The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01578

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
tewifelb-IEIIiDipidliiaun
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
ber 18
Miami, Florida, Friday, May 2, 1958
28 Pages -- Two Sections
Price 200
)es All Out in Meeting New
Arab Republic 'Half Way'
AFTERMATH OF BOMBING

By MILTON FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)-What will the State Department's new
quest for better relations with Nassers United Arab Republic cost
Israel? That question loomed h,ere as Secretary of State Dulles sought
a rapprochment with the U.A.R.
It is now an open secret in Washington that Dulles deliberately,
minimized official American identification with Israel's tenth anniver-
sary celebration. The State Department thought a display of warmth
for Israel on a large scale by the U.S. Government would needlessly
antagonize the U.A.R. while weakening "pro-Western" Arabs in Jordan
and Iraq. +------------------------------------------_
LAWSOH
instructions
To justify itself, the State De-
partment looked for possible oe>
jectiont to the greet Israeli cell
oration. An unusually ha ran
stand was taken toward a mildly
controversial Israeli anniversary
parade in Jerusalem. The issue
was artificially enlarged. Jordan,
of course, quickly exploited the
situation by a loud outcry that
INHUMANE SLAUGHTER'
So Ions Hit Shechitah
Senate Comm. Hearing
JTABy Direct Teletype Wire
-Opposition was expressed Tuesday to the proposed
Mil which was passed recently in the. House of Rep-
dw pending before the Senate, by Orthodox Jew-
ring on the bill before the Senate Committee on
peatry.
ent presented to the Senate committee, Rabbi Solomon
Hddent of the Rabbinical Council of America, and
kin, president of the Union of Orthodox Jewish Con-
ica, said that "this bill is bound not merely to fail
"+of its proclaimed purpose but will
actually promote inhumane slaugh-
ter. Our conscience will not per-
mit us to underwrite in any man
ner the treatment of animals which
violates the principle of our relig-
Ib^L^IJ ion requiring the humane slaughter
upnciu r amma|s

to Use
I The 87-nation
iritime conference
conference early
following adopt-
tion which upheld,
l's right to use the
in and the Gulf of
five its port of Elath
FRed Sea.
(of 2 to 1, with the
(abstaining and Israel
ting against the reg-
Ustake, the conference
cent passage of ship-
1 straits connecting the
th national or interna-
lation was worded in
and did net men-
situation. Im-
iffer the vote an Is-
inun called it a
?cision" affecting ac-
lath.
-other hand, an Arab
Ahmed- Shukairy of
i)ia, said that tne Arab
not recognize Uie*le-
\he rule which he charged
"tailored" by Britism and
States to fit a specific
inference adjourned with-
Bg taken any action on the
fof the territorial sea, a
which might have affect-
el's right to fish in the rich
waters in the. Mediterran-
The testimony presented in be-
half of the Union of Orthodox
Jewish Congregations of America
and the Rabbinical Council of
America laid stress on the view
that while the bill would be a
Continued on Page 2A
Consevatives
Air Integration
KIAMESHA LAKE, N.Y.(JTA)
The position to' be taken by the
Conservative rabbinate in this coun-
tryparticularly by rabbis and con-
gregations in the Southon the is-
sue of desegregation of Negroes
was outlined here Monday at the
58th annual national convention of
the Rabbinical Assembly of Amer-
ica, central body of the Conserva-
tive rabbinate. Some 600 delegates
are attending the parley.
In a report to the convention,
Rabbi Harry Halpern. chairman of
the assembly's commission on so-
cial action, said that Conservative
Judaism is not concerned with the
appropriate pace at which the de-
segregation process should be real-
ized, but Jews "must not remain
silent in the face of denial of equal-
ity to a segment of the American
people and have a moral duty to
speak out against the injustice
meted out" to" Negroes.
Insisting that this injunction
Continued en Page lft-A
required United Nations consid-
eration. Ambassador Edward B.
Lawson received orders from
Washington to shun the Israeli
parade.
The State Department had pre-
viously succeeded in dissuading
President Eisenhower from send-
ing a special delegation to Israel
to represent America at the festiv-
ities. A prominent political per-
sonality with influence at the
White House wanted to go. But
State Department intervention kill-
ed the project.
Another ill-fated attempt to send
an official delegation took place in
the House Foreign Affairs Commit-
tee. A resolution providing for a
goodwill delegation to Israel was
sabotaged by early and deadly
State'Department action. The State
Department maintained it would!
have embarrassed American-Arab
relations at delicate juncture.
There was even talk in State De-
partment circles of warning Amer-
ican citizens to stay out of Jerus-
alem, for their physical safety, on
Apr. 24, the day of the big parade.
This would have had the effect of
frightening off many potential tour-
ists. At the last moment the De-
partment exercised reetraint and
withheld a prepared warning mes-
sage.
But Jordan sensed the behind-
the-scenes attitude of American
diplomats. Shooting and threats
were increased. An unprecedent-
ed incident took piece on the
Gulf of Aqaba where Jordanian
machine gunners strafed an Is-
raeli fishing boat, killing fisher-
men.
Dulles' main aim at this time is
to persuade Nasser not to link him-
self more closely with the Krem-
lin. The State Department is very
mindful of Nasser's present trip to
Moscow. To head Nasser off and
to provide him bargaining power
and leverage as a "neutral," the
State Department is making con-
cessions to the U.A.R.
Dulles indicated at a recent press
conference that Egypt was easing
anti American propaganda. He
also thought Nasser was assuming
a more conciliatory stand in the
Continued on Page 3A
Jax Leaders Map
Human Relations
Consultant Group
JTABy Direct Teletype Wire
JACKSONVILLEThe Jewish Community Council of Jackson-
ville met Tuesday to map plans for immediate and long-range com-
munity action to prevent further attacks such as last weekend's
bombing of the Jacksonville Jewish Center which caused less than
$3,000 in damage and injured no one.
The Community Council, whose members agreed to act jointly
on all maHers pertaining to the bombing, has scheduled a meeting
with the local Ministerial Alliance to obtain en official expression of
views of the Christian clergy. It is understood that most ministers in
Jacksonville were planning to devote Sunday's sermons to the attacks
on the Center and a Negro school and its significance as an assault
on the civil rights of all citizens.
Meetings with newspaper and radio officials and with municipal
officers and police authorities mrm underway.
Among the long-range plans tentatively considered at Tuesday's
Community Council meeting was the establishment in this city of a
Human Relations Council, embracing the widest possible representa-
tion of political, civic and spiritual leaders.
NCCJ Spokesmen in Blast
At 'Pattern of Bigotry;'
Meet to Discuss Strategy
"The bigotry with violence in the Jacksonville bombing and the
Birmingham attempt Monday to blow up Temple Beth El is part of an
ominous pattern of anarchy," Dr. Everett R. Clinchy, president of the
National Conference of Christians and Jews, declared in a statement
in Birmingham, Ala., Tuesday.
The statement was released by+
the Florida regional office of the
National Conference here in Mi-
ami.
"Pieced together with recent
Nashville and Miami adult delin-
quency, it presents an overt threat
to America as subversive as the
most despicable form of Commun-
ist violence."
Clinchy continued that "Pro-
testants and Catholics must stend
up and act together with our
Jewish neighbors against this
"All civic, industrial, educational
and religious organizations have
responsibilities and duties placed
upon them by this indecent be-
havior," he concluded.
The statement was also signed
by Benjamin Fairless, former
chairman of the board, U.S. Steel;
James F. Twohy, West Coast in-
dustrialist; and Lewis E. Straus,
chairman of the Atomic Energy
Commission. All are national co-
chairmen of the National Confer-
ence of Christians and Jews.
Meanwhile, the Florida NCCJ is
alerting Brotherhood Week chair-
men in 12 major Florida commun-
ities to mobilize their leadership
against further terrorism, H. Y.
Kinard, board chairman, declared
Tuesday.
A meeting Monday of 55 leaders
will be held in the Columbus hotel
at 4 p.m. They will be addressed
by Dr. Gordon W. Lovejoy, of
Guilford College, N.C., human rela-
tions expert. Also expected to at-
tend are police officials. State At-
torney Richard Gerstein, and the
mayors of Greater Miami's munici-
palities.
FILLING IN THE BACKGROUND -
Jews Outside Miami Beach Will Die'
JACKSONVILLE (JTA) A bomb blasted the
stillness of the night at 12:30 Monday morning and
blew down the doors and left a crater in the entrance
to the Jacksonville Jewish Center. A few minutes
later, another cache of explosives damaged an all-
Negro school.
Though homes in the vicinity of both buildings
were damaged and many windows were smashed by
shock waves, no one was injured. Anonymous tele-
phone callers later identified themselves as members
of a so-called "Confederate Union" and accepted re-
sponsibility for the deeds. One caller declared:
"Every segregationist must be set free. Jews must
be driven out of Florida except Miami Beach. Jews
outside Miami Beach will die."
Jews in the city were calm and there was no
visible excitement as they continued about their
business. Jewish sources in this city said the police
authorities had been "very cooperative" and were
Continued on* Page 16 A


I
I
m I a


i


2-A
vine/*/thrMkMi
Orthodox Solons Hit Shechitah
Bill at Senate Comm. Hearing
Continued from Pag* 1 A
disservice to nomanrtarienism it
o**ert parallels with legislation
in other countries directed
against Shechitah, the method of
animal slaughter required by th*
laws of mo Jewish religion.
"Legislation in foreign lands un-
der the cloak of 'humane slaughter'
has beea accompanied by vicious
am.-Shechitah agitation disclosing
be\ood doubt the real purpose of
such measures. While the imme
'One-Parent fomubf' h Topic
Parents Without Partners will
meet Wednesday evening at the
Everglades hotel
Prof. Aaron Upmen. of the Unj
1 of Miami sociology depart-,
meat, will discuss "One-Parent other
diate sponsors of the bill before
' this commit! are surely free of
any such motivation we have rea-
son to believe that there are those
' who would strive for the ultimate
in that respect. Americans must
not permit themselves to allow this j
spacious bill to open the door to
i the undermining of American re-
ligious freedom."
.Voting that the bill cites Sbeeh
itah as humane. Feuerstein aad
! Rabbi Sharfmaa said that this was
in accord with the findings of more
than 800 recogaiaed authorities.
mostly non-Jewish, in the field of
payaology. pathology and anatomy,
who have teatifana that Shechitah
is "most humane."
Their statement declared, how-
ever, that the bill's provision for
Shechitah u Ukisory" because of
provision* which could re-
S^TMofX
tmumfl to laoogmato Smmor Day Camp Promrom
Temple Bmanu-El will inaugu-1 gram of arts
Family."
Question and answer period will
foHow. according to Isadore Sol-
koff; president.
PEST
DROBLEMS9
-4-1774
strict or prevent its exercise. They
said: "Should this bill be enacted,
an a fancy of the government will
be responsible for the. supervision
of religious practices. Certainly.
such legislation flouts the fun da-.
Young Orator Will
Compete in Jax
Veal Soanett, 15-year-old winner
of the Miami Beach aad Dade
county competitions in the 1958
oratorical contest sponsored by /Op-
timist Crabs International, will rep-
resent Sooth Florida Zone G in the
rate a new summer day camp for
children from four to 12 years of
age. commencing June 23 for an
eigkywaek period to Aug. 15, Irv-
ing Kaplan, director of activities
at the Temple, announced Wednes-
day'.
The camp will include a -full pro-
excursions,
swimming i
nd crafts,
ttltOB,
* Private n
swimming instruction.
years
a.m
"ture study l
ivate -
W.
ur to
from
Children from
,C.hf,dre".from 'our to si,

2 noon Children fro, ^
r of ago will attend fJL*1
. to 4 p.m. '*
DAILY MCK.Ol TO NEW Y0|k
M. UEBERMAN & SONS
LOCAL AND LONC DISTAMa MOVING TO AND FM*
uumm
tT4
nomma end a* inau gipaH- loooafr Sonico

'Pice inspection
J'^L SINCE 1901
WORLD'S LARGEST
^l^T^^IZu^n 'datnct championship runoff, May
of any faith, the Ortnodaa Jewish Representing the North Shore
leaden agreed. Optimist Club, the young Miami j "
---------------- Beach tag* School initat woo the j i
!.. S^feM*. ^^-4JtoS oT!i
Sisterhood of Dade Height* Jew.- eiauaa." at the X Miami Oaoaust '
ish Center will elect officers and .Club, toaaaag the ofarrmgi of Mike
hMr r-,k u^,, ,r yh- Dens, from Miami Huh. aad Lewis
'"' Serbia Mum, Beach High student. \ J
The waaner of the statewide coo- {
test earns the nzht to compete in I
the grand finals m June m Dallas, I .
with scholarship* up to $1,000 as:"
prizes.
Xeal. who resides with his par-
ents. Mr. and Mrs. Murray Sonnett.
at 1380 Stuiwater dr.. garnered
third prize in the Optimise Interna-
tional finals last year in Philadel-
phia.
Fko Proof Constricted St or 094 Warokooso .
655 Collins Am., Mkm Bonch Dkl JE14153
GLASS '* l***Y MM
** storr nma un oat mm ua
Center. Dr. Carlos
speak on "Sex Bdaeahon ~ Pro-
gram chau-man u Mrs Herbert
Ellnn
Ten*.
- A G. Gl
134 S.W. 4th STREET
and Mirror Work.
PHONE FR M30 f
PROTECT
CLOTHES
HOUSEHOLD
GOODS AND
fURNIJMINGS'
WITH
PARA
MOTH
CRYSTALS
335 S.W. Ilth e.
UO AUDI, sSrecfor fh. R 4-5437 I fl MOT
to Core ro MM IMoHy oa CbreoKoWy
NUGGETS, MA 6- RICI SIZES
CASH AND CARRY MIKES
tft.Ph4.4at Sib. Kg. $1.29
10 lb. Kg. $2.25
Aeaohnla oi AM
TRULY NOLEN
Exrerminoror Oi
Val hj4JMMi
9mm Joseph L Rockey$ky
MS MKJUCAN AVBWt, MIAMI tfACf
M 1-3SV5
Resources
Over
$112,000,000.00
deral
*
Savings and Loan Association
lAWfT MtO OU3UUT IN MIAMI HACM


Lincoln Rajpf at Washington Avenue
rh St. at Washington Ave. 71st and Harding Ave.
260 Sonny Isles Blvd.
and YOCR NEAREST MAILBOX!
rrosctiotion Spocioifsrs
W TWO Ml 10C4T NMS
OH MIAMI UACH
340 UNCOtN ROAR
'*roae oa Weiaiagf A
rheoe JE 742S
721 UnCOUl ROAR
r>ee Paralaw fa f,,
*hee JE t-0749
0CUU4TS' KESCIR>TlONS f-JJ>
CONTACT IINSES
>i. Rophun
HEBREW BOOK STOfiE
mJS!^rVm *^ "Sr-
erwoaa f oarn aod Nrm SH.
Tflesaeoe JE 14R17
^^aotm uuohmh oomm i
or Sraanms m. RrWrt, Um
Ah* for Roarew Schools
AMI MORRIS reuCMTU
c"no TtlD
RIVERSIDE-BEACH
MEMORIAL CHAPEL
for a
Perfect Tribute
la keeping with the traditions of the
Jewish faith,Riverside-Beach Memorial
Chapel offers service* that you can be
proud of at a price you can afford.
Whether orthodox, conservative, or re-
formed services are dpaired, Riverside-
Beach provides the attention; of a
friendly, experieneed, understanding
staff and sparious chapels with facilities
to meet every family requirement. Un-.
der the personal supervision of:
laiNcl
RIVERSIDE-BEACH
MEMORIAL CHAPEL
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
K l-ll51
12S0 NoaMAMDT Dftivt
1234 Washington Avbnub
1850 Alton Roar
WaRT Placlm akd 20m AvoNoa
.54 HOUR AWBt'LANCE SERVICE
3W Boroa. V.D.
Ri*eraMr Memorial <:hpel
New > citk Thlh St. 4 Amlrrdain Ae-


(day, May 2. 1958
*JaHslincrldttan
ilute to Israel Will Hear Diplomats;
Original Musical Revue Also Slated
At Giant Bayfront Park Fete May 8
A gigantic salute to Israel will be presented by the Greater Miami
imitlee for Israel's Tenth Anniversary Celebration at Bayfront Park
itorium Thursday, May 8.
Stanley C. Myers, chairman of the committee, announced that more
m 65 major organizations in the area will participate in the huge
r-wide celebration scheduled to begin at 8 p.m.
he festive event will feature a
3-A
j| program of addresses oy out
Inding, internationally-noted per-
ialitifs and a musical revue pay-
tribute to Israel in song, music
dance.
Sharing the speakers' podium
Jill ba the Hon. Gideon Saguy,
Irst consul of Israel in New
forte, and the Hen. Octavio L.
D*. OCTAVIO MALOLES
Raloles, envoy and Minister
fienipotentiary to the United
latts from the Philippine Re-
l>blic.
)r. Malolea has for many years
tn a ranking diplomatic repre-
^tative of his country. As dep-
permanent representative to
United Nations from the Philip-
!s. he is at the forefront ot high-
rel international diplomacy.
[As a career diplomat, Dr. Malo-
has served his country in Lon-
fn, Rome, Paris, Brussels and
iienos Aires. A graduate-of the
Irv'ard University law school, he
is professor ot constitutional law
I professor of international law
Arellano Law College in the
Philippines.
Sasuy has served in Israel's
Ministry of Foreign Affairs since
11950. Prior to entering the dip-
pmatie service, he had been a
nimlur of the Hagannah since
11936. During Israel's War of In-
Idepervdence, he served with the
rank of major as chief instructor
[at tha Army School of Adminis-
tration. He has been Israel's first
consul in New York since Jan.
uary, 1957.
A. Arlhur Pekelner, chairman of
the executive committee of the
Greater Miami Committee for Is-
rael's Tenth Anniversary Celebra-
tion, pointed out that "a significant
aspect of the celebration, like those
taking place in hundreds of other
communities throughout the United
States, is its broad representation,
involving every major Jewish or-
ganization. It is a tribute of our
whole population to Israel on her
historic birthday."
Mrs. Dorothy Krieger Fink is
program chairman, and Mrs. Sam-
uel Z. Sakraia is arrangements
chairman. A highlight of the pro-
gram will be the presentation for
the first time in Miami of an orig-
inal musical revue, "Song of Is-
rael," composed and directed by
Mrs. A. Anhur Pekelner.
The revue, in drama, song and
dance, will feature Joyce Farber
and Joseph Pardo as soloists,
and the Miami Hadassah Choral
Group and dancers from B'nai
B'rith Youth Organisations. Mrs.
Fink will be narrator.
A musical salute to Israel in a
spiritual vein will be presented by
the Cantors' Assn. of Greater Mi-
ami of which Cantor Jacob Born-
stein is president.
Benediction will be by Rabbi Al-
fred Waxman, of Temple Zion, ex-
ecutive secretary of the Greater
Miami Rabbinical Assn.
Among! organizations participa-
ting in the community-wide cele-
bration are the American Jewish
Congress, American Jewish Com-
mittee, Anti-Defamation League,
B'nai B'rith, B'nai B'rith Women,
Bureau of Jewish Education, Coun-
cil of Pioneer Women, Greater Mi-
ami Jewish Community Center,
Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
Hadassah, Jewish Labor Com-
mittee. Jewish War Veterans, La-
bor Zionists of Greater Miami, Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women,
Rabbinical Assn. of' Greater Mi-
ami, Zionist Council of South .Flor-
ida, and the Zionist Organization of
America.
Mendelssohn is Her Topic
Mme. Hilda Steuerman will dis-
cuss Felix Mendelssohn at the
Music Workshop class which meets
in the Miami Public Library, 1 Bis--
cayne blvd., 7:30 p.m., Wednesday.
US Meets Nasser Half Way'
Continued from Page 1 A
dispute with the Suez Canal Co.
I As a result, Dulles envisaged re-
1 lease of approximately $30 million
| in blocked Egyptian assets.
After being briefed by the State
Department, chairman Theodore F.
; Green of the Senate Foreign Rela-
tions Committee displayed a friend-
lier attitude toward Nasser. He ad-
vocated a. foreign policy change in
that direction.
But other Congressional leaders
GIDtOM SAGUT
Synagogue Drive
Seen Picking Up
The tempo of the Combined Jew-
ish Appeal synagogue campaign
has picked up considerably in the
last two weeks, Dr. Morris Good-
man, campaign chairman, announ-
ced Wednesday.
Joseph M. Rose accepted the
chairmanship of Temple Emanu-
El's campaign and was to have
held a meeting Thursday to or-
ganize a follow-up of potential con-
tributors.
At the North Shore Jewish Cen-
ter Maurice C. Weil was named
chairman of their synagogue cam-
paign, assisted by Jerry Sussman
as co-chairman.
Aaron Kravifi, who heads the
Bath David synagogue campaign
for CJA, mat with his volunteors
Monday to organize a concen-
trated drive among members
there.
At Temple Beth Sholom, chair-
man John Serbin has reported that
"many of the members have come
forward With contributions to CJA
to celebrate Israel's tenth anniver-
sary."
Dr. Goodman said that the chair-
man for Temple Israel would be
announced this week.
ALL
TERMITES!
f CRirVOGC
^- \ NYLON TENT
SLbIRHANtAN\
By 1 M.ihoa
CHEMICAL
Treatment ,
fVERT JOB
GUARANTEE!!
C3IIFR91761
TRULY NOLEN. inc.
( tides' nnri largest'
I 0ade Federal
L Ravings and Loan Association o> Miami
Miami, Florida
I0SEPI
SAVE BY THE 10th...
EARN FROM THE 1st!
Now b tht tin* to open or odd
to four Dode Federal Savings Account!
cvrre/tf r*r.
peg annum
ON INSURED .
SAVINGS
4 Convenient Offices with Once) a Week Evening Hours and Free Parking
DADE FEDERAL RESOURCES EXCEED 115 MILLION DOLLARS
ism." In their view, Nasser is not
truly neutral. He weakens the U.S.
position in the Middle East while
strengthening Russia's* status
there. Considerable note is taken
of Nasser's dangerous drive for
hegemony at the expense of the in-
dependence of other Arab states.
In fast, the greatest danger is
seen in Nasser's unrelenting drive,
to dominate the Arab world. Too
much optimistic importance was
placed by the State Department on
were wary, fearing a victory ot- *** Possibility of a Suez Canal Co.
Nasser's anti-Western "neural- settlement.
.

! i
v

M in thl^SW1AA7\S 100% AIR CONDIJIONID
t>L MIAMI j
SWIMMING
POOL SUN DECK
Modern ship-Swimming Pool. Sun Deck. Excellent
Caisme, EoMfUwimint by Cruise Director nd SUM.
Ship it hotel. Tun* tor sightseeing.
Barfairi shopping in all ports.
Majstaa i
CiaM TrajUU fca b*. (sr-hM
Sea Jaea hmi sj
St. Tseajes ium* ci j i
Inm MIAMI I.J.s tU
4-DM HAVANA NASSAU
Saturday all day.all nightia Havana leaves Sunday Monday-all day in Nassau
Alston W, I., pWs asoa. team MIAMI f ri. t PM May t. 2); Jat a,2l jiilirljli
IdtmiiilHiiiMil* Aua. 1.I5.J*
EASTERN SHIPPING CORPORATION Gen I At,ent
3 POPo. 88; Miom.ft.Flii 1311 or spe -Ou TavelAge-l
Complete and Dependable Title Service
M
IAMI TITLE
& Qkttact Ca
34 YEARS OF TITLE SERVICE IN DADE COUNTY
ESCROWS ABSTRACTS TITLE INSURANCE
Title Insurance Policies ef
Kansas City Title Insurance Co.
Cmpilul, SaraJos < Reserves
ficaaal S4J0MM
124 anal 12t> SHOMIAKD AaKAarl TELEPHONE W 18*1
(Alao Knawn Ae 12* and 179 Security Trut Company Bldg.)



4-A
*Je*tstirk****>
Frid
^^Mayta



vJenisti Meridian
PubllahM !> Friday .inc. IMr by tha Jf*
ricndun at 110 N. Smth Straat, Miami 1S, Florida.
-*r,d at Hcond elm mi'tit July 4, 1*30, at tha Poit
Ofrica of- Miami, Fla.. undar tha Act of March S. 1ST*.
Tha Jiwuh Florldian hat abaorbad tha Jawlah Unity
ana tn Jawiah Waamy MimMr o tha Jawlah Tala-
ajtaphic Agency. Savan Arta Faatura Syndleata, World'
wioa Ni*i Sarvlca. National Editarlal Aaaociation, Amar.
kan Aaaociation of Engliah-Jatwiah Nawapaptra, Florida
Praa Aaaociation. .__________________
FRED K. SHOCHET.............Editor and Publisher
OFFICE and PLANT 120 N.E. Surth Street
Telephone FR 4-1141 FR 4-8212^
ruth
Tha JawUb FlorlJIan .0.1 not |JtfMtJJ tha K*a..
, of the marcbandia. advarttaad In Ita columna.
during tHm ir*#fc-
on i **## It
by LEO MINDLIN
MSBM.......Bbbtaal 1
TM"ESANot0
ethics that say.fea,
be performed for J^11
intrinsic worth, not l0f -.
Ona Year (5.00
Volume 32
S Two' vUraV* ULVaars .1..00
Number 18
LEO MINDLIN....... ...................Executive Editor
12 Ivor 5718
Friday. May 2, 1958
Silence May Encourage Further Violence
From a "community relations" point of
view, it is perhaps a good idea to keep secret
both the course and extent of police investiga-
tions.
We recognize that the police don't core
to be put on the griddle of critical public
opinion. We also understand that their in-
quiries can often be hampered by too much
publicity.
But total silence is not a preferrable altern-
ative to these possibilities. Two synagogues
have been dynamited here and in Tennessee;
less recent attempts have also been made on
The Warsaw Ghetto Uprising
April is the month of anniversaries. In ad-
dition to Israel's tenth anniversary celebration
launched this month, April marks thirteen years
since the death of President Franklin Delano
Roosevelt.
Three years ago in April Prof. Albert Ein-
stein passed away.
The Nazi Third Reich collapsed in April,
1945; while in April fifteen years ago some
30,000 Jews died during the Warsaw Ghetto
uprising.
This last anniversary is particularly signifi-
cant today, for the Warsaw Ghetto in its time
became a world symbol on two levels.
While the nations of Europe bowed in ter-
ror before Hitler's ravaging armies, it was the
Jews of the ghetto who made the first deter-
mined, fearless resistance against them.
Unarmed, they fought with their naked fists
and undaunted dignity a modern military ma-
chine the power of which had never been seen
before.
And this was the second symbol: that, in
the aftermath of the uprising, Jews would never
again be called "coward" by a world sated
horn baiting and persecuting them even as it
denied them the wherewithal of self-defense.
If the Jews of the Warsaw Ghetto succeed-
ed in nothing else, they showed where the cow-
ardice had always been. More important, how-
ever, they served notice that the armies of
Nazism were not invincibleand that the illicit
murder of Jews would never again go unchal-
lenged.
Out of the smoke and ruin of the Warsaw
Ghetto uprising, though 30,000 Jews perished,
there marched the advanced columns of many
of Israel's later citizens. Over the tire of Nazi
persecution, they helped forge a new nation.
This was the Warsaw Ghetto fifteen years
ago in April. Two years later in April the ar-
sonists and slaughterers of the ghetto succumb-
ed to the flames of their own tyranny.
Thirteen years after that, in April, we mark
the first decade of Israel's existencean anni-
versary the 30,000 who perished in the uprising
never more than dreamed would be celebrated
at some distant time in history.
two others in North Carolina. This is certainly
This means that the in
than the fruit of J^J*
i.^thecoreofmSjnp2
n ideihstic point of vt. ?
osophic reasoning can come up with no better rule for humaa*!?!
But practical consideration frequently demands a more raiir^!
preach. What courie does one take, for example m ther, 1l
person whose extremely delicate health precludes the pouMii
reporting to him that a beloved son or daughter hus justbee*!*T
down by an automobile? ^ """8.1
The categorical imperative of ethics urges that the truth K,au
while intelligence would dictate the lie in order to protect the J
from perhaps fatal stock. But the He is Irrefutable proof taM
has been performed for a purpose external to the act and not <
^JflJ^aiovAlvMU. CflBNLttAiyi thai .triitb^mbQlBe, Jatftonur^iJ
(feed for its own sake. For the ethically minded, the choice^
Deliberately ignoring ends, since ft would be immoral to do otheS
the automobile accident is reported. As had been feared thTaaU
The news Monday of the terrorist bomb- de,icjJ nea,,h camb* t0 8n* "d dies. The *?
inqs of a Jewish Center and a Negro junior high bee" ., ....., ,.
school in Jacksonville makes itworse. All of which is by way of saying that little less tha. ft,,,,
scnooi fui.a.ov.i.u.c of distinctl0n frequently existt between what one believes to ZZ
The dynanutings are symbols of something tru(h and wnat is often nothing more than cruelty in disguise v
far more terrible than the demented anti-Semit- man or woman is suspect who will, whether in wide eyed iiwoca
ism of a social malcontent. or under the strain of psychic confusion, tell the truth under wj
The dynamitings are waminas to commun- cumstances and regardless of the cost to human sensibility p,
ities like Miami throughout the South warn- reality, truth here ceases to-be a desirable social phenomena. |
ings that terror will be used to discourage law- has instead become a lethal weapon of destruction
abiding citizens from contributing toward a full
compliance with the Supreme Court ruling on
desearegation.
All decent Americans hope that police or- THE AMERICAN MEDICAL Center dinner at the Dupont Tarte.
rests will soon lead to a solution of the bomb- .'*0,','a ^L'L"'^l^' t Z'VnT" R00Seve" *
ings; all decent citizen, certainly are prepared ,{T"a "* K^JL"*** **;tui*Uon give, m ho*
to cooperate with our law enforcement officials
to the fullest extent in order to achieve this end.
If the police feel that a minimum of pub-
licity is helpful to them, it is our belief their
wishes should be respected. But it is also our
belief that no publicityno announcements, no
reports to the community on the progress being
made, no accounting to responsible leaders, no
assurances that investigations are being carried
forward to the limit of police meanscan bo
just as dangerous.
For silence gives groups like the "Confed-
erate Underground" responsible for the Jack-
sonville bombings Monday the feeling that the
South doesn't care what acts of destruction and
violence are committed by way of counter-
manding both the spirit and the letter of (he law
of the Supreme Court ruling on desegregation.
HI AHSWUS HIS OWN QUfSTIONS
French Self-Annihilation
The recent increasing evidence of anti-
Semitism in France is disturbing as much to
French officials as it is to Jews, themselves.
One would think that France had enough
anti-Semitism in the famed Dreyfus case at the
turn of the century to last her for a long time
to come.
In addition, the constantly growing rela-
tionship between France and Israel in the Mid-
dle East directly opposes the spirit of anti-Jew-
ish sentiment that has been heard and seen in
the French Republic more and more often dur-
ing the past months.
We expect that the French are embar-
rassed and that, as usual, they are trying to do
something about it. But France, a "poetic"
nation, moves slowly. Presumably, we must
dig in for a long haul in anticipation of this un-
savory situation's righting itself.
Meanwhile, unfortunately, many loyal
French Jews are being embarrassed. This is
another example of modern France's mania for
her own peculiar brand of self-reliant annihila-
tionregardless of the nation's best interests
either at home or abroad.
Apt Choices for Outstanding'
The "Outstanding Man and Woman of the
Year" for 1957 earn our applause. So do the
judges. Their particularly apt selections were
difficult to make, for they came from a long list
of candidates who have contributed to the
growth and development of Dade county.
John B. Turner is well-known for his lead-
ership in a number of causes. But his chair-
manship of Dade county's first United Fund
campaigna campaign marked by its record-
smashing successtruly earns for Turner the
high award presented him last week.
Mrs. Anna Brenner Meyers, as "Outstand-
ing Woman of the Year," symbolizes the cher-
ished democratic principles upon which this
nation is founded.
Both Turner and Mrs. Meyers have en-
viable records of civic leadershipthe listing
of which, alone, would take many columns.
Suffice it to say that their names signify for all
Dade countians the intelligent progress toward
which we all aspire.
THI 10th ANNIVIRSARY
industrialist Sam Kipnis. Ptomaine poisoning presumably held Raw-1
velt abed, and Rep. William Ayres of Ohio filled the breech in a as
minute substitution.
Ayres delivered an address in total conformity with the spirit tail
purpose of the occasion. He lauded the industrialist, served iai|
copious number of encomiums"for his charity of mind and pocket.
But the honored guest would not be moved.
Accepting a presentation made him by the American Medial I
Center at Denver, he assumed the role of a gay social commeouta-
instead. Speculating upon the possibility that Rep. Ayres might.
another one of those ambitious politicians, he wondered on whit baa
the substitute guest speaker called him by his first name, jut as
it was the Ohio legislator knew so much about him in view oft*]
fact that they had never met before.
Answering his own questions, Kipnis concluded that Rep. Ayra I
uncovered his information in the newspapers, which in turn cast iI
for his ascerbly humorous criticism. As he saw it, their tragic flit]
had been demonstrated by the headlines publicizinu the dinner. Un
characterized him as an American industrialist risen frum the nob i \
baby sitterdom.
His comic fancy tickled byood control, he proceeded to mhs
the motives behind the American Medical Center's decision to honor
him. Obviously, he concluded, it was to solicit an attractive gift Bu.
Kipnis reported, he had warned AMC spokesmen who initiall} ap<
proached him to dignify their occasion here that he hardly sit to-
self the "renowned personage" they imagined.
:- :- -:- -: :
IXAMMS Of fAUKATU SITUATKMS
IF OFFICERS OF the Miami chapter of the American Medical Ceate j
' at Denver insisted, who was be to be difficult' It was praumtHj |
on the basis of these disarming revelations that the industrialist is
sequently announced a gift the minimal nature of which shocked sw
community leaders.
I suppose no one can in full justice be criticalleast of all of*
gift a man chooses to make. In the strictest sense, it would be 4*
cult if not impossible to refute the charge that the Center had ultenw
motives in its desire to honor him. It would be equally difficult
accept on their face the substance of the headlines tracing his rw
from baby-sitter to tycoon. No less would it be impossible to **
the essential absurdity of Rep. Ayre's high praise when the two as j
had never previously met.
AU of these are examples of fabricated situations at best *'
fundamental falsehoods at worst. Contrarily, the guest of Mast 1
reply to the presentation was based on impeccable truths. The *
elusion must nonetheless be drawn here that indignity if not harm*
done the American Medical Center.
This is no plea for naive acceptance of the techniques earns* I
employed by publicisU and fund-raisers in their effort to advance |
cause they espouse professionally, by conviction or, on happy occ^*
both. Neither is this an excuse for the heights of fancy to which ft*
headlines frequently soar; their writers are on more than u"?
occasion at least as cynical as was Kipnis at his best last week.
u : -:- : :
hays a tuck on socinr
DUT THERE WAS a cause involved here. Right or wrong. P***
* bad. whether or not independent fund raising for national heaw
needs is intelligent, the American Medical Center called upon >w-
for financial support of its research work in cancer Even Mr
these considerations, the guest of honor clearly knew why he haa
approached. ^
If he entertained reservations based on private principle that
loaded flattery should be spurned, the time to exercise them mo "*_
since passed when he rose to the rostrum at the dinner Since v ^
ed to reject the offer at the outset, his dazzling display oi """
Us own sake became as suspect as the fund-raising and publicity p
tices he humorously lampooned. _,
Especially humiliating in my" eyes was this whole P"'"*".^
as a sequel to the address by Dr. Robert A. Huseby. diree"VJLnr
American Medical Center, who had flown here fom Denver "^ce
for the occasion. His pilhy characterization of the Center as sfj^
for research to help patients of the future rather than as a aw*
where the tragically condemned ate brought to die was subject
a kind of indignity by what followed. ^
There was no less truth in Mr. Kipnis' address on Us fl"^.
in Dr Huseby's. It was simply a case of lack-of concern tor
Barring the pressure upon him to rise to the rigorous oeman ^
philanthropic test, what other purpose could this psrticular or ^
truth serve than to play a joke on societythe very society ma
ored him for his charitable sensibility?
l


lay. May 2, 1958
* Jew 1st IhrUirtr
5-A
ISRAEL CELEBRATES HER TENTH ANNIVERSARY
, v
I.S. Leaders In Hands-Across-Sea Greetings
If ""mm
t -*.
m
early as last Chanuka, U. S. JewTy began
ring notice of Israel's then-approaching tenth
iniversary celebration. Chanuka festivals
roughout nation included this panoramic
dance scene, depicting building of a house for
immigrants in Israel, as presented at annual
festival in New York's Madison Square Gar-
den.
)M CAST-OFF VESSELS TO A MODERN LUXURY AND MERCHANT FLEET-
her 2,000 Years Israeli Ships
\gain Search the Earths High Seas
By GOTTLIEB HAMMER
President, American-Israeli
Shipping Company, Inc.
Israel went to sea in 1948 out of
re necessity. Hostile neighbors
Surrounding, her on three sides
)poaed an economic boycott and
prevented overland trade. For-
|LgD shipping companies sus-
pended operations to Haifa, Jaffa
ind .TVljAviv during the Palestine
war. and were slow to resume
|hern after th? war was won. The
Jewly created Jewish State had
Jo brine in food, raw materials,
nachiriery, motor vehicles, pre-
lab houses and a multitude of
other essentials or face starva-
tion and economic stagnation.
[Most urgent were the means of
transporting tens of thousands of
jm migrants from Europe and
tforth' Africa to their new home-
hand. All of these needs could be
(summed up in one word: ships!
[And they, had to be ships flying
the flag of Israel. Sad experience
proved that foreign vessels could
not be depended upon in times
of stress.
Even if no national emergency
had- existed in 1948 and 1949. Is-
rael would, have gone to sea. Geo-
graphy placed her at the eastern
rim of the Mediterranean and
hemmed her in by a vast desert
and semi-desert hinterland. The
sea is her natural line of com-
munication to .the rest of the
world. Israel had gone to sea in
ancient times. Sea-faring was as
much a part of her re-birth as
building industry and developing
agriculture.
The rise and development of Is-
rael's merchant fleet during the
last ten years can be divided into
three phases. The first phase was
an emergency during which the
young shipping industry pooled
its resources to acquire vessels
for the job immediately at hand
i Kiddush cup for Seder at seaMrs. Israel Goldstein, prominent
woman Zionist leader, presents silver wine goblet to Capt. Ber-
nard Berkowitz, master of SS Zion of Zim Israel America Lines,
prior to vessel's departure from New York a day before Pass-
over. Cup was dnated by 40 members of Pioneer Women of
America who sailed aboard Zion on tenth anniversary pil-
grimage to Israel. Second rCiddush cup presented by Pioneer
Women through Mrs. Goldstein is held by Zion's Chief Purser,
John Hoffman.
the transportation of immigrants
and vital import cargoes. The
second phase saw the consolida-
tion of Israel's chief maritime
services under a single manage-
ment and the first steps toward
the development of new trade
routes on a competitive basis.
The third phase was a vast mod-
ernization program which replac-
ed virtually the entire fleet with
fast new ships of the latest de-
sign, enabling Israel to expand
her maritime services and com-
pete on a basis of equality with
the services of other nations.
Throughout this ten-year period,
the pace of Israel's maritime
growth was set by the Zim Israel
Navigation Co., Ltd., of Haifa,
the country's largest shipping en-
terprise. The Zim lines were
founded shortly before Statehood
was proclaimed. Their initial
capital was provided by the Jew-
ish Agency for Palestine and His-
tadrut, Israel's labor federation.
Their total assets consisted of
half interest in a small, second-
hand ship.
During the emergency phase,
the Zim lines bore the brunt of
immigration and established the
first cargo lines to Mediterranean
ports and Northwest Europe. Zim
ships were old, several of them
on 11th hour reprieve from the
scrapyard. Good tonnage was ex-
pensive and in short supply in
1948. The miracle is that Zim
lines were able to maintain reg-
ular sailing schedules and carry,
tourists to and from Israel in
safety and comfort even if the
usual ocean liner frills were miss-
ing.
Many of the most famous steam-
ship companies in the world be-
gan with second-hand ships and
earned their first revenue from
immigration. The Zim lines dif-
fiiid jBnry in that it was perform-
ing a national service With little
thought of profit. Whatever the
company earned in immigrant
fares went into a special fund ear-
marked for future modernization.
The first steps in this direction
Continued on Pag* 7A
7-Point Program Proposed
To Ease Mideast Tensions,
Challenge Soviet Leadership
A seven-point program for eas-
ing tensions in the Middle East,
and saving the world from pos-
sible global warfare that could be
ignited in that region, due to the
Soviet thrust, was recently pro-
posed at a luncheon at the Hotel
Pierre in New York City by Gov.
W. Averell Harriman, former
United States Sens. Herbert H.
Lehman and William Benton, and
Mayor Robert F. Wagner.
The program called for:
American sponsorship of a
"pilot disarmament program" in
the Middle East as a challenge to
the Soviet Union's aggressive
thrust in that area, and as a way
"that points to peace and secur-
ity" for the entire world.
The convocation of a Middle
East States "summit conference"
by President Eisenhower, to in-
clude Israel as well as all the
Arab states.
American and Western-power
guarantees of Israel's territorial
integrity and frontiers.
Abandonment of the Amer-
ican policy of "impartiality" in
the Middle East and the substitu-
tion of a policy that would con-
vince the Arab states that any
'"destructive.". movement against
Israel would "fail because we are
going to see that it fails."
Creation of a United Nations
committee to meet with all the
Middle Eastern states, including
Israel, "privately or collectively,
openly or even secretly," in an
effort to attain peaceful existence
between the Arab states and Is-
rael.
. A challenge to the newly-fed-
erated kingdoms of Jordan and
Iraq to resettle Arab refugees
from land-hungry Jordan to man-
power-hungry Iraq, where the
refugees could find abundant
lands and work on needed devel-
opments.
A Middle East regional de-
velopment plan that would bene-
fit Arabs and Israelis alike eco-
nomically and socially.
The proposals were made in
addresses at the first meeting of
the American Committee for Is-
rael's "Tenth Anniversary Cele-
bration, of which Sen. Lehman is
general chairman. Dr. Israel
Goldstein, chairman of the com-
mittee, announced specific plans
for the American observance of
HEKBtRT H. LtHMAN
, disarmament program
W. AVtRUL HAM1MAN
... "bond in friendship" .
Israel's tenth anniversary. The
anniversary celebration began of-
ficially last week.
The American Committee is
composed of more than 500 prom-
inent Americans of all faiths who,
according to Lehman, "are not
interested in Israel alone, but are
concerned for the security and
stability of the Middle East as a
whole, and the welfare ot all the
peoples who inhabit that area."
Some 250 members of the com?
mittee attended the luncheon-
meeting.
In his address, Gov. Harriman,
Continued on Pago 6 A
World famous comedian Eddie Cantor with wife, Ida, prior to
his departure for trip to Israel in 1950. Cantor has long been
in vanguard of U.S. workers in behalf of Jewish State.


VK
+Jelstrk>rrt**n
fndoy. May 2,

1







U.S. Farmers Nucleus
For Start of Village,
Qrot, in Pioneers'Area
Soon after the State of Israel came into beinj. Levi Eshkol, now
Israel's Minister of Finance, spoke to the Jewish poultry farmers of
Vineland. N.J., askin if some of their children would not take up
farmin? m i Orot, the Smallholders' Cooperative Village, settled mottrjf by Enulish-
speaking couples from England. Canada, and South Alrica, with a
sprinkling of a few Americans.
The village has just ceieuiated
its tenth anniversary, and in h"n-
or of the occasion has laid the
cornerstone for its Cultural Ce.i-
ter.
The settlers are looking forward
to playing host to \H9ttors to I-
rael's tenlh anniversary celebra
tions. which beean Apr. 22, and
will last for a year.
Each family which settled in
Orot owns five acres of land, on
which the villagers prow veer
tables, cotton, and fnilt trees
Each family was provided with a
cow and bam. agricultural Imple-
ments and a well-stocked chicke.i
coop. In addition, the villase has
a larsc communal orange grove.
But the nicest crop raised in Orot
are the exceptionally handom.\
sturdy children growing np there.
Twenty-three attend kindergarten
in Orot, while twenty-six older
ones go to school in the nearby
village of Beer-Tuviah.
The village now numbers 46
Lies Goosens Pick, repeated-
ly referred to in Anne Frank's
celebrated diary as young
martyr's "best friend," arriv-
ed in Miami last year as part
of her tour of U.S. to bring
story of Israel, her adopted
country, to Jews throughout
nation.
families, a'l living in solid spa-
wn one-family uniis.
All the set !er> are *OOTrg (below
35) except for these parent wh.
have come to live with their chil-
dren and grandchildren. Wi h
the exeep M tochers and
an engineer in charge of construc-
tion in the retnon. all ot th?m are
ynuaced in farming. The whol?
village gives the impression of a
serenely active, educated people.
None of the settlers came from
wealthy homes; most of them
were clerks, the sons of small
shopowners, and describe them-
selves as working people.
One of the settlers. Abraham
Lev 1. of Johannesburg, told as:
"It's a nice life. We work hard,
but we really have everything we
need. Even the children work;
farming needs many hands to be
a paying proposition. The women
work harder than everybody. Be-
sides farmine. they have the
house and babies to care for. But
they seem to like it. You know,
no man can stay in a place if his
wife isn't happy there."'
He then told us of one of the
unexpected difficulties these new
farmers are up against. "We did
not know it when wc started it,
but for a farm to be productive,
one must constantly re-invest
one's profit. Most of us had lit-
tle cash left by the time we paid
our passage over. To raise cap-
ital out of earnings isn't easy,
and we have a nice natural in-
crease in children, who also need
to have some capital invested in
them. Still we manage. Some of
us bought a second cow, or two
calves instead of a cow, and as
they too multiply, we have a few
heads of rattle. On the whole we
are doing nicely, and this is the
life we chose and like. We have
a pleasant social life folk dan-
ces, a chamber music group, and
a play-reading circle. All in all,
there is hardly an evening with-
out something to do, though most
of us belong to those who like to
spend a quiet evening at home
with a book."
i
Lies Goosens Pick, who narrowly escaped sharing Anne
Frank's tragic death by being rescued from a sealed train
headed for gas chamber four days before V-E Day, emigrated
to Israel ten years ago. where she regained her health. Now
wife of Maj. Walter Pick of Israel Army and mother of three
children. Lies last -saw Anne Frank in winter of 1945, when
they met at Bergen Belsen. Inseparable friends from time they
were four years old. Lies and Anne (right) are shown together
during childhood in Amsterdam, Holland. This is but one of
countless tragedies turned "happy ending" in Israel, land of
miracles, which today celebrates tenth anniversary of inde-
pendence.
Greater Miami Jewry has fair share in th
pictorial views of men and women refashion-
ing their lives in Israel. Brought from every
part of globe, they are greeted, resettled and
steered onto course of self-reliance largely
through assistance of United Jewish Appnf
funds. Greater Miami Jewish Federatai
Combined Jewish Appeal campaign is thn |
area's arm of UJA.
Propose Seven-Point Program to Ease
Mideast Tensions, Challenge Soviet Rule
Continued from Pago 5 A
who praised Israel for having es-
tablished "a record for all the
world to be proud of," declared
that a number of factors must be
taken into account in evaluating
the situation in the Middle East
today. He listed these factors as:
"Implacable Arab hostility to-
ward Israel, and Arab determin-
ation eventually to destroy her;
the Kremlin's design to weaken
and destroy Western assets in
the area by any means; the con-
tinued failure of our Government
in recent years to do the thing
that might have injected, and
might now inject, a degree of sta-
bility into the area, namely, to
reaffirm in direct and meaning-
ful terms a pledge to protect
existing frontiers and armistice
lines against attempts to change
them by force, as we did in 1950;
the serene and steadfast progress
%t Israel toward fulfillment of its
national purposes."
One of "the ingredients in the
mortar of Arab nationalism."
warned Gov. Harriman, "is a de-
termination to drive Israel into
the sea."
"Instead of trying to convince
Arab leaders," the Govenor said,
"that our great country is 'im-
partial' as between them and
those they seek to destroy, we
must seek to convince them that
any movement that has destruc-
tive purpose at its core is bound
to fail because we are going to
ee that it fails."
On the other hand. Gov. Harri-
man held that the United States
must offer the Arab states "our
hand in friendship and help if
they will work together for hu-
man progress and live with Israel
in peace."
Sen. Lehman called for the is-
suance by this country of a chal-
lenge to the Soviet Union "to join
with us and other powers In spon-
soring a pilot disarmament pro-
gram" in the Middle Bast. In
that area, he assured his audi-
ence, "disarmament can be made
effective; Inspection hi no great
problem."
Such a pilot program, said the
four-time Governor of Now York,
Miami s Contribution to Israel
Combined Jewish UJA Other Ismi
Year Appeal Goal Allocation CtUMi
1957 $1,750,000 $950,000 sxm
1956 1.525,000 745.000 24,090
1955 1.251.000 537,000 20.000
1954 1.150.850 475,000 20.000
1953 U17.841 505.000 26,000
1952 1.158244 578.000 14,500
1951 1,201,608 581,000 27,090
1950 1.200.573 583,000 31.000
1949 1.100,000 578,000 48.000
1948 1.485,000 1,000.000 27,000
"is a genuine way to relax the
dangers in the area, a way that
points to peace and security."
Sen. Lehman called attention
to the "explosive" situation in the
Middle East which, he held, could
"threaten the extinction of civil-
ization," and accused the Soviet
Union of "capitalizing" on the
region'6 hostilities. "We face the
fact," he said, "that Russia has
become a mighty power and in-
fluencefor evilin tfcis region."
In the Middle Best today, Leh-
man cautioned, ''the Soviet Union
is calling the tune.'' He express-
ed the hope that the United States
and the rest of the world will net
"continue to dance" to the Soviet
tune.
"I would like to see eur coun-
try. he continued, "take the lead
in the United Nations or outside
the United Nations in association
with all nations interested in
peace, to work 'tar fundamental
programs that will be to the ad-
vantage not of any particular
power-bloc, hot of all mankind.
"Regional undertakings for the
social and economic betterment
of all the peoples of the area con-
stitute a logical approach. The
emphasis must be shifted from
the differences which divide
these peoples to the common in-
terests which should unite them
and I mean all of them, includ-
ing the Israelis.
"Many specific plans ha H
put forward to provide nt*\
and credit for programs to rwi
the living standars of "I*?
pie, and to make possible *"
ual fulfillment and socnl jw"
for aU.
These plans and "
must be advanced astte si
head of American P*f* *
Middle Eaat-alon* 2
tees of security and tern**
integrity to which 1 haw aln
'rwcrrco.
"Let the Sovie- '*"* *[
lenged, publicly I*!""" ^
in es many variations as
necessary, to join with "|
projects
"Let es hold 'iP ***,,
world a vWen 0' **^JJl
poHcv of peace in <**,!
Bst. Let us urge '*]"*,
this area to direct ***"!
against a ^'/^'lifti A
let Arab and '<;,'*!?rw.
Joined In hrhMhv **J
vest from the land wh*"
only for water and eert A
"Bat Isahih-s ****;*
time when swords would oe
en Into ploughshares be '
first In the Middle Ea*J*J
the prophecy was m*
ancient times m
Mayor Wagner "^J^-at
mittee that the Arab staaw ^
be "made to understaso ^
peaceful life between AraW
Caiwhwd en *$**


lay. May 2. 1958
*w/tll fhrirf/tr
7-A
Israel Shows Her Strength in Field of Action
Lightening Sinai Campaign
Told World Arab 'Sniping'
Would Not Go Unanswered
The most fateful days in recent Israel history began on Oct. 29,
1956, when Israeli forces struck deep into the Sinai Peninsula to route
put Egyptian fedayeen (commando) bases there, whose personnel had
^een striking terror into the hearts of Jewish border settlers, raiding,
pillaging, destroying and murdering in nightly forays.
The following is a day-by-day "log" of events that occared after
ahat modern military expert* consider to be one of the most remark -
Ible war maneuvers h> history:
Oct. 29
Israel strikes oat to destroy the
ledayeen oases. In th& course of
live days, it succeeds in destroy-
ing the Egyptian-controlled feda-
|reen bases in the Gaza Strip, and
Ihe Egyptian fortification block-
ading the Gulf of Aqaba.
In the Sinai Desert the Israel
lefense forces capture and dis-
place the Egyptian fortifications
It Sharm-el-Sheikh. The Israelis
klso take the islands of Tiran and
Banafir. This action produces two
isults: It pats an end to the ter-
srist campaign of the fedayeen;
opens up the Port of Elath not
Only to commerce for Israel, bat
is an international waterway,
free 'to peaceful traffic of the
Ships of all nations.
Oct. 30
Israel informs the Security
Council it is ready to negotiate
peace with Egypt.
Oct. 31
Following Israel's march on
Sinai, Russia warns Israel that
|ts future is at stake.
Nov. S
The United Nations votes to es-
sblish the United Nations "Emer-
. icy Hsrce, since stationed in
FGata.^ahd atSharmel-Sheikh, the
(purpose of which is to prevent the
outbreak of new hostilities.
The USRR warns that Israel's
''very existence as a state is at
Istake."
- Nov. 11 -
Great Britain, in a special re-
Iport, estimates that Egypt had re-
Iceived, in a single year, $420 mil-
lion worth of military equipment,
(including bombers ami other
[heavy equipment, and that the in-
filtration of technicians make it
[possible for the Russians to form
[military unions very quickly.
Ndv. $9
The Soviet Union proposes that
[the Israeli defensive troops be
tried as war criminals, while Iz-
| vestia declares, "the very exist-
; ence of Israel as a state is now
I in doubt."
The USSR proposes a 24-hour
strafing of Israel. Its offer of
volunteers to take their place by
the Egyptians is regarded as di-
rected primarily against Israel.
December
By the end of December, the
Arab boycott is extended to for-
eign firms having Jewish direc-
tors, while foreign firms doing
business with Israel are called
upon to suspend operations under
the threat of being banned'from
the entire Arab world.
By the end of December, 100
ships have been blacklisted by
Bgypt, Israel cargoes confiscated
to the value of $9,600,000, an Is-
raeli ship seized, while the cost to
Israel, as a result of the ban on
oil from the Middle East, was $44
million.
Jan. 15, 1957
United Nations Secretary Gen-
eral Dag Hammarskjold upholds
the international character of the
Gulf of Aqaba in a report to the
General Assembly, In which he
states: "The international signifi-
cance of the Gulf of Aqaba may
be considered to justify the right
of innocent passage Jhrsugh the
Straits of Tiran and the Gulf, in
accordance with recognized rules
of international law."
Jan. 19
Secretary General Hammarsk-
jold, in a report to the General
Assembly, declares: "None of the
parties to the 1949 Armistice
Agreement is entitled to claim
belligerent rights, including the
application of such rights in the
Gulf of Aqaba and the Straits Of
Tiran. It follows from the find-
ing of the Security Council in
1951 ... the parties of the Armis-
tice Agreement may be consid-
ered as not entitled to claim any
belligerent rights and will not as-
sert belligerent rights (including,
of course, such rights in the Gulf
of Aqaba and the Straits of
Tiran.)"
Fob. 11
The United States issues a
memorandum emphasizing the in-
ternational character of the Gulf
of Aqaba, the right of free and
Continued on Pago 9A
Former President Harry S. Truman, who virtually fathered
Israel into existence with immediate U.S. recognition of Jewish
State, is shown on occasion of his winning annual America-
Israel Friendship Award for 1956. Making citation is M^. S.
Deborah Ebin, past national president of Mizrachi Women's
Oganixation of America, in brief ceremonies at Truman's office
in Kansas City. Award cited him as "that American, not of
Jewish faith, who has contributed most deeply to friendship
and understanding between the people of the United States
and the people of Israel."
Intensified effort to achieve sale of $75 million
in Israel Bonds during 1958 was planned last
week at a special meeting of board of govern-
ors of State of Israel Bond Organization.
Shown at session are seated (left to right) Abra-
ham Feinberg, Israel Bond president; Levi Esh-
kol. Minister of Finance of State of Israel; Ira
Guilden, national campaign chairman of Is-
rael Bond drive, who presided at meeing.
Standing (left to right) are Samuel Rathberg,
national chairman for -trustees, and D. Joseph
J. Schwartz, Israel Bond vice president. Eshkol
stressed that Israel's achievements during her
first decade of Statehood must be consolidated
through expanded economic effort, and em-
phasized importance ofTState of Israel Bonds.
BONN REPARATIONS AGREEMENT GAVE BIG BOOST
Israel Again Travels the High Seas
Continued from Pago 5 A
were taken in 1950 when Zim pur-
chased two newly built fruit car-
riers for Israel's all-important
citrus trade. At the same time,
they placed orders in Dutch
yards for two similar vessels, the
first designed and built specific-
ally for the Israel flag.
In 1052, Zim lines entered the
North Atlantic trades. This was
done through the purchase of two
other Israeli shipping lines, the
M. Dizengoff Company and the
Israel American Line. Zim also
-purchased the American-Israeli
Shipping Company of New York,
which became their representa-
tives in-the U.S. and Canada. Ser-
vices to North America were
streamlined. Uneconomical ves-
sels were replaced by ships bet-
ter suited to the route. In the
spring of 1953, the first Israel-
flag passenger liner service be-
tween New York and Haifa was
established with an old ship pend-
ing construction of new liners.
The Bonn Israel Reparations
Pact in 1952 hastened the mod-
ernization of the Zim fleet.
Through the reparations account,
the company was able, to finance
the construction of 14 new fchips
representing an investment of
some $35 million. Eight of them
were cargo motorvessels, rang-
ing up to 7.000 deadweight tons,
which entered service in 1955 and
195. Two were combination pas-
senger-cargo liners, the popular
SS Israel and SS Zion, designed
for the Haifa-New York route.
One was an 18,500 ton tanker.
The two final units of the pro-
gram were luxury passenger lin-
ers SS Theodor Herzl and SS Je-
rusalem, designed for the Medi-
terranean service and winter
cruising. Both of these ships en-
tered service in 1957.
Zim lines today own and oper-
ate 25 vessels of over 130,000
deadweight tons. They are em-
ployed on ten separate services
which cover most of Europe and
Africa, U.S. Gulf and Eastern
seaboard ports, the Great Lakes
and the Far East. These ships
presently account for about 33
percent of Israel's exports and 28
percent of her Import trade. They
carry 85 percent of all passen-
gers traveling to and from Israel
by sea. Seventy-five percent of
the Zim fleet is made up of ves-
sels built during the last five
years.
Th the passenger department,
the Zim lines provide the finest
services ever offered to and from
the Holy Land. The modern sis-
Miami Makes Bond Investments
Israel's victory on the battlefield in 1948 was the principal
contribution to her development during the last decade. But the
economic and industrial progress made by Jewish State business
and commerce solidified and gave meaning to this Victory.
Greater Miami's share in the Israel Bond campaign, key source
of Israeli development funds, is shown here:
YEAR BONDS PURCHASED
1951 (Independence Issue lauched in May) $702,460
1952 -------.,__________________________631,300
1953 ............----------------------------- 544,750
1954 (Development Issue launched in May) 528,250
1955 ....................___:___I_____________....... 631,250
1956 ------------------............._.....___................. 926,250
1957 .................... ..............__________...... 947,650
Joel Van Coevorden, chef de cuisine aboard SS Israel, inspects
two huge pressure cookers which are about to be scoured
with live steam following a voyage from Haifa to New York.
In course of an average two-week trip, Dutch-born Israeli
supervises preparation of 1,000 meals a day in liner's modern
kitchens.
terships Israel and Zion sail from
New York and Haifa every three
weeks the year round. Each liner
accommodates 300 passengers in
first and tourist classes, all in
outside staterooms. Much of the
accommodation is air condition-
ed. Facilities are on a par with
the best to be found anywhere.
The new Theodor Herzl and
Jerusalem maintain weekly ser-
vice between Haifa, Naples and
Marseilles. These fully air con-
ditioned liners each carry 560
passengers. They boast a com-
plete deck of public rooms and
a movie theater seating 100 per-
sons. Like the Israel and Zion,
they provide such amenities as
automatic lifts linking the pas-
senger decks, outdoor swimming
pools, separate children's dining
rooms and playrooms and under-
water stabilizing fins which re-
duce rolling in heavy weather.
Both new ships made special voy-
ages to New York this spring.
One of them will be there next
winter for a series of West Indies
cruises, the first under the Israel
flag.
Zim lines' growth is far from
Continued on Pago 9-A


04*1
the
3
jW'd %^ /#



MUSICAL SALUTE
TO ISRAEL
IT
CAHTOtS
ASSOCIATION
or
WKATEt
CANTO*
JACOf
BotNsnm,
NtfS.DENT
K1V
ll I
Greater Miami Committee For
Israel's 10th Anniversary Celebration
invites you and your family
to a
Community-Wide
BIRTHDAY
CELEBRATION
THURSDAY. MAY 8
8 p.m.
BAYFRONT AUDITORIUM
BISCAYNE BLVD. at NX FIFTH STREET
SEE.. HEAR ..
^--'
""^ss-
***;
Greater Miami Committee For
Israel's Tenth Anniversay Celebration
60V. ioot counts, I
STANUY C MTBtS. Ckukmm
A. AITWt KKOMO, Cluif. l.tetm
atom nsca mm. Hopofj
Z. SAK1A1S.
S?if?*S4Gv7
^ *""*
NO ADMISSION CHARGE ... NO SOLICITATION OF FUNDS
L ALBERT PALLOT
HOWARD KANE
FLEEMAN BUILDERS
THE MAILMAN BROTHERS
JOSEPH R. STEIN
MR. MIKE SOSSIN
MRS. JACK ABLIN
PEOPLES GAS SYSTEM
THIS MESSAGE MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH THE COOPERATION OF
LEE COUNTY LAND ft TITLE CO.
MR. AND MRS. CHARLES CHARCOWSKY
MR. AND MRS. ABRAHAM KASOW
MR. AND MRS. MORRIS SIMON
RICHARDSON FURNITURE WHSL, INC
MR. AND MRS. SAM REINHARD ft FAMILY
MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM AGRANOVE .
MK. AND MRS. JACK KATZMAN
MAX KRAUSS, President
Kort* Short Jewish Center
TNI HEBREW ACADEMY
B. I. Binder, President
MT. NEtO CEMETERY
JENNIE GROSSINGER
AND MRS. HARRY L MAGID
LfON B. JACOBS
j


May 2. 1958
^JemMifhrMkui
Imping Would be Answered
firmed fmm Page 7-A
passage through the
lid the willingness of the
Slates tojrttercise and test
lit. The memorandum de-
"The United States be-
hai the Gun comprehends
fcional waters and that no
bas the right to prevent
innocent passage in the
\d through the Straits giv-
es* thereto. We have in
bt Only commercial usage,
(passage Of pilgrims on re-'
[inissioiis, which should be
specteeV'
[memorandum continues:
ilnited States recalls that
28, 1950, the Egyptian
of Foreign Affairs in-
I the United States that the
In occupation of the two
of Tiran and Sanafir at
hnce of the Gulf of Aqaba
Uy to protect the islands
pves against possible dam-
violation and that 'this oc-
bcing in no way con-
In a spirit of obstructing in
innocent passage through
etch of water separating
co islands from the Egypt-
it of Sinai,' it. follows that
Issage, the only practicable
pil remain free as in the
conformity with interna-
[ practices and recognized
lies of the law of nations.
he absence of some over-
| decision to the contrary,
[the International Court of
\, the United States, on be-
vesseurof United States
y. is prepared to exercise
lit of free and innocent pas-
ad to jo|n with others to
[general recognition of this
Feb. 20
pident Eisenhower, in a
st, states: "We should not
that if Israel withdraws
harm-el-Sheikh. Egypt will
Israel shipping from us-
| Suez Canal or the Gulf of
If. unhappily hereafter,
violates* the Armistice
sent, then this should be
eith firmly by the Society
Ions."
Mar. 1
el's Foreign Minister Golda
Ion behalf of Israel, affirms
|s own belief that the Gulf
lie straits of Tiran are in-
lonal waterways: on the as-
lion that they would be so
lined, she announces to the
fal Assembly Israel's readi-
withdraw its forces from
goida mm
... far good of all
Sharm-el-Sheikh, with their place
taken by United Nations Emer-
gency Forces. She states:
". The Government of Israel
believes that the Gulf of Aqaba
comprehends international waters
and that no nation has the right
to prevent free and innocent pas-
sage in the Gulf and through the
Straits giving access thereto, in
accordance with the generally ac-
cepted definition of those terms
in the law of the sea*
"In its capacity as a littoral
State, Israel will glady offer port
facilities to ships of all nations
and all flags exercising free pas-
sage in the Gulf of Aqaba. We
have received with gratification
the assurances of leading Mari-
time Powers that they foresee a
normal and regular flow of traf-
fic of all cargoes in the Gulf of
Aq&ba.
"Israel will do nothing to im-
pede free and innocent passage
by ships of Arab countries bound
to Arab ports or to any other des-
tination.
"Israel is resolved on behalf of
vessels of Israel registry to ex-
ercise the right of free and inno-
cent passage on the high seas and
in international waters.
"Interference by armed force
with ships of Israel flag exercis-
ing the right of free and innocent
passage in the Gulf of Aqaba and
through the Straits of Tiran will
be regarded by Israel as an at-
tack entitling it to exercise its in-
herent right of self defense under
Article 51 of the United Nations
Charter and take all such meas-
ures a are necessary to ensure
4
4
4
4
4
4
-air-. -mAmrr. *- tow tkaco ion
Woy I S.W. 27th Ave. 840 S.W. 8th St. \
"Progressing with Our Many Satisfied Customers"
AHOTMII LOCATION FOR YOUf CONVENIENCE
(HILTON BROS
iew- COLUMBUS -now open-
CONVALESCENT & NURSING CENTER
MODERATE RATES REGISTERED NURSES
I Complete #*-_|| Dl T_fW?l S*42 NE 2nd Av-
} A Facilities 1*011 TsW /-UZ/ I Miaml, Fl.
24 HOURS
Don'.* put it off put it on !
Re-Roof 3
WRITTEN GUARANTEE
LICENSED & INSURED
PAYMENTS ARRANGED
"AX TOM IffF/Cr*
Nr free liNaMe
HONf
PL 1-1658
m
Re-Roofing
& Repairing
ACM
SUPPLY CO.
2*70 N.W. 75m ST.
I
the free and innocent passage of
its ships in the Gulf and in the
Straits.
"Israel is now prepared to with-
draw its forces from the Gulf of
Aqaba and the Straits of Tiran in
the confidence that there will be
continued freedom of navigation
for international and Israeli ship,
ping in the Gulf of Aqaba and
through the Straits of Tiran."
Foreign Minister Golda Meir
appeals through the United Na-
tions General Assembly for Arab-
Israel peace, stating: "Can we,
from now onall of usturn a
new leaf and, instead of fighting
each other, can we all united
fight poverty, disease, and illit-
eracy? ... I can here pledge the
Government and people of Israel
to do their part in this united ef-
fort. There it no limit to what we
are prepared to contribute, so
that all of us together can live to
see a day of happiness for all our
peoples, and see again from that
region a great contribution to
peace and happiness to all hu-
manity."
Mar. 1 to I
The views expressed by the
Government ~of Israel are sup-
ported in the UnMd Nations Gen-
eral Assembly by the representa-
tives of the United States, Argen-
tina, France, Costa Rica, Great
Britain, Italy, the Netherlands,
New Zealand, Australia, Belgium,
Canada, Norway, Sweden, Den-
mark, Iceland.
Apr. 6
The United States ship, the
Kern Hills, passes through the
Gulf of Aqaba, testing the right
to freedom of passage, to deliver
oil to Israel at its Port of Elath.
Israel completes an eight-inch
oil pipeline from Elath to a Med-
iterranean port.
May 14
Secretary of State John Foster
After 2,000 Years, Israeli Ships
Again Search the High Seas
Continued from Page 7A
over. In a sense, it is just begin-
ning. The company will soon
make a determined bid for a fair
share of general ocean commerce
in addition to serving Israel's
trade needs. Zim recently era-
barked on a $100 million new
building program that will add 27
ships of more than a quarter of a
million tons to the fleet between
1958 and 1963. Five of the ves-
sels building or on order are dry
bulk carriers in the 18,000-20,000
ton class. Three are tankers of
about the same size. One and pos-
sibly two super-tankers of 46,000
tons are contemplated. These
ships will give Israel a high de-
gree of maritime self-sufficiency
and will substantially increase
her foreign currency earnings.
The first unit of the new con-
struction program is already in
service. She is the 15,050 ton, 16-
knot cargo motorship Ampal em-
ployed on monthly service from
U.S. Gulf and Southeastern ports
to Italy, Greece and Israel. The
Ampal is one of the largest ves-
sels of her type afloat. She has
six holds and ventilated between
decks providing 840,000 cubic feet
of cargo space and an additional
45,000 cubic feet of deep-tank
space for lubricating or vegetable
oils. She is ideally suited for both
general merchandise or bulk car-
goes such as ore, grain or coal.
With a cruising range of 18,000
miles, she can be employed any-
where in the world. Her sister-
ship, the MS Negba, enters ser-
vice in June.
Israel is employing her mer-
chant marine not only for profit
but for the creation of good will.
Last year, the Zim lines entered
into a unique arrangement with
the newly-independent West Afri-
can Republic of Ghana to estab-
lish the Black Star line, the first
shipping venture under the Gha-
nan flag. Zim lines contributed
40 percent of the initial capital
and their ten years of ship oper-
ating know-how.
'Israeli officers on leave from
the Zim fleet are manning the
first Ghanan ships while Ghanane
train at the Israel Nautical Col-
lege in Acre. Zim lines undertook
this, partnership, with the Israel
government's blessings, in order
to strengthen the ties of friend-
ship and commerce between Is-
rael and the new African nation.
This unselfish move on the part
Blood Pressure Reading $1
No Waiting.
DR. EARL N. KAHN (D.C.)
441 Washington Avenuo
Miami Beach JE 2-3395
MASSAGE
' Webbar Bros. Swediih Mimgl
COLONICS
Dierfcer Colonlc Irrigations
STEAM BATHS
FR 4-IMM 51 E. lit Straet
10 A.M. -8 P.M.
Horn* and Hotel Calls
of an Israeli shipping company
has created a stir among under-
developed African and Asian na-
tions. Several already have ap-
proached Israel with a view to-
ward similar joint arrangments.
Perhaps nothing that Israel bas
done has so effectively countered
Arab and Soviet propaganda in
the area.
7-Point Plan
For Accord
Continued from Pago 6A
Jews in Israel is possible, and
that the entire world would bene-
fit from "peace and progress" in
the area. "The burden of this
educational program," he said,
"devolves naturally upon the Uni-
ted Nations, with the United
States as the sponsoring nation
giving impetus to this drive.''
"Recent events in this area,"
continued the Mayor, "point up
the urgency of the situation, and
my plan necessarily calls for im-
mediate action. A committee of
responsible leaders of the United
Nations should meet with all the
Middle East nations, privately or
collectively, openly or secretly.
Note on Illustrations
General photographic illustrat-
ions in this and recent Israel Tenth
Anniversary Sections of The Jew-
ish Floridian include material pre-
pared by the natnonal offices of
'the United Jewish Appeal aid Is-
rael Bond Organization.

______________________9-A
Dulles tells a Washington press
conference that the United States
would not oppose an effort by Is-
rael to test her rights by sending
a ship through the Suez Canal.
May IS
This statement is confirmed by
President Eisenhower.
May 20
Russia, in the United Nations
Security Council, challenges Is-
rael's right to test its use of the
Suez Canal.
May 24
The Arab states, in a joint ef-
fort^ try to persuade the United
States to change its view on the
international character of the
waterways of Suez and Aqaba,
and the rights of free and inno-
cent passage.
Juno 3
Israel announces its support of
the Eisenhower Doctrine.
The Economic Council of the
Arab League decides to strength-
en the boycott by blacklisting
concerns selling vehicles to Is-
rael, and foreign companies un-
der contract to furnish Israel
with goods and services, and fur-
ther by establishing a unified sys-
tem to control exports and im-
ports to prevent Arab goods from
reaching Israel and Israel goods
from reaching Arabs through in-
termediaries. '
Juno II
Russia delivers tlyee subma-
rines.
Juno 23
The United States reiterates the
views expressed on Feb. 11 and
makes public a State Department
communication to shipping com-
panies directing them promptly
to report any denial of the right
of "free and innocent passage."
Juno 28
The State Department, in an
aide memoire, rejects Arab claim
denying Israel's right to freedom
of passage in the Gulf of Aqaba
and the Suez Canal.
July
The first International Con-
gress of Jewish Studies is opened
in Jerusalem, participated in by
120 scholars from abroad and 350
from Israel.
September
The first international stamp
exhibition in Israel is held at
Tabil, 33 countries participating.
Twenty six countries, repre-
sented by 1.000 athletes, partici-
pate with '5.000 Israelis in fifth
world Maccabee games.
An international conference on
nuclear structure is opened at the
Weizmann Instiiute of Science at
Rchovoth.
Oct. 31
Israel completes its drainage of
the Huleh swamps.
MIAMI BEACH SURFSIDE
1104 Lincoln Rd. 9473 Hording Ave.
Ph.JE 1-3812 PH. UN 64171
pierre
CUSTOM TAILOKING
1104 LINCOLN ROAD
Miami leech
9473 HARDING AVENUE
S.rfside
HAIERBASNIir
34th rear Mimmi feel*
:


PRUDENTIAL
LAND
COMPANY
Op DVfc
tfs
o:
^1 36j


10-A
+Jeistncridt*tl





.



':

Fridge,
for Leadership
Noted at AJC Confab
NFW YORKNelson A. Rockc- The president of the Rockefeller
feller forecast here a steady rise Foundation Termed it "a tremen-

in family income, full employment,
expansion of industry an I a doub-
ling of expenditures for reilh. ed-
ucation and social welfare pur-
poses.
Rockefeller delivered I striking-
ly optimistic speech on 'h" naH
economic, social and hitman rirhts
prospects before the 51st annual
meeting of the American Jewish
Committee at th? Bil'more hotel
here last weekend.
Stressing that we can achieve
full employment an-l stability."
Rockefeller pinpointed as foresee-
able the following developments:
"... a steady rise in family
income to perhaps 50 percent more
than it is today;
". expansion of our private
enterprise eeonomv:
"... a doubling in the next
ten years of expenditures on health,
public works, education and social
insurance."
At the same time Rockefeller
emphasized: "We look forward
to bringing back Me the main
stream of our life those who for
reasons of education, vocation
end, yes, discrimination have
been debarred from sharing in
its abundance." '
At another point of the evening.
IrVing M. Engel. president of the
American Jewish Committee, an-
nounced a contribution of $250,000
by Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Blaustein.
to the Committee's Institute of Hu-
man Relations. The Institute,
which will be completed by spring
of 1959. will serve as a center for
research and practical application
in the field of human relations.
Blaustein. of Baltimore, an indus-
trialist, was president of the Com-
mittee for five years and is now
the Committee's honorary presi-
dent.
Rockefeller centered his speech
on the importance of the individual
human being, pointing out that all
gams "are meaningless unless
dous human adventure." in the
American tradition, "to join with
others in freeing men everywhere
from persecution and prejudice,
from sickness and want."
Rockefeller warned that "big-
otry and prejudice continued to
plague us in many ways" despite
th? fact ft>st "we have both a
political framework and an ethi-
cal climate dedicated o the free-
nm of the intividual to develop
his capacity. As yet we have not
fully realized the full potential of
this ideal."
In this connection Rockefeller
declared: "But it is the recogni-
tion and constant enhancement of
individual worth that has given a
sense of direction to our lives as
a people. It is the realization that
freedom is for all men, everywhere
and not for us alone, that gives
meaning to our purpose."
Engel, in his presidential ad-
dress, recommended the creation
of a comprehensive plan centered
on a regional. Middle-Eastern eco-
nomic development program. To
this end, he urged the initiation of
a study of an objective, non-polit-
ical nature to be undertaken under
the aegis of a group of distinguish-
ed Americans with a record of high
competence.
The Committee president called
upon the U.S. Government to sup-
port a comprehensive plan of eco-
nomic aid and cooperation for the
entire Middle Eastern region.
Engel paid tribute to the State
of Israel en her tenth anniver-
sary. "Out of the depth* of our
concern for the fabric of free-
dom we must, inevitably, turn to
Israel. Born in the councils of
the United Nations, Israel was
the world's answer to the Roman-
off Cxars and their pogroms, to
Adeloh Hitler and his Ausch-
witz."
At the same time. Engel warned
they contribute to the freedom and I that the communists are putting to
opportunity of the individual to cxceilent use the "mighty and nat-
clevelop his own life." He enlarged
on this point by saying that "our
purpose to translate economic
growth into individual well-being is
the touchstone of our dedication to
the ideal of human dignity."
The impact of American free-
dom and growth. Rockefeller said,
is "felt throughout the world." Mil-
lions of oppressed people "have
caught from us and our Judeo-
ural force" of the grievances and
aspirations of the people of Asia,
Africa and India. These people,
the majority of the world's popula-
tion, are determined to "throw off
the yoke of legalized inferiority."
The pursuit of equality of oppor-
tunity is no longer a matter of na-
tional pride but of national sur-
rival, Engel stated. "Whether we
like it or not, as the leading demo-
Christian heritage the concepts and eratic power of the Western World,
meaning of the freedom of the in-; we have been plunged into a posi-
dividual to develop himself to his tion of dramatic visibility. Our
full stature as a spiritual being." | private domestic quarrels, partic-
INJ0Y
A TRADITIONAL fRIDAY NIGHT DINNER
SACRAMENTAL WINE and SELTICR OEFILTE FISH
MATZOH BALL SOUP KREPLACH ROAST CHICKEN
ROAST DUCKLING CHICKEN OR BEEF IN POT KUGEL
STUFFED DERMA TZIMMES STRUDEL DESSBRTS
O TEA OR COFFEE
IO-COURSF
$
DINNER
I re ,'jiI mj: Dm 0 St
350
SIRVATIONS
K 1 6881

V
Herbert H. Lehman (center), honorary vice
president of American Jewish Committee, is
paid -special tribute for bis "six decades of.
service to the cause of human welfare and hu-
man rights" with presentation of a Bruce
Rogers Bible by Committee at its 51st annual
meeting in New York last weekend.'
pating are Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt,]
Rockefeller (seated right); Col. Fn
Greenman (standing left),
president; and Irving M. Engel.
president. Bible has only 975 nanbeig)J
nlarly those that reveal how we
feel about one another, and espec-
ially about those among us of dif-
ferent race or color, are of para-
mount importance to some two and
a half milNon people in all parts
of the world."
Herbert H. Lehman was honor-
ed on he* Mth birthday by the
American Jewish Committee for
his six decodes of service to hu-
man rights end human welfare.
Sen. Lehman, in accepting the
gift, focused on the cultivation of
leadership in American life, which
he called "our greatest necessity."
He said: "If I were asked to select
one element that could be produced
by wishing for itor working for it
that element would be national
leadershipa leadership that would
inform, advise, arouse and inspire
the people to do things tnat mus^t
be done to solve our problems."
With the advent of this quality of
leadership, Lehman envisioned an
acceleration of the prospects for
world peace and the achievement
of "that bright future which I am
sure is in store for eur country
and for mankind."
Mrs. Roosevelt paid tribute to
Sen Lehman's "courage, vigor and
great breadth of interest." Above
everything else, she said, "you
have inspired so many young peo-
ple to respect and admiration be-
cause they have felt that you spoke
asd aoted according to the dictates
of your conscience
ternv as president of)
Jewish Committee art
ation's 51st annual |
last weekend.
Newly-elected it 11
sion of the meeting
Lazarus.Jr.. hbnoraty |
National Advisor) la
H. Block, Julius H.
Gang. J. M. Kaplan, Af
bend, vice prendenu.
William Rosenwaldsi
man of the Conuniueen
Advisory Council. Alail|
was elected cnamnasdl
Engel was reelected to a fifth I administrative btsri
... finest outline
taw discriminating.
PMf)|gj ,
NICK d
ARTHUR'S
RESTAURANT
Your Hosts
NICK & ARTHUR
' Succulent charcoal steaks done to
I o tender turn delectable
| dishes to tempt the most pampered
palott .
Per Reservations Ptteoe
UN 6-9759
1601 79th St. Causeway
OPEN ALL YEAR
STRATH HAVEN HOTEL
The On/y Kosher Hotel Directly on Ike Ocean lersw tiecela weed with
Air-Conditiomng Swimming Pool 200 ft. Private Beach
HUNG ROOM OPEN ML YEAR
Kashruth and Sabbath Strictly Observed
10W SUMMER RATES
Mgt: Rabbi Abraham I. Twersky and Joseph Hoffman
WRITE OR PHOWE FOR RESERVATIONS
417 Oetan Drive -Miami Beach Ph. II 4-4691
coMPim l-cm
DINNERS frw $1J|
mtwm,
SHTIU mi MB |
Wl Ml AIL OtlKIOilS COLD t NOT DHKATKSf", Sit** |
AND OUK OWM SAK18Y GOODi.
1141 Washington Ave. Opposite City Hall Mia
? Open Deify 11 a.m. to 9 a.m. Satereey S a**!
IXQUISm CAJUiD AffAIKS rVfDD/NGS, BA* MITIn* {
At Home or hi feer Temple
FINEST ^73
CAjmnc rot Hi occ*
940 -71st St., Miami I
mt Fork N 6-6043
OffN DART 4 h"
Under Orthodn
BOOKINGS FOR WEDDINGS AND JAR MiTZVA|
ARE NOW BEING TAKEN POR THE SUMMER MOH
AT VSRY REASONABLE PRICES
ROYAL HUNGARIAN -RM MEAT RESTAUB
731 Washington Avenue
PMONE JE I-J669
LINCOLN MANOR 2S*1
0 the OlMi
SERVING 7 COURSE KOSHER DINNER fro* Sl*|
< an ring Far All Oceaslo*'
Alt CORDfTIOIBD l0W?TJiSr
Wader t.Mmic.1 SeserWi/ee ef the OrhWeJi trees' "
, tweeter ^.,,1
1 IHKOIM > mZ*
Ml /. M
Free Poritlag ea Premises
U<
k*Ll
VOAY
* n *n


lay 2, 1958
ration Test
Applauded
is President
fORKCarlos L. Israels,
bnt of United Hias Ser-
j-wide Jewish migration
Wednesday described the
cision of the New York
[Court, that- sponsorship
Migrant is not a legal ob-
hs "a boon Jo the cause
Ion."
said that "the sponsor is
|to give all possible as-
tffB immigrant in the''
ges of resettlement. But
ponsors with life-long re- [
could very well create
[to immigeartion and ham-
process of getting spon-
urantce jobs and housing
and relatives."
st cast, decided by the
i Term of the New York
I Court, involved a 1948
who several years af-
irrival in the U.S. was
ted and therefore be-
ublic charge in Califor-
Ite contended that his
tas "legally" rather than
brally" responsible. Is-
prominent New York at-
lid leader in worldwide
Ion aid, pointed out, "this
pat all sponsors of immi-
contractually liable to
Ithem for life."
tcision upholds the view
Affidavit of support is a
loral" but not a "legal"
+Jelsiincrlcnan
11-A
He Brings Lauded Record to Post
MORRIS S/PSfff
"professional achievement"
Greater Miami's new Israel
Bond city manager was present-
ed with the Israel Bond Organ-
ization's Award for Professional
Merit in 1956.
The award cited Morris Slpser
for "extraordinary professional
achievement in behalf of Israel's
economic development."
This, in essence, sums up the
career of the alert-eyed, quick-
witted new Bond executive who
arrived hWe fr to fill the office recently vacated
by Sidney Glazier.
Glazier retired to become a
vice president of Washington
Federal Savings and Loan Assn!
on Miami Beach.
Sipser has been with the
State of Israel Bond Organiza-
tion in Peterson since 1951.
Under his managership, the
Peterson aree head the entire
country in Bond sales on a per
cepita basis for the past six
years.
In 1951, Sipser originated the
idea of a High Holy Day appeal
for Israel Bonds in Paterson's
Jewish congregations. The ap-
peal has since been adopted na-
tionally and has led to bond sales
of over $5 million each year in
synagogues .across, the country.
Sipser also originated afid con-
ducted Ihe first Golf Tournament
for Israel Bonds, as well as the
first Israel Bond Telethon.
In addition to managing Israel
Bo;id campaigns in the Patcrson
area, he has been responsible for
record-breaking Israel Bond
achievements in Springfield,
Mass., and a half-dozen other
communities. His "Springfield
Plan" has been adopted as an Is-
rael Bond campaign guide in
many eities.
Sipser is a graduate of Brook-
lyn College, where he received
the AB degree. His advanced
work was towerd a Master's
degree at Kings County Hospital
in clinical psychology.
During World War II. Sipser
served as a captain with the Air
Force in the European Theater.
He and his wife. Rose, have two
children, Richard, 8, and Julie,
10. They are still in Teaneck,
N.J., "and won't be down until
school is out in early June," Sip-
ser explained.
They will live at 1519 Biarritz
dr., Normandy Isle.
U.S. Jewish Population Expected Will Decline by 1975
KANSAS CITY. Mo. (JTA)
The number of Jews in the United
States will drop below 5.000,000 by
1975 and. their percentage within
the entire population will decline
by nearly one-third. Dr. Arthur T. creasin i in numbers and percent-
Jacobs, administrative secretary
of the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, declared here at
the five-day meeting of the Na- 3.2 percent of the population to 2.2
of the Reform movement.
noted, the suburban temples face
Drawing on_ a recent Federal | similar situations. Finally, Dr. Ja-
Census Bureau" survey of the popu-. cobs warned that the exploding
lation, Dr. Jacobs said that while
Protestants and Catholics were in-
ages, Jews were failing to main-
tain their own position and would,
in less than 20 years, decline from
tional Assn. of Temple Secretaries
tur every affair
A brl Irian* event/
Your xueeta -will be complimented
by an invitation to a function at
the Carillon, largest and most
luturkms hotel an Mlatni'Beaeh.
Our vaat facilitiee enable us to
add parltliMg lustre to ach .
occasion For weddings, banqiets
or any gathering, > Aur choice 5f
the Carillon is an indication of
the discerning. s

Cafl WitKem K.ff, leaaaet Manager, ON S-/S*)
ANFPONT 68.h to 69'h STREETS MIAMI BEACH i> FLORIDA
Have that
lne Meeting.
Banquet, or
?clal Occasion
You'll'find complete
facilities to exactly satisfy
your needs m the Kismet,
Aladdin, Scheherazade and
Rubaiyat Rooms, be it for a
wedding or a private party I
tor IntormertSoni
HAZEL ALLISON
percent. The Census Bureau's sur-
vey was the first in which a rep-
resentative population sample was
asked: "What is your religion?"
Other then increasing the birth
rate, Dr. Jacobs pointed out, two
possibilities exist for increasing
the number of Jews: through im-
migration or conversion of Chris-
tians. He seid large-scale Jewish
immigration was "beyond the
realm of our expectations" but
replacement of the McCerren
Walter Act by "a decent immi-
"present trickle of Jewish immi-
gration into a mall stream." Dr.
Jacobs expressed the opinion
thet there ere hundreds of thou-
sands of nominal Christians who
would find Reform Judaism e
"satisfying religion," but It could
not come about "unless our rab-
bis come to believe it necessary
and ere given time end tools to
do the job." he seid.
The Reform leader noted that
population statistics highlighted
another important congregational
problem service to aging Jews.
The latest statistics, he pointed
out. showed that over 37 per cent
of American Jews were past 45
and that there were already an
excess of 43.000 Jewish women
over Jewish men in the age groups
past 65. He warned that unless the
Reform congregations became
"sensitive to this problem," they
would "either lose this older group
or retain them as nominal mem-
bers" but fail to serve them ade-
quately.
Dr. Jacobs dwelt, too, en the
plight of Reform synagogues which
find themselves isolated in rapid-
ly changing and deteriorating
neighborhoods. While this Is a
prime problem of city temples, he
scientific and technological forces
of American society would in tire
coming two decades present the
religious movement with untold
new moral and spiritual problems.
Catering Director.
Phone JE 1-4061
SI. a Colllnai Ave.
Si'm IAI.lf.IS1i IN
BAR MITZVAHS
Miami Springs Villas
fcperv
--------ffomf* maun ---------------------
ised by the Unites Baleftetim Vooa Hofcoskreth la
Hen wire the teMieicol Coeecil el Greater Miami.
beee TU 1-4521
ART MRS, Co-Owaer .
Flagler-Granoda Day Camp
Names Swartz Director
Mrs. Jess Freed, chairman of
the Flagler-Granada Jewish Com-
munity Center day camp, Wednes-
day announced the appointment of
Donald Swartz as camp director.
Flagler-Ciranada day camp is
open to .boys end girls five through
12 years of age for two four-week
periods, June 16 to July 11 and
July 14 to Aug. 8. Mrs. Louis Lop-
atin is in charge of information.
Surfside Councilman Elected
Jo Jewish Hall of Fame'
IrVing Schulman, of 8958 Gar-
land ave., Surfside. has been elect-
ed to Jewry's Hall of Fame of
Dade County.
Men's Club of North Shore Jew-
ish Center is sponsor of the organ-
ization.
A focal attorney, Schulman was
recently elected to the Surfside
City Council.
m

-to internem.bex. .
Bar Mitzvahs and Weddingsand all the
important milestones in life. Oar Catering
Department is particularly deft in capturing
the special significance of your occasion.
Our Million Dollar Redecoration Program
has made us Miami's largest and finest
hotel, with the widest selection of
facilities for any function, from the
smallest group to a banquet for one thousand.
Call Catering Manager: Henry Braun
)FjR 4*6151
j
MIAMI, FLORIDA
CALCUTTA ROOM r* Ht
OPEN TO THI PUB IK
i*^
MNQUCT
DEPARTMENT
CempMe catennf
lor private eatnu
Executivt
$01 W. GEITMAN
lacutive
lOMtttor
CONTINENTAL CUISINE
LUNCHEON to 3:30 P.M.
DINNER 6 to 10:30 P.M.
DINNER MUSIC
Gala Supper Dancing
from 9:30 P!M. to 1 A.M.
Bi/lv Arnold's
SOCIETY ORCHESTRA
Rrsfrrafiom
HOUYWOOD WA 2-7536
MIAMI W 1-6453
HALLANRAIE BEACH BLVD.
Between USl aqd AlA
Near Gulfstream Park
IPL0MAT
MOTEL aed'COUNTRY O.UR'
*
for social functions with a flair ^
that will be remembered
<* jayxr* eW oVfft9V aVremrr of **>.
*utilmt, btrrratti, tmd dtftnnlial $rrrh*. fllcUr* or m fat*
wkk J.5Pe t*mt... ar* twevtaW wt++t/f4+t*t
> tfBJM tea?IUUtR*S Meoottt VttflB BKTMB
UNS-eeTl moaw-i.<
ON IMS OCMN AT 671k *TKT M6MM BtACft


12-A
*Jelstfk>rld*M

W

Key Convention Roles for Miamians
Leaders of (he Miami Jewish community will play key roles in the
national biennial convention of the American Jewish Congress May 14
to 18 in the Carillon hotel, Miami Beach.
Nearly 1.000 delegates from all parts of the country will gather
for the AJCongrcss parley, which will be addressed by Israel Ambassa-
dor Abba Eban. Gov. G. Mennen Williams of Michigan. Walter Reuther,
president of the United Auto Workers, and other notables.
All of the major convention ses-
sions will be open to the public, ac-
.. Dr. Georpe Williams, of
cording to Rabbi Yaakov G. Rosen ,nc Harvard Divinity School; and
berg, of Beth D*vjd Coregawn. a j,u;>|, a.,j n;y on church-siatc
chairman of the Sotirti Florida
Council *>f American Jewish Corn
gress.
Two sessions of the AJCon-
gress meeting wilt be chaired by
Miami Jewish leaders, it was
disclosed. Mrs. Anna Brenner
Meyers, named last week as
Dade county's "Outstanding Wo-
man Citizen," will serve as chair-
man of a panel discussion Fri-
day, May 16, on "Interreligious
Relations Conflict or Competi-
tion?"
Participants will include a Cath-
olic editor. Robert G. Hoyt of the
Kansas City. Mo.. "Register;" a
Protestant professor of ecclesiastic
law. Dr. Leo i'l^if. r, tint.
nmmissron on Law and Social
Action of the American Jewish
Congress.
A special "Oneg Shabhat" ses
rJoa on Safari*..> afternoon, May
17, will featUW two .Miami Jewish
leaders. Chairman of the -
will be Stank) C. Myers, lormer
president of the Greater Miami
ion. who will lead a
. ...i Jewish
Community Lite Today." Dr. Ben
jainin B. Roaenbe.-j:. execut:
rtctor of the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Fedv-ratiop, w.ll ser\e on the
discussion panel, along with Sid-
nev Hollander. Bal;imore. Md.,
Speakers at American Jewish Congress biennial convention in
Miami Beach May 14 to 18 include top row (left to right) Am-
bassador Abba Eban; U. Thant, Ambassador of Burma; Gov.
G. Mennen Williams, of Michiaan; Walter Reuther, president.
United Automobile Workers. Bottom row (left to riant) are Dr.
Nahum Goldmann, president. World Jewish Congress and
World Zionist Organization; Judge Justine Wise Polier, AJCon-
gress executive committee chairman; Rev. Martin Luther King,
leader of Montgomery, Ala., bus boycott; and Dr. Israel
Goldstein, AJCongress president.
BIKUR CHOLIM KOSHER
CONVALESCENT HOME
NON PROFIT NON-SECTARIAN
SUPPORTED BY YOUR COMMUNITY
UNDtK STRICT SUH*YM0H OF THE VAAD HAKASHSOTHS
24-HOUR NURSIN5 DOCTORS ON CALL
ALL DIETS OBSERVED CONGENIAL SURROUNDINGS
MODERN EQUIPMENT t WKHISHIHGS FIREPROOf BUiWING
310 Collins Ave.
Ph. JE 2-3571
Miami Beach
HELLMAN
FUNERAL CHAPELS, INC.
/
Coring for Those You Cart For"
STATIONS TO
SERVE YOU
IT4I Bay Rood
Mt. Sinai Hoe.ital
ft. Francis Hot***!
I92JS.W. >rt. St.
OFFICIAL AMBULANCI SERVICI
OP MIAMI BEACH
SERVING ALL OF DADI COUNTY.
FOR
IMMEDIATE
SERVICI
FLAT RATI NO MITERS
JE 8-5333
MIAMI REACH
MIAMI
1741 Bay Raod, eer Da* BM.
JI 1-1331 Jl 1-9000
ItZI S.W. Bth SV
R 4-Mt
WORLD-WIPE TRANSFER SERVICI
1 At HILLMAN, Pn. HARRY W. IIYIIL .
.It-wish communal leader, and
Isaac Toubin of New York, nation-
al executive director of the AJCon-
gress.
Greetings of the city will be ex-
tended at the opening session of
the convention at a noon luncheon
Wednesday. May 14. by Mayor
Kenneth Oka of Miami Beaeh.
Climax of the five-day meet-
ing will ba a bancuet Saturday
night, May 17,. saluting tha State
of Israel on Hs tenth annivar-
sary, according to Mr*. Charles
P. Feinberg, chairman of tha
convention committee. Speakers
at tha b*ncuet session will in-
clude Abba Eban, Israel Am-
bassador to tha U.S.; Dr. Israel
Goldstein of New York, pres-
ident of tha American Jewish
Congress; U. Thant, Ambassador
of Burma to the U.S.; and Gov.
G. Mennen Williams of Michi-
gan. Judge Justine Wise Polier
of Now York, chairman of the
executive committee of AJCon-
gress, will preside.
The 1958 convention marks the
fir>t lime the organization has
held a national meeting outside
New York City.
Delegates from the Greater Mi-
ami area to the convention include
Dade Men's chapter. Fred Barad
and Harry Levy. Alternate, Harry
Corn; South Florida Council, Rab-
bis Yaakov G. Rosenberg, Leon
Kronish and Jonah E. Caplan. Al-
ternates. Louis Hoberman. Leonard
Friedland; Florida Women's Divis-
ion, Mesdames Charles P. Fein-
berg, Abraham Augenstein, Larry
Friedland and Benjamin I. Kamen.
Alternates, Mesdames Albert I.add
and Alfred Rubenstein: Louis-Bran-
deis chapter, Mesdames Sidney
Finger, Sy Ginsberg. Sam Herder,
Willie Hollander, David Muskat
and Sam Rose. Alternates, Mes-
dames Henry Berg, Jack Edwards
and John Sorin.
COMING TO NEW YORK?
Saav aa.aab ssatfan 2S.
Last*
baovtilvlly l.oi.kU
eoeas wife kiKfc-
eaotto, prlvata
Both. t.o. It St
dolly. Two tomm
ottos fro- $11.50
smut awamuT
ATISI
* man,.!., a;
Inililii mWii
**< BEACON
rood-oy a* 75* St.. Now Tort
Oerar Wtotnk. Mo~, ., D,m >
commercial
social
Bf hotel
'"t carat
monogroaSs
invitations
wadding announcements
Dial FRanklin 3-4634
"* sixth street
mlaml 32. florid*
ON THE OCEAN AT 42ud ST., MIAMI
TRAVM0RE
HOI
At 24th ST., MIAMI
Writ*
For
Information
and
Reservation*:
JE 1-0331
O Air-Conditioned Roemi
O Private Beacn and Pool
O Parking on Prrmioei (
o Cocktail Lounge
O Dining Room
'o Entertainment
luxury for you at Iht
HOTEL,
H0TI
SPRINGS,!
^ARKANSAS
We are sore yoaTl be delighted
vith the exciting, new decor in our
lobby, lounges and dining room created / t,| |k.i
for your enjoyment and relaxation by / tnrrail mlf Wli
one of America's foremost decorators./ tl! your vl* mi t
due to tfiMioaJ"^ "1
pation.il fatigw,
ease arthrit!, rherapj I
and high bloed pre"*
Superl bathhnue right h Ml
Alt sports hfMntt^t
club pmil't", |Wt&t]
water sports. Es/ertan
social 1irfdt*H
, *
1
* 69BBBS 8<0 0
J,B8 6BB9 8 00
B8 B6 BBS 00
IB BB 88 8 0 0

Trltf for Tine
CotarTd**
F. E. MrEAClIrt
General Mansftf

"Yeer SaffsfactrM Owt HmtttT
P1CI-UP AND DELIVER i'
ZANDER'S LAUNDRY & DRY CLEfl
3466 N. Miami Avenue ^of A
"Pr.mpf Dot ooe" Wig** Unto
MrCOB]HIK-BO V KIT
PIUMBING CONTRACTORS
FOR $AlS, SERVICI Ot ilPAIM MOW rt W
9443 PARKWAY DRIVE *"AMI SH0.
VW\^^r^~'rfN*A-^^\rVV^>r-^-
COOK & PRUITT, INC.
MASONRY FWEMACES FATK>$ lARBtCUl!
"COMPLETE FIREPLACE A RAR-t-0 ACCE$JM
ph. mo y
649 Bird Road ( S.W. 40th St.)
vvvvvvvvvvvvv
GENERAL AUTO REPAIRS
WOODV\S TEXACO K*\L
Mrksta a>ecMhts OMs 0-ttaH- '-
470 N.W. 5th STMET


lay 2. 1958
+Jew!stiflcrMian
13-A
rt Editor in Hot Water Over Prayer Policy
C-(1*A)A dean of
diversity this week de-
jaction of the Orthodox-
Istitution in suspending
newspaper whose stil-
us demanded the right
the issue of compul-
jance at morning re-
dices'.
|ent governing board of
lmcniator" suspended
Apr. 2 rather thai)
th an order from Dr.
elkin, university pres-
the question was not
}ssed in the newspaper.
Shapiro, 20, a pre law .
\d editor of the paper,
jblication would not be
until the restriction is
[In the past we had the
disagreeing with the
(illations. This is one
times we commented
fie religious issue."
The university administration
last month cracked down on
students who have been skip-
ping early morning service*.
New York residents of tha uni-
versity dormitory were sus-
pended for a week. Stern warn-
ings war* given to 30 out-of-
town students living in the
dormitory.
The Commentator published an
editorial questioning the wisdom
of enforced attendance and urg-
ing the administration to allow
students .X*o. in-dividual ap-
proach" to worship. Dr. Belkin's
order declaring the subject "out
of bounds" for discussion in the
newspaper followed.
Dean Simeon L. Guterman, of
the undergraduate school, de-
fended Dr. Belkin's order, assert-
ing that the paper "had enjoyed
greater freedom than any other
school paper I have ever known."
Ha assortad that the prob-
lem, taken out of the school sit-
uation, "becomos grossly exag-
gerated," and that "froodom
that a student enjoys, like free-
dom in our society, is a rela-
tive liberty or right." H.t added
that the interests "of an insti-
tution may override the Inter-
est of n individual student."
Noting that "behavior and de-
portment" of students "are in-
fluenced, if not governed" by the
Orthodox orientation of the uni-
versity, Dean Guterman said that
"residence in the dormitory pre-
supposes some kind of religious
identification on the part of a stu-
dent. A student knows before he
comes to Yeshiva University that
this is an institutional require-
ment. It is printed in italics in
the college catalog."
Back Words With Deeds,
Reform Leader Tells Gurion
Mr KAVTMAM
NEW YORK-A leader of Amer-
ican Reform Judaism recently
asked Israel to allow complete
freedom of religious interpretation
for all Jews in the Middle Eastern
State.
In making the request Rabbi Jay
Kaufman, vice president of the
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations, replied to an article by
David Ben-Gurion in a March
issue of Look magazine.
The Union of American Hebrew
Congregations represents 550 Re-
form temples in the Western hem-
isphere with a total membership
of about 1,000,000 men, women and
children.
^HEBREW SELF-TAUGHT
sy AHARON ROSEN
XZ .20$
B*!K .207
T
p*33 -208
>n*y) syifc .209
none .210
h nVos in*
p>3 ntf1?!* .ntorw
mM nnx nT"?
.ntoriar
1
tons yrt7 n"7
|is?n nin mtfjsjaa-
pf DVJKS1 rrtr>
Mv>n tfan nirw-
fan oi-id main
t I r v : -
iDi^tf irrrin
tore,'slitfp jrtjn ,2 01
hah-noot
buy(m.s.) nAp ,202
koh-ne
time
z'mahn
mo..ey
ke-ssef
payOn.s.) q^q #205
m'shah-lehm
]DT .203
joa .204
Icnw!) ,(i 00) nxn
,{300) nixa tffrv
ton ,(400) nixo
10) 1^K....(500)
"^l^' loan
fD nT*?a .ny^n
.nteriB (1000)
irona
nsin nx no imam ,oV?tf-
trtapy
1 S '"I "~t
.mtb main "?xx mate
""I" TV I" 7" TT
janyi nann nth trm
t : t 1
wn |QTn .nun ns ,mai-
.nb f k io3 ,xna & |dt-
fx...yTV vt* ,vrr to-
-ik .nm rK .i03 a1?
rm ,,i3#nn *; ante
.tin1? nnx noVtfo
_ it*i
to*ik n nuns vfi vr-
*? tfi .nix n *} fK .*? -
ttt r. n
.D^aR? ntffttf **? jn-
f ri3E>nn no
J>i3p>3 !n^j?33 !T...0'?^,7-
9g material in vocalized Easy Hebrew, and also material for
fed students may be obtained through your local Hebrew
ization or by writing to: Brit Ivrit Olami; P.O.B. 7111.
V'm, Israel.
P obi bed by Brit ivrit OUmil
In tha article, the, Israeli
Prima Minister stated that Re-
form Jews would be given "free.
dom of religion" were they to
arrive in numbers of 10,000 or
more.
"Many freedoms and privileges
are denied non-Orthodox Jews in
Israel," stated Rabbi Kaufman.
"There do exist presently in Is-
rael thousands of Jews who find
the rigid Orthodoxy, which is the
sole permitted Judaism, incompat-
ible with their religious sensitivi-
ties and spiritual needs," contin-
ued the religious leader.
Rabbi Kaufman noted that many
Jews in Israel are anxious to have
the Judaism in the new State "re-
formed right now without awaiting
the Suggested and most doubtful
migration of 10,000 Reform Jews
from elsewhere."
Rabbi Kaufman praised the re-
ligious freedom accorded Chris-
tian and Mesletn groups in Israel
and indicated the hope that Is-
raelis would allow similar relig-
ious liberalism to those Jews in
Israel desiring to' reform the tra-
ditional Orthodoxy.
"A democracy is concerned over
the rights of the entire res* pub-
lics," emphasized the rabbi.
At present the only form of Ju-
daism that is allowed to be prac-
ticed in the State of Israel is strict-
ly traditional Judaism. Neither
Reform nor Conservative Judaism
has been granted official recogni-
tion by the government.
A branch of the Hebrew Union
College-Jewish Institute of Relig-
ion, the Reform seminary is ex-
pected to open in Jerusalem around
1959.
Rabbi Kaufman meanwhile led a
pilgrimage of 35 lay and rabbinic
leaders to Israel in observance of
that country's 10th anniversary.
The delegation is traveling under
the auspices of the Union of Amer-
ican Hebrew Congregations and
will observe cultural and industrial
advances made by Israel during
the last few years.
North Shore Men
Install Officers
Al Sherman will be installed
president of the Men's Club of
North Shore Jewish Center Satur-
day evening at the Deauville hotel.
Others to be installed are Al
Granoff, first vice president; Rob-
ert Block, second vice president;
David S. Miller, treasurer; I. Ed-
ward Cotzin, secretary; and Irving
Greenberg, financial secretary.
Board of directors include Wil-
liam Weiss, Leon Brown, Stuart
Levitt, Ben Ledwitz, Sol Weiss,
Jack Fried, Coleman Goldstein,
Ben Silverman, Joseph Steinberger,
Martin Kurzweil Sam HoRauser,
Harry Holtzman. Herman Kooper-
man, David Zinn, Jack Fisch, Mil-
ton Ehrenreich, Nathan Rabino-
witz and Herman Spector.
Religious Services
AGUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle ave
Orthodox. Rabbi Isaac Ever.
Friday 6:4:, p.in. Saturday S:30 a.m.
Sermon: "Impure and t'nrlghteom."
e
*.NSHE EMES. 2535 W 19th awe. Can
tor Morris Zimmerman.
e
BETH DAVIO. 2S2S SW 3rd ave. Con-
servative. Rabbi Yaakov Rosenberg.
Cantor William W. Lipson.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "Kabbls
Chailenes*. Tl.emse|y*-HReport on the
.National Rabblnlrnl Assembly ('on-
vention Saturday 9 a.m. Bar Mlt/.-
vah: Hamld, w,n of Mr. and Mrs. Iivln
Goodman: Alvlii, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Theodore (iulkls. .
e
BETH EL. 500 SW 17th ave. Orthodox.
e
BETH EMCTH. 122*0 NW 2nd ave.
Conservative. Rabbi David W. Her-
son. Cantor Hyman Fein.
Friday s p.m. Sermon: "The Hofy anil
the Profane," Saturday a.m. Bar
Mitsvah: Edward, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Morris Goldfarb. Sermon: "Obligation
Yoke or Privilege."
e
BETH ISRAEL. 4000 Prairie ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi H. Louis Rottman.
e
BETH JACOB. 301-311 Washington
ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Tibor Stern.
Cantor Maurice Mamches.
Friday 6:3ft p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m.
Sermon: "Sainted Life."
e
BETH RAPHAEL. 139 NW 3rd ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Aria Becker.
- e
BETH TFILAH. 935 Euclid ave. Ortho-
dox. Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky.
e
OADE HEIGHTS JEWISH CENTER.
18160 NW 2nd ave. Conservative.
Rabbi Nathan H. Zwitman.
Friday N:I5 p.m. Sermon: "Phyatcal
Purity and Spiritual Sanctity." On eg
Shabbat hosts: Sisterhood members.
e
FLAOLER-GRANADA. 50 NW 51st pi.
Conservative. Rabbi Murray A.
Alstet.
Friday 6 p.m. Saturday 8:4.ri a.m. Bar
Mitzvah: Frank, son of Mr. and Sirs.
Barney Norwich.
e
HEBREW ACADEMY. 918 6th St.
Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander Gross.
Friday ( p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. Ser-
mon: "Ye Shall be Holy."
e
HIALEAH-MIAMI SPRINGS. 951 Fla-
mingo Way. Conservative. Rabbi Leo
Heim.
Friday 8:13 p.m. Sermon: "-Rabbis and
i.a>in-n View the Future of Conserv-
ative Judaism." Oneg Khabbat hosts:
Mr. and Mrs. Louis wine. Saturday
9 a.m.
ISRAELITE CENTER. 3198 SW 24th
Sr, Conservative. Rabbi Morton
lavsvy
Friday 6:3ft p.m. Saturday S:J0 a.m.
Bar Mltxvah: Alan, son of Mr. and
Mrs. John Welnstein.

KNESETH ISRAEL. T415 Euclid see.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Cantof Abraham Self.
Friday 6:30 p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m.
Sermon: "The Conquest of Holiness."
e
MIAMI HEBREW CONGREGATION.
1101 SW 12th ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Simon April. Cantor Berele Kelemer.
Friday 6:3ft p.m. Saturday 8:3ft a.m
Sermon: "Responsibility of the In-
structor."
e
MONTICELLO PARK. 184th st. and
NE 11th ave. .Conservative. .Rabbi
e
NORTH DADE CENTER. 13630 W.
Dixie hwy. Conservative. Rabbi
Henry Okolica. Cantor Maurice Neu.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "What Ev-
ery Jew Must Know." Stoturday 9 a.m.
Sermon: "Weekly Portion."
e
NORTH SHORE CENTER. 880 75th
at. Conservative. Rabbi Mayer
Abramewita. Cantor Edward Klein.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "The Good
Man." Bas Mitsvah: Deborah, daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Philip Jacoby.
Saturday 8:4.'. a.m. Bar Mitsvah:
Allen, son of Mr. and Mrs. Max Fugei.
Michael, son of Mr. and Mrs. Sol K.l-
warcls.
SOUTH DADE JEWISH CENTER
Room 315, Msrrick bldg., U. of M.
campus. Reform. Rabbi Herbert M.
Baumgard.
Friday 7:30 p.m. Sermon: "The Child
Asks Why Did God Let Me BeoODM
Sick?"
e
SOUTHWEST JEWISH CENTER. 8438
SW 8th st. Conservative. Rabbi
Abraham Levltan.
CANDLEUGHTING TIME
12 Iyar 6:35 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM. 4144Chase
ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kronish.
Cantor David Conviser. ,
Fii.iay S:li p.m. Sermon: 'The Tenth
Anniversary of Is.ael" (eighth In a
.-ri'- of ten sermons). Honor guest:
Di Frederick R, Lachman, executive
vice pre-ldent, American Friends' of'
thi- Hebrew irniverslty. Saturday
10:45 a.m. Bar Mitzvah: Martin, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Burton Kngels: Klllott
U, son of Mrs. Kaye Turner and Ben
Turner.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 1701 Washing-
ton ave. Conservative. Rabbi Irving
Lehrman. Cantor Israel Reich.
Friday 6 and S:30 p.m. Guest spiritual
leader: Dr. Herman Cohen. Sermon:
"Tha Nineteenth Chapter of Levlt-
loUa." Saturday 9 a.m. Sermon:
"Weekly Portion." Bar Mitzvah: Neil,
son of Mr. and lire, laaaa Beckernujui;
Robert, sou of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Bed-
man.
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF GREATER Ml.
AMI. 137 NE 19th St. Reform. Rabbi
Joseph Narot. Cantor Jacob Born-
stein.
Ft May 8:15 p.m. Special service for
public school teachers. Sermon: "Ed-
ucation In America "
e
TEMPLE JUDEA. 320 Palermo ave.
Liberal. Rabbi Morris Skop. Cantor
Herman Gottlieb.
TEMPLE NER TAMID. (Being erect-
ed at 80th St. and Tatura Waterway.)
Modern Traditional.
Friday l:U p.m. at Sutfslde Towa Hall.
Guest speaker: Jutsga Milton Fried-
man. Sermon: "Israel on Ks Tenth
Anniversary."
e
TEMPLE SINAI OF NORTH MIAMI.
131st st. and NE 6th ave. Reform.
Rabbi Benno M. Wallach.
e
TEMPLE ZION. 5720 SW 17th st. Con-
servative. Rabbi*Alfred Waxnian.
Friday 8:30 p.m. Sermon: "Aspiring to
i".real Heights." Saturday 9 a.m. Bar
Mitzvah: Jeffrey, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Sidney Splegler.
e
TIFERETH ISRAEL. 6500 N. Miami
ve. Conservative. "bbi Abraham
Herson. Cantor Albert Glantz.
Friday 8:30 p.m. Sermon: "Wisdom in
Leadership." New officers and board
members to be honored Saturday 9
a.m. Sermon: "The Virtue of Kind-
ness."
e
ZAMORA JEWISH CENTER. 44 Za.
mora ave. Conservative. Rabbi B.
Leon Hurwltz. Cantor Rudolph Brill.
Friday 8:30 p.m. Sermon: "The Life of
tha Spirit." Oneg Shabbat hosts: Mr.
and Mrs. B. Greensteln, whose daugh-
ter. Arlene, will become Bas Mitsvah
durine Saturday services 9 a.m.
"4J
Miami Hebrew Book Store
1585 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach JE 8-3840
Hebrew Religious Supplies for
Synagogues, Schools aV Private Use
ISRAELI DOMESTIC GIFTS
Rabbi Dr. Tibor H. Stem
311 Washington Ave, M. B.
Prunes: JE S-2205 Jl 1-1969



14-A
*JeistDcrkSkHi
Iff!XRY 3iiVWIJV-


His Golden Egg Highlights the Jewish Farmer in Am
,1
THE GOLDEN EGG. By Arthur D. Goldhaft, V.M.D.
With an Introduction by Meyer Levin. 314 pp. New
York: Horizon Press. $5.00.
*R. ARTHUR GOLOMAFT is a Miami winter resident;
" he has just left, this past Tuesday, his Bay Harbor
Island home to return to his world-renowned Vineland
(New Jersey) Poultry Laboratories. My own encounter
with him was too brief to be productive, and now that I
have read his book, I am sorry. Veterinarian author-re-
searcher experimenter Goldnaft is a man with vision and
zeal, but more than that, he has character and charm, a
kind of rueful humor, and a vast humanity.
IlKKX %IU> RH'IIARRS
This is his autobiography, and a highly entertaining,
enjovable book it is. It is not merely the recounting of
what he has done, although he has done some tremendous
things. At a time when little was known and less was
cared about poultry disease*. Dr. Goldhaft became the first
veterinarian in the world to give his full attention to the
problem; he became what he still laughingly calls "a lowly
chicken doctor." There was little lowly about his accom-
plishments. Dr. Gold ha ft virtually pioneered with vac-
cines for poultry; he was instrumental in taking the chic-
ken out of the Sunday-dinner class and turning it into one
of the least expensive meats. And out of his Vineland
Poultry Laboratories came a far greater benefit, the devel-
Judge Levinthal--His Career a Leader's Model
IN THE FINEST Jewish tradition have the members of
' the Levinthal family of Philadelphia carried the stan-
dards of Jewish service to America and to humanity and
held aloft the ideals of Jewish revival and national restor-
ation.
The family itself is part of the annals of American
Jewry, especially Zionist history, the late Rabbi Bernard
1.. Levinthal having been one of the pioneer advocates of
the Zionist cause in the United States. We find also that
as early as 1901 "a youth group called Age of Zion' was
founded in Philadelphia by Israel Herbert Levinthal, Louis
Feinberg, C. David Matt. Joseph Kohn, David J. Gaiter
and others." Rabbi B. L. Levinthal's distinguished career
as leader and later dean of Jewish Orthodoxy in America
included public activities in various fields: among the
many honors which came to him during a long life, he was
chosen as a member of the notable delegation of Jewish
leaders which represented American Jewry at the Peace
Conference of Versailles in 1919.
These observations go back to our past of many years,
and this is quite natural, for the Levinthals not only par-
ticipated in public events but helped to make history.
Several professions have been adorned by members of this
family, and one branch has sent its roots into the soil of
Israel.
Louis Edward Levinthal. who as one of our younger
Zionist leaders was honored with a dinner on his 65th
birthday, chose and concentrated on the law, and. like
other members of his tribe, he has shed brilliant luster on
the profession itself as well as on the public causes which
he and the profession selected for service. Of special sig-
nificance, in fact of historic significance, was his service
XATIMAX ZirillX
as Jewish advisor to the U.S. Military Command in Ger-
many, to which he was appointed by Secretary of War
Paterson in 1947-48.
His is a crowded career of many public activities,
with an increasing 'number of obligations to our people,
always readily assumed. Yet despite all pressing imme-
diate tasks, as lecturer at the University of Pennsylvania
Law School, as special counsel of the Public Service Com-
mission, as speaker, writer and lecturer on many sub-
jects, and above all as Judge of the Caurt of Common Pleas
. of Philadelphia County, he has always found time fot
Jewish tasks as well as Jewish interests.
A list of Judge Levinthal's local affiliations and activ-
ities in Philadelphia reads like a small directory of or-
ganizations, but beyond the claims of these, various asso-
ciations he naturally gravitated to certain important cul-
tural enterprises. Perhaps the Jewish Publication Society
of America is his special hobby, though Grati College,
Dropsie College, and the American Assn. for Jewish Educa-
tion are other favorite activities that might claim this
priority.
The American Jewish Congress, the struggle for equal
rights for the Jews in all lands, was among other tasks
which required energetic efforts as well as good judg-
ment. Closely related to that cause was the endeavor to
arouse American public opinion in behalf of a Jewish Pal-
estine and later for the rights of statehood.
But throughout a roost active career of 40 years or
more. Zionism has been to the Judge the most absorbing
of all interests, and this has meant a burden of labors
carried on in Philadelphia, New York and other cities,
with continued travels abroad and trips to Israela heavy
task not easily assessed.
New Attitude Apparent Toward Yiddish Pen
ONFERRAL BY THE Hebrew Union College Jewish In-
** strtute of Religion of an honorary doctorate in Jewish
Literature on H. Leiviek, noted Yiddish poet and dramatist,
was not only a most proper tribute to a great artist but a
welcome sign of a new attitude in our Jewish community
toward the Yiddish pen.
It wasn't so long ago that our Reform friends were
looking with virtual contempt upon Yiddish creativity,
fearing that this distinctive tongue constituted a barrier
to assimilation and Americanization. They looked upon
1MAROLD f. RiRAIAPW
Polo Grounds Not Dead
CPORTS ARE ENDLESSLY fascinating because of their
** interesting relationships with the outside world. For
example, when the New York Giants left the historic Polo
Grounds, there was much gnashing of teeth and wailing
that the traditional diamond would now grow weedy and
useless.
It is true that Willie Mays will no longer cavort in the
outfield in New York: there will be no games between in-
trrboro rivals, the Giants and the Dodgers, who are now
on the West Coast. Na longer will Jewish baseball fans
hope to see Jewish stars shine in the Polo Grounds. Sid
Gordon. Phil Weintraub. Andy Cohen, Goody Rosen are
now part of the irrevocable past.
Nevertheless, the Polo Grounds is not deadand the
Jewish angle is still part of it.
Now that the ball teams are out of the Bele Grounds,
the managers of the arena have introduced a new career
for the ancient field. And the first event to be. held at
the Polo Grounds in beginning this new career was the
celebration of Israel's tenth anniversary Sunday afternoon,
Apr. 27.
This "Salute to Freedom" was a spectacular event
and offered the Jews of New York an opportunity to dem-
onstrate their faith in the future of the Jewish State.
Instead of baseball players in uniform, there was a
dramatic pageant starring such non-athletes as Rajph
Bellamy, who js now playing, the role of Franklin D. Roose-
velt on the, Broadway stage; Henry Fonda, who is starring
in Two for thevSeeuw;" Melvyn Doaglas. who ham gained
an enviable reputation through his many brilliant stage
and screen, characterizations: and Theresa Wright, the at-
tractive Hollywood star now playing with Bellamy in "Sun-
rise at CampobeUe."
Yiddish as symbolizing a way of life that had no place
in the American pattern and upon its literature as a phe-
nomenon of minor significance. In fact, the distance be-
tween the Reform wing in our community and the Eastern
European Jewish immigrant was so vast that one almost
sensed a film of enmity between them.
In time, however, the barriers began giving way. with
both sides making concessions to climate and time. On
the one hand the Reform Jew has largely liberated him-
self from the old traditions of the movement, and on the
other hand, the Yiddish-speaking immigrant has become
as adept in the language of the land as his Park-Avenue
cousin. Thus the two were able to meet on common ground'
and understand each other as brethren in faith and in pur-
pose. Recognition of Leiviek by the Hebrew Union Col-
lege epitomizes that great transition.
The change has possibly been impacted by the multi-
tude of Yiddish works which have come to us in transla-
tion in recent years. More likely it was a product of
growth. Men who once maligned the Yiddish tongue have
in the end come to realize the vastness and importance of
Yiddish creativity both as a force in the molding of a
distinctive Jewish civilization in recent centuries aud in
the preserving of ancient values.
The Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion
is to be congratulated for giving honor to Yiddish through
one of its greatest masters.
rumis SMOLAR
opment of a mass production rt
vaccines inside the egg. The Ashum f,'" *<
Levin points out in his introduction ,, N
eggs. ^'troniJ
This is also the story of Vinel,* v,
earliest Jewish agricultural colonies m a.. '
Three waves of Jewish refugees ha*, u ""
the Vineland soil; Dr. Goldhaft s {?'
those who fled the Russian pogrom^?!,
under the auspices of the old HlAS uw iU
fanning. Groups of German Jews io tb?i2
tied on the old farms deserted by the* 3
Goldhaft> stories about some of them u, *
concentration-camp survivors of the latV la
third wave. a
Then, too, it is also the storv of Dr Go
They are three generations of Jewish veto
His son and daughter and son-in-law and r.
in the profession. Apart from the writing^!
quite skilled. I think one of the most endears*
the book is the sheer joy in continuity whirhM
feel*. "Jews-, veterinarians, people." he writ* 3
of his family. But the bland statement muhf
of a longing which runs like a hidden river d
book. It is what transforms the book frta
icl* ino a sensitive and personal history \t^.
ual's dramatization, perhaps, of the feeiiniS
past which gives meaning to the fuUireTuJitl
RKN SIR A
Youth More
PORTS AND CAMPUS activities, diaceti
** shows take up much more of the Isndij
today than they did ten years ago, u hen the J
came into existence.
There is a Pat Boone fan club, a Jan (
jam sessions, and the second largest
goers in the world (after Great Britain). Aaii
ball games, tucked away into odd coraen ol(
papers unitl a few years back, are now news.
Before the State was established, eetjj
his free time to the clandestine groups defeats*]
ish population. Now there is a regular
and young Israelis.are comparatively free for I
suits.
Israel baa its young nuclear scientist!.!
from 27 to 31, who work on nuclear spectroscay. |
tors have contributed to cancer research andtoi
the influence of color schemes on emotional is
young engineer has invented still another net |
showing three dimensional motion pictures.
The lessened tension, living in one's on I
shows in the divorce statistics. In 1947 there\
divorces for- every 59 marriages, in 1955. the 1
with complete figures, the number was-101
every 65 marriages. But people are also stowalj
as against 12.98 marriages for every 1.000 i
1947. there ware only 8.7 marrmes per IDOJi
Although over 50 percent of today's IsneStj
migrants who came after the State was esubr
about half of them stem from Moslem lands, wsj
have shed the Oriental custom of keeping
and uneducated. Among Oriental immigrant!
girls now go steady and get to know each other"
marrying. Education up to the high school lertl
free and compulsory. There are virtually nor
those who came at a more advanced agesU<
evening schools.
However, just as they did ten years a*.
girls become- familiar with weapon* at an eifljt
18 they are called up for 24 to 30 months'
service in the Army. But even before tkat.au
they begin drilling in special youth groups.
Growing up and taking part in the csejg
still go hand in-hand in Israel. At high o*J
youngsters go for one moqth in summer to a
ment. where they work the land by day_'
at night. And after their army sen -ice.""> "Jn
called up for 4 days each year the *** *
Many of the idealistic youngsters stay jJ
regular army or in agricultural settlements
wedded .in Israel. a> they are iu few other eo
Economic Recession and Jewish Philanthropy
THERE WAS MUCH talk at the Zionist Actions Commit-
tee session about the possible elfect of the economic
recession in the United States on fund raising for Israel
The fear expressed by some oLthe speakers turns out to be
a bit exaggerated The United Jewish Appeal is in a posi-
tion to show better results in iu campaign so far than last
i- rJ?J?f T"1, ,h\camD"ign-'n Is*? the most successful
m Detroit Jewry s history-has now reached a higher total
that last year at this time. This despite the fact that
Detroit is among the hardest hit cities. The same is true
for practically all larger Jewish communities, with the
exception of one ty Texas. They all show better results
than last year at thltW. or at least the same resulu.
a iffden.?. *%* V",ted Jewish ** hv* therefore
adopted an attitude of 'cautious optimism" on the ultimate
results of the UJA drive this year They have sfud2Ttsi.
list of the 200
$50,000 to $250
top 8ivers Pfle "fJS
,j,00Qayeart<.theUAJ^ur||
they see no reason far pessimism fe*enJ?rifed
who have been affected by the "rc,'ssl*
best to maintain their standard of g">"g
They are conscious of the fact that UW"
as an example to th* other. o their ~ ,,,
they certainly do not want te set' n '"i<
giving. The Council of Jewish I-ederau^.
Funds similarly foresees that on the *n ^ ^
turns to tba local community ^mpuai?7u0drai'
fected by the recession. The sm,1'enrntlibotor'1
paigns will probably be hit, since ^"""T^j
year concentrate mast on the important .
ating the less important or contributing "
in previous years.


ky 2, 1958.
15-A
NOTICE
ICE UNDER
kUS NAME LAW
I, RBBY GIVEN, that
a siring IO engage I"
... fictitious II.I
K.p.l'TING <*> i NOT
flA' lijlnd street Intends
i .mi* with the Clerk
i.urt of Dade County,
MAX SPIEGEL
ON
pplicant
hcE UNDER
bus NAME LAW
fHErUUn* OWBN that
deslr.ng to engage III
the fictitious name of
EAT Co.UPANT at r.M
Miuinl I leach. Florida
_ter said name with 'ne
Circuit Court of Dade
ROY S. SiTOMKR
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY (ilVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
>s under Ilia fictitious name if
JET BAR AND I'ACKAf.K STORK at
12801 N W. 27th Avenue, Miami. FIoi -
Ma, Intend* to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dkde
County, Floilua.
PINNY'S, INC.
Sole Owner
LEWI SON AND FREED
Attorneys for Applicant
4/11-18-2*. 5rf8
LEGAL NOTICE
MCE UNDER
bUS NAME-LAW,
[HERE*? GIVEN that
1, desiring to. engage in
Hit- in Utloiia nine of
pN TRADES, CO. atJ
it. Miami, Florida.
|ter said name with- the
{Circuit Court of 11e.de
E. B. 1J3VWUU
r. o. LQ.VKU,
tlTEI.MAN
I Applicants
as.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
LEONARD CARl'ET MANL'FACTUR-
INt; CO., at 1031JE...3JM|d St.. lli.ileeh,
Ha.. Intends to register said name
With the Clerk of I lie Circuit Court of
Hade county, Florida.
LEE RATNER
4/11-18-25, 5/2
NOTICE -UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREI1Y GIVEN that
the .:idaralgaed, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
IMii.VT APARTMENTS at 10:16
B.W, r.t* Street, Miami, Florida In-
tends te register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Dated at Miami, Florida this 23rd
day of April, 1B9.
JOSEPH PATISH
Sole Owner
4/85, 5/2-9-18
MriT CF. MN"R
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY (ilVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
CORAL GAP.I.ES CONVALESCENT
HOME at 7M0 B.W. Kth Street, Miami.
Fla., Intend!, to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florid*.
CORAL GABLE*! I'llNVAOWCBNT
HOME, INC
IA Florida Corporation)
WILIJAM E, BRENNER
Attorney for Applicants
428 Lincoln Rd., Miami Bench, Fla.
4/2."i, 5/2-9-16
LEGAL NOTICE
_1_______
3Y PUBLICATION
JUIT COURT OF THE
IUDICIAA. CIRCUIT OF>
AND. FOR DADE
IN CHANCERY,
to. 58C3Q8-.

lOTH
FOR DIVOUCS
W. ROTH
err ace
loiida
by notified that a Bill
fot Divorce has been
ou, and, yon are raautr-
m|iv of > our Answer oi
I Hill of Complaint on
Attorney, 1U.CHM.UN1>
1 Uncoin Road, Miami
and file the original
'iiding in the ofnVoe of
tin Circuit Court on or
lay of May, I sag. If
so. Judgment by default
against you for the re-
lii the Hill uf Complaint.
shall In- publlshnd once
lour consecutive w*.*ks
SI I I'l.i IRIDIA.N.
ORDERED .a Miami,
.11 Hi day of April, Al).
2ATHERMAN. Clerk,
I >ade County, Florida
I'y .\. A. HEWETT,
Deputy Cleik.
WOLfr'aoN
I Hldg.
Mil
Plaintiff
NOTICE UND1R
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, ilmlrlng to engage In
business under the riclltlous name of
St'N COAST TKI'HH MFG. at 3695
N.W. 17th Htreet in the City of Miami,
Florida Intends to register the said
name with the Clerk of the circuit
Court oi Dade County, Florida.
I luted at Miami, F.orlda, this 31st
day of March. llliS.
SUN-COAOT ROLL FORMING CORP.
By: George P. Oreenway,
President
AARON M KANNER, Esq.
Attoi-ney for Applicant
23 Shm-eland BHg., Miami, Fla.
1/2.".. .1/2-9-16
NOT.CE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned,- desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
BONDED FURN1TFRK CO. at 3007
N.W. 17th Ave.. Miami, Fla.. Intends
to register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Bade County,
Florida.
ALEXANDER DRENNER,
Sole Owner
>BV PUBLICATION
^UIT COURT OF THE
[JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
|N AND FOR DADE
IN CHANCERY,
[No. 58C3030
iVITZ, -
HOROWITZ.
I*.
I FOR DIVORCE
|Ei:\IAN HOROWITZ
17th Street
,., New York
tUMAN HOROWITZ.
NOTrCE- UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEJV that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
usine.ss under the fictitious name of _,
RALK-KIH S'PEC|AIVrr\lFC, CO. at KASTEXBAHM. MAMBKB &
2447 N.W. 75th Street, Miami, Fla., in- p '. A."0.,o"'vs. ?"" A,BI'~"nt
tend to register said name with the !':"\con, Kd- Mauri I Beach, Fhv
Cler* "f the Circuit Court of Dade *
County, Florida.
LEO SCHOR
WILLIAM PJJCHS
t/2S. 5/2-9-16
"NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 5SC3127
CARIX T. HARRIS,
Plaintiff,
JANINE LEROY HARRIS.
Defendant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: JANINE LEflOY HARRIS,
c/o Madame Janine Leroy
Poste Rastante
Casablanca, Bourse, Morroco
You are hereby notified that a BUI
of Complaint for Divorce has been
filed,against you, and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your Answer
or Pleading to the Bill of Complaint
on the plaintiffs Attorney, Monrnd R.
Thue. Jr., 5846 S.W. 73rd St., South
Miami, Fla., and file the original An'
swer or Pleading In the office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before
the 19th day of May, 1958. If you fall
to do so, Judgment by default wii' be
taken against you for the relief de-
manded in the Bill of Complaint.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
HONE AND ORDERED at Miami,
Florida, this ion day of April, A.D.
1958.
E. R. LEATHERMAN. Clerk,
Circuit Court, I hide County. Florida
(seal) By I. a CLEARS,
Deputy Clerk.
Monrad R. Thue* Jr.
.1846 S.W. 73rd St.
South Miami. Florida
Attorney for Plaintiff
4/18-25, 6/2-9
e.
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
solicit* your legal notice*.
W* appreciate your
patronage and guarantee
accurate eerrice at legal
Phone FR 4-4366
lor meeeenget
LEGAL NOTICI
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
SHOP THE QI'KMC WAY OFF COR-
AL WAY at Z450 S.W. 87th Avenue,
South Miami, Florida, intends to, reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
QUICK WAY fcHOPilNi;
CENTERETTB No. 1. Inc.
(A Florida Corporation)
8. PHUJP MALSPEIS
Attorney for
(Juick W'ny Centerette No. 1, Inc.
4/18-25, 5/2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS IIEREPV GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name "t
II ,v I. A CTo PARTS at 2501 N.W.
27th Avenue. Miami, Florida intend to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County
Florida.
HENRY J. LANMKN
I. EON A K. LANM'-N
GEORGE CHEREN
Attorney for H Ik L Auto Parts'
-, 'o.n.iii
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
QUICK WAY SHOPPING CENTER
at 2450 S.W. 87th Aye,, South Miami.
Fla., intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
QUICK WAV SHOPPING
( KNTKKETTK No. 1. Inc.
i A Florida Corporation)
S PHILIP MALSPE1S
Attorney for
Quick Way Centerette No. 1, Inc.
4/18-25. 5/2-9
NOTrCE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS Ill-IM'I'V OIYFV it
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the liciuious name oi
THE REBEL at i486 South Wst 87th
Avenue, Miami, Florida intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
L. C. MURDOCH. Sole Owner
GOLDMAN* GOLDSTEIN
Attorneys for Registi mt
2:108 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida.
5/f-9-16-23
ed that, a Coiuiiiaint for
been filed again
required to serve
| ei fir pleading
the Plaintiff's attorney,
H.OTH. 420 Lincoln Road.
ed against yon.
cop)
to the
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS I1EUKHY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name, of
1UU1IT AIR CONDITIONING CO. at
E06 71st Street, Miami Beach, Dade
lounty, Florida, Intend (o register the
said name lUi tin- Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court I M.I.- coujuy, Florida.
. HESTER M. Rt'SRO
8857 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida
HERMAN C. WRIGHTJ
770 N.W. 12Sth Street
North .Miami, F.orlda
4/25,5/2-9-16 _______
IN THR CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
,w uv... ."~>.. 1Hh JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
Florida, and file the FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN
Mrer or pleading In the
I Clerk of the Circuit Court
lade County, Florida, on
jy lXh. 19:hn. H you fall
[lgiucnt by defaiUlt will be
al you for the relief de-
|he complaint.
V* 11th day of April, 1958.
I.EATIIER\UL*J, 'Clerk,
urt, I'ade Cnhngy. I'Torlda
I!y .IGA.N SNEEDEN,
De|>ul> l.leiK.
It' >TH
PlatMUf
Btoad
th. Florid*
I
t uy PUBLICATION
IIRCUIT COURT OF THE
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
IN AND FOR DADE
Y. IN CHANCERY,
No. 68C2*1*
WARWICK
| WARWICK
IT FOR DIVORCE
(.I.i: WARWIiTv
ox 127
T.8.. AP.O.O. M,
oik. New York
ll-I.E WARWICK, are
tied that a Complaint for
been filed against you.
I required to serve a copy
.-wcr or Pleading to the.
u ilie jOaliulff'a Attorney,
.KNHT, 420 Lincoln Road,
h. Ilerlda a-nd flH the.
wer or Pleading in the of-
Clerk of the Circuit Court
> the lath day of May, 1M<
to do so. Judgment by de-
i- taken against you for the
led ly the Bill of Cony
di oRDUIiaUl ut Miami,
lltti day of April, A*)-
l.EATHKBMAN, cktrk,
sirt, Ttaile County. Urn Ida
II- H H. RICH, JR.
I>ci>ut> Clerk.
iENUT
It., id
rirta
i Plaintiff
CrIANCERY. No. 58C3I97
WILLIAM L. ENSINGER,
Plaintiff,
l.ois MARCARET ENSINGER.
'o-RDER"oF PUBLICATION
TO: Ils Margaret Enslnggr,
111 South t'th Street,
Hairisburg. Pennsylvania.
You are hereby ordered and re-
quired to seiAc I COW of your ti-
mer to the bill of complaint for di-
vorce on plaintiffs attorney W. Kent
Jameson. 1784 N.W. 3th Street, Mi-
ami, Florida, and file the m ig na in
the office of the Clerk of the I ircul
Court of Dade County, Florida, oner
before the 23rd day of May, lfc.8,
otherwise the WR- of complain* will
1st taken as confessed by you.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that
*he undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
P.OLKKO PAR nt 1321 N. Miami Ave.,
Miami. Fla., intends to reglsli
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
CLARENCE W. MAHLER,
Sole Owner
HARNETT PELTZ
Alluiiii'i for Applicant
MB N.W. llth Ave., Miami. Fla.
I':'-,. -,/2-b-h;
IN THE CIRCU'T COURT OF THE
ELEVFNTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
No. 56C3283
HESSIF PFRMAN,
Plaintiff.
rratuN PBRMAK.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO: miMaiN PEUMAN
719 Van Rensseiaer Avenue -
Niagara Falls, New York
YOU ARM- HEREP.Y NOTIFIED
that a Complaint for Divorce has been
filed against you and you are required
to serve a copv of your n.nr on the
plaintiffs attorney. MICHAEL M.
ISENltERG, 1412 Alnslev Building,
Miami 32, Florida, and file the orig-
inal In the office of the Clerk of the
circuit Court on or before May 29th,
1958, in default of which the complaint
will be taken, as confessed against
Dated this- 22nd day of April, A.D.,
1158.
E. B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk,
Circuit Court, Dade Count v. Florida
(seal) By: JOAN KNEEliEN.
Deputy Clerk.
4/23, 5/2-9-16 ^ -_______
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY IN CHANCERY,
No. 58C3I10
HELEN SIMMAT.
Plaintiff,
vs.
OTTO SIMMAT,
I lefendant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
You, OTTO SIMMAT, P.O. Pox 27,
17 Stevens Street. Woodmont. Con-
necticut, are required to file your an-
swer to the complaint of divoree with
the Clerk of the BOOVe Court and
serve a copy thereof upon Hermtln
Cohen, Attorney, 136ft Congress FMdg.,
Miami, Florida, on or before May it.
1168, .....Ins iump'aint win in- taken
as confessed. Dated April It, 1958,
E. B. LEATHERMAN, clerk.
Circuit Court, J Hide Count.. Florida
all By: JOAN SNEEDEN,
Deputy Clerk.
4/18-25, 5/2-9
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 58C2957
WILLIAM HBUWUT RICHMOND,
Plaintiff.
Ell.i:E.\V"'cROW1yET RICHMOND,
Defendant. ____
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: Eileen Crow ley Richmond,
Defendnnt.
f.!2 W>t 136th Street
New York, New York
You Eileen Crowley Richmond, are
hereby notified that a Bill of Com-
plaint for Divorce has been filed
against vim, and you are required to
serve a copy of your Answer or Plead-
ing to the Bill of Complaint on tha
plaintiffs Attorney. RAY MAN *
nrilltl, 902 Ainsley Bldg., Miami 3i.
Florida, and file the original Answer
or Pleading in the office of the Clerk
of the circuit Court on or before tha
19th day of Muy, 1958. If you fail to
do so, Judgment by default will be
taken against you for the relief de-
manded In the Bill of Complaint.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this 10th day of April, A.D.
E. B. LEATHERMAN. Clerk.
Circuit Court, Dade County. Florida
(seal) By JOAN SNEEDEN.
Deputy Clerk,
RAYMAN & DUHIG
902 Ainsiey Pldg.
Miami 32, Florida
Attorneys for Plaintiff
4/18-25, r, '2 -9
(seal)
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
YALE WINDOW at 1675 East 16th
Street, Hlalenh, Florida Intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
YALE MANUFACTURING
COMPANY. INC.
(A Florida Corporation)
S. PHILIP MALSPEIS
Attorney for
Yale Manufacturing Company, Inc.
4/18-25. 5/2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAfrfE LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
\ HAH .v RESTAURANT
SUPPLIES at IBM Alton Road, Mi-
.11,1, P..-ai h. Dade County, Florid i, in-
tends to register laid name with tne
Clerk of the circuit Court of Dade
County, nflfeb^ UKVESTH^
Sole Owner
ENGLANDER & TENDRICH
Attorneys for Crown Bar &.
Restaurant Supplies
4/11-U-25. 5/2_____________
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thst
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under th* fictitious name of
QUICK WAT SHOPPING CENTER-
ETTE at MM S.W. S7th Avj.. South
Miami, Florida intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the I ir-
cqit'Court ofDanV County. Florida.
QUICK WAY SHOPPING
CENTERETTE No. 1. Inc.
s< -' *~ Corporation)
Hated at' Miami, Florida, this 18th I g pHIBIP MAU8PEI9
aa" k. Vleatherman. (
(seal)
4/85,5/1-9-16
the Circuit Court.
By: L. A. CLEARS.
Deputy Clerk.
,N T4HH CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
llth JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN Ago
FOR DADE COUNTY, Ft OR IDA. IN
CHANCERY. No. W08282
IN HE:
*WPrjA^EAR.CHARD.
f Br DONALD* vVc/nrn LAWSON.
her stepfather.
NORMAN W. RICHARD
YOU AflPI HRH'

I M.ur Answer or -
Plion, ti, show cause wW W Pll-
tlon should not h- grant"J: ''"..15^.
MU, Ml
* MILLEli s llulldlng. nl-
|.-|*rln>. and file, the orlg naj In
fh. office of the Clerk nf tl..- '"-ult
Court on or liefora Ihe 29th of May.
"HEREIN l'Mi. MS
pro confesso will be
s:.lV VnirtlnTBnl. Florid., this
,*^,> IOAN SNJ
Deputy Clerk
guick Way Centerette No. 1, Inc.
4/18-25,5/2-9
2-9-16
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
N0.58C2438-B
MAP.Y ELLEN 1IAHHETT
Plaintiff,
robert" Frederick barrett
Defendant. ^_
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: ROBERT FREDERICK
BARRETT
Residence Unknown
Toil, ROBERT FREDERICK BAR-
RETT, are hereby notllled that a
Complaint for Divoree has been filed
against you, and you are required to
serve a MM of yom- Answ-er or Plead-
l, to the Complaint ..n the plaintiff e
Attorn, v. GENET A "ENKT BjO*.
I'll Lincoln Road. Miami Beaell
Ida and file the oi-Iglnal Answ er or
Pleading In the office oT the Clerk of
nitt Court on or before the 12th
dav of May. 195S. If you fall to doino,
Judgmeng, by. default will be taken
against vou for the relief demanded
In the Coeaalalnt. ... ,
DONE AND ORDERED nt Miami,
1-1 "Ida, this th day of April. A.D.
,,M' E. H. LEATHERMAN. Clerk.
Cltrull Court, Dad. Cmmtv, Florida.
R H. Kl'-E. 1R
,.uty Clerk.
NET
for Plaint iff -
il Peach, Fla.
i,ii-is-:;., 5/2 -
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVES that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name til
FEDERAL MORTGAGE 1 N V E S T-
MENT EXCHANGE nt 407 Lincoln
Road, Miami I'.each. Florida, intends
to register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County.
REAL ESTATE CORPORATION
OF FIXlRII'A
A Florida corporation
.IUI.1IS JAY PERLMUTTER
Attorney for Real Estate Corporal.on
of Florida.
I/JJ-18-28, 5/8
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IH. HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage m
business under the fictitious name or
colll.l.loN ARMS .il 6886 Rue \er-
sailles. Miami Reach. Florida, intends
to register said name with the clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County,
F1rRUPLA, CONSTRUCTION coup.
By Irving Rubin
albert i* Rosen
Attorney for Rupla Construction Lorp.
940 Lincoln Road
Miami i:i-iuii, Florida
5 2-9-1B-23 _________,
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREPY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
COREY'S at 991 N.E. 167th Stit.
North Miami Reach. Fla Intends to
register sakl name with the Cleric ol
the Circuit Court of Dade Couaty,
BAR-RUE CORPORATION
(A Florida Con>oraliooJ
WALTMAN & COHEN
Attorneys for Applicant
Pldg,. 1
1108 Congress
6/n-m-L'-,. 571
Miami, Fla.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTIT40US NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY (IlVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage ln>
business under the fictitious name of
tINCOLN SALE* at 924 Lincoln
oad. Miami Reach. Fla., Intend to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court ot Daoe Counfcy,
Fh^ida.
MARTIN GOLDSTEIN
MARTIN U, STAHLUEIfl
4/H-1S-25. 575
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FC!?_v,DAOE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
NO. 58CS306-B
GRACE FRANDSEN.
Plaintiff,
vs
JACK It FRANDSEN,
Defendant. _
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
I'. i I tCK P.. FRANDSHN
c/o General Delivery
Charleston. South Carolina
You, Jack B. Frandsen. are herehv
notlfied that a Bill of Complaint for
Divorce has been filed against you,
mid you an- required to serve a copy
of your Answer or Pleading to the l.'Il
,,f Complaint on the plaintiffs Attor-
ney. DAVID M. C.ONSHAK 1009 Bis-
cay ne Building, Miami 88, Florida and
file the original Answer or Pleading
In the office of the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit-Court on or before the 2nd day
of June. 195s. If yuu fail to do so.
Judgment by default will be taken
against you for the relief demanded In
the Bill of Complaint.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FliOlUDIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this 25th day of April. A.D.
11"'' SJj B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk,
circuit Court, Dade County, Florida
By L. A. CLEARE,
Deputy Clark
DAVID M. OONHHAK
1009 Biscay ne Building
Miami :<-. Florida
Attorney for Plaintiff
ATTENTION ATTORNEYS!
CORPORATION OUTFITS
. Lowept Prices Quickest Delivery
in South Florida
Call the JEWISH FLORIDIAN at
FR4-43G6


16-A
lews Outside Miami Beach Will Die'
1 A
This kmji
fuputj nghta of
this
declared "It is the more
it happened in Florida. "The
the gwdty Mi in o
f the personal and
directly injured." Go* Col-
u a aenous crune against every
security of American justice Any-
a wrong ha* this has such
that he is a c nmmaaj
of race, color or religion."
1:
Speculation Sounded FBI Conservatives
May Open Bombing Query
Air Integration
Continue from Pane 1 A
Will the Federal Bareaa of In
vestitataaa faaaUy decide u take a
hand m the nreseax reign of terror*
This was aa ones ancrtian early
Wednesday as the Department of
Justice avasted report* in Wash-
ington iron the FBI and the
mej office U> determine d
any rioiation of Federal lav occur-
red in the Jacfcjonvme a rim bang
Monday of a Jewish Center and a
Negro school
**rtniainf eridanci of a ionf
stiiao of torronstit acts wtlb the
ft rTVWVJM
JacJrsoawMa
OX.
sources war* Wednesday we
the FBI *a enter Hi* invesrieje-
and Washing tan.
hi addition tn the Jack
ndenU. pools to the
Beth El himriing aa Miami and the
Nashville Jewish Center aambrng
at the same time almost two
oaths ago Also cited are efforts
recently directed at Gastonia and
Charlotte. N.C.. synagogues.
In all. some 45 incidents, ac-
cording to the sources, were listed
for examination by the FBI to de-
termine if the Federal agency has
jurisdiction in the case.
r American Jaws and
their rabbis where *c they lived,
th* rabbinical loader added: "We
ratapniia the dilemma in which
our Jews in Soothe in cemmun
eSes find the inn lyes and fully
understand the uniowenass af
thaw posihan hi communities
where they consHtwt* a small
. MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY
THE CEMETERY OF DISTINCTION
FOR DISCRIMINATING FAMILIES
S50S N.W. 3rd Shoot Phono MO 1-8201
US jit PASSES htOUMT NEBO
He said that it could not be ex
peeled of Jews in Southern com
m unities "that they should speak
out alone when their 'economic se
rarity, social standing or. who
knows, even their well-being may
be placed in jeopardy."
While agreeing that leaders of
national organizations should con-
sult with Jews in Southern com
munities "whenever we issue any
pronouncement* and take counsel
with them before enunciating any
resolutions." Rabb Halpern insisted
that Southern Jewry "should work
jointly with others who; like them.
abhor the injustice being done to
those whose pigmentation alone is
deemed sole justification for their
treatment."
GORDON 2
FUNERAL HOME
FR 3-3431
FRanklin 9-1436
710 S.W. 12th Avt.
m eotnoN, f~w
Mf. Sine/ Nwrsiag School
Gef s S3,500 Bequest
Mt. Sinai Hospital School of
! Practical Nursing is the recipient
of a $3,500 bequest under the will
of the late Dr. Abraham M. Hor
of Ft. Lauderdale. Max Oro-
viu. president of the hospital, an
nounced this week.
The will provides that the be-
quest is to be used lor a scholar
ship fund to assist deserving young
women in the field of nursing. Mrs
Carmen Ross u director of the Mt.
Sinai Hospital School of Practical
Nursing.
s^*
^**w^*Ai asha*\ aaa n
PALMER'S
Memorial Dealers"
MM
CAT,
ixcunnnr
10 im
cuutriu
fOTWhWU
0-ly $35.00
Wfcy Pey More? fey ft* Less at P.liwr's mi Soy.
GORDON ROOFINXJ AND
SHET METAL WORKS INC.
21 N.W. lfttfc Ft j 71M
! ytir reef repaired now: you
ill mv* en a new reef later.
Satiafacter, Work by
Eiaer.cnced Mm"
J awyil
4*tH
4-tOtt
GOLFERS
WSTYSMAfTS?
A new metallic treatment
lam for year
WWni. IBwtWtnas
rO|s*. AintATrOW
oax* servrCf
f-aotr w>4UTT
Goff's
14M Peexe Carol Cablet
MEANS
thbffaahat
KOSHER :Z
Watch Sat ft
Smileacje,
Stirfs A>
tlKC
BJ.Goodrich SAFETY*
Fully Guaranteed NEW TIRE tui
135 lit 85
17*11
. r../ vuiuiOTU B*BJ|
LCT3
470-15
LIFE-SAVER Silvertown]
seals punctures permanently
B.F.Goodrich Tires
irM
NORTON
TIRE <
uu me* *".
IM "


BY... S
n
j
,4. oman s
IJUeM
How time does fly! Temple Emanu-El spirit-
ual leader Dr. and Mrs. Irving Lehrman and Tem-
ple Emanu-El president Mr. and Mrs. Samuel
Friedland are due back from Israel .
They will be honored at a reception in the
Rosewood room of the Fontainebleau hotel Thurs-
day evening. May 15 .
)r. Lehrman will report on the trip to Israel, where he has been
Renting Dr. Louis Finkelstein, chancellor of the Jewish Theological
nary of America, at an educators' conference gftmiffting ef 90
ri of the Teachers' Institute and Seminary now living in Israel .
he reception will climax Emanu-El's annual effort in behalf of
eminary. Handsome Judge Irving Cypen has been named chair-
{of the affair .
I'ice chairmen are distinguished community leaders Samuel J.
fcrin, Joseph M. Lipton, Leo Robinson and Marcus O. Sarokin.
New Arrivals...
Jirth Dase ... A very welcome note from former Miami Beachites
Bd Juliet (Oshlag) Lieber, way out in Phoenix, Ariz., sends the news
^ly and Juliet are grandparents Daughter and son-in-law Fran
Jene Gendlin. of Chicago, are the proud parents of brand-new
Ann, their first child Gene's parents are Dr. and Mrs. Otto
|lin. of WasMngton, D.C. .
knd Arizona*, writes Juliet, is "fascinating!"
Uso: Robin Sheryl arrived to become the first child of Mr. and Mrs.
M. Berman, 747 SW 10th st., on Apr. 18. Her port of entry was
t>rs Hospital .
Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Nam off and Mr. and Mrs.
le Sanders, all of Miami.
ihJIiKwiislbJEIliOiriidliigun
Miami, Florida, Friday, May 2, 1958
Section B
Mizrachi Women to Hear National Leader Here
Mrs. Ruth Waldman, of New
York City, a member of the na-
tional board of the Mizrachi Wo-
men's Organization of America,
will be principal guest speaker a'
the annual donor luncheon of Mi-
ami chapters of the women's relig-
ious-Zionist organization at the
Deauville hotel Sunday at 12 noon.
Members of six local chapters of
Mizrachi Women will attend the
luncheon, which marks the tenth
anniversary of the establishment of
the State of Israel..
Mrs. Alvin Levenson and Mrs. A.
Rudley serve as co-chairmen of the
event. Participating chapters are
the Dov, Tamara, Orah, Tziona,
Coral Gables and Miami Beach
Seniors.
Mrs. Waldman, who serves also
as national co-chairman of organ-
ization of Mizrachi Women, has
traveled extensively throughout
the U.S. as a vigorous participant
in the women's religious-Zionist
movement for more than a decade.
ting (he Best of (he Worst
>r. Ted Berman was host at his Waverly Arms apts. diggings Sat
"in memory of a bad season on Miami Beach'' .
kbout 50 friends turned out to help Dr. Ted celebrate the occasion.
c >
tnne Marcia Fishbein is appearing in the Brandeis University Gil-
land Sullivan Society production of "Iolanthe," this weekend at the
ham, Mass., campus .
tune, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. I. Leo Fishbein of Miami Beach,
ashman at Brandeis, and has the leading role of Phyllis in the
opera.
c ," >..
MRS. RUTH WALDMAN
yah and" ertnrationar field's, gather-
ing information and data on condi-
tions affecting her organization's
work.
Her interest in Jewish education
and youth work generally is reflect-
ed in her leadership role in many
national Jewish organizations. She
is the founder and first president of
the National Assn. of Hebrew Day
School Parent-Teacher Assns. and
honorary president of Young Is-
rael's Women's League.
In addition to her many organ-
izational activities, and her fre-
quent appearances on the lecture
platform and radio program, she
serves as a member of the editorial
board of Jewish Parents Magazine.
In 1954, she surveyed Mizrachi
Women's extensive network of pro-
jects in. the Holy Land, and con-
Chesed Skel tines Meeting
Sisterhood Chesed Shel Ernes
will meet Monday, 1 p.m., at the
borne of vice president Mrs. Anna
ferred with top governmental lead- j Block, 1643 SW 7th st. Mrs. Israel
ers in the social service. Youth Ali-1 Goldberg is president.
lie and Sam Postcard It
liamians Abroad Hattie and Sam (Food Fair) Friedland send-
ord of their "delightful stay" in Israel Post card is from Tel
showing beautiful seacoast and promenade .
a
nvitations in the mail to "Duck in for a cocktail" at Harry and
Simonhoff's new home, at 887 N. Shore dr. The time to "live
erously" is May 11, from 5 to 7 p.m.
Jut-of-town for a few months will be Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Shawmut,
176 Prairie ave.
sme 40 friends were entertained at luncheon in the Rubaiyat room
Algiers hotel Tuesday by Mrs. Sam Kantor, 601 SW 5th st., and
Morton Steele, 4320 N. Meridian ave. .
Jeautiful table decorations for the six individual tables were in
nk and white motif with place cards of tiny wrought iron chairs with
Cushion seats, holding the name of each guest. Grapefruit baskets
with melon balls, which became the first course, were also part
table decor.
iior from L.A. Squired Around Town
Mrs. Frances Quittner is in from Los Angeles and happy to see her
bother Mrs. Emanuel Gordon, 1021 NW 1st st. .
Gaily squiring her about town are brother and sister-in-law Mr.
} Mrs. Harry Gordon, of S. Miami ave. .
'Already out is the surprise news that brother Ike will shortly be
ried to Miss Florence Freedman, secretary to Miami Beach Mayor
aeth Oka and City Manager Claude Renshaw.
Recent luncheon and shower honored Arlene Tarshis, daughter of
y Ben Chasin ... -
Arlene will become the bride of Warner Mitchell June 18 in a cere-
jiy at the Eden Roc hotel .
Hostesses at the Orange Blossom function in the Fontainebleau were
Y H. C. Barsky and Mrs. Morris Prince, of Detroit.
123 LINCOLN ROAD
AT THE OCEAN
MIAMI BEACH
INVITES YOU...
(Jmham* J^""
inner Party...
Some 38 guests were present to say -'many more!" when Mr. and
I Julian Aherman celebrated their 11th wedding anniversary at
1525 Cleveland rd. home ...
Guests included the Gilbert Feins, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Frank. Mr.
Mrs. Bernard Wexler, the Leonard Abels, Mr. and Mrs. Howard
^ters, Mr. and Mrs. Hy Forrest and the David Grossbergs.
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Gaines, 4550 N. Bay rd., were hosts at a dinner
t.v in the Mona Lisa room of the Eden Roc hotel .
The party included Baron and Polly de Hirsch Meyer, the Leo
s, Mr. and Mrs. Ben Cohen, Mr. and Mrs. Michael Wiesner and
H. Goldsteins.
FASHIONS
MATCHING BEACH AND SPORTSWEAR
. Something to match your "date" .
. that gift to the Bride and Groom .
. ... for Mom and Dad on Mother's Day .
... or Sis and Lad ... or just something
new for yourself .
CREATIONS BY .
OLEG CASSINI ADRIAN NANI OF HAWAII
CEEB OF MIAMI BUCKNELL OF NEW YORK
123 LINCOLN ROAD at the Ocean .
Phone JE 8-5107


2-B
Jt>*ist> nor**r
-^Il^Iil



w 1 ^^yB life. m
Tastes like a million, costs only penniesand lasting fresh-
ness of this luscious, vacuum-sealed lissssit cake makes it
ideal "helper-outer" whenever occasion calls for an unusually
tempting snack. Kosher too. it bears 1' seal oi strictest kashruth
on label. T ..
Ready-to-Serve Dromedary Date-Nut
Roll Favorite for Snacks and Desserts
It's probably just pure coinci-
dencebut have you ever noticed
the way unexpected guests some-
how menage to irp in for a
\isit at the precise moment when
your pantry is embarrassingly
bare? A pretty problem, indeed,
for the woman who prides herself
on her hospitality.
There is. however, a simple
solution to this problem that will
do any hostess proud, as countless
home makers have discovered:
keep a supply of ready-to-serve
Dromedary Date-Nut Roll on hand
and whatever the time or the cir-
cumstance, you're set to greet your
guests almost instantly with a
royal treat.
Slice it thick, slice It thin; toast
' it, cube it, spread it with cream
.cheese or top it with syrup, berries,
?preserves: scoop-tt otrt and fill it
with fruit salad, applesauce, ice
cream whichever of these you
have at hand. However you serve
it, the tempting taste of Drome
; dary Date-Nut Roll makes it every-
one's instant favorite as a snack or
i dessert.
Made to an exclusive Dromedary
: recipe and produced by an exclu-
| live Dromedary process, this dark
and wonderfully delicious dessert
I cake combines the wholesome, en-
ergy-rich qualities and luscious
j taste of crisp, chunky walnuts and
the world's choicest dates vacuum-
fe*S
for CAREFREE.
100%
PURE BEEF!
COLD CUTS
RICH WITH
JUICY
FLAVOR
- -
:
Here's party food guests Just
love I Famous Kosher 2k>n
Delicatessen Products are
pure beef products ... lightly
end carefully spiced end sea-
soned to give you perteat
flavor. Kosher Zion meets are
strictly kosher ... rich and
Juicy end marvelously good
eating. Try them tonight
FOOD STORES EVERYWHERE
tXClUSIVt DfSTMSuTOffS OF TH SOOTH
COASTLINE PROVISION CO. INC
855 EUSCAYNE ST., MIAMI BEACH
Two Lectures Scheduled
Fifth lecture in a aeries on "The
Art of Happy Living" will be given
by Dr. Abraham Wolf son Saturday.
8" p.m at the Spinoza Outdoor
Forum, 11th st. and Oeeen ct.
Topic is "Whet is Year -Deepest
Desire in Life?"' At 8:30 p.m.. Ber-
nard Sberwis will discuss "Better
Health Through Relaxation."
sealed in tins to provide indefinite
prntanlian rf the characteristic,
tender-textured freshness and in-
viting flavor of this popular treat.
One note of cajjtion: M yQlt want
to be sure of an available supply
at all times, it is advisable to stock
up in quantity, as a precaution
against the pantry-raiders in your
family, from the youngest member
up. Dromedary Nut-Rolls are the
youngsters' favorites for whole-
some between-meals snacks, as an
inducement to reluctant miak-drink-
ers and as the perfect answer to
the teen-ager's urge to "do it my-
self" in fixing a snack for friends.
In addition to Dromedary Date-
Nut Roll, your local food store fea-
tures Dromedary Chocolate-Nut
Roll and Orange-Nut Roll, each
with its own delightfully distinc-
tive flavor.
All of them are strictly kosher,
displaying on the label the (g seal
of approval that indicates they arej
made under the constant kashruth!
supervision of the Union of Orth-
odox Jewish Congregations of
America.
Miami IB Women
Installs Officers
Mrs. Gerald Solti, second vice
president of B'nai B'rith District 5,
will install Mrs. Nathan Spiegel-
man president of B'nai B'rith Wo-
men of Miami at an installation
brunch Tuesday, at the Algiers
hotel.
Others to be installed are the
Mesdames Bernard Tytcll, Phillip
Hand and Betty Birchansky, vice
presidents: Nathan Levme, treas-
urer: Ethel Lackey, financial sec-
retary.
Also the-Mesdames David Hess,
recording secretary; Louis Dia-
mond, corresponding secretary;
Henry Wolf son. roster secretary;
Jack Teitler, administrative secre-
tary; Gerald Rubin, historian; Ben
Slut sky. sentinel: Aaron Bcllinkoff,
guardian; Harvey Herman, parlia-
mentarian; George Liebman, re-
tention: and Stephanie Klein, coun-
selor.
Rabbi Yaakov Rosenberg, spirit-
ual leader of Beth David Congre-
gation, will be guest speaker.
Mrs. Murray Gladstone is chair-
man, and Mrs. Phillip Rand and
Mrs. Jack Teitler are co-chairmen
f this function.
*
*
Ladies Schedule Election
Sisterhood of Miami Hebrew Con-
gregation will hold its annual elec-
tion Tuesday at 1 p.m. Rabbi
Simon April will speak and Cantor
Berele Kelemer will render musi-
cal selections.
mos. QATHuisnmuui
Now AKongresi CIm*, j
Hows Education Diriat
Newly organized BiicajaJ
ter of the American Jeviaj
gress studied Patterns tfa
ican Jewish Life'' n JHj
Apr. 24 at the home of Hn3
Zuckerman, 17120 NE Uikjl
Miami Beach.
Abraham Gittelion, tdwl
director of the North Defc j
Center, was guest speaker.
Membership chaimun i
new chapter is Mrs. Lenai
MOTHER'S
GEFILTE FISH
PHONES:Jl "M2
' Jf l-tttl
NEMAN PEAU,
PAT
MotheKs
OLD-FASHIONED
GEFILTE FISH
An appetizing touch of perfection has been>
odded to America's most popular gefihe fish...
now. ita golden broth cemes to yea ofreedy Jsfted- roSMW PAaivt
a sparkhng, tender, delkotety flavored M M .J^us** ** \H
geldenospk-reodyteasfveissdenby. es5T ""
*~m *a Seosaa. Kitchen, ef MOTMB'S POO PtOOUCTS. WC, HiWA* I. *
250 N.E. 40th Street PLaza 4-W58


May 2. 1958
+JewlsHk>rMlan
3-B
(deration's Annual Meeting Picks
rs. Ssrkin to Chair Varied Program
Bother member of a pioneer
jni iamily has been appointed
important post in the upcom-
EOih annual meeting of Greater
ii Jewish Federation,
rs. Milton Sirkin, who arrived
lie Miami area in 1938, the year
pralion was officially conceiv-
las this week named program
rman of the 20th annual mcet-
[by Sam Blank, chairman.
|rs. Sirkin immediately named
Aaron Farr to head the at-
lance ZWnmittee aTUTMrs. Har-
[Spaet to develop the decora-
theme,
he 20th annual dinner has been
jfor Sunday evening, June 1, in
new ballroom of the Americana
a preliminary meeting of the
tram committee, Mrs. Sirkin
fhasized that, "although Feder-
s two decades of community
rice will come in for its share
ecognition, the event, will also
social affair with dancing dur-
| th< reception and dinner. Ten
(re program plans also call for
iuling of a nationally known
kker in the field of welfare, ed-
Jion, or government.
here will be appropriate cere-
pjes in which the pioneer foun-
of Federation and our Jewish
kmunity will participate," Mrs.
tin added.
deluded in the program will be
ftecial tribute to the presidents
guided the destiny of Feder-
during the past 20 years.
(rs. Sirkin is a former president
he Greater Miami Jewish Cora-
aity Center and hag also been
sident of the Greater Miami
pter of Hadassah, and a num-
of ether local and national ser-
organizations.
She is a member of Federation's
board of governors and executive
committee, and headed the CJA
Women's Division in 1949. She has
also been active nationally with the
Jewish Welfare Board and was
president of the Conference of
Jewish Womens' Organizations of
Dade and Broward Counties.
Interested in youiii activities for
many years, Mrs. Sirkin has func-
tioned on the boards of many or-
ganizations s\lch"as Brandeis'Uni-
versity Women, Nautilus School,
Welfare Planning Council of Dade
County and National Council of
Jewish Women.
MM. MILTON SIKKIN
North Shore Chapter of BB Women
Plans Installation Luncheon Wednesday

NOW
You. Can Drink
All The f
Iced Tea You
Want
WITHOUT
Gaining A Single
Ounce
4-Or. -Size Bottle Only TH
At Leading Feed Store*
UGARiNI is Kaabw o.id is Approved
by the Union of Orthodox
Jewish Congregations.
.ugust rr*os.ftv^
fs ft* b: iTt
Barcelona hotel has been select-
ed as the site for the North Shore
chapter, B'nai B'rith Women, in-
stallation luncheon to be held Wed-
nesday noon.
Mrs. Arthur Newmark will be in-
stalled as president. Serving on the
executive board are the Mesdames
Arthur J. Rose, Ivar Blacker, Sey-
mour Blume, Edyth Berman, Frank
Cuttler, Morris Goodman, vice
presidents; Jack Fein, Sam Ches-
kes, treasurers; Benjamin Berko-
witz, audtior; George Shaw, re-
cording secretary; Ann Lazarus,
Tina Cameron, corresponding sec-
retaries; S. David Cohen, Mike
Cohen, Mike Kahn, financial secre-
taries; Max Benkowitz, social sec-
retary; Morris Urist, sentinel;
David Dreeben, guardian; George
Baltuch, parliamentarian; Richard
Schwartz, historian; Lester Arkin,
counsellor; George Baltuch, Ber-
nard Hoffman, Emanuel Pincus,
George Lev en son, Mark Silver-
siein, trustees.
The following board of directors
will also be installed: the Mes-
dames Charles Barlly, Sam Belsky,
George Barry, Libby Berger, R. A.
Bergman, Maurice Bernstein, Mau-
rice Brantman, Sol Cheskes, Sam
Cohen, Harry Dickert, Abe Eisen-
berg, Sylvia Friedland, Nathaniel
Friedman, Philip Ciller, Murray
Herlands, Otto Kahn, Maurice Kauf-
man, Aaron Kapit, Albert Kappy,'
Charles Kimmel, Irving Kleinman, \
Charles Kollin, Abe Kremmens,
Philip Kenner, Benjamin Kimmel,
Mitchell Lehrman, Ann Levantine.
Irving Mandel, Jerome Marshak,
Louis Marks. Joseph Meister, Abe
Neumark, Frank Menkes, Murray
Ratner, Louis Rolnick. Sam Rud-.
nick, Sam Schwartz, Milton Shaw,
Benjamin Shinkman, Mitzie Weiss,
Michael Wilder.
A highlight of the afternoon will
be the presentation of a Past Pres-
ident's Marcasitc Pin and Gavel to
retiring president Mrs. Lester Ar-
kin, who is also celebrating her
birthday.
Mrs. George Baltuch, past pres-
ident of North Shore chapter, South
Florida Council and Florida State
Federation, will be installing offi-
cer.
Mrs. Frank Cuttler, program di-
rector, will present a variety pro-
gram with the following members
participating: the Mesdames Max
Benkowitz, Myron Alpert, Charles
Barlly, S. David Cohen, Morris
Goodman, Mike Kahn, Aaron
Kapit, Jerome Marshak, Frank
Menkes, Arthur J. Rose, Simon
Rosen, Richard Schwartz. They
will be accompanied at the piano
by Mrs. Mackey Klein.
Mrs. Benjamin Berkowitz, chair-
man of the day, and Mrs. Sam Sch-
wartz, co-chairman, are in charge
of reservations.
He's Named Vice President
Milton N. Fisher, former execu-
tive vice president of Dixie-Style,
Inc., Miami contract furnishing
firm, has been named president of
Decor International Corporation of
Cuba, and will make his headquar-
ters in Havana.
Council Schedules
Joint Installation
Installation meeting of Greater
Miami Section, National Council of
Jewish Women, promises to be one
of the outstanding events in the
Section's history.
Members of all seven divisions
will meet at lunch in the Sky room
of the Dupont Tarleton hotel Wed-
nesday noon for the installation of
both Section and Division officers.
This will be the first time that of-
ficers have been installed in a joint
ceremony.
- la. ad/'ilinBi li_l|]'*_Ji"'tjUa'iDn
the meeting will celebrate the 40th
anniversary of the founding of the
Miami Section of Council. Mrs.
Milton Margulies, chairman of the
day, has announced that the pro-
gram, "Life Begins -at Forty," will
honor all living past president of
the Section and other past leaders
in Council.
She has urged that Council mem-
bers of long standing, as well as
those who have become active in
recent years, join in honoring these
leaders.
Mrs. Isadore Cohen, president of
the Miami Section NCJW in 1918,
the year of its founding, will give
the invocation. Dr. Ben Rosen-
berg, executive director of Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, will
bring greetings from Federation.
Mrs. Samuel Gertman, of Coral
Gables, will be installed as pres-
ident of the Greater Miami Section.
Rabbi Joseph Narot, of Temple Is-
rael, will conduct the installation.
Mrs. Margulies will trace the his-
tory and growth of the Greater Mi-
ami Section of Council.
Other Section officers who will
be installed are vice presidents,
Mrs. Sidney Lewis, Mrs. Robert
Lewin, Mrs. Leo Alpert, Mrs. Nor-
man Tatar, and Mrs. William Bren-
ner; recording secretary, Mrs. Bur-
ton B. Goldstein; corresponding
secretary, Mrs. Howard Grove; fi-
nancial secretary, Mrs. Maxwell
Hyman; treasurer, Mrs. Charles R.
Jacobson; assistant treasurer, Mrs.
Marvin Zank.
Division presidents will be Bis-
cayne, Mrs. William I. Brenner;
Shores, Mrs. Raymond Rubin; Sun-
set, Mrs. Emery Kemeny; Islands,
Mrs. Ben Lond; Lincoln, Mrs. Os-
car Green; Indian Creek, Mrs.
Leonard Bursten; Bay, Mrs. Leo-
pold Schwartz.
^Lppw* ^m jfl
" '^ht, -Jm\
^H

ff*"i_i. >..... JroJEuAt
MRS. SAMUEL CLKTMAN
Zamora Ladies Plan
Meets, Installation
Dupont Tarleton hotel will be the
scene of a donor luncheon Wed-
nesday noon, when the Sisterhood
of Zamora Jewish Center is plan-
ning an interesting program with
entertainment and surprises. Mrs.
Dorothy Krieger Fink will be guest
speaker.
Wednesday evening. May 14, Za-
mora Sisterhood will hold a regular
meeting and hear conference re-
ports of the Southeastern Branch
of the National Women's League.
Conference was held at St. Pe-
tersburg, Fla. Mrs. David Kivel,
president-elect, and Mrs. Nat Dav-
idow, vice president, were dele-
gates.
Sisterhood held election of offi-
cers recently. Named were pres-
ident, Mrs. David Kivel; vice pres-
idents, Mrs. Leon Honig, Mrs. Rose
Galton, Mrs. Nathan Davidow, and
Mrs. Joel Cohen; recording secre-
tary, Mrs. Israel Kussner; corre-
sponding secretary, Mrs. Murray
Shulman.
Treasurer, Mrs. Nathan Goldy;
financial secretary, Mrs. Harry
F i s h m a n; and parliamentarian,
Mrs. Joseph Ostpe.
Installation of officers and board
members will be at late Friday
evening services. May 16.
J
; I
Salads
Men Go For!
j MAKES IT BETTER!
MMOUS NUNIIR


ut rioeucTS
so/**10*
KOSHI* *
IP*
SINAI KOSHFK STAR COBf
Distributed by HI-ORADE FOOD CO.
7200 N.W. 27th Avenue phm NE iv**
EUDCET MINDED? LOOKING FOR QUALITY f30D AT THE LOWEST PRICES? REMEMBER
YOUR DOLLARS GO FARTHER
of your friendl; Neighborhood
B-THRIFTY or GRAND UNION
SUPERMARKET
featuring nationally advertised
KOSHER FOODS
Mother's Rokeoch Monischewitz
and MANY OTHERS
Be sure to visit our new
GRAND UNION
SUPERMARKET
4S0 N.E. 125th STREET NORTH MIAMI
"fiorido'j moif nedera supermarket"
FREE PARKING
AT ALL STORES
OPA LOCKA
121 Opa lock a Boulevo.,1
NORTH MIAMI
13020 N.E. 8th Avenue
MIAMI
1753 N.E. 2nd Avenue
MIAMI
1263 W. Flagler Street
MIAMI
3050 N.W. 7th Street
CORAL GABLES
1906 Pence de Leon Blvd.
WEST MIAMI
6190 S.W. 8th Street
MIAMI
Coral Way at ludlum Road
MIAMI
5767 Bird Road
KENDALL
11301 S. Dixie Highway







I
J

Miami Beach chapter of Hadassah Donor Re-
ward Day will be highlighted by noon lunch-
eon Monday at Eden Roc hotel. Music drama.
"Fire on the Mountain," by Millard Lampell.
is program's feature. Corps of workers in be-
half of Donor Reward Day includes (left to
right) standing Mesdames Abe Appel. Bran-
deis; Charles Bushell, Hannah Senesch; Fran-
ces Errftne, Henrietta Szoid; Nathan Rattoer.
Stephen Wise; Robert Perlman. Deborah; Rose
Feibush. Shaloma; I. N. Weinkle. Heral; and
R. Murray, hostess chairman. Seated (left to
right) are Mesdames Fred Jonas. Brandeis; N.
Joseph. Israeli; F. HolofceneT, Donor Reward
luncheon chairman; Harold Mekiiok. arrange-
ments chairman; M. Richfeld, Shaloma; and
Ellis Amdur. Herzl. Hadassah choral group
will be directed by Cantor Israel Retch, of
Temple Emanu-EL Dr. David Adren. pres-
ident of Miami Beach District ZOA. will be
narrator Entire production is by Vk*. Trbrie
Levin.
Academy to Mark
Yearbook Victory
Evening of stars will mark the
completion of the annual yearbook
project of the Hebrew Academy
Women Wednesday evening at the
Pontainebleau hotel
Entertainment, a late supper and
dancing will be followed by the
crowning of the 1958 Hebrew
Academy Yearbook King and
Queen.
Chairmen in charge of the eve-
ning are B. I. Binder, president of
the Academy; Mrs. Benjamin Ap-
pel president of the Hebrew Acad-
yps, u/""n< }ir< t^jHnrp Spolter
"and Mrs. Williflm Kesselman, year-
book chairmen; Mrs. David S. An-
dron, yearbook editor.
Victory dance committee mem-
bers are Mesdames Irving Firtel,
Hyman Sandier. Harry Kaplan.
Jonah Caplan and Alexander S.
Grose.
IWf Mother's Ooy n
To feofure Wofofcle, |
Rabbi Mayer Abr.nl?1!
ident of the JewJfffiM
Council of Greater Mun
riomeed m, a ME?i
gram sponsored by the be presented over r**?**
WAHR Sunday momi^,
, ^"bbi, Morri8 Skop
leader of Temple Judea
Anna Brenner Meyers h
week as Dade county's '(
ing Woman of the Year"
pear as guest speakers.'
Daniel M. Broad, honor,
ideot of the Council, ji| _
YlHBisnrialffrft nas%\
monies.
Strinq GrOttP WHI ScWortrmcn Wif, Attend
* T.uiit SrhaartiuTun execul
Be Heard Sunday
Louis Schwartsman, executive
director of the Bureau of Jewish
Education, was to represent Miami
at convention of the National Coun-
, I cil for Jew*sh Education May 1 in
will be presented in Beaumont.Hall j AlUnUc at>. NJ -r^ ^v^.
tion includes leading educators
Special program celebrating the
State of Israel's tenth anniversary-
Sunday by the String Sinfonietta of
Temple judea. Robert Strassburg
conductor.
The event is be lag sponsored by
officials of Coral Gables and the
University of Miami jointly with
the Chamber of Commerce, the
Ministerial Assn., Temple Judea
and Zamora Jewish Center.
String Sinfonietta will present
"Three Statements" from "The
Patriarchs.'" by Strassburg. The
work was originally premiered by
the University of Miami Symphony
Orchestra under the direction of
John Bitter.
It will follow the Bach choral.
"Break Forth 0 Beauteous Hea-
venly Light."
Strassburg has also made a spe-
cial string setting for a group of
Hebrew and Israeli folk melodies
which will be presented by Cantor
Htrman Gottlieb, of Temple Judea.
in the Orthodox. Conservative and
Reform movements and is sched-
uled to meet at the Breakers hotel.
Also attending was to be Bureau
assistant director Zvi Berger.
Hours or Sonnet Cfiosgec
Ttte flours of servtee at the phil-
atelic window at the main post
office in Miami wHl fle from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. and 1:90 to 3 p.m..
Monday through Friday, acting
Postmaster E. M. Uuniop announ-
ced rhis week. The window will
not be open on Saturday
Executive Group
Hoars Reports
Luncheon meeting of the execu-
tive committee of the Greater Mi-
ami chapter. National Nephrosis
Foundation, was held at the Du-
jpont Tarleten hotel Tsesday.
Mrs. Henry Green presided. Pro-
gress report was given by member-
ship chairmen Mrs. Maurey L.
Ashmann and Mrs. Robert Yolken.
Reports were also read by vice
presidents Mrs. Sidney Alterman,
Mrs. Joseph Grrtreman and Mrs.
Al Sokol.
and Lynn Cohen, of Zamora.
The program will conclude with
the third movement of Strassburg's
"Symphony of Lights." Rabbi Leon
B. Hurwitz is chairman of the
event.
iTETLEY TEA in a glass
i\i
Thai's the fine old Jewish way to en-
joy tea at its finest..."flavor crushed"
Tctley for fullest strength and stimu-
lation ... richer taste and pleasure...
served in a glass or cup!
Certified Kosher
under strict
Rabbinical
Supervision
SINCE 18371
Tribute Slated
For Mothers
Parent-Teachers Assn. of Beth
David Congregation will pay trib-
ute to mothers with a presentation.
'Mother's Delight." Monday, 8
p.m. at Beth David.
The presentation entitled "Yen-
teh Telabendahs on Parade." will
include the following cast of char-
acters:
The Mesdames Irving Bayer,
William Berson, Reuben Meis.
Bernard Kanter, Morris KleiaMn,
Bernard Klein, William Lipson,
Manuel Lubel.
The Mesdames Saul Rabin. Sigo
Raskin. Bernard Reiter, Joseph
Sandier. Rose SchriedeiL
Mrs. Robert Nedbor and atrs.
Meyer Forer win be commenta-
tors, and Mrs. Joseph Feld will be
accompanist. Mrs. Jack Toppell
will offer a solo dedicated to
mothers.
PREPARE MODERN YOUNGSTERS
FOR ACTIVE
NO fAT! Hotlcnd Honey Cakes j
NO SALT' are ma(,e w,t^out these ingredients, !
tist rus*.7\i Yet a:e Delicious, Tasty, and Good
NO SUGAR! (or Everyone!
ASK FOt THEM IN YOUt FOOD STORE OR HEMTH FOOD SHOT.
Made ay
HOLLAND HONEY CAKE CO., Holland, Michigan
with Holsum
Children lore meal,
time when lunch*
boxes include better*
tasting sandwiches.
Nutritious Holsum
Premium Quality*
Bread always means,
extra good flavor!
Holsum
^ QUALITY
firs, frotman is Hostess
Coral Gables chapter <
men's American ORT win
the home of Mrs. Henry Fn
384 Shore dr. E., Bay
Wednesday evening.
NOW!
Xco,*a x
Ufa* UNO
KOSHER
CORNED
for delknom
magic-easy meilil
TetDHO :
,tewTh Holsum Bread
GRADE v \ I 7 /
v lllV Q > SERVING
**A" 1 ^ "rlj^^rtjl -GREATra
PRODUCTS flJ^J-lL^flj M1AM1
CHILDREN MEED
Homogenized Vttami* MD" MUc
PHONE JE \^9tf
Iv
CHALLENGE
M UIUH UIlB TO WOMEN WHO jTWVE *0J1*E"#T0 tsKE
" IfS.^ ,in^ '* "" rt,i,'$ hoUiaf^ot-fc^k, you ocH
only Inree minutej proe to yoursetf that you oa do
yoUi own home biking ... uiih tut I ^aaaMaaaj^M
Th.f$ .11 Jtwke,k, m,x DromeAry taw^f, bound
<*e. ain.crbfMd corn muSni ,nd ottWr .
yutptrfta rtsmlt, tbt fa, *, md any rf*t j
Keep mpply of Droaxdiry Mim <*.?,,***,
,< frm momrnu. cv, rou, busiest /^'^P*>**Lb+*t l*e o expert... *
IICAKI

WILNO KOSHER
SAUSAGE CO.
(of Chicago)
MIAMI EXANCH
2181 N.W. 10th AVENUE
Phone PR 1-6551
WUNO Kosfcer SUCH) *t
AfsferAfl
tomes' uel, Htm
Mush, M#>
ft*** FreeMerters
ferrfiimer^DVTfef*^^!
HOTorCOtt.
iaui-ei,Wfi>>i**q
, j^ M Otc-i
eiiitu*
Ct "fewer*
t9ie f.w.-"f
4-5790


May 2. 1958
** ^fr Jt It'jf^ aSr ^eX
;'J
-.* K *^j|
+Jt~ist rkricHir
5-1
I
[Jdelson Club of Pfoneee- Women, Miami
elect officers. Seated (left to right axe
Ximes Mollie Perelman. vice president;
oe Cosow, president; Clara Left, first vice
sot, national otteer-Roee Brat-low, wtk-
jdat; Di. Alia Sudaxaky. Standing are
jjmet Rae Weieeerg, C&uncil chairman;
. Olletthefiea.. ocOMfipniiing secretary;
Rebecca Schwartz, I'uiei iiieer Fannie Levine,
recording, secretary; Kate- Wftisbecq, Moetzot
Hapoalot; Rose Gumberg, Kate Selekeaa, Rae
Block, executive; Rose Weisburgh, child res-
cues Rose- Zatman, Fannie Goldberg, Rose
Singe*, Nachama Yanich and Clara Offenhen-
des, eaecative.
BB Women Plot
New Groups Here
Due to the increase in both the
present and potential membership
of B'nai B'rith Women on Miami
Beach, national B'nai B'rith Wo-
men and District 5 this week rec-
ommended that several new chap-
ters be organized on Mrami Beach
in addition to the three presently
existing groups. They will be both
daytime and evening chapters, de-
pending upon demand.
The national office said that
smaller chapters function more ef-
ficiently because of a closer rela-
tionship among members.
There will be an open period of
organization at the Deauville hotel
at 1 p.m. Monday for a day group.
Also scheduled is a meeting at the
Crown hotel at 8 p.m. Monday for
the evening group.

#**
19** -t>
?1
Ly Birthday to State of Israel: Mark Silverberg, youngest
ew Academy student, is shown kindling ten candles com-
-dating establishment of State of Israel. Hebrew Acad-
[students are celebraing anniversary with special holiday
icms presented by each class and special prayers re-
for peace and welfare of young State. Standing (left to
axe Silverberg, Geoffrey Temple, Kenneth Sussman.
Lipman, Margaret Rapaport. ^^^^^______________
S. Dade Women
Name Officers
Elections were held at the April
meeting of the Sisterhood of South
Dade Jewish Center for officers
and board of directors to serve the
organization during the coming
year.
Elected were Mrs. A. B. Wiener,
president; Mrs. Lewis Gillis vice
president; Mesdames Lee Braun,
Alex Reiken, Harry Gunther, sec-
retaries; and Mrs. Bernard Spie-
gel, treasurer.
On the board of directors are the
Mesdames Eugene Fleischer, Louis
Kirk, Harold Pomerantz, Byron
Cherkas, Herbert Baumgard, Ar-
nold Simon, Jack Salem, Morton
Schoen, Maurice Steinberger, Rob-
ert Tanner.
Affiliated with the National Fed-
eration of Temple Sisterhoods,
which comprises over 500 groups
throughout the country and other
parts of the world. Sisterhood's
concerted efforts during the past
year have been in aiding the build-
ing of the South Dade Jewish Cen-
ter now being constructed on N.
Kendall dr.
Mother's Day
Luncheon Slated
Pioneer Women Club II wH have
a mother's day luncheon Sunday
noon at the Raleigh hotel.
Guest speaker will be Mrs. Mil-
ton Green. Mrs. Marmia Shubov
will be acting chairman, and Mrs.
Zelda Liebman will deliver the in-
vocation.
The club will honor two of its
mothers, Mrs. William Malmuth
and Mrs. Rose Esther.
Proceeds will go to the Moetzet
Hapoalot counterpart of Pioneer
Women in Israel which aids wo-
men, children and youths.
Student Art Exhibit Dae
At Lowe Gallery May 11
Seventh annual exhibition of art
by University of Miami students,
will preview to members of the
Joe and Emily Lowe Art Gallery
Sunday, May 11, 3 to 5 p.m.
On view to the public May 13
through 25, the annual competition
offers prizes to students in each of
seven categories: oils, watercolors,
sculpture, graphics, drawings, de-
sign, crafts, and commercial art.
The exhibition is open to all I'M
students regardless of major.
Joint Installation
Doer Here May 18
Tempte Emanu-El will hold its
annual joint Sisterhood. Men's Club
a rae PTA, installation dinner dance
Stands*, Maty 18, in the- Fleur De
Lie room at the Fentautebleau ho-
tel, aceturiiec to Mrs. M*x Boder
man, chairman.
Dr. Irvmg Lehrmen. spiritual
leader of the congregation, will in-
stall Mrs. George Goldberg, Sister-
hood president; Maurey L. Ash
mann. Men's Club president; and
Mrs. Joseph M. Abelow, PTA pres-
ident
Dinner committee consists of the
Mesdames Max Bauer, M. M. Co-
hen, Irving Cypen, Sherman R.
Kaplan, Jack S. Popick, William
D. Rubenstein and Michael Sal-
mon.
|NG MAN, age 34, presently
eyed as office & credit mgr.,
qualified as full charge
ICKEEPER & STENOGRAPHER
ESIRES TO MAKE CHANGE
Please call FR 9-8445
Mrs. Geltner Redacted Head
CHUMESCH
gush and Hebrew with Rashi's
hentariea In English and He-
Complete, limited edition $15
or money order payable to
lomo." Mr. S.. Box 2973,
18, Florida.
Mrs. Sam Geltner has been re-
elected president of the Goodwill
Group of Greater Miami for the
1958-59 term.
Also elected are vice presidents,
Mrs. Frank Hoffman and Mrs. Sig-
mond Hirsch; financial secretary,
Mrs. Lee B. Kripple; correspond-
ing secretary, Mrs. Mary Fellman;
social secretary, Mrs. Frank Hoff-
man.
Publicity chairman, Mrs. Marvin
Williams; recording secretary, Al-
bert Grossman; treasurer, Rubin
ATTENTION!!
$10,000 REWARD
IS OFFERED
For rise apprehension of the person or persons
responsible for planting dynamite at
BETH EL CONGREGATION.
on March 16th at approximately 2:40 A.M.. causing
an explosion resulting In ertous damage to the
building both inside and out.
SiJney ,
President
COMCfflEGATION BETH EL
Anyone Haying Any Information, No Matter Now
insignificant or Seemfg/rnlnfpertant# Please Com-
municate with the Authorities Immediately, and You
Will Be Doing year Secred ami Civic Doty.
AIX NSWSPAP6RS FH.SAS6 *P*UNT
Hyatte; welfare chairman, Mrs. Al-
bert Grossman.
Members of the board of direc-
tors are the Mesdames Phillip
Dann, Elkan Flaum, Jeannette
Friedman, Allen Forbes, Gustave
Grodensky, Rubin Hyatte, David
Kanner, William Moss, Ray Rus-
sak, and Jennie Wilchyk.
Installation ot officers and board
of directors was to be Thursday
noon in Toby's restaurant.
GIVE TO CJA
To Save Lives ..
UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI SYMPHONY
John Bitter, Conductor
UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI CHORUS of 110
Wilfred Smith, Director
Sur -/0' 4tn Mi .mi Bcoc'' Aud 8 JO
Mo. h iJude Cojnry Aud 8:30
Verdi's
\lis>a Da Requiem
-RANGES diBlE, Mezzo-soprano
HEIDI jON CRAIr-', Tenor
4NETH iMlTH, Baritone
t ,1 M OM MO 1-4*0 M.6. Aud. JE 1 0477
Dade Co. Auc 3 Co delta i FR 3 5123
s HI 6-2070
) 0 S3.50
They'll Mark fag VOmer
The Temple Emanu-El religious
school family will celebrate Lag
B'Omer with an outing at Baker's
Haulover Sunday.
To Serve You is
Oar Pleasure
Ed. J. Vischi
Real Estate in All
its Branches
1248* NX 7th AVSNIK
Phone PI 4-4641
FOSimEltXTRIC
COMPANY, INC.
Electrical Contractors
RESIDENTIAL COMMEBCtAL
INDUSTRIAL ALTERATIONS
MAINTENANCE
24 Hour Servic*
AIR CONDITIONING and
ADEQUATE WIRING
2J64 W. Flasler St. HI S-2471
Nights. Sundays A Holiday* dia
Hi 3-0922
TO LOW
CALORIE MEALS
SoNe that weighty problem .
serve plant* of nutritious, flavorful
Auou*t Bret, bread made
from select spring wheat flour .
contain* ne shortenin*.
PUMPHNKKEL BOHEMIAN ITS
BACKS VIENNA ECO TWIST
FRENCH BREAD EGC tOllS
HARP ROUT


6-B
-Jewlstifk***9fi
J^^Ha^



Werner-hLahn
AWS. STOAaTT KfMMtS
Miss Chajmovitz
Now Mrs. Baron
Eva Chajmovitz became the
bride of Dr. Murray G. Baron in
8 p.m. rites Apr. 19. Rabbi Joseph
Rackovsky, of Beth Tfilah Congre-
gation, officiated.
The bride is the niece of Mr. and
?.Jrs. David Rosner. of the Sterling
hotel, Miami Beach, who gave her
in marriage. The groom's parents
are Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Baron, of
I\tw York City.
The bride chose a white silk mist
gown trimmed with alencon lace
ar.d short cap sleeves Her crown
01 orange blossoms featured a fin-
g< tip length veil of silk illusion.
She carried white orchids on a
white Bible.
Mrs. Ruth Wolfe, of Miami
Beach, her cousin, was the bride's
natron of honor. Flower girl was
Miss Sharon Wolfe. Dr. Steven
Kceff, of Ann Arbor, Mich., was
best man.
The former Miss Chajmovitz at-
tend Miami Beach High School, Mt.
Sinai Hospital School of Practical
Cursing, and is a graduate of
Teachers College at Columbia Uni-
versity.
Dr. Baron is a Phi Beta Kappa
graduate of the University of
Michigan and a cum laude grad-
uate of the University of Michigan
school of medicine.
He spent two years in the U.S.
Army Medical Corps in Europe
and is now a resident in radiology
at the University Hospital in Ann
Arbor, where the couple will re-
side after their Jamaica, BW1 trip.
A reception and dinner followed
the ceremony at the Sterling hotel.
Hennes, Kosch
Exchange Vows
Miss Carolyn Kosch and Stuart
Hennes exchanged 6 p.m. wedding
vows in a candlelight ceremony at
the Algiers hotel Sunday. Apr. 27.
Rabbi Morris Skop officiated.
The bride is the daughter of Mrs.
Celia Kosch, 1748 Meridian ave.,
Miami Beach, and Sidney Kosch,
Charlotte, N.C. The bridegroom's
parents are Mr. and Mrs. Maurice
Hennes, Newark, N.J.
Mrs. Gerald Menaker. the bride's
sister, was matron of honor. Miss
Judi Lorber was maid of honor.
Best man was Peter Hennes, and
Gerald Menaker was usher.
Her gown of white alencon lace
over taffeta featured a scalloped
neckline and long sleeves, and end-
ed in a chapel-length train. The
bride carried white orchids on her
confirmation Bible. Her attendants
wore cocktail-length dresses of
light blue taffeta and carried cas-
cades of white and blue carnations.
The bride is a graduate of Mi-
ami Beach High School and attend-
ed the University of Alabama. The
bridegroom received his BA de-
gree from the University of Ala-
bama and is presently in the U.S.
Army.
A reception and dinner followed
the ceremony. After a honeymoon
trip to New Orleans, La. the couple
will live for the next one and one-
half years in Bamberg. Germany,
where Mr. Hennes is stationed.
miss wot SHAHKO
She'll Wed Dental
Student in June
The engagement of Miss Judy
Shapiro, daughter of Rabbi and
Mrs. David Shapiro. 1135 Polk t.,
Hollywood. Fla.. to Stanley Saxe,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Sue,
Maiden. Mass., is announced by
her parents.
The wedding will be held Sun-
day. June 22. in the chapel of Bran-
deis University, Waltham. Mass.,
Miss Shapiro's alma mater.
Her father, spiritual leader of
Temple Sinai of Hollywood, will of-
ficiate at the ceremony.
Miss Shapiro was graduated from
Miami Beach High School before
taking her Bachelor's degree at
Brandeis.
Mr. Saxe. a native of Boston,
graduates this June from the Har-
vard University school of dentistry.
Emamt-EI to Inaugurate
Summer Day Camp Program
Temple hmanu-El will inaugu-
rate a new summer day camp for
children from four to 12 years of
age, commencing June 23 for an
eight-week period to Aug. 15, Irv-
ing Kaplan, director of activities
at the Temple, announced Wednes-
day.
The camp will include a full pro-
gram of arts and crafts, athletics,
excursions, nature study, hiking,
swimming in a private pool and
swimming instruction.
Children from four to six years
of age will attend from 9 a.m., to
12 noon. Children from six to 12
years of age will attend from 9
a m. to 4 p.m.
Arlene Will bo
Bas Mitzvah
Arlene Greensteta will become
Bas Mitzvah during services Sat-
urday morning. May 3, of Zamora
Jewish Center. Rabbi B. Leon Hur-
witz will officiate.
Arlene is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Bernard Greenstein, 2900
SW 26th st. She is a student in
Zamora's daily religious school and
a member of the pre-confirmation
class. Leading pupil soloist at Sab-
bath morning services, she will be
presented with a pupil soloist
award.
Arlene's mother is president
Zamora's PTA. Her father is
active in the Men's Club.
Assisting her during Saturday
morning services will be her bro-
thers, Barry and Dennis.
m
AfN{ CMEMSTBI
L*urnce-Victor
miss Mint sam/unz
Schwartz, Horn
Engagement Told
The engagement of Miss Myrle
Iris Schwartz and Dr. Martin U.
Horn is announced by her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Saul Schwartz, of
3237 Monegro St.. Coral Gables.
The bride-elect is a graduate of
Miami Senior High School and the
Davis Institute of Medical Tech-
nology.
Dr. Horn, son of Mr and Mrs.
Jack Horn. 17351 NE 5th ave., N.
Miami Beach, is a graduate of the
Long Island University of Podiatry
and is now in practice here.
The couple will be married June
22 at the Lucerne hotel.
Deborah, daughter of Mls
Mrs. Philip Jacoby,
Crespi blvd.. will becomel
Mitzvah Friday ertniqjl
May 2. during late
of North Shcre Jewish CftI
ter. Rabbi Mayer Abnal
witz will officiate. Detail
is a student in religil
school of Center and i
Nautilus Junior High.
AMS. SAMVft BARON
PROTECT
IfOU/V
FURS
WITH CEtTtFlEO
STORAGE
Play Safe! Store
them with Mi-
ami's oldest
and most reli-
able furrier .
Vaults a* oar
premises. Free
in A eel service,
a PHONl
FR 4-4188
FOR FRff
MOP
Year fars will be mere beaatil.l ..
when rasfyled by I. tOSENOAITIN
Concert Pianist,
MD Say Vows
Announcement has been made of
the marriage of Lotte Landau,
daughter of Dr. Ezekiel Landau,
rabbi of Congregation Beth Israel
and the United Hias Service, New
York City, and Mrs. Helen Landau,
to Dr. Nathan Glover. He is the
son of Mr. and Mrs. Israel Glover,
of Portland. Me.
The wedding ceremony took
place at Congregation Zichren
of the famous "Nodah Biyehudah."
chief rabbi of Prague during the
18th century, is a concert pianist
who made her debut in 1950. Her
most recent appearance was as
soloist with the Brooklyn Philhar
I monia at the Brooklyn Academy of
Music under the baton of her bro-
ther, Siegfried Landau.
Winner of the Gertrude Pepper-
corn Scholarship for the Tobias
Matthay School for Pianoforte in
London, and of a scholarship at
the New York College of Music, she
also holds a Bachelor of Arts de-
gree, magna cum. laude. from
Brooklyn College, and Master of
Arts degree in musicology from
Columbia University.
Dr. Glover, Miami anesthesiolo-
gist, received his PhD from the
University of Rochester, and MD
PRACTICAL NURSE
INFANTS CHILDREN
ADULTS REFERENCES
HI 6-6227
FAMOUS
GOOD HUMOR
ICE CREAM
For Delivery Service
CALL FR 9-5553
1 to 3 p.m. Doily
3410 COtAl WT
Open Oaadtr
7iM
U3rd ST. SHOrFlW CO*
Oeee Otoede* eed R-i
Mitt T f
Ephraim Sunday Apr 20. The from h Umversjty of Vermont
brides father officiated, assisted u ic .,,, ,./ .___;. ^'.
LIo
ami's pioniii
ruaaita
SiiK. IMS
III SOUTH MIAMI AVCNUf
by her brother, Rabbi Sol Landau,
associate rabbi of Park Synagogue,
Cleveland, O. Eight other rabbis
participated in the ceremony.
Miss Anne Brown, of Toronto,
Canada, was maid of honor. Mrs.
Norman Glover, of Miami, was
matron of honor.
Samuel Glover, Hartford, Conn.,
was best man for his brother.
Ushers were Dr. Aaron Bohrow,
Dr. Morton Bort, Norman Glover,
Dr. William Marcuse, Carl Rozin-
sky and Morris Weinstein.
Mrs. Glover, a direct descendant
He is a fellow of the American Col-
lege of Anesthesiologists, and an in-
structor at the University of Miami
school of medicine
AUGUST BKOS fti-/
/s ff., lit \ I '
GREATER MIAMI HEBREW
fill LOAN
Meets f very Wedaesday, to 9 P.M.
MTM UCfNTfR
500 S.W. 17th A venae, Miami
Far Information Phase FR 3-6107
THE THRIFT SHOP
ot the
Jewish Homo for the Aged
f'*rf you th* opportunity to ae-
lit iti fine old men and women
without cost to you!
SEND US ARTICLES WHICH
YOU CANNOT USE OR SELL
ueh a* Furniture Linens
RuBo LampsCostume Jewelry.
ring to us at
524* NE 2nd Ave.
or call Mr. Silverman at PL t-JWf
f?r. **- we are open daily
Closed Saturdays only.
8 to 4:30.
Av'cusr mhos R|...
/ % > hi \ i
a ""'
Do You Know...
You Can Have Your
(photoqhaphk. (pnJdJud
done by
. CUhuL Bath**-
$6.17 Each Print in Group of 3
ARTHUR GODFREY ROAD AT ALTON
Coll for Appointment JE 2-2351


May 2. 1958
"JmistifkxtcMMT
iond Anniversary Function
Scene of Fabulous 5250,000 Sale
|500 people turned out Tues-
Icelebrate Israel's tenth an
|ry at a function sponsored
Greater Miami Committee
pie of Israel Bonds.
jing many of the area's
igress Forms
Chapter
H Yaakov G. Rosenberg,
an of the South Florida
ill, announced Wednesday
lie American Jewish Con-
in process of forming a
Mrs. chapter "in response
erous requests for a chapter
[would enable husbands and
(to participate in the same
s."
meeting of the chapter is
iJed for Tuesday, 8:30 p.m.,
liami Colonial hotel.
ram has been planned by a
[committee consisting of Mr.
fs. Marim Kurman, Mr. and
ernard Segal, and Mr. and
penry Kamen. The May 6
will be open to the public.
>rd Reveals
imer Camp
Ibraham M. Caasel, director
^ord School, 1204-54 West
nnounced this week that Ox-
hlj again conduct its pop-
pmer camp program.
previous summers, Oxford
cept boys and girls of all
both its day and boarding
ients. Though the official
fcr cimp period will run for
{weeks, beginning June 30
tiding Aug. 22, Dr. Cassel
[that campers will be accept
I early as June 9, and may
igh Aug. 31.
rd's summer camp pro-
has attracted campers
Florida, as well as
m cities. Camp facilities
an outdoor swimming
fishing decks, boating, and
and water sports.
fay northern children come
Drd camp to combine their
Br vacation with educational
rg, which Oxford offers," Dr.
added.
campers receive transporta-
and from camp, daily lunch
Dack. Dr. Cassel also said
ay campers will be accepted
Saturday program in addition
usual five-day a week pro-
leading citizens, the banquet at the
Fontainebleau hotei witnessed the
massive purchase of some $230,000
in bonds to mark the occasion.
.The unprecedented quarter of
a million outpouring by Greater
Miamians to aid in Israel's eco-
nomic development included 11
trustees. Trustees of Israel arm
purchasers of $10,000 m bonds
or more.
Keynote speaker Sir Leslie
Plummer, dis,t:n.uished British
member of Parliament, was pre-
vented from reaching Miami be-
cause of bad living weather in,
New York. Substituting for him
were Israeli singer Balfouria Gilad
and stars from the ho.el's La
Ronde show.
Called upon to light the candles
on the anniversary cake were these
ten community leaders: Dr. Morris
Goodman, Mrs. Louis Glasser,
Jacob Sher, chairman of the Great-
er Miami Committee for State of
Israel Bonds, Mrs. Anna Brenner
Meyers, Mr. Benjamin Meyers,
Aaron Kanner, Dr. Benjamin Ros-
enberg, Mrs. Jennie Groesinger,
former U.S. Sen. Claude Pepper
and Miami Beach Mayor Kenneth
Oka.
Lighting an 11th candle were
Jack Cantor and Sam Orit. They
will take over for Sher as co-chair-
men of the 1958 bond campaign
here.
Tif ereth Israel
Reelects Comis
Marshall H. Comis was reelected
president of Ttfereth Israel North-
side Center at a recent congrega-
tion meeting.
Other officers elected were Mrs.
James Harris and Arnold Siegel,
vice presidents; Nate Rosenberg,
treasurer; Ernie Iserson, record-
ing secretary; Irving Querido, cor-
responding secretary; Leo Free-
man, sergeant-at-arms; and Jacob
Meyer and H. Rothman, gaboyim.
Board of directors are Sam Aller,
Jack Berke, Joe Ganz, Leon Gold-
berg, Herman Goldfarb, Al Kurz-
ban, Herman Kutun, Teddy Pearl-
stein, Harold Robin and Larry
Mann.
Installation will be Sunday, 7:30
p.m., at Michel's restaurant.
Aqua Dance Scheduled
Temple" Emanu-EI Young Adults'
first "aqua dance" was to be held
at the New Yorker hotel Thursday
evening.
7-B
Gov. LeRoy Collins purchases a $100 Israel Bond from Mrs.
Louis Glasser in honor of Jacob Sher, chairman of Israel anni-
versary dinner at Fontainebleau hotel Tuesday night.
JSirtlis in
Recent births at Mt. Sinai Hos-
pital include the following:
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Marvin
Hirschensohn Apr. 19.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Donald
Heier Apr. 19.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Ben
Shafer Apr. 19.
Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs.
Edwin Cohen Apr. 19.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Harry
Gilbert Apr. 18.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. James
Roth Apr. 17.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Ber-
nard Slessinger Apr. 17.
Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Roth Apr. 17.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Mal-
colm Stein Apr. 17.
Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs.
Bernard Hausman Apr. 14.
Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs.
Si Stern Apr. 14.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Gus
August Apr. 14.
Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph Lowe Apr. 12.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Warren
Bernstein Apr. 11.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Her-
man Carter Apr. 11.
Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs.
Ernest Levi Apr. 10.
Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs.
Morris Schiff Apr. 10.
Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs.
Noel Bloomfield Apr. 8.
Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs.
\\^S*Mh~
urdines
fhe heme of
SUNSHINE FASHIONS'
U.S. pot. off.
- MUM MACN PT. UODRDAU WKT PAL* lEACX
INFORMAL*
INVITATIONS
CALLING CAMDS
ANNOUNCIMINTS
"THANK YOU" MOTH
HMSONAL STATIOtmr
Out weeing consultant will display a com
plete selection in the comfort ol you' home
none onkKn 3-4o34
-J"
'?"'"?
116 N C Wi Sheet. Muss. Hord*

Vacation at Wonderful
j DUHCRAGGAH
I INN
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
"in the lend of fhe Sky"
HENOERSONVILLI, N.C.
Secluded 16 acres; private
swimming pool; entertain-
ment; golf nearby. Amer-
ican plan; superb Jewish-
American cuisine; rea-
sonable rates; children's
counselor. Your new
hosts: Irene and Al Wise
. Blanche and George
Goodfrienid.
Write for fret redberal
M 1029, Meadtrstevillt, N C.
VI0LETTE DE N0YER
femees Hollywood MmkmAlp Artitl
presents
Aromatic, penetralia* ells mt
ESSENTIAL FACE WASH
/eatlerfel Hens' of rick nutritienn
foods owe' oils es
CELLULAR FACE CREME
Effective tea crtotiej soft,
imeetfc, letia-fiftf ski*
MIAMI HEALTH INSTITUTE
Diatribe tor
7235 Biscavne Blvd. PI 7-7896
Don't seloy cell today.
$3.50 each, plat tax.
ictnii
Michael Silverstein Apr. 8.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Eugene
Brams Apr. 8.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Her-
man Cohen Apr. 3. .
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Mayer
Negrin Apr. 3.
Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs.
Maurice Lesser Apr. 3.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. How-
ard Beck Apr. 2.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Moie
Tendrich Apr. 1.
Collins Vows HeU
Attend Surf side
4th Annual Dinner
Florida's Gov. LeRoy Collins has
promised to attend the fourth an-
nual dinner of the Surfside-Bal Har-
bour-Bay Harbor Islands Chamber
of Commerce here next month if it
is possible to work the affair into
his busy schedule.
Collins joins 22 other chief execu-
tives who have already indicated
they will attend the dinner, to be
held in the Grand Ballroom of the
Americana hotel Wednesday, May
21.
Definite confirmations to the af-
fair, which is being given in honor
of those governors attending the
national conference here May 18
to 21, have come from William F.
Quinn, Hawaii; A. B. "Happy"
Chandler, Ky.; Cecil B. Under-
wood, W.Va.; C. William O'Neill,
Ohio; George D. Clyde, Utah; Joe
Foss, S. D.; John E. Davis, N. D.;
James T. Blair, Mo.; and J. P.
Coleman, Miss.
Tentative acceptances include
the governors of Tennessee, Texas,
Rhode Island, Oregon, Alaska, Col-
orado, Delaware, Washington, Kan-
sas, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, and
Maine.
Philip M. Talbott, chairman of
the board of the United States
Chamber of Commerce, will be
principal speaker.
Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs.
Bernard Spector Apr. 1.
Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs.
Stuart Jacobs Apr. 1.
Good News for Those Who Want the Best in Camping
THE FAMOUS
CAMPS
WILL ACCEPT A FEW MORE
CAMPERS FROM THIS AREA
Enrollment Strictly Limited
-ft High in the Pocono Mountains. 90 miles from
Philadelphia, or New York.
* Separate Camps on opposite side of the beau-
tiful private Blue Mountain Lake (1 mile long).
-ft Long-established Organization of expert lead-
ers and Specialists in Sports, Crafts, Hobbies.
-ft Outstanding Record of Health and Safety. Ex-
perienced Physician and Nurses reside in Boys'
Camp and Girls' Camp.
38th Season-Same
Ownership-Management
(Mr. and Mrs. Morris J. Escoll)
Blue Mountain Camps have long been noted for
their healthful, mountain-top Locationspacious
Lawns and Playing Fields (over 600 acres)mod-
ern Buildings and Equipment fine Food and
home Baking mature Counselors and variety
of Athletic and Cultural Activities.
Many children from Miami and Miami Beach
have been coming to Blue Mountain Camp, season
after seasonincluding a number of "2nd getar-
ation" campers. They travel by plane, escorted
by counselors from Miamiand reach Camp in a
few hours.
FOR LITERATURE AND INFORMATION
CALL OUR FLORIDA REPRESENTATIVE:
MRS. MILTON MANNHEIMER
1014 W. 47th CL, Miami Beach IE 8-4461
"Soil and. JuhT
SUMMER CAMP
JUNE, JULY AND AUGUST
DAY CAMPERS
BOARDING CAMPERS
ROYS end GIRLS
JI IV3171 Jl II Ml
>.
ON TNI BAY
12*4 West Am,
r'-r "'- riif S

/
M
:
I
>'
:

I
I
I


+Jewlsl>nu*0a*
Friday,


tUCMAUi HHStX
Junior Scientist
Is Bar Mitzvah
Michael Jeffrey Zinner, son of
Dr. and Mrs. Doran D. Zinner.
2*17 Alhimbri Circle, Coral
Cables, will become Bar Mitzvah
Saturday, May 3. at Temple Judea.
The service will beijin at 9:30 a.m..
with Rabbi Morris Skop officiating.
Kiddush will follow the services.
Michael is an honor student in
the seventh grade at Ponce de
Leon Junior High. He has attend-1
ed Temple Judea religious school j
for lour years, is a violist in the
Ponce de Leon concert orchestra,
and a First Class Scout. Troop 64.
Michael recently won a Certifi-
cate of Merit in electronics in his
division at the School Science Fair.
He is also the youngukt participant)
in the newly formed junior so. n
ti.-t program lor high school stu-
dent* by the Dade County Board
ol Education.
He works in the Microbiological
irci Department of the Na-
U::il Children's Cardiac Hospital,
and was recently written up as the
itor of this junior scientist
jiri .ram.
An evening reception will honor
Michael at his home.
Alvin Ray. son of Mr. and
Ma. Theodore A. Gulkis.
2040 SW 13th ct will become
Bar Mitzvah at Beth David
Congregation Satuday. May
3. Rabbi Yaalcov Rosenberg
will officiate. Kiddush fol-
lows services. Reception will
be held at Pub restaurant
Sunday.
Robert, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Ray Redman, will become
Bar Mitevah Saturday morn-
ing. May 3. at Temple
Emanu-Er: Dr. Herman M.
Cohen will officiate. Robert
is a seventh grade student at
Central Beach Junior High
and attends Temple Emanu-
El religious school.
Allen, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Max Fogel. 775 81st St.. will
become Bar Mitzvah Satur-
day, May 3, at North Shore
Jewish Center. Rabbi Mayer
Abramowite will officiate.
Allen w a student in religious
school of Center and attends
Nautilus Junior High.
Michael, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Sol Edwards. 1820 Biarrtti dr..
will become Bar Mftxwah Sat-
urday morninq, Mtay 3, at
North Shore Jewjeh Center.
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
will officiate. Michael is a
student in religious school of
Center and attends Nautilus
Ji'n'or High.
i
Neil son ol Mr. and Mrs.
Isaac Beckerman, will be-
come Bar Mitzvah Saturday,
May 3, at Temple Em an u-El.
Dr. Herman M. Cohen will of-
ficiate. Neil is a seventh
grade student at Nautilus
and attends Temple Emanu-
El religious school.
Elliott L.. son of Mn,
Turner and Mr. Ben V,
will become Bar Mitral
urday morning, May
Temple Beth Sholom.1
Leon Kronish will
Elliott is. in Beth Sholoajj
ligious s c h o o 11
class of 1980.
Alan Wcmsten
Bar Mitzvah
Alan, son of Mr. and Ma]
Weinstein, 3140 SW 26h si,
ami, will become Bar Mitznrf
urday, May 3. at the Iswi&q
ter.
Alan is a student in the I
Center religious school aadi
eighth grade at ShenandoahM
High.
Out-of-town cnests will
and Mrs. Jack Rueben. cf I
lyn. NY., and Mr and Mrs. I
Shein, White Plains, NY
Rabbi Morton Malavsky nrj
ficiate.
ALAN WflNSTEIN
Jtwiih Cypress Sees Battle
NEW YORK (JTA) Sunday
closing laws have become an in-
creasingly controversial issue in
various sections of the nation dur-
ing the past year and it is antici-
pated that conflicts between
re-
ligious and commercial
over Sunday laws will grwl
acute in the future.
The report noted that trial
day closing regulations haatl
on 0MS statute books of most
and municipalities, particuf
the East and South. '
time, "the past year hu NRJ
intensification in the
new and more restrictive I
tion.
Leslie Barry Gomberg, 670
S. Shore dr., will become Bar
MSzvah at Torah Temple Sat-
urday. May 3. Rabbi Louis
Cassel will officiate. Grand-
parents Mr. and Mrs. Morris
Fenster will be hosts at Kid-
dush. Leslie is an eighth
qrade honor student at Ox-
ford School
Larry, son of Mr. and Mis.
Irving Malnick. 202S SW 9th
St., will become .Bar Mitzvah
Saturday moaning. Mny 3, at
Beth Er Cangregatieri.
New Mortgage
Firm Announced
Former Miami Beach Mayor
Harold Turk, his law partner and
three Michigan supermarket oper-
ators have organized a new mort-
gage and investment firm, the
Palm State Mortgage Co.. Inc..
with offices at 420 Lincoln Road
l)l>l.'.. Miami Beach.
Sol C. Shave. 51-yeer-M former
president of Detroit's Big Bear
Markets, currently a director of
the 175 store ACF-WrigJey super-
market chain, and executive vice
president qf the Groaae Pointe
Quality Food Company of Detroit.
is president of the new Palm State
firm.
Turk, a Miami Beach resident
for 22 years, will be executive
vice president end secretory of
the firm. A former Dade County
commissioner and Miami Beach
c*uncUm*, Turk has been one
of the area's top civic leaders.
Included in Turk's background
'ofeejears Iggai; btismes* and gov-
ernmental experience ate seven
years a* president of Tropical
Mortgage. Co.
Joel P. lfawmta. a local resi-
dent for 12 years, and Turk's law
partner, is tressnne* of the sew
firm. He is a director of the law
refresher course* for candidates
for-the Florida Bar
Directors of the Palm State
[Mortgage Co.. Inc. include the
'officers and Max M. Shave, vice
president of Wrigley Properties in
Detroit and Nathaniel Shaye. pres-
ident of Groaae Pointe Quality
Food Co.
Washington
It
Federal Savings & Loan Association Soys:
WE'RE SORRY
... If the crowds at the opening of our third office on Meridian
Avenue at 17lh Street kept you away Thursday. We ore ex-
tending otu- opening celebration through next Friday, May 9,
and you can stop in and pick your
FREE GIFTS
today or any business day next week. Just come in and say
hello at our new office on
MEWDtAM AVENUE AT 17* STKEJ (next to Burdine's in Miami Beach)
and we'll be happy to present you with a free, usefu' 9,rI-
Voe torn oh* recede w fj tfcue leiir keeetiW eJB,
by eoeeit e new aavieai eeeoeet tor 0 <>*
')
HOSTESS SO
ENCIISH
STEAK KNIVES
P"n| tn HmouJ Sktf-
f'Ud anna, ttasa. late
fMeniMii iM.niJSS
Ilaal blKMl ml" lorattd
Bi,m lee nee neat.
Itt mill 24 litit lO'i
"! ***** otU auk*
!. IM 4 y MOIUW
Yn'ii w piaaa ol Aa
lu*tr thu lavall Mt
A to your IMIt Mj0a
ol staiaiau UmI. tkit
ioe-*i. naaoMM aat
u cat in baaaliW
maeaia dmn it'a -
pa*ct taila.
CHROME TBIEI"
IM aaoatrtal "+V.&
"* "' "just
,u-roU(i."ii"crr;
laauoat o""* JT,|
#.ali"faf''* 9*"
PfftPU etuis
M%da ol Vautitul
oad, mill ioxIt
ma\ haMia. iiiv.
'il area aaminaa
Up* raur l' -ooiaj la ou fitl-Doufl.
THESE GIFTS AVAILABLE AT ALL THRU WASM*NTON FEDEtAL
OfFrCB
WHEN YOU OPEN A SAVINGS ACCOUNT FOR $5 OR MORi.
WASHIN
SAVING
H
t*C* 0. Goaoon.f,
FEDERAL1
MSOCIMNM ,36,000.000
BEACH -
3%%
rutrrtti
*iuc couesHOX.
^?^ l?4 WASHUGTON AVlNUf .1170 NOaMANOY OerVf. NCWMAMOV
mot rsnf
Avewi A'_>^2enl


^J&tviSwl fttt AfltU7
134
See His Cousin's Drama Unfold m 1
fnext Wednesday, Greater
as will be able to relive
[gedy of Alfred Dreyfus,
fcnch Army captain at the
the nineteenth century
treason trial brought him
|de notoriety.
cuse!" starring Jose Fer-
ceca Lindfors, Leo Genn
trbert Lom, will bring to
story of Copt. Dreyfus,
was wrongfully charged
|lling French military se-
_the Germans; ^spent five
~irs on Devil's Islands
vindicated five years
|lt in the wake of a sec-
ll and the cracking of
[Army super-discipline.
ccuse!" which alto plot*
world-famous novelist
Zola had in uttoWscor-
vicieus anti-Semitism
stble for Capt. Droyfus'
ion and tardy vindica-
te apodal moaning for
Droyfus, of Miami
I father and Capt. Drcyra*
st cotsina," he tpkhied
was born hi e said. *I,Mb is atoot a
the first World War bnoke out, he
was a student at Columbia Uni-
versity in New York City. "I was
in the last 'class' of volunteers
called up for duty," he said.
99 aMrCK f%
MAKIL DREYFUS
half-hour's travel from Mulhaus-
en, where Capt. Dreyfus was
born."
Roughly, this is in the east of
France, the site of the Battle of
the Bulge of World War II.
When be- was six. Marcel T>rey-
fns went toTaris. AorOy-(after
_ in
the 42nd Infantry of the French
Army stationed a* Belfort.
"This regiment woo attached to
tho staff on which Capt-. Droy-
fus, now a major, served dur-
ing World Wor I."
"Of course," "Wared Dreyfus
said, "I was a corporal and he a
top-ranking officer, so we didn't
have too much to do with one
another even though I was his
second cousin."
Marcel Dreyfus came to the
United States in 1922 to live
permanently. Five years later,
he married. Retired from the im-
port-export business he sad bis
wife came to Miami in 1M7.
"But I couldn't stay retired,"
he observed. So the couple open-
ed a health food store, Angelina's,
at 1688 Alton rd. They have a
daughter, Mrs. Edward ISbiik)
Alter, of N. Miami Beach, aad
two grandchildren. Ronaoe, 5, aad
Anita, 9i.

'Shocked
Bombinds
deeply shocked over the
(bombing incidents that
e in Jacksonville early
U.S. Sen. Speasard Hol-
ed in Washington -early
Butrage does not represent
if Nursing School
),S00 Bequest
iinai Hospital School of
Nursing is the recipient1
bequest Under the will
lite Dr. Abraham M. Hor-
H. Lauderdale, Max Oro-
Kdent of the hospital, an-
rthis week.
the Attitude of the people of Florida
in racial matters," Holland said,
"and I am sure that they wil not
condone r tolerate shch irrespon-
sible crtmmal behffvfor."
Referring to floe dynamitifeg of
the Jacksonville Jewish Center and
a Ne'gro school within minutes of
one baoflaer early Monday, Holland
continued:
"I am confident that the full
strength of the state's 1*w enforce-
mem agencies win be directed to-
ward ojaVty apprehension and pun-
ishment of the guitly parties. I
have trrged the Attorney General
and the director of the FBI to lend
very possible assistance to these
agencies in bringing to justice the
person or persons responsible for
the violence."
fSsr
eiger reaches his pedk at viHcriny In "Cry Terror," show-
ough next Weckieaday at Ctrrib, Miami and Miracle
Brs. He is shown here (center) with his henchman play-
Neville Band, aha lager Stevens who plays wife of a
luped into aiamg an eadtortion plot. James Mason has
liole.
THE McCUNE COMPRKY
APPRAISERS COUNSelOkS
ADR-A I,' ^.CUNL, r.
MARION C McCUNE nVA
is h.E. THIRD STRE6T
\.V!"
' ^,
>WaaJ*^oHe%s^>Aw'W*>sS*>l*Aii<*\.
HURMOND
IMNUMINT CO.
Pi ^s^r^
Serrtwg the Jewhk CormrnnHr Since 1925
SW. It. It. two Story WVr* f M|- Opposite
Pfceoe IN 4-HI4
Painful meeting occurs between Capt. Alfred Dreyfus, played
by Jose Ferrer, and his wife, Lucie, who is Viveca Lindfors,
when officer returns to France from imprisonment on Devil's
Island for a second trial to determine whether he was falsely
condemned as a traitor. Scene is from MGM's gripping drama,
"I Accuse!" based on world-famous Dreyfus case, scheduled
to open at Cameo Theater, Miami Beach, Wednesday, May 7.
Verdi 'Requiem'
Ends UM Season
Gihseppi Verdi's great Requiem
Mass will be the final offering of
the season for "the University of
Miami Symphony Orchestra.
Dean John Bitter win conduct
the orchestra Sunday and Monday
evenings, May 4 and 5, at Miami
Beach and Dade County Auditor-
iums.
They will be joined by the uni-
versity's 110-voice chorus under
the direction of Wilfred Smith.
Featured artists will be Heidi
Krall, soprano of the Metropolitan
Opera; Frances Biblo, mezzo-so-
prano of the New York City Opera
and Chautauqua Opera; Jon Crain,
tenor of the New York City Center
Opera; and Kenneth Smith, bass-
baritone of NBC Opera Theater.
The program will begin with So-
nata Pian e Forte for Brass Choir
by Giovanni Gabrieli.
Study Retreat Set
Over Weekend
Albert L. Rosen, president of the
Southeast Florida Federation of
Tessple Brotherhoods, has anaoun
ced that his group will hold a study
retreat at Greyhound Key, Friday
through Sunday.
Participating rabbis Include Rab-
bis Leon KroTiish, Temple Beth
Sholom; Marius Ranson, Temple
Emanu-El, Ft. Lauderdale; Her-
bert Baumgard, South Dade Jew-
ish Center and director of Union of
American Hebrew Congregations,
parent body of Temple Brother-
hoods.
Over 50 men, representing eight
congregations, are expected to
spend the weekend in study, dis-
cussion and relaxation. Herbert
Blume, Morton Grant and Jack
Wagner constitute the committee
planning the weekend.
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAM* LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business, under th*- fictitious name of
DUN RITE LAUNDRY & PlyEANERS
at 4.1UU N.W. 2nd Ave., Miami, Ma..
Intend to register %ald name with the
Clerk of lh* Circuit Court of -Dado
County, Florida. .
JACK MITRir-K
REN A MITNICK
4/25, 5/2-8-16_________________________
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN ttlat
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
NEW YORK OPTICAL, CO. OK FLOR-
IDA at 327 N.E. 1st Ave.. MiamL Fla..
Intends to register 'said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
DOBORTHY SCHWARTZ,
Sole Owner.
5/8-S-l-23
A MESSAGE
TO A YOUNG MAN
WITH BUSINESS ABILITY
A PUASANT PERSONALITY
a oesm to "o places'1
"1
| An opportunity to buy half interest <
? in a well paying, firmly established 4
? and staple year round business lo- 4
, cated in Miami. J
Potential expansion limited only 4

with 4
4
<
4
I to capabilities.

Meoest cosh investment
k long-term payments arranged.
I
? A resume of your abilities and 4
? references will bring fall details, i
\ Please give name, address ond J
? phone number.
WRITE
I MR. K. BOX 2973,
; Miami 18, Florida
I_____________
>, Honda
tA4AAA4a\AA Vdaf
I Miller Electric Co. j
? QUALITY CONTRACTING t SERVICE
I,
820 S.W. 4th St.
Ph. FR 9-2477
Le vi Plumbing
Company
19**"
H1 J.W. M St. Csff n 9UH
CHOICE FLORIDA
KEYS PROPERTY
PLANTATION KIT,
45 miles from Miami.
Large seaside (gaff) frontage.
Beautiful beach, deep water boat
basin. Several tovely furnished cot-
tages. Swimming pool. 13 ocre*
subdivision, wooded high land up
to 1S ft. elevation.
Lots platted, reads completed,
all utilities. Suitable for homesites,
motel or yacht club.
Priced to sell comolefe or in part.
fair down payment and terms.
CONTACT OWNER,
MR. L. BOX 2973,
Miami 18, Florida
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUOICiAi. CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN ANO FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 58C3568
RAYMOND E. BCRKrlAI.TETt.
Plaintiff,
CORA R. BTRKHALTER.
Defendant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: CORA R. BLTtKftAT.TKR
ADDRESS ITNKN'OV/N
You. Cora K. Burkhalter, are hereby
notified "that a Bin of Complaint for
Divorce has been filed aga*n*t you,
and you are.required to serve a copy
of your Answer or Pleading to the
Bill of Complaint on the plaintiff's At-
torney, Bernard Margolin, T10 Bis-
cayne Huildinc, Miami. Florida, and
file the original Answer or Pleading in
the office of the Clerk of the Circuit
court on or before the 2nd day of
June. r58. If you fall to do so. judg-
menl by default will be taken against
you for the relief demanded In the
Kill of Complaint.
This noti.e shall he published once
each week for fou kitlve weelca
in THE JEWISH FU 'RIDIAN.
DONE AM' ORDERED at Miami,
. this tOth oa) Of April. A.D.
ISS8.
K. B, I EATHERMAN, Clerk,
circuit Court, : > lorlda
B) 1- A. CLEARE,
Deputy Clerk
BERNARD MARCIOMS
7!" Illscayne Bull
Miami, Florida
Attorney for I'lainilff
5/2-9-11
Bobbins Roofing & Sheet Metal Co.
Tba ftsponsibf* fteefen" ESTABLISHED 191 Isfimafei Free
ROOFING and HOOTING Stiff IKS o UCTAK CONTIACTING fttAIRIh6
A. H. BECKER, Manager
222 N. W. 26th STREET, MIAMI
fHOfrt FR 4-3705
Furnishers & Installers
Inlaid Linoleum Asphalt Til*
Rubber Tile
"EVERY INSTALLATION GUARANTEED-'
Phone for Free Estimates ____
4256 N.W. 7th Avenue Phone PL 9-2288
FOR ALL TYPE OF SASH OR JALOUSIES
BAR-LOK STORM SHUTTERS
MAINTENANCE INCORPORATED
(Division of Ludman Corporation)
F.H.A. Financing DIAL CD O.CiOl
3427 NORTH MIAMI AVE. n ,JTf


10-B____________________________
Dag Will Adress
Governors' Meet
Dag Hammarskjold, Secretary-
General of the United Nations, will
add international flavor to the 50th
annual governors' conference May
18 to 21 at Miami Beach when he
addresses the nation's governors at
the annual state dinner Monday,
May 19, at the American hotel.
National defense will be high-
lighted when two cabinet members
take part in round table discus-
sions Wednesday. May 21, with the
governors. Secretary of Defense
Neil McKirov will discuss military
defense an4. new weapons. Treas-
ury Secretary Robert B. Anderson
will talk to the governors on the
economic aspects of national de-
fense.
The conference will open offi-
cially with a host state reception
Sunday evening. May 18. at which
host Gov. LeRoy Collins and Mrs.
Collins will welcome governors
from 48 states, the territories of
Hawaii, Alaska, the Virgin Islands,
and the Commonwealth of Puerto
Rico, together with members of
their parties.
-Jewistncrkflar)
New Hospital Will
Go Up in Miami
A $1,250,000 hospital will go up
on the grounds of the former Mi-
ami Country Club.
To be known as the Cedars of
Lebanon Hospital, it is expected to
be gotten under way before the end
of the current year.
The hospital, planned to in-
clude facilities for 200 bods, will
bo a strictly "got well" institu-
tion. Research will not be em-
phasiied.
Officers of the corporation, which
will finance construction of Cedars
of Lebanon through the sale of
bonds maturing in ten to 20 years,
are Drs. Martin Belle. Morris Blau,
Morton Halpern. Al Kernish. Louis
Lemberg. Stanley Margoshes. Ben-
jamin Oren. Max Pepper. Maurice
Rich. Reuben Rochkind. Bernard
Yesner and Charles Rosenfeld.
Dr. Morton Halpern has been
designated as president of the new
institution
Miami attorneys Robert J. Lewison (left) and Edward S. Klein
discuss final arrangements for Sholem Lodge of B'nai B'rith
installation banguet at Lucerne hotel Sunday. Lewison will
head lodge for 1958 term. Co-chainnen Klein, Bernard New-
mark and Alvin Budner have named Judge Milton A. Fried-
man to present award to retiring president Harry S. Schwartz.
Marx Faber will be toastmaster.
Astronomer Heard in Talk
Carl Carlton. vice president of
the Gulfstream Astronomical
Assn.. gave an illustrated
lecture for the Tropical Audubon
Society last week in the auditorium
of the Miami Public Library, 1 Bis-
cayne blvd.
The topic was "A Journey
Throu^i Space." and colored
slides of actual photographs taken
through the 200-inch lens at Mt.
Palomar were used in the talk.
Drawings of an artist's conception
of what planets look like in space
were also shown.

*rfW*W*WA^WW-%*
f+\~mf\
Fossett's Prescription Pharmacy
Huntington Medical Building
lit $.1. FUST STRUT MIAMI, FLORIDA PH0NI Fit 4-7691
One of the largest and Most Complete Prescription
Pharmacies in the World
W. E. FOSSETT, Founder
Sidney Palmer will be in-
stalled p r e s i d e n t-elect at
Sholem Lodge function Sun-
day in Lucerne hotel.

WESTERN MEAT COMPANY
. Servicing .
Hotels Restaurants Clubs Institutions
J122 N W 7th A.m.* Telephone FR 3 7637
Miami 37, Florida
REBUILT BATTERIES
12 Month Guarantee$7.50 up, exch.
EXPERTS ON STARTER AND GENERATOR REPAIRS
REASONABLE PRICES
BATTERIES GENERATORS STARTERS
HI-VOLT BATTERY MFG.
1850 N.W. 7th Avenue Phono FR 9-3451
Service PLUS Quality tVorkmoathia
RADIO
DOCTORS
SOUTH MIAMI e, C0RAI CABLES
SOUTHWEST SECTION
RADIO &
TELEVISION SERVICE
5736 S. Dixie Highway
Phone MO 1-6877
Homestead Area Solicits for
Residents of the Homestead, Cut-
ler Ridge. Perrine. and the Keys
have launched a full-fledged cam-
paign to raise funds in the 1938
Combined Jewish Appeal.
Headed by civic leader Herman
Marks, a group of Homestead's top
citizens last week announced plans
to solicit moro than 150 families
and merchants in the Homestead
area for their contributions to the
life-saving campaign.
Vice chairmen are Abe Silver
and David J. Liebman. Strong sup-
port is being given to the Home-
stead campaign by former Home
rtoad ubeieoa Punt -fisunet, and
Sidney Kanter president of Home-
stead B'nai B'rith Lodge.
Spurred forward by dynamic
address on Thursday everting de-
livered by Dr. Morris Goodman,
general campaign chairman, a
steering committee wont into
action at once. Nearly $2,000
was raised at the initial organ-
isation mooting.
Local leaders named by Marks
to assist in the organization of the
Homestead rfrivpjnclJu
ir- Lu'i. Sidney i
Julius KnkelanduJJI
for thr;r ,,,a ot R *l
nounced plans for ,?.<
party which was ,0 felSI
t the Homestead J^Jj1
MiamioiTNi
To District i
Miami attorney ^
Greene was elected
the Florida State B-
B'nai B'rith Lodges |
tion's convention in'
Other Miamiim
fice were Stanley
vice president; Fda
treasurer; and Geor(tj
and Joseph Rayvis,"
live members.
\\JGVJST BROS i
Is I hi iw \
Baby Die-Dee Diaper Service
"IfIff MIAMI'S PIIIT
An Exclusive laundry for Diapers and Baby Clothes
2111 N.W. lOtli AVENUE
PHONE FR 9-S593
Carpet Laying and Repairlno
RUGS CLEANED, DYED and PFMOTHTCP
26 S.W. South River Drive Phones FR 9 1155 & FR 1-2007
AJE RUG CLEAXERS
nrRNTTURE CLEANTf*'-:
MAtlNE ENGINE OVERHAUL
ad INSTALLATION
MttriaotOM
Ktrmatk Marint fiteiaei
MIAMI MARINE
ENGINEERS, INC.
418 S.W. 2nd AVENUE
MIAMI 34, FLORIDA
C. A. lealer
Telephone PR 9-982S
f/Ses
/vOGUST BROS ny;
la tit si '
OPEN MOM. WIB., Ml. NIGHTS TILL I tM.
AN* OPEN ALL DAT SUNDAY
AT ON* 2701 N.W. 7* A VI STOM
luuimi. rueui it. it*
PAN-AMERICAN
CO.
ANNUAL
SPRING TIRE
CLEARANCE
Dayton
in unm

tUARAHTttO M WRtTMt TO WEAR
1MM MUS 14 MMTHS
n\n MAS HAZARD WNUURTEE
UOMT
runs
M OtlOMM
H trm
at UTTU U
r r
mwi nun
20*ll]
17*
lin HMMNW MAM UITIIT HIT Mill
400x14 Tube Type White........36.60
440x15 Tube Type Mock........31.20
440x15 Tube Type White........38.25
440x15 Tubeless Mock..........34.85
440x15 Tubeless White..........42.70
470x15 Tab* Type Mock........32.75
670x15 Tab* Type Whit*........40.10
670x15 Tubeless Block..........37.00
670x15 Tubeless Whit*..........45.25
710x15 Tube Type Hock........36.25
710x15 Tub* Type White........44.40
710x15 Tubeless Mock..........40.55
760x15 Tube Type Block........39.65
740x15 Tubeless Mock..........44.40
800x15 Tube Type Mock........43.60
800x15 Tub* Type White........53.40
800x15 Tubeless Mock..........49.45
820x15 Tube Type Mock........45.40
820x15 Tubeless Mock..........51.25
FIRSTUNE
10*'
UUI
1MJI
ml
Mill
ISM
i4.nl
Ulil
15.IJ|
16.95|
Ml
14.151
u.isl
I5.ul
15.|
14.fi!
mil
2111
17
1751
ll
DAYTON FLYER
BLACKWAU.S
15 MONTH ROAD HAZAID WUtNTII
*0814 479.1 S
its
T5 9
FULL CAP
YOUR TIRES NOW
TUBETTPE M TUBELES8,
TUB OB BATON, PUU
CAPPED SHOULDER TO
SHOULDER WITH
BATTtN PREMIUM
COLD RUBBER
uABABTIEO TO WEAR
15,888 MIUS-ll M0BTHS
NO MOUNTING CHAMI- If!*
i Ptcs run tax a ncHANca *"* >
is wi nru ABO 11 M fl Till __^^^
MS0 N. MIAMI AVI. 2781 N.W]*'L,.
10S3S N.W. 27* AM. 748 SJ>'Xl1 "V
W. rLAOLER ft 22.4 AVI. "iTLTf
HOMfSTIAD: III N. PB8*jAI MIBHW**,
HOUTWOOD: SU SOUTH DIXIE HIHW
FT. LAUDf B0AII: 3*18 S. -* HIGH!ig


i Mgy A
1958
+Je1s*fk**on
11-B
onaj iind nine grandchildren. Her-
w-ne In Newark, N.J., with
ltlv*rsld*-llaih Memorial clwirg* of arrangements here.
WR6. LILLIAN SHAPIRO
6". 'if :','.' Wiinhinistiin ave., (lied Apr.
20 A resident here for In years, he a'
w bj tier hiiHimntl. Solomon;
two Minn, JultiiM nncl HUrray; Tour
d*nh(is. Mrs. Bettv lUiiin. Mrs.
Klilrl.y Friedman. Mm. KINtne Hnin-
*elw and Mm. Kvilyn Lavy; two l.ro-
th*i.~. three saner* nn.l 16 roml-
1 Hlnr.ii Rrvtres were In nrnokl.tn
with KtverM.'. 'MhicIi **emorlni
I" I In ch.inje of local Mrrunirement.-.
MM*. N-M4cy~m0kitnMn
K, of IBM KuolM aw., .lied at her
home Apr. 2tf. A winter resident here
for many yearn, eomlmi from Brook-
lyn, N.V, she lx survived by her hn-
hand, too, an.l daughter, Mrs. Jeon-
wti* WIIUu. Hhv aasn-aisaaa II-III mi ii
Karl Service* and burial were In I .on I
Inland. N.Y with Hellmnn I- un.r :
Horn.- in eharvp Joint Inaugural Ceremonies Will
Install North Shore Officers Here
Installation ceremony will be
sponsored by North Shore Jewish
Center for its elected officers and
board members of the congrega- (tent, will be installed for his sec-
tion, Sisterhood, Men's Club, and
PTA Saturday evening at the Dcau-
ville hotel.
Theme of the Installation will be
"The Holy Ark Focal Pdlnt of
Judaism."
A replica of the bronze Ark of
the synagogue will be used in the
TriSTBIfailoh ceremony to be eon-
afficers of Heart Assn. of Greater Miami salute past pree-
r. Jim S. Jewett with a plaque for outstanding achieve-
i in office. Dr. Louis Lembetg (right) is president for 1958-
lile vice presidents are Mrs. Nanette Savage, Dr. Jean
[Perdue and Dr. Milton Easlaw. Treasurer is Ira Mogul,
[Dr. Martin S. Belle will act as secretary for coming year.
trt Mmsky,
lies Here
Herman Minsky, of 6520
st, died Tuesday, Apr. 29.
manager of alt. Nebo
f, Mr. Minsky came to Mi-
Ltma, 0., 12 years ago.
Its a member of the West
(sons.
rors include his wife, Leona
nd two daughters, Mrs.
jwards and Miss Joy Min-
|h of "Kliarni; -two -brothers
(ren sisters, including Mrs.
wson, Miami Beach, THrs.
lUVeralde-r.eweh M-m*rlal
miiel. with an rial In aaltteslde CMne-
tery.
Apr 27 at
Char
DANIEL SOMEnmAN
r.R, of 710 Rue Bordeaux, Normandy
Isle, died Apr. H. A resident here six
years, he wave* *1 -wtfe, Anne: a
on, Arnold ('.: and two slaters, Ser-
vices were In Brooklyn, with Rlver-
slde-Beach Memorlul Chapel In charge
locally.
MORRIS YAGER
TO, f-lM0 Collins ave., died Apr, M.
A retired cloak and sUlt'tmMiwwa oper-
ator, he was a winter visitor here for
rlow and Mrs linn"sBvW. '"",v TO *efore Incoming a perm-
now ana Mrs. Lna SUVBT- HnrT1, praflleat two vain ago. Tie was
menvh*r of the WoHtawm's Circle
Branch 369. Surviving are "bin wife,
l^itrle; a aan, Herman; two daughters.
Mrs. Mary (JofdharK arm Mrs. Ada
oily wood, Fla.
tes Wet* to be Thursday,
[at Gofdon funeral Home,
Vial in Mt. Mrtx> Cemetery.
JACK WECHSLER
i J5 12th at., died Apr. 27.
of New York, he entire here of 7845 Byron ave., died Apr. 22.
tar* age. He waa a musician
nember -of the liaorgc 0r*h-
Klie was a resident hare 10 months.
Kervlcen and burial were In Chicago,
lg. Knights of Pylhlaa, the .Witt! nivurslue-Haach Memorial Cha-
L'nlon In New York, -aiM pel In charge of arrangements here.
Miami. Surviving are his
Ula: and a brother. George.
were Apr. 28 at Rlvershl. -
lemorlal Chapel, with burial in
Cemetery.
LOUIS i. BLUM
liri Bay dr., died Apr. t. The
Bf a textile printing firm, ha
rinter i.-.-nVnt here for many
[Survivors Include his wife,
ID son*, Kaart II and
[; a brother and a nlster. ker-
nel burial were In Brooklyn,
Bveralde-Beach Memorial i ha-
ll.hm.- of local arrangements.
WILLIAM WEISSLANOER
M, of ll!i Merlillan ave.. died Apr. 21.
A retired maintenance man, he came
heae 11 years ago from New York.
Surviving ure a son, Leo, and four
nTandcHiMr.'ii Services were Apr. 23
at NewmaiijOirdon Funeral Home,
With burial "111 Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
|fvfS. BETTY DOCTOR
i SW Mst pi., died Apr. 21.
of Toledo, o.. she name here
an.'. ETie waa member of
|ghis of Pythian Btatori of III-
Derlcan legion Auxiliary and
Auxiliary of Toledo. Sniviv-
Iher hnebaml, -Harry; two sona,
|r and Bernard! IWo brothers,
and thre.- BTandchlklraji. Ber-
lere Apr. 27 at 1 i i\ .- i t. -1:. n -11
ll Chapel, with burial In Mt.
Cemetery.
IENJAMIN FREIREICH
tb St., .lle ptand operator, he is survived
Ii-, (lerlrurte; three immis. Wil-
lanford and Ralph: f.wir aWiKh-
| Marlon Fredrick*. Mil. Isa-
ooper. Miami Reach. ttr~
lite OH more, and Mrs. I.enore
knd two slaters. Services were
jy'll Neerf 4he
your home aafe far your
by aafelng 'now aiwut our
Sage RMempllOn 1'lan.
AT li1V
fMpresennag
litnn lift Insarawte <*mpony
S.W. 3rd Avewn, Wtami
m FR 3-4S16 or Hi/1
-VffmiSWMG
WtTHUKid!
ABRAHAM FRANK
St. who came here eight weeks ago
from New York, died Apr. Si. Sur-
vrenra-include his wife, TIMle: a son.
Ijeo. and a daughter. "Mrs. Jerl 1-ewls.
Services were in New York City, with
Hellman Funeral Home In charge of
local arrangements.
SWinbrg. and ii *X$lvr. Services and
berlfll Were In llew Te)rk. with River-
side-Reach Memorial Chapel In charge
locally.
MRS. MINNIE VINIK
MRS. ROSE KANTZLER
70. of 01 W. 17th St., died Apr. 22. A
Winter visitor here for 2.1 years, she
leaves her husband. Jacob: two sons.
Morris H. and Benjamin: and a
daughter, Mrs. Muriel I.lbow, Miami
Bench. Servl -es and Initial were In
New York, with RIveraToe-Beach lie-
mortal Chapel In charge of local ar-
rangements.
LESLIE COHEN
75, of III Palm Island, died Apr. 21. A
retired fiitii.r he waa resident here
ta months. He leavaa Ma wife, Jea-
ale; and two dauKhters. Rervices wet.-
ton, with RIveraWa-Beaeh -Me-
morial Chapel In charge of arrange-
ment* locally.
NATHAN LIDSKY
6S, of 372i saerltlan ave., dted Apr. 21."
A real estate broker, he caWe here
n\t- vears ago from Lake Mahopac,
N Y. He was a member of B'nal B'rlth
and <*s a Zionist and .Mason. Surviv-
ing are his lfe, Ida; two sons, Ru-
dolph and JullUs: an.l five grandcbil-
,n,ii Services weit in New ^ ork, with
Kowma'n-Oordon Funeral Home In
of local arrangements.
ACS.X M. SHEOROFF
IM, of 15SS Drexel ave.. died Apr. 2".
An a|rth>em house owner, he came
aaaje H. years, ago. Ho waa a memlier
of l.-mple Bhianu-KI. Surviving are
his *wKe, FWtence: a daughter. Mrs.
'Avtva ^Waitaman: and three grand-
c'H1teen l#ei vices were In Cleveland,
with loeal arrangements by Newman-
CtordtMi Funeral Home.
ABE SCHNITZLBR
*0 of 792 NW isth **-.. died Apr. 22.
FormWly of Wildwood, N.J.. he waa
a resident here 12 years. He leaves a
daughter, Mlas Eva Schnltslcr: and
a son, Ruben: and two sisters Ber.
vices were Apr. 2-1 at RiveiMde-Bea. h
Memorial Chapel, with burial in Mt.
Sinai Cemetery.
SAMUEL OREEN
7i, Of ISM SW Mh St.. died Apr. II. A
ttaldent here eight years, he if
dsuhier. Mrs. Cllllan Wallach: three
QOXVON
JaSIral'.^Kt
WWS. OA WERK8
9. of 1720 Taylor St., Hollywood, died
Apr 2. A winter visitor in Holly-
wood for many years, coming from
Brooklyn, NY.. he Is aurvtved bs het
husband, Morris, and a daughter, Mrs.
1'earl Weltinei She also leaves two
sons. I>r. Max anil I.eo. Services and
burial were in New York, with Hell-
man Funeral Home In charge or ar-
rangements.
SAM KRON
72. of 1010 Wastilntgoii ave.. died at
his home Apr. 28. lie was a winter
visitor for many years, coming from
Flushing, N.Y. A retired waiter, he
was a member of fhe Young Pstofl
Society. He Is survived By a daugh-
ter, Mrs. Corinne Frey. Services and
interment were In New York, -vith lo-
cal s rramtemehts by Hellmnn Funeral'
Home.
JOSEPH MAZEN
R, of fSR7 "Merfdlan ave., died Apr. 3.
He came here a year ago from Mon-
treal. Canada, where he had liwell a
wholesale jeweler. He Is survived by
his wife. Jennie, and daughter TBrs.
Miriam -Lewis. He also leaves a sis-
ter, three brothers and three grand-
eMMren. -Ha wax a Zionist, beloiaRiri
to B'nal B'rlth. and was a anted Tal-
mud scholar. Services and burial were
in Haverhlll, 'Mass.
ducted by Rabbi Mayer Abranio-
witz, spiritual leader of the Center.
President of the congregation
Max Krauss will be installed for
his second term, together with the
following officers:
Vice presidents, Jack Korenbllt,
Morris Black, Sam Fuchs, Abe
Seletoff, Jerry Sussman; secre-
tary, Fred Jonas: treasurer, Harry
Rosenfeld; financial secretary,
Herman Kooperman; assistant fi j
nancial secretary, Jacob Mayblum.
Mrs. Sam Belsky, Sisterhood
president, will be installed for her
second term with the following of-
ficers:
Vice presidents, Meadames AI
Mechlowitz, Irving Laibson, Ray
Worse, Louise Mulsh, Sam Ho
hauser; 'treasurer, Mrs. Herman
Bergad: financial secretary, Mrs
Morris Hirirfen; recording secre-
tary, Mrs. Alvin Schlesmger; so-
Milton Mannhcimer; and historian,
Mrs. Al Schwartz.
Al Sherman, Men's Club presi-
ond term together with the follow-
ing officers:
Vice presidents, Al Granoff and
Robert Bloch; treasurer, David S.
Milkr; secretary, I. Edward Cot-
'iin;' financial secretary, Irving
Oreenberg.
Mrs. Norman Harrow, newly-
elected PTA president, will be in-
stalled with the following officers:
Vice presidents, Mesdames Paul
Greenfogel, William Gotlieo. Henry
Davidson, Percy Millman, Nate
Pozin; recording secretary, Mrs.
Joseph Small; corresponding sec-
retary, Mrs. Arthur Goodman; par-
liamentarian. Mrs. Robert Bloch;
librarian, Mrs. Irving.Laibson; ad-
visor, Mrs. Philip Jacoby. Mrs.
Jacoby is retiring PTA president.
child; corresponding secretary
Mrs. Frank Nankin; chaplain, Mrs
Max Krauss; parliamentarian, Mrs.
ItMitch to be Speaker
MBMPHK, Tenn. Morris Zel-
diteh, one of the nation's lead-
ing experts in health and welfare
plarmmg, will be principal speaker
at the opening dinner session Sat-
urday at the CterlAge hotel here of
a weekend leadership meeting of
the Southern States region of the
Council of Jewish Federations and
Welfare Funds. Zelditch, who is
director of the social planning de-
cial secretary, Mrs. Lillian Roth* fpartment of CJFWF, will apeak on
"Development of Cbcal Jewish Ser-
vices: Achievements and Prob-
lems."
MAY is
DOUBLE
BONUS
MONTH at
ICAN SAVINGS!
OPEN A SAVINGS ACCOUNT BEFORE
MAY 10th AND ._
YOURFCHV
//
^
DIVIDEND EARNINGS
FROM MAY 1st!
Every American Savings
account opened before
May 10th receives full
dividend earnings from
May 1st!
CURRENT DIVIDEND
3*%
PER ANKetJM
Each account insured
up to $ 10,000 by an agency
of 'the Federal Government
WW&


CHOICE OF FREE
BONUS GIFTS!
witheoery account o/ $100 oi mor*
INGWAMAM IlECTHIC
ALARM CLOCK

HJfcT TO
A FAMIIY
16 PIECE
TTXtMTfSS
TABllWAKf
2^
wm
MERICAN SAVINGS
'Building and L
wwwuii
1655 Washington Avenue, Just North of -Uneeln Heed, -Miami altwh
JE -6$26
JMaWMMM


12-B
+Jcnistncr***M


UNDER THE STRICT AND CONSTANT SUPERVISION OF
THE ORTHODOX VAAD HAKASHWrTH Of KOMDA
RABBI DR. ISAAC HIRSH EVER. DIRECTOR
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
PRICES EFFECTIVE MAY 1 THRU MAY 8
*'T,hiu|
u.s.hk
and U.S. CHM
MEATS
PLAN YOUR MEALS AROUND
THESE FAMILY FREEZER FAVORITES!
ass? Ss? 3F ^ ifflfiaiwgsaratfffl
dicfin^" rt?rui2^PRICES- P1* is Hnder the stri* rabbinical j
GENUINE
CALV*S L/VER
WHOLE
or
SLICED
Flavor Protected
LONG ISLAND DUCKS
u TOM TURKEYS
ONLY
Cl YOUR FMMIY THI FHttST STtAKS OR ROASTS
RIBS of BEEF
CENUINE SPRING
Baby LAMB CHOPS
CUT AMD WRAPPED
FOR YOUR FREEZER
ONLY
BY THE RACK
3 TO 6 LBS. AVC.
30 TO 35 LBS. AVO.
CHOOSE FROM OUR LARGE
SELECTION OF SPECIALTIES
FOR THE GOURMET
STEER JPMK -CJLVES LUNCS CALVES FEET STEER LIVER
i BRAIKS OXTAILS MAX'S STUFFED KISHKA
MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS YOUR EXTRA BONUS AT FOOD FAIR
Ir


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E4NDOUKH4_CJMFWJ INGEST_TIME 2013-05-17T22:01:48Z PACKAGE AA00010090_01578
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES