The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01577

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
awiislfcUEIIiDipidliiaun
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
klume 32 Number 17
Miami, Florida, Friday, April 25, 1958
32 Pages Two Sections
Price 20*
tate Dep't. Warns: Stay Away From Parade

Yisarm Mideast,
lurion Suggests
fo Soviet Boss
JERUSALEM (JTA) 1*1 Is-
H Cabinet approved Sunday
emier David Ben-Gurion's reply
| Soviet Premier Nikita Khrush-
Bv's plea to Israel, among other
lions, to support the Soviet call
an international ban on further
clear bomb tests and the pro-
ction of nuclear weapons.
Ir. Ben-Gurion reportedly sug-
pted that the principle of dis-
lament be applied to the Mid-
East region to diminish the
Bsibility of an outbreak of war
jthe area. The gist of the reply
[thought to be: Israel favors the
ining of nuclear weapons tests
believes that this can only be
into effect by a decision among
Big Powers.
Meanwhile, in a repercussion of
Moscow-Belgrade rift, the Is-
eli Communist delegation which
Is to participate in the forth-
ling national convention of the
Igoslav Communist Party Tues-
cancelled its flight plans at
last minute. The Israeli Com-
lists informed the Yugoslav
legation in Israel that its action
9s in line with Moscow's boycott
the Belgrade meeting,
lowever, an Israeli Mapam dete-
ction left for the Yugoslav capi-
to attend the parley.
JTABy Direct Teletype Wire ,
WASHINGTONState Department sources made known Tuesday
that the United State* considers the movement of heavy military equip-
ment into Jerusalem for the) tenth anniversary parade to be a violation
of the General Armistice Agreement between Israel and Jordan, and a
throat to peace.
The State Department, it was learned, is taking an extremely
serious view of the Israel Government's position on the parade, and the
United States is considering a public expression on the matter.
Among rhe ideas being discussed at the State Department is a
warning to American citizens to stay away from the parade in Jerus-
alem because) of the danger of violent eruption.
ISRAELIS RIDDLED BY JORDANIAN GUNFIRE
JTABy Direct Teletype Wire
TEL AVIVTwo Israelis died on the Gulf of Aqaba late Tuesday,
victims of Jordanian bullets fired from an Arab gunboat.
The two Israelis set out in a small motorboat to catch an empty
skiff which had drifted away from the port of Elath. When the motor
boat was several mites from shore on the "open seas" of the Gulf, the
Jordanian patrol boat sped up and opened fire with a machine gun.
Later, an Israel naval patrol craft found the civilian boat drifting
with one bullet-riddled body crumpled on the bottom, and the second
one apparently knocked out of the craft by the impact of the steel-
jacketed bullets.
Turner, Mrs. Meyers Listed
'Outstanding' Dade Citizens
John B. Turner and Mrs. Anna Brenner Meyers were Wednesday
night named Dade county's "Outstanding Man and Woman" of the year
in ceremonies at Bayfront Park.
The annual awards are presented by Sholem Lodge of B'nai B'rith,
and were started here in 1947. More than a score of Dade county or-
ganizations now also list themselves as sponsor.
Joseph M. Lipton, president of Dade Federal Savings and Loan
Assn. and patron of the function
Birthday Luncheon Hears From
Noted Children's Court Justice
Greater Miami was to join communities throughout the world in
pening festivities celebrating Israel's tenth anniversary of Statehood
1 a "Birthday Luncheon" Thursday at the Dupont Tarleton hotel.
Leaders representing every ma-*-------------------------
mittee was headed by Mrs. Louis
Glasser.
Prominent leaders in all walks
of life and of all faiths were to join
the local committee in a salute to
Israel's achievements. A high-
light of the salute was to be a col-
orful birthday cake-cutting cere-
mony in which representatives of
major areas of Miami's civic life
Continued on Page 3 A
r area of community life were
gather to pay tribute to Israel
id its first decade of achievement
a democratic force in the Mid-
le East.
Featured speaker was to be
ftoted New York Jurist Judge Jus-
Ine Wise Polier, daughter of the
ate Rabbi Stephen S. Wise.
Heading the committee under
( whose auspices the local cele-
bration is taking place are Gov.
LeRoy Collins, honorary chair-
man; Stanley C. Myers, chair-
man; and A. Arthur Pefcelner,
chairman of the executive com-
mittee.
The luncheon arrangements com-
Tradition Broken
JTABy Direct Teletype Wire
JERUSALEM Israel broke a
|rule of nearly two years' standing
Tuesday and reentered the Israel
Jordan Mixed Armistice Commis-
sion to dispute Jordan's contention
that the presence of unarmed
tanks in Jerusalem Thursday to
participate in the Independence
Day parade would violate the arm-
istice pact.
The meeting opened Monday
without the presence of Israeli
delegates. Tuesday, the Israelis
called the Jordanian charges of
violation of the pact "absurd."
for the 11th successive year, made
the presentations. Judges were
Fred K. Shochet, publisher, The
Jewish Floridian; George Beebe.
managing editor. The Miami Her-
ald; Ralph Renick, news director,
television station WTVJ; and San-
ford M. Swerdlin, co-chairman of
the awards committee.
Turner, born in England, is a
graduate of the University of
Edinburgh, and came to the
United States in 1933. He ar-
rived in Miami in 1950 as an
executive of the Orange State
Oil Company, and was named
the firm's vice president and
general manager in 1955.
Last year, he was appointed
chairman of Dade county's first
Continued on Page 16-A
Israel Charges Express
Company Bowed Out
Before Arab Pressure
JERUSALEM(JTA)The Israel Government Tourist Office this
week charged that the American Express Company had surrendered to
the pressure of the Arab boycott in closing down its operations in the
State of Israel and had, more recently, prevented the Hertz Driv-Ur-
Self Company from opening a branch in Israel. This is the first time
that the State of Israel has publicly voiced its indignation against firms
which give way before Arab pressure, and may be the beginning of a
new policy in this direction. *
The Israeli statement said that
for the past two years Israel has
been negotiating, unsuccessfully,
with the American Express Com-
pany for re-opening of its branch in
this country. (In New York, a
spokesman for American Express
said that "for the time being" the
company had no comment on the
Israel statement.) The text of the
statement reads:
"The American Express Com-
pany which is one of the largest
travel and tourist agencies in the
world has maintained an inde-
pendent office in Israel since the
time of the British Mandate and
up to the beginning of 1956. In
March, 1956 the company closed
its Israeli office, claiming that
there ie no commercial justifica-
tion for its existence. The Amer-
ican Express Company left the
Continued on Page 3A
SIR USUf HUMMER
. territorial infearity
British MP Criticizes Own
Gov't/s Middle East Policy
A warning that Israel must be on constant alert against an Arab
strike was sounded in a special message issued here Wednesday from
Sir Leslie Plummer, distinguished member of the British Parliament.
* Sir Leslie will be guest of honor at a special tenth anniversary din-
ner sponsored by the State of Is-*-
rael Bond Organization at the Fon-
. TURHtt
. oil executive
MRS. AMMA MIMNU MITERS
. reaewaed mUrny
tainebteau hotel Tuesday.
In his message to Jacob Sher,
Greater Miami chairman of Israel
.Bonds, Sir Leslie said that "Israel
is in as great a danger today as
she was ten years ago when the
State was founded."
Sir Leslie is making a special
trip here, accompanied by Ledy
Plummer, to help the Greetor
Miami community celebrate the
tenth anniversary.
He contended that the fact that
Israel had won military victories
"does not mean that Arab political
and military leaders, headed by
Col. Nasser, are satisfied with the
results."
He said President Nassar "be-
lieves that if he can weld the Arab
states into some semblance of a
united nation, then he will have the
power once again to challenge Is-
rael."
For several years. Sir Leslie
said, "friends of Israel like my-
self" have called for a four-power
declaration "of the integrity of the
frontiers of the Middle East, both
Continued on Page 2A
Zind Case Not
Seen as Ground
For Jew-Baiting
LONDON (JTA> Neither in-
formed Jewish nor German opin-
ion views the Ludwig Zind case as
indicative of a resurgence of anti-
Semitism in Germany, the Daily
Telegraph reported in a dispatch
from its Bonn correspondent.
The report noted that from time
to time "relatively minor" expres-
sions of anti-Semitism occur in
bars and the offenders are treated
"with comparative severity" by
the German courts. It, cited a re-
cent three-week jail sentence for
a German who shouted anti-Semi-
tic remarks during the showing of
an anti-fascist film and a two-
week term for a disabled German
war veteran who had shouted anti-
Jewish insults at a Jewish col-
Continued on Page 16 A


2-A
+Jmlsl>ncr*0Mi
Gurion Launches Celebrations;
President Hears Knesset Talk
JTABy Direct Teletype Wire
JERUSALEM The rebirth of,
L-rael differed completely from
the birth of any other new state in
the past c'tcade where the people
wire not cut off from their lands.
Premier David Ben-Gurion de-
clared Tuesday in a special ad-
dran on the occasion of Israel's
tenth anniversary of independence
which was -to- be. celebrated
Thursday on.
The premier spoke in a flag-
bedecked parliament called into
nuencf
t -iron.
Dr. Lemberg Heads
Miami Heart Assn.
Annual meeting of the Heart
AM*, of Greater Miami was held
last week at the Dupont Tarle-
ton hotel.
Highlight of the evening was
presentation of awards to outstand-
ing campaign volunteers and lead-
en whose combined efforts result-
ed in raising $133,414.5420 per-
cent more than was raised in last
%ar record fund drive here.
Officers for the new year as pro-
posed by the nominating committee
are president, Dr Louis Lemberg;
president-elect. Dr. Robert J.
Boucek: vice presidents. Dr. Jean
Jones Perdue. Dr. Milton S. Sas-
law. Mrs. Alvin Savage; treasurer,
Ira Mogul; secretary. Dr. Martin
S. Belle. Outgoing president is Dr.
Jim Jewett.
special session to mark the ob-
servance of the decade of freedom
and development Chief among the
visitors who listened to Mr. Ben-
Gunon's words was Israel Presi-
dent Itzhak Ben-Zvi. whose pres-
ence was signified by the fly ins of
the Presidential Flag from .the.,
mast over the building.
Other notables in the visitor's
arry were T>r.'-Kanohv Gold-
man*, president of the World
Zionist OiBOftiettew; Chief Reb-
tMi Isaac Nissim end Isaac Her
100; end Dr. Abbe Hiltel Silver,
veteran American Zionist lead-
er.
Ben-Gurion noted that while the
uprooted and scattered Jewish
people, "hopeless minority"' among
the nations of the world- had sur-
vived, other nations who had sim-
ilarly been uprooted had vanished.
"Neither exile nor unparalleled
sufferings crushed the Jewish peo-
ple." he said. "Their profound spir-
itual bonds were unbroken while
all of Israel's neighbors in the
Biblical period have disappeared
their languages forgotten, their
cultures vanished, their religions
no longer in existence."
Friday, Apru 25.
MP Raps Mideast Policies
DAVID HH-CU9I0H
Membership Drive Open
Ladies' Auxiliary of North Shore
Post 677. Jewish War Veterans,
opened its membership drive
with a "member-bring-a-member"
luncheon and fashion show at the
Alden hotel last week.
Weiner Named
CPA Chairman
Certified Public Accountant A.
B. Wiener. 6420 Maynada, Coral
Gables, has been appointed state
chairman of the Florida member-
ship committee of the American
Institute of Certified Public Ac-
countants.
Wiener, a partner in the account-
ing firm of Wiener and Stern, is
active in local professional and
civic affairs.
He currently serves on the board
of governors of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and is a past
president of the Dade County chap-
ter of the Florida Institute of Cer-
tified Public Accountants.
Continued from Page 1 A
Israei frontiers and Arab." He
added that the "germs of the third
World War may well He in the Mid-
dle East," but warfare could be
averted by a guarantee of borders.
Sir Leslie voiced rearer that
hit country "has boon as back-
ward as the ether greet powers
in doing its-doty m this respect.
Unfortunately, these guorentees
have not been forthcoming."
i Rabbi Leon Kronish will be toast-
master at the dinner, and reserva-
tions may be made through the Is-
rael Anniversary Dinner. 1544
Washington ave.. Miami Beach.
Morris Sipser, who is replacing
Sidney Glazier as city m,n,0
the State of Israe. Bon? o^
tion, will
at the
*.-**"3
Fumtcr
CLOTHES
HOUSEHOLD
GOOOS AND
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WITH
PARA
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Serving the Jewish Community Since 1925
MARKERS $40.00 phis Ceasttery Caerees
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and YOUR NEAREST MAILBOX!
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MFBREW RELISKMtS SUrrlllS
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AMI MORRIS FROCNTU
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York: 7nih St. A Ani.lrrd.im A*r.


riday, April 25. 1958
vJewMFhrMian
3-A
\lsrael Says Express Co. Submitted
I
Continued from Page 1 A
anagement
he hand* of
of its business
a local agent.
in
We have been convinced be-
rt any doubt that the closing
he ofcfices of the American Ex
U Company was a result of
ding to the threats of the Arab
boycott. During the last two years,
the Government Tourist Corpora-
tion was in constant contact with
the American Express Company
asking them to re-open the offices,
but with no results.
"During the last months the Gov-
ernment Tourist Corporation has
been in contact with various firms
lay Luncheon Hears From
fed Children's Court Jurist
1
1
Continued from Peg* 1 A
re to participate, including lead-
l in the field of arts, journalism,
ncation, health, government and
momy.
Underlining Hie direct link be-
een the local celebration and
e festivities taking place in Is-
ael wes a cabled message from
r. Irving Lenrman wne, te-
ther with Samuel N. Fried-
nd, last week .carried mes-
ge of greetings from Gov. Coi-
ns to President Itrhak Ben-Zvi
Israel, in behalf of the citiiens
Florida.
. incheon invocation was to be
ivered by Dr. Joseph R. Narot,
1 the benediction by the Rev.
rlerlck Nelson of Miami Shores
wnunity Church.
Providing appropriate incidental
music throughout the ceremonies
was to be Mrs. A. Arthur Pefcelner
at the piano.
The luncheon, coinciding with
similar events taking place in more
than 300 communities throughout
the United States, signaled the be-
ginning of a series of tenth anni-
versary events to be held in Great-
er Miami in- the year-long celebra-
tion.
Miami's tribute, to Israel's anni-
versary will be highlighted by a
community-wide celebration May
8, at Bayfront Auditorium.
Emphasizing the American Jew-
ish community's spiritual link with
Israel will be special solemn ser-
vices at synagogues and temples
Friday night and Saturday morn-
ing.
in the field of 'renting cars to
tourists.' Hertz Drive-Ur-Self was
included in this contact. This
company agreed tentatively to
open a branch in Israel. We have
been informed that the new part-
nership of American Express and
the Hertz Company was a factor in
the cancellation of the negotiations
with the Hertz Company. This
shows that not only did the Amer-
ican Express Company cease to
function in Israel, but that it had
kept another company from fane
tioning there.
"Let us assume lor fhe moment
that the closing of the American
Express office in Israel was indeed
an outcome of a purely commer-
cial consideration and that there
was no commercial justification
for its activities in 1956. Then we
have to point out that since then
other companies have widened
their activities in Israel as a re-
sult of the mounting number of
tourists in this country. The air-
lines have added many flights to
Tel Aviv and the shipping lines
have put in more or larger ships.
"The public should know that in
spite of all this American Express
Company not only did not re-open
its offices in Israel, but is conduct-
ing a policy toward Israel which is
in contradiction to every accepted
commercial consideration."
TODAY
rsca.-a'ses to
a\0 t'Jiv
EXTRA
1/ttnmKf CJU&9*
."BIRDS .
JlhqhYmouSj
-5 mi mmw
c".no<.hehM h.
THE EPIC OF THE REAL AMERICAN
i
ANNA KASHPI BRIAN DONIEVY
Starts Tuesday "1HE FEMALE AMMAI."
Beach Lodge Will Install Officers
Miami Beach Lodge, B'nai
B'rith, will hold its annual installa-
tion banquet at the Deauv'ille hotel
Sunday, Apr. 27. The lodge will in-
stall the following officers:
Edwin Marger, president; Irving
Schatzman, president-elect; Daniel
Broad, Herbert Heiken, and Harry
Rogers, vice presidents; Seymour
Gelber, recording secretary.
Harry Laser, treasurer; Gerald
Berkell, financial secretary; Jack
Fink, monitor; Theodore Trushin,
assistant monitor; Abraham Swartz.
warden; and Sol Goldstrom, guard-
ian and honorary life member.
Outgoing president Jack Fink
will be. presented with a., plaque.
Speaker will be State Attorney
Richard Gerstein.
Marger has been a resident of
this area since 1938, and is a prac-
ticing attorney on Miami Beach.
He is a veteran of World War II.
Marger has served as president
of the Biscayne Democratic Club,
executive board member of the Mi-
ami Beach Zionist District, mem-
ber of the Miami Beach Jaycees,
National Legal Aid Society, and
Dade County, Florida, and Amer-
ican Bar Assns.
Spring froth Dante
Singles Limited will hold its
"Spring Frolic'.' dance Sunday at
8:30 p.m.. at the DiLido hotel.
Chamber Group
Reelects Slate
Robert S. Kistler was reelected
president of the Friends of Cham-
ber Music of Miami at a recent
meeting in the Coral Gables home
of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Gregor.
Others reelected are Burton T.
Wilson, vice president; Ernest A.
Silverman, secretary; Mrs. Arthur
F. French, assistant secretary;
Lawrence Friedman, treasurer.
Newly-elected directors include
D. Pierre, G. Cameron, Dr. Paul
Beck, Mrs. Judy Kinseley and
Emanuel Tropp.
Announced was the concert
schedule for 1958-59. Janacek
String Quartet will open the season
Nov. 4. Others are Grlller String
Quartet, Jan. 14, 1959; Quartetto
Italiano, Jan. 27; I Musici, Feb.
24; and Fine Arts Quartet, Mar. 10.
INSURED SAYINGS EARN 3V2%
Current Rate
Per Annum
LOW COST HOME LOANS TO BUY, BUILD, REFINANCE OR REPAIR
Inquiries Invited ... No Obligation
,r "One of the Nation's
Oldest and Largest
i Federal
f,NGS and Loan Association at Miami t,
JOSEPH M. UPTON, Presidert tjd
I e RESOURCES EXCEED 115 MILLION DOLLARS
A MESSAGE.....
OF PARAMOUNT IMPORTANCE
On March 16 ... At approximately 2:40 A.M., a
most cowardly act was committed against peaceful .
God-fearing Beth Q Congregation.
Stupid terrorists Men of violent character .
Planted sticks oi dynamite against the rear wall oi the
building, resulting in serious damage to the Recreation
Hall. Kitchen and Classrooms.
The explosion lifted the wails of the buildings, caus-
ing serious damage to the roof, structure and ceilings.
The interior and its contents hare been seriously dam-
aged, resulting in the necessity of rebuilding and refurn-
ishing the enure spacious kitchen and its equipment
After more than 30 days of tense waiting ... Hoping
and praying, no tangible clues hare been found as yet.
and no prospect of an early solution of this dastardly
crime is in sight
In order to stop this sort of violent and unprovoked
bombings of peaceful religious institutions,
A Reward of $10,000 Is Offered
by patriotic organizations, individuals and friends of
Congregation Beth EL to anyone who will provide
Chief Headley and/or Capt Napier of the Miami Police
Department Sheriff- Thomas J. Kelly, or Mr. Sidney H.
Palmer, president of Beth El Congregation, with infor-
mation which will lead to the apprehension and con-
viction of the person or persons guilty of planting the
dynamite under the cover of darkness.
While the bombing incident is no longer on the
front pages of our country's newspapers and more cur-
rent stories are taking its place, the entire community
of Greater Miami and people everywhere are not ready
to forget it Are not ready to compromise with
violence, and are hoping and praying for a speedy
solution to return "peace of mind" to all people every-
where.
Sidney. President
CONGREGATION BETH EL
Anyone Having Any Information, No Matter How
Insignificant or Seemingly Unimportant, Please Com-
municate with the Authorities Immediately, and You
Will Be Doing Your Sacred and Civic Duty.
ALL NEWSPAPERS PLEASE REPRINT
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4-A
+Jen 1st fhrMtor
Friday.




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t't.ra muk4cIim matter July 4. ISM, at Ma Paa*
Off>ea af Miami, Fla.. aakr tha Act af March a. ill.
Tin Jiwun FterWIan ha* abaaratd tha Jawlafc Unity
nd tna Jawia* Waaltly- Mamear af tHa rfawiaii Taa.
graphic Agency, ttvm Arta Faatura Syndicata. Wafte-
aaa Nti Sarviaa. National Editanai Aaaociation, Amar-
lean Aaaoclatidw af Enajiah-Jawta* Nawaaaa*. FaarUa
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FRED K. SHOCHET.............Editor and Publisher
OFFICE and PLANT 120 N.E Sixth Street
Telephone FR 4-1141 FR +8212
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rath of tha marchawdiaa adTftiaad In iu columna.
lUtlCRIPTION ATIIj ...
Ona Yaar SS.OO T Yaara W-00 Thraa Yaara I1Q-0O
Volume 32
LEO MINDLIN.
Executive Editor
5 Iyar 5718
Friday. April 25. 1958
Number 17
Miami's Proud Role in Israel's Achievement
The worldwide celebration of Israel's tenth
anniversary of independence begins officially
this week.
Greater Miami Houses of Worship will
mark the launching of the year-long occasion
with sacred services Friday evening and Sat-
urday morning.
On Tuesday, a special dinner under the
The New Challenge Ahead
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's move
to new quarters signifies the end of an era.
In 1947, Federation established itself in its
offices at 420 Lincoln rd. In a very real sense,
these offices embodied the nerve center of a
kind of philanthropy far superceding popular
notens of "charity.''
It was there that Federation took its great
leap forward to enter "the big time" of Jewish
community action. Federation's hrst campaign
at 420 Lincoln rd. netted S929.0O0.
Only one year later, with the ease of a
champion, it met the challenge of Israel's emer-
gence as a free nation. Responding to the
fledgling republic's sudden financial needs.
Federation came up with a whopping S 1.485,-
000 to send Israel on her wayand Miami into
the higher echelons of American Jewish phil-
anthropy.
Since then, the Mezzanine at 420 has ser-
ved as the strategy center of fund-raising cam-
paigns increasingly large in scope and ambi-
tion. Not the least of the growth has come from
the growth of the city, itselfthe ever-widening
cultural, religious, educational and health
needs of Greater Miami Jewry.
Now, in the midst of its most ambitious
drive to date. Federation has launched a new
era by moving to 424 Lincoln In. What are the
hurdles Federation will have to leap horn this
center? What the problems? What the chal-
lenges?
The answers to these questions will be
written in the pages of history. And 424 Lincoln
In. will be privileged to see history being made.
Changing the Ground Rules
In her public charge that the American Ex-
press Company has submitted to Arab black-
mail pressures. Israel is changing a long-stand-
ing policy.
Up until now, the Israel Government has
fought the Arab-inspired international eco-
nomic boycott against her mainly on a legal
level, using every means at her disposal in the
UN and elsewhere.
Last week, in bringing her open charge
against the American Express Company, Israel
finally made some ground rules of her own. It
is to be hoped that the names of other offenders
will soon be made public.
For the Arab game now emerges from the
shadows of "international law," where it pre-
ferred to remain, into the clear light of what it
in fact isopen warfare against a member of
the United Nations.
It is about time that public opinion has
been given an opportunity to assist in the bat-
tle against Arab blackmail by doing some boy-
cotting of its own.
Ell Will Represent the US.
The Eisenhower Administration has be-
stowed a signal honor on a member of our
community.
Secretary of State John Foster Dulles has
chosen Miami Beachite Leon Ell as one of five
delegates throughout the U.S. to attend an In-
ternational Emergency Migration convention
in Geneva next month.
Ell's record in civic affairs eminently justi-
fies the choice. In addition, his many activities
in behalf of a host of Jewish religious and edu-
cational organizations are ample comment on
the knowledge he has gathered in the field of
emergency migration needs.
The community wishes Ell well in his
Geneva endeavors and deliberations.
auspices of the Israel Bond Organization will
also herald the joyous event
While the Greater Miami Committee for
Israel's Tenth Anniversary Celebration was to
lack off the city's festivities at a luncheon
Thursday noon, with a special message sched-
uled by noted New York jumt Judge Justine
Wise Polier.
These serve as exciting preludes to a truly
spiritual occasion, and residents throughout the
area may well feel proud of Israel's notable
progress. Apart from the significance of the
reemergence of the Jewish State in our time.
Israel is a symbol of the outpouring of human
hearts throughout the world of the fulfillment
of a 2,000-year-long dream in the wake of an
unprecedented record of philanthropic en-
deavor.
Greater Miamians have shared generous-
ly in that endeavor through their efforts in be-
half of the Combined Jewish Appeal and the
Israel Bond Organization. CJA has been re-
sponsible for the immigration of untold hun-
dreds of thousands of Jews from their lands of
poverty and oppression to the new Jewish
State. In rum, Israel Bonds are a vital source
of investment capital, assuring Israel's indus-
trial development and commercial progress.
Once again, we salute the Jewish State on
the occasion of her tenth anniversary. We also
congratulate our proud Jewish community for
its dedicated efforts in Israel's behalL
Take it Easy Next Time
There con be no control over the observa-
tions of a dictator. When Russia's Nikita
Khrushchev let loose against the Jews in an in-
terview in a leading French newspaper last
week, not even his conscience could stop him.
But when Jews, themselves, joined the
chorus, it was as if men sang the praises of
their own executioner.
There is no point in disputing the reaction
of the New York Morning Freiheit to Khrush-
chev's charges. The Freiheit's political posi-
tion is well-substantiated.
We can only marvel at the fact that the
paper bothered to take note of the charges at
alL AfteralL editorially, it said nothing in reply
except obsequiously to beg Comrade Khrush-
chev not to be so hard on the Jews next time
he cared to indulge his phony Brotherhood of
Man wit in a good old-fashioned Russian round
of anti-Semitism.
VC8ASE of ft*H? m
MAIL? TiMTM^Z
celebrations will oWn*l
young nation s my"H
menu in a variety of 5.L. '
u proper that Uu, .K^
for Israel', dec.deTet^
has also been markeTH
number of failure,^.
them clearly not her fa* *!
the celebrations will maximize the positive is as much a liaarfM
State's optimism as it is of her spirit. Nonetheless, it u han!5|
month past since Zionist Actions deliberation in Jerusalem n
daring the week
an i see it
by LEO MINDLIN
atmosphere of pre-anniversary preparation to expose some of is.
resolved ideological conflicts that still spit Israel's soul From *
facial point of view oae may argue that world Jewish ties with S3
are essentially unrelated to the State's successes or failure. fS
an evaluation of the decade following the establishment of uraeT ^
be made on the basis of internal progress. **
If the Jewish State's negatives are as well to receive unabash
exuberant 1*ewfmenweiie may continue the argument ?hat fleaS"*!
realities of the Zionist movement nor the poetry of Zionist puto
enters as a significant phenomenon into frank examination af
achievement. Apart from the fact that Prime Minister Ben-Gura*
himself, has on more than one occasion disavowed any necesun laUonship between his country and Jews outside of it. what precJ!
has World Zionism contributed to Israel since May 14, lu^g? :
In addition to being absurdly superficial, this question also ikai
blindness to history. If one is to take Ben Gurion at bis wordi>
moment of hot-headed outburst, then the equally absurd reply J
by-pass entirely the issue of Zionist significance, dwelling insieada
American-Jewish philanthropy, notably. UJA and the Israel Bo2
campaign.
THERE IS PRECEDENT for such an alternative. The sad facts
deed is that fund-raising has during the past decade taken prior*
over every other facet of Jewish life. Where ideological struggle Z
manding broad intellectual understanding once fructified and oat
vated Jews here, budgeting and community planning today m*a,|
quately fill the breach. Philanthropy is by no means to be Diiiunnjaf
but neither is it to be confused with the more fundamental Jetai
values or. what is worse, to serve as a total substitute for ihea.'
World Jewry's rela'ionship to Israel thus emerges as a centra)
significant issue for Jews both inside and outside the Jewish State.
In this sense, the wrangling at the Zionist Actions meeting in Jena)
alem. the duality of Zionism, itself, are as much to be counted tarn
Israel's significant failures since her establishment a decade laj
they are a reflection against the emerging intellectual anemia ottj
American Jewish community.
It is safe to indicate that no one recognizes the truth of the*af
sumptions so clearly as Ben-Gurion. himself, and it is perhajefS
cisaiy for this reason that he frequently badgers American Jew*3
their Zionism.
While all will seem rosy through May. 1959, no one is tbertaf
to conclude that the failures have been resolved or forgottea/afl
unstated truce exists during this period, one may expect it It cillalj
the name of the tenth anniversary. But the issues at odds watta*
to smoulderissues upon which the future of Israel very likeiy depat
tJLfHAT TOOK PLACE on May 14. 1948 was the fulfillment of i dreta
"* for Jews throughout the world. But it was the Jews of easuwul
Europebroadly the Westwho created the instrumentality of t#H- \
ment. who skilfully manipulated that instrumentality, and who as i [
through a successful transition to political reality For two am |
milienia. Jews might very well have prayed. 'Next year in Jer
alem." and the emergence of the State of Israel would prove aselum
as it did in the past.
It was the genius of Western Jewry, knowledgeable in the JffAf
tactics of the world they inhabited, that fired the dream and brosgat j
it off. But did these Jews, in truth, think of anyone except themserra!
w hen they envisioned a Jewish haven in modern Palestine? It is DMSt
than an assumption that the miracle of Theodor Herri does not etfeal
beyond the Western borders of his Zionist vision
There is something uncanny and prophetic in Herd the mil
Thoroughly European in dress and profession, as far removed fn>
"traditional" Judaism as were the ghettos of the East to him Id
the role of Zionist inspiration and leader.
A sociological stranger to the philosophy he seemed destined a !
formulate, Herzl found many willing disciples in his own worldnan j
more in Poland and Russia, where youth sought restlessly to gtv* |
the weariness of their wait for Divine deliverance. Thus, modal
Zionism traces its formulation to two fundamental sources: the *
logic potential in Western and Central Europe, where secularism m
long since begun to dilute Orthodox Judaism; the realistic actual ii
Eastern Europe, where traditional Orthodoxy, inflamed by its fW
contact with secularism through the late arrival there of the Industrui
Revolution, offered up many recruits willing to fight for an emffguf
sense of Jewish group equality, whose still-tender traditional n
could translate themselves only into terms of an independent J*
homeland.
Modern Israel, in turn, springs from the Zionism this m''**,1
created when finally mixed with the mighty economic and politic"
powers American Jews unfurled in the fateful days leading up
May 14. 1948
UfHEN PRIME MINISTER Ben Gurion urges a mass AmencjJ
'yah today, it is not that he unrealistically fails to res****
population limitations of bis country. Nor is it that, in a moment
emotion, he has forgotten the value of U.S. philanthropy to ue,
What Ben Gurion wants is an influx of Western values "2"L
political, sociology into a land founded by Western visioiufl
increasingly settled by Jews hardly considered in the original vm>
dream.
This does not make of Western Jews a privileged order, or of t
Jews of North Africa and the Middle East Arab nations an iawr
grouping What the Ben-Gurioo caU does is to recognize that ".
eence of Israel and her strength thus far have depended up
Western cunning; what it anticipates is that survival and fnr"*r'*it
gres require continuing Western ambition. If her doors are to""
open for unprecedented numbers of indigent Jews frm "**.}
pressed areas, they must also attract the Jews of knw *"**,.
xkill. the Jews whose values stamp the original character of w
Israel. /wral
American Jews, in the manner of Herri's Western "dJj*%
European tradition, thus continue to find themselves bogged now-
Zionist ideological disputation at best. At worst, they fj"*"^
dispute for fund raising and community planning. But a Ben**>-
Ten-Year Progress Report
for example, product of the realism that gave early Palestine ^
ish pioneen and soldiers, sees this danger: Short of a *""7ff.
answer to his call, the phrase "Jewish State." in the sense '"V,.,*
- meaningful to Western Jewry, may cease to exist by aei
ly the philosophic among us will be outraged by hi*
IS
ish
Only
headed concern.


idcry, April 25. 1958
*Je*ist flcrid/an
5-A
TENTH ANNIVERSARY: DECADE OF A NATION'S ACHIEVEMENT
listory Was Jewish Claim to Land of Israel
Long Succession in Change
Of Hands Preceded Birth;
Partition Plan is Rejected
EDI
SYRIA
72.23
3,906,000p
Mik
IS**tl BM,
IRAQ
ni.ooos^TH.
5.200,000*?,
EGYPT
386.000^
24,339.0007^
JORDAN
37.000-^-
1.427,000^
SAUDI ARABIA
930,000 ^.
7,000,000/-.
Arab States Area: 1,675,234sq.mi.
Israel Area: 8,050sq.mi.
Arab States Population: 47,797.000
Israel Population: 2.000,000
r YEMEN 75.000 .* ^SJSijijSi*
L p 4.500.000 _____________ i:=::,=j shI
i.. -'-''-------------
liter ten years of Israel's existence, Arab na-
tions are more determined than ever to destroy
Jewish State by pushing her into sea. Within
fiours of establishment of Israel by United Na-
tions, Arab armies invaded in 1948, ignoring
world sentiment and legal decree. Despite
their ignominious defeat, Arabs today remain
as firm as ever that Israel shall not survive.
Map shows land and population distribution
in Middle East.
5SUED IN TEL AVIV MAY 14. 1948 BY PROVISIONAL STATE COUNCIL
?ull Text of Israel's Proclamation of Independence
The Land of Israel was the birthplace of the
lewish people. Here their spiritual, religious and
fational identity was formed. Here they achieved
Jidcpendence and created a culture of national and
Iniversal significance. Here they wrote and gave
Be Bible to the world.
Exiled from Palestine, the Jewish people re-
gained faithful to it in all the countries of their div-
ersion, never ceasing to pray and hope for their
eturn and trie restoration of their national freedom.
Impelled by this historic association, Jews
Irove throughout the centuries to go back to the
and of their fathers and regain their statehood. In
.ecent decades they returned in masses. They re-
claimed the wilderness, revived their language, built
pities and villages, and established a vigorous and
ever-growing community, with its own economic and
Cultural life. They sought peace yet were prepared
lo defend themselves. They brought the blessings of
progress to all inhabitants of the country.
In the vear 1897 the First Zionist Congress, in-
spired by Theodor Herzl's vision of the Jewish State,
proclaimed the right of the Jewish people to na-
tional revival in their own country.
This right was acknowledged by the Balfour
Declaration of Nov. 2, 1917, and reaffirmed by the
Mandate of the League of Nations, which gave ex-
plicit international recognition to the historic con-
nection of the Jewish people with Palestine and
their right to constitute their national home.
The Nazi holocaust, which engulfed millions of
Jews in Europe, proved anew the urgency of the
reestablishment of the Jewish State, which would
solve the problem of Jewish homelessness by open-
ing the gates to all Jews and lifting the Jewish people
to equality in the family of nations.
The survivors of the European catastrophe, as
well as Jews from other lands, proclaiming their
Continued en Pag* 10A
lewish State Arabs Enjoy Citizen's Rights
Although Hebrew is country's national language and is taught
in school system generally. Arabic is also taught as an op-
tional subject in lewish schools. In Arab schools, Arabic is
language of instruction, with Hebrew taught on a second
language.
Israel's Arab population of 204,-
000 is the only minority group in
the country. It is mainly Mos-
lem, but includes some 50,000
Christian Arabs, and 20,000
Druzes. The Druzes have recent-
ly been given the right to conduct
their internal affairs as an inde-
pendent community.
The Arab population enjoys
full citizenship rights in Israel.
This includes Arab women.
In dealing with the Arab
minority, the Government's pol-
icy is to offer its Arab citizens
every opportunity to integrate hi
the country's economic and so-
cial structure, while at the same
time recognizing their right to
preserve their o*n traditions and
culture.
Eight Arabs have been elected
to the Knesset; Arabs also serve
as members of municipal coun-
cils and in other posts of local
Continued en Peg* 7A
From the year 1516, when it was conquered by the Turks and
made part of the Ottoman Empire, until the formation of the State
of Israel in 1948, the area known as Palestine was governed contin-
uously by foreign powers.
The Ottoman domination lasted for 400 years After the first
World War, in breaking up the Turkish empire, the League of Nations
entrusted the Mandate for Palestine to Great Britain; and for the
succeeding 30 years the territory was governed by the British.
Thus, for more than four and a
quarter centuries prior to the end
of World War II, Palestine had
belonged in the political sense
neither to the Jews nor to the
Arabs who, together, made up its
population. No validity whatever
attaches to claims that Palestine,
prior to 1948, was an "Arab"
state. For four centuries it had
been a Turkish province and for
three decades a ward of the Lea-
gue of Nations, governed by
Great Britain.
Indeed, Palestine had not been
an independent state since before
the time of Christ. In the days
of antiquity a Jewish state, in 63
B.C.E. it was invaded and con-
quered by the Romans. There-
after, it suffered changing for-
tunes, alternately ruled by Chris-
tians and Moslems until 1948.
In 1947 Britain announced that
it would relinquish the Palestine
Mandate and requested the Uni-
ted Nations, as the successor of
the League of Nations, to deter-
mine how Palestine would be gov-
erned thereafter. British rule for-
mally ended on May 14, 1948.
In anticipation of Britain's de-
parture, the United Nations had
appointed a special committee on
Palestine, composed of represen-
tatives of Australia, Canada,
Guatemala, India, Yugoslavia,
Peru, the Netherlands, Czechoslo-
vakia, Iran, Sweden and Uru-
guay, to study the situation in
Palestine and to make recommen-
dations regarding its future sta-
tus.
In August, 1947 this committee
recommended that the territory
be divided into a Jewish State
and an Arab State, joined in an
economic union, with the Jeru-
salem area to be governed by an
international authority subject to
the Trusteeship Council of the
United Nations.
On Nov. 29. 1947, the General
Assembly of the United Nations
adopted this recommendation by
a vote of 3 to 13, with 10 absten-
tions. At that time the Jewish
population of Palestine was about
650,000; the Arab population
about one million.
The Jewish Agency, represent-
ing the Jews of Palestine, imme-
diately accepted the United Na-
tions Partition Plan, although the
plan fell far short of the Jewish
claims and hopes. Jewish Pales-
tine began at once to prepare for
statehood in the territory assign-
ed by the United Nations and in
the stages laid out in the United
Nations resolution.
But the Arab Higher Commit-
tee, representing Palestine's Arab
population, and backed by the
surrounding Arab countries, flat-
ly rejected the United Nations de-
cision and refused to implement
it. Instead, attacks by so-called
Arab irregulars, mobilized by the
surrounding Arab states, the
Arab Higher Committee, and the
Arab League, were begun at once
against the Jewish population of
Palestine.
On May 14, 1948. the British
departed with all their admin-
istrative and military personnel.
The Provisional State Council of
Continued en Peg* 6A
JOYOUS OCCASION
Sheep-Shearing
Festival Slated
Near Jerusalem
In the days when Israel resided
on its land, sheep and cattle rais-
ing was a significant manner of
livelihood. On every hill the shep-
herd's flute transcended all other
sounds. Almost every page in
the Bible recalls the place occu-
pied by sheep and cattle raising
in the domestic life of the early
Hebrews. Sheep became an in-
separable feature of the Israel
landscape and a most important
branch on the farm. The farmer
was thrice blessed because of his
flocks: he drank of their milk; he
brought of their meat to his holi-
day table; and their wool kept
him warm in winter.
Then as now, upon renewal of
agricultural settlement, the day
set aside for shearing the sheep
became a joyous occasion for the
farmer. Today, the first sheep
shearing festival in the Jerusa-
lem Corridor marks the success*
ful settlement of the hill region
and the return to an occupation
once prosperously carried on in
this area. The extensive pasture
area in the hills and valleys that
is not utilized for any other ag-
ricultural purposes constitutes a
valuable source of wealth. Sheep
and cattle raising is now a favo-
rite pursuit among new settlers.
This coming May, many visi-
tors to Israel's tenth anniversary
year celebrations will join the
settlers of the Judean hills for the
Hag Hagez (sheep shearing festi-
val). Pastoral songs and dances,
colored by diverse origins of the
hill settlers, will be performed by
former Yemenites, Kurds, Moroc-
Continued en Page 6 A
Israel or U.S., expression's
universal at bottom of a play-
ground slide. This young-
ster's happy face pays full
tribute to care he receives at
Tel Ranaan Children's Home
in Bnei Brak, a project of Miz-
rachi Women's Organization
ol America.



S-A ______
Arabs Nix ,
UN Decree;
Open War
Continued from P9 5 A
Government, established in ac-
cordance^ ith the Lmted_N_atjons
Partition" Reso!ut:on. proclaimed
the State of Israel.
Simultaneously, the regular mil-
itary forces of Egypt. Trans-Jor-
dan. Syria. Lebanon and Iraq in-
vaded Palestine from the north.
south and east with the avc
purpose of destroying the new
Jewish State and its inhabitants.
This march on Palestine was an-
nounced in formal communica-
tions to the Security Council of
the United Nations.
"This will be a war of exterm
ination and a momentous mass-
acre. said Azzam Pasha, secre-
tary general of the Arab League
at a Cairo press conference on
May 14. 1W8.
In four weeks of intense fight-
ing, th* Jews drove back the in-
vading Arab armies. On June 1L
a one-month truce went into ef-
fect at the insistance of the Uni-
ted Nations. Thereafter the Arab
states renewed the attack: but.
after ten days' fighting, durins
which their forces were severely
beaten, the truce was reinstated.
During the autumn and winter of
1946. further fighting took place.
Between February and Apri'
1949. mediation by the Unite I
Nations produced a series of arm-
istice agreements between Israel
and her immediate neighbors.
Eaypt. S>ria. Lebanon and Jor-
dan.
The aim of these agreements
was. "To facilitate the transition
from the present truce to perma-
nent peace.'' They prohibited
"aggressive action" and "ant
hostile or warlike acts' by a (
of the signatories
But the Armistice Agreements
did not lead to peace. Throu-h
ensuing years, the Arab States
persisted in open and avowed
belligerency toward Israel, in-
vr!\ :ns constant euerilla harass-
ment, stringent economic boycott,
and the blockade of Israel ship-
ping in the Suez Canal and the
Gulf of Aqaba.
In repelling the 1948 Arab ag-
gression, the Israeli defense for-
ces drove beyond the boundaries
proposed for the Jewish State in
the United Nations Partition Res-
olution. None of the additional
territory thus gained by Israel be-
longed to any Arab state. It was
part of the area proposed by the
United Nations Partition Plan for
an Arab Palestinian State, which
had been rejected by the Arabs.
Some of the territory was relin-
quished during the armistice ne-
gotiations: most of it was not.
The armistice agreements were
concluded and signed by the Arab
states on the basis of the new
boundary lines established by Is-
rael in driving back the attack-
ing Arab arnica.
Subsequently, on Apr. 24. 1950,
Continued an Paea 7 A
ISIAEL S 10-YEAR G*0W7H AT A GLANCE
Friday. April K si
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Invitation to Jerusalem: Dr. Benjamin Mazar. world renowned
archeologist and president of Hebrew University at Jerusalem
menu extends invitation to visit Jerusalem for dedication of
university's new campus at Givat Ram Sunday, Apr. 27, to Dr.
Neison Olueck, fellow-archeologist and president ol Hebrew
Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion. Hebrew University
ceremony will be one oi highlights of Israel's current tenth
anniversary celebrations.
How American Jewry Has Come
To Israel's Economic Assistance
Through Active Bond Campaign
Israel's first ten years have truly been a time of unprecedented
achievement and development made possible in great measure by
the funds derived from Israel Bonds. Yet the coming decade must
exceed that achievement, and it is the Desert area the Negev
which will make it possible.
Israel expects about one mil-
lion newcomers during the next
ten years. At least half of them,
perhaps more, must be settled in
the Negev if the economy of the
country is to remain in balance.
This is vital to prevent an undue
proportion of the population in
the big cities and coastal areas.
At the same time, it is vital if
production is to soar as it must:
the resources of the Negev. not
only in terms of mineral resour-
ces, but in agricultural output as
well, are indispensable to the
growth of Israel during the next
decade.
The Negev has already demon-
strated its capacity for growth.
Beershba is becoming a flourish -
iM industrial and commercial
center. Elath. the part at the
soothers tip of the Negev, is
rapidly developing into Israel's
gateway to the countries of Asia
and Africa. These advances have
been made pueilbsc to a great de-
gree by the infusion of economic
strength through the Israel Bond
drive.
Prime Minister David Ben-
Gurioo long ago predicted that
the Negev would become the
backbone of Israel's economic
progress. The results thus far
achieved with investment capital
derived from State of Israel
Bonds bear out his prediction.
Two major steps in the devel-
opment of the Negev have been
the completion of the Naan-Beer-
shebt railroad and the Yarkon-
Negev irrigation pipeline, both of
which link Beersheba. key city of
the Negev. with the north.
The Naan Beersheba railroad
u helping to speed the flow of
equipment and supplies to Beer-
sheba. Conversely, it is making
possible the swifter shipment of
raw materials for manufacture
from the Negev to the industrial
IMS
ISM.
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103
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Israel's Greatest Asset Not
Counted in Financial Budget
It is often said that Israel's greatest asset does not apaarabj
financia: widget. TDe reference is to the intellectual ability 4 ktl
population. If this is true of the present generation, mast of ital
were not educated in Israel, the Government and people are os I
mined that the next generation, too, will be worthy of the reman. I
Visitors during Israel's tenth anniversary year celebrituwslj
see two-year-old children in nursery schools amusing themselvMi
fifteen playmates and plenty of room to run around.
Three years later, at five, chil-
dren must by law enter a kinder-
garten for one preschool year.
This is the first of the eight years
of Government provided, free,
compulsory education. They tod-
dle down the road at eight o'clock
in the morning, a black-eyed Ye-
menite five-year-old concentrating
hard on getting her ash-blond
charge of three to school" in
time. Each one carries round
his neck a red strap from which
is suspended a plastic drinking
bottle, the owner's name broadly
displayed on the outside to pre-
vent mix-ups. The nursery schools
are exceptionally well organized
and hygienic and the children re-
ceive first class care. Govern-
ment supervision keeps teachers
up to the mark and ensures that
the high standard it demands be
maintained.
The sixth birthday means fare-
well to playing and singing and
time for serious, grown-up school.
In the towns parents may choose
to send their children to a Gov-
ernment or a Government relig-
ious school. Ten years ago Is-
rael's primary educators prided
themselves on the intimacy of
their classes and the individual
attention it was then possible to
give. Today, after an overnight
doubling of the population the
situation is somewhat
Half-a million rhiktrea
this year at primary schools, i
each year the number o! si*l
increases by 25 000. reginflesfl
immigration. Closes of a|
the rule rather thai ttt maI
tion, overcrowding a cwnael
Continued on Pass- 7* \
Sheep-Shearing
Near Jerusalem
Continued iromPsftS*
cans and South Americans.
members of the region s3i
ments.
Their stage is a platform ill
large clearing overlookin*I
oramic view of *** Music is provided by drum
recorders played by w*5
th. ~l.. hand SIX ttS*l
the police band. Six _
head of sheep are owaed
Corridor settlements.
gan sheep raising only n" /"J
ago. During the P*t *[ H
settlements marketed IflJI
litres of sheep milk. UJl^
and 4.000 kilograms of **
7A
Herders from Judean hills pause during Hag Hage* &
hearing festival) held annually outside of Jru*a^Ba|,
to Israel's tenth anniversary celebration can pQ^^.s.
May activities oi song and dance performed by '
Kurds. Moroccans, members of region's 36 settlne


friday. April 25. 1958
+3e*istfk>ridian
7-A
irst Year of Freedom: Period of Adjustment
mar Ravage
Initial Sight
lOf Freedom
Jan. 7, 1949
Hostilities in southern Israel
end with the defeat of the Egypl-
I iaii invaders.
Jan. 20
The United States Export-Im-
|port Bank extends a $100 million
| loan to Israel for development
(purposes.
Jan. 25
The first general elections for
Ithe first Parliament of the new
[state are hold. The vote is by
| secret ballot of Arabs, as well as
Jews, of the age of 18 and over,
men and women alike.
Fab. 14
The first Parliament of Israel
Us opened in Jerusalem by Dr.
Khaim Weizmann.
Fab. 17
Dr. Chaim Weizmann is elected
tie first President of Israel.
Fab. 24
An Egyptian Israel Armistice
agreement is signed on the Island
fol Rhodes.
Mar. 7
David Ben-Gurion is inducted
[as Prime Minister of Israel, to-
gether with his Cabinet.
Government departments for
[Moslem and Christian religious
affairs are set up, to assure the
[uninterrupted religious life of the
Moslem and Christian communi-
ties.
Mar. 12
The Israel flag is hoisted at the
[ancient port of Elath, on the Gulf
lot Aqaba, the southernmost tip of
Ithe new State.
Mar. 23
An Israel-Lebanon Armistice
I Agreement is signed at Ras
[Naqura.
Apr. 23
An Israel-Jordan Armistice
[Agreement is signed at Rhodes.
Apr. 30
Israel informs the United Na-
tions Palestine Conciliation Com-
i mission that its purpose is to
transform the Armistice Agree-
ments into an "honorable and
lasting peace," and submits a
draft treaty.
May 11
Israel is admitted to the United
Nations as a member.
Upon being adrr.itted to the
United Nations, Israel's Foreign
Minister tells this body: "The
pursuit of peace is a treasured
part of the Jewish heritage .
that pledge becomes an earnest
and urgent appeal, when address-
ed to our closest neighbors, the
Arab states and other nations of
the Middle East."
June
The Research Council of Israel
Continued on Page 10A
Arabs Reject UN
Launch War to
Continued from Paga 6A
the Hashemite Kingdom of Jor-
dan formally annexed some 2,600
square miles of Eastern Palestine
west of the Jordan river, includ-
ing the old city of Jerusalem,
where- moat of the Holy Places
are located. This annexation of
territory, intended by the United
Nations to be part of the indepen-
dent Arab state in Palestine, was
based on the boundary "ne estab-
lished by the Armistice Agree-
ment with Israel.
4 Inside Israel's present boun-
How US Helps Build
State Through Israel
Bond Campaign Funds

Israel Bond funds are helping Israel develop and exploit her
vital natural resources, including copper deposits of Timna
mines, located about ten miles north of Elath. Shown here in
operation during an evening shift is sulphuric acid plant at
Timna, which was completed in February with aid of Israel
Bond dollars.
Arabs Enjoy All Privileges
Of Full Israeli Citizenship
Continued from Paga 5 A
responsibility and authority.
All Government services avail-
able to the Jewish community are
available to Arab citizens as well.
In addition, a special officer for
Arab affairs is attached to the
Prime Minister's office, and
special departments for Arab af-
fairs are part of the Ministries of
Agriculture, Education, Health,
Interior and Religion.
To meet the needs of the Arab
population, the Government
maintains 121 Arab elementary
and secondary schools, with a
teaching staff of 835 in 1957.
School attendance of Arab chil-
dren has almost trebled since the
creation of the state, rising from
10.092 in 1948 to 29.127 in 1957.
Ninety percent of the Arab boys
and 60 percent of the girls of
school age are enrolled in public
schools. About 80 percent of the
Arab school-age population at-
tends school. A seminary has
been established for the training
of Arab teachers.
There are 80 Arab students in
the Hebrew University and at
Technion.
Arab education is paid for en-
tirely either by the national gov-
ernment or by the government to-
gether with local communities.
The Israel Trade Union Move-
ment includes Arab workers, who
are also covered by the country's
national insurance program.
The eradication of disease
among the Arab population has
been a special project of the gov-
ernment.
Infant mortality in the Arab
Community has been cut in half
in ten yearsfrom 121 per thous-
Partition Plan;
Destroy State
daries, which for 10 years have
defined the area of the country,
8.6 percent of the land was owned
in 1948 by the Jewish population
of Palestine; 3.3 percent by the
Arabs who remained in Israel
and have become citizens of the
country; 16.5 percent by Arabs
who fled Palestine during the
fighting and now make up the
Arab refugee population. The re-
mainder, 71.6 percent, or nearly
three-fourths of the area, was
public land with title vested in
the British Mandatory Govern-
ment. -j.
and in 1944, to 61.2 per thousand
in 1954.
In 1950, the Ministry of Health
establshed 28 clinics at the Arab
population centers, and four mo-
bile clinics to serve Arab citizens
in Western and Easter Galilee
and in the Negev. All public clin-
ics of the country are open to the
Arab population.
' A tuberculosis hospital has
been set up in Nazareth, the larg-
est Arab community. Special
clinics exist for mother and child
care. District nurses serve out-
lying areas, and special training
courses for Arab nurses have
been developed. Malaria and
Continued on Paga 11-A
Continued from Paga 6A
cities of the north, thereby help-
ing Israel to increase her indus-
trial production while cutting
down on her imports.
Stretching from the Yarkon
river in Tel Aviv down to Beer-
sheba, the Yarkon river irriga-
tion project has made possible
conversion of tens of thousands of
desert acres into productive
farmland. New crops like cot-
ton, peanuts and sugar beets
have been introduced, many new
agricultural s e 111 e m e nts have
been established, and the Negev
is witnessing a fresh flow of im-
migration as new immigrants set-
tle there to pioneer the land.
Beersheba, as the northern
"capital" of the Negev, is devel-
oping into the hub of Israel's
chemical and mineral industries.
Israel Bond dollars are aiding in
the location and exploitation of
chemical and mineral wealth in
the Negev; Beersheba, as a road
and railroad center, is the focal
point for these projects. In addi-
tion to the Machteshim Chemical
Industries plant, which utilizes
Israel Bond income, the new gov-
ernment sponsored housing pro-
jects going up overnight in Beer-
sheba are another example of
how Israel Bond investments help
to develop the country's economy.
Two more recent projects that
link the entire Negev together in
a compact unit are toe Elath-
Beersheba oil pipeline and new
Elath Beersheba road. The oil
pipeline was financed with over
$5,500,000 of Israel Bond capital,
and over 25 percent of the cost
of the road was derived from the
same source.
The oil pipeline runs from
Israel's Greatest Asset Not
Counted in Financial Budget
Continued from Paga 6A
place. In areas opened up by new
immigrant settlers it is no sur-
prise to see the whole school con-
centrated in one room, but where-
as ten years ago this room might
have been a tent or a tin hut, to-
day it is space stolen from a
permanent brick housing unit.
A second shift of afternoon
classes has been organized until
enough classrooms can be built.
It is expected that there will be
1,000 classes learning in the af-
ternoon this year To combat this
undesirable state of affairs the
Government plans to spend 13
million (roughly $6Vi million) on
the erection and equipment of
13,000 classrooms. It is hoped
that by next year the afternoon
classes will be entirely abolished.
A further cause for this arrange-
ment is lack of trained teaching
staff. At present 30 percent of
the 9,000 employed are untrain-
ed. "Pressure cooker" courses
trained about half of these this
year, while a program to assist
student teachers financially is
planned to ensure an adequate
supply of trained instructors in
the future.
But whether it Is a traditional
class in an older school or a cor-
ner of the packed room in a new
institution, all the kids love
school. They are given the great-
est possible freedom and their
course of study is on the latest
lines of Western liberalism. The
accent is, of course, on ancient
heritage of the Jewish people, its
history and culture. The chil-
dren are unafraid, confident and
exceptionally alert. At question
periods the classroom sounds
more like playtime than lesson
time. Everyone has his own
opinion, which he feels morally
Continued on Page
Elath to Beersheba and conveys
oil brought to Elath through the
Gulf of Aqaba, which was open-
ed to Israel's shipping as a result
of the Sinai campaign. In addi-
tion to the imported oil, Israel's
own oil wells at Heletz continue
to produce, and have saved many
millions of dollars by cutting
down on the amounts of oil that
are imported.
Cutting through soiid rock
mountains and traversing the
route of an old camel path, the
new Elath-Beershba road is a
milestone in the development of
Israel's transportation system.
Built by only 150 workers and
guards, the new road#tretches up
from Elath, past King Solomon's
copper mines at Timna and than
up to Beersheba. Referred to as
"Israel's dry land Suez Canal"
by Prime Minister Ben-Gurion,
the new road means faster trans-
portation and shipping, since it
makes possible the use of huge
semi-trailers and eliminates the
costly wear and tear and main-
tenance of vehicles.
The oil pipeline and new road
are speeding the development of
Elath. Located where Egypt, Jor-
dan, Saudi Arabia and Israel
meet. Elath has undergone a
complete transformation into a
major deepwater port. It is the
site of huge oil storage tanks, and
the point of origin of the oil pipe-
line. New docks and harbor im-
provements facilitate and speed
the handling of cargo both into
and out of the country. Phos-
phates, glass sand, gypsum, clay
and quartz are among the min-
erals being extracted from Red
Sea waters. Increasing amounts
of high-quality copper ore are be-
ing taken from King Solomon's
mines at Timna. More marble
from the Evan V'sid quarries is
being exported to Belgium, Ger-
many and the United States.
During the coming period, Is-
rael Bonds must provide the im-
petus for the construction of
many tens of thousands of hous-
ing units in the Negev; for the '
irrigation and planting of large
areas that were formerly desert;
for the construction of roads and
electric power lines, for the build-
ing of factories, for the exploita-
tion of natural resources. At the
same time, Israel Bonds must
Continued on Paga 11 A
As Israel prepares to celebrate her tenth anniversary of inde-
pendence, a recent immigrant from North Africa, shown here
at work in a cotton field, exemplifies some oi ways in which
Israel Bond income strengthens Israel's economy. New In-
dustrial and agricultural projects help absorb immigrants in-
to Israel's expanding economy. New housing projects give
them a place to live, an expansion of commercial crops like
cotton, sugar beete and peemuto. which receive brael Bond
dollars, are speeding Israel's growth.


4
H
'ZfoM&l
*
sift
Sy.
Ail
PRI/ME AIIN'STER DAVID BEH-GURION'S NIWE-POiNT PROGRAM FOR ISRAEL'S SiCOHD DECADE
1. Welcome, absorb and integrate additional hundreds of
thousands oi oui brethren from distant land who yearn
to come to Israel, to walk in dignity and raise their
children as free Jews. It is my hope that these will
include our brethren from Eastern Europe.
2. Complete the integration oi the multitudes who have
already come.
3. Complete our long range irrigation plan and the Jordan
River project, so that water from the abundant north can
bring life to the arid south as a primary move in the
conquest of the Negev desert
4. Cover the Negev with a rich network of agricultural
settlements, cities, rail and road communications, pipe-
lines, industrial plants and mineral workings, and a
large port town at Eilat.
5. Establish peaceful relations with our Arab neighbors.
6. Prepare the country for the utilization of atomic energy
for constructive development.
7. Maintain and strengthen the spirit of pioneering of our
people.
S. Continue raising our standards of education, with twin
accents on the teachings of our ancient Hebrew prophets
and the knowledge of modem science.
9. Strengthen the ties between Israel and World Jewry.


HELP ACHIEVE THESE GOALS-MAKE YOUR CJA fl
Yam* contribution will help complete the absorption of
hundrids of thoaionds of nmm^pomlI of previous years
as well as those who will come m 195S Your CJA
gift will provide meals, nursery care, and schooling for
190,000 Jewish children in 25 countries ... Your
CJA gift will also help 34,000 immigrant families settle
on farms m Israel... ISRAEL'S TENTH ANNIVERSARY of
independence marks a yew of rededkatioa for American
JeH
ret**
SALUTE ISRAEL ON ITS TENTH ANNIVERSARY BY
CONTRIBUTION NOW TO THE 1958 COMBINED JP
STEVENS MARKETS
JACOI SHER

IRVING 3US4KRG

NATHAN ADEIKAN
MR. AND MRS. JACOI H. ARVEY
MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY
SPECT0RI SONS
SfWWflWNlWOOlD11*^1
jm^lUTWIlMrv*!
CORDON FUNERAL "D* |
***** "**?L*
A.i.mwHi>^tsn*"


April 25. ItSt
+Jeisi>
9-*





the Special Tenth Anniversary Services at your
ir Temple on Friday, April 25 and Saturday, April 26
in rtoivi^jv
ISRAEL'S TENTH ANNIVERSARY will be held of
\iami congregations on April 25 and April 26:
IGUDATH ISRAEL
BETH DAVID
EL CONGREGATION
BETH ISRAEL
iRANADA JEWISH CENTER
LH-MIAMI SPRINGS
iKNESETH ISRAEL
IEBREW CONGREGATION
LLO PARK JEWISH CENTER
DADE JEWISH CENTER
IPLE BETH SHOLOM
TEMPLE EMANU-El
Israel of greater miami
temple judea
sinai of north miami
temple zion
eth israel north side
iora jewish center
shore jewish centex
beth tfilah
temple ner tamid
UTION NOW!
with pride on on unprecedented
I life and hope to millions of needy
citizens throughout the world
life anew in the State of Israel
YOUR
EAL!
In the hearts of all men of good will, ISRAEL evokes warm
feelings of admiration because of its democratic institutions, its
pioneering spirit, its gallant struggle against the desert, its cultural
and artistic achievements.
As the Land of the Bible the cradle of the spiritual heritage
of all of us the rebirth of this ancient state is, indeed, an appro-
priate occasion for rejoicing and celebration. But, more than that,
it is a time for solemn prayers of thanksgiving and prayers for
peace, progress and justice in the Middle East
This is the true spiritual significance of the tenth anniversary
celebration.
The observance of ISRAEL'S TENTH ANNIVERSARY in
Miami and throughout the western world, beginning on April 24,
offers an uncommon opportunity to reaffirm the unbroken con-
tinuity of Jewry's relationship to Israel as reflected in two millema
of prayer, liturgy and literature.
DR. AND MRS. DAVID S. ANDRON
MR. GUSTRAU
THE HUB

DIAMOND CENTER
Raninowif z I GoWsf o Families
SERBIN INC
EAST COAST FISHERIES
MR. AND MRS. IRVING HOFFMAN
RICHARDS DEPARTMENT STORE
STAR OF DAVID MEMORIAL PARK
MR. SOL GOLDMAN
INTERCOASTAl BOATYARD, INC
A. Arthur Pekelner, President
SAM J. HUMAN
RUDY ADIER
MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM BORNSTEIN
MARKEL INDUSTRIES INCORPORATED
LAKESIDE MEMORIAL PARK

1
i


10-A
*JenlstiHcrMkun
20 Years of UJA, 10 Years of Israel
Have Recreated a Peoples Dignity
By MOSS'S VV. BERINSTEIN
President, Uni^ Jewish Appeal
Two anniversaries cf great sig-
nificance to .'.' are boin celebrated this yi UJA
is in its 20th year as the major
instrument of American Jewish
philanthropy, and the State of Is-
rael is marking the lOib year of
its modern rebirth.
UJA's 20th ann've-sary and Is-
rael's 10th underscore years of
great achievement for Jews the
world over. It was the campaign
of the United Jewish Appeal in
1939. as the unified fund-raising
arm of the major American Jew-
ish philanthropic organizations,
which ushered in two decades of
significant progress in solving the
problems of uprooted, homeless,
oppressed and insecure Jews in
Europe and in Moslem lands. And
it was the establishment of free
Israel in 1948 which opened the
path of freedom for the over-
whelming majority of Jews seek-
ing a haven. With American Jew-
ry financing in greatest measure
this refugee movement through
its support of the UJA. the land
of Israel has received more than
a million immigrants since 1939,
some 900.000 since statehood.
By 1938. with the Nazis in
power in Germany and extending
their hold throughout Central
Furope. the position of the Jew*
became desperate. Thousands of
,iew were in flight from anti-
Semitic terror.
The American Jewish com-
munity viewed the situation with
t-rewme concern and far-seeing
American Jewish leaders called
for a united" effort bV*the oTpfffl-
zations which had been engaged
in separate campaigns to finance
help for the mounting tide of the
hunted and the fleeing.
The United Palestine Appeal,
the Joint Distribution Committee
and the National Coordinating
Committee decided to pool their
fund-raising efforts in an attempt
to gear the American Jewish
community to the large-scale re-
sponse necessary to meet the un-
precedented needs. Edward M.
M Warburg. William Rosenwald,
Paul Baerwald. Dr. Jonah B.
Wise and Dr. Abba llillel Silver
had the privilege of organizing
this joint fund-raising instrument,
which was called the United Jew-
ish Appeal.
In its first campaignthat of
1939with Dr. Wise and Dr. Sil-
ver as co-chairmen, the UJA rais-
ed more than $15 million for
worldwide Jewish needs, a sum
more than double the amount
! irate campaigns of
the three organizations the pre-
nuii'.: year.
With the b-itbreak of World
War II. ordinary channels for ref-
ugee aid were blocked. New
methods of operations had to be
extemporized. Staff members of
UJA's constituent agencies work-
ed -leveeisfvrWMmd hen*' attj. oft-
en in enemy territory. They
saved whom they could, when
they could, in any way they
could.
No one can say how many tens
Continued on Page 11 A
I
W M w r
il Kjv
f'~':-' ----- ,1
**u*..
Young sheepherders work swiftly and surely as
of sheep with rope prior to actual shearino durinq Hi
(shearing festival) outside of Jerusalem. After sheou!
sheep, settlers celebrate with song and dance."
Ravage of War is Legacy
Of First Year of Freedom
Four youngsters of Egyptian origin smile happily at Bes
Gotsfeld Children's Villaqe and Farm School in Raanana, Is-
rael. Escapees from Egyptian persecution of last year, they
have adapted rapidly to life at model village, which is a pro-
ject of Mizrachi Women's Organization of America.
Continued from Page 7A
is established, attached to the
Prime Minister's office, for the
purpose or organizing and coor-
dinating research in the natural
sciences and technology, to accel-
erate maximum development of
all the country's resources.
July 20
An Israel-Syrian Armistice
Agreement is signed in No-Man's
Land, near Mahanayim.
All four agreements provide
that:
ARTICLE I
"1. The injuction of the Secur-
ity Council against resort to mil-
itary force in the settlement of
the Palestine question shall
henceforth be scrupulously re-
spected by both Parties.
"2. No aggressive action by
the armed forcesland sea or air
of either Party shall be under-
taken, planned or threatened
against the peepie or the arm.;!
forces of the other: it being un-
derstood that the use of the term
'planned' in this context has no
bearing on normal staff planning
as generally practiced in military
organizations
"3. The right ef each Party
to it* security and freedom from
fear of attack by the armed for-
ces te the other shall be felly re
spected.
Full Text of Israel's Proclamation of Independence
Continued from Pave S A
right to a life of dignity, freedom and labor, and
undeterred by hazards, hardships and obstacles,
have tried unceasingly to enter Palestine.
In the Second World War. the Jewish people in
Palestine made a full contribution in the struggle of
the freedom-loving nations against the Nazi evil. The
sacrifices of their soldiers and the efforts of their
workers gained them title to rank with the peoples
who founded the United Nations.
On Nov. 29, 1947. the General Assembly ef the
United Nations adopted a resolution for the establish-
ment of an independent Jewish State in Palestine,
and called upon the inhabitants oi the country to
take such steps as may be necessary on their part
to put the plan into effect.
This recognition by the United Nations of the
right of the Jewish people to establish their inde-
pendent State may not be revoked. It is, moreover,
the self-evident right of the Jewish people to be a
nation, as all other nations, in its own sovereign
State.
ACCORDINGLY, WE. the members of the Na-
tional Council, representing the Jewish people in
Palestine, and the World Zionist Movement, are met
together in solemn assembly today, the day of term-
ination of the British Mandate for Palestine; and by
virtue of the natural and historic right of the Jewish
people and of the resolution of the General Assem-
bly of the United Nations.
WE HEREBY PROCLAIM the establishment of
the Jewish State in Palestine, be called Medinat
Yisrael (State of Israel).
WE HEREBY DECLARE that, as from the
termination of the Mandate at midnight, the 14-15
of May, 1948, and pending the setting up of the duly
elected bodies of the State in accordance with a Con-
stitution to be drawn up by the Constituent Assembly
not later than Oct. 1, 1948, the National Council
shall act as the Provisional State Council, and that
the National Administration shall constitute the Pro-
visional Government of the Jewish State, which shall
be known as Israel.
THE STATE OF ISRAEL will be open to the
immigration of Jews from all countries of their dis
persion: will promote the development of the coun-
try for the benefit of all its inhabitants; will be based
on the principles of liberty, justice and peace as con
ceived by the Prophets of Israel; will uphold the full
social and political equality of all its citisens with
out distinction of religion, race or sen; will guaran
tee freedom of religion, conscience, education and
culture; will safeguard the Holy Places of all relin
as; and will loyally uphold the principles of the
Unfced Nations Charter
THE STATE OF ISRAEL will be ready to co-
i?^^^* "* rg*ns *** ^Pwswtalives of the
United Nations m the implementation of the Rom|u.
Uon of the Assembly of Nov. 29. 1947 and wfl take
wEeS J2*t" ^ e0nmk "* = *
i ^e PPf"' to ,he Uni,*d Nations to assist the
m7 Ur^^" b,Uilding f ,te Sta* "n to ad-
mit Israel in the family of nations.
In the midst of wanton aggression we vt *>n
upon the Arab inhabitants of tnTSsto oTJraeUo
preserve the ways of peace and play their pan !n the
development of the State, on the basis of ful land
equal citizenship ,nd due representation in all its
bodies and institutions provisional and permanent
to ,nLlXltr tand in ** nd neighborliness
L.tl ,k 8hborm states ami their peoples and
^' s-srau: a? s rr
Our call goes out to the Jewish nanni. .n _
the world to rally to our side in the taK i W
Uon and development and to stand by u, S h.""*"
struggle for the fulfillment of the dreLJl8""
tions for the redemption of Israel "****
an
"4. The establishment of
armistice between the armed for-
ces of the two Parties is accepted
as an indispensible step toward
the liquidation of armed conflict
and the restoration of peace in
Palestine."
ARTICLE II
"1. In pursuance of the fore-
going principles and of the res-
olutions of the Security Council of
Nov. 4 and 16, 1948, a general
armistice between the armed
forces of the two Partiesland,
sea and airis hereby establish-
ed.
"2. No element of the land,
Continued on Pane 12A
mOSHl U4MM
. Mmiitcr d i
Many Religions Ai
Jewish State's Belie!
Freedom of religion and con-
science, and the safeguarding of
all Holy Places and sites of all
religions, are guaranteed in Is-
rael's Proclamation of Indepen-
dence.
In the Government, there is a
Minister for Religious Affairs.
His ministry gives assistance to
the institutions of all religions;
this assistance ranges from aid-
ing repairs of synagogues, mos-
ques and churches to providing
extra rations for religious festi-
vals of the different communities.
The Sabbath and the Jewish
festivals are recognized as offi-
cial days of rest. But the right of
each religious community to ob-
serve its own weekly day of rest
and its religious holidays is guar-
anteed by law.
The majority of Israel's inhab-
itants are of Jewish faith.
The majority of the Arab com-
munity in Israel is oi the Mos-
lem faith (138.000 at the end of
1956). The highest Moslem dig-
nitaries are the Kadis of the Mos-
lem Religious Courts. There are
about 165 Moslem clenj.d
paid by the State.
vices take place in
mosques. Moslem Advil
cils. whose expenses aitj
the State, attend to all I
and social affairs of tfcel
community
There are about 45J*|
tians in Israel, mo* off
Arabs. However, almoal
Christian Church and
some foothold, bowwerl
Israel.
There are about 160 0
churches and chapels ill
The clergy number abodj
including some ISO
about 550 nuns,
some 30 monastic orders.
There are Christian Holjlj
in Jerusalem (the Co
Mt. Zion). on Mt. Caradi
lee (in Nazareth and
and on the shores of l
Galilee.
The Israel MinW* L
ious Affairs works in owe
Continued on Ft*'"

y
State Council, on the Soi7of'thT^^|0,!i Prwrts'on>
of Aviv. on thli SaLbi^vem|henf1^naJe^,y
5708, the 14th day of May. 1943 ""* ****,
Samuel Rubin, president of America-Israel CJtural
Uon (left) who established test Fellowships at ***%!
hate of Science for Arab scientists, is beina ror"*",\T
Dewey D. Stone, nhinsjuiii ef board of Gorernors
mann Institute.
BBSM


^tgfl
26. 1938
Jewish fhrkBan
HP1 W
W5 Greatest Asset
)pesn't Show Clearly
Financial Budget
Inued from Page 7-A
express out loud^-even
jne can hear him. At recess
ill stand aroififlT flTTneir
bhorts and tee shirts, their
leus and supple backs mov-
|s gracefully as the young
ss saplings behind them,
they discuss everything
Ithe Prime Minister's latest
announcement to the way
cats his sandwich. Among
ewer population from Asia
frica a little difficulty was
limes encountered with par-
[ who were not quite sure
[this education business was
bout, but now that they see
iprovements their children
|made they have become so
siastic that two-thirds of
turn up to parents' meet-
something unheard of
European communities,
bre are 162 high schools of
kinds in Israel's education
academic, trade and ag-
hiral. Although secondary
Ition is neither free nor com-
, Government help is lib-
Twenty-five percent of
}1 expenses are met out of
rnment and local authority
and 12,000 scholarships and
ids* covering 40 percent of
In fees are paid by the Gov-
kent and the Jewish Agency
fg four-year study period,
about one-third of second-
school pupils receive finan-
belp. This year a system of
lated reductions in fees
on economic as well as in-
itial considerations was in-
red and it is planned to ex-
this to replace the stipend
ngement. Thirty-nine trade
agricultural schools afford a
|ral education but concentrate
on practical work during
|ast two years. Study is di-
into school work periods
[periods of work with private
is in the city, payment for
bh covers school fees and
atenance. Graduates of these
ills are Israel's own artisans,
and trained here, entering
stry to replace the older gen-
lion from Europe,
lie academic high schools are
arge measure a preparation
[the Hebrew University and
linion, allowing for a large de-
of specialization in addition
general studies. The chubby,
and smiling six-year-old is
ten years later, a serious
school student intent on
sing his matriculation and
carrying on his. education at the
higher institutions of learning on
completion of his two years in the
national service.
The pracucal-minded go to
Haifa's new Technion for engi-
neering, aeronautics and mechan-
ics. The humanists come to the
recently completed university
city in Jerusalem to study the
natural sciences, arts or Jewish
and Middle Eastern studies. They
major in two subjects, taking also
a secondary course of general
education. Seventy percent of the
4,000 students enrolled hold posi-
tions in the city yet still carry on
a-full program of study. They be-
lieve it is worth an effort to re-
tain the name given to their peo-
ple m former times"The Peo-
ple of the Book."
Dressed in biblical costumes, these Israeli girls are dancing
in joyful celebration of Israel's tenth anniversary. Israel is
marking her ten years of statehood with a gay Festival Year.
Celebrations will last through May 11, 1959. More than 150
events have been scheduled thus far. There will be pageants,
dance-and music festivals, masquerades, exhibitions, pilgrim-
ages to Holy Sites, Biblical quiz contests, concerts, country
fairs, flower shows, and even plowing competitions, as well
as other special events.
20 Years of UJA, 10 Years of Israel
Have Helped Recreate a People's Dignity
Continued from Pag* 10-A
of thousands of lives were saved
by UJA's agencies. Throughout
the war, for example, the JDC,
with permission of the United
States War Refugee Board, was
able to send funds into occupied
Europe, facilitating the escape of
thousands and keeping thousands
more hidden, but alive, with the
help of underground groups.
The United Palestine Appeal
was able to bring many thous-
ands of newcomers to Palestine,
in spite of British restrictions on
immigration. In 1944 more than
20.000 Jews succeeded in reach-
ing Palestine.
In the United States, the Na-
tional Refugee Service, founded
in 1939 to succeed the National
Coordinating Committee, devoted
the greater part of its efforts to
integrating into American life
those refugees who had arrived
before the war began.
With the end of war in Europe
on May 8, 1945, came the assess-
ment of the staggering tragedy
sustained* by Jewry; 6,000,000
dead, tens of thousands homeless,
and the great cultural centers of
Jewish life in Central and East-
r '- -/3W3
SB P5

New housing during 1957, financed with aid from American
Jewry, was rushed to meet urgent needs of new immigrants.
Homes have been provided for 700,000 refugees.
onomic Assistance Through Bonds
Continued from Page 7-A
ke possible comparable expan-
in other ports of the country.
The developments projected in
Negev for the coming decade
1st be parelleled by growth and
peascd economic strength
ughout the territory of the
i of Israel. The Industries of
north must continue their his-
ic program of expansion. The
(mlands of the fertile valleys
list be made more productive,
ectric power sources must be
Creased. Trade must be ex-
udedby ship and plane to for-
lands, by truck and railway
thin the borders of the country,
entire country must develop
a level which wfll enable if to
commodate three million per-
as before the end of 1960.
(Above all, Israel's desert today
rapidly emerging as a center
growth, in' sharp contrast to
I desert in which the Jews wan-
bred after their flight from
m>t. This year, the tenth in
I history of the modern State
Israel, is a moat appropriate
fcasion for rededicatlon to the
pclamatioh of the desert and the
Pvelopment of the entire land
trough Israel Bonda.
V
Accelerated development of Negev. through irrigation systems
that have added thousands of arable acres to Israel's produc-
tive farmland, is being made possible through Israel Bond
drive, which must raise a minimum of $75 million during 1958.
Shown here is a huge cement mixer at Yuval Gad pipe fac-
tory, largest pre-stressed concrete pipe plant in world. Pips
plant, and actual construction of irrigation lines, are projects
that benefit directly from Israel Bond investments.
em Europe irretrievably destroy-
ed.
On May 14, 1948, the State of
Israel was established. Although
the reborn nation was at once
plunged into a war of survival, it
began immediately to function as
a haven for the surviving rem-
nant of European Jewry.
The United Jewish Appeal call-
ed upon American Jewry to give
Israel's people the financial as-
sistance needed to receive and
absorb the great tide of new-
comers. American Jewry re-
sponded with a record sum of
$148 million for the UJA's 1948
campaign. In its first seven
months of statehoodfrom May
until the end of December, 1948
the newborn nation welcomed
some 101,600 immigrants.
UJA-supported agencies have
played a major role both in reset-
tling Jewish refugees in Israel
and in helping them to build
creative lives there. By 1952, the
UJA was calling upon American
Jews to help "turn the great
homecoming into the great home-
making.'' The record shows the
.great response made to UJA's
call.
Today UJA stands ready as a
fully-operating means for Amer-
ican Jews to help save Jewish
lives. In 1938 our efforts, our
organizations, our techniques for
lifesaving were inadequate. But
in 1957-58 we know that the
scope, elasticity and vigor of the
United Jewish Appeal and its
agencies, make it possible to save
lives with the speed necessary to
do soand while time remains to
do so.
UJA is a wonderful instrument
in the hands of America's Jews.
It is an instrument which must be
used to fullest effect. It can be
used only if it is supplied with
sufficient power to do its job,
and therefore this year the UJA
has sought in addition to its reg-
ular budgetary goal of $105 mil-
lion for worldwide vital services
to half a million Jews, an addi-
tional $1000 million Emergency
Rescue Fund.
The Emergency Rescue Fund
was designed to help rescue and
initially settle in Israel, the U.S.
and other free countries some
100,000 refugees. Since that fig-
ure was set in December, 1956,
the refugee crisis has deepened.
Israel alone will be called upon
to accept more than 100,000 im-
migrants this year.
A great refugee crisis still con-
fronts us one of the greatest
since 1948 opened wide the possi-
bilities for life and freedom for
survivors of the concentration
camps. The task must be com-
pleted.
11-A
,i la ai
Arabs Enjoy
Their Rights
Continued from Page 7-A
tuberculosis, once rampart
among the Arab population, are
being eradicated. Full hospital-
ization for contagious disease's is
available to Arab citizens with all
costs defrayed by the govern-
ment. ......
The majority of the Arabs live
in rural communities and are en-
gaged in agriculture. More than
80 percent of the Arab fanner*
own their own land in sharp
contrast to the pattern of tenancy
and share-cropping almost uni-
versal in the Arab world. Mobile
units of mechanized agricultural
equipment are available to An.b
farmers for a nominal fee.
Special instruction is available on
modernization through irrigation,
land conservation and diversifi-
cation of production. Govern-
ment loans are ?lso available for
these purposes. More than 50
tractors are owned Drtvately by
Arab farmeis now as against
none hi 1948.
The agricultural output of Arab
farmers in Israel has Increased
ten-fold In ten years, with result-
ing Tr.ptkcd increases in their
standard of living.
There is only one restriction
on the Arab population. For se-
curity reasons, the Israeli Gov-
ernment has required that bcr-
mitsv. be gr.-n"*-! for all move-
ment, Arab and Jewish, in -vr-
tain sensitive security areas of
the country. This has created
some Arab resent.nen!.
On July 7, 1957, however, the
Israeli Government took a num-
ber of steps to meet Arab objec-
tions to the curfew and restric-
tions on travel. Arabs in Galilee
are now permitted to travel to
various communities such as
Nazareth, Acre and Afula without
special permits.
The dark-to-dawn curfew, in
effect in the military district of
the Little Triangle along the Jor-
danian border has been eased. A
road hitherto closed to civilians
has recently been opened, giving
the Arabs more direct access to
markets along the coastal plain.
Many Faiths
Represented
Continued from Page 10-A
tact with the heads of all the vari-
ous religious communities. It
publishes in English, French
and Spanish a periodical called
"Christian News from Israel."
The Ministry also cooperates
with the Government Department
of Antiquities in the restoration
and preservation of ancient
churches. ,
As of the end of 1956, the Chris-
tian communities in Israel in-
cluded the following churches,
total membership, and heads re-
spectively:
Greek Catholic, 17,686 mem-
bers (including 6.445 Melkites),
headed by Archbishop;
Greek Orthodox, 14,337, Metro*
polian;
Latin, 5.188, Representative of
Latin Patriarch in Jerusalem;
Maronite, 2,470, Vicar of Bis-
hop of Tyre;
Armenian Gregorian, 779. Vicar
of Armenian Patriarch of Jeru-
salem;
Coptic, 91, Representative of
Coptic Archbishop of Jerusalem;
Anglicans, Presbyterians and
Lutherans, 1,153;
Others (including Abyssinian
Church, headed by Archbishop),
1,581.
The Druze split away from Is-
lam in the 11th century. In Is-
rael, they are recognized as a
fully autonomous religious com-
munity. There are 20.000 Druze
in Israel, living in 18 villages and
communities in Galilee and the
Carntel. A council of three heeds
the community.


12-A
+Jmistnwk&M
Jtoy. Ajuj



.


1



Israel's Financial Picture: Rising Nat'l. Income
Israel's national income rose
from SW3.eOO.000 in 1954 to $1-
186.720.000 in 1956.
Major sources of national in-
come in 1956 were: commerce,
finance and banking. $375,520-
000: industry and mining. $245.-
280.000: government and public
institution*. S235 200.000: agri-
culture, $157,360,000: transporta-
tion. $91 840.000: building and
public works. 562.800.00; and
pubbc utilities. S20.720.000:
Two budgets are presented an-
nually to the Knesset: 111 an or-
dinary budget financed from lo-
cal taxes, covering normal expen-
ditures of the government, which
includes government salaries, so-
cial welfare and related service-:
(2) a de\ek>pment budget finan-
ced from foreign grants, loans,
contributions, as well as from lo-
cal sources. Funds of the devel-
opment budget are used for agri-
culture, industry, irrigation and
similar public works.
In 1957-58. the total budget for
both normal expenditures and the
development program was $537.-
795.000.
Of this amount. S184.815.000 or
34 percent represented the devel-
opment budget. The remaining
$352,980,000 was for ordinary ex-
penses and social services, in-
cluding 11 percent for education.
10 percent for housing. 5.5 per-
cent for health services. 2 per-
cent for social welfare. 5 percent
for labor and 2 percent for pen-
sions.
About 18 percent of the normal
budget is required for the coun-
try's defense establishment. Cer-
tain additional sums are allo-
cated for this purpose, but are
not made public for security
reasons.
The Government's principal
sources of income are internal.
65 percent of the revenue being
derived annually from income
The Ravage
Of War, 1st
Yr. s Legacy
Continued from Pag* 10-A
sea or air military' or para-mi'-
itary forces of either Party, in-
cluding non-regular forces, shall
commit any warlike or hostile
act against the military or para-
military forces of the other Par-
ty, or against civilians in terri-
tory under the control of that
Party: or shall advance beyond or
pass over for any purpose what
soever the Armistice Demarca-
tion Line set forth in Article VI
of this Agreement, except as pro-
vided in Article III of this Agree-
ment: and elsewhere shall not
violate the international frontier;
r enter into or pass through the
air .space of the other Party or
through the waters within three
miles of the coastline of the other
Party."
taxes and other normal sources.
The budget for 1957-58 shows a
current return of some S3S6 mil-
lion from these sources.
The national income tax is the
largest single source of internal
revenue, producing in 1957-58 an
estimated $109 million, or about
one-third of the Government's in-
come from normal sources.
Similar in general to the in-
come tax system of the United
States, the law taxes all incomes
on a sliding scale up to 60 per-'
cent, but provides for a variety
of exemptions Companies pay a
total cf 53 percent, consisting of
25 percent income tax and 28 per-
cent company profits tax.
Other taxes, such as the prop-
erty tax. inheritance tax. excise
taxes, and amusement tax, to-
gether with customs and postal
revenue and similar collections,
make up the balance of the cur-
rent internal income. A special
defense tax. required to maintain
the country's defenses against
continual threat of aggression
from surrounding Arab states.
ados from 4 percent to 9 percent
to mo>t income tax rates.
About 35 percent of the Govern-
ment's income has come from
sources outside the country in the
form of foreign loans and grants. -
the sale of State of Israel Bands.
German reparations payments.
contributions from the world Jew-
ish community, and the release
of frozen Sterling balances.
From 1948 to June 30. 1957. ap-
proximately SI44.2 million has
been received from these sources. '
This aggregate figure includes
the following:
L'nited States economic aid in '
all forms has totaled S469.2 mil-
lion. This has included: loans of
S135 million from the Export-Im-
port Bank; other loans and grants
totaling $276.2 million: $52 mil
lion from surplus agricultural
products under L'nited States
Pubbc Law 480; and $S million in ';
United States Technical Assist-
ance.
sales of Israel Bonds through-:
out the world have produced >
some $365 million. Income from
this source has been used almost
entirely for the development pro-
gram in the fields of agriculture,
industry, transport and commun-
ications.
Two issues of Israel Bonds
have been offered: the Indepen-
dence issue, open to subscription
until May. 1954; and the Develop-,
ment issue, now being sold.
About $15 million of interest
has been paid to Israel Bond hold-
ers, and over $30 million worth
of bonds have been redeemed.
I>rael has received from the
West German Government some
$304 million in goods and ser- .
vices under a reparations agree-;
ment concluded in 1952. This
agreement, designed to compen- I
Sis for material damage to Jew-
ish interests in Germany during
the Nazi regime, provides for |
payment of a total of $822 million
to Israel by the Bonn Govern-
ment over a period of 12 years.
Contributions from the United !
Jewish Appeal and other sources
totaled some $656 million.
Release of frozen Sterling bal-,
ances totaled $150 million. The
"Froien Sterling" balances are
funds that were blocked by the
British Government after it had
given up the Mandatory power.
At the end of 1956. Israel's na-
tional debt totaled $472,920,000 in
long, intermediate and short-term
loans Included in this total was
S135 million owed to the Export-
Import Bank of the United States.
Israel's basic monetary* unit is
the Pound, consisting of 1.000
prutot (singular: pruta). Cur-
Aviation mechanics for Israel's growing air fleet are being
trained by Histadrut at Holtz Trade School in Tel Aviv. Insti-
tution is newest oi 12 schools in "Amal" network where 1.000
boys are learning industrial skills under Histadrut auspices.
rent official rate of exchange for
United States currency is 56
cents to the Israeli pound.
The currency system is regu-
lated by the Bank of Israel, es-
tablished in December, 1954 un-
der the direction of a governor
appointed by tha President of the
State. The Bank's assets and lia-
bilities at the end of 1956 balan-
ced at S270.M940D. The Bank of
Israel issues the currency, acts
the sole fa,^ ^
Government, mini*!",
rt**8 ***
vate banking into,
lends money to the r
under cerUi. p^
There are 27 coma*,
in the country, as vm\,
operative credit society
term credits are piS]
General MortgageBe?,
estine (urban nvortejfKii
raeli Bank of AgncSJ
cultural credit), M(j7^
xar Leta'asiya, Ltd.
credit i.
Ijou JL JmnU Oo Men!
_>/ Jjinner C etebralinq
Jr&raelA 10th -Jtnniver&artf
GUEST OF HONOR
$i)L ojSjdfit flhiMnWL
Sir Leslie is a leadm member of the British Par foment and is makki
this special trip from England, with Lady Hummer, to help the Greet*
Miami Community in its celeb,-o/fon of Israel's lOffc Aaarrersary.
Tuesday Evening, April 29. 1958
Six Thirty O'clock
Grand Ballroom, Hotel Fontainebleau
Jacob Sbor
Greater Miami Choirmoo, Stoto of Israel Bonds
Reservations Telephone: JE 1-5314
Dietary Laws Observed


April 25. 1958
+J(nisii fhrHitr
13-A
BaB
kekend Sacred Services to Launch Anniversary Festivities
bdox, Reform and Conservative rabbis throughout the Greater
rea have announced plans for special solemn services com-
ing Israel's tenth anniversary Friday night and Saturday
services will be part of the local observance of Israel's tenth
ry of Statehood, being held under the auspices of the Greater
lebration committee, of which Gov. LeRoy Collins is honorary
and Stanley C. Myers, Chairman.
H ISRAEL. 7801 Cariyle ave
|c. Rabbi laaae Ever.
J5 p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m.
(j. wish Nationalism Leading
kmliain." Tenth annlveiaary
Eel \ icaa.
FMES. 2535 W 1tth ave. Can
rn Zimmerman. __ ,.

kviD. 2625 SW 3rd ava. Con.
Rabbi Yaakov Rosenberg.
(William W. Lipion
p:, p.m. Srrmon: "All Eyec
Tenth nnlvedaary of 1k-
>a. Saturday 9 a.m. Bar
. I.:i Tenet, mm of Mr. and
,iiu. I llnntman; Michael
i of Mr. and Mra. Murray
500 SW 17th ava. Orthodox.
O
IMETH. 12250 NW 2nd ava.
Tative. Rabbi David W. Her-
lntor Hyman Fain.
||i.in. SVrmon: ''A Decade of
Saturday 9 a.m. 8er-
tM.nal and Spiritual. Cleanll-
JRAEL. 4000 Prairie ave.
Ix. Rabbi H. Louis Rottman.
p.m. Saturday 8:4.1 a.m.
hlversary of Israel Mrvlooa.

? COB. 301-311 Washington
rthodox. Rabbi Tibor Stern.
I Maurice Mamchea.
p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m.
'Israel the Prince of Na-
o
PHAEL. 139 NW 3rd ave.
|x. Rabbi Arie Becker.
- O
ILAH. 935 Euclid ave. Ortho-
ktobi Joseph E. Rackovsky.

lEIGHTS JEWISH CENTER.
|W 2nd ave. Conaarvative.
ilathan H. Zwitman.
:1S p.m. Sermon: "Ko-
Saturday 11 a.m.
O
-GRANADA. 50 NW 51st pi.
tive. Rabbi Murray A.
IJTi p.m. Guest speaker: K.
lllot, president of the B'nal
Btrlct Grand Lodge. Israeli
vrisiiij services.
O
ACADEMY, tit tth St.
Rabbi Alexander Gross.
. n. Saturday 9 a.m. Ser-
brily In the Jewish Life."

I.MIAMI SPRINGS. 961 Fla-
fay. Conservative. Rabbi Leo
iir, p.m. Sermon: "If Herri
Sman Were Alive Today." Is-
Versarv Babbath. One* Shab-
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Schoen-
lu relay 9 a.m.
O
ItE CENTER. 319t SW 24th
Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Eao p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m.
lah: Martin, son of Mr. and
bey Kats.

TH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid ave
Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Abraham Self.
1:30 p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m.
A Salute to Israel."
O
HEBREW CONGREGATION.
12th ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
April. Cantor Berele Kslemar.
|:3<) p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m.
Israels 10th Anniversary.

bELLO PARK. 1t*th St. and
hth ave. .Conservative. Rabbi
p.m. Sermon: "This le the
ilih the Ixird Hath Made
nniverxary of Israel aervlcea.
in Beach Jewish organizations
ipate. Saturday 9 a.m. Bar
_ Barry, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Ildsleln.
O
DADE CENTER. 13630 W.
hwy. Conservative. Rabbi
Okolica. Cantor Maurice Neu.
J:15 p.m. Guest speaker: Arleh
bnly member of the Poplei
and former member of the 1m-
iny. Participating fourth grade
Roger Alperln, Gall Ash-
..sha Ball, Ami Bergman, Kl-
*in, Nell Gottehrer, Sandra
[felg, Murray Zacharla and
tucker. (meg Sluthbat hosts:
J Mrs. David Dogoloff in honor
I birthday of their twin eons,
id Sylvan, of Baltimore. Sat-
a.m. Sermon: "Weeky Por-
SHORE CENTER. 620 75th
onservatlve. tJabbi Mayer
-lowiti. Cantor Edward Klein,
i.l'i p.m. Sermon: "He That
Israel." Tenth anniversary
I'as Mitivah: Debbie, daugh-
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Llherman.
8:43 a.m. Bar Mitsvah:
son of Mrs. Gertrude Bnydvr
|ni Snyder; Kl. hard, son of Mr.
rs. Harry Greenberg.
O
DADE JEWISH CENTER
315, Merrick bldg.. U. of M.
is. Reform. Rabbi Herbert M.
Mars),
' i p.m. Sermon: "Premier
>: i-<:.irlon the Israeli Bplrll
CANDLEUGHTIHG TIME
5 Iycg -fe30 pjn. -----
Personified.'
?Ices.
Tenth anniversary eer-
SOUTHWEST JEWISH CENTER. 6438
SW 8th st. Conservative. Rabbi
Abraham Levitan.
Friday 8:30 p.m. Sermon:. "Jewish
Ethics." Saturday 9 a.m. Sermon:
"The Counting of the Omar."

TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM. 4144 Chase
ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kronish.
Cantor David Convlser.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Guest speaker: Judge
Justine Wise Polier of the Children's
Court of New York City. Saturday
Itltf a.m. Bar Mltzvah: Jeffrey i:.
son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ch,een;
l.imis C, son of Mrs. Jack M. Keiier.
O
TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 1701 Washing-
ton ave. Conservative. Rabbi Irving
Lehrman. Cantor Israel Reich.
Friday 6 and 8:30 p.m. Guest Rabbi:
Dr. Herman M. Cohen. Sermon: "This
Is the DayIsrael's 10th Anniversary."
Saturday 9 a.m. Sermon: "Weekly
Portion." Bar Mltzvah: Jonathan, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Tuik.
O
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF GREATER MI-
AMI. 137 NE 19th st. Reform. Rabbi
Joseph Narot. Cantor Jacob Born-
atein.

TEMPLE JUDEA. 320 Palermo ave
Liberal. Rabbi Morris Skop. Cantor
Herman Gottlieb.
Friday S:15 p.m. Symposium on "Sho-
lem Aschthe Man of Controversy."
Guest speakers: Leo Mindlln, execu-
tive editor of The Jewish Floridlan:
Lnuis Srhwartzman, executive direc-
tor of Bureau of Jewish education:
M. A. Baskln, attorney, moderator.
Saturday 10 a.m. Bar Mltzvah: Nell
Franklin, eon of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel
Goodman.

TEMPLE NER TAMID. (Being erect.
ed at Both st. snd Tatum Waterway.;
Modern Traditional.
FrM.ee- 8:ln -prtn. at- Surfs Id e-Twwn
Hall, 93rd st. and Harding ave. Guest
speaker: Judge Albert Saperslein.
roptc: "Religion vs. Juvenile Delin-
quency."

TEMPLE SINAI OF NORTH MIAMI.
131st St. and NE 6th ava. Reform
Rabbi Benno M. Wallach.
Friday 8:15 p.m. at Carpenter's Hall,
SIS NE IllSt si., N Miami. Sermon:
"The Changing Concept of piety."
(Third In a trilogy based on Isaac
I,.el, Peretz' "Three Gifts.")

TEMPLE ZION. 5720 SW 17th St. Con-
servative. Rabbi Alfred Waxman.
Friday 8:30 p.m. Sermon: "Man-
Earth and Spirit." Saturday 9 a.m.
Bar .Mltzvah: I'eter, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Bela Wind.

TIFERETH ISRAEL. 6500 N. Miami
ave. Conservative. Rabbi Abraham
Herson. Cantor Albert Glantz.
Friday 8:30 p.m. Guest speaker: Paul
Kwitney. attorney, who visited Israel
last year. Tenth anniversary of Israel
ten i' es. Saturday 9 a.m. Sermon:
"Reminiscing My Trip to the State of
Israel."

ZAMORA JEWISH CENTER. 44 Za-
mora ave. Conservative. Rabbi B.
Leon Hurwitz. Cantor Rudolph Brill.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Tenth anniversary
service. Oneg Shahbat hosts: Gilbert
Balkin lx>dge of B'nai B'rith. Satur-
day 8:30 a.m.
IP ^ ...... ...
BSMHBflBJ 1NBBM|

Accepting tenth anniversary display from Stanley C. Myers,
chairman of Greater Miami celebration commitee, is Miss
Lynn Starkey, of Richards Department Store. Similar displays
are being exhibited by all major department stores in Greater
Miami area and at other key locations during celebration of
Israel's tenth, anniversary starting this week in Miami and
throughout world. ____
Seminary Acquires Letters Supporting
Evidence Dreyfus Framed After Charge
AMUKAM IU.E1I
RELIGIOUS STORE
l7 WASHINGTON AV.
|MI BEACH JE 1-7722
BIG SELECTION OF BAR
>!TZVAH OUTFITS and
VNAOOGUE SUPPLIES
NEW YORKLetters of Joseph
Reinach, writer and French
statesman, concerning the famed
Dreyfus affair constitute part of a
unique collection of 288 original,
unpublished letters and documents
recently acquired by the library of
the Jewish Theological Seminary
of America.
The Reinach letters substantiate
the belief that the evidence pre-
sented against Dreyfus at his sec-
ond trial in 1899 was forged after
Dreyfus was originally indicted.
The discovery of pro-Dreyfus evi-
dence, which, as the text books In-
dicate, ultimately reopened the
Dreyfus case in 1905. is alluded to
in a letter addressed to Reinach
and dated 1903.
Tht majority of tht letters,
written in French, relate to the
fioht for Jewish emancipation in
19th century Europe and recount
the effort* of prominent Jews o
combat anti-Semitism in Franco,
Algeria, Rot/mania, Poland and
Corfu. Of major importance are
the accounts of Jules Carvallo,
Chariot Notter and Narcitto
Leven, founders of tht Alliance
Israelite Universolle, established
in 1o0 by French Jews and dedi-
cated to the defense of Jewish
riohtt the world over.
The correspondence covers a
wide area of the Alliance's activi-
ties including its intercessions in
Russia and Roumania and its nego-
tiations with important French pol-
iticians.
Other material includes ac-
counts of the Jews of Algeria as
found in the letter of Adolph Crem-
ieux, Jewish statesman and pro-
moter of civil liberties for Alger-
ian Jews and Albert Cohn, philan-
thropist and scholar, who first in-
terceded on behalf of the Algerian
BLOCK UNVEILING
The Unveiling of a Memorial
Plaque to the Memory
of the late
Hugo Joseph Block
will take place at 11 a.m.,
ta SUNDAY, Arltll 27th,
at the Star of David Cemetery
with Rabbi Joseph E. rUc*,ovslry
officiating.
Mr. Block is survived by his
wife. Sara: his sobs, Irwin and
Edmund: and a daughter, Judith
Fremerman.
Friends and Relatives are
as\ed to be present.
HEBREW SELF-TAUGHT
BY AHARON ROSEN
month
hoh-desh
date
lah-ahreekh
tt^in .i 96 nolhin* (nV x*?) Drba .191
k'loom (loh kh'loom)
-TTW 198 m'e" r
** -- or,n*e rn .193
or fer tah-pooz
oH ^Permit n^lStfK .194
, esh-koh-Ieet
of HtH 2 00
shel moment mm >195
ri-tah
fl*n/0 .n'jKitf ?f&t- "?3 nDj?-n^,p -fiSn tit
I
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^1?T? '""JIT? '"|?1!?-
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?d riaix mism .nnay
T I 1 "
nD&n nx nsji1? nsnn
T T V ~ T V T
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t l T
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....
anaipi nv^iaB-x-fa ix
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7H T^*1 lnx 31? 'WJ -:
.D-ian Vs nipTpa^
... : I r I
sirrta, ,e^x 3^ ln^e, iVs?
T-^y .-iDD3 xiipi nn
*7X lffn in .xoa yfHfa
tc^x1? naixi rn^fn
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nsin ^x ,-jnx ,nn^o-
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xin ,nsiT nnx ,nsiT -ix-
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.. .VxW "tx ,-mx ,nrr,?o -
Reading material h vocalized Easy Hebrew, and also material for
advanced students may be obtained through your local Hebrew
Organization or by writing to: Brit Ivrit Olamit, P.O.B. 7111,
Jerusalem, Israel.
Published by Brit Ivrit Olamit
Orthodox Schules Fete Tenth Year
Orthodox synagogues of the
Greater Miami area will unite in
a religious service in commemora-
tion of the tenth anniversary of the
founding of the State of Israel Sun-
day at 8 p.m. in Beth Jacob Con-
gregation.
In addition to Beth Jacob, other
participating congregations will be
Beth El, Miami Hebrew School,
and Beth Raphael.
Included in the program will be
Rabbis Simon April, Arie Becker,
and Tibor H. Stern.
I William G. Mechanic, newly-
elected president of Beth Jacob,
will welcome the gathering, and
I Col. Sidney Palmer, president of
Beth El, will be master of cere-
monies.
Jews in 1845 and again in 1860
when Spanish expeditions in that
area provoked new tensions.
The efforts of Polish Jewish lead-
ers to present their position in the
revolutions of 1848, the joint bat-
tle by the Jews of Russia and Rou-
mania to win citizenship rights and
the dire conditions of Russian
Jewry during the famine of 1868
are stressed also in many items of
the collection.
Miami Hebrew Book Store
1S85 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach JE 8-3840
Hebrew Religious Supplies tor
Synaooguee, Schools A Private Use
ISRAELI A DOMESTIC GIFTS
TV.
p*w.nW0Ur,yw
Rabbi Dr. Tibor H. Stern |
311 Washington Ave., M. B.
Phonos: Jl 8-2205 JE M**
NWM71N~
QOXVON
fUNMAl M0M1
HtHn I.Ttn
Id-ore T. Nona
f enerel Director
Harry


14-A
+Je*lst>ncrMlan
Jj^Y. Apra
fill, till" MIXDLIX
No Racial Myth: Dr. Pool Takes the Sociologists Appn
WHY I AM A JEW. By David de Sola Pool. 207 pp. Now
York: Bloeh Publishing Company. $2.75.
"I CAN DRAW no dividing line between my faith and my
- life." writes Dr. David de Sola Pool, famed rabbi of
New York's famed Spanish and Portuguese synagogue.
Shearith Israel. Thus in his Foreword he sounds a key-
note basic to his discussion of Judaism Judaism past,
present, and future, as it is lived and breathed and borne
by Jews.
In pegging the unique character of Judaism, Dr. Pool
MM FRIEDMAN -
flies by the nets of comparison with other religions in
which some writers have been snared; he is also at pains
to dispel the racial myth. The sociologic definition takes
preference: "Jews form a distinctive group with a con-
sciousness of their group characteristics, and with a cer-
tain recognized collective identity." Religious, historic
and cultural tradition are united in an emotional matrix;
there you have a Jew.
Dr. Pool looks at Judaism from every aspect possible.
It is part of the uniqueness of Judaism that it permeates
every facet of existence. Again and again one cannot help
What to Do About Insane' Poet Ezra Pound
Washington
EZRA POUND, THE anti-Semitic American poet who
^ aided the Axis during World War II, will go free.
Pound has been confined in a governmental mental
hospital here since 1046 when he was ruled incompetent
to. stand trial for treason. He had denounced America
and served Mussolini's Italy as a propagandist.
He was indicted for treason as a result of radio broad-
casts he made from Rome during the war years. Since
there was no doubt that Pound made the broadcasts, his
best line of defense was that he was insane when he made
them. A board of psychiatrists found him "eccentric,
querulous, and egocentric."
A blue-ribbon patient at St. Elizabeth's Hospital for
the last 13 years. Pound was given all manner of freedom
and privileges. The arrogent, bearded poet neither lan-
guished nor fell into obscurity. He thrived and wrote
assiduously. He even found time to receive visits from
John Kasper, the anti-Semitic segregationist agitator now
confined in a Federal penitentiary. Kasper claimed Pound
as a source of inspiration.
The Washington Post described Pound as simultan-
eously "a generous literary adviser to young writers and
a mean-spirited reviler of Jews." Pound despises not only
Jews but also his native America. He referred to the
United States as the land of "boobs."
The Saturday Review of Literature termed Pound's
poetry "anti-humanitarian ravings of an insane man .
incoherent medley of wild ideas." But other periodicals
opened a campaign to free Pound. They describe him as
DAVID SCnWAMZFZ
a sensitive, misunderstood genius being punished for non-
conformist ideas.
A Washington law firm volunteered Its service,
without a fee, to petition the court to set Pound free. The
law firm acted at the request of Robert Frost, the conser-
vative ultra-American poet. It is the firm of Arnold, Abe
Fortas, and Paul A. Porter.
Such literary personages as T. S. Eliot, Ernest Hem-
ingway, and AUen Tate have espoused Pound's cause.
Eliot called Pound "the best poet of our times." Tate
credited him with instilling new life in the English langu-
age as no one else has done. Hemingway condemned
Pound's Fascist broadcasts but thought he had paid his
debt. According to Hemingway, continued confinement
was a "cruel and unusual punishment."
However, it was Robert Frost who personally inter-
ceded in the top levels of Washington officialdom. He told
Attorney General William Rogers it would make America
look bad to let such a famed literary figure die in a
mental institution. A number of newspapers editorially
supported the movement to free Pound. They held gen-
erally that the nation should display no "vindictiveness"
toward Pound despite his actions "under the pressures of
war."
A view was taken by some that Pound's stature as a
poet overshadows the admitted anti-Semitic facet of his
philosophy. In this view, he should be released on human-
itarian ground* and allowed to return to Italy where he
spent many of his 72 years. But the present Italian Gov-
ernment was not certain it desires a return of the high-
brow agitator who loved Mussolini's Black Shuts
Now He's Making Everyone Sing Boombah
BROADWAY IS GOING "boombah" over Israel's tenth
* anniversary. Harold Rome, one of Broadway's top
pgpular song writers, has written a sonfijot th auuivcr
sary celebration called Boombah.
Rome's first hit was "Pins and Needles," for which he
wrote the music and lyrics. Some 20 years ago, the entire
country was singing his song, "Franklin D. Roosevelt
Jones."
HAROLD 11. MBALOW
Baseball for Israel
BASEBALL IS THE national sport in the United States.
* Indeed. Morris Raphael Cohen, the noted American
philosopher, once called baseball America's national re-
ligion. It is. therefore, difficult for us to accept the thought
that the diamond sport is practically unknownand un-
popularin other lands, except for Japan, where the cit-
izens seem as crazy about the game as we are. /
I know that when GI's in England played baseball on
the British Isles during the war, Englishmen watched in
great puzzlement and wondered what was the matter with
the Yanks, tin the other hand, when we looked at the
cricket games but that's another story for another
day.
In any event, there is a movement afoot now to make
baseball the game of Israel. Gussie Busch of the St. Louis
Cardinals has lent his name and sports prestige to the
campaign and Marvin Kratter. a realtor who owns Ebbatl
Field (does he have a free moment now that the Dodgers
are out of twn?>, is chairman of a new group called,
simply enough "Baseball for Israel."
And this is what has been done about it. A large
baseball stadium is going to be built on the grounds of the
OiyIp Wingate Institution for Physical Education, which
will itself be built eight miles north of Tel Aviv, on tei
eral hundred acres of land overlooking the Mediterranean.
Onde Wingate was a British general wbo fell in love with
the Jews of Palestine and helped them organize the
Haganah and fight successfully against the Arabs. His
name was Orde and net George, as the United States Com-
mittee for Sports in Israel calls him. He is worth remem-
bering.
The ball park will be named after Busch and the en-
tire program and promotion has the blessing of the United
States Department of Slate, and U.S. Ambassador to Israel
Edward B. Lawson is a sponsor of the'drive to build the
baseball arena. It is said that the Ambassador has been
impressed with influence of the United States in helping to
promote basketball, track and swimming projects in Is-
rael. And now. the feeling is, what is more significant
than baseball in Israel?
Rome got the idea for the song first when he visited
Israel in 1954. He was tremendously thrilled then. He
had a feeling of pride and of being at home. Maybe, he
says, it was like the feeling that a Catholic has in being in
Vatican City, or an American Irishman visiting Ireland.
Anyway, he was very excited by the purposefulness which
everyone displayed and by the vitality of the younger
generation. He felt that everything was boombah.
Rome visited Israel along with James Waterman Wise,
the son of the late Stephen Wise. One of the places they
visited was a little village named alter Wise. The two
came to the office of the mayor of the settlement uniden-
tified. In the office, they looked up above the desk to see
a large-sized painting of Stephen Wise. The mayor looked
at Jimmy and then at the picture.
"You are the son of Rabbi Wise0" he asked.
"Sing out the News" and "Sunday in the Park" by
Rome are jukebox favorites of the American public.
The American public likes Jewish music, according
to Rome, who cites the large number of Jewish compo-ers
who are top American favorites Irving Berlin. Jerome
hern. Richard Rodgers. George Gershwin-and he miht
have added Harold Rome.
but be struck by the sheer reasonable,,*,* *
faith. It demands no suspense of |0gic \. J*\
panacea, no sudden attainment of grace .5m 1
extra-worldly rewards for being a Jew j, ^
exclusively to Jews except the added du^ttl5',,,l
"Being a Jew." Rabb, Poo| *
happy." He is with Judaism's optimistic vu^
his potential goodness. He is happy that jL
virtue in enjoying life and trying to improve it-
mary reason why he is and why he *i,h*.
Jew i. that he is "the heir of a supreme XL
going back to my ancestor Abraham and still
mankind .Since his time, nearly 4,000
spiritual children of Abraham have beea
against superstitions and social evils." And late
that "It was Heinrich Heine who pungently auh
the. time of. the exodus from Egypt freed,- i,
with a Hebrew accent."
There are chapters on Prayer, Semantics
ish Home, the Messiah, and the Jew and Hii'ftfcJ
One called "Is Judaism Legalistic?" i$ esped*
and ones on the Chosen People and JewUg
world thought make engrossing reading. tn,
teresting style. Dr. Pool has packed more
tradition into this slender book than seems po__
Jews. I think, are always fascinated to he I
themselves. This book, however, js good enough
non-Jews who may care to discover what a Jew ra.
The difficulty is, of course, that non-Jews w^Tl
usually already know. In any case, the book is
and a fine contribution to Jewish letters it is.
ELI AMI SAJLPETER -
Great Zionist Debate!
THE DEBATE.ASOUT the tasks of the Zionist 1
1 after the establishment of the State of Israeli
relationisbp to the State, and to the Jewish peajkl
whole, is as old as Israel. After much debate aau
ment. a Charter of the Zionist Organization was 1
as a law of the State of Israel by the Knesset, <
tasks and position of the Zionist Organization.
Theoretically, that should have ended the 1
fact, however, the argument continued, with
David Ben-Gurion holding one view and the leadenJ
world Zionist movement holding a quite differed
The Zionist leader* demand that the State of Israq
ognize the Zionist organization as the channel
the State and Jewry abroad; that Israel speak Ui
Jewry through the Zionist movement, and world It
participation in the upbuilding of Israel be mile I
the Zionist organization.
Ben-Gurion, wbo holds that true Zionism
some form of personal identification with Israel,!
immigration, sanding of youth for a period of t
ucation or pioneering work in Israel, insists that)
not have to be a Zionist to help Israel, and
funneling assistance to Israel cannot be left an eid
Zionist task. The State of Israel has a right to afl
world Jewry directly, without the intermediary 1
Zionist movement, and Jews abroad can help IsnaJ
out using the instruments of the Zionist orgai
says.
This theoretical argument has some very'
concomitants: How can the most material I
diaspora Jewry for the absorption of immigrants 1
development of Israel best be organized?
While world Jewry's contributions have been
siderable indeed, they lagged far behind the esr
needs created of housing and employment for over I
now immigrants in ten years. It is also no seen
while hundreds of thousands of American Jews g"
erous support through the United Jewish App*a' I
chased Israel Bonds, there were many more, pertuM
lions, whom the above organizations did not res* 1
The question arises, then, how to bring about l
ticipation, at least financially, of these unimoMic
in the great task of upbuilding the Jewish State.
SAUL CARSON
The Petty Fabric of Arab Grievance Revealed
gY THE TIME this column is in print, one of the most
ambitious development projects begun by Israel will
have been completed. Fifteen thousand acres that had
been dangerous, malarial swampland will have been con-
xerted into rich agricultural soil. The completion of the
.Wv ,'f Ke "! on,y ,0 ,sraels *lMic.i Profic-
w nm f a rM !.aiS ,Srael'S poli,,oal realls *'r
this pioject could not have been finished without precise
measurements. And those measurements were not 0,uV
physical; they were also political. *
Once again, the Arab representatives showed they
too know how to measure how to measure nuisance
value. Some of the moves were made along the Syrian
border of the demilitarized zone separating Israel from
Syria in the Lake I.uleh region. And those move l
complemented by heavy artillery a. the United Nation.
For seven years, since 18*1, Syria has been firing
salvo after salvo at Israel in connection with the Huleh
reclamation project. Three weeks ago. it seemed that
nheva\a'2i 'he SCCU,ri,y C0UDCil wouU ^S-of this
phony Syrian complaint. Syria fired artiUery it the Is-
rael, workmen digging a ditch needed to f.nf.h the pro
SssSJ,rrlhrU8b i,S new United Arab RepubUc
^sssrs^s.comp,a,nt after 'noiher- ^
Let the record show that all of this shooting'
exactly 82 yards of territory in one place, Btn
another. ^a
The ditch which Israel was digging was w *-a
last, of a series of drainage canals nPdcd,"e| bsl
large project. Syria complained (1) That w ,
riyht lo dig in the demilitarized zone at all, W
was digging up lands owned by Arabs. ^
Twice, surveys were made of the area .
tions personnel. Each time, the UN Wf*2
no Arab lands were involved. But Syria uw"^,
stopped the work again, allowed the IN> P*"^
take one more survey. This timebehold*" f]
rods were political. This time, the ON t-
82 yards of the area involved may have net*
An,b- until
Israel accepted the new UN survey, "fn,i
in part of the ditch already dug, move the ai
to the west of the original plan. ihe ri**'
Israel also omitted to insist that it has 1m ^$jd
in the demilitarized zone. Thus the '^'^""L, i<
Certainly the completion of the big pr<>J"
more than haggling over a few yards 01 *
But the Arabs showed how P*,e2n |J,'
produces some results. They proved *"
value of being a nuisance.


Lpril 25. 1958
+Je*Ht> fkrHt^r
15-A
kE**t WOTrCS
k,OTICE UNDER
ITIOUS NAM LAW
IS Hi-JRIsilV rnVDN that
,i. I desiring to engage In
ta.iei ihe ilitltiiiUH name of
lHSTllinUTINU CO. (NOT
N \\ atnd Street Intends
;al.l n.Wr with the Clerk
it Court of Dade County,
MAX SPIEGEL.
lORTON
or Applicant
Bid(.
I-'-1
gOTICE UNDER
FlTIOUS NAME LAW
HEREBY OIVEN that
Igned, destr ng to engage Ui
Oder the fictitious name of
MEAT -COMPANY at 514
\r, Miami .-.Beach. Florida
i-glster said.name with the,
? <^.!iit cout-fot ttmf
Dl I'll.
ROT 8. S1TOMER
LIOAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to .image In
huslncsa under the fictitious mm. of
JET BAR AND PACKAGE STORK at
12M1 N.W. 27th Avenue, Miami, Flor-
'llla. intends to i-eiMster salil name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dude
County, FlarWa.
DlNNY'S. INC.
Hole tiwner
LEWISON AND FREED
Attorneys for Applicant
4/11-18-25. S/
NOTICE UNDER
flTIOUS NAME LAW
IS HEREBY GIVEN that
Igned. desiring to engage In
Kiler the fictitious name of
fcTION TRADES CO. at
lull Street. Miami. Florida
leql.-ter said name with the
|ne Circuit Caurt of Dad*
111 ill.t.
E. B. LOVBLL
It. U. LUVlfcLi.
TEITELMAN
for Applicants
Illdg.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HBrTEBY GIVER that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
husiiic.-s under the fictitious n LEONARD CARPET MAM'K.M': i ,;.
1NG CO., at 1051 E. 3*nd St., I Hales h,
*l-*.-irlfRn'1* l,i. '"Ifcr^r ""''' name
with tne"1le.lt of HwTlroult Court of
Dade County. Florida.
LEE RATNER
4/11-18-25, S/8
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY CIVICS that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business uhder the fictitious name of
HOI THMllNT APARTMENTS at 1036
rW, r.th Street. Miami. Florida In-
tends to register anld name whh the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Dated at Miami, Florida this 23rd
dar ot April, I95S.
JOSEPH PATIKH
Sole Ownir
4/r.. fi/2-*-i
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
SlNsHINF. COTTON SHOPS at 440
Perrlne Avenue. Perrlne, Florida in-
tend to register said name with the
Clerk or the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
HERRERT f\ NAFTAL
BLANCHE NAFTAL
SAUL WRONKEI!
BLANCHE WRONKEtl
HENRY NORTON
Attorney for Applicants
1406 Blscayne Building
4/4-11-18-2:.
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
BAY TOWERS APARTMENTS at
2316 Bay Drive, Normandy Isle, Miami
Beach, Fla., Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
LI PON CORP.
a Florida corporation
4/4-11-18-25
JE BY PUBLICATION
IRCUIT COURT OF THE
4 JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
IN AND FOR DADE
ITY. IN CHANCERY,
No. **C3034
lOTU
If
'*
ROTH
lent
IT FOR DIVORCE
M ROTH
1st Terrace
Florida
Fhereliy- nntlfleB that a Bill
,lnt f..r Divorce has bceq
St you, and you are reqlilr-
a copy of your Answer or
the Bill of Cnmiilarnt on
It s Attorney, RICHMOND
|ON, 1 Llnco.n Road, Miami
Brida and file the original
ing In the office of
of the Circuit Court on or
19th day of May, IMC. If
do so, judgment by default
en amim.-.! you for the re-
id In the Bill of Complaint.
shall be published once
or lour consecutive weeks
K1SH FI.ORIDIAN.
Mi i >RI 'l-REn at Miami.
14th day of April, AD.
LEATHERMAN. Clerk,
ourt, l>ade County, Florida
l> N. A. rfEWETT,
Deputy Clark.
& WOLFSON
Bldg.
fch. FT
lor Plaintiff
ICE BY PUBLICATION
ICIRCUIT COURT OF THE
NH JUDICIAL OlRCUtT OF
IN AND FOR DADE
TY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 58C3C30
ItOWITZ,
r'L
HOROWITZ,
giant.
JIT FOR DIVORCE
HERMAN HOROWITZ
J>st 17th Street
Btlyn, New York
pliKHAIAN HOROWITZ, are
ailfie.l that a Complaint for
been filed against you,
required tO serve a copy
Innswer or idcadlng to the
in the Plaintiff's attorney,
ItoTH, 420 Lincoln Road,
each. Horkla. and file the
newer or Reading In the
ie Clerk of the Circuit Court
i Dade County, Florida, on
May B'tli, IH8. If you fail
judgment by default will be
ilnat yog. for the relief de-
i the complaint.
this 14th day of April. 1958.
III. I.EATHLRMAN. ,er*
Court, Dade County. Florida
By JOAN SNEKDEN,
Deputy Civ. K.
TT ROTH
llaintlff
bin Read
cli, Florida
2-
NOTICE UNDER
-FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the ftctftloua name of
RALEIGH SPECIALTY MFG. CO. at
2447 N.W. 75lh Street, Miami. Fla., In-
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
LEO SCHOR
W1I.LIAM Fl'fHS
4/K, 5/2-9-18
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
SB under the fictitious name of
FHarson AND COMPANT at |7M
I'I I'rado Boulevard, Coconut Grove,
Miami. Florida, intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of l>ade County, Florida.
D]''K PEARSON & CO., INC.
By Richard Pearson, President
ALBERT L. ROSEN
Attorney for Dick Pearson & Co., Inc.
tti Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach, Ma.
4/4-11-18-25
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
SHOP THE QCICK WAY oFF CoR-
Al. WAY at 2450 S.W. Sith Avenu.-,
South Miami, Florida, Intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
QUICK WAY SHOPPINC
CENTERETTE No. 1. Inc.
(A Florida Corporation)
S. PHIIJP MALSPBIS
Attorney for
Quick Way Centerette No. 1, Inc.
4/18-25, 5/2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
PEPINO RECREATION CENTER at
number 2107 North Miami Avenue In
the City of Miami, Florida intends to
register the said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this 28th
day of March, 1958.
WILLIAM GONZALES
BERNARD MARTIN
Attorney for Applicant
4/4-11-lv-LT.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
EL BOCADITO RESTAURANT at
number 2401 North Miami Avenue In
the City of Miami. Florida Intends to
register the said name with the Clerk
<' the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Dated at Miami, Florida this 28th
day of March, 1958.
I,CIS GONZALES
BERNARD MARTIN
Attorney for Applicant
4/4-11-1S-2-.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. SKC3127
CARLL T. HARRIS,
Plaintiff.
JANINE LEROY HARRIS,
Defendant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: JANINE LEROY HARRIS,
c/o Madame Janlne Leroy
Poste Restante
Casablanca, Bourse, Morroco
You are hereby notified that a Bill
if Complaint for Divorce ha- bam
filed against you, and you are re-
quired to serve a eopy of your Answer
or Pleading to the Bill of Complaint
on the plaintiffs Attorney, Monrad R.
Thtie. Jr., SM6 S.W. 73rd St., BOUtb
Miami, Fla.. and file the original An-
swer or Pleading In the office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before
the 1h day of May, 1958. if jr*U fall
to do so, judgment by default will he
taken against you for the relief de-
manded In the Bill of Complaint.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami,
Florida, this lth day of April, A.D.
E. B. LEATHERMAN. Clerk,
Circuit Court. Dade Countv, Fiorina
(seal) By L. A. CLEARS,
Deputy Clerk.
Monrad R. Thue. Jr.
6846 S.W. 73rd St.
Kouth Miami, Florida
Attorney for Plaintiff
4/18-25. 5/2-9
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
vjfcpfai Meridian
ollcite roar legal noil
We approc-iato your
patronage and guaranlo-o
accurate service at legal
roles
Phone FR 4-4366
lor messenger serrlc*
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
liuslnejs under the fictitious name of
II A I. AUTO PARTS at 2501 N.W.
27th Avenue, Miami, Florida Intend to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
HENRY J. LAN DEN
LEON A K. I, AN DEN
GEORGE CHEItEN
Attoinev for HAL Auto Parts
IMS, -':-!.-1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW.
NOTICE IS -HEREBY GIVE.V that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
bualnsai under the fictitious name of
KKHIT Allt CONDITIONING CO. at
70 71st Street, Miami Beach, Dade
County. Florida, intend to register the
ssld name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
CHESTER M. Rl'SSO
8857 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida
HERMAN C WRIGHT
770 N.W. lL'Mh Street
North Miami, Florida
4/25, 5/2-9-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
ABLE KAI.iX at 54)10 N.W. 14th Ave-
n'ie. Miami. Florida Intends to reg-
ister sal I name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
ALBERT FREEDMAN, Sole Owner
GOLDMAN & GOLDSTEIN
A t torneys for Able Sales
2303 West Flagler Street, Miami, Fla.
4/4-11-1K-2.".
in the circuit court
-".u't
n-.t BY 'PUBLICATION
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ITH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
|A IN AND FOR DADE
JNTV. IN CHANCERY,
Ne. 58C291B
:co WARWICK
J.H WARWICK
|SUIT FOR DIVORCE
ILLE WAFRWICK
Box m
F.T.8., AP.O.O. 23,
York. New York
! NEVILLE WARWICK, are
a If led that a Complaint for
has been filed against you,
are required to serve a cot)>
Answer or Pleading to the
nt on the pWiiiitill's Attorney,
GENET, 420 Llitcnln Road,
Beach, Florida and file the
Answer m- Wewdlm Hi t*te f
Ihe Clei k of the Circuit Court
tlore the lth day of May, IW.
to tlo so, Jtidffwient by de-
III l>e takea aettlnBt you for the
imandsd In the BUI of Cuin-
AND ORDERED at Miami,
this 14th lUy ef A|irll, gt.D.
[ H LEATHERMAN, Clerk.
It Court. Daite County, Florida
By R. II Hi,
c ,.,.,, ll'ut> Clerk.
n i:.,,i
' <-li, liorlsa
' lor PHtHitnf
OF THE
11th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA. IN
CHANCERY. No. 58C3197
WILLIAM I.. BNSeMOIf.
Plaintiff,
LOW MAROARBT ENSINGER.
Defendant.
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
TO: 1 ois Margaret Enslnger,
PIS South 9th Stleel.
llarrisburg, Pennsylvania.
You are h.-ieby Oadered and re-
iiuired to serve a copy of yow an-
swer to the bill of complaint tor dl-
...... on plaintiffs attorney. W. Kent
la meson, 1764 N.W. 3th Street. Mi-
ami, Florida, and file-the original In
the office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida, on or
before tag Mrd day of May, 1958,
t*erw4pe *e 4HI of eomrHBiat will
be taken as confessed by you.
Dated at Miami. Florida, thhi 18th
-*y (s.j.1) trie Clrc'lll Court.
By: L. A. CI.EARE.
Deputy Clerk.
4/15. 5/2-9-16 ________.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
I.RHIGH ACRKS RII1LDINO COM-
PANY at 8W 71et Street. Miami
Beach, Fla., intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of !>nde County. Florida.
CENTRAL MORTGAGE AND
INVESTMENT CORPORATION
(A Florida Corporation)
By Gerald H. Gould, Pies.
4/4-11-18-25
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 58C3110
HELEN SIMMAT,
Plaintiff,
vs.
OTTO SIMMAT,
1 icfendant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Y.hi, OTTO SIMMAT, P.O. Box 27.
17 Stevens Street, Woodmont, Con-
necticut, are required to file your an-
swer to the complaint of divorce with
the Clerk of the above Court and
serve a copy thereof upon Herman
Cohen. Attorney, 1804 Congress Illdg..
.Miami. Florida, on or before May 17,
IS58, or. els, compil int will be taken
as confessed. Dated AmH Hi. IMS.
r. B LEATHERMAN, Clerk,
circuit Court, Dade County, Florida
(teal) By: JOAN BNBEDRN,
Deputy Clerk.
4/18-23, 5/2-9
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 5BC2957
WILLIAM IILARY RICHMOND,
Plaintiff,
EILEEN CROW-LEY RICHMOND,
Defendant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: Eileen Crowley Richmond,
Defendant
22 West 136th Street
New York, New York
Tou, r.iieei. i,ri>wicy Richmond, are
hereby notified that a BUI of Com-
plaint for Divorce has been Bled
against you, and you are required to
serve a copy of your Answer or Plead-
ing to the Bill of Complaint on the
plaintiffs Attorney. RAYMAN &
DLH1G, 02 Alnatey Bldg.. Miami 32.
Florida, and file the original Answer
in Pleading In the office of the Clerk
of the Circuit Court on or before the
19h day of May, 1958. If you fail to
do so, Judgment by default will be
taken against you for the relief de-
manded In the Bill of Complaint.
This notice shall be published onoe
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH Fl-ORIIUAN.
Iio.NE AND ORDERED at Miami,
Florida, this 10th day of April. A.D.
1' *"s
" E. II. LEATHERMAN. clerk,
Circuit Court, Dade County, Florida
(seal) By JOAN SNEKDEN,
Deputy Cleik.
RAYMAN t Drill.I
MS Alnaie] Bldg.
Miami M, Ho.i.la
Attorneys lor Plaintiff
4/11-23, 5/2-9
GUST UHOS Ki /
!. t ,.e in si '
rN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
D.h JUTJICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA. IN
CHANCERY. No. 96CS232
By DONALJ3* VICTOR LAWSON.
4>er stepfather.
"SS^iS. ^rsY' VOnFIEI.
that a petition has been filed Ini the
ao.Ae M..SO WHH bj IHI.NAlJI \ K -
he sstopilon ol
MBbA LBA RICHARD, a minor 1
the r-tMioner. loNALD \K I < >lt
LAWSoN, asid >eu are retftilred
,.r... :, sun' ''' \eswer or
ieelIons to show cauee why said petl-
attorneys lor petltlonei, BHBNJTI. N
Mll.l.li:. Congreaa Build ng, M -
^l ftiriit sad tie the original in
the offl.e of the Olerk ef the Circuit
i on or av.ure the EHu f May,
155 ,.1-iv |.-M'- NOT or a rtecn '
pro confesso will be enl.-i.-.l against
' W'flWMI my hand and the
OOUrt In Mlimi._ Florid
I
(seal)
to
I l!i-
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
huslness under the fictitious name of
E-Z-PIK at 5700 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade Countv, Florida.
SARMAY CORP.,
a Florida corporation
By: Oscar Mayers, President
I. R. MAYERS
Attornev for Sarmay Corp.
1612 Congress Bldg., Miami. Fla.
4/4-11-18-25
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
QI'ICK WAY SHOPPING CENTI.1t-
E'lTE at 24".a S'.W. 87th Ave.. South
Miami, Florida intends to register
mi id name with the Clerk of the I Ir-
cult Court of Dade County. Florida.
QI'ICK WAY SHOPPING
CENTERETTE No. 1. Inc.
(A Florida Corporation)
S PHILIP MAI.SPE1S
Attorney for
Quick Way Centerette No. 1. Inc.
4/18-25. 5/2-9
!l of
this
i; LUATIIERMAN. Clerk of
lMl. ii. nil ...ort.
Bj JOAN SNEEDEN,
De|Mlt)
2-9-16
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL C4RCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTV. IN CHANCERY,
N0.5BC2438 B
MARY ELLEN BARRETT
Plaintiff.
Robert" Frederick barrett
Defendant. ___
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: ROBERT FREDERICK
BARRETT
Residence Unknown
Ye>u. ROBERT FREDERICK BAR-
RETT, are hereby notified that a
Complaint for Divorce has been filed
against von. and you are required to
serve a eopr ** T>r Answer or P*n;
Ina to the Complaint on the iHalntlff s
Attorney. GENET A c.VTNET. Bses.,
i-0 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach, Fkir-
|,| and file the original Answer or
lleadlng In the office of the < -ri< "'
the circuit Court on or before the 12tn
a... 0r If vnii fall to do so,
judgment by default will be taken
.gnlnsi you for the relief deman.le.i
^NEMAl!?r?m0RDHRBDstiWtt
Florida, this tth day of April, A.D.
1S*S' i: B. LEATHERMAN. Clerk,
Circuit Court, Dade Cnnntv, Ftonoa.
(seal) By i: ';l,l;. "V,, ,
Deputy Clerk.
CI-'VIT ci-vi-e
Attorneys for Plaintiff
..in ltd., .Miami Beach, Fla.
I 11-18-15, 5/2
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desli in to engage In
business Ululei the t'ii I iliolls name of
YALE WINDOW at 1075 East lth
Street. Hlaleah, Florida Intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
YALE MANC-v '"'"NO
COMPANY, INC.
(A Florida Corporation)
S. PHILIP MALSPE1S
Attorney for
Yil.- Manufacturing Company. Inc.
4/18-25, 3/2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engng< !
business under the fictitious name of
CROWN BAR .* RESTAIRANT
SUPPLIES at 1627 Alton Road, Mi-
nim Beach, Dade County, Florida, in-
lemls to register s.ii I name With tne
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dr.de
County, Florid*.
8ANKORD I.I.VENTHAL
Bole i >a n.-i
ENGLANDER A TENDRICH
Attorneys for Crown Bar &
Restaurant Supplies
I T1-18-25, 5'2
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name ol
l-IMn- RAI. M.iRTGAGE INVEST-
MENT EXCHANGE st 407 Lin. oln
goad, Miami Beach. Florida, Intends
to register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County,
"REAL ESTATE CORPORATION
OF FLORIDA
A Fto'-lda corporation
JCLII'S JAY PERI.MrTTFR
Attorney for Real Estate Corporation
of Elorida.
4/11-18-25, 5 -'
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
COREY'S at 901 NE lf.7th Street,
North Miami Beach, Via., Intends to
register said name with the CUsrs of
the Circuit Court of Dade County,
rUla' BAR-RFE CORPORATION
(A F'ortda Con>oratlon)
WALTMAN ft COHEN
Attorneys for Applicant
1102 Congress Bldg., Miami, Fla.
4/11-18-2*. 6/2
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
KATTIWAMTCS BAR at 843 N V
54th Street, Miami, Fla.. Intends to
register aald name with the Clerk of
in- circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
MARSAILLE HOUGH. Sole Owner
KESHLER & OARS
Attorneys for Applicant
1998 S.W. lat Street
4 4-11-18-25
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under Ihe fictitious name of
Si oTTS MEAT CENTER at T.ill
N.W. 22nd Avenue Intends to register
said name with the clerk of Ihe Cir-
cuit Court of Dade Countv, Florida.
LULA EPSTEIN. Sole owner
A. J. KAPLAN
Attorney for Lula Epstein
4/4-11-18-25
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring 4o engage In
business under the fictitious num. ...
L ft T AGENCY at 940 Lincoln Road.
Miami Beach. Dade County. Florida
Intend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
MAX TI'RK
JAMES LBVENSON
^KATZ AND ROSEN
Attornrvs for L & T Agency
4/4-11-18-25 _________._______
NOTICE UNBER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage la
business under the fictitious name of
LINCOLN SALES at 924 Lincoln
Road, M4aml BeacJi. Fla., intent to
register said name with the Clerk of
Re Circuit Court of Dade County.
orlda. ______
MARTIN GOLDSTEIN
MARTIN E. BTAHLDBRO
4/11-18-25. 5/2
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTIBE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
tne undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
DADE AMBULANCE at 2987 W. Flag-
ler Bt.. Miami, Florida intends to reg-
ister aald name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of I>ade County, Elorida.
FLAGLER AMRn.ANCE
SERVICE. INC
By Harold A. Omild
COl'RSHON. FINK & OOLDWORM
Attorneys for Flagler Ambulance
entree, Inc.
4/4-11-18-25
ATTENTION ATTORNEYS!
CORPORATION OUTFITS
Lowest Prices Quickest Delivery
In South Florida
Call the JEWISH FLORIDIAN at
FR4-43G6
i S-


l&A
-S2L_AtfJ
Turner, Mrs. Meyers 'Outstanding'
Ceawirtaww from Pa*e 1 A
United Fund campaign.
Under Turner's leadership, tbe
area's first one-time, all-inclusive
philanthropic effort went over the
top to score a smashing success
Photojournalism Coarse lists
Motei LemsmeH as Saeeters
Editors, writers and photograph
ers from 14 states, the District of
Columbia. Sweden. Panama ami
Canada have already signed np
for the May ? to 10 second annual
photojournalism conference at the
University of Miami.
Co-sponsored by the American
Society of Magazine Photographers
and the university, the conference
i- mited to 200 registrants. Lead-
ing sessions will be 25 of the na-
tion s outstanding photo journalists
including Margaret Bourne-White.
Cornell Capa and Lisa Larsen.
and solidly to entrench IT as
Dade s pattern for future fund
raising.
Tvmtr H a member of the cit-
bens hoard of the University ei
Miami, was chairman of me
slooihva coramitte* of the Dad*
County Red Cross in 1951, and
has boon a immfair of the board
ever si
He is a member of the Dade
, Development Committee, is the re-
i ipei nt of the highest award of the
Boy Scouts of America, and has*
been honored by the oil industry's
coveted Gold Award.
In 1B54. the National Conference
'. of Christians and Jews presented .
Tuinei with its annual citation.
A former root stereo
teacher, cortifiod social wortcer
and lievtenant in the Crime Pre-
vention Bureau of the New York
Police Department, Mrs. Movers
is an internationally lonewcwd
No Anti-Semitism Seen in Zind Case
Continued from Pae 1 A
league in the course of a personal
aiMiment.
Th* B corresponded
ed Dr. H. G. van Dam, secretary
eneral of the Central Council of
Jews in Germany, as statins that
suspended schoolteacher Zatd
was a pathological and untypi-
cal case." Hot ei the less, it was
ditturhina, the Jewish leader
told the correspondent, that Zind
was permitted to hold his teach-
German opinion varies, the dis-
patch pouted out and though sym-
pathy in Ofleohurg was with Zind.
enlightened opinion'* in Germany
considers the sentence just and
necessary" to reaffirm Germany's
reformed character to the world
Enlightened Germans, including
Chancellor Konrad Adenauer, are
"painfully anxious to make
amends to the Jews. They feel
their record on restitution is
good" the Daily Telegraph report
concluded.
or 17 outstanding women in
Dado county last year.
A member of the Dade County
School Board, she is noted for ber
forthright stand in behalf of the
principles of American democracy.
For three terms. Mrs. Meyers
was treasurer of the International
women's Lawyers Assn.. and is
current vice president and U.S.
delegate to the association. She is
a director of international affairs
of the -Dade County Chamber of
Commerce.
Mrs. Meyers, who came to Miami
in 1936. last year served as direc-
tor of the Women's Division of the
Greater Miami Committee, State
of Israel Bonds She is a charter
organizer of Temple Beth Sholom
and the Jewish Home for tbe Aged,
on whose board she now serves.
She helped organise the Miami
Beach YM 8 WHA, and was the
Beach YWHA's first secretary.
Mrs. Meyers is a member of the
board of governors and execu-
tive committoo of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation.
Turner and Mrs. Meyers were
chosen from a field of 38 candi-
< dates. Attorney General Richard
. Ervin was guest speaker at the
| event chaired by Swerdlin and
Stanley Caidin.
Last year's awards went to S. D.
Shep' Phillips and Mrs. William
Ccx for their distinguished com-
munity service.
I MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY
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Y
. .. u
n
j
^njjt
ovnan s
"VJ.rlJ
Birth Daze Wilma and Marvin J. Hirsch-
lensohn, of 979 SW 4th St., have a son and heir
. Samuel William arrived Apr. 19 at Mt. Sinai
Hospital Mr. and Mrs. Irving Fine are the
If I \V grandparents on Wilma's side Albert Hirsch,
[J / \ V of Royal Beauty Supply, is Marvin's father .
j_A_VJ Very, very happy are great-grandmothers Mrs.
Solen and Mrs. Clara Hirsch, both of Miami.
Metropolitan Opera star Jennie Tourel is vacationing at the
}to hotel- ,
lostesses at a shower-brunch at the Algiers hotel Apr. 19
Mrs. Albert Rosen, of 675 Fairway dr., her daughter, Janet,
'hyllis Abramson, of 3001 Prairie ave. Honoree was bride-
Jill Flitman, who is planning a June wedding to Stanley
of Miami Beach .
)ccor was pink and white, with the gift table the center of
let ion ... A pink parasol was suspended over, festooned with
inds of rosebud-bedecked ribbons Stanley's mother, Mrs.
ph Arkin, and Jill's mother, Mrs. Charles Flitman and her
Mrs. John Porte, were among the guests .
Ihe others were all friends who have gone through school to-
pr and are now students at Miami Beach High School.
large silver ship in the middle of an orchid and gold table
Dted the Bon Voyage luncheon given for Mrs. Henry Schulraan
|rs. Maurice Koven, of 1074 Venetian Way ... At the Algiers
Mrs. Schulman embarks soon on a European tour.
Friends will be pleased to hear that Leon Brettholtz, of 911
kt., is back at home He's convalescing, following surgery
It. Sinai Hospital.

Mr. and Mrs. Dave (Algiers) Letfnson hostessed an interest-
table at the hotel Guests were the Honorable Lionel
.rier, rriember of Parliament in Canada, and former president
he St. Lawrence Seaway Authority, his daughter, Marie, Sen.
(Mrs. Wickes of New York State (he was formerly Lt. Gov-
r), and Mr. and Mrs. Bob Towers, prominent advertising agent
ew York.
Luncheon and cards Friday, Apr. 18, brought together many
(ds of Mrs. Anna Kaplan, of 995 W. 48th St., and Mrs. Maurice
Ikin, of 6767 Indian Creek dr. .
Chatting in between bids were Mrs. Ben Appel, Mrs. Rae
merman, Mrs. Charles Fruchtman, Mrs. Daniel Broad and
Fy Sussman Also Mrs. Sadie Kriegel, Mrs. Bess Birn-
i, Mrs. Belle Fishman, Mrs. Irving Chidnoff and Mrs. Han-
I Cohen .
And Mrs. Anna Miller, Mrs. Harry Altman, Mrs. Nathan Nash,
L Frances Entine, Mrs. Charlotte Katz, Mrs. Anne Tannenbaum
[Mrs. Sarah Waxman And then we mustn't forget Mrs. Sam
|m, Mrs. Lois Makowsky, Mrs. Herman Jacobs, Mrs. Trudy
[jmerslag, Mrs. Sol Silverman, Mrs. Jack Filosof and Mrs.
nond Rubin.
[Also hostessing on Friday, Apr. 18 at the Algiers was Mrs.
Cohen, of 316 Surfside blvd., Surfside ... Her guests were
Df-towners Mrs. Irving Boyce, from New York City, Mrs. B. D.
Jen, of Brooklyn, Palm Beach's Mrs. Gert Feldman, Mrs. Louis
, who hails from Detroit, and Mrs. Ben Bressler, who is down
Atlanta .
[Tables were decorated with white glads, gold sprays, white
] silver butterflies and long white tapers with a silver glitter
Cards followed the luncheon.
Wedding reception at the Carillon hotel Sunday honored Mr.
Mrs. Adoplh Lermanshe's the former Lona Rose .
[Both are noted manufacturershe of handbags, and she of
elry Seems like a natural combination .
J Attending were relatives of the bride Mr. and Mrs. Philip
lo Lona's sister and brother-in-lawMiss Sally Biblo, Mr. and
Y Martin Biblo and Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Sigler .
; Not to be forgotten, of course, were proud parents Mr. and
f. Charles Rose .
Wednesday, Mrs. Philip (Irene) Biblo followed up the recep-
J with a brunch at the Carillon, with guests including Mrs.
fries Dernis, Mrs. Harry Decky and Mrs. Phillip Morris.
May 6 will mean departure time from Miami for Hyman and
pha Sootin, of 1700 SW 65th ave. .
They'll be off to New York City where, on May 16, they em-
fk on the Niew Amsterdam for four months abroad .
Itinerary will include the Belgian Fairand, of course, Israel,
te the Sootins are long-time devoted Zionists .
They expect to be back home in mid-August.
More on the Birth Front: Congratulations! to Cantor and Mrs.
^ob Bornstein on the birth of their son. He's cantor at Temple
el of Greater Miami.

Hosts to her uncle and aunt are Mr. and Mrs. Harry Gordon
Iheir 2201 S. Miami ave. home .
Kllie and Bruno Herz are down from New York for four
eks vacation.

Mr. and Mrs. Victor Levine and Mr. and Mrs. Maurey Ash-
^nn he's Temple Emanu-El's new Men's Club president are
! to London to attend the Variety Club Caravan convention there.
l^wiislbJEIliDipidliiaun
Miami, Florida, Friday, April 25, 1968
Section B
.-.
These five girls (left to right) Karin Klingerman,
Marylin Hurwitz, Roberta Truppman, Frankie
Sperling and Judi Klein, all from Coral Gables,
were co-hostesses on their 16th birthdays this
week to friends in Rubaiyat room of Algiers

Members of cast of "Grandpa Moses," musical play to be
given by Sisterhood of Temple Beth Sholom Saturday and
Sunday evenings in Temple Auditorium are (bottom up) Carol
Getz, Evelyn Lipsky, Ruth Rudine, Philip Rudine, and Hal
Hertz. Not shown are Ethel Brenner, Beatrice Mersel, Gytell
Gottfried, Elayne Goodman, Reloris Wickman, Louis Lowen-
stein, Lynn Peal, Barney Spector. Benjamin Berlin. Eva Jacob-
son, Helen S. Lowenstein, Rae Murray, Dr. Philip Stern, Sarah
Spielman, Seymdur Larry Kimmel, Phyllis Miller, Ruth Druker,
Reuben M. Levin, Dr. Norman Russ and Murray Sonnett.
"Grandpa Moses" is written and directed by Trixie Levin and
is based on play, "You Can't Take it With You."
Annual Luncheon Slated Thursday
Greater Miami Women's Auxil-
iary. Jewish Home for the Aged,
will hold its annual donor luncheon
Thursday noon, May 1, at the
Deauville hoteL
Young Marrieds on Hayride
Temple Emanu-El's club for
young married couples will hold a
"hayride-plus" Saturday evening.
May 3, according to Nelan Sweet,
president. The hayride will leave
from the White Stallion Ranch, and
the evening will include entertain-
ment and authentic chuck wagon
supper. Bus transportation will
leave _from the Bayshore Golf
Course Club House at 7:30 p.m.
hotel. Pcrcents of five gills had their own cele-
bration in Scheherazade room. Some 150
friends partook of buffet dinner and huge
tiered pink-and-white bir'.hday cake with each
girl's name on it. Arne Barnett provided mu3ic.
Joint installation
For Gabies Groups
B'azi B'rith Women of Coral
Gables and Coral C-ahles Lodiie
"ill hold a joint installation of of-
ficer? at the Saxony hotel Sunday
evening.
Judge Milton A. Friedman will
be installing officer.
Mrs. Sam Kurland is president of
the women's group. Others are the
Mesdames Alan Bornstein and
Loon Bernard, vice presidents;
Alex Grossman, Moe Finegold, Irv-
ing Verdon and Sam Kratish, sec-
retaries: Moe Langer. treasurer.
Maurice J. Finegold is president
of the Lodge. Others are Samuel
Nieberg, Arthur Paddor and Nor-
man Pallot. vice president: David
Linn, Jerome Robinson, Milton
Parker and Solomon D. Bodian,
secretaries; Samuel Kratish, treas-
urer.
Mrs. Sol J. Rappaport and Hy-
man Friedman, both retiring pres-
idents, will be presented with na-
tional Bnai B'rith "past president"
pins.
The lodge and chapter each has
over 400 members and comprise
the largest bowling leagues in the
city- ._ A
Reservations may be made
through chairmen Mrs. Alan Ben-
jamin and Hyman Friedman.
"Fire on the Mountain," by Mil-
lard Lampcll, is the play to high-
light Miami Beach chapter of Ha-
dassah's celebration of Israel's
tenth anniversary May 5 at the
Eden Roc hotel. Mrs. Joseph Sha-
piro is president.
Donor reward luncheon chair-
man is Mrs. Edward Holofcener.
and Miss Lillian Goodman will be
program chairman.
Dance ensemble will be by Stu-
dent Junior Hadassah, and Miami
Beach District ZOA president Dr.
David Andron will be narrator. The
entire production is under the di-
rection of Trixie Levin.
Cantor Israel Reich, of Temple
Emanu-El, will conduct the Hadas-
sah Choral Group.
Women's Group kUets
Women's Division Chamber of
Commerce of Surfside, Bal Har-
bour and Bay Harbor Islands met
at the Chamber of Commerce in
Surfside Wednesday noon.
Address of welcome will be fiven
by Mrs. Trudy Hamerschlag. donor
chairman. Mrs. Sam Rost. honor-
ary donor chairman, will give the
invocation. Mrs. Alex Dellerson,
coloratura soprano, will sing.
Mrs. Sol Silverman, president,
will award Certificates of Merit
lo members who have performed
unusual services during the past
year.
Mrs. Louis MaKovsKy, program
chairman, will introduce Fran Im-
merman, star of "Kiss Me Sadie,"'
an original musical comedy re-
cently presented by the Flagler-
Granada Jewish Community Cen-
ter, who will present a program of
original songs and stoi


2-B
Jmisi>ncr*m*r
Friday. AprfJ;
Judge Pofier Slated Here in Talk;
To Install Ra. Women's Dhr. Officers
Judge Jastaae Vise
rieea in ltUu this week to fatal
a basy sehedate pbwd far her by
the Southeast regaoa of ike Amer-
ican Jewish Cnagres*-
In iimumci the visit here of
the distinguished jarus, Rabat Yaa-
kov G. Buatalbirg chairman of the
Sooth Florida Council, said that
"Jwdge Poher briags to Miami oat
only the wealth of her own experi-
ence, hat the heritage-other WTfcr.
Dr Stephen S. Wise, on* of eur
te of the moat em-
pleaders in behalf of the
State of Israel, whose
day we commemorate this
Judge Polier was to be .
speaker at the tenth anniversary
luncheon at the Papont Tarietor.
hotel Thursday under the sponsor
ship of the Greater Miami Commit
tee for Israel's Tenth Anniversary
Celebration.
On Friday. Judo* rltor wvR
iwsfwM fke totaiwa) officers of
the Florida Woman's Pwiuwi.
Aawikai Jawiah Cans* a in. a* a
toncwa to ha haW at Mat Bar-
On (he same -
To Present Slate
At Home Meeting
Greater Miami Women's Auxil-
iary. Jewish Home for the A.-r-I
will meet Tuesday noon u> the
Kubaiyat rooai of 'he Algiers hotel
vjj Siivenaan will preside.
Mrs Frances Entme. noaainat-1
ing chairman, will :>re*ent
e of nominees for officers
and board of cirectors.
Mrs. Louis Makovsky. program
chairman dl present Mrs. James
iSalwa Abrams. formerly of the
New York concert sta^e. and
soprano soloist at Temple Beth El
of Hollywood
Miss Abrams will be accompa-
nied at the piano by Mm Anyuta
Melicov.
AJCongress Women Meet Friday
In Joint Session to Elect
and Al-
York City, and socfwtary
HHayor LaOwar-
dia s Coiuinittoa on Una n>o ley -
menf Relief. In 1941. Judaa
Polier took leave af ahaaaoa to
aj as saacaal advisor to Mrs.
Eleanor Roosevelt at the Office
of Civil Defense in Washington.
A antht labeled My Brothers
Keeper Blood Donor Night" wiU be
hy RooseveK Temple 33.
Pythian
A complete Mood donor unit will
be set up at Beth El Congregation
Moaday night. Operations win
start at 7 an.
To those who reoaire baby sit-
ters in order to participate. Tags
of B'aai B'rith win volunteer their
services free In charge of infor-
mation is Mrs Milton Bhimenthal.
Florida Women's Division of the
American Jewish Congress and
the Louise-Bra rvdeis and Miami
chapters of AJCongress meet Fri-
dav at the Barcelona hotel to elect
officers for the coming year.
Nominated as officers for the
Florida Women's Division axe the
Mesdames David Muskat. presi-
dent; Abraham Augenstein. Sidney
Finger. Larry Friedland Alfred
n9R9n Vutf* Eetf^SWWherT;.
vice presidents; Joseph Weisman.
corresponding secretary: Henry
Berg, reeording secretary-; Samuel
Rose, financial secretary
bert Ladd. treasurer.
Norn mated as officers
Lnwse-Braadets chapter
Mesdames hfieWael Sossin. presi-
dent; Jack-Edwards. Delia DeJan-
cy- Harry Levy and Max Raskin;
Walter Baoer. corresponding sec-
retary; Louis Cohen, recording
secretary: John Sorin financial
secretary; and Abe Malkm. treas-
urer.
Nominated as officers for the
Miami chapter are Mesdames Irv-
ing Quartm. president; Harold Jaf-
fer. Fred Klein. Samuel Rosen-
stein. Leo Steinberg and Fred
Weiss vice presidents; Harry Kru-
pin. treasurer; Jay Greenberg,
rorre. Penchant**, recordrng secretary;
Edward Goldstein, financial secre-
for
are
the
the
tary; Louis Gold, social t
In addition to election .
the annual meeting jq
, a revised eonsutu'ioi]
I Women's Division. Ft*.
I morning session, ^y^
; 10;3- 'be members *ui;
for an installation lunch
Justine Wise Polier. eh
?he national execotiv* _
of the American Jewisfl
I all! blANRl'Timshn i|
officers and present am
the work of the Ane*
Congress.
Mrs. Harold Ji
chairman, wul
formance of "The-.
Gtan-Carto Menotti.
.Mrs Una Maddaford
er and onera coach at tin |
sity of Miami, with John j
Miss Roberta Werner. "
Usf Meetitg if Jnhi
Last meeting of tbin^.
Greater Miami ciusiaV.
men's American okf'j
Thursday. May 8, at tit 1
hotel
Dr. Jack Kapthut cfj
verslty of Mi sail
psychology, will a
p.m. affair. "Sex i
Subjects" is tbe i
cban's talk.
She has served as national pres-
ident of tbe Women's Division of
the American Jewish Congress,
and is currently chairman of the
national executive committee of
the Congress. She is the wife of
Shad Poher. a-New York attorney,
land the mother of three children.
Judge Poher is the author of
Everyone's Children Nobody's
Child." a standard work on chil-
dren's courts, and "Back to What
Woodshed*"' a public affairs pam-
phlet, published in March. 1956
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ray. April 25, 1958
9-JmlstifkwkUan
3-B
WNN4*

%MM
r<*>-f
V /
w
Chronic Illness in Aged Stressed
At Home Meeting as New Expansion
Program Launches Four Pavilions
The gravity of the problems of chronic illness, the plight of the
long-term patient, and the disabled were heavily stressed by Irving
Cypen, board chairman of the Jewish Home for the Aged, who was
chairman and principal speaker at the Home's 13th annual meeting and
groundbreaking ceremonies last week at Douglas Gardens.
The construction of four new
jders of community agencies join with Jew- to right) are Maurice Peartotein, Home execu-
. Home for Aged in celebration of FHA ap- tire director; Malcolm Ross, chairman. Senior
oval of $400,000 building program for which Citizens Division, Welfare Planning Council;
pundbreaking ceremonies were held recent- Mrs. Maxwell FassFer, secretary, Sfenior Citi-
fat Douglas Gardens. Seated (left to right) zens Division; Roy Kitts, executive director.
t Mrs. Stanley C. Myers, chairman, Jewish United Fund; and Dr. Benjamin B. Rosenberg,
deration community planning committee; executive director. Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
ron Kanner. Federation president; Irving Cy- oration. Jewish Home is a beneficiary agency
|n Home board chairman; Max Orovitz. of Federation and United Fund, and a mem-
ait'ed Fund president; Baron de Hirsch ber agency of Welfare Planning Council.
eyer. Home vice president Standing (left _________
Mt. Sinai Auxiliary Installation Will
Feature Mother-Daughter Fashion Show

rf 1
MKS. PHUf UMOKMTZ
SUGARINE li KofK.tr and it Approved
by the Union of Orthodox
Jewish Co*lrojnttons.
Annual installation luncheon of
the Women's Auxiliary of Mt. Sinai
Hospital will be held at the Fon-
tainebleau hotel Friday, May 2, at
noon. A highlight of the luncheon
will be a mother-daughter fashion
show of John Serbin originals.
Mrs. John Owens will be commen-
tator.
Mrs. E. E. Bloom and Mrs. Her-
bert Tenenbom are program chair-
men. Mrs. Gue Feuer and Mrs.
Chester Krone are arrangements
chairmen, and Mrs. D. Donald
Smith and Mrs. Milton Weinkle are
publicity chairmen.
Nominees tor election and Instal-
lation are the Mesdames Meyer
Eggnatz, honorary president;
Philip Lefkowitz, president; David
Bass, A. Herbert Mathes, Leonard
Wien, Jack Robinson, Murray A.
Shaw, Milton Weiss, vice pres-
idents.
The Mesdames Edward Roth, re-
cording secretary; Max Dreyer,
corresponding secretary; Irvin Ko-
rach, treasurer; Myer Friedman,
She's Named
To Second Term
Mrs. Sidney Lowe, 6761 SW 6th
st, has been elected to a second
term as president of Murray Solo-
mon Auxiliary. Jewish War Vet-
erans, .and she will be installed
Sunday evening at the MIAD Offi-
cers Club.
Other auxiliary officers to be in-
stalled include the Mesdames Mor-
ris Zipper, senior vice commander;
Abe Michaelson, junior vice com-
mander; Norman Levine, treasur-
er; Lou Smith, chaplain; Jerry
Simms, conductress.
The Mesdames Leonard Lifshutz,
instructor; S MeWin Morris, his-
torian; Dorothy Gussinoff, guard;
and Lou Bobson, corresponding
secretary.
The Sunday installation will be
held jointly with Murray Solomon
1 Post. _______.
financial secretary; Arthur Burrell,
secretary of dues; Jerome Hof-
mayer, auditor; Isaac Levin, par-
liamentarian; and Louis Krensky,
chairman of nominating commit-
tee.
Models for the fashion show will
be the following mothers and
daughters: Mrs. Stanley Frehling
and Stephanie; Mrs. Richard Flem-
ing and Susan; Mrs. Milton Weiss,
Kay and Alexa; Mrs. Stanley Ras-
kin and Debbie; Mrs. Sam Coolik
and Susan; Mrs. Harry Frohman
and Lynn; Mrs. Robert Roesing
and Laurie; Mrs. Howard Kane,
Carol and Penny; Mrs. Jack Young
and daugmers; and Mrs. Morris
Lansburgh and Ellen.
pavilions to the Home's facilities
was launched at the- annual meet-
ing.
Ac chairman of the building
- commit***, David B. Fldeman
re ported that when the expansion
program of four new pavilions, a
research laboratory and a shel-
tered workshop is finished in th*
fall, "th* Horn* will b* on its
way to th* completion of its mas-
ter architectural plan and to-
ward its goal of becoming com-
pletely rehabilitative in its ser-
| rfces. Th* Horn* eventually en-
visages a total capacity of some
200 beds within th* next four or
five years."
After completion of the present
expansion, it will have a capacity
of 107 beds.
A highlight of the meeting was
the tape-recorded welcoming ad-
dress of Abe Kurman, president of
the Home, who is recovering from
a serious illness in a Boston hos-
pital. The speech was flown to
Miami specially for the occasion.
The Sunday "Bar Mitzvah" affair
was dedicated in Kurman's honor.
Vic* Mayor Harold B. Spa*t,
honorary president of th* H*m*,
paid tribute to Kurman for his
"inspiring leadership" during
th* past six years, "which has
been th* main factor in develop-
ing the Horn* into a nationally-
recognized institution, noted for
its pioneering facilities and re-
habilitation program for Senior
citiiens."
mately know how urgent and
tragic a problem we face."
Cypen said that "because so
many of the aged faU victim of
these, diseases w4th disastrous re-
sults, we of the Home are in the
front lines and must face these
tragedies every day, every week.
It is time that the total community
began moving on this problem in
a concerted and planned way, for
it cannot be solved on a sectarian
basis.
"It is time, we feel, for the gov-
ernmental agencies, the University
of Miami, the voluntary central
bodies, the hospital council, and
the health and welfare agencies to
get together and work together, to
coordinate their efforts, and to
develop sound plans of action to
meet these needs in Greater Mi-
ami."
More than 1,000 persons jammed
the grounds of the Home at Doug-
las Gardens to participate in the
groundbreaking ceremonies. One-
third of the board was elected by
the membership at the meeting for
three year terms.
The Home is a beneficiary
agency of the Greater Miami Jew*
ish Federation and the United
Fund. It is a member of the Wel-
fare Planning Council.
In his talk before a capacity
audience, Cypen declared that
"chronic disease is a problem so
vast that its scope is as broad as
the total population of the nation.
Every individual is a potential vic-
tim. From our own personal ex
Mrs. Sirkin on Board
Mrs. Milton Sirkin was elected to
the board of directors of the Na-
tional Jewish Welfare Board at the
organization's 1958 biennial na-
tional convention in Washington.
D.C., last weekend. JWB is the
government-authorized agency for
meeting the religious, welfare and
morale needs of Jewish personnel
in the U.S. Armed Forces and Vet-
erans Administration hospitals,
and the national association of 353
Jewish Community Centers and
YM-YWHAs. Mrs. SirKin is im-
periences and observations here in mediate past president of Greater
Greater Miami, we should inti- Miami Jewish Community Center.
IT'S A
HABIT
NOTE TO Ail THRIFTY MINDED HOUSEWIVES: remember that
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to shop df Hm friendly neighborhood
B-THRIFTY or GRAND UNION
SUPERMARKET
featuring nationally advertised
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FREE PARKIN6
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CORAL GABLES
1906 Ponce de leen Blvd.
WEST MIAMI
6190 S.W. 8 th Street
MIAMI
Corel Way at ludlum Read
MIAMI
5767 Bird Road
KENDALL
11301 S. Dixie Highway


4-B
*Jt!Wi5i>nt>r**M)
Essay, Art Contest Revealed by Bureau
IU HAS-U
Israeli Stewardess
Will Compete Here
El Al Israel Airlines .Has selected
pretty Ila Har-El. 22 year-old au-
burn-haired beauty from Tel Aviv,
to represent the airline at the
Miss International Airline Stew-
ardess' contest in the Barcelona
hotel. May 30 to June 1.
The young Israeli beauty, who
will compete with airline steward-
esses from all corners of the world
for the coveted title, was born in
Lemberg. Poland, is 5 ft.. 6 in.
tall and weight 117 lbs.
Joy R. Ails, public relations rep-
resentative of El Al. said Wednes-
day that Miss Har-El "is an excit-
in- entry. Her rare and delicate
beau'v has most recently been the
subject of nationwide advertising
in American newspapers."
Winner of t*e coveted title of
"Miss International Airline Stew-
ardess" will be introduced to the
entire country on the Ed Sullivan
television show.
As one of the events celebrating
Israelis tenth anniversary- es'
say and art contest for all boys,
and girls attending elementary or,
high school in the Jewish schools
of Greater Miami has been an-
nounced by Dr. David Andron and
Louis Schwartiman. executive di-
rector of the Bureau of Jewish
Education.
Fiist pr.ie will be a $100 Israel,
Bond. Second and third proes will
be one week each of free summer
campine at Camp Hijfcland. Se-
aling. Fla. Fourth pnte will be $25
in ca, and fifth prize will be an (
Israeli art object.
Entries must be mailed
later than Apr. 27 to the Bureau
of Jewish Education. HS NW
3rd eve., Miami, or the Greater
Miami Committte lee Isrear's
Tenth Anniversary Celebration,
921 Lincoln rd. (Met*.). Miami
Beach. Fla.
Rules of the contest, according
to Schwarizman. provide that the
essay or art entry be the original
work of the applicant and that
tants may submit an entry'
for either contest or both but that
only one prize shall be given to
any one person.
Bnajr subjects are: 1. The State
Of I-raels most important accom-
plishment in its first ten years; 2.
Th? leader of the State of Israel
whom I most admire: and 3. What
ten years of the State of Israel
have done for the Jews in Amer-
ica.
Art subjects ara: 1. An animat-
ed map of the State of Israel
today; or 2. Drawing of any in-
cident, personality or piece re-
lated to the activities of the State
of Israel in its first ten years.
The essay must consist of no j
less than 250 and no more than
SOD words and must be typed on
one side of the paper *" "]}"e*
must be original drawing, sketch
or painting on cardboard or draw-
ing paper, no larger than 24x36
inches.
Reference material for essays
and art information are available
at the Bureau of Jewish Ehica-
tion. Schwartiman pointed out.
Jud^oaviox these contests include
Dr Uavid Andron. Zionist leader;
Louis Schwartiman. Bureau of
Jewish Education executive direc-
tor; Leo Mindlin, editor of The
Jewish Floridian; Mrs. Reyna
Youngerman. local artist; and
Charles Jacobson, publicist and
artist.
AjmmI Donor Uod*.
Miami Beach Bnaj bw
men held their annual dJi
!N1
eon Tuesday noon at th.
hotel. Mrs. Charles Alta
chairman. Past pred*,*!
Helen Sanders and Mrs Dmi
pert gave the invoctKmSr
dI.Cl,0n .*? E ***
charge of the program
fee diecrimlMtiaf
pewpU .
NICK -*
ARTHUR'S
RESTAURANT
orm Ait had
STRATH HAVEN HOTEL
Tae OaVy KessW Betel Directly am the Oeeae Belew liaceie leaf elfci
Air-Coodition'mg Swimming Pool 200 ft. Private Bea*|
DiMIMG *O0H OPEN All YEAR
Kashruth and Sabbath Strictly Observed
10W StfiNMft KATES
Mat: Rabbi Abraham I. Twersky and Joseph Heffmu
WRITE OR PHONE FOR RESERVATIONS
41? Ocean Drive Miami Beach Ph. jt ft|i I
Rebekah lodge Meeting
Sunshine Rebekah Lodge met
Tuesday evening at the Workmen's
Circle. 25 Washington ave.
Sisterhood Meet
Installation Site
Judy Gross will be installed
president of United Synagogue
Youth at a meeting of the Hialeah-
Miami Springs Jewish Center Sis-
terhood Wednesday evening.
Also to be installed as officers
of the Center I'SY group are Irwin
Becker, vice president; Lois Alex-
ander, corresponding secretary;
Beverly Beck, treasurer; -and
Marion Gordon, recording secre-
tary.
Sisterhood is sponsor of the
j group. Members will hear a re
, port from delegates to the spring
conference of the Southeast region.
United Synagogue of America, and
elect officers for the coming sea-'
son.
Your Host.
NICK ft ARTHUR
Succulent chorcool ateoks dona *
tender turn deleetoble
dishes to tempt me moat pampered
palate .
*> RlMI PI >*
UN 4-9759
1601 79th St. C.usewey
ENJOY ... A TRADITION Al FRIDAY NIGHT DIJWH
SACRAMENTAL WINE and SELTZER O GEFILTE FISH al
MATZOH BALL SOUP KREPLACH ROAST CHICKEN al
ROAST DUCKLING CHICKEN OR BEEF IN POT 0 KUGEL
STUFFED DERMA TZIMMES STRUDEL O DESSERTS|
TEA OR COFFEE
IQ-COURSE
DINNER
SrftiCTuY KOSHER
~ coewinf 7-coma
DINNERS from $1.50
nu mm,
siuztt .* n
!!
HI tf T All OfUCfOOS COtO 0 ROT BfUCATfSSEN, SAUK,
OWN IAKUT OOOOS.
1141 Washington Ave. Opoosrtt Crty Hall MmM*
11 mm. to t mm. Seterer 5 ,m. ft t t*|
aowsrrf CArarfo attarts mummt, bam tumm 1
At Mease or in Teer Teazle
8
finest -W3 "!
CATERMO KM ill OCCISMB
940-71stSt.MioilMi
UN 6-6043 airtei
OPW BART ItitiM '*
U..r Ortho-o. V.- Me*a**
BOOKINGS FOR WEDDINGS AND JAR MITZVAHS
ARE NOW BEING TAKEN POO THE SUMMER MOUTHS
AT VIRY REASONABLE PRICES
ROYAL HUNGARIAN "W3 *^T 5TAUU,IT
731 Washington Avenue
hTMWI
LINCOLN MANOR USSSm
,, a. Oka A '
SERVING 7 COURSE KOSHER DINNER from $1i*
AM CONOfTNOMO ^ lOWEST r"i3r
Oader fHIi.lirf SeperrMee ef N Ortkede. V
Freerwtfc.ee,
^-.aas. -.
HAROLD PONT and IRVIN GORBON
GORDON and PONT
RjNR IOIIII < A T E I I
WJ fro. Her. rere. to W* *" ^
170 N. W. 5th ST, MIAMI .^aSSiS
OeeW Seprvisto. of eWted mwhkwltm VW "*"*!-
. BAR MITZVARS
ROOM

UffRIDIp-W*
**^ Mitt *
SID LEWIS*
ORCHESTRA


*'JewishthrUHsm
5-B
Emanu-El PTA Picks Mrs. Abelow;
Other Officers, Board Also Named
Mrs. Joseoh Abelow hn been Feller, treasurer; Ann Reiser, cor-
elected president of the Temple
Kmanu-hl PTA. She succeeds Mrs.
Norman N. Giller.
Others elected at a recent meet-
ing of the organization include:
The Mesdames Irving Lehrman.
honorary vice president; Irving
Fineberg, administrative vice pres-
ident; Raymond Malshiek, house
vice president; Simone E. Rubia.
membership vice president; Harry
Lechtner, room mother vice pres-
ident.
responding secretary; Seymour
Ruhin, historian; and Norman N.
Giller, honorary past president.
Roard of directors includes the
Mesdamcs Theodore Arvan, Her-
bert Beilinson, Harry Brick, Her-
bert Cohen, Irving Cypen, Hurray
DebJinger, Leon Epstein, Raymond
Feiner, Leonard Friedland, Harry
Gentfcn, Charles Gertler, Jacob
Glassman, Morris Goodman. Atox-
ander Gordon. Irving Gordon, Ben-
jamin Greene. Philip Grenwald,
MM. JOSEPH ABUOW
57
MERIDIAN
AVE.
Mesdames Jerry Resnick, gift Jesse O. Halpern, Elliott Harris,
shop vice president; James Cohen,'Irw,n Harris. Henry Hillman, Har-
recording secretary; Martin Bor- old Hirschfield.
kan, financial secretary; Simon1' The Mendames Joseph Jacobson.
Gould, social secretary; Milton | Bernard Kaplan, Sherman R. Kap-
I Ian, Harry King. Ben Klempner.
Paul Klempner, Hylan Kout, Sam-
| uel Kulok, Albert Laufer, Alfred
Levi, Allan Lipkin, Philip Mandel,
Robert Marcus, George Margolis,
Joel P. Newman, Nathan Perlmut-
ter, Louis Pollack. Arnold Pomer-
ance, Israel Reich, Israel Ribner,
Arthur Ross.
The Mesdames Lester Rubin,
Marshall Ruff, Ben Schwartz, Har-
old Schwartz, Harold Segal, Jos-
eph Shulman, Harry Siegel, Wil-
liam Siresky, Theodore Struhl,
Thomas Trent, Isaac Weinkle, Eve-
lyn Weinman, Eugene Weiss, Her-
bert Young, Stanley Worth, and
Raphael K. Yunes.
yevry JzjWxco
\
v
Qcdt&MhA
PIKKVE
JE 2.2974
CATERING IS AN ART
ISAM EHRENZWEIG, well-known restauranteur and
owner of SHERRY LINCOLN (Meridian Ave.) announces
the expansion of his operations to include
CATERING
[Formerly connected with the world-famous Louis Sherry of
^Jew York, Sam was the first to introduce the world's finest
ioiifs Snefry Ice Cream in this area.
Ic entered .the restaurant business and continued his success
[cause of his know-how and conscientious belief in serving
only top quality foods.
The SHERRY LINCOLN established an excellent renutation for
he fine food and pastries served in their restaurant.
Jefora eaterigg the CATERING field, Sam gathered and train-
[d a staff with years of experience, and is now ready to CATER
(rour party ... be it small or large.
Give your maid the day off as our trained staff takes over.
fust call SHERRY LINCOLN CATERERS, JE 2-2974, and our
SpTesefttatiVe will be glad to discuss your party, whether it
for 16 persons or 1500 at your home or hotel.
CALCUTTA ROOM 9**ifc
CONTINKNTAL CUISINE
LUNCHEON to 3:30 P M.
DINNER* to 10:30 P.M.
DINNER MUSIC
Gala Supper Dencirz
from 9:30 P.M. to 1 A.M.
Billv Arnold's
SOCIETY ORCHESTRA
Reservations 3
H0:i.v,... WA 2-7536
MIAMI 7R 1-6453
SAUANDALE BEACH BLVD.
Between L'SLand_^A
w!lr (TrfffSWanTTark
JPLOMAT
Mm
S& HOTEL and COUNTRY CLUO'

w
luslne
(pedal Occ
You'll find complete
facilities to exactly satisfy
your needs in the Kismet,
Aladdin, Scheherazade and
Rubaiyat Booms; be it for a
wedding or a private party I
West Miami BB
i Ladies to Install
j Officers Apr 30
}\ Mrs. Harold Tokayer will be in-
< stalled president of West Miami
4 B'nai B'rith Women at a meeting
JjApr. 30 at the Algiers hotel. Out-
4 going president Mrs. David Green-
vberg is chairman.
<1 Others to be installed at the 8
\\ p.m. function are the Mesdames
4'Harvey Sootin, William Goodman
J and Louis Zeger, vice presidents;
rllyman Potash, recording secre-
tary; Albert Lynn, corresponding
secretary.
The Mesdames Marvin Griesel,
treasurer: Jack Wasserman. finan-
cial secretary; Martin Yelen, par-
liamentarian; Alan Jay, historian;
and David Greenberg. counselor.
Invocation will be by Mrs. Ger-
ald Soltz, second vice president of
B'nai B'rith Women District 5. Mrs.
Alfred Reich, third vice president,
District 5. will read the benedic-
tion. Mrs. Jerome Robinson, chap-
ter service renresentative. District f"
5, will be installing officer.
Invited guests include Mrs. Sol
Gcldstrom, District 5 honorary
vice president, and Mrs. Nqntf
Reinhard. South Flflrtda Council
immediate past president.
Hypnotist Pat Bussey will -be-}--
guest entertainer.
to reme mt>e i*
Bar Mitzvahs and Weddingsand all the
important milestones in life. Our Catering
Department is particularly deft in capturing
the special significance of your occasion.
Our Million Dollar Redecoration Program
has made us Miami's largest and finest
hotel, with the widest selection of
facilities for any function, from the
smallest group to a banquet for one thousand.
Call Catering Manager: Henry Braun
FR 4-6151
it th
UhJ
W
loiters
#
i
CASTER.
have a truly luxurious
wedding
fasnion show
o /h ex
^Seville
Matchless facilities, experienced management,
expert stall-all to serve you lor much less
than you could imagine. Remember
s SEVILLE affair-whether for 10 or 1.000
is served with the same gracious ease!
Mm. ML OOUMUNO -
[XMU+H It 2-2311
OCEANFRONT, 2Wh TO SOth STREET8. MIAMI BEACH
tor Informant*****
HAZEL ALLISON
Calerlng Director,
Phone JE 1-6061
MM SI. A Collins Av*>.
Your every affair
A brilliant event!
Your guests will be complimented.,
by an invitation to a function at
the Carillon, largest and most
luxurious hotel in Miami Heath.
Our vast facilities >nable us to
add sparkling lustre to <*ach
occasion For weddings, banq lets
or any gathering, y lur choke >f
the Carillon is an indication of
the discerning.
Cell W.lliem K*ff, Bmeeel Mwrager, UN S-7S4I
OCEANFRONT 68t>, >o -6W. STREETS MIAMI BEACH 41 FIORINA
Home Residents
Assist CJA Drive
Residents of Jewish Home for"
the Aged raised $211.51 for the
1958 Combined Jewish Appeal. -
The project is conducted annual-
ly by the Residents' Council head-
ed by Mrs. Sidonie Gluck.
At a recent carnival, residents
HisDlaved and sold many items pro-
duced in their ceramic and handi-
craft olaes. such as vases, ash-
trays and candy dishes, pillows,
baskets, pocketbooks. key chains,
and a variety of household wares
and novelties.
A good portion of the total raised
included personal contributions by
residents of the Home.
Jewish Home for the Aged is
one of the important local benefic-
iaries of the Combined Jewish Ap-
peal.
Proceeds for Hospital Clinic
Roosevelt Temple 33, Pythian i
Sisters, held a luncheon and games I
party at tbe Aloha restaurant,
last week
Proceeds win De donated to the
Geriatric Clinic at Jackson Me-1
mortal Hospital, one of the charity
projects of Roosevelt Temple.
In charge of reservations were.
Mrs. Milton Weizenthal and Mrs.,
I Nat Fields. -~ '
Where
Godfrey Collins Meet
ARTHUR CODFRfY ROAD AMD COUSNS AVE THAT ISI
The High Spot of Miomi Beach Ihe lucerne i quite
occvltoofed to serving governors as well as other
celebrities and because of its famous hospitality,
delicious food, marvelous service and sensible prices...
it is the fine choice of hundreds for
LUNCHEONS SALES MEETINGS BANQUETS
WtDDINGS end ell importonl occesions'
ANDour fabulous HAVANA MARDI OKAS show it
All YOURS for ony porty you give in the CLUB CHALET I
Make plan* now Phone Mr. SOLTZ, JE 2-2541
He'll do the work you'll hove the funl
SPECMALEZMNG IiV
BAR MITZVAHS
For Rvserration*: TV 8-4521
Miami Springs Villas
300 Deer Run ART BRUNS, Co-Owner


Mb Hie
Menordi Hmdassah Gremp
Menorah group of Hadassah pre
xsted iu World Jewish Child's
Day luncheon and fashion show
ast week at the Dupont Tarle-
;oo hotel.
Funds raised at the affair go to
.he Youth Aliyah program.
Guest speaker was Mrs. Samuel
: Sakrais. regional rice president
,1 Hadassah.
look Review Wednesday
North
3'rith Women
w*aWTw*Wlcj Ptaa
Dade chapter. of^JTnaLq
fmeo will bold Ifs annualr The
PJ for th Hadasaak L
cosaarssiLL to be held t nJl
Gate hotel in HoUm^TJ
end are near complete*.
Registration of dthM,!
day evening is under the '
of Mrs. J. J. Briefer, wfcT
handling the reservation ,
being assisted by Mrs Abe |
who is in charge of ticket uL
the various luncheons and IS
quet to be held Monday
cv
jook review brunch at the Casa j around the theme of a
Home oi Mrs. Louis Sokol. SI Shore dr. W..
Bay Heights, is scene of successful member-
ship lunch in behalf of Greater Miami chapter.
National Nephrosis Foundation- Speakers
were Mr*. Tracy B. Hare and Mrs. Kay Shee-
han. director of social service. Variety Chil-
dren's Hospital Seated left to right' are Mrs.
Victor Rutansky. Dr. David Loveman, Men-
comes Seymour Friedman. Stanley Adter.
Raymond AppeH and Sheldon Schaumberg.
Secied .second row) are Mendames Marvin
Kucerman. Maurey L. Ashmann. mernbwhic:
Kav Sheehan.
Green. Robert
lew will be given by Mrs. Helga
Eason. of the Miami Public
Library. *bo has chosen "Please
Don't Eat the Daisies." by Jean
Kerr.
Attends Confab
co-chairman. Tracy B. Hare.
Richard A. Deemer. Henry Green. H<*>ert Urn .. |4J--l-lf-%l
Yolken. membership co-coainnfm. Morton RrlrS. mimmuil
Nash. Clarsnce ABen. Third row toding)
ace Mesdames Lou* SokoL Austin Burke. Wil-
knd Wohsgemuth. Al SokoL Leo Koplow. Stan-
ley Tinter. Herman Boren. Jack Young. Larry
Steward. George Hornik. Bernard Lee. Dr.
Howard Hewett. Dr. Daniel Kindler. Last row
are Mesdames Leonard Wailach. Irving
Rosenfeld. Norman Emmer. Julian WohL and
Morris Greene.
Mrs. Kanner Gets
Another Term
Sisterhood of Temple Israel of
Greater Miami again elected Mrs.
.Aaron Kanner president at a meet-
ing this week
Vice presidents are Mrs. Joseph
P.uffner. Mrs Jack Levkofi. Mrs.
Elmer Lesie. and Mrs. Sol Lev
Recording secretary will be Mr-
Joseph Buskin, with Mrs. Martin
Parnes as corresponding secretary.
and Mrs. Louis Gorfine. financial
secretary.
Sisterhood now numbers over
600 members, making it one of the
largest women's organizations in
Dade county.
Activities include Braille for the fij
band, auxiliary to the Sunday /
school, and sponsorship of youth
camp funds to stimulate religious
interest.
US. 11 AM CUM
/
MORE
DELICIOUS
Mrs. Elkin Named Branch Manager
_. n. *- _.___ nn__. pili- M .. ...i^
convention Upl|
jooK review ummu i *. ihwpu the theme of a tm
31anca hotel Wednesday. The re- rael. and the delegates' r
1 Saturday evening is called
Off Time." Rose Obfetz.
first novel. Long ly Ho,
just off the press, u in cbansj
the meeting. She will n
cerpts from her book and
autographed copies to viutaj |
nitaries.
Sunday noon. foUowiai n
Mrs Milton S. Malakofl. execu- <* workshop meetings, tat
tive secretary of Temple Beth Sho- junch*00 he directed In
lorn, represented Beth Sholom at a! EDa *" Mrs. Bernard
convention of temple executives of ** chairmanoftbed
the Xauonal Assn. of Temple Sec- d""" Sunday night The'
retanes from Liberal Jew,*, coo-1 *ory wulbe narrated by
Stanley Beckerman. as a eta
Hollywood women dramalae
tale
The Monday evening _
"Spring in the Xeger," has;
chairman Mrs. Murray
president of the HoUyW-l
Lauderdale chapter Into
will be given by Mrs. L il
Zornberg. and music will te!
nished by Mrs. Lena Santa.
ist, accompanied by Mrs.
Bennett at the piano.
Mrs. A. Tuhn. national
chairman, will address tat
I and the principal speaker
I Dr. Saul K. Padover. dean of k|
j New School of New York.
The conference will daw '
Fire on the Mountain." by Mil- day with a Bon Voyage
lard Lampell. is the play to high- J under the direction of Ma
light Miami Beach chapter of Ha- Rosen,
das'ah's celebration of Israel's
tenth anniversary May 5 at the
Eden Roc betel. Mrs. Joseph Sha-
piro is peeewtent.
Donor reward luncheon chair-
; man is Mrs. Edward Holefceaer.
and Miss Lillian Goodman will be
program chairman.
Dance ensemble will be by Stu-
dent Junior Hadassah. and Miam
gregataons in the Western
sphere last week
The conference was held at the
Bellerive hotel and Congregation
B'nai Jebudah in Kansas City. Mo.
The group is affiliated with the
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations, which represents 550
Liberal temples in the Western
hemisphere with a t^tal member-
ship of 1.000.000 men, women and
children-
Delegates participated in 25
workshops led by experts in vari-
ous fields of business and religion.
Bch. Chapter Has
Anniversary Fete

David Sturm, president. C
1 Federal Savings and Loan Assn. of
Haaiean. has announced the
appointment of Mrs. Jear. K -
manager of the association's newly
opened North Hialeah Branch a:
4696 Palm ave. adjacent to the
Municpal Auditorium
Mrs. Elkin's appointment to
branch manager is her second pro
motion since joining the associa-
tion as savings officer in Decerr.
Mrs. E.kin--------i~.ssist.nt -* "l^Jl?*****
...uitb Imported
Swiss Knight
Cheese!
The nut-sweet never ef tree,
imported Gruyere ch.ssa fltwea
new test to food r.nd beverages
Wonderful for TV snnnka. and
as a dessert or lunch*** treat.
Package contains handy
bite-size" wedges. Try Swiss
Knight today!
Imported
Swiss Knight*
secretary with the Wilkinsburg
Federal S.vir.gs and Loan Assn.
for 11 years. She is gr.du.t.
of the Noble-Thompson Business
Cell*;, in Pittsburgh and is .n
active mnbtr in tho American
Savings and Loan Institute.
Location of the new branch,
which i the first for Citizens Fed-
raJ was chosen with a vie* to
66 At the annual meeting Providing better service to the in-
m January, she was elected to the creasing o*lS of the residents of
position of assistant secretary be rapidly expanding North ,i.a
leah area. Stuzin exp.ained.
In addition to Mrs Elkin. other
statf members include Mrs Bern-
Harrison, new accounts, and!
Charles Prather. teller Mrs. Har- j
Slate Saturday Beach Party ri*n and Prather have both been
Maccabees. Temple Beth Sholom P"1> employed in similar ca-1
'Young Adults, will have a beach *** \n ,he raalD l
party at Bakers Haulover Saturday Mia,eaa <""-
evening. Citizens Federal Savings' newj
A car pool wiD leave from the |>,,r',!,Chfimakes ***** TS**1,
Temple at 8 15 p.m.. and the party mst,,ut,t* the Hialeah-Miami
will start at 9 Spnngs area to establish and op
r M ii v ^ .w erate a branch office
Tedi Miller is chairnfan of the The new branch w.ll maintain
affair, assisted by Stella Biff door ^ Mm committee. Stan Josowuz and Ira main ofllce 9:30 a m t0 3
3JTl* re,rh,nent- f "^ Bob Monday through Fnday. and ot
Marnotes. entertainment wrve bo,h Fami)> Xigh> ^ _
In charge of information for day night between 8 and 8
rides are Dave Kleinman and Sam and Ladies
Softdinger
David Andron will be narrator. The
entire production in under the di-
rection of Trixie Levin
Cantor Israel Reich, of Temple
F.maru El. will conduct the Hadas-
sah Choral Group.
Proceeds for Cancer Research
Chairmen of Orah chapter. Miz-
rachi Women. Miss Helen Bond
and Mrs. Irene Miller will sponsor
a dance Saturday evening at the
hotel Proceeds are for
the children of Israel.
MILCHIG
\ forBABfg
Prior to meving to Florida,
Beth Sholom Young AdoHs
m
SWISS
rVttfCM
p.m .
Day, the thud Wed
: neday of each month
LuSQHfrteSSfilt C9JL
Served pUia it's jma pt*in dditiomi
. tapped wHh icv-cfcaoi. fruit or ber-
ries, it's a peak-of-the-menu dessert!
Wk katt rt saw I
Dromeaa
DATE.NUT ROLL
TETUEY
TEA
A TRADITION
IN JEWISH
HOMES
SINCE 1837
Yes, there'* Yoss Tov spirit in
this fine tea.. ."flavor crushed"
for fullest strength and .cumu-
lation ... richer tats* and sasns-
ure with your ileishigt aad
milcbigs and between meal
refreshment...
If. Wikhio! )f^t\
Custard U the only *"
* with asask ^ofl,o"Si
in k. Makes it "^
than milk inH.Er fr
.or, recommend H^
.et^ustard for bsby
orange, lemon. str-^Jj
berry, chocoi..^'"
wpk. At your ***


April 25, 1958
T ,>.
1
33 1 "* SSSJ 'Jl p i
Ky ^^^B^^^^ / ^^^B k^^A*' S* V
W^Sm^^'j 4Mb
1 ^a^^H 5j(
HKtk. ^ ^lSI
j Lamarr narrowly misses injury in this scene from drama
(female Animal." Her rescuer, George Nader, playing
Lecure movie extra, also is being lifted to his ieet. Bolides
j two, story of conflict between mother and daughter stars
?owell and Jan Sterling. CinemaScope production starts
lay at Wometce's Carib, Miami and Miracle Theatres.
|or Stern Presents Viola Concert;
Joan Field Also in Mozart Work
Stern, assistant professor i grams for elementary school c'uil-
at the school of music of
yefsity of Miami, present-
sixth annual recital in
|>nt Hall Monday evening.
is known throughout Dade
[for his string quartet pro-
>man to Chair
|ional Program
Jaffe, of Birmingham,
resident of the Southeast re-
the Zionist Organization of
Wednesday announced
Ipointment of Seymour B.
Miami Beach attorney
(mediate past president of
Uthcast region, as regional
and education chairman.
lan will coordinate the pro-
>nd educational work of the
ricts in the seven-state re-
lan has just returned from
|al meeting of the ZOA Na-
Idministrative Council.
^imiiTMErn^
orkers \. siXVfCf
LL 5th St. Fl 94401
III. MEIOENBERO, Ownw
endabU
*tk Help
bk Day
dren. As director of the Univer-
sity of Miami String Quartet he
has presented concerts for 30,000
children in over 70 schools during
the last two years.
George Roth, of tho piano fac-
ulty of tho school of music,
accompanied Stern at tho harpsi-
chord for tho C.P.E. Bach So-
-nata for Viola and Harpsichord.
Also on tho program was Sonata
for Unaccompanied Viola by
Max Roger.
Highlight of the recital was
the presentation of Mozart's Sym-
phonie Concertante for Violin. Vi
ola and Orchestra. Joan Field was
guest artist in this work.
Miss Field, American virtuoso
violinist, is well-known to Miami
audiences. She has appeared in
recitals and as solo artist witi>
many symphony orchestras, in-
cluding the New York Philhar-
monic. Detroit Symphony, Chat-
tauqua, and others.
She has also had two guest ap-
pearances with the University of
Miami Summer Symphony.
John Bitter, dean of the school
of music and conductor of tlie sym-
phony orchestra, led an or-
chestra composed of students and
faculty for the Mozart work.
Mental Health Fair
At Temple Israel
All Day Wednesday
Temple Israel of Greater Miami
will be the site of the Mental
Heal'h Fair snonsored hy the Men-
tal Health Society of Greater Mi-
ami all day Wednesday, lempie
Israel spiritual leader Dr. Joseph
Narot has been designated overall
Fair chairman.
lneme is "Everybody Has Prob-
lemsWhat are Yours." The Fair
will be high point of Miami's ob-
ervjDce ui N^Uo^UatentsdJiealUi]
Week Apr. 27 to May 3. Co-chair-
man with Dr. Narot is Mrs. T. K.
Nelson Sterling.
Sections and their chairmen are:
The Children are Grown What
Now?" Dr. Syvil Marquit; "Menial
Illness," Dr. Harry Dean; "Psy-
chosomatic Illness," Dr. A. Lester
Stepner; "Marriage." Seymour
Siegel; "Teacher Parent School
Program," Miss Margaret Gilkey.
"Senior Citizens," Miss Hazel
Chafin; "Alcoholism," Dr. Louis
Rogel; "Community Services for
he Recovered Patient," Miss Mar-
garet Pearson; "Religion and Men-
tal Health," Rev. Dale Ratliff;
"Fears and Prejudice," Seymour
Samet; "Parents of Mentally Re-
tarded," Allen R. Cohen; "Parents
Without Partners," Mrs. Laura
Ross; "Sex Education," Dr. L. W.
Elgin; "Parent Children's Pro-
gram," Mrs. John L. Bagg.
Chairman of hostesses at the
Fair is Mrs. Jack Levkoff. Chair-
men are Mesdames Cecelia Elliott,
Max Oser, Ben Rich and Marvin
Tanner. Mrs. Joseph Ruffner is
chairman of the refreshment bar.
7-B
Dorothy Belson (third from left) receives Playtime Magazine's
"Woman of the Year" award as husband Elliott (right) looks
on. With active couple are noted entertainer Jimmy Durante
and Mrs. Jennie Grossinger, renowned philanthropist and
hotelwoman.
UM Groups Slate Verdi's 'Requiem1
The ninth and last pair of the
University of Miami Symphony
series May 4 and 5 will end the
31st season on a high note.
The University of Miami will
combine its musical forces, the
University of Miami Symphony
and the University Chorus of 110.
With them will be these four
well-known New York artists as
soloists: Frances Biblo, mezzo-so
prano; Heidi Krall, soprano; Jon
Crain, tenor; and Kenneth Smith,
baritone.
They will be heard in a presenta-
tion of Guiseppi Verdi's "Re-
quiem."
Wilfred Smith, choral director,
has been rehearsing the chorus
since Jan. 1. The entire perform-
ance will be under director John
Bitter.
Miami Theater Supporters
To be Cited Wednesday
Miami's own recognition of those
who have contributed generously
and zealously to the cause of Thea-
tre Arts and Culture will take
place at the Biscayne Terrace hotel
Wednesday evening.
For the first time in the history
of the Miami Theatre Conference
nominees will be publicly honored
for service rendered to legitimate
theatre and the perpetuation of
stagecraft in the community.
The presentation of the first an-
nual "Muse Award," similar to the
Oscar, Emmy and Tony, is expect-
ed to stimulate new interest in the
work of the Conference, dedicated
to the encouragement of live thea-
tre in the area.
JGa,
%.
wrmries
the home of
SUNSHINE FASHIONS'
U.8. pat. oft.
Ml MIAMI MACN FT. lAUDERDAU rIST fMM
FOR THI
INfOHMALS
INVITATIONS
CALLING CARDS
ANNOUNCIMINTS
"THANK YOU" NOTtS
fltSONAl STATIONUY
Out wedding consultant will display a com
plete selection in the comfort ol you' hmt
Phone HteftkNn 3-4634 -
;fr
r;
116 N E Stti Stfeet. Miaan. f lorida
Vacation at Wonderful
DUNCRAGGAH
INN
"in fhe land of the Sky"
HENDERSONVILIE, N. C.
Secluded 16 acres; private
swimming pool; entertain-
ment; golf nearby. Amer-
ican plan; superb Jewish-
American cuisine; rea-
sonable rates; children's
counselor. Your new
hosts: Irene and Al Wise
. Blanche and George
Goodfriend.
Write far free brecharef
tol 1029, Hendersoiville, H.C
SUMMER CAMP
rA SURE
HIT!
MIAMI
MILITARY
ACAOEMY
lOMi use. live.
MIAMI at. ML
OPENS JUNE 16th
Pho.. PI 7-4*21
Good News for Those Who Want the Best in Camping
THE FAMOUS
CAMPS
WILL ACCEPT A FEW MORE
CAMPERS FROM THIS AREA
Enrollment Strictly Limited
* High in the Poceno Mountains. 90 miles from
Philadelphia, or New York.
-k Separate Camps on opposite side of the beau-
tiful private Blue Mountain Lake (1 mile long).
-k Long-established Organization of expert lead-
ers and Specialists in Sports, Crafts, Hobbies.
-k Outstanding Record of Health and Safety. Ex-
perienced Physician and Nurses reside in Boys'
Camp and Girls' Camp.
38th Season-Same
Ownership-Management
(Mr. and Mrs. Morris J. Escoll)
Blue Mountain Camps have long been noted for
their healthful, mountain-top Locationspacious
Lawns and Playing Fields (over 600 acres)mod-
ern Buildings and Equipment fine Food and
home Baking mature Counselors and variety
of Athletic and Cultural Activities.
Many children from Miami and Miami Beach
have been coming to Blue Mountain Camp, season
after seasonincluding a number of "2nd-gener-
ation" campers. They travel by plane, escorted
by counselors from Miamiand reach Camp in a
few hours.
FOR LITERATURE AND INFORMATION
CALL OUR FLORIDA REPRESENTATIVE:
MRS. MILTON MANNHEJMER
1014 W. 47th Ct, Miami Beach IE 8-4461
"Suil and. JjuC
SUMMER CAMP
JUNE, JULY AND AUGUST
DAY CAMPERS
BOARDING CAMPERS
I BOYS and GIRLS
Dinaltwltt Alt tlirtltliel
UetHod ReeMreMea
ji i-327i ji -iosa
QXKW
ON THI IAY
1204 West Ave- Mleml
"Cempiay At In *uL~sHBBn


r


8-B
Fridoy. April 25. 1981
+Jntrlf'>i
Friday< April 2.r>. 1958
9-B
WKrfc.in
mwm Munow
m. s. C4tr stun
Stern, Levitt Exchange Vows
he late Bernard Stern. 12404 NE
Isl avi' N Miami.
Matron of honor al the- candle-
Nlta Irene Levitt became Mm
S. Gary Stern In noon nie Apr 20
in New York City.
The bride la the daughter of Mr
and Mrs. Al Levitt, lttltf Michigan
ave.. Miami Death. The groom la
the ton of Mra. Dorothy Stern and
Reception Fetes
25th Anniversary
A reception In observance of the
commencement of Chase Federal
Savinga and Loan Assn.'* 25th year
In buainesa was held Friday at the
Lincoln rd. office with Chaw pi
Mont Charles L. Clements, Sr., as
boat.
Clements, who has been man
aging officer and president of the
Miami Beach financial institution
since it was chartered in 1934. was
the only active member of the a*-
sociation when it opened for busi-
ness at 1141 Lincoln rd. with assets
of I10.8S2.
Teday. Chata Patfiral employ*
a staff ef mere than 90 among
few eWica* A fifth U cWed-
ulee te *en In Mey. *-et at
4 *.r. 1 war. S7B.4S4.S&S. an
\n* Ws*e imn.
\ 4 %M r
light ctri ninny was Mrs. Kayo
Mcyerowitz, Ucllc Harbor. LI.,
aunt of the bride. Junior brides
maids were her cousins, Claudia
and Janet Meyerowitz, Carol Wol
ash snd Karen Dnllingcr. Another
cousin. Leigh Terry Schwartz, was
flower girl
Boat man for his friend was for-
mer Miami Beachlte Stanley Klein
Uahcrs were cousin of the groom
Martin Cowan and Martin Meyer
owitz, the bride's cousin. The
groom's neph.-w, Ross Sherman,
was ring bearer.
Newlywcd Mrs. Stern is a grad-
uate of Miami Beach High School.
Her husband received his BPA de-
gree from the University of Miami.
A reception and dinner followed
the ceremony. After a two-week
honeymoon in Nasiau, the couple
will be at home .it 7720 Abbott
Miami Beach.
Miss Finkelstein
In Poie de Soie
Miss Hindu 1 Finkclslrin and
irwm l Mualow wars dmi rted Sal
urduy night. Apr 19, at the K\ I
hotol Rabbi Mayor Abrwnowiu
performed tin- ceremony, which
mi followed bj rocoptlon and
dinner
'Hii bride is iIn- daufhtf* of lr
tnd Mts lol Flnkelatcln
Cri i-i ill 'I Mi.urn Botch 1 <'
groom'i parents in Mr, and Mn
il\ man Mualow, Ihn repot l, La
jsnies Mualow, skisoi In
law of the groom, was matron of
honor, and Marru \i i lasts bra hoi
of the groom, ictod s boat M
The bride's gown ol imported,
mi i i hMtUl) la
featured a buck in.i-rt ol lace,
quarter length lace sleeves
and a scoop neckline The prlncca*
nun fell into a ehapel train.
Hi i -I- uhle tiered French lllllslilli
veil fell from a seed pearl crown
The bride is a graduate ol Mi
ami lle.i.h High School Mr MU
low graduated irom Louialana
Slate I nivcr-.ity He is now an
attorney.
Afier a hnneymoon to .1 imalca
and New Orb-ana, the couple will
reside at 1923 Bayou dr Shrive-
port, La.
ave.
mm ouiHst
HIM KOS:M0:i
KISS CONI.f
These Girls Flan To Change Names
Mr .iihI Mrs l.du.'iid Cohen Tl 1 son of Mr and Mi- Jack Itiiliin
i Miami Beach annjounca M Beacon btvfj
id.- enga tameol ol tholr daughter,! June 15 is the .late set for the
llarlNirn Nanette to Gary Krunk. | wedding.
North Shore Ladies
To Inslal Officers
Mrs sun Bolaky will bo InataU
d prei id. ill ol N.iltll Slime Jl
ih Cantor Blatorbood at a amor
ial hi .1 upper s iturday evening
May it il the le:lil i|| lintel
11 ii.: in be Inatalled Include lb
ifi dame Al Mochlou Its, irv Ini
lib "ii Hay M0111 Louisa Huh'
Hid BaOl llohouset vice | rl
idonta
1 ii Mi- 1 m-.-s Hyman ll.-rg.id,
'reaauror; Morris Hlndon, llnancii
ii); AImh SehleNiu :er, re
-ordlng set ratal I.tllmn Rnthi
hild 1.' 101 rstary; fri ik Nan
in, .hi. pondin icon lary, Ma-
Craui 1 '1 ipla n. Milton M mn
1' tm parliamentarian; and Jot
.ph Ichwarts, kiatorian.
Die (unction will ba a combined
affair, wiih the InstaUation of con
grcgaliou and MtO'l Club officers
alko scheduled.
son of Mr. and Mrs. Barney Frank,
NightMown. N.J.
Cohen ettenda the Univer-
sity of Miami and is 0 m.-mlicr .if
Alpha E|wilnn Phi sorority.
Mr. Frank is a member of Phi
Bpellor. Pi fraternity at the Uni-
vanity Of Miami where he is ma
joring in political science A June
wedding in planned.

Resenson Dorfeld
Miss Ada Rosenson will be mar-
ried in May to Howard Porfeld
1 he -nil of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel
Dorf.ld of New York
The announcement I* made by
the bride-elect's parents, Mr. and
Mra. Samuel B. Rosenson. 2257 SW
llth xt
Miss Rosenson received her
Mi s Has* is .1 graduate nl Mi
.mn Beach Hi. Ii School and at-
tended 1 he I'nivemity of Alabama
and Northwestern Cnivcralty
where she was a member of Sigma
Dilta Tau sorority.
Mr Rubin graduated from Mi-
ami High School and F.mory I'm-
vnuty where he was .. memlx-r of
Tau F.psil.m l'hi fraternity lie 00
tamed a Bachelor of Laws degree
from University of Florida

Onerst Katcher
The engagement of Miss Cecily
Ann Oberat, daofhtav of Mr. and
Mrs. Harry Oberst of Miami Beach
and New York, to (ierald Katcher
of Jamaica F.states, N.Y.. is an-
nounced.
Miss Oberst. a graduate of High
Bachelors and Master s degrees ,in(J Manor S(.,,()| for <;.,,. at.
fn>m the University of Florlds. 1 tmdca ,nc University of Wlscon-
Mr Dorfold attended New York,,m and u m studying at the
,f University of Miami.
Her fiance graduated magna
cum laude from Brooklyn College
where he wan elected to Phi Beta
Kappa. He received his Bachelor
of Laws degree from Yale Law
School where he was Case Editor
of the Yale Law Journal and aerv-
ed on the law faculty. Mr. Katcher
ia a member of the New York Bar
and the Yule Club of New York
August Wedding For Bride-Elect
Mr ami Mn. Aliruhum Wanner i Cutler. aon of Mr. und Mm. Abe
announce niwmeil <>t Ihcti I Cutler.
tUuichtiT. Sl Re. to JmoK(
Brooklvn. He is a member of the
Masonic Lodge and an Army vet-
eran.

Prankel Furmm
Mr. and Mrs William Frankel,
825 KHih St. SurfMde. announce the
engagement of their daughter,
Rosemary, to Richard I. Furman.
son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Fur-
man. 175 Alton rd.. Miami Beech.
A Julv wivMing is planned.
Miss Frankel attended the Uni-
yrally 1 t Miami where she WSI I
in. miter ol Alpha Epatlon Phi so
rortt) and is now 11 < ni.'i St Hal
nnril Colleue In New York.
Next Cull rfe aSMeta to atlen.l
tke Unlverxlty of Miami gmaSua*e
ct.il
1 at~i..
. h..l>rHlili> li\ KnU-
Coodman Straus*
Mr and Mrs Itert (loodman. 740
loth at., Miami Bosch, announce
the em:...vim-nt ol their daughter.
Judith Myrnu. to William Josejih
Struims. mm> of Mr. und Mra. Solo-
mon Slruuaa. Brooklyn, NY.
Ttie l>rldo-.|** la a araduate of
Miami llrnt-h lllnl. H-*1mI an.l a*
Sholem Installs
In Beach Fete
The lucerne hotel has been se
ICCted as the -.lie lor the Sholeu
B'nal Until instslistloi
banqUOl lo be held Sunday even
ing. May 4.
Robatl J. l^wison. Miami attar
ley, will lie installed as president
Serving on th.- executive commit
ee w.th Lewiaon are preajdossj
leel Col Sidtiev II PalmiT am'
rice prealdents F.d Klein and 1.1
Hurwitz.
Other officers are treasurer
David Rsyv'is; corresponding sec
retary. Sanford Freed; recording
secretary, Saul Bloke; financial
secretary, Harry S. Schwartz; war
len. Dave Meltzar; assistant war
1.11, LitUo Kngelmsn; montior.
Nst Newmsn; sssiatsat monitor.
Phil Abrams; guardian, Harr>
ftondman; aaslstant guardian, Joe
Parker.
Trustees arc Leo Axelrod. Philip
Berkowitz, Ben Essen. Sam Fried
man, William Friedman. Prank
Jaffe. Bernard Uberman. Bernard
Newmark, Martin Parnes. Sem
Schlndler and Ben Temeles.
A highlight of the evening will
he the presentation of a bronze
plaque and "Paat President'a Pin"
to retiring preaident Harry S
Schwartz Presentation will be
made hy awards chairman Judgi
MiU.in A Kriedmnn Marx Faber
paat president of Sholem LotSge,
will be loaatmaaler.
Bernurd Newmark and Ed Klein
r In charge of rrniiemeiil
ind rawvtlwu.
Chosen Seminar Icodtr
Mra. Ethel Groaaman. aupervli
..( th.- Greater Miami Jewish Ooml
innndy Center nursery schools.1
will be one of the weekday kinder[
garten seminar loader* at OH
Interdenominational Laborator
School spon-aTt'd by the educatit
department of the Greater Miami
Council of Churches Apr 17 U
May 2 at the First Methodist!
Church, KM Coral Way She wl
discuss "Philosophy of Dlsclplinf
and How lo Maintain It" at til
iflcrnoon session May 2.
Dobbin, dauqhttr oi Mr. and
Mm. Morris Libwrman, 7925
ll.iwihorno ave., will become
Fldt Milzvth f'liday svonlnq,
Apr. 25, at North Shore Jew-
ish Contor. Rabbi Mayor
Abramowilz will- o i f 1 c I a I o.
Debbio is a student in Center
rcliqioun school and attends
Nautilus Junior Hltih.
Annual Donor Luncheon
Ner Tsmld Rislernood will hoi
its first annual donor lunrheog
Wednesday noon at the Diplomat
Country Club Mra. lister l.ssk|
la chairman Meadamri Mathef
Pay ton and Charles Itaab are Cfl
chairmen Mrs. Fannie Sklar I
pre ident.
founder's Day Dinner
Alumni of Temple UnlversltJ
will hold an annual Founder's Dal
dinner early In June. Prelimlnar
srrangements sre bring made
Austin Burke, JK 8 14U2. and MrsJ
Ruth Lockharl, secretary. MO 14
3510
'fair ladies in fftviaV
North Shore Jewish Center I
tcrhood met for lunch last
st the Carillon hotel. Mrs.
Mechlowitz, chairman, said tt
"Fair Lndlee in Review," directs
by member Mra. Esther Bloct
was presented as part of the en-
tertainment for the afternoon.
Ml. AND MIS, 6010UM
Goldbergs Leave
For Israel Tour
Mr and Mrs. Max Goldberg, 328
NE 22nd st., are leaving this week-
end for New York.,
On May 7 they 'will embark 00
he Queen Mary for tendon, and
rum there will fly to larael.
Their first slop will be Nathanya.
hers the) will vlsn 1 ephew and
11.. 1. Mr. ami Mrs. Sulamal
N.idi I. who have liV.'d in larael (>>i
20 yrara; a nephew. Mayor Zolir:
and a c-oiinIii. S.hiih.'I f'rlt-Jlander.
rPROriicrl
PURS
ci-i
STOIs
Pbty lefel Store
riMM wHh Mi-
atl't aldest -
aaa aaetf rail-
oal* farrier .
Vault 1 an ear
transit**. free
I g ant i#rvlc.
* HONt
FR 4 4188
torn raws


Chase Federal.
| all chairman.
An Au-^ust wedding is planned.
Starting
our 25th
year
It is stimulating to look back through
the years of progresl... of growth from otM
office to four... of assets that have passed
the 77 million dollar, mark. But more
stimulating still is the realization that
this strong and conservative savings
institution looks forward with youthful
vigor to greater and more useful service.
Our business is more than safeguarding
savings, insuring each account up to
$10,000 with the Federal Savings and
Loan Insurance Corporation, and paying
generous dividends at the current rate of
3Vi% a year, compounded every six months.
Wrapped up with the funds we manage are
the hopes and aspirations of people:
your dreams of new homes, your children's
education, your comfortable old age.
To aid you in your financial planning for
happier living will continue to be our
inspiration as we sta^t our 25th year.
C. L. CLIMBNTI. Pr..ldnt
Chase
FEDERAL
vino AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
n
See our unusual display of rare photographs show-
ing the amazing growth and progress of Miami
Beach since 1934 ... Lincoln Road office, every
dayMonday through Friday 9 AM to 4 PM.
LINCOLN ROAD \
No.llOO at Lmoi Avno
FORTY FIRST STREET
n> 42* at narldan Avanwa
COLLINS AVENUE
at 7th "V
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
t 3r



COO-U, NOTICI

F
th under-In..
KO BAH -
Miami. Fl,
MTO With
Court of 1
L*W
.
Ouf-of-Towners
At Neil Goodman
Bar Mitzvah
Neil Franklin Goodman will be-
come Bar Miizvah dwnag Saturday
morning services. Apr. 26. of Tem-
ple Judea. Rabbi Morris Skop will
officiate.
Neil is the son of Mr and Mrs.
Sam S Goodman. 6236 SW lOtb
ter Miami
An honor student, be is in the
eighth grade of West Miami Junior
High School and a member of the
band.
Out-of-town guests at the Bar
Mitzvah ill include Neil's aunts.
Mrs Philip GrossJeld. Flushing.
NY. and Mr? Ted R. Mutt and
Mrs. Raphael SegaMf. New Haven.
Cor.- cousin. Miss Peggy
Pickus. New York Cry: and Mr.
and Mr- Joseph Hoffman, friends,
of New Ha\en.
Jeffrey A., sod of Mr. and
Mrs. Harry Cheen. will be-
come Bar Mitzvah during Sat-
urday morning services. Apr.
26. of Temple Beth Sholom.
Rabbi Leon Kronish will offi-
ciate.
David, son of Mrs Gertrude Soy-
der and Sam Snyder. 727 78th St..
Miami Beach, will become Bar
Mitzvah Saturday morning. Apr.
26. at the North Shore Jewish Cen-
ter Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz will
officiate David is a student in re-
ligious school of the Center and at-
tends Nautilus Junior High
aMtTM KATZ
Martin Katz
Bar Mitzvah
Martin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Sid-
ney Katz. will become Bar Mitzvah
Saturday. Apr 26. at the Israelite
| Center.
Martin is a student in the Israel
' ite Center religious school and will
be one of the first students to grad-
uate.
Martin is in the seventh grade
' at Ponce de Leon Junior High.
Out-of-town guests will be Mr.
and Mrs. Samuel Katz. uncle and
aunt. Flushing. L.I and Mrs. Elsie
Cbernofsky and family. Baltimore.
Md.
Jonathan, son of Mr. and
Mm. Harold Turk, will be-
come Bar Mitzvah Saturday
morning at Temple Emanu-
EL Jonathan is a seventh
grade student at Nautilus
and attends Temple Emanu-
? religious school. Dr. Her-
man M. Cohen will officiate.
Grand Union Opens
Lauderdale Market
Yernon C. Hill, president of
Grand Union Supermarkets. Inc .
Florida Division of Grand L'aion
Company, announced the opening
Wednesday of the 13th Grand
Union operated supermarket in
Florida at Wilton Manors. Ft.
Lauderdale.
The new 28.000 sq. ft. super-
market is located at 2633 N. Dixie
hwy Wilton Manors, and is the
third new Grand Union store open-
ed in Florida since November.
Hill also stated that six addi-
tional Grand Union Supermar-
kets are in various staves of con-
struction and all si* will bo open-
ed by the end or rho year.
The various departments in the
new Grand Union Supermarket in
l Ft. Lauderdale will include gro-1
eery, meats, produce, dairy, and,
non-foods, including garden sup-
plies. The use of "Food-O-Mat." I
ultra-w.de aisles and nine checkout
\ stands will facilitate ease, and
speed of shopping.
Customer parking for 300 cars
is provided for in a huge parking'
lot facing N Dixie hwy. and NE
26th St.. in Wilton Manors.
Nationally. Grand Union, the
second oldest food chain in the
' nation, will open 40 new markets.
during the current fiscal year.
Currently operating food markets
in ten Eastern states, the District '
of Columbia. Canada, and Florida,
Grand Union reported sales ot
$427876.672 for the 52-week fiscal
year ended Mar. 1. 1958
Special Program
Due at Beth El
Sidney H. Palmer, president of
Congregation Beth El. announced
Wednesday the appointment of
Simon Seiden and A. P. Rosenberg
as committee members to arrange
for Israel's tenth anniversary cele-
bration Saturday at the congrega-
tion's Dora Avust Memorial Hall.
In cooperation with Greater Mi
I ami committee for Israel's tenth
anniversary celebration, the pro-
gram will be in the form of a Kid-
du*h following services
Hiehlight of the celebration will
be presentation of a Shofar to the
congregation by the Israel Bond
organization in recognition of Beth
El's participation in the purchase
and sale of bonds. Table arrange-
ments are in charge of Harry
Pearl
LEGAL NOTICE
Louis C. son of Mrs. Jack M.
Feuer. will become Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday, Apr. 26, at
Temple Beth Sholom. Rabbi
Leon Kronish will officiate.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HKKKItT QIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to encase In
t> Dl'N RITE LAfNPRT n.KAXKRS
t 4SO0 K r Miami. K.a .
lo rWn u!4 nnir with the
<"Vrk <>f th Circuit <"oun of I Hide
Count)'. Florida.
JACK Ml I.NICK
KK.\A kltolM ix
-U
HARNETT IVI.TZ
nejr foe
>H V U' I |
It
COUNTY^ ,N CHSjSLI
No. ;C x v't,"
iRACE H
Hlainti'r.
ja k a pra:
SUIT F-)R o Vinrc
TO: JACK R i VCE
' '
T..u. JACK
herebr not I -1 that a Blu'f,
plaint lor I> vorc* hna '
axalnsl you. and ,.-_-]
aerveaco; four Ju ~wtF
'1*. lo..Jh* mphUaT,
;>l..iMtlfr Att-rn.'. I>AVIIi V
UL MM I'.,-. 1>M HuUfc.1
ami IT, Florida and ni 1JJ7 '
Answer or I .., ,,
the Clrk of tl 'Won
before the 3rd da> of Ma; \vt\
MM fall to do I iimriit ii; S
will be taken afa nst )oa for thM
Ilrfdemandel li IOj
Th. notice shal. he psaaaaa
eiwh week t..r four asctUiu 1
n THE JEW infUSST
DONE AM' 'kDERiaj t U
Florida, this 22nd of Ami,
E B l-KATHKRVAN.
Circuit Court. I 'ad* Coaatr
By 1. A at.
HAVID M. OON.-ilAK
10 Bincaynr BuUdlac
Miami tl. Florida
Attorney f.ir T .
4 S. i'2-S-lf
IN THE ClRCU T COURT OF
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT!
FLORIDA IN AND
COUNTY IN CHANCE
No SsCUSJ
KESSIK PERMAX, ._
PkalaUn.
\ -
HTMAN PBRatAK,
Defenlant
NOTICE BY PUBLICATIM
Tt: HTMAN rKRMAX
IS Van Ren.-Uer Aiuum
Niagara r i Nes
TOf ARK rlKKEBT SO
hat a Cowips) IM tail
filed against you and >u are 1
tt. serve a n aiwwrroal
plaintiff* attorn. MICHAEL!
ISKXHKK"! Ihufcw
Miami St, Florida, and fw 0*1
inal In th oft f the Chntsl
Circuit Court on 11$, In default of hfc-h tktl
will be taken a* ooofaasst
you.
tinted this Etnd day of lanl |
ISM
K B LEATHnEMas.1
Circuit Ooa
frail I' JUAN O
Ikajan
4/SS. 5/I-S-l*
/i the oir'
UPHOLSTERING
Wo do moro thon
REUPHOLSTER.
Wo restylo vour tunvl-
tura to look BETTER
rhon new with tho fin-
est quality fabrics.
AH Our Ftones in
MiVoain FirwaK 8
CUSTOM MAM FURNITUM
FREI ESTIMATENO OiLIGATION
SLIP COVERS CORNICES
Who. it's UanofcM.ro. kT Or
It's oof to be
I0% AM COsssMriOsMO
Crtt. I
~t *Ml Sm Ooa (icee
si Crasss akracSw asd Staff
So* saaal. Ism Ms uttumt.
ail
root sun Mat
U uat HiSl IHUlii 19C
-M. ,
ar.lf;ao|l].?;.taotl|.I4.
Ms I.. aof.S.lt
tomi auaau Taotoayt *IB
4-DAY HAVANA NASSAU Cn
1 lossst Ssaoif ssMs*-aS > Manas
frtitj s BWrt. 71.lsatt.NMT4.ll.
ani.is.n
EASTERN SHIPPING CORPORATION Cent agent
O Sea 117 aa.oie 6 fta Il. f *'"
AKWorkFowr
- 0t 2t Ya-n r*- Coooio
' wiw rasar vaaaranraoo war taasrs r
I oiiii s Upholstery
5990 N.W. 7H. AVI. MIAMI PHONE PL 1-3715
Richard, son of Hi. and Mrs.
Harry Greenberg. 193 N.
Shore dr., will btxrome Bar
Mitzvah Saturday morning,
Apr. 26. at North Shore Jew-
ish Center. Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz will officiate.
Richard is a student in relig-
ious school of Center and at-
tends Nautilus Junior High.
ftrt Your Money to Work!
.n.urance n..w ,d
fk. for a bilahter
future wtotta) or
IN'
aWaMI
6 A If 9
AT
Reortaanting
Mefrooolittm Lift Insoronct Csaaaaav
"00 SW. 3ra Atrow., Mi^i
rhoam n 3-441* or HI o-9Wl
BIKUR CHOLIM KOSHER
CONVALESCENT HOME
NON PROFIT NON-SECTARIAN
SUPPORTED Y VOUR COIrlMUNlTY^^
mu CTOKT SOPEIVISJON OE TOI WAAf Rtf
24-HOUR NURSING DOCTORS ON CALL
AXL DIETS OBSERVED CONGENIAL ^^^L(
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iw*oos-


I. April 25, 1958
+-Jeistrk>rklian
ll-B
Commits
[Fracas Over
\iet Jewry
-(JTA)A severe crisis
ken out among Jews in the
Communist Party and in
nist-led organizations fol-
Ithe return to this country
legation of three prominent
I Communists to the Soviet
where they studied the po-
rf Jews. The (l.iree were M.
editor of the Jewish Com-
newspaper here, "Neue
Dr. J. Slacks and A. You-
prescnt crisis has its roots
eport received here five
ago of anti-Semitic prac-
the USSR, which resulted
ange in the editorial board
Presse.
last year, apparently at
isrence of French Commu-
er Jcqot Duclos, th
(Jewish Communists were
to Moscow to so* for
Ives ttio situation and
it was hoped, quiot tho
Jews in tho Fronch Corn-
Party.
their Moscow visit, the
:e in New
ibing Query
pi police Tuesday carried
ensive interrogation of Beth
fgregation members in an
track down further clues
dynamiting of the congrega-
month.
[the vandalism Mar. 16, ad-
| damage has been done to
fregation's facilities.
Z\ president Sidney Palmer
ek reported the additional
of windows some of
(placed following the bomb-
Jcipating in the interroga-
jesday were Palmer, con-
bn vice president Simon
and Rabbi Abraham Levi-
liritual leader of Southwest
Center, whose facilities
ireatened within days fol-
(the Beth El bombing.
&er Tuesday disclosed the
of a letter from the Na-
pouncil of Churches of Christ,
g the Mar. 16 event and
a check toward the re-
action of the damaged con-
ion. The amount was not
W.
Entertainers
I. Dade Center
awards of free weekends at
|gosy hotel will be presented
dimming pool rally Sunday
It! at the North Dade Jewish
ry K. Nixon has arranged the
binment.
|. Henry Gilbert, chairman of
oject, said the free weekends
be presented to those who
Bold the most tickets during
pril drive for the swimming
i be donated by Mr. and Mrs.
iiRust. of Mermaid Pools.
. Gilbert said that outstand-
Blent has been secured for
14. when a dance at the North
li Armory will climax the pro-
femy Appoints Appel
of /Membership Push
Jan executive committee meet-
lf the Hebrew Academy Sun-
1B. I. Binder, president ap-
d Reniamin Appel member-
Irhairman.
pel will launch a special mem-
fip campaign during the seven
period between Passover and
oth. Special radio and telo-
programs are also being
lied.
fisting Appel as co-chairman
e campaign will be Daniel
vice president of the He-
Academy.
three met with Shmuel Halkin of
the USSR Jewish Writers Commit-
tee and officials of the Soviet Min-
stry of Culture and Religious Af-
fairs. They asked for the publica-
tion of Yiddish books and news-
papers in the Soviet Union and ex-
pansion of Jewish cultural activi-
ties, but were turned down.
These facts were included in the
report of the delegation which was
presented at a meeting of the
French Communist Party central
committee during which, it was re-
ported. Dr. Shlages and M. Wilner.
a Stalinist, came to blows. These
differences are expected to ex-
plode shortly and cause a split
among Jews in the Communist
Party and affiliated groups.
VJGUST BROS Ry?
NOW
WE
We're Celebrating the opening of our
New Office at Meridian and 17th Street
... next door to Burdine's
and we want you to join in the
festivities... THURSDAY. MAY 1
The time is 10:30 AM for opening ceremonies.
With the establishment of this third office,
Washington Federal offers courteous savings
service convenient to every Miami Beach resident.
FREE GIFTS
AND FREE REFRESHMENTS for everyone who comes
in to say hello during our opening celebration.
HEAR AND MEET CLAUDE PEPPER
former United States Senator, during the
opening ceremonies at 10:30 AM Thursday at the
opening of our third office at Meridian Avenue
and 17th Street, next door to Burdinc's.
Open a new savings account for $50 or more at any of Washington Federal's three
offices during our opening celebration, and choose one of these beautiful and useful gifts.


1

,*
ENGLISH STEAK KNIVES Bearing the famous Sheffield brand,
these keen-edged knive* have stainless steel blades with serrated
edges. The beautiful black handles with 24-karot gold plated
bolsters will make this set a welcome addition to your home.

I
SAVINGS^AND lOAN'ASSOCIATION
I
assets
MORE THAN $37,000,000
3%*
MIAMI BEACH
JACK D. GORDON, President
ARTHUR H. COURSHON, Cnairmn of the Boord
SAVINGS ACCOUNTS INSURED
UP TO $10,000 BY AN AGENCY
OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
new residents: FREE transfer OF funds
FROM ANYWHERE IN THE UNITED STATES
dividend
three offices: 1244 WASHINGTON AVENUE 1120 NORMANDY DRIVE, NORMANDY ISLE MERIDIAN AVENUE AND 17th STREET


12-B
+ lev I ^ tierHiar
Hirschmann Report
Due at Board Meet
Ira Hirschmann, well-known ed-
ucator, author and friend of Is-
rael, will give an important re-
port on the Middle East situation
at a breakfast meeting scheduled
for Sunday at the Barcelona hotel.
The meeting, sponsored by the
State of Israel Bond Organization,
will finalize plans for the recep-
tion of Sir Leslie and Lady Plum-
mer. who will make a special trip
here to help Gii'Blei "MlalW cell
brate Israel's tenth anniversary at
a dinner in the Fontainebleau ho-
tel Tuesday.
Jacob Shr, Grjater Miami
chairman of Israel Bonds, de-
clared that a limited number of
teat* are still available.
Rabbi Leon Kronish has been
named toastmaster of the dinner
and assisting him will be a special
advisory committee comprised of
the following leaders of the com
m unity:
Rabbi Mayer AbnunowUt, William
Afranove, Sidney Anmn. Jonejih Ap-
{lebaum, Meyer A. Ha.-kin. iii-njanun
<-rlln. S.niu.l Clank. \\ IIIIhi.i Itorn-
eteliii Eejiepard Breed, Batnuel Brod .
JecH <*unt>r. Jack earner. Jooepta
Cohen, Leon km. Samuel N Med
land, Ohariea Pniehtnwn, Sfra i < i
Qlaaoer, Samuel Croj.*. Dr. Korrla
Goodman, Max Gottlieb, t'nl. William
J Harris. B. St. (Bu.ky) HalTia,
M.i n Ityman.
HoWanJ Kan.', .lack Kaixmnn. Sun-
Keaa, Samuel KlpnU, William
Kline. Max Krau, KhI>I>I Leon Kro-
nish. Samuel I .actinia n. I>r. Inmi:
1..-I rinaii. Oscar I.elchuk. |ia\.- L.-vin-
>>< ta-rnaiii li. Liberman, Marcie
l.lli-rni.in. Seymour l.iehman. Joeepb
Me. nu.w. Mr.-. Anna Brenner Meyers,
Benjamin Meyers, .tack Muravcluk.
tsii.iuel Drltt. Max omvlti.
Samuel HelnhaM. Jacob Rlfkin.
Joeepb li"-' Rabbi Taakov Rosen-
t Mr. i ii.ia Rubin, Pn Ruakln,
J-nh Serbin. Jacob Bner, William 811-
\. i. in. Hjim CHmonhorf, Mi- Bam-
ue Aljnonhoff, Joeepb Busnnnen, Oarl
Wemkle. Max WeltB, Mrs Max Weill.
ami Samuel Zilner
Fridcn
BB Youth Hold
Weekend 'College'
South Florida Council of B'nai
B'rith Youth Organization held a
three-day "college" last weekend
at the University of Miami lliliel
House.
"Deans" and "professors" of the
college were the youth leader-
ship in the Greater Miami area,
who geared their survey to dis-
cussions of B'nai B'rith Youth ac-
tivities and a new social action
program which BBYO has adopt-
Dr. Max Karl, regional direc-
tor of He National Conference of
Christians and Jews, Burnett
Roth, former vice mayor of Mi-
ami Beach, and Mrs. H. S. Aus-
tin, president of the United
Church Women of Greater Mi-
ami, were guest speakers.
President of the BBYO Council
is Bernard Weiner, member of 322
chapter Aleph Zadik Aleph. Co-
ordinator is Donald Bierman. vice
president Hurricanes AZA.
*
1
Sd
- ' Rabbi Leon Kronish, toastmaster of Israel Bond anniversary
dinner to be held at Fontainebleau hotel, lights ten symbolic
candles in celebration of Israel's birthday. Looking on is re-
tiring city manager Sidney Glazier._________________________
Social highlight of the weekend
was a semi-formal dance Sat-
urday night Chairman of this
event was Iris Bell, corresponding
secretary, Tsion chapter, B'nai
B'rith Girls. Religious services
took place Friday night con-
ducted by the youth, with Marvin
Schiller, Hurricanes AZA. acting
as "rabbi."
Lefcoe Gets New
College Honor
George Lefcoe. of 2120 SW 21st
St.. Miami, has been elected pres
ident of the Jewish Life Council at
Dartmouth College. Son of .Mr.
and Mrs. Maurice Lefcoe, he is a
junior at the Hanover, N.H., col-
The Jewish Life Council sponsors
weekly religious services and pro-
motes programs-for students on
campus.
A graduate of Miami Senior High
School, Lefcoe has been president
oi his class at Dartmouth (ur the
past year Recently, he was award
a Senior Fellowship. This award
will enable him to work on a pro-
gram of independent research dur-
ing his final year at the college
Miami, Gables ZOA
Districts in Merger
Miami and Coral Gables Zionist
Districts Wednesday merged into
a single chapter to be known as
the Miami-Gables Zionist District.
The Miami Zionist District, third
oldest in the Southeast region, and
the Coral Gables District, founded
ten years ago, have merged "in
order better to service their Jew-
ish communities." Gil Rappaport,
ZOA Southeast region director, ex-
plained in announcing the merger.
A meeting to elect officers of
the new chapter will be held
Tuesday evening et the Israelite
Center. Ephraim Collins is pro-
gram chairman.
Assisting Collins are Mr. and
I Mrs. Morris Simon, Mrs. Pauline
' I.evick. Mr. and Mrs. Isidore B.
1 Sacks. James David Liebinan. Sam
Traurig, Moses Meyer. Harvey
j Sootin, Louis Shapiro, and Rabbi
i B. Leon Horowitz.
Presidents of the merged dis-
tricts were Sam Levine, Miami,
and Monte Rast.ner, Coral Gables.
MU QtUi
MUVIN KICHAKD
N. Shore Lodge
In Triple Fete
North Shore Lodge of B'nai
B'rith will celebrate three big
events in on affair at 6 p.m. Sun-
day In the Americana hotel.
The lodge win install new offi-
cers and directors, mark the tenth
anniversary of the lodge and the
tenth anniversary of the State of
Israel.
Miami Beach City Councilman
Melvin J. Richard will be installed
as president. Vice presidents to be
installed are George Baltuch. Fred
Jonas. Dr. Robert Rosen and Jack
Wilson. I
E. Albert Pallo*. Miami attorney
and District Grand Lor'ge 5 B'nai
B'rith president, will be installing
officer. Pallot recently returned
from a B'nai Britjusponsored trip
to- Israel.
Members and guests will dance
to the music of A. Haiduck. Jack
Wilson is banquet chairman.
Raft of H.
For Jack Graff]
Jack Graff was awirtMj
prise by the American Iu|
Electrical Engineers at tael
sity of Florida.
He was also chosen to i
UF in a district piper and L
contest at Duke UnivtnM
week.
Graff will address He I
Engineers Society wfw )|
in Tampa late in J
The son of Mr. sod Mrs. |_
Sands. 2031 SW 82nd pL,|
receive his engineering i
June.
An active member o( Pi j
Phi and Sigma Tau,
gineering fraternity,
enter Georgetown Uai
study patent law.
W fluiuaiits*MftaV T...ui
Kaopj,. M. I'.uina I \ llr-ta
UM to be Host At Gables Fete
University cf Miami will play
host to the Ci'v (1f Coral Gables'
celebration of Israel's tenth anni-
versary Sunday evening, May 4.
The 8 p.m. function is scheduled
for Bcaumon; Hall on the main
campus of the universitv
?ar-
Speake-s wil" inrludt E. Al-
bert Pallot, District S B'nai
B'rith president, who has iost
returned from a trip to Israel,
end State Rap. Verle A. Pope,
of St. Augustine.
Dr. H. Franklin Williams, vice
president of the University of Mi-
ami, will bring greetings.
Featured entertainment will be
by the String Sinfonietta of Tem-
ple Judea, Robert Strassburg, con-
ductor.
Becker Wins Top ill
Noted Miami Beach|
er E. Allen Becker1
awards at the Southeast 1
tion in Atlanta, Ga.
Becker has been a
winner with his ch
ana salon photograi
tional, national and:
petition.
Becker's studios It i
frey rd. and Alton fcirnii,
galleries of bus
prints.
MIAMI BEACH
{llMllr.co'nRd. W71I
, n.n 1-331? n.\
picrn
CUSTOM TAMW
1104 LINCOLN ROAD
Miami *
9473 HAPn-MR AVENWJ
Surfsait. -aj
H A B E IDA*.1..'.!
J4fk reor ea AW
Merger to be Speaker
Edwin Marger, Miami attorney
and president of Miami Beach
B'nai B'rith Lodge, will be guest
speaker Saturday, 8:30 p.m.. at the
Spinoza Outdoor Forum, 11th st
and Ocean ct. Marger will speak
on "Life in Czechoslovakia."
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I April 25, 1958
+JelshfhrkHair)
13-B
to Chair Federation Annual Meet;
lose Heads Nominations Committee
ank has been named
! the 20th annual meet-
Greater Miami Jewish
iin Blank, Federation
Aaron Kanner Wednes-
jted out that the first or
nal meeting of Federation
in Sam Blank's home in
[standard Brands, Inc.
is Federation president
(and Has been a member
ration'* beard si gewern-
txecutlve committee
agency's inception.
|h anniversary of Fedora-
salute two decades of
service to Greater Mi-
The event will be held
[ the Americana hotel.
a trustee of the Unlver-
liami and Mt. Sinai Hos-
jirector. of the National
ke of Christians and Jews,
tr of Temple Emanu-El
?ic Israeli and a director
jtistriai* National Bank of
-:
also served as director
jxcrican Red Cross, Miami
of Commerce, D a d e
Incer Society, Dade Coun-
Ich Foundation, Children's
fome, and the citizens ad-
jird of the JJniversity of
eceived a national award
National Conference of
and Jews at NCCJ's an-
Herhood dinner two years
Is cited for his owtstand-
|ce to the Conference as
rr of the executive com-
the national board for
irs and in recognition of
initarian and spirited
, in the religious, edu-
[civic, philanthropic and

SAM UAHK
ISTE* A SAVS
l><

000 b-
ncy ol Go^mmenf

economic areas of the commun-
ity."
The annual meeting chairman
has taken a leading role in the
1958 Combined Jewish Appeal, ser-
ving with the Initial Gifts and Big
Gifts Divisions. He has numerous
business interests in the State of
Israel. In November, 1957, Mr.
and Mrs. Blank visited Israel as
official members of the United
Jewish Appeal overseas study mis-
sion.
First official act of the annual
meeting chairman was to an-
nounce the appointment of Joe
Rose as nominating committee
chairman.
Rose's committee will select a
slate of officers to head the Great-
er Miami Jewish Federation for
the coming year. The nominating
committee will hold its second
meeting Friday in the offices of
Federation, 424 Lincoln In., Miami
Beach.
Committee of Employees of Greater Miami
Jewish Community Center discusses GMJCC
campaign in behalf of Combined Jewish Ap-
peal. Receiving first contribution from staff is
executive director Efraim H. Gale (left) shaking
hands with chairman of stall committee Ar-
nold Piskin. From left also are David Eskenazi,
Vincent Wiley, Mrs. Louis Spindel, Mrs. Oscar
Evans. Committee is now compleing solicita-
tion among more than 50 full-time profession-
al, clerical and maintenance Center em-
ployees, a3 well as some 75 part-time group
leaders.
The Bell Tolls for Your Greatly Needed Gift
Telephones all over Dade coun-
ty commenced ringing last week-
end .as the sixth annual Combined
Jewish Appeal "Dial-a-thon" got
under way.
Campaign chairman Dr. Morris
Goodman announced Wednesday
that M. J. "Jimmie" Kopelowitz,
a pioneer leader of the Jewish
community, will direct the tele-
phone campaign.
At a planning session of his
group, Kopelowitz outlined the
Dial-a-thon project.
"We will enlist representa-
tives from all CJA Divisions to
call prospects in their owi busi-
ness or profession, inviting
these persons to participate in
the 1958 campaign. Our job
will be to impress Miamians
with the tragic fact that Jew-
ish lives are in danger and
may be lost forever unless we
raise dollars for the Rescue
Fund," Kopalowiti declared.
Local and national services will
also suffer if CJA tunds are not
raised to meet their minimal
needs, he said. Such agencies
which serve 45,000 Miamians
yearly include Mt. Sinai Hospital,
Jewish Family Service, Greater
Miami Jewish Community Cen-
ter, Bureau of Jewish Education.
Jewish Home for the Aged, Hillel
Foundation, the Anti Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, National
Council of Jew.sh Women, Baron
de Hirsch Loan Fund, and others.
He announced that the Dial-a-
thon is aimed at those contribu-
tors who gave to CJA in previous
years, bui have not yet made
their gift for 1958.
The immensity of the task
can be grasped, Kopelowitz ex-
plained, by the fact that less
than 8,000 have piedged to this
year's campaign, far less than
in 1957, and a long way from
the more than 12,000 total con-
tribotors in 1957.
'Gilt-Edged' Prospects Will be Tapped
In Two-Hour Campaign Here Sunday
The doorway to a quarter of a
million dollars may be unlocked
by the "Gold Keys" of Combined
Jewish Appeal volunteers Sunday
when top-ranking officers of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Join forces with CJA leaders in a
two-hour door-to-door solicitation
to secure pledges from a special
group of "gilt-edged" prospects.
"These are many of our com-
munity leaders in the top brackets
who have not yet made their 1958
contributions to CJA," said Dr.
Morris Goodman, CJA campaign
chairman, who will be in charge of
the Gold Key drive.
Aaron M. Kanner, president of
the Greater Miami Jewish Feder-
ation, Wednesday called on all of-
ficers to enroll for action on Gold
Key Day to insure the success of
the 1958 Combined Jewish Appeal,
recently directed a similar Key
Day drive throughout Dade county.
. According to plans outlined by
Dr. Goodman, 30 teams of two
men each will bo organized from
among top echelon campaigners.
Each team will bo assigned to
visit five prospects within a two-
hour period. Approximately 130
potential contributors will be on
the visiting list.
"If we secure a' 100 percent re-
sponse our Key Day effort could
easily smash the one quarter mil-
lion dollar barrier," Dr. Goodman
said.
Working closely with Dr. Good-
man will be Sam J. Heiman, who
' All Gold Key Day solicitors will
be identified by a special lapel in-
signia. Volunteers will wear an
engraved Gold Key linked to a
genuine Israeli coin, symbolizing
the close relationship between
Greater Miami Jewry and their ef-
forts to aid the State of Israel
through CJA life dollars.
Among. the community leaders
who will make up the Gold Key
teams Sunday are Sidney Ansin,
Leo Chaikin, Leo Eisenstein, Leon
Ell, Martin Fine and Jacob C.
Fishman.
Others who have been active in
the current campaign and will
work Sunday are David Fleeman,
Judge Milton A. Friedman, Her-
bert Gelernter, Louis Goldman,
Sol Goldman, Maurice H. Hyman,
Leon Kaplan, Aaron Kravitz, Oscar
Mamber, Thomas Kravitz, and
Stanley C. Myers.
Also enrolled as Gold Key work-
ers are Jacob Rabinowitz, Joseph
Rose, Philip Schoenberg, Arnold
Seeder, John Serbin, William Sil-
verstein, Isidore Simkowitz, Abe
Solosko, Harold Thurman, George
J. Talianoff and William Wein-
traub.
An urgent plea was issued by the
campaign chairman to every Jew-
ish family residing in Dade county,
requesting former contributors to
come forward with their life-saving
pledges in these closing weeks of
the campaign.
"The Dial-athon is the final
clean-up effort by every available
campaigner to bring our drive to
victory," Dr. Goodman announ-
ced. He called upon all workers to
assist in the phone program by
enrolling for a few hours' work
each day, until all former con-
tributors have been reached.
First group of Dial-a-thon solic-
itors to enroll with Kopelowitz
last week was headed by Aaron
M. Kanner, president of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, and a former CJA campaign
chairman.
A Miami Beach phone squad,
under direction of Arnold Seeder,
used the temporary telephone in-
stallations in the new headquar-
ters of Federation while painters,
carpenters, and electricians were
putting the finishing touches to
the Board Room at 424 Lincoln
In.
Assisting Seeder were Joseph
Rose, David Levinson, Oscar
Mamber, Philip Schoenberg, Max
Kolker, Joe Dallet, and Joseph
Mechlow.
Some early returns showed
that seven out of 10 persons
called were more than pleased to
repeat their gifts of 1957. Of the
seven, at least half were able to
promise increases in behalf of the
Rescue Fund.
"Most common reply to our
Dial-a-thon calls is that they
were waiting for the CJA vol-
unteer to visit them," said
Kopelowitz, reporting on the
first six days of phone-action.
"In a year when the overseas
and local needs were greatest,
we had the fewest number of vol-
unteers to go out after the life-
saving dollars," he pointed out.
Mrs. Aaron Farr, chairman of
the Women's Division campaign,
reminded the hundreds of women
who were unable to attend the

']
M. J. KOPtlOWITZ
. heeds pets
big luncheons and teas during the
early part of the drive they may
still make their plus-gift pledge
to CJA at this time.
"There has been a most grati-
fying response to our Passover
appeal, but we are still short of
last year's division total," she
reported. The plus-gift is an ex-
pression by Miami women of
their acceptance of responsibility
for health and welfare causes,
Mrs. Farr explained. These are
contributions by the women, per-
sonally, separate and in addition
to the gift of their husband.
The Women's Division will
make available to Kopelowitz a
group of volunteers for work in
the Dial-a-thon program, Mrs.
Farr said. Persons interested in
assisting should call "Dial-a-thon"
at JE 8-4331. The project will
close Apr. 30.
-


14-B
KtmlsiifhrkMon


Academy Names Binder to Fourth
Term, 40 Board Members Chosen
Benjamin I. Binder was this
week unanimously reelected to
serve as president of the Hebrew
Academy for a fourth consecutive
term
Elected to serve with Binder
was a board of directors consist-
ing of 40 members. The slate of
officers presented by Joseph Co-
hen, chairman of the nominations
committee, included:
Honorary life president. Dr.
David S. Andron: chairman, execu-
tive board, Harry Genet; honorary
vice presidents. Kolman Luria,
Charles Fruchtman, Harry Levitt.
Hon. Marcie Lieberman. Max
Kamiel: senior vice president,
Jack Satin.
Vice presidents, Samuel Rein-
hard, Herman Basch. Raymond
Rubin, Jacob Kaufman. Charles
Charcowsky, Daniel M. Broad. Max
SUverberg, Irving Firtel. Benjamin
Appel, Louis Merwitzer: financial
secretary, Moses Grundwerg; gen-
eral secretary, Isidore Spolter;
treasurer, Joseph Cohen; corre-
sponding secretary. Sidney Rubin-
owitz; auditor, Sol Goldman.
Board of directors elected were
Charles Bender, Adolf Blank. Wol
fie Cohen. Juda Diener, Morris
Dubler. Harry Fields. Martin
Genet, Saul Genet, Ben Zton Gins-
burg, Nathan Ginsburg. Maurice
Goldring. Joseph Gonshor. Gerald
Greenberg, Hyman Jablon. Wil-
liam J. Klein. Harry Koretzky. Wil-
liam Kesselman. George Kimmel.
Isidore Kramer. Dr. Robert Lito
witz. Oscar Mamber. Alex Miller.
SHa of Board Meeting
Home of Mrs. Isidore Gold, 905
Michigan ave.. was the site this
week of a Workmen's Circle Wo-
men's Club board meeting.
Morris B. Miller, Abraham Mos-
low, Henry Penchansky. Max Ra-
dus. Moses H. Rosenhotisc. Julius
Rosenstein, Sam Rosner. William
Rubin. Samuel Sakols. Hyman
Sandier. Rev. Joseph Shapiro. Ben-
jamin Sherry. Rabbi Henry Wer-
nick, Nat Wolf, Joe Zalis. Morris
D. Mager.
Trustees are Hyman Berman,
Leo Gelvan, Morris Gordon. 1. B.
Jacobson. Al Kevelson, Louis Ttra-
mer. David Levenson. Samuel M.
Magid. Morris Sugarman.
Also elected were Samuel Kaean.
J. Popick. Harry Schwartz. Isidore
Friedman. Leo Rappaport. Alex-
ander Moskovits. Jerome Bienen-
feld, Herbert Shapiro.
Fink Elected Head
Of BB Youth Board
Miami attorney Jack Fink has
been elected president of the board
of directors of the Greater Miami
B'nai B'rith Youth Organization.
He succeeds Mrs. Joseph Ber-
mann. Fink is the outgoing presi-
dent of Miami Beach Lodge. B'nai
B'rith. and is a past Grand Aleph
Godol (national president) of Al-
eph Zadik Aleph, boys' junior or-
der of B'nai B'rith.
Elected to serve with Fink are:
Eli Hurwitz. vice president, Sho-
lem Lodge, Mrs. Norman Sand,
past president, Eleanor Roosevelt
chapter, both of whom will serve
as vice presidents of the BBYO
board: Mrs. Alfred Reich, third
vice president of District 5 Wom-
en's Grand Lodge, who will be
treasurer; and Mrs. Bernice Bob-
koff. vice president of Emma Laz-
Washington Federal Opens Thir
Office Here Next WeekGori
1.1. WMon
Team Gats Trophies
Irving Hoffman Realtors, Little
League Bowling Team sponsored
by Miami Beach realtor Irving
Hoffman, has won the champion-
skip of the North Shore Optimist
Club Little League. The team was
tendered a dinner at Delmonico
hotel and awarded trophies last
week.
arus chapter, who will act as sec-
retary.
Executive committee will in-
clude Judge Milton A. Friedman.
itn. Bermann. Mrs. Murray Laz-
arus, newly elected BBYO chair-
man for the Florida State Assn. of
B'nai B'rith. Mrs. Norman Rein-
hard. Mrs. Harvey Herman, Dr.
William Wilson, Mrs. Gerald Soltz.
Michael Sossin and Mrs. Frank
Smulson.
Officers will be installed Sunday.
May 4, at the annual board meet-
ing, whi. h will be held at the Du-
pont Tar let on hotel.
Openin* of a third office by
Washington Federal Savings and
Loan Assn. will take place at 10:30
a.m. next Thursday at Meridian
ave. and 17th st., Miami Beach.
Jack D. Gordon, president, said
that establishment of the new of-
fice means that Washington Fed-
eral "can now offer courteous sav-
ings service convenient to every
Miami Beach resident."
Temporary quarters have been
laaied for the office next door to
Burdine's, Gordon said. Con-
struction of a modern,. p,rma- j
nont building, will begin before
the end of this year.
Arthur H. Courshon. chairman of
the board, said that "granting of
this office indicates the confidence
in Washington Federal held by the
Home Loan Bank Board in Wash-
ington."
"It provides the opportunity for
Washington Federal to extend its
facilities and its popular program
of personal service to many more
members of tie community it
serves." Courshon continued. He
pointed out that Washington Fed-
eral's other two offices are located
at 1244 Washington ave. and at
1120 Normandy dr.. Normandy
Hit.
au^s
Stay through May...
,t!f,
Tkrrr't tomething
EXTK.I-SPCCMt about the
Sunshine Stale w May!
There's more bhie .
in the sky mare
mjtnest in the breex .. .
more magic in tfle"ti enmg air. The ocean it
more uniting, too and tpringrimr Jluuert
ate bursting into bloom et-rry uheref
Decide today to toy throtrh .!*>/ you'U be glad you did!
| FLMIftA POIfK UffMT CO Mr A MY %tt7
Hebrew Lessons
To be Televised
Two introductory programs in
the teaching of Hebrew will be
heard over ch. 2 Monday, Apr. 28,
and Monday, May 26, at 10 p.m.
The two broadcasts will illus-
trate "Hebrew Old and New,"
and will serve to introduce an ele-
mentary course in the teaching of
Hebrew to begin in September, and
to continue through the 1958-59
school term, heard twice each
week.
The two introductory programs
will illustrate how an old biblical
language has become a modern
living language today. The narra-
tor will be Louis Schwartzman, ex-
ecutive director of the Bureau of
Jewish Education.
The program is sponsored by
the Bureau of Jewish Education of
Greater Miami, in cooperation with
the educational committees of the
Jewish schools of Greater Miami,
and the Hebrew Teachers Aasn. of
Greater Miami.
Opening c.ren,^
by former !,. C1\
Freo gift, tnd fr^
will be giv(n ,0 m
mg the now afit,
epenir.j ctlebration.
Gordon, a Miami .
since 1940. served aiTai
fantryman in World g-
since his return hat L
in Miami Beach civic i
is a graduate of toe
Michigan and past prtu
Miami Beach Better R
rcau? '-" 5
Courshon is a prae
ney on Miami Beach i
lor member of the _
Courshon and Courshii*
ed four years with the i
Corps during World
has been a Miami
since 1923.
The story of Wt
al's rapid expansion V.
only in the increase a* j
to more than S37.009.tt
yean, but also in the w*
of its facilities, service! |
fices, Courshon added.
"With the opening of i
office, we can tr.ithhiUv (
Washington Federal
Beach." said Gordon Wi
that the people have .
much conidence in b .
have been able to eipudi
idly."
Rabbi rVattach on Television
Rabbi Benno M. Wallach appear-
ed on "The Still Small Voice."
weekly program of the Rabbinical
Assn. of Greater Miami. Featured
also on the program was a film
entitled "Freedom Rings," star-
ring veteran actor Shepperd Strud-
wick. The Temple Sinai spiritual
leader was seen Sunday,

1
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JACK COM*
LEGAL N0TK*
commercial
social
Sim hotel
DM
Dial FRanklin 3-4634
114 n.o. atxth etreet
ml am I 31, tlvitf
NOTICE -
FICTITIOUS N* i
NOTICE IS l(KREi:T B
(be underpinned. oart**tl
l.u-lneiui UI..1. r the ''!J?J!J
CORAL UAIH.W glSUW
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with the iMerK of C""I
of l>de CouBU.Jr .
CORAL IABIX CpSWIj
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WILLIAM E KRKNSra
AUu.u.y for A|.Mtoe
IM Lincoln M. Miami*
l/tt. 3/2-9-1*
NOTICE IS "K5SfM*l
the andormigned. OoojM'i
bwlnm >i-i-r '.I'.'V'uW
SI'N COAST TRl8"jB
Florida intend, !
name with the CWJ ,
Court of Pad- "'>Jff
Dated t Mla."l. **
% ,,f March, WM
ARON M KANN'ER.,6*
! Shorrland Uld-,
|'S. 5'--! _____I
FICTITIOUS N
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HONI.EM PI KN|T,m| f>
n- w !Tth A; **,,
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MAI/KT ASHHAMH
'$ Club Picks
imonn Leader
fs Club of Temple Emanu-El
annual election of officers
Embers of the board of direc-
Tst week. Named to serve
Esident is Maurey L. Ash-
fwho succeeds Jules B. Chan-
! presidents are Henry Cove,
| Friedlarui, Benjamin Kline,
Samelson, Charles Yavers.
pry is Hylan Kout, and Sam
treasurer.
rd of directors are Joseph
Max Boderman, Harry Co-
hing Cohen, Joseph Cohen,
, Dubbin, Judge Milton Fel-
)r. Leonard Finn, Harold
|[ield, Daniel Levine, Sidney
Goldberg, chairman, Ed-
Lassman, Philip Mandel, Ed-
lewman, Robert Marcus, Al-
Ksip, Joseph Postol, Simon
kin, Irving Schatzman, Jack
an, Murray Schwartzman,
Sossin, Jacob Spund, Al-
Dne, William Sussman, Ira
py, and Al Zablo.
Nathan Felka, 72;
Chicago Services
Nathan Feika, T8, of 836 Lenox
ave., Miami Beach, passed away
Monday. Apr. 21, at the Veterans'
Hospital.
Feika came here from Chicago
12 years ago and was engaged in
the food and sugar brokerage busi-
ness there.
He was a Mason, a member of
Temple Israel and Harvey Seeds
Post of the American Legion. He
served in World War I.
Survivors include his wife Schir-
"lify Mfillman FeiRa, and"four sis-
ters, including Mrs. Martha Wein
feld, of Miami Beach.
Funeral services were to be held
Thursday, Apr. 24, at Piser's Cha-
pel. Chicago, with interment in
Rosehill Cemetery.
Ite Center. SurvivInK nre his wife,
Natalie; a daimht.i, Diana; a m,
Martin Lee; nil father, Morrli, of
Savannah; and two brothers, ier-
were Apr. 16 t Riverside-Beach
Memorial Chapel, with Inn lal In Mt.
Slnal Cemetery.
MAX GROSSMAN
1882 riardina .i\. died Apr. 19.
a retired Miami Beacb hotel
he bad been i resident he e for 20
11. tru Wa\ id War i vet-
eran, Surviving are Ma wife. KoMe;
hlv mother, M !;> Grossman; and
t > son.". Martin and rlowarl, Ser-
vices an \ 1-rial were In i, ROSS.....I,
N'.l with Rlverfdde-Bea Chanel In charire of local arrange-
FI1.M-.
MRS. R08E GOLUBOFF
79. of 1890 Coral Gate ds.. died Apr. 19.
A resident here six years, she is sur-
vived by two dauR-hters, Mrs. Adele
Vavltz. and Mrs. Cella Corenthal; a
SYDNEY LANG
68, of ?". Meridian ave.. died Apr. 20.
a nfechaolc with the City ol Miami
Reach Knulneeiing Department, he
had lived hen- 10 vein.-, coming from
Ww York. *J*urvTv!nK ate nl* wife,'
Haxel: a son, Gerald; and a daughter,
Mrs. Lucille Weiss. He was a mem-
ber of the City of Mis nil Keach
Benevolent Society and Ihe Noah So-
ciety. Services were Apr. 21 at River-
side- Bea*-h Memorial Chapel, with
burial In Mt. Sinai Cemetery.
LOUIS ROBINSON
il, of 9.141 K. Ray Harbor dr., died In
Baltimore Apr. 20. An apartment
house owner, he was a Mason and a
member of the Maimonides Society,
fe'urvlvors Include three daughteis,
Mrs. I'.uillne Ijewis. Mrs. Muriel Hom-
ier, and Mrs. Maureen Khrllck; a bro-
son, Samuel; and six grandchildren, 'her. a sister and six grandchildren.
Service* and burial were In Water- Services were Apr 28 at Riverside-
bury, Conn., with Riverside-Beach Pe*n Memorial I ha pel. with burial
Memorial Chapel In charge of local
arrangements.
rers' Licenses
Dade Youth
Discussed
uld the age limit of drivers'
be raised?" will be one of
Jany questions asked on a
program panel entitled
Off for Safety" sponsored
Dade County Council of
k-Teacher Assns. on Safety
Ims.
panel will be held Wednes-
|ght in the Shenandoah Junior
School Auditorium, 1950 SW
It.. Miami.
lerator will be Harold Shop-
safety chairman of Dade
Council of PTAs.
|lt panelists will be Ted J.
supervisor of health and
cal education; Mrs. Robert
|r, immediate past president
Dade County Council of
Mrs. Frank J. Orcutt, mem-
Jf the steering committee of
de county school safety com-
and Prof. Herbert A. Ru-
ff the University of Miami,
lent panelists will be Dean
hit. N. Miami Senior High:
lirsch, Miami Edison Senior
tSchool; Harriet Newman, Mi-
(licach Senior High School;
Hausman, Miami Senior
and George Crawford, Coral
Is Senior High School, alter-
SAMUEL IADCK
of 2343 SW 27th ter., died Apr. IS.
Head of the Miami Plastic Pjibrlc Co.,
he came here 14 years aao from New
York City. Surviving are his wife,
Nanny, and a sister, Mrs. Ann Weiss
Services were Apr.- 20 at Gordon
Funeral Home.
MRS. ADE^NE-*MASOHL8-R
57. of 942 Ivnn.-ylvariU ave.. died Apr.
17. She was the Tlorlfla stale patriots-
instructor of the Disabled American
Veterans, paat district commander of
Greater Miami DAV Auxiliary, past
commander of DAV Auxiliary' 27, a
member of the American I-eglnn Aux-
iliary, a member Of the Alley Cats of
the DAV, and a member of Kastern
Mar. She was senior hostess of the
Miami Reach Servicemen's Center,
and recently received an "Oscar" for
her work there. She was also a vol-
unteer worker at Veterans' Hospital.
and was active In Red Cross work.
Surviving are her husband. Henry;
and a brother. Services ware Apr. 2U
at Newman-Gordon Funeral Home.
MRS. ANNA RITTER
76, of 17:> Meridian ave.. died Apr. 18.
l-'o] merlv of New York, she came here
30 years ago. Surviving are two ni..iss,
Miss Lillian Rltter and Mrs. Moris
lii. dopier. Semices were Apr. 21 at
Klveiside Beach Memorial Chapel,
with burial in Woodlawn Cemetery.
in Mt. Nebo Cemetery
JOSEPH GLASS
70, of 1943 8th St., died Apr. IS. A re-
tired carpenter, he was a resident here
six years. He leaves his wife, Anna.
Services and burial were In Washing-
ton, I>.<\. with Hellman Funeral
Chapels In charge of local arrange-
ments.
LOUIS KRAMER
76, of 1144 Collins ave.. died Apr 17.
A winter visitor from San Diego,
Calif., he Is survived by two brothers.
Including Joseph of Miami Beach, and
two sisters. Services were Apr. 20 at
Hellman Funeral Chapels.
DAVID IRWIN TROY
39, of 2009 Calais dr., died Apr. 15. A
salesman, he Is survived by his wife,
Shirley; a son, Sanford; his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Trosky; a bro-
ther and two sisters. Services and
burial were In Par Rockaway, N.V.,
with Rlversidi -Be ach Mi moi lal Chapel
in charKe of local arrangements.
)i Stern on Television
bbinical Assn. of Greater Ml-
Iwill present Rabbi Tiber H.
I Friday^ over ch. 10. Rabbi
ys topic will be "Independence
challenge." Rabbi Stern will
seen on cb. 7 Sunday, May
lien he will discuss "Unity of
[and Man."
MAURICE SHAW
8, of 4844 7th St.. died Apr. 17. A re-
tired deputy tax collector of Brook-
lyn, he came here 13 years ago. He
wii a member of Flagler-Granada
Jewish Center and Knights of. J/ythlas.
Surviving are his wife. Rose; a son,
Sidney; three daughters, Including
Mrs. Pearl Raider of Miami Beach; a
brother, two sisters and six grand-
children. Services were in New York,
with Gordon Funeral Home In charge
locally.
ARTHUR OOLOBERO
38, of 2776 SW 32nd ave.. died Apr. IB.
A resident here nine years, he was an
officer of the Men's Club of the Israel-
Publication Lists
His Achievements
The accomplishments of Miami
Beach architect Leonard H. Glas-
ser are fealured in the April issue
of the Florida Building Journal.
The article deals with his edu-
cational and professional back-
ground, as well as containing a
summary of some of his largest
projects. In addition, the publica-
tion contains an informative col-
umn, written by Glasser, concern-
ing the architect's relation to the
building products manufacturing
industry.
He is associated with his bro-
ther, Bob, in their Lincoln rd.
architectural offices. Both "
graduates af the University of
Florida and have been active in
civic affairs.
Leonard was founder and past
president of the 100 Club of Dade
County. He is adjutant of Post 85
American Legion, and is serving
as vice president of the Miami
Beach Zionist District.
Bob is serving as vice president
of the Florida Junior Chamber of
Commerce.
BERNARD E. BLANKENBERQ
31, of 1243 Drexel ave., died Apr. 10,
Survivors include his mother, Mrs.
Ethel White and a sistei, Mrs. Evelyn
Cubblnson. Her vires were Apr. I." at
Riverside Beach Memorial Chapel,
with burial In Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
MAX LANDESMAN
7, of 800 1st St., died Apr. 13. One of
Miami Beach's first sign painters, he
came here 23 years ago from New
York and owned the I-andesnian Sikh
Studio. He was a member of I'.lks
Lodge 1601. Surviving are hl.s wife.
Teresa; a daughter, Mrs. Theodore K.
Arvan; three sisters and two brother*.
Including Edward. Miami, Set I SI
were Apr. 15 at Newman-Gordon
Funeral Cnapel, with burial In Wood-
lawn Park.

2*c
ieosrt
MRS- JIANNETTE MASS
44. of 1889 SW 5th st., died Apr. 13.
Formerly of Birmingham, Ala., she
came here four years ago. Surviving
are two sons. David and Stanley, of
the UBAT-. Germany; a daughter.
Sherry Beth; her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. M. H. Dlcksteln; and a sister.
Services were Apr. 18 at Rlverside-
Heach Memorial Chapel, with burial In
Mi Mnal Cemetery.
N'EWMZN-
gaxvoN
VNIRAt HOM|
Hit..... 1.7T*
COMING TO NEW YORK?
Slay at Hilt modem 25-
itory hotel. All rooms
ouliide exposure, large,
beautifully furnished
roomi with kitth-
eaeile, prlvole
both, from $6.50
Jolly. Two rooss
suites from $11.St
VICUl raOHTMIT
HHM
wilrttf I'
MtnldM milaMe .
^ BEAfOX
Sioodwey at 75th St.. New York i
Oscar WlmVea. Mease las Directs*
;.;
12/ /et/z/derr
Convenient
for
Everybody
HOMf Of THI FAMOUS 'HttWttUttn ROOItl'
LEXINGTON AVE. at 48th St., NEW YDM 17 Plaia 5-4400
See your loesl trsvtl stey or write to
Promotlen Oepirtmenl lor Brochure______
'H the HMmtlPC/k'....
In Ihe heort of
Manhattan'! tmort Eott Side
TOAyttOKE
\ Write
\ For
\ Infori
\ and
Private Pool
Beach and
Cabana Colony
HOTEL
At 24th ST., MIAMI BEACH
rmatlon
tnd
Reservations-1
JE 1-0331
Air-Conditioned Rooms
e Private Beach and Pool
e Parking on Premises V
e Cocktail Lounge
e Dining Room
e Entertainment
Daily
Per
Person
ol
oiqnofj
IN TW
rONTAIHEBUAU AHA
j- Y' \ Air Con
(^0 ^ ........
ndltlened
Beach
Pool
Spacious Lobbies
e OHcktall Lounge
e Dining Room
e FREE PARKING
ON PREMISE8
ON THE OCEAN AT 42nd ST., MIAMI BEACH
relief iWrru i^nslonj
Let the radioactive waters of world-famous Hot Springs National
Park banish all your aches and pains due to tension and occu-
pational fatigueease arthritis, rheumatism and high blood
pressure. Countless thousands have benefited from these
wonderful thermal baths Superb bathhouse right in hotel.
All sports available, including golf with club privi-
leges, game fishing, and water sports. Entertainment and social
diversions.
IFrffe for Tour
I Jlmm Color
\Jm Folder
HOTEL
and BATHS
r SPRING ARKANSAS
OOSOTHV DRAPari
*r:fiesrlna Vou
Exciting new
ij decor in lobby,
^v lounges and
dining room.
Created /or your
added pleasure and
relaxation by one oj
America's foremost
decorators.
R. E. McEACIHN
Ceucral Manager
HELLMAN
FUNERAL CHAPELS, INC.
"Coring for Thoso You Cart For"
STATIONS TO
SERVE YOU
1 743 lay Road
Mt. Sinai Hotpitel
St. Francis Hospital
IV23 S.W. 8 th St.
* OFFICIAL AMBULANCE SERVICI
OF MIAMI BEACH
* SERVING ALL OF DADE COUNTY
JE 8-5333
FOR
IMMEDIATE
SERVICE
FLAT RATE NO METERS
MIAMI BEACH
1741 Boy Rood, neer Dade Brve.
JII-53UJl 1-9000
WOBLD-WIPB TRANSFER SERVICE
V AL HILLMAN, MS.
1921 5.W. It* 1
M 4-4140


16-B
9-JewlsHhrkMan

Friday,
UNDER THE STRICT AND CONSTANT SUPERVISION OF
THE ORTHODOX VAAD HAKASHRUTH 01UFUMDA
RABBI DR. ISAAC MIRSH EVER, DIRECTOR
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
PRICES EFFECTIVE APRIL 28 THRU MAY 2
FILL YOUR FREEZER NOW!
... WITH THESE FAMILY FAVORITES
. j
FOOD FAIR'S FINE KOSHER POULTRY is supplied by FOOD FAIR'S own KOSHER
POULTRY DRESSING PLANT... insuring MAXIMUM FRESHNESS. EXCEPTION*
QUALITY, and LOW. LOW PRICES. This plant is under the strict rabbinical iuris-
diction of THE ORTHODOX VAAD HAKASHRUTH of FLORIDA and the constJ
supervision of REV. JACOB D. KATZ.
FRESH KILLED
EVISCERATED
KOSHER MADE
PULLETS.BROILERS
CAPONS.CAPONETTES
READY FOR THE PAN

SAVE 20c PER LB.
I
GIVE YOUR FAMILY THE FINEST STEAKS OR ROASTS
RIBS of BEEF
GENUINE SPRING
Baby LAMB CHOPS
BY THE RACK
3 TO 6 IBS. AVG.
CHOOSE FROM OUR LARGE
SELECTION OF SPECIALTIES
FOR THE GOURMET
?
CHICKEN FAT CALVES LIVER LAMB TONGUES VEAL TONGUB
STEER TONGUES CALVES LUNGS CALVES FtB STEER LIVBI
CALVES BRAINS OXTAILS MAX'S STUFFED KISHKA
MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS YOUR EXTRA BONUS AT FOOD FAIR


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