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The Jewish Floridian ( October 2, 1959 )

UFJUD

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19 59 ... & S li JiaMona Edition ... 5 720 — 'Jewish Floridian Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKIY [3 — Number 40 Section A Miami. Florida, Friday, October 2, 1959 Ten Sections — Price $2.00 <£



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Page 2-A -JmistncrkMan Friday. October 2, Greater Miami Ushers in Rosh Hashcna Friday Eve Greater Miami tnfaen in the Hick Hety Day with evens** semees Friday. Saturday u the first day at Rash Hashoaa. Servic es are aha) scheduled ea the second day. Sunday The Rasa llnh e ai eeeerraace. rig—mmf the ceasing of the Hebrew New Year. 972a concludes Sunday evung. Next a a n ng th e perM aPahc way* ef A' which commences at Kol Xidre serrices on the evening of Oct. 11. Temple Beth Am. 5960 K Kendall dr.. So. Miami, will bold Friday evening services at 1.15 p.m., ^ with Rabbi Herbert Banmgard off floating Cantor Charles Kodner CAMDUUGMtMG TIM ti Ool — &48 P-m. rtaderi the musical portions of the f liturgy. Sermon will be "The Renewal of Creation." Services on Che first day of Rosh Hashona. Saturday, commence at 10 a.m.. with the sermon s c h e dul ed "Why Have the Jews Survived?" -^—' There will be a special service for children in the afternoon at 2 ^Tne Adventure Called Life SunDm day services are also at r „' ^ .. „ .— „ Shofar will be blown at 19:39 a.m. Rabbi CawJ Hernsuwdl offiev ^ ^ ^^ ^^^ „ .^^ Friday at :30 p.m. First day of Tenants Emaew 11 17tl Wash Boah Hashona begins with servington ave.. bmncbed Rosh Ha Saturday at t a.m. Cantor Hyshona at services Friday. I IS Fein and Samuel Grayson pju.. at the Miami Reach Municiwill chant the liturgy Sermon is pal A u ditori um Saturday services are at 9 15 Ha s scheaaaedffor 9 15 aa. Dr. ITVJI? Lehrmaa will officiate speak on -Eap*oring Inner Space." Cantor Israel Reich renders the maricil portions of the Services Sunday, the see. day of Rash Hashona. are at a:15 and 915 a-m.. with the ser"A Coauaaauty Distinct and ." Junior services for 9 to 12 will be in the s main sanctuary under the i am nirion of Rabbi Bernard day of Rosh Hashona services commence Sunday a8 am., with the sermon scheduled as "The Byes of the World are Upon Us." Shofar services axe at 11 15 a.m. Rabbi Herman M. Cohen and Cantor Emanuel Mandel will officiate at Rash Hashona services of Dad* lleiphl s Jew is h Canaran a rla n MOa* NW 2nd ave.. Friday at 5 30 p.m. Services will be held at 19569 NW 2nd ave. to assure adequate sea tin? Sermon is "Let There be Light." Services Saturday 131 a-m.. with (he sermoi NOW YOU DIAL FR 3-4605 + Uist thri-h OJ7 OAILY PICKUPS TO NIW YORK M. LIEBERMAN & SONS fire Proof Constructed Storage Warehouse 655 Collins Ave., Miami Beach 'Teen-Agers Look at Jewish Education" is the topic of a forum discuasion at the fall meeting of the board of directors of the Bureau of Jewish Education at the Fontainbieau hotel. Participating in the discussion, led by Louis Schwartzman. executive director, are standing (left to right) Alkm Albert. Charles Reiter. Jack Rabin. Seated are Dorothy Naness, Jo Ana Rubel. Pamela Beckman. Acceptance of Gad's WilT win be the sermon topic of Rabbi Bernard Shoter at se t ri tes ea the first day of Rosh ntiheai at Fleeter Mr. 50 NW 51st pi.. Saturday at pan. Cans ST Fred Bernstem renders the mmriral Por ti a — of the liturgy. Services Sunday are at 8 am Sounding of the Shofar will be at 11:15 am. Sermon is "Which' m the Coming Year?" %  Hashona will be launched' with Friday evening services at Teaapia B'ssai Shilim. lsWO NW) 22nd ave, at 8 p.m. Rabbi Sheldon' Edwards wiO officiate and discuss* "Who Leads the Blind*" Cantor 1 Ben Grossberg renders the musical { portions of the liturgy Saturday services commence at 9 a.m. Ser-' moo is -The Gifts of God." Services on the second day of Rosh Hashona. Sunday, are also at 9 a.m. Sermon is scheduled as "Not New. but Re-New." At Temple ThVreth Jacob. 951' Flamingo Way. Hialeah. Rabbi Leo: Heim will usher in Rosh Hashona with services Friday at 7:30 p.m. Cantor Samuel Levine renders the. musical portions of the liturgy. Saturday services are at 8:30 a.m. Rabbi Heim will discuss "In Thy Glory." Services Sunday are at 8:30 a.m.. with the sermon. "Not. Words but Deeds in the ComJig YearNorth Dade Jewish Center, 13630 W. Dixie hwy.. will commence the Rosh Hashona observance with services Friday at 6:30 p.m. Rabbi Henry Okolica will officiate and discuss "A New Year." Cantor Herman Marchbein Marbiny renders the musical portions of the liturgy. Services Saturday are at 8 a.m.. with the sermon scheduled : as "What Shall We Do Now?" Cm Saturday. 6:30 p.m.. Rabbi Okolica will discuss "A World at Peace." Second day of Rosh Hashona begins Sunday at 8 a.m. Shofar will be sounded at 10 a.m., and the sermon is "The Great Sound." Rabbi Tibor Stern officiates at High Holy Day services of Beth Jacob Congregation, 301-311 Washington ave.. beginning with services Friday at 5:50 p.m. Saturday services are at 8 a.m. Sermon is "A Full Measure of Life." Second %  ted as "Aa Bad to Evil." Evening ten ic es are at 5:3* p.m.. with the sirawai "Two Days m One." Special children's service is-at 2 p.m. Second day of Rosh Has boa a comwith su kta at 8:39 a.m. Sermon will be "The Shofar Signal." At the Hebrew Academy, 918 6th st. Rabbi Abraham Twersky will conduct the High Holy Day services beginning Friday at 5:45 p.m. Senke* Saturday are at 7:45 a.m. and 5:39 p.m. Rabbi Alexander Gross, A ca d emy principal, will speak on "Looking Ahead in Education." Services on the second < day of Rash Hashona are 7:45 a.m. and 5 p.m. Sermon is "A World in Balance." Tashlich service lot-! lews. Meiwicello Park Connrosatian, law NE 163rd st., ushers in Rosh; Hashona Friday 5:45 p.m. Services Saturday are at 7:30 a.m. Sermon at 10:15 a.m. is scheduled as "The Cost of Attainment." Rabbi Max Lapse hit? officiates, with Cantor Ben-Zion Kirschenbaum rendering the musical portions of the liturgy. Services on the second day of Rosh Hashona commence at 7:30 a.m. Shofar will be sound-, ed at 10:15 a.m.. followed by a sermon on "Why Did God Will Life for Us?" Special children's serv-' ices to be conducted by Abraham J. Gittelson, education director, Isadore Dickman at North Miami: Beach Junior High and Sabal and Palm Elementary School. Rabbi David Lehrfield will offl. date at Rosh Hashona sen ices of Kneseth Israel Cennrenation, Mlj Euclid ave., Friday at 6 p.m. Saturday services are at 7 a.m. Sermon is "Two Kinds of MottV are at|ars." OB the seconl day of 8^ sched-. Hashona. he will preach on u \ Good Year." Cantor Abraham Saf renders the m u sica l portions of the liturgy. Even in g services boti days are at 6 p.m. Bath Is rael Canaa-eaation, m 46th st., will observe Rosh Hasboaa aa Page 11 A V$S& fresanjtiom Specie!isf$ MOW IN TWO MODERN LOCATIONS SPAff re eras 350 LINCOLN ROAD Phono JE 8-7425 Ave. ftWiieaia* 728 LINCOLN ROAD Phono JE 84749 OCBUSTS' PtESCRs*TIONS FIIL:D CONTACT LENSES HAPPY NCW YIAI-S720 STRENGTHEN THE STATE OF ISRAEL BUY ISRAEL BONDS MAYSMII Ftuteenc JE s-4949 1959-60 May the fiew Hear br'm health and happiness ) \ LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE MOVING TO AND FROM NIW JUSIY e PHILADELPHIA • BALTIMORE ALBANY a WASHINGTON • BOSTON PROVIDE NCI end all ethar paints Weakly Service Dial JE 8 8353 < ; ORKIN EXTERMINATING COMPANY f fct Ike privacy and \l ewM of our loroe rapouna foomi and in tha dliilngunnad XI nng of oor iwnUt windowed Chopah\ Her MM ultimo)* in comfort and •ervios, > -ov. wifk livarwoa far over 50 yawn. R iverside i MIMO'IAI CHAPIL FUNERAL DIRECTORS Phon* JE 1-1151 MI AMI MAC H %  *^r Pwa9fMaBM#y Dfnf) ItM West Rosier end 20m Avena* rtl i-ltl\ / K 14 HOUR AAARULANCI SIRVICf / Irvhw llnsharf Aba Eistaaer* Lorrie S. Iloibtrg, F.D.



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October 2. 1959 +JewM>aorSdkn Page 3-A TO THE EDITOR leader Says Nikita, Columnist Agree liiw. Ipermit The JtwWi Floridiant mP to comment on Leo rticle in The Jewish i'ln of'sept. 25, on the eve Z fateful Camp David lo speak. Mindlin accuses Premier of suggesting world Hi SUJSt "because it will ereTworld condition "in which form of society can do no less M flourish.' l in make his meaning crytiriwr Mr Mindlin continues in vein "For the West, contrarabandonment of a garrison mean, in addition retrenchment, the government activity research, medicine, and a host of renomy must industrial ssation of education, msine. power fcd fields" the "In pHshed If the Soviet Premier had been faced with such questions?' Would Pfeffer have been brought back to life? Would the plight of Soviet Jews have been ameliorated? Of course Mr. Khrushchev micht have been embarrassed, which might have made some sort of murky point for somebody. But I believe that most of us Jews are pretty much like most other Americans. Wo want peace for our children and if possible a little less of the taxes, tensions, and Strontium 90 that harry us. And we agree with President Eisenhower and Adlai Stevenson that it does no harm to sit down and talk with the Soviet Premier. It might even do a little And then be sums up fcol, problem as follows: ^ the Khrushchev peace total i* %  declaration of ecoic warfare on the Soviet dic. own terms, according to ikh he feels as certain of vleM he is sure of universal at should a shooting war %  ak out." [Now as I understand the above, \ t Mindlin feels that America's _j system is such that it needs and the threat of war to keep and remain prosperouj, the Soviet Union can thrive ily in peace and general disarmMr. Mindlin and Mr. hrushcbev are thus in pretty agreement, it seems, that cialism (or Communism) is a uperior system to our democratic fapitalism and will eventually my us as j result of peaceful ompetition. Well, that's all pretty depressMr. Khrushchev comes over and tells us it's not so, he esn't believe that capitalism has have war, and that the Marxhave revised that particular tlief of theirs, and we can really live together in peaceful cometition. And now Mr. Mindlin says bon't believe him, capitalism does pave to have war. Just to add to the confusion, Mr. Hindlin also thinks that Shirley (acClaine should have stopped in the middle of that famous cancan and asked Mr. Khrushchev oint-btank: 'What about Itzhak ?" It would have been a sight, all right. on sober second thought, what would have been accomEDITOR, The Jewish Floridian: While Wilson & Company attended a meeting of the Beth Din, ihcy did not consent to make any changes in their Miami Kashruth supervision from which they have had the last several years. T. O. McMULLAN Manager Wilson A Co." Miami But I don't think that most people believe that embarrassing Khrushchev could serve any useful purpose. Nor that our country wants war. Mr. Mindlin concludes that "you can't do business with the Com' munisfs." Has he a realistic alternative? I have just had a second thought, and perhaps Mr. Mindlin's belief in the inevitability of war is a good thing after all. For one, it will once and for all obliterate the problem of anti-Semitism, since all anti-Semites will undoubtedly perish. Of course, all Jews will just as surely perish, but is this too bit; a price to pav for the kind of world we want? RICHARD STILLER Hlaleah Retorts Mr. Mindlin: "Mr. Stiller conveniently half-quotes to support his own misconceptions. What he does is to offer up a sandwich composed of two pieces of bread, while carefully avoiding the meat between. Thus, he repeats the paragraphs 'For the West .' and 'In effect, the Khrushchev peace proposal But he forgets the crux of the observation, which appears between them: While xne alternative. the continued accretion of get-emment programs in these areas of human endeavor, in the face of an abandoned garrison economy, can do no less than spell ultimate success to the Khrushchev .prophecy that our grandchildren will lire in a Communist society.' This is the focal point upon which the Soviet Premier's peace proposal rests, it recognizes that Tt-e must finally acttpt the Khrushchev alternative precisely because war is unthinkable. It also recoenizes that in accepting it. in continuing meticulously to develop a paternalistic society, we shall he contributing to the creation of a world order which our traditional laissezfaire beliefs previously held unthinkable. What Mr. Khrushchev's proposal did was to spell out his accurate conception of our dilemma as a reinforcement of his friendly challenge to substitute economic competition for the threat of war. With respect to the rest of Mr. StiIIer's conclusions, they are purely his own and hardly relevant to the Sept. 25 column." North Dade Jewish Center sponsors a "Welcome Night" for new members. Left to right are North Miami Mayor-Elect Ed Vischi; Rabbi Henry Okolica, North Dade spiritual leader, who delivered the invocation; Larry K. Nixon, master of ceremonies; and Stanley L. Cohen, president, who presented the address of welcome. Mrs. Henry Gilbert also spoke on behalf of the Center Sisterhood. Editor, The Jewish Floridian: I am a Jew. I have been in Miami for only seven weeks, but here I have been hurt very deeply. For the past four weeks, I have been looking for work in a loan company, wanting to start at the bottom and work my way up to the top. Up to now I am still unemployed. I have filled out several applications for some of the larger loan companies, but have never received any replies. Although my interviews have been mostly favorable, I thought that perhaps they had gotten someone more qualified or experienced in that field. Today, I went to apply to another loan company. I was interviewed and pasaed two testa with high grades. Before I filled out the application, •eked M there was any discrimination against Jews, as s omebody had recently told me that most of the loan companies in Miami will not hire Jews. htit ... and now AUSTIN BURKE •reseats floridsfs largest and newest selections for the Teenese Student. Snort, bosky, or tell hem 13 years end •War AUSTIN BURKE'S own .Continental Look Carefully tailored with: Deeble Side Vents • Sllnt Topered Pants e Hocking Pockets e Ceffed Sleeves e Snorter Cetaway sockets New Shipments Dally Continental A Ivy %  V %  .<•> SUITS r n d .$^Q50 SPORT $2Q50 The manager seemed surprised at the question and replied that it did not make many difference to him. Later, as an after thought, he phoned his supervisor and said that he was hiring a bright young man and had a question to ask him; did they hire Jews? The reply was that it was the policy of the company not to hire Jews. It is hard to believe that in this day and age job discrimination exists in an organization that is nationally known. The manager was as surprised to hear this as I was hurt, and he hardly knew what to say. Neither do I. STANLEY DeLEON Miami Bech Educators Name Rabbi Azulay Rabbi Shimon Azulay, instructor at the Hebrew Academy and Hebrew High School, is the newlyelected president of the Hebrew Educators Alliance of Greater Miami. Rabbi Azulay Is a graduate of the Teachers Institute of Jerusalem, and also holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Toronto. In Israel, Rabbi Azulay was associated with the Youth Aliyah department of the Jewish Agency, and was educational director of a Hadassah camp in Haifa. Arriving here in 1M7. Rabbi Azulay was instructor of Talmud at the Toronto H ebrew Academy and director of the Hebrew Cultural Organization and Camp Mased. Ho is the author of many Hebrew articles on grammar, rhetoric, and Jewish history. In addition to Rabbi Azulay, the following were elected officers for the year: Honorary presidents, David Freedman and Rabbi Morris HorFHOTO CREDITS Included among the illus1 trations in the special sections of this Rosh Hashona edition of The Jewish Florid. ian arm photos by the United : f Jewish Appeal and Israel i: E Bond Organization. Illustra| tive materials by ether no* tional and international philanthropic and educational | I institutions ere els n,nw i.iw tiiifliHuiiiiwr.ii :'*:in reprs" f %  MMMBI To Accent Membgrsnip Mt. Scopus group of Hadassah will accent membership as the theme of its meeting at Masonic Hall. 41 Valencia, Coral Gables, Monday at 1 p.m. ovitz; vice president, Nettie Goldstein; secretary, Zvi Perach; treasurer, Saul Porush; executive board, Avi Kayfe. Isaac Dickman, Yaakov Safra, Meir Somberg, Zehava Sukenick. Tuc-i.. T r lay nl| till 9 P M r J>' your conven ""-' ChdT(;. '" %  '"i account FlortJt'i Targtit AUSTIN Clcthr. c/ Distimlion Quality Cltthirr BURKE a! c. Uiscou.it SUPERIOR STAMP & SEAL WORKS MAHVfACTUnnS OF RUBBER STAMPS CORPORATION SEALS and StfPfUIS CHARLIE MERZ, Owner MOW LOCATED AT 613 Mi. 1st Ave. FR 4-1034 I would like to thank my many friends for their kindness to me during my recent illness and to wish them and the entire Jewish'community a very Happy New Year. TILLIE SANDLER mt. end sirs, tni Ssmdhr) HYPNOTISM AND SELF-HYPNOSIS Ulncu ot the mind and body miraculously responde to 1>'P noth,r .? p *: Alto combats bad habits; a-"?""*; Drinking; Insomnia; F m D ': den; Complexes; Nsrvous '• n,,c .": Leek of Confldsncs; Ovsrwsight. Impoteney; Al.eral.s: Etc. Improve yourself mentally and physically. Dt. W. H. APPlttY. *-• Fla.'s Only Hypnotherapy Clinic &f 24 S.W. 42nd Ave. M Copyright 1S5S /Sfc_ ABSOLUTELY PRICELESS!" **^sjja^^ _Crefcsr. N.f. T,m v* i



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Foge 4-A •JeHistfkrkMor ftMay. October 1 1 9S| j OFFICE and PLANT — 120 N £. Sarth Street Telephone FR ^4605 Teletype Canunuzucatiaos Miami TWX MM396 FRED K. SHOCHET LEOMINDLIN Editor and Pubfisber .1.. hi* uUte E i Jilui IsffT fcr Tte Jawtafe PtafMlaa iTm icn. iwk saw. Mtami I. %  **•%  *J*rr' i BUUT Ar I*M. *t Pa* Otfltt of Miami. S. 1T. M Jaw.** Uty •* jr/. Miajan • tH Jawiafc Taatraa*> Art. Future S 1ca t a Wa#*rida Nnri Nitwill Eitartal *u. American Aaan. a ||rii laanaa Nrrown. M tfca Flaria'a Praae Aaa. Tto Tialaa FWMiaa do** not rnrante* tfca Kaahrutb of the %  Mrca*a4>*r < %  %  U mi ta ita eoaaaaBa. >iicate an ^ did. as reflected both in Miami and nationally large number e* new synagogues and JewLT ^ ten. as well as in the increase in levels education for children and adults. Studies in addition seemed to creased willingness on the part of Amerk to stand up and be counted among the ranks n," seemed to be less* timidity about Jewish idenffi tion with the integration issue—although this hare been because the outrageous bombing synagogues poefcmarking the previous year J 5719 aenerally untouched. tUSIC'l TION ISRAFI. BITREAU M A. D. Gerdes Street, Tel Anc. %  AY U. BINDER RATH generally Thus, while theprocess of Jewish cultural ds. Volume 33 Number 40 Friday. October 2. 29 Dul 5719 1969 of Wish %  aj<* Jewish Vibrant Jewish Community Greets New Year The Hebrew Year 5719 will, in'a matter of a few hours, become another page of history. The dawn c: a New Year is upon us. The events mat shaped the past 12-month period are com p lex in their detail. They had an impact on Jewish communities throughout the world. One of me biggest stones to come out of 5719 was the sudden exodus of Rumanian Jewry. Without warning, this Iron Curtain country o cte t ed its Jewish rrftzens the opportunity to migrate to Israel. Families previously separated by an impersonal Communist regime when Rumania cut off immigration to Israel years before with the same swiftness and unpredictability as it resumed it once cgain during 5719. were now rsnscmled with the possibucy of reunion. For American Jewry, this meant added responfbiKt y in a Rescue Fund campaign financed by the United Jewish Appeal with an attendant share in '-ZB responsibility filtering down to the individual Jewish communities throughout the nation—as it did to Miami and its Combined Jewish Appeal -which in 1959 gathered a record S 1.800.000 to sup port the Rumanian immigration. Israel generally, c host of other organizations, and our own local cgeucies. THE FATE Of SOVIET JEWRY If Rumania was a dramatic occurrence during j:e past Hebrew Year, events in other lands under Communist domination were no less important. The single most stirring story found itself written in the Exciting among events in Jerusalem was the debate betwe en outgoing president Philip Klutznick and the Prime Minister of Israel. For the first time, an American Jew took the opportunity publicly to defend the status of Diaspora Jewry—long a favorite target of David Ben-Gurian. Make no mistake, Khitznick told the citizens of Israel, the American Jewish community was not some kind of strange animal existing in a twilight world. It was vital philosophically as well as philanthropicaily. It would be a tragic error, he warned, for Israelis to expect American Jews to migrate en masse to Israel—and to conclude that American Jews are not Jews if they fail to do so. But to back up Klutznick's words of warning was little at the Jerusalem convention by way of conviction. Less than would be desired came from its deliberations to strengthen the assertion that the American Jewish community is a vital philosophic force. This sad impression equally marked the WJC assembly in Stockholm—as it did the national conventions of Hadassah. the Zionist Organization of America. Pioneer Women, and ORT in such motor American cities as New York. St Louis, Washington and Cleveland. For the fundamental emphasis was on three issues: the fate of Soviet Jewry, the principal of freedom of passage in international waters, and philanthropy. There is no denying the significance of each. Yet important as they are, none strengthened the Klutznick assertion mat the American Jewish community is shifting some of its emphasis from these repeated assertion that Jewish cultural and religious areas of its principal vitality to areas encompassing life was being systematically strangled by Soviet traditional Jewish culture. rule. This finding was corroborated again and again But if the conventions did not, events generally cy auiiontatrve reports and observations. A major effort during 5719 thus directed itself to war d achieving liaison between free world Jewry and Russian authorities in an effort to secure a clearer picture with respect to the fate of the Jewish community there. The unique achievement in this regard was the meeting during the past Hebrew Year in Washington between top leaders of lbs American Jewish Committee and Anastas Mikoyan. one of the Communist Big Three, en the occasion of MJroyan's visit here. Mikoyan. like Frol Kozlov. second in the Russian triumverate. who came to the U.S. several months later, denied the reports and observations. If Jewish cultural and reLgious life in the Soviet Union seemed to be en the wane, he declared. it was a matter of personal choice maim by the individual Soviet Jewish citizen. "Some of my best friends." Mikoyan noted unoriginaliy. "are Jews or married to Jewish "girls." Less willing to discuss the situation, but more ginger in his comment was Premier rOirusLcnev, who graced the naton with a visit on the eve of Rosh Hashona 5720. Jews in the Soviet Union, he told the National Press C.ub, "hold c place of high honor." caaing that they played principal roles in the development of the Russian moon rocket More than this, be did not care to say ;ring later in San Francisco comment by top American labor leaders, among them Waher Reuther, who quest: c Premier with respect to the status of the Soviet Jew^^"S?" Nor wa thia a general reflection of Mr. Khrushchev's singular failures to hit it off with our union officials. For. at year's despite the USSR's earlier sendoff to a £ gnifjeant cultural event like the recentlyrnc*ed 100th anniversary of t Sholem Aleichem. Jews in Russia still carriec Heritmcaticn papers stamped "Jew. k% DEFENSE OF DIASPORA JEWRY National convention time dotted the final days of 5719. Heading the list were two ma, r i W f rid Sobering*. B'nai B'rith met in Jerusalem at the height of the summer, while the World Jewish Congress followed up with an "-emery of its own in Stockholm. semination took an upward swing in developing! the vocal accent remained on other areas identification—as the conventions organizations indicated. But what of 5720. the year ahead, on this eve d Rosh Hashona? We begin a New Year in the shade* that we were unable to meet with Premier Khnsk chev to discuss the fate of Soviet Jewry; that Israeli Ambassador to the U.S.. Abba Ebon, has resigned to seek political office In his homeland; that Ge many, on the 20th anniversary of her launchina d World War II, now believes Hitler's sole mistake was to lose; that Egypt continues her threats of-an. nihikttion of the Jewish State; that riots rocked the Jewish State in a blasting charge by North African immigrants of discrimination against them. MEETING THE CHALLENGE Of TOMORROW The Jewish co mmunit y of Greater Miami has id ultimate impact on all of these issues in the manner in which it meets these and other issues culturally and philanthropicaily. The Combined Jewish Ap-, peal of 1960 has a double challenge: to better the SI.800,000 achieved during 5719; and to do so in the face of the widely-regretted announcement several weeks before Rosh Hashona that Federation executive director Dr. Benjamin Rosenberg would resign in November to assume a new position in Boston. The Greater Miami Israel Bond committee regards with pride its achievement on the occasion of the last High Holy Days, when Miami was first in the nation in percentage increase—while striving to maintain the pace for the year ahead. Similar progress is the anticipation of our local agencies: Mt Sinai Hospital. Greater Miami Jewish Co mmuni ty Center, Jewish Family and Children'i Service, Bureau of Jewish Education, Jewish Home for the Aged. Jewish Vocational Service, and National Council of Jewish Women. As the Hebrew New Year 5720 dawns, we observe a vibrant Jewish community in Miami and throughout the nation ready and willing to meet the challenge of tomorrow.



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adBy.Odobgg.19S> • Jenisti ncrkHon Pag 5-A BABBI CHAIM IARMNSEY Rav Hamachhlr lvw Wfw %  VT RABBI HENRY B. WERNICK Executive Director Wl nsiw? ipnKon nineon ijn (AirW /TasAras Association Of Greater Miami, Inc. 1587 WASHINGTON AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA "L'SHONO TOVO TIKOSAYVy V'SICHOSAIMU L' ALTER L'CHIM TOVIM UL'SHOLOM." The United Kashrus Association of Greater Miami extends to the Jewish Community of Greater Miami and to KLAL Israel our sincere wishes for a very Happy, Healthy and Prosperous New Year replete with spiritual fulfillment. RABBI CHAIM KARLINSKY, RAV HAMACHSHIR My sincerest wishes for a Happy, Healthy and Prosperous New Year to our Rav Hamachshir, to our President, Hyman Zaidman, Vice President. Norman Kaplan, Recording Secretary. Herman Dale, to all the Members of our Board, and the entire membership of the United Kashrus Association, and the entire Jewish Community. RABBI HENRY B. WERNICK, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR In behalf of the United Kashrus Association, I offer a hearty BOACHEM L'SHOLOM to our beloved Rav Hamachshir, Rabbi Chaim Karlinsky, to all of our members, sponsors, business associates, and to all of the Jewish Community in Greater Miami. I am grateful for the cooperation of our friends that have helped us establish a proven efficient Kashrus system that sets high standards for our community. Again we pledge to you under the United Kashrus Association the strictest Kashrus and quality of our products. HYMAN ZAIDMAN. PRESIDENT Happy Hew Tear to AH Our Friendt and Customer! CROWN KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY 1122 • 15tH Street JE 1-*5W May T*u Hat* a Healthy and Happy Hew Tear COLUNS KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY 7449 Collins Avenue — UN 6-2955 Best Wishes for the Hew Year to All CORAL WAY KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY 1741 S.W. 21 t Straet HI 3-1383 May the Hew Year be Filled with Happiness for You COMMUNITY KOSHER MEATS & POULTRY 525 • 41 si Street — JE 1-7*91 Hew Tear Greetings to All DADE KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY 153 N.W. 5th Str**t — FR 3-1430 Happy Hew y e „ to ^j Our Friends and Customers EU A HELEN'S KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY 630 %  6th Street — JE 4-253* May Tou Have a Haalthy and Happy Hew Year K. GROSS KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY 1447 Pennsylvania Avu JE 1-70*0 Be*t Wishes for the Hew Year to All HABER'S KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY 112 Normandy Drive — UN 6-5223 May the Hew Year be Filled with Happiness for You HERMAN'S KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY 1053 Washington Avenue JE 19008 Hew Yedr Greetings to All S A K KOSHER MEATS & POULTRY 243 Collins Avenue — JE 1 7861 Happy )$ tw Year to All Our Friends and Customer! JACK'S TROPICAL KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY 1325 Washington Avenue — JE 1-12*7 May Tou Have a Healthy and Happy Hew Year KAHLENBERG'S KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY MM 6th Street — JE 8-4577 Best Wishes for the Hew Year to Alt KAPLAN'S KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY 1447 Dr.xel Avenue — JE 4-2929 May the Hew Year be Filled with Happiness foe You KATZ'S KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY 189* S.W. 8th Street — FR 1-38*9 Hew Year Greeting? to All KAY'S KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY 1041 Washington Avenue — JE 1-3496 • Happy Hew Year to All Our Friends and Customers MURRAY A ITZ KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY 953 Washington Avenue — JE 34)221 May Tou Have a Healthy and Happy Hew Year ROYAL KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY 5937 S.W. 8th Street — MO 74733 Best Wishes for the Hew Year to All RUBINDALE KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY 2101 Corel Wey — HI 3476* May the Hew Year be Filled with Happiness for You S. A M. KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY 810 S.W. 22nd Avenue — HI 3-7743 Hew Year Greetings to All MALTER'S SUNSHINE KOSHER MARKET 43* Collins Avenue — JE 1-5583 Happy Hew Year to All Our Friends and Customers SOL'S KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY 7446 Collins Avenue — UN 6-6226 Hew Year Greetings to All SOL MALTER'S KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY 957 Washington Avenue — JE 8-1539 NORMAN KAPLAN, VICE PRESIDENT May Tou Have a Healthy and Happy Hew Year PHIL'S KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY 613 Collins Avenue — JE 2-2135 Best Wishes for the Hew Year to All NEW DEAL KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY 13*2 N.E. 163rd Street — Wl 5-2512 Hew Year Greetings to All WEINER'S KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY 1332 N.E. 163rd Street t— Wl 7-7443 Happy Hew Year to All Our Friends and Customers BEACH FOOD CENTER KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY 1419 Weshington Avenue — JE 1-3418 May the Hew Year be Filled with Happiness for You KOSHER CATERING FOR ALL SIMCHAS GORDON A PONT 170 N.W. 5th Street — FR 9-7996 y^ew Tear Greetings to All MIDT0WN KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY 523 41st Street — JE 1-1396 Kosher Meat Packing Hovsns A Poultry Dealers Unit Out Strict Supervision Hew Year Greetings to All GE0. LAZARUS A SON PACKING CO. May Tou Have a Healthy and Happy Hew Year WILSON A CO Best Wishes for the Hew Year to All HARRY'S UVE POULTRY 2011 S.W. 3th Street FR 3-4232 May the Hew Year be Filled with Happiness for You ADLER'S LIVE POULTRY 1832 S.W. 8th Street FR 4-2279 Hew Year Greetings to All CARMEL KOSHER POULTRY INC JE 1-3418 — JE 1-0343 MASHGICHIM REV. DEUTSCH. REV. SAFRA. REV. MOSCOWITZ SHOCHTIM REV. SHAPIRO. REV. SCHECHTER. REV. HECHT



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Pcne 6-A -Jenlst FIcrkMan J'ridoy. OctoUr Golda, Zeineddine In Hot Suez Exchange UNITED NATIONS JTA Mrs. Golda Meir. Israels Fore.cr. Minister, opened Israel's figh: in the I arises here against the United Arab Republic of The Sun Canal with the thai the ON could bring peace to the Middle East by msisaar, oa la. rari's right to freedom of aavtgatjon is the waterway. la aa address to tine General A* sembiy. Mrs. Meir also warned accept "a szmaDoa ia which she is singled oat for iOegal discnminauon-'" She added Israel tkat the UAt claim ef "an a lt aa e d stats af war" wrlfc Israel as tfie basis far the blockade was irvadmtssabie' under the \JM ih a* a i and that '1t*s os-caHed state of war" had "z. The p i in aple af respect for the political inih piidaarf and ter rtforial Jamil Rj of afl states in tV regiea. "3 The principle that J a s l i mast he settled be aaeuV me*"s ia accordance w:th the Charter." Ererrisaie h: of rer.lv'" Farad Zeseed'ine. of Syria. Deputy Foreign Minister of the 1 Arab Bepabbc deiirered a 15-mintle speech attackinc Mrs. Meir. as • %  ell as Israel and Zionism. He char."ed that Mrs. Meir had preseated "an ambiguous and con the OH -,ue!T ea, r. J^^ 1 !" U^ If't^ Sf Z \l ^^^ v-=> i c*. prohlna which, he said, had been stua,lcB -created by ZkarsaT and wa's made possible by British colonial bayonets." T-e UAR delegate said that the entire Zionist concept is "based up an racial and relieteus discrimination" and "breeds trt -Semrhsm." Ha accused Mrs. Meir of ctatwaj "many things which unfortunately are contrary to the fact." He alleged that in citing a warlike statement by President Nasser of fha UAR. Mrs. Meir was telling only a "part of the truth" because Nasser was only replying to a similar statement made by Israel's leti i ed Gen. Moshe Oayan. He told the Assembly that, while the UAR was at present widening arid deepening the Suez Canal, "for the benefit of navigation" these benefits would not be provided "at the expense of the Palestine refuor of Israeli aggression." Meanwhile, the Egyptian press and radio launched a violent attack on Secretary of S'ate Christian A Herter this week because of ihe Secretary's appeal at the : Nations for freedom of. transit in the Suez CanaL The important newspap e r, Al Ahra*n of Cairo, declared that "Israel will never pass through the canal." ft said: The ban is not caemecrvo wttn troeoom ot navigation throtrah the canal, but with the Palestine issue. Egypt banned Israeli navigation even w he n British occupation forces were camping on the cenet's President Eisenhower displays his famous grin as be receives the B'nai B'rith President's Medal from Label A. Katz. head of the organization. Participating in the White House ceremony are Maurice Bisgyer, of Washington D.C.. B'nai B'rith executive vice president md Mrs. Charles D. Solowich. of Detroit nresiHoof B'nai B'rith Women. H We B'nai B'rith Gives Eisenhower Top Award The "bellicose" attitude and activities toward Israel of the Arab countries "have Taken on new and ominous iorm. she said, adding that "Arab voices calling for war" were in "harsh discord" wish DM efforts to preserve peace. Getting down to specifics. Mrs. Meir told the Assembly that 330 shops, belonging to 21 different countries, were on the Arab blackNoting that for reasons best known to himself. President Nasser of the FAR had resumed the blockade only in the last \ moBths. Mrs Meir said that Suez canal interference in that ume had involved the interests of 10 countries — Ceylon. Denmark. We>t Germany. Hong Kong. Japan. L. bena. Malaya, the Phi ..prunes. Switzerland and the United States. In reviewing the international rules on free passage in the ca sal. Mrs. Mencited the Constantinople Convention of 1888. the UN Sec. ncil resolution of 1951 and of MS6 She also cited Pdent Eisenhowers pledge that FAR interference "should be firmly dealt with by the societ> of natioWASHJNGTON — B'nai B'rith honored President Eisenhower last week for his "positive efforts for world peace on freedom's terms— peace with justice and dignafy." B'nai B'rith president Label A. Katz, of New Orleans, presented Mr. Eisenhower with the B'nai B'rith President's Medal, the organization's highest award, in a ceremony at the White House. Mr. Kara told the President that the medal, inscribed "For Peace and Humanity/' was voted him by B'nai B'rith in recognition of "consistent and determined deeds to advance the peace of the world while preserving the dignity and strength of our nation, and its leadership of the free world." "We applaud jsou for your motivations—to seek avenues of understanding that can ease the tensions of the cold war. inspire an enduring peace and convert the nuclear triumphs of science exclusively for the betterment of humanity," the %  B'nai B'rith leader said. Participating in the ceremony were Maurice Bisgyer. of Washington, D. C, executive vice president of B'nai B'rith. and Mrs. Charles D. Solovich. of Detroit, president of B'nai B'rith Women. ADL Chief Raps Khrushchev For Manipulation of Prejudice NEW ORLEANS — (JTA) — The address by James P. Mitchell, Sec"evasive answers" given by Soviet I retary of Labor, denouncing bigShe co n d emned constant warlike statements emanating from the Cairo Radio and from Nasser one ft* efforts of the Arab League B o> i ot1 Committee, which she said a H o c ted no* only Israel but also many states and of firms She expressed appre ci a ti on UN sfJMai at ggloi the but noted that they had sa far ••wr-bnu: awaiaL" She called a UN to see to it that all member the canal %  BfJRaa ttBMrvi Rasa* UK sxanciajajRaa ;>; A radio broadcast from Cairo r-habeneed •Herter. British ForM-cretary Selwyn Lloyd, and all Zionist agents" to prove that the United Arab Republic restncthan Israel The newspaper Ash Shah said "Ta allow Israel to pass throueo isneuat to a rertfce so-called state of psa ; The prmrxple that a* aa her state a entitled to claim or erase rights af war. whether zmt rferencf w.-th the freedom ahippinf or by or any other means is accomplished af usurped Pal and the sly one of refthing longed for by Zion aajpenabsm. and the Arabs' BOSH HASHONA GREETINGS TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS MR. and MRS. HTMAN ZAIDMAH DADE KOSHER MARKET Premier Nikita Khrushchev to questions about the -status of Soviet Jews showed that "his regime persists in the old Russian government practice of manipulating anti-Semitic prejudice whenever it servo political expediency." Henry Edward Schultz. national chairman of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, said here at a d.nner honoring Label A Katz. international B'nai B'nth president. More than 600 guests attended the dinner which also heard an Youngsters Score In Unique Meet Six young people from Dade county were informed this week that they had won first places in a unique international athletic meet which was conducted by airmail under the auspices of the National Jewish Welfare Board. The local winners were sponsorotry. The address was delivered for the Secretary of Labor by his assistant George Lodge, since Secretary Mitchell was detained in Washington by the White House talks on the steel strike. Mr. Katx said that "positive progress" is being made in intergroup relations in the South year after year. The dinner in his honor was tendered in connection with the annual executive committee meeting of the Anti-Defamation League held at the Roosevelt Hotel here. Mr. Katz told President bower that the award to hi been decided before announ of the Khrushchev visit. He i "We are. therefore. parac_ pleased to hae the opportunity g| this time to advise you that B'rith endorses your actions of | viting Premier Khrushchev and accepting a reciprocal i Don to visit the Soviet Union Ticstl are acts of calculated risk ft*] demonstrate the bold judgmeat ] and creative leadership that ta>] search for enduring peace rs] quires. "We ere confident that your actions and motives in Hit • change af visits are further cs firmation of your continued tffarts far world peace." The B'nai B'rith group said tatr] had also discussed with Presided] Eisenhower the concern of Ameri-j can Jewry with the status of Jen] in other parts of the world. The President, they said, thankj ed B'nai B'rith for its support tf the reciprocal visits between Mr. j Khrushchev and himself. "He told us it Is gratifying that | the people know what he it trying j to accomplish in these meetings between heads of government," Mr. Katz said. ftlosaWf Gets License Jewish leaders in the South were told at the meeting that they should not fear taking a "positive stand" on the segregation issue and should "violence against synagogues." Mr. Schultz emphasized that anu Semitic activities "have had little effect upon traditional friendly attitudes toward Jew* ia the South." Benjamin R. Epstein, executive director of the League, predicted that exclusion of Jews ed by the Greater Mum, Jeh by college fraternities "will virtu Coma.un,ty Center, and they comally disappear as an official pracpeted against boys and girls of Uce" in two years waular age from Centers in other parts of the United States. England ft,-., ci-a. o. A and Canada. All of the contests Ue ws 5 '" %  •CC* were held in the various' home communities, with standard tun Larrie Blasbere. Sky Lake, Nf. Miami Beach, was this ueek notified that he has passed his state : board examinations and is now I licensed funeral director. Busberg. a graduate of auial Beach Hi eh School and the University of Miami, is also a licensed embaJmer. He is an executive WSJ the Riverside Memorial Chapels not be influenced by chain, and the fourth generation of his family in the busine>His father, Irving Blasberg. is presides* of Riverside Memorial Chapels. As uncle. Charles Boaenthal. now in his Ms and still active in the organization, is Riverside founder. f^~^*^*WW^ FLAGLER-GRANADA JEWISH COMMUNITY.CENTER 50 K.W. 51st PLACE HICH HOLY DAY SEATS IN OU NEWLY AIR CONDITIONED AUDITORIUM MOW AVAILABLE OfTICIATDK* Rabbi Rrrnmrd amd i tint or Frrd Rermntrin *w fwrtWr kdmm*im Cfaf M 44547 1 ( ; ] 1 First seminar of the DernocratJe devices used and d^wwliSS^'TtSri D,d through the national office. SSa. !. li^ri* 1 S ,n,r-,y % %  d usner:. Sunday at the Deauville hotel. SubFirst place winners on the local ** %  <* the seminar will be Fundi lae-yard dash; Felice Sussman. — Peamy Goldman. Harriet Newman and Madeline Mirrow. 220-vard relay team; Sharon Price. so-yard dash. The local competiuoa was supervised by Herber t L. Jacobaoa physical education saperrtsar of the Center's Miami Branch. O'NEAL BLOCK & SEPTIC TANK CO. grn c TANKS mSJALLATHmS RarAfta UcatiM 1927 ISM N.W. tftfa Street NEM431 AWVR NfjfjRSaw* H Meet Avna group of Hadassah will meet Monday. l; p.m.. Tem He Beth Am. 3KD No. Kendall dr So ~ HIALEAH CONVALESCENT HOME Do Not Accept a Subrtituaa for TOOT Senior OawJB •MfcHBawaawSl 14-Hr. Licensed Nurses 195 WEST 27th STKET NtALEAJi aORIDA Tall TI S-63 •YRTitRrW



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lrriday.Q ctober2 1 959 >k*UI Ihjklim Page 7-A Community Council in Joint Plan KEW YORK — (JTA) — A joint I nlin for coordinated action on Wish communityrelations,prob^ i,ms adoptedT>y six majW'TCwW Irganizalions and 48 local Jewish I founcils, was announced here this week by the National Community Relations Advisory Council, the coordinating body of the 54 Jewish | groups. The plan sets forth coordinated I programs designed to protect religious freedomfosier good interrelieious relationships; counter Arab promganda; promote* public understanding of America's stake in preserving peace with Justice and stability in the Middle East; protect the rights of American citizens against discriminations imposed hv Arab states; advance qual rights and equal opportunities for all without regard to religion, race, color or national origin; liberalize U. S. immigration policies and provide more effective refugee aid; defend the Supreme Court acainst efforts to discredit it; and increase the effectiveness of Jewish community relations work generally. The six national organizations affiliated with the NCR AC irt tht American Jewish Congress, Jewish Labor Committee, Jewish War Veterans of the U.S.A., Union of America Hebrew Co n g r egations, Union of Orthodox Congregations of Amerlta, and United Synagogue of America. W,hile noting an increase in antiSemitic agitation and distribution of hate literature, "especially in some parts of the South as bigots sought to exploit tensions over the desegregation controversy," the plan concludes that the appeals were almost universally disregarded and rejected and that overt antiSemitism continued at a low ebb. "Intrusions of religion upon the public schools" were major cause* of interreligious conflict, the plan asserts. Sunday closing laws are cited as another source of conflict among religious groups during the past year. Noting that a 1958 federal "huRabbi Twersky Will Officiate Rabbi Abraham I. Twersky will conduct the Rosh Hashona and Yom Kippur services at the Hebrew Academy, B. I. Binder, pres iderrt, revealed Wednesday. Rabbi Twersky announced that the services will be rendered gratuitously in honor of the more than 300 students of the Hebrew Academy. A descendant of the famous Chassidic dynasty, Chernobel and Trisk, Rabbi Twersky has conducted services in leading congregations in Poland, England and Argentina. Rabbi Twersky is former operator of Uie strath Haven, hotel in Miami Beach. Airline Inaugurates Service Northwest Orient Airline B inaugurated service from Miami to Atlanta on Sept. 27, John H. May Northwest's district sales man ager here, said Wednesday. At the same time, May announced that Northwest is adding a fifth daily 'Eht northward to Chicago and other p 0 i n u on Northwest's system. 10NG DISTANCI MOVING mane slaughtering" law explicitly, defined the Jewish religious meth-1 od of slaughter as humane, the plan calls for inteffsTTlcation of, public educational activities to spread knowledge of the humaneness of the Jewish religious method of slaughter. The report comments with gratification on the growth of frlondty relations between the United Sfltoilnd" Israel, and the extension of Israel's diplomatic, commercial and cultural rota tlone with new Asian and African states and call for continuing efforts to foster public understanding in the United States of this nation's stake in the establishment of a just end stable peace in the Middle East, and for effective counteraction of false Arab propaganda here. Declaring that the Executive Branch of the U.S. Government "continues to acquiesce" in the imposition by Arab governments of discriminations against United Slates citizens because they are Jews, the plans calls for "continuing remonstrances." The plan pledges educational efforts by Jewish organizations to increase public understanding of the need for revisions in U. S. immigration policies, especially replacement of the national origins quota system oil points in the country "J'MATES CHEERFULLY GIVEN WITHOUT CHARGE LINES, INC. 2136 N.W. 24th Avenue Ml 5-64-6 MIAMI Celebrating Our 25th Year •V\rf ["/ %  / % %  Dade Federal Savings, now entering its second quarter-century of service to Dade County, will soon pass another great milestone as its main office moves to its beautiful home, corner of Flagler and First... Watch For The Big Move! Open or add to your savings account by the 10th and earn dividends from the MeeeWftote % Per Annum Savings accounts are insured to $10,000 by the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation, an agency of the Federal government. .iVii ." "One of the Nation's Oldest and Largest eral AVINGS and LOAN ASSOCIATION of MlAMI JOSEPH M. LIPION, President 'f **#! 5 CONVENIENT OFFICES SERVE DADE COUNTY D. I. Fed. D.,,i. I%  Dad • Federal : Present Mais Off ice 45 N.E.Ut Avenue Mapattah Branch North Miami Branch %  Tamiami Branch Eases Center Branch ...-. i IOTA IOAI sunn 1400 12370 1901 5800 N.W. 3fh Sfreef N.W. 7th Avenve S.W. $th Sfreef N.W. 7th Avenue I • RESOURCES EXCEED 138 MILLION DOLLARS %  ti.



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Page 8-A +3eist norHton FridayOctober 2. 1959 JO A NMKS SM. far. Dkecfr NEW YORK—Louis Wernick has I bees appointed Southern regional' firector of the Joint Detente Ap-j peal, it wa announced by O. Roy I Chalk, national chairman of JDA. In his capacity as Southern regional director. wrniick wiD inte rpr et' the many sided programs of the' JDA agencies—the American Jewish Committee and the Anti-Defamat.on League of B'nai B'rith. Richard N. Bluestein (cenlox:. assistant to Dr. Abram L Sachar. president oi Brandeis University, addressed the first meeting of the Brandeis University Club of Greater Miami on Sunday. Left to right are Mortimer E. Wien. treasurer; Dr. Stanley Frehling. president: Sidney M Schwartz, financial secretary; and Harold Turk, first vice president. Mrs. Sidney M Schwartz, honorary president of Greater Miami chapter. National Women's Committee of Brandeis University, holds Lite Magazine reprint of the university's internationally-renowned Catholic. Jewish, and Protestant chapels. Poll Feels Mapai Will Gain New Strength JERUSALEM—pendent daily. Haaretz. which Progressives 4.4 and 7.4. q crets during his speeches because! the Haboker, the organ of the General Zionists, criticized him for "using party platforms for revealing military secrets." The nature of the secrets was not mentioned 1 by the newspaper a Ft bough it was understood that the Prime Minister had hinted that Israel had, purchased some new weapons. Miami Chapter Launches Season Miami chapter of Hadassab will have its first general meeting of •he season' Monday evening at the Everglades hotel. Mrs. Max Handshu. chapter pro gram chairman, has arranged to have as guest speaker Mrs. Sidney Gluckmsn. of Or!ando. immedia!) past president of the Florida reg ion of Hadassah. Mrs. Gluckman will speak on "Israel Between Two Worlds." Mrs. Homer Rievman. president of the Miami chapter, recently returned from the Hadassah national convention in St. Louis, and will exhibit the gavel stand presented to her at the convention in behalf of'the Miami chapter for its membership efforts. Reports of the convention will be made by Mrs Rievman, as well as Mrs. Joseph Milton, president of Menorah; Mrs. Albert Garwood, president of Naomi; Mrs. Henry Gilman, president of Torah; and Mrs. Henry Paul, vice president of ML Scopus. ttbcci wing of the congregation lie hall in Israel was unused over dunng the High HoLdays. Services the weekend in the rush of polititeminence at 9:45 a.m. under the cal parties to present their bids supervision of Jerome Bass Chilfor votes. In towns and settlements drer. aged 3 to 7 wrll gather in the as well, members of Knesset bidnursery under the guidance of ding for reelection, sought support Cayle Libman. who will direct hoiof voters, frequently by slandering Way story-telling and games. the opposition. Seeing for himself how cold blueprints are translated into living stone, glass and warm colors is Irving Blasberg, president of Riverside Memorial Chapels, shown above inspecting the nearly-completed SI25,000 addition to his Normandy Isle Branch. The building, originally opened in 1955, has been enlarged by the addition of five reposing rooms, a garden chapel, lobby, smoking lounge, and new executive offices. Leonard Glasser, architect, and Arkin Construction Co., collaborated on the work, with interior decoration by Roz Mark, Ltd. The addition will go into service in late October. Dade PTA Council Hears Panel "What Should the Home. School, Religion, and Community be Doing to Develop Our Child to be a Better Citizen?" This was the subject for discussion at the Dade County Council of PTA's meeting Wednesday, 10 a.m., at Citrus Grove Junior High School. James Gwin was the host school principal, and greeted representatives from all schools in Dade county. Gwin, who is Council's citizenship chairman, was moderator of a panel discussing such questions as "Can we expect good citizenship to develop if young people constantly see examples to the contrary by adults representing the home, school, community or House of Worship?" and "What are some outstanding ways, methods, or devices by which the home. House of Worship, school, or community can develop good citizenship" Representing the "home" was Mrs. T. M. Holdcraft, of Coral Ga-' bles, and a local PTA president, i Representing the religion was Dr. Joseph R. Narot, of Temple Israel of Miami. Richard O. Roberts, principal of the Riviera Junior High School i nd formerly both a Junior and senior high school dean of boys, represented the "school." Mrs. i Eva Mae Furr discussed the' community. She is a retired principal of Miami Springs Elementary School. Mrs. William P. Cooke, president of the Council, presided for the I business portion of the meeting, i County Council committee chair-' I men were introduced. Miomians Buy Summer Camp Carl Gardner, Dr. Sidney H. Solomon, and Victor Levine have pur! chased what was formerly known as the Chimney Rock Camp for Girls located at Lake Lure, ji. C, in the heart of the Smokies, consisting of 250 acres of a forest of pine trees, hemlock and rhododendron on the shores of Lake Lure 28 miles northeast of Asheville and 20 miles from Hendersonville, N. C. Dr. Solomon, former owner and director of Camp Deerf ield in Vermont, who operated his camp successfully there for 27 years, will act as full-time director, and the name of the camp will be changed from Chimney Rock to Camp Deerfield for Boys and Girls. Dr. Solomon has been actively engaged in the summer camp business for 40 years. Levine, Miami attorney, was engaged in the camping business for 20 years prior to the commencement of his practice. Gardner, well known Miami Beach resident, is active in many civic and fraternal organizations, and has been a member of the Old Timers BaseRiot Leaden Off to Prison HAIFA-


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October 2. 1959 *Jewlsijfhrkan Page 9-A II fcv Hard of Hearing Classes Hard of hearing persons in the Greater Miami aiea ca.i uuw register for classes conducted by the Miami Hearing Society, a United Fund Agency. Special classes will | be held, in lip-reading, better hearjing and speech training, and hearing aid adjustment for new and old users. Classes are held at the Society's Miami headquarters on Tuesday morning and Wednesday evening, and at Miami Beach on Monday evening. Other classes will be arranged at other times in accordance with the demand. Full course description and schedules may be obtained by writing or calling the Miami Hearing, Society, 395 NW 1st St. fr m Training in the appreciation of books begins at an ecrly age at the Hebrew Academy. Hebrew Academy nursery students visit the Miami Beach Public Library, where they participated in a "Stor y Hour" presented by Helena Clardy, children's librarian. Left to right are Melody Feldman, Lane Jeffrey Genet, Eric Glesserman, Leah Rottman, Mrs. Edith Kass, nursery teacher, Ahron Horovitz, Beala Rosengarten, Debora Schwartz and Howard Kass. Mt. Sinai Nurses Slate Graduation Mt. Sinai Hospital School of Practical Nursing held its pregraduation banquet at the Algiers hotel last week. Graduation exercises will take place Oct. 7 in the new Mt. Sinai Hospital Auditorium, and will be the first public ceremony to be performed in the new building. Twenty-four of the 29 graduating practical nurses have already announced that they will continue on the staff of Mt. Sinai. I Charity football Game Due Second annual Kiwanii charity I football game between the University of Miami freshmen and the University of Florida freshmen mil be played Oct. 9 in the Orange Bowl. Last year's game attracted J3.055 spectators as Miami won 20-8 and earned the right to keep the three loot silver trophy that goes to the winner of each year's contest. Monticello Youth Slate Services Youth of Monticello Park Jewish Center will conduct their own services en the High Holy Days this weekend. Students from 7 to 13 will congregate at the Sabal Palm school cafeteria, 17101 NE 7th ave., at 10:15 a.m., Saturday and Sunday morning, under the direction of Abraham J. Gittelson, education director. Serving as cantors will be Billy and Perry Leff and Marvin Liss. with Justin and Steven Weiningcr as rabbis. Teen-asers from 13 up will hold services at the North Miami Beach Junior High School cafeteria, with members of the United Synagogue Youth in charge, under the direction of Isidore Dickman, faculty member of the religious school. Joel Lefkowitz will sound the ancient ram's horn at the services. Both serv.cea will conclude at 12:30 p.m. Beach Girl Off To Stern College Beach Resident Founds Grant A tuition scholarship has been established at Brandeis University by Alee E. Clark Adams, of 4450 Alton rd., Miami Beach. The $5,000 grant will provide tuition assistance for needy and deJust before schools opened last month, airports all over the nation witnessed scenes like this as the Jewish National Home tor Asthmatic Children at Denver sent home its largest class, after an average stay of 18 to 24 months. UF Recruits For Campaign Mental Health Play Scheduled "Which Way Out," a new mental health play, will have its first performance in Florida on Wednesday at a dinner meeting in the McAllister hotel, when the Mental Health Society, a United Fund agency, celebrates its 12th annual meeting. Ester Brezo will direct the play, which was written by Nora Sterling for the National Assn. for Mental Health by the American Theatre Wing. The Child Welfare Foundation ol the American Legion provided the grant for the preparation of the play. The Cast is made up of teenagers from Coral Gables High School, Marsha Marsh, John Ballard, Peter Freitag, Sandra SheeRochelle L. Stern, daughter of Rabbi and Mrs. Tibor H. Stern, of Beth Jacob Congregation, has entered Stern College for Women in New York. Stern College is a branch of Yeshiva University. Rochelle graduated Miami Beach High School. She was president of the Future h a n "' andKare^br'afton Nurses'of America, member of National Honor Society, circulation manager of the school newspaper and yearbook, "Quill and Scroll," and "Anchor," and chaplain of Gibson's. At the college, she will continue her studies in Hebrew and modern art, in which she is majoring. Dr. John Beery is president of the Mental Health Society. Banquet to Honor Miami Postmaster Over 500 reservations have been received for the installation banquet and dance honoring Miami's new Postmaster Eugene M. Dunlap, on Saturday at the new Everglades hjtel.. Many executive postal officials will be present at the affair, including Former Assistant Postmaster General Norman Abrams, regional operations director William L. Crawford, and James E. Greene, postal installation manager. Former Postmaster Hugh P. Emerson will be master of ceremonies. As a career employee, Dunlap entered the postal service at Williamsport, Pa., as a substitute FPU Cites Newspaper Week Florida Power and Light Company will salute the nation's free press during National Newspaper Week, Oct. 15 through 21. National Newspaper Week is proclaimed by President Eisenhower in tribute to the 1,770 daily and 9.000 weekly newspapers published in the country. Ship Cruises Will Stress Arts NEW YORK—The latest Israeli fashions in knitted dresses and other women's apparel made by the noted house of "Aled," in Israel, will be modeled aboard the fully air-conditioned SS Jerusalem of the Zim Lines while she cruises the Caribbean next fall and winter, it was announced here by the American-Israeli Shipping Company, Inc., of New York, U. S. representative of the Zim Lines. In another realm of the arts, the Jerusalem will carry a permanent exhibition of paintings by some of Israel's leading contemporary artists. They will be on display in the ship's Art Gallery on the Lido Deck. The fashion shows and paintings are a special feature of the Jerusalem's cruises to acquaint Americans with two important aspects of artistic creativity in Israel. It is intended to select young ladies from among the passengers on e"ach cruise to model the clothes. The Jerusalem will make ten cruises from New York to the West Indies between Nov. 11, 1959 and Mar. 12, 1960. The cruises will range in length from nine to 16 days, and will cover* 13 Caribbean ports. An additional program of spring cruises to the Caribbean is scheduled for next May and June. Recruitment of 15,000 women for its annual county-wide, house-tohouse drive, which this year is called the United Good Neighbors campaign and whrch is scheduled i clerk and he worked both as clerk to kick off on Good Neighbor Day, I and carrier. He became a regular Sunday, Jan. 10, I960, is the goal of j postal employee in 1938. After passthe United Fund during the cur-! j n g a competitive examination for rent United Good Neighbor Rethe inspection service, he was apcruitment campaign. Mrs. Ffed Ravlin is chairman of the United Good Neighbor Division of the United Fund. Assisting her wrvin R students at the university re nne division coordinators 25 regional chairmen, and district captains whose duty is to secure volunteers to cover 109 districts throughout the county during the drive. in Waltham, Mass. Called the Paul C. Clark Memorial Scholarship, the grant is a memorial to Mrs. Adams' son, a Marine corporal killed in 1944. Some 33 percent of Brandeis stuUnited Fund rendered more dents receive financial assistance. I than 300 different types of sen-ice to 228,164 men, women and ohildren during 1958 in family and child care, health services to the aged and handicapped, and youth services. Next year's service load may be heavier. bee Him Showing W. c. Fields is the star of "Mil!" D'.llni Legs" which was to be *wn at the Miami Public Library on Oct. i at 8:30 p.m. NORTHWEST PAINT & BODY SHOP. GLASS SERVICE UPHOLSTERY ELECTRIC WELDING SPORT TOPS AND SEAT COVERS GORDON C. TRIMBLE, Owner 521 N.W. 54th Strttt Phone PL 4-9464 pointed a postal inspector in 1941, and assigned to Brattleboro, Vt. i He was reassigned to the Miami I post office in 1948. | In 1955, Dunlap was appointed district operations manager for the Southern postal district, from which position he was named acting postmaster of the Miami office on Feb. 8, 1958. Dunlap was confirmed by the U. S. Senate Aug. 27 as Miami's postmaster. Podiatrists in Meeting Southeast Florida Podiatry Society inaugurated its fall season with a meeting at Jackson Memorial Hospital on Monday evening. Highlight was a panel discussion of techniques demonstrated at the recent American Podiatry convention in New York City. Final plans were formulated for the state convention in Miami Beach next month. Dr. Otilio Ulate (left), former president of Costa Rica and member of the Inter-American Development Bank, shown at a meeting with Joseph S. Moss, president of Pan American Bank ol Miami and director of Sottile, Inc., Banking Division. They're discussing forthcoming program of the soon-to-be activated Inter-American Development Bank for Latin America. Meeting took place at Pan American Bank of Miami, immediately preceding a luncheon given in Dr. Ulate's honor by business and community leaders here. __^_ LEVIN A CO. BROKERS Invention* Paterttt ProcMt Suit* 714 StytoM IwiMiai Miami S2. 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r Page 10-A ••JewlstifkrMtor Friday, Qctobg 2, EXPLANATION TO PUZZLE NO. 11 HR A 5 H 3 jy T illwl %¡ E X P E lol R E A ol 9 ''B C 1 I|NI : %  PC [R| AJ N] G, i[ Op 1 W FJ Hj $1 11 T] _A_-_! M ft c]~o TD 0] _SJ rliallenae t6 an BigumTnT ,f ln,, *l tl ..ill ui. Irr„l L." Itn| i Oil", 'I NM€ ADDRESS CITY PHONE STATE COIN WORD PUZZLE NO. 13 WORTH $220 If there are no correct solutions to the previous week'i puzzle. Otherwise prize returns to beginning $100 Jackpot. If you wish to subscribe to The Jewish Fleridian check the square and your paper will start immediately. Subscription price is C *5 per ytar, %¡ f 10 for 3 years Regular subscribers are eligible fer large' prizes. See rules. (No explanations are given for words having no posaible alternatives.) EXPLANATIONS ACROSS 1—When an old building collapses. Ihe i K.I.-.H involves a heavy Job of cleaning up. Though it was the 1K...M1 III Hie iiuiiuiim mai deposited I he i iibbit.li there, l( la the debris that mual InI'learrai <). 9—EXPERIENCEshould prompt you not t<> brad money to a deadbeat. A ile.iilbeut Is constantly borrowlnginone>. and you know from puat 'touches" thai, he never pays it back. I.I.I ..,,] %  :..' K In this ene means .i.'If-liii.-r.-.-u. .iften with the Implication ol a lack oi moral W lusja an al lly n|>i'lii-* to a relusal to lend %  nonei to .. %  ooonoft 1"—The Me of a big bully cringes at the I'liKAli "I hi bomecoming. Though his TRKA1"— IIIH footatepe at the door—alerts her to the fact that he is home, it a her fear of him that makes her cringe. 11—American pumpers rode roughshod over ill.Indiana' PLAINS, The) ignored their iighia i<> land that was theirs first. When Indians wore in a position to complain, there was more than one PLAINT. 11—Teenage arisvannsa, if I'NAIRBD. MI ...1 bring about a rift In the lami._.solve the puizle aa you wmild any other croasword puzzle Annronrkta CL.IT58 ACROSS and CLUES TX)WN tell you how to complet.the Insnm* plete words. Correct answers to thle week's COINWORD puzzle will be In alphabetical order, hi the word liet. 8.—Anyone la eligible to enter the COtNWORI> contest except employeei cr I staff members (or members of their families) of The Jewish Klorldlan DEADLNE THIS WEEK SUNDAY MIDNIGHT, OCT. 4 Cut along the dotted line, paste on a Scent postcard and mail to COINWORD Editor, The Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box 2973. Miami 1, Fla. CLUES ACROSS 2—Such remarks can spoil a good party. 7—Bridal pictures, years later, make fat housewives gaze nostalgically at what they shea. 8—Conservative parents hate to see their daughter going steady with a young 16— Young lamb: var. 12—In the jungle, they're likely to be full of danger. 13—Printers' measure. ll— You can't do a good job without the proper 15—Symbol of tantalum. 17—High regard. 20— When a boy grabs his friend's toy, there's likely to be a fight. 21—A girl who's regarded as this is unlikely to get many dates. 23—Help. 26—Dad is angry when Junior has the car against the garage wall. 29—In a solo dance contest at ballet school, the will probably determine the winner. 30—Shade tree. 34—In concluding a verbal contract, one should note careluliy what he is CLUES DOWN 1—A bird iover enjoys heariirg such a note from a bird. 2—Abraham's home: Bible. 3—A child should be warned that a stray cat may scratch if he it. 4—Nazi doctors would their prisoners with germs, for inhuman experiments. 5—In" an English pub near a race track, many bets would be suggested by a 6—Not any. 9—In medieval days, there was not much more danger of attack by these than there is now in our big city parks. 11—When you're camping out, a outside your tent at night is pretty frightening. 16—Entertain. 18—It's bad if someone bis toe because hedge clippers are left lying on the ground. 19—Heroic poem. 22—If an executive job proves too much for him, a man worries about losing with his co-workers. 24—Ailing. 25— Floodgate. 27-Opener for a lock. 28—Clatter. Beth Sholom States Policy By. Basically, grievances that eaa'l be bii.uKat nut into the open suggest a lack ol i-.inlidi-lice between pai.-ius and children—the children are afraid to talk about their troubles. If their problems are UNAIDED. It may be that there i> in.thins, the parents oun do—through iwverty. perhaps, or Ignorance of how to get help—though they appreciate and sympathize with the difficulty. 13—A cabinet member's remarks made as a TEST often etlr up a storm of protest This method is sometimes used, witn a presidents approval, to learn what the public reaction would be to aome contemplated pollcjr. It protects the president from brickbats. Remarks made as a JEST are usually accepted aa such; and misundeistanding la soon cleared up. 13—A child finds it exciting to watch a lot of monkeys RANG1.V; around among the trees. They spring and I-.iiml iroin one limb to another. HANGING is usually tem|H>rary. on the way Irom one bough to another: and would not be as exciting as movement 11—It's a gallant man who can maintain his UHIT after veers of trouble. It's this QRiT, or ooaJTace, which Is responsible for his VRIl*— hls self-control—or his grin, If he is able lo .-mile. tt—A candidate hates to REWORD his speei* again, after trying It out many times r are Just talking to their mates. EXPLANATIONS DOWN *-By SPACING portions of meat evesy other day. a tight food budSi*1vr. ek d out They "T •* u AKINU. or scanty, portions, but !" u 8r e 1 l "" vln •" In having meat only at Intervals of two days 6—When an incompetent ruler refuses to WIELD enough power a' nat ton gets into trouble. An Incompetent persen, anwlttlngly pemhaoa. Is likely t„ Y1EIJJ power those around him with more forcefulneee. I—it takes a brave man to INV1TH vengeance by exposing a VIP fn v^aT 0 ?." He ta> himself open to vlndictlveness, though he doesn't actively stir |t up, INCITE It 14—After a long Illness, a mans problem is to SHORE up—strengthen or reinforce sufficient energy (with a tonic, vitamins, etc.) to return to ruoolv • S 7, RF i V ""''"'• • rSerre •Mm! "' '" ,ryln t0 • back loet lfr_i ^ m £ neo .P' opinions are too AIRY to be worth an argument; out an Irreslslable how wrong they are. 1—A qulsmaater on TV >i— fessea de.lght h "T> we.1 •mart UlTHBS, since I, p|J^ r i | have someone win Tliejeir."'""*! Moots* moment tor hln "" Kf.| on a (Jl-KST who u, sinat-tVSl!i—Her husband'VMIIIV *T^" t i would embarrass „ ',,, '."'Nl when Mrs. VIP call. Sna^btaSl*!! DO! .hi, l„ ,),ese H,,.!,.,,^^ however. WORK clothes ar.fj and In good taste w 21—Holdup men all too frequently %  >T 10 slleDce a '„, Lrii storekeeper, not nece.*sailly tn jS51 hira. but to hit him over ths £!?1 I'ying him up with „ ,V ( J"JM mouth takes too long in the asl a storekeeper, when a quirk e'tW..l U needed. A QAS of curse *3 apply htie. but fits number 24 acroejl Copyright 15. General Features Cora. 1 Rules for the COINWORD Contest S.—A contestant may submit as many entries as he wishes on the official earn blank printed In this paper, but no more than one exact-sized, hand-draw, facsimile of the puzzle. No mechanically reproduced (printed, mimeugmphsL etc..) copies of the message wHl be accepted, unless Issued by this paper ] 4. —To suhrelt aa entry, the contestant should attach the completed puxzlt M a J-cent postcard and mall It In time to reach the COINWORH editor 3 The Jcwlfa Floridian before midnight of the Sunday evening follow m, publica. tlon of that week's puzsle. No entries received after that tlrhe, whether mail. ed or delivered by hand, will be declaped eligible. Tou may mall your snlatS in an envelope If you wish. This paper Is not responsible for entalis low published In The Jewish Floridian. ••—Regular subscribers to The Jewish Floridian who win will receive a zurprise bonus. nly one correct solution to the COINWORD nuzzle. nd osh •t answer can win. The decision of the Judges Is final and ii ree te abide by the ledges' decision. All entries become tat Israel Releases Previously Frozen Arab Bank Funds | UNITED NATIONS-< JTA) It-, The Commission reported, conrael. has released Arab refugee %  corning Arab bank accounts prebank accounts previously blockee { viously blocked in Israel, rhat the in Israel valued at 2,781,164 Brit2.781,164 pounds worth of assets ish pounds sterling (about $7,800,-,' have for the greater part not yet 000), according to a report filed"! been c l" iD ed by the owners. 1*e here this week with the United Naj Commission has advertised in reftions General Assembly by the UN ugee camps calling on the owners to claim their money. The accounts released to date by Israel include only deposits in Palestine branches of Barclay's stank. Judge Harry Arthur Greenberg, president of Temple Beth Sholom] Wednesday announced the following policy as adopted by the religious committee and board of directors of the Temple: 'Membership in Temple Beth Sholom includes High Holy Day seating, as well as religious school privileges. The Temple does not sell seats for the High Holy Days and accommodates only those who are members. "In the past, the general unaffiliated public was able to listen to the services on a public address system. This practice will no long^er be continued because Beth I Sholom feels that everyone has an j obligation to be a member of the congregation. Non-members are j invited to apply for regular mem; bership if they wish to attend the High Holy Day Services in the i Beth Sholom Sanctuary." [GORDON F UNERAL HO ME lUmml-t fieaeer Itwhk Fe.erel Horn, FR 3-3431 FRanllin 9-1436 710 S.W. 12th Ave. Miami NAMT GORDON, PrnMemt %  I C0I00N. fevers. DifwCtar WORD LIST AID AMUSE HACK KD BUCKBD CI^APs '•1..VS.S DAM DIN BUM EN EPIC ESTEEM i:\v FACE FAST FT ST II.I. IN EE( 'T i v i %  •:( -rKEY KNAVBS KMVKS NE4-TUE8 NETTLES NONM PA<' K I'.wixa PINK PRl'DB PRUNE PUNK ftATl \'>; SI' i Bfl SWEET T\ TAPSTER TIPSTER TOIL Tl s >I, TRI TREKS T\\! UNEITTINT. UNWITTING II: WERE Will r WOOF WORE Conciliation Commission for Pel•stitne. At the same time, the Commission reported that it has compiled records of 450.000 parcels of Israel land for which Arabs claim ownership and is now in process of determining the monetary value ol each parcel. The Commission has been engaged in these tasks since 1952. In the report, the Commission made it dear that its work of identification and evaluation of Arab refugees' land "constitutes a prerequisite for any settlement with regard to the right of individuals to their | immovable property." However, the Commission added, its work does not "lay down a basis for overall settlement of the Arab refugee problem." OXYGEN UNITS Full Price $69.95 NO DOWN PAYMfNT 25* A DAY Sheriff Kelly to Speak "Election vs. Appointment" will be the subject of an address by Sheriff Tom Kelly before members of the Biscayne Democratic Club on Thursday evening, Oct. 8, at the Shelborne hotel. Walter B. Lebowitz is club president. Pertokle Oxygea Unit in artroitive, hem** tarry if case. OMfal far Heart Patients, Asrfceje, tks. Bronchitis Coses. Usefel i Cases of Drowning, Shack see Smoke Inhalation, etc. FRff OXYGEN Call JE 2-1555 •r write LIFE-AIR t~ 350 Lincoln Rood Suite 310 Miami Beach, Florida FREE DELIVERY Cart JlffrrsoH 1-747? -* T ifnT-r-ii ">" A VJG'JST BROS fty£ /l t h. fit. si • nmauLNOMi ""Jzi?. r^^ M^*T. Hmmm MIAMI IIACM %  urssrel Dtrecter



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Lay. Oct ohf 2, 1959 *Jeist Meridian Page 11-A deafer M/a/iw Welcomes Hew Year Contimd from Page 2-A tul SKnce of Silence." Sec^^0^ Hashona is at 8 with Rabbi Rottman schedj£'u* speak on "Mother, of Is-. rael" Rtf h Hashona will be ^ he d i" ..Beth El Conqreoetion. 500 SW f •JTe., on Friday at 6 p.m. Ser[Ji Saturday are at 7:30 a.m. a bi Solomon Schiff will offic 1 a nd preach on "Launching Anihrr Year." Services Sunday are L at 7 30 a.m., with Rabbi Schiff tltuied to speak on "ComSSSnt an T Commitment." Junior services both days are at 10 a.m. Evening services are at 6 p.m. At the Israelite Cnrr, 3175 SW Kth ter. Rabbi Morton Malavsky will officiate and launch the Rosh Hashona observance Friday at 6 nm Saturday services are at 7:30 ,m. Sermon is "A Year Anew Cantor Louis Cohen renders the musical portions of theliturgy. Services second day of Rosh Hashona will be at 7:30 a.m., with the sermon. "We Pray for a Year of Peace in 5720." Junior services will be in the Social Hall at 11 a.m. under the d.rection of Ronald Katz and Jack Katzker. More than 3,000 adult members of Temple Israel of Oroator Miami, 137 NE 19th St., and 800 children will usher in the High Holy Days at services Friday. Four evening services will be conducted tor adults. In the sanctuary, Rabbi Joseph Narot will officiate and preach at ? and 8:15 p.m. In the Wolfson Auditorium, Rabbi Morris W. Graff, director of adult education, will preach at 7 p.m., and Assistant Rabbi Elijah E. Palnick will preach at 9:15 p.m. Cantor Jacob Bornstein and Cantor Sheldon Torn will render the musical .portions of the liturgy. Saturday morning, Rabbi Narot will officiate at two services in Wolfson Auditorium, at 8:45 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. Rabbi Palnick is scheduled to preach in the Temple at-10 a.m. observance of Rosh Hashona at Children's service will be held evening services Friday at 5:50 Saturday at 9:30 p.m. •e •ju.Ypuc.Uod" will be the p.m. Saturday services are at 8 a.m. Rabbi Herschell Saville will subject of a sermon by Rabbi officiate and discuss "Building ToLcon Kronish when Ttmplo Both morrow Today." Second day of Sholom, 4144 Chase ave., ushers in Rosh Hashona commences with Rosh Hashona Friday at 8:15 p.m., services Sunday at 8 a.m. Sermon Saturday services are at 9:45 a.m. is "A New Year or Another Year."| Cantor David Conviser will render, Junior services are at 9:45 a.m., the musical portions of the liturgy.; under the supervision of Jerome Sermon will be "There are My i Bass. Evening services both days People." Services on the second | will be at 4:45 p.m. day of Rosh Hashona arc at 9:45 a.m., when the sermon topic will be "No Peace of Mind." At Agudath Israel Hebrew Institute, 7801 Carlyle ave., Rabbi Isaac Ever will usher in Rosh Hashona with services Friday at 5:30 p.m. Saturday services 1 are at 8 a.m. Sermon will be "Rosh Hashona—Period of Self-Examination." Second day of Rosh Hashona commences with services Sunday at 8 a.m. Rabbi Ever will discuss "The Shofar—A Call for Universal Peace." Evening services both days are at 5:30 p.m. Tashl.ch is Sunday at 5 p.m. Congregation Ansh* Ernes, 2533 SW 19th ave., will hold High Holy Day services Friday at 5:45 p.m. Cantor Jacob Greenberg will officiate, and sermons will be delivered by prominent laymen. Saturday and Sunday services are at 8 a.m., with evening services at 5:45 p.m. At Temple Judea, 320 Palermo, Coral Gables, Rabbi Morris Skop officiates at the-launching of Rosh Hashona with servi-"s Frid'v at 7:30 p.m. Sermon will be "Atoms, Space and God." Cantor Herman Gottlieb renders the musical portions of the liturgy. Saturday services are at 9:30 a.m., with-the sermon scheduled as "With Our Magnificent Heritage." Second day of Rosh Hashona slates services Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Sermon will be "L'Shona Tovah Tikosevu." Rabbit Nathan II. Zwitman will officiate at High Holy Day services of Hialeah Jewish Congregation. Friday services are at 7:30 p.m. in the Hialeah Municipal Auditorium at 4800 Palm ave. Sermon will be "To Thine Own Self be True." Saturday services are at 10 a.m. Sermon will be "The Things in Life that are Worth While." Second day of Rosh HaHebrew teachers returning from Irrael report on their experiences in the Holy Land at the fall meeting of the board of directors of the Bureau of Jewish Education held at the Fontainebleau hotel. Left to right (seated) are Benjamin Kaminetzky, Mr?. Shoshannah Spector Greenberg, Harry Brooks. Standing are Paul Kwitaey and Zvi Rosenkranz. Rabbi Max Shapiro will officiate snona will be observed with servat Rosh Hashona services of Both j ces a t in a m j n the congregaRaphael Synagogue, 139 NW 3rd ate., Friday at 6 p.m. Cantors A. Perl and Morris Fruchter render the musical portions of the liturgy. tion's own facilities at 1150 W. 68th st.. Palm Springs. Rosh Hashona will be launched at Temple Zion, 5720 SW 117th St., Saturday services commence at 8 ... a.m. Rabbi Shapiro will preach on !" th .." !" *J *££*** *& .v._:. ..D--;.U „* ^ nmm ,rfii. Rabbi Alfred Waxman will offiCORAL GABLES Traditional Services for th IBiqh Holidays will be held in the i hapvl of the Mlnyonalres of Tvmolv '9 ml "• a the topic "Portrait of a Community." Sunday services are at 8 a.m., with Rabbi Shapiro due to discuss "No Man is Free." The High Holy Days wiH be ushered in at Tifereth Israel North. side Center, 6500 N. Miami ave., at services Friday evening. Saturday and Sunday services are scheduled for the morning and evening, with Rabbi Harry Lawrence officiating. Cantor Albert Glantz and choir render the musical portions of the liturgy. Rabbi Sherwin Stauber officiates at Friday evening services of Young Israel of Greater Miami, 16750 NE 10th ave., ushering in j Rosh Hashona at 6 p.m. Saturday ] services are at 7:45 a.m. Sermon at 10 a.m. will be on "The Days of Awe." Cantor M. Mendelssohn renders thte musical portions of the liturgy. Sunday services are 7:45 a.m., with the 10 a.m. sermon scheduled as "Our Father, Our King." Evening services both days of Rosh Hashona are at 6 p.m. Rabbi Samuel Lerer will offii ciate at services Friday, 8 p.m., of Temple Beth Sholom of Hollywood, 1725 Monroe st. Sermon is "Restoration." Saturday services are ?t 18 a.m. The Rosh Hashona sermon will be "Destination." Cantor Rudolph Deutsch renders the musical portions of the liturgy. Miami Hebrew Congregation, 1101 SW 12th ave., will mark the IREPHUN'S HEBREW; BOOK STORE REV. GEORGE GOLDBERG Officiating; 320 Palermo HI 33737 HI 8-8073 Tickets on Sal* at Temple Office Largest and Oldest Hebrew Supply Houee In Greater Miami WHOitSAll mmi 117All Complete Line of Hebrew Supplie for Synafloouee, Hebrew and Sunday School* \ ISRAELI OlfTS and NOVBLTtES < \ 417 Weshieetee Awe. Miami leech < % JEHertea 1-W17 < PROMINENT CANTOR Resident of Miami Available for Y0M KIPPUR, SUCC0TH SERVICES I FOR YEAR Reasonable Salary Call PL 7-6743 ciate. Cantor Jacob Goldfarb renders the musical porttions of the liturgy. Sermon is "Let There be Light." Saturday services are at 8 a.m. Sermon topic win be "Tomorrow is Another Day." Second day of Rosh Hashona commences Sunday at 8 a.m. services. Junior services will be conducted by the Temple teaching staff assisted by members of the USY. Beth David Congregation, 2625 SW 3rd ave., will 1 observe Rosh Hashona with services Friday at 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday services are at 8 a.m., with sermons by Rabbi Yaakov Rosenberg on both days at 10:15 a.m. Cantor William Lipson renders the musical portions of the liturgy. Shofar will be sounded on Sunday, the second day of Rosh Hashona, at 10 a.m. Temple Nor Tamid, 80th st. and Tatum Waterway, will commence the Rosh Hashona observance at services Friday at 8 p.m. Saturday services are at 8 a.m. Sermon by Rabbi Eugene Labovitz at 10:30 a.m. is scheduled as "The Dial is Turned." Sunday services will be at 8 a.m., with the sermon, "Men Must Live." Cantor Samuel Gomberg renders the musical portions of the liturgy. Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz will officiate at High Holy Day services of North Shore Jewish Center, 620 75th st., Friday at 6:15 p.m. Saturday services are at 8 a.m. Sermon will be "A Year of Happiness." Sunday services are at 8 a.m., with the sermon scheduled as "Ingredient of Faith," Shofar will be at 10 a.m. Cantor Edward Klein renders the musical portions of the liturgy, Vith the choir under the direction of Eli Samuels. Coral Way Jewish Center will observe Rosh Hashona with services at the Dade County Auditorium, 2901 W. Flaglerst. Rabbi Samuel April will officiate Friday at 5:30 p.m. Cantor Jacob Newman renders the musical portions of the liturgy. Saturday services are at 8 a.m. Second day of Rosh Hashona'will commence with services at 7 a.m. Rabbi April will preach on both days. Rabbi Jacob Rackovsky will officiate at services of Beth Tfllah Congregation, 935 Euclid ave., launching the Rosh Hashona observance Friday at 5:45 p.m. Saturday services are at 7 a.m. Sermon at 10:30 a.m. will be "Our View of the New Year." Sunday Temple Ner Tamid Sisterhood holds a membership luncheon .at the home of (left) Mrs. Jack Klinger, 9264 Bay dr. Center is Mrs. Ccrrlton Blake, membership vice president. Mrs. Yvetto Silberger was co-chairman. Twenty new members and one life member were enrolled at the event. Service Slated At Auditorium Temple Emanu-El congregation will, for the third year in succes sion, worship during the High Holidays at the Miami, Beach Municipal Auditorium, across the street from the Temple. "The congregation has grown so rapidly during the last few years, that it was necessary to utilize the services are at 7 a.m. Sermon at 10:30 a.m. on the second day of Rosh Hashona will be "The Sound of the Shofar." Evening services are at 5:45 p.m. At Zemora Jewish Center, 4t Zamora ave.. Coral -Gables, Rabbi B. Leon Hurwitz will officiate Friday at 6 p.m. Saturday services are at 7:30 a.m. Sermon will be "The Mountainous View of Life." Cantor Meyer Gisaer renders the musical portions of the liturgy. Second day of Rosh Hashona commence> with services Sunday at, 7:30 a.m. Sermon will be -Image of Man." Junior services both days %  are at 10:30 a.m. under the direc( tion of Rev. Rudolph Brill and j Jacob Zion. Southwest Jewish Center, 6438; SW 8th st., will launch the Rosh ^ Hashona observance Friday at 71 p.m. Rabbi Maurice Klein will offer New Year greetings. Saturday services are at 8 a.m. Sermon will be "Memory and Hope." Sunday services are at 8 a.m., with the sermon scheduled as "Call to Forward and Upward." Assisting are Morris Broks and Nachman Lossman. Choir is under the direction of Mrs. Nat Lurie. Miami Hebrew Book Store 1585 WASHINGTON AV C Miami Beach — JE 8-3840 Hebrew Religloue Supplies for Synagogues. 6choole A Private Ue ISRAELI A DOMESTIC GIFTS A NAPfr NEW TEA* ISRAELI RELIGIOUS STORE •ill NfMfW SUPWtS rot iYNAGOGUtS JtWISH HOMES BIG SELECTION KZROGIM 1357 WASHINGTON AVE. JE 1-7722 3.fOO-F"at facilities of the auditorium in order to accommodate entire fam'lies who wish to be seated together for (he services," according to Samuel Friedland, president. "In addition, teen-agers may sit next to their parents, an accommodation which prior to the acquisition of the auditorium had been practically impossible." Dr. Irving Lehrman, spiritual leader of Temple Emanu-El, will officiate at all services. Junior congregation services will be held on both holidays in the main temple sanctuary at 10:30 a.m. Rabbi Bernard Mussman, director of education at the Temple Emanu-El religious school, will conduct the services, which are open to children between 9 and 12 years of age. > CORRECTION STELLA Marchbein-Marbiny. former Star-aoprano of La Scala Opera, and wite of Cantor Marchbein-Marbiny at N. Dade Center, wrfl KlOT APPEAR as eoloiet with the choir, due ts previoui engagement. •MIS VB y*r rro. Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovskf MS MICHIGAN AVENUE, MIAMI •toe Jt 1-3595



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Page 12 -A +Jmistifk**Mam **&Q. October Heart Assn. Names 18 Top Committees Heart Assn. of Greater Miami, thruugn its president. Dr. Robert Boucek, has announced the appointment of 18 different commit i % %  < Hie HMiftiMrlni^ing on its program of research, education and community service in Dade and Monroe counties fir 1959-60. Miami Beach physician Dr. Paul N. Ungar will be chairman of the medical advisory and research committee for the second successive year, and Dr. John B. Liebler, of Coral Gables, will chair the professional education committee. Dr. Milton E. LetMr, of Miami Beach, is chairman of rho comDelegates Named To Zionist Council J. David Liebman. president of the M.ami-Gables Zionist District 1. has appointed Ephraim Collins, Morris Simon, and Sam Levine as delegates to the South Florida Zionist Council. Other members from the MiamiGables Zionist District include Seymour Liebman, chairman; Arthur Pekelner, past chairman: Louis Rudnick. vice president of the American Zionist Council; and Isador Dickman. ZOA coordinator. : Liebman has also appointed Mrs., Max Stein as a delegate to the | munity Mrvico c o mm i t tee •fid' Mrs. Vore H*ign and Dr. RoWrt V. Edward*, both of Miami, will ea-ckair Mw public •dweatien c^timfo. — '•' A subcommittee on school health has also been created with Myron McKiernan, science teacher at Miami Beach High School, as chairman. Questions of finance and budget will fall under the direction of Dr. Edward St. Mary, of Miami, and matters' involving membership and personnel will be under the chairmanship of Dr. Francisco Hernandez, of, Miami, and Dr. Louis Lemberg, of Coral Gables. Mrs. N'anftte Savage, of Surfside, last year's chairman, will once more head the Heart Sunday committee. Special events will be planned this year under the corhairmanship of Dr. Lemberg and Mrs Robert Robbins. of Miami, ind for the second year in succession. Mrs. Marianne Reynolds, of Bay Point, will head the Heart Ball committee. Annual mooting committee chairman is Jack ROM. of Miami Beach, and the nominating and awards committee! chairman is Dr. Joan Jonas Perdue, of Miami Beach. To aid the Heart Assn.'s relaJewish National Fund Council of! tionship with the University of Mi Greater V ami. and Morris Simon and Louis Dudnick as representatives to the Israel Bond committee. Liebman said that general membership meetings will be held on the third Thursday of every month for the coming year at the Zamora Jewish Center. ami, the hospitals and the Dade County Medical Assn., committees under the leadership of Drs. Lemberg, Milton S. Goldman, of Miami Beach, and Jack R. Wright, of Miami, have been established. Handling the publicity and public relations committees are Carl Harold, of Miami, and Jack Ross. Temple Ner Tamid organizes new Cub Scout group. Left to right are Sidney Rabinowitz, of the Scout organization of Miami Beach; George Rosen, assistant Cub master; Seymour Horowitz, Cub master; Norman Giller, district chairman; Jack Shevlin, Cub master. Pack 226; and Zelda Shevlin, braining chairman. Hertzoff Named To JYS Board Charles Hertzoff, director of Citizens Federal Savings and Loan Assn. of Hialeah, has been appointed to the board of directors of the Jewish Vocational Service, it was announced Wednesday by Lloyd L. Ruskin, president. JVS is a reactivation of the agency of the same name which was formed here eight years ago to assist refugees arriving in their new status as future citizens. It subsequently became the Vocational Service Department of the Jewish Family and Children's Service. As the newest member of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. .TVS provides job placement service, educational-vocational guidance. Sheltered Workshop placement for (he disabled, and vocational rehabilitation services. A partner in David Stuzin .and Company, certified public accountants, Hertzoff is active in the Hia1eah-Miami Springs Chamber of Commerce, and is a past director of the Temple Judea in Coral Gables. Medical Auxiliary Card Party Greater Miami Auxiliary of the American Medical Center at Denver held a card party Wednesday evening at the Promenade hotel. Chairmen were Mrs. Morris Goluskin, Mrs. B. Cole andMrs. Sam Haverty. Proceeds are for the care and treatment of patients suffering from cancer and tuberculosis at the hospital. Rebekah Lodge to Meet Sunshine Rebekah Lodge 9 will meet Tuesday, 7:30 Dm at Work, men's Circle! 25 Wa^ng* n ave. Xd"" Pan Am Team Wins First Place Pan American Bank of Miami Slow Pitch League Softball Team was recently awarded the championship trophy. The team won 22 out of 23 games played during the past season, walking away with first place honors in the League, Annex 1. Joseph S. Moss, president, Pan American Bank of Miami, a Sottile Group Bank, accepted the trophy for the bank from Max Hochstadt, manager of the team. All members of the team, including A. Axelrod, N. Finkelstein, M. Jacobs, E. Bragman, L. Wadler, E. Dillman, D. Kingsberg, Z. Sheinfeld, M. Court, M. Goldberg, T. Reed, David and Max Hochstadt, are expected to participate in next year's League, again under the banner of the Pan American Bank of Miami, as soon as necescan be cornStudent life at Yeshiva University, including rabbinical studies, the sciences, sports, discussion groups, recreation and research. Yeshiva University Achieves Maturity •y RABBI JONAH E. CAPLAN The Florida chapter of Yeshiva University is three years old. It was born in Sept., 1956 through the initiative and dedicated effort of its first chairman, Leo Robinson. Actually, activities in behalf of Yeshiva University preceded the Florida chapter when, in 1952, Mr. Sam C. Levenson, Mrs. Louis Glasser, 1953, Sam C. Levenson, Mrs. Louis Glasser. Isidore Goldberg and R. Williams Ante initiated a campaign in behalf of the university's medical school, the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Although the school was then just a dream, the leadership of the Greater Miami Jewish community rallied behind the call as did other leaders throughout the country. The need for a medical school under Jewish auspices was universally accepted. Prominent among the many who participated in that initial effort and who had faith in that dream were Sam Blank, Sam J. Heiman, Aaron Ksnner, Max Orovitz, Baron de Hirsch Meyer, Dan Buskin, William D. Singer, Sam Stampleman, Carl Weinkle and Joseph Weintraub. Since this initial effort, the University has grown to 17 graduate and undergraduate schools. In 1954 Yeshiva established Stern College for Women—first women's liberal arts and science college under Jewish auspices in the nation. Grant Aid In 1955 Yeshiva initiated the first class of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, the nation's first non-sectarian medical school under Jewish sponsorship. In 1957, the non-sectarian co-ed graduate school of education was founded. Through the partial aid of a $500,000 grant from the Ford Foundation for the Advancement of Education, a teaching fellowship program was set up for liberal arts college graduates to acquire Master's and Doctorate degrees while earning $2,000 as salaried teaching interns in the Greater New York public and private schools. Also, in 1957 the first School of Social Work in a university setting was established. It is the outgrowth of the university's School of Education sod Community Administration. The school is interdenominational and co-ed. The year of 19SS saw the birth of the Graduate School of Mathematical Sciences, an outgrowth of the Institute of Mathematics, organized by the university in 1945. Charier Day Award The phenomenal growth of the university has, however, in no way dimmed the philosophy which underlined it. Dr. Samuel Belkin, president of the university, has Indicated that America's colleges and universities must maintain a balance between the various branches of learning. To fulfill their educational obligations they must keep them in proper perspective. "The university should be dedicated to the study of the natural sciences, the humanities and the moral and spiritual purposes of life. The neglect of the humanities," he said, "could very well result in an inbalance of knowledge." The activities of the Florida chapter center around its Annual Charter Day award dinner, • non-fund-raising affair. The first year, the honoree was Leo Robinson, banker, civic and religious leader. The second year the award went to Louis E. Wolfson, industrialist and philanthropist. In 1958. R. Williams Apte, a member of one of the oldest Jewish families to Florida, a dedicated worker in all phases of community and national endeavor, was so honored. Officers of the Florida chapter are Leo Robiason, chairman, and Jack A. Cantor, co-chairman; vice chairmen, R. Williams Apte, Jay J. Berkowitz, Benjamin I. Binder, Shepard Broad, J. KenContinued en Paea 14-A Greater Miami Hebre immeti Mrs. Zvi Feingreater Miami Hebrew Tpnrhar. n. ^. sents Joshua Stadlan wTth catftTn ,£t? ^ 0kun ^J^n Kar association's appreciation t th£ VS "^ 5"* Gad n S,adlan ^ B to ^ course he conducted in behalf of hi w f elt mn Zv Rosenkranz, Mrs. Joshua Stadlan, tion's membership. Left to riahTcrre MrTZ' ^^ an <* Mr. Nathan Center. Not shown cha Kaplan, Mrs Ruth Wagner Mis. HaTa **"" ^ Gwchokw



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October 2. 1959 +Jewlstifk>rkHar) Page> 13-A Contributions of South Florida Zionists By SBYMOO* B. LIIBMAN lionor ri PresJdenr, Southeast Re*ien ZOA Jlte past y*M" MW a continuation d the norft activities oyhevanojjr Sewitsundin* function u the Israel CavalI j sj ars held at the Miaipi Beach Auditorium llhToist December. The Israeli artiste had been uLuUy ^ te ted by w SuUiv B ta tara 1 ,Bd L brought by him to this country to appear on Revision show. They then undertook a tear Of I united States under ZOA auspice*. They played i full house. No small part of the success of the tion was due to-the patrons -who were erganI rf under the co-chairmanship of Max Bederman lurt j 0S eph M. Rose. The affair was a Joint effort hf the districts in Miami, Miami Beach, Coral 6af MM and Hollywood. to the spring, the Miami-Gables District held liti annual barbecue on the spacious lawn of Mr. land Mrs. Sam Levine. Abe Hurwiti, who has since Ldly passed away, and his wife. Rose, were honIcredfor the many years of devoted sendee to the [Zionist Organization of America. Over 500 people [attended the function. Local Activities He annual elections of some of the districts brought Al Ossip to the presidency of the Beach District, as successor to Judge Mai Englander, James D. Liebman. as successor to Murray Levine for the Miami Gables District, and Ezra Finegold again assumed the presidency of the North Shore District. Noted local and national' figures addressed many of the various district meetings, and the Beacb Luncheon Club held forth as in previous. years under the chairmanship of Herbert Heiken. The Kfar Silver Agricultural Training School in Israel, which is maintained by the ZOA, had several scholarships contributed to it as a resist p| the fund-raising activities of the districts. This school is accredited by the University of the State of New York. The ZOA House in Tel Aviv which has won the acclaim of Israelis and all American tourists, also received financial support from the local districts. During the year, several questions have arisen Much will undoubtedly form the basis of a discussion for the coming months.,The problem in Israel as to "Who is a Jew" was debated, and the ultimate answer may not be resolved for a considerable period. The meeting this past summer of the World Zionist Actions Committee, which is the ruling body of the World Zionist Organization between its conventions, authorized the affiliation of nonZionist bodies with the WZO. Negotiations have been carried on with the United Synagogue of America, B'nai B'rith and other organizations. The wisdom of this decision and the ultimate consequences will require prolonged discussion. Strengthening Bends The cultural program of the ZOA, the need for maximal Jewish education for our youth, and the" inculcation and indoctrination of adult Jews with knowledge of the Jewish and Zionist past and_prestt will receive the attention, of the districts during the coming year. Literacy in its fullest sense Itquires more than the ability ta read and writte. Zionists arc dedicated to seeing that the "people of the book" are fully conversant with every phase Miami Hebrew Names Cantor Charles Hablow, president of Miami Hebrew Congregation, this week announced that Rev. Joseph Sa reman has been engaged as cantor'for the congregation and will chant the liturgy during"the*"s president, announced Wednesday. Miss Kiein was formerly director of youth activities of the Atlantic t-ny (N. J.) Jewish Center, where ne supervised the hobby and club activities of some 700 young girls ar -a boys there. She has been direclor of the Leadership Training institute of the regional USY pro* r m during the past four years. Miss Klein is a graduate of the ^Diversity of Georgia, with a BA ree. She also has a Master's defree from the University of FlorMorry Rovitz is chairman of the *uth Commission of the North More Jewish Center. able to muster a quorum of ten male adults for Sabbath services, accbrding to the Folkshtimme, Warsaw Yiddish-language daily, which was received here thi3 week. Wroclaw, formerly Breslau, capital of German Upper Silesia, now has the largest Jewish community in Poland. The Jews of the city are active in most economic fields, including the professions. Many of them work in a big railway car factory and in the Wroclaw plants manufacturing precision instruments. In pre-war days. In German Breslau, the community maintained two synagogues. The "now" synagoqu" was dctroyed by the Nails In 1S38 and rha synagogue now in use wa virtually nutted bv the Nails. Sc held there every Saturday, but, according to the nawapaper'a cor respondent, the sexton complained that "it la difficult to assemble a mlnyan." The two old Jewish cemeteries in Wroclaw were not damaged but many of the tombstones were described in "sad" disrepair. Among famous men interred there were the Jewish historian,! Heinrich Graetz, who taught at; the Theological Seminary in old Breslau, and the German philosopher of Socialism, Ferdinand Lasalle. The Theological Seminary does not function now. By contrast with the situation he found at the synagogue, the Folkshtimme writer reported lively activities at the Jewish Folk Club, the local headquarters of the Jewish Social and Cultural Union, the Yiddish Theatre, and the vocational training classes conducted by ORT. He reported that the Jewish library in Wroclaw contained 6,000 volumes, 2,000 of them in Yiddish, and displayed Yiddish newspapers published not only in Poland but also in Rumania, the United States and Argentina. The library has registered 450 regular readers, of whom about a third read Yiddish. mi Mayoi Robert King High signs proclamation designaOct. 13 to 20 B'nai B'rith Membership Week. Looang on (left to right) are Jerome Greene. Florida State president; Alfred Kreisler; Albert Elies. B'nia B'rith national membership director; and Eli Hurwilx. I



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Pace I4-A +Je*isMcrMiar7 Fridaf. OctoU, 2. B /" — %  Yeshiva University Achieves Maturity Mesdames Jacob Glassman. Irving Carrey, Irving Tillis, George Linden. Jccques Brill. Joseph WUkes. and Harry Rosenblatt Mesdames Martin Goodman. Norman Bergin. Sheldon Kay. Leonard Wcldman. Henry Freeman. Max Deakter. Estelle Tischler, and Norman Morgenstern. mm BUT HAPPY Local Delegates Back from ORT Confab Happy delegates of the Southeastern Florida region returned this week from the 15th biennial convention of ORT in Washington. D.C. Tired out from the round-the-clock schedule, their notebooks are filled with details relating to the decisions designed to blue print ORT activities during the year ahead. Major resolution at the convention was to institute a program to train the many persons who do not qualify for regular ORT schools Current enrollment throughout the world is 40.000 students Mr. and Mrs. Erich Cohn board plane for extended trip around the world. Coral Way Men Aid Bicod Bark Blood Bank drive was given an Mats* Sunday when the Coral Way Jewish Center Men's Club donated 44 pints of blood at the West Miami Junior High School. "Operation Save-A-Life" was the first undertaking of the newlyformed Blood Bank committee of the Men's Club. Jack Raymond is chairman of the committee. Breakfast was served to donors by the Sisterhood. The 44 pints of blood are being held in reserve at Mt. Sinai Hospital. Dr. M. B. CirUn was in charge of the mobile unit Conns Leave On World Tour NEW YORK—Erich Cohn, wellknown in the Jewish community and prominent manufacturer of koshez food*, and Mrs. Cohn left recently by air on an extensive trip around the world. The couple will visit Italy, Greece and other continental countries first, and are spending the Hich Holy Days in Israel with intimate friends. Cohn. who has frequently been a traveler to Israel, has a host of long-standing contacts there. He will re-visit many of the historical and religious sites. Among the calls will be the Weitzman Institute and the Hebrew University. Following th holidays, the couple will leave Israel and continue on the global trip, which will then take them via Teheran to India. There thty plan to • many of the archeological sites in both northern and southern districts. They will visit Cochin, Jewish settlement of centuries, where one of the oldest synagogues is still in existence. Then onto Ceylon. Indonesia. Angorwat in Cambodia, and Bangkok. Hong Kong will be the "next port of call, and some time will be spent in Japan. Cohn plans to visit Jewish communities and settlements there. The Cohns will return after some four months via Honolulu, making a visit to the nation's newest American state. Cohn is president of A. Good1 man & Sons, Inc., famed matzo bakers, and producers of many kosher food products. Continued from Page 12 A neth Edlin, Charles Fruchtman, Isidore Goldberg, N. C. Goldman (West Palm Beach), Jennie Grossinger, Sam Reinhard, Allen E. Rosen, S. E. Schwartz. Nat Wolf (Lakeland); treasurer. Benjamin Rudn.ck. and secretary, Joseph Cohen. Living up to its name, the Florida chapter has branched out to other parts of the' state where meetings and functions were held and are being planned for the immediate future. • Many new and significant developments have taken place at the university during the three jears of the chapter's operation. The Middle States Assn. of Colleges and Secondary Schools passes on the accreditation of the colleges and universities in the east every ten years. On May 8. 1959, Dr. Edward B. Nyquist, chairman of the Assn Commission on Institutions of Higher Education, in reporting to Dr. Belkin, said the following: "Surely the previous decade has been one of rapid growth and expansion, but more important in quality. Clearly, Yeshiva University is much more important, influential and a stronger institution today than it was in 1948. Yeshiva University has fulfilled many of our expectations of its potential find progress and. hence, we are delighted to validate its claim for reaffirmation of its accreditation." Large Graduate School Shortly thereafter. Yeshiva University's Graduate School of Social Work was granted accreditation by the Council of Social Work Education at the 88th annual forum of the National Conference of Social Welfare held May 24 to 29 in San Francisco. Dr. Morton Teicher, outstanding scholar and anthropologist, is the director of the school. At the commencement exercises this past June, the first eight graduates received their Master of Social Service degrees. la 1957. when the Graduate School of Education opened its doors, the registration was 80 students. Today, it is one of the largest in the country, with over 900 students. At the June commencement exercises, 163 were awarded advanced degrees—142 Master's and 21 Doctorates. Dr. Benjamin Fine, one of the foremost authorities on education, who for 22 years was the education editor of the New York Times^ is the dean. Other advanced degrees at the last graduation included two Doctor of Hebrew Literature degrees, four Master of Art degrees by the Bernard Revel Graduate School. Also. 21 Doctor of Philosophy degrees, one Doctor of Education degree. 139 Master of Science degrees by the Graduate School of Education. The growth of the university can be measured when we take into account also the following undergraduate degrees awarded by Yeshiva University: 95 Bachelor of Art by Yeshiva College; 17 Teachers Diplomas, 16 Bachelor of Religious Education. 13 Bachelor of Hebrew Literature by the Teachers Institute for Men; seven Teachers Diplomas and four B.R.E. by the Teachers Institute foi Women; 29 BA degrees and three B.R.E detrees by Stern College for Women; and two by the Cantorial Training Institute. Record Total In all. the university awarded this June, 777 degrees and d


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October 2, 1959 -Jewlsti fhrknan Page 15A %  edical Expert at n K c!tTs CHURCH, Va.-(JTA)^ Tinner, the ion of ROM Herman. Services were Sept. 28 were In New Tork City, with local ardaughters, Mrs. Radle Shoatack and L ihraham Flexner, the vm 01 P r %  • „i Jewish parenU from fc '?'Sa who revolutionized medP' u Uon in United *a£ (ud a t Princeton in 1930. died jfweek I" his home here. He lljlO report, which condemnlisting medical education fa£ was followed by a fundS career in which he perauadhe Rockefeller family to give Uooo between 1917 and 19271 he ip make American medical £ion among the best in the was instrumental in persuadline the late Albert Einstein to Live Germany to join the Institute Ifor Advanced Study. In 1945. he agreed to head a comImittee of scientists to sponsor the [establishment of the Hebrew UniIversity-Hadassah Medical School loo Mt. Scopus in Jeruaalem. f Jewish Labor ILeader Passes NEW YORK — (JTA) — Funeral I services were held this week for Isidore Nagler, a vice president of Hie International Ladies Garment Workers Union for 30 years who was actively identified with many Jewish causes. He died at the age | of 64. Born in Auitria, ha. cam* to New York in 1909. Among many labor, civic, philanthropic and Jewish positions during his career, ho was secretary of the Jewish Labor Committee and chiirman of the Federa+een for Labor Israel. At his death, Mr. Nagler was a vice president of the New York State Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations. Last year he was labor adviser to the United States delegation to the International Labor Organization conference in Geneva. In 1938. he had been American Labor Party candidate for Congress. at Riverside Memorial mandy Isle, with burial In Mt. Nebo tory. DAVID BROWN 7S, of *MO Hamlnao dr.. 1M Sept X, Retired owned of a plastering business, he came here ten years ago from New York. There are. no survivors here. Services were In New York City, with local _rran.smenta by Riverside Memorial Chattels. MRS. RUTH QOLDMAN 52. of SUOtl iJanand a\c., oled Sept. 2.",. She came here eight yearn HKO 'nun New York, and was a member of the North Snore Jewish Center and Agudath Israel Hebrew Institute. Surviving are her husband. Harry; son, Paul: daughter, Mrs. Rosalind l'*•}*" %  : Surviving .are her husband. William. three sons. Including Seymour J two daughters. Including Mrs. Anne Sax-. and a sister. MrRabeoOB l.leb.-rman. She also leaves -even irran.l..,,. Sept. 2.. at Gordon Puneral Home, with burial In Mt. Ni 'cry. MRS. CELIA SCHENKER 7(. of 1235 Euclid ave.. died Sept IK She and her husband, Ixiuls, who passed away last month, came here eight years ago from New York. Surviving Is a son In New York. Services were In New York, with local arrangements by Riverside Memorial Chapel. MRS. ESTHER BABNETT 71, of 1801 l^-iiox ave., died Sept. II She came from New York seven years ago. Surviving are her husband, Aaron; three daughter; Mrs. Cella Zucker, Mrs. Sylvia Robinson and Mrs. Leah Slern: and a son. Irving. Services wece> Sept. ID its. J I ail 11 last Funeral Chapel, with burial In Mt. Nel.o Oe.neteiv MRS. JENNIE MYERS <7. of lllo Pennsylvania ave., died Sept. 10 In ljncaster. I'a. A Miami Beach resident *.r 22 years, she is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Minnie Strauss and Mlsa Ulllan Friedlander; and two sons. Including Jack Friedl;, nder. Miami Beach. Services were Sevt. 13 In IjRnraster LEGAL NOTICE MRS. KATIE SEOAL 70. of Z4&0 SW 5th St.. died Sept. IS. She came here II years ago from Boaton. Surviving is her husband, Samuel, two. sons, Milton and Oscar: a brother and three grandchildren. Services were Sept. 18 at Gordon Funeral Home. MRS. ANNIE RADNER 7S, of S20 NW 153rd St.. died Sept. 17. She came here seven years ago from Holyoke, Mass. Surviving are three daughters. Miss Minn Radner. Mrs. Melba Klsenberg and Mrs. Stella Merlin: two brothers, a sister, ten grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren. Services were In Springfield, Mass.. with local arrangements by Gordon Funeral Home. JACOB ROBINSON 73, of 1117 SW 32nd ave., died Sept. 18. He came here 13 years ago from Philadelphia. Pa., and was employed as an agent with the Seaboard Railroad. Surviving are his wife. Jennie; a daughter. Mrs. Samuel Chernoff: brother and one grandchild. Services were Sept. 17 at Gordon Puneral Home, with burial In Star of David Cemetery. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. SOC 9288 MICHAEL LK DONE. Plaintiff, vs. JEANNE LE DONE. Defendant. NOTICE BY PUBLICATION TO: JEANNE LE DONE Defendant tea Sutter Avenue Brooklyn. New York YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Complaint for Divorce has been filed against you. and you are hereby required to serve a copy of your answer on the Plaintiffs Attorney, ANOEI.O A. AU, 1103 Alnsley Building, Miami 32, Florida, and file the original answer in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before the *th day of November. 19511. or the allegations will be taken as confessed against you. DATED at Miami. Dade Count \. Florida, this 30tb day of September. 1959. E. B. LEATHERMAN. Clerk, Circuit Court, Dade County, Florida (seal) By: K. M. LYMAN. Deputy Clerk. 10/2-9-16-23 NOT.CE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No 59C 9241 BETTY MAYA. Plaintiff, vs. UASTON MAYA. I 'efelidant. %  ~—s"SPiT % WO W DTVORCE TO: CASTt iN MAYA 8414 Beverly Woods Street I>,M Angeles 34, California You G ASTON MAYA are hereby notified that a Bill of Complaint f -r Divorce lias been riled against rou, a ml vou are required to serve a eopy ,,f vonr An-wer or Pleading to the BUI of Complaint on the plalnti Attorney, GOLDMAN & GOLDSTEIN 2303 West Hauler Street. Miami, Florida, and file the original Answer or Pleading In the office of theCleric of the Circuit Court on or before the 3rd dav of November, 1959. If you fall to do so. Judgment by default win be taken against you for the relief demanded In the Bill of Com—taint. This notice shall lie published once each week for four consecutive weeks in THE JEWISH FL'.RIDIAN. DONE AND ORDERED at Miami. Florida, thla 29th day of September, A B. B. LEATHERMAN. Clerk. Circuit Court, Dade County, Florida (seal) By: K. >f. LYMAN. Deputy Clerk. GOLDMAN GOLDSTEIN 2303 West Flagler Street Miami, Florida NH 5-0818 Attorney, for Plaintiff ,„,,.,.„., LEO B. HOFFMAN ",9, of 8333 Harding ave., died Sept. 15. A taxi driver, he came here 21 years ago from Chicago. Surviving are his wife, Anne, and three %  including Mrs. Clara Levy Classman. Miami Beach. Services war* Sept. lfi at Gordon Funeral Home. IN NOTICE BY PUBLICATION THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE MORRIS HOROWITZ 74. of 22fi? SW 11th t.-r.. died Sept. 1". A retired grocer, he came hi vears ago from Ixmg Island, N.Y. Surviving are his wife. Dora; two Jacob Udell. 62 Passes Away Jacob Udell, of 241 28th st., Miami Beach, died Sunday, Sept. 27. He was 62. Mr. Udell was the founder and an executive of the Gulf 6tream Frozen Food Co. of Miami. He came here 17 years ago from Philadelphia, and is survived by his wife. Leah: two sons, Lawrence and Barton, Miami; a brother and six sisters. Services were Monday at Riverside Memorial Chapel, Alton rd., with burial in Mt. Nebo Cemetery. .. MRS. MINNIE SHUBOW "• of 2:111 ."Hi st., died Sept. 27. She ire .!.-, yeara ago from Detroit, mnder of Pioneer Women. SMirvlvliiu are a son, David, and two oauisnters, Mr. l'aula Bloom and lien rude Friedman. Services 11 Oordoa Funeral ith burial In Mt. Slnal Cemelery. SAMUEL B. BERGEN 67 of 13SS0 NE 6th ave.. died Bepl Surviving are hiwife. Ksther:^a son, Robert, three sisters, jpcjudlnt lira. Thera Kasson, Miami: four grandchildren and a brother. IjnfcuWW Sept 2B at Gordon Puneral Home, wit* burial In Mt. Nebo Cemetery. HENRY BRIELOFF 8.-,, of 171 Collins ave., died Sept. 2a He came here 20 years ago from tne Bronx, NY., and was a retired salesman There are no local survivor.. Services were Sept. 22Jit Blveralete Memorial Chapel. Washington ave.. with burial In Mt. Neb o Cemetery. ANTHt/R NEWMARK 48 of 1330 StlUwater dr.. died Sept. 18 In San Mateo. Calif. He came from New York 14 years ago and owned the Knickerbocker Meat Co. here. Surviving are his wife. *•• _"": Jamie; mother. Mrs. Sadie New mark, brother. Murray: and sister. Mr*. I iet t v ZtlOkar. S.-rv Ice. were Sent. .3 at Riverside Memorial Chapel. Alton rd. SIOMOND LANDES 75. of 3*80 SW 2nd st.. who came here IS years ago frofn New Wk. died Satit 19. He was a Mason and meml„. r of Miami Hebrew ConttreKation. Surviving IK his wife. Heine. Services were Sent 21 at Cordon Funeral Home, with burial In Mt. Nebo Cemetery. MRS. EFFIE K. ROSEN 74. of IMS SB ls^tli dr.. Bo. sOamJ Beach, died Kept M. She came from I'aterson. S J "even years ago. Surviving are three sons. Abraham, Louis and F.inaiinel. two daughter-. Mrs. Helen tlootenberg and MrsFlorence Morris: and four brothers. Services were Sept. 22 at Newman Funeral Home. Beth Sholom Schools Open MRS. ANNA HOFFMAN •J. of „.,.. SW 37th st.. died Sept. 2:,. one cam,, here five years ago from n W o k "'"' w 8 member of the !i";f""" Friendship Club of Coral uables Surviving are her husband. Kichard. and a son. Richard R. 8er-ere in New York, with local "ranaeinenta by Riverside Memorial f the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before the i'th dv of November, 1 I • if vou fall to d.. BO, Judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded In the Bill of i 'omplalnl This notlas shall be published once I. !• week fi.l f.. I! %  eekS In THE JEWISH Fl ORIDIAN. DONE ANH ORDERED at Miami, Florida, thla 2!,tu Oaj of Beptem AD. I! 1: 1: LEATHERMAN, Clerk, circuit Court. Dade County, Florida (M aj) By: K M I.YMAN. v Deputy CU k. ALVIN GOODMAN -L".| Blaa s) ne Blvd. Miami, FloAttorney for Plaintiff ,,,•.,..,. EUGENE BERSHAD 83 of lio-'.o N. Bayshore dr., died Sent IV. He was a retired postal emand came here seven years ago from Newark,-N.1. Surviving are his wlfi* Ida; two daughters, Including Mra. Beverly IjiFYngola. No. Miami Beach: a sister, Mrs. Frames Kats; and brother. Services were Sept. 20 at Riverside Memorial Chapel. Normandy Isle, with buflal In Mt. Nebo Cemetery. MEYER GAINER 78. of 74S Jefferson ave.. died Sept. IS. A retired coffee broker, he came here seven year, ago from Brooklyn. N.T. Surviving are his wife, Gussle, two daughters and two sons. Services LEGAL NOTICE SATISFYING YOUR DEEPEST DESIRES FOR BEAUTY AND DIGNITY The Vista offers family nemorlal eatates on beautlul'y landscaped park like 'rounds. Complete freedom -f choice In memorials and '" details, Prrpttual tort f m i n seaa s* THE-V1S1 \ MI< .1 uirocni Xueulltm O0emi Hnaaain(oPUsa.Hialeab,!1a. Pfaonet TU 7-M01 ti OUR SPECIALTY CONDOLENCE BASKETS MSHIV FACKtD mi DEUVERfD WITHIN TNI HOUR FRUIT CIRCUS 1698 S.W. Flagler Tor. • PHONE • f> FR 3-9275—FR 1-2511 " %  are r|Uired to ., i ap) of your Answer or Pleading to the Bill of Complalni on the plaintiffs Attorney, ItARSHALL H. \HKli 110 Lincoln Road, M Beach, Florida, and file the original Knswer or Pleading In the office or the Clerk of thCircuit Court on Of before the 23rd day of Oct r. 1989. If vou fall to do so. Judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the Bill of Complaint. .... This notice shall be published once each week for four consecutive weeks in THE JEWISH FI-ORIDIAN. DONE AND ORDERED at Miami. Florida, this 2.1nl day of September, 'E'B. LBATHERafAN, Clerk. Circuit Court. Dade PountY, Mnrid* (seal) By: R. H. RICE. JR. Deputy ci.K. MAHSHAl.l. II ADER. Esq. 42" Lincoln Road Miami Beach 39, Fla. (JE J^J^..^ NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME" LAW NOTICE IB HEREBY C.IVION that the underslrned, desiring to engage in s under the fictitious name of I.APNDROMAT at S0..S Way Intende to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. }0M CORAL WAY. INC. ALVIN S. CAWN Attorney for Applicant 1 Lincoln Road. Miami Be8 1 c 0 h ,,_ § ., e 83 IN IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OP. FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. S9C-0OI9F (Cannon, J.) LOUIS LEVINE, Plaintiff. SOPHIE LEVINE, Defendant _____ AMENDED ORDER OF PUBLICATION TO; Sophie Levlne 100 Van Cnrtlandt Park South Bronx 3, N.Y. You are hereby notified that a Complaint Pbr Divorce haa been filed agaln-t you. and you are hereby required to serve a copy of your Answerto the Complaint For Divorce on Plaintiffs attorneys and file the original Answer in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before the 2nd day of Nov-.nl.er. 1959. other. e XZS*t !" tiX l S a it October. ,959. ctrouii ,';.,,r' : i I'!e : co^,S^or\da cation hereof, or the same will (> CBflt t-ourL j |( ^",. |R THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT N AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. 47503-C IN RE: Estate of JACOB FEINBERO. I >eceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All P< Ing Claims or Demands Against Said Estste: You are hereby notified and required 1o present any claims and demands which you may have against the estate of JACOB FEINBEH ceased late of Dade County, Florida, to the County luitges of Dade County. and file the same In their ofti the County Courthouse In Dade County, Florida, within eight calendar the date of the flr-l be barred. j||NN|] ,. | :|V|;! MYERS, HKi.MAN KAPLAN By: Attorney Kenneth M. Myers it Street Miami M. Florida w/ ,. 9 .„. 2 Deputy Clerk. TAI.lAN'OFF & WALLER Attorns) s for Plaintiff Lincoln Road > Shu* P.each. Fla. 10/ t.,.l,.i



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%  iJOCIAUIE d.nju t ovnan s lAJorlJ ,*. • cartel will Wf oflt 'S Mr?Sidney Schwartz |Dd -avid will arrive afte years of making tte navid will arrive after ,a -ars of making the rounds in Europe and the C The two rented cribs ".also be in place as daugh*" 2 son-in-law Meta and £je Bcrger arrive at the S time with Iwo-year-o d f a „ Ellen and six-week-old JJi, Alan %  Twenty ports, 52 s brief whirl in Europe „e the plans for Harold and JL, Cohen, when they leave £ lhe Caronia for a MediterSnean cruise... But Ester admils that if the three different kinds of seasick pills she s taking along don't work, they may be back sooner than all those people think who hosted such lovely Bon Voyage parties for them • • The new long distance dial system works well, but Dr. Meyer Eggnatz had to get an operator to help him when he talked to his wife, Rena, first in Rome and then in Tel Aviv. Rena is on a mission to Israel, representing the Greater Miami Jewish Federation and FJWO • • Postcard from Russia-Hy and Juliet Lieber writing from behind the Iron Curtain: "One of the things we don't like here is that we have no idea how the baseball pennant race is turning out. We hope the Giants are winning— and the Reds couldnt care less." • • • Bridal shower Saturday at the home of Mrs. Sol Cohen, &f 557 Jefferson ave., honored Miss Phyllis Sweet, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Harold Sweet, who'll marry Sanford Turner, son of the Jack Turners, New York City, at the end of November ... Mr. and Mrs. Turner came down from Gotham Town to attend the event Guests also included Mr. and Mrs. Irving Radin—she's a sister of the groom to-be—Mrs. Max WeRz, Mrs. Robert Litowitz, Mrs. Anita Tischler, and Mrs. Earl Ferron. • • • Jay Burke, son of Mrs. Marilyn Burke, of Hialeah, is now attending Hospital Corpsman School at the U. S. Naval Hospital, San Diego, Calif Jay graduated from Hialeah High School with honors this past June, enlisted in the U. S. Navy, and was sent to Boot Camp in San Diego During this period, he maintained the highest average scores on examinations given to his company, and was given an academic award by his commanding officer Mr. and Mrs. George Wescourt celebrated their 11th wedding anniversary Sept. SO ... The Wescourts and children, Keith, Mark and Barbara, make their home at I960 NW 187th ter., Opalocka ... Mr. and Mrs. John Hensel, of Clifton Heights, Pa., were house guests of the Morris Zatlyns, of Hiafean Hannah is ways and means vice president of Sisterhood of Temple Tifereth Jacob. • • • On the Birth Front: A son, Barry Michael, born to Mr. and Mrs. Harvey L. Brant Aug. 30 at Doctors Hospital Barry joins brother, Jeffrey Randall, • Bris was Sept. at the Brant home, 8025 SW 19th St., ""h Rabbi Samuel Machtei officiating Grandmothers are Mrs. Tema Newman, of Miami, nd Mrs. Eva Brant, of Coral Gables Also: Gary Jay, born to Mr. nd Mrs. Michael (Rita) Bern"ein on Sept 10 at Jackson Memorial Hospital .. Bris wa ;*Pt 17 at the Bernstein home, 7 SW 2it ter., with Cantor Herman Gottlieb officiating... Maternal grandparents are Mr. •d Mrs. Irving Laden, Miami Mr. and Mrs. Jack Bernstein, of New York, are paternal grandparents. • • • Spotted at the Miami Herald annual press conference: Mrs. Louis Glasser, Mrs. Milton Sirkin, Mrs. Charles P. Feinberg and Mrs. Jean C. Lehman Second row front—Mrs. Jeanette Good seated next to Mrs. Harold Solomon — newest Herald staff writer under the name of Muriel Miles Mrs. Aaron Farr in a talk on community projects Mrs. Raymond Rubin in a fetching brown and black combination Mrs. Irving Fell, seated with her, in contrasting black and white .. Mrs.-'Nathaniel Levin greeting many friends Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Revitz will host a reception for Rep. James Roosevelt at their home, 1250 97th st...Bay Harbor Island, Wednesday evening at 8:30 The reception was originally planned for the Max Krauss home Mrs. Solomon Margolis, acting president of the Greater Miami chapter of the National Women's Committee for Brandeis University—Mrs. Albert I. Jacobs, president, is still away —took along a portable TV set to her ex-board meeting so that everyone could watch the ch. 10 program, "The Women Challenge," a Friday, 10 a.m., presentation Reason? Federation of Jewish Women's Organizations was featured. • • • It'll be happy first birthday Sunday for Susan Brooks, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Brooks, of Bay Harbor Islandhe's the Luau exec %  Mrs. Bernard Israel, 12200 Vista In., So. Miami, is back from New York Owner of the Gallery restaurant here, she has been making twice-a-month trips to Gotham Town to supervise the redecorating of the Gallery champagnery in Greenwhich Village That Rolls Royce parked at Tony Sweet's several times this past week belongs to Ben and Joan Gaines Wonder if the doormen call him Sir Ben? At an Israel Bond luncheon: Mrs. Henry Fine, her beautiful red hair accented by a dotted dress, near the table of Mrs. Al Askowitz and Mrs. Nathan Becker .. Mrs. Yaakov Rosenberg's dark eyes sparkling under a vivid red hat, talking to Mrs. Phil Schiff, one of the 12 captains soon to be announced by Charles Finkelstein, chairman of the Jewish Attitudes Survey here of the American Jewish Committee Postcard from Spain: Janet and Sidney Rosenberg writing friends to report they had just seen an exciting bull fight—but were still thrilled by their just concluded tour of Israel. • • • The ponies had bright ribbons wound in their manes The 25 children invited to help Michael Cary Blasberg celebrate his second birthday were enchanted by the ponies, the ice cream, and favors After the excitement quieted down, Michael's parents, Larrie and Arlene Blasberg, readied things for a birthday dinner, with guests including paternal grandparents, Irv and Lil Blasberg, and George and Jessie Light, maternal grandparents ... At the Mia mi -Tula ne game: Joe Arkin and his three boys, Norman, Jules and Stanley— and Stan's pretty wife, Jfll The William Weintraubs, toiling up the stairs Mrs. Sam Weissel standing up to see who was sitting down behind her... Louis PrUikin and his Etta also surveying the crowds Mickey and Ronny Escol stopping at each row to greet friends ... Dr. and Mrs. George Lister seated in the charmed Cwrtinved an Pate -B %  r "Jewish IHLoridLiaii Miami, Florida, Friday, October 2, 1959 Section B Hon. Jacques E. Turner (center). Consul of France, leads a toast to the friendship of France and Israel at the launching of the French-Israel Festival of Friendship Wednesday in the Carillon hotel, preceding the installation of officers of the Women's Division for State of Israel Bonds, joining the Consul in the toast are deft to right) Mesdames Jack Popick, Miami Beach Israel Bond chairman; Trudy Hamerschlag, Chen chairman; Moses P. Epstein, former national president of Hadassah, who was luncheon guest of honor; Samuel T. Sapiro, Miami Trustee chairman; Louis Glasser, installing officer; and Anna Brenner Meyers, former chairman and now honorary chairman of the Women's Division. Not shown is Mrs. Max Weitz, chairman of the Women's Division. Wine used in the toast was Israel Carmel champagne. Festival of Friendship will be climaxed Oct. 22 by the French-Israel Festival of Fashions in the Fontainebleau hotel Chairman of the Festival is Mrs. Paul Polk*. 1 Adirft Opens Season Adult social season of the Southwest YMHA begins next week with a smorgasbord and games night sponsored by the Couples Club Saturday, Oct. 10, at 8:30 p.m. Arnold Klapper, Edmond Lynn and Ed Ross are in charge of entertainment. The function will be held at the Southwest YMHA, 7215 Coral Way. A new Young Marrieds Club, for couples under 30, is holding its first organizational meeting on Sunday, 8:30 p.m., to develop plans and program for the younger set. County-wide hospitality program far Jewish servicemen is launched by the National Jewish Welfare Board Armed Services Division, with the cooperation of Greater Miami's Federation of Jewish Women's Organizations. Chaplain Norman D. Hirsh, of the 2nd Marine Division, made a special trip from Camp Lejeune, N.C., to attend the ceremonies staged at last week's FJWO board of governors meeting. Mrs. Louis Glasser (right) accepts her official Certificate of Appointment naming her chairman of the Armed Services Division for the 5th District, as Mrs. Gerald P. Soltx (center) who heads the ServeA-Camp committee, looks on. No. Shore Slates Two Speakers North Shore Men's Lodge of B'nai B'rith and the women's chapter will hold a joint meeting Monday evening at the Carillon hotel. Jack Wilson is chairman. The meeting will feature Rev. William K. Williams and Nate Perlmutter. Rev. Williams, director of the Florida Council of Human Relations, will speak on "Civil Liberties and Human Relations in Tori a y' s Southland." Perlmutter, Florida director of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, will bring to the body the community's first report on the deliberations of the ADL's national executive committee in New Orleans, La. Bonds to Honor Women's Leader Mrs. Max Weitz, chairman of the Women's Division of Israel Bonds, will be honored at a luncheon Wednesday in the Mona Lisa room of the Eden Roc hotel "for ten years of devotion and dedicated service to the State of Israel." Coming to Miami to join in tribute to Mrs. Weitz will be Rep. James Roosevelt, of California, eldest son of the late President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Luncheon chairman will be Mrs. Jack Katzman, chairman of the Sponsors of Israel. Active with Israel Bonds since its inception, Mrs. Weitz succeeded Mrs. Anna Brenner Meyers as chairman of the Greater Miami Women's Division. Mrs. Weitz has been in Israel several times, and is affiliated with many community organizations. Mrs. Weitz is one of a handful of American Jewish women leaders who are responsible for the Sept. 23 to Oct. 22 French-Israel Fashion Festival. Some months ago, she and several other national women leaders developed the idea for the French-Israel Fashion Show which will take place Oct. 22 at a luncheon at the Fontainebleau hotel.



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?• IJ> J KMM <>*** 2, Xarta Sses' fcw Y e* for BgM — i lmarflWiICidofW*i £%£$££ %  ST! 12 tor "P. • are ^iS? ifs FL0l!AF0IEH0ST DAIRIES new Holsum Real Jewish Rye ... and Real Pumpernickel, too 1



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October 2. 1959 ^Jewisiif/oricffatr igress Director To be Speaker Irionda Women's Diviiion will 1 Z have as its guest speaker JAchztz. for 12 years national fc of of the Community Service Jl u of the American Jewish f£r*s The meeting will be Kthe Normandy Isle Branch f^Washington Fedaral Savings !£ David Muskat, president of Florda Women's Division, has Lunoed that the Oct. 6 date will fing together the combined rds of the three women's chapi D the Miami area. The busi meeting will begin at 10:30 „ and will be chaired by Mrs. tfild Jaffer. chairman of the exLyve committee. 7rs Russell Winer will report tbe Louise Waterman Wise uth Hostel luncheon scheduled Tnec. 8 Mrs. Albert Rubenstein, Lber^hip chairman of the diviL ill bring the group up to fc on the paid-up membership [scheduled at the Eden Roc hoJ on Nov. 12. A detailed schedule levenis for November, Congress nth, will be discussed at the ling. batz will speak on 'The American Jewish Congress and its Meaning to the American Jewish Community." Schatz is chairman of the national conference of program directors;' representing all major national Jewish agencies, and a member of the executive committee of the New York Film Council and the Film Council if America. He represents the Amer ican Jewish Congress in the Adult Education Assn., the American Assn. for the United Nation* CARE, Book Campaign for Israel, and many other organizations. Schatz has been religious and intercultural film editor for the mac azine "Film News," and has had articles published in other publi cations. While the Women's Division meeting in the morning is con vened for members of the board, the afternoon session beginning at 1 p.m. is open to the public. Academy Women to Meet Hebrew Academy Women will initiate the'1959-80 season with its first general meeting at the Algiers hotel Wednesday at 12:30 p.m. Program theme, "Reflections on the Holiday Scene," will be nar rated by Mrs. Jack Donnerstag. Page 3-B JWS. JOSEPH CArl Mrs. Supworth To be Speaker "Crisis in the South Today and Our Role as Women" will be the subject of an address by Mrs. Bernard Supworth at the Oct. 13 meeting of B'nai B'rith Women, Sun shine chapter, at 900 NE 125th st., No. Miami. Mrs. Supworth is district and state Anti-Defamation League chairman. There will be a question and answer period. A special addition to the 1 p.m. program will feature Mrs. Murray Summers, North Dade-Broward Council, B'nai B'rith Women, who will demonstrate "Dolls for Democracy." ORT Rcelects Mrs. Gayl Prexy WASHINGTON—Mrs. Joseph C. Gayl, of Philadelphia, was unanimously reflected national president of Women's America ORT at the final plenary session of the Women's America* ORT biennial national convention. The top-policy meeting, attended by 1,200 Women's American ORT delegates from 360 chapters throughout the country, was held here at the Mayflower hotel. Mrs. Gayl has been active in Women's, American ORT for 20 years, and has been the organization's president since October, 1958. Before her election to the presidency, she was chairman of the national executive committee. She was chairman of the organization's 14th biennial national convention (1957), held in Chicago, and of its 1956 national board conference in Pittsburgh. She had previously held offices in the Women's American ORT Philadelphia region, one of the largest Women's American ORT areas in the country. Mrs. Gayl, who is married to a physician and has three children, is also active in Philadelphia Al'Come Back Unto Sheba' "Come Back Little Sheba" opens Tuesday night, Oct. 6, at Studio M i Playhouse. Bird rd. and Ponce in j Coral Gables, for a three-week %  run, with Sunday matinee performance. The theater is dark Monday evenings. Tifereth Israel Rummage Sale Tifereth Israel Sisterhood is holding a rummage sale at Stevens Market, 6209 NW 27th ave., Thursday and Friday. lied Jewish Appeal and in community social service and hospital organizations. The convention at which she was elected met to discuss means of expanding and strengthening the support which Women's American ORT gives to World ORT Union, | a global agency devoted to giving vocational education to impoverished uprooted, and unskilled Jews. The ORT network of schools, located in 19 countries, now contains 631 installations training more than 36,000 students. Women's American ORT is the largest ORT branch in the world. 1UUIIS SCHATZ Now is the time for romedary DATI-MUT "Oil V I to come to the aid of Ithe party! Pellctous deutrt M .. madt pith crisp, chunky lllnuti nd Ihi po'ld's choiceit *••* ncu"•Picked (or prpet fretnniul it in t supply.,. MOMEDAIT N0C01ATE-NUT ROU OtAHCIUUT MU GOLFERS Cain COSIMMCS with NEW GRIPS A" Styles A.aiUbt. (•shafting RsfislsUaf Alterations rOFFS u P0NCE 1 "COtAl 6AIIM } R ALL MIXED DRINKS HAPPY NEW YEAR peace, health, prosperity and good will to all RDINE'S



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Fag* 4-B +Je*istntjiJk>n Friday. October 2. Jewish Flondtc* tubuim YOUR MARRIAGE COUNSELOR •. by t^ttmt$4€l t-f. Jxlimg MIAMI'S NATIOXAIJ.Y FAMOUS MASAUCI AUTHOBITT. LecTvae* AKD Aimtoa Not every second aumv is doomed to failure. Nor does erery remarriage importing children wind up in the divorce courts. If half of all second marriages prove unsuccessful then by the same token naif of them succeed. Take the Fishers, for example from my home town. I have known them for many yean, and here uhamid their manage from its very inception. Yea, the Fishers are happy and have been so from the day the rabbi pronounced the benediction. This despite the fact that it is a second marriage for both, and that both had youngsters by a previous Damage. Let me tell you something about the Fishers, which is not their real name, of course. When Carl Fisher's first wife died, be was in his early thirties, the owner of a moderately prosperous automobile agency. Left with two young toys. Carl remained single for several years after his' wife's death. He kept a housekeeper for the Recovers from Blow Carl had been devoted to his first wife, and she to him. Cart, in fact, was an easy going, genial sort cf person who probably would have been happy with anyone. His first marriage by common consent had been a great success. The sudden death of his charming first wife had teen a severe blow. But it was one from which he eventually recovered. He now spent most of his time NnMing up his automobile agency. Virtually all of his leisure time was spent with his sons. Three years after his wife's death. Carl met Betty at the home of a mutual friend. They liked tach other immediately, although it was by no means a passionate attraction. Nor was the first meeting a wild infatuation in which Carl was smitten w.th Betty's beauty. As a matter of fact. Betty was visibly on the plain side. She was short and dumpy. Her teeth were rather uneven. And she had a round, undistinguished face. Betty had been a widow for three years when she first met Carl, and she had been left with two small youngsters, a boy and a girl. But if to an outsider Betty appeared to be physically unattractive, she more than made up for it with her unbounded enthusiasm. She was enthusiastic about practically everything, and her enthusiasm was contagious. In fact, where Cart tended to be rather quiet and reserved Betty was bouncy and loquacious. She had a zest for living that radiated from her even pore. These may have been the very qualities that appealed to Cart in the first place. Determined to Succeed Carl and Betty saw a good deal of each other, and their friendship burgeoned into marriage, after a year. As I say. the marriage turned out to be an unusually good one. The Fishers are ideally happy and so are the youngsters who are now quite grown up. All the boys, I might add, have found jobs with Cart. Just before I left Baltimore for Miami. I asked Betty for her recipe for her successful second marriage. By what sorcery. I wanted to know, had she overcome the well-known obstacles to a successful remarriage? How had she managed to succeed where half of all other remarried couples had failed? "I was dead set on making a go of my second marriage." Betty explained seriously, "just as I was dead set on making a success of my first one. I knew that statistically remarriages had a difficult time—especially those involving children—and I was determined not to be another divorce casualty. I also knew that it was largely up to the wife to make a success of any marriage. "During the time I saw Carl. I made a careful study of his likes and dislikes. I charted his moods, studied his personality and temperament, and even read several books on male psychology. I was determined not to reform him or nag him, either. My one object was to please him, not to compete with him, and I have dedicated myself to doing so ever since we became man and wife. "I learned the foods he liked and those he detested, the amusements and recreation he preferred and those he avoided, and I made certain Carl was made as comfortable as possible. "I vowed to myself that I would never mention my former husband or ever make comparisons between him and Carl. I was resolved not to re-live the past, but to concentrate on the present, and I have faithfully kept these promises. "I knew. too. that Cart worked hard, and that he was physically exhausted when he came home. I have tried to make him comfortable both physically and iininiwnj I have refrained from bombarding turn with idle gossip upon his arrival, or deluging him with all sorts of trivial problems which I have learned to solve for myself. Nor have I asked him j to be a Mr. Fixit around the bouse Twmaui Dreidsndt "Instead, when Carl comes home I greet him with a smile and a kiss, and a warm, appetizing dinner. I also learned the value of silence. I discovered there was a time for talk and a time to be quiet, a time to be busy and a time to be discreetly ) unobtrusive, a time to be affectionate and a time not to be demonstrative. "Studying Carl has paid off in tremendous dividends, and catering to his creature comforts has paid off even more. Every man wants to feel he returns to a home instead of a house. He wants to! feel warm and wanted, to know that he is Mr. Big I and that his wife thinks he's the most important person on earth. • I have given Carl this feeling because to me be is the most important person in my world. He never takes second place even to the children." "But isn't all Uus terribly one-sided?" I protested. "It seems to me you have given everything of yourself. What about Cart? What part does he play in all this? Or is be merely the recipient of all your ministrations?" 'By no means." Betty retorted. "Carl is just as much interested in me as I am in him. My interest in and affection for Carl are fully reciprocated. This, too. is part of the secret. Show a man you are genuinely interested in him and. nine times out of ten. he will return that interest ten-fold. And the same is true with affection. Love is a reciprocal force. It grows and is strengthened by what you give to another, not by what you take. And the more you give of yourself, the more you are likely to receive in return." No Favoritism "But what about the children." I persisted, "didn't you find them a source of trouble between you and Carl, especially since they were his children and your children?" • No." Betty replied firmly. "I didn't. I thought af the youngsters not as Carl's or mine, but as ours.! Carl and I treat them all alike. And even though in my heart of hearts I may have my favorites, 11 have gone out of my way not to show any favoritism. | Nor does Carl. And that. I think, is another reason; why we have succeeded where so many second mar-1 riages have failed. "We have given our youngsters love and affection, without in any way spoiling or pampering, them. We have been firm in our discipline. Be-' sides, we made each of the chldren understand from the very beginning that Carl and I truly loved each other. And I think that helped a great deal, too. For if youngsters feel you really don't care for your new husband—that you are unsure of vour feelings —they will do everything they can to create trouble and dissention. We never gave them the chance. Carl and I stand firmly together about most decisions. We make them outside the presence of the ; youngsters and then present a united front to them It works like a charm." Art of Living Togethsr 1 haVe been a marri *8* counselor for more than 25 years. In all that time. I can honestly say I have never know a couple who used more uncommon sense, had a more profounder knowledge of real'• psychology, than the Fishers. Most couples. I have found, soon lose interest in each other once the wedding ceremony is over They take each other for granted. They become careless and slovenly. They either become bored with each other or constantly battle for status, power and prestige. Nine times out of ten they are hell bent on reforming each other's personalities. The Fishers have learned otherwise. They have earned the fine art of living together. They have If*?? 0 re pect each otb r ** Personality and individuality. And. above all, they have learned the virtues of tolerance and acceptance. In their hizhlv successful second marriage there is a lessonfor all of us, given the willingness to try. Mr. life* h evsflehfe for privets mmtim — ** %  — f I— MsdkW m,* HAPPY SEW YEAR Mr. Albert Herman is no longer associated with Adrian Thai F MR. HERMAN will be pleased to again serve his many""" friends. He is now associated with REBUILT BATTERIES 12 Month Guarantee—$7JO up, sxch. EXPERTS ON STARTER AND GENERATOR REPAIRS — REASONABLE PRICES'— BATTERIES — GENERATORS — STARTERS HI-VOLT BATTERY MFG. mo N.W. 7th Avenue Phon. FR 9-3451 SS45 5. Dune Hignway Phene MO 1-5357 pwwftffWartt ROWM Or. Tiber H. Store 311 Washington Ave, M A. Phones: JE 1-1949 JE 14150 !" MRm LINCOLN ROAD, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA ACTORS'STUDIO M PLAYHOUSE Rirra % %  COME BACK LITTLE SHEBA" SUNOAY MATMEI KtTOtMAJKU DARK MONDAYS Ticket* St-25; Student* $1.50 %  M g Peace CortahtMMa. HI 4-3212 KNOW YOUR BANK IT'S THE KEY TO SECURITY! Place your trust where you'll feel secure...in a bank with complete faculties, including; • A VINOS ACCOUNT* CHICKIMO ACCOUNTS %  WIINDLV I MRSONNIL AUTO LOANS AP#>MANC t -OA Nt J MOPtTOAOa LOANS 163rd STREET SHOPPING CENTER ~" "~" BANK OF DADE COUNTY insurance Corp CORAL GABLES CONVALESCENT HOME -A Frfeadfe aed Centle Atamptura for Tanas fee lev*" HPL25!* 0antltO T0 tANt rV kLut.1T. UMOWN.AUY ILL AND COHVAllSCIMTS 24-MOUR REMSTBtEO NWSMC SttVKE special Diet* Strictly Observed. Private Bathroom*, Air-Conditioned Spacious Ground*. Patio. Swimming Pool, Planned Activities ALL ROOMS ON GROUND FLOOR Reasonable Rates Brochure on Request Ferdinand H. Rosenthal Director-Owner Former An'l Dir. ML Sinai Hospital Dir-ctor. Jewish Home for the Aaed Cleveland. Ohio Pitt*burh. Pa. 7060 S.W. 8th Street Miami Flo. Phone MO 6-8826 FORECLOSE RE SALE SOVEREIGN HOTEL %  :.. Collins Avo. Will be offer**] for ufe MONDAY, OCTOBER Srh. at 11:00 AM. —south front door Dad* County Courthouse, Miami. This oceanfront hotel has 100 feet an Collins Avenue, is fully furnished and rqu.ppod—comisis f 113 r ^ omti pkm ^fc^., sWt^usm. bar, and swimming pool. FOR INFORMATION, TELEPHONE •IE 1-1779 • inriaii Marrrtla f pf.o/Vri. Shop I fe sdssws W ith sr ivMesv efer 31*5 S.W. life STRUT 37551 "ft* 'Pickled Herring" CHARIIE'S TW COfttffB t{{, INMJg -CKl CHARLIE'S MARKET VIEW RESTAURANT 31*3 N.W. mfc AVBfM charts* Wsd-ss



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FridayOctober 2. MM ^JewlstirhrldUati FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS. WE EXTEND BEST WISHES FOR \ : Page 5-B Celebrate The Holidays With One Of These SPECIAL VALUES from your neighborhood GRAND UNION or B-THRIFTY SUPERMARKET we carry a complete line of holiday foods ran* m? MAff QUICK FROZEN, GOV'T. INSPECTED, GRADE "A BROILER TURKEYS 5 TO 7 LB. AVG. L B. ROKEACH," "MOTHER'S" GEFILTE 16 OZ. JAR %  STREITS" or 'GOODMAN'S" UNSALTED MATZOS 12 OZ. PKG. (Nt Prict) MANISCHEWITZ" BORSCHT ITEMS and PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SATURDAY, OCT. 3 1753 N.E 2nd Avenue 1263 W. Flagler Street 3050 N.W. 7th Street *<450 N.L 125th Street 13020 N.E. 8th Avenue 321 Opo-lecka Boulevard 6190 S.W. 8th Street 5767 Bird Rood 2501 S.W 22nd Street 2593 S.W. 67th Avenue 1906 Ponce de Leon 11301 S. Dixie Highway + 18000 N.W. 27th Avenue (CAROL CITY) 3271 Congress Avenue (Palm Springs) Lake Worth 3000 Broadway (RIVIERA BEACH) WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES AND SALES



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Page 6-B +JeistinDr**3*J Friday, October 2, 1939 Women to Attend Informal Opening The new Mt. Sinai Hospital w:ll have its informal opening when the members of the Women's Auxiliary attend an Open House Thursday. Oct. 8 at 10 a.m. A preliminary' to the second annual "Blesed Event" luncheon scheduled for Oct. 30 at the Fontainebleau hotel, the gathering will serve to familiarize previous and future women contributors to the building fund with the features of Florida's most modern hospital slated to open formally before the end of this year. Guests will attend a briefing in the 326-seat auditorium, during which time a staff member will explain the progress achieved and the future advantages which the new building offers to their re spective departments. Dr. Sherman R Kaplan will be speaker and master of ceremonies at the presentation. Women attending will be led on guided tours through the building,' Flora Sinick. which is now in the process of being furnished. Mrs. Leonard A. Wien. chairman of the Women's Division of the Mt. Sinai building fund, and Mrs. A. Herbert Mathes. chairman of the "Blessed Event," will be hostesses. Max Orovitz. president of Mt. Seventeen tuition scholarships of, Sinai Hospital. J. Gerald Lewis, $135 w h have been awarded to chairman of the building and planUniversity of Miami students. Membership committee of the Miami Beach chapter oi Hadassah includes standing (left to right) Mesdames Sol Lubell. Moe Thau. Lee Howard, Herman A. Berg, Kenneth Sokolsky, David Samuels. Ann Hirschman, and Miss Seated (left to right) are Mesdames Manning Mintus, Norman Myer, Edward Holofcener, and Samuel Jackson. Not shown are Mesdames Mickey Michaels, David Komisarow, David Davis, Charles Bushell, Joseph Abelson, Nathan Shain, Alfred Mandell, Morris Plaine, and Samuel Feierman. Food Fair Foundation Awards 17 Scholarships to Univ. of Miami Students scholarship grants, said that students maintaining good scholas, He averages may have their mng committee, and bamuel Certf res hmen to seniors, by the Food scholarships renewed from term ner. executive director of the hosFalr st^.. FoundaUon for the to term. pital. will address the women semester now beginning. Limited to the food chain's employees and children of employees,, the scholarships are granted for] h ave been renewed: each academic year. Henry M. Dubbs, School of BusiUnder the direction of Jules S. i ess Administration, 20, son of Schwartz, the Foundation, with of-! Mr and Mrs Robert F. Dubbs. Miami Beach Council of B nai flces in Phl iadelphia, administers: 6 791 SW 16Ul %  *•• ****& %  stuart B'r.th Women will meet Monday. a national program of such schol %  **• business. 21. son of Mr. and 8 p.m.. at the DeauvQle hotel. Mrs. ars hi ps since its founding in 1952 i Mrs Leon A RPee, 1191 71st St.. Sam Belsky will preside. Program lhe Foundation has granted 323 i Miami Beach; Joel A. Savitt, busiwiU include discussion of bulletin scholarships at 27 colleges and uni-! TCSS ^ son of *• and Mrs. Da and publicity, program, ways and vers ities from Connecticut to I vid N Savttt, 3785 Chase ave., MiOpen House for the Women's Di vision. BB Women to Meet Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Friedwald, 935 2nd st., Miami Beach; William R. Newfield. business, 18, son of Mrs. W. H. Newfield, 5146 SW 6th st., Miami; Richard B. Skor, Arts and Sciences, 17, son of Mr. and Mrs. Morris Skor, 61 Tamiami blvd.. Miami; Ira Weiner, Arts and Sciences, 17, son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Weiner, 3601 SW 26th st., Miami. Beach PTA Plans "Beck to School' When P arm jpi y, |( general meetmToT^.o "^,u a 3 j Beach Senior Hiph School Parent| Teachers Assn. on Tuesday at 7-a | p.m., they will go back to school. as the firs* pro-ram in a Bark to School Night." This will be their first oppw. tunity to learn about tho courses of their children and meet the teachers in each of the classes, Since Miami Beach High is QQ trin'e sessions, the Darents win follow their children's schedule! in ten-minute periods. Irvin Katz. principal, will i come the parents. The businesi portion of the PTA will he held over the loudspeaker during the Home Room period by Mrs. D Donald Smith. PTA president. The last period will be an extr. curricular course to include refreshments and entertainment in keeping with the theme for the vear, "Let's Get Acquainted With Our School and Teachers." pt. ents will entertain with an on> mal song written by Mrs. Albert Pollak. They are Mrs. Irma Podvin, Mrs. Theodore Struhl and Mrs, William Wickman, with Mrs. sm Kelinson at the piano. Their attire will include hats from the collection of Mrs. Muriel Hirsch Pick. Following is the list of UM seniors whose Food Fair scholarships means, and membership. Mrs. AlFlorida. fred Reich, first vice president. District 5, is Miami Beach Council Dr. H. Franklin Williams, UM advisor. vice president in charge of DIET FACTS: WmWib fORmmm TRUtSmssFLAvon! Now ce/ebro/ing our 75fh Ann/versoryF GRADE "A" PRODUCTS „ SERVING ^GREATER MIAMI CHILDREN NEED Homogenized Vitamin "D" Milk PHONE JE 1-5537 ami Beach; William E. Schockett, business, 19, son of Mrs. Motive Schockett. 163 N. Shore dr., Miami Beach; Richard A. Meirowitz. business, 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Meirowitz, 1315 SW 19th St., Miami. Students in their junior year in' ?lude the following: Linda Rose Frisch, business, 19 daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ben | Frisch. 3130 Hemando St., Coral, Gables; Stephen L. Kessler, 19. : College of Arts and Sciences, son jof Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Kess|ler, 4720 NW 5th st., Miami; Richard L. Ecord. business, 24, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Ecord, 4593 SW 3rd st., Miami; Marshall Han dleman. Arts and Sciences, 19, son of Mrs. Lea trice Handleman. 939 Ahon rd., Miami Beach. Sophomores are Richard Mater son. Arts and Sciences, 18, son ol Mr. and Mrs. Alfred L. Matersor, H130 Hawthorne ave., Miami Beach; Susan Goodman, School ol Education, 18, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Martin Goodman, 5114 SW 5th ter., Miami; Joseph Hecker. School of Engineering, 19, son of Mrs. Gertrude Hecker. 5731 SW 6th st., Miami; Deborah Schulman, | business. 19, daughter of Mr. and | Mrs. William Schulman, 7885 SW %  17th tcr., Miami. Entering freshmen: Elliott C. j Friedwald. engineering, 18, son of B tales Afcis* [ +Mm-mt Umttkm to prod oco tim Afai-cwecc, dieniictive flavor of Softs Knight pfoceMOnqfefCbtcea. Deacioui wich cracken end fruit. Com ilifhtly aore thea Homsstli yon taets 0M dflbrcacsl Swiss KNIGHT Tho Original PROCISS G1UYIRI CHIESI GREATER MIAMI HEBREW ERIE LOAM Meets Every Wednesday. • to • P.M. BETH El CENTER 500 S.W. 17th A.en.e, Miami for Information Meet PI J-ol0> 7200 N W MM? i ? rlbot,d b HI-ORADE FOOD CO. 7200 N.W. 29th Avenue p hooQx 1' He* tor betptog •„ make the future w ee f.,r v,„, ,,„| WAT GANS 3200 SW. 3rd. A.ee.e, Miemi Phenes FR 3-4616 er HI 4-9911 „ ''epreeentmo MmofOllTAN LIFE INSURANCE CO. M n Ave. New York 10. N.Y GORDON ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORKS INC.! 2148 N.W. 10th Av.. F R 3-7180 im y .V" r00t "V 1 "* now: you Satisfactory Work by Experienced Men" TO LOW CALORIE MEALS Solve that weighty problem ... serve plenty of nutritious, flavorful August Bros. Sreid made from select spring wheat flour • • contains no shortening. PUMPERNICKEL • iOHEMIAN RTI • lAflffU • VttNNA • EGG TWIST •FRENCH BREAD EGG ROLLS • HARD ROLLS



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friday. October 2. 1959 •Jewist>ncridltar Jewish Library Resumes Hours Page 7-B Central Jewish Library of the Bureau of Jewish Education has reopened for the school season, making available its 7,000 volumes of Judaica in Hebrew, Yiddish and English to borrowers in the comj munity. The library is open for frw circulation on Mondays, Wedii' sdays and Fridays from 9 to 4:30 p.m. Judy Mayfair. daughter of Mi and Mrs. Bernard ham onI. of Temple Ner Tamid, entertained last week at a Dutch sapper and variety show sponsored by Sisterhood. Some 400 persons attended. Beach Hadassoh Slates Symposium "The World We Have —The World We Want" will be the sub[ject of a symposium held by the Miami Beach chapter of HadatIsah. Officers and chairmen of the 11 [groups of the chapter are inrrted to a day of orientation, education and information on Monday at the I Algiers hotel. Registration for the conference twill start al 9:30 a.m. Simultanelous workshops on education, fundIraising, membership and program |will occupy the morning. After lunch and greetings by the I president, Mrs. Joseph Shapiro, [there will be a summation of the [outstanding features of each work| shop. This w;ll be followed by the ItympoMum. Panelists will be Mrs. Dorothy Krieger Fink, lire. Samuel Z. Sakrais, president •( the Florida region, and Mrs. Milton Sirkin. Mrs. Sydney Gluckman. of Orlando, who is the immediate past president of the Florida regMO of Hadassah, will be the modI erator. Mrs. Fred Jonas, executive vice I president of tha chapter, as chairman of the day. \huth Hold Member Party Membership party was held by I Temple Sinai Youth Group last Iteek at the home of Dorothy tempner. 1075 NE 176th st, No. Iliami Beach. Snfty is affiliated I with the National Federation of [Temple Youth, and Carolyn Maysan is president of the Sinai jlroup. Mrs. Dorothy Stone is Sisterhood chairman of Youth Group activity. MORE PEOPLE USC rerfrtshint catonc-frM Suq0 r,n e SWIITtl IIUIISWU m no row VMM I 'KMIWM ky fettwi tot 1 MM, MnWMi m* locriI ^9 ms Tr' •"• *'•'• *>— it knwMM, -l 7* f"*"•">!. Puff. Cos. | J*WIUPMHyktmlM. 4.-m 6URltlTi(0 XrtNFlll. OOD STORCS IVUYWHIRI CHINCH BUG CONTROL n 4-8.12 month* ^'rant.td Satisfaction Ai.. f y0ur m ny bck


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%  Page 8-B *Jels*norMk*n ftMa T. October 2. i navo )v II \WKK l\l Chocolates Delightful selection* of isteuo-dark or milk chocolate miniatures: or Faroe Fruits and Mala. i Appropriate assortm*r. /or adults and children— for every Jewish bolidsy. Write tor bsstdajr brochures. TO* INFORMATION ea our Fund-Raisiaa* Flan, write to: l>ept. 0*8 Barrieini Caadies 2-l41.t A.e. Los* Island City l.N.Y. BARRICINI DR. EDWARD N. TESCHER ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF HIS OFFICE FOR THE PRACTICE OF OPTOMETRY at 3719 S.W. St*. Straw* Miami 44, Florida TelwPhwtM Highland 4-52*7 omci MOWS •:30 ta 5:30 Eve*!*-* by % % %  l.o.ls.ial ITS EXAMJNO CONTACT IBISES A Nappy **. M*4tk r New Yeeafo Owr CmtHmmn aw. frkmd* PEGGY'S BEAUTY SALON. INC. 1*37 WASHINGTON AVI. (at UncoM loo.) NNAM tEACH JIUMS -i BUN HEWSu. WE NAVE SATISfACrOtllY SEIVEN 6AMWTIS SNKE 1*50 SLENDERIZING I BEAUTY SALON • COtONJC MlrCATIONS • tEOOCINO MASSAM • STEAM IATNS M4 AUUMBtA CNKIE. COtAl SANIES We specialise in Medical Massage tor Artnrit.sBuraitis. ate. Nerve and Muscular Relaxation. Nl 440.1



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PridoY. Q<*>bT 2, 1959 +Jmlst> Flcrkttain larnun X 9V M OST of you are wondering what to wear for services during! the High Holy Day. We thought you would be interested in knowing of the suggestions offered by women whose husbands are the presidents of many of Miami's congregations, as well as what they are planning to wear. The subject of hats was distussed at length by several of the women, and they all agreed that hats should be small. One of the wives suggested that if you wanted to wear a large hat you .should make certain to sit in the very last row. Mrs. Max Krauss, who's husband is president of the North Shore Jewish Center, has selected a black and white cotton print suit dress ensemble. Her skirt is a sheath with a short fitted bolero. Black shoes and hat and a white handbag and gloves will complete her duocolor ensemble. Out in Coral Gables at Temple Judea, Mrs. Victor Reiter had not yet decided upon her dress for Rosh Hashona, but as she is scheduled to give the candleblessing on Yom Kippur when, for the Fast day, she will be dressed all in black. Her crepe sheath is trimmed in satin, and has its own matching jacket. The satin is inserted at the waist in small pleats and gives a cumerbund effect, and her dress also features a high bateau neckline. The jacket has a wide lapel and and is trimmed with satin binding. Her shoes and bag are of doeskin. • • • IN keeping with the lighter colors recommended for Rosh Hashona, severalof the president's wives are wearing beige. Mrs. Robert Newman, of Beth Am Temple, has selected a beige silk shantung with brown accessories. It features three-quarter length sleeves and a modified coat dress styling with a large stand-up collar. Her all-feathered hat is composed of tones and shades of browns. On Miami Beach, at Temple Beth Sholom, Mrs. Harry A. Greenberg is wearing a black silk shantung sheath. Her small white hat is composed entirely of osttrich feathers, and the remainder, of her accessories are in black. At Beth David Congregation, Mrs. Sidney Aronovitz has chosen a beige silk linen sheath with a short bolero jacket, which features a large portrait-type collar with three-quarter sleeves. Her hat is a small cloche of beige felt, and her shoes and gloves of a deeper brown tone. Mrs. Benjamin L. Fabric, of Temple Ner Tamid, is waiting for the weather to help her decide which ensemble to -wear. Depending on which day some of you may see her, she will be in either a beige-toned silk shirtwaist or a linen just a shade lighter than royal blue. • • I^IRS. Fabric's indecision is probably reflected in many of you. Our climate is so unpredictable that even some of the ensembles selected by the women already mentioned may have to be changed at the last minute. Even if the weather turns uncomfortably warm, and there is no air-conditioning in your congregation, refrain from wearing a sunback or low cut dress. Hats and gloves axe necessary, and it goes without saying that stockings are, of course, to be worn. Remember though, this is a religious holiday, not a fashion show. As long as what you are wearing is simple, and in good taste, you will be dressed appropriately for services. In keeping with the season, may I extend my very best wishes, and hope that this coming year brings happiness to us all. Mrs. Appel Will Be Memorialized A women's monetary fund on Miami Beach will be named after Mrs. Ida Appel, who died here last week. Hebrew Academy Women Wednesday changed the name of the organization's Binyan Bank Fund to the Ida Appel Memorial Binyan Bank Foundation, Mrs. Joseph Shapiro, president, announced. The fund will memorialize the former president of the Hebrew Academy Women and one of its founders. The fund was started five years ago to raise money for the proposed Hebrew Academy structure to be launched soon. The Foundation will be used for the construction of the new Hebrew Academy Auditorium. Season's Greetings from the Salons of Little Rubin and Miss Georgette "Rent a painting for your home or office' scornavacca gallery 6711 RED ROAD MO 1-7710 SOUTH MIAMI MO 74479 Harry Schneiderman is chairman of the annual poet-Yom Kippur dance sponsored by the Men's Club of Temple Ner Tamid at the Dunes motel on Oct. 12. Dr. Cirlin to Speak Next regular meeting of the Greater Miami Lay Diabetes Society will be held Monday, 8 p.m., at the DiLido hotel. Guest speaker will be Dr. M. B. Cirlin, of the Dade County Medical Assn., whose subject will be "Diseases of the Skin in Diabetes." A question and answer period will follow his talk Mitchell Sandweiss (left), president of the B'nai B'rith Youth Council of Greater Miami, presents a check for $750 to Jack Fink, chairman of the BBYO board of directors. The money represents the collection of funds made by BBYO chapters here for the Bellefaire Hospital in Cleveland, O., for emotionally disturbed children, a recipient of B'nai B'rith funds. The check also represents the 750 members of the 27 B'nai B'rith youth groups here. • • • ijjff t^ocia/ite Continued from Page IB circle The Marvin Zanks hurrying to get to their car ahead of the crowd Ditto most all at Juniors for coffee afterward In addition: The Ralph Speros and Irving Rothmans, with a group at a large table Commissioner Alex Gordon, Morie Morris, Manny Goldstrich and Mickey Krause in a booth Leonard and Dune Treister at another table, with a gay group of friends Bill Pite, his wife and son, with Herb S c h w*a r z and Mrs. Schwarz Harry and Marilyn Smith back from their vacation. • • • Eating out Sunday night: Mr. and Mrs. Morris Dubler Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Abrams and brother, Fred Vacationing at the Barcelona is top hit song writer Nat Simon Friend is Jack Parker, manager of the hotel ... Off to New York on a buying trip is Dan Herman, of Sandra Post Wife Lucy is chairman of the Variety Children's Hospital Ball in January. FLORAL CENTERPIECES by SYLVIA HILStN Bk fm* ap For YONTIF $ J.JJ DELIVERY ALL GREATER MIAMI ORDER EARLY BLOSSOM SHOP 1572 Washington Ave. JE 2-3231 FLOWERS TELEGRAPHED U.S. and CANADA W-^~^W^^^\~^_-\~/'WA_^\_v>_^\~^'\~^^^ Complef e and Dependable Title Service M IAMI TITLE &QktmctCa 34 YEARS OF TITLE SERVICE IN DADE COUNTY ESCROWS ABSTRACTS TITLE INSURANCE TIM* htsaraaci '•Ikies ef City TitU iNtaraac* Ca. CasMfcf, SmrmUt A Rasarvaa f Mt-4 ts.ooojoeo U4 md m SMORfUISi ARCAM TUIPHORI PR T-ltfl ''o Kimm A 1t4 and 1 Security Trust Company Blda) Small 1st, 2nd & 3rd GRADE CLASS GROUPS With ACCREDITED CURRICULUM INDIVIDUAL ATTENTION •mi REMEDIAL HELP $40 MfJr With AUtr—n Car* $55 Nursery I Kindergarteo CLASSES ALSO AVAILABLE The Eliot School 7910 S.W. 57th Avt. M0 6-8301 IF YOU LIKE GOOD DRY CLEANING AND FAST ONE-HOUR SERVICE YOU WILL REALLY GO FOR FREEDMANS CLEANERS UMWESTIOIIABLY THE FINEST 1718 79th St. Causeway TREASURE ISLAND Fast Service Fraa • Caia Laaaa V y MON. thra SAT. • a.m. te 5:30 soft. 2922 Coral Way MIAMI, FLORIDA 1-MR. SERVICE FREE • EVERY DAY MOW. thru SAT. 7:30 a.m. te • p.m. i 1 i! ( 1 i A-l EMPLOYMENT SERVICE DaamtkNab* Wsrfcsrs Established 1(44 37 N.L 5* St. fa. FR •-040! ^v*v'^v'^v<^^'^^^ > ^^ < %  v'*^^*n<^v'^^*'^v'^^rf-v < ^^^^^^^'^^<*^ MIAMI CONVALESCENT HOME 24-Hour Nursing Service • Special Diet* Strictly Obeerved • All Rooms on Ground Floor "CtmUmllf lacafasT Et. If SI Jewish Style Cooking a Specious Grounds • Reasonable Rates • Specializing in Care to the Elderly and Chronically III 335 S.W. 72th AVE., Pfa.FR 4-5437 & FR 9-0278 LEO ALIEN, Direct*



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Friday. October 2. 1959 'Jet*is/i fhrMi&n Page 11-B Home of Aged Auxiliary; looks Ahead .._ _. By MRS. SOL SILVERMAN Prsic'e>nt, Jtwiih Hem* for thg Agtd Auxiliary The 2.000 women who comprise our Woman's Auxiliary live by this principle: We have dedicated ourselves to bring "life" to the "living." It is because cif the unceasing work of kind and generous people that we are able to bring hope, comfort and peace of mind to those who might otherwise be abandoned in their twilight years. In the 14 years of our existence, we have seen many dreams come true. The Jack Ablin Memorial bldg., which houses (he chronically ill and the incapacitated, was just the beginning. The Sol and Mollie Sih/erman Physical Therapy Room, under the direction of a trained physical therapist, has opened new vistas to the physically handicappedi The Sidney Appel Med.cal Fund provides all the special medical needs and mediL cation in performing these services. The -Sophie Sherry Occupational Therapy Room provides the means of an art and crafts program, conducted by a trained group worker in cooperation with the wonderful volunteer service of the Council of Jewish Women. The dedication of the new pavilions at Douglas Gardens, just a few months ago, is the realization of so many years of dreaming and planning. This has been the inspiration for the women, who give of themselves so generously to help older people live again. Major Contributions A summation of our activities and contributions to tthe Home for the past. 12 months shows that towards maintenance, we have given $12,000. For medical aid to residents, we have paid $1,351.82. Occupational therapy $120. Physical Therapy Room $250. We were proud to contribute $500 towards the cost of the drapes for the new pavilions. These were our major contributions. While we are concerned with the security and health needs of our old people we also try to bring sunshine into their lives, with happy occasions. Our monthly birthday parties, Mothe's and Father's Day, and Chanaka parties gives them a new lease on life. They dress up in their best and anticipate each such occasion with great joy. Usually a program of professional entertainment is arranged for their pleasure, and refreshments are served to our residents and their guests. Once a year, we arrange a picnic and boat ride. During the season, we invited the ambulatory residents to many of our Auxiliary functions. This always Rives them pleasure and an opportunity for our members to see our old people looking so well and happy. Our Auxiliary also participates in the Combined Jewish Appeal drive, and plays an important role in the United Fund drive. Our women feel that they receive much more than they give. Always in their hearts, the cause has been the goal. We have never been discouraged in our desire to help our elders. Oihtr Auxiliaries All of us in the senior group take special pride £ the devotion an* progress of our two other women s Auxiliaries. The Hollywood Women, unoer the leadership of Mrs. Stanley Beckerman, has done a fantastic job in its brief existence, having MRS. SOI UHfUMM contributed $10,000 for a research laboratory to be used for a basic research program in the study of geriatrics and gerontology under the supervision of the University of Miami medical school. It has also paid for two $5,000 rooms in one of the new pavilions, dedicating one in tribute to onr Greater Miami Auxiliary, a most unusual tribute. The Junior Auxiliary, whose founder president was Mrs. Larry Silverman, and it now under the leadership of Mrs. Louis Cole, has also made great strides. It contributes monthly to maintenance, and has presented two rooms. Last year, the group presented our residents with a bus, which is used to take them to concerts, movies and parties. To our entire membership, to our two wonderful Auxiliaries, to all our devoted friends in this community, in behalf of all our women, I extend hearty good wishes for a wonderful New Year. Hadassah Service Continued from Pao* 10-B prea of endeavor is the school of dress-making and design, which has already attracted the attention of the fashion conscious the world over. In the years to come, we will share in the joy of knowing that we did our best to rescue children when there was yet time. Hadassah is proud of its part in the support of Israel for the good of its people and the progress of mankind. The Hadassah Medical Organization, the project known as H. M. O., includes an extensive health welfare program, where new treatment techniques, drugs, equipment and specialized personnel strive constantly to keep the horizon of Hadassah's standard making medical work in Israel on a par with American achievements, on which they are patterned. During this past year, new services, research and perfected procedures have once again added luster to the work of Continued on Pago 13 B I BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR From the •. IVKW CAMP DEERFIELD LAKE LURE, NORTH CAROLINA Dr. Sidney N. Solomon Victor Levine Carl Gardner Dhecferi ^ 2<^*^>S*S&:S*eJffi%^*^*32*2= New Year's Greetings to All FROM Florida State Theatres, Inc. THE COMEDY-ROMANCE WITH THE ACCENT ON YOUTHll MWMOUHT HCTU£5 PBfSCNTS CLARK GABLE CARROLL BAKER LILLI PALMER LEE J.CORR M PERLBERG SEATON .** j| BUT v. NOT FOR „ *>MMBAMIYCQEniowsGOHQ.AMM(*uM>nun Ok&JtbL 0M O t oe M eUlOe •KM ItlTff UK .. % %  t, Ktm epea lenoj Ae," f %  • %  • %  kUMmuMMosiM \Jhi. I %  f i n — —rt TH Ttm mwiiummw IWI rti izU 5C OLYMHA BEACH GABLES OCT. 13th in Mr. VICTOR POSNER STEVEN & GAIL extend the best wishes of the holiday season to all thier friends and relatives BALTIMORE (514 St. Poor Place) MIAMI BEACH CALIFORNIA'S •nd NEW TOWER California^ WorWe Fomout Retort overlooking the Bluo Faoifig whoro Wilthire meets the Ma. Twonty minute* from International Airport. 450 luxurlouo mw and bungalows all with television and) radio. Complete convention facilities Banquet room* for up to 2,000, air-conditioned, belting^ •aw Venetian Room and Cantonese Room.' j_ Swimming pool Beautiful ground! anal IABH&I landuoped gardens Rates from Me $9Et> W i,# WiHIom W. Donnelly, Oen. Mo*. Across th. U.S.A. and In HAWAII MASSAGLIA CREST OF GOOD LIVING JOSEPH MASSAGLIA, JR., r Voi idowt — MASSAGLIA HOTELS — SANTA MONICA. CALIF. Hotel Mlremer SAN JOSE. CALIF. Hetel Selnte Clelro LONO IfACH, CALIF. Hotel Wiltea AllUP, N.M. Hotel El Reecho e ALIUQUIRQUi. Hetel Freeclscee DENVER. COLO. Hetel Pert Leite WASHINGTON. DC. Hotel Delete* HARTFORD. CONN. Hotel lond PITTSIURSH, PA. Hotel Sherwva • CINCINNATI, O. Hetel Sieten • NEW YORK CITY Hetel NeYorker • HONOLULU Hotel Weilltl liltmer* World-famed hoteli Teletype service—Family Flaa



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ttMoy. Oaebm X j^i .4A FAMBLY EXPEND BEST W35EE5 YEJUk. GLASS 's Stake %  Nvse Education mm f k* .V BANK ..(MIAMI BEHH TC XT XAXf rSltaUS A3D ACQCA3TJWCES A XCS7 =a?PT SEW THA3 sa CCT. r* ?.~ %  %  Xra. -. ZTTT I W I 3cas, -Sw 'nf a zmns and % % %  BUT CULU!iCH Twrf Twrr 3 -fr^ ^-nr^-i' 3 ? %  j Ltiii ii Xnrwnij. in its "• %  —r %  Tnr r J VL SH % %  yuat air tfh> is xtea taditba. Ci



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rridqy. O ***" 2 1 959 +Je*MiFbrldlaii Hada$$ah-47 Years of Service for Zion Page 13-B Continued from Pag* 11-B H M 0. The acquisition a Cot)aii n*chine for the treatment of cancer was one of tilt excitinf advances ^^flWIfcTI. m Complex Medical Center In July, I960, the new Hadassah-Hebrew UniT ersity-Medical Center in Kiryat Hadassah (Hadassah-Town—so named last year by the Government 0 f Israel in recognition of Hadassah's contribution to the State, began formation. In the two-building hospital there will be a doctor's lounge and many looms bearing the names of individual residents of the Greater Miami area, as well as the names 0 [ the Miami and Miami Beach chapters of Ha dasS jh, some of whose members will have their names on the huge Wall of Healing on the site of the Medical Center. Our chapters have played a dedicated ro le in this brilliantly conceived group of buildings because, whether you go from medical school, to teaching auditorium, to classrooms, to research iD d clinical laboratories, or proceed from maternity pavilion to nursing school, past dignified devices to honor donors, into an Outpatient Department capable of handling 200,000 visits a year— this City of Science will be ready to serve Jew, Christian and Arab alike. In the year to come, Hadassah hopes to further its exchange fellowship program, increasing the number of fellows receiving post graduate training in the United States and in other leading top medical areas throughout Europe, and inviting more experts to go to Israel to teach their specialties there, and this is a two-way road, for these men are sharing the fruits of their achievements with each other and within their people. One final issue—our relationship to the community, to welfare funds, UJA and Israel Bonds. We are proud to know that the Hadassah leadership h*as boon in the forefront of the UJA and other community drives. They have done their tasks well. Peace and Plenty Each day the Hadassah women has woven one more thread in establishing the lines of communication with their past, as they identify themselves with the historic people of their past and as they prepare to make a great historic contribution to the presmt. They know that nothing approaching accomplishment grows weary. Analyzing this, one can readily see that it can be applied to every phase of our efforts. Hadassah has become a way of life for hundreds of thousands of American women appealing to their heritage through the American affairs programs and the opportunity for participating in civic and community activities. Hadassah reaches out te every human heart through its health and social welfare program in Israel. The world has acclaimed her for medical excellence and for her attainAorial view of Hadassah Medical Center. ments in the redemption of barren soil and broken bodies. May the year which lies ahead see the fulfillment of dreams in every democratic corner of the earth—peace and plenty for all mankind. Mt Sinai Women Continued from Page 12-B hospital to meet the demands of increased enrollment. Although students cannot reside on the premises, housing is available for those who desire to live in. All students are under the care of their own school's private physician and active health program. Not only are physical needs considered, but-social and emotional needs of the student under a health and active guidance program. From a report issued at the time of the 1959 capping ceremony, this quotation explains the reason for the many devoted hours of service to the School of Practical Nursing given by the Women's Auxiliary of Mt. Sinai: "The Women's Auxiliary feels that its support has made possible one of the finest practical nursing programs in the country, that it helps safeguard the patient and nursing care not only at Mt. Sinai Hospital, but throughout the country, since many of the graduates return to their home communities or find their fields of employment in doctors' offices, public health, private duty work, or in other community hospitals." As president of the Auxiliary for a second term, I deem it a privilege to head this wonderful organization of women who constantly strive to serve toward the progress of the hospital. I m\ '""^ateeS P'lrO in i &f If uinnil with, wonderful Hot Springs waters H D'ink tkm world-tamont -ofci. foae I*, loorfii'ag batkt and thrill to a .. le.ie ol ptiyiKot -eM-oeiag. You C." b.tH. .way ell your .ch.t and p.mi du. to femiori and ferio,ue end find r.li.l lor erfhritii. rhoumatltm. and h"j h blood preuure jn lha redioectire, tHermel waten of Hoi Spring! Government r.qJeled WthhoiM "9rl in me Arlington -here yon can 90 in roba and tlipport by tpacial alavator direct from tka privacy of your room. Troe hospitality and tka finoit in entertainment it yor to anfoy at tko Arlington— Hot Springs' top luiury hotel. Concert, dinner,, and ballroom denelno, move by Eddy Rogan and tka Arlington Orckoitra. Social divartioni under tko guidanca of our grecioui Social Hottoaa. Enjoy your favorito racrootion in Hot Springt. Suporb golf itk Club privilege, at our noorby Country Club. Yeer-ereund fithing at lalei Hamilton, Ouackita. and Catherine. £3L %  • Finott food iereet anywhere i tko p. id. of the Arlington. Room ratat -ith karf bath from it I IT thai*. WH* torn kadi and prh-ato bath .fr^^d-H^WAujU. No room chorga for ckMron undor 14. HOTEL and BATHS beautiful color brochure -r-e McEoeMn, •*•,•, Manager, i\ HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK, ARKANSAS ^ In A Jweal... BECAUSE YOUR AIR CONDITIONER BROKE DOWN! Wl 5-2722 For Fast Radio Dispatched Service • LATEST MODERN FACTORY EQUIPMENT • HIGHLY SKILLED TECHNICIANS • LOW, LOW PRICES Guaranteed Qaallt, Workauahlp SHERBA BROS. AIR CONDITIONER REPAIR DEPOT ?n*A Kl C K3.J CT —nn OPT W. mxri HIGHWAY *U3U n.C. IJ^rQ •) I -BEAB OP SOCK OP BIDDING ROBBINS Roofing & Sheet Metal Co. "THE RESPONSIBLE ROOFERS" Established 1919 ROOFING and ROOfING SUPPLIES RZTAIL CONTRACTING • REPAIRING "WRITTEN GUARANTEE ON ALL WORK" Phone FR 4-3705 ESTIMATES FREE 222 N.W. 26th ST. GENERAL AUTO REPAIRS WOODY'S TEXACO SERVICE lubrication Specialists Gas Oils • Batteries Tires Strict with a Smile" 470 N.W. 5th STREET PHONE FR 3-9533 Carpet Laying and Repairing RUGS CLEANED, DYED and DEMOTHED 26 S.W. South River Dri !" Phones FR 9-1155 & FR 1-2007 ACE RUG CLEANERS FURNITURE CLEANING "Prompt Day aae Night Service" MeCORMICK-ROYETT PLUMBING CONTRACTORS FOR SALES, SERVICE OR REPAIRS PHONE PL 7-0606 •443 PARKWAY DRIVE MIAMI SHORES, FLORIDA To Sun You is Our Pleasure Ed. J. Vischi Real Estate in All its Branches 124*4 N.E. 7th AVENUE Pbone PL 44441 i Miller Electric Co. OeAUTY CONTRACTING 4 SERVICE 3905 N.W. 37th Ct. Ph. NE 3-2686 Lula Jones flowers For All Occasions D E L I V I I T • Cot Flowers • Pottee Plants • Corsaf es • Funeral Designs • Weaainas • Parties 191* S.W. lib STREET Phone FR 4-5790 FOSTER ELECTRIC COMPANY. INC Electrical Contractors RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL ALTERATIONS MAINTENANCE 24 Hour Service AIR CONDITIONING and ADEQUATE WIRING 2264 W. Flagler St. Kl 8-2671 N.Qhta, Sundays & t-folidaya dial HI 347922



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Page 14-B +Je*lsMorktian L'Shona Tova Tikesevu STRATH HAVEN -HOTELJoseph Hoffman Pearly Gait by Hal Pearl '; \ ONCE A KNIGHT ALWAYS A KNIGHT AT KING ARTHUR'S COURT for Dinner t Dancing and ft Be Entertained 2y the Six Singing Strings Miami Springs Villas TV S-4521 Art Inns, m — — OUR SPECIALTY — NICE, THICK, JUICY PRIME RIBS OF BEEF -AMD THE VE*T BtST IN TOWN! IANQUET FACILITIES Candlelight Inn 1131 Commodore Plaza Coconst Grove HENRY LE1TSON, Mqr. OINNfR P Sb"IS Tu mem r\utki TO TAI\.E Gv. i PHONE UN 64303 i' > > I Urges* family Trade in f lerido ON 79th ST. CAUSEWAY ****** *******^*-l-I H 4 Hoppv Mew y0r to AH Please Do not think mo concerted STOECJKER'S Sentj. PrkM eternal £ am gc Steaks MS. r>M. MO 1-OJ44 7o AVI. ON IW (S.W. 8th St.) NAMES MAKE NEWS: An overflow crowd was on hand for MiI ami Beach Hieh's opening football game at Flamingo Field. Among the many loyal rooters were Mr. and Mrs. John Serbin. whose son. Jon. lormer Beach grid great, is now at Harvard Mrs. Jerry Warren, whose daughter, Barbara, is one of the fetching baton wielders with the school's hand ... Mr. and Mrs. Dick Pindley, whose son, Steve, plays center for Beach, and Lou Greenwajd and son, Danny. Merle Troop. University of Florida grad, has recently joined the staff of WCKT ch. 7. Her dad and mother, Morris and Jerrie Troop, will celebrate their first anniversary as Surfside realtors next month. Investment broker Allen Goldberg is on the mend at Mt. Sinai after an auto accident. Mr. and Mrs. Jack Rabinovitch, recently returned from a trip around the world, were especially interested in the hone realty boom in Tokyo's suburbs. On a recent West Indies and South American cruise out of New York, on the SS Santa Paula, were localites Mr. and Mrs. Dan Solomon, of South Miami, and Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Eustler and Mr. and Mn. -Max Saltzman, of Miami Beach. Irwin Kishner. of Miami Beach, was appointed chairman of the Florida Bar committee in cooperation with the American Law Stu-1 dents' Assn. Serving with him are attorneys Joel P. Newman and Lawrence Philip Kuvin. Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Goldsmith, pf Miami Beach, are entertaining her mother. Mrs. Harry Hoffman, of Boston. The Goldsmiths were recent weekend guests of former Beachites, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Gartner, in Melbourne. Arthur Lewis, 15-year-old singing discovery of Sid Franklin, is heading for national feme es e record singer. The Miami Beach High student just waxed two numbers, "Alone, All Alene," and "Why Don't They Believe Us?" under the Forward label in New York. His proud parents are Mr. and Mrs. Ben Lewis. Dr. Ben Miller, one of the more ardent local golfers when he's not busy with his dental work, moves his office to Miami Beach First Federal bldg. on Oct. 1. And mentioning golfers, Morris West on. Bill Segal, Dr. Norman Russ and Jerry Krongold were among the many Bayshore Golfers who traveled to Naples for the MAGA two-day best-ball twosome tournament, along with Sid Frenchman, Harry Peral, Seymour Berkowiu and Sid Feuer, Jerry Warren, Dr. Maxwell Sayet, Harold Rubin, Ira Levy, Micky Kraus and Murray Tobin. Normandy Shores golfers included Al Savage and Lester Podarsky. RESTAURANT ROW: Sam Sterling, of the Embers, will have 600 or more seats when renovations are completed at his famed Beach restaurant. Last Saturday, even with his new additions. Sterling's Silver Room and the Scot Room, there was a line of hungry patrons waiting for seats. When it comes to service and personal attention, the Embers excels. From the time you enter the imposing interior, with its plush and taseful decor, Maitre d' Mario and his friendly staff of &f captains make you feel "at home." 4— No sooner is one seated when, as if by magic, there appear a ^hugc basket of baked-on-the-premises bread and rolls, a cold, crisp JslTad bowl, a dish heaped with iced celery, whole tomatoes, pickles and other condiments. This is an appetite-whetting forerunner of -things to come. Our party enjoyed succulent, melt-in-your-mouth broiled Pompano, barbecued chicken, and thick, juicy prime sirloin steak. The desserts are gastronomical marvels, including Frozen Embers—a strawberry ice cream pie, with a strawberry cream topping and crisp, crunchy crust-and a profusion of heaping high cream pies, trench pastry and parfait. ice cream, cake, etc. The fame and name of the Embers continue to grow by leaps and bounds. Every night, any season, is a busy pne there. Many local families were enjoying Sunday dinners when the Pearl family visited the Embers. I spotted Mr. and Mrs. Sid Cans and their son Chuck. Dr. and Mrs. Fred Schwartz ... Mr and Mrs }A JTr', h Mr and Mrs Mil,on Sussman and son, Donald and daughter. Felice Attorney and Mrs. Sid Poller and their sons, Neale and Peter Furrier and Mrs. Adrian Thai. BOTH SIDES OF THE BAY: Ben Tracy, popular local entertamer, dropping into the Bonfire for a late snack Adding to the Pleasure of dining at King Arthurs Court of Mum. Springs V.Uas. are the six vioUns and twin pianos. They'are just one of the many continental touches of host Art Bruns Busy a. be.*., j, Barney Biller, of Michel', in Normandy Isle preparing many catered affair, .t hi* roomy spot for the coming weeks. ^^ !" No matter what day you choose to dine at Fu Manchu you'll always run into a friend or two. that's how popular Al Goldman's spot is with localites. Fu Manchu home deliveries have reaSSTJ new high the past month. e reac,UJd %  Although a newcomer, only opened a few we*k — %  -* COMPLETE DINNERS wrth a large variety of entreee FROM $1.20 Jerry's Restaurant DINNER INCLUDES: Choice of appetizer, Salad, Vegetable, Choice of Deart, Beverage. •• Parking Open Hour* Air Conditioned By the Airport BeBvln. "The Food of the Slara" 24tk Street end LeJeuop R bought £ gigantic spot, lock, stock and barrel. And it's goodTnewT^ *. !Ei M .F ha 2 •**' D *• -^Bea'ch^Hrehsb"^^ again this winter. mm auo A JOYFUL NEW YEAR TO YOU AND YOURS. f ridoy, October 2, 1959 ENJOY YOUR OWN SPECIAL PARTY AT THE LUCERNE'S AUTHENTIC LATIN REVUE *wm WVWN e*A$ ttarrmg America s 1111 Key BETTY REILLY AH AN HKIT1II6 All STAI CAST ROBERTO & ALKIA • If PI • MEKEBffA • BUNCO World's Most Booutiful Show GIH DaVf ma, Meiice. Mrechw FAUSTO CMSQO end Ms lotin American Orch. Cree-i pf It |g SCO r pa f aWJf re this •5-ee-ifra. ./ ffce werW-pccApJased kit! Jeperfc reed, assfca/tss StfVKt — WWfff • 0f The spriml mtmshm* CLUB CHALET ATTRACTION BLANQUITA AMARO lat US. appear. ewceWSeeiA OCFANfRONI 41st TO l?nd SI MIAMI HEACH WE SERVE THE FINEST PRIME STEAKS SAM STERLING'S also prime ribs pheasant plus the finest sea .245 22ND STREET MIAMI BEACH JE 8-4345 LUNCHEONS SERVED DAHY STEAK HOUSE & RESTAURANT FEATURING: CHARCOAL BROILED "KT STIEAK$149 Tossed So lad Chosso Off Drpssing *ottJloo8 • GoHk irotwl II s... tj t M wMkAv-Sm 1 ,* MM. A\ vMt ow 1.1 cootTA* urn ^AV HO N.I. ntk ST. SfJOM HMiii T/O



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Friday, October 2, 1959 *• Jewish IkriUtr VAVBHU Page 15-B LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HhJRKUY (11VBN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of CENTRAL BUREAU OP INVESTIGATION" .it 175 N.E. 4th Street, Mlnmi 3:'. Ha., intends to register Mid nimr with the Clerk of t.ie Circuit Court <>f Made County, Florida. NED REGEIN, Sole Owner S'11-18-25. 10/2 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL C.RCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DAOE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. 59CBM2 GWENDOLYN WARD, Plaintiff, \ s. R< >l:i:i: r JOHN WARD. Hi f. ndaaL SUIT FOR DIVORCE TO: ROBERT JOHN WARD r %  %  Manllu Manltus, Sew York You, ROBERT JOHN WARD, are hereby notified that a Kill of Complaint for I Ivorc* has been filed %  you, and you are required to atrve a copy of your Answer o: Pleading to the 1*111 of ('••int>lalnt on the plaintiff's Atti.rnev, S" il. ALEXANDER, one Lincoln Road Building, Sliaini Beach, Florida and file the orlRinal Answer orHeading in the of flee of the Clerk of the CirouR Court on or before the 19th day of October. 1JS. If you fall to do so. Judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the Rill of Complaint. This notice ahall be published once each week for four consecutive weeks in THE JEWISH FIAIRIDIAN. I'liXE AM) ORDERED at Miami, Florida this 11th day of September, AD. E B. LEATHERMAN. Clerk. Circuit Court, Dade Count., Florida (teal) B) K H. RICE, JR. Deputy Clerk. 8/18-SG. 10/2-9 NOTICE UNDER FICT.TIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY QIVEM that the un .;, n, ,i. desiring to engage In I'.', 1 -! 1 ."under Die fictitious name of < ITl SERVICE REERItJKBATION %  % %  < t. Miami Beach intends li register lair name with the jl.ik of the Circuit Court of Ihd 1 HV.MA.N SHALOMITH. Sole Owner 9/11-18-2 Capitalcorp. ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE FINANCBJG WAREHOUSE LOANS FACTORING EQUIPMENT FINANCING COMMERCIAL PAPER Phone: TUxedo 8-7551 4309 N.W. 36th Street Miami Springs. Florida H. S GRUBER PRESIDENT GEORGE J. TALIANOFF CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD %  N THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADS COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. 47461-C IN RE: Estate of LOC1S SCHa'.NKER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors at d .\u Persons Having Claims or Demandb Against Said Estate: V.iu are hereby notified and required to present any claims and demands which you may have against the eatat* of LOCUS SCHFiNKKi: deceased late of Dade County, Florida, to the County Judges of Hade County, and file the same In their offi inly Courthouse In i >.,,|, un ty. Florida, within eight calendar months from the date of the first E nbllcatlon hereof, or the same will e haired. AIM)!. I'll SCIIENKER. Hv of the Estate if Loula BV hi MYERS, HEIMAN & KAPLAN Attorneys ii Fifty Building 1100 8.W. 1st Strec t Miami, Florida 918-2... 10/2-9 IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. 41403 IN RE: Estate of ISABELLA BROOKS I ceased. NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION AND FINAL DISCHARGE NOTFCE it hereby given that we have filed our Final Report ami Petition for Distribution and Final Discharge as Executors of the estate of ISABELLA BROOKS, deceased: and that on the 20th day of October, 19&9, will apply to the Honorable County Judges of Dade County, Florida, for approval of said Final Re|>orf and for distribution and final discharge a* such Executors of the estate of the above-named decedent. This lath day of September. 19.19. WILLIAM E BROOKS ETHEL I. RODDER MYERS, HEJMAN Ac KAPLAN Attorneys Eleven Fifty Bldg. 1150 s.w. 1st St. Miami. Florida 9/18-25. 10/2-9 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE 18 HEREBY OIVBN that the undersigned, desiring to outage in bualnesa under the n >ictoua THE CHARBURGER %  Miami, Dade County, intends to rei irsaid name with the Clark of the c.t '. Court of Hade County, Florida. JAC") FOOD*.. INC. Fla. Corp. JOSEPH PARD Attorney for Ap, ..runt KM Industrial Bank Ilidg *'18-!". 10/2-9 Si.iten.on required bj ie Act '.f August 4, 1!'12. as Amu d by the Act* of M.uvh 3. IMS, c.il July 2, 1948 (Title 39. PullerStates Code. Section 233) showing I ) ownership, management and cttcuUJon of THE JEW1KH FLORID1AN, published week!) at Miami. Florida, for October 1st, 1959. I lie names and addresses of the publisher and editor are: Edltor-PubI red K Shmhet, P. O. Box 2973, Miami 1, Fla. The owner l: The Jewish Florldtan: Not Inc., Ethel Shorhet, Fred K. ShiK-het. P.O. B"X 7. Miami 1. Fla. Til.' average number ofi copies of each Issue of this publication sold or distributed, I *• r o u g h t h e malls or otherwise, to .'A subscr icrs during •he 12 month* praeedln,, the date shown above was .4 "2. St L. 8HOCHET. Edltor-Pnnllslier. Sworn to and subscribed before me this 1st day of October. 1959. SEI.MA M. THOMPSON (My commission expires September 198S.1 __^ IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE E r fX-?rTa H JUD,CIAL TRCUIT OF Fl -0"'DA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. 59C8708 LATHU AIIRAMS, Plain tiff, HORJUI ABRAlfS, Defendant. NOTICE TO DEFEND K) MORRIS ABRAMB Mrs. Louis Appelbaum 10*1 1'earl Street Sharon, I'ennsvivanla i V '" ,„ A ". ,Ui:ls A-BRAHS, are hereby notified that a Complaint for Divorce has hern filed against you and you are required to serve a oom of our Answer or Pleading to the Complaint on the Plaintiffs attorneys. !!.??. *,„Teltelnian. 904 Blscayne Building. 19 West Flagler Street. Miami 32. Florida and file the original SP^W '" ''leading In the office of th. ( i,.rk of the Circuit Court on or before the 2(lth day of October. 1*59. >. ou '" ,0 do "o Judgment by Default will be taken against you for the relief demanded In the Complaint ,.,'",'•, E A ND ORDERED at Miami, i V r a u'- '* Htn day of September. E. B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk, Circuit Court. Dade Countv, Florida (seal) By: K. M. LYMAN. Deputy Clerk. BBIGEL A TEITELMAN Attorneys for Plaintiff "04 Blscayne Building Miami 12. Florida 9/18-26,10/2-9 NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. MCM94 DOROTHY CHRISTIAN, Plaintiff, va. ALONZO CHRISTIAN. Defendant. •UIT FOR DIVORCE TO: ALONZO CHRISTIAN. Defendant 80 Hoyt Street Newark, New Jersey You. ALONZO CHRISTIAN, are hereby notified that a Bill of Complaint for Divorce has been filed against you. and you are required to serve %  oopy of your Answer or Pleading to the Bill of Complaint on the plaintiff's Attorneys, RAYMAN & DCHIO, i"<1 Alnsley Building, Miami 32, Florida and file the original Answer or Pleading In the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or hefore the 20th day of October. IN*. If you fall to lo no. judgment by default will be taken against you for 'he relief demanded in the Bill of Complaint. This notice shall lie published once each week for four co n secutive weeks In Tin: JEWISH FLORIDIAN, DONE AND ORDERED at Mlnml. Florida, this Hth day of September. A.:>. i: B LBATHBRMAN, Clerk. Circuit Court. Dade Countv. Florida (seal) By: K M LYafAN. Deputy Clerk. HA Y.MAN & DIIIKi Alnsley Bldg. Miami SI FI. HJOf Counsel for Plaintiff J/1S-25, 10/2-9 LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, IN CHANCERY, No. MC 8831 MARILYN HELEN JACKSON. Plaintiff. EVERT LEE JACKSON, JR*^* I 'cfoidant. NOTICE BY PUBLICATION EVERT LEE JACKSON, JR. c/o Mrs Darlene Sangster l-'-ast Jefferson Monies. Iowa You. EVERT LEE JACKNoN. JR., are hereby notified that a Complaint for Divorce has been filed against you. and you are required to serve a copy of your Answer or Pleading to the Complaint on the i'lalntlffs Attorney, ANOELO A. AM, 801 Alnslev lllulding, Miami ,i2. Florida, and file the original Answer or Pleading In the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before the 28th day of October, 1959. If you fail to do so. judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded In the Complaint. _DONE AND ORDERED at Miami. Florida, this 17th day of September, "E. B'. LEATHERMAN. Clerk. Circuit Court. Dade Countv. Florida (seal) By: K. M. LYMAN. ni Deputy Clerk. ANOELO A. ALI Attorney for Plaintiff 801 Alnsley Building Miami 32, Florida. 9/25. 10/2-9-18 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY No. 59C 8478 PAl.'LA PARK HOMES'. INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff. vs. ARMOND HOCKMAN and VIRGINIA R. HOCKMAN Defendant. NOTICE BY PUBLICATION (MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE) TO: ARMOND HOCKMAN and VIROINIA R. HOCKMAN (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) You are hereby notified that a BUI of Complaint to Foreclose Mortgage on the following described property: Lot 2. Block 1. PA FLA PARK, recorded In Flat Book 84, page 38. Dade County. Florida; has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your Answer or Pleading to the Bill of Complaint on the Plaintiffs Attorney, PAUL WARREN ESQUIRE, oln Road, Miami Florida, and file the original Answei or Pleading In the office of the Clerk of the clnult Court on or before October 12, IWt. If you fall to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded In the BUI of Complaint. This notice shall be' published once each week for four consecutive weeks in THE JEWISH PI.i >RI I'IAN. DONE AND ORDERED at Miami. Florida, this 1th day of September. 1959. K B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk Clrclut Court, Dade County, Florida (seal) By: it H. RICE, JR. Deputv cleik 9/11-18-25.10/2 NOTICE UNO"' FICTITIOUS NAMw .AW NOTICE IS HEPKHY it.VBN that the undersigned, dt -Ing to engage In business under the ...tltlous name of NATIONAL HOME FINANCING ,.t H w.st Flieler Street, In the City of Miami. Florida Intends to register the said name with the Clerk of the Cirult Coui t of Ds ly, Florida. DATED at Miami. F'loCda this 3rd day of September, A.D. 1959. ASPIC ivVESTMENTS iRPOF "ION By: Sidney Pa.rnak. Vice Pre*. Attest: Elisabeth Pearson. Secy. HARTWIO %  ^BjjBjBMy lor Applicant 9/11-18-2, 10/2 (I IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY No. 99C gNM EILEEN M. MONGAN. Plaintiff, vs. JAMES X F". MONO AN. Defendant. NOTICE BY PUBLICATION TO: JAMES P. MONOAN 2272 Andrews Avenue Bronx. New York You. JAMES F". MONOAN. are hereby notified that Complaint for )r'lvorce has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of vour Answer or Pleading to the Complaint on the Plaintiffs Attorney, ANOELO A. ALI. 601 Alnsley Building. Miami 32, Florida, and file the original Answer or Pleading In the of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before the 12th day of October, IBB>, If you fail to do so. Judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded In the Complaint, DONE AM' ORDF-.RTJD at Miami, Florida, this 8th day of September, \ I'. '.' .' %  E. B LEATHERMAN, Clerk Clrclut Court, Dade County. Florida By: JOAN SXEEDEN, Deputy 'Clerk ANOBLO A. ALI Attorney for Plaintiff Sl Alnsley Building Miami 32, Florida „ .... 9/11-18-28,10/2 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY QIVBN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the rid it lout, name of ADVANCE INDUSTRIAL HECURITY at 1801 Congress Building. Miami, Florida Intends to register said name with tbe Clerk of tile Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. KHWARII J JAPHE WELLIHCH. DOUGHERTY SAIAC Attorneys for Edward J. Japhe 9/28, 10/2-9-18 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious names of i) SPORT-BASE. •_ %  ) BPORT-HASB; division of Spo-ties of Miami at Si NVV :Mth Street, Miami, Florida Intends to register said names with the Clerk of the Clreult Court of Dade County, Florida. ESTHER KASSMi Sole (>wner MARVIN I. WIENER 1111 Alnsley Bldg., Miami 32. Fla. Attorney for Spa nil ftoort%  n of Spoi ties of Miami. 9/2.'. I0/Z-9-1I ATTENTION ATTORNEYS! solicits your ieqaJ not! WB apprtrlato your patronaqB and guarantB* accuiat Bsnrics at UaaJ ratsM e • Phone FR 4-4366 lor mMsaq8i ••rrlc* LEGAL NOTICE MOTIOC UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEKIuIlY GIVEN tht the undei nigned. ilenlring to engage In hoslnes** "nder the fictitious name of MAINTENANCE PRODUCTS Co at 220 North West 127th Street, North Miami Intends to* register said lunw with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida. FRED J. COCCAONA, Sole Owner CB.YDK E. FOSTER, JR. Attorney for F'red J. Coccogna 9/20, 10/2-9-18 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious nalme of A.nSSCO GIFTS AND ACCESSORIES at 3432 SW 22nd St.. Miami Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. ANNA BUCHBERGER. Sole Owner SAMtEI, KoNEF'SKY Attorney 2240 SW 18th St. 9/2."., 10/2-9-18 CIRCUIT COURT. 11TH JUDICIAL CIRCU T. DADE COUNTY. FLA. CHAN. No. 59C 2431-C PHL \Y" B, PlylERO. Plaintiff, MADELINE PIQTJBRO, Defendant. NOTICE BY PUBLICATION YOU, MADEIJNE PIQUERO. :.3."I Park Place Brooklyn, New York, are notified to serve a copy of your Answer to the Divorce Complaint on plaintiffs attorneys. F-ngel and Housen. 30j Blscayne Building, Miami. Fla., and file original with Clerk of above named Court, on or before the 28th day of October, 19"i9. otherwise Complaint will be confessed by raS DATED: 23rd day of September. 1939. F:. B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk (seal) By: K. M. LYMAN, Deputy 9/M. 10/2-9-18 NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY IN CHANCERY No. 59C 8584 GRACE CAMPBELL Plaintiff, vs. JAMFS J. CAMPBELL Defendant. TO: JAMES J. CAMPBELL I 'efendant 814 Kummerdale Road Summerdale. New Ji %  You are required t copy of your an>\ver to the Bill of Complaint for invoice on the plaintiffs attorney, and to file the origin. %  angwar in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before the l.'th da) of October A.D. 1S; Other WIM, the Bill of Complaint f u Divorce, h ere t ofore filed herein, will be taken as confessed by you. Dated at Miami. Florida this the 9th day of September 19 LEATHERMAN, Clerk Clrclut Court, Dade County, Florida (sesl) By: K. M I.VM \N, Deputy clerk MI ETON A. FRIEDMAN Plaintiffs Solicitor llll Ablate) Bldg Miami, Florida 9'I1-1-2S 10/? NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. MC 8943 SADIE M. COHEN a/k/a MARION LITT. Plaintiff. vs. HARRY i. COHEN, Defendant SUIT FOR DIVORCE TO: HARRY I, Ci IHEN ADDRESS UNKNOWN You HARRY 1. COHEN are herab* notified that a Bill of Complaint for Divorce baa been filed agalnal and you are required to serve a copy of your Answer or Pleading 1 BUI of Complaint on the plaintiffs' Attorney* LHBOWITZ AND BBLl Kli. ?0 First Street. Miami Beach, Florida and file the original Answer or Pleading In the oflce of the cleric of Ihe Circuit Court on or hefnrthe 28th day of October, 1969. If you fall to do so, Judgment by default will be taken against vnu for the relief demanded In the Bill of Complaint DONE AND ORDERED at Miami. Florida, this 21st day of September. A.D.. ircn. E R LEATHERMAN, Clerk. Circuit Court. Dade Countv. Florida (seal) By: K. M LYMAN. Deputy Clerk. l.i:itoWlT7. A HELLER 708 First St.. Miami Beach. Fla. JE S-0774 Attorneys for Plaintiff 9/*-.. 10'2-9-l NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to cagage In business under the fictitious name of PONT1AC PARKIMi CO (Not lac I at 138 S.W. 2nd Street, Miami. Florida Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida SAM U Sl'ol.ollOW SIDNEY M. ARONOVITE Attorney for Sam L. Stolorow 1001 Alnsley Building Miami 32. Florida 9/U-U}-Sfi, in/2 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DAOE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY. No. 59C 8602 ROSE PI OTN1CK, Plaintiff, vs. HAPRY PI.OTNICK', Defendant. NOTICE BY PUBLICATION TO: HARRY PLOTNTK "".I Durooher Street Montreal Quebec. Canada 'fied that a Pill if Complaint for Divorce has been filed against you and you are hetwby required to serve a cov off your .vni w. r to the i .oipialnt on Plaintiff's attorney SAMUEL RUBIN, IL'II Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, Florida and file the original Answer In the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court en or bcfoie the 2fth day >f October. IM#, otherwise the allegations of said Bill will he taken aa confessed hv yon. Dated this 22nd day of September, I!-.".!'. F:. B. LEATHERMAN. tlerk. Circuit Court. I>nde County. 1 (aoal) By: R. H RICH JR.. Deontv Clerk. 9/26. 10/2-9-Id NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOU8 NAME LAW NOTICF: is HBRF:HY OIVBN that i signed, desiring to engage ID l>tislness under the fictitious name of AERO NTBWS IN' 1 si .i:', N.W. 3fith Street. Miami Springs, Fla.. Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of thtde county, Florida. AEIto NEWS SOUTH. INC. Sole Owner 9/18-28. 10/2-9 ATTENTION ATTORNEYS! CORPORATION OUTLETS Lowest PricfM — Quickest Delivery in South Florida Call the JEWISH FLORIDIAN at FR4-4369





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Rosh Hashona Penetrates The Soul "dfewislrt Floridian Miami, Florida. Friday. October 2, 1959 Section C HOLY 0AYS MING A GREAT SENS* OF CONTINUITY AND AN IMMENSE SENSE Of JEWISH IMMORTALITY. Days Of Awe Concern Mans Spiritual Relationship To God By MEIR CHARNIAK We search deep into our heritage when we attempt to find meaning in our holidays. No celebration exists in a vacuum; its cause is to be discovered in the past. With the passage of yews, the commemoration, or event, or holiday takes on added value and perhaps new traditions. But it is steeped in history, in cultural mores, in the faith ages. Passover without the exodus from Egypt would be impossible to conceive. Purim without the Esther story is meaningless. Chanuka minus the Maccabees would lack importance, drama and excitement But it is Rosh Hashona, and Yom Kippur with Jl, of course, which is, if the phrase ie permissible in any discussion of religious holidays, the most "religious" of all holidays and plunges most penetratingly into the Jewish soul and the beginnings of the Jewish faith. This is the period of the Days of Awe, and one does not connect the holidays with Egypt, or with a Persian King and his Queen, or with the fight of the Hebrews versus the Hellenists. Rosh Hashona is a purely religious event, when Man and God (and not Man and Man) are the major players in a stirring drama. Some years ago, a fascinating volume on Jewish life in the European villages of the past, was published under the title of "Life is with People," by Mark Zborowski and Elizabeth Herzog, and in it the authors tell us how the Jews of the shtetl marked Rosh Hashona, and in this account we learn that "the Days of Awe belong more to the synagogue than to the home." This, of course, is equally true today, bul_the overwhelming power of the holiday was even greater then. "From the beginning of the month until Rosh Hashona the shammes makes the nightly rounds, pounding on the shutters of each house and calling, 'Jews, get up, it's time to go to "pardons".' The girls and women lie quietly under their warm covers, while the men and boys leave their beds, dress, and go to the synagogue for prayers of repentance and entreaty, intoned with voices that quaverand wail. During the day there is less laughter than usual, tor this *yontev' is building up to a climax of solemnity." The entire village was caught up in the spirit Continued en Pa** 1S-C



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zc r *oy.OaoUr 21SS9 *• All ... ImrrriimQH MASON CONTRACTORS JOSEPH M. HESSANA Block Masuu — Cewcrefe Sidewalks B — I — Uumti wmmm wmmom CAifomr Phone MU 1-2998 140W N.W. 20th COUtT NEW YEARS GHEETEVGS AND BEST WISHES TO ALL CAL KOVENS CONSTRUCTION CORP. HOLIDAY GREETINGS MINNA'S BEAUTY SALON • STYLING PERMANENT WAVING • AM COMOITMMSO OPEN TUCS. THUkS EVEMIMCS JAJl e -/ ,,,. u %  Y APPOINTMENT 4ZI *•". 241* St. APPOINTMENT CA 14111 ConrfWoy HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL OHIO AUTO PAINT & BODY 1445-55 N.E. 129th STREET NORTH MIAMI Phone PL 7-0201 • PROMPT SERVICE • QUALITY WORKMANSHIP • REASONABLE PRICES BEST WISHES TO ALL FOR A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR Florida I pholNterv Sappl v Ca, •M M.E. First Avenue Hionee: FR 9-3431-2 GREETINGS Ormsby Pen Shop "STOP* -WIJUHAT TOW SUVKf 55 N.E. IN SWCET "* T tff f 1 IM§ S PH. F* 1^417 TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR M. •** MRS. ELLIOn C COHEN and Family 18 W. Di Lido Drir*. Dl Lido bland TO OUR MANY FRIENDS. A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR Davis Boiler 4k Iron Works, Ine. ~_ -2 OILERMAKEHS AWD CERTIFIED WELDERS Ph. FR 44030 190040 N. Miami Ave. Heeonditioned Boil.n for Sale nd Repair. Day or Night Anywhere. Smokestacks and Tanks. Ruin Where Her Synagogue Used to Be tr TRUOE DUB — t/jccstet England LMI year. I chose Austria far my fcaliaay. I a tre m endous yearning to re-visit the continent after nearly a years of exile, but did aot ever exam wish to sec my native Czechoslovakia, where %  ay entire faaaily'perished. Austria then became my choice. It is only next door to my former homeland, with a similar sceaery. and I know the language well; last, hot Mt least, it is the cheapest country is Europe. And I was aot disappointed. The pine forests *• J*t as fragrant as in my youth, the in— tains with their majestic peaks filled me with awe sad the sight of the brooks, cascading like thin ribbons down wooded slopes, thrilled me beyond I was happy and carefree as in the days of when we had holidays such as these. every year I felt a tremendous sense of release All the m em or i e s I dad not dare to lmi, hi re mi liberated all of a sodden and I was able to re-live them with my children, while we were nicking wild strawberries, bilberries and and mushrooms But towards the end of the week 1 grew restless and feJt hungry for Jewish people. At the little guesthouse in the mountain village, where we stayed, we did sat encounter a single Jew. And so on a Saturday, my husband. I and oar two young daughters, set out for I nnsb r uck where we hoped to find a synagogue. WeB. how do you set about finding a synagogue? We arrived at the station and my first idea was to consult the telephone directory. We looked under 'Hebrew.we looked under "Juedische."' we looked under "Israelitische." then finally decided to search for a Cohen or a Levi, alas in vain, Drawinf a Blank While we were so occupied, a man appeared with a bundle of keys and some instruments to test the telephone apparatus. He asked if be could help us. and we told him of our quest. He got in touch with the operator, but there was no number or address of a Jewish community or any similar organization. The man told us, in parting, that there used to be a synagogue in the Silzgasse. hut it was destroyed. We were undismayed. We felt there must be some Jews left in Innsbruck and we were going to find them. But how? Of course, how silky of us. why did we not think of this in the first place? The police was the obvious answer. My husband entered the grey, forbidding building and was gone for some time. The girls grew restless, but I thought his long absence promising They must be explaining to him where the new synagogue is. I hoped. When my husband reappeared. I could teU from the look on his face hat he drew a blank, but we were determined not to give up so easily. Then my husband had an idea. He stopped a taxi driver and asked him if he knew of a Jew in Innsbruck, or the synagogue. The man said: 'I don't know of a synagogue since the old one was destroyed, but I do know a Jew. Go to Sch.. that is a Jewish firm, he will be able to tell you all you want.'' So with great excitement we made our way to the elegant shop in the main street and while mv husband went to find Mr. Sch.. I stood outside and read framed cuttings of newspapers from the time during and after Hitler, concerning the takeover of the business by the Nazis and the subsequent struggle for its return to the rightful heirs. The Dr. John Waller Bachman (center proles nor of practical theology at the Union Theological Se minar y, holds the medal from the American Fumstrip Festival awarded to "Call far the Quwebon" as the best funstrip in the category of ethics and religion. Dr. Samuel Grand deft) and Albert Vorspon (right) bold the winning documentor-.produced by the Union of American Hebrew Congregations. "Without a religion lib and religious education, they will ... disappear altogether captions above those cuttings read: "The story of a Jewish business." I rejoiced. Here at last was a real. a ?eainie Jew What a pity, he want there that Saturday morning. His employee advised my hssbaoj to visit Mr. B.. another Jew. who owned a fi.-nitnr shop not far away. And so we went after Mr. B. — we f*ind hit shop easily enough. The elegant sbopwicJitts wen full of expensive furniture, all in very good taste, both the traditional and the contempo.j.-. Wa entered and asked for Mr. B. An Immaculate Oh. what joy. He was actually in. and all | had to do was to wait a few minutes, while he; tended to a client in his office. In my mind formulated all the questions I was going to "How many Jews are there in Innsbruck? have they survived the Hitler regime? Are Zionists? Are they in touch with their brethm in Israel?" At last Mr. B. appeared, an immaculately dressed tall, middle aged man, when person and whole bearing resembled more a Germaa officer than a Jew. He was ok so correct, as he politely inquired after our wishes. My husband said "I am Dr. Dub from F -g l nd. and this is my family. We would like to attend a Jewish service aad wondered if you could help us?" The man stiffened a little. "There is no Jewish service on Saturdays." he answered'. And we felt as if we inquired after a piece of furniture that was no longer in fashion. "We only meet 00 High Festivals." And that was that. Somehow, and to this day I do not know how. we found ourselves near the door, which Mr. B. opened for us and bowed em so politely, as he ushered us out Of course. I never had a chance to ask my questions, but 1 was no longer interested in Mr. B. or his fellow congreContinued an Pee* 10-C BEST WISHES FOR THE HOLIDAYS JACKSON ELECTRIC COMPANY ALTERATIONS & REPAIRS AIR CONDITIONING WIRING COMMERCIAL DiTJUSTRLAL RESIDENTIAL 21330 $. Federal Hwy. Hnlm d 5-2541 PERRTNE. FLORIDA BEST WISHES FOR THE HOLIDAY SEASON MERLE NORMAN COSMETIC STUDIO 2160 PONCE DE LEON BLVD. CORAL GABLES HI 4-3918 PHONE FOR APPOINTMENT FOR YOUR FREE DEMONSTRATION MOW w oat OWM 00MOO K 1101 NX. 791b Street Sincere Good Wishes for the Hobday DAM UNDERWRITERS INSUtANCE AGENCY RALPH D. HOLLANDER BEST WISHES TO ALL OUB PATRONS AND FRIENDS MERCURY MEDICAL CO. 1545 ALTON RD. IE 1-6411



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r^doYPC **** 2. 1959 +Je*lst FhriHtr Page 3C Hias House in Negev: Home for Expert! By ITZHAK SHARGIL Beersheba n is morning in Beersheba, the capital of the 7(, c sky over the Judean hills towards the I rtheast becomes brighter as the fi rst rays of ItM stffl" c f ni Tn,<> ffle vaft "SSWJesert," BgRing j ts canyons and hills, its few isolated settleIwiis awl workers' camps and Beersheba itself, Lhich is already a busy town. A constant stream L vehicles—jeeps, taxis and buses trailing black I smoke from their exhaust pipes—is leaving town, Ijod is swallowed by the desert. Thete vehicles bring life to the Negev and [carry its future. They move building materials, I rails for new railroads and pipes for new water lind oil lines. They are loaded with drilling machines -md mining equipment, and carry the men Lho operate the machines. They also provide (transportation for the expertsand technicians, Uilhout whom the Negev would not have become II field of experiments and production on which [tie Israeli economy must rely. Let us meet some of them. Alexander Tarsey, 36, graduate of the Tulane Ifniversity, New Orleans. His field is water deLalination. He came to Israel to conduct research |work on desalination of brackish" Negev waters, hiring to turn them into water fit for drinking and %  for irrigation. His work is conducted at the Re liearch Institute of Arid Zones, on the outskirts of IBeersheba. Dr. G. H. Dannies is an elderly German expert Ion solar energy. He came from Bonn at the inI vitation of the government of Israel, through the [good offices of UNESCO. He is also doing reHun, which has helped hundreds of thousands of leu i-i immigrant! to come to the United Suites from unoui countries m Europe. u this year celebrating its 75th anniversary. On* of the contributions made by the Huts M Israel it the buiUing of i moitrrx hostel in the Hegev to house scientists from abroad who are helping in the development of the Kigcv. The article reflects the moods in this house. — rt. c;'^ w1 > Ik %  %  j IBafl 'US The Negev ". awaits those skilled hands that would turn it into productive land — agriculturally and industrially ." Frutarom Eecto-Chemical Industries at Acre, which manufacture chlorine, sodium hydroxide and other materials for industrial and home use. Israel Bond dollars helped develop this high water tower, tallest of its kind in Israel. Hias House in the N egev. search work at the Institute, specializing in the utilization of solar energy for refrigeration and air-conditioning—two very important problems for the future of living conditions in the Negev. Mr. and Mrs. Winter are from Switzerland. He is a geologist working near the Dead Sea, where the local oil corporation "Naphta" is prospecting for oil. There are also Naomi Moses, a young schoolmistress from Ramot-Hashavib, near Nathanya, who came down to teach new immigrant children; Dr. Aronheim, the Sick Insurance Fund medical officer for the Negev; and David Margolith, a young engineer from Winnipeg, Canada; and his friend, John Norris, from Oklahoma. They are supervising the construction of bridges for the new railway line to the phosphate mines in the South. Heart of the Neev Sometimes Prof. Nelson Glueck. the famous archaeologist, is in one of the cars that go deep into the Negev. Some vehicles, engaging their front wheel drive, leave the asphalt road and plough their way up bills or down valleys, along dry river beds, following old Nabatean tracks. Some go to Sdora, the lowest spot in the world, where Israel's potash works are located. Still others go to Oron, site of the phosphate mines, while more cars go to the various settlements of the Negev pioneers— Kfar Yeruham, Dimona and others. After a hot work-day, a steady stream of dusty cars, carrying sun-tanned people, their hair white with Negev dust, pours back into Beersheba. In Beersheba, a town that in less than ten years, grew in population from 4,000 to well over 40,000, with a wide network of roads and new residential quarters emerging among the sand dunes; part of the stream of cars takes a common route. They pass the Old Town with its sun-bleached stone houses, past the traditional Abraham's Well and Abraham's Tree, and to the New City. There they park in front of a huge white building surrounded by a big garden and flower beds, and—what is even moie attractive—flanked by a swimming pool. Here, to this, their temporary home, they all come, take a shower, shave, glance at the paper, and go down to have dinner and talk about their experiences of the day. "Here" means the "Hias House in the Negev." It is often described as the "Heart" of the Negev. It is from here that technical skill in the shape of experts and supervising staffs for operations in the Negev spreads day after day all over the vast spaces which actually cover half the area of Israel. As, under their advice, more and more of the Continued on Pao 11-C HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATONS VENETIAN CITIES SERVICE 1349 Dado Blvd. IE 8-1004 Holiday Greetings t w. KTSTLEB COMPANY **?"T BunjDma Ml AML FLOWDA %  Wet rv. 4-S1M LOWEST HATI To All... Season's Best Wishes Tropical Paper & Wax Company Wax Paper, P re — r Paper, DoMce f —on Paper, Tropical" 1111 East 24th Stroot Hialooh, Florida NEW YEAH GREETINGS TO ALL LES AUSTIN TROPA COPA STEAK HOUSE Dining Room 11:30 aan. till 11:00 pan. •Oil BIRD ROAD — Opposite Tropical Park iffO 14101 YOUR HOST FRANK DELMAN To All Season's Best Wishes S.J. 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*-.a4/: kS l TOctet*' SHB1EY TIACTOR 1 "EWPMBTTCO. Cf *r aiffgr brought froml*.; and Jewish Ion aad youth actr*' mer is JBISL. H rs laiarec of Senile, openly defied k%  %  %  the Caanine te ban aB Procamps and ROE ?vT* :L GABLES COOLING & HEATING CO. MBawi fkawi &< f Ac JTA brafaM ran. *c Lmmitm. made c fpe.-i* mp SfMm KWatUk! 2£ALEA2 XT* TEA! LCCOU NEHI BOTTLING CO. S RUT. Ml SMp~. ?2 148T TO AU HOST lAffT MMatAtt Paul U. Terrs YOUR MAYOR OF SOUTH MUM 7225 S.W. 57* CWt %  till MlffMM COCONUT GROVE EMPLOYMENT AGENCY nciMcmc na* 6*JU> $. m SacftM fan. fraa C 1 n $ 5 M Hvy. — C*rl KM Ml 4-1*11 HAPPY NEW YEAR TS ALL .. Surfside Gulf Smke Station Mil HARDING AVENUE Faooe UN f>2324 FHAHE AYLOH "Over as docile wrought-iron gates, no PMBU iaAkMBi •-* .dr-vy >1 MI MMI sr-i-rraxe is the modernistic "Fountr-r. -x ~—* 7:.oes by Beinaiu Z^nmerman, krJrJB -2W Home at the University of ua. The S102.000 Jewish 1.100 unhrersity students. of Pope with i m \ lateral]ie. the *d Spain's n] as foreign aid have radie* j the jwrwttl'i and churciTiJJ %  *s apefacataaas for admission to M International M o n etar y F*—I. the European On j ganization far Ecaaaauc Cooperation, and NATO;] Himaghnali of Mharal Westers countries, have i had their bearing oa the issue. AppUcafMR of Low Eased The law has not rhiaffart; its application, had fifr. has b tt a ait taore benevolent and elasbt] Hitherto aaheara of fatililki are granted to' Jewish cooaauoaaty. Legally, it has no ex it is aot erea recognised as s cultural but. in practice, it caa caaat oa the gun cooperation in futfiffiag Ms tasks. It has been (ranted its own cemetery in I burial facilities: it snares the nect-ssary peraM for holding social and cultural actn :ti. it Oat j accornmodatioBs for its faattiom and can canton the authorities for a tanaliailiie approach to ffj problems. Its main difficalties remain thaw the law cannot be ride napped; the graatiaf < naturalization is still a faattios of the Catholicism, obit notices hi the press must be headed by the Croat, aad personal statot I controlled by a religious body. Five hundred years after the capture of i nada. the Exile and the Inquisition, the main for Spain's —frer^f the "in/idols who crucified Christ-" Among the masses, mi superstition-ridden peasant*, there is an undertone to their bathing of the Jews. It si hatred based on religion aad not on race, and end today a converted Jew is feted with sometkifj like the return of the prodigal son For the government the Jews are ao adfajl cor.: part of a vast problem. There are no spedta discriminatory measures directed agaiast thesj and they count oa a marc benevolent gorenmafJ attitude than the Protestants. This is doe partiM to the lack of interventions oa their behalf. ** %  *] the proud Spaniards reseat, and to the lack proselytism in the Jewish faith. Left to themselves aad without undue CanKfMod an Paao 1*X Happy New Year to AD Our Friends and Patrons Flamingo Dress Shop tit M V44tt "FfrfitaWtf l i i < I t 1 A HAPPY NEW TEAA TO AU O03 faiEltTjp AND CUSTOMERS flsT faW Mrs. Btcfc of the APEX CIEANERS I LAUNDRY PB4-2S33 SEASON*^ GHEETINGS TO AU OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS HOTEL PHARMACY LWCOUI and ALTON ROADS IE 1-U2S Dafly T1H 12 Mfidbaiaat TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW H. POPKIN4 SON CfNofracfovs S75 Arthur Godfrey Bi JE 1-5200 SAVOY HOTBt "OpmiYwAioari' • ALL OUTSlOe 00M • v ornmo mu 152 R.W. Sm^ood S*+



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joy.Octobwa 1959 +Jeist>fk>r*Mr*7 Pcgo 5* Ultimate Cruelty: The Six Million Myth' By ARNOLD PORSTIR AOL Bulletin tyhf ultimate cruelly W We" six 'fnillWH Jews kited under Hitler—the denial of the fact that they existed, suffered, and died—la now being pratLed by the haters, professional and amateur, here abroad. It is a constant theme in their liter.(ure ami speeches; through repetition it is beginto find its way into the responsible press and, [Jrelumably. the minds of respectable people. There is no telling Just when the ultimate truelty began to take form. Probably it started Lin after the facts were'established at the International Military Tribunal held In Nuremberg, Gernv a fier World War II. Then the facts were fcade hideously clear. Some six million Jews had en murdered, gassed or shot, beaten or starved death The figure—six million dead—was determined in many ways. Among them: • The Nazis themselves generally kept good records. Adolf Eichmann, one of those in charge Lf the Nazi program of exterminating Jews, was buoted as saying, on the basis of all his knowledge [ind statistics, that four million Jews had been iilled in concentration camps, another two million killed by Einsatz, Nazi task force units. (Also at Nuremberg, another high Nazi official, S. S. Sturm[wnnfuehrer Wilhelm Moettl, said that Heinrich Himmler had rejected the six million figure as |>eing too low.) • Allied demographers and other population exerts independently came to the six million figure is a result of study of statistics before, during, and tfter Hitler. • Historian Arnold Toynbee, among others, reviewed Nazi records, statements made by camp kommandants, and others and concluded: "By the |ime that the Allied Armies had gained control of be whole of Europe, approximately six million ^ews had perished." • And through the years, all authoritative studes and documentation produced the same figure— : million Jewish dead. The P o t Ohs of Tragedy The figure is so huge that it etudes the imagnation and, in its enormity, loses meaning. In he Kishinev Massacre of 1909, 47 Jews were killYou can think of 47 people as individual men, nen and children. You can read the words of ust one of the six million killed by the Nazis—an &nne Frank or Emanuel Ringelblum—and fathom be depths of individual tragedy. Or you can think family or friends who died under Hitler. But he figure—six million—is a nameless, faceless Abstraction. It is so large that it appears incredble. It is this fact that the bigots are trying to hploit in making their insanely cruel charge—the pemal that the six million ever existed. How, in the face of all historical fact, can the bigots use this as a persistent propaganda slogan? hey do it by playing a weird kind of numbers ^ame, without logic or context Look at the reaning of professional anti-Semite James Madole, % riling in his "National Renaissance Bulletin": "Although the World Almanac attests to the.fact that fewer than 600,000 Jews ever lived in Germany, the Jews persisted in their monstrous lie that Nazi Germany had cremated six million of their co-racials Many Jews allegedly roasted by Hitler are now turning their talents to butchering Arab women and children in the Gaza strip." Madole has the fact* right about the Jewish Left is Ambassador Eduardo Espinosa y Prieto. acting chief of the Mexican delegation at the United Nations, who presents human rights award to Moses Moskowitz, secretary general of the Consultative Council of Jewish Organizations. Moskowitz received the citation for his proposal to establish a United Nations Attorney General for Human Rights. Dr. John Slawson, executive president of American Jewish Committee, looks on at presentation made during past Hebrew Year. population of Germany. But the overwhelming number of Jews killed under the Nazis were not German Jews. Madole completely overlooks the fact that, under the Nazis, 2,800,000 or 85 percent of Poland's 3,300,000 Jews were killed; that 1,500,000 or 71 percent of the 2,100.000 Jews in occupied portions of Russia were killed; that 425,000 or 50 percent of Rumania's 850,000 Jews were killed; that 260,000 or 82.5 percent of Czechoslovakia's 315.000 Jews were killed. To say nothing of Jews killed hi Hungary. Lithuania, Holland, Prance. Latvia, and Germany itself. These figures, too, are available in various editions of the World Almanac. Madole has his own explanation of why the figure "six million" is used: "The Jews have found it extremely lucrative to maintain the gigantic swindle of atrocities committed by the German people against the Jewish race. Each year, world Jewry forces Western Germany to pay the sum of $110,000,000 in reparations to the State of Israel. The entire Israeli merchant marine was built by the sweat of German labor ." Sympathy for Nazis Madole's concern for the Germans includes complete sympathy for the Nazis. He shows this in an almost classical rewrite of history when he seeks to prove that Jews flourished in Poland despite Hitler: "In late 1944, the Jews of Warsaw, Poland, fully armed with modern war material, launched an offensive against Nazi troops How could these Jews have been exterminated during five years of Nazi rule in Poland when they were able to launch a full scale military offensive as late as 1944?" 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Pa., is on* of many suburbs which rim* tbe great city of Philadelphia. Because of a mat H at ,which was recently erected there, Elkaas Park is becoming a particular point of interest for all American-Jews. The synagogue is that of Congregation Beth Shotom, formerly located in Philadelphia proper. It ail designed and finished, just before his death las: April in his ninetieth year, by Frank Lloyd Wright, the world's most famous architect of the twentieth century, the pioneer of modern architecture whose every building aroused greater discussion, greater admiration— and also greater antagonism—than any structure that would be erected by any other master builder. In ilnif int this synagogue. Wright was aided by the rj-.bbi of the congregation. Dr. Mortimer J. Cohen, well-known in American Jewish life as a Conservative rabbi and author of scholarly Jewish books who first thought of getting Wright to do the building, who worked with him on it for about sax years and whose help in the design Wright had publicly acknowledged. As might have been expected by anyone at all acquainted with Prank Lloyd Wright's work, this r.ew rmagogue is vastly different from anything we have hitherto seen in synagogue architecture. What are the ideas behind it' What does it symbolize" Here is what Wnght himself had to say: "At last a great symbol' Rabbi Mortimer J. Cohen gave me the idea of a synagogue as a traveling Mt. Sinai—a mountain of light' We chose white giass Let God put his colors on. He's the great artist. When the weather is sunny, the temple wiE glitter like gold. At night, under the moon, it will be silvery. On a gray day it will be gray. When the heavens are blue, there will be a soft blue over it And when you go into a place of worship, you night to feel as if you were in the hands cf God." Eiuboranc* an Old As* And so the plan of Wright's (1.300.000 Beth Sholom Synagogue is hexagonal in shape, like a pair of hards cupped around the congregation. Side ramps emerge at prowlike corner buttresses into the main hall, which seats 1.040 persons. The int-rior rises over 80 feet in a. great translucent teat ^i corrugated plastic and glass: from the top of the trip.'Hl structure hangs a single chandelier of brilliant colored glass trimmed with spiky incandescent lights. Viewed from outside, the new synaSPtwe. rising like a mountain of light is a huge triangular form of glass, aluminum and concrete, upon which are groups of menorahs with their seven branched lighting facing you from everv direction, ready to cast their glow toward the sky at night. The tlass and plastic tent—the roof if yon hke-which rises above the concrete base is a'.most pyramidal shaped. whJe in the interior triangularity is everywhere emphasized. The synagogue structure has alreadv been photographed and described m Time Magazine, in Architectural Forum and in Life, and in the future probably many other publications, large and small general, architectural and Jewish, will devote flteimor. to it. It was the last building which wnght managed to see completed before his death. 'The interior of the Guggenheim Art Museum in -New York City, which Wright also designed and which has been the subject of many discussions was not completed at the time of the great archill *2TIL; A *** Yort Tmn ** ue ueth Sholom synagogue structure is •more *xuberant than anything Wnght has done in the last thirty years First synagogue to be built at an will be provided at New York Airport. Rabbi A. Alan Steinbach. dent of the New York Board of Rabbiij Isaac Charchat. president of the s)_ sign historic document during Hebrew^. 5719 with Austin J. Tobin, executive d of the Port of New York Authority, has made the prope H y available to board. "When you go into a place of I ship, you ought to feel as il you were in | hands of God." I have visited the new synagogue and hart |_ tremendously impressed by it. I believe it's I most beautiful synagogue in the country Put then I have for many years been an of Wright's art. There are people w ho are ir by it. who find its modern contours too an too harsh. A Zionist leader who saw it cfa ized it to me as a "monstrosity All art—painting. scml p tsr e and music. < weB architecture—is a controversial subject a on which there is a great division of opinion i art connoisseurs. But whether thrilled or repelled one cannot i main indifferent Even those who don't like i shape of Wright's synagogue structure are fa to pay attention to it for a number of And herein lies its great significance for the I of synagogue ai chiteccure, not only in this < try. but in other lands as weB. Since it is so < nal. so different the work of a great growl architecture, of a mas who upon his deati bailed by fellow-architects as an "immortal." "Michelangelo of the Twentieth Century,* architect who swept across the face of the! like some vast force bending both men and i to his wilt" tbe first thing it dees is to avakttj us an interest is the whole subject of architecture, an interest which hitherto has I almost non-existent, though for many yean i we've heen building lavish synagogue Ought synagogues to be built in traditional J modern style? If year answer is traditional f !)K question comes up: Is there really a of synagogue architecture, or were Jews tbe centuries in H-'Mrt their synagofan copying the building styles of their neighbors? The lisiWi—alili I believe, have a better argument if we at least had idea of the architecture of the Temple of I mna. After (he destruction of tbe Temple is silem we tost the design and were Continued on Pas* 7-C MacYiear Wells, rnc Cceapasto BuOdinq Supplies L D. alscVlCAR President '"RANK J. WELLS Vice President BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAH WOAWtlPPtE HOTR Ken Rubin**"'" **?' 4370 COLLINS AVE Miami Beach NEW YEAB GREETINGS TO ALL .. VIRBEV KIKTIONUs 2765 S.W. 27th AVEMDE Phmsw HI 4-SM1 NEW YEAB GREETINGS TO ALL •E UXt III* ORATOR* SG71 BLW. 7* STREET T. OTST Masy Hh%n mi Mmit fniehauf Trailer Cn %  EM6SS 17*1 HW. fed Ai NA 13433 HOLIDAY GREETINGS H. W. MY CO! %  4101 BLWJTm A** HEJJW Florida



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jof, October 2, 1959 + lelsti fhrHltr Page 7-C tabbi's Question Box on Rosh Hashona By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX h do Jew* eo to • watorway on Rosh Hashona .M.rnoon to pray? A m mber of reasons are_ advanced^ this islom Rabhi Jac0D MoeTTnlrUe Maharii) cites Iwell-kniwn Midrash which relates this ceremony •oric episode of the "binding of Isaac."' jfaen Abraham was on his way to Mt. Moriah to Icrifice his son. Isaac, Satan, anxious to prevent En from doing the will of God, sought to hinder k progress. He changed himself into a river kd tried to drown Abraham. Abraham withstood L test and the water dried up. Standing at the bier's edge we remind ourselves of Abraham's Croism and are inspired to abide by the will of Almighty at any cost, thus meriting His for[ and mercy. Some claim that the ceremony is to remind j of Abraham's fidelity. Others claim that the Crpose of going to the waterway to pray was to at the fish. In one opinion this was meant i be a reminder to us that we are like the fish lught in the net of circumstances. Another opinstates that we ask the Almighty to make us ke the fj*h over whom no evil eye prevails and ho increase and multiply profusely. The Shaloh Liar, I .-n.witzi claims that we look at the fish understand that just as the fish always have heir eyes open (having no eyelids) so do we appal to tbe ever watchful eye above to watch over i and have mercy on us in this hour of judgment. do somo Jows shako owt rhoir pockets or tho ends of their armenrs during this eerorrony of TaehUkT According to some this is a means of throwing nbs to the fish thus showing our merciful trait feeding lower animals and expecting the Lord I likewise sustain us in His mercy. Others claim at this is a means of emptying,our souls of hidi sins indicating that man has it in his hands to himself of all of his sins which cling to his The Wright Temple Continued from Pet* e-C Mole to develop a tradition of synagogue buildbg which could be called uniquely Jewish, and •thing else. I Has Frank Lloyd Wright, in designing Beth olom for us, given us some standard, or standrds. for the synagogue architecture of the future? Ithe Mt. Sinai motif the proper one for archikts to follow in designing Jewish religious strucpres? Or the cupped hands of God? iTlien, too, the Wright structure raises anew the [Id question: Should synagogues be built lavishly, ipensively. or simply and inexpensively? My own mwer to this would be: They should be built Imply and inexpensively, unless you can get anIher Frank Lloyd Wright to design them. I If only because it raises these and other quesrns. tlu new structure of Congregation Beth holom, however we may react to it, is of greet Ignificance, and American Jews are indebted to |abbi Mortimer J. Cohen for prevailing upon frank Lloyd Wright to design it ioran tow mvft soul. Some authorities have eliminated this phase of tbe ceremony from the ritual because a number of superstitions have been erroneously read into the ceremony because of it. • • • • Why is it that this ceremony is porformod in tho late afternoon? Rosh Hashona is the birthday of the .world and the birthday of man. Man was created in the afternoon and sinned and was forgiven in the late afternoon. Thus we choose this same time of day to seek our forgiveness hoping that, just as the first man was forgiven at this time of day, so will we be forgiven. Some claim that it is because the afternoon prayer of Mincha was inspired by the Patriarch Isaac who was born on this day. Since it is his heroic sacrifice which is so often mentioned on Rosh Hashona, we place our ceremony at the service which he inspired—that is, Mincha. • • • • Why is Hie ceremony po s tponod until tho second day of Rosh Hashona if the first day falls en tho Sabbath (ao it does this year)? The reason given for this shift is the fear that a person might be tempted to carry his prayer book to the water's edge and carrying anything was forbidden on the Sabbath. Even where there was a surrounding 'Erub, the waterway was usually outside the city and thus afforded no protection of encirclement to allow carrying something on the Sabbath. It is interesting to note that there were a number of authorities who insisted that even when the first day fell on the Sabbath the ceremony should be carried out on the Sabbath. Some of these had in mind the city of Jerusalem where there were water wells within the encircling walls of the city. • • • • Why is MM Biblical narrative describing birth of the prophet Samuel reed en Roeh Hashona? First of all, it is claimed that the Almighty remembered Hannah, the mother of Samuel, and allowed her to conceive on Rosh Hashona. The prophetic portion of the first day of Rosh Hashona recounts her plea and God's answer. We hope that our pleas on this day will likewise be answered affirmatively as was Hannah's. Furthermore, Hannah's prayer served as the model for the regular system of prayer of the Jewish tradition. Prayer is one of the three cardinal means of seeking forgiveness on Rosh Hashona. DESCO POOLS COMMfRCIAt RESIDEWT/Al CONCRETE emm HOCK DESCO BUILDERS, INC. mt ESTIMATES CoO PL 1-1334 621 N.E. I27th Street N. Miami. Ha. SINCERE WISHES FOR A PEACEFUL NEW YEAR F. L. 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t, October 2. 19S9 mideliiwa in the dimensions noted at Mef |V ^e astonished Workmen, mainly anaophiiited Jcwis* immigrants from Yemen and Kur*stan dug and found tBe at ** eMctl y where they ere assuied they would find them. Or. Vtdin wai held to be something of a wit by his diggers until they learned that his forederived from the Bible. Then they held the it of little account, one "which anybody could ive done."' But this episode of finding Solomon's gates hs not the first time Dr. Yadin had put his knowlee of th< ancient world to modern use. In 1949 invadrg Egyptian forces stood astride the lain road leading into Israel from Sinai, blocking End's occupation of the Negev. Gen. Yadin orired Israel planes to scout for signs of a military ad which he knew existed in Roman times. The ad was revealed from the air, and Israel troops oved down it to surprise the Egyptians from the tar. Litts Outstanding Fmds" Today. Dr. Yadin has listed some of the outanding tads thus far at Hazor. He noted the folring as coming from the Canaanite period: 1. The finding of a unique Canaanite temple sort c>J prototype of Solomon's Temple. 2. The uncovering of two additional phases of same temple. In the uppermost phase, the temple in Canaanite Hazor, the expedition nod a clay figurine in Mycenaean style of the century B.C.E. This permitted the Hazor cbaeologjsts to place Joshua's conquest of Cain the 13th century. A broken, basalt statue, i found here, provided evidence that the temple is devoted to the worship of the sun-god. 3. The recovery in the second phase' of the ime temple of one of the finest ortbostats ever in the Fertile Crescent. This was a 5 ft, i m. basalt slab, bearing the relief of a crouching bn with its head fully sculptured. Indications ere thai the orthostat had Men a part of the en%  nce jarr.b of the temple. 4. The recovery in an earlier temple of the ay mode! of an animal's liver, of the sort used ancient diviners, this one bearing omens inribed ir. cuneiform. This Is the only inscribed del found in Palestine, and one of the very few Dm the 15th Century B.C.E. found in the Middle %  st. The find indicates hat the sun-god, god of liver-diviners, was also the god of this earlier iple. 5. The recovery of still a third temple, underbath the first two temples, constructed about 1750 J.C.E. indicating that the spot was held holy for any generations. w* +* %  BKr * 4 £ ^'Irf^ % %  / K jMr hsat**'jj| ^85 lose oeiial view of exposed diggings at ute of Hazor, largest city of ancient Cawn, conquered by Biblical hero Joshua rebuilt centuries later by Solomon. and frC Unique Shofar found at Hazor, fashioned some 3,000'years ago, is blown by an immigrant working at the excavation. 6. The laying bare of a Late Bronze Age city gate, and below it city gates from the Middle Bronze Age. The Late Bronze Age gate was built of huge ashlar (dressed) stones, some of them six feet long. The Middle Bronze works were distinguished by a revetment wall of huge boulders, more than nine feet high and still standing. Together, the formidable defense works represented by these various structures, confirm the Biblical estimate of Hazor as the largest and moat defended city of the country. Dr. Yadin said that the most valuable discoveries in the Israelite Hazor period, along with Ha tor's earliest period, were made on the mound dominating the Hazor site. The Canaanite finds, in contrast, were made chiefly in what must have been the lower city. Israel it* Period Findings The recoveries from the Israelite period included: 1. The finding of two beautiful proto-Aeolic capitals of the type characteristic of the architectural treatment of public buildings in the times of the Kings of Israel and Judah. 2. The finding nearby of the original pillar bases of the capitals—the first time in Palestine archaeology that the original position of recovered capitals has been located with certainty. S. The finding of evidence that before Solomon turned Hazor into a garrison town, but after its destruction by Joshua, there existed a small Israelite settlement, apparently without a city wall. Along with this was found an idolatrous Israelite cult place, such as the Bible notes existed in many parts of the Holy Land during the pre-monarchial period. 4. The sensational discovery, in 1957, of Solomon's city gate, identical with his gates at Meggido and Gezer. Dr. Yadin told the group that in its excavations on the mound, the expedition was able to reach the earliest, and 21st, city found at Hazor. Pottery found here was typical of the Early Bronze Age III (the 26th-24th centuries, B.C.E.). The beginnings of Hazor were thus fixed at about 2,700 B.C.E. Summing up the significance of his findings. Dr. Yadin declared that Hazor has revealed the best picture to date of the material culture of the Canaanites and Israelites in the Galilee. For the first time, too, archaeologists have a clear picture of how a big Canaanite city looks. The diggings also firmly date Joshua's codquest of Canaan as the 13th century. Finally, they shed important light on Biblical Continued on Page 10C BURDA METAL INDUSTRIES, INC Eat. 1948 I Consultants & fnrjtiteecs o* Roll rom Ptodncto M toJ Weather Stripping Roll Forming tTnrhhus Screen Frame Sections Venetian nUnd GuUee | G mg Skip. & HpsrinW %  W. 23nl Street PHONE TUMS43 SEASON'S BEST WISHES m BROWN'S REST HOME 24-HOUR NURSING SERVICE JlMM/fteSeYfMMtf MfJ PIMM M 3-1M1 To Alt m Mmt Hmppg New Yemr STANLEY DRUGS UnW*.tUd+. MM Ffc.fi t-1355 McDonald Air Conditioning, Inc. TRANE AIR CONDITIONING ENGINEERS 241 N.W. 26* Street fvltVonlf rtvi NM Phertt FR 3 7681 GREETINGS FRANK J. ROONEY GENERAL CONTRACTORS SM0 N.E. 4th AVTNUE PL 7-5751 \ FOR REST AND RELAXATION AT TOUR FAVORITE FURNITURE STORE E. B. MALONE MATTRESS CO. TO ALL... GREETINGS ROYALTON HOTEL \W% 131 SE. 1st STREET V MIAMI j "OHM TMt 11 At AtOUHD" 10 AIL A MOST HAW NEW YIAK ... A] KELLERMAN PAINT & LACQUER CORP. UCQUfRS, SYNTHETIC ENAMELS 4* LACQUER TMNMRS ^| 54 NX 73rd Street Pi 1-S441 f TIT AN MOTORS INC DODGE AND PLYMOUTH PJftSEl4feR DODGE "Job-Ralexi" TRUCES SALES and SERVICE PHONE HI 3-7481 8. W. EIGHTH ST. MIAMI 35. FLA.



PAGE 1

Png IOC 7e Om /Heey friends mad Acqwa'mtnces Best Wishes for A Hampy New fern CefBarcf e Im&rnte Eiecrncer Jerrice Marine Electrical Service, Inc. MIAMI FLORIDA !4t0 N.W. 22nd COURT PHONE NE S*S3l >Jmisl>nor*0ar} P^ky. Octobtr GREETINGS T. S. BUDD OPTICIAN 122 S.E. 1st Street Miami Florida mow Ft v-1451 M Andulaski Phone HI 6-0291 Coral Gable* mm FRANK D. WUAAD and FAMHY A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR FOBS EXCLUSIVELY BY P I X T O .'42 Euclid Avenue Phone IE 1 *066 HAPPY NEW YEAR II VM.O\ PL1 MBIXG CO. 729 S. W. 12th Avenua Ft 1-U11 asd FR 1 SJ12 A Happy New Year to All Our Friends and Patrons ABBE VENETIAN BLIND. INC. :! N.W. 19th STREET Miami Phone FR 9-9751 ZIS W. 23rd Street re AU ATLAS SHOT METAL WORKS, INC Phone TU 1-3411 T. Fries* ea tea accesses ef Ike •Wer eer Vrf Coos' Wbaos DR. J. HOLOCN KCKWTTH DR. JACK M. BEOCWITH DR. WtilAM W. ASHLEY — I m cexfTMes re AU tlM'AV\i; CO. ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS es* w.w. nrk AMIM. aiu*^ %  *„,. FR 4,^5, tO ALL GREETINGS Boulevard Floral hardens CORSAGES — CUT FLOWERS ^ %  %  er arm ...Fin lamir Njjl Bjacayisa Boulevard Phone FR 4-5017 VITALYTE BATTERY SERVICE .'•5 SR. fMb STRUT ->,,, n ^ JJU Asee ric e e Dieners CKKTRU rrAMMI emuiTRB ascvhaj she nesst NeRee reei Hen IMS WOVAWrs RESTAI RA.XT n JL U.S. Commissioner of Immigration and NatRecords at United Hias Serrice in New York. I uraliration Joseph M. Swing (left) examines "All over the country new buildings are a few of some one million Jewish immigraing up Who would mink of the dead?" tion files in the Wilhelm Weinberg Hall of in Where Her Synagogue Used to Be Continued from Pi 2-C gants. The children thought the scene very funny and mimicked Mr. B. and his oh-socorrect manner, but 1 could not laugh with them. Where was the proverbial Jewish warmth and the feeling of brotherhood between Jew and Jew? While we were discussing this with my husband, we were wandering aimlessly through the city, when suddenly my eyes alighted on a street name: Silzgasse. Was this not the street where the ruined synagogue was supposed to be? I dragged the family in great excitement up sod down the street, but there was no trace of a synagogue. Finally I stopped an old woman about to eater a shop and asked her where the synagogue used to be "Over there." she waved ber arm indifferently, where the empty space is." And when I looked at her unrstinntngty, she added: they are building* the new block of flats." So we retraced oar steps to the building. which we passed before without recogmtian. there, a— a n g st wee ds and rabble, we found a pitiful remains of a Hsaae of God. A broken 1 a few corne r s to nes that was all. Oh could still see. if yon looked for it. where the mast have adjoined the neighboring building. A sense of desolation swept over me. sack 1 I have not experienced since the day I was I that my family was wiped eat. There, behind 1 a aew building was going ap. the bustle aad I typifying the spirit of rebirth pervading AH However, this was Shsbbos and wo CIK Innsbruck to pray. Se I stood on the place L_ the synagogue used to he sad silent I r reeled I Shemone Eare. Archaeologist's View off Might off Joshua Continued treat Pan* *-C events connected with Solomon. In U4. while first visiting the United States in behalf of the United Jewish Appeal. Dr. Yadin succeeded in acquiring for the Israel government four of the famous Dead Sea Scrolls. This climaxed an episode that has now become one of the great stories of archaeology. The first three scrolls were acquired in 1M7 on Nov 29. the day the UN voted the establishment of an independent Jewish state in Palestine The man who acquired them, and identified them as the oldest known Bible manuscript treasures beyond compare, was Prof. E. L. Sukenik the Hebrew Uni vershy-s first professor of archaeology. Prof. Sukenik was Dr. Yadias father he adopted the Basse Yadin while be served a Haganah. the Jewish u n derground defense font I Palestine. Prof. Sukenik had sought to acquire) seven of the serous, which were found by a I shepherd in a cave near the Dead Sea. 1 regretting that he had been unable to purchase of four of the scrolls, owing to the 1 led times. Seven years Later, a chance ad in the Street Journal revealed to Dr. Yadin. then vi this country, that the scrolls were here sad for sale. In a long, ceaapttx series of neeahsl Dr. Yadin bought she fear scrolls, greatly asfca) the late Samuel Gottesman. philanthropist of P York, who donated the major part of a of a milhoa dollars to pay for them Te AM wreefi-fs ALAN S. BOYD VOITl R.R. COMMISSIONER Wmt Flagler Strt*. Greetings from JiMMiES BEER — WINE Ha—burgers in Tews* Jinunie A Nat 300 S.W. 8th STHECT FR4-9S30 TOAU... amms GUARANTY AND SURETY AGENCY. INC. 4Rf a^CRTRe m* FR 3-574* HAPPY NEW YEAH TO ALL OUR FRIENDS aU CASV Ah Co-arttooi-sg • *** no.



PAGE 1

iiday, October 2. 1959 +Jeisli ncricfton Page 1I-C Hias House in Negev: Home for Expert; Lria Continued fretn Pefe J-C e c T becomes habitable, rodm is created for n ireds of thousands of new immigrants. United Hias Services arc a familiar feature (ountries of Jewish immigration—U.S.A., CanLatin America. In Israel, Hias in its aCCfc n the midst of the immigration waves, followg we II experienced line of personal contact. j; operated a special counselling servicejor th L.Mng advice on migration and emigration probAnd it provided shelter for unattached ini-jgrants—since the settling and absorption auborities of the Jewish Agency and the government ... ted their main attention to immigrant fam. [n those shelters, which during the peak i tae immigration waves numbered 33, over 12,000 ini;le immigrants received temporary accommuJations until they found jobs and were able to icquire homes of their own. Hem* Away from Home But, as it was felt that the future of Israel is In the tfcgev, future activity of Hias was also focused on the Negev. During various discussions, It came up again and again that, due to inadequate Accommodations in the Negev, experts and technicians needed to undertake the research and development work were reluctant to take such assignments. Thus Hias, known for its experience in this field, was approached by the government and the Jewish Agency with the proposition of providing a borne away from home for such experts, technicians and other professionals. The outcome of the discussions is the Hias House in the Negev. This kuge half million-dollar hostel consists of 47 selfcontained apartments—a bed-sitting room, shower kitchenette, with a small refrigerator and a Latuial air-conditioning system. It was devised pv local engineers who took advantage of the winds knd designed the apartments so that they have natural cress-airing. There are a small synagogue, a lounge and hading room, as well as a restaurant. And there I: a library which, when completed, will be unique. %  Vvi ^&. 1 m %  A Kilt il -A ^ Wg^^T-—nlL The Hias House in the Negev is a place hill of life ." Valuable chemical and mineral sources in the Negev have been found by expert geologists. In a new plant near Machtesh Ramon, gypsum-bearing rock is fed into a crusher. Prime Minister Ben-Gurion cuts ribbon opening highway from Elath to Beersheba at ceremonies last year in Yotvata. ". today the Negev is becoming more and more active. The Beersheba-Oron railway line is under construction ." Through the help of the American Katzen fund, the Hais will establish there a special Negev library which, ultimately, should contain every book dealing with the problems of arid zones. This library should also become a kind of Negev Archive, holding reports from all settlements in the Negev, their population and agriculture, their folklore and problems. In the long run this would also become a research center on sociological problems of this Negev melting pot, where there is a merger of the various tribes of Israel that came from so many countries, different in culture and living standards. This library, rhich is in its initial stages, includes already rare books of the first explorers of the Negev, dating hack several hundreds of years, and Are used by the geologists and archaeologists from among the residents of the Hias hostel. "Had it not been for this Hias hostel, we would not have stayed here," said Alexander Trasey, the New Orleans desalination expert who is here with his young wife. The elderly solar energy expert, Dr. Dennies, nodded in agreement, adding quietly in his German-accented English: "There is practically no other place to live here." Majority an Israelis And nobody could blame them for not wanting to stay somewhere else. One cannot expect that an expert, coming from abroad for a relatively short stay of half a year or even one year, should acquire an apartment in Beersheba. Yet he wants to feel at home, and does not want to live in a hotel. One gets this feeling of a home in the small Hias apartments. The expert, technician, scientist, administrator, manager or trasher finds here a piace he can live in and relax, work and read. Each room is equipped with modern furniture, colContinued on Page 13-C HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL MEL • JACK • HERMAN and MORRIS KALER PRODUCE COMPANY 2121 N. W. 13th Avenue Pfcene Ft 44174 It Is Our Pleasure Serving You ALLIED PARCEL SERVICE 5702 N.W. 2nd AVENUE Phone PL 17822 TO ALL GREETINGS PARIS BUILDERS GENERAL CONTRACTING FREE ESTIMATES MO 6-0366 7401 S.W. 69th Court Miami, Florida To All Oroofiiigs JULIAN LANGNER RESEARCH, INC. ECONOMIC CONSULTANT 1105 Congress Building, Miami, Florida BEST WiSHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR from Towne Optical, Inc. 66 N.E. 2nd Street Miami, Florida FR 3-5323 DAILY 9:00 5:30 SAT. Till 2:00 Monday Evt. Till 8:00 REST WiSHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR SPECS TV, RECORD & CAMERA STORE 1566 S. DIXIE HIGHWAY CORAL GABLES FT. LAUDERDALE HOMESTEAD SEASON'S BEST WISHES BYRNES NURSERY General Nursery and Landscaping Stock House Plants £ hurt Trees — Soil by the Bushel or load 2660 S.W. 27th Avenue Phono HI 4-6641 HOLIDAY GREETINGS 10 ALL IMI'l/S TV-RADIO APPLIANCE SERVICE RADIO SERVICE TV SERVICE "Coee* Service It Our Motto" 1117 S.W. 27th AVENUE Phone HI 8 39".7 i""* X9 TF TT" T T N I*"* ^ J. F. STEWART MORTGAGE CO., INC MORTGAGE LOAN DEPARTMENT Room 300 ltt National Bank Building CORAL GABLES. FLORIDA HOLIDAY GKttTINGS TO ALL SUNILAND FLORIST AND SWEET SH0PPE 11353 SOUTH DIXIE nowias roK ALL OCCASIONS CANDLES one PARTY PAPER C
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
October 2, 1959

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01600

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
October 2, 1959

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01600

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text
19 59 ... &Sli JiaMona Edition ... 5 720
'Jewish Floridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKIY
[3 Number 40
Section A
Miami. Florida, Friday, October 2, 1959
Ten Sections Price $2.00
<




Page 2-A
-JmistncrkMan
Friday. October 2,
Greater Miami Ushers in Rosh Hashcna Friday Eve
Greater Miami tnfaen in the Hick Hety Day with evens** semees
Friday. Saturday u the first day at Rash Hashoaa. Services are aha)
scheduled ea the second day. Sunday The Rasa llnheai eeeerraace.
rigmmf the ceasing of the Hebrew New Year. 972a concludes Sunday
evung. Next aanng the perM aPahc way* ef A'
which commences at Kol Xidre serrices on the evening of Oct. 11.
Temple Beth Am. 5960 K Ken-
dall dr.. So. Miami, will bold Fri- -
day evening services at 1.15 p.m., ^
with Rabbi Herbert Banmgard of- f
floating Cantor Charles Kodner
CAMDUUGMtMG TIM
ti Ool &48 P-m.
rtaderi the musical portions of the f
liturgy. Sermon will be "The Re-
newal of Creation." Services on
Che first day of Rosh Hashona.
Saturday, commence at 10 a.m..
with the sermon scheduled *
"Why Have the Jews Survived?" -^'
There will be a special service for __
children in the afternoon at 2 ^Tne Adventure Called Life Sun-
Dm day services are also at
r ^ .. ________- Shofar will be blown at 19:39 a.m.
Rabbi CawJ Hernsuwdl offiev ^ ^ ^^ ^^^ .^^
Friday at :30 p.m. First day of Tenants Emaew 11 17tl Wash
Boah Hashona begins with serv- ington ave.. bmncbed Rosh Ha
Saturday at t a.m. Cantor Hy- shona at services Friday. I IS
Fein and Samuel Grayson pju.. at the Miami Reach Munici-
will chant the liturgy Sermon is pal Auditorium. Saturday services
are at 9 15
Ha
s scheaaaedffor 9 15 aa.
Dr. Itvji? Lehrmaa will officiate
speak on -Eap*oring Inner
Space." Cantor Israel Reich ren-
ders the maricil portions of the
Services Sunday, the see-
. day of Rash Hashona. are at
a:15 and 915 a-m.. with the ser-
"A Coauaaauty Distinct and
." Junior services for
9 to 12 will be in the
s main sanctuary under
the i am nirion of Rabbi Bernard
day of Rosh Hashona services
commence Sunday a8 am., with
the sermon scheduled as "The
Byes of the World are Upon Us."
Shofar services axe at 11 15 a.m.
Rabbi Herman M. Cohen and
Cantor Emanuel Mandel will offi-
ciate at Rash Hashona services of
Dad* lleiphls Jewish Canaranarlan.
MOa* NW 2nd ave.. Friday at 5 30
p.m. Services will be held at 19569
NW 2nd ave. to assure adequate
sea tin? Sermon is "Let There be
Light." Services Saturday
131 a-m.. with (he sermoi
NOW YOU DIAL
FR 3-4605
+ Uist thri-h
OJ7


OAILY PICKUPS TO NIW YORK
M. LIEBERMAN & SONS

fire Proof Constructed Storage Warehouse
655 Collins Ave., Miami Beach
'Teen-Agers Look at Jewish Education" is the topic of a forum
discuasion at the fall meeting of the board of directors of the
Bureau of Jewish Education at the Fontainbieau hotel. Partici-
pating in the discussion, led by Louis Schwartzman. executive
director, are standing (left to right) Alkm Albert. Charles Reiter.
Jack Rabin. Seated are Dorothy Naness, Jo Ana Rubel.
Pamela Beckman.
Acceptance of Gad's WilT win
be the sermon topic of Rabbi Ber-
nard Shoter at set rites ea the first
day of Rosh ntiheai at Fleeter
Mr. 50 NW 51st pi.. Saturday at .
pan. Cansst Fred Bernstem ren-
ders the mmriral Portia of the
liturgy. Services Sunday are at 8
am Sounding of the Shofar will
be at 11:15 am. Sermon is "Which'
m the Coming Year?"
Hashona will be launched'
with Friday evening services at
Teaapia B'ssai Shilim. lsWO NW)
22nd ave, at 8 p.m. Rabbi Sheldon'
Edwards wiO officiate and discuss*
"Who Leads the Blind*" Cantor1
Ben Grossberg renders the musical {
portions of the liturgy Saturday
services commence at 9 a.m. Ser-'
moo is -The Gifts of God." Serv-
ices on the second day of Rosh
Hashona. Sunday, are also at 9
a.m. Sermon is scheduled as "Not
New. but Re-New."
At Temple ThVreth Jacob. 951'
Flamingo Way. Hialeah. Rabbi Leo:
Heim will usher in Rosh Hashona
with services Friday at 7:30 p.m.
Cantor Samuel Levine renders the.
musical portions of the liturgy.
Saturday services are at 8:30 a.m.
Rabbi Heim will discuss "In Thy
Glory." Services Sunday are at *
8:30 a.m.. with the sermon. "Not.
Words but Deeds in the ComJig
Year-
North Dade Jewish Center, 13630
W. Dixie hwy.. will commence the
Rosh Hashona observance with
services Friday at 6:30 p.m. Rabbi
Henry Okolica will officiate and
discuss "A New Year." Cantor
Herman Marchbein Marbiny ren-
ders the musical portions of the
liturgy. Services Saturday are at
8 a.m.. with the sermon scheduled
: as "What Shall We Do Now?"
Cm Saturday. 6:30 p.m.. Rabbi
Okolica will discuss "A World at
Peace." Second day of Rosh Ha-
shona begins Sunday at 8 a.m. Sho-
far will be sounded at 10 a.m., and
the sermon is "The Great Sound."
Rabbi Tibor Stern officiates at
High Holy Day services of Beth
Jacob Congregation, 301-311 Wash-
ington ave.. beginning with serv-
ices Friday at 5:50 p.m. Saturday
services are at 8 a.m. Sermon is
"A Full Measure of Life." Second
ted as "Aa Bad to Evil." Evening
ten ices are at 5:3* p.m.. with the
sirawai "Two Days m One." Spe-
cial children's service is-at 2 p.m.
Second day of Rosh Has boa a com-
with sukta at 8:39 a.m.
Sermon will be "The Shofar Sig-
nal."
At the Hebrew Academy, 918 6th
st. Rabbi Abraham Twersky will
conduct the High Holy Day serv-
ices beginning Friday at 5:45 p.m.
Senke* Saturday are at 7:45 a.m.
and 5:39 p.m. Rabbi Alexander
Gross, Academy principal, will
speak on "Looking Ahead in Edu-
cation." Services on the second <
day of Rash Hashona are 7:45 a.m.
and 5 p.m. Sermon is "A World in
Balance." Tashlich service lot-!
lews.
Meiwicello Park Connrosatian,
law NE 163rd st., ushers in Rosh;
Hashona Friday 5:45 p.m. Serv-
ices Saturday are at 7:30 a.m. Ser-
mon at 10:15 a.m. is scheduled as
"The Cost of Attainment." Rabbi
Max Lapse hit? officiates, with Can-
tor Ben-Zion Kirschenbaum ren-
dering the musical portions of the
liturgy. Services on the second
day of Rosh Hashona commence
at 7:30 a.m. Shofar will be sound-,
ed at 10:15 a.m.. followed by a ser-
mon on "Why Did God Will Life
for Us?" Special children's serv-'
ices to be conducted by Abraham
J. Gittelson, education director, Is-
adore Dickman at North Miami:
Beach Junior High and Sabal and
Palm Elementary School.
Rabbi David Lehrfield will offl.
date at Rosh Hashona sen ices of
Kneseth Israel Cennrenation, Mlj
Euclid ave., Friday at 6 p.m. Sat-
urday services are at 7 a.m.
Sermon is "Two Kinds of MottV
are at|ars." Ob the seconl day of 8^
sched-. Hashona. he will preach on u\
Good Year." Cantor Abraham Saf
renders the musical portions of
the liturgy. Evening services boti
days are at 6 p.m.
Bath Israel Canaa-eaation, m
46th st., will observe Rosh Hasboaa
aa Page 11 A
V$S&
fresanjtiom Specie!isf$
MOW IN TWO MODERN
LOCATIONS
SPAff
re eras
350 LINCOLN ROAD
Phono JE 8-7425
Ave. ftWiieaia*
728 LINCOLN ROAD
Phono JE 84749
OCBUSTS' PtESCRs*TIONS fiil:d
CONTACT LENSES
HAPPY NCW YIAI-S720
STRENGTHEN THE STATE
OF ISRAEL
BUY ISRAEL BONDS
maysmii Ftuteenc je s-4949
1959-60
May the fiew Hear br'm
health and happiness
) \
LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE MOVING TO AND FROM
NIW JUSIY e PHILADELPHIA BALTIMORE
ALBANY a WASHINGTON BOSTON *
PROVIDE NCI end all ethar paints Weakly Service
Dial JE 8 8353 <
.............;
ORKIN EXTERMINATING COMPANY
f
fct Ike privacy and \l
ewM of our loroe rapouna
foomi and in tha dliilngunnad XI
nng of oor iwnUt windowed Chopah- \
Her Mm ultimo)* in comfort and ervios, >
-ov. wifk livarwoa far over 50 yawn.
Riverside i
MIMO'IAI CHAPIL
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
Phon* JE 1-1151
MIAMI MACH
*^r Pwa9fMaBM#y Dfnf)
ItM
West Rosier end 20m Avena*
rtl i-ltl\ /
K 14 HOUR AAARULANCI SIRVICf /
Irvhw llnsharf Aba Eistaaer*
Lorrie S. Iloibtrg, F.D.


October 2. 1959
+JewM>aorSdkn
Page 3-A
TO
THE EDITOR -
leader Says Nikita, Columnist Agree
liiw.
Ipermit
The JtwWi Floridiant
mP to comment on Leo
rticle in The Jewish
i'ln of'sept. 25, on the eve
Z fateful Camp David
lo speak.
Mindlin accuses Premier
of suggesting world
Hi
SUJSt "because it will ere-
Tworld condition "in which
form of society can do no less
M flourish.'
l in make his meaning cryt-
iriwr Mr Mindlin continues in
vein "For the West, contrar-
abandonment of a garrison
mean, in addition
retrenchment, the
government activity
research, medicine,
and a host of re-
nomy must
industrial
ssation of
education,
msine. power
fcd fields"
the
"In
pHshed If the Soviet Premier had
been faced with such questions?'
Would Pfeffer have been brought
back to life? Would the plight of
Soviet Jews have been ameliorat-
ed? Of course Mr. Khrushchev
micht have been embarrassed,
which might have made some sort
of murky point for somebody.
But I believe that most of us
Jews are pretty much like most
other Americans. Wo want peace
for our children and if possible
a little less of the taxes, tensions,
and Strontium 90 that harry us.
And we agree with President Eis-
enhower and Adlai Stevenson
that it does no harm to sit down
and talk with the Soviet Pre-
mier. It might even do a little
And then be sums up
fcol, problem as follows:
^ the Khrushchev peace
total i* declaration of eco-
ic warfare on the Soviet dic-
. own terms, according to
ikh he feels as certain of vle-
M he is sure of universal
at should a shooting war
ak out."
[Now as I understand the above,
\t. Mindlin feels that America's
_j system is such that it needs
and the threat of war to keep
and remain prosperouj,
the Soviet Union can thrive
ily in peace and general disarm-
Mr. Mindlin and Mr.
hrushcbev are thus in pretty
agreement, it seems, that
cialism (or Communism) is a
uperior system to our democratic
fapitalism and will eventually
my us as j result of peaceful
ompetition.
Well, that's all pretty depress-
Mr. Khrushchev comes over
and tells us it's not so, he
esn't believe that capitalism has
have war, and that the Marx-
have revised that particular
tlief of theirs, and we can really
live together in peaceful com-
etition. And now Mr. Mindlin says
bon't believe him, capitalism does
pave to have war.
Just to add to the confusion, Mr.
Hindlin also thinks that Shirley
(acClaine should have stopped
in the middle of that famous
cancan and asked Mr. Khrushchev
oint-btank: 'What about Itzhak
?" It would have been
a sight, all right.
on sober second thought,
what would have been accom-
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
While Wilson & Company at-
tended a meeting of the Beth Din,
ihcy did not consent to make any
changes in their Miami Kashruth
supervision from which they have
had the last several years.
T. O. McMULLAN
Manager
Wilson A Co."
Miami .
But
I don't think that most people
believe that embarrassing Khrush-
chev could serve any useful pur-
pose. Nor that our country wants
war.
Mr. Mindlin concludes that "you
can't do business with the Com'
munisfs." Has he a realistic alter-
native?
I have just had a second thought,
and perhaps Mr. Mindlin's belief
in the inevitability of war is a good
thing after all. For one, it will
once and for all obliterate the
problem of anti-Semitism, since all
anti-Semites will undoubtedly per-
ish. Of course, all Jews will just
as surely perish, but is this too bit;
a price to pav for the kind of
world we want?
RICHARD STILLER
Hlaleah
Retorts Mr. Mindlin: "Mr. Stiller
conveniently half-quotes to support his
own misconceptions. What he does is
to offer up a sandwich composed of
two pieces of bread, while carefully
avoiding the meat between. Thus, he
repeats the paragraphs 'For the West
. .' and 'In effect, the Khrushchev
peace proposal But he forgets the
crux of the observation, which appears
between them: While xne alternative.
the continued accretion of get-emment
programs in these areas of human en-
deavor, in the face of. an abandoned
garrison economy, can do no less than
spell ultimate success to the Khrush-
chev .prophecy that our grandchildren
will lire in a Communist society.' This
is the focal point upon which the
Soviet Premier's peace proposal rests,
it recognizes that Tt-e must finally ac-
ttpt the Khrushchev alternative pre-
cisely because war is unthinkable. It
also recoenizes that in accepting it. in
continuing meticulously to develop a
paternalistic society, we shall he con-
tributing to the creation of a world
order which our traditional laissez-
faire beliefs previously held unthink-
able. What Mr. Khrushchev's pro-
posal did was to spell out his accurate
conception of our dilemma as a rein-
forcement of his friendly challenge to
substitute economic competition for
the threat of war. With respect to the
rest of Mr. StiIIer's conclusions, they
are purely his own and hardly relevant
to the Sept. 25 column."
North Dade Jewish Center sponsors a "Welcome Night" for
new members. Left to right are North Miami Mayor-Elect Ed
Vischi; Rabbi Henry Okolica, North Dade spiritual leader,
who delivered the invocation; Larry K. Nixon, master of cere-
monies; and Stanley L. Cohen, president, who presented the
address of welcome. Mrs. Henry Gilbert also spoke on be-
half of the Center Sisterhood.
Editor, The Jewish Floridian:
I am a Jew. I have been in Mi-
ami for only seven weeks, but
here I have been hurt very deeply.
For the past four weeks, I have
been looking for work in a loan
company, wanting to start at the
bottom and work my way up to
the top.
Up to now I am still unemployed.
I have filled out several applica-
tions for some of the larger loan
companies, but have never re-
ceived any replies. Although my
interviews have been mostly favor-
able, I thought that perhaps
they had gotten someone more
qualified or experienced in that
field.
Today, I went to apply to an-
other loan company. I was inter-
viewed and pasaed two testa
with high grades. Before I filled
out the application, eked M
there was any discrimination
against Jews, as somebody had
recently told me that most of
the loan companies in Miami will
not hire Jews.
htit
... and now AUSTIN BURKE
reseats floridsfs largest and newest selections
for the Teenese Student.
Snort, bosky, or tell hem 13 years end War
AUSTIN BURKE'S own
.Continental Look
Carefully tailored with:
Deeble Side Vents Sllnt Topered Pants
e Hocking Pockets e Ceffed Sleeves
e Snorter Cetaway sockets
New Shipments Dally Continental A Ivy
V .<>
SUITS
rnd.$^Q50 SPORT $2Q50
The manager seemed surprised
at the question and replied that it
did not make many difference to
him. Later, as an after thought,
he phoned his supervisor and said
that he was hiring a bright young
man and had a question to ask
him; did they hire Jews? The re-
ply was that it was the policy of
the company not to hire Jews.
It is hard to believe that in this
day and age job discrimination ex-
ists in an organization that is na-
tionally known. The manager was
as surprised to hear this as I was
hurt, and he hardly knew what to
say. Neither do I.
STANLEY DeLEON
Miami Bech
Educators Name
Rabbi Azulay
Rabbi Shimon Azulay, instructor
at the Hebrew Academy and He-
brew High School, is the newly-
elected president of the Hebrew
Educators Alliance of Greater
Miami.
Rabbi Azulay Is a graduate of
the Teachers Institute of Jerusa-
lem, and also holds a Bachelor of
Arts degree from the University
of Toronto. In Israel, Rabbi Azulay
was associated with the Youth Ali-
yah department of the Jewish
Agency, and was educational di-
rector of a Hadassah camp in
Haifa.
Arriving here in 1M7. Rabbi
Azulay was instructor of Talmud
at the Toronto Hebrew Acad-
emy and director of the Hebrew
Cultural Organization and Camp
Mased. Ho is the author of many
Hebrew articles on grammar,
rhetoric, and Jewish history.
In addition to Rabbi Azulay, the
following were elected officers for
the year:
Honorary presidents, David
Freedman and Rabbi Morris Hor-
FHOTO CREDITS
Included among the illus- -
1 trations in the special sec-
tions of this Rosh Hashona
- edition of The Jewish Florid- .
ian arm photos by the United :
f Jewish Appeal and Israel i:
e Bond Organization. Illustra-
| tive materials by ether no- *
tional and international phil-
anthropic and educational |
I institutions ere els
n,nw i.iw tiiifliHuiiiiwr.ii :'*:in
reprs" f
mmmbI
To Accent Membgrsnip
Mt. Scopus group of Hadassah
will accent membership as the
theme of its meeting at Masonic
Hall. 41 Valencia, Coral Gables,
Monday at 1 p.m.
ovitz; vice president, Nettie Gold-
stein; secretary, Zvi Perach;
treasurer, Saul Porush; executive
board, Avi Kayfe. Isaac Dickman,
Yaakov Safra, Meir Somberg, Ze-
hava Sukenick.
" Tuc-i.. T
r lay nl|
till 9 P M
rJ>' your conven
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MAHVfACTUnnS OF RUBBER STAMPS
CORPORATION SEALS and StfPfUIS
CHARLIE MERZ, Owner
MOW LOCATED AT
613 Mi. 1st Ave. FR 4-1034
I would like to thank my
many friends for their kind-
ness to me during my recent
illness and to wish them and
the entire Jewish'community
a very Happy New Year.
TILLIE SANDLER
mt. end sirs, tni Ssmdhr)
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?24 S.W. 42nd Ave. M
Copyright 1S5S
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**^sjja^^ _Crefcsr. N.f. T,m

v*
i


Foge 4-A
JeHistfkrkMor
ftMay. October 119S| j
OFFICE and PLANT 120 N. Sarth Street
Telephone FR ^4605
Teletype Canunuzucatiaos Miami TWX
MM396
FRED K. SHOCHET
LEOMINDLIN____
Editor and Pubfisber
.1.. hi* uUte EiJilui
, IsffT fcr Tte Jawtafe PtafMlaa
iTm icn. iwk saw. Mtami i. "**- *J*rr' "
i buut Ar I*M. *t Pa* Otfltt of Miami.
S. 1T.
m Jaw.** Uty *
jr/. Miajan tH Jawiafc Taatraa*>
Art. Future S1cata. Wa#*rida Nnri
. Nitwill Eitartal *u. American Aaan. a
||rii laanaa Nrrown. M tfca Flaria'a Praae Aaa.
-
Tto Tialaa FWMiaa do** not rnrante* tfca Kaahrutb
of the Mrca*a4>*r < U mi ta ita eoaaaaBa._____
>iicate an ^
did. as reflected both in Miami and nationally
large number e* new synagogues and JewLT ^
ten. as well as in the increase in levels -
education for children and adults.
Studies in addition seemed to
creased willingness on the part of Amerk
to stand up and be counted among the ranks n,"
seemed to be less* timidity about Jewish idenffi
tion with the integration issuealthough this *
hare been because the outrageous bombing
synagogues poefcmarking the previous year J
5719 aenerally untouched.
tUSIC'lTION
ISRAFI. BITREAU
M A. D. Gerdes Street, Tel Anc.
AY U. BINDER ______________
RATH
generally
Thus, while the- process of Jewish
cultural ds.
Volume 33
Number 40
Friday. October 2.
29 Dul 5719
1969
of Wish
aj<* Jewish
Vibrant Jewish Community Greets New Year
The Hebrew Year 5719 will, in'a matter of a few
hours, become another page of history. The dawn
c: a New Year is upon us. The events mat shaped
the past 12-month period are complex in their de-
tail. They had an impact on Jewish communities
throughout the world.
One of me biggest stones to come out of 5719
was the sudden exodus of Rumanian Jewry. With-
out warning, this Iron Curtain country octet ed its
Jewish rrftzens the opportunity to migrate to Israel.
Families previously separated by an imper-
sonal Communist regime when Rumania cut off im-
migration to Israel years before with the same swift-
ness and unpredictability as it resumed it once
cgain during 5719. were now rsnscmled with the
possibucy of reunion.
For American Jewry, this meant added respon-
fbiKty in a Rescue Fund campaign financed by the
United Jewish Appeal with an attendant share in
'-ZB responsibility filtering down to the individual
Jewish communities throughout the nationas it
did to Miami and its Combined Jewish Appeal
-which in 1959 gathered a record S 1.800.000 to sup
port the Rumanian immigration. Israel generally,
c host of other organizations, and our own local
cgeucies.
* *
THE FATE Of SOVIET JEWRY
If Rumania was a dramatic occurrence during
j:e past Hebrew Year, events in other lands under
Communist domination were no less important. The
single most stirring story found itself written in the
Exciting among events in Jerusalem was the de-
bate between outgoing president Philip Klutznick
and the Prime Minister of Israel. For the first time,
an American Jew took the opportunity publicly to
defend the status of Diaspora Jewrylong a favorite
target of David Ben-Gurian. Make no mistake,
Khitznick told the citizens of Israel, the American
Jewish community was not some kind of strange
animal existing in a twilight world. It was vital
philosophically as well as philanthropicaily.
It would be a tragic error, he warned, for Is-
raelis to expect American Jews to migrate en masse
to Israeland to conclude that American Jews are
not Jews if they fail to do so. But to back up Klutz-
nick's words of warning was little at the Jerusalem
convention by way of conviction. Less than would
be desired came from its deliberations to strengthen
the assertion that the American Jewish community
is a vital philosophic force.
This sad impression equally marked the WJC
assembly in Stockholmas it did the national con-
ventions of Hadassah. the Zionist Organization of
America. Pioneer Women, and ORT in such motor
American cities as New York. St Louis, Washington
and Cleveland. For the fundamental emphasis was
on three issues: the fate of Soviet Jewry, the princi-
pal of freedom of passage in international waters,
and philanthropy.
There is no denying the significance of each.
Yet important as they are, none strengthened the
Klutznick assertion mat the American Jewish com-
munity is shifting some of its emphasis from these
repeated assertion that Jewish cultural and religious areas of its principal vitality to areas encompassing
life was being systematically strangled by Soviet traditional Jewish culture.
rule. This finding was corroborated again and again But if the conventions did not, events generally
cy auiiontatrve reports and observations. A
major effort during 5719 thus directed itself
toward achieving liaison between free world
Jewry and Russian authorities in an effort
to secure a clearer picture with respect to
the fate of the Jewish community there.
The unique achievement in this regard
was the meeting during the past Hebrew
Year in Washington between top leaders of
lbs American Jewish Committee and Anas-
tas Mikoyan. one of the Communist Big
Three, en the occasion of MJroyan's visit
here. Mikoyan. like Frol Kozlov. second in
the Russian triumverate. who came to the
U.S. several months later, denied the re-
ports and observations. If Jewish cultural
and reLgious life in the Soviet Union seemed
to be en the wane, he declared. it was a mat-
ter of personal choice maim by the individ-
ual Soviet Jewish citizen. "Some of my best
friends." Mikoyan noted unoriginaliy. "are
Jews or married to Jewish "girls."
Less willing to discuss the situation, but
more ginger in his comment was Premier
rOirusLcnev, who graced the naton with a
visit on the eve of Rosh Hashona 5720. Jews
in the Soviet Union, he told the National
Press C.ub, "hold c place of high honor."
caaing that they played principal roles in
the development of the Russian moon rocket
More than this, be did not care to say
;ring later in San Francisco comment by
top American labor leaders, among them
Waher Reuther, who quest: c Premier
with respect to the status of the Soviet Jew-
^^"S?" Nor wa* thia a general reflection
of Mr. Khrushchev's singular failures to hit
it off with our union officials. For. at year's
despite the USSR's earlier sendoff to a
gnifjeant cultural event like the recently-
rnc*ed 100th anniversary of t
Sholem Aleichem. Jews in Russia still
carriec Heritmcaticn papers stamped "Jew.
* *
k% DEFENSE OF DIASPORA JEWRY
National convention time dotted the final
days of 5719. Heading the list were two ma-
,riWfrid Sobering*. B'nai B'rith met in Jeru-
salem at the height of the summer, while the
World Jewish Congress followed up with an
"-emery of its own in Stockholm.
semination took an upward swing in developing!
the vocal accent remained on other areas
identificationas the conventions
organizations indicated.
But what of 5720. the year ahead, on this eve d
Rosh Hashona? We begin a New Year in the shade*
that we were unable to meet with Premier Khnsk
chev to discuss the fate of Soviet Jewry; that Israeli
Ambassador to the U.S.. Abba Ebon, has resigned
to seek political office In his homeland; that Ge
many, on the 20th anniversary of her launchina d
World War II, now believes Hitler's sole mistake
was to lose; that Egypt continues her threats of-an.
nihikttion of the Jewish State; that riots rocked the
Jewish State in a blasting charge by North African
immigrants of discrimination against them.
* *
MEETING THE CHALLENGE Of TOMORROW
The Jewish community of Greater Miami has id
ultimate impact on all of these issues in the manner
in which it meets these and other issues culturally
and philanthropicaily. The Combined Jewish Ap-,
peal of 1960 has a double challenge: to better the
SI.800,000 achieved during 5719; and to do so in the
face of the widely-regretted announcement several
weeks before Rosh Hashona that Federation execu-
tive director Dr. Benjamin Rosenberg would resign
in November to assume a new position in Boston.
The Greater Miami Israel Bond committee re-
gards with pride its achievement on the occasion of
the last High Holy Days, when Miami was first in
the nation in percentage increasewhile striving to
maintain the pace for the year ahead.
Similar progress is the anticipation of our local
agencies: Mt Sinai Hospital. Greater Miami Jewish
Community Center, Jewish Family and Children'i
Service, Bureau of Jewish Education, Jewish Home
for the Aged. Jewish Vocational Service, and Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women.
____As the Hebrew New Year 5720 dawns, we ob-
serve a vibrant Jewish community in Miami and
throughout the nation ready and willing to meet
the challenge of tomorrow.


adBy.Odobgg.19S>
Jenisti ncrkHon
Pag 5-A
BABBI CHAIM IARMNSEY
Rav Hamachhlr lvw Wfw

VT
RABBI HENRY B. WERNICK
Executive Director
Wl nsiw? ipnKon nineon ijn
(AirW /TasAras Association Of Greater Miami, Inc.
1587 WASHINGTON AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
"L'SHONO TOVO TIKOSAYVy V'SICHOSAIMU L' ALTER L'CHIM TOVIM UL'SHOLOM."
The United Kashrus Association of Greater Miami
extends to the Jewish Community of Greater Miami
and to KLAL Israel our sincere wishes for a very Happy,
Healthy and Prosperous New Year replete with spirit-
ual fulfillment.
RABBI CHAIM KARLINSKY,
RAV HAMACHSHIR
My sincerest wishes for a Happy, Healthy and
Prosperous New Year to our Rav Hamachshir, to our
President, Hyman Zaidman, Vice President. Norman
Kaplan, Recording Secretary. Herman Dale, to all the
Members of our Board, and the entire membership of
the United Kashrus Association, and the entire Jewish
Community.
RABBI HENRY B. WERNICK,
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
In behalf of the United Kashrus Association, I offer
a hearty BOACHEM L'SHOLOM to our beloved Rav
Hamachshir, Rabbi Chaim Karlinsky, to all of our mem-
bers, sponsors, business associates, and to all of the
Jewish Community in Greater Miami.
I am grateful for the cooperation of our friends that
have helped us establish a proven efficient Kashrus
system that sets high standards for our community.
Again we pledge to you under the United Kashrus
Association the strictest Kashrus and quality of our
products.
HYMAN ZAIDMAN.
PRESIDENT
Happy Hew Tear to AH Our Friendt and Customer!
CROWN KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY
1122 15tH Street JE 1-*5W
May T*u Hat* a Healthy and Happy Hew Tear
COLUNS KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY
7449 Collins Avenue UN 6-2955
Best Wishes for the Hew Year to All
CORAL WAY KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY
1741 S.W. 21 t Straet HI 3-1383
May the Hew Year be Filled with Happiness for You
COMMUNITY KOSHER MEATS & POULTRY
525 41 si Street JE 1-7*91
Hew Tear Greetings to All
DADE KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY
153 N.W. 5th Str**t FR 3-1430
Happy Hew ye to ^j Our Friends and Customers
EU A HELEN'S KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY
630 6th Street JE 4-253*
May Tou Have a Haalthy and Happy Hew Year
K. GROSS KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY
1447 Pennsylvania Avu JE 1-70*0
Be*t Wishes for the Hew Year to All
HABER'S KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY
112 Normandy Drive UN 6-5223
May the Hew Year be Filled with Happiness for You
HERMAN'S KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY
1053 Washington Avenue JE 19008
Hew Yedr Greetings to All
S A K KOSHER MEATS & POULTRY
243 Collins Avenue JE 1 7861
Happy )$tw Year to All Our Friends and Customer!
JACK'S TROPICAL KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY
1325 Washington Avenue JE 1-12*7
May Tou Have a Healthy and Happy Hew Year
KAHLENBERG'S KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY
MM 6th Street JE 8-4577
Best Wishes for the Hew Year to Alt
KAPLAN'S KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY
1447 Dr.xel Avenue JE 4-2929
May the Hew Year be Filled with Happiness foe You
KATZ'S KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY
189* S.W. 8th Street FR 1-38*9
Hew Year Greeting? to All
KAY'S KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY
1041 Washington Avenue JE 1-3496
Happy Hew Year to All Our Friends and Customers
MURRAY A ITZ KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY
953 Washington Avenue JE 34)221
May Tou Have a Healthy and Happy Hew Year
ROYAL KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY
5937 S.W. 8th Street MO 74733
Best Wishes for the Hew Year to All
RUBINDALE KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY
2101 Corel Wey HI 3476*
May the Hew Year be Filled with Happiness for You
S. A M. KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY
810 S.W. 22nd Avenue HI 3-7743
Hew Year Greetings to All
MALTER'S SUNSHINE KOSHER MARKET
43* Collins Avenue JE 1-5583
Happy Hew Year to All Our Friends and Customers
SOL'S KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY
7446 Collins Avenue UN 6-6226
Hew Year Greetings to All
SOL MALTER'S KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY
957 Washington Avenue JE 8-1539
NORMAN KAPLAN,
VICE PRESIDENT
May Tou Have a Healthy and Happy Hew Year
PHIL'S KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY
613 Collins Avenue JE 2-2135
Best Wishes for the Hew Year to All
NEW DEAL KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY
13*2 N.E. 163rd Street Wl 5-2512
Hew Year Greetings to All
WEINER'S KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY
1332 N.E. 163rd Street t Wl 7-7443
Happy Hew Year to All Our Friends and Customers
BEACH FOOD CENTER KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY
1419 Weshington Avenue JE 1-3418
May the Hew Year be Filled with Happiness for You
KOSHER CATERING FOR ALL SIMCHAS
GORDON A PONT
170 N.W. 5th Street FR 9-7996
y^ew Tear Greetings to All
MIDT0WN KOSHER MEATS A POULTRY
523 41st Street JE 1-1396
Kosher Meat Packing Hovsns A Poultry .
Dealers Unit Out Strict Supervision
Hew Year Greetings to All
GE0. LAZARUS A SON PACKING CO.
May Tou Have a Healthy and Happy Hew Year
WILSON A CO
Best Wishes for the Hew Year to All
HARRY'S UVE POULTRY
2011 S.W. 3th Street FR 3-4232
May the Hew Year be Filled with Happiness for You
ADLER'S LIVE POULTRY
1832 S.W. 8th Street FR 4-2279
Hew Year Greetings to All
CARMEL KOSHER POULTRY INC
JE 1-3418 JE 1-0343

MASHGICHIM REV. DEUTSCH. REV. SAFRA. REV. MOSCOWITZ
SHOCHTIM REV. SHAPIRO. REV. SCHECHTER. REV. HECHT


Pcne 6-A
-Jenlst FIcrkMan
J'ridoy. OctoUr

Golda, Zeineddine
In Hot Suez Exchange
UNITED NATIONS JTA -
Mrs. Golda Meir. Israels Fore.cr.
Minister, opened Israel's figh: in
the I arises here against
the United Arab Republic
of The Sun Canal with the
thai the ON could bring peace to
the Middle East by msisaar, oa la.
rari's right to freedom of aavtga-
tjon is the waterway.
la aa address to tine General A*
sembiy. Mrs. Meir also warned
accept "a szmaDoa ia which she
is singled oat for iOegal discnmi-
nauon-'" She added Israel
tkat the UAt
claim ef "an altaaed stats af
war" wrlfc Israel as tfie basis far
the blockade was irvadmtssabie'
under the \JM iha*ai and that
'1t*s os-caHed state of war" had
"z. The piinaple af respect for
the political inih piidaarf and ter
rtforial Jamil Rj of afl states in
tV regiea.
"3 The principle that J.asli. ,
mast he settled be aaeuV me*"s
ia accordance w:th the Charter."
Ererrisaie h: of rer.lv'"
Farad Zeseed'ine. of Syria. Deputy
Foreign Minister of the 1
Arab Bepabbc deiirered a 15-min-
tle speech attackinc Mrs. Meir. as
ell as Israel and Zionism. He
char."ed that Mrs. Meir had pre-
seated "an ambiguous and con
the OH -,ue!T ea, r. J^^1* U^ If't^ Sf
Z \l ^^^ v-=> i c*. prohlna which, he said, had been
stua,lcB -created by ZkarsaT and wa's
made possible by British colonial
bayonets."
T-e UAR delegate said that
the entire Zionist concept is
"based up an racial and relieteus
discrimination" and "breeds tr-
t -Semrhsm." Ha accused Mrs.
Meir of ctatwaj "many things
which unfortunately are con-
trary to the fact." He alleged
that in citing a warlike state-
ment by President Nasser of fha
UAR. Mrs. Meir was telling only
a "part of the truth" because
Nasser was only replying to a
similar statement made by Is-
rael's letiied Gen. Moshe Oayan.
He told the Assembly that, while
the UAR was at present widening
arid deepening the Suez Canal, "for
the benefit of navigation" these
benefits would not be provided "at
the expense of the Palestine refu-
or of Israeli aggression."
Meanwhile, the Egyptian press
and radio launched a violent at-
tack on Secretary of S'ate Chris-
tian A Herter this week because
of ihe Secretary's appeal at the
: Nations for freedom of.
transit in the Suez CanaL
The important newspaper, Al
Ahra*n of Cairo, declared that
"Israel will never pass through
the canal." ft said: The ban is
not caemecrvo wttn troeoom ot
navigation throtrah the canal,
but with the Palestine issue.
Egypt banned Israeli navigation
even when British occupation
forces were camping on the ce-
net's "
President Eisenhower displays his famous grin
as be receives the B'nai B'rith President's
Medal from Label A. Katz. head of the organ-
ization. Participating in the White House cere-
mony are Maurice Bisgyer, of Washington
D.C.. B'nai B'rith executive vice president md
Mrs. Charles D. Solowich. of Detroit nresiHo-
of B'nai B'rith Women. H We*
B'nai B'rith Gives Eisenhower Top Award
The "bellicose" attitude and ac-
tivities toward Israel of the Arab
countries "have Taken on new and
ominous iorm. she said, adding
that "Arab voices calling for war"
were in "harsh discord" wish DM
efforts to preserve peace.
Getting down to specifics. Mrs.
Meir told the Assembly that 330
shops, belonging to 21 different
countries, were on the Arab black-
Noting that for reasons best
known to himself. President Nas-
ser of the FAR had resumed the
blockade only in the last \
moBths. Mrs Meir said that Suez
canal interference in that ume had
involved the interests of 10 coun-
tries Ceylon. Denmark. We>t
Germany. Hong Kong. Japan. L.
bena. Malaya, the Phi ..prunes.
Switzerland and the United States.
In reviewing the international
rules on free passage in the ca
sal. Mrs. Men- cited the Constanti-
nople Convention of 1888. the UN
Sec. ncil resolution of 1951
and of MS6 She also cited P-
dent Eisenhowers pledge that
FAR interference "should be
firmly dealt with by the societ>
of natio-
WASHJNGTON B'nai B'rith
honored President Eisenhower last
week for his "positive efforts for
world peace on freedom's terms
peace with justice and dignafy."
B'nai B'rith president Label A.
Katz, of New Orleans, presented
Mr. Eisenhower with the B'nai
B'rith President's Medal, the or-
ganization's highest award, in a
ceremony at the White House.
Mr. Kara told the President
that the medal, inscribed "For
Peace and Humanity/' was voted
him by B'nai B'rith in recogni-
tion of "consistent and determin-
ed deeds to advance the peace
of the world while preserving the
dignity and strength of our na-
tion, and its leadership of the
free world."
"We applaud jsou for your moti-
vationsto seek avenues of under-
standing that can ease the tensions
of the cold war. inspire an endur-
ing peace and convert the nuclear
triumphs of science exclusively for
the betterment of humanity," the
' B'nai B'rith leader said.
Participating in the ceremony
were Maurice Bisgyer. of Washing-
ton, D. C, executive vice president
of B'nai B'rith. and Mrs. Charles
D. Solovich. of Detroit, president
of B'nai B'rith Women.
ADL Chief Raps Khrushchev
For Manipulation of Prejudice
NEW ORLEANS (JTA) The address by James P. Mitchell, Sec-
"evasive answers" given by Soviet I retary of Labor, denouncing big-
She condemned constant war-
like statements emanating from
the Cairo Radio and from Nasser
one ft* efforts of the Arab
League Bo>iot1 Committee,
which she said a Hoc ted no* only
Israel but also many states and
of firms
She expressed appreciation
UN sfJMai at ggloi the
but noted that they had sa far
wr-bnu: awaiaL" She called a
UN to see to it that all member the canal
BfJRaa ttBMrvi Rasa* UK sxanci- ajajRaa ;>;
A radio broadcast from Cairo
r-habeneed Herter. British For-
M-cretary Selwyn Lloyd, and
all Zionist agents" to prove that
the United Arab Republic restnc-
than Israel The newspaper Ash
Shah said
"Ta allow Israel to pass throueo
isneuat to a rer-
tfce so-called state of
psa
; The prmrxple that a* aa
her state a entitled to claim or
erase rights af war. whether
zmt rferencf w.-th the freedom
ahippinf or by
or any other means
is accomplished
af usurped Pal
and the
sly one of ref-
thing longed for by Zion
aajpenabsm. and the Arabs'
BOSH HASHONA GREETINGS TO
ALL OUR FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS
MR. and MRS. HTMAN ZAIDMAH
DADE KOSHER MARKET
Premier Nikita Khrushchev to
questions about the -status of So-
viet Jews showed that "his re-
gime persists in the old Russian
government practice of manipu-
lating anti-Semitic prejudice when-
ever it servo political expedien-
cy." Henry Edward Schultz. na-
tional chairman of the Anti-Defa-
mation League of B'nai B'rith,
said here at a d.nner honoring La-
bel A Katz. international B'nai
B'nth president.
More than 600 guests attended
the dinner which also heard an
Youngsters Score
In Unique Meet
Six young people from Dade
county were informed this week
that they had won first places in
a unique international athletic
meet which was conducted by air-
mail under the auspices of the Na-
tional Jewish Welfare Board.
The local winners were sponsor-
otry. The address was delivered
for the Secretary of Labor by his
assistant George Lodge, since Sec-
retary Mitchell was detained in
Washington by the White House
talks on the steel strike.
Mr. Katx said that "positive
progress" is being made in inter-
group relations in the South
year after year. The dinner in
his honor was tendered in con-
nection with the annual execu-
tive committee meeting of the
Anti-Defamation League held at
the Roosevelt Hotel here.
Mr. Katz told President
bower that the award to hi
been decided before announ
of the Khrushchev visit. He i
"We are. therefore. parac_
pleased to hae the opportunity g|
this time to advise you that _
B'rith endorses your actions of |
viting Premier Khrushchev
and accepting a reciprocal i
Don to visit the Soviet Union Ticstl
are acts of calculated risk ft*]
demonstrate the bold judgmeat ]
and creative leadership that ta>]
search for enduring peace rs]
quires.
"We ere confident that your
actions and motives in Hit
change af visits are further cs
firmation of your continued tf-
farts far world peace."
The B'nai B'rith group said tatr]
had also discussed with Presided]
Eisenhower the concern of Ameri-j
can Jewry with the status of Jen]
in other parts of the world.
The President, they said, thank- j
ed B'nai B'rith for its support tf
the reciprocal visits between Mr. j
Khrushchev and himself.
"He told us it Is gratifying that
| the people know what he it trying j
to accomplish in these meetings
between heads of government,"
' Mr. Katz said.
ftlosaWf Gets License
Jewish leaders in the South were
told at the meeting that they
should not fear taking a "positive
stand" on the segregation issue
and should
"violence against synagogues."
Mr. Schultz emphasized that
anu Semitic activities "have had
little effect upon traditional
friendly attitudes toward Jew* ia
the South." Benjamin R. Epstein,
executive director of the League,
predicted that exclusion of Jews
ed by the Greater Mum, Jeh by college fraternities "will virtu
Coma.un,ty Center, and they com- ally disappear as an official prac-
peted against boys and girls of Uce" in two years
waular age from Centers in other ________'
parts of the United States. England ft,-., ci-a. o. A
and Canada. All of the contests Ue"ws 5'" CC*
were held in the various' home
communities, with standard tun
Larrie Blasbere. Sky Lake, Nf.
Miami Beach, was this ueek noti-
fied that he has passed his state
: board examinations and is now I
licensed funeral director.
Busberg. a graduate of auial
, Beach Hi eh School and the Univer-
sity of Miami, is also a licensed
embaJmer. He is an executive wsj
the Riverside Memorial Chapels
not be influenced by chain, and the fourth generation of
his family in the busine>- His fa-
ther, Irving Blasberg. is presides*
of Riverside Memorial Chapels. As
uncle. Charles Boaenthal. now in
his Ms and still active in the or-
ganization, is Riverside founder.
f^~^*^*WW^
FLAGLER-GRANADA
JEWISH COMMUNITY.CENTER
50 K.W. 51st PLACE
HICH HOLY DAY SEATS IN OU NEWLY
AIR CONDITIONED AUDITORIUM MOW AVAILABLE
OfTICIATDK*
Rabbi Rrrnmrd
amd i tint or Frrd Rermntrin
*w fwrtWr kdmm*im Cfaf M 44547
1
(
;
]
1
First seminar of the DernocratJe
devices used and d^wwliSS^'TtSri D,d.
through the national office. SSa. !. li^ri*1-S,n,r-,y d
usner:. Sunday at the Deauville hotel. Sub-
First place winners on the local **' <* the seminar will be Fund- i
lae-yard dash; Felice Sussman.
Peamy Goldman. Harriet Newman
and Madeline Mirrow. 220-vard re-
lay team; Sharon Price. so-yard
dash.
The local competiuoa was su-
pervised by Herbert L. Jacobaoa
physical education saperrtsar of
the Center's Miami Branch.
O'NEAL
BLOCK & SEPTIC TANK CO.
grnc TANKS
mSJALLATHmS
RarAfta
UcatiM
1927
ISM N.W. tftfa Street
NEM431
AwVr NfjfjRSaw* H Meet
Avna group of Hadassah will
meet Monday. l; p.m.. Tem
He Beth Am. 3KD No. Kendall dr
So ~
HIALEAH CONVALESCENT HOME
Do Not Accept a Subrtituaa for TOOT Senior OawJB
MfcHBawaawSl
14-Hr. Licensed Nurses
195 WEST 27th STKET NtALEAJi aORIDA
Tall TI S-63
YRTitRrW


lrriday.Qctober2'1959
>k*UI Ihjklim
Page 7-A
Community Council in Joint Plan
KEW YORK (JTA) A joint
I nlin for coordinated action on
Wish communityrelations,prob^
i,ms adoptedT>y six majW'TCwW
Irganizalions and 48 local Jewish
I founcils, was announced here this
week by the National Community
Relations Advisory Council, the
coordinating body of the 54 Jewish
| groups.
The plan sets forth coordinated
I programs designed to protect re-
ligious freedom- fosier good inter-
relieious relationships; counter
Arab promganda; promote* public
understanding of America's stake
in preserving peace with Justice
and stability in the Middle East;
protect the rights of American
citizens against discriminations
imposed hv Arab states; advance
qual rights and equal opportuni-
ties for all without regard to re-
ligion, race, color or national ori-
gin; liberalize U. S. immigration
policies and provide more effective
refugee aid; defend the Supreme
Court acainst efforts to discredit
it; and increase the effectiveness of
Jewish community relations work
generally.
The six national organizations
affiliated with the NCR AC irt
tht American Jewish Congress,
Jewish Labor Committee, Jewish
War Veterans of the U.S.A., Un-
ion of America Hebrew Congre-
gations, Union of Orthodox Con-
gregations of Amerlta, and Uni-
ted Synagogue of America.
W,hile noting an increase in anti-
Semitic agitation and distribution
of hate literature, "especially in
some parts of the South as bigots
sought to exploit tensions over the
desegregation controversy," the
plan concludes that the appeals
were almost universally disregard-
ed and rejected and that overt anti-
Semitism continued at a low ebb.
"Intrusions of religion upon the
public schools" were major cause*
of interreligious conflict, the plan
asserts. Sunday closing laws are
cited as another source of conflict
among religious groups during the
past year.
Noting that a 1958 federal "hu-
Rabbi Twersky
Will Officiate
Rabbi Abraham I. Twersky will
conduct the Rosh Hashona and
Yom Kippur services at the He-
brew Academy, B. I. Binder, pres
iderrt, revealed Wednesday.
Rabbi Twersky announced that
the services will be rendered gra-
tuitously in honor of the more
than 300 students of the Hebrew
Academy. A descendant of the fa-
mous Chassidic dynasty, Cherno-
bel and Trisk, Rabbi Twersky has
conducted services in leading con-
gregations in Poland, England and
Argentina.
Rabbi Twersky is former opera-
tor of Uie strath Haven, hotel in
Miami Beach.
Airline Inaugurates Service
Northwest Orient Airline B
inaugurated service from Miami to
Atlanta on Sept. 27, John H. May
Northwest's district sales man
ager here, said Wednesday. At the
same time, May announced that
Northwest is adding a fifth daily
'Eht northward to Chicago and
other p0inu on Northwest's sys-
tem. *
10NG DISTANCI
MOVING
mane slaughtering" law explicitly,
defined the Jewish religious meth-1
od of slaughter as humane, the
plan calls for inteffsTTlcation of,
public educational activities to
spread knowledge of the humane-
ness of the Jewish religious meth-
od of slaughter.
The report comments with
gratification on the growth of
frlondty relations between the
United Sfltoilnd" Israel, and the
extension of Israel's diplomatic,
commercial and cultural rota
tlone with new Asian and African
states and call for continuing
efforts to foster public under-
standing in the United States of
this nation's stake in the estab-
lishment of a just end stable
peace in the Middle East, and
for effective counteraction of
false Arab propaganda here.
Declaring that the Executive
Branch of the U.S. Government
"continues to acquiesce" in the im-
position by Arab governments of
discriminations against United
Slates citizens because they are
Jews, the plans calls for "continu-
ing remonstrances."
The plan pledges educational ef-
forts by Jewish organizations to
increase public understanding of
the need for revisions in U. S. im-
migration policies, especially re-
placement of the national origins
quota system
* oil points in the country
"J'MATES CHEERFULLY
GIVEN WITHOUT CHARGE
LINES, INC.
2136 N.W. 24th Avenue
Ml 5-64-6 MIAMI
Celebrating Our 25th Year
V\rf ["//


-
Dade Federal Savings, now entering its second quarter-century of
service to Dade County, will soon pass another great milestone as its
main office moves to its beautiful home, corner of Flagler and First...
Watch For The Big Move!
Open or add to your savings
account by the
10th
and earn dividends from the
MeeeWftote
%

Per Annum
Savings accounts are insured to
$10,000 by the Federal Savings and
Loan Insurance Corporation, an
agency of the Federal government.
.iVii
." "One of the Nation's
Oldest and Largest
eral
AVINGS and LOAN ASSOCIATION of MlAMI
JOSEPH M. LIPION, President
'f
**#!
5 CONVENIENT OFFICES SERVE DADE COUNTY
D. I. Fed.
D.,,i. I-
Dad Federal
:
Present Mais Off ice
45
N.E.Ut Avenue
Mapattah Branch North Miami Branch Tamiami Branch Eases Center Branch
...-. i iota ioai sunn
1400
12370
1901
5800
N.W. 3fh Sfreef N.W. 7th Avenve S.W. $th Sfreef N.W. 7th Avenue
I _
RESOURCES EXCEED 138 MILLION DOLLARS
ti.


Page 8-A
+3eist norHton
Friday- October 2.
1959
JO A Nmks Sm. far. Dkecfr
NEW YORKLouis Wernick has I
bees appointed Southern regional'
firector of the Joint Detente Ap-j
peal, it wa announced by O. Roy I
Chalk, national chairman of JDA.
In his capacity as Southern region-
al director. wrniick wiD interpret'
the many sided programs of the'
JDA agenciesthe American Jew-
ish Committee and the Anti-Defa-
mat.on League of B'nai B'rith.
Richard N. Bluestein (cenlox:. assistant to Dr.
Abram L Sachar. president oi Brandeis Uni-
versity, addressed the first meeting of the
Brandeis University Club of Greater Miami on
Sunday. Left to right are Mortimer E. Wien.
treasurer; Dr. Stanley Frehling. president: Sid-
ney M Schwartz, financial secretary; and
Harold Turk, first vice president. Mrs. Sidney
M Schwartz, honorary president of Greater
Miami chapter. National Women's Committee
of Brandeis University, holds Lite Magazine
reprint of the university's internationally-re-
nowned Catholic. Jewish, and Protestant
chapels.
Poll Feels Mapai Will Gain New Strength
JERUSALEM opinion indicated this week that the dominant Mapai was likely to in-
crease its strength in the November elections for a new Knesset. Is-
rael's Parliament, while the right-wing Herat may gain less than antic-
ipated. Both predictions conflicted with widely-held opinions to the
ccntrary.
lie poll, which also indicated a
pSMftfc loss of votes by the left- ttrtmt 4.7 and |j Mapam 7.3 and
parties, was conducted by the aj; Communists 4.5 and 2-2;
ir >pendent daily. Haaretz. which Progressives 4.4 and 7.4.
q tive voters. Political observers considered
the figures on Mapai. Herut. Gen-
eral Zionists, Progressives and
Communists whose voters are
distributed uniformly throughout
Israelas more reliable than the
findings for Mapam. Achdut Avo-
dab* and the Religious Parties
whose concentrations in collective
and Orthodox sections might cause
a slanting in the poll results.
The pace of campaigning for the-
November national elections for
as re-
Tne newspaper listed
percentages of the parties in the
cctgoing Knesset with the pell
results: Meaei TLk and 31.6;
Achdut Avod 1.2 and 5.4; Relig-
kus Party 9.1 and 1.2; Agudes
Junior Services Sckedwled
Inarles Hablow, president of the
Miami Hebrew Congregation, has
announced that junior services for new Knesset accelerated
beys and girts, ages to 15. wiU ports came in that scarcely a pub
be conducted in the air-conditioned
Prime Minister David Berv
Gurien, who spent his weekend
in Northern Israel, speke at
Sofad. Tiberias and Kiryat
Shmoneh. In between, he found
time for a personal visit to a
young Bible quiz champion, a
Sephardic boy in Tiberias, with
whom he chatted for almost an
hour. During that chat, prac-
tically all the residents turned
out for a look at the Premier.
Mr. Ben-Gurion apparently re-'
vealed some sort of military se- >
crets during his speeches because!
the Haboker, the organ of the Gen-
eral Zionists, criticized him for
"using party platforms for reveal-
ing military secrets." The nature
of the secrets was not mentioned1
by the newspaper a Ft bough it was
understood that the Prime Min-
ister had hinted that Israel had,
purchased some new weapons.
Miami Chapter
Launches Season
Miami chapter of Hadassab will
have its first general meeting of
he season' Monday evening at the
Everglades hotel.
Mrs. Max Handshu. chapter pro
gram chairman, has arranged to
have as guest speaker Mrs. Sidney
Gluckmsn. of Or!ando. immedia!)
past president of the Florida reg
ion of Hadassah. Mrs. Gluckman
will speak on "Israel Between Two
Worlds."
Mrs. Homer Rievman. president
of the Miami chapter, recently re-
turned from the Hadassah national
convention in St. Louis, and will
exhibit the gavel stand presented
to her at the convention in behalf
of'the Miami chapter for its mem-
bership efforts.
Reports of the convention will
be made by Mrs Rievman, as
well as Mrs. Joseph Milton, presi-
dent of Menorah; Mrs. Albert Gar-
wood, president of Naomi; Mrs.
Henry Gilman, president of Torah;
and Mrs. Henry Paul, vice presi-
dent of ML Scopus.
ttbcci wing of the congregation
lie hall in Israel was unused over
dunng the High HoLdays. Services the weekend in the rush of politi-
teminence at 9:45 a.m. under the cal parties to present their bids
supervision of Jerome Bass Chil- for votes. In towns and settlements
drer. aged 3 to 7 wrll gather in the as well, members of Knesset bid-
nursery under the guidance of ding for reelection, sought support
Cayle Libman. who will direct hoi- of voters, frequently by slandering
Way story-telling and games. the opposition.
Seeing for himself how cold blueprints are translated into liv-
ing stone, glass and warm colors is Irving Blasberg, president
of Riverside Memorial Chapels, shown above inspecting the
nearly-completed SI25,000 addition to his Normandy Isle
Branch. The building, originally opened in 1955, has been
enlarged by the addition of five reposing rooms, a garden
chapel, lobby, smoking lounge, and new executive offices.
Leonard Glasser, architect, and Arkin Construction Co., col-
laborated on the work, with interior decoration by Roz Mark,
Ltd. The addition will go into service in late October.
Dade PTA Council
Hears Panel
"What Should the Home. School,
Religion, and Community be Do-
ing to Develop Our Child to be a
Better Citizen?"
This was the subject for dis-
cussion at the Dade County Coun-
cil of PTA's meeting Wednesday,
10 a.m., at Citrus Grove Junior
High School.
James Gwin was the host school
principal, and greeted representa-
tives from all schools in Dade
county.
Gwin, who is Council's citizen-
ship chairman, was moderator
of a panel discussing such
questions as "Can we expect
good citizenship to develop if
young people constantly see ex-
amples to the contrary by adults
representing the home, school,
community or House of Wor-
ship?" and "What are some out-
standing ways, methods, or de-
vices by which the home. House
of Worship, school, or commu-
nity can develop good citizen-
ship"
Representing the "home" was
Mrs. T. M. Holdcraft, of Coral Ga-'
bles, and a local PTA president,
i Representing the religion was Dr.
Joseph R. Narot, of Temple Israel
of Miami.
Richard O. Roberts, principal of
the Riviera Junior High School
i nd formerly both a Junior and'.
senior high school dean of boys,
represented the "school." Mrs. i
Eva Mae Furr discussed the'
community. She is a retired prin-
cipal of Miami Springs Elemen-
tary School.
Mrs. William P. Cooke, president
of the Council, presided for the
I business portion of the meeting,
i County Council committee chair-'
I men were introduced.
Miomians Buy
Summer Camp
Carl Gardner, Dr. Sidney H. Sol-
omon, and Victor Levine have pur-
! chased what was formerly known
as the Chimney Rock Camp for
Girls located at Lake Lure, ji. C,
in the heart of the Smokies, con-
sisting of 250 acres of a forest of
pine trees, hemlock and rhododen-
dron on the shores of Lake Lure
28 miles northeast of Asheville and
20 miles from Hendersonville,
N. C.
Dr. Solomon, former owner and
director of Camp Deerf ield in Ver-
mont, who operated his camp suc-
cessfully there for 27 years, will
act as full-time director, and the
name of the camp will be changed
from Chimney Rock to Camp
Deerfield for Boys and Girls.
Dr. Solomon has been actively
engaged in the summer camp
business for 40 years. Levine, Mi-
ami attorney, was engaged in the
camping business for 20 years
prior to the commencement of
his practice. Gardner, well known
Miami Beach resident, is active
in many civic and fraternal or-
ganizations, and has been a
member of the Old Timers Base-
Riot Leaden
Off to Prison
HAIFA- 'rate's court this we*i.found Di-
vid Ben-Haroush, self-styled Uai
er of North African immigrants
guilty of organizing the Julv dis!
turhances in Haifa and of using ,
:un against a policeman. He was
sentenced to two years in prison.
Mr. Ben-Haroush was %%n.,
tenced to 11 months far shooting
and 13 months on the other
charge. Yaakov Maman, n idt.
was given a ni.-e-menth sen!
tence. and two other defendants
were given six months' terms
each.
Mr. Ben-Haroush announced that
e would appeal his conviction
The court rejected his demand for
elease on bail pending the out-
ome of the planned appeal. He
leads a North Africa immigrants
ticket is the November elections
or the Knesset. He will be releas-
ed if be is elected.
Puzzle Jackpot
Soars to $220
COINWORD Editor took hope in
the arrival of the New Year as
mother week passed without his
being able to hand out any of the
mounting Jewish Floridian Jack-
pot.
COINWORD No. 13 appears on
page 10-A. and is worth $220. A
New Year is a good omen for
Greater Miami puzzlers, who have
bus far been unable to come up
with a cored solution to COLN-
WORD.
Mail your entry to The Jewish
Floridian, P.O. Box 2973, Miami 1,
Fla., by Sunday midnight, Oct. 4.
This may be the week for you to
win.
ball Club at Miami Beach for the
past 25 years.
An extensive building program
will commence immediately for
the erection of additional camp
fac.lities with a registrtation of
250 campers anticipated before
Jan. 1, 19C0.
The camp will specialize in all
track and field events, including
baseball and basketball, with ex-
j tra emphasis upon water sports
such as water skiing, aquaplan-
ing, and qualification for Red
Cross 'examinations. Dramatics,
dancing, arts and crafts, photogra-
phy, ham radio, tripping and nu-
merous other hobbies will be em-
phasized.
l
Joseph V. Jcmson. assistant treasurer of Atlas Sewing Centers,
signs new 53.000,000 group life insurance and major medical
contract with the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Com-
pany. Representing Massachusetts Mutual were Herman B.
nOV'naonmfleft)' ol ne Waiter Pierce Agency. Miami, and A
Bradford Mosher, district group representative, rebvinson i
tanner comptroller of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation.


October 2. 1959
*Jewlsijfhrkan
Page 9-A
II

fcv
Hard of Hearing Classes
Hard of hearing persons in the
Greater Miami aiea ca.i uuw reg-
ister for classes conducted by the
Miami Hearing Society, a United
Fund Agency. Special classes will
| be held, in lip-reading, better hear-
jing and speech training, and hear-
ing aid adjustment for new and old
users.
Classes are held at the Society's
Miami headquarters on Tuesday
morning and Wednesday evening,
and at Miami Beach on Monday
evening. Other classes will be ar-
ranged at other times in accord-
ance with the demand. Full course
description and schedules may be
obtained by writing or calling the
Miami Hearing, Society, 395 NW
1st St.
fr
m
Training in the appreciation of books begins
at an ecrly age at the Hebrew Academy. He-
brew Academy nursery students visit the Mi-
ami Beach Public Library, where they par-
ticipated in a "Story Hour" presented by Hel-
ena Clardy, children's librarian. Left to right
are Melody Feldman, Lane Jeffrey Genet, Eric
Glesserman, Leah Rottman, Mrs. Edith Kass,
nursery teacher, Ahron Horovitz, Beala Rosen-
garten, Debora Schwartz and Howard Kass.
Mt. Sinai Nurses
Slate Graduation
Mt. Sinai Hospital School of
Practical Nursing held its pre-
graduation banquet at the Algiers
hotel last week.
Graduation exercises will take
place Oct. 7 in the new Mt. Sinai
Hospital Auditorium, and will be
the first public ceremony to be
performed in the new building.
Twenty-four of the 29 graduating
practical nurses have already an-
nounced that they will continue on
the staff of Mt. Sinai.
I Charity football Game Due
Second annual Kiwanii charity
I football game between the Univer-
sity of Miami freshmen and the
University of Florida freshmen
mil be played Oct. 9 in the Orange
Bowl. Last year's game attracted
J3.055 spectators as Miami won
20-8 and earned the right to keep
the three loot silver trophy that
goes to the winner of each year's
contest.
Monticello Youth
Slate Services
Youth of Monticello Park Jew-
ish Center will conduct their own
services en the High Holy Days
this weekend.
Students from 7 to 13 will con-
gregate at the Sabal Palm school
cafeteria, 17101 NE 7th ave., at
10:15 a.m., Saturday and Sunday
morning, under the direction of
Abraham J. Gittelson, education
director. Serving as cantors will
be Billy and Perry Leff and Mar-
vin Liss. with Justin and Steven
Weiningcr as rabbis.
Teen-asers from 13 up will hold
services at the North Miami Beach
Junior High School cafeteria, with
members of the United Synagogue
Youth in charge, under the direc-
tion of Isidore Dickman, faculty
member of the religious school.
Joel Lefkowitz will sound the an-
cient ram's horn at the services.
Both serv.cea will conclude at
12:30 p.m.
Beach Girl Off
To Stern College
Beach Resident
Founds Grant
A tuition scholarship has been
established at Brandeis University
by Alee E. Clark Adams, of 4450
Alton rd., Miami Beach.
The $5,000 grant will provide tui-
tion assistance for needy and de-
Just before schools opened
last month, airports all over
the nation witnessed scenes
like this as the Jewish Na-
tional Home tor Asthmatic
Children at Denver sent
home its largest class, after
an average stay of 18 to 24
months.
UF Recruits
For Campaign
Mental Health
Play Scheduled
"Which Way Out," a new mental
health play, will have its first per-
formance in Florida on Wednes-
day at a dinner meeting in the
McAllister hotel, when the Mental
Health Society, a United Fund ag-
ency, celebrates its 12th annual
meeting.
Ester Brezo will direct the play,
which was written by Nora Sterl-
ing for the National Assn. for
Mental Health by the American
Theatre Wing. The Child Welfare
Foundation ol the American Leg-
ion provided the grant for the
preparation of the play.
The Cast is made up of teen-
agers from Coral Gables High
School, Marsha Marsh, John Bal-
lard, Peter Freitag, Sandra Shee-
Rochelle L. Stern, daughter of
Rabbi and Mrs. Tibor H. Stern, of
Beth Jacob Congregation, has en-
tered Stern College for Women in
New York.
Stern College is a branch of Ye-
shiva University. Rochelle gradu-
ated Miami Beach High School.
She was president of the Future h"a"n"' andKare^br'afton
Nurses'of America, member of Na-
tional Honor Society, circulation
manager of the school newspaper
and yearbook, "Quill and Scroll,"
and "Anchor," and chaplain of
Gibson's.
At the college, she will continue
her studies in Hebrew and modern
art, in which she is majoring.
Dr. John Beery is president of
the Mental Health Society.
Banquet to Honor
Miami Postmaster
Over 500 reservations have been
received for the installation ban-
quet and dance honoring Miami's
new Postmaster Eugene M. Dun-
lap, on Saturday at the new Ever-
glades hjtel..
Many executive postal officials
will be present at the affair, includ-
ing Former Assistant Postmaster
General Norman Abrams, regional
operations director William L.
Crawford, and James E. Greene,
postal installation manager. For-
mer Postmaster Hugh P. Emerson
will be master of ceremonies.
As a career employee, Dunlap
entered the postal service at Wil-
liamsport, Pa., as a substitute
FPU Cites Newspaper Week
Florida Power and Light Com-
pany will salute the nation's free
press during National Newspaper
Week, Oct. 15 through 21. National
Newspaper Week is proclaimed by
President Eisenhower in tribute to
the 1,770 daily and 9.000 weekly
newspapers published in the coun-
try.
Ship Cruises
Will Stress Arts
NEW YORKThe latest Israeli
fashions in knitted dresses and
other women's apparel made by
the noted house of "Aled," in Is-
rael, will be modeled aboard the
fully air-conditioned SS Jerusalem
of the Zim Lines while she cruises
the Caribbean next fall and win-
ter, it was announced here by the
American-Israeli Shipping Com-
pany, Inc., of New York, U. S. rep-
resentative of the Zim Lines.
In another realm of the arts, the
Jerusalem will carry a permanent
exhibition of paintings by some of
Israel's leading contemporary art-
ists. They will be on display in the
ship's Art Gallery on the Lido
Deck.
The fashion shows and paintings
are a special feature of the Jeru-
salem's cruises to acquaint Ameri-
cans with two important aspects
of artistic creativity in Israel. It is
intended to select young ladies
from among the passengers on
e"ach cruise to model the clothes.
The Jerusalem will make ten
cruises from New York to the
West Indies between Nov. 11,
1959 and Mar. 12, 1960. The cruises
will range in length from nine to
16 days, and will cover* 13 Carib-
bean ports. An additional program
of spring cruises to the Caribbean
is scheduled for next May and
June.
Recruitment of 15,000 women for
its annual county-wide, house-to-
house drive, which this year is
called the United Good Neighbors
campaign and whrch is scheduled i clerk and he worked both as clerk
to kick off on Good Neighbor Day, I and carrier. He became a regular
Sunday, Jan. 10, I960, is the goal of j postal employee in 1938. After pass-
the United Fund during the cur-! jng a competitive examination for
rent United Good Neighbor Re- the inspection service, he was ap-
cruitment campaign.
Mrs. Ffed Ravlin is chairman of
the United Good Neighbor Division
of the United Fund. Assisting her
wrvinR students at the university re nne division coordinators 25
regional chairmen, and district
captains whose duty is to secure
volunteers to cover 109 districts
throughout the county during the
drive.
in Waltham, Mass.
Called the Paul C. Clark Memo-
rial Scholarship, the grant is a me-
morial to Mrs. Adams' son, a Ma-
rine corporal killed in 1944.
Some 33 percent of Brandeis stu-
United Fund rendered more
dents receive financial assistance. I than 300 different types of sen-ice
to 228,164 men, women and ohil-
dren during 1958 in family and
child care, health services to the
aged and handicapped, and youth
services. Next year's service load
may be heavier.
bee Him Showing
W. c. Fields is the star of "Mil-
D'.llni Legs" which was to be
*wn at the Miami Public Library
on Oct. i at 8:30 p.m.
NORTHWEST
PAINT & BODY SHOP.
GLASS SERVICE UPHOLSTERY
ELECTRIC WELDING
SPORT TOPS AND SEAT COVERS
GORDON C. TRIMBLE, Owner
521 N.W. 54th Strttt Phone PL 4-9464
pointed a postal inspector in 1941,
and assigned to Brattleboro, Vt.
i He was reassigned to the Miami
I post office in 1948.
| In 1955, Dunlap was appointed
district operations manager for
the Southern postal district, from
which position he was named act-
ing postmaster of the Miami office
on Feb. 8, 1958. Dunlap was con-
firmed by the U. S. Senate Aug. 27
as Miami's postmaster.
Podiatrists in Meeting -
Southeast Florida Podiatry Soci-
ety inaugurated its fall season
with a meeting at Jackson Memo-
rial Hospital on Monday evening.
Highlight was a panel discus-
sion of techniques demonstrated
at the recent American Podiatry
convention in New York City. Fi-
nal plans were formulated for
the state convention in Miami
Beach next month.
Dr. Otilio Ulate (left), former president of Costa Rica and mem-
ber of the Inter-American Development Bank, shown at a meet-
ing with Joseph S. Moss, president of Pan American Bank ol
Miami and director of Sottile, Inc., Banking Division. They're
discussing forthcoming program of the soon-to-be activated
Inter-American Development Bank for Latin America. Meet-
ing took place at Pan American Bank of Miami, immediately
preceding a luncheon given in Dr. Ulate's honor by business
and community leaders here. ____________^_______
LEVIN A CO.
BROKERS
Invention* Paterttt ProcMt
Suit* 714 StytoM IwiMiai
Miami S2. Florida
TiM Fl 44114
L'Shona Tova Chog Samayaeh
MODERN WOOD INDUSTRIES,
INC
Elizer Hora Fred Schrager
fORMICA KITCHEN CABINETS
DISKS AND BAH TOPS
MEDICINE CABINETS
1029 E. 28th Street
OX 6-0771
I
I


r
Page 10-A
JewlstifkrMtor
Friday, Qctobg 2,
EXPLANATION TO PUZZLE NO. 11
Hr A 5 H 3 jy T illwl
? E X P E
lol r E A ol
9 ''B C 1 i|ni :
PC
[r| AJ n] G, i[ * Op
1 W FJ Hj
$1 11 t]
_A_-_! " M ft c]~o
tD 0] _SJ
rliallenae t6 an BigumTnT ,fln,,*l tl
..ill ui. Irrl___l." Itn|i Oil", 'I
NM
ADDRESS
CITY______
PHONE
STATE
COIN WORD PUZZLE NO. 13 WORTH $220
If there are no correct solutions to the previous week'i
puzzle. Otherwise prize returns to beginning $100 Jackpot.
If you wish to subscribe to The Jewish Fleridian check the
square and your paper will start immediately. Subscription
price is C *5 per ytar, ? f 10 for 3 years Regular subscribers
are eligible fer large' prizes. See rules.
(No explanations are given for words
having no posaible alternatives.)
EXPLANATIONS ACROSS
1When an old building collapses.
Ihe i K.I.-.H involves a heavy Job
of cleaning up. Though it was the
1K...M1 iii Hie iiuiiuiim mai deposited
I he i iibbit.li there, l( la the debris that
mual In- I'learrai <).
9EXPERIENCE- should prompt you
not t<> brad money to a deadbeat.
A ile.iilbeut Is constantly borrowlng-
inone>. and you know from puat
'touches" thai, he never pays it back.
i.i.i ..,,]:..' K In this ene means
.i.'If-liii.-r.-.-u. .iften with the Implica-
tion ol a lack oi moral Wlusja anal
lly n|>i'lii-* to a relusal to lend
nonei to .. ooonoft
1"The Me of a big bully cringes at
the I'liKAli "I hi bomecoming.
Though his TRKA1"IiIh footatepe at
the dooralerts her to the fact that
he is home, it a her fear of him that
makes her cringe. '
11American pumpers rode rough-
shod over ill.- Indiana' PLAINS,
The) ignored their iighia i<> land that
was theirs first. When Indians wore
in a position to complain, there was
more than one PLAINT.
11Teenage arisvannsa, if I'NAIRBD.
mi...1 bring about a rift In the lam- i._.solve the puizle aa you wmild any other croasword puzzle Annronrkta
CL.IT58 ACROSS and CLUES TX)WN tell you how to complet.- the Insnm*
plete words. Correct answers to thle week's COINWORD puzzle will be
In alphabetical order, hi the word liet.
8.Anyone la eligible to enter the COtNWORI> contest except employeei cr I
staff members (or members of their families) of The Jewish Klorldlan
DEADLNE THIS WEEK SUNDAY MIDNIGHT, OCT. 4
Cut along the dotted line, paste on a Scent postcard and mail to
COINWORD Editor, The Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box 2973. Miami 1, Fla.
CLUES ACROSS
2Such remarks can spoil a good
party.
7Bridal pictures, years later,
make fat housewives gaze nos-
talgically at what they _
shea.
8Conservative parents hate to
see their daughter going steady
with a young
16 Young lamb: var.
12In the jungle, they're likely to
be full of danger.
13Printers' measure.
ll You can't do a good job with-
out the proper
15Symbol of tantalum.
17High regard.
! 20 When a boy grabs his friend's
toy, there's likely to be a____
fight.
21A girl who's regarded as this
is unlikely to get many dates.
23Help.
26Dad is angry when Junior has
the car against the
garage wall.
29In a solo dance contest at bal-
let school, the will
probably determine the win-
ner.
30Shade tree.
34In concluding a verbal con-
tract, one should note care-
luliy what he is________.
CLUES DOWN
1A bird iover enjoys heariirg
such a note from a bird.
2Abraham's home: Bible.
3A child should be warned that
a stray cat may scratch if he
............... it.
4Nazi doctors would their
prisoners with germs, for in-
human experiments.
5In" an English pub near a race
track, many bets would be
suggested by a
6Not any.
9In medieval days, there was
not much more danger of at-
tack by these than there is
now in our big city parks.
11When you're camping out, a
outside your tent at
night is pretty frightening.
16Entertain.
18It's bad if someone ....... bis
toe because hedge clippers
are left lying on the ground.
19Heroic poem.
22If an executive job proves too
much for him, a man worries
about losing with his
co-workers.
24Ailing.
25 Floodgate.
27-Opener for a lock.
28Clatter.
Beth Sholom States Policy
By. Basically, grievances that eaa'l
be bii.uKat nut into the open suggest
a lack ol i-.inlidi-lice between pai.-ius
and childrenthe children are afraid
to talk about their troubles. If their
problems are UNAIDED. It may be
that there i> in.thins, the parents oun
dothrough iwverty. perhaps, or Ig-
norance of how to get helpthough
they appreciate and sympathize with
the difficulty.
13A cabinet member's remarks
made as a TEST often etlr up a
storm of protest This method is
sometimes used, witn a presidents
approval, to learn what the public
reaction would be to aome contem-
plated pollcjr. It protects the presi-
dent from brickbats. Remarks made
as a JEST are usually accepted aa
such; and misundeistanding la soon
cleared up.
13A child finds it exciting to watch
a lot of monkeys RANG1.V;
around among the trees. They spring
and I-.iiml iroin one limb to another.
HANGING is usually tem|H>rary. on the
way Irom one bough to another: and
would not be as exciting as move-
ment
11It's a gallant man who can main-
tain his UHIT after veers of
trouble. It's this QRiT, or ooaJTace,
which Is responsible for his VRIl*
hls self-controlor his grin, If he is
able lo .-mile.
ttA candidate hates to REWORD
his speei* again, after trying It
out many times HB'iJRi) it takes comparatively little
time, but writing it over and over Is'
a chore.
26l'tgeona that COO at dawn on
one's window sill Infuriate many
apartment dwellers, who find shell
Bleep interrupted. It's the noise that
Is a disturbance, and It hardly mat-
ters whetrher the pigeons WOO ->r
are Just talking to their mates.
EXPLANATIONS DOWN
*-By SPACING portions of meat
evesy other day. a tight food bud-
Si*1vr. ek*d out' They "T *
u AKINU. or scanty, portions, but
u 8r.e1l ""vln* In having meat
only at Intervals of two days
6When an incompetent ruler re-
fuses to WIELD enough power a'
nat ton gets into trouble. An Incompe-
tent persen, anwlttlngly pemhaoa. Is
likely t Y1EIJJ power those
around him with more forcefulneee.
Iit takes a brave man to INV1TH
vengeance by exposing a VIP
fn v^aT0?." He ta>" himself open
to vlndictlveness, though he doesn't
actively stir |t up, INCITE It
14After a long Illness, a mans prob-
lem is to SHORE upstrengthen
or reinforce sufficient energy (with a
tonic, vitamins, etc.) to return to
ruoolv S7,RFi V ""''"' rSerre
Mm! "' '" ,ryln* t0 back loet
lfr_i^m neo.P' opinions are too
AIRY to be worth an argument;
out an Irreslslable ,
how wrong they are.
1A qulsmaater on TV >i
fessea de.lght h "T> we.1
mart UlTHBS, since I, p|J^ri |
have someone win Tliejeir."'""*!
Moots* moment tor hln, "" Kf.|
on a (Jl-KST who u, sinat-tVS-
l!iHer husband'- Vmiiiv *T^"ti
would embarrass ',,, '."'Nl
when Mrs. VIP call. Sna^btaSl*!!
DO! .hi, l ,),ese H,,.!,.,,^^
however. WORK clothes ar.fj
and In good taste w
21Holdup men all too frequently
>T 10 slleDce a ', Lrii
storekeeper, not nece.*sailly tn jS51
hira. but to hit him over ths !?1
I'ying him up with ,-V(. J"JM
mouth takes too long in the asl
a storekeeper, when a quirk e'tW..l
U needed. A QAS of curse *3
apply htie. but fits number 24 acroejl
Copyright 15. General Features Cora. 1
Rules for the COINWORD Contest
S.A contestant may submit as many entries as he wishes on the official earn
blank printed In this paper, but no more than one exact-sized, hand-draw,
facsimile of the puzzle. No mechanically reproduced (printed, mimeugmphsL
etc..) copies of the message wHl be accepted, unless Issued by this paper ]
4.To suhrelt aa entry, the contestant should attach the completed puxzlt M
a J-cent postcard and mall It In time to reach the COINWORH editor 3
The Jcwlfa Floridian before midnight of the Sunday evening follow m, publica.
tlon of that week's puzsle. No entries received after that tlrhe, whether mail.
ed or delivered by hand, will be declaped eligible. Tou may mall your snlatS
in an envelope If you wish. This paper Is not responsible for entalis low delayed In the mall. .j
S-The .lew ish Floridian will award a Jackpot prise to the winner of COW.
W'oRI) puzzle. If more than one winning answer Is received, the prize w
be divided equally among the winners. IX no correct solution is received iS
will be added to the next week's prize.
S.There is only
that correct a
contestants agree
property of this paper. Only one prise will be awarded to a family"u
7 Entries must be mailed to the COINWORD editor of The Jewish Florinas.
No entries can be returned. The correct answer of each puzzle will b>
published In The Jewish Floridian.
Regular subscribers to The Jewish Floridian who win will receive a zur-
prise bonus.
nly one correct solution to the COINWORD nuzzle. nd osh
t answer can win. The decision of the Judges Is final and ii
ree te abide by the ledges' decision. All entries become tat
Israel Releases Previously
Frozen Arab Bank Funds |
UNITED NATIONS-< JTA) It-, The Commission reported, con-
rael. has released Arab refugee corning Arab bank accounts pre-
bank accounts previously blockee { viously blocked in Israel, rhat the
in Israel valued at 2,781,164 Brit- 2.781,164 pounds worth of assets
ish pounds sterling (about $7,800,-,' have for the greater part not yet
000), according to a report filed"! been cl"iDed by the owners. 1*e
here this week with the United Na- j Commission has advertised in ref-
tions General Assembly by the UN ugee camps calling on the owners
to claim their money. The accounts
released to date by Israel include
only deposits in Palestine branches
of Barclay's stank.
Judge Harry Arthur Greenberg,
president of Temple Beth Sholom]
Wednesday announced the follow-
ing policy as adopted by the relig-
ious committee and board of direc-
tors of the Temple:
'Membership in Temple Beth
Sholom includes High Holy Day
seating, as well as religious school
privileges. The Temple does not
sell seats for the High Holy Days
and accommodates only those who
are members.
"In the past, the general unaffil-
iated public was able to listen to
the services on a public address
system. This practice will no long-
^er be continued because Beth
I Sholom feels that everyone has an
j obligation to be a member of the
congregation. Non-members are
j invited to apply for regular mem-
; bership if they wish to attend the
High Holy Day Services in the
i Beth Sholom Sanctuary."
[GORDON
Funeral home
lUmml-t fieaeer Itwhk Fe.erel Horn,
FR 3-3431
FRanllin 9-1436 -
710 S.W. 12th Ave. Miami
NAMT GORDON, PrnMemt
I C0I00N. fevers. DifwCtar
WORD LIST
AID
AMUSE
HACK KD
BUCKBD
CI^APs
'1..VS.S
DAM
DIN
BUM
EN
EPIC
ESTEEM
i:\v
FACE
FAST
FT ST
II.I.
IN EE( 'T
i v i :( -r-
KEY
KNAVBS
KMVKS
NE4-TUE8
NETTLES
NONM
PA<' K
I'.wixa
PINK
PRl'DB
PRUNE
PUNK
ftATl \'>;
SI' i
Bfl
SWEET
T\
TAPSTER
TIPSTER
TOIL
Tl s >I,
TRI
TREKS
T\\!
UNEITTINT.
UNWITTING
ii:
WERE
Will r
WOOF
WORE
Conciliation Commission for Pel-
stitne.
At the same time, the Commis-
sion reported that it has compiled
records of 450.000 parcels of Israel
land for which Arabs claim owner-
ship and is now in process of de-
termining the monetary value ol
each parcel.
The Commission has been en-
gaged in these tasks since 1952. In
the report, the Commission made
it dear that its work of identifica-
tion and evaluation of Arab refu-
gees' land "constitutes a prerequi-
site for any settlement with regard
to the right of individuals to their |
immovable property." However,
the Commission added, its work
does not "lay down a basis for
overall settlement of the Arab ref-
ugee problem."
OXYGEN UNITS
Full Price $69.95
NO DOWN PAYMfNT
25* A DAY
Sheriff Kelly to Speak
"Election vs. Appointment" will
be the subject of an address by
Sheriff Tom Kelly before members
of the Biscayne Democratic Club
on Thursday evening, Oct. 8, at the
Shelborne hotel. Walter B. Lebo-
witz is club president.
Pertokle Oxygea Unit in artroi-
tive, hem** tarry if case. Om-
fal far Heart Patients, Asrfceje,
tks. Bronchitis Coses. Usefel i
Cases of Drowning, Shack see
Smoke Inhalation, etc.
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""Jzi?. r^^ M^*- T. Hmmm
MIAMI IIACM urssrel Dtrecter


Lay. Octohf 2, 1959
*Jeist Meridian
Page 11-A
deafer M/a/iw Welcomes Hew Year
Contimd from Page 2-A
tul' SKnce of Silence." Sec-
^^0^ Hashona is at 8
with Rabbi Rottman sched-
j'u* speak on "Mother, of Is-.
rael"
Rtf,h Hashona will be ^he"di"
..Beth El Conqreoetion. 500 SW
f JTe., on Friday at 6 p.m. Ser-
[Ji Saturday are at 7:30 a.m.
a bi Solomon Schiff will offic
1and preach on "Launching An-
ihrr Year." Services Sunday are
L at 7 30 a.m., with Rabbi Schiff
tltuied to speak on "Com-
SSSnt an T Commitment."
Junior services both days are at
10 a.m. Evening services are at
6 p.m.
At the Israelite Cnrr, 3175 SW
Kth ter. Rabbi Morton Malavsky
will officiate and launch the Rosh
Hashona observance Friday at 6
nm Saturday services are at 7:30
,m. Sermon is "A Year Anew
Cantor Louis Cohen renders the
musical portions of theliturgy.
Services second day of Rosh Ha-
shona will be at 7:30 a.m., with the
sermon. "We Pray for a Year of
Peace in 5720." Junior services
will be in the Social Hall at 11 a.m.
under the d.rection of Ronald
Katz and Jack Katzker.
More than 3,000 adult members of
Temple Israel of Oroator Miami,
137 NE 19th St., and 800 children
will usher in the High Holy Days
at services Friday. Four evening
services will be conducted tor
adults. In the sanctuary, Rabbi
Joseph Narot will officiate and
preach at ? and 8:15 p.m. In the
Wolfson Auditorium, Rabbi Morris
W. Graff, director of adult educa-
tion, will preach at 7 p.m., and
Assistant Rabbi Elijah E. Palnick
will preach at 9:15 p.m. Cantor Ja-
cob Bornstein and Cantor Sheldon
Torn will render the musical .por-
tions of the liturgy. Saturday
morning, Rabbi Narot will officiate
at two services in Wolfson Audi-
torium, at 8:45 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.
Rabbi Palnick is scheduled to
preach in the Temple at-10 a.m. observance of Rosh Hashona at
Children's service will be held evening services Friday at 5:50
Saturday at 9:30 p.m.
e ju.Ypuc.Uod" will be the
p.m. Saturday services are at 8
a.m. Rabbi Herschell Saville will
subject of a sermon by Rabbi officiate and discuss "Building To-
Lcon Kronish when Ttmplo Both morrow Today." Second day of
Sholom, 4144 Chase ave., ushers in Rosh Hashona commences with
Rosh Hashona Friday at 8:15 p.m., services Sunday at 8 a.m. Sermon
Saturday services are at 9:45 a.m. is "A New Year or Another Year."|
Cantor David Conviser will render, Junior services are at 9:45 a.m.,
the musical portions of the liturgy.; under the supervision of Jerome
Sermon will be "There are My i Bass. Evening services both days
People." Services on the second | will be at 4:45 p.m.
day of Rosh Hashona arc at 9:45
a.m., when the sermon topic will
be "No Peace of Mind."
At Agudath Israel Hebrew In-
stitute, 7801 Carlyle ave., Rabbi
Isaac Ever will usher in Rosh
Hashona with services Friday at
5:30 p.m. Saturday services1 are at
8 a.m. Sermon will be "Rosh Ha-
shonaPeriod of Self-Examina-
tion." Second day of Rosh Hashona
commences with services Sunday
at 8 a.m. Rabbi Ever will discuss
"The ShofarA Call for Universal
Peace." Evening services both
days are at 5:30 p.m. Tashl.ch is
Sunday at 5 p.m.
Congregation Ansh* Ernes, 2533
SW 19th ave., will hold High Holy
Day services Friday at 5:45 p.m.
Cantor Jacob Greenberg will offi-
ciate, and sermons will be deliv-
ered by prominent laymen. Satur-
day and Sunday services are at 8
a.m., with evening services at
5:45 p.m.
At Temple Judea, 320 Palermo,
Coral Gables, Rabbi Morris Skop
officiates at the-launching of Rosh
Hashona with servi-"s Frid'v at
7:30 p.m. Sermon will be "Atoms,
Space and God." Cantor Herman
Gottlieb renders the musical por-
tions of the liturgy. Saturday serv-
ices are at 9:30 a.m., with-the ser-
mon scheduled as "With Our Mag-
nificent Heritage." Second day of
Rosh Hashona slates services Sun-
day at 9:30 a.m. Sermon will be
"L'Shona Tovah Tikosevu."
Rabbit Nathan II. Zwitman will
officiate at High Holy Day serv-
ices of Hialeah Jewish Congrega-
tion. Friday services are at 7:30
p.m. in the Hialeah Municipal Aud-
itorium at 4800 Palm ave. Sermon
will be "To Thine Own Self be
True." Saturday services are at
10 a.m. Sermon will be "The
Things in Life that are Worth
While." Second day of Rosh Ha-
Hebrew teachers returning from Irrael report on their experi-
ences in the Holy Land at the fall meeting of the board of
directors of the Bureau of Jewish Education held at the Fon-
tainebleau hotel. Left to right (seated) are Benjamin Kaminet-
zky, Mr?. Shoshannah Spector Greenberg, Harry Brooks.
Standing are Paul Kwitaey and Zvi Rosenkranz.
Rabbi Max Shapiro will officiate snona will be observed with serv-
at Rosh Hashona services of Both jces at in a m jn the congrega-
Raphael Synagogue, 139 NW 3rd
ate., Friday at 6 p.m. Cantors A.
Perl and Morris Fruchter render
the musical portions of the liturgy.
tion's own facilities at 1150 W.
68th st.. Palm Springs.
Rosh Hashona will be launched
at Temple Zion, 5720 SW 117th St.,
Saturday services commence at 8 ...
a.m. Rabbi Shapiro will preach on th.."*J **** *&
.v- ._:. ..d--;.u ^nmm,rfii. Rabbi Alfred Waxman will offi-
CORAL GABLES
Traditional
Services
for th
IBiqh Holidays
will be held in the
i hapvl of the
Mlnyonalres of
Tvmolv '9 ml a
the topic "Portrait of a Communi-
ty." Sunday services are at 8 a.m.,
with Rabbi Shapiro due to discuss
"No Man is Free."
The High Holy Days wiH be ush-
ered in at Tifereth Israel North-
. side Center, 6500 N. Miami ave., at
services Friday evening. Saturday
and Sunday services are sched-
uled for the morning and evening,
with Rabbi Harry Lawrence offi-
ciating. Cantor Albert Glantz and
choir render the musical portions
of the liturgy.
Rabbi Sherwin Stauber officiates
at Friday evening services of
Young Israel of Greater Miami,
16750 NE 10th ave., ushering in
j Rosh Hashona at 6 p.m. Saturday
] services are at 7:45 a.m. Sermon
at 10 a.m. will be on "The Days
of Awe." Cantor M. Mendelssohn
renders thte musical portions of
the liturgy. Sunday services are
7:45 a.m., with the 10 a.m. sermon
scheduled as "Our Father, Our
King." Evening services both days
of Rosh Hashona are at 6 p.m.
Rabbi Samuel Lerer will offi-
i ciate at services Friday, 8 p.m., of
! Temple Beth Sholom of Hollywood,
, 1725 Monroe st. Sermon is "Resto-
ration." Saturday services are ?t
18 a.m. The Rosh Hashona sermon
' will be "Destination." Cantor Ru-
dolph Deutsch renders the musical
portions of the liturgy.
Miami Hebrew Congregation,
1101 SW 12th ave., will mark the
Irephun's hebrew;
book store
REV. GEORGE GOLDBERG
Officiating;
320 Palermo
HI 33737 HI 8-8073
Tickets on Sal* at
Temple Office
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ciate. Cantor Jacob Goldfarb
renders the musical porttions of
the liturgy. Sermon is "Let There
be Light." Saturday services are
at 8 a.m. Sermon topic win be
"Tomorrow is Another Day." Sec-
ond day of Rosh Hashona com-
mences Sunday at 8 a.m. services.
Junior services will be conducted
by the Temple teaching staff as-
sisted by members of the USY.
Beth David Congregation, 2625
SW 3rd ave., will1 observe Rosh
Hashona with services Friday at
6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday serv-
ices are at 8 a.m., with sermons
by Rabbi Yaakov Rosenberg on
both days at 10:15 a.m. Cantor
William Lipson renders the musi-
cal portions of the liturgy. Shofar
will be sounded on Sunday, the sec-
ond day of Rosh Hashona, at 10
a.m.
Temple Nor Tamid, 80th st. and
Tatum Waterway, will commence
the Rosh Hashona observance at
services Friday at 8 p.m. Saturday
services are at 8 a.m. Sermon by
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz at 10:30
a.m. is scheduled as "The Dial is
Turned." Sunday services will be
at 8 a.m., with the sermon, "Men
Must Live." Cantor Samuel Gom-
berg renders the musical portions
of the liturgy.
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz will
officiate at High Holy Day services
of North Shore Jewish Center, 620
75th st., Friday at 6:15 p.m. Sat-
urday services are at 8 a.m. Ser-
mon will be "A Year of Happi-
ness." Sunday services are at 8
a.m., with the sermon scheduled
as "Ingredient of Faith," Shofar
will be at 10 a.m. Cantor Edward
Klein renders the musical portions
of the liturgy, Vith the choir under
the direction of Eli Samuels.
Coral Way Jewish Center will
observe Rosh Hashona with serv-
ices at the Dade County Auditor-
ium, 2901 W. Flagler- st. Rabbi
Samuel April will officiate Friday
at 5:30 p.m. Cantor Jacob New-
man renders the musical portions
of the liturgy. Saturday services
are at 8 a.m. Second day of Rosh
Hashona'will commence with serv-
ices at 7 a.m. Rabbi April will
preach on both days.
Rabbi Jacob Rackovsky will of-
ficiate at services of Beth Tfllah
Congregation, 935 Euclid ave.,
launching the Rosh Hashona ob-
servance Friday at 5:45 p.m. Sat-
urday services are at 7 a.m. Ser-
mon at 10:30 a.m. will be "Our
View of the New Year." Sunday
Temple Ner Tamid Sisterhood holds a membership luncheon
.at the home of (left) Mrs. Jack Klinger, 9264 Bay dr. Center is
Mrs. Ccrrlton Blake, membership vice president. Mrs. Yvetto
Silberger was co-chairman. Twenty new members and one
life member were enrolled at the event.
Service Slated At Auditorium
Temple Emanu-El congregation
will, for the third year in succes
sion, worship during the High
Holidays at the Miami, Beach Mu-
nicipal Auditorium, across the
street from the Temple.
"The congregation has grown so
rapidly during the last few years,
that it was necessary to utilize the
services are at 7 a.m. Sermon at
10:30 a.m. on the second day of
Rosh Hashona will be "The Sound
of the Shofar." Evening services
are at 5:45 p.m.
At Zemora Jewish Center, 4t
Zamora ave.. Coral -Gables, Rabbi
B. Leon Hurwitz will officiate Fri-
day at 6 p.m. Saturday services
are at 7:30 a.m. Sermon will be
"The Mountainous View of Life."
Cantor Meyer Gisaer renders the
musical portions of the liturgy.
Second day of Rosh Hashona com-
mence> with services Sunday at,
7:30 a.m. Sermon will be -Image
of Man." Junior services both days
are at 10:30 a.m. under the direc- (
tion of Rev. Rudolph Brill and j
Jacob Zion.
Southwest Jewish Center, 6438;
SW 8th st., will launch the Rosh ^
Hashona observance Friday at 71
p.m. Rabbi Maurice Klein will
offer New Year greetings. Satur-
day services are at 8 a.m. Sermon
will be "Memory and Hope." Sun-
day services are at 8 a.m., with the
sermon scheduled as "Call to For-
ward and Upward." Assisting are
Morris Broks and Nachman Loss-
man. Choir is under the direction
of Mrs. Nat Lurie.
Miami Hebrew Book Store
1585 WASHINGTON AVC.
Miami Beach JE 8-3840
Hebrew Religloue Supplies for
Synagogues. 6choole A Private Ue
ISRAELI A DOMESTIC GIFTS
A NAPfr NEW TEA*
ISRAELI RELIGIOUS STORE
ill NfMfW SUPWtS rot
iYNAGOGUtS JtWISH HOMES
BIG SELECTION
KZROGIM
1357 WASHINGTON AVE.
JE 1-7722

3.fOO-F"at facilities of the audito-
rium in order to accommodate en-
tire fam'lies who wish to be seat-
ed together for (he services," ac-
cording to Samuel Friedland, pres-
ident. "In addition, teen-agers may
sit next to their parents, an ac-
commodation which prior to the
acquisition of the auditorium had
been practically impossible."
Dr. Irving Lehrman, spiritual
leader of Temple Emanu-El, will
officiate at all services.
Junior congregation services will
be held on both holidays in the
main temple sanctuary at 10:30
a.m. Rabbi Bernard Mussman, di-
rector of education at the Temple
Emanu-El religious school, will
conduct the services, which are
open to children between 9 and 12
years of age. >
CORRECTION
STELLA Marchbein-Marbiny.
former Star-aoprano of La Scala
Opera, and wite of Cantor March-
bein-Marbiny at N. Dade Center,
wrfl KlOT APPEAR as eoloiet with
the choir, due ts previoui engage-
ment.
mis vb y*r rro.
Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovskf
MS MICHIGAN AVENUE, MIAMI
toe Jt 1-3595


Page 12 -A
+Jmistifk**Mam
**&Q. October
Heart Assn. Names 18 Top Committees
Heart Assn. of Greater Miami,
thruugn its president. Dr. Robert
Boucek, has announced the ap-
pointment of 18 different commit
i %< Hie HMiftiMrlni^-
ing on its program of research,
education and community service
in Dade and Monroe counties fir
1959-60.
Miami Beach physician Dr. Paul
N. Ungar will be chairman of the
medical advisory and research
committee for the second succes-
sive year, and Dr. John B. Liebler,
of Coral Gables, will chair the pro-
fessional education committee.
Dr. Milton E. LetMr, of Miami
Beach, is chairman of rho com-
Delegates Named
To Zionist Council
J. David Liebman. president of
the M.ami-Gables Zionist District
1. has appointed Ephraim Collins,
Morris Simon, and Sam Levine as
delegates to the South Florida
Zionist Council.
Other members from the Miami-
Gables Zionist District include
Seymour Liebman, chairman; Ar-
thur Pekelner, past chairman: ,
Louis Rudnick. vice president of
the American Zionist Council; and
Isador Dickman. ZOA coordinator.:
Liebman has also appointed Mrs.,
Max Stein as a delegate to the |
munity Mrvico committee, fid'
Mrs. Vore H*ign and Dr. RoWrt
V. Edward*, both of Miami, will
ea-ckair Mw public dweatien
c^timfo. ''
A subcommittee on school health
has also been created with Myron
McKiernan, science teacher at Mi-
ami Beach High School, as chair-
man.
Questions of finance and budget
will fall under the direction of Dr.
Edward St. Mary, of Miami, and
matters' involving membership and
personnel will be under the chair-
manship of Dr. Francisco Hernan-
dez, of, Miami, and Dr. Louis Lem-
berg, of Coral Gables.
Mrs. N'anftte Savage, of Surf-
side, last year's chairman, will
once more head the Heart Sunday
committee. Special events will be
planned this year under the co-
rhairmanship of Dr. Lemberg and
Mrs Robert Robbins. of Miami,
ind for the second year in succes-
sion. Mrs. Marianne Reynolds, of
Bay Point, will head the Heart
Ball committee.
Annual mooting committee
chairman is Jack Rom. of Miami
Beach, and the nominating and
awards committee! chairman is
Dr. Joan Jonas Perdue, of Mi-
ami Beach.
To aid the Heart Assn.'s rela-
Jewish National Fund Council of! tionship with the University of Mi
Greater V ami. and Morris Simon
and Louis Dudnick as representa-
tives to the Israel Bond commit-
tee.
Liebman said that general mem-
bership meetings will be held on
the third Thursday of every month
for the coming year at the Zamora
Jewish Center.
ami, the hospitals and the Dade
County Medical Assn., committees
under the leadership of Drs. Lem-
berg, Milton S. Goldman, of Miami
Beach, and Jack R. Wright, of Mi-
ami, have been established. Hand-
ling the publicity and public rela-
tions committees are Carl Harold,
of Miami, and Jack Ross.
Temple Ner Tamid organizes new Cub Scout group. Left to
right are Sidney Rabinowitz, of the Scout organization of Mi-
ami Beach; George Rosen, assistant Cub master; Seymour
Horowitz, Cub master; Norman Giller, district chairman; Jack
Shevlin, Cub master. Pack 226; and Zelda Shevlin, braining
chairman.
Hertzoff Named
To JYS Board
Charles Hertzoff, director of
Citizens Federal Savings and Loan
Assn. of Hialeah, has been appoint-
ed to the board of directors of the
Jewish Vocational Service, it was
announced Wednesday by Lloyd L.
Ruskin, president.
JVS is a reactivation of the ag-
ency of the same name which was
formed here eight years ago to as-
sist refugees arriving in their new
status as future citizens.
It subsequently became the Vo-
cational Service Department of the
Jewish Family and Children's Ser-
vice. As the newest member of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
.TVS provides job placement serv-
ice, educational-vocational guid-
ance. Sheltered Workshop place-
ment for (he disabled, and voca-
tional rehabilitation services.
A partner in David Stuzin .and
Company, certified public account-
ants, Hertzoff is active in the Hia-
1eah-Miami Springs Chamber of
Commerce, and is a past director
of the Temple Judea in Coral Ga-
bles.
Medical Auxiliary Card Party
Greater Miami Auxiliary of the
American Medical Center at Den-
ver held a card party Wednesday
evening at the Promenade hotel.
Chairmen were Mrs. Morris Go-
luskin, Mrs. B. Cole and- Mrs. Sam
Haverty. Proceeds are for the
care and treatment of patients suf-
fering from cancer and tubercu-
losis at the hospital.
Rebekah Lodge to Meet
Sunshine Rebekah Lodge 9 will
meet Tuesday, 7:30 Dm at Work,
men's Circle! 25 Wa^ng*n ave. Xd""
Pan Am Team
Wins First Place
Pan American Bank of Miami
Slow Pitch League Softball Team
was recently awarded the cham-
pionship trophy. The team won 22
out of 23 games played during the
past season, walking away with
first place honors in the League,
Annex 1.
Joseph S. Moss, president, Pan
American Bank of Miami, a Sottile
Group Bank, accepted the trophy
for the bank from Max Hochstadt,
manager of the team.
All members of the team, in-
cluding A. Axelrod, N. Finkelstein,
M. Jacobs, E. Bragman, L. Wad-
ler, E. Dillman, D. Kingsberg, Z.
Sheinfeld, M. Court, M. Goldberg,
T. Reed, David and Max Hoch-
stadt, are expected to participate
in next year's League, again under
the banner of the Pan American
Bank of Miami, as soon as neces-
can be corn-
Student life at Yeshiva University, including
rabbinical studies, the sciences, sports, dis-
cussion groups, recreation and research.
Yeshiva University Achieves Maturity
y RABBI JONAH E. CAPLAN
The Florida chapter of Yeshiva University is
three years old. It was born in Sept., 1956 through
the initiative and dedicated effort of its first chair-
man, Leo Robinson.
Actually, activities in behalf of Yeshiva Uni-
versity preceded the Florida chapter when, in
1952, Mr. Sam C. Levenson, Mrs. Louis Glasser,
1953, Sam C. Levenson, Mrs. Louis Glasser. Isidore
Goldberg and R. Williams Ante initiated a cam-
paign in behalf of the university's medical school,
the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Although
the school was then just a dream, the leadership of
the Greater Miami Jewish community rallied be-
hind the call as did other leaders throughout the
country. The need for a medical school under Jew-
ish auspices was universally accepted.
Prominent among the many who participated
in that initial effort and who had faith in that
dream were Sam Blank, Sam J. Heiman, Aaron
Ksnner, Max Orovitz, Baron de Hirsch Meyer, Dan
Buskin, William D. Singer, Sam Stampleman, Carl
Weinkle and Joseph Weintraub.
Since this initial effort, the University has
grown to 17 graduate and undergraduate schools.
In 1954 Yeshiva established Stern College for
Womenfirst women's liberal arts and science
college under Jewish auspices in the nation.
Grant Aid
In 1955 Yeshiva initiated the first class of the
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, the nation's
first non-sectarian medical school under Jewish
sponsorship.
In 1957, the non-sectarian co-ed graduate
school of education was founded. Through the par-
tial aid of a $500,000 grant from the Ford Founda-
tion for the Advancement of Education, a teaching
fellowship program was set up for liberal arts
college graduates to acquire Master's and Docto-
rate degrees while earning $2,000 as salaried teach-
ing interns in the Greater New York public and
private schools.
Also, in 1957 the first School of Social Work in
a university setting was established. It is the out-
growth of the university's School of Education sod
Community Administration. The school is inter-
denominational and co-ed.
The year of 19SS saw the birth of the Graduate
School of Mathematical Sciences, an outgrowth of
the Institute of Mathematics, organized by the
university in 1945.
Charier Day Award
The phenomenal growth of the university has,
however, in no way dimmed the philosophy which
underlined it. Dr. Samuel Belkin, president of the
university, has Indicated that America's colleges
and universities must maintain a balance between
the various branches of learning. To fulfill their
educational obligations they must keep them in
proper perspective. "The university should be ded-
icated to the study of the natural sciences, the
humanities and the moral and spiritual purposes
of life. The neglect of the humanities," he said,
"could very well result in an inbalance of knowl-
edge."
The activities of the Florida chapter center
around its Annual Charter Day award dinner,
non-fund-raising affair. The first year, the honoree
was Leo Robinson, banker, civic and religious
leader. The second year the award went to Louis
E. Wolfson, industrialist and philanthropist. In
1958. R. Williams Apte, a member of one of the
oldest Jewish families to Florida, a dedicated
worker in all phases of community and national
endeavor, was so honored.
Officers of the Florida chapter are Leo Robia-
son, chairman, and Jack A. Cantor, co-chairman;
vice chairmen, R. Williams Apte, Jay J. Berko-
witz, Benjamin I. Binder, Shepard Broad, J. Ken-
Continued en Paea 14-A
Greater Miami Hebre
immeti
Mrs. Zvi Fein-
greater Miami Hebrew Tpnrhar. n.__ ^.
sents Joshua Stadlan wTth catftTn ,t? ^ 0kun- ^J^n Kar
association's appreciation t th VS "^ 5"* Gadn' S,adlan' ^ Bto ^
course he conducted in behalf of hi wfelt mn- Zv Rosenkranz, Mrs. Joshua Stadlan,
tion's membership. Left to riahTcrre MrTZ' ^^ an<* Mr. Nathan Center. Not shown
cha Kaplan, Mrs Ruth Wagner Mis. HaTa **"" ^ Gwchokw-


October 2. 1959
+Jewlstifk>rkHar)
Page> 13-A
Contributions of South Florida Zionists
By SBYMOO* B. LIIBMAN
lionor,ri PresJdenr, Southeast Re*ien ZOA
Jlte past y*M" mw a continuation d the nor-
ft activities oyhevanojj-
r Sewitsundin* function u the Israel Caval-
I j sjars held at the Miaipi Beach Auditorium
llhToist December. The Israeli artiste had been
uLuUy ^teted by w SuUiv*B ta tara*1 ,Bd
L brought by him to this country to appear on
Revision show. They then undertook a tear Of
I united States under ZOA auspice*. They played
, i full house. No small part of the success of the
' tion was due to-the patrons -who were ergan-
I rf under the co-chairmanship of Max Bederman
lurt j0Seph M. Rose. The affair was a Joint effort
hf the districts in Miami, Miami Beach, Coral 6a-
fmm and Hollywood.
to the spring, the Miami-Gables District held
liti annual barbecue on the spacious lawn of Mr.
land Mrs. Sam Levine. Abe Hurwiti, who has since
Ldly passed away, and his wife. Rose, were hon-
Icredfor the many years of devoted sendee to the
[Zionist Organization of America. Over 500 people
[attended the function.
Local Activities
He annual elections of some of the districts
brought Al Ossip to the presidency of the Beach
District, as successor to Judge Mai Englander,
James D. Liebman. as successor to Murray Levine
for the Miami Gables District, and Ezra Finegold
again assumed the presidency of the North Shore
District.
Noted local and national' figures addressed
many of the various district meetings, and the
Beacb Luncheon Club held forth as in previous.
years under the chairmanship of Herbert Heiken.
The Kfar Silver Agricultural Training School in .
Israel, which is maintained by the ZOA, had several
scholarships contributed to it as a resist p| the
fund-raising activities of the districts. This school
is accredited by the University of the State of New
York. The ZOA House in Tel Aviv which has won
the acclaim of Israelis and all American tourists,
also received financial support from the local dis-
tricts.
During the year, several questions have arisen
Much will undoubtedly form the basis of a dis-
cussion for the coming months.,The problem in
Israel as to "Who is a Jew" was debated, and the
ultimate answer may not be resolved for a con-
siderable period.
The meeting this past summer of the World
Zionist Actions Committee, which is the ruling
body of the World Zionist Organization between
its conventions, authorized the affiliation of non-
Zionist bodies with the WZO. Negotiations have
been carried on with the United Synagogue of
America, B'nai B'rith and other organizations. The
wisdom of this decision and the ultimate conse-
quences will require prolonged discussion.
Strengthening Bends
The cultural program of the ZOA, the need for
maximal Jewish education for our youth, and the"
inculcation and indoctrination of adult Jews with
knowledge of the Jewish and Zionist past and_pres-
tt will receive the attention, of the districts dur-
ing the coming year. Literacy in its fullest sense
Itquires more than the ability ta read and writte.
Zionists arc dedicated to seeing that the "people
of the book" are fully conversant with every phase
Miami Hebrew
Names Cantor
Charles Hablow, president of Mi-
ami Hebrew Congregation, this
week announced that Rev. Joseph
Sa reman has been engaged as can-
tor'for the congregation and will
chant the liturgy during"the*" coming High Holidays.
Cantor Salzman received his
early training from his father, who
was renowned as a cantor in
Chernovitz and Krakow. In Vienna,
he entered the Royal Conservatory
fer vocal senate and harmony,
white at the same time he was a
student at the Cantors Seminary Of
Austria.
SttHOVK UtBMAN
and aspect of Jewish life, not only in America, but
also in Israel.
Surveys and returning visitors have shown
that there is a lack of knowledge by Israelis of
American Jewish life. By the same token, many
American Zionists who make their first visit to
Israel are surprised to find that they do not fully
understand the citizens of the State of Israel. The
closing of this gap of understanding must be
achieved without delay. The failure to do-so will
constitute an irreparable loss to the future Jewish
generations in the diaspora and in the Jewish
State.
It is only an organized Zionist movement pos-
sessing the vision and appreciating the necessity
of the strengthening of the bonds between Jewish
communities throughout the world that can play
the major role in bringing about the desired goals.
The ZOA also nas piayecr and will continue its
role in, the American Zionist Council, UJA, Bonds
for Israel the Jewish National Fund, and other
nationally recognized causes for the aid of Jewry
in Israel and throughout the world. The Zionist
movement still remains the one group in which
Jews of all ideologies, philosophies, sects or de-
nominations can find a common meeting ground
to hear and discuss every facet of life affecting
Judaism.
Eisenhower in Greetings
WHITE HOUSE
Washington, D.C.
Greetings to my fellow citizens of Jewish faith
as they enter the season of their High Holy Days.
The teachings of your ancient belief have long
sustained you and strengthened the communities in
which you live. By constant repetitionin word
and deedof the Commandments of God, you have
nourished the noblest principles of mankind.
The demands of justice, the plea for mercy,
the rights and responsibilities of each individual
these should be uppermost in our thoughts at home
and at work, when we sleep and when we awake.
DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER
President of the United States
Sofia/ Activities Thrive-But Synagogues Totter
Upon arriving in Am*riee Kev.
Salzman was angagad as cantor
and music director o< Congrega-
tion B'nai Sholom of Brooklyn,
N. Y., where he served fer a pe-
riod of ten years
During his tenure, he studied ai
New York University and it
Teachers College of Columbia
University. Rev. Salzman also
served as cantor of Congregation
Agudath Achim of Savannah, Ga.
Rev. Salzman is the recipient of
a Certificate of Merit from the Sa
cred School of Music.
a1
Rev. Salzman combines musi
cianship and tradition, emphasiz
ing the traditional chants in t
lyric baritone voice. He succeed-
Cantor Berele Kelemer, who re
cently resigned.
Director f be Speaker
Charles Plotkin, newly-appointed
director of the department of ser-
vice to senior citizens for the
Greater Miami Jewish Community
Center, will be guest speaker at
a luncheon meeting of Miami
Beach Lodge of B'nai B'rith on
Tuesday noon at the DiLido hotel.
JOSWH SALZMAH
UM Slates Two
Youth Concerts
First major project of the year
for the Symphony Club of the Uni-
versity of Miami is Its announce-
ment this week of sponsorship of
a series of two Young People's
Concerts to be presented by the
University of Miami Symphony
Orchestra on Friday, Oct. 16, at
the Miami Beach Auditorium and
next Jan. 29 at the Dade County
Auditorium.
Dr. Fabien Sevitzky, conductor
of the University of Miami Sym-
phony Orchestra, will wield the
baton on the two dates, which will
each feature two successive con-
certs at 9:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.
Rehearsals are now under way for
the Miami Beach opening con-
certs, at which Dr. Sevitzky will
be making his first appearance of
the season here.
Tickets for the two-concert se-
ries are now on sale at all of Dade
county's elementary and secon-
dary schools. The Dade County
Board of Public Instruction is co-
operating with the Symphony Club
in the project.
Moyor Robert King High aids
Sidney H, Palmer, president
of Sholem Lodge, to kick-off
a B'nai B'rith membership
rally at a luncheon at the
Robert Clay hotel last Friday.
Disabled Yets
I Dedicate Home
Hialcah Miami Springs chapter
of the Disabled American Veter-
ans will dedicate its new $150,000
' home at 3300 Okeechobee rd., Hia-
leah, on Sunday at 4:30 p.m.
National Commander William H.
: Fribley, of Crestline, Kan., will be
j guest speaker.
Other national and state veteran
officers, together with state, coun-
ty and city officials, will be repre-
i sented.
Albert Cuervo, national service
: officer, of St. Petersburg, will be
present Saturday and Sunday to
assist all veterans, widows and ds-
pendents who may have a veteran
problem. Robert C. Gonzalez, of
Pensacola, department comman-
der, will also be present to assist-
in these services.
Veterans, widows and depend-
ents who may not be able to at-
tend and are in need of assistance,
may contact Tony Benedetto, 3300
Okeechobee rd.. Hialeah.
VIENNA (JTA) There are
lively social, cultural and other
secular activities among the
Jews of Wroclaw, Poland, but
the synagogue there is barely
No. Shore Names
Youth Director
Miss Edith Klein was appointed
director of youth activities of the
rth Shore Jewish Center, Max
Krau>s president, announced Wed-
nesday.
Miss Kiein was formerly director
of youth activities of the Atlantic
t-ny (N. J.) Jewish Center, where
ne supervised the hobby and club
activities of some 700 young girls
ar-a boys there. She has been di-
reclor of the Leadership Training
institute of the regional USY pro-
*rm during the past four years.
Miss Klein is a graduate of the
^Diversity of Georgia, with a BA
ree. She also has a Master's de-
free from the University of Flor-
Morry Rovitz is chairman of the
*uth Commission of the North
More Jewish Center.
able to muster a quorum of ten
male adults for Sabbath services,
accbrding to the Folkshtimme,
Warsaw Yiddish-language daily,
which was received here thi3
week.
Wroclaw, formerly Breslau,
capital of German Upper Silesia,
now has the largest Jewish com-
munity in Poland. The Jews of
the city are active in most eco-
nomic fields, including the pro-
fessions. Many of them work in
a big railway car factory and in
the Wroclaw plants manufactur-
ing precision instruments.
In pre-war days. In German
Breslau, the community main-
tained two synagogues. The
"now" synagoqu" was dctroyed
by the Nails In 1S38 and rha syn-
agogue now in use wa virtually
nutted bv the Nails. Sc
held there every Saturday, but,
according to the nawapaper'a cor
respondent, the sexton complain-
ed that "it la difficult to assem-
ble a mlnyan."
The two old Jewish cemeteries
in Wroclaw were not damaged
but many of the tombstones were
described in "sad" disrepair.
Among famous men interred
there were the Jewish historian,!
Heinrich Graetz, who taught at;
the Theological Seminary in old
Breslau, and the German philos-
opher of Socialism, Ferdinand
Lasalle. The Theological Semi-
nary does not function now.
By contrast with the situation
he found at the synagogue, the
Folkshtimme writer reported
lively activities at the Jewish
Folk Club, the local headquarters
of the Jewish Social and Cultural
Union, the Yiddish Theatre, and
the vocational training classes
conducted by ORT.
He reported that the Jewish
library in Wroclaw contained
6,000 volumes, 2,000 of them in
Yiddish, and displayed Yiddish
newspapers published not only
in Poland but also in Rumania,
the United States and Argentina.
The library has registered 450
regular readers, of whom about
a third read Yiddish.
mi Mayoi Robert King High signs proclamation designa-
Oct. 13 to 20 B'nai B'rith Membership Week. Looang on
(left to right) are Jerome Greene. Florida State president; Alfred
Kreisler; Albert Elies. B'nia B'rith national membership direc-
tor; and Eli Hurwilx.
I


Pace I4-A
+Je*isMcrMiar7
Fridaf. OctoU, 2.
B
/"
Yeshiva University Achieves Maturity
Mesdames Jacob Glassman. Irving Carrey, Irving Tillis,
George Linden. Jccques Brill. Joseph WUkes. and Harry
Rosenblatt .
Mesdames Martin Goodman. Norman Bergin. Sheldon Kay.
Leonard Wcldman. Henry Freeman. Max Deakter. Estelle
Tischler, and Norman Morgenstern.
mm BUT HAPPY
Local Delegates Back from ORT Confab
Happy delegates of the Southeastern Florida region returned this
week from the 15th biennial convention of ORT in Washington. D.C.
Tired out from the round-the-clock schedule, their notebooks are
filled with details relating to the decisions designed to blue print ORT
activities during the year ahead.
Major resolution at the convention was to institute a program to
train the many persons who do not qualify for regular ORT schools
Current enrollment throughout the world is 40.000 students
*
Mr. and Mrs. Erich Cohn
board plane for extended trip
around the world.
Coral Way Men
Aid Bicod Bark
Blood Bank drive was given an
Mats* Sunday when the Coral Way
Jewish Center Men's Club donated
44 pints of blood at the West Mi-
ami Junior High School.
"Operation Save-A-Life" was the
first undertaking of the newly-
formed Blood Bank committee of
the Men's Club. Jack Raymond is
chairman of the committee.
Breakfast was served to donors
by the Sisterhood. The 44 pints of
blood are being held in reserve at
Mt. Sinai Hospital. Dr. M. B. CirUn
was in charge of the mobile unit
Conns Leave
On World Tour
NEW YORKErich Cohn, well-
known in the Jewish community
and prominent manufacturer of
koshez food*, and Mrs. Cohn left
recently by air on an extensive
trip around the world.
*
The couple will visit Italy,
Greece and other continental coun-
tries first, and are spending the
Hich Holy Days in Israel with in-
timate friends.
Cohn. who has frequently been
a traveler to Israel, has a host of
long-standing contacts there. He
will re-visit many of the historical
and religious sites. Among the calls
will be the Weitzman Institute and
the Hebrew University.
Following th holidays, the
couple will leave Israel and con-
tinue on the global trip, which
will then take them via Teheran
to India. There thty plan to
many of the archeological sites
in both northern and southern
districts.
They will visit Cochin, Jewish
settlement of centuries, where one
of the oldest synagogues is still in
existence. Then onto Ceylon. In-
donesia. Angorwat in Cambodia,
and Bangkok.
Hong Kong will be the "next port
of call, and some time will be spent
in Japan. Cohn plans to visit Jew-
ish communities and settlements
there. The Cohns will return after
some four months via Honolulu,
making a visit to the nation's new-
est American state.
Cohn is president of A. Good-1
man & Sons, Inc., famed matzo
bakers, and producers of many
kosher food products.
Continued from Page 12 A
neth Edlin, Charles Fruchtman, Isidore Goldberg,
N. C. Goldman (West Palm Beach), Jennie Gross-
inger, Sam Reinhard, Allen E. Rosen, S. E.
Schwartz. Nat Wolf (Lakeland); treasurer. Benja-
min Rudn.ck. and secretary, Joseph Cohen.
Living up to its name, the Florida chapter has
branched out to other parts of the' state where
meetings and functions were held and are being
planned for the immediate future.
Many new and significant developments have
taken place at the university during the three
jears of the chapter's operation. The Middle States
Assn. of Colleges and Secondary Schools passes
on the accreditation of the colleges and universi-
ties in the east every ten years. On May 8. 1959,
Dr. Edward B. Nyquist, chairman of the Assn
Commission on Institutions of Higher Education,
in reporting to Dr. Belkin, said the following:
"Surely the previous decade has been one of rapid
growth and expansion, but more important in
quality. Clearly, Yeshiva University is much more
important, influential and a stronger institution to-
day than it was in 1948. Yeshiva University has
fulfilled many of our expectations of its potential
find progress and. hence, we are delighted to vali-
date its claim for reaffirmation of its accredita-
tion."
Large Graduate School
Shortly thereafter. Yeshiva University's Grad-
uate School of Social Work was granted accredita-
tion by the Council of Social Work Education at
the 88th annual forum of the National Conference
of Social Welfare held May 24 to 29 in San Fran-
cisco. Dr. Morton Teicher, outstanding scholar and
anthropologist, is the director of the school. At the
commencement exercises this past June, the first
eight graduates received their Master of Social
Service degrees.
la 1957. when the Graduate School of Educa-
tion opened its doors, the registration was 80 stu-
dents. Today, it is one of the largest in the coun-
try, with over 900 students. At the June commence-
ment exercises, 163 were awarded advanced de-
grees142 Master's and 21 Doctorates. Dr. Benja-
min Fine, one of the foremost authorities on edu-
cation, who for 22 years was the education editor
of the New York Times^ is the dean.
Other advanced degrees at the last graduation
included two Doctor of Hebrew Literature degrees,
four Master of Art degrees by the Bernard Revel
Graduate School. Also. 21 Doctor of Philosophy de-
grees, one Doctor of Education degree. 139 Master
of Science degrees by the Graduate School of
Education.
The growth of the university can be measured
when we take into account also the following un-
dergraduate degrees awarded by Yeshiva Univer-
sity: 95 Bachelor of Art by Yeshiva College; 17
Teachers Diplomas, 16 Bachelor of Religious Edu-
cation. 13 Bachelor of Hebrew Literature by the
Teachers Institute for Men; seven Teachers Di-
plomas and four B.R.E. by the Teachers Institute
foi Women; 29 BA degrees and three B.R.E de-
trees by Stern College for Women; and two by the
Cantorial Training Institute.
Record Total
In all. the university awarded this June, 777
degrees and d includes the Rabbi Isaac Elchanon Theological
Seminary, the Albert Einstein College of Medicine'
and the three high schools". A fourth high school
v.ill be opened in September.
Although this was the 28th commencement of
the university. its origin goes back to Eitz Chavim
Thei3 '", lm and the Rabbi Isaac E"*.non
Theological Seminary in 1896.
M. SAMUtl HUM
. rfistins.ishcrf presissat
With 1886 as the starting point. Yeshiva Uni-
versity will inaugurate its 73rd academic year-
and its 14th year as a fully fledged university-
with some 4,500 young men and women who
gathered from all corners of the globe when it
opened its doors in September, according to Dr
Belkin, distinguished president of the nation's first
accredited university under Jewish auspices.
A faculty of more than 850 outstanding schol-
ars in the fields of science, religion and the hu-
manities will teach courses leading to more than
15 different academic degrees and diplomas in
fields of study ranging from Arabic to zoology.
Dr. Belkin said, "Most of the privately en.
dowed institutions of higher learning in America
were established by religions groups. That is the
origin of Yale, Harvard, Columbia, Chicago, Brown
and Princeton, and many others. It is in this spirit
that Yeshiva University was established and
maintained; it has a distinctive philosophy and a
distinctive goal."
Gov. Collins in Greetings
STATE OF FLORIDA
Office of the Governor
Tof/ofcossee
It is a sincere pleasure, both personally and
officially, to extend good wishes for a blessed New
Year to all my Jewish friends.
The Jewish people and all freedom-loving
people of the world, at this jucture of history, are
face to-face with the most formidable and fearsome
challenge mankind has ever encountered. The false
and fatal lure of ruthless, cruel and Godless Com-
munism, and the demonstrated capabilities of its
soulless discipline, can be successfully defeated
only by courageous citizens, dedicated to the cause
of freedom and justice under God.
Rosh Hashona. 5720, in recalling to mind our
deep desire for universal peace, love and brother-
hood, also keynotes the basic responsibility of each
individual to do his personal part if human dignity
nnd spiritual value are to be preserved and re-
stored to all men.
May this New Year be the happy occasion for
rediscovery of the great personal and spiritual pur-
poses of our nation. This reawakening and renewal
of our sense of great purpose and high destiny so
appropriate at this season is, I am convinced, our
most pressing current need.
LEROY COLLINS
Singles Limited to Meet
Singles Limited will hold a social
evening Sunday at the Alcazar ho-
tel. Talk by Eleanor Hart will be
on the theme, "Heart to Heart."
Choir will assist in High Holy Day service.
W?thThhnT- Sf* lQCOb ^Wuol
With Robot Tibor Stern, spiritual leader, and
Cantor Maurice Mamchee are Ira Marcus,
bianey Streicher. Micnael Breit, Jerry Bern-
stein. Daniel Shain. and Robert Lynn!


October 2, 1959
-Jewlsti fhrknan
Page 15- A
edical Expert
at n
Kc!tTs CHURCH, Va.-(JTA)-
^ Tinner, the ion of
Rom Herman. Services were Sept. 28 were In New Tork City, with local ar- daughters, Mrs. Radle Shoatack and
L ihraham Flexner, the vm 01
Pr i Jewish parenU from
fc'?'Sa who revolutionized med-
P'uUon in United *a
(udat Princeton in 1930. died
jfweek I" his home here. He
lljlO report, which condemn-
listing medical education fa-
was followed by a fund-
S career in which he perauad-
he Rockefeller family to give
Uooo between 1917 and 19271
heip make American medical
ion among the best in the
was instrumental in persuad-
line the late Albert Einstein to
Live Germany to join the Institute
Ifor Advanced Study.
In 1945. he agreed to head a com-
Imittee of scientists to sponsor the
[establishment of the Hebrew Uni-
Iversity-Hadassah Medical School
loo Mt. Scopus in Jeruaalem. f
Jewish Labor
ILeader Passes
NEW YORK (JTA) Funeral
I services were held this week for
Isidore Nagler, a vice president of
Hie International Ladies Garment
Workers Union for 30 years who
was actively identified with many
Jewish causes. He died at the age
| of 64.
Born in Auitria, ha. cam* to
New York in 1909. Among many
labor, civic, philanthropic and
Jewish positions during his ca-
reer, ho was secretary of the
Jewish Labor Committee and
chiirman of the Federa+een for
Labor Israel.
At his death, Mr. Nagler was a
vice president of the New York
State Federation of Labor and
Congress of Industrial Organiza-
tions. Last year he was labor ad-
viser to the United States delega-
tion to the International Labor Or-
ganization conference in Geneva.
In 1938. he had been American La-
bor Party candidate for Congress.
at Riverside Memorial
mandy Isle, with burial In Mt. Nebo
tory.
DAVID BROWN
7S, of *mo Hamlnao dr.. 1M Sept X,
Retired owned of a plastering busi-
ness, he came here ten years ago
from New York. There are. no sur-
vivors here. Services were In New
York City, with local _rran.smenta
by Riverside Memorial Chattels.
* MRS. RUTH QOLDMAN
52. of SUOtl iJanand a\c., oled Sept. 2.",.
She came here eight yearn hko 'nun
New York, and was a member of the
North Snore Jewish Center and Agu-
dath Israel Hebrew Institute. Sur-
viving are her husband. Harry; son,
Paul: daughter, Mrs. Rosalind l two alsters, two brothers and four
grandchildren. Service* were Bapt.
17 at Riverside Memorial Chapel,
Normandy lale, with burial In Lake-
side Cemetery.
by Riverside Memorial
r -nirements
Chapela.
OEOROE J. QUNSHOR
77. of .ill 7rd St.. died Hept. 17. A re-
tlred building contractor, he came
here six years ago from New York.
arvtvlna are his wife, Qertrnde:
'laughter, Mrs. Ijlllan .k; and
son. Leonard. He also leaves three
tirothers and a sister. Services were
In Brooklyn.
Mrs. Ada Sher; two sisters and four
grandchildren. Benrtoaa were Beat.
16 at Gordon Funeral Home, with
burial in Mt. Slnal Cemetery.
LEGAL NOTICE
J.'M. oppe'nheimer
(9, of 18020 NW lth ave.. died Sept.
17 He came here from Chicago five
years ago. Surviving are two sons,
Including Robert, Miami, his mother,
two brothers, two sisters and four
randchldren. services were in Chl-
caKo. with local arrangements by
Gordon Funeral Home.
LOUIS SPIOEL
71, of 536 Mth St.. died Sept. 23. An
attorney, he came here It years ago
from Richmond. Va. He was a Mason
and Hhrlner. Surviving are a sister,
Mrs Ida Comander, and brother. Ser-
vices were In Richmond, with local
arrangements by Riverside Memorial
Chapels. ^^^^^
MRS. LENA ARNOLD
7. of 151 8W olet pi., died Sept. 24.
Survivors Include her husband. Sam.
a son, daughter and brother. She
came here five years ago froea New
York. Services were Sept. 2r, at Riv-
erside Memorial Chapel, with burial
In New York. _____
HUOO BAND
M of 1735 Calais dr.. died Sept. 24.
He came here six years ago from
Brooklyn and was manager of the
.lack Kaplan and Co. brokerage house.
Surviving are his wife. Zelda; and
two brothers, Alvln and Sidney. Ser-
vices and burial were In Brooklyn,
with local arrangements by Riverside
Memorial Chapel. Normandy Isle.
MRS. SOPHIE M. ROSEN
72 of 300 NW 32nd ave., died Sept. Z4.
She came from Chicago 11 years ago,
and was a member of Hadassah. Pio-
neer Women and other clubs Sur-
viving are her husband, Abel, two
daughters. Including Mr. Ruth Slot-
nlk. a sister, Mrs. Rose Kolovskl and
two sons. Services were Sept. 27 a
Riverside Memorial < hapel. Wltn
Burial In Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
MRS. ALICE WIENER
S of TU* 6W "th at., dl.-d Hept. M.
She came here 16 years ago fromJ*-
(rail gat] WM a member of Hadassan
nd Uh Jewish Home for >'*}*":
Surviving .are her husband. William.
three sons. Including Seymour J two
daughters. Including Mrs. Anne Sax-.
and a sister. Mr- RabeoOB l.leb.-r-
man. She also leaves -even irran.l-
..,,. Sept. 2.. at
Gordon Puneral Home, with burial In
Mt. Ni 'cry.
MRS. CELIA SCHENKER
7(. of 1235 Euclid ave.. died Sept IK
She and her husband, Ixiuls, who
passed away last month, came here
eight years ago from New York. Sur-
viving Is a son In New York. Services
were In New York, with local ar-
rangements by Riverside Memorial
Chapel.
MRS. ESTHER BABNETT
71, of 1801 l^-iiox ave., died Sept. II
She came from New York seven years
ago. Surviving are her husband,
Aaron; three daughter;-, Mrs. Cella
Zucker, Mrs. Sylvia Robinson and
Mrs. Leah Slern: and a son. Irving.
Services wece> Sept. ID its. JI ail 11 last
Funeral Chapel, with burial In Mt.
Nel.o Oe.neteiv
MRS. JENNIE MYERS
<7. of lllo Pennsylvania ave., died
Sept. 10 In ljncaster. I'a. A Miami
Beach resident *.r 22 years, she is
survived by two daughters, Mrs. Min-
nie Strauss and Mlsa Ulllan Fried-
lander; and two sons. Including Jack
Friedl;, nder. Miami Beach. Services
were Sevt. 13 In IjRnraster
LEGAL NOTICE
MRS. KATIE SEOAL
70. of Z4&0 SW 5th St.. died Sept. IS.
She came here II years ago from Boa-
ton. Surviving is her husband, Sam-
uel, two. sons, Milton and Oscar: a
brother and three grandchildren. Ser-
vices were Sept. 18 at Gordon Funeral
Home.
MRS. ANNIE RADNER
7S, of S20 NW 153rd St.. died Sept. 17.
She came here seven years ago from
Holyoke, Mass. Surviving are three
daughters. Miss Minn Radner. Mrs.
Melba Klsenberg and Mrs. Stella Mer-
lin: two brothers, a sister, ten grand-
children, and three great-grandchil-
dren. Services were In Springfield,
Mass.. with local arrangements by
Gordon Funeral Home.
JACOB ROBINSON
73, of 1117 SW 32nd ave., died Sept.
18. He came here 13 years ago from
Philadelphia. Pa., and was employed
as an agent with the Seaboard Rail-
road. Surviving are his wife. Jennie;
a daughter. Mrs. Samuel Chernoff:
brother and one grandchild. Services
were Sept. 17 at Gordon Puneral
Home, with burial In Star of David
Cemetery.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. SOC 9288
MICHAEL LK DONE.
Plaintiff,
vs.
JEANNE LE DONE.
Defendant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO: JEANNE LE DONE
Defendant
tea Sutter Avenue
Brooklyn. New York
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Complaint for Divorce has
been filed against you. and you are
hereby required to serve a copy of
your answer on the Plaintiffs At-
torney, ANOEI.O A. AU, 1103 Alns-
ley Building, Miami 32, Florida, and
file the original answer in the office
of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on
or before the *th day of November.
19511. or the allegations will be taken
as confessed against you.
DATED at Miami. Dade Count \.
Florida, this 30tb day of September.
1959.
E. B. LEATHERMAN. Clerk,
Circuit Court, Dade County, Florida
(seal) By: K. M. LYMAN.
Deputy Clerk.
10/2-9-16-23
NOT.CE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No 59C 9241
BETTY MAYA.
Plaintiff,
vs.
UASTON MAYA.
I 'efelidant.
~s"SPiT%WOW DTVORCE
TO: CASTt iN MAYA
8414 Beverly Woods Street
I>,m Angeles 34, California
You G ASTON MAYA are hereby
notified that a Bill of Complaint f -r
Divorce lias been riled against rou,
a ml vou are required to serve a eopy
,,f vonr An-wer or Pleading to the
BUI of Complaint on the plalnti
Attorney, GOLDMAN & GOLDSTEIN
2303 West Hauler Street. Miami,
Florida, and file the original Answer
or Pleading In the office of the- Cleric
of the Circuit Court on or before the
3rd dav of November, 1959. If you fall
to do so. Judgment by default win be
taken against you for the relief de-
manded In the Bill of Comtaint.
This notice shall lie published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FL'.RIDIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, thla 29th day of September,
A' B. B. LEATHERMAN. Clerk.
Circuit Court, Dade County, Florida
(seal) By: K. >f. LYMAN.
Deputy Clerk.
GOLDMAN GOLDSTEIN
2303 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida
NH 5-0818
Attorney, for Plaintiff ,,,.,..,
LEO B. HOFFMAN
",9, of 8333 Harding ave., died Sept.
15. A taxi driver, he came here 21
years ago from Chicago. Surviving
are his wife, Anne, and three
including Mrs. Clara Levy Classman.
Miami Beach. Services war* Sept. lfi
at Gordon Funeral Home.
IN
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
MORRIS HOROWITZ
74. of 22fi? SW 11th t.-r.. died Sept. 1".
A retired grocer, he came hi
vears ago from Ixmg Island, N.Y.
Surviving are his wife. Dora; two
Jacob Udell. 62
Passes Away
Jacob Udell, of 241 28th st., Mi-
ami Beach, died Sunday, Sept. 27.
He was 62.
Mr. Udell was the founder and
an executive of the Gulf 6tream
Frozen Food Co. of Miami.
He came here 17 years ago from
Philadelphia, and is survived by
his wife. Leah: two sons, Lawrence
and Barton, Miami; a brother and
six sisters.
Services were Monday at River-
side Memorial Chapel, Alton rd.,
with burial in Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
.. MRS. MINNIE SHUBOW
" of 2:111 ."Hi st., died Sept. 27. She
ire .!.-, yeara ago from Detroit,
mnder of Pioneer Women.
SMirvlvliiu are a son, David, and two
oauisnters, Mr. l'aula Bloom and
lien rude Friedman. Services
11 Oordoa Funeral
ith burial In Mt. Slnal Ceme-
lery.
SAMUEL B. BERGEN
67 of 13SS0 NE 6th ave.. died Bepl.....
Surviving are hi- wife. Ksther:^a son,
Robert, three sisters, jpcjudlnt lira.
Thera Kasson, Miami: four grandchil-
dren and a brother. IjnfcuWW
Sept 2B at Gordon Puneral Home,
wit* burial In Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
HENRY BRIELOFF
8.-,, of 171 Collins ave., died Sept. 2a
He came here 20 years ago from tne
Bronx, NY., and was a retired sales-
man There are no local survivor..
Services were Sept. 22Jit Blveralete
Memorial Chapel. Washington ave..
with burial In Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
ANTHt/R NEWMARK
48 of 1330 StlUwater dr.. died Sept.
18 In San Mateo. Calif. He came from
New York 14 years ago and owned
the Knickerbocker Meat Co. here.
Surviving are his wife. _"":
Jamie; mother. Mrs. Sadie New mark,
brother. Murray: and sister. Mr*.
I iet t v ZtlOkar. S.-rv Ice. were Sent. .3
at Riverside Memorial Chapel. Alton
rd.________
SIOMOND LANDES
75. of 3*80 SW 2nd st.. who came here
IS years ago frofn New Wk. died
Satit 19. He was a Mason and mem-
l.r of Miami Hebrew ConttreKation.
Surviving Ik his wife. Heine. Services
were Sent 21 at Cordon Funeral
Home, with burial In Mt. Nebo Ceme-
tery. .
MRS. EFFIE K. ROSEN
74. of IMS SB ls^tli dr.. Bo. sOamJ
Beach, died Kept M. She came from
I'aterson. S J "even years ago. Sur-
viving are three sons. Abraham,
Louis and F.inaiinel. two daughter-.
Mrs. Helen tlootenberg and Mrs-
Florence Morris: and four brothers.
Services were Sept. 22 at Newman
Funeral Home.
Beth Sholom
Schools Open
MRS. ANNA HOFFMAN
J. of .,.. SW 37th st.. died Sept. 2:,.
one cam,, here five years ago from
nWo k' "'"' w"8 member of the
!i";f""" Friendship Club of Coral
uables Surviving are her husband.
Kichard. and a son. Richard R. 8er-
-ere in New York, with local
"ranaeinenta by Riverside Memorial
<- hajiels.
.....JACK LIFSCHEN
i, Of 13.6 Hl.wrltx dr., who came here
[ years ago from New York, died
wpt. :6. Surviving are his wife, Her-
inide three daughters, Miriam. Mra.
ri'ireme lleruld and Mra. Barbara
wauns, three brother.. Cconrad,
"*rry and Morris; and a sister, Mra.
Temple Beth Sholom religious
=rriool has begun the semester of
1959-60.
The primary and elementary
departments opened their pro-
gram Sunday. Sept. 20. The junior
high department got under way
the day before.
Staff and fatuity for the coming
year are Mrs. Edythe Geiger, Ber-
nard Kreisberg. Sol Lichter, Phil-
lip Mann, David Platt. Bernard
Kreisbeetg, David Shelist, Mrs.
Goldie Sussman, Mrs. Emily Grun-
wald, Miss Debbie Seidner, Mrs.
Dorothy Sponder.
TJovd Slone, Mrs. Marilynn
Bloom, Mrs. Barbara W'llig. Mrs.
Mimi Osman. Mrs. Thalia Stern.
Miss Nettie Goldstein, Dr. Morton
Maisel
In charge of direction of the
school are Rabbi Leon Kronish,
spiritual leader of Temple Beth
Sholom, Cantor David Conviser,
Herbert C. Bloom, education direc-
tor, and Mrs. Jerome E. Goldman,
arts and crafts director.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 59C 9230
MARION EVELYN QATJT1BR,
Plaintiff,
vs.
Al.llUKS ; UTIKK.
I lefendant.
SUIT FOR D VORCE
TO: ALCIDBh 'I M'llKK
1090 Southern Boulevard
BrobX, New York
Y.-ii ALCIDB8 QAL'TIER are here-
l.v notified that a Bill of Complaint
for Divorce has been filed
you. and jroo are required to serve a
copy of jrour Answer or Pleading to
the Bill "f Complalni "t, the plaintiffs
attorney, HAR04D B BPAET, ESQ..
I"7 I Ineoln Rd., Miami Beach. Florida,
ami 'lie the original Answer or Plead-
Ink In the office of the Clerk of the
Circuit Curt on or before the 8th
dav of November. ISSt, If you fall to
! Judgment by default will be
taken again-*'! V'U for the relief de-
manded In Ihe Bill of Complaint.
This notice shall be published once
each Week for four consecutive weeks
in TDK JBWI8H FMMUDIAN
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this 29th day of September.
\ 11 l'l'-i
' K I-. I.KATHERMAN, Cleric.
Circuit Court. Dade County, Florida
iseal) By: JOAN BNEEDBN,
Deputy Clerk.
HAROLD B BPAET
pi? I,Inc..In Rd.. Miami Beach. Hi.
10/2-9-16-23
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN/AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 5*C 9237
SYLVIA P. MANNING,
Plaintiff.
va.
.KiSI'i-M MANNlNti.
Defendant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: JOSEPH MANNING
You are hereby notified that a BIN
of Complalni for Divorce has b.-.-n
filed against vou. and you are requir-
ed to serve a copy of your Answer
or Pleading to the Pill of Complaint
on the plaintiffs Attorney, ALVIN
<;......man. k-.mh 1.1 ne Blvd., M -
ami. Florida, and file the original
Answer or PleakHu in the office >f
the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or
before the i'th dv of November, 1 I
if vou fall to d.. BO, Judgment by
default will be taken against you for
the relief demanded In the Bill of
i 'omplalnl
This notlas shall be published once
. I. week fi.l f.. I! eekS
In THE JEWISH Fl ORIDIAN.
DONE ANH ORDERED at Miami,
Florida, thla 2!,tu Oaj of Beptem
AD. I!
1: 1: LEATHERMAN, Clerk,
circuit Court. Dade County, Florida
(Maj) By: k m i.yman.
v Deputy CU k.
ALVIN GOODMAN
-L".| Blaa s) ne Blvd.
Miami, Flo-
Attorney for Plaintiff ,,,.,..,.

EUGENE BERSHAD
83 of lio-'.o N. Bayshore dr., died
Sent IV. He was a retired postal em-
and came here seven years ago
from Newark,-N.1. Surviving are his
wlfi* Ida; two daughters, Including
Mra. Beverly IjiFYngola. No. Miami
Beach: a sister, Mrs. Frames Kats;
and brother. Services were Sept. 20
at Riverside Memorial Chapel. Nor-
mandy Isle, with buflal In Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
MEYER GAINER
78. of 74S Jefferson ave.. died Sept.
IS. A retired coffee broker, he came
here seven year, ago from Brooklyn.
N.T. Surviving are his wife, Gussle,
two daughters and two sons. Services
LEGAL NOTICE
SATISFYING YOUR
DEEPEST DESIRES FOR
BEAUTY AND DIGNITY
The Vista offers family
nemorlal eatates on beautl-
ul'y landscaped park like
'rounds. Complete freedom
-f choice In memorials and
'" details,
Prrpttual tort fminseaas*
THE-V1S1 \
mi< .1 uirocni
Xueulltm O0emi _
Hnaaain(oPUsa.Hialeab,!1a.
Pfaonet TU 7-M01
ti OUR SPECIALTY *
CONDOLENCE BASKETS
MSHIV FACKtD
mi DEUVERfD WITHIN
- TNI HOUR -
FRUIT CIRCUS
1698 S.W. Flagler Tor.
PHONE
f> FR 3-9275FR 1-2511 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. S9C 927*
ELINOR L. L-UCEWICH.
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOSEPH LITCEWICH.
'nOTICe'-BY PUBLICATION
You. JOSEPH LUCEW1CH, Corner
of Carlock Avenue and Brace Avenue.
Perth Ambov, New-Jersey, are re-
quired to file your answer to the
complaint of divorce with the nerk
of the above Court and serve a copy
thereof upon Herman ohen. Attor-
nev, 1S05 CnnSTess Bldg.. Miami.
Florida, on or before Novemoer 3.
1859. or else complaint will be^ taken
is_ confessed. Dated September Z.
lM*' E. B. LEATHERMAN. Clerk.
Circuit Court. Dade County "orlda
(seal) Bv: JOAN SNEEDEN
'"*"" Deputy Clerk
10/!--l-2S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THF
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. SOC 9085
FLORA D BUPWORTaT, a
Free Dealer,
Plaintiff,
vs.
OLORIA QUINAREfl MEL1N and
ANTONIO A. MK1.1N. JR. he*
husband.
ItefendanLs.
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
TO: OLORIA QUINARE* MELIN
and ANTONIO A. MK1.IN. JR..
h.i Inn-hand
Itefendants
ItesMence l'nknown
Ynr are hereby notified that a Bill
of Complaint has been filed against
vou. and you are required to serve a
copy of vour answer or other plead
ins; on plaintiffs attorney, MILTON
A FRIEDMAN, 1111 Alnsley Build-
ing Miami XI. Florida, and file tin
original with the Clerk of the Court
on or before the Ind day of Novem-
ber. 1H59. or Judgment by default Will
be taken against you
DATED this Hth day of September.
1959. at Miami. Dade County. Florida.
E. B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk.
Circuit Court. Dade County, Florida
(seal) By: JOAN SNKKDKN
Deputy Clerk.
MILTON A. FRIEDMAN
1111 Alnsley Building
Miami X2. Florida
FRanklin l-K ,,,.,_,,.*
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 59C 9024
THOMAS K. LEWIS.
Plaintiff,
vs.
RUTH C. LEWIS,
i r. ii,in t,
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: MRS. RUTH C LEWIS
1227 Old ApnaiMtlis Boulevard
Baltimore Highlands
Baltimore '.-T. Maryland
You KITH C. LBW18, 4OT 0
Annapolis Boulevard, Baltimore Hlah-
ImmiIs. Baltimore 27. Maryland, are
hereby notified that a Bill or Com-
plain! for Divorce has been filed
,,.., ,,-t .on. anil >"! are r|Uired to
. ., i ap) of your Answer or Plead-
ing to the Bill of Complalni on the
plaintiffs Attorney, ItARSHALL H.
\HKli 110 Lincoln Road, M
Beach, Florida, and file the original
Knswer or Pleading In the office or
the Clerk of th- Circuit Court on Of
before the 23rd day of Oct......r. 1989.
If vou fall to do so. Judgment by de-
fault will be taken against you for
the relief demanded in the Bill of
Complaint. ....
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FI-ORIDIAN.
DONE and ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this 2.1nl day of September,
. 'e'b. LBATHERafAN, Clerk.
Circuit Court. Dade PountY, Mnrid*
(seal) By: R. H. RICE. JR.
Deputy ci.- k.
MAHSHAl.l. II ADER. Esq.
42" Lincoln Road
Miami Beach 39, Fla. (JE J^J^..^
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME" LAW
NOTICE IB HEREBY C.IVION that
the underslrned, desiring to engage in
s under the fictitious name of
I.APNDROMAT at S0..S
Way Intende to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida. ____
- }0M CORAL WAY. INC.
ALVIN S. CAWN
Attorney for Applicant
1 Lincoln Road. Miami Be81c0h,,_.,e.83
IN
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OP.
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. S9C-0OI9F (Cannon, J.)
LOUIS LEVINE,
Plaintiff. ,
SOPHIE LEVINE,
Defendant _____
AMENDED ORDER
OF PUBLICATION
TO; Sophie Levlne
100 Van Cnrtlandt Park South
Bronx 3, N.Y.
You are hereby notified that a
Complaint Pbr Divorce haa been filed
agaln-t you. and you are hereby re-
quired to serve a copy of your Answer-
to the Complaint For Divorce on
Plaintiffs attorneys and file the orig-
inal Answer in the office of the Clerk
of the Circuit Court on or before the
2nd day of Nov-.nl.er. 1959. other.
eXZS*ttiXlSait October. ,959.
ctrouii ,';.,,r':iI'!e:co^,S^or\da
cation hereof, or the same will (>CBflt t-ourL j |( ^",. |R
THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
N AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 47503-C
IN RE: Estate of
JACOB FEINBERO.
I >eceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All P<
Ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estste: .
You are hereby notified and re-
quired 1o present any claims and de-
mands which you may have against
the estate of JACOB FEINBEH
ceased late of Dade County, Florida,
to the County luitges of Dade County.
and file the same In their ofti
the County Courthouse In Dade Coun-
ty, Florida, within eight calendar
the date of the flr-l

be barred. j||NN|], ,.|:|V|;!
MYERS, HKi.MAN KAPLAN
By: Attorney Kenneth M. Myers
it Street
Miami M. Florida w/,.9..2,
Deputy Clerk.
TAI.lAN'OFF & WALLER
Attorns) s for Plaintiff
Lincoln Road >
Shu* P.each. Fla. 10/t.,.l,.i


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Friday. October 2.
.*
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FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
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BY
I


iJOCIAUIE
d.njut
ovnan s
lAJorlJ
,*. cartel will Wf oflt
'S Mr?Sidney Schwartz .
|Dd -avid will arrive afte
years of making tte
. navid will arrive after
,a-ars of making the
rounds in Europe and the C
The two rented cribs
".also be in place as daugh-
*" 2 son-in-law Meta and
je Bcrger arrive at the
S time with Iwo-year-o d
fa Ellen and six-week-old
JJi, Alan Twenty ports,
52s, brief whirl in Europe
e the plans for Harold and
JL, Cohen, when they leave
lhe Caronia for a Mediter-
Snean cruise... But Ester ad-
mils that if the three different
kinds of seasick pills she s tak-
ing along don't work, they may
be back sooner than all those
people think who hosted such
lovely Bon Voyage parties for
them
The new long distance dial
system works well, but Dr.
Meyer Eggnatz had to get an
operator to help him when he
talked to his wife, Rena, first
in Rome and then in Tel Aviv.
Rena is on a mission to
Israel, representing the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and
FJWO Postcard from Rus-
sia-Hy and Juliet Lieber writ-
ing from behind the Iron Cur-
tain: "One of the things we
don't like here is that we have
no idea how the baseball pen-
nant race is turning out. We
hope the Giants are winning
and the Reds couldnt care
less."

Bridal shower Saturday at
the home of Mrs. Sol Cohen,
?557 Jefferson ave., honored
Miss Phyllis Sweet, daughter of
Dr. and Mrs. Harold Sweet,
who'll marry Sanford Turner,
son of the Jack Turners, New
York City, at the end of Novem-
ber ... Mr. and Mrs. Turner
came down from Gotham Town
to attend the event Guests
also included Mr. and Mrs. Irv-
ing Radinshe's a sister of the
groom to-beMrs. Max WeRz,
Mrs. Robert Litowitz, Mrs. Ani-
ta Tischler, and Mrs. Earl Fer-
ron.

Jay Burke, son of Mrs. Mari-
lyn Burke, of Hialeah, is now
attending Hospital Corpsman
School at the U. S. Naval Hos-
pital, San Diego, Calif Jay
graduated from Hialeah High
School with honors this past
June, enlisted in the U. S. Navy,
and was sent to Boot Camp in
San Diego During this pe-
riod, he maintained the highest
average scores on examinations
given to his company, and was
given an academic award by
his commanding officer .
Mr. and Mrs. George Wes-
court celebrated their 11th
wedding anniversary Sept. SO
... The Wescourts and chil-
dren, Keith, Mark and Barbara,
make their home at I960 NW
187th ter., Opalocka ... Mr. and
Mrs. John Hensel, of Clifton
Heights, Pa., were house guests
of the Morris Zatlyns, of Hia-
fean Hannah is ways and
means vice president of Sister-
hood of Temple Tifereth Ja-
cob.

On the Birth Front: A son,
Barry Michael, born to Mr. and
Mrs. Harvey L. Brant Aug. 30
at Doctors Hospital Barry
joins brother, Jeffrey Randall,
* Bris was Sept. at the
Brant home, 8025 SW 19th St.,
""h Rabbi Samuel Machtei of-
ficiating Grandmothers are
Mrs. Tema Newman, of Miami,
nd Mrs. Eva Brant, of Coral
Gables .
Also: Gary Jay, born to Mr.
nd Mrs. Michael (Rita) Bern-
"ein on Sept 10 at Jackson
Memorial Hospital .. Bris wa
;*Pt 17 at the Bernstein home,
7' SW 2it ter., with Cantor
Herman Gottlieb officiating...
Maternal grandparents are Mr.
d Mrs. Irving Laden, Miami
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Bern-
stein, of New York, are pater-
nal grandparents.

Spotted at the Miami Herald
annual press conference: Mrs.
Louis Glasser, Mrs. Milton Sir-
kin, Mrs. Charles P. Feinberg
and Mrs. Jean C. Lehman .
Second row frontMrs. Jean-
ette Good seated next to Mrs.
Harold Solomon newest Her-
ald staff writer under the name
of Muriel Miles Mrs. Aaron
Farr in a talk on community
projects Mrs. Raymond Ru-
bin in a fetching brown and
black combination Mrs.
Irving Fell, seated with her, in
contrasting black and white ..
Mrs.-'Nathaniel Levin greeting
many friends .
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Revitz
will host a reception for Rep.
James Roosevelt at their home,
1250 97th st...Bay Harbor Isl-
and, Wednesday evening at
8:30 The reception was
originally planned for the Max
Krauss home .
Mrs. Solomon Margolis, act-
ing president of the Greater Mi-
ami chapter of the National
Women's Committee for Bran-
deis UniversityMrs. Albert I.
Jacobs, president, is still away
took along a portable TV set
to her ex-board meeting so that
everyone could watch the ch. 10
program, "The Women Chal-
lenge," a Friday, 10 a.m., pre-
sentation Reason? Fed-
eration of Jewish Women's Or-
ganizations was featured.

It'll be happy first birthday
Sunday for Susan Brooks,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jerry
Brooks, of Bay Harbor Island-
he's the Luau exec Mrs.
Bernard Israel, 12200 Vista In.,
So. Miami, is back from New
York Owner of the Gallery
restaurant here, she has been
making twice-a-month trips to
Gotham Town to supervise the
redecorating of the Gallery
champagnery in Greenwhich
Village That Rolls Royce
parked at Tony Sweet's several
times this past week belongs to
Ben and Joan Gaines Won-
der if the doormen call him Sir
Ben? .
At an Israel Bond luncheon:
Mrs. Henry Fine, her beautiful
red hair accented by a dotted
dress, near the table of Mrs. Al
Askowitz and Mrs. Nathan
Becker .. Mrs. Yaakov Rosen-
berg's dark eyes sparkling un-
der a vivid red hat, talking to
Mrs. Phil Schiff, one of the 12
captains soon to be announced
by Charles Finkelstein, chair-
man of the Jewish Attitudes
Survey here of the American
Jewish Committee .
Postcard from Spain: Janet
and Sidney Rosenberg writing
friends to report they had just
seen an exciting bull fightbut
were still thrilled by their just
concluded tour of Israel.

The ponies had bright rib-
bons wound in their manes .
The 25 children invited to help
Michael Cary Blasberg cele-
brate his second birthday were
enchanted by the ponies, the
ice cream, and favors After
the excitement quieted down,
Michael's parents, Larrie and
Arlene Blasberg, readied
things for a birthday dinner,
with guests including paternal
grandparents, Irv and Lil Blas-
berg, and George and Jessie
Light, maternal grandpar-
ents ...
At the Mia mi -Tula ne game:
Joe Arkin and his three boys,
Norman, Jules and Stanley
and Stan's pretty wife, Jfll .
The William Weintraubs, toiling
up the stairs Mrs. Sam
Weissel standing up to see who
was sitting down behind her...
Louis PrUikin and his Etta
also surveying the crowds .
Mickey and Ronny Escol stop-
ping at each row to greet
friends ... Dr. and Mrs. George
Lister seated in the charmed
Cwrtinved an Pate -B
r
"Jewish IHLoridLiaii
Miami, Florida, Friday, October 2, 1959
Section B
Hon. Jacques E. Turner (center). Consul of
France, leads a toast to the friendship of
France and Israel at the launching of the
French-Israel Festival of Friendship Wednes-
day in the Carillon hotel, preceding the in-
stallation of officers of the Women's Division
for State of Israel Bonds, joining the Consul
in the toast are deft to right) Mesdames Jack
Popick, Miami Beach Israel Bond chairman;
Trudy Hamerschlag, Chen chairman; Moses
P. Epstein, former national president of Hadas-
sah, who was luncheon guest of honor; Sam-
uel T. Sapiro, Miami Trustee chairman; Louis
Glasser, installing officer; and Anna Brenner
Meyers, former chairman and now honorary
chairman of the Women's Division. Not shown
is Mrs. Max Weitz, chairman of the Women's
Division. Wine used in the toast was Israel
Carmel champagne. Festival of Friendship
will be climaxed Oct. 22 by the French-Israel
Festival of Fashions in the Fontainebleau ho-
tel Chairman of the Festival is Mrs. Paul
Polk*.
1
Adirft
Opens Season
Adult social season of the South-
west YMHA begins next week with
a smorgasbord and games night
sponsored by the Couples Club
Saturday, Oct. 10, at 8:30 p.m.
, Arnold Klapper, Edmond Lynn
and Ed Ross are in charge of en-
tertainment. The function will be
held at the Southwest YMHA, 7215
Coral Way.
A new Young Marrieds Club, for
couples under 30, is holding its
first organizational meeting on
Sunday, 8:30 p.m., to develop plans
and program for the younger set.
County-wide hospitality program far Jewish servicemen is
launched by the National Jewish Welfare Board Armed Ser-
vices Division, with the cooperation of Greater Miami's Fed-
eration of Jewish Women's Organizations. Chaplain Norman
D. Hirsh, of the 2nd Marine Division, made a special trip from
Camp Lejeune, N.C., to attend the ceremonies staged at last
week's FJWO board of governors meeting. Mrs. Louis Glas-
ser (right) accepts her official Certificate of Appointment nam-
ing her chairman of the Armed Services Division for the 5th
District, as Mrs. Gerald P. Soltx (center) who heads the Serve-
A-Camp committee, looks on.
No. Shore Slates Two Speakers
North Shore Men's Lodge of
B'nai B'rith and the women's
chapter will hold a joint meeting
Monday evening at the Carillon
hotel. Jack Wilson is chairman.
The meeting will feature Rev.
William K. Williams and Nate
Perlmutter.
Rev. Williams, director of the
Florida Council of Human Rela-
tions, will speak on "Civil Liber-
ties and Human Relations in To-
ri a y' s Southland." Perlmutter,
Florida director of the Anti-Defa-
mation League of B'nai B'rith,
will bring to the body the commu-
nity's first report on the delibera-
tions of the ADL's national execu-
tive committee in New Orleans,
La.
Bonds to Honor
Women's Leader
Mrs. Max Weitz, chairman of the
Women's Division of Israel Bonds,
will be honored at a luncheon
Wednesday in the Mona Lisa room
of the Eden Roc hotel "for ten
years of devotion and dedicated
service to the State of Israel."
Coming to Miami to join in trib-
ute to Mrs. Weitz will be Rep.
James Roosevelt, of California,
eldest son of the late President
Franklin D. Roosevelt. Luncheon
chairman will be Mrs. Jack Katz-
man, chairman of the Sponsors of
Israel.
Active with Israel Bonds since
its inception, Mrs. Weitz succeeded
Mrs. Anna Brenner Meyers as
chairman of the Greater Miami
Women's Division. Mrs. Weitz has
been in Israel several times, and
is affiliated with many community
organizations.
Mrs. Weitz is one of a handful of
American Jewish women leaders
who are responsible for the Sept.
23 to Oct. 22 French-Israel Fashion
Festival. Some months ago, she
and several other national women
leaders developed the idea for the
French-Israel Fashion Show which
will take place Oct. 22 at a lunch-
eon at the Fontainebleau hotel.


? IJ> J
KMm
<>***
2,
Xarta Sses' fcw Y e* for BgM i
lmarflWiICidofW*i %$
ST!
12 tor
* "P.

are ^iS?

ifs
FL0l!AF0IEH0ST
DAIRIES
new Holsum
Real Jewish Rye
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1


October 2. 1959
^Jewisiif/oricffatr
igress Director To be Speaker
Irionda Women's Diviiion will
1 Z have as its guest speaker
JAchztz. for 12 years national
fc" of of the Community Service
Jlu of the American Jewish
fr*s The meeting will be
Kthe Normandy Isle Branch
f^Washington Fedaral Savings
! David Muskat, president of
Florda Women's Division, has
Lunoed that the Oct. 6 date will
fing together the combined
rds of the three women's chap-
iD the Miami area. The busi-
meeting will begin at 10:30
and will be chaired by Mrs.
tfild Jaffer. chairman of the ex-
Lyve committee.
7rs Russell Winer will report
tbe Louise Waterman Wise
uth Hostel luncheon scheduled
Tnec. 8 Mrs. Albert Rubenstein,
Lber^hip chairman of the divi-
L ill bring the group up to
fc on the paid-up membership
[scheduled at the Eden Roc ho-
J on Nov. 12. A detailed schedule
levenis for November, Congress
nth, will be discussed at the
ling.
batz will speak on 'The Amer-
ican Jewish Congress and its
Meaning to the American Jewish
Community." Schatz is chairman
of the national conference of pro-
gram directors;' representing all
major national Jewish agencies,
and a member of the executive
committee of the New York Film
Council and the Film Council if
America. He represents the Amer
ican Jewish Congress in the Adult
Education Assn., the American
Assn. for the United Nation*
CARE, Book Campaign for Israel,
and many other organizations.
Schatz has been religious and in-
tercultural film editor for the mac
azine "Film News," and has had
articles published in other publi
cations.
While the Women's Division
meeting in the morning is con
vened for members of the board,
the afternoon session beginning at
1 p.m. is open to the public.
Academy Women to Meet
Hebrew Academy Women will
initiate the'1959-80 season with its
first general meeting at the Al-
giers hotel Wednesday at 12:30
p.m. Program theme, "Reflections
on the Holiday Scene," will be nar
rated by Mrs. Jack Donnerstag.
Page 3-B
JWS. JOSEPH CArl
Mrs. Supworth
To be Speaker
"Crisis in the South Today and
Our Role as Women" will be the
subject of an address by Mrs. Ber-
nard Supworth at the Oct. 13 meet-
ing of B'nai B'rith Women, Sun
shine chapter, at 900 NE 125th st.,
No. Miami.
Mrs. Supworth is district and
state Anti-Defamation League
chairman. There will be a ques-
tion and answer period. A special
addition to the 1 p.m. program will
feature Mrs. Murray Summers,
North Dade-Broward Council,
B'nai B'rith Women, who will
demonstrate "Dolls for Democra-
cy."
ORT Rcelects
Mrs. Gayl Prexy
WASHINGTONMrs. Joseph C.
Gayl, of Philadelphia, was unani-
mously reflected national presi-
dent of Women's America ORT at
the final plenary session of the
Women's America* ORT biennial
national convention. The top-policy
meeting, attended by 1,200 Wom-
en's American ORT delegates
from 360 chapters throughout the
country, was held here at the May-
flower hotel.
Mrs. Gayl has been active in
Women's, American ORT for 20
years, and has been the organiza-
tion's president since October,
1958. Before her election to the
presidency, she was chairman of
the national executive committee.
She was chairman of the organi-
zation's 14th biennial national con-
vention (1957), held in Chicago,
and of its 1956 national board con-
ference in Pittsburgh. She had
previously held offices in the
Women's American ORT Philadel-
phia region, one of the largest
Women's American ORT areas in
the country.
Mrs. Gayl, who is married to a
physician and has three children,
is also active in Philadelphia Al-
'Come Back Unto Sheba'
"Come Back Little Sheba" opens
Tuesday night, Oct. 6, at Studio M
i Playhouse. Bird rd. and Ponce in
j Coral Gables, for a three-week
run, with Sunday matinee per-
formance. The theater is dark
Monday evenings.
Tifereth Israel Rummage Sale
Tifereth Israel Sisterhood is
holding a rummage sale at Stevens
Market, 6209 NW 27th ave., Thurs-
day and Friday.
lied Jewish Appeal and in commu-
nity social service and hospital or-
ganizations.
The convention at which she was
elected met to discuss means of
expanding and strengthening the
support which Women's American
ORT gives to World ORT Union,
| a global agency devoted to giving
vocational education to impover-
ished uprooted, and unskilled
Jews. The ORT network of schools,
located in 19 countries, now con-
tains 631 installations training
more than 36,000 students. Wom-
en's American ORT is the largest
ORT branch in the world.

1UUIIS SCHATZ
Now is the time for
romedary
DATI-MUT "Oil V
I to come to the aid of
Ithe party!
Pellctous deutrt
M .. madt
pith crisp, chunky
lllnuti nd Ihi
po'ld's choiceit
** ncu-
"Picked (or pr-
pet fretnniul
it in t supply.,.
MOMEDAIT
N0C01ATE-NUT ROU
' OtAHCIUUT MU
GOLFERS
Cain CosIMmcs with
NEW GRIPS
A" Styles A.aiUbt.
(shafting RsfislsUaf
Alterations
rOFFS u" P0NCE'
1 "COtAl 6AIIM
}R ALL MIXED DRINKS

HAPPY NEW YEAR
peace, health, prosperity and good will to all
RDINE'S


Fag* 4-B
+Je*istntjiJk>n
Friday. October 2.
Jewish Flondtc* tubuim
Your Marriage Counselor
. by t^ttmt$4l t-f. Jxlimg
Miami's Natioxaij.y Famous Masauci Authobitt. LecTvae* akd Aimtoa
Not every second aumv is doomed to failure.
Nor does erery remarriage importing children wind
up in the divorce courts.
If half of all second marriages prove unsuccess-
ful then by the same token naif of them succeed.
Take the Fishers, for example from my home
town. I have known them for many yean, and here
uhamid their manage from its very inception. Yea,
the Fishers are happy and have been so from the
day the rabbi pronounced the benediction. This
despite the fact that it is a second marriage for
both, and that both had youngsters by a previous
Damage.
Let me tell you something about the Fishers,
which is not their real name, of course.
When Carl Fisher's first wife died, be was in
his early thirties, the owner of a moderately pros-
perous automobile agency. Left with two young
toys. Carl remained single for several years after
his' wife's death. He kept a housekeeper for the
Recovers from Blow
Carl had been devoted to his first wife, and she
to him. Cart, in fact, was an easy going, genial sort
cf person who probably would have been happy
with anyone. His first marriage by common con-
sent had been a great success.
The sudden death of his charming first wife had
teen a severe blow. But it was one from which he
eventually recovered. He now spent most of his time
NnMing up his automobile agency. Virtually all of
his leisure time was spent with his sons.
Three years after his wife's death. Carl met
Betty at the home of a mutual friend. They liked
tach other immediately, although it was by no
means a passionate attraction. Nor was the first
meeting a wild infatuation in which Carl was smit-
ten w.th Betty's beauty.
As a matter of fact. Betty was visibly on the
plain side. She was short and dumpy. Her teeth
were rather uneven. And she had a round, undis-
tinguished face. Betty had been a widow for three
years when she first met Carl, and she had been
left with two small youngsters, a boy and a girl.
But if to an outsider Betty appeared to be
physically unattractive, she more than made up
for it with her unbounded enthusiasm. She was en-
thusiastic about practically everything, and her en-
thusiasm was contagious. In fact, where Cart tend-
ed to be rather quiet and reserved Betty was
bouncy and loquacious. She had a zest for living
that radiated from her even pore. These may have
been the very qualities that appealed to Cart in
the first place.
Determined to Succeed
Carl and Betty saw a good deal of each other,
and their friendship burgeoned into marriage, after
a year. As I say. the marriage turned out to be
an unusually good one. The Fishers are ideally
happy and so are the youngsters who are now quite
grown up. All the boys, I might add, have found
jobs with Cart.
Just before I left Baltimore for Miami. I asked
Betty for her recipe for her successful second mar-
riage. By what sorcery. I wanted to know, had she
overcome the well-known obstacles to a successful
remarriage? How had she managed to succeed
where half of all other remarried couples had
failed?
"I was dead set on making a go of my second
marriage." Betty explained seriously, "just as I was
dead set on making a success of my first one. I
knew that statistically remarriages had a difficult
timeespecially those involving childrenand I was
determined not to be another divorce casualty. I
also knew that it was largely up to the wife to make
a success of any marriage.
"During the time I saw Carl. I made a careful
study of his likes and dislikes. I charted his moods,
studied his personality and temperament, and even
read several books on male psychology. I was de-
termined not to reform him or nag him, either. My
one object was to please him, not to compete with
him, and I have dedicated myself to doing so ever
since we became man and wife.
"I learned the foods he liked and those he de-
tested, the amusements and recreation he prefer-
red and those he avoided, and I made certain Carl
was made as comfortable as possible.
"I vowed to myself that I would never mention
my former husband or ever make comparisons be-
tween him and Carl. I was resolved not to re-live
the past, but to concentrate on the present, and I
have faithfully kept these promises.
"I knew. too. that Cart worked hard, and that
he was physically exhausted when he came home. I
have tried to make him comfortable both physically
and iininiwnj I have refrained from bombard-
ing turn with idle gossip upon his arrival, or deluging
him with all sorts of trivial problems which I have
learned to solve for myself. Nor have I asked him j
to be a Mr. Fixit around the bouse
Twmaui Dreidsndt
"Instead, when Carl comes home I greet him
with a smile and a kiss, and a warm, appetizing din-
ner. I also learned the value of silence. I discov-
ered there was a time for talk and a time to be
quiet, a time to be busy and a time to be discreetly )
unobtrusive, a time to be affectionate and a time
not to be demonstrative.
"Studying Carl has paid off in tremendous div-
idends, and catering to his creature comforts has
paid off even more. Every man wants to feel he
returns to a home instead of a house. He wants to!
feel warm and wanted, to know that he is Mr. Big I
and that his wife thinks he's the most important per-
son on earth.
I have given Carl this feeling because to me
be is the most important person in my world. He
never takes second place even to the children."
"But isn't all Uus terribly one-sided?" I pro-
tested. "It seems to me you have given everything
of yourself. What about Cart? What part does he
play in all this? Or is be merely the recipient of all
your ministrations?"
'By no means." Betty retorted. "Carl is just
as much interested in me as I am in him. My in-
terest in and affection for Carl are fully recipro-
cated. This, too. is part of the secret. Show a man
you are genuinely interested in him and. nine times
out of ten. he will return that interest ten-fold. And
the same is true with affection. Love is a reciprocal
force. It grows and is strengthened by what you
give to another, not by what you take. And the
more you give of yourself, the more you are likely
to receive in return."
No Favoritism
"But what about the children." I persisted,
"didn't you find them a source of trouble between ,
you and Carl, especially since they were his children
and your children?"
No." Betty replied firmly. "I didn't. I thought
af the youngsters not as Carl's or mine, but as ours.!
Carl and I treat them all alike. And even though
in my heart of hearts I may have my favorites, 11
have gone out of my way not to show any favoritism. |
Nor does Carl. And that. I think, is another reason;
why we have succeeded where so many second mar-1
riages have failed.
"We have given our youngsters love and affec-
tion, without in any way spoiling or pampering,
them. We have been firm in our discipline. Be-'
sides, we made each of the chldren understand from
the very beginning that Carl and I truly loved each
other. And I think that helped a great deal, too.
For if youngsters feel you really don't care for your
new husbandthat you are unsure of vour feelings
they will do everything they can to create trouble
and dissention. We never gave them the chance.
Carl and I stand firmly together about most decis-
ions. We make them outside the presence of the ;
youngsters and then present a united front to them
It works like a charm."
Art of Living Togethsr
1 haVe been a marri*8* counselor for more than '
25 years. In all that time. I can honestly say I have
never know a couple who used more uncommon
sense, had a more profounder knowledge of real'
psychology, than the Fishers.
Most couples. I have found, soon lose interest
in each other once the wedding ceremony is over
They take each other for granted. They become
careless and slovenly. They either become bored
with each other or constantly battle for status,
power and prestige. Nine times out of ten they are
hell bent on reforming each other's personalities.
The Fishers have learned otherwise. They have '
earned the fine art of living together. They have
If*?? .,0 re*pect each otb*r** Personality and in-
dividuality. And. above all, they have learned the
virtues of tolerance and acceptance. In their hizhlv
successful second marriage there is a lessonfor
all of us, given the willingness to try.
Mr. life* h evsflehfe for privets mmtim
________ ** f I MsdkW m,- *
HAPPY SEW YEAR
Mr. Albert Herman is no longer associated with Adrian Thai F
MR. HERMAN will be pleased to again serve his many"""
friends. He is now associated with
REBUILT BATTERIES
12 Month Guarantee$7JO up, sxch.
EXPERTS ON STARTER AND GENERATOR REPAIRS
REASONABLE PRICES'
BATTERIES GENERATORS STARTERS
HI-VOLT BATTERY MFG.
mo N.W. 7th Avenue Phon. FR 9-3451
SS45 5. Dune Hignway Phene MO 1-5357
pwwftffWartt
RoWm Or. Tiber H. Store
311 Washington Ave, M A.
Phones: JE 1-1949 JE 14150
MRm
LINCOLN ROAD, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
ACTORS'STUDIO
M
PLAYHOUSE
Rirra

COME BACK
LITTLE SHEBA"
SUNOAY MATMEI KtTOtMAJKU
DARK MONDAYS
Ticket* St-25; Student* $1.50
M g Peace CortahtMMa. HI 4-3212
KNOW
YOUR
BANK
IT'S THE
KEY TO SECURITY!
Place your
trust where
you'll feel secure...in
a bank with complete
faculties,
including;
A VINOS
ACCOUNT*
CHICKIMO
ACCOUNTS
WIINDLV
I MRSONNIL
AUTO LOANS
AP#>MANC t-OANtJ
MOPtTOAOa LOANS
163rd STREET
SHOPPING CENTER
~" "~" BANK OF
DADE COUNTY
insurance Corp
CORAL GABLES CONVALESCENT HOME
-A Frfeadfe aed Centle Atamptura for Tanas fee lev*"
HPL25!* 0antltO T0 tANt rV kLut.1T. UMOWN.AUY ILL
AND COHVAllSCIMTS 24-MOUR REMSTBtEO NWSMC SttVKE
special Diet* Strictly Observed. Private Bathroom*, Air-Conditioned
Spacious Ground*. Patio. Swimming Pool, Planned Activities
ALL ROOMS ON GROUND FLOOR
Reasonable Rates Brochure on Request
Ferdinand H. Rosenthal Director-Owner
Former An'l Dir. ML Sinai Hospital Dir-ctor. Jewish Home for the Aaed
Cleveland. Ohio Pitt*burh. Pa.
7060 S.W. 8th Street Miami Flo. Phone MO 6-8826
FORECLOSE RE SALE
SOVEREIGN HOTEL
:.. Collins Avo.
Will be offer**] for ufe Monday, OCTOBER Srh. at 11:00 AM.
south front door Dad* County Courthouse, Miami. This ocean-
front hotel has 100 feet an Collins Avenue, is fully furnished and
rqu.ppodcomisis f 113 r^omti pkm ^fc^., sWt^usm. bar,
and swimming pool.
FOR INFORMATION, TELEPHONE
IE 1-1779
inriaii
Marrrtla f pf.o/Vri. Shop
Ifesdssws. With sr ivMesv efer
31*5 S.W. life STRUT
37551
"ft*
'Pickled Herring" CHARIIE'S
TW COfttffB t{{, INMJ- g -CKl
CHARLIE'S MARKET VIEW RESTAURANT
31*3 N.W. mfc AVBfM charts* Wsd-ss


Friday-
October 2. MM
^JewlstirhrldUati
FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS. WE EXTEND BEST WISHES FOR
\ ---------------------:---------------------------------_------------- -------------
Page 5-B
Celebrate The Holidays
With One Of These
SPECIAL VALUES
from your neighborhood
GRAND UNION or B-THRIFTY SUPERMARKET
we carry a complete line of holiday foods
ran* m?
MAff
QUICK FROZEN, GOV'T. INSPECTED, GRADE "A
BROILER
TURKEYS
5 TO 7 LB. AVG.------LB.
ROKEACH," "MOTHER'S"
GEFILTE
16 OZ. JAR
STREITS" or
'GOODMAN'S"
UNSALTED
MATZOS
12 OZ.
PKG.
(Nt
Prict)
MANISCHEWITZ"
BORSCHT
ITEMS and PRICES
EFFECTIVE THRU
SATURDAY, OCT. 3
* 1753 N.E 2nd Avenue
* 1263 W. Flagler Street
* 3050 N.W. 7th Street
*<450 N.L 125th Street
* 13020 N.E. 8th Avenue
* 321 Opo-lecka Boulevard
* 6190 S.W. 8th Street
* 5767 Bird Rood
* 2501 S.W 22nd Street
* 2593 S.W. 67th Avenue
* 1906 Ponce de Leon
* 11301 S. Dixie Highway
+ 18000 N.W. 27th Avenue
(CAROL CITY)
* 3271 Congress Avenue
(Palm Springs) Lake Worth
* 3000 Broadway
(RIVIERA BEACH)
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES AND SALES


Page 6-B
+JeistinDr**3*J
Friday, October 2, 1939

Women to Attend
Informal Opening
The new Mt. Sinai Hospital w:ll
have its informal opening when
the members of the Women's Aux-
iliary attend an Open House Thurs-
day. Oct. 8 at 10 a.m.
A preliminary' to the second an-
nual "Blesed Event" luncheon
scheduled for Oct. 30 at the Fon-
tainebleau hotel, the gathering will
serve to familiarize previous and
future women contributors to the
building fund with the features of
Florida's most modern hospital
slated to open formally before the
end of this year.
Guests will attend a briefing in
the 326-seat auditorium, during
which time a staff member will
explain the progress achieved and
the future advantages which the
new building offers to their re
spective departments. Dr. Sherman
R Kaplan will be speaker and
master of ceremonies at the pre-
sentation.
Women attending will be led on
guided tours through the building,' Flora Sinick.
which is now in the process of be-
ing furnished.
Mrs. Leonard A. Wien. chairman
of the Women's Division of the Mt.
Sinai building fund, and Mrs. A.
Herbert Mathes. chairman of the
"Blessed Event," will be hostesses.
Max Orovitz. president of Mt. Seventeen tuition scholarships of,
Sinai Hospital. J. Gerald Lewis, $135 wh have been awarded to
chairman of the building and plan- University of Miami students.
Membership committee of the Miami Beach
chapter oi Hadassah includes standing (left
to right) Mesdames Sol Lubell. Moe Thau. Lee
Howard, Herman A. Berg, Kenneth Sokolsky,
David Samuels. Ann Hirschman, and Miss
Seated (left to right) are Mes-
dames Manning Mintus, Norman Myer, Ed-
ward Holofcener, and Samuel Jackson. Not
shown are Mesdames Mickey Michaels, Da-
vid Komisarow, David Davis, Charles Bushell,
Joseph Abelson, Nathan Shain, Alfred Man-
dell, Morris Plaine, and Samuel Feierman.
Food Fair Foundation Awards 17
Scholarships to Univ. of Miami Students
scholarship grants, said that stu-
dents maintaining good scholas-
, He averages may have their
mng committee, and bamuel Cert- freshmen to seniors, by the Food scholarships renewed from term
ner. executive director of the hos- Falr st^.. FoundaUon, for the to term.
pital. will address the women semester now beginning.
Limited to the food chain's em-
ployees and children of employees,,
the scholarships are granted for]have been renewed:
each academic year. Henry M. Dubbs, School of Busi-
Under the direction of Jules S. i "ess Administration, 20, son of
. Schwartz, the Foundation, with of-! Mr and Mrs Robert F. Dubbs.
Miami Beach Council of B nai flces in Phliadelphia, administers:6791 SW 16Ul ****&, stuart
B'r.th Women will meet Monday. a national program of such schol *** business. 21. son of Mr. and
8 p.m.. at the DeauvQle hotel. Mrs. arships, since its founding in 1952 i Mrs- Leon A- RPee, 1191 71st St..
Sam Belsky will preside. Program lhe Foundation has granted 323 i Miami Beach; Joel A. Savitt, busi-
wiU include discussion of bulletin scholarships at 27 colleges and uni-! TCSS' ^ son of and Mrs. Da
and publicity, program, ways and versities from Connecticut to I vid N- Savttt, 3785 Chase ave., Mi-
Open House for the Women's Di
vision.
BB Women to Meet
Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Friedwald,
935 2nd st., Miami Beach; William
R. Newfield. business, 18, son of
Mrs. W. H. Newfield, 5146 SW 6th
st., Miami; Richard B. Skor, Arts
and Sciences, 17, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Morris Skor, 61 Tamiami
blvd.. Miami; Ira Weiner, Arts and
Sciences, 17, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Albert Weiner, 3601 SW 26th st.,
Miami.
Beach PTA Plans
"Beck to School'
When Parm jpi y, |(
general meetmToT^.o "^,ua3
j Beach Senior Hiph School Parent-
| Teachers Assn. on Tuesday at 7-a
| p.m., they will go back to school.
as the firs* pro-ram in a Bark
to School Night."
This will be their first oppw.
tunity to learn about tho courses
of their children and meet the
teachers in each of the classes,
Since Miami Beach High is qq
trin'e sessions, the Darents win
follow their children's schedule!
in ten-minute periods.
Irvin Katz. principal, will i
come the parents. The businesi
portion of the PTA will he held
over the loudspeaker during the
Home Room period by Mrs. D
Donald Smith. PTA president.
The last period will be an extr.
curricular course to include re-
freshments and entertainment in
keeping with the theme for the
vear, "Let's Get Acquainted With
Our School and Teachers." pt.
ents will entertain with an on>
mal song written by Mrs. Albert
Pollak.
They are Mrs. Irma Podvin,
Mrs. Theodore Struhl and Mrs,
William Wickman, with Mrs. sm
Kelinson at the piano. Their attire
will include hats from the collec-
tion of Mrs. Muriel Hirsch Pick.
Following is the list of UM sen-
iors whose Food Fair scholarships
means, and membership. Mrs. Al- Florida.
fred Reich, first vice president.
District 5, is Miami Beach Council Dr. H. Franklin Williams, UM
advisor. vice president in charge of
DIET FACTS:
WmWib
fORmmm TRUtSmssFLAvon!
Now ce/ebro/ing our 75fh Ann/versoryF
GRADE
"A"
PRODUCTS
SERVING
^GREATER
MIAMI
CHILDREN NEED
Homogenized Vitamin "D" Milk
PHONE JE 1-5537
ami Beach; William E. Schockett,
business, 19, son of Mrs. Motive
Schockett. 163 N. Shore dr., Miami
Beach; Richard A. Meirowitz.
business, 21, son of Mr. and Mrs.
William Meirowitz, 1315 SW 19th
St., Miami.
Students in their junior year in-
' ?lude the following:
Linda Rose Frisch, business, 19
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ben
| Frisch. 3130 Hemando St., Coral,
Gables; Stephen L. Kessler, 19.
: College of Arts and Sciences, son
jof Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Kess-
|ler, 4720 NW 5th st., Miami; Rich-
ard L. Ecord. business, 24, son of
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Ecord, 4593
SW 3rd st., Miami; Marshall Han
dleman. Arts and Sciences, 19,
son of Mrs. Lea trice Handleman.
939 Ahon rd., Miami Beach.
Sophomores are Richard Mater
son. Arts and Sciences, 18, son ol
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred L. Matersor,
H130 Hawthorne ave., Miami
Beach; Susan Goodman, School ol
Education, 18, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Martin Goodman, 5114
SW 5th ter., Miami; Joseph Heck-
er. School of Engineering, 19, son
of Mrs. Gertrude Hecker. 5731 SW
6th st., Miami; Deborah Schulman, |
business. 19, daughter of Mr. and
| Mrs. William Schulman, 7885 SW
, 17th tcr., Miami.
Entering freshmen: Elliott C.
j Friedwald. engineering, 18, son of
B tales Afcis* [
+Mm-mtUmttkm to prodoco tim
Afai-cwecc, dieniictive flavor of
Softs Knight pfoceMOnqfefCbtcea.
Deacioui wich cracken end fruit.
Com ilifhtly aore thea Homsstli
yon taets 0m dflbrcacsl
Swiss Knight
Tho Original
PROCISS G1UYIRI CHIESI
GREATER MIAMI HEBREW
ERIE LOAM
Meets Every Wednesday. to P.M.
BETH El CENTER
500 S.W. 17th A.en.e, Miami
for Information Meet PI J-ol0>
7200 N W mm? i?rlbot,d b* HI-ORADE FOOD CO.
7200 N.W. 29th Avenue phoo- Qx 1 PUN FOR BRIDEGROOMS
*** ,,;n"' '>' He* tor betptog
make the future wee. f.,r v,, ,,|
WAT GANS
3200 SW. 3rd. A.ee.e, Miemi
Phenes FR 3-4616 er HI 4-9911
___ ''epreeentmo
MmofOllTAN LIFE INSURANCE CO.
' M"n Ave. New York 10. N.Y
GORDON ROOFING AND
SHEET METAL WORKS INC.!
2148 N.W. 10th Av.. FR 3-7180
im y.V" r00t "V1"* now: you
Satisfactory Work by
Experienced Men"
TO LOW
CALORIE MEALS
Solve that weighty problem ...
serve plenty of nutritious, flavorful
August Bros. Sreid made
from select spring wheat flour
contains no shortening.
PUMPERNICKEL iOHEMIAN RTI
lAflffU VttNNA EGG TWIST
FRENCH BREAD EGG ROLLS
HARD ROLLS


friday.
October 2. 1959
Jewist>ncridltar
Jewish Library Resumes Hours
Page 7-B
Central Jewish Library of the
Bureau of Jewish Education has
reopened for the school season,
making available its 7,000 volumes
of Judaica in Hebrew, Yiddish and
English to borrowers in the com-
j munity. The library is open for
, frw circulation on Mondays, Wed-
ii' sdays and Fridays from 9 to 4:30
p.m.
Judy Mayfair. daughter of
Mi and Mrs. Bernard ha-
monI. of Temple Ner Tamid,
entertained last week at a
Dutch sapper and variety
show sponsored by Sister-
hood. Some 400 persons at-
tended.
Beach Hadassoh
Slates Symposium
"The World We Have The
World We Want" will be the sub-
[ject of a symposium held by the
Miami Beach chapter of Hadat-
Isah.
Officers and chairmen of the 11
[groups of the chapter are inrrted
to a day of orientation, education
and information on Monday at the
I Algiers hotel.
Registration for the conference
twill start al 9:30 a.m. Simultane-
lous workshops on education, fund-
Iraising, membership and program
|will occupy the morning.
After lunch and greetings by the
I president, Mrs. Joseph Shapiro,
[there will be a summation of the
[outstanding features of each work-
| shop.
This w;ll be followed by the
ItympoMum. Panelists will be Mrs.
Dorothy Krieger Fink, lire. Sam-
uel Z. Sakrais, president ( the
Florida region, and Mrs. Milton
Sirkin. Mrs. Sydney Gluckman. of
Orlando, who is the immediate
past president of the Florida reg-
mo of Hadassah, will be the mod-
I erator.
Mrs. Fred Jonas, executive vice
I president of tha chapter, as chair-
man of the day.
\huth Hold Member Party
Membership party was held by
I Temple Sinai Youth Group last
Iteek at the home of Dorothy
tempner. 1075 NE 176th st, No.
Iliami Beach. Snfty is affiliated
I with the National Federation of
[Temple Youth, and Carolyn Mays-
an is president of the Sinai
jlroup. Mrs. Dorothy Stone is Sis-
terhood chairman of Youth Group
activity.
MORE PEOPLE USC
rerfrtshint catonc-frM
, Suq0r,ne
SWIITtl IIUIISWU
m no row VMM
I 'kmiwM ky fettwi tot
1 MM, MnWMi m* locri-
I ^9msTr' *'' *> it knwMM,
-- l7*,f"*- "">!. Puff. Cos.
| J*WIU- PMHyktmlM. 4.-m
6URltlTi(0 XrtNFlll.
OOD STORCS IVUYWHIRI
CHINCH BUG CONTROL
n 4-8.12 month*
^'rant.td Satisfaction
Ai.. f y0ur mny bck
The following books have been
recently added to the library col-
lection :
Hebrew Books "Kivsat Har-
ssh," Shamir; "Even Al Pee,"
Habeer; "Yemei Ziklag," (2 vol.)
Yi^parj. "MaruisJiavah. v'emet,"
(2 vol) Amlshai; "Haphilosophia
Shel Hayaadut." Guttman; "Mar-
ikhot Hakhinukh b'Israel," Mer-
havyah; "Dor Baaretz, Anthologia
Shel Hasafrut Halsreelit,"
Yiddish Books-"Fun Barukh
Spinozoe bis Shmuel Alexander,"
Polishuck; "Farloirene Wegn,"
Coronia; '^)os Erste Un Dos Zente
Yor Fun Medina Israel," Noy;
"Di Welt is Ful Mit Nissim,"
Trunk*-. "Letzte Shriftn," WUhest-
dorf; "Sholem Asch Fun Der
Noent," Rosenberg; "D'Jebelia,"
Perlow; "Bei di Teikhen Warte un
East River," Federman.

English Books "Flowering of
Modern Hebrew Literature," Riba-
low, Menachem; "The Chosen,"
Ribalow, Harold; "The Varieties
of Religious Experience," James;
"Children of the Kibbutz," Spiro;
"The Long Road to Humanity,"
Coblenz; "Eva, Levin; For 2c
Plain," Golden; "Ashkenazim and
Sephardim," Zimmels.
To Jewry Everywhere...
BIRDS EVE
IOODJ
UtWyORSAUE
.............
BEST DISHES FN
THE NEW YEAR
from
HOLIDAY MEALS WITH
GREEN PEAS ^37
FRENCH FRIES^,35c
POTATO PUFFS ^. 43c
RASPBERRIES K 29c
ORANGE JUIC^c-, 51c
BIRDS EYE FRUITS. VEGETABLES
& POTATOES ARE KOSHER
BEEF, CHICKEN or TURKEY PIES CHICKEN A LA KING FISH
STICKS FISH BITES BEEF, CHICKEN or TURKEY DINNERS and BIRDS
EYI MAIN COURSES FOR TW6.
"Some Freeze Food ... Birds Eye Freezes Flavor99
Redeem your
5
NEWSPAPER
COUPONS
Now!
SEE MIAMI HERALD
AND MIAMI NEWS
Penn Food Trachlenberg Kosher Food Market
609 WASHINGTON AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
Beach Food Center
1421 WASHINGTON AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
Suniland Food Shop
105S WASHINGTON AVENUI
MIAMI BEACH
1323 WASHINGTON AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
Schitf's Market
1600 LENOX AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
Bob's Food Market
1116 NORMANDY DRIVE
MIAMI BEACH
Original New York Meal Market
7S7 41 t STREET, MIAMI BEACH
s
c



Page 8-B
*Jels*norMk*n
ftMaT. October 2.
Miss Bernstein Weds Robert Shapiro;
Bride Wears White Peau de Sole
mas. mmut SMAtmo
Specializing
in
Pormslt
Coc\Mil Goumi
s**J
BrwldJ Arnrr
PARSONS
3410 CMAL WAT
Optn MM.ay Nile
Til 9
163rd ST. SHOEING CtNTII
0^ Mo.y on. Friday
MiU TH
At a 4 p.m. ceremony Sunday,
Sept. 6, at Temple Beth El, Miss
Brenda Muriel Bernstein, daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Bern-
stein, Portland, Me., became the
bride of Robert Irv.in Shapiro, son
of Mr and Mrs. Max L. Shapiro.
1861 S\V 21st ter.. Miami. Rabbi
Raymond Leiman and Rabbi Eph-
raim Bennett, of Reading. Pa., for-
merly of Portland, officiated at
the double ring ceremony.
Escorted by her father, the bride
wore a gown of white peau de
soie fashioned wi'h a portrait neck-
line embroidered with imported
peau d'ange lace. The sheath line
was complemented by a Watteau
back which flowed into a court
train. Her finger-up veil of French
illusion was caught to a cap of
matching lace.
Miss Dorothy Anne Bernstein, of
New York, was maid of honor for
her sister, and the bridesmaids
were the Misses Beverly Shapiro,
sister of the groom, and Doris For-
gash. of Weirton. W. Va. Janet Les-
lie Shur. of Portland, cousin of the
bride, was the junior bridesmaid.
Miss Nancy Davidson, cousin of
the bride, was in charge of the
guest book.
Kenneth Greenburg. of Steu-
benville. O.. was best man. Usher-
ing were Harvey Brice. Gary anil
Ronald Saiet. of New York, cous-
ins of the groom; Mark Rubin.
Kenneth Myers and Dr. Eugene
Rosenthal, of Miami; Kenneth
Eisenberg, of Newark, N. J.; and
George M. Shur, of Portland, cous-
in of the bride.
Miss Bernstein graduated from
Waynflete School and Pine Manor
Junior College in 1957.
Mr. Shapiro graduated from
Harvard University in 1954, served
for two years as a lieutenant in
the Air Force, and was graduated
i in June from Harvard Law School.
Following a wedding trip to
'Canada, Mr. and Mrs. Shapiro will
reside at 2158 SW 14th ter., Miami.
Warner Kalin
MM. NANNON NrfSTffCN
Miss Block Now
Mrs. Westrich
Miss Sandra Ann Block became
Mrs. Hannon Lee Westrich in 6:45
p.m. vows Sept. 27 at the Fontaine-
bleau hotel. Rabbi Irving Lefarman
officiated.
The bride is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Abraham N. Block, 9270
Bal Harbor dr., Miami Beach. The
groom is the son of Mrs. Beatrice
LWestrich, 790 73rd st.. Parkview
'island.
Maid of honor was Miss Carla
Glaser. Stanley Kradman was best
man.
-n
LARGEST SELECTION IN AREA
NEW YEAR
CARDS
FAMilY-DEAR FRIENDS-GENERAL
We Ah* Carry Complete Urn* af
JELLIES CANDIES FRUITS GIFTS
Jmrh9m Courtesy
GiFT SHOP
SOI COLLINS AVENUE
{ Jair Across MacArtavr Causeway
bride chose a peau de soie
gown featuring a cathedral train,
long sleeves, and sabrina neckline.
Newlywed Mrs. Westrich is a
graduate of Normandy School. The
groom attended Lindsey Hopkins.
Following a reception at the
Fontainebleau, the couple left for
a Nassau honeymoon. They will
live at 2445 Lake Pancoast dr.,
Miami Beach.
centerpieces from $350
delivered anywhere in greater miami
personalized service at the
blackstone flower shops
where you get more for
your money un 6-1233
24 hour service except rose hashono and yom kippur
BIKUR CHOLIM KOSHER
CONVALESCENT HOME

NON PROFIT NON-SECTARIAN
SUPPORTED BY YOUR COMMUNITY
Under Strict Supervision of the Orthodox Vaad Hakaehruth of Florida
Rabbi Or. Iiaac H. Ever. Director
24 HOUR NURSING DOCTORS ON CALL
ALL DIETS OBSERVED CONGENIAL SURROUNDINGS
mooum twnrmnn t rmmsmics rmtntoof mhimnc
310 CelliRs Avt. Ph. JE 2-3571 Miami Beach
MRS. MAffTIN MATZ
NOW YOU DIAL
FR 3-4605
for
Newcorns Will
Live on Beach
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz offi-
ciated at the 5 p.m.. wedding vows
spoken Sunday, Sept. 27, by Miss
Barbara Altshuler and Jerry Nevr-
corn in the North Shore Jewish
Center.
The bride is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Maurice Altshuler, 936
; Byron ave., Miami Beach. hTe
groom's parents are the Milton
Newcorns, of St. Louis, Mo.
Maid of honor for her niece was
Miss Gertrude Zahn, of Camden,
N. J.
William Newcorn, of St. Louis,
was best man for his brother. Jun-
ior best man was Robert Bruce
Altshuler, the bride's brother.
The bride was attired in a bal-
lerina-length dress of silk taffeta
and chantilly lace, featuring a
bodice of lace with scalloped neck-
line and short lace sleeves. The
very full skirt was scattered with
lace medallions.
Her crown of pearls held a
double-tiered veil of French illu-
sion in place. The bride carried a
prayer book covered with orchids
and stephanotis.
Newlywed Mrs. Newcorn grad-
uated from Camden High School
and the Philadelphia Modeling and
Charm School. Her sorority is Tau
Epsilon Chi. The groom attended
Toledo. Michigan State, and Wash-
ington Universiles.
Reception followed at the Caril-
lon. After a New York honey-
moon, the couple will reside at
4001 Indian Creek dr., Miami
Beach.
Werntr-Kata
MRRY NFWCMN
Goodwill Group Schedule
Goodwill Group of Greater Mi-
ami will bold its regular monthly
meeting on Thursday, Oct. 8, 1
p.m., at 1947 W. Flagler t The
organization is also scheduling a
card party for 1 p.m. on Oct. u
at the same address. On Oct. B,
the Goodwill Group will gather for
another regular meeting at 1 p.m.
Matz, Dynner
Exchange Vows
Dr. and Mrs. Martin H. Matz
were married Sunday. Sept 27, at
the Seville hotel and are honey-
mooning at Montego Bay in Ja-
maica. Mrs. Matz is the former
Miss Judith Ann Dynner, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Dynner,
1SC0 Ancona ave.. Coral Gables,
and Dr. Matz is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Albert P. Matz, 2U0 NE 191st
dr., No. Miami Beach.
Rabbi Yaakov Rosenberg per-
formed the double ring ceremony.
He was assisted by Cantor Sheldon
Kodner.
The new Mrs. Matz was gradu-
ated cum laude in June from the
University of Miami, and is pres-
ently teaching science at Carol
City Junior High School. Her orig-
inal plays have been produced on
radio, television and the stage.
She spent the summer of 1957 in
Israel, studying under a scholar-
ship awarded her by the American
Jewish Congress.
Dr. Matz holds a Bachelor's de-
gree from Dickinson College,
where he was elected to Phi Beta
Kappa. He received his MD from
the University of Pennsylvania,
and is now a resident at Jackson
Memorial Hospital.
Dr. and Mrs. Matz wUl live in
North Miami Beach.
HAPPY
NEW YEAR
njv?t>i navo )v
II \WKK l\l
Chocolates
Delightful selection* of
isteuo-dark or milk chocolate
miniatures: or Faroe
Fruits and Mala.
i Appropriate assortm*r.,
/or adults and children
for every Jewish bolidsy.
Write tor bsstdajr brochures.
TO* INFORMATION
ea our Fund-Raisiaa*
Flan, write to:
l>ept. 0*8
Barrieini Caadies
2-l41.t A.e.
Los* Island City l.N.Y.
BARRICINI
DR. EDWARD N. TESCHER
ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF HIS OFFICE
FOR THE PRACTICE OF OPTOMETRY
at
3719 S.W. St*. Straw*
Miami 44, Florida
TelwPhwtM Highland 4-52*7
omci MOWS
:30 ta 5:30
Eve*!*-* by l.o.ls.ial
ITS EXAMJNO
CONTACT IBISES
A Nappy **. M*4tkr New Yeea- fo Owr CmtHmmn aw. frkmd*
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SLENDERIZING I BEAUTY SALON
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tEOOCINO MASSAM
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We specialise in Medical
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Nl 440.1


PridoY. Q<*>bT 2, 1959
+Jmlst> Flcrkttain
larnun
X9V

MOST of you are wondering
what to wear for services
during! the High Holy Day. We
thought you would be interested
in knowing of the suggestions of-
fered by women whose husbands
are the presidents of many of
Miami's congregations, as well as
what they are planning to wear.
The subject of hats was dis-
tussed at length by several of
the women, and they all agreed
that hats should be small. One of
the wives suggested that if you
wanted to wear a large hat you
.should make certain to sit in the
very last row.
Mrs. Max Krauss, who's hus-
band is president of the North
Shore Jewish Center, has selec-
ted a black and white cotton
print suit dress ensemble. Her
skirt is a sheath with a short
fitted bolero. Black shoes and
hat and a white handbag and
gloves will complete her duo-
color ensemble.
Out in Coral Gables at Temple
Judea, Mrs. Victor Reiter had
not yet decided upon her dress
for Rosh Hashona, but as she is
scheduled to give the candle-
blessing on Yom Kippur when,
for the Fast day, she will be
dressed all in black. Her crepe
sheath is trimmed in satin, and
has its own matching jacket. The
satin is inserted at the waist in
small pleats and gives a cumer-
bund effect, and her dress also
features a high bateau neckline.
The jacket has a wide lapel and
and is trimmed with satin bind-
ing. Her shoes and bag are of
doeskin.

IN keeping with the lighter col-
ors recommended for Rosh
Hashona, several- of the presi-
dent's wives are wearing beige.
Mrs. Robert Newman, of Beth
Am Temple, has selected a beige
silk shantung with brown acces-
sories. It features three-quarter
length sleeves and a modified
coat dress styling with a large
stand-up collar. Her all-feathered
hat is composed of tones and
shades of browns.
On Miami Beach, at Temple
Beth Sholom, Mrs. Harry A.
Greenberg is wearing a black
silk shantung sheath. Her small
white hat is composed entirely of
osttrich feathers, and the remain-
der, of her accessories are in
black.
At Beth David Congregation,
Mrs. Sidney Aronovitz has
chosen a beige silk linen sheath
with a short bolero jacket, which
features a large portrait-type col-
lar with three-quarter sleeves.
Her hat is a small cloche of beige
felt, and her shoes and gloves
of a deeper brown tone.
Mrs. Benjamin L. Fabric, of
Temple Ner Tamid, is waiting for
the weather to help her decide
which ensemble to -wear. De-
pending on which day some of
you may see her, she will be in
either a beige-toned silk shirt-
waist or a linen just a shade
lighter than royal blue.
*
I^IRS. Fabric's indecision is
probably reflected in many
of you. Our climate is so un-
predictable that even some of the
ensembles selected by the women
already mentioned may have to
be changed at the last minute.
Even if the weather turns un-
comfortably warm, and there is
no air-conditioning in your con-
gregation, refrain from wearing
a sunback or low cut dress. Hats
and gloves axe necessary, and it
goes without saying that stockings
are, of course, to be worn.
Remember though, this is a
religious holiday, not a fashion
show. As long as what you are
wearing is simple, and in good
taste, you will be dressed appro-
priately for services. In keeping
with the season, may I extend my
very best wishes, and hope that
this coming year brings happi-
ness to us all.
Mrs. Appel Will
Be Memorialized
A women's monetary fund on
Miami Beach will be named after
Mrs. Ida Appel, who died here
last week.
Hebrew Academy Women Wed-
nesday changed the name of the
organization's Binyan Bank Fund
to the Ida Appel Memorial Bin-
yan Bank Foundation, Mrs. Jos-
eph Shapiro, president, announced.
The fund will memorialize the
former president of the Hebrew
Academy Women and one of its
founders. The fund was started
five years ago to raise money for
the proposed Hebrew Academy
structure to be launched soon.
The Foundation will be used for
the construction of the new He-
brew Academy Auditorium.
Season's Greetings
from the Salons of
Little Rubin
and
Miss Georgette
"Rent a painting for your home or office'
scornavacca gallery
6711 RED ROAD
MO 1-7710
SOUTH MIAMI
MO 74479
Harry Schneiderman is chair-
man of the annual poet-Yom
Kippur dance sponsored by
the Men's Club of Temple
Ner Tamid at the Dunes motel
on Oct. 12.
Dr. Cirlin to Speak
Next regular meeting of the
Greater Miami Lay Diabetes Soci-
ety will be held Monday, 8 p.m., at
the DiLido hotel. Guest speaker
will be Dr. M. B. Cirlin, of the
Dade County Medical Assn., whose
subject will be "Diseases of the
Skin in Diabetes." A question and
answer period will follow his talk
Mitchell Sandweiss (left), president of the B'nai B'rith Youth
Council of Greater Miami, presents a check for $750 to Jack
Fink, chairman of the BBYO board of directors. The money
represents the collection of funds made by BBYO chapters
here for the Bellefaire Hospital in Cleveland, O., for emo-
tionally disturbed children, a recipient of B'nai B'rith funds.
The check also represents the 750 members of the 27 B'nai
B'rith youth groups here.
ijjff t^ocia/ite
Continued from Page IB
circle The Marvin Zanks
hurrying to get to their car
ahead of the crowd Ditto
most all at Juniors for coffee
afterward .
In addition: The Ralph Spe-
ros and Irving Rothmans, with
a group at a large table .
Commissioner Alex Gordon,
Morie Morris, Manny Gold-
strich and Mickey Krause in a
booth Leonard and Dune
Treister at another table, with
a gay group of friends Bill
Pite, his wife and son, with
Herb S c h w*a r z and Mrs.
Schwarz Harry and Marilyn
Smith back from their vaca-
tion.

Eating out Sunday night: Mr.
and Mrs. Morris Dubler Mr.
and Mrs. Herbert Abrams and
brother, Fred Vacationing
at the Barcelona is top hit song
writer Nat Simon Friend is
Jack Parker, manager of the
hotel ... Off to New York on
a buying trip is Dan Herman,
of Sandra Post Wife Lucy
is chairman of the Variety Chil-
dren's Hospital Ball in Janu-
ary.
FLORAL CENTERPIECES
by SYLVIA HILStN Bk fm* ap
For YONTIF $J.JJ *
DELIVERY ALL GREATER MIAMI ORDER EARLY
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1572 Washington Ave. JE 2-3231
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ESCROWS ABSTRACTS TITLE INSURANCE
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M0 6-8301
IF YOU LIKE
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LEO ALIEN, Direct*






*~~,


Friday. October 2. 1959
*'Jet*is/i fhrMi&n
Page 11-B
Home of Aged Auxiliary; looks Ahead
. .._ _. _____
By MRS. SOL SILVERMAN
Prsic'e>nt, Jtwiih Hem* for thg Agtd Auxiliary
The 2.000 women who comprise our Woman's
Auxiliary live by this principle: We have dedicated
ourselves to bring "life" to the "living." It is be-
cause cif the unceasing work of kind and generous
people that we are able to bring hope, comfort and
peace of mind to those who might otherwise be
abandoned in their twilight years. In the 14 years
of our existence, we have seen many dreams come
true. The Jack Ablin Memorial bldg., which houses
(he chronically ill and the incapacitated, was just
the beginning.
The Sol and Mollie Sih/erman Physical Ther-
apy Room, under the direction of a trained physi-
cal therapist, has opened new vistas to the physic-
ally handicappedi The Sidney Appel Med.cal Fund
provides all the special medical needs and medi-
L cation in performing these services. The -Sophie
Sherry Occupational Therapy Room provides the
means of an art and crafts program, conducted
by a trained group worker in cooperation with the
wonderful volunteer service of the Council of Jew-
ish Women.
The dedication of the new pavilions at Douglas
Gardens, just a few months ago, is the realization
of so many years of dreaming and planning. This
has been the inspiration for the women, who give
of themselves so generously to help older people
live again.
Major Contributions
A summation of our activities and contribu-
tions to tthe Home for the past. 12 months shows
that towards maintenance, we have given $12,000.
For medical aid to residents, we have paid $1,-
351.82. Occupational therapy $120. Physical Ther-
apy Room $250. We were proud to contribute $500
towards the cost of the drapes for the new pavil-
ions. These were our major contributions.
While we are concerned with the security and
health needs of our old people we also try to bring
sunshine into their lives, with happy occasions. Our
monthly birthday parties, Mothe's and Father's
Day, and Chanaka parties gives them a new lease
on life. They dress up in their best and anticipate
each such occasion with great joy. Usually a pro-
gram of professional entertainment is arranged
for their pleasure, and refreshments are served to
our residents and their guests.
Once a year, we arrange a picnic and boat
ride. During the season, we invited the ambulatory
residents to many of our Auxiliary functions. This
always Rives them pleasure and an opportunity for
our members to see our old people looking so well
and happy.
Our Auxiliary also participates in the Com-
bined Jewish Appeal drive, and plays an important
role in the United Fund drive. Our women feel
that they receive much more than they give. Al-
ways in their hearts, the cause has been the goal.
We have never been discouraged in our desire to
help our elders.
Oihtr Auxiliaries
All of us in the senior group take special pride
the devotion an* progress of our two other
women s Auxiliaries. The Hollywood Women, un-
oer the leadership of Mrs. Stanley Beckerman, has
done a fantastic job in its brief existence, having
MRS. SOI UHfUMM
contributed $10,000 for a research laboratory to be
used for a basic research program in the study of
geriatrics and gerontology under the supervision
of the University of Miami medical school.
It has also paid for two $5,000 rooms in one of
the new pavilions, dedicating one in tribute to onr
Greater Miami Auxiliary, a most unusual tribute.
The Junior Auxiliary, whose founder president was
Mrs. Larry Silverman, and it now under the lead-
ership of Mrs. Louis Cole, has also made great
strides. It contributes monthly to maintenance,
and has presented two rooms. Last year, the group
presented our residents with a bus, which is used
to take them to concerts, movies and parties.
To our entire membership, to our two wonder-
ful Auxiliaries, to all our devoted friends in this
community, in behalf of all our women, I extend
hearty good wishes for a wonderful New Year.
Hadassah Service
Continued from Pao* 10-B
prea of endeavor is the school of dress-making and
design, which has already attracted the attention
of the fashion conscious the world over. In the
years to come, we will share in the joy of knowing
that we did our best to rescue children when there
was yet time.
Hadassah is proud of its part in the support of
Israel for the good of its people and the progress
of mankind. The Hadassah Medical Organization,
the project known as H. M. O., includes an exten-
sive health welfare program, where new treatment
techniques, drugs, equipment and specialized per-
sonnel strive constantly to keep the horizon of
Hadassah's standard making medical work in
Israel on a par with American achievements, on
which they are patterned. During this past year,
new services, research and perfected procedures
have once again added luster to the work of
Continued on Pago 13 B
I BEST WISHES FOR A
HAPPY NEW YEAR
From the .
IVKW
CAMP
DEERFIELD
LAKE LURE,
NORTH CAROLINA
Dr. Sidney N. Solomon
Victor Levine Carl Gardner
Dhecferi
^ 2<^*^>S*S&:S*eJffi%^*^*32*2=
New Year's Greetings to All
FROM
Florida State Theatres, Inc.
THE COMEDY-ROMANCE WITH THE ACCENT ON YOUTHll
MWMOUHT HCTU5 PBfSCNTS
CLARK GABLE CARROLL BAKER
LILLI PALMER LEE J.CORR
M PERLBERG SEATON .** j|
but v.
NOT
FOR
*>MMBAMIYCQEniowsGOHQ.AMM(*uM>nun Ok&JtbL
0M OtoeMeUlOe KM ItlTff UK- .. t, Ktm epea lenoj Ae," f
* kUMmuMMosiM \Jhi. I
fin rt th Ttm mwiiummw iwi rti izU
5C OLYMHA BEACH GABLES
OCT. 13th
in
Mr. VICTOR POSNER
STEVEN & GAIL
extend the best wishes of the
holiday season to all thier
friends and relatives
BALTIMORE (514 St. Poor Place) MIAMI BEACH
CALIFORNIA'S
nd NEW TOWER California^ WorWe
Fomout Retort overlooking the Bluo Faoifig
whoro Wilthire meets the Ma. Twonty minute*
' from International Airport. 450 luxurlouo
mw and bungalows all with television and)
radio. Complete convention facilities Banquet
room* for up to 2,000, air-conditioned, belting^
aw Venetian Room and Cantonese Room.'
j_ Swimming pool Beautiful ground! anal
iABH&i landuoped gardens Rates from Me
$9Et> W'i,# WiHIom W. Donnelly, Oen. Mo*.
Across th. U.S.A. and In HAWAII
MASSAGLIA
CREST OF GOOD LIVING
JOSEPH MASSAGLIA, JR., rVoiidowt
MASSAGLIA HOTELS
. SANTA MONICA. CALIF. Hotel Mlremer
. SAN JOSE. CALIF. Hetel Selnte Clelro
. LONO IfACH, CALIF. Hotel Wiltea
. AllUP, N.M. Hotel El Reecho
e ALIUQUIRQUi. Hetel Freeclscee
. DENVER. COLO. Hetel Pert Leite
. WASHINGTON. DC. Hotel Delete*
. HARTFORD. CONN. Hotel lond
. PITTSIURSH, PA. Hotel Sherwva
CINCINNATI, O. Hetel Sieten
NEW YORK CITY Hetel Ne- Yorker
HONOLULU Hotel Weilltl liltmer*
World-famed hoteli
Teletype serviceFamily Flaa


ttMoy. Oaebm X j^i
.4A FAMBLY
EXPEND BEST W35EE5
YEJUk. -
GLASS
's Stake Nvse Education
mm f k* .V
BANK ..(MIAMI BEHH
TC XT XAXf rSltaUS A3D ACQCA3TJWCES
A XCS7 =a?PT SEW THA3
sa
CCT. r* ?.~ !
Xra. -.ztttiwi 3cas, -Sw 'nf a zmns and
BUT CULU!iCH Twrf Twrr 3 -fr^ ^-nr^-i'
3 ?. jLtiiiii Xnrwnij. in its "r' Tnrr j
VL Sh yuat air tfh>
is xtea taditba. Ci


rridqy.O***"2-1959
+Je*MiFbrldlaii
Hada$$ah-47 Years of Service for Zion
Page 13-B
Continued from Pag* 11-B
h M 0. The acquisition a Cot)aii n*chine for
the treatment of cancer was one of tilt excitinf
advances ^^flWIfcTI....... m
Complex Medical Center
In July, I960, the new Hadassah-Hebrew Uni-
Tersity-Medical Center in Kiryat Hadassah (Hadas-
sah-Townso named last year by the Government
0f Israel in recognition of Hadassah's contribution
to the State, began formation. In the two-building
hospital there will be a doctor's lounge and many
looms bearing the names of individual residents
of the Greater Miami area, as well as the names
0[ the Miami and Miami Beach chapters of Ha das-
Sjh, some of whose members will have their names
on the huge Wall of Healing on the site of the Med-
ical Center. Our chapters have played a dedicated
role in this brilliantly conceived group of build-
ings because, whether you go from medical school,
to teaching auditorium, to classrooms, to research
iDd clinical laboratories, or proceed from materni-
ty pavilion to nursing school, past dignified de-
vices to honor donors, into an Outpatient Depart-
ment capable of handling 200,000 visits a year
this City of Science will be ready to serve Jew,
Christian and Arab alike.
In the year to come, Hadassah hopes to further
its exchange fellowship program, increasing the
number of fellows receiving post graduate training
in the United States and in other leading top medi-
cal areas throughout Europe, and inviting more
experts to go to Israel to teach their specialties
there, and this is a two-way road, for these men
are sharing the fruits of their achievements with
each other and within their people.
One final issueour relationship to the com-
munity, to welfare funds, UJA and Israel Bonds.
We are proud to know that the Hadassah leader-
ship h*as boon in the forefront of the UJA and other
community drives. They have done their tasks well.
Peace and Plenty
Each day the Hadassah women has woven one
more thread in establishing the lines of communi-
cation with their past, as they identify themselves
with the historic people of their past and as they
prepare to make a great historic contribution to
the presmt. They know that nothing approaching
accomplishment grows weary. Analyzing this, one
can readily see that it can be applied to every
phase of our efforts.
Hadassah has become a way of life for hun-
dreds of thousands of American women appealing
to their heritage through the American affairs pro-
grams and the opportunity for participating in civic
and community activities. Hadassah reaches out
te every human heart through its health and social
welfare program in Israel. The world has acclaim-
ed her for medical excellence and for her attain-
Aorial view of Hadassah Medical Center.
ments in the redemption of barren soil and broken
bodies.
May the year which lies ahead see the fulfill-
ment of dreams in every democratic corner of the
earthpeace and plenty for all mankind.
Mt Sinai Women
Continued from Page 12-B
hospital to meet the demands of increased enroll-
ment. Although students cannot reside on the
premises, housing is available for those who desire
to live in. All students are under the care of their
own school's private physician and active health
program. Not only are physical needs considered,
but-social and emotional needs of the student un-
der a health and active guidance program.
From a report issued at the time of the 1959
capping ceremony, this quotation explains the
reason for the many devoted hours of service to
the School of Practical Nursing given by the
Women's Auxiliary of Mt. Sinai: "The Women's
Auxiliary feels that its support has made possible
one of the finest practical nursing programs in the
country, that it helps safeguard the patient and
nursing care not only at Mt. Sinai Hospital, but
throughout the country, since many of the grad-
uates return to their home communities or find
their fields of employment in doctors' offices, pub-
lic health, private duty work, or in other commu-
nity hospitals."
As president of the Auxiliary for a second
term, I deem it a privilege to head this wonderful
organization of women who constantly strive to
serve toward the progress of the hospital.
I m\ '""^ateeS P'lrO in i? If uinnil
with, wonderful
Hot Springs waters
H
D'ink tkm world-tamont -ofci. foae
I*, loorfii'ag batkt and thrill to a
.. le.ie ol ptiyiKot -eM-oeiag.
You C." b.tH. .way ell your .ch.t and
p.mi du. to femiori and ferio,ue end find
r.li.l lor erfhritii. rhoumatltm. and h"jh
blood preuure jn lha redioectire, tHermel
waten of Hoi Spring! Government r.qJeled
WthhoiM "9rl in me Arlington -here yon
can 90 in roba and tlipport by tpacial
alavator direct from tka privacy of your room.
Troe hospitality and tka finoit in entertain-
ment it yor to anfoy at tko Arlington
Hot Springs' top luiury hotel. Concert, dinner,,
and ballroom denelno, move by Eddy Rogan and
tka Arlington Orckoitra. Social divartioni
under tko guidanca of our grecioui Social Hottoaa.
Enjoy your favorito racrootion in
Hot Springt. Suporb golf itk
Club privilege, at our noorby
Country Club. Yeer-ereund fithing
at lalei Hamilton, Ouackita. and
Catherine.
3L Finott food iereet anywhere i tko
p. id. of the Arlington.
Room ratat -ith karf bath from it I
IT thai*. WH* torn kadi and prh-ato bath
.fr^^d-H^WAujU.
No room chorga for ckMron undor 14.
HOTEL and BATHS
beautiful color brochure -r-e
McEoeMn, *,, Manager,
i\
HOT SPRINGS
NATIONAL PARK, ARKANSAS
^ In A
Jweal...
BECAUSE YOUR
AIR CONDITIONER
BROKE DOWN!
Wl 5-2722
For Fast Radio Dispatched Service
LATEST MODERN FACTORY EQUIPMENT
HIGHLY SKILLED TECHNICIANS
LOW, LOW PRICES
Guaranteed
Qaallt,
Workauahlp
SHERBA BROS.
AIR CONDITIONER REPAIR DEPOT
?n*A Kl C K3.J CT nn opt w. mxri highway
*U3U n.C. IJ^rQ ) I -BEAB OP SOCK OP BIDDING
ROBBINS Roofing & Sheet Metal Co.
"THE RESPONSIBLE ROOFERS" Established 1919
ROOFING and ROOfING SUPPLIES
RZTAIL CONTRACTING REPAIRING
"WRITTEN GUARANTEE ON ALL WORK"
Phone FR 4-3705
ESTIMATES FREE
222 N.W. 26th ST.
GENERAL AUTO REPAIRS
WOODY'S TEXACO SERVICE
lubrication Specialists Gas Oils Batteries Tires
Strict with a Smile"
470 N.W. 5th STREET
PHONE FR 3-9533

Carpet Laying and Repairing
RUGS CLEANED, DYED and DEMOTHED
26 S.W. South River Dri Phones FR 9-1155 & FR 1-2007
ACE RUG CLEANERS
FURNITURE CLEANING
"Prompt Day aae Night Service"
MeCORMICK-ROYETT
PLUMBING CONTRACTORS
FOR SALES, SERVICE OR REPAIRS PHONE PL 7-0606
443 PARKWAY DRIVE MIAMI SHORES, FLORIDA
To Sun You is
Our Pleasure
Ed. J. Vischi
Real Estate in All
its Branches
124*4 N.E. 7th AVENUE
Pbone PL 44441
i
Miller Electric Co.
OeAUTY CONTRACTING 4 SERVICE
3905 N.W. 37th Ct.
Ph. NE 3-2686
Lula Jones
flowers For All Occasions
D E L I V I I T
Cot Flowers
Pottee Plants
Corsaf es
Funeral Designs
Weaainas
Parties
191* S.W. lib STREET
Phone FR 4-5790
FOSTER ELECTRIC
COMPANY. INC
Electrical Contractors
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
INDUSTRIAL ALTERATIONS
MAINTENANCE
24 Hour Service
AIR CONDITIONING and
ADEQUATE WIRING
2264 W. Flagler St. Kl 8-2671
N.Qhta, Sundays & t-folidaya dial
HI 347922


Page 14-B
+Je*lsMorktian
*'
L'Shona Tova Tikesevu
STRATH
HAVEN
-HOTEL-
Joseph Hoffman
Pearly Gait
by Hal Pearl
';
\
ONCE A
KNIGHT
ALWAYS A
KNIGHT
AT
KING ARTHUR'S
COURT
for Dinner t Dancing and
ft Be Entertained 2y the
Six Singing Strings
Miami Springs
Villas
TV S-4521 Art Inns, m
OUR SPECIALTY
NICE, THICK, JUICY
PRIME RIBS OF BEEF
-AMD THE VE*T BtST IN TOWN!
IANQUET FACILITIES
Candlelight Inn
1131 Commodore Plaza
Coconst Grove
HENRY LE1TSON, Mqr.
OINNfR P Sb"IS
Tu mem
r\utki TO Tai\.E Gv. i
PHONE UN 64303
- i' -
>


>

I
Urges* family Trade in f lerido *
ON 79th ST. CAUSEWAY ,
****** *******^*-l-I
H
4 Hoppv Mew y0r to AH
Please .
Do not think mo concerted
STOECJKER'S
Sentj. PrkM eternal am gc
Steaks
MS. r>M. MO 1-OJ44
7o AVI. ON IW
______(S.W. 8th St.)
NAMES MAKE NEWS: An overflow crowd was on hand for Mi-
I ami Beach Hieh's opening football game at Flamingo Field. Among
the many loyal rooters were Mr. and Mrs. John Serbin. whose son.
, Jon. lormer Beach grid great, is now at Harvard Mrs. Jerry
Warren, whose daughter, Barbara, is one of the fetching baton wield-
ers with the school's hand ... Mr. and Mrs. Dick Pindley, whose
son, Steve, plays center for Beach, and Lou Greenwajd and son,
Danny.
Merle Troop. University of Florida grad, has recently joined
the staff of WCKT ch. 7. Her dad and mother, Morris and Jerrie
Troop, will celebrate their first anniversary as Surfside realtors
next month.
Investment broker Allen Goldberg is on the mend at Mt. Sinai
after an auto accident.
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Rabinovitch, recently returned from a trip
around the world, were especially interested in the hone realty
boom in Tokyo's suburbs.
On a recent West Indies and South American cruise out of New
York, on the SS Santa Paula, were localites Mr. and Mrs. Dan Solo-
mon, of South Miami, and Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Eustler and Mr. and
Mn. -Max Saltzman, of Miami Beach.
Irwin Kishner. of Miami Beach, was appointed chairman of the
Florida Bar committee in cooperation with the American Law Stu-1
dents' Assn. Serving with him are attorneys Joel P. Newman and
Lawrence Philip Kuvin.
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Goldsmith, pf Miami Beach, are enter-
taining her mother. Mrs. Harry Hoffman, of Boston. The Gold-
smiths were recent weekend guests of former Beachites, Mr. and
Mrs. Walter Gartner, in Melbourne.
Arthur Lewis, 15-year-old singing discovery of Sid Franklin,
is heading for national feme es e record singer. The Miami
Beach High student just waxed two numbers, "Alone, All Alene,"
and "Why Don't They Believe Us?" under the Forward label in
New York. His proud parents are Mr. and Mrs. Ben Lewis.
Dr. Ben Miller, one of the more ardent local golfers when he's
not busy with his dental work, moves his office to Miami Beach First
Federal bldg. on Oct. 1.
And mentioning golfers, Morris West on. Bill Segal, Dr. Nor-
man Russ and Jerry Krongold were among the many Bayshore
Golfers who traveled to Naples for the MAGA two-day best-ball two-
some tournament, along with Sid Frenchman, Harry Peral, Seymour
Berkowiu and Sid Feuer, Jerry Warren, Dr. Maxwell Sayet, Harold
Rubin, Ira Levy, Micky Kraus and Murray Tobin. Normandy Shores
golfers included Al Savage and Lester Podarsky.
* *
RESTAURANT ROW: Sam Sterling, of the Embers, will have
600 or more seats when renovations are completed at his famed
Beach restaurant. Last Saturday, even with his new additions.
Sterling's Silver Room and the Scot Room, there was a line of hungry
patrons waiting for seats.
When it comes to service and personal attention, the Embers
excels. From the time you enter the imposing interior, with its
plush and taseful decor, Maitre d' Mario and his friendly staff of
?captains make you feel "at home."
4 No sooner is one seated when, as if by magic, there appear a
^hugc basket of baked-on-the-premises bread and rolls, a cold, crisp
JslTad bowl, a dish heaped with iced celery, whole tomatoes, pickles
and other condiments. This is an appetite-whetting forerunner of
-things to come.
Our party enjoyed succulent, melt-in-your-mouth broiled Pom-
pano, barbecued chicken, and thick, juicy prime sirloin steak.
The desserts are gastronomical marvels, including Frozen Em-
bersa strawberry ice cream pie, with a strawberry cream topping
and crisp, crunchy crust-and a profusion of heaping high cream
pies, trench pastry and parfait. ice cream, cake, etc.
The fame and name of the Embers continue to grow by leaps
and bounds. Every night, any season, is a busy pne there.
. Many local families were enjoying Sunday dinners when the
Pearl family visited the Embers. I spotted Mr. and Mrs. Sid Cans
and their son Chuck. Dr. and Mrs. Fred Schwartz ... Mr and Mrs
}a JT- r',h Mr and Mrs Mil,on Sussman and son, Donald
and daughter. Felice Attorney and Mrs. Sid Poller and their
sons, Neale and Peter Furrier and Mrs. Adrian Thai.
* *
BOTH SIDES OF THE BAY: Ben Tracy, popular local enter-
tamer, dropping into the Bonfire for a late snack
Adding to the Pleasure of dining at King Arthurs Court of
Mum. Springs V.Uas. are the six vioUns and twin pianos. They'are
just one of the many continental touches of host Art Bruns
Busy a. be.*., j, Barney Biller, of Michel', in Normandy
Isle preparing many catered affair, .t hi* roomy spot for the
coming weeks. ^^ "
No matter what day you choose to dine at Fu Manchu you'll
always run into a friend or two. that's how popular Al Goldman's
spot is with localites. Fu Manchu home deliveries have reaSSTJ
new high the past month. e reac,UJd
Although a newcomer, only opened a few we*k -* -

COMPLETE DINNERS
wrth a large variety of entreee
FROM $1.20
Jerry's Restaurant
DINNER INCLUDES: Choice of appe-
tizer, Salad, Vegetable, Choice of
Deart, Beverage.
Parking Open Hour*
Air Conditioned
By the Airport
BeBvln. "The Food of the Slara"
24tk Street end LeJeuop R M 4-5341
for its fopd service.
Ruth Foreman has added Sunday matinees to her Studio M
theyfheU8tr^Pe,Ung *ChedUle- "C'M B*ck ** eb." Uunche"
nU.! *T *< Tuesday. Top entertainment for t^
^JXlai!i al*ay- on hand at the Bird rd. playhouse
SHOW BIZ: Betty Reilly still going over si big^Theadliner of
bSnden.n?ard,,GraS'" **'' ^ **" Ver **<"* OctobeT Thl
blonde and explosive entertainer is .. verwtile TaJ/^ t?.
!** V^V ballad singer around who cJTL S
senonta s talent in that department. ^" msh
Another performer in the Lucerne hotel show who's nki.
Attorney Shirley Woolf was extra busy last w*k *ij- .w
deal for Cop. City representing clientuTSL Sye^rt> bought
gigantic spot, lock, stock and barrel. And it's goodTnewT^ *.
!EiM.Fha 2 **' D -^Bea'ch^Hrehsb"^^
again this winter. mm auo
A JOYFUL NEW YEAR TO YOU AND YOURS.
f ridoy, October 2, 1959
ENJOY YOUR OWN SPECIAL PARTY AT
THE LUCERNE'S AUTHENTIC LATIN REVUE
*wm wvwn e*A$
ttarrmg America s 1111 Key
BETTY REILLY
AH AN HKIT1II6 All STAI CAST
ROBERTO & aLKIA
If PI MEKEBffA BUNCO
World's Most Booutiful Show GIH
DaVf ma, Meiice. Mrechw
FAUSTO CMSQO end Ms
lotin American Orch.
Cree-i pf It |g
SCO r pa f aWJf re this
5-ee-ifra. ./ ffce
werW-pccApJased kit!
Jeperfc reed, assfca/tss
StfVKt WWfff 0f
The spriml mtmshm*
CLUB CHALET
ATTRACTION
BLANQUITA
AMARO
lat US. appear.
ewceWSeeiA
OCFANfRONI 41st TO l?nd SI MIAMI HEACH
WE
SERVE
THE
FINEST
PRIME
STEAKS
SAM STERLING'S
also
prime ribs
pheasant
plus the finest
sea
.245 22ND STREET MIAMI BEACH JE 8-4345
LUNCHEONS SERVED DAHY
STEAK HOUSE & RESTAURANT
FEATURING: CHARCOAL BROILED
"KT STIEAK$149
Tossed So lad Chosso Off Drpssing
*ottJloo8 GoHk irotwl
II s... tj t M wMkAv-Sm 1 ,* MM. A\
vMt ow.....1.1 cootTA* urn ^AV
HO N.I. ntk ST. SfJOM HMiii T/O


Friday, October 2, 1959
* Jewish IkriUtr
VAVBHU
Page 15-B
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HhJRKUY (11VBN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
CENTRAL BUREAU OP INVESTI-
GATION" .it 175 N.E. 4th Street, Ml-
nmi 3:'. Ha., intends to register Mid
nimr with the Clerk of t.ie Circuit
Court <>f Made County, Florida.
NED REGEIN, Sole Owner
S'11-18-25. 10/2
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL C.RCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DAOE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 59CBM2
GWENDOLYN WARD,
Plaintiff,
\ s.
R<>l:i:i: r JOHN WARD.
Hi f. ndaaL
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: ROBERT JOHN WARD
r Manllu
Manltus, Sew York
You, ROBERT JOHN WARD, are
hereby notified that a Kill of Com-
plaint for I Ivorc* has been filed
you, and you are required to
atrve a copy of your Answer o:
Pleading to the 1*111 of ('int>lalnt on
the plaintiff's Atti.rnev, S" il. ALEX-
ANDER, one Lincoln Road Building,
Sliaini Beach, Florida and file the
orlRinal Answer or- Heading in the
of flee of the Clerk of the CirouR
Court on or before the 19th day of
October. 1JS. If you fall to do so.
Judgment by default will be taken
against you for the relief demanded
in the Rill of Complaint.
This notice ahall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FIAIRIDIAN.
I'liXE AM) ORDERED at Miami,
Florida this 11th day of September,
AD.
E B. LEATHERMAN. Clerk.
Circuit Court, Dade Count., Florida
(teal) B) K H. RICE, JR.
Deputy Clerk.
8/18-SG. 10/2-9
NOTICE UNDER
__FICT.TIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY QIVEM that
the un.;, n, ,i. desiring to engage In
I'.',1-!1."- under Die fictitious name of
< ITl SERVICE REERItJKBATION
-< t. Miami Beach in-
tends li register lair name with the
jl.ik of the Circuit Court of Ihd
1
HV.MA.N SHALOMITH. Sole Owner
9/11-18-2
Capitalcorp.
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE
FINANCBJG
WAREHOUSE LOANS
FACTORING
EQUIPMENT FINANCING
COMMERCIAL PAPER
Phone: TUxedo 8-7551
4309 N.W. 36th Street
Miami Springs. Florida
H. S GRUBER
PRESIDENT
GEORGE J. TALIANOFF
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD
N THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADS COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 47461-C
IN RE: Estate of
LOC1S SCHa'.NKER
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors at d .\u Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demandb Against Said
Estate:
V.iu are hereby notified and re-
quired to present any claims and de-
mands which you may have against
the eatat* of LOCUS SCHFiNKKi: de-
ceased late of Dade County, Florida,
to the County Judges of Hade County,
and file the same In their offi
inly Courthouse In i >.,,|, un
ty. Florida, within eight calendar
months from the date of the first
Enbllcatlon hereof, or the same will
e haired.
AIM)!.I'll SCIIENKER. Hv
of the Estate if Loula BV hi
MYERS, HEIMAN & KAPLAN
Attorneys
ii Fifty Building
1100 8.W. 1st Strec t
Miami, Florida
______________ 918-2... 10/2-9
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 41403
IN RE: Estate of
ISABELLA BROOKS
I ceased.
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
AND FINAL DISCHARGE
NOTFCE it hereby given that we
have filed our Final Report ami Peti-
tion for Distribution and Final Dis-
charge as Executors of the estate of
ISABELLA BROOKS, deceased: and
that on the 20th day of October, 19&9,
will apply to the Honorable County
Judges of Dade County, Florida, for
approval of said Final Re|>orf and for
distribution and final discharge a*
such Executors of the estate of the
above-named decedent. This lath day
of September. 19.19.
WILLIAM E BROOKS
ETHEL I. RODDER
MYERS, HEJMAN Ac KAPLAN
Attorneys
Eleven Fifty Bldg.
1150 s.w. 1st St.
Miami. Florida
9/18-25. 10/2-9
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY OIVBN that
the undersigned, desiring to outage in
bualnesa under the n >ictoua "
THE CHARBURGER Miami, Dade
County, intends to rei ir- said name
with the Clark of the c.t '. Court of
Hade County, Florida.
JAC") FOOD*.. INC.
Fla. Corp.
JOSEPH PARD
Attorney for Ap, ..runt
KM Industrial Bank Ilidg
_____ *'18-!". 10/2-9
Si.iten.on required bj ie Act '.f
August 4, 1!'12. as Amu d by the
Act* of M.uvh 3. IMS, c.il July 2,
1948 (Title 39. Puller- States Code.
Section 233) showing I ) ownership,
management and cttcuUJon of THE
JEW1KH FLORID1AN, published
week!) at Miami. Florida, for October
1st, 1959.
I lie names and addresses of the
publisher and editor are: Edltor-Pub-
- I red K Shmhet, P. O. Box
2973, Miami 1, Fla.
The owner l: The Jewish Florldtan:
Not Inc., Ethel Shorhet, Fred K.
ShiK-het. P.O. B"X 7. Miami 1. Fla.
Til.' average number ofi copies of
each Issue of this publication sold or
distributed, I r o u g h the malls or
otherwise, to .'A subscr icrs during
he 12 month* praeedln,, the date
shown above was .4 "2.
St L. 8HOCHET.
Edltor-Pnnllslier.
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 1st day of October. 1959.
SEI.MA M. THOMPSON
(My commission expires September
* 198S.1 __________^______
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ErfX-?rTaH ,JUD,CIAL TrcUIT OF
Fl-0"'DA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 59C8708
LATHU AIIRAMS,
Plain tiff,
HORJUI ABRAlfS,
Defendant.
NOTICE TO DEFEND
K) MORRIS ABRAMB
Mrs. Louis Appelbaum
10*1 1'earl Street
Sharon, I'ennsvivanla
i V'" ,A".,Ui:ls A-BRAHS, are here-
by notified that a Complaint for Di-
vorce has hern filed against you and
you are required to serve a oom of
our Answer or Pleading to the Com-
plaint on the Plaintiffs attorneys.
!!.??. *,Teltelnian. 904 Blscayne
Building. 19 West Flagler Street. Mi-
ami 32. Florida and file the original
SP^W '" ''leading In the office of
th. ( i,.rk of the Circuit Court on or
before the 2(lth day of October. 1*59.
. >.ou '" ,0 do "o Judgment by De-
fault will be taken against you for the
relief demanded In the Complaint
,.,'",', E A.ND ORDERED at Miami,
i Vr ,au'- '* Htn day of September.
, E. B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk,
Circuit Court. Dade Countv, Florida
(seal) By: K. M. LYMAN.
Deputy Clerk.
BBIGEL A TEITELMAN
Attorneys for Plaintiff
"04 Blscayne Building
Miami 12. Florida
_____________9/18-26,10/2-9
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. MCM94
DOROTHY CHRISTIAN,
Plaintiff,
va.
ALONZO CHRISTIAN.
Defendant.
UIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: ALONZO CHRISTIAN.
Defendant
80 Hoyt Street
Newark, New Jersey
You. ALONZO CHRISTIAN, are
hereby notified that a Bill of Com-
plaint for Divorce has been filed
against you. and you are required to
serve oopy of your Answer or
Pleading to the Bill of Complaint on
the plaintiff's Attorneys, rayman &
DCHIO, i"<1 Alnsley Building, Miami
32, Florida and file the original An-
swer or Pleading In the office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court on or he-
fore the 20th day of October. IN*. If
you fall to lo no. judgment by default
will be taken against you for 'he
relief demanded in the Bill of Com-
plaint.
This notice shall lie published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In Tin: JEWISH FLORIDIAN,
DONE AND ORDERED at Mlnml.
Florida, this Hth day of September.
a.:>.
i: B LBATHBRMAN, Clerk.
Circuit Court. Dade Countv. Florida
(seal) By: K M LYafAN.
Deputy Clerk.
HA Y.MAN & DIIIKi
Alnsley Bldg.
Miami SI fi. hJ-
Of Counsel for Plaintiff
J/1S-25, 10/2-9
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, IN CHANCERY,
No. MC 8831
MARILYN HELEN JACKSON.
Plaintiff.
EVERT LEE JACKSON, JR*^*
I 'cfoidant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
EVERT LEE JACKSON, JR.
c/o Mrs Darlene Sangster
l-'-ast Jefferson
Monies. Iowa
You. EVERT LEE JACKNoN. JR.,
are hereby notified that a Complaint
for Divorce has been filed against
you. and you are required to serve a
copy of your Answer or Pleading to
the Complaint on the i'lalntlffs At-
torney, ANOELO A. AM, 801 Alnslev
lllulding, Miami ,i2. Florida, and file
the original Answer or Pleading In the
office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court on or before the 28th day of
October, 1959. If you fail to do so.
judgment by default will be taken
against you for the relief demanded
In the Complaint.
_DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this 17th day of September,
"e. b'. LEATHERMAN. Clerk.
Circuit Court. Dade Countv. Florida
(seal) By: K. M. LYMAN.
. ni Deputy Clerk.
ANOELO A. ALI
Attorney for Plaintiff
801 Alnsley Building
Miami 32, Florida.
9/25. 10/2-9-18
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY
No. 59C 8478
PAl.'LA PARK HOMES'. INC.,
a Florida corporation
Plaintiff.
vs.
ARMOND HOCKMAN and
VIRGINIA R. HOCKMAN
Defendant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
(MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE)
TO: ARMOND HOCKMAN and
VIROINIA R. HOCKMAN
(RESIDENCE UNKNOWN)
You are hereby notified that a BUI
of Complaint to Foreclose Mortgage
on the following described property:
Lot 2. Block 1. PA FLA PARK, re-
corded In Flat Book 84, page 38. Dade
County. Florida; has been filed against
you, and you are required to serve a
copy of your Answer or Pleading to
the Bill of Complaint on the Plain-
tiffs Attorney, PAUL WARREN
ESQUIRE, oln Road, Miami
Florida, and file the original
Answei or Pleading In the office of
the Clerk of the clnult Court on or
before October 12, IWt. If you fall
to do so, judgment by default will be
taken against you for the relief de-
manded In the BUI of Complaint.
This notice shall be' published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH PI.i >RI I'IAN.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this 1th day of September.
1959.
K B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk
Clrclut Court, Dade County, Florida
(seal) By: it H. RICE, JR.
Deputv cleik
9/11-18-25.10/2
NOTICE UNO"'
FICTITIOUS NAMw .AW
NOTICE IS HEPKHY it.VBN that
the undersigned, dt -Ing to engage In
business under the ...tltlous name of
NATIONAL HOME FINANCING ,.t
H w.st Flieler Street, In the City of
Miami. Florida Intends to register the
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
ult Coui t of Ds ly, Florida.
DATED at Miami. F'loCda this 3rd
day of September, A.D. 1959.
ASPIC ivVESTMENTS
iRPOF "ION
By: Sidney Pa.rnak. Vice Pre*.
Attest: Elisabeth Pearson. Secy.
HARTWIO
^BjjBjBMy lor Applicant
9/11-18-2, 10/2
(I
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY
, No. 99C gNM
EILEEN M. MONGAN.
Plaintiff,
vs.
JAMES XF". MONO AN.
Defendant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO: JAMES P. MONOAN
2272 Andrews Avenue
Bronx. New York
You. JAMES F". MONOAN. are here-
by notified that Complaint for )r'l-
vorce has been filed against you, and
you are required to serve a copy of
vour Answer or Pleading to the Com-
plaint on the Plaintiffs Attorney,
ANOELO A. ALI. 601 Alnsley Build-
ing. Miami 32, Florida, and file the
original Answer or Pleading In the
of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court on or before the 12th day of
October, IBB>, If you fail to do so.
Judgment by default will be taken
against you for the relief demanded
In the Complaint,
DONE AM' ORDF-.RTJD at Miami,
Florida, this 8th day of September,
\ I'. '.' .'
E. B LEATHERMAN, Clerk
Clrclut Court, Dade County. Florida
By: JOAN SXEEDEN,
Deputy 'Clerk
ANOBLO A. ALI
Attorney for Plaintiff
Sl Alnsley Building
Miami 32, Florida ....
9/11-18-28,10/2
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY QIVBN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the rid it lout, name of
ADVANCE INDUSTRIAL HECURITY
at 1801 Congress Building. Miami,
Florida Intends to register said name
with tbe Clerk of tile Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
KHWARII J JAPHE
WELLIHCH. DOUGHERTY SAIAC
Attorneys for Edward J. Japhe
9/28, 10/2-9-18
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious names of
i) sport-base. _) bport-hasb;
division of Spo-ties of Miami at Si
NVV :Mth Street, Miami, Florida In-
tends to register said names with the
Clerk of the Clreult Court of Dade
County, Florida.
ESTHER KASSMi
Sole (>wner
MARVIN I. WIENER
1111 Alnsley Bldg., Miami 32. Fla.
Attorney for Spa nil ftoort-
n of Spoi ties of Miami.
9/2.'. I0/Z-9-1I
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
solicits your ieqaJ not!
Wb apprtrlato your
patronaqB and guarantB*
accuiat Bsnrics at UaaJ
ratsM e
Phone FR 4-4366
lor mMsaq8i rrlc*
LEGAL NOTICE
motioc UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEKIuIlY GIVEN tht
the undei nigned. ilenlring to engage In
hoslnes** "nder the fictitious name of
MAINTENANCE PRODUCTS Co at
220 North West 127th Street, North
Miami Intends to* register said lunw
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
FRED J. COCCAONA,
Sole Owner
CB.YDK E. FOSTER, JR.
Attorney for F'red J. Coccogna
9/20, 10/2-9-18
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious nalme of
A.nSSCO GIFTS AND ACCESSORIES
at 3432 SW 22nd St.. Miami Intends
to register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
ANNA BUCHBERGER.
Sole Owner
SAMtEI, KoNEF'SKY
Attorney
2240 SW 18th St.
9/2."., 10/2-9-18
CIRCUIT COURT. 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCU T. DADE COUNTY. FLA.
CHAN. No. 59C 2431-C
PHL \Y" B, PlylERO.
Plaintiff,
MADELINE PIQTJBRO,
Defendant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
YOU, MADEIJNE PIQUERO. :.3."I
Park Place Brooklyn, New York, are
notified to serve a copy of your An-
swer to the Divorce Complaint on
plaintiffs attorneys. F-ngel and Hou-
sen. 30j Blscayne Building, Miami.
Fla., and file original with Clerk of
above named Court, on or before the
28th day of October, 19"i9. otherwise
Complaint will be confessed by raS
DATED: 23rd day of September.
1939.
F:. B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk
(seal) By: K. M. LYMAN, Deputy
9/M. 10/2-9-18
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY IN CHANCERY
No. 59C 8584
GRACE CAMPBELL
Plaintiff, '
vs.
JAMFS J. CAMPBELL
Defendant.
TO: JAMES J. CAMPBELL
I 'efendant
814 Kummerdale Road
Summerdale. New Ji
You are required t copy of
your an>\ver to the Bill of Complaint
for invoice on the plaintiffs attorney,
and to file the origin.! angwar in the
office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court on or before the l.'th da) of
October A.D. 1S; OtherwIm, the Bill
of Complaint f u Divorce, heretofore
filed herein, will be taken as con-
fessed by you.
Dated at Miami. Florida this the
9th day of September 19
LEATHERMAN, Clerk
Clrclut Court, Dade County, Florida
(sesl) By: K. M I.VM \N,
Deputy clerk
MI ETON A. FRIEDMAN
Plaintiffs Solicitor
llll Ablate) Bldg
Miami, Florida
9'I1-1-2S 10/?
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. MC 8943
SADIE M. COHEN
a/k/a MARION LITT.
Plaintiff.
vs.
HARRY i. COHEN,
Defendant
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: HARRY I, Ci IHEN
ADDRESS UNKNOWN
You HARRY 1. COHEN are herab*
notified that a Bill of Complaint for
Divorce baa been filed agalnal
and you are required to serve a copy
of your Answer or Pleading 1
BUI of Complaint on the plaintiffs'
Attorney* LHBOWITZ AND BBL-
l Kli. ?0 First Street. Miami Beach,
Florida and file the original Answer
or Pleading In the oflce of the cleric
of Ihe Circuit Court on or hefnr- the
28th day of October, 1969. If you
fall to do so, Judgment by default will
be taken against vnu for the relief
demanded In the Bill of Complaint
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this 21st day of September.
A.D.. ircn.
E R LEATHERMAN, Clerk.
Circuit Court. Dade Countv. Florida
(seal) By: K. M LYMAN.
Deputy Clerk.
l.i:itoWlT7. A HELLER
708 First St.. Miami Beach. Fla.
JE S-0774
Attorneys for Plaintiff
9/*-.. 10'2-9-l
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to cagage In
business under the fictitious name of
PONT1AC PARKIMi CO (Not lac I
at 138 S.W. 2nd Street, Miami. Flor-
ida Intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida
SAM U Sl'ol.ollOW
SIDNEY M. ARONOVITE
Attorney for Sam L. Stolorow
1001 Alnsley Building
Miami 32. Florida
9/U-U}-Sfi, in/2
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DAOE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
No. 59C 8602
ROSE PI OTN1CK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
HAPRY PI.OTNICK',
Defendant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO: HARRY PLOTNTK
"".I Durooher Street
Montreal
Quebec. Canada
'fied that a Pill
if Complaint for Divorce has been
filed against you and you are hetwby
required to serve a cov off your
.vni w. r to the i .oipialnt on
Plaintiff's attorney SAMUEL RUBIN,
il'ii Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, Flor-
ida and file the original Answer In
the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court en or bcfoie the 2fth day >f
October. IM#, otherwise the allega-
tions of said Bill will he taken aa
confessed hv yon.
Dated this 22nd day of September,
I!-.".!'.
F:. B. LEATHERMAN. tlerk.
Circuit Court. I>nde County. 1
(aoal) By: R. H rich jr..
Deontv Clerk.
9/26. 10/2-9-Id
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOU8 NAME LAW
noticf: is hbrf:hy OIVBN that
i signed, desiring to engage ID
l>tislness under the fictitious name of
AERO NTBWS IN'1", si .i:', N.W.
3fith Street. Miami Springs, Fla.. In-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of thtde
county, Florida.
AEIto NEWS SOUTH. INC.
Sole Owner
9/18-28. 10/2-9
ATTENTION ATTORNEYS!
CORPORATION OUTLETS
Lowest PricfM Quickest Delivery
in South Florida
Call the JEWISH FLORIDIAN at
FR4-4369






Rosh Hashona Penetrates The Soul
* "dfewislrt Floridian
Miami, Florida. Friday. October 2, 1959
Section C

HOLY 0AYS MING A GREAT SENS* OF CONTINUITY AND AN IMMENSE SENSE Of JEWISH IMMORTALITY.
Days Of Awe Concern Mans Spiritual Relationship To God
By MEIR CHARNIAK
We search deep into our heritage when we
attempt to find meaning in our holidays. No cele-
bration exists in a vacuum; its cause is to be dis-
covered in the past. With the passage of yews,
the commemoration, or event, or holiday takes on
added value and perhaps new traditions. But it is
steeped in history, in cultural mores, in the faith
' ages.
Passover without the exodus from Egypt would
be impossible to conceive. Purim without the
Esther story is meaningless. Chanuka minus the
Maccabees would lack importance, drama and ex-
citement
But it is Rosh Hashona, and Yom Kippur with
Jl, of course, which is, if the phrase ie permissible
in any discussion of religious holidays, the most
"religious" of all holidays and plunges most pene-
tratingly into the Jewish soul and the beginnings
of the Jewish faith. This is the period of the Days
of Awe, and one does not connect the holidays
with Egypt, or with a Persian King and his Queen,
or with the fight of the Hebrews versus the Hellen-
ists. Rosh Hashona is a purely religious event,
when Man and God (and not Man and Man) are the
major players in a stirring drama.
Some years ago, a fascinating volume on Jew-
ish life in the European villages of the past, was
published under the title of "Life is with People,"
by Mark Zborowski and Elizabeth Herzog, and in it
the authors tell us how the Jews of the shtetl mark-
ed Rosh Hashona, and in this account we learn
that "the Days of Awe belong more to the syna-
gogue than to the home." This, of course, is
equally true today, bul_the overwhelming power
of the holiday was even greater then. "From the
beginning of the month until Rosh Hashona the
shammes makes the nightly rounds, pounding on
the shutters of each house and calling, 'Jews, get
up, it's time to go to "pardons".' The girls and
women lie quietly under their warm covers, while
the men and boys leave their beds, dress, and go
to the synagogue for prayers of repentance and
entreaty, intoned with voices that quaverand wail.
During the day there is less laughter than usual,
tor this *yontev' is building up to a climax of
solemnity."
The entire village was caught up in the spirit
Continued en Pa** 1S-C


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"STOP* -WIJUHAT TOW SUVKf
55 N.E. IN SWCET -
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TO ALL A MOST
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M. ** MRS. ELLIOn C COHEN and Family
18 W. Di Lido Drir*. Dl Lido bland
TO OUR MANY FRIENDS. A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
Davis Boiler 4k Iron Works, Ine.
~_ -2OILERMAKEHS AWD CERTIFIED WELDERS
Ph. FR 44030 190040 N. Miami Ave.
Heeonditioned Boil.n for Sale nd Repair. Day or Night Anywhere.
Smokestacks and Tanks.
Ruin Where Her Synagogue Used to Be
tr TRUOE DUB
t/jccstet England
Lmi year. I chose Austria far my fcaliaay. I
a tremendous yearning to re-visit the continent
after nearly a years of exile, but did aot ever
exam wish to sec my native Czechoslovakia, where
ay entire faaaily'perished.
Austria then became my choice. It is only
next door to my former homeland, with a similar
sceaery. and I know the language well; last, hot Mt
least, it is the cheapest country is Europe.
And I was aot disappointed. The pine forests
* J*t as fragrant as in my youth, the in
tains with their majestic peaks filled me with awe
sad the sight of the brooks, cascading like thin
ribbons down wooded slopes, thrilled me beyond
I was happy and carefree as in the days of
when we had holidays such as these.
every year I felt a tremendous sense of release
All the memories I dad not dare to lmi, hi re mi
liberated all of a sodden and I was able to re-live
them with my children, while we were nicking
wild strawberries, bilberries and and mushrooms
But towards the end of the week 1 grew rest-
less and feJt hungry for Jewish people. At the little
guesthouse in the mountain village, where we
stayed, we did sat encounter a single Jew. And
so on a Saturday, my husband. I and oar two young
daughters, set out for Innsbruck, where we hoped
to find a synagogue.
WeB. how do you set about finding a syna-
gogue? We arrived at the station and my first idea
was to consult the telephone directory. We looked
under 'Hebrew.- we looked under "Juedische."'
we looked under "Israelitische." then finally de-
cided to search for a Cohen or a Levi, alas in vain,
Drawinf a Blank
While we were so occupied, a man appeared
with a bundle of keys and some instruments to test
the telephone apparatus. He asked if be could
help us. and we told him of our quest. He got in
touch with the operator, but there was no number
or address of a Jewish community or any similar
organization. The man told us, in parting, that
there used to be a synagogue in the Silzgasse. hut
it was destroyed.
We were undismayed. We felt there must be
some Jews left in Innsbruck and we were going to
find them. But how? Of course, how silky of us.
why did we not think of this in the first place? The
police was the obvious answer.
My husband entered the grey, forbidding build-
ing and was gone for some time. The girls grew
restless, but I thought his long absence promising
They must be explaining to him where the new
synagogue is. I hoped.
When my husband reappeared. I could teU from
the look on his face hat he drew a blank, but we
were determined not to give up so easily.
Then my husband had an idea. He stopped a
taxi driver and asked him if he knew of a Jew in
Innsbruck, or the synagogue. The man said: 'I
don't know of a synagogue since the old one was
destroyed, but I do know a Jew. Go to Sch.. that is
a Jewish firm, he will be able to tell you all you
want.''
So with great excitement we made our way to
the elegant shop in the main street and while mv
husband went to find Mr. Sch.. I stood outside and
read framed cuttings of newspapers from the time
during and after Hitler, concerning the takeover
of the business by the Nazis and the subsequent
struggle for its return to the rightful heirs. The
Dr. John Waller Bachman (center proles
nor of practical theology at the Union Theo-
logical Seminary, holds the medal from the
American Fumstrip Festival awarded to
"Call far the Quwebon" as the best funstrip
in the category of ethics and religion. Dr.
Samuel Grand deft) and Albert Vorspon
(right) bold the winning documentor-.- pro-
duced by the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations. "Without a religion lib
and religious education, they will ... dis-
appear altogether .
captions above those cuttings read: "The story of
a Jewish business."
I rejoiced. Here at last was a real. a ?eainie
Jew What a pity, he want there that Saturday
morning. His employee advised my hssbaoj to
visit Mr. B.. another Jew. who owned a fi.-nitnr
shop not far away.
And so we went after Mr. B. we f*ind hit
shop easily enough. The elegant sbopwicJitts wen
full of expensive furniture, all in very good taste,
both the traditional and the contempo.j.-. Wa
entered and asked for Mr. B.
An Immaculate
Oh. what joy. He was actually in. and all |
had to do was to wait a few minutes, while he;
tended to a client in his office. In my mind
formulated all the questions I was going to
"How many Jews are there in Innsbruck?
have they survived the Hitler regime? Are
Zionists? Are they in touch with their brethm
in Israel?"
At last Mr. B. appeared, an immaculately
dressed tall, middle aged man, when person and
whole bearing resembled more a Germaa officer
than a Jew. He was ok so correct, as he politely
inquired after our wishes. My husband said "I
am Dr. Dub from F-glnd. and this is my family.
We would like to attend a Jewish service aad won-
dered if you could help us?"
The man stiffened a little. "There is no Jew-
ish service on Saturdays." he answered'. And we
felt as if we inquired after a piece of furniture
that was no longer in fashion. "We only meet 00
High Festivals."
And that was that. Somehow, and to this day
I do not know how. we found ourselves near the
door, which Mr. B. opened for us and bowed em
so politely, as he ushered us out Of course. I
never had a chance to ask my questions, but 1 was
no longer interested in Mr. B. or his fellow congre-
Continued an Pee* 10-C
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IE 1-6411


r^doY- PC**** 2. 1959
+Je*lst FhriHtr
Page 3C
Hias House in Negev: Home for Expert!
By ITZHAK SHARGIL
Beersheba
n is morning in Beersheba, the capital of the
. 7(,c sky over the Judean hills towards the
I rtheast becomes brighter as the first rays of
ItM stffl" cfni Tn,<> "ffle*vaft "SSWJesert," BgRing
jts canyons and hills, its few isolated settle-
Iwiis awl workers' camps and Beersheba itself,
Lhich is already a busy town. A constant stream
L vehiclesjeeps, taxis and buses trailing black
I smoke from their exhaust pipesis leaving town,
Ijod is swallowed by the desert.
Thete vehicles bring life to the Negev and
[carry its future. They move building materials,
I rails for new railroads and pipes for new water
lind oil lines. They are loaded with drilling ma-
chines -md mining equipment, and carry the men
Lho operate the machines. They also provide
(transportation for the experts- and technicians,
Uilhout whom the Negev would not have become
II field of experiments and production on which
[tie Israeli economy must rely.
Let us meet some of them.
Alexander Tarsey, 36, graduate of the Tulane
Ifniversity, New Orleans. His field is water de-
Lalination. He came to Israel to conduct research
|work on desalination of brackish" Negev waters,
hiring to turn them into water fit for drinking and
for irrigation. His work is conducted at the Re
liearch Institute of Arid Zones, on the outskirts of
IBeersheba.
Dr. G. H. Dannies is an elderly German expert
Ion solar energy. He came from Bonn at the in-
I vitation of the government of Israel, through the
[good offices of UNESCO. He is also doing re-
Hun, which has helped hundreds of thousands
of leu i-i immigrant! to come to the United Suites
from unoui countries m Europe. u this year cele-
brating its 75th anniversary. On* of the contribu-
tions made by the Huts M Israel it the buiUing of
i moitrrx hostel in the Hegev to house scientists
from abroad who are helping in the development of
the Kigcv. The article reflects the moods in this
house. rt.
c;'^ "
w- -
1 > Ik j IB- afl
'US
The Negev ". awaits those skilled hands
that would turn it into productive land
agriculturally and industrially ." Fruta-
rom Eecto-Chemical Industries at Acre,
which manufacture chlorine, sodium hy-
droxide and other materials for industrial
and home use. Israel Bond dollars helped
develop this high water tower, tallest of its
kind in Israel.
Hias House in the N
egev.
search work at the Institute, specializing in the
utilization of solar energy for refrigeration and
air-conditioningtwo very important problems for
the future of living conditions in the Negev.
Mr. and Mrs. Winter are from Switzerland.
He is a geologist working near the Dead Sea, where
the local oil corporation "Naphta" is prospecting
for oil.
There are also Naomi Moses, a young school-
mistress from Ramot-Hashavib, near Nathanya,
who came down to teach new immigrant children;
Dr. Aronheim, the Sick Insurance Fund medical
officer for the Negev; and David Margolith, a young
engineer from Winnipeg, Canada; and his friend,
John Norris, from Oklahoma. They are supervis-
ing the construction of bridges for the new railway
line to the phosphate mines in the South.
Heart of the Neev
Sometimes Prof. Nelson Glueck. the famous
archaeologist, is in one of the cars that go deep
into the Negev. Some vehicles, engaging their front
wheel drive, leave the asphalt road and plough
their way up bills or down valleys, along dry river
beds, following old Nabatean tracks. Some go to
Sdora, the lowest spot in the world, where Israel's
potash works are located. Still others go to Oron,
site of the phosphate mines, while more cars go to
the various settlements of the Negev pioneers
Kfar Yeruham, Dimona and others.
After a hot work-day, a steady stream of dusty
cars, carrying sun-tanned people, their hair white
with Negev dust, pours back into Beersheba. In
Beersheba, a town that in less than ten years, grew
in population from 4,000 to well over 40,000, with
a wide network of roads and new residential quar-
ters emerging among the sand dunes; part of the
stream of cars takes a common route. They pass
the Old Town with its sun-bleached stone houses,
past the traditional Abraham's Well and Abra-
ham's Tree, and to the New City. There they park
in front of a huge white building surrounded by a
big garden and flower beds, andwhat is even
moie attractiveflanked by a swimming pool.
Here, to this, their temporary home, they all
come, take a shower, shave, glance at the paper,
and go down to have dinner and talk about their
experiences of the day.
"Here" means the "Hias House in the Negev."
It is often described as the "Heart" of the Negev.
It is from here that technical skill in the shape of
experts and supervising staffs for operations in
the Negev spreads day after day all over the vast
spaces which actually cover half the area of Israel.
As, under their advice, more and more of the
Continued on Pao 11-C
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SHB1EY TIACTOR 1
"EWPMBTTCO.
Cf *r aiffgr
brought froml*.;
and Jewish Ion
aad youth actr*'
mer is jbisl. h rs laiarec
of Senile, openly defied
k- the Caanine te ban aB Pro-
camps and
ROE ?vT* :L
GABLES COOLING & HEATING CO.
M- Bawi fkawi &< f Ac JTA brafaM
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Paul U. Terrs
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7225 S.W. 57* CWt
till
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nciMcmc na*
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HAPPY NEW YEAR TS ALL .. .
Surfside Gulf Smke Station
Mil HARDING AVENUE
Faooe UN f>2324
FHAHE AYLOH
"Over as docile wrought-iron gates, no
pMbU iaAkMBi -* .dr-vy >1 Mi mmi
sr-i-rraxe is the modernistic "Foun-
tr-r. -x ~* 7:.oes by Beinaiu Z^nmerman,
krJrJB -2W Home at the University of
ua. The S102.000 Jewish
1.100 unhrersity students.
of Pope with i m\
lateral]ie. the
*d Spain's n]
as foreign aid have radie* j
the jwrwttl'i and churciTiJJ
*s apefacataaas for admission to M
International Monetary F*I. the European On j
ganization far Ecaaaauc Cooperation, and NATO;]
Himaghnali of Mharal Westers countries, have i
had their bearing oa the issue.
AppUcafMR of Low Eased
The law has not rhiaffart; its application, had
fifr. has bttaait taore benevolent and elasbt]
Hitherto aaheara of fatililki are granted to'
Jewish cooaauoaaty. Legally, it has no ex
it is aot erea recognised as s cultural
but. in practice, it caa caaat oa the gun
cooperation in futfiffiag Ms tasks.
It has been (ranted its own cemetery in I
burial facilities: it snares the nect-ssary peraM
for holding social and cultural actn :ti. it Oat j
accornmodatioBs for its faattiom and can canton
the authorities for a tanaliailiie approach to ffj
problems.
Its main difficalties remain thaw
the law cannot be ride napped; the graatiaf <
naturalization is still a faattios of the
Catholicism, obit notices hi the press must
be headed by the Croat, aad personal statot I
controlled by a religious body.
Five hundred years after the capture of i
nada. the Exile and the Inquisition, the
main for Spain's frer^f the "in/idols who
crucified Christ-" Among the masses, mi
superstition-ridden peasant*, there is an
undertone to their bathing of the Jews. It si
hatred based on religion aad not on race, and end
today a converted Jew is feted with sometkifj
like the return of the prodigal son
For the government the Jews are ao adfajl
cor.: part of a vast problem. There are no spedta
discriminatory measures directed agaiast thesj
and they count oa a marc benevolent gorenmafJ
attitude than the Protestants. This is doe partiM
to the lack of interventions oa their behalf. ***]
the proud Spaniards reseat, and to the lack
proselytism in the Jewish faith.
Left to themselves aad without undue
CanKfMod an Paao 1*X
Happy New Year to AD Our Friends and Patrons
Flamingo Dress Shop
tit
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flsT faW Mrs. Btcfc
of the
APEX CIEANERS I LAUNDRY
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152 R.W. Sm^ood S*+


joy.Octobwa 1959
+Jeist>fk>r*Mr*7
Pcgo 5*
Ultimate Cruelty: The Six Million Myth'
By ARNOLD PORSTIR
AOL Bulletin
tyhf ultimate cruelly W We" six 'fnillWH Jews
kited under Hitlerthe denial of the fact that they
' existed, suffered, and diedla now being prat-
Led by the haters, professional and amateur, here
abroad. It is a constant theme in their liter-
.(ure ami speeches; through repetition it is begin-
to find its way into the responsible press and,
[Jrelumably. the minds of respectable people.
There is no telling Just when the ultimate
truelty began to take form. Probably it started
Lin after the facts were'established at the Inter-
national Military Tribunal held In Nuremberg, Ger-
nv afier World War II. Then the facts were
fcade hideously clear. Some six million Jews had
en murdered, gassed or shot, beaten or starved
death The figuresix million deadwas de-
termined in many ways. Among them:
The Nazis themselves generally kept good
records. Adolf Eichmann, one of those in charge
Lf the Nazi program of exterminating Jews, was
buoted as saying, on the basis of all his knowledge
[ind statistics, that four million Jews had been
iilled in concentration camps, another two million
killed by Einsatz, Nazi task force units. (Also at
Nuremberg, another high Nazi official, S. S. Sturm-
[wnnfuehrer Wilhelm Moettl, said that Heinrich
Himmler had rejected the six million figure as
|>eing too low.)
Allied demographers and other population ex-
erts independently came to the six million figure
is a result of study of statistics before, during, and
tfter Hitler.
Historian Arnold Toynbee, among others, re-
viewed Nazi records, statements made by camp
kommandants, and others and concluded: "By the
|ime that the Allied Armies had gained control of
be whole of Europe, approximately six million
^ews had perished."
And through the years, all authoritative stud-
es and documentation produced the same figure
: million Jewish dead.
The PotOhs of Tragedy
The figure is so huge that it etudes the imag-
nation and, in its enormity, loses meaning. In
he Kishinev Massacre of 1909, 47 Jews were kill-
You can think of 47 people as individual men,
nen and children. You can read the words of
ust one of the six million killed by the Nazisan
&nne Frank or Emanuel Ringelblumand fathom
be depths of individual tragedy. Or you can think
family or friends who died under Hitler. But
he figuresix millionis a nameless, faceless
Abstraction. It is so large that it appears incred-
ble. It is this fact that the bigots are trying to
hploit in making their insanely cruel chargethe
pemal that the six million ever existed.
How, in the face of all historical fact, can the
bigots use this as a persistent propaganda slogan?
hey do it by playing a weird kind of numbers
^ame, without logic or context Look at the rea-
ning of professional anti-Semite James Madole,
?riling in his "National Renaissance Bulletin":
"Although the World Almanac attests to the.fact
that fewer than 600,000 Jews ever lived in Ger-
many, the Jews persisted in their monstrous
lie that Nazi Germany had cremated six mil-
lion of their co-racials Many Jews allegedly
roasted by Hitler are now turning their talents
to butchering Arab women and children in the
Gaza strip."
Madole has the fact* right about the Jewish
Left is Ambassador Eduardo Espinosa y
Prieto. acting chief of the Mexican delega-
tion at the United Nations, who presents
human rights award to Moses Moskowitz,
secretary general of the Consultative Coun-
cil of Jewish Organizations. Moskowitz re-
ceived the citation for his proposal to estab-
lish a United Nations Attorney General for
Human Rights. Dr. John Slawson, execu-
tive president of American Jewish Commit-
tee, looks on at presentation made during
past Hebrew Year.
population of Germany. But the overwhelming
number of Jews killed under the Nazis were not
German Jews. Madole completely overlooks the
fact that, under the Nazis, 2,800,000 or 85 percent
of Poland's 3,300,000 Jews were killed; that 1,500,-
000 or 71 percent of the 2,100.000 Jews in occupied
portions of Russia were killed; that 425,000 or
50 percent of Rumania's 850,000 Jews were killed;
that 260,000 or 82.5 percent of Czechoslovakia's
315.000 Jews were killed. To say nothing of Jews
killed hi Hungary. Lithuania, Holland, Prance.
Latvia, and Germany itself. These figures, too, are
available in various editions of the World Almanac.
Madole has his own explanation of why the
figure "six million" is used:
"The Jews have found it extremely lucrative to
maintain the gigantic swindle of atrocities com-
mitted by the German people against the Jew-
ish race. Each year, world Jewry forces West-
ern Germany to pay the sum of $110,000,000 in
reparations to the State of Israel. The entire Is-
raeli merchant marine was built by the sweat
of German labor ."
Sympathy for Nazis
Madole's concern for the Germans includes
complete sympathy for the Nazis. He shows this
in an almost classical rewrite of history when he
seeks to prove that Jews flourished in Poland
despite Hitler:
"In late 1944, the Jews of Warsaw, Poland, fully
armed with modern war material, launched an
offensive against Nazi troops How could
these Jews have been exterminated during five
years of Nazi rule in Poland when they were
able to launch a full scale military offensive
as late as 1944?"
The year in which the Jews of the Warsaw
Ghetto made their epic, desperate fight for sur-
Continved en Peso 12 C
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Page &C
+Je*ist>fk*iJ**n
FWdaY Ociobir
WSHES FOR THE HOLIDAY SEASON .
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MOST HAPPY HOLIDAYS
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OCEAN FRONT at 2Sth STREET MIAMI BEACH
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Ff^T EUetrUmi M+t+r Service
The Wright Temple That Glitters Like
By PHILIP RUBIN
BJkins Park. Pa., is on* of many suburbs which
rim* tbe great city of Philadelphia. Because of a
matHat,which was recently erected there, Elk-
aas Park is becoming a particular point of interest
for all American-Jews. The synagogue is that of
Congregation Beth Shotom, formerly located in
Philadelphia proper. It ail designed and finished,
just before his death las: April in his ninetieth
year, by Frank Lloyd Wright, the world's most
famous architect of the twentieth century, the pio-
neer of modern architecture whose every building
aroused greater discussion, greater admiration
and also greater antagonismthan any structure
that would be erected by any other master builder.
In ilnif int this synagogue. Wright was aided
by the rj-.bbi of the congregation. Dr. Mortimer J.
Cohen, well-known in American Jewish life as a
Conservative rabbi and author of scholarly Jewish
books who first thought of getting Wright to do
the building, who worked with him on it for about
sax years and whose help in the design Wright had
publicly acknowledged.
As might have been expected by anyone at all
acquainted with Prank Lloyd Wright's work, this
r.ew rmagogue is vastly different from anything
we have hitherto seen in synagogue architecture.
What are the ideas behind it' What does it sym-
bolize" Here is what Wnght himself had to say:
"At last a great symbol' Rabbi Mortimer J.
Cohen gave me the idea of a synagogue as a trav-
eling Mt. Sinaia mountain of light' We chose
white giass Let God put his colors on. He's the
great artist. When the weather is sunny, the tem-
ple wiE glitter like gold. At night, under the moon,
it will be silvery. On a gray day it will be gray.
When the heavens are blue, there will be a soft
blue over it And when you go into a place of wor-
ship, you night to feel as if you were in the hands
cf God."
Eiuboranc* an Old As*
And so the plan of Wright's (1.300.000 Beth Sho-
lom Synagogue is hexagonal in shape, like a pair
of hards cupped around the congregation. Side
ramps emerge at prowlike corner buttresses into
the main hall, which seats 1.040 persons. The in-
t-rior rises over 80 feet in a. great translucent teat
^i corrugated plastic and glass: from the top of
the trip.'Hl structure hangs a single chandelier of
brilliant colored glass trimmed with spiky incan-
descent lights. Viewed from outside, the new syna-
SPtwe. rising like a mountain of light is a huge
triangular form of glass, aluminum and concrete,
upon which are groups of menorahs with their
seven branched lighting facing you from everv
direction, ready to cast their glow toward the sky
at night. The tlass and plastic tentthe roof if
yon hke-which rises above the concrete base is
a'.most pyramidal shaped. whJe in the interior
triangularity is everywhere emphasized.
The synagogue structure has alreadv been pho-
tographed and described m Time Magazine, in
Architectural Forum and in Life, and in the future
probably many other publications, large and small
general, architectural and Jewish, will devote
flteimor. to it. It was the last building which
wnght managed to see completed before his death.
'The interior of the Guggenheim Art Museum in
-New York City, which Wright also designed and
which has been the subject of many discussions
was not completed at the time of the great archi-
ll *2til; a *** Yort Tmn ** *
ue ueth Sholom synagogue structure is more
*xuberant than anything Wnght has done in the
last thirty years "
First synagogue to be built at an
will be provided at New York
Airport. Rabbi A. Alan Steinbach.
dent of the New York Board of Rabbiij
Isaac Charchat. president of the s)_
sign historic document during Hebrew^.
5719 with Austin J. Tobin, executive d
of the Port of New York Authority,
has made the propeHy available to
board. "When you go into a place of I
ship, you ought to feel as il you were in |
hands of God."
I have visited the new synagogue and hart |_
tremendously impressed by it. I believe it's I
most beautiful synagogue in the country
Put then I have for many years been an .
of Wright's art. There are people w ho are ir
by it. who find its modern contours too an
too harsh. A Zionist leader who saw it cfa
ized it to me as a "monstrosity All
artpainting. scmlptsre and music. < weB
architectureis a controversial subject a
on which there is a great division of opinion i
art connoisseurs.
But whether thrilled or repelled one cannot i
main indifferent Even those who don't like i
shape of Wright's synagogue structure are fa
to pay attention to it for a number of
And herein lies its great significance for the I
of synagogue ai chiteccure, not only in this <
try. but in other lands as weB. Since it is so <
nal. so different the work of a great growl
architecture, of a mas who upon his deati
bailed by fellow-architects as an "immortal."
"Michelangelo of the Twentieth Century,*
architect who swept across the face of the!
like some vast force bending both men and i
to his wilt" tbe first thing it dees is to avakttj
us an interest is the whole subject of
architecture, an interest which hitherto has I
almost non-existent, though for many yean i
we've heen building lavish synagogue
Ought synagogues to be built in traditional J
modern style? If year answer is traditional f
!)k question comes up: Is there really a
of synagogue architecture, or were Jews
tbe centuries in H-'Mrt their synagofan
copying the building styles of their
neighbors? The lisiWialili I believe,
have a better argument if we at least had
idea of the architecture of the Temple of I
mna. After (he destruction of tbe Temple is '
silem we tost the design and were
Continued on Pas* 7-C
MacYiear Wells, rnc
Cceapasto BuOdinq Supplies
L D. alscVlCAR
President
'"RANK J. WELLS
Vice President
BEST WISHES FOR
A HAPPY NEW YEAH
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Ken Rubin**"'" **?'
4370 COLLINS AVE
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NEW YEAB GREETINGS TO ALL ..
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Florida


jof, October 2, 1959
+ lelsti fhrHltr
Page 7-C
tabbi's Question Box on Rosh Hashona
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
h do Jew* eo to watorway on Rosh Hashona
.M.rnoon to pray?
A m mber of reasons are_ advanced^ this
islom Rabhi Jac0D MoeTTnlrUe Maharii) cites
Iwell-kniwn Midrash which relates this ceremony
oric episode of the "binding of Isaac."'
jfaen Abraham was on his way to Mt. Moriah to
Icrifice his son. Isaac, Satan, anxious to prevent
En from doing the will of God, sought to hinder
k progress. He changed himself into a river
kd tried to drown Abraham. Abraham withstood
L test and the water dried up. Standing at the
bier's edge we remind ourselves of Abraham's
Croism and are inspired to abide by the will of
Almighty at any cost, thus meriting His for-
[ and mercy.
Some claim that the ceremony is to remind
j of Abraham's fidelity. Others claim that the
Crpose of going to the waterway to pray was to
at the fish. In one opinion this was meant
i be a reminder to us that we are like the fish
lught in the net of circumstances. Another opin-
states that we ask the Almighty to make us
ke the fj*h over whom no evil eye prevails and
ho increase and multiply profusely. The Shaloh
Liar, I .-n.witzi claims that we look at the fish
understand that just as the fish always have
heir eyes open (having no eyelids) so do we ap-
pal to tbe ever watchful eye above to watch over
i and have mercy on us in this hour of judgment.
do somo Jows shako owt rhoir pockets or tho
ends of their armenrs during this eero-
rrony of TaehUkT
According to some this is a means of throwing
nbs to the fish thus showing our merciful trait
feeding lower animals and expecting the Lord
I likewise sustain us in His mercy. Others claim
at this is a means of emptying,our souls of hid-
i sins indicating that man has it in his hands to
himself of all of his sins which cling to his
The Wright Temple
Continued from Pet* e-C
Mole to develop a tradition of synagogue build-
bg which could be called uniquely Jewish, and
thing else.
I Has Frank Lloyd Wright, in designing Beth
olom for us, given us some standard, or stand-
rds. for the synagogue architecture of the future?
Ithe Mt. Sinai motif the proper one for archi-
kts to follow in designing Jewish religious struc-
pres? Or the cupped hands of God?
iTlien, too, the Wright structure raises anew the
[Id question: Should synagogues be built lavishly,
ipensively. or simply and inexpensively? My own
mwer to this would be: They should be built
Imply and inexpensively, unless you can get an-
Iher Frank Lloyd Wright to design them.
I If only because it raises these and other ques-
rns. tlu new structure of Congregation Beth
holom, however we may react to it, is of greet
Ignificance, and American Jews are indebted to
|abbi Mortimer J. Cohen for prevailing upon
frank Lloyd Wright to design it
ioran tow mvft
soul. Some authorities have eliminated this phase
of tbe ceremony from the ritual because a number
of superstitions have been erroneously read into
the ceremony because of it.

Why is it that this ceremony is porformod in tho
' late afternoon?
Rosh Hashona is the birthday of the .world and
the birthday of man. Man was created in the
afternoon and sinned and was forgiven in the late
afternoon. Thus we choose this same time of day
to seek our forgiveness hoping that, just as the
first man was forgiven at this time of day, so will
we be forgiven. Some claim that it is because the
afternoon prayer of Mincha was inspired by the
Patriarch Isaac who was born on this day. Since
it is his heroic sacrifice which is so often men-
tioned on Rosh Hashona, we place our ceremony
at the service which he inspiredthat is, Mincha.

Why is Hie ceremony postponod until tho second
day of Rosh Hashona if the first day falls
en tho Sabbath (ao it does this year)?
The reason given for this shift is the fear that
a person might be tempted to carry his prayer
book to the water's edge and carrying anything
was forbidden on the Sabbath. Even where there
was a surrounding 'Erub, the waterway was usu-
ally outside the city and thus afforded no protec-
tion of encirclement to allow carrying something
on the Sabbath. It is interesting to note that there
were a number of authorities who insisted that
even when the first day fell on the Sabbath the
ceremony should be carried out on the Sabbath.
Some of these had in mind the city of Jerusalem
where there were water wells within the encircling
walls of the city.

Why is Mm Biblical narrative describing birth of
the prophet Samuel reed en Roeh Hashona?
First of all, it is claimed that the Almighty re-
membered Hannah, the mother of Samuel, and
allowed her to conceive on Rosh Hashona. The
prophetic portion of the first day of Rosh Hashona
recounts her plea and God's answer. We hope that
our pleas on this day will likewise be answered
affirmatively as was Hannah's. Furthermore,
Hannah's prayer served as the model for the reg-
ular system of prayer of the Jewish tradition.
Prayer is one of the three cardinal means of seek-
ing forgiveness on Rosh Hashona.
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t, October 2. 19S9
, mideliiwa in the dimensions noted at Mef
|V ^e astonished Workmen, mainly anaophii-
ited Jcwis* immigrants from Yemen and Kur-
*stan dug and found tBe *at** eMctly where they
ere assuied they would find them.
Or. Vtdin wai held to be something of a wit
by his diggers until they learned that his fore-
derived from the Bible. Then they held the
it of little account, one "which anybody could
ive done."'
But this episode of finding Solomon's gates
hs not the first time Dr. Yadin had put his knowl-
ee of th< ancient world to modern use. In 1949
invadrg Egyptian forces stood astride the
lain road leading into Israel from Sinai, blocking
End's occupation of the Negev. Gen. Yadin or-
ired Israel planes to scout for signs of a military
ad which he knew existed in Roman times. The
ad was revealed from the air, and Israel troops
oved down it to surprise the Egyptians from the
tar.
Litts Outstanding Fmds"
Today. Dr. Yadin has listed some of the out-
anding tads thus far at Hazor. He noted the fol-
ring as coming from the Canaanite period:
1. The finding of a unique Canaanite temple
sort c>J prototype of Solomon's Temple.
2. The uncovering of two additional phases of
same temple. In the uppermost phase, the
temple in Canaanite Hazor, the expedition
nod a clay figurine in Mycenaean style of the
century B.C.E. This permitted the Hazor
cbaeologjsts to place Joshua's conquest of Ca-
in the 13th century. A broken, basalt statue,
i found here, provided evidence that the temple
is devoted to the worship of the sun-god.
3. The recovery in the second phase' of the
ime temple of one of the finest ortbostats ever
in the Fertile Crescent. This was a 5 ft,
i m. basalt slab, bearing the relief of a crouching
bn with its head fully sculptured. Indications
ere thai the orthostat had Men a part of the en-
nce jarr.b of the temple.
4. The recovery in an earlier temple of the
ay mode! of an animal's liver, of the sort used
ancient diviners, this one bearing omens in-
ribed ir. cuneiform. This Is the only inscribed
del found in Palestine, and one of the very few
Dm the 15th Century B.C.E. found in the Middle
st. The find indicates hat the sun-god, god of
liver-diviners, was also the god of this earlier
iple.
5. The recovery of still a third temple, under-
bath the first two temples, constructed about 1750
J.C.E. indicating that the spot was held holy for
any generations.
w* +* -
BKr ^'^~-^SSBBBBl
*^^^^^H i& J '
^j*>* 4
^'Irf^
/K jMr
hsat**'jj|
^85
lose oeiial view of exposed diggings at
ute of Hazor, largest city of ancient Ca-
wn, conquered by Biblical hero Joshua
rebuilt centuries later by Solomon.
and
frC
Unique Shofar found at Hazor, fashioned
some 3,000'years ago, is blown by an im-
migrant working at the excavation.
6. The laying bare of a Late Bronze Age city
gate, and below it city gates from the Middle
Bronze Age. The Late Bronze Age gate was built
of huge ashlar (dressed) stones, some of them six
feet long. The Middle Bronze works were distin-
guished by a revetment wall of huge boulders,
more than nine feet high and still standing. To-
gether, the formidable defense works represented
by these various structures, confirm the Biblical
estimate of Hazor as the largest and moat defend-
ed city of the country.
Dr. Yadin said that the most valuable discov-
eries in the Israelite Hazor period, along with Ha
tor's earliest period, were made on the mound
dominating the Hazor site. The Canaanite finds,
in contrast, were made chiefly in what must have
been the lower city.
Israel it* Period Findings
The recoveries from the Israelite period in-
cluded:
1. The finding of two beautiful proto-Aeolic
capitals of the type characteristic of the architec-
tural treatment of public buildings in the times of
the Kings of Israel and Judah.
2. The finding nearby of the original pillar
bases of the capitalsthe first time in Palestine
archaeology that the original position of recovered
capitals has been located with certainty.
S. The finding of evidence that before Solo-
mon turned Hazor into a garrison town, but after
its destruction by Joshua, there existed a small
Israelite settlement, apparently without a city wall.
Along with this was found an idolatrous Israelite
cult place, such as the Bible notes existed in many
parts of the Holy Land during the pre-monarchial
period.
4. The sensational discovery, in 1957, of
Solomon's city gate, identical with his gates at
Meggido and Gezer.
Dr. Yadin told the group that in its excava-
tions on the mound, the expedition was able to
reach the earliest, and 21st, city found at Hazor.
Pottery found here was typical of the Early Bronze
Age III (the 26th-24th centuries, B.C.E.). The be-
ginnings of Hazor were thus fixed at about 2,700
B.C.E.
Summing up the significance of his findings.
Dr. Yadin declared that Hazor has revealed the
best picture to date of the material culture of the
Canaanites and Israelites in the Galilee.
For the first time, too, archaeologists have a
clear picture of how a big Canaanite city looks.
The diggings also firmly date Joshua's cod-
quest of Canaan as the 13th century.
Finally, they shed important light on Biblical
Continued on Page 10C
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JL
U.S. Commissioner of Immigration and Nat- Records at United Hias Serrice in New York. I
uraliration Joseph M. Swing (left) examines "All over the country new buildings are .
a few of some one million Jewish immigra- ing up Who would mink of the dead?"
tion files in the Wilhelm Weinberg Hall of
in Where Her Synagogue Used to Be
Continued from Pi
2-C
gants. The children thought the scene very funny
and mimicked Mr. B. and his oh-socorrect manner,
but 1 could not laugh with them. Where was the
proverbial Jewish warmth and the feeling of bro-
therhood between Jew and Jew?
While we were discussing this with my hus-
band, we were wandering aimlessly through the
city, when suddenly my eyes alighted on a street
name: Silzgasse. Was this not the street where
the ruined synagogue was supposed to be?
I dragged the family in great excitement up
sod down the street, but there was no trace of a
synagogue. Finally I stopped an old woman about
to eater a shop and asked her where the synagogue
used to be "Over there." she waved ber arm in-
differently, where the empty space is." And when
I looked at her unrstinntngty, she added:
they are building* the new block of flats."
So we retraced oar steps to the building.
which we passed before without recogmtian.
there, aangst weeds and rabble, we found a
pitiful remains of a Hsaae of God. A broken 1
a few corner stones that was all. Oh__
could still see. if yon looked for it. where the
mast have adjoined the neighboring building.
A sense of desolation swept over me. sack 1
I have not experienced since the day I was I
that my family was wiped eat. There, behind 1
a aew building was going ap. the bustle aad I
typifying the spirit of rebirth pervading Ah
However, this was Shsbbos and wo cik
Innsbruck to pray. Se I stood on the place L_
the synagogue used to he sad silent I r reeled I
Shemone Eare.
Archaeologist's View off Might off Joshua
Continued treat Pan* *-C
events connected with Solomon.
In U4. while first visiting the United States
in behalf of the United Jewish Appeal. Dr. Yadin
succeeded in acquiring for the Israel government
four of the famous Dead Sea Scrolls. This cli-
maxed an episode that has now become one of the
great stories of archaeology.
The first three scrolls were acquired in 1M7
on Nov 29. the day the UN voted the establishment
of an independent Jewish state in Palestine The
man who acquired them, and identified them as the
oldest known Bible manuscript treasures beyond
compare, was Prof. E. L. Sukenik the Hebrew Uni
vershy-s first professor of archaeology.
Prof. Sukenik was Dr. Yadias father he
adopted the Basse Yadin while be served a
Haganah. the Jewish underground defense font I
Palestine. Prof. Sukenik had sought to acquire)
seven of the serous, which were found by a I
shepherd in a cave near the Dead Sea. 1
regretting that he had been unable to
purchase of four of the scrolls, owing to the 1
led times.
Seven years Later, a chance ad in the
Street Journal revealed to Dr. Yadin. then vi
this country, that the scrolls were here sad
for sale. In a long, ceaapttx series of neeahsl
Dr. Yadin bought she fear scrolls, greatly asfca)
the late Samuel Gottesman. philanthropist of P
York, who donated the major part of a
of a milhoa dollars to pay for them
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no.


iiday, October 2. 1959
+Jeisli ncricfton
Page 1I-C
Hias House in Negev: Home for Expert;
Lria
Continued fretn Pefe J-C
e-cT becomes habitable, rodm is created for
n ireds of thousands of new immigrants.
United Hias Services arc a familiar feature
(ountries of Jewish immigrationU.S.A., Can-
Latin America. In Israel, Hias in its aCCfc
n the midst of the immigration waves, follow-
g we II experienced line of personal contact.
j; operated a special counselling servicejor th
L.Mng advice on migration and emigration prob-
And it provided shelter for unattached ini-
-jgrantssince the settling and absorption au-
borities of the Jewish Agency and the government
... ted their main attention to immigrant fam-
. [n those shelters, which during the peak
i tae immigration waves numbered 33, over 12,000
ini;le immigrants received temporary accommu-
Jations until they found jobs and were able to
icquire homes of their own.
Hem* Away from Home
But, as it was felt that the future of Israel is
In the tfcgev, future activity of Hias was also
focused on the Negev. During various discussions,
It came up again and again that, due to inadequate
Accommodations in the Negev, experts and techni-
cians needed to undertake the research and devel-
opment work were reluctant to take such assign-
ments.
Thus Hias, known for its experience in this
field, was approached by the government and the
Jewish Agency with the proposition of providing a
borne away from home for such experts, techni-
cians and other professionals. The outcome of the
discussions is the Hias House in the Negev. This
kuge half million-dollar hostel consists of 47 self-
contained apartmentsa bed-sitting room, shower
kitchenette, with a small refrigerator and a
Latuial air-conditioning system. It was devised
pv local engineers who took advantage of the winds
knd designed the apartments so that they have
natural cress-airing.
There are a small synagogue, a lounge and
hading room, as well as a restaurant. And there
I: a library which, when completed, will be unique.
Vvi ^&. 1 m A Kilt il -A!
^
Wg^^T-- nlL
The Hias House in the Negev is a place
hill of life ." Valuable chemical and
mineral sources in the Negev have been
found by expert geologists. In a new plant
near Machtesh Ramon, gypsum-bearing
rock is fed into a crusher.
Prime Minister Ben-Gurion cuts ribbon open-
ing highway from Elath to Beersheba at
ceremonies last year in Yotvata. ". to-
day the Negev is becoming more and more
active. The Beersheba-Oron railway line
is under construction ."
Through the help of the American Katzen fund, the
Hais will establish there a special Negev library
which, ultimately, should contain every book deal-
ing with the problems of arid zones. This library
should also become a kind of Negev Archive, hold-
ing reports from all settlements in the Negev, their
population and agriculture, their folklore and prob-
lems. In the long run this would also become a
research center on sociological problems of this
Negev melting pot, where there is a merger of
the various tribes of Israel that came from so
many countries, different in culture and living
standards.
This library, rhich is in its initial stages, in-
cludes already rare books of the first explorers
of the Negev, dating hack several hundreds of
years, and Are used by the geologists and archae-
ologists from among the residents of the Hias
hostel.
"Had it not been for this Hias hostel, we
would not have stayed here," said Alexander Tra-
sey, the New Orleans desalination expert who is
here with his young wife. The elderly solar energy
expert, Dr. Dennies, nodded in agreement, adding
quietly in his German-accented English: "There is
practically no other place to live here."
Majority an Israelis
And nobody could blame them for not wanting
to stay somewhere else. One cannot expect that
an expert, coming from abroad for a relatively
short stay of half a year or even one year, should
acquire an apartment in Beersheba. Yet he wants
to feel at home, and does not want to live in a
hotel.
One gets this feeling of a home in the small
Hias apartments. The expert, technician, scien-
tist, administrator, manager or trasher finds here
a piace he can live in and relax, work and read.
Each room is equipped with modern furniture, col-
Continued on Page 13-C
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un rim Mummm
TTrf MftUTsM MAMS
Til Ml.
Ultimate Cruelty: The Six Million 'Myth'
tke
P*. J-C
Madote cab tkeir death
f the Xaxi army a
early IMS. aat late 1944
straggle, acaaest tie
Rdl
R
aad a
Semitic Common Seme." kas his
about tke late of tke six malhoa. Wntiac
ass Seme." May 1. MOP. under the heading. "Si<
Milboo Jew Hoax." Freedmaa plays the naiahirs
game to sacgest that there are mttlions more Jews
ir the United States than Jews admit. "The dif-
ference ni these figures." he writes, approximates
the 6.000O00 soeaDed Jews' allegedly P* to
death in furnaces and in gas chambers between
1939 and IM5 ."' (Freedman always puts quota-
tion marks around the word "Jews" because, he
claims, today's Jews are lmposters. really descend-
ed from a tenth century Kingdom of Kharars" in
Eastern Europe.)
Profitable Fraud
Freedman offers a dubious explanation of why
anay Jewish organizations opposed intmsion in
tke United States census of a question about relig
ion. They opposed it- he says, m order to disguise
the fact that "allegedly put to deatk" Jews are
now in the United States.
The notion that the six million are now in the
United States is echoed by anti-Semite Lincoln
Rockwell, of Arlington, Va.. who says that many of
them "later died happily and richly in the Bronx.
NY." and the whose thing is "a monstrous and
profitable fraud-"
The effort to deny the existence of the six
million started when former Nazis, still active in
Germany, sought to erase the memory of Nazi
brutality. Some years ago, neo-Nazi school teach-
er Johann Stntnk of Dusaeldorf printed a handbill,
"Did Hitler Really Destroy Six Million Jews?"
(Stnsnk has several times been penalised by West
German tkaritii i for has crimes.) Etnas* nod
thus have found tsopi ration among ike-minded
people throughout the worm.
In tke Jordanian section of Jerusalem, anti-
Jewish propagandist Anseaae F. Albina wrote an
article. "Spotlight on tke Poor 6.M0.M0 Dead
Jews," which has been picked up and distributed
by anti-Semites from Einar Aberg in Sweden, to
Gerald L. K Smith in Los Angeles, to tke South
African Anglo-Nordic Union. Albina, who calls his
hate mill "World Truth." starts off: "Since 1945
the Gentile world has never been for one moment
allowed to forget the 6.000.000 alleged to have
been killed by Hitler in World War II. Even me-
morials have been erected to commemorate these
6.000,000 dead' Jews ."
Turgid Reckonirtfl
It concludes: "In other words, the whole story
of the 6.000,000 dead Jews is pure fiction." In be-
tween, he plays his own numbers game, with exten-
sive calculations based on figures from the World
Almanac and from a 1940 New York Times study
of the Jewish population of the world. (Benjamin
Freedman, in his article on the subject, quoted the
same study but used a different set of figures.) Al-
bion's calculations defy analysis; he says that "as
there are now only some 18,000,000 Jews in the
world, an increase of 9.000.000 in the ten years,
1938-1948. represents a total increase of popula-
tion (in only ten years) of fifty percent an im-
possibility even for a race so immersed iff sex
as the Jews."
"American JewnTheir Lives and AchierJ
ments." was published during the Hebrew I
JYear 5719. New York Mayor Robert F.
Wagner (censer) receives pre-publicatiott
copy. "It is tragic that today we still dJ
bate the consequences cf the horrible phjJ
losophy of Nazism.
This turgid reckoning, with its inaccurate
uresthe world Jewish population is generally ee
timated at about 12,000.000 today apparently |
impressed Gerald L. K. Smith that he reprinted m
twice in his "Cross and tke Flag." In the Marcs]
1959 issue, it appears with tke introduction: "M
are indebted to Antoine F. Albina of Jerusalem]
Jordan, for a very shrewd analysis ." Tal
months later. May. 1990, the story' is repeats!]
verbatim, bet a new source is credited: "We ar|
indebted to the Sooth African Anglo-Nordic Una]
for publishing a very teflinc survey coaceraiai tkj
takrhind about she six aulbon Jews ..."
in New York, suggested tkatl
same of the six snsUoa Were really in tke fitfl
atrip. Bet piapansdlit ARnaa. operating add]
Jordanian Jerusalem, not too far from Gaul
shares witk Freedman, Rockwell and others tkj
theory that they're all in the United States. H
quotes with approval tke 1SS2 statement of ml
W. D. Herrstrom, an American anti-Semite, warn]
"Bible News Flashes'' had this to say:
"Sen. Pat McCarran says there are more dual
5,000,000 aliens in this country who got in il
legally." He doesn't say who they are but mod
'informed' people believe that most of them aid
Jews ... No use looking in Shickelgrubtrij
ovens for them. Walk down the streets of if]
American city. There they are."
This bit of fantasy apparently caught up vial
Gerald L K Smith's "Cross and Flag lite. 1M|
notion that the six million are in the United SUtttl
appears in its June, 1956 issue under a headiafl
of barbaric flippancy: "Into the Valley of 0M
Rode the Six Million. Or Did They*" Conde Mel
Ginley reprinted the Herrstrom item back in 19S|
Cempaian in Gear
In the past few weeks, this line has been usdj
with ever greater frequency. McGinley, in "Coil
mon Sense," prints sa item "From Our Asian Com
respondent" which offers s brand new set of as-j
related figures. Others come closer to a sembliasl
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joy, October 2. 1959
+Jelst>rhrkUaii
Page 13C
I .. w|,en they "reveal" that one German con-
0* __ innthar had nn ffa ffhttmhai*
entration camp
or another had no gas chamber
ils premises. (Sometimes the Nazis, to keep
P" efs from rebelling, concealed the fact that
ih'v were doomed by building gas chambers and
Cmitoria out of _si*J* "* ">P-> No matter
t the twist, the campaign to deny the existence
six millto'ligp m-hiU^iear^ .. ^
)W effective are these tales? Despite the
.ird calculations in this macabre numbers game,
oite the obvious inhumanity of the aims, the
6 sometimes get through.
It's a long time since 14S, when the facts
ifcut the six million were first exposed to the
rld when Allied leaders first visited the Nazi
mps and saw the evidence of mass death at first
n(j The horror has worn off, to be replaced
L-ith wonderin some case disbeliefthat it ever
Ball> happened. And people forget.
Austin J. App. a pro-Nazi apologist who once
*mnded that President Eisenhower be hanged
L i war criminal, writes a letter from Philadel-
hia, to the Catholic "Brooklyn Tablet" offering
clous "proof" that the figure of six million is
la bloated libel." The letter is printed and read
lv thousands who may be innocent or uninformed
labout App, about the truth -of the six million.
The editor of a Detroit newspaper receives a
jatch of hate literature, including a mimeographed
liece from the Boniface Press, App's Philadelphia
utlet, which also talks about "the libel of six mil-
ion." The editor is mystified, asks ADL for clari-
Ication of the subject.
Doubts About Truth
In a Southern city, another newspaper editor
ets a batch of mail from Einar Aberg, a source
embarrassament to the government of Sweden
nd frequent visitor to its jails. Included is a piece
slled "The Falsehood About Six Million Jews
ud to be Gassed by Hitler." The editor asks a
ewish friend if he can really document the facts
out Jewish dead.
A letter to the editor appears in the June 14,
059 issue of the big-circulation Catholic weekly,
|Our Sunday Visitor." It comments on a column
a previous issue which had criticized V. S. Pnt-
hett for mentioning, in Holiday Magazine, that
tx million Jews had been killed by the Nazis. The
Jolumn said that "the rehashing of such bitter
pemories would hardly help an American enjoy
holiday in Germany." The letter writer ap-
arently endorses this view and goes one step fur-
ker: "Pritchett uses the old propaganda myth
bat millions of Jews were killed by the national
pcialists. From what I was able to determine
ring six post-war years in Germany and Aus-
jia, there were a number of Jews killed, but the
(gure of a million was certainly never reached."
gain the numbers game, this time in a reputable,
^spectahle medium.
And I he doubts about the Incredible truth are
pised, a Lain and again, in places as widely scat-
red as New York and St. Benedict, Ore., and in
lie general, special, and foreign language press.
Recently from Germany, where it all started,
ime some >tartling news. A German reporter
ok his television equipment into 12 schools in
|ve widely differing regions of the land. He asked
y 15 to 17 year-old pupils: "What do you know
|bout Hitler?" and "How many people were mur-
ered in the Nazi era?" He found that nine out of
*n students either knew nothing at all about Hit-
r or beheved that he had done more good than
"m. The highest estimate of the number of
Jews killed by the Nazis was 30,000. Many stu-
dents professed total ignorance.
The answers should have been anticipated.
German parents are not apt to educate their chil-
dren about the past. The schools do not do much
better. Here, for example, is the complete account
of Nazi persecution of Jews in a textbook for 12
and 14-year-olds: "The Jews fared worst under
Hitler. They were expelled from the German peo-
ple. They were shipped by the thousands into
concentration camps. Through hunger, diseases,
maltreatment, many died."
Debating the Consequences
The recent German trials of SS guards excited
great interest among German youth. The facts of
mass murder were related during the proceedings.
For many young Germans, this was the very first
time that they had heard any details of the bru-
tality of the Hitler years.
Recently the monthly organ of the General
Students Committee at Heidelberg University dis-
closed that a self-styled students' Fascist group
was "engaging in anti-democratic and anti-Sem-
itic" activities. In their paper, "Student Und
Volk," the Fascist students had published many
articles supporting racist theories and saying that
the figure of 6,000,000 Jews exterminated by Hit-
ler was "grossly exaggerated."
Joachim Lipshitz, West Berlin senator, had an
answer to this type of thinking. He wrote in a
Dusseldorf newspaper: "It is tragic that today we
still debate the consequences of the horrible philos-
ophy of Nazism. When there are people who can
argue whether it was six million or only four or
three million who were killedthen Hitler still
lives. When there are those who say that Hitler's
murder of the Jews was 'a big mistake,' thus re-
ducing the murder of six million to the status of
a tactical or political faux pasthen too, Hitler
still lives."
Hias House in Negev
Continued from Page 11 C
orful curtains and book shelves, as well as a small
flower-vase with some flowers in itan important
change of view from the barren Negev panorama.
The importance of this house can be seen
from the number of residents and visitors who
have passed through it. Since its immigration in
1956, over 15,000 experts and technicians, and
group of visitors from all parts of the world, stay-
ed for a short or long period. During their stay,
they all contributed, in one way or another, to the
Negev's development
A statistical cross-section of the residents and
visitors of this house is rather illustrative: six per-
cent were agricultural experts, two percent mining
and industrial experts and technicians, 17 percent
administrative officials, over 50 percent scientists,
and 10 percent workers in various social services.
The majority of those passing Hias House are
Israelis58 percent. English-speaking countries
come next, with 26 percent. Western Europe, 12
percent, and Latin America, two percent.
The Hias House in the Negev is a place full
of life, and its vitality radiates through the whole
Negev. And today the Negev is becoming more
and more active. The Beersheba-Oron railway line
is under construction, bridges are built, oil wells
Continued on Page 15-C
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Fag* 14C
+Je*isB'fk**Mtn
FridT. October X
A Prmmpr
f All
Xewr l'rar
Jewish Community Life in Spam Today
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Local people Living here wi*
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feresec freei external factors, the Jew. can carnal
e ii 1| jam11ami m their legal and socssl
atmv Five amndred year* after the Exik and
30 years only after their return, the cominamity u^
coafadeat am its future.
C-.-Jiiuiii'i Caieai m uWcelena
CaOe Porieair is a typical Barcelona street; it
starts a) eae at the cay's most luxnnoas residen-
tial amsrters and gi ana aft} tapers off into a small
after bat ai the senator of Spam's misery Half
ia length is No. 44. a three-story
ihoe m the Medcerraaean son.
nth as early 20th century lines.
Over iu doable wrweght-iron gates, a* shield indi-
cates the identity ef its owners.
Thas a the Jewish Coaanianity Center in Bar-
nlani and the appropriate symbol of the small
ago hat ts staB anore seal Hid than admitted. Un-
der a ted of anocy nuty. the budding is a center
of aetne Jewish caharal and religious life.
On the first floor, there is a spacious Sephardi
ijasgofai the second, a smsler Ashhenazi
prayer aalL across the corridor, an assembly room
complete with stage, microphones, light eqeip-
sseat ami a bar. Next to it u a library and the
AD over the building, the
of Herxi and Franco hang side by side.
_J ptopk are registered with the
m Barcelona, three hundred m Madrid.
to bee in Valencia. The
of Jews m the tentry is probably
The Barcelona tiasssaahiy secre-
tary i aim am them to several thousands.-' Span-
ish sfanaats "many leas of thousands.'' and his-
i is aa Snoansh family wuh-
here it prudent not to disclose their J,
and yet others arc the mysteneas "man
-hebraicoa" dtsseaasssted throughout SmL?
particularly numerous m their traditional
In the inland of Majorca.
Jewish historians and a special branch lk. i
Spanish Academy, the laot&uto des Estemn aN
braicos. which udirected by the fa>owaJl]
Francesco Cantera. are trying to pierce asm
the mystery which still surrounds these crfiJji
Catholics who continue to observe certain jS
rituals and who eelcbrnte the High Holidays mZ
secrecy of their amuses. It It, however. diffJl
to lift the veil as many Maranos still feel th,
nbie -* -* -*-. --------
rccaatly as the eighteenth
of which they were the butt
>i
LostTa
ts Fstd
With improved social and political condiuja
for religious minorities, some of Spain's "los,-
Jews try to reintegrate Jewish life and often an*
to the commonity for advice and for the rabtxi
ministrations. Bat ia Seam when a Jew has en*
sed the hae. it is almost impossible to rejoin the
fold since the enmmasnty cannot risk being *
rased of proselytism by the ever-vigilant Catholic
The "last" Jews fall m various
ic have married am* Christian fan
eea i on mi rated or are trymg to assimilate.
others were converted daring the hut war when
they feared a Nam uuaparmn of Spain fallowing
the Haler-Tranco meeting at Heads)e; others be-
Officially. Jews have been in the country f*
less than 30 years, some, of Spanish ongu, jg I
Salonika and Istaabal in the early thirties far By. !
celona. when the then Spanish dictator Gen. Prj.
de Rivera lifted Esrope's oldest and most xr
gently enforced hen on Jews; others came durst
the second World War and stayed on. a few t*.
cause they rnrrrrdsd hi ante grating themselves a
the country's tcoeossy, most because of their a
The vast majority of the Jews have remaiad
either stateless or foreigners; far it u difficult ul
expeasive. if at aB soaaabk. for a nonCathobt to
Many still hold Turkish or Ge>
of prosperous bus-
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Apart from a small
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COME 6. rVrflTrffY


Lay. October 2^959
+ kist nor Mian
Page 15-
[bout Man's Spiritual Relationship to God
Continued from Pago 1-C
, ,he religious fervor of the holiday. Theodor
-,r phrases it in this fashion, which makes the
m spirit more understandable: "God was con-
i fly doing battle against the forces of chaos,
Ltinually fighting His way to Kingdom, conti.i-
allv asserting His dominion, and continually eu-
1 ining Himself as sovereign of creation. At
|ieW Year, when the world was annually reborn,
ht sovereignly was evinced anew, but it was tne
bnsequcnccs f a,continual, not of a particular
jumph: and the palace in which He was enthroned
s not an earthly dwelling, but rather nature
If, and the hearts and minds of men." -
Fore, of tho Holiday
Thus, all Jews in the shtetl were embraced by
force of the holiday. Nature, Man, God all
cime One. And the sovereignty of God was the
and most persistent theme of the hohday.
ibbi Pinhas of Korotz, a noted Hasaidic leader,
as observed, "At New Year's -God is in that con-
talment which is called 'the sitting of the throne,'
Ind everyone can see him, everyone according to
[is own nature: one in weeping, one in prayer, and
in'the song of praise."
Rabbi Pinhas also said of New Year's Day:
fAll creatures renew themselves in sleep, even
ones and streams. And if man wants to renew
life over and over, then before falling asleep,
must put from him his shape, and command his
laked soul to God. It will ascend and receive new
ife But today is the day of great renewal, and
|eep sleep falls on all spiritual creatures, on
'Is, and holy names, and the letters of the
riptures. This is the meaning of the great judg-
ment in which the spirit is renewed. And so today,
nan shall be destroyed in deep sleep, and the re-
eling hand of God will touch him."
The passion of the Hassidim, the piety of the
tillage Jew in Europe may be tokens of the past,
nit Rosh llashona continues to hold us in its em-
brace, even if we now live in large metropolitan
[reas, comfortable suburbs or lovely cities in the
lliddle West, Far West and the South. The "three
a year" Jews are, on the surface, those Jews
r-ho attend the synagogue only on Rosh Hashona
d Yom Kippur. While the phrase may be an
ver-simplification, it does stress the fact that
^osh Hashona and Yom Kippur are the holidays on
Jewish calendar which are observed most
osely and with the greatest amount of respect.
in a period when religious observance was
ss adhered to than it is now, these holidays were
ever overlooked.
Moanif* of Life
There must be a basic reason for this. I
wild imagine that it is due to the spirituality of
Days of Awe. Other holidays are connected
h special and historical events, or seasonal
banges in the Holy Land. A 4ew living outside
Israel may question the need for praying for
lain in Israel, for example. He may.not wish to
lebrate a military victory of the Jews centuries
Or he may argue that events of the past
fn unrelated to him.
But the Days of Awe are concerned with
nan's relationship to God; in a word, his own rela-
lionship to an Almighty. And here, the issues
louch his inner soul. We all feel we must, at some
jime, account for our actions to One Above. This
Ms nothing to do with a Purim shpiel, or a Pass-
over Seder. It has to do with ourselves, inside,
apart from history. There comes a time, in
. .^ the Days of Awe are concerned with
man's relationship to God ... his own rela-
tionship to an Almighty."
all our lives, when we feel penetential, when we
must talk to God, when we wonder about our be-
havior, our future lives and what happens to us
after life.
No matter how busy we may make our days
and nights, no matter how many "problems" over-
whelm us, weall of us, sometimestake time out
to wonder about the meaning of Jife, our part in
it, and why we have been placed on tins earth. In
a phrase, we face the Days of Awe. And so, these
holidays force us to face up to ourselves, to ques-
tion our ways of life, to ask for forgiveness for
what we may have done which is wrong, or evil,
or useless.
Even if there no longer exists the close com-
munal connections of the ghetto or shetetl Jews;
and although the ecstasy of the Hassidim seems a
piece of the past, we, today, must also face the
basic questions which challenged the Jews of old,
man at all times.
It is in recognition of this challenging period
that we do not feign indifference to the Days of
Awe, and why Jews who do not attend the syna-
gogue at other times, make it their business to
observe the three days of Rosh Hashona and Yom
Kippur. It is a time when we look inward. We
must, sooner or later, do that. And this is the
time for it. It renews us and because all Jews do
it at one and the same time, utilizing the great and
eloquent prayers of these holidays-, there is
a great sense of continuity and an immense sense
of Jewish immortality.
Hiss House in Negev
\
ConHnwod from Pago 13-C
are drilled, the potash works in the Dead Sea have
doubled production, the phosphate mines are in
full operation, as are the copper mines near Elath.
Silicate sand is sent north for glass production,
while the ceramic industry is developing in Beer-
sheba itself, which is becoming gradually a great
industrial center utilizing the raw materials from
its hinterlands.
This part of Israel awaits those skilled hands
that would turn it into productive landagricul-
turally and industriallyfor the benefit of those
who are coming and those whom we expect to
come.
HAPPY NEW YEAR
mriT fair
1645 COLLINS AVE.
Fred Aaronson Eli Quain
MIAMI BEACH
ABSTRACT &
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itc
Friday. Oodatt
Isolated Spanish Jews Seek Identification With World OutsiM
CM o* trmm
has arri
t rrty
eridy
WtiMftCM
rat af
Jewry.
WITH FAITH AHD RESOLVE...
f
Noahs faith *on God's gift of a kw start for al living
things on earth-the save wwadroai gift dm is offered
to everyone of faith and resolve af die start of each
New Year.
On the occasion of Roah Hashaaafc 5720, die people
of Maxwell Home josa with Jewish people every.
where, ia the spirit of this ancient celebration, in wish-
ing for pood wdl among afl men ia the modern world.
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL ^^m^,0/ MAXWELL HOUSE COFFEE
SERVE CHEERING MAXWELL HOUSE COPFEB
.FOR HOLIDAY AND EVERT DAT CHEER 1
Ground or Instant... the superior coffees of
Maxwell House bring joy and refreshment
into far more Jewish homes than any other
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tbe-last-drop flavor...
*TA'Ali VOS IS AINS IN DEE VELaT
U __
ft HOUSt
t>* I'Mtttt
Mlll flWl||
*<
COHMMJMf-
"- ml*.
mil.
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^HOUS*
'5"omy S <

18*
or MNstAi


0
High Holy Days' Inspiring Message
/ By HELEN HIRSCH
According to our tradition, Rosh Hashona
marks the birthday of- the world, the anniversary
of the creation of the first man and the birthday
of our Patriarch Abraham, who occupies such a
high place in our history. For he was the medium
through which religion was presented to a heathen
world; he was the high souled proclaimer of mono-
theism, the founder of a great spiritual kingdom.
When in the night of the new moon of Tishri
Kosh HashonaAbraham was watching the stars
to forecast the year's fertility, the revelation came
to him that, in view of God's omnipotent will, all
astrological predictions were valueless. And in a
fervent prayer, he complained to the Lord that he
had no children. And lo and behold, the word of
ihe Lord came unto him saying: "Look now toward
heaven and count the stars if thou be able to
count them. So shall thy seed be." (Gen. 15:5).
And He promised him: "I will bless thee and*
greatly multiply thy seed as the stars of heaven
We are of the Seed
Of Abraham Which
Is Our Top Treasure
and as the sand which is upon the seashore. And
thy seed shall possess the gate of his enemies and
by thy seed shall all the nations of the world be
blessed." (Gen. 22:16-18.)
And when Abraham was called upon to prove
bis love for God to> sacrifice his young son Isaac-
he resigned himself with a heavy heart to obey,
but by God's infinite mercy regained his beloved
child. This is a story of deep significance. Because
%
i
die wish Flor idian
Miami, Florida, Friday, October 2. 1959
Section D
"Patriarch Abraham," by Saul Raskin .
"And behold, the word of the Lord came
unto him saying 'Look now toward heaven
and count the stars And fervently we
pray, "Remember us unto life, O King, whe
delightest in life and inscribe us in the Book
of Life, for thine own sake, O living God."
Abraham was ready to give up what he prized
most, be received more than he gave. By his un-
hesitating readiness., to fulfill the Lord's wish.
Abraham had given proof that he served God not
only from fear, but out of love.
And God Almighty then gave the solemn prom-
ise that whenever the Akedah chapter (telling of
Abraham's sacrifice) is read on Rosh Hashona,
when the ram's horn is blown (in remembrance
of the horn of the ram sacrificed instead of young
Isaac on Mt. Moriah), the descendants of Abra-
ham should be redeemed of sin, of oppression and
apprehension.
Thus the solemn ritual of the Rosh Hashona
liturgy reminds us that we are of the seed of
Abraham and that such seed is a precious treasure.
The whole spirit of the New Year Festival is
one of solemnity and seriousness which is re-
flected in the Zodiac sign for Tishri, a pair of
scales, a symbol reminding us that our deeds are
weighed and judged in the Heavenly Book of Life,
where everyone's fate is written for the coming
year.
The Mood of Rosh Hashona
A wealth of thought of deep religious faith
and feeling lies behind this hearty wish, which is
i:ot a wish for mere merriment as in other relig-
ionsfor us it means a fervent prayer for faith
and hope, for deep joy and unbound love. Our
Rosh Hashona thoughts and wishes are wide
enough to express their poignant concern not only
lor our loved ones, but for all our Jewish brethren
in suffering or peril. Our mood is never frivolous,
our wishes not glib lip service. When we say "A
Happy New Year," we wish it also for those who
are saddened, for those who are in need, for those
who are distraught.
More than ever in these troubled, insecure
Unw, we have need of joy, we have need, as never
before, of calm assurance and confidence in God
who, despite many tribulations through danger-
fraught millennia, has never deserted us, but
brought us to safety. We have need of courage in
the face of danger and of patience in the face of
frustration. And before all we are sorely in need
of unshakeable faith in Cod's mercy and compas-
sion. These are the great spiritual gifts of Rosh
Hashona, which will give us strength, lighten our
sorrows and lift up our hearts.
And so, like our Patriarch Abraham, in the
days of old, we come before the world's -dMpOtl
to bring them the eternal message of human
rights, equality and justice proclaiming that no
people can of right be robbed of its national life
or territory, its language or spiritual heritage.
The humane message of Rosh Hashona is ex-
tended to all peoples reminding them that not
blind fate determines the rise and fall of nations
and kingdoms, but that only righteousness exalteth
a nation. In the long run, all will be well with
those that biuld on moral foundations; in the long
run, robber-states write out their own doom. And
we pray fervently: "Remember us unto life, O
King, who delightest in life and inscribe us in the
Book of Life, for thine own sake, O living God."
RESTORING THE ORIGINAL SERENITY OF MIAN'S TURBULENT SPIRIT
Universal Theme Of The Shofar Throughout Jewish History
By RABBI SAMUEL M. SILVER
Is the Shofar a musical instrument? The
trumpet-like object, the ritual item identified with
the High Holydays, is becoming as well known to
the general public as the melody of Kol Nidre. One
will often see the Shofar on TV programs. More
and more non-Jews also see it on display in visits
to synagogues. .
Invariably, a look at the Shofar elicts a bat-
tery of questions. If the Shofar is to be labeled a
musical instrument, we will nave to agree that the
-und it produces is both limited and eerie. An-
other Shofar "note" is the fact that it has been the
target of many folkloristic stories heavily tinged
with superstition. Any old-timer can reel off a
series of stories about the difficulties that people
have had in blowing the Shofar and attributing
these difficulties to the work of Satan.
It is tine for the Shofar to be liberated from
these diabolical fancies and also the widespread
misunderstanding about its significance. Once we
clear the ram's horn from these agglutinated anec-
dotes we discover that there is a host of worthy
reflections which we can entertain when we sit in
shul on the High Holydays and hear the sound of
the Shofar. First,, its tone is deliberately eerie,
for one function of the Shofar is to jar us out of
our moral slothfulnessto awaken within us a real-
ization of the need to improve.
Second, the difficulty in making the Shofar
produce its blasts is also instructive. It drama-
tises the fact that correcting bad habits does not
come easily. There are faiths in which the wor-
shipper is promised automatic salvation through a
quick formula. Not so in Judaism, which declares
that man has been granted the power to rise moral-
ly, but be must work on it, must strive mightily
to achieve it, as one strains to sound the Shofar.
Thirdly, the Shofar is a reminder of Judaism's
abhorrence of human sacrifice. The story of Abra-
ham's near-sacrifice of Isaac ends with substitu-
tion of a ran) in place of the boy. This story is
read on the High Holydays to emphasise the re-
pugnance which sensitive men must feet towards
carnage and violence. When you hear the Shofar
let it be as a cry in your ears against any tendency
on your part to cause a Tellow-man any kind of
sorrow or suffering.
Fourthly, the very sounds of the Shofar tell
their story. The smoothness of the "tekiah" may
symbolize the innocence, the ethical smoothness
which was yours at birth, for Judaism adheres to
a belief in original goodness. The more, "ruffled"
sounds of the "truah" and "shvorim" represent
the roughness which comes to our spirit during the
course of life. The reprise of the "tekiah" is the
Shofar's way of telling us that you can restore the
original smoothness of your soul despite its scar-
red and marred condition if only you make an ef-
CanHfMMd an !# *
MBMMi


Page 2-D
-JewisH*******
frtdY. October i
To Alt.. Sratton'tt Greetings
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TO ALL
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Phone FR 1-6551
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GREETINGS TO ALL FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
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Phone FR 9-141* .
Florida BaUd*rs Service. Iae.
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Miami. Florida

DR. and MRS. MILTON SANES GOLDMAN
and daughters Rose Hannah and Lynn Esta
2335 Meridian Avenue, Miami Beach
Extend Best Wishes far the New Year
to their Friends and Relatives
Italian Jewish Community Since 5719
By TULLIA ZEVI
Italv s 30.000 Jews, grouped into 23 commun
ities. remained stationary numbers the past
year but tended to move increasingly into cities
with large Jewish communities. The trend fore-
shadowed the disappearance of the smaller Jewish
communities.
Milan and Rome are the two major centers of
Italian Jewish life. Milan. Italy's largest industrial
center, offers substantial educational and job op-
portunities and it exerts a great attraction not only
for Italian Jews living in the smaller towns but
also on foreign Jews who have established their
own communities within the Jewish community.
They include Jews from Syria. Egypt. Iran. Leb-
anon. Turkey and a large group of Ashkenazi Jews.
The Milan Jewish community totals 8.000 persons.
The largest Jewish community in Italy is that
of Rome with 11.238 persons, according to official
statistics. But Rome's Chief Rabbi Elio Toaff
says the actual number of Jews in Rome is close
to 15.000. including the employes of such interna-
tional organizations as FAO. the United Nations
and the film industries, as well as the members of
the international colony of artists, students, trades-
men and journalists who frequently take up resi-
dence in Rome lasting several years.
The Jewish communities of Home and Milan
reflect the characteristics of the larger urban com-
munities of which they are a part. In Rome, a
large part of the working Jewish population is in
trade, either wholesale or retail. Some fields, in-
cluding clothing, leather goods and durable goods
m general have a large percentage of Jews. The
doors of Rome's ghetto were opened 90 years ago.
Jews poured out into the life of the city and have
opened shops all over Rome since. The old ghetto
remains a predominantly Jewish section with an
ir. tense and colorful small trade commercial life.
The Jewish community of Milan reflects the
industrial character of the city and of Northern
Italy. Important industries such as cotton and
paper manufacturing, paints, etc.. are owned and
managed by Jews.
Jewish educational and cultural activities oc-
cupy a major area of Jewish communal activity,
as in most free countries, and there were impor-
tant developments in such activities during the
past Jewish year.
Last December, a new elementary and pro-
vocational school was inaugurated in-Rome. De-
signed to accommodate 700 pupils, the school cost
S2SO.0O0. Construction of a kindergarten for the
school is expected to start this rear.
In Milan a sate for a sew Jewish school has
been purchased. The school will cost an estimated
SI.000.000 with half of the money coming from the
Claims Conference and the rest from Milan Jewry
It will accommodate 1.000 pupils from first grade
to college and win be the largest Jewish school in
Europe. There are 790 pupils in the present Milan
Jewish school, of whom only 395 are Italian Jewish
children. The others come from other countries,
representing 37 nationalities.
Scholarships are a special aid for Jewish stu
dents, both Italian and overseas. A total of 57
tumersity scholarships were provided resident ref-
ugees and 81 scholarships were assigned to high
school students
Cultural activities received new impetus on
Tu : r dW Jkw*| rrfigenij, AjjbW/i
O-rripondrnj tn Romt

Spectators attend gala celebration recent]
ly marking the graduation of the first Lnaj!
student from the Hebrew University-Krdca- j
sah medical school in Israel. 'The cdtad ]
program is extensive, covering Jewish]
schools, rabbinical college, teacher ras-
ing programs, textbook publication, Jewish 1
centers and regular contacts with, vzrjml
youth organizations."
April 1 when Dr. Auguste Segre wa- nam.:
of the Cultural Department of the I'nion of In
Jewish Communities. An 11-point prog]
developed, highlighting the emphasis of |
on its cultural program as the key phase of 11
tinuous effort to combat pressures toward
lation.
The cultural program is extensive
Jewish schools, rabbinical college, teacher tra
programs, textbook publication. Jewish
and regular contacts with the various youth i
izations. These include B'nai Akiva. Zof.n
the Jewish Youth Federation. The Jewish
in Rome will be augmented soon by or.: >1
opened in Florence and a third in Milan.
The UIJC has organised several sem.ini
Hebrew culture tor teachers and pupils. Cm I
teachers started In Jerusalem on July 15 for a I
month program with 14 Italian teachers pan
pating. Funds were provided by the Joist
bution Committee and the Jewish Agency,
three-week teachers' seminar, organized b*
Italian Jewish Teachers Federation, was he.d i
ing August and ten Italian Jews took part j I
one-month course organized by the Jewish Age
in Arosa. Switzerland.
Other phases of the UIJC cultural proj-im i
elude plans for mailing each week's Porttoa
sha). starting this Rosh Hashona. to all pen
asking for it. This follows an idea already
in France for Jews living in areas withou'
gogues. The UUC also announced aereemeat I
the Italian state-owned radio network for a
broadcast by a rabbi on the week's nor!
Jewish community members continued to
weekly the discussions of the prophets of
prepared by Dante Lattes. considered Italy;;
est hvmg Jewish scholar.
The UIJC also reported that the Ana
Kodeth of Trieste, which was demolished n
Continued en Page 15-D
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-iMfll


'Jewis* nor/dfor?
Page 3-D
[ichard Strauss and His Jewish Friends
By BOB BREWER
. on Rosh Hushona. we piously re-
Imbcr "n a sPecia'' solemn ritual, the six mil-
jews murdered by the Nazis, but we are, un-
I |y, apt to forget the many thousands of
Lnswho suffeXcUbeHtfnd spiritual death in
iler erite. uprooted and alone.
The 10th anniversary of the death of the
nous composer, Richard Strauss, whose two best
tndi and most successul collaborators were two
Istrian Jews, is a fit occasion to look back at a
when blind mass hatreds killed not only
tsical bodies, but annihilated the spirit and cul-
of a nation whose contributions in all the
|ds of science and literature have been invalu-
c.
This is the tragic story of three eminent art-
! composer, a poet, and an author*! who were
ecuted by the Nazi hordes because of their
irishress, Hugo von Hofmannsthal and Stefan
lei? and because of his liberal thinking Richard
Two great friendships were destroyed,
cppy collaborations ruthlessly stifled and
Light to an untimely end by suicide.
Richard Strauss, one of the most vital and
[ci !ul composers, was fortunate in his associa-
with two of Vienna's greatest authors of the
e. Hugo von Hofmannsthal (1874-1929). the
odxn of Isaac Loew, of Prague, and Stefan
cig 18811942).
Correspondence Reveals Story
The moving story of the great friendship and
|pp> highly successful cooperation of Richard
Tauss with both authors is reflected in their
eer exchange of letters which was published in
B5 (Strauss-Hofmannsthal) and in 1958 (Strauss-
peig) and widely acclaimed.
Tc Hofmannsthal, Strauss owes the success of
; rich enjoyable and most popular opera, "Der
Isenkavalier." which after its premiere in 1911
[Germany, conquered the stages of the world,
today is still performed on the leading opera
Iges. During the following two decades, Strauss
ote his best operas in happy collaboration with
kfmannsthal and in numerous letters expressed
i joy and satisfactidn of having found a librettist
| such eminent stature.
But in 1920. when in the shadow of Braunau.
swastika first raised its ugly head, Hofmanns-
became depressed and less eager to write.
ith increasing horror, he watched the Gorgon-
laded monster of anti-Semitism raise its ven-
jous head, saw the German people under the
er-increasing spell of the Nazi Pied Piper and
(ffercri greatly from it, the more so as the Jew-
ping hate-slogans quickly found their way into
native Vienna. Hofmannsthal, the hypersensi-
N poet, sensed the great impact of the deadly
Inger ahead for his people. This undermined his
|licate health and hastened his untimely end.
Years passed. Strauss deeply mourned his
eat friend and did not compose anything. Later,
Iwevcr. the urge to compose rose mightily in him
lain, although he was in his 70th year. He tried
H though reluctantly, to find somebody.
pougn a friend, he was introduced to the noted
Jenna bom author and playwright, Stefan Zweig,
miniate friend of Theodor Herzl, then editor of
P most reputed, daily, "Die Neue Freie
sse Their successful collaboration began in
31 t), thu story of "The Silent. Woman," a plot
pn from a medieval play by Ben Jonson, whose
TPone" Zweig had so brilliantly modernized
is still performed all over the world.
RICHARD STRAUSS
foMta fruits
HUGO VON NO/MANNSTMAL
. ftyeerseasirivc poof
In the following years their collaboration pro-
gressed well, but a cruel fate willed it otherwise
and slowly brought it to a tragic ending. Hitler
had come into power and Strauss, much against his
will, was made president of the Reichsmusikkam-
mer. Soon however, Strauss, who continued his
eager correspondence with Zweig, was looked upon
askance. When "The Silent Woman" was pre-
miered in Dresden in 1933, the playbill, omitting
Zweig's name, read "Prom an English play by
Ben Jonson." When Strauss insisted to have
Zweig's name mentioned, his wish was granted,
but after three performances, the warmly-received
opera.disappeared "by higher order."
Revealing Diary Entry
Zweig, anxious not to cause his friend any
more trouble, wanted to remain "anonymous" and
recommended other noted playwrights to Strauss.
Fairminded and proud, Strauss refused to listen.
In, the meantime, Zweig had submitted to him two
plans for future operas, "Friedenstag" and "Ca-
priccio." Strauss liking them both immensely
wrote to him: "These are your very own ideas, and
I want you and nobody else to work them out. Do
not propose to me men such as Alexander Lernet-
Holenia or Joseph Gregor. Both of them cannot
measure up to you."
On July 3, 1935, Strauss entered in his diary:
"Sure it is a tragic era when a creative artist of
Continued on Page 11-D
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MTBWKS & EXTBMKS
The Past Year in America-Israel Affairs
By MILTON FRIEDMAN
Washington
The American public. Jewish and nooJewish.
grew closer to the 11-year-old state of Israel during
the past Je-nsh year. Israel's cause was cham-
pioned b> the U.S Congress. But the SUte Depart
eat continued to waver, following its nou-
faauliar --expedient" policies in the Near East
State Department officials, obsessed with the
bigger picture." overlooked Israel's interests to
a considerable extent When President Nasser of
-the United Arab Republic condemned prtKCommu-
nist tendencies in Iran., the State Department
listened- It sought a formula for improving rela-
tions with Nasser while simultaneously avoiding
steps thai might drive Iraq toward Moscow.
The State Department was well aware that
both Iraq and the I'AR scrutinized American rela-
tions with Israel Therefore, to exploit the inter-
Arab nit. in the most cautious manner, the State
Department decided to avoid any role that might
cause America to be portrayed as Israel's guard-
ingel The Department wanted to disengage,
me extent, from VS. support of Israel-
Congress, however, was convinced of the value
oj Israel as a friendly democracy Congress had
doubts about the State Department's wisdom in
wooing the elusive and unreliable Arab states at
Israel's expense
A clash between the two branches of the Gov-
ernment on this issue was clearly in the making.
The f.ght came when Israel was dropped from the
Lst of nations recommended by the State Depart-
ment for grant aid for the new fiscal year. This
State Department action was discovered by the
House Foreign Affairs Committee when the an-
nual foreign aid proposals were submitted to Con-
gress
U'9 Aid Restoration
State Department officials were questioned
about the omission of Israel. They held that Is-
- economy had so improved that a grant was
a am rnomt
mdmr aliciiiii
bboM But c ran mitt ee members like
Fulton Peaasrhazui Republican.
le tacts They mere aware of Israels con-
ecaaaanc dBrraahiet under the burden of
:h% knew that the
"e P iar US military assistance to
%ahmjxor Imb. C
Israel although the Department urged fre-
of heavy munitions to the Arabs
Rep. Fulton insisted that Israel be reaaM
the economic grant list. He went furtherir
that Israel had voluntarily done so much tti
the world refugee situation that Congress
match funds raised by the United Jewish
on a potential basis of $1 for every tz ^
the UJA State Department officers,
Arab resentment of immigration
horrified.
mu*hl
into Israel,
The SUte Departments clever spokesmenftJ
sanrW mrtkt Lmj
Ji
;ht to obscure the issue. They Hnght to ratm.-|
alia* Israel's elimination from grant aid by sag-
gesung that Israel could rely on possible de'vela-j
rr.ent loans and surplus commodity aha. r^J
Leonard Farbstetn. New York Democrat, quxUr
; ioted out that stoekptbag of surplus cobum
ties was a problem and irwaai.il Israel's need:
a direct grant.
Other committee members, like Rep. ah
rite Stm Church. Illinois Republican, and
I ie L. Hays. Ohio Democrat, lauded the tad]
Army. They pointed out that it would be a goat
force on the side of the free world Rep Chester
Bow let, a former VS. Ambassador to India. cood'
see no justice in the elimination of Israel from tat;
aid list. Finally, the committee expressed its ea>J
elusion.
Chairman Thomas E. Morgan nude knowa the ]
committee's decisraa to C. Douglas Dillon. later-1
secretary of State far Fcoaamic Affairs CoaeerteiJ
about Ciiiigimianil support on bigger issues the
State Department grudgingly decided to give in at |
the Israel grant.
Haaaahrar Servos NaHca
The State Departat decision was tab* I
partly because of stgas of an impending Semite
fight equally formidable. Already, four leads*
Senators had called personally on Secretary j
State Christian Herter. la tact, it mis the fint
official appointment of the aew Secretary after
he assumed office.
The Senate Foreign Relations Committees,
firebrand. Hubert TTtmpai i j had sened tooce
the State Dcpartaaeat. He iadacated be
bring out before the Amencaa aahbc bo the!
Deparuaeat added aa aihlftraar.1 harden to 1
budget by grriag free aaapaas to the Arabs wi*
denying similar ary aid to Israel
Whea fader secretary Dilate appeared hehWj
the Senate CoauaWee. he at fSrat remained aaJ
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Friday. October 2,1959
+Je*is*Fk>rMian
Page 5-D
The Yellow Badge of Jewish Courage
By DR. BLANCHE KATZEN
On and after Dec. 1, 19J9, all Jews and Jew-
us living in (He territory "6lf the Government
rencral and who are ten years of age or more
nust wear on the right sleeve of their clothes,
rcoa, or mantles, a white armlt not less than
inches in width, bearing as a distinctive sign
hi Star of David. Jews or Jewesses must provide
hemsilvcs with such, armlets with the described
Distinctive sjgn. infractions will be punished
by imprisonment.'
This law was issued on Nov. 13. 1939, in Nazi
3ermany. legalizing the yellow badge of infamy in
same state where it had officially been abol-
ished in 1812. The story of a badge of discrimin-
ation, fastened1 upon a minority group in general
and the Jews in particular, traces back to the first
tury. The famous Roman author Tertullian
rites: "If the Tiber rose to the walls of the city,
the inundation of the Nile failed to give the
fields enough water, if the heavens did not send
tain, if an earthquake occurred, if famine threat-
j, if pestilence raged, the cry resounded 'Throw
he Christians to the lions!""
But while theirs was oniy a snort martyrdom
those dark days, a martyrdom out of which
ater developed a most powerful religious group,
other minorities have been suffering as scapegoats
i to the present day. Usually one group is chosen,
eak and scattered, unable to defend itself; and in
nes of economic pressure, of misery, of the vicis-
of long wars and their disastrous conse-
quences, such group is a welcome victim for an
angry and incensed mob and for irresponsible
Readers eager to fill their own pockets. It is an
utlet for every accusation and for the shifting of
onsibilities.
The Law 434
These, briefly summarised, arc the basic rea-
ns for the Jewish tragedy, started five thousand
rs ago, and continued unabated up to this day.
In 634, a law was issuednot specifically di-
ned against the Jewsa law that had the most
|ominous consequences for all Jaws. For in that
ir, a date to be forever remembered by Jews,
Mohammedan Calif Omar entertained the dis-
Itstrous idea of separating religious believers from
Iron-believers by ordering all non-Mohammedans
|to wear different headgear and girdles and a patch
Ion the shoulderJews a yellow, Christians a blue,
|jlagi a black one.
Again it was the Mohammedans who, in Sicily,
jcarly in the course of the nineth century, made the
|Jews wear a badge, this time a white one with
he image of a monkey, and the Christians one
a pig. The same symbols were affixed to the
houses of Christians and Jews, respectively. Here
the first time, the ominous technique of increas-
ling the power and supremacy of one's own group
|by fastening a badge of differentiation on others,
|was successfully used.
The Church made the idea her own. Already
Jin the year 1204, Pope Innocent III suggested a
(distinguishing mark between Jews and Saracens,
land 11 years later, that same Pope branded the
jJews with a badge of infamy that was to be worn
|by them-visiWy or invisiblyup to this day.
On Nov. 11, 1215, the Fourth Lateran Council,
I consisting of 412 bishops, 800 abbots, many priors,
land numerous representatives of prelates and
clergymen, convened in Rome in the Church of
|St. Giovanni in Laterano. Pope Innocent III pre-
sided over this memorable assembly, which issued
|many canons, among them the fateful canon 68,
Original yellow badge brought back from
Europe following World War IL
which decreed: "Jews and Saracens of both sexes
in every Christian province and at all times shall
be marked off in the eyes of the public from other
people through the character of their dress."
Other European countries went even further:
they insisted upon specifically Jewish characteris-
tics in apparel to make Jews conspicuously recog-
nizable. Not only did Jews wear beards (a copper
beard kopk issued in Russia in the early 17th cen-
tury to Jews who paid for the privilege of retaining
their beards is a valuable historic document) as
required by the ritual law; they also wore the
older form'of the "Jewish Hat"pUeus cornutus,
the horned hat. This was a conical low hat with-
out a brim or a very narrow brim only.
Soon the infamous badge spread all over
Europe. But it never became quite popular in
Spain and, consequently, was soon abolished.
Thanks to the political situation in this country, the
Jews were powerful enough to resort to strong
economic pressure; they simply started a mass
emigration to Moorish lands, taking all their con-
siderable wealth along.
Strong Economic Pressure
In France and Germany, however' such pres-
sure was of no avail. In vain, the Jews appealed to
the Pope and sent their representatives to him
to plead for the removal of the badge. The Pope
remained unmoved. Yet, strange to state, the
badge, born in Rome, can be traced in Italy only
for a short time during the 15th century.
In Germany and Austria, as well as In Bo-
hemia, the'badge is not found prior to the 15th
century since in all these countries Jews were com-
pelled to wear the "horned hat" according to the
old Jewish tradition. So, instead of a badge, the
wearing of the "horned hat" was obligatory. When
a Gentile woman was convicted of sexual relations
with a Jew, she was publicly pilloried and had to
wear the "Jewish hat" while standing for hours
at the pillory of shame. And the Jew sentenced
to death wore his "horned hat" on his last journey.
In the 14th century the city of Augsburg com-
pelled all her Jews to wear a yellow wheel in addi-
ConHnwed an Page 11-D
T. 4(1 ... 4 Msef Mapaw New rear
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3585 COLLINS AVE.
Miami Beach
Cf /*
m n.w. n* mm, <
At NfAl AS TNI TfHWNti n 4-JIM
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Our Friends and Customers
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Established 1856
i
Members New York Stock Exchange and other leading
stock and commodity exchanges
452 Biltmore Way Coral Gables
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Phones FR 3-3562 or FR 9-2336
1
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A Happy New Year to All Our Friends and Patrons
GOVERNOR CAFETERIA
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HOLIDAY GftlTtHGS TO ALL .
GRIFFIN ELECTRIC COMPANY
REPAIRS REWIRING COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL
3701 North Miami Avsimm PL 7-4022
NEW YEAR GREETINGS TO ALL
MIAMI NURSING t CONVALESCENT CENTER, INC
1I2S BISCAYNE BLVD.
Phone FR 4-1713
MIAMI, FLA.
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55* MKKtU AVtMN aW*lTM*TON
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SCHIFF'S MARKET
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1*00 Lanox Avenue. Miami Beach Phone IE 1-S7S1


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548 Minorca Annw Pn^ jg g.7493
GREETINGS
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SEASONS GREETINGS
GRABLE'S BAKERIES
* its OroUe's ifs feW
World Jewish Congress leaders gathered in
New York during outgoing Hebrew Year 5719
for talks relating to Conference on Jewish
Material Claims Against Germany. Left to
right are Alex Easterman, WJC political di-
rector. London: Monroe Abbey, chairman,
national executive. Canadian Jewish Con-
gress; Dr. Nahum Goldmann. WJC president;
Saul Hay*. Canadian" Jewish'
executive director; H. van Dam *,
general. Central Committee of JewVTn
many; Gerhart Riegner. Geneva Wr i
rector of coordination; Shad polier wH
nance committee chairman; Maurice Li
zweig WJC international affairs direct:
Jose Ventura. DAIA. Buenos Aires.
Anti-Semitic Outburst Rocked S. Africa
By EDGAR BERNSTEIN
Johannesburg
Clarifying statements in the House of Assem-
bly by two members of the South African parlia-
ment have removed the impression that they were
making anti-Jewish comments in a recent debate.
One of the two members. J. F. Schoonbee. has in
addition written a letter to the "Zionist Record.,
Johannesburg Jewish communal weekly, in which
he says: "I defy anyone to call me racial or anti-
Semitic. My own constituency is the greatest
proof of this. I have not got one Jewish enemy
and can count hundreds of Jews as personal and
business friends."
Mr. Schoonbee. who is a member of the gov-
erning National Party, says his speech is on record
m Hansard (the official minutes of parliamentary
debates) for anyone to read, and that "any calm
objective reader who finds the rudiments of anti-
Semitism in my remarks, wants to read that into
what I said."
The Hansard record supports Mr Schoonbees
contention that he was not making an anti-Semitic
attack.
What happened was this. A national contro-
versy had taken place in South Africa, following
certain court proceedings arising from alleged
abuses of a government farm labor scheme A
number of fanners had been ordered to produce
Natives (Negroes) who.had disappeared from the
towns and were alleged to be working on these
%T?\ZL lC.duced" labor Deposiuons were made
that these Natives had been arrested for alleged
statutory offenses and told that if they would serve
a contractual period of farm labor, they would not
trtZn??- n!iwas furthcr au*ged ?*>
famnS ^T1 aDrxd ,0 communi'e with their
"dthat on thew ,arms they werp
2EinM aod *orking -*~ *
* L I. Rabinowiu. of Johannesburg, made rer>
resentations to them and announcedTha, ,U Jew
b farmers except one" in the area affected had
W. aW u W A/n n. | ,
T< the Jeu^h Tdtpaj*k Ataawj
agreed to release natives sent to them under |
farm labor scheme and not again make use tfj
source of labor. He also severely criticiad]
farm labor scheme from his pulpit and ^
the abuses alleged to have taken pla~ulde1
The chief rabbi's statement led to some crii
that he was "interfering in politics and t*i
ports in some papers that not all Jewish k_
had*in fact agreed to dispense with this ',nil
labor
I sear Icfceme Criticiied
The nutter was next ventilated in Pariai
where the opposition strongly attacked the
labor scheme and demanded a judicial
The Minister for Bantu (Nativei Adminis...
Daan de Wet Nel, after defending the scheme i
claiming that the number of alleged abuses i
been grossly exaggerated, agreed to appoiatj
Commission of Inquiry (but not a judicial
sioni. and announced that, pending the raui)
that inquiry, the scheme would be suspetdel|
The opposition attack was largely led by
members of the United Party who happen It)
JewishMrs. Helen Suzman and Dr Boris
They delivered vigorous speeches. -upportedi
extensive documentation. Dr Wilson
the alleged conditions with those in
labor camps (the press reports say he cot.
them to "Nari" labor camps, but the word fl
does not appear in the Hansard report), and 1
cused the minister of "cowardice in refctiofj
appoint a judicial commission. He and Hu-
man tried to make it clear that they were
ing only the farm labor scheme and those
alleged to hive committed abusesnot the
ing community as such. But it as evident I
reactions and interjections on the government i
that government members thought an attack
being .made on the farming community general
and on Afrikaner fanners in particular.
members of the governing National Party,
Schoonbee and F. E. Martins, expressed r
ment on this ground in their replies, aid
duced a "tu-quoque" aspect by strestiaf
several of the farmers involved in court pr
Centinu**) an Fa a* 13-D
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MIAMI


October 2. 1959
*Jenlst> lk*Mnr
|. A. Friedland: Pied Piper of Hebrew
In
bh
tn (
v*
k
ebil
|By PHILIP SLOMOVITZ
After a lapse of more than 20
. ,. the outstanding crea-
Iftirm litereture>for chi*- -
,_. -0w being revived, and the
[l'('ir, in Jewish schools in Eng-
l,.sp?.king countries again wiH
be access to a series of the most
[f|y reclaimed Hebrew vstories.
he 1930's, the late Hes
(A.H.) Friedland, who was
isidered the leading He-
ucator in this country,
;nd published in mimeo-
fonn a series of stories
inn. with translations of
ew words in parenthesis
L, e title Sippurim Yofim"
I ant Stories" this series
the imagination of chil-
En in hundreds of Jewish schools.
\ Hand's illness and subse-
joni timely death ended this
Iporta't project. Only a limit-
Dumber of the stories, which
Ipear' i as attractive brochures,
.been available in the past 20
Rcrgnizing the importance of
prefect, a group of educators
ive u" lertaken these stories. It
natuial for the project to have
n revived in Cleveland, where
dla"d had created his major
fks bs short story writer, es-
yist and poet from 1921 until his
iath r 1939. The children's book-
a new are being republished by
i Cleveland Bureau of Jewish
a, n, under the guidance oi
dm-.tor of the Bureau, Nathan .
illian'. One of the country's
adin;, educators, Bernard Isaacs,
pentr.tndent emeritus of the
ited Hebrew Schools of Detroit,
one :f the chief editors of the
vised and revived project. Serv-
or. 'ie editorial committee are
i. Y nina Friedland, widow of
* author of the stories, Dr. Jacob Kabakoff and
*nry Margolis.
The first five stories already have been re-
in ted, and the brochures are most attractive,
hll -ira'ed and beautifully bound.
The secret of Friedland's successful approach
stor-telling for children was a simple one: he
is a master story-teller; he possesed the imag-
lative -nind that links the poetic with the prosaic;
found a path to the minds of children with an
istiole appeal and with an approach to the
reryday occurrences in life, including sports and
eleirents that appeal to children in democratic
untries.
It was no wonder, therefore, that his stories
kre read by Jewish children in schools throughout
be United States and Canada, in South Africa, in
piglano and in Australia. Friedland met with a
eceptive audience wherever there were English-
peakir.c Jews, whenever the pages of "Sippurim
rofim were opened for the child in a Jewish
thool
Friedland, whose creative works are mention-
ed to this day whenever Jewish educators gather,
did not limit his acivities to the "Sippurim Yofim."
He also created a library for adults under the title
Bibliotheka Du-Leshonith""The Bi-Lingual Li-
brary"which accomplished a double purpose:
they helped to popularize the works of the out-
standing Jewish writers and served as excellent
self-teachers of Hebrew. The story itself appeared
at the right hand of every page with a maximum
of four words to the line. The English translation
was on the left. Anyone with a smattering of He-
brew language knowledge who desired to enrich
bis knowledge of the language at last had at his
disposal the ideal type of teacher in the "Bi-Ling-
ual" series.
The works of Chaim Nachman Bialik, David
Shimonowitz, Abraham Raisin, Ahad Ha Am, H. D.
Numberg, Yehudah Steinberg, Micha Joseph Ber-
dichevsky, David Frishman and others were in-
cluded in the texts.
There were more than a hundred stories in The reprinted "Sipurim Yofim" represent a
p original series, and during Friedland's lifetime revival of a great Hebrew literary effort, repre-
[>ore than 130,000 copies of the brochures had senting one of the most valuable contributions to
~en circulated in Jewish schools. modern Hebrew.
Page 7-D
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Adams Glass Service
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Page 8-D
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fridqY- Odobe, 11
Zalman Schneour-Poet of a Creat Epodi
By ITZHAK IVBY
Literary historians of the Hebrew renaissance
period have classified Zalman Schneour as one of
the Big Three in Hebrew poetry, together with
Bialik and Tchernichovsky. Although the three
poets were basically different in talents, inclin-
ations and creative patterns, it may rightly be
said that since Bialik's and Tchemichovsky's de-
mise. Schneour felt like the last Mohican. A poet
with a great sense of pride, he felt lonely when his
greatest competitors left the stage.
In moments of quiet reflection the poet must
have said: Give me back the bright and shinin?
moments of Odessa. Warsaw. Vilno and Berlin, not
because he yearned for these strange and desolate
towns whose Jewish population has since been deci-
mated and their cultural monuments destroyed,
but because these moments meant a period of
ascendency, a period of novel and memorable
creativity, not only for him but also for his close
friends. One of them was Bialik. whom Schneour
unreservedly admired. It was Bialik who first de-
clared in his famous essay "Our Young Poetry'':
"And here is Schneour. a young Samson, whose all
seven braids grew over night, a young lion ."
This was Bialik's immediate reaction to Schneour's
first poems of youth, and this remained very dear
to Schneour's heart.
Schneour. a man of keen psychological insight,
knew wellwhen he reached his seventiesthat "a
generation goes, and a generation comes," and
that you cannot blame the young too much for con-
sidering the poets and artists of the older genera-
tion as belonging to the past. He. the poet of
youth, of "Sturm und Drang." of passion and
hedonism, he, the revolutionary and fighter, the
admirer of the titans and the superman, suddenly -
found himself in his old days somewhat neglected
and glossed over, especially by youthful and incon-
siderate critics who thought that there was no bet-
ter way to be revolutionary than to belittle the
greats of the near past. In the last years of his
life Schneour. who always took pride in his mental
and physical prowess, was also beset by ill health.
But he bore his sufferings with pride and courage,
and to his last day he never bent his head to fate.
He departed from this world at 72still a young
lion.
Left at Fourteen
. He was bom at Shklov. Russia, in 18*7. in a
family of "Habad" Hassidim and scholars. In his
autobiographical memoirs, "My Beginnings as a
Writer." Schneour recalls that at the age of seven
or eight years he began to write poems in Hebrew
and Yiddish. He wrote not only poetry but also
prose, fables and "thoughts." He was 14 years old
when he left home and came to Odessa, which was
then a center of Hebrew and Yiddish renaissance
literature, and where such young poets as Bialik
and Schneour came under the strong influence of
Mendele. Two years later Schneour left for an
other literary center of these days, Warsaw and
published his first Hebrew and Yiddish poems m
"Olam Katan" and in the "Yiddishe Folkszeitung
For a while he worked for the Tushia Hebrew Pub-
ashing House and later he became J. L Perel/'
private secretary, and also participated in David
Fnschmans "Hadoar." Schneour wrote his won-
derful poem "Vilno" in the period of his stav in
this city (1904-06).
In the years 1906-07 his first books of poem,
appeared, the first was "Children's Poems' and
the second was "At Sunset The poet-wanderer
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of the European nations."
Schneour left in 1006 for Western Europe.
he went to Switzerland, where he began his
"In the Mountains From there he went to.,
where he studied the natural sciences, philosophy]
and literature at the Sorbonne University. InUUi
a volume of his poems, written during a period tfi
14 years, was published in Odessa A few Ten]
carrier he had published some of his short storm
Detained as Enemy
The period 1908-1014 was for Schneour rids!
wanderings and impressions and blessed in cro-f
tivity. Some of his best poems were writtea dJ
ing this period. World War I found rum in Gel
many, where be was detained as an enemy abet,]
and only in 1918 did he succeed in reaching &
United States. After the war he returned to E j
rope and settled in Berlin, where he establishes]
the publishing house "Hasefer." together will 11
Salzman. Here he published his book of pom]
Bridges" (1922). hit poem "Vilno" (19231, as
book of short stories "Bemetzar" (1923). and ]
other book of poems "Hezionot" (Visions) (MMJ
In 1923 he settled in Paris, where he stayed
until World War II. In hisautobiographical now
Schneour writes with disappointment that he vj
ited Eretz Israel in 1925 and "looked for socse |
material anchor either in the literary field or a j
some other profession, and had to leave the con-
try with a heavy heart." He then goes on to dtj
scribe the period of his participation in the Yiddist!
daily 'Forward" of New York for 22 years. That]
is no doubt that the fact of his participation in tta]
daily contributed in no small degree to the grort j
of his prose work in Yiddish, which number
I olumes.
During the Nazi occupation period of ParuJ
Schneour's family went through many bitter a1
ments.. For one and a half years they had to hidlj
in basements until they succeeded in escaping t
Spain and from there to the U.S.A. He arrow]
penniless in the States, but very soon he setueJ|
down and established a fine home, as in PariJ. Yd,!
he did not give up his' idea of settling in Israeli
and succeeded in realizing this dream nine ytij
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October 2,195$
j h* became a dtires *f Kantat Can. After
^ considered himself a guest whenever he
I .j,e United States.
Grvarnat* in P**try
jfour wrote soars' ard prose in Hebrew and in Yiddish. He
ifamous both as a Hebrew poet-aWI Yiddish'
Most of his Yiddish novels he reworked
, w and published in Israel during the last
Mr9. Without any intention of detracting
the importance of his novels or from his
Ls m must state here that his real greatness
i ;he field of poetry, and that his talent as
found its expression almost exclusively in
ity and unique form, in the Hebrew language.
He will not analyze here all the reasons or
; aJ) 'he causative factors, but we will men-
, ftv. circumstances which brought this about,
[in the nature of poetry, even stormy and tern-
lii.i:- poclry. even poetry of epic proportions,
ain force is a concentrated one, and its
it the quintessence of feeling and thought,
[ short and polished verse and the meas-
jand weighed poem.
Not k> in prose, where the main role is given
! bread canvas, to the multi-colored landscape
Exhaustive description.
Ichreour, in whose soul two lived, not without
._ pi':' channel for his poetic talent, for his tal-
ks a poet in Hebrew, and for bid talent as a
J4e!!tr in Yiddish. True, in his later years,
considerable efforts to rework several of
Hjh -ovels. including "Noah Pandre" and his
Irica] novels like "The Emperor and the Rab-
JiKc Hebrew, and they were quite a success
fcrat! On the other hand, he wrote Yiddish
i, as he had written Hebrew poems in his
, arrt from-time to time he demonstrated his
pu > on this score. And yet Schneour re-
bec 'a the main, in its essence, a Hebrew poet
la Yiddish story-teller with all the consequen-
lof ha double track creativity.
lADCther peculiarity of his prose is that his
stories, written in Hebrew and publish
at ;, lal the same ripe talent as if manifested in
prst poems. There is a certain limitation, a
reminiscent of the dark, pessimistic and
kward story-telling of that time without
broi scope, the lively style, and the full colors
is later-day novels. Only in his middle years
|Scr.--our begin to write his ripe prose and win
with his Shklov novels. But this happened
i later, after he had reached his apogee as a
Realism in Pros*
IStiJ another peculiarity characteristic of
peoir's prose is that it is mostly a monument
tie pot. describing Jewish life in the pale, at
[tun of the century, or early in the 19th cen-
n:- with an intent to glorify it, or to sing the
I* cl the shtetl, but to describe it realistically
^ a realism bordering on naturalism, and at the
"litre with a forcefulness and liveliness that
it i; mbolic significance.
I He i. in love with the masses, with his, now
: classical, type of Noah Pandre. on one
, \d with the great spiritual personalities
[the ,iina c.aon on the other. Yet, at the same
he sees the weaknesses of the shtetl and is
I *-. e to describe them. On the other hand,
P" is, in the main, poetry of the future or
Fe legendary past.
[H's role in Hebrew poetry can hardly be des-
i- one short essay. He began as a revolu-
aad a hedonist, a follower of Nietzsche, and
>*"*Q**,
"Your task is not yet fulfilled, O eternal peo-
ple!/ The play has not yet reached its
end./ The heavy curtain has not yet been
lowered ..."
as a man who despised the shackles of tradition
and conventions. His poems were full of meta-
physical struggles and doubts manifestly groping
for a goal and content in life. Nature and land-
his main attention to the fate of man, of nation
scape were not of great interest to him; he devoted
and universe. He described in rather sharp terms
the eternal man-woman struggle in the spirit of
Otto Weininger's theory.
He Could bo Obj.ctiv.
He was the poet of the city, but he was no
stranger to nature. Whatever he had to say he
said with force, with vision and beauty in masterly
verse and multicolored and shining language, orig-
inal and mighty, full of pathos but at the same
time without the slightest banality. This is the
reason why each volume of his poems and some-
times a single poem was an event in Hebrew liter-
ature in the renaissance epoch. His eroticism had
a purely physical character. In this respect he
did not change from the time his poem "Pragim"
(Poppy-Seed Flowers), the poem which may be
termed as a hymn of passions, appeared and until
he wrote "Luchoth Genuzim," one of his later
poetic works which appeared first in the United
States, and was supposed to serve as a mouthpiece
for all the hedonistic elements in ancient times,
for all the false prophets whose words were not
preserved after the Biblical traditionalists won a
victory over them. But his overemphasis of erotic-
ism, as his Nietzscheism, mellowed as time went
on, and so changed his almost hateful attitude to-
wards woman in the sense of enmity of the sexes.
It was none other than Schneour who exclaimed in
the end, "Woman is the golden window of eternity
and infinity, and in this is her greatness."
Attempts have been made to pigeonhole
Schneour as a neo-romanticist, an expressionist, a
Schopenhauer pupil and a Nietzsche-follower. He
was each of these things to a degree in certain
periods of his creativity, but, in the main, he was
Continued on Pag* 12-D
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TO ALL GREETINGS


Page 10-D
+Jewist>fhr*0r7
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MR. and MRS. ALFRED STONE
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Everyman-Yom Kippur's Stern Challei
The medieval morality play "Everyman" viv-
ified and humanized by the great Austrian poet.
Hugo von Hofmannsthal. and performed every
year with such tremendous success at the Salzburg
Festival In a<~Rfflftardt'S Tfnpplng" open-air
staging, is designed to enforce a maral religious
lesson, the stern message of sin and deathwhich
is the meaning of the Day of Atonement
With all the drastic changes of thought end
experience that have taken place in the fast-
BMVing, ever-changing world of the atom. "Every-
man," the naive 15th century morality play, has
never failed to transport a spellbound audience out
it faces US relentlessly with the ultimate facts of
life and death as does the Day of Atonement.
.lust as this holiest day. it draws us into the
awful halls of silence, of meditation and pitiless
self introspection. It marks the speechless com-
munion of the heart with Him that ponders it. the
tench of the soul with its Keeper: "Doth not He
that weicheth the heart consider if And He that
keepeth thy soul, doth not He know? And shall
not He render to every man according to his
works'" (Prov. 24:72).
The eternal theme of "Everyman." similar to
the stern message of Yom Kippur, are the thoughts.
the fears, the apprehensions aroused in the human
heart when it realizes that death is omnipotent.
Trembling, we ask ourselves: Are we ready to
face our Maker? This is the time for a reckoning
of the soulCheshbon Hanefesh.
When "Everyman." who typifies you and me.
, hears the imperative call of death, when he is or-
dered to leave the stage of life and enter the dark
unknown land "from which no traveler returneth."
he suddenly realizes how unprepared he is; that
he has not used his life as he should have done;
that piling up goods and gold and silver and run-
ning after pleasures, are not everything.
In the same way. Yom Kippur brings home to
vs the frightening consciousness that we may be
America-Israel Affairs
Continued from Pag. 4-D
on Israel. But when directly confronted by Sen
Wayne Morse, Oregon Democrat, he revealed that
the State Department had given in. Mr. Dillons
explanation was that the Department decided to
restore aid fo Israel because of the psychologi-
cal attitude of certain elements, rather than for
economic considerations.
Sen. Morse lost no time in telling Undersecre-
tary Dillon that the State Department itself was
thought by many to have displayed a "psychologi-
cal attitude of unfair discrimination against
Israel."
Shofar's Message
Continued from Pay* 1-D
fort to recapture your ideals and translate them
into action.
Many more legitimate and valid lessons can
r *?ct "", '^ Shfar Thwe is "o "* then
for the cargo of superstition which has surrounded
this unique instrument which we know as the c-.ll
<*>*
*
-
Samuel Rubin (right), president of the,,
ica-Israel Cultural Foundation, during
outgoing year presented a gold
made by an Israeli craftsman, to U
Bernstein, first American-born music
tor of the New York Philharmonic i
bra, for his services to the cause of *..,
exchange between the United States
Israel.
called away in the middle of our sins before t
have been able to make proper use of life and t
many opportunities it offers.
When our end draws near and when the i
account is balanced, there is but one _.
our good deedscharity that delivers from i
We are sternly reminded to take stock and .
in the grave hour of our departureneither.
nor gold nor precious stones will be of any |
to us on our last Journey, but only Torah
edge) and our good deeds.
But in striking contrast to "EverymanV i
vocable doom. Yom Kippur offers us the
opportunity to repent our sins and obtain i
lease of life by promising to better our
And we pray:
Who u d God Ulte unto Thee that pardtnui
iniquity.
And p+iseth by th* trtnitrruiom of tht
"""K"! of Hu h*nu**'
He retatneth not Hit anger forever.
because He deUthteth m Mercy."
(Micah 7: IH)
to conscience. Listen carefully to the Shofir |
Rosh Hashona; be especially attentive to it |tl
close of the Yom Kippur service It speab
you; it says, in effect, "I toll for you and I
promise of spiritual improvement Hearkes
my voice and make of the year 5720 a good one!
you and all those you love, and may those yw I
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5M7 AHonBooJ
MIAMI BEACH


day. October 2. 1959
+Jf>*istfk>ridlk*n
Page 1 ID
khard Strauss and His Jewish Friends
Continued from
3D
stature is forced to beg an Underling s pcrmis-
as lo what he is allowoj in compose and to
1,. performed. Now I, too, belong to the sei
[ .i nation of servants and waiters, and I
> my persecuted friend Zweig. who now
j .illy refuses to work for me, either
jpnly or secretly. With "Phe Silent Woman' my
work seems to have come to an end. I think
Luld have created much more, and it would
have Icon entirely worthless. Too bad:"
The coirespondence between Strauss and
Lem became more and more cautious, since their
Iters were opened, censored and often confis-
ted by the Gestapo; everything ended abruptly
Jh a last note Zweig sent, him from London, irt
Ech Zweig openly revealed his high regard and
Irm frendship for Strauss and his deep regret
It all communications had to stop.
For a long time, Strauss was doomed to
lence, he saw his grandsons banned from public
Jiools because of their Jewish mother, he saw his
rtune dwindle, his operas disappear from all
Irman stages.
In 1938, when the Na/is invaded Austria,
eig and his wife fled to Brazil. But despite a
^rm, friendly welcome, despite four years of
Mtive writing, Zweig -was never the same again.
;h his life had been immensely successful.
could never forget his beloved Vienna, his
fcendship with Strauss so dear to him, the burning
150 books representing the relentless work of 40
lars, his good name vilified.

'And so, in his sixties, he saw his rich, creative
h come to a bitter self-willed ending. At Petro-
|lis (Brazil), on Feb. 23, 194?, Stefan Zweig and
wife took their own lives. In a farewell note,
k-eig wrote: "After one's sixtieth year, unusual
^wer is needed to make another wholly new be-
ling. My strength has beep exhausted by long
bars of aimless wandering, homeless and perse-
Ited. So I deem it better to conclude in good
STEFAN ZWEIG
. persecuted friend
time and bearing a life in which intellectual labor
meant the purest joy and personal freedom the
highest good on earth."
TIm Last Curtain
Grief-stricken about his friend's tragic death,
Strauss was silent for many years, until the end
of World War II. His fortune had dwindled when
he fell out of the favor of the Nazi party, and in
his old age, he had to make a new start. In 1945,
after the Allied victory, Strauss was called to the
Berlin Opera house as conductor and associated
with the librettist Joseph Regory, with whom he
produced three more opera* with mythological
subjects.
He died in 1949, deeply mourned by his
friends and admirers, but the golden fruits of his
fertile mind will remain forever and delight many
generations to come. And with him will live his
two best friends and collaborators, Hugo von Hof-
mannsthal and Stefan Zweig.
lie Yellow Badge of Jewish Courage
Continued from Pago 5-D
|w to their horned hat. Ferdinand I. of Austria,
i Aug. 1, 1551, issued a decree in Vienna requir-
Ig all .lews to wear the wheel on their garments.
Tus yellow wheel was 2 cm. thick and 8 cm. in
lameter. Caught without such discriminatory
dge. the Jew received drastic punshiment: he
bs stripped of his garments, humiliated, beaten,
pd if caught a second time, driven penniless out
i Austria, together with his family.
In 1760. Empress Maria Theresa- changed the
Wlow wheel to yellow cuffs "to prevent sinful
Jitercourse of young Jews with loose women."
Edict of Toloranco
Only the 17th century brought to the Jews a
pdher treatment. In Austria it was Joseph II
!'80-1790i. that great and enlightened son of
Noted Maria Theresa who, on the memorable day
f May 18. 1781. wrote a letter to Count Heinrich
lucmegen outlining the edict of tolerance with its
pmous article 6:
"Moreover, all those humiliating and .spirit-
Wtf oppressive coercive laws which impose on the
*s differences of clothes or costume or partic-
ular external signs, are to be done away with."
(Pribram: "Urkunden und Akten zur Geschichte
der Juden in Wien," I, p. 441, Vienna, 1918). In
vain Pope Pius VII hastened to Vienna in person
in 1782 to obtain the annulment of the edict and
the revocation of the restrictions imposed on the
clergy.
Slowly the yellow badge disappeared in
France in 1789, after the Revolution. A few years
later, it was officially abolished in Italy. Prussia
followed unwillingly and hesitatingly in 1812.
The 18th century of humanity and enlighten-
ment did the tormented Jews some justice by not
only abolishing the outward sign of the badge but
also relieving them from other humiliating differ-
entiation. Men like Alexander von Humboldt (1769-
1859) bravely fought for Jewish rights, fully real-
izing the historical mission of the chosen people.
In a famous letter, Humboldt stated: "I cannot
approve any laws against the Jews, but 4he one
containing these four words, 'Same rights, same
duties'." He also said: "It is a very dangerous
presumption of frail humanity to deem itself clever
enough to explain the ancient laws of God. The
Continued on Pago 15 D
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NEW YEAR GREETINGS
FRANK and MACK'S
GARAGE
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Specializing in Auto
Air-Condi tioning
08 S.W. 1st COURT
PR 9-9810
To All... Greetings
BARNARD NUT COMPANY, INC.
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POPCORN and POPCORN SUPPLIES
113 N.W. 36th Street
PL 8-5553
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ABSTRACTS TITLE INSURANCE MORTGAGES
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151 S.W. 27th AVENUE Phone HI 4-1601
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*
To AH Our Tenants end Friends
CONGRESS BLDG.
SEASON'S GREETINGS
CORAL GABLES MIAMI SHORES
NORTH MIAMI BEACH PERRINE
HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM .
Lou De Money and John F. Harfcness, of
Doctors' Apothecary
12990 W. DIXIE HIGHWAY
PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY
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Phone MO 1-7696 Immediate Delivery
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Established 1937 Manufacturers Representative Paper FrodocH
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3135 COMMODORE PLAZA F.O. IOX 10J PHONE HI 3-1*21
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JAMES NELSON
170 N.W. 71th STREET, MIAMI, FLORIDA Phone Ft 4 3*42
SEPTIC TANK CONTRACTOR
Teak* Cll* Drain Lints Kt Laid Now Installations
M. B. <.\ltRIS
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622 S.W. 27th Avenue Phone HI 6-0336
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Page 12-D

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Phone FR *4008
Hr I **t Wiskts To All Om Fritzs
On Thit Holiday Occoshw
Mr. and Mrs. Allen Goldberg
l It All Gr-timt
t, Russell House Movers, Inc.
0f MOVHM mmi tABJSM .rW.', nW.t I.K^U in,
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Naphlali Hen Imber, author of Haakavah. is
honored by the dedication of a memorial
bronze plaque on the house in New York's
Lower East Side where he died in 1909. Left
to right are Israel Consul-General Simcha
Pratt; Ira Guilden, national campaign chair-
man. State of Israel Bonds; Dr. Israel Gold-
stem, chairman ol th. AmeriCQn
for Israel I Tenth Anniversary d J"
observance the dedication wasT^
Hulan E. Jack. Manhattan BoSgJ**
He foresaw the begining of the B
holocaust in times of deepest quiet^
Zalman Schneour-Poet of a Great Ei
Continue fr.m P.9. t-D
himself. Zalman Schneour a poetic personality,
full of contradictions and pain, proud and sarcastic
and at tne same time soft and lyrical, lonely and
bitter, mild and dreamy, egocentric yet a good
comrade.
For Schneour could be a devoted friend and
could be objective if it was a matter-with which he
was not concerned directly, in a literary or per-
*om1 way. and then he could become stormy and
cantankerous. But let it be said that even in his
moments of ire he never stepped over the boun-
dary of the threatening: posture. His bitter attacks
Mlpersonal entities wilt be forgotten, tfe great
work will remain.
___"f ''f* "tionaJ poet wai won very
early in hfe wtth his "Hm Tslilei IlamandoliauT
(Listening to the Strains of a Mandelin) where he
was one of the first to develop in Chanter n <"N.
**t Israel") the u^me of bitter^mSy^
Peon* of Israel on the part of the extern?. wo
based largely, on biological hedonism. To these
the Jewish people for the victory of monotheism
over the old idols They cannot forg^kTh^
sohi ion is the renaissance of the JewJh peopled
the land of their fathers. ^^
very^nTwhT? HZ. T f "* *"* "* ><
very first, who foresaw in the prophetic spirit of
great poet, the black clouds o' bartansnTwhJch
began to threaten European Jewry. ^ he foresaw
this before the First World War. In lfliaLtT-S
. Poem called -Ymei H.bei.im *?
he'decl.^: "f ^ "~
The ?m cr"p,ndu" *--
And h mUngMt oppression ln the ^ in ih
Heart, everywhere.
As >J at an oncom.ng ecl,p,e~where house* turn
ashen-gray and shalty ""*
The Uu< lb U+* the cows lou, restlessly unth
And grass and tret assume a stiver hut, &,,
of cellar-damp.
And human faces freeze, and loo^ r. J
wax mask.il .
Me Fmu Holocaust
The a*year-ld poet felt that the dark 1
of leaction and anti-Semitism are threati.
struction for the Jewish people, that enUAi
and hberausm are but a pawing drew, ml
Uie Middle Ages are sure to return as niskl
day.
He foresaw the beginning of the Ei
holocaust in times of deepest quietude bw
liche Gemuetlkhkeit. and superficial pea1
wares the Jewish people, as Bialik muaH t
the days of theTfcmirov pogrom:
Cnougfc dying Ut\t rssartyrt. Iwnng the u the unclean'
You shall die tfce death Of all crea-.on. -Ao c
nd art consumed m the world
For the sa\e of the new arising u::h innocnoj
pnwine mystery in their eyes .
InZienNw SetwtMn
The Russian revolution was one of his
disappointments. He saw in it an awaktual
dangerous and negative forces, and wared |
People not to participate in this revolt
drinking orgy" of the outside world. He as I
monished his people not to forgive the psj
bands of the Ukrainians who spilled innocent J
ish blood because "the refuge of every wicfadl
isforgiveness ..."
In Zion he saw then, as in later ytin,(
real solution and the only answer to all pen
-d to aU evils of the European nations. Hi,
ism turned more and more into humanism y.it
love for the martyred Jewish people.
k _te last resort he returned to the old}
new theory of the Jewish mission among tat I
Tff proUgonist of the godl> spirit anfl
ccepted Jewish martryology as an unavoidd
historical development. His final answer :!
be stiffnecked and unyielding, to be daruf
courageous.
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October 2. 1959
-Jenlsti Fk>rMian
Page 13-D
ti-Semitic Outburst Rocked S. Africa
Continued from Page 0-D
I like Mrs. Suzman and Dr. Wilson, Jews.
Schoonbee said: "Jpf I 5
I would be Ihe last person to raise this
in ^js House." He mentioned Jewish
K who had been convicted for maltreatment
, laborers and said they had brought dis-
i"the farmers of South Africa. That it was
jr. Mr. Schoonbee's intention to attack
Jewish farmers as such appears from a
lie paid later in his speech, in which he
one well-known Jewish farmer, Jacob
i for especial praise.
Pnss Highlights Incident
t Mart:"- expressed resentment of Dr. Wil-
Cjarge at cowardice" against the minister
Lgd to make it boomerang by alleging that
Ikon had changed his name from a certain
mn Woo! nop. who had shirked joining the
Iduring the war. He also made pointed ref-
[ to the fjct that not all the farmers involved
court proceedings were Afrikaners. Ac-
i to Hansard, Dr. Wilson interjected: "Are
Iiti-Sen.
was inevitable that the press should high-
tis incident and that, in South Africa's tense
I climate, it should be reported on each side
party "angle." On the opposition side, it
fcflectcd a- Anti-Semitic Uproar in Assem-
bnd "Nationalist M.P.'s in Anti-Jewish Out-
do quote two of the headlines actually
On the g ivernment side, it was reflected as
ack on Afrikaners which had been crushingly
red by government members;-and the allega-
kbout Dr. Wilson having changed his name
featured.
bnfrontei by these reports (which, however
they 'ditiered in "angle" between pro-gov-
knt and pro-opposition versions, were agreed
luoque" remarks about Jews had
(made, the South African Jewish Board of
lies felt that, as the central representative
pation of the Jewish community, responsi-
[rested upon it to express concern at the un-
fcable injection of a "Jewish angle" into the
e; to reaffirm the position that members of
Jment and ministers of religion (Chief Rabbi
owitz' name was also mentioned in the de-
and citizens generally, should feel free to
their convictions on matters of public im-
Dce without having their religious or com-
affiliations called into question; to deplore
pts. from whatever quarter, to exploit such
for party advantage; and generally to ap-
|to all parties to "keep 'the Jew' out of
Jewish press endorsed this statement. It
prew a distinction between the incident which
jeecurred in Parliament and the attitude of
wernment to the Jewish community, which it
I had been unexceptionable throughout its
I of office. It dealt with the issues of prin-
I involved and expressed the hope that the
psion created would be removed.
Retraction Follows
pie next development was a statement in
lament by Dr. Wilson, taking exception to Mr.
ps allegation he had changed his name from
son. Dr Wilson said the charge was a seri-
pflcction on his character because there was
"Light Unto the People" is the inscription on
this menorah presented to Sen. Herbert H.
Lehman on his eightieth birthday by Dr.
William Haber, president of the American
ORT Federation. Sen. Lehman is World
ORT Union honorary president, and has
been associated with the organization for
forty years. Presentation was during He-
brew Year 5719.
a Benjamin Woolfson, whose name had been men-
tioned on a previous occasion in connection with
suspected Communist activities. He was not Ben-
jamin Woolfson, he had never changed his name,
and he handed his birth certificate to the Speaker
to prove that his given name was Boris Wilson.
This was followed, in a subsequent debate, by
a retraction from Mr. Martin, who said: "Insofar
as my statement was incorrect, I am prepared to
make a full apology to Dr. Wilson. It is my sin-
cere desire not to make any false statements
against any person." He denied that he had any
anti-Semitic feelings, or that his remarks in the
farm labor debate had been directed against Jews.
He had resented what he construed to be an attack
on Afrikaners, and in replying he had sought to
make it clear that several of the farmers involved
were not Afrikaners. Dr. Wilson had interrupted
him with the remark about anti-Semitism, and this
remark, contended Mr. Martins, had "given the
opposition press the cue to indulge in a racial
campaign."
Mr. Schoonbee also denied that he was anti-
Semitic or had any anti-Jewish motive in making
the remarks he did. He complained that opposition
papers had seized on only one small part of his
speechthe part in which he had mentioned that
several of the farmers involved in court proceed-
ings were Jewish, and that if he were of Jewish
descent he would not have launched the attack
which Mrs. Suzman and Dr. Wilson had launched
and had reported that out of context, with large
headlines about "an anti-Semitic outburst."
There the matter rests, and the agitation that
briefly surrounded it has died down. Jews are
gratified that a wrong impression has been re
moved.
(Happy New Year to All
Best the Market Affords
at Reasonable Price*
ban Alexander end Family
Hyman, Harry at Sol
of the
(IE CASH MARKET
139 N. W. 14th Street
, MIAMI. FLORIDA
1756 N. W. 16th St.
TO AIL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
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Insurance Agency, Inc.
EASY OFF-STREET PARKING
2600 W. Flagler Street Phone HI 4-6575
"SERVING SOUTH FLORIDA OVER 40 YEARS'*
To All Greetings
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Oede Coeeff, Oeeeir t Jbeffaf Ceefreerer
FtflUTtaUTB
Hmmm m 04.35, MM 04030
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S
HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL .
CITY PLUMBING CO.
PLUMBING CONTRACTORS
4646 N.W. 17th Avenue Miami ;
Phone NE 5-4411
TO ALL NEW YEAR GREETINGS
KING FINISH PLASTER CO. f
LIME COLORED PLASTER
Phone FR 3-2031

260 N. W. 27th Street
MiamL Florida
Best Wishes for A Happy New Year ... (
AMERICAN EXTERMINATORS
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PHONE JE 8-6140
G0EET/NGS TO OUR MANY FOUNDS
HIALEAH MIAMI SPRINGS BANK
101 HIALEAH DRIVE
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(Member of F.D.I.C.)
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Fertilizers lawn Mower Sharpening, Repairs \
Sprinkler Systems Birds
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MIAMI MILITARY ACADEMY
35 Acres on Bay Small Classes All Sports Catalogue
10601 BISCAYNE BLVD. Phone PL 7-4921
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY
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205-07 Lincoln Bldg. 350 Lincoln Road
Phone JE 1-5260 Miami Beach. Florida
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3800 N. Miami Avenue Phone PL 8-8791. PL 8-8766
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HOLIDAY OfCT'NCS TO ALL
Uncle Eric's Happy Town
Tin Stere Where the Uaeteel is Usual Imported and Domestic Teys
3100 PONCE DI LEON BIVD., COOAL GABIES PHONE HI 0-5470


TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
ALBERT HAUER JACOB L LEVINE
AIRCARGO BROKERAGE CO.
Custom House Brokers and Forwarders
Pscific Mil fW R 1-4578
r-^ wwww wwww^www

To Mil.. Grtttmfs

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Fsnacrty C & A
WMR auuts m
Ail TTO W SCATM6 FOt asts
a. r. ai rM<
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52 HE. 51st Street
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hr the S~tk"
Plt-1954
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)
GULF ELECTRIC SERVICE
Ceetreefn* ffeeeiriee AjyfiMccs
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3523 N. E 2nd Ai
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w*"WW^U-
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241 Pan American Bank Blda. Phone FH 9-1663
Year Hreetiag* ...
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3601 N.W. 46th Street
DIAL NE 4-7541 or NE 4-8941
C. H. ERVIN
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3524 H.W. 54* Street pfc. W |g||
HAPPY NEW YEAH TO ALL
Israel-Site of the Crusaders' JMove
mem
r LUCIAN O. MEYSELS
_ historians and many other students of
history bad a tendency to look with disdain or
if wi an important period in the history of the
Holy Landthe Crusader Era. from 1099 to 1921
CM J-_____
While many in thTVestern world, in art and
literature, gloried in the exploits of men like God-
EN) de Bouillon. Richard the Lion-Hearted or St
Lows, the Jewish people had good reason to re-
rat saber the merciless pogroms in Europe and
Palutmt which often accompanied the Crusader
movement. The Jews of the Holy Land joined the
sfaslems in fighting the Crusaders, and their
heroic defense of the town of Haifa at the time of
the Rrst Crasade evoked even the admiration of
then- opponents.
As far as the history of Jerusalem is con-
cerned every #euooi boy in Palestine was taught
that the entire Jewish population of the city was
massacred by the Crusaders in the main synagogue
when the town fell to the Franks in 1099or at
least this version of the era was popular until re-
cently.
Modern historical research, earned out by
scholars in many parts of the world and particu-
at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, has
tended to revise the original judgment and throw
a new hght on the relations between the Jews and
the Crusader*
~ The main Jewish source on the events of the
period are the documents found in the so-called
"Cairo Genoa." a storeroom in the ancient syna-
gogue of Ezra the Scribe in the old City of Cairo,
here worn oat and unused documents, as well as
damaged and heretical books on religious subjects
had been stored ever since the ninth century C.E.
Research on these documents, initiated by the
late Prof. .Solomon Schechter. the great scholar
and founder of the Jewish Theological Seminary,
is now concentrated at the Hebrew University of
Jerusalem under the director of Prof. Shlomo D.
Gotten, chairman of* the Hebrew University's
School of Oriental Studies.
Those scholars examining the Geniza docu-
ments who are concerned with the Crusader pe-
riod have come across a whole series of original
letters between the Jews of Cairo and those of
Jerusalem written immediately after the fall of
the city to the Crusaders. This correspondence by
no means indicated that the entire Jewish com-
munity of Jerusalem had perished, although it did
suffer grievously in the turbulent events. Further
com ipoautate shows that the Frankish Kings of
Jerusalemwhatever their personal feelings to-
wards the Jews may have beenrealized at an
early date that they could not get along without
**e Jews nd invited those who had fled to return
to their dominions.
The type of historical research on the Cru-
sader period carried out at the Hebrew Unnersitv
"*be*n -""fined to the examination of liter-
*ry records Today, the country's leading expert
on the Crusader period is Prof Joshua Prawer
chairman of the university's department of gen-
eral history Prof Prawer years ago spotted the
limitations of the then prevalent attitude of treat-
ing the Crusader period of the country as if it
haa not existed Himself a graduate of the Hebrew
Ir.ivers.ty. Prof Prater devoted his doctoral dis-
sertation to The first thesis in Hebrew on the His-
tory of the CrusaoYr Kingdom of Jerusalem. This
work formed the basis of what is still the only
Hebrew textbook on the subject
Since then Prof Prawer has extended his re-
Dr. YigaeJ Yadin (right), professor of J
aeology at the Hebrew University. SZ
some of hut dieexnrerie. to fteni jJJ
Ben-Gunon during the Israel statesman,
rujil to the recent exexnranbns at rkaa.
searches into the field. With the aid of h mJ
ate studentx-and here it should be paktWi
that the Hebrew University', department of Z
era! history is its largest single unit, with 3
350 students-he has initiated a-truly comprZ]
sive research project on the Crusader era. 13
consists of cataloguing aU known Crusader s
within the territory of the State of Israel End
Place namebe a town, village or fortress-vd
occurs in ancient records of the period is elauifitjl
on special index cards. The present identitrofS
site is then checked in the light of all the avauabb]
evidenceliterary or archaeological
Significant Paried
The identity of some Crusader sites has bnj
completely lost and can be reconstructed oJ
through painstaking research. On the other haiii
substantial remnants still exist of many Croud
places which can now be examined and eomparaH
with the medieval descriptionsoften indicia,.
P.ft of exaggeration on the. part of some of tfcj
ancient chroniclers.
Not that exaggeration was always necena
Israel can today boast of some of the finest il
nants of Crusader architecture in the world. IM
include the chapter fortresses of the Knights Tmj
Plar and the Teutonic Knights at Atlit and w
fort, respectively, the magnificent basilicas
Abu Ghosh, Lydda and Ramleh. as well as flkl
stantial remnants of entire Crusader towns i
Acre and C?esarea. not to mention the manyfotfj
reaa rum, wh.ch dot the Sharon Plain and Galim
Today, when a Hebrew University studesV
draws his tape measure around the keep of a]
ancient Crusader fortress, he no longer thmb
'.lie period as one which, to make use of a co]
mon expression, 'was bad for the Jews." atl
i ether as another significant period in the UirH
lent history of his country.
BAM.VK KAklRV
TO ALL SEASONS BEST WISHES
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ACE UWXMOWEI SHOP

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tATMND
OfSTOMMATS
XUOA CMFT
13120 8. Dixie
Cat 61S


October 2. 1959
Bay, UCraue
talian Jewish Community
Continued from Page 2D :
! had been shipped by the Trieste Jewish com-
njlv to Israel in 1956. was. placed this year ia.
i Tel Aviv's new synagogues. This brought
the number of Israel's synagogues enriched
[portions of the religious and artistic creations
Btatlian Jewry.
[Italy's Jews continued a tradition of taking
|e of their needy, including the refugees coming
nation considered the most important Euro-
transit country for Jews coming both'from
[east and the south. However, there has keen
Iteady decrease in the number of Jewish rei
; ln,ng in Italy temporarily while awaiti
nanent settlement in other countries.
+Je*lstiFk)rkUaHn
5719
irish Refugees
During the past year only 83 persons arrived
East European countries, in addition to the
already here. Most of them were resettled in
\ks of their choice, including Canada, Australia,
the United States. Some settled permanently
!> Last June 30, according to statistics pro-
1 by the UIJC Welfare Department, there
only 33 Jews in Italy from East European
tries still awaiting resettlement.
The exodus from Egypt continued through
and 1959 but at a reduced pace. The number
gyptian Jews receiving relief in Italy de-
ased from 442 cases in 1087 to 238 in 1958.
it 2.500 Egyptian Jews have settled in'Italy
90 percent of these have become Italian citi-
Milan alone has absorbed 2,000. Both the
C and the JDC had encouraged the resettle-
ni of Egyptian Jews in Milan because of the
ge number of employment opportunities avail-
e The other Egyptian Jews have settled in
me. Leghorn. Genoa and Verona.
The UIDC and JDC have vigorously aided the
j-ptian Jews to become integrated into ine Jew-
communities of Italy. The sum spent for set-
iment of Egyptian Jews in 1958 and 1959 is
it $150,000. with most of the money coming
i the JDC and the remainder from Milan
ry. Twenty-five Egyptian Jews received
.300 in loans from Milan's Jewish bank. H1AS
irted a trickle of Jewish refugees from^Leb-
n this year, about 30. Moat of them^peve left
settlement in Brazil.
For the relief and assistance of needy Italian
vs. the Welfare program of Italian Jewish com-
mie this year operated oa a budget of $90,000.
klf of this was raised by Italian Jewry and the
pt was provided by the Claims Conference and
JDC for 842 faiurtjes. Better organization of
welfare program has resulted in a decline in
number of needy cases. The needy included
aged. There are homes for the Jewish aged
[ Milan. Rome. Turin, Venice, Trieste and Man-
caring for 258 persons. A new old age home
ps finished this year in Florence with dedication
for this Rosh Hashona.
A sidelight of Jewish life in Italy this past year
ps a manifestation of an increased interest in
daism among non-Jews in Rome. Rabbi Toaff
there were a number of requests for conver-
w from Catholicism to Judaism, the majority, as
pht be expected, being motivated by a desire to
prry a Jew.
A number of events took place on the larger
Mian scene of consequence to Italian Jewry. One
fi the Mediterranean conference organized in
orence last October by former Mayor Giorgio
Pira at which, after some initial Arab objec-
ts. Jews and Arabs mixed on a
ental level for fruitful *^fcf-g> of
"And She Put Moses Down crt the Brink of
the River," sculpture by Erna Weill. "This
brought to ten the number of Israel's syna-
gogues enriched by portions of the relig-
ious and artistic creations of Italian Jewry."
Yellow Badge of Courage
Continued from Page I ID
history of the preceding dark ages teaches us best
what errors such interpretation encourages."
All over Europe a short century of respite
followed; yet. beneath the thin veneer, the hideous
serpent of anti-Semitism was always rampant
only biding its time. Germany and Austria boast-
ing of Teutonic supremacy over all other races,
always found their Jews welcome scapegoats for
the misfortunes that wars or pestilence brought
them. Although even Bismarck had once stated
that Germany's Jews were the "drop of cham-
pagne" which the German nation needed, and al-
though Emperor Franz Joseph I of Austria-Hun-
gary favored the Jews in every respect, there was
a burning Jewish question and a minority problem
lonf before Adolph Schickelgruber was born at
Braunau.
The Invisible Bade*
The end of the First World War, which brought
the collapse of Germany aad the ruthless catties;
to pieces of Austria, spelling inflation, poverty aad
wam for miltiimii of people, meant a cruel revival
of Jew-baiting and the rebirth of the yettow badge
together with the appearance of the crooked cross.
The badge was invisible for a lone period; bat at
existed; for there was a definite aumerus
in German and Austrian universities and
There were the "Aryan paragraphs" exclud-
ing Jews from many gmiiiil positions aad
clubs. From 1820 to 1830. the badge was invis-
ible: but the "yellow spot" was there till the
of 1838 and 1841 squeezed the
down (o a numerus aufJu* aad officially
tated the wearing of the yellow hedge. Mama
Lowenthal. in his highly interesting book. The
Jews of Germany.'* states: "When the ledgers of
a people show red. the outlook far aikearilj pea-
pies is black. '
November ItU: Armistice DayTreaty of
ea Fee
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Page 15-D
*
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rmmm.rm


Page 16-D
Jcnist ntrklton
Friday
Badge of Jewish Courage And Forbearance Through Histon
Continued fewm li-O the most besual passions, and there were pogroms. and usually only half were released by deik
Versaillesa sham peace. At this time the Jews
were a little nation, but they had bees caught up
in the maelstrom Ugty hatreds were loosed.
executions, wholesale deportations, the like of
which had not been known in the tearful history of
ihe Jews. Whole communities -were leaded- into
sealed box cars to be sent to forgotten destinations
y death
Only 16 years later, in November 193, ,
badge of infamy was reintroduced ofWu .
the German authorities. A number a *
followed the first law. f *"*
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5%i


Pure Religion Found In Man's Heart
"Jewish Floridiaiti
Miami, Florida. Friday. October 2, 1959
Section E
. : 'v.
4 mr>Dn njw now
\0ut Of Confusion, Let There Come A New View Of Order
By RABBI SAMUEL UMEN
Each Jewish holiday comes with its own spe-
cial message. The message of Rosh Hashona is one
of universal significance. Its appeal is not for the
lew alone, but for all minkind. The sound of the
ram's horn on this holy day is' a call for a better
"an, a more wholesome family life, progress in
the political, economic, and moral spheres, a world
based upon the pillars of truth, justice and peace.
No one can deny the pressing need for improve-
ment in all these areas of our bewildered and con-
tused world. The question, that needs to be aa-
wered is, "Can man, family and nation answer
the call of the Shofar in any degree of affirmative-
ness?" In view of world conditions and the social
make-up of present-day life, it must be aaid that
individual men, as well as individual nations, can-
not hope to emerge better from the general world's
pattern of life without a great act of will. I say this
because I am fully aware of the numerous potent
forces that combine to influence our thinking and
shape our mode of living. For example, in a world
in which religion is constantly pushed to the back-
ground, it" is not too easy to practice the virtuous
life prescribed by our teachers, prophets and
sages. At a time when materialism is glorified, it
is not a simple matter for the individual or a group
to reverse the process.
Pattern of History
The problem of modern culture is that while
we progress in the mechanical sense, we are faced
with disintegration of our moral standards. Moral
progress today is no luxury but is as necessary as
total employment. Without moral reconstruction
we are doomed. Human culture has developed
through the creative influence of human needs. A
need has now been created for moral advance-
ment
We arc sometimes misled by the fact that we
have more students, more universities and less
illiteracy than ever before in history. It is im-
portant- to remember that the lack-of illiteracy
does not necessarily mean a more ethical society,
nor does the growth of the schools and universi-
ties mean necessarily moral and social progress.
What was the advantage for mankind that there'
was practically no illiteracy in Nazi Germany?
In Italy, Mussolini used to delight in showing vis-
itors his beautiful schools, universities and campus-
es filled with Fascist students who admired Mari-
netti's poetry: It was then that he wrote: "War
is beauty, it realizes the mechanical man."
Education worthy of the name must be based
on ethics, morality, and man's relationship to his
fellow-man, to his community, to the world. It
must aim to develop the whole man; In our age
we are like Diogenes with his lantern in hand look-
ing for a man. A man in the fullest sense. Until we
Continued en P
ll-l


Pago 2-E
-Jenis* fki kHar
Friday. October 2,
A HOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
. .TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Parham's
Restaurant
Open 24 Hows a Day
7301 COLLINS AVENUE
f
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HOME STYLE COMPLETE DINNERS
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1400 N.W. 27th Avenue
1400 N.W. 27th Ave. 3601 N. Miami Avt,

PLENTY OF FREE PARKING
HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO OUR FRIENDS
CROSSLY WINDOW CORPORATION
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70 ALL... SEASON'S BEST WISHES
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24o S.W. 17Hi AVINUE
MIAMI
Where the JNF Freedom Forest Will RjJ
By O. E. ORNI
American Jewry is now preparing tor yet an-
other of its many significant undertakings for
Ir-iaelthe planting of the "Freedom Forest"
which will number at least two million trees.
The site chosen is less than twenty minutes'
drive trom Jerusalem, but it all depends on the
type of car you drive. Unless it is a very strong
jeep, able to negotiate the roughest terrain, you
may never reach the forest site. It Is the wildest
of the Judean Hills, marked by narrow gorges,
precipitous slopes and sheer rock walls. It is in one
ot the most exposed sections of Israel's long
frontier.
Perhaps some readers will wonder why the
Jewish National Fund could not have chosen a
more accessible site. Actually, the area was chosen
precisely because of its wild character. Israel is a
very small country committed to absorb large
numbers of immigrants and to afford the millions
of future citizens a decent standard of living. This
can only be achieved by carefully husbanding all
its natural resourcesespecially soil and water.
Only land which holds no promise whatsoever for
any other use. agricultural or industrial, only the
steepest slopes where the soil erosion is gravest,
are reserved Tor afforestation. Forests are a se-
curity factor apart from their value for soil con-
servation and soil amelioration, and apart from the
considerable return they yield directly through
their products.
The drive to the "Freedom Forest" area takes
you past Mt. Herzl. the well-known Jerusalem
landmark, and the growing suburb of Kiryat Yovel
so named because the Jewish National Fund in-
itiated its construction in its Jubilee year. 1951.
The highway passes the new Hadassah Medical
Center. Here glorious mountain scenery opens up
before you. Turning left, you enter a rough coun-
try-road, passing two immigrants- villages, Ora
and Aminadav. Both are built on a high narrow
ridge, planted with fresh, young orchards and vine-
yards. To your left the slopes fall into the abyss-
hke vale of Soreq where the railway winds its
course painfully between the protruding mountain
spurs You probe into the vale by a steep road-
today little more than a path overgrown wjth
v.eedsa zig zagging down to the abandoned vil-
lage of Walaja. Peach and apricot trees still bear
sweet fruits, herbs give off a fragrant perfume
The railway and the border are only a few yards
away.
Longing far Freedom
The other wall of the valley rises abruptly
with small stone houses seemingly glued to it The
height is crowned by the majestic mound of an-
cient Bethar where Bar Kochba and his comrades
held out for desperate months in their last effort
o shake off the Roman yoke. Around Betha, on
the Israel side of the frontier which surrounds it
fjom the north, west and southwest, the "Freedom
forest will grow, symbolic of the universal long-
ing for freedom. During the long siege, the Ro-
mans built their camps around beleaguered Bethar
M a terrain now belonging to Israel. There are
some vestiges of the Roman legions; installations
of some pots-herds, and the stone walls which
surround the camps. But even these will soon be
covered by the trees of the "Freedom Forest '
Bethar is not mentioned in the Bible, but arch-
cologica. research proves that an Israeli v, age
nTjudea' ^T "* *"! f 'he Ki"*s ot **
-nd Judea. The place was important after the re-
turn from the Babylonian captivitv. The steep hSl
sides were then terrain fr ."k P
hilltop a i rraced from the gorge to the
Jiilltop._A_large community lived off the soil. AfteJ
Making way for the Freedom Forest
Titus burned the Second Temple and sacked m
Eternal City, it is assumed that Bethar ock J
many refugees from the Capital. Two generatJ
later Bar Kochba came and prepared Bethtrkl
his last stand. He knew the abrupt slopes t3
surround the site from all but one side, and til
scent of more than 900 feet would make this hilltJ
an ideal fortress. There are signs that his dead
to choose Bethar and prepare it for battle s3
made at the last minute. The walls, designed iti
Lfcricultural skill, were put up rather hiimedrfil
rough stones, not of the neatly-cut ashlar so tnttfl
of the period. The defenders, it appears. de*nj3
t he terrace walls on the slopes which could hut
given the enemy cover while storming the fit^J
Where Bar Kochba Foil
The Romans brought to bear all iheir imperial
might and the situation inside Bethar deteriorate!
i ..pidly. But the defenders were not idle. Perhtn
it was hunger and thirst that impelled them torn
rgain and again to break the siege. Legend hast]
that Bethar fell at long last because a Cutatsal
tiaitor showed the enemy a secret entrance to Us]
fortress. That was on the Ninth of A b in the real
year 135 of the Common Era. Bar Kochba hinted
fell in the last struggle. There was terrible slatM
tcr. According to Talmudic legend, streams dj
blood broke out of the vanquished citadel, sweet-1
ing along heavy rocks, and engulfing the Sam
Vale. Now the new "Freedom Forest" will tentl
as a memorial to this unconquerable will of tstj
people to live in honor and freedom, to a H
which manifested itself both in ancient Bethar tall
in the heroic fighting in this same area in our dajij
during the War of Independence.
It was not far from Bethar that an Israeli ca-1
iimn passed on its way to destroy the Arab poUtH
fortress of Husan, as a consequence of the murder!
o! the archaeologists at Ramat Rahel in 1356. AsU
the Mound of Bethar greets from afar the solitaryf
tree on the skyline of the Hebron Mountains whid
marks the center of the famous Etzion Bloc-tall
site of the four isolated settlements which held oil
for half a year against the unceasing attacks al
overwhelming enemy forces. In so doing they *!
verted the enemy from Jerusalem and saved lj
rael's Capital.
The new road is hewn out of hard limestoHj
lock on the northern side of the Soreq gorge. Tttj
road is the shortest link between the Capital wj
the Negev. The Jewish National Fund begaii
construction quite recently. Huge bulldozers waj
Continued on Pago 14-E
"ouoav ntrrwGi to au .
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w
Jewlstnerlctian
Page Mi
Development and Care of Jewish Leaders
By GUSTAV HELLER
Tfir question of recruiting and training lay
fiarny perennial. It seems to me
i,.,! || .( beard it discussed annually for the 30
I.,'.iir> :.i I have bMO attending National Jewish
Velfai Hoard regional and national conventions.

leadership in any area of life, be it in
i war or social organization, is a "some
lime Uiirg." We try our best to seek but we never
achieve perfection and, as with the stock market,
the |evi l of leadership has its ups and downs. But
\t must continually plan and reevaluate our ap-
broaeht- because just as with "savings" so it is
,ith the preparation of -leadership. If you post-
one dcJng it until you need it, it usually is too
ite.
I dco't mean to say that we should wring our
kands m morbid self-criticism. If we think about
h, I'm sure we can agree with considerable pride
(hat in any catalog of the virtues and benefits
Much flow from the Jewish Community Center
irogram into the life of the community-at-large,
aden-hip and personality development are pre-
fcminent.
Training Begins Early
Actually, we start developing leadership qual-
ities in the nursery school as witness the definition
y one four-year-old who described it as "a place
here ihey try to teach children who hit, not to
bit; and children who don't hit, to hit back." We
p on working at this job right through to our
enior Citizen clubs, working our magic in many
lys, open and subtle. The reaion we are able to
it, lies in the very nature of our work which
bomehow brings us closest to man's innermost hu-
bnan needs and desires, the need for love and
friendship and the desire to express himself cre-
atively.
Through clubs, dramatics, athletics, and in our
discussion groups we provide a natural setting; in
{H'hich individual men and women, boys and girls
attain a sense of status and purpose in life.
Through desirable forms of competitive activity
we heJp people sow seeds of group togetherness
[cultivate a spirit of interdependence, and out of
there emerges a fragrant and intimate per-
onal happiness. The shared experience blossoms
' the common responsibility and the highest
Dowering of all comes with the recognition that
he important thing in life is not nearly so much
he ability to do good work as the ability to create
|conditions in which it can be done.
This is the essence of leadershipto create
Conditions in which good work can be done and
P truest test is not any one leader's indispensa-
idrty but rather the ease with which he can be re-
placed, for as Lao Tze said, "of the best leaders.
pie people only know that they exist." and "when
Jtheir task is accomplished their work done," the
people all remark, "We have done it ourselves."
Now, if we have the tools for developing lead
lership qualities all ready to hand in our program
land in our very purpose, how can we apply those
tools to our own problems of attracting leadership
land training it to do the administrative tasks re-
quired of our governing boards? It is at this point
Ithat u, always come back to our perennial pre-
loccupation with the need for doing a better job.
I lom Watson, Jr., International Business Machine
ipresidtnt, said recently that his company could
make machines that would answer questions pro-
vided the facts are previously stored in them. He.
added, however, that "man will never be able to
make a machine that will ask questions-and the
ability to ask the right questions is more than half
the battle of finding the right answers."
This newest "House of the People"one of
more than 350 YM-WHA's and Jewish Com-
munity Centers throughout the United States
affiliated with the National Jewish Welfare
Boardwas dedicated just before the High
Holy Days. Since World War H, more than
60 communities have embarked on build-
ing programs to provide essential facilities
for their expanding Center services.
If we ever hope to find our right answers, it
seems to me that there are three basic questions
which we have to ask ourselves:
What kind of leaders do we need to invest
part of themselves in our program and its proper
and progressive improvement?
After we get them how can we keep them
interested and inspired enough to assume some-
thing more than nominal responsibility?
When they have been motivated and trained,
how do we make room for them at the top so that
our work may gain in true continuity and depth?
Let us take up these three broad areas of soul-
searching one at a time. What kind of leadership
do we need? First of all, let's dispose of the most
obvious platitude. We need representativeness both
of the community and of our own membership. In
the business I know best, this is the quality we
speak of as "diversification."
Dedicated Personnel
To be representatives, and to command re-
spect, we know that we must attract to our cause
as sponsors and advocates certain people who
bring financial strength and the prestige with
which such financial strength is usually associated,
sometimes' without merit. In this choice we must
try to remember that "prestige," as has been said,
"involves at least two personsone to claim it
and another to honor the claim."
There are people of means, many of them
young, vibrant and socially responsive, who can
and must be involved. But we also need dedicated
people who by their own choice may not have
achieved great financial status and who perhaps
never will. These people, many of whom possess
great competence in the fields of Jewish and gen-
eral cultural activity, make valuable partners as
shapers of our program responsibilities. In every
community these people are known and respected
for the fruits of their labors. Finally, we need
adequate representation from the very people who
are the day-in, day-out participants in our pro-
gram, from the teen-ager to the senior citizen.
Only through this type of board representation can
Continued on Pago 7-E
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
i
University
of Miami
CORAL GABLES
GREETINGS
TOM DUPE
EAL ESTATE
MOS Bay Bead .
num
BEST WISHES FOR THE NEW YEAR HOLIDAYS .
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lesf Wishts for tho Holiday Somso*...
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m NEWMAN
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WI 5-2631
MR. and MRS. DONALD S. LAVIGNE
join with their children
MR. and MRS. MYRON COWEN
Son, Gary John, and Daughters, Elizabeth & Melinda
and
MR.'and "MRS. WALTER A. LAVlGNE
Daughters Leslie, Morley and Shelly
and Son, Elliot Mayer
In expressing their best wishes to all their friends for a
HAPPY NEW YEAR
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3423 N.W. 36th Street
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GREETINGS
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im M >I!M.H'


** M *SS-~------------- IF 1 tr -J 1 m MMMM 1.1 _p_|lF^^_l ._..
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A Visit to the Falasha World of Ethiopia
By ELIAHU SALPETE*
Beading
Ababa. Ethiopia
the FalashasEthiopia black
IWTrBHrtPTS ^er-isalem^one
aware only of the exotic air surrounding this
tribe dais-Jng to be oae of the most ancient
of the Chiktren of Israel. Only when mu-
tiny Tillages and the small towns is the
aware of the iimplnifj of the problem presented
by their citict with Israel and other Jewish
(the
-C All GREEnNCS .
H. T. JONES
MASOK COKTIACTm
US ESTIMATE MU 1-2T41
3193 N.W. 101st Street Mb
Parid.
Nobody knows the exact number of Falashas.
Estimates m frwm 30.000 to 50.000 or more.
There a no ilifiw Falasha territory in Ethi-
opia. The Falasha Jews are scattered in small vil-
liCimany of them ewwwrmg of not more than
srx or eight primitive hotsand in small native
owns where they ore together with other Ethio-
pians. Sometimes the next Tillage is also populated
by Falashas. while m other cases their neighbors
are Chnstiaa or Moslem Ethiopian.
En route to visit a typical Falasha village in
Mrthweatern Ethiopia, we travelled first on the
gravei-peved .Asmara-Geadar highway. Then our
J**P turned off to a barely recogmzabie road in the
fields and finally rnta1 through some grazing
land, ntunatefy. we came to a halt a few hundred
yards from the village when stones and bathes
made any farther motorued progress impossible.
Tte a*^*ct*5* ** ** mai* or by cart (of
which, however, not a single oae was in evidence
is. the entire viBage
inveaesi of the village is hard to
snare is surrounded by
watts are made of tree branches
has a roof of straw. The only light
from the opeeicg serving as the
the center is a hearth of a few rough
icg through- the straw
' covered with hides.
A few crates serve to keep the few stensils and
SI
! LAYIGNE afCTMC CO.
Es?T?v'-s>ec is 132S
r
3*40 N.W. 41fh Street
Fk. 4-4591
BEST WBEZ3 FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
MIAMI DIAMOND CENTER
Mr. & Mrs. Jacob Bsbisowitz
Mr. <5 Mrs. David RabinowrS
Mr. <5 Mrs. Morris Roofedwitx
Mr. & Mrs. Sol Goldsttk
HOLT3AY GREETINGS TO ALL .
rODD'S Bonded Fruit Shippers
flME FOODS
rW Un it lltMfcn Grck 0.5215
SamWrraFxd.____ Hoi B-rb.
tranas JOEcrassmoox ~rnidln
Tropic* WHe. # Const Food.
COmOWKl BASKETS
FaUshas HUsTj Farmers
on the ground, there are
pots and jogs. The
are mostly farmers, but
d makers of primitive
their Christian neigh-
> tku very day. associate
I This, by the way. is
between the Falashas
The Ethiopian government
1 to modernize the' country.
*_ .I'**"'"* these backward preju-
dices, which stem from the ancient effort of the
E.?yptiaa Copt* church to maintain its domina-
ttn over the Ettrnpian church. Aware of the fact
* *'"*"* societies arIbbbj oo one hand.
IT i"iTi 11^ n the other, are the bearers
ranni progress, the Church in Alexandria was
interested m retarding the development of handi-
Tf.Tfjrj* Ethiopians They
ren\ therefore, the belief that these activities
are related to dark forces.
Asme ippuintd the village, the women and
I?**"1** former dressed m long night-shirt
l*e apparel, the Utter half-caked and all of them
-"TBpomdem {or At JtwxA
-*gcj |o
1 .^una :,. fj-uAj rf
tttt ^2* **>*
several talented yourxj men f.
lb. Falashas. brc^fat\^ fo^? *J
an Orthodox s-dtSmlfafaSi JTLt
returned them to Ethiop,T n ^i**1
toachers." npia to becoo.
o^ckly seat to cpJI in the men. who arS^|
Jewishms, Still OjHwt^
,'uh*J P**k Hebrew. Mr* 1
their rabbis understand the Ungaage of tat 1
The Torah and the rest of the Scriptures vn
on parchment leaves bound into a book, a
Gbeez. which is the ancient language of Ethi
and still u the Utsrgical Unguage of the EUn-a
Church. as Latin is of the Catholic ChurtkiAs.
hanc. the present official language of Ethiopia.
dewed from Cheez. like lukan u from Uuli
Gbeez u related to Hebrew, and similar,
sometimes crops op between Hebrew and Aosam
and particularly Tigriniao, which is another dene
t:vt of Gbeez spoken by the tribes u Westas
E-itrea and N'ortbwestern Ethiopia
The discoverer of the Falashas. Pn*
Feitelowich. who found them SO years ago. ii con-
vinced they are Jews, (as are the Falashas the*
selves) even if off-beat ones, in the usual sease of
the word There are other, more recent seieiusa,
however, who dispose the genuine Je-kishoess d
the Falashas.
With the constantly increasing relation
tween Israel and Ethiopia, on one hand, and _
first stirrings of the wish to emigrate to Israel,
felt among the Falashas after a few of them wet*
taken by the Jewish Agency for a years schoouBf
ifl Israel, the qoestioa whether the Falashas n
truly Jews is now not only a theoretical but atei
practical problem.
It is fairly well known that Ethiopia is one of
the oldest Christian countries of the world. Fw
people know, howeier. that for more than a thorn*
and years Ethiopia was a Jewish kingdom.
The Ethiopians are very proud of their Jerri*
relationship*. Their Emperor claims direct de-
scent from King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba,
and the Star of Da v.iwatch they call the Star d
^oonis an yh-*rf national emblem. Tit
Emperor of Ethiopia hears the title "The Iaoc *
Judaa."- and of the 14 hmhonn of the Etkiopa*
Church. 13 are in ^tMria and one in Jermism. j
In more recent times, the Emperor Haile Selasei |
spent the first years of his exile (when the ItaLaai
occupied his realm on the ere of World War HV
m l^E
Kww Year Greetiacs scan ICarnTa Only Leatbn Oecciers
Certified Suede & Leather Cleaners
U Ail Grttt if*
EU Witt Ci^ar and Tobago < mpa.>
WHOLESALERS CAMOY C.CATTES WeSF^
W0MT YOU
"' -m-Tmrnprn Cl^mrf
"THIT'II 1ITTU"
73 M.W. EIGHTH STREET wn^-^.
raOME FR 4-8115
If IIMKI
C I I MET Al ntOOUOS CO.
IMSJK,
SE.ASOJTS BEST WISHES TO ALL
atsut, ldMsmn
m i i
LITTLE RIVER RECREATWH
1*001 SNOOKER
WHnfc ALL SPOBTS KrXT
n**Y BOBDSON
1 "Lt 7t- Street
1*-5314
A Happy New Year to All
Our Friends and Patrons
Jim Wood
Land Clearing
SOU If, W. 54* STRUT
Ph. NE 54102


Friday.
October 2". MSB.
+JewisMhrkUati
Page 5-E
Rosh Hashona and World Refugee Year
By MORRIS W. SCRtNSTEIN
C.rt.r,! Chairman. U*td J.wJsh App*l
Rosh Hashona 5720 fills during the United Na-
tions sponsored World Refugee Year, which is
tfiring to focus attention on the fact that grave
jiunian problems, resulting from 20th century tur-
hulence, remain to be solved.
The United Jewish Appeal subscribes whole-
heartedly to the aims of the World Refugee Year.
for the last 21 years it has dealt at first-hand with
these problems on a global scale. It can truly be
said that every year since the beginning of the
Hitler era has been a world refugee year for Jews.
The serious situation which is now being empha-
s,7ed through World Refugee Year has been one
with which Jews have been intimately and thor-
oughly familiar for centuries.
AH those who are concerned for the plight of
refugees are heartened by the knowledge that a
world body such as the United Nations is calling
attention to this problem. During World Refugee
Year it is anticipated that governments and volun-
tary agencies will step up their efforts to aid refu-
gees, by broadening their programs, by new legis-
lation to facilitate refugee immigration, by gov-
ernmental grants and allocations and by intensi-
fied fund-raising campaigning. Trie World Refugee
Year is an undertaking which can be of enormous
benefit to those who have suffered most from the
upheavals of our age. Although we of the UJA have
been helping refugees for many years, World
Refugee Year will serve to stimulate thought and
action on behalf of refugees in a much wider area,
both on the international and on the community
levels.
One of the most tragic facts of the modern
era is that the age-old homelessness of Jews
reached a new pitch of intensity in the holocaust
of Hitlerism. This impelled the Jews of America
into the greatest single voluntary rescue program
of our time and when we speak of refugees and of
what to do to help them we must realize that the
Jewish experience it authoritative.
UJASymk* mt LiWty
A quarter of a century ago Hitter began his
attempt to eradicate Jews and Jewishness from the
face of Europe) and presumably from the faee of
the earth. Before he himself was destroyed he had
crested six million Jewish martyr* to his mon-
strous ideal
A few short years later, in 188, America's
Jews formed the United'Jewish Appeal in order to
unify and strengthen efforts to help the increasing
numbers of victims of Nazism. Because of the Uni-
ted Jewish Appeal an entire generation of refu-
gees was given new hope and new life. UJA be-
came the symbol of liberty to those who dwelled in
the shadows of oppression; it became the light of
freedom and life to those who had managed to sjir-
\ive the concentration camps and the gas ovens.
But World Refugee Year serves to remind us
forcibly that problems similar to those with which
UJA has coped for 21 years are still with us. Our
age is still one in which homelessness, uprooted-
ness and fear are widespread. Even though World
War II, which Hitler unleashed, came to an end,
the turbulence and chaos it brought in its wake
have extended far beyond the period of heartbreak
and disaster which it ushered in.
The generation which suffered under Hitler is
heed with a tragic debris of spiritual suffering
and material need as a heritage of their experi-
ence. And in country' after country where the
Nazis once ruled, tortured? and slew, a sickness of
hostility remains,;as well as a great emptiness
vbere Jewish life once flourished.
The need to .migrate to new lands of liberty, to
first visas under the Australian "Hard
Core" project are issued in Vienna to a Uni-
ted Hias Service-sponsored couple, Mr. and
Mrs. Lajos Fuelop, by A. R. Downer (right).
Minister of the Australian Department of
Immigration. "Rosh Hashona 5720 falls
during the United Nations-sponsored World
Refugee Year, which is serving to focus at-
tention on the fact that grave human prob-
lems, resulting from 20th century turbu-
lence, remain to be solved."
new lands of opportunity and hope seems to be im-
perative for almost all refugees.
This is a fact which the World Refugee Year
emphasizes to us. I cannot help observing that this
kind of recognition of refugee needs, if made two
decades ago, would have saved many lives, Jewish
end non-Jewish alike.
But sometimes the opportunity to save lives
and to weave the fabric of new lives is one that
must be created where it does net exist We of the
United Jewish Appeal have never paused to let our
regrets over the past impede oar concern for
those who need help in the present.
Thus, American Jews, through UJA, have in
21 years managed to help and to rescue more than
2,700,00 men, women and children. Coping with
the hardships of wee, in the faee of immigration
restrictions and of lack of funds, UJA managed to
lielp and to rescue more than 2,700,000 men, women
and children. Coping with the hardships of war, in
the face of immigration restrictions and of lack of
funds, UJA managed to bring 120,200 refugees to
Palestine in the period from 1939 until 1947. In that
same period it brought 112,000 to other countries.
The EwPrtwnt New
With the birth of the State of Israel in 1948 the
doors of opportunity for rescue opened wide. As
the only country in the world which would accept
Jews without restriction, Israel gave the AmericSn
Jewish community a chance to effect an astonish-
ing achievement in human rescue: Since 1948 it
has taken in more than 924,800 Jewish refugees.
In addition, since 1930, some 213,000 have been
able, with UJA aid, to emigrate to Latin America,
British Dominion countries, and other free lands; of
this number, 180,000 found sanctuary in the United
States. In the two turbulent decades from 1830 to
1898 a grand total of more than 1,369900 Jews were
helped by UJA to emigrate to a new chance in life.
At the same time, UJA provided vital survival and
Continued en-*at t4l
GUARANTY TITLE *
**8TtACTf -
tnu
ROOM 208
BISCAYNE BUILDING
KAsoirs oaBsmiod
HENRY SHIER
and Family
MM K. W. 27th A
IEA SOU'S BEST
WIlHirfO Alt
'-.
HI ifJi
A60CY
l
SWEET IS YOUltJfflTTO SBCURTTlr
Phone FB 44179
GREETINGS ^.
Wherrln Search For DefiniteIy"Bettei
Furniture and Home Furnishings
At Reasonable Prices
Remember The Name
WOODRUM'S
ONE OF FLORIDA'S LARGEST AND FINEST
HOME FURNISHERS
AIR CONDITIONED if
NORTHEAST SECOND AVE. AT
SEVENTY-THIRD STREET
Df A HURRY CALL
KIMBALL MURRAY
THE LUXURY DBT CLEANERS
1705 H.W. 2nd Avenue Po~ PL 1-5511
8220 N.W. 2nd Avenue
MIAMI
Phon PL 4-1625
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Pearl
oimI Family
wish 4J ffcir fries*
- AND HANtY WISHES HIS CUSTOMER-
A HAPTY AMD HtOSPUtOUS MtW YEM
i
m
BEST WISHES TO ALL OUR FRIENDS FOR
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
Miami Title and Abstract Company
Hyland Rilas David R. Rifas
25 YEARS OF TITLE SERVICE DC DADE COUNTY
124 & 129 SECURITY TRUST BLDG.
Phone FR 9-1891
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
CONGER CLINIC PHARMACY
1833 N.W. 35th Street Congwr Building
NfS-4711
VAX DAYTON, Owner
TO-Atl
Iff* I. SUTTON
18 8skmU MM.
Cleafl
GREETINGS TO OUR MANY JEWISH FRIENDS
EARL V. WILSON COMPANY J
MERCHANDISE BROEERS 1

Jacksonville
T**
TOM FLAHERTY


Page 6-E
vJewlsti ftcrUUan
j^Octob.jJ
PEOPLES GAS SYSTEM
Extend Best
Wishes
to the
Jewish
Community
for
A HAPPY
NEW YEAR
m 11I2SS ST.
imi urn mm
unmi: u ma stket
liuttpmam)
\

THE PERSONNEL OF
WEINKLES
Liquor Stores
WISHES EVERYONE
A Most Happy \ew Year
IsUUitM 1935
17 STORfS SERVING SOUTH FLORIDA
Mr. Pumpernik sez:
A Very Happy New Year To All
I IISTAUIANT
67th & Collins
TO All StASOWS UST WISHIS
TROPI-PAK FOOD PRODUCTS INC
3663 M.W. 47* STREET ^^
TO All ... UST WISHIS fOK HAPPY HOLIDAYS
AGG-RATE STONE CORPORATION
"UST IT KIT"
fUm* n 4 mi
7230 M.W. 1*4 Aye...
NEW YEAR GREETINGS TO ALL '>
SNIDER-JONES, INC.
MAMVfACTWUS Of TKADt WIND OlrT ilUlfS
Phone MO 1-2730
MIAMLFLA.
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Ate Greenfield
tewing Machines. Commercial and Domestic
Bought Sold Repaired Rented
SMWe-rtete,!^1 C0A$T MACHINERY CO.
"-trtejtew. afc..i5 m^iU.fM4m
Israel at the United Nations During 5719
--------~- By SAUL CARSON
United Nations
On one major levelthe level of open, public
debate, controversy and resolutionIsrael enjoyed,
in the year 5719. the quietest period in its ten-year
history as a member of the United Nations. But
there is another important level to be considered:
Israel's position vis-a-vis the United Nations Sec-
retariat and Israels position in world diplomacy,
both of these affected by many weighty factors in-
cluding the Cold War, Big Power (especially the
I mted Arab Republic) and the stresses inside the
Arab bloc.
Examing both major facets, one sees two
f.ces: Serenity on the level of public debate, the
same old disregard for Israel's essential security
on the second uf the major levels. Neither picture
is clear; there are both lights and shadows in
both. And on balance, the focus must be on vig-
ilance and alertness as the Jewish State's prime
requisiteshere at the United Nations as else-
where in the world.
When the thirteenth session of the General
Assembly opened a year ago, a crisis had just been
overcome. In the summer of 1958, Iraq, Lebanon
and Jordan exploded. Israel, keeping its powder
dry and, presumably, its defense forces on the
alert, stood on the sidelines, watchfully aware of
the potential dangers facing it as the surrounding
Arab states were in turmoil.
All Had Spoken
There were efforts to provoke Israel. The Sov-
iet Union tried hard to needle Israel into attacking
Jordanmaking open charges during the Special
Emergency Session of the General Assembly,
which dealt with the Jordanian-Lebanese crisis,
that Israel was ready to march across into Jordan.
Israel kept its head, and gained more friends
among the Western delegations here as a result.
When brad voted for the Arab League resolution
there would be no night session All del*...-
spoken-and if Israel wanted to be he h1
to speak immediately. Eban had t ,!!/' *'
the-spot decision, without specific i *i
from Jerusalem. He did. He addressed u'?**
bry, electrified it by announcing that foTL/
est of unanimity, he would vote "yes"
COIOA Mil*
. tifkttKS CMfKfi
OAS HAMMAMSKKHD
MCf diplomacy
adopted by that special assembly on Aug. 21 1958
its prestige here rose to an all-time high.
(One must stop here to recall that vote For
many hours that day. while the Arab resolution was
debated everybody wondered how Israel would
vote The wise money" was divided between an
Israel, abstention and an Israeli vote against the
resolution. Abba Eban. then head of the delega-
turns was inlouch with his home government all
day long and.saying nothing. He had expected to
have final instructions from Jerusalem in time for
a night session of the Assembly. At 6 p.m while
he was conferring with his delegation, he received
word from the President of the Assembly that
many brilliant moves he had made here, Urn fej
sion was outstanding.)
When the regular session of the .Assembly nJ
vened, there was not a single item on the age*]
concealing Israel directly, except the routine3
dealing with Arab refugees. For the first uaeij
10 year, "The Palestine Question" was left in abey-
ance. Even the Security Council hardly toecM
the Arab-Israel tensions. These were left lirpk,
in the hands of United Nations Secretary Genera
Dag Hammarskjold. And that is precisely iJ
one of the dangers to Israel manifested itteB-j
not in public debate but wrapped by Hamaad
skjold's "quiet diplomacy."
Policy a Failure
The Inge Toft case is illustrative of how line I
Hammarskjold can do when he acts entirelyobnm
own authority, without the backing of the Seen*]
Council. Hammarskjold had tried to solve ioatia-1
passe, involving Israel's fundamental right freedom of innocent passage through the Suei f>7
raland had failed. The Danish freighier IafB
'ioft remained at a dock in Port Said, uaere tal
United Arab Republic ^topped it while cirryJ
goods from Haifa to the Far Eastand there tM
.-hip stayed from May onward, regardless if Hil
narskjold's personal intervention with Dictaatj
Nasser.
The new United States policy of tryin: to call
vince the world at large, and the Arab states M
particular, that Nasser was the firmest bulm*]
against Communism in the Middle East-that p*|
icy did not help Israel feel more secure, either.
But balancing these factors has been
own progress in world diplomacy. The basil
the improvement of Israel's relations with most**!
Ihe nations of the worldexcept the Arab and SM
1tt blocswas laid right here, at the United tfi
lions. It is here that Israel's Foreign MinisUfj
Golda Meir, and Eban, contacted Foreign
tcrs and other leading members of the diplomat*]
corps from all continents, and it is here kfl*|
Israel's ever-expanding* friendship with the j
Uont saw fruition. This is not to say tha: Israeli j
Ambassadors in these countries did not do veomai
work. But the United Nations is the center, til]
Continued on Page 12-E
THAT ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS MAY ENJOY
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
K THE SINCERE WISH OF THE
AUGUST FAMILY and
AUGUST BROS. BAKERY
361 S.W. Eighth Street
Phone FH 4-2792
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
1YORMAXDY
LAUIVBERETTE
QUALITY CLEANING
HAND IRONING
SHIRT FINISHING
962 Noetnandy Dri>
Opposite Food Fair
TO ALL..GREETIN
GS
Williams Sign Companv
of HI All] All J
<55 EAST OKECHOBEE ROAD
PhooTU 6^468
JEWELS V*1*
WORKS OF ART
Fund tare. Antique* and Cur*
INTERNATIONAL
FINE AHT GALLEBIE
1226 Lincoln Rd.. Mknnl B*"*
A. SCH'RR. Bepreaaart^*
jf tlttS
J.44*


IJjiy, October 2. 1959
+Jew 1stFk>rldian
Page 7-E
levelopment and Care of Jewish Leaders
Continued from Page 3-E
keep close enough ie the woek to be practical
Ed progressive.
in ihe lisht of these needs what are the ques-
must store in our personal thinking ma-
taii wellwhat about tlfose boards that are
Iprloatled with husband-and-wife teams, or boards
iat an' ingrown in another way by the inclusion
[ a charmed circle of close friends? What about
buncos where an overwhelming percentage is
-entificii with one synagogue in a multi-synagogue
Immunity? what shall we sav about hoards that
[ve Income exclusive clubs consisting of tried
L tired people, whom the executive director feels
I |, with and with whom he believes his
K, js Inn"'- 'ace a deficit with either courage or hope
l< ever worse, boards of absentee tycoons who
Ln alwpys be relied on to raise money without
iowinj; or caring much about the purposes for
Injfh the money is needed or much disposition
I shari their time and talents with people of lesser
hancml substance in an- effort to find out.
Thc-e are purposely drawn caricatures, but
L mot caricatures they may bear a slight re-
tmblance to the truth which, when it appears in
no con. > ntional form, we often fail to see.
Keeping a Board Interested
The 'econd question we must ask is how to
ep a board interested and inspired. This is not
isy, arj it often takes more expenditure of time
nd imagination than a lot of presidents and ex-
fcutive directors are able or willing to give.
Basically it comes back at once to program
lus a correct and frequent use of every available
hanncl cf communication. The right people of all
irpes will give generously of their time, means,
|nd counsel if they have confidence that the pro-
ram by which they are represented Is making a
enuine, significant and honest contribution to the
nnchnunt and growth of the individual member,
|nd to the strength and vitality of the Jewish and
eneral community.
Wc care not live on past accomplishments
limn nor do we deserve to live as an agency if we
not meet current needs with imagination and
Duragc. Such response to need permits us to keep
constant prideful communication with the peo-
Be we serve and with those who make it possible
pr us tc provide the service.
But there is more than program Content in-
olved in our quest for good leaders. If we_shouM
|xpect new members on our boards to give freely
themselves, we must be sure to take some good
ard look.> at our present board members to see
bat they are ready to regard their positions as
pportun ties for service rather than posts of hon-
[t. To test that we must be sure that every board
ember is given adequate chance through work
tsignment to experience the truth that enjoyment
any job varies in direct proportion to what one
rings to it. There is a Gresham's Law in leader-
blip as veil as in coinage and all too frequently we
ce bad material driving out the good from our
ounsel tables.
This downgrading of board strength can hap-
en as the result of undemocratic processes, in-
frequent board meetings, too frequent reliance on
lired old work horses, or too much executive com-
aittee usurpation. In our own community, I have
heard of two boards where meetings are called
bnly at the convenience of the president and where
Wtaess is more often conducted by executive
ommittee fiat rather than by joint thinking. Mini-
izinj; -v.e decision-making prerogatives of board
ember.-.lip can seriously damage board mem-
"The Third Allegory," painting by Ben
Shahn, was inspired by Samuel II (6:22),
describing the triumphal entry of King David
and 30,000 selected men of Israel bearing
the Ark into the City of David. The paint-
ing is in the collection of the Jewish Com-
munity Center of Buffalo, N.Y., and is one of
the many works of art on Jewish themes
acquired by YM-WHA's affiliated with the
National Jewish Welfare Board.
bers' morale, but often the same result can come
hy too much absorption in the details of the ad-
ministrative process.
Board meetings must be used primarily to de-
fine and develop agency philosophy and policy.
Busy people will be bored by endless discussion of
petty detail which properly should be handled by
an effective committee system. We all must have
had to endure meetings where more time was de-
voted to such matters than to the stuff of which
our dreams are made.
Law of Triviality
A recent book, "Parkinson's Law,'-' written by
an English civil servant, now professor of history
at the University of Malaya, gives some amusing
insights into the subject of boards and councils
and upon their organizational foibles. In one chap-
ter, titled "High Finance or the Point of Vanishing
Interest," Prof. Parkinson evolves a law of board
Continued on Page 14-E
*
Mrs. Sally Gardner
1560 MERIDIAN AVENUE
MIAMI MACM
MTINItS MST miMUS MM A
H4W NEW riAR
Te All Her Meads
Or. and Mrs.
A. K. Rosenthal
and Family
Extend to All Thir Relatives
and Friends
Sincere Wishes For A
VERY HAPPY NEW YEAR
TO AIL... GREETINGS
HERM GELLER CONSTRUCTION CO.
14075 WEST DIXIE HIGHWAY
2225 NX 123rd Strttt Phone PI 7-6652
NORTH MIAMI
TO ALL
A MOST HAPPY
HO LILT AY
*
ZARET BUILDING CORP.
*
924 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach
GREETINGS ARE EXTENDED
WITH THE SINCERE AND FERVENT WISH
FOR GENEROUS BLESSINGS OF
GOOD AND HAPPINESS
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD.
RIVERSIDE
MEMORIAL CHAPEL

IRVING BLASBERG
ABE EISENBERG
LARRIE BLASBERG
ARTHUR ZWEIGENTHAL
*
rv
HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL
Sameth-Piepgras Realty Company, Inc.
REALTORS
BALES RENTALS Residential Commercial Industrial
976 E. 25th Street Phone TU 8-0233
HIALEAH
We Extend Sincere Best Wishes to All Our
Relatives and Friends
Dr. and Mrs. Alvin F. Gardner
and Daughter Ava Lee
Mr. and Mrs. ARTHUR APPLE '
and Sons LARRY and JEFFREY
of the
ASSOCIATED PHOTOGRAPHERS
Extend Greetings for a Happy Passover
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Security Trust Company
SECURITY TRUST BUILDING
119 E. FLAGLER STREET
MIAMI
Phone FR 1-4661
comrumihts or
YOUR FULLER BRUSH MAN
n 1-2321


Page 8-E
jrttgy. OOob i

SiNCERE WiSHES FOR A
h i* l MA*nw SEW YEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Sherman J. Tobin & Family
KENNETH JAY and AMY JAN
SEYEX-I P KOI I I IX. CO.
r|* i Miami. Florida
HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL .
E. B. LEATHERMAN
DADE COUNTY
COURT HOUSE
*
the cobbs company
*
I i
s* **
J -
i MRS- SAM SE HUM
"d daur/kiar "
EXTEND BEST WISHES
TO ALL
FOR A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW vr
SEASON'S GREETINGS
TNE SNORE CLUI HOTEL
at ltt
Observations on a Tour in the Orient
By OR. AND MRS. NATHANIEL LEVIN
Here we are in San Francisco for the gathering
of the clan before the final takeoff to the Orient.
A large group of physicians and their wives from
all over the United States and South America are
meeting with colleagues from .Europe. Africa and
Asia for the fifth international congress on dis-
HMI of the chest and the seventh international
congress of bronchoesophagology (throat and chest
specialists).
We board a clipper for Hawaii and enjoy a
smooth flight over a vast expanse of Pacific
(K-ean: over the clouds and blue waters, enormous
distances. Everyone is very friendly in passing the
time during theamg overseas flight. All are look-
ing forward to the next stop. Hawaii, an eight-hour
j>.unL
As we approach Hawaii, looking down from
al.out 10.000 feet, we can see small boats on the
blue Pacific, and then land comes into view and
the well known landmark. Diamond Head, an ex-
tinct volcano. Along the shoreline we see beautiful
sandy beaches and gorgeous trees and mountains
that are so characteristic of Hawaii. On arrival at
the airport, we see the tower with the greeting.
' Aloha." As we deplane, beautiful Hawaiian girls
are dancing the hula, and each descending passen-
ger receives a kiss on both cheeks, and the tradi-
tional beautiful flowered leis are draped around
our necks. Then a bus ride to Henry Kaiser"s Ha-
uanan Village, situated on beautiful Waikiki
Beach.
The village is a complete resort consisting of
a magnificent series of buildings, restaurants,
shops and Polynesian attendants We are now in
our quarters high above the beach and looking out
over the Pacific. Diamond Head and surrounding
hill- of Oahu In the hills you can see many settle-
ments of homes, business areas, and nearby a hos-
pital is being built by Henry Kaiser and is well
near completion.
The physicians go off to the Queen's Hospital
for their first medical meeting. Hospitals are much
the same the world over, and the problems are the
same, with the exception of diseases characteristic
to a Pacific outpost with a melting pot of peoples.
The Hawaiian medical men make us feel right at
home.
MS. HATMAHIll UVIW
. Flight to Tofc,o
We take off from Honolulu Airport. This is a
bolidaj; and hundreds of families are at the airport
to see the airships taking off and landing. What a
mixture of faces, such beautiful childrenall very
colorful and exciting. Sylvia hangs her leis over
the necks of children as we depart and their faces
ere pure delight. We take off with the sound of
Aloha" as dusk is falling, for an eight-hour flight
Dr. and Mrj. Let-m here set dou-n their im-
fresnont of a tnp to the Orient following an imi-
tation to Dr Lenn from the University of Tokyo,
to address a group of Japanese ear nose and throat
specialists and re participate hi the scientific pro-
ceedmg. of the American Academy of Chest Physi-
cians and the International Congress of Broncho-
esophagoU.z>. Active ,n Dade county medical af-
fairs Dr. Lei me i on the faculty of ihe University
of Musm, School of Mediant. A noted throat spe-
cialist he u the recent of a number of grants
from the Department of Health Education and
Wdfor. Office of Vocational RehaMnat.on fa
the field of rehabilitation of thost handicapped bv
peech and io.ee problems. He u a member of Tern-
plehrati. Mrs Lenn i, a member of the Prtsident,
2 7TTS, Cnn""" on 'toymen, of the
physically handicapped
to Wake Island a small dot in the pacific We
arrive with a nice breeze blowing from the beats
and a starlit sky, then back again on the plant fa-j
the final seven-hour flight to Tokyo.
We arrive at Haneda Airport in Tokyo bripl]
and early with the Japanese delegation meeting *]
there. It is a surprise meeting Dr. Ono. the directs:]
general of 'the congress, who turns out to be;
classmate of mine in a Philadelphia hospital L
1932. In addition, other Japanese friends meet ftl
We entertained them while they were in the Uatai]
States on official missions as guests of the Sun]
Department. The bowing from the waist by tktl
Japanese seems so natural that a handshake ii ail
of place. A friendly grinand we were one ej
gress and one world. Many official picture! ui|
taken. Television, newspaper reporters and dipt |
tanes make up the official welcoming party.
From the airport we are taken on a tear a
Tokyo before registering at our hotel, which u bt 1
ing readied for the large group. Tokyo is ran
city, over eight million population, and growing a'j
rapidly that it is competing with London and Nei
York for first place as the world's largest metn>j
politan center. Tokyo is an amazing sight. I|
spreads out in all directions and the approach*
from the airport are not the most beautiful part*!
of Tokyo, as in many other cities all over ts
world. In these outlying areas, there are two ani]
three-story unpainted buildings, many of tne> |
very flimsy and ramshackle in type. Howeter. aM
ve approach the metropolitan business areas. ]
sec buildings and architecture that delight thrtjtj
RABBI and MRS. S. M. MA< HTKI
MR. and MRS. MORTON STTTSIY
STELLA REGWA. LEO JAY and JERRY JiOWARD
Extend To All Jewry
Boot WisasM ^
* ***>f NEW YlAi
d^EKE WEISS. Pr^itUn, ^
EXTEND BEST WISHrc
oiionr gtiirff-*
fgfry TripneU J
Mr. and Mr*
David Browi
a ad Fa B.H v
WISH ALL THSB
RELATIVES AND
FRIENDS
A HAPPY NEW YEA*


October 2, 19S9_______________^^
,-omparable wit* the best to be found in
| large cities.
he streets are crowded with much constmc-
[jn zn attempt to keep pace with the tremen-
j growth and noise of the city. The police are
Dg an effort to minimize this cacophony of
Mating Mtomien*
fier the taxi reaches the hotel, in this instance
irperial. we are in for a most pleasant sur-
Ycu are met at the door by a smiling attend-
ee bows from the waist as you are ushered
I the lobby. The hotel was. designed by Frank
|d Wright. It is a well-known hotel and one of
\eVl buildings which has survived the tremen-
cailhquakes of Japan. We are fortunate
to be housed in the annex which was just
picttd several months ago.
>, sc of meeting fellow Miamians, Mr. and Mrs.
and family and Mr.-and Mrs. William
er ,Ve had the pleasure of meeting them
in Hong Kong.
The rexl morning on awakening we find an in-
|ior under the door to us individually and as a
to meet with the American Ambassador to
li n. Douglas McArthur II, at a closed door
i which lasted more than an hour. He
psscil Japan's present status following recov-
Ifroin the war, with Its tremendous industrial
sou.il development, its culture, history, di-
nar.. relationship to the United States, to
pa ard to the Orient and the world.
)in:ri; out with our Japanese friends, we lunch
pet.te Abbe Totsuka, whom we had eoter-"
i Miami several months ago. She is editor
official publication of the Japan Travel
eau. Jt is a delightful luncheon of native foods
ih indescribable delicacy and charm by
pp Japanese waitresses on their knees. All food
trvt in specially designed porcelain or wooden
: foi different dishes. Small portions are served
ai -no arrangement and epicurean taste.
n many varieties of fish, vegetables and
[ -lined with delicate flavors, sauces and
lishes. We arc seated on the floor on cushions
o tables Shoes are left outside the door.
Special Treatment
[Dr. :;atsnmi Mori, a professor of history whom
also entertained in Miami, is now our host at
I fa\ ...; eating spot, a pure delight. The restau-
if. a facsimile of an old farmhouse; simply
isbcJ wi'.h low tables, matter floors and beau-
cr -aware. Conversation is not too difficult,
[ protessor using a Japanese-English dictionary
I a better brand of English than he will acknowl-
|e. We are getting along famously, enjoying the
1 an each other. We are shoeless, using chop-
ks, .sitting bowlegged and eating tempura, espe-
|ly cooked and seasoned. The giggles from our
rteo;.> little hostesses in their native costumes
I add to this delightful and long-to-be remem-
ed c.ening together in* Japan.
I As an invited guest to speak before the Japa-
!! society of ear, nose and throat specialists at
l Graduate Club of the University of Tokyo, my
Beagrts and I received very VIP treatment.
ysici.-:ns from all over Japan have come to at-
tre lectures on operative procedures on the
oat r.:.d rehabilitation of speech .There is a tre-"
> ovation from the physicians, followed by
wing and the presentation of an exquisite lac-
bred bowl as a gift. Then a buffet reception 'with
Bent, n style hors d'oeuvres, Sylvia noted, "look-
: more than a little Japanese."
On :he streets the numbers of people are end-
Is. Tokyo is mainly a westernized Community
lm the standpoint of dress with exceptional peo-
wer.ring the native costumes. Men character-
pcally dressed in white shirts and dark trousers,
+Jewi%tncrk*an
**
the women dressed in the latest styles as seen in
the other cities of the world. In the streets, hun-
dreds of trucks, taxicabs, bicycles, streetcars and
pedestrians all appear in countless numbers. Traf-
fic u well organized by police standing on elevated
platforms-left hand traffic as in England. The
taxi drivers are exceptionally skillful. They do not
stop for pedestrians but seem to go around them,
weaving in between trucks and cars. Also, bicycles
and motorcycles avoid hitting cars and pedestrians
with only inches to spare.
A little man with muscular legs peddles a rick-
shaw with a bicycle attachment, and accompanied
by another couple in another rickshaw, we tour the
Japanese palace grounds, weaving slowly through
traffic, taking pictures of the Japanese Sunday
strollers who in turn looked us over very carefully,
smiling and friendly throughout. Following the
tour of the grounds, a cabbie takes us to visit the
main shopping district of Tokyo with modern
boulevards, wonderful shops and department
stores comparable to the finest in the world.
Research Papers
Inaugural ceremonies of the Congress of Chest
Diseases was an outstanding event, held at
Yomiuri Hall. The meeting was opened by the
chairman, who introduced the Premier of Japan,
MrNobosukc Ishi, official host of the Government
of Japan.
The following morning the scientific sessions
were underway. Short papers were presented by
specialists from all over the world on diseases of
tl.e chest and allied conditions, including the heart,
throat and others. Outstanding papers, many re-
search problems were presented for the good of
rll. The presentations of the congress were trans-
lated into English, Japanese and French by phy-
sicians who were linguists, as it is done at the
United Nations.
Visits to hospitals and rehabilitation centers
were the order of the day whenever time permit-
ted. The Japanese are far advanced in the healing
Continued on Page HE
Singer Harry Belafonte holds an original oil
painting done by a 15-year-old Israeli art-
ist, gift of the National Women's Division
of the American Jewish Congress. Bela-
fonte was honored by AJCongress during
the outgoing Hebrew Year 5719 for his role
in the fight against bigotry. Right is Judge
Justine Wise Polier, of the New York Domes-
tic Relations Court, honorary president of
AJCongress Women's Division. Mrs. Bela-
fonte looks on at left.
IRENE and AL WISE
>nd BLANCHE and GEORGE
GOODFRIEND
Extend New Year
Greetings
to their many friends
Duncraggan Inn
HendetsoewAue. N.C.
"(iriKCj
*KN reman; 4 m attWARtm
ROOVTU
AWARDING CO.
[* KREPS INTERNATIONAL
'HO.Ne.7M
13' NJ. 1* snort. MUM
. M M250 P.O. Om 4M7
Mr. and Mrs. Leo Mindlin
and son Jeremy
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
rrna novn *um
BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
TO OUR RELATIVES AND FRIENDS
Mr. mm* Mrs. A. Fbtley Binder
and Children
. J. Loala, Ma-trie Jeffry,
j>Mftts- Mark aad Ethel Mary

ROSH HASHAMAH
TIME FOR REFLECTION AND RESOLUTIONS
'Whosoever Honors the Jot ah Shall Himself ft Honored'
% las*? ;
HU3s Kiel'
Rosh Hashanah is a religious milestone, when we pause to reflect
upon our past deeds to make resolutions for the future.
At the dawn of this New Year of 5720, the
W1LNO
KOSHER
saisaij; IO.
A
N
D
leaders in the manufacture of fine delicatessen meat products for
nearly 70 years, reaffirm the principles that have made WILNO
kosher products the favorite of families from coast to coast:
TO safeguard resolutely our religious heritage
of KASHRUTH,
TO maintain rigidly the WILNO standards of
highest QUALITY,
TO preserve faithfully the inimitable
WILNO FLAVOR,
And to continue steadfastly to justify the
confidence placed in our INTEGRITY.
The Kashruth department is under the supervision of two promi-
nent Rabbis: Rabbi Boruch Rabinowitz. Rabbi Ben Zion Rosen-
thai, and two steady Mashgichim. Rev. Abraham Weinberg and
Rev. Nachman Stone.
With a sincere and fervent prayer for world peace and the safety
of Israel, we wish our worthy Rabbis, all Rabbis everywhere, our
customers and Jewish people the world ever,
A HAW, HEALTHFUL, PROSPEROUS AND PEACEFUL
NEW YEAR'
WILNO KOSHER SAUSAGE CO.
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
Local Plant:
2181 NORTHWEST 10th AVL, MIAMI, FLORIDA
Telephone: FRanklin 1-6551
SEASON'S GREETINGS
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS' .
\ li
;*i!:t!
MIAMI BEACH REFRIGERATION SERVICE
1201 71st Street Miami Beach |
UN 5-3541 **!
HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL .
BAC CONSTRUCTION. INC. Q
ENGINEERING CONTRACTORS
DRAINAGE SPECIALISTS
3
1514 S.W. 129th Tor. South Miami d 5-4511
avrr
riAt to au .
THE WAX MUSEUM
Opea Oelly 4:34 AJN. to :30 PJM.
scenes wifa Utl Slit mm, Hfees to rrsioajdoo.
I IdTTffc JfTMt
Mmmo wn 5-3*41
tutors omtmos...
ABBOTT A BONNETT FURNITURE
"CMTOM KIFNNSNf U"
1144 S.W. Ml SHOT
- Al PtANCIS. free.
Mom ft 4-14M


Pcgo IOC
Captain Eddie Rickenbacker
at the Board at
Eastern Air Lines
AMD HB WOOD ASSOCIATES IN THE
EASTERN FAMILY
WSHYOOA
AND HB 17.000 ASSOCIATES IN THE
WE EXTEND SINCEHE GREETINGS AND BEST WISHES
FOB A HAPPY NEW YEAR
TNE
DANIA JAI ALAI PALACE
12rh
MYRON S. ZEIENTZ
w
BACHE & COMPANY
l*tfdi Greet,mai f His
CUEHTS mi FKKNDS
happy ft^WyeaR
/n*/ /o/ f>e inscribed
lor page* and good lift
McMAHON FURNITURE CENTER
Wishes All Their Friends a Very Happy
and Prosperous New Year
6511 South Dixie Hwy. South
Open Monday and Friday Until 9 PM.
SEASON'S GREETINGS
from
7mm Greetey
(Formerly U.S. Meat Inspector)
Now the Owner of
U-PAINWT FURNITURE CO.
5519 M.W. 7th Avenue pi 1-2325
Complete Line in Stock. Also Custom Made Dept
houmy ummts to aii .
TRUDY'S RESTAURANT
numr Horn cooKiNc ohm u nees a my
5743 S.W. St* STOI7
"Next Year in Jerusalem."*this family sang to remind us forcibly that problems similm
gaily during 5719-** they had arrived in to those with which UJA has coped for twentv
Israel through assistance of the United lew- one years are still with us."
ish AppeaL "World Refugee Y
Hashona
from P* 5-E
rehabilitation aids for more than 1.4M.0S0 people
is countries where they remained.
As we begin the 21st Rosa Hashona of 0X4*1
existence we remember what these first two dec-
ades were alike not only is terms of hardship and
terror for those who suffered, but in terms of the
send accomplishment which was the result of the
compassionate will of the American Jewish com-
munity, carrying out a unique and hitherto un-
matched effort of rescue and healing by men and
Momen acting in voluntary association
The New Year we sow usher in serves to re-
mind us ef the ever present bow of seed. For Jews
the World Refugee Year means renewed applica-
tion to the pressing needs which face more than
GOO.OW Jews in Israel and 25 other countries
A refugee's problems do not end at the port
of entry. On the contrary, a long and hard phase
ct his rehabilitation merely begins there. We find
this to be startingly true in the cases of those
hundreds of thousands who have come to Israel, a
land which is relatively underdeveloped, where
the problems of resettlement are much greater
than in other countries with stronger economic
and financial resources.
Since 1948. wave upon wave of immigrants has
washed upon the shores of this tiny country where
it* people, largely newcomers like those whom
they were continually accepting, have been striv-
ing to build a bulwark of liberty and democracy.
Some 400.000 immigrants of recent years are
still not fully absorbed, and. of necessity, the bulk
of the UJA programs is directed at helping them
complete their transformation into full productive
citizenship of their new land. Their needs are many
and varied.
There is an urgent need, for example, to pro-
vide decent, modest bousing for some 85.000 im-
migrants who are still living in Israel's ma'aba rot
immigrant shanties of wood, tin and canvas.
Another S"ve absorption problem is that of
some 130.000 recent newcomers on 482 farm i. j
tiemeflts which are not economically self sufficient
The full absorption of these immigrants is sen-:
ously impeded by lack of water, livestock, farj
machinery, fencing, electrification and approaci
roads. Immigrants on these farm settlements ban
ffiund that in order to make ends -Meet they ami
accept work away from the farms even those!
agriculture is s major factor in Israel's develop-
ment as a haven for immigrants.
Let Us RswMmber
An additional 140.000 immigrants of recent!
years are aged, orphaned, handicapped or adoles-
cents who are in need of continued institutional
rare, therapy, special Job training, and rchabilru-
tion
Added to these are the initial absorption oeedi
faced by some 30.000 who have entered Israel h j
the first six months of 199* Their requirement!
added to an already severe backlog of unmet needi
ir Israel which are UJA's biggest set of problem
today.
Nor must we forget the more than 200.000 Jen |
in 25 other countries who look to UJA for help is j
survival and rehabilitation. These include some,
li.000 Polish Jews recently repatriated to Poland j
from the Soviet Union, some 10,000 Hungarian and
Egyptian Jews waiting hi Europe for final settle- S
ment in the VS. or other Western Hemisphert [
countries, and thousands of needy or destitute Jen
in North Africa, the Middle East, Europe and the
Far East.
Let us remember these real and vital needs u
we begin our High Holy Day observances. Let ui
remember, too. that they are part of a vast sea tf
refugee needs which are being brought to the at-
tention of the world through World Refugee Year.
We, who have experienced perhaps more strongly
than those of other groups the grief and anxiety
and torment of persecution and homelessness, Join
Continued n Pa 13 E
Mr. and Mrs. Abraham J. Maloff
and Family
117 RIVIERA DRIVE. CORAL GABLES
Extend best wishes for the coming year
to the entire Jewish Community
DAVID ROSNEft I FAMILY
of the
sterling
Hotel Pool Cabanas
Wish for all Jewry
L'SHONA TOVA TKESEVU
urcn n-*.D n:v?
TO OUR MANY FRIENDS
OUR SINCERE WISHES
lor a
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Gottesman
BEST WISHES
TO ALL MY FRIENDS
FOR A
HAPPY NEW YEAR
FRANCES
N4fff.fr
.J


October 2. 1959
tat 11-E
Observations on a Tour in the Orient
-
Continue? Iram #* *-E "
bits The physical facilities do not equal oars from
the .standpoint of chrome, steej and glass. They are
handicapped by a tack of personnel and finances.
Li m the professional aspects, they are there with
[^e best
The health problems of Japan are many; bow-
lever their medical care is excellent. Most people
lire protected by bospitaluation insurance. Tuber
Llosis >> >'-M prevalent throughout the Orient.
\ne other prevalent ailments of the population are
I ncer, hypertension and cerebral vascular acci-
dents (strokes'.
If traff"" in Tokyo is a treadmill of activity
Lnd the cars are tiny, the Japanese trains are an
Ifbsolute surprise and delight. They are extremely
Imodern. absolutely punctual as to arrivals and de-
[wrturcs. air conditioned, wide, spacious with re-
dlining seats, adequate foot rests, big picture win-
|(Ws for visualization of the countryside and cour-
Itcous attendantsa tremendously relaxing atmos-
Iphere As you nde by the beautiful countryside
liway from the teeming industrial areas of Japan,
[with characteristic Japanese thoroughness, you
head a four-page typewritten self-guided tour
[pamphlet indicating to the minute the places that
[you are passing and a short description of what
|you are seeing.
Mile after mile flashes by of lush fertile acres
of food for the 91 million people who depend on
|the farmer^ and fishermen to provide sustenance.
[Everywhere is evidence of order, efficiency and
hkill and everything from rice fields to terraced
[farm land on the sides of foothills is the evidence
[of work, persistence and artistry Occasionally one
sees Mt. Fujiama but it is nearly always surround-
|ed by haze end cloud formations.
Tour of Kyoto
We arrive in Kyoto, one of Japan's most in-
Icirnt cities, the original capital of Japan. Kyoto
[maintains many of its old beliefs, customs and
I superstitions Streets are narrow and were never
I meant for modern vehicular traffic.
Official reception follows at Kyoto University
Ifor continuation of scientific sessions with physi-
|c:ans from all over the world."
A tour; arranged of the Kyoto countryside by
I courtesy of a young Japanese physician to places
Jvhich we i rdmarily would not see. as factories
heaving brocades, shrines, temples, beauty beyond
[description One of the beautiful areas of Kyoto
[prefecture -tatei is now a park where deer are
[sacred and have been permitted freedom and pro-
Itection for centuries. For the sake of the tourists,
Ifeeding is purposely withheld until their arrival:
[then, at the sound of a born, they come running
|from all directions to be fed rice cakes.
On to Hakone National Park, the area in which
I'!' Fuji is located. We registered at the beautiful
[Fuuta hotel after climbing through the mountains
|ty bus over perilous roads. Hotel Pufeta is at the
[site of mineral springs on beautifully landscaped
[grounds the spacious rooms are named after flow-
[ers. a gracious delightful relaxing resort. The
[biths in themselves are a delight suitable for two
|people or an entire family.
Privately one need not wear any clothing.
[However, in other parts of Japan to quote Sydney
[Clark, where abundant hot mineral waters gush
[constantly into a dozen or more pools, you will find
[families honeymoon couples, .school boys and
school girls literally by the score and ail as naked
Us Adam and Eve before their fall, though their
bodies are mainly shrouded by a generous fog of
-'team and one does carry a wash cloth that may
be used"by^hTsensnWons"as a
f>g leaf." Japanese baths lished institution hi all Urge
Back to bus In
uninteresting
beautiful Ji
directors who are
business finance,
you may wish to ask a>ou*.
We are now waiting at the
Tokyo for our plane to take off far
A storm is brewing and
V. e are delayed. A torrential rant
v e cannot leave the i
hot and uncomfortable. Iiiii
will be cancelled.
We arrive in Hong Kong via Ja.
lr. the early morning hours we ran see
:nd junks in the waters. PtnaOy we arrive
Kaitak Airport of this faknlii dry We
at the Peninsula hotel, and fro
windows we can overtook the
surrounding mountains and the nuttng uanns m
the streets. The Peninsular annex, iwlad aa Eaw-
loon, is new. beautiful, irr rimrntionrd and (he ser-
vice is superb.
The British Crown Colony of Bong Kong be-
came a realty in ISO when the Chinese ceded a B
square mile area after a naval battle and defeat by
the British. In IMC Kowloon. a little over three
struare miles of mainland territory, was ceded also.
In addition, the so-cahed "New Territories" were
added in 1Mb on a 90-year lease. So that, roughly,
the Crown Colony is about 400 square aides with a
population of about three million. Previous In
World War II there were roughly one nuBaan Chi-
nese and English in Hong Kong.
China took over, another two nun
refugees practically tripled the population.
These refugees can be seen bring in dkre pov-
erty in shim areas on the sides of mountains.
About 130.000 persons live packed hke sardines on
boats 'in a floating slum in the Harbor of Aber-
deen on Hong Kong Island." They say that these
people live and die on the boats, living in fairly
1-rge families and subsisting as best they can. The
British Crown Colony is making every effort to
aljeviate the circumstances by housing projects.
The problem, however, is tremendous. Of the three
million people, about 20.000 are British and other
Europeans, and about 3.000 are Americans.
Elaborate Hem* Boats
The Harbor of Hong Kong is one of the mast
beautiful in the world. Hong Kong is a free port
ind could easily be overrun by the Communists,
since there* is practically no defense. However.
they choose to leave it in status quo bt iam it is
n outlet for their goods, and they can obtain cur-
rency and materials from all other parts of the
world through this port. The Bank of Co
China is in a very imposing building in the
town business section, as well as banks
ing all other nations. As a bmhwit center, of
course, it is worldwide in scope and repuoatwe.
The shopping that everyone looks forward to in
coming to Hong Kong is everything that one hears
about it; the finest fabrics, jewels, clothing, gifts
from all over the world can be bought here at a
p-ice that is still much lower than anywhere else.
The highest part of Hong Kong is the Peak
which is about 1J00 feet high. It is here that yon
find the gorgeous homes and the Consul General's
headquarters atop one of the peaks.
Floating restaurants of Aberdeen Bay must net
Continued on Pan* IS-E
THE OPERA GUILD
OF
GREATER MIAMI
afl an
ARTURO Dt FR.BPP1
SUmi HHEDLIND
*
WEH THCR RELATIVES AND FRIENDS
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
cTifriiiifCia/fi^
SfeeJ Die Earravcrf Stwtmmtrj
WetUM* Iw/Hattomi Ut Mif zym invrfof
FRED K. SHOCHET
JAMES I. HILL
116 R.e.6tfc street
SHIRLEY BARNES
BILL APTE
Ft 3-4434
New Year Greetings to All
| OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Chris' Beaaty
Salon
BEAUTIFUL HAIR STYLING
1672 ALTON ROAD
MIAMI BEACH
Poone IE 8-1912
Mr. and Mrs. Lanrelli
PASSOVER
GREETINGS TO ALL
VER0 BEACH
ASSOCIATE, WC
*l IfT41I
UTMU
bte
* MOT*
v HOLIDAY GREETINGS from
THE WILLIAM J. WtNS
IMTERHATIOMAL DETECTIVE AGENCY,
-coaunm omcTnrf soviet-
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S ? 49 M ft #. r e e f ? 4J .
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WTYJ Channel 4 television station
and WOMETCO THEATRES
tIB SURF ROSETTA
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fro* fist Ism 0, f'tm Sfots


Page 12-F
***aT. October
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fi^d ** human bsas*ar-w*ew-eaMwkrs, we ee-
not expect oar moral standards to rise aad toe
world to become a happier plate to live io.
la all generations people asked whether his-
tory siast follow the pattern of thousands of years
and man must destroy bis brother-man in the most
untold manner. So long as man believed that he
had no control over the cataclysms which robbed
bim of life and happiness, there was no hope for
change. Man's outlook on this question today is
changing. He is sensing more and more that change
is possible and that war can be avoided providing
it is so desired by all mankind.
Beginnings towards this objective were made
with the creation of the World Court the League
of Nations, and furthered by the United Nations.
Weak as the League proved to be. and despite the
ineffectiveness of the OX, nevertheless the for-
mation of such'bodies espressos man's hope and
" desire for the building of one united world.
Arnold 1. Toynbee in his book "Civilization on
Trial," asks and answers the following question:
"What will the future historian single out as the
salient event of our time?" Not wars, revolution,
famines, gluts, slumps, massacres, political and
economic events the happenings which make
headlinesbut deep, slower movements in the end
make history. The impact of Western civilization
upon all other societies, says Toynbee. is what
future historians win say was the greatest event of
the Twentieth Century. The reason why this will
be evaluated as the epoch-making event of our
age. historians will say, is because this encounter
of civilizations was the first step towards the uni-
fication of mankind into one single society. In the
year 2050 people will have to strain their imagina-
tion to view the world split up as we know it at the
present. The historians of the future will also say,
remarks Toynbee. that the unification of the world
jo the Twentieth Century was accomplished not
by mechanics or by war, bat by religion.
We of the Twentieth Century who see the
weak hold religion has on mankind cannot help
but wonder boor religion will accomplish this mir-
acle wf unity.
Yet, when we differentiate between conven-
tional and purs religion, then Tsynbee's dream
which also the heps f the world, does not ap-
peer far fetched. ^
Conventional religion centers around the rit-
ual, doctrine, theology. Pure religion is found in
Abo Stark (center), president oj the Citrl
Council of New York, assists officials of the. I
Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregation,
of America plan a Youth Torah Pilgrim. I
mage during the summer of the outran*, I
Hebrew Year 5719. Left is Harold fc>xe?|
UOJA Youth Commission chainr.cn. Rial*!
is Rabbi Jacob Sodden, director of the Nq.1
tional Conference of Synagogue Youth. "Sl
long as there is a spark of religion in th
heart of man which can be solicited sort
high purposes ... a united world will conn
through man's best in him .
the heart of man. So long as there is
religion in the heart of man which can be iu
into flames and which can be solicited for U.
Purposes, we can believe won Toynbee that
united world will come through man's be- in
which is his religious
In ushering in the New Year, we hope i
pray that oat of the darkness in which we are i
engulfed will come light; oat of the chaos
eenfusiea will come order, clarity of visioa
Pwpose; out of a troken-up world will come*
united world, and a brotherhood of mas uc.iea i
der one God.
Israel at the United Nations During 5719
Continued from Page 6-E
common ground, and Israel has made excellent use
of this establishment.
What is ahead? The 14th session of the UN
General Assembly, under way now. has an agenda
which is again devoid of any itme, except for the
Arb refugee issue, directly concerning Israel But
the Israel issue is here, the Israeli-Arab tensions
are here.
Observers Confide*
Mrs. Heir, heading her country's delegation in
the early weeks of the Assembly, was prepared to
bring before the Assembry-potslbty even before
the Security Councilnot only the Inge Toft issue
but, in general, the United Arab Republic's recal-
citrant attitude regarding Israels right to receive
nd to send goods through the Sues CanaL ,
debate on that issue was assured before the
sembly convened.
In non-public talks, Mrs. Heir was prepared L.
continue tightening the contacts here which htfl
Foreign Ministry has so skilfully established withl
many nations. Once again, most of Israels deannpj
win take place outside the spotlight of the cos-1
ference chambers or Assembly debate. But then
are many matters for Israel to watch, many pit-
falls to avoid, many dangers to counteract L*4|
of public debate is not always, not necessarily, t
be equated with lack of problems.
But. looking back at 5719, and upon the yew
preceding, noting Israel's vast progress on tW
diplomatic front, observers here are confides*
that, once again, in 5720, Israel will handle its is
temational^ affairs with skill, andin the long na[
with success.
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[gay, October 2. 19S9
Page 13-E
A Visit to the Falasha World of Ethiopia
Continued from 4-C
yjll, in the modem Jewish suburb of Rehavia
BpoffTci.i' publication issued a few weeks ago
ths Ethiopian government on 'The Ethiopian
Lrth" begins with the following introduction:
, the time of the meeting between their
, 0f Sheba and King Solomon about 1.600 B.C.,
, jthiop.ar.s. like other ancient peoples, were
ns The son born to the Queen of Sheba
I Solomon. Meoelik I. founded the dynasty still
jag today The Queen of Sheba and her son
_aced into their kingdom, later known as the
tjom of Axum. the faith of the God of Israel
EhUsted until the adoption of Christianity, and
bjcfa was strengthened by Jewish immigration at
time of Nebuchadnezzar's persecutions. The
tie tribe jf the Falashas dates from that
A Dirfeveece an Doiwiifiees
It is of ^niticance that the official publica-
_and the Ethiopians in generaldifferentiate
(expression "Jew*" which they use in reference
| the people who fled from Palestine, and "Ju-
lie" used in r-ference to the Falashas. whom they
nsider as one of the numerous indigenous Ethi-
pian tribe- > rr.Jar opinion is held by some out-
landing scientists who behove that the Falashas
te a tribe >:' Ethiopians, who either by their own
olition or luse of lack of contact with the
bain frcar- : Ethiopian life in the fourth cen-
y, did not lijot Christianity.
The quest whether the Falashas are Jews
i the ethnic sense of the word is of significance
connect ith the problem of their right to
nigrale to Israel and Israel's duty to tuppoit
jut right. I'.ler Israel's "Law of Return" every
lew has the right to come to Israel, and it is one
I the card.r.... Jxats of Israel's "raison d'etre* to
Irotect tab r
The question is a Yery far-reaching one. be-
kuse of the complex implication of a positive or
Jegative ar- ier both on Israel's social structure
pd on the ..-;. conception of Judaism and the
nity of the .-h people. It was. however, never
lie subject :' i-y fundamental debate either in
Irael or Nevertheless, the Department
br Religip'-- Education hi the Diaspora of the
pish Ager. in Jerusalem started some acuvi-
les an, asaas which, far from offering
py solutior. rather complicated the entire prob-
11.
The Dep;-aieot took several talented
ien from an ing the Falashas,
Iyear to an Or.hodox n fill mini
purned them to Ethiopia to become teachers.
he young men inevitably faced a tragic spirituaf
nsis: The Ethioaimi Government would
lelcomed then as teachers in the general
Tonal systerr or else they could have ptiformed
I most welcome role even among the Falashas,
Jving them a general education of which they are
such d.re need. Howiutr. the Department in-
ttrinated them with the idea that
1 bring the word of the Lord- to
|io ult-mately will be taken to the Land of Israel
iwmething which the Israel Government has
w decided and the Ethiopian Govern lint
*tt agreed to.
A Goad Owed
The Ethiopian Goverameat, m her effort tr
?e a modern cation out at the various tnbes of
' Wntrj. xi%ts a struggle against aay i
tend to perpetuate the existing
erefore apy particularist activities
> under-core the separateness of the Falashas at
HoMwy Greet,ft U 0m Mtwy fmmit
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6*65 N.W. 36* Aftmt MmmNES-0411
Sen. and Mrs. Herbert H. Lehman (second
and third from left), on recent tour in Israel,
shown wishing the new ORT vacationed
center at Tel Avtv. "His a mast Velcorne
development that an ORT delegation ham
SwitsoiWirwi which recently" nsstod Ethiopia
has uegutiuted the oponimj of an OH I
school under those principles."
If t. sown
(inriKi
HOND0N MARINE ENGINES, MC
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create mischief
d ases teachers
in Egypt as
therefore op-
aJso aawelceme. They are
if they are conducted by
trained abroad by religious
Nasser of Egypt is trying to
sicong Ethiopia's Ma
trained
of has
posed to
Thus
among the Falnshas
favorable effect on the
taoas between Israel and
The only conceivable Jewish activity for the
Falashasthe one that would presumably receive
Jewish or Israel mgasiiaioni to epea schools for
general and particularly for pent*iimail educa-
tion in areas where there is a large percentage of
Falashas. These schools, however, would have to
be open for young people of all
not for Falashas. and no particul
triaation could take place there,
der similar cosuhtioas.
F'hiopia by various Christian
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Ba resign after tkree fail (eras, ke said.-
Where the JNF Freedom Forest
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giaat shovels sweep away tke heap* of rock dyna-
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ing oat tke driving lane. Tkis JNF gang represents
a real -mothering of exiles." tbe stoat, bearded
Kurds with fringed headcJetbs wrapped around
their shaven dulls, dark fiery-eyed Moroccans and
tbe blond Jew from Poland who came to Israel
enfy a few months ago, but who already speak*
Hebrew well enough.
We met tbe foreman of the group: a veteran
JNF worker in this region, who joined us in the
car In Shlomo Shalom you see tbe prototype of
t/te young IsfSaB IriL broad-set. smiling and self-
assuredthe "tembel" hat cocked cheerfully on
bis thick forelock. Tbe fact is that Shlomo hails
from Turns and it took him exactly ten years to
become the "sabra" be is today. He Uves with his
wife and young daughter in the nearby village of
Rsnflfan. He is enthusiastic about his work and
readily gives any information you want. See what
progress has been made during one year?
We continued on past Keve: the remnant of a 1
itadel is watching ovar oar new read jut
as u kept vigil over tbe ancient highway which ru
through this same vale. It is here that Jewish Nt
tional Fund workers recently discovered gran
niches, sacropaagae. and evea banes in one of Da
many caves, similar to those of Jewish placet of
tbe Talmadic erawhich may well be proof that
Jewish life continued here even after the Betkar |
disaster.
As our joamey through the "Freedom Forest"
area ended we could see tbe village of Mevo Betir, I
the approaches of Bethar" which, thanks to the
Jewish National Fund's reclamation and affores-
tation in the region, has been greatly enlarged. T
tbe left another JNF road branches off. running in
a southwesterly direction along the border through
the Adullam area. The "Freedom Forest" will
reach deep into this area, leaving not an inch of
land unused or wasted. The Hills of Judea once
more become what they were in Israels ancient
pastclosely settled and enjoying the greenery |
woods and copses, a "land of milk and honey."
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Lay. October 2.1959
"kmistnnrHiar
Page 15-E
Observations on a Tour in the Orient
overlooked. These are fantastic and elaborate
& boats which are two-story restaurants. To get
toem you have to go through the crowded wa-
You are transported by water taxi, propelled
^omen who are highly skillful in manipulating
Desc small boats and avoiding collisions with each
Lher The tremendous traffic on this water is be-
ond description.
On to Manila. A superb three-hour flight on a
Vueount. we are enroute to Manila. In a newspaper
Ljgtributed on the plane, originating from Manila,
saw an announcement regarding Yom Kippur
ervices at a Temple in Manila.
We arrived at Manila Airport, the crossroads
of the world. Here planes come in from all over
lEurope and Asia, North and South America, the
outh Pacific. Australia and New Zealand. We are
Falten by bus to check in at the Manila hotel, front-
ling on a large park and the bay.
Holy Day Services
We attended Rosh Hashona evening services
lit the Tokyo Jewish Community Center. It was a
Ivery gratifying experience. Services were con-
Iducted by Rabbi Jacobs, newly arrived from Eng-
land, having been at the Center only one week.
[service.- were conducted in English in an Orthodox
[manner; however, men and women were seated
[together. Watching the congregation, we saw a
|mixture of many types of responses to the serv-
ices. A great majority of the people were former
[refugees from Europe. Russia and now China. The
[Tokyo Jewish community purchased a baronial
|c [there is a country club, including a swimming
Ipool. in addition to the community center.
This makes it possible for the Jewish commu-
nity to have all its activities, both religious and
Inicial. in one place .It seemed to be a well-run
[and succes-ful enterprise. Following the services,
|e attended the Oneg Shabbbat for the new rabbi.
[it was a delightful experience because we had an
[opportunity to talk to many of the people and were
[surprised to tind three Japanese in the congrega-
Itionone later proved to be a professor of Euro-
Ipean history ;n one of the Tokyo universities, who
I was interested in Judaism from the standpoint of
|European history.
Another Japanese was a young student who
Ihad received a fellowship Xo study in Israel and
|as getting some background of Jewish life before
liming his country. The third one was a Japanese
I bride of a young Jewish man. Following the Oneg
[Shabbat. we had dinner in the country chw see-
Ition. met a lot of people who were enjoying the
[evening dinner of delicacies found in any Jewish
[home, but served by Japanese waiters.
On Yum Kippur Eve, we attended services at
I Temple Eemil in Manila. Again, the services were
I rather baic responses, but mainly Orthodox. They
lhave no rabbi. The services were conducted by a
|Bal Tephila.
The Tokyo Jewish Center was originally or-
ganized by civilian employees of the United States
[Government Services were conducted by chap-
Plains from the Armed Forces. Chaplain Rosen
jierved for two or three years during the war pe-
riod Also. Chaplain Rosen tutored Crown Prince
lAkihito. who has recently married a commoner
Iwide. m the Jewish religion and customs, cere-
iKonies and in the Hebrew language. There was
lome rumor that he would convert to Judaism;
[however, that has not occurred.
Chaplain Rosen also taught at the Tokyo Uni-
versity and attempted to bring before the Japanese
Building in the State of Israel The
Hills of Judea once more become what they
were in Israel's ancient past .
people something of the principles of Judaism and
the Jewish faith. Recently, an international con-
ference of social workers was held in Tokyo, and
was attended by the Ambassador of Israel to
Tokyo among others. The Jewish chaplains and the
Jewish Welfare Board gave of themselves to bet-
ter relations between peoples of all groups and the
Japanese people.
Som Jewish Background
Rabbi Nathan Witkin, field representativve of
the National Jewish Welfare Board, Armed Serv-
ices Division. Carribean Command of all United
States in Bases in Panama and Central and South
America, with headquarters at Balboa in the Pan-
ama Canal Zone, was kind enough to give us some
additional background on the Jews in the Orient.
He stated that during Solomon's reign there was
an active merchant marine which carried on com-
merce with India and China and possibly with
Japan. During World War II, there were several
thousand Jewish refugees in Shanghai, many of
whom went to Tokyo. Previous to this, many peo-
ple had left Siberia, and there was a flourishing
Jewish community in Harbin, Manchuria before
and after World War I. Following the Rosso-Japa-
nese war, the Jewish community in Shanghai was
very prosperous.
- In the Philippines the Jewish synagogue in
Manila was destroyed, and the servicemen who
v-ere on duty there raised the money at the nsjsert
of Chaplain Morris Adler, of Detroit, a former Jew-
ish chaplain of Gen. Krueger's Sixth Army. He
spark-plugged the rebuilding of a new synagogue.
Chaplain Robert Kahn. of Houston. Tex., a Reform
rabbi, was chaplain and went to New Guinea and
the Philippines with the Sixth Army.
Representative Netiorg, of the Jewish Welfare
Board, who lived in Manila from 1917 op to and in-
cluding World War II, was interned at Santo
Tomas University. He refused repatriation until
after the war and until all the prisoners were
evacuated cud repatriated.
After tk* Communists took ever Shanghai,
many white Russians came to the Ptiilippines.
2mong tbem many Jews. Temple Emil in Manila
has about 300 people in the congregation.
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Uoppvi..
NEW YEAR



he Biblical Current In Israel's Art
]fewislh Floridian
Miami, Florida, Friday. October 2. 1959
Section F
ynbal: Voice of the Lamentation of the Deserts Expanse
By SARA LEVITANAt
Ten years ago a group of young men and
women of Yemenite origin met in a small hall in
north Tel Aw. They themselves weren't clear
abaut what they wanted. Should they form a
theatre or dance group? Should they restrict
themselves to Yemenite folklore or should they be
an Israeli group made up members of Oriental
background?
One thing was certain: that there was a great
longing for expression. The Yemenite Jews have
a rich store of experience and folklore and there
w" no need to go looking for material. We began
t sing and to dance. But even from the beginning
11 was clear to us that our Yemenite sources alone
wauld not be sufficient. Our aim was the creation
of a permanent professional group, and not the
occasional union of people who are preparing one
or two programs. What course then should we
take?
The story of the development of Inbal cannot
be told in a few words. Our ideas berime clearer
to us as we worked. Little by little, step aiter
step, the project developed, the repertory grew and
now three currents can be ditlrngmihtd in the
work of 4* comply:
The Yemenite current, kneed upon the tra-
dition and folklore of the Yemenites. This trend
also includes original songs and stylized Yemenite
movement.
The Biblical current, freely-shaped works
on subjects taken from the Bible. Here, also, the
movement is chiefly Yemenite, but it is augmen-
ted by a tendency to broaden and enrich the more
meet and to make it express the drama.
The Israeli current. The spiritual tension
in the building of the new Israel naturally influ-
ences every Israeli artist who shares the life of
his nation. The feeling for the old-new landscape,
the joy of redeeming the land and the desert, and
the struggle for existence all these supply a rich
of material.
Ten years ago the whole project seemed a
daring Jung. Tbe'pupib had never studied danc-
ing or acting. All came from religious finalise,
where the theatre is synonymous with idleness, or
wan profligacy. The teacher herself was not over-
en Pa
1W*




, October 2. 1959
+Jewish Tlcrldfori
Page W
|est Reading Fare During the Past Year
By HAROLD U. RIBALOW
Instead of attempting to survey and list. wTln-
|ie compass of a short article, every good and
ortant Jewish book of the year, I think it may
|,o more useful and interesting if I were to
Vs the books of this past year which remain on
[shelves for future reading; titles I do not plan
fend or give up. Books, in a word, which I ex-
to keep and return to. This, to me, is the
si way of judging the value of a man's work.
J I return to it? And if so, with spiritual profit?
[ink the books which followissued during the
yearfit this category. So don't be angry
me if your own favorite isn't here. If, after a
Ljy year of reading of volumes which one must
(for review purposes or other professional
Lonsi, these titles stand out, 1 am prepared to
(id behind them, a year or two or three years
First, I should like to begin by recalling that
nard Malamud's collection of short stories,
L> Magic Barrel" (Farrar, Straus and Cudahy),
|ed a year ago, was the winner of the National
Award, which makes it, in the eyes of the
fcor critics of contemporary American letters,
[finest creative writing of the year. I am in
ty agreement, especially since one of the tales
Deluded in my own latest anthology of American-
fcish short stories, called "The Chosen" (Abel-
ISchuman). Mr. Malamud now ranks with
erica's top writers, and it is nice to see that a
can select deeply Jewish materials, commit
isclf artistically to issues of genuine Jewish con-
d, and yet win the plaudits of the critics. I
only wish that his commercial success will
He day equal the fanfare he receives from those
professional Job it is to recognize writing
elience.
Two books have dominated the best-seller lists
past year, both by Jews and about Jews. They
re been talked about, written about and read
Idly and with enormous interest. In most cases,
earlier era and the precise blend of nostalgia and
shrewdness, with a pinch of humor, have won for
Harry Golden a newly-born reputation as an Amer-
ican sage.
It Moves People
As for the Uris novel, as everyone must know
(it has sold far more than a quarter of a million
HARRY GOLDIM
. aetfelfie
ch volumes do not outlast a season. But both of
ese will do better and will deserve to. They are
^rry Golden's "Only in America" (World), and
on Uris' "Exodus" (Doubleday). The Golden
ok is a collection of pieces, long and short, on
ly matters which intrigue the editor of the
outhern Israelite." It happens he is a man oi
^61 knowledge and a light touch. Much of his
aterial concerns the Jews of the East Side of-an
i
t
If 0* UIIS
. "leeser"
copies and will soon become a major motion pic-
ture), it is about Israel, the Jewish people and how
in our own time a Jewish State was brought into
being. The fact that it is written in journalese and
contains whole hunks of undigested ristory and is
not "literary" hasn't meant a thing to the Amer-
ican public. It has "punch" and impact. It has
been of enormous influence in revealing to non-
Jews and Jews alike, that the people of Israel have
accomplished miracles during the past ten years
and it contains elements of all Jewish tragedies
and victories of the past decade as well. Mr. Uns
has not been afraid of the "big picture." He has
tried to put it all down on paper, to say it all, with-
out worrying about the emotionalism of his work.
The result has been a "sleeper," a book no one
really expected to go far but one which is a little
like "Uncle Tom's Cabin." Maybe it isn't litera-
ture with a capital "L" but, by God, it moves peo-
ple, makes them weep and react. This in itself
is a major thing. '
We cannot overlook Jerome Weidman's "The
Enemy Camp" (Random House) which was a Book-
of-the-Month Club selection and which is about
Jewish-Gentile relationships in the United States.
Mr. Weidman, who used to write with acidity, has
become a trifle more mellow. In this new book he
manages to demonstrate his story-telling skills.
More than that, however, he also offers insights
into anti-Gentilism. Some critics and readers
thought that Mr. Weidman overplayed his hand
and exaggerated. Perhaps so. Still, his description
of the Jew who marries a Gentile and lives in "the
enemy camp," has its own artistic validity and
will be read-past its year of publication for sociol-
ogical as well as artistic reasons. I
There are other important novels of Jewish
interest, content or approach which deserve spe-
cial note and which, I know, will remain on my
shelves for years to come, to be picked up, perused
and re-read. Foremost among them is Charles
Continued on Page 12-F
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r
fcy.Oc
October 2. 1959
*Jewlsttflbr*09n
Page 5-F
I
hould Lohengrin be Played at Weddings?
By HAUY SUftONHOFR
tecttif.y r atte'naeO i~*ynagogue wedding. As
procession started down the aUle the organ
Ld the bridal ohorvt from Lohengrin. Richard
ner> music struck roe in the face. I felt out-
id a< if someone insulted me. The revulsion*
(rienced on seeing Dachu and Bergeo-Betsen
e back With Wagner's music, I imagined the
am-, the moans, the dying gasps at the crema-
[S.
Pitting next to a bright young fellow I re-
fed: Do they have to play Wagner's music at
[wish weddingand in a Temple?" The young
[looked at me condescendingly and said: "Why
| You want music to be chauvinistic?" I an-
led "But that is exactly what Richard Wag-
's music is. Did you ever read his pamphlet
iaism in Music?'" Evidently he did not like my
[. I am not interested in Jewish propaganda."
fas now my turn to be withering. "I suppose
[ would also class 'Mein Kampf as Jewish
Laganda." Obviously I was wasting my time,
des. the ceremony ended with Mendelssohn's
ding March. I did take a final fling. "You
iws seem to know everything except about
ers Jewish."
[The intellectual snob's approval of Wagner's
lie at a Jewish wedding is by no means excep-
[t\. It is shared by artists and rabbis, by refu-
and professors. How many Jews ever heard
Wagner's pernicious essay? Or know about his
lous anti-Semitism? Are they aware that the
egade Englishman, Houston Stewart Chamber-
married Wagner's daughter? This arch anti-
lite's "Foundation of the Nineteenth Century"
ame a Bible to the Naxis. Was it merely acci-
that Wagner's daughter-in-law, the widow
jlis son Siegfried, was among the first in the art
Kd to back Adokph Hitler? It was her prestige
[owner of Wagner's Music Drama Theatre at
rreuth that enabled Shikelgruber to meet and
|uence the German intelligentsia.
He Use* Jews
| Wagner's anti-Semitic writings were especial-
Vicious. I'util the middle of the 19th century the
were singularly free of Judeophobia. Any
sible person might ask what has music to do
race-hatred? But such tolerance was changed
[Richard Wagner, who incidentally, is suspected
(prtttty strong evidence, to be the son of Ludwig
r, an actor of Jewish descent who became his
i-father. The chief of police, Karl Friedrich
Jgner. and Johanna were estranged for good at
time Richard was born.
Unquestionably, Richard Wagner was one of
j great musical geniuses of all time. Yet he
old be spiteful, envious and ungrateful. He
jver believed in paying an honest debt. He
bught nothing of seducing the wives of his best
lends, especially ofi those who trusted and helped
n. When Wagner started his career, the out-
knding names in music were Mendelssohn,
iycrbeer. Halevy, Offenbach and others. They
Ippened to be Jews. When Wagner saw these mu-
lians successful and idolised while he struggled
] poverty to gain recognition, he decided to get
|en for this neglect. In" the tradition of Haman,
took revenge, not on his competitors alone but
the entire Jewish people.
H.'tm Simonhoff's is a familiar byline to rend-
mrs of The Jewish Floridian where, for many years.
\l umn, "I'll Say." appeared regularly. He it
Islso author of a number of volume* on Jews noted
| HAW SIMONHOff
. twiTI$kt ef haft
Wagner's vicious pamphlet, "Judaism in Music,"
became a textbook for anti-Semites, not only in
Germany but throughout Europe. And as he
emerged from obscurity to international fame this
venomous tract was taken more and more seri-
ously. It established Richard Wagner as the anti-
Jewish Pope, the godfather of Nazism. The cen-
tral theme of his creed is that Jews as an alien
race cannot possibly comprehend the German
soul. Since he held that people think with their
blood, a Jewish artist could not express or inter-
pret the Germanic spirit. Thus, if he composes
music he introduces an alien element which cor-
rup8 the pure fountainhead of Teutonic Kultur.
It follows quite logically that all music written by
Jewish composers must be torn root and branch
out of German art. This poisonous germ grew into
a catalysis that drove the Nazis to bum musical
works by Jewish composers and to far more crim-
inal excesses. Wagner's dream was symbolically
realized with the destruction of Felix Mendels-
sohn's marble statue at Dusseldorf.
Yet Wagner never hesitated to welcome Jew-
ish assistance in popularizing his music dramas.
The anti-Semite is seldom a wholesome or consist-
ent person. This becomes apparent when, in spite
of his anti-Semitic ravings. Wagner utilized the
talents of Herman Levi to conduct the international
premiere of Parsifal at Beyrouth, an historical
event of high magnitude in the musical world. But
his subsconscious wishes were completely fulfilled
when Jewish singers, conductors, violinists, pian-
ists, and composers were either banished or mur-
dered in concentration camps.
Wagner's Judeophobia did not stop with mu-
sic. He embraced racism in all its aspects. Jews
became the demons exploiting "the adorable and
beautiful Germans" as described by his "Meister-
singer" who dogmatized that by controlling the
banks and the press Jews dominated the entire
German life. But he insisted that there is some-
thing racially mystical about the German language
which Jews could never hope to acquire. In the
face of Heinrich Heine's exquisite handling of the
language in poetry and prose, Wagner argued that
Jews could never feel, understand or create in
Continued on Pago 15-F
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Lincoln and Herzl: A Study in Similarity
B, OR. MJtIAMK, FREUNO .
In May. 1880. the moeth Abraham Lincoln was
nominated for the Presidency of the United States.
a child was born is the Asstro-Hunganan city of
Budapest. That child. Theodor Herzl. was destined
to become the father of modern Zionism, whose
sham ion with the situation of his fellow Jews and
whose compulsive desire to norm aloe their status
was to bring about the reemergence of Israel as
a sovereign state. The centennial of both events
will be marked in May. I960
Lincoln and Herzl assumed the responsibility
of liberating human beings from the tyranny of
bigotry and prejudice as their mission in life
.Neither survived to see the fruits of his labor. Yet
each is enshrined is history and revered today
despite the fact that during their lifetime they
were controversial figures. They had to endure
stinging criticisms uttered is the best of passion
and the honor they enjoyed was "not quite free
from ridicule."
Herzl was the first man since Biblical times
who became a national Jewish hero. The Jews
chose Herzl because it was he who reawakened in
the contemporary world Jewish community a na-
tional consciousness at a time when the Jewish
people had sunk into the depths of despair undei
the degradation and opprobrium of their anti-
Semitic oppressors. The Jews accepted Herzl as
a guiding lodestar because he gave new life to the
ancient hope within their breast and gave concrete
direction to their craving for a return to Zion. All
through their long exilein their prayers, their
books, their writingswas expressed their inner-
most spirit: "Next Year in Jerusalem." Herzl
articulated their yearning for nationhood in the
ancient homeland of Palestine.
Goiwos for Action
In the moment of Czarist pogroms and the
odious anti-Semitism which manifested itself so
acutely in the Dreyfus Trial, the Jews needed the
self-confidence Herzl was able to instill in them.
The mantle of Moses seemed to fall upon him and
he offered surcease to Jewish sufferings and Jew-
ish longings through the centuries. In his person-
ality, through his writings, in his "Judenstadt," he
made it possible for Jews to look forward to and
to mobilize efforts for a Jewish State in the land
promised by the Lord.
The author of thi% article is
ndtitmdi prendent of Htdaxtah
f
Dt. miKIAM K. fttUND
. vision a reality
of Moses
Although Lincoln and Herzl both now below
to the ages," the issues they fought for are asriw
today as when they were first defined. Despite
Israel's establishment as an independent Jewish
State, there is still a need for the Herzlean dream
in our livesa need for believing, as he did. that
Zionism has united the scattered limbs of Jewr?
upon a national basis and that it means "the return
to Judaism even before the return to the Jewish
land." For he maintained that only by joining
forces in the perpetuation of Jewishness in a Jew
uh homeland could a Jewish nation raise itself as
an equal among nations; the very existence of a
Jewish State would militate the benefit of Jewi
wherever they may be.
Max Nordau, one of Herzl's closest colleagues,
has called bun "our Disraeli," who was endowed
with a "genius for action." In the eight years prior
to his untimely death in 1904, Herzl had risen from
obscurity in Jewish fife to a position of unchal-
lenged leadership in the cause of Jewish national-
ism. In that period, be founded the World Zionist
Organization and instituted annual World Zionist
Congresses as a means of providing self-expression
to the political aspirations of the Jews. He organ
ized the Jewish Colonial Trust and the Anglo-
Palestine Company as the financial instrument of
the Zionist Movement. Not only did he define the
philosophy of political Zionism, he pondered and
formulated every detail of a magnificent plan for
a future Jewish Commonwealth.
As early as 1865. Herzl seems to have been pos-
sessed of the premonition that his time might be
running out. "Who knows how soon it will be
over?" he wrote. He described bis anxiety in the
words of Heine:
"I tremble
Lest I may pass away this night.
Pass away before I bring this work to a close."
Herzl was a prophet and yet a man of action.
The Herzl that reaches deepest into our hearts and
minds is Herzl the dreamer. It was his dreams
that propelled himand usto action: it was in
his dreamsin the imponderablesthat he found
substance. "Please believe me," he wrote to Baron
de Hirsch. "the political life of an entire people-
particularly when that people is scattered through-
out the entire worldcan be set in motion only
w-ith imponderables floating high in the air .
What? You do not understand imponderables?
Continued en Page 13-F
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I


Fridoy-October 2,
1959
^JenistiflcridUann
Page 7-F
Since Last Rosh Hashona in 49th State
By IRMA FINN
Anchorage, Alaska
The desire of Alaska's small Jewish population
Anchorage to identity .with their faith has been
videnced in a ieri "I" events beginning with the
Establishment of Congregation Beth Sholom less
than a vear ago.
jli,. congregation is the first and only one in
the stale. Both Sholom" has chalked up a steady
stream of achievements since it was founded last
August by Lenard Bazell, lay spiritual leader. The
croup's greatest asset appears to be enthusiasm
Lm within. This enthusiasm, however, has been
ugmenti-fl in large measure by the knowledge that
jews throughout the United States are wishing the
fledgling congregation well.
The knowledge has been evidenced in several
Wavs. A few months ago an article describing the
nns formation appeared in Jewish pub-
lications throughout the U.S. and Canada.
Following its publication Beth Sholom received
a stream of congratulatory lettersfrom house-
wives, school children, businessmen and rabbis.
Beth Sholom also received several gifts. The
first was an altar cloth from the Philip Miller
family of Lansdowne, Pa. Other gifts followed:
prayer books. Bibles, children's books, etc.
The greatest gift was a Torah. When it was
received, its arrival brought to the congregants a
mixture of sorrow and gladness.
Helping the Group
It was received here after a series of events
which began with the publication of the article
describing the formation of Beth Sholom. The
article was read by Cantor Arthur Koret of Hart-
ford. Conn., on his morning radio program.
Within an hour, residents of Hartford rallied
to help the small group get started. Donations be-
gan pouring in to Cantor Koret and within a short
time, a "Torah, Book and Prayer Fund for Alaskan
Brethren" was founded in Hartford.
One of the contributors was one Jacob Salad,
a retired Hartford clothier. He stated that his
donation was to be used solely for the purchase of_
a Torah for Beth Sholom. The Torah was ordered
ir. New York and delivered to Hartford for ship-
ment to Anchorage.
On the day the Torah was received in Hart-
ford. Mr. Salad died. His wife, however, hastened
to assure Anchorage Jewry that the Torah would
be delivered. And it was.
During a moving service on the Friday night
following the Torah's arrival in Alaska, members
of Congregation Beth Sholom mourned and said
kaddish for the 80-year-old philanthropist they had
never seen.
Until quite recently, the congregaUon has been
in a position of receiving rather than giving. It
has, however, rallied to a call for help from the
Sisters of Providence, a Catholic order.
Making Strides
A drive has recently been launched here to
build a 125-bed hospital. The present one, built to
house only 50 bed patients, is run by the Sisters of
Providence. The new hospital, a non-sectarian one,
will also be built and run by the sisters.
Congregation Beth Sholom, which has now
reached a total membership of some 40 persons,
has made a $700 pledge to the Catholic hospital.
During the year, Beth Sholom has made great
slrides. Before its formation, the Jewish commu-
nity in Anchorage was technically non-existent.
Today, thanks to the congregation, it is well or-
ganized.
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A High Holy Day service in America's 49th
state brings to these U.S. airmen a touch of
home and a link with Jewish tradition.
"Many Jews throughout Alaska are enabled
to keep up with the activities of their Alaska
brethren through a publication originated
by Chaplain Wachtfogel."
Beth Sholom has been fortunate in being able
to host distinguished visitors. One was Rabbi Ra-
phael Levine, of Congregation Dehirsh of Seattle,
who came to Anchorage to perform Beth Sholom's
Torah dedication. Another was .Rabbi Ralph Simon
of Congregation Rodfei Zedek of Chicago, 111., who
arrived in July to offer assistance.
One of Beth Sholom's visitors is a man known
the world over. A few months ago Jan Peerce, star
of the Metropolitan Opera, came to Anchorage on
a 'concert tour. On a Friday evening during his
stay here he attended services of Congregation
Beth Sholom and led the congregants in the kid-
dush chant.
Congregation Unaffitiated
During the Passover season, Beth Sholom had
a community Seder, thanks in large measure to
the Rev. Malcolm Miner, pastor of All Saints' Epis-
copal Church, who made church facilities available
for the occasion. Some 75 men, women and chil-
dren attended.
The group has already chalked up its first
confirmation. It was the Bas Mitzvah of Rayanne
Aronson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Aronson
of Anchorage, formerly of Seattle.
At present the congregation's major interest is
in the establishment of a Sunday school. To date
youngsters have attended classes held under Air
Force sponsorship. The Sunday school is directed
by Chaplain Joshua Wachtfogel, Alaska's only
Jewish chaplain.
Because military set-up often precludes full
season Sunday school, Beth Sholom has felt it nec-
essary to set up their own classes exclusive of
military help but open to all dependents of mili-
tary personnel. Ground work is being laid and it
is hoped the school will become operational late
in the fall. I
At present the congregation is unaffiliated with
either the Orthodox, Conservative or Reform
branches of Judaism and appears likely to remain
unaffiliated at least for the present.
Beth Sholom's constitution provides for affih-
Continoed on Page 11-F
Te All .
A JWesf Hmppi New Teer
W. M. "Newt" HUDSON
Yeer District #1 Cesitssle
5050 N.W. 7th AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA
TO ALl GUttJINOS
Grectrits Welters Most
VesetsMes $es feeds
BOULEVARD
GROCERY
3023 RISCAYNI IOULEVARD
MIAMI, FLORIDA
Phone FR 7-2729
HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL
Sun shim- ot Miami
Cap Mfg. Co.
All Kinds of Caps for
Men, Women, Children
467 W. FLAGLER ST.
Miami Ph. FR 14652
BEST WISHES
TO OUR
JEWISH FRIENDS
MR. and MRS.
M. N. LIPP
in Service...
FHOT
in Convenience!
V Je/iaii^SRSi
In our new home, virtually all personal and business banking services
are concentrated on the first floor... motor bank facilities accommo-
date two-way traffic and provide 12 drive-in teller windows ... and
ample free parking is available in the parking garage while you do
your banking. For complete banking service and maximum conven-
ience, look to Miami's oldest bank. The First National Bank of Miami.
FREE PARKING WHILE YOU BANK
100 Biscayne Boulevard, South
Founded in 1902
Complrtf Banking
ind I'usl Struct*
St Miblt Espalol
] !: M
1\U I LOJS
U.mk o! \li.imi
MEMBER FEKttt RESERVE SYSTEM 0ERAl DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION
ICE CREAM
DAIRYPRODUC
Extends to All Their Jewish Friends
SINCERE WISHES
FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
SEALTEST FOODS DIVISION
National Dairy Products Corporation
P.O. Box 152. Miami. Florida FR 9-6501
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
Phont HI 3-7179
Wcinl's
BEAUTY SALON
Air-Conditioned
2712 Pones ds Leon Blvd.
CORAL GABLES
Best Wishes for a Happy Now rear
WOLFIE'S EGG RANCH
REALLY FRESH! LOCAL EGGS!
1425 lvo$ Dairy Rd. (NE 205th St.) Wl 7-6200
ALSO ORTAINEO AT
WOLFirS RfSTAOtANT ALTON IttAT AARKIT
tincaln at Cellini AHea et 171*
wkVmsw? sum* rsus Ruwtn
Lmctln et Alton *
BEST WISHES FOR THE HOLIDAY SEASON ...
Air Conditioning Hooting Refrigeration JR
24-Hour Service Estimates Free
SYDCO CORPORATION
5870 S. Dixie Highway, South Miami
Mgr. Floyd R. Younkin Phone: MO 7-3663
HOLIDAY CffUTINCS .
RLIJE MARLIK FISHERIES f
D. DIEFENBACH -
NORTH MIAMI BEACH


V?
.
,
I
I
I
t.
jm extends
sincere wishes for a
HAPPY
NEW YEAR
y MIAMI
Maes. 7a aero meet 'Je
ahaw,a:iBa. Israel Ms
11 1 4V j % J 1
^v
^^ ***!&?
urg \
%57
TO
COKMDRTT
MIAMI FEDERATIOW OF MUS1CIAKS
LOCAL US, A. r. of ML
1AM TRAtTOG and WALTER TRAURJG
Be* Wiofaoj to afl thew
for a Happy Now T
Israel's ecor*aa]
MB. to a prat cttrij
safe of farad Maria, which
IM1 kot played a key role a
freedom.
occtirr^rce
Ml oMerved Ml
:'s nrririaa to pass
of the new S300 mi
of State of Israel 1
oa tae successful r*Ml
Mated m L951. aadfll
watch was MM]
oapMxi which haa
i ii ii _J tM> growft of eaerr
or Jaraefa TirToMj and
factor Mo excandan or
akey
at tbo
""M Hore. htnv-
M* aro piled up
imo pulp.
been created at the mem m
Mflioa m State of farad
1M, to provide capital fa
ooouc advance.
at sbx njaathj ago sf J
pan mi I interest
t. A minimum of S6 j
. most be smiti
farad's conurxed K
program of
lie developed
during Use *a^
achievements acre *'
MJOOhilowatt electric p* |
station at Ashdod. the aeor part dry on the Me*:*
IaraeTa
has resslted m
year. Among the
coatructioo da
mm riAt eutriats...
' MIAMI SHORES fflARMACY
f549IU.2a.Avt.
n. n Msts
MUMf MYHflMf M4K.fi
SOUTH MIAMI CMPIOYMENT AWWCY
mm i.w. m* jrwrr pfc^ M 7 M1I
A HAPPY HOLIDAY TO ALL
A. J. Wallace
7SJ2 M-E. 2nd AVENUE
*** ruL
ft S-7IM
TO ALL GREETINGS
Mr Mmeto Ceaaref TV far
Stern Electrical
Engineering:
RCA Radios Trltrlafoa
od Service
S13t 8.W. Sth STREET
Phono HI 6-6540
"The test far Usr"
With Bad Wiahoa For A
Happy Holiday
Season
Collins Glass and
Mirror Co.
MM
MIAMI BEACH
IE 1-7W7
CoffeeAn* He
NEW ELITE
RRSTAURAbTT
203 If. E. Id Avenue
AB>CojadBBoaed
"Where Friends Meet-
Home Cooking a Specialty
SPAGHETTI


hpjjdoy, October^!
*Jtwi*H9t*M*u
ItUJBJ'- 9*
ranean:
the erection c* the first textile plant in
. heart of the Negcv desert at Dimona, 25 miles
uth.a-1 of Beershebst the start of the 14S-mMe
* sh(-ba to Elath raUway, which will link iadus-
[trial and mining centera of the Negcv with Israel's
I ,or cities; the completion of a new reservoir,
Seated in the Jerusalem suburb of Bsyit VegaiL,.
I j thc expansion of the steel center at Acre\
which has a potential output of 100,000 tons of
[steel.
Port City of Elath
In the vital field of housing, a total of I800
[million ere invested in the construction of
Limosl 250,000 rooms of new housing during the
past three years. Of this sum, the government
invested I320 million, with more than a third i>f
Hese expenditures derived from Israel Bonds.
Much of the construction program is centered
in the port city of Elath, which Israel Bond dollars
are helping to transform into a major gateway *o
the countries of Asia and Africa. Israel's housing
program, which is the cornerstone of her "open
door" immigration policy, has helped make pos-
sible a growth in Elath's population from a fw
hundred to more than 5,000. In addition to finan-
cing the construction of housing in Elath, Israel
Bond money has also helped in port development
and the growth of tourism.
It is this type of intensified development,
which must be extended to settlements and vil-
lages of the Negev and other parts of the country,
that makes the new Second Development Israel
Bond Issue the most important avenue of invent
ment for Israel's economic future.
Israel is also making phenomenal advances In
agriculture. Today the country is well on the way
to becoming self-sufficient in most foodstuffs, sup^
plying over 75 percent of its own food neea'sl "
The most significant change in agricultural
production in the past few years has been the
changeover in many settlements and farms from
the growing of agricultural products for human
consumption to the production of crops for indus-
try. These include sugar beets, cotton, tobacco,
groundnuts, and others.
The total cultivated area has risen to more
than 1,000.000 acres, with nearly a third of this
under irrigation. The annual agricultural produc-
tion has risen in value from $90 million in 1951 to
$350 million in 1958, and the number of persons
gainfully employed in agriculture has increased
from 30,000 to almost 100,000.
Development of Irritation
The overall advances made in agriculture are
highlighted by an increase in agricultural exports,
which rose from $16 million in 1951 to $54 million
in 1958, while food imports only rose from $75
million to $85 million during the same period. Food
items that are being sent to foreign markets in-
clude citrus fruits, eggs, bananas, melons, vege-
table preserves, flower and vegetable seeds.
These impressive agricultural achievements
were made possible with the assistance of Israel's
"Master Plan" for the development of irrigation
and hydroelectric power. Israel hopes to complete
this master plan within the next decade, so that
2,000,000.000 cubic meters of water will be made
available annually: 85 percent for irrigation, the
remainder for domestic and industrial purposes.
Israel now utilizes 400,000,000 cubic meters of
water per year for irrigation purposes, as com-
pared with 150,000,000 cubic meters in 1951.
The master plan is comprised of various water
projects, including the new 68-inch Yarkon-Negev
pipeline, the West Galilee-Emek scheme, now near-
ing completion; the spring water development in
the Beisan Valley; the swamp clearance and irri-
gation of the Huleh area; the second Yarkon-Negev
Increased productivity of Israel's industries
and agriculture is making more of the coun-
try's products available for export. Above,
* motors are being assembled for small cars
at the Kaiser-Fraser auto assembly plant.
Below, eggs are sorted for export market.
pipeline, recently begun; the Jordan-Negcv system,
of which certain phases have been completed, and
several other plans.
At this New Year, Israel can be proud of her
progress in the field of industry and mineral ex-
ploitation. Key industrial plants throughout the
country have been strengthened by loans of Is-
rael Bond funds. Some of these enterprises include
Fertilizers and Chemicals in Haifa; the Dead Sea
Works and the Bromine Dead Sea Company, with
headquarters at Beersheba; the phosphate mines
and processing plant near Dimona; the copper
mines and refinery at Timna, and the Palestine
Electric Corporation in Jerusalem.
In addition, Israel now processes such basic
resources as iron ore, potash, oil, clay, gypsum,
margle, kaolin, glass sand and quartz. Israel
Bond dollars have played a major role in the build-
ing of the new oil pipeline from Elath to Haifa,
and are aiding in the financing of a second one
now under construction.
Improved Trade Relations
Since the Israel Bond drive was inaugurated
eight years ago, industrial employment has in-
creased by 40 percent, while industrial production
has risen in value from $400 million to $900 mil-
lion. The greatest expansion took place in the
food processing industry, textiles, clothing, metal-
lurgy and chemicals.
Israel's 25,000 factories now manufacture over
1,500 different products. Since 1951, some 700 new
enterprises were established to produce machinery
and equipment like lathes, drilling machines, weld-
ing equipment, cranes, lifts, agricultural machin-
ery and tools. About 100 other enterprises were
Continued on Pat* 15-F
GREETINGS
Palmer's Roofing Company
has carried on continuously
since 1920 thru "booms,"
"depressions" and hurri-
canes. In a great many
cases it has maintained roofs
for the same families and
estates thru two generations.
We are not "Super-rooters"
but we make every effort to
do a worthy job. We-con-
sider that when we install a
roof it is our responsibility
until it has outlived the term
of years for which the class
of roof was intended.
Sincerely yours.
ill Palmer
PHOM PR 34244
SEASON'S GREETINGS
TO ALL
SELMA
m
THOMPSON
SEASON'S BEST WISHES
TO ALL
GOWNS
BRIDAL &
EVENING WEAR
3546 Coral Way M1W
TO ALL GREETINGS .
ELLING AUTOMATIC
. SCREW MACHINE
PRODUCTS
3240 N.W. 2T0r Avenue
BEST WISHES
f or a
A PP Y 2VEW YEAH
maule
StRVING SOUTH H0RIDA
FOR OVER FOUR DECADES
5220 Biscayne Boulevard
Phone PI 1-6631
HOLIDAY GREETINGS .
PRACTICAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS
LOUIS PLOTJON
16461 W. Dixie Highway
Phone Wl 7-1421
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS.
RELATIVES AND
ACQUAINTANCES
A MOST HAPPT NEW YEAR

Mr. A Mrs.
Harry W. Fields
1434 COLLINS AVI.. MIAMI IEACH
Miir I arr
RAWATOwCOMfAMT
1M7 HX 1st A
R-s-wer
Te A A M. Hmppy New few
WEATHER-TIGHT COMPANY
ISM
1812 NORTH LE JEUNE ROAD
PHONE NE 44731


'-*
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IE
HHMNE MM CMP.
U--?J.LfK
mctLv.i-s*
2SET W2&&E *C* T2K LWB
E. C SWANSON
Hmkti Years for Jews of Canada
* 'MJtt
aaaaaaal Je> u
a i mm m
SWUMiM
ZLtJBom t 'starrjm

* **r
K^aPtaMftWaterlaterC^tac.
WATB HEATMa CCi Try
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BHOI
WIC 7C ALL
CHETS SUNOCO
P11-4*21
J* "*" r *^ has fcaea relatively
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fc*x Ht^nw-t Oaraat* fc f
mm a-Cunr ueo^ aaHaatJ ay aar haat af far
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fcATTEREt
12440 W.Bui*
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af *er af a
The way a/ life af
of their tlu
* aerer .
kappeaed la
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* CaaaaVaa Jews. Saekt aas-
* at the year
OaaMT
AMERICAN AIR TAXI, Inc.
CH**nm An CAco An ammjiamcz
P.-. Bmc* Wmimi J-J447
n-aao AH Araoa koaa
Airports
af Caudal
and lav
raiatd auhwit metta-
arcesf to Piria i
thb was accaMi
Ofr
a> the eaaaate* thai a
Caaaiaa q-
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has bees the hail
aaaat ("ana*
_jl Cattail, tai
hare beea prart*
reeew yean 1st
as the seat of al
of Te
far a Moss Happj
Wm Yaar
to Oor Many Friends cad
Hi i|imiiaini M
NAT and BOB
BERNSTEIN

HOLOMY froai the
P4ir for
f 2011 OUrs
('naanaii Systeaij
'AHfTS ..a
WALLAPER
Social Prkaa
"" **0 7-MI7
MWYEAB
JOHN B. ORR. INC.
HI U in \ 4. 4 o VST/If Quarry Bi*>u*im4>
iMS .Vf. 5llh
B^ Wiahaa To AD
f-lno Hair .M vlint
Hobday Giaate*,, to AH Our
Friands and Patrons
1057 WASHmCTOK AVIL W.5Sl IT
Miami laac. pfc. je j^,,
2M1 S.W. 374 Ara.
Coral Gofalaa
pfco>* HI ft-1217
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
PUBLIC
GAS
CO.
7200 N.W. 7th Art.
PHONE PI 7-2431
MM Fieri*
RANCHES:
Ft Loudardola
lalamorada


. October 2. 1959
*'Jewish nuridttar
Page 11-F
and of Winnipeg and the color of Western
Ln_truly fit for Todd-A-Ohave been ignored.
Without an effective "Spanish" or ''German"
,0i Jewish history in_Canada is more clearly
jjnry of East Eur6"pe"aiTfieartlana''Je'ws wiih
/tJl beginning some 80 years ago, and the true
meaningful story is the immigration (and
brought it about), the adjustment, organiza-
and creativity of this movement. Their
vemcnts have been- tremendous, if we re-
mber how small and peripheral the. community
s always been.
That this backwoods community scarcely
,en noticed on the world scene two decades ago-
mid have produced a Canadian Jewish Congress
ch has been a model of communal organization;
t it should have given forth an Abraham M.
whose primacy in the English-language
jvince of Jewish literature is as clear as his un-
estioned leadership in Canadian literature; that
Governor General's medal for literature should
ice have gone to Canadian Jewish writerswith
others as fitting candidates for future
ar"dswhile the Lamed Prise for Jewish Litera-
e has gone so often to Canadian artists that
"me mistake it for a Canadian institution; that
nada should be the home of \ts own editions of
l Siddur, of the Mishneh, of the Babylonian Tal
u,l and of the Jerusalem Talmud; that Montreal
iould be one of the largest centers of Jewish
rary reading outside Israel, and should have one
the oldest and most widespread systems of Jew-
integrated parochial schools; that the first Jew
Canada should at the time of his passing be
nominated the richest man in the British Em-
re, while today the community has at its head
r. Samuel Bronfman, whose success and munifi-
nt philanthropy have won him equal distinction
11 these characteristics give a high interest to
ladian Jewry and significance to its birthday in
nturies.
write this history. Those who are familiar with his
achievements in illuminating the facts about Can-
id lan Jewry are readying themselves for two fes-
tivities: the official bicentenary with its dinners,
-Xy .shows, proclamation and formalitiesand, in
due time, the appearance of the true fruit of the
bicentenary, the history of Canadian Jewry by
Louis Rosenberg.
Exodus of Jews
These unique aspects are accompanied by the
Jore usual features of Jewish communities in the
Worldthe community philanthropies and
bninstitutions, the magnificent new synagogues,
fe outpouring of gold and love for Israel, the
lengthening loyalties and the deepening of
Wish learning after the wave of assimilation,
ke adjustments to suburbanity. These exist in
lanaua as they do elsewhere on the continent, as
the diasporas of Africa, South America, Asia
bd the antipodes.
All of which brings to mind the theory of some
listor.ans of Judaism that there is no such thing
Is a significant history of a single modern Jewish
lommunity, but that the history of any one of
pernlet us say of California or Canadian Jewry-
f a parallel to ihat oflet us sayAustralia or
Bolivia, in each case with surprisingly few local
Itriations.
The real story is the total, single story of the
exodu> of the Jews out of the European heartland,
bi what drove them from their hearth, and of what
happened to them in their new homes. Canadian
Jewish history is a case in point, almost a clinical
base, constituting several unrelated segments on
b continental scale. The stories of the Maritimes,
W Quebec, of Ontario, of the West and of the
Pacif.c Coast are almost unconnected chapters in
the totality of Canadian history, the whole colored
ty interesting constitutional and ethnic relation-
ships n the background.
It is, therefore, interesting to anticipate the
Ibook which the very creative demographer and
sociologist Louis Rosenberg has been commission-
lea by the Canadian Jewish Congress to write.
He has been given leave of absence from his
I social and economic research for the Congress to
Hope in the Ghetto
Continued from Pago 4-F
These recent arrivals aspire to better things and
are more enterprising.
The Jewish communal aid tries to save the
youth from being submerged in the ghetto way of
life. Basically, the community authorities put their
hopes in vocational training, which here means
the. ORT.
The trade school for boys, run by ORT, trains
in skills on a European standard. Many of the in-
structors come from the Anieres Institute near
Geneva, where ORT trains a great part of its staff,
be they for its schools in Europe, Africa, Asia or
Latin America.
Young Jewish girls of Tunis car also register
for courses where they will be trained as dress-
makers, salesgirls, laboratory assistants, typists.
Two professional social workers have the task
of locating promising youngsters in the hara, to
persuade the parents to send their children to the
ORT school, sometimes offering a small stipend
for the time the youth is in training.
For the moment, economic stagnation and the
paucity of industrial enterprises prevents many
graduates of ORT from finding employment in
Tunis proper. Because of this, many are driven to
emigrate. From the suburbs of Paris or Marseilles,
where they have settled in whole colonies, they
send back a steady flow of money-order remit-
tances that keep whole families alive.
Gradually, the social level of the hara rises.
Most important, the Jews have the possibility of
spreading into the townor abroad. Thus they
escape from the ancient, stifling ghetto.
The Year in Alaska
Continued from PoflO 7-P
ation upon action by the congregants. However,
at a recent annual meeting, congregants voted
down the question of affiliation.
While Anchorage Jews are the only ones who
have their own congregation, men in the military
service throughout the state take part in services
at Army, Navy and Air Force bases. When pos-
sible, they are conducted by Chaplain Wachtfogel.
If he is needed in the Anchorage area, where he
is permanently based, the men elsewhere in the
state in the armed forces conduct their own serv-
ices.
During the Passover season, Anchorage Jews
sent them a parcel containing Passover food. They
wrote it was the first Passover in many, many
years that they had been able to celebrate the
season with the proper "kosher for Passover"
foods.
Many Jews throughout Alaska are enabled to
keep up with the activities of their Alaska breth-
len through a publication originated and edited by
Chaplain Wachtfogel.__________
TO ALL...
A MOST
HAPPY NEW YEAR
MILTON
WEISS
HAPPY HOLIDAY TO ALL
ART'S NURSERY AND
LANDSCAPE CO.
oo N.I. 7tfc St., Mloail
1mm, n 7-2551
Harvty fieMsftfe
oral* SoIovm
NEW YEAR
GREETINGS
PRINTING
ARTS
1300 N.W. 29th Street
Season's Greetings
Truly Nolen Exterminators
600 N.W. 7th Avenue, Miami FR 9-1762
1742 Alton Road, Miami Beach JE 1-3444
TO ALL GREETINGS .
DeWOLF & SONS
CONTRACTORS BUILDERS
"Quality Materials and Workmanship
Throughout the Yean"
2146 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
HI 5-2812
HOLIDAY GREETINGS .
leCile' CORSET STUDIOS
Corsets & Surgical Supports
Designed for the Individual
Made in Miami Since 1936
LIX3LE STEPHENSON
867 S.W. 1st Street
Ph. FR 4-3485
TO ALL...A
HAPPY HOLIDAY
John Slmcy
AND
COLUMBUS HOTEL
In The Heart of Miami
312 N. E. First Street
PHONE R 3-2*71
Us Ui
420 Lincoln Road
Wish All Their Many Friends
A Happy New Year
Season's Greetings ...
THOMAS J. KELLY
YOUR METROPOLITAN SHERIFF
i)
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS .
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR .
PRINCE ARTHUR
KING ARTHUR
EMBASSY
20101 N.W. 12th AVENUE
HOMES
Phone NA 4-3624
's
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR .
BANNER SUPPLY COMPANY
PLASTERiNG SUPPUEST
B. LANDERS S. FALK
2520 S.VY. 28th Lane HI 6-1634
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR
FRIENDS AND PATRONS
KEYSTONE TOURIST COURT
6307 N.E. 2nd AVENUE
MIAMI
Phone PL 4-6295
George W. Lasche
1
HOilDAX CtffTINCS TO All
TONY'S SIXTY SERVICE STATION
490 N.W. 34th STREET
Fl l-tSfJ
New Year Greetings to Our Friends and Relatives
I. ROSENGARTEN FURS
DOROTHY and HENRY ROSENGARTEN


12-F
>Jen*st>fkr**an
ITS fUM TO SHOP AT
Man's Wear
"TOM HOUDAYS Of AMYTIAW
m Mm 159 L FUGLE*
Ft 44424
Cord Umkot 310 MKAOE MAI
WW7
/r a Happy \ew
Erie F. tJmdqnint
STORK FIXTf RF.S
144*0 N.W. 26th Avwe Opo-locka, FWioo
NEW YEAR GREETINGS TO ALL
OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Fred B. Hartnet t
INSURANCE REAL ESTATE
2836 Ponce de Leon Bird. Coral Gables
SERVICE
QUALITY
GOOD WILL
"GLASS FOR EVERY PURPOSE"
Distributors Libber. Owwi. Ford Glass Co. k Insulux Class Block
1401 1*1* N.W. 7th Avonwo Phono Fit 9-0656
MIAMI M. FLORIDA
FRIENDSHIP HOUSE, IIC.
Smce 1M4
GIFT FRUTT SHIPPERS
SAM KMOWlfi, Prti.
747 LINCOLN ROAD phona JE 1-3626
It la again a Pleasure To Extend
Season'a Greetings To AD
ABE ALLENBERG
BEST WISHES FOR THE NEW YEAR
3fERl I RY MO I I I
OttANFRONT AT 180th STREET
MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA
NEW YIAM GKUimCS 10 All .
iiwin i.ivi i o\
PAM AM r00 "ODUCTJ COMPANT
4621 H.W. Satfc AVENUE
Nf 4-1041
Best Reading Fare During the Past Year
r*s*F
rs tearr* nt*r! in a emu inning series, en
titled "Between Day aad Dark" lYoselorfi This
is a densely-conceived, warmly-written series of
books aboat the adjustment of a large family of
Jews to hie in the United States. As the aeries
crows more voluminous, the people move about
the country and Mr. Angoff describes and depicts
the Jew in various activities: as hniimTsiaiii. law-
yer, teacher, foreign correspondent, newspaper-
man aad worker. Each book adds to the richness
of the entire conception and the Angoff series al-
ready stands out as the most ambitious one ever
conceived by an American novelist interpreting
the Jew on the American scene.
Philip Roth's "Goodbye. Columbus" (Hough-
ton, Ififflin) is a controversial collection, including
a novella and five short stories, which I include not
as "a book I have liked" but as one which I "could
not overlook." Mr. Roth, at 26, has talent as a
writer and his work already has gained critical
acclaim. What I hold against him is that he casts
too cold an eye at the American Jew he recreates
in his books. I cai'iot expect an author to choose
"nice" Jews only, but I should like a creative
writer to reveal some sympathy for his characters.
Except for one story in bis collection ("Eli. the
Fanatic") Mr. Roth pushes pins into his victims
and the reader is liable to believe that Mr. Roth's
victimsall unlikable Jewsdeserve the pins. Per-
haps the> do. as he creates them, but, really, there
are other Jews. My complaint is that the young
Mr. Roth hasn't met them yet, or. having come
across them, has decided they aren't dramatic
enough for his typeywriter. There is an undertone
of hatred in his work. I recognize the talent that
Mr. Roth possesses, and I have been entertained by
ome of his work. I am sorry, on the other hand.
to see success come to him so quickly, or before
he has attained maturity of artistic vision. At the
moment, he is a bright boy. Not more.
Artistically Dam Stories
On to Dan Jacobseo, another young writer, but
far more mature than Mr. Roth. Mr. Jacobson is
a South African Jew and the author of a handful
of books and stories. His latest is "The Zulu and
the Zeide" (Little. Brown) an intriguing title Isn't
it? And his stories, not all Jewish (but the title
story and some others are), are artistically done
sensuous, with patches of fine prose and some
heartbreaking situations and illuminating insights
into unhappy men and women for whom the world
is too strong and demanding.
In another vein entirely, this time in autobiog-
raphical form, we are given a view of the unhappi-
ness of the life of a Hebrew poet, in Ephraim E.
Usitzky s "In the Grip of Cross-Currents" (Bloch)
This is a most powerful book and will be referred
to time and again by Jewish historians and literary
C"i!*?' r,m "l9 confldent tna future anthologists
will be culling from its painful pages for years to
CinT Jfr.' L"itZky i$ Dt*d Hebrew P**1 "vi"8
m?". ?"nS. "* "utobi<*"P>y. which carried
him into his early manhood, is full of lyricism but
stresses unhappy moments in his life in Europe as
a yeshiva student and in the United StatesTas a
young man seeking his way as a human being and
a' .artist. There are few Jewish autobiographies
which v,e with this one for pathos and StTt
U rank as a class* with the passing of the years
and any season which produces such a volume is
a rich one.
and !?#*! 2f2 **** are th* books on Israel
^nd the Zionist dream and ideal. These appear
each season and only a handful of them are worft
reading and re-reading. One of the fine ones u
Arthur Hertzbergs "The Zionist Idea (Doubleday
and Herri Press), which contains a Zionist reader
(hill of selections from basic Zionist writings, with
historical introductions to the writers and the time
in which they produce their essays and books) and
a long essay by the editor. Rabbi Hertzberg Even
if some of the leading Zionist thinkers and authors
of the past SO years are inexplicably omitted it
remains a valuable and significant work for the
specialist and the student.
Another valuable book is "The Flowering of
Modern Hebrew Literature" (Twayne) by the late
Menachem Ribalow and translated by Judah N-
dich. This volume contains essays on ten of the
finest Hebrew writers of our time, with selections
from their work, short stories, poems, essays, etc.
It is the best source book and guide book for those
who want to understand and study the Hebrew
writers who led the revival- of the Hebrew laagu-
age in Israel and in the United States.
James T. FarreU's "It Has Come to Pass"
(Herzl Press) and Horace M. Kalian's "Utopians at
Bay" (Herxl Press) as well as Mettbrd Spire's see
ond book on kibbutz life "Children of the Kibbutz"
(Harvard University Press) are basic books on the
Jewish State. Each of them, even if dated in part,
contains information, historical background and
sociological reports which one can turn to again
and again and which, if properly read and ab-
sorbed, can help us understand the problems Israel
faces. They are books, not for the year alone but
for the future.
Archaeologist as Writer
I should, at this point, like to list a few titles,
for 1 see that space is running out and some books,
not yet mentioned, cannot be entirely omitted from
a list of good books of the year, those I have read
and enjoyed and which you, too. may want to read.
They are: Rahpael Patai's "Sex and Family
in the Bible" (Doubleday), a fascinating report on
past and present, a work for the general reader as
well as the specialist. This holds equally true for
the best-selling "Rivers of the Desert" by Nelson
Glueck and published by Farrar. Straus and Cud-
ahy. a report on Dr. Glueck's archaeological ex-
plorations in Israel's NegeV. And then there are
the Biblical novels: Jean Cabrie's "Jacob" (Dut-
ton); Benjamin Siegel's "The Sword and the Prom-
ts* (Harcourt, Brace), about the time of Hadrian
Continued on Page 14-F
CKUTINCS TO ALL
frees Merry Herman t Morris Sold
BANK
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Happy Now Year to All
BEST WISHES
FOR
A
HAPPY
NEW YEAR
MR. and MRS.
HARRY SIRKIV
ffTinas
MFIEID'S CAMERA SHOP
503 LINCOLN ROA0
* Jl 1-3451
133? RISCATNE BOULEVARD
Phono FR 3-7676
Best Wishes
tor the
Holidays
WEBB
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639 N.W. 102nd Street
We Specialize in
Bargain Acreage and
Business Properties
PHONE
PL l-SKIti


Lfcy, October 2.1959
+Jewlst FIcrkHari
Inbal: Voice of the Desert's Lamentation
with
None of
Continued frem Pag* 1-F
[widened with artiatic training. She had only di-
l-rird r-rf"rm*DCC ftY*? by ff"twirf .in schools
'2 kibhntimi.-lf.d- -sev'erll WffHces
LL groups and in children's theatres.
had any conception of the dance as an art in
ll$ own right
Group Finds Encouraomonr
However, "the Lord watches over fools." Naive
we were, we sang the tonga of Yemen and the
new songs of Israel. We performed Yemenite
dmces and Israeli shepherd dances. Our very first
appear miccs, with all their unripeness, caught the
public interest especially in the worker's settle-
[wnts which felt that Inbal was near to them in
jpirii. After every appearance in* some isolated
settlement or large kibbutz the same cry was
heard: this is ours; we understand it." Here the
yoang sroup found much encouragement.
Then through the America-Israel Cultural
Foundation, sponsors of the American tours of
Inbal. tame great help. Artists like Jerome Rob-
bins and Anna Sokolow were sent to Israel to help
develop this budding enterprise. Miss Sokolow
visited Israel several times, trained the members fo
the group and laid the foundation for organized and
professional work. She helped prepare Inbal fw
the most daring of all our dreamsour first tour of
Europe and the United States and Canada in 1957.
And she returned this past summer to work with
us in preparation of our second American tour this
fall.
As a Jewish, Israeli and Oriental group, Inbal
draws from rich spiritual storehouses. The thous-
and-year-old culture of Israel, which has stood the
test of torment and shame, supplies every artist
participating in the life of his nation with innum-
erable topics. What is also important is the spir-
-/rfWWWWWWWWWWV.
w*^rf^*^^A^"WA*/A*
Page 13-F
**WWWVJ

SABA LtVI-TAHAI
. founder oho1 dir
Lincoln and Herzl
Continued from Pago 0-F
And what is religion? Bethink yourself what the
Jews have endured fpr 2,000 years for the sake of
this fantasy."
This was Herzl's language of faith, spoken with
the voice which is the voice of the Jews through
the centuries.
Today, the vision is a reality. We have seen
the advent of the State of Israela new nation
born out of Jewish idealism and faith, of Jewish
courage and tenacity, of Jewish tragedy and per-
secution. The major objective of Herzl's Basle
program has been achieved. But Herzl saw more
as the role of Jewry in the world.
In addressing the third Zionist Congress, he
declared: "The present condition of .the Jews can
lead in three directions. The first is the dumb en-
durance of humiliation and need. The second is a
fierce rebellion against a step-motherly society.
We have chosen the third way: we wish to lift
ourselves to a higher level of morality, work for
the common weal.
This is the utterance of a man who, like Lin-
coln, believed in the necessity of that "new birth
of freedom," which is so vital to all mankind. This
is a message fraught with meaning and signifi-
cance to us all. And if this be dreaming, then let
us dream with all our might.
dual content stored in every subject; the fruit of an
ancient, continuous culture. This makes the dra-
matic touch of the Jewish, Biblical or Israeli sub-
ject more poignant. For even when we come to
deal with a new Israeli subject we are imbued
with the feeling of our ancient landscape. The
figure of the modern Israeli farmer and fighter
does not fall short or its precursors in the Bible,
for the modern Israeli has also sprung up faithful
to our ancient sources.
Lamentation of Dosort
As a Jewish ethnic group whose place of exile
has remained the Orient, we have at our command
folklore which has rich ancient and Oriental traits.
It can be said of Inbal that the problems of what
to do and what material to draw on, does not even
exist. The sources, the material, the background,
and the stimulus exist in a blinding and oppressive
abundance. There is a feeling that the silence of
generations has been broken and the song burst
forth.
When Yeshayahu, Yehuda, Shoshanah or Mar-
galith sing, one can hear in their voices the lamen-
tation of the desert in its broad expanses of waste-
land, distress of the individual in the burning land-
scape of the Orient, the same intense and charm-
ing landscape which brought forth stormy prophets,
stubborn farmers and shepherds, the visionaries of
one great wide world, in which the human species
lives in brotherhood and the Lord of Justice i3
his Lord.
On such a spiritual basis almost every dance
receives a deep and symbolic meaning. Without
cutting itself off from the roots of reality, this ex-
pression rises to exalted heights.
In ten years we have created about fifteen
dance-pieces which form the basis for the tech-
nique of Inbal, five of them never before seen in
America. This is a treasure and the movements
have broadened during the years. Now it is also
beginning to be crystalized. But the act of branch-
ing out involves no diminution of strength. Cease-
lessly new movements penetrated by a generally
Oriental influence are being added to the elements
of the Yemenite dance, movement and gesture.
Yemen lies in the southern part of the Arabian
peninsula and it is near Africa and India; what
wonder then that the influence of these nearby
countries is felt in its song and dance?

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cron roto mV?
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Atlantic Television & Appliance Co.
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Phone FR 3-6449 Mr. & Mr*. Max Stern*tein & Fondly
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USE
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Good Plumbing
23 N.W. llrh Street Ph. FR 440W Miami, Fieri**



* we
+u JACKSON'S
Burons
SERVICE
INTEGRITY
QUALITY
S i c Iff/
SAVE AT JACKSOItS^rnm WWY PAT HOtf?
The Jewish Community of Puerto RjC(
frtn Pt
I*
ruOf direct**- of JWB't rhaelaa,, Bai,ii.
Ib tke pern-war yean. Rabin Abraham Arrack
-


1130 H.W. 2ft.
v. r a rr-
S4712

*
C>, ticWrf, /* aW fat,
1M Americans
The "new iauni-
of the managerial
es-
Tke infkn *oagkt
re adequate
* synagogue aad a aew
at Ike first instance from the
of Rabbi Witkhv It was tpariuj
anapert of JWB. wkick kad keld
tocetker and guided tkcai
rf a synagogue aad Comma-
kad aatil tkea keea keld 1a
aa aa office '"M'ng
HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL
I Wl 7-5717
rtfc Dode Septic Tank Co^
and Cradle Drain Tie Co.
COMPLETE SEPTIC TANI SERVICE
|f*ti Back Ho* Dfachtoa MmckLw! I.
*: 157tfc St. 1 W. Wx*
GREETINGS .
RADER and ASSOCIATES
aewms AIKWTICTS
100 Biuayr* Blvd., Sautfi, Fir,, liatiaaol M ^^
rW FR 1-3551 ^ ^
*** c*"*y pnrefcased aa old man
m tke rriMkalijJ area of San Juan, called
* Tke r.aiaaaaij tkea caked on JWB for
nead af its bunding bureau,
drew plans far a complete ahera
^tosaeet tke refisjaaas aad social require-
ntv. la Mar MB. tke Paerto
Center and Shaare Zedek
-I^T*- *** ****** Taagt>gue
by tke Saru. was dedicated. Rabbi Israel
a was iiati as first rabbi. Prom tax
CIs frosa all parts af tke island bare been
- at tke Center
{**** raaity of Puerto Rico is basic
enclave witb insufficient
class, professional aad
^Fkrb^.tatk^Same^lS
"^ Laer^.'Me y8*r business
JWBsCl program aad i. tke work of USO. He
ra a^J!!"" JWB *nd U,A fnnd "*. In
tkm ml1 fcr JWB. Hi, devo-
a^l^rir!L!lLfa,e* ""a***- There he
Harr, Herbert. JWB worker in the area.
Er, e.n*?!* ^ Hertwt' *oy < Mr. Her-
m teus n, in tke AZA in Shanghai-and he
j XES MrHerbm L ^SjlS. *
J*Bs fund raising division.
The Jewish community has had in the part a
luted Stete. Distract Attorney for Puerto Rico
and former chief justice of the Supreme CourT
Luis Sulahacher Juti~ f .k c tourt,
th. i^_Tv'.. ** ^ SuPreme Court of
the territory; Judge Adolph E. Wolf, who served
_^L^_Aaocute Justice of the Supreme
High Horjr Day planning in he Navy fa,
?onra, a examination of je^age \ and ancient JajrhA tradition. WheSeT
service, are hAd to, a few men in eJ
hundred, at a bo- city, the trodST.
y j-wi*s-,ii ^ -* *ma--
t^ I^_JaCOl> Hon"*. "o organized J
Terrtoryarerenne system; Joaeph Jacob Z\
tS!"*. "BSQ,ti,, enxineo- and builder of daat
SLifyJ"1* ** "** ""^buuons to i
coatrol of disease, attacking citrus fruits Dr n.
uam Hoffmaa, a parasitologist, who did unportaj!
reaeaTak en Ike area of tropical diseases; Dr j
Charles Weiss (auntioaed abore) whose wort W
U tke caatrol of tke tropical disease. Sprue to.
rikle duahler of tksaad,; a* toTu?\
toraaer director of tke Paa Asoencan Uniaa, *' \
beaded a Coraautrioa wkiek revised and roauial
tke law, today governing the ii.y<
In a vitally strategic area, the community j
Puerto Rico it tarrying oa in the tradition begu
ie tke eariy day, of World War U. A commune
grown to matarity ha, time to think of those wbt
need her services. Its rabbis are serving as p*.
time chaplains. Last Passover. Rabbi Gottesmu
officiated at tke Canbe Hilton at a communit/-
sponsored Seder attended by ISO servicemen ud
their families. The community is all set again far
service* and hospitality for Rank Hasbon*. In the
light of this service, who can gainsay that, througl
its partnership with JWB. tke little community bat
found its way into the mainstream of Jewish life
Years Reading Fan
tram Page 12-F
and the conflict of Jew aad Christian; and Lauren
Chinn's The Unannointed" (Crown), a vivid retell-
ing of the story of King David, through the booki
hero his Gen. Joab And, naturally, a transla-
tion of Mordecai Feierberg's Haskaiah norel
Whither?" (Abelard-Schumanl. which depicts is
strong terms the impact of modern civili/ation on
the intellectual Jews of tke European ghetto ..
Moshe Shamir's -The King of Flesh and Blood"
(Vanguard), the Hebrew novel on Alexander Yao
nai. which won the Bialik Prize in Israel some
years ago And Roger Iker's "The Sons of
Avron." a French chronicle of Jewish Me k
France.
O. M. PUSHKIN
YOUR MIAMI BEACH CHTEF BUILDING INSPECTOR
Extends Gretinga to All
SEASON'S BEST WISHES
WJEEMAN BI ILJJEKS
"HUMAH MM, ajCAW afTTM famr-
2139 .W. 7* Street
To All Our Friends and Patrons |
New Year Greeunga
BARK IN ENVELOPE
MFG. CO.
2740 S.W. 28th LANE
MIAMI
TO ALL GREETINGS
MIAMI COAL & OIL CO.
1 a^ tkam n 4r,f,
HI 3-7598
Harry Barldn
A MOST HAPPY
NEW YEAR TO ALL
Le Bon Cleaners
& Laundry
Irving Kornicks
955 S.W. tth STBEET
MR. and MRS.
L. SILVERMAN
siLvi?! 'paint
COMPANY
lilt 8. W. FIRST STREET
*' cgW AVEKUE
WttM rat in mat pairoms
ap mans
* ***rr new rcAff
LAWRENCE DRUG
StW COtAl WAY
Mr. and Airs. Larry Simkin
Wiao Their Many Friends
A Happy New Year
A
HAPPY
NEW YEAR
TO ALL
DB. and MBS.
MA*mc? J. ROSNICK
and Family
To All a Moot Happy
NEW YEAR
dwoskhv cvc
"Wallnters Distinction"
ff N. MOM AV0WC
ATUUITA BAUAS kVUMI
z..


riday
October 2. 1959
+ 3e*irkikr
Page 1W
|At the Threshold of Industrial Progress
Continued from P*9 *F
| Wl up during this period to process various
oical deposits.
The most important development of all. per-
ils the improvement in Israel's trade rela-
E'Vith other nations, which purchased more
zt $200 million of her goods and services in
^88 This figure represents increased agricul-
!,! industrial and commercial production, and
jjcatei that Israel is beginning to narrow thu
,p between her exports and imports.
By the end of 1959. Israel anticipates an iu-
Lase of some 20 percent in exports, bringing her
Uual total close to $250 million. When the Israel
Lnd drive was started eight years ago. Israel's
Exports amounted to less than $35 million per year.
This New Year. Israel can feel a sense Of satis-
faction in her economic achievements. For eco-
Lmic progress is essential to Israel, not only for
Jthe continuation of her basic development, but
Llso for the full integration of her new citizens,
Lho must be provided with homes and job oppor-
tunities
During the coming year, Israel must create
Inew areas of growth and development throughout
line country, especially in the Negev. This is es-
Isential if she is to maintain her "open door" pol-
licy, anci to complete the absorption of those who
Ihave already entered. Those who purchase State
Iof Israel Bonds during the Hebrew Year 5720 will
I help mobilize the resources necessary for the ful-
Ifillrmm of this program.
Israeli immigrant shown holding a crate of
grapefruit which will be exported to Western
Europe.
Lohengrin at Weddings
Continued from Pago 5-F
I German. Nazis mouthed this slogan until their
I gas chambers were seized by the allied forces.
Wagnerian Poison
A qood example of Wagner's virus can be
found in his four gigantic music dramas named
the "Nibclungen Ring." It opens with the three
maidens swimming in the Rhine while guarding
the golden treasure. Alberich, the "swarthy,
swampy and sulphurous" gnome, steals the hoard
and with it determines to dominate the world. (The
anti-Semite's snide charge of Jewish love of gold
and power.) The heroes of the saga are of coarse
tall, blond, strong, brave, courteous, generous and
honorable, while the brothers Alberich and Mimi
are described as "gruesome, grinled and gray,
cramped and crooked, with hanging ears stretch-
ing, bleary eyes staring." In his written instruc-
tions on the original score, Wagner directed that
the vocal delivery of the two Nibelungs should be
"the Jewish manner of speechshrill, hissing,
buzzing, a wholly foreign and arbitrary distortion
of our idiom."
The Wagnerian poison coursed through the
German nation for three-score years. It was an
ingredient in the Satanic brew that concocted the
Third Reich; it also became a factor in its de-
struction. Hitler was an admirer of Wagner. He
refused Roosevelt's terms for unconditional sur-
render, regardless of German suffering and loss
of life. It was more Wagnerian to crash the Reich
into a mighty ruin in keeping with the "Gotter-
daemerung," the twilight of the Gods.
In the last paragraph of "Judaism in Music,"
Israel Bonds are helping in the giant stride
toward economic independence through
the production of steel. At the Irgul Steel
City of Acre, molten steel is shown being
poured into molds.
Wagner addresses the Jews: "But. think you that
one thing only can redeem you from the burden
of your curse: the redemption of Ahasuerusanni-
hilation." Can psychotic hate go further? This
was carried out by Hitler in Buchenwald and
Tr'eblinka, in Auschwitz and Maidanek, in Dachau
and Bergen-Belsen.
How can Jewish parents lead their sons and
daughters to the marriage canopy in the syna-
gogue to the crashing rhythmic chords of Wag-
ner's Wedding March? ____
7&v sJC JMo~ll
v
Jjest Wishes for
&A Vo JHy Jewish friends
Best Wishes for a Hoppy Holiday .
Bird Chevrolet Oldsmobile Company
HOMESTEAD and PERRINE
WE CAN BEAT ANY DEAL!
TO All... StASON'S BEST WISHES
Key Plastering Company
on on MM WAtAirrett ttowtmutsmr
114 M.W. 42nd Ave. (leJeone Rd.) Ph. HI 8-9667
TO ALL SEASON'S GREETINGS .
FRED CASTILLO
GOOD USED CARS
"WE APPRECIATE DOING BUSINESS WITH YOU"
1016 West Flogler St. ra *
"The Best for Less"
LEE AUTO TRIM SHOP
Custom Made Sport Tope
and Seat Corsrs
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Fr Parking
2550 N. W. 34th St.
HI 5 0522
A Happy New Year to All
My Friends
D. C' Kennett
FIRE C H I E r
Miami Beach
Florida
MR. LEO CIMENT
I Nm
DIXIE PICTURE FRAME CO.
Extends New Year Greetings
to All His Friends and Patrons
394 E. 10th Court
Phone TO 5-1454
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
Phone PL 1-2924
Prescription Specialists
CENTER
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HOLIDAY GREETINGS
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Happy New Year
McMarray PrlMters
TO AU etffTIIWS
ROME MATTRESS CO., INC.
-fun WHm**~m* "Sew esd ''''
NanSseh Met Uiear
M*7 N. MIAMI AVI.
PI 1 2421
MKNN6S .
WASNU SHOP
jsr.rsrtT.swaaffAKs-,
233 NX. 34th Street ra :HHra3
~~ GREETINGS
ALBERT E. MILLER SERVICE STATION
"C A Oil L A C SPICIAIIST"
f *srf AsfeateMla Msletaeesee
370 N.W. 8th AVENUE
374 H.W. It* AVMUS ""*"',.


Pom 14-F
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ftMf. Octets 2, l959
SEE?
, PERPETUAL CM*____
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lYom Kippur By Blitz Bomb Cry
By BARBARA M. RtBAKOVB
IB the darkness of the tunnel, people moved
shitting slightly, huddling together against the
damp chill, murmuring-and falling silent. The air,
once still and heavy, trembled now with the distant
sound of whining motora. Men spoke in whispers or
not at all, and fear crouched beside them.
But above the whine, above the murmurs, a
voice rose. At the od of -the tunnel a candle -ap-
peared, held aloft. In Ks glow a man played a tiny
portable organ, finding the stops by candlelight.
Reside him walked another man, from wbom the
words and the melody came:
"I shall know no-fear .
The Lord is with me .
When the Lord is with me
Who shan stand against dm .?"
Outside the sirens wailed and the bombs fell.
In the tunnel people lifted their heads and listened
to the-1
The author it a free-lance writer whose Article*
have appeared in many American magazine*.
He Brought Courage
To the Frightened
Huddled in a Shelter
The year was 1040, the place London. The
singer was Jakob Goldstein, once Cantor of VUna,
now the beloved Hauan of London's Great Syna-
gogue, and he was singing to the greatest congre-
gation of his life, the 12,000 men and women of
England, Jew and non-Jew, who huddled together
every night in the Manor House Tube Station while
the Luftwaffe roared over London.
Life had not been easy for the Cantor since the
beginning of the war. More and more of the hard-
pressed Rabbi's duties feU on him. Daily he visited
member* of the congregation in their homes. After-
noons bo traveled from one London hospital to an-
T Jewish Floiidian
Miami, Florida, Friday. October 2, 1959
Section G
, : ,.ii" -........ i '
In precise formation, rank after rank of Israel
Army paraders swing down Haifa's main
streets. "When a bomb foil close by. the
Cantor sang louder. When the tunnel quiv-
ered, people laughed aloud and joined him
in the refrain, shouting above the roar ."
Time, Judgment Unite in New Year
By BEN MATHAN
The primary theme of the New Year is Time.
The secondary theme is Judgment.
At the conclusion of a major act or era Time
sod Judgment coincide. Such a Juncture is always
one in which disaster is omnipresent. It is also a
juncture in which the possibUity of miracle is also
omnipresent. At this juncture, ours, only a miracle
will suffice, and in this sense ours is a holy time if
only in virtue of its necessity to draw forth holy
powers. Only these can preserve it, or mitigate its
agony.
There is, after aU, the possibility that
the archangels will render themselves visible
at their stations on the four corners of the earth,
or that one of the celestial hosts will decimate
earthly dominions via the vehicle of fire. Each
nuclear explosion may represent the opening of
just one more latch in the gate of that fiery en-
trance.
It is not, however, thla order of miracle, al-
though wondrous, that our time is prepared for,
or quite requires. The miracle required must stem
from a more immediate, more blunt source, as
must its logic, and therefore its inevitability. Its
necessity must be-openly, and la this instance, uni-
versally acknowledged, That necessity cannot be
clouded by any reasoning not in keeping with plain
everyday modalities, open to all, even to children.
If it is to occur, as it must, that occurring must
hold no mysteries. Buf neither can it therefore hold
alternatives.
The inevitability of its coming is made evident
by the nature of the basic questionthe probabil-
ity of human duration now that vehicles of extinc-
tion are so plentiful. Said more coarsely: Will the
bombs fall or not' Does the human element con-
tinue or does it cease? Are there five years left?
Said even more coarsely: Is ourvtime up? Nobody
really thinks about anything else, and each man's
composure is in part resolved by the attitude
adopted to that possibUity.
Miracle of Admission
The villainy of it all is that the answers to
these questions rest in the hands that they seem to
rest in. The villainy of it aU is that the apparent
power to determine continuation or cessation of
human destiny is a power threatened to be exer-
cised on the basis of political controversy. What
Continued en Page 13-0
other, and Ms Pollsh-ar-cented English became
known in every ward and infirmary. At night he
waited, like the rest of the city, for the motors and
the bombswhenever the flames of a hit could be
seen from his window, Cantor Goldstein left his
home and, in his white clerical collar and black
suit, dodged fire engines and lorries to get to the
bombing site. Once he estimated that he saw and
.'poke to three thousand people in a single day;
ordinarily be had no time to count.
**- -*--*-*!----
One night when the raid was heavy, Cantor
Goldstein and bis wife, Tiba. took shelter in the
Manor House Station. Picking their way through
the dark, crowded tunnel, they were recognised by
a congregation member. "Reverend," a voice said,
"could you singmaybejust a litUe song?" Can-
tor Goldstein stopped. He peered into the dark.
"But everyone is asleep," he protested. The man
shook his head. "We're really not sleeping. Please,
Cantor, my wife is not taking it so well ." The
Cantor stooped down. Very softly, he began a song,
a Yiddish song, quiet and tender. His eyes grew
accustomed to the dark, and he could see the
woman raise her face, smiling. Around her, other
people stirred, sat up. The Cantor finished the
song, and rose. Instantly another voice spoke out.
"Reverendbow about'Die Sterne'?" This time
be didn't hesitate.
The next day, he found a man who could play
a portable organ by candlelight.
And so began the strangest series of Jewish
music concerts ever given. Seven nights a week
untU the blitz of London was over, Cantor Gold-
stein sang his way through the tunnel of Manor
House Station. He sang every song he knewIs-
raeli folk songs, Russian and Polish lullabies re-
membered from childhood, the Yiddish songs of
every country. He sang in Hebrew, from the lit-
urgy, in Yiddish, and in Englishbut to his sur-
prise, there were almost no requests for the latter,
even from the gentiles in the tunnel. Though they
understood few words of the Yiddish and Hebrew
songs, the sound of prayer, of faith in the future,
cf hope pouring out of sorrow needed no transla-
tion; they understoodand learned the songs well
enough to ask for favorites again and again.
While the Cantor sang, full-voiced now, the
sick, fearful silence vanished from the tunnel.
When a bomb fell close by, the Cantor sang louder.
When the tunnel quivered, people laughed aloud
and joined him in the refrains, shouting them
above the roar. When once he broke off in the mid-
dle of a song to help a young woman give birth to
a baby, the people around him rushed to give aid
and, when it was over, asked him to sing again.
He did. British newspapermen, descending into the
tunnel to hear him and report, asked when he
slept. The Cantor answered blankly that he didn't
know. He didn't need to know. He was born not
to sleep, but to sing.
Tha Service Continues
Nineteen-Forty wore on, and the Germans now
flew over London by day as well as night. Just
before Yom Kippur, the chief rabbi. Dr. Joseph
Herz, called the Cantor aside. "The Yom Kippur
service must be short. Reverend. Daven only three-
quarters of an hour. The officiating rabbi will sig-
nal you when to stop. Then go to the shelter; it is
not safe for the congregation to stay longer."
Goldstein nodded agreement. But on his way to
the bima, a delegation from the congregation
stopped him. "Cantordon't cut the service short.
Do it as you do it every year. Anyone who wants
to leave can leave." Cantor Goldstein murmured,
"But the rabbi has said ..." A member of the
congregation leaned forward. "Don't look at the
rabbi," he suggested. "Sing."
The service began. The Great Synagogue holds
seats for 1,300but that day, praying for them-
selves and their country, and for all the Jews of
Europe, 2,500 English packed it full. When an hour
had gone by, the warning siren wailed to take
cover. The Cantor's eyes searched the temple. No
one moved. He dropped his eyes before they met
the rabbi's and went on singing.
The drone of the bombers filled the air. The
anti-aircraft batteries began to fire. The thud of
bomb hits began, Ike a giant walking the earth. As
the Cantor reached Un'sane Tokef, a land mine
crashed into Tottenham, a thousand yards away.
A window shattered behind the choir upstairs.
The Cantor broke off the prayer and looked to-
ward the rabbi, but an emergency had called him
from the synagogue. The Cantor spread out his
arms and shouted above the screams and sirens
that filtered in the ruined window, "the service is
over! Go to the shelter!" A man stood up. "Please
Continued on Paps 13-0 .. _^


Pag 14-F
Pane 3-G
^jmistfhtiMmn
Frida7.0c%.
Brynwood, Greenwood and Kenwood
_ .w. ~> of rrm-atttr eei
By RABBI JOSEPH L. BAftOW
B.yuwaad sea! Gnxuaiaad are nem-public
dKC it 'BtMwstaawe sermeT the aeed* ff iewsa
iaroilies uc patntinr to tie opposite pates m Bar
arhit of knm interest. Dutwiii i* a eeantry
canb. fiMBiwd is a 11 iiliiiy-
Bi uaiaad art tike w life, On* vior and exuheT
aace si heatm. the nest and fan ef yenth
carpeted wur. roUmi: meaoows tor pnlfm;. equii-
pad witti a sparkling poo. iar mimail supplied
wilt 1111111'1 an iaciiiue-- tor aeiectab*t renoee-
1: .....aenli vita leoahaer and tar a
Greenwead h hashed it.tat la; a' death It
k the aides: tunetianmf Jewat banai-groand m
thr city Tae remains oi saeae of our earlier. pn>
neers navt rested taert tor nearly a century aac
permtbcali} it> gates enes a> Teoewe a newcomer
ac a aisence nauiUniL. pierced to* a sigt and a aofc
Clnriaush tae two mstntines exist iar raw
practical purposes for the aead
liKMedo! mtement. ^et the
. -,-- wn> nyec/pcall} Jewish ekaft.
-r, cemetery"
TV negative *"**" Je*?_.
where the> are v i aawerehlr aaaa*e '
dtfucuf t< fee completely at aawe and relea.
or ever u> gam admiKance. m ^"ett*"P]
ctab* And in-------- nave naturally followed
a iianftiaiil pattera of KB*-** symbeB *
Iftflp ____
Tner, aae a postUve answer *""
tron a thud insuiatnai. the syaaftafne
tae wast luerabh example in onr ert? """^
or. Kenwaod Mvd And if the "-" in Brynwood
symhoiue* the hnne and hraax of the body, if the
greetf m Greenwood call* mine the bihiical
compansor oi mac u. -grass which m the morning
Srowett up and ir. the evening k cu: down and
witheretfc." thex le. tftt ~ker." in Kenwood suCftest
the knowledge of God wnicr. the Temple has eo-
a* Scnnaal Omt) and Mark V jw
tnaBt) daceee *m kne Louis GinW,
"Ligenda at the baa." with Rabbi lac &,
Bokaar taenser> oe "Bannsl Light" NBC
gram epoaeaeed Bw the Jewish Tnatnejed
Sfiiiiiaiiy cd Aaanca. ". the moral Sw '
d am paopie acoosmhi for the ^
atrangth at Mar faaavy omd coBaaaajhraaJ
J
:
5
IN wishing you a happy
New Year, The Herald
hopes for you even"
possible blessing that
the New Year can bring
(Lhr jHirmri iicral^
FLORIDA'S BBST COMPUTE NEWSPAPER
TO ALL GREETINGS .
Dell's UPHOLSTERING
BEUFBOLSTX20K2
slip covns
PlMlto

VENEZUELA CONSUL
MANUEL ARISTEGUIETA
CONSUL GENERAL
904 Inarahcmi Bmafiag PWaaa FR 3-42 i: Moml
GREETINGS TO ALL JEWRY
GREETINGS ..
SUNLAND
To Hora Year T.V. or
ft T.Y. SERVKi
-CncOj Baoaad
__fVtl Sunikmd
5-1771
the Baal
11333 ScuMn
NEW YEAS GREETINGS
TELEX HEARING CENTER
SMS CMbAL WAV
PJ-4BM4* iff 4-4 Ht
BEST WISHES
for a
HAPPY NEW YEAR
to our many
Friends and

-ft. KMP|jYNE.\T
x^A
SAXBTAMY U\.\ A SKM***
1 B.w. naalMK awB,J
>A\| TME
% 3UU
HTl UB ft*
nMft*


October 2, 1959
-Jewish nurldUan
Page 3-G
Ejeavori(l to channel through several generations
Kf our people, and which in a measure helped to
[determine the character of their personal lives and
Icommunal institutions.
Faith in Moral Fiber
Juadism has distinct attitudes in matters of
Irecreation and social intercourse. The Law of
UM Jim' iMtanrr torbMn hwaiiig-fr n mort.
Lnd any human pleasure which involves the wan-
[ton infliction of pain on a dumb animal. The rab-
Ibinic code has much to say regarding the sensi-
bilities of neighbors and guests. The Hebrew cal-
endar offers many opportunities for cultural and
Ifestival delights. Our traditions of ethics and eti-
tte reveal a wealth of beautiful customs and
profound insight* on fellowship, entertainment,
Ijoy and sobriety.
This is very, very important. The material-
istic trend is often frightening, and a country club
y be symtomatic of a tragic degeneracy. The
vulgarities of affluence, the crueltties ot snobbery,
[tin- debaucheries of pleasure, the emptiness of
[pastime, led to the ruin of many an empire, and
may portend the most serious subversion of Amer-
ica. It may be specially disastrous as a Jewish
spectacle. A house devoted to physical recreation
and play must have the balance offered by the
house of God. Brynwood needs the constant tie
with Kenwood.
I have faith in the moral fiber of our people,
which accounts for the basic strength of our fam-
ily and community patterns, our civic and voca-
tional and personal integrity' I was therefore not
surprised to read the latest resolution of the Bryn-
wood board that every member must give annually
to charity a sum at least equal to the year's aggre-
gate of dues, assessments and taxes imposed by
the club.
It ix our hallowed custom to visit the cemetery
during the month preceding the holy days, to keep
fresh the remembrance of departed ones, to main-'
tain the bond that is mightier than the grave, and
to enter into the seasonal spirit of repentance and
atonement by the contemplation of death.
A truly Jewish cemetery fortifies this pur-
pose. It supports that remembrance and bond by
keeping our dear ones within their natural frame
of spiritual referencethe Jewish community. Its
simplicity and serenity help us to find peace and
resignation. Its lesson is that our body cannot be
preserved, that it belongs to the earth.
Rabbi Lipman Heilprin of Bielostok once
heard a case involving a bitterly disputed piece of
land. He finally suggested that they go to inspect
the property; and when they arrived there, he bent
down with his ear to the ground, remaining-in-that
position for a little while. "What are you doing?
asked the unyielding litigants. "Let me explain,
replied the rabbi. "You're quarreling over a bit
of earth. Each of you claims that it belongs to
him So I thought I'd consult the earth. Now,
what do you supose I heard? Why, the earth claims
that you both belong to her!"
Unfortunately, an alien drive has invaded our
cemeteries and disturbed their essential tradition.
Costly caskets and vaults, as if the body could be
preserved. Conspicuous monuments and mauso-
leums to stress the inequalities of life. The vani-
ties of our mundane existence which, when carried
Continued on Pege *
Wishes for the New Year
HiTE-TITE
Roots
PRESSURE CLEANING,
SEALING and PAINTING
13 rears' Experience
JESSE J. SCALZO
Owner A Ateneetr
licensed and Insored
nes NE 5-3603. NE 3-8511
|400 N.W. 54th Street
Miami, Florida
HAPPY HOLIDAYS
\rom suop
115 LINCOLN ROAD
IE 8-2151
Ipecielizinj in Pre-Teen,
aad Junior Fashions
MR. AND MRS. HARRY MARKOWITZ
and Family
Thomas Robert Jorry

Wish Their Friends and Relatives a Happy Passover
GREETINGS .
TO ALL GREETINGS
R. & J. ELECTRIC
REPAIRS RE-WIRING CONTRACTS
SERVICE SSffiSSfl Wl 7-5017
1871 MX 167th St.
'Serving North Dade Area"
JEST WISHES FOR
THE NEW'YEAR
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ifAUUNG IM UNDEtCOATING
|7 N.W. 79th STREET
PL 7-4729
SAMPLE SHOE CO.
i -
2302 PONCE DE LEON BLVD.
ALSO
2117 PONCE DE LEON BLVD.
BEST WISHES FOR A
VERY HAPPY AND
PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
T. K. NEWELL DISTRIBUTORS, INC.
WHOLESALE SHOES
CANVAS & RUBBER FOOTWEAR SALES
615 S.W. 2nd Avenue "*"** F,a*
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HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL .
HARRIS & RENN
RE UPHOLSTERING and NEW
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Also Breakfast Nooks
9221 N. Miami Avenue ra v"5286
1-4
TO ALL GREETINGS .
PONCE DE LEON DRY CLEAHERS
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loppy New Year to All
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IIXIAM A
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IE 2-3820
PECIALIZING IN EXPERT
IS t WOMEN'S TAILORING
Strict Observers of ISO
both I All Jewish Holidays
?PY NEW YEAR
TO ALL
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IPPLY CO.
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CORAL GABLES
HI 8-1339
>T WISHES TO
OUR FRIENDS
[EDWIN T.
REEDER
^UPONT PLAZA CENTER
PL 8-1668
5720-1959
As you face the new year with vision and
courage, please accept the sincere wishes
of your many good friends here who
stand ready... always... to help you to
make your future brighter and happier.
THE TREND
IS TO ...
JOSEPH M. UrrOJt President
5 CONVENIENT OFFICES TO SBtVI TOO
main offki wejuiei "
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o
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