The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01606

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
(Jewish Floridian
Combining THE JPN15H UNITY and THE JEWISH WUKVf
.33. Number 46
Miami, Florida, Friday, November 13, 1959
Three Sections Price 20c
Ida Tells Gurion She Wants To Quit Post
,
linet Position for Eban;
ildiers' Vote Will Decide
itus of General Zionists
BATTLt FOI NEW tLf CTOftAL S WEM MCE 9-A
kUSALEM(JTA> Israel's new Parliament, elected last week,
krene for the first time on Nov. 23, and Premier David Ben-
Ltepped up discussions Tuesday on the composition of a coali-
' let in order to enable him to present the new government to
et at its first session.
+ Mapai leaders continued to dis-
cuss the coalition possibilities open
to them as a result of Mapai's
great election victory in prepara-
tion for talks with the other polit-
ical parties. Mapai is expected to
discuss possible coalition compo-
sition with all the political parties
except the Herut and Communist.
Meanwhile, the General Zionist
leaders, smarting from that par-
ty's shattering defeat in which it
lost at least five of its 13 seats in
Parliament and possibly also the
mayoralty of Tel Aviv, met Tues-
day and discussed the conditions
under which it could enter a Mapai-
led coalition.
Prim Sees
ifference
ring in US
|YORK(JTA)A growing
nee to Jewish identifica-
an Increasing ignorance
ph values pose a "deepen-
lis" in American Jewish
Joachim Prinz, president
American Jewish Congress,
here, addressing 500 lead-
lie organization.
|eeting marked the launch-
"American Jewish Con-
ilonth" proclaimed by a
[ of mayors and governors
pus parts of the country.
of "American Jewish
Month" is to focus atten-
the activities of the organi-
the fields of civil rights,
ertics, Jewish culture, and
to Israel, an intensive
ship drive will also be un-
during the month.
>rinz said that the AJC
neat "the challenge and
nity offered by the free-
Wch Jaws enjoy in Amer-
other democratic lands
I Wast" and must combat
difference of Jewish idan-
, He also described
Ser areas of responsi-
oich the American Jew-
imunify faces today. Ho
as:
strengthening of Israel
[protection of Jewish rights
LABEl KATZ
, matter of urgency
EISENHOWER'S TRY PRAISED
B'nai B'rith Chief Calls
*
For Action in Behalf
Of Soviet Jewish Life
NEW YORK(JTA)Deep concern for the survival of Jewish life
in the Soviet Union was expressed here by Label A. Katz, national pres-
ident of B'nai B'rith, addressing the opening session of the four-day
annual meeting of the organization at the Waldorf Astoria hotel. He
urged a policy of "pressing vigorously" for action by Soviet authorities
to remove the existing restrictions against Jewish religious and cul-
tural activities.
-----------------? "It is a matter of urgency and
responsibility for American Jews
UAHC Convenes as South
Florida Temples Set Stage
Mrs. Golds Meir, Foreign Min-
ister in the outgoing govern-
ment. Has repeatedly Informed
Mr. Ben-Gurkm that she does
not want to retain that post In
the now go ve mm ant, but the
Premier is said to bo insistent
and hopeful that ha can per-
suade his long-time associate to
retain that difficult post.
Former Ambassador Abba Eban
was expected to enter the Cabinet
as a minister without portfolio if
Iraq Threatens
Liberation Move
LONDON(JTA)Premier Kas-
sem of Iraq threatened to "liber-
ate Palestine from the Jewish
mi puiuuuu yoke wlt 1 ...
Mrs. Meir remained in the Foreign the threat in an interview with
Ministry. Zalman Aranne, the the Tunis daily Al Thawrawarn-
Minister of Education, may drop: ing that "our dear Pajestme.be-
out of the Cabinet to accept elec-
tion as Speaker of the Knesset. In
that case, the education portfolio
might go to Mr. Eban
Among other Mapai leaders
mentioned for Cabinet posts were
Gen. Moshe Dayan, Giora Joseph-
tal, secretary-general of Mapai,
and Yosef Almogi, chairman of the
Haifa Labor Council, who directed
the Mapai victory campaign. Al-
being mentioned for
to exert positive efforts in behalf
of the Soviet Jewish community,"
Katz said. In doing so, he added,
"we make no plea to Mr. Khrush-
chev and the Soviet Union's ruling
authorities for any special privi-
leges for Russian Jews. What is
claimed, is that Jews be granted
Eight South Florida Reform Jewish congregations, their Brother- ** ^^S^STu^
hoods and Sisterhoods, will join some 3,000 delegates from across the nationality and reiigious groups
nation converging on Miami Beach this weekend to attend the 45th within the established system of
general assembly of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations at the !
the Fontainebleau hotel.
____,--------------------------------* Simultaneously, seme 1,500 dele-
gates of the National Federations
of Temple Sisterhoods, a UAHC
affiliate, will gather for its 22nd
biennial assembly at the Eden Roc
hotel.
mogi was
, the post of laer^W^w
e world, with particular party in succession to Josephtal.
on efforts to secure for Mordechai Nam.r, Minister of La
loved to all Arabs and Moslems,
will be liberated only by the Iraqi
Army and the Iraqi people."
He complained that Egypt and
Jordan had taken no action against
Israel "in spite of their 30,000,000
inhabitants." He said it would be
the Iraqi people alone and unaided
who would "chase out the criminal
Jews now in power."
Simultaneously the Cairo radio
anounced the United Arab Repub-
lic plans a campaign to close the
Gulf of Aqaba to Israeli com-
merce. The broadcast said the
UAR delegate has been instructed
The huge 4,500-delegate ga-
thering here will represent some
585 Reform congregations, 100,-
000 women members of NFTS,
and 60,000 man affiliated with
the National Federation of Tem-
ple Brotherhoods.
UAHC sessions will be held at
Continued on Pago 7-A
Katz praised President Elsen-
hower's intervention in the mat-
tor in his Camp David discus-
sion with Soviet Premier Nikita
Khrushchev in late September.
Ho said there are "no immedi-
ate moans" for evaluating the
effect of the President's action.
"But if the Soviet Premier's pro-
nouncements for a peaceful co-
existence were genuine and
some competent observers have
cautiously accepted this promise
the possibility exists that the
President's words left an impact
on Mr. Khrushchev that can re-
Continued on Page 9-A
1 on efforts to secure for Moraecnai r...., ......-.--- UAR delegate nas Deen insirucieu
4ind the Iron Curtain the bor, is expected to drop out 01 tne rajsc the igsue in the Umted
.no* on Pag. 1*A Continue, on Pogo U* I Watt- legal committee.
)scow Rabbi in Tilt With American
y DAVID MILLER
JTA
Moscow
an assurance that comes
realistic understanding of
llcate role, Rabbi Leib Le-
Chief Rabbi of Moscow,
the visitor any conclu-
1 be drawn about the pres-
life of the Soviet Union's
_ Jews.
nows that what he tells a
[may be misread both by
This is the fourth in aseries of
article, on the Soviet Union by
David Miller. special Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency correspondent who
Soviet Union on a Pulitzer Scholar-
*hip from Columbia University.
non-Soviets and the vast hier-
archy that controls all segments
of Soviet life.
Take the subject of Jews as a
national group. He was asked
why Jews should be so identified
in their identity cards.
"I do not know the reason," he
told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, "but I do not think any
special reason exists. Jews are
a separate nationality. In any
event, all Soviet citizens are
equal."
Rumanian Jews Terrorized;
London Lists New Arrests
LONDON(JTA>The Rumanian government startled by the num-
ber of Jews who registered for emigration last year, has launched a
campaign to terrorize all Rumanian Jews who have shown a desire to
go to Israel, the Times of London reported this week. ___________
Noting that 10,000 Jews left Ru-*"
Would the word "Jew"
Continued on Page 6-A
ham-
mania in 1950 and 1951, the Times
said at the same time, Rumanian
authorities were arresting and
sentencing Zionist leaders to vary-
ing terms in prison, with some 200
persons involved. The Times re-
ported that "some of these people
are now being re-arrested and
tried for the offenses for which
they have already served senten-
ces."
Partly because of the unex-
pectedly large number of Jaws
registered when "the Rumanian
government suddenly and with-
out explanation reopened its
doors to allow the departure of
Jews to Israel," and partly be-
cause of the strength of Arab op-
position, the government stepped
the emigration "but the Jaws
have remained restless." In re-
sponse, the government opened
its campaign of arrests and
trials on charges of espionage
and treason, the Times report-
ed, in a bid "to frighten the
Jews into breaking their emo-
tional ties with Israel."
The Times listed a number of
individuals who have been victims
of the new campaign:
1. Israel Hart, who was employ-
ed by the Israel legation as jani-
Continuod on Pago 7-A
tome
to Union of American Hebrew Congregations Assembly... See Pages U6C




Page 2-A
*Je*lstnorkHn*i
Marilyn, Carroll
Banned by Arabs
NEW YORK(JTA) Major
American film distributors were
notified "by "the I'nited Arah Ro-
public Fiim Censor Board that
films starring Marilyn Monroe and
Carroll Baker, both recent con-
verts to Judaism, will be banned.
The board informed the film
makers that "this decision has
been taken for the general secu-
rity of our country." The board
ook similar action when Elizabeth
Taylor became a Jewess. The cen-'
orship is in line with the Arab
League boycott of producers and
actors who financially "or moral-
ly" support Israel.
Jorah Hadassah Luncheon
Torah group of Hadassah will
Sold its annual Youth Alyiah lun-
cheon Monday. 11:30 a.m.. at the
Algiers hotel. Saks Fifth Ave. will
show adv?nced holiday and Paris
fashions flown from New York U
pecially for the meeting. ^^^^
LONG-DISTANCE
MOVERS
FridcY. No*
Federation Appoints Le
Key Committees Through Comi
Chairmen o f major standing
committees of the Greater Miami
jeWKTr 'Federation "we**' frame.
Wednesday by 9am J. Heiman
president.
Miami attorney Louis H>iman.
| long active- in Jewish affairs,
I named chairman of the by-laws
I committee. A study will get under
way shortly to appraise the exht
ing by-law* and make recommen-
dations lor changes reflecting the
recent growth of Federation and
the local Jewish community.
Congratulating Dr. Irving Lehrman (second from toft) o.din-
ner ol tribute honoring the rabbi and ag^Tg
Emanu-El last week for "outstanding "[*****"2?
Bonds" are (left to right) George Tabanoff. -J^~^
ies; former Gov. of Maryland Theodore R. McKeldm who
made a special presentation to Rabbi Lehrman on behalf o
Israel; and (extreme right) Joseph Rose, honoraryJ^
the dinner and Miami Beach chairman for State of Israel
Bands. _______,_____________________
I aider* SimlcowHi has
mmid Chairman of th* person-
nel committee, which consists of
five members of the board of
governors, all appointed by Hei-
man. This committee acts for
the executive committee in mat-
tars relating to personnel rota-
tions and makes recommenda-
tion! to the executive commit-
to* on personnel practices.
DAILY PiCK-UPS New York, N-w fat
ley, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Wash-
iagten, Boston all other point*.
DIAL JE 8-8353
H. Lieberman & Sons
655 COLLINS AVE. MIAMI BEACH
RETURN LOAD RATES
Mendel Fisher to Join Gen. Marshall
At Jewish National Fund Dinner
Mendel N. Fi.sher. national ex-
ecutive director of the Jewish Na-
tional Fund, will pay tribute to
the leadership responsible for the
planning of the annual Greater
Miami JNF Council dinner.
Fisher will be among major
ipeaken at the annual dinner
scheduled for Thursday evening,
No*. 10. at the Fontainebleau
hotel.
Also partieipatinc Will be Gen.
S. L. A. Marshall, distinguished
military authority and newspaper-
man. Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Oritt
are chairmen of the annual event.
Rabbi Leon Kronish, Temple
Beth Sholom, and Rabbi Morris
Skop, Temple Jodea, will d*liv*r
th* invocation and benediction.
Rabbi Irving Lehrman, Temple
Emanu-El, will speak in behalf
of th* Jewish National Fund.
W*rd fund, n,
irer of j.
member of flfe |
"''"live Mai
active in |0
Ihr nmbinej jc.
1958 and 1
Olher s'MHtt.j
chairmen have I
nounci (i inchidri
ram.' committee,
Myers, and bn;
Leon Kaplan.
Tells Jncreost |
Al Brenner, pr
rior Window Corai__
Wednesday mJJ
of more than SJ
come for the ye
against the prevKaijij
The compaay, time
cated at 62S E. loth
j factures residential
cial windows, jalaaj,
Simkowitz is a member of Fed- walk in addition un
eration's board of governors and! a sun control device
the executive committee, and has horizontal or vertietl
I served on Federation's budget
committee and personnel commit-
tee. He is president of the Greater
Miami Jewish Community Center,
and has worked with the Welfare
Planning Council of Dade County
on the child and family welfare
survey committee.
Jay Kislak. who recently assumed
the leadership of .he local CJA
cash drive, has accepted the im-
portant post of chairman of the
finance committee. This group con-
sists of the treasurer of Federa
Hon. chairman of the budget com-
mittee, and other members of the
executive committee, including the
NEW BUILDING
Philip B. Stem,
D.D.S.
IS NOW LOCATED AT
1137 71st Street
Program will include bass-bari-'campaign chairman. This commit-
tone Charles Sheldon, who has ap- tee prepares Ibe annual Federation
peared in many Broadway pro- operating budget for presentation
NORMANDY
Miami Beach,
ISLE
Florida
UN 64551
SURfTY-SONDED
TERMITE
CONTROL
ductions. Accompanist will be
Miss Esther Barrett.
to the executive body.
Kislak is president of the Jay I
Ki>lak Moclgaaa Corporation, and
1901
MIPICnOM
IS. J-2 421
WORLD'S IARGIS?
Rabbi Mayer Abramowit*presj- !erwririfff budj?et commlt
dent, and So1 Goldman '*'; lees of ^th Federation and the
chairman of the JNF Council, sain
this week that reservations to the
dinner should be completed before
Nov. 16 to insure seating at the
annual event.
Prescript"!
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Beth Sholom Stag Party
Brotherhood of Temple Beth
Sholom held its first stag party ofj
| the season at the Lucerne hotel [
Thursday evening, according to
Jack Wagner, president.
W VlKVnfrO.
Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky
MS MICHICAN AVI MIAMI BEACH
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lerrlt S. Bletetre, F.D.


smber 13,-1959
*JewHHkridHam
Page 3-A
Southern Leader Casts Critical Eye on Youth
r A
IRIS AMAM
NOTISM
! SELF-HYPHOSIS
he mind and body mlrac-
bonds to Hypnotherapy.
Is bad habits: Smoking:
Insomnia; Female Diior-
exes: Nervous Tension;
bnfidence; Overweight;
[Allergies; Etc. Improve
tntally and physically.
j. Amov, fcu.o.
Hypnotherapy Clinic
Fid Awe. HI- 8-3033
Copyright 1959
>T BROS r> ,
I I'. /!# S/ '
To Morris B. Abram, a native
Southerner who Is chairman of
Atlanta's Citizen Crime Com-
mission, the civic and moral
health of a community is mea-
sured by its ability to face up to
its most pressing problems.
At present, he believes that
too many people in the North
and South are 'literally and figu-
ratively" fleeing the problem of
urban intergroup tensions by de-
nying their responsibility for the
status of "other" races or minor-
ity groups in their communities.
The Gecrgia-born attorney and
former prosecutor at the Nuren-
berg war trials, who will address
the eighth annual meeting of the
Greater Miami chapter of the
American Jewish Committee
Sunday, Nov. 22, recently ex-
pressed this view before a Uni-
ted States commission. He told
the body that the existence of so
large a class of "underprivileg-
ed" in the Negro community is
an indictment of the entire com-
munity and "the price of the
wrong is one which is exacted
from the total community and
not just the Negro."
His deep involvement in the
problems and conscience of his
own community led Abram to ac-
cept the chairmanship of the Cit-
izens' Crime Commission of At-
lanta. In this capacity he sees
his duties as two-fold: the pre-
vention of crime in the South's
largest city and the rehabilita-
tion of criminals especially
youthful offenders.
"If all society does is to lock
up one who has perpertrated a
crime and makes no attempt to
analyze and eliminate the causes
IE JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
...WAL BANQUET FONTAINEBLEAU HOTEL
IURSDAY. NOV. 19, 6:30 p.m.
Ceeif Speaker:
GEN. S. L. A. MARSHALL
Eefertainment by:
CHARLES SHELDON
Star of Opera, teeMe, mmd TolevltJM
Dietary Laws Observed
Reservations Call J.N.F. Office JE 8-6464
Chairmen: SELMA AMD SAMUEL ORITT
DR. JACK R. LAZAR
Chiropractic Physician
Moved to
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shrinks the swollen doors to the
sinus cavities and helps drain
away the pain-causing pressure
and congestion. .
The shrinking substance in
this new tablet has been so suc-
cessful topically In promoting
drainage of the sinus cavities
that it is now prescribed more
widely by doctors than any ma-
terial for this purpose. This new
medication is now available at
drug counters without the need
for a prescription under the
name, Dristan* Decongestant
Tablets. Dristan Tablets cost
only 98* for a bottle of 24 tab-
lets. Buy and use Dristan Tab-
lets with the absolute guarantee
that they will drain away pain-
causing pressure and congestion
of the alnus cavities, relieve the
pain and distress, or purchase
price will be refunded.
and motivations," he says, "it re-
flects only an attitude of ven-
geance." To take a juvenile de-
linquent and merely put him
away for ten years with harden-
ee>rrim*.rrals* RKiPtjilion, Abram
states, which only insures that
"he will be a worse citizen when
he leaves jail than when he en-
tered."
Abram, Who will speak before
the American Jewish Committee
workshop on "Spotlight on
Youth," assails the notion that
juvenile delinquency involves
only one type of youngster and
can therefore be handled by a
single overall solution. He sees
at least three different categor-
ies and situationseach calling
for distinct and different orien-
tations.
Initially, there is "the normal
child in the normal environment."
Any delinquency on his part is
more of the nature of "pranks"
or testing of parental or society's
authority. The remedy in this
case is a keener understanding
by parents of "the psychodynam-
ics of raising children."
"In my generation," "* MV*'
"sternness was the keynote of
parental attitude toward chil-
dren." Since then there has ta-
ken place a complete evolution
to extreme "permissiveness."
Currently the pendulum is swing-
ing back a little. "A balance be-
tween these two extremes and an
understanding of the need* of
these children will, for the most
part make for good citizenship
in these youngsters."
The second category is "the
normal child "in an abnormal en-
vironment." In the main, these
are the childen of newly arrived
rural migrants to large urban
centers, particularly slum areas.
The adults and children find
themselves in a way of life they
never knew or made. Old values
are destroyed and assimilation to
the new way of life is slow and
painful. A feeling of uprooted-
ness and lack of belonging re-
sults. In this situation, Abram
asserts, it is the responsibility of
the entire community to extend
all of its social welfare facilities
to these people. The communi-
ties should be sensitized to this
problem and develop human re-
lations programs to deal with
this "thoroughly human condi-
tion."
The last type of juvenile de-
linquent is the most dangerous
and most difficult to help. He is
"the abnormal child in any en-
vironment." Here, says A^^ram,
we need a neW 'In lentation. 'We
must recognize that this situa-
tion must be treated as a medi-
cal rather than legal problem."
Abram agrees that this type of
child must be withdrawn from
.society because he may become
an "object of mimicry." How-
ever, he adds, "locking him up
and not trying to cure him \s
nothing less than barbarism."
Abram emphatically denies that
crime or juvenile delinquency is
rooted more in any one race or
ethnic group than another. He
has proven this point in dramatic
empirical fashion., As one of the
developers of the Highpoint
Apartments in Atlanta, the first
aad largest private rental project
in the South for Negroes, he lev-
eled a depressed area which he
says "had at least one police call
a night" and substituted good
housing for some 1,600 Negroes.
Now, he says, "in the same area
there is about one police call
every six monthsor about the
same ratio as any similar white
residential nejgnbornood.:'
Invited to Join Club
Junior high school boys and girls
in the near Southwest area were
invited to join the club program
sponsored by the Miami YMHA of
the Greater Miami Jewish Com-
munity Center, 450 SW 16th ave.,
at a free dance scheduled for Sat-
urday, 8 to 10 p.m.
NtViR BEFORE-V A6AIN
l 5 PASSENGER, SUN ROOF
Full Price $llf6
Dorr Motors. Inc.
20800 S. FEDERAL HWY.
F-ERRINE
Phone a 54114
MOW YOU DIAL
FR 3-4605
for
vJenistiFkrkli&n
GOLFERS
6.i* CeefWeec. wflh
NEW GRIPS
AN Styles Avertable
iMfcertiaf R.fiai.hinf
GOFFScilS TUSs
CARIB MIAMI MIRACLE
m I CORAL GAJ
KM. ^WH"*
SMmi^
KUKKZ memo
ROCK, HUDSON
Doris DAY
in Eastman COLOR CINEMASCOPE
FriAGm at h^powhtown |
. TARZAN.
FINOS rOaGOTTIN \
WORLDS
I'
DENNY WILED a Its NEW T.rni J
CfSAtt OANOVA BANNA MUSES
THE APE MAN
TECHNICOLOR
"IttiAfcSJ
Opan LOS
fjfltft*""^
II illK MBIT CiRRIIU. B\M.R
ULUPUMER III I "MB
ESSEX
BUI yorfOBME
TODAY

j^*^ Bqrons
CORAL GABIES
45 Miracle Mile
EDISON CENTER
6200 N.W. 7th Ave.
HIAIEAH
165 Hteleah Dr.
LITTLE RIVER
7964 NX 2nd Ave.
AILAPATTAH
1736 N.W. 36th St.
MIAMI BEACH
1261 Washington Ave.
DOWNTOWN MIAMI, 51 E. Flagler St.
SA1
PER
ANNUM
DADfr FEDERAL SAVINGS aeeoeati
are INSURED to $10,000 by an ag.ncy
of the Fed.ral gov.ram.nt.
"One of the Nation's
Oldest and largest"
0ade Federal
t/AViNGS on-4 Ioan Association o< Miam.
PH M UPTON P-esideni
'5 Convonfenf Office* S*rv Dad* Comfy
RESOURCES EXCEED 140 MILLION DOLLARS


j


Page 4-A
rjmist Her****
OFFICE and PLANT 120 NX. Sixth Street
Telephone FR 3-4605
Teletype Communications Miami TWX
_________________MM 396_________^^^^
4
FRED K. SHOCHET..........Editor and Publisher
LEO MINDLIN ........................ Executive Editor
ISRAEL BL'REAl'
202 Bra Yehuda Tel Aviv. Israel
RAY U BINDER ______________ Correspondent
UAHC's General Assembly
Greater Miami welcomes the 4.500 dele-
gates from across the cation who axe gather-
ing here this weekend to attend the 45th gen-
eral assembly of the Union of American He-
brew Congregations, the 22nd biennial assem-
bly of the Union's National Federation of Tem-
ple Sisterhoods, and other UAHC affiliate meet-
ings.
In recognition of the event The Jewish
Fkxidian in this issue offers its readers a spe-
cial supplement depicting the manifold pro-
grams of organized Reform Jewry. See Paqes
l-eci
The renown of the many speakers who
will be appearing at the UAHC sessions and
the scheduled workshop sessions portend an
exciting convention.
We take this opportunity of wishing the
many delegates arriving in our community
success in their deliberations.
The JNF Annual Meeting
Jewish He:.:r.=: Fund Council of Greater
Miami holds its annu.'' a tr.eetmg Thurs-
Mee. 19. at the Fontcmeb!eau hoteL
' -; :r.zr. the Jewish community
ha event w.th the vigor that
-"--5 ; ".es beck to the very
-Tys of active eficrt c-.ed at the estab-
,ent of a Jewish republic in Palestine. Vir-
tually from the beginnina. the Jewish National
set upon itself the task oi purchasing and
amassing lend for the hacpy day when the
Zkm irecar. would become z reality.
p131 G s 4 of acreage had
=hecay beer, aoqaked by the JNF was in no
5mail measure responsible for the vitality of
';"-e sr -.Hilary defense Israel s early'set-
tiers mustered agennst a seven-nation Arab in-
vasion on Independence Day.
The Greater Miami Council is our commun-
ity s Jewish National Fund representative or-
ganization here. Through a relatively new
program of wills and bequests. | has taken
upon itself the task of extending the range of
JNF effectiveness far beyond the greatest as-
-ens of the day when the famed Blue and
White Box of Keren Kayemeth reiqned su-
preme.
Those attending the Nov. 19 meeting here
will come away with a more intimate knowl-
edge of Miami's efforts dedicated to the fumD-
ment of mis task. I
Israel's New Spokesmen
Recollections of the incomparable Abba
Ebon as Israel's emissary here are still with
us. But the doubts since his resignation have
been allayed that the rnan-killing job he held
could not be filled.
Recognition of his diplomatic brilliance is
cccorded in Israels decision to split the post
of Ambassador to the United Stales and Uzuftod
Nations between two forces. Apart from this.
Mr. Ebon's successors are "~*im them-
selves with enviable ^n
Arthur Laurie's recent handling of the Is-
raeli position at the UN in the face of vicious
attacks by Ahmed Shukairy and Dr. Fawn, the
United Arab Republic's big guns there, is a
case in point
Equally able was Avraham Harmon's ora-
torical gambits before a Zionist audience in
New York some ten days ago. Harmon's warn-
ing to the Arab leadership that Israel's eleven
years of continued achievement and fiMjiesi
make her an infinitely more difficult military
objective to challenge and conquer than ever
before contains the razor of historical per-
ceptivenees that raised his predecessor's diplo-
macy to levels of sheer poetry.
For a email nation. Israel certainly seems
to suffer no lack of ardent spekesmen capable
of meeting the prestige and know-how of their
In this, the Jewish State is certainly
!->----------**"*' -" V*,J,rwi*%J?????t
t nan

BSREmFtt&TmSSrt^
ts^J^TH^s^. ~~ ^-r
Volume 33 Number 46
Fridav November 13. 1959
*12 Heshvan 5720
A LISSOM IN POLITICS
American Education Week
This is American Education Week. The
notional ocearvaunj is being marked Nov. 8
la 15.
We have become particularly sensitized to
oar educational needs during the past few
yeas. As a people, we recognize increasingly
that only a soundly-educated citizenry will pre-
vail over the challenge to our freedom from
alien political and er?m>fnir philosophies.
But there are those to whom education was
among the most exalted values long before the
threat from withoutto whom scholarship and
intellectual achievement have always been a
virtue for their own sake. This is certainly true
of Jewish communities wherever they may be
MttMsksxi
Apart from their theological seminaries.
American Jewry may point proudly to such
Jewisn-sponsored institutions of higher learn-
ing as Yeshiva University and its Albert Eon-
stein college of medicine. Brandeis University
and tne recently-established Jewish University
of Chicago. *
These schools add strength to the lifebfood
ot our nation's educational processa nation
mcreasingly aware of its profound shortcom-
ings to the same extent that it is rightly prood
of its inagnificent achievement, in Uus cnea oi
numan endeavor.
That achievement shall ultimately gain
total aecendancy over shortcoming, is the aoal
of Amencan Education Week! ^^
Mortgage-Burning
Both El Congregation burns its mortqpne
Sunday evening. This i. an cnispiciouT^ccS-
on for any congregation, since it uvlicasse
onrnteres, on the part of its tnembersTaedi.
*-?$& niunfr^
ttons as a major goal oouga-
-THt continuing development of a svna-
gogue as a center of lewishreliofous 2^
^S^r^S^ ,tS 9azhmat day* will wufr
porticukx gaitmcabon. join the rt ^wf
am i see U
by U0 MIUDUN
man extraction, who escaped Hitler twenty years kaojifc'
mmI Van arrests. Tne Bonn niiiimnn mi
JACK I
Pn.Tient of ^
Uon LfJ?Ue rfj,
PPcarasce a>
*> >; a meethx
ADI. raueTTTS
to" questissi k,
aaturaluee Kmnt^J
an he*
several Nan arrests. The Bonn government reeeath *.
tour the coustry ui his present capacity as a meaas f"
extern of the anti-Semitic resurgeece there It wa,
h return. *e the CnMed States that Baker eas* t,_
before the Florida ADL. "
Perhaps he had little or so time to digest the nbta.
observations, but Baker's report was a confusion tatt*
-facts" that made many of his listeners wince It sW
his defeose that he warned sis audience a: the sststt
happy probability of reaching ary nsskj-
instead that he vaguely intended using the talk as a aerwJ
board. He would. Baker implied. let the data lead km j^
eon session af random, with these who heart] fc^
uhimato process of-lerretiag out some sensible
Uoa of resurgent German aati-Semiti-u-
This may have bees his intentioo, but Baker'( faa.
vent nowhere, nor could his listeners come to any c2
than that he had sent them on an illusory -.- i; bj
the ADL executive was fearful of what he nngkt
retrospect, his report emerged as a ma-- i^
his own fate as a refugee and for the ir.ac:. r. of hu enliC
try men who contributed to it.
SB-
SI
urns or ceanfCTM* saArawr mrenmrni
BAKER LABOKIOOSLY TRACED the pjyehie
' fered with respect to his return to Germ any \lsttksSs|
town that was the city of his birth, be beheld the ream
of the synagogue is shits his father served u rabbi
shell of the house where he had lived. Baker traced the iavj
be experienced on bow viewing the lonely alley cats tat]
among its ruins. This essetsoasl laceration be brosgkthi|
climax with a listing of figures spotlighting the seaieoe i|
proud German Jewish eossmestty.
If there was evidence of restraint ia his erokatMa all
ory. the audience could do so less than mark it up w 1
tally sociolotoc hunt for impersonal fact and to kss
travel the frequentry-vijited path that characterosi
often unscientific design of contemporar. Jevah
In this assumption, his listeners were promptly
purged hiissif of the tragic quality of I re-urs. laser |
laesched into the presentation of a series of coefhetisg:
views designed to shed light oa whether or rot there a i an(
The ADL's director of foreign isfsrssatioe bat u --?m\
giuesJ is journalism and the Isssimmuilii But sh icaor ae|
cated that it had Bttle effect on the method be adostt i
he optmooa nsrttvd as tracsparert km hi
semis desire to anile at predeternained cor.ci-s.^es.
gy war of fiamm. ciFiAimmc rm tmxm:suu
tJUHATEVER HIS ULTIMATE survey ma> lad
" duenssed a variety of interviews and offerH tsea as
would simply be madmissaUe in profe>s:--.' -- u-rm
was the mas he had knows years before, who today adsnBnil
because he dad enlhmr, daring the Hitler holocaust ( I
tunate Jewish frireds. There were the sminrn if
h emeiab who* earned via heartening and cost
the significance of Neo-Nazi youth grour? -' "
light of the recent eonvortios of the former SS ehe
There was eves the Bookshop keeper be revi
years, who prided himself oe the pirmoal k.ad of .
be had waged igiisw National Socialism B.: naehm sfl
m his report here, did Baker pitet evidence of as stjett"
guarded person-to-pervm sampling of seisins
reliable picture reflecting cm-rent German
their midst.
What emerged was s pastiche of prefahrkatesladejl
no particular direction except perhaps onea PT*|
tent oa justifying the inaction of his former
Baker achieved his negative higapsint. when ke
counted a German official's explanation of what
Semitic literature today
"We simply seize and barn it." he esoted the aBrfT
Germany today caa eat afford the laxsry of avi.i
cern for freedom of the press however emously __*"-
exercised." And thee, by way of mterpretisz -c **"*"
of democracy eader Bean. Baker explained The te'
had three keadred years to sractice liberty 1
wtth as
keffswl
For still, the r
cast him out attracted
MteOectually Hence, the vague leseks ef si* r-
mg ease wuh which he accepted Nan tactics a
CUCM OUTKtCKT APPROVAL ef so massive as at
"* freedom, be it ia the aame of protecu= Jews .
them by the sax auBjon. betrayed the ADL execauwif
stability. Twenty years a refugee from a Germany P"
this time a catuea ef the eertd's '-** -,frt
little.
aa**
Baker may very eefl be a competeet man **J
f*Pt oa Germany to the Aatf-Defamatisa !>*
"* the sagacity and rigitihlj that the office s hs^J
5*nd Bwf his leak here, lake the last metesteat w
WoieWm1V^W'
All of which
Cerman Jews
*^ the street
their former
levels of bakavaar to
,h*m agaiast this sad
pat
tong
cataoa
IPs WeMe. merely ssag eat. "Yos _f n
areas Severn, isalsmrd why Baker was s
ich brmes to mmd the sad paght ef sJ
who cast ge heme agaie. yet wse P*JPTj
ret at what eaee was. Neiiber the *
toeatonsee. ear at werst the -_*^
ivaar k watch their termer country*""^
this sad fTii i-fJiLtisa b#w*T*r ^


irember 13, 1959
+Je*U*nark9lan
Page 5-A
:iAL ANNOUNCEMENT TO ISRAEL BONDHOLDERS
^l.^^^Kl'^^y^^^^y Miami's most exciting social event in years
THE GALA
^Diplomatic tj^jall
JDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 5th
Three World Premieres
AMERICA WELCOMES ISRAEL'S NEW AMBASSADOR
&^rvranam encu
arman
and ^ed by the Diplomatic and Consular Corps of World Nations
{*harlton eston
Star of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer's Presentation
of William Wyler's "BEN HUR"
joan C'rawford
Glamorous Star of Many Motion Pictures
FFICIAL OPENING OF THE WORLD'S LARGEST BALLROOM
JUc <_/Ve*v Ljrand of the Fontainebleau
yami's First "Hollywood" Opening
TV and radio interviews with guests as they
arrive at the entrance .
On-the-spot coverage by national press services .
Fashion and Society Editors .
Columnists, Newsreels, National Picture Magazines .
(MISSION BY PURCHASE OF A $500 ISRAEL BOND
Dinner Couvert: $10 Per Person
THE COMMITTEE FOR THE DIPLOMATIC BAll
|$44 Washington Ave. J* 1-5314
Gov. LeRoy Collins, Honorary Chairman
GREATER MIAMI ISRAEL BOND COMMITTEE
lack A. Cantor and Samuel Oritt, General Chairmen
Samuel Friedland, Board Chairman
Jacob Sher, Honorary Chairman
Mrs. Max Weitz, Chairman Women's Division
jUrs. Jack Katzman, Diplomatic Ball Grande Hostess
FONTAINEBLEAU HOTEL
r""
^* l -
.^"^fl af
wv \u
> L\u'k flu
Wk
_^
AMBASSADOR HARMAN
CHARLTON HESTON
JOAN CRAWFORD

C^a/a jf-cstivities!
Noted Stage, Screen and TV Stars
JOAN CRAWFORD PAT CARROLL
JOHNNY CARSON PETER DONALD
HERB SHRINER KENNY DELMAR
DORE SCHARY SAMMY KAYE
PARKER FENLEY AND MANY OTHERS
Plus Complete Fonlainebleau floor Mew
And dancing all evening to the Sacasas Orchestra
NO SPEECHES! NO SOLICITATIONS!
Wally Wanger, Producer
Jerry Bell, Stage Manager


Pag 6-A
*Jewisiint>r*mri
^W*. ftl MWM UI6Mt>1 T'
Planning new series of courses in modern Hebrew to be broad-
cast again over WTHS. ch. 2. sponsored by the Bureal of Jew-
ish Education of Greater Miami are Mrs. Miriam Anisfeld and
Mrs. Fay Feinstein.
Hebrew Program On Television
Two Hebrew programs will be
broadcast on Station WTHS ch. 2
for the study of modern Hebrew.
On Thursdays at 8 p m "Begin
Hebrew" will be broadcast for
:hosc who wish to begin the study
of the modern Hebrew laneuar
Mrs. Zvi Feinstein will be instruc-
tor. First broadcast is scheduled
for Nov. 12.
The second course will begin
on Tuesday, Nov. 24, It a.m.,
with a broadcast of "Living He-
brew," a continuation of the ele-
mentary Hebrew program broad-
cast during the last school ytr.
Instructor will bo Mrs. Miriam
Anisfeld.
Programs are under the super
of Louis SchwsrUaBM, ex
ccutive director, and Dr Nathan
.el Soroff. consultant, of the Bu-
reau of Jewish Kauc-.ir.un The
programs unl be heard once each
eaBB on a one-half hour broadcast.
and will continue throughout the
school year.
The local TV committee on "Liv-
ing Hebrew" include Mrs. Fein-
stcn. Mrs. Anisfeld. Schwartiman.
Dr Soroff. Herbert Berger. Abra-
ham Gittelson. Benjamin Udoff
pad Zvi Rosenkranz. who supplies,
the necessary art materials.
IPS President Resigns
PHILADELPHIA Edwin Wolf.
2nd. for the past five years presi-
dent of the Jewish Publication So-
ciety of America, resigned last
week and was succeeded by Jus-
tice Horace Stern who. for the past
48 years has been a vice president
of the Society Wolf's action was
prompted by his election to the
pre dency of the Federation of
i Agencies of Greater Phila
delphia. He was immediately elect-
ed to serve as a vice president of
JPS.
GENE HINSONS
THREE ARTS THEATRE CLUB
342 ARAGON AVENUE
PREStNTS
WES DUNAWAY and BETTY O'KEEFE
m the Out of This World Comedy
"AMPHITRYON 38"
("The Uve life ef tfc* CeJs" b S. N. HHtMAN
D.recied by SID CASELL
Nightly except Sunday thru Nov. 14
CUBTAIN 1:30
hilAlCCS -GeorSe B.rke. Her.ld
fOft UUMVAJlOMi HtOM HI 5-0*74
Moscow Rabbi in Tilt With Ai
Continued from Page 1-A
per -an apperant seeking"-a' ^eb?
No. It makes no difference."
The visitor said he had been
told some supervisors could
make obtaining a position diffi-
cult for a Jew.
"How can that be?" he replied.
"There if no unemployment in
the Soviet Union. EveryoneJew
and non-Jew works. Do yew
know o* any such cote? I have
heard there is anti-Semitism of"
that nature in the United State*.
Is it true that seme companies
in America will net hire Jews?
Is it true that Jews know they
can never a&/nc* in certain
companies?"
Why are there no Yiddish
newspapers in the Soviet Union?
"Your information is incor-
rect There is one. It is pub-
lished in Birobidjahn."
The question meant why is
there none herewhere the bulk
of the Jews in the Soviet Union
live?
"There is no need for one."
But other national groups have
newspapers. Why not the Jews?
"There is no Ukrainian news-
paper either Besides, we receive
copies of the Birobidjan news-
paper."
How many copies?
"Some."
Who reads it here?
"Whoever is interested."
How many?
"That is hard to say."
But, the visitor pointed out,
Yiddish publications thrived in
the Soviet Union in the early
lWCs. There were six daily
newspapers, 11 weeklies, 12 bi-
monthlies, 13 other periodicals
and four publishing houses.
Rabbi Levine: "There is no
need now. however."
Are there any Yiddish books?
' No."
Is there a state Yiddish or He-
brew publishing house?
No."
Why not?
"There is no need for one."
Why was there a need in the i
1930s and none now?
Rabbi: "I do not know."
The visitor recalled the golden
period of throe decades ago Yid-
dish books wore published in edi-
tions of 100,000 copies. In 193)0
hore were 171 titles totaling
750,000 copies. A year later, the
Yiddish State Publishing House
in Kharkov published 744 titles
totaling 5,000.000 copies. Yiddish
book publishing increased five-
fold from 1913 to 193r.
Yet today, with the number of
Jews in the Soviet Union approxi-
mately what it Was fhen, the
amount has fallen to zero
"Not exactly rero." the rabbi
corrected. "The works of Sho-
lem Aleichem and a seder were
recently published."
Nothing else?
"There is no need/'
The State Publishing Company,
however, has announced plans to
publish a book of Yiddish folk
songs written by Zinovi Kom-
panieyetz, a Jewish composer. A
Russian-Hebrew dictionary is also
believed to be in preparation by
a Moscow scientific institution.
Why is there no Yiddish
theater? Before the war there
were 10 Yiddish state theaters
and two theatrical schools.
Rabbi: "There is no need. Be
sides, many today speak Yiddish.
They would not understand any
plays in Yiddish. There is no
audience and therefore no de-
mand."
Then virtually nothing Yiddish
is left? No Yiddish is taught,
none being published, none being
performed?
"Perhaps."
During the past four years the
jubilee issue of Sholem Alei-
chem "s works, 200 pages long
and printed in 30,000 copies, was
the only book published in Yid-
UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
SUNDAY, NOV. 15, MIAMI BEACH AUDITORIUM 8:30 PM
MONDAY, NOV. 1, DADE COUNTY AUDITORIUM 8 30 P M
FABIEN SEVITZRY
LEONARD ROSE, Cellist
CAROL SMITH, Contralto
TONIA FLORES, Spanish Dancer
PROGRAM: BiOCH, BOCCHERINI AND DeFAUA
T'e, M.am. Beach Aud.tor.un,: JE 1.0477 Dad. do-nty A-d.toc.um: HI S-2SM
Cordelia*: FR 3-5123 Amidon's: HI S-S070 ^^
the spencer-tart nT
school of | ART inc.
3917 alton road, miami beach
DRAWING
PAINTING
LIFE CLASSES
NEW SCULPTURE DIPT.
adults-children
days evenings
Students Mark
Education Week
Students of the Lear School are
this week celebrating American
Education Week by attending and
participating in special lectures
assemblies, book reviews, social
and,athletic activities.
Hiehlight of the school's cele-
bration was to be on Thursday at
friends. Af noon, members of the
home economics class of the sen-
ior high school were to prepare
guests "* $PeCial brunch t0 *
Ira Elegant, president of the
senior class, announced that be-
*"" meet for an evening of social
activities whJWsd.JlX!*1
Tribute P,ms Near ffr,,#
a Vj^M* BMrtag conation for
on Tuesday. Nov 24 ,. ,hX n
J0JJL Accordm* J^ *
Federation president, several Tun
<>r<1 communal leaders hn-n"
t- and frieSVexpecV
Philanthropy of Greater Bo2bb.
Russ.an. Thtrtj.w.
" Yiddish. TW, ^
read. YiddkhkBeJ
ny mom."
But there ire _
at least 100 YaH
Poets nd dnnuMni
They have hadci,
be published of;
cent years.
Rabbi: "There sbI
The visitor rctifc
All I nion Conjrt-n',
ter- :n June Xd'i
Yiddish writers ui T|
ature menuooed
Rabbi Levine
for a moment. Tank
to his favorite laxe]
How many books,!
were being pubiiihaj
in America?
NEXT WKi: TWJssal
el East ltd*.
VOTE FOR
The ONLY candidate for
who lias PROVED he can
CUT TAXES]
WHEN WOLFARTH WAS MAY0J,
THE TAX MILLAGE DROPPED 6%-
UNDER THE PRESENT MAYOR,
THE TAX RATE HAS CLIMBED 21%!
As candidate in 1949, Bill
Wolfartfi pledged "efficient,
business-like handling of the
city's finances to lighten the
tax burden In his two years
as Mayor, Miami's tax levy
compared to runaway which
this year brought more than
21% increase in levy, tax
bills 25% to 50% higher.
Wolfarth's administration in-
creased] surplus savings to
more than $3,000,000.00 -
wild spending has decimated
this by nearly 65% this year
alone to barely $500,0001
Pull Lever
5-A
w,
LETS ELECT FORMER MAYOR
WILLIAM M.
WOLFARTH
AGAIN


bt 13. 1959
* */.!? thrihtr
Page 7-A
Rumania Terrorizes Jews, London Says
fuAt_____I _. .
|y woiif
Opens
Here
from Pago 1-A
lu hotel from Nov.
a bevy of interna-
ed leaders in relig
the arts and other
to speak at nu-
tiop gatherings,
congregations par-
Temple Beth Am,
[M. Baumgard; Tern-
Hollywood, Rabbi
Temple Beth
eon Kronish; Tern-
Ft. Lauderdale,
Ranson; Temple Is-
Beach, Rabbi Irv-
Temple Sinai of
Rabbi Benno M.
pie Israel of Greater
Joseph R. Narot;
,Hdea, Rabbi Morris
Wolff, immediate
of the South Flor-
of the Union of
raw Congregation*,
In with Mr*. Leo-
irti of th* gigantic .
1 committo* of more
hich ha* prepared
fltanoous meeting*
and it* affiliates.
[ in Dade and Brow-.
ml their presidents
| in a Sunday runni-
ng session of the
il assembly at the
Temple Beth Am,
Steinberger; Beth
loward Miller; Beth
vorite ((ere for rARA-
l.d with FIRST-EVE*
III TFAEPHONE DIHEC-
PAOE INDEX GUIDE
26, Jft 4-2500 (A.M I
Continued from Pago 1-A
tor and whose father and sister!
went to Israel ten years ago, was!
arrested on charges of espionage.
2. Kalman Bernstein, 60, and his |
two sons, both engineers, were'
charged with espionage. The evi-
dence was the contents of letters
sent to the Bernsteins by members
of their families in Israel. The
letters contained descriptions of
religious ceremonies with pictures.
3. Efraim Zingor, who had pre-
viously boon triad and sentenced
to 20 year*' imprisonment, was
charged with betraying Rumania
and th* newspaper for which ho
worked in Kluj when ho sent
copies of songs ho had written to
a brother in tsraol. Zingor had
an extra day addad to hi* son.
tence because ho was toon sig-
naling to hi* wife to remove hor
wedding ring, apparently so that
she could disassociate herself
from him.
4. A large group of Zionist lead-
ers in Transylvania were arrested
and were believed still waiting
trial. They included Dr. Ernest
Horvato, 70, who served one sen-
tence after being arrested in 1950.
Bad health kept him in the prison
hospital for most of his term and
the new arrest may threaten his
life, the Times reported. Re-arres-
ted also was Dr. Leo Fried, who
had been general secretary of the
Zionist Organization in Transyl-
vania, who served one sentence
and emerged from prison suffer-
ing from tuberculosis.
Amoaig the Jews arrested in
Bucharest, the Timea liatc*-hoH*>4
Wurzel whose family was mur-
dered by the Nazis, except for a
sister who went to Israel 12 years I
ago; David Faibash, a Hebrew
writer; Schmidt, Schitinovizer, To-
bakaru, and Horowitz, all Zionist
leaders; four employees of the le-
gation, including Israel Hart, and
three girls.
They Move Their Offices
Paul Sobel and Charles Wein-
berg, realtors and land analysts,
announce the removal of their of-
fices to 420 Lincoln rd., second
floor.
El of Hollywood, Mrs. Irving Fish-
man; Emanuel of Ft. Lauderdale,
Mrs. Henry Thanz; Temple Judea,
Mrs. Maurice Waldorf; Temple Is-
rael of West Palm Beach, Mrs.
Samuel Bubis; Temple Israel of
Greater Miami, Mrs. Joseph Ruff-
nec and Temple Sinai of North
Miami, Mrs. Ralph Whitehouse.
Invitation was extended Wednes-
day to all Greater Miamians to at-
tend the following UAHC evening
sessions: Sunday, Nov. 15 Rabbi
Maurice N. Eisendrath, Union
president, recently elected "Cler-
gyman of the Year;" Monday,
Nov. 16 "Youth Challenges Re-
ligion," Rabbi Arthur Lelyveld, of
Fairmount Temple, Cleveland, O.,
Mrs. Rose Franzblau, New York
Post columnist and noted child psy-
chiatrist, David Levit, head of the
International Doughnut Corpora-
tion of America; Tuesday, Nov. 17,
"Religion in Our Emerging So-
ciety," Norman Cousins, editor,
Saturday Review, Rabbi Louis
Binstock, Temple Sholom, Chicago.
Among South Floridians setting
the stage here for the convention
are:
Meyer A. Baskin, Dr. Alvin
Krasne, Sam C. Levenson, Allen
I. Freehling, Dr. J. A. Greenhouse
and A. J. Harris.
Also David I. Hochberg, Albert
I. Jacobs, David D. Pollack, Al-
bert L. Rosen, Jack Wagner, Irv-
ing Wolff, and Sandford Levkoff.
Women active locally in arrang-
ing for the National Federation of
Temple Sisterhoods biennial are
Mesdames Sidney Stengel, Hy
Kaplan, Alfred Rich, Jack Krause,
Aaron Kanner, Ben Kazan, Albert
A. Green, Aaron Farr, Harold B.
Spaet, Alexander Robbins, Irving
Kobley, Sam A. Goldstein, Jack
Levkoff, Harry Levinson.
.....' iij.......'"'......is hi in i mi
COINWORD TWO
PUZZLES TO GO .
COINWORD No. 19 is this
week worth $280. Our puz-
'Ifi.iHi'ic .'"'"-my- iukjjha.t
there are only two weeks left
for you to win any or aU of
The Jewish Floridian Jack-
pot.
Next week's COINWORD
brings the series to a con-
clusion. The jackpot at that
will be worth $290. If there
are no winners, the jackpot
fund will be turned over as
a contribution to the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation.
Mail your entry to COIN-
WORD Editor, c/o The Jew-
ish Floridian, P. O. Box 2973,
Miami 1, Fla., by Sunday,
midnight, Nov. 15
Hebrew Group
Meets Saturday
Moadon, Hebrew-speaking grou->
here, will hold its first meetin-
of the season Saturday evening at
Temple Emanu-El.
Menachem L. Roth, Israeli ed"-
cator, will be guest speaker. Als"
to speak is Paul Kwitney, wno wTl
discuss his trip last summer to
Russia and Israel.
David Freedman will presid'.
Election of officers for the new
year will take place.
FR 9-4482
FICIENCIES
iAGE MONEY
CONSTRUCTION
IMANCE PRtMf
U OR HOME
ntt. near shopping
||r.conditioned, heal-
th carpeting. Season
Ifjnable.
ylvania Ave.
information
it 4-432*
SWEETZ
MDJON CHAmHOH
AVAILABLE
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YOUR HOME.
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i.
YOU DIAL
3-4605
for


Page 8-A
+Jmistfk>rklku)
Frid<*y. Ko^^ J
Charlton Heston, Joan Crawford Will
Visit Here for Gigantic Diplomatic Ball
Charlton Heston star of The
Ten Commandments" and Holly-
wood's newest spectacular film.
*Ben-Hur," and Joan Crawford,
glamorous star of motion pictures,
will head a galaxy of screen, stage
CHAKITON HtSTOM
. Ice-Ner
and television star? coming to Mi
ami to join in Americas welcome
to Israel's new Ambassador. Atm-
ham Harman.
Ambassador Harman and Mr-
Harman will be greeted by the dip
loiritic and consular corps of
mar.y nations, in addition to the I
entertainment siars. at a Diploma
tic Ball to be held on Saturday j
evening. Dec. 5. in the Fontaine-1
bleau hotel.
Jack A. Canter and Samuel '
Oritt, general chairmen of the
Greater Miami Israel Bend com- .
mittee, announced that "onprec-
edented enthusiasm" for the eve- !
ning was mounting rapidly.
The ball will also mark the offi-'
cial opening of the new Grand
Ballroom of the Fontainebleau ho-
tel, which is said to be the world's
largest.
Opening night festivities are ex-
pected to make this Miami's -first
Hollywood opening.'" with all the
glamour and excitement associat-
, cd with such events.
Among other stars who will join
Charlton Hestotn and Joan Craw-
ford in the festivities are Johnny
Carson, young new sensation of
television. Herb Shriner, Pat Car-
roll. Peter Donald, Kenny Delmar.
Sammy Kaye and many oth i -
Included in the festivities will be
television and radio interview^
with guests as they arrive at the
t ntrance of the Fontainebleau ho-
tel and national on-the spot cover
ace by press services fashion and
society editors, columnists and
picture news magazines.
Entertainment will include the
entire Fontainebleau floor show
in addition to the visiting screen
and television celebrities. There
will be dancing all evening to
the musk of the famed Sacasas
orchestra.
Admission to the Diplomatic Bail
is by purchase of a $500 Israel
Bond, plus $10 per person dinner
couvert.
Gcv\ LeRoy Collins is honorary
chairman of the Diplomatic Ball.
Heading arrangements, in addition
to Oritt and Cantor are Samuel
Friedland. Israel Bond board chair-
man. Jacob Sher. honorary chair
man. and William Bornstein. chair-
man of the arrangements commit-
tee. They said there would be no
speeches or solicitations at the
ball.
The appearance of Charlton Hes-
ton. who is Hollywood's "man of
the hour." will be his last personal
appearance prior to departure on
a world tour. Comparatively un
known ten years ago. Heston star-
red in "The Ten Commandments" !
before being selected for the title
role of Metro Goldwyn Mayer's
spectacular picture. "Ben-Hur."
The selection of Heston to por-
tray the role of "Ben-Hur" cli-
maxed a search that found pro-
ducer Sam Zimbalist and direc-
tor William Wyler interviewing
hundreds of actors. Heston was
deemed the perfect choice far
the most coveted role of the dec-
ade.
Joan Crawford, in addition to
being a star of motion pictures and
an Academy Award winner, is also
a successful business woman, serv-
ing on the board of directors of
the Pepsi-Cola Company. She is the
first woman to be elected to the
board of an international and ma-
jor corporation, and is believed to
be the first actress to hold the
post.
SA* C. UVENMM
Levenson Heads
Sinai Committee
Sam C. Levenson. founder and
trustee of Mt. Sinai Hospital, has
been selected by the hospital's
board of trustees to bead the open-
ing committee now preparing de-
tails for the dedication of the new
building, set for Dec. 13.
Dedication will be one day after
the formal opening of the new
Gloria Tuttle Causeway, terminat-
ing right next to the Mt. Sinai
building on the Miami Beach side.
The opening ceremonies will be
preceded by a series of private re-
ceptions in the hospital, which will
open its doors on dedication day to
thf general public.
Gov. LeRoy Collins is expected
to attend a reception in his honor
at the new hospital one day prior
to its opening, due to his inability
to be in Miami on Dec. 13.
Sinai Drive Inches Toward Half
Report Truman Will be Guest
where results oTSm,
announce! '
Oroviti Wi|| w
?nth ytar as i
Sinai Hospital, _
celebrt its it*
existence. Some l
acted to attend.
Several new fmaaWj
ready joined the nab,
men an contribute: fco.oo*/ej1
vidually. and the* \
announced at the
It was also iaa
de Hirscn Meyert
Idem Harry S.
invited to be
speaker, and that mrtTl
tive acc( ptance had ife*
received, subject objj j
by his doctors.
With pledges roaOaine nearly
~S00jm. Mt Sinai.IftJplnl's stretch
drive towards $2,000,000 to com-
plete funds for the opening of the
new building is progressing satis
factorily, according to Baron de
Hirsch Meyer. Miami Beach finan-
cier and community leader.
Meyer is chairman of the Max
Group Praised
By Air Force
The Armed Services committee
of the National Jewish Welfare
Board serving the Miami area has
been commended lor its hospital-
ity programs ty officials of the Air
Force Base in Homestead. Pis.
Mrs. Louis Glasser received
communications of appreciation
last week for the number of social
events sponsored by NJWB through
the Greater- Miami Jewish Feder
atton.
families
NJWB
La
and their
of the
and laWard
of Waffle's
breakfast. The
JWV OnegSUosj
Jewish War Veteran 1
ami Post 223 and
hold an Oneg Shabtaat
Veterans' Day at Trssjl
Friday evening. ,
Go fo the Polls
ftevaastor I7fk aad 24tb
PULL LEVER 10 A
VOTE ron
RICHARD E.
NORMAN
MIAMI CITY
Commissioner
Group 2
A Werkiee Me* Debates' to
frefy represent Tat fereortea
0w*j"-r0V
Goodwill Group fo Moot
Goodwill Group of Greater Mi-
ami will meet Thursday. Nov. 10,
1 p.m.. at 1047 W. Flagler at.
breakfast function far service-
men Sunday, Nov. IS, at one of
the Miami Beach restaurants.
Early in December, the commit-
tee is sponsoring a book review for
servicemen with the cooperation of
Una Bureau of Jewish Education,
another Federation agency.
The hospitality programs also
include swim parties at local pools.
with cabana facilities contributed
by Beach residents.
The Greater Miami programs
began in October with the presen
tation of the first New Year's cal-
endar booklets by Mrs. Glasser to
CoL John B. McPherson. Com
mender of the 2ard Air Division
at Homestead.
LONG MSTMBl
MOVII
fo of! poirrfs iari(
SSTIMATES CHEIIn
GIVEN WITHOUT
All! R.B.VJ
L1XES.KC
2136 N.W. 24ft J
5-44M
-TT
Heave Cars -- Will Trove/
To Your Home To Discuss
YOUR HEATING
PROBLEMS
lisceyste leosword
Phone Ft -Sit*
I'd r v .
We hove 42 d
meet and we
porticnlor problem
faction.
types of beating W
the type to onswer ft*
to rosjr complete sonv
I will personally chock every $ref
asm adns* the best kind of hcotinj
far veer home, the best possible V**
ond the best terms, if desired We can
do this with no money down od 5
years to pay.
S.E.TIDCY
WHY WAIT? UTS TALK BUSINESS!
D jef of or onW Po/ff kal Bosses Most Go.
HONEST ED. CZARNESKI
Your Vote and Support Appreciated
AS COUNTY TAXES GO UP .
. CITY TAXES SHOULD COME DOWN!
Call Today H01-3426
flocf
CZARNESKI
MMoti Cffy C
GROUP 3
ifssioocr
LEVER 13A
P*. tol Alv
EVE.
a*j SUN.
Sareing Tfco Public for Threw
One Compmmy ResposanhJo Jor ssW
(A 1-1301
AIR CONDITIONING*3
HEATING CORP-
47y S.W. 8Hi St. MO I-*4*


13. 1959
fJewlst ncrkflar)
Page 9-A

M
Jack Corner (right) attend recent groundbreaking
for new religious school building of the Commun-
jue of Rye, N.Y. The Camera were both first pres-
^e synagogue and are now honorary life presidents.
eir roovina to Miami Beach, the couple were prom-
cKric leaders. Corner was 1959 Combined Jewish
iainnan in Greater Miami
B'rith Chief Urges Action
ihalf of Soviet Jewish Life
from Pag* 1-A
bly on the cultural
Hm Soviet Jewish
" Katt declared.
House several weeks
B'nai B'rith that the
I had questioned Mr.
on the status of Rus-
that the Soviet Pre-
nied they were treated
Irom other nationality
Soviet Union.
[ the delegates that "the
ppiinR of Jewish life in
Union cannot be dis-
i merely saying it does
He said there is "ade-
ctive evidence" that
rg are denied the rights
tionality groups and "as
it situation endures, it
ar active concern." As-
|t the policy of discrim-
'government imposed,"
frith president said its
aspijrxiate every pos-
| Jewish cultural and re-
[in the USSR."
ibassador Avraham
pd the delegates that Is-
onal elections of last
ted the "complete self-
of Israelis that their
exist is an unshakable
ily and economically."
nee, he said, was evi-
[fact that foreign policy
"practically no part"
aign or election results.
^s made their choice on
sues, including that of
form, Harman said.
'positive aspect" of
the elections, the Ambassador
said, was that none of the lists
which made their political ap-
peals directly to the ethnic beck-
grounds of Israel's immigrants
get into the Parliament. This,
he declared, was demonstrable
proof that Israel's "mixed mul-
titudes mr* successfully under
going a tremendous transforma-
tion from rootless people to root-
ed citizens."
While he characterized Israel's
relations with the Arab states as
still "negative on their (Arab)
parf," he predicted" that "the day
of positive relsttans'ls just a ques-
tion of timeif we use time ad-
vantageously, to strengthen the
roots of IsrajM." <-This was being
accomplished through increased
economic development and foreign
exports, Mr. Harman said, point-
ing out that in the first nine
months of this year Israel's ex-
ports have increased 17 percent
accompanied by a decrease in im-
ports.
The conference honored the
B'nai B'rith president with the es-
tablishment of a Label A. Katz
Youth Fellowship. The presenta-
tion was made to Mr. Katz by
Paul- Kapelow of New Orleans,
chairman of the B'nai B'rith Foun-
dation.
Heart Director Resigns
Dr. Robert J. Boucek, president
of the Heart Assn. of Greater Mi-
ami, has announced the resigna-
tion of James E. Blozie as execu-
tive director of the local Heart
Assn.
IfT'S BREAK THE CLOSED CIRCUIT
COMMISSION
MURRAY Z. KLEIN
For CITY COMMISSIONER, Group 3
* FLORIDA BORN VETERAN
* ATTORNEY BUSINESSMAN
PULL LEVER 15A
S\ will publish a report to die public within
on the progress, plans and financial means of our
Port City Hall and Interama Projects.
URRAY Z. KLEIN
oil T.V. Channel 4, 11:40 P.M. Nov. 16
Channel 7, 12:20 A.M. Nov. 17
"A machine is a clique by another name
Pd. rol. Adv.
B-G to Battle for Electoral System Change
JERUSALEM(JTA>Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion announ-
ced this week that he intended to use the increased political strength
of his Mapai Party-among other objectives-for a renewal of his battle
to change Israel's proportion representation system of elections.
In an interview immediately-----------------------------------
after the elections for Israel's
fourth Knesset, in which Mapai in-
creased its 40 seats, the Prime
Minister said he would give prefer-
ence in forming the next coalition
government to those parties which,
like Mapai, favored a change. The
Prime Minister has been urging
the electorate since statehood to
give his party a majority so that
the election method could be
changed to one along American
anfl British lines in which the
voter votes for a candidate and
not a party list.
Although actual negotiation*
en a new coalition are still two
weeks away. Initial maneuver-
ing*, including Ben-Ourion's
statement, began almost Imme-
diately after the election.
Became of the proportional rep.
resent a tion system, complete re-
sults on party strengths, as meas-
ured by seats, won in the 120-man
Knesset continued to remain un-
certain. On the basis of some 90
percent of returns, unofficially,
the tally was like this:
Mapai, from 40 to 46 and pos-
sibly to 49; Herut, from 15 to 16
or 17; General Zionists, from 13
to seven or eight; Mapam, stable
at nine seats with a loss in total
votes; National Religious Party,
from 11 to possibly 12; Joint Agu-
dah, steady at six; Communist
Party, from six to three; Progres-
sives, from five to six; three pro-
Mapai Arab parties, from five to
one each.
None of the splinter parties was
able to amass the minimum one
percent needed to retain status as
a legal party. They included the
community list headed by David
Ben-Haroush, self-styled leader of
the North African settlers, who
carried on his campaign from a
jail cell where he is serving a term
for participation in the riots in
Haifa-last July.
Final composition of the new
Knesset must await counting of
the Army vote, which was ex-
pected to follow the general pat-
tern, and readjustment of the
party percentages following the
elimination of the vote for the
doien or so parties that failed
to qualify. This was not ex-
pected to alter the overall pic-
ture materially and it appeared
that Mapai, with its long-time
ally, the Progressives, and the
pro-Mapai Arabs, could obtain a
solid Knesset majority in a coali-
tion embracing the Mapam and
Achdut Avodah.
Jubilant Mapai leaders stressed
that the election results consider-
a b 1 y strengthened Ben-Gurion's
hand in negotiations for formation
of a new coalition. They pointed
out, too, that with Mapai's in-
creased strength, it was not re-
stricted in its choice of coalition
partners to the left-wing parties.
However, observers were confi-
dent that the new government Mr.
Ben-Gurion will form will have the
same components as beforeMa-
pai, the Progresses, Mapam and
the Achdut Avodah. The coalition
would control some 70 seats in the
120-man Knesset.
There were reports that Mr.
Ben-Gurion might personally pre-
fer the "cheaper" terms of the
badly-beaten General Zionists and
of the Religious Party. Most Ma-
pai leaders, however, particularly
the younger generation, were re-
ported as convinced that a coali-
tion with Mapam and Achdut Avo-
dah would be more stable, effici-
ent and reasonable in a long-term
coalition, even though such a coali-
tion would probably require more
concessions from Mapai.
Observers said that when Mr.
Ben-Gurion resumes office at the
head of a new government he
will act swiftly on a program to
prepare Israel for the time when
West German reparations cease
and United States government
aid diminishes. At the same
time, lower European tariffs
and a shift of the East-West con-
flict to the economic field will
greatly intensify competition on
world markets where Israel
must seek expanding sales.
Mr. Ben-Gurion, therefore, is ex-
pected to seek a wage freeze and
abolition of various hidden sub-
sidies, plus higher customs and
taxes which may increase prices
on the domestic market. Mapai
leaders were understood to con-
sider the increased y.ote for their
party as a mandate for action and
their increased strength in the
Knesset as freeing them from un-
due concern over the opposition
from left and right to unpopular
changes.
Mr. Ben-Gurion summed up the
election outcome with the com-
ment that Achdut Avodahwhich
dropped two or three seatslost
to Herut, which picked up two
seats. He said the General Zion-
ists, whose leaders he blamed for
the party losses, also lost to Herut.
He said also that he was convinced
many Herut members voted for
Mapai.
The apparent slight gain of Ma-
pam, he said, was at the expense
of the Communists. He was par-
ticularly critical of Gen. Yigal
Alon of the Achdut Avodah and
Menachem Beigin of Herut. He
said the two leaders were wrong
in their campaigning and deserved
their disappointments. The Prime
Minister disclaimed any personal
victory and said it was his party
which deserved the credit.
young Harriets Make Debut
Young Marrieds of the South-
west YMHA make their debut Sun-
day with a social and open house
beginning at 8:30 p.m. Dancing,
games, discussion, and refresh-
ments will be the order of the eve-
ning. The Young Marrieds are the
latest addition to the Southwest
"Y" adult activities, -and will be
conducted as a social and cultural
group for young couples under 35.
Kenneth Waks, temporary chair-
man, said that election of perma-
nent officers will be held Nov. 29.
Cell-o-zyme
A REVELATION IN
BEAUTY CULTURE
MIAMI CONSERVATORY
Founded 1921
Muttie Drama Dance
TAUGHT BY QUALIFIED FACULTY OF 24
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Studios: Coral Way; Biscayne Blvd.; Coral Gobies; So. Miami; M Springs
I MOST RESPECTFULLY URGE ALL OF MY FRIENDS TO VOTE FOR
MAYOR
ROBERT KING HIGH
HE IS PHYSICALLY, MENTALLY AND MORALLY EQUIPPED TO
CARRY ON THE UNFINISHED WORK I SOUGHT TO DO BUT
COULDN'T, BECAUSE OF HEALTH.
HE HAS NEVER COMPROMISED WITH PRINCIPLE AND HAS
FOUGHT FOR THE WELFARE OF ALL THE PEOPLE OF MIAMI.
RESPECTFULLY SUBMITTED, u___
Pd. Pol. Adv.


Page 10-A
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EXPLANATIONS TO PUZZU NO. 17
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lately, nf ,i .,, |n j^, ,
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NAME
ADDRESS
CITY
PMONt
STATE
COINWORD PUZZLE NO. 19 WORTH $280
If th.r. are no correct solution, to^the P^'J- "
puule Otnrv.iie prita returni to begmn ng S100 Jacapov.
f you with to .libacribe to The Jewish Flor.d.an check the |
auare and your paper will .tart immediately. Subicr.pt.on
"ice 15 per year. Q a'O for 3 year. Regular .ubacr.ber.
,nat he owe* them.
PINI I" "> ^""'':'' '
....:. ....
,,.,;., h.n baking
rae the condemnation ..I land
HT. "" new
: ,.: -J t.-.I All legal
, hi. property have
Plv hla propertyJi
.,,. ,,i,i family homj. rather
,hH,i land that hr BOI OHT Wbicll
IsY.iu ii. uratrful to a wealthy
| who I.ANM'S .'""'.."."viw
lob Mr eel,, a J.* for him HAM'S
u.nl.l mean
him a Job." which your wealthy
miaht not be In a pnolli.ni t.,
4
Rules for the COINWORD Contest
i fkilvo the pusSle aa yon would any other
,; wPtS COTTfCt iWm ... thl. week', i
_A contet..nt may aubmll aa many entrtea aa he wlihei
blank printed In lhl paper. I.ul no inorc than
fa.-.linlle of the puaale. No mechanlrally roprodu
ate.) roploo o lh* ikm'M* "I" be accepted, unl.ua lu<
i -n^ wbi a
MhoTlcal oMoV. In the Word I
tAnyone elli-'bU to enter the COINVV'iltl> r.,nte.r exeat _
ai.li n. il*ia lor in.mb.ri of their famllle.) ol The j,.ua n^gj
tA c.ntet..nt may aubmll aa many entries ria he a I.he. on Thtirlhkl
-a *_ ....^* K>i> t*k nuira than "||< \* 'l-slllNl
laeued by ihu pa^aZ
7_To aiibmlt an entry, the contentant ahould alUrh !h.- n.irple'il
a 1-cont pootcard and mall It In time to reach th. IfHXwQt*
The Jewish riorl.lUn before mldnlrht of the Sunday e\enini
tK.n ..f that week'a puaale. No entrle. rer-lved after 'hit time,
ail or delivered by hat.d, will be declared elUlbie Y..u may mail )'_
In an envel..|o If you wlah. Thla poper la not re|K.n.ible for w^H
I deuiyed In the maJJ. 1
a _The Jewlah Horldlan will award a yackp. t prise tn the slaae<4{_
\ViRI puaile. If more than one winning an. r.. rived, the mil
be divided tHjually among the wlnnera. If no oorre i rudiiM
will be added to the ne*t week'a prime.
are el.a.Vle for lara.ee pr.aeo. See rulea
DCADUNE THIS WEEK SUNDAY MIDNIGHT, NOV. 15
Cut along the dotted line, paate on a 3-c.nt poiteard and mail to
COINWORD Editor, The Jewnh Fleridian. P.O. Boa 73. Miami I, Fl*.
l..vil.l be atyle loadira. .Rearular Nbacrlbers to Tha JewUh Floridlaa ho win 1U rrartiti
prtao bonva.
N,, entries can be returned. The correct answer of eaci peaks"]
published In The Jewish Klorldlan.
CLUiS ACROSS
1 another* sicnature takes keep a man awake.
a lot of prM am: Cont
i.nje
to Wear them
, .. ,, bo sUrl :> roe. .e.
and bardly lh,- type '> Induce SNU -
K KHS
> When a nartv hunts DflsfP In the |
i.t be wary of hit- .
tlna other hunters In a thlcktv
.....led area, ne fre<|iiently eees only
movement and cannot 1 sure whe-
"ie ..th." anl- I
tuv belnr hunte.1. or a human helnaj. ,
2-lTou'.l be dismayed If a roailn
Kl.KW oil "' >..ur hand, aa you I
studied it. In a si- BUBW I
auraeata win I. and there may he j
erreitt ol air rauaed by
. .llrue v.')... I
j;A T. >AI'Y m.v Increase a man a
senso of slf-lm|iortani-e A fawn-
rd \i
dling one.
9 Period in history.
10A person's hand could be bad
T-Specialskill is needed m han- 21to a '^S^^^Jp.fft^^J&^Z^TJTl^
arrive*, ihe noteUeeper no s m ho| rtr!nk n( >lcihic ikjuor.
beea threatened doesn't fear ,eetene arly "a" ToDPY la hardly enough to tu-
rned on this. 23A defendant in a murder case ? *ro-
11Green vegetable. regrets writing a letter that explanations down
12-An-er. is to disprove hLs alibi. ------. ..------
13 A mink stole makes a 25iyince. sample*. h.M>es to create a
working firi the envy of her 26A di.-agreeable one can ruin I,.,..,,i t.., h^- predaot. He s shrewd
frie.ui- the gaiety of a party.
14If a man is unduly so. arguing 27They're a great bother to a
onlv makes h.m more OMtin- rheumatic housewife who has

to clean the fireplace.
l&s-Negativi 28 A man who has all day
17if he freti about it. this wU hound to be pretty tired.
CLUES DOWN
1Rural householders must some
times take measures for
off wild deer.
2Either
3A regular horse player knows
fairly well how each horse
4Russian- visiting the U.S. on
a diplomatic mission return
8-Weird.
15There may be many be-
fore a reluctant divorcee gets
over the breakup of her mar-
riage.
17A collection of valuable heir-
loom may be haggled
over by the heirs
borne thinking of many things 18The average draftee is not en-
to thusiastic about the .....____in
5Scottish no. I the army.
6 Annoying insect. 20Simple.
7 headlights of an on- 22Facility.
coming car may confuse a dog 24"____________Rheingold." an
trying to cross the road. opera.
en.niKh to know that the public haa
I alM.iit something before they
will buy It This applies to CANDT
s- w.ll as to many other products.
SIt's is f.-r the army to
tockpll. I'.Kl.TS lor years ahead.
t uniform <-hanes from
time to time; also the leather may
I'.i'l.TS are standard,
and far-nun* military raqtlhre an am-
pta Mppll Of .til sllee so there nil
nev.r t.- a .h..rtajte In case of emer-
I'tii'v for their equipment
IS \ i \|Msrt a IM Sf 1'ITH In a
?ill worker*! speech als-ut slum
eoadatlasBB. He would s|-ak with
and trkjar, and tho.iah tn.re
tn- an un.l. rly ins PITYiys-
the ].llsbt of slum dwelle-s
the tone of the speech would more
prol.al.lv 1m- one of indignation.
IIItrutal treatment makes a doa;
fear his master's WHIM, a mood
In which he shows greet i-ruelt\ It
may culminate In the use of a WHIP,
or la brutish kicks and I,
SWIFT
LUXURIOUS
LIVELY
SAILING
FrtalrraYartMrlMwII
Si IvK'andUbwftM]
en isute atu-Awaa.il
Ftm Meiittrraaiaiaaaaflj
S.S TbwoofHealasl
S.S. ItruiHt* it i
20 Years Ago this Veek >,>on- *'"" Jf-J '* J**
*. Jewish pupils coming from schools
London Schools in tzechoslo ...
vakia have been ordered to limit where ,he >"gug* of instruction
enrollment of Jewish students to *" o"* t*>an Cxech were barred
four percent of the total registra completely from Czech schools.
WORD LIST
AS FOR KIDNEY ACTION
AND STONE FORMATION
Most doctors ogrea that one way to help prevent
formation of kidney ond blodder stone* it to
DRINK ENOUGH WATER
fight or more glasses of sparkling clear Moun-
tain Valley Water doily, provides abundant fluid
for proper kidney action.
1 MILPty ALKAUMt \ VCHLO*IM-flUE\
NOH-LAXATIVE
I
I
I
I
J
I
I
I
I
I
I
MOUNTAIN VALLEY WATER
Phone FR 3-244 301 S.W. 8th St,
aohfsj
Ast
ASHES
11KI
BEE
BMNTHNn
RIJNKNU
'MIME
.!. lAKS
.'I..KS
CR V.'K
.'lt VNK
fRIME
Idas
,DATED
EASE
I \TK|.
IV.
iim;
V.I'.MlN.i
ONAT
I'lTi'll
I M
IMPART
IMIMRT
IRE
i. :er
I/iN i
MAN.Jl.r.
M\NTI.E
MERE
N A E
NO
i>R
PEA
PITCH
RA<
SKWK!>
' ED
s. iBK
\ ED
TEARS
TINT
TOST
TKARst
a Stabilirer-equippedfor
smooth sailing
e Ternpti raj, strictly kosher
cuisine
a Lively Israeli atmosphere
Consult your travel agent
he's your best source of advice
i omri wim eg, -*. i-M*
^LStafe
AtfTNOfflZfO AGENT fOR
ZtM LINES and LKI AL
GEORGE KRONENGOLD TRAVEL
540 ARTHUR GOOPRIY ROAD, MIAMI BEACH
IK 1-4M55
Notionally distributed for over 75 years just
as it flows from the fomous spring near Hot
Springs, Arkansas. Why not ask your doctor f
MUGHTfQL TASTIHG
$1,973,750 Iwtfftf fee MB
NEW YORK-The National Jew-
ish Welfare Board Sunday adopted
a budget of $1,973,750 for iu pro-
grams in ISfio. The action was ta-
ken by the organization's board of
j directors at the end of a four-day
series of meetings at which mem
jbers of JwB advisory committees
analyzed current needs and estab-
lished priorities for the services to
be provided by the organization in
| the coming year. JWB is the na
tional association o f 350 YM-
YWHAs and Jewish Community
Centers and is the government
authonxed agency for religious
morale and welfare services to
Jew, in the I S Armed Forces
and veterans' hospitals.
KNOW
YOUR
BANK
/ T KEY TO secuni m
y Place your
trust where
you'UrSwleecure..-"-
beak with complete
facilities.
jgarlltdi**!"
S A VINOS
NTS
CMBCKINO
ACCOUNTS
sesjIBNOLV
rtmscNNax
AUTO LOANS
AFfstJANCa LOAN* \
LOANS
l3ro af*>TT
p.Noc.*r.H 3ANK OJ
DADE COUNT
^|irsrrgl3
' eeaaee: Feaersl


jvember 13, 1959
t'Jtwisjh wtcu/ irfmti
Page 11-A

[V-
DAVID NAKOT
to Head
Division
Jarot, a junior at Edison
ol, has been named over-
chairman of the teen
lion of the March of
i was announced by W. C.
errell. Dade county March
director.
[who is 16 years old, will
Jand lead the teen activi-
he March, Herrell said.
|U1 include a unique Tag
Bvity in Greater Miami
ities and high schools.
ew teen chairman is the
labbi and Mrs. Joseph R.
pintual leader of Temple
Greater Miami. He is a
|of the Edison Key Club,
nal Forensic League, the
[National Honor Society,
Mi Discussion Club, and
lie Israel Youth Group.
; Health film Doe
(Hope Psychotherapy and
priysis Can Offer" will be
ct of a film showing and
by Dr. George Jacob-
tiesday evening in the
. of the Miami Public
Dr. Jacobson, clinical as
professor of psychiatry,
of Miami school of
will talk about psycho-
knd the specialty of psy-
s. and will answer ques-
ts. June Hosea will be
of the program.
Golda to Quit;
Eban in Cabinet
Continued from Pag* 1-A
i Cabinet to take election as Mayor
I of Tel Aviv. Kadish Luz, Minister
of Agriculture, wants to retire.
Both are Mapai members.
The special election committee
began tabulation of the ballots
which were cast by voters on ac-
tive duty with the Armed Forces
and until these tabulations are in,
the exact composition of the new
120-man Knesset cannot be deter-
mined exactly.
The General Zionist control of '
the Tel Aviv administration
hung in the balance and would
not bo settled until the soldiers'
votes wore in. In any case it
appeared that the single Progres-
sive Party member in the new
31-man Municipal Council might
have the deciding vote. If a
Mapai-led combination takes
ever the municipal government,
then the General Zionists would
like a Cabinet post for their re-
tiring mayor, Chaim Levanon.
The completed count in the Je-
rusalem municipal elections show-
ed that although Mapai ran far
ahead of all other parties and won
eight of the 21 seats in the Muni-
cipal Council, it will be unable to
form an administration unless the '
unity of the religious parties is
broken. Mapai's only possible al-
lies in the council are the Progres-
sives and Achdut Avodah, each of
which has one seat, and the com-!
bination would still be short of a
mapority.
The Herat Party won four seats,
the Mizrachi parties and their
Iraqi settlers affiliate, four, and
the Agudist parties, three. If Je-
rusalem's municipal politics fol-
low their customary trend, the city
administration will be in the hands
of a Religious Blde-Herut coalition.
Election procedure for the twin
posts of Chief Kabbi will get un-
derway next week with the forma-
tion of an eight-man committee to
convene the 72-man electoral body,
it was reported here today. The
current five-year term for the
posts expires on Feb. 18.
Four members of the eight-man
committee will be appointed by
the government and four by the
rabbinate. The 72-man body which
will name the Chief Rabbis, will
be composed of 24 representatives
Lord Balf our, Goldmann, Redelheim
To Address ZOA Herzl Centennial Dinner
By Special Report
NEW YORK Three glorious
chapters in Zionist history culmin-
ating in the establishment of the
^ScTMlanaT as* g>jesTs*of the ZOA to
address the annual dinner.
Other guest speakers will be Dr.
Nahum Goldmann, president of the
State of Israel wiH be commemo- World Zionist Organization; Abra-
rated on Monday evening Nov. 23,
at the annual dinner sponsored by
nine metrtopolitan regions of the
ham A. Redelheim, president of
the ZOA; and Rabbi Irving Miller,
former ZOA president and chair-
Zionist Organization of America | man of the dinner committee, who
at thte Hotel Waldorf-Astoria here, will be the toastmaster.
Over 1,000 persons, prominent in! Mimi Benzell, noted opera star,
all walks of Jewish life in the met-1 will present a repertoire of Israeli
Emanu-EI Pians
Dinner Ncv. 22
Temple Emanu-EI will hold its
semi-annual congregational meet-
ing Sunday evening, Nov. 22, at
the Fontainebleau hotel, accord-
ing to Samuel Friedland, president.
The affair will include supper
and dancing, and will be highlight-
ed by a special request repeat per-
formance of "Just for Fun," a
musical review written by Trixie
Levin and starring the following
members of the Sisterhood:
Mesdames Ben Ball, M. C. Co-
hen, Sol Geltman, Elliott Harris,
Henry Hillman, Myron J. Mitnick,
Jack S. Popick, Morris Pollock,
Rocky Pomerance, Charles Rosen
blatt, Herbert S. Shapiro, Milton
Weinkle and Mr. O. J. Rosen-
strauch.
The precedent, established last
year, of holding the annual Sister-
hood party in conjunction with a
congregational semi-annual meet-
ing, is being repeated, and on this
evening a "Sisterhood Patron," a
$100 donor, will be awarded an all-
expense trip to Europe for two.
ropolitan area, will participate in
the observance of the following
three most significant events in
modern history of tie Zionist
movement:
The 100th anniversary of the
birth of Theodor Herzl; the 42nd
anniversary of the issuance of
the Balfour Declaration, which
marked the first international
recognition of the 2,088-year.old
aspirations of the Jewish people;
and the 12th anniversary of the
passage of the resolution by the
United Nations for the establish-
ment of the State of Israel. (The
resolution was adopted on Nov.
22, 1947.)
The Rt. Hon. The Earl of Balfour,
nephew of Arthur James Balfour,
author of the Balfour Declaration,
accompanied by Countess Balfour,
of the country's municipalities and
48 appointees of the rabbinate.
The electors will vote for a suc-
cessor to the late Chief Rabbi Yitz-
hak Herzog, while the present Ris-
hon Le Zion (Sephardi Chief Rab-
bi), Yitzhak Nissim, will be up
for reelection.
The principal candidates to suc-
ceed Chief Rabbi Herzog are Rab-
jbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik, of Bos-
Iton, and the Chief Chaplain of the
j Armed Forces, Rabbi Shlomo
Goren. Rabbi Soloveitchik has not
yet revealed whether he would be
a candidate.
*-
ton
CITY
COMMISSIONER
FRED
DAVANT
II
"Mr. Action
'J
Avoid Machine Politics
SUPPORT DAVANT
fOR
CITY COMMISSION
GROUP 2
PULL LEVER
8 A
songs.
The Earl of Balfour has been an
active supporter of the Zionist
movement for many years. Both
he and the Countess of Balfour
have visited Israel on several oc-
casions.
During the Hitler period, he gave
his old family home of Whittinge-
hame, Scotland, for Jewish refugee
children from 1939 until the end
of the war.
Dr. Salk to be Honored
NEW YORK Dr. Jonas Salk.
originator of the anti-polio i vac-
cine, will receive an Honorary
Fellowship from the Weizmann In-
stitute of Science at a dinner Dec.
8 at the Waldorf Astoria hotel.
Among the Weizmann Fellows are
Nobel laureates Niels Bohr, I. I.
Rabi, Victor Weisskopf and J. Rob-
will shortly arrive by plane from ert Oppenheimer. ___^
ELECT
ROLAND
H0R0VITZ
MAYOR
OF
MIAMI
Lever 3-A
(RONNIE)
Born in Pittsburgh, Pa--------resident of Miami 14 years .
prominent insurance agent formerly with Department
of Public Safety, City of Miami for 7 years assigned to
Allapattah, Edison Center, Littles River and Coconut Grove
areas with an outstanding record ... in 1956 received
"Outstanding Citixen Award" from local TV station .
received national recognition for bravery and heroism in
City of Los Angeles, Calif., in 1955 lives at 4014 NW
4th St. with wife, Judy, and four children attended
University of Miami and City College of Los Angeles .
served with United States Marines in World Wr II
recalled to active duty for the Korean conflict active
member of U.S. Air Force Reserves American Legion,
Harvey Seeds Post Veterans of Foreign Wars .
Fraternal Order of Police Touchdown Club Navy
League served as Advisory Counsel to the Supervisory
Committee of the Government Installation at Cherry
Point, N.C.
k1

1M. l'ol. Aev.


Pogss 12-A
>Jewist>nor***n
Beth El Congregation to Burn Mortgage
At Festive Dinner Ceremony Sunday Eve
Sunday
night will mark the
reahzatrBrrof a AM
started many years ago at Congre-
gation Beth El where, at a festive
dinner, the mortgage of the con-
gregation will be burned.
Beth El. originally known as ID-
ami Jewish Orthodox Congrega
also purchased, and in 1946. the
presee*. school was built. Together
with the Dora Aueust Memorial
Hall. The Berkowitr Patio was
built re MM. completing its pres
eat structure.
Some of the active members
during the early years of the con
gregation's history were
tion. started in a modest building -_-- v ^ Pepper. Max Rap-
? t." ^ST"*/.?? Japort Nathan Adetoan. Hy R.fas.
J. Louis Shocbet. Miles Baer. Al
Pallot. Max Kupperstein. and Ger
building for $25 a month, and sub-
sequently purchasing the building
for a small sum.
Before leeta. Hie facilities prov-
ed too small for its growing
membership, and Hie property
on SW 17th ave. and 6th st. was
acquired. On May !. 1W. Hie
cornerstone was laid by Mr. and
Mrs. Abe Pepper for the syna-
gogue which now stands there.
Pepper was treasurer of Hie
congregation. W it h o u t class-
rooms, Beth El's Hebrew school
still met at the old building.
To meet the increasing need of
the congregation, the property on
the 5th st. side of 17th ave. was
M. SAMUU CKAHD
Education Expert
To Speak Here
Dr. Samuel Grand, director of
experimental education and audio-
visual aid< of the Union of Amen
car. Hebrew Congregat.ons. will
lecture before the Bureau of Jew-
ish Education on Wednesday eve-
ning at 8 30 p m
He will be a guest speaker be-
fore the College of Jewish Studies{
at the Bureau of Jewish Educa-
tion bldg.. 135 NW 3rd ave. His
subject will be "Use of Motion
Pictures. Records. Filmstnps. and
Flannelboard Materials in the Jew-
.-h Classroom."
Dr. Grand is credited with de-
veloping the first series of film-
strips in use in Jewish religious
schools. He is author of the pic-
ture book. "The Jewish Settle-
ment ji New Amsterdam1854,"
"Palestine and the Jewish School."
Audio Vi-ual Education in the
Jewish Religious School." and nu
merous articles in Jewish educa
tional magazines.
Dr. Grand was the recipient of
the Lean Socolow fellowship award j
from the Hebrew University of!
Jerusalem Recently. Dr. Grand
spent five months in Bee opt and
Israel. lecturing at the Hebrew
University and before teacher
groups in Israel, Italy, France.
Holland and England.
Iner was spiritual leader. H M
lener was spiritual leader. H. M
Drevich was the congregation
president, and Mrs Buckstem was
Sisterhood president.
BerkowiU. the current president
has been one of the main leaders
of the congregation down through
the years. Today Beth El. with a
membership of over 200. has a re-
ligious and cultural program.
Under 'he spiritual leadership of
Rabbi Solomon Schiff. it has ex
panded facilities for all age groups,
offering a Sunday and Hebrew
school, as well as a post graduate
class, a junior congregation, and
a Sunday morning Tfilin Club. The
schools serve the children of the
community from the ages of 6 to
15
The Berfcowrrz Cub Scout Pack
5M and Boy Scout troop SM,
whose number coincide* with
the congregation's address, 5M
SW 17th ave., has recently boon
formed in honor of Beth El *
president. The congregation also
has a thriving Sisterhood, as well
as a Men's Club. Young Couoles
Club, and Young Adults Club
among its affiliates.
The Hebrew and Sunday school
are served by five classrooms, and
the sanctuary has recently been
air-conditioned, and has a seating
capacity of 500.
Officers of the congregation in
addition to Berkowitz. are Abe
Chid, first vice president; Abe
Pepper, second vice president:
Sam Phillips, recording secretary:
Hyman Chabncr. treasurer.
Sisterhood officers are Mesdames
Jack Shapiro, president.- Max.
Rappaport. first vice president: '
Sam Siegal. second vice president:
Sol Potash, third vice president;
Reuben Blaustein, recording sec-
retary: Harry Klein, correspond-'
ing secretary; Sam Phillips, treas-
urer; Arthur Klein, financial sec-
Iretary.
The committee for Sunday's din
Iner include Mrs. Max Rappaport,
chairman, Mrs. Jack Shapiro. Mrs.
Sam Siegal, and Mrs. Sol Weger
The dinner guests will be enter-
tained by Irving Pietrack and his
orchestra, fe a t u r i n g Florence
Weiss.
Beth Am Installs
Rabbi Baumgard
At Friday Service
Rabbi Herbert Baamflard will be
installed as spiritual leader of
Temple Beth Am at services Fri-
day. S:13 pa.
Rabbi Baumgard has served the
congregation on a part-time basis
since 1956. He was brought to
Florida by the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations to serve as!
director of its South Florida Coun-
cil.
He maintained both peers until
recently, when he resigned the
directorship. Installing officer
will be Rabbi Daniel L. Davis,
director of the New York FesV
ef Synagogues.
Adult Course
Opens Tuesday
A course on "Marriage and the
Family." one of the four given in J
the adult education program, will
be launched Tuesday evening at
Monticeilo Park.
Rabbi Max A. Lipschiti. spirit
ual leader of the congregation, will
conduct an informal discussion on
the social needs of the North Mi-
ami Beach community
Monticello Park Adult Institute
also offers a course in "Beginner's
Hebrew." taught by Abraham J.
Gittleson. education director, ev-
ery Tuesday morning. 10:30 to j
11-45 am.
Noted Hebraist
In Talks Here
Dr. Hczel Klepfisz, noted au-
thor and Hebraist, began a series
of lectures on the "Development
of the Jewish Prayer Book" on
Tuesday at Temple Emanu-El.
Dr. Klepfisz' next lecture will be
Nov. 17. 8:30 p.m.. at the Bureau
of Jewish Education bldg.. 135 NW
3rd ave when be will trace the
history and development of the
prayer book in a series of five He-
brew lectures.
The series is under the auspices
of the Bureau of Jewish Education
as part of a training program for
Hebrew teachers.
His lectures will alternate week-
ly from Temple Emanu-El to the
Bureau of Jewish Education bldg.
Robert Newman, Beth Am presi
dent, said Rabbi Davis win discuss
"Understanding Judaism."
Rabbi Baumgard served Temple
B'nai Israel in Elmont from IMS
to 50 as a student at the Hebrew
Union College Jewish Institute of
Religion in New York. The con-
gregation began with 60 families
and had 560 families when Rabbi
Baumgard accepted his new du-
ties in Florida in ISM.
The Rabbi wee ordained in
ltS6 as president of the Student
Body and Palmer Prise winner
(outstanding student). He was
elected to Beta Gamma Sigma,
honorary scholastic society, at
the University of Virginia where
he obtained a degree m Business
Administration in 1M1.
He attended law school in 1942
before entering the armed services
where for three and one-half years
i he served in the Information and
Education Department and as as-
sistant to the Jewish chaplain. He
began his rabbinical studies in 1M6
and studied in the Department of
Semitic*. Colombia University,
from 1950 to 1*54.
Rabbi Baumgard now serves on
the executive board of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, the ex-
ecutive board of the Dede County
Council on Community Relations,
the board of the GMJCC. and the
Florida State Advisory board of
the Anti-Defamation League.
S/io itespegr,
Dr. David fje
" of the Ert2 i
aesasa
til meet eadu
p.m
Mid-East"
OnUM
One of th worf,,
area* the Middle
analyzed in deui! ""-
s"> of Miimi. Taj,
launched Mood*/.
Five authorities
10 lectures duriai i
stitute on Middle
co sponsored by ta
the American Al
East Studies.
Meetings are held a|
Lecture HaD on the i
7:30 to 9:30 p.m
P- f Charles P.
lumb.a rnivtrsitri |
nal Affairs, i
ries :th an ecci
the Middle East
Morday and Tuesdij.
Establishment of t
was discussed by Dr.I
Berr.stein. of Prmcflai!
Wednesday and
'Religions mi I
Middle East" win hi
Nov. K and 17 ay Dr.I
S. Fatemi, former i
Iran to the UN, n.
social science at
i n s o n Unnrmt>,
N. J.
On Nov. II ud 11.1
1 Hanna. professor H i
| ces. University of florid
turc on 'Middle Eatf
isms." discussiEf il
forms of nauosissMi
I the Middle East. :M|
jstitutions and relatml,
governments.
Monday and Toesbfj
r ;h:rd week. *.'
Dr William B. Ml
lessor of history, tail
of the Institute, wiH I
Middle East is MM
Other
weeks include He* I
servicemen, and podl
Ballet Classes
For Children
>i Cohen Due
At Beth David
Beth David Institute of Adult
Jewish Studies on Wednesday. 9 to
10 p.m.. will feature Rabbi Herman
M. Cohen, formerly of Temple
Aaron, Minneapolis, Minn., in a
discourse based on the text Tra- designating "her as chairman of the
dition and Change." edited by Dr. hospitality programs
Mordecai Waxman
Air Force Group To Meet S
Jewish Activities Group of the Other event
Homestead Air Force Base will be
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Oritt
at a breakafst Sunday morning at
the Seville hotel.
The social affair will be head on
der the auspices of the National
Jewish Welfare Board. Armed Ser-
vices committee for Greater Mi
ami, headed by Mrs. Louis GUsser.
Mat David Rinzler, president of
the Jewish Activities Group, has
announced Mrs. Glasser will re-
ceive an official certificate of ap-
pointment from the National Jew
ish Welfare Board headquarters
1SSB WASHINGTON AVE.
Miami BoaeH JE S-1840
Hebrew Retioioua Supp'ie* for
Synagogue*. School* A Private Uaa
ISRAELI A DOMESTIC G.FTS
Classes in ballet and modern
dance are now being provided for
children at both the Miami and
Southwest YMHA. with Judith
Youngerman as instructor.
Miss Youngerman has been
teaching dance in the Greater Mi-
ami area for many years. She re-
ceived her training with Jose
Limon. Martha Graham and)
others, and holds a degree fromi
the Connecticut College of Dance.
Classes for children of elemen-:
tary school age are held at the!
Miami "Y" at 450 SW loth ave...
Rabbi Cohen was spiritual lead-
er of Congregation Temple Aaron
for 25 years before coming to Mi-
ami.
Until his arrival here, be was
active in many phases of religious i
and civic life. He received his Doc-j
ear of Divinity in 1953 and Doctor
of Hebrew Letters in 1155.
CJ* Ifedrfor
Rabbi Dr. Tibor N. Star*
311 Weohmeeow Ave. eft. B
JE MW JE 1-4150
Men's Club of Temple Nor Ta-
ndd will meet Sunday, tarn at
Maisel's Crown Room, M2nd st
and Collins ave. The breakfast
meeting will feature Dr. Jacob
Southwest -Y" at 7215 Coral Way |-----------------------L-ZZT ""
every Thursday afternoon. *************^*,A_.
These branches of the Greater R E P H U N S HEBREW'
Miami Jewish Community Center 1. J 1 """"j
e beneficiary agencies of the J BOOK STORE
rtitaMi FlinH Btwi thn Itbn*iwh r^l a.
United Fund and
eraUon.
the Jewish Fed-
ISRAEll RELIGIOUS STORE
All EMUW SEPPUIS f0
STEAMMeVS I JeWUE SOftMS
13S7 WASHINGTON AVE.
JE 1-7722
"PSMy Heuee in Greater Miami
WWUSUI ^ MTM
? Complete Line of Hebrew Suppt,*. J
er Synagogue.. Hebrew an* 4
**"")f Schoole
OIFTS and NOVELTIES
417 Weebeayto. Ave.


, ISRAEL
Te Lit* s*> Hearts We Lewve
Behind ... If W Live Forever!
Brand
The oV*"*" ''
to the "fW "
GEO*a5
TOnreT^ M
136S S.W. Bm^
Sunday,
11 AJtet
with
lab* *"*"
*/4
. t P-m-
fUM* Imttpk I RorAeweajr
eMMEB L MeUML 2 sa,
rUbbs B Uon He
e
A. rwTBsr AS, 2 *
Sfrf/
rUM Soloes
"May TW Seeds Rrpewe
" Bcermaa PseSCeT*
MHersee l-eaiy
Mr 8rd
loved ^e. T**
rmwesaw
Galbut
The ctKea*"1
K -wras^vef!
USSCi
waeMsoBJ
Sunday, "
HUM* -**1
.Htlabe""1
fM"i
ewB"**'' *^|
eecn
T-d-w-
of **
bwrit or
and Abr
mi

si'
ZZ4


13, 1959
-Jewlst) fhridlian
Page 13- A
ices This Weekend
AaX. 7801 CarlyU ave.
pbl Isaac Evrr.
Saturday 8:30 a.m.
Ilti'lWhan You May
Oood."
m,53 SW 1Mb ivi
fMaxwell Sllbarman.
n430SW3rd ava. Con
ibi Yaakov Rosenberg.
W. Lloson.
, Sermon: "Reform
WPfceUive Judaism
rtners?" Saturday 9
ry, son of Mr.
II I.ull.-I.

"17th ave. Orthodox.
.< Iff.
Saturday 8:30 a.m.
pK Ufe's Challenges."
Ian, sun of Mr. and
Jclnian.
12250 NW 2nd ave.
[Rabbi David W. Her-
lyman rein.
Bcatnon: "The Story
nt TimesGreek
PftluWInv a -n Ser-
and the Redemp-
,4000 Prairie ave. Or.
| H Rotman.
Saturday 8:45 a.m.
[fed Your Community."
-
301-311 Washington
{x. Rabbi Tibor Stern.
ft Mamehea.
rday 8:30 a.m.
krry. son of Mrs. Ruth
|on: "Abraham Show-
IL. 13 NW 3rd ava.
935 Euclid ava. Or.
Josenh E Rackovsky.
;rday 8:30 a.m.
anderlng of the Peo-
, at 4:10 p.m.: "The
lion." Dally services
):15 p.m.
"jEWISH CENTER.
*. Miami. Rabbi Sam.
Sorraon: "The Ad-
ihain and the Peril
BMay 8:15 a.m. Ser-
1' r,iiii." Service* at
feu.
C~ *
rs CENTER. 18180 NW
rvative. Cantor Eman-
NAOA. 50 NW 51st
Stive. Rabbi Bernard
lor Fred Bernstein.
I.ri! Siturday 9 a.m.
Eii-iiael. moii of Mr. and
Veen.
----
M.E EMANU-EL. 1801
CANDlilWTING TIM*
t-r-Ktl ikit---. *- ,ft7- n|
12 Heshvan 5:18 pm.
E. Andrews ave. Reform. Rabbi
LatvfM R,n,on- Cantor Sherwin

HEBREW ACADEMY. 918 6th st. Or-
thodox. Rabbi Alexander Gross.
-----. .
HiALEAH REFORM JEWISH CON-
GREGATION. 1150 W. 88th St.. Palm
A VS.
HOLLYWOOD TEMPLE SINAI. 2030
Polk st. Conservative. Rabbi David
Shapiro. Cantor Yehudah Heilbrajn.
--------
ISRAELITE CENTER. 3175 SW 24th
ter. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Lot's Cohen.
I ilil.iy 8 and 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "Be-
ins; Determined." Saturday 9:JO a.m.
liar Mltzvah: Stuart, son of Mr. ami
Mrs. Ben Mandel, Who "ill h.- hosts
at Friday evening Ones b'habbat.
KNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield
Cantor Abraham Seif.
Friday 5 p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m. Ser-
mon: "The First Jaw."
MIAMI HEBREW CONGREGATION.
1101 SW 12th ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Herschell Savllla. Cantor Joseph
Salzman.
Friday 5:30 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. Ser-
mon: "Religion to Measure."
MONTICELLO PARK. 164th st. and
NE 11th ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Max Lipshitz. Cantor Ben-Zion
Kirschenbaum.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Ras Mltzvah: Cyn-
Mn.i. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Abra-
ham Schorr. Sermon: "Helng Truth-
ful to Yourself The Van Doren
Story." Saturday 8:45 a.m. Bar Mitii-
vah: Marc, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joel
Feldman.
C__om
NORTH DADE CENTER. 13630 W.
Dixie hwy. Conservative,. Rabbi
Henry Okolica.
Friday B:U p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. Bar
Mltzvah: Steven, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Jlll-k lt"SH.
Members of arrangements committee plan Sunness and Dr. Louis Lemberg. Others not
gala dinner of tribute for Congregation Beth shown at the planning luncheon weje George
David and Rabbi Yaakov G. Rosenberg. Seat- Taubman. Louis Hayman, Maurice Hyman,
ed are Abram Fox, Harry Gordon, chairman Charles Adelman, Peter Moser and Fred Sand-
of the committee, and Harold Bemey. Stand- ler. The dinner tribute will take place Nov. 29
ing (left to right) are Joseph Nurenoerg, Na- ai Miami Springs Villas,
than Alexander, Abraham Kasow, Stewart

Israel Bond Award Adds to Honors
Miami Rabbi Has Earned Over the Years
creation
r&HjiBa
m noatf
t : *
tin "hbo nnx
>otY*n /??rnn
in t^?V D^i-iii;??
0Hc#?| &!?,
tl I T I V
rnnatf-,Dn3o
L, V T v T :
In trattno nx
jito; )B3 npn1?
v
IMttts In the Negev
was the name of
_,tean towns in the
r. The life of the
especially their
Duies great interest
elars (researchers)
i day it is possible
rieir ancient settle-
'of dams in which
Dhabitants of the
in collecting the
us.
holars decided to
mighty the dams,
ces, and even the
Nabateans.
fBrit Ivrit Olamit)
NORTH SHORE CENTER. 620 76th st
Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abram-
owltz. Cntor Edward Kl-in
Friday 8:11 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. Bar
Mltzvah: David, son of Mr. and Mis.
Klein.
Friday S:30 p.m. Sermon: "The Wand
of Responsibility." Kiturday 9 a.m.
Sermon: "Weekly Portion."
TEMPLE BETH AM. 5950 N. Kendall
dr., S. Miami. Reform Rabbi Herbert
Baumgard. Cantor Charles Kodner.
He is chairman of the South
Florida Council of the American
In recognition of his "untiring | mittee of the Jewish Federation on
and selfless efforts on behalf of the board of the Home for the
Israel and Israel Bonds," Rabbi I Aged, treasurer of Jewish Family
Yaakov G. Rosenberg, spiritual j and Children's Service, and on the
leader of Congregation Beth Da-1 board of the American Civil Liber
vi.i. will be honored at a dinner of \ ties Union,
tribute on Sunday evening, Nov.
Harry Mann: Kdward. BOfl of Mr. nnd 29, at Miami Springs Villas.
Mrs. Paul Wilson, s^imon: "Weakly Rahhi Rnsrnhprn was first eh air- i
Kabbi KoscnberD was iirsi cnatr i Jcvvish congress and a member of
OuWEST"ciNTiS 6438 SW 8th an-f the .Isr3el Bond High Holl- fc fc rf f aincto o[ ,he Dade
Rab^f SaX.*. dvs campaign in Greater Miami. courty Co(inci! of Cornrn-unitv Re.
Congregation Beth David will | latjons.
be honored at the dinner for "out-
standing service to Israel" with
the presentation of the flag of
the City of Jerusalem, to be
made by Dr. Abraham Biran, of
the Israel Ministry for Foreign
Affairs.
1645 Polk St.,
Rabbi Samuel
TEMPLE BETH EL.
Hollywood. Reform.
Jaffa.
Friday s:l" p.m. fiuest spiritual lead-
er: I >i Kimene u. Borowitz. director
of tiu> Commission yf Jewish Educa-
tion of the I'nlon of American He-
brew Congregations.
Chairmen of the arrangements
committee are Mr. and Mrs. Harry
Gordon. Members of their commit-
tee (in formation) include Sidney
Rabbi Rosenberg came to Mi-
ami from Philadelphia, where he
held his first pulpit at Temple
Beth Zion from August, 1949 to
July, 1955, after being ordained
by the Jewish Theological Semi-
nary of America in June, 1949.
IMBBI YAAKOV ROSENBERG
TEMPLE BETH SHOLEM of Holly-
wood. 1725 Monroe st. Conservative
Rabbi Samuel Lerer. Cantor Ernest
Rohrelber
Friday 8 p.m. Sermon: "A Need for
Living Creed." Saturday 9 a.m. Bar 7 cronoarn nrosi.
Mltzvah: Steven and Joel, sons of hood; Charles Z. Spingarn, presi-
Mr. and Mrs. Abram Handshu. dent of the Men's Club; Abram
temple bet"h~jjh6Tom. 4144 Ch..e Fox, Harold Berney, Joseph Nu-
renberg, Nathan Alexander, Abra-
ham Kasow, Stewart Sunness, Dr.
For Rabbi Rosenberg, being or-
dained as a Rabbi was the fulfill-1
ment of a life-long ambition. He \ meet weekly for luncheon for dis-
, M. Aronovitz, president of Congre- was born in Newark. N. J., in cussion of the Bible.
"' gation Beth David; Mrs. Harold March. 1925, to parents who had. For the past four years, he has
Reinhard, president of the Sister-1 migrated to the United States from also conducted a study group of 16
the Ukraine in 1921. dentists and their wives who meet
... ,, ,, : once a month for Bible study.
His father, a cantor and scho-, RecentlVi he was invited by the
chef in Newark and Baltimore, j United Synagogue to serve as
was a master of modern Hebrew : member of aNational cavalcade to
r&bbi','/,;" S3F =: Louis Lemberg, George Taubman, S^ihe f frsl^pre-tSeoLgfcal iT^Zil?*"^5 '" 8maUer
VX m^eWl^i ijj* Hayman. Maurice Hyman student at Johns Hopkins Universi- COmmun,U!l__________
ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kronisb
Cantor Davia Convlaer.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Onest aiiiritual lead-
i. BarTfitivah: iiiejin. son of Mr. Charles Adelman,
mid Mrs. Sidney Hulaiman: Ronald n(j yreA Sandier.
Bart, son of Mr. and Mfs. Mortimer
Edelsteln.
TEMPLE B'NAl SHOLOM. 16800 NW
22nd ave. Conarvtlva. Rabbi
Sheldon Edwards. Cantor Ben Gross-
berg.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "The Syn-
agogue."
TEMPLE EMANU-EL. Ifol Washing-
ton ave. Conservative. RaBbl Irving,.
Lehrman. Cantor Israel,Reich
Friday 3 and 8:JvD.m.-0*fsrajlrltual.
leader: Kabbl Hyman tRablnowltav
Sermon: "What are Yout-A Name or.
a Number?" Saturday a.m. Ser-
mon by Rabbi Bernard Musanamnr
"Weekly Portion." .
Peter Moser
Rabbi Rosenberg came to Miami
in July, 1955 to assume the pulpit
of Congregation Beth David.
In addition to serving on the ex-
ecutive board of the Greater Mi-
ami Israel Bond committee, he is
a member of the executive com-
temple Israel. ts7 ne nth st
Reform. Rabbi Joseph R. Narot
Cantor Jacob Bornstein.
Friday 8:18 p.m. Sermon: "Today*
Challenge to Reform Judaism.'
TEMPLE JUDEA. S20 Palermo ava
Liberal. Rabbi MorrJ* 8ko. Canto'
Herman Gottlieb.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Otleat spiritual lead-
TEMPLE NER TA-*D. BOtfl St. ano;
Tatum Watsrway. Modern Tradi
tional. Rabbi Eugene Labovlta. Can-,
tor Samuel Oomberg. ___ 1
Friday 5:30 and .IMI'K* s'rm"n.:'
" 'This is My God.-by Hwamut Wouk.
Saturday 8:45 a.m. ,
TEMPLE SINAI NO. MIAMI. 12100'
NE lit It ave. Reform. Rabbi Bonno.
M. Wallaeh. .
Frldav 8:15 p.m. Guest spiritual lead-
er- I>r Abraham J. Feldman. paat
President of the Cental Conference
of American Rabbis.
TEMPLE
Flamingo Way. Conaervative. Rabb
Leo Helm.
Frildav 8:15 p.m. Veterans Sabbath
to be observed, nneg Shabbat hosts:
Members of Jewish War Veterans
Post and Auxiliary 681. Saturday 9
a.m. ___
TEMPLE ZION. 5780 SW 17th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Alfred Wax-
man. Cantor Jacob Qoldfarb.
Friday 8 p.m. Sermon: "The Wander-
ing Jew." Saturday 9 a.m. Bar Hits-
vail! I'avid Richard, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Alart Weissman.
ISRAEL. 6500 N. Miam
ty. He completed his undergraduate
work at the university in less than
three years, graduating in May,
1945.
While at Johns Hopkins, he also
studied at Baltimore Hebrew
Teachers College, attending class-
es two nights weekly and Sunday
afternoons, graduating in .1944.
During this time j. he also managed
to find time to teach Hebrew
school classes.
Hillel Leaders
Eye Campaign
Some 40 key leaders attended a
cocktail reception Wednesday at
the home of Sam A. Goldstein, 51S5
Alton rd.
The reception highlighted the
current countywide Hillel House
drive for $73,870.
Goldstein and Harold Thurman
. t are co-chairmen of the local drive.
_^ff.h^g!_aiU.?ir..f r,J^l "Hillel House means so much to
abbath Mlnyonatrea a.m. p^',,. S:30 .m. sermon: "The Young
-----*~7~ ^^. _* .... in Jears and the Young hi Heart."
rrupi F NER TAaWD. SOHl St. ano t shnhhat host*: Mcmlwri of
In Je_.-
One% Shabbat hosts: Memliers
Vivalefa. Saturday 9 a.m.
TORAH TEMPLE. 1254 West ave
Traditional. Rabbi Abraham Cassei
e
YOUNG ISRAEL. 16750 NE 0th ave
Orthodo*: Rabbi Sherwin Stauber.
Frldav 5:S0 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. Ser-
imiii: "Tho Chosen People."
ZAMORA JEWISH CENTER. 44 Za
mora ave. Conervative. Rsbhi B.
Leon Hurwits. Cantor Meyer Gisser.
Opening late Friday evening sr\ Ice
of season 4:30 p.m. Sermon:
TIFERETH JACOB. 651 Rainbow." Saturday 8:30 a.m.
I:
'The
Hopkins, he enrolled at the Jewish
Theological Seminar}'- In his junior
year he married the iormer Dvo-
rah Bloshteln. They have two
daughters, Peninah. 9. and Shiran,
6'*. Both are students at the He-
brew Academy here.
A* spiritual leader of Congre-
gation Beth David, Ribbi Rosen-
berg has won "wido roeognitien
for his efforts on behalf of adult
Jewish education. For the past
four years, he has participated
at the University of Miami In Re-
ligious Emphasis Week. At the
University, he is also a guest lec-
turer for f classes, speaking on religion,
marriage and tho family.
Rabbi' Rosenberg conducts sev-
eral adult Bible study classes. One
group consists of businessmen who
our young men and women stu-
dents at the University of Miami,"
Goldstein told the gathering.
"I know that our Jewish com-
munity is ready to" respond to the
drive to keep Hillel going."
The drive will cover the Hillel
House structure mortgage on the
University of Miami campus. It
will also assist in completing the
building, installation of air-condi-
tioning, and extension of its spe-
cial library.
Dr. Sarnoff to Speak
Dr. Jacob Sarnoff, surgeon and
author, will be guest speaker at a
Bikur Cholim meeting Wednesday
noon at the Algiers hotel. Subject
will be "Better Health and Longer
Life," which is the title of bis re-
cent popular book.


Page 14-A
+JmlsHk*-ktk*n
Friday. %
0**^*]
Browsing With Books: By H1URY MIMPIIN
Two Books for Children Shed Light on Main Cun
... ....... .__.__-*--- _i.~ -m.. ki. i. i;..i
LITTLE QUEEN OF SHEBA. T4d by Laah GoWbrg.
Photographs by Jmm Rivkin-Brick. Translated by
ShuUmit N.rdi. 98 pp. Now York: Union of
Amorkan Hobrow Congregation*. $3:50.
THIS LITTLE BOOK, geared mainly to older chil-
dren, tells the story of the integration of Yael, a
Moroccan orphan, into an Israeli children's village.
Yael was a difficult child, confused and withdrawn,
who suffered the additional handicap of coming late to
the group. Faced with the hostility and resentment of
the other children, she withdrew still further. Her
eventual recoverythrough giving, herself, to other
childrenforms the climax of the story.
Capitol Spotlight: By WILTON FRIEDMAN
; no doubt true, thhi little tale; nothing else
could account for it* odd. elliptical style and the pecu-
liar flatness in the teUing of it. Truth may be stranger
than fiction, but it" more difficult to write. Two of
the characters have some real definition, but it is still
a surface kind of portrayal; than is no depth writing
here.
The book is not serieioffcal: there is not enough
material presented forlhat. It is not a psychological
study: it is too pat and superficial for that. The charac-
terization of Yael is not compelling: without the photo-
graphs, which set forth the spirit of the child and the
shadow of her sad face, it would be hard to identify
with Yael at all.
U.S. Munitions Men Make Friends With Krupp
Washington
IJNITED STATES munitions makers
** are noav entering alliances with Al-
fred Krupp. a convicted Nazi war crim-
inal. Will Congress require firms making
such cartel pacts to file with the Justice
Department Anti-Trust Division'
This question emerged in Washing-
ton among those who recalled Thurmond
Arnold's revelations before the Truman Committee in the
early days of World War II The nation was then shocked
to learn how Standard Oil's secret agreement with I G.
Farben handicapped American defense production. To-
day's developments are reminiscent of the previous car-
tels.
A new partnership of American corporations with
Hitler's merchants of death was never envisaged. An
issue is being raised, even by liberal West German ele-
ments, of the wisdom of rebuilding a dangerous inter-
national hierarchy of munitions kings. Will this contribute
to the stability President Eisenhower is seeking in world
relations?
Krupp is already participating in West Germany's
Oral nuclear project and plans for manufacturing atomic
weapons. If West Germany needs such ultimate arms,
must production be in the hands of the sole owner of the
former Nazi arms works?
Overss Newsletter: By ELIAHU SAlPfTER
Redesigned Currency
Jerusalem
COUt NEW ISRAEL banknotes
have gone into circulation here,
marking the fourth change-over of
currency series since the estab-
lishment of the State in 1948 The
Mw banknotes will replace the
old ones gradually, as banks will
slowly withdraw the old notes,
which, however still remain legal tender.
The reason for the change-over was given by
the State Bank as "esthetic": when the previous
series was issued, there was such a wide outcrv of
criticism that a special committee was appointed
this time including artiststo select new designs for
the Israel money. However, again, the Israel pub-
ic received the new notes with mixed comments.
While many liked their bright colors and under-
standable pictures, others again vehemently criti-
cized the artistic merits of the "realistic" drawings
The old notes bear on one side various Israel
landscapes, and on the other side completely ab-
stract drawings which may or may not be styliza-
tions of leaves. The latter was necessary, it was
claimed at that time, because no portraits could be
painted on the notesas is done in other countries
in deference to traditional Jewish objections against
"graven images." (Portraits are most difficult to
counterfeit, it was claimed, since the smallest devia-
tion immediately changes the facial expression
making it easily recognizable as a counterfeit.)
However, these scruples were overcome this
time. The new notes do bear human figures, though
not of anybody speofic-they are figures symbol
lzing workers in modern Israel. On the reverse of
the notes are shown some archaeological findsthe
two sides to symbolize the continuity of Past and
Present of Israel.
The half-pound note is sea-green, it shows a
sturdy girl in the uniform of Nahal (the Army'* g.
ncultural units), holding a huge basket of oranges
In the background is a typical" Israeli scenewith
neat farm houses, the inevitable water tower, and
the other paraphernalia familiar from Zionist pos-
ters. On the reverse is the picture of one of the por-
tals in Jerusalem's Sanhedna necropolis.
The sky-blue, one-pound note bears the image
of a fisherman, carryingbesides netsalso a huge
anchor, obviously being the only fisherman in Israel
taking home the anchor of his boat after work. His
weather-beaten face looks more like that pf the
sailor of the Player's cigarette peck.
Krupp has been rehabilitated by the United States and
West German governments to the extent that he is the
wealthiest man in Europe. He was convicted by .a I'.S.
War Crimes Tribunal at Nuremburg in 1947. The court
found Krupp guilty of exploiting and abusing slave labor,
including Jews. He was also convicted of looting Nazi-
occupied countries.
The court imposed a 12-year prison sentence on
Krupp. He was also ordered to forfeit his property be-
cause of the notorious manner in which the industrial em-
pire was expanded. But American industrialists were
persuaded to intervene on Krupp's behalf. In 1951, be
was freed from prison by John J. McCloy. then U.S. High
Commissioner for Germany. Krupp had served less than
half his sentence.
McCloy also restored confiscated properties. This
was in exchange for an agreement by Krupp to split bis
cartel structure by selling a portion of his holdings not
later than 1958. Krupp agreed to "relinquish" manage-
ment of the coal, steel, and iron ore units of his empire.
At first, he made a few transparently evasive maneuvers,
transfering firms on paper. Soon, with the tacit support
of German Chancellor Adenauer and Secretary of State
Dulles. Krupp openly ignored the cartel relinquishment
pledge.
Not only did Krupp fail to fulfill commitments to
split his monopolistic structure; he actually purchased a
rival firm in January to expand his cartel. On Jan. 31,
the State Department approved a year's extension of the
accord that obligated Krupp to dispose of steel mills and
coal mines. American officials admitted this order would
go by the board when the delayed deadline comes up
again in January*. 1900.
The State Department is operating under a decision
by the late Secretary of State to end "harraaaanent" of
Krupp. The Communist threat to Germany is cited.
Krupp recently made known he woaid resume turning
out instruments of war. He stressed that "we must not
forget reality."
One "reality is that the Krupp operation helped build
the dictatorship of Adolf Hitler. In the early 1930s
Krupp violated the Versailles Treaty by secretly building
guns, tanks, and submarines for the Nazis.
The 1947 Nuremburg trial records established that
Krupp joined the Nazi Party even before his father who
pubUcly boasted of Nazism ,n the Krupp works. In recn*
mtion of the Krupp role. Hitler allowed the Krupp uxjus-
Eh ^Tv* V,r,Ua' fam,ly emP,re Wlthln ** Third
m i !t ^fUPP- endors*d >y Hitler, became chair-
man of the board.
The book is little more, then l
tale. nreetly^oluV. tiny f.cet of u,2i*J
mean to imply that a book must be h!SVkh
ogy or sociology-heaven forfend' But it !*! --.
that Yaels story could have been a^rfJ^H
an excellent book for children a, ,Vd 'l!/**l
fMrary and lightweight really to be
photographs help; but they are not ia
tacular. either.
ALU ON THI TEAM. By Franc Fox j^,
traterf by Sylvia ttmmm^ 1M -. JJJ-lj
Nashville: *Htll PrM,. "* *i
This is an interfaith book for chiMr*.
one of the nicest I've seen. Done W|,h *j
stickiness and with honesty without ptm2
tells about the Cohens and the Parsons InT^a
testants. who are neighbors. Eh and TemaiaaJ
little boys who play on the same basebil^
generally interrelate, with the usual gnw-T"
standing and respect. There are .ome ankaVi
like the little boy who could not -Ude into Z k.
because of the toad he always kept ,n his ootb.
biggest problem it whether he should pliVuT
game, which is scheduled for Yom Kippur-'thtd
has been left up to him. The whole episode a ai
beautifully, with a resolution integrated *uh Um
of the booksomething which is unusual, not <*,]
a children's book, but for adult books as we!
OH the Record
By NATHAN]
slave^aS^^ T000 human beings "" <
Krupp 500 young Jewish girls. He worked them under
inhuman conditions They were beaten and stared. When
^Jewish ml* were^JZ3"1.^ *2n WortLS ,n ,9- cenm resource, of the Negev. should -1
sh!ppld back concen,^10 '"""" 22 ""*> ^loaK ,nterest '""herm* <* ** "*J
heart of .gaV Cncentrat,on "mP troI and never another example of the interdependence bttmm*
of life today.
Israel Art and DeJ
QNE OF THE first instittfaui
^^ in Israel's pre-state dm.
Bezalel school of arts and crafiii
salem. It scarcely received thea,
to which it was entitled bermci
nation for art is strangely
it should be. Neverthelea, the I
school played an import**
shaping the embryonic State of L,
iouay Israel is not only more art coojooo,
aware of art value in terms of dollars and eeavf
this awareaeea that is most likely behind the awl I
of selling Israel Bonds ia New York to tk _
tours to tie studies of famous Americas arum
The rising importance of the Jew in the alt
one of the striking phenomena of these da?*- L
said that the Biblical injunction agatast nubHI
images acted as a cheek oa the artistic hstehe (
Israel. Recently, archaeologists have uneweraJl
of ancient synagogues going back to the din l
Temple, which would seem to show that the pf
was not as absolute as some have claimed oritL
it did not extend to painting, the lister of tk|
imaged sculpture.
Whatever may be true of the past, there ml
doubt that the Jew has emerged to a from po*<
more modern art world. Yesterday there l
Israels. Modigliani, Soutine. and others, all na*
art world. Today there is Max Weber, regwWIft
as America's greatest painter. Chagall, Ben 9fl
Mania Katz and a host of other-
Israel now has its Lin Hod, a town <"*''.
ly to art. ^The painting is of the fine arts nnitrt,
periences has shown that the influence of fw"J
over to the crafts, and we may be sure that th*
pen with regards to the rising ceramics indmtTH
It is therefore no oddity that the pionotmsl
Bonds, whose resources are used in part *> *"
ceramics resources of the Negev. should hire'
from HoffywoW:
HERBERT G. UJFT
Sabra Has Burning Desire to Succeed as A
Hollywood
_', married to a merchant manner.
Mies Eden, who flew the Atlantic by r
the Hollywood studio, owes her discovery
20th Century-Fox to play the title
^5'" ,he forthcoming filmuation *
nlSJ \Z ?' Ru!h;"' h,d Wt her
native Israel until last month when she
was summoned by .,r to Lond^ to teit
for the part in the biblical picture The
worldwide search. 1,stlg seven booths I
self an Orthooox Jew. SnCffsSSv? ^ W- h- -- f bring her to .
on Nov 16. with Henrykom^rrir!! brfre "* c*" its drama about uth, the lW
Norman Corwin (of r,dio (.,,, ^ZT^* ******. nd "> Jwaaisan mentioned ia the Bible, and
tor the million pSur. Mpp,Jrui *** reen play treta of King David.
to the earlier, widely different rdl.tor,,
Anne Frank. A novice drama student, thea "
Theater in Tel Aviv. Elaaa was te**1 ***:
of 1997 for the reie for which Millie Perkinf
selected. Elaaa was one of the three MPJ1
role in "The Diary;" the oaw other havB*i
girt. Elaaa Eden's film-testing for Aaa"
has aervod now to hrinc her to the atteaoa^
ice. ^J?ttilto7&ZZ* BUiU" '
the Israeli Army. *.? &*0** Wer, ia
married and have a^him A ZZ? eB*wfo hecom*
_J beauty, with Urelr*CT
her hair, a lawozy heart ahapari face sap
long had a burning desire to succeed oa "
particular aaetaaatJon to go lato fHCtare*
maa, however, that she was greatlyJ"**,^
having been selected to play Anna f*""^j
now very much wishes to be a suceas*
of ~
_


fovember 13, 1959
* Jewish nor Minn
Page 15-A
.fci-.i
2T

'*"(>,
Welfare Funds Open Frisco Meeting
MIAMI PARTICIPANTS
SEE PAGE 7-C
mi ** ,.-fc*.

Iy back from Israel, where she represented Greater
as a member of the United Jewish Appeal Study Mis-
1 Mrs. Meyer Eggnatz. She is shown displaying an
rood box presented to her by the Ministers of Israel,
ceramic trays, copper candlesticks, oil paintings on
~id a hand-engraved silver fountainpen depicting the
i of Israel. The hand-knit striped blouse and her knit
re all made in Israel. Mrs. Eggnatz is active in the
ion of Jewish Women's Organizations and the Corn-
Jewish Appeal.
;t Region Will Meet in Savannah
50 delegates representing
stricts in the Southeast
the Zionist Organization
ca will meet in Savannah,
weekend for the organi-
22nd annual conference,
over the opening and
sessions will be Harry
Birmingham, Ala., presi-
Ihe seven-state region.
Biting the program will
lasrollah Saifpour Fatemi,
East Moslem leader, states-
Id editor; Moshe Erell,
>r of the Israel Embassy,
Dn, D. C; Jacques Grel-
iil General of France to
iern United States; Dr.
Robbins, of Nashua,
Rational vice president of
and Ben R. Wimck, of
Tenn., also a national
font.
tr B. Liebman, of Miami
ill address a luncheon on
[afternoon, honoring life
of the region, and Mrs.
Punter, of Pittsburgh, Pa.,
of the national Hadas-
Buroau, will be guest
It an Oneg Shabat on Sat-
kernoon.
s from the Greater Mi-
'. Albert Ossip, Joseph
man Weintraub, David
'. A. Goodman, Saul Ge-
Louis Shapiro, Miami
trict; James David Lieb-
and Mrs. Morris Simon,
rs. Louis Rudnlck, Mr.
ra Levine, Mr. and Mrs.
ine, Mr. and Mrs. A.
nd Seymour B. Lieb-
ini-Gables District; Ezra
Dr. Herman Ausubel.
Dr. Milton Lubarr and William
Goldworm, of North Shore Dis
trict; Sam Soldinger, Joe Meyers,
and Mai Ornstein, of Maccabees.
Soprano to be Heard
Roy Oliver, director of the Sing-
ers Workshop, will present Melanie
Markarian, award-winning soprano,
as guest artist on Tuesday evening
at the Miami Conservatory Con-
cert Hall, 2073 Coral Way.
By Special Report
SAN FRANCISCO-The Estab-
lishment of a National Jewish Cul-
tural Foundation to serve as a fo-
cus of American cultural activities
was recommended at the 28th Gen-
eral Assembly of the Council of
Jewish Federations and Welfare
Funds scheduled here ovef the
weekend. The recommendation
was contained in a summary of the
national cultural study sponsored
by the Council.
More than 1,000 Jewish leaders
from over 100 cities throughout
the United States and Canada were
on hand at the opening general
session to hear the report. Sidney
Z. Vincent, of Cleveland, study di-
rector, addressed the assemblage
on the background and findings of
the year-long study. Dr. Judah
J. Shapiro, of Washington, D.C.,
chairman of the technical advisory
committee, presented the recom-
mendations. Julian Freeman, of
Indianapolis, past president of the
Council and chairman of the Coun-
cil committee for the national cul-
tural study, presided. Walter A.
Hass, president of the Jewish Wel-
fare Federation of San Francisco,
delivered a welcoming address.
Herbert R. Abeles, of Newark,
CJFWF president, opened the As-
sembly.
Dr. Shapiro, who was former-
ly national director of the Hillel
Foundations, said the proposed
Foundation would be composed
of representatives of the 24 na-
tional Jewish cultural agencies
involved in the study and would
be invited to serve on a Council
of Jewish Cultural Agencies,
functioning as a central planning
instrument for the field. The
Council would be the arm of the
Foundation for clearance and
coordination among the agen-
cies, and for pooling and ex-
change of ideas. The Founda-
tion would undertake projects of
a magnitude too great for indi-
vidual agencies, would help fill
unmet needs, establish priori-
ties in scholarship and research.
M. JUDAH SHAPIRO
and stimulate activities In the
field generally.
Stressing the responsibility of
American Jewry to encourage cul-
tural programs, Vincent said, "Eu-
ropean Jewish culture as we knew
it only yesterday, historically
speaking, is finished for the fore-
seeable future. We share with
Israel the cultural responsibility
for our future as a people. Certain-
The survey stressed- that 1 ade-
quate safeguards had been pro-
vided to preserve the autonomy
-."and to-"prtfrtiote-'the creativity of
the individual agencies and to as-
sure them a continuing and vital
role."
In presenting the findings of
the study Vincent, who is assis-
tant director of the Jewish Com-
munity Federation of Cleveland,
observed that the most hopeful
aspect of the cultural study was
the emerging optimism of a re-
surgence of Jewish cultural ac-
tivities in America.
The opening session was devoted
to joint budget review sessions of
the Large City Budgeting Confer-
ence with a number of national
agencies. A series of concurrent
workshops were held in the after-
noon dealing with women's partici-
pation in communal service, the
role of federation presidents, per-
sonnel recruitment and a national
scholarship plan, and principles
and practices of budgeting. There
was also a series of regional din-
ner meetings prior to the opening
general session. A reception for
the delegates tendered by the San
Francisco Jewish community
closed the evening.
The conference will continue
through Sunday, Nov. 15, with
ly here is a challenge worthy of alT than 25 gcneral and "
community that ha T demonstrated \ZZ^ V"i*1 ^'^h
its genius for organization in the **.? ^L*^.1*}.
creation of a network of expert in-
stitutions to meet welfare and re-
ligious needs, and its profound
capacity for giving by its support
of overseas rescue and rehabilita-
tion work."
The Foundation would assist in
interpreting the needs of individ-
ual agencies and the field as a
whole to federations and welfare
funds and to trip pntire community.
It would also assume responsibil-
ity for .a system of. scholarships
and grants-in-aid "so crucial to
the future well-being of the field."
It could secure gifts from interest-
ed individuals and foundations and
thereby provide the means for
greatly expanding operations of
various agencies and in the field
generally.
community. Principal speakers
will be Israel Ambassador Avra-
ham Harman, who speaks Friday
on the current situation in Israel,
and Stanley Mosk, California At-
torney General, who will deliver
the principal address at the an-
nual banquet session. Other ma-
jor speakers are William Rosen-
wald, Carlos L. Israels, Joseph Wil-
len, Dr. Franz Goldmann and Dr.
Judah Pilch, all of New York, and
Philip W. Lown, of Boston.
lecture on Spinoza
Third lecture on the "Life and
Philosophy of Baruch Spinoza" will
be given by Dr. Abraham Wolfson
Friday, 6:30 p.m., in the gardens
of the Blackstone hotel. Question
and answer period will follow.
leers
'ami Beach
1-A
BACKGROUND QUALIFICATIONS OF
JOHN N. GIBSON
Candidate for the office of
MAYOR OF THE CITY OF MIAMI
1-A
JOHN N. GIBSON
has been engaged in economic and business research in Miami
since 1949. He became industrial research consultant to the
Chamber of Commerce in 1953, and at that time compiled and
published the area's first industrial survey, 'later joining the
staff of the Chamber of Commerce as Director of Economic Re-
search and Development. Upon the inauguration of the Metro-
politan County Government in 1957, he was selected by a citizens
advisory committee to establish and head the county's first gov-
ernment department devoted to afea economic development.
He continued as Director of the Dade County Development
Department until June, 1959 when he joined the General Devel-
opment Corporation of Miami as Director of Economic Plan-
ning and Development; resigning in October to campaign for
the office of Mayor.
Mr. Gibson's undergraduate studies were in engineering sci-
ence, and he also earned a degree in Business Administration
from the University of Miami while recuperating from an attack
of polio in 1952. Additionally, he is a graduate of the U.S. Mari-
time Service Engineering School and has qualified as a licensed
marine engineer. He studied city planning at the Urban Plan-
ning Institute, conducted jointly by the University of Florida
and the Georgia Institute of Technology.
He first entered the field of planning in 1936 with the Indus-
trial Planning Corporation of New York, and prior to World War
II was engaged in the research department of the Curtiss-Wright
Corporation and the field service and engineering divisions of
the Bell Aircraft Corporation. In World War II he directed the
overhaul of Fifth Air Force fighter aircraft in the combat area
of New Guinea and was a test project engineer on the nation's
first jet-propelled aircraft at Wright Field, Ohio.
Forty years of age, and a widower, he resides with his three
children at 2626 Lincoln Avenue in Coconut Grove. A paraplegic
himself, he is president of the Florida Paraplegic Association
and a director of the National Paraplegia Foundation. He is pres-
ident of the Coconut Grove P.T.A. and cub scout pack master of
Cub Pack No. 13. He is vice-president of the South Florida
Chapter of the American Society for Public Administration and
is a member of the Economic Society of South Florida as well
as a member of the South Florida Chapter of the Florida Plan-
ning & Zoning Association, the Technical Planners and the Amer-
ican Society of Tool Engineers. He is a director of the Dade
County Employ-the-Physically-Handicapped-Committee, and is
1-A
vice president of the Workshop for the Handicapped. He teaches
Sunday School at Bryan Memorial Methodist Church in Coconut
Grove.
He was recently named as consultant to the Economic De-
velopment Council of the Miami-Dade County Chamber of Com-
merce, is a member of the important "Goals Committee" of the
United Fund and is a speaker for The National Foundation. His
other affiliations have included the American Management Asso-
ciation, the American Industrial Development Council, the Insti-
tute of Radio Engineers, the Southern Association of Science and
Industry, the Southern Industrial Development Council, and the
United States Naval Institute.
In 1956 he was selected as "The South's Most Outstanding
Handicapped Employee," by President Eisenhower's Committee
on Employment of the Physically Handicapped; and in 1958 he
received an award from the state organization of B'nai B'rith
for his work in aiding the handicapped. -
A technical treatise on the "Theory of Analytical Industrial
Development," written by Mr. Gibson, has been adopted as a
basic tool of development analysis by many organizations
throughout the country and served as the basis for Dade Coun-
ty's new Conditional Industrial Zoning Ordinance," which sets
aside twenty-five square miles of undeveloped land as a site for
high grade industries.
. He prepared Miami's presentation for the Dodge Island Port
hearings before the U.S. Corps of Engineers which resulted in
the city's gaining approval for its new port program. At the
same time he won victory over the City of Miami in its auditor's
attempt to collect a 10% utility tax on the sales of bottled indus-
trial and medical gases. Despite the ruling of the city's legal
counsel that such assessment was within the city's powers, Mr.
Gibson prepared a validation opinion citing ten Supreme Court
decisions and contended such taxation Was illegal. He was upheld
in his opinion by the State Attorney General.
His most outstanding community contribution, completed
just prior to leaving the Dade County Development Department,
was the compilation and writing the three hundred-fifty page
Economic Survey of Metropolitan Miami, the first such survey
ever made on the Dade County area. Additionally, he is credited
with the compilation of the survey and directory entitled "Metro-
politan Miami Manufacturers," published this October by the
Dade County Development Department (ah agency of the Metro-
politan Miami government).
Pd. Pol. Adv.
GO GIBSON FOR MAYOR
THE 1A CANDIDATE
ON YOUR VOTING MACHINE
Pd. r>c
1-A


Page 16- A
+JeistncrkMan
Frid
^
German Sentenced to Prison
For Slanderous Remark to Jew
FRANKFURT (JTA) Karl
Sontheimer. 27. was sentenced to
four mdnths Of imprisonment ttrts
week and fined 100 marks for slan-
dering a Jewish taxi driver in
Wunsiddel. The court found Sont-
heimer guilty of having shouted at
Fritz Oesterreicher: "Hflfl Hitler.
They must have forgotten to gas
you during the Third Reich." The
incident took place in a restaurant
here. During the trial, several
witnesses who pleaded a "loss cf
memory." testified only after be-
ing reminded by the judge that
they were under oath.
Rudolf Treffurth. 52. a trade
school teacher in New Ulm, was
under arrest again Monday on
charges of libelling Jews. A lower
court released him from custody
last week following his first arrest
after he accused Jews of ritual
murder and of assaulting "blonde
German women." The Memmmgen
circuit court ordered his re-arrest.
Trial of Karl Chcnieleswski, 56-
year-old former commander of
the Muthu*rt-Gus*n concen-
tration camp, on charges e* tor-
ture and murder of several thaw-
sand prisoners will begin in Jan-
uary in the Ansbach Circuit
Court, it was announced here.
During preliminary investiga-
tions extending over three years,
the prosecution sought repeated-
ly to have the number of charges
in the indictment reduced to save
time and simplify the trial. The
former SS leader will be tried
for "only" about 1M crimes, the
prosecution said. More than 3M
witnesses from Germany and
abroad have given testimony so
far.
Exhumations of the bodies of vie
tims of the Mauthausen death
camp have been halted and ih>-
French Commission dealing with
the problem is reconsidering the
.entire matter. A French proposal
to erect a mausoleum at Mauthau
; sen in which would be interred the
thousands of skeletons sull lying
, in the Mauthousen camp garage
has been withdrawn. The question
of disposition of the remains win
be put before the World Rabbinical
(Council m Jerusalem for a deci
sion.
Meanwhile, in Munich. Dr Max-
lmillian Merten. Nazi war cnmi
nal who has been charged with de-
porting 50.000 Greek Jews to Nazi
annihilation camps and with loot-
ing Jewish property, was arrested
upon his arrival from Greece
where he was released last week
under an amnesty law for Nazi
prisoners. He was sentenced in
Greece to 25 years' imprisonment.
! but served only about three years.
'Jewish organizations strongly pro-
tested his release.
Dr. Merten was arrested as he
reached the German border. He
will be taken to Berlin for court
proceedings. The warrant for his
arrest was issued by the West Ger-
man authorities two years ago.
The West German Government re-
quested that he be returned by the
Greek authorities to Germany fol-
lowing his release from the Greek
prison.
Mrs. Jennie Groearinger. of
Miami Beach and New York,
has been awarded an honor-
ary Doctor of Humanities de-
gree by Wilberforce Univer-
sity. Presentation waj made
in Wilberforce. O. Mrs. Gros-
singer was made a Fellow of
Brandeis University in 1958.
Women's Chapter to Meet
Coral Gables chapter of B'nai
B'rith meet Tuesdav evening at
Zamora Jewish Center.
UN Agency
Raps Arabs
UNITED MATIOM8- pr neatly tefi years of operation
the United Nations Relief and
Works Aeency for Palestine Refu
gees in the Middle East is still un
able to obtain the full cooperation
of the Arab "host" governments
in whose countries the refugees
are maintained, the UN General
Assembly was officially informed
this week.
The charge was made in the for
mal report to the Assembly of the
agency's activities during the year
ending last June 30. It was filed
by Dr. John H. Davis, the rJNWRA
director. The Davis report, phis
one by UN Secretary General
Dag Hamroarskjotd, recommend
ing the Integration of the Arab
refugees into the economies of
Arab countries, will be debated
this month by the Assembly's spe-
cial Political Committee.
Dr. Davis reminded the Assem-
bly that the mandate of UNWRA
expires next June 30. He also
stated that thus far UNWRA has
received only $23,000,000 of the
funds pledged to it by member
states for 1959. He said that even
if the pledged total of $37,300,000
was paid in full, the agency would
still have a 1959 deficit of $1,600 -
000. On the assumption that opera-
tions would not be forced to halt
}WofPre,tti]
''Nrt Mfl
J'nai BTttt^L
committee for Ar^l
Veterans, p^jj
f" a mcttmj of !F
in New York. TV J
pos('d of mrtehS
cd a number of 3
to hospitj|ilc Prova. ,M?\
*omen in the Arniedpi
lot is a former <***_]
B'rith Grind LodgT]?"
long has been,o,j
affairs.
Ceramic
Show Opens3
Ceramic League a*1
hold an exhibit of tlef
members at the Gra
ies. Bird rd. tnd Pa,
blvd opening Smdit I
13.
The show will be ja
old Riegger, priie-s
1st from the Golf Ctt|
in Oarwater, Fk;
win. well-known Hi"
and W.lhs Wood. _
Norton Caller)'. Pila I
Mrs. Albert Comaari
League president.
next June 30. be i
get for 1960 calling
tures of $38,709,000.
Prinz Sees U.S. Indifference
Continued from Page M
right to continue their Jewish tra-
dition and to assure their continu-
ity as part of the Jewish people.
A "revitalization of the Zionist
idea" to arrest the "decline'' of
the Zionist movement in America
by creating an Amencan-or.ented
Zionist group "uniting all those
forces in the American Jewish
community committed to the idea
of Israel as the central element ir.
the concept of Jewish people-
hood."
Full participation in the effort
to make the promise of equalii;.
which America offers to all Ma
citizens, come true for those citi-
zens who because of race, relig
ion or national origin are den.ed it.
Meanwhile, in Washington last
weekend, Germany'* Ambassa-
dor to the United States and the
president of the American Jew-
ish Congress agreed that effort*
to wipe ewt anti-Semitism and
strengthen democracy In Ger-
many must be pursued with full
vigor H me Federal Republic is
to $#tn ffn# corHicMiKt or ?* tTES
I
i
German Ambassador Wilhelm G.
Grewe and Rabbi Prinz spoke at a
pres> conference here at which Dr.
Prinz presented the German dip
lomat with the first copy of a 63-
page study by the American Jew-
ish Congress entitled "The Ger-
man DilemmaAn Appraisal of
Anti-Semitism. L'ltra Nationalism
and Democracy in West Ger-
many."
The study reports that Germany
has made "immense progress" in
her development from Nazi dic-
tatorship to the democracy of the
Adenauer regime. But it warns {hat
while the government has accept
cd the obligation to make material
amends to the victims of Nazism.
anti-Semitism remains a popular
sentiment among the German peo-
ple.
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CHARLIE MERZ, Owner
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either of Flagler Federal's two conven-
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BEAUTIFUL 16-PC. SET OF CHINA W-PC. TABLEWARE SET *jjJJ
ELECTRIC COFFEE PERCOLATOR .8**8KYBALL" GLASSES h
CARAFE QUART THERMOS BOTTLE.
FREE TRANSFER OF FUNDS from anywhere
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take care of all the detaik.
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L,
n
d.
"Wc
ovnan s
"World
One person moving into a new house who can't
complain to the builder Sally Goldman may be
able "to mention a few things, but since husband Aaron
is the builder, he doesn't really have to listen Mrs.
Emanuel (Belle) Goldstrich just back from an in-
spection trip to the U. of Georgia and South Carolina
. Belle's national regional advisor for Sigma Delta
Ky .. Now, she's off to Parents Weekend at the U. of Florida
\t" daughter Jill who, by the way, belongs to Alpha Epsilon
ena Kaplan returned from an extended summer vacation .
gsau to celebrate her birthday went Mrs. Harry Orleans and
[Doris Also Mrs. Joseph Berger and daughter Bernice .
ichelor girls' holiday.

laze: Daniel Jay, born to Rabbi and Mrs. Arie Becker on
The new arrival joins his brother, Alan Lee, 18 months .
ker is former spiritual leader of Beth Raphael Congregation,
ad recently assumed the pulpit of Beth Sholom of Memphis,
Danny's great-grandmother is Mrs. Esther Shorstein, of Mi-
Linda Hope, born to Mr. and Mrs. Robert (Sandra) Stone, 820
St., No. Miami Beach, Oct. 20 at St. Francis Hospital .
arrival, the Stone's first, is the granddaughter of Mrs. Flora
1217 Collins ave., and Mrs. Lillian Green, 1143 SW 22nd ter.
t-grandmother is Mrs. Fanny Goodrich, also of 1143 SW 22nd
M
a switch from ordinary photos are the ones Sid Feldstein has
ring around Taken in color at a Halloween party, they
dressed as half-angel and half-devil Husband Bob looks
fctedly in a tramp's costume Ninety-year-young Mrs. Sarah
laving a birthday in New York, where she is living now .
Mrs. Irving Ellis and son, Irving, jr., flew up to be on hand for
day .
anal Council of Jewish Women went to college last week at the
of Miamiand there were plenty of aching feet that night
Blatt, Lola Greenfield, Cele Kemeny, Nanette Mayer, Roddy
ra Rochkind and Ann Berman were just a few of the 400 trudg-
; the campus Was that you, Pete Hirsch, with the chocolate
[the Student Union?

srtscaster Jack Cummings and Mrs. C. at the Candlelight
either night wishing Owen Phillips good luck on the Coconut
ayhouse opener Miss K. T. Stevens in before curtain time,
and Mrs. William M. Muir entertaining noted author Philip
Mrs. W. at still another table ... Dr. and Mrs. Seymour
iimenthalhe's the psychologist and marriage counselorback
Dur-day tour of New Orleans While Bess was exploring the
Blumenthal busied himself as a participant in an advanced
symposium .
f-towners came to wish Richard Fleischman congratulations
ir Mitzvah last Saturday at Temple Israel Richard's the
r. and Mrs. Harvey Fleischman, 463 NE 56th ter. Visitors
Mrs. Melvin Albert, New Rochelle, N.Y.; Gerson Silvarstein,
nswick, N.J.; and Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Silverstein and family,
Venezuela.
*
Milton Friedman's a sweetie ... He gave the award he won
bmbined Jewish Appeal "Thank You" party the other night to
Sylvia for her charm bracelet The's award's a paper
nd feels like a ton .
stunning outfit Mrs. William Weintraub wore was made of
she brought back from Milan ... The most charming of all:
xhing shoes .
[a six-month-old Dalmatian puppy named Butch for Mr. and
Urge Simons' six-year-old daughter.

and Arnold Greenfield inviting friends to "the garden at
Iks," 752 NW 7th st. rd., on Nov. 21 from 4 to 6-ish ... Mr.
Bernard (Flora) Supworth out for the first time since his
[stay, and dining at the Candlelight Inn .
ed Dade County Municipal Court Judge Otto Stegemann play-
iLord in "The Philadelphia Story" at Studio M.
dfewjisjli FlloriLdliLan
Miami, Florida, Friday, November 13, 1959
Section B
* J"


BUS TOURS
*
AGENCIES
Cedars Auxiliary
Ball Saturday
Saturday is the date the Ever-
glades hotel the place, and 7 p.m.
the time for the Inaugural Ball of
the Cedars of Lebanon Hospital
Auxiliary.
The occasion will begin with
cocktails at 7, dinner served at 8,
and dancing to follow. Gracie Bar-
rie and Paul Gray will be on hand
to entertain. There will be no so-
licitation of funds.
Co-chairmen for the event are
Mrs. Herschel Leschel and Mrs.
Jacob Colsky,- while Mrs. Peritz
Scheinberg and Mrs. Robert Wer-
ner are in charge of tickets. Mrs.
Nathaniel Levin is president of the
organization.
The ball comes as a followup to
the groundbreaking ceremonies
Sunday at the Cedars of Lebanon
Hospital site at NW 12th ave. and
14th st.
Mrs. George Simon Qeft) signs up the first "VIP" lor the FJWO
Bus Tour on Friday, Nov. 20. Mrs. Joseph Milton, president
of Menorah groop of Hadassah (right), will join nearly 100
organization presidents and leaders on the tour of Federation
agencies starting 9:30 a.m.
'Seeing is Believing': Women Leaders To
Get Insight into Local Welfare Agencies
believing" will
"Seeing is
demonstrated next week for a
group of women presidents who
will be invited to tour Miami's
welfare agencies via air-condition-
ed buses.
The annual "VIP Bus Tour"
sponsored by the Federation of
Jewish Women's Organizations
will be held on Friday, Nov. 20,
from 9:15 a.m. to 2:15 p.m., it has
been announced by Mrs. Jean C.
Lehman, FJWO president.______
Mrs. George Simon is chairman
of the bus tours, which are design-
ed to give some 70 new organiza-
tion presidents and their execu-
tive committees a first-hand op-
portunity to visit the Federation
family of agencies and to watch
community service in action.
"Last year's bus tours proved
such a tremendous success, that
we are repeating them again by
popular demand," Mrs. Lehman
said. .
Buses will leave from the Fed-
eration office, 424 Lincoln In.,
promptly at 9:15 a.m. An informa-
tion host will be aboard to brief
the women as they approach each
be welfare agency. Buses will visit
a the Greater Miami Jewish Com-
munity Centers, Jewish Home for
the Aged, Jewish Vocational Serv-
ice Workshop, and the new Mt.
Sinai Hospital.
Executive directors of the Bu-
reau of Jewish Education and
Jewish Family and Children's Ser-
vice will describe their agency
functions.
Directors and officers of the re-
maining Federation agencies will
also be on hand to conduct tours
and to. answer questions.
Due to limited seating facilities,
Mrs. Simon has urged presidents
and their executive women to make
reservations early for the bus tour
next Friday.
BB Council Slates
Meeting Here
Regular monthly meeting of the
North Dade-Broward Council of
B'nai B'rith Women will be held
Thursday, Nov. 19, 8:15, at Temple
Beth Sholem, 1725 Monroe St.,
Hollywood.
Following the meeting, Mrs. Viv-
ian Klein will conduct a program
workship.
This new Council consists of five
chapters of B'nai B'rith, which en-
compass three in North Dade area,
one in Hollywood, and one in Ft.
Lauderdale.
In charge of information are
Mrs. Alvin Wank, president, 1021
NE 154th ter., and Mrs. Mack Sher-
man, publicity chairman, 17021 NW
8th ct.

Shoshana chapter of B'nai B'rith
Women will hold its annual fall
dance at the Saxony hotel on Sat-
urday evening.
Oriental wood will prevail, with
the highlight of the evening a Chi-
nese auction.
In charge of admissions is Mrs.
Herbert Brautman, ways and
means vice president.
Tifereth Jacob
Women's Affair
Temple Tifereth Jacob Sister-
hood will have a membership af-
fair on Monday evening, Nov. 23,
at the Temple, 951 Flamingo Way
under the direction of Mrs. Joseph-
ine Hammel, vice president, who
'will be assisted by Mrs. Harry
j "triple premeire" program for the ^f0^*^
dng Israel's new Ambassador to the Unitedl States
an Harman. Dec. 5 is discussed by ^^^^
Women's Division and the stage manager ^producer
fcpecial show which will be a feature ? # JS
ft to right) are Mrs. Jack Popick. Micmu Beach Women s
D chairman; Mrs. Max Weit*. Greater Miam.-**
fr. Jack Katzman. sponsors chanman and^grand hos
br are Jerry Ball (left), stage manager and noted tar
"me hoteTproductions. and Wally Wftnger. formerly
lount Pictures.
'Eva* fo be Retrieved
Sisterhood of Temple Emanu-El
will hold its annual Thanksgiving
tea Wednesday, 1 p.m., at the Al-
giers hotel, according to Mrs. Mil-
ton Smith, president. Highlight of
the event will be a review of the
novel, "Eva," by Meyer Levin. Re-
view will be presented by Mrs.
Helga Eason, of the Miami Public
Library.
Beth 1 Sisterhood Dinner
Beth El Sisterhood will hold a
dinner Sunday evening, 6 p.m., at
Dora August Memorial Hall, 500
SW 17th ave.
Sinai Women Will
Attend Seminar
What makes a good volunteer
worker? How is leadership train-
ing transmitted to the new volun-
teer? What are the definite re-
sponsibilities of a chairman? How
can the volunteer program be im-
proved?
These and other questions will
be answered at a seminar for vol-
unteer chairmen and officers of
the Women's Auxiliary of Mt.
Sinai Hospital at the Fontainebleau
hotel on Friday, Nov. 20. Coffee
will precede the meeting which
begins promptly at 10 a.m.
Mrs. Milton Sirkin, chairman of
the seminar, will talk about the
general responsibilities" of the
chairmen.
Volunteer interviewers, Mrs.
Roseman.
An original musical skit will belDores Frankenthal and Mrs. Ber-
presented, "Sisterhood Carousel," nard Spector, will discuss the spe-
written by Mrs. Louis Bernstein.
Participating are:
Mesdames Harry Beck, Philip
Begun, Ruth Brower, Joseph
Gross, Charles Kirsch, Philip Ly-
ons, Albert Levite, Joseph New-
man, Jesse Pearl, Jack Wilco,
Louis Wine, Sam Weinstein, Mel
Weiss, Morrie Wyman and Leon
Dorson.
On the refreshment committee
will be Mrs. Mae Goldman and Mrs.
Harry Beck, and in charge of dec-
orations are Mrs. Eugene Abram-
son, Mrs. Jack Rackear and Mrs.
Leon Rubenstem.
cific responsibilities and the exact
procedure of placement of new
volunteers.'
Since expansion of the volunteer
service program will be increased
in the new Mt. Sinai Hosspital,
Mrs. PhiliD Lefkowitz, president of
the Auxiliary, has called for this
orientation so that chairmen in va-
rious departments can answer the
questions of their workers.
Mrs. Edward Roth, general vice
president, is in charge of volunteer
chairmen, and is assisting Mrs.
Sirkin in the coordination of this
program.
1
I

P\
' i
\


?aqe 2-8

At the recent first birthday party and membership affair of the
Sunshine chapter. B'nai B'rith Women, at the Americana
hotel. Mrs. Lillian Ritter signed in as the 50th new member.
To the extreme right is Mrs. Gerald Soltz. District Five presi-
dent. At her riqht is Mrs. Eva Porte, membership vice presi-
dent of Sunshine chapter.____________________
Kronengolds Note 35th Anniversary
Mr. and Mrs. George Kronengold
week announced the 351 h an
liversarj of tfca George Kronen
;oid Travel Servtci of Kttajni
Beach II f* I York The local of-
. cated at 540 Arthur God
: i j rd.
Kr<
if the : hi- a :f.' have
ins! returned from a b
:
,.y : i
U they
T kj >. Kamakura. Eno
shima Nikk Kj oto, Nara
ka.
:\y before '.heir departure
trom Miami Beach, Mr. and Mrs.
Kronengold were bosta to the Jap-
,:.t ca Tu B Visit-
::_ in hfiaani Beach. Upei
arrival in Jjpan. the group reap
then
l i
Sur; the old Japanese
way of lite is st.ll preserved, al
thouch in the big cities most of
the Japanese, especially the males,
have adopted Western dress. the
Kronengolds observed
They found Hone Kong "fantas |
tic. and no matter how much
reads or is told about this arr.azine j
iNland. one must experience it>
thrills to bcl.cve it. The scenic
beauty of the harbor and mour.
t:un- can hardly be virpassed "
Mrs. Kroneneold -aid that in
Konj. it is very easy to go
on a sh>pp::iL' ipfl e from the time
pen at 9 am until they
at 9 p.m And this is one of
the few ctties where the male does
just as much shopping a- the fe-
male. The money saved on pur
chasing new wardrobes goes a long
am) towards defraying the cost
of the trip" Although they havr
taken many cruises and traveled
< !> m Europe, and Soul^
Amer.ca. '"this without a
doubt, one of the most exciting
tr ;<- we have ever made."' the
Kronengolds agree.
'Pledge Parade"
Dance Saturday
Delta rhi f r"v "'"
present its 13th annual "Pledges
n Parade dance Saturday in the
vuu. gardena. The
n ujlr resent th, new pledge
, of 1959 at the same time.
pied m will appear in white
ll-e pledge president of
each group Will H reive the tradp
QoaaJ re. ro, presented l.y P
Phi E's pledge mother. Lois Fein
berg.
Officers of Omega chapter of
Delta Phi Epsilon are Lynn Swurt/.
president: Barbara Robins, \ ice
president; Lots Feinberg. pledge
mother; Barbara Laskin. treasur
or. A\i< Kaplow. recording -ecre
tary and Judy Millman. corre-
sponding secretary.
BB Women Plan
Varied Meetings
North Shore chapter of B"nai
B'rith Women will meet Monday
noon at the Washington Federal
Savings and Loan Assn 1133 Nor-
mandy dr. Book review will be
featured.

Combined meeting and luncheon
will be held by Miami Beach chap-
ter Tuesday noon at the Sea Gull
hotel Co chairmen are Mrs/Harry
Kaufman and Mrs. David Demar.

Tuesday evening is the date of
white elephant sale and meeting
by the Chai chapter of B'nai B'rith
Women in the Deauville hotel.
Frid Winners in a Cake-a-thon sponsored bv Southnall
Center Sisterhood proudly display their designated i
Left to right are Mesdames Charles Esterman, tlurd n
Blen, second prise; and William Heyman, first prat
was at the Henry M. Flaqler Elementary School i
cakes were entered. Judges included Mist Ruth;
the University of Miami Department of Home Ecoooaal
Joe Boise was master of ceremonies.
School in Special Mention
Temple Emanu-EI nursery
school, represented by Mrs Naoro.
i B. Qrandeis. head teacher, and the
entire nursery' school staff, r*
ceived special mention for the clay
creations done by the children and
[displayed at the fourth annual
convention of tht
on Children Under Sal
30 at the Barcelona' Mil
vention. based on tit I
proving Ourselves
was attended by
nurst ry teachers fraa I
the State of Floridi
NEW
DAIRY MEAL
TREAT
JUST HEAT "N" EAT
Dade Federal
Execs at Confab
Two Dade Federal Sav.ng- and
Loan Asn officials left this week
t.. attend the annual I'nited States
Savings and Loan League conven-
tion in Dalla-
Jo>eph Nt Lipton. president, and
t.us Feuer. general counsel and
director, are official delegates rep-!
resenting Dade Federal.
Lipton is a member of the Cni
ted States Savings and Loan;
League management committee
comprised of some 100 savings and
loan professionals who help set:
peBey to meet the broad problems!
of savings and loan management.
Dade Federal Savings and Loan
Assn now celebrating its 25th an
mMr^arj'. recently moved its
downtown home office quarters to
the newly modernized multiple
story building on the corner of
Flagler st. and NE 1st ave.
Even without the label you'd know
were Heinz Kosher Beans. One taste *M
you. 'Cause what other bean in all the wide wide workM
delightfully, deliciously, di.tinctively Heinz-ish? Ju* ^
servc.be ready for seconds. Tonight.
Near family. awast*. choor far
hat imI Itolian flavor waled
by fom.d Chef ley-Ar D..
Tendor littla macaroni oiot...
fMtod with tangy Italian Chooto
... lavished with avory tomato
ave*... si wan fad w inS mwsk-
m and ckooso... toatonod
Italian way. TMiftyt
tie
todayl
^Ut^c^rnth.Om,0(.ppr0wlg

November 13, 1959
mi's Courses
Conclusion
eadership Training
1 women presidents have
filled for Tuesday Nov.
at Beth David Congre-
in personalUn^-publif
membership retention,
Ig, and fund-raising will
tetl by officers of the
of Jewish Women's Or-
i.
ernard Stevens, FJWO
[vice president, designed
for the purpose of dis-
nd developing new lead-
smen's organizations. In-
jtaclude Mrs. Harold Sol-
b. Phillip Schiff and Mrs.
"Soltz.
who complete the six-
irse will receive certifi-
|he next open meeting of
has been announced by
C. Lehman, president.
*Jewlsli fkridUari
Page 3-B
Ish Women1
le of Meet
Creation of the Jewish
[will be the theme of a
planned by the Plagler
I Jewish Community Cen-
ftiood Thursday, Nov. 19,
enter auditorium.
group under the direc-
rs. Paul Draizar will per-
rtley's Fur Salon will pre-
fur fashion show, with
of sisterhood modeling.
lite to Jewish Book Month,
Gittelson, education di-
Monticello Park Jewish
[will review "This is My
Herman Wouk.
Jarney Landers is Sister-
sident. Mrs. Sam Kowal-
ogram chairman.
Newly-elected officers of the Teen-age Presidents Council of
the Miami Beach YHMA look over plans for the year ahead.
Left to right are Gail Pollak, president, and Sandy Weinstock,
vice president. Gail is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert
Pollak, 4570 North Bay rd., and Sandy's parents are Mr. and
Mrs. Sidney Weinstock, 4420 Adams ave. The Council is
composed of 12 teen-age clubs sponsored by the Beach
Branch of the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center.
Sisterhood Marks Anniversary Sisterhood Marks
Book Month
Sisterhood of Temple Judea will
celebrate its tenth anniversary
Sunday, 8:15 p.m., at the Temple.
Past presidents will be honored
at a candlelight service. "Flite"
committee of Eastern Airlines will
present a variety show. Program
chairman is Mts. Jack Somberg.
! GALA FIFTH SEASON !
I0C0NUT GROVE PLAYHOUSE
3500 Main Hwy.
HI S-2581
Matt. Wad. ft Sat. 1:30
5-2581
Bx. Moo. 8:30
ly$: 7:30
NOW THRU NOV. 15
MATINEE SATURDAY AT 1:30
ROBERT Q. LEWIS
ONCE MORE, WITH FEELING"
Alt* Sfarrlaf
K. T. STEVENS
"Explnlrafr MtorfaMaflr-larr, M.Y. HeroW TrifcMa
\\
OPENS tUES^ NOV. 17 29
KIM HUNTER
and
if
ii
JEFFREY LYNN
in
SUMMER AND SMOKE
A Moat Poignant Lova Story
by
TENNESSEE WILLIAMS
IYH0USE RESTAURANT AND COCKTAIL LOUNGE
[iWKHIONS a 0INNUS aWMRS COCKTARS
Reservations: Jimmy Ksarns
In observance of Jewish Book
Month, celebrated nationally Nov.
20 to Dec. 20, Beth David Sister-
hood will present a play, "Fash-
ions in Books." directed by Mrs.
Louis Schwartzman on Wednesday
noon.
The cast will include the Mes-
dames Ben Abrams, Sam Badanes,
Michael Covin, Walter Falk, Irving
Genet, Robert Gold, Stanley Gos-
tei, Daniel Hagan, Richard Her
old, Stanley Jamison, Morris Ra-
binowitz, Philip Schiff, Edward
Schwartz, Max Silver, Jerome
Stern, John Strunin, and Stanley
Tinter. Mrs. Harold Berney is
musical accompanist.
In honor of Book Month, there
will also be- a prize of a book
awarded.
^ GREATER
MIAMI
CHILDREN NEED
lomogenized Vitamin "D" Milk
PHONE IE 1-5537
Sisterhood Slates
Member Meeting
One of the world's great accord
ionists will entertain members of
the Beth Israel Sisterhood at a
"member bring-
a-member" party
at the home of
[Mrs. Emanuel
J Finkel, 5171 Pine-
al ree dr., on Tues-
__ 1 lay noon.
Mrs. George
rlechter, p r e s i -
lent, announced
hat Ronald Pe-
.er Sweetz, win-
ner of the 1957
international accordion contest in
which 17 countries participated in
Europe, will entertain Sisterhood
members at the "kickoff" meeting.
Sweetz, who now lives and
teaches in Miami, has been nation-
al champion of the United States
Accordion Assn. for three years,
and has appeared on the Ed Sulli-
van show.
Also on the program will be a
book review of "This Is My God,"
by Herman Wouk, to be given by
Herbert Berger, assistant director
of the Bureau of Jewish Educa-
tion.
Mrs. Harry Milsen is member-
ship chairman, and Mrs. Alexander
Moscovits is program chairman.
SWffTZ
Bikur Cholim Meeting
Miami chapter of Bikur Cholim
Kosher Convalescent Home will
meet Monday, 1 p.m., at Beth El
Congregation, 500 SW 17th ave.
Cell-o-zyme
A REVELATION IN
BEAUTY CULTURE

>
.
juniors take kindly
to the shapely sheath
17
Devastating after dark! This is a
date-time cotton with a bright
future. Bead and pleat detail at
bodice and hip, accent the quiet
simplicity- of this "little dark
dress." Black only, sizes 5 to 15.
Young Florida Shop, third floor, Miami.
At all five Burdine's stores.
shop monday "til JP
J


Page 4-B
+Jmlst>r**A**i>
****/. Hon,^.
Jetnsh Ftroduw Exv.'wbi*
Your Marriage Counselor
|*g*tl N\wvuit Fa>h-s Uazj ~Jw* Flor>d>an mmo countW Swu*\ G. KSwg-
: on *< bb. lr*.g l*nmn apmiwal *V o*
Tcn^ttt bMnw-EL. Mr. KKng't mw*d oum>
tKt
By DR. IRVING LEHRMAN
Prof Arnold Toynbee in his analysis of the rise
and fall of ancient civilizations comes to the conclu-
sion that most of them perished not because they
were destroyed by an enemy from without bat
rather because they rotted from within and roll ay
sed from moral decay It sweats to me that the
conclusion of this freat historian should serve as a
challenge to all of us who are concerned with the
preservation of our society
The greatest threat to civilization today is the
weakening of family life. This means the moral
(latoaegratioa of the familywhich brings worn it
infidelity, illegitimacy, juvenile dekneoeucy nod of
MM, divorce According to a study of social sta-
tistics presented by the late Dr. Sidney Goldstein,
there are one-third as many divorces granted today
a* there are marriages solemnised
The population of the United States increased
SXi percent since lmTT. marriages increased 400 per-
ind divorce* 2.000 percent. The answer of the
Catholic Church to this challenge is that divorce
-hculd be outlawed altogether The Protestant
Church permits divorce, but knowing its damage,
tries to limit and restrict the grounds. Thronghoot
he country the trend is toward making dnorce
difficult
Jewish law on the other hand has an altogether
cut approach There are many curumstaaces
m Baser i-.-.-- reauni m ax#j phtafl M
-courage, aiimomnn of a mnrrtage la spite of
i lenient approach, divorce seemed to have re-
td ie the realm of the theoretical and the
.cademK. for we Jews have developed a
-ng which worked so weB thronghoot the
M knot always been able to pride oursehc*
n the solidarity of Jewish marriages and on the
csptratten and eodorance of the Jewish
and mana)
Jowiafc Divorce Rate Soars
r ghttnang b that iswathi.io we i
ingh: ia the general watrspeel of family
ataae For the fast time
nag. aad many experts are sa>-
- -
n eaten the old traditaoi wah as
the tost
Ml are these valors*
altar of sen ice and delation. Marriage, because it
was considered sacred, was approached with dedica-
tion, respect, reverence and awe. This is why mar-
riages were planned with proper preparation and in-
struct ion. and why marriage by impulse was frown-
ed upon.
This preparation in Jewish tradition even In-
cluded laws of selection Remember, in choosing
a mate, if one is tall the other should be short so the
children will not be too tall." If one is dark the
other should be light so the children will not be too
dark or too light." aad there were many, many
others, perhaps old^asakmed and outdated, but
nevertheless showing that marriage was never taken
ugntry.
Imoortancn of Family Background
Selection especially considered family back-
ground We moderns consider the word Yictous"
old-fashioned, aad yet we find that marriage coun-
schnrs and psychologists today tell as that family
background is of vital inwjortiacf. Who are the
parents' What is the family'' What are the interests
of the young coupler What b their outlook on ufe*
We look askance at the ward. JThidrhen." and yet
this was in a certain seas* the function of the old
matchmaker, to delve into family backgrounds Per
haps many of our short-lived marriages today might
have been pet ranted if there had been a little more
preparation and planning, hafare the decisive step
When 1 thmk of the approach so many of at
take to marriage. I recall the story of a man who
had a garden la order to protect it he planted a
hedge around it. hot then realised that the hedge
was inwteaiiiti to keep animals aad i hilih i oat.
so he buih a feme* around the hedge. One day he
saw a fax Juanptag oer the fence lie was greatly
dastorbed aad decided to budd a wail around the
fence and iimfdantslj applied haaneif to this
arduous task When the wall was completed he en-
tered the gardea to admire his work, hut k> and he-
hold, his flowers were dead. What
He was so
and pve R
want we do m our
all our energies au
I
Emma Laaaras chap of B'txri B'rith Women pkr*,i
Hatters luncheon and swrim party Sunday noon at tW k
of Mrs. Alfred Reich. 6003 SW 59th .. So. Miami Laft,,
are the Miaeee Edith Simmons. Mae Hurwitt, Bent Oil
can Spitnlnik. Bornice Bobkoff. president, and Raft IobjJ
-Wedonaj' Fete At Temple Zk
ibersaip meeting of
Sisterhood Monday
were jean-
's organization, I
The head table ia tie Temple's
social hall featured a three-tier
wedding cake Mrs. Reuben Leder
man played the wedding march
while past priaidtBti. as
maids." came down the aisle
They were follond fe j
Mrs. Sidney Pascal
Mrs. Sam Lena Sou* fgj
don sang ongkal wxhi|
wedding marcs.
Also parhcipoteg wet-
maker" Tsiiibnihn ws
dent Mrs Lawn
Mrs David Pans.
prtnidinL a s
"bride nnrtuntat all
members.' was Mrs. Anal


.'.' 'i lays
when
only
the bot
MANISCHEWrri
Gef ilte FisM


iber 13, 1959
*Jewisii fhrMKaHn
Page 5-B
,f Lebanon Breaks Ground;
:irsf Phase of Hospital Building
t more ho=pital beds Dr. Homer Marsh, dean of the
Is far too tpparer.l medical school al the University
IS"T3d5y7/* |ollins told a gather-jDade county commissioner; and
D persons at ground- Jud=e Joe Eaton,
monies Sunday fnr|
Former Miami
fcnon Hospital at N\v i
14th st.
aessage, in which he
Fbeing able "to makej
|n person,""Collins de-
re never can bel
bout that American
Juntary philanthropy '
Res citizens to act in- j
En a cause such as
|ng also heard from
Robert King High;
Mayor Aba
Arenovitx was chairman of the
function which broke ground for
the nsw $1,211(1,000 medical struc-
ture. A currant campaign here
for $2,450,000 !s in progress to
augment existing funds for the
erection of the first phase of the
ultimate 281-btd medical insti-
tution.
Dr. Morton M. Halpern, presi-
dent of Cedars of Lebanon, greet-
. ed guests. Invocation was l.y Rabbi
fcholson, president of Joseph Naroti of Temple Israel of
Vida Hospital Assn.;; Greater Miami, and ROT, A. E.
yd. jr., vice chairman, Gysan, president of f.-.e Greater
i Miami Ministerial Assn.
Groundbreaking committee in-
cluded Mrs. Hyman Kaplan, chair-
man, Dr. Jacob Colsky, Mrs. Na-
thaniel Levin. Sam Luby, Mrs.
Reuben Rochkind, Dr. Maurice
nday morning Nov. Rkh flnd RaWj. Naro(
5 p.m., on 27th ave.
st., opposite Farm-
ale include men's and
ling, baby and chil-
is, rugs, books, furni-
lier items. In charge
Ion is Mrs. Herbert
in Rummage Sale
Raptor of B'nai B'rith
, hold its annual rum-
Participating m the groundbreak-
ing ceremony were Abe Aronovitz,
Sidney Aronovitz, Dr. Mo r r i s
Blau, Mrs. Nathaniel Levin, and
David Stuzin, all prominently iden
tified with the Cedars of Lebanon
drive to establish a hospital in
Miami under principally Jewish
medical auspices.
EBAI
[PROFIT'
tic
1T0C
Blau, chairman of the building committee, gets an
i his six-year-old daughter, Kathy, at Cedars of Leb-
Bndbreaking ceremonies Sunday.
*?2
^ZZ.I^mtlna our 75m Annivarsoryf
In Miami it's
FLORIDA-FOREMOST
DAIRIES
for Home Delivery
Phone FR 4-2621
Th great name In dai'y products
FRANK J. HOLT, Managei
Groundbreaking committee of Cedars of Leb-
anon Hospital exhibits architect's conception
of the $4,200,000 medical facility to be erected
at NW 12th ave. and 14th st. Left to right are
Rabbi Joseph R. Narot, Mrs. Nathaniel M
Levin, Dr. Jacob Colsky, Mrs. Hyman Kaplan
Dr. Maurice Rich, and Mrs. Reuben Rochkind.
'Volunteens' Will Install Officers
From the high school age group,
junior members of the Women's
Auxiliary of Mt. Sinai Hospital,
known as "Volunteers," have elect-
ed their own officers and will in-
stall them at a luncheon on Satur-
day morning in the Memorial Room
of the hospital.
The officers are Miss Linda Kas-
sen, president; Miss Betty Breit-
ler, vice president; Miss Jane
Firestone, secretary; and Miss
Judy Russin, treasurer.
These volunteer high school
girls give volunteer service to the
hospital and work as servettes in
the various departments on week-
ends and during summer vacation.
Some find time to work after
school on occasion.
Food Editor to Speak
Temple Beth Am Sisterhood will
hold its regular monthly meeting
Monday evening at the Temple
auditorium. Mrs. Herman Feld-
man. program chairman, will pre-
sent the guest speaker, who is Mi-
ami News food editor Bertha
Cochran Hahn. Her topic will be
"Do You Eat to Live, or Live to
Eat?"
membership is not limited only I
girls living in the area. All h:
school girls from any part of Dae
county are welcome to serve.
Mrs. James Ruby is chairma'-
-and Mrs. Thomas Trent, co-chai'
man, of the Volunteer program 0
There are now 45 members, but the auxiliary.
At the installation, awards will
be presented to those girls who
have given 50 hours or more of
service.
mfl, ,

PHYLLIS WOLFF toys:
Ah-h-h... Kasha!
Wb
course!
A "haimishe" standby
... for old-limy good Kasha
Varneshkes, Kasha Knishos, and
other treats. Less than 2* a serving I
Abe wijor Wolffi CrMqr Karmb (griti) .. .
WoM'f Kmha 'N' Gravy .. WoW KoWw Soup.
Sand for ntff KASHA COOK BOOK:
PHYUIS WOIFF, rnn Van, Nw York
Monthly Luncheon Scheduled
Temple- Tifereth Jacob Sister-
hood will hold its regular monthly
luncheon on Thursday noon, Nov.
19, at the Temple, 951 Flamingo
Way, Hialeah. In charge of reser-j
vations are Mrs. Max Lebowitz and
.Mrs. Nat Holtzer. "
LEVINSON'S FOOD SPECIALTIES. Exclusive Distributors
1060 E. 17th STREET. HIALEAH. FLA. PHONE TU 7-1571
ON SALE AT
THRIFTY SUPER MARKET

Gables Lodge Anniversary
Gables Lodge, Knights of Pyth-
its, marked its 12th anniversary
with a dinner dance at the Israelite
Center on Sunday. The dinner also
honored Meyer Shapiro for his 49
years as a member of the organi-
zation.
YOUR
MONEYS
WORTH
For the Best in Honey Cakes
HOLLAND HONEY CAKES
NONE BETTER. THE GENUINE ALL-HONEY CAKE.
NO FATS or SUGAR. Also WITH or WITHOUT FRUIT.
Also Available Without Salt
Made by
HOLLAND HONEY CAKE CO. Holland, Michigan
WASHINGTON
FEDERAL
Miami Beach
Distributed by HI-GRADE FOOD CO.
7200 N.W. 29th Avno Phone OX 1-0961


Page 6-B
+Je*istncrkfi*n
FridaY- Nor.,8^,
Sn tltclQcalm of Society
Miss Gottfried.
Leo Raphael Say
Evening Vows
Kay Ins Gottfried became Mrs
Leo Raphael in 8 p m. MNhl
ceremonies on Saturday. Nwl "
at Hibiscus Auditorium. Rabbi
Morris Skop officiated.
The bride is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Arnold Gottfried. 4SU
Alton rd. Mr. and Mrs Victor Ra-
phael. JOO Ocean dr. are the par-
ents of the groom.
Given in mama^e by her par-
ents, the hnd* chose a sequin aad
beaded gown featuring Queen Ann
lace over satin The sleeves came
to a point over the hand, with the
bridal attire also featuring an
apron front and sequined ruffle,
with tiers of lace and mile fum-
ing the chapel train Her tiara and
triple veil also showed sequins and
beads.
Matrons of honor were Mrs.
Charles D. Newman. Mrs. Shirley
Feuerstem. and the grandmothers
of the bride and groom.
Maids of honor were Miss Ar-
kne Cohen and Miss. Betty Ra-
phael. Bridesmaids included Suz-
anne Fi>:err.ak. Margaret Broker.
Valerie Krusiak. Roberta Sherr> '
and Rome Sfcotooiith Ju-
bndesmaiil ana Doreeo Sholoauth
Dav.d Itunfcaal as best man
r Ushers included ed from the 0. S Army, is adju-
Jaek Bnmgnr. great uncle of the tant of Jewish War Veterans Post
Raymond Berry, Carl Mus- S3B. and associated with Mtdwest
uo lAnua
Mr Raphael, recently discharg-
Mexican Holiday
For Konhauzers
In a double ring candlelight cer-
cmonv on Sunday. Nov. 8. at the
Barcelona hotel. Miss Barbara Su-
san Bauer, daughter of Mr and
Mr- Sidney Bauer. 113 N. Shore
dr. became the bride of Jerry
Konhauier. son of Mr. and Mrs.
David Konhauier. J45 W. 42nd st.
Rabbi Leon Kronish officiated.
Best man was Robert Konhaui-
er. brother of the groom. Ushers
ere Michael Bauer, brother of
the bride. Dr. Al Rosman. and Ken
Kaplan. Matron of honor was Mrs.
Robert Konhauier. Bridesmaids
were Sandy Fishfan. Linda Dia-
mond, and Roi Miller. Dene Fried-
man was junior bridesmaid.
The br.de selected a traditional
wedding gown featuring a bodice
'of imported chantilly lace over
bridal satin, with scooped ueek-
' line, three quarter sleeve, aid
. bouffant start of shirred tnQe ez-
! tending into a cathedral train. Her
four-tiered French illusion veil
fell from a tiara of matching lace
' and seed pearls. She carried white
' orchids, oephanotis. aad hry-af-
the valley on a Bible belonging to
her maternal grandmother.
The bride is a graduate of Mi
ami Beach High School and Flor-
ida College of Medical Technology
Mr Konhauier attended schools in
New York, received his AB degree
from New York University, and is
president of Ace Plastics Co
Coral rVayi^j^,
. Sisterhood ofth, r-3
ih ( nter i, *
the Kitchen Sib**
"M on TuesdaTTT;
t Roo.eveh L^J",
Lrjrthiaa Hall mi
-Tn* Center bulESj
I construction, andrtfl
ed within a few wi
Jewish Book
Meeting
their
and Acapalco.
tien. Richard Green, and Harry
CVer. Pan] I'omawons aad .'
.-.h uere junior war
V Mrs Raphael attend
she a> a member of the
hand, and belonged to tV Amen
ci- '..,..- \u\.l ir> V .-. Beach
and s
packed as Hosress of the Month
nrtgwaji Oubbbbj
ReceptMe fallowed the
at Hibiscus Hall
eere-
AP.er a recrpbon
seated dinner, the c
and formal they wil
left for
Bench.
ROOM I SHOWER
PRIVATE ENTRANCE
1 or 2 JE 1-4067
ROOM FOR RENT
KrVAT1 BO a,
acrum n can** m tony
earn pnsrwx
Schulman, Israel Exchange Vows
In a double ring candlelight eer-
emowy on Sunday. Not at the
Diplaaui Country Cham, hfiss Deb-
orah Lee Rebecca Trhwlmai.
dnaghtfi of Mr. aad Mrs TiKam
^rhnhnaa. 7B Sir 17th ter, Mi-
ami became the bnie of S Israel
see of Mr and Mrs. Beajaaua Is-
raeL 12Mw Corgaado ter, Key-
stane bland. Xo. Miami. Rabbi
Isaac Ever ptilarmtd the S pm
aeremony m a chaaei deaatatnd In
blue aad wain.
Usher as Leoaard Kaye. Best
maa was David Sehajhaam, broth-
er of the bride.
Matron of honor was Mrs. Leoa-
ard Kaye. and maul af honor was
Masha -r*iiliin. saner of the
brute. Joyce Fnkkel was hndes- *
s Mama Freeman. Flower
garts were fhwtotm Straan. Val-
erxStraasu. aad Qady Beth Kaye k
The hnde seaecuwj a ti -, '
chaffaa
> fft-
"Our Hentage-STaL
meeting Monday aZi
pie Sinai of No. aWil
15th ave "^IMJ
Also Uking put u+M
will be He.ni ***%
to. Canada, and Nama-l
Detroit. Mich
The prograa is -ft M
Pices of the Boreaiof j*3
; ocation in haw of leanl
iMooth. ^"1
Dr Essrog u unmrrial
partment of Adah Jew*.
tson of the Uaua afaaaal
brew Coagregauoss.
Women
Attend
Six women offkendl
| Group Banks a Dawn
join their ranngsn a I
coming
the National Asa. af ha]
ArUnnrJea. They are iiiiiiiaag jT
i Friday for a tvadty
I Special honors at |
that year to these laaa.i
am vuj I chairman of the Oak i
Upon their return. I for Florida of the Km
their home m Mi-.of Bank Womea b am
,of the Sortile Gram 1
Dorothy V Hoofctfcr. dh|
of Palmetto
The SotUe Baakag I
keen COwBOWBBH If 1
of the Vatkaal Asa.
Wamea for as "hranl
pabeses .th reganlni
of woecer. eaofcaea t
af leadership
e p*. ma. mx Postoi, Cordova
Betrothal Told
t-
Mr u4h> :*
M. P-nsti.
W
Til
MMH.
SEXTON
FOR TVAOmONAL
MIAMI SYNAGOGUE
nmn auOTh. ham Iffhak a I
saaaf Mrs. Dura Cnrdara. af _
** C*B>L- nal Mat last Ahe Car The
The
a
Uarvenaty f
It
11
1101 S.W. 121*1 Avw.
Cahea. of
of Pm
ah The
eria/iit. serried f fit
MBafr jblackstone flower sko|
--B~SJ wWrt yoa aet more for
MIAMI CONVALESCENT HOME
DeJU
s J
mi 6-1S3
mao
fkrlwWri
m PL Puerce. Fii
Tan
rrah
n-BMKM
E^j
BtKUR CHOUM KOSH0
COMVALESCen Hgjg.
MaswMi
p%.*MS71


13, 1959
* Jewish fibridlfon
Page 1-1
CM
xarvnin
<$&
yours.
jaunt
be rage for travel,
udget is limited,
[to go to Burdine's
| .use a little imag-
Mte of the Orient,
play is called the
the Orient Ba-
_ all the flowing
^beautifully-gowned
tic, live models,
home furnish-
the Orient, you
f 'splendors of the
on view at Bur-
ai store only, is
|ue mirror-frame
17 inches wide
les long, deeply
with a crysan-
jttern. The raw
|ged to a mellow
tone. A mod-
mirror has been
[the back. The
is old iron.
Iveral delightful and
|ours simply looking
|wnd in rich tapes-
brocades, magnifi-
ftsseled corners, and
From the small
sed for a touch of
piuge oversized ones
(finite touch of lux-
on the floor, the
as flexible as the
|es, and anyone can
ntal (ouch to their
1-money" prices.
unusual treat, stop
department on the
(rhere $100,000 worth
Din India is on dis-
ipes of gems that
adorn the maharajahs are there
for you to admire.
Burdine's has cooperated with
a special project of the Rocke-
feller Foundation called "Prod-
ucts of India" in order to bring
this Oriental Bazaar to the
Greater Miami area. The project
specializes in the trade develop-
ment between the two countries.
Actually, Burdine's has Imports
on display from the Near and
Far Eastas Hiss Julie Daves, of
Burdine's says, "from Turkey to
Tokyo."

"fMIRI are Julianelli shoes,
' hand-made in India, which
are to be found only in Bur-
dine's. For unusual wedding,
house-warming or holiday gifts,
there are imported brasses, wood
and pewter pieces in both practi-
cal and ornamental designs.
For the person who appreciates
works of art, there is also on dis-
play an antique Japanese screen
panel. The panel is one section of
a Coromandel screen with all
hand-carved inlay of mother of
pearl and ivory. This panel is
over a hundred years old. An-
other magnificent piece is the
band-carved mirror frame, also
from Japan and over a hundred
years old.
The most significant influence
in recent years, in both fashion
and home furnishings, is the Ori-
ental influence. People are trav-
eling more, and as Americans
see the many wonders tf the
world, the tendency seems the
strongest towards the Orient.
The New York Times was so im-
pressed by the strength of this
influence that its editors sent
one of their staff writers around
the world to do a complete series
of articles on this subject.
There are also many live Japa-
nese flower arrangements to be
seen and admired. They were
created by the- Coral Gables
chapter of the Ikebana Interna-
tional, a flower-arrangers organ-
ization. The Oriental displays
feature line and simplicity before
color, and were executed with
local flora and fauna. Live birds
perched around the displays lend
another interesting touch.

FASHIONS from the Orient are
beautiful: Most of them fea-
ture simple lines cut in a man-
ner to fall gracefully, yet are
comfortable to wear. The colors
are deep and rich-lookingnone
of the softly muted shades or in-
between colors that defy descrip-
i-O-Zyme
a REVELATION IN
BEAUTY CULTURE
-created by SANFORD LABORATORIES, INC.
Designed to improvd the skin suffering
dehydration that takes place with each
advancing year. Contains no fats or wax
[-. _^o clog pores, thereby, helping to refine
" them. All ingredients tested against
allergies. A scientific accomplishment
backed by a money back guarantee.
Give yourself that "DEVVEY FRESH" and
"PORCELAIN SMOOTH" look today.
POSTAGE PREPAID. No C.O.D.
Cell-O-Zyme
141 N.E. 109 St., Miami 38, Florida
NAME
ADDRKSS
CITY
____ STATE
one feted find my J-oi $7.50 4-oi. *> < !"'*
Tennessee Williams
Opens at Playhouse
"Once More, With Feeling," a
Junpy-fabltt. abuut a tempecame-
tal maestro's adventures in love
and symphonic music, starring
Robert Q. Lewis and K. T. Stevens,
runs through Sunday night at the
Coconut Grove Theater.
Entrance to the "Splendors of the Orient Bazaar."
tion. They are all definitely in-
tense jewel tones.
The Oriental fabrics are a
beauty to behold. One local de-
signer who has won internation-
al acclaim, Jay Anderson, de-
signed a floor-length formal
which may be seen at the en-
trance to the Gold Coast Room.
Using a green silk print Sari,
Anderson added royal purple in-
serts in the bodice and softly
draped this formal with its own
attached head covering. A bor-
der design is woven into the fab-
ric with gold thread. The silk is
incredibly soft to the touch.
Burdinej will have the bazaar
until the end of this week, after
which many of the items will be
found in various departments in
the store. We recommend that
you see this most unusual col-
lectionwhere you walk into the
store on imported Oriental rugs
and spend a few hours in a verit-
able fairyland of exhibits, color
and excitement.
Adult Studies at Ner Tamid
The Playhouse's second produc-
tion, opening Tuesday, and run-
ning through Sunday, Nov. 29, will
be "Summer and Smoke," a poig-
nant love story by Tennessee Wil-
liams, starring Kim Hunter and
Lee Philips.
"Summer and Smoke" was first
produced by Margo Jones at the
Music Box Theatre in New York
City, on Oct. 1948, and also
catapulted Garaldina Pag* and
director Josa Quintero to fama
whan it was presented in the
Circle in the Square, New York
City, during the 1*51-52 season.
Miss Hunter graduated from
Miami Beach High School in 1940,
and during that time studied un-
der Charmaine Lantaff. After
playing in many local produc-
tions, she went to California, where
she was soon discovered by David
Selznick. While under contract,
she did four movies for him, and
then went with J. Arthur Rank.
Her Broadway roles include
"Streetcar Named Desire," also
the motion picture, "The Tender
Trap," "Darkness at Noon," and
"The Chase."
Temple Ner Tamid will launch
a series of studies in adult educa-
tion Tuesday.
There will be a ten-session course
in "Beginners Hebrew" and "Bible
Study." The course in "Beginners
Hebrew" will be held each Tues-
day at 10:30 a.m., followed by
lunch, and the course in "Bible
Study" will follow from noon to
one p.m.
Mr,s. Zvi Feinstein will teach the
"Beginners Hebrew," and Rabbi
Eugene Labovitz will conduct the
"Bible Study" group.
Ardmore
MISS SANDRA HALPRYH
Former Flyer,
Teacher to Wed
Mr. and Mrs. Julius Halpryn, of
New York City, announce the en-
gagement of their daughter, San-
dra Eileen, to Irving Friedman,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Fried-
man, of Miami Beach.
The bride-elect is a graduate of
the University of Miami, with a
BS degree in education, and re-
ceived her Master's from Hunter
College in New York. She is a
member of the American Assn. of
University Women, and teaches in
New York City.
Mr. Friedman is a graduate of
Tri-State College in Angola, Ind.,
where he received his BS degree
in aeronautical engineering, and a
Master's from the University of
Miami.
He served in World War II as a
flight engineer on a B-29, which
was attributed with dropping the
first atomic bomb. He is president
of Universal Aircraft Parts Corp.,
of Hialeah.
The couple are planning to be
married in January.
Schedule Chanuka Workshop
Sisterhood of the Coral Way
Jewish Center will hold a regular
meeting Thursday evening, Nov.
19, at Everglades Elementary
School. A Chanuka workship will
be led by Mrs. Samuel April, Mrs.
Evelyn Cohan, and Mrs. Julia
Weinstein, of the religious com-
mittee. They will demonstrate how
to make various articles for dis-
play during "The Festival of
Lights."
Cenfer Sponsors Evening
The public is invited to a gala
evening Saturday in the Tambou-
rine room of the Carillon hotel,
! sponsored by the Southwest Jewish
Center and Sisterhood. Proceeds
of the affair will be for the gen-
eral fund and to assist the Center
in completing its building. In
charge of information is Mrs.
Harriet Bornstein.
Philips, star of "Peyton Place"'
with Lana Turner, the motion pic-
ture "Middle of the Night," TV's
"12 Angry Men" and the Elleiy
Queen TV series, has flown in from
Hollywood and will commence re-
hearsals immediately with the
cast of "Summer and Smoke."
He replaces Jeffrey Lynn, orig-
inally cast in the role, who has
been unable to fulfill the commit-
ment.
The story of "Summer and
Smoke" tells of a frustrated min-
ister's daughter and her awaken-
ing of love for a young doctor.
Hampered by inhibitions all her
life, she finally offers her love to
the doctor, only to find that she is
too late.
A-1 EMPLOYMENT
DOMESTIC HELP
DAY WORKERS
Ph. FR 9-3401
is it rossiitu; .
TO GET A GOOD DRY CLEANING JOB IN ONE HOUR?
Friedman guarantees that not only will it be a good job, bat the
FINEST DRY CLEANING YOU EVER HAD (Reejordless ol Priea).
Including DRAPES SLIP COVERS
SUITS $1.00 PLAIN DRESSES $1.25
FREEDMANS CLEANERS
2922 Coral Way, Miami, Florida
MONDAY thru SATURDAY 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Cngrtving Co n p t nj
116 N.E. 6th Street, Miami
Wedding Invitations Bar Mitivah Invitations
Enjoy the specialized services of
our Weding Consultant
Rita H. Bukstel
Complete selection shown in the
comfort of your home
Only $17.95 for 100
Bus. Phone FRanklin 3-4634 Res. Phone MUrrey MM6
Manufacturers of Genuine Steel Die Engraved Stationery


Pew 8-B
JfttitfUrrXttor
Fridoy.No^
imw TO TNI rOfTOR -
Jews are in Dade County to Stay
docs that elimi-
loo**, jh. j.w^jMtfun:. -asiCJSga^a- SMS.-
Recontl>
while sailing from 0 Yalta,
our \> .1 hj man an
terms the dinm: Kail "'See man*"
hi' whispore i .some rial
\ote 'Mo pi. only 40
wtrast
mtfMd In Mt a--ry. IW*>n4l
h wt nor cootr*hnd thai tha
T.V Jews in GraaMr Miami ant
rwt hr on DrabaHan.
tack Raaaiaa adulation with our nitj that turn rtrr of
owfl "i a fair proportion of
rude toward ; n ami hanke n ami
ldin.; r. I!* anJ mus.
. \- teacaarj and manutactur
h> an incident thai auTl ami builder-
rs am! ta>.r-~'
\ Tappa-- all ate '
!
read
nl all t*>.
I

i
- ,.:: the an
red
i ts. insult that h Aad if Ike all-wtoe. hand picked
karj aaaaari "I ahn-fXM, *"
that l! tor j sot at Nuremberg
Law* M di-lodge an important sec
-i a population composed
of varied r national and
iake up a vibrant commit racii\ stocks*
Rl -dently s lot of tommymt
a learned
know thai the
up of Greater Miami is
;al.
KICHAKD
CAir
HARRY SIMONMOFF
Jjor akl
UOffAffO
MKAN
On* mi#ht t%k whl pvrp*** 't
served ay a -*''- which, c-
Mi. Lr* Mmdi.n hat
Rkh*rd FWischman
Rar Mm-afc
man took plate Saturday. N i
at Temple Israel of Greater Mi
ami. ui;h Rabbi Joseph Naiat
' -
Gary Alan Lubel Saturday
14. at Be:h Pav-d CongTegation.
Gary. son of Mr. and Mrs. Man-
uel Lubel. 19Tj S lTin at- is in
crade at Sheoandoah Jun-
ior High, and a graduate of Beth
IDITOR Th J...U* Flco#-an:
Richard BM of Mr and Ma-id religious schooL
Baraaj Fletschaaaa. 0 NE He will be honored at a reeep
tion Saturday evening at Hibiscus
He ..- a student in the eighth Auditorium. Out-of-town guests
1 aaaN at Miami Edison Junior U1 include his grandparents. Mr.
iiijih School. aad Mrs Hams Lubel. Mobile,
corrr. wad and Mr. and Mrs. Julius
Ranald l*Wtin a. Itiea. N Y.. and Tuc- -^ Jacob Coagregation.
the -wvygram S Rabbi Leon Kronish will off:c ate Am. I g^ u the arm of Mrs, Ruth
* "*"* > X. 14, at .-oo.rn Mkara M^^^Xrii
Beth Shornta. Ronald is Leonard Wilson, son of Mr. and tB* musical portions of the lit
must have iauaed* the aaa of Mr and Mrs Mortimer Mrs. Paul Wilson, arm Oreapi
Ilia fth. St.. Miami blvd.. will become Bar M.tivah !am i
mttir lafonaatita as for Beach He s a student in the Beth during Saturday morning services. Wiam. Beach High School.
warded Shoto-a eonflrMiatioa class of ":: Not If, a: North Shore Jewish
TV procraai of the Shabba: I Center. Rabbi Mayer Abramo-ntt
M David Wtsatnn will ofbetate Leonard is a stu-
bi Temple Zma will be the site of *** th* rthgiiai school of the ,
a on tW Bar Mr.r-ah on Saturdav. Nw Ceanar. aad atteads NauUhu Jaa- tt^L^T .__ JS! I J\
< of Da-xl Richard Wetssaaan, -or High.
He ts the soa of Mr aad Mrs V
wwlfemi prv
Rabbi Alfred Waxmaa w-Jl of Bar M.uvah of Glenn
v the first maa wQl be cch-hratad
at Temple Zaon Satmrday
m the Torah The Wesss 14. of Temple Beth
mans w-.U he aosts at the One; Leoa Kronish wiR
Saaahot toRoamg Fraiay eveaaag n a Mr ad Mrs.
S:ee-
there .hiring
ore- MT
-. >
: >-vr"- i.- \ .v
Ta marh Inr per
aiaaaaa of year r*.
. at**
NATIONAL HOTE
,,-_.-------Mai


1959
~-J(W$Wf wwOWmfwWftfl
Pegs 9-B
tei Eye Miami Voters for Tuesday Polling
M to the polls Tuesday to elect a Mayor and jaem-
Unission. Following it a listing of a number of
themselves for offiee:
High
uer Mayor of
fannounced his
^Mayor Robert
to succeed
urge all of
for Mayor
leclared.
It Mayor High
Bally, and mor-
|rry on the un-
Hght to do but
ill-health."
tormer Mayor,
|r compromised
has fought for
the people of
(Mfarth
tWolfarth urged
"remember the
voting in the
iiesday.Y
said, "are
of constructive
Id lack of lead
aation it a tre-
it issue," Wol-
tax levy has
tit, and our tax
hup from 25 per-
And there has
for the money
was mayor ma
down six per-
indicate,
for emeroatv
to $3^09,080,
Ity of Miami's
(roppod 65 par*
mere $500,000.
was mayor and
there was i
of real accom-
t )he building of
Sdmarks as the
plant, Bayfront
Dinner Key Ma-
er plant, on Gal-
as the rebuild-
Auditorium and
cts."
layor has head-
Coral Way and
liver
Miami city com-
lt his drive for re-
close this week
campaigning on
Constructive lead-
fairness in rep-
people, not just
her."
sg office, Shiver
Miami for his
gainst the Milk
iver's supporters
out that "he was
ile for ending the
ers of the Milk
lie benefit of low
an advocate of
I urban renewal.
lade a decision,
lie. based solely
[religion," his sup-
They also credit him "with start-
ing the city's beautificatfon pro-
gram. Shiver said this achieve-
ment is "one of which I am very
proud. I am hopeful we can con-
tinue these efforts to give our city
streets and parks of floral beauty
that will be the envy of the na-
tion."
The candidate indicated that "by
energetic action, "he stepped in"
to stop the bus strike last fall, thus
averting a costly transportation
tieup right at the start of our win-
ter tourist season."
Hia supporters declare that the
commissioner's record on public
issues "includes consistent support
of the new Miami port, coopera-
tion with Metro, and support of a
number of public works including
the new Municipal Justice build-
ing.
"Shiver also led the fight to keep
big time baseball here by saving
Miami Stadium for use as an ath-
letic field. During his administra-
tion, too, a pair of new golf courses
are being added to the city's sports
facilities."

Edward J. Czarnesk]
Edward J. Czarneski this week
began bringing to a close his cam-
paign for Miami city commission,
Group 3.
The 41-year-old candidate is a
bus driver and farmer, has three
children and two grandchildren.
He pledget to "transfer as many
functions as possible to Metro;
turn Dodge Island and bus super-
vision over to Metro, and let
Metro build the City Hall, at a
saving of $30 million to the city
taxpayers; close control of budget
requirements that have caused
taxes Vb skyrocket; closer control
of liquor licenses, and a stricter
observance of zoning require-
ments."
A member of Bus Drivers Local
1267 and the St. Michael's Catholic
Church, Czarneski. recommends
"more action and not so much talk
about city beautification."
*
Roland Horoviti
Roland Horovitz is a candidate
for Mayor of Miami.
Born in Pittsburgh, Pa., he has
been a Miami resident for the past
14 years. He is an insurance agent,
formerly with the Department of
Public Safety of the City of Miami
for seven years.
In 1956, Horovitz received an
"Outstanding Citizen Award" from
a local television station.
Horovitz resides with hit wife,
Judy, and four children et 4014
NW 4th st. He attended the Uni-
versity of Miami and City Col-
lege of Lot Angeles, and served
with the Marinet during World
War II, subsequently being re-
called to active duty for the Ko-
rean War.
Horovitz belongs to the Harvey
Seeds Post of the American Leg-
ion, Veterans of Foreign Wars,
Fraternal Order of Police, Touch-
down Club, Navy League, and
served as advisory counsel to the
supervisory committee of the gov-
prnment installation at Cherry
Point, N. C.
Murray Z. Klein

Murray Z. Klein, candidate for
Miami City Commission In Group
3, drew his campaign to a close
this week by hitting at the "com-
plete disregard for the citizen and
his tax dollar today."
Klein, a practicing attorney here
for the past seven years, told vot-
ers that "the time has arrived for
an unencumbered politically free
candidate to come forth."
Klein, 37, is a graduate of John
Stetson University and the Uni-
versity of Miami. He served over-
seas during World War II, and is-j
a former school teacher.
"Metro, the port. City Hall and
Interama are not private enter-
prises, and must be dealt with as
the city and county projects they
are," he declared.

Fred C. Davant
Commissioner Fred C. Davant,
appointed eight months ago to fill
the unexpired term of a retiring
official, has announced that he is
a candidate for Miami City Com-
mission, Group 2.
'The insight I got working with
the other commissioners and the
projects I've worked on have
not yet been completed. They in-
terest me to such a degree that I
feel impelled to seek office for a
full term in order to help expedite
this vital and unfinished business,"
the ex-city judge declared at a
kickoff rally held at the Harvey
Seeds American Legion Post last
week. x
Davant declared that "the con-
struction of a modern port for Mi-
ami has been my main project,
and we have now agreed on a site,
and only the financing needs to be
achieved. It has been my stand
from the very beginning that the
port is a Metropolitan-Dado Coun-
ty function and should be built by
them."
The 41-year-old ex-judge is mar-
ried to the former Marian Sloan.
They live at 80 SW 17th rd. with
their five children. Davant is an
ex-captain who served during
World War II and Korea. He cur
rently serves as an officer in the
Intermediate Sunday School De-
partment of the Riverside Baptist
Church.

John B. Gibson
John B. Gibson, candidate for
the office of Mayor of Miami, has
been in the business research field
since 1949.
Aged 40 and a widower, he lives
at 2626 Lincoln ave., Coconut
Grove, with his three children. A
paraplegic, he is president of the
Florida Paraplegic Assn. and a di-
rector of the National Paraplegic
Foundation.
Gibson is president of the Coco-
nut Grove PTA and Cub Scout
Pack Master of Pack 13.
He holds a business degree
from the University of Miami,
which he earned while recuper-
ating from en attack of polio in
1952. He it alto a graduate of the
U.S. Maritime Service Engineer-
"When your guests come to an affair
ATTH
Horn.
vre do the worrying
you relax with the assurance
of perfection in every detail
top in or phone
Dept. UNion 5-7756
O
Oceanfront at 68th Street
Miami Beach
ing School. He hat studied city
planning at the Urban Planning
Institute.
In 1956, Gibson was selected as
"Most Outstanding Handicapped
Employee" by President Eisen-
hower's Committee on Employ-
ment of the Handicapped, and
in 1958, he was the recipient of an
award from B'nai B'rith for his
work with the handicapped.
He is author of "Theory of Ana-
lytical Industrial Development."

Richard E. Norman
Richard E. Norman, candidate
for Miami Commissioner, this
week listed his platform as fol-
lows:
"To remember you when I am
elected; to stand against inequali-
ties in our tax structure and spe-
cifically the water and sewer de-
partment; against the new Court
House with stores and offices that
would compete with free enter-
prise; to work for more economy
in government."
Norman also declared himself
in his platform as being "for the
new port and refurbishing our old
port before it falls apart."
He said that, if elected, "I will
bring the government back to the
people, where it belongs. Let's
see," he challenged, "if a working
AW. AND MKS. flSHEK
Fishers Mark
50th Anniversary
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Fisher are
celebrating their golden wedding
anniversary this month. The Fish-
ers were married in New York on
Nov. 9, 1909 and have lived in
Florida for the past 15 years. He
is a prominent builder of Miami
Beach and Broward county.
A dinner party honored the Fish-
ers at the Seville hotel on Sunday.
Their sons are Melvin Fisher,
builder and owner of Coral Gar*
dens in Miami; Dr. Edward Fish-
er, dentist, of Miami Beach; and
Herbert Fisher, Miami Beach at-
torney.
businessman can win an election
with footwork and not a $4,000
campaign for a $5,000 a year job."
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for m-nui aid
information ca
Karl Weill
Catering
Director
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On-Promiioi
Parking
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it the

ers

lor Information!
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Catering Dlrojclor,
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Pago 10-B
**/S/*#**ir
ss*
Pearly Gait

by Hal Pearl j
NAMES MAKE NEWS: Arthur Spiegel, of Miami ADL. makins
to address an rn.erfa.ih churehwomen's meetina .n rrg.nl "
, community relation* program. He was the hmo N *2g
H.mhly-the first conference of its kind in the Orlando area In early
December he hits A\on Hark u.rhor
Mr. and Mrs Bern* Srferman moxing into their new ?.?>"*,;,'
Island manse with a neu addition to the family. Richard -Allen lit
second kuj ___.^ ._
L.s and Doris Goldstein retwmed from a trsp re New York, aner
looking op old friend, and doing lets of stepping. *'* bock from
Goh.m are Dave and Elaine Lesser. The two couples, homo w. time
for ideal golfing weather, rejoining thoir fairway compamem. Steca-
broker Tod ond Marge Sow*!I.
IT! *** mm ** the Normandy Shores course
r,v,, take the pressure ofl Bayshore which has been
mho) the past si\ weeks ___ -
Pr and Mrs Lester Bert joining the many couples twosonungr
it at the Beach links ._ _.. ..
Helen Bennett shooting a neat 86. while playing with Harriet il-
H and Mae Saigh at Bayshore The game ol Mrs Leo Fenster and
Mrs Maxwell Sajrel *M*Q| mprwed
Mi Bea Lapxhis recently rented an apartment Manhat-
-^e their home is here, but they make so many trips to
New York.
Pr M:ke Gilbert and Joe Weiti golfing together *ute often at
-. i swath in the local construction
K are Bob Gt HMtSBT and Al Foerster. behind the University
Manor" developer*
Sol Rabkin. New York APL legal counsel, to discuss litigation in
the re on separation of church and state He'll address the
Miami Beach B'nai B'nth on Wednesday Also uill talk in Orlando
Marcia Shaffer is tow new media director of mo Loo Jay Reeen
*rfriung aamcT Loo s brwmor. Harry Rosen, vko pmidiof ol mo
Now York Poet, was a recent visitor horo, along with Iko Gollis
sports ed of mo some dairy.
Sure to he the topper" of the winter social season here: the gala
diplomatic ball at the Footaiahleau Dec. S. orlrnming Israel's new
Ambassador to the CkdM States. Axraham Rinnan
MatttJ Oriu expanding. His Rooey Plata men's shop mores across
the street to larger quarters
Ben Zioa Gmshwrg among the local realtors off to Toronto to attend
>a*jonal Assn of leal Estate Boards
Tan Eauihm Phi named Leonard Glasser. the architect, to serre as
for Florida, imedmatiog uadergrad duties at V of
Mmnti I" of Florida. Florida Southern and Florida State A kefceopter
.vane m handy, right. Lee'
n *
OTM SIDES OF THE BAY Henry Tohus. Mag-ume top ranker
among the Borsch: Be* entertamment directors, takes over that post
Ponumehknn. starting Sunday He's composed a mher of hit
~l Remember Mama." and "Away We Go."
Coconwt &r**o FUywaws* aumtoti of
steering Robert Q.
Ssinou. FiRnowaj sKat writ ho T
ea on Tweed**. Kio>
first
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NOW THE EMBB
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plus
our i
REOPENING FMIDAY,
NOV. 12. 4 PAL
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OSM1A
FOOOS
DIMMERS from *|JK
Choico of 17 Main Cowrsos
Fro* Wmo. Soltxor A Kfwshos
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Affairs Coll
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K 13. 1959
* Jew 1st fk>rkttan
Page 11-B

1, noted au-
iirer, will be
^CKT ch. 7 Sun-
with Prof.
Dren, of Colum-
{, in a discus-
"A Vist to the
Diom Aleichem."
is part of the
t" series of the
logical Seminary
The Samuel-
discussion will
a second pro-
over WCKT.
ted to Board
hnlans was elected
! the Jewish Funeral
America at the or-
Cent convention In
Ida. Named were
, of Gordon Funeral
Newman, Newman
; and Irvine Bias-
Memorial Chapels.
Sen. Humphrey
To Speak Here
Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey (D.-
Minn.), who ha? tossed h.s hat into
the 1960 Presidential campaign;
will be guest speaker at a dinner
for the new""M*.. Sinai Hospital o*
Greater Miami on Nov. 30 at West-
view Country Club, according to
an announcement by William A.
Weintraub, dinner chairman.
Sen. Humphrey is chairman of
the Special Senate Subcommittee
on Disarmament. He is also hold-
er of the first American Political
Science Award, the "Congression-
al Distinguished Service Award."
The dinner will also honor David
Phillips, trustee of Mt. Sinai Hos-
pital, as the "outstanding volun-
teer" for having secured pledges
in excess of one million dollars for
the hospital's building fund.
Home Show
Opens Sunday
Are you snopping around for a
floor covering for that new house
or remodeling job? Need a swim-
ming pool filter, or perhaps a pool
itself? Want to see the latest de-
signs in new homes, furnishings,
appliances? Need a lot for the new
house and the financial services to
make this and your other desires
possible?
All these materials and services
and many morewill be avail-
able when the biggest and most
complete package of home-build-
ing products in the entire South-
east is unwrapped at the Miami
Home Builders Show on Sunday.
When the free event opens at 2
p.m. in Dinner Key Auditorium,
some 130 exhibitors will be par-
ticipating. Included will be South
Florida's leading homebuilders,
the area's major industrialists, and
a heavy contingent of nationallv-
known manufacturers and distrib-
utors from out of state.
/
MICKEY HATES
EL BROWN
pion ave.,- dip* Noy.
>V finisher, he came
>m \'*'\v Y<>rk.
y his wife, Rose, tWO
J brother*. Service!
Qnnlun Funeral Home,
ft. Sinai Cemetery.
SILVER
nreop. ave., died Nov.
pro 1" years ftgo from
Survivors Include
son, Seymour; and
i silver and Mm.
0 leaven two
|lno sinters. Services.
"t Riverside Memorial
a\.-. with burial
lerVy. a
WINTERS
uii ave., died Nov. 7.
d-printer anil came
up from New York.
Nov. !> at Riverside
Li. Washington ave.,
i Nebo Cemetery.
-HENSCHEL
JloTti lei., died Nov. 5.
six years ago from
"J..'- and was a re-
_ dealer. Surviving
I. two'sons, a brother
Auxiliary Meeting Tuesday
Cedars of Lebanon Auxiliary will
hold a board meeting Tuesday, 10
a.m., at the Elks Club, 495 Brick-
ell ave.
IETH FRIEDMAN
on ave.. dle<1 Nov. 5.
Jl years ago from New
rvlving are three sons.
, und Mnrtln; three
Stella Schonholts.
and Mrs. Henrietta
timers and four bro-
SfYING YOUR
|T DESIRES FOR
AND DIGNITY
i Vista offers family
J estates on beaut I
pdscaped park like
l'i>ni|>Iete freedom
in memorials and
wl w.'*S
-----lO|)lI.'
PUw.Hial*aMla.
ITU 7*3601
SPECIALTY ir
BASKETS
|ir PACKED
VERED WITHIN
WE HOUR -
CIRCUS
1. Plagler Ter.
lONE
fSFR 1-2511 thers. Services were Nov. Rlvfr-
slde Memorial Chapel. Washington
ave with burial in BE Nebo Ceme-
tery. ^^^^^^_
SOL LEVY
jS of 2162 Ularrlts dr., died Nov. 6.
He came here 13 years ago from New
York Cltv. Surviving are his wife,
Charlotte, a lin'1 f""r brothers.
Sei vices were Nov. 8 at Riverside
Memorial Chapel, Washingto n ave..
With burial in BtaTbT David Cemeten-
JACOB BROWER
r,l of 700 B. 14ll> St.. Illaleah. died
Nov 3. He came here is years ago
from Elisabeth, NJ.. and was a fUMl-
ure dealer. Surviving are h.s wife.
Ruth- a son. David; two daughters,
his mother, brother and two sisters.
He also leaves five grand,*, dr,
fervlres were Nov. .> at i.oriion
Funeral Home, with burial In Lake-
sj.le Memorial Park.
MRS. MINNIE SPIEGEL
is, of Mi 1Kb -t., died Nov. 3. She
came here 23 years ago T>in New
York. Surviving are two sisters. In-
cluding Mrs. Nellie CMMh <7' n'
lur brothers, and six grandchildren.
nmveslde services were Nov. ;> at mi.
sinal tvmeterv. with local arrange-
ments by Riverside Memorial Chapel.
LAWRENCE A. KLEIN
Nov. 4j" at Gordon Funeral Home.
MRS. DA S'LVERSTEIN
-.2 of 7840 Hawthorne ave.. died Nov.
3 She came here 13 years f.'r"m
Boston Surviving are her husband.
^"WttRWJB
Memorial Park. ___
mm
Slnal Cemetery.
MICHAEL HIRSCHBERO
Tl of a8W17th ave., died Nov. 1.
'Byrrrwo*d.u,h-
live,; and one ,
,wsasrrw. n.x'st.. with
"frill in "n Nebo Cemetery.
Orkin Service
School Planned
Miami *will serve as headquar-
ters for Orkin Exterminating Com-
pany's annual service school.
There will be over 100 service per-
sonnel in attendance. The meeting
will be held Saturday at the Mc-
Allister hotel.
Pest control specialists from Or-
kin's home office in Atlanta, Ga.,
will be on hand to conduct the
sessions devoted to pest control,
termite control, fumigation, and
sanitation. Each year, from August
through November, the Orkin
Technical Department "caravan"
visits branch offices in the 28-state
[territory, with the latest in pest
control "know-how" as a part of
Orkin's continuous program of re-
search and training.
Orkin's service schools were
started back In Ihe 1940's. They
now include film presentations
produced in Orkin's own Techni-
cal Department and Training
Center In Atlanta, round table
discussions, on-the-job demon-
strations, and this year will in-
clude a special report on insect
resistance developed by Orkin
field representatives based on a
continuing study of insect infes-
tation trends.
Among those on the program are
Robert Russell, Orkin's technical
director; Clarence Marshall, as-
Fashion Guild
Elects Officers
Micky Hayes, local retailer, was
named president of the Men's
Fashion Guild of Miami Beach at
the group's annual election dinner
at the Deauville hotel.
Hayes was acting president dur-
ing 1959, after moving up from the
first vice presidency when former
president Morris Kaganov moved
to New York.
Other new officers are Dave
Miller, first vice president; Al
Zablo, second vice president; Ed
Greenberg, secretary; and Jack
Seigel, treasurer.
Named to the board of directors
of the 12-year-old organization
were past president Jules Gillette.
Irving Berlin, Joe Linn, Larry
Hoffman, Lymey Bressler, Martin
Wexler, Henry Steig and Lou Le-
vine. In addition, Mrs. Lillian Za-
blow, wife of the late Miami Beach
retailer Irving Zablow, was named
an "honorary board member," the
first woman so honored by the
Guild.
The officers and board of direc-
tors will be installed at the 1959
dinner of the Guild at the Diplo-
mat Country Club Nov. 24.
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
the flctltloua name of
GOPHER-MIAMI CO. (No! Inc.) C/o
Jerome <:. Greene, 141 Security Trust
T.ldg., Miami. Fla., Intend to register
eald nani.- with the Clerk of the Clr-
itirt cf I lade <-'iiinlwKiort HARVBY B. BREAM
ROBERT I,. BERNSTEIN
HARRY H. KATZ
JEROME H CiIiEENH
attorney for Applicants
::ii Security Trust Bide.
11/13-20-27. 12/4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
. rsjgned, dee!ring to engage In
nder the fictitious name of
GENERAL ELECTRONICS al 1659
James Avenue. Miami Beach, Florida
intends to register said name with
the clerk of the Circuit Court of Hade
County, Florida. ___
TRANS-OCEANIC SAI.FS. INC.
Sole Owner
F.I.I HRBOER
Attorney for Owner
ISO Lincoln Road
Miami ..each, Fla. > ^.^ ,2/<
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name or
I'ALMLAND PRINTERS at 7937 Bls-
cayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida in-
tend* to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
T. D. F. CORP.
IRVING NATHANSON. Attorney
11/13-20-27. 11/4
At the dinner, the Guild will
also make its annual charitable
donations and present its I960
scholarship to deserving Univer-
sity of Miami students. Some 250
retailers, government and civic
leaders, manufacturers and Guild
store employees are expected to
attend the annual affair.
The Guild, composed of 32 retail
men's stores, was founded here in
1947 as a business and charitable
organization. It has become known
for its continuing efforts to in-
crease the recognition of the Great-
er Miami area as the top resort
fashion style outlet.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS MFP^^v ctVPV rht
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
MIAMI Mc.\- T< ..- at uii Ne. Mi-
ami Place. Miami, Florida intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County,
t iorlda.
FRAN-LEE SPORTSWEAR
OF MIAMI. INC.
By: Ruth Cohen. President
SETMOUH J- SIM' IN
Attorney for Fran-I.ee Sportswear
of Miami, Inc.
11'13-20-27. 12/4
Senior Citizens to be Honored
Officers and board of directors
of the Sisterhood of Flagler Gra-
nada Jewish Community Center,
will honor the Senior Friendship
Group at a bruncheon Tuesday in
the Center's air-conditioned audi-
torium. Program will include a
book review by Abraham Gittel-
son, education director of Monti-
cello Park.
President of the group is Mrs.
Selma Green. Mrs. Edgar Rifkin
will present each member of the
group with a gold corsage.
Sisterhood Hears Review
Mrs. Frank Kerdyk reviewed
Pearl Buck's "Command the Morn-
ing" at Beth David Sisterhood's
first "Book of the Brunch" Wed-
nesday. Ticket chairmen were
Mrs. -Stan Tinter, Mrs. Murray
Darks, Mrs. John Strunin and
Mrs. Sam Ostrowski.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the Mild, rsigl Ing to engage in
business under the fictitious name or
3AXDRINA OF MIAMI at S16 N.W.
:'tli Street, Miami, Florida intends
to restate! sail name with the Clerk
Of the Circuit Court of Dade County,
TOW BMBHOIDERY WORKS
INC Milton Tow, Preel lent
Marvin i WIENER
Mill Ainsley Bid*. Miami 32. Fla.
Attorney tor aaadrlaa.* W*M ^
sistant technical director; Robert
Wright, entomologist; Ernest Co-
field, termite control specialist;
Don Lewis, training director; War-
ren Frazier, entomologist.
Orkin Exterminating Company
was founded by Otto Orkin, who
began his career in 1901 in eastern
Pennsylvania. Today Orkin is rec-
ognized as "the world's largest
pest control company."
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
CANDLE CANE VARIETIES at 17600
ColllM Av.nue. Miami Beach. Fla,
intends to register said lame with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
TOMAG CORP. (a Fla. Corn.)
Irving M. Finn
11/13-20-27, 12/4
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
Tl(i il'ICANA BAR at 1007 N.W. 79th
Sti.-et. Miami. F.a intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Hade County, Florida.
JALK CORP. (a Fla. Corp.)
Sole Ownership
11/13-20-27, 12/4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
FALLSBURG RESORT SHOP at 441
Arthur Godfrcw Road Intends to reg-
ister said name- with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County,
KU,r",a- WILLIAM SIMK1.MAN
11'13-20-27, 12/4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name or
MICKEY'S I-.All & PACKAGE STORE
I SAY. 17th Avenue. Miami. Fla..
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
MICKEY'S INC. OF MIAMI
(a Fla. Corp.)
KE8SLER .< OARS
Attorneys for Applicant
l998 S.W. 1st Street ^^^
LOW COST
HOME LOANS
To Buy, Build or Refinance
Inquiries levMed Ne Obligation.
Celebrating eer M* Aawlvortary Y4
ne of t'u' Natioi
Oldest and largest'
0ade Federal
Javings and Loan Associavon o Miami
IfJStPH M UPTON, Pievdcnl
5 Conventenf Offkt Serve Dade County
RESOURCF.S EXCEED 140 MILLION DOLLARS
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCBRY,
No. 59C1O870
PATRICK CLRRAN.
Plaintiff.
vs.
FLORENCE CURRAN,
Defendant. .
SUIT >4 DIVORCE
RENCS CLRRAN
63-50 Wetherole Street
Rego Park, New York
You, FLORENCE CLRRAN. are
hereby notified that a Bill of Com-
plaint for Divorce has been filed
against you, and you are required to
serve a copy of your Answer or Plead-
ing to the Bill of Complaint on the
plaintiffs Attorney. Richard W Was-
serman. Esq., 420 Lincoln Road. Mi-
ami Beach 39. Florida, and file the
original Answer or Pleading JT> the
office of the. Clerk of the Circuit
Court on or before the Hth tjay of
December, 1959. If you fail to do
so, Judgment by default will be taken
against yon for the relief demanded
in the Bill of Complaint
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIIHAN
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this 9th day of November.
AD' E. B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk,
circuit Court. 1 Jade County, Florida
By: H ,:|I'K ',,
n y clerk.
RJCHARD \Y WASHERMAN. ESQ.
Lincoln Road
Florid*
' ''^"""ii/i^o-r.i^


Pog 12-B
+Ja*Utfkrl(fc*r)
Frid,
ley.
UNDER THE STRICT AND CONSTANT SUPERVISION OF
THii 0R7K0D3X VAAD HAKASHRUTH OF FLORIOA
RABBI OR. ISAAC HIRSH EVER, DIRECTOR
- FOOD FAIR KOSHER MARKtij Jl
rt. EDGED TO ftlVI THE BEST 1AUI^
AT THI LOWBST FRICF OR'YOUR ,
11 IK
4

meat ancrpouLt
Oua
M
R
ST0E|
Sun., Mon., and Tues.
Turkey time
Buy them
is coming and we've got them!
now and save 20c a pound!
YOUNG HEN
U.S. GOVT.
INSPECTED
GRADE "A"
PAN READY
KOSHER MADE
KOSH-R-BEST OR LADY ESTER
8 TO 12-LB. AVERAGE
LB.
OUR OWN KOSHER MADE
BRISKET CORNED BEEF
FIRST CUT
LB.
89
SECOND CUT
un
69
(
NEW YORK STRIP
CLUB STEAKS
LB.
s|4
GROUND BEEF
2 LBS $1.1
Price effective Seedey efco at our Cord Way Kosfcer Market
______________ SUNDAY I AM TO 3 PJ1
143rd ST. SHOPPMG
NO. MUM! BEACH
ltth ST. at ALTON BO. JBfl CO***
MAM BEACH MM*j
MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS YOUR EXTRA BONUS AT FOOD


C 45th General Assembly Meets Here
Awislti Floridian 3'000 ** Ejected
Will Attend Sessions Set
For Beach Nov. 14 to 19
Ja. Friday, November 13, 1959
Section C
RABBI MAX JUDGt SOLOMON RABBI LOUIS RABBI SOLOMON
NUSSBAUM USNLR BMMTOCK fRttHOf
NORMAN
COUSINS
RABBI ARTHUR
LtLYVHD
)rm Jewry to Launch Combined
lpaign for $3,558,536 by June
500 rabbis and lay-
tke part here on Tues-
jching the 1959-60 na-
rive of the Combined
ffor American Reform
ke central agency that
funds to meet the an-
jftenance and program
lie Union of American
congregations and the
lion College-Jewish
Religion.
gural will take in the
Froom of the Fontaine-
el, with a luncheon
12:15 p.m. Regular
the UAHC's 45th bi-
feral assembly *riH be
during the luncheon
ke fullest possible at-
invited delegates and
will hear from a num-
tstanding personalities.
fclinsky, of San Diego,
airman of the UAHC
ustees and now begin-
burth successive term
apaign's general chair-
la statement emphasiz-
nportance of the inaug-
eon, declared that "the
. and the opening of
tiers by the Reform
in Judaism is fully de-
the funds put at the
_ both the UAHC and
JIR by the Combined
Unless our central na-
titutions are given the
_ the brave plans and
drawn at the biennial
will largely remain
cheon will set in motion
effort among the Re-
rement's 585 congrega-
ualize a total of $3,558,-
later than June 30 to
the programs of the
the College-Institute,
(?to be sought represents
budgetary needs of
istitulions.
in his statement,
fcntion to the record of
lined Campaign over the
Briod ending -with June
' j
i
t
4.A
JULIAN VtNlZKY
-
30. 1959. He noted that in these
years the campaign had amassed
better than $15,500,000 ibr sup-
port of the national Reform bod-
ies, asserting that "this proved
not only more than was raised
for any other Jewish religious
cause in America but enabled the
Reform movement to make gains
without precedent in any other
era, in the religious history of
American Jewry.
"We stand today on the thresh-
hold of a new decade and a new
era," he stated. "With hundreds
of families continuing to flow in-
to our synagogues, with new con-
gregations being organized every
other week, with a consequent
need of many more rabbis, can-
tors and religious educators, the
Reform Jewish constituency
mustand I hope it willoutdo
even its great performance of the
1950V
A. B. P0LINSKY
Serving with Polinsky in the
top leadership of the Combined
Campaign is Samuel W. Bano-
wit, of Los Angeles, a vice chair-
mon of the Union's board of trus-
tees. Silberman is also associate
general chairman.
Julian B. Venezky, of Peoria,
111., president of Temple Anshe
Emeth, who is prominent in the
national leaderships of the Uni-
ted Jewish Appeal and the Israel
Bond drive, is serving with the
campaign as its national chair-
man for special gifts.
Irving S. Schneider, of New
York, president of the Suburban
Temple of Wantagh, L. I., is the
Combined Campaign's executive
vice chairman, and has just been
named executive vice chairman
of the newly-formed Develop-
ment Fund for American Juda-
ism.
The forthcoming 45th general
assembly of the Union of Ameri-
can Hebrew Congregations, par-
ent body of 585 Reform syna-
gogues, will be the largest con-
vention in the history of Ameri-
can Jewry, according to program
chairman Louis A. Chase, of Los
Angeles.
Attending the convention,
which gathers at the Fontaine-
bleau hotel on Saturday, Nov. 14,
through next Thursday, Nov. 19,
will be 3,000 delegates, represent-
ing the 585 synagogues which
comprise the Union ot American
Hebrew Congregations. These
congregations represent a com-
bined 'constituency of approxi-
mately 1,000.000 persons.
Meeting privately with UAHC,
will be the National Federation
of Temple Sisterhoods, a Union
affiliate, for its 22nd biennial as-
sembly. Some 1,500 delegates are
expected. Headquarters will be
the Eden Roc hotel.
The general assembly serves
as the policy-making body of Re-
form Judaism in the Western
Hemisphere. Some of the most
distinguished religious leaders,
authors, editors and laymen in
the country will address the six-
day gathering, among them Nor-
man Cousins, editor of the Sat-
urday Review; Dr. Robert Katz,
of Harvard University; Rep.
Abraham Multer, of Brooklyn,
N. Y.; Raymond Wilson, director
of the Friends Committee on Na-
tional Legislation; Fr. L. G.
Twomey, of Loyola University:
Dr. Leo Pfeffer, of the Ameri-
can Jewish Congress; Hon. Sim-
cha Pratt, Minister Plenipoten-
tiary and Consul General of New
York for the State of Israel.
Also, Joseph L. Rauh, jr., for-
mer chairman of Americans for
Democratic Action; Prof. Her-
bert Wey, of the University of
Miami; Rabbi Solomon B. Free-
hof," president of the World Union
for Progressive Judaism; Rabbi
Jacob P. Rudin, past president
of the Central Conference of
American Rabbis; and Harold
Fleming, director of the South-
ern Regional Council.
Plans for "Exploring New
Frontiers for Reform Judaism"
will be discussed and debated by
the congregational representa-
tives. Rabbi Maurice N. Eisen-
drath, UAHC president, in his
keynote address, "The State of
Our Union," will blueprint the
continued expansion for Reform
Judaism before the assemblage.
mum CUMAX TO LONG HWjg Of CTOWTH
Thirty New Congregations and Extension
Of Services Mark Two Years of Progress
S. SCMNH0M
The two-year period between
the 44th and 45th general assem-
blies of the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations has wit-
nessed sweeping changes in the
size of its membership and the
extent of its services.
Since the last general assem-
bly in Toronto, in 1957, 30 new
congregations have joined the
UAHC, parent body and patron
of American Reform Judaism
a larger number than gathered
for its founding In 1873.
From the Union's headquarters
at the Union House of Living Ju-
daism in New York City flow the
services, guidance and leader-
ship for the growth and spiritual
nourishment of Reform congre-
gations in the Western Hemis
phere. The building will also
serve in the near future as head-
quarters for the World Union for
Progressive Judaism, to stimu-
late and carry out related pro-
grams and activities in countries
throughout the world.
In the words of the Union's
president, Dr. Maurice N. Eisen-
drath, "the record of these two
years, which has added a striking
climax to a long perior of growth,
makes evident that the Union
now faces unparalleled opportu-
nities and correspondingly chal-
lenging problemsits achieve-
ments have indeed brought it to
new frontiers in Jewish religious
development. Into these new
frontiers we must now advance
with high confidence, with an
ever-quickening pace, and with
unswerving dedication to God's
will and word."
The challenge of the new and
expanding era in Reform Juda-
ism is reflected in the increased
numbers and changing emphases
in the field of Jewish education.
It is an extraordinary and per-
haps paradoxical fact that there
are more children attending the
Continued on Page 4-C
Meeting in conjunction with
the Union, in addition to the
Temple Sisterhoods, will be these
affiliates: executive board of the
National Federation of Temple
Brotherhoods (NFTB); National
Assn. o f Temple Secretaries
(NATS); and the Cabinet of the
Combined Campaign for Ameri-
can Reform Judaism.
Workshops will deal with cur-
rent techniques to aid the syna-
gogue; a reevaluation of con-
temporary theological beliefs;
new concepts for congregational
worship; and programming and
social action issues relating to
Judaism and Christianity in the
community and on the national
scene.
On Monday, Nov. 16, David
Levitt, of Great Neck, L. I., Mrs.
Rose Franzblau, of New York
City, and Rabbi Arthur Lelyveld,
of Fairmount Temple, Cleveland,
O., will respond as a father,
mother and rabbi to the chal-
lenge presented by the teen-age
affiliate, the National Federation
of Temple Youth, in a dramatiza-
tion depicting "What Youth De-
mands of the Congregation They
Will Inherit."
On Tuesday evening, Nov. 17,
Norman Cousins, editor of the
Saturday Review, and Rabbi Lou-
is Binstock, spiritual leader of
Temple Shalom, of Chicago, 111.,
will discuss "Religion in Our
Changing Society."
The following evening, Wednes-
day, Nov. 18, a banquet on "Win-
ning the World for Prophetic Ju-
daism," will discuss liberal, pro-
gressive and Reform Judaism on
the international scene. Speakers
include the newly-elected presi-
dent of the World Union for Pro-
gressive Judaism, Rabbi Solo-
mon B. Freehof, of Pittsburgh,
Pa.; Rabbi Jacob K. Shankman,
co-chairman of the World Union
executive board; Mrs. Hiroshi
Okamoto, of Japan; Rabbi Ru-
dolph Brash, of Australia; and
Rabbi Henrique Lemle, of Brazil.
After business sessions will de-
bate constitutional changes, res-
olutions on social issues, action
for new programs and current
problems of concern to Reform
Judaism and the Jewish commu-
nity.
On Wednesday, the meeting
Continued on Pago 6-C
Marvin J. Silt>erman, associ-
ate general chairman of the
Combined Campaign for
American Reform Judaism,
was killed with his wife,
Ruth, in the tragic Oct. 30
Virginia plane crash. Silber-
man, prominent in the Feder-
ation of Jewish Philanthro-
pies of New York, was to fig-
ure prominently in conven-
tion deliberations here.


?ac/a 2-C
+Jeist>ncr*Mar
Frid
ay.
fl/VD FOR AMIRICAN JUDAISM
Building Program Will
KicTDff 315 Million
National Development
A building and deveJopaeeat prop-am without precedeat in Amer-
ican Jewish religious history entailing the raising and expenditure
over the nest three years of $15,000,000 on a nationwide scale will
be launched here on Wednesday by leaders of the I'nion of America*
Hehrvw Congregations and the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute
[%l
. MMAM
* JMi
of Religion The launching will
take place at a luncheon of the
Reform movement s national
leaders in the La Ronde roast af
the Fontainehleau hotel and will
be one of the chief highlights af
the VABCt 45:h biennial gen-
eral assembly
Dr Maurice X E;sendrath.
president of the I'nion of Amer-
ican Hebrew Congregations, aad
Dr ttalm Graces, president of
Hebrew I llcge-Jew-
ish tasfjrate of Reiiooa. will be
the principal speakers
Dr Eiseadrath aad Dr Glueck
aaaxxtoced. m e a r. w h 11 e that
fwads for :he $15,000,000 pro
sal1 be sought through a
.Tcorparated agency
- has heea designated the
:'oc Amen-
> .'..-.- Former I "-.ted
S Sew Hcbcr H learn as.
of X< York, has agreed to serre
- apd of
1 a member af tae I v
board of trustees aad a nraau
in New York auiidng
ad r_: amgaai, .u
-
. S Sohaeider. of Nn
has bees earned the taad's
execi;\e vkv caajrmaa. a pad
he haM* aha with the
Caaapuga far Aacma
Jadaism The CoaahsMd O
patga imrmahi fads oe a reg-
ular basas la awi the maail
aad a HIVJIR
FiiBMhmh aad Dr Gluec*
Union and Seminary Leaders Reveal
Of Gigantic Expansion for Religious
Dr. Maurice Eisendrath. presi-
dent of the I'nion of American
Hebrew Congregations, giving
the details of the development
program mapped by the I'AHC.
aated that eoastnicuoa for the
$15,000,000 program has already
started at the I'nion s House of
Living Judaism in New York.
The I'AHC program as a whole
tor:
The i r 6.:x Since the end of World
War II. the Reform
eat m Judaism has
growing at the rate of oae
new raagriginaH every two
week* The laflcw of thous-
of families has. pot as-
straias on both the
Vatoa as the Reform
ceatral
aad the CaUege-
as Reform Jasa-
tsaVs sale saaree af rahhis.
The creation of a Synagogue
Building and Subsidy Loan Fund
eat of wh.ch three temples will
be constructed for low-income
families in Xew York. Chicago
and Los Angeles, with the bal-
ance to be iarested so that Ms
yield will make possible gra
and free loans for the construe -
tioa of temples and the payment
af rabbinical salaries ta other
low iaeoawt areas $1720 000
Tbe purchase of three spe-
cially-equipped motor buses ta
serve is 'ytiagogues-oej wheel*
fcr Jewish fimiht i in rural aad
semi rural areas. $10000.
The opening of library and
dJanaaUaB centers on Judaism
m the dew-atewu haianit dis-
tricts af four large eitaea. these
ta he destfaated shortly aUOOOO
The creabaa af a Xatxmal
Pihai Library, and the
af J mhLi af spe-
cial Jewnah ifmii, hath projects
Details
Instwti
!!i
: U
L!i
!i
i
rr
ii u
ii
Dr Xelsoa Grace k. presides* of
the Hebrew Vatoa Cotatge Jew-
af "
the rat
Hoosa of Liwiag JucknanhmMkpai
YcwkQrjr. SkwOcfc shows the top ti.-
:;: -e .
jxnfc
TmuKM Twoinomm
Reform Jewry Strives
Toward the Achievi
Of Highest Spiritual
tawe uidsiMa**J
m advaataje


mber 13. 1959
*Jewl$t>nor*Jian
Page 3-C
BOAST 60,000 MEMBERS
tple Brotherhoods
Meet at Assembly
^tional Federation of
otherhoods, Union af-
will meet here Nov.
conjunction with the
embly, has 400 Men's
60,000 members.
[through its 400 affili-
I's Clubs with 60,000
I in the United States,
nd abroad, NFTB has
strengthen temple Bro-
programs by providing
of tools and services,
liem a Lecture Bureau
Brotherhood service
last two years, NFTB
lied and distributed for
|l Clubs an Adult Educa-
and supplements, con-
icussion materials, out-
Miographies, and' other
fential to foster Jewish
hoods is the Jewish Chautauqua
Society, an instrument aimed at
crealing better understanding of
Judaism among Christians. In
the discharge of this function,
the JCS arranges hundreds of
lectures and visits by rabbis to
colleges and summer church
camps here and overseas. In
1958-59, the Society assigned
rabbis to nearly 450 engage-
ments at colleges and 103 at
summer camps. During the same
period, it donated over 2,100
Jewish reference books to college
libraries.
Utilizing the mass media to
reach wider audiences, the JCS
has now produced eight films for
the Joint Commission on Inter-
faith Activities, the last six of
which have dramatized the ma-
jor Jewish holidays. These have
had 4,000 showings on TV, and
a similar number before temple,
church, and communal groups.
Encouraged by this reception,
the Commission is now working
on a new film series based on the
lulating more frequent
endance, NFTB has is-
annual Temple Atten-
and worked assiduous-
nationwide "Religion
Ban Life" (RIAL) cam-
ethical and moral themes of
rincipal national educa- "Pirke Avot," and "The Ethics
reject of the Brother- of the Fathers."
AND IT SHAll UVt UNBROKW
Isaac Mayer Wise's
im to Today's Union
Jnion of American He-
agregations is the parent
patron of American Re-
Jaism. From its head-
at the Union House of
Judaism in New York
the services, guidance,
(ership essential for the
and spiritual nourish-
| Reform congregations in
era Hemisphere.
lion was founded in 1873
tti Isaac Mayer Wise. It
jjdest congregational body
Western Hemisphere. The
mention took place in
in 1874.
ea of a union of con-
obsessed Rabbi Wise
ieral decades. He wrote
in his papers, the "Is-
and the "Deborah,"
about it in his Cincin-
t and in the many "other
om which he spoke, ad-
it at many gatherings
pen succeeded in convok-
meetings, only to see
^rts aborted.
>e initial assemblage in
Bder the presidency of
.n, the UAHC deter min-
wo goalsthe establish-
a rabbinical school and
Ration of religious litera-
[ goals were achieved. The
Jnion College was found-
%
NFTY teen-agers prepart for Sabbath service adults towards greater efforts in synagogue
at summer Leadership Training Institute. Vi- participation,
tality of UAHC's youth affiliate has stimulated
I ii:!""|I:;it!:miii
ISAAC MMU mil
ed in 1875, and textbook mater-
ials have never ceased to pour
out of the Union presses.
The first national religious as-
sociation in America, the Union
soon assumed the role of pro-
tector of Jewish rights. In 1876,
it absorbed the Board of Dele-
gates of American Israelites,
which remained an adjunct of the
Union until 1925.
"The article on the Union writ-
ten for the Vmversal Jewish En-
cyclopedia by Rabbi George
Zepin, who was UAHC secretary
from 1917 to 1941, records that
the Union was responsible for the
first census of Jews in the U.S.
(1880), chartered the Hebrew Im-
migrant Aid Society (1884), or-
ganized the Hebrew Sabbath
School Union (1886), and the first
Hillei Foundation (1923).
As long-time unpaid president
of the Hebrew Union College, Dr.
Wise never lost his interest in the
Union. "Proceedings" of the
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations are replete with the
reports which he regularly sub-
mitted to the Union executive
boards. Upon his death in 1900,
the Union mourned his passing
and hailed him as the "voice"
which bad "summoned us into
the First Council" and "assigned
to us tasks for the establishment
of Judaism in this land."
The tribute to the founder, con-
tained in a formal statement de-
livered to the 17th convention of
the Union, in 1901, by the com-
mittee on Isaac M. Wise Memor-
ial, also contained this phrase-
ology:
"The Union which he made
possible shall live unbroken,
sturdy and true. We feel our-
selves charged to enhance this
Union with every hearty feeling
within us. We shall make it a
force for the permanence of the
things that are good and true
and sacred. This Union of Amer-
ican Hebrew Congregations here-
by declares that it will fervently
continue to work for the cause
of Israel, so that our tradition
shall live. Israel has been po-
tent in the life of the nations and
the races of the earth and it
should again influence the cul-
Continuad on Page 5-C
Federation of Temple Youth Comes of Age
National Federation of Temple Youth lists
20,000 teen-agers in its chapters.
While the term, "new frontiers," is applic-
able everywhere in the movement, nowhere is
it more justified than in the mind and hearts
of young people. The 45th general assembly
coincides with the coming of agethe beginning
of the 21st yearof the Union's energetic off-
spring, the National Federation of Temple Youth.
In two decades, NFTY has multiplied its
membership to nearly 20,000 teen-agers in some
400 chapters. From the ranks of NFTY have al-
ready come 40 young rabbis and rabbinical stu-
dents; in its rosters today are those who will be
the teachers, the informed Jewish parents and
the leaders of tomorrow's congregations.
To dramatize Jewish ideals and to incorpor-
ate them into dally living, NFTY has originated a
treasury of program forms: "Conclaves," gather-
ings combining prayer, study and recreation;
"Kalians," study retreats; "Caravans" to organ-
ize groups in new areas; the "Miztvah Program"
of justice in action; and other community and con-
gregation service projects.
During the fall, winter, and spring, NFTY
members across the country are involved in about
100 events of regional scope. As for the summer,
since the last biennial, approximately 2,300 teen-
agers attended more than 60. summer conclaves
and kallah-retreats, eight of which were National
Leadership Training Institutes for members se-
lected from all, over the land. The success of
NFTY summer activities, and the demand of the
young people themselves, prompted the UAHC to
expand its camp acquisition program.
Since the last biennial, NFTY has conducted
two Summer Bible Institutes in Israel. Nearly
100 young people visited that country, including
the Leo Baeck School in Haifa, a recipient of
NFTY's fund-raising endeavors, and met their
opposite numbers in liberal Jewish groups in
Europe who are linked to NFTY through the
World Union of Progresive Jewish Youth section.
Of NFTY's numerous social action programs,
and joint projects with Christian youth, one of
the most moving was the 1958 "Trick-or-Treat"
collection for UNICEF, the international agency
to aid needy children. Together with young lead-
ers of American Protestantism and of American
Catholicism, the president of NFTY presented the
sum of $850,000 to United Nations officials at a
ceremony which was telecast nationally.
NMMMMnMMMWMH
OTHPt ASftaS Of THE MOVEMENT'S WORK
Central Conference of American
Rabbis Deepens UAHC Strengths
The interdependence of the in-
stitutions of the Reform move-
ment is furthered in UAHC rela-
tionships with the Central Con-
ference of American Rabbis.
The CCAR has many responsi-
bilities toward its more than 700
members. But it also is deeply
involved in tasks which are vital
to the enrichment of its congrega-
tions and the entire movement.
Rabbis and laymen alike look
to the rabbinical Conference
each year for discussions of ma-
jor problems in every area of
Jewish life, from which are gain-
ed authoritative concepts and
data, knowledge to be used in
Union programs and tested out
in the crucible of congregational
living. The CCAR has the major
responsibility of publishing the
liturgy of the synagogue, and the
fruits of this laborthe "Union
Prayerbook," "Union Home
Prayer Book," "Union Hymnal"
and "Union Haggadah" are
used across the land, distributed
from the Union House of Living
Judaism.
The Union and the CCAR work
together on Joint Commissions in
programs such as rabbinical
placement, the policies of which
are formulated by a committee
made up of representatives of the
UAHC, the CCAR and the HUC-
J1R. The training, scholarship,
experience, and inspiration pro-
vided by the rabbis complement
the abilities and experience of
knowledgeable laymen. Together,
they have created a reservoir of
resources and strength that sup-
plies motive power to the entire
movement.
Annual Congregational Survey
In August, 1958, and October,
1959, the UAHC published two
documents, the First and Second
Annual Congregational Survey.
Prepared by the Union in cooper-
ation with its affiliate, the Na-
tional Assn. of Temple Secre-
taries, the surveys are compen-
dia of statistical information and
analysis which, for the first time,
furnish a comprehensive picture
of the Reform movement as a
whole and of the individual syn-
agogues that make up the UAHC.
The pioneering surveys pro-
vide basic, up-to-date facts about
major areas of congregational
Continued on Pag* 5-C
Rabbi Abba Hillel Silver presents check of $10,000 to congre-
gation in Bombay, India. Money helped to build new sanc-
tuary and religious school facilities to aid Liberal synagogue.


Pag* 4-C
+Jeisi>ncr***"i
Friday.
Federation of Temple Sisterhoods to Con
Will Hold 22nd Biennial Assembly Here-
Joint Meetings Planned With UAHC Group

,r I
Om ol the largest Jew .>h wom-
en's org.xnitations in the world,
the National Federation el
pie S ;*articipa"e
:*2n,i biennial assembly
which will be Mi at the Eden
K hotel Jvnt meetin.ss ::h
the parent body, the
ricjn Hebrew Or-grega-
u:!l be held at th.-
tainebieau hot. \ M through
H
Some 1 SW> defecates are ex-
pected, i
oal presi-
dent. chairing the con\TOton
Theme of the convention is
New Fr
hood." and among those who tll
m>v roles are nearly ISO
speakers, fomm.tte* chairmen,
dwcwssion lej.lerx workshop or
seminar consultant* and record
'I coadact
Lejierthiff Trat-;mg lnstitntes.
The convention will open tats
an all-day Adult
Study Retreat sponsored by the
CAHC The Cams, senses as the
patron and parent body of Amer-
ican Reform Judaism in the
Western Htmirphert Its 585
mimbir congregations repre-
sent a constituency of one md-
aWS. UOTOtB SOMTAtn
Ssrvmg a co-cea-r=ea of the
baronial program committee are
n Lrroy Glauber. RerkriUe
Centre V V a member of the
NRB board of directors, and
Mrs Alan S Green. Shaker
Oeagau. O. a member of the
NFTS execunve committee. Mrs.
Leopold L Schwartz. Miami
Beach, a member af the NFTS
hoard of cLrectnrs. n wniag as
chj:rrrr the
arrangements The
sembry ta the hgtiUtm aa
icy making body of NETS,
meets on alternate rears to re-
view the program ami make vi-
tal ffrci'mnu concerning a coarse
of actMa for the next ran ma
The Sisterhood delegates repre-
sent more than 100.008 women in
563 chapters throughout the I'm
lad Statm and Cuba. Canada,
Panama. Netherlands West In-
iom. l"nion of
Africa. India. Australia and
Zealand.
Rabbi Jacob P. Rudin. spirit-
ual leader of Temple Beth El
Great Neck. N Y. and immedi-
ate past president of the Central
Conference of American Rabbi's,
will speak on "Our World and
our Faith Challenge and Re-
sponse." at the first plenary ses-
sion on Sunday Following Rabbi
Beam's address, three "Idea
Seminars" will be held oo The
Idea of GodHow do Women
Teach the Idea of God to Their
Children aad in Their Homer"
"Sptntualutag the Sabbath." and
"The Meaning of Prayer and the
Union Piajer Book in oar Lives.**
Sn workshops scheduled dnr-
mg the week will discuss "New
Fnad ftaeaag." Yoath Activi-
ties" aad "Social Aetaon." Each
of the Mhjaapi. well as each
of the Idea Seanears, wil he da-
far
Laadara of the National Federation of Temples Sa
UAHC s women's affiliate, atop to pause before irJh
22nd conrentjon meeting at Eden Roc hotel La,
Mia* Jane Evans, NFTS. executive direclot. Ma |
aheimar. of Baltimore, former NFTS president eadl_
Monaky. of Los Angelas, current NFTS prtcde^iJ
peeled to be renamed for another two-year hm
I
Role of NFTS in World
Of Modern Judaism
v throe a.awf Jew- i, rf Wianim iml
ah hscery at a* tame have aaaa- the WerM lama far Pracressav*
_phi?e< sa great a rear m ar- Taaaiim
'..' v\ .r^BBSatm? of *** *f_V**B* "*. NT1*^
" ** XTTS. the Hhi Us Ti*S|^lamimTitfT+tTn
5S ^TrrrV 'ae^m^jpTi t ^ *** ***" _" *
Ierne f See* Armca. ^HfS,,,"
!ari<
The cerveaoaa wsfl he adetess-
ed on Monday mnramg by
Maurice N Eueadrath.
eat af the Umoe of
Hebrew Ceagregataeas. aad eg
Mixs Jar.e
rertar of NFTS. whose sabject
will be -ShoaM Caacepts m Pro-
gram Patterns he
A panel amtaasma oa Taesday
af the ac-
of the
witk whach
NFTS is afMmted The Vortd
OMsa
Reform Spiritual Goals
Pat 2-C
syaaflogttes apply these principles, a 0eB*naati|
established hy the UAHC is 1163 !V|
focus of this department aad af the Comaumm a Sail
af Reform Jadamm. wham a the advisory aad
body for the dcpmtmiat. is h> eacourage the I
lautiees a Behml
the last Bi-aaiil. same 100
lard then- owe tammiWam. mafemg a total a* i
with the aad of the central
of the Jewish tradatma to sack i
peace, crri tberani
aad mter-grsm rcafl
Markiag Two Years of Urn* Progrei



jr 13. 1959
fJtmistinrridticiti
Leaders Slated
iar Report on Rise
id a ism in Japan
Page 5-C
(report on the in-
of the Japanese
[be presented to
Lbanquet gather-
pjiennial assembly
p American He-
ltons on Wedhes-
he Pontainebleau
of 3,000 lay and
is from all areas
31 hear an address
Oka mill (i, educa-
tor to the Japa-
Jewish customs
hon B. Freehof,
World Union for
|daism, and Rabbi
nkman, chairman
In Board of the
rill outline to the
for "Winning the
jphctic Judaism."
Jto and her husband
jthis country, where
[at the Reform Sem-
Jew Union College-
K of Religion. Her
Inamed to succeed
Jaism as a culture
its religious sig-
stimulated by her
Iring World War II,
[in Japan find ref-
Nazis. She has
is tours of the Jap-
es and cities, ex-
Judaism to throngs
iences desiring to
[about one of the
religions.
to came to this
pgh efforts of the
ent. Rabbi Maurice
|. They met during
leader's extensive
"Peace Mission"
Japan.
Her, newly-elected
I Union will receive
symbols of their
rom Rabbi Eisen-
chalrman of the
Judge Solomon B. Eisner, of
Hartford, Conn.
Philip M. Klutznick, past pres-
ident of B'nai B'rith, will act as
toastmaster. The invocation will
be delivered by Rabbi Ferdinand
M. Isserman, of Temple Israel,
St. Louis, Mo., and the benedic-
tion by the honorary secretary of
the UAIIC, Rabbi George Zepin.
Meet 'Clergyman of Year':
Rabbi Eisendrath's View
Of Jewish Praitiie Today
D*. MAUKICt USINDRATH
Reform Spiritual Goals
Continued from Page 4-C
tives of the Union and the Central Conference of American
Rabbis.
The Office has been engaged in a pioneering investigation
into the role of prayer and divine supplication. In a field which
has never before been charted, it convened two major confer-
encesone of Jewish scholars who examined facets of the Jew-
ish worship heritage, the other of social scientists who consid-
ered the subject from the viewpoints of such disciplines as psy-
chology, psychiatry, social psychology in sociology, and anthro-
pology. These convocations, held with the last year, mark the
beginning of what will be a long-range research project, the
fruits of which, it is now felt, will ultimately be of crucial in
terest to every member of the Reform family.
Supplementing its magazine, "Synagogue Service," which
is now distributed regularly to 12,000 leaders of Reform Juda-
ism, the Office disseminates information on ritual and liturgy,
and answers an increasing number of inquiries on these subjects
from rabbis and laymen. The Joint UAHC-CCAR Committee on
Ceremonies is attentive to the need for creating experimental
rituals for the home, as well as the synagogue. Since the last
biennial the committee has undertaken, among other activities,
to publish new music for ceremonial purposes.
Rabbi's Dream Fulfilled
tSHI 0X4M0T0
Continued from Pago 3-C
ture and the world. We shall con-
tribute to the progress of the
world and shall vindicate justice,
spread the spirit of humanity and
pursue our ideals for the salva-
tion of man."
The chain reaction of creativ-
ity has resulted in the Union's
continuous formations of auxil-
iary groups which help to bolster
the Reform movement. The Na-
tional Federations of Sister-
hoods, Brotherhoods, and Youth
are now augmented by Associa-
tions for Temple Secretaries and
Educators.
The functioning of the Union
has also been marked by the
work- of commissions, most of
them operating in conjunction
with the Central Conference of
American Rabbis the third of
Isaac M. Wise's creationsfound-
ed 1889. Such groups include the
American Conference
[from Pago 3-C
lip enrollment, re-
registration, serv-
ers and non-mem-
ily a few examples
pered. The findings
udividual congrega-
hemselves in reta-
iner' congregations
and geographical
and to the nation-
At the same time,
Ibled the UAHC to
fown strengths and
to plan realistic-
(ture.
rid Union
the history of the
tmi'iit was ushered
|ien the World Union
vc its headquarters
to the UAHC's
ng Judaism in New
ected an American
ent to succeed the
revered Lady Lily Montagu.
In the 33 years since its crea-
tion, the World Union has en-
deavored to assist Liberal Jews
in the far-flung lands of their
settlement. It has recently aided
in establishing a Reform semin-
ary in Paris and Liberal congre-
gations in Bombay, India and
Auckland, New Zealand. It has
fostered the formation of Reform
groups in Israel and has given
suport to the Leo Baeck School
in Haifa. In addition to explor-
ing the opportunities for Liberal
Judaism in Latin America, the
World Union has helped to nur-
ture the growth of Reform in
South Africa, Australia, Holland,
Germany, Italy, and other coun-
tries.
Financial aid from the Nation-
al Federation of Temple Sister-
hoods and the leadership given
by prominent American Reform
personalities have contributed
greatly to its work.
Commission on Religious Educa-
tion, the Commission on Syna-
gogue Activities, the Interfaith
Commission, the Commission on
Information about Judaism, and
the Commission on Social Action.
The general assemblies of the
Union, which take place every
other year, have become the
largest convocations in America
under Jewish religious auspices.
Biennial assemblies have taken
place in most of the major cities
of the United States; and in 1957,
Toronto, Canada, celebrating the
centennial of the birth of its Jew-
ish community, was the scene of
the first convention beyond the
borders of the U.S. At the con-
ventions, delegates establish pol-
icy for the Union, engage in
seminars and workshops on the
practices and customs of Reform
Judaism, and adopt resolutions
with regard to the moral impli-
cations of national and inter-
national issues.
Once sponsors of circuit
preaching efforts, the Union is
now involved in intensive region-
al activities. Some 16 regional
councils and a number of metro-
politan federations dot the UAHC
map. Within the regions, direc-
tors and lay leaders seek to in-
tensify the bond among congre-
gations, arranging for exchange
of ideas, pooling of resources,
greater imparting of Union serv-
ices, and regularly scheduled
conventions, which have become
miniature biennial assemblies.
But again and again it is stres-
sed that physical growth must be
accompanied by spiritual deepen-
ing. This note was sounded once
again at a gala event, inaugura-
ting the present national observ-
ance of the 85th anniversary of
the Union. Responding to words
of parise on his 15th anniversary
with the Union, Rabbi Maurice
N. Eisendrath, UAHC president,
urged upon his listeners the quest
for intensified religious living.
He spoke of the "spiritual hun-
ger" of millions of religiously
dissatisfied Jews, overseas and
on this continent, as a challenge
which Reform Judaism should
meet.
Rabbi Maurice N. Eisen-
drath, a leading spokesman
for Reform Judaism in Amer-
ica, was asked recently why
he placed so much emphasis
on material issues like world
peace, hunger, population ex-
; plosions and segregation. "Be-
cause," was his emphatic re-
: ply, "that's religion."
But isn't the heart of relig-
ion man's relation to God?
That definition is incomplete,
Eisendrath answers; it's not
"orthodox" enough, it doesn't
go back to Genesis, where you
will plainly find that the heart
i of religion also concerns itself
with man's relation to man.
"In fact," he went on, en-
j joying the apparent contradic-
: tion of terms, "Reform is
probably the most orthodox
current of Judaism with a
: small 'o' because it goes
back to our beginnings and
I the search for social justice."
Rabbi Eisendrath was in
Washington recently to accept
: an Interfaith Award as 1959
Outstanding Clergyman of the
Year. He is president of the
Union of American Hebrew
; Congregations, which is the
parent body of Reform Juda-
ism in the Western Hemis-
phere. The UAHC comprises
about 600 congregations with
an estimated 1,000,000 mem-
bers. The other two main
streams of Jewish religion in
America are Orthodox and
I Conservative.
Eisendrath, 57, has been a
rabbi 33 years, 14 of them in
Canada. In 1952, he became
lifetime president of the
UAHC. He is a tall, attractive
. man with graying sandy hair
and piercing blue eyes. He
I fits easily into the ministerial
pattern of eloquent speech.
His Clergyman of the Year
; award, by the Religious Heri-
j tage of America, is largely in
I recognition of his attempts to
promote a "summit confer-
; ence" of world religious lead-
ers to find a way out of the
threat of total annihilation.
"People the world ovef," he
says, "want peace. And that
includes those behind the Iron
Curtain or Bamboo Curtain.
As for their leaders, they fear
war. Certainly I would invite
Soviet and Chinese represen-
tatives to a religious summit.
They've sent observers be-
fore. The conference would
not be permitted to degener-
ate into an 'anti-Russian'
front. But if the religious
leaders of the world could give
the majority of mankind a
single targetpeacethen the
Communists could not make
any further inroads."
Eisendrath is also concern-
ed with the disparity between
American abundance and the
widespread hunger in much of
the world.
If Rabbi Eisendrath's relig-
ion is steeped in social aware-
ness, he makes no apology. "If
you go back to the Talmud
the Jewish lawyou'll find,"
he says, "that it's filled with
social legislation we haven't
caught up with yet. The Pro-
phets abound with God's in-
junctions for social justice
among men. It permeates our
whole Jewish consciousness
from the very beginning."
He thinks that was a strong
motivation for his becoming a
rabbi in the first place:
"There were no rabbis in my
family before me. My father
and motherAmerican-born
were religious Reform Jews,
but I suppose the reason for
my decision was the rabbi in
my congregation in Chicago.
It was a case of hero worship.
I couldn't have been more
than 6 or 8 when I decided to
become a rabbi. As I got old-
er, I thought of social work
I could easily have gone into
medicine or law but I felt
that this was the way."
Maurice Nathan Eisendrath
was born in Chicago, July 10,
1902, took his degree at the
University of Cincinnati,
where he made Phi Beta
Kappa, and was ordained as
a rabbi at Hebrew Union Col-
lege in 1926.
He and his wife have fond
remembrances of Canada.
They own a two-acre island
located 300 miles north of
Toronto. "It's two hours away
by boat from the nearest
mainland, and we try to es-
cape to there during the sum-
mer," he says.
Rabbi'Iay Kaufman, UAHC vice president, explains the mean-
ing of the Torah to youngsters during the recent consecration
ceremony observed in Reform congregations welcoming new
entrants to the religious school.


Page 6-C
+Jmist>nt>rk**r>
Frid<7. No^i
Two Years of Progress f
Continued from Page 4 C
gratifying measure of initial suc-
cess, evidenced by the fact that
the number of lull time e.iucators
in our iwngmtttm has increas-
ed In at least one thud since the
lncnni.il. and the curve is
.-till ri-ing."
The In ion's Department of
Jewish Education has increased
ami Intensified Ka schedule of
I'.isonal contact with teachers.
principals, hoards (4 education
and rabbis, and in the past year.
very region has had at least DM
I nion sponsored Matt visit, ac-
cording to Dr. Eisendrath The
department has pressed e\or>
where for the expansion an.l
strengthening of teaching per
3,000 Due
Continued from Page 1-C
will hear a debate between Rab-
bi David H Wice. of Rodeph
Shalom, and kits* O Sigal. of
Mm Qa*, a leading layman of
the Union's hoard of trustees, on
whether \
i v or Cads tor Reform Jew
las. Prod
The fumr.! debate on Who is
a le aril !v v:\ore.i
afternoon businev -. on
aj Net Sbm alien pre-
clude
A'fred R Raohrsch. p:<
N
and Rabbi Mi\ Nusshaum.
-pie Israel ii
Calif
Uaeanl xmt
..irman af the I
of tr. succeed
Solomon B Eisner, of
M Headquarte-
the tMa> convention will be a:
the FDntatReblcaw The S
and Brotherhood me*
aa Brian
-
Mm ftateaan brail
sonnel. Since the Ukf biennial.
the UBden has established teach
er training colleges in Miami and
Philadelphia, making a total of
five such institutions assisting
the Reform movement. The oth
ft are located in Los Anfetes,
Men York oty. and Chicago. The
department has also initiated a
program for lay leaders in Jew-
i-h education: the national lead
arship Training Institute, a sew
event for members of boards of
education, is being inaugurated
this year; and the Religious Edu-
cation Newsletter, a period.cal to
inform and guide laymen in the ^ 300-bed general hospital of Kupat Holim. on a 70-acre site, where palm tre* *J
field, was launched last year. the Histadrut medical network, wan officially vegetation is being planted toartif
Services to temple schools are dedicated in Beersheba on Oct. 20 by David desert winds and sand. Situated ma.
geared to various age and inter- Dubinsky. president of the International Ladies' of the Negate, the hospital will ht*.i
*-l Garment Workers Union. The new hospital, the Kupat Holim health service col
which is to include a nurses training school, peccant of Israel's entire popu]atk.(
maternity pavilion, pediatrics ward, and other boo af hospital facilities and medknlis.
facilities, will cost S5.500.000, of which SI.000.- Kupat Holim is financed in part brad
000 in cash has already been contributed by Histadrut campaign of the noticed*
Dubinsky's union The institution is situated for Labor Israel.
items. Among these, the maga
rine Keeping Posted dwyrned J^m UsieS WlH CoB lt AZOTCS
for young people attending grades
seven through 12. has met with
an unusually positive response.
ginning with youngsters in kin
dergarten and continuing through
huh aokaasV the Union in the last
two years has published a long
list of books, periodicals, educa-
tional play materials, and other
Building Plan
Continued frcm Paoe J-C
under S2.CO0.000. Constructions
tea be-efi! other cities. Mi
ami and Chicago among them,
through the planned expenditure
of another $3.000 000
The Union of American He-
brew Congregations i* America's
oldest national federation oTsyn-
agogucs. embracing at the pres-
ent time 585 Reform temples in
the United States and Canada
The Hebrew Union ColVge-
bb. Insutute of Religion is the
emrkf's oldest existing rabbinical
seminary with branches of the
school in New York. Cincinnati
and Lo* Angeles.
the nature of
ranean cruise.
NEW YORKThe Em Lines* j lrtv at Nantes, rslma de Malls, .a The Israel aad fat. |
passenger steamships. Israel end nd GihralUr. 1855 and 195S, cad u
Zion. will rail regularly at Ponta With PooU Delgada added to 300 passengers m Rnti
Delgada. m the Azores, on aU j their itinerary, tthe American-, ists classes. The sacsan]
ages from New York to Haifa I""*** Shipping Company said, ly air conditioned, ami
, beg-nning with the sailing of Feb. the Israel and Zion will always be staterooms, four loop]
2. i960, it was announced here by I taking the mild Southern rente to tiled outdoor swiauuaji
| the American Israeli Shipping the Mediterranean. The roend-trip are equipped witt
Company. Inc.. U S represents voyage by these ships will be in reduce rolling.
tire of the Zim Lines.
The two liners, which maintain
year round service between New
York and Israel and other Medi-
terranean ports, sad from here
every thud week. They will be ar-
r.ving at Ponta Delgada on the
sixth day out of New York, and
will remain there for about half
a day. allowing ample time for
sightseeing ashore. Other ports of
call on the Eastbound voyage are
Gibraltar. Piraeus and Haifa.
Westbound, the vessels call reaje-
GETTING THE JOB DONE
NEW YORK Rabbi Pinchas
Stoaser. of New York Cay. has
been appealed national youth di-
rector, it was itineaaacul Wednes-
day by Moses I. Feeerstean. pres-
ident of the Union of Orthodox
Jewish Congregations of
and Harold H Boxer, chau
.he I 'aeon's Youth 0
LET'S RE-ELECT OTIS W. SHIVER
* **- ahajeneabnvTlSr ofS Tril Aow. Or tanres lwanr tree ianle
******* s*aas f,gi
*a> TvJ Aver
- HW First Clasa
*^eaa Beeston aad) Heat


13, 1959
+Jewlsii FhrMton
ft Will Participate in Key CJFW Discussions
|t of the Great-
federation and
lit will lead a
Southern Flor-
[ general assem-
, of Jewish Fed- will
. Funds Nov.
Jcisco.
arrent Federa-
U Stanley C.
at and a found-
jrill play import-
conference at
will discuss
nip develop-
drives, health
needs, serving
> education and
public welfare
dent of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, will present a major
paper at the Large City Budgeting
Conference on Nov. 11, at which
representatives of 23 large cities
undertake their cooperative
review of 1960 budgets with a num-
ber of national agencies.
Mr*. Stanley Myers, chairman
of Federation's community
planning committee, will join
Samuel Cohen, Federation's com-
munity planning and budget di-
rector, at a session concerned
with "Planning for Health and
Welfare Services."
Federation director Dr. Benja-
min B. Rosenberg is to be a dis-
cussion leader on "Synagogue-
Federation Relationships," and
Robert H. Golden, Miami Federa-
tion campaign director, will attend
fund-raising clinics studying cam-
paign techniques.
Others attending the general as-
sembly from the Miami area will
include Mrs. Sam J. Heiman, Mrs.
Maurice Pearlstein, Mrs. Harold
Thurman, and Lloyd L. Ruskin,
president of the Jewish Vocational
Service.
at a general
y morning on
of Jewish agen-
can community.
Charles Laic
! Lewis D. Cote,
I take up the
social serv-
Iso chairman- of
committee of the
[participate in a
npaigning tech-
on Miami's Com-
eal drive in 1959.
[preside at a spe-
Southern region,
he is president.
Iman will take
on chronic illness
-health problems,
tend a meeting
lination of health
valuation of the
jCJFWF national
' Study.
p-lstein, executive
Tjewish Home for
a panel member
ig with "Serving
the Institution."
Ian, a vice presi-
United Fund Launches Campaign Here
For $3,635,729 Goal of Minimum Needs
This week marks the official
kickoff of tlie 1960 campaign for
the United Fund of Dade County.
By Thursday afternoon, some
5,000 volunteers those soliciting
contributions from businesses,
employes and professionals will
have begun their personal mara-
thon for the support of the 300
health and welfare services of the
Fund.
Campaigns are being launched
each day this week, culminating
on Thursday with a corporate
leadership luncheon atop the Du-
pont Plaza.
In making public the third an-
nual kickoff schedule, Eugene
Weiss, 1960 campaign co-chair-
man for Miami Beach, said that
"volunteers will be shooting for
$3,635,729." This amount, he de-
scribed as a "minimum need
figure."
Weiss said tbifeflast year some
228,000 men, women and children
in Dade county benefited directly
from at least one of the services
of our United Fund. "If we are to
INSURED SAVINGS
I0ME FINANCING
tAVE-BY-MAIL
Oldest
and
Largest
in
Miami
Beach
[FEDPAL
lAVINOS and loan association
in Offices: Lincoln Road ot Washington Avenue
continue this health and welfare
service for one out of four of our
neighbors, we must aim our sights
at an amount which is $400,000
more than was ever raised."
The "minimum need" figure,
Weiss said, was presented to the
campaign organization by the
Fund's 37-member budget commit-
tee.
Among them, the volunteers
who this week launch their cam-
paigns will canvass more than
2,200 businesses throughout the
county. They will solicit 1960
pledges from more than 115,000
employes and from more than
4,500 Dade county professionals.
"It is our intent," Weiss said, "to
sign every employee and business
in the county to our fair share
plan.
"The plan," he said, "requires
that each employee asign to the
United Fund cne hour's pay each
month. The firm fair share is
based on the average gift contri-
bution given the drive last year by
businesses of a like size and
type."
The United Good Neighbors will
launch their phase of the 1960
drive on Jan. 10, v/ith 15,000 vol-
unteer block workers.
United Good Neighbors, recruit-
ed for the most part from women's
civic, religious and service clubs,
will go from door-to-door seeking
contributions for Fund services
for the forthcoming year.
Each volunteer will cover only
one block in her own neighborhood.
NOW! YOU CAN SHARE
IN ONI OF
AMERICA'S
FASTEST GROWING
SPECTATOR SPORTS
GREYHOUND
RACING
Wf HAVt nttPAHIO
SPtCIAl JtfPOftTS ON
WESTERN RACING, INC.
Common Stocks, $1.37V4
Approx. pries'
Operators ot Pensocolo, Greyhound
Pork, Phoenix and Portland Mead-
ows.
j Actively Traded on the
Over-the-Counter Market
CHI 1 Writs tsr mi ttftru Irtsj
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Investing Corp.
814 Akasley Bldg. Miami 32, Fla.
Phone FR 7-3547
Please send me FREE Reports on
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City ------
state-
Page 7-C
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102 S. KR0ME AVE.
KEY WEST
540 GREEN ST.
'.

I
<
I


Pag 8-C
+Je*ls*fkrA09n
A severely injured" woman is about to receive first aid. while
"-formation sheet establishing her name, address and con-
dition is being prepared by one ol the attending student
MS. The "tag" on the victim's chest indicates the natuie
Ml Sinai Hospital Takes Part
In Civil Defense Dry Run Here
What happen^ hni d:*a>:er
Dade const? defense of-
- ned to had out reer
when -?perauos
Vrugalr 0" *ith the participa-
t-on of Mi. Sinai Hospital's student
srses at the proving passiL le-
> ted it h st. asd SW srtb axe.
Scares o injured" persons, vic-
tims of a theoretical tornado and
> "ere rescued" frost upper
dots asd trust usder debris.
rece \ t first aid and
pmUTxm to local hospitals a
vee-basr driB which afa* saw
the rooperatiua of the Fire De-
-nhslasee Corps, C
bbsj Cosmuaicatios facfflQes
* a fRMSj el C.-vd Defense offi-
as'
The drill was preceded
short bnefcsg llaanq the
M performed by ail participants
uho were forced to work usder
"anted by realistic make-op.
Working in three firs: aid sta-
tions established in a "white" aone
protected by a police cordon, the
runes appLcd bandages. splint*,
antiseptics, gave injections of sed-
atives, asd performed blood trans
IbbMbs.
Nearly a hundred "victims- were
property processed during tke
maneuver and aiere than half eva-
cuated by imhulasccj for trans
portation to local TrtalT that
sad been contacted dura* the droll
m order to ascertain the smhrr
of beds asd emergency beds avail-
able.
Flaws escoontered during the
*tll mere discussed in a cntasae
hi esd of the proceedings, and
* itiu of constructive leggi t
forwarded to the individual
department* for adoption a the
hj i real
ate with itrongm
rescue work
trees two
I -i-.- | .- as
wheh these poos
sere tagged te mdacate the nature
sf their asfsnes, coeveniestry es
and Mrs. Ghana
Mt Sasai
**h the .1 atversaty of Miami.
GORDONx)
FUNERAL HOME
FR 3-3431
FrUiilui 1-143*
710 S.W. 12* Aw.
Mayshie Friedberg Scores Again;
Salesmanship Benefits Israel Bonds
x Mir^H electrician, who came ho may he seen pessine out M
A rrtwd electrician.
mi Beach many years ago.
. of performing jobs he
personal respono-
.n behalf of the State sf h>
l
He is Mayh.e Friedberg. of 17
rrasdbsrg is active in
the camp.. Israel Bond
drive and l ombined Jewish Ap-
peal here personally paving for
newspaper advertisements solint-
ipport for these campaigns.
During the active season here,
Chagall Named
To Brandeis U
1 ILTHAM, Brandeis
I'nnersity Wednesday announced
the appointment of Marc Chagall
faculty as the first Jack I
Poses art.st-in residence. Chagall.
one of the worlds greatest living
artists. ill execute a ceramic
composition mural in the new li-
brary on the Waltham. Mass.
campus.
Brandeis Trustee Poses, a New
York art collector and president
of D'Or*ay Perfumes, created the
new artist-in residence program
;rant to the university.
Resident artists in this program
ill work at Brandeis for from
two months to a semester Al-
though they will not teach in for-
mal classes, they will be available
for students and faculty to meet
with and study at work.
leaf-
lets and literature to Beechites.
explaining the philentrepic need
of Jews overseas.
One of Friedberg's haunts is the
Literary Circle, a group that meets
every day behind the 10th st.
Oceanfront Auditorium.
The group attracts such literary
lights as "Der Lebediger." Chain
Goodman, book editor of "Der
Tog;" Shleaso Rosenberg, also a
Tog" staffer, editor of "Der
Freier Arbeiter Shtimme," and
former personal secretary to Sho-
lem Asch; and noted Yiddish nov-
elist Iser Tohish.
Friedberp Wednesday cen
fiented the Literary Circle with
an urgent pica fur the purchase
of Israel Bondsend found the
hearts of sweh visitors te the
group's session as Charles f del-
item, Michael Morgan. Jech
GreonwaM. Chiim CaaSPJtsu,
and Chertes Kene.
It's all in a day's work for May-
shie Friedbergincluding the SS00
check he collected at the Literary
Circle meeting, among the other
$100 and smaller but equally im-
portant purchases made there.
i even sold some bonds to mem-
bers of the Literary Circle, them-
selves, not only to their visitors."
Fnedberg noted proudly.
This is an accomplishment long
since expected from the retired
electrician but one always wel-
come in the annals of local Jewish
philanthropy.
TV. itv
' ,NEW YORK-flTd
11* ^U of la* ?5
.*'-wi*~ta
announced t(eJ.i
WUhren Book rJ.
Publish.d in WSmTi
,o*raphio] dkthaZ?!
Je< "i an cowr*
which *,n be 7^
and greatly ealaro,
b 'ted by HarrVi
nd I. J Canaj, V
edited Vohisw L
Herreiro"
'60 Dimes
w.c -cur B^,
named Dade com*
Dimes director for ]
A member of tat
Hou>e of Re
mer Miami Sonap i
rell has long beea
work of local actor*
tional Polio Fo__
raided fuads for tke i
led to the J lisij
vaccine.
Herrel! has bea 11
the executive
Dade county eat
Uonal Pouo Foua^atax]
, past t years. As thT
. county March of Dual
he succeeds loom I
counting firm exeeaf.
served during 1x9.
The new Marek d I
| paign will run fron InJ
and conclude vitk fa]
March on Jaa at
Faculty members from local
narsasg schools whs assisted m ts*
over-all drrectios acraded Mrs.
Xora McCowas asd Miss Roberta
GaJbra Ji. of ML Suui llmgatil
school of sprang. Mrs
Known By
More people prefer and j
enjoy the superior fl*
of SeagramsV.O.
to any other
Imported Whisky-
Seagram's
YO.
Chnf*A''
IWBBSUTEAtS
Wi-T


fJewisti fkrHnn
Page &
prom four brariches of the Greater Miami Jewish
' Center meet fo make plans for the sixth crhnual
ticlave. Four of the more than 50 senior high rep-
i "are seated (left to right) Sandy Weinstock, Miami
ch, Bobbi Wachtel, North County Branch. Stand-
?right) are Gene OdelL Southwest Branch, and Bob
ai Branch.
L Cited For EPH Policy
^cognition for employ-
handicapped veter-
an accorded Peoples
of Florida by the
jigion.
a Certificate of Ap-
hf the three million
pie American Legion."
to President Phillip
Peoples, by national
DRNIA'S
California's World*
frlooling til* Blue Pacifle
li the mo. Twenty minutoi
Airport. 430 luxurious
pwt, all with television and
nvenlion facilities. Banquet
0, air- Dm and Cantonese Room.
i pool'Beautiful groundi and
I gardens. Rate from $1.
William W. Donnelly. G.n. Mgr.
[f.A.and In HAWAII
SAGLIA
GOOD LIVING
AGLIA, JR., PresMent
JLIA HOTELS '
, CALIF. Ho'.l Mtrsmef
LIP. Hole! Solute Clelro
.CALIF. Hold Wilts*
[Hotel II UncKo
, Holol fronciicoo
I Hotel Park I
[ll.C. Hoi.l H.l.lgl
9NN. Hotel lood
|A. Hotel Stiorwr*
Hotel tlntoa
' Hotel Now To.lef
I Woikiki lillmore
famed hotels
leePeseily Plea
adjutant E. A. Blackmore, of the
Legion, in a recent ceremony in
North Miami Beach.
Crowen said that of the com-
pany's 418 employes, 21 are phys-
ically handicapped persons. Of
this number, 19 av veterans.
"We are proud of this high and
unexpected honor," Crowen said.
"We are not even aware that we
were being considered for it."
Crowen said Peoples Gas System
"had always followed an "enlight-
ened employment policy and would
continue to do so.
"All other things being equal, a
physically handicapped veteran
gets the same consideration by
this company that anybody else
gets."
TO WOMEN WHO WORK
Will your present Income continue all
jour life? Ask about the Metropolitan's
Income Planand make your future
N A T "C A N S
3200 S.W. 3rd Avenue, Miami
Phones FR 3-4616 or HI 6-9981
Representing
METROPOLITAN LIFE INSURANCE CO.
1 Madison Ave.. New York 10. N.Y.
GORDON ROOFING AND
SHEET METAL WORKS INC.
2148 N.W. 10th Ave. Ft 3-7180.
Have your roof repaired now; you
will eave on a new roof later.
"Satisfactory Work by
Experienced Men*'
NOW YOU DIAL
FR 3-4605
for
* Jew 1st fhrUHan
JlfforoM 1.7477
ZWMXH
rUNIHAL NOMI
IB DAM BOUUVAU Mdwuti T. N
MIAMI REACH
Funeral Wreeter
Teen-Agers Map
Annual Conclave
"Values of the Teen-age Com-
munity" will be the theme of the
sixth annual teen-age conclave
sponsored by the Greater Miami
Jewish Community Center, it was
agreed at a meeting of more than
50 youth club representatives held
this week.
Delegates, from groups sponsor-
ed by the Center at four branches
in different parts of Dade county,
also set Sunday, Dec. 6, as the date
of this year's conclave.
Plans were made for a special
workshop for club presidents to
discuss their problems. More than
30 clubs of senior hifch age are in-
volved in the annual event. Stuff
coordinator for the conclave is Ju-
dith Goldstein, youth activities su-
pervisor of the Miami Branch.
Delegates presen were Harvey
Schorr, Gene Gardner, Harriet i
RnKKnbwmK, ,s Va ^!.R;::man\ Volunteers Here
Bobbi Wachtel, Tern Scheffman,'
Center Seeks
Leonard Wolfer, Henry Pecullen,
Dorothy Wiener, Wendy Weiss,
Sandra Rothenberg, Laurie Au-
gust, Ellen Blumin, Barbara Gold-
berg, Joanne Rosen, Sandi Whit-
man, Elaine Chausky, Linda Mor-
ris, Gerri Wasserman, Sandy
Weinstock, Sid Schreidell,
Dave Philo, Jeff Schuman, How-
ard Roth, Ralph Gneco, Norman
Roskm, Robert Goldberg, Ronnie
Pasell, Linda Chaiken, Marvin
Goldstein, Jack Blumenfeld, Rob-
ert Stone, Mike Kasse, Jane Safer,
Trina Lust, Larry Pius, Gene
Odell, Ellen Darlow, Bunny Mich-
lowitz, Adrienne Levine, Gail Pol-
lack, Paula Gelman, Elaine Cchae-
fer.
A call for volunteer workers,
both men and women, has been
issued by the senior citizens de-
partment of the Greater Miami
| Jewish Community Center. The
workers will be utilized in the
newly reorganized and expanded
program for senior citizens at the
Miami Beach Y.MI1A Branch at
1536 Bay rd.
Charles Plotkin, director of the
department, indicated that he is
now seeking capable volunteers in
the fields of social dancing, music
and choral group, arts and crafts,
ceramics, English instruction, and
other subjects.
All volunteers will participate in
a training session to help them
in their work with senior citizens.
' Inbal to Return
For Second Tour
NEW YORKInbal, Dance The-
atre of Israel, will return to Amer>
ica for a second American tour
all under the auspices of the
America-Israel Cultural Founda-
tion and the management of S.
Hurok, it was announced by Sam-
uel Rubin, president of the Foun-
dation.
As the highlight of the Founda-
tion's 19591960 program of cultu-
ral exchange between Israel and
he United States, the Inbal will
give 78 performances in 27 com-
munities in the United States and
Canada.
The tour, which opened in
Princeton, N. J., at the McCarter
Theatre, on Oct. 4, will go coast-
lo-coast, and will be highlighted by
the two-week engagements in Los
Angeles and New York City. Ex-
cept for Chicago and Boston,
where four performances will be
given in each city, most of the en-
gagements will be for one night
only, with a few two-night stands.
Inbal will be seen in New York
City at the City Center from Nov.
24 through Dec. 6. The Los Ange-
les engagement is slated for Oct.
28 to Nov. 8. Among the other
large cities in which Inbal will
perform are Vancouver, Edmon-
ton and Winnipeg in Canada, and
Philadelphia, Cleveland, 8feattle,
Portland, San Francisco, St, Louis,
Milwaukee, Newark, Baltimore,
and Washington, D. C.
The company of 24 dancers,
singers and musicians will.'again
be under the direction of Mrs.
Sara Levi-Tanai, who founded the
group ten years ago In Israel.
They will arrive in New Ydrk on
Oct. 2.


Pcrgn 10-C
-JewisiifkrkMorJ
Second Concert
Shaping Under
Sevitzky Baton
The University of Miami Sym
phony Orchestra under the baton
of conductor Fahien Sevitzky will
present Its -econd pair of
concerts featuring Leonard Rose
cellist. Carol Smith, contralto, and
Spanish dancer Tonia Flore* H
Sunday tad MnoMia] \ening. Nov.
15 and 16. at Miami Beach ami
Pade Ccunty Auditoriums
Scxitrky will open the program
with Frnest Bioch s Concerto
QruSM for SbriBfl Orchestra and
Piano." which will be played in
rj of the late composer, fol
lowed h] formt Muman Leonard
Rom the BMehwM
certo ir OtBi and Orchestra.
Carol Smith and Tonio Flores join
s\ and the orcV>tra for a
lUtioa of DeFalla's "El
Amor Brujii." to be heard f
firs: time in its ent.rety in Miami
Leonard Rom it a oraoXjate of
Ada Merrift Junior High School
in Miami. He studied cello with
the lt Walter Gretsman, who
was for many y*r first cellist
with the University Symphony.
At the ape of 15. young Roso re-
ceived a full scholarship to the
Curtis Instititt of Music
4*99|



UONAtO tOSf
ho studied with trro distinguished British virtuoso Felix Salmend.
Communist Chinas Jewish
Community Expected to Decline
Friday.]
NEW YORK-(JTA)-The or
ganited Jewish community in,
Communist China will cease to ex-;
Mthin a few years, if the num .
. her of Jew* there continue* to de-1
cline at the present rate, it is in-,
dicated in a report received here,
from the Council of the Jewish
Comm unity of Shanghai
The report, received by the|
World Jewish Congress in New-
York, was prepared and is signed
b> P. I Yudalevich. chairman of i
the Shanshai Jewish Community
Council. It
the numerical doeiino but also
the ponoral diHicvttios facing
the community. Determine, what
ho lot ma "the degenerating, fj.
none ill condition" of the major-
ity of the 72 Jews remaining in
Shanghai, Yudalevich reports
that two-thirds were an relief in
Juno of Hi year. In addition,
more than 20 parsons wert re-
ceiving three meals daily at the
community's she Ha i hows*.
SCR,*?
tm-r*!
The Shanghai Council has ex-
says that today there tended iU help to the diminishing
251 Jews in the' entire j J**wh community of Tientsin,
country' A vear ago the Jewish| whose own central communal body
community "of China numbered, recently dissolved. There are only
294 in 1967 it was 397. In the >S<* J Ml "> TienUw. and 15 ol
At IT. he was appointed to the
faculty of the I tute. and
in 1938 joined the NBC Symphony
Orchestra. For 11 years. Rose
was f:r>t ce:h>t with the Cleve-
land Orchestra and later the New
York Ph.'.harmonic, resigning the
post in 1951 to devote full time to
a career as a concert soloist. Leon-
ard's parents. Mr and Mrs Harry
Rose of Miami Beach, will be see- ;
rag their son make his third ap
pearance with the
there were more than 25.000 Jews
on the Chinese mainland. Migra-
tion took most of them to Israel.
Brita.n. the I". S. and other lands.
Tn# report receros nor otMy
Reconstructionists
Pick Dr. Eisenstein
NEW YORK Rabbi Ira Eisen-
l niversity *tein. former president of the Rab-
phony Orchestra.
Carol Smith, called -one of the
finest young contraltos." will be
making her debut on the Miami
concert stage A contralto or great
versat.lity, she stepped into the
national musical spotlight with a
nut Town Hall recital in 1961.
followed by an auspicious sold-out
tour of 71 appearances as soloist
with the top symphony orchestras
across the country and the New
York Opera Company.
Flamenco dancer Tonia Flores.
"resh from a our of Europe, where
she thrilled audiences with her au-
ther.t.c interpretation of the clas-
sical and Spanish dance, was en-
gaged by Sevitzky to appear with
binical Assembly of America and
spiritual leader of the Ansbe Emet
Synagogue in Chicago, has been
elected president of the Jewish Re-
constructionist Foundation and ed-
itor of "The Reconstructionist"
according to an asnoun-
by Herman Levin, chair-
man of the board of directors of
the Foundation.
Dr Eisenstein will succeed Dr.
Mordecai M Kaplan as chairman
of the magazine's editorial board.
Dr Kaplan, professor of Philoso-
phies of Religion at the Jewish
Theological Seminary of America
and internationally-famed nlulonu
pher. educator and author, found-
ed the Reconstmctsontst' move
them are receiving regular month-
ly relief grants from Shanghai '
Help towards medical ezpens<
also being accorded to- the tin>
Tientsin community.
Harbin, with 153 Jew*, remains
the largest community in Chun.
and its Community Council con-
tinues to carry out its functions
independently. This community al
so maintains a shelter house, in
w hich u persons are fully taken
care of. Harbin still has its own
synagogue with regular services
and, as in Shanghai, matzoth were
baked and distributed to the com
munity prior to last Passover.
Nor.et i
FlCTITI(*i
EM BUGBt
TOMU HOtfS
Miss Smith in the exciting El Amor, ** in 1935. Dr. Etseustem has
been one of the foremost spokes-
men of the movement since its in-
ception.
Bids Opened
For New Temple
Harold Woflt. chairman of Mont
ice Ho Park building committee.
Wednesday announced that bids
are let for the proposed synagogue
and religious school building to be
erected on the site of its present
structures at 10H NE lS3rd st.
Architect for the building Philip Pearbman. A scale model of
the proponed temple and school
will be exhibited throughout the
North Miami Bench area.
HOW TWO KST SLUNG PAPOWACKS
n/oVt MawdftpoW W atcy CfCDcai
A
ia tor
MNCgg
AND
"J{t
fc hln and held a ntalc
ty SAMU&G. RUNG
. 50*
UArmuui ,
WHOtEVBr POCXET iOOKS ARE SOLD
Specifications tor the new strut
bares inckode a sanctuary for
total seating capacity of Leflo per
offices.
The
a total of 1
room, libraries,
tion chapel,
offices.
will include
a youth
eongrega
administrative
at the Jewish Theological Semtn
ary in 1931. Dr. Eisenstein served
as leader of the Society for the
Advancement of Judaism in New
York, the wonur congregation ha
the Reconstructionist niiiimn
He remained at this post until
1984. when he was invited to he-
leader of Anshe
He earned his .
PhD at Cossmbu University, and! Orah chapter of Mzaracai
l8Sg the Srmmorj awarded him' *" Organization will hold a
DD degree. berahtp ten at the Nintmai hotel
Ion Nov. Ml Miss Math Kaplan is
s ~"L aaairi
ELEVENTH,
FLONIOA m I
COUKTY. Ml
Sl
> '"-.-HA SAT
jpiMi r ktr 1
HaKP.I MTEUafl
m
MVD JL BUtl
aod NEUJKUTF
ku -'- iU
jNEtJJE EAS B0KE1
Orwk
lm
l i annum
HOTCt or
iia jlw :m%
Kit
Ifcsl x CMUL
ctain bM >*_
aad 7a
of yont
Cou^
JAT
ROOFING
LICENSED (H TEAM IN DADE COUNTY' INSURED
E vc* S
>iHC CO
*.> S LVJ
V354K.W 1Mb Am.
: ^_
M
V^mMk Jkk smct
IAMI TITL
iQktmctCo.
M YEAftS C* TITLE SERVICE IN OAOE COUNTY
ESCIOWS ABSTRACTS TTTU MSUtAMQ
M
Nl wlSYl
Carol C- J"0***
SeWaut;
?.*? t-;
s MYauaxorr a7wi
iLn-u-as-r

"par5*^
cw5-^:M
aw*^*mi



13, 1959
* Jewish Fforfrffrtin
Page 11-C
B CSUtt #f J3l j
eased Istt <( iMll
[ the Coeerj J*_
>-. u< nit at m|
the cs_
wutfjr. fWMk. i
uaUM frsa im i
eMcatlei kottl t|
km!
sal
;--!J>ka\ _
Ij Saanel GtUsafcl
: i nwir . llaaji. IV
UNDER
NAME LAW
tKI'.Y GIVEN thai
Iriug I" en
flctll oue name "J'
SERVICE at 638
I i. l.uud. i rlaii .
register said name
I i CUlt Court of
i/ i
. I.".\1I!AKD
I.MAN
I > 1 < -;i.l
11/8-13-20-27
PUBLICATION
T COURT OF THE
IC'AL CIRCUIT OF
{AND FOR DADE
ElN chancery,
I S9C 6429
)R DIVORCE
Lvenue,
York.
FBEtlAR, are hereby
BUI of Complaint for
filed against you,
lulred to nerve a copy
or Pleading to the
t on the plalntlff'i!
Pert c. zbmbl, o
tlaml Beach 39, Flor-
orlKlnal Answer or
office of the Circuit
pfore the 7th day of
If you fall to do so,
fault will be taken
the relief demanded
nplalnt.
all be published once
r consecutive weeks
FLORIDIAN.
U>ERED at Miami,
fSSth day of October,
bATHERMAN. Clerk.
Daile County. Florida
It II. RICE, JR.
Deputy Clerk.
CMEL
mm
BY HENRY LEONARD
Florida
aim in
11/6-13-20-27
LEGAL NOTICE
"When you're ready, just press this button, then
the ark and pulpit will disappear and you'll have
your full-size basketball court."
Ci>iti inf. uwi *ui
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 47645-C
IN RK: ffuammml
iA' SCHBKS
-
NO/CE TO CREDITORS
I'" AM i-i i I Ml |-..|- en II i
InxWMMMs or Demands Against Said
Ifo I art I notl ] and re-
quired t<> i i claims
maud* which you may have against
if CELIA SCHBNKER,
ad 'ate of i lade County, nor-
Ida, lo the ('mnty .1 ifkies of Dade
County, and Hie i In- saaie In tlie.r
offici a In t ha < ounty 'o irl ho
Dade County, Florida, within
calendar months from the dale of tli
first puh'lcati n hereof, or the earn*
Will lie i... i n .1
Ai mi.i-ii sciii:\kkk. Bttecnter
of the Eatate (Vila Schenker,
i ieiease II VERB, BEIMAN & KAPLAN
Attorneys
Eleven Fifty Building
II.Ml S.W. 1st Stieei
Miami, Florida
10/23-30, 11/6-13
LEGAL NOTICE
NCE UNDER
US NAME LAW
I'HEKKP.Y OIVBN that
desiring ty em
the fictitious name of
PEL SlU'I' at 42 North
1 In en is t.) register said
Clerk of the Circuit
C.nntv,' Florida.
lYLVIA RAPAPoRT,
gota Owner
10/23-30,11/6-13
riCE UNDER
JUS NAME LAW
HEREBY GIVEN that
desiring to engage In
the fictitious name of
ii (IN A- BERVICB
PNROMAT
1,39 B.W.. lh Street In
ami. ForMa. intends
said name wlfh the
Circuit Court of Dade
iml. Florida, this 16th
MM.
IC THORSEN
JNE THOH8EN
lie Owners
jner,
Building.
Applicant
10/23-30.11/6-13
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
Ihe undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
RONDKX ENTERPRISES at 73a 1st
Avc .Miami Bench, Fla., Intend! to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
AMERICAN FRF IT PI' P.VEYi HIS
INC. a Florida corporation
I'.v: Hnrrv Sturm, President
TALIANOFF & WALLER
Attormi)
11/6-13-20-27
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thit
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
FLORIDA SI'NSHINE BOTATE at
13715 Biseayne ..Boulevard, Miami.
Florida Intend ttt i-etflster said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida. ,
LAWRENCE HL'RWIT and
EDITH Hl'RWIT, Sole Owners
l,ACRENCf7 disKiM"
Attorney for Owners
,140 N.E. 163rd Street
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
+. Jewish FtorSdfJ&m
solicits your legal notices.
We appreciate your
patronage and guarantee
accurate service at legal
rates .
mmi fk .i-405
for messenger service
LEGAL NOTICE
JUIT COURT OF THE
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
IN AND FOR DADE
IN CHANCERY,
59C10446
IAR. and ADA G.
fclfe.
| R TO APPEAR
Miller, if single and If
she and her huslmnd
1 are unknown. If living
belr unknown heirs, de-
l or granteee, Almee
|d J. M. Scott, her hus-
and If dead, their un-
devlsees. legatees, or
[C. Hawes. and If mar-
>wes, his wife, If living
Iheli unknown heirs,
s, or gruntees; Harry
finiarricd Cohen,
living and If dead their
.. devisees, legatees, or
Itors. trustees, or other
natural or cori>oraie.
Its by through under
lid parties defendant or
also all persons having
ly Interests In the fol-
ed lands, situate, tying
Dade County, Florida.
ck 1. T W E I. F T II
..INI>IIS, 3rd SECTION.
pn according to the Flat
orded In Plat Hk 6,
of the Public Records
tiuntv, Florida."
EACH OF TOIL are
to serve a copy of
to the Complaint to
On plaintiffs Attorney
EBIdg Miami, Fla., on
7th day of December.
the original with the
Court otherwise the
.aid complaint .vU1 be
sod by you and each
[Jrd day of November,
^ATHKIIMAN, Clerk.
H, Dade County, Florid*
Deputy Clerk
By: K. M. I.Y.MAN.
11/6-13-2 '-'-'7
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Uiat
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under ,the fictitious name of
HARRY LEVY *, ASSOCIATES at
1101 Lincoln TOad, Miami Beach,
Fla., Intends to maWer said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida^ ^
ARTHUR G. GOTTUEB
Attorney for Applicant
20 N.E 2nd AY*.
ll/fi-IS-20-27
riCE UNDER
lOUS NAME LAW
HEREBY GIVEN that
A, desiring to engage In
the fictitious name of
Tli A FLAIR at Dade
pa Intends to register
th.. Clerk of the i ii -
Dade Countv. Florida.
Til K. MAN. INC. .
a Fla. Corp..
Sole Owner
INS( >N
Applicant
rU"1 "ff/IO. 11/1-13-20
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLOR-
DA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
IN CHANCERY
No. WC 9975
IRMA FAI.K.
Plaintiff,
vs.
THOMAS FAI.K,
n'ot'Ic'e'bY PUBLICATION
TO: THOMAS FAI.K.
12 Plnecone I-ane
Westbury. New York ______
YOU ARE IIERKBY M .TIF1ED to
serve a copy f your W|W*r to tlte
BUI of Complaint for Divorce fllefl
ag Inst yotl. OB Plaintiff's atlorneys.
BERNSTEIN MILI.KK. CongreM
BuUdlng, Miami 32, Fk.r da.and to
file the original thereof lth the
Clerk of the above Court. ."" "r. ~-
fore the 23rd day of November. 19a.
otherwise I'.cree Pro Cnfesso will
of the Clrc.il Coi.it.
(seal) By: JOAN BNBBDEM.
'''" Deputy Clerk
10/23-3U, 1V-1S
Building Outlays
Boost Economy
Outlays for maintenance, mod-
ernization, and additions to exist-
ing homes, while not included in
new construction totals, provide
an imrjortant market for products
of building materials compa-
nies ...
These expenditures are be-
lieved to have moved ahead at
a rate of about 10 percent a year
in the past few years, and a con-
tinued advance may be expected
in future years .
More immediately, such expend-
itures should respond to the im-
provement in general economic
activity. Much of this business is
not affected* by changes in the
availability of credit .
Meanwhile, sales of original
equipment passenger car parts
should show a substantial year-to-
year gain for 1959 With the
combination of the first spring
sales upturn in four years and the
threat of a steel strike encourag-
ing the parent industry to build
up dealer stocks, Standard and
Poor's reports that production to
date hag been some 48 percent
above the year-earlier experience.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
Fi FVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
NO. 59CI0375
ROBERT ALTON BISHOP
Plaintiff
AMANDA' I.OBISE BISHOP
""'SUt" FOR DIVORCE
TO- AMANDA I.OPIffE RISHOP
You are herel v notified that a Bill
./SUM '- **sr* ta.b1S!
the
Court on
December.
,'' vou 'fail to do so. Judgment
. ,,fnu.t will be taken gainst vou
..|ief demanded 1
of th- Clerk "f the (Ircult
, before the 7th day of
or be for
%:r;^"Si,,ii .ic puhhshe,, o-e
each week for four """*&$ W**"'
.}"}} Ail1 >.k ,i.,v of November,
each
I
la INK
Florida, this
A.I'. \-'^'
Circuit
(seal)
..KVrllKHMAN. Ogrfc
Deputy Clerk
11/6-13
Races Telecast in Color
WCKT, eh. 7 in Miami, will origi-
nate to the NBC Television Net-
work seven feature races from Hi-
aleah Race Course, during the com-
ing winter season, four of them in
color. In making the announce-
ment. Niles Trammell, WCKT1
president, said that NBC will send
its mobile color unit to Miami in
time to pick up four races in Feb-
ruary, the most valuable of the
Hialeah Stakes calendar. These
four will be fed to the entire net-
work on successive Saturdays.
CIRCUIT COURT, 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCU.T, DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
No. SKC 9908
ANNE MAK 1. KM IKE,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ALBERT Q, I.KMIRE, ORANGE
kKADTY. Inc., a New Hampshire
corporation, and JOHN T. HoND,
Defendants.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
YOP, ADIIERT pike Road, Auburn. New Hampshire,
are notified to serve a copy of your
Answer to the Complaint tor Alimony
Inconnectod with Divorce on plain-
tiff's attorney. IIARItY HiU'SICN,
.105 Rlscayne Building. Miami, Flor-
ida, and file the original with the
Clerk of the above styled Court, on
or before the 23rd day of November,
A.K.. 1959,
DATKI>: October l'.i. 1HS9.
B, B. L.BATHBRMAN, clerk
(seal) By: K. M. I.V.MAN,
Deputy Clerk
10/23-30. 11/6-13
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 59C 3682-K-Prunty
ASENATH FRI8HMAN,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SEYMOUR IRISHMAN,
l efendant.
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
TO: BEYMOl'R FRISHMAN
.ti.ini
BH n< rih l lth Street
l,s.-> Vims. Nevada
1 < >l ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the Final Decree of Divorce
i.i.'ii AflgfuM 3. IS59 entered In the
above Myb a cause has been set aside
and tb:M lh- plaintiff, ASENATH
ritlsilMAN has l^-en permitted to
file this new Notice of Publication
rainsilLUtlng said sbit. You are fur-
ther notified that an Amended Bill of
Complsfht *for Dlvoroe has been filed
against you In this cause and you are
hereby., rej^ci red to serve a copy of
your Answer or .other pleading to
Amended UiH or Complaint on plain-
tiffs attorney, MIL/TON A. kkii:i>-
MAN. 1111 Alnslev Bulldlne, Miami
IS, Florida, and file the original with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or
before the 7th day of December, 19a9.
or Judgment by default will be taken
ajtnfnst you. You are hereby further
notified that said Amended Rill of
Complaint also prays for title to the
following descrlls-d property to be-
come vested solely In your plaintiff,
ASENATH FRISHMAN: Ix>t 9, Block
2. CRYSTAL V1KW, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
12 at Page 47 of the Public Records
of Dade County. Florida: also known
as sriSD Crystal View Court, Miami.
Dade County. Florida.
DATED this 30th day of October,
1959, at Miami. Dade f'o'in'v. Plot Ida.
B. B. DEATHERMAN, Clerk,
Circuit Court, Hale Countv. Florida
(seal) By: K M I.YM \\
Deputy Clerk.
MILTON A. FRIFDMAN
Attorney for Plaintiff
111 Alnsley Hide.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
basiness under the fictitious name of
BOUND BAUDS at 18 W.B, 7th St..
Intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
SAMUEL H III.OCH
10/23-30, ll/C-13
Miami 32. Florida
PR 1-OeM
LE3AL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
F'CTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY C.IVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
JOHN'S APTO RADIATOR SERVICE
at 3''7t N.W. -ilth Street. Miami in-
tends to register ssld name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
'"'"""> Florlda- DAVEUN. INC.
HKNRY NORTON
\ttornev for Applicant
1406 Blscayne Building ,..;,,...
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 59C 9274
ELINOR I* L.UCEWICH,
Plaintiff,
.Kisi:i'H LUOBW1CH,
Defendant. ___.,
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
You, JOSEPH I.l I'KWICH. Corner
of I'.rlock Avenue and llrace Avenue,
Perth Anihoy, New Jersey, are re-
to file your answer to the com-
plaint of divorce with the Clerk of
court and serve a cop]
thereof upon Herman Cohen, AttOT-
Hutidlng, Miami,
before December ..
1959. or else complaint will be taken
:,. enf.-sscd. Dated Novembei
K P. LEATHBRMAN, Clerk,
Circuit Court. Dade County Florida
(Mali By: Joan SNBEDEN,
Depnty clerk
11/6-1S-20-27
ll/H-13-20-27
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY C.IVKN that
the underslened, desiring to ngage in
business under the fictitious name of
CAROL FASHIONS al Dade County.
Florida Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade Countv. Flo! ida.
EDWARD A AZBN
Sole Owner
BIDNEY BFRONSON
Attorney for Applicant
241 Security Trust Bldg.
ln/jn. ii '(i-i3-;i
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
FORD VENETIAN BLIND WIN-
DOW SPECIALISTS at 3299 N.W. 7th
Street. Miami 15, Florida Intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County
Florida.
WILLIAM STI'RM \N
Sole Owner
HERMAN I. BRETAN
Attorney for owner
16 S.W. 1st Avenue
10/30, 11/6-W-20
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 475IS-C
IN RE: Estate of
VICTOR GILBERT
Deceased.
NOT.CE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You are hereby notified s,nd re-
quired to present any claims and de-
mands which you may have against
He Batata of VICTOR aiLBtaRT de-
ceased late of Dade County. Florida,
lo the County Judges of 1 >ade County,
and file the same In their offices In
the Countv Courthouse in Dade Coun-
ty. Florida, within eight smlendar
months from the date of the first
publication hereof, or the same will
be barred.
kvf.lyn i;ii.ih:rt.
Executrix
HARRY ZUKERNICK, Attorney
IL'O Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach
10/23-30. 11/6-1S
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 47739-C
IN RE: Estate of
Isaac HOFFMAN
1 creased.
NOT.CE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and AD Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
Yon, and each of you, are hereby
notified and required [o present any
claim* and demands which you, or
either of you, may have agalnat the
estate of ISAAC HOFFMAN deceased
late of Dade County, FTorkla. to the
Hon. George T. Clark, County Judge
of Dade County, and file the same In
his office In the County Courthouse
In Dade County, Florida, within eight
calendar months from the date of the
first publication hereof. Said claims
..t deflsenda to contain the legal ad-
Jreas of the claimant and to be sworn
to and prevented as aforesaid, or
same will lie barred. See Section 120
of the 1933 Probate Act.
Date October 2u, A.D. 19.">9.
MILTON It M ANMIF.l.MER, As
.Executor of the I*ist Will and Testa-
ment of Isaac Hoffman. Deceased.
KOVNER MANNHBIMER
Attorneys for Executor
10/23-30,11'6-13
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 47698-C
IN RE: Estate of
I Ol'ISK SCHCMAN'N
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You are hereby notified and re-
quired to present any claims and de-
mands which you may have against
the estate of I/ll'ISK SCIU.MANN
deceased late of Dade County, Flor-
ida, to the County Judges of Dade
County, and file Ihe game In their
Offices in the County Courthouse in
Dade County. Florida, within eight
calendar months from the date of the
first publication hereof, or the same
will be Isirred.
ROSE L. TI'CKER. ISvccutrlx
Estate of Louise Schumann,
deceased.
First publication of this notice on
October 23.
W, KHNT JAMESON
Attorney-
net N.W. 36th Street
10/23-30. 11/6-13
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious names of
GOLDEN GLADES TV SERVICE and
GOLDEN GLADES TELEVISION
SERVICE at 7r,:, N.E. lR7th
North Miami Beach, Florida Intends
to register said names with the Clerk
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florlda.
MONROE REESE
KnVNER & MANN11EIMER
Attorneys for Monroe Reese
10/23-30. 11/6-1S
ATTENTION ATTORNEYS!
CORPORATION OUTFITS
Lowest Prices Quickest Delivery
in South Florida
Call THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN at
I'll 3-4605


Page 12-C
*Ai*t>fkr*M!*r}
Frid
cy.
a magnificent tribute to the memory of departed loved
00ft

rift**

* NAT IS TIE HETMI IF Hllil
II TIE HillII uisaiEw?
Each chamber, or crypt, ha* fresh
ir circulating through it. always.
This make* possible the most fa-
vorable conditions for the contin-
ued safe-keeping of your loved
ones. No other form of buna) offers
more complete protection than that
available in Mount Nebo's beauti-
ful Community Mausoleum.
NT AM* Clllll MULT
Above-jrround burial fulfills a heart-
felt want, the peace of mind that
comes from knowing that your
departsd loved ones rest securely
in the permanent protection of
beautiful chambers. ABOVE the
earth. From the Bible and from
history from the Cave of Mach-
pelahto our modern mausoleum*1
e see that above-ground en-
tombment affords the highest trib-
ute we can pay to those whose
memory we wish to honor.
NEIE fill IT IE IICATEI?
The Community Mausoleum will
be located in a' Urge, beautifullv
Undscsped area Section 9\ of
Mount Nebo Cemetery. Mount
Nebo Cemetery i* in the heart of
Miami for convenience and acces-
sibility from every direction bv car
or bus Miami. oldest and most
beautiful. Mount Nebo recog-
"*** one of the country's lead-
ing, exclusively Jewish cemetery.
_ NIlMtEilUITII?
When completed. Mount Nebo's
Community Mausoleum will coo-
tain 624 Crypts. 4 Family Rooms
and a Columbarium. The first unit
of the Mausoleum contains 144
Crvpu and Family Room It will
be bushed in unit* and those who
make selections now will benefit
in oot n price and choice of location.
NAT IF TM SMO IS IEEKI KFME
miAmaiBFiuTCMirtnEi?
Temporary above-ground burial
space m avaOable now if the need
for it should anse before the entire
Mausoleum is completed In any
eaa*. now i* the time to reserve
K*v apart menu in the CommuniUr
ausoteum. so that you will ndt
be faced with the effort and ex-
pense of burial arrangements
at *-^** **" **** "** ab*
to cope with them. Your inquiries
are most welcome and will be
answered promptly.
Family Crypts are a Definite
The Talmud is replete with deaxriptiom
of Kuchin Crypt*}. Evan dimension* far
family room*) were given in cubit*, to
contain the number required for various
family need*. They were small rooms with-
out windows, hewn out of the rock, or in
the walk of caves. The surrounding area
was beautifully landscaped, and won for
the Jewish cemeteries the admiration of
theRornans.whosposwofthemse**hortua
(Garden of the Jew>. So
NOW...
above-ground
burials are
available at the
beautiful tiew
i 1 i ] S N

^^^^____
I ^ir^ 1 ^lr^l
Architect s sketch of rp.cal rtm,\, Room
COMMUNITY
MAUSOLEUM
This may surprise you. If you can afford conventional!
burial for your departed loved ones, you can NOW sMI
honor them with above-ground burial, in the protection dt
ventilated chambers, within the most magnificent of alls
leums. This is now possible, at the average cost of earth I
... if you act promptly to become one of the privileged o
of the preferred burial apartments in Mount Nebo's net!
munity Mausoleum. HOW is this possible? How can '
ment in a majestic marble mausoleum, usually assoaai
the wealthy and famous, now be brought within the te
virtually every Jewish family? Consider the earth burial i
that do not exist in above-ground burial. You save thu
of a cemetery lot, preparation of graves, vaults,
and care of the burial lot.
I
YOU HAVEONIYONEI
... fke cast *l *** i
ft* riasi.ni Mssmswb. *]
sprJ r~r "ViS.l
price. Aft*
sea* east. Osly esrh


fla-fet
Act Today
Part of the Jewish Tradition
attractive were they, that in earlier days,
it -reported to Km, Neborh^meaaar
of^Babylor. -Tha b^ gromda m
Jerusalem are fairer than Royal Palacea."
The family plot in the i.....>, at.-
*""* *tion private room in the
WMawaVum, are tanfstas aspects of th.
bef in -HoAoro. Haneiesh."
nrvrval of the soul, and the
of the family as an entity
ouht mem ccMCTERr Miami's most butiful xclustvty Jmwish Ctnt
MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY
5508 N. W. 3rd Street, M". FU>n^
"lease tend me. without
Community
Mrtfrde*^^]
jONiSTAT


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PAGE 1

Page 6-C +Jmist>nt>rk**r> Frid <7. No^i Two Years of Progress f Continued from Page 4 C gratifying measure of initial success, evidenced by the fact that the number of lull time e.iucators in our iwngmtttm has increased In at least one thud since the lncnni.il. and the curve is .-till ri-ing." The In ion's Department of Jewish Education has increased ami Intensified Ka schedule of I'.isonal contact with teachers. principals, hoards (4 education and rabbis, and in the past year. •very region has had at least DM I nion sponsored Matt visit, according to Dr. Eisendrath The department has pressed e\or> where for the expansion an.l strengthening of teaching per 3,000 Due Continued from Page 1-C will hear a debate between Rabbi David H Wice. of Rodeph Shalom, and kits* O Sigal. of MM Qa*, a leading layman of the Union's hoard of trustees, on whether \ i v or Cads tor Reform Jew las. Prod The fumr.! debate on Who is a le aril !v v:\ore.i afternoon businev -. on aj Net SBM alien preclude A'fred R Raohrsch. p:< N and Rabbi Mi\ Nusshaum. -pie Israel ii Calif Uae a nl xmt %  ..irman af the I of tr. succeed Solomon B Eisner, of M Headquartethe tMa> convention will be a: the FDntatReblcaw The S and Brotherhood me* aa Brian MM ftateaan brail sonnel. Since the Ukf biennial. the UBden has established teach er training colleges in Miami and Philadelphia, making a total of five such institutions assisting the Reform movement. The oth %  ft are located in Los Anfetes, Men York oty. and Chicago. The department has also initiated a program for lay leaders in Jewi-h education: the national lead arship Training Institute, a sew event for members of boards of education, is being inaugurated this year; and the Religious Education Newsletter, a period.cal to inform and guide laymen in the ^ 300-bed general hospital of Kupat Holim. on a 70-acre site, where palm tre* *J field, was launched last year. the Histadrut medical network, wan officially vegetation is being planted toartif Services to temple schools are dedicated in Beersheba on Oct. 20 by David desert winds and sand. Situated ma. geared to various age and interDubinsky. president of the International Ladies' of the Negate, the hospital will ht*.i *-l Garment Workers Union. The new hospital, the Kupat Holim health service col which is to include a nurses training school, peccant of Israel's entire popu]atk.( maternity pavilion, pediatrics ward, and other boo af hospital facilities and medknlis. facilities, will cost S5.500.000, of which SI.000.Kupat Holim is financed in part brad 000 in cash has already been contributed by Histadrut campaign of the noticed* Dubinsky's union The institution is situated for Labor Israel. items. Among these, the maga rine Keeping Posted dwyrned J^ m UsieS WlH CoB lt AZOTCS for young people attending grades seven through 12. has met with an unusually positive response. ginning with youngsters in kin dergarten and continuing through huh aokaasV the Union in the last two years has published a long list of books, periodicals, educational play materials, and other Building Plan Continued frcm Paoe J-C under S2.CO0.000. Constructions •tea be-efi! other cities. Mi ami and Chicago among them, through the planned expenditure of another $3.000 000 The Union of American Hebrew Congregations I* America's oldest national federation oTsynagogucs. embracing at the present time 585 Reform temples in the United States and Canada The Hebrew Union ColVgeBB. Insutute of Religion is the emrkf's oldest existing rabbinical seminary with branches of the school in New York. Cincinnati and Lo* Angeles. the nature of ranean cruise. NEW YORK—The Em Lines* j lrtv at Nantes, rslma de Malls, .a The Israel aad fat. | passenger steamships. Israel end nd GihralUr. 1855 and 195S, cad u Zion. will rail regularly at Ponta With PooU Delgada added to 300 passengers m Rnti Delgada. m the Azores, on aU j their itinerary, tthe American-, ists classes. The sacsan] ages from New York to Haifa I""*** Shipping Company said, ly air conditioned, ami beg-nning with the sailing of Feb. the Israel and Zion will always be staterooms, four loop] 2. i960, it was announced here by I taking the mild Southern rente to tiled outdoor swiauuaji | the American Israeli Shipping the Mediterranean. The roend-trip are equipped witt Company. Inc.. U S represents voyage by these ships will be in reduce rolling. tire of the Zim Lines. The two liners, which maintain year round service between New York and Israel and other Mediterranean ports, sad from here every thud week. They will be arr.ving at Ponta Delgada on the sixth day out of New York, and will remain there for about half a day. allowing ample time for sightseeing ashore. Other ports of call on the Eastbound voyage are Gibraltar. Piraeus and Haifa. Westbound, the vessels call reajeGETTING THE JOB DONE NEW YORK — Rabbi Pinchas Stoaser. of New York Cay. has been appealed national youth director, it was itineaaacul Wednesday by Moses I. Feeerstean. president of the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of and Harold H Boxer, chau •.he I 'aeon's Youth 0 LET'S RE-ELECT OTIS W. SHIVER **— ahajeneabnvTlSr ofS • Tril A ow. Or tanres lwanr tree ianle ******* s aas f,gi *a> TvJ Aver HW First Clasa ^eaa Beeston aad) Heat



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Pogss 12-A >Jewist>nor***n Beth El Congregation to Burn Mortgage At Festive Dinner Ceremony Sunday Eve Sunday night will mark the reahzatrBrrof a AM started many years ago at Congregation Beth El where, at a festive dinner, the mortgage of the congregation will be burned. Beth El. originally known as IDami Jewish Orthodox Congrega also purchased, and in 1946. the presee*. school was built. Together with the Dora Aueust Memorial Hall. The Berkowitr Patio was built re MM. completing its pres eat structure. Some of the active members during the early years of the con gregation's history were tion. started in a modest building -_-v ^ Pepper. Max Rap? t." ^ST"*/.?? Japort Nathan Adetoan. Hy R.fas. J. Louis Shocbet. Miles Baer. Al Pallot. Max Kupperstein. and Ger building for $25 a month, and subsequently purchasing the building for a small sum. Before leeta. Hie facilities proved too small for its growing membership, and Hie property on SW 17th ave. and 6th st. was acquired. On May !. 1W. Hie cornerstone was laid by Mr. and Mrs. Abe Pepper for the synagogue which now stands there. Pepper was treasurer of Hie congregation. W it h o u t classrooms, Beth El's Hebrew school still met at the old building. To meet the increasing need of the congregation, the property on the 5th st. side of 17th ave. was M. SAMUU CKAHD Education Expert To Speak Here Dr. Samuel Grand, director of experimental education and audiovisual aid< of the Union of Amen car. Hebrew Congregat.ons. will lecture before the Bureau of Jewish Education on Wednesday evening at 8 30 p m He will be a guest speaker before the College of Jewish Studies{ at the Bureau of Jewish Education bldg.. 135 NW 3rd ave. His subject will be "Use of Motion Pictures. Records. Filmstnps. and Flannelboard Materials in the Jew.-h Classroom." Dr. Grand is credited with developing the first series of filmstrips in use in Jewish religious schools. He is author of the picture book. "The Jewish Settlement JI New Amsterdam—1854," "Palestine and the Jewish School." Audio Vi-ual Education in the Jewish Religious School." and nu merous articles in Jewish educa tional magazines. Dr. Grand was the recipient of the Lean Socolow fellowship award j from the Hebrew University of! Jerusalem Recently. Dr. Grand spent five months in B ee o p t and Israel. lecturing at the Hebrew University and before teacher groups in Israel, Italy, France. Holland and England. Iner was spiritual leader. H M lener was spiritual leader. H. M Drevich was the congregation president, and Mrs Buckstem was Sisterhood president. BerkowiU. the current president has been one of the main leaders of the congregation down through the years. Today Beth El. with a membership of over 200. has a religious and cultural program. Under 'he spiritual leadership of Rabbi Solomon Schiff. it has ex panded facilities for all age groups, offering a Sunday and Hebrew school, as well as a post graduate class, a junior congregation, and a Sunday morning Tfilin Club. The schools serve the children of the community from the ages of 6 to 15 The Berfcowrrz Cub Scout Pack 5M and Boy Scout troop SM, whose number coincide* with the congregation's address, 5M SW 17th ave., has recently boon formed in honor of Beth El president. The congregation also has a thriving Sisterhood, as well as a Men's Club. Young Couoles Club, and Young Adults Club among its affiliates. The Hebrew and Sunday school are served by five classrooms, and the sanctuary has recently been air-conditioned, and has a seating capacity of 500. Officers of the congregation in addition to Berkowitz. are Abe Chid, first vice president; Abe Pepper, second vice president: Sam Phillips, recording secretary: Hyman Chabncr. treasurer. Sisterhood officers are Mesdames Jack Shapiro, president.Max. Rappaport. first vice president: Sam Siegal. second vice president: Sol Potash, third vice president; Reuben Blaustein, recording secretary: Harry Klein, correspond-' ing secretary; Sam Phillips, treasurer; Arthur Klein, financial secIretary. The committee for Sunday's din Iner include Mrs. Max Rappaport, chairman, Mrs. Jack Shapiro. Mrs. Sam Siegal, and Mrs. Sol Weger The dinner guests will be entertained by Irving Pietrack and his orchestra, fe a t u r i n g Florence Weiss. Beth Am Installs Rabbi Baumgard At Friday Service Rabbi Herbert Baamflard will be installed as spiritual leader of Temple Beth Am at services Friday. S:13 pa. Rabbi Baumgard has served the congregation on a part-time basis since 1956. He was brought to Florida by the Union of American Hebrew Congregations to serve as! director of its South Florida Council. He maintained both peers until recently, when he res i g n e d the directorship. Installing officer will be Rabbi Daniel L. Davis, director of the New York FesV ef Synagogue s Adult Course Opens Tuesday A course on "Marriage and the Family." one of the four given in J the adult education program, will be launched Tuesday evening at Monticeilo Park. Rabbi Max A. Lipschiti. spirit ual leader of the congregation, will conduct an informal discussion on the social needs of the North Miami Beach community Monticello Park Adult Institute also offers a course in "Beginner's Hebrew." taught by Abraham J. Gittleson. education director, every Tuesday morning. 10:30 to j 11-45 am. Noted Hebraist In Talks Here Dr. Hczel Klepfisz, noted author and Hebraist, began a series of lectures on the "Development of the Jewish Prayer Book" on Tuesday at Temple Emanu-El. Dr. Klepfisz' next lecture will be Nov. 17. 8:30 p.m.. at the Bureau of Jewish Education bldg.. 135 NW 3rd ave when be will trace the history and development of the prayer book in a series of five Hebrew lectures. The series is under the auspices of the Bureau of Jewish Education as part of a training program for Hebrew teachers. His lectures will alternate weekly from Temple Emanu-El to the Bureau of Jewish Education bldg. Robert Newman, Beth Am presi dent, said Rabbi Davis win discuss "Understanding Judaism." Rabbi Baumgard served Temple B'nai Israel in Elmont from IMS to 50 as a student at the Hebrew Union College Jewish Institute of Religion in New York. The congregation began with 60 families and had 560 families when Rabbi Baumgard accepted his new duties in Florida in ISM. The Rabbi wee ordained in ltS6 as p re s ident of the Student Body and Palmer Prise winner (outstanding student). He was ele c ted to Beta Gamma Sigma, honorary scholastic society, at the University of Virginia where he obtained a degree m Business Administration in 1M1. He attended law school in 1942 before entering the armed services where for three and one-half years i he served in the Information and Education Department and as assistant to the Jewish chaplain. He began his rabbinical studies in 1M6 and studied in the Department of Semitic*. Colombia University, from 1950 to 1*54. Rabbi Baumgard now serves on the executive board of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, the executive board of the Dede County Council on Community Relations, the board of the GMJCC. and the Florida State Advisory board of the Anti-Defamation League. S/io itespegr, Dr. David fje •" of the Ert2 i aesasa •til meet eadu p.m Mid-East" OnUM One of th worf ,, area* the Middle analyzed in deui! „""s"> of Miimi. Taj, launched Mood*/. Five authorities 10 lectures duriai i stitute on Middle co sponsored by ta the American Al East Studies. Meetings are held a| Lecture HaD on the i 7:30 to 9:30 p.m Pf Charles P. lumb.a rnivtrsitri | nal Affairs, i ries :th an ecci the Middle East Morday and Tuesdij. Establishment of t was discussed by Dr.I Berr.stein. of Prmcflai! Wednesday and %  Religions mi I Middle East" win hi Nov. K and 17 ay Dr.I S. Fatemi, former i Iran to the UN, n. social science at i n s o n Unnrmt>, N. J. On Nov. II ud 11.1 1 Hanna. professor H i | ces. University of florid turc on 'Middle Eatf isms." discussiEf il forms of nauosissMi I the Middle East. :M| jstitutions and relatml, governments. Monday and Toesbfj r ;h:rd week. *.' Dr William B. Ml lessor of history, tail of the Institute, wiH I Middle East is MM Other weeks include He* I servicemen, and podl Ballet Classes For Children >i Cohen Due At Beth David Beth David Institute of Adult Jewish Studies on Wednesday. 9 to 10 p.m.. will feature Rabbi Herman M. Cohen, formerly of Temple Aaron, Minneapolis, Minn., in a discourse based on the text Tradesignating "her as chairman of the dition and Change." edited by Dr. hospitality programs Mordecai Waxman Air Force Group To Meet S Jewish Activities Group of the Other event Homestead Air Force Base will be guests of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Oritt at a breakafst Sunday morning at the Seville hotel. The social affair will be head on der the auspices of the National Jewish Welfare Board. Armed Services committee for Greater Mi ami, headed by Mrs. Louis GUsser. Mat David Rinzler, president of the Jewish Activities Group, has announced Mrs. Glasser will receive an official certificate of appointment from the National Jew ish Welfare Board headquarters 1SSB WASHINGTON AVE. Miami BoaeH — JE S-1840 Hebrew Retioioua Supp'ie* for Synagogue*. School* A Private Uaa ISRAELI A DOMESTIC G.FTS Classes in ballet and modern dance are now being provided for children at both the Miami and Southwest YMHA. with Judith Youngerman as instructor. Miss Youngerman has been teaching dance in the Greater Miami area for many years. She received her training with Jose Limon. Martha Graham and) others, and holds a degree fromi the Connecticut College of Dance. Classes for children of elemen-: tary school age are held at the! Miami "Y" at 450 SW loth ave... Rabbi Cohen was spiritual leader of Congregation Temple Aaron for 25 years before coming to Miami. Until his arrival here, be was active in many phases of religious i and civic life. He received his Doc-j ear of Divinity in 1953 and Doctor of Hebrew Letters in 1155. %  CJ* Ifedrfor Rabbi Dr. Tibor N. Star* 311 Weohmeeow Ave. eft. B JE MW — JE 1-4150 Men's Club of Temple Nor Tandd will meet Sunday, tarn at Maisel's Crown Room, M2nd st and Collins ave. The breakfast meeting will feature Dr. Jacob Southwest -Y" at 7215 Coral Way | LZZT "" every Thursday afternoon. *************^*, A _. These branches of the Greater R E P H U N S HEBREW' Miami Jewish Community Center 1. J 1 """"j e beneficiary agencies of the J BOOK STORE rtitaMi FlinH Btwi thn Itbn*iwh r^l a. United Fund and eraUon. the Jewish FedISRAEll RELIGIOUS STORE All E MUW SEPPUIS f0 STEAMMeVS I J eWUE SOftMS 13S7 WASHINGTON AVE. JE 1-7722 •"PSMy Heuee in Greater Miami WWUSUI ^ MTM % Complete Line of Hebrew Suppt,*. J •er Synagogue.. Hebrew an* 4 **"")F Schoole OIFTS and NOVELTIES 417 Weebeayto. Ave. — ISRAEL Te Lit* s*> Hearts We Lewve Behind ... If W Live Forever! Brand The oV*"*" '' to the "fW •" GEO*a5 TOnreT^ M 136S S.W. BM^ Sunday, „ 11 AJtet with lab* *•"*" */4 t P-mfUM* Imttpk I RorAeweajr eMMEB L MeUML 2 sa, rUbbs B Uon He e A. rwTBsr AS, 2 %  Sfrf/ rUM Soloes "May TW Seeds Rrpewe Bcermaa PseSCeT* MHersee l-eaiy Mr 8rd loved ^e. T ** — rmwesaw Galbut The ctKea*" 1 K -wras^vef! USSCi waeMsoBJ Sunday, HUM* -** 1 .Htlabe"" 1 •fM"i • ewB"**'' *^| •eecn T-d-wof **•• bwrit or and Abr mi si' ZZ4



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Page 16A +JeistncrkMan Frid ^ German Sentenced to Prison For Slanderous Remark to Jew FRANKFURT — (JTA) — Karl Sontheimer. 27. was sentenced to four mdnths Of imprisonment ttrts week and fined 100 marks for slandering a Jewish taxi driver in Wunsiddel. The court found Sontheimer guilty of having shouted at Fritz Oesterreicher: "Hflfl Hitler. They must have forgotten to gas you during the Third Reich." The incident took place in a restaurant here. During the trial, several witnesses who pleaded a "loss cf memory." testified only after being reminded by the judge that they were under oath. Rudolf Treffurth. 52. a trade school teacher in New Ulm, was under arrest again Monday on charges of libelling Jews. A lower court released him from custody last week following his first arrest after he accused Jews of ritual murder and of assaulting "blonde German women." The Memmmgen circuit court ordered his re-arrest. Trial of Karl Chcnieleswski, 56year-old former commander of the Muthu*rt-Gus*n concentration camp, on charges e* torture and murder of several thawsand prisoners will begin in January in the Ansbach Circuit Court, it was announced here. During preliminary investigations extending over three years, the prosecution sought repeatedly to have the number of charges in the indictment reduced to save time and simplify the trial. The former SS leader will be tried for "only" about 1M crimes, the prosecution said. More than 3M witnesses from Germany and abroad have given testimony so far. Exhumations of the bodies of vie tims of the Mauthausen death camp have been halted and ih>French Commission dealing with the problem is reconsidering the .entire matter. A French proposal to erect a mausoleum at Mauthau ; sen in which would be interred the thousands of skeletons sull lying in the Mauthousen camp garage has been withdrawn. The question of disposition of the remains win be put before the World Rabbinical ( C ouncil m Jerusalem for a deci sion. Meanwhile, in Munich. Dr Maxlmillian Merten. Nazi war cnmi nal who has been charged with deporting 50.000 Greek Jews to Nazi annihilation camps and with looting Jewish property, was arrested upon his arrival from Greece where he was released last week under an amnesty law for Nazi prisoners. He was sentenced in Greece to 25 years' imprisonment. but served only about three years. 'Jewish organizations strongly protested his release. Dr. Merten was arrested as he reached the German border. He will be taken to Berlin for court proceedings. The warrant for his arrest was issued by the West Ger• man authorities two years ago. The West German Government requested that he be returned by the Greek authorities to Germany following his release from the Greek prison. Mrs. Jennie Groearinger. of Miami Beach and New York, has been awarded an honorary Doctor of Humanities degree by Wilberforce University. Presentation waj made in Wilberforce. O. Mrs. Grossinger was made a Fellow of Brandeis University in 1958. Women's Chapter to Meet Coral Gables chapter of B'nai B'rith meet Tuesdav evening at Zamora Jewish Center. UN Agency Raps Arabs UNITED MATIOM8- conference here at which Dr. Prinz presented the German dip lomat with the first copy of a 63page study by the American Jewish Congress entitled "The German Dilemma—An Appraisal of Anti-Semitism. L'ltra Nationalism and Democracy in West Germany." The study reports that Germany has made "immense progress" in %  her development from Nazi dictatorship to the democracy of the Adenauer regime. But it warns {hat while the government has accept cd the obligation to make material amends to the victims of Nazism. anti-Semitism remains a popular sentiment among the German people. SUPERIOR STAMP & SEAL WORKS MANUFACTURES Of RUBBER STAMPS CORPORATION SEALS and SUPPLIES CHARLIE MERZ, Owner NOW LOCATED AT 613 Hi. 1st Ave. FR 4-1034 HERBERT DIAMOND ENDORSES When you open a savings account at either of Flagler Federal's two convenient offices you'll receive one of these beautiful gifts* Free. • %  • •/**'• WITH NSW ACCOUNTS OF S60 OR MOM 1. GE ELECTRIC CLOCK with adjuatable ahum ... Accurate and quiet. 2. ARPEGE PERFUME BY LANVIN-Puree atee in beautiful oM and bhek taMfc 3. GENUINE DETECT BATHROOM SCALE in beautiful bathroom MORI WITH NEW ACCOUNTS OF MOO OR BEAUTIFUL 16-PC. SET OF CHINA • W-PC. TABLEWARE SET *jjJJ ELECTRIC COFFEE PERCOLATOR .•8**8KYBALL" GLASSES • h CARAFE • QUART THERMOS BOTTLE. FREE TRANSFER OF FUNDS from anywhere tat MIAMI CITY COMMISSIONER CROUP 3 "VT* State* Just brin in or mail ia your take care of all the detaik. That* ia no charge or red taps• • %  wrf toe. P*. PoJ. AdY. lrt at • ELZad** FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI l* ACCINLIISIIU a. I§ SIM|| „ w fmm ^^ t mm ^ua C



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Pago 10-B **/S/*#**ir •ss* Pearly Gait by Hal Pearl j NAMES MAKE NEWS: Arthur Spiegel, of Miami ADL. makins to address an rn.erfa.ih churehwomen's meetina .n rrg.nl •£"£ community relation* program. He was the hmo %  N *2g H.mhly-the first conference of its kind in the Orlando area In early December he hits A\on Hark u.rhor Mr. and Mrs Bern* Srferman moxing into their new ?.?>"*,;,' Island manse with a neu addition to the family. Richard -Allen lit second kuj ^ ._ L.s and Doris Goldstein retwmed from a trsp re New York, aner looking op old friend, and doing lets of stepping. *'*• bock from Goh.m are Dave and Elaine Lesser. The two couples, homo w. time for ideal golfing weather, rejoining thoir fairway compamem. Stecabroker Tod ond Marge Sow*!I. IT! *** mm ** %  the Normandy Shores course r v ,, take the pressure ofl Bayshore which has been mho) the past si\ weeks Pr and Mrs Lester Bert joining the many couples twosonungr it at the Beach links ._ „ _.. „.. Helen Bennett shooting a neat 86. while playing with Harriet ilH and Mae Saigh at Bayshore The game ol Mrs Leo Fenster and Mrs Maxwell Sajrel *M*Q| mprwed Mi Bea Lapxhis recently rented an apartment %  Manhat-^e their home is here, but they make so many trips to New York. Pr M:ke Gilbert and Joe Weiti golfing together *ute often at -. i swath in the local construction K are Bob Gt HMtSBT and Al Foerster. behind the University Manor" developer* Sol Rabkin. New York APL legal counsel, to discuss litigation in the re on separation of church and state He'll address the Miami Beach B'nai B'nth on Wednesday Also uill talk in Orlando Marcia Shaffer is tow new media director of mo Loo Jay Reeen *rfriung aamcT Loo s brwmor. Harry Rosen, vko p m idiof ol mo Now York Poet, was a recent visitor horo, along with Iko Gollis sports ed of mo some dairy. Sure to he the topper" of the winter social season here: the gala diplomatic ball at the Footaiahleau Dec. S. o rlrn ming Israel's new Ambassador to the CkdM States. Axraham Rinnan MatttJ OR I U a*jonal Assn of leal Estate Boards Tan Eauihm Phi named Leonard Glasser. the architect, to serre as for Florida, imedmatiog uadergrad duties at V of Mmnti I" of Florida. Florida So u ther n and Florida State A kefceopter .vane m handy, right. Lee' n • •OTM SIDES OF THE BAY Henry Tohus. Mag-ume top ranker among the Borsch: Be* entertamment directors, takes over that post Ponume hknn starting Sunday He's composed a —mher of hit ~l Remember Mama." and "Away We Go." Coconwt &r**o FUywaws* aum toti— of steering Robert Q. Ss inou F iR n owaj sKat writ ho T ea on Tweed**. Kio> first TV liiswm BM Loo PtwBi %  M I>I\\FK AM* Mr sic — *r *• Sinking String* %  DM AIITil I R\S COI'RT The T*> TOfrttS M fhf CARRIA6I CLUE Miami .Springs Villa** TV M5I1 Art trows, ce-ewoer NOW THE EMBB DUCll'n plus our i REOPENING FMIDAY, NOV. 12. 4 PAL THI ECS / yy OSM1A FOOOS DIMMERS from *|JK Choico of 17 Main Cowrsos Fro* Wmo. Soltxor A Kfwshos WE RETAIL DELICATESSEN 1141 Wiiminftii AY*. Boaotifwlry Catorod Affairs Coll JE 4-2*55 Ei M m &f •rtinfl'. E|VI BEI ma H^^^B^ BMBBI 245 22N0 ST.MtAMJ M THI HIW ylY PACKAGE O" FLAM IS YOU* *KT tUY MCTAtY LAWS OnSCtVIO SALT ASUGAR F OCEAN ntOMT • I Eggfe • OATS MOV Il-OtC tl 14 OATS MOV. I7-0C It 121 OATS MOV 10-OtC li M OATS NOV. I-OOC Iso—1205 00 10% W STAY t mu* o Looowu *T0* CS>> 145 00 %  CACMOPOOC A*t *: < rr P*'* -S MAttOLO *OOJT and IRVOI GORDON ond PONT •#***. lOtOII C.TIIIilJ PARTRtS CATB9 J ABEL'S 1ESTAUANT ajICj AVENUE WE S41WV* LilTT KOSMEI •***] MfTTVAMS-rtfjJ • • tQNfttt



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Page 4-A rjmist Her**** OFFICE and PLANT — 120 NX. Sixth Street Telephone FR 3-4605 Teletype Communications Miami TWX MM 396 ^^^^ 4 FRED K. SHOCHET E ditor and Publisher LEO MINDLIN Executive Editor ISRAEL BL'REAl' 202 Bra Yehuda — Tel Aviv. Israel RAY U BINDER Correspondent UAHC's General Assembly Greater Miami welcomes the 4.500 delegates from across the cation who axe gathering here this weekend to attend the 45th general assembly of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, the 22nd biennial assembly of the Union's National Federation of Temple Sisterhoods, and other UAHC affiliate meetings. In recognition of the event The Jewish Fkxidian in this issue offers its readers a special supplement depicting the manifold programs of organized Reform Jewry. See Paqes l-eci The renown of the many speakers who will be appearing at the UAHC sessions and the scheduled workshop sessions portend an exciting convention. We take this opportunity of wishing the many delegates arriving in our community success in their deliberations. The JNF Annual Meeting Jewish He :.:r.=: Fund Council of Greater Miami holds its annu.'' a tr.eetmg ThursMee. 19. at the Fontcmeb!eau hoteL •'• %  -; :r.zr. the Jewish community • ha event w.th the vigor that • -" -5 ; ".es beck to the very -Tys of active eficrt c-.ed at the estab,ent of a Jewish republic in Palestine. Virtually from the beginnina. the Jewish National set upon itself the task oi purchasing and am a ssi ng lend for the hacpy day when the Zkm irecar. would become z reality. p 131 G s 4 of acreage had =hecay beer, aoqaked by the JNF was in no 5mail measure responsible for the vitality of ';"e sr -.Hilary defense Israel s early'settiers mustered agennst a seven-nation Arab invasion on Independence Day. The Greater Miami Council is our community s Jewish National Fund representative organization here. Through a relatively new program of wills and bequests. | has taken upon itself the task of extending the range of JNF effectiveness far beyond the greatest as-ens of the day when the famed Blue and White Box of Keren Kayemeth reiqned supreme. Those attending the Nov. 19 meeting here will come away with a more intimate knowledge of Miami's efforts dedicated to the fumDment of mis task. I Israel's New Spokesmen Recollections of the incomparable Abba Ebon as Israel's emissary here are still with us. But the doubts since his resignation have been allayed that the rnan-killing job he held could not be filled. Re cognition of his diplomatic brilliance is cccorded in Israels decision to split the po st of Ambassador to the United Stales and Uzuftod Nations between two forces. Apart from this. Mr. Ebon's successors are "~*im themselves with enviable ^n Arthur Laurie's recent handling of the Israeli position at the UN in the face of vicious attacks by Ahmed Shukairy and Dr. Fawn, the United Arab Republic's big guns there, is a case in point Equally able was Avraham Harmon's oratorical gambits before a Zionist audience in New York some ten days ago. Harmon's warning to the Arab leadership that Israel's eleven years of continued achievement and fiMjiesi make her an infinitely more difficult military objective to challenge and conquer than ever before contains the razor of h i storic a l perceptivenees that rais e d his predecessor's diplomacy to levels of sheer poetry. For a email nation. Israel certainly seems to suffer no lack of ardent spekesmen capable of meeting the prestige and know-how of their In this, the Jewish State is certainly !%  >- *"*•' V*, J rwi *%J????? t t .• %  %  nan BSREmFtt&TmSSrt^ ts^J^TH^s^. ~~ ^-r Volume 33 Number 46 Fridav November 13. 1959 *12 Heshvan 5720 A LISSOM IN POLITICS American Education Week This is American Education Week. The notio nal oc ea r v aun j is being marked Nov. 8 la 15. We have become particularly sensitized to oar educational needs during the past few yeas. As a people, we recognize increasingly that only a soundly-educated citizenry will prevail over the challenge to our freedom from alien political and er?m>fnir philosophies. But there are those to whom education was among the most exalted values long before the threat from without—to whom scholarship and intellectual achievement have always been a virtue for their own sake. This is certainly true of Jewish communities wherever they may be MttMsksxi Apart from their theological seminaries. American Jewry may point proudly to such Jewisn-sponsored institutions of higher learning as Yeshiva University and its Albert Eonstein college of medicine. Brandeis University and tne recently-established Jewish University of Chicago. These schools add strength to the lifebfood ot our nation's educational process—a nation mcreasingly aware of its profound shortcomings to the same extent that it is rightly prood of its inagnificent achievement, in Uus cnea oi numan endeavor. That achievement shall ultimately gain total aecendancy over shortcoming, is the aoal of Amencan Education Week! ^^ Mortgage-Burning Both El Congregation burns its mortqpne Sunday evening. This i. an cnispiciouT^ccSon for any congregation, since it uvlicasse onrnt eres, o n the part of its tnembersTaedi. *£-?$£& niun£fr^ ttons as a major goal oouga-THt continuing development of a svnagogue as a center of lewishreliofous 2^ ^S^r^S^ ,tS 9azhmat day* will wufr porticukx gaitmcabon. join the rt ^wf am i see U • by U0 MIUDUN man extraction, who escaped Hitler twenty years kaojifc' •MMI Van arrests. Tne Bonn %  niiiimnn — mi JACK I Pn.Tient of ^ Uon Lf J?Ue rf j, %  PPcarasce a> •*> > ; a meethx ADI. raueTTTS to" questissi k, aaturaluee Kmnt^J an he* several Nan arrests. The Bonn government reeeath *. tour the coustry ui his present capacity as a meaas f" extern of the anti-Semitic resurgeece there It wa, h return. *e the CnMed States that Baker eas* t,_ before the Florida ADL. %  Perhaps he had little or so time to digest the nbta. observations, but Baker's report was a confusion tatt* -facts" that made many of his listeners wince It sW his defeose that he warned sis audience a: the sststt happy probability of reaching ary nsskjinstead that he vaguely intended using the talk as a aerwJ board. He would. Baker implied. let the data lead km „j^ eon session af random, with these who heart] fc^ uhimato process of-lerretiag out some sensible Uoa of resurgent German aati-Semiti-uThis may have bees his intentioo, but Baker' ( faa. vent nowhere, nor could his listeners come to any c2 than that he had sent them on an illusory -.i; BJ the ADL executive was fearful of what he nngkt %  retrospect, his report emerged as a ma-. i^ his own fate as a refugee and for the ir.ac:. r. of hu enliC try men who contributed to it. %  SBSI urns or ceanfCTM* saArawr mrenmrni BAKER LABOKIOOSLY TRACED the pjyehie %  fered with respect to his return to Germ any \lsttksSs| town that was the city of his birth, be beheld the ream of the synagogue is shits his father served u rabbi shell of the house where he had lived. Baker traced the iavj be e xp eri en ced on BOW viewing the lonely alley cats tat] among its ruins. This essetsoasl laceration be brosgkthi| climax with a listing of figures spotlighting the seaieoe i| proud German Jewish eossmestty. If there was evidence of restraint ia his erokatMa all ory. the audience could do so less than mark it up w 1 tally sociolotoc hunt for impersonal fact and to kss %  travel the frequentry-vijited path that characterosi %  often unscientific design of contemporar. Jevah In this assumption, his listeners were promptly purged hiissif of the tragic quality of I re-urs. laser | laesched into the presentation of a series of coefhetisg : views designed to shed light oa whether or rot there a i an( The ADL's director of foreign isfsrssatioe bat u --?m\ giuesJ is journalism and the Isssimmuilii But SH icaor ae| cated that it had Bttle effect on the method be adostt %  i he optmoo—a nsrttvd as tracsparert %  km hi semis desire to anile at predeternained cor.ci-s.^es. gy war OF fiamm. ciFiAimmc rm tmxm:suu tJUHATEVER HIS ULTIMATE survey ma> lad duenssed a variety of interviews and offerH tsea as would simply be madmissaUe in profe>s:--.' -u-rm was the mas he had knows years before, who today adsnBnil because he dad enlhmr, daring the Hitler holocaust (• I tunate Jewish frireds. There were the sminrn if %  H emeiab who* earned via heartening and cost the significance of Neo-Nazi youth grour? -' light of the recent eonvortios of the former SS ehe There was eves the Bo oks hop keeper be revi years, who prided himself oe the pirm o al k.ad of be had waged igiisw National Socialism B.: naehm sfl m his report here, did Baker pite—t evidence of as stjett" guarded person-to-pervm sampling of sei sin s reliable picture reflecting cm-rent German their midst. What emerged was s pastiche of prefahrk ateslad ejl no particular direction except perhaps one—a PT*| tent oa justifying the inaction of his former Baker achieved his negative higapsint. when ke counted a German official's explanation of what Semitic literature today "We simply seize and barn it." he esoted the aBrfT Germany today caa eat afford the laxsry of avi.i cern for freedom of the pre ss howe v er emously __*"exercised." And thee, by way of mterpretisz -c **"•*" of democracy eader Bean. Baker explained The te' had three keadred years to sractice liberty 1 wtth as keffswl For still, the r cast him out attracted MteOectually Hence, the vague leseks ef si* rmg ease wuh which he accepted Nan tactics a CUCM OUTKtCKT APPROVAL ef so massive as at "* freedom, be it ia the aame of protecu= Jews them by the sax auBjon. betrayed the ADL execauw IF stability. Twenty years a refugee from a Germany P" this time a catuea ef the eertd's — -*• % %  •* %  frt little. aa** Baker may very eefl be a competeet man • **J f*Pt oa Germany to the Aatf-Defamatisa !>*• "* the sagacity and rigitihlj that the office s hs^J 5*nd Bwf his leak here, lake the last metesteat w Woie W m 1 V ^ W All of which Cerman Jews *^ the street their former levels of bakavaar to ,h *m agaiast this sad pat tong cataoa IPs WeMe. merely ssag eat. "Yos _f n areas Severn, isalsmrd why Baker was s— %  ich brmes to mmd the sad paght ef sJ who cast ge heme agaie. yet wse P*J P Tj ret at what eaee was. Neiiber the •* toeatonsee. ear at werst the -_*^ ivaar k watch their termer country*""^ this sad %  fT—ii— % %  i-fJiLtisa b#w* T r ^



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Pag* 4-C +Jeisi>ncr***"i Friday. Federation of Temple Sisterhoods to CON Will Hold 22nd Biennial Assembly HereJoint Meetings Planned With UAHC Group ,r I OM ol the largest Jew .>h women's org.xnitations in the world, the National Federation el pie S ;*articipa"e :*2n,i biennial assembly which will be Mi at the Eden K hotel Jvnt meetin.ss ::h the parent body, the ricjn Hebrew Or-grega• u:!l be held at th.tainebieau hot. \ M through H Some 1 SW> defecates are expected, i oal president. chairing the con\TOton Theme of the convention is %  New Fr hood." and among those who tll m>v roles are nearly ISO speakers, fomm.tte* chairmen, dwcwssion lej.lerx workshop or seminar consultant* and record 'I coadact Lejierthiff Trat-;mg lnstitntes. The convention will open tats an all-day Adult Study Retreat sponsored by the CAHC The Cams, senses as the patron and parent body of American Reform Judaism in the Western Htmirphert Its 585 mimbir congregations represent a constituency of one mdaWS. UOTOtB SOMTAtn Ssrvmg a co-cea-r=ea of the baronial program committee are %  n Lrroy Glauber. RerkriUe Centre V V a member of the NRB board of directors, and Mrs Alan S Green. Shaker Oeaga u O. a member of the NFTS execunve committee. Mrs. Leopold L Schwartz. Miami Beach, a member af the NFTS hoard of cLrectnrs. n wniag as chj:rrrr %  the arrangements The sembry ta the hgtiUtm aa icy making body of NETS, meets on alternate rears to review the program ami make vital ffrc i mn u concerning a coarse of actMa for the next ran ma The Sisterhood delegates represent more than 100.008 women in 563 chapters throughout the I'm lad Statm and Cuba. Canada, Panama. Netherlands West Iniom. l"nion of Africa. India. Australia and Zealand. Rabbi Jacob P. Rudin. spiritual leader of Temple Beth El Great Neck. N Y. and immediate past president of the Central Conference of American Rabbi's, will speak on "Our World and our Faith Challenge and Response." at the first plenary session on Sunday Following Rabbi Beam's address, three "Idea Seminars" will be held oo The Idea of God—How do Women Teach the Idea of God to Their Children aad in Their Homer" "Sptntualutag the Sabbath." and "The Meaning of Prayer and the Union P iajer Book in oar Lives.** Sn workshops scheduled dnrmg the week will discuss "New Fnad ftaeaag." Yoath Activities" aad "Social Aetaon." Each of the %  Mhj aa p i. well as each of the Idea Seanears, wil he dafar Laadara of the National Federation of Temples Sa UAHC s women's affiliate, atop to pause before irJh 22nd conrentjon m eeting at Eden Roc hotel La, Mia* Jane Evans, NFTS. executive direclot. Ma | aheimar. of Baltimore, former NFTS president eadl_ Monaky. of Los Angelas, current NFTS prtcde^iJ peeled to be renamed for another two-year hm I Role of NFTS in World Of Modern Judaism v throe % %  %  %  a. a w f Jew'— —i, rf Wianim iml ah hscery at a* tame have aaaathe WerM lama far Pracressav* •_phi?e< sa great a rear m arTaaaiim %  ..' %  v\ .r^BBSatm? of ** f _V ** B "*. NT1 *^ •" ** XT TS. the Hhi Us „ Ti*S|^lamimT i tfT+tTn 5S ^TrrrV 'ae^m^jpTi t ^ •*** %  %  ***" %  Ierne f See* Armca. ^HfS,,," !ari< The cerveaoaa wsfl he adetessed on Monday mnramg by Maurice N Eueadrath. •eat af the Umoe of Hebrew Ceagregataeas. aad eg Mixs Jar.e rertar of NFTS. whose sabject will be -ShoaM Caacepts m Program Patterns he A panel amtaasma oa Taesday af the acof the witk whach NFTS is afMmted The Vortd OMsa Reform Spiritual Goals Pat 2-C syaaflogttes apply these principles, a 0eB*naati| established hy the UAHC is 1163 !V| focus of this department aad af the Comaumm a Sail af Reform Jadamm. wham a the advisory aad body for the d c pmt m i a t is h> eacourage the I lautiees a Behml the last Bi-aaiil. same 100 lard thenowe tammiWam. mafemg a total a* i with the aad of the central of the Jewish tradatma to sack i peace, crri tberani aad mter-grsm rcafl Markiag Two Years of Urn* Progrei



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13, 1959 Jewish Fforfrffrtin Page 11-C B CSUtt #f J3l j eased Istt <( iMll [ %  the Coeerj J*_ >-. u< nit at M| the cs_ %  wutfjr. fWMk. i •uaUM frsa IM i eMcatlei kottl t| • km! sal ;--!J>KA\ Ij Saanel GtUsafcl : i %  nwir . 1 < -;i.l 11/8-13-20-27 PUBLICATION T COURT OF THE IC'AL CIRCUIT OF {AND FOR DADE ElN CHANCERY, I S9C 6429 )R DIVORCE Lvenue, York. FBEtlAR, are hereby BUI of Complaint for filed against you, lulred to nerve a copy or Pleading to the t on the plalntlff'i! PERT C. ZBMBL, O tlaml Beach 39, FlororlKlnal Answer or office of the Circuit pfore the 7th day of If you fall to do so, •fault will be taken the relief demanded nplalnt. all be published once r consecutive weeks FLORIDIAN. U>ERED at Miami, fSSth day of October, BATHERMAN. Clerk. Daile County. Florida It II. RICE, JR. Deputy Clerk. CMEL mm BY HENRY LEONARD Florida aim in 11/6-13-20-27 LEGAL NOTICE "When you're ready, just press this button, then the ark and pulpit will disappear and you'll have your full-size basketball court." Ci>iti inf. uwi *ui IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE No. 47645-C IN RK: ffuammml iA' SCHBKS NO/CE TO CREDITORS I'" AM i-i i I Ml |-..|en II i InxWMMMs or Demands Against Said Ifo I art I notl %  % %  ] and required t<> i i claims %  maud* which you may have against if CELIA SCHBNKER, ad 'ate of i lade County, norIda, lo the (' %  mnty .1 ifkies of Dade County, and Hie i Insaaie In tlie.r offici a In t ha < ounty 'o irl ho Dade County, Florida, within calendar months from the dale of tli • first puh'lcati n hereof, or the earn* Will lie i... i n .1 Ai MI.I-II scii I:\KKK. Bttecnter of the Eatate (Vila Schenker, i ieieasewes, his wife, If living Iheli unknown heirs, •s, or gruntees; Harry finiarricd Cohen, living and If dead their .. devisees, legatees, or Itors. trustees, or other natural or cori>oraie. Its by through under lid parties defendant or also all persons having ly Interests In the foled lands, situate, tying Dade County, Florida. ck 1. T W E I. F T II ..INI>IIS, 3rd SECTION. pn according to the Flat orded In Plat Hk 6, of the Public Records tiuntv, Florida." EACH OF TOIL are to serve a copy of to the Complaint to On plaintiffs Attorney EBIdg Miami, Fla., on 7th day of December. the original with the Court otherwise the %  aid complaint .vU1 be %  %  sod by you and each [Jrd day of November, ^ATHKIIMAN, Clerk. H, Dade County, Florid* Deputy Clerk By: K. M. I.Y.MAN. 11/6-13-2 '-'-'7 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Uiat the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under ,the fictitious name of HARRY LEVY *, ASSOCIATES at 1101 Lincoln TOad, Miami Beach, Fla., Intends to maWer said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida^ ^ ARTHUR G. GOTTUEB Attorney for Applicant £20 N.E 2nd AY*. ll/fi-IS-20-27 riCE UNDER lOUS NAME LAW HEREBY GIVEN that A, desiring to engage In the fictitious name of Tli A FLAIR at Dade pa Intends to register th.. Clerk of the i ii Dade Countv. Florida. Til K. MAN. INC. a Fla. Corp.. Sole Owner INS( >N Applicant rU 1 "ff/IO. 11/1-13-20 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 11th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY IN CHANCERY No. WC 9975 IRMA FAI.K. Plaintiff, vs. THOMAS FAI.K, N'OT'IC'E'BY PUBLICATION TO: THOMAS FAI.K. 12 Plnecone I-ane Westbury. New York YOU ARE IIERKBY M .TIF1ED to serve a copy f your W|W*r to tlte BUI of Complaint for Divorce fllefl ag Inst yotl. OB Plaintiff's atlorneys. BERNSTEIN MILI.KK. CongreM BuUdlng, Miami 32, Fk.r da.and to file the original thereof lth the Clerk of the above Court. ."" r ~fore the 23rd day of November. 19a. otherwise I'.cree Pro Cnfesso will of the Clrc.il Coi.it. (seal) By: JOAN BNBBDEM. %  • '" Deputy Clerk 10/23-3U, 1V-1S Building Outlays Boost Economy Outlays for maintenance, modernization, and additions to existing homes, while not included in new construction totals, provide an imrjortant market for products of building materials companies ... These expenditures are believed to have moved ahead at a rate of about 10 percent a year in the past few years, and a continued advance may be expected in future years More immediately, such expenditures should respond to the improvement in general economic activity. Much of this business is not affected* by changes in the availability of credit Meanwhile, sales of original equipment passenger car parts should show a substantial year-toyear gain for 1959 With the combination of the first spring sales upturn in four years and the threat of a steel strike encouraging the parent industry to build up dealer stocks, Standard and Poor's reports that production to date hag been some 48 percent above the year-earlier experience. NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE Fi FVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY. NO. 59CI0375 ROBERT ALTON BISHOP Plaintiff AMANDA' I.OBISE BISHOP ""' SUT" FOR DIVORCE TOAMANDA I.OPIffE RISHOP You are herel v notified that a Bill ./SUM '**sr* ta £. b 1S! the Court on December. ,' % %  vou 'fail to do so. Judgment ,,fnu.t will be taken gainst vou ..|ief demanded 1 of thClerk "f the (Ircult before the 7th day of or be for %  •%:r;^"Si,,ii .ic puhhshe,, o-e each week for four •"""*&$ W **"' .}"}} %  Ail 1 >.k ,i.,v of November, each I la INK Florida, this A.I'. \-'^' Circuit (seal) ..KVrllKHMAN. Ogrfc Deputy Clerk 11/6-13 Races Telecast in Color WCKT, eh. 7 in Miami, will originate to the NBC Television Network seven feature races from Hialeah Race Course, during the coming winter season, four of them in color. In making the announcement. Niles Trammell, WCKT1 president, said that NBC will send its mobile color unit to Miami in time to pick up four races in February, the most valuable of the Hialeah Stakes calendar. These four will be fed to the entire network on successive Saturdays. CIRCUIT COURT, 11TH JUDICIAL CIRCU.T, DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA No. SKC 9908 ANNE MAK 1. KM IKE, Plaintiff, vs. ALBERT Q, I.KMIRE, ORANGE kKADTY. Inc., a New Hampshire corporation, and JOHN T. HoND, Defendants. NOTICE BY PUBLICATION YOP, ADIIERT : October l'.i. 1HS9. B, B. L.BATHBRMAN, clerk (seal) By: K. M. I.V.MAN, Deputy Clerk 10/23-30. 11/6-13 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. 59C 3682-K-Prunty ASENATH FRI8HMAN, Plaintiff, vs. SEYMOUR IRISHMAN, l efendant. NOTICE OF PUBLICATION TO: BEYMOl'R FRISHMAN %  .ti.ini BH N< rih l lth Street l,s.-> Vims. Nevada 1 < >l ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the Final Decree of Divorce i.i.'ii AflgfuM 3. IS59 entered In the above Myb a cause has been set aside and tb:M lhplaintiff, ASENATH ritlsilMAN has l^-en permitted to file this new Notice of Publication rainsilLUtlng said sbit. You are further notified that an Amended Bill of Complsfht *for Dlvoroe has been filed against you In this cause and you are hereby., rej^ci red to serve a copy of your Answer or .other pleading to Amended UiH or Complaint on plaintiffs attorney, MIL/TON A. KKII:I>MAN. 1111 Alnslev Bulldlne, Miami IS, Florida, and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before the 7th day of December, 19a9. or Judgment by default will be taken ajtnfnst you. You are hereby further notified that said Amended Rill of Complaint also prays for title to the following descrlls-d property to become vested solely In your plaintiff, ASENATH FRISHMAN: Ix>t 9, Block 2. CRYSTAL V1KW, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 12 at Page 47 of the Public Records of Dade County. Florida: also known as sriSD Crystal View Court, Miami. Dade County. Florida. DATED this 30th day of October, 1959, at Miami. Dade f'o'in'v. Plot Ida. B. B. DEATHERMAN, Clerk, Circuit Court, Hale Countv. Florida (seal) By: K M I.YM \\ Deputy Clerk. MILTON A. FRIFDMAN Attorney for Plaintiff 111 Alnsley Hide. NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in basiness under the fictitious name of BOUND BAUDS at 18 W.B, 7th St.. Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. SAMUEL H III.OCH 10/23-30, ll/C-13 Miami 32. Florida PR 1-OeM LE3AL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER F'CTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE is HEREBY C.IVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of JOHN'S APTO RADIATOR SERVICE at 3''7t N.W. -ilth Street. Miami intends to register ssld name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade '"'""">• %  Florlda DAVEUN. INC. HKNRY NORTON \ttornev for Applicant 1406 Blscayne Building „,„.„.;,,... IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. 59C 9274 ELINOR I* L.UCEWICH, Plaintiff, .Kisi:i'H LUOBW1CH, Defendant. _., NOTICE BY PUBLICATION You, JOSEPH I.l I'KWICH. Corner of I'.rlock Avenue and llrace Avenue, Perth Anihoy, New Jersey, are reto file your answer to the complaint of divorce with the Clerk of court and serve a cop] thereof upon Herman Cohen, AttOTHutidlng, Miami, before December .. 1959. or else complaint will be taken :,. enf.-sscd. Dated Novembei K P. LEATHBRMAN, Clerk, Circuit Court. Dade County Florida (Mali By: JOAN SNBEDEN, Depnty clerk 11/6-1S-20-27 ll/H-13-20-27 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY C.IVKN that the underslened, desiring to • ngage in business under the fictitious name of CAROL FASHIONS al Dade County. Florida Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade Countv. Flo! ida. EDWARD A AZBN Sole Owner BIDNEY BFRONSON Attorney for Applicant 241 Security Trust Bldg. ln/jn. ii '(i-i3-;i NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of FORD VENETIAN BLIND £ WINDOW SPECIALISTS at 3299 N.W. 7th Street. Miami 15, Florida Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County Florida. WILLIAM STI'RM \N Sole Owner HERMAN I. BRETAN Attorney for owner 16 S.W. 1st Avenue 10/30, 11/6-W-20 IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE No. 475IS-C IN RE: Estate of VICTOR GILBERT Deceased. NOT.CE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persons Having Claims or Demands Against Said Estate: You are hereby notified s,nd required to present any claims and demands which you may have against He Batata of VICTOR aiLBtaRT deceased late of Dade County. Florida, lo the County Judges of 1 >ade County, and file the same In their offices In the Countv Courthouse in Dade County. Florida, within eight smlendar months from the date of the first publication hereof, or the same will be barred. KVF.LYN I;II.IH:RT. Executrix HARRY ZUKERNICK, Attorney IL'O Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach 10/23-30. 11/6-1S IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE No. 47739-C IN RE: Estate of ISAAC HOFFMAN 1 •creased. NOT.CE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and AD Persons Having Claims or Demands Against Said Estate: Yon, and each of you, are hereby notified and required [o p r esent any claim* and demands which you, or either of you, may hav e agalnat the estate of ISAAC HOFFMAN deceased late of Dade County, FTorkla. to the Hon. George T. Clark, County Judge of Dade County, and file the same In his office In the County Courthouse In Dade County, Florida, within eight calendar months from the date of the first publication hereof. Said claims ..t deflsenda to contain the legal adJ r eas of the claimant and to be sworn to and prevented as aforesaid, or same will lie barred. See Section 120 of the 1933 Probate Act. Date October 2u, A.D. 19.">9. MILTON It M ANMIF.l.MER, As .Executor of the I*ist Will and Testament of Isaac Hoffman. Deceased. KOVNER MANNHBIMER Attorneys for Executor 10/23-30,11'6-13 IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE No. 47698-C IN RE: Estate of I Ol'ISK SCHCMAN'N Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persons Having Claims or Demands Against Said Estate: You are hereby notified and required to present any claims and demands which you may have against the estate of I/ll'ISK SCIU.MANN deceased late of Dade County, Florida, to the County Judges of Dade County, and file Ihe game In their Offices in the County Courthouse in Dade County. Florida, within eight calendar months from the date of the first publication hereof, or the same will be Isirred. ROSE L. TI'CKER. ISvccutrlx Estate of Louise Schumann, deceased. First publication of this notice on October 23. W, KHNT JAMESON Attorneynet N.W. 36th Street 10/23-30. 11/6-13 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious names of GOLDEN GLADES TV SERVICE and GOLDEN GLADES TELEVISION SERVICE at 7r,:, N.E. lR7th North Miami Beach, Florida Intends to register said names with the Clerk Circuit Court of Dade County. Florlda. MONROE REESE KnVNER & MANN11EIMER Attorneys for Monroe Reese 10/23-30. 11/6-1S ATTENTION ATTORNEYS! CORPORATION OUTFITS Lowest Prices — Quickest Delivery in South Florida Call THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN at I'll 3-4605



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L, n d. "Wc ovnan s "World One person moving into a new house who can't complain to the builder Sally Goldman may be able "to mention a few things, but since husband Aaron is the builder, he doesn't really have to listen Mrs. Emanuel (Belle) Goldstrich just back from an inspection trip to the U. of Georgia and South Carolina Belle's national regional advisor for Sigma Delta Ky .. Now, she's off to Parents Weekend at the U. of Florida \t" daughter Jill who, by the way, belongs to Alpha Epsilon ena Kaplan returned from an extended summer vacation gsau to celebrate her birthday went Mrs. Harry Orleans and [Doris Also Mrs. Joseph Berger and daughter Bernice ichelor girls' holiday. laze: Daniel Jay, born to Rabbi and Mrs. Arie Becker on The new arrival joins his brother, Alan Lee, 18 months ker is former spiritual leader of Beth Raphael Congregation, ad recently assumed the pulpit of Beth Sholom of Memphis, Danny's great-grandmother is Mrs. Esther Shorstein, of MiLinda Hope, born to Mr. and Mrs. Robert (Sandra) Stone, 820 St., No. Miami Beach, Oct. 20 at St. Francis Hospital arrival, the Stone's first, is the granddaughter of Mrs. Flora 1217 Collins ave., and Mrs. Lillian Green, 1143 SW 22nd ter. t-grandmother is Mrs. Fanny Goodrich, also of 1143 SW 22nd M a switch from ordinary photos are the ones Sid Feldstein has ring around Taken in color at a Halloween party, they dressed as half-angel and half-devil Husband Bob looks fctedly in a tramp's costume Ninety-year-young Mrs. Sarah laving a birthday in New York, where she is living now §Mrs. Irving Ellis and son, Irving, jr., flew up to be on hand for day anal Council of Jewish Women went to college last week at the of Miami—and there were plenty of aching feet that night Blatt, Lola Greenfield, Cele Kemeny, Nanette Mayer, Roddy ra Rochkind and Ann Berman were just a few of the 400 trudg; the campus Was that you, Pete Hirsch, with the chocolate [the Student Union? srtscaster Jack Cummings and Mrs. C. at the Candlelight either night wishing Owen Phillips good luck on the Coconut ayhouse opener Miss K. T. Stevens in before curtain time, and Mrs. William M. Muir entertaining noted author Philip Mrs. W. at still another table ... Dr. and Mrs. Seymour iimenthal—he's the psychologist and marriage counselor—back Dur-day tour of New Orleans While Bess was exploring the Blumenthal busied himself as a participant in an advanced symposium f-towners came to wish Richard Fleischman congratulations ir Mitzvah last Saturday at Temple Israel Richard's the r. and Mrs. Harvey Fleischman, 463 NE 56th ter. Visitors Mrs. Melvin Albert, New Rochelle, N.Y.; Gerson Silvarstein, nswick, N.J.; and Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Silverstein and family, Venezuela. • *• %  Milton Friedman's a sweetie ... He gave the award he won bmbined Jewish Appeal "Thank You" party the other night to Sylvia for her charm bracelet The's award's a paper nd feels like a ton stunning outfit Mrs. William Weintraub wore was made of she brought back from Milan ... The most charming of all: xhing shoes [a six-month-old Dalmatian puppy named Butch for Mr. and Urge Simons' six-year-old daughter. € — and Arnold Greenfield inviting friends to "the garden at Iks," 752 NW 7th st. rd., on Nov. 21 from 4 to 6-ish ... Mr. Bernard (Flora) Supworth out for the first time since his [stay, and dining at the Candlelight Inn ed Dade County Municipal Court Judge Otto Stegemann playiLord in "The Philadelphia Story" at Studio M. dfewjisjli FlloriLdliLan Miami, Florida, Friday, November 13, 1959 Section B J" BUS TOURS AGENCIES Cedars Auxiliary Ball Saturday Saturday is the date the Everglades hotel the place, and 7 p.m. the time for the Inaugural Ball of the Cedars of Lebanon Hospital Auxiliary. The occasion will begin with cocktails at 7, dinner served at 8, and dancing to follow. Gracie Barrie and Paul Gray will be on hand to entertain. There will be no solicitation of funds. Co-chairmen for the event are Mrs. Herschel Leschel and Mrs. Jacob Colsky,while Mrs. Peritz Scheinberg and Mrs. Robert Werner are in charge of tickets. Mrs. Nathaniel Levin is president of the organization. The ball comes as a followup to the groundbreaking ceremonies Sunday at the Cedars of Lebanon Hospital site at NW 12th ave. and 14th st. Mrs. George Simon Qeft) signs up the first "VIP" lor the FJWO Bus Tour on Friday, Nov. 20. Mrs. Joseph Milton, president of Menorah groop of Hadassah (right), will join nearly 100 organization presidents and leaders on the tour of Federation agencies starting 9:30 a.m. 'Seeing is Believing': Women Leaders To Get Insight into Local Welfare Agencies believing" will "Seeing is demonstrated next week for a group of women presidents who will be invited to tour Miami's welfare agencies via air-conditioned buses. The annual "VIP Bus Tour" sponsored by the Federation of Jewish Women's Organizations will be held on Friday, Nov. 20, from 9:15 a.m. to 2:15 p.m., it has been announced by Mrs. Jean C. Lehman, FJWO president. Mrs. George Simon is chairman of the bus tours, which are designed to give some 70 new organization presidents and their executive committees a first-hand opportunity to visit the Federation family of agencies and to watch community service in action. "Last year's bus tours proved such a tremendous success, that we are repeating them again by popular demand," Mrs. Lehman said. Buses will leave from the Federation office, 424 Lincoln In., promptly at 9:15 a.m. An information host will be aboard to brief the women as they approach each be welfare agency. Buses will visit a the Greater Miami Jewish Community Centers, Jewish Home for the Aged, Jewish Vocational Service Workshop, and the new Mt. Sinai Hospital. Executive directors of the Bureau of Jewish Education and Jewish Family and Children's Service will describe their agency functions. Directors and officers of the remaining Federation agencies will also be on hand to conduct tours and to. answer questions. Due to limited seating facilities, Mrs. Simon has urged presidents and their executive women to make reservations early for the bus tour next Friday. BB Council Slates Meeting Here Regular monthly meeting of the North Dade-Broward Council of B'nai B'rith Women will be held Thursday, Nov. 19, 8:15, at Temple Beth Sholem, 1725 Monroe St., Hollywood. Following the meeting, Mrs. Vivian Klein will conduct a program workship. This new Council consists of five chapters of B'nai B'rith, which encompass three in North Dade area, one in Hollywood, and one in Ft. Lauderdale. In charge of information are Mrs. Alvin Wank, president, 1021 NE 154th ter., and Mrs. Mack Sherman, publicity chairman, 17021 NW 8th ct. • • Shoshana chapter of B'nai B'rith Women will hold its annual fall dance at the Saxony hotel on Saturday evening. Oriental wood will prevail, with the highlight of the evening a Chinese auction. In charge of admissions is Mrs. Herbert Brautman, ways and means vice president. Tifereth Jacob Women's Affair Temple Tifereth Jacob Sisterhood will have a membership affair on Monday evening, Nov. 23, at the Temple, 951 Flamingo Way under the direction of Mrs. Josephine Hammel, vice president, who 'will be assisted by Mrs. Harry j "triple premeire" program for the ^f 0 !" ^*^ dng Israel's new Ambassador to the Unitedl States an Harman. Dec. 5 is discussed by ^^^^ Women's Division and the stage manager ^producer fcpecial show which will be a feature ? *• £# JS ft to right) are Mrs. Jack Popick. Micmu Beach Women s D chairman; Mrs. Max Weit*. Greater Miam. -* !"!" fr. Jack Katzman. sponsors chanman and^grand hos br are Jerry Ball (left), stage manager and noted tar "me hoteTproductions. and Wally Wftnger. formerly lount Pictures. 'Eva* fo be Retrieved Sisterhood of Temple Emanu-El will hold its annual Thanksgiving tea Wednesday, 1 p.m., at the Algiers hotel, according to Mrs. Milton Smith, president. Highlight of the event will be a review of the novel, "Eva," by Meyer Levin. Review will be presented by Mrs. Helga Eason, of the Miami Public Library. Beth £1 Sisterhood Dinner Beth El Sisterhood will hold a dinner Sunday evening, 6 p.m., at Dora August Memorial Hall, 500 SW 17th ave. Sinai Women Will Attend Seminar What makes a good volunteer worker? How is leadership training transmitted to the new volunteer? What are the definite responsibilities of a chairman? How can the volunteer program be improved? These and other questions will be answered at a seminar for volunteer chairmen and officers of the Women's Auxiliary of Mt. Sinai Hospital at the Fontainebleau hotel on Friday, Nov. 20. Coffee will precede the meeting which begins promptly at 10 a.m. Mrs. Milton Sirkin, chairman of the seminar, will talk about the general responsibilities" of the chairmen. Volunteer interviewers, Mrs. Roseman. An original musical skit will belDores Frankenthal and Mrs. Berpresented, "Sisterhood Carousel," nard Spector, will discuss the spewritten by Mrs. Louis Bernstein. Participating are: Mesdames Harry Beck, Philip Begun, Ruth Brower, Joseph Gross, Charles Kirsch, Philip Lyons, Albert Levite, Joseph Newman, Jesse Pearl, Jack Wilco, Louis Wine, Sam Weinstein, Mel Weiss, Morrie Wyman and Leon Dorson. On the refreshment committee will be Mrs. Mae Goldman and Mrs. Harry Beck, and in charge of decorations are Mrs. Eugene Abramson, Mrs. Jack Rackear and Mrs. Leon Rubenstem. cific responsibilities and the exact procedure of placement of new volunteers.' Since expansion of the volunteer service program will be increased in the new Mt. Sinai Hosspital, Mrs. PhiliD Lefkowitz, president of the Auxiliary, has called for this orientation so that chairmen in various departments can answer the questions of their workers. Mrs. Edward Roth, general vice president, is in charge of volunteer chairmen, and is assisting Mrs. Sirkin in the coordination of this program. %  1 I •P\ i \



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Page 10-A F 2 3 R 4 | 5 fit B 8 9 A 1 W M N L NI ii n|>2 R L J 1 16 f %  ^rf N "s %  !? %  m E %  cL M E •s e3 T ^^n 21 "of G 23 R %  M |-8 % ft R 1 K| EM PA H S '"sl 1 w 1 EXPLANATIONS TO PUZZU NO. 17 Frida Y. NoTem*, It—A S)M.IU,| when %  wilh the h...i. w .lrtL^EXPLANATIONS ACROSS ,., ^ i but nierelir %  >v : walk saaa "'" i fehi mm •...live. I im. :•!... • %  in.. TA'H I'erty bualni n pel risk that n ) %  'Moi; aim. All IO0 "ft... %  .. defenseless person not nl > •* ,„,! the victim may "' %  I ah.vh tl" ..f a U AT"small >v sees. hi'Id refoae, stnn.ler t. %  nit ckilng '-nd toS ~' lO V Whl h %  •••' T A TTmmJ. •raaV] n". If. thT'l the creorwh elmins hom* lioa reassarm,. M ri-l was Inun Soviet m.*ll AIMSDuJ 1 iyV] lately, nf • ,i .,, | n j^, %  -a miivnin-n: i.l the m.„ i"VJ UsJ 'xi !" J paas e ne. r i rowdi FM u the bus hi i(h Himr" clumall) I IJ\Y f lU "I OUtaaUo la a in* up an iiaanT W e. in .Uin uio NAME ADDRESS CITY PMONt STATE COINWORD PUZZLE NO. 19 WORTH $280 If th.r. are no correct solution, to^the P^'J- £•£"• puule Otnrv.iie prita returni to begmn ng S100 Jacapov. f you with to .libacribe to The Jewish Flor.d.an check the | auare and your paper will .tart immediately. Subicr.pt.on "ice • 15 per year. Q a'O for 3 year. Regular .ubacr.ber. ,nat he owe* them. PINI I" ">•• ^"•"'': %  •'' %  %  '• .. : .... ,,.,;., h.n baking rae the condemnation ..I land HT. "•" new „ :„ ,.: • -J — t.-.I All legal hi. property have P lv hla propertyJi .,,. ,,I,I family homj. rather ,hH,i land that hr BOI OHT Wbicll Is—Y.iu ii. uratrful to a wealthy %  „| who I.ANM'S .'""'.."."viw lob Mr eel,, a J.* for him HAM'S u.nl.l mean • him a Job." which your wealthy miaht not be In a pnolli.ni t., 4 Rules for the COINWORD Contest i fkilvo the pusSle aa yon would any other „,„; wPtS COTTfCt iWm ... thl. week', i _A contet..nt may aubmll aa many entrtea aa he wlihei blank printed In lhl paper. I.ul no inorc than fa.-.linlle of the puaale. No mechanlrally roprodu ate.) roploo o lh* IK M M "I" be accepted, unl.ua lu< i -n^ wbi a MhoTlcal oMoV. In the Word I t—Anyone %  elli-'bU to enter the COINVV'iltl> r.,nte.r exeat ai.li n. !" il*ia lor in.mb.ri of their famllle.) ol The j,.ua n^gj t—A c.ntet..nt may aubmll aa many entries ria he a I.he. on Thtirlhkl -a *_ • %  •— .. %  ..^* K>i> t*k nuira than "||< • \* 'l-slllNl laeued by ihu pa^aZ 7_To aiibmlt an entry, the contentant ahould alUrh !h.n.irple'il a 1-cont pootcard and mall It In time to reach th. IfHXwQt* The Jewish riorl.lUn before mldnlrht of the Sunday e\enini tK.n ..f that week'a puaale. No entrle. rer-lved after 'hit time, ail or delivered by hat.d, will be declared elUlbie Y..u may mail )'•_ In an envel..|o If you wlah. Thla poper la not re|K.n.ible for w^H I deuiyed In the maJJ. 1 a _The Jewlah Horldlan will award a yackp. t prise tn the slaae<4{_ \ViRI puaile. If more than one winning an. %  r.. rived, the mil be divided tHjually among the wlnnera. If no oorre %  i r u diiM will be added to the ne*t week'a prime. are el.a.Vle for lara.ee pr.aeo. See rulea DCADUNE THIS WEEK SUNDAY MIDNIGHT, NOV. 15 Cut along the dotted line, paate on a 3-c.nt poiteard and mail to COINWORD Editor, The Jewnh Fleridian. P.O. Boa 73. Miami I, Fl*. L ..vil.l be atyle loa dira .—Rearular Nbacrlbers to Tha JewUh Floridlaa ho win 1U rrartiti prtao bonva. N,, entries can be returned. The correct answer of eaci peaks"] published In The Jewish Klorldlan. CLUiS ACROSS 1— another* sicnature takes keep a man awake. a lot of prM • am: Cont i.nje to Wear them .. ,, bo sUrl :> roe. .e. and bardly lh,type '> Induce SNU K KHS > When a nartv hunts DflsfP In the | • i.t be wary of hit. tlna other hunters In a thlcktv led area, ne fre<|iiently eees only movement and cannot 1 sure whe"ie ..th." anlI tuv belnr hunte.1. or a human helnaj. 2-lTou'.l be dismayed If a roailn Kl.KW oil "' >..ur hand, aa you I studied it. In a si' BUBW I auraeata win I. and there may he j erreitt ol air rauaed by • • .llrue v.')... !• %  I j;—A T. >AI'Y m.v Increase a man a senso of slf-lm|iortani-e A fawnrd \i dling one. 9— Period in history. 10—A person's hand could be bad T-Specialskill is needed m han21—to a '^S^^^Jp.fft^^J&^Z^TJTl^ arrive*, ihe noteUeeper no s m ho| rtr!nk n( >lc „i„hic ikjuor. beea threatened doesn't fear ,eetenees to create a working firi the envy of her 26—A di.-agreeable one can ruin I,.,„..,„,i t.., h^predaot. He s shrewd frie.uithe gaiety of a party. 14—If a man is unduly so. arguing 27—They're a great bother to a onlv makes h.m more OMtinrheumatic housewife who has to clean the fireplace. l&s-Negativi 28— A man who has all day 17—if he freti about it. this wU hound to be pretty tired. CLUES DOWN 1—Rural householders must some times take measures for off wild deer. 2—Either 3—A regular horse player knows fairly well how each horse 4— Russianvisiting the U.S. on a diplomatic mission return 8-Weird. 15—There may be many before a reluctant divorcee gets over the breakup of her marriage. 17—A collection of valuable heirloom may be haggled over by the heirs borne thinking of many things 18—The average draftee is not ento thusiastic about the i n 5—Scottish no. I the army. 6— Annoying insect. 20—Simple. 7— headlights of an on22—Facility. coming car may confuse a dog 24—" R heingold." an trying to cross the road. opera. en.niKh to know that the public haa I alM.iit something before they will buy It This a p p l ies to CANDT sw.ll as to many other products. S— It's is f.-r the army to %  tockpll. I'.Kl.TS lor years ahead. t uniform <-hanes from time to time; also the leather may I'.i'l.TS are standard, and far-nun* military raqtlhre an ampta Mppll Of .til sllee so there nil nev.r t.a .h..rtajte In case of emerI'tii'v for their equipment IS \ i \|Msrt a IM Sf 1'ITH In a % % %  ill worker*! speech als-ut slum eoadatlasBB. He would s|-ak with and trkjar, and tho.iah tn.re tnan un.l. rly ins PITY—iysthe ].llsbt of slum dwelle-s —the tone of the speech would more prol.al.lv 1Mone of indignation. II—Itrutal treatment makes a doa; fear his master's WHIM, a mood In which he shows greet i-ruelt\ It may culminate In the use of a WHIP, or la brutish kicks and I, SWIFT LUXURIOUS LIVELY SAILING FrtalrraYartMrlMwII Si IvK'andUbwftM] en isute atu-Awaa.il FTM Meiittrraaiaiaaaaflj S.S TbwoofHealasl S.S. ItruiHt* it i 20 Years Ago this Veek > > on *'"" Jf-J '* J** *. Jewish pupils coming from schools London Schools in tzechoslo ... vakia have been ordered to limit where ,he >"gug* of instruction enrollment of Jewish students to *" o"* t*>an Cxech were barred four percent of the total registra completely from Czech schools. WORD LIST AS FOR KIDNEY ACTION AND STONE FORMATION Most doctors ogrea that one way to help prevent formation of kidney ond blodder stone* it to DRINK ENOUGH WATER fight or more glasses of sparkling clear Mountain Valley Water doily, provides abundant fluid for proper kidney action. 1 MILPty ALKAUMt \ VCHLO*IM£-flUE\ NOH-LAXATIVE I I I I J I I I I I I MOUNTAIN VALLEY WATER Phone FR 3-244 301 S.W. 8th St, AOHFSJ Ast ASHES 11KI BEE BMNTHNn RIJNKNU 'MIME .•!.• lAKS .'I..KS CR V.'K .'lt VNK fRIME IDAS ,DATED EASE I \TK|. IV. IIM; V.I'.MlN.i ONAT I'lTi'll I M IMPART IMIMRT IRE i. •' :ER I /IN I MAN.Jl.r. M\NTI.E MERE N A E NO i>R PEA PITCH RA< SKWK!> ED s. iBK \ ED
TT •p.Noc.*r. H 3ANK OJ DADE COUNT ^ |ir srrgl£3 eeaaee: Feaersl 



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13. 1959 fJewlst ncrkflar) Page 9-A M Jack Corner (right) attend recent groundbreaking for new religious school building of the Communjue of Rye, N.Y. The Camera were both first pres^e synagogue and are now honorary life presidents. eir roovina to Miami Beach, the couple were promcKric leaders. Corner was 1959 Combined Jewish iainnan in Greater Miami B'rith Chief Urges Action ihalf of Soviet Jewish Life from Pag* 1-A %  bly on the cultural HM Soviet Jewish Katt declared. House several weeks B'nai B'rith that the I had questioned Mr. on the status of Rusthat the Soviet Prenied they were treated Irom other nationality Soviet Union. [ the delegates that "the ppiinR of Jewish life in Union cannot be disi merely saying it does He said there is "adective evidence" that rg are denied the rights tionality groups and "as it situation endures, it ar active concern." As|t the policy of discrim'government imposed," frith president said its aspijrxiate every pos| Jewish cultural and re[in the USSR." ibassador Avraham pd the delegates that Isonal elections of last ted the "complete selfof Israelis that their exist is an unshakable ily and economically." nee, he said, was evi[fact that foreign policy "practically no part" aign or election results. ^s made their choice on %  sues, including that of form, Harman said. 'positive aspect" of the elections, the Ambassador said, was that none of the lists which made their political appeals directly to the ethnic beckgrounds of Israel's immigrants get into the Parliament. This, he declared, was demonstrable proof that Israel's "mixed multitudes mr* successfully under going a tremendous transformation from rootless people to rooted citizens." While he characterized Israel's relations with the Arab states as still "negative on their (Arab) parf," he predicted" that "the day of positive relsttans'ls just a question of time—if we use time advantageously, to strengthen the roots of IsrajM." <-This was being accomplished through increased economic development and foreign exports, Mr. Harman said, pointing out that in the first nine months of this year Israel's exports have increased 17 percent accompanied by a decrease in imports. The conference honored the B'nai B'rith president with the establishment of a Label A. Katz Youth Fellowship. The presentation was made to Mr. Katz by PaulKapelow of New Orleans, chairman of the B'nai B'rith Foundation. Heart Director Resigns Dr. Robert J. Boucek, president of the Heart Assn. of Greater Miami, has announced the resignation of James E. Blozie as executive director of the local Heart Assn. IfT'S BREAK THE CLOSED CIRCUIT COMMISSION MURRAY Z. KLEIN For CITY COMMISSIONER, Group 3 FLORIDA BORN VETERAN ATTORNEY BUSINESSMAN PULL LEVER 15A S\ will publish a report to die public within on the progress, plans and financial means of our Port City Hall and Interama Projects. URRAY Z. KLEIN oil T.V. Channel 4, 11:40 P.M. Nov. 16 Channel 7, 12:20 A.M. Nov. 17 "A machine is a clique by another name Pd. rol. Adv. B-G to Battle for Electoral System Change JERUSALEM—(JTA>—Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion announced this week that he intended to use the increased political strength of his Mapai Party-among other objectives-for a renewal of his battle to change Israel's proportion representation system of elections. In an interview immediately —— after the elections for Israel's fourth Knesset, in which Mapai increased its 40 seats, the Prime Minister said he would give preference in forming the next coalition government to those parties which, like Mapai, favored a change. The Prime Minister has been urging the electorate since statehood to give his party a majority so that the election method could be changed to one along American anfl British lines in which the voter votes for a candidate and not a party list. Although actual negotiation* en a new coalition are still two weeks away. Initial maneuvering*, including Ben-Ourion's statement, began almost Immediately after the election. Became of the proportional rep. resent a tion system, complete results on party strengths, as measured by seats, won in the 120-man Knesset continued to remain uncertain. On the basis of some 90 percent of returns, unofficially, the tally was like this: Mapai, from 40 to 46 and possibly to 49; Herut, from 15 to 16 or 17; General Zionists, from 13 to seven or eight; Mapam, stable at nine seats with a loss in total votes; National Religious Party, from 11 to possibly 12; Joint Agudah, steady at six; Communist Party, from six to three; Progressives, from five to six; three proMapai Arab parties, from five to one each. None of the splinter parties was able to amass the minimum one percent needed to retain status as a legal party. They included the community list headed by David Ben-Haroush, self-styled leader of the North African settlers, who carried on his campaign from a jail cell where he is serving a term for participation in the riots in Haifa-last July. Final composition of the new Knesset must await counting of the Army vote, which was expected to follow the general pattern, and readjustment of the party percentages following the elimination of the vote for the doien or so parties that failed to qualify. This was not expected to alter the overall picture materially and it appeared that Mapai, with its long-time ally, the Progressives, and the pro-Mapai Arabs, could obtain a solid Knesset majority in a coalition embracing the Mapam and Achdut Avodah. Jubilant Mapai leaders stressed that the election results considera b 1 y strengthened Ben-Gurion's hand in negotiations for formation of a new coalition. They pointed out, too, that with Mapai's increased strength, it was not restricted in its choice of coalition partners to the left-wing parties. However, observers were confident that the new government Mr. Ben-Gurion will form will have the same components as before—Mapai, the Progresses, Mapam and the Achdut Avodah. The coalition would control some 70 seats in the 120-man Knesset. There were reports that Mr. Ben-Gurion might personally prefer the "cheaper" terms of the badly-beaten General Zionists and of the Religious Party. Most Mapai leaders, however, particularly the younger generation, were reported as convinced that a coalition with Mapam and Achdut Avodah would be more stable, efficient and reasonable in a long-term coalition, even though such a coalition would probably require more concessions from Mapai. Observers said that when Mr. Ben-Gurion resumes office at the head of a new government he will act swiftly on a program to prepare Israel for the time when West German reparations cease and United States government aid diminishes. At the same time, lower European tariffs and a shift of the East-West conflict to the economic field will greatly intensify competition on world markets where Israel must seek expanding sales. Mr. Ben-Gurion, therefore, is expected to seek a wage freeze and abolition of various hidden subsidies, plus higher customs and taxes which may increase prices on the domestic market. Mapai leaders were understood to consider the increased y.ote for their party as a mandate for action and their increased strength in the Knesset as freeing them from undue concern over the opposition from left and right to unpopular changes. Mr. Ben-Gurion summed up the election outcome with the comment that Achdut Avodah—which dropped two or three seats—lost to Herut, which picked up two seats. He said the General Zionists, whose leaders he blamed for the party losses, also lost to Herut. He said also that he was convinced many Herut members voted for Mapai. The apparent slight gain of Mapam, he said, was at the expense of the Communists. He was particularly critical of Gen. Yigal Alon of the Achdut Avodah and Menachem Beigin of Herut. He said the two leaders were wrong in their campaigning and deserved their disappointments. The Prime Minister disclaimed any personal victory and said it was his party which deserved the credit. young Harriets Make Debut Young Marrieds of the Southwest YMHA make their debut Sunday with a social and open house beginning at 8:30 p.m. Dancing, games, discussion, and refreshments will be the order of the evening. The Young Marrieds are the latest addition to the Southwest "Y" adult activities, -and will be conducted as a social and cultural group for young couples under 35. Kenneth Waks, temporary chairman, said that election of permanent officers will be held Nov. 29. Cell-o-zyme A REVELATION IN BEAUTY CULTURE MIAMI CONSERVATORY Founded 1921 Muttie — Drama -— Dance TAUGHT BY QUALIFIED FACULTY OF 24 DIPLOMA COURSES preparing for College and Advanced Music Study, Coaching in opera, light opera, and concert repertoire—Theory—Harmony—Composition—Solfege—Arranging— •* MODERN MUSIC Techniques preparing for all entertainment fields DANCE-lallet, Spanish, and Modern Dance V DRAMA—Acting Technique, Voice Culture, and Body Movement -ADVANCED STUDY WITH MASTER TEACHERS FOR PROfESSfONAlSDEPARTMENT HEADS JOAN STEIN—Music THOMAS ARMOUR—Dance ROY OLIVER—Modern SUSAN JONES—Drama BUSINESS OFFICE: 2973 Coral Way Phone HI 6-2523 Studios: Coral Way; Biscayne Blvd.; Coral Gobies; So. Miami; M Springs I MOST RESPECTFULLY URGE ALL OF MY FRIENDS TO VOTE FOR MAYOR ROBERT KING HIGH HE IS PHYSICALLY, MENTALLY AND MORALLY EQUIPPED TO CARRY ON THE UNFINISHED WORK I SOUGHT TO DO BUT COULDN'T, BECAUSE OF HEALTH. HE HAS NEVER COMPROMISED WITH PRINCIPLE AND HAS FOUGHT FOR THE WELFARE OF ALL THE PEOPLE OF MIAMI. RESPECTFULLY SUBMITTED, u Pd. Pol. Adv.



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mber 13. 1959 *Jewl$t>nor*Jian Page 3-C BOAST 60,000 MEMBERS tple Brotherhoods Meet at Assembly ^tional Federation of otherhoods, Union afwill meet here Nov. conjunction with the embly, has 400 Men's 60,000 members. [through its 400 affiliI's Clubs with 60,000 I in the United States, nd abroad, NFTB has strengthen temple Broprograms by providing of tools and services, liem a Lecture Bureau Brotherhood service last two years, NFTB lied and distributed for |l Clubs an Adult Educaand supplements, conicussion materials, outMiographies, and' other fential to foster Jewish hoods is the Jewish Chautauqua Society, an instrument aimed at crealing better understanding of Judaism among Christians. In the discharge of this function, the JCS arranges hundreds of lectures and visits by rabbis to colleges and summer church camps here and overseas. In 1958-59, the Society assigned rabbis to nearly 450 engagements at colleges and 103 at summer camps. During the same period, it donated over 2,100 Jewish reference books to college libraries. Utilizing the mass media to reach wider audiences, the JCS has now produced eight films for the Joint Commission on Interfaith Activities, the last six of which have dramatized the major Jewish holidays. These have had 4,000 showings on TV, and a similar number before temple, church, and communal groups. Encouraged by this reception, the Commission is now working on a new film series based on the lulating more frequent endance, NFTB has isannual Temple Attenand worked assiduousnationwide "Religion Ban Life" (RIAL) camethical and moral themes of rincipal national educa"Pirke Avot," and "The Ethics reject of the Brotherof the Fathers." %  AND IT SHAll UVt UNBROKW Isaac Mayer Wise's im to Today's Union Jnion of American Heagregations is the parent patron of American ReJaism. From its headat the Union House of Judaism in New York the services, guidance, (ership essential for the and spiritual nourish| Reform congregations in era Hemisphere. lion was founded in 1873 tti Isaac Mayer Wise. It jjdest congregational body Western Hemisphere. The mention took place in in 1874. ea of a union of conobsessed Rabbi Wise ieral decades. He wrote in his papers, the "Isand the "Deborah," about it in his Cincint and in the many "other om which he spoke, adit at many gatherings pen succeeded in convokmeetings, only to see ^rts aborted. >e initial assemblage in Bder the presidency of .n, the UAHC deter minwo goals—the establisha rabbinical school and Ration of religious litera[ goals were achieved. The Jnion College was found% NFTY teen-agers prepart for Sabbath service adults towards greater efforts in synagogue at summer Leadership Training Institute. Viparticipation, tality of UAHC's youth affiliate has stimulated I II:!""|I:;IT!:MIII ISAAC MMU mil ed in 1875, and textbook materials have never ceased to pour out of the Union presses. The first national religious association in America, the Union soon assumed the role of protector of Jewish rights. In 1876, it absorbed the Board of Delegates of American Israelites, which remained an adjunct of the Union until 1925. "The article on the Union written for the Vmversal Jewish Encyclopedia by Rabbi George Zepin, who was UAHC secretary from 1917 to 1941, records that the Union was responsible for the first census of Jews in the U.S. (1880), chartered the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (1884), organized the Hebrew Sabbath School Union (1886), and the first Hillei Foundation (1923). As long-time unpaid president of the Hebrew Union College, Dr. Wise never lost his interest in the Union. "Proceedings" of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations are replete with the reports which he regularly submitted to the Union executive boards. Upon his death in 1900, the Union mourned his passing and hailed him as the "voice" which bad "summoned us into the First Council" and "assigned to us tasks for the establishment of Judaism in this land." The tribute to the founder, contained in a formal statement delivered to the 17th convention of the Union, in 1901, by the committee on Isaac M. Wise Memorial, also contained this phraseology: "The Union which he made possible shall live unbroken, sturdy and true. We feel ourselves charged to enhance this Union with every hearty feeling within us. We shall make it a force for the permanence of the things that are good and true and sacred. This Union of American Hebrew Congregations hereby declares that it will fervently continue to work for the cause of Israel, so that our tradition shall live. Israel has been potent in the life of the nations and the races of the earth and it should again influence the culContinuad on Page 5-C Federation of Temple Youth Comes of Age National Federation of Temple Youth lists 20,000 teen-agers in its chapters. While the term, "new frontiers," is applicable everywhere in the movement, nowhere is it more justified than in the mind and hearts of young people. The 45th general assembly coincides with the coming of age—the beginning of the 21st year—of the Union's energetic offspring, the National Federation of Temple Youth. In two decades, NFTY has multiplied its membership to nearly 20,000 teen-agers in some 400 chapters. From the ranks of NFTY have already come 40 young rabbis and rabbinical students; in its rosters today are those who will be the teachers, the informed Jewish parents and the leaders of tomorrow's congregations. To dramatize Jewish ideals and to incorporate them into dally living, NFTY has originated a treasury of program forms: "Conclaves," gatherings combining prayer, study and recreation; "Kalians," study retreats; "Caravans" to organize groups in new areas; the "Miztvah Program" of justice in action; and other community and congregation service projects. During the fall, winter, and spring, NFTY members across the country are involved in about 100 events of regional scope. As for the summer, since the last biennial, approximately 2,300 teenagers attended more than 60. summer conclaves and kallah-retreats, eight of which were National Leadership Training Institutes for members selected from all, over the land. The success of NFTY summer activities, and the demand of the young people themselves, prompted the UAHC to expand its camp acquisition program. Since the last biennial, NFTY has conducted two Summer Bible Institutes in Israel. Nearly 100 young people visited that country, including the Leo Baeck School in Haifa, a recipient of NFTY's fund-raising endeavors, and met their opposite numbers in liberal Jewish groups in Europe who are linked to NFTY through the World Union of Progresive Jewish Youth section. Of NFTY's numerous social action programs, and joint projects with Christian youth, one of the most moving was the 1958 "Trick-or-Treat" collection for UNICEF, the international agency to aid needy children. Together with young leaders of American Protestantism and of American Catholicism, the president of NFTY presented the sum of $850,000 to United Nations officials at a ceremony which was telecast nationally. NMMMMnMMMWMH OTHPt ASftaS Of THE MOVEMENT'S WORK Central Conference of American Rabbis Deepens UAHC Strengths The interdependence of the institutions of the Reform movement is furthered in UAHC relationships with the Central Conference of American Rabbis. The CCAR has many responsibilities toward its more than 700 members. But it also is deeply involved in tasks which are vital to the enrichment of its congregations and the entire movement. Rabbis and laymen alike look to the rabbinical Conference each year for discussions of major problems in every area of Jewish life, from which are gained authoritative concepts and data, knowledge to be used in Union programs and tested out in the crucible of congregational living. The CCAR has the major responsibility of publishing the liturgy of the synagogue, and the fruits of this labor—the "Union Prayerbook," "Union Home Prayer Book," "Union Hymnal" and "Union Haggadah" — are used across the land, distributed from the Union House of Living Judaism. The Union and the CCAR work together on Joint Commissions in programs such as rabbinical placement, the policies of which are formulated by a committee made up of representatives of the UAHC, the CCAR and the HUCJ1R. The training, scholarship, experience, and inspiration provided by the rabbis complement the abilities and experience of knowledgeable laymen. Together, they have created a reservoir of resources and strength that supplies motive power to the entire movement. Annual Congregational Survey In August, 1958, and October, 1959, the UAHC published two documents, the First and Second Annual Congregational Survey. Prepared by the Union in cooperation with its affiliate, the National Assn. of Temple Secretaries, the surveys are compendia of statistical information and analysis which, for the first time, furnish a comprehensive picture of the Reform movement as a whole and of the individual synagogues that make up the UAHC. The pioneering surveys provide basic, up-to-date facts about major areas of congregational Continued on Pag* 5-C Rabbi Abba Hillel Silver presents check of $10,000 to congregation in Bombay, India. Money helped to build new sanctuary and religious school facilities to aid Liberal synagogue.



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smber 13,-1959 *JewHHkridHam Page 3-A Southern Leader Casts Critical Eye on Youth r A IRIS AMAM NOTISM SELF-HYPHOSIS he mind and body mlracbonds to Hypnotherapy. Is bad habits: Smoking: Insomnia; Female Diior%  exes: Nervous Tension; bnfidence; Overweight; [Allergies; Etc. Improve tntally and physically. j. Amov, fcu.o. Hypnotherapy Clinic Fid Awe. HI8-3033 Copyright 1959 >T BROS R> I I'. /!# S/ To Morris B. Abram, a native Southerner who Is chairman of Atlanta's Citizen Crime Commission, the civic and moral health of a community is measured by its ability to face up to its most pressing problems. At present, he believes that too many people in the North and South are 'literally and figuratively" fleeing the problem of urban intergroup tensions by denying their responsibility for the status of "other" races or minority groups in their communities. The Gecrgia-born attorney and former prosecutor at the Nurenberg war trials, who will address the eighth annual meeting of the Greater Miami chapter of the American Jewish Committee Sunday, Nov. 22, recently expressed this view before a United States commission. He told the body that the existence of so large a class of "underprivileged" in the Negro community is an indictment of the entire community and "the price of the wrong is one which is exacted from the total community and not just the Negro." His deep involvement in the problems and conscience of his own community led Abram to accept the chairmanship of the Citizens' Crime Commission of Atlanta. In this capacity he sees his duties as two-fold: the prevention of crime in the South's largest city and the rehabilitation of criminals — especially youthful offenders. "If all society does is to lock up one who has perpertrated a crime and makes no attempt to analyze and eliminate the causes IE JEWISH NATIONAL FUND ...WAL BANQUET FONTAINEBLEAU HOTEL IURSDAY. NOV. 19, 6:30 p.m. Ceeif Speaker: GEN. S. L. A. MARSHALL Eefertainment by: CHARLES SHELDON Star of Opera, teeMe, mmd TolevltJM Dietary Laws Observed Reservations Call J.N.F. Office JE 8-6464 Chairmen: SELMA AMD SAMUEL ORITT DR. JACK R. LAZAR Chiropractic Physician Moved to LARGER OFFICES 560 Washington Ave., Miami Beach Telephone JEHerson 8-3530 {our Spine Is Your Life-Line. Keep It in Line" Announce Way To Help v'n A//8 Sinus Cavities Without Discomfort I deconjistant tabtat tor sinus cowestioR sirffertfS acts bttk ta drain cltfitd sinus cavitits wi rtbtvi distressing bead pain lYork, N. Y. (Special) ement has been made tablet development the remarkable abiljlp drain clogged sinus [and thus relieve conind pressure. The headassure pains, stuffed-up 4*1 drip, clogged breath[the unrelenting symp| sinua sufferer knows %  are attacked directly ing drainage of the -aarkable of all la the this is accomplished raordinary speed and discomfort of any kind, tablet does Ha remarlcrk internally, through H stream, ft deposits | drop of blood plasma iieetkm which is eari sinua area, where it shrinks the swollen doors to the sinus cavities and helps drain away the pain-causing pressure and congestion. The shrinking substance in this new tablet has been so successful topically In promoting drainage of the sinus cavities that it is now prescribed more widely by doctors than any material for this purpose. This new medication is now available at drug counters without the need for a prescription under the name, Dristan* Decongestant Tablets. Dristan Tablets cost only 98* for a bottle of 24 tablets. Buy and use Dristan Tablets with the absolute guarantee that they will drain away paincausing pressure and congestion of the alnus cavities, relieve the pain and di str ess, or purchase price will be refunded. and motivations," he says, "it reflects only an attitude of vengeance." To take a juvenile delinquent and merely put him away for ten years with hardenee>rrim*.rrals* RKiPtjilion, Abram states, which only insures that "he will be a worse citizen when he leaves jail than when he entered." Abram, Who will speak before the American Jewish Committee • workshop on "Spotlight on Youth," assails the notion that juvenile delinquency involves only one type of youngster and can therefore be handled by a single overall solution. He sees at least three different categories and situations—each calling for distinct and different orientations. Initially, there is "the normal child in the normal environment." Any delinquency on his part is more of the nature of "pranks" or testing of parental or society's authority. The remedy in this case is a keener understanding by parents of "the psychodynamics of raising children." "In my generation," "* M V*' "sternness was the keynote of parental attitude toward children." Since then there has taken place a complete evolution to extreme "permissiveness." Currently the pendulum is swinging back a little. "A balance between these two extremes and an understanding of the need* of these children will, for the most part make for good citizenship in these youngsters." The second category is "the normal child "in an abnormal environment." In the main, these are the childen of newly arrived rural migrants to large urban centers, particularly slum areas. The adults and children find themselves in a way of life they never knew or made. Old values are destroyed and assimilation to the new way of life is slow and painful. A feeling of uprootedness and lack of belonging results. In this situation, Abram asserts, it is the responsibility of the entire community to extend all of its social welfare facilities to these people. The communities should be sensitized to this problem and develop human relations programs to deal with this "thoroughly human condition." The last type of juvenile delinquent is the most dangerous and most difficult to help. He is "the abnormal child in any environment." Here, says A^^ram, we need a neW 'In lentation. 'We must recognize that this situation must be treated as a medical rather than legal problem." Abram agrees that this type of child must be withdrawn from .society because he may become an "object of mimicry." However, he adds, "locking him up and not trying to cure him \s nothing less than barbarism." Abram emphatically denies that crime or juvenile delinquency is rooted more in any one race or ethnic group than another. He has proven this point in dramatic empirical fashion., As one of the developers of the Highpoint Apartments in Atlanta, the first aad largest private rental project in the South for Negroes, he leveled a depressed area which he says "had at least one police call a night" and substituted good housing for some 1,600 Negroes. Now, he says, "in the same area there is about one police call every six months—or about the same ratio as any similar white residential nejgnbornood. : Invited to Join Club Junior high school boys and girls in the near Southwest area were invited to join the club program sponsored by the Miami YMHA of the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center, 450 SW 16th ave., at a free dance scheduled for Saturday, 8 to 10 p.m. NtViR BEFORE-V A6AIN l


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Pog 12-B +Ja*Utfkrl(fc*r) Frid, ley. UNDER THE STRICT AND CONSTANT SUPERVISION OF THi i 0R7K0D3X VAAD HAKASHRUTH OF FLORIOA RABBI OR. ISAAC HIRSH EVER, DIRECTOR FOOD FAIR KOSHER MARKtij Jl rt. EDGED TO ftlVI THE BEST 1AUI^ AT THI LOWBST FRICF OR'YOUR 11 IK 4 meat ancrpouLt Oua M R ST0E| Sun., Mon., and Tues. Turkey time Buy them is coming and we've got them! now and save 20c a pound! YOUNG HEN U.S. GOVT. INSPECTED GRADE "A" PAN READY KOSHER MADE KOSH-R-BEST OR LADY ESTER 8 TO 12-LB. AVERAGE LB. OUR OWN KOSHER MADE BRISKET CORNED BEEF FIRST CUT LB. 89 SECOND CUT un 69 ( NEW YORK STRIP CLUB STEAKS LB. s|4 GROUND BEEF 2 LBS $1.1 Price effective Seedey efco at our Cord Way Kosfcer Market SUNDAY I AM TO 3 PJ1 143rd ST. SHOPPMG NO. MUM! BEACH • ltth ST. at ALTON BO. • JBfl CO*** MAM BEACH MM*j MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS YOUR EXTRA BONUS AT FOOD



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jvember 13, 1959 t'Jtwisjh wtcu/ irfmti Page 11-A [VDAVID NAKOT to Head Division Jarot, a junior at Edison ol, has been named overchairman of the teen lion of the March of i was announced by W. C. errell. Dade county March director. [who is 16 years old, will Jand lead the teen activihe March, Herrell said. |U1 include a unique Tag Bvity in Greater Miami ities and high schools. ew teen chairman is the labbi and Mrs. Joseph R. pintual leader of Temple Greater Miami. He is a |of the Edison Key Club, nal Forensic League, the [National Honor Society, Mi Discussion Club, and lie Israel Youth Group. ; Health film Doe (Hope Psychotherapy and priysis Can Offer" will be ct of a film showing and by Dr. George Jacobtiesday evening in the of the Miami Public Dr. Jacobson, clinical as professor of psychiatry, of Miami school of will talk about psychoknd the specialty of psy%  s. and will answer quests. June Hosea will be of the program. Golda to Quit; Eban in Cabinet Continued from Pag* 1-A i Cabinet to take election as Mayor I of Tel Aviv. Kadish Luz, Minister of Agriculture, wants to retire. Both are Mapai members. The special election committee began tabulation of the ballots which were cast by voters on active duty with the Armed Forces and until these tabulations are in, the exact composition of the new 120-man Knesset cannot be determined exactly. The General Zionist control of the Tel Aviv administration hung in the balance and would not bo settled until the soldiers' votes wore in. In any case it appeared that the single Progressive Party member in the new 31-man Municipal Council might have the deciding vote. If a Mapai-led combination takes ever the municipal government, then the General Zionists would like a Cabinet post for their retiring mayor, Chaim Levanon. The completed count in the Jerusalem municipal elections showed that although Mapai ran far ahead of all other parties and won eight of the 21 seats in the Municipal Council, it will be unable to form an administration unless the unity of the religious parties is broken. Mapai's only possible allies in the council are the Progressives and Achdut Avodah, each of which has one seat, and the com-! bination would still be short of a mapority. The Herat Party won four seats, the Mizrachi parties and their Iraqi settlers affiliate, four, and the Agudist parties, three. If Jerusalem's municipal politics follow their customary trend, the city administration will be in the hands of a Religious Blde-Herut coalition. Election procedure for the twin posts of Chief Kabbi will get underway next week with the formation of an eight-man committee to convene the 72-man electoral body, it was reported here today. The current five-year term for the posts expires on Feb. 18. Four members of the eight-man committee will be appointed by the government and four by the rabbinate. The 72-man body which will name the Chief Rabbis, will be composed of 24 representatives Lord Balf our, Goldmann, Redelheim To Address ZOA Herzl Centennial Dinner By Special Report NEW YORK — Three glorious chapters in Zionist history culminating in the establishment of the ^ScTMlanaT as* g>jesTs*of the ZOA to address the annual dinner. Other guest speakers will be Dr. Nahum Goldmann, president of the State of Israel wiH be commemoWorld Zionist Organization; Abrarated on Monday evening Nov. 23, at the annual dinner sponsored by nine metrtopolitan regions of the ham A. Redelheim, president of the ZOA; and Rabbi Irving Miller, former ZOA president and chairZionist Organization of America | man of the dinner committee, who at thte Hotel Waldorf-Astoria here, will be the toastmaster. Over 1,000 persons, prominent in! Mimi Benzell, noted opera star, all walks of Jewish life in the met-1 will present a repertoire of Israeli Emanu-EI Pians Dinner Ncv. 22 Temple Emanu-EI will hold its semi-annual congregational meeting Sunday evening, Nov. 22, at the Fontainebleau hotel, according to Samuel Friedland, president. The affair will include supper and dancing, and will be highlighted by a special request repeat performance of "Just for Fun," a musical review written by Trixie Levin and starring the following members of the Sisterhood: Mesdames Ben Ball, M. C. Cohen, Sol Geltman, Elliott Harris, Henry Hillman, Myron J. Mitnick, Jack S. Popick, Morris Pollock, Rocky Pomerance, Charles Rosen blatt, Herbert S. Shapiro, Milton Weinkle and Mr. O. J. Rosenstrauch. The precedent, established last year, of holding the annual Sisterhood party in conjunction with a congregational semi-annual meeting, is being repeated, and on this evening a "Sisterhood Patron," a $100 donor, will be awarded an allexpense trip to Europe for two. ropolitan area, will participate in the observance of the following three most significant events in modern history of tie Zionist movement: The 100th anniversary of the birth of Theodor Herzl; the 42nd anniversary of the issuance of the Balfour Declaration, which marked the first international recognition of the 2,088-year.old aspirations of the Jewish people; and the 12th anniversary of the passage of the resolution by the United Nations for the establishment of the State of Israel. (The resolution was adopted on Nov. 22, 1947.) The Rt. Hon. The Earl of Balfour, nephew of Arthur James Balfour, author of the Balfour Declaration, accompanied by Countess Balfour, of the country's municipalities and 48 appointees of the rabbinate. The electors will vote for a successor to the late Chief Rabbi Yitzhak Herzog, while the present Rishon Le Zion (Sephardi Chief Rabbi), Yitzhak Nissim, will be up for reelection. The principal candidates to succeed Chief Rabbi Herzog are Rabjbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik, of BosIton, and the Chief Chaplain of the j Armed Forces, Rabbi Shlomo Goren. Rabbi Soloveitchik has not yet revealed whether he would be a candidate. %  ton CITY COMMISSIONER FRED DAVANT •II "Mr. Action 'J Avoid Machine Politics SUPPORT DAVANT fOR CITY COMMISSION GROUP 2 PULL LEVER 8 A songs. The Earl of Balfour has been an active supporter of the Zionist movement for many years. Both he and the Countess of Balfour have visited Israel on several occasions. During the Hitler period, he gave his old family home of Whittingehame, Scotland, for Jewish refugee children from 1939 until the end of the war. Dr. Salk to be Honored NEW YORK — Dr. Jonas Salk. originator of the anti-polio i vaccine, will receive an Honorary Fellowship from the Weizmann Institute of Science at a dinner Dec. 8 at the Waldorf Astoria hotel. Among the Weizmann Fellows are Nobel laureates Niels Bohr, I. I. Rabi, Victor Weisskopf and J. Robwill shortly arrive by plane from ert Oppenheimer. ___^ ELECT ROLAND H0R0VITZ MAYOR OF MIAMI Lever 3-A (RONNIE) Born in Pittsburgh, Pa r esident of Miami 14 years prominent insurance agent formerly with Department of Public Safety, City of Miami for 7 years assigned to Allapattah, Edison Center, Littles River and Coconut Grove areas with an outstanding record ... in 1956 received "Outstanding Citixen Award" from local TV station received national recognition for bravery and heroism in City of Los Angeles, Calif., in 1955 lives at 4014 NW 4th St. with wife, Judy, and four children attended University of Miami and City College of Los Angeles served with United States Marines in World Wr II • recalled to active duty for the Korean conflict active member of U.S. Air Force Reserves American Legion, Harvey Seeds Post Veterans of Foreign Wars Fraternal Order of Police Touchdown Club Navy League served as Advisory Counsel to the Supervisory Committee of the Government Installation at Cherry Point, N.C. • k 1 1M. l'ol. Aev.



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Page 6-B +Je*istncrkfi*n Frida YNor.,8^, Sn tltclQcalm of Society Miss Gottfried. Leo Raphael Say Evening Vows Kay Ins Gottfried became Mrs Leo Raphael in 8 p m. MNhl ceremonies on Saturday. Nwl at Hibiscus Auditorium. Rabbi Morris Skop officiated. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Gottfried. 4SU Alton rd. Mr. and Mrs Victor Raphael. JOO Ocean dr. are the parents of the groom. Given in mama^e by her parents, the hnd* chose a sequin aad beaded gown featuring Queen Ann lace over satin The sleeves came to a point over the hand, with the bridal attire also featuring an apron front and sequined ruffle, with tiers of lace and mile fuming the chapel train Her tiara and triple veil also showed sequins and beads. Matrons of honor were Mrs. Charles D. Newman. Mrs. Shirley Feuerstem. and the grandmothers of the bride and groom. Maids of honor were Miss Arkne Cohen and Miss. Betty Raphael. Bridesmaids included Suzanne Fi>:err.ak. Margaret Broker. Valerie Krusiak. Roberta Sherr> and Rome Sfcotooiith Jubndesmaiil ana Doreeo Sholoauth Dav.d Itunfcaal as best man r Ushers included ed from the 0. S Army, is adjuJaek Bnmgnr. great uncle of the tant of Jewish War Veterans Post Raymond Berry, Carl MusS3B. and associated with Mtdwest uo lAnua Mr Raphael, recently dischargMexican Holiday For Konhauzers In a double ring candlelight cercmonv on Sunday. Nov. 8. at the Barcelona hotel. Miss Barbara Susan Bauer, daughter of Mr and MrSidney Bauer. 113 N. Shore dr. became the bride of Jerry Konhauier. son of Mr. and Mrs. David Konhauier. J45 W. 42nd st. Rabbi Leon Kronish officiated. Best man was Robert Konhauier. brother of the groom. Ushers • ere Michael Bauer, brother of the bride. Dr. Al Rosman. and Ken Kaplan. Matron of honor was Mrs. Robert Konhauier. Bridesmaids were Sandy Fishfan. Linda Diamond, and Roi Miller. Dene Friedman was junior bridesmaid. The br.de selected a traditional wedding gown featuring a bodice 'of imported chantilly lace over bridal satin, with scooped ueek' line, thr ee quarter sleeve, aid bouffant start of shirred tnQe ez! tending into a cathedral train. Her four-tiered French illusion veil fell from a tiara of matching lace and seed pearls. She carried white orchids, oephanotis. aad hry-afthe valley on a Bible belonging to her maternal grandmother. The bride is a graduate of Mi ami Beach High School and Florida College of Medical Technology Mr Konhauier attended schools in New York, received his AB degree from New York University, and is president of Ace Plastics Co Coral rVayi^j^, Sisterhood ofth, r-3 ih ( nter i, ££* the Kitchen SIB** "M on TuesdaTTT; •t Roo.eveh L^J", Lrjrthiaa Hall mi -Tn* Center bulESj I construction, andrtfl ed within a few wi Jewish Book Meeting their and Acapalco. tien. Richard Green, and Harry CVer. Pan] I'omawons aad .' — .-.h uere junior war V Mrs Raphael attend she a> a me mb e r of the hand, and belonged to tV Amen ci'..,..\u\.l ir> V .-. Beach and s packed as Hosress of the Month %  nrtgwaji OUBBBBJ ReceptMe fallowed the at Hibiscus Hall eereAP.er a recrpbon seated dinner, the c and formal they wil left for Bench. ROOM I SHOWER PRIVATE ENTRANCE 1 or 2 JE 1-4067 ROOM FOR RENT KrVAT1 BO a, acrum %  • n can** m tony earn pnsrwx Schulman, Israel Exchange Vows In a double ring candlelight eeremowy on Sunday. NOT • at the Diplaaui Country Cham, hfiss Deborah Lee Rebecca Trhwlmai. dnaghtfi of Mr. aad Mrs TiKam ^rhnhnaa. 7B Sir 17th ter, Miami became the bnie of S Israel see of Mr and Mrs. Beajaaua IsraeL 12Mw Corgaado ter, Keystane bland. Xo. Miami. Rabbi Isaac Ever ptil ar mt d the S pm aeremony m a chaaei de aa t at n d In blue aad wain. Usher as Leoaard Kaye. Best maa was David Sehajhaam, brother of the bride. Matron of honor was Mrs. Leoaard Kaye. and maul af honor was Masha -r*iiliin. saner of the brute. Joyce Fnkkel was hndes•* s Mama Freeman. Flower garts were fhwt o tm Straan. ValerxStraasu. aad Qady Beth Kaye k The hnde seaecuwj a ti %  % %  % %  chaffaa > fft"Our Hentage-STaL meeting Monday aZi pie Sinai of No. aWil 15th ave "^IMJ Also Uking put u+M will be He.ni ***£% to. Canada, and Nama-l Detroit. Mich The prograa is -ft M Pices of the Boreaiof j*3 ; ocation in haw of leanl iMooth. ^"1 Dr Essrog u unmrrial partment of Adah Jew*. tson of the Uaua afaaaal brew Coagregauoss. Women Attend Six women offkendl | Group Banks a Dawn join their ranngsn a I coming the National Asa. af ha] ArUnnrJea. They are iiiiiiiaag jT i Friday for a tvadty I Special honors at | that year to these laaa.i %  am vuj I chairman of the Oak i Upon their return. I for Florida of the Km their home m Mi-.of Bank Womea B am ,of the Sortile Gram 1 Dorothy V Hoofctfcr. dh| of Palmetto The SotUe Baakag I keen COwBOWBBH If 1 of the Vatkaal Asa. Wamea for as "hranl pabeses .th reganlni of woecer. eaofcaea t af leadership e p*. ma. mx Postoi, Cordova Betrothal Told TMr u4h> : %  %  %  M. P-nsti. W Til MMH. SEXTON FOR TVAOmONAL MIAMI SYNAGOGUE nmn auOTh. ham Iffhak a I saaaf Mrs. Dura Cnrdara. af • %  ** %  C B>L nal Mat last Ahe Car The The a Uarvenaty f It 11 1101 S.W. 121*1 Avw. Cahea. of of Pm ah The • eri a / iit. serried f fit MBafr jblackstone flower sko| --B ~SJ w Wrt yoa aet more for MIAMI CONVALESCENT HOME DeJU s J MI 6-1S3 %  • • mao fkrlwWri m PL Puerce. Fii Tan rrah n-BMKM E^j BtKUR CHOUM KOSH0 COMVALESCen Hgjg. MaswMi p%.*MS71



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C 45th General Assembly Meets Here Awislti Floridian 3 000 •*•* Ejected Will Attend Sessions Set For Beach Nov. 14 to 19 Ja. Friday, November 13, 1959 Section C RABBI MAX JUDGt SOLOMON RABBI LOUIS RABBI SOLOMON NUSSBAUM USNLR BMMTOCK fRttHOf NORMAN COUSINS RABBI ARTHUR LtLYVHD )rm Jewry to Launch Combined lpaign for $3,558,536 by June 500 rabbis and laytke part here on Tuesjching the 1959-60 narive of the Combined ffor American Reform ke central agency that funds to meet the anjftenance and program lie Union of American congregations and the lion College-Jewish Religion. gural will take in the Froom of the Fontaineel, with a luncheon 12:15 p.m. Regular the UAHC's 45th biferal assembly *riH be during the luncheon ke fullest possible atinvited delegates and will hear from a numtstanding personalities. fclinsky, of San Diego, airman of the UAHC ustees and now beginburth successive term apaign's general chairla statement emphasiznportance of the inaug£eon, declared that "the and the opening of tiers by the Reform in Judaism is fully dethe funds put at the both the UAHC and JIR by the Combined Unless our central natitutions are given the the brave plans and drawn at the biennial will largely remain cheon will set in motion effort among the Rerement's 585 congregaualize a total of $3,558,later than June 30 to the programs of the the College-Institute, ( % to be sought represents budgetary needs of istitulions. in his statement, fcntion to the record of lined Campaign over the Briod ending -with June j i t 4.A JULIAN VtNlZKY 30. 1959. He noted that in these years the campaign had amassed better than $15,500,000 ibr support of the national Reform bodies, asserting that "this proved not only more than was raised for any other Jewish religious cause in America but enabled the Reform movement to make gains without precedent in any other era, in the religious history of American Jewry. "We stand today on the threshhold of a new decade and a new era," he stated. "With hundreds of families continuing to flow into our synagogues, with new congregations being organized every other week, with a consequent need of many more rabbis, cantors and religious educators, the Reform Jewish constituency must—and I hope it will—outdo even its great performance of the 1950V A. B. P0LINSKY Serving with Polinsky in the top leadership of the Combined Campaign is Samuel W. Banowit, of Los Angeles, a vice chairmon of the Union's board of trustees. Silberman is also associate general chairman. Julian B. Venezky, of Peoria, 111., president of Temple Anshe Emeth, who is prominent in the national leaderships of the United Jewish Appeal and the Israel Bond drive, is serving with the campaign as its national chairman for special gifts. Irving S. Schneider, of New York, president of the Suburban Temple of Wantagh, L. I., is the Combined Campaign's executive vice chairman, and has just been named executive vice chairman of the newly-formed Development Fund for American Judaism. The forthcoming 45th general assembly of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, parent body of 585 Reform synagogues, will be the largest convention in the history of American Jewry, according to program chairman Louis A. Chase, of Los Angeles. Attending the convention, which gathers at the Fontainebleau hotel on Saturday, Nov. 14, through next Thursday, Nov. 19, will be 3,000 delegates, representing the 585 synagogues which comprise the Union ot American Hebrew Congregations. These congregations represent a combined 'constituency of approximately 1,000.000 persons. Meeting privately with UAHC, will be the National Federation of Temple Sisterhoods, a Union affiliate, for its 22nd biennial assembly. Some 1,500 delegates are expected. Headquarters will be the Eden Roc hotel. The general assembly serves as the policy-making body of Reform Judaism in the Western Hemisphere. Some of the most distinguished religious leaders, authors, editors and laymen in the country will address the sixday gathering, among them Norman Cousins, editor of the Saturday Review; Dr. Robert Katz, of Harvard University; Rep. Abraham Multer, of Brooklyn, N. Y.; Raymond Wilson, director of the Friends Committee on National Legislation; Fr. L. G. Twomey, of Loyola University: Dr. Leo Pfeffer, of the American Jewish Congress; Hon. Simcha Pratt, Minister Plenipotentiary and Consul General of New York for the State of Israel. Also, Joseph L. Rauh, jr., former chairman of Americans for Democratic Action; Prof. Herbert Wey, of the University of Miami; Rabbi Solomon B. Freehof," president of the World Union for Progressive Judaism; Rabbi Jacob P. Rudin, past president of the Central Conference of American Rabbis; and Harold Fleming, director of the Southern Regional Council. Plans for "Exploring New Frontiers for Reform Judaism" will be discussed and debated by the congregational representatives. Rabbi Maurice N. Eisendrath, UAHC president, in his keynote address, "The State of Our Union," will blueprint the continued expansion for Reform Judaism before the assemblage. mum CUMAX TO LONG HWjg Of CTOWTH Thirty New Congregations and Extension Of Services Mark Two Years of Progress S. SCMNH0M The two-year period between the 44th and 45th general assemblies of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations has witnessed sweeping changes in the size of its membership and the extent of its services. Since the last general assembly in Toronto, in 1957, 30 new congregations have joined the UAHC, parent body and patron of American Reform Judaism— a larger number than gathered for its founding In 1873. From the Union's headquarters at the Union House of Living Judaism in New York City flow the services, guidance and leadership for the growth and spiritual nourishment of Reform congregations in the Western Hemis phere. The building will also serve in the near future as headquarters for the World Union for Progressive Judaism, to stimulate and carry out related programs and activities in countries throughout the world. In the words of the Union's president, Dr. Maurice N. Eisendrath, "the record of these two years, which has added a striking climax to a long perior of growth, makes evident that the Union now faces unparalleled opportunities and correspondingly challenging problems—its achievements have indeed brought it to new frontiers in Jewish religious development. Into these new frontiers we must now advance with high confidence, with an ever-quickening pace, and with unswerving dedication to God's will and word." The challenge of the new and expanding era in Reform Judaism is reflected in the increased numbers and changing emphases in the field of Jewish education. It is an extraordinary and perhaps paradoxical fact that there are more children attending the Continued on Page 4-C Meeting in conjunction with the Union, in addition to the Temple Sisterhoods, will be these affiliates: executive board of the National Federation of Temple Brotherhoods (NFTB); National Assn. o f Temple Secretaries (NATS); and the Cabinet of the Combined Campaign for American Reform Judaism. Workshops will deal with current techniques to aid the synagogue; a reevaluation of contemporary theological beliefs; new concepts for congregational worship; and programming and social action issues relating to Judaism and Christianity in the community and on the national scene. On Monday, Nov. 16, David Levitt, of Great Neck, L. I., Mrs. Rose Franzblau, of New York City, and Rabbi Arthur Lelyveld, of Fairmount Temple, Cleveland, O., will respond as a father, mother and rabbi to the challenge presented by the teen-age affiliate, the National Federation of Temple Youth, in a dramatization depicting "What Youth Demands of the Congregation They Will Inherit." On Tuesday evening, Nov. 17, Norman Cousins, editor of the Saturday Review, and Rabbi Louis Binstock, spiritual leader of Temple Shalom, of Chicago, 111., will discuss "Religion in Our Changing Society." The following evening, Wednesday, Nov. 18, a banquet on "Winning the World for Prophetic Judaism," will discuss liberal, progressive and Reform Judaism on the international scene. Speakers include the newly-elected president of the World Union for Progressive Judaism, Rabbi Solomon B. Freehof, of Pittsburgh, Pa.; Rabbi Jacob K. Shankman, co-chairman of the World Union executive board; Mrs. Hiroshi Okamoto, of Japan; Rabbi Rudolph Brash, of Australia; and Rabbi Henrique Lemle, of Brazil. After business sessions will debate constitutional changes, resolutions on social issues, action for new programs and current problems of concern to Reform Judaism and the Jewish community. On Wednesday, the meeting Continued on Pago 6-C Marvin J. Silt>erman, associate general chairman of the Combined Campaign for American Reform Judaism, was killed with his wife, Ruth, in the tragic Oct. 30 Virginia plane crash. Silberman, prominent in the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York, was to figure prominently in convention deliberations here.



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Pag 6-A *Jewisiint>r*mri ^W*. ftl MWM UI6Mt>1 T' Planning new series of courses in modern Hebrew to be broadcast again over WTHS. ch. 2. sponsored by the Bureal of Jewish Education of Greater Miami are Mrs. Miriam Anisfeld and Mrs. Fay Feinstein. Hebrew Program On Television Two Hebrew programs will be broadcast on Station WTHS ch. 2 for the study of modern Hebrew. On Thursdays at 8 p m "Begin Hebrew" will be broadcast for :hosc who wish to begin the study of the modern Hebrew laneuar Mrs. Zvi Feinstein will be instructor. First broadcast is scheduled for Nov. 12. The second course will begin on Tuesday, Nov. 24, It a.m., with a broadcast of "Living Hebrew," a continuation of the elementary Hebrew program broadcast during the last school ytr. Instructor will bo Mrs. Miriam Anisfeld. Programs are under the super of Louis Sc h w srUa BM, ex ccutive director, and Dr Nathan .el Soroff. consultant, of the Bureau of Jewish Kauc-.ir.un The programs unl be heard once each eaBB on a one-half hour broadcast. and will continue throughout the school year. The local TV committee on "Living Hebrew" include Mrs. Feinstcn. Mrs. Anisfeld. Schwartiman. Dr Soroff. Herbert Berger. Abraham Gittelson. Benjamin Udoff pad Zvi Rosenkranz. who supplies, the necessary art materials. IPS President Resigns PHILADELPHIA — Edwin Wolf. 2nd. for the past five years president of the Jewish Publication Society of America, resigned last week and was succeeded by Justice Horace Stern who. for the past 48 years has been a vice president of the Society Wolf's action was prompted by his election to the pre dency of the Federation of i Agencies of Greater Phila delphia. He was immediately elected to serve as a vice president of JPS. GENE HINSONS THREE ARTS THEATRE CLUB 342 ARAGON AVENUE PREStNTS WES DUNAWAY and BETTY O'KEEFE m the Out of This World Comedy "AMPHITRYON 38" ("The Uve life ef tfc* CeJs" b S. N. HHtMAN D.recied by SID CASELL Nightly except Sunday thru Nov. 14 CUBTAIN 1:30 •hilAlCCS -Geor S e B.rke. Her.ld fOft UUMVAJlOMi HtOM HI 5-0*74 Moscow Rabbi in Tilt With Ai Continued from Page 1-A per -an apperant seeking"-a' ^eb? • No. It makes no difference." The visitor said he had been told some supervisors could make obtaining a position difficult for a Jew. "How can that be?" he replied. "There if no unemployment in the Soviet Union. Everyone—Jew and non-Jew — works. Do yew know o* any such cote? I have heard there is anti-Semitism of" that nature in the United State*. Is it true that seme companies in America will net hire Jews? Is it true that Jews know they can never a&/nc* in certain companies?" Why are there no Yiddish newspapers in the Soviet Union? "Your information is incorrect There is one. It is published in Birobidjahn." The question meant why is there none here—where the bulk of the Jews in the Soviet Union live? "There is no need for one." But other national groups have newspapers. Why not the Jews? "There is no Ukrainian newspaper either Besides, we receive copies of the Birobidjan newspaper." How many copies? "Some." Who reads it here? "Whoever is interested." How many? "That is hard to say." But, the visitor pointed out, Yiddish publications thrived in the Soviet Union in the early lWCs. There were six daily newspapers, 11 weeklies, 12 bimonthlies, 13 other periodicals and four publishing houses. Rabbi Levine: "There is no need now. however." Are there any Yiddish books? No." Is there a state Yiddish or Hebrew publishing house? No." Why not? "There is no need for one." Why was there a need in the i 1930s and none now? Rabbi: "I do not know." The visitor recalled the golden period of throe decades ago Yiddish books wore published in editions of 100,000 copies. In 193)0 hore were 171 titles totaling 750,000 copies. A year later, the Yiddish State Publishing House in Kharkov published 744 titles totaling 5,000.000 copies. Yiddish book publishing increased fivefold from 1913 to 193r. Yet today, with the number of Jews in the Soviet Union approximately what it Was fhen, the amount has fallen to zero "Not exactly rero." the rabbi corrected. "The works of Sholem Aleichem and a seder were recently published." Nothing else? "There is no need/' The State Publishing Company, however, has announced plans to publish a book of Yiddish folk songs written by Zinovi Kompanieyetz, a Jewish composer. A Russian-Hebrew dictionary is also believed to be in preparation by a Moscow scientific institution. Why is there no Yiddish theater? Before the war there were 10 Yiddish state theaters and two theatrical schools. Rabbi: "There is no need. Be sides, many today speak Yiddish. They would not understand any plays in Yiddish. There is no audience and therefore no demand." • Then virtually nothing Yiddish is left? No Yiddish is taught, none being published, none being performed? "Perhaps." During the past four years the jubilee issue of Sholem Aleichem "s works, 200 pages long and printed in 30,000 copies, was the only book published in YidUNIVERSITY OF MIAMI SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA SUNDAY, NOV. 15, MIAMI BEACH AUDITORIUM 8:30 PM MONDAY, NOV. 1, DADE COUNTY AUDITORIUM 8 30 P M FABIEN SEVITZRY LEONARD ROSE, Cellist CAROL SMITH, Contralto TONIA FLORES, Spanish Dancer PROGRAM: BiOCH, BOCCHERINI AND DeFAUA T e,r<1 communal leaders hn-n" •tand frieSVexpecV Philanthropy of Greater BO2BB. Russ.an. Thtrtj.w. %  Yiddish. TW, ^ read. YiddkhkBeJ •ny mom." But there ire at least 100 YaH Poets nd dnnuMni They have hadci, be published of; cent years. Rabbi: "There SBI The visitor rctifc All I nion Conjrt-n', ter:n June Xd'i Yiddish writers ui T| ature menuooed Rabbi Levine for a moment. Tank to his favorite laxe] How many books,! were being pubiiihaj in America? NEXT WKi: TWJssal el East ltd*. VOTE FOR The ONLY candidate for who lias PROVED he can CUT TAXES] WHEN WOLFARTH WAS MAY0J, THE TAX MILLAGE DROPPED 6%UNDER THE PRESENT MAYOR, THE TAX RATE HAS CLIMBED 21%! As candidate in 1949, Bill Wolfartfi pledged "efficient, business-like handling of the city's finances to lighten the tax burden In his two years as Mayor, Miami's tax levy compared to runaway which this year brought more than 21% increase in levy, tax bills 25% to 50% higher. Wolfarth's administration increased] surplus savings to more than $3,000,000.00 wild spending has decimated this by nearly 65% this year alone to barely $500,0001 Pull Lever 5-A w, LETS ELECT FORMER MAYOR WILLIAM M. WOLFARTH AGAIN



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fJewisti fkrHnn Page &€ prom four brariches of the Greater Miami Jewish Center meet fo make plans for the sixth crhnual ticlave. Four of the more than 50 senior high repi "are seated (left to right) Sandy Weinstock, Miami ch, Bobbi Wachtel, North County Branch. Stand% right) are Gene OdelL Southwest Branch, and Bob ai Branch. L Cited For EPH Policy ^cognition for employhandicapped veteran accorded Peoples of Florida by the jigion. a Certificate of Aphf the three million pie American Legion." to President Phillip Peoples, by national DRNIA'S California's World* frlooling til* Blue Pacifle •li the MO. Twenty minutoi Airport. 430 luxurious pwt, all with television and nvenlion facilities. Banquet 0, air- ica for a second American tour all under the auspices of the America-Israel Cultural Foundation and the management of S. Hurok, it was announced by Samuel Rubin, president of the Foundation. As the highlight of the Foundation's 19591960 program of cultural exchange between Israel and he United States, the Inbal will give 78 performances in 27 communities in the United States and Canada. • The tour, which opened in Princeton, N. J., at the McCarter Theatre, on Oct. 4, will go coastlo-coast, and will be highlighted by the two-week engagements in Los Angeles and New York City. Except for Chicago and Boston, where four performances will be given in each city, most of the engagements will be for one night only, with a few two-night stands. Inbal will be seen in New York City at the City Center from Nov. 24 through Dec. 6. The Los Angeles engagement is slated for Oct. 28 to Nov. 8. Among the other large cities in which Inbal will perform are Vancouver, Edmonton and Winnipeg in Canada, and Philadelphia, Cleveland, 8feattle, Portland, San Francisco, St, Louis, Milwaukee, Newark, Baltimore, and Washington, D. C. The company of 24 dancers, singers and musicians will.'again be under the direction of Mrs. Sara Levi-Tanai, who founded the group ten years ago In Israel. They will arrive in New Ydrk on Oct. 2.



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?ac/a 2-C +Jeist>ncr*Mar Frid ay. fl/VD FOR AMIRICAN JUDAISM Building Program Will KicTDff 315 Million National Development A building and deveJopaeeat prop-am without precedeat in American Jewish religious history entailing the raising and expenditure over the nest three years of $15,000,000 on a nationwide scale will be launched here on Wednesday by leaders of the I'nion of America* Hehrvw Congregations and the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute [ %l MMAM •JMi of Religion The launching will take place at a luncheon of the Reform movement s national leaders in the La Ronde roast af the Fontainehleau hotel and will be one of the chief highlights af the VABCt 45:h biennial general assembly Dr Maurice X E;sendrath. president of the I'nion of American Hebrew Congregations, aad Dr ttalm Graces, president of Hebrew I llcge-Jewish tasfjrate of Reiiooa. will be the principal speakers Dr Eiseadrath aad Dr Glueck aaaxxtoced. m e a r. w h 11 e that fwads for :he $15,000,000 pro sal 1 be sought through a T corpa ra ted agency has heea designated the :'oc Amen> .'..-.•Former I "-.ted S Sew Hcbcr H learn as. of X< York, has agreed to serre apd of 1 a member af tae I v board of trustees aad a nraau in New York auiidng ad r_: amgaai, .u • S Sohaeider. of Nn has bees earned the taad's execi;\e VKV caajrmaa. a pad he haM* aha with the Caaapuga far Aacma Jadaism The CoaahsMd O patga imr ma hi fads oe a regular basas la awi the maail aad a HIVJIR Fi iBM hmh aad Dr Gluec* Union and Seminary Leaders Reveal Of Gigantic Expansion for Religious Dr. Maurice Eisendrath. president of the I'nion of American Hebrew Congregations, giving the details of the development program mapped by the I'AHC. aated that eoastnicuoa for the $15,000,000 program has already started at the I'nion s House of Living Judaism in New York. The I'AHC program as a whole tor: • The i r


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Page 14-A +JmlsHk*-ktk*n Friday. % 0**^*] Browsing With Books: By H1URY MIMPIIN Two Books for Children Shed Light on Main Cun ... • ._ %  _. -*%  -_i.~ -m.. k—i. i. i;..i LITTLE QUEEN OF SHEBA. T4d by Laah GoWbrg. Photographs by Jmm Rivkin-Brick. Translated by ShuUmit N.rdi. 98 pp. Now York: Union of Amorkan Hobrow Congregation*. $3:50. THIS LITTLE BOOK, geared mainly to older chil%  dren, tells the story of the integration of Yael, a Moroccan orphan, into an Israeli children's village. Yael was a difficult child, confused and withdrawn, who suffered the additional handicap of coming late to the group. Faced with the hostility and resentment of the other children, she withdrew still further. Her eventual recovery—through giving, herself, to other children—forms the climax of the story. Capitol Spotlight: By WILTON FRIEDMAN ; no doubt true, thhi little tale; nothing else could account for it* odd. elliptical style and the peculiar flatness in the teUing of it. Truth may be stranger than fiction, but it" more difficult to write. Two of the characters have some real definition, but it is still a surface kind of portrayal; than is no depth writing here. The book is not serieioffcal: there is not enough material presented forlhat. It is not a psychological study: it is too pat and superficial for that. The characterization of Yael is not compelling: without the photographs, which set forth the spirit of the child and the shadow of her sad face, it would be hard to identify with Yael at all. U.S. Munitions Men Make Friends With Krupp Washington IJNITED STATES munitions makers ** are noav entering alliances with Alfred Krupp. a convicted Nazi war criminal. Will Congress require firms making such cartel pacts to file with the Justice Department Anti-Trust Division' This question emerged in Washington among those who recalled Thurmond Arnold's revelations before the Truman Committee in the early days of World War II The nation was then shocked to learn how Standard Oil's secret agreement with I G. Farben handicapped American defense production. Today's developments are reminiscent of the previous cartels. A new partnership of American corporations with Hitler's merchants of death was never envisaged. An issue is being raised, even by liberal West German elements, of the wisdom of rebuilding a dangerous international hierarchy of munitions kings. Will this contribute to the stability President Eisenhower is seeking in world relations? Krupp is already participating in West Germany's Oral nuclear project and plans for manufacturing atomic weapons. If West Germany needs such ultimate arms, must production be in the hands of the sole owner of the former Nazi arms works? Overs—s Newsletter: B y ELIAHU SAlPfTER Redesigned Currency Jerusalem COUt NEW ISRAEL banknotes %  have gone into circulation here, marking the fourth change-over of currency series since the establishment of the State in 1948 The Mw banknotes will replace the old ones gradually, as banks will slowly withdraw the old notes, which, however still remain legal tender. The reason for the change-over was given by the State Bank as "esthetic": when the previous series was issued, there was such a wide outcrv of criticism that a special committee was appointed— this time including artists—to select new designs for the Israel money. However, again, the Israel pubic received the new notes with mixed comments. While many liked their bright colors and understandable pictures, others again vehemently criticized the artistic merits of the "realistic" drawings The old notes bear on one side various Israel landscapes, and on the other side completely abstract drawings which may or may not be stylizations of leaves. The latter was necessary, it was claimed at that time, because no portraits could be painted on the notes—as is done in other countries— in deference to traditional Jewish objections against "graven images." (Portraits are most difficult to counterfeit, it was claimed, since the smallest deviation immediately changes the facial expression making it easily recognizable as a counterfeit.) However, these scruples were overcome this time. The new notes do bear human figures, though not of anybody speofic-they are figures symbol lzing workers in modern Israel. On the reverse of the notes are shown some archaeological finds—the two sides to symbolize the continuity of Past and Present of Israel. The half-pound note is sea-green, it shows a sturdy girl in the uniform of Nahal (the Army'* g. ncultural units), holding a huge basket of oranges In the background is a •typical" Israeli scene—with neat farm houses, the inevitable water tower, and the other paraphernalia familiar from Zionist posters. On the reverse is the picture of one of the portals in Jerusalem's Sanhedna necropolis. The sky-blue, one-pound note bears the image of a fisherman, carrying—besides nets—also a huge anchor, obviously being the only fisherman in Israel taking home the anchor of his boat after work. His weather-beaten face looks more like that pf the sailor of the Player's cigarette peck. Krupp has been rehabilitated by the United States and West German governments to the extent that he is the wealthiest man in Europe. He was convicted by .a I'.S. War Crimes Tribunal at Nuremburg in 1947. The court found Krupp guilty of exploiting and abusing slave labor, including Jews. He was also convicted of looting Nazioccupied countries. The court imposed a 12-year prison sentence on Krupp. He was also ordered to forfeit his property because of the notorious manner in which the industrial empire was expanded. But American industrialists were persuaded to intervene on Krupp's behalf. In 1951, be was freed from prison by John J. McCloy. then U.S. High Commissioner for Germany. Krupp had served less than half his sentence. McCloy also restored confiscated properties. This was in exchange for an agreement by Krupp to split bis cartel structure by selling a portion of his holdings not later than 1958. Krupp agreed to "relinquish" management of the coal, steel, and iron ore units of his empire. At first, he made a few transparently evasive maneuvers, transfering firms on paper. Soon, with the tacit support of German Chancellor Adenauer and Secretary of State Dulles. Krupp openly ignored the cartel relinquishment pledge. Not only did Krupp fail to fulfill commitments to split his monopolistic structure; he actually purchased a rival firm in January to expand his cartel. On Jan. 31, the State Department approved a year's extension of the accord that obligated Krupp to dispose of steel mills and coal mines. American officials admitted this order would go by the board when the delayed deadline comes up again in January*. 1900. The State Department is operating under a decision by the late Secretary of State to end "harraaaanent" of Krupp. The Communist threat to Germany is cited. Krupp recently made known he woaid resume turning out instruments of war. He stressed that "we must not forget reality." One "reality is that the Krupp operation helped build the dictatorship of Adolf Hitler. In the early 1930s Krupp violated the Versailles Treaty by secretly building guns, tanks, and submarines for the Nazis. The 1947 Nuremburg trial records established that Krupp joined the Nazi Party even before his father who pubUcly boasted of Nazism ,n the Krupp works. In recn* mtion of the Krupp role. Hitler allowed the Krupp uxjusE£h ^Tv* V,r,Ua fam,ly em P ,re Wlthln ** Third m „i !t £ ^f UPP endors d >y Hitler, became chairman of the board. The book is little more, then l tale. nreetly^oluV. tiny f.cet of u,2i*J mean to imply that a book must be h!SV£ k h ogy or sociology-heaven forfend' But it !*! --. that Yaels story could have been a^rfJ^H an excellent book for children A, ,Vd 'l!/**l fMrary and lightweight really to be — photographs help; but they are not ia tacular. either. ALU ON THI TEAM. By Franc F ox j^, traterf by Sylvia ttmmm^ 1 M -. JJJ-lj Nashville: H „ t l l„ PrM ,. „£ "* *i This is an interfaith book for chiMr*. one of the nicest I've seen. Don e W| h "• *j stickiness and with honesty without PTM2 tells about the Cohens and the Parsons InT^a testants. who are neighbors. Eh and TemaiaaJ little boys who play on the same basebil^ generally interrelate, with the usual gnw-T" standing and respect. There are .ome ankaVi like the little boy who could not -Ude into Z k. because of the toad he always kept n his ootb. biggest problem it whether he should pliVuT game, which is scheduled for Yom Kippur-'thtd has been left up to him. The whole episode a ai beautifully, with a resolution integrated *uh UM of the book—something which is unusual, not <*,] a children's book, but for adult books as we! OH the Record By NATHAN] slave^aS^^ T 000 human beings "" < Krupp 500 young Jewish girls. He worked them under inhuman conditions They were beaten and stared. When ^Jewish ml* were^JZ 3 1 .^ *2 n WortLS ,n ,9 cenm !" resource, of the Negev. should -1 sh!ppld back „ concen,^ 10 '"""" 22 ""*> !" ^ loaK ,nterest '""herm* <* ** "*J heart of .gaV C ncentrat,on m P troI and never another example of the interdependence bttmm* of life today. Israel Art and DeJ QNE OF THE first instittfaui ^^ in Israel's pre-state dm. Bezalel school of arts and crafiii salem. It scarcely received thea, to which it was entitled bermci nation for art is strangely it should be. Neverthelea, the I school played an import** shaping the embryonic State of L, iouay Israel is not only more art COOJOOO, aware of art value in terms of dollars and eeavf this awareaeea that is most likely behind the awl I of selling Israel Bonds ia New York TO tk tours to tie studies of famous Americas arum The rising importance of the Jew in the alt one of the striking phenomena of these da?*L said that the Biblical injunction agatast nubHI images acted as a cheek oa the artistic hstehe ( Israel. Recently, archaeologists have uneweraJl of ancient synagogues going back to the din l Temple, which would seem to show that the pf was not as absolute as some have claimed oritL it did not extend to painting, the lister of tk| imaged sculpture. Whatever may be true of the past, there ml doubt that the Jew has emerged to a from po*< more modern art world. Yesterday there l Israels. Modigliani, Soutine. and others, all na* art world. Today there is Max Weber, regwWIft as America's greatest painter. Chagall, Ben 9fl Mania Katz and a host of otherIsrael now has its Lin Hod, a town < %  "*''. ly to art. ^The painting is of the fine arts nnitrt, periences has shown that the influence of fw"J over to the crafts, and we may be sure that th* pen with regards to the rising ceramics indmtTH It is therefore no oddity that the pionotmsl Bonds, whose resources are used in part *> *" ceramics resources of the Negev. should hire' from HoffywoW: HERBERT G. UJFT Sabra Has Burning Desire to Succeed as A Hollywood _', married to a merchant manner. Mies Eden, who flew the Atlantic by r the Hollywood studio, owes her discovery 20th Century-Fox to play the title ^5'" ,he forthcoming filmuation nlSJ \Z ?' Ru h ;"' h,d %  %  Wt her native Israel until last month when she was summoned by ., r to Lond^ to teit for the part in the biblical picture The worldwide search. 1, stl „g seven booths I self an Orthooox Jew. SnCffsSSv? ^ W h -—f bring her to on Nov 16. with Henrykom^rrir!! brf re "* c *" *• its drama about uth, the lW Norman Corwin (of r ,d io (.„,,, ^ZT^* ******. nd "> Jwaaisan mentioned ia the Bible, and tor the million pSur. Mpp,Jrui *** reen play treta of King David. to the earlier, widely different rdl tor ,, Anne Frank. A novice drama student, thea •" Theater in Tel Aviv. Elaaa was te** 1 ***: of 1997 for the reie for which Millie Perkinf selected. Elaaa was one of the three MPJ 1 role in "The Diary;" the oaw other havB*i girt. Elaaa Eden's film-testing for Aaa" has aervod now to hrinc her to the atteaoa^ ice. ^J?ttilto7&ZZ* BUiU the Israeli Army. *£.?£ & !" 0 ** — Wer, ia married and have a^him A ZZ? %  e B *wfo hecom* _J beauty, with Urelr*CT her hair, a lawozy heart ahapari face sap long had a burning desire to succeed oa particular aaetaaatJon to go lato fHCtare* maa, however, that she was greatly J"**, ^ having been selected to play Anna f *""^j now very much wishes to be a suceas* of ~



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13, 1959 -Jewlst) fhridlian Page 13A ices This Weekend AaX. 7801 CarlyU ave. pbl Isaac Evrr. Saturday 8:30 a.m. Ilti'l—Whan You May %  Oood." m ,53 SW 1Mb IVI fMaxwell Sllbarman. n430SW3rd ava. Con ibi Yaakov Rosenberg. W. Lloson. Sermon: "Reform WPfceUive Judaism— rtners?" Saturday 9 ry, son of Mr. II I.ull.-I. • "17th ave. Orthodox. .<• Iff. Saturday 8:30 a.m. pK Ufe's Challenges." • Ian, sun of Mr. and Jclnian. 12250 NW 2nd ave. [Rabbi David W. Herlyman rein. Bcatnon: "The Story nt Times—Greek PftluWInv '• a -n Serand the Redemp,4000 Prairie ave. Or. | H "•• Rotman. Saturday 8:45 a.m. [fed Your Community." • %  — 301-311 Washington {x. Rabbi Tibor Stern. ft Mamehea. rday 8:30 a.m. krry. son of Mrs. Ruth |on: "Abraham ShowIL. 13 NW 3rd ava. 935 Euclid ava. Or. Josenh E Rackovsky. ;rday 8:30 a.m. anderlng of the Peo, at 4:10 p.m.: "The lion." Dally services ):15 p.m. "jEWISH CENTER. *. Miami. Rabbi Sam. Sorraon: "The Adihain and the Peril %  BMay 8:15 a.m. Ser1' r,iiii." Service* at feu. C~ • *— rs CENTER. 18180 NW •rvative. Cantor EmanNAOA. 50 NW 51st Stive. Rabbi Bernard lor Fred Bernstein. I.ri! Siturday 9 a.m. Eii-iiael. MOII of Mr. and Veen. — • M.E EMANU-EL. 1801 CANDlilWTING TIM* t-r-Ktl IKI T --. *„,ft7n| 12 Heshvan — 5:18 pm. E. Andrews ave. Reform. Rabbi LatvfM R,n,on Cantor Sherwin —•— HEBREW ACADEMY. 918 6th st. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander Gross. -.• —. HiALEAH REFORM JEWISH CONGREGATION. 1150 W. 88th St.. Palm A VS. HOLLYWOOD TEMPLE SINAI. 2030 Polk st. Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro. Cantor Yehudah Heilbrajn. • ISRAELITE CENTER. 3175 SW 24th ter. Conservative. Rabbi Morton Malavsky. Cantor Lot's Cohen. I ilil.iy 8 and 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "Beins; Determined." Saturday 9:JO a.m. liar Mltzvah: Stuart, son of Mr. ami Mrs. Ben Mandel, Who "ill h.hosts at Friday evening Ones b'habbat. KNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid ave. Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield Cantor Abraham Seif. Friday 5 p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m. Sermon: "The First Jaw." MIAMI HEBREW CONGREGATION. 1101 SW 12th ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Herschell Savllla. Cantor Joseph Salzman. Friday 5:30 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. Sermon: "Religion to Measure." MONTICELLO PARK. 164th st. and NE 11th ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max Lipshitz. Cantor Ben-Zion Kirschenbaum. Friday 8:15 p.m. Ras Mltzvah: CynMn.i. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Schorr. Sermon: "Helng Truthful to Yourself — The Van Doren Story." Saturday 8:45 a.m. Bar Mitiivah: Marc, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joel Feldman. C__om NORTH DADE CENTER. 13630 W. Dixie hwy. Conservative,. Rabbi Henry Okolica. Friday B:U p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. Bar Mltzvah: Steven, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jlll-k lt"SH. Members of arrangements committee plan Sunness and Dr. Louis Lemberg. Others not gala dinner of tribute for Congregation Beth shown at the planning luncheon weje George David and Rabbi Yaakov G. Rosenberg. SeatTaubman. Louis Hayman, Maurice Hyman, ed are Abram Fox, Harry Gordon, chairman Charles Adelman, Peter Moser and Fred Sandof the committee, and Harold Bemey. Standler. The dinner tribute will take place Nov. 29 ing (left to right) are Joseph Nurenoerg, Naai Miami Springs Villas, than Alexander, Abraham Kasow, Stewart • Israel Bond Award Adds to Honors Miami Rabbi Has Earned Over the Years creation r&HjiBa m noatf T : tin "HBO nnx >otY*n /??rnn in T^?V D^i-iii;?? 0Hc#?| &!?, tl I • T I V rnnatf-,Dn3o L, V T v • T : In trattn—o nx jito; )B3 npn 1 ? v • IMttts In the Negev was the name of _,tean towns in the r. The life of the especially their Duies great interest elars (researchers) i day it is possible rieir ancient settle'of dams in which Dhabitants of the in collecting the us. holars decided to mighty the dams, ces, and even the Nabateans. fBrit Ivrit Olamit) NORTH SHORE CENTER. 620 76th st Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abramowltz. Cntor Edward Kl-in Friday 8:11 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. Bar Mltzvah: David, son of Mr. and Mis. Klein. Friday S:30 p.m. Sermon: "The Wand of Responsibility." Kiturday 9 a.m. Sermon: "Weekly Portion." TEMPLE BETH AM. 5950 N. Kendall dr., S. Miami. Reform Rabbi Herbert Baumgard. Cantor Charles Kodner. He is chairman of the South Florida Council of the American In recognition of his "untiring | mittee of the Jewish Federation on and selfless efforts on behalf of the board of the Home for the Israel and Israel Bonds," Rabbi I Aged, treasurer of Jewish Family Yaakov G. Rosenberg, spiritual j and Children's Service, and on the leader of Congregation Beth Da-1 board of the American Civil Liber vi.i. will be honored at a dinner of \ ties Union, tribute on Sunday evening, Nov. Harry Mann: Kdward. BOfl of Mr. nnd 29, at Miami Springs Villas. Mrs. Paul Wilson, s^imon: "Weakly Rahhi Rnsrnhprn was first eh airi Kabbi Koscnber D was iirsi cnatr i Jcvvish congress and a member of •Ou !" WEST"ciNTiS 6438 SW 8th !" an f the Isr3el Bond High Hollfc fc rf f aincto „ o[ he Dade Rab^f SaX.*. d v s campaign in Greater Miami. courty Co(inci! of Cornrn unitv Re Congregation Beth David will | latjons. be honored at the dinner for "outstanding service to Israel" with the presentation of the flag of the City of Jerusalem, to be made by Dr. Abraham Biran, of the Israel Ministry for Foreign Affairs. 1645 Polk St., Rabbi Samuel TEMPLE BETH EL. Hollywood. Reform. Jaffa. Friday s:l" p.m. fiuest spiritual leader: I >i Kimene u. Borowitz. director of tiu> Commission y f Jewish Education of the I'nlon of American Hebrew Congregations. Chairmen of the arrangements committee are Mr. and Mrs. Harry Gordon. Members of their committee (in formation) include Sidney Rabbi Rosenberg came to Miami from Philadelphia, where he held his first pulpit at Temple Beth Zion from August, 1949 to July, 1955, after being ordained by the Jewish Theological Seminary of America in June, 1949. IMBBI YAAKOV ROSENBERG TEMPLE BETH SHOLEM of Hollywood. 1725 Monroe st. Conservative Rabbi Samuel Lerer. Cantor Ernest Rohrelber Friday 8 p.m. Sermon: "A Need for Living Creed." Saturday 9 a.m. Bar „. %  7 cronoarn nrosi. Mltzvah: Steven and Joel, sons of hood; Charles Z. Spingarn, presiMr. and Mrs. Abram Handshu. dent of the Men's Club; Abram TEMPLE BET"H~JJH6TOM. 4144 Ch..e Fox, Harold Berney, Joseph Nurenberg, Nathan Alexander, Abraham Kasow, Stewart Sunness, Dr. For Rabbi Rosenberg, being ordained as a Rabbi was the fulfill-1 ment of a life-long ambition. He \ meet weekly for luncheon for dis, M. Aronovitz, president of Congrewas born in Newark. N. J., in cussion of the Bible. "' gation Beth David; Mrs. Harold March. 1925, to parents who had. For the past four years, he has • • Reinhard, president of the Sister-1 migrated to the United States from also conducted a study group of 16 the Ukraine in 1921. dentists and their wives who meet ... ,, ,, : once a month for Bible study. His father, a cantor and scho-, RecentlVi he was invited b y the chef in Newark and Baltimore, j United Synagogue to serve as was a master of modern Hebrew : member of a National cavalcade to r&bbi','/,;" £S£3F =: • Louis Lemberg, George Taubman, %  S^ihe f frsl^pre-tSeoLgfcal • iT^Zil?*"^ !" 5 '" 8maUer VX m^eWl^i ijj* Hayman. Maurice Hyman stude nt at Johns Hopkins UniversiCOmmun,U !l ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kronisb Cantor Davia Convlaer. Friday 8:15 p.m. Onest aiiiritual leadi. BarTfitivah: iiiejin. son of Mr. Charles Adelman, mid Mrs. Sidney Hulaiman: Ronald n( j y re A Sandier. Bart, son of Mr. and Mfs. Mortimer Edelsteln. TEMPLE B'NAl SHOLOM. 16800 NW 22nd ave. Conarvtlva. Rabbi Sheldon Edwards. Cantor Ben Grossberg. Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "The Synagogue." TEMPLE EMANU-EL. Ifol Washington ave. Conservative. RaBbl Irving,. Lehrman. Cantor Israel,Reich Friday 3 and 8:JvD.m.-0*fsrajlrltual. leader: Kabbl Hyman tRablnowltav Sermon: "What are YOUT-A Name or. a Number?" Saturday a.m. Sermon by Rabbi Bernard Musanamnr "Weekly Portion." Peter Moser Rabbi Rosenberg came to Miami in July, 1955 to assume the pulpit of Congregation Beth David. In addition to serving on the executive board of the Greater Miami Israel Bond committee, he is a member of the executive comTEMPLE ISRAEL. ts7 NE nth st Reform. Rabbi Joseph R. Narot Cantor Jacob Bornstein. Friday 8:18 p.m. Sermon: "Today* Challenge to Reform Judaism.' TEMPLE JUDEA. S20 Palermo ava Liberal. Rabbi MorrJ* 8KO. Canto' Herman Gottlieb. Friday 8:15 p.m. Otleat spiritual leadTEMPLE NER TA-*D. BOtfl St. ano; Tatum Watsrway. Modern Tradi tional. Rabbi Eugene Labovlta. Can-, tor Samuel Oomberg. 1 Friday 5:30 and .IMI'K* s rm n .:' 'This is My God.-by Hwamut Wouk. Saturday 8:45 a.m. TEMPLE SINAI NO. MIAMI. 12100' NE lit It ave. Reform. Rabbi Bonno. M. Wallaeh. Frldav 8:15 p.m. Guest spiritual leaderI>r Abraham J. Feldman. paat President of the Cental Conference of American Rabbis. TEMPLE Flamingo Way. Conaervative. Rabb Leo Helm. Frildav 8:15 p.m. Veterans Sabbath to be observed, nneg Shabbat hosts: Members of Jewish War Veterans Post and Auxiliary 681. Saturday 9 a.m. TEMPLE ZION. 5780 SW 17th St. Conservative. Rabbi Alfred Waxman. Cantor Jacob Qoldfarb. Friday 8 p.m. Sermon: "The Wandering Jew." Saturday 9 a.m. Bar Hitsvail! I'avid Richard, son of Mr. and Mrs. Alart Weissman. ISRAEL. 6500 N. Miam ty. He completed his undergraduate work at the university in less than three years, graduating in May, 1945. While at Johns Hopkins, he also studied at Baltimore Hebrew Teachers College, attending classes two nights weekly and Sunday afternoons, graduating in .1944. During this time j. he also managed to find time to teach Hebrew school classes. Hillel Leaders Eye Campaign Some 40 key leaders attended a cocktail reception Wednesday at the home of Sam A. Goldstein, 51S5 Alton rd. The reception highlighted the current countywide Hillel House drive for $73,870. Goldstein and Harold Thurman t are co-chairmen of the local drive. _^ff. h ^ g !_ a i U .?ir.. f r, J ^l "Hillel House means so much to abbath Mlnyonatrea a.m. p^',,. S:30 „. m sermon: "The Young *~7~ ^^. _* .... in Jears and the Young hi Heart." rrupi F NER TAaWD. SOHl St. ano t shnhhat host*: Mcmlwri of In Je_.One% Shabbat hosts: Memliers Vivalefa. Saturday 9 a.m. TORAH TEMPLE. 1254 West ave Traditional. Rabbi Abraham Cassei e — YOUNG ISRAEL. 16750 NE 0th ave Orthodo*: Rabbi Sherwin Stauber. Frldav 5:S0 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. Serimiii: "Tho Chosen People." ZAMORA JEWISH CENTER. 44 Za mora ave. Conervative. Rsbhi B. Leon Hurwits. Cantor Meyer Gisser. Opening late Friday evening sr\ Ice of season 4:30 p.m. Sermon: TIFERETH JACOB. 651 Rainbow." Saturday 8:30 a.m. I: 'The Hopkins, he enrolled at the Jewish Theological Seminar}'In his junior year he married the iormer Dvorah Bloshteln. They have two daughters, Peninah. 9. and Shiran, 6'*. Both are students at the Hebrew Academy here. A* spiritual leader of Congregation Beth David, Ribbi Rosenberg has won "wido roeognitien for his efforts on behalf of adult Jewish education. For the past four years, he has participated at the University of Miami In Religious Emphasis Week. At the University, he is also a guest lecturer for f


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fovember 13, 1959 *• Jewish nor Minn Page 15-A •.fci-.i 2T '*"• %  (>, Welfare Funds Open Frisco Meeting MIAMI PARTICIPANTS SEE PAGE 7-C MI ** ,.-fc*. Iy back from Israel, where she represented Greater as a member of the United Jewish Appeal Study Mis1 Mrs. Meyer Eggnatz. She is shown displaying an rood box presented to her by the Ministers of Israel, ceramic trays, copper candlesticks, oil paintings on ~id a hand-engraved silver fountainpen depicting the i of Israel. The hand-knit striped blouse and her knit re all made in Israel. Mrs. Eggnatz is active in the ion of Jewish Women's Organizations and the CornJewish Appeal. ;t Region Will Meet in Savannah 50 delegates representing stricts in the Southeast the Zionist Organization ca will meet in Savannah, weekend for the organi22nd annual conference, over the opening and sessions will be Harry Birmingham, Ala., presiIhe seven-state region. Biting the program will lasrollah Saifpour Fatemi, East Moslem leader, statesId editor; Moshe Erell, >r of the Israel Embassy, Dn, D. C; Jacques Greliil General of France to iern United States; Dr. Robbins, of Nashua, Rational vice president of and Ben R. Wimck, of Tenn., also a national %  font. tr B. Liebman, of Miami %  ill address a luncheon on [afternoon, honoring life of the region, and Mrs. Punter, of Pittsburgh, Pa., of the national HadasBuroau, will be guest It an Oneg Shabat on Satkernoon. s from the Greater Mi'. Albert Ossip, Joseph man Weintraub, David '. A. Goodman, Saul GeLouis Shapiro, Miami trict; James David Lieband Mrs. Morris Simon, rs. Louis Rudnlck, Mr. ra Levine, Mr. and Mrs. ine, Mr. and Mrs. A. nd Seymour B. Liebini-Gables District; Ezra Dr. Herman Ausubel. Dr. Milton Lubarr and William Goldworm, of North Shore Dis trict; Sam Soldinger, Joe Meyers, and Mai Ornstein, of Maccabees. Soprano to be Heard Roy Oliver, director of the Singers Workshop, will present Melanie Markarian, award-winning soprano, as guest artist on Tuesday evening at the Miami Conservatory Concert Hall, 2073 Coral Way. By Special Report SAN FRANCISCO-The Establishment of a National Jewish Cultural Foundation to serve as a focus of American cultural activities was recommended at the 28th General Assembly of the Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds scheduled here ovef the weekend. The recommendation was contained in a summary of the national cultural study sponsored by the Council. More than 1,000 Jewish leaders from over 100 cities throughout the United States and Canada were on hand at the opening general session to hear the report. Sidney Z. Vincent, of Cleveland, study director, addressed the assemblage on the background and findings of the year-long study. Dr. Judah J. Shapiro, of Washington, D.C., chairman of the technical advisory committee, presented the recommendations. Julian Freeman, of Indianapolis, past president of the Council and chairman of the Council committee for the national cultural study, presided. Walter A. Hass, president of the Jewish Welfare Federation of San Francisco, delivered a welcoming address. Herbert R. Abeles, of Newark, CJFWF president, opened the Assembly. Dr. Shapiro, who was formerly national director of the Hillel Foundations, said the proposed Foundation would be composed of representatives of the 24 national Jewish cultural agencies involved in the study and would be invited to serve on a Council of Jewish Cultural Agencies, functioning as a central planning instrument for the field. The Council would be the arm of the Foundation for clearance and coordination among the agencies, and for pooling and exchange of ideas. The Foundation would undertake projects of a magnitude too great for individual agencies, would help fill unmet needs, establish priorities in scholarship and research. M. JUDAH SHAPIRO and stimulate activities In the field generally. Stressing the responsibility of American Jewry to encourage cultural programs, Vincent said, "European Jewish culture as we knew it only yesterday, historically speaking, is finished for the foreseeable future. We share with Israel the cultural responsibility for our future as a people. CertainThe survey stressedthat 1 adequate safeguards had been provided to preserve the autonomy -."••and to-"prtfrtiote-'the creativity of the individual agencies and to assure them a continuing and vital role." In presenting the findings of the study Vincent, who is assistant director of the Jewish Community Federation of Cleveland, observed that the most hopeful aspect of the cultural study was the emerging optimism of a resurgence of Jewish cultural activities in America. The opening session was devoted to joint budget review sessions of the Large City Budgeting Conference with a number of national agencies. A series of concurrent workshops were held in the afternoon dealing with women's participation in communal service, the role of federation presidents, personnel recruitment and a national scholarship plan, and principles and practices of budgeting. There was also a series of regional dinner meetings prior to the opening general session. A reception for the delegates tendered by the San Francisco Jewish community closed the evening. The conference will continue through Sunday, Nov. 15, with ly here is a challenge worthy of alT !" than 25 gcneral and community that ha T demonstrated \ZZ^ V"i !" 1 !" ^'^h its genius for organization in the !" !" !" .? ^L* !"!" ^ !" 1 *}. creation of a network of expert institutions to meet welfare and religious needs, and its profound capacity for giving by its support of overseas rescue and rehabilitation work." The Foundation would assist in interpreting the needs of individual agencies and the field as a whole to federations and welfare funds and to trip pntire community. It would also assume responsibility for .a system of. scholarships and grants-in-aid "so crucial to the future well-being of the field." It could secure gifts from interested individuals and foundations and thereby provide the means for greatly expanding operations of various agencies and in the field generally. community. Principal speakers will be Israel Ambassador Avraham Harman, who speaks Friday on the current situation in Israel, and Stanley Mosk, California Attorney General, who will deliver the principal address at the annual banquet session. Other major speakers are William Rosenwald, Carlos L. Israels, Joseph Willen, Dr. Franz Goldmann and Dr. Judah Pilch, all of New York, and Philip W. Lown, of Boston. lecture on Spinoza Third lecture on the "Life and Philosophy of Baruch Spinoza" will be given by Dr. Abraham Wolfson Friday, 6:30 p.m., in the gardens of the Blackstone hotel. Question and answer period will follow. leers '•ami Beach 1-A BACKGROUND QUALIFICATIONS OF JOHN N. GIBSON Candidate for the office of MAYOR OF THE CITY OF MIAMI 1-A JOHN N. GIBSON has been engaged in economic and business research in Miami since 1949. He became industrial research consultant to the Chamber of Commerce in 1953, and at that time compiled and published the area's first industrial survey, 'later joining the staff of the Chamber of Commerce as Director of Economic Research and Development. Upon the inauguration of the Metropolitan County Government in 1957, he was selected by a citizens advisory committee to establish and head the county's first government department devoted to afea economic development. He continued as Director of the Dade County Development Department until June, 1959 when he joined the General Development Corporation of Miami as Director of Economic Planning and Development; resigning in October to campaign for the office of Mayor. Mr. Gibson's undergraduate studies were in engineering science, and he also earned a degree in Business Administration from the University of Miami while recuperating from an attack of polio in 1952. Additionally, he is a graduate of the U.S. Maritime Service Engineering School and has qualified as a licensed marine engineer. He studied city planning at the Urban Planning Institute, conducted jointly by the University of Florida and the Georgia Institute of Technology. He first entered the field of planning in 1936 with the Industrial Planning Corporation of New York, and prior to World War II was engaged in the research department of the Curtiss-Wright Corporation and the field service and engineering divisions of the Bell Aircraft Corporation. In World War II he directed the overhaul of Fifth Air Force fighter aircraft in the combat area of New Guinea and was a test project engineer on the nation's first jet-propelled aircraft at Wright Field, Ohio. Forty years of age, and a widower, he resides with his three children at 2626 Lincoln Avenue in Coconut Grove. A paraplegic himself, he is president of the Florida Paraplegic Association and a director of the National Paraplegia Foundation. He is president of the Coconut Grove P.T.A. and cub scout pack master of Cub Pack No. 13. He is vice-president of the South Florida Chapter of the American Society for Public Administration and is a member of the Economic Society of South Florida as well as a member of the South Florida Chapter of the Florida Planning & Zoning Association, the Technical Planners and the American Society of Tool Engineers. He is a director of the Dade County Employ-the-Physically-Handicapped-Committee, and is 1-A vice president of the Workshop for the Handicapped. He teaches Sunday School at Bryan Memorial Methodist Church in Coconut Grove. He was recently named as consultant to the Economic Development Council of the Miami-Dade County Chamber of Commerce, is a member of the important "Goals Committee" of the United Fund and is a speaker for The National Foundation. His other affiliations have included the American Management Association, the American Industrial Development Council, the Institute of Radio Engineers, the Southern Association of Science and Industry, the Southern Industrial Development Council, and the United States Naval Institute. In 1956 he was selected as "The South's Most Outstanding Handicapped Employee," by President Eisenhower's Committee on Employment of the Physically Handicapped; and in 1958 he received an award from the state organization of B'nai B'rith for his work in aiding the handicapped. A technical treatise on the "Theory of Analytical Industrial Development," written by Mr. Gibson, has been adopted as a basic tool of development analysis by many organizations throughout the country and served as the basis for Dade County's new Conditional Industrial Zoning Ordinance," which sets aside twenty-five square miles of undeveloped land as a site for high grade industries. He prepared Miami's presentation for the Dodge Island Port hearings before the U.S. Corps of Engineers which resulted in the city's gaining approval for its new port program. At the same time he won victory over the City of Miami in its auditor's attempt to collect a 10% utility tax on the sales of bottled industrial and medical gases. Despite the ruling of the city's legal counsel that such assessment was within the city's powers, Mr. Gibson prepared a validation opinion citing ten Supreme Court decisions and contended such taxation Was illegal. He was upheld in his opinion by the State Attorney General. His most outstanding community contribution, completed just prior to leaving the Dade County Development Department, was the compilation and writing the three hundred-fifty page Economic Survey of Metropolitan Miami, the first such survey ever made on the Dade County area. Additionally, he is credited with the compilation of the survey and directory entitled "Metropolitan Miami Manufacturers," published this October by the Dade County Development Department (ah agency of the Metropolitan Miami government). Pd. Pol. Adv. GO GIBSON FOR MAYOR THE 1A CANDIDATE ON YOUR VOTING MACHINE Pd. r>c 1-A



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Page 8-A +Jmistfk>rklku) Frid <*y. Ko^^ J Charlton Heston, Joan Crawford Will Visit Here for Gigantic Diplomatic Ball Charlton Heston star of The Ten Commandments" and Hollywood's newest spectacular film. *Ben-Hur," and Joan Crawford, glamorous star of motion pictures, will head a galaxy of screen, stage CHAKITON HtSTOM Ice-Ner and television star? coming to Mi ami to join in Americas welcome to Israel's new Ambassador. Atmham Harman. Ambassador Harman and MrHarman will be greeted by the dip loiritic and consular corps of mar.y nations, in addition to the I entertainment siars. at a Diploma tic Ball to be held on Saturday j evening. Dec. 5. in the Fontaine-1 bleau hotel. Jack A. Canter and Samuel Oritt, general chairmen of the Greater Miami Israel Bend com. mittee, announced that "onprecedented enthusiasm" for the eve! ning was mounting rapidly. The ball will also mark the offi-' cial opening of the new Grand Ballroom of the Fontainebleau hotel, which is said to be the world's largest. Opening night festivities are expected to make this Miami's -first Hollywood opening.'" with all the glamour and excitement associat, cd with such events. Among other stars who will join Charlton Hestotn and Joan Crawford in the festivities are Johnny Carson, young new sensation of television. Herb Shriner, Pat Carroll. Peter Donald, Kenny Delmar. Sammy Kaye and many oth i Included in the festivities will be television and radio interview^ with guests as they arrive at the t ntrance of the Fontainebleau hotel and national on-the spot cover ace by press services fashion and society editors, columnists and picture news magazines. Entertainment will include the entire Fontainebleau floor show in addition to the visiting screen and television celebrities. There will be dancing all evening to the musk of the famed Sacasas orchestra. Admission to the Diplomatic Bail is by purchase of a $500 Israel Bond, plus $10 per person dinner couvert. Gcv\ LeRoy Collins is honorary chairman of the Diplomatic Ball. Heading arrangements, in addition to Oritt and Cantor are Samuel Friedland. Israel Bond board chairman. Jacob Sher. honorary chair man. and William Bornstein. chairman of the arrangements committee. They said there would be no speeches or solicitations at the ball. The appearance of Charlton Heston. who is Hollywood's "man of the hour." will be his last personal appearance prior to departure on a world tour. Comparatively un known ten years ago. Heston starred in "The Ten Commandments" before being selected for the title role of Metro Goldwyn Mayer's spectacular picture. "Ben-Hur." The selection of Heston to portray the role of "Ben-Hur" climaxed a search that found producer Sam Zimbalist and director William Wyler interviewing hundreds of actors. Heston was deemed the perfect choice far the most coveted role of the decade. Joan Crawford, in addition to being a star of motion pictures and an Academy Award winner, is also a successful business woman, serving on the board of directors of the Pepsi-Cola Company. She is the first woman to be elected to the board of an international and major corporation, and is believed to be the first actress to hold the post. SA* C. UVENMM Levenson Heads Sinai Committee Sam C. Levenson. founder and trustee of Mt. Sinai Hospital, has been selected by the hospital's board of trustees to bead the opening committee now preparing details for the dedication of the new building, set for Dec. 13. Dedication will be one day after the formal opening of the new Gloria Tuttle Causeway, terminating right next to the Mt. Sinai building on the Miami Beach side. The opening ceremonies will be preceded by a series of private receptions in the hospital, which will open its doors on dedication day to thf general public. Gov. LeRoy Collins is expected to attend a reception in his honor at the new hospital one day prior to its opening, due to his inability to be in Miami on Dec. 13. Sinai Drive Inches Toward Half Report Truman Will be Guest where results oT Sm, announce! Oroviti W i|| w &f •nth ytar as i Sinai Hospital, celebrt its it* existence. Some l %  acted to attend. Several new fmaaWj ready joined the nab, men an


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(Jewish Floridian Combining THE JPN15H UNITY and THE JEWISH WUKVf .33. Number 46 Miami, Florida, Friday, November 13, 1959 Three Sections — Price 20c Ida Tells Gurion She Wants To Quit Post linet Position for Eban; ildiers' Vote Will Decide itus of General Zionists BATTLt FOI NEW t Lf CTOftAL S WEM MCE 9-A kUSALEM—(JTA>— Israel's new Parliament, elected last week, krene for the first time on Nov. 23, and Premier David BenLtepped up discussions Tuesday on the composition of a coali' let in order to enable him to present the new government to et at its first session. + Mapai leaders continued to discuss the coalition possibilities open to them as a result of Mapai's great election victory in preparation for talks with the other political parties. Mapai is expected to discuss possible coalition composition with all the political parties except the Herut and Communist. Meanwhile, the General Zionist leaders, smarting from that party's shattering defeat in which it lost at least five of its 13 seats in Parliament and possibly also the mayoralty of Tel Aviv, met Tuesday and discussed the conditions under which it could enter a Mapailed coalition. Prim Sees ifference ring in US |YORK—(JTA)—A growing nee to Jewish identificaan Increasing ignorance ph values pose a "deepenlis" in American Jewish Joachim Prinz, president American Jewish Congress, here, addressing 500 leadlie organization. |eeting marked the launch"American Jewish Conilonth" proclaimed by a [ of mayors and governors pus parts of the country. of "American Jewish Month" is to focus attenthe activities of the organithe fields of civil rights, ertics, Jewish culture, and to Israel, an intensive ship drive will also be unduring the month. >rinz said that the AJC neat "the challenge and nity offered by the freeWch Jaws enjoy in Amerother democratic lands I Wast" and must combat difference of Jewish idan, He also described Ser areas of responsioich the American Jewimunify faces today. Ho as: strengthening of Israel [protection of Jewish rights LABEl KATZ matter of urgency EISENHOWER'S TRY PRAISED B'nai B'rith Chief Calls For Action in Behalf Of Soviet Jewish Life NEW YORK—(JTA)—Deep concern for the survival of Jewish life in the Soviet Union was expressed here by Label A. Katz, national president of B'nai B'rith, addressing the opening session of the four-day annual meeting of the organization at the Waldorf Astoria hotel. He urged a policy of "pressing vigorously" for action by Soviet authorities to remove the existing restrictions against Jewish religious and cultural activities. &f "It is a matter of urgency and responsibility for American Jews UAHC Convenes as South Florida Temples Set Stage Mrs. Golds Meir, Foreign Minister in the outgoing government. Has repeatedly Informed Mr. Ben-Gurkm that she does not want to retain that post In the now go ve mm ant, but the Premier is said to bo insistent and hopeful that ha can persuade his long-time associate to retain that difficult post. Former Ambassador Abba Eban was expected to enter the Cabinet as a minister without portfolio if Iraq Threatens Liberation Move LONDON—(JTA)—Premier Kassem of Iraq threatened to "liberate Palestine from the Jewish mi puiuuuu yoke wlt 1 "• ... Mrs. Meir remained in the Foreign the threat in an interview with Ministry. Zalman Aranne, the the Tunis daily Al ThawrawarnMinister of Education, may drop: ing that "our dear Pajestme.beout of the Cabinet to accept election as Speaker of the Knesset. In that case, the education portfolio might go to Mr. Eban Among other Mapai leaders mentioned for Cabinet posts were Gen. Moshe Dayan, Giora Josephtal, secretary-general of Mapai, and Yosef Almogi, chairman of the Haifa Labor Council, who directed the Mapai victory campaign. Albeing mentioned for to exert positive efforts in behalf of the Soviet Jewish community," Katz said. In doing so, he added, "we make no plea to Mr. Khrushchev and the Soviet Union's ruling authorities for any special privileges for Russian Jews. What is claimed, is that Jews be granted Eight South Florida Reform Jewish congregations, their Brother%  •£** ^^S^STu^ hoods and Sisterhoods, will join some 3,000 delegates from across the nationality and re iigious groups nation converging on Miami Beach this weekend to attend the 45th within the established system of general assembly of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations at the the Fontainebleau hotel. —— -* Simultaneously, seme 1,500 delegates of the National Federations of Temple Sisterhoods, a UAHC affiliate, will gather for its 22nd biennial assembly at the Eden Roc hotel. mogi was the post of laer^W^w e world, with particular party in succession to Josephtal. on efforts to secure for Mordechai Nam.r, Minister of La loved to all Arabs and Moslems, will be liberated only by the Iraqi Army and the Iraqi people." He complained that Egypt and Jordan had taken no action against Israel "in spite of their 30,000,000 inhabitants." He said it would be the Iraqi people alone and unaided who would "chase out the criminal Jews now in power." Simultaneously the Cairo radio anounced the United Arab Republic plans a campaign to close the Gulf of Aqaba to Israeli commerce. The broadcast said the UAR delegate has been instructed The huge 4,500-delegate gathering here will represent some 585 Reform congregations, 100,000 women members of NFTS, and 60,000 man affiliated with the National Federation of Temple Brotherhoods. UAHC sessions will be held at Continued on Pago 7-A Katz praised President Elsenhower's intervention in the mattor in his Camp David discussion with Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev in late September. Ho said there are "no immediate moans" for evaluating the effect of the President's action. "But if the Soviet Premier's pronouncements for a peaceful coexistence were genuine — and some competent observers have cautiously accepted this promise —the possibility exists that the President's words left an impact on Mr. Khrushchev that can reContinued on Page 9-A 1 on efforts to secure for Moraecnai r...., ......-.--UAR delega te nas Deen insirucieu 4ind the Iron Curtain the bor, is expected to drop out 01 tne rajsc the igsue in the Umte d %  no* on Pag. 1*A Continue, on Pogo U* I Wattlegal committee. )scow Rabbi in Tilt With American y DAVID MILLER JTA Moscow an assurance that comes realistic understanding of llcate role, Rabbi Leib LeChief Rabbi of Moscow, the visitor any conclu1 be drawn about the preslife of the Soviet Union's Jews. nows that what he tells a [may be misread both by This is the fourth in a s eries of article, on the Soviet Union by David Miller. special Jewish Telegraphic Agency correspondent who Soviet Union on a Pulitzer Scholar*hip from Columbia University. non-Soviets and the vast hierarchy that controls all segments of Soviet life. Take the subject of Jews as a national group. He was asked why Jews should be so identified in their identity cards. "I do not know the reason," he told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, "but I do not think any special reason exists. Jews are a separate nationality. In any event, all Soviet citizens are equal." Rumanian Jews Terrorized; London Lists New Arrests LONDON—(JTA>—The Rumanian government startled by the number of Jews who registered for emigration last year, has launched a campaign to terrorize all Rumanian Jews who have shown a desire to go to Israel, the Times of London reported this week. Noting that 10,000 Jews left Ru-*" Would the word "Jew" Continued on Page 6-A hammania in 1950 and 1951, the Times said at the same time, Rumanian authorities were arresting and sentencing Zionist leaders to varying terms in prison, with some 200 persons involved. The Times reported that "some of these people are now being re-arrested and tried for the offenses for which they have already served sentences." Partly because of the unexpectedly large number of Jaws registered when "the Rumanian government suddenly and without explanation reopened its doors to allow the departure of Jews to Israel," and partly because of the strength of Arab opposition, the government stepped the emigration "but the Jaws have remained restless." In response, the government opened its campaign of arrests and trials on charges of espionage and treason, the Times reported, in a bid "to frighten the Jews into breaking their emotional ties with Israel." The Times listed a number of individuals who have been victims of the new campaign: 1. Israel Hart, who was employed by the Israel legation as janiContinuod on Pago 7-A tome to Union of American Hebrew Congregations Assembly... See Pages U6C



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Pew 8-B JfttitfUrrXttor Frid oy.No^ imw TO TNI rOfTOR Jews are in Dade County to Stay docs that elimiloo**, jh. j.w^jMtfun:. -asiCJSga^aSMS.Recontl> while sailing from 0 %  Yalta, our \> .1 hj man an terms the dinm: Kail "'See man*" ••hi' whispore i .some rial \ote 'Mo pi. only 40 wtrast •mtfMd In Mt a--ry. IW*>n4l h wt nor cootr*hnd thai tha T.V •*• Jews in GraaMr Miami ant rwt hr on DrabaHan. tack Raaaiaa adulation with our nitj that turn rtrr of owfl "I a fair proportion of rude toward ; n ami hanke n ami •ldin.; r. I!•*• anJ mus. \%  teacaarj and manutactur h> an incident thai auTl ami builderrs am! ta>.r-~' \ Tappa-all ate read nl all t*>. I • i ,.:: the an red i ts. insult that h Aad if Ike all-wtoe. hand picked karj aaaaari "I ahnfXM %  that l! tor J sot at Nuremberg Law* M di-lodge an important sec -i a population composed of varied r national and •iake up a vibrant commit racii \ stocks* Rl -dently s lot of tommymt a learned know thai the up of Greater Miami is ;al. KICHAKD CAir HARRY SIMONMOFF Jjor X. 14, at .-oo.rn Mkara *„ M ^^^Xrii Beth Shornta. Ronald is Leonard Wilson, son of Mr. and tB musical portions of the lit • must have iauaed* the aaa of Mr and Mrs Mortimer Mrs. Paul Wilson, arm Oreapi Ilia fth. St.. Miami blvd.. will become Bar M.tivah !a m i mttir lafonaatita as for Beach He s a student in the Beth during Saturday morning services. Wiam. Beach High School. warded Shoto-a eonflrMiatioa class of ":: NOT If, a: North Shore Jewish • • TV procraai of the Shabba: I Center. Rabbi Mayer Abramo-ntt M David Wtsatnn will ofbetate Leonard is a stubi Temple Zma will be the site of *** th* rth g i i ai school of the — a on tW Bar Mr.r-ah on Saturdav. Nw Ceanar. aad atteads NauUhu Jaatt^L^T .__ JS! I J\ < of Da-xl Richard Wetssaaan, -or High. He ts the soa of Mr aad Mrs V wwlfemi prv • Rabbi Alfred Waxmaa w-Jl of Bar M.uvah of Glenn v the first maa wQl be cch-hratad at Temple Zaon Satmrday m the Torah The Wesss 14. of Temple Beth mans w-.U he aosts at the One; Leoa Kronish wiR Saaahot toRoamg Fraiay eveaaag n a Mr ad Mrs. S:eethere .hiring %  oreMT -. > • : >-vr"i.\ .v Ta marh Inr per aiaaaaa of year r*. at** NATIONAL HOTE ,„,-_. — M ai



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1959 ~-J(W§$Wf wwOWmfwWftfl Pegs 9-B tei Eye Miami Voters for Tuesday Polling M to the polls Tuesday to elect a Mayor and jaemUnission. Following it a listing of a number of themselves for offiee: High uer Mayor of fannounced his ^Mayor Robert to succeed urge all of for Mayor leclared. It Mayor High Bally, and mor|rry on the unHght to do but ill-health." tormer Mayor, |r compromised has fought for the people of (Mfarth tWolfarth urged "remember the voting in the iiesday.Y said, "are of constructive Id lack of lead aation it a treit issue," Woltax levy has tit, and our tax hup from 25 perAnd there has for the money was mayor ma down six per• indicate, for emeroatv to $3^09,080, Ity of Miami's (roppod 65 par* mere $500,000. was mayor and there was i of real accomt )he building of Sdmarks as the plant, Bayfront Dinner Key Maer plant, on Galas the rebuildAuditorium and cts." layor has headCoral Way and liver Miami city comlt his drive for reclose this week campaigning on Constructive leadfairness in reppeople, not just her." sg office, Shiver Miami for his gainst the Milk iver's supporters out that "he was ile for ending the ers of the Milk lie benefit of low an advocate of I urban renewal. lade a decision, lie. based solely [ religion," his supThey also credit him "with starting the city's beautificatfon program. Shiver said this achievement is "one of which I am very proud. I am hopeful we can continue these efforts to give our city streets and parks of floral beauty that will be the envy of the nation." The candidate indicated that "by energetic action, "he stepped in" to stop the bus strike last fall, thus averting a costly transportation tieup right at the start of our winter tourist season." Hia supporters declare that the commissioner's record on public issues "includes consistent support of the new Miami port, cooperation with Metro, and support of a number of public works including the new Municipal Justice building. "Shiver also led the fight to keep big time baseball here by saving Miami Stadium for use as an athletic field. During his administration, too, a pair of new golf courses are being added to the city's sports facilities." • • • Edward J. Czarnesk] Edward J. Czarneski this week began bringing to a close his campaign for Miami city commission, Group 3. The 41-year-old candidate is a bus driver and farmer, has three children and two grandchildren. He pledget to "transfer as many functions as possible to Metro; turn Dodge Island and bus supervision over to Metro, and let Metro build the City Hall, at a saving of $30 million to the city taxpayers; close control of budget requirements that have caused taxes Vb skyrocket; closer control of liquor licenses, and a stricter observance of zoning requirements." A member of Bus Drivers Local 1267 and the St. Michael's Catholic Church, Czarneski. recommends "more action and not so much talk about city beautification." • Roland Horoviti Roland Horovitz is a candidate for Mayor of Miami. Born in Pittsburgh, Pa., he has been a Miami resident for the past 14 years. He is an insurance agent, formerly with the Department of Public Safety of the City of Miami for seven years. In 1956, Horovitz received an "Outstanding Citizen Award" from a local television station. Horovitz resides with hit wife, Judy, and four children et 4014 NW 4th st. He attended the University of Miami and City College of Lot Angeles, and served with the Marinet during World War II, subsequently being recalled to active duty for the Korean War. Horovitz belongs to the Harvey Seeds Post of the American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Fraternal Order of Police, Touchdown Club, Navy League, and served as advisory counsel to the supervisory committee of the govprnment installation at Cherry Point, N. C. Murray Z. Klein • • • Murray Z. Klein, candidate for Miami City Commission In Group 3, drew his campaign to a close this week by hitting at the "complete disregard for the citizen and his tax dollar today." Klein, a practicing attorney here for the past seven years, told voters that "the time has arrived for an unencumbered politically free candidate to come forth." Klein, 37, is a graduate of John Stetson University and the University of Miami. He served overseas during World War II, and is-j a former school teacher. "Metro, the port. City Hall and Interama are not private enterprises, and must be dealt with as the city and county projects they are," he declared. • • • Fred C. Davant Commissioner Fred C. Davant, appointed eight months ago to fill the unexpired term of a retiring official, has announced that he is a candidate for Miami City Commission, Group 2. 'The insight I got working with the other commissioners and the projects I've worked on have not yet been completed. They interest me to such a degree that I feel impelled to seek office for a full term in order to help expedite this vital and unfinished business," the ex-city judge declared at a kickoff rally held at the Harvey Seeds American Legion Post last week. x Davant declared that "the construction of a modern port for Miami has been my main project, and we have now agreed on a site, and only the financing needs to be achieved. It has been my stand from the very beginning that the port is a Metropolitan-Dado County function and should be built by them." The 41-year-old ex-judge is married to the former Marian Sloan. They live at 80 SW 17th rd. with their five children. Davant is an ex-captain who served during World War II and Korea. He cur rently serves as an officer in the Intermediate Sunday School Department of the Riverside Baptist Church. • • John B. Gibson John B. Gibson, candidate for the office of Mayor of Miami, has been in the business research field since 1949. Aged 40 and a widower, he lives at 2626 Lincoln ave., Coconut Grove, with his three children. A paraplegic, he is president of the Florida Paraplegic Assn. and a director of the National Paraplegic Foundation. Gibson is president of the Coconut Grove PTA and Cub Scout Pack Master of Pack 13. He holds a business degree from the University of Miami, which he earned while recuperating from en attack of polio in 1952. He it alto a graduate of the U.S. Maritime Service Engineer"When your guests come to an affair ATTH Horn. vre do the worrying you relax with the assurance of perfection in every detail top in or phone Dept. UNion 5-7756 O Oceanfront at 68th Street Miami Beach ing School. He hat studied city planning at the Urban Planning Institute. In 1956, Gibson was selected as "Most Outstanding Handicapped Employee" by President Eisenhower's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped, and in 1958, he was the recipient of an award from B'nai B'rith for his work with the handicapped. He is author of "Theory of Analytical Industrial Development." • • • Richard E. Norman Richard E. Norman, candidate for Miami Commissioner, this week listed his platform as follows: "To remember you when I am elected; to stand against inequalities in our tax structure and specifically the water and sewer department; against the new Court House with stores and offices that would compete with free enterprise; to work for more economy in government." Norman also declared himself in his platform as being "for the new port and refurbishing our old port before it falls apart." He said that, if elected, "I will bring the government back to the people, where it belongs. Let's see," he challenged, "if a working AW. AND MKS. flSHEK Fishers Mark 50th Anniversary Mr. and Mrs. Louis Fisher are celebrating their golden wedding anniversary this month. The Fishers were married in New York on Nov. 9, 1909 and have lived in Florida for the past 15 years. He is a prominent builder of Miami Beach and Broward county. A dinner party honored the Fishers at the Seville hotel on Sunday. Their sons are Melvin Fisher, builder and owner of Coral Gar* dens in Miami; Dr. Edward Fisher, dentist, of Miami Beach; and Herbert Fisher, Miami Beach attorney. businessman can win an election with footwork and not a $4,000 campaign for a $5,000 a year job." THE FINEST FOR YOUR AFFAIR Your choice of the following rooms: EMBASSY • VICTORIA • BRIGADOON KING'S TERRACI • ARGYLE • HEATHER Surroundings of elegance and luxury, faultless service and incomparable cuisine. Groups of 10 to 475 are accommodated royally for all catered occasions. for m-nui aid information ca Karl Weill Catering Director UN 6-7792 On-Promiioi Parking SIX ACRES ON THE OCEAN AT 98th STREET • MIAMI BEACH Have that Business Meeting* Special Occasion You'll find complete facilities to exactly satisfy your needs in the Kismet, Aladdin, Scheherazade and Rubaiyat Rooms, be it for a wedding or a private party I it the ers lor Information! HAZEL ALLISON Catering Dlrojclor, JE 1-6061 Mtt SI. Collins Ave). KOSHER HOTEL FOR RETIRED PEOPLE Kaskralh end Sabbath strictly seier v a 1 • • S Meets dally — special diets — alr-coeditieeed — sy aeeeee e ea prenites Salt water iwimwlea. peel — Usage —• beach chain Gardes — Soloria 24 HOUR TELEPHONE AND ELEVATOR StRVICI KOSHM HOME ATMOSTHIRI ^firath Ifaven 411 OCEAN DR. (on the Ksan) MIAMI BEACH, FLA, Ph. IE 4-4891 KOSHER HOTEL



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?aqe 2-8 At the recent first birthday party and membership affair of the Sunshine chapter. B'nai B'rith Women, at the Americana hotel. Mrs. Lillian Ritter signed in as the 50th new member. To the extreme right is Mrs. Gerald Soltz. District Five president. At her riqht is Mrs. Eva Porte, membership vice president of Sunshine chapter. Kronengolds Note 35th Anniversary Mr. and Mrs. George Kronengold week announced the 351 h an liversarj of tfca George Kronen ;oid Travel Servtci of Kttajni Beach II f* I York The local of. cated at 540 Arthur God : i j rd. Kr< if the : hia :f.' have ins! returned from a b %  : %  ,.y : i U they T kj >. Kamakura. Eno shima Nikk %  Kj oto, Nara ka. :\y before '.heir departure trom Miami Beach, Mr. and Mrs. Kronengold were bosta to the Jap,:.t ca Tu B Visit::_ in hfiaani Beach. Upei arrival in Jjpan. the group reap then l i Sur; the old Japanese way of lite is st.ll preserved, al thouch in the big cities most of the Japanese, especially the males, have adopted Western dress. the Kronengolds observed They found Hone Kong "fantas | tic. and no matter how much reads or is told about this arr.azine j iNland. one must experience it> thrills to bcl.cve it. The scenic beauty of the harbor and mour. t:uncan hardly be virpassed Mrs. Kroneneold -aid that in Konj. it is very easy to go on a sh>pp::iL' ipfl e from the time %  pen at 9 am until they at 9 p.m And this is one of the few ctties where the male does just as much shopping athe female. The money saved on pur chasing new wardrobes goes a long am) towards defraying the cost of the trip" Although they havr taken many cruises and traveled < !> m Europe, and Soul^ Amer.ca. '"this •, without a doubt, one of the most exciting tr ;, presented l.y P Phi E's pledge mother. Lois Fein berg. Officers of Omega chapter of Delta Phi Epsilon are Lynn Swurt/. president: Barbara Robins, \ ice president; Lots Feinberg. pledge mother; Barbara Laskin. treasur or. A\i< Kaplow. recording -ecre tary and Judy Millman. corresponding secretary. BB Women Plan Varied Meetings North Shore chapter of B"nai B'rith Women will meet Monday noon at the Washington Federal Savings and Loan Assn 1133 Normandy dr. Book review will be featured. • • • Combined meeting and luncheon will be held by Miami Beach chapter Tuesday noon at the Sea Gull hotel Co chairmen are Mrs/Harry Kaufman and Mrs. David Demar. • • • Tuesday evening is the date of %  white elephant sale and meeting by the Chai chapter of B'nai B'rith Women in the Deauville hotel. Fri deph Nt Lipton. president, and t.us Feuer. general counsel and director, are official delegates rep-! resenting Dade Federal. Lipton is a member of the Cni ted States Savings and Loan ; League management committee comprised of some 100 savings and loan professionals who help set: peBey to meet the broad problems! of savings and loan management. Dade Federal Savings and Loan Assn now celebrating its 25th an mMr^arj'. recently moved its downtown home office quarters to the newly modernized multiple story building on the corner of Flagler st. and NE 1st ave. Even without the label you'd know were Heinz Kosher Beans. One taste *M you. 'Cause what other bean in all the wide wide workM delightfully, deliciously, di.tinctively Heinz-ish? Ju* ^ servc.be ready for seconds. Tonight Near family. awast*. choor far •hat IMI Itolian flavor w a l ed by fom.d Chef ley-Ar D.. Tendor littla macaroni oiot fMtod with tangy Italian Chooto ... lavished with avory tomato •ave*... si wa n fad w inS mwskM and ckooso... toatonod Italian way. TMifty t tie todayl ^Ut^c^rnth. Om 0( ppr0wlg


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Page 12-C *Ai*t>fkr*M!*r} Frid cy. a magnificent tribute to the memory of departed loved 00ft rift** NAT IS TIE HETMI IF Hllil II TIE H ill—II uisaiEw? Each chamber, or crypt, ha* fresh • ir circulating through it. always. This make* possible the most favorable conditions for the continued safe-keeping of your loved ones. No other form of buna) offers more complete protection than that available in Mount Nebo's beautiful Community Mausoleum. NT AM* Clllll MULT Above-jrround burial fulfills a heartfelt want, the peace of mind that comes from knowing that your departsd loved ones rest securely in the permanent protection of beautiful chambers. ABOVE the earth. From the Bible and from history from the Cave of Machpelah—to our modern mausoleum* 1 — e see that above-ground entombment affords the highest tribute we can pay to those whose memory we wish to honor. NEIE fill IT IE IICATEI? The Community Mausoleum will be located in a' Urge, beautifullv Undscsped area Section 9\ of Mount Nebo Cemetery. Mount Nebo Cemetery i* in the heart of Miami for convenience and accessibility from every direction bv car or bus Miami. oldest and most beautiful. Mount Nebo %  recog"*** %  • one of the country's leading, exclusively Jewish cemetery. NIlMtEilUITII? When completed. Mount Nebo's Community Mausoleum will cootain 624 Crypts. 4 Family Rooms and a Columbarium. The first unit of the Mausoleum contains 144 Crvpu and Family Room It will be bushed in unit* and those who make selections now will benefit in oot n price and choice of location. NAT IF TM SMO IS IEEKI KFME miAmaiBFiuTCMirtnEi? Temporary above-ground burial space m avaOable now if the need for it should anse before the entire Mausoleum is completed In any eaa*. now i* the time to reserve K *v apart menu in the CommuniUr ausoteum. so that you will ndt be faced with the effort and expense of burial arrangements at *-^* •**" **** "** %  ab to cope with them. Your inquiries are most welcome and will be answered promptly. Family Crypts are a Definite The Talmud is replete with deaxriptiom of Kuchin Crypt*}. Evan dimension* far family room*) were given in cubit*, to contain the number required for various family need*. They were small rooms without w in dow s hewn out of the rock, or in the walk of caves. The surrounding area was beautifully landscaped, and won for the Je wish cemeteries the admiration of theRornans.whosposwofthemse**hortua (Garden of the Jew>. So NOW... above-ground burials are available at the beautiful tiew i • 1 i ] S N ^^^^____ I ^ir^ 1 ^lr^l Architect s sketch of rp.cal rtm,\, Room COMMUNITY MAUSOLEUM This may surprise you. If you can afford conventional! burial for your departed loved ones, you can NOW sMI honor them with above-ground burial, in the protection dt ventilated chambers, within the most magnificent of alls leums. This is now possible, at the average cost of earth I ... if you act promptly to become one of the privileged o of the preferred burial apartments in Mount Nebo's net! munity Mausoleum. HOW is this possible? How can ment in a majestic marble mausoleum, usually assoaai the wealthy and famous, now be brought within the te virtually every Jewish family? Consider the earth burial i that do not exist in above-ground burial. You save thu of a cemetery lot, preparation of graves, vaults, and care of the burial lot. I YOU HAVEONIYONEI ... fke cast *l *•*• %  •* %  i ft* riasi.ni MSSMSWB. %  •] spr—J r~r %  •••* •"ViS.l price. Aft* *• %  sea* east. Osly esrh fla-fet Act Today Part of the Jewish Tradition attractive were they, that in earlier days, it -reported to Km, Neborh^meaaar of^Babylor. -Tha b^ gromda m •Jerusalem are fairer than Royal Palacea." The family plot in the i >„, at.*""* *tion • private room in the WMawaVum, are tanfstas aspects of th. bef in -HoAoro. Haneiesh." £ •nrvrval of the soul, and the of the family as an entity ••OUHT MEM ccMCTERr Miami's most b—utiful •xclustvty Jmwish Ctnt MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY 5508 N. W. 3rd Street, M••". FU>n ^ "lease tend me. without Community Mrtfrde*^^] jONi— STAT



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irember 13, 1959 +Je*U*nark9lan Page 5-A :iAL ANNOUNCEMENT TO ISRAEL BONDHOLDERS ^l.^^^Kl'^^y^^^^y Miami's most exciting social event in years THE GALA ^Diplomatic tj^jall JDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 5th Three World Premieres AMERICA WELCOMES ISRAEL'S NEW AMBASSADOR &^rvranam L\ u 'k flu WK _^ AMBASSADOR HARMAN CHARLTON HESTON JOAN CRAWFORD C^a/a jf-cstivities! Noted Stage, Screen and TV Stars JOAN CRAWFORD PAT CARROLL JOHNNY CARSON PETER DONALD HERB SHRINER KENNY DELMAR DORE SCHARY SAMMY KAYE PARKER FENLEY AND MANY OTHERS Plus Complete Fonlainebleau floor Mew And dancing all evening to the Sacasas Orchestra NO SPEECHES! NO SOLICITATIONS! Wally Wanger, Producer Jerry Bell, Stage Manager



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Pcrgn 10-C -JewisiifkrkMorJ Second Concert Shaping Under Sevitzky Baton The University of Miami Sym phony Orchestra under the baton of conductor Fahien Sevitzky will present Its -econd pair of concerts featuring Leonard Rose cellist. Carol Smith, contralto, and Spanish dancer Tonia Flore* H Sunday tad MnoMia] \ening. Nov. 15 and 16. at Miami Beach ami Pade Ccunty Auditoriums Scxitrky will open the program with Frnest Bioch s Concerto QruSM for SbriBfl Orchestra and Piano." which will be played in rj of the late composer, fol lowed h] formt Muman Leonard ROM the BMehwM certo ir OtBi and Orchestra. Carol Smith and Tonio Flores join s\ and the orcV>tra for a lUtioa of DeFalla's "El Amor Brujii." to be heard f firs: time in its ent.rety in Miami Leonard ROM it a oraoXjate of Ada Merrift Junior High School in Miami. He studied cello with the lt Walter Gretsman, who was for many y*r first cellist with the University Symphony. At the ape of 15. young Roso received a full scholarship to the Curtis Instititt of Music 4*99| UONAtO tOSf ho studied with trro distinguished British virtuoso Felix Salmend. Communist Chinas Jewish Community Expected to Decline Friday.] NEW YORK-(JTA)-The or ganited Jewish community in, Communist China will cease to ex-; Mthin a few years, if the num her of Jew* there continue* to de-1 cline at the present rate, it is in-, dicated in a report received here, from the Council of the Jewish Comm unity of Shanghai The report, received by the| World Jewish Congress in NewYork, was prepared and is signed b> P. I Yudalevich. chairman of i the Shanshai Jewish Community Council. It the numerical doeiino but also the ponoral diHicvttios facing the community. Determine, what ho lot ma "the degenerating, fj. none ill condition" of the majority of the 72 Jews remaining in Shanghai, Yudalevich reports that two-thirds were an relief in Juno of Hi year. In addition, more than 20 par s on s wert receiving three meals daily at the community's s he H a i hows*. SCR,*? % %  tm-r*! The Shanghai Council has exsays that today there tended iU help to the diminishing 251 Jews in the' entire j J**wh community of Tientsin, country' A vear ago the Jewish| whose own central communal body community "of China numbered, recently dissolved. There are only 294 in 1967 it was 397. In the >S<* J Ml "> TienUw. and 15 ol At IT. he was appointed to the faculty of the I tute. and in 1938 joined the NBC Symphony Orchestra. For 11 years. Rose was f:r>t ce:h>t with the Cleveland Orchestra and later the New York Ph.'.harmonic, resigning the post in 1951 to devote full time to a career as a concert soloist. Leonard's parents. Mr and Mrs Harry Rose of Miami Beach, will be see; rag their son make his third ap pearance with the there were more than 25.000 Jews on the Chinese mainland. Migration took most of them to Israel. Brita.n. the I". S. and other lands. Tn# report receros nor otMy Reconstructionists Pick Dr. Eisenstein NEW YORK —Rabbi Ira Eisenl niversity *tein. former president of the Rabphony Orchestra. Carol Smith, called -one of the finest young contraltos." will be making her debut on the Miami concert stage A contralto or great versat.lity, she stepped into the national musical spotlight with a nut Town Hall recital in 1961. followed by an auspicious sold-out tour of 71 appearances as soloist with the top symphony orchestras across the country and the New York Opera Company. Flamenco dancer Tonia Flores. "resh from a our of Europe, where she thrilled audiences with her auther.t.c interpretation of the classical and Spanish dance, was engaged by Sevitzky to appear with binical Assembly of America and spiritual leader of the Ansbe Emet Synagogue in Chicago, has been elected president of the Jewish Reconstructionist Foundation and editor of "The Reconstructionist" according to an asnounby Herman Levin, chairman of the board of directors of the Foundation. Dr Eisenstein will succeed Dr. Mordecai M Kaplan as chairman of the magazine's editorial board. Dr Kaplan, professor of Philosophies of Religion at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America and internationally-famed nlulonu pher. educator and author, founded the Reconstmctsontst' move them are receiving regular monthly relief grants from Shanghai Help towards medical ezpens< also being accorded tothe tin> Tientsin community. Harbin, with 153 Jew*, remains the largest community in Chun. and its Community Council continues to carry out its functions independently. This community al so maintains a shelter house, in w hich u persons are fully taken care of. Harbin still has its own synagogue with regular services and, as in Shanghai, matzoth were baked and distributed to the com munity prior to last Passover. Nor.et i FlCTITI(*i EM BUGBt TOMU HOtfS Miss Smith in the exciting El Amor, %  ** in 1935. Dr. Etseustem has been one of the foremost spokesmen of the move ment since its inception. Bids Opened For New Temple Harold Woflt. chairman of Mont ice Ho Park building committee. Wednesday ann oun ced that bids are let for the proposed synagogue and religious school building to be erected on the site of its present structures at 10H NE lS3rd st. Architect for the building '"-.-HA SAT jpiMi r ktr 1 HAKP.I MTEUafl m MVD JL BUtl aod NEUJKUTF ku -'iU jNEtJJE EAS B0KE1 Orwk lm L i %  annum HOTCt or iia JLW :M% Kit Ifcsl x CMUL— ctain bM >*_ aad 7a of yont Cou^ JAT ROOFING LICENSED (H TEAM IN DADE COUNTY' INSURED E vc* S >iHC CO %  *.>£• S LVJ V354K.W 1Mb AM. : ^_ M V^mMk Jkk smct IAMI TITL€ iQktmctCo. M YEAftS C* TITLE SERVICE IN OAOE COUNTY ESCIOWS ABSTRACTS TTTU MSUtAMQ M Nl wlSYl Carol C%  J" 0 *** SeWaut; £? %  .*? t-; s MYauaxorr a 7wi iLn-u-as-r %  par5*^ cw5-^:M aw*^*mi



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iber 13, 1959 *Jewisii fhrMKaHn Page 5-B ,f Lebanon Breaks Ground; : irsf Phase of Hospital Building t more ho=pital beds Dr. Homer Marsh, dean of the Is far too tpparer.l medical school al the University IS %  "T3d5y7 / *


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jr 13. 1959 fJtmistinrridticiti Leaders Slated iar Report on Rise id a ism in Japan Page 5-C (report on the inof the Japanese [be presented to Lbanquet gatherpjiennial assembly p American Heltons on Wedheshe Pontainebleau of 3,000 lay and is from all areas 31 hear an address Oka mill (i, educator to the JapaJewish customs hon B. Freehof, World Union for |daism, and Rabbi nkman, chairman In Board of the rill outline to the for "Winning the jphctic Judaism." Jto and her husband jthis country, where [at the Reform SemJew Union CollegeK of Religion. Her Inamed to succeed Jaism as a culture its religious sigstimulated by her Iring World War II, [in Japan find refNazis. She has is tours of the Japes and cities, exJudaism to throngs iences desiring to [about one of the religions. to came to this pgh efforts of the ent. Rabbi Maurice |. They met during leader's extensive "Peace Mission" Japan. Her, newly-elected I Union will receive symbols of their rom Rabbi Eisenchalrman of the Judge Solomon B. Eisner, of Hartford, Conn. Philip M. Klutznick, past president of B'nai B'rith, will act as toastmaster. The invocation will be delivered by Rabbi Ferdinand M. Isserman, of Temple Israel, St. Louis, Mo., and the benediction by the honorary secretary of the UAIIC, Rabbi George Zepin. Meet 'Clergyman of Year': Rabbi Eisendrath's View Of Jewish Praitiie Today D*. MAUKICt USINDRATH Reform Spiritual Goals Continued from Page 4-C tives of the Union and the Central Conference of American Rabbis. The Office has been engaged in a pioneering investigation into the role of prayer and divine supplication. In a field which has never before been charted, it convened two major conferences—one of Jewish scholars who examined facets of the Jewish worship heritage, the other of social scientists who considered the subject from the viewpoints of such disciplines as psychology, psychiatry, social psychology in sociology, and anthropology. These convocations, held with the last year, mark the beginning of what will be a long-range research project, the fruits of which, it is now felt, will ultimately be of crucial in terest to every member of the Reform family. Supplementing its magazine, "Synagogue Service," which is now distributed regularly to 12,000 leaders of Reform Judaism, the Office disseminates information on ritual and liturgy, and answers an increasing number of inquiries on these subjects from rabbis and laymen. The Joint UAHC-CCAR Committee on Ceremonies is attentive to the need for creating experimental rituals for the home, as well as the synagogue. Since the last biennial the committee has undertaken, among other activities, to publish new music for ceremonial purposes. Rabbi's Dream Fulfilled tSHI 0X4M0T0 Continued from Pago 3-C ture and the world. We shall contribute to the progress of the world and shall vindicate justice, spread the spirit of humanity and pursue our ideals for the salvation of man." The chain reaction of creativity has resulted in the Union's continuous formations of auxiliary groups which help to bolster the Reform movement. The National Federations of Sisterhoods, Brotherhoods, and Youth are now augmented by Associations for Temple Secretaries and Educators. The functioning of the Union has also been marked by the workof commissions, most of them operating in conjunction with the Central Conference of American Rabbis — the third of Isaac M. Wise's creations—founded 1889. Such groups include the American Conference [from Pago 3-C lip enrollment, reregistration, servers and non-memily a few examples pered. The findings udividual congregahemselves in retainer' congregations and geographical and to the nationAt the same time, Ibled the UAHC to fown strengths and to plan realistic(ture. rid Union the history of the tmi'iit was ushered |ien the World Union vc its headquarters to the UAHC's ng Judaism in New ected an American ent to succeed the revered Lady Lily Montagu. In the 33 years since its creation, the World Union has endeavored to assist Liberal Jews in the far-flung lands of their settlement. It has recently aided in establishing a Reform seminary in Paris and Liberal congregations in Bombay, India and Auckland, New Zealand. It has fostered the formation of Reform groups in Israel and has given suport to the Leo Baeck School in Haifa. In addition to exploring the opportunities for Liberal Judaism in Latin America, the World Union has helped to nurture the growth of Reform in South Africa, Australia, Holland, Germany, Italy, and other countries. Financial aid from the National Federation of Temple Sisterhoods and the leadership given by prominent American Reform personalities have contributed greatly to its work. Commission on Religious Education, the Commission on Synagogue Activities, the Interfaith Commission, the Commission on Information about Judaism, and the Commission on Social Action. The general assemblies of the Union, which take place every other year, have become the largest convocations in America under Jewish religious auspices. Biennial assemblies have taken place in most of the major cities of the United States; and in 1957, Toronto, Canada, celebrating the centennial of the birth of its Jewish community, was the scene of the first convention beyond the borders of the U.S. At the conventions, delegates establish policy for the Union, engage in seminars and workshops on the practices and customs of Reform Judaism, and adopt resolutions with regard to the moral implications of national and international issues. Once sponsors of circuit preaching efforts, the Union is now involved in intensive regional activities. Some 16 regional councils and a number of metropolitan federations dot the UAHC map. Within the regions, directors and lay leaders seek to intensify the bond among congregations, arranging for exchange of ideas, pooling of resources, greater imparting of Union services, and regularly scheduled conventions, which have become miniature biennial assemblies. But again and again it is stressed that physical growth must be accompanied by spiritual deepening. This note was sounded once again at a gala event, inaugurating the present national observance of the 85th anniversary of the Union. Responding to words of parise on his 15th anniversary with the Union, Rabbi Maurice N. Eisendrath, UAHC president, urged upon his listeners the quest for intensified religious living. He spoke of the "spiritual hunger" of millions of religiously dissatisfied Jews, overseas and on this continent, as a challenge which Reform Judaism should meet. Rabbi Maurice N. Eisendrath, a leading spokesman for Reform Judaism in America, was asked recently why he placed so much emphasis on material issues like world peace, hunger, population ex; plosions and segregation. "Because," was his emphatic re: ply, "that's religion." But isn't the heart of religion man's relation to God? That definition is incomplete, Eisendrath answers; it's not "orthodox" enough, it doesn't go back to Genesis, where you will plainly find that the heart i of religion also concerns itself with man's relation to man. "In fact," he went on, enj joying the apparent contradic: tion of terms, "Reform is probably the most orthodox current of Judaism — with a : small 'o' — because it goes back to our beginnings and I the search for social justice." Rabbi Eisendrath was in Washington recently to accept : an Interfaith Award as 1959 Outstanding Clergyman of the Year. He is president of the Union of American Hebrew ; Congregations, which is the parent body of Reform Judaism in the Western Hemisphere. The UAHC comprises about 600 congregations with an estimated 1,000,000 members. The other two main streams of Jewish religion in America are Orthodox and I Conservative. Eisendrath, 57, has been a rabbi 33 years, 14 of them in Canada. In 1952, he became lifetime president of the UAHC. He is a tall, attractive man with graying sandy hair and piercing blue eyes. He I fits easily into the ministerial pattern of eloquent speech. His Clergyman of the Year ; award, by the Religious Herij tage of America, is largely in I recognition of his attempts to promote a "summit confer; ence" of world religious leaders to find a way out of the threat of total annihilation. "People the world ovef," he says, "want peace. And that includes those behind the Iron Curtain or Bamboo Curtain. As for their leaders, they fear war. Certainly I would invite Soviet and Chinese representatives to a religious summit. They've sent observers before. The conference would not be permitted to degenerate into an 'anti-Russian' front. But if the religious leaders of the world could give the majority of mankind a single target—peace—then the Communists could not make any further inroads." Eisendrath is also concerned with the disparity between American abundance and the widespread hunger in much of the world. If Rabbi Eisendrath's religion is steeped in social awareness, he makes no apology. "If you go back to the Talmud— the Jewish law—you'll find," he says, "that it's filled with social legislation we haven't caught up with yet. The Prophets abound with God's injunctions for social justice among men. It permeates our whole Jewish consciousness— from the very beginning." He thinks that was a strong motivation for his becoming a rabbi in the first place: "There were no rabbis in my family before me. My father and mother—American-born— were religious Reform Jews, but I suppose the reason for my decision was the rabbi in my congregation in Chicago. It was a case of hero worship. I couldn't have been more than 6 or 8 when I decided to become a rabbi. As I got older, I thought of social work— I could easily have gone into medicine or law — but I felt that this was the way." Maurice Nathan Eisendrath was born in Chicago, July 10, 1902, took his degree at the University of Cincinnati, where he made Phi Beta Kappa, and was ordained as a rabbi at Hebrew Union College in 1926. He and his wife have fond remembrances of Canada. They own a two-acre island located 300 miles north of Toronto. "It's two hours away by boat from the nearest mainland, and we try to escape to there during the summer," he says. Rabbi'Iay Kaufman, UAHC vice president, explains the meaning of the Torah to youngsters during the recent consecration ceremony observed in Reform congregations welcoming new entrants to the religious school.



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13, 1959 Jewish fibridlfon Page 1-1 CM xarvnin <$& yours. jaunt be rage for travel, udget is limited, [to go to Burdine's | .use a little imagMte of the Orient, play is called the the Orient Ba_ all the flowing ^beautifully-gowned tic, live models, home furnish%  the Orient, you f 'splendors of the on view at Burai store only, is |ue mirror-frame 17 inches wide les long, deeply with a crysanjttern. The raw |ged to a mellow tone. A modmirror has been [the back. The is old iron. Iveral delightful and |ours simply looking |wnd in rich tapesbrocades, magnififtsseled corners, and From the small sed for a touch of piuge oversized ones (finite touch of luxon the floor, the as flexible as the |es, and anyone can ntal (ouch to their 1-money" prices. unusual treat, stop department on the (rhere $100,000 worth Din India is on disipes of gems that adorn the maharajahs are there for you to admire. Burdine's has cooperated with a special project of the Rockefeller Foundation called "Products of India" in order to bring this Oriental Bazaar to the Greater Miami area. The project specializes in the trade development between the two countries. Actually, Burdine's has Imports on display from the Near and Far East—as Hiss Julie Daves, of Burdine's says, "from Turkey to Tokyo." • • • "fMIRI are Julianelli shoes, hand-made in India, which are to be found only in Burdine's. For unusual wedding, house-warming or holiday gifts, there are imported brasses, wood and pewter pieces in both practical and ornamental designs. For the person who appreciates works of art, there is also on display an antique Japanese screen panel. The panel is one section of a Coromandel screen with all hand-carved inlay of mother of pearl and ivory. This panel is over a hundred years old. Another magnificent piece is the band-carved mirror frame, also from Japan and over a hundred years old. The most significant influence in recent years, in both fashion and home furnishings, is the Oriental influence. People are traveling more, and as Americans see the many wonders tf the world, the tendency seems the strongest towards the Orient. The New York Times was so impressed by the strength of this influence that its editors sent one of their staff writers around the world to do a complete series of articles on this subject. There are also many live Japanese flower arrangements to be seen and admired. They were created by the Coral Gables chapter of the Ikebana International, a flower-arrangers organization. The Oriental displays feature line and simplicity before color, and were executed with local flora and fauna. Live birds perched around the displays lend another interesting touch. • • • F ASHIONS from the Orient are beautiful: Most of them feature simple lines cut in a manner to fall gracefully, yet are comfortable to wear. The colors are deep and rich-looking—none of the softly muted shades or inbetween colors that defy descripi-O-Zyme a REVELATION IN BEAUTY CULTURE -created by SANFORD LABORATORIES, INC. Designed to improvd the skin suffering dehydration that takes place with each advancing year. Contains no fats or wax [-. _^o clog pores, thereby, helping to refine them. All ingredients tested against allergies. A scientific accomplishment backed by a money back guarantee. Give yourself that "DEVVEY FRESH" and "PORCELAIN SMOOTH" look today. POSTAGE PREPAID. No C.O.D. Cell-O-Zyme 141 N.E. 109 St., Miami 38, Florida NAME ADDRKSS CITY STATE one feted find my <• !•"'*• Tennessee Williams Opens at Playhouse "Once More, With Feeling," a Junpy-fabltt. abuut a tempecametal maestro's adventures in love and symphonic music, starring Robert Q. Lewis and K. T. Stevens, runs through Sunday night at the Coconut Grove Theater. Entrance to the "Splendors of the Orient Bazaar." tion. They are all definitely intense jewel tones. The Oriental fabrics are a beauty to behold. One local designer who has won international acclaim, Jay Anderson, designed a floor-length formal which may be seen at the entrance to the Gold Coast Room. Using a green silk print Sari, Anderson added royal purple inserts in the bodice and softly draped this formal with its own attached head covering. A border design is woven into the fabric with gold thread. The silk is incredibly soft to the touch. Burdinej will have the bazaar until the end of this week, after which many of the items will be found in various departments in the store. We recommend that you see this most unusual collection—where you walk into the store on imported Oriental rugs and spend a few hours in a veritable fairyland of exhibits, color and excitement. Adult Studies at Ner Tamid The Playhouse's second production, opening Tuesday, and running through Sunday, Nov. 29, will be "Summer and Smoke," a poignant love story by Tennessee Williams, starring Kim Hunter and Lee Philips. "Summer and Smoke" was first produced by Margo Jones at the Music Box Theatre in New York City, on Oct. 1948, and also catapulted Garaldina Pag* and director Josa Quintero to fama whan it was presented in the Circle in the Square, New York City, during the 1*51-52 season. Miss Hunter graduated from Miami Beach High School in 1940, and during that time studied under Charmaine Lantaff. After playing in many local productions, she went to California, where she was soon discovered by David Selznick. While under contract, she did four movies for him, and then went with J. Arthur Rank. Her Broadway roles include "Streetcar Named Desire," also the motion picture, "The Tender Trap," "Darkness at Noon," and "The Chase." Temple Ner Tamid will launch a series of studies in adult education Tuesday. There will be a ten-session course in "Beginners Hebrew" and "Bible Study." The course in "Beginners Hebrew" will be held each Tuesday at 10:30 a.m., followed by lunch, and the course in "Bible Study" will follow from noon to one p.m. Mr,s. Zvi Feinstein will teach the "Beginners Hebrew," and Rabbi Eugene Labovitz will conduct the "Bible Study" group. Ardmore MISS SANDRA HALPRYH Former Flyer, Teacher to Wed Mr. and Mrs. Julius Halpryn, of New York City, announce the engagement of their daughter, Sandra Eileen, to Irving Friedman, son of Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Friedman, of Miami Beach. The bride-elect is a graduate of the University of Miami, with a BS degree in education, and received her Master's from Hunter College in New York. She is a member of the American Assn. of University Women, and teaches in New York City. Mr. Friedman is a graduate of Tri-State College in Angola, Ind., where he received his BS degree in aeronautical engineering, and a Master's from the University of Miami. He served in World War II as a flight engineer on a B-29, which was attributed with dropping the first atomic bomb. He is president of Universal Aircraft Parts Corp., of Hialeah. The couple are planning to be married in January. Schedule Chanuka Workshop Sisterhood of the Coral Way Jewish Center will hold a regular meeting Thursday evening, Nov. 19, at Everglades Elementary School. A Chanuka workship will be led by Mrs. Samuel April, Mrs. Evelyn Cohan, and Mrs. Julia Weinstein, of the religious committee. They will demonstrate how to make various articles for display during "The Festival of Lights." Cenfer Sponsors Evening The public is invited to a gala evening Saturday in the Tambourine room of the Carillon hotel, sponsored by the Southwest Jewish Center and Sisterhood. Proceeds of the affair will be for the general fund and to assist the Center in completing its building. In charge of information is Mrs. Harriet Bornstein. Philips, star of "Peyton Place"' with Lana Turner, the motion picture "Middle of the Night," TV's "12 Angry Men" and the Elleiy Queen TV series, has flown in from Hollywood and will commence rehearsals immediately with the cast of "Summer and Smoke." He replaces Jeffrey Lynn, originally cast in the role, who has been unable to fulfill the commitment. The story of "Summer and Smoke" tells of a frustrated minister's daughter and her awakening of love for a young doctor. Hampered by inhibitions all her life, she finally offers her love to the doctor, only to find that she is too late. A-1 EMPLOYMENT DOMESTIC HELP DAY WORKERS Ph. FR 9-3401 is IT rossiitu; TO GET A GOOD DRY CLEANING JOB IN ONE HOUR? Friedman guarantees that not only will it be a good job, bat the FINEST DRY CLEANING YOU EVER HAD (Reejordless ol Priea). Including DRAPES SLIP COVERS SUITS $1.00 PLAIN DRESSES $1.25 FREEDMANS CLEANERS 2922 Coral Way, Miami, Florida MONDAY thru SATURDAY 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Cngrtvi ng Co n p t nj 116 N.E. 6th Street, Miami Wedding Invitations — Bar Mitivah Invitations Enjoy the specialized services of our Weding Consultant Rita H. Bukstel Complete selection shown in the comfort of your home Only $17.95 for 100 Bus. Phone FRanklin 3-4634 Res. Phone MUrrey MM6 Manufacturers of Genuine Steel Die Engraved Stationery



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Pag 8-C +Je*ls*fkrA09n A severely injured" woman is about to receive first aid. while •"-formation sheet establishing her name, address and condition is being prepared by one ol the attending student MS. The "tag" on the victim's chest indicates the natuie Ml Sinai Hospital Takes Part In Civil Defense Dry Run Here What happen^ hni d:*a>:er Dade const? defense ofned to had out reer when • % perauos V r ugalr 0" *ith the participat-on of Mi. Sinai Hospital's student %  srses at the proving passiL le> ted it h st. asd SW srtb axe. Scares o injured" persons, victims of a theoretical tornado and > "ere rescued" frost upper •DOTS asd trust usder debris. rece \ t first aid and •pmUTxm to local hospitals a vee-basr driB which afa* saw the ro op eratiu a of the Fire De-nhslasee Corps, C BBSJ Cosmuaicatios facfflQes a fRMSj el C.-vd Defense offi%  as' The drill was preceded short bnefcsg %  llaanq the M performed by ail participants uho were forced to work usder %  "anted by realistic make-op. Working in three firs: aid stations established in a "white" aone protected by a police cordon, the runes appLcd bandages. splint*, antiseptics, gave injections of sedatives, asd performed blood trans IBBMBS. Nearly a hundred "victimswere property processed during tke maneuver and a i ere than half evacuated by imhulasccj for trans portation to local TrtalT that sad been contacted dura* the droll m order to ascertain the %  smhrr of beds asd emergency beds available. Flaws escoontered during the *tll mere discussed in a cntasae hi esd of the proceedings, and — i t i u of constructive leggi T forwarded to the individual department* for adoption a the hj i real ate with itrongm rescue work trees two I -i-.| .as wheh these poos sere tagged te mdacate the nature sf their asfsnes, coeveniestry es and Mrs. Ghana Mt Sasai **h the .1 atversaty of Miami. GORDONx) FUNERAL HOME FR 3-3431 FrUiilui 1-143* 710 S.W. 12* Aw. Mayshie Friedberg Scores Again; Salesmanship Benefits Israel Bonds x Mir^H electrician, who came ho may he seen pessine out M A rrtwd electrician. mi Beach many years ago. of performing jobs he personal respono.n behalf of the State sf h> l He is Mayh.e Friedberg. of 17 rrasdbs rg is active in the camp.. %  • Israel Bond drive and l ombined Jewish Appeal here personally paving for newspaper advertisements solintipport for these campaigns. During the active season here, Chagall Named To Brandeis U 1 ILTHAM, % % %  Brandeis I'nnersity Wednesday announced the appointment of Marc Chagall faculty as the first Jack I Poses art.st-in residence. Chagall. one of the worlds greatest living artists. ill execute a ceramic composition mural in the new library on the Waltham. Mass. campus. Brandeis Trustee Poses, a New York art collector and president of D'Or*ay Perfumes, created the new artist-in residence program e of Re mer Miami Sonap i rell has long beea work of local actor* tional Polio Fo__ raided fuads for tke i led to the J lisij vaccine. Herrel! has bea 11 the executive Dade county eat Uonal Pouo Foua^atax] past t years. As thT county March of Dual he succeeds loom I counting firm exeeaf. served during 1x9. The new Marek d I | paign will run fron InJ and conclude vitk fa] March on Jaa at Faculty me mb er s from local narsasg schools whs assisted m ts* over-all drrectios acraded Mrs. Xora McCowas asd Miss Roberta GaJbra Ji. of ML Suui llmgatil school of sprang. Mrs Known By More people prefer and j enjoy the superior fl* of SeagramsV.O. to any other Imported WhiskySeagram's YO. Chnf* A '' IWBBSUTEAtS •Wi-T



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BT 13. 1959 */.!? thrihtr Page 7-A Rumania Terrorizes Jews, London Says fuAt— I _. |y woiif Opens Here from Pago 1-A lu hotel from Nov. a bevy of internaed leaders in relig the arts and other to speak at nutiop gatherings, congregations parTemple Beth Am, [M. Baumgard; TernHollywood, Rabbi Temple Beth eon Kronish; TernFt. Lauderdale, Ranson; Temple IsBeach, Rabbi IrvTemple Sinai of Rabbi Benno M. pie Israel of Greater Joseph R. Narot; ,Hdea, Rabbi Morris Wolff, immediate of the South Florof the Union of raw Congregation*, In with Mr*. Leoirti of th* gigantic 1 committo* of more hich ha* prepared fltanoous meeting* and it* affiliates. [ in Dade and Brow-. %  ml their presidents | in a Sunday running session of the il assembly at the Temple Beth Am, Steinberger; Beth loward Miller; Beth vorite ((ere for rARA4 Wurzel whose family was murdered by the Nazis, except for a sister who went to Israel 12 years I ago; David Faibash, a Hebrew writer; Schmidt, Schitinovizer, Tobakaru, and Horowitz, all Zionist leaders; four employees of the legation, including Israel Hart, and three girls. They Move Their Offices Paul Sobel and Charles Weinberg, realtors and land analysts, announce the removal of their offices to 420 Lincoln rd., second floor. El of Hollywood, Mrs. Irving Fishman; Emanuel of Ft. Lauderdale, Mrs. Henry Thanz; Temple Judea, Mrs. Maurice Waldorf; Temple Israel of West Palm Beach, Mrs. Samuel Bubis; Temple Israel of Greater Miami, Mrs. Joseph Ruffnec and Temple Sinai of North Miami, Mrs. Ralph Whitehouse. Invitation was extended Wednesday to all Greater Miamians to attend the following UAHC evening sessions: Sunday, Nov. 15 —Rabbi Maurice N. Eisendrath, Union president, recently elected "Clergyman of the Year;" Monday, Nov. 16 — "Youth Challenges Religion," Rabbi Arthur Lelyveld, of Fairmount Temple, Cleveland, O., Mrs. Rose Franzblau, New York Post columnist and noted child psychiatrist, David Levit, head of the International Doughnut Corporation of America; Tuesday, Nov. 17, "Religion in Our Emerging Society," Norman Cousins, editor, Saturday Review, Rabbi Louis Binstock, Temple Sholom, Chicago. Among South Floridians setting the stage here for the convention are: Meyer A. Baskin, Dr. Alvin Krasne, Sam C. Levenson, Allen I. Freehling, Dr. J. A. Greenhouse and A. J. Harris. Also David I. Hochberg, Albert I. Jacobs, David D. Pollack, Albert L. Rosen, Jack Wagner, Irving Wolff, and Sandford Levkoff. Women active locally in arranging for the National Federation of Temple Sisterhoods biennial are Mesdames Sidney Stengel, Hy Kaplan, Alfred Rich, Jack Krause, Aaron Kanner, Ben Kazan, Albert A. Green, Aaron Farr, Harold B. Spaet, Alexander Robbins, Irving Kobley, Sam A. Goldstein, Jack Levkoff, Harry Levinson. IIJ %  '"' is HI in i mi COINWORD TWO PUZZLES TO GO COINWORD No. 19 is this week worth $280. Our puz'Ifi.iHi'ic .'"'"-myiukjjha.t there are only two weeks left for you to win any or aU of The Jewish Floridian Jackpot. Next week's COINWORD brings the series to a conclusion. The jackpot at that will be worth $290. If there are no winners, the jackpot fund will be turned over as a contribution to the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. Mail your entry to COINWORD Editor, c/o The Jewish Floridian, P. O. Box 2973, Miami 1, Fla., by Sunday, midnight, Nov. 15 Hebrew Group Meets Saturday Moadon, Hebrew-speaking grou-> here, will hold its first meetinof the season Saturday evening at Temple Emanu-El. Menachem L. Roth, Israeli ed"cator, will be guest speaker. Als" to speak is Paul Kwitney, wno wTl discuss his trip last summer to Russia and Israel. David Freedman will presid'. Election of officers for the new year will take place. FR 9-4482 FICIENCIES i AGE MONEY CONSTRUCTION IMANCE PRtMf U OR HOME %  ntt. near shopping ||r.conditioned, health carpeting. Season Ifjnable. %  ylvania Ave. information it 4-432* SWEETZ MDJON CHAmHOH AVAILABLE SEMI-ADVANCED YOUR HOME. -It, P.M. ONLY 1-4512 i. YOU DIAL 3-4605 for



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K 13. 1959 Jew 1st fk>rkttan Page 11-B • 1, noted auiirer, will be ^CKT ch. 7 Sunwith Prof. Dren, of Colum{, in a discus"A Vist to the Diom Aleichem." is part of the t" series of the logical Seminary The Samueldiscussion will a second proover WCKT. ted to Board hnlans was elected the Jewish Funeral America at the orCent convention In Ida. Named were of Gordon Funeral Newman, Newman ; and Irvine BiasMemorial Chapels. Sen. Humphrey To Speak Here Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey (D.Minn.), who ha? tossed h.s hat into the 1960 Presidential campaign; will be guest speaker at a dinner for the new""M*.. Sinai Hospital o* Greater Miami on Nov. 30 at Westview Country Club, according to an announcement by William A. Weintraub, dinner chairman. Sen. Humphrey is chairman of the Special Senate Subcommittee on Disarmament. He is also holder of the first American Political Science Award, the "Congressional Distinguished Service Award." The dinner will also honor David Phillips, trustee of Mt. Sinai Hospital, as the "outstanding volunteer" for having secured pledges in excess of one million dollars for the hospital's building fund. Home Show Opens Sunday Are you snopping around for a floor covering for that new house or remodeling job? Need a swimming pool filter, or perhaps a pool itself? Want to see the latest designs in new homes, furnishings, appliances? Need a lot for the new house and the financial services to make this and your other desires possible? All these materials and services —and many more—will be available when the biggest and most complete package of home-building products in the entire Southeast is unwrapped at the Miami Home Builders Show on Sunday. When the free event opens at 2 p.m. in Dinner Key Auditorium, some 130 exhibitors will be participating. Included will be South Florida's leading homebuilders, the area's major industrialists, and a heavy contingent of nationallvknown manufacturers and distributors from out of state. / MICKEY HATES EL BROWN pion ave.,dip* Noy. >V finisher, he came >m \'*'\v Y<>rk. y his wife, Rose, tWO J brother*. Service! Qnnlun Funeral Home, ft. Sinai Cemetery. SILVER nreop. ave., died Nov. pro 1" years ftgo from Survivors Include son, Seymour; and I silver and Mm. %  0 leaven two |lno sinters. Services. "t Riverside Memorial a\.-. with burial lerVy. a WINTERS uii ave., died Nov. 7. d-printer anil came up from New York. Nov. !> at Riverside Li. Washington ave., i Nebo Cemetery. -HENSCHEL JloTti lei., died Nov. 5. six years ago from "J..' and was a re_ %  dealer. Surviving I. two'sons, a brother Auxiliary Meeting Tuesday Cedars of Lebanon Auxiliary will hold a board meeting Tuesday, 10 a.m., at the Elks Club, 495 Brickell ave. IETH FRIEDMAN •on ave.. dle<1 Nov. 5. Jl years ago from New rvlving are three sons. und Mnrtln; three Stella Schonholts. and Mrs. Henrietta timers and four broSfYING YOUR |T DESIRES FOR AND DIGNITY i Vista offers family J estates on beaut I %  pdscaped park like l'i>ni|>Iete freedom in memorials and wl w.'*S lO|)lI.' •PUw.Hial*aMla. ITU 7*3601 SPECIALTY ir BASKETS |ir PACKED VERED WITHIN WE HOUR CIRCUS 1. Plagler Ter. lONE • fS— FR 1-2511 St.. Illaleah. died Nov 3. He came here is years ago from Elisabeth, NJ.. and was a fUMlure dealer. Surviving are h.s wife. Rutha son. David; two daughters, his mother, brother and two sisters. He also leaves five grand,*, dr, fervlres were Nov. .> at i.oriion Funeral Home, with burial In Lakesj.le Memorial Park. MRS. MINNIE SPIEGEL is, of Mi 1Kb -t., died Nov. 3. She came here 23 years ago T>in New York. Surviving are two sisters. Including Mrs. Nellie CMMh <7' n „' l„ur brothers, and six grandchildren. nmveslde services were Nov. ;> at MI. sinal tvmeterv. with local arrangements by Ri verside Mem orial Chapel. LAWRENCE A. KLEIN Nov. 4j" at Go rdon Fu neral Home. MRS. DA S'LVERSTEIN -.2 of 7840 Hawthorne ave.. died Nov. 3 She came here 13 years f.' r m Boston Surviving are her husband. ^"WttRWJB Memorial Par k. mm Slnal Cemet ery. MICHAEL HIRSCHBERO Tl of a8W17th ave., died Nov. 1. B y r rrwo*d.u,hlive,; and one w sasr r w. n.x'st.. with "frill in "n Nebo Cemetery. Orkin Service School Planned Miami *will serve as headquarters for Orkin Exterminating Company's annual service school. There will be over 100 service personnel in attendance. The meeting will be held Saturday at the McAllister hotel. Pest control specialists from Orkin's home office in Atlanta, Ga., will be on hand to conduct the sessions devoted to pest control, termite control, fumigation, and sanitation. Each year, from August through November, the Orkin Technical Department "caravan" visits branch offices in the 28-state [territory, with the latest in pest control "know-how" as a part of Orkin's continuous program of research and training. Orkin's service schools were started back In Ihe 1940's. They now include film presentations produced in Orkin's own Technical Department and Training Center In Atlanta, round table discussions, on-the-job demonstrations, and this year will include a special report on insect resistance developed by Orkin field representatives based on a continuing study of insect infestation trends. Among those on the program are Robert Russell, Orkin's technical director; Clarence Marshall, asFashion Guild Elects Officers Micky Hayes, local retailer, was named president of the Men's Fashion Guild of Miami Beach at the group's annual election dinner at the Deauville hotel. Hayes was acting president during 1959, after moving up from the first vice presidency when former president Morris Kaganov moved to New York. Other new officers are Dave Miller, first vice president; Al Zablo, second vice president; Ed Greenberg, secretary; and Jack Seigel, treasurer. Named to the board of directors of the 12-year-old organization were past president Jules Gillette. Irving Berlin, Joe Linn, Larry Hoffman, Lymey Bressler, Martin Wexler, Henry Steig and Lou Levine. In addition, Mrs. Lillian Zablow, wife of the late Miami Beach retailer Irving Zablow, was named an "honorary board member," the first woman so honored by the Guild. The officers and board of directors will be installed at the 1959 dinner of the Guild at the Diplomat Country Club Nov. 24. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In the flctltloua name of GOPHER-MIAMI CO. (No! Inc.) C/o Jerome <:. Greene, 141 Security Trust T.ldg., Miami. Fla., Intend to register eald nani.with the Clerk of the Clritirt cf I lade <' iiinl w Kiort ^.^ 2/< NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name or I'ALMLAND PRINTERS at 7937 Blscayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida intend* to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. T. D. F. CORP. IRVING NATHANSON. Attorney 11/13-20-27. 11/4 At the dinner, the Guild will also make its annual charitable donations and present its I960 scholarship to deserving University of Miami students. Some 250 retailers, government and civic leaders, manufacturers and Guild store employees are expected to attend the annual affair. The Guild, composed of 32 retail men's stores, was founded here in 1947 as a business and charitable organization. It has become known for its continuing efforts to increase the recognition of the Greater Miami area as the top resort fashion style outlet. NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS MFP^^v ctVPV rht the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of MIAMI Mc.\T< %  •..at uii Ne. Miami Place. Miami, Florida intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, t iorlda. FRAN-LEE SPORTSWEAR OF MIAMI. INC. By: Ruth Cohen. President SETMOUH JSIM' IN Attorney for Fran-I.ee Sportswear of Miami, Inc. 11'13-20-27. 12/4 Senior Citizens to be Honored Officers and board of directors of the Sisterhood of Flagler Granada Jewish Community Center, will honor the Senior Friendship Group at a bruncheon Tuesday in the Center's air-conditioned auditorium. Program will include a book review by Abraham Gittelson, education director of Monticello Park. President of the group is Mrs. Selma Green. Mrs. Edgar Rifkin will present each member of the group with a gold corsage. Sisterhood Hears Review Mrs. Frank Kerdyk reviewed Pearl Buck's "Command the Morning" at Beth David Sisterhood's first "Book of the Brunch" Wednesday. Ticket chairmen were Mrs. -Stan Tinter, Mrs. Murray Darks, Mrs. John Strunin and Mrs. Sam Ostrowski. NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Mild, rsigl Ing to engage in business under the fictitious name or 3AXDRINA OF MIAMI at S16 N.W. :'tli Street, Miami, Florida intends to restate! sail name with the Clerk Of the Circuit Court of Dade County, TOW BMBHOIDERY WORKS INC • Milton Tow, Preel lent MARVIN I WIENER Mill Ainsley Bid*. Miami 32. Fla. Attorney tor aaadrlaa.* W*M ^ sistant technical director; Robert Wright, entomologist; Ernest Cofield, termite control specialist; Don Lewis, training director; Warren Frazier, entomologist. Orkin Exterminating Company was founded by Otto Orkin, who began his career in 1901 in eastern Pennsylvania. Today Orkin is recognized as "the world's largest pest control company." NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of CANDLE CANE VARIETIES at 17600 ColllM Av.nue. Miami Beach. Fla, intends to register said lame with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. TOMAG CORP. (a Fla. Corn.) Irving M. Finn 11/13-20-27, 12/4 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of Tl(i il'ICANA BAR at 1007 N.W. 79th Sti.-et. Miami. F.a intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Hade County, Florida. JALK CORP. (a Fla. Corp.) Sole Ownership 11/13-20-27, 12/4 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of FALLSBURG RESORT SHOP at 441 Arthur Godfrcw Road Intends to register said namewith the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, KU,r ,a WILLIAM SIMK1.MAN 11'13-20-27, 12/4 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name or MICKEY'S I-.All & PACKAGE STORE I SAY. 17th Avenue. Miami. Fla.. intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. MICKEY'S INC. OF MIAMI (a Fla. Corp.) KE8SLER .< OARS Attorneys for Applicant l998 S.W. 1st Street ^^^ LOW COST HOME LOANS To Buy, Build or Refinance Inquiries levMed • Ne Obligation. Celebrating eer M* Aawlvortary Y4 ne of t'u' Natioi Oldest and largest' 0ade Federal JAVINGS and LOAN ASSOCIAVON o MIAMI IfJStPH M UPTON, Pievdcnl 5 Conventenf Offkt Serve Dade County RESOURCF.S EXCEED 140 MILLION DOLLARS NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCBRY, No. 59C1O870 PATRICK CLRRAN. Plaintiff. vs. FLORENCE CURRAN, Defendant. S UIT >4 DIVORCE RENCS CLRRAN 63-50 Wetherole Street Rego Park, New York You, FLORENCE CLRRAN. are hereby notified that a Bill of Complaint for Divorce has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your Answer or Pleading to the Bill of Complaint on the plaintiffs Attorney. Richard W Wasserman. Esq., 420 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach 39. Florida, and file the original Answer or Pleading JT> the office of the. Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before the Hth tjay of December, 1959. If you fail to do so, Judgment by default will be taken against yon for the relief demanded in the Bill of Complaint This notice shall be published once each week for four consecutive weeks in THE JEWISH FLORIIHAN DONE AND ORDERED at Miami. Florida, this 9th day of November. AD E. B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk, circuit Court. 1 Jade County, Florida By: H ,:|I K •',•, n y clerk. RJCHARD \Y WASHERMAN. ESQ. Lincoln Road Florid* ''^"""ii/i^o-r.i^



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Page 2-A *Je*lstnorkHn*i Marilyn, Carroll Banned by Arabs NEW YORK—(JTA) Major American film distributors were notified "by "the I'nited Arah Ropublic Fiim Censor Board that films starring Marilyn Monroe and Carroll Baker, both recent converts to Judaism, will be banned. The board informed the film makers that "this decision has been taken for the general security of our country." The board •ook similar action when Elizabeth Taylor became a Jewess. The cen-' orship is in line with the Arab League boycott of producers and %  actors who financially "or morally" support Israel. Jorah Hadassah Luncheon Torah group of Hadassah will Sold its annual Youth Alyiah luncheon Monday. 11:30 a.m.. at the Algiers hotel. Saks Fifth Ave. will show adv?nced holiday and Paris fashions flown from New York U pecially for the meeting. ^^^^ LONG-DISTANCE MOVERS Fridc Y. No* Federation Appoints Le Key Committees Through Comi Chairmen o f major standing committees of the Greater Miami %  jeWKTr 'Federation "we**' frame. Wednesday by 9am J. Heiman president. Miami attorney Louis H>iman. | long activein Jewish affairs, I named chairman of the by-laws I committee. A study will get under way shortly to appraise the exht ing by-law* and make recommendations lor changes reflecting the recent growth of Federation and the local Jewish community. Congratulating Dr. Irving Lehrman (second from toft) o .dinner ol tribute honoring the rabbi and ag^Tg Emanu-El last week for "outstanding "[***** "2? Bonds" are (left to right) George Tabanoff. -J^~^ ies; former Gov. of Maryland Theodore R. McKeldm who made a special presentation to Rabbi Lehrman on behalf o Israel; and (extreme right) Joseph Rose, honoraryJ^ the dinner and Miami Beach chairman for State of Israel Bands. I aider* SimlcowHi has mmid Chairman of th* personnel committee, which consists of five members of the board of governors, all appointed by Heiman. This committee acts for the executive committee in mattars relating to personnel rotations and makes recommendation! to the executive committo* on personnel practices. DAILY PiCK-UPS New York, N-w fat ley, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washiagten, Boston — all other point*. DIAL JE 8-8353 H. Lieberman & Sons 655 COLLINS AVE. MIAMI BEACH RETURN LOAD RATES Mendel Fisher to Join Gen. Marshall At Jewish National Fund Dinner Mendel N. Fi.sher. national executive director of the Jewish National Fund, will pay tribute to the leadership responsible for the planning of the annual Greater Miami JNF Council dinner. Fisher will be among major ipeaken at the annual dinner scheduled for Thursday evening, No*. 10. at the Fontainebleau hotel. Also partieipatinc Will be Gen. S. L. A. Marshall, distinguished military authority and newspaperman. Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Oritt are chairmen of the annual event. Rabbi Leon Kronish, Temple Beth Sholom, and Rabbi Morris Skop, Temple Jodea, will d*liv*r th* invocation and benediction. Rabbi Irving Lehrman, Temple Emanu-El, will speak in behalf of th* Jewish National Fund. W*rd fund, n, irer of j. member of flfe | "''"live Mai active in | 0 Ihr nmbinej j c 1958 and 1 Olher s'MHtt.j chairmen have I nounci (i inchidri ram.' committee, Myers, and bn; Leon Kaplan. Tells Jncreost | Al Brenner, pr rior Window Co rai __ Wednesday — MJJ of more than SJ come for the ye against the prevKaijij The compaay, time cated at 62S E. loth j factures residential cial windows, jalaaj, Simkowitz is a member of Fedwalk in addition un eration's board of governors and! a sun control device the executive committee, and has horizontal or vertietl I served on Federation's budget committee and personnel committee. He is president of the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center, and has worked with the Welfare Planning Council of Dade County on the child and family welfare survey committee. Jay Kislak. who recently assumed the leadership of .he local CJA cash drive, has accepted the important post of chairman of the finance committee. This group consists of the treasurer of Federa Hon. chairman of the budget committee, and other members of the executive committee, including the NEW BUILDING Philip B. Stem, D.D.S. IS NOW LOCATED AT 1137 • 71st Street Program will include bass-bari-'campaign chairman. This committone Charles Sheldon, who has aptee prepares Ibe annual Federation peared in many Broadway prooperating budget for presentation NORMANDY Miami Beach, ISLE Florida UN 64551 SURfTY-SONDED TERMITE CONTROL ductions. Accompanist will be Miss Esther Barrett. to the executive body. Kislak is president of the Jay I Ki>lak Moclgaaa Corporation, and 1901 MIPICnOM IS. J-2 421 WORLD'S IARGIS? Rabbi Mayer Abramowit*presj!erwririfff budj?et commlt dent, and So1 Goldman '•*'; lees of ^th Federation and the chairman of the JNF Council, sain this week that reservations to the dinner should be completed before Nov. 16 to insure seating at the annual event. Prescript"! NOW IN TJRj A.'t-CO INlAtef.0 VM Mjf nunii cr.-wjuum 350! Phon? JL JT latr. W-shiejtin 723 LINC0LH1 piion it ma OCULISTS' MHciynaf COMMOlWl WE INSTALL GLASS EOR EVERY PiIMPOSE STORE FRONT PLATE AND WINDOW SUSS furniture Tops, tutted Mirrors aad Bttihirimo Our Saeciaftv 5 L & G. GLASS AND MIRROR WORKS 136 S.W. 8th ST. Atom's Or/in Phone FR 1-1363 Beth Sholom Stag Party Brotherhood of Temple Beth Sholom held its first stag party ofj | the season at the Lucerne hotel [ Thursday evening, according to Jack Wagner, president. W VlKVnfrO. Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky MS MICHICAN AVI MIAMI BEACH Phetie II 1 3595 JANITOR SE1 FREE BT Be -" • lariat* • c %  mums %  A A riOOF WAXINO I 215 N E a PLMS; HELP ISRAEL! BUY BONDS MAYSHII FRIEDBERG JE 8-4969 Progi.salng with Our Many Satiafled CusttBtt'| LOCATtON FOI YOOI C0NVT*W C0ULT0N BROS] "AfT" • "MAOWT ~UttTOW THAtOUrl Coral Way I S.W. 27th Ave. MO S.W.I PALMER'S MIAMI MONUMENT CO. "Miami's Leading Memorial Dealers" ServiMf the itwiih Community Since 1*26 MIAMI'S OMl AND ONLY JEWISH MONUMENT BUILDERS CATERING fxcivsivur TO THE JEWISH CLIENTELE GUARANTIED FINEST QUALITY MONUMENTS AT LOWEST PRKES IN MIAMI! GRAVE MARKERS HEADSTONES FOOTSTONES Only $35.00 Why Pay More? Buy for less at Palmer's and Save I AH UUtmmtmH CutUm $Hm4t in 0r Owe Sheet wrthln 3 Deyt I f 3277-79 81 SOUTHWEST (th STRUT Motet te Ceroer ml 33ri Ave**e e HI \ HI HI 4-0*21 W 1*19 D#Tw9)Cy tattlej ^ •etet *f our (ore* le p orine v \J •0Wa •ffO ^Ofe •Wsa' O*^eW"OR"l*l#0eSea' •etltnfl ol eur tunlrt windowed Chooeh — \J > offer the wlttmote la comfort and *'ke. Sailiai with tha trie s for eve* 90 yo<%. iverside 'MIMORIAI CMAPtl FUNIRAL OIRCCTOnt Phor.9 *ie 1-1151 MIAMI KACH 1130 Ml aiiii Dr IM4 Wa.fcb,,,.. A v* WOMiMteaMl \ K Wor*o.30-), \ PI I %  > %  H 4. I V M HOUR AMIULANCI SiaTVrCI / •n-i** llatherf Abe EUeaber* lerrlt S. Bletetre, F.D.



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Page 4-B +Jmlst>r**A**i> ****/. Hon,^. Jetnsh Ftroduw EXV.'WBI* YOUR MARRIAGE COUNSELOR |*g*tl N\WVUIT FA>H-S UAZJd>an mmo countW Sw u*\ G. KSwg: on *•••< bb. lr*.g l*nmn apmiwal *V O* Tcn^ttt bMnw-EL. •• Mr. KKng't mw*d OUM> tKt By DR. IRVING LEHRMAN Prof Arnold Toynbee in his analysis of the rise and fall of ancient civilizations comes to the conclusion that most of them perished not because they were destroyed by an enemy from without bat rather because they rotted from within and r ol l a y sed from moral decay It sweats to me that the conclusion of this freat historian should serve as a challenge to all of us who are concerned with the preservation of our society The greatest threat to civilization today is the weakening of family life. This means the moral (latoaegratioa of the family—which brings worn it infidelity, illegitimacy, juvenile dekneoeucy nod of MM, divorce According to a study of social statistics presented by the late Dr. Sidney Goldstein, there are one-third as many divorces granted today a* there are marriages solemnised The population of the United States increased SXi percent since lmTT. marriages increased 400 perind divorce* 2.000 percent. The answer of the Catholic Church to this challenge is that divorce -hculd be outlawed altogether The Protestant Church permits divorce, but knowing its damage, tries to limit and restrict the grounds. Thronghoot he country the trend is toward making dnorce difficult Jewish law on the other hand has an altogether cut approach There are many curumstaaces % %  m Baser i-.-.-reauni M ax#j phtafl M -courage, aiim o mn n of a mnrrtage la spite of i lenient approach, divorce se emed to have retd ie the realm of the theoretical and the .cademK. for we Jews have dev el ope d a -ng which worked so weB thronghoot the M knot always been able to pride oursehc* n the solidarity of Jewish marriages and on the csptratten and eodorance of the Jewish and mana) J ow ia fc Divorce Rate Soars r g h t t nang B that iswathi.io we i ingh: ia the general watrspeel of family ataae For the fast time nag. aad many experts are sa>n ea ten the old traditaoi wah as the tost Ml are these valors* altar of sen ice and delation. Marriage, because it was considered sacred, was approached with dedication, respect, reverence and awe. This is why marriages were planned with proper preparation and instruct ion. and why marriage by impulse was frowned upon. This preparation in Jewish tradition even Included laws of selection •Remember, in choosing a mate, if one is tall the other should be short so the children will not be too tall." If one is dark the other should be light so the children will not be too dark or too light." aad there were many, many others, perhaps old^asakmed and outdated, but nevertheless showing that marriage was never taken ugntry. Imoortancn of Family Bac kg round Selection especially considered family background We moderns consider the word Yictous" old-fashioned, aad yet we find that marriage counschnrs and psychologists today tell as that family background is of vital inwjortiacf. Who are the parents' What is the family'' What are the interests of the young coupler What b their outlook on ufe* We look askance at the ward. JThidrhen." and yet this was in a certain seas* the function of the old matchmaker, to delve into family backgrounds Per haps many of our short-lived marriages today might have been pet ranted if there had been a little more preparation and planning, hafare the d e cisi ve step When 1 thmk of the approach so many of at take to marriage. I recall the story of a man who had a garden la order to protect it he planted a hedge around it. hot then realised that the hedge was inwteaiiiti to keep animals aad i hilih i %  oat. so he buih a feme* around the hedge. One day he saw a fax Juanptag oer the fence lie was greatly da stor be d aad decided to budd a wail around the fence and iimfdantslj a pplie d haaneif to this arduous task When the wall was completed he entered the gardea to admire his work, hut k> and hehold, his flowers were dead. What He was so and pve R want we do m our all our energies au I Emma Laaaras chap— of B'txri B'rith Women pkr*,i Hatters luncheon and swrim party Sunday noon at tW k of Mrs. Alfred Reich. 6003 SW 59th .. So. Miami Laft,, are the Miaeee Edith Simmons. Mae Hurwitt, Bent OIL can S p i tnlnik Bornice Bobkoff. president, and Raft IOBJJ -Wedonaj' Fete At Temple Zk ibersaip meeting of Sisterhood Monday were jean's organization, I The head table ia tie Temple's social hall featured a three-tier wedding cake Mrs. Reuben Leder man played the wedding march while past priaidtBti. as maids." came down the aisle They were follond fe j Mrs. Sidney Pascal Mrs. Sam Lena Sou* fgj don sang ongkal wxhi| wedding marcs. Also parhcipoteg wetmaker" Tsiiibnihn ws dent Mrs Lawn Mrs David Pans. prtnidinL a s "bride nnrt un tat all members.' was Mrs. Anal .'.' 'i lays when only the bot MANISCHEWrri Gef ilte FisM



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November 13, 1959 MI'S Courses Conclusion eadership Training 1 women presidents have filled for Tuesday Nov. at Beth David Congrein personalUn^-publif membership retention, Ig, and fund-raising will tetl by officers of the of Jewish Women's Ori. ernard Stevens, FJWO [vice president, designed for the purpose of disnd developing new leadsmen's organizations. Injtaclude Mrs. Harold Solb. Phillip Schiff and Mrs. "Soltz. who complete the sixirse will receive certifi|he next open meeting of has been announced by C. Lehman, president. *Jewlsli fkridUari Page 3-B Ish Women 1 le of Meet Creation of the Jewish [will be the theme of a planned by the Plagler I Jewish Community Cenftiood Thursday, Nov. 19, enter auditorium. group under the direcrs. Paul Draizar will perrtley's Fur Salon will prefur fashion show, with of sisterhood modeling. lite to Jewish Book Month, Gittelson, education diMonticello Park Jewish [will review "This is My Herman Wouk. Jarney Landers is Sistersident. Mrs. Sam Kowalogram chairman. Newly-elected officers of the Teen-age Presidents Council of the Miami Beach YHMA look over plans for the year ahead. Left to right are Gail Pollak, president, and Sandy Weinstock, vice president. Gail is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Pollak, 4570 North Bay rd., and Sandy's parents are Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Weinstock, 4420 Adams ave. The Council is composed of 12 teen-age clubs sponsored by the Beach Branch of the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center. Sisterhood Marks Anniversary Sisterhood Marks Book Month Sisterhood of Temple Judea will celebrate its tenth anniversary Sunday, 8:15 p.m., at the Temple. Past presidents will be honored at a candlelight service. "Flite" committee of Eastern Airlines will present a variety show. Program chairman is MTS. Jack Somberg. GALA FIFTH SEASON I0C0NUT GROVE PLAYHOUSE 3500 Main Hwy. HI S-2581 Matt. Wad. ft Sat. 1:30 5-2581 Bx. Moo. 8:30 ly$: 7:30 NOW THRU NOV. 15 MATINEE SATURDAY AT 1:30 ROBERT Q. LEWIS ONCE MORE, WITH FEELING" Alt* Sfarrlaf K. T. STEVENS "Explnlrafr MtorfaMaflr-larr, M.Y. HeroW TrifcMa \\ OPENS tUES^ NOV. 17 29 KIM HUNTER and if ii JEFFREY LYNN in SUMMER AND SMOKE A Moat Poignant Lova Story by TENNESSEE WILLIAMS IYH0USE RESTAURANT AND COCKTAIL LOUNGE [iWKHIONS a 0INNUS • aWMRS • COCKTARS Reservations: Jimmy Ksarns In observance of Jewish Book Month, celebrated nationally Nov. 20 to Dec. 20, Beth David Sisterhood will present a play, "Fashions in Books." directed by Mrs. Louis Schwartzman on Wednesday noon. The cast will include the Mesdames Ben Abrams, Sam Badanes, Michael Covin, Walter Falk, Irving Genet, Robert Gold, Stanley Gostei, Daniel Hagan, Richard Her old, Stanley Jamison, Morris Rabinowitz, Philip Schiff, Edward Schwartz, Max Silver, Jerome Stern, John Strunin, and Stanley Tinter. Mrs. Harold Berney is musical accompanist. In honor of Book Month, there will also bea prize of a book awarded. ^ GREATER MIAMI CHILDREN NEED lomogenized Vitamin "D" Milk PHONE IE 1-5537 Sisterhood Slates Member Meeting One of the world's great accord ionists will entertain members of the Beth Israel Sisterhood at a "member bringa-member" party at the home of [Mrs. Emanuel J Finkel, 5171 Pineal ree dr., on Tues1 lay noon. Mrs. George rlechter, p r e s i lent, announced hat Ronald Pe.er Sweetz, winner of the 1957 international accordion contest in which 17 countries participated in Europe, will entertain Sisterhood members at the "kickoff" meeting. Sweetz, who now lives and teaches in Miami, has been national champion of the United States Accordion Assn. for three years, and has appeared on the Ed Sullivan show. Also on the program will be a book review of "This Is My God," by Herman Wouk, to be given by Herbert Berger, assistant director of the Bureau of Jewish Education. Mrs. Harry Milsen is membership chairman, and Mrs. Alexander Moscovits is program chairman. SWffTZ Bikur Cholim Meeting Miami chapter of Bikur Cholim Kosher Convalescent Home will meet Monday, 1 p.m., at Beth El Congregation, 500 SW 17th ave. Cell-o-zyme A REVELATION IN BEAUTY CULTURE > .• juniors take kindly to the shapely sheath 17


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13, 1959 +Jewlsii FhrMton ft Will Participate in Key CJFW Discussions |t of the Greatfederation and lit will lead a Southern Flor[ general assem, of Jewish Fedwill Funds Nov. Jcisco. arrent FederaU Stanley C. at and a foundjrill play importconference at will discuss nip developdrives, health needs, serving > education and public welfare dent of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, will present a major paper at the Large City Budgeting Conference on Nov. 11, at which representatives of 23 large cities undertake their cooperative review of 1960 budgets with a number of national agencies. Mr*. Stanley Myers, chairman of Federation's community planning committee, will join Samuel Cohen, Federation's community planning and budget director, at a session concerned with "Planning for Health and Welfare Services." Federation director Dr. Benjamin B. Rosenberg is to be a discussion leader on "SynagogueFederation Relationships," and Robert H. Golden, Miami Federation campaign director, will attend fund-raising clinics studying campaign techniques. Others attending the general assembly from the Miami area will include Mrs. Sam J. Heiman, Mrs. Maurice Pearlstein, Mrs. Harold Thurman, and Lloyd L. Ruskin, president of the Jewish Vocational Service. at a general •y morning on of Jewish agencan community. Charles Laic Lewis D. Cote, I take up the social servIso chairmanof committee of the [participate in a npaigning techon Miami's Comeal drive in 1959. [preside at a speSouthern region, he is president. Iman will take on chronic illness -health problems, tend a meeting lination of health valuation of the jCJFWF national Study. p-lstein, executive Tjewish Home for a panel member ig with "Serving the Institution." Ian, a vice presiUnited Fund Launches Campaign Here For $3,635,729 Goal of Minimum Needs This week marks the official kickoff of tlie 1960 campaign for the United Fund of Dade County. By Thursday afternoon, some 5,000 volunteers — those soliciting contributions from businesses, employes and professionals — will have begun their personal marathon for the support of the 300 health and welfare services of the Fund. Campaigns are being launched each day this week, culminating on Thursday with a corporate leadership luncheon atop the Dupont Plaza. In making public the third annual kickoff schedule, Eugene Weiss, 1960 campaign co-chairman for Miami Beach, said that "volunteers will be shooting for $3,635,729." This amount, he described as a "minimum need figure." Weiss said tbifeflast year some 228,000 men, women and children in Dade county benefited directly from at least one of the services of our United Fund. "If we are to INSURED SAVINGS I0ME FINANCING tAVE-BY-MAIL Oldest and Largest in Miami Beach [FEDPAL lAVINOS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION in Offices: Lincoln Road ot Washington Avenue continue this health and welfare service for one out of four of our neighbors, we must aim our sights at an amount which is $400,000 more than was ever raised." The "minimum need" figure, Weiss said, was presented to the campaign organization by the Fund's 37-member budget committee. Among them, the volunteers who this week launch their campaigns will canvass more than 2,200 businesses throughout the county. They will solicit 1960 pledges from more than 115,000 employes and from more than 4,500 Dade county professionals. "It is our intent," Weiss said, "to sign every employee and business in the county to our fair share plan. "The plan," he said, "requires that each employee asign to the United Fund cne hour's pay each month. The firm fair share is based on the average gift contribution given the drive last year by businesses of a like size and type." The United Good Neighbors will launch their phase of the 1960 drive on Jan. 10, v/ith 15,000 volunteer block workers. United Good Neighbors, recruited for the most part from women's civic, religious and service clubs, will go from door-to-door seeking contributions for Fund services for the forthcoming year. Each volunteer will cover only one block in her own neighborhood. NOW! YOU CAN SHARE IN ONI OF AMERICA'S FASTEST GROWING •SPECTATOR SPORTS GREYHOUND RACING Wf HAVt nttPAHIO SPtCIAl JtfPOftTS ON WESTERN RACING, INC. Common Stocks, $1.37V4 Approx. pries' Operators ot Pensocolo, Greyhound Pork, Phoenix and Portland Meadows. j Actively Traded on the Over-the-Counter Market CHI 1 Writs tsr mi ttftru Irtsj General Investing Corp. 814 Akasley Bldg. Miami 32, Fla. Phone FR 7-3547 Please send me FREE Reports on Wtttern Racing Inc. 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