The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01593

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
"Jewish Floridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
tlume 33 Numb 33
Miami, Florida, Friday, August 14, 1959
Two Sections Price 20*
\Lift Suez Canal Block
Or Stop American Aid
To Nasser, Javits Says
POTT UAVf IT TO DAS PACE J-A
WASHINGTON(JTA)Sen. Jacob K. Javits, of New York, told
Senate this week that unless President Nasser's illegal restrictions
use of the Suez Canal are lifted, "we cannot give aid or fail to pro-
it aid proposed by international agencies" to Egypt.
This was a direct reference to proposals for a loan to Egypt by the
rid Bank to finance widening*--
SEN. JACOI JAVITS
. dear el recurrence
deepening of the international
Iterway. The loan is expected
come up for discussion here in
Lptemter at the meeting of the
>n's board of governors.
Speaking on the fleer of the
enate, the New York Repub-
can declared that Nasser had
enew*d the blockade of Israeli
bargees at the Sues Canal in
violation of the Constantinople
Convention and international law
pnd, during the last ten days,
ad accompanied this by violent
[treats and declarations of bellig-
erency.
... noted that Nasser had used a
_eech by Moshe Dayan, Israel's
kmer Chief of Staff, as a pretext
. his own attacks on Israel and
Hinted out that Gen. Dayan did
ot speak for the Israel govern
nt. He said "it must, however,
made dear that provocations
tm whatever source only exacer-
l and make more-difficult main-
nance of peace, and pose the
nger of a recurrence of the
ents of 1956 and 1957 which
ould certainly be avoided."
...' said "all this has occurred
f a time when we have been in-
reasing our assistance to Egypt
Ccntinuad on Page JA
Arabs Split on Refugees;
Lebanon Backs Resettling
hower and Premier Khrushchev
JERUSALEM (JTA) A Lebanese cabinet minister this week and ^d ^ Wf .eadersjip.o
warned other Arab countries that Lebanon will not continue to support J^ ^"JJ'Jf tension and to con-
Arab intransigence in refusing the resettlement of the Arab refugees | _-----o, loartrs fl)l
and that his country may split off from the Arab camp on this issue.
Commenting on the Arab Leagues outright rejection of UN Secre-
tary General Dag Hammarskjold's+
Jewish Leaders
Eye Talk With
Soviet Premier
WJCOWCtfSS AT STOCKHOLM PAW 12-A
STOCKHOLM(JTA)Representatives of the World Jewish Con-
gress, together with leaders of other Jewish organizations, will seek to
meet with Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev during the latter's visit
to the United States, it was reported Monday at the WJC Assembly.
The Assembly delegates discussed the current international situa-
tion in the light of the forthcoming*
meeting between President Eisen m UL fAf^m. ]/ofr
Elect Abrams
New Commander
report on the refugees, Pierre Ju-!. suggestions while falling to pro-
*- -__t_'_ ...> !>*> iUlm nrrtnACll
meil, Lebanese Minister of Labor
and leader of the Christian Falange
coalition party, declared that this
was the last warning to the Arab
countries that Lebanon cannot sup-
port a negative attitude and unless
Arab leaders swiftly find a con-
structive solution to the refugee
problem, Lebanon will have to go
its own wa>
The Minister explained that
small Lebanon cannot carry any
longer the burden of 100,000 ref-
U9s who form 11 percent of
the population, while Lebanon's
own c it i i ens are tor cad to ami-
grato. The Arab governments
reject all constructive
duce their own feasible proposal.
Jumeil said. He proposed that
the Arab countries ask the Uni-
ted States and the Soviet Union
Continued on Page 7-A___
tact Soviet government leaders for
the purpose of securing amelior-
ation of the situation of Soviet
Jewry.
Philip Klutinik, honorary pres-
ident of the B'nai B'rith, addres
sing Monday's session of the
Assembly, toW delegates that it
Continued on Page I A
Ban Lifted on Jewish-Content
Books at US Exhibit in Moscow
WASHJNGTON-(JTA>-Two volumes about Judaism which had
een removed from the U.S. Exhibition in Moscow by Soviet censors
P,ave been returned to the shelves of the exhibition, according to in-
formation received by the State Department. However, books on Israel
were still held by the Soviet censor.____________________
The two volumes restored to the*
shelves are "Great Ages and Ideas
| of the Jewish People," edited by
Leo M. Schwartz, and "History of
the Jewish People." edited by D;
M. Dunlop. The books which had
not been returned by the censor
jare "Israel and Its Glory." Pic-
torial volume edited by Avraham
I Herman and Yigal Yadin, and
"The Politics of Israel," by Mar-
! ven H. Bernstein.
The Jewish books returned by
the censer fee display were
the 70 volumes removed
by Soviet officials from the U.S.
Exhibition. Thirty-three of them
re still banned. The restored
books were shielded by P"'<
from readers.
Meanwhile, it was reported In
Tel Aviv that not one of the 20
Jewish folklore research experts
in the Soviet Union and its satel-
lites, invited to participate there
Continued en Page 3-A
Trial of North African Riot
Chief Suspended by Court
JERUSALEM-(JTA)-The trial of Ben Haroush leader of the
North African imm.grants in the Wadi Salib quarter of Haifa who is
charged with illegally possessing fire arms and with shooting at police-
men during the recent riots in Wadi Salib. was suspended this week by
a high court order after it opened before a local magistrate ito Ha*.
Suspended also was the trial of three other Jews from Wadi Salib who
UN charged with attacking policemen.___________________________
The suspension came after the
accused demanded the trial be held
NEW YORK(JTA) Bernard
I Abrams. of Jersey City. N. J. a
combat veteran of World War II,
was Sunday elected the national
commander of the Jewish War
Veterans at the organization's 64th
annual convention. He succeeds
Sam Shaikowitz, of St. Louis. The
second highest post, that of nation-
al judge advocate, went to Hy-
man Wilensky, of New London.
Conn. .
The convention adopted a res-
olution condemning the Egyptian
blockade of the Suez Canal
against Israeli shipping. The res-
olution appealed to President
Eisenhower and the State De-
partment "to use every possible
means to cause Egypt to desist
from its treaty violations and
Continued on Pago 1-A
in another court. The lawyer de
fending the four also argued that
the defense was not given suffici-
ent time to prepare for the trial.
Police took precautionary meas
tires to insure quiet during the
trial prior to its postponement.
Meanwhile, the Jewish Agen-
cy executive Monday started
discussions en problems eon-
corning the absorption and set-
tlement of new immigrants. The
discussions, conducted in the
light of the recent disturbances
by North African immigrants,
bavo established thet if there Is
any discrimination in the handl-
ing of newcomers, h is in favor
of nen-Iurepoans.
The director of the Agency's
Continued on Page 3-A
PNo Real Danger' in German Anti-Semitism
By Spatial "Japort
NEW YORK-Eric OUenhauer. chairman of the
GermanWSoci.l-Democr.Uc Party stotec"Wednesday
that virulent anti-Semitism U not at P* f ,
danger to our state or even to Jewish costmuniue*.
The statement was made in a letter to Adolph Held
here, national chairman of the Jewish Labor Com-
mittee. ,..
OUenhauer. speaking on behalf of the Presidium
. of his party which met late in July in Bonn rep bed
to a detailed letter from Held in which the latter
escribed a series of recent incidents and events
tuned at Jews indlviduaUy and Jewish Institutions.
are the least to minimize anti-Semitic
Oilenhauer wrote, "but those things
"We
attacks,"
should bo seen In their proper proportion. Every
ingle anti-Semitic outburst is, of course, an of-
fenso to human dignity and is being treated from
our side as such.
"I am sure that you will agree with me that a
Continued en Page 7-A
HE DOESN'T SEEK POST
Will Boston Spiritual Leader
Become Israel's Chief Rabbi?
JERUSALEM- dav requested his supporters to desist from a campaign to promote his
?!Tsucceed^e late Chief Rabbi YiUhak hM *
also intimated that he favor, the American Rabb, Joseph B Sotovt-
Jhik for the post. He made known that he would not seek the exalted
poet it Rabbi Soloveitchlk announced his candidacy.________
The succession to the poet ee-
cupied by the revered Rabbi
Herseg is thus narrowed down
to the Chief Chaplain of Israel's
Armed Forces. Rabbi Shleme
Gore, and Rabbi Solovoitehik.
While the former enjoys polit-
ical backing and would be wel-
comed by progressive religious
laments who are alienated from
strict Orthodoxy, Rabbi Sotoveit-
chik is destined to bo the choice
of the rabbinical circles.
Comprising two-thirds of the
electors mayors and heads of
local councils provide the remain-
ing third rabbinical circles will
undoubtedly carry the day and the
next Ashkenaii Chief Rabbi may,
as In the past, be drawn from over-
seas.
In addition to great scholarship.
Rabbi Soloveitchik's richest asset
appears to be that he does not
seek the post.
AIM MSfPN SOlOVfIJCHIK



I



Pnoe 2-A
+Jeist fkrHtor
Friday. A
*** 14. lu,
Don't Leave it to Dag,
Keating Warns Senate
;\ i\ > :> rtU .
ion a', tin- I'niv
S
.Rend ir. a legal purposes K e indicated
blican Sen a| with a view
Eon i York boM I "*>
'
Sen Kei v .,
can
ui cannot leave
nnh Id I
Hammarskmlc: H. >aic :h. tin.
nan com- : "'"
should again formal!* mor' ir
French Politico Winner
On Anti-Semitic Platform
French Senate
Auberg*r.
o di
*, (f
The annulment of M A,h.. ,
lection m ntavor .^ :T,aai
(In Cairo. Nasser told an aud-
ience las* week that Israel would
not be allowed to use the Suei
Canal. He scoffed at reports that
Israel planned to raise the mat-
ter before the United Nations
and repeated that he will "waoe
total war" against Israel if the
Jewish State will pursue "an act
gressive policy' against Egypt.
His speech was broadcast
throughout the country, i
>*!.
Keating expressed h
that Proaidem Baentaownr am: tha -
i:imnus:r;rion "*a il. ,:--unn ;ti<
we to it that our
repneai | nited Na
to hen -
terfer-
I :".[. 1-":
mere in'
f fiance in
naJ affair> that i!
feeds upor. rtsell aid
ma involve illegalm in an
area '
He said thai President Nasser of
the I'nited Arab Republic if pre-
venting th< Danish ship Inge Tolt
irom transporting a cargo I
Far East "which h;i> no'hint: to
do with military affair- in a
mann- totallv without le-
High Holiday
Seats Available
LONG-DISTANCE
MOVERS
DAIir PICK-HM New York New Jet
sey, Philadelphia Baltimore Wash
"ten, Boston oil ether poults
DIAL JE 8-8353
M. Lisberm, i Sots
53 COLLINS AVI.
RETjftN LOAD RATES
far il..: H
will coma ity. 9
a m.. and continue i
5 p.tii
and Sunda>
nrvinu nil <-..ncHiried in
inriitioncd huildinu
of the Miami Hebrew (on.
tion Special youth services wi!
be held m the air-conditione,
ntaagj nea| o! th< builI
Tn' caajfi ,, present lv
formulating plans for an adult
Bhafa Liturgx will be chanted bv
Cantor Berele Kelemer Ha lib.
nel, Savilie will officiate and
deliver the sermons
COINWORD Still
Eludes Miami
>RD mrnv
week t.. elude hundred
Greater Miami contestant-
Puz-

This mean- that COIN
N i 6 appearing on
Pat- "irth S150. pro-
rrecl
week puzzle
INWOBD Edit..: .-
'ha: he has not been
able to pay out T1
Floridian Jackpot m
but takes solace in the
that his horde .-
j ur d inci
cash, plus an add
to

It -
-
-
-
PARISrn-
-e election at
r of a -in. town vli
annulled by it liecause of
-ue* in **e*tton as mayor and j
nil Jewish Pl on him for riolatiaaj 0
cnt wa- reflected to the *l*Uon laws, represented the 1
> an even greater majority. l,m* ,n* new legislation bar
new election- were held. appeals to racial or reUeioe. i
in eleetioru had been ^
Henry Torres, noted French There were no indications whZi
....... .-J I...J mt M^> ,A~.i. the mtherili --
barrister and head of the admin-
istrative council of the French
radio and television, in a breed-
cast Sunday, called en the
11*' AU,s!!!!!!f* woaldto
m. Aubergei a reelectw,,
mayor alty.
to ta>
JWV Convention
Elects Abrams
Continued from Pag* I-A
broken promises and, if our Gov-
ernment deems it desirable, to
present a fitting resolution to
the General Assembly of the
United Nations dealing with
this situation."
The delegate- also passed a res-
olution askine for the deportation
opportunity of the
Butcher of the Balkans Andnja
trtukovic. a former Minister of
the Interior of the Nazi puppet
ot Croatia Artukoric now
1-'- Me came
inder a : -j and en
imerici despite
thai while he wa- I
j. his
tore Jew
than th.
COMPLETE
PEST
CONTROL

MORTGAGES
$500,000 Private Money
CHAS. HIME
Pereaaeeat Ceastrertiea leeas as
New or Old Preeertiei Unaer
tjtnictiea Ceaaaletea. Will l.T M
leak. Lean ea 1st er 2a*! MUrt.eaei
*reed Fees er Leases
bTMbbI iasvreact Fuses.
FREE ROOM & BOARD
PLUS SALART
Jewish Wastes Live la
Na Harriet
Call FR 94401 Between 3 5
etwee
Prescription Specialists
NOW IN TWO MODERN
A 9-iOMtHTIOMD,
ENLAISO KACN LOCATIONS
MOftf PAtKlajC SPATE
CONr-fNfENT TO 8BSIS
350 LIMCOLN ROAD
Phe-ve JE -742S
Eetr. Waifciaalea A*a. bMiteaiat
728 UNCOLN ROAD
Phame JE i-074
ocuusrs' pukupikins nua
CONTACT LENSIS
R'B broker
Ph FR S.3444
TERMITES
CHINCH BDGS
FR 7-1411
r-tr.
KmzztM
FNEE ESTIMATE*
TR1 LV XOLEX. BC
Srtere, aaaafle ..r,,,- IrrerwMt tp i*ai
7^f>mWirst^iT
lobbi Joseph L Rodcovslry
HS MICHIGAN AVENUt, MUM' IEAO
GLASS F0R EVEtY ^"o$e
u_ STMC FMNT ^-n end WMMW SUSS
m*Z iTcr '*** mud *"-~r WorkN
'3* S.W. 8th STREET ^ ^ mmm%m
"Progreaeing with Our Many
ANOTNEI LOCATION FOR TOM
>*.< a ids d>
AUGUST BROS ft w:
t* Irli AS" CT' *>
.....^-.~v. rue roaaj CONVeNNNCI
C0ULT0N BROS
__, u."^: I'!"""' **-- W TOAC* Mfl
"NAOIT- -MT- .
^' Woy t S.W. 27tfc Aw.
PALMER'S MIAMi^^
stAJirs om
AMD OMIT
C4THWN6
ETCUarVBr
TO TK jnr >S*
ajcwTfu
OOAIANTEEt
BT OUAim
"ONOMENTS
AT LOWEST PRICB
MIAM
JEWISH
MONUMENT
BUILDERS
tAVE MARKEM
A$TOaiB
OOTJTONB
"^ 7* n KNTTHWEST 8tk STRErt
" Cenaer af r. Aveaee
PNONES
HI *^092i
W 4-0922
40 S.W. tti St
1


r, August 14. 1959
+JelstTk>rkfiari
?aqe 3-r

David Pinski, 87, Passes in Haifa

rot OTHER OtITUABIlS, SEf SK. I
M BS c-HXfl.- I
n fTi?'~ i
H> *
^B ' ^M
dors of religious affairs of Protestant, Catholic and Jewish
Jents at Temple University in Philadelphia go over the
plans of their goodwill tour to Israel on the boat deck
ie SS Jerusalem of the Zim Israel America Lines on which
recently sailed from New York for Haifa. Seated (left to
k) are Rev. Robert L. James, jr., director of Protestant activ-
fon the Temple campus; Fr. John J. Mc.Hale, director of the
pman Club at Temple and rector of St. Elizabeth's Church,
idelphia; and Rabbi Shalom Segal, director of the B'nai
Hillel Foundation at Temple. The trip is sponsored by
kr B. Marcus, executive vice president of Food Fair Stores
Philadelphia, and William M. West, insurance executive,
is arranged under the auspices of the Philadelphia Zion-
)rganization.
JTA By Direct Teletype Wire
HAIFA David Pinski, world
prominent Yiddish author and
playwright, diedjate Monday night
at his home on'MtTT^arrnel. He
was 87. Several friends of the au-
thor, including writer Shimshon
Meltzer, were at the bedside when
Mr. Pinski passed away.
David Pinski was considered the
last of the generation of the great
Yiddish writers of the stature of
I. L. Peretz, Sholem Asch and
Sholom Aleichem. Born in Mohilev.
in New York, he cam* to Hie
United States, becoming that
newspaper's literary editor.
From the time he came to the
Russia, in 1872, he started writing
while stilt an adolescent, soon
joined the stream of young Jewish | United States until he moved to
I intellectuals who made their way I Israel after the State was estab-
to Warsaw, and worked alongside lished, Mr. Pinski was one of the
Peretz as pioneers in the develop-
ment of the new modern vital
Yiddish literature.
By 18M, when he was 24 and
already a writer of repute, he
went to Berlin, where he attend-
ed the university. In 1899, at the
invitation of the "Ovend Blatt"
Break Blockade, Javits Says,
Or Cut U.S. Aid to Nasser
teds Lift Ban on Jewish Books
inued from Pate 1-A
forthcoming world conven-
^n Jewish folklore, will come
Aviv for that scholarly par-
convention will open Sept. 1.
am IS experts from abroad,
hers from Israel, are sched-
to deliver a total of 71 ad-
es on various aspects of Jew-
folklore through the ages,
dent Itzhak Ben-Zvi will open
rst session.
organizers of the convention
had sent invitations to experts in
the Soviet Union and elsewhere in
Eastern Europe. Most of the ex-
perts did not reply. Some wrote
simply that they would not attend.
The organizers also requested
the various scientific academies in
the USSR to locate Jewish folklore
experts and extend the Israel in-
vitations to them. None of the
academies, except one in Uzbek-
istan, bothered to reply. Uzbek-
istan's academy replied it could
find no expert in the field qualified
to participate in the convention.
DADE FEDERAL SAVINGS accounts
are INSURED to $10,000 by an aqancy
of the Federal government.
"One of the Notion's
Oldest and largest'
( 0ade Federal
L. i/avings and Loan Association oi Miami
JQMPH M UPTON, Piesident
5 Convenient Offices Serve Dade County
RESOURCES EXCEED 134 MILLION DOLLARS
Compete mi Dependable Wit Stnrkt
MIAMITITLf
&QtetnxctCv.
34 YEARS OP TITLE SERVICE IN DADE COUNTY
ESCROWS ABSTRACTS TITLE INSURANCE
TtHe hmrsttce PeKe.es el
City THto tosereace Co.
Cealtof, Serphn Resenrea
1J4
13* SHORJLANO ARCADE
FR f-IMI
(Alee Known Aa 1*4 and 1l Security Truot Cemi oy->
Continued from Page 1-A
and when we have been bending
our every effort to bring about
mutual cooperation with President
Nasser*.".
Expressing concern over "de-
terioration" of Israel-UAR rela-
tions. Sen. Javits said: "I believe
it essential that our government
determine to deal with the present
crisis about the transit of shipping
through the Suez Canal and not to
temporize with it."
He said "all of us will recall
how our government came to Pres-
ident Nasser's aid, insisting on
withdrawal from Sinai and Suez
Canal area. The United States, on
its part, advanced $5 .million
through the United Nations for. the
purpose of reconstructing the Suez
Canal. President Nasser has re-
ciprocated poorly."
Sam. Javits said the United
States would net carry out it*
responsibilities in the Suez is-
sue "by an airy reference to the
issue to Mr. Hammarskjold or
the -UN." He pointed out that
"the UN is no stronger than any j
of its members, and we are one j
of the strongest. This is net en I
issue to bo decided by asking
little Israel to accept some
abridgement of its rights, and j
by pressuring Israel to live un-
der imposition, blockade and
siege."
He said that "we cannot hope to
Court Suspends
Trial of Rioters
Continued from Page 1-A
Absorption Department, Yehuda
Braginski. reported at the session
that of a total of 160.000 North
African immigrants. 120.000 came
from Morocco, 103,000 of them
since 1954. Of these. 83.000 were
sent to development areas where
housing was provided.
Of the 19.000 families still in
ma'abarot (villages of temporary
huts), 6,000 were from North
Africa. Many of these North Afri-
can immigrants had been given
housing in agricultural or indus-
trial development areas, but had
abandoned the houses, returning to
the ma'abarot, Jewish Agency of-
ficials reported.
It was also reported at the ses-
sion that of 19,000 scholarships
given jointly by the Ministry of
Education and the Jewish Agency
for Immigrant children, over 70
percent were given to non-Euro-
pean immigrants.
foremost literary figures in the
Jewish world, writing Yiddish but
widely translated into Hebrew,
English, and many other lan-
guages.
He was particularly noted as a
playwright. His play, "The Treas-
ure," was produced in New York
by the Theatre Guild in 1815. An-
other of his plays, produced in
English in 1926, was "The Final
Balance." On the Yiddish stage,
his plays from one-actors to full-
length dramas, were extremely
popular.
Member of the Poale Zion since
his youth, Mr. Pinski was for years
1 president of the Jewish National
bring about peace and commerce Workers Alliance, the fraternal or-
between Israel and Egypt now. ganization now known as the Far-
But we can hope to pursue a per- { band Labor Zionist Order,
sistent policy to bring about re-, He had been editor of "Die Zeit,"
spect for international law." Amer- daily newspaper, and of the Poale
ican policy, he added, had often zjon organ. "Der Karrrpfer." An-
been criticized for failure of con- other of his early American con-
sistency in its application. 'This is nections was with the Yiddish,
a situation in wheh such consis- weekly "Die Arbeiter Zeitung."
tency is both practical and need-1_____________ i
ed."
American policy now, he de-1 Branch Picnic Sunday
clared. must insist that "the illegal
restrictions on the use of the Suez
Canal must be lifted and the Inge
Toft case settled. Otherwise, we
cannot give aid or fail to protest
aid proposals by international
agencies."
Lebediger Branch of Farband
will hold a picnic at Greynolds
! Park Sunday beginning at 12 noon.
1 Meeting point will be NE 172nd
ist. and Federal hwy. at the Log
I Cabin.
CARIB MIAMI MIRACLE
gXTOOAY
"/ have not
and then the shout yet begun
that has echoed down _._ *;-.,.# I"
the ages tO fight!
&F
ROBERT STACK MARtSA PAVAN-CHARlfSCOeuRN-ERIN O'BRIEN
- MACOONAID CAREV JEAN PIERRE AUMONI DAVID FARRAR '
PETER CUSHING SUSANA CANALES
; feYa
DAVID NIVEN
SHIRLEY *Sj4#y&4C
MacLAINE
cmuMscoHfc wmoCOLM
0
GOLFERS
can Ce*fidee*e with
NEW GRIPS
AN Styles A.eilohle
toahahhag RtHnbhleg
ArMftJftMM
GOFFS 14W "*"-
wrM(0W eAtUs
'/? aAttt4 SuAtdef" An/Tkeotte
Opan 6:45
TODAY

^Opan 6:43,
Ml IftJOM And G*2 C'Utf -
*****
0
HOT FO* CHUOtfN
Don't put it off put it on !
Re-Roof S
* WRITTEN GUARANTEE
* LICENSED ft INSURED
* PAYMENTS ARRANGE*
mAX rora nincr
For Free Istimerte
PHONE
OX 1-1321
Re-Roofing
& Repairing
ACMI
WPfiY eg,
2670 N.W. 75th ST.
1
1'


Page 4-A
rjmisfFkridhiir
Friday. Augu., ,,




ejfewih
OFFICE and PLANT 120 N.E. Sixth Street
Telephone FR 4-1141 FR 4-821?
Teletype Communications Miami TWX
_________________MM396__________________
FRED K. SHOCHET............Editor and Publisher
LEO MINDLIN............................Executive Editor
ISRAEL BUREAU
10 A. D. Gordon Street, Tel Aviv, Israel
EAY U. BINDER_______________Correspondent
Making the Charge Plain
The news wires in recent weeks seem to
devole a large part of their coverage to the
fate of the Jewish communities behind the Iron
Curtain.
The World Jewish Congress Assembly,
which completed its deliberations in Stockholm
this week, also allocated a significant number
of its sessions to this guestion.
All of which bears out the vast concern
Jews everywhere in the free world feel about
their Iron Curtain brethren. That the Jewish
communities locked in the grip of the Soviet
orbit almost unanimously refrained from par-
ticipating in the World Jewish Congress Assem-
bly sets a seal of emphasis on the universal
uneasiness experienced in this respect.
Russian authorities continue to deny the
reports here about the systematic destruction
of Jewish culture in their midst, but free world
observers, with little variation in fact, are vir-
tually agreed on what they see during the
course of their travels in the Soviet Union.
Religion as a general rule may be dis-
couraged by Red authorities, but Jews, they
feel, are getting the worst end of the campaign.
Now that Nikita Khrushchev will be com-
ing to the United States for a visit, it may be a
good time to pin him down on this issue. We
can not, of course, anticipate that he will tell
us the truth. Russian leaders rarely do But
we can at least confront him with the charqe
and the evidence. '
Floridlan
PUM:
,, i \ fl
March 3. .
The JWMl Ftorid-n Mt rt.orb.dth. jg^HSlWK
the J.wuh Week'/. Member of the J.w.h Telegrjp""
A".ne ?.<%> Art'. Feature Smd.c.tt. w.r.d.d. N.
..-..-I Nannr.il Editorial A.n American *" '
during the ir ##/
as i mpp If*-.
by LEO MINDLIN
as a peopiS* *
Nrruytag *,, J. h J
an academic one fT***!
in Jewish fusion. aS^H
hapa initially ..>pr^L*"Pa
prophet Nathan U,, M
<-arpi
si'rVicJ: N;rr.7i-td.;?rrT.i ; ^sSuPiSSTiJS.
Englith-Jewith Newspaper., and the Florida Pren "
The Jewish H..rMIn do*. Bd IHMIU U*f Kdjlmilll
of ihr m.T. haiuli-- a.lvfrtlwd in im "''""'"
SUBSCRIPTION
On. Year $500
RATES:
Three V.ar. .10.00
Volume 33
Friday. August 14. 1959
10 Ab 5719
Number 33
Time to Pause and Ponder
,, XiCG ^l601 Nixon's visit last week to
urn^arwWKGhe,, memriaI Pfi0r to his I*
PnL ^?uhln?,0nJ should have made the
Poles and their leaders somewhat uneasy
seme lessons we forget'too guick^ heT
monal has been abuilding for a long time
In effect, the Poles don't have too much
sSctTth" 'h6 PrieCt' Qnd are P-t'cuTar y
KrwJE Sh0rt memor* charae which
kind Recen", genej;al.,erms. accuid all man-
Slier ITA 'n^6p0rtS 5 OUr Clumns bV Dav^
iW PrlSent dQy Poles member' Do
hey remember the Jews who perished? Do
ThyeSIheweha.-,eelingI f Pl,y?" M^ -"-ered
Jhe jew has no place in Poland is thdi
iiTL7Ph1h heKcame "p ^&&
B!,*a^-nsr= Fur,her
to thTSoS- ViHe PreSidenf durin9 ** visit
nourished are unleashed." WhSe PoinnH ^
mSXThe^''r' S tnelaSy' o"
a monument ^^^.^l&SS^ fi
Dulles in the final two and a half years of his
regime.
Egypt is now sounding out the possibility
for a loan to fcnance widening and deepening
Worlri t ? Z?a\ ? 'S eXpec,ed ,ha th2
World Banks board of governors will discuss
the proposed loan m Washington next month.
What posture will American diplomacy
ake now-pecially in light of ou/incS
ing y warm relations with Nasser these days'
Failure to let the UAR chief know j J whe
this nation stands with respect to his hiah
handed policies will send us hurtling oack.o
the grim days of Washington's unbridled -L
SfTSc^ whi^cS'e^6
world to the momentary brink of disaster.
The Fruits of Saudi Oil
the U.S. Air Force S'a SV0"^0' at
Jewish servicemen are "ot^SS"' "^
Morse (D.-Ore) Add fe J'^"^ by Se-
- ss MS~sw5
LelHng Hie UAR Chief I aBSaBT^SSta
also out of accord with ,'k incidentally.
told Aramco to abandon it, 0mp?ny- which
Practice against Jews orVL P'6'^1 hirin9
was a major victory J The LTT^ ,here
Rental concern in the matrt to 'r govern-
to American citizens 0f foreian aront
clealte^^rethth^^ a
he nation morally. But lho? *uld indicate
must again be wa^ed for t h^"011 81an
the fruits of vietory. TheVmofi Th can taste
conequencrs of a worlni uH
for his brood During our own time, the issue was until r*. "*
principal factor in the argument for religious rcprpsenT^"111 M
Israel's government What would a Jewish State he prono*I'n *
representation declared, without the spiritual source of T^"'5 M
an integral element in its halls of deliberation? Un: |
Orthodox Jews took this line to defend their monopoly
tion. suggesting that a compromise of tradition must ultirruteh *H
destruction to the principle of Judaism as a cernerstone o( i""*
rule. Modernized" branches of Jewish faith, they said seek t u?
the differences between themselves and other faiths thus erad
the unique distinctions that set Judaism apart. "Modemiied""h!? '>
ches. according to Orthodox spokesmen, are therefore not It*!**
all. and can hardly be trusted to nurture the tradition they dT *
to espouse. pre,u* I
This reasoning lies at the very root of the question of Jew
survival as a people, with Orthodoxy here steadfastly guarduwikl
watchdog role it maintained during the centuries of exile ioL
in it is the almost tacit assumption that while other people m!?
require a palpable national heritage to assure their continuum i
depend upon somewhat more. The "somewhat more is ohi-ml
that which kept them going through all the centuries durin? wk
they had no nation of their ownan unswerving identification *inv2
precepts of their faith. M *
! ;.
THUS EXISTING CONCURRENTLY are two manifest experw*.
in Jewish history. There is the clear proof that Jews can SUrtk
without a functioning central national interest. There U equally C|m!
proof of the existence of doubt that nationhood necesaanly mrnha
to that survival If such considerations reaurrctt Nathan's flZ
they also point to recent events pertinent In this regard.
One is the arms deal with Germany. The other relatei to tk>
noting of North Africans in a number of major Israel cities Witl
respect to the arms deal, there has been much discussion about tV
moral transgression committed by the Jewish State. Some objentn
suggest that traffic in weapons and not Bonn is the relevant issue TV
sin would be the same were Israel to have engaged in munitions it
rangements with France. England, Turkey or. indeed, any nation. F
such reprehensible commerce, they argue, lowers her to the level of
her peers. |
This is beyond doubt interesting thinking. Sweeping aside what-
ever diplomatic or commercial advantages the sale may have brooikt
Israel it suggests that she is symbolic of a sphere of human existetct
apart from that found elsewhere. Ignoring those arguments adyitwd
in Israel s defense to demonstrate that the agreement with Bonn cob-
tnbuted to her tactical security in a hostile Middle East, they m
in isYaeh reliance upon such maneuvering signs of how much worse
can be expected in other quarters.
A double standard of international morality is thus suggested, ii
which Israel will shun un traffic and refrain from charting hermit
tarj survival while her world ne.ghbora hardly pause in their efforts
.ml H asfe"danc> n Precisely these areas. This It, mcdenUU,,
little different from their experience throughout history, during which
iZl v?ri"*l.v considered an irritant to the conscience of
sa s,cetSsp,e f s,,od *ne "vy- cha,,en8e *gMmi
: :
JYMBOLIC ROLES OF such exalted character hardly deterred their
it..n Knt'nts !"",m almos, un'versally seeking Jewry's extermu.
level of m^f^K61 S,ands ,0day' Expecting from I.r.el the highest
"f L ^V S' 'S.an iuut "traneous to the central questioi
doS. in 7 !. 'h,S reaMni" be conatrued as belonging to hv
Eld he! li! W'1,hOU, Prartic*1 coacm t0' I"Mli surv.y.1. it
at one ""'ntioned that many citizens of the Jewish State haw
ZTl Z *no,hor adop,ed a 8im" P*W- I
In the nWi ?? "B "*"? lh*1 ,heir <***'* *hould sve no army '
SSten h s Mr"Lg the War of liberation that unintentional*
whe ratwn I V* S"11 0,hers dtroyed valuable canned foods
Thei \\ZZ >lm?S{ unv.il.ble-bec.use they were not kosher
am.net Zi"SILT wha,ev. vwpomt one may care to
natwnal un-iva"? \IL comPromi <* principle in the name of
immigrant are ,he nctni r' ** by North Africm
m.S? XeS theevfaSUCh ""P"""*- SP*"men tor th r
crimination t, y art' mee,mg with economic and social du-
--ier" ha. sulr, h? ?**. have bw!n found mon* ,hf 1
"""' U'ft-noToT the. been,.,raced to extreme right or the I
Object oMh. ,he" nul,* the complaint at hand,
upon IsrTel as theirH? "f frmer EuP*- who distinctly look
European JewrvL*. 0?' ProPrt>r- No qne will deny that West
European Jewrv |dra<'Ped modern Zioni ideology, nor that East
"V.O largely translated the ideal into a working reality-
;" : .;.
'Vnuge^Jf'J^",in'/ Jews conceive of Israel as a privW
"ring to the voun LP V? for North A"-^*" or Oriental Jews, who
need for cduYatii-.T'T c no,nin* *>ut their immediate dependency,
"race of cum "n.t,u /' 8tiU P^omlnnntly Western ways, and
"a.ion here s aIL' fre,gn l V,enM A*^ A Pra"el ,""
t'onal ongms uu0T,?h .* resPnM' to the Chinew influx and the m-
W'th rsnj .Vth rS!f'C,ed 8uch inimigrntioo back in 1921
a basic precept ,..,.. ^ndamentl meaning of the Law of Return.
ceivnbly adoot .ill. i' DecUruO" of Independence, can Israel
*ouW the universal .i ,, a,,erntive? Such considerations iP.
tom. permit if v*. .. Juda,'n. transcending unique native cv>
social disconttmt briHl "T rioU m ,r "* express"* of
one group 0f J,ws ,1 ,he yoke ** diacrimination practiced by
national self-image rhSi ano,her- ith the ma)ority feeling thr
This n lnuenged.
Zionists' n" u-sTthan hi u' C2re <* th* M**t| plea voiced by noted
t Israel ln s,nif1(an, 1BcnGurion, that American Jews mign
'"" that Western J?J1 nun?bers; for the silent threat is every***
n Eastern garb. ^^ Cni,d wiU >meday be a thing unrecognued
'"ate tV'VTndhoef r,^!nC MtttW ^ th* oonaiderations, they re-
r,,l'r ethical IS?. ?* nc c",,, 'mmoral-whcther on reli|
.iu.. i.- "' grounds, wiu.. .____>i____ ._______i- a*.**1
Jwt'ce has been mflm^? Jlhere *P**ency transcends decency
f arms, ,s We|l as ,n?h Th,s ho,d "^e in the international s*
to survive as nat.L pr.ac' of social diacrimination. The search
foreign to us-and ,! h,neviUo,y 'esda to the adoption of standards
al,ve a people w, h c.ompnmiw ot Principles that have kept
s|ons poisomng other, i.! nation' we were unaffected by the V
moral nr^ With one, can we maintain a high level *
m<"al propriety. c
we aaaure the Jewish coatinuum?


iday, August 14. 1959
+Je*lstJ rhrkflaw
Page 5-A
TO THi EDITOR -
[Reader Charges Columnist Distorted Byrnes Talk
EDITOR, Th Jewish Floridian:
Milton Friedman in his article.
Inyrncs Reflects Bevin's Anti-
Jewish Opinions," published in
mr isue of Friday, July 24, is
. only inaccurate but unjust to
great American, Judge James F.
Jyrnes, of Columbia, -S.C., former
oncressman. Senator, Secretary
State of the United States, Jus-
Ice of the Supreme Court, and
governor of South Carolina.
The very first paragraph of Mr.
triedman's article is without foun-
dation in fact: "The anti-Jewish
lilosophy of Ernest Bevin, the
. British Foreign Minister, is
_.1ay being revived by James F.
Jyrnes who, as American Secre-
try of State, dealt with Bevin on
be Palestine issue."
In other respects, Mr. Fried-
tan's comment is misleading in
Quoting Judge Byrnes out of con-
ext. I have procured from Judge
Jyrnes a copy of his address to
be Georgia Bar Assn. in Savan-
nah. Ga., June 19, 1959, and am
It pains to quote the paragraphs
m which Mr. Friedman had bor-
ed statements:
'Our trouble with the Arab
povernments it due not to seg-
regation but support of Israel.
I During the last war those gov-
ernments cooperated with the
[United States.
After the war the Democratic
knd Republican parties competing
the votes of Jewish citizens
[ave all-out support to increasing
le immigration of Jews to what is
v Israel. We encouraged the
Establishment of Israel. We were
lie first to recognize the new state.
lat support brought to an end
ir cordial relations with the
Irabs. There is little hope of
reconciling the Jews and Arabs.
*ride of race and religion is in-
alved. The Arab governments do
Dt allow a Jew to enter their
jntries except temporarily, to
LONG DISTANCE
MOVING
fo all points in tka country
ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY
GIVEN WITHOUT CHARGE
ACE R.B. VAN
LINKS, INC.
2136 N.W. 24th Avenue
NE 5-44*6 MIAMI
visit relatives. The Jews have been
persecuted for centuries, but by
their courage and perseverance
they have preserved the integrity
of their race. Their people do not
marry Arabs. The Jews and Arabs
provide the outstanding examples
of segregation.
"It was a realization of the wis-
dom of segregating races that
prompted 46 governments, includ-
ing the United States, to agree in
the Geneva Convention of. 1929
that 'Belligerents shall, so far as
possible, avoid assembling in a
single camp, prisoners of different
races or nationalities.'
"This action by so many govern-
ments of the world indicates that
segregation -laws did not adversely
affect our relations with other gov-
i ernments."
In commenting upon Mr. Fried-
man's article," Judge Byrnes has
written to me as follows:
"Upon reading what I said about
the Arab nations, you will agree
there is absolutely no justification
for the criticism of Mr. Friedman.
I He has deliberately quoted parts
| of sentences in order to misrepre-
sent what I said.
"With regard to what he wrote
! of my position while Secretary
I of State, at no time did I dis-
I sent from the policy of the Uni-
ted States with respect to the in-
crease of immigration to Pales-
tine, and I do not even recall the
Morrison Plan, which he says
i was supported by me. The Uni-
ted States' policy was determin-
ed by President Truman and
i provided for gradually increas-
ing the number of immigrants.
"Unable to point to an unfriend
|ly word uttered by me as to Jew-
i ish aspirations at that time, he
said, 'Byrnes opposed Jewish as-
pirations in other ways but re-
mained generally discreet in his
public statements.' He had to
make this concession because it
was impossible for him or anyone
Company Announces Contest
More than 2.500 prizes, valued
| at $25,000, await employees of
I Swift & Company and associated
i units who submit the best entries
in the firm's national letter wri-
ting contest, S. E. Meredith, man-
, ager of Swift's ice cream plant
1 announced Wednesday. The con-
test, to be held during August,
will emphasize the importance
and relationship between custo-
mers and jobs.
bJm |fl quote an unfriendly expres-
sion-of opinion by me as-to Jew-
ish aspirations."
It is untfortunate that our Jew-
ish columnists and writers, partic-
ularly those who pose as experts
on segregation, the South and Is-
rael, should juggle the truth even
to the extent of misquoting dis
tinguished Americans with the ap-
parently avowed purpose of stir-
ring up trouble.
They would serve a more patri-
otic purpose if their pens were
wielded in the cause of understand-
ing and-good will amongst men of
all races and creeds in America.
HERBERT U. FEIBELMAN
Miami
Announce Way To tiefp
Drain JW 8 Sinus Cavities
ji Without Discomfort .
New contestant taMet fir sims ceegestiM sefferen
ecu tot h ti frail denei stan cavities
eel reNfftv fstrusieg beef pete
Nw Tork, N. Y. (Special)
Announcement has been made
of a new tablet development
which has the remarkable abil-
ity to help drain cloned sinus
cavities and thus relieve con-
gestion and pressure. The head-
aches, pressure pains, stuffed-up
head, nasal drip, clogged breath-
ing-all the unrelenting symp-
toms the sinus sufferer knows
so well are attacked directly
by improving drainage of the
sinus areas.
Moat remarkable of all Is the
fact that this Is accomplished
with extraordinary speed and
without discomfort of any kind.
This new tablet does its remark-
able work internally, through
the blood stream. It deposits
into every drop of blood plasma
new medication which is car-
ried to the sinus area, where it
shrinks the swollen doors to the
sinus cavities and helps drain
away the pain-causing pressure
and congestion.
The shrinking substance in
this new tablet has been so suc-
cessful topically in promoting
drainage of the sinus cavities
that it is now prescribed more
widely by doctors than any ma-
terial for this purpose. This new
medication is now available at
drug counters without the need
for a prescription under the
name, Dristan* Decongestant
Tablets. Dristan Tablets cost
only 98* for a bottle of 24 tab-
lets. Buy and use Dristan Tab-
lets with the absolute guarantee
that they will drain away pain-
causing pressure and congestion
of the sinus cavities, relieve the
pain and distress, or purchase
price will be refunded.
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
In Leo Mindlin's column of July
24, dealing with the Israeli sale of
arms to Germany, Mr. Mindlin
weighs the "divine duty to sur-
vive" against the moral scruples
of the opposition to the deal, and
he praises Prime Minister Ben-
Gurion for having struck "a gold
mine, politically and diplomatic-
ally."
He leaves your readers with the
impression that those who object
to the arms deal on moral grounds
transgress against Israel's strug-
j le for survival, and that the arms
, deal was dictated by Israel's de-
| fense and diplomatic needs. The
! facts underlying the transaction
will hardly bare out his conten-
I tion.
The arms deal was, first of
all, not a government-to-govern-
ment issue, but merely a com-
mercial transaction conducted
between arms dealers. Origin-
ally, the German dealers con-
cluded the deal for the mortar
grenades with a Finnish manu-
facturing firm. Due to the re-
lationship between Finland and
the Soviets, the Finns could not
ship the grenades to the Ger-
mans. The Finnish firm, how-
ever, having a financial interest
in an arms factory of Solel
Boneh in Israel, a Histadrut
concern, turned over the con-
tract to the Israelis. While, of
course, the deal required the ap-
. proval of the respective govern-
ments, it was merely a routine
matter and no diplomatic con-
siderations were involved in it,
according to the reports publish-
ed in the Israeli press, which
were not denied by official cir-
cles.
It was further claimed that the
French encouraged Israel to ship
the arms to Germany. Gen. Koe-
nig-was even quoted as having ex-
pressed himself publicly'in favor
of the arms deal. This, too, was
denied by the General, and no
other French source was found to
verify the claim. Mr. Mindlin's
contention that, by dealing with
Germany, "Israel established eco-
nomic liason with NATO's corner-
stone power on the continent,"
would seem to be based on a flim-
sy foundation.
Another argument was advan-
ced in favor of the arms deal,
claiming that the Israeli sale of
arms to Germany would be recip-
rocated by a German sale of
heavy weapons to Israel. The
truth, however, is that Germany
today is not a manufacturer and
exporter of heavy arms, and her
own forces are supplied bv Amer
ican French and Britisn stock.
Bear in mind, also, that the Ger-
mans already announced that they
are ready to buy arms from Nas-
ser, if the price will be acceptable.
i
| Mr. Mindlin deals very lightly
1 with the moral issue involved in
I Israel's shipping arms to Germany.
However, if the material interests
of the State of Israel are to over-
ride moral considerations, then
the very basis for Jewish life in
the world is profoundly shaken.
Not only does this weaken our
claim for sacrifices by Jews for
the survival of Jewish life in all
its aspects, but even the very
basis for the existence of Israel
and of Jewish communities the
world over is being dealt a serious
blow.
f
If political interests of na-
tions, even national security, are
considered to be above moral
precepts, then the Jewish case
in the world, including Israel's,
is resting on a very weak foun-
dation. This conception is cer-
tainly contrary to everything
that net only the Zionist move-
ment, but Jewry throughout its
history, has maintained vis-a-vis
itself and the world at large.
As to the divine duty for sur-
vival, may I be permitted to re-
mind you that the Jabotinsky
movement was the first among all
Jewish and Zionist groups to
preach the moral imperative of
preparedness for the defense of
the Jewish people and the need for
military action to gain Eretz Israel
and statehood. At that time the
people now presiding over the des-
tiny of Israel were branding this
idea as militaristic, chimeric and
dangerous. Mr. Mindlin's rebuke
that moral considerations were at
the bottom of the "shock when Is-
rael went to war in 1048 to assure
her legacy; for Jews, it is argued,
should possess little more than
spiritual plowshares," can hardly
be addressed to the disciples of
Jabotinsky in the Herut Party in
Israel.
However, Herat's objection to
the arms deal was consistent with
its policy against dealing with
Germany and is due entirely to
the obligation of a people to main-
tain its moral integrity which, in
the long run, determines its secur-
ity and existence more than ma
terial wealth and stocks of wea
pons The revolt of the Irgun Zva.
Leumi, Israel's War of Indepen
dence and the Sinai campaign
proved this conclusively.
BEINESH EPSTEIN
Executive Director
United Zionists-Revisionists
of America, New York City
55v^ww\^^v^w^^
TWIN CITY GLASS CO.
eUAOANTfie MINORS STORI FRONTS FUsNITURE TOPS
^^ ANTIOUI MIRRORS ft RI-SRVfRwie
aero etas* awrauio wu roe watt
12M ie Street, MJ. Closed SaNreey. Tel Jf e-4141
#*^**w*^*
~>^mk^>^>**^-%*~>***~*******~*^^^******^'**'*
Registration Set
At Ner Tamid
Registration for the religious
school of Temple Ner Tamid is
scheduled for Sunday, Aug. 23.
from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and
will be open Sunday and daily
thereafter. The expanded facil-
ities of Ner Tamid religious school
include modern, air-conditioned
classrooms.
Hebrew school will be open to
children from eight years of age
and over. Sunday school offers an
integrated course, and is open to
children five years of age and
over. Rabbi Eugene Labovitz will
be education director of the school.
THEN TO TEL AVIV
This is Tel Aviv's Golden Jubilee
Year, and a golden opportunity for
you to enjoy flying at its finest,
KLM will speed you non-stop across
the Atlantic on a luxurious, four-
engine DC-7C (Kosher foods avail-
able on all flights). Then go direct
to Tel Aviv. Or turn your trip into
a grand tour with the KLM stop-
over plan. Visit London, Paris,
Brussels, Vienna, Rome, and a host
of other historic cities-at no extra
cost I
Round trip to Tel Aviv: $047.70
Economy. $1,308.80 First Class.
Service from Houston and New
York, too. See your travel agent or
call KLM: Columbus Hotel, 308
N.E. First Street, Miami, Florida.
FRanklin 3-8455.
GOLDEN JUBILEE!


p.jf+litfkrKfan
TM
ky. Augw^- w f
Page 6-A
I'
H E 1 3 4 5 feD 1
ul 8c 0 E
9M A
cs "t IG
13 4B F 15 feo Lr
"D aI 18 19
1 A 1 n-y 25 22
^D Q 24 A R
*o T
t-es, !,s T A ~ic
Ca*. *& '
EXPIAHATION TO WHIf MO. 4
IUKD B^ewewtfe put kw
wee*, and the. .an cna, .If** '
chore, together "Iktgj,
1
I
I
injBftfsa**:
w.rdt
)
EXPLANATIONS ACROSS
find
. v .,,,, ,tl|.i,-..,s ******
... S..ITIN'
NAME..
ADDRESS
CITV.-
PMONE.
STATE
COINWORD PUZZLE NO. 6 WORTH $150
If there are no correct olution to the previous week's
puzile. Otherwise prixe returns to beginning $IO0 Jackpot.
If you with to subscribe to The Jewish Floridian check the
square and your paper will start immediately. Subscription
price is C *5 per year, Q $10 for 3 years Regular subscribers
are eligible for larger prizes. See rules.
i
\
-I.....Id nevt
i:Kl i urtala
.,.!,. .'..-i. or too
bImhiI ,,.
-A ', I
a TORPID, ... ;;-<' ,,.,-,
mS IP u..
".'"Vu'Vs '":...Hoqulally, l-r<
.mount.) ol ever, l '
:",;r-'; I
1A* ambition. yOUBc mi_ .
worry about his f
jinx, if w w.k-. ;%**%
wlvea. In buatnes. circles VTJJ
iH-rtant for a young roan's Wir. ."!
aporoved of. If n..t. she J,* *]
had luck Par his career ;
l>ert. hut the word has a i^.vf,
notation, and kii. h a wlf. i"',
helpful.
17An n ..inera
often FlI.UKI) with
could
hou
4
l>... .grounds Su- .
Instance, as .lie stands m "
Itrl.lce. Background w
Una for m.I .. *
cantata enlhuxla-t w.,ui perspective. o thai hl ot7
not he KII.I.KD with l>. kiro
IIWhen an em. ig.-n. y ;.,-
..i.hestra ha* onl> I.,
performer before. nu.ti\
needed. A *.< pert
plays sjraU. and then
why he should not merge ? r>k
easily Into that .,f a full orchestra
Copyright IMS. Genera) Fi fu'etf

MADUNE THIS WEEK SUNDAY MIDNIGHT, AUG. 16
| Cut along the dotted line, paste on a 3-cent postcard and mail to
COINWORD Editor, The Jewish Floridian. P.O. Box 2973. Miami I, Fla.
1 CLUES ACROSS

1 -_......hay onto a stack soon I
exhausts a tenderfoot.
6A highly strung person gets
upset by any
8This might be a nuisance on a
long walk.
9 ........ Klansmen seeking ve.n-'
geance are no longer in good
repute.
10At a buffet supper, it is usual-
ly informal.
13Chemical symbol, erbium.
16Old English: Abbr.
17After a public idol's death, i
historians may dig up facts
that his memory.
19Doctor of Science: Abbr.
20To impress a house guest, a
hostess would want to vary
her setup for dinner
22That man.
24Preposition.
25A of candy shouldn't be
kept in the sun.
26 A man going to Alaska on busi-
ness could certainly use a
warm .... coat.
27A fruit vender would try to
catch a boy who made off with
a----------of bananas.
CLUES DOWN
1Eying her son as he .............
over his studies. Mom might
worry about Willie's lack of
exercise.
2Paid notices: Abbr.
3Frozen desserts.
4Hard swelling.
5Greek: Abbr.
6A belligerent toper usually
a cop's right to arrest
him.
7Impersonal pronoun.
11Drinking ....... is acceptable
in many strait-laced house-
holds.
12 Undelivered produce piled up
by a truckmen's strike works
hardship on a
14It's not much fun to play a
game with an opponent you
can't ......
1!>Washing machines are a
way to do laundry than those
old washtubs.
18Passage out.
21Plunder.
22Those with a persistent
in their throats should not neg-
lect it.
23An unkempt one is appropriate
for an actress in playing a
slattern.

WORD LIST
HACK
H l.S'li;
BEAR HAWK
B :\ : HE
B Bi IB hi: w ixq
1 :i >W HIMMKIt
CORNET HIMPED
CORSET ICES
I'ASI.V IT
I'AN I ilKR JAR
DEFACB LOOT
DEFAME M IRKED
DEFIEM MASSED
DBN1E8 NODE
DIG
DIN OTTER
IxjIIvT OUTER
II s BEATING
EH EXIT PETTING BTAI K
GR> STALK
GRi CKR TO
GROWER Today
TODDY
I..I1-
,,. ,,.. tnaklni oVmanda "'' ',,
rinnloyers cannot or ,""'
ThoiVh II l u"lU -'N"'s
Sjectlve. sre CSWoX. m...,> s rikej
,., (urlsdlctlon.1. or wIMcal strutei
ultli-'Ul UNION apiii-i'*.!
u-^.,w neujhborti.....I kkta jlW.
HINT f..r I snack h.n '>"-.
your hooaa Thai <'<> ';' "JT. S"
indeed 10 noas anmnrt the kll.h.n
.,,! actlval) RUNT for om.tallH i
ta-Evtryoni b utmaafttl for tkaOAIN
in the reaarrolr, whan < i"1"[
burst relieves "* -h'""";1 "
I. ,., Jutl th. RAIN that lull- IMO
U,. reservoir, but Iba continued run-
ft from lh water t.ble feeding 11
th.it raises lha ,.!' level after the
RAIN is ..v. ,. .
\ n ..... uw i- i n pai"' '""
about the MOTIONS she uses i"
riving .i mawiage training hat lauant
h. i when the iiervi n nli i II;
p,hi h stroki r* mo.1 rela mj ot
.tlmulatlrur. Bb llkel) i" Jiif
. ream. ..> to use LOTH NS ill......'-'
[and an) c.....I ones Intended foi the
| |.ui|M.-r .!(-- probably satlsfactorj
36 It's hard for the rlmi
Ibl i- I lENTED b> hit bi si
friend. It l.n'l neremar) lhal Ihi
alibi I- DENIED romplel.....
I., -t .......I uld li | nol to do) i.i.i
ili.it some "f the statements support
Ini his alibi ma) fhjuratlvi I) i
red b) Information .. q.....i
the pressure of qu< stloninit
_ \ MOODY atmosph.....
. !!>.. f..r the m) st< i j rltei
tti. I. ., f. pllna f let .! jit-
ter) nerves, and gloom M'il,lY
n,. ant mu ty, stale, In the
emie, .nd might be concerned more
with horrot r(i. 11 with myMer) .tor-
les.
EXPLANATIONS DOWN
ftWhen TV ibi farea badl) In
It:* audience l'l'l.l.. ^>onsora us-
ually drop it its I'.ii.i. may sboa ..
high rating (In tin.-. "What pi
re rou listening lo?" telephone ...ll-i
l.ut it does tin- sponsor llttli .....I f..r
you to listen if v..ii don t bu> u -
productthe shoa doesn't 1't'U. In
the customers,
"A preoccupied man may unwit-
llngl) GRANT hi- consent lo laki
his wit. to .....net it He ma) ORCNT
when she ..-k- him, ..r mak< son
other reply srhli h -......ds more hk.
agreement than hkn "No," .;th the
result that uutliiiikiniilv hi
t.. lake hi r
Some political I'I.ans that will
put liim in the spotlight in. log-
i a] foi .i .. dentlal hop. t.il .
Include such thing, as speeches pub-
rfli tc, to establlah
"'" A political PLANK, .-. basic
ill. in. ..f hat tin part) stands r. ,
la formulated b) th. ruling hlet
..f til.- party, rather than b) .. nr< si-
denlul h.....fui
11When .. gamiktui i Heal npin-
Ions ire ixs. .r\i,. ,.lk,
i.i,..- ... listen quiet
him in i) lose th. account, bul
l'"1 '" 1*1 '..............Irorrei-ted
tt'r"vrf "'",': '"' "Pinions .... in
WOI Nli rollowln. ... ,,
end i- v.,> helpful In leai.....i
ill |.l. as. ihi Hem
H A II VRRIED hi is. fi
, tt> nelghbot ii.....nstant^
;""';- .chat Idle talk Is
racking wh. n nn. a mind Is i.r,
'"'I with w.H les .,,,.1 freti \ ,
Rules for the COINWORD Contest
The*J. w.b rlorldUn before midnight of Iks* 8iuta*r evening f,i|loi:.g; pubUoJ
on ,.f That weeks puasle. No enlrlea re.-lved after that time, whether sai-1
id'" d--IKer* by hand, win be declared ejtwtala. Tou may mail your mto*]
m an envelope if >"u wl.h. This paper la not reaponalble for enUies lwt1
t'"Th'.' j'cw^h"riolrldUn will award a j-ekpot prime to the winner of C0J
' WORD puIe. If -ore than one winali anew Is received, the pra, rt1
be divided equally among Ibe wlnaefa. If no cortact solution Is rc:elv>i.l
;^A^:.'l\VV,vl;'";..'':"rr,vkso".upDo^-o th. coin p.,.,. *.
" ThaiTco?re""tVI can win. The decision of the Judge. I. flt.al a* ,
contestants agree to abide by the Judge, decision. All entries threat I
.,..,. ... (h paper "nlN >.ne prise will he awarded to a famil. aail
j-'nu ..'' itst be mailed lo Ihe i-..INW(1MD editor of The Jew,fl. Florjl
No entries can he ..turned The correct answer of each puule ati
.^!!^;L;^:!^:,:i;:.':,;.'Th:rt';e1w.,h nnrui.. -ho t.... ,*-..;
Cuii am designed Charm and Modeling Courses available far ages 2.iK>U
OITH APPLISAUM
Director
MODEHNG SCHOOt AND AGENCY
177 Miracle Mile. Coral Gable*. Fie,
Highland 4-1 MO* *
Zionists Name
Program Chief
NEW YORK Appoint m,.nt of
-Nathaniel S. Rdlhcnhern. of New
York, a vice prcM,|(.nt f ,h(. z,)A
and a member of .is officer, ,,
mittee. as national rhairman of the
program committee for the B2n-I
annual convention of the Zionist
Organization of America Sept lo
to 13 at the Willard hotel ln Wa,,
"HJton. DC. was announced W.l
nosday by Abraham A Redelhtun
1 president of the organ.zat.on
Dedicated to the Herzl Centen
mal Year, marking the loothi an
der of modern Zionism, the 7(\
convention will draw an ^JJ
,200 delegates ttm all parts of
the country. y m\
Major topics on the agenda will
NEVER BEFORE
Luxury Tourist Flights At Such Low Fares!
UMA......'150
BUEHOS AIRES '251
Wo thm Mow Oovgfaj DC-* wJtFr C
'+* a/r//nes
"nr^S I PTWVMH Mitti**,


Augurf 14. 1959
Jr Al^ ^KeSf tMtl
Page 7-A
I
Real Danger' hi Genftan Anti-Semitism
Continued from Paee 1-A
things we could have done ten years ago
[now become rather obsolete and more diffi-
tackle. The Jewish organizations in Western
my would no doubt be in a position to confirm
Writing that his party has sought to remove for-
K'azi officials from positions within the Aden-
regime, Ollenhauer said that "the basic law
is our constitution has established an ethical
[of decency and conduct which would allow
courts to deal with any offenders. There is,
fer, the question of whether the judges pre-
over these courts are able or willing to apply
I laws. This brings us to the question of the
|al of officials.
|r party has for years clamoured for the re-
of former Nazi officials, who have sought and
shelter also among highest gevernment posi-
tions. This is an eminently political task, and some
progress^has been made.""
Accusing the Bonn regime' of making the SPD
position on the issue clear abroad, Ollenhauer in-
formed Held that "we share your anxiety on recent
developments of anti-Semitic outburts and anybody,
who has followed events close at hand, that means
on the spot in Germany, will know that our party
has been leading the attack against a renaissance of
anti-Semitism."
He added that his party and the trade union
movement are "bearing the brunt of the struggle
against old and new Nazi elements."
Stating that his party and the labor movement
were fully aware of their responsibilities, Ollenhauer
said that "we should like you to realize that the
success of our joint efforts will depend entirely on
the political situation here and whether we will be
able to have the support of democratic forces be-
yond our national frontiers."
ice Instructors
Group
.nation of the United Dance
ctors of Florida, a benevo-
jssociation, was announced
|eek by Charles Gantz. newly-
president' of the associa-
te charter was signed by
County Circuit Judge Robert
pyd. Other officers include
\y Rissman, Bernie Sager,
Milkens, Dorothy Gantz,
j Cugat, Nino DiPenna, Wil
[Craner, Joe Lustig, Peter
Here, Prank Bart, Ruth Riss-
JTom Vincent, Steve Bozio,
[Carney, Tom Carney, Stan-
hbin.
ter was prepared by legal
bl Joseph W. Malek.
ibs Split
Refugee Issue
from Pafl* 1-A
ly work out a idvtion of
rab refugee problem.
nd Jumeil's firm words
[to bo the fact that Lebanese
ll balance is based on an
equilibrium between the
and Christian populations
percent of the refugees
[Moslems while most of the
mtj are Christians', thus
ening to upset the balance.
League delegates, meeting
_ut, cautiously rejected the
of Hammarksjold's sugges-
about integration of the ref-
mto the economic life of
st countries, while repeating
logic statements about the
(ding return of the refugees
at was formerly Palestine.
A "builders' party" on behalf
of M t. Sinai Hospital of
Greater Miami will be host-
ed by Cal Kovens, local
building contractor, who
Wednesday accepted (he
chairmanship of the event.
low Students fo Moot
Law students representing stu-
dent bar associations at universi-
ties throughout the country will be
at Miami Beach Aug. 22 to 26 for
the tenth annual meeting of the
American Law Student Assn. The
University of Miami school of law
will be host school for the group
which will hold most of its events
at the Carillon hotel. The meeting
will coincide with the American
Bar Assn. national convention ses-
sions at the Americana hotel. Ir-
win Kishner will help direct the
meeting.
Sinai Prepares
Plenty of Parking
Parking congestion at the new
Mt. Sinai Hospital of Greater Mi-
ami win be solved with the crea-
tion of five parking lots accommo-
dating a total of 1,187 cars, accord-
ing to a statement Wednesday
from the office of H. A. Lefferts,
who is supervising the construc-
tion of the new building.
Thanks to the filled in areas be-
tween the former Collins and
Johns Islands, and a complete re-
modeling of the environments of
the old Mt. Sinai site, the new
building will practically be sur-
rounded by parking lots.
Lot A, south of Hie new build-
ing, with a capacity for 3*7 cars,
will be reserved mainly for doc-
tors and staff members. Lot B
to the roar of tho building aitd
facing Biscayne Bay, will be re-
served for ltt cars of employees
and delivery vehicle*.
The largest lots, C and D, oc-
cupy the space between the new
building and the new Nurses Resi-
dence, and will accommodate 427
cars belonging to visitors and pa-
tients. The Nurses Residence will
have its own lot located partly on
land gained from the bay.
Finally, the circle in front of the
old,hospital will disappear due to
a change' in the location of the
accesses to the new facility, and
in its place a parking lot for 122
cars will be created.
Landscaping and paving of the
parking lots will go hand in hand,
and is expected to be started by
the end of September.
Aronovitz Will
Chair Bank Board
INSURED SAVINGS
HOME FINANCING
SAVE-BY-MAIL
Oldest
and
Largest
Inc
Miami
Beach
|FEDERAL]
SAVINGS AND VOAM MMflMnON*
Mm Offkos: liecoU let* ot WtshkoatM AvtfwD
J. 11114*111
tor* BrwMk* m4 WM*0*
[M......*
Miami attorney Sidney Arono
vitz has become chairman of the
board of directors of the Bank of
Dade County.
He succeeds Dr. Kurt Peiser,
who was made honorary chair-
man. Peiser stepped down from
active board chairmanship to de-
vote more time to his post with
Air Control Products, where he
recently took a top executive job.
Other new officers of the bark
are Joseph Levay, senior vice
chairman, and Salvador Olivar,
vice chairman. Aronovitz, a gradu-
ate of the University of Florida, is
a native Floridian. He was one of
the bank's founders when the
North Dade institution opened in
April, 1956.
TO WOMEN WHO WORK
Will your preaant Income continue all
your Ufa? Ana about tha Metropolitan"
Income Planand make your future
NAT "CANS
3200 S.W. Jr. Al-
thaeas n 24414 er IN 4-tMl
Repreeenting __
MlTt0*OUTAN 1*1 MfWUNCI CO.
1 Madleon Ave.. New Yark 10. N.V.
GORDON ROOFING AND
SHEET METAL WORKS INC
2144 H.W. 10* Ae. W 2-7110
Have yer reef '''V".0"; *,u
will aave an a "* reaf ,,Ur-
"laatiafaetary Werk by
3i f7goodr1ch
TIRE PRICES
REDUCED
51.25%
LOWEST PRICES IN YEARS 4
tAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAi
WHITEWALLS ..
14" TIRES
fifT"
SElT
Par Tha
7.TW
14
tt0xi4-OK.l4
w
-**
IS" TIRES
%uT
14*11
at The
ntiii
114.11
o.es-
up...............ovwr
mil.......TKit?
Aiv-iseatl ......io.oo*
fet *e-eM* fee I
HOUSANDS OF GOOD JCCQ
TIRES
WHtTEWALL
ILACKWALL
TRUCK
PASSENGER
95
4
K'iJL i
B. F. GOODRICH
BATTERY
ELECTRO-PAK
24-MONTH
GUARANTEE
95
i r v.
B.f.Codrkh
$
11 fOtT UIOMTIT HISMBI
11
INCIUOH
ACIO
OPM 24 HOURS
A ALL DAY 4UNDAY
5301 H.W. 27th Art
EASY CREDIT
YO WAIN TM1 TSSMS
llf ttTS YON MR1IH6
NORTON
TIRE
aw. iio an.
MIAMI
I AW. M kit.
oMrni wami
aw. m .
103 t
aw.
MIAMI
Ml W. HASH! IT.
I4M ALTNMAI
tOOTR MIAMI
' JOeTH DIIII
MAIATMN
tAUWlP QUO.


Page 6-A
+ k*ist Fkridiar


i

i
_[f"7_^WR
Dade County Council to Meet Tuesday;
Will Interpret Goals to Community
Dade County Cmtmai ea C+m
if Relations win njeet Tue*
;-*- < >*i.' i. '
hotel
Purple of the meeting will be
to satreduce ibe new IBM
irrVf to ".be casnaaaniity and
to 11 jaakijii11 the program of the
Ceaasei]. an aff-liaw of the Florida
Cmi il of C( iwnity Relations,
to the general public.
Sew appointees to the commit-
tee by Metropolitan Government.
hjcfc lends do support except of
a leadership variety to the Coun-
cil, are Leon McAsblL Miami
Beach publisher J X. McArthur.
Dade county dairyman: Jose
Ferre. Pwerto Rico industrialist
Edward C Rogers. Miami insur-
executne. and Sen. Harry'
t Cam. president of the United
jjkAllistav Fund <* Dade County..
Financial support comes to the
Council through partial assist-
ance of some of the areas mu-
nicipalities, as well as from
membership dues and contribu-
tions. "We make no benes about
it," explained William K. Wil-
liams, eaecutive director. The
Council is constantly hurting for
want of an adequate budget. But
the iob at hand is *n enormous
one. And it must be done.
Rabbi Warns Against
Jewish Beatnik' Rise
The job to which he refer- in
volves human relations education,
the resolution of community ten
sioiis. the general mterreligious
and interracial programs of other
community relations agenciesex
cept that the Dade County Council
is a quasi-official group and non-
J M Palframan. president, sectarian in membership.
Bark of Dade County, announced These are the aims which will
Wedrx-sci of Joseph be laid forth before the Tuesday
A F.i>..- Miami investment night meeting at the McAJUatCf
fra~nTT and !' urban of Ply mo.
ffoyvrs fleetest' Chairman
Bond and Share C ba post
of chairman of the bank i invest-
ment c-oaansnee 1' :.acity.
Rayvis will be in charge of all in-
-: r.u that tbe bank mat
its own portiobo Ray\.
ector of the Bank of Dade
County since 1
Nasatir Unveiling
MOCKS NASATH

Sun dor, Aeaast Urk at 1:30 p.m.
T

Mr
"It is a pity." the Council ei
ecutive explained, 'that hate cam-
paigns seem to flourish economic-
and that programs such as
-jffer for want of the where-
withal to keep going. But 1 think
that communities here and
throughout the state are beginning
realize they must >tart financ
it more adequately than
finance hate.
"The Metro appointments Wil-
liams explained, "are an mdica-
.his praiseworthy goal
be coming about."
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz.
spiritual leader of North
Shore Jewish Center, is back
from a trip to Cuba, where
he officiated at services of
the Havana Jewish Center.
Rabbi Abramowitz discussed
his experiences on the island
during his Saturday morning
sermon at North Shore last
week.
;REPHUN'S HEBREW:
BOOK STORE
L.-oe-t and O flet Hebrew
St-ppiy Ho,it r G'tater M.jmi
WHOUiAU end MM
CoTipietc Uaa ot Htt>r* Supplie*
tor SynBoguet. Hebrew and
S-najy Schools
>
>
r


?
, ISRAELI GIFTS and NOVELTIES
, 417 Woshiagtea kit. Miami Beach
* Jtfferse. 1*017 J
Flagler Opens
Registration Here
Flaglcr Granada Jewish Center
will open registration for its Sun
day and Hebrew tebooll on Sun
day, AU| SO, and Sept. 6. from 9:30
a.m. to 12 noun
Hebrew school will he under di-
rect scpervision of Rabbi Bernard
Shoter, who ill he assisted by
Ivi Kaj and Abraham R(enth..i
Double SI isej .ire planned
for Sunda) school, and both de-
partments will commence Sept IS,
Erwin Marshall, principal of
Sunday school, will be assisted
by eight teachers and five junior
teachers.
There \>ill be four trades ol Hi
brew school, which will be inte-
I with Sunday school, with
a post-Bar Mitzvah and po-' Bai
Mitzvah stud] group orgaoii
meet once I week lor one to two
hours under Rabbi Shoter
There will also he a Tall:-
Tef'llm Chlb lor fathers and
and daughters, which will meet on
Sunday mornings for discusi
prayers and break).
\
Here, memory
is forever
enshrined in beauty
v Neb M amfi obloM and
M Jii-ii eaweiai) can \our
Ml j- il has
Ireaej l+e ir ever 4.000 other
hsjhl) aiinfd lewU uatuMee,
r**' ''"r Faint tiiindiM
IIOQJMO i- \,,ur sseawanet of
i- aaear* baaaakaj beauty ... .nd
liirtr ut no anas, assasssseata
or atsastewaace easts, Your initial
oast need be \our onl\ one.
Detail, kill hrjladl) furnished, in
>our batae, b> mad or phone.
'
"'MS MOST BAUT,FUl EXCLUSWElr JEWtSM CEMETERY
Wmt ~JW> Bmttm
5bOS Northw.,, 3rd St. >h.M UHQmm^k 1
76*3
..............F DETAILS WR.TE TO............
I *~*NeboC~e..n, J50J Kw ^ ^ ^ ^""l
\ Name.......
Zone State.....
Leaders to Seek
Khrushchev Meet
Continued from Page 1-A
has been reported that Khrush
chev has allegedly indicated will-
ingness to receive American
Jewish leaders and discuss with
them the position of the Jews in
the Soviet Union.
The questions concerning. Soviet
Jewry will never be answered in a
Miide meeting with Premier
Khrushchev patently desirable ||
such a merlin* is," Klulzn.k said
He predicted that it would be
long time before meaningful an
swers would be received
tnr. ana'yS!S f the m,ernat.onal
situation and its impl.cauons both
for the State of Israel and world
Jewry was given here bv Dr S
Uvenberg. of Undon a, |he Mi
-ca commutee of the Assemblv
Following Dr Ix-venberg s report
he committee adopted a reso u
"on a.sk.ng ,he Great PowerT.o
^e Lnited Nations, for a forth, r
and f0r an end to the cold n,
between East and West
The committee reu>rtH
|"..on presented by'JrmemU,':i
-nn,M hsh contact uhk eiao-
organua,:n^'th Wto" "*
STAR1 IGHT Pa- American Jewish educational ays
tern runs the risk of producing a
generation of Jewish beatniks"
unless it can give young Jews
"straightforward, realistic and
constructive" answers to their
questions, Dr. Ira Eisenstein. for-
mer president of the Rabbinical
Assembly of America, and one of
the leaders of the Reconstruction-
ist movemeni. warned here.
Rabbi Eisenstein was addressing
more than 100 teen-age regional
officer- of the B'nai B'ritb Youth
Organization who are attending a
23-day Leadership Training Insti
lute at (amp B'nai B'nth here
The young delegates participating
in the Institute were specially se-
lected for leadership potential.
They were granted scholarships
from the national B'nai Brifi
Youth Organization and their local
B'nai B'nth adult communities.
"Jewish youth no longer wants
to run away from tho Jewish
heritage; they want to adopt it,"
Rabbi Eisenstein said. "But they
recognize that they cannot live
with it as it has boon handed
down to them. Unfortunately,
they have, by and large, found I
few teachers prepared to adapt
it to their needs and to the times
in which we live." He added that I
Jewish young people particu-
larly those in leadership posi-
Teen Club Ends
Summer Program
An o\ernii;ht visit to Maeatrtr
and a complete tour of
ibmannes ,in the I S Naval Station highlighted
the final week ol summer activi-j
'' ol the Traveling Teens Club j
ol th. Miami VM1!\
\ chartered air conditioned bus
transported the young people to
an area most ot them had never'
hu- tour through
old Kej West, -wimming. and the
hospitality of the I'. S. Naval Sta-'
nel rounded out an ex-1
tnp Aug. 3 and 4.'
' i ighl weeks, the group of
junior high school-age boys andf
have enjoyed a wide variety'
trips throughout
lorida. In addition,
led in a program of
art- and crafts, dramatics, sports,
and IBM
The croup ha- been supervised
bj Mr- Estelle Fein Hardin and'
red by the Greater Miami
Jewish Community ("enter.
lebediger Branch Heelings
Forty members gathered last
week at a meeting of the I^bediger
Branch of Farband Morris Levinc
chaired the meeting at the Greater
Miami Jewish Community Center.
executive committee of the or-
ganization met Aug. 5 at the home
of Mr and Mrs |uac Offenden-
den. with Herman Mirowiu as
chairman.
tjem In J^ith ^
*"*** in desoerat,
^"m^dern M j
The challenge prejentfctk
generation cannot forlasJ
nored," he warned "TaTIl
produced beatniks skJfl
well to the meaning o7 '!
fused and desperate chjr
we are not to have a cr!
ish beatniks the Jew,,/
nity had better bestir
give answers that are ^
ward, realistic and com
Youth is willing no toSj
ted, but will our adult
meet this challenge?
The BBYO Institute pr-,
ehadea a series of lecture,,
cussions on Judaism, tat
phy of leadership aaa ,
eathma designed to tt,
and Israeli singing and _
The Institute, which wfll
through Aug. 18. will be
by tbe international coore
Aleph Zadik AJeph. hoys ,
of the B'nai B nth Yoatii,
zation, and B'nai B'nth
teen-age girls counterpart
organization.
To fJM i-i H
Behind
Schedultd Unvtilinji
AY, AUGUST U
If. Neho Ceaxttrr
IRNAIO IICKIH, It-.Jt
RaAbi M
MUM WOIUN, 2 fJA
RaW> \; ;wa)
SUNOAT, AUGUST 11

Weedlewn 'ark Cimt'rt \
IALPN S. iUKH, 12:4: tl
"Mav Tl
m E:c ... Pttct
AMANGEMENTS I"
PAUaDt/S aaUMl MOMUMEfTI
ISRAELI RELIGIOUS STORE
AU Nfttmr sufmis roe
SrMAQOtUli I IIWISM HOWS
1357 WASHINGTON AYE
JE 1-7722
MifMi Hebrew Book
lies wai'B'" **^
Miami neacn j
Hebrew nastaieu* *'
. et>en er rej
ISRACLI A DOMESTIC
kW Dr. ft* H.
S11 Waahtem Aa._J
ilfW205-JlW
Coll Jlff.rgoft 1-747J
School Dofcs Posted
schools on Sunday Aua *i u*
*> '~m 10 a m uIL n^
" *' start Sept 8 f^ P"-
ar aaa
nzwmxh
VHBUiHOhU
tin ADfl muuvum
MIAMI IIACM
T.


August 14, 1959
+.lewisii ftcrldHan
Page 9-A
Services This Weekend
vESHURUN. 17080 Collins
Cc-eervalive. Rabbi Abraham
Ion. Cantor Ben Zion Kirachen-
--------
rM ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle ave.
, >. Rabbi Isaac Ever.
p.in. Kul >" a.m.
, (,,.' \voi "i fomforl .""I
|'< 0,1 T.lu\ Mini V.
rMCS. 8*33 SW 18th a v.
prvMivt. Maxwell Silberman,
ent.
DAVID. 2435 SW 3rd ave. Con.
itiv". Rabbi Yaatcov Rosenberg
gr William W. Lipson.
El 500 SW 17th ave. Orthodox
Solomon Behlff.
*i p.m. HiturHay 8:3n a.m.
' 'rnnfort Ye. My People."
FM6ThTi90 NW 2nd ave.
r.v.-tive. Rabbi David W. Her-
.nntor Hymaa Fain.
S ". p.m. finest nplrltiiBl lead-
er1 *hrnhtn Henwn. Sermon:
,.i : IrtVal* for Our Times"
B.m. Sermon: "The Sab-
ufurt."
ISRAEL. 4000 PraIHe ava. Or-
x Rabbi H. Louis Rottman.
JACOB. 801-311 Washington
Orthodox. Rabbi Tlbor Stern.
Maurice MamcheS.
, RAPHAEL. 186 NW Srd ava.
p TF'LAH. t3S Euclid ava. Or-
X. Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky.
WAV JEWISH CENTER.
p. 34-584. Miami. Rabbi Sam-
fcpril.
.lE'OMTS CENTER. 1S180 NW
ve. Conaervative. Cantor Eman-
fanrfel,
R.QRANAOA. 50 NW 61et
onservative. Rabbi Barnard
r'rn p.m. Saturday 8 a.m. Br
Carry. won of Mr. and Mr*
8rn. Aiifmf of Rabbi Hhoter In
\l M wedding Hunday to Mlaa
KenaOaV
LuDERDALE EMANU-EL. 1801
inrtrewa ava. Reform. Rabbi
>a Ramon. Cantor Sherwin
SW ACADEMY. 818 8th at. Or-
Rabbi Alexander Creaa.
------a .
AH REFORM JEWISH CON-
IATION. 1150 W. 88th at.. Ralm
s. Rabbi Nathan H. Zwitman.
------a------
YOOO TEMPLE SINAI. 2030
I. Conservative. Rabbi David
o. Cantor Yehudah Hallbraun.
.ITE CENTER Siva SW 24th
[Conservative. Rabbi Morton
pSky.
ih ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid ava.
Idox. Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Abraham Self.
: i *** p.in suiii'liiy 8:30 a.m.
sabbath of Consolation."
HEBREW CONOREOATION.
12th ava. Orthodox. Rabbi
Hell Savllle. Cantor Berele
nrr.
I B in p.m. Saturday 8 a.m. Ser-
f'l.l-. inac HKperlem-e "
8)------
flCELLO PARK. 184th at. and
llth ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Lipshiti.
p.m. Saturday 8 a.m. Ser-
rWcfkly Portion."
H DADE CENTER. 136*8 W.
hwy. Conaarvativa. Rabbi
fy Okolica. Cantor Herman
phbcin-Marbiny
p.m. Camp Avlr Rabbath
spa kit: Jerry Rarlnh. eavmp
| i Cantor llai maa atareh-
nf'lclate In the abnem ot
II ik..lira. H iturday 8 a.m.
--------
|H SHORE CENTER. 620 75th at
rvative. Rabbi Mayer Abram-
Cantor Edward Klein.
IWEST CENTER. 04SS SW 8th
Conservative. Rabbi Maurice
-E BETH AM. 5650 N. Kendall
Miami. Reform Rabbi Herbert
ignrd. Cantor Charlaa Kodner.
p.m. Special ervtoe lo
lb Am flrxt nnnlvermirv
Temple. Robert H. Newman.
em, lo officiate.
BETH EL. 1646 Polk at..
Kw.cd. Reform. Rabbi Samuel
-E BETH 8HOLEM of Holly
, 1725 Monroe at Conaarvativa
bl Samuel Lerer. Cantor Ernest
elber.
8 p.m. Rabbi Samuel Mendel-
,ilon director, to officiate
' Kililil I,erer. Hat-
JlE BETH SHOLOM. 4144 Chase
Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kroniab
lor David Coitvlsor.
Liberal. Rabbi Morris Skop. Cantor
Herman Qottlieb.
[hllfhts
n lev Hi' i
Mr* 11. Ion i 'ohen ami Mr- Tl
Mlnyoi
a.m. Keaular i m.
----
TEMPLE NER TAMID. 80th st. ana
Tatum Waterway. Modern Tradi
tional. Rabbi Eugene Labovitx. Can-
tor Samual Oombarg.
--------
TEMPLE SINAI NO. MIAMI. 12100
NE 15th ave. Reform. Rabbi Benno
M. Wallach.
TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB. 851
Flamingo Way. Conaervative. Rabbi
Loo Helm.
I'rl.l.iy 8:13 p.m. Cantor Samuel La-
vlne to officiate In the absence of
Rabbi Helm.
------at------
TEMPLE ZION. 5720 SW 17th at
Conservative Rabbi Alfred Wax-
man.
Friday 4:30" p.m. Saturday 8 a.m. Jun-
ior concreajatlon service follows.
TIFERETH ISRAEL. 6600 N. Miami
ava. Conaervative. Rabbi Harry L.
Lawrence. Cantor Albert Qlantz.
Friday :S0 p.m. Sermon: "Bo>k of
IJeuteronomy." Onea; Shabbat howtw:
Members of Sisterhood. Saturday 8
TORAH TEMPLE. 1254 West ava
Traditional. Rabbi Abraham. Casaet
Services Friday evening; and Satur-
day morning*. Dally prayer and medi-
tation.
YOUNG ISRAEL. 167*0 NE 10th ava
Orthodox.
ZAMORA JEWISH CENTER. 44 Z*
mora ava. Conservative. Rabbi B
Leon Hurwitz. Cantor Meyer Oiaaor.
omi crtatiott
nnsrnniBn
TRANSLATION -
Who Creates the Fruit of ths> Tree
And they all know al-so about the
grapes, olives, almonds and figs,
the pomegranates and the dates.
In the Pentateuch already these
are mentioned (told about).
But recently the cultivation of
sub-tropical and northern fruit
trees has been expanding. Within
a few years we shall have large
rsn ns x-ria
^mm,-. _,. .
,D"3n *?V DJ D'BIV ttffl
r-: r -i :
,0TKnn ,n-Tj?i#. ,tPTO
dt^s .onanm o-iiann
1 -1 T I T
annna frmm tot? ^k
-a-to ns-^ "?ru pxa
I I :
ni*a? "? rrr nlmn VW
\ T I T -1 T
T- > I I V I
DUX ,nl3-in D'pDIDX
.ot^ n33 S7b*3 rftrm
.D-i3i3,i 1a ff-Vnna
T I I \ I "
T\H -as Dl0 n33 "2X -
onc^am ninan ^a bt Dan
'tl" "" T ---
.n"?xn
V -" T
quantities of apricots and pears,
peaches and guavas, pineapples
and apples, not to mention banan-
as which already grow in large
quantities today. And the latest
innovation, which we are begin-
ningcherries. "
"In my mouth I can already feel
the taste of all of these wonderful
fruiU."
(Published by Brit Writ Olamit)
More than 600 representatives of American Jewish commun-
ities presented $38,150,000 in cash collections against pledges
to (he nationwide 1959 United Jewish Appeal campaign at the
recent UJA national cash conference in New York City. Dele-
gates passed a resolution urging Jewish communities in the
United States to raise a like amount ol cash in the last half of
F959, for a year's total of $75 million cash. Shown with sym-
bolic check representing announced total at conference are
fleft to right) Melvin Dubinsky. UJA national cash chairman;
Morris W. Berinstein, UJA general chairman; and Rabbi Her-
bert A. Friedman, UJA executive vice chairman.
Humane Slaughter
Probe Aids Shechita
KAMI MARir tAtVlfWCf
Young Israel
Chapter Forming
Meeting will be held Sunday at
the home of Jack Ciment, 1026 Eu-
clid ave.. Miami Beach, for the
purpose of discussing the forma-
tion of a new Young Israel chap-
ter here.
Twenty- live representatives
throughout Greater Miami are ex-
pected to attend the planning meet-
ing, which will formulate plans for
an open forum discussion Tuesday.
8:30 p.m.. at the Royal Hungarian
restaurant.
The Royal Hungarian meeting-
wilt be the site for the signing of
the new Young Israel charter and
election of officers.
Ciment explained this week that
he recently discussed the "great
need" for a chapter with Rabbi
Ephraim H. Strum, national direc-
tor of Young Israel. The new chap-
ter will be the second in the area,
with one currently existing at
16T50 NE 10th ave
Tifereth Israel
Names New Rabbi
Rabbi Harry L. Lawrence, of
Brooklyn, N. Y., has assumed the
pulpit of Tifereth Israel Northside
Center, it was announced Wednes-
day by Herman W. Kutun, presi-
dent of the congregation.
Rabbi Lawrence served as area
director for the Jewish Welfare
Board-USO, and was executive di-
rector of Congregation Beth Sho-
lem in Kansas City, Mo.
A graduate of Mentclair State
Teachers College, he was ordain-
ed at the Lubavitch Seminary
in Brooklyn. He has served con-
gregations in Hackettstewn and
Summit, N. J., and was chaplain
of Selinsgrove State School at
Solinsgrove, Pa. Rabbi Lawrence
is a veteran of World War II,
with four and a half years of
service in the U.S. Air Force.
Rabbi and Mrs. Lawrence have
taken up residence at 94 NE 68th
ter., Miami. He and Mrs. Lawrence
are the parents of four children,
Geoffrey, 14. Sheldon, 9, Joseph,
6, and Beth Lee, 4.
He succeeds Rabbi Abraham
Herson.
NEW YORK(JTA)-A research
study, sponsored by American Jew-
ish communal and religious agen-
cies, is underway to determine
whether modern methods of pre-
handling food animals for slaugh-
ter are humane. The study, spon-
sored by the Joint Advisory Com-
mittee of the National Community
Relations Advisory Council and the
Synagogue Council of America, is
part of an overall program to pro-
tect Shechita, Jewish ritual slaugh-
ter, in a recent wave of federal
and state efforts to pass humane
slaughter legislation.
A federal measure became law.
on Aug. 27, 1958. Since then,
usually under sponsorship of lo-
cal Humane Societies, humane
slaughter bills were introduced
in 16 state legislatures and pas-
sed in three, California, Minna
seta and Washington. Local Jew-
ish communal and religious or-
ganisations testified before legis-
lative committees in opposition
to such legislation, except in the
state of Washington, where the
-E B-NAI SHOLOM 16800 NW
fid ava. Conservative. Rabbi
Son Edwards. Cantor Ban Qress-
h-E EMANU-EL. 1T01 Washing-
lave. Conaervative. Rabbi Irving
rm.in. Cantor Israel Raich.
[lE ISRAEL. 137 NE 16th at.
Rabbi Joseph R.. Narot.
or Jacob Bometetn.
-----re------
JLE JUDEA. Ua Palermo ava.
CANDLEUGHTING Tim
10 Ab 6:36 pan.
...
Temple Zion
Registration Open
Registration for Hebrew and j
Sunday school, which will com-
mence Sept. 8. is now open at
Temple Zion.
The Temple office is open dailv
from 9 to 5 and on Sunday until
noon.
Addition to the school's facilities
are two school busses. Transpor-
tation will be provided in most
areas. Staff will this year be ex-
clusively made up of licensed
teachers, with the system under
the authority of Rabbi Alfred Wax-
man, spiritual leader of Temple
Zion.
The school has been an affiliate
of the Bureau of Jewish Education
for the past eight years, and last
year boasted a registration of over
200 students in its Hebrew depart-
ment. An even larger registration
is expected this year, according to
Rabbi Waxman.
Beth Jacob Lists
Education Slate
Registration for daily Hebrew
and Sunday school is now open at
Beth Jacob Congregation. 301-311
Washington ave., Miami Beach.
Hebrew school classes com-
mence Sept. 14. and students mus
register during August, Morns
Krevat. chairman of the board of
education, and Morris Fogel. co-
chairman, announced Wednesday.
"We will not accept students for
Bar Mitzvah unless they have had
two years of Hebrew study," the
co-chairmen warned, adding that
"all Bar Mitzvah applicants will
be cleared" by Beth Jacob spirit-
ual leader Rabbi Tibor Stern.
Sunday school opens Sept. 20,
with registration in August and
September. Boys from 5 to 7 and
girls from 5 to 8 are eligible.
Rabbi Stern will initiate a class
for Bar Mitzvah graduates this
fall. Students advanced in Hebrew
and Talmud will be eligible to reg-
ister in the Beth Jacob Hebrew
High School department.
Krevat and Fogel also revealed
that the congregation's educational
program for youth will include a
junior congregation Sabbath morn-
ings at 9:15 a.m.. Sabbath cultural
class for high school students, and
Tallith and Tefillin Club Sunday
mornings under the direction of
Rabbi Stern.
Jewish community was caught
napping and the bill was passed
without testimony from local
Jewish groups.
The federal measure and most
of the state proposals specifically
declared Shechita to be humane
but in almost all cases, the prob-
lem of pre-handling was treated in
such a way as to carry a threat
that Shechita would be impossible.
None of the three states which
have passed humane slaughter
measures has created such pre-
handling problems but the threat
continues. The Joint Advisory
Committee therefore undertook the
study, noting that the Talmud bans
cruelty to animals in all circum-
stances, including both pre-handl-
ing and slaughtering.
Joint Advisory Committee offi-
cials pointed out that traditional
Jewish pre-handling of animals
for Shechita was manual and de-
signed to insure that the animal
did not suffer in being prepared
for Shechita. Modern automation
in packing houses has been applied
to pre-handling in such forms as
hoisting and shackling for both
regular and Jewish ritual slaugh-
tering.
Joint Advisory Committee of-
ficials pointed out that it has
never been established whether
such methods of pre-handling
are painful to the animal. The
research study was undertaken
to determine this. If this scien-
tific study finds more humane
practical forms of handling ani-
mals for slaughter, then the
Jewish organizations will rec-
ommend the alteration of pros-
rtt met nods.
If existing pre-handling methods
are found to be humane, then the
Jewish organizations will urge, as
in the case of Shechita, that such
methods of handling also be rec-
ognized as humane in federal and
state legislation.
Civil Service Group Meeting
Miami chapter of the National
Welfare of Jewish Civil Service
Employees will meet Sunday, 1:30
p.m., at 1540 SW 29th ave., accord-
ing to an announcement this week
by Robert Kanzer, organizer.
Beth Am Will
Fete Anniversary
First anniversary at Temple
Beth Am will be celebrated with
a membership brunch Sunday at
an open house 10 a.m. to 12 noon.
New members of the congrega-
tion and guests will be invited to
join in the celebration, and will be
welcomed by Rabbi and Mrs. Her-
bert Baumgard. They will be es-
corted through the Temple. Also
open for the vistors will be the
newly-completed Mark Light Me-
morial School bldg.
The modern 18-Classroom school
will accommodate a nursery and
kindergarten, and will have over
500 children attending classes in
Hebrew, Sabbath and Sunday
school this fall.
Cantor Sheldon Kodner will offer
a varied program of songs.


'aae
jimistiihr***>
Friday, August
JAM
M m *+* aHllA,Y MIWDU-
/W/a/ow /Vece 0/ 5fWaA/p tertr/tfes fro Ufa**
f f l/l#f tfWW ^^ when Jew t Greek^.ny thinf. were already i nj
HELLENISTIC CIVILIZATION AND THE JEWS. By Vjc
tor Tcherikovtr. Translated by S. Applebaom. 5W PP
Philadelphia: The Jtwish Publication Soooty of Amer-
ica. $6.00.
"JEBRAISM AND HELLENISM," wrote Matthew Ar
nold. "between these two points of influence moves
our world." It was within this world, too. that the late
Dr Victor Tcherikover spent his entire scholarly life.
From his Berlin student days up through his last years
as professor at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, he
devoted his research to "the social and economic founda-
tions of Ptolemaic Egypt and Soleucid Syria. He was the
first to make full use of a new type of source material for
Jewish history, thus inaugurating the specific branch of
Jewish papyro Most of ^'^ Kn^
arucles deal with the history of the Jew* in
agi.

SS>.sa= :-,'.':-"=."-
The
prodigious piece of scholarship.
At
book is a h'","*'"m- t-..... _
glance, it> dry-assist format. |Wljjjjj
denied paragraph plodding down tbepkge^l. gg
But shortly, some of the reasons which 1kept DTchen
kover in willing thraUdom to the period become apparent.
Capitol Spotlight:
By MILTON FRIEDMAN
State Dep't. OK's Indignities to Citizens
i
Washington
yHE U.S. AIR FORCE is submit-
ting to anti-Jewish indignities
from Saudi Arabia because of the
State Department policy barring
American military personnel of
Jewish faith from the VS. Dhar-
han airbase.
The extent of discriminatory
tactics has shocked Sen. Wayne Morse. Oregon
Democrat. At Dharhan. Arabian officials are ap-
parently permitted to behave like Nazi Gestapo
agents. Sen. Morse revealed "they examine our
crews: they check our crew lists and our army list!
they raise questions if any name sounds as though
it might be Jewish. We even have information they
raise questions if some of our personnel happen to
look Jewish
"Even, time they do that." said Sen. Morse.
Americans ought to shudder with shame that we
permit that kind of trespass upon American relig-
ious freedom."
State Department officials are familiar with
America's many stands in defense of its citizens
against foreign anti-Semitism. They know that the
State Department in 1911 went so far as to abrogate
a treaty with Czarist Russia because that nation
discriminated against Jewish Americans.
But today Department officials are taking a
line that they are powerless in Saudi Arabia because
of Israel's existence.
When an anti-Di.-criminatory body questioned
anti-Jewish policies of the Arabian-American Oil
Co. in New York, State Department officials rushed
to the defense of Aramco. They sought to justify
Panorama:
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
Shalom to the Pilgrims
HAVE JUST landed at Plymou'h.
Mass : r mj
the Ma;.: ce
ago 1 am a .
I would have liked to met"
he old timersBradfor
'ish. Brewster and espec
lot I goon they are not U
nore. I did ask the ir.ailr
PrisciHa's ad In -. "What's her last name"" he -
n at '< the way it is.
.And I would have liked to see Squanto. the Indian.
It sure must have been nice for the Pilgnms to have this
friendly Indian about. You know how it is when you are
a stranger and you are lonely, and all of a sudden a
stranger comes around and shows you the new post office
Of course Squanto couldn't have shown them the post
office. It wasn't until Washington and the .American
Revolution that they had the figures to put on the stamps,
so they couldn't have had any post offices then.
I'll tell you about another man who was with the
Pilgrims. He was Moses. The laws for the Brst .V*
England settlement were called The Moses Judicials."
And the General Court of the New England settlement
er.acted "that the judicial laws of God. as thev were de-
livered by Moses. shaU be accounted of moral "equity and
generally binding."
I guess I could have said Shalom to many of the
Massachusetts Bay Settlement and they would have un-
derstood me The Rev. John Cotton, the outstanding fig.
ure of the Bay settlement, was especially noted as a He-
brew scholar. When you read his great sermon. "God's
VT1* His p,antati<-'* you get the feeling of a page
of the Talmud m the way he reasons like a rabbi from the
I ... lSaid Torah' because drew almost entirely on
the Old Testament.
Cotton also points to a reference in Jeremiah to God
as the King of Nations. If God is the King of Nations
He must provide for all nations, and not leave any people
out He cites further the Biblical injunction to "increase
and multiply and subdue the earth" and concludes where
there is vacant space, there is liberty for the sons of Adam
to come and inhabit it though they neither buy it nor
anti-Jewish policies within Saudi Arab.a The)
shielded Aramcos anti-Jewish tactics inside the l ni-
ted state- a US Usistanl Secretary of Mate
actual!) wrote that a ruling against the anU-Jewisn
stand of Aramco might "adversel) affect I 5 in-
terests In Saudis A State Department autborit)
took I stand that American acquiescence was a
reasonable compromise in vie* of important I a
national security interest!
This line appear- to represent the wa) of think-
ing In the State Department. The Department has
rationalized Arab bigotry to the point that officials
sympathetically explain Arab policies Such think-
ing i> understandable when finds that Depart-
ment officials were high-salaried employees of
Aramco while on leave of absence, upon retirement,
and sometimes before entering the foreign service
Sen. Morse challenged "our Government'! bend-
ing its knee to such treatment and in fact creating
second-class citizens among our own people." He
said this situation "cannot be sold to me on ground.-.
of national security, because we weaken the secur-
ity of the United States around the world if we sub-
ject ourselves to that kind of political blackmail "
It was brought out meanwhile that the United
States has more effective bases nearer the S<>\ let
I'nion. There are crippling restrictions on American
use of the Dhahran base The US Air Force wai
not even permitted to use the Dhahran base to cover
the U.S. landings in Lebanon.
Sen Morse is asking the Senate to adopt a
resolution making "perfectly clear to this Adminis-
tration that we would rather get out of Saudi
Arabia than have the Hag of the United States con-
tinue to be desecrated in Saudi Arabia."
T- Senate ma) soon question whether the
State Department is adhering to long-established
preci lent* involving the religious freedom of Amer-
'car the Act of July 27.
1868 the President and the State Department
r t Seen
.'i polic) i- "not mi
a Cath .1 c .:. ,
' in a Catholic country. ;i Ji
it an Ami ......
*te James G. Blaine
Ireatii -
:
It can
' them, whatever be then
or cri
that "no
mus test shall em be required" and that
eh", "" T "*"** establishment ol
religion or prohibiting the free
Between You and Me:
BORIS SMOUR
rent dir 'ts own iJ
When Jew met Greek, many things were already in
politics, religion, culture and even economics wer i
preaching crucial point* of development. The meehS
was in a sense a catalyst, an intellectual firecracker^3
sent whatever it touched spinning off in different h
dons, once ignited, powerless to control
ponents.
The volume, nearly half of which is notes and idm
dices, is divided into two parts. The first deals mthtw
rotations between the Jews in Palestine as they came it
der the authority of Alexander's successors The ,ecaail
is concerned with Hellenistic and Jewish civiiuationb
the diaspora, particularly Egypt. One of the most ife!
csting sections is the author's discussion of the beginS
of anti-Semitism, which he places in Egypt, the EnS
priest Manetho having been the first to "speak of the J
with detestation Such detestation had been
th.- Greeks previously."
It is impossible not to be impressed with the authsl
integrity His generous glimpses into the problem^
interpretation of source material, his own wa> of handM
what was to other scholars an invitation to deceive!
painstaking honestythese combine to the credit of bsf
author and book. His refusal to use the Dead Sea Scnjgl
in their present state of chaotic research, much is |
wanted to in support of his own theories, is a case I
point
Dr. Trherikover's novel theories on the Maccib
revolt will be of special interest to many. On a
scope, however, it i~ his whole picture which is fascinatj
of these two cultures "bestride the narrow world like]
Colossus," in vital cohabitation.
OH the Record
y NATHAN Zlrtmj
ihelmii
Recognition of Reform
UfHAT FOLLOWS IS not a defense of
" Reform theology, but of the right of
Reform Jews to establish their move-
ment in Israel, to construct temples.
houses of worship, and schools. Many
among my Orthodox friends will any I
am in error. They may be right, but
not in my opinion. The right to pursue
one's religious orientation is so basic
in fact axiomaticin a democracy that it seems odd
the issue should even have to be debated. I am mil
that Reform Judaism is repugnant to the overwt
majority of religious-minded Jewry in Israel, but that
no justification for excluding it from the inalienable
to public functioning.
There is of course a different coloration to the i
tion of giving Reform Judaism official status in Isr
Here there are vast factors that must be considered.
eluding th,- sensitivity of Orthodoxy, whose share in tarl
land ami its redemption antedates that of Reform JudV]
ism Yel even that will come about in due time
our Reform friends would do well not to press tksl
issue loo strongly at this time, lest the erroneous impraj
sion he created that there is something less than a cordul]
relationship between Reform Judaism and Israel.
was a time when the word "Zionism'' was as
I >rm Jew as is pork to the pious. But times haul
Today there are probably as many Refoml
in the Zionist Organization of America as there ait]
Orthodox or Conservative
Currently there is some tension between Reform Jet
Z< \ over a reported charge that the ZOA Hou
in Tel \\ v had barred the use of its promises to the i
cle tor Renaissance of Religious Life in
rather pretentious title, to say the Ieat A spoke
Jewry told this writer that responsibility
the exclusion rested with the ZOA. but a lay leader of I
ZOA to whom I have spoken vehemently denied it. *j
daring that the ZOA House is a cultural not a rehgwHj
center
Another Reform spokesman, speaking bitterly, tafl
this columnist that the denial of ZOA House facilities t|
a Reform group in Israel stemmed from politics.
treif"
Scholar Offers His View of 'Who is a Jew?
THE ISSUE Who is a Jew.' which is i
provoking so much political heat in
Israel, is now becoming a subject of
scholarly discussions also in the (Mud
States. Most interesting views are now
advanced by Prof Solomon Ze.tl.n. of
Drops.e College, in a special studv on
his subject. He develops the theory
that in ancient times there was quite a
distinction between Jews and Israelis.
The people called Judeans Jews wPP tk a
dants of Judah. the son of Jacoh -rw e descen
men of Judea" ,Bna. Yen^aTLau^.h*/", "',ed ,h-
Judean state, in the South tT y ,,Ved ,n ,hc
Judea. their king i,5 S the Kl T^ ** "*"
language was called JudeanOnV ^'\"* ,he,r
People living j. the North were Caal Th K ,he
Israel .Bnai Israeli. Their landV,! i5e^chlWrwi "f
TWirkta, was called ^l^TnT* ** ,^'
Soutnern' aS'te 'SKST con^L """^ *
*.. About the year^^r A^n^
quered the Northern state and exiled most of the
to other countries. The Northern kingdom then ce
!? elist Mn> People of the Northern kingdom j
tne Kingdom of Judah. In the year 5M BCE, the
dom of Judah also ceased to exist, but the Judeans j"*!
later permitted by King Cyrus of Persia to return to **|
homeland. Judea.
Only a smaU minority of them left Babylon^
Judea. Prof. Zeitlih goes into lengthy historical df^JJI
ments to show that the name Israel dissppeared "l
the period of Erra the prophet. After the aest?'^.!
the Second Temple and particularly with the nse of w*M
tianity-when Christian, maintained they were Ike ",
Israelites-the term Judeans was abandoned I*?*"*
called themselves Israelites in order to combat is*
tenuous of the Christians. ,,
The word Israel was used and term Jew. J*
became the term for religion. Against this back]
I'rof Zeitlin discusses the issue of "who is a Jew" "J|
answer u: A Jew u anyone who is born of i **
"'other or one who has embraced Judaism, regsrd*-.
whether he observes or dees not observe the preceso-


August 14. 1959
*Jewlsli rk>ridHcnn
Page 11-A
vmHo
LEGAL NOTlCf
LEGAL NOTICE
BY HENRY LEONARD
"Mr. Chairman door prizes to stimulate
I attendance at our lodge meetings if we must,
but Green Stamps NEVERI"
< -. /. Um4 eo*i.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOU8 NAME L*'/
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, uesitiug t" eneftgs in
under the rictittoui B......(
FLAMINGO I >ll V CLEANERS *
LAUNDRY .il 1815 N W II A i
tends to rep il trim.- with Hi-
Clerk of Hi- Circuit Court of Dmi
MAXWEI.I, SCHWARTZ,
Bolt la nor
1-81-U
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
;tiTIOU3 NAME LAW
IS II i-:i: !-:: v OIVBN thai
I i I Ins to .image In
n^liT the fictitious name ol
U'CIIM XN Mi -Ti'ltS at llOt)
Street. Miami Intend* to
i name with the dork o(
! Ci.nri of I'a.le County.
- RAUCHMAN, Soi.- Owner
8 n-ji-
NOTICE unobr
:titious name law
IS HERE It C.1VBN that
I i.. sftgag* In
th< -nlous name ol
M'AKTMI'N'TS at I0S
- nue, Miami Bench, tm .
amid name with the
C ill Court of
I 1 l.rl.l..
| J ,CK an.I OLOA KA1IN
llth SI Fla.
. | i
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAMI LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY QIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fit .mo- of
ADVANCE RESEARCH BUREAU al
ISM Congress liullding intend* to
register said name with the Clork of
real! Court of Pad* County,
Florida
EDWARD l JAPriK
\\ ci.l.iscil. DOUGHERTY .v /..\l.\c
Att-.i io-\ i for Ad^ ant
.IU.
tyti-Sl-
IN IHE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY. -
No. 59C 7367
FIDELITY M< >RTQ \OK CO., INC.,
i .rporatlnn.
Plaintiff,
V*.
TROT WARD and MAXfB WARD,
III I v. if.-,
1 >. U Inlant*.
NOTICE OF SUIT
T<): TROT WARD and MAXIE
WARD, in- atlfa
i o HOMER BARS
Colorado City. Texas
TOU ARE HEREBY NoTfPIBD that
a Complaint to Foreclose mortgage
haa been filed against you and each
of you. That Um prop* tj sought to
to- foreclosed Is described as:
Ix>t Fourteen (14) In Block Six (6)
of IVE8 KSlATKS BBCTION ONE,
a subdivision of Dftd* County. Flor-
Ida, according to the Plat thereof,
led In Plat Book I. at Page 74
of the Public Record* of Dade
County, Florida: together with all
furniture, furnishing* and fixture*
and any replacements theieof which
an boo or may horaaftor he located
and altuate on the above described
property. _____
TOO ARE HEREBY WOTTFIED to
aerve a copy of your anawer to the
complaint on the Plaintiffs attorney.
flKOROE CHERBN. 07 Olympia
Buiidlng. Miami 32. Florida, and file
the original Anawer in the Office of
th >-lerk of the Circuit Court. Mi-
ami, l>a>ie County, Florida. on W
before the 8th day Of September. 1S.
Otherwise the allegation* of said
Complaint will be taken a* confessed
against vou
DATED the Srd flay of August, 19.9
at Miami, hade County. Florida
i: i- LHATHERMAN,
Clerk of the Circuit C-urt
K M I.YMAN,
Ileputv < lerk.
l-Jl-M
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
I1TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IN CHANCERY No 59C 7161
JOHN M HYI.ANI'.
Plaintiff.
ALICE LORRAINE HYLAND,
Defendant -vauuxlt -..-..
ORDER TO APelfX/t
TO!*, ALICE LORRAINE HYLAND,
Elmhurat, Nev
- by notified t-> flic *"'ii
to the complaint for divorce filed
1 \ ..a with the Clerk of Ini
rult Couj/1 and eerve > ropy thereof
ntx.n Claude M BartlM, 102 Calumel
Hidg.. Miami r,2, Fla attorney, f--i
plaintiff, mi aw ol
August ham las the t nmplalnt
win be taken aa nonfeaaed by you.
Dated July II
r B 1.1 n-i MKItM \.v
rk "f the Clrcull Co rl
(seal) Bj JOAN BNEEDEN,
Denntv clerk.
7/S1. 8/7-14-21
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY OIVEN
the undersigned, de*lrlrig to engage In
business under the fictitious nai......f
MALANOA BAR at jnm Northwael
Seventh Btreel intend* to reglst.
name with the Clerk of the
Court of Da.de County Florid i
FR A N K I > I: V NI si i N -1 Of***
LBWIBON ft FREEH
Attorneys for Petitioner
40 Industrial National Hank Itldg.
7/31. 8/7-11-1
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
*Jen i of Ik rMian
" olicifs' rour legal notJcefeT
We appreciate your
patronage and guarantee
accurate eenrice at leaai
rotes
Phone FR 4-4366
tor meMenger eervlee
LKSAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, dealrlng to engage In
liuslnes* under the fictitious name of
SI'DS-1'K -DUD8 at 177". N.W. ".4th
St. Mi.inn. Ma. Intend* to register
aald name with the clerk of the i'ii -
cult Court of Dade County. Florida
NIGHT AND DAY. IMC
HAROLD A. OREENE
Attorney for Night ft Day. Inc.
7/31. 8-7-11-21
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
that NOTICE IS HEREBY (1IVEN that
the undersigned, deelrlna to engage in
hu*lni under the ri- tltious name of
MIAMI BEACH HEALTH ( I-'".*'
Miami Peach. Dade County. M
L'lrcuR Intend* I "'"- ",' ,'J 11
clerk of the Circuit Court "f Dade
County, Florida
ALBERT B. GILL.
s,.ie Owner
Til K'l "'Hi-: M Till'WHIN
At tot nev for Allart E. (llll
d/h/a Miami Peach Health ( lub
T'3lt ** 1*1**
CERTIFICATE OF
IPORATE DISSOLUTION
IE NAME AND BV THE
IRITY OF THE STATE OF
FLOR DA
TO WHoM THESE PRES-
II M.I. COME. (JRBETINOB
CKI.IA D, JARVIS. Ml-
a.iillll'A, ERNESTINE C.
MIAMI. FLORIDA; I1E.S-
1 i:\I.IAN, MIAMI. FLOP.
ii the 2 e to be IncoiiM.rated under
i..i i of Chapter 608. Florida
HOUSEHOLD CAS COW
-rporutlnn. with It* prln-
- of 1,.,-lnes* at OPA-
DADE COUNTY In the State
.i, and whereas the itock*
such corporaUon did on
day of Auroit, AD. 1K>9.
i- filed In the office of the
-f State of the Stale of
i Convent of all the took-
|under the provision* of aald
'.'8, H<>rlda Statute*, show-
.lutioii of such coriair-
[ therefore, the Secretary of
i hereby oartlfi lo Ike fore-
|d that he la satisfied that the
tits of law have been coin-
l
WITNESS WHEREOF, I have
ntu set in> hand and have
I 'he Creat Seal of the State
I'-rlda. at Tallahassee, the
it.il this the SEVENTH day
I 'UST. A.I' 15. '
R A. GRAY.
- -t.uv of State
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVBN that
.IK-- in
und.r the rictltio nil
TIA8 at ST07-1I N W 27th Avenue.
end* -glstcr nabl
8 ;\\ the Clerk "f the -
Court of Dade County,
THE INTERNATIONAL AP.T
SHOW '\"C a '"'........ration
B] PAIL W. WATSON.
President
MARVIN ALAN KOS.VLVN
Attornej for The lnternuJ.ional
An S'h... In.
I/M-SI-SS, /4
IN THE COUNTY JUOOE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
NO 47163
In RE: Estate of
ANNA ROB EMI EC K
Deceaaed.
NOTICe TO CREDITORS
To All Creditor* and All Person* Ha-
ing Claims or Demands Against Bald
Estate:
You are hereby notified and required
to present any claims and dema-ul*
which vou may have aealnt the
estate of ANNA ROSENHECK. de-
ceaaed late of Dade County, Florida,
to the County Judges of Dade County,
and file the same In their offices in
the County Courthouse In Dade Coun-
ty. Florida, within elht calendar
month* from the date of the first
8iil.li. atlon hereof, or the same will be
aired.
ETTA WEI89BERQBR,
utrix.
RUBIN
H.
meral
litalwp.
)UNTS RECEIVABLE
FINANCING
IREHOUSE LOANS
FACTORING
?MENT FINANCING
>MMERCIAL PAPER
TUxedo 8-7Wl
N.W. 36th Street
Springe. Florida
H S GRUBER
PRESICENT
^RGE J TALIANOFF
JlRMAN OF THE BOARD
IFONARD
Attorney
1611 .Metropolitan
Miaou I
Hank Bide.
I 'l-'.'l-M, /4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
MOTH E is HEREBY UIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring 10 en.
business under the fictitious name ol
M EHHHE1M HARDWARE CO., not
INc t Ml N v\ 7'-- Btreet, Mann.
k;..- Ida Inti d to n name
srlth the Clerk ol the Circuit Court ol
Dade County, Florid
MAX ERDHEIM
OL \1'YS F. ERDHEIM '". ownei
GOLDMAN -\ OODDSTBIN
ItM w Flakier 81 Mtami,
Attorm-ys for Reglsttant
pi*.
I/S4-S1, s/7-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, deslrlru; to .nitage In
s under the t ine of
SUMOPAMA intends to reghjt.
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
SLIM-I" P-SPI.K, IN'"
HAROLD \ ORERNE
Attorney for Bftm-Ur-Self In
7 II 7-II-'.'!
CIRCU.T COURT. 11TM JUDICIAL.
CIRCUIT. DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. CHANCERY No. S9C 7309
EVE MAE TEMPLE, Plaintiff.
OBOROH p'-HN TEMPLE. Defendant
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
YOC. BEORCE JOHN TEMP .H,
\HDHESS UNKNOWN, are notified
to sfrve a copy of your answer to
the complaint on plaintiff* attorneys,
Bnel and Housen, 3ui Blacftyne
Huildlng. Miami. Florida, and file the
original with the Clerk of the above
styled Court, on or before Bepteirtoor
Its, otherwise eotnptftiiM will be
, ..Messed In \ Oil
I -1ted: July .11. 196S. ,
r B LEATHBRalAN,
Clerk of the Clrcull '
is.al) B) WM W BTOCKINO,
Deputy Clerk
I
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to enjtate In
business under the fictitious name of
OPM VENDOR BBRVICE at 15..6
SW Sth Street. Miami, Dade Coun-
ts Florida. Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the- Circuit
COU,, "HENllV iT'sOLL^Y
sole Owner g/7.14.si.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEKEI1V OTVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
IM'TT'S CAFE at 060 Pi'd Road, Ml-
ami, Florida Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of Hie circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Court ot ^ WJA ,.,,,,,-skY
S'-.Im Owner
KESSI.ER. OARS ft ROTH
Attorney* for Applicant
1998 SW 1st Street
T'tt-*1. '7-M
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring t-- engage In
business utid.r the fictitious name --
STATE MORTGAOE intends t-- reg-
-id name with the Clerk of tin
circuit i'iiu'I -if Dal.- County Florida.
SYl.Yl \ Bole owner
M RAY FRIEDMAN
Attorney for Applicant
7M1 n i:. tad Am
I 7-14-21
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY CIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
8AV-ON MORTOAOE intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Cinnit Court of Dade County. Florida.
SYLVIA W FRIEDMAN,
Sole Owner
M. RAY FRIEDMAN
Attorney for Applicant
7S62 N.E. ind Ave. ,.,.,..
IN
In
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
Notice is HEREBY OIVEN that
derelfhed, desiring to engage In
-. under the fictitious nun.- of
CIIAI'.I.OTTE S DRESS SHOP at 167R
N.W Mth St.....t. Miami. Intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the circuit Court of Dftde County.
da
CHARLOTTE S l"S, IM
By Slu Idon I. s.hleslnger,
Se. I
SHEl.l'oN J BCHLBSINOER
Attosney for Charlotte-* 1676. Inc
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
No. S*C SMS
ROSE T RIOOI.
Plaintiff.
em.
LllloRlo RIOOI.
Defendant
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO: l.ll'.oltlo RIOOI
Aildrea* I'nknown
You LIHoltIO RIOOI ire hereby
notified that a Pill "f Conn.lalnt for
s ha* been filed against you,
and \oii are required to serve a copy
of your Answer or Pleading to the
BUI of Complaint on the Plaintiff
Attorney ANOELO A. ALL ll' Ain-
lev Hiilidlng. Miami SI. Florida and
file the original Anwer or Pleading
In the office of the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court on or before the Hth day
of SeptesMb) [I y.-o fall to do
so. judgment bj lafaull will be taker,
against you 'or,thT relief demanded
' miplalre.
This notice shall be pul
itlve weeks
n THI
In .N
day .f August. A.D.
-. Clerk.
Deputy Clerk
VNC.E1 O A AI.I
ng
THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
N AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 46511-B
RE Estate of
FERNANDO II NUbSEW
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All editors and All Persons HftT.
iBg claims or Demands Against Said
You are hereby notified and required
to present any claim* an.l demands
which vou may heve wrajUagt the
e.tate of FERNANDO H NI88BN de-
ceased late of Dade Coonty. Florida,
lo the County Judges of Dftde County,
and file the same in their off Ice* In
the Countv Courthouse in Dade i oun-
tv Florida, within eight calendar
month, from the date of the first pub-
lication hereoT. or the name wl be
bB1Te Bv: Richard Altshuler
RICHARD Al.fSHL*LER
Attorney
., Seyhold Bldg. Vtt.fVT.H-tl
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVBN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
MR JAY MORTOAOE Intends to reg
later said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida.
SYLVIA W FRIEDMAN.
Sole Owner
M. RAY FRIEDMAN
Mto-iiey for Applicant
NE.m.Ave so-j-jftj.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, deslrlru: 10 SRSftRS IB
business under the fictitious n
Mlm* A Thomas Manufacturing Co..
I'nlncorporuted at r.?.h N \\ 50th
Street. Miami 42. Florida Int.-nd to
register salof name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Da
ROBERT N MIMS
J PAUL THOM \-
7 II, i- 7-14-11
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
No. 59C6913
PATRICIA M. LEVITT,
Plaintiff.
EDWARD H LEVITT,
1 'efelidant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: EDWARD H. LEVITT
ill Falls Btreet
Niagara FalU Sew ^ ork
You EDWARD H LEVITT are hereby
notified that a Bill of Complaint lor
Divorce has been filed against you.
and vou are required to serve a copy
of your Anawer or Pleading to the
BUI of Cumplslnt on the plaintiff's
Attorneys, OOLDMAN A YIOLD-
STEIN t3 Wes( Flagler Street. Mi-
ami. Florida and file the original An-
swer or Pleading In the office of the
clerk of the Circuit Court on or be-
fore the 24th day of August. 1959, It
vou fall to do o. judgment by default
will be taken against you for tbe re-
lief demanded In the Bill of Complaint.
This notice shall 1m- published once
each week for four consecutive weefts
in THE JEWISH FLoRIDlAN
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this 21t day of July. A.u.
19i'' E B I.EATHERMAN. Clerk
Circuit Court. Dade Couftty-Florldft
(seal) By: WM W ^ToCKINi..
Deputy Clerk.
OOLDMAN A c.oi.nsTF.IN
Attorney* for Plaintiff
IJftJ West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida
?l--.l I
7-11-21-ZS
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
N*. 5C 7360
ROSELLA McBURROWS
ptaiBtlff.
L. B. McllCRRi'WS.
Defen*nt _______
SUIT FOR OIVORCE
H M. P.I'RROWS
Route 1
Flnleyson. Oeorgia .
fou .,,.. hen by notified tht a Com-
plaint for Divorce ha* been filed
against yon. and you are required to
i oop) of vnur Answer on the
Plaintiffs ':" ,','
J09 Industrial Bank Build-
ing Miami 11, Florida and file the
original thereof in the office of the
i'ii rk of thi i on or be-
fore the 7th dv of ieptemhei
Iss. the
allegations of ald Complaint will be
taken a* i onfessed
NV Clerk.
Circuit court Dade Florida
,.,[, K M LYMAN,
Deputy ei
L6-Z1-U
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREUI UIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage rn
business under the fictitious name of
DOWNTOWN REAL ESTATE at So*
laingford Building Intends Is register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County. Florida.
JAMES J. McVBIOH, Bole owner
* T/tt-N, k 7-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
BOISE OF ZBOER at :i SW. Xth
Street. West Miami. Florida intend*
to register said name with the Clerk
Of the Clrcttlt Court of Dade County.
LOCUS 7.EOER
Sole Owner
4-il, T-I4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring 10 engage In
business under the fictitious name of
x DOLORES APT* at '.;""'";
llll N.W I7tft Court in the Cltjroc
M ..mi Florida and Intends to register
the said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade Count'. Florida.
ALFREDO PONTON
DOLORES I'oNToN, his wife
RICHARD ALTSHULER
Attorn*] << Applicant* _^ M M
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
WHEEL BRAKE SERA MI-
\MI at 2701 N W. 16th Street intends
to register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Victor QC1NT. Sole Owner
7 14-11, 7-14
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAM* LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
NEW YORK LUNCHEONETTE at
H49 Blscayne Boulevard. Miami Shorea
intends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dad*
County, Florida
EMAN1EL AREAS.
Sole Owner
7/J1. 6/7-14-21
ATTENTION ATTORNEYS!
CORPORATION OUTFITS
Lowest Prices Quickfgst DffliTry
in South Florida
Call the> FEWISH FLORIDIAN at
Fit 1- 1.166

s>^


+Jewlstnorklian
FridoY Auqu*





*WJConqress At Stockholm Eyes Top Jewish Problems 7bcbj
"^ *^ _.,J... Fvm distribution of anti Jewish Utera-. tween Jewish cin. ^H
By EDWIN EYTA.N
STOCKHOLM< JTA >-The
fate
and future of the Jewish million*
in the Soviet Union hung over the
A^emalx of the World Jewish
Congress here this week as 300
Jewish leaders, representing com-
munities in 40 countries, debated
the main issues facing the Jewish
lions in which he expressed the
belief that followin* his recent
talks with Chancellor Adenauer
of West Germany, en early er-
ran9ement for German compen-
sation to Jewish victims of Nat's
in Poland and Rumania was in
view.
An Italian delegate. Dr. S. Can-
v resident in Egvpt distribut.on 01 ami **., .-. ,wn, jewisii citlw
jovs who ere resmeni 'n VH various countries, the countries and their reLS
had been able o^their^righ re ^^ ^ ^^
under these agreements Dee-. ^ ^ ^ ^^ sharett
nations. institu- tjnn ,,
f Sm 'E. ;h:\:.d,,,n;'vT";'s.'br"eare"er
5Sffis *3i*33
Semitic literature in various coun- nation of racist material on m m
------ ternational scale.
ndrr these agreements because wonu Jr.
""he" face msurmountable obs.a- said there was
,,: on the part of the Egyptian ant,-Semi jc organ,
'.h.rinps Stateless Jews, fore t.ons or indn Tuat
prooiems 01 jcu laonsnmeni 01 israeu uipiumain.
Dr. Nahum Goldmann. president relations ,th Germany Speaker,
of the WJC led off the discuss, from Israel and Belgium sharpl>
:..._: ', ,k L_Ui c. cnticued the Israel Government
with an appeal to the Soviet Gov
ernment to grant Jews in the Sov
iet Union at least the same rights
winch the Jews enjoy in Commu-
nist Poland. He pointed out that
liSl l^ ,he ",d* <*
ship between Israel and ta
pora in the organizauonah
There were funct,onj of
Fife which lay outside th, ^
Israel affairs, he s,d n?T
other hand, there were'
activity which are the
prerogative of the State N
he stressed.
Sharett told the Assent j
for th arms rleal and asked I vears. repon sia^-u. .......~. ~~------{"polemics about the futtsW
israeltovtrlent re s While this report was under d,s- rallies m negotiat.ng jn intern.^Ienc of ., 0(J(side
decision to sell arms to Germanv lu.Mon. ant.-J e w s h literature t.onal conyent.on to <*' J^this { c,demic. Even the ^
Rabbi Max N'ussbaum. of L^s onginatin-
people-today and fussed the ^ supp0rt e, ^-^^^^^^r^;,^ tha^a Governments had inv.ri.bl
problems of Jewish Ufe. tabhshment of Israel, diplomatic [J^g^*,; lnternaonal com- (.pjved World Jewish Congress
mcrce in ant, Jewish literature representations on such litersture
h;., developed in the last fe with 'the utmost sympathy." the
report stated. Admitting the diffi
with
t h e notorious problem, the World Jewish Con-; prophet of the ultimate a
Einar Aberg, gress experts had consistently ; liquidation of Jewry outua*
miffs? i irs ssL-JS. otssjsts < u *
a, 5 *- a*-*-- aM5S5 is^'Jst- as zsttZ**
the Jews in Poland were allowed Ang Swedish anti-Semite, Einar Aberg. gress expert
to group themselves within a Jew-
ish Cultural Union, to publish Jew-
ish books and newspapers, and
thev chose to go. He demanded course as a:a t-nme Minister w r- --j-j f h nnnstinn the DnnciDle of the
hat the Soviet Goverrune. How v,d Ben-Gunon on selling arms to Sweden during the period of th. ^^^**%S
process would stretch over J
calculable stretch of time."
the same rights to Jews in the Germany.
Soviet Union.
"Poland can serve as an ex-
ample for the Soviet Govern-
ment," Dr. Goldmann declared.
He emphasized that other Com-
munist countries even some
that had stopped Jewish emigra-
tionwere giving the Jews more
freedom in their communal ac-
tivities than Moscow.
An impassioned plea for resump
tion of Jewish emigration from
Rumania was voiced at the session
by Dr. Walter Abeleff. of Israel.
Pointing out that he was speaking
"without partisan feeling>." Dr.
Abeleff emphasized "the tragic
and painful problems" resulting
from the closing of Rumania's
doors to further Jewish emigration
toward brad. "Relatives are be-
said that while ln8 separated from their famili
\ -- nibly.
Dr. Abraham Schwartz, of Uru-
guay, told the delegates that dip-
lomatic representatives of the
United Arab Republic, who have
substantial funds at their dis-
posal, are organizing press con-
ferences i n Latin American
countries and are issuing free
ticks to Latin American jour-
nalists to visit Europe.
governments to cooperate in pro-
tecting the rights and security of
those threatened by such propa-
ganda from abroad.*' the report
stated.
A discussion on the role of Israel
in Jewish life was sparked by a
warning from Mr. Sharett on the declared it was impost
concept of a "partnership" ar- Jews outside Israel to prtpm
rangement He declared that "Is- program or plan of action
racl should not interfere in com-j in some way or other, n
munal affairs of Jewish communi-; or programs have a reli
Dr. Salo Baron. Profe.
Jewish History. Literature i
stitutions at Columbia Ua
expressed belief that "bran]
continue with the ingathehaj]
the exiles, not only in the i
sense but also in the u
sorbing the fruit of world i
Israel M. Sieff. chairman i
European executive of the
Dr. Goldmann said that while mg separated from their fam;: Reviewing the work of anti
the anti-Jewish persecutions and he stated, "husbands from wive-. Semitic groups who concentrate on ties or in the normal relations be- with Israel."
deportations of the Stalin era had parents from children." He urged-------- -----------------------------------------------------------
I ised in the Soviet Union, the the Assembly to reiterate the
present regime there did not best- World Jewish Congress "basic
tate to use "very strong measures views regarding the necessity of
indeed '" He warned against execs- the reunification of families."
live slogans and exaggerations a review of the Jewish nation
which, he said, played into the ln Mosiem countries was pr-
He appealed for a ed t0 the Assemblv bv A L. East-
Soviet hands
policy based on "reason." calm
ness and the estimate of what thf
Jews in Russia really wanted. He
voiced his belief that the situation
of the Jews in the Soviet Union "is
erman. political director of the
WJC He pointed out that'Jewish
emigration from Morocco is at
present at a complete standstill
and asked the Assembly to deal
rii ficult but not desperate. He ,vith-lhii problem without ,,.
told the Assembly that the relaxa The need o( con,,^^ of neg0.
tion of tensions between East and tlations wllh ,he Moroccan author.
WM would improve their s.tua- !tlv< mu,t be kept m mmd ,,e
tion and would also benefit Israel ,ald. we a- the delicate p^,.
Moshe Sharett. former Israel tion of the Jewish communities in
Premier, addressing the Assem- Morocco. "Protests." he stated.
My, demanded that Soviet JewTy will not help. What is needed are
THRIFT IS ALWAYS
v IN STYLE
be allowed to become "an integral
should be permitted "actively and
should be permitted to "actively
legitimately" to participate in the
activities of the Jewish people as
a whole.
Condemnation of the Soviet
treatment of Jews was voiced by
Shad Polier. of the American Jew
ish Congress, replying to a speech
by a member of the five-man team
of observers from Poland who at
tacked Israel for its "link-up with
the Western world."
"It was sad." Polier said, "to
listen to a fellow Jew who looked
askance only at the West while
forgetting the grave tragedy of diteJ^SU 'S #sT "" '
lino aism,eSraton of the Egyptiar
m the Soviet Union tod*ay "is"a"new Je*'1.sh communit>- Following per
patient and fruitful negotiations
With regard to Tunisia, the
WJC official reported that the
pledges given by the government
there in respect of Jewish rights,
as well as the right of emigra-
tion, had been observed. World
Jewish Congress leaders have
also been assured recently by
the Tunisian Government that
the membership of Tunisia in
the Arab League should not be
taken as indicating "automatic
acceptance of the League's pol-
icy against Israel."
The report also dealt with fhe
Russian Jewry. What b happening j|2?
in the Soviet Union today is a new c,_.
Phenomenon without any parallel T^Z, aiurS ** frc*d
in Jewish history. It is something \elT^h J T? ^ 2'00
worse than anti-Semitism. It SIf^*..**?***
anti-Jewishness. It is a very dan- ?:'*" "?*
Jews now live in Egypt. "They

1
t
|
tj
!
worse than anti-Semitism. It .
paign of 1956. only about 10.000
gerous and assiduous campaign to Lwl-S! ^u TV
carve out part of the Jewishpeo- '" "I'V 'V.0 ma,n,a,n Q
Pie from the rest of their breth *?* "1 '"Millions ttemmy
ren." i,0 **"* the continuity of an ele-
mentary Jewish existence. The
The recent transaction in once great network of Jewish in
which Israel sold munitions to stitutions has disintegrated, and
the West German Government one ** another they have pas-.
was sharply attacked and equal- ** ou' of Jewish hands." Mr. Eas
ly strongly defended in the pien- terman reported.
ary debate. This discussion fol- Although the British and Fr...K
onermaTcomL0" ^"^^ ^ ""^ "ZlToJ*
rman compensat.on ou~ mrnts. neither BnUsh nQr ^^
Over the years many things go out of style."
But saving money never becomes old fashioned,
especially at FLAGLER Feoejlal SAVINGS. At
Flagler Federal your money earns a generous
dividend of 4% and when you open a savings account
you will receive one of these beautiful gifts* Free.
* ~l7nlVo^H*OS CL .-i-M-W. ...n....Aec-r. a- f-H
ARPECE PERFIME BY LASiviw
dc.jnrd bycstTita. LA>VN Perse ssse sat beautiful gold and Mack lacoa
r,iNEW "COUNTS OF $100 OR MORE
GORDON
FUNERAL HOME
A. {, j.,,1,, fwmnl im
FR 3-3431
FRanlJin 9-1436
710 S.W. 12th Ave. Mioml
JUMT MtOON. rVwWe*
WaOttOat.feweiiV.cto,
FREE TRANSFER OF FUNDS r,
)"" Pb*A. The
PIFCE TABLEWARE SET THRrB
LIBBEY CLASSES ISK COFFEE
RRO ELECTRIC COFFEE PERCOLATOR.
So.,.,, Actaeats
taee'eaer
aafere the lOta
ore frt tat |ej
the eaticipatte
rat* of
* t* RrtaXH
J-kere 1 Ae United States, jest brief
*' "*"* Wf hah. car. ef all ih. Ma
III io
100 H L 2a. AVEMC
iSCAYRt SMOfPWC rtA
-'tWMSflMaTlno*;
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
ANDl-OAN ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI
"CH ACCUMT "m" .T THE JU Mf^J
nnmn *****


mJOCUllTE
Cozy foursome at the Eden Roc: Mrs. Louis
(Bess-) Glasoer, Mrs. Mortimer (Ethel) Wien, Mrs.
Al (Nettie) Levin, and Mrs. Morris (Annette)
Goldin Annette recuperating from the ex-
citement of the delicious cookout she gave on
the occasion of her son's leaving for two weeks
of reserve duty The Fair table at the last
tiling U of M Pop concert was the meeting place for a swarm of
glites, with Sidney Schwartz ambling over to say goodbye be-
leaving for Chicago to meet wife Esther and await the arrival
their second grandchild Bobbette and Leo Ackerman leav-
er homo instead of sticking it out for coffee Pops regulars
re Shepard and Ruth Broadhe's the Bay Harbor Islands chief
cutive-^Leo Eisenstein and wife Bert, and Eleanor Coleman .
Promise Fulfilled: Florence Pick back from her round-the-
rid tour to say hello and farewell to the Pops Florence said
would Sylvia Weil and Laura Goldstein discussing the
frits of the program and especially pianist Ozan Marsh Sylvia
taking from experience, since she's an expert pianist herself .
,iits Anne and Sue Berkowitz back from their Vacation and
ching up on current events ... All in all, the tenth and last
W, with oh so handsome Maestro Arthur Fiedler, a pleasurable
artistic affair.
Home again after a four-week trip to California are Mr. and
rs. Maurice Revitz, 1250 97th st., Bay Harbor, and son and daugh-
Mark and Janice, the latter a recent confirmand at North
are Jewish Center Jason Rhodes, of London, here with sons
nes and John to visit his father, Jason Rosenberg, and sisters,
!.. Garrett and Helen Rosenthal, of 7380 Gary ave., Parkview
and James and John will stay with their grandfather and
nts for three weeks, with their dad taking off for New York and
-ion after a week's stay here Mr. and Mrs. Hank (Barbara)
Jcner, of Sherman Oaks, Calif., visiting her father and mother,
and Mrs. Harry Pearl, 1100 SW 23rd ave., Miami, long-time
m,:. His here It's open house at the Pearl residence during
couple's stay Hank graduates from college shortly, and
join his wife in the teaching profession.
Mr. and Mrs. Sam (Francine) Weinstein and children Barbara
I Alan, of Hjaleah, are entertaining Francine's mother, Mrs.
tse Rapoport, of Brooklyn and Detroit Mrs. Rapoport is
rationing at the Lombardy hotel Francine's a member of
Temple Tifereth Jacob choir She is also secretary of the
|khland Park Elementary School Mr. and Mrs. Phil (Rose)
elson and son Buddy, of 2959 SW 18th st., are spending their vaca-
bn at the Mercury motel on Miami.Beach Their other son,
avid, is visiting with his aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. I. M.
egel. of Atlanta, Ga. Rose is past president of the Shcnan-
bah Elementary School PTA .
Knid Slrusser and Melvin Berman exchanged vows Sunday
Nick and Arthur's The bride is the daughter of Mr. and
|i Max Strusser, 1.848 James ave., Miami Beach The groom
the son of Mr. and Mr*. Philip Berman. 15261 NE 13th ave.,
Miami Beach After a honeymoon in Puerto Rico, the
uple will reside in No. Miami.
On the Birth Front: First born son. Max Michael J'Meir,"
brn July 6 to Rabbi and Mrs. Samuel (Judith) April at 'Jackson
lemorial Hospital Bris was July 13 at their home, 1925 SW
pth ct.. with Rev. Abraham Seif officiating Paternal grand-
irents Rabbi and- Mrs. Simon April arrived from Israel two days
pfore the birth of their grandson .
Maternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Charles Holober, of
akeland, Fla., who attended the Bris Maternal great lgrand-
ther is Mrs. Molly Gantzman, of New York Grandfather
abbi Simon April, Rabbi Tibor Stern, of Beth Jacob Congregation,
nil Morris Fox, president of Coral Way Jewish Center, addressed
?* mor# than 100 guests New father Rabbi Samuel April is
pintual leader at Coral Way .
Incidentally, Rabbi and Mrs. Simon April are presently visit-
lit' their daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert (Esther)
(lumenthal, of Savannah, Ga.
c
Off to Boston are Charlie and Frances Oppenheim ... He has-
been back for years, so there will be His and Her family re-
mons Frances' sister, Grace Masters, lives in Boston, and
other sister, Anne Jacob*, formerly of Miami Beach, is vaca-
ting in New England during the summer .
Travel Tidbits: Inez (Mrs. Henry) Kaufmann hasn't bought her
:irr tickets for Mexico as yet But she's already stocked up
the stomach pills she'll be taking on arrival there .
Jennie and Harry Gordon leaving their So. Miami ave. borne
k a trip to South America, including Lima, Buenos Aires, San
liago, Montevideo, Quito, Rio de Janeiro, and Panama The
dpular couple will be gone three weeks .'. .
Taking it easy at Duncraggan Inn, HendersonviUe, N.C., are
and Mrs. Jack Stein, Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weiss, Mr. and Mrs.
rrman Polans, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Delson and daughters, Mr.
Mrs. Louis C. Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Simon Sanders, Mr. and
. Sol Frankel, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Berman, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred
^wis and family, and Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Aronovitz and family.
Flagler-Granada Jewish Community Center spiritual leader
>bbi Bernard Shoter receiving everyone's best wishes on the
^casion of his marriage this coming Sunday to Miss Dolores
rusch Aufruf' for the Rabbi is during Sabbath morning
rvices of his congregation .
Lovely luncheon given by the Alpha Epsilon Phi Alumnae
isn. last Saturday at the El Centra Club Exchanging greet-
gs: Mrs. Henry (Inez) Kaufman, Mrs. Howard (Roslyn) Hirsch,
Sidney (Florence) Lewis, Mrs. Jean C. (Frances) Lehman,
Ravid (Ruth) Rifas. Mrs. Marvin (Naomi) Zank, Mrs. Sam
ted) Elinoff, Mrs. Jess (Mildred) Spirer .
President Mrs. Norman (Barbara) Brown did a splendid Job
spite the rough sledding these da*ys Just back from the
SPhi convention at Sun Valley, she found son Tim with seven
itches he got in an accident and son Paul about to have an oper-
iion .
Mrs. Howard (Barbara) Katzen chairman of the day, assisted
Mrs. Howard (Gloria) Scharlin Mrs. Arthur (Judy) Gilbert
greetings from her mother, Mrs. Stanley (Martha) Myers,
vacationing in the Carolinas Mrs. Daniel (Iris) Franco,
CsnrinvM on Pae 7-B
4 1U
ontan s
njjoru
' eJewish Floridiaxi
Miami, Florida, Friday, August 14, 1959
Section B
Leaders of the Greater Miami Council of Pio-
neer Women for 1959-1960. Left to right are
Mesdames Milton Green, Council president;
Ruth Ulise Wagner, Tikva Club; Dora Ofien-
henden. Beba Idelson Club; Marvin Copen-
hagen, Kadimah Club; Harry Queen, Golda
Meir Club; Bernard Powell, Club 2; Joseph
Krantz, Club 1. Mrs. Paul Berlin, Coral Gables
Club, is not shown. Council will this yecr
mark Pioneer Women's 20th anniversary i.i
Greater Miami.
No Lull in Summer Months for Dade
Women as Philanthropy Study Goes On
tuts, ahha uamat mints
College Cites
Mrs. Meyers
Mrs. Anna Brenner Meyers is
the recipient of an award "in rec-
ognition of her outstanding serv-
ice to education and human rela-
tions."
The award was presented to Mrs.
Meyers on Aug. 2 at summer ses-
sion graduation exercises of Beth-
une-Cookman College in Daytona
Beach, Fla.
Mrs. Meyers, an internationally-
renowned woman attorney, is a
member of the Dade County
Board of Public Instruction.
Her husband, Benjamin Meyers,
was recently cited by Bethune-
Cookman College "for his achieve-
ments as a businessman and or-
ganizer in the field of human re-
lations" and "for his forthright
stand on the principles of equality
and justice."
Both are long-time leaders in
Greater Miami's Jewish commu-
nity.
Wedding Theme
At Function
Sisterhood of North Shore Jew-
ish Center will hold a member-
bring a member tea Wednesday
noon at. the home of Mrs. Larry
Wesson.*
The wedding theme will be used,
and a fashion show will be pre-
sented around the pool. Informal
attire will be worn.
Working with Mrs. Weston on
arrangements are Mrs. Al Mechlo-
witz, Mrs. Norman Harrow, and
Mrs. Jack Fisch.
The women of Dade county have
not permitted summer doldrums
to interrupt their service activi-
ties, according to Mrs. Jean C.
Lehman, president of the Federa-
tion of Jewish Women's Organiza-
tions.
She announced that there has
been scarcely a lull in the work of
her committees during the months
of July and August.
In the weeks ahead, FJWO will
resume a number of important
programs, notably "buzz coffees."
These are the novel briefing ses-
sions originated last year for pres-
. idents and officers of local wom-
en's service groups.
The series will open on Thurs-
day, Sept. 10, in the board room of
the Greater Miami Jewish Feder-
ation, 424 Lincoln In The first
meeting is planned for presidents
who attended the four coffees in
June.
"On Friday, Sept 11, we will
conduct a special 'buzz coffee' to
indoctrinate new club presidents
who did not have the opportunity
to come to our June meetings,"
Mrs. Lehman added.
Miami's "buzz coffees" last year
gained national attention as a
unique educational experiment.
Women presidents and officers
come together at informal meet-
ings to discuss what they can do
to fulfill their responsibilities in
the general matter of meeting
total community need.
New Cancer
Unit Organized
Philip Ayre Unit of the Women's
Corps of the Cancer Institute at
Miami was officially organized in
the North Dade area this week.
Under the tutelage of Mrs. Sid-
ney Raffel, president of the Wom-
en's Corps, the new group met at
the home of Mrs. William Good-
man, 949 NE 163rd St., No. Miami
Beach.
Mrs Goodman was unanimously
elected president of the unit. Her
fellow officers are Mrs. Morton
Reiss, first vice president; Mrs.
Milton Hornstein, second vice
president; Mrs Harris King, third
vice president; Mrs. Saul Bell.
treasurer; Mrs. Arthur Selevan,
financial secretary; Mrs. Sidney
Shecter, recording secretary: and
Mrs. Harold Lichter, corresponding
secretary.
The new unit chose its name in
"We find a mutual wavelength."
Mrs. Lehman explained. "These
solutions over the coffee cups are
not always final, but they help to
give direction and meaning to
what we are doing," she stated.
Biggest program undertaken
each year by the women of FJWO
.s full support of the Combined
Jewish Appeal, in which they
serve as volunteers at special
fund-raising events and in the
door-to-door drive. Women also
give personal contributions as
Ifcatr 'plus gifts" to CJA.
FJWO members also participate
in other worthwhile city-wide ac-
tivities such as the United Fund.
Executive committee has sched-
uled a meeting for Wednesday. 10
a.m.. in the Board room of Feder-
ation to develop the agenda at tho
September "buzz coffees."
Reception Fetes
Israeli Consul
A farewell reception for Nahum
Artar, consul of Israel in the
Southeastern region of the United
States, will be given Sunday eve-
ning at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Sam Oritt, 810 Lakeview dr., Mi-
ami Beach.
The reception will be jointly
tendered by the Oritts and Mr. and
Mrs. Jack Canter. Oritt is general
chairman of the Greater Miami
committee for Israel Bonds, and
Carner is chairman of the 1959
Combined Jewish Appeal.
Astar will shortly return to Is-
rael after serving in his present
post as Israel's representative
here since the beginning of 1956.
He has served in Israel's Ministry
of Foreign Affairs since the estab-
lishment of the state in 1948.
Former chief public relations of-
ficer of the Foreign Ministry, he
was assigned to the American di-
vision of the ministry in 1950 as a
senior officer. Prior to his appoint-
ment as consul in the Southeastern
region, he served as vice consul of
Israel in Chicago.
memory of the son of Dr. Ernest
Ayre, director of the Cancer Insti-
tute at Miami. Meetings are
scheduled to be held on the first
Wednesday of each month. Chair-
man of the membership commit-
tee is Mrs. King, 1125 NE 176th st.
I
a


Vaaa
Page 2-B
fJeHlstnuMten
Friday. August ty
They're Off to Higher Education
t- ;# ,n who Israel Rabbinical College in because K h dot t New York-------
Seven of the 10 students who
graduated in Jwne^toorrrine 11**
brew Academy ninth grade will
be off to Hebrew High Schools
throughout the nation when clas-
ses resume in September.
Of the greup. five available for
comment Wednesday were firm
in their expectation not to make
the rabbinate their life's work,
but all said they were going for
-"The t(*rew--and--when- I w**tJnrir* ^ mA'~
ev*r hopes ultimately to become
a teacher of mathematics
Also leaving for Hebrew High
School are Daniel. >on of Rabbi
and MM Simon Azulav. ol Nor h
Miami, who'll be entering Pitts-
burgh Hebrew Acadenn.
Daniel, son of Mr. and Mrs. Abe
Aronoff. 1401 Bay rd who
registered in Ner Israel.
According to Rabbi Aleander
Gross, Hebrew Academy princi-
pal, "this is the last graduating
class that will b* sanding students
to Hebrew schools elsewhere for
lack 0* facilities here. The Acad-
DAVID
LION AID
additional Hebrew studies be-
cause they felt it an important
part of developing into mature
citizens.
Larry Nadler, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Charles Nadler, 2851
Prairie ave., will shortly leave
for the Chicago Jewish Academy
"because it combines an out-
standing secular studies depart-
ment with its Hebrew curric-
ulum." But Larry has his eye
on electrical engineering, and
hopes to be able to go to MIT
when he enters college.
For Gerald Backman. son of
Mr. an! Mrs Cecil Backman. MS
-Meridian a\e. it will he the \ef
Israel
BatMineer-:
secular programs are strong
here.'" is Gerald's reason for en-
rolling. While he has not yet de-
cided about the future, he 1- sure
he will not enter the rabbinate.
Arthur Spolter. son of Mr and
Mrs. Isidore Spolter. 817 Lenox
ave.. leaves for Yeshiva High
School of Yeshiva I'niversity hi
New York City. "I'm going
there." he explained, because my
brother, Seymour, a former He-
brew Academy honor student.
will be entering Yeshiva College
in the fall. But apart from be-
ing able to be together with him.
I understand the school is excel-
lent for Hebrew and English
studies.''
Arthur expects to study archi-
tecture some day. and has no
plans of entering rabbinical
school when he graduates.
For Leonard Kornreich, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Anton Kornreich.
536 lOUi St.. it will be Chicago
Jewish Academy, "which has
been recommended to me by
many rabbis in Miami. My bro-
ther David also went there, and
I'm told its overall curriculum
is superior."
Of the five boys, Leonard is
the only one who entertains cur-
rent ambitions of being ordained.
But his life's ambition is den-
tistry.
David Holland, son of Mr and
Mrs. Sidney Holland. 426 Jeffer-
son ave.. is leaving for Ner Israel
Rabbinical College. His n
for going there is "the school',
intense itodieJ in Talmud
tAttr
r.fKAW
THtft
Miami Chapter Official Hii
Red Policy Against Jews
The American Jewish Commit. Jewish students admitted to I
iSn irImmcJTEJZ has made public a comprehen- tulions of higher learning"'
sive report on the policy of re-1 tematically limited.
Europe "is grave and comp
put forth a program of action i
veloped on the basis of four i
principles:
1. Equality of rights for Jew, |
Eastern Europe and the Set
Union in law and in fact wiUm t
framework of the existing
and economic system. an
"equality under this system it i
consonant with the American i
ccpt of freedom."
2. The ngnt of Jews to emi
freely to places of their t
with all of their possessions.
or South Miami, featuring dormi-
tory living. Students from Cuba
and South America are also ex-
pected to register.
"Our parents simply put up
too much resistance to their chil-
dren's leaving Miami for a high
school education, and feel it's
about time that the Academy
launched one of its own."
Beach Girl Will
Live in Israel
Maxine Donna Brandeis, daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mr- Leo D. Bran-
l< 1605 Pennsylvania ave. Mi-
ami Beach, will leave from New
York City Aug. 23 aboard the
Queen Fredericks bound for Haifa.
Israi! where she will spend
six months on a kibbutz.
loate
ef th< Florida, where
-h< rj educa-
tion, meeco SI
considering working lor a Mas-
ter's degree at the Hebrew Univer-
sity in Jerusalem.
Misi Brandeis has been a Miami
Beach resident for the past 19
years, and served as a counselor
at the Temple EmanuEl summer
day camp.
re
pression and discrimination since
the end of World War II practiced
b ythe Soviet Union and its satel-
lites against its more than 3.000.000
Jewish citizens.
Harold B. Spaet, executive com-
mittec chairman of the Greater'
Miami chapter, in announcing the
publication of the report, said that
the Jews in the Soviet Union and.
its satellites are subject to "dis-
criminations and disabilities
which blight their daily lives.".
Spaet warned that official Soviet
policy threatens the "extinction of
the Jewish religion and culture in
.i vast region of the earth."
Spaet -aid that the American
Jewish Committee study reveals:
The Jewish community is "kept
organizationally in an atomiiod
condition." There is no federa-
tion of Jewish communities and
practically no communication
among local congregations.
The: vabbis,
all ol then oldone rabbi for
in the Soviefl
Unionmost ot them officiating in
X In accordance with its ear*. ]
mount concern for the individulj
human being and its convicma]
that emigration should be
pletely voluntary, the AJC ct]
t-'nuet to oppose all compulsion ]
on the individual to uproot him-j
self.
The AJC will join wjtn
gamzations. Jewish and non-Je
LsJJL in -ceking private. gMB
mental, and inter-go\ ernnwnu
aid for the assistance of emigrantd
rented rooms which substitute for from Eastern Europe and the
Campers Pass
Swimming Test
Over 90 percent of the boys and
synagogues Not a single syna-
gogue has been built or returned
to a Jewish congregation. The
training of rabbbis was prohibited
lor 40 years until 1957. when per-
misMon was granted for the open-
ing of a seminary for 20 students
in Moscow.
The Jewish population is per-
mitted neither schools nor thea-
viet Union, and influence the
motion of liberalized immigraua
opportunities in the I S.
other countries.
In a section on the Soviet
tionality system and the status >
the Jews, the report points ootl
that the Soviet Union doe- not m-j
ognize religious minorities lal]
that Jews are considered "a at-1
tres nor the publication of books'tonalitythey
and newspapers, except on very n individual
are so designate!
identity passport j
the Greater Miami Jewish Com-
brod in Amenca to a good description of one of the goals of
tenJies of the Fen-band. 46-year-old Labor Zionist Fraternal
Order, in Highland Mills. N.Y. To make sure that Kinderwel
tSHZSr QKU,henf ISiael mUSiC' Farband -vi.es exp^i
from Israel, such as the attractive young lady at the pian?
1W 9 ^ f the n,ed Israel "* Sho^ana
.- ----- "j' **\a "^"r"r"'. tAicpi uii very ** *
th"S<~". w:.dJ!y c.ampers *'!! rare occasions. This virtually com- which all citizens must possea.'
plete blackout of a once flourish- The Soviet experiment at Bon-
ing and lively culture is paralleled Bidjan in Asia which was planotd
by equally serious discrimination Jewish national settlemest
in jobs, education and public *re, clearly a "failure" the re-
life.'' Spaet said pert said. The Soviets had predict-
In education, the number of ed that the population of Biro-Bid-
.. janan area of roughly 13JM
No Jew is known to
Flagler Adds New Staffers
Flagler Federal Savings and
Loan .Assn. has added three new
members to its expanding apprais-
al and construction loan depart-
ment. *^
Fred Hug. appraisal and con-
struction inspector, has been in
the appraisal-construction loan
fiekj here for four years. A native
of Scranton. Pa., and a Miamian
20 years, he studied appraising and
real estate at the University of
-Miami, and is a licensed real es-
tate salesman.
Max Herman, also an appraisal
construction loan inspector,
munity Center passed at least
their beginners swimming tests
by the end of the last week of
camp, Emanuel Tropp. assistant
director. >aid Wednesday.
Campers at all four day camps
sponsored by GMJCC have been
going through a concentrated
swimming instruction program un-
der ,he gU,dance of Red Cross
waterfront safety instructors.
Many will have received ad-
vanced certificate,. The water-
front program was featured at
,*T7 '" Camp la*
zssrw.....*
be in the
foreign service of the U.S.S.R.,
in the higher ranks of the armed
forces, or in the military, air and
naval academies. Even in such
matters as the distinguished ser-
vice record of World War II. the
Official Soviet publication omit-
ted Jews entirely in listing sol-
diers who have received high
military honors for bravery
though in April, mjj thoy wore
bird place among the "no-
thus honored in the
Germany.
Early this year in New York an
.f .uno. on Thurs- """* J*>*h Committee de-
' week. Camp Sholom *a,,on > First Deputy Pre-
quare mileswould reach SOO.lsJj
of v. hich half would bbe Jews of
1931. However, the failure of re i
i run mem is reflected in the latest j
estimates.
Branch conductedt ft [aM,m
tS*V\ C1U^US' f0r S" da> *S and SjS Sun-' "* "*
han 20 years before joining Flag- da> h proceeds gouw to the Earl> vear in .
* Feder-L He ,s ,tive Ml. J^-*-* fund. C?n SJS jghei *5S C^tee^e,?
Mrn^ mmm mmm
Z,J, S-.' '"Z" for n v* and niht camp shows.
secretary to the accounUng super- Bov
Calif.,
Parent
visor of Lake Arrowhead; ,
before jouung Flagler Federal.
G
In Miami it's
FLORIDA-FOREMOST
DAIRIES
for Home Delivery
Phone FR 4-2621
The great name in dai'y products
FRANK J. HOLT, Manager
m and
completed a
crafts projects Thi,
>ear that the GMJCC
signed
speciausi
sa,d. Campers have been^vSved
>n ^uch projects as basket*.
">*. copper toolmg .* [,X av"
aluminum work en!m i h"'g'
others enameling, and
Kha"har>:ar.x.Ls.,!.n" f a*
V*1' all camp, JelZ?***. "P^^nt-Uvea of a
vnety of arts and w?h a ,2 t*" h,d inferred
Tt... i. .u- f w,,n a So\iet offinai ....
camps as- Th
that
top So\iet official on this
a full me Vns andTraft ?, V.0 J** ,n "C
i' at each branch ESS ^. pU^ 0^ the Jew, b. Fasten
f!l>'PtrtOU Uti
J^3 rafreshint calorie tree
Bhustein Confers with Dog
TED NATION
cob Blau^tein. An
leader, rret here
JTA)Ja-
,ion5^ -VS',
J0id ^ !VSL
the Suez i\ii \t- n. ",m
reported to Mr h Blaas,eiB *'>
"M
f*"'s. in -n.
">
i" ______
TETLEY TEA
I
ATtAWTlON
IN JEWISH
MOMfS
5INCI 1W7
Vea.
j, Yoaa Tov spin"
its...-iavoro*dea"
for foOoM ssteagsh awi i
lanoo.. riches tsestaod|
ore with yoor fletsbip
ailckigs sod betweea i
refr
CertajWa^owW


Augu* M. JtM
Page 3-B
GRAND-WAY"
DISCOUNT
FT. LAUMRDAU Wl
L_n_Ai
WILTON MANORS
MXII HWHWAY
AT WILTON DRIVE
U W.H0UYW00D b FT.
I S STATt ID. 7 AT I ST4
I WASIHHTOM ST. ~ W. I
CENTERS
Si
3700 NORTH
FEDERAL HWHWAY
LAUDERDALE
STATE ROAD 7 AT
RDOWADD DUD.
All ITEMS IFFECTIVE AT All STORES EXCIPT AS OTHERWISE NOTED. FEDERAL AND SUNRISE NAS FOODS OtHYl
HEN TUR
GIGANTI SHARP
PROVOLONE
CHEESE
69
LB.
TOMATO JUICE
UBBY'S
2 49c
White Potatoes
KING
COLE
WHOLE
6 a 49c
ITEMS AND PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SATURDAY
CELERY
GOLDEN HARVEST CUT
GREEN
BEANS
NO. 303 CAN
5149
c
STALK
5
CARROTS
* 6C
$3.98 MISSES'
Pedal Pushers,
C A P R I S
CORDUROY jJ97
AND
FALL PLAIDS
$1.98 MISSES' CHINO
Pedal Pushers
2 roR$3
$3.49 MISSES'
CORDUROY. VIRGIN WOOL
SKIRTS
$2*7
SIZE
22-30
OPEN DAILY 8 A.M. TO 10 P.M.-SUNDAYS TO 7 P.M.


Cage
'!' '
Page 4-B
*Jmist>rtor**'ar
FridY:AugMt lf '
Yoijr Marriage Coinseior
MlAS NAXIT
Famom Mauiaci Autmomtt. Ucn.B and A
To fill the hour." said Emerson, -that is
happiness." .
Tucked awav in a modest apartment in W
National hotel on Miami Beach is a short, charming
white-haired widow of 82 who is living prooi Ol
Emerson's wisdom.
Her name is Sarah Sive Czech. For more than
a half century now this bright, alert lady with her
sharp mind and insatiable curiosity has dedicated
herself and her fortune to philanthrophy and good
works. In short. Mrs. Czech has learned to fill the
hour, and she has been doing so ever since she *U
a voting girl in Chicago.
In the windy city, back in the early 1900 s. Mrs.
Czech ran and operated four stores, and there she
built the small fortune which enabled her to retire
in Miami back in 1921. When widowhood finally
came. Mrs. Czech met the challenge with courage
and spirit.
Women Without Men
In Miami she became a life member of some
20 organizations, contributing not only her money
but her zeal and energy as well. She was an ardent
and tireless campaigner for Israel Bonds and for
Mt. Sinai Hospital, maintaining, in fact, a lively in-
terest in all things Jewish.
All this despite the fact that most of her good
works have been done between heart attacks; for
while old age has inevitably tarnished her body, it
bas been unable to crush a spirit that is in the
noblest Hebraic tradition.
Now there is a moral in all this. A few weeks
ago. some of my readers may recall. I told the story
of some widows on Miami Beach who sit around
hotel and motel lobbies mourning their fate and
waiting hopefully for a man to come around and
propose marriage.
TtMC ; tant thev are tronen without a purpose, aimlesa
and rudderless m | world desperately in need of
their help .
In mv column I suggested thai some ..f the*?
widows and divorcees would be far better off if they
would devote at lea-t KMM of their time to hospitals
and other organizations in dire need of extra help.
Thev would. I suggested, be performing a serv-
ice. Equally important they would be performing
the best possible sen-ice for themselves.
Filling Her Hour*
For one thing they would be getting the social
therapv so many need. For another they would be
involved in a worthwhile cause And they wouW
meet and exchange ideas with other people, and so
lose some of their neurotic interest in hen?scl^s
Mv suggestion still stands. To fill the hour
Emerson said, is happiness. Mrs Sarah Sive Czech
has been filling her hours-some of it writing poetry
and she has been doing so for many years. It has
brought her much happiness. It can bring happi-
ness to others
For in keeping busy Mrs. Czech has had no
time to brood and think of the mournful past. In
her heart there is no place for self-pity For her,
keeping busy is the best of all therapies, the most
effective of all medications.
Not every woman, of course, can be as self-
reliant or as independent as Sarah Sive Czech. Not
every women is in her heroic mould. But every
woman can make some contribution to the commun-
ity and to some form of public service. And every
woman should.
Mr. K/iii it availaklt for private marriagt cawsucfiaf
f the Maafiaf fea Mtwicaf !., in Miami
W. Germany to Compensate Italian Jews
ROME-(JTA)The West Ger-
man Government has agreed, in
principle, to compensate Italian
Jews who were victims of the
Nazis, "La Stampa." Turin's lead-
ing newspaper, reports from Bonn.
The unofficial decision to compen-
sate Italian Jews was disclosed
during preliminary negotiations be-
tween German and Italian officials
on the payment of compensation to
Italian victims of Nazism.
The West German Government
had originally objected to the pay-
ment of compensation to Italian
Jews on the grounds, that they
were already paying 450.000.000
marks to Israel and the Ji
Claims Conference.
Tho paper reports that inten-
sive Italian-West German nego-
tiations on details of compensa-
tion to Italian citizens are ex-
pected to start before the end of
the summer. Taking part in the
discussions will be a mixed
Italian-West German commis-
sion which will study economic
and commercial problem* and
which will be presided over by
Italian Undersecretary of the
Treasury Valsecchi and by West
onomic Affairs Westrick.
onomic Affairs, Westrick.
The Bonn Government is also
understood to have yielded on the
question of the number of catego-
ries of persons entitled to compen-
One-Hour Service Free at Cleaners
sation. The Federal Government
had previously claimed that com-
pensation WU due only to those
Italian citizens who had establish-
ed residence in Germany not later
than 1945 Bonn now concedes that
compensation is due all Italian
victims of Nazism, whether they
resided in Germany or not.
One difficulty still to be over-
come in the negotiations is the
definition of "persecuted by Nai
ism." According to present Ger-
man laws persons persecuted "for
confessional, racial and ideological
motives" are entitled to compen-
sation, but there are several con-
troversies on this point. Italian war
pri-oners and internees in Ger-
many have been excluded from
compensation, the paper said.
Al Goldman has been named
to the board of directors of
the merchants division of the
Miami Beach Chamber of
Commerce. Goldman is own-
er of Fu Manchu restaurant
here. ___________
Himmler Papers
Found in Lake
HAMBURG(JTA)New light
may illuminate aspects of Nazi
atrocities against Jews and others
with the discovery Monday of SS
Chief Heinrich Himmler's secret
diaries. The diaries were found oo
the bottom of an Austrian lake.
The newspaper Der Stern has
been exploring the bottom of Lake
Toplitz for several weeks. On Mon-
day divers came up with Himm-
ler's personal files, his diaries and
identity cards. Part of the mate-
rial deals with the fate of Jews.
Bundles of counterfeit English
five-pound notes were also found.
They were counterfeited by Nail
engravers during the war.
The salvaged possessions will be
handed over to the Austrian Min-
istT) of Interior The contents of
Himmler's papers were not pub-
lished although it was indicated
that revealing information was
found Himmler headed the SS,
wai chief of the Nazi Security or-
ganization, and, at the end of the
Bikur Cholin,
Women Meet
Miami chapter of fli]
Kosher Convalescent
TfTVet MondaT*l p.m. -
torbUB of Richards'
Store.
The meeting win
return of Mrs. PauU^J"
president, from her vs*
celebrate the birthdays
Gladys Fende*. Mrs.
liner, and Mrs Anna
Also welcomed back
; tion will be Mrs Muy"
horn, chairman <>< ihe ul
Urn Birthday Club. /
Hostesses at tne lfoaJ
tng will be Mrs. Isi4ocei
Mrs. Sarah Sparr, and m
man Mck.
Granada Wor
Welcome H<
Flagler-Granada Womtrj'i
will welcome Hawaii ai
tion's 50th state with a
Far 'Eastern fashion
sented by Buddy Logue n
ter's auditorium Thursday!
20. Commentary is by Ma
Logue, with creations bjr
Shaheen, Honolulu.
Members of Flaglar-
Jewish Community
model the back to-school
fashions.
Mrs. Barney Landers it
man. Mrs. Sam Ko*aufcy
gram chairman.
Sisterhood Cord forty
Sisterhood card part; t
held at Tifereth Israel Si
Center. 6500 N Miami a*|
aday evening.
Xtdtfail Might' Sc/tedai
B'nai B'rith Women of H
ami will hold a "cocktail
at the Casablanca hotel oil
day, Aug. 22.
war, commanded all soM
police inside the Germul
He committed -uicide aflj
British captured him
Freedman's Cleaners are now of-
fering special cleaning prices foi
your wearing apparel.
Freedman's maintains two es-
- intents, at 1718 79th st.
causeway. Treasure Island, and
2922 Coral Way. Miami.
The Freedman family has been
in the cleaning business for three
*>
generations. Founder was llyman
Freedman. Son Jesi and now
Bruce Freedman are pi
the original one-hour dry cleaning
service, with eight plai
oany. \ V
One-hour i> free even
day. Monday through Saturdaj
7:3C a.m. to 6 p.m.
HAPPY THE 1
Have that
Business Meeting,
Banquet, or
Special Occasion

You'll find complete
focilities to exoctly satisfy
your needs in the Kismet,
Aladdin, Scheherazade and
Rubaiyot Rooms, be it for a
wedding or o private party!
it thi
Ml
falters #
^

for Information?
HAZEL ALLISON
Catering Director,
JE 1-6061
atr St. Colllnm Av
flonfied by
Ui smart settmes, the aalabratatl
euisine, the suave serwee of Tea
Sanaa, where a famous flair tor
an affair it now ennancod by
Miami Beach's anal dauling array
f handsome NEW FACILITIES
for epicurean functions ... from a
Pooli.de Party to a Grand Ball ...
for 2& cuetis or UOO ... in Grand
Ballroom. Petite Ballroom, Ivory
Toer. Upper Echelon Club. Ver-
anda Room. Roma Loange, Tsrrsc*
Eoom. Cardinal Room, Town Hall.
Choosing Ta* Sajrsak for n |vM
f function ... **-
MSIWW. FUTHMl. CalllTUU IFFUW
mm Hernias ctw muiiMt
will be your assurance of a part*
as sor./r.e as It Is ..rr,,|,'
ft WaS and infaraaefiaa call
JE 8-6811
*"THU TllCHNrt,
"".cfor .f C.,i tm4 c,Urim
aaaaaf
MIAMI
BEACH!
riNIST
BANQUET
FACILITIES
BANQUETS RECEPTIONS WEDIIMS
COCKTAILS LUNCHEONS IAR AUTZVA*
1) mling room, mating from 10 fnaofre-iryle to 5MI
boncjuer-ify/e. 3 imporolm dining end cocttaa' oreoa *l
trained, imoginalivt afoff waV aw'< fou without War||
Horn* root
BALMORAL
UN 6-7792
caaaNA ciui
Sll ($ ON THt 0(fAN AT 98th STRUT Ml**1 '
For Social Functions with a flair
that will make for a magnificent affair
GDeatjville
Cotnpleie Catering Facflil> *< lh*1
Sj^cial Party Served in an elffMnt
fashion within a luxun<.ut sftuag
that will reflect yotar good laate.
*t**t#4 H ax>, fJiut
fUMiUmmmannmytlf
caatniiai. Maws tatwrn
Trie a tele or a gala eektralioa
with 3,300guesu...
sufnv/si toswft cariMM avAitaMf
"UN $4511 ItU MtNINw, Cattriat

fridoy, Augu* 14. 1959
+Jels*fk>rklk*n
Page 5-B
^
/?/vYo/w #ji Row Over Arms to Bonn
LONDON(JTA)Israel's munitions sales to West Germany re- Barnett Janner, Member of Par-
suited in sharp debates in two of British Jewry's major organizations I liament and president of the
this week the Board of Deputies of British Jews and the Anglo-Jewish i board, said he agreed that the ulti-
Assn.
icob Potofsky (right), president of the Amalgamated Clothing
/orkejs of America, presented the Mental Health Center of
America award to O. A. Knight, president of the Oil, Chemical
tnd Atomic Workers International Union, at a recent banguet
3r the new Denver non-sectarian, free Jewish-sponsored men-
jl hospital.
nday Might Social
ISlarting the celebration of the
(h year of organized Pioneer
lomer. in Greater Miami, Kadi-
ah chapter will have a social and
rd party Sunday night, 8 p.m.,
the Ocean Rranch hotel. 200 SE
lih si Mrs. Celia Segal is chair-
a
fatei-less Whisk
[leans Easily
uattrless hand cleaner used
factories and other installations
title workmen need a double-
ity product is Whisk, now dis-
[buted by the Troy Sanitary
)ping Cloth Company of Florida,
NW 80th st.
IVhiak removes paint, grease,
adhcHves, carbon, printers'
Luncheon Fetes
President's Aide
Mrs. David Vender was chair-
man last Friday at a luncheon
meeting in the
Pub restaurant
honoring Gen.
Melvin Maas,
chairman of
President Eisen-
hower's commit-
tee on employ-
ment of the han-
dicapped.
Mrs. Vender
! heads the South
(Florida B'nai $. *
I B'rith Women's Council program
| an employment of the handicap-
iped.
Germans Form
Jewish Library
COLOGNE(JTA)A special li-
brary has been established here,
devoted to the aim of "bringing
light to the question of the rela-
tion of Germany to her Jewish
population." An official announ-
cement stated that the goal of the
library is the gathering of material
covering 2,000 years of Jewish life
I in Germany, with the heip ot tne
I Federal government, state govern-
ments, and private collectors and
contributors.
Thus far, 1,500 volumes have
been gathered by the library, re-
lating to general Jewish life in this
country. A special division of the
library is being devoted to the
life, contemporaries and works of
Moses Mendelssohn, the father of
the Haskalah, or Enlightenment
movement, among German Jewry.
The library will also have material
on Nazi atrocities against Jews.
Two of the foremost authors of
the younger German generation,
Heinrich Boell and Paul Schal-
lueck, initiated the library by is-
suing a public call for establish-
ment of a collection of "Germania
Judaica." Financial support has
been given to the library by the
city of Cologne and the state of
North Rhine-Westphalia.
Neither organization took any
mate decision must be left to Is-
rael and that he did not believe Mr.
official position on the matter, the Ben-Gurion would take 'action not
presiding officers of both rulmgfin Israel's best interests. He ap-
that the issue was a questioq for pealed to the board to take no fur-
Israel alone to resolve. ther action on the question..
A similar stand was taken by
In the board, the debate was
enlivened by sharp criticism of
the Ajx, the Jewish Veterans
Organization, which had made a
protest against the arms deal.
Speakers in the debate asserted
that the organization should not
have acted without clearing its
action through the board. A
veterans' spokesman told the
meeting that criticism of Pre-
mier David Ben-Gurion did not
imply a lack of love or devotion
to Israel. Ho said those who
"merely kept silent or acqui-
esced" in such actions as the
arms deal, "under-mined Israel's
integrity."
The committee report to the
board which preceded the debate,
expressed understanding of moral
and sentimental objections to the
transaction but held that it what
was involved was a question of
defense and self-preservation, the
decision "must be left to Israel."
R. N. Carvalho,. president of the
Anglo-Jewish Assn., at a meeting
of the organization's Council. He
said the AJC had always maintain-
ed that Jews who werejiot citizens
of Israel had no right to intervene
in domestic issues there.
Bombay Officials in Tribute
NEW DELHI(JTA)The first
anniversary of the India-Israel Re
view was marked this week by
congratulatory messages to the
Bombay Jewish Association from
leading officials of Bombay. Pay-
ing tribute to the goal of the peri-
jodical of strengthening Indian
I Israel friendship were Y. B. Cha-
,van, Chief Minister of Bombay,
P. T. Borale mayor of Bombay.
K. K. Shah, president of the Bom
bay Regional Congress Commit-
tee, and Kakasabeb Kalelkar,
member of the Indian Parliament
PR Counselor
Back from Meet
Back from the first such con-
In a message to the organization ference held in this country, the
' and'manv' other factorV'sous I here. Gen. Maas acknowledged the \ National Strategy Seminar, Frank
tome 7TlnrnntoerTJonten-' work of B'nai B'rith in creating Wright this week warned that "our
employment opportunities for the country is in very serious danger,
handicapped, and informed the and our people must quickly take
luncheon audience that the na-; note of sonie hard facts."
tional committee has now enlarged j The two-week seminar, conduc-
at sizes, including Whisk for an
Itomatic dispenser.
hand dispenser is furnished by
[>y Sanitary Wiping Cloth Com-
ly on a loan basis without
its program to include mentally re-
Urded and the cured mentally ill
rge. Where staff "** among prospects for its campaign.
acc< rr.modated by the hand B r
The committee seeks to sensi-
tize employers to the fact that
handicapped persons perform on
the job as well as "normal" per-
sonneland in many cases better.
Guests at the Friday meeting
included Robert Green, secretary
general of the Junior Chamber In-
ternational; John Nesbttt, Jaycees
international program director;
Sen. Harry P. Cain, president of
the world committee and Dade
County United Fund; and A. T.
Euster, immediate past president.
del, i,*ire is a foot-operated dis-
iser, also furnished gratis.
The dispenser meters just the
fcht amount of Whisk for best
lulls, so that there is no unnec-
lary waste of cleaner.
Information on Whisk Hand
Baner or a Whisk service agree-
fcnt arc available from Troy at
1-8611.S. T.
LUNCH?
ted at the National War College in
Washington, was authorized by the
Joint Chiefs of Staff. Only 200
reserve oficers from the 50 states
were selected to attend, and Wright
was one.
In the military he is public in-
formation officer of the 51st Inf.
Div., Florida-South Carolina Na-
tional Guard, second largest of
27 U.S. National Guard divisions.
In civilian life, Wright has been a
public relations counselor in Mi-
ami for 13 years.
The three German Shepherd dogs shown here arrived in Israel
after a 16-hour flight from the United State* aboard an El Al
jet-powered Britannia. This is the second shipment of watch-
dogs purchased by a non-profit group of Missourians headed
by Kansas City lawyer Arnold Shanberg. So far, the group
has sent nine such dogs to the Israel Police Force for special
patrol duty in that country's border settlements.
TH
u

Room of The lolSow Uim
Downtown Miami's only
Mfoad rootauront
Coftoo Mouoo
TMI
XNCft
L O U N O
unique ooteng
ttCArW KVO.MMM St, Weal
Will Highlight
Civil War Role
WASHINGTON Eight Jewish
organizations this week jointly an-
nounced plans for a traveling ex-
hibit depicting the roles played by
American Jews during the Civil
War.
The exhibit is being prepared
as part of the nation-wide centen-
nial observance of the war period.
It will feature Jewish contributions
to both the Confederacy and the
Union.
Through the initiative of the
American Jewish Historical So-
ciety, seven other groups joined
with it to establish the Jewish His-
torical Commission on the Civil
War Centennial. The eight organ-
izations will pool resources from
their archives and from other
sources to create the exhibit that
will open at the Jewish Museum of
New York in November, 1980.
The following year the display
will be moved to the exhibit hall
of the B'nai B'rith in Washington.
Vandals Attack Synagogue
MONTREAL(JTAM Police re-
ported this week that vandals
broke into an Orthodox synagogue
during the weekend and destroyed
scrolls, prayer shawls and books
and smashed silverware and other
religious items. They estimated
the damage at $1,000.


rafe 6-B
-JemMI*****"
Friday. Augat H,
J7m tltel^eafm of Society
Simpkin, Cone,
Exchange Vows
udtth Ann Cone became Mrs.
Beryl Daniel Simkin in 6:30 p.m.
rites Sunday. Aug. 9. at Miami
Springs Villas. Rabbi Morris Skop
, eiatad.
The br.de is the daughter of the
Mr and Mrs. Earl Cone, of
uasCtt?. Mo. The groom is the
Of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence
- iktn 6230 Killian dr.. So. Miami.
tn in marriage by her uncle
I 1 mat, Mr. and Mrs. Leonard
S Wohlfeld. 959 E. 23rd St.. Hia-
leah. the bride was attired in a
White fioorlength lace gown fea
taring i chapel train.
Maid of honor for her sister was
K SS Cynthia Cone. Bridesmaids
ireluded Miss Patsy Lavin. Mrs.
J! >rton Kramer, Mrs. David Leon,
and Miss Lillian Rubin. Debbie
Simkin, the groom's sister, was
ibwer girl.
Albert Simkin was best man for
h.s nephew. Ushers included the
groom's brother, Herbert Simkin,
C-erold Prager, Stanley Rose, and
Stanley Barnett. Michael Wohl-
f;eld, cousin of the bride, was
r:ngbearer.
The bride is a graduate of Miami
Fiison High School and the Uni-
versity of Florida, where she re-
ceived her Bachelor of Education
degree. She will teach at Keystone
Height* Elementary School. Her
sorority is Alpha Epsilon Phi.
The groom graduated from Mi-
ami Higb. and attends the Univer- j
s.ty of Florida school of pharm- |
asy. He is a member of Alpha
EpsJo.i Pi fraternity.
Biscayne Chapter
Plans Party
Biscavne chapter of the Amer
ican Medical Center will hold a
"La Petit" coffee and card party
at the Saxony hotel Wednesday
noon under the chairmanship of
Mrs. Robert iCloriai Milberg.
This is a newly-chartered chap
ter of the American Medical Cen-
ter at Denver, which provides free
and unlimited hospilahzation for
victims ol cancer, tuberculosis and
other chest diseases. Plans arc
now under way for the Eleanor
Roosevelt Institute for cancer re-
search.
President is Mrs. Marvin (Bar
bara> Haven, of 85 NI 174th dr.
No. Miami Beach Corresponding
secretarv is Mrs. Jay iHermionei
Cohen. 1021 NE 180th ter No. Mi-
ami Beach.
Change of Pace
At Studio M
Ruth E. Foreman, owner-direc-
tor of Studio M Playhouse and the
Dramatic Academy, offers a com-
plete change of pace in her thirds
presentation of the Studio M Play-
house summer series.
Solid Gold Cadillac" is a rib-
tickling comedy and a complete
contrast from "Bad Seed," Studio
Ms last offering.
Freddie Albert, who designed
the unusual and original stage set-
lings, exhibits a "One Man Show"
in the Plavhouse.
Solid Gold Cadillac" plays
through Aug. 23. with Sunday eve-
ning- included. The theater is dark
Mondays.
,v
\
W< rn-T-Kahn,
mts. inn smmin
Dinner followed at Miami Springs
Villas. The couple will reside in
Gainesville.
Siegel, Borok Eye
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Scherer, of
Miami Beach, announce the en-
gagement of their daughter, Ella
Carol Siegel. 3200 SW 25th ter., to
Arnold J. Borok, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Arthur Borok. 3880 NW 2nd
St., Miami.
Mi.v. S:ege(. a senior scholarship
^udi'iit in elementary education,
will graduate from the University
of Miami in February1. She is also
Sept. Rites
employed as assistant director of
the Greater Miami B'nai B'rith
Youth Organizatiin.
Her fiance, former winner of an
administrative art scholarship,!
j graduated from the University of;
Miami. He is an instructor at
'Homestead Junior High School.
Mr. Borok was formerly an as-
| sistant on the staff of the Joe and
I Emily Lowe Art Gallery of the]
University of Miami, and is now-
associated with the Mirell Art]
Gallery of Coconut Grove. He has
been a student instructor at the '
Parkway Playhouse. Burnsville,
N. C.
The couple plan an early Sep-
tember wedding.
Brody, Lepselter
Betrothal Told
A November wedding is in the
offing for Miss Dorene Brody and
Irwin Lepselter
Announcement of the couple's
engagement is being made here by
the bride-elect's parents. Mr. and
Mrs. Sam Brody. 620 N. Shore dr.
Her fiance is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Leon Lepselter. 9172 Emer-
son ave.
Miss Brody is a graduate of Mi-
ami Senior High School, attended
the University of Alabama, and
graduated from the University of
Miami with a Bachelor's degree
v i" educal,on Her sorority was
Werner-Rahi. Delta Phi Epsilon.
HISS D0KINI Moor Mr. Lepselter graduated from
_____________________. Miami Beach High School and at-
Phi Sigs Have
Barbecue Here
Mrs. Erwin P. Hoffman. 5709
LaGorce dr.. will be hostess to the
Phi Sigma Sigma Alumnae chapter
of Miami Saturday evening, whin
the group holds its annual summer
barbecue.
The event will be attended by
members and their husbands, and
is one of several social gatherings
held for Phi Sigma Sigma alumnae
and their husbands during the
year.
President of the chapter is Mrs
Marvin W. Lewis, 4421 Post ave.
The group meets each month al-
ternating meetings between Miami
Beach. Miami and Coral Gables,
and is for alumnae only
To Announce Contest Winners
George Bacher's "Trip to Paris"
contest will end this month, with
the winner being named at 10 p.m .
Monday, Aug. 24. A flight to Eu-
rope via KLM Royal Dutch Air-
lines, with dinner at Maxim's res-
taurant in Paris, is the prize in
the novel competition The flight
will include overnight stops at
Caracas, Venezuela and Amster-
dam, Holland.
Non-Stop Service Duo
Non-stop jet service between
Miami and Chicago starts Oct. 15.
Ed H. Bishop, district sales man-
ager for Delta Air Lines announ
ced Wednesday. Using the new
DC-8 which last week set a tran>
continental record from Long
Beach-Los Angeles. Calit. to Mi-
ami in four hours and 43 minutes,
Delta will also inaugurate jet ser\
ice from Miami to Atlanta on the
same day.
Pal Joey* Opens
On Weekend
"Pal Joey," America's first mu-
sical comedy with a heel for a
hero, is the next attraction at the
Coconut Grove Playhouse, open-
ing Saturday matinee and running
through Saturday night, Aug. 29,
showing every evening except Moo-
days.
The plot of "Pal Joey." adapted
by John O'Hara from his famous
short stories in the New Yorker
Magazine, with score by Richard
Rodgers and Lorenze Hart, centers
around a down-and-out hoofer,
Joey, who fast-talks himself into
a job in a nightclub on Chicago's
South Side. Having a way with the
ladies, he talks an innocent young
girl into romance, but then drops
her when a wealthy female patron
of the cheap bistro takes a shine
to him, and sets him up with all
that money-can-buy.
Richard Tone, who appeared
here last season in "Say, Darling."
will play the title role, successive-
ly played in the two Broadway
engagements by Gene Kelly and
Harold Lang, and Carol Bruce will
have the role of the beautiful but
aging matron who moves him to
the upper echelons only to drop
him when the situation gets hot.
Erin O'Brien will play Gladys, the
only girl who is impervious to
Joey's charms.
The famous Rodgers and Hart
tunes of the show that have be-
come almost classics include "Be-
witched. Bothered and Bewilder-
ed." "1 Could Write a Book." "That
Terrific Rainbow." "You Mustn't
Kick it Around." "The Flower
Garden of My Heart." "In Our
Little Den of Iniquity," Do it the
Hard Way." the haunting song of
renunciation, and the celebrated
"Zip." describing the intellectual
Mrr FOMMAN
J$irttf in J\\t9n
Recent births at Mt. Siiui
pital include the folowing:
Son born to Mr. and Mrs.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs.
ard Mesh Aug. 6.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. lm\
Ruff Aug. 3.
Daughter born to Mr. aad
Bernard Milstein July 31.
Daughter born to Mr. and
Morton Ernatling July 30.
Daughter born to Mr aad
Melvin Muroff July 28
Son bora to Mr. and Mrs. AOaJ
Rakow July 28.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs.
Mann July 28.
Son bora to Mr. and Mrs Ba|
Shofer July 26.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs Wl|
ham Friedopfer July 24.
Son bora to Mr. and Mrs.
Ham Eisenberg July 24.
Son bora to Mr. and Mrs.
ue! Shell July 23.
Son bora to Dr. and Mrs.
Witkoff July 23.
thoughts Of a atrip-teaser as
works.
Owen Phillips is directing tkl
production of "Pal Joey," Riduril
Tone is serving as choreograph]
and Lea Rohde is musical direct*.]
A-l
^ EMP10YMBIT
__** __ s m
Established IM4
37 NX S* St. .. ft 4*11
-------- i
tended the University of Florida
He was a member of Tau Epsilon
Phi fraternity.
ACF0RS' STUDIO
PLAYHOUSE
. pre**!*,
Solid Gold Cadillac
.-.iraUf THRU AUGUST 33rd
"cket.--41.75; suent Tickets Si.25
**m tmmkomPM m4-3212
MIAMI CONVALESCENT HOME
Ctfft>#r
I M-Haur NuriiM Service
??"! 't **r'etly OMr.M
ah Room* en Ground Floor
1st.
mi
Jewish styl* CoetciM
_ S#aeiu Grounds a
Reasonabl* Rate*
C__J_|. -- "- Reasonable Rates
earn -l? "*" "
J rtcoilM HWWW 1
ID0NCRAC6AN I
INN I
I Secluded 18 acres; private
Iwmming pool; entertain- |
IM Hftft I
GcodfXE* "d G* I
J Wrf* #f Inn y,^, I
I !...,, ax j

*ww*ww*w>
'*WWWWW^M^*^*'WWWW**"*<
IF YOU CAN
CATCH US IT'S
ON THE HOUSE!
... ANY GARMENT THAT LEAVES OUR
STORE WITHOUT A BUTTON!
All of our work is so thoroughly InnpncWd wo
c..., YOU cm{ a *" lob at any price,
J!1".......$1.00 MESSES $1.25 if
PANTS.......5C RESIZING.....WS
FREEDMAN'S CLEANERS
1718 79th St. CewNwiy
Fl $llA.$URE.'5LIAN0 MIAMI. FLONIC
2922 Coral Way
MIAMI, FLORIDA
BIKUR CHOLIM KOSHER
CONVALESCENT HOME
N0M PBOFIT NOW-NICTAJII AN
Under Str.e, ?UP*"T* YOUR COMMUMITY
ai R,.HOU" NURSrNO OOCTOM ON CALL
aw^lTL2!!y;p coSaSZ Bmoumwj*


iy. HuejuM 14.

Donald
Cssswassd frM Fee* IB
la Tdona) CauetT and "Mrs. Morris (Rhoda) Levitt
talking to lovely blonde Mrs. Mack (Miriam) Mades.
' c a
Also on the Birth- Front: Rabbi and Mrs. David (Miriam)
[Lehrfield became the proud parents of a son? Moshe Mordecai,
their first born, June 30 at Mt. Sinai Hospital Bris was July
7 at Kneseth Israel Synagogue, where Rabbi Lehrfield is spirit-
ual leader Rev. Abraham Seif officiated Maternal grand-
parents are Rabbi and Mrs. M. H. Eichenstein, of St. Louis, Mo.,
who attended Paternal grandparents Rabbi and Mrs. Louis
Lehrfield, of Chicago. IU., were also present, and are now the
houseguests of the Lehrfield family at 1400 Lenox ave. Among
(the 300 guests who attended were Rabbi and Mrs. Benjamin
Kirch, of New York, as well as Rabbi Abraham Twersky, of New
York, who is Mrs. Lehrfield's uncle The new parents cele-
brated their first wedding anniversary Aug. S .
In Addition: A son, Glenn Elliott, bom to Rabbi and Mrs.
[Isaac Jerer July 18 at Mt. Sinai Hospital Bris was July 25
jat Rabbi Lerer'a home, 1301 NE 160th st.. No. Miami Beach, at
I which Rev. Seif officiated Glenn Elliott Joins sisters Barbara
Ellen and Michelle Judy Maternal grandparents are Mr. and
|Mrs. George Schwartz, of Brooklyn, N.Y., who attended the Bris
Paternal grandfather is Rabbi Leib Lerer, of Jerusalem,
[Israel.
a a
Mrs. Leon (Alyce) Ell smart in blue with red trim and
|m atoning shoes and wearing a leftover birthday orchid stopping
Ion her way to her birthday presenta brand new orchid-colored
Icarto show an adorable picture of her and Leon's new grand-
Ichild Photo was taken.in Muwcoaa, Wis., where Joel and
[Sandra Dolkin took the baby for a visit with his paternal grand
parents Mrs. Irving (Reva) Wexler taking it easy all summer
[while Sam, Myra and Jerry are in Lear School day camp .
IReva's storing up energy for a coming hectic season at National
[Council of Jewish Women .
To Mexico City, back to Miami Beach for one day and then
off to Baltimore to visit their children are the plans of Dr. and
Irs. Joseph Kotzky .
Looking like a magazine cover. Eddie and Vera Sirkin in son
lan's new yellow and white boat looming up and down Indian
reek waterway One last ride before they're off to' Lake
I'jrleton with a stop to tell Alan how wonderful his boat really
Mr. and Mrs. Abram Fox. 141 SW 23rd rd., visiting their
children, with side trips to Hot Springs, Connecticut, New York,
lew Jersey and Pittsburgh.
Shirley Goodman back to bar Sam here after a delightful
reek in Gotham Town ... Mr. and Mrs. Ben Silverhe's the
Food Fair execreturned from their Virginia vacation trip .
Williams (Bill) Ante, wife Bessie, and her sisters, Mrs.
largcry Bloom and Mrs. Frances Gaggstatter. off for a South
Imerican tour The Aptes due back at their DiLido Island
ome about Oct. 20 .
First stop, Charleston, S.C., to pick op son Jay at Citadel
potlcge, where he is in his third year, then the trio. Dr. and
Irs. Bertram J. Thorpe, went to New Orleans and Panama City
This was the second part of the Thorpes' vacation First
tart was- the usual Gotham tour of Broadway shows ... Off to
lamorada on the Keys are Dr. and Mrs. Leslie T. Bukstel for a
ive-day trip Keeping an eye on grandchildren Lee and Ellen
Mrs. Maxwell Hyman Grandma Bee isn't worrying about
her charges, since they're as good as gold But Flippy the
pt is in the package deal, too .
Monday Club was as excited as hostess Mrs. Jean C. (Fran-
si Lehman, when she showed them the two unusual signed
ketches on her livingroom wall They were done by Blanche
Mafson, whose "one-man" show at the McAllister brought terrific
eviews.
"I......../......I mm.......ft .........rn.nn.........
ip Series Judged Most Successful
i
t.
Campus exchange between two American
girls and an Israeli youth, all members of the
freshman class at Bar-Dan University at Ramat
Gan. Israel Rina Moraine, af Chicago (left).
and Roelyn Miller, of Providence. R.L, chat
with Abraham Kocainsky, of Kfar Sabah. The
young women are two of the 20 American
high school graduates enrolled for one year
of study at the college. ',

Leaders Debate New Move on Suez
JERUSALEM(JTA>The Israel government came closer to de-,
cision this week on what course Israel was to take to secure its rights |
to freedom of transit of the Suez Canal for cargoes bound to and from
the Jewish State. As the Israeli Cabinet weighed action on this issue, I
a propaganda campaign was launched among the Arab states by the
Kingdom of Jordan to close the Gulf of Aqaba to Israeli shipping.
- The gulf is Israel's window to the
East and its means of access to the
Red Sea and Indian Ocean. Israel
the United Arab Republic in his
talks with UN Secretary General
^J^".DK^"e.uth*JFASE Dag H.mmarskjold. they reported
Gulf, and their gulf ports of Eilat
and Aqaba are only a few miles
apart. Egypt and Saudi Arabia
also border on the gulf.
At the same lime, tee, accord-
ing) te Landau reports, Egyptian
authorities wore preparing' ware-
house apace far the seixvre ef the
5,527 tens ef semens from Israel
heard Che Danish freighter Ins*
Ten, detained by the Arabs at
Fart Said since May 21.
While official sources have main-
tained a tight-lipped silence on con-
ditions set by President Nasser of
le ninth season of the Miami
ch Pop series by the University
liami Summer Symphony was
I most successful series in its
fry, symphony officials said
Inesday.
["he total number of music lovers
attended the concerts was
an increase of 2,428 over
[ year.
lx concerts In the series were
npletely sold out, with bun-
's ef paopla turned away,
conductors who drew the
st audiences were D'Artecje
HAVING A DAMCf?
OLOR CRAFT
OF MIAMI
assure your dance of
sing a gala cdscdr. by
[airing every couple a
Color Fbf Somenir
Oner to fcrssodad to
e. Fraternal Sorted, and
For befalls CwN
Row TUxowe 7-7253
at both ef his concerts, Leroy
Anderson, Switch Henderson,
'toward Barlow and Arthur
Fiedler. rlirrTaft
Two of the concerts, "Ballet
Night," with Hugo Fiorato con
ducting, and the "Opera Night."
with Franz Alters on the podium,
were near sellouts and musically
considered among the highlights
of the season.
The second and third concerts
with Emerson Buckley and Leo
Reisman had inclement weather,
but under the circumstances were
also well-attended.
Financially, the series is unique
in its accomplishments, according
to Mrs. Marie Volpe, concert man-
ager. This summer it was almost
able to meet the budget of $50,000
by the sale of tickets alone, to be
exact $43,605.35. something very
few orchestras have been able to
accomplish anywhere, she explain-
ed. The sale of tickets also in-
creased by $4,009.10 over last
year's figure of $39,596.25.
to provide that Israel was not to
send cargoes on its own or Israel-
chartered ships, but only in ordin-
ary foreign vessels, and Israel was
to maintain secrecy on the passage
of cargoes through the Suez Canal
on such ships.
Belief here was that the Cabinet
could not long delay a decision on
an appeal to the United Nations Se-
curity Council against the renewed
blockade of IsraeU cargoes at the
international waterway. The com-
plaint would charge the UAR with
repeated violations of the interna-
tional right of free passage.
Israel's diplomatic representa-
tives abroad had already made
contact with Security Council
member states and the major
maritime powers en the matter,
H was else reported. Simultane-
ously. it was understood, the Is-
rael Foreign Ministry had asked
Secretary General Hammarsk-
jold te consider another visit to
Cairo te clarify President Nas-
ser's rapactsd conditions for Is-
rael cargo transit threueh She
const. Those were isnildarssf
here as amounting te a do facto
blockade.
Although the Western powers
were reported to be enthusiastic
about an Israel complaint on the
issue to the Security Council, it was
expected here that the United
States, Britain and France would
join Canada, Argentina, Italy, Ja-
pan and Panama in a stand in sup-
port of the principle of free pas-
saee through the canal.
FASHION SHOWING
let as ssefcs yeer Ck*s Msetiaes Mterestiag and estorteisisf with cor
Fashion Show Coordinated and Available by francee
resaleac by frescos, Cestea* Mads, Fersesel Stylise. AN Alterations.
For Information Mom Highland J-2425
personalized tonka at the
blackstone flower shops
where you get more for
your money wi 4-1233
24 boar tank* except rosb hmshene ami yarn kipper
Js& *_.-
SUNSHINE FASHIONS' R
res. o.n pet. eft.
- MIAMI KACN FT. UMBMU WIST PALM MAO


f
1
Pore 8-B
jhfe*/fcr***v
rridQy- A"qux u
Knesset Eases Restrictions Against Arabs
. ,-. it*. The Israel government moved this week U
srisr.'SiKSssra..............
totricte to* UM eountiyi frnuers_______________^-------------
PromUr David lion I'.urion over-
JJt rnaS R i rtve-man the Communist Party revealed
, ml SmmW which rec ,his ,,k .ha. .< had droppedI from
!,,,;,, .brogation oi mOitary lts election platform a clause ad-
u he treei accepted i vocsting tomtom iiemlw for
/,.,;,-: which stres-d Ik ,.,,,!> Arab WjtaUoo. The ae
'.,", continued security me.s ,,.,., plank has bee. part of the
52 in the frontier *es and pre communist platform s nee 1957
Matting in New York City at the 64th annual national conven-
r:i of the Jewish War Veterans, the organization's national
l ecutive committee last week appointed Joseph F. Ban (left).
pasf national commander, to succeed Ben Kaufman, who is
letting, as national executive director of JWV. Barr is CUT-
icntly national administrator of the veterans' organization.
JLC Charges Soviet
With Liquidating Jewry
vention of Infiltration
Despite the government ac-
tion, the Knesset proceeded with
consideration of < bill intro
duced by the General Zionists
calling for abolition of all emer-
gency regulations, including the
authority to maintain military
government in the border lones.
The National Religious Party
and the Mapam ni Achdut Avo
dan Parties supported the bill.
Mapai, the Progressives and the
right-wing Hervt abstained from
voting, and tho bill was carried
for its first reading.
The Knesset vote meant little,
however, except as an election
campaign gesture, since Parlia
nenl wM about to adjourn and the
bill would die with the adjourn
merit.
However, it has caused lnction in
side the party between Arab na-
tionalistic leader.- and leaders ol
the Jewish section Instead of
secesson. the Communta, J
have inserted in their dSLH
clause speaking vaguely?*!
right, of the Arab peoVl 3
estine and of the right"^ T
refugee* to retun tolij4!
NEW INFANT NURSERY
J4-H0AJP CAM IT TAINO J
licensed ty State WeHejf
RABBI WANTED
FOR
NEWIY FORMED C0NCU6ATI0M
in Central Florida, ISO families,
younger generation, duties in-
clude teaching and orgonitina
religioui school, la raply give
ft, moritol stonis, ocodentk
kockaround, salary expected,
pulpit kockground. ADORESS
RABBI ML P.O. MX 2973,
MIAMI 1, Ft A.
ARROWHEAD
Day Camp
COMPUTE CAMPING FACaJml
FLORIDA CERTIFIED TUChj
PRE SCHOOt THROUGH ttk *(
RUTH BACK, DIRECTOf
4240 N.W. 18th Sfcaat
NE 3-3134
!W YORKThe liquidation of
r< ected at the Soviet Exhibition
a; lM New York Cotiaeum, Jacob
Pat. executive secretary ol the
sh Labor Committee, charged
VV< lesdaj after making survey
e exhibit The II C represents
6 (Hi Jewish wi rkers in the
AH CIO
: Mid iha; despite the dii
c Soviet consumer and .echni-
). ...i Roods, the cultural display
v a sharp contrasi Insofar is
S t treatment of Jewish culture
i; i ncsrned.
The Soviets claim that 40 na-
1 cral groups in Ciarist Russia
Jon Becker Will
Be Bar Mitzvah
n, son of Mr and Mrs. Inrin
oker. will become Bar Mitz-
i it Temple Emanu-EI Sa'urdav
i n i n g. Aug.
Pi Irvine
1 < hroua will of
EM <
n is an eighth
V- e student at
ni Beach
>r High and
a:-.nds Temple
1 ..nu-El reUg-
i i school Dur-
ing the service.
Lehrman will JOM
nt Jon nth the Ner Tarn id
DM al of the Boy Scouts of Amer-
B recognition of his 'outstand-
fa achievement in religious
>" V"
B addition to his regular Boy
S t Troop, the Tern pie-sponsor-
- Troop 65 will attend the Bar
ah and presentation cere-
-in appreciation of his ten
- M Den Chief of the pack."
- Jon is an accomplished sports-
and the recipient of numer-
- trophies for bowling and ten-
r i He is also a member of the
M onal Rifle Assn.
* luncheon recepuon will be held
is honor at the Algiers hotel
i :wing the Temple senice
who had no developed language
or literature now enjoy both. But
the only attempt to reflect Jews
and Judaism in non-Russian is
through a so-called "Book of
Peace" issued by Moscow Rabbi
Schleifer and a thin book on
^K>lem Aleichem. This is all
that seems to be left of Jewish
culture in the Soviet Union
once a thriving arena of Yiddish
and Hebrew," Pat said.
I'.il continued: "The Soviet ex-
hibit boasts of school! and text-
books for its multi-lingual popu-
lace There are children*! books
But there are no signs of Jewish
schools or textbook.- or children's
literature
"The Soviets claim that there
are some 2.500 different titles pub
lished in 86 different languages and
dialects. Claims are made that
there are 400.000 libraries of
varied sizes and dimensions in the
Soviet UlJon. There are 10.500
newspapers published in 67 langu-
ages according to the press infor-
mation given out at the exhibition.
Yet there i- no sin at the ex- KCDOrt Oil COLlf Ob
hibit which displayed a varied
amount of newspapers in different
languages of a Yiddish news-
paper. There is no sign of a Jew-
ish library, or a Jewish theatre, or
a Jewish school at the exhibit, al
though other national language
groupings are represented.
APARTMENT TO SNARE
Business women wishes to share
apartment with some or Univer-
sity student. One block Miracle
Mile, 3 buses, Sears t Stevens.
CAll EVES or WEEKENDS
HI 4-4929
WANTED EXPERIENCED
YOUNG PERSON
to direct social activities of ear
youngsters and teen-agers. Mast
have programing and previews
experience with youth groups.
Position is permanent. Write
resume and salary desired. No
le calls.
Talianoff Will
NOtTH DA0I JEWISH CENTEi
13600 W. Dixie Highway
North Mia*, Florida
Mr. Business H]
& Mrs. Housewifil
The Jewish Home in [
Aged, Thrift Shop, nosfe
your furniture, appliance*
clean clothing, lugcjao*
drapa>s. lamps, dishes, pofc
pane, silverware, shaeaj
bedspreads, etc.
All proceeds aoina towards At
maintenance of oar dlstloowsW
residence.
THE HOME THRIFT SHOP I
5737 N.W. 27th Aw.
Telephone NE 3-2331
Pleom Cadi as for Pict-as,
PALMIST
MADAM ROBERTS Indian
ana advioor on all problems ml
marriago. buoinoot All rtMnjil
private and confidential at
SS1S N.W. 7th Avenue
Fee Aswasfwmont PL I MM
"There is the clearest demon-
stration, the boldest underscoring
of the liquidation of Jewish culture,
of Jewish schools, of Jewish litera-
ture, of Jewish theatre, by the
silence with which these once thriv-
ing institutions are treated by the
administrators of the Soviet exhi-
bition." Pat concluded.
Monthly meeting of the Miami
Beach Lodge of B'nai B'rith will
be held at the Algiers hotel on
Wednesday evening, president Irv-
ing Schatzman announced.
Highlight of the meeting will be
a welcome home to George Talian-
off. delegate at the Supreme Lodge
convention recently held in Israel
Talianoff. who will report on the
convention, us a past president of
the lodge, past president of the State
Federation of B'nai B'rith Lodges,
and former chairman of the Na
tional Commission of the Ann
Defamation League.
Plan Conference For Israel
NEW YORKPlans for Israel's
industrial and agricultural develop
ment during her second decade of
statehood will be discussed at the
national economic conference for
Copstkks as Souvenirs
m 10.000 sets of chopsticks
been given away as sousenirs
patrons of Luau restaurant.
r Joe Cohen revealed this
week. A surprising number of peo-
eat with the Oriental utensils.
. said, some showing consider
skill Property used, chop-
- promote slower eating and
e thorough enjoyment of food.
MV teak Smday
t Miami Post and Auxiliary
Jeans* War Veterans, wul
Wij Picnic Sunday. U: a.sa,
at Craudon ptrk. pj, r
* TEjajAJAIMt FOftM*
Israel slated for the Hotel Sher
man in Chicago. Sept 18 to 20 it
as announced Wednesday bv Dr
Joseph j Schwartz, vice president
of the Israel Bond Organization
The conference will launch the
fall campaign for State of Lsraej
Bonds which constitute the cen-
tral channel for American invest.
ment m laraaT, economv More
Uun 750 Jewish leaders from com
mumties ,n the Imted State, an 1
Serened **** '"* *
Dr Yeshaiahu Foerder chair
rvs^iaWSK
Pens, is a member of the advisnrv
councu of the Central Bank ^
2 eJorTmber "ii
numerous Isr.eU corpor.Ssr
SCHUROWITZ
PRUDENTIAL
AGENT
m South Dado County
M0 7 6041
WA NTKD
HBIEVV SCHOOt TUCH11S. Port tiaaa.
*PSh/ hr letter statianj ed.c.t..., re*,
eronces, oaalifkatitaw, taachiaa ajs>
aorience, talorv desired, ate. testa
2S" C*mm'"* ,J** "est tBia
^^^North Miaaoi, fU.
QUALIFIED CANTOR
Well trained tenor ,,*,, je^fc, mli.
!!!! *%,n**^- treed M aaZ
Call eveaeaft, Pi 4-OOSe #
" n- p.o. uu\m. mmZTnZ
WANT TO LOSE WHCUT?
SHI'S HCAITH 1 REDUCWC CEffl|
New locafion I feoepaoat
Lot Ua Oiocuoi Your ProoMoa ]
With Vou
Wl QUARANTEE RESULTS
MIMTl Ae.. Meonti PI l-&nj
LOSE WEIGHT
MYPNOSn hot proven la kasj
avOfwfacvocy swefiawa wt *
overwoiont, ssstakoaf. shin
A variaas yaychasasaatir c
sWa ts rsereaasd fears i
I. tOttMAKa,
Ik.Nysaaa- 1Varaa>rst ft svvasai
TV 7-UU, Eat !
INWANREADB
ANi UVttOi Arevoeskti
easpaNtotl wHti life? So.
FAThMA, etJI NW 27 sea,Ml
AVON CALLING
S ^n P" ^ aanJ as*.
e*celleat M|,|, -lr,niii,L
vAtuAju nnnoms opcm most
Call FR 1^407
H* APPOtajTnaWT
ooifjajajjajnjjfjjjgaBn^a^ ^^^^
^ETotcoaSow
Studio of
Modem Musk
"fm fsVt ua **\
P1ASW-VOCJU s^TWICT*1
Vote! Caa*dei**-Arraa|laj
SIR JOHN HOTEL, S-ittf
27* M.W. ** i^^
ftaaklsaJJ*.'
^rf^rf^^
COMPLETE LAW
Excel/tn. Iff
PL 4-3705


Friday, August 14. 1959
+Jewltirk>rldnan
Page 9-B
JAMES UtVMY
Moscowifz Will Speak
Kmil Moscowilz will be guest
I speaker st Saturday morning serv-
lices in the Sterling hotel. Moa-
[cnwii/ is founder of the New Jer-
Carpet Company.
ALIEORNJA'S
SANTA MONICAS
nd N8W TOWER California'! World-
Imogi R*wrl overlooking th. tlu. Pacific
*r* Wilihir* m**ti th* a. Tw*nty minut*.
bm lnt*rnolionol Airport. 440 Ivnuriov.
Dmi and bungalows, all with t.l.viftton and]
dio. Complete convention facilitiot. ionquot
pmi lor up to 2,000, air-conditionaal. Exciting
V.n.tian Room and Canton*** Room.
Swimming pool Boawliful ground* and
i landxop*d gardens. Ratal from IS.
, W.,l. William W. Donn.Hr, G*n. Mgr.
Iron lh. U.S.A. and in HAWAII
MASSAGLIA
:rest of good living
JOSEPH MASSAGUA, JR.. Pr.iid.nt |
MASSAGLIA HOTELS
SANTA MONICA. CAUF. H*i.l Mlr*m*r
SAN JOSE. CAIIP. Hotel S*l*t* CUIre
> IONS iEACH, CALIF. Hotel WIIIM
I SAllUP. N.M. Hotel El fanch*
AllUOUHOUE. Hotel Fr.ci.<.*
DCNVir.. COIO. Hotel Part l*M
I WASHINSTON. DC Hotel Palof h
HAITr-OiO. CONN. Hotel i*>d
[ UTTSIUPSH. PA. Hotel Sh.rwy
' CINCINNATI, O. Hotel Siifon
NIW TOIK CUT Motel N*> T* HONOLULU Hotel Walllkl |iltm*r*
World-Eam.dhaP.il ------------
T.l.typ* lervlceFamily Plan
United Fund Lists
Campaign Cabinet
A ten man campaign cabinet,
ma*lc up of past presidents, cam-
paign chairmen and key figures in
the chartering of the United Fund
of Dade County, has been named
by the I'F's board of directors to!
^streamline the operations of the!
"i960 drive.
James R. Brumby. Miami busi-
ness consultant, will head up the
cabinet as chairman of the 1960
United Fund campaign.
A former vies president and
general manager of The Miami
News, Brumby we* among the
original group of businessmen
and labor leaders who designed
and developed the United Fund
hp tarty in 1957.
During its first campaign, he
served as a volunteer publie rela-
tions advisor, a member of the
board of directors, and a volunteer
campaigner In the commerce and
industry divisions.
Well-known for his civic service.
Brumby has been active with sev-
eral of the agencies supported
through the annual United Fund
drive.
He was one of the founding
members of the Dad* County
Citiiens Safety Council, and has
served as chapter chairman,
budget chairman and board
member of the Dado chapter,
American Rod Cross, largest
agency In the United Fund.
Brumby's eforts as a leader in
a number of civic groups has been
recognized as an "outstanding con-
tribution" to Dade county's busi-
ness growth. He was one of the
original members of the Dade
county development committee,
and was a member of the Florida
Development Commission.
Serving with Brumby will be
Harry P. Cain, current United
Fund president and vice president
of the First Federal Savings and
Loan Assn.
Comer .1. Kimball, first president
' of the United Fund, chairman of
, the board of First National Bank
Of Miami, and Max Orovitz, last
year's president. Miami Beach
businessman, will serve on the
campaign operations committee
along with John B. Turner, first
campaign chairman, vice president
of Orange State Oil Co., and Wil-
liam C. Lantaff, last year's cam-
paign chairman and Miami attor-
ney.
Serving on the community rela-
I lations committee of the campaign
I cabinet will be John S. Knight, pub-
Rothschild Granted Oil
Pipeline Right in Israel
JBRl SALEM(JTA> With only. Giant floats completed the lay-
the Communists in opposition, the i ing of six new pipes of large bore
so that oil tankers of the largest
JUDGE MftTON FffffDMAN
Judge WiH Take
Part in Confab
Judge Milton A. Friedman, mu-
nicipal judge of the City of Miami,
has been invited by the President
of the United States to be a mem-:
ber of the President's committee
for traffic safety at the national
American Bar Assn. meeting Aug.
24 and 25 at the Americana hotel.
Judge Friedman is a lecturer on
traffic safety, appearing before'
schools and civic groups. He has I
prepared many bills and present-!
ed them to legislative committees
for their consideration.
Judge Friedman recently re-.
reived national notice when a
magazine published a story taken
from a Miami newspaper which
editorialized on the fact that de-
fendants who appear before him
and are found guilty usually end
up saying "thank you." He is well-
known for his lectures before each
session of court.
Knesset approved on final read
ing.-a bill granting a group of in-
ves (irs, headed by Baron Edmund
de Rothschild, a special 49-year
lease to operate a 16-inch oil pipe-
line from Elath to Haifa.
The eight-inch line between
Elath and Beersheba is now being
replaced by a new 16-inch line.
When the entire line is brought
up to 16-inch bore, by July, 1960,
it will have a capacity of 2.000,000
tons of oil annually. Further im-
provements, including the estab-
lishment of more efficient pump-
ing stations, will increase the ca-
pacity to 3.000,000 tons a year by
March of 1961.
A huge, new crude-oil anchorage,
which will more than double the
capacity for unloading oil in the
harbor of Elath, was completed in
the harbor of that Gulf of Aqaba
port this week.
capacity, up to 60,000 tons, will
now be able to unload their car-
goes. Unloading capacity has been
increased from 1,500 tons per hour
to 3,500 tons per hour.
IN NEW YORK, IT'S THf
great Northern hotel
GREAT
City Councilman to Spook
Miami Beach Lodge of B'nai
B'rith will meet at a luncheon
meeting Tuesday noon at the Di-
Lido hotel. Guest speaker will be
City Councilman Harold B. Spaet.
Gershon S. Miller is chairman.
Irving Schatzman is president of
the lodge.
lisher of The Miami Herald; Dan j
J. Mahoney, publisher of The Mi-
ami News; Niles Trammell, pres :
ident Biscayne Television Corp.: i
and Mitchell Wolfson, president of
Wometco Theatres.
KNICKlfRBOCKER
45 th ST. & BROADWAY
In the Hoart of
Times lojyro
NEW YORK CITY
400 ROOMS
Nowly Furnished
every Ream with Radio
SINGLES from $5
DOUBLES from $8
Also Weekly Rates
TV Air Conditioning Available
Band for Map of New York
and Sights.eing Information
MEAT
GREAT
LOCATION on smart
57th Street between Fiftf
Avenue and Broadway
.. .One minute to
Central Park.. .Two
minutes to Radio City
a few short steps
to the new Coliseum.
VALUE from $6.00 add)
single$8.50 a day
double. Even lower by
the week or month.
ACCOMMODATION***
Light, airy, specious
rooms and suite*',
private tub bath.ihTwe*)
radio. TV and air
conditioning; if desiredy
The furnishings are
new and colorful. Of
special interest to
families are the
complete kitchenette
7\ studio apartments.
JUTAT
THI

.A*T
25t
TOGUST BROS R>
>:
Is the flfc.SJ
Jgreat
nOrthern
pOTEL
\/IIP*. 57 ST., N-Y.lt
I til emeu 7-1 too
UTlrOtl
IUUSTRATE0 BROCHUM 4444
^*^jnSaTaTfiSlI ?*B with uinnrl
with wonderful
Hot Springs waters
H
Oiini fft* wo'ld tamont woftri roao
t. loo'hm* oo'> oo rr,/f to *
a*w i.m. of pApt'C*/ r/h.'.f.
You e*n bath* **y all your ach.i *nj
pa.m du* I* l*mion and fatiouo *nd find
r*li*f lor aHkrith), rh*um*tim. *nd high
blood pr*uvr* in th* radioactive, *h**m*l
v*l*rt of Ho Springs. &o*rnm*nt r.qul*t*d
b*thhouM right In th* Arlington wh.r. you
*n aa ia rob* nd tlipp*rt by tp*ci*l
l**lo dlr*el from th* privacy of your raaav
Tr* hospitality and th* fin.it in nt*rti*,
as*rt i* yaari to i*y *" Arliagtan
Hot Springs' lap Unary h*t*l. Concert. dinnr.
and ballroom dancing music by Eddy R*a*rs *ad
th* Arlington Orch*str*. Social divstftntM
andor th* guidanc* ( oar gracious Social Hatfaos,
enjoy yawr favo.it* r*cr*ati*n ia
Hot Spriaet. Suparb aalf -rfh
Club prlvila*i oar aoarby
Country Club. Y.ar-ar*ui fiihine
*4 Lai*, HamirrO*. Ouockrl*. a*J
Catborioa.
S'.. "* FinMt food nmyj .aytiw* It too
prid* of Arlinatk
oooi rat*, with h*M bath fro- J.
$7 tin*!*. With t.in bU, *ad prlxt* bath
hom|l2do.bU.ineW.
Na racun charaa far chilaVa. uadar 14.
VL Far boauti
^ ft. L h4cfc
baautiful cofar bradra wrtta
M.6aa*r*f
A
HOTEL and BATHS
HOT SPRINGS
NATIONAL PARK. ARKANSAS
i
TOAYMOEE
\ Write
\ For
\ intormatloi
\ and
\ Roaorvat
Private Pool
Beach and
Cabana Colony
HOTEL
At 24th ST., MIAMI BEACM
Air-Condition.d Room.
Private Beach and Pool
Parking on Premi... fj|
Cocktail Lounge '<
Dining Room
Entertainment
Daily
Per oers. .
Del* Occ.f
FROM
APR L 2Sl
JE 10331
COMING TO NEW YORK?
Stay at this modern
25-story hotel. Large,
beautifully furnished
rooms with kitchenette,
^VfcVw private bath, from
$7.00 daily, double
from $10.25. Two
room suites from
$12.50.
LOWER RATES
BY THE MONTH
NO CHARGE for chil-
dren under 14 sharing
room with parent.
Air-cenditioning t
television available
Mrs
If
39c.
-*** BEACON
Broadway at 75th St., New York
Oscar Winfrob, Managing Director


I
I

Page 10-B
l^i^fhrHitr ___
Ftidwy. Augp|4
55S
Something
New Under
The Sun!
"THE SOMBRILLAC
THE HOLIDAY SUN LOUNGE &
CARRY-ALL FOR OUTDOOR LIVING
NOW only ... s# qc
(Reduced from $15) g,7a
(Red
Maif
i $15)
Phene Orderf MM
KIMBALL'S
SPORTING GOODS
"The Best for Less for All Sporfs"
215-17 19 N.E. 2nd AVENUE
FR 4-3374 FR 4-4712
Pearly Gait
ENJOY YOUR OWN SPECIAL PARTY AJ
THE LUCERNES AUTHENTIC LATIN RfVU
by Hal Pearl j HMMA fHftW1 6^J
. ^m% ^bv
tfcrraao Aimrkm't Sizxtmg
RESERVE NOW for the HIGH
HOUDAYS and SUCCOTH
KOSHER MEALS
INCLt'DED
"KTT
eg iia) rv rvnai
?^ D,blt Occup.im
Ocmii Front A Oetsn Vm|
All OlNft loc.ri
Qpt n*>DM HldWf
u >, -mi^.,1 A Holidays
El'ROPEtN PLAN
A APAIITMFMS
1K7
Dcnln> flftu
Com Hrtsjjwl
Inri.
Dietary Laws & Sabbath observed
Serv. Daily Sell & Diabetic Diet*
Free 21" TV in Every Room
FREE PARKING
and 1" Other Wonderful Ftatures
Free I>iy ('amji Nl>rht Patrol
Phone JE 1-5711
OatheOceaa Pvt. Roach t Pool
1741 Collins, Miami loach, Flo.
iJtSoy
A GRAND miMND
RESERVE NOW!
DAVID ROSNM't
HOTI
POOL.
m m occm trik smn. auai ma
counanr air-conditioned
For All Information Ph. UN 6-8831
I
$250
SMORGASBORD
SIKVED WITH ALL LVHNtRS
Alore than twenty different kinds
of deiicieesfy prepared Hors
D'Oewvres. each a rasre-fe matimm
treat that will odd to roar diawsa
oleosare. Served mitt, tat com-
a*ears of Ca*DLU>6WT INN
fa eff dinners.
OUR SPECIALTY
jpi filet
MJGNON
Served arrta fall Cntrse Dinner
- fAHOUS FOR -
AGED STEAKS
Primo Rib of Beef
Fobaloas Dinners
I m\*m mew $i.oo |
BANQUtT fACIUTHS
Candlelight Inn
3131 Commodore Plaza
Coconut Grovo
HENRY LEITSON. Mar.
LUNCH O'NSIC IUWII
ORDERS TO TAKE 0'_T
PHONE UN 6-43C3
i ON 7rrh ST. CAUSEWAY I
NAMES MAKE THE NEWS: Nat Strauss, of the water heater firm,
and his missus off to the North Carolina mountain terrain to forget i
about the heat air temperature, that is.
Mr and Mrs. Murrav Baron recently celebrated their 25th anni
'versarv. and part of the celebration was dinner at Fu Manchu where
they received surprise gifts from thoughtful proprietor Al Goldman.
What material for book Mamo Donna Brandtit will bo able to
gather! Tho recent graduate of University of Florida and daughter
of Mr. and Mrs, Leo D. Brandois. of Miami Beach, embarks for Israel
Aug. 29, sailing from New York to Haifa. She'll spend si* months
en a Kibbuti in Israel, studying the economic and social life of the
communal farm village.
Hal Kayes. the toy and novelty wholesaler, and his right hand man.
Dave Finkel. forgetting business on the Bay shore hnk> the pa-!
end.
Dare any golfing fanatic to walk into Jerry Kimball's snorting
goods store in downtown Miami and come away empt> handed Never
saw such a complete stock of golf equipment including bags Oi varied
materials, among them leather, plasm- canvas, and in a not of colors;
plus balls, sticks, and almost everything to make you ,-u better on
the fairways, ,'erry carries every .-ports line and right Ire-
mendous specials for tennis players
Mrs. Ann Jeffre>. Mr- Blanche Mai nd Mr- B
Swartbur ime, and the ti i nnie
Kalan. having a grand time shopping and ng on the
stopover.
A few more Beach couples making the grand tour of F.uropi this
summer include Mr. and Mrs. Leon Green (recent returnee.-'. Mr and
Mr- Ben Sine. Mr. and Mrs. S. Sidney Hoffman, and Mr and Mrs Joel
Newman.
The Alfred Cohens, of Miami Beach, guesting at tho Stardust
in Las Vegas, and witnessing the biggest summer boom in that gam-
bling resort's phenomenal history. And, we could add, in Las Vegas,
take away the dice, and the empty hotels would be loaded with mice.
Dr. and Mrs. Irving Bernstein joining the summer exodus from
Uda area to Israel.
Councilman Wolfie Cohen (and a good restaurateur, too) shooting
par golf these days. Hits the ball a mile off the tee.
His many friends glad to hear that Westview pro Ross Sobel is
feeling much better.
Marshall Wolper and Jerome Katz. local insurance agents, lauded '
for their fine work at the special leadership program of their company
Equitable Life Assurance, during its recent centennial conference in
New York,
MAKING THE ROUNDS: Didn't think it was possible, but 'Havana
I Mardi Gras" has a new zip and a new lilt since the addition of two 'new
faces." One is Betty Reilly, "The Irish Senorita," who's a human
dynamo of music, dancing and personality. The amazing and amusing
blonde, blue-eyed sparkler sings in Yiddish, Spanish, Portuguese Ital
Ian, French, and of course. English. Such talent, such vigor, such vim
Also new in the almost three-year-old revue is curvacious and audience
conquering Blanquita Amaro, South America's foremost screen -tar
Zi,ZV/J*n?? a,"d sin*V's hiP-hiP with a decided Latin accent.
.? .J?' Wi,K '? R,i"y *nd Senori,a Am,ro maki"9 Hub debut
a the Lucerne, "Havana Mardi Gr" i, better than ever, and you
all know how great h) has been ever since it opened in January 57.
Hn ,Pr!<\CaIed n ?aS' P<'rforman's at her Studio M Playhousi I
don think I m Itkking oul my neck by predicting that SohV 'old
Cadii.ac will be Ruth Foreman's top presentation to date The ni-
k -VKf lhJ, theatre adds l0 ,he "*""- Rtmosphere and de erv -
whoieheaned support of the community. Wtervw
trv ,h^URANT,RW: Next ,ime you drP in, "<' CandJelight inn
toS-S adults,h,eooWaUS- aDd ^ ^?*3*tt
Isaac Gellis restaurant on the Beach now features fin ,
Sprmgs Villas. (Not at Carriage Club m.V 1 un at Mumi
it you haven', heard his superb'aSry.'y^ff-JJ^1:' ^
to catch him. But make sure you do- two ** lefl
An off-beat Broadway format will be the stvle of th- .
Three Arts Theatre Club, in Coral Gables Now^inJ! ",?W,y crea,fd
bftmg operation, the "membership only" PlavhouI !i?"8 a face
in September. George Blac-kwoodI and tJm >,,0Use *l11 Pn early
dling over the footli|ht scheTulT "* H,nS00 are cumn,l> hud"
U tbeCarib. Miami and Miracle ^ET?J*LTT *" greens
b, Robert Stack, and the supporting east inrf^I. rlV" ,s enaed
like something on TV-this guest appeal "bit) D"VU (Sounds
* *
u 5xsy srjzxstf asa"- -
Native Stone." The Silver Spoon odT ThIT ^ h,s ^sellers ,
Good to see Leon Uris' Ss" st.ll If ,K?V'rre'Cage "
I seUer h, -s Uie most popular book^ thV^ruSarfert^
BETTY REILLYj
AND AN EXCITING All STAI (AST
MILOS ViURDi
ROBERTO 4 AlKIA
+ PEPE MERCEDITA BUNCO
World'* Moat ioowtrful Show Qw*+ |
DAVE TTLER, Musical DirechK
FAUSTO CURIEIO ond Ms
lotm American Orch.
Crnpi tl 10 fe
SOD cea thrill fa ffe/s
'59 rdifien af ffce
wrldouiiimri kMI
Sptrk 14, mmUkltit
stnlit -irfctTfever
fhe saeciaf atcasi'ea. '
f "^
.*>
SMCIAI
ADOIO
ATTRACTION 1 j
blanqutti
AMARO
isf US oppo,.
once o- SovH.
American taajaa. i
twinging smmij,, \
Command Periormamce Before tho Km)
THl POfT Of rm MAM
CARMEN
CAVALLARO
AIM Tf
KING ARTHUR'S H OI HT
MIAMI SPRINGS VtXLAS
500 Deor Run Phone TU 8-4521
OPEN DAAY fraaa 4 to a.-.
MRMSLS1.95 ",l"
CATERING FOR ALL OCCASIONS
940 71si St., Miomi Beech
free Par. UN 6-6043 Air-Cead.
Under Orthodox Vaad Makashruth
HAROLD PONT and IRVIN GORDON
GORDON and PONT
^U^ K0SNIR CATIRIRI
Ar froej hers d'oewrei H laaapliH 6a#M
170 N. W. 5th ST., MIAMI PHONE FR -7*
Unit, S.eervisiee ef Umittd K.shras Associofioo of Onmt* Mhrnl
OPEN HOUSE WEDDINGS BAR MITZVAJtt RfCEPTKJNS
AKIIICAS tautisT
'(MALI
IMIIIAWU
AV^ hi The C......
2Hi & Cellini A.,
Ei 9|uai: Heat
BELLE
BARTH
No Covrr Anyii ,,
*' Solli H \ 5733
ia.il aad "
1S.IMI
ON BISCAYNE BOULEVARD
FRANKS ITALIAN RESTAURANT
1TAUAN 4 1 iSIXE
y*mr Host SAVTINO CASCI
"AtTI CRUHAtfA"
*** CONDITIONED # AMPLE PARDNG
- *H*v'SXZSr Dul PL 4-2431
<^<^^A^e\M

t, August U. 1959
-JewlstifhrldHan
Pag 11 E
Wisher Schocken Buried in Israel
few YORK-r.By'3l ,f.
ocraphcr and long-time Zion-
luho died last weekend of a
, attack in Switzerland, will
. place in Israel, it waa an-
Iced Sunday by members of
imily. Mr. Schocken, who was
Jled from Nazi Germany in
[to Palestine. He came to the
Id States in 1940 and acquired
fcnship here.
i owner of a chain of depart-
stores in Germany before
It came to power, he alao
youndgd. the^er^inSchocken pub
,' iismng house in 1931, devoted to
the publication of books of Jewish
knowledge. After he left Ger-
many, he founded in 1936 the
Schocken Publishing House in Tel
Aviv, which is now operated by
members of his family, including
his son Gustav, publisher of the
Haaretz, one of the leading news-
papers in Israel.
In New York, ha founded
Schocken Book*, Inc., in 1M5,
which published books by Jowish
authors and on Jowish subjects.
Lie Katz
[ad at 77
lENOS AIRES(JTA)Pinie
the noted Yiddish writer,
here at the age of 77. He was
bf the founders of the Yiddish
"Di Presse," and was an
of the paper for more than
lars.
tn in Russia, he emigrated to
Lrgentine in 1888. He was the
ir of "The History of Argen-
lewish Journalism" and also
lated into Yiddish Cervantes'
[Quixote" and several famous
tine works.
Katz had greatly contribu-
the Jewish cultural develop-
of Argentine Jewry, espe-
m the years after the First
I War. He was considered a
linger, but in his early years
ccntina he was a member of
loale Zion.-
Hhop. Surviving arc bar husband.
Sum; two brothers. Holly unit Simon
Isaacs: and a sister, Mr*. I.llllc Kline.
Service* were Aug. S hi Gordon
Funeral Home, with burial in Ml
Nebo Cemetery.
WILLIAM EISNER
1, Of M? NW 4th st., died All*. 7. He
came her* 20 years ago from Now
York City, and wax an electrlclan.
Surviving are his wife, (Vila; son,
Harold, daughter, Mm. Ann Stone:
and a brother and sister. Services
were In New York, with local arrange-
ments by Riverside Memorial phapcl*.
ADOLF HOFFMAN
73. of 10S5 PennKylvanla ave., Alad
Aug. He was a retired necktie
manufacturer, who rame here -Ix
years ago from New York City. Sfcir-
vlvlng are his wife, Rose, and two
daughters. Mrs. Beatrice Sofer and
Mrs. Bernlce Ilorwltz. Services were
Aug. 7 at Riverside Memorial Chanel,
Washington ave., with burial In lake-
side Memorial Cemetery.
More than 70 books have boon
published by the Schocken en-
terprise in New York. His pri-
vate library of over M,000 vol-
umes of Jewish and world liter-
ature is housed in Jerusalem. It
includes a large collection of
rare manuscripts, incunabula
and early prints.
Schocken held honorary docto-
rate degrees from the Hebrew
Union College-Jewish Institute of
Religion and the Jewish Theologi
cal Seminary in New York. In
1933, Schocken was elected to the
executive committee of the tfe-
brew University in Jerusalem and
from 1935 to 1945 served as its
chairman.
When the Nazi party rose to
power in 1933, he had realized that
the very existence of German
Jewry was doomed and, from then
until the beginning of World War
II, he made use of all the resources
at his disposal to provide both
physical and spiritual help to
German Jewry. A Zionist since
his early youth, he was a member
of the board of directors of the
Jewish National Fund. It was due
to his efforts that the territory of
the Haifa Bay area, so essential to
the development of modern Israel,
was acquired.
Hi Jacob
inder Dead
lie! Guttman, 66, of 5101 SW
died Thursday. Aug. 3
((".uttman came here 37 years
>m New York, and was one
founders and first secretary
Ih Jacob Synagogue.
Iginal services of the con-
ation were held at Ms butch-
op on Miami Beach before
Jacob was built.
iving are his wife, Helen;
)>i; David and Louis; daugh
Id seven grandchildren,
rices were Aug. 7 at New-
funeral Home, with burial in
If David Cemetery.
LOUIS LUBOVITZ
80. of 3900 Collins ave., died Aug 7
He cam, lure eight yean ago from
Chicago. There are no local survivors.
ea and burial were In Chicago
under the direction of Riverside He-
mortal chapels.
American Jewish community aid to help provide educational
facilities for Israeli teen-age youngsters is discussed by (left
to right) Ira Guilden, Dr. Dewey D. Stone and Dr. Joseph I.
Schwartz at the recent dinner for Boys Town Jerusalem honor-
ing its Golden Founders. Guilden, president of Boys Town
Jerusalem, is also national campaign chairman for State of
Israel Bonds. Dr. Stone, board chairman of Weizmann Insti-
tute of Science, is also national chairman of United Israel Ap-
peal and vice president of Zionist OrganJeation cd America,
and Dr. Schwartz is executive vied president for State of Israel
Bonds. The institution; located in the Bayit V*Gan suburb of
Jerusalem, is conducting an expansion program to provide
hundreds of Israeli youth with a comprehensive program of
vocational, academic and spiritual training.
RS ANNE OROSSBERG
[1421 Kuclld ave., died AUg. 1.
resident of Miami Beach
|.. -. coming from New York.
time of ber death, she was
|led with the Swim Fair BbOP,
-urvlved by her husband.
ton, Robert; two brothers,
id William Kinvbrunner: and
It Mis. Minna Kati. Services
l"K 10 at Hellman Funeral
k. with burial In the Knight of
S. lion (IT Ml. Sinai tVmc-
OLLIE LEWIS
IVI" W 42nd st.. manager of
'nial I'untlsc Co.. died Aug. 9.
lie here five years ago from
Surviving are his wife. Ida;
lerome; two daughters. Mrs.
Kink and Mrs. Shirley Malkin.
-in and six grandchildren.
were In Chicago under the
of New nnn Funeral Home.
[rs. sylvia beckman*
I.-'3 sW Had ter.. died Aug. 7.
to Miami from Chicago IT
Igo. She was ..wrier and oper-
i-'innVa Custom Ceramics
MURRAY ROSEN
M. of !'' M.-.an .Ir dlatT Anfc ''. II.
came here 11 yea igo rrom Brook-
lyn. Surviving an hi* wife, Sail)
son: and two daughters, Including
i. N V with local .u
ft) Riverside Memorial Chapel
MRS FRANCES B. KOTT
M. of 147.". Alton i.i aleia Aug ::
while vlsltlnu In Loa Aneelei Hh<
came here :~ ears ago rrom ejeo
York City. Survlvlng_ V' n'r hus-
band* luls; two none. Seymour and
Irwln; four brothers and three sis-
ters. Service,, were Aug. 7 at Rlver-
alde Memoilnl Chanel. Alton rd.
MRS. RUTH PRICE
IS, of 120V Collins ave.. died Aug. 4.
She came here two years ago from
New York. Surviving are two nieces,
Mrs. Ruth Morrle and Mrs. Henrietta
Schneider. Services were Aug. 4 at
Newman Funeral Hotne, with burial
in Mt, Sinai Cemetery.
J M. came here 16 years ago from
Brooklyn, and wan a in.inl.cr ..t the
.Odd Follow. Surviving arc his wife.
-Mary: f,,ur SHM, Samuel, Joseph, lu-
llaa and Louie: an.I a daughter, Mrs
lie also leaves
brother, II grandchildren, ami gig
rrandchildren. Service* were
Aua .i lordm I- uneral Home, erlth
ML sinal i'
MAX ROSENBLUM
: alea Am i.
from
Hartford, Ci nn .- n h In*
ier, Mi Eleanoi i;. i. Sei vice*
and b trial ere in Hat tford. with
Is b) Riverside Me-
Chattel
NATHAN SIEGEL
7, owner of the Cadet hotel, died
Am.- 4 while visiting In New York.
He came here 2H years ago from New
York and lived at 445 l.enox ave.
Surviving are his wife. Rose; three
daughters. Including Mrs. Harriet
Dockson; a sister and seven grand-
children. Services were Aug. at
Riverside Memorial Chapel. Washing-
ton ave.
JACOB TEITEL
13. of 1421 SW 22nd ter., died in New
York Aug. 5. He .came to Miami from
New York eight years ago. Surviving
are his wife, Rebecca; aon; two
daughters. Mrs. Bernard Tytell and
Mrs. Sylvia rienandes; brother, tfoeee
Teltelbaum; sister and six grandchil-
dren. Services were Aug. 7 at Gordon
Funeral Home, with burial In Mt.
Nebo Cemetery.
OR. MARK HARTFIELD
IS. of 4001 ITalrle ave., died Aug. 4.
He came from Detroit nine years ago
and was a Mason, veteran of World
War I, life member of the Jewish
War Veterans, and a member of the
American Legion. Surviving are a
brother, Ben. and sister Bel Titan
were Aug. 7 at Ittv.r-idc Memorial
Chapel. Alt"n rd., with buriul In Mt.
Nebo Cemetery.
CHARLES TANENBAUM
|v- "' lied Aug. n.
A baher, he came her* l\
from Hartford. Survivors Include -
wife, Dorothy, services were, in Hart-
ford, with local arrangements by Itiv-
erslde MOBaUrtol Chap.]
MEYER WEINBERO
8Z. of 1414 Collins ave., died Aug. 4
A retired dry goods merchant, he
came here "even years ago from Chi-
cago. Surviving Is a daughter. Mrs.
Hose Borr. Services and burial were
In Chicago, with local arrangements
by Rivet side Memorial Chapels.
ABRAHAM WINTZ
SI, of ttel Alton rd.. died Aug. 4. He
was a retired, builder, who came here
six years ago from Manchester. Conn
He la survived by a son, Ixiuls. Ser-
vices were Aug. r> at Riverside Me-
morial Chapel. Alton rd., with burial
In Lakeside Memorial Park.
MRS. IDA OREENSTEIN
77, of 7>s Pennsylvania ave., died Aug.
T She came here 10 years ago from
New York, and was a member of
Workmen's Circle. Surviving are her
husband, Isaac, and a daughter, Mrs.
Bertha Bernstein Services were In
New York under the direction of Riv-
erside Memorial Chapel.
ABRAHAM BARATZ
7S, of 347 Washington'ave., died An*
LOW COST
HOME LOANS
To Buy, Build or Refinance
laajalrios Invitee1 e Ne Obltfetloat
Cetehrotlaf ear 2Sta Anniversary YeesT
'
I5ade Federal
MRS. CELIA STEINBERG
S3, of :.T61 SW 7th st., died Aug. 3
while vlsltlm: h daughter In Detroit.
She came h. iri ago from Chi-
cago. Surviving are two daughters.
Mrs. Elsie Ma lien ami Mrs. Rose
Smargon; four sons, Fred, Joseph. Irv-
ing and Harry: 15 grandchildren and
three great-grandchildren. Services
were Aug. 5 at Gordon Funeral Home,
with burial In Mt. Sinal Cemetery.
JOSEPH M. WAITZMAN
74. 04VIT4I W Mauler st.. died Aug.
I in Chicago, where he went to visit
relatives. He had lived her* 14 years
Surviving are bis wife, Anna; six
sons. Harold. Sidney. Charles. Krnest.
Stanley and Pr Morton: a daughter.
Mrs. Bernlce Rosen; 17 grandchildren
and one great-crandchlld. Services
were Aug. 3 In Chicago.
Civil Rights
Measure OK"d
WASHINGTON (JTA) An
amendment to the civil rights bill
making it a Federal offense to
cross a state line to escape pros-
ecution for bombing or setting tin-
to any building or vehicle survived
further modifications in the bill
and was included in the final drat*
which was accepted by the Hou-c
Judiciary Committee this week.
An Administration proposal to
set up a permanent commission to
prevent discrimination in employ-
ment by firms holding government
contracts was rejected by the com-
mittee.
The draft measure, which will
have to clear the House Roles
Committee before it goes to the
Hawse floor, would have the ef-
fect of shifting trials in such
cases as synagogue bombings,
to the Federal courts if it were
established that the defendants
had crossed state lines.
It would also permit the FBI to
enter such cases sooner and on a
much broader basis. While the
Administration proposals on this
had restricted Federal action to
cases involving religious or educa-
tional institutions, the committee
extended it to buildings of any
description and to vehicles.
The Senate Judiciary Committee
was to take up consideration of
civil rights legislation this week.
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICB IS HKKKBY (;|VEN fat
the undersigned, desli Ing t.. engav- in
business under the fictitious nam- of
.1. & s. S1I..K STORE .' TS> &.B.
2nd Ave, Miami intends to reg.
-aid name *iih the Clerk of the
ill Court of Bade Conntv, ku-
tt'll.UAjl II SP1RF.K
WIIJ.1A.M I RRBNNKR
Attorn ipt)IIcant
120 I.
t .aTH-H-t< 4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HKKl.l:. rH\ KN
the enttage in
busln. ... mt -f
TK1. ANSWI'ltl'llMV SI'.
ICE .'I.IV i >.'. TEL. \NSWKI'.i\. 1
VICK .'i.i i: r.Kl. i'KI. TPHON'B
HI :i;\i. 'i: ci.i'it Intends .'. r.-r
names with the Clerk of the i"lr-
c,.iirt of I'a.io County, an.
other port! of the Slate of Mori
PARAMOUNT ABV'ERTIHIK
1M'|;I.IC IIKI.ATM INS &
PROMOTIONS, IV.'
V l(-L'l-'.'

5 Convmhnt Offices Sgrvg Dooej County
JvESQURCES EXCEED 190 MILLION DOLLAI
MRS. ESTHER K WERTHEIMEB
71, of ISO S Shore dr.. died Aug. 2.
She came here five years ago from
New York. Surviving are her hus-
t.ahd; BeTt; son, Lee K. Bendhitm.
and a sister, Mrs. Rose K. Oreenwald.
Bervlcea were In Wilmington. Del.,
under the direction of Riverside Me-
morial Obajeal,
. MRS. ROSE SMLIVEK
N, of 17M NW 1st St.. died July ?.
She waa a member of Hadaaaah and
Golden Ag* Friendship Club, and
came here fr. no New York 12 rears.
ago. Surviving are a son. Alan;
daughter. Mrs Judith S West: bro-
ther. Joseph Klein; two sister*. In-
cluding Mrs Evelyn Kohn; and three
lul> M
:.n Kuneral Home, with burial
In Mt flffl Cemetery._________________
'Noose' Hits Proposal
WASHINGTON (JTA) The
House Judiciary Committee struck
from a pending Ciwl {Lights Bill
this week a proposal by Pre
Eisenhower for a commission to
enforce non-discriminatory prac-
tices in employment on government
Dutch Minister Resigns
THE HAGUE(JTA)Sydney J.
van den Befgh, Minister of De-
fense and the only Jew in the
Dutch Cabinet, sent his resignation
to Queen Juliana here last week-
end. The resignation was caused
by personal reasons. Mr. van den
Btrgh's name figured last week in
a divorce case in San Diego. Calif.
Mr. van der Bergh is a retired
Major-General in the Dutch Army,
and was formerly paymaster
general for the Army.
Yeshiva Opens 73rd Year
NEW YORK When Yeshiva
University opens its doors this
September to inaugurate its 73rd
academic year, and its 14th year
as a fully-fledged university, some
4,500 young men and women will
gather from all corners of the
globe to form the largest student
body in the history of the Amer-
ican Jewish community, according
to Dr. Samuel Belkin, president ..:
the university
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN ANO FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 46904-B
IN RE: Estate of
sa.m yi;;i:i.. >witz a/k/a
SAMUEL YEGBLOWITZ,
1 '- .eased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Itentanda Against Said
Estate:
You are hereby notified and requir-
ed to present any claims and demands
which you may have against the
estate of SAM YEOBt-OWITZ a k a.
SAMCEl, TEi;El>>WITZ. deceased
I.i.- of Pad* County. Florida to the
County Judges of Hade County, and
file the same In their offices In the
County Courthouse In Uade County.
Florida, within eight calendar monttis
from the date of the first publication
hereof, or the same will be barre>'
KKWARD ItOSEN, Exerutor
KV'll. V.VDER A TENI>R1CH
Attorneys
111 1-incln Road
Miami Beach. Florida
'14-21-2* I
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
-No. 5C 7428
BETTY BCRKETTE DBFS,
rialntiff,
CARL L I'EKs.
Defendant .
UIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: A IV 2 Carl 1. Decs
N ART C
c/o Aircraft Maintenance '
Naval Air Station
Memphis. Tennessee
You are herebv notified that a I'-lll
of Complaint for Divorce has beee
filed eTgalnst you, and v..u are re-
quired to serve a copy of your Answer
or Pleading to the Bill of Complaint
on the plaintiff's Attorney, SIDNEY
M. ARONoVlTZ. 1001 Alnsley Build-
ing. Miami 32, Florida, and file the
original Answer or Pleading In the
office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court
on or before the Tth day of September,
1.">. If you fall to do so, Judgment
by default will l.e taken srainst you
for (he relief demanded in the Mil
of Complaint.
This, notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH Fl t "RUM \ N
DONB AND i.RHKRBn at Mhti
Florida, this 5th day of August. A D,
BJas
E B .i' \ HERM \N. <-lerk.
Clr. Florida
(seal) K M l.YMAN.
Depot? Cleric
14-a-M
TtjGVJST BROS R>7
'is
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
in
tikS MIAMI BEACH



fridoy, Aucruw u
WESEU
U.$. PRIME
and U. S. CH
MEATS u
STORE HOURS-
OH., TUI$., Wtt. 1-314
*mm. i:3o.t *
nt MM
WITHOUT A DOUBT
. FOOD FAIR KOSHER MARKETS BRING TO YOU
THE FINEST QUALITY KOSHER U. S. GOV'T. INSPECTED
WESTERN PRIME OR CHOICE MEAT, THE WHOLE YEAR 'ROUND!
.... FOOD FAIR KOSHER MARKETS BRING TO YOU
THE LOWEST PRICES. WITH YEAR 'ROUND SAVINGS!
MILK FED
Rib Veal Chops
MILK FED BREAST OF VEAL....
Extra Special!
BONELESS AND TRIMMED JUST RIGHT
FILET
STEAK_____. *
89
c
89
c
SWISS
STEAK.....n
TITE MINUTE STEAK LB. $1.39
ABOVE PRICES EFFECTIVE ON SUNDAY ALSO AT OUR
CORAL WAY KOSHER MARKET.... OPEN SUNDAYS
FROM 8 AM. TO 3 P.M.
163rd ST. SHOPPING CTR.
NO. MIAMI BEACH
19th ST. at ALTON RD
MIAMI BEACH
:R MARKETS
2W1 CORAL WAY
MIAMI
ft 4.
BONUS AT FOOD TaIR


Full Text

PAGE 1

Cage %  %  Page 4-B *Jmist>rtor**' ar Fri dY : A ug Mt lf YOIJR MARRIAGE COINSEIOR MlAS NAXIT FAMOM MAUIACI AUTMOMTT. Ucn.B AND A •To fill the hour." said Emerson, -that is happiness." Tucked awav in a modest apartment in W National hotel on Miami Beach is a short, charming white-haired widow of 82 who is living prooi Ol Emerson's wisdom. Her name is Sarah Sive Czech. For more than a half century now this bright, alert lady with her sharp mind and insatiable curiosity has dedicated herself and her fortune to philanthrophy and good works. In short. Mrs. Czech has learned to fill the hour, and she has been doing so ever since she *U a voting girl in Chicago. In the windy city, back in the early 1900 s. Mrs. Czech ran and operated four stores, and there she built the small fortune which enabled her to retire in Miami back in 1921. When widowhood finally came. Mrs. Czech met the challenge with courage and spirit. Women Without Men In Miami she became a life member of some 20 organizations, contributing not only her money but her zeal and energy as well. She was an ardent and tireless campaigner for Israel Bonds and for Mt. Sinai Hospital, maintaining, in fact, a lively interest in all things Jewish. All this despite the fact that most of her good works have been done between heart attacks; for while old age has inevitably tarnished her body, it bas been unable to crush a spirit that is in the noblest Hebraic tradition. Now there is a moral in all this. A few weeks ago. some of my readers may recall. I told the story of some widows on Miami Beach who sit around hotel and motel lobbies mourning their fate and waiting hopefully for a man to come around and propose marriage. TtMC ;< ih e ul Urn Birthday Club. / Hostesses at tne lfoaJ tng will be Mrs. Isi4ocei Mrs. Sarah Sparr, and m man Mck. Granada Wor Welcome H< Flagler-Granada Womtrj'i will welcome Hawaii ai tion's 50th state with a Far 'Eastern fashion sented by Buddy Logue n ter's auditorium Thursday! 20. Commentary is by Ma Logue, with creations bjr Shaheen, Honolulu. Members of FlaglarJewish Community model the back to-school fashions. Mrs. Barney Landers it man. Mrs. Sam Ko*aufcy gram chairman. Sisterhood Cord forty Sisterhood card part; t held at Tifereth Israel Si Center. 6500 N Miami a*| — aday evening. Xtdtfail Might' Sc/tedai B'nai B'rith Women of H ami will hold a "cocktail at the Casablanca hotel oil day, Aug. 22. war, commanded all soM police inside the Germul He committed -uicide aflj British captured him Freedman's Cleaners are now offering special cleaning prices foi your wearing apparel. Freedman's maintains two esintents, at 1718 79th st. causeway. Treasure Island, and 2922 Coral Way. Miami. The Freedman family has been in the cleaning business for three *•> generations. Founder was llyman Freedman. Son Jesi and now Bruce Freedman are pi the original one-hour dry cleaning service, with eight plai oany. \ V One-hour i> free even day. Monday through Saturdaj 7:3C a.m. to 6 p.m. HAPPY THE 1 Have that Business Meeting, Banquet, or Special Occasion You'll find complete focilities to exoctly satisfy your needs in the Kismet, Aladdin, Scheherazade and Rubaiyot Rooms, be it for a wedding or o private party! it thi ML falters # ^ for Information? HAZEL ALLISON Catering Director, JE 1-6061 atr St. Colllnm Av flonfied by Ui smart settmes, the aalabratatl euisine, the suave serwee of Tea Sanaa, where a famous flair tor an affair it now ennancod by Miami Beach's anal dauling array •f handsome NEW FACILITIES for epicurean functions ... from a Pooli.de Party to a Grand Ball ... for 2& cuetis or UOO ... in Grand Ballroom. Petite Ballroom, Ivory Toer. Upper Echelon Club. Veranda Room. Roma Loange, Tsrrsc* Eoom. Cardinal Room, Town Hall. Choosing Ta* Sajrsak f or n |v M •f function ... *—*MSIWW. FUTHMl. CalllTUU IFFUW mm • Hernias • ctw muiiMt will be your assurance of a part* as sor./r.e as It Is ..rr,,|,' ft WaS and infaraaefiaa call JE 8-6811 *"THU TllCHNrt, "".cfor .f C .,i„ tm4 c Urim§ • aaaaaf MIAMI BEACH! riNIST BANQUET FACILITIES BANQUETS • RECEPTIONS • WEDIIMS COCKTAILS • LUNCHEONS • IAR AUTZVA* 1) m—ling room, mating from 10 fnaofre-iryle to 5MI boncjuer-ify/e. 3 imporolm dining end cocttaa' oreoa *l trained, imoginalivt afoff waV aw'< fou without War|| Horn* root BALMORAL UN 6-7792 caaaNA ciui Sll ($ ON THt 0(fAN AT 98th STRUT • Ml** 1 •' %  For Social Functions with a flair that will make for a magnificent affair GDEATJVILLE Cotnpleie Catering Facflil> •*< lh 1 Sj^cial Party Served in an elffMnt fashion within a luxun<.ut sftuag that will reflect yotar good laate. *t**t#4 H ax>, fJiut %  f UMiUmmmannmytlf caat—niiai. Maws • tatwrn Trie a tele or a gala eektralioa with 3,300guesu... sufnv/si %  toswft cariMM avAitaMf "UN $4511 ItU MtNINw, Cattriat


PAGE 1

r, August 14. 1959 +JelstTk>rkfiari ?aqe 3-r David Pinski, 87, Passes in Haifa • rot OTHER OtITUABIlS, SEf SK. I %  % %  M BS •c-HXfl.I %  %  n fTi?'~ i H> ^B ^M %  dors of religious affairs of Protestant, Catholic and Jewish Jents at Temple University in Philadelphia go over the plans of their goodwill tour to Israel on the boat deck ie SS Jerusalem of the Zim Israel America Lines on which recently sailed from New York for Haifa. Seated (left to k) are Rev. Robert L. James, jr., director of Protestant activfon the Temple campus; Fr. John J. Mc.Hale, director of the pman Club at Temple and rector of St. Elizabeth's Church, idelphia; and Rabbi Shalom Segal, director of the B'nai Hillel Foundation at Temple. The trip is sponsored by kr B. Marcus, executive vice president of Food Fair Stores Philadelphia, and William M. West, insurance executive, is arranged under the auspices of the Philadelphia Zion)rganization. JTA— By Direct Teletype Wire HAIFA — David Pinski, world prominent Yiddish author and playwright, diedjate Monday night at his home on'MtTT^arrnel. He was 87. Several friends of the author, including writer Shimshon Meltzer, were at the bedside when Mr. Pinski passed away. David Pinski was considered the last of the generation of the great Yiddish writers of the stature of I. L. Peretz, Sholem Asch and Sholom Aleichem. Born in Mohilev. in New York, he cam* to Hie United States, becoming that newspaper's literary editor. From the time he came to the Russia, in 1872, he started writing while stilt an adolescent, soon joined the stream of young Jewish | United States until he moved to I intellectuals who made their way I Israel after the State was estabto Warsaw, and worked alongside lished, Mr. Pinski was one of the Peretz as pioneers in the development of the new modern vital Yiddish literature. By 18M, when he was 24 and already a writer of repute, he went to Berlin, where he attended the university. In 1899, at the invitation of the "Ovend Blatt" Break Blockade, Javits Says, Or Cut U.S. Aid to Nasser teds Lift Ban on Jewish Books inued from Pate 1-A forthcoming world conven^n Jewish folklore, will come Aviv for that scholarly parconvention will open Sept. 1. a M IS experts from abroad, hers from Israel, are schedto deliver a total of 71 ades on various aspects of Jewfolklore through the ages, dent Itzhak Ben-Zvi will open rst session. organizers of the convention had sent invitations to experts in the Soviet Union and elsewhere in Eastern Europe. Most of the experts did not reply. Some wrote simply that they would not attend. The organizers also requested the various scientific academies in the USSR to locate Jewish folklore experts and extend the Israel invitations to them. None of the academies, except one in Uzbekistan, bothered to reply. Uzbekistan's academy replied it could find no expert in the field qualified to participate in the convention. DADE FEDERAL SAVINGS accounts are INSURED to $10,000 by an aqancy of the Federal government. "One of the Notion's Oldest and largest' ( 0ade Federal L. I/AVINGS and LOAN ASSOCIATION oi MIAMI JQMPH M UPTON, Piesident 5 Convenient Offices Serve Dade County RESOURCES EXCEED 134 MILLION DOLLARS Compete mi Dependable Wit Stnrkt M IAMITITLf &QtetnxctCv. 34 YEARS OP TITLE SERVICE IN DADE COUNTY ESCROWS ABSTRACTS TITLE INSURANCE TtHe hmrsttce PeKe.es el City THto tosereace Co. Cealtof, Serphn Resenrea 1J4 13* SHORJLANO ARCADE FR f-IMI (Alee Known Aa 1*4 and 1l Security Truot Cemi oy-> Continued from Page 1-A and when we have been bending our every effort to bring about mutual cooperation with President Nasser*.". Expressing concern over "deterioration" of Israel-UAR relations. Sen. Javits said: "I believe it essential that our government determine to deal with the present crisis about the transit of shipping through the Suez Canal and not to temporize with it." He said "all of us will recall how our government came to President Nasser's aid, insisting on withdrawal from Sinai and Suez Canal area. The United States, on its part, advanced $5 .million through the United Nations for. the purpose of reconstructing the Suez Canal. President Nasser has reciprocated poorly." Sam. Javits said the United States would net carry out it* responsibilities in the Suez issue "by an airy r eference to the issue to Mr. Hammarskjold or the -UN." He pointed out that "the UN is no stronger than any j of its members, and we are one j of the strongest. This is net en I issue to bo decided by asking little Israel to accept some abridgement of its rights, and j by pressuring Israel to live under imposition, blockade and siege." He said that "we cannot hope to Court Suspends Trial of Rioters Continued from Pa ge 1-A Absorption Department, Yehuda Braginski. reported at the session that of a total of 160.000 North African immigrants. 120.000 came from Morocco, 103,000 of them since 1954. Of these. 83.000 were sent to development areas where housing was provided. Of the 19.000 families still in ma'abarot (villages of temporary huts), 6,000 were from North Africa. Many of these North African immigrants had been given housing in agricultural or industrial development areas, but had abandoned the houses, returning to the ma'abarot, Jewish Agency officials reported. It was also reported at the session that of 19,000 scholarships given jointly by the Ministry of Education and the Jewish Agency for Immigrant children, over 70 percent were given to non-European immigrants. foremost literary figures in the Jewish world, writing Yiddish but widely translated into Hebrew, English, and many other languages. He was particularly noted as a playwright. His play, "The Treasure," was produced in New York by the Theatre Guild in 1815. Another of his plays, produced in English in 1926, was "The Final Balance." On the Yiddish stage, his plays from one-actors to fulllength dramas, were extremely popular. Member of the Poale Zion since his youth, Mr. Pinski was for years 1 president of the Jewish National bring about peace and commerce Workers Alliance, the fraternal orbetween Israel and Egypt now. ganization now known as the FarBut we can hope to pursue a per{ band Labor Zionist Order, sistent policy to bring about re-, He had been editor of "Die Zeit," spect for international law." Amerdaily newspaper, and of the Poale ican policy, he added, had often zj on organ. "Der Karrrpfer." Anbeen criticized for failure of conother of his early American consistency in its application. 'This is nections was with the Yiddish, a situation in wheh such consisweekly "Die Arbeiter Zeitung." tency is both practical and need-1 i ed." American policy now, he de-1 Branch Picnic Sunday clared. must insist that "the illegal restrictions on the use of the Suez Canal must be lifted and the Inge Toft case settled. Otherwise, we cannot give aid or fail to protest aid proposals by international agencies." Lebediger Branch of Farband will hold a picnic at Greynolds Park Sunday beginning at 12 noon. 1 Meeting point will be NE 172nd ist. and Federal hwy. at the Log I Cabin. CARIB MIAMI MIRACLE gXTOOAY "/ have not and then the shout yet begun that has echoed down _._ *;-.,.# I" the ages tO fight! &F ROBERT STACK MARtSA PAVAN-CHARlfSCOeuRN-ERIN O'BRIEN MACOONAID CAREV • JEAN PIERRE AUMONI • DAVID FARRAR PETER CUSHING • SUSANA CANALES ; feYa DAVID NIVEN SHIRLEY *S£j4#y&4C MacLAINE cmuMscoHfc wmoCOLM 0 GOLFERS •can Ce*fidee*e with NEW GRIPS AN Styles A.eilohle toahahhag R t H nbhleg ArMftJftMM GOFFS 14W "*"wrM (0W eAtU s '/? aAttt 4 SuAtdef" An/Tkeotte Opan 6:45 TODAY ^Opan 6:43, Ml IftJOM And G*2 C'Utf *** 0 HOT FO* CHUOtfN Don't put it off put it on Re-Roof S WRITTEN GUARANTEE LICENSED ft INSURED PAYMENTS ARRANGE* m AX rora nincr For Free Istimerte PHONE OX 1-1321 Re-Roofing & Repairing ACMI WPfiY eg, 2670 N.W. 75th ST. 1 1'



PAGE 1

Augu* M. JtM Page 3-B GRAND-WAY" DISCOUNT FT. LAUMRDAU Wl L_n_Ai WILTON MANORS MXII HWHWAY AT WILTON DRIVE U W.H0UYW00D b FT. I S STATt ID. 7 AT I ST4 I WASIH H TOM ST. ~ W. I CENTERS Si 3700 NORTH FEDERAL HWHWAY LAUDERDALE STATE ROAD 7 AT RDOWADD DUD. All ITEMS IFFECTIVE AT All STORES EXCIPT AS OTHERWISE NOTED. FEDERAL AND SUNRISE NAS FOODS OtHYl HEN TUR GIGANTI SHARP PROVOLONE CHEESE 69 LB. TOMATO JUICE UBBY'S 2 !" 49 c White Potatoes KING COLE WHOLE 6 a 49 c ITEMS AND PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SATURDAY CELERY GOLDEN HARVEST CUT GREEN BEANS NO. 303 CAN 5149 c STALK 5 CARROTS 6 C $3.98 MISSES' Pedal Pushers, C A P R I S CORDUROY JJ97 AND FALL PLAIDS $1.98 MISSES' CHINO Pedal Pushers 2 roR$ 3 $3.49 MISSES' CORDUROY. VIRGIN WOOL SKIRTS $2*7 SIZE 22-30 OPEN DAILY 8 A.M. TO 10 P.M.-SUNDAYS TO 7 P.M.



PAGE 1

I I Page 10-B l^i^fhrHitr ___ Ftidwy. Augp| 4 •55S Something New Under The Sun! "THE SOMBRILLAC THE HOLIDAY SUN LOUNGE & CARRY-ALL FOR OUTDOOR LIVING NOW only ... s# qc (Reduced from $15) g,7a (Red Maif i $15) Phene Orderf MM KIMBALL'S SPORTING GOODS "The Best for Less for All Sporfs" 215-17 19 N.E. 2nd AVENUE FR 4-3374 FR 4-4712 Pearly Gait ENJOY YOUR OWN SPECIAL PARTY A J THE LUCERNES AUTHENTIC LATIN Rf V U£ by Hal Pearl j HMMA fHftW 1 6^J • • %  ^m% ^BV tfcrraao Aimrkm't Sizxtmg RESERVE NOW for the HIGH HOUDAYS and SUCCOTH KOSHER MEALS INCLt'DED "KTT eg iia) rv rvnai % ^ D,blt Occup.im OCMII Front A Oetsn Vm| All OlNft loc.ri Qpt n*>—DM HldWf u >, -MI^.,1 A Holidays El'ROPEtN PLAN A APAIITMFMS 1K7 Dcnln> flftu Com Hrtsjjwl Inri. Dietary Laws & Sabbath observed Serv. Daily Sell & Diabetic Diet* Free 21" TV in Every Room FREE PARKING and 1" Other Wonderful Ftatures Free I>iy ('amji Nl>rht Patrol Phone JE 1-5711 OatheOceaa Pvt. Roach t Pool 1741 Collins, Miami loach, Flo. iJtSoy A GRAND miMND RESERVE NOW! DAVID ROSNM't HOTI POOL. M m OCCM • trik smn. auai ma counanr AIR-CONDITIONED For All Information Ph. UN 6-8831 I $250 SMORGASBORD SIKVED WITH ALL LVHNtRS Alore than twenty different kinds of deiicieesfy prepared Hors D'Oewvres. each a rasre-fe mat imm treat that will odd to roar diawsa oleosare. Served mitt, tat coma*ears of CA*DLU>6WT INN %  %  fa eff dinners. — OUR SPECIALTY — jpi FILET MJGNON Served arrta fall Cntr se Dinner fAHOUS FOR • AGED STEAKS • Primo Rib of Beef •Fobaloas Dinners I m\*m MEW $ i.oo | BANQUtT fACIUTHS Candlelight Inn 3131 Commodore Plaza Coconut Grovo HENRY LEITSON. Mar. LUNCH • O'NSIC IUWII ORDERS TO TAKE 0'_T PHONE UN 6-43C3 i ON 7rrh ST. CAUSEWAY I NAMES MAKE THE NEWS: Nat Strauss, of the water heater firm, and his missus off to the North Carolina mountain terrain to forget i about the heat air temperature, that is. Mr and Mrs. Murrav Baron recently celebrated their 25th anni 'versarv. and part of the celebration was dinner at Fu Manchu where they received surprise gifts from thoughtful proprietor Al Goldman. What material for • book Mamo Donna Brandtit will bo able to gather! Tho recent graduate of University of Florida and daughter of Mr. and Mrs, Leo D. Brandois. of Miami Beach, embarks for Israel Aug. 29, sailing from New York to Haifa. She'll spend si* months en a Kibbuti in Israel, studying the economic and social life of the communal farm village. Hal Kayes. the toy and novelty wholesaler, and his right hand man. Dave Finkel. forgetting business on the Bay shore hnk> the pa-! %  end. Dare any golfing fanatic to walk into Jerry Kimball's snorting goods store in downtown Miami and come away empt> handed Never saw such a complete stock of golf equipment — including bags Oi varied materials, among them leather, plasmcanvas, and in a not of colors; plus balls, sticks, and almost everything to make you ,-u • better on the fairways, ,'erry carries every .-ports line and right Iremendous specials for tennis players Mrs. Ann Jeffre>. MrBlanche Mai nd MrB Swartbur ime, and the ti i nnie Kalan. having a grand time shopping and ng on the stopover. A few more Beach couples making the grand tour of F.uropi this summer include Mr. and Mrs. Leon Green (recent returnee.-'. Mr and MrBen Sine. Mr. and Mrs. S. Sidney Hoffman, and Mr and Mrs Joel Newman. The Alfred Cohens, of Miami Beach, guesting at tho Stardust in Las Vegas, and witnessing the biggest summer boom in that gambling resort's phenomenal history. And, we could add, in Las Vegas, take away the dice, and the empty hotels would be loaded with mice. Dr. and Mrs. Irving Bernstein joining the summer exodus from Uda area to Israel. Councilman Wolfie Cohen (and a good restaurateur, too) shooting par golf these days. Hits the ball a mile off the tee. His many friends glad to hear that Westview pro Ross Sobel is feeling much better. Marshall Wolper and Jerome Katz. local insurance agents, lauded for their fine work at the special leadership program of their company Equitable Life Assurance, during its recent centennial conference in New York, MAKING THE ROUNDS: Didn't think it was possible, but 'Havana I Mardi Gras" has a new zip and a new lilt since the addition of two 'new faces." One is Betty Reilly, "The Irish Senorita," who's a human dynamo of music, dancing and personality. The amazing and amusing blonde, blue-eyed sparkler sings in Yiddish, Spanish, Portuguese Ital Ian, French, and of course. English. Such talent, such vigor, such vim Also new in the almost three-year-old revue is curvacious and audience conquering Blanquita Amaro, South America's foremost screen -tar Zi,ZV/J* n ?? a ," d sin *V' s hi Phi P < a "d what shaking hips, booray, with a decided Latin accent. &f .J?' Wi,K '£? R,i y nd Senori,a Am,ro maki "9 Hub debut a the Lucerne, "Havana Mardi Gr„" i, better than ever, and you all know how great h) has been ever since it opened in January 57. H„n P r! < \ Ca I ed n ? aS P < rforman 's at her Studio M Playhousi I don think I m Itkking oul my neck by predicting that SohV 'old Cadii.ac will be Ruth Foreman's top presentation to date The niK V K f lh J, theatre adds l0 ,he "*""Rtmosphere and de erv whoieheaned support of the community. Wtervw trv ,h^ URANT R W: Next ,ime you dr P in, •"<' CandJelight inn toS-S adults ,h e oo WaUS aDd ^ ^?*3*£tt Isaac Gellis restaurant on the Beach now features fin„ Sprmgs Villas. (Not at Carriage Club m.„V %  1 un at Mumi it you haven', heard his superb'aSry.'y^ff-JJ^ 1 :' ^ to catch him. But make sure you do* two *•* %  lefl An off-beat Broadway format will be the stvle of th— Three Arts Theatre Club, in Coral Gables Now^inJ! ,?W,y crea,fd bftmg operation, the "membership only" P lavh ou I !i?" 8 a face in September. George Blac-kwoodI and tJm > ,, 0 Use l11 • Pn early dling over the footli|ht scheTulT "* H,nS00 are cumn,l > hud" U tbeCarib. Miami and Miracle ^ET?J* LTT *" greens b, Robert Stack, and the supporting east inrf^I. rlV" !" ,s ena ed like something on TV-this guest appeal "bit) D VU (Sounds u 5xsy srjzxstf asa"!" •Native Stone." The Silver Spoon odT ThIT ^ h,s ^sellers Good to see Leon Uris' Ss" st.ll If ,K?V' rre C age I seUer h, „s Uie most popular book^ thV^ruSarfert^ BETTY REILLYj AND AN EXCITING All STAI ( AST MILOS ViURDi ROBERTO 4 AlKIA + PEPE • MERCEDITA • BUNCO World'* Moat ioowtrful Show Qw*+ | DAVE TTLER, Musical DirechK FAUSTO CURIEIO ond Ms lotm American Orch. Crnpi tl 10 fe SOD cea thrill fa ffe/s '59 rdifien af ffce wrldouiiimri kMI Sptrk 1—4, mmUkltit stnlit -irfctTfever fhe saeciaf atcasi'ea. f "^ .*> SMCIAI ADOIO ATTRACTION 1 j BLANQUTTI AMARO isf US oppo,. once oSovH. American taajaa. i twinging SMMIJ,, \ Command Periormamce Before tho Km) THl POfT Of rm MAM CARMEN CAVALLARO AIM Tf KING ARTHUR'S H OI HT MIAMI SPRINGS VtXLAS 500 Deor Run Phone TU 8-4521 OPEN DAAY fraaa 4 to • a.-. MRMSLS1.95 ",l" CATERING FOR ALL OCCASIONS 940 • 71si St., Miomi Beech free Par. UN 6-6043 Air-Cead. Under Orthodox Vaad Makashruth HAROLD PONT and IRVIN GORDON GORDON and PONT ^U^ K0SNIR CATIRIRI !" Ar froej hers d'oewrei H • laaapliH 6a#M 170 N. W. 5th ST., MIAMI PHONE FR -7* Unit, S.eervisiee ef Umittd K.shras Associofioo of Onmt* Mhrnl OPEN HOUSE WEDDINGS BAR MITZVAJtt RfCEPTKJNS AKIIICAS tautisT '(MALI IMIIIAWU AV^ hi The C 2Hi & Cellini A., Ei -£ 9|uai: Heat BELLE BARTH No Covrr Anyii •,, *' Solli H \ 5733 ia.il aad %  1S.IMI ON BISCAYNE BOULEVARD FRANKS ITALIAN RESTAURANT 1TAUAN 4 1 iSIXE y*mr Host • SAVTINO CASCI "AtTI CRUHAtfA" *** CONDITIONED # AMPLE PARDNG *H*v'££SXZSr Dul PL 4-2431 <^<^^A^e\M


PAGE 1

p.jf+litfkrKfan TM ky. Augw^w f Page 6-A I' H E 1 3 4 5 fe D 1 ul 8 c 0 E 9 M A c s "T IG 13 4 B F 15 fe o LR "D AI 18 19 1 A 1 n-y 25 22 ^D Q 24 A R *o T t-es, !, s T A ~ic Ca*. *•&• %  • EXPIAHATION TO WHIf MO. 4 IUKD B^ewewtfe put kw „ wee*, and the. .an cna .If** chore, together •" %  Iktgj, 1 I I injBftfsa**: w.rdt ) EXPLANATIONS ACROSS find v .,,,, t l | .i,-..,s ****** ... S..ITIN' NAME.. ADDRESS CITV.PMONE. STATE COINWORD PUZZLE NO. 6 WORTH $150 If there are no correct olution to the previous week's puzile. Otherwise prixe returns to beginning $IO0 Jackpot. If you with to subscribe to The Jewish Floridian check the square and your paper will start immediately. Subscription price is C *5 per year, Q $10 for 3 years Regular subscribers are eligible for larger prizes. See rules. i \ -I Id nevt i:Kl i urtala .,.!,. .'..-i. or too BIMHII ,,. -A ', I A TORPID, ... ; ;-<' ,,.,„-, MS IP u.. ".'"Vu'Vs '":...Hoqulally, l-r< .mount.) ol ever, l : ",;r-'; I 1—A* ambition. y OUBc mi worry about his f JINX, if w w.k-. „;£%**% wlvea. In buatnes. circles VTJJ iH-rtant for a young roan's Wir. ."! aporoved of. If n..t. she J,* *•] had luck Par his career ; l>ert. hut the word has a i^. v f, notation, and KII. h a wlf. i"', helpful. 17—An n ..inera often FlI.UKI) with could •hou 4 l>... .grounds — Su. Instance, as .lie stands m Itrl.lce. Background w Una for m.I •.. cantata enlhuxla-t w.,ui. kiro II—When an em. ig.-n. y ;.,..i.hestra ha* onl> I., performer before. nu.ti\ needed. A *.<• pert plays sjraU. and then why he should not merge % r>k easily Into that .,f a full orchestra Copyright IMS. Genera) Fi fu'etf MADUNE THIS WEEK SUNDAY MIDNIGHT, AUG. 16 | Cut along the dotted line, paste on a 3-cent postcard and mail to COINWORD Editor, The Jewish Floridian. P.O. Box 2973. Miami I, Fla. 1 CLUES ACROSS 1— -_ hay onto a stack soon I exhausts a tenderfoot. 6—A highly strung person gets upset by any 8—This might be a nuisance on a long walk. 9— Klansmen seeking ve.n-' geance are no longer in good repute. 10—At a buffet supper, it is usually informal. 13—Chemical symbol, erbium. 16—Old English: Abbr. 17—After a public idol's death, i historians may dig up facts that his memory. 19—Doctor of Science: Abbr. 20—To impress a house guest, a hostess would want to vary her setup for dinner 22—That man. 24—Preposition. 25—A of candy shouldn't be kept in the sun. 26— A man going to Alaska on business could certainly use a warm .... coat. 27—A fruit vender would try to catch a boy who made off with a o f bananas. CLUES DOWN 1—Eying her son as he over his studies. Mom might worry about Willie's lack of exercise. 2—Paid notices: Abbr. 3—Frozen desserts. 4—Hard swelling. 5—Greek: Abbr. 6—A belligerent toper usually a cop's right to arrest him. 7—Impersonal pronoun. 11—Drinking is acceptable in many strait-laced households. 12— Undelivered produce piled up by a truckmen's strike works hardship on a 14—It's not much fun to play a game with an opponent you can't 1!>—Washing machines are a way to do laundry than those old washtubs. 18—Passage out. 21—Plunder. 22—Those with a persistent in their throats should not neglect it. 23—An unkempt one is appropriate for an actress in playing a slattern. WORD LIST HACK %  H l.S'li; BEAR HAWK B :\ :• HE BW HIMMKIt CORNET HIMPED CORSET ICES I'ASI.V IT I'AN I ilKR JAR DEFACB LOOT DEFAME M IRKED DEFIEM MASSED DBN1E8 NODE DIG DIN • OTTER IxjIIvT OUTER II s BEATING EH EXIT PETTING BTAI K GR> STALK GRi CKR TO GROWER TODAY TODDY I..I1•• ,,. ,,.. tnaklni oVmanda "'' ',, rinnloyers cannot or ,""'• • ThoiVh II l u"lU -'•N"' s Sjectlve. sre CSWoX. m...,> s rikej ,., (urlsdlctlon.1. or wIMcal strutei ultli-'Ul UNION apiii-i'*.! u-^., w neujhborti I kkta jlW. HINT f..r I snack h.n '>"-. your hooaa Thai <•'<> ';' "JT. S" indeed 10 noas anmnrt the kll.h.n .,„,! actlval) RUNT for •om.tallH i ta-Evtryoni b utmaafttl for tkaOAIN in the reaarrolr, whan •< • i" 1 "[• burst relieves %  "§•* -h'"""; 1 I. „,., Jutl th. RAIN that lullIMO U,. reservoir, but Iba continued run„ft from lh water t.ble feeding 11 th.it raises lha ,.!•' level after the RAIN is ..v. ,. \ n ..... uw ii %  n pai"' '"•" about the MOTIONS she uses i" riving .i mawiage training hat lauant h. i when the iiervi n nli i II; p,hi h stroki r* mo.1 rela mj ot .tlmulatlrur. Bb %  • llkel) i" Jiif ream. ..>• to use LOTH NS ill '-' [and an) c I ones Intended foi the | |.ui|M.-r .!(-•probably satlsfactorj 36— It's hard for the • rlmi Ibl iI lENTED b> hit bi si friend. It l.n'l neremar) lhal Ihi alibi IDENIED romplel I., -t I "• uld li | nol to do) I.I.I ili.it some "f the statements support Ini his alibi ma) fhjuratlvi I) i %  • red b) Information .. %  q i the pressure of qu< stloninit _• \ MOODY atmosph !!>.. f..r the m) st< i j %  rltei tti. I. ., f. pllna f let .! jitter) nerves, and gloom M'il,lY n,. ant mu ty, stale, In the %  emie, .nd might be concerned more with horrot r(i.• 11 with myMer) .torles. EXPLANATIONS DOWN ft—When %  TV ibi %  farea badl) In It:* audience l'l'l.l.. ^>onsora usually drop it its I'.ii.i. may sboa .. high rating (In tin.-. "What pi %  re rou listening lo?" telephone ...ll-i l.ut it does tinsponsor llttli %  I f..r you to listen if v..ii don t bu> u product—the shoa doesn't 1't'U. In the customers, •"•— A preoccupied man may unwitllngl) GRANT hiconsent lo laki his wit. to net it He ma) ORCNT when she ..-Khim, ..r mak< son • other reply srhli h ds more hk. agreement than hkn "No," .;th the result that uutliiiikiniilv hi t.. lake hi r —Some political I'I.ANS that will put liim in the spotlight in. logi a] foi .i %  dentlal hop. t.il Include such thing, as speeches pubrfli •. • tc, to establlah "'•" A political PLANK, .-. basic ill. in. ..f hat tin part) stands r. la formulated b) th. ruling hlet ..f til.party, rather than b) .. nr< sidenlul h f ui 11—When .. gamiktui i Heal npinIons ire ixs. .r\i,. „ ,. lk I.I,..... listen quiet him in i) lose th. account, bul l 1 '" 1*1 Irorrei-ted tt'r"vrf "'",': '"' "Pinions .... IN WOI Nli rollowln. ... ,„, end iv.,> helpful In leai i ill |.l. as. ihi Hem H A II VRRIED hi is. fi tt > nelghbot ii nstant^ ;""';.chat Idle talk Is racking wh. n nn. a mind Is i.r, '•"'I with w.H les .,,,.1 freti \ Rules for the COINWORD Contest The*J. w.b rlorldUn before midnight of Iks* 8iuta*r evening f,i|loi:.g ; pubUoJ on ,.f That weeks puasle. No enlrlea re.-lved after that time, whether sai-1 id'" d--IKer* by hand, win be declared ejtwtala. Tou may mail your mto*] m an envelope if >"u wl.h. This paper la not reaponalble for enUies lwt1 t'"Th'.' j'cw^h"rio l rldUn will award a j-ekpot prime to the winner of C0J %  WORD puIe. If -ore than one winali anew Is received, the pra, rt1 be divided equally among Ibe wlnaefa. If no cortact solution Is r c :elv>i.l ;^A^:.' l \VV,v l ;'";..'':"rr,v k so".u p Do^-o th. COIN !"!" p. !" ,.,. *. •" ThaiTco?re""tVI can win. The decision of the Judge. I. flt.al a* contestants agree to abide by the Judge, decision. All entries threat I .,.„.,. ... (h paper "nlN >.ne prise will he awarded to a famil. aail j-'nu %  ..'„' itst be mailed lo Ihe I-..INW(1MD editor of The Jew, f l. Florjl No entries can he ..turned The correct answer of each puule ati .^!!^;L;^:!^:,•:i;:.': ;.'Th: rt ';e 1 w.,h nnrui.. -ho t.... ,*-..•; Cuii am designed Charm and Modeling Courses available far ages 2.iK>U •OITH APPLISAUM Director MODEHNG SCHOOt AND AGENCY 177 Miracle Mile. Coral Gable*. Fie, Highland 4-1 MO* Zionists Name Program Chief NEW YORK Appoint m,.nt of -Nathaniel S. Rdlhcnhern. of New York, a vice prcM,| ( n t „f h( z, )A and a member of .is officer, ,,„„ mittee. as national rhairman of the program committee for the B2n-I annual convention of the Zionist Organization of America Sept lo to 13 at the Willard hotel ln Wa,, "HJton. DC. was announced W.l nosday by Abraham A Redelhtun 1 president of the organ.zat.on Dedicated to the Herzl Centen mal Year, marking the loothi an der of modern Zionism, the 7(\ convention will draw an ^JJ ,200 delegates ttm all parts of the country. y m \ Major topics on the agenda will NEVER BEFORE Luxury Tourist Flights At Such Low Fares! UMA 150 BUEHOS AIRES '251 Wo thm Mow Oovgfaj DC-* w JtFr C '+*§ a/r//nes •"nr^S I PTWVMH Mitti**,



PAGE 1

I Pnoe 2-A +Jeist fkrHtor Friday. A *** 14. lu, Don't Leave it to Dag, Keating Warns Senate •;\ i\ •> :> rtU • ion a', tinI'niv S • %  •. %  Rend ir. a legal purposes K e indicated blican Sen a| with a view Eon i York boM I "*> • %  •' Sen Kei v %  ., can %  ui cannot leave nnh ID I Hammarskmlc: H. >aic :h. tin. nan com: "'" should again formal!* mor ir French Politico Winner On Anti-Semitic Platform French Senate Auberg*r. o di •*••, (f The annulment of M A, h .. lection M ntavor .^ :T aai (In Cairo. Nasser told an audience las* week that Israel would not be allowed to use the Suei Canal. He scoffed at reports that Israel planned to raise the matter before the United Nations and repeated that he will "waoe total war" against Israel if the Jewish State will pursue "an act gressive policy' against Egypt. His speech was broadcast throughout the country, i >*•!. Keating expressed h that Proaidem Baentaownr am: tha %  i:imnus:r;rion "*a il. ,:--unn ;ti< we to it that our repneai • | nited Na to hen terferI :".[. 1-": mere in' f fiance in naJ affair> that i! • feeds upor. rtsell aid ma involve illegalm in an area He said thai President Nasser of the I'nited Arab Republic if preventing th< Danish ship Inge Tolt irom transporting a cargo I Far East "which h;i> no'hint: to do with military affair" in a manntotallv without leHigh Holiday Seats Available LONG-DISTANCE MOVERS DAIir PICK-HM New York New Jet sey, Philadelphia Baltimore Wash •"•ten, Boston — oil ether poults DIAL JE 8-8353 M. Lisberm, i Sots •53 COLLINS AVI. RETjftN LOAD RATES far il..: H will coma ity. 9 a m.. and continue i 5 p.tii and Sunda> •nrvinu nil • % %  <-..ncHiried in inriitioncd huildinu of the Miami Hebrew (on. tion Special youth services wi! be held m the air-conditione, %  ntaagj nea| o! th< builI Tn caajfi ,, present lv formulating plans for an adult Bhafa Liturgx will be chanted bv Cantor Berele Kelemer Ha lib. nel, Savilie will officiate and deliver the sermons COINWORD Still Eludes Miami >RD mrnv week t.. elude hundred Greater Miami contestantPuz%  This meanthat COIN N i 6 appearing on Pat"irth S150. pro• %  %  • rrecl week puzzle INWOBD Edit..: .'ha: he has not been able to pay out T 1 Floridian Jackpot m but takes solace in the that his horde .• %  j ur d inci cash, plus an add to %  It • PARIS—rn-e election at r of a -in. town vli annulled by it liecause of -ue* in ** e *tton as mayor and j nil Jewish Pl on him for riolatiaaj 0 cnt wareflected to the *l*Uon laws, represented the 1 > an even greater majority. l,m ,n new legislation bar new electionwere held. appeals to racial or reUeioe. i in eleetioru had been ^ Henry Torres, noted French There were no indications whZi ....... .-J I...J mt M^> ,A~.i—. the mtherili -barrister and head of the administrative council of the French radio and television, in a breedcast Sunday, called en the 11*' A U, s!!!!!!f* woald to m. Aubergei a reelectw,, mayor alty. to ta> JWV Convention Elects Abrams Continued from Pag* I-A broken promises and, if our Government deems it desirable, to present a fitting resolution to the General Assembly of the United Nations dealing with this situation." The delegatealso passed a resolution askine for the deportation •• opportunity of the Butcher of the Balkans Andnja trtukovic. a former Minister of the Interior of the Nazi puppet ot Croatia Artukoric now 1-'Me came inder a : -j and en imerici despite thai while he waI J. his tore Jew than th. COMPLETE PEST CONTROL MORTGAGES $500,000 Private Money CHAS. HIME Pereaaeeat •• Ceastrertiea leeas as New or Old Preeertiei Unaer tjtnictiea • Ceaaaletea. Will l. T M leak. Lean ea 1st er 2a*! MUrt.eaei *reed Fees er Leases %  BTMBBI iasvreact Fuses. FREE ROOM & BOARD PLUS SALART Jewish Wastes Live la Na Harriet Call FR 94401 Between 3 5 etwee Prescription Specialists NOW IN TWO MODERN A 9-iOMtHTIOMD, ENLAISO KACN LOCATIONS MOftf PAtKlajC SPATE CONr-fNfENT TO 8BSIS 350 LIMCOLN ROAD Phe-ve JE -742S Eetr. Waifciaalea A*a. bMiteaiat 728 UNCOLN ROAD Phame JE i-074 ocuusrs' P UKU PI KI N S nua CONTACT LENSIS R'B broker Ph FR S.3444 TERMITES CHINCH BDGS FR 7-1411 r-tr. KmzztM FNEE ESTIMATE* TR1 LV XOLEX. BC Srtere, aaaafle ..r,,,IrrerwMt tp i*ai 7^f>mWirst^iT lobbi Joseph L Rodcovslry HS MICHIGAN AVENUt, MUM' IEAO GLASS F0R EVEtY ^"O$E %  u_ STMC FMNT ^-n end WMMW SUSS m*Z iTcr '*** mud *"-~r WorkN '3* S.W. 8th STREET ^ ^ mmm%m "Progreaeing with Our Many ANOTNEI LOCATION FOR TOM >*.< %  %  a ids d> AUGUST BROS ft w: t* Irli AS" CT' *> ^-.~v. rue roaaj CONVeNNNCI C0ULT0N BROS __, u."^: I'!"""' •**•-W TOAC* Mfl "NAOIT. -MT. ^' Woy t S.W. 27tfc Aw. PALMER'S MIAMi^^ stAJirs om AMD OMIT C4THWN6 ETCUarVBr TO TK jnr >S* ajcwTfu OOAIANTEEt • %  BT OUAim "ONOMENTS AT LOWEST PRICB %  MIAM JEWISH MONUMENT BUILDERS •tAVE MARKEM A$TOaiB %  OOTJTONB "^ 7* n KNTTHWEST 8tk STRErt "• •• Cenaer af r. Aveaee PNONES HI *^092i W 4-0922 •40 S.W. tti St 1



PAGE 1

Page 6-A + k*ist Fkridiar i i _[f"7_^WR Dade County Council to Meet Tuesday; Will Interpret Goals to Community Dade County Cmtmai ea C+m if Relations win njeet Tue* ;-•*<• >*i.' i. •' hotel Purple of the meeting will be to satreduce ibe new IBM i— %  rrVf to ".be casnaaaniity and to 11 jaakijii11 the program of the Ceaasei]. an aff-liaw of the Florida C— MI il of C( iwnity Relations, to the general public. Sew appointees to the committee by Metropolitan Government. • hjcfc lends DO support except of a leadership variety to the Council, are Leon McAsblL Miami Beach publisher J X. McArthur. Dade county dairyman: Jose Ferre. Pwerto Rico industrialist Edward C Rogers. Miami insurexecutne. and Sen. Harry' t Cam. president of the United jjkAllistav Fund <* Dade County.. Financial support comes to the Council through partial assistance of some of the areas municipalities, as well as from membership dues and contributions. "We make no benes about it," explained William K. Williams, eaecutive director. The Council is constantly hurting for want of an adequate budget. But the iob at hand is *n enormous one. And it must be done. Rabbi Warns Against Jewish Beatnik' Rise The job to which he referin volves human relations education, the resolution of community ten sioiis. the general mterreligious and interracial programs of other community relations agencies—ex cept that the Dade County Council is a quasi-official group and nonJ M Palframan. president, sectarian in membership. Bark of Dade County, announced These are the aims which will Wedrx-sci of Joseph be laid forth before the Tuesday A F.i>..Miami investment night meeting at the McAJUatCf fra~nTT and %  urban of Ply mo. ffoyvrs fleetest' Chairman Bond and Share C ba post of chairman of the bank i investment c-oaansnee 1' :.acity. Rayvis will be in charge of all in-: r.u that tbe bank mat its own portiobo Ray\. ector of the Bank of Dade County since 1 Nasatir Unveiling MOCKS NASATH %  Sun dor, Aeaast Urk at 1:30 p.m. T • Mr %  %  • "It is a pity." the Council ei ecutive explained, 'that hate campaigns seem to flourish economicand that programs such as -jffer for want of the wherewithal to keep going. But 1 think that communities here and throughout the state are beginning %  realize they must >tart financ it more adequately than finance hate. "The Metro appointments Williams explained, "are an mdica•.his praiseworthy goal be coming about." Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz. spiritual leader of North Shore Jewish Center, is back from a trip to Cuba, where he officiated at services of the Havana Jewish Center. Rabbi Abramowitz discussed his experiences on the island during his Saturday morning sermon at North Shore last week. ;REPHUN'S HEBREW: BOOK STORE L.-oe-t and O flet Hebrew St-ppiy Ho,it r G'tater M.jmi WHOUiAU end MM CoTipietc Uaa ot Htt>r* Supplie* tor SynBoguet. Hebrew and S-najy Schools > > r % ISRAELI GIFTS and NOVELTIES 417 Woshiagtea kit. Miami Beach Jtfferse. 1*017 J Flagler Opens Registration Here Flaglcr Granada Jewish Center will open registration for its Sun day and Hebrew tebooll on Sun day, AU| SO, and Sept. 6. from 9:30 a.m. to 12 noun Hebrew school will he under direct scpervision of Rabbi Bernard Shoter, who ill he assisted by Ivi Kaj and Abraham R(enth..i Double SI isej .ire planned for Sunda) school, and both departments will commence Sept IS, Erwin Marshall, principal of Sunday school, will be assisted by eight teachers and five junior teachers. There \>ill be four trades ol Hi brew school, which will be inteI with Sunday school, with a post-Bar Mitzvah and po-' Bai Mitzvah stud] group orgaoii meet once I week lor one to two hours under Rabbi Shoter There will also he a Tall:Tef'llm Chlb lor fathers and and daughters, which will meet on Sunday mornings for discusi prayers and break). \ Here, memory is forever enshrined in beauty v Neb M amfi obloM and M Jii-ii e a we i ai ) can %  \our %  •Ml Jil has •Ireaej l+e„ i„ r ever 4.000 other hsjhl) ai inf d lewU uatuMee, r**—' ''"r Faint tiiindiM IIOQJMO i\,, ur sseawanet of %  iaaear* baaaakaj beauty ... .nd liirtr ut no anas, assasssseata or atsastewaace easts, Your initial oast need be \our onl\ one. Detail, kill hrjladl) furnished, in >our batae, b> mad or phone. "'MS MOST B£AUT,FUl EXCLUSWElr JEWtSM CEMETERY Wmt ~JW> Bmttm 5bOS Northw.,, 3rd St. >h. M UHQmm^k 1 76*3 • F DETAILS WR.TE TO. I *~*NeboC~e.. n J50J Kw ^ ^ ^ ^""l \ Name Zone State Leaders to Seek Khrushchev Meet Continued from Page 1-A has been reported that Khrush chev has allegedly indicated willingness to receive American Jewish leaders and discuss with them the position of the Jews in the Soviet Union. The questions concerning. Soviet Jewry will never be answered in a Miide meeting with Premier Khrushchev patently desirable || such a merlin* is," Klulzn.k said He predicted that it would be %  long time before meaningful an swers would be received tnr. ana yS S f the m,er nat.onal situation and its impl.cauons both for the State of Israel and world Jewry was given here bv Dr S Uvenberg. of Undon a | he Mi -ca commutee of the Assemblv Following Dr Ix-venberg s report he committee adopted a reso u "on a.sk.ng ,he Great PowerT.o ^e Lnited Nations, for a forth, r and f 0r an end to the cold n, between East and West The committee reu>rtH — |"..on presented by' J rmemU ': i • -nn„„, M \; ;wa) SUNOAT, AUGUST 11 • Weedlewn 'ark Cimt'rt \ IALPN S. iUKH, 12:4: tl "Mav Tl m E:c ... Pttct AMANGEMENTS I" PAUaDt/S aaUMl MOMUMEfTI ISRAELI RELIGIOUS STORE AU Nfttmr sufmis roe SrMAQOtUli I IIWISM HOWS 1357 WASHINGTON AYE JE 1-7722 MifMi Hebrew Book lies wai'B'" **^ Miami neacn — J£ • %  Hebrew nastaieu* *'• %  • %  •••••••. et>en er rej ISRACLI A DOMESTIC kW Dr. ft* H. S11 Waaht—e m Aa._J ilfW205-JlW Coll Jlff.rgoft 1-747J School Dofcs Posted schools on Sunday Aua *i u *>• '~m 10 a m uIL n^ %  *' start Sept 8 f^ P" ar aaa NZWMXH •VHBUiHOhU tin AD fl muuvum MIAMI IIACM T.



PAGE 1

August 14. 1959 *•Jewlsli rk>ridHcnn Page 11-A vmHo LEGAL NOTlCf LEGAL NOTICE BY HENRY LEONARD "Mr. Chairman door prizes to stimulate I attendance at our lodge meetings if we must, but Green Stamps NEVERI" < -. /•. UM4 eo*i. NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOU8 NAME L*'/ NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that the undersigned, uesitiug t" eneftgs in %  under the rictittoui B ( FLAMINGO I >ll V CLEANERS LAUNDRY .il 1815 N W II A i tends to rep il trim.with HiClerk of HiCircuit Court of DMI MAXWEI.I, SCHWARTZ, Bolt la nor 1-81 -U LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER ;TITIOU3 NAME LAW IS II i-:i: !-: %  : v OIVBN thai I i I Ins to .image In n^liT the fictitious name ol U'CIIM XN Mi -Ti'ltS at llOt) Street. Miami Intend* to i name with the dork o( Ci.nri of I'a.le County. RAUCHMAN, Soi.Owner 8 n-jiNOTICE UNOBR :TITIOUS NAME LAW IS HERE It C.1VBN that I i.. sftgag* In th< -nlous name ol M'AKTMI'N'TS at I0S nue, Miami Bench, tm %  amid name with the C ill Court of I 1 l.rl.l.. | J ,CK an.I OLOA KA1IN llth SI Fla. | i NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAMI LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY QIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fit .moof ADVANCE RESEARCH BUREAU al ISM Congress liullding intend* to register said name with the Clork of real! Court of Pad* County, Florida EDWARD l JAPriK \\ ci.l.iscil. DOUGHERTY .v /..\l.\c Att-.i io-\ i for Ad^ ant • .IU. tyti-SlIN IHE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY. No. 59C 7367 FIDELITY M< >RTQ \OK CO., INC., i .rporatlnn. Plaintiff, V*. TROT WARD and MAXfB WARD, III I v. if.-, 1 >. U Inlant*. NOTICE OF SUIT T<): TROT WARD and MAXIE WARD, inatlfa i o HOMER BARS Colorado City. Texas TOU ARE HEREBY NoTfPIBD that a Complaint to Foreclose %  mortgage haa been filed against you and each of you. That UM prop* tj sought to toforeclosed Is described as: Ix>t Fourteen (14) In Block Six (6) of IVE8 KSlATKS BBCTION ONE, a subdivision of Dftd* County. FlorIda, according to the Plat thereof, •led In Plat Book I. at Page 74 of the Public Record* of Dade County, Florida: together with all furniture, furnishing* and fixture* and any replacements theieof which an BOO or may horaaftor he located and altuate on the above described property. TOO ARE HEREBY WOTTFIED to aerve a copy of your anawer to the complaint on the Plaintiffs attorney. flKOROE CHERBN. 07 Olympia Buiidlng. Miami 32. Florida, and file the original Anawer in the Office of th > lerk of the Circuit Court. Miami, l>a>ie County, Florida. on W before the 8th day Of September. 1S. Otherwise the allegation* of said Complaint will be taken a* confessed against vou DATED the Srd flay of August, 19.9 at Miami, hade County. Florida i: iLHATHERMAN, Clerk of the Circuit C-urt K M I.YMAN, Ileputv < lerk. l-Jl-M IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE I1TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA IN CHANCERY No 59C 7161 JOHN M HYI.ANI'. Plaintiff. ALICE LORRAINE HYLAND, Defendant -vauuxlt • -..-.. %  ORDER TO APelfX/t TO!*, ALICE LORRAINE HYLAND, Elmhurat, Nev by notified t-> flic *"'ii to the complaint for divorce filed 1 \ ..a with the Clerk of Ini rult Couj/1 and eerve %  > ropy thereof ntx.n Claude M BartlM, 102 Calumel Hidg.. Miami r,2, Fla attorney, f--i plaintiff, MI aw ol August ham las the t nmplalnt win be taken aa nonfeaaed by you. Dated July II r B 1.1 N-I MKItM \.v rk "f the Clrcull Co rl (seal) Bj JOAN BNEEDEN, Denntv clerk. 7/S1. 8/7-14-21 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE is HEREBY OIVEN the undersigned, de*lrlrig to engage In business under the fictitious nai f MALANOA BAR at jnm Northwael Seventh Btreel intend* to reglst. name with the Clerk of the Court of Da.de County Florid i FR A N K I > I: V NI si i N -1 Of*** LBWIBON ft FREEH Attorneys for Petitioner 40 Industrial National Hank Itldg. 7/31. 8/7-11-1 ATTENTION ATTORNEYS! *• Jen i of Ik rMian •olicifs' rour legal notJcefeT We appreciate your patronage and guarantee accurate eenrice at leaai rotes • • Phone FR 4-4366 tor meMenger eervlee LKSAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE 18 HEREBY OIVEN that the undersigned, dealrlng to engage In liuslnes* under the fictitious name of SI'DS-1'K -DUD8 at 177". N.W. ".4th St. Mi.inn. Ma. Intend* to register aald name with the clerk of the i'ii cult Court of Dade County. Florida NIGHT AND DAY. IMC HAROLD A. OREENE Attorney for Night ft Day. Inc. 7/31. 8-7-11-21 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW that NOTICE IS HEREBY (1IVEN that the undersigned, deelrlna to engage in hu*lni %  under the ritltious name of MIAMI BEACH HEALTH ( I-'".*' Miami Peach. Dade County. M L'lrcuR Intend* I %  '"•",' ,'J 11 clerk of the Circuit Court "f Dade County, Florida ALBERT B. GILL. s,.ie Owner Til K'l "'Hi-: M Till'WHIN • At tot nev for Allart E. (llll d/h/a Miami Peach Health ( lub T'3lt ** 1*1** — %  CERTIFICATE OF IPORATE DISSOLUTION IE NAME AND BV THE IRITY OF THE STATE OF FLOR DA TO WHoM THESE PRESII M.I. COME. (JRBETINOB CKI.IA D, JARVIS. Mla.iillll'A, ERNESTINE C. MIAMI. FLORIDA; I1E.S1 i:\I.IAN, MIAMI. FLOP. ii the 29. ifiled In the office of the -f State of the Stale of i Convent of all the took|under the provision* of aald •'.•'8, H<>rlda Statute*, show.lutioii of such coriair[ therefore, the Secretary of i hereby oartlfi lo Ike fore|d that he la satisfied that the tits of law have been coinl WITNESS WHEREOF, I have ntu set in> hand and have I 'he Creat Seal of the State I'-rlda. at Tallahassee, the it.il this the SEVENTH day I 'UST. A.I' 15. R A. GRAY. -t.uv of State NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW %  NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVBN that .IK-in und.r the rictltio nil TIA8 at ST07-1I N W 27th Avenue. • end* %  %  • -glstcr nabl 8 ;\\ the Clerk "f the Court of Dade County, THE INTERNATIONAL AP.T SHOW '\"C a '"' ...ration B] PAIL W. WATSON. President MARVIN ALAN KOS.VLVN Attornej for The lnternuJ.ional An S'h... In. I/M-SI-SS, /4 IN THE COUNTY JUOOE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN PROBATE NO 47163 In RE: Estate of ANNA ROB EMI EC K Deceaaed. NOTICe TO CREDITORS To All Creditor* and All Person* Haing Claims or Demands Against Bald Estate: You are hereby notified and required to present any claims and dema-ul* which vou may have aealnt the estate of ANNA ROSENHECK. deceaaed late of Dade County, Florida, to the County Judges of Dade County, and file the same In their offices in the County Courthouse In Dade County. Florida, within elht calendar month* from the date of the first 8 iil.li. atlon hereof, or the same will be aired. ETTA WEI89BERQBR, utrix. RUBIN H. meral litalwp. )UNTS RECEIVABLE FINANCING IREHOUSE LOANS FACTORING ?MENT FINANCING >MMERCIAL PAPER TUxedo 8-7Wl N.W. 36th Street Springe. Florida H S GRUBER PRESICENT ^RGE J TALIANOFF JlRMAN OF THE BOARD IFONARD Attorney 1611 .Metropolitan Miaou I Hank Bide. I 'l-'.'l-M, /4 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW MOTH E is HEREBY UIVEN that the undersigned, desiring 10 en. business under the fictitious name ol M EHHHE1M HARDWARE CO., not INc t Ml N v\ %  7'-Btreet, Mann. K;..Ida Inti D to n name srlth the Clerk ol the Circuit Court ol Dade County, Florid MAX ERDHEIM OL \1'YS F. ERDHEIM %  •". ownei GOLDMAN -\ OODDSTBIN ItM w Flakier 81 Mtami, Attorm-ys for Reglsttant pi*. I/S4-S1, s/7-11 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that the undersigned, deslrlru; to .nitage In %  s under the t ine of SUMOPAMA intends to reghjt. name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. SLIM-I" P-SPI.K, IN'" HAROLD \ ORERNE Attorney for Bftm-Ur-Self In 7 II • 7-II-'.'! CIRCU.T COURT. 11TM JUDICIAL. CIRCUIT. DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA. CHANCERY No. S9C 7309 EVE MAE TEMPLE, Plaintiff. OBOROH p'-HN TEMPLE. Defendant NOTICE BY PUBLICATION YOC. BEORCE JOHN TEMP .H, \HDHESS UNKNOWN, are notified to sfrve a copy of your answer to the complaint on plaintiff* attorneys, Bnel and Housen, 3ui Blacftyne Huildlng. Miami. Florida, and file the original with the Clerk of the above styled Court, on or before Bepteirtoor Its, otherwise eotnptftiiM will be ..Messed In \ Oil I -1ted: July .11. 196S. r B LEATHBRalAN, Clerk of the Clrcull is.al) B) WM W BTOCKINO, Deputy Clerk I NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to enjtate In business under the fictitious name of OPM VENDOR BBRVICE at 15..6 SW Sth Street. Miami, Dade Counts Florida. Intends to register said name with the Clerk of theCircuit COU, • "HENllV iT'sOLL^Y sole Owner g/7 14 si .„ NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEKEI1V OTVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of IM'TT'S CAFE at 060 Pi'd Road, Mlami, Florida Intends to register said name with the Clerk of Hie circuit Court of Dade County. Florida. Court ot ^ WJ A ,.,,,,,-SKY S'-.IM Owner KESSI.ER. OARS ft ROTH Attorney* for Applicant 1998 SW 1st Street T'tt-*1. '7-M NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that the undersigned, desiring t-engage In business utid.r the fictitious name --• STATE MORTGAOE intends t-reg-id name with the Clerk of tin circuit I'IIU'I -if Dal.County Florida. SYl.Yl \ FEWISH FLORIDIAN at Fit 11.166 s>^



PAGE 1

f 1 Pore 8-B jhfe*/fcr***v rridQ yA qux u Knesset Eases Restrictions Against Arabs ,-. IT*. The Israel government moved this week U srisr.'SiKSssra — totricte %  to* UM eountiyi frnuers_ ^ PromUr David lion I'.urion over— JJt rnaS R i rtve-man the Communist Party revealed ml SmmW which rec his „,,k .ha. .< had droppedI from „!,,,;,, .brogation oi mOitary lts election platform a clause adu he treei accepted i vocsting tomtom ii emlw for „/,.,;,-: which stres-d Ik ,.,,,!> Arab WjtaUoo. The ae '.,"„, continued security me.s ,,.„,.,„ plank has bee. part of the 52 in the frontier *es and pre communist platform s nee 1957 Matting in New York City at the 64th annual national convenr:i of the Jewish War Veterans, the organization's national l ecutive committee last week appointed Joseph F. Ban (left). pasf national commander, to succeed Ben Kaufman, who is letting, as national executive director of JWV. Barr is CUTicntly national administrator of the veterans' organization. JLC Charges Soviet With Liquidating Jewry vention of Infiltration Despite the government action, the Knesset proceeded with consideration of < bill intro duced by the General Zionists calling for abolition of all emergency regulations, including the authority to maintain military government in the border lones. The National Religious Party and the Mapam ni Achdut Avo dan Parties supported the bill. Mapai, the Progressives and the right-wing Hervt abstained from voting, and tho bill was carried for its first reading. The Knesset vote meant little, however, except as an election campaign gesture, since Parlia nenl wM about to adjourn and the bill would die with the adjourn merit. However, it has caused lnction in side the party between Arab nationalistic leader.and leaders ol the Jewish section Instead of secesson. the Communta, J have inserted in their DSLH clause speaking vaguely?*! right, of the Arab peoVl 3 estine and of the right"^ T refugee* to retun tolij 4 NEW INFANT NURSERY J4-H0AJP CAM IT TA INO J licensed ty State WeHejf RABBI WANTED FOR NEWIY FORMED C0NCU6ATI0M in Central Florida, ISO families, younger generation, duties include teaching and orgonitina religioui school, la raply give %  ft, moritol stonis, ocodentk kockaround, salary expected, pulpit kockground. ADORESS RABBI ML P.O. MX 2973, MIAMI 1, Ft A. ARROWHEAD Day Camp COMPUTE CAMPING FACaJml FLORIDA CERTIFIED TUChj PRE SCHOOt THROUGH ttk *( RUTH BACK, DIRECTOf 4240 N.W. 18th Sfcaat NE 3-3134 !W YORK—The liquidation of r High and a:-.nds Temple 1 ..nu-El reUgi i school During the service. Lehrman will JOM nt Jon nth the Ner Tarn id DM al of the Boy Scouts of AmerB recognition of his 'outstandfa achievement in religious >" V" B addition to his regular Boy S t Troop, the Tern pie-sponsorTroop 65 will attend the Bar ah and presentation cere• -in appreciation of his ten M Den Chief of the pack." Jon is an accomplished sportsand the recipient of numertrophies for bowling and tenr i He is also a member of the M onal Rifle Assn. luncheon recepuon will be held is honor at the Algiers hotel i :wing the Temple senice who had no developed language or literature now enjoy both. But the only attempt to reflect Jews and Judaism in non-Russian is through a so-called "Book of Peace" issued by Moscow Rabbi Schleifer and a thin book on ^K>lem Aleichem. This is all that seems to be left of Jewish culture in the Soviet Union— once a thriving arena of Yiddish and Hebrew," Pat said. I'.il continued: "The Soviet exhibit boasts of school! and textbooks for its multi-lingual populace There are children*! books But th ere are no signs of Jewish schools or textbook.or children's literature "The Soviets claim that there are some 2.500 different titles pub lished in 86 different languages and dialects. Claims are made that there are 400.000 libraries of varied sizes and dimensions in the Soviet UlJon. There are 10.500 newspapers published in 67 languages according to the press information given out at the exhibition. Yet there Ino sin at the exKCDOrt Oil COLlf Ob hibit — which displayed a varied amount of newspapers in different languages — of a Yiddish newspaper. There is no sign of a Jewish library, or a Jewish theatre, or a Jewish school at the exhibit, al though other national language groupings are represented. APARTMENT TO SNARE Business women wishes to share apartment with some or University student. One block Miracle Mile, 3 buses, Sears t Stevens. CAll EVES or WEEKENDS HI 4-4929 WANTED %  EXPERIENCED YOUNG PERSON to direct social activities of ear youngsters and teen-agers. Mast have programing and previews experience with youth groups. Position is permanent. Write resume and salary desired. No le calls. Talianoff Will NOtTH DA0I JEWISH CENTEi 13600 W. Dixie Highway North Mia*, Florida Mr. Business H] & Mrs. Housewifil The Jewish Home in %  [ Aged, Thrift Shop, nosfe your furniture, appliance* clean clothing, lugcjao* drapa>s. lamps, dishes, pofc pane, silverware, shaeaj bedspreads, etc. All proceeds aoina towards At maintenance of oar dlstloowsW residence. THE HOME THRIFT SHOP I 5737 N.W. 27th Aw. Telephone NE 3-2331 Pleom Cadi as for Pict-as, PALMIST MADAM ROBERTS Indian ana advioor on all problems ml marriago. buoinoot All rtMnjil private and confidential at SS1S N.W. 7th Avenue Fee Aswasf w mont PL I MM "There is the clearest demonstration, the boldest underscoring of the liquidation of Jewish culture, of Jewish schools, of Jewish literature, of Jewish theatre, by the silence with which these once thriving institutions are treated by the administrators of the Soviet exhibition." Pat concluded. Monthly meeting of the Miami Beach Lodge of B'nai B'rith will be held at the Algiers hotel on Wednesday evening, president Irving Schatzman announced. Highlight of the meeting will be a welcome home to George Talianoff. delegate at the Supreme Lodge convention recently held in Israel Talianoff. who will report on the convention, us a past president of the lodge, past president of the State Federation of B'nai B'rith Lodges, and former chairman of the Na tional Commission of the Ann Defamation League. Plan Conference For Israel NEW YORK—Plans for Israel's industrial and agricultural develop ment during her second decade of statehood will be discussed at the national economic conference for Copstkks as Souvenirs m 10.000 sets of chopsticks been given away as sousenirs %  patrons of Luau restaurant. r Joe Cohen revealed this week. A surprising number of peoeat with the Oriental utensils. %  said, some showing consider skill Property used, choppromote slower eating and e thorough enjoyment of food. MV teak Smday t Miami Post and Auxiliary Jeans* War Veterans, wul Wij• Picnic Sunday. U: a.sa, at Craudon p tr k. PJ, r %  TEjajAJAIMt FOftM* Israel slated for the Hotel Sher man in Chicago. Sept 18 to 20 it as announced Wednesday bv Dr Joseph j Schwartz, vice president of the Israel Bond Organization The conference will launch the fall campaign for State of Lsraej Bonds which constitute the central channel for American invest. ment m laraaT, economv More Uun 750 Jewish leaders from com mumties ,n the Imted State, an 1 Serened **** '"* • Dr Yeshaiahu Foerder chair rvs^iaWSK Pens, is a member of the advisnrv councu of the Central Bank ^ 2 eJorT mber "•ii numerous Isr.eU corpor.Ss r SCHUROWITZ PRUDENTIAL AGENT m South Dado County M0 7 6041 WA NTKD HBIEVV SCHOOt TUCH11S. Port tiaaa. *PSh/ h r letter statianj ed.c.t..., re*, eronces, oaalifkatitaw, taachiaa ajs> aorience, talorv desired, ate. testa 2S" C mm '"*•• ,J ** "est tBia ^^^North Miaaoi, fU. QUALIFIED CANTOR Well trained tenor ,,*,, je^fc, mli !!!! *% n **^• treed M aaZ •• Call eveaeaft, Pi 4-OOSe •# •"• np.o. uu\m. mmZTnZ WANT TO LOSE WHCUT? SHI'S HCAITH 1 REDUCWC CEffl| New locafion I feoepaoat Lot Ua OIOCUOI Your ProoMoa ] With Vou Wl QUARANTEE RESULTS MIMTl Ae.. Meonti PI l-&nj LOSE WEIGHT MYPNOSn hot proven la kasj avOfwfacvocy swefiawa wt overwoiont, ssstakoaf. shin A va ri aa s y a y c ha s asaa t i r c sWa ts rsere aa sd fears i I. tOttMAKa, Ik.Nysaaa1Varaa>rst ft svvasai TV 7-UU, Eat %  INWANREADB ANi UVttOi Arevoeskti easpaNtotl wHti life? So. FAThMA, etJI NW 27 sea,Ml AVON CALLING S ^ n P" ^ aanJ as*. e*celleat M |,|, lr ,nii„i, L vAtuAju nnnoms OPCM MOST Call FR 1^407 H* APPOtajTnaWT ooifjajajjajnjjfjjjgaBn^a^ ^^^^ ^ETotcoaSow Studio of Modem Musk "fm fsVt ua **\ P1ASW-VOCJU s^TWICT* 1 Vote! Caa*dei**-Arraa|laj SIR JOHN HOTEL, S-ittf 27* M.W. ** i^^ ftaaklsaJJ*.' ^rf^rf^^ COMPLETE LAW Excel/tn. Iff PL 4-3705



PAGE 1

iday, August 14. 1959 +Je*lstJ rhrkflaw Page 5-A TO THi EDITOR [Reader Charges Columnist Distorted Byrnes Talk EDITOR, Th Jewish Floridian: Milton Friedman in his article. Inyrncs Reflects Bevin's AntiJewish Opinions," published in mr isue of Friday, July 24, is only inaccurate but unjust to great American, Judge James F. Jyrnes, of Columbia, -S.C., former oncressman. Senator, Secretary State of the United States, JusIce of the Supreme Court, and governor of South Carolina. The very first paragraph of Mr. triedman's article is without foundation in fact: "The anti-Jewish lilosophy of Ernest Bevin, the British Foreign Minister, is _.1ay being revived by James F. Jyrnes who, as American Secretry of State, dealt with Bevin on be Palestine issue." In other respects, Mr. Friedtan's comment is misleading in Quoting Judge Byrnes out of conext. I have procured from Judge Jyrnes a copy of his address to be Georgia Bar Assn. in Savannah. Ga., June 19, 1959, and am It pains to quote the paragraphs m which Mr. Friedman had bored statements: 'Our trouble with the Arab povernments it due not to segregation but support of Israel. I During the last war those governments cooperated with the [United States. After the war the Democratic knd Republican parties competing the votes of Jewish citizens [ave all-out support to increasing le immigration of Jews to what is v Israel. We encouraged the Establishment of Israel. We were lie first to recognize the new state. lat support brought to an end ir cordial relations with the Irabs. There is little hope of reconciling the Jews and Arabs. *ride of race and religion is inalved. The Arab governments do Dt allow a Jew to enter their jntries except temporarily, to LONG DISTANCE MOVING fo all points in tka country ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY GIVEN WITHOUT CHARGE ACE • R.B. VAN LINKS, INC. 2136 N.W. 24th Avenue NE 5-44*6 MIAMI visit relatives. The Jews have been persecuted for centuries, but by their courage and perseverance they have preserved the integrity of their race. Their people do not marry Arabs. The Jews and Arabs provide the outstanding examples of segregation. "It was a realization of the wisdom of segregating races that prompted 46 governments, including the United States, to agree in the Geneva Convention of. 1929 that 'Belligerents shall, so far as possible, avoid assembling in a single camp, prisoners of different races or nationalities.' "This action by so many governments of the world indicates that segregation -laws did not adversely affect our relations with other govi ernments." In commenting upon Mr. Friedman's article," Judge Byrnes has written to me as follows: "Upon reading what I said about the Arab nations, you will agree there is absolutely no justification for the criticism of Mr. Friedman. I He has deliberately quoted parts | of sentences in order to misrepresent what I said. "With regard to what he wrote of my position while Secretary I of State, at no time did I disI sent from the policy of the United States with respect to the increase of immigration to Palestine, and I do not even recall the Morrison Plan, which he says i was supported by me. The United States' policy was determined by President Truman and i provided for gradually increasing the number of immigrants. "Unable to point to an unfriend |ly word uttered by me as to Jewi ish aspirations at that time, he said, 'Byrnes opposed Jewish aspirations in other ways but remained generally discreet in his public statements.' He had to make this concession because it was impossible for him or anyone Company Announces Contest More than 2.500 prizes, valued | at $25,000, await employees of I Swift & Company and associated i units who submit the best entries in the firm's national letter writing contest, S. E. Meredith, man, ager of Swift's ice cream plant 1 announced Wednesday. The contest, to be held during August, will emphasize the importance and relationship between customers and jobs. BJM |fl quote an unfriendly expression-of opinion by me as-to Jewish aspirations." It is untfortunate that our Jewish columnists and writers, particularly those who pose as experts on segregation, the South and Israel, should juggle the truth even to the extent of misquoting dis tinguished Americans with the apparently avowed purpose of stirring up trouble. They would serve a more patriotic purpose if their pens were wielded in the cause of understanding and-good will amongst men of all races and creeds in America. HERBERT U. FEIBELMAN Miami Announce Way To tiefp Drain JW 8 Sinus Cavities ji Without Discomfort New %  •contestant taMet fir sims ceegestiM sefferen ecu tot h ti frail denei stan cavities eel reNfftv %  fstrusieg beef pete Nw Tork, N. Y. (Special) Announcement has been made of a new tablet development which has the remarkable ability to help drain cloned sinus cavities and thus relieve congestion and pressure. The headaches, pressure pains, stuffed-up head, nasal drip, clogged breathing-all the unrelenting symptoms the sinus sufferer knows so well —are attacked directly by improving drainage of the sinus areas. Moat remarkable of all Is the fact that this Is accomplished with extraordinary speed and without discomfort of any kind. This new tablet does its remarkable work internally, through the blood stream. It deposits into every drop of blood plasma • new medication which is carried to the sinus area, where it shrinks the swollen doors to the sinus cavities and helps drain away the pain-causing pressure and congestion. The shrinking substance in this new tablet has been so successful topically in promoting drainage of the sinus cavities that it is now prescribed more widely by doctors than any material for this purpose. This new medication is now available at drug counters without the need for a prescription under the name, Dristan* Decongestant Tablets. Dristan Tablets cost only 98* for a bottle of 24 tablets. Buy and use Dristan Tablets with the absolute guarantee that they will drain away paincausing pressure and congestion of the sinus cavities, relieve the pain and distress, or purchase price will be refunded. EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian: In Leo Mindlin's column of July 24, dealing with the Israeli sale of arms to Germany, Mr. Mindlin weighs the "divine duty to survive" against the moral scruples of the opposition to the deal, and he praises Prime Minister BenGurion for having struck "a gold mine, politically and diplomatically." He leaves your readers with the impression that those who object to the arms deal on moral grounds transgress against Israel's strugj le for survival, and that the arms deal was dictated by Israel's de| fense and diplomatic needs. The facts underlying the transaction will hardly bare out his contenI tion. The arms deal was, first of all, not a government-to-government issue, but merely a commercial transaction conducted between arms dealers. Originally, the German dealers concluded the deal for the mortar grenades with a Finnish manufacturing firm. Due to the relationship between Finland and the Soviets, the Finns could not ship the grenades to the Germans. The Finnish firm, however, having a financial interest in an arms factory of Solel Boneh in Israel, a Histadrut concern, turned over the contract to the Israelis. While, of course, the deal required the ap. proval of the respective governments, it was merely a routine matter and no diplomatic considerations were involved in it, according to the reports published in the Israeli press, which were not denied by official circles. It was further claimed that the French encouraged Israel to ship the arms to Germany. Gen. Koenig-was even quoted as having expressed himself publicly'in favor of the arms deal. This, too, was denied by the General, and no other French source was found to verify the claim. Mr. Mindlin's contention that, by dealing with Germany, "Israel established economic liason with NATO's cornerstone power on the continent," would seem to be based on a flimsy foundation. Another argument was advanced in favor of the arms deal, claiming that the Israeli sale of arms to Germany would be reciprocated by a German sale of heavy weapons to Israel. The truth, however, is that Germany today is not a manufacturer and exporter of heavy arms, and her own forces are supplied bv Amer ican French and Britisn stock. Bear in mind, also, that the Germans already announced that they are ready to buy arms from Nasser, if the price will be acceptable. i | Mr. Mindlin deals very lightly 1 with the moral issue involved in I Israel's shipping arms to Germany. However, if the material interests of the State of Israel are to override moral considerations, then the very basis for Jewish life in the world is profoundly shaken. Not only does this weaken our claim for sacrifices by Jews for the survival of Jewish life in all its aspects, but even the very basis for the existence of Israel and of Jewish communities the world over is being dealt a serious blow. f If political interests of nations, even national security, are considered to be above moral precepts, then the Jewish case in the world, including Israel's, is resting on a very weak foundation. This conception is certainly contrary to everything that net only the Zionist movement, but Jewry throughout its history, has maintained vis-a-vis itself and the world at large. As to the divine duty for survival, may I be permitted to remind you that the Jabotinsky movement was the first among all Jewish and Zionist groups to preach the moral imperative of preparedness for the defense of the Jewish people and the need for military action to gain Eretz Israel and statehood. At that time the people now presiding over the destiny of Israel were branding this idea as militaristic, chimeric and dangerous. Mr. Mindlin's rebuke that moral considerations were at the bottom of the "shock when Israel went to war in 1048 to assure her legacy; for Jews, it is argued, should possess little more than spiritual plowshares," can hardly be addressed to the disciples of Jabotinsky in the Herut Party in Israel. However, Herat's objection to the arms deal was consistent with its policy against dealing with Germany and is due entirely to the obligation of a people to maintain its moral integrity which, in the long run, determines its security and existence more than ma terial wealth and stocks of wea pons The revolt of the Irgun Zva. Leumi, Israel's War of Indepen dence and the Sinai campaign proved this conclusively. BEINESH EPSTEIN Executive Director United Zionists-Revisionists of America, New York City 55v^ww\^^v^w^^ TWIN CITY GLASS CO. eUAOANTfie MINORS STORI FRONTS FUsNITURE TOPS ^^ ANTIOUI MIRRORS ft RI-SRVfRwie aero etas* awrauio wu roe WATT 12M ie Street, MJ. Closed SaNreey. Tel Jf e-4141 #*^**w*^* ~ > ^m k ^ > ^>**^-%*~>***~*******~*^^^******^'**'* Registration Set At Ner Tamid Registration for the religious school of Temple Ner Tamid is scheduled for Sunday, Aug. 23. from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and will be open Sunday and daily thereafter. The expanded facilities of Ner Tamid religious school include modern, air-conditioned classrooms. Hebrew school will be open to children from eight years of age and over. Sunday school offers an integrated course, and is open to children five years of age and over. Rabbi Eugene Labovitz will be education director of the school. THEN TO TEL AVIV This is Tel Aviv's Golden Jubilee Year, and a golden opportunity for you to enjoy flying at its finest, KLM will speed you non-stop across the Atlantic on a luxurious, fourengine DC-7C (Kosher foods available on all flights). Then go direct to Tel Aviv. Or turn your trip into a grand tour with the KLM stopover plan. Visit London, Paris, Brussels, Vienna, Rome, and a host of other historic cities-at no extra cost I Round trip to Tel Aviv: $047.70 Economy. $1,308.80 First Class. Service from Houston and New York, too. See your travel agent or call KLM: Columbus Hotel, 308 N.E. First Street, Miami, Florida. FRanklin 3-8455. GOLDEN JUBILEE!



PAGE 1

August 14, 1959 +.lewisii ftcrldHan Page 9-A Services This Weekend vESHURUN. 17080 Collins Cc-eervalive. Rabbi Abraham Ion. Cantor Ben Zion Kirachen• rM ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle ave. >. Rabbi Isaac Ever. p.in. Kul >" a.m. (,,.' \voi "i fomforl .""I |'< 0,1 .• T.lu\ Mini V. rMCS. 8*33 SW 18th a v. prvMivt. Maxwell Silberman, ent. DAVID. 2435 SW 3rd ave. Con. itiv". Rabbi Yaatcov Rosenberg gr William W. Lipson. El 500 SW 17th ave. Orthodox Solomon Behlff. *i p.m. HiturHay 8:3n a.m. 'rnnfort Ye. My People." FM6THTI90 NW 2nd ave. r.v.-tive. Rabbi David W. Her.nntor Hymaa Fain. S ". p.m. finest nplrltiiBl leader 1 *hrnhtn Henwn. Sermon: ,.i : %  IrtVal* for Our Times" B.m. Sermon: "The Sabufurt." ISRAEL. 4000 PraIHe ava. Orx Rabbi H. Louis Rottman. JACOB. 801-311 Washington Orthodox. Rabbi Tlbor Stern. Maurice MamcheS. RAPHAEL. 186 NW Srd ava. pa Ramon. Cantor Sherwin SW ACADEMY. 818 8th at. OrRabbi Alexander Creaa. a —. AH REFORM JEWISH CONIATION. 1150 W. 88th at.. Ralm s. Rabbi Nathan H. Zwitman. a YOOO TEMPLE SINAI. 2030 I. Conservative. Rabbi David o. Cantor Yehudah Hallbraun. .ITE CENTER Siva SW 24th [Conservative. Rabbi Morton pSky. IH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid ava. Idox. Rabbi David Lehrfield. Abraham Self. : i %  ** %  p.in suiii'liiy 8:30 a.m. sabbath of Consolation." HEBREW CONOREOATION. 12th ava. Orthodox. Rabbi Hell Savllle. Cantor Berele nrr. I B in p.m. Saturday 8 a.m. Serf'l.l-. inac HKperlem-e %  8 ) flCELLO PARK. 184th at. and llth ave. Conservative. Rabbi Lipshiti. p.m. Saturday 8 a.m. SerrWcfkly Portion." H DADE CENTER. 136*8 W. hwy. Conaarvativa. Rabbi fy Okolica. Cantor Herman p hbcin-Marbiny p.m. Camp Avlr Rabbath spa KIT: Jerry Rarlnh. eavmp | i Cantor llai maa atarehnf'lclate In the abnem •• ot II ik..lira. H iturday 8 a.m. • |H SHORE CENTER. 620 75th at rvative. Rabbi Mayer AbramCantor Edward Klein. IWEST CENTER. 04SS SW 8th Conservative. Rabbi Maurice -E BETH AM. 5650 N. Kendall Miami. Reform Rabbi Herbert ignrd. Cantor Charlaa Kodner. p.m. Special %  ervtoe lo lb Am flrxt nnnlvermirv Temple. Robert H. Newman. em, lo officiate. BETH EL. 1646 Polk at.. Kw.cd. Reform. Rabbi Samuel -E BETH 8HOLEM of Holly 1725 Monroe at Conaarvativa bl Samuel Lerer. Cantor Ernest elber. 8 p.m. Rabbi Samuel Mendel,ilon director, to officiate Kililil I,erer. HatJLE BETH SHOLOM. 4144 Chase Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kroniab lor David Coitvlsor. Liberal. Rabbi Morris Skop. Cantor Herman Qottlieb. [hllfhts n lev Hi' i Mr* 11. Ion i 'ohen ami MrTl Mlnyoi a.m. Keaular i m. • —— TEMPLE NER TAMID. 80th st. ana Tatum Waterway. Modern Tradi tional. Rabbi Eugene Labovitx. Cantor Samual Oombarg. • TEMPLE SINAI NO. MIAMI. 12100 NE 15th ave. Reform. Rabbi Benno M. Wallach. TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB. 851 Flamingo Way. Conaervative. Rabbi Loo Helm. I'rl.l.iy 8:13 p.m. Cantor Samuel Lavlne to officiate In the absence of Rabbi Helm. at TEMPLE ZION. 5720 SW 17th at Conservative Rabbi Alfred Waxman. Friday 4:30" p.m. Saturday 8 a.m. Junior concreajatlon service follows. TIFERETH ISRAEL. 6600 N. Miami ava. Conaervative. Rabbi Harry L. Lawrence. Cantor Albert Qlantz. Friday :S0 p.m. Sermon: "Bo>k of IJeuteronomy." Onea; Shabbat howtw: Members of Sisterhood. Saturday 8 TORAH TEMPLE. 1254 West ava Traditional. Rabbi Abraham. Casaet Services Friday evening; and Saturday morning*. Dally prayer and meditation. YOUNG ISRAEL. 167*0 NE 10th ava Orthodox. ZAMORA JEWISH CENTER. 44 Z* mora ava. Conservative. Rabbi B Leon Hurwitz. Cantor Meyer Oiaaor. Tree And they all know al-so about the grapes, olives, almonds and figs, the pomegranates and the dates. In the Pentateuch already these are mentioned (told about). But recently the cultivation of sub-tropical and northern fruit trees has been expanding. Within a few years we shall have large rsn ns x-ria • ^ mm ,. _,. —. ,D"3n *?V DJ D'BIV ttffl %  r-: r -i : ,0TKnn ,n-Tj?i#. ,tPTO DT^S .onanm o-iiann 1 •• -1 • T %  I • T annna frmm TOT? ^K -a-to ns-^ "?ru pxa I I : ni*a? "? rrr nlmn VW \ T I • T -1 • T • T> • I I • V I DUX ,nl3-in D'pDIDX .ot^ n33 S7b*3 rftrm .D-i3i3 i 1a ff-Vnna • T I I \ • I T\H -as Dl0 n33 "2X onc^am ninan ^a bt Dan 'tl" "" T --.n"?xn V -" T quantities of apricots and pears, peaches and guavas, pineapples and apples, not to mention bananas which already grow in large quantities today. And the latest innovation, which we are beginning—cherries. "In my mouth I can already feel the taste of all of these wonderful fruiU." (Published by Brit Writ Olamit) More than 600 representatives of American Jewish communities presented $38,150,000 in cash collections against pledges to (he nationwide 1959 United Jewish Appeal campaign at the recent UJA national cash conference in New York City. Delegates passed a resolution urging Jewish communities in the United States to raise a like amount ol cash in the last half of F959, for a year's total of $75 million cash. Shown with symbolic check representing announced total at conference are fleft to right) Melvin Dubinsky. UJA national cash chairman; Morris W. Berinstein, UJA general chairman; and Rabbi Herbert A. Friedman, UJA executive vice chairman. Humane Slaughter Probe Aids Shechita KAMI MARir tAtVlfWCf Young Israel Chapter Forming Meeting will be held Sunday at the home of Jack Ciment, 1026 Euclid ave.. Miami Beach, for the purpose of discussing the formation of a new Young Israel chapter here. Twentylive representatives throughout Greater Miami are expected to attend the planning meeting, which will formulate plans for an open forum discussion Tuesday. 8:30 p.m.. at the Royal Hungarian restaurant. The Royal Hungarian meetingwilt be the site for the signing of the new Young Israel charter and election of officers. Ciment explained this week that he recently discussed the "great need" for a chapter with Rabbi Ephraim H. Strum, national director of Young Israel. The new chapter will be the second in the area, with one currently existing at 16T50 NE 10th ave Tifereth Israel Names New Rabbi Rabbi Harry L. Lawrence, of Brooklyn, N. Y., has assumed the pulpit of Tifereth Israel Northside Center, it was announced Wednesday by Herman W. Kutun, president of the congregation. Rabbi Lawrence served as area director for the Jewish Welfare Board-USO, and was executive director of Congregation Beth Sholem in Kansas City, Mo. A graduate of Mentclair State Teachers College, he was ordained at the Lubavitch Seminary in Brooklyn. He has served congregations in Hackettstewn and Summit, N. J., and was chaplain of Selinsgrove State School at Solinsgrove, Pa. Rabbi Lawrence is a veteran of World War II, with four and a half years of service in the U.S. Air Force. Rabbi and Mrs. Lawrence have taken up residence at 94 NE 68th ter., Miami. He and Mrs. Lawrence are the parents of four children, Geoffrey, 14. Sheldon, 9, Joseph, 6, and Beth Lee, 4. He succeeds Rabbi Abraham Herson. NEW YORK—(JTA)-A research study, sponsored by American Jewish communal and religious agencies, is underway to determine whether modern methods of prehandling food animals for slaughter are humane. The study, sponsored by the Joint Advisory Committee of the National Community Relations Advisory Council and the Synagogue Council of America, is part of an overall program to protect Shechita, Jewish ritual slaughter, in a recent wave of federal and state efforts to pass humane slaughter legislation. A federal measure became law. on Aug. 27, 1958. Since then, usually under sponsorship of local Humane Societies, humane slaughter bills were introduced in 16 state legislatures and passed in three, California, Minna seta and Washington. Local Jewish communal and religious organisations testified before legislative committees in opposition to such legislation, except in the state of Washington, where the -E B-NAI SHOLOM 16800 NW fid ava. Conservative. Rabbi Son Edwards. Cantor Ban Qressh-E EMANU-EL. 1T01 Washinglave. Conaervative. Rabbi Irving rm.in. Cantor Israel Raich. [LE ISRAEL. 137 NE 16th at. Rabbi Joseph R.. Narot. or Jacob Bometetn. re JLE JUDEA. Ua Palermo ava. CANDLEUGHTING Tim 10 Ab — 6:36 pan. ... Temple Zion Registration Open Registration for Hebrew and j Sunday school, which will commence Sept. 8. is now open at Temple Zion. The Temple office is open dailv from 9 to 5 and on Sunday until noon. Addition to the school's facilities are two school busses. Transportation will be provided in most areas. Staff will this year be exclusively made up of licensed teachers, with the system under the authority of Rabbi Alfred Waxman, spiritual leader of Temple Zion. The school has been an affiliate of the Bureau of Jewish Education for the past eight years, and last year boasted a registration of over 200 students in its Hebrew department. An even larger registration is expected this year, according to Rabbi Waxman. Beth Jacob Lists Education Slate Registration for daily Hebrew and Sunday school is now open at Beth Jacob Congregation. 301-311 Washington ave., Miami Beach. Hebrew school classes commence Sept. 14. and students mus register during August, Morns Krevat. chairman of the board of education, and Morris Fogel. cochairman, announced Wednesday. "We will not accept students for Bar Mitzvah unless they have had two years of Hebrew study," the co-chairmen warned, adding that "all Bar Mitzvah applicants will be cleared" by Beth Jacob spiritual leader Rabbi Tibor Stern. Sunday school opens Sept. 20, with registration in August and September. Boys from 5 to 7 and girls from 5 to 8 are eligible. Rabbi Stern will initiate a class for Bar Mitzvah graduates this fall. Students advanced in Hebrew and Talmud will be eligible to register in the Beth Jacob Hebrew High School department. Krevat and Fogel also revealed that the congregation's educational program for youth will include a junior congregation Sabbath mornings at 9:15 a.m.. Sabbath cultural class for high school students, and Tallith and Tefillin Club Sunday mornings under the direction of Rabbi Stern. Jewish community was caught napping and the bill was passed without testimony from local Jewish groups. The federal measure and most of the state proposals specifically declared Shechita to be humane but in almost all cases, the problem of pre-handling was treated in such a way as to carry a threat that Shechita would be impossible. None of the three states which have passed humane slaughter measures has created such prehandling problems but the threat continues. The Joint Advisory Committee therefore undertook the study, noting that the Talmud bans cruelty to animals in all circumstances, including both pre-handling and slaughtering. Joint Advisory Committee officials pointed out that traditional Jewish pre-handling of animals for Shechita was manual and designed to insure that the animal did not suffer in being prepared for Shechita. Modern automation in packing houses has been applied to pre-handling in such forms as hoisting and shackling for both regular and Jewish ritual slaughtering. Joint Advisory Committee officials pointed out that it has never been established whether such methods of pre-handling are painful to the animal. The research study was undertaken to determine this. If this scientific study finds more humane practical forms of handling animals for slaughter, then the Jewish organizations will recommend the alteration of pros•rtt met nods. If existing pre-handling methods are found to be humane, then the Jewish organizations will urge, as in the case of Shechita, that such methods of handling also be recognized as humane in federal and state legislation. Civil Service Group Meeting Miami chapter of the National Welfare of Jewish Civil Service Employees will meet Sunday, 1:30 p.m., at 1540 SW 29th ave., according to an announcement this week by Robert Kanzer, organizer. Beth Am Will Fete Anniversary First anniversary at Temple Beth Am will be celebrated with a membership brunch Sunday at an open house 10 a.m. to 12 noon. New members of the congregation and guests will be invited to join in the celebration, and will be welcomed by Rabbi and Mrs. Herbert Baumgard. They will be escorted through the Temple. Also open for the vistors will be the newly-completed Mark Light Memorial School bldg. The modern 18-Classroom school will accommodate a nursery and kindergarten, and will have over 500 children attending classes in Hebrew, Sabbath and Sunday school this fall. Cantor Sheldon Kodner will offer a varied program of songs.



PAGE 1

+Jewlstnorklian Frido Y Auqu* *WJConqress At Stockholm Eyes Top Jewish Problems 7bcbj "^ *^ _., J ... .„ Fvm distribution of anti Jewish Utera-. tween Jewish cin. ^H By EDWIN EYTA.N STOCKHOLM—< JTA >-The fate and future of the Jewish million* in the Soviet Union hung over the A^emalx of the World Jewish Congress here this week as 300 Jewish leaders, representing communities in 40 countries, debated the main issues facing the Jewish lions in which he expressed the belief that followin* his recent talks with Chancellor Adenauer of West Germany, en early erran9ement for German compensation to Jewish victims of Nat's in Poland and Rumania was in view. An Italian delegate. Dr. S. Canv resident in Egvpt distribut.on 01 ami %  **., „.-. ,wn, jewisii citlw jovs who ere resmeni 'n VH various countries, the countries and their reLS had been able o^their^righ £re ^^ ^ ^^ „ under these agreements Dee-. ^ ^ ^ ^^ sharett „„ nations. institutjnn ,„„,„ f Sm ££ 'E. ;h:\:.d ,,, n;'vT";' s .'br"ea re "er £5Sffis *£3£i*33 Semitic literature in various counnation of racist material on m m • ternational scale. ndrr these agreements because wonu Jr. !" ""he" face msurmountable obs.asaid there was ,,: on the part of the Egyptian ant,-Semi jc organ, '.h.rinps Stateless Jews, fore t.ons or indn Tuat prooiems 01 JCU "• laonsnmeni 01 israeu uipiumain. Dr. Nahum Goldmann. president relations ,th Germany Speaker, of the WJC led off the discuss, !" from Israel and Belgium sharpl> :..._„: ', ,K„ L_Ui c—. cnticued the Israel Government with an appeal to the Soviet Gov ernment to grant Jews in the Sov iet Union at least the same rights winch the Jews enjoy in Communist Poland. He pointed out that li Sl l^ ,he ,d <* ship between Israel and ta pora in the organizauonah There were funct,onj of Fife which lay outside th, ^ Israel affairs, he s,d n?T other hand, there were' activity which are the prerogative of the State N he stressed. Sharett told the Assent j for th arms rleal and asked I vears. repon sia^-u. !" .......~.• ~~ { polemics about the futtsW £ israeltovtrlent r££e s While this report was under d,srallies m negotiat.ng jn intern.^I e nc of ., 0(J(side £ decision to sell arms to Germanv lu .Mon. ant.-J e w s h literature t.onal conyent.on to <*' J^this { c demic Even the ^ Rabbi Max N'ussbaum. of L^s onginatinpeople-today and fussed the ^ supp0 rt e ^-^^^^^^r^;,^ tha^a Governments had inv.ri.bl problems of Jewish Ufe. tabhshment of Israel, diplomatic [J^g^*,; lntern a„onal com( pjved World Jewish Congress mcrce in ant, Jewish literature representations on such litersture h;., developed in the last fe with 'the utmost sympathy." the report stated. Admitting the diffi with t h e notorious problem, the World Jewish Con-; prophet of the ultimate a Einar Aberg, gress experts had consistently ; liquidation of Jewry outua* •miffs? i irs ssL-JS. OTSSJSTS < !" u •• %  %  %  a, 5 *a*-*-aM5S£5 is^' J stas zsttZ** the Jews in Poland were allowed Ang Swedish anti-Semite, Einar Aberg. gress expert to group themselves within a Jewish Cultural Union, to publish Jewish books and newspapers, and thev chose to go. He demanded course as a:a t-nme Minister w — r• %  •• % % % %  --j-j f h nnnstinn the DnnciDle of the hat the Soviet Goverrune. How v,d Ben-Gunon on selling arms to Sweden during the period of th. ^^ !" ^**%S ££ process would stretch over J calculable stretch of time." the same rights to Jews in the Germany. Soviet Union. "Poland can serve as an example for the Soviet Government," Dr. Goldmann declared. He emphasized that other Communist countries — even some that had stopped Jewish emigration—were giving the Jews more freedom in their communal activities than Moscow. An impassioned plea for resump tion of Jewish emigration from Rumania was voiced at the session by Dr. Walter Abeleff. of Israel. Pointing out that he was speaking •"without partisan feeling>." Dr. Abeleff emphasized "the tragic and painful problems" resulting from the closing of Rumania's doors to further Jewish emigration toward brad. "Relatives are besaid that while ln 8 separated from their famili \ -%  nibly. Dr. Abraham Schwartz, of Uruguay, told the delegates that diplomatic representatives of the United Arab Republic, who have substantial funds at their disposal, are organizing press conferences i n Latin American countries and are issuing free ticks to Latin American journalists to visit Europe. governments to cooperate in protecting the rights and security of those threatened by such propaganda from abroad.*' the report stated. A discussion on the role of Israel in Jewish life was sparked by a warning from Mr. Sharett on the declared it was impost concept of a "partnership" arJews outside Israel to prtpm rangement He declared that "Isprogram or plan of action racl should not interfere in com-j in some way or other, n munal affairs of Jewish communi; or programs have a reli Dr. Salo Baron. Profe. Jewish History. Literature i stitutions at Columbia Ua expressed belief that "bran] continue with the ingathehaj] the exiles, not only in the i sense but also in the u sorbing the fruit of world i Israel M. Sieff. chairman i European executive of the Dr. Goldmann said that while mg separated from their fam;: Reviewing the work of anti the anti-Jewish persecutions and he stated, "husbands from wive-. Semitic groups who concentrate on ties or in the normal relations bewith Israel." deportations of the Stalin era had parents from children." He urged — I ised in the Soviet Union, the the Assembly to reiterate the present regime there did not bestWorld Jewish Congress "basic tate to use "very strong measures views regarding the necessity of indeed '" He warned against execsth e reunification of families." live slogans and exaggerations A review of the Jewish nation which, he said, played into the ln Mos i em countries was prHe appealed for a ed t0 the A ssemblv bv A L. EastSoviet hands policy based on "reason." calm ness and the estimate of what thf Jews in Russia really wanted. He voiced his belief that the situation of the Jews in the Soviet Union "is erman. political director of the WJC He pointed out that'Jewish emigration from Morocco is at present at a complete standstill and asked the Assembly to deal rii ficult but not desperate. He vith l hii problem without ,„„,„„. told the Assembly that the relaxa The need o( con,,^^ of neg0 tion of tensions between East and tlations wllh he Moroccan author WM would improve their s.tua!tlv< mu t be kept m mmd ,, e tion and would also benefit Israel ald „ we „ a the delicate p^,. Moshe Sharett. former Israel tion of the Jewish communities in Premier, addressing the AssemMorocco. "Protests." he stated. My, demanded that Soviet JewTy will not help. What is needed are THRIFT IS ALWAYS %  v IN STYLE be allowed to become "an integral should be permitted "actively and should be permitted to "actively legitimately" to participate in the activities of the Jewish people as a whole. Condemnation of the Soviet treatment of Jews was voiced by Shad Polier. of the American Jew ish Congress, replying to a speech by a member of the five-man team of observers from Poland who at tacked Israel for its "link-up with the Western world." "It was sad." Polier said, "to listen to a fellow Jew who looked askance only at the West while forgetting the grave tragedy of diteJ^SU 'S #sT £"" lino aism,e Sraton of the Egyptiar m the Soviet Union tod*ay "is"a"new %  Je *' 1 sh communit >Following per patient and fruitful negotiations With regard to Tunisia, the WJC official reported that the pledges given by the government there in respect of Jewish rights, as well as the right of emigration, had been observed. World Jewish Congress leaders have also been assured recently by the Tunisian Government that the membership of Tunisia in the Arab League should not be taken as indicating "automatic acceptance of the League's policy against Israel." The report also dealt with fhe Russian Jewry. What b happening j£|2? in the Soviet Union today is a new c „„,„_. Phenomenon without any parallel T^Z, !" aiu r S **£ f rc d in Jewish history. It is something \ e lT^ h J T? ^ 2 00 worse than anti-Semitism. It SIf^*..**?***—• anti-Jewishness. It is a very dan?:'*" "?*• Jews now live in Egypt. "They • • • 1 t • | tj • • • •! worse than anti-Semitism. It paign of 1956. only about 10.000 gerous and assiduous campaign to Lwl-S! ^u TV carve out part of the Jewishpeo'" £ "I'V 'V. 0 ma,n,a,n Q Pie from the rest of their breth *?*£• "1 '"Millions ttemmy ren." i 0 **"* the continuity of an elementary Jewish existence. The The recent transaction in once great network of Jewish in which Israel sold munitions to stitutions has disintegrated, and the West German Government one ** another they have pas-. was sharply attacked and equal** ou of Jewish hands." Mr. Eas ly strongly d efended in the pienterman reported. ary debate. This discussion folAlthough the British and Fr...K onermaTcomL 0 ^"^^ ^ ""^ "ZlToJ !" rman compensat.on ou~ mrnts neither BnUsh nQr ^^ Over the years many things go out of style." But saving money never becomes old fashioned, especially at FLAGLER FEOEJLAL SAVINGS. At Flagler Federal your money earns a generous dividend of 4% and when you open a savings account you will receive one of these beautiful gifts* Free. *• ~£l7 n lVo^ H OS CL !" • .-i-M-W. ...n....Aec-r. af-H • ARPECE PERFIME BY LASiviw dc.jnrd bycstTita. LA>V N — Perse ssse sat beautiful gold and Mack lacoa r,i NEW "COUNTS OF $100 OR MORE GORDON FU NERAL HOM E •••A. {•••, j.,,1,, fwmnl §im FR 3-3431 FRanlJin 9-1436 710 S.W. 12th Ave. Mioml JUMT MtOON. rVwWe* WaOttOat.feweiiV.cto, FREE TRANSFER OF FUNDS r, )"" Pb*A. The PIFCE TABLEWARE SET • THRrB LIBBEY CLASSES • ISK COFFEE RRO ELECTRIC COFFEE PERCOLATOR. So.,.,, Actaeats ••taee'eaer aafere the lOta •ore frt tat |ej the eaticipatte rat* of t* RrtaXH • %  J-kere 1 Ae United States, jest brief %  •' %  *' •"*"* %  •• Wf hah. car. ef all ih. Ma •


PAGE 1

t, August U. 1959 -JewlstifhrldHan Pag 11 E Wisher Schocken Buried in Israel few YORK-r< JTA) >. B y£'3l f %  ocraphcr and long-time Zionluho died last weekend of a attack in Switzerland, will place in Israel, it waa anIced Sunday by members of imily. Mr. Schocken, who was Jled from Nazi Germany in [to Palestine. He came to the Id States in 1940 and acquired fcnship here. i owner of a chain of departstores in Germany before IT came to power, he alao youndgd. the^er^inSchocken pub ,' iismng house in 1931, devoted to the publication of books of Jewish knowledge. After he left Germany, he founded in 1936 the Schocken Publishing House in Tel Aviv, which is now operated by members of his family, including his son Gustav, publisher of the Haaretz, one of the leading newspapers in Israel. In New York, ha founded Schocken Book*, Inc., in 1M5, which published books by Jowish authors and on Jowish subjects. Lie Katz [ad at 77 lENOS AIRES—(JTA)—Pinie the noted Yiddish writer, here at the age of 77. He was bf the founders of the Yiddish "Di Presse," and was an of the paper for more than lars. tn in Russia, he emigrated to Lrgentine in 1888. He was the ir of "The History of Argenlewish Journalism" and also lated into Yiddish Cervantes' [Quixote" and several famous %  tine works. Katz had greatly contributhe Jewish cultural developof Argentine Jewry, espem the years after the First I War. He was considered a linger, but in his early years ccntina he was a member of loale Zion.Hhop. Surviving arc bar husband. Sum; two brothers. Holly unit Simon Isaacs: and a sister, Mr*. I.llllc Kline. Service* were Aug. S HI Gordon Funeral Home, with burial in Ml Nebo Cemetery. WILLIAM EISNER •1, Of M? NW 4th st., died All*. 7. He came her* 20 years ago from Now York City, and wax an electrlclan. Surviving are his wife, (Vila; son, Harold, daughter, Mm. Ann Stone: and a brother and sister. Services were In New York, with local arrangements by Riverside Memorial phapcl*. ADOLF HOFFMAN 73. of 10S5 PennKylvanla ave., Alad Aug. He was a retired necktie manufacturer, who rame here -Ix years ago from New York City. Sfcirvlvlng are his wife, Rose, and two daughters. Mrs. Beatrice Sofer and Mrs. Bernlce Ilorwltz. Services were Aug. 7 at Riverside Memorial Chanel, Washington ave., with burial In lakeside Memorial Cemetery. More than 70 books have boon published by the Schocken enterprise in New York. His private library of over M,000 volumes of Jewish and world literature is housed in Jerusalem. It includes a large collection of rare manuscripts, incunabula and early prints. Schocken held honorary doctorate degrees from the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion and the Jewish Theologi cal Seminary in New York. In 1933, Schocken was elected to the executive committee of the tfebrew University in Jerusalem and from 1935 to 1945 served as its chairman. When the Nazi party rose to power in 1933, he had realized that the very existence of German Jewry was doomed and, from then until the beginning of World War II, he made use of all the resources at his disposal to provide both physical and spiritual help to German Jewry. A Zionist since his early youth, he was a member of the board of directors of the Jewish National Fund. It was due to his efforts that the territory of the Haifa Bay area, so essential to the development of modern Israel, was acquired. • Hi Jacob inder Dead lie! Guttman, 66, of 5101 SW died Thursday. Aug. 3 ((".uttman came here 37 years >m New York, and was one founders and first secretary Ih Jacob Synagogue. Iginal services of the conation were held at Ms butchop on Miami Beach before Jacob was built. iving are his wife, Helen; )>i; David and Louis; daugh Id seven grandchildren, rices were Aug. 7 at Newfuneral Home, with burial in If David Cemetery. LOUIS LUBOVITZ 80. of 3900 Collins ave., died Aug 7 He cam, lure eight yean ago from Chicago. There are no local survivors. ea and burial were In Chicago under the direction of Riverside Hemortal chapels. American Jewish community aid to help provide educational facilities for Israeli teen-age youngsters is discussed by (left to right) Ira Guilden, Dr. Dewey D. Stone and Dr. Joseph I. Schwartz at the recent dinner for Boys Town Jerusalem honoring its Golden Founders. Guilden, president of Boys Town Jerusalem, is also national campaign chairman for State of Israel Bonds. Dr. Stone, board chairman of Weizmann Institute of Science, is also national chairman of United Israel Appeal and vice president of Zionist OrganJeation cd America, and Dr. Schwartz is executive vied president for State of Israel Bonds. The institution; located in the Bayit V*Gan suburb of Jerusalem, is conducting an expansion program to provide hundreds of Israeli youth with a comprehensive program of vocational, academic and spiritual training. RS ANNE OROSSBERG [1421 Kuclld ave., died AUg. 1. %  resident of Miami Beach | %  •.. -. coming from New York. time of ber death, she was |led with the Swim Fair BbOP, -urvlved by her husband. ton, Robert; two brothers, id William Kinvbrunner: and It Mis. Minna Kati. Services l"K 10 at Hellman Funeral k. with burial In the Knight of S. lion (IT Ml. Sinai tVmcOLLIE LEWIS I VI W 42nd st.. manager of '•nial I'untlsc Co.. died Aug. 9. lie here five years ago from Surviving are his wife. Ida; lerome; two daughters. Mrs. Kink and Mrs. Shirley Malkin. -in and six grandchildren. were In Chicago under the of New nnn Fu neral Home. [RS. SYLVIA BECKMAN* I.-'3 sW Had ter.. died Aug. 7. • to Miami from Chicago IT Igo. She was ..wrier and operi-'innVa Custom Ceramics MURRAY ROSEN M. of !'' M.-.an .Ir dlatT Anfc ''. II. came here 11 yea igo rrom Brooklyn. Surviving an hi* wife, Sail) son: and two daughters, Including i. N V with local .u ft) Riverside Memorial Chapel MRS FRANCES B. KOTT M. of 147.". Alton i.i aleia Aug :: while vlsltlnu In Loa Aneelei Hh< came here :~ ears ago rrom ejeo York City. Survlvlng_ V' n r husband* luls; two none. Seymour and Irwln; four brothers and three sisters. Service,, were Aug. 7 at Rlveralde Memoilnl Chanel. Alton rd. MRS. RUTH PRICE IS, of 120V Collins ave.. died Aug. 4. She came here two years ago from New York. Surviving are two nieces, Mrs. Ruth Morrle and Mrs. Henrietta Schneider. Services were Aug. 4 at Newman Funeral Hotne, with burial in Mt, Sinai Cemetery. J M. came here 16 years ago from Brooklyn, and wan a in.inl.cr ..t the .Odd Follow. Surviving arc his wife. -Mary: f,,ur SHM, Samuel, Joseph, lullaa and Louie: an.I a daughter, Mrs lie also leaves • brother, II grandchildren, ami gig rrandchildren. Service* were Aua '• .i %  lordm Iuneral Home, erlth ML sinal i' MAX ROSENBLUM :• alea Am I. from Hartford, Ci nn .n h In* ier, Mi Eleanoi i;. i. %  Sei vice* and b trial ere in Hat tford. with Is b) Riverside MeChattel NATHAN SIEGEL •7, owner of the Cadet hotel, died Am.4 while visiting In New York. He came here 2H years ago from New York and lived at 445 l.enox ave. Surviving are his wife. Rose; three daughters. Including Mrs. Harriet Dockson; a sister and seven grandchildren. Services were Aug. at Riverside Memorial Chapel. Washington ave. JACOB TEITEL 13. of 1421 SW 22nd ter., died in New York Aug. 5. He .came to Miami from New York eight years ago. Surviving are his wife, Rebecca; aon; two daughters. Mrs. Bernard Tytell and Mrs. Sylvia rienandes; brother, tfoeee Teltelbaum; sister and six grandchildren. Services were Aug. 7 at Gordon Funeral Home, with burial In Mt. Nebo Cemetery. OR. MARK HARTFIELD IS. of 4001 ITalrle ave., died Aug. 4. He came from Detroit nine years ago and was a Mason, veteran of World War I, life member of the Jewish War Veterans, and a member of the American Legion. Surviving are a brother, Ben. and sister Bel Titan were Aug. 7 at Ittv.r-idc Memorial Chapel. Alt"n rd., with buriul In Mt. Nebo Cemetery. CHARLES TANENBAUM |v "' lied Aug. n. A baher, he came her* l\ from Hartford. Survivors Include £ wife, Dorothy, services were, in Hartford, with local arrangements by Itiverslde M OB a Urto l Chap.] MEYER WEINBERO 8Z. of 1414 Collins ave., died Aug. 4 A retired dry goods merchant, he came here "even years ago from Chicago. Surviving Is a daughter. Mrs. Hose Borr. Services and burial were In Chicago, with local arrangements by Rivet side Memorial Chapels. ABRAHAM WINTZ SI, of ttel Alton rd.. died Aug. 4. He was a retired, builder, who came here six years ago from Manchester. Conn He la survived by a son, Ixiuls. Services were Aug. r> at Riverside Memorial Chapel. Alton rd., with burial In Lakeside Memorial Park. MRS. IDA OREENSTEIN 77, of 7>s Pennsylvania ave., died Aug. T She came here 10 years ago from New York, and was a member of Workmen's Circle. Surviving are her husband, Isaac, and a daughter, Mrs. Bertha Bernstein Services were In New York under the direction of Riverside Memorial Chapel. ABRAHAM BARATZ 7S, of 347 Washington'ave., died An* LOW COST HOME LOANS To Buy, Build or Refinance laajalrios Invitee 1 e Ne Obltfetloat Cetehrotlaf ear 2Sta Anniversary YeesT %  I5ade Federal &.B. 2nd Ave, Miami intends to reg. -aid name *iih the Clerk of the %  ill Court of Bade Conntv, KUtt'll.UAjl II SP1RF.K WIIJ.1A.M I RRBNNKR Attorn ipt)IIcant 120 I. t .aTH-H-t< '• 4 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HKKl.l:. rH\ KN the enttage in busln. %  ... mt -f TK1. ANSWI'ltl'llMV SI'. ICE .'I. IV i >.'. TEL. \NSWKI'.i\. 1 VICK .'i.i i: r.Kl. i'KI. TPHON'B HI :i;\i. 'i: ci.i'it Intends .'. r.-r names with the Clerk of the i"lrc,.iirt of I'a.io County, an. other port! of the Slate of Mori PARAMOUNT ABV'ERTIHIK 1M'|;I.IC IIKI.ATM INS & PROMOTIONS, IV.' V l(-L'l-'.' • 5 Convmhnt Offices Sgrvg Dooej County JvESQURCES EXCEED 190 MILLION DOLLAI MRS. ESTHER K WERTHEIMEB 71, of ISO S Shore dr.. died Aug. 2. She came here five years ago from New York. Surviving are her hust.ahd; BeTt; son, Lee K. Bendhitm. and a sister, Mrs. Rose K. Oreenwald. Bervlcea were In Wilmington. Del., under the direction of Riverside Memorial Obajeal, MRS. ROSE SMLIVEK N, of 17M NW 1st St.. died July ?•. She waa a member of Hadaaaah and Golden Ag* Friendship Club, and came here fr. no New York 12 rears. ago. Surviving are a son. Alan; daughter. Mrs Judith S West: brother. Joseph Klein; two sister*. Including Mrs Evelyn Kohn; and three lul> M :.n Kuneral Home, with burial In Mt flffl Cemetery. 'Noose' Hits Proposal WASHINGTON — (JTA) — The House Judiciary Committee struck from a pending Ciwl {Lights Bill this week a proposal by Pre Eisenhower for a commission to enforce non-discriminatory practices in employment on government Dutch Minister Resigns THE HAGUE—(JTA)—Sydney J. van den Befgh, Minister of Defense and the only Jew in the Dutch Cabinet, sent his resignation to Queen Juliana here last weekend. The resignation was caused by personal reasons. Mr. van den Btrgh's name figured last week in a divorce case in San Diego. Calif. Mr. van der Bergh is a retired Major-General in the Dutch Army, and was formerly paymaster general for the Army. Yeshiva Opens 73rd Year NEW YORK — When Yeshiva University opens its doors this September to inaugurate its 73rd academic year, and its 14th year as a fully-fledged university, some 4,500 young men and women will gather from all corners of the globe to form the largest student body in the history of the American Jewish community, according to Dr. Samuel Belkin, president ..: the university IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN ANO FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE No. 46904-B IN RE: Estate of SA.M YI;;I:I.. >WITZ a/k/a SAMUEL YEGBLOWITZ, 1 '.eased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persons Having Claims or Itentanda Against Said Estate: You are hereby notified and required to present any claims and demands which you may have against the estate of SAM YEOBt-OWITZ a k a. SAMCEl, TEi;El>>WITZ. deceased I.i.of Pad* County. Florida to the County Judges of Hade County, and file the same In their offices In the County Courthouse In Uade County. Florida, within eight calendar monttis from the date of the first publication hereof, or the same will be barre>' KKWARD ItOSEN, Exerutor KV'll. V.VDER A TENI>R1CH Attorneys 111 1-incln Road Miami Beach. Florida '14-21-2* I NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, -No. 5C 7428 BETTY BCRKETTE DBFS, rialntiff, CARL L I'EKs. Defendant •UIT FOR DIVORCE TO: A IV 2 Carl 1. Decs N ART C c/o Aircraft Maintenance Naval Air Station Memphis. Tennessee You are herebv notified that a I'-lll of Complaint for Divorce has beee filed eTgalnst you, and v..u are required to serve a copy of your Answer or Pleading to the Bill of Complaint on the plaintiff's Attorney, SIDNEY M. ARONoVlTZ. 1001 Alnsley Building. Miami 32, Florida, and file the original Answer or Pleading In the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before the Tth day of September, 1.">. If you fall to do so, Judgment by default will l.e taken srainst you for (he relief demanded in the Mil of Complaint. This, notice shall be published once each week for four consecutive weeks In THE JEWISH Fl t "RUM \ N DONB AND i.RHKRBn at Mhti Florida, this 5th day of August. A D, BJas E B .i' \ HERM \N. <-lerk. Clr. Florida (seal) K M l.YMAN. Depot? Cleric 14-a-M TtjGVJST BROS R> 7 'is NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW •• in tikS MIAMI BEACH



PAGE 1

Friday, August 14. 1959 +Jewl§tirk>rldnan Page 9-B JAMES UtVMY Moscowifz Will Speak Kmil Moscowilz will be guest I speaker st Saturday morning servlices in the Sterling hotel. Moa[cnwii/ is founder of the New JerCarpet Company. ALIEORNJA'S SANTA MONICAS nd N8W TOWER California'! WorldImogi R*wrl overlooking th. tlu. Pacific *r* Wilihir* m**ti th* a. Tw*nty minut*. bm lnt*rnolionol Airport. 440 Ivnuriov. Dmi and bungalows, all with t.l.viftton and] dio. Complete convention facilitiot. ionquot pmi lor up to 2,000, air-conditionaal. Exciting V.n.tian Room and Canton*** Room. Swimming pool Boawliful ground* and i landxop*d gardens. Ratal from IS. W.,l. William W. Donn.Hr, G*n. Mgr. Iron lh. U.S.A. and in HAWAII MASSAGLIA :REST OF GOOD LIVING JOSEPH MASSAGUA, JR.. Pr.iid.nt | MASSAGLIA HOTELS —— SANTA MONICA. CAUF. H*i.l Mlr*m*r SAN JOSE. CAIIP. Hotel S*l*t* CUIre > IONS iEACH, CALIF. Hotel WIIIM I • SAllUP. N.M. Hotel El fanch* • AllUOUHOUE. Hotel Fr.ci.<.* • DCNVir.. COIO. Hotel Part l*M I • WASHINSTON. DC Hotel Palof h HAITr-OiO. CONN. Hotel i*>d [ • UTTSIUPSH. PA. Hotel Sh.rwy CINCINNATI, O. Hotel Siifon NIW TOIK CUT Motel N*> T*— With only. Giant floats completed the laythe Communists in opposition, the i ing of six new pipes of large bore so that oil tankers of the largest JUDGE MftTON FffffDMAN Judge WiH Take Part in Confab Judge Milton A. Friedman, municipal judge of the City of Miami, has been invited by the President of the United States to be a mem: ber of the President's committee for traffic safety at the national American Bar Assn. meeting Aug. 24 and 25 at the Americana hotel. Judge Friedman is a lecturer on traffic safety, appearing before' schools and civic groups. He has I prepared many bills and present-! ed them to legislative committees for their consideration. Judge Friedman recently re-. reived national notice when a magazine published a story taken from a Miami newspaper which editorialized on the fact that defendants who appear before him and are found guilty usually end up saying "thank you." He is wellknown for his lectures before each session of court. Knesset approved on final read ing.-a bill granting a group of inves (irs, headed by Baron Edmund de Rothschild, a special 49-year lease to operate a 16-inch oil pipeline from Elath to Haifa. The eight-inch line between Elath and Beersheba is now being replaced by a new 16-inch line. When the entire line is brought up to 16-inch bore, by July, 1960, it will have a capacity of 2.000,000 tons of oil annually. Further improvements, including the establishment of more efficient pumping stations, will increase the capacity to 3.000,000 tons a year by March of 1961. A huge, new crude-oil anchorage, which will more than double the capacity for unloading oil in the harbor of Elath, was completed in the harbor of that Gulf of Aqaba port this week. capacity, up to 60,000 tons, will now be able to unload their cargoes. Unloading capacity has been increased from 1,500 tons per hour to 3,500 tons per hour. IN NEW YORK, IT'S THf GREAT NORTHERN HOTEL GREAT City Councilman to Spook Miami Beach Lodge of B'nai B'rith will meet at a luncheon m ee ti ng Tuesday noon at the DiLido hotel. Guest speaker will be City Councilman Harold B. Spaet. Gershon S. Miller is chairman. Irving Schatzman is president of the lodge. lisher of The Miami Herald; Dan j J. Mahoney, publisher of The Miami News; Niles Trammell, pres : ident Biscayne Television Corp.: i and Mitchell Wolfson, president of Wometco Theatres. KNICKlfRBOCKER 45 th ST. & BROADWAY In the Hoart of Times l oj y ro NEW YORK CITY 400 ROOMS Nowly Furnished every Ream with Radio SINGLES from $5 DOUBLES from $8 Also Weekly Rates TV Air Conditioning Available Band for Map of New York and Sights.eing Information MEAT GREAT LOCATION on smart 57th Street between Fiftf Avenue and Broadway .. .One minute to Central Park.. .Two minutes to Radio City —a few short steps to the new Coliseum. VALUE from $6.00 add) single—$8.50 a day double. Even lower by the week or month. ACCOMMODATION*** Light, airy, specious rooms and suite*—', private tub bath.ihTwe*) radio. TV and air conditioning; if desiredy The furnishings are new and colorful. Of special interest to families are the complete kitchenette 7\ studio apartments. JUTAT THI .A*T 25t TOGUST BROS R>£ >: Is the flfc.SJ „JGREAT NO R THERN pOTEL \/IIP*. 57 ST., N-Y.lt I TIL emeu 7-1 too %  UTlrOtl IUUSTRATE0 BROCHUM 4444 ^*^jnSaTaTfiSlI ?*B with uinnrl with wonderful Hot Springs waters H Oiini fft* wo'ld tamont woftri roao t. loo'hm* oo'> oo rr,/f to a*w i.m. of pApt'C*/ • •r/h.'.f. You e*n bath* **y all your ach.i *nj pa.m du* I* l*mion and fatiouo *nd find r*li*f lor aHkrith), rh*um*tim. *nd high blood pr*uvr* in th* radioactive, *h**m*l v*l*rt of Ho Springs. &o*rnm*nt r.qul*t*d b*thhouM right In th* Arlington wh.r. you *n aa ia rob* nd tlipp*rt by tp*ci*l •l**lo dlr*el from th* privacy of your raaav Tr* hospitality and th* fin.it in nt*rti*, as*rt i* yaari to •i*y •* *"• Arliagtan— Hot Springs' lap Unary h*t*l. Concert. dinnr. and ballroom dancing music by Eddy R*a*rs *ad th* Arlington Orch*str*. Social divstftntM andor th* guidanc* •( oar gracious Social Hatfaos, enjoy yawr favo.it* r*cr*ati*n ia Hot Spriaet. Suparb aalf -rfh Club prlvila*i •* oar aoarby Country Club. Y.ar-ar*ui fiihine *4 Lai*, HamirrO*. Ouockrl*. a*J Catborioa. £S'.. "* FinMt food nmyj .aytiw* It too prid* of •* Arlinatk •oooi rat*, with h*M bath froJ. $7 tin*!*. With t.in bU, *ad prlxt* bath hom|l2do.bU.ineW. Na racun charaa far chilaVa. uadar 14. VL Far boauti ^ ft. L h4cfc baautiful cofar bradra wrtta M.6aa*r*f A HOTEL and BATHS HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK. ARKANSAS i TOAYMOEE \ Write \ For \ intormatloi \ and \ Roaorvat Private Pool Beach and Cabana Colony HOTEL At 24th ST., MIAMI BEACM Air-Condition.d Room. Private Beach and Pool Parking on Premi... fj| Cocktail Lounge '< Dining Room Entertainment Daily Per oers. Del* Occ.f FROM APR L 2Sl JE 10331 COMING TO NEW YORK? Stay at this modern 25-story hotel. Large, beautifully furnished rooms with kitchenette, ^VfcVw private bath, from $7.00 daily, double from $10.25. Two room suites from $12.50. LOWER RATES BY THE MONTH NO CHARGE for children under 14 sharing room with parent. Air-cenditioning t television available Mrs If 39 c -*** BEACON Broadway at 75th St., New York Oscar Winfrob, Managing Director



PAGE 1

fridoy, Augu* 14. 1959 +Jels*fk>rklk*n Page 5-B ^ /?/vYo/w #JI Row Over Arms to Bonn LONDON—(JTA)—Israel's munitions sales to West Germany reBarnett Janner, Member of Parsuited in sharp debates in two of British Jewry's major organizations I liament and president of the this week — the Board of Deputies of British Jews and the Anglo-Jewish i board, said he agreed that the ultiAssn. icob Potofsky (right), president of the Amalgamated Clothing /orkejs of America, presented the Mental Health Center of America award to O. A. Knight, president of the Oil, Chemical tnd Atomic Workers International Union, at a recent banguet 3r the new Denver non-sectarian, free Jewish-sponsored menjl hospital. nday Might Social ISlarting the celebration of the (h year of organized Pioneer lomer. in Greater Miami, Kadiah chapter will have a social and rd party Sunday night, 8 p.m., the Ocean Rranch hotel. 200 SE lih si Mrs. Celia Segal is chair%  a fatei-less Whisk [leans Easily uattrless hand cleaner used factories and other installations title workmen need a doubleity product is Whisk, now dis[buted by the Troy Sanitary )ping Cloth Company of Florida, NW 80th st. IVhiak removes paint, grease, adhcHves, carbon, printers' Luncheon Fetes President's Aide Mrs. David Vender was chairman last Friday at a luncheon meeting in the Pub restaurant honoring Gen. Melvin Maas, chairman of President Eisenhower's committee on employment of the handicapped. Mrs. Vender heads the South (Florida B'nai $. % %  I B'rith Women's Council program | an employment of the handicapiped. Germans Form Jewish Library COLOGNE—(JTA)—A special library has been established here, devoted to the aim of "bringing light to the question of the relation of Germany to her Jewish population." An official announcement stated that the goal of the library is the gathering of material covering 2,000 years of Jewish life I in Germany, with the heip ot tne I Federal government, state governments, and private collectors and contributors. Thus far, 1,500 volumes have been gathered by the library, relating to general Jewish life in this country. A special division of the library is being devoted to the life, contemporaries and works of Moses Mendelssohn, the father of the Haskalah, or Enlightenment movement, among German Jewry. The library will also have material on Nazi atrocities against Jews. Two of the foremost authors of the younger German generation, Heinrich Boell and Paul Schallueck, initiated the library by issuing a public call for establishment of a collection of "Germania Judaica." Financial support has been given to the library by the city of Cologne and the state of North Rhine-Westphalia. Neither organization took any mate decision must be left to Israel and that he did not believe Mr. official position on the matter, the Ben-Gurion would take 'action not presiding officers of both rulmgfin Israel's best interests. He apthat the issue was a questioq for pealed to the board to take no furIsrael alone to resolve. ther action on the question.. A similar stand was taken by In the board, the debate was enlivened by sharp criticism of the Ajx, the Jewish Veterans Organization, which had made a protest against the arms deal. Speakers in the debate asserted that the organization should not have acted without clearing its action through the board. A veterans' spokesman told the meeting that criticism of Premier David Ben-Gurion did not imply a lack of love or devotion to Israel. Ho said those who "merely kept silent or acquiesced" in such actions as the arms deal, "under-mined Israel's integrity." The committee report to the board which preceded the debate, expressed understanding of moral and sentimental objections to the transaction but held that it what was involved was a question of defense and self-preservation, the decision "must be left to Israel." R. N. Carvalho,. president of the Anglo-Jewish Assn., at a meeting of the organization's Council. He said the AJC had always maintained that Jews who werejiot citizens of Israel had no right to intervene in domestic issues there. Bombay Officials in Tribute NEW DELHI—(JTA)—The first anniversary of the India-Israel Re view was marked this week by congratulatory messages to the Bombay Jewish Association from leading officials of Bombay. Paying tribute to the goal of the perijodical of strengthening Indian I Israel friendship were Y. B. Cha,van, Chief Minister of Bombay, P. T. Borale mayor of Bombay. K. K. Shah, president of the Bom bay Regional Congress Committee, and Kakasabeb Kalelkar, member of the Indian Parliament PR Counselor Back from Meet Back from the first such conIn a message to the organization ference held in this country, the and'manv' other factorV'sous I here. Gen. Maas acknowledged the \ National Strategy Seminar, Frank tome 7 Tl n rnntoerTJonten-' work of B'nai B'rith in creating Wright this week warned that "our employment opportunities for the country is in very serious danger, handicapped, and informed the and our people must quickly take luncheon audience that the na; note of sonie hard facts." tional committee has now enlarged j The two-week seminar, conducat sizes, including Whisk for an Itomatic dispenser. hand dispenser is furnished by [>y Sanitary Wiping Cloth Comly on a loan basis without its program to include mentally re„ Urded and the cured mentally ill rge. Where staff "•** among prospects for its campaign. acc< rr.modated by the hand B r The committee seeks to sensitize employers to the fact that handicapped persons perform on the job as well as "normal" personnel—and in many cases better. Guests at the Friday meeting included Robert Green, secretary general of the Junior Chamber International; John Nesbttt, Jaycees international program director; Sen. Harry P. Cain, president of the world committee and Dade County United Fund; and A. T. Euster, immediate past president. del, i,*ire is a foot-operated disiser, also furnished gratis. The dispenser meters just the fcht amount of Whisk for best lulls, so that there is no unneclary waste of cleaner. Information on Whisk Hand Baner or a Whisk service agreefcnt arc available from Troy at 1-8611.—S. T. LUNCH? ted at the National War College in Washington, was authorized by the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Only 200 reserve oficers from the 50 states were selected to attend, and Wright was one. In the military he is public information officer of the 51st Inf. Div., Florida-South Carolina National Guard, second largest of 27 U.S. National Guard divisions. In civilian life, Wright has been a public relations counselor in Miami for 13 years. The three German Shepherd dogs shown here arrived in Israel after a 16-hour flight from the United State* aboard an El Al jet-powered Britannia. This is the second shipment of watchdogs purchased by a non-profit group of Missourians headed by Kansas City lawyer Arnold Shanberg. So far, the group has sent nine such dogs to the Israel Police Force for special patrol duty in that country's border settlements. TH u Room of The lolSow UIM Downtown Miami's only •Mfoad rootauront Coftoo Mouoo TMI XNCft L O U N O %  %  unique ooteng •ttCArW KVO.MMM St, Weal Will Highlight Civil War Role WASHINGTON — Eight Jewish organizations this week jointly announced plans for a traveling exhibit depicting the roles played by American Jews during the Civil War. The exhibit is being prepared as part of the nation-wide centennial observance of the war period. It will feature Jewish contributions to both the Confederacy and the Union. Through the initiative of the American Jewish Historical Society, seven other groups joined with it to establish the Jewish Historical Commission on the Civil War Centennial. The eight organizations will pool resources from their archives and from other sources to create the exhibit that will open at the Jewish Museum of New York in November, 1980. The following year the display will be moved to the exhibit hall of the B'nai B'rith in Washington. Vandals Attack Synagogue MONTREAL—(JTAM Police reported this week that vandals broke into an Orthodox synagogue during the weekend and destroyed scrolls, prayer shawls and books and smashed silverware and other religious items. They estimated the damage at $1,000.



PAGE 1

rafe 6-B -JemMI*****" Friday. Augat H, J7M tltel^eafm of Society Simpkin, Cone, Exchange Vows „udtth Ann Cone became Mrs. Beryl Daniel Simkin in 6:30 p.m. rites Sunday. Aug. 9. at Miami Springs Villas. Rabbi Morris Skop eiatad. The br.de is the daughter of the %  Mr and Mrs. Earl Cone, of uasCtt?. Mo. The groom is the Of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence iktn 6230 Killian dr.. So. Miami. tn in marriage by her uncle I 1 mat, Mr. and Mrs. Leonard S Wohlfeld. 959 E. 23rd St.. Hialeah. the bride was attired in a White fioorlength lace gown fea taring i chapel train. Maid of honor for her sister was K SS Cynthia Cone. Bridesmaids ireluded Miss Patsy Lavin. Mrs. J! >rton Kramer, Mrs. David Leon, and Miss Lillian Rubin. Debbie Simkin, the groom's sister, was ibwer girl. Albert Simkin was best man for h.s nephew. Ushers included the groom's brother, Herbert Simkin, C-erold Prager, Stanley Rose, and Stanley Barnett. Michael Wohlf;eld, cousin of the bride, was r:ngbearer. The bride is a graduate of Miami Fiison High School and the University of Florida, where she received her Bachelor of Education degree. She will teach at Keystone Height* Elementary School. Her sorority is Alpha Epsilon Phi. The groom graduated from Miami Higb. and attends the Univerj s.ty of Florida school of pharm| asy. He is a member of Alpha EpsJo.i Pi fraternity. Biscayne Chapter Plans Party Biscavne chapter of the Amer ican Medical Center will hold a "La Petit" coffee and card party at the Saxony hotel Wednesday noon under the chairmanship of Mrs. Robert iCloriai Milberg. This is a newly-chartered chap ter of the American Medical Center at Denver, which provides free and unlimited hospilahzation for victims ol cancer, tuberculosis and other chest diseases. Plans arc now under way for the Eleanor Roosevelt Institute for cancer research. President is Mrs. Marvin (Bar bara> Haven, of 85 NI 174th dr. No. Miami Beach Corresponding secretarv is Mrs. Jay iHermionei Cohen. 1021 NE 180th ter No. Miami Beach. Change of Pace At Studio M Ruth E. Foreman, owner-director of Studio M Playhouse and the Dramatic Academy, offers a complete change of pace in her thirds presentation of the Studio M Playhouse summer series. •Solid Gold Cadillac" is a ribtickling comedy and a complete contrast from "Bad Seed," Studio Ms last offering. Freddie Albert, who designed the unusual and original stage setlings, exhibits a "One Man Show" in the Plavhouse. •Solid Gold Cadillac" plays through Aug. 23. with Sunday eveningincluded. The theater is dark Mondays. ,v \ W< rn-T-Kahn, mts. inn SMMIN Dinner followed at Miami Springs Villas. The couple will reside in Gainesville. Siegel, Borok Eye Mr. and Mrs. Harry Scherer, of Miami Beach, announce the engagement of their daughter, Ella Carol Siegel. 3200 SW 25th ter., to Arnold J. Borok, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Borok. 3880 NW 2nd St., Miami. Mi.v. S:ege(. a senior scholarship ^udi'iit in elementary education, will graduate from the University of Miami in February 1 She is also Sept. Rites employed as assistant director of the Greater Miami B'nai B'rith Youth Organizatiin. %  Her fiance, former winner of an administrative art scholarship,! j graduated from the University of; Miami. He is an instructor at 'Homestead Junior High School. Mr. Borok was formerly an as| sistant on the staff of the Joe and I Emily Lowe Art Gallery of the] University of Miami, and is nowassociated with the Mirell Art] Gallery of Coconut Grove. He has been a student instructor at the Parkway Playhouse. Burnsville, N. C. The couple plan an early September wedding. Brody, Lepselter Betrothal Told A November wedding is in the offing for Miss Dorene Brody and Irwin Lepselter Announcement of the couple's engagement is being made here by the bride-elect's parents. Mr. and Mrs. Sam Brody. 620 N. Shore dr. Her fiance is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Leon Lepselter. 9172 Emerson ave. Miss Brody is a graduate of Miami Senior High School, attended the University of Alabama, and graduated from the University of Miami with a Bachelor's degree v i" educal,on Her sorority was Werner-Rahi. Delta Phi Epsilon. HISS D0KINI Moor Mr. Lepselter graduated from _. Miami Beach High School and atPhi Sigs Have Barbecue Here Mrs. Erwin P. Hoffman. 5709 LaGorce dr.. will be hostess to the Phi Sigma Sigma Alumnae chapter of Miami Saturday evening, whin the group holds its annual summer barbecue. The event will be attended by members and their husbands, and is one of several social gatherings held for Phi Sigma Sigma alumnae and their husbands during the year. President of the chapter is Mrs Marvin W. Lewis, 4421 Post ave. The group meets each month alternating meetings between Miami Beach. Miami and Coral Gables, and is for alumnae only To Announce Contest Winners George Bacher's "Trip to Paris" contest will end this month, with the winner being named at 10 p.m Monday, Aug. 24. A flight to Europe via KLM Royal Dutch Airlines, with dinner at Maxim's restaurant in Paris, is the prize in the novel competition The flight will include overnight stops at Caracas, Venezuela and Amsterdam, Holland. Non-Stop Service Duo Non-stop jet service between Miami and Chicago starts Oct. 15. Ed H. Bishop, district sales manager for Delta Air Lines announ ced Wednesday. Using the new DC-8 which last week set a tran> continental record from Long Beach-Los Angeles. Calit. to Miami in four hours and 43 minutes, Delta will also inaugurate jet ser\ ice from Miami to Atlanta on the same day. •Pal Joey* Opens On Weekend "Pal Joey," America's first musical comedy with a heel for a hero, is the next attraction at the Coconut Grove Playhouse, opening Saturday matinee and running through Saturday night, Aug. 29, showing every evening except Moodays. The plot of "Pal Joey." adapted by John O'Hara from his famous short stories in the New Yorker Magazine, with score by Richard Rodgers and Lorenze Hart, centers around a down-and-out hoofer, Joey, who fast-talks himself into a job in a nightclub on Chicago's South Side. Having a way with the ladies, he talks an innocent young girl into romance, but then drops her when a wealthy female patron of the cheap bistro takes a shine to him, and sets him up with all that money-can-buy. Richard Tone, who appeared here last season in "Say, Darling." will play the title role, successively played in the two Broadway engagements by Gene Kelly and Harold Lang, and Carol Bruce will have the role of the beautiful but aging matron who moves him to the upper echelons only to drop him when the situation gets hot. Erin O'Brien will play Gladys, the only girl who is impervious to Joey's charms. The famous Rodgers and Hart tunes of the show that have become almost classics include "Bewitched. Bothered and Bewildered." "1 Could Write a Book." "That Terrific Rainbow." "You Mustn't Kick it Around." "The Flower Garden of My Heart." "In Our Little Den of Iniquity," Do it the Hard Way." the haunting song of renunciation, and the celebrated "Zip." describing the intellectual Mrr FOMMAN J$irttf in J\\ t9n Recent births at Mt. Siiui pital include the folowing: Son born to Mr. and Mrs. #r I M-Haur NuriiM Service %  ?? %  "! t ** r 'etly OMr.M • AH Room* en Ground Floor 1st. mi Jewish styl* CoetciM • S#aeiu Grounds a Reasonabl* Rate* • C__J_|. • %  -— •"••Reasonable Rates • earn -l? "*" "• J rtcoilM HWWW 1 ID0NCRAC6AN I INN I I Secluded 18 acres; private %  I wmming pool; entertain| IM Hftft I %  GcodfXE* d G I J Wrf* #f INN y,^, I I % %  %  %  % %  %  ,, ax j *ww*ww*w> '*WWWWW^M^*^*'WWWW**"*< IF YOU CAN CATCH US IT'S ON THE HOUSE! ... ANY GARMENT THAT LEAVES OUR STORE WITHOUT A BUTTON! All of our work is so thoroughly InnpncWd wo c..., YOU cm{ •* a •* % %  %  lob at any price, J! 1 $ 1.00 MESSES $ 1.25 if PANTS 5 C RESIZING W S FREEDMAN'S CLEANERS 1718 79th St. CewNwiy Fl $ll A $ URE .'5 L I AN0 MIAMI. FLONIC 2922 Coral Way MIAMI, FLORIDA BIKUR CHOLIM KOSHER C ONVALESCENT HOME N0M PB OFIT NOW-NICTAJII AN Under Str.e, ? UP *" T YOUR COMMUMITY ai • R ,. H OU NURSrNO OOCTOM ON CALL a w ^l T L2!!y; p coSa SZ BMOUMWJ*



PAGE 1

• fridoy, Aucruw u WESEU U.$. PRIME and U. S. CH MEATS u STORE HOURS••OH., TUI$., Wtt. 1-314 *mm. i:3o.t %  • nt MM WITHOUT A DOUBT FOOD FAIR KOSHER MARKETS BRING TO YOU THE FINEST QUALITY KOSHER U. S. GOV'T. INSPECTED WESTERN PRIME OR CHOICE MEAT, THE WHOLE YEAR 'ROUND! .... FOOD FAIR KOSHER MARKETS BRING TO YOU THE LOWEST PRICES. WITH YEAR 'ROUND SAVINGS! MILK FED Rib Veal Chops MILK FED BREAST OF VEAL.... Extra Special! BONELESS AND TRIMMED JUST RIGHT FILET STEAK 89 c 89 c SWISS STEAK n TITE MINUTE STEAK L B $1.39 ABOVE PRICES EFFECTIVE ON SUNDAY ALSO AT OUR CORAL WAY KOSHER MARKET OPEN SUNDAYS FROM 8 AM. TO 3 P.M. 163rd ST. SHOPPING CTR. NO. MIAMI BEACH 19th ST. at ALTON RD MIAMI BEACH :R MARKETS • 2W1 CORAL WAY MIAMI ft 4 BONUS AT FOOD TAIR



PAGE 1

Vaaa Page 2-B fJeHlstnuMten Friday. August ty They're Off to Higher Education t;# ,„„ ,n .„ who Israel Rabbinical College in because K h dot t New York Seven of the 10 students who graduated in Jwne^toorrrine 11** brew Academy ninth grade will be off to Hebrew High Schools throughout the nation when classes resume in September. Of the greup. five available for comment Wednesday were firm in their expectation not to make the rabbinate their life's work, but all said they were going for -"•The t(*rew--and--whenI w**tJnrir* % %  ^ mA '~ ev*r hopes ultimately to become a teacher of mathematics Also leaving for Hebrew High School are Daniel. >on of Rabbi and MM Simon Azulav. ol Nor h Miami, who'll be entering Pittsburgh Hebrew Acadenn. Daniel, son of Mr. and Mrs. Abe Aronoff. 1401 Bay rd who %  registered in Ner Israel. According to Rabbi Aleander Gross, Hebrew Academy principal, "this is the last graduating class that will b* sanding students to Hebrew schools elsewhere for lack 0* facilities here. The AcadDAVID LION AID additional Hebrew studies because they felt it an important part of developing into mature citizens. Larry Nadler, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Nadler, 2851 Prairie ave., will shortly leave for the Chicago Jewish Academy "because it combines an outstanding secular studies department with its Hebrew curriculum." But Larry has his eye on electrical engineering, and hopes to be able to go to MIT when he enters college. For Gerald Backman. son of Mr. an! Mrs Cecil Backman. MS -Meridian a\e. it will he the \ef Israel BatMineer-: secular programs are strong •here.'" is Gerald's reason for enrolling. While he has not yet decided about the future, he 1sure he will not enter the rabbinate. Arthur Spolter. son of Mr and Mrs. Isidore Spolter. 817 Lenox ave.. leaves for Yeshiva High School of Yeshiva I'niversity hi New York City. "I'm going there." he explained, because my brother, Seymour, a former Hebrew Academy honor student. will be entering Yeshiva College in the fall. But apart from being able to be together with him. I understand the school is excellent for Hebrew and English studies.'' Arthur expects to study architecture some day. and has no plans of entering rabbinical school when he graduates. For Leonard Kornreich, son of Mr. and Mrs. Anton Kornreich. 536 lOUi St.. it will be Chicago Jewish Academy, "which has been recommended to me by many rabbis in Miami. My brother David also went there, and I'm told its overall curriculum is superior." Of the five boys, Leonard is the only one who entertains current ambitions of being ordained. But his life's ambition is dentistry. David Holland, son of Mr and Mrs. Sidney Holland. 426 Jefferson ave.. is leaving for Ner Israel Rabbinical College. His n for going there is "the school', intense itodieJ in Talmud tAttr r.fKAW THtft Miami Chapter Official Hii Red Policy Against Jews The American Jewish Commit. Jewish students admitted to I iSn ir„ IMMCJTEJZ •* has made public a comprehentulions of higher learning"' sive report on the policy of re-1 tematically limited. Europe "is grave and comp put forth a program of action i veloped on the basis of four i principles: 1. Equality of rights for Jew, | Eastern Europe and the Set Union in law and in fact wiUm t framework of the existing and economic system. an "equality under this system it i consonant with the American i ccpt of freedom." 2. The ngnt of Jews to emi freely to places of their t with all of their possessions. or South Miami, featuring dormitory living. Students from Cuba and South America are also expected to register. "Our parents simply put up too much resistance to their children's leaving Miami for a high school education, and feel it's about time that the Academy launched one of its own." Beach Girl Will Live in Israel Maxine Donna Brandeis, daughter of Mr. and MrLeo D. Branl< 1605 Pennsylvania ave. Miami Beach, will leave from New York City Aug. 23 aboard the Queen Fredericks bound for Haifa. Israi! where she will spend six months on a kibbutz. loate ef th< %  Florida, where h < rj education, meeco SI considering working lor a Master's degree at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Misi Brandeis has been a Miami Beach resident for the past 19 years, and served as a counselor at the Temple EmanuEl summer day camp. re pression and discrimination since the end of World War II practiced b ythe Soviet Union and its satellites against its more than 3.000.000 Jewish citizens. Harold B. Spaet, executive committec chairman of the Greater' Miami chapter, in announcing the publication of the report, said that the Jews in the Soviet Union and. its satellites are subject to "discriminations and disabilities which blight their daily lives.". Spaet warned that official Soviet policy threatens the "extinction of the Jewish religion and culture in .i vast region of the earth." Spaet -aid that the American Jewish Committee study reveals: The Jewish community is "kept organizationally in an atomiiod condition." There is no federation of Jewish communities and practically no communication among local congregations. • The: vabbis, all ol then old—one rabbi for in the Soviefl Union—most ot them officiating in X In accordance with its ear*. ] mount concern for the individulj human being and its convicma] that emigration should be pletely voluntary, the AJC ct] t-'nuet to oppose all compulsion ] on the individual to uproot him-j self. The AJC will join wjtn gamzations. Jewish and non-Je LsJJL in -ceking private. gMB mental, and inter-go\ ernnwnu aid for the assistance of emigrantd rented rooms which substitute for from Eastern Europe and the Campers Pass Swimming Test Over 90 percent of the boys and synagogues Not a single synagogue has been built or returned to a Jewish congregation. The training of rabbbis was prohibited lor 40 years until 1957. when permisMon was granted for the opening of a seminary for 20 students in Moscow. The Jewish population is permitted neither schools nor theaviet Union, and influence the motion of liberalized immigraua opportunities in the I S. other countries. In a section on the Soviet tionality system and the status > the Jews, the report points ootl that the Soviet Union doenot m-j ognize religious minorities lal] that Jews are considered "a at-1 tres nor the publication of books'tonality—they and newspapers, except on very n individual are so designate! identity passport j the Greater Miami Jewish Combrod in Amenca to a good description of one of the goals of tenJies of the Fen-band. 46-year-old Labor Zionist Fraternal Order, in Highland Mills. N.Y. To make sure that Kinderwel tSHZSr Q K U,hen f ISiael mUSiC Farband -vi.es exp^i from Israel, such as the attractive young lady at the pi an? 1W 9 ^ f the n ,ed Israel %  Sho ^ana • .—" J •' —**\A — % %  "^"•r"r"'. tAicpi UII very ** % %  •* th" S <~" !" .„ w:. d J! y c ampers *'!! rare occasions. This virtually comwhich all citizens must possea.' plete blackout of a once flourishThe Soviet experiment at Boning and lively culture is paralleled Bidjan in Asia which was planotd by equally serious discrimination Jewish national settlemest in jobs, education and public *re, clearly a "failure" the relife.'' Spaet said pert said. The Soviets had predictIn education, the number of ed that the population of Biro-Bid.. jan—an area of roughly 13JM No Jew is known to Flagler Adds New Staffers Flagler Federal Savings and Loan .Assn. has added three new members to its expanding appraisal and construction loan department. *^ Fred Hug. appraisal and construction inspector, has been in the appraisal-construction loan fiekj here for four years. A native of Scranton. Pa., and a Miamian 20 years, he studied appraising and real estate at the University of -Miami, and is a licensed real estate salesman. Max Herman, also an appraisal construction loan inspector, munity Center passed at least their beginners swimming tests by the end of the last week of camp, Emanuel Tropp. assistant director. >aid Wednesday. Campers at all four day camps sponsored by GMJCC have been going through a concentrated swimming instruction program under ,he g U ,d a nce of Red Cross waterfront safety instructors. Many will have received advanced certificate,. The waterfront p rogr a m was featured at „,* T 7 '•"€ Camp la* zssr w % %  %  — be in the foreign service of the U.S.S.R., in the higher ranks of the armed forces, or in the military, air and naval academies. Even in such matters as the distinguished service record of World War II. the Official Soviet publication omitted Jews entirely in listing soldiers who have received high military honors for bravery though in April, mjj thoy wore bird place among the "nothus honored in the Germany. Early this year in New York an .F .uno. on Thurs"""*• %  J *>*h Committee de' week. Camp Sholom a,,on > •* %  First Deputy Prequare miles—would reach SOO.lsJj of v. hich half would bbe Jews of 1931. However, the failure of re i i run mem is reflected in the latest j estimates. Branch conductedt £ft [ !" aM m tS*V\ C 1U ^ US f0r S" da> *S and SjS Sun-' "* "* han 20 years before joining Flagda > h proceeds gouw to the Earl > %  vear in Feder-L He s „, tive Ml J^-*-* fund. C?n SJS jghei *5S C^tee^e,? Mrn^ mmm mmm Z,J, S -.' '"Z" for n v !" and ni ht camp shows. secretary to the accounUng superBov Calif., Parent visor of Lake Arrowhead; before jouung Flagler Federal. G In Miami it's FLORIDA-FOREMOST DAIRIES for Home Delivery Phone FR 4-2621 The great name in dai'y products FRANK J. HOLT, Manager m and completed a crafts projects Thi, >ear that the GMJCC signed speciausi sa,d. Campers have been^vSved >n ^uch projects as basket*. ">*. copper toolmg £.* [,X av aluminum work en!m i h "' g others enameling, and K ha ha r > : a r. x .L s !. n f a* V* 1 all camp, JelZ?*** "P^^nt-Uvea of a vnety of arts and w?h a ,2 t*" !" h,d inferred Tt... i. .uf !" w,,n a So\iet offinai .... camps asTh that top So\iet official on this a full „me Vns andTraft ?, V. 0 J** ,n "C i' at each branch ESS ^. pU ^ 0 ^ the Jew, b. Fasten f!l > 'PtrtOU Uti J^3 rafreshint calorie tree Bhustein Confers with Dog TED NATION cob Blau^tein. An leader, rret here JTA)—Ja,ion5 ^ -VS', J0id ^ !VSL the Suez i\ii \tn. ,m reported to Mr H Blaas,eiB *'> "M f*—"'— s in -n. %  •> %  i" TETLEY TEA I ATtAWTlON IN JEWISH MOMfS 5INCI 1W7 Vea. j, Yoaa Tov spin" • its...-iavoro*dea" for foOoM ssteagsh awi i lanoo.. riches tsestaod| ore with yoor fletsbip • •ailckigs sod betweea i refr CertajWa^owW



PAGE 1

%  mJOCUllTE Cozy foursome at the Eden Roc: Mrs. Louis (Bess-) Glasoer, Mrs. Mortimer (Ethel) Wien, Mrs. Al (Nettie) Levin, and Mrs. Morris (Annette) Goldin Annette recuperating from the excitement of the delicious cookout she gave on the occasion of her son's leaving for two weeks of reserve duty The Fair table at the last tiling U of M Pop concert was the meeting place for a swarm of glites, with Sidney Schwartz ambling over to say goodbye beleaving for Chicago to meet wife Esther and await the arrival their second grandchild Bobbette and Leo Ackerman leaver homo instead of sticking it out for coffee Pops regulars re Shepard and Ruth Broad—he's the Bay Harbor Islands chief cutive-^Leo Eisenstein and wife Bert, and Eleanor Coleman Promise Fulfilled: Florence Pick back from her round-therid tour to say hello and farewell to the Pops Florence said would Sylvia Weil and Laura Goldstein discussing the frits of the program and especially pianist Ozan Marsh Sylvia taking from experience, since she's an expert pianist herself ,IITS Anne and Sue Berkowitz back from their Vacation and ching up on current events ... All in all, the tenth and last W, with oh so handsome Maestro Arthur Fiedler, a pleasurable artistic affair. Home again after a four-week trip to California are Mr. and rs. Maurice Revitz, 1250 97th st., Bay Harbor, and son and daughMark and Janice, the latter a recent confirmand at North are Jewish Center Jason Rhodes, of London, here with sons nes and John to visit his father, Jason Rosenberg, and sisters, !.. %  Garrett and Helen Rosenthal, of 7380 Gary ave., Parkview and James and John will stay with their grandfather and nts for three weeks, with their dad taking off for New York and -ion after a week's stay here Mr. and Mrs. Hank (Barbara) Jcner, of Sherman Oaks, Calif., visiting her father and mother, and Mrs. Harry Pearl, 1100 SW 23rd ave., Miami, long-time M,:. His here It's open house at the Pearl residence during couple's stay Hank graduates from college shortly, and join his wife in the teaching profession. Mr. and Mrs. Sam (Francine) Weinstein and children Barbara I Alan, of Hjaleah, are entertaining Francine's mother, Mrs. tse Rapoport, of Brooklyn and Detroit Mrs. Rapoport is rationing at the Lombardy hotel Francine's a member of Temple Tifereth Jacob choir She is also secretary of the |khland Park Elementary School Mr. and Mrs. Phil (Rose) elson and son Buddy, of 2959 SW 18th st., are spending their vacabn at the Mercury motel on Miami.Beach Their other son, avid, is visiting with his aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. I. M. egel. of Atlanta, Ga. Rose is past president of the Shcnanbah Elementary School PTA Knid Slrusser and Melvin Berman exchanged vows Sunday Nick and Arthur's The bride is the daughter of Mr. and |i Max Strusser, 1.848 James ave., Miami Beach The groom the son of Mr. and Mr*. Philip Berman. 15261 NE 13th ave., Miami Beach After a honeymoon in Puerto Rico, the uple will reside in No. Miami. On the Birth Front: First born son. Max Michael J'Meir," brn July 6 to Rabbi and Mrs. Samuel (Judith) April at 'Jackson lemorial Hospital Bris was July 13 at their home, 1925 SW pth ct.. with Rev. Abraham Seif officiating Paternal grandirents Rabbi andMrs. Simon April arrived from Israel two days pfore the birth of their grandson Maternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Charles Holober, of akeland, Fla., who attended the Bris Maternal great lgrandther is Mrs. Molly Gantzman, of New York Grandfather abbi Simon April, Rabbi Tibor Stern, of Beth Jacob Congregation, nil Morris Fox, president of Coral Way Jewish Center, addressed % %  mor# than 100 guests New father Rabbi Samuel April is pintual leader at Coral Way Incidentally, Rabbi and Mrs. Simon April are presently visitlit' their daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert (Esther) (lumenthal, of Savannah, Ga. c Off to Boston are Charlie and Frances Oppenheim ... He hasbeen back for years, so there will be His and Her family remons Frances' sister, Grace Masters, lives in Boston, and other sister, Anne Jacob*, formerly of Miami Beach, is vacating in New England during the summer Travel Tidbits: Inez (Mrs. Henry) Kaufmann hasn't bought her :irr tickets for Mexico as yet But she's already stocked up the stomach pills she'll be taking on arrival there Jennie and Harry Gordon leaving their So. Miami ave. borne k a trip to South America, including Lima, Buenos Aires, San liago, Montevideo, Quito, Rio de Janeiro, and Panama The dpular couple will be gone three weeks .'. Taking it easy at Duncraggan Inn, HendersonviUe, N.C., are and Mrs. Jack Stein, Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weiss, Mr. and Mrs. rrman Polans, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Delson and daughters, Mr. Mrs. Louis C. Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Simon Sanders, Mr. and Sol Frankel, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Berman, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred ^wis and family, and Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Aronovitz and family. Flagler-Granada Jewish Community Center spiritual leader >bbi Bernard Shoter receiving everyone's best wishes on the ^casion of his marriage this coming Sunday to Miss Dolores rusch •Aufruf' for the Rabbi is during Sabbath morning rvices of his congregation Lovely luncheon given by the Alpha Epsilon Phi Alumnae isn. last Saturday at the El Centra Club Exchanging greetgs: Mrs. Henry (Inez) Kaufman, Mrs. Howard (Roslyn) Hirsch, Sidney (Florence) Lewis, Mrs. Jean C. (Frances) Lehman, Ravid (Ruth) Rifas. Mrs. Marvin (Naomi) Zank, Mrs. Sam ted) Elinoff, Mrs. Jess (Mildred) Spirer President Mrs. Norman (Barbara) Brown did a splendid Job spite the rough sledding these da*ys Just back from the SPhi convention at Sun Valley, she found son Tim with seven itches he got in an accident and son Paul about to have an operiion Mrs. Howard (Barbara) Katzen chairman of the day, assisted Mrs. Howard (Gloria) Scharlin Mrs. Arthur (Judy) Gilbert greetings from her mother, Mrs. Stanley (Martha) Myers, vacationing in the Carolinas Mrs. Daniel (Iris) Franco, CsnrinvM on Pae 7-B 4 1U ontan s njj or u eJewish Floridiaxi Miami, Florida, Friday, August 14, 1959 Section B Leaders of the Greater Miami Council of Pioneer Women for 1959-1960. Left to right are Mesdames Milton Green, Council president; Ruth Ulise Wagner, Tikva Club; Dora Ofienhenden. Beba Idelson Club; Marvin Copenhagen, Kadimah Club; Harry Queen, Golda Meir Club; Bernard Powell, Club 2; Joseph Krantz, Club 1. Mrs. Paul Berlin, Coral Gables Club, is not shown. Council will this yecr mark Pioneer Women's 20th anniversary i.i Greater Miami. No Lull in Summer Months for Dade Women as Philanthropy Study Goes On tuts, AHHA uamat mints College Cites Mrs. Meyers Mrs. Anna Brenner Meyers is the recipient of an award "in recognition of •her outstanding service to education and human relations." The award was presented to Mrs. Meyers on Aug. 2 at summer session graduation exercises of Bethune-Cookman College in Daytona Beach, Fla. Mrs. Meyers, an internationallyrenowned woman attorney, is a member of the Dade County Board of Public Instruction. Her husband, Benjamin Meyers, was recently cited by BethuneCookman College "for his achievements as a businessman and organizer in the field of human relations" and "for his forthright stand on the principles of equality and justice." Both are long-time leaders in Greater Miami's Jewish community. Wedding Theme At Function Sisterhood of North Shore Jewish Center will hold a memberbring a • member tea Wednesday noon at. the home of Mrs. Larry Wesson.* The wedding theme will be used, and a fashion show will be presented around the pool. Informal attire will be worn. Working with Mrs. Weston on arrangements are Mrs. Al Mechlowitz, Mrs. Norman Harrow, and Mrs. Jack Fisch. The women of Dade county have not permitted summer doldrums to interrupt their service activities, according to Mrs. Jean C. Lehman, president of the Federation of Jewish Women's Organizations. She announced that there has been scarcely a lull in the work of her committees during the months of July and August. In the weeks ahead, FJWO will resume a number of important programs, notably "buzz coffees." These are the novel briefing sessions originated last year for pres. idents and officers of local women's service groups. The series will open on Thursday, Sept. 10, in the board room of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, 424 Lincoln In The first meeting is planned for presidents who attended the four coffees in June. "On Friday, Sept 11, we will conduct a special 'buzz coffee' to indoctrinate new club presidents who did not have the opportunity to come to our June meetings," Mrs. Lehman added. Miami's "buzz coffees" last year gained national attention as a unique educational experiment. Women presidents and officers come together at informal meetings to discuss what they can do to fulfill their responsibilities in the general matter of meeting total community need. New Cancer Unit Organized Philip Ayre Unit of the Women's Corps of the Cancer Institute at Miami was officially organized in the North Dade area this week. Under the tutelage of Mrs. Sidney Raffel, president of the Women's Corps, the new group met at the home of Mrs. William Goodman, 949 NE 163rd St., No. Miami Beach. Mrs Goodman was unanimously elected president of the unit. Her fellow officers are Mrs. Morton Reiss, first vice president; Mrs. Milton Hornstein, second vice president; Mrs Harris King, third vice president; Mrs. Saul Bell. treasurer; Mrs. Arthur Selevan, financial secretary; Mrs. Sidney Shecter, recording secretary: and Mrs. Harold Lichter, corresponding secretary. The new unit chose its name in "We find a mutual wavelength." Mrs. Lehman explained. "These solutions over the coffee cups are not always final, but they help to give direction and meaning to what we are doing," she stated. Biggest program undertaken each year by the women of FJWO .s full support of the Combined Jewish Appeal, in which they serve as volunteers at special fund-raising events and in the door-to-door drive. Women also give personal contributions as Ifcatr 'plus gifts" to CJA. FJWO members also participate in other worthwhile city-wide activities such as the United Fund. Executive committee has scheduled a meeting for Wednesday. 10 a.m.. in the Board room of Federation to develop the agenda at tho September "buzz coffees." Reception Fetes Israeli Consul A farewell reception for Nahum Artar, consul of Israel in the Southeastern region of the United States, will be given Sunday evening at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Oritt, 810 Lakeview dr., Miami Beach. The reception will be jointly tendered by the Oritts and Mr. and Mrs. Jack Canter. Oritt is general chairman of the Greater Miami committee for Israel Bonds, and Carner is chairman of the 1959 Combined Jewish Appeal. Astar will shortly return to Israel after serving in his present post as Israel's representative here since the beginning of 1956. He has served in Israel's Ministry of Foreign Affairs since the establishment of the state in 1948. Former chief public relations officer of the Foreign Ministry, he was assigned to the American division of the ministry in 1950 as a senior officer. Prior to his appointment as consul in the Southeastern region, he served as vice consul of Israel in Chicago. memory of the son of Dr. Ernest Ayre, director of the Cancer Institute at Miami. Meetings are scheduled to be held on the first Wednesday of each month. Chairman of the membership committee is Mrs. King, 1125 NE 176th st. I a


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EEEWND2OL_NVQVY0 INGEST_TIME 2013-05-10T22:40:43Z PACKAGE AA00010090_01593
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

Augurf 14. 1959 Jr AL^ ^K eSf tMtl Page 7-A I Real Danger' hi Genftan Anti-Semitism Continued from Paee 1-A things we could have done ten years ago [now become rather obsolete and more diffitackle. The Jewish organizations in Western my would no doubt be in a position to confirm Writing that his party has sought to remove forK'azi officials from positions within the Adenregime, Ollenhauer said that "the basic law is our constitution has established an ethical [of decency and conduct which would allow courts to deal with any offenders. There is, fer, the question of whether the judges preover these courts are able or willing to apply I laws. This brings us to the question of the |al of officials. |r party has for years clamoured for the reof former Nazi officials, who have sought and shelter also among highest gevernment positions. This is an eminently political task, and some progress^has been made."" Accusing the Bonn regime' of making the SPD position on the issue clear abroad, Ollenhauer informed Held that "we share your anxiety on recent developments of anti-Semitic outburts and anybody, who has followed events close at hand, that means on the spot in Germany, will know that our party has been leading the attack against a renaissance of anti-Semitism." He added that his party and the trade union movement are "bearing the brunt of the struggle against old and new Nazi elements." Stating that his party and the labor movement were fully aware of their responsibilities, Ollenhauer said that "we should like you to realize that the success of our joint efforts will depend entirely on the political situation here and whether we will be able to have the support of democratic forces beyond our national frontiers." ice Instructors Group .nation of the United Dance ctors of Florida, a benevojssociation, was announced |eek by Charles Gantz. newlypresident' of the associate charter was signed by County Circuit Judge Robert pyd. Other officers include \y Rissman, Bernie Sager, Milkens, Dorothy Gantz, j Cugat, Nino DiPenna, Wil [Craner, Joe Lustig, Peter Here, Prank Bart, Ruth RissJTom Vincent, Steve Bozio, [Carney, Tom Carney, Stanhbin. ter was prepared by legal bl Joseph W. Malek. ibs Split Refugee Issue from Pafl* 1-A ly work out a idvtion of rab refugee problem. nd Jumeil's firm words [to bo the fact that Lebanese ll balance is based on an equilibrium between the and Christian populations percent of the refugees [Moslems while most of the mtj are Christians', thus ening to upset the balance. League delegates, meeting _ut, cautiously rejected the of Hammarksjold's suggesabout integration of the refmto the economic life of st countries, while repeating logic statements about the (ding return of the refugees at was formerly Palestine. A "builders' party" on behalf of M t. Sinai Hospital of Greater Miami will be hosted by Cal Kovens, local building contractor, who Wednesday accepted (he chairmanship of the event. low Students fo Moot Law students representing student bar associations at universities throughout the country will be at Miami Beach Aug. 22 to 26 for the tenth annual meeting of the American Law Student Assn. The University of Miami school of law will be host school for the group which will hold most of its events at the Carillon hotel. The meeting will coincide with the American Bar Assn. national convention sessions at the Americana hotel. Irwin Kishner will help direct the meeting. Sinai Prepares Plenty of Parking Parking congestion at the new Mt. Sinai Hospital of Greater Miami win be solved with the creation of five parking lots accommodating a total of 1,187 cars, according to a statement Wednesday from the office of H. A. Lefferts, who is supervising the construction of the new building. Thanks to the filled in areas between the former Collins and Johns Islands, and a complete remodeling of the environments of the old Mt. Sinai site, the new building will practically be surrounded by parking lots. Lot A, south of Hie new building, with a capacity for 3*7 cars, will be reserved mainly for doctors and staff members. Lot B to the roar of tho building aitd facing Biscayne Bay, will be reserved for ltt cars of employees and delivery vehicle*. The largest lots, C and D, occupy the space between the new building and the new Nurses Residence, and will accommodate 427 cars belonging to visitors and patients. The Nurses Residence will have its own lot located partly on land gained from the bay. Finally, the circle in front of the old,hospital will disappear due to a change' in the location of the accesses to the new facility, and in its place a parking lot for 122 cars will be created. Landscaping and paving of the parking lots will go hand in hand, and is expected to be started by the end of September. Aronovitz Will Chair Bank Board • INSURED SAVINGS • HOME FINANCING • SAVE-BY-MAIL Oldest and Largest Inc Miami Beach |FEDERAL] SAVINGS AND VOAM MMflMnON* MM Offkos: liecoU let* ot WtshkoatM AvtfwD J. 11114*111 •tor* BrwMk* •* •••• M4 WM*0* [M Miami attorney Sidney Arono vitz has become chairman of the board of directors of the Bank of Dade County. He succeeds Dr. Kurt Peiser, who was made honorary chairman. Peiser stepped down from active board chairmanship to devote more time to his post with Air Control Products, where he recently took a top executive job. Other new officers of the bark are Joseph Levay, senior vice chairman, and Salvador Olivar, vice chairman. Aronovitz, a graduate of the University of Florida, is a native Floridian. He was one of the bank's founders when the North Dade institution opened in April, 1956. TO WOMEN WHO WORK Will your preaant Income continue all your Ufa? Ana about tha Metropolitan" Income Plan— and make your future NAT "CANS 3200 S.W. Jr. Althaeas n 24414 er IN 4-tMl Repreeenting MlTt0*OUTAN 1*1 MfWUNCI CO. 1 Madleon Ave.. New Yark 10. N.V. GORDON ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORKS INC 2144 H.W. 10* Ae. W 2-7110 Have yer reef '•••''•V". 0 "; ,u will aave an a "•*• reaf ,,Ur "laatiafaetary Werk by 3i F7GOODR1CH TIRE PRICES REDUCED 51.25% LOWEST PRICES IN YEARS 4 t AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAi WHITEWALLS .£. 14" TIRES fifT" SElT Par Tha 7.TW 14 tt0xi4-OK.l4 w -•** IS" TIRES %uT 14*11 %  at The ntiii 114.11 o.esup ovwr mil .. % % % % % %  TKit? Aiv-iseatl ......io.oo* fet *e-eM* fee I HOUSANDS OF GOOD JCCQ TIRES • WHtTEWALL • ILACKWALL • TRUCK • PASSENGER 95 4 K'iJL i B. F. GOODRICH BATTERY ELECTRO-PAK 24-MONTH GUARANTEE 95 i — r v. B.f.Codrkh $ 11 fOtT UIOMTIT HISMBI 11 INCIUOH ACIO OPM 24 HOURS A ALL DAY 4UNDAY 5301 H.W. 27th Art EASY CREDIT YO WAIN TM1 TSSMS llf ttTS YON MR1IH6 NORTON TIRE AW. iio an. MIAMI I AW. M kit. oMrni WAMI AW. m •. 103 t AW. MIAMI Ml W. HASH! IT. I4M ALTNMAI tOOTR MIAMI JOeTH DIIII MAIATMN tAUWlP QUO.



PAGE 1

Page 4-A rjmisfFkridhiir Friday. Augu., ,, ejfewi§h OFFICE and PLANT — 120 N.E. Sixth Street Telephone FR 4-1141 — FR 4-821? Teletype Communications Miami TWX MM396 FRED K. SHOCHET E ditor and Publisher LEO MINDLIN E xecutive Editor ISRAEL BUREAU 10 A. D. Gordon Street, Tel Aviv, Israel EAY U. BINDER C orrespondent Making the Charge Plain The news wires in recent weeks seem to devole a large part of their coverage to the fate of the Jewish communities behind the Iron Curtain. The World Jewish Congress Assembly, which completed its deliberations in Stockholm this week, also allocated a significant number of its sessions to this guestion. All of which bears out the vast concern Jews everywhere in the free world feel about their Iron Curtain brethren. That the Jewish communities locked in the grip of the Soviet orbit almost unanimously refrained from participating in the World Jewish Congress Assembly sets a seal of emphasis on the universal uneasiness experienced in this respect. Russian authorities continue to deny the reports here about the systematic destruction of Jewish culture in their midst, but free world observers, with little variation in fact, are virtually agreed on what they see during the course of their travels in the Soviet Union. Religion as a general rule may be discouraged by Red authorities, but Jews, they feel, are getting the worst end of the campaign. Now that Nikita Khrushchev will be coming to the United States for a visit, it may be a good time to pin him down on this issue. We can not, of course, anticipate that he will tell us the truth. Russian leaders rarely do But we can at least confront him with the charqe and the evidence. Floridlan PUM: ,, i %  \ fl March 3. The JWMl Ftorid-n Mt rt.orb.dth. jg^HSlWK the J.wuh Week'/. Member of the J.w.h Telegrjp"" A".ne ?.£<%> Art'. Feature Smd.c.tt. w.r.d.d. N. .•.-..-I Nannr.il Editorial A.n American *•" •' during the ir ##/•• as i MPP If*-. • by LEO MINDLIN as a peopiS* £* •* Nrruytag „*,,„„ J. h J an academic one fT***! in Jewish fusion. aS^H hapa initially ..>p r ^L*"Pa prophet Nathan U,, £.£ M <-arpi si'rVicJ: N;rr.7i-td. ; ?rrT.i ; ^sSuPiSSTiJS. Englith-Jewith Newspaper., and the Flori da Pren %  The Jewish H..rMIn do*. Bd IHMIU '•• %  U*f Kdjlmilll of ihr m.T. haiuli-a.lvfrtlwd in im "''""'"• SUBSCRIPTION On. Year $500 RATES: Three V.ar. .10.00 Volume 33 Friday. August 14. 1959 10 Ab 5719 Number 33 Time to Pause and Ponder ,, X iCG ^l 601 Nixon 's visit last week to urn^ ar w W K Ghe,, mem riaI P fi0r to his I* PnL ^?u hln ? ,0n J should have made the Poles and their leaders somewhat uneasy seme lessons we forget'too guick^ heT monal has been abuilding for a long time In effect, the Poles don't have too much sSctTth" 'H 6 Pr ieCt Qnd are P-t'cuTar y KrwJE Sh0rt memor charae which kind Recen", gene j; al ,erms accuid all manSlier ITA 'n^ 6p0rtS 5 OUr C lumns b V Dav ^ iW Pr l Sent dQy Poles member' Do hey remember the Jews who perished? Do •Th y e S I h ew e h a .,eeling I f Pl,y? M ^ -"-ered Jhe jew has no place in Poland is thdi „„ £iiTL7 P h 1 h he K came "p ^&&£ B! *a^-nsr = Fur,her to thTSoSVi H e PreSidenf durin 9 ** visit nourished are unleashed." WhSe PoinnH ^ mSXThe^''r' S — tnelaSy' o" £ a monument ^^^.^l&SS^ fi£ ches. according to Orthodox spokesmen, are therefore not It*!** all. and can hardly be trusted to nurture the tradition they D !" T to espouse. pre,u I This reasoning lies at the very root of the question of Jew survival as a people, with Orthodoxy here steadfastly guarduwikl watchdog role it maintained during the centuries of exile ioL in it is the almost tacit assumption that while other people m!? require a palpable national heritage to assure their continuum i depend upon somewhat more. The "somewhat more i s ohi-ml that which kept them going through all the centuries durin? wk they had no nation of their own—an unswerving identification *inv2 precepts of their faith. M •!• •!• •;. THUS EXISTING CONCURRENTLY are two manifest experw*. %  in Jewish history. There is the clear proof that Jews can SU rtk without a functioning central national interest. There U equally C |M! proof of the existence of doubt that nationhood necesaanly mrnha to that survival If such considerations r e aur rc tt Nathan's flZ they also point to recent events pertinent In this regard. One is the arms deal with Germany. The other relatei to tk> noting of North Africans in a number of major Israel cities Witl respect to the arms deal, there has been much discussion about tV moral transgression committed by the Jewish State. Some objentn suggest that traffic in weapons and not Bonn is the relevant issue TV sin would be the same were Israel to have engaged in munitions it rangements with France. England, Turkey or. indeed, any nation. F such reprehensible commerce, they argue, lowers her to the level of her peers. | This is beyond doubt interesting thinking. Sweeping aside whatever diplomatic or commercial advantages the sale may have brooikt Israel it suggests that she i s symbolic of a sphere of human existetct apart from that found elsewhere. Ignoring those arguments adyitwd in Israel s defense to demonstrate that the agreement with Bonn COBtnbuted to her tactical security in a hostile Middle East, they m in isYaeh reliance upon such maneuvering signs of how much worse can be expected in other quarters. A double standard of international morality is thus suggested, ii which Israel will shun un traffic and refrain from charting hermit tarj survival while her world ne.ghbora hardly pause in their efforts .ML H as f e danc > n Precisely these areas. This It, mcdenUU,, little different from their experience throughout history, during which iZl v ? ri "*l.v considered an irritant to the conscience of sa s,c e tSs p,e f s,,od ne "v y %  • c ha,,en8e g Mmi ••• •:• •:• •JYMBOLIC ROLES OF such exalted character hardly deterred their it..n •K nt nts !"", m almos, un v ersally seeking Jewry's extermu. level of m^f^K 61 S,ands ,0day Expecting from I.r.el the highest "f L ^V„ S S an iuut "traneous to the central questioi DOS. in 7 !. h,S reaMni be conatrued as belonging to hv Eld he! li! W 1 ,hOU, Prartic 1 coacm t0 I"Mli surv.y.1. it at one ""'ntioned that many citizens of the Jewish State haw ZTl Z no,hor adop,ed a 8im P*WI In the nWi ?? B "*"? lh 1 ,heir <***'* hould sve no army SSten h s M r "L g the War of liberation that unintentional* whe ratwn I V* S 11 0,hers d troyed valuable canned foods The i \\ZZ >lm ? S{ un v.il.ble-bec.use they were not kosher am.net Zi"SILT wha,ev v wpomt one may care to • natwnal un-iva"? \IL com P romi <* principle in the name of immigrant are ,he nctni r %  by North Africm m.S? X e S th e ev f a SUCh ""P"""*S P*" men tor th r crimination T, y art mee, mg with economic and social du•--ier" ha. sulr, h ? £?**. have bw!n found mon ,hf 1 """•' U'ft-noToT the. been ,. ,raced to "• extreme right or the • I Object oMh. he nul, the complaint at hand, upon IsrTel as their H? "f f rmer Eu !" P*who distinctly look European Jewr vL*. 0 ?' P ro P rt > r No qne will deny that West European Jewrv | d ra < Ped modern Zioni ideology, nor that East •"•V.O largely translated the ideal into a working reality• ; •:• .;. 'Vnuge^Jf'J^" ,in '/ Jews conceive of Israel as a privW "ring to the voun L P V? for North A" ^*" or Oriental Jews, who need for cduYatii-.T'T c no,nin *>ut their immediate dependency, "race of cu„m "n.t,u /' 8tiU P^omlnnntly Western ways, and "a.ion here s AIL' f re,gn l V,enM • %  A*^ A P ra el "" t'onal ongms uu 0 T,?h .* res P nM to the Chinew influx and the mW'th rsnj .Vth r S !f' C,ed 8uch inimigrntioo back in 1921 a basic precept ,..,.. ^ ndamen tl meaning of the Law of Return. ceivnbly adoot .ill. i' DecUr u O" of Independence, can Israel *ouW the universal .i ,, a,,ern tive? Such considerations iP. tom. permit if v*. .. Juda, n transcending unique native cv> social disconttmt briHl „! "T rioU m r •"* •" express"* of one group 0 f J,ws ,1 ,he yoke ** diacrimination practiced by national self-image rhSi ano,her ith the ma)ority feeling thr This n ln uenged. Zionists' n" u-sTthan hi u' C 2 re <* th %  M**t| plea voiced by noted t Israel ln s,nif 1( a n, 1 Bc nGurion, that American Jews mign '"" that Western J?J1 nun ? bers; f or the silent threat is every*** n Eastern garb. ^^ Cni,d wiU >meday be a thing unrecognued '•"ate tV'VTnd h o e f r,^!n C MtttW ^ th oonaiderations, they rer,,l r ethical IS?. ?* nc c ,,, 'mmoral-whcther on reli| .iu.. i.. "' grounds, wiu.. ._ >i iA*.**1 Jwt'ce has been mflm^? J lhere *P**ency transcends decency f arms, s We |l as ,n?h Th,s ho,d "^e in the international s* to survive as nat.L pr ac of social diacrimination. The search foreign to us-and ,! h ,neviUo, y 'esda to the adoption of standards al,ve •* a people w, h c ompnmiw ot Principles that have kept s| ons poisomng other, i.! nation we w ere unaffected by the V moral nr^ With one, can we maintain a high level m <"al propriety. c„ we aaaure the Jewish coatinuum?



PAGE 1

iy HuejuM 14. Donald Csss w ass d frM Fee* IB la Tdona) CauetT and "Mrs. Morris (Rhoda) Levitt talking to lovely blonde Mrs. Mack (Miriam) Mades. c a Also on the BirthFront: Rabbi and Mrs. David (Miriam) [Lehrfield became the proud parents of a son? Moshe Mordecai, their first born, June 30 at Mt. Sinai Hospital Bris was July 7 at Kneseth Israel Synagogue, where Rabbi Lehrfield is spiritual leader Rev. Abraham Seif officiated Maternal grandparents are Rabbi and Mrs. M. H. Eichenstein, of St. Louis, Mo., who attended %  Paternal grandparents Rabbi and Mrs. Louis Lehrfield, of Chicago. IU., were also present, and are now the houseguests of the Lehrfield family at 1400 Lenox ave. Among (the 300 guests who attended were Rabbi and Mrs. Benjamin Kirch, of New York, as well as Rabbi Abraham Twersky, of New York, who is Mrs. Lehrfield's uncle The new parents celebrated their first wedding anniversary Aug. S In Addition: A son, Glenn Elliott, bom to Rabbi and Mrs. [Isaac Jerer July 18 at Mt. Sinai Hospital Bris was July 25 jat Rabbi Lerer'a home, 1301 NE 160th st.. No. Miami Beach, at I which Rev. Seif officiated Glenn Elliott Joins sisters Barbara Ellen and Michelle Judy Maternal grandparents are Mr. and |Mrs. George Schwartz, of Brooklyn, N.Y., who attended the Bris Paternal grandfather is Rabbi Leib Lerer, of Jerusalem, [Israel. a a Mrs. Leon (Alyce) Ell smart in blue with red trim and |m atoning shoes and wearing a leftover birthday orchid stopping Ion her way to her birthday present—a brand new orchid-colored Icar—to show an adorable picture of her and Leon's new grandIchild Photo was taken.in Muwcoaa, Wis., where Joel and [Sandra Dolkin took the baby for a visit with his paternal grand %  parents Mrs. Irving (Reva) Wexler taking it easy all summer [while Sam, Myra and Jerry are in Lear School day camp IReva's storing up energy for a coming hectic season at National [Council of Jewish Women To Mexico City, back to Miami Beach for one day and then off to Baltimore to visit their children are the plans of Dr. and Irs. Joseph Kotzky Looking like a magazine cover. Eddie and Vera Sirkin in son lan's new yellow and white boat looming up and down Indian reek waterway One last ride before they're off to' Lake I'jrleton with a stop to tell Alan how wonderful his boat really Mr. and Mrs. Abram Fox. 141 SW 23rd rd., visiting their children, with side trips to Hot Springs, Connecticut, New York, %  lew Jersey and Pittsburgh. Shirley Goodman back to bar Sam here after a delightful reek in Gotham Town ... Mr. and Mrs. Ben Silver—he's the Food Fair exec—returned from their Virginia vacation trip Williams (Bill) Ante, wife Bessie, and her sisters, Mrs. largcry Bloom and Mrs. Frances Gaggstatter. off for a South Imerican tour The Aptes due back at their DiLido Island ome about Oct. 20 First stop, Charleston, S.C., to pick op son Jay at Citadel potlcge, where he is in his third year, then the trio. Dr. and Irs. Bertram J. Thorpe, went to New Orleans and Panama City This was the second part of the Thorpes' vacation First tart wasthe usual Gotham tour of Broadway shows ... Off to lamorada on the Keys are Dr. and Mrs. Leslie T. Bukstel for a ive-day trip Keeping an eye on grandchildren Lee and Ellen Mrs. Maxwell Hyman Grandma Bee isn't worrying about her charges, since they're as good as gold But Flippy the pt is in the package deal, too Monday Club was as excited as hostess Mrs. Jean C. (Fransi Lehman, when she showed them the two unusual signed ketches on her livingroom wall They were done by Blanche Mafson, whose "one-man" show at the McAllister brought terrific eviews. %  "I / I mm f t rn.nn. ip Series Judged Most Successful i t. Campus exchange between two American girls and an Israeli youth, all members of the freshman class at Bar-Dan University at Ramat Gan. Israel Rina Moraine, af Chicago (left). and Roelyn Miller, of Providence. R.L, chat with Abraham Kocainsky, of Kfar Sabah. The young women are two of the 20 American high school graduates enrolled for one year of study at the college. ', Leaders Debate New Move on Suez JERUSALEM—(JTA>—The Israel government came closer to de-, cision this week on what course Israel was to take to secure its rights | to freedom of transit of the Suez Canal for cargoes bound to and from the Jewish State. As the Israeli Cabinet weighed action on this issue, I a propaganda campaign was launched among the Arab states by the Kingdom of Jordan to close the Gulf of Aqaba to Israeli shipping. The gulf is Israel's window to the East and its means of access to the Red Sea and Indian Ocean. Israel the United Arab Republic in his talks with UN Secretary General ^ J ^". D K^" e .u th *JFASE Dag H.mmarskjold. they reported Gulf, and their gulf ports of Eilat and Aqaba are only a few miles apart. Egypt and Saudi Arabia also border on the gulf. At the same lime, tee, according) te Landau reports, Egyptian authorities wore preparing' warehouse apace far the seixvre ef the 5,527 tens ef semens from Israel •heard Che Danish freighter Ins* Ten, detained by the Arabs at Fart Said since May 21. While official sources have maintained a tight-lipped silence on conditions set by President Nasser of le ninth season of the Miami ch Pop series by the University liami Summer Symphony was I most successful series in its fry, symphony officials said Inesday. ["he total number of music lovers attended the concerts was an increase of 2,428 over [ year. lx concerts In the series were npletely sold out, with bun's ef paopla tur n ed away, conductors who drew the •st audiences were D'Artecje HAVING A DAMCf? OLOR CRAFT OF MIAMI assure your dance of sing a gala cdscdr. by [airing every couple a Color Fbf Somenir Oner to fcrssodad to E. Fr at e rn al Sorted, and For befalls CwN Row TUxowe 7-7253 at both ef his concerts, Leroy Anderson, Switch Henderson, 'toward Barlow and Arthur Fiedler. rlirrTaft Two of the concerts, "Ballet Night," with Hugo Fiorato con ducting, and the "Opera Night." with Franz Alters on the podium, were near sellouts and musically considered among the highlights of the season. The second and third concerts with Emerson Buckley and Leo Reisman had inclement weather, but under the circumstances were also well-attended. Financially, the series is unique in its accomplishments, according to Mrs. Marie Volpe, concert manager. This summer it was almost able to meet the budget of $50,000 by the sale of tickets alone, to be exact $43,605.35. something very few orchestras have been able to accomplish anywhere, she explained. The sale of tickets also increased by $4,009.10 over last year's figure of $39,596.25. to provide that Israel was not to send cargoes on its own or Israelchartered ships, but only in ordinary foreign vessels, and Israel was to maintain secrecy on the passage of cargoes through the Suez Canal on such ships. Belief here was that the Cabinet could not long delay a decision on an appeal to the United Nations Security Council against the renewed blockade of IsraeU cargoes at the international waterway. The complaint would charge the UAR with repeated violations of the international right of free passage. Israel's diplomatic representatives abroad had already made contact with Security Council member states and the major maritime powers en the matter, H was else reported. Simultaneously. it was understood, the Israel Foreign Ministry had asked Secretary General Hammarskjold te consider another visit to Cairo te clarify President Nasser's r ap a c tsd conditions for Israel cargo transit threueh She const. Those were i snilda r ssf here as amounting te a do facto blockade. Although the Western powers were reported to be enthusiastic about an Israel complaint on the issue to the Security Council, it was expected here that the United States, Britain and France would join Canada, Argentina, Italy, Japan and Panama in a stand in support of the principle of free passaee through the canal. FASHION SHOWING let as ssefcs yeer Ck*s Msetiaes Mterestiag and estorteisisf with cor Fashion Show Coordinated and Available by francee resaleac by frescos, Cestea* Mads, Fersesel Stylise. AN Alterations. For Information MOM Highland J-2425 personalized tonka at the blackstone flower shops where you get more for your money • •. wi 4-1233 24 boar tank* except rosb hmshene ami yarn kipper Js& *•_.SUNSHINE FASHIONS' R •res. o.n pet. eft. MIAMI KACN FT. UMBMU WIST PALM MAO



PAGE 1

'aae jimistiihr***> Friday, August %  JAM M m *+* a H llA,Y MIWDU /W/a/ow /Vece 0/ 5fWaA/p tertr/tfes fro Ufa** f f l/l#f tfWW ^^ when Jew t Greek^.ny thinf. were already i nj HELLENISTIC CIVILIZATION AND THE JEWS. By Vjc tor Tcherikovtr. Translated by S. Applebaom. 5W PP Philadelphia: The Jtwish Publication Soooty of America. $6.00. %  JEBRAISM AND HELLENISM," wrote Matthew Ar nold. "between these two points of influence moves our world." It was within this world, too. that the late Dr Victor Tcherikover spent his entire scholarly life. From his Berlin student days up through his last years as professor at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, he devoted his research to "the social and economic foundations of Ptolemaic Egypt and Soleucid Syria. He was the first to make full use of a new type of source material for Jewish history, thus inaugurating the specific branch of Jewish papyro Most of ^'^ Kn^ arucles deal with the history of the Jew* in agi. SS>.sa= :-,'£.':-"=." % %  The prodigious piece of scholarship. At book is a H'" "*'" M t, %  glance, it> dry-assist format. |Wljjjjj denied paragraph plodding down tbepkge^l. gg But shortly, some of the reasons which 1kept DTchen kover in willing thraUdom to the period become apparent. Capitol Spotlight: By MILTON FRIEDMAN State Dep't. OK's Indignities to Citizens %  i Washington yHE U.S. AIR FORCE is submit%  ting to anti-Jewish indignities from Saudi Arabia because of the State Department policy barring American military personnel of Jewish faith from the VS. Dharhan airbase. The extent of discriminatory tactics has shocked Sen. Wayne Morse. Oregon Democrat. At Dharhan. Arabian officials are apparently permitted to behave like Nazi Gestapo agents. Sen. Morse revealed "they examine our crews: they check our crew lists and our army list! they raise questions if any name sounds as though it might be Jewish. We even have information they raise questions if some of our personnel happen to look Jewish "Even, time they do that." said Sen. Morse. Americans ought to shudder with shame that we permit that kind of trespass upon American religious freedom." State Department officials are familiar with America's many stands in defense of its citizens against foreign anti-Semitism. They know that the State Department in 1911 went so far as to abrogate a treaty with Czarist Russia because that nation discriminated against Jewish Americans. But today Department officials are taking a line that they are powerless in Saudi Arabia because of Israel's existence. When an anti-Di.-criminatory body questioned anti-Jewish policies of the Arabian-American Oil Co. in New York, State Department officials rushed to the defense of Aramco. They sought to justify Panorama: By DAVID SCHWARTZ Shalom to the Pilgrims HAVE JUST landed at Plymou'h. Mass : r mj the Ma;.: ce ago 1 am a I would have liked to met" he old timers—Bradfor 'ish. Brewster and espec lot I goon they are not U nore. I did ask the ir.ailr PrisciHa's ad In -. "What's her last name"" he n at '< the way it is. .And I would have liked to see Squanto. the Indian. It sure must have been nice for the Pilgnms to have this friendly Indian about. You know how it is when you are a stranger and you are lonely, and all of a sudden a stranger comes around and shows you the new post office Of course Squanto couldn't have shown them the post office. It wasn't until Washington and the .American Revolution that they had the figures to put on the stamps, so they couldn't have had any post offices then. I'll tell you about another man who was with the Pilgrims. He was Moses. The laws for the Brst .V* England settlement were called The Moses Judicials." And the General Court of the New England settlement er.acted "that the judicial laws of God. as thev were delivered by Moses. shaU be accounted of moral "equity and generally binding." I guess I could have said Shalom to many of the Massachusetts Bay Settlement and they would have understood me The Rev. John Cotton, the outstanding fig. ure of the Bay settlement, was especially noted as a Hebrew scholar. When you read his great sermon. "God's VT 1 His p,antati< -'* you get the feeling of a page of the Talmud m the way he reasons like a rabbi from the I ... l Said Torah because drew almost entirely on the Old Testament. Cotton also points to a reference in Jeremiah to God as the King of Nations. If God is the King of Nations He must provide for all nations, and not leave any people out He cites further the Biblical injunction to "increase and multiply and subdue the earth" and concludes where there is vacant space, there is liberty for the sons of Adam to come and inhabit it though they neither buy it nor anti-Jewish policies within Saudi Arab.a The) shielded Aramcos anti-Jewish tactics inside the l nited stateA US Usistanl Secretary of Mate actual!) wrote that a ruling against the anU-Jewisn stand of Aramco might "adversel) affect I 5 interests In Saudis A State Department autborit) took I stand that American acquiescence was a reasonable compromise in vie* of important I a national security interest! This line appearto represent the wa) of thinking In the State Department. The Department has rationalized Arab bigotry to the point that officials sympathetically explain Arab policies Such thinking i> understandable when • finds that Department officials were high-salaried employees of Aramco while on leave of absence, upon retirement, and sometimes before entering the foreign service Sen. Morse challenged "our Government'! bending its knee to such treatment and in fact creating second-class citizens among our own people." He said this situation "cannot be sold to me on ground.-. of national security, because we weaken the security of the United States around the world if we subject ourselves to that kind of political blackmail It was brought out meanwhile that the United States has more effective bases nearer the S<>\ let I'nion. There are crippling restrictions on American use of the Dhahran base The US Air Force wai not even permitted to use the Dhahran base to cover the U.S. landings in Lebanon. Sen Morse is asking the Senate to adopt a resolution making "perfectly clear to this Administration that we would rather get out of Saudi Arabia than have the Hag of the United States continue to be desecrated in Saudi Arabia." TSenate ma) soon question whether the State Department is adhering to long-established preci lent* involving the religious freedom of Amer' car the Act of July 27. 1868 the President and the State Department r of handM what was to other scholars an invitation to deceive! painstaking honesty—these combine to the credit of bsf author and book. His refusal to use the Dead Sea Scnjgl in their present state of chaotic research, much is | wanted to in support of his own theories, is a case I point Dr. Trherikover's novel theories on the Maccib revolt will be of special interest to many. On a scope, however, it i~ his whole picture which is fascinatj of these two cultures "bestride the narrow world like] Colossus," in vital cohabitation. OH the Record •y NATHAN Zlrtmj ihelmii Recognition of Reform UfHAT FOLLOWS IS not a defense of Reform theology, but of the right of Reform Jews to establish their movement in Israel, to construct temples. houses of worship, and schools. Many among my Orthodox friends will any I am in error. They may be right, but not in my opinion. The right to pursue one's religious orientation is so basic— in fact axiomatic—in a democracy that it seems odd the issue should even have to be debated. I am mil that Reform Judaism is repugnant to the overwt majority of religious-minded Jewry in Israel, but that no justification for excluding it from the inalienable to public functioning. There is of course a different coloration to the i tion of giving Reform Judaism official status in Isr Here there are vast factors that must be considered. eluding th,sensitivity of Orthodoxy, whose share in tarl land ami its redemption antedates that of Reform JudV] ism Yel even that will come about in due time our Reform friends would do well not to press tksl issue loo strongly at this time, lest the erroneous impraj sion he created that there is something less than a cordul] relationship between Reform Judaism and Israel. was a time when the word "Zionism'' was as I >rm Jew as is pork to the pious. But times haul Today there are probably as many Refoml in the Zionist Organization of America as there ait] Orthodox or Conservative Currently there is some tension between Reform Jet Z< \ over a reported charge that the ZOA Hou in Tel \\ v had barred the use of its promises to the i cle tor Renaissance of Religious Life in rather pretentious title, to say the Ieat A spoke Jewry told this writer that responsibility the exclusion rested with the ZOA. but a lay leader of I ZOA to whom I have spoken vehemently denied it. *j daring that the ZOA House is a cultural not a rehgwHj center Another Reform spokesman, speaking bitterly, tafl this columnist that the denial of ZOA House facilities t| a Reform group in Israel stemmed from politics. treif" Scholar Offers His View of 'Who is a Jew? THE ISSUE Who is a Jew.' which is i provoking so much political heat in Israel, is now becoming a subject of scholarly discussions also in the (Mud States. Most interesting views are now advanced by Prof Solomon Ze.tl.n. of Drops.e College, in a special studv on his subject. He develops the theory that in ancient times there was quite a distinction between Jews and Israelis. The people called Judeans Jews w PP tk A dants of Judah. the son of Jacoh -rw e descen men of Judea" ,Bna. Yen^aTLau^.h*/", "' ,ed ,h Judean state, in the South TT y ,,Ved ,n ,hc Judea. their king i, 5 S the K l T^ ** "*" language was called JudeanOn V ^'\"* ,he,r People living j. the North were C aal Th £K£ ,he Israel .Bnai Israeli. Their landV,! „i5 e ^ chlWrwi f TWirkta, was called ^l^TnT* ** ^' Soutnern' aS'te 'SKST con^L """^ *.. About the year^^r A^n^ quered the Northern state and exiled most of the to other countries. The Northern kingdom then ce !? e l ist M n > People of the Northern kingdom j tne Kingdom of Judah. In the year 5M BCE, the dom of Judah also ceased to exist, but the Judeans j"*! later permitted by King Cyrus of Persia to return to **| homeland. Judea. Only a smaU minority of them left Babyl on^ Judea. Prof. Zeitlih goes into lengthy historical df^JJI ments to show that the name Israel dissppeared "l the period of Erra the prophet. After the aest !" ?'^.! the Second Temple and particularly with the nse of w*M tianity-when Christian, maintained they were Ike ", Israelites-the term Judeans was abandoned I*?*"* called themselves Israelites in order to combat is* tenuous of the Christians. ,, The word Israel was used and term Jew. J* became the term for religion. Against this back] I'rof Zeitlin discusses the issue of "who is a Jew" "J| answer u: • A Jew u anyone who is born of i• ** "'other or one who has embraced Judaism, regsrd*-. whether he observes or dees not observe the preceso



PAGE 1

"•Jewish Floridian Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY tlume 33 — Numb 33 Miami, Florida, Friday, August 14, 1959 Two Sections — Price 20* \Lift Suez Canal Block Or Stop American Aid To Nasser, Javits Says POTT UAVf IT TO DAS PACE J-A WASHINGTON—(JTA)—Sen. Jacob K. Javits, of New York, told Senate this week that unless President Nasser's illegal restrictions use of the Suez Canal are lifted, "we cannot give aid or fail to proit aid proposed by international agencies" to Egypt. This was a direct reference to proposals for a loan to Egypt by the rid Bank to finance widening*-—SEN. JACOI JAVITS d —ear el recurrence deepening of the international Iterway. The loan is expected come up for discussion here in Lptemter at the meeting of the >n's board of governors. Speaking on the fleer of the enate, the New York Repubcan declared that Nasser had enew*d the blockade of Israeli bargees at the Sues Canal in violation of the Constantinople Convention and international law pnd, during the last ten days, ad accompanied this by violent [treats and declarations of belligerency. ... noted that Nasser had used a _eech by Moshe Dayan, Israel's kmer Chief of Staff, as a pretext his own attacks on Israel and Hinted out that Gen. Dayan did ot speak for the Israel govern nt. He said "it must, however, made dear that provocations tm whatever source only exacerl and make more-difficult mainnance of peace, and pose the nger of a recurrence of the ents of 1956 and 1957 which ould certainly be avoided." ...' said "all this has occurred f a time when we have been inreasing our assistance to Egypt Ccntinuad on Page JA Arabs Split on Refugees; Lebanon Backs Resettling hower and Premier Khrushchev JERUSALEM (JTA) A Lebanese cabinet minister this week and ^d ^ W f .eadersjip.o warned other Arab countries that Lebanon will not continue to support J^ ^"JJ'Jf tens ion and to conArab intransigence in refusing the resettlement of the Arab refugees | o „, loart „ rs fl)l and that his country may split off from the Arab camp on this issue. Commenting on the Arab Leagues outright rejection of UN Secretary General Dag Hammarskjold's+ Jewish Leaders Eye Talk With Soviet Premier WJCOWCtfSS AT STOCKHOLM PAW 12-A STOCKHOLM—(JTA)—Representatives of the World Jewish Congress, together with leaders of other Jewish organizations, will seek to meet with Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev during the latter's visit to the United States, it was reported Monday at the WJC Assembly. The Assembly delegates discussed the current international situation in the light of the forthcoming* meeting between President Eisen m UL fAf^m. ]/ofr Elect Abrams New Commander report on the refugees, Pierre Ju -!. suggestions while falling to pro* t_'_ ... % %  > !>*> iUlm nrrtnACll meil, Lebanese Minister of Labor and leader of the Christian Falange coalition party, declared that this was the last warning to the Arab countries that Lebanon cannot support a negative attitude and unless Arab leaders swiftly find a constructive solution to the refugee problem, Lebanon will have to go its own wa> The Minister explained that small Lebanon cannot carry any longer the burden of 100,000 refU9s who form 11 percent of the population, while Lebanon's own c it i i ens are tor cad to amigrato. The Arab governments reject all constructive duce their own feasible proposal. Jumeil said. He proposed that the Arab countries ask the United States and the Soviet Union Continued on Page 7-A tact Soviet government leaders for the purpose of securing amelioration of the situation of Soviet Jewry. Philip Klutinik, honorary president of the B'nai B'rith, addres sing Monday's session of the Assembly, toW delegates that it Continued on Page I A Ban Lifted on Jewish-Content Books at US Exhibit in Moscow WASHJNGTON-(JTA>-Two volumes about Judaism which had een removed from the U.S. Exhibition in Moscow by Soviet censors P ,ave been returned to the shelves of the exhibition, according to information received by the State Department. However, books on Israel were still held by the Soviet censor. The two volumes restored to the* shelves are "Great Ages and Ideas | of the Jewish People," edited by Leo M. Schwartz, and "History of the Jewish People." edited by D; M. Dunlop. The books which had not been returned by the censor jare "Israel and Its Glory." %  P ictorial volume edited by Avraham I Herman and Yigal Yadin, and "The Politics of Israel," by Mar! ven H. Bernstein. The Jewish books returned by the censer fee display were the 70 volumes removed by Soviet officials from the U.S. Exhibition. Thirty-three of them •re still banned. The restored books were shielded by P"'< from readers. Meanwhile, it was reported In Tel Aviv that not one of the 20 Jewish folklore research experts in the Soviet Union and its satellites, invited to participate there Continued en Page 3-A Trial of North African Riot Chief Suspended by Court JERUSALEM-(JTA)-The trial of Ben Haroush leader of the North African imm.grants in the Wadi Salib quarter of Haifa who is charged with illegally possessing fire arms and with shooting at policemen during the recent riots in Wadi Salib. was suspended this week by a high court order after it opened before a local magistrate ito Ha*. Suspended also was the trial of three other Jews from Wadi Salib who UN charged with attacking policemen. The suspension came after the accused demanded the trial be held NEW YORK—(JTA) — Bernard I Abrams. of Jersey City. N. J. a combat veteran of World War II, was Sunday elected the national commander of the Jewish War Veterans at the organization's 64th annual convention. He succeeds Sam Shaikowitz, of St. Louis. The second highest post, that of national judge advocate, went to Hyman Wilensky, of New London. Conn. The convention adopted a resolution condemning the Egyptian blockade of the Suez Canal against Israeli shipping. The resolution appealed to President Eisenhower and the State Department "to use every possible means to cause Egypt to desist from its treaty violations and Continued on Pago 1-A in another court. The lawyer de fending the four also argued that the defense was not given sufficient time to prepare for the trial. Police took precautionary meas tires to insure quiet during the trial prior to its postponement. Meanwhile, the Jewish Agency executive Monday started discussions en problems eoncorning the absorption and settlement of new immigrants. The discussions, conducted in the light of the recent disturbances by North African immigrants, bavo established thet if there Is any discrimination in the handling of new c omers, h is in favor of nen-Iurepoans. The director of the Agency's Continued on Page 3-A PNo Real Danger' in German Anti-Semitism By Spatial "Japort NEW YORK-Eric OUenhauer. chairman of the German W Soci.l-Democr.Uc Party stotec"Wednesday that virulent anti-Semitism U not at P !" !" f !" danger to our state or even to Jewish costmuniue*. The statement was made in a letter to Adolph Held here, national chairman of the Jewish Labor Committee. ,.. OUenhauer. speaking on behalf of the Presidium of his party which met late in July in Bonn rep bed to a detailed letter from Held in which the latter escribed a series of recent incidents and events tuned at Jews indlviduaUy and Jewish Institutions. are the least to minimize anti-Semitic Oilenhauer wrote, "but those things "We attacks," should bo seen In their proper proportion. Every •ingle anti-Semitic outburst is, of course, an offenso to human dignity and is being treated from our side as such. "I am sure that you will agree with me that a „ Continued en Page 7-A HE DOESN'T SEEK POST Will Boston Spiritual Leader Become Israel's Chief Rabbi? JERUSALEM-