new at any post office. I Decoration of the new currency bears modern figures, including a girl soldier on the half-pound note The reverse sides have Biblical and archaeological themes. The ten-pound note shows a scientist with a teat tube, while the other side depicts a Dead Sea scroll opened at a verse from Isaiah— "comfort ye, my people." Wefr Direct,,! Mon.hlv „^1 t vfn,n 8 SarfZ.1 featured spe^J >watt. director O(M5] ami Planmne vTjl George W. VuntZj German. Kennit,, Crown. GoldoRey She'll Keep | Centtow.^, ; Foreign "hlia. j r ***al*. it WM )M •• &f •vary tan as*. M Mtiri^ assurances inn David BerMknoi U, be no interferes^ a, authority ai Porejl any other Minuter ft It was reported tfc] had repeatedly t activities of the L as tantamount u>u Foreign Ministry's i She was aswre) I member other thai Prime Minimi ted to make foretj j ments and that as I fields relatiag to would be utea proval. I 1 aflfieis OPEN ALL NIGHT COMPLETE HALLMARK SUNDRIES CMamTsa GREETING CARD MTBfT MKMn DEPARTMENT KBOMCAU asm HOWARD CHOCOLATE JOHNSON'S SHOPPE ICE CREAM Phone JE 8-5538 1664 ALTON ROAD %  EACH $ GORDON FUNERAL HOME FR 3-3431 RaUL. M4w 718 S.W. 12th km. When you open a savings account at either of Flagler Federal's two conver>| ient offices youll receive one of these i beautiful gifts* Free. o •/• %  & • WITH NEW ACCOUNTS OF **BO OR M RE 1. GE ELECTRIC CLOCK with ailj.aUalai alarm ... Acearota and *"*" t ARPEGB PERFUME BY LANVIN—Pwswa saw in b—rifwl goad and ba*s GENUINE DBTECTO BATHROOM SCALE in awanatatal bathroom whUtWITH NEW ACCOUNTS OF -lOO OR NjjJJ' BEAUTIFUL 16-PC. 8BT OF CHINA • M-PC. TABLEWARE ***'^jf^* ELECTRIC COFFEE PERCOLATOR* f TSBTOAIA" GLASSES • M* w j CARAFE • QUART THERMOS BOTTLE. FREE TRANSFER OF FUNDS fro*r*^** 1 %C FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OP MIAMI



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Page 10-A -JmistrkrkMan Ambassador's entourage arriving at the DipA. Cantor, general chairmen of the Greater lctic Ball last Saturday at the Fontarnebleau Miami Israel Bond committee. William Bornhotel is greeted by Dennis James (left), teleslein. chairman of arrangements (or the ball, vision star. Lett to right are James. Ambassaand Jacob Sher. honorary chairman ol the dor Avraham Harmon. Samuel Oritt and Jack Israel Bond committee. Indian Succeeds 2,000 Turn Out in Glittering Fj To Welcome Ambassador HarmaiitS Glitter and glamor, highlighted „ion of "in. ,. by Hollywood and television and ren andfc„^ : "l •tars and noted rxraona liUe s in y ^n. government and the socialworH V 1 "'P^matic aj prevailed at the Diplomatic Ball under au - MIAMI XJSirf U llfiOK P-evde-' 5 '"^^^r^r^s^e* Convenient Offices Sent* Dode County RESOCRCES EXCEED 140 MILLION DOLLAKS Groups to Instoll installation dinner dance by Workmen's Circle eakmg Branch 1050 .if Mia ni %  rcle English-Speaking Branch 1059 of MiBesch on Sunday at the Al|Mn hagaj. Master of ceremonies will be Al Shukat. and Phil.p We-.ner wdl in stall the new officers for the com mg year. Officers to be installed are: Branch 1050 Miami chairman. Mrs Philip Werner: vice chair man. Mary Weis>. financial secretary. Harry Scbuliiner; treasurer Mrs John Layton; recordukg secretary. Mrs. Harry Schuldmer corresponding secretary. Ida Pos ton: hospitaler. Mrs. Sam Groav man. Branch 1059 of Miami Beachchairman. Mrs. Max Greenberg; tirst vice chairman. Mrs Abraham Haiduck; second vice chairman, Stanley Brady; financial secretary Louie Jay SOB; treasurer. Mrs. Isadore Newman; recording ~retary. Mrs. Harry Green; cor responding secretary. Mrs. Louie .^ ; Bd • oc, e tmtknm Goodwill Croup of Greater Miami, will give a luncheon and card P*rty Thursday noon, Dec 17 at 1947 W. Flagler st tmm thr R TW BI. imm J *J JaJca **d s mtaiiad WHI tut loojs low —iltwr ••J MM; hit *mory in ife* : nor. htsanxitr loo for *• kaMMdul l)tpKV MI ikit ptenn by Ik* SanombnakM ffa>a IUrrn). t n tAJJf MOMfT rot TOW MVOMTf CHAtlU T IAIT %  NoM • •'l^a>JJssrTheatre %  Wtyl H is wortfc a %  %  earest dtf what* K is phryasff. Sptcrt caasi*trtti-J* H greeps. Per l.rthir insssaiatiia. writ* t. tw* US %  Mtk "w* (WRDIIN HESIOff-.IMX HtWIfflB + mam memom-am****** a* oOiH mm >^SHOU ATnmmi n mim rams LINCOLN tSB;: —.^ JEWersos U** THEATER *-**, WtD. IVt. DIC. 23rd ll



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:ember 11. 1959 +Jmlsii Florid fan i. JACK ABUM lack Ablin Hostess ck Ablin will open her 42 No. Bay rd. to all new ers and life trustees on fioon, Dec. 17, in behalf reater Miami Women's Jewish Home for the Ablin Memorial bldg. iic at Douglas Gardens fcte to Mrs. Ablin's late luncheon and book reIrs. I. M. Weinstein are ernoon's program. ^vid Phillips, life chairIrs. Sol Silverman, preswelcome guests. Mrs. fanenbaum is assisting ips with reservations. ORT Chapters Slate Programs Special ORT Sabbath services will be held .Friday evening at Temple Beth Sholem, of Holly, wood, with Rabbi Samuel Lerer officiating. The service will lake"note of' the contribution of Organization for Rehabilitation Through Training to the upbuilding of indigent Jews throughout the world. • • • Northwest chapter of Women's American ORT held a membership tea this week at the Balmoral ho'tel. Featured were an award-winning documentary, "Mellah," and a fashion show by Mai Marshall. In charge was Mrs. Dan Sternlicht. • • • North Dade chapter of ORT will hold a book review program Thursday evening, Dec. 17, at the First Federal Bank bldg., 9th ave. and 125th St. Abraham Gittleson, education director of Monticello Park Jewish Center, will review "This is My God," by Herman Wouk. Mrs. Norman Morgenstern is president of North Dade ORT. Program is dedicated to Jewish Book Month. • • • First prize for girls went to little Ellyn Pat Solis, six months old, of 622 NE 80th St., whose red hair and hazel eyes stole the show in the Charming Child Contest sponsored by the Southeast region of Women's American ORT at a bazaar at Hibiscus Auditorium last weekend. First prize for boys went to six ; year-old David Wilkes, of 8859 Emerson. Judges were Mrs. Arnold Perlstein, director of the Women's Division, Greater Miami Jewish Federation; Lawrence Thompson, Miami Herald columnist; and Myron Kaplan, publisher of Turnpike Guide. Page 5-B Miamian Gifts Beauty Shop w 'octal iith a Flair... THE lEAUVILLE tie Catering Facilities [that Special Parly i in an elegant fashion piliin a luxurious etting that will ct your good taste. )NFIRMAT!ONS [RECEPTIONS WEDDINGS BANQUETS MEETINGS PARTIES Tete-a-tetf or a Rala rcK'liration Lwith 3.500J guests BILL r GOLDRING> CATERING WKCTO* p*rvised Kother (ring Available INE: UN 5-8511 .'UAN 67th r0 !.9thST',. 'AMI-BEACH DAVID WILKtS Beth Israel Ladies to Meet Monthly meeting of the Sisterhood of Beth Israel Congregation will be held Tuesday noon in the synagogue. Miss Doreen Sakrais, formerly of New York City, who has appeared at numerous Bonds for Israel functions at the Fontainebleau and other hotels locally, will head a musical program. She will be accompanied at the piano by Mrs. R. Sakrais. While in New York, Miss Sakrais played the lead in "Ruth and Naomi." Rabbi H. Louis Rottman, spiritual leader, will discuss the historic aspects of Chanuka. Members celebrating their birthdays during the month of December will be hostesses for the meeting. Mrs. George Hechter is president, and Mrs. Alexander Moscovits is program chairman. INS SATURDAY. DEC. 12th PARI-MUTUEL BETTING U.I. 1 AT DANIA (\ fATIOMSi MIAMI n MM • FT. urauuu iHiiwn w MMI Women Presidents On Agency Tour New presidents of women's organizations have been invited on a bus tour of health and welfare agencies served by the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. The four-hour inspection trip, which was rained out several weeks ago by Miami's five-inch tropical storm, will be held Thursday, Dec. 17, from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., it has been announced by Mrs. George Simon, chairman of the educational project. "Nearly 200 leaders of top women's groups made the trip last year and were so exhilarated with what they saw, that we are repeating the program in 1959," said Mrs. Jean C. Lehman, president of the sponsoring organization. Air-conditioned buses will leave promptly at 9:30 a.m. from the offices of Federation, 424 Lincoln In., Miami Beach, and proceed to the new Mt. Sinai Hospital, the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center, Jewish Home for the Aged, and other Federation agencies. The presidents will be encouraged to ask questions of their guides, who will be executive directors of the various agencies. At Douglas Gardens, Dr. Michael Goodman, executive director of Jewish Vocational Service, will conduct a tour through the sheltered workshop. Arthur Kalish, assistant executive director of the Jewish Home for the Aged, will take the group through the newly-constructed pavilions and the University of Miami research laboratory on the grounds of the Home. Other guides for the tour will include Louis Schwartzman, executive director of the Bureau of Jewish Education; Maxwell Fassler, supervisor of Jewish Family and Children's Service; and Emanuel Tropp, assistant executive director of the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center. When the doors of the new Mi. Sinai Hospital of Greater Miami open, its facilities will include a fully-anuipped beauty shop. The shop has been presented to the hospital by Albert Hirsch, of Royal"Palm Beauty Supply Company, and will be operated on a profit basis by the Ladies' Auxiliary of the hospital. fiirsch previously donated a Similar shop to the Jewish Home for the Aged. He is a past p roc Wn dent and board member of the Temple Israel Men's Club, on the charity committee of the Shrine, vice president of Jewish Vocational Service, and board member of Miami Beach Music and Arts League. .' Have that Business Meeting, Banquet, or Special Occasion You'll find complete facilities to exactly satisfy your needs in the Kismet, Aladdin, Scheherazade and Rubaiyat Rooms, be it for a wedding or a private parly! I for Information: HAZEL ALLISON Catering Director, JE 1-6061 26th St. A Collins Ave. THE FINEST FOR YOUR AFFAIR Your choice of the following roomtt EMBASSY • VICTORIA • BRIGADOON KING'S TERRACE • ARGYLE • HEATHER Surroundings of elegance and luxury, faultless service and incomparable cuisine. Croups of 10 lo 475 are accommodated royally for all catered occasions. For moniri and information loll] Karl Wtill Coloring Dirottw UN 6-7792 HOTEl • POOL On-Premiioi Parking BALMORAL CAIANA CIU SIX ACRES ON THE OCEAN AT 98th STREET • MIAMI BEACH A



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iber 11, 1959 +JewlsUFk)ricUari *#?**& of his friendship for Israel and his support of tBond campaign. Roman Catholic Archbishop BerB eil (center), of Chicago, receives a 4,000-year-old re pitcher from the State of Israel. The presentaby Israel Ambassador Avraham Harman (right), at a banquet attended by more than 2,000 leading at which Archbishop Sheil was honored as Chi9 Israel Bond "Man of the Year." At left is Col. rey, of Chicago and Miami Beach, banquet chair[ honorary chairman of the Greater Chicago comf Israel Bonds. ult to Invest Millions lew Egypt Auto Plant -(JTA)—The Renault concern has promised ', 8,000,000 pounds ($22.new plant for conassembly of Renault pt, the Cairo Radio relayrecently cancelled a assembly of its Dauat the Kaiser-Frazer jifa, Israel, in order to yal of its name from Bycott ef firms doing Israel. Radio said that Ren fentatives in that city [that Renault had not the car assembly operUa but had also broken commercial tics with usalem it was reported g Monday that several Israel Ministries wore studying the possibility of establishing a government-owned automobile plant to help fill the gap created by the cancellation by Renault of assemblies in Israel. Such an enterprise, if it jnaterializ.-s. would be along the pattern of development companies in Israel in which the Government makes the basic investment and then invites private investors as partners, the report said.) Goodman Group Plans Meeting Next regular meeting of the I. R. Goodman group of Hadassah will beJield..on Wednesday evening at the Barcelona hotel. Miss Polly Gershon, president, will discuss the Festival of Chanuka. Program chairman Misss Lillian Goodman, will show a Hadassah film, "The People of Israel Live." Miss Frances Lebon will highlight "Youth Aliyah," major project of Hadassah, which to date has saved the lives of over 90,000 children in Israel. The group will also have a night club party at the Casablanca hotel on Saturday evening. In charge of reservations is Mrs. Irving Bernstein, chairman. Mt. Sinai Opening Slated Sunday Continued from Pag* 1-A recognition of his contributions to the hospital. Program will also include an address by Sam J. Heiman, president of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, and Max Orovitz, president of the hospital for the past 12 years. Rabbi Irving Lehrman, spiritual leader of Temple Emanu-El, will offer the dedicatory prayer, and Rev. Wally Scott, pastor of the Congregational Church of Lincoln Road, will present the benediction A special dais will be erected en the north side of the new building, on which about 80 personalities, including the mayors of Miami and Miami Beach and mem bers of Miami Beach City Counj cil and Metropolitan Commission j will sit together with state repre' sentatives and invited guests. A special reserved section for i invited guests, Founders, trustees, | members of the medical and administrative staff, and department beadi will accommodate about 350, %  while nearly 2,500 seats will be oprn to the general public. >up to /Meet iHebrew-speaking group liami Beach, will meet lening at Temple Ner |>b Spielman, secretary, Theodor Herzl and RNJA'S >NICA-, Nit California'! Worldflocking the Blue Pacifie •ti the MO. Twenty minute* al Airport. 490 luxurious Blows, all with television and onvention facilities. Banquet l_.000. air-conditioned, belting oom and Cantonese Room. 0 pool Beautiful grounds and aped gardens. Rates from $• ^ William W. OenneUr.Oea.Mgr. S.A..nJ In HAWAII SAGLIA >F GOOD LIVING SAGUA, JR., SAGLIA HOTELS |ICA, CALIF. Hesel AUP. Hstel Warn) CALIF. Hetelmiajmm Ui. Hotal FreeclKea 10. H.HI Ferl lew O.C. Hotel %  CONN. Hotel I ,'A. HeM r O. HeM Metee CUT Hotel KM fetter Hotel W.IUM etHmere %  Ih/Plm. Ay*atf=oo SEABOARD %  i t NORTH! GOING NORTH? Make sure it's a pleasure trip-carefree, comfortable and smart! Step aboard our Silver Meteor or Silver Star and relax in spacious lounge and tavern cars as well as in your own reserved Pullman or Coach (accommodation... enjoy choosing your own meals and mealtime. Taking the children!they'll soon make friend* with the Registered Nurse. The afternoon "Hospitality Hour" ia a pleasant treat for all. And your ticket includes a most generous luggage allowance Hay we reserve an automobile fot you at your Northern destinationt Obtain and use your convenient RAIL TRAVEL CREDIT CARD. rOR PULLM.N ND OE LUXE COACH TO NEW YORK, wtSHIttCTON, PHILADELPHIA AMOTMER N0RIMERM CITIES — Hesse phone FRanklln 1-6611 or call In person, 173 E. Flejler St., 2206 ItV 7th Ave., Miami, 1553 Washington Ave., Miami Beath; 1240 S.E Elsventh Ave., Hlsleah: West Hollywood ITvd., Hollywood*• > %  FICHT, d.P.A. 1HE ROUTE OF ni-M'i SERVICE NOW TWO BEST SELLING PAPERBACKS i( \Jbe JZecjal Encyclopedia /c


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eember 11. 1959 SAL NOTICE •Jcn>lst) fk>rMinn Pace 11-B %  %  —' riCE UNDER |OUS NAME LAW HEREBY GIVEN that Id, ii. filing to engage In r the fictitious name of [DECORATOR*, at 6885 ., Miami Intends to regm wiih the clerk of the fof I'Mill' County, Florida. BOL GOLDSTEIN LYONS [ Applicant Blvd. 11/20-27. 12/4-11 iTICE UNDER (lOUS NAME LAW l...li,.l:Y GIVEN that lug to enK.igc In the ficllUoui name o A. -ii IT fctDOKI \v. 3rd Avenue, Miiimi, s to register said name oi the mint Court „ %  Florida. %  U.S. Sole Owner fr'TN t | Owner Building L>l 1-1:. 12/11-1 8-25,1/1 )TICE UNDER IOUS NAME LAW HEREBY GIVEN that ped, desiring to engage %  pi the fictitious num.' c.l ,'N BAR at 7305 Bird Fla., intends to ie ui, Fla.. Int. mis I ild name with the Clerk ii c, nt of Dude County. tEN. INC.. a Fla. Corp. S'ole i iv %  •"i:< ivs' IN Applicant Trust Bldg. 12/11-11-.' :E TO CREDITORS )UNTY JUDGES' COURT FOR DADE COUNTY, IDA IN PROBATE, No. 477&5-A ITAIi: oi'KRITE 1X>RETTA I.l>. I |ltors ami .\ll Persona Ilavor Demands Against Bald each of you, are hereby B-wlt: i IS, ,.f BUNCIIE PARK, felon, according to the Plni lecorded In Plat Book 50. Jof the I'ublic Records of intv. rToTM nils. ICE BY PUBLICATION %  THICK. C VSTEl.l. DEAR i DEATRICE (" UJTELL Rl'Sland JESSE RUSSELL, hueI of i:. iatell i "ear Beatrice Caatell Russell; if any of ilie above n uned Tlanis he dead, the heirs, e,-grantees, creditors, and Irtles claiming Interest by, |h, under or against the ] named Defendants; the unspmise of any of the aboVe Defendants and all pariwn or unknown, having or pig to have aay right, title (rest In and to the fidlowlng bed property situate, lying king in Dade Countv. Florida, : Lot ft, Block 26, of BIN 1 ARK. a subdivision, accordthe Plat thereof recorded ft Hook 50, Page 20 of the Records of Dade County, tND EACH OF YOU. are otlfled that a complnlnt for Jm nf forged deed has been tlnst you. and you are re%  serve a oopy of your answer |lngs to the complaint for f>n of for-ed deed on nlalnttrnev, RMANUBL I EVEN ne Building, Miami la. and file the original snI'l' sdlne. In the office ,,f the the above styled Court on the nth day of January, If you fall to do so, judgII he tiken against you fur demanded In Ihe complaint at Miami. Florida, this Srd fcemher. A I : C'erk. court. Dade Countv. Florida K \! I.YM VN. it! Clerk. 12/11-18-25. 1/1 WEHU ** mm LEONARD LEGAL NOTICE "Gentlemen, I suggest we lower the entrance fees so that our poorer Jewish brethren in town can belong." Ctfr. I tit, iMfrt MlUI, LfcO*.L NOTICfc NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undarabfnad, desiring to engage In bualness under the fictitious II. mi.• of ESQUIRE BARBER SIKH' al 1527 Ppnca da Leon Blvd.. Cora] Oablea, V\a., Intend to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. JOSE L'RRELT GARY ORTEGA Sole Owners WALTERS, MOORE \COSTANZO Attorneys for Applicants 1008 Ain.-liv Bldg. 11/20-27. 12/4-11 Dania Jai-Alai Opens Saturday Dania Jai-Alai Palace kicks off its 1959-60 season on Saturday night, with 11 action-packed games. Newcomers to the 36-man roster are headed bv Echave, youn'j cesta swinger from Manila in the Philippines. This front court ace is expected to move right into feature game competition, and judging from his terrific record at Manila Fronton, he is certainly ready to acquit himself admirably. Five other newcomers will join the old stars such as Bari, Isasa, Ignacio, Laca, Ondarra and Echeverria. In doubles competition, the brothers Carej and Careaga should provide tha opposition with tha sternest fast. Careaga, one of tha finest front court players in tha world for yaars, returned to Dania with an improved service. Carea, on tha other hand, has shown a vastly improved backhand to go with his forehand, considered to ba one of the strongest in jai-alai. The singles competition also shapes up extremely tight. Last year, Isasa beat out Ignacio for the top position, with Ondarra a close third. Ondarra, singles titleholder in 1956-57 and 1957-58, aprircui't' fc'''t' i'i %  • •" <"" %  '•'•'' Kjortda | n ea rs ready and able to win back By: *§*Sv8^: Jtta singles championship. Besides the exciting cesta battles again this year, Dania also has its gourmet restaurant open nightly. Closed circuit TV enables guests in the restaurant to watch every game while enjoying the cuisine. Post time on Saturday is 7:45 p.m. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. 59C11147 IN THE MATTER oK: MAJ.il E I. CLARK. NOT+C I E 'TO APPEAft""—"" TO: ALBERT M. CLARK, Residence Unknown. You are hereby notl led that the undersigned MARIE I. CLARK will • n the u^'h tin-.f December al tinhour of 9:00 A.M. or as soon therein, IT ;..ouunx i can appiy to one nf the Judgea oi t ie above styi.-d cnuit for a Ifeenaa to manage, take charge of and control her pr .,'erty. nod to become a free dealer In every reapeot. MARIE I. n AUK. „_ '' %  Itloner DEOROE X. MacDi INELL M' 1 i aay for Pal tl mar 5M Ulscayne lltilldlng Miami 32. Florida 12/11-'R IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY. No. 59C10826 VEROIN'IE PRANCES SI'IRTOS, Plaintiff, vs. Tlll-O SI'IRTOS, Defendant. NOTICE BY PUBLICATION TO: TIIKO SI'IRTOS, Jis W. 24th Street, New York City. N.Y. •VOf ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED that suit for divorce, and in the alternative annulment, has been brought against you, and you are tc file your Anawer or other pleading in Ihe office of the Cleric of the above court and serve a copy upon the plaintiff's attorney. OEOROE N. MacDONBLL, on or before the 2Sth day of December. l'i!': otherwise the complaint will be taken as confessed liv you, DATED, this 13th day of November, A.D., I B B. I.EATIIKRMAN, Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) By: K. M. LTMAN, Deputy Cli rk H/2U-J7. !2/4, 1 NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, IN CHANCERY, No 59C11366 BSTELLE NAMBR, Plaintiff, vs. VICTOR NAMER, Defendant, SUIT FOR DIVORCE TO: DR. VICTOR NAMER Bellevue if • i^iiitai i'Ttli Street and 1st Avenue New Yurk 1. N'.Y. You VICTOR NAMER are hereby I thai a Hill of Complaint for Divorce has been fried against you. and you are reqalred to serve a copy nf Mini Anawer or l'l. adlng to the Hill of Cinnplalnt on the plaintiff's Altonievs, (JO I.D.MAN & C,ol,DSTi:iN. 1303 W. Flaeler Street. Miami, Fla., and file tin original Anawer or Pleading in the office of the Clerk of tinCirr'ilt Court on or before the 1th day of January, i960. If you fall to do so. Judgment bj defauit win ii.taken against you for the relief demanded In fhe BUI of Complaint. ., This notice shall he puMIhed once each week for f'.-jr consecutive weeks in THE JEWISH FLOR-IDl N DONE AND ORDERED at Miami, Florida, this 3','th day of Wovembar, AD ItSt. LBATrTBRHAN, <% % %  -k. NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREI'.Y (S1VBN that the underslKiied. -I,-siring to engage In huslnem under the fictitious name of GENERAL CARPETS at :. North East 115th Street, North Miami, Florida Intends to r> name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida. WILLIAM A. MAHER Sole Owner CLYDE E. FOSTER, JR. Attorney for William A. Maher 11/20-27.12/4-11 (sea |] 4-11-1S-2S IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. 48085C IN RE: Estat. of I. M.I.IAN K. LEWIS, NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and AH Perapna Having Claims or Demand! Agalnat bald Ton are hereby notified and required to present any claims amiI oemanda which >•..,. may have alnat tinestate of LILLIAN K.VVma deceased late of Dade <"ount. Florida, to the County Judges of Dade Cotinlv, and file the same In their office.-'in the Countv CourthouajIi 1-iH.le Countv. Forha. within eight c^dendar months from the oat' of the first publication hereof, or the same Wl Flr b e t publication November 27 IMS. i/ J. fSERALD UBfriS. aa -**f !" %" of the estate of Lillian K. Lewis, HEl<;rFRT d E. KAIT-MAN Attorney f"r.F* e f, ulor 129 duf'ont Building Miami 32. Florida n/TJ ]2/4 n 18 m TUC COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT ,N ,N T A NOFOR DADE rOuNTY. FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. 48110-B IV RE: Estate of BELLE O'BRIEN used. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All *5&a%£i lng Claims or Demanda Against oaiu ^rou* : are herebv notified and requTred uTprJf^nt any claims anddej ,Lnd. which v..;, m-^;.-,';! susaar &f% d o, b6 /ft r rto'RflTHT LEVFY Erecutrlx 'of ihe l-St-' V !" *"nen JEhrllcn .'Tvdee.. PMlldlng Miami 32. Florida 12/4-11-18-23 To Discuss Heart Ailment "Heart Ailment and How to Prevent It" will be the subject discussed by a local physician Monday at a meeting of the Men's Club of Knesseth Israel Congregation. Walter Lebowitz, president, said that election of officers will be held. Temporary Officers Elected Barry Kantor has been elected temporary president of the Young Adult Group of MonticeUo Park. Other temporary officers recently elected are ttae Meschaan, vice president; Risa Kantor, treasurer; Sandy Dweck, secretary. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE !•• HEREBY OH EN that the underalgned. derfring to engage .n tafasAa^rifSKr a UA %  rrii,iVr A s*.;. nX'^Vh'o,:":-';': or !i.e client Court of Dade County, !a v ,„-NO R-M.TY OORP. (a New York Corp.) Sola Owner I .PON FI-ST-KIN attorney for Applicant I ''•''• Minml Ki-lS-JS NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY. Ne. &9C11Z51 (TEOROE FURMAN, Plaintiff, vs. MAPY FURMAN, Defendant. 8UIT FOR DIVORCE TO: MARY .FL'RMAN 50 Division Avenue Brooklyn, New York You MARY FURMAN are hereby notified that a Bill of Complaint for Divorce has been filed against you. and you are required to serve a cony of your Answer or Pleading to the Bill of Complaint on the plaintiffs Attorney, RAYMAN • DUIIIO, 902 Alnsley Bldg., Miami 32. Florida nnd file the original Answer or Pleading in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before the 2Sth day of December, 195S. If you fail to do so, Judgement by default will be taken against von for the relief demanded In the Hill of Complaint. This notice shall, be published once each we.-k for fmir consecutive weeks in THE JEWISH l .1)1111 IAN DONE AND ORPEftED nt Miami. Florida, this :'lth day of November, A.D. 1959. K II l.i:ATHFR*IAN, Clerk. Circuit Court. I lie %  in".. Florida Rj : K. M. LTMAN, • oltty Clerk. ll.W MAN K Dime, .' Alnsley Bldg. Miami 32, Florida .money, for !" iurii „„.„_„ NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW %  NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of CHARLES ii HARRIS Correotlve F.otwear at SIS Washington Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida intends to reglater s i' 1 name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida. CORRECTIVE FOOTWEAR. INC. Charles B Harris, President MARVIN 1 WIENER 1111 Alnslev Bldg. Miami 32. Fla. Attornev for Corrective Footwear, Inc. ^^ 1J/4 u ., g NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVBN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of PELICAN BAR ft ORII.L. at 7818 Northeast Second Avenue, Miami. Florida Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida. JOHN C.ENONI—100% LEWISON AND FREED Attorneys for Genonl H West Flagler 8treet Miami. Florida n/2n 27 12/4 U ATTENTION ATTORNEYS! ^Jwi&lhJUkiirJiiMrain solicits your lrgal notices. We appreciate your patronage and guarantee accurate service at legal rates nial FE& 3-405 for messenger service LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in bnatneea under the fictitious name of DADE RECORDS at number #7M NW 2 Avenue In the City of Miami. Florida intends to register the aald name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida. Dated at, Miami, Florida, this 17th day of November, 1959. MARIdN RFCORD CORPORATION EUGENE LEMLICH Attorney for Applicant 11/20-27, 12/4-11 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the ri %  name of FI/iRII'A BUNSHINE ESTATE at 18715 Blsoayna Boulevard, Miami, Florida intend to regieter s:iiii name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida I.YWIAY. INC. a i-'i-' •Corp, LAURENCE DISK IN Attornev for IV 1140 N.E. 163rd Street %  -27. 12/4-11 • NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious niune of R. A. M. INDUSTRIAL AND TRADING COMPANY nt I860 N.E. 2nd Avenue, -Miami, Blotida intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. OUBTAV R. MAYER WBLLI8CH, DnUOHERTY & ZAIAC Attorneys for Gustav R. Mayer 11/20-27. 12/4-11 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business iinili r the fictitious name of Ti?T\S TOTEM OIVFRSIFTESD INVESTMENTS at 10823 Blscayne Blvd., Miami, Dade County, Florlua, Intends to register said name with the clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. TEXAS TOTEM DIVERSIFIED INVESTMENTS MALSPBIS A: BAKER Att-rneys for Texas Totem Diversified Investments 11/20-27. 12/4-11 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of COLLECTION BUREAU OF AMERICA at IT-1 S !•:. 163rd Street. North Miami Bench. PlOrlda, Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. J. C. FRUSCIANTE. Sole owner I I J'i-_!7. It 1-11 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of PARTS SUPPLIERS INTERNATIONAL al 1820 B.W. '-I Avenue, Miami Florida Intend to n name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dfde County. Florida. DWAYNE V. COX ft LUCIA E. COX Sole Owners II 'IT, 13 4-11-18 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In bUBlneaa under the fictitious name of ALAN APARTMENTS at 0a Bay Drive, Miami Beach. Florida Intend to register s.ild name with the C'erlc of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. HIMEN FEVSTER REBECCA FENSTER KOVNER -• MANNHEIMER Attornevs for Hlmen Fenster and Rebecca KSur ^^ NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of AZUR OF MIAMI at 490 North East 112th Street. Miami 38, Florida Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. ROBERT E. FRAZER CLYDE E FOSTER. JR. Attorney for Robert E. Fraaer 11/20-27, 12/4-11 ATTENTION ATTORNEYS! CORPORATION OMIT WETS Lowest Prices — Quickest Delivery in South Florida Call THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN at FR 3-45 %  A i ll >, i ..:; i i • A



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Pag* 2 A ^JemtsttHrwidhr %  U.S. Praises UN Emergency Fo MIRDNMVONS——The United States Gorernment is pre%  *4 XarKW K m ir g eacy T*rt |vd to cnil nh %  Um*rl ~ minting the Gata Strip border be UJIEF" IMP e ap iaai a a tot*] of tween Egypt and Israel, as well as J9.WC.000 cover.ni nearly haif of the shores of the Gulf of Aqaba. I NET* B ttWW budget for next has -done ita job magnificently, year, the United Stales delegation declared Sore this week, but "unfor•wnatelv. the peace in this area"' has not as ret been "assured for all times." Tiis statement was ma;'e in the eneral Assembly's Administrative aad Budgetary Committee by Coagressmaa James G. Pulton, whs is the American delegate in that group. He IWIII— nil that the Secretary General Dae. HamrrartkjVd to'd tha committee, in urging that Ms UNCF budgetary fiavras far iMt he adopted, that tha coats far meinfenanee of tha Emar am cy Force ere noads d to •nawre "cont inui ng ejuiet along the entire Bor d or ti na hetwae n Israel tod Egypt." th- Hollywood Beth El Plans Building Ihavti cf Mum; has been named' al co ntr actor, accordtag to Malm an Teeaple president. Mr bad Mrs. Harry Le&aS baqaamh S2S 000 to Jewish National Fund. The c~-~. %  osflnhhnn. a Nachkdi is Israel becr; ". %  '-.N-.rr; r r d exec_' %  •e bflOBd c J aa an uau. recerres the boxroeal froca LefkaB at race-: r.T LONG OISTANCI SevHrky Seeking MOVERS %  ?""• MW FTf-gPS Hev~4 e- J. • ftaaiihiin Bafti. •ytaa. gastsa :: aahar 04AL JE IJ53 K. lielwnan & Soo, s COU-M atn. avjuas KKB ~ s dtp, conductor of the 1'iuversity of Muni Symphony Orchestra, is seeking tenon. ban-' tones and basses lor a Mare ceocert priai slatiii of Bertiec' "Dan> cf Faust He toad the committee while there had been few incidents in the were situations which, in sence of restraining could hare had nrl oe a ccs far overshadowing the effort Beth El of Hollywood. "^J?~*£^,f2£^ ..*" "* new S500.000 sanctu %  ••** eT Torre and school build • „ tne parent circumstances." %  %  *" continued Mr TTaiiia—i ihjiili. "it s impassible for -tie : to foresee when the operations of the Force might be brought to an end with TV new budding will include a out rskuig loss of the progress aggrapacity sanctuary and 400tWf fu maif %  Mr r-Tj-rl m£ *•* ^ nbw,c ,o <>neni % %  %  -h Holy Days '**" bis roosisJenUj fme leader aad special occasions. The social ship of the Force.'' As usual when hall includes a stage, dress.nUNEF M %  rooms and kitchen. There will he eight standard-size classrooms in the school building, and one double-sue classroom or molti-purpose room. Ala* in ch ided are library, rabbi's study, offices and steraee rooms. The sliu c l w e fully air-canditianad. All • %  oa*. fumi m i waa aevine, of straofa, miiewa n and parting ar*. as wall as PILES NEWfj Wi; hoot St •TAUV5 SniT41 -MEssJaij /£' '" %  %  B -amn "! was Aaduaans for vocalist* win be held at The university's Beaamoat Hall ea Satarday from H to 12 aaaa aad I to 5 r n SCIENTIFIC* PEST CONTROL the Uaafl -. V >— > %  — : *-T _>*f j r e or write to the lertersty of Masai rj ama uaj T O Box gafi Coral Gaties at. a later Chan Friday. The land consists of mately 11 acres with S feet front age on lath are %  and 7TM feet in depth, nhich was donated to the Temple by the Mailman family ~ early ia 1967. Irrrag Karach. Smith and Korac has been retained as architect SlNCi leoi 'Ml rafSPf crioa ML 3-M21 fl'Wpira Bt 1 In %  -! • taw X %  t. •tl*v* 1 m aan •i atS ^ cbeW3t rVeserigf iog | NOiV \H T^rOMoggJ AJt-coaarrioaa, aatAKO IUa UCJhfJ mcatmmn, c:*f£wrroj 350 UKCOUi I PS JE va Imtr. Wall sin an. I 723 IIMCOU Pbem Jf Mff gcvusrs' of the firm of % ~ %  "f llP I Miami BesrH 'pOllaf pn '•Sit fJPT Moot MSwph L •teckgvdcy VI IHSTAll GIA5S FOR LfTSBT Pf RPOSE JTI nTaTmTf FIATC MASS jVJ^ LU CLASS AJO M*2Kflt WORKS 1 tllS-rn. am ST. Carm aV^. faaat n !.•)) ilEPHOM'S HEBREW: •** BOOK STORE L'St *' AanTfgsw IgCATRTM KB TOgt CUIIIUnaff • C0ULT0N BROS; Cgrna Wwy ft S.W. 27tli Arg. TOACOMn M0S.W.I PAUHEITS MIAMI MOHUMBJT CO. "Miggai's tgg.ig. Mg.gri.l DgUrs" Wiry Pirf Mtn? Raj* far km O-rySlS-00 i %  Am ( %  a-gtX2



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Efmber 11. 1959 *Jewlsti Fkrldlfor) Page 7-J rppietaum ie Saturday night in Grand ballroom of lincbleau hotel was just as one would expect ^lomatic BalL Honoring bassador Avraham Harevening was complete lal reception line, dipiotocol, visiting consuls, politicians, and glitrie stars. ien in the audience lilly impressed with [Heston, and men and like fell under the spell ous Joan Crawford. Esto the stage was Jake ss Crawford wore a white satin short fora low-scooped neckline It and back, and pearl, and bugle beads enJin embroidery, which like a ribbon from the the hemline of her pr bodice was fitted and cut in a full circular ick Katzman was grand •nd led the beautifullyiiromen who greeted the jom the red carpet enthe doors of the Grand She was in a fushia[Balanciaga import ball ts. Max Weitz, Women's |chairman, chose a misty gown embroidered in ed bugle beads. Mrs. hick was in a heliotropeered satin ball creation. Black chantilly lace over apricot tafetta was the choice of Mrs. Samuel T. Sapiro. Mrs. Sam Heiman selected a muted honey beige satin short formal brocaded with-gold. Her bodice featured an asymetrical drape from one shoulder to the waist, and her skirt was gathered into a full harem hem. The gown had its own matching great stole. Mrs. Ben Novack wore a pure silk warped print in tones and shades of browns, with a gold thread brocade. Her tulip-shaped bodice flowed to a full short skirt. The same fabric lined a white satin evening coat. From Tallahassee, where her husband is a Justice in the State Supreme Court, Mrs. B. K. Roberts chose a floor-length satin gown in porcelain blue. Self fabric roses were appliqued to the dress, and foliage was embroidered with silver-lined bugle beads. • • • |u|RS. Leon Kaplan was in a "* carmen red silk chiffon which featured a Grecian draped bodice, latticed cummerbund effect, and full skirt. Wife of the consul from Mexico, Mrs. Rafael Spindola, set off her dark beauty with a black chantilly lace gown. Busy greeting guests and making introductions were the wives of the general chairmen of the Greater Miami Israel Bond committee. Mrs. Jack A. Cantor wore JMuravchick Eyes June Rites Mrs. Abe Muravchick, ke Wales dr., announce ement of their daughter, t Leonard Grand, son of Irs. William Grand, 1220 nia ave. Je-to be is a graduate of ach High School, attendiversity of Alabama, and I is a senior at the Uni[ Miami, where she is maelementary education. nember of Delta Phi Ep^ity, and served as treasorganization. Ijnd is a graduate of Mii High.School, the UnlMiami School of Busi|inistration, and the UniMiami School of Law. ember of the Florida Bar tified public accountant, [he is associated with the ernard B. Davidson. I wedding is planned. a gold lame gown, and Mrs. Saman 1 VLSSAr&ai Mian Beach Mizrachi Plans Testimonial In Honor of Mrs. Brenner Sundy Eve ge-colored silk drape from the neckline to the floor, which gathered to a poui on one side. wUMhr J T h a n m o S s e AhvL Were l K ere JHM** chwtejr oUtoaabi ner for her many philanthropic ch Id en wm soSn Te l W rr^ e SS2 n Wi give a tes t im !" > civic, and religious contribution: Mn Ahr !" L". married, birthday party for Mrs. Edythc to the Greater Miami Jewish con-. Deriwefnkle hT„ .ill r "". (J SeFh Bre ner Sunday 6 pm mUnity 0ver the vears a woven oolkl H u A ""*? at the Sterlin hoteL Mrs Bretmer !" e to Mi dr^pe of saUn wen t'the Kto The party will honor Mrs. Bren£j !, to recuperate from > siege of pneumonia, and settled in while the gown was cafe-length. Mrs. Serbin's floor-length gown was a white silk satin sheath, with a bodice of reembroidered ribbon lace and a crushed cummerbund. Mrs. Ann Jacobs, known professionally for years as Mary Ford, wore a white chiffon short formal with the bodice of white iridescent sequins. Her matching shoes and beaded handbag were bought on a recent trip to Paris. Mrs. Mac Mermell selected an iced sky blue silk organza. Her full skirt featured a reembroidered silk satin applique in a butterfly motif. In an oyster white satin short formal was Mrs. Marion Sibley. Dark ranch mink trim created a caplet effect on the bodice, and her skirt was the controlled fullness of the bubble. • • ILJRS. Melvin Richards chose a %  charcoal silk organza short ball gown, with a fitted bodice, bateau neckline, and full skirt composed of tiers of ruffles. Welcoming the holiday season was Mrs. Stanley C. Myers in a deep eggnog-colored Italian lace gown. The pattern was reembroidered in gold, and had matching colored silk organza inserts at the waistline. A flower printed gold lame from Hong Kong was Mrs. Louis Glasser's floor-length formal. Also from the Orient was Mrs. Robert Haverfield's ming green dynasty brocade. Honorary chairman of the Israel Bond Women's Division is Mrs. Anna Brenner Meyers. Her floor-length gown was a silver grey satin with pink leaves appliqued around the scooped neckline. Self covered miniature buttons went down the front to the hemline, and she also wore long matching gloves. N EXT week is our Fashion Supplement, with exciting fashion announcements, pictures of social activity, and stories about some or the major social functions planned for the next few months. IS MT POSSIBLE TO GET A GOOD MY CLEANING JOB IN ONt HOUR? BOB guarantees that net only will H at a good job, hot the EST MY CLEANING YOU EVER HAD (Regardless of Price). Including DRAPES SLIP COVERS SUITS $1.00 PLAIN DRESSES $1.25 REDMAN'S CLEANERS 2922 Coral Way, Miami, Florida MONDAY thr SATURDA Y 7:30 %  %  >* BIKUR CHOLIM KOSHER CONVALESCENT HOME MOH PROFIT — NON-SRCTARIAN SUPPORTED BY YOUR COMMUNITY [Strlot Sup.rvi.lon of th. Orthodox Vaad Hakaehruth of Florida 1 Rabbi Or. laaac H. Ever, Director 24-HOUR NURSING DOCTORS ON CALL )IRTS OBSERVED CONGENIAL SURROUNDINGS **n iQwmnn t rwmsamot rmnoor BUIIDIMQ iHloi Avt. Ph. JE 2-3571 MtamlBaoth Mrs. Roosevelt Due in Hollywood The community of Hollywood will honor Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt at a dinner of tribute Sunday evening *at the Hollywood Beach hotel. The dinner will be sponsored by the Hollywood committee for State of Bonds in recognition of Mrs. Roosevelt's outstanding "service to humanity and to democracy." Maynard Abrams, well-known Hollywood attorney, city commissioner and civic leader, is chairman of the committee of sponsors for the dinner. Ben Tobin, Hollywood business and civic leader, will serve as official host. Tobin is owner of the Hollywood Beach hotel. Three of the community's outstanding leaders will be honored with special presentations. They are Samuel Barskin, Max Cantor and Harry Rich. The dinner will honor Mrs. Roosevelt as "one of the greatest women of our times," pointed out Tobin. "In her efforts on behalf of the oppressed and underprivileged and as one of the early participants in the United Nations. Mrs Roosevelt has helped to bring the nations of the world much cloaer together," Tobin added. Mrs. Roosevelt will come to Hollywood 1 personally to accept the tribute. The former First Lady has been a friend to the cause of Israel for many years, and helped establish Israel's independence 11 years ago as United States representative at the United Nations. Mrs. Joseph Brenner was honored at the recent fourth annual Jewish National Fund banquet. Dr. Zev Kogan, Southeastern executive director of JNF, lauded Mrs. Brenner as a true "Ayshes Chayil." Her children, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Meyers and Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Bergad, were among guests at the function, which also marked her 84th birthday. Parent-Teacher Confabs Here Allapattah. Since there was no synagogue in the area, she and her husband organized a Minyon in their home, borrowed a Tora!. from Beth David Synagogue, and turned over all proceeds from holiday services to Beth David. The Brenners later moved to SW 3rd ave., where they helped t< build and became affiliated witli the Miami Jewish Orthodox Congregation — today known as Beth El. In 1940, the couple moved again—this time to Miami Beach, and found themselves lending a hand in the construction of David Witman Hall of Beth Jacob Congregation. Mr. and Mrs. Brenner—he passed away several years ago—also sain on the planning meetings with Dr. David Andron, first presiden! of the Hebrew Academy, offering their assistance in the establish ment of the Academy, where sh is still an active member. Since its inception 34 years ago Mrs. Brenner has been active in Mizrachi, and organized the Mian; Beach chapter, of which Mrs. Pauine Groundwerg is president todav DUPLEX APT. FOR RENT Deluxe, new, spacious, 1 bedroom, Ultra-Modern kitchen, new 12 ft. refrigerator, separate dining room. Free washer & dryer. WI S-S307 "Your Child's Development" was the theme of the week-long parentteacher conferences held at Congregation Monticello Park's nursery school. Under the leadership of Mrs. Sidney Kay, head teacher, parents of each class met every morning for discussion on the physical, social, emotional and religious development of the child and a presentation of the school's program by the staff. The conferences have become a semi-annual part of the school's program and serve to acquaint parentswith a knowledge and understanding of how teachers and parents can complement each other's activities for the child's growth. Kosher Bakery For Sale ONLY KOSHER BAKERY IN MIAMI Phone HI 4-7871 or HI 3-2807 tROOM AND BOARD FOR ELDERLY PEOPLE STRICTLY KOSHER. REASONABLE RATE: Warm Atmosphere — Car Service MRS. H. LEVIN 1S4S EUCLID AVE. JE 1-3741 YOUR LETTER WILL LOOK BETTER ON Personal Stationery 25 MONARCH SHEETS with Matching ENVELOPES for only $1.50 Sales Tax and Postage Included SHAPIRO 415 LANGFORD BLDG. Phone FR 9-0955 I jjil;IAHiU l J. l Jil f |:J (j | < j.r t | l f l SOCIALITES Of MIAMI STARTING DECEMBER 11 DANCES—tvery friday, Saturday, Sunday and Monday Dance to HERMAN BATARD'S Latin-American Orchestra ADMISSION $1.50 MEMBERS FREE DeLIDO HOTEL, Collins Ave. at Lincoln Rd., M.B. Plenty of Parking Available Single Men and Women Welcome (over 28) CHARTER MEMBERSHIP NOW AVAILABLE FOR INFORMATION PHONE JE 4-4644 "Dignify and Sociability at its Finest" INVITATIONS WEDDINGS, BAR BAS MITZVAHS PERSONALIZED STATIONERY, MATCHES, NAPKINS, ETC. An Ideal Chanuka Gift HANNAH B. SCHER ALL YOUR PRINTING NEEDS ENGRAVING, EMBOSSING, PERSONALIZED PRINTING & COMMERCIAL Phone HI 4-4602


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Page 12-A •Jml&fhrMkxn Friday Browsing With Books: Y HRARY M1NPUN For the Lost Europeans, All RowlsJLeadijo. H THE LOST EUROPEANS. By Emanuel Lifvinoff. 21? p*New York: The Vanguard Press. Inc. $3.95. OW AFTER TEN years there begin to'appear the fir-t throes of ar.istic agony. Fiction, always susceptible to a cultural time-lag in the race with reality, is starting to come to grips with one of the mapr moral problems of 0O> age. for Jews and non-Jews alike. That ithe problem of Germany, and if one would put them down as coldly and dispassionately as possible, the questions would go like ;his who i> guilfyl how may they be judged? who shail hate, and for how loaf? in whose hand is vengeance, and what form shall it take? They are the kind of questions for which a collective answer can only be framed in the terms of art: art is perpetually concerned with morality, morality is both the father and the child of art. Born in London's East End. Emanuel I.itvinoff writes of todays Berlin with much of Isherwood's sharpness and with the same sort ot intimacy—an eye for the tattered detail, an ear for the wrong note. "Here at the sick heart >i Europe there is a desperate gaietv; white apartment Capitol Spotlight: By MILTON FRIEDMAN house* have risen on the ruins of Jewish dwellings, neon 1, [hti kilitter on the Kurfurslendamm, the music is loud and vulgar To Berlin comes Martin Stone, who had left as a child fourteen years previously. He cames hoping to remain indifferent, but his first encounter with a G"nn crumples the veneer: So they still look at a J*W R thai." and the dammed hatred floods in. Novelist Litvhwff parallels three stories, embodyin* three kinds of hatred There is Goldberg, who survived Auschwitz, who went to Israel and came back to live to Berlin among the people he loathed. Why? Because hate was for him his remaining passion, the only thing which kept him alive, which tied him to people. "Hate. Between him and the Germans there would always be this Obsessive iniimacy." But Goldberg's hatred could bring nothing but destruction. There is the aging homosexual Hugo Krantx, also a Jew. once the toast of Berlin's theater world.He has spent the post-war years searching compulsively for the beautiful German whom he had loved and who had betraved him. Putxi von Schlesinger. He was reputedly Hungarians Admit Anti-Semitism Still Exists Washington W ESTERN RADIO monitors amazed lecently when the Hungarian Home Service departed from the party line by openly admitting the existence of extensive anti-Semitism in Com munist Hungary. The third anniversary of the Hungarian upr:>:nc found anti-Jewish sentiment at a high level. Anna Balls, a Budapest government radio commentator, made startling admissions. She said >he was "embarrassed but compelled to admit that many Hungarians -sully others because they are Jewish Miss Balla made an expose .eldom heard in Communatatoa. She revealed that "a few days ago, an acquamtOtonoos Wtmjmm B y EUAHU SALPETBc Unmet Needs Aired ; Jerusalem PIVE HUNDRED and eighty mil %  -oa dollars sounds like quite a lot of moaey. It is. even if it id over a period of ten and one half years. Yet that was the amount received by the Jewish Agency from Jewish donations — mainly from the I'JA—during the period of Oct l. IMS to Mar. 31. 19S9. But the sum spent by the Agency on the reception, settlement and absorption of the close to one miluon immigrants and on servicing the debts incurred in the process was almost twice as much— SI. 181.000.000. to be exact. Part of this difference came from participation by the Israel government and from German reparations. Part of at is stil owed by the Jewish Agency to various banks and institutions. This debt is again part of the "unmet needs"— but only a minor part. The larger part is not visible on hooks, but it is estimated to be in the vicinity of Stoo.oao.000 The "unmet needs" are the houses which have not yet been built far the teas of thousands of immigrants who sull live in ma'aherot and other temporary buildings. They are the li v e sto c k and the tractors promised to the new settlers to make their farms fully self-supporting. Tbey also include the loans promised to the artisans and small manufacturers among the newcomers to enable them to open workshops. Sometimes the "unmet needs" represent the difference between a hard life and a fairly decent one. sometimes they form Ike the tragic gap between desperation and hope, between the sense of futility and the vision of a brighter future. The "unmet needs" hare the ten years of efforts of world Jewry and tl could not keep up with the requirement of mass ahanrptisa. One m a ath rr Jews outside Israel, and partsralartv ican Jews did all they ecuM and whe thei the Israehs of Lvmg in But the fact remains that the here and they must be met. Mow. for the first time, there is a the flow of immigration, since the Mvds" V* hato of of •ads of Jews would lake to come to Israel, are i Every Israeli hoses that the doors wtt suss, hut in the %  l aa tu ae the ah — t i U a of those who have already arrived must he ta m p l iti d. both fur the sake of those already here ami to prepare the far the reception af those yet to conae. Maw the -unmet aseds" at the central subject by toe sixth ii nan il study Busman of the I'JA which has armed i of mine, on reading about this impending talk on anti-Semitism in the radio program, approached me." The acquaintance said. "It is a pity to harp on that subject so much there is no point in reiterating again and again the history" and significance of Jewry Let us drop the subject Anti-Semitism is not dangerous today most people keep it up as a habit." The individual who tried to dissuade her from broadcasting against anti-Semitism, said Miss Balla, was not the only Hungarian who takes prejudice "so lightly." Miss Balla revealed that in today's Hungary, "one often hears things like: We loathe the Jews because they all aspire for leading positions. They do not work at the lathes; they want to get away from hard physical work." She heard it asserted "that all department chiefs are Jewish at the ministries as well aa at councils or enterprises." When she asked the anti-Semite how be suffered from the fact that his departmental chief is a Jew. he said "none at all. but be objected in principle." Miss Bala addressed a question to Hungarians: "Would you consider it just if someone were to be removed from h.s position as the bead of a department solely because he was a Jew*" She said the real issue should he: "Is be suited for the post? The issue is decided not by racial affiliations, but by skill and honesty in the job. toward his fellow human beings, toward society." After probing the nature of anti-Jewish prejudices in present day Hungary. Miss Balla concluded that "antiSemitism is a complex thing." She said "I know many people who are not really anti-Semites hut profess antiSemitism by sheer force of habit. They find it quite natural if their best friend happens to be a Jew." Perhaps to appease its critics, this radio appeal for tolerance included anti-Jewish aspects. Jews of the "ruling class" were attacked. They were charged as equally guilty as nch non-Jews m scaprgoating 'the little Jew" to "cover up their own tyranny and divert the people's wrath." The broadcaster illustrated the point that Jews cannot he lumped together as a homogenous lot Citing Hungarian examples, the broadcast said the public should know "that Simi Krausx. the notorious (Jewish) hanker. cannot he measured with the same yardstick aa the small backstreet grocer, or Baron Manfred von Wain as a little weaver, though both are Jews.".' An appeal was made: "Let us not judge people by the shape of their prof.le but by their character." Such reference to an allegedly "Jewish" profile indicated that the broadcaster, how ever intentkmed. harbored an ilnnsnl of racist stereotype. To some extent, the broadcaster apologised for sadaag with the Jews. She said "some people anight interpose: there they go again defending, whitewashing the Jews. Bat we are not defending the Jews; pamnry aad •wftrtwB TN aai it.BOtB SMtXAl dead. Hugo knew he wa not; he u^, name. For Putzi. in their inev^hj?' all the German, who were SK," "andaa. by UUing the .tew* Z? deWroy something the> feared ar The* moral inferiors. .„ it -; had sought to destroy hi. mo r,| ln SJ with the one per-on who reminded iTSl it." For Hugo, this can ^mTJ^ many betrayals; he is freed. LZlA alive, he was a danger ,., l'utzi_io£3 he was the only one who knew hi. £, Martin StoLe-agair.M his will ^J and bitter hatred-falls in love withal one of the truly innocent, herself u J the war. It is the only relationship in i not perverted. Even th, ugh ithus. it if left, literally, partly n the J.. gainings, to a birthplace-lor in |i, first Man and the first Woman, so omaN pain of one is the pain of the other I give each other every day of our lim.Thus Mr. Litvinoff has made i ca five answer, but one which stretches U of hope. To hate collectively is "f fifl-'jj death, he says. To hate those IBKSV lo remain vulnerable to them. One can i at the beginning. The author has made this sUbaT! pages of bitter, collective criticism of G germinates here more \ intently that Europe. The Nazis couldn't have | Germans What right have I to .„, ... If you were born a Jew in EOropj j3 inside you from the cradle All roads hit] I believe every one of them. It is to It.I —as a writer and as a man of asriln _, believes in his affirmation It is his aaswU be that it is the only one. LhfmKO Post: ty SJUtl On Protecting |£OR THE FUST tatl| t ry of lae U*nl t of basic roles to I Ito guarantee | lill peoples to eiercsy lind preserve their I |rules -K.uJd apply U jiarticuiarry to aeam^ Coiled Nai.oas, includir.,; the Soviet such rights have been flasranUf deaatl million Jews in the direct orbit aU' The rules are included in a SO.WWajJ discrimination in religious rights iaf| Indian social scientist. Dr Arc* of the Human Rights IW on prevention of difcxtouital The U-member committee ** %  ] sailing in their individual capacities,F their governments. Judge Philip rlalpaM a weU-kaown Jewish communal**•* ican member of the subcommittee. T*j states are represented — Rimoa ins iJ there are two members ^Pf"*"* ^ Lebanon aad the United Arab Bern** Dr. Knshaaswami is the rapporteur on religious ^• c rmiM ?V based on reports be hartcemdft-l %  eats of every one of the 82 a*wi UN. Oa Jan. 11. the subcomnrfjees-J aanual tbreeweek session. •*•**,, sader Dr. Krtshnaswarn. studyaj"j iag to note the Soviet Cnion > rearspuipeiid set of basic rules. I. oae section of ku "*£ + ao.es that, in some !" r !n< iJ£!,3 affect the right af Jews to 1 May be Sharply Tttt "RENAULT AFFAIRas aag r e v ti he ntmaa ia the Uadtoa Slates Amencaa Jewish are alertaag coaamaaities to the ttoa by the Reaaua Company af ito tract with the Earner Praxer firm ia bv r*eJ as a result af Arab pressure The Ito p li a tt i ai af the m v naas e af by the ia the %  ill mam srsnrti have aho been *eatbj r ams orraaisatiaas to hue •** *** ^-*i extent affect toe sale af the Preach firm Is trying wTj ^ Ji' y A g ^ -*. **" aad the Jewah War Vatoraaa. Such •atoSaaai*** —aaelatAB*



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iber 11. 1959 *Jenisti fhridTiajn i THE NEW UROLOGY WING the Best Operative Program order to give the best pre-operative and rrative care, it is hopod that the day will vhen all urology cases will be assigned to 6a of the hospital which will be designated rology Wing." is the anticipation of Dr. Solomon B. Ian. director since its inception, of Ml. Sinai lal's Urology Department. Goldman, reflecting on the past, recalls d" days at Alton rd.. when the department improvise equipment, rooms and proced[Today, with the development of new facilimore bed capacity, he hopes that more fists will bring their cases to the hospital, increasing the work done and the size of rology medical staff. viewing 1he newly-installed equipment. Dr. lan sees a decided change from their former when space limitations forced urology to the major operating rooms with the other -pressed surgical departments. Where once Jepartment had one Cystoscopy Room, now are two. One of these can be converted for use in major surgery. In the suite, there is the added convenience of an adjacent dark room for the development of X-Rays. One cystoscopy table will be equipped with electronic and hydraulic mechanisms. This will allow the doctors to place the table in the varictv of positions necessary for urolotiic proeedurcs. Similar to the other departments at-Mt. Sina;, the Urology Department takes an aclive part in training the house staff and surgical residents. A signed to them to augment and enhance their general surgical training, the Urology Department periodically shares grand rounds with the Dpnrimont of General Surgery. It is the hope of Dr. Goldman that one day a Urology Residency program will be established. Every member of the department is certified by the American Board of Urology or is qualified to have such certification in the reasonably near future,. This greatlv reflects the competency of the department. Further, most of its members arc on the urology staff of the University of Miami School of Medicine. %  ..IUUWKJ'I'IJWHI; .kiii.til.lli.liiHi.iiii'.' |i": MM Ml I=I : 'N • MI."thology Laboratories: Heart of Sinai's iplex Healing and Research Activities I Pathology Laboratory plays but little known role in ire of the sick. It is intimatesolved with the questions of nature, progress, prognosis [course of treatment of illThe pathologist, director of laboratory, is a medical docI v. ho is basically a consult|>n patient problems. Through [knowledge and direction of plcx laboratory facilities, he the physician answer these Itions. Mt. Sinai Hopital, the PathLaboratoriea are directed [T)r. Jerome Benson, who Its out that pathology is a Vh of medical science conled with the cause and mechof disease. The pathologist It be versed not only in the fial techniques of his own ratory, but must also have a king knowledge of all brancht>f medicine. I thology La born ton os h ave vn from a dusty back room into a large well-organized irtmentalized center, where ^imens of tissue, blood, urine, al fluid and other body sub |ces are studied for their celr, biochemical, and bacterilical characteristics. In the Sinai Hospital of 1949, some tests were performed. In I. over 200,000 tests have been tormed to answer the quests mentioned here. OR. JikOtnt UNSOH department head The pathologist has many functions. He must be a physician, a teacher, an administrator, and an investigator. As a teacher, he is responsible for the constant post-graduate education and reeducation not only of residents in his own department, but also of the interns, residents and attending physicians on the hosCONGR ATULATIONS and BEST WISHES to the new MT. SINAI HOSPITAL MMERICAN SAVINGS U\j AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI IEACH AT MIAMI BEACH.'S ALL-AMERICAN CORNER LINCOLN ROAD AND WASHINGTON AVENUE ADJACENT FREE PARKING JE 2 5566 SHEPARD BROAD. Chirmin pital staff. As a teacher, he offers guidance in the proper selection of diagnostic tests which may be performed, and he organizes and conducts daily conferences for his own and the hospital staff in general. These conferences are conducted in the auditorium, laboratory areas, offices and autopsy rooms. He presents to the staff examples of daily diagnostic problems which may help physicians solve present and future problems. He is also on the faculty of the University of Miami Medical School. As an administrator, the pathologist must maintain control of the quality of laboratory work by constantly checking the accuracy of the many laboratory technologists and clerical personnel, by making certain that proper equipment is purchased, developed and maintained, and by participating jointly in conferences with other physicians toward the achievement of the highest level of medical care for patients. The The pathologist almost automatically finds himself involved in the consideration of same research problem, usually based on his daily experience with medical or surgical patients. The decisions of the pathologist are frequently crucial in that the entire course of a patient's life may change based on his opinion. Training, experience, education and reeducation are essential for the pathologist to carry out his grave and complex responsibilities. With the opening of the new Mt. Sinai Hospital, the work load of the Pathology Department will increase. The problem of the availability of medical technologists is -of major import. High academic requirements coupled with tremendous expansion of nationwide hospital facilities have created this shortage. In order to maintain the technological staff, Dr. Benson believes in training his own at the hospital's School of Medical Technology, which is accredited nationally by the American Society of Clinical Pathologists. The course offered by the'school is one of one year's duration, during which time the student, who must have three years of college before entering, rotates through the various departments of the laboratory where he learns the various techniques under the guidance of Dr. Benson and his technological staff. Following this year of training, the student takes fenexamination given nationally to qualify him as a Registered Technologist. With such technical help, the Pathology Laboratories can achieve their mission of service to the patient. Page 11-C H Left to right are Mrs. Mac (Rose) Gache, Mrs. Alicia Adams and Dan B. Ruskin, honorary chairman of the Mt. Sinai Hospital Development Fund. Both are Founders of the hospital, with individual contributions of over $50,000 each. Congratulations — Good Wishes WE ARE HAPPY TO SERVE YOU CHARBET CHEMICAL CO. 619 Washington Ave. MIAMI BEACH JE 1-3309 ARDMORE STUDIOS 738 ARTHUR GODFREY ROAD, MIAMI BEACH PHOTOGRAPHERS FOR MT. SINAI HOSPITAL SINCE 1945 OUR SINCERE CONGRATULATIONS ARTHUR DeGUTZ BEST WISHES FROM SUN CITY DAIRY FARMS, INC. Butter — Eggs — Cheese 3601 N.W. 50th Street CONGRATULATIONS... FLORIDA FILTERS AIR CLEANING DEVICES FOR ALL APPLICATIONS WHOLESALE 3110 N.E. 2nd Avenue Phone FR 1-8625