The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01547

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Jewish Floridian of South Broward
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Jewish Floridian of North Broward
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Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
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Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
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Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
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Jewish Floridian of South County
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Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
leiidsb4ElcdGkin
. 31 Number 39
Combining THt JiWISH UNITY and THl JEWISH WEEKLY
Miami, Florida, Friday, September 27. 1957
Price $2.00

! I




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I

Page 2 A
Israel Voted Down in
Wording on Refugees
LONDON-tJTAV-An attempt hy Israel to .telete the word "Arab"
trom a resolution on refugees before the Conference ol the inter t irua-
was defeated in vote this tel u the wraaee^en*
cd. The balloting tu 332 against the Israel niendment. i8i ntavor
and 52 abstentions, the latter including the entire British delegation.
The resolution as adopted with
only (he Israel delegation opposed, ,, wn,eh would have suhstitut
fjmistncridian
FRONTISPIECE
Tht frontispiece on thi* New
Year Edition of Tho Jewish
FloridUn include* artwork by
courtesy of Baton's Continental
ChocoUte Shopt, New York City.
Friday, Se^tembor VI
included a clause reading "This t,(j,),,, uori|
their expectation of destroying Is-
,..! in UllfOOM would be frustrated.
Mr Kader *aid the boycott "harms
:" '-"'l"t no ,ubt but the damage us le>>
-II" fr Arab, found ---------, irf ouf MUooa|
included a clause reaaing m >d the word "all tor Arau. i"" percent of
oomesam-e-eeouuyjtfud*. tnjuaba.nlw eunmisaisj state*, melanin I e- \a'iime T'ne kMMt
United Nation- give to thi
refugees the consideration which
the ustice ri Ihe i
and find I ntatioa to their
probli uttona
the United Ma
tioni 1K>n l<
le financial
,-- -
The reference to the United
Nations *s incorporated in conv
m.rtee on The initiative ot Emit
Busteni ot Lebaejon. A second
Israel amendment which wauld
have deleted a large part ot the
resolution dealing with various
aspects of the refugee problem
was withdrawn.
The voting on the beaten amend-
The losses of the boycot-
laad aaaj ttagoslana. .online "h t ouatr.e.s-tbeir own cost of
the Arab bloc and m* rUJMCQuav )COt(_are many times big-
:h' except.on o Burma ^ .
and the attention of Thailand I in- **r Vision of Shell
iiu! up in ..position to Nrael. Japan He called the ~JL~
Bd Certa.voted with the anti Is Oil Company and British Petroleum
rael line-up.
With the exception of Italy. Fin-
land ami Spain which \oted against
I>raei. hum western Kuropean
countries .xcept Kngland which
abstained--voted in support of the
Israel amendment. The l-Yench
delegation registered a split vote
M tor Nrael and two u^aiiM The
United states and Uhariaa delega-
- supported Nrael
to withdraw from sales activities ia
Israel an 'ill-conceived and useless
gesture of aiter-Suei appease-
ment." He thanked the British
Parliament members who voiced
opposition to this "unnecessary sur-
render." adding "it will make no
difference in our oil supplies."
"Economic warfare, boycott, in-
timidation and blockade cannot go
together with economic cooperation
'New Year' Talk'* Theme
At Spinoza Outdoor forum
"Uappj New Year Is M
ure by
Vbraham
the Spinoi
0*
N
V
-
M,,l | III 1.1 to a gen- -* *! .". _^ "jj
oral economic resolution that call- *'h *r,m'"dn'"nf JTr^iw in
, w......, k- one -late is denied tree passage in
opposition to boycotts h mtwnatlonal ,.,,, and made
one state a.ainsl another was not ^ m|c h|()okade
1957-50
\lllay the ^llew ^(jear bring XJ0u
lieallli ana happiness
571|
ORKIN EXTERMINATING COMPANY
**ai**
CHlHC
BUGS?
WE tl'MIN4Tl THEM AND
GUAIANTH TOUI LAWN
TO IE CHINCH SUft Mff .
to APta i. ins
Phone: FR 9-1761
TRULY NQlEN.mc
I i nM*-i inM "---
having explained that the
commit tin amendment Mi
not ap to the general
terms ol the resolution
The total economic losses in-
volved in the ten-year-old Arab
boycott against Israel would cov-
er the costs of resettlement of all
Arab refugees in a "generous
manner." Yochanan Bader, mem-
ber of tSe Israel Knesset, told
the inter-Parliamentary Union
conference.
b leaders that
to all Stall
Happy New Year from Israel
INVEST IN ISRAEL BONDS
Toe Cm Be Sere that They Will
Pay Yea Bock with Interest
Mayshie friedberg
to pemember..,!
Bar Miuvaha and Weddingsand all the *
important milestone* in life. Our Catering
Department is particularly deft in raptunng
the special significance of your occasion.
Our Million Dollar Redecoration ProgTam
has made ua Miami's largest and finest
hotel, with the widest selection of
facilities for any function, from the
smallest group to a banquet for one thousand.
Call Catering Manager: Henry Braun
FR 4-6161
CMC4WSKH|
MIAMI, FLORIDA
Social Scheduled Sunday
Amity Club, tor single men and
women between the uses ot 25 and
4U now meeting rejjuiarly at the i
Beach Branch of the lirrater Miami
Jewish I'ommunity center. 1536 1
Bag rd will hold a social dance at '
he Center Sunday evening.
DeeeaaaMs
Deasestk Mela
Balioble Day
Workers
37 NX 5th St. Fl
*l MtiDENSERG. Owner
US S.W. 12th Av*. ISO ALLM. irecter Ml FB 4-5437 I Ft'
Sswcialiimf la Cera re Nkt Haerry awe Caraaically IN
M0RT6A6O
$500,000 Private Money
CHAS. HIME
er Ceostrectiea
WAN
Matzohs
9 ifalaty squares
[Sar^>
mm
Leaas aa 1st a 2ad
Sraaad Fees mr I eases
atisillii laseraaxe
Ra. Broker Ph. F
^pOllMpKI ^Sjt^TjV t!t
Rabbi Joseph L Rackovsky
MS ajKMESASI AVfMM. MUaM MACK
Jl 1 Jt5
i
M. Rephan
KORfW BOOK STORE
T TMt tAKits or "Ovim etisr* UHSAlTfO MATIONS
Diatributed by PALM DISTWBUTORS. BIC. 14 N.I. 54th ST.. MIAMI 37. FLA. PHONE FR 3o*46


417
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Jl 1-M17
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Serving ffce JewfsA Cowssiuarfy Sesce lf2S
M*Vee Mas Cii..... Caares

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baaa J B-742S
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RIVERSIDE-BEACH
MEMORIAL CHAPEL
for a
Perfect Tribute
In keeping with the traditions of the
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Chapel offers service* that you can be
proud of at a price you can afford.
Whether orthodox, conservative, or re-
formed services are desired, Riverside-
Beach provides the attention of a
friendlv. experienced, understanding
staff and spacious chapels with facilities
to meet every family requirement. I n-.
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ltMMc Btoarac. Tiee-PresideM
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tm
p*tey
September 27, 1957
.__ An 1strhridllar
S-Man Group to Seek
fobles-Zamora Peace
palient roa-oning with Coral Gables Mayor W. Keith Phillips by
Mi B. Le,,n HurwitJ la,e Thursday averted what might bay*) bocoaw
delicate situation.
Following a new clash with Zamora Jewish Center. 44 Zamora ave
diluted bv City Attorney E. L. (Ted) Semple and the Coral Gables
Commission, Mayor Phillips -
tariiv gladly accepted a recom-
dation by Kabbi HurwiU that a
nan committee be set up to
charges of "commercialism"
urfit aainsI ,he Center and
Bolaint- bv neighbor! of exces-
noise But the real target will
/,he antiquated 1937 Coral
Imk zoning ordinance.
[Semple started the ruckus when
told the Cables commission
17 that Zamora Jewish Center
opened "a school and a gymna-
i and has established a branch
. Miami Beach Hebrew Acad-
i there"
Phillips, without investigating
import of Semple's state-
At, rtportedly replied that Za-
Inera Jewish Center "is like the
limey changers in the tempi*.
pjw exception was granted to
L* them i house of worship,
I but now they've mad* a com-
till enterprise out of it."
[ Semple thereupon declared be-
! the commission: "I'm tired of
: with these people. I recom-
I that we get rid of this head-
It's been a cancer to me for
to pan, the complaints we've
Burwitz Sunday told The
rish Flondian that "the possible
|wus strife as a consequence of
inflammatory staleme nts
grew to alarming propor-
by Thursday morning."
e's explanation of the Cen-
rs violation is only partially cor-
Zamora seven years ago ap-
Ifora permit from the Zoning
1 to erect i synagogue on Its
nt site.
[The exception to which Semple
I was a ruling that granted
era the right to have religious
[vices only.
Rabbi Hurwitz said Sun-
r that when he arrived herd in
mber, 1954 to take up his
"ties spiritual leader of the
Center, a second building was in
the process of being added to fhe
original facility. "Thet building
was constructed for specific
classroom use, and the Coral
Gables permit stated so unequi-
vocally."
Rabbi Hurwitz said that his ar-
rival here "was a call for me to
make Zamora a live synagogue.
They who gave us life, the city
commission and the zoning board,
have since demonstrated that their
grant was conditional. We could
have lifebut wc would not be
permitted to breathe.
"How can we live if we are not
allowed to teach?" the Zamora
spiritual leader asked.
Rabbi Hurwitz declared that the
erection of the schoolroom building
was tacit agreement on the part of
Coral Gables that Zamora has the
complete right to carry on all of its
spiritual functions. He Sunday
charged neighboring families with
deliberately fomenting the diffi-
culties.
"This Is not the first time we
have been called to account,"
Rabbi Hurwitz said. 'Two years
go we were also called before
the city commission. The absurd
thing then was that many of the
complaining neighbors had mov-
ed into the area long after the
erection of the schoolroom build-
ing. Their insistence that Za-
mora was in violation of its orig-
inal exception is patently dis-
honest."
Rabbi Hurwitz also singled out
the Merrick Demonstration School,
a grade school of some 600 students
directly across the street from Za-
mora Jewish Center, as an example
of the "dishonesty" of the com-
plaints.
The latest Semple effort to clamp
down on the Center arose when the
Htbrew Academy opened a branch
there. First leseloiu began imme-
actwn before the commission was
tne result of new complaints about
excessive noiae" and the Zamora
gymnasium.
"If 600 pupils at Merrick don't
bother the neighbors how can 30
diately after Labor Day with a rea-
istrat.on of 30 pupils. 8emple's
oopils bother them? In addition,
the Academy pupils attend air-
conditioned classes, whose win-
dows are closed. As for the 'gym-
nasium,' it's pity that Mr. Sam-
ple didn't bother investigating
himself, it consists in totality
of a sliding pond for 3'a-year-
olds and a swing for 4-year-olds.
"Because of Semple's charge, we
hlfVe' since had 'ajJpricatioYis 'from
residents in the area. Jewish and
non-Jewish, for membership in our
gymnasium.' I heartily solicit Mr.
Semple's membership above all
others."
Rabbi Hurwitz denied Semple's
charge of "commercialism." He
said the Hebrew Academy pays
only such nominal fees'as for extra
janitorial or secretarial service.
"Zamora receives no added benefit
other than assisting the area's stu-
dents who want to attend the He-
brew Academy and who now no
longer need to travel two hours
daily by bus to and from the Acad-
emy's school at 918 6th st., Miami
Beach."
Rabbi Hurwitz said he was
"gratified" at the number of per-
sons, Jewish and non-Jewish, who
were outraged by Mayor Phillips'
and Semple's shoddy Bible-quot-
ing statements, and who called
him to offer their assistance.
Christian ministers of the clergy
joined Rabbi Hurwitz Friday at a
meeting in Tyler's restaurant to
discuss what the Zamora spirit-
ual leader called "not an attack
against a synagogue, but an ir-
responsible effort by the state to
control the church."
At a four-hour talk between Rab-
bi Hurwitz and Mayor Phillips
Thursday evening, the mayor ac-
cepted Rabbi Hurwitz' suggestion
that a five-man committee spend
the next several months studying
American Israeli
Religious Store
1357 WASHINGTON AVE.
VIAMI BEACH JE 1-7722
Big Selection Talcum. Machaorim A.
all Hebrew Supplies for High Holy
Days;
{-jrcctinojs
ctnd
Best UJiJt
to all
mM friends
cs
i>
or a
Very <_Happ\f GEORGE DuBREUIL
Page 3 A
P
the Coral Gables 1937 zoning law
with an eye toward responding to
the expansion needs of all churches
and synagogues.
"This is an antiquated piece of
legist lation," Rabbi Hurwitz ex-
plained. "The city is much bigger
today, its spiritual needs are far
greater. But the law doesn't per-
mit hi to expand. Vet. they keep
turning to us to combat juvenile
delinquency. How can we with such
laws restricting our expansion
needs?"
The committee will include three
clergymen one each from the
Catholic, Protestant and Jewish
faiths.
I
OSHg-MIS/X
rot toos and walls
, wiKOtimmonAL
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FOOD FAIR STORES INC.
Exclusive Distributors
1050 E. 17th Street. Hialeah. Ha. Phone TU 7-1571
NEW TEAR GREETINGS FROM .
CERTIFIED SUEDE & LEATHER CLEANERS ,
M/AM/S OKU LEATHER CltANUS
734 S.W. 22nd AVEN&E Phone HI 8-66*8
COMMUNITY MEMORIAL SERVICES
OFFERED BY THE
JEWISH CEMETERY ASSOCIATION '
OF GREATER MIAMI
"Honoring Our Beloved Deceased Is A Part of
Our High Holiday Repentance"
RELIGIOUS SERVICES WILL BE HEL0 AT THE
Jewish Section of the
Woodlawn Park Cemetery
3260 S.W. 8th Street
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 11 A.M.
also at the
Nt Sinai Memorial Park Cemetery
1125 N.W. 137th Street
SUNDAY, SfPTtMBER 2f, 2>.TH
KABBI TtBOR ft. STERN WILL 0FFKIATI
SEATS AND A TENT WLL BE SET UP
PHAYERBOOlfS WILL BE FURNISHED.
THE JrWtfH COMMUNITY IS COHHMtY INVITED
HYMAN GALBUT. President
'


I
Page 4 A
? b~,utrh*kfton
fiMay..gg!ri^y,
wjewisti Floridian
Rosh Hashona 5718:
Glance at Tomorrow
Seen Through Past
"L'SHANA Tova T'kasevu May You be In-
scribed for a Good Year ..." This is the tradi-
tional, time-hallowed greeting Jews offer one another
at the advent of Rosh Hashona. And. on Yom Kip-
pur, ten days later, men offer up the prayer for one
another: "G'mar Chasema Tova May the Seal-
ing be a Good One ." May the final judgment on
your fate point to a fruitful coming twelve months.
To our readers we prayerfully say the same.
Tve past Hebrew Year 5717 has been filled with a
variety of events many of them happy, many
sad. many of them pointing to our progress as a
people, some setting the sign upon human weak-
nesses. For the Jewish community of Greater^ Miami
there have been all sorts of developments from a
local, national and overseas point of view. Where
space and significance permitted, we commented on
these developments here.
If the opinions thus expressed did not always
meet with universal approval, there was nonethe-
less the happy recognition that diiferences are the
substance of human liberty and that they excite
honest and frequently constructive thought.
Rosh Hashona is a time for introspection for
examination of one's innermost feelings. Were the
events making up the past Hebrew Year 5717
assimilated in the best way possible? Did we, as
human beings, play at least a small part in them?
Was our thought indeed constructive, or were we
observers only of the panoply of human experience?
And, as observers, were we merely satisfied to pass
silent judgment or not even to judge or to care?

THESE are centrally significant questions for a Jew
individually and for the Jewish people as a
group. Few ai9 the humans with as much spiritual
self-autonomy as the Jews'; and few therefore are
the humans with as much responsibility to act upon
this sell-autonomy as the Jews bear. The fact is that
where the Jew fails this responsibilty, he fails not
only his tradition and all other Jews; he fails him-
Mlf, as well.
.no th. towMl W.tW. M.mb.r of th. J~,,h 5.
can Association of Enlnh-Jwih Nawapapor*. noriM
rfn Association. ^________.
FRED~K. SHOCHET............Editor and Publisher
LEO MINDLIN......................................News Editor
OFFICE and PLANT
CE and PLANT -, 120 N.E. Sixth w,
Telephenes FR 4-1141 FR 4 8212
Th. Jwlih FluHUIan oot uri,n.t~ti,. iTT"
nth of th mrcbndi dvrtllyd In It. rolun,n, ^"
On* Year 5 00
Friday. September 27, 1957
2 Tishri 5718
"*" lit*
Volume 31
Number 39
This is not mere rhetoric; this is a substantial
truth proved to be all too accurate by the fate of the
Jewish community under the Third German Reich.
Only in our own -nation was a Jewish community
ever to rise to greater secular prestige, greater num-
bers and more generally productve significance. But
where the Jew of Germany as Dr. Iheodor Herzl
bitterly learned as early as 1903 denied his spirit-
ual self, and thus his essential freedom, we pray
that our own community has acted upon its auto-
nomy to the fullest possible extent.
Events during the Hebrew Year 5717 offer some
hope in this regard. Nationally, American Jewry
mot one of the greatest challenges of its history when
the State of Israel, by the pressure of negative cir-
cumstance, moved to lessen the strains directed
against her with a lightening campaign into the
Sinai Peninsula. While President Eisenhower con-
demned the move in the strongest diplomatic langu-
age, and vowed U.S. sanctions unless Israel backed
down unconditionally, the American Jewish com-
munity stood unintimidated acted proudly upon
the principle that the strength of American democ-
racy lies in respect for minority belief.

OUT it was to the credit of this nation's understand-
ing that vocal Jewish identification with Israel's
plight during the Hebrew Year 5717 found support
not just in a minority whose spiritual relationship to
the Jewish State was obvious, but in a majority of
the population a majority of Americans, despite
th*> President's policies, acting out of respect for
decency and fair play. This mass mobilization of
sentiment galvanized Jewry right down to the local
community level, and Greater Miami moved to meet
its share of the responsibility.
From voluntary cooperation with a Federation
"clearing house" that advised organzations and indi-
viduals on the wisdom or folly of their intended state-
ments to the press, meetings, public rallies, etc., to
the Jewish community's participation in emergency
United Jewish Appeal quotas above and beyond
their annual UJA commitment, Miami added its own
assurances to the collected voice of American Jewry,
telling beleaguered Israel that she would prevail.
A parallel situation to which our community
rose was the mass Jewish immigration developing
out of President Nasser's Hitler-like campaign
against Egyptian Jewry as well as the Jewish
flight from Hungary and Communist oppression fol-
lowing the outbreak of revolution there. No less did
spiritual and financial assistance go to the Jews of
Egypt than to the many Hungarian families who ar-
rived in Miami during the past Hebrew Year to take
up residence among us as new Americans.
*
^HILE its joint local endeavor gears itself heavily
toward overseas responsibility of this kind,
Mianu Jewry recognizes a similar responsibility to-
J"d'S In reaar,d- 'he Jewish community
during 5717 raised a record sum of money through its
Combined Jewish Appeal to deal with the expand-
ing needs of the area's inordinate growth.
Thus Mt. Sinai Hospital's new and beautiiul
quarters began to be erected on Collins Island ad-
Mt 6S nni T reSen' SHeu Under new Federation-
\l"a Zn7STmen'' ,he,vannUQl "A11S,ar '^lee-
is a thina of the past. The hospital's operational
deficit henceforth devolves as a more dueS comnS
ment upon the organized Jewish community.
In a similar regard, other Jewish agencies made
notable progress, expansion-wise as well as in
achievement To meet the demand for leisure-time
activity fa the burgeoning North Dade area the
Greater Mknu Jewish Community Center at the con-
elusion of 5717 opened a North County Branch there
which is already in full function.
Realistically coping with the increasing numi
of retired persons here, as well as with the dem
for its services, the Jewish Home for the Aqed i
final weeks of the last "Hebrew" Year regre^tC!
nounced it would accept no now application! |
entry until further notice; and, in the Year Si
ahead, the Home looks forward to copinq withi
restriction through organized community pin.
methods.
No less were other Jewish agencies. inc;a
the Bureau of Jewish Education and Jewish Fan
Service, appraising their record of achievementso
assessing their continuing needs to match the I
tastic growth of Greater Miami Jewry
QNE of the important occurrences of the
year was the increased relationship beti
Federation, the Jewish community's central plan
organization, and its cognate in the general i
munity. United Fund, successor to Dade co
Community Chest.
Three Jewish agencies now participate in I
ted Fund, and Jewish leaders here only recently]
affirmed their wholehearted support of it. Bui
developing interrelationships also created the I
for asserting the Jewish community's undiminiiL
fund-raising needs for upward of 55 national and]
ternational Jewish agencies including the tret
dous requirements of the State of Israel in ad
to Miami's Jewish agencies whose budgets are Fs
eration responsibilities.
The increasing identification between the ]
and general communities was seen as a good thsl
for both. The partial sponsorship United Fund I
upon itself in regard to the Jewish agencies
only a natural development these agencies,
all, serve residents of the Greater Miami area.
But the Jewish community's undiminished L
needs required the kind of restressing that pl^
into proper focus Miami Jewry's understanding d
relationship to the general community, as weilf
of its responsibility to Jewry overseas and in'

THESE are but passing views into a few of the
ing problems of the Hebrew Year 5717
of them previously taken up in far areater d
these columns. As commentary on an out-g_
year. they also serve to raise the curtain on thestd
where will be played the events of the H
twelve-month period.
For human experience is fundamentally .,
cil. The problems of yesterday are the problems
tomorrow. That we, in Dade county, thusfar ad
ed the heated imbroglio of integration and mat
postponed the battle against efforts at introdir
religious instruction into the public school sy
does not mean that the Hebrew Year 5718 will"
leave us indifferent or inert.
Our liturgy durinq Rosh Hashona asks:
shall live? Who shall die? Who shall
by sword? Who by fire? ." These are
mere words. For the people of Israel, only *
after the advent of 5717. they were real enough
the sands of the Sinai, with Egyptian hordes fl
before them. For the Jews of Hungary and (
hiding from the perils of Communist tyranny on
one hand and Hitler-like atrocity on the other, 0
were questions filled with significance in term*
survival.
Let them therefore not be mere words in
own hearts. Nor do they have to be not if
future, like the past, wiH be one to live, as ww
to observe, on the basis of time-honored and h
ed Jewish tradition. We pray the answers to
questions will redound to a rich and fruitful 1
community during 5718 to a happy America
a peaceful Israel, to a humble and creativ* h'
kind.


dav,
September 27, 1957
Jewlsti Fhrkttan
Page 5 A
lAs Slaps Red Intervention, Dag Seeks UNEF in Israel
UtTED NATIONS-(JTA)Sec
l oi State John Foster Dulles,
I of the Big Power ministers to
ress the twelfth General Asaem-
"tocussed world attention
' with
this
on the Middle East with a
ibat Soviet "indirect aggros-
jn she area endangered world
ring the history of Soviet ef-
,to get a -Middle East foothold,
I* said that "this Soviet Com-
L( tffort has-made- thc-flrost
K# in Syria where Soviet bloc
nere exultantly received and
political power has increas-
hbeen taken over by those who
upon Moscow." He said
[ Soviet acts "may perhaps un-
jngly lead the recipients of So-
larms into acts of direct ag-
kndrti Gromyko, the Soviet
Inister, replied the next day
11 renewal of Russian pro-
fit for four-power agree-
mt on the renunciation of the
i of force in the Middlo East
J of interference in tho intern-
laffairs of any country in that
Li Neither Dulles nor Gromy-
Ireferred indirectly or by name
I Israel in their lengthy ad-
rises.
Biles told the General Assem-
llhat the United States may in-
troduce "concrete proposals" at the
current session in an effort to
"tranquillize the scene."
A spokesman for the Israel dele-
gation called the Dulles speech "an I
important discussion of the dangers'
created by ttje heavy rearmament
and incitement of Syria." A Syrian
spokesman said Syria "is not threat-
ening any of its neighbors." '
Exactly what Israel issues were
Jikety to be considered at the cur-
rent AsserfibTy session appeared
uncertain. Sir Leslie Munro, the
new Assembly president, said Arab-
Israel issues were expected to come
up only in relation to the United
Nations Emergency Force and the
Arab refugee problem
Ho said tho UNEF matter
would bo on tho agenda when UN
Secretary General Dag Him-
marskjold reports on tho present
status of UNEF and possible
plans for a permanent UN force.
Tho Secretary-General's report
will deal with tho organitation,
deployment, operation and finan-
cing of UNEF.
The question of deployment was
likely to revive the issue of placing
UNEF contingents on Israel's side
of the Gaza Strip demarcation line,
an objective dear to Hammarsk-
jold, who believes his authority for
disposing UNEF forces in the Mid-
dle East will be greatly strengthen-
ed if they are not exclusively on
Egyptian territory
Tribute to UNEF was paid hy
Prince Van Waithayakon of Thai-
land, the outgoing Assembly presi-
dent, in opening the session. Me
said UNEF "has rendered signal
services to the cause of peace by
helping to restore tranquillity to
this region. It has deserved well
of the United Nations and we owe
it a great debt of gratitude "
Ke-atrso nMtlVaff'M general {
source of satisfaction" the accep-
tance by Egypt of compulsory jur-
isdiction of the International Court
of Justice in regard to "disputes
arising out of the Con^ntinoDle
Convention of 1888 relating to pas-
sage of shipping through the Suez
Canal."
Religious Services Scheduled
ffi Cemeteries Sunday
Religious services will be held at
cemeteries throughout the Greater
Miami area Sunday, Sept. 29.
The services are a long-standing
tradition, involving the visiting of
burial sites between Rosh Hashona
and Yom Kippur.
Greater Miami Cemetery Assn.
Wednesday announced that persons
desiring to participate in these ser-
vices should make individual ar-
rangements with the spiritual lead-
ers of their congregations.


Welcome guest in Israel, John K. Tetagah, general secretary
of Ghana Trade Unions, is greeted by Pinhas Lavon, general
secretary of Histadrut, Israel's labor federation. Tetagah's re>
cent visit to Jewish State as gue3t of Histadrut precedes arrival
of a larger delegation of Ghana trade unionists who will study
strnr-fure ^nd activitis of Histadrut.
:4
Hi

coio
*?Us
GUAKMmeiD
FIRSTS!
_____________BfCONDS
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AT SAMPU SHOt STOKB
Open Every
' Monday
* friday
'T 9 P.M.
Ic Shoe t Don't miss
these values
ot the finest
high grode
ancellation.
Store
in the South
2302 PONCE DE LEON BLVD.
CORAL GABLES
PHONE HI 8-5500


Page 6 A
+JeJst>fk>r*Man
Friday, September 27,
NJ. Urged to Defeat 'Grace' Bill
. NEWARK(JTA)The New Jer-
sey Region of the American Jewish
Congress, supported by the Rabbin-
ical Council of New Jersey this
Charles Goldberg, managing
director of Delano hotel, Mi-
ami Beach, announces ap-
pointment of Horace Bum-
stsin a= Delano resident man-
ager. Burnstein. a veteran ho-
tel man in Miami Beach since
1945, formerly managed Sag-
amore hotel. He is a member
cf Hotel Greeters Assn., Hotel
Sales Manager Assn., and
Alpha Epsilon Phi Alumni
Club
week urged the State Legislature to
defeat a bill which would permit
the -aying of grace in the public
schools of New Jer-
"The American Jewish Congress
declares its unreserved oppo-itmii
to >uch legislation, as an lnva-ior.
of the right of every citizen to ex-
ercise his religious beliefs exclus
ively according to the traditional
and exercised practices of the re-
ligious group to which he belongs,"
the statement declared. _
The organization pointed oot
that there has never been an ap-
proved and correct version of
grace and that there has been no
manual of prayers which has
been agreed upon by the authori-
ties of the Catholic, Protestant
and Jewish faiths. 'The ultimate
effect of introducing several sets
of non-sectarian prayers into the
Photo Interpreter Joking Part
In MATO Maneuvers
T, Sgt. Herbert B. Geltner. son of
Mr- Bessie Geltner. 3311 S\V 23rd
st i> on board the Navy aircraft
carrier l"SS Lake Champlaign. on
! way to participate in the NATO op-1
eration. "Deep Water"' in the Med-
: iterranean Sea.
Sgt. Geltner is an aerial photo in-
terpreter assigned to Marine At-
tack Squadron 324. stationed with
Marine Aircraft Group 31 at MCAS
Miami.
public school system would create
pseudo- religious system of wor-
ship and confuse the children
with regard to participation and
affiliation of their respective
sects," the AJC stated.
Religious observance is a pri-
vate matter reserved to the indi-
vidual, his family and church. We
defend the right of every individ-
ual to practice his religious belief
fully and with no fear of pen^ty
fin 'jeNHiRiiiK WShy-SWl. "flu
American Jewish Congress is of the
belief that pressure by agencies of
government to compel individuals
into religious adherence of any
kind is a blow against religious
freedom. Religiosity is a matter
of conviction and belief and not of
legislative pressure." the statement
concluded.
W/
NORMANDIt KfSTAURANT
llmfrr rear Holiday Biaaeri .ft ,
FINfST IN -R&3 DINING
40 71 .t St., Miami *
INORMANDYIS..K,,,,,, ,h ,
| Open Daily at 4 p.m. (Cnd^f
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
Marseilles Hetel
1741 COLLINS AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
Phone IE 8-5711
Abe Getter, Managing Director
The NATO operations will take
place during the latter part of Sep- I
\ tember. and will ci>n>i*t of Marine |
, air and ground units assisting am-
phibious landings with Greek and
Turkish troops in Southern Europe.
, flu*** euliine
for diseriminarii*f
people
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY WfW YEAR .
ALCAZAR HOTEL
Biscayne Blvd. I NX 5th Street
JERRY PAULDING, General Manager
COMMERCIAL MAN'S HOME
Phone 9-24*1
^^f <-J~ltppu 1.^411
NICK ond
ARTHUR'S
RESTAURANT
Your Hosts
NICK & ARTHUR
Succulent charcoal iteoki dona te
a tender turn delectable
dishes to tempt the most pompared
palate .
KtMrVsjTIOPlI Pss*MR#
UN 6-9759
1101 79th St Causeway
Holiday iirvviinqs fr
HENRY NEYLE'S
Steak House
and Lounge
a
I WANT Mf MILK
a
mihouKoWi
FLORIDA
DAIRIES
Oavocanie
Vhomia "D" Milk
"Milk Products"
ere 'refected
TtL 4-M2I
2475 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
Phone Wl 5-2611
rot mavATioHs
A\JGUST BROi
\ *Vr
CHARCOAL STEAKS
CHOPS SEA FOOD
CHOICE LIQUORS ft WINES
MAUANDAU BIACH C JU**C
N(B GulfSTMAM RACE TRACK
HAILANDAIE, FLORIDA
Open All Year 'Round
ftew
PLANTATION
RESTAURANT
vL*-'e^
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2-029]
mom jk-5o*
LINCOLN MANOR 2KS
RESTAURANT
0 f k a Oltll
SERVING 7 COURSE KOSHER DINNER from S1.65
Catering For AU Occasion*
AIR COMOmONEO LOWEST rOSSUUI PIKB|
MaeW HkkMtBl taaarrWaa W fm4 JMunW* *| Aeeeefft (ml
Raaai J. tun, Mrecfer
free ec*m ea Preempt 1 IBXOUI ROAR. MUM sM0r|
'Quality la Lafwj Htmimbtrtd"
CANMUJKtMiHT IVV
CHEF'S 4-STAR SPECIAL
Junior F|LBT MtCNON CHARCOAL
Shrimp Cocktail Green Vegetable
BROILED
lacladcs:
Chef's Salad
Chopped Liver
Baked Idaho Potato
Cottage Cheese
and Chivea
Garlic Broad
Boat Cup of Coffee
in Town
Choice of Dessert
Relish Tray
Rolls and Butter
250
COMPUTE SEAEOOO AND SNOtf 0WNERS free. Sl.75
Open Daily 1t:W a.m. to 1 a.m. Sundays from 12 No**
COCKTAIL
LOUNGE
GROUP LUNCHEONS
PARTIES AND BANQUETS
TELEPHOnf]
Henry Leitaon, Mgr.
3131 COMMODORE PLAZA, COCONUT GROVE
0 Sleet Serfs ef sVara PtaySeaae AameJa free rVrfcisf
BBBBBBBBSBBBBSBBSBBeBBJ Air Conditioned
IMPORTANT INFORMATION
Do you know that recent medical research has found tW|
fats play an important part in the cause oi heart disease. I
Not the fat on shoulders, hips, waistline, etc. but fat that ac-l
cumulates in the arteries. To combat this danger less fatal
foods is recommended^ HOLLAND HONEY CAKE AWI
BREAD tit perfectly in such a diet for these are made witfij
out additions of any fat. Yet thory are nutritious, dawr-"
and energy airing foods. Good stealth depends to a I
extent upon what we eat
Sugar, wheat eggs, salt your problem? HOLLAND HQNCTl
CAKE AND BREADmade without these ^<^?5'Jm|
the answer. For your Good Health's sake eat HOLM""!
HONEY CAKE, fell your friends about this produci-7|
will appreciate the tip. Ask lor it in your k*** 8U**"
Be*t WUkem tor the New ***
PAISANO'S
for Fine
Italian Food
M255 N.W. 7th Avenue
Phone
Mui-^y
m Wims FOR TEE NEW YEAR
JAY'S POTATO CHIP C'
4101 H.W. 37th AVfNUE *" *


hrtemb" 1957
ii Lehrman Receives Doctorate;
Earl Warren Given Soncino Talmud
j0hrman, spiritual | muniry of Southern Florida."
+Jewistn*rkUai
m
Paq "7 A

convocation Sept.
rife Jewish Theological Sem-
^'S^KnV.nu-El.'receiv
rpUS of Doctor of Hebrew
nture at a
irASa.n New York City.
'Iting the degree Dr. Simon
j-rt vice chancellor of the
B,ry. congratulated Rabbi
on having completed the
research and studies re-
I (0r the degree.
j uhrman's thesis was on
[Jews Win
)ts in Bonn
B_(JTA)Three Jews were
| to the West German Bun-
. ib the national elections
l brought Chancellor Konrad
jier's Christian Democratic
[Tfull majority of Germany's
rHouse.
d were Jeenetta Wolff,
J Blichstem nd Jacob Alt-
\. Two other Jews, Max Lipav
i md Dr. Josef Neukeroer,
Seeiel Democratic candi-
, aero defeated.
telections also brought defeat
I openly neo-Nazi groups
the 151 IK Refugee party
j polled 1.375.000 votes but
I to carry five percent of the
nte and, under German con-
ioBal procedure, will not be
ailed at all in the Bundestag.
[German party, which has dis-
I a notable lack of sympathy
i all Jewish mutters, has only
i in the Bundestag.
The convocation at which Rabbi
Lehrman received his degree open-
ed the 71st academic year of the
Seminary. Held in the Seminary's
Louis Marshall Memorial Quadran
gle, it ended a weekend of study
sessions, dealing with the ethical
insights of the Talmud and their
relevance to. contemporary legal
problems. __
Guest of the Seminary for all of
- "j.c sAudy sessions *as Chief Justice
.Jistom.of tha.jewtfn coe- Bu-n^BnfJwr-AI the-convocation,
Samuel Friedland, president of
Temple Emanu-El, a member of the
Seminary's board of overseers, pre-
sented the Chief Justice with a
complete set of the Soncino edition
of the Talmud, a 30-volume work.
"I will boar in mend," mM
Chief Justice Warren in accept-
ing the presentation, "that moat
Of the good thing* that we find
bi vr law nd our own institu-
tions came from the wisdom of
men of other ages."
Speaker at the convocation was
Hon. Simon H. Rifkind, former
judge of the United States Federal
Court, who spoke on "Law as a
Moral Force." Dr. Mordecai M. Kap-
lan, professor of philosophies of re-
ligion at the Seminary, and Dr.
Louis Finkelstein, Seminarp chan-
cellor, discussed a section of Mish-
nah at the convocation.
'Post Yom Kippur' Dance
North Shore Jewish Center Sis-
terhood has completed final plans,
for its "Post Yom Kippur" dance
to be held Saturday evening, Oct.
5, at the Center. Irving Laibson
and his orchestra will perform. .
Rabbi Irving Lehrman (center), spiritual leader of Temple
fcmanu-El. received Doctor of Hebrew Literature degree at con-
vocation Sept. 15 of Jewish Theological Seminary of America
in New York City. Guest of Seminary for convocation's study
" wa8 US" SuPreme Court Chief Justice Earl Warren
(left). Rabbi Louis Finkelstein, Seminary chancellor, congrat-
ulates Rabbi Lehrman, whose thesis topic was "History of the
Jewish Community of South Florida." Samuel Friedland, Miami
Beach community leader, presented Warren with 30-volume
Soncino edition of Talmud during ceremonies.
Liebman Named To ZOA Executive
At the recent 60th annual con-
vention of the Zionist Organization
of America, held in New York City,
Seymour B. Liebman, Miami Beach
attorney and communal leader, was
elected to the National Executive
Council of the organization.
Liebman is president of the
Southeast region of the ZOA. He
was one of the 20 members elected
from the country at large to serve
on the highest policy making body
of the oldest and largest men's
Zionist group in the United States.
Meir Club Has
Officer Installation
Golda Meir club of Pioneer Wo-
men's Organization of Greater Mi-
ami will install officers at a lunch-
eon and musicale Tuesday noon,
Oct. 1, in the Garden restaurant.
Ia^charjje of_Jhe musicale are
Mrs Luba Roy and Miss Anyuta
Melicov. Mrs. Anna Seltzer, install-
ing officer, will give the official
charge to the following:
The Mesdames Oscar Zeltzer,
president; A. Seltzer and Shirley
Qeeen, vice presidents; Sonia Rob-
bing, recording secretary; Barbara
Greenburg, treasurer; Anna Qua-
ker, financial secretary; and Esther
Brown and Anna Sorin Bild, corres-
ponding secretaries.
Chairmen to be installed include
the Mesdames K. Victorhouse,
dues; Shirley Queen, Moetzet Ha-
poalot; Anna Seltzer, membership;
Miriam Halperin, cultural; Alice
Lefcourt, JNF; Bonds of Israel,
Lena Pushkin; and Anna S. Bild.
publicitv.
j .' '
August bros rVi
* is the atsj '
i fippr Might Dance
(krGranada Jewish Cotnmun-
ttr will hold a Yom Kippur
_ahow and dance Saturday,
| at the Center. Music is by
I Johnson sextet.
1 W~ "We feVcate for
"_ Successfti/ Grecieos
2*W Livit"
SCHOOL
"rT W riU TO 411 OOI
HKH7S AMD FRIENDS
l*y Through High School
**! Pool on Spaeieua,
Muliful Campus
jy AVE. JE. 1-0604
.WNWHSTANC1
10VERS
lAliYr,CK.ur,
*. 'reriooM, -. a*
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OF LEAK?
CALL
f(*0 CONN
n 'Pair it or apply
!* For free
Phone:
ACME
SUPPLY
CO.
FR 9-5274
FR 3-6996
EXTENDS BEST WISHES
FOR THE
NEW YEAR
To Jewry Everywhere-
EVERY MEAL'S A

HOLIDAY with...
Eye Frosted Foods
FISH STICKS
PRE COOKED JUST
HEAT AND SERVE
39
FISH BITES
FRENCH FRP
WHIPPED
POTATO PATTIES
\
YOUR
CHOICE
19'
Birds Eye Fruits. Vegetables, Potatoes. Fish and Jaiceg Are Kosher
SUNILAND DELICATESSEN
leSS WASHINGTON AVMW. MUM OUCH
TROPICAL KOSHER FOOD MARKET
132S WASHINGTON AVENUE, MIAMI 1IACH
TRACHTENBERG KOSHER FOOD MARKET
1323 WASHINGTON AVINOI, MIAMI BEACH
LUNDY'S MARKET
143S WASHINGTON AVENUE, MAMI BIACH
M. ft M. MEAT t POULTRY MARKET
441 ESPANOU WAT, MAMI BEACH
ORIGINAL NEW YORK MEAT MARKET
7S7 WASHINGTON AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH
SCHIFF'S MARKET
1630 IENOX AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH

V

;l * .1
1 I 1 1
u
t
yl

MM "



Pcajo SA
Fiiday, Septet ff
Ji tltcl Double Wedding for Sisters Libl
Mrs. Adler; Barbara Mrs. Murray
At a beautiful doable otddinc.uun Schlassel. Marshall n
U-
Rites, Troths
Revealed Here
Brae* Faatana-~r*iraE. M1 a :
was ike seraa*. fur the >*
Sept 14. wedkas* mi re-
i :< Mrs Arine CMMr Laat-
rof Me ant
:.v: O i .-
Ima bb* tmrmt Bon
b*. \*w York at* **

ullmal
nu

Barry Leif. -Ma,*"0hJ
-boy Am tended th,u,
an araiao ity of Miam:
Beach.
l
1 masher of P>

M:s> ItauM Ann Vjcri--
-- ; : -. .....- :- '.-'-
thai BuTCH :: Ni To* OS BM
.: Mr Muret-
- and Mrs. kaatpa J. Sharer
*C ir s. akaan Beach
ana* aha -cukesc a; But-
?;-.-;..->:.: v; Yrt Mr Sta
: -. : V .kn_
Mas Baba auk Merr-
Lauoaon V.-- l-
Ttirj "-! be named n .">nne. whecr r* oat
Mrs. i*njjc ?**.
- *udjer SSS. *
- Jeusaue C Tucker mi A)- vows as ax S is
. il be
v- Ikiws rasiriaata _.
7a*. aTpnaai Pta -^ bnaVcfcKI i* rhe i'iaa|uliii af
* Mrs. J l>anhui S.-.I BawUinaa ikmos
**""" *" *1 Miam Senea, ac :he iate Dr. ^ u-^
i :- 7-tfccor 3e j* ae
"" -'* Mm My *.fri ue iiaert Sas T^ani iu CuBL
daafban- of Mr ace Mrs. Aarux
VaiawaV. Tens., uk Chn*
hjBBaM H- ? :: Mr?
Bear? S-roa. SO* Afcac. re M-
auhi Bench, m toe hue Mr Sanaa.
TYe tnde-:>*e arwawi Sank
L-rwrence Ceilepe and vul craanac*
:: V i a
Jauaar> *
Zpsaim Pi_
Mr 5^t-2= rras-.;a': rnut M-
Scaeal and ".M.
pure -
bears neck, and hite alencon lace
ceremony Libby Ana and Barbara,
cbagaters of Mr. and Mrs. Loo
Pastor. 1BB02 XW 7th et. Mined,
irr undet-
Ubby Ana was wed to Boy S.
Adier. son of Mr and Mrs. Milton
Adler! 2477 SW 19th tor., and Bar-
bara married Bichard Murray, ton ^n ^ eaaplox
of Mrs Rae Murrey 5765 La Goree wa^ ht^ :.
dr. Miaau Beach, and the Ute Mr. a*. York. Vr Murr," if
MurT; v ,^ .- -' ** *"* w-' Herald
ftabbt Leon Kronj-b officiated at j ,, roo,^ I"T*W
the *"*" eweS2r "J*f I After a rece;
Aiinnaai hotel on Sunday. Sept., '
22. at 5 JO pju. 4 = n ""
Tae new Mr Adler choae a gourn 13^-^, '"T '; '
tney will lire ar.; -he ]fu
traia Her veil fell from a Juliet
cap af seedpearU.
Mrs. Murray's bridal fown '
tared an ihrrina norfrirar, and its
bodare and chapel train of pure*
whae aft was trunaaed with lace.*.
A crrws heM her rnup-rtip vaiL
Both brides earned white Bibles:
wch urchads and stepfaaBOtax.
M->s Marsha Atraa was aaaid of
ta> Mrs Adler Mrs. Mickey
aatrou of honor to her
Mrs. Murray. Juaaor
Lane Mae Adler.
as bos best on
Mr Murraj
has best aean his brother,
I'shers were Shroe Doreaoo. Be
Davidson. Lassk Exchange Vows
TuJe Dmdaua and parents are Mr. and Mrs. Adotph
of latlriaunUe. Fla.
v ?- I r# .i fMajkah] a*
. :
Miss Tucker Eyes Nov. 24 Wedding
Mass .11 iiii11' rreatiai Tnoaer She affihated wsh Dude Federal
and A. t*>trwz are encaaed. TV Sr'-.rjs and
at the Ahners
trap to the Po-
the coucae wiB
I XZ Sth st, ;
f ttfttss
/fffcei
exp/esjitdJi
idfkir
Btrecreae*
MooamG scaoci & acsmcy
277
ana. the Biac
ci. but a aauaer -dunce ae me
uaarai n. Snaaay cujkB.
Tie rnac Mnea Snraal C
' il >? Bnai -Trek
and eaapans af
\EW .IKWISH BIBLE
GUT FOR EVERYONE
at the Himk M*Udmjj S+a***
Walpaper DaStrilxrtors,
SMS BZSCAT-G BOCIEVAID
9CAJC
pl -osa
THE FRUITOLOQST
OrcWs 49c
:RE>EXB IRV1><> ROBIV
SM9 S.W. lcVrk Tinm MO
CHABIjOTTK UAMTS
PAIJldV^BBwUTY
117 W
O
WILL 147* SL
*


Lember^Ji!!
*Jewisti fhr/cf^r
Page 9 A
w
omen in
y
educations
[ K. W fUHSTOH
, Fein stein
to School
Ditimittee of
[UerTamicI Wednesday an-
I the engagement of Mrs.
iyl Feinstein to head the
{staff of the newly formed
f school.
(Feinstein is a graduate of
i Jacob Seminary of Jeru-
Bd holds the degree of
r of Hebrew Kdueation.
i taught in New York at
; Tremont Talmud Torah,
jas at Yeshiva Yesode.
Feinstein has been teaching
i Beach for the past four
She is a member of the
(Teachers Assn. of Greater
Solid'Food
f ou Dieters
| a summer of "living it up"
Ity barbecue feasts, sweet
sehed in butter, and sun-
(tetather treats, comes the
harvest of extra pounds.
la diet is indicated to help
\ off the excess weight, you
without starving, says
Foods.
fs the theme nf Breakstone's
Cheese fall advertising
The Best Friend a Diet
i cottage cheese is high
Nil and amazingly lew in
it il ideally suited to
PNt, and Breakstone's
ifaturts appetising, nu-
utitfying dishes metie
I "It chetse and other
?in, low-fat foods.
"wipe booklet. "Clues to
foi with Breakstone's Cot-
*." U offered free, and
fwipes for low-calorie
I til as lavish desserts
' U-occasion fare. For a
BM postcard request with
tandaddres> to The Jew-
P*"1- Box 2973, Miami 18,
Miami Hadassah to Preview Mine'
At Orientation Workshop Sept. 30
j have its "fhanot f l* .u __. r_ *
Paris may have its "Chanel Line."
but the Miami chapter of Hadassah
will unveil its "H Line" at a fashion
preview of the "Look of Know-
ledge." Some 1,200 Hadassah wo-
men in the Miami area have been
invited to attend this unique orien-
tation workshop for board and gen-
eral members of the prganization.
Mrs. Gerald P. Soltz is chairman
ofThe event scheduled for Monday,
Sept. 30, from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p m.,
at Beth David auditorium, 2625 SVV
3rd ave.
Mrs. Irwin 'Liss, president of
the Miami chanter of Hadassah,
will bring greetings followed by
prologue skit antitled "Tell Me
Ladies," directed by Mrs. Mar-
shall Litvak. Mesdames George
Graham, Nathan Cynamon, Les-
lie Blumberg and Michael Covin
re in the skit.
Morning workshops will be con-
ducted by "designer" Mrs. Homer
Rievman. who will discuss styles
and patterns in successful fund-
raising, assisted by Mesdames Jos-
eph Milton, Louis Goldman, Sey-
mour Schulner. Louis Rubin, Ger-
ald Martin and Harold Berkowitz.
"Fabric consultant" Mrs. Bernard
Sterling will head the membership
workshop, together with Mesdames
Nathan Cynamon and Bernard Kra-
marsky. "The Look of Knowledge-
will be presented by education
chairman Mrs. Joseph Klein, assist-
ed by Mrs. Eugene Silverstone and
Mrs. Louis Schwartzman.
'The designing woman," in the
person of Mrs. Bernard Stevens,
will discuss Hadassah's role in
th* community. Mrs. Arnold
Perlstein, past president of the
Florida region of Hadassah and
director of the Women's Division
of the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration, will be a special consul-
tant in this session.
"Trimming coordinator" Mrs.
George Simon will demonstrate
proper programming techniques
during the afternoon session, as-
sisted by Mrs. Rafkind. Highlight
of the afternoon will be Mrs. Sid-
ney Gluckman of Orlando, presi-
dent of the Florida region of Ha-
dassah, lifted as "couturiere par
excellence," who will deliver an in-
spirational address.
Ben Gurion Branch Launches Season
Ben Gurion Branch of Farband
will have its first regular meeting
of the season Thursday evening,
Oct. 3, at Beth El Congregation.
Program will include a discus-
sion of currant events by Manuel
Burstein and a talk on "Sholem
Asch and Hit Works" by Beryl-
Morrison.
In charge of the program is Dr.
A. J. Ishlon. S. Halperin, vice pres-
ident, replaces Bernard Thurman,
president, currently on an Israeli
tour.
Social hour will be under the
auspices of Mrs. Miriam Halperin.

These Meals Just the Thing
For Your Rosh Hashona Table
By REGINA FRISCHWASSER
FISH BALLSGEFILTE FISH
2 lb. winter carp
2 lb. yellow pike
1 lb. white fish
3 minced onions
1 roll, sliced carrots
1 teaspoon salt
2 well beaten eggs
1 teaspoon sugar
Clean the fish, place them in a
covered casserole and into the re-
frigerator overnight. Wash and
chop the fish with minced onions
and roll soaked in cold water and
squeezed dry. Add salt, well beat-
en eggs, sugar, and chop fish until
it clings to the chopping knife.
Place the fish bones, heads and 3
sliced onions in a saucepan. Pour
into the saucepan 6 cups of boiling
water. With moistened hands
shape balls, and sprinkle with salt.
Place into the pan, cover, and
cook l-s hours. Add sliced car-
rots and cook for 45 minutes long-
er. Then remove the fish to a
platter. Boil down gravy until 2
cups are left; strain and pour into
fish boat.

KREPLACH WITH SOUP
2 cups flour
' cup water
2 well beaten eggs
Mix together the flour, with eggs
and water. Knead a soft dough and
roll out to V inch thickness. Pre-
pare the filling:
MIXED MEAT FILLING
1 pound boiled veal
1 pound calf s lung
1 cup fried onions
1 teaspoon salt
'a teaspoon pepper
1 tablespoon melted fat
2 well beaten eggs
Boil the veal and lung in salted
water until tender. Drain the broth
and add it to the soup. Grind the
meat with the fried onions and mix
well. Add salt, pepper, melted fat
and well beaten eggs. Press an in-
verted glass into the dough and ro-
tate to cue out perfect rounds.
Spread the filling on the rounds,
fold them and press the edges to-
gether, forming a crescent shaped
pocket. These are to be dropped
into boiling salted water and. cook-
ed 15-20 minutes.

FRIED CHICKEN
Cut a cooked four-pound chicken
into portions. Dip in cracker meal
mixed with salt and in well beaten
egg mixed with 2 tablespoons wa-
ter, then in cracker meal again.
Fry in deep hot fat until browned
on both sides. Place fried chickens
on brown paper to drain excess fat.

NUT AND DATE STRUDEL
3 cups sifted flour
2 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons oil

In presentation of "Life of Bridie Murphowitz" are Mrs. Norman
J. Russ and Mrs. Harold Druker, members of Sisterhood of Tem-
ple Beth Sholom. Playlet was presented at membership tea of
Sisterhood Wednesday. Trixie Levin is author and producer
of skit. Mrs. Sol S. Pine is Sisterhood president.
-i'
*w- "'d Directors, end ell mimkm ef MUrecM W
1 whk to extend beat wishes fee
COOP YEAR M 5711
**' ond t. a|| tht jwU 9mf^ everywhere k* world.
ACMCl SAIOWTTZ, Pres.
"BOV" Chapter Mtsrechi W<
4 **f, MAlTHr AND fKOSMKOUS NEW rf At TO Ail
WEST MIAMI POST 223
JEWISH WAR VETERANS AUXILIARY
Shdy Piano with a Highly Skillod
Concert Pianist and Teacher
Miami Hebrew Book Store]
1S8S Waihington Ave.
Miami B**ch JE S-3S40
Hebrew Religion* Supplit* for
Synagogues, School* V Private Us* I
ISRAELI A DOMESTIC GIFTS
3/4 cup water
Place the flour into a mixing
bowl, add sugar, oil, and warm wa-
ter and knead a soft dough. Cover
and allow to stand 30 minutes. Roll
out to inch thickness. Place on
a floured cloth with a plate under-
neath and stretch the dough until
thin. Brush with oil and sprinkle
with 1 cup seedless raisins, 1 pound
chopped dates, 2 cups chopped wal-
nuts, 1 cup sugar mixed with cin
namon.
Remove the plate and for?" a roll
by pulling the cloth away from you
while rolling the far edge of the
dough toward you. Place in a greas-
ed baking pan, slice and bake 1
hour in a medium oven.
K:..-..,it ^utiiUMin I *J*a*MI *
CONCERT PIANIST
ft ACCOMPANIST
AVAILABII FOR TEACHING
AND ACCOMPANYINC.
Sensitive, Individual Approach.
Yeer Home er Mint. HI 1-1*45
JSSPBM *****J**1> nw inmt........*** -
SI
Hj

i'
10,000 ACRE RANCH
ON A HIGHWAY
a* $100 per Acre
JEFFCOTT REALTY
INVESTMENTS
2400 First Street
FORT MYERS, HA.
EDISON S-4421
ti blaekstone
flower shops
to serve y*
24 hoars
JE t-lSYl
... Jwilltorel Graduate
Ch,idr.r,. Adults. Pe.fe.mers ALL LEVELS
FRIEDA
1121
FELDMAN
NE. 171th Terr. Nerth Miami Beech
MR. BUSINESSMAN
and MRS. HOUSEWIFE
Wr eon EM yor efcieltfe tor-
m'fre, rttgt, linens, eestumf jtw-
tlry, lampi-most amythint that
vow cannot use er sell I .
PROCEEDS GOING YOWlBD THE
SUPPORT OF THE 4 DISYIN6UISH-
ED OlO MEN AND WOMEN AY YHE
JEWISH HOME FO THE A6E0.
% fcrtof
Mr. liberate* fer *** a*
THE THRIFT SHOP
n l-Wv 514* Ml ** Ave.
Oeea every eey to 4:30
Closed Fridays and Saturdays
HOTEL... MOTEL... HOME
b APARTMENT HOUSE OWNERS
We era here te serve ye* wttb COMPLETE UNI OP LINENS
* CANNON SHEETS BLANKETS SPREADS
* PILLOW CASES BATH TOWELS
* DISH TOWELS
DRAPES CURTAINS BED PADS RUGS
TABLE CLOTHS PLASTIC GOODS
Cannon Womsuft* FieWcrest Poelfk
. AIR CONDITIONED
. '
1
4i
MIAMI
WHOLESALE
CORPORATION
127
N.**L Yin !
n i i7i7
PARKIN*
W^'i" -SB*-** "
Best Wishes for a Happy New Year
EVERGLADES LUMBER and
BUILDING SUPPLY, INC
6991 S.W. 8th Street Phono MO 1-6505
MONDAY SATURDAY 7:30 A.M. 5:30 P.M.
SUNDAY 8:30 A.M 12:30 P.M.


Pje 10A
vjewistintrMton
V
HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL
A. ARTHUR PEKELNER
INTERCOASTAL BOAT YARD INC
"MiamTs Most Complete Marine Service"
60S N.W. So. River Dr. FR 1-2629 Miami Florida

SINESSMEN!
PURCHASE YOUR
XMAS GIFTS
NOW!
Ph. FR 31019 FR 4-1971
JACK PEOOR
996 SW. 1st 51
Michael RadeK
Bar Mitzvah
Michael H. Radell, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Philip Radell, was Bar
Mitzvah Saturday, Sept. 7, in El
Centro de las Americas, at the
Hotel McAllister.
Guests from Brooklyn, N.Y., in-
cluded Mr. and Mrs. William Rad-
well, Mr. and Mrs. Harry "Shupack.
Miss Rosalie Wewberg and Edward
J. Macklis.
* Gue.srs -frem the Greater Miami
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR .
CHARLES H. KENNEY
"KENNY" STUDIO
DRAPERIES DRAPERIES EOR AIRCRAFT
1215 71s* Street UN 6-5583
Miami Beach
Arnold Charles, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Daniel Somerman,
will become Bar Mitzvah at
Saturday morning services of
Temple Ernanu-EL Rabbi Irv-
ing Lehrman will officiate.
Arnold is an eighth grade stu-
dent at Nautilus School and
attends Temple Emanu-El re-
ligious school.
SINCE 1925
EAST COAST FISHERIES, INC.
We Supply Hotels Restaurants & Institutions
Also Ship to All Parts of U.S.A.
mi PARKING WHOLESALE & RETAIL
Eat Sea food for Health
West Flagler Street at the Bridge FR 3-5514
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR .
LENA SPORSWEAR. INC.
BOYS' and MEN'S SPORTS VflAR
lt5 N.W. 23r FR 3 6175
< +m < # +m
summit srunmim
Sonny Sternstein
Is Bar Mitzvah
Sumner Harold (Sonny), son of
Mr and Mrs. Max Sternstein, 1415
SW 12th St.. was Bar Mitzvah Sat-
urday. Sept. 21. at Beth David Con-
gregation. Rabbi Yaakov Rosenberg
and Cantor William Lipson offici-
ated.
Kiddush honoring the Bar Mitz-
vah followed the service. In the
evening, Summer's family and
friends attended a reception for
him at his homr'
Sumner is an eighth grade stu-
dent at Shenandoah Junior High
School and has attended religious
school for several years.
U All My friends and Acquaintances .
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
LEROY RASHID
Candidate for Hialeah Council
3391 East 1st Avenue
Hialeah, Fla.
To All My Friends and Acquaintances .
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
VICTOR WILDE
Your Candidate for Hialeah Council
460 S.E. 8th Avenue
Hialeah, Fla.
trr eeffttas .
THE FISHIN' HOLE
Live Shrimp Specialty
All Leading Brands of Tackle
Thorough and Prompt
TACKLE REPAIR
Accurate Fishing Information
600 N.E. 13th Street
Phone FR 3-1045
524 West Ave., M.B.
Phone JE 4-2244
area were Mr. and Mrs. Sam Som-
mers and son, Mr. and Mrs. Sol
Jacobs and daughter, Mr. and Mrs.
Sam Altman and son, Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Tavss, Mr. and Mrs. Irving:
Perlman, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur
Borok.
Also Mr. and Mrs. Jack Kamen,
Mr. and Mrs. Abe Feinberg, Mr.
and Mrs. Jack Kessier, Mr. and
Mrs. Jack Geartner, and George
Radell and Miss Sheila Baker.
Charles, son of Mr
Ira C. Wcusey, 2
Bar Mitzvah at TJ
Emanu-El Saturday |
Rabbi Irving Lehnnt
bciate. Charles is i
grade student at N,
school and attends |
Emanu-El religious:
Oti
i t u a r i e s
MARHOLD DU8ROVV
It, rft 711 SW 2Jrd rd.. died Sept. 1*
while <>n a business trip In Nassau. A
member of the Miami Hebrew Corfgre-
aatlirft. be was in the wholesale dress
m,-r, h.imli^liiK business and a resident
here 17 Me leaves his wife,
Hannl: a son, Stephen, and a daugh-
ter. I>r Musan. Seivi.es were Sept. 23
a! (Jordan Funeral <"liapel, with burial
at Ml Sinai iVmel.-iv
SOLOMON LEVINE
SB, of Itt OoaM .i. .Ii.-.I Sept. 1!.
Known to South Beach residents as a
sidewalk philosopher, ha waa a fruit
peddler .itt.i ,. physical niituralisi. sur-
vlviaa > daughter, lira. L>th
i bei. Abraham: and .i
grandchild Services were Sept. tj at
Newman-Oordon Funeral Home, with
burial In Btar ..f David cm. t,i,.
MORRIS LEIVENSON
73. nf 67 ('ollins ave died Sept. 17.
Formal I;, from New York, be la sur-
vived bj a dauKhlei. Mr-, hither Boat
Smith, a brother and two sisters. Rerr
vtees and burial were in New York'.
with Newman-Oordon Funeral Home
in charge of local ariangements.
HERMAN J. SUNNCSt
63. of 177" Meridian ave dead Sept. 18.
Owner of the IMx shoe store chain In
Miami ami Florida, he waa a member
of Temple Beth Kholom and a real-
dent heie l" yean Survivors include
hie wife, Dorothy, his aon. Stewart;
hia mother. Urn. Rebecca thinness;
three brothers and a sister. Services
were Relit. IS at Riverside-Beach Me-
morial Chapel, with burial In Mt. Nafco
('ein.tery.
ABRAHAM JEFFER
.V., nf tS7 .X Federal hwy., Hallandule,
'A resident here 15 years,
he had lived In Miami Beach until
recently, surviving, are his wife, Rae:
and two daughters. Services and
burial were In New York, with local
arrHiHTements by Riverside-lleaeh Me.
murial Chapel.
MRS. FANNIE WOLLOCK
S2. of R421 Cheapl hlvd died Sept. It.
A resident here 15 ye*rs, she Is sar-
vived by a son, Mark: a daughter,
Mrs. Betty Grace: a grandchild and
two great-grandchildren. Services
were Sept. 1 at Newman-Oordon
Funeral Home, with burial in Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
MRS. IDA GORDON
. of 1514 SW 6th at. died Sept. JO. A
resident here five years, she leaves her
husband. Jacob; a di.ujfhter. Mrs.
.Sophie Schelnbart: two brothers, a sis-
ter and two grandchildren. Services
and burial were In Cleveland. wRb
Cordon Funeral Home In charge of ar-
rangements locally.
'Cinerama
Closes on
Louis de RochemorUV
Holiday" will play &|
formance Monday eve
30, at the Roosevelt__
which the theatre wilfi
doors temporarily in _
pare for a Florida pren
fourth and latest Gnenu
Lowell Thomas' "Starch I
dise," in December.
For the benefit of
have not yet seen "Cin
day" in its exclusive I
ing at the Koo-evelt. the]
ment emphasizes that en
over a week remains in i
can still do so.
Inasmuch as the
the only theatre Hin
state of Florida that cm]
show Cinerama croorn
will be no other chine*ii
production anywhere in I
The forthcoming Cii
ture, "Search for
scheduled to have its
miere in New York City!
The Roosevelt Cinerawi
ment has been alerted to]
for its Florida opening I
in December, the exact i
fixed in the near future.
Cantor Cohen at
Cantor Louis Cohen is I
in the main synagogue'
Isaac Lerer of Monticeltof
gregation. Cantor Cobn|
for his lyric presents
liturgy
witu-wd
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
WINIROOK, INC.
FURNITURE REFINISHLrfG
UPHOLSTERING
4647 East 10th Lane
Phone MU 8-0632
Hialeah. Florida
SINCERE WISHES
tea
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Mr. and .lira.
Abe Aronovl.br
and Family
To Our Many
friends
Best Wishes lor
the Holidays
2601 W.fW*1
PkemMS**


r 27,1957
"JewistirhrkUan
Page 11 A.
IV
\
m qI United Jewish Appeal "Goodwill
hneet with newly appointed chairman
Combined Jewish Appeal, Dr. Morris
i (center) on occasion of their recent
(jami Beach. Right is Col. Joseph
(of planning of Israel defense for-
mght in 1948 War of Liberation and
i campaign. Far left is Joseph Holtz-
roit industrialist and a UJA national
i^FB
W *

*
*
1 1 It
h


chairman. Second right is Samuel Rolhberq,
of Peoria, national co-chairman for cash of UJA
and member of UJA cabinet. Second from left
is Aaron M. Kanner, president of Greater Mi-
ami Jewish Federation. Current UJA "Good-
will Mission" is made up of 35 national leaders
who have volunteered to tour some 75 key
communities during September.
Kdtion Survey Results Unfold
teacher training programs, and
evaluation of the Hebrew High
School.
According to study chairman
Scher, Part two of the study is
progressing rapidly. He is inform-
ed by national headquarters of the
association in New York.City that
this phase will deal in part with at-
titudes of parents, pupils, teachers,
anr community leaders concerning
the schools courses of study and
programs.
These were the questions put to
hundreds of Greater Miamians in
the months of December and Jan-
uary by a group of local volunteers
which included the membership of
the National Council of Jewish Wo-
men. Answers to their queries
were compiled here, then, along
with written questionnaires and all
pertinent material, were sent on to
the New York office, where the
data was analyzed, computed, and
produced into the preliminary form
of the first volume.
Dr. Engelman is known as the
foremost statistician of Jewish ed-
ucation in the United States, and
has conducted many community
surveys similar to the one in Miami.
The national study o* Jewiah
, education is a tour-year proiect,
new drawing to a close, during
which time studies were under-
sthe cost of Jewish education? How adequate are our school
dlities? How do our children and their parents feel about
t some of the questions considered in the first volume of
wish Education just concluded throughout Dade county.
aft has been received by Herbert Scher, chairman of the
i Education Study Commission.
the important docu-
ni was announced by
Myers, chairman of
nity planning committee
Miami Jewish Fed-
ich sponsored the local
r was directed in the Mi-
ll Dr. Uriah Z. Engelman,
[ known educator, who
apartment of Research
incan Assn. for Jewish
also serves as the
the national study in
i participated.
'Iiminry report eon-
1 psges, and is not a
!ction," Schtr pointed
i of Jewish education
i initial volume in-
i Miami Jewish school
i ttmcturt and form;
JofKud.nt enrollment
* ovtr the years; rela-
Ixhooli with the Bu-
wh Education; length
* remain in Jewish
n analysis of ac-
ting.
red were the costs of
cation; adequacy of
flJ and physical facili-
f special section devoted
?w of Jewish Education,
| into evaluation and sta-
*ireau in the commun-
wms and functions,
taken in a score of cities of vari-
ous sizes. When Miami's study
becomes final, it will take its
sentation to be made at some fu-
ture date, possibly from New
York.
"The bulky volume received here
is being prepared now for submis-
sion to the local study commis-
sion," said Scher.
'This is the first comprehensive
study of its kind in the Miami area
since the Chipkin study of 1943,
which led to the creation of the
present Bureau of Jewish Educa-
tion," Scher explained.
frigidt
Jdaire Names Robin Co.
Authorized Saks Representa
Frigidaire has appointed the Sam
Rabin Company, 276 NW 6th it,
Miami, as authorized factory sales
and service representatives in this
area for Frigidaire Ice Cube Makers
and Water Coolers, it was announ-
ced Wednesday.
Sam Rabin, Surfside councilman
and former vice mayor, disclosed
that his organization would repre-
sent sales of the new Frigidaire
automatic ice cube makers, as well
as furnish complete maintenance
service on the ice machines and
Frigidaire water coolers.
Two new models of the Frigi-
daire ice cube makerswith 450
pound and 220 pound daily capaci-
tiesnow are available to hotels,
restaurants, cocktail lounges, clubs,
drug stores, motels and lunch-
rooms, Rabin said.
"9* to All
MF6.C0.f
INC.
Nngdoor
1 and
1 HARDWARE
1<-W. 50th Street
"E265
raetingg _
CHEMICAL
rG. CO.
P,N SCHRIEBER
fe BLEACH
28th La.
Florida
NORMAN BABEL
extends
New Year Greetings
to All His
Friends
and
Customers
-Wfc NORMAN
Babel
Mortgage Company
Quick Action
Free Inspection
Phone FR 9-0667
PLAZA BLDG.
245 S.L 1st Street
SEASONS CKllTMCS
Sommers Herbert
iu*.
HOMlttS ArrAKIL
1455 N. MIAMI AVUtUE
M1AM1
Phen* Ft 1-S47
it. J. SOMMMS
A Heppy ** *' M "
frltmdt eed fefreei
KRESS STUDIO OF FURNITURE
AND ANTIQUES
Ml N.I. 7t STMIT
rh.it PI 4-4126


'//%(& "" ltlUil "AVI6AT.0N COMPANY. ITU
OWUn UETTIa: Uttiai-ISUEUMimW CO.JIC., 42 rWT. .._ IIMY 4-7Mt
A Nappy New Year to Our Jewish Customers and Friends
GAYLORD CONTAINER CORPORATION
DIVISION OF CROWN ZELLERBACH CORPORATION
Shipping Containers Folding Cartons
8730 N.W. 36th Avenue
Phone MU 8 6541

To My Many Friends and Acquaintances .
HAPPY NEW YEAR
STANLEY ADAMS
Candidate for Hialeah Council
348 West 15th Street Hialeah, Fla.
To All My Friends and Acquaintances ..
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
FRANCIS "TONY1 BENEDETTO
Candidate for Mayor Hialeah
CAMPAIGN HEADQUARTERS TU 7-1156
700 Palm Avenue Hialeah, Fla.
A MOST HAPPY NW YEAR TO ALL
PAUL GOMEZ
Candidate for Hialeah Council
141 East 15th Street Hialeah, fla.
>
To Mrf Many Friends and Acquaintances .
A WPST HARPY NEW YEAR
FRED E. GOWING
Candidate for Hialeah Council
1083 East MrJ Street Hialeah, Fla.
To A\i My Friends and Acquaintances .
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
McLEUAN'S MARKET
WALTER J. McLELLAN
Candidate for Hialeah Council
810 East 41st Street Hialeah, Fla.


T

B
Page> 12A
+Jewistncridk>n
Friday,
Sepiemb,
Best Wishes
on the
Oeeasion ot
KOSII HASHOXA
\\ and a prosperous Xew Year
PAN AMERICAN BANK
of Miami
Member:
Federal Reserve System-Federal Deposit Insurance Cerperotiea
Coral Gables
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
Member:
Federal Reserve System-Federal Depesit lasarance Corporation
SOUTH DADE FARMERS BANK
of Homestead
Member:
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
SOTTILE BANKS
Sabbath of Repentance Servk
The Sabbath falling between Rosh Hashona wdYora Kippur it known as "Shabbat
Sabbath of Repentance." Greater Miami'. Houses of Warship are scheduling such service, tk:
Vom K.PPur. the Day of Atonement, begins next Friday evening, Oct. 4, and will be ob^'
following Saturday
AOUDATH ISRAEL. 7101 Cerlyle
.v.. Orthodoa. Rabbi Isaac ever.

ANSHE EMES. 2535 SW 19th
vo. Canter Morris Zimmerman.
BETH DAVID. 2425 SW 3rd ave.
Censarvatlva. Rabbi Yaekov Rosen-
} | berg. Cantor William W. Lipson.
iaturdaj : a.m. Bar alltsva* Mark.
nun of Dr. an.I Mrs. Kohrri Uayia:
[i,vld, eon ..i Mi and Hra. Kattaa
1 Uiblt-C.

BETH EL. 5C> SW 17th ave. Or-
thodox. Rabbi Shmaryahu T. Swir-
sky.

BETH EMETH. 12250 N.W. 2nd
ava. Conservative. Rabbi David W.
Harson. Cantor Hyman Fain.

BETH ISRAEL. 4000 Prairie ava.
Orthodox. Rabbi H. Louis Rott-
man.
i May
s.i mon:
CAHDLEUGHTING TIME
2 Tishri i:32 pjn.
a- *------af .
, p in Saturday sin n m.
S ibbath "f Repentaai a."

TO ALL .
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
Transport Rental Systems, Inc.
511 S.W. 3rd AVENUE MIAMI. FLORIDA
Phones FR 4-3942 FR 9-7859
BETH JACOB. 301-3U Washing-
ton ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Tibor
Starn. Cantor Maurice Mamchas.
ISRAELITE CENTER. 3i9i SW
24th tar. Conservative. Rabbi Mor-
ton Malavsky.
KNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid
ava. Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehr-
field. Cantor Abraham Saif.
I riday 8 M p m Saturda\ %:%*) a.m.
Seriimn: "Two AspectH of Tchuvah."

MIAMI HEBREW CONGREGA-
TION. 1101 SW 12th ava. Orthodox.
Rabbi Simon April. Cantor Barale
Kelemer.
Sin inlay 8 a.m. Kerrrw.n: "Rint-
.111. "
MONTICELLO PARK. 164th at.
and NE 11th ova. Conserve', ive.
, Rabbi Isaac Larar. Cantor Jacob
BETH RAPHAEL. 139 NW 3rd Goldf,rb.
Cantor Hernur,
Friday
of Hebriw
*m. ferin
Gorily
'The
TO ALL GREETINGS
i > i
LEWIS CRANE SERVICE & LEWIS STEEL ERECTION INC.
Structural Erection Reinforcing Placing Rigging
2201 N.W. 1st CL phone ra g.4551
FOR
MODERN
STREET
LIGHTING
CONSULT
WHITMORE ELECTRIC COMPANY
ivt. Orthodox. Rabbi Arit Bcckor.

BLTH TFILAH. 935 Euclid ava.
Orthodox. Rabbi Joseph E. Rackov-
sky.
9
CORAL WAY JEWISH CENTER.
Consarvativa.
i la ; n at 11 He
auditorium. Rabbi Jonah Caplan, Flor-
>. i
it y, i" .-rfi. lati
topk "Tin- jay of Living."
...
DADE HEIGHTS JEWISH CEN-
TER. 18160 NW 2nd ava. Con-
servative.
...
FLAGLER-GRANADA. 50 NW
51st pi. Conservative. Rabbi Mur
ray A. Alstat.
...
FT. L/UDERDALE EMANU-EL,
1801 S. Andrews ave.. Ft. Lauder-
lale. Reform. Rabbi Marios Ran-
son.
.
HEBREW ACADEMY. 918 6th
st. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander
Gross.
...
HIALEAH-MIAMI SPRINGS. 951
Flamingo way. Conservative. Rab-
bi Leo Heim.
. o
HOMESTEAD CENTER. 183 NE
8th St., Homestead. Conservative.
r*~"'-% Gerti officiates.
a a
HOLLYWOOD TEMPLE BETH
EL. 1645 Polk st., Hollywood. Re-
form. Rabbi Minard Klein.
a
HOLLYWOOD BETH SHOLEM
1725 Monroe st., Hollywood. Con-
servative. Rabbi Samuel Lerer.
in Nil late Kprvli'OK. S.it-
mon "An In.
In Repent Bar Mttavah: Marvin. *on
uf Mr. anj Mm. Julius Lowenhart.
A Healthy and Prosperous
New Year To All
EVERGLADES INDUSTRIES
Herman Gaines
NORTH DADE CENTER. 13430
W. Dixie hwy. Conservative. Rabbi
Henry Okolica. Cantor Maurice
Neu.
I- i ;.!.n V.". ;i m.
a
NORTH SHORE CENTER. 620
75th st. Conservative. Rabbi Mayar
Abramowitz. Cantor Edward Klain.
a
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER.
715 Washington ave.
...
SOUTH DADE JEWISH CBN
TER. Reform. Rabbi Herbert M.
Baumgard.
...
SOUTHWEST JEWISH C1NTER.
6438 SW 8th st. Conservative. Rab-
bi Abraham Levitan.
.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM. 4144
Chase ava. Liberal. Rabbi Leon
Kronish.
Saturday l:f. a.m.
Kai y. I ..:
.,-,.1 M
Bel Ham Waller
-
TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 1701
Washington ave. Conservative.
Rabbi Irving Lehrman. Cantor Is-
rael Reich.
I a.m.
-' mon U. I'..mi,.!, | "II -it Mr and Mr-
n i 'hai i-:. son ,r llr. anil
a
TEMPLE ISRAEL. 137 NE 19th
St. Reform. Rabbi Joseph Narot.
| Cantor Jacob Bornstoin. v
11 IS 11 in Satunlav S a.m.
Bar Mluvati :. m -I Mra.
Esther i;., i|i r
a
Kabbath f Ketum
TEMPLE NER T*
erected at 80th st .J^
TEMPLE SINAI of,
131st st. and N.E ft-l
form. Rabbi Banno M. \
.
TEMPLE ZION. STuj
st. Conservative.
Waxman.
e
TIFERETH ISRAIL.
Miami ava. Conserv*
Abraham Herson.
Giants.
i
TORAH TEMPLE.
ava. American Jud
Abraham Cassal.
a 1
ZAMORA JEWISH CB
Zamora ava. Contend
B. Leon Hurwiti.
rill.
Krnlav i .., sata
8erniim: "W< ..,;.- I'urtiaa?
HOLLYWOOD TEMPLE SINAI.
2030 Polk st., Hollywood. Conserv-
ative. Rabbi David Shapiro. Cantor | TEMPLE JUDEA, 320 Palermo
Yehudah Hailbraun. ave. Liberal. Rabbi Morris Skop.
Program for I
Now on at Cc
Registration for after*,
junior program is nowt
at the Greater Miami,
munity Center's Town
Branches. Those progn
variety of activities in
cooking classes, games
ictic ~. imuli in dancing, I
and play groups.
The special afterscha
at the Beach Branch.
is geared to help wort
as well as others who i
vised care for children isj
and second grades. Thej
open to both boys and |
five-day week supervii
play program.
Children are picked l
ignated public schoolil
ported to the Center, i
play program of reel
social development forJ
vidual child is provid
ternoon snack of rHrtril
is given the children.
The junior program ill
Branch will serve boysj
in the third through.
with activities schedule*!
da\ -. Wednesday- and I
The Town Branch H
ave.. is offering a proj
youngsters from the Ujj
sixth grades. Monday *
day. The Greater r
Community (enter is
agency of the Greater 1
i>h Federation and
Fund.
TO ALL GREETINGS
CENTURY
H O M I; s
2325 S.W. 79th Court
Phono MO 1-4261
7488 N.E. 2nd AVENUE
PHONE PI 8-2022
MIAMI
TO All A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR .
JACK L. KING
Candidate for Mayor-Hi
121 NX 6th Avenue
m
TO ALL .
SEASON-S
BEST V/ISHES
HAPPY HOUR
TAVERN
3680 Coral Way
PHONE HI 8-2733
TO AH A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
BRUCE G. DODD
Candidate for Council of Hi
690 S.E. 3rd Place
Hi

27.j957_
L Drive Aid
Urusalem. thief Rabbi
iHenog of Israel Wed-
^d the importance of
fcjdefforl in synagogues
, observances of Rosh
j Yom Kippur.
,lo "the sacred duty of
L sou! to lend a hand
tdy-tospired process"
{Holidays. I he chief rab-
Kenlinn to the vital as-
ud Bonds provide for
-onstrurlion, and state*-
the sacred privilege of
|hn wherever they may
| their rule as an inEtru-
t Divine will"
Iprticulir stress on tha
, of newcomers who
I Israel from Egypt,
J other lands, ha a*-
j the purchase of Israel
lint 'h service* which
Jewish New Year 5718
liy of Atonement will
liel "to provide hornet
hf the returning immi-
I year has again illus-
[the hand of providence
e destiny of our storm-
t on their road to free-
Rabbi Herzog said,
k "this stressful period"
ginning of the redemp-
rged the Jews of Amer-
I part in the Israel Bond
agogues "so that we
I full redemption speed-
lair day.''
ctice of conducting a
lay effort for State of
; in synagogues began
*ption ot the Israel
|tign six years ago, and
II widely accepted cua-
loul the country.
pb cards are provided in
us. making it possible
ippers to indicate the
I Israel Bonds they wish
r without violating the
I injunction against writ-
IHigh Holidays.
)unci! Sets
Program
IKippur Yizkor program
[auspices of the Jewish
Jlnd Council of Greater
|bwn announced by Dan-
president of the
[ram is scheduled for
W. 29. from 9:30 to 11
|ndio station WAHR.
Kronish, spiritual
[Temple Beth Sholom,
I Rbbi Mayer Abranv
Nsrth Shore Jewish
P* chairman of the
\**' "r on the program.
Pele Ke'emer. of Miami
togation. will render
j*! memorial liturgy
1 'reet the program as
[Wremuriies.
KAHBI ISAAC HIKZOG
Hollywood School
Appoints Staff
Staff of teachers of the Holly-
wood Temple Beth Sholem Sunday
school, 1725 Monroe st., has been
announced by Eli Olasky, principal.
Mrs. Blanche Turgel. kindergar-
ten; Mrs. Saul Haimm, first grade;
Mrs. Sylvia School, second grade;
Mrs. David Pollack, third grade;
Mrs. Bernard Kaufman, fourth
grade; Mrs. Ben A. Rosenthal,
fourth grade; Mrs. David Mason,
fifth grade; Mrs. Samuel S. Lerer,
fifth grade; Miss Greta Freud, sixth
grade; Michael Hauser, sixth grade;
and Harry Brooks, seventh grade.
Cadet teachers, members of the
confirmation class who will assist
teachers, are Lois Theodore, Frima
Kallen, Pearl Charnow, Andrea
Wolfe, Dee Greitzer, Stephanie
Wolfe, Cynthia Brooks and Elyse
Karasow.
Oxford Names
New Headmaster
Dr. Abraham M. Tassel, founder
l?ii.2r^7r.0f Xfrd Sch001'
1204-54 West ave.. Miami Beach
private school accredited bv the
DeDartment of Education of the
State of Florida, Wednesday an-
nounced the appointment of John
W. Lorton as headmaster.
Lorton will be directly respon-
sible for fhe educational programs
of both the elementary and high
school departments. He will suoer-
vise the daily educational activities
on the cammis and the progress of
each'Sftmtent: ..-. .. ..
Dr. Tassel said that the appoint-
ment "became a necessity due to
the unusual growth and expansion
of Oxford School.
"Our new headmaster will
make it possible better to super-
vise tha growth and progress of
each and ovary boy and girl at-
tending Oxford fnr the coming
school year. Mr. Lorton's fine
educational background and ex-
perience will add much to tho
executive department of our
school."
The new headmaster is a grad-
uate of the University of Florida,
where he received the degree of
Master of Education in 1952. Be-
fore coming to Oxford, Lorton held
the position of administrative dean
and counselor at Plant High School
in Tampa.
He has also spent many summers
guiding boys and girls in summer
camps in Florida and in the North.
He is certified by the Department
of Education of the State of Flor-
ida as expert in the field of educa-
tional supervision and admlnistra-
; inn Lorton assumes his post im-
mediately.
Page 13 A
i. i
NEW YEAR GREETINGS TO All
RENEW YOUR DRIVERS LICENSE AT
NORTH DADE DRIVERS LICENSE AGENCY
Wl 5-1372 1790 N.E. 163rd St. North Miami Beach
Notary Public Photostats
RENEWALS OUT OF STATE TRANSFERS

Best Wishes far a Happy New Year
Castro Convertibles
% K. ...
America's Top Name in Convertible furniture
Miami Ft. Lauderdale Boca Raton West Palm Beach
i
t

TO ALL GREETINGS
MIAMI CORNER RITE CO., INC.
"CORNER RITE"
(GUARD TOR PLASTERED CORNERS)
2769-71 S.W. 27th Avenue
HI 8-9066
70 ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR ...
KELLERMAN PAINT & LACQUER CORP.
IACQUERS, SYNTHETIC ENAMELS
LACQUER THINNERS
54 N.E. 73rd Street
PL 1 5641
Dr. Abraham M. Cassel (left), founder and director of Oxford
School, hands over roster of students for coming school year
to John W. Lorton, newly appointed headmaster. Oxford's
classes began Monday.
|"ida Seafoods, Inc.
" 0W imHDS AM ACQUAINTANCES
JOI STAllMC
"'" Better Health Eat Mora SeotW
>*t Avenue Phone FR 3-0130
SEAFOOD AT ITS MIT
f,0ur Manv friends and Acquaintance* .
Season's Best Wisfo
Daisy's Originals, Inc.
"tllir\ltS SPOtTSW" "d BUCN COATS
.os of famous fvsiiii sportsweat*
Fisth
Street
Phone TU 8-4523
REAL ESTATE SALESMAN
NEEDED. Good Commission.
Norman E. Butler, Realtor
1303* N.Ve. 7th Ava. MO H4I
IfST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
VELMA WHATLEY'S BEAUTY SALON
Open 8:30 ta I Oven Friday Evening
Phone PL 1 6180
12787 WEST DIXIE HIGHWAY
Best Wishes tar the New Year
CORAL SPRINKLER CO.
12145 N.W. SEVENTH AVENUE
WELLS PUMPS
INSTALLATIONS REPAIRS
Guaranteed Work and Satisfaction
Phone MU 8-8035
Best Wishes far the New Year
ELKA PRODUCTS
WOOD OR FIBERGLASS
Diving Boards at Lowest Prices!
BUY DIRECT FROM THIS LOCAL MANUFACTURER
CALL UP AND COMPARE OUR PRICES!
169 N.E. 62nd Street Phone PI 1-3211
Wt extend to yon oar wishes for a Shonoh Tovah
for a year ai peneo, happiness and well-being -
as the New Year 5718 unfolds
LAKESIDE MEMORIAL PARK
N.W. 25th STREET at 103rd AVENUE MIAMI
MIAMI BEACH OFFICE: 4007 Chase Avenue


I
'H.

I:
Page 14 A
+Jelsttk>rktton
Friday. Sm
HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
DAVIS TOURS. INC.
242 Biscayne Blvd. FRanklin 9-6531
Serving South Florida Since 1924
Member of American Society of Travel Agents
f>
SILTCA~tAWN DRESSING
-* This it not an ordinary land dressing.
It is scientifically processed for a perfect lawn.
-* Cuoranteed to be weed, root and lump fret.
* Silica retains moisture
* Silica levels and firms lawns.
FLORIDA SILICA SAND CO., INC.
Phone MU 8-2569 2675 N.W. 131st St.
=.
Choir, spiritual leader and cantor of Miami
-lebrew Congreaation, who are blending voices
and reading at Rosh Hashona services begin-
ning Wednesday evening. Left to right are
Bernard Klein. Jordan Kelemer, Terry Bloom,
Rabbi Simon April, Cantor Berele Kelemer,
Howard Kaplan, Sidney Sokol, Bernard Asa-
tanowicz, Manny Glass. Not shown are Larry
Gold, Jeffrey Schwardon, Melvin
David Kleber. Cantor Kelemer
turned from New York City, where
ed specialized courses at Stern C
shiva University, and Herzl Instif,
brew history and liturqy. He prt,
composition, "Prophecy of Isaiah,"
ceremonies in both schools.
SUPERIOR STAMP & SEAL WORKS
MANUFACTURERS OF RUBBER STAMPS
CORPORATION SEALS and SUPPLIES
CHARLIE MERZ, Owner
NOW LOCATED AT
.
613 N.E. 1st Ave.
FR 4-1034
JWB Helps GIs Mark High Hoik
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
HELLMAN FUNERAL CHAPELS
0*in| re T'.cwc i cm Ctw For
OFFICIAL MIUlNCE SERVICE
f OF MIAMI Bf CH. FLORID*
SERVINC ALL OF PAOE COUNTY
4'.',' M
To S:^
...
JES-5J33 ; I Hour JE 1-9000
ft
A
i -' -
. .. i
MEMOPJflL
SErWICES
joriha c/ep3rtvL
CJ^YIZKOR DATES

., puTOtfSS rjTNAM


/ '1WYMK
- ..
-. I
rAHIZCIT CIEKCAIS"EC UfON tlOUIST
I r. ,w. * IU4 KIW itiuni
i-.: tprllU Jur.r 6 11,1 \ O.l. 17
mi Aonll: M.y 26 Srpl.S* Oft 6
p.-.'. \pMin JuntlJj ... i: On. 2*
low) Ipril ) Junf 21 (>.. i Oti 11
i%i \[ nl R M*j -: Srpl M On. 2
I942 AprUU Jun. ' Oct. 8 On. 20
MI April 16 M. W ,.. -; Oct. 10
IVfrt April 4 M.v IB , u <*pi 2*
1/. April M June 7 II,, ,, On. II
HOLIDAY
TO ALL
GRff TINGS
FARRAX* PALMISTRY STIMO
life Reader'- Advisor Born with Power
All Welcome You Must Be Satisfied or No Charge
4500 N.W. 27th A,.., Miami Sfc Nl 4.J267 Afpt
NEW YORK Winging their
way over vast expanses in the Arc-
tic, Far East, Latin America, and
i North Africa. Jewish chaplains on
(Jewish New Year "missions" will
! Fly thousands of miles to conduct
religious services for Jewish GIs
stationed at U.S. military posts on
, five continents as part of world-
wide plans made by the National
'Jewish Welfare Board, organizer of
global "operation Rosh Hashona"
for the military since 1917.
Flying in a plane made available
by the Caribbean Air Commnad, a
USO-JWB worker serving as a part-
time chaplain, recently flew 10,-
000 miles to see to the High Holy
Day needs of GIs throughout the
Caribbean.
A Jewish chaplain will fly to
Hit Arctic bat* of Thule, most
northerly U.S. post on the conti-
nent, to conduct service* for a
little band of 35 servicemen.
Other flying chaplains will pro-
vide religious coverage at Ber-
muda, the Azores, Cubaand at
desert oosts in North Africa,
from Tripoli to Casablanca.
I irge quantities of kosher foods
nd sundry Mugioug supplies
Shofars. 61 calendars, -kuii caps,
r shawls, prayer hoiks, i
were -hipped months ago h\ JWB
t'ir service! to be conducted l>\ a
corps of 370 full and part time Jew-
ish chaplains serving at 890 mili- ,
tary posts mine r.s.. an in Germany, France. KnL'lanrl, ,
Nrih Africa. Alaska. Greenland,
Panama, the Philippines. Okinawa,
Japan and Korea.
A member of USO. JWB is the
agency authorized by the govern-
ment to serve the religious and
morale needs of Jewish military,
personnel.
In Korea, airlifts will carry hun- j
dreds of soldiers to Ascom City I
where the three Jewish chaplains,
who have been busy for weeks with
problems of billeting and feeding
for the huge congregation of neaf-
ly 1.000 men. will conduct services
on Rosh Hashona and Yom Kippur.
Lending a hand will be USO-JWB
men in Seoul. Break the Fast din-
ners and parties at the close of the
Day of Atonement will be the rule
in many overseas and domestic in-
stallations.
Servicemen who will come
hundreds of miles from the re-
motest parts of Japan by airlifts
will greet the Jewish New Year,
5718, at mass services to be hold
in Tokyo and Yokohama. Jewish
chaplains, aided as always by
their Christian colleague*, have
made all arrangements for relig-
ious coverage at Yokosuka, Na-
goya, Tachikawa, and Yokofa.
Where chaplains wil
ent at a service,:
noted GIs, well.
the High Holy Diytl
iate.
The time-honored
greeting, "May You
for a Good Year,"
heard on all Army
Navy ships on the I _
the New Yearinclu
the U.S. Sixth, Atlantic]
Fleets, all of which
with JWB supplies
port. Sailors who
leaders" will officiate I
aircraft carriers, Fa
Ranger.
The solemn notes of]
will also be heard it i
and Nike stations
to the jungles of Pa
Lear School Has Top Registn
The Lear School at 1010 West Wednesday by Mrt I!
ave.. is beginning its 24th year of
continuous operation with an en-
rollment far exceeding that of any
previous year, it was announced
To All .. Season's Greetings
Hoover Awning & Mfg. Co.
6921 N.W. 7th Avenue Phone PL 4-2667
Awnings e $,loTml Tarpaulins
Canopies e Beoch Cabanas e Canvas Garoees
Beach and Garden Umbrellas Lawn and Garden Farnitvr*
Canvas Paint Waterproofing
"We Moke Anything in Cenves"
Friendship Clvb Plans Tenth
Anniversary Fete in Town
As part of its tenth anniversary
celebration, the Golden Age Friend-
ship Club of the Greater Miami
Jewish Community Center's Town
Branch. 450 SW 16th ave.. will
-I*>iiM,r a gala get-together Sunday
evening at 8 p.m.
Friendship Club's president Hen-
ry Garison said that an outstanding
-enes of programs has been plan-
ned to celebrate this anniversary
year.
The club meets at the Town
Branch every Sunday afternoon
from 2 to 5 p.m.. and Thursday
evening from 8 to 11 p.m.
tor principal nf the seh
The new term will
novations introduced!
extensive curriculum.
sports program will be 1
the regular athletic
which interest will bei
boating, swimming, as
ing.
A eomolete educl
gram will be offered I
of all age groups In
school and kindergir
preparatory for cols
Lear said.
"Particular stress willj
on an intensive sciea
and the popular art P
an ever-increasing use*
uel aid equipment
according to Richard !
sistant principal of
To All...
Season's Best Wishes
BECKER-DOLAN, INC.
MAI 1ST ATI III ALL ITS MUNCHES
813 Olympia Building
Phone FR 9-7671
A. B. BROWN
Wood Sectional-Steel Rolling
Ro-Way Overhead Type Doors
Repcdrs on All Makes
Residential and Commercial
Folding Gates
3651 N.W. 46th St. NE 4-5011
e answer dial PI 8 5856
Happy Holiday To All
Williams Optical
Dispensary
Complete Eye Glass Service
1213 N.W. 3rd AVENUE
To All .
SEASON'S GREETINGS
SOUTHERN
AWNING
COMPANY
"28 Years Canvas Experience'
Awningi, Canopies. Trailer
Canopies. Tarpaulins,
Lawn Umbrellas
Lawn and Beach Equipment
Recovered
7927 N.W. 7th AVENUE
MIAMI 38. FLORIDA
Phone PL 8-2514
New Year Greet
III u-i
Ke-Koo
ALL TYPES
FREE ESTIMA
Licensed fc*
PHONES:
MO 7-2507
FH
ro a H--
tArriHtwrU*
MfAMIVVATWl
COMW
1334 M.W. *' JJ
iiia-ic vfsTtf
e^..ra.'--T-,*,,,
Ml W0U *'


27. 1S57
^MtAssn.
4any Benefits
Ischatzman. president of
i Reach Apartment Assn.,
' cailed allention to the
[offered the association's

'pointed out that the
a free rental bureau
i newspaper advertising.
pilv coming to Miami
s the privilege of consult-
j^reau at <>ur 420 Lincoln
he explained.
Joffarsd by the sssocia-
in rental rang* from
($3,500 a year. "For this
I tyf y apaetrresrit owner
kind it worth wni, ,0 b#"
(lit it no effort ot being
' Schatzman added.
j newcomers not to con-
Miami Beach Apartment
hih other organizations,
roup was originated by
Lt uwners. None of the
fcr board members is com-
[for his services," Schatz-
Mad
LEGAL NOTICE
r'm*&
llTING SCHATZMAN
Scheduled
|a Picnic Basket for Two!"
I the instructions offer-
's by the North Dade
f Women's American ORT
I social function of the
torsday.
s to be in the form of a
"y and box supper at the
f Mrs Harold Book, 12905
"I-. Keystone Point. Mrs.
1 Besel wa to be chair-
^affair.
UCAl NOTICE"
IN TH COUNTY JUDGES/ COURT
In Re: HHTATK OF "'
ISABELLA BROOKS
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITOR*
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing ( lalinn or Demands Against Sai.l
r.Hla I,*:
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE. No 41*
.1-?' al"} ''"* "f '"u are hereby nil
titled and required to present anv
claims and demanda which ng r
either <>r you, may have against' the
estate of ISABELLA BROOKH deoeaa!
..I late of Dade County. Florida, to the
( ountv Judges of Dade County, and
file the same In their offices In the
County GosjMmmms In Dade County
Florida within eight calendar months
rrom the date of the flret puolication
hereof, or the aame will he bar el
WII.I.IAM E. BROOKS
Brooks,
MYERS. HKIMAN KArUN"**"11,
Attorneys for Executors
ll.'.O Southwest lt Street
Miami, Florida
9/13-20-27. 10/4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTIl'E IS IIF.ltF.BY f.lVKN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
MAGIC CHEF at 3303 N.W 48th St
Miami Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
ACME PACKINO COMPANY OF
FIXHtlDA. INC. A Florida Corp.
9/27,10/4-11.18 '
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name ot
JIM A WAI.I.YS 22 BAH at 22 S.VV
27th Avenue, Miami intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
J. H. BROWN, W Equal Partner
WAI.l.Y TRAI'TH. \i Equal Partner
BARNKTT PELTZ
Attorn.-v for Applicants
914 Congress Bldg.
9'6-13-20-27
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY niVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to tn|
under the flcl Itlnu* n
BENDIX I.AItlii:i!I.A\n at 2288
B.W. 'tli Street, ktlaml, Fhu Ida, In-
tend* to register -aid name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida
JEANETTE s PI8HHAN
BHRICH a ZCCKERMAN
.....i i-i- ayi t Bldg HI unl It, Pta.
Attorneys tor Jeanette B. Flabman
I 30-37, l" l-ll
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY No. 205188
HORRIH GOLDBERG,
Plaintiff
1.II.I.IAN l! GOLDBERG,
Defendant
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO: LILLIAN" P. GOLDBERG
U*% Winston!
I .oh Angeles 4.',, California
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED to
aeive a copy of your- Answer to the
Complaint for Divorce filed against
you on Plaintiff'* attorney, ABRA-
HAM LEVINSON, :>.:! West Fl.iKlr
Street. Miami. Florida, and to file the
original thereof with the Clerk of the
above named Court on nr before the
llth day of October. 19'.", otherwise I
I>ecree Pro Confesso will he entered
against you.
Dated this 9th day of September,
19".
E. B. LEATHER MAN. Clerk
(seal) of the Circuit (Curt
By JOAN 8NEEDEN,
Deputy Clerk
Th"o!T CcTuRT OF THE
DAW:DrAIAL C'"CUIT. IN
. -ERt.A
I
l*t'EII0LA
PMant
bKTTl i. '..... "I""1 HINO
I !"',, '"......... before
l ".inplamt will
P *ATHKRMAj,i .Merit
-A r I II Court.
;... '"HI-.. Deputy Clerk.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name ot
THE FAMILY DEPARTMENT STORE
at 3028 N.W. 7th St.. Miami, Florida
Intends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
THE FAMILY DEPARTMENT
sir irc INC a Ha. Corp.
MARSHALL CHERN
18 17, 10/4
Attorn, \ for Applicant
8/I8-88-IT, 10/4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
bualnoaa under the fictitious name of
UROSVENOH llcnsi: at 1940 Bay
Drive, Miami Beach. Pto., Intends i"
regjUter aaM name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Hade County.
Florid.,
BERNARD NEWMAN
GERTRUDE NEWMAN
IS/4-1L1I
cmplefe and Dependable Title Service
IAMI TITLE
iQhtmctCo.
F TITLE SERVICE IN DADE COUNTY
WS ABSTRACTS TITLE INSURANCE
M
* YEARS
Title Insurance Policies el
"ei City Title laureates Cs.
Cegffo/, $rolei ft Reserves
fseeest $f 000,000
^0lANDAKAO(
TELEPHONE ft Ml
LEGAL NOTICE
Pciqe IS A
IN Ti,Nr.CUJ'JV J"X"' COURT
an asm!!? FOR DAOE "O""'-
T, ?,RI,* ,N p"OBATE.
In Re: ESTATE OF
l-olis Roi'SH
I >eceaaed.
Tn .11N,?TI., E T CREDITORS
To Al Creditors and All Persons
Estat. "r "e",and Against
You. and each of you are hereby no.
Ifie and required present a
elth, ) """""da l'lch you. or
, "' >.,"-,r"H> have against the
,,, i r-l'"'"s """-s deceased late
. Dade County. Plorl.la. to the lion-
"'>. <;'"> -'uciges .,, Dads Count",
an,| i |e the aiue In their offices in the
r-OlintJ Courthouse l Hade County
from u, "',","" VK,y """"'i'"- months
rLlh,'*l1' "','" first publication
hereof gala ,.|ai,s or chmands to
I-TTHEl^i. fibfiffrjit"" -irr I! '', ""J^" a'ldr,>'' of I be clalui-
Aa Kxecntora of the lj.st will ,,! ?T W-Weawworn to Testament of IsateMa^rocZ' fLfSSS^rff.PSK&*J*
COUNTY.
No. 41544
Hav-
Sald
.. Iiarred
BOS Section lU.ll of the 194i Probate
Date September. AD. 19:,7.
ADOLPH HAUPT
Aa Administrator of the Estate of
MARXM. PABE^8Rtr88D>M^
ISI2 Congress Building
Miami, Florida
Attorney for Administrator
(/1I-J0-I7, 10/4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
,tNO-riCE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
lAMIAMl COFFEE Sllop at 20.1 W
Flagler Street. Miami, Intend to reg.
later said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida
I.ARKIN WILLIS
_.__ FANNIE WILLIS
KE88LER cars
Attorney! for Applicants
1998 S.W. 1st St., Miami, Fla.
.V20-27, 10/4-11
IN THE COUNTY JUDQES* COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. In PROBATE. No. 41626-B
In \U- B8T \ti; OP
HYMAN GOFHEYEFF, also known as
I1VMAN OOPP
l >.'i p.aeod
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hay-
ing Claims or Hcrnands Against Said
Von. and each of you are hereby
notified and required to present any
claims and demands which you, or
either of you, ma> have afali
.state of HYMAN GOFHEYEFF, also
known as HYMAN OOPP dec
late of Dade County, Florida, to ths
Honorable County Judrea or Dade
County, and rile the aame In their ,.f-
n the Count) < 'oui thouai in Dads
County, Plorida, within eight calendar
mi. in s from the date ol the flrsl pub-
II 11' n hem of Bald claims ot da
mends lo contain the legal addi ss if
the claimant and to be -worn to and
' imc win be
Se, Bee ;i..n 731.18 of the 1813
Probate Act.
I late s. ptember 12, A D. 1SS7.
GILBERT (IROSa, A. ".dmli
tor of the Estate of HYMAN OOP-
KEYEFP, also known a.- HYMAN
GOFP, Deceased.
MARX M EABER
1813 Cemrres* BMk., Miami. Ha.
17, 10,1-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN thai
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
bu Inees under the fictitious name of
DEACVTLLB BHILDRENS SHOP, at
Deauville Hotel, S7th and Collins Ave.,
Miami Beach. Florida. Intend to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of lh
Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
MEYER DAYAN
RAY I'AYAN
0RAY8ON and LIPTON
Attorneys for lleyer Dayan and
Ray Dayan
I/1S-M-3T, 10/4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
MITCHELL AIR CONDITIONING
BBRVICE al 71" N.W. 35th Street, Mi-
ami intends to register said name; with
the c 'lerk of dhe Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
C. V. MITCHELL, Sole Owner
KKSSI.ER cv CARS
Attorneys for Applicant
1998 S.W 1st St Miami, Fla.
I 88 37, 10/4-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTIT.OUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IB HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
LEGS I'NLIMITED al 380 Northeast
TMh Street, Miami, Forida Intend to
register -..col name with the Clerk of
the ''in nt Court of B.ole County.
Fin; Ida
DATED at Miami. Florida, this 12th
Dal "1 Julj. I8i
SAIL BERMAN
LOI' BERM v
Pal tm-is.
DANIEL NKAl. 111:1.1 ER
A Home) ioi Applicants
: 37, in 1-11.18
COMING TO NEW YORK?
Stoy at Hilt modern 25-
ttory hotel. All room
oultids eipoture. large,'
beautifully feralihse)
> rooMi with kitch-
j ensile, privole
both, free) $8.50
doily. Two roost
.wild Iron $11.50
IPIOal MONTMIY
fUTISI
alt HleiliM iltUt
^w BEACON
roadway al 75th St.. New York
Osier WlsfreS. Mewoi'"S O'recler '
________LsWAL fetyrrCB
LTf JJH\.$'mCU,r COURT OF TMf
EL,EVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. IN
AND FOR DAOE COUNTY. FLOR-
r^w,iN.CHANCE"V- No- ZO"95
GRACE VIOLA CALLKN
Plaintiff,
ALVIN C. CALLEN,
I lefenclant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TOO, ALVIN C CALLEN, 0/0 Cos-
notU Motors, 566 Corey Ave.. Brad-
dock. Pa., are hereby required to serve
your Answer to the Complaint for Di-
vorce filed against you herein, upon
NELSON ft BCHULMAN. AttornVva
for Plaintiff. 407 Lincoln Road, Miami
Beach. Florida, and file the original
thereof In the office of the Clerk of
the above Court, on or before the 14th
day of October. 1957. otherwise the
said complaint will he taken as con.
fesaed by you.
Dated this 4n41reT.
larVts
E. B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk
'"eal) f the Circuit (dun
By R. H. RICE, JR.,
9/13-20-27. 10/4 D"PU,y C"""
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
Rl XLN AITS, at .100 13th Ktreet and
1260 Drexel Avenue, Miami Beach,
Dade County, Florida intend to regi-
ster said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of I^ade County, Florida.
LEON RI'XIN
MARY RIXIN
RNGLANDER & TENDRicii
Attorneys for Leon & Marv Ruxln
311 Lincoln Rd.. Miami Beach, Fla.
9/6-13-20-27
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
IN CHANCERY. No. 205050
PETITION OF HAROLD WAYNE
HOLLAND for the Adoption of
JERRY KNAPP RKED. a minor
LINDA SII-; RKED. a minor
ROBERT ECGENE RKED, a minor
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION OF
PETITION FOR ADOPTION
TO: CARL C. REED
Address: 4'nknown.
Yon are hereby notified that a peti-
tion has been filed in the above- stvlccl
court by HAROLD WAYNE HOL-
LAND for the adoption of JERRY
KNAPP REED, LINDA SIK REED
and ROBERT EUGENE REED, min-
ors, by the Petitioner. HAROLD
waynk HOLLAND, and you are rs-
qulred to serve s copj ol your Answer
or Objecttona to show oause wh} .-aid
petition should not be (ranted, on the
attorney for Petitioner, HYMAN P.
gai.bi't. 340 Fifth Street, .Miami
Beach, Florida, and rile the original
in the office c,r the Clerk of the cir-
cuit court on or before the tth day
..r i.tol.er. 1957.
HEREIN FAIL NOT or a d, .
pro oonfeaso will be 1 itered sgalnst
you.
WITNESS MY HAND (OTD BEAL
of said court in Dade county. Florida,
Ho- 3rd day of September, A.D., lie:.?.
K i: LEATHERMAN, Clerk
(seal) As Clerk of said circuit Court
By: L. a CLEARS,
Deputy clerk.
HYMAN P. GALBUT
Attorney for Petitioner
348 Fifth St., Miami Beach, Fla.
9 8-1S-38-2?
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
r+JenlstiriorMiarj ,
olicita four legal notice**.
We appreciate your
patronage and guarantee
accurate service at legal
rotes
Phone FR 4-4366
lor messenger servic*
LEGAL NOTICE
IN COUNTY JUDGES- COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
No. 37935
RE: ESTATE OF
ABRAHAM KCGLER. a/k/a
ABE KCGLER
Deceased
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR FINAL
DISCHARGE
NOTICE Is hereby given that I have
filed my final report and petition for
Final Dlsehsuraje at Executor of theo
estate of ABRAHAM KI'GLER. a/k/a
ABE KUGLER deceased: "d "' -"l
the 21st day of October. 1957. will ap-
ply to the Honorable County Juuge of
Dade County, Florida, for apnroval of
said final report and for final dis-
charge .us Executor of the Latate of
AHRAHAM KUGLER, a/k/a ABE
KUGLER, deceased.
This 23rd day of July, 1957.
I.Kci KCGLER
MILTON A. FRIEDMAN
Attorney for Executor.
9/13-20-27, 10/4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTlt'K IS HBRBB1 GIVEN that
the untlerslgned, desiring to anajaajt In
buvlneei under the fictitious name of
BELBY'S at 256 Miracle Mile. Coral
Qabtea, Florida intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dado County Florida
NATHAN \\ WINilKCR,
Sola i >" i i
PALLOT, SILVER MI'LLOY
Attorney* for Nathan W. vvinokur
.. 18/4-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
WiTIci: IS HEREBY GIVEN that
lln- undersigned, dealriftg to engage In
b islne'S under the fictitious name of
TRABERT A- HOEPKER m :j Lin-
coln Road. Miami Reach, Florida. In-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court ol Dual
. .,uioy, Florida.
ALAN CITI.KR
81 North Shore I M i e,
Miami Beach, Florida
KATZ Wl> R< INKN
is for Alan c 'nllco-
..... Lincoln Rd., Miami Bt aoh, Fla.
:. io/4-ii
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES' COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE. No. 41488
In Re: ESTATE oF
SAMCEL ALONZO HYLE
I lecea sed
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demanda Against Said
Estate:
You, and each of you. are hereby
notified and required to present any
claims and demands which you. or
either of you, may have against the
estate of SAMCEL ALONZO HYLE
deceased late of Dade County, Florida,
to the Honorable County Judges of
Dade County, and file the an me In his
offlos in the County Courthouse In
Dade County. Florida, within eight
calendar months from the date of the
first publication hereof. Said claims
or demands to 'contain the legal ad-
dress of the claimant and to be sworn
to and presented as aforesaid, or same
will he Iiarred.
Oat- September 11. A.p. INT.
Mildred Pauline Hyle Huddlestou
As BxeCUtriS Of the Last Will and
Testament of SAMUEL aiai.nzo
HYLE, Deceased.
Eli Breger Harvey J. St. Jean
Attorneys for BxecutliT
138 Lincoln Rd., .Miami Beach, Fla.
!c 13-38-37, 10/4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, deelrlng to engasje In
busfnesa under the ftctltloua namea of
Rellat..... Realty a- Business Brokers;
and Reliance RealtJ A- Investment
Brokers: ami Reliance Realty a* Mort-
gage Brokers; and Reliance Real De-
late; and Reliance Buaineea Brokers
it il'ii s w. 37th Av.n ie, M an I, PI a-
Ids intends to register said names VI I
the Clark of the Clcult Conn of Dade
i lount} Plorld i
HERBERT BRAl'N,
R-g Real Estate BiokSJff
KESSLER A 0 \l:s
Attorneys for Applicants
I..... S W 1st 81
: 13-30-37, in 4
On* Coat of QouL&wtQ. i-
8881 Street sl1_# ef#t4esee>
ManheHen't leroett end most con-
veniently located hotel. 2500 outside
reeens, al with bath and free radio,
television in many. Direct tunnel con-
nection to Pennsylvania Station. AN
transportation facilitiet et door. Three
air-conditioned rettauranH
1AM* rOST COtNH COFFEE HOUSE
OOIDCN THKEAD CAFE
Sinqlef I Doublet I Suite*
trom $7 J from t] \ | Irom $2J
JOSEPH MASSA6LIA. JR. Prel4
CHA8LES W. COLE. 6.. uv.
rOther MASSAGLIA HOTELS'
SANTA MONICA. CAl Hotel Mir.m.r
SAN JOSE, CALIF. Hotel Seiste Clelsa
IONS SEACH, CALIF. Hotel Wlltea
CALLUS. N.M. Hovel II Rsncho
ALIUOUIIQUE, Hovel Frasciicaa
OEMVES. COLO. Hotel Park Lose
WASHINGTON. D.C. Hotel Raleigh
HARTFORD. CONN. Hotel Bond
ITISIURGH. PA. Hotel Sherwya
CINCINNATI, O. Hotel Slnton
NEW YORK CITY Hotel New Yorker
HONOLULU Hotel Welklkl Siltmore
CHICAftO MI0WKT HIAOCHIAltTltS
eOCiNC cOffICi SM 1 WALTON Ol I 14

eosiON OfHCi ee soruroM ST. hu >ata
savsese World-famed hotels "emeues
Teletype servicefemily Plon
ATTENTION ATTORNEYS!
CORPORATION OUTFITS
Lowest Prices Quickest Delivery
in South Florida
Call the JEWISH FIORIDIAN at
FR4-4366 .


1
Page 16 A
**.
B
*Jeistf*>rktiar
Ili^Se^emUr!

>>.-
v
1957
. extending
treason's {-jreetinas
ana J^cst (A/isftes
for a soerous
NEW YEAR
nSmSz**^ snip" *
meat and
5718


of PROGRESS I Thfr J
Lou PIAHHIHG
ACHIEVEMENT AHEAD
fOR YEAR 5718
jty Self-Appraisal on Rosh Hashona


f

Page 2 B
+Je*lstfk>rkMari
I^^^i
Mrs. Jack A. Ablin
Withes All Her Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Israel Abram*
and family
Wish All Then Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. Rudy R. Adltr
Wishes All His Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT \'EW,TAR.w
Mr. and Mrs. William Agranove
of 960 Bay Dr., Miami Baach
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Behrman
and sons
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Bargar
and Jan Elian
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. Nathan Alexander
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and FnenJs
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. William S. Altman
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Berkey
. and family
Wish All Their Relatives ami Friends
A HAPPT KEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Berfcowitx
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. M. M Apfelbaum
and son, Walter
Wish All Their Relative! and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. M Jay Berliner
and son, Fredric of
915 S.W. 7th Street
Wi.sh All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Appel
of 1605 Lenox Avenue
Vs : All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Apte
and sons, Marvin and Stuart
and grandsons, Bobby and Stevie
W ish All tri'el and Friends
A HAPPT \EW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Barney Bernstein
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Bernstein
and family
With All Their Relatnes and Friends
A HAPPT \E\\ TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. William N. Berson
and daughter. Rose Edith
Wish All Their Relatival and Friends
A HAPPT SEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Apte
W. All Their Relatnes and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Argintar
and family
V. A Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT \E\V TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Beubis
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mrs. Anna Sorin Bild
and family
All Their Relatnes and Friends
A HAPP1 HEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L. Arkin
and son, Stanley
Wish Ail Their Relatives and Friend*
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Bill
and family
With All Their Relatnes and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Aronovitz,
Elaine, Tod and Karen
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Auerbach
and son, Mitch
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. Blaker
and son, David
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur J. August
and daughter. Dale
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Louis August
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Edward I. Blackman
and family
U ilh AH Their Relatnes and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Bleich
WiA All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bloch
and children,
Maxine, Henry and Steven
W ish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPP1 \t\V TEAR
If
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Badanes
and daughters,
Sharon, Arlyne and Alva
Ail Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Bain
WiA All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mrs. Miriam Balaban
Wishes All Her Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Block
and family
WiA A|| Then Relative, and Friends
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Mr and Mrs. Joseph Block
W,l, All 7T,e,r Relatnes and Friends
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Nat Blumber9
daughter, Charlotte
and grandson, Ronald
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Balsam
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. George Baltuch
and son*, Marshall and Harris
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Barr
and sons
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Becker
and son, Bernard
of 615 West 47th Street
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Becker
and sons. Jack and Irwin
of Miami Springs
Wish AN Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bodenstein
nd family
Wish All The,r Relatives and Friend,
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Dr. and Mrs. William K. Boros
and children
Phyllis, Andrew, Bruce
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Rubin Bott
and family
All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Sol Brandeis
and family
Wish AH Their Relatives and Friend,
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Brantman
and George W.
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Haskell H. Bratter
and family
^Jh" Relat'v" <""* fiends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Former President Harry S. Truman (right) con-
gratulates 1957 Combined Jewish Appeal
chairman John Serbin on his splendid lead-
ership in a critical year. Occasion |
here by Truman to address Jewish u,
ity. on needs of Israel in Middle Eat.
Miami's Central Planning Agei
By AARON KANNER
President, Greater Miami Jewish Federation
AT '"is time of traditional soul-searching and
personal inventory, it is proper that agencies
dedicated to the service of the community also take
stock of their accomplishments and look searching-
ly at the problems which lie ahead, in an effort to
be of greater service in behalf of the people of
our community.
I appreciate
the opportunity!
afforded us by
The Jewish Flor-
idian to review
briefly the work
of the Greater
Miami Jewish
Federation, and.
e s p e c i a lly, to
point up some of
the areas in
which we hope
to have intensi-
fied activity and,
hopefully, fur-
ther constructive
efforts,
Fed era t ion
means many
things to many
people. But I am
sure that I would
not be hazarding
AARON JT4NNK
. community planning
II
Mr. and Mrs. Bob Brenner
and daughters, Francia and Helene
W.sh All The,. Relatives and Fnendi
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Herman I. Bretan
, Barbara, Neil and Janice
Wh All Their Relatives and Friends
____A HAPPT NEW TEAR
n
a guess in saying that to the average
eration is almost synonymous with
or fund-raising. Certainly, fund-rating fat]
port of the more than 50 causesbe then
community agencies, our important
ganizations, or the United Jewish App__
the most important, if not the most vital,]
of Federation. For the funds raised
the Combined Jewish Appeal of Feden
resent the veritable life blood of the agen
serve our community and our people
front. I would like to point up a few i
things about Our fund-raising picture.
before doing so, I believe it to be in
point up the other areas in which Fe
been active and which add up to what I
is today in our own Greater Miami, and <
erations do in most of the other communiti
country.
In addition to fund-raising. Fede
volved in allocation of funds; in comma ,
ning; in rendering of community servical
organizations; in concern with the general!
of the Jewish community; and in represer
organized Jewish community in a number!
Great Strides Made
UOW Federation has fared in these efl
what the prospects are for the
should give us guide posts for determinioil
of Federation we have and the kind of T
we want for our community.
The graphic table showing what happ
Continued on Page U"
i I
Mr. and Mrs. J. Jackson Brickman
and family
W,,h All Their Relatnes and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. William Bretan
and children
Jacqueline, Harriet and
Stephen Allan
W,sh All Their Relatives and Fnends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Saul Brett
... *' on. Miles
_____A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Broder
u/*? /*"' L,wrne E. Broder
Wish All Their RtUllvts fln7Fnends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR d
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin E. Bronston
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Brooks
Wish All Their Relatives and Fnends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis J. Brooks
ltd family
W.sh All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Brown
nd family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Brumer
nd family
Wish AH Their Relative, and Friends
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Mr. Nathan Burf*
and family
Wish All Their R'1't""*1}
A HAPPT NEW
Mr. and Mrs. Howard I
and family
Wish All Their Relative. *jl
A HAPPT KEW "
Mr. nd Mrs. Manual I
and fan"1*
Wmh All Their Ma**'JJ
A HAPPT NEW 1

Or-andMrs-Leona"11
and mm
of 14615 N.W. 1W**
Wuh All rheir^'1^]
A HAPPr N** I
Mr. and *"**&
and daughter, f


Spnber
27. 1957
*Jeistncrkfiam
Page 3 B
a^trxxhs.^ "*4jHst j{am jvewL%
|de Horizons of Family Service
By ALVIN CASSEL
|PrWio*nr, Jwih *""* Ur,i9
LoAY a man torn with perplexity, having
Lered in his personal affairs, said to our
.. tfas I mad that I did not come to you
Lttas ago" Today a young girl, knowing
Blv she needs to get herself straightened
I fearful about committing herself, .said to
Itptionist.
ijbe you
i me d"
11 don l
in you
his, ask
why peo-
[ yoursill
chos-
lunder or
Jen con-
|by their
Iber than
Em-
mt, fear
re, ob-
jpride,
Jwe of in-
Idenee
I of these
is, and
; readily
kle. But I
land I ask
i not agree, if the most general reason is
| plain lack of knowledge, or misinforma-
ALVIH CASStL
. MMMfhlMf special
Ian experiment. Ask a group of people if
|cw about Jewish Family Service. The ma-
: likely to say that they don't know of it.
: what it does, and it will be the unusual
ho will know that Jewish Family Service
i serve him or her. Try that question direct-
[ you had a serious personal problem in
Tiage, as a parent would you go to a
kunselor?"
I they understand the modern family ser-
pcy, such as Jewish Family Service, intends
es serve anyone who needs its help not
lly poor peuplc particularly, but everyone?
pork has a noble and contructive history,
lie awareness seems not to have kept up
pal work changes.
Combination of Skills
pntsof Miami Jewish Family Service come
every economic grSup; have a wide va-
loccupatioiK from the unskilled to the pro-
0: from every district of the Greater Miami
Khat they have in common is that being
|they have personal and family problems,
i have the intelligence to want professional
In tho>e problems, that they have enough
1 strength to get that help. Many pay fees
ervice they receive.
I family sen ice caseworker, today more fre-
I called the tamily counselor, has had ac-
1 professional post-graduate education last-
ast two years, and holds a Master's degree
I work. There is a professional association
las established a code of ethics binding on
lession which assures the client of privacy
pfidentiality and a point of view which
makes the client's interests the worker's paramount
concern.
In Jewish Family Service the average length
of experience of the professional staff is about ten
years. Nor does even this experienced staff work
alone, for each counselor has supervision and ex-
pert case consultation available, and psychiatric
consultation for staff is a well organized part of
poacrice. Moreover, the agency-ts dwsrty associated
with other organizations and other professions, so
that medical consultation and referral, legal guid-
ance, business consultation, psychological testing,
vocational guidance, and other specialized helps,
are available and are called on when needed.
There is no other profession trained in the
social casework processes of helping, or so directly
committed to general social needs, or so informed
on community resources and institutions. Yet, with
only minor exception, this entire body of profes-
sional services and skills can be obtained only
through a community organization such as Jewish
Family Service. To fail to use it when needed is
comparable to a failure to use the doctor when
one is in ill-health.
A Ytar of Progress
THERE are other problems than those that have
been so far mentioned and some of these re-
quire special services or special attention, although
all demand the same high quality of professional
commitment and skill. The attitude of Jewish
Family Service, as we have said so many times,
is one of broad responsiveness, of trying to create
and maintain the programs we know people need.
In this past year we are glad to be able to report
some further progress. In our c,hiid care service
we extended the psychiatric consultation given us
by Dr. Walter White; we.were able to add another
child placement caseworker to our staff; and there
has been some headway in planning for the care of
disturbed children.
Following a report of our observations about
the extent of the problem of disturbed children
?nd the lack of facilities for their care, the Welfare
Planning Council of Dade County established a
special committee to work on this subject. Our
most serious problem in the conduct of our child
care service continues to be the lack of a sufficient
number of foster homes. The interest and help in
finding foster homes of all Jewish Floridian read-
ers is ilrgently wanted.
Another milestone was passed when, several
months ago, we formally established a department
of services for the aged. The needs of older people
can now receive specialized attention. In the
months ahead we expect to develop such specific
services as private residential care, homemaker
service and closer working relationships with nur-
sing home facilities. We have long been aware of
the many painful needs of our older citizens. Un-
der the able leadership of Irvin Korach as chair-
man of the board committee and Seymour Siegel,
professional supervisor of the services, we are at
long last finding ways to be of very real help.
The great need and value of Jewish vocational
services was again-demonstrated by the extensive
use macje of our department. In 1956, 850 different
people asked us for various forms of vocational
help, and another 390 ware participants in group
guidance sessions. Despite a guarded approach in
offering educational and career guidance we did
Continued on Page 7 B
/
' Mrs. JoUs P. Channing
IM Jill nd Jon
f The.r Relaaves anil friends
[HAPPY HEW TEAR
; hid K. Chaplain
'Hij Relative* and Friends
I HAPPY \W TEAR
' Mrs. Jacob L. Chaykin
l"W, Stovon and Bruce
T'Th, Re|atufI aj friends
tll^TNEW TEAR
'M"-benjamin Cohen
iV*" **Ul.vei and Friend*
[WWTNEW TEAR
ift K*,t c<*erT~
yWrjiEW TEAR
I*-***+ Cohen
V n mily
P^_NfcAV TEAR
'^".IK. Cohen
I, family
Map'!*^'1'" d Friend*
[WPT N*W TEAR,
w
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Collegeman
and family
.Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Commor
ltd sons, Peter and Jeffrey
Wish All Thir Relatives and Fnends
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Victor Conn
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Or. and Mrs. Frank Coret
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Fnends
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Nat Coulton
and asm
Wish All The* Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Cevo
and family
Wish All Their Relative? and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR

Mrs. Rubon Crystal
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Crystlo
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Cutlor
and son, Leonard Jay
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel F. Danols
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Davidow
and family
Wuh All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Degutz
and daughter, Helen*
Wish All Their Relative* and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
MB
Mr. and Mrs. Mark Denburg
Wish All Their Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Diamond
and family
Wish All Their Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Donnerstag
and daughters
Elaine and Toni-Diane
Wish All TheirfMhtrvej and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Doshay
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. H. M Drewich and family,
Mr. and Mrs. Bon Drewich
and children,
Mr. and Mrs. Nat Weiss
and children,
Mr. and Mrs. Pete Silverman
and children.
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Duntov
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR

Mr. and Mrs. S. Edelmart
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Eli Einbinder
and daughters
Wish All Their Relatives and Friend*
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Dr. and Mrs. George Einborn
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Abe Ei sen berg
Wish All Then Relatives and Fnends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Loon Ell
and children, Sandra and Joel
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Elson
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mrs. Elsie Entman
and son, Howard
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Essen
and son, Richard
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR

Mr. and Mrs. Eli Fader
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Falk
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Feinberg
and sons. Bill and Dan
Wish All Their Relative* and Frietxds
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Max P. Fold
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Feldan
daughter, Rachel, and
ton and daughter-in-law,
Mr. end Mrs. Albert Feldan
Wish All Their Relatives and Fnends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph FeMheim
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. Irving Foldmon
Wishes All Hi* Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. end Mrs. William Foldmon
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Morton R. Fellman
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
ear

Mr. and Mrs. Moo Fenster
and children
Harbld, Ronald and Carol Ann
Wish Ail Their Relatives and Friend*
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M Fine
end family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friend*
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Jack M Fink
and daughter, Carla Jane
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Naomi and Dick Fink
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Isadora Fischer
and family J^
of 512 75th Street
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Ivan Fisher
and George, Stuart, Harriot
Wish All Their Relatives and Friend*
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Max Fishman
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friend*
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Sens Fli*gler~
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Foror
end children,
Henry, Minna Loo and Joseph
Wish All Their Relatives and Fnends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Alvin S. Forrest
and children, Linda Geyo,
Howard nd Roberta Helen*
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. end Mrs. Seymour Fox
and family
Wish All TheiT Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Frank
and daughter, Charlotte
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. A. Frankel
and daughter
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Franklin
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Freehold
and daughter, Sandy, of
1911 Coral Gate Drive
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Mortimer Fried
and children.
Scon, Mark and Diane
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. Charles Friedlander
Wishes All His Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Dr. and Mrs. Nathan Friedman
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friend*
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Friedsen
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friend*
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
tHA'SP Smol A' p'~""*r
Wish All Their Relatives and Fr.end*
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. M. G. Furman
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friend*
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Wish All Their Relatives and Fnendt
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
G
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Gok>
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Efralm Gale
end children, si
Diane and Michael
Wish All Their Relative, and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR



i
>


jge
*JmlsHk>rid*Mn
Fridc
CTo a4lffW. Saj, "*4Jltost JCappy JVew %
W
w#
Dr. and Mrs. Samuel Gertman
Paul, Richard and Susan
Wish All Their Relative* and Friends
A HAPPY NEW TEAR
90
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Gettleman
and family
Wish All Their Relative* ,nd Friend*
A HAPPT NEW T \R
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Gidnn,
and family
Wish AJI Their IWatiro and Fnen.'
A HAPPT HEW T EAR
^_____-* -ri _t__* V* ton* iae_____
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Gordon
and son, Jimmie
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mrs. Herman Gordon
Withtl All Her Relative! and Friends
A HAPPT .\W TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Ban Gilltr
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friend*
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Gordon
and family
All Their Relative! end Friends
A HAPPT \EU TEAR
Mr ;and Mrs. Hyman GWresman
Wish All Their Relatives and Fnendi
A HAPPT \EU TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Zion Ginsburg
and Edwin
All Their Relative] and .Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Louis A. Gottlieb
All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT HEW T FAR
Mr. and Mrs. William Givner
and family
Wish All Their Relume* and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Al Glasser
and sons, Harvey and Bruce
Wish All Their Relative* and Friends
A HAPPT \E\\ TEAR
Dr. and Mrs. George A. Graham
and sons, Michael, Lee and Jon
V All Their Reloi 11 and (
A HAPP1 \/U TEAR
Mrs. Bertha Glazer
Withes All Her Relative! and Friends
_____A HAPPT \li\V TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. William Click
and family
\\ isn All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT ,\EAV TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Jack I. Green
and children, Linda and Bobby
U ish All Their Relative* and I tend)
A HAPP1 \l\\ 1EAR
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Green
and son, Elliot
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Mr. Archie Greenberg
Wuhet All His Relative* and Friends
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Wish All T
Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Greenberg
Wish All Their Relatives and Fnendi
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Philip Greenfield,
Louis, Eileen and Johnny
Relative* and Friends \\ i, n ti. u i n
vc.,. vb4d AU Th"T Relatnes and Friends
Mrs. Sophie Gold
and family
A HAPPT \E\V TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Allan Goldberg
V. ; All Their Relatu ts and :
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
A HAPPT \E\Y TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Murray Goldberg
and children, Alan and Cynthia
to .> Ail Tiinr Relative! ..
A HAPPT \'W UAK
Mrs. Mash* Goldfarb
W ti All Her ,-,_ Friendi
A HAPPT NEW -):
Mr. and Mrs. Gary Greenwald
and family
Wish AH Their Relatnes and Friends
A HAPPT HEW YEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Leo A. Gross
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPP-) NEU TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Goldman
and daughters
All Their Relative! and Frtendi
A HAPP1 \/:U Ti:Ai<.
Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Goldman
and family
A Their I
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel Goldstrich
and family
All The.r Re|j, tl dj Fnendj
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Sol and Josie Goldstrom
and family
All Their Relatnes and Friend.
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Mr. Joseph Goldwebor
and family
Wish All Their Relatnes anJ Fnendi
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Ashley Goodman
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Herman Goodman
U (eh All Their Relatives and Friend,
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. S. Grossman
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
____A HAPPT HEW YEAR
Mrs. Pauline Grundwerg
and sons, Moses J.,
and Saul (U.S. Navy)
All Tl.e.r Relative! and Friends
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Dr. and Mrs. Bernard K. Guerin
and family
Wish All The.r Relative! an.! Friendi
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Gurkey
and son, Daniel,
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Eichenbaum,
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Seliger
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
____A HAPFl NCW TEAR
Mr. .d Mrs. Herbert I. Gutmen
and family
Wish All Their Frnds
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
II
Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Hagen
nd family
Wish All Their Relatnes and Friend!
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Lew Goodman
and family
Wish All Their Relatnes and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Lillian and Esther Goodman
7727 Dickens Avo.
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Goodstein
and family
Wish All Their Relatnes and Fnendi
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mrs. Emanuel Gordon
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mrs. Trudy Hamerschlea
Wishes All Her Fnend,
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Hamersmilh
and family
Wish All The,, R,Utu,s and Fnend,
_____A Happy NEW TEAR
*. and Mrs. f rnesT E. Harris"
and family
H'Jl'Z' Re,a"x" <*<* ****
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Mark L. Harris
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Gordon
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Hausman
and daughter, Peppi
* -yjh" Rtu"v"and ***
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Isadore Hecht
and children,
Isabelle, David and Barbara
Wish All Their Relatnes nd Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
a? 'T-H.
t^
ear
r
tf -

\m\


r Sf
, New Mt. Sinai Hospital now going up on Col-
lins Island, adjacent to hospital's present
site. New quarters will make Mt. Sinai among
most modern and progressive medico!I
tutions in South.
Latest Developments at Mt. Sii
By MAX OROVITZ
President, Mt. Sinai Hospital
THE walls are going up on our new Mt. Sinai Hos-
pital, and I daily feel the exaltation of seeing
brick and steel being moulded into forms from
which will rise our long-time dream. Each day. as
the workmen hammer and drill and their trucks
move the massive amounts of cement and sand, I
watch the build-
ings come into
reality from the
draftsman'!
boards. In a few
short months, ap-
proximately De-
comber. 1958. we
will all join in
the opening cere-
monies of our
hospital.
What will this
mean to the Jew-
ish community's
needs? The an-
swers are many.
The new hos-
pital will give us
once again the
filling of hope
and pride in our
own accomplish-
ments that have
sustained us
hrough history. The physical dimensions of the
buildings will house the finest equipment in the
country. The medical, nursing and research staff
will continue its excellent work on a broader scale.
The hospital is already recognized as one of the fin-
est in the area for care and treatment of illness and
disease, as well as the recognition it has gained for
its research programs. It will grow with its reputa-
tion until our name is synonymous with the ulti-
mate in medical operation anywhere in the country.
_Wehave stated repeatedly that, in essence, the
max otovrrz
. pusfii'na forward
general hospital operated under Jewish a_
the same as any non-sectarian hospital. t[
Jewish needs and the community's general|
needs simultaneously. Mt. Sinai admits |
all faiths and makes no discrimination i
patients in the quality and type of
it provides.
Security and Understanding
BUT its particular importance lies in the fl
tunity it gives our own people, our |
and interns, as well as our community.
Mt. Sinai Hospital makes it possible!
practice of medicine by physicians of any i
creed to be maintained on a high level; K|
its facilities to train ever increasing nu:
Jewish physicians, to the benefit of both I
ish community and the general populatitm |
Jewish hospital, Mt. Sinai gives the sole I
of care for those members of our commusi
feel the need of the security and unden
which Mt. Sinai offers.
At the present time, we still must i
facilities which do not entirely conform too
standards as far as physical properties are t
ed. Some criticism has been heard that thef
ent facilities are inadequate. No one realil
more than the board of trustees and the a
tive staff. When Mt. Sinai Hospital wasi
ed in December of 1949, the building selei
formerly a hotel and subsequently, a conw
hospital for the Army Air Force.
Progress on All Fronts
THE major achievements of this year we&J
erous. Taken by departments, there i
vances made everywhere.
No one intended these facilities to be
nent. but we determined to provide the
care, the most modern equipment, the
ical medium available anywhere The
served its temporary use well It gave the
community the cohesiveness it needed, it
Continued on P*9 >
Mrs. Sarah Heiner
Wishes All Her Relatnes and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
aod Mrs. Samuel I. HorecMeid
Wish All TW Relatives and Fnend*
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. an* Mr* Herbert Hoffman
W,,h All Thrir Rrlatues and Fnend,
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. .* Mrs. Joseph Hoffman
and family
Wh All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Hollander
nd family
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr.
r. and Mrs. Edward A. Holly
dao.ht.ra. Cissy .,, m,^/
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
H
Mr.
nd Mrs. Edward Hornreich
end family
Wish All Their Relent s and Fncnds
A HAPPT NEW TEAR-
Mr. and Mrs. Richerd J. Herwien,
Mirchett Alan and Prancin. May
W1W1 Ail Tberr Relatives and Friend*
a HArrr hew tear
Mr. and Mrs. S* Hyman
end family
Wish All Their RcUtitri and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
J
Mr. and Mrs. J*, <
and femih/
Wish All The. Hf'stires*"*"
A HAPPT \'w' TEA*
Mr. and Mrs. Leon
,nd faadly
Wish All Their Relanwi *jd
A HAPPT NEW TA*
nd daughter, Ul*
Wish All The,. R^J"%
A HAPPT NEW II
Mr. Mid Mrs. Reuben Idols
nd sons, Richard Mid Robert
Wuh All Their Revives and Fnend*
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr.
* Mrs. Loui. Jackson
and family
Wish AH The,, R,Ui and Fnend.
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
mr.endMrs.Samu.lA-'
Wtsh All The* MffJjl
A HAPPT NEW TW
Mr. and Mrs. Free
and f**'"
Wish All The,. R^'VeV
A HAPPT NEW 1^
Mr. and Mrs, Stm
.ndf*"""* j
MSrWa


Saptember 27. 1957
**eistrhrktian
Page 5B
a *4U "We Say "*4 JHost J{m JVew %r"
lassah's Aims in Greater Miami
By MRS. IRWIN M LISS
,,*, Miami Chapter of Hadassah
KTENED by the eager support of both new
i former friends within our community, the
l chapter of Hadassah moves into its second
(life with reflWedVigor. As a vital member
Zionist family, Hadassah is primarily re-
h|e for interpreting Israel to the American
become a member of Hadassah is to do
an just join an organization. For the thous-
I Jewish women who comprise our const it-
fin this area, joining Hadassah has become a
life. This is because the active member
I fuller life as a woman, a more vital life as
rican citizen and a more creative life as
I and carries over the impact of her enthus-
|and knowledge to her family, trends, com-
- and country.
hough some of the groups within the Miami
lr continue to hold general meetings through
Immer months, most of them "vacation" dur-
fcie, July and August. On the second Mon-
September however, every group held a
jig to which both members and friends were
-some in the afternoon, others in the eve-
le are proud to announce the formation of a
oup within our chapter this yearthe Aviva
, which draws its membership from the far
| Dade area. Because these young women
lade so brilliant a beginning, we look for-
Ito much "noches" from this offspring. We
Dually proud of our Junior Hadassah unit,
[for the first time this year becomes aiLinteg-
t of our Senior chapter.
|i most of our meetings, in addition to Zionist
[relations reports, there will also be Amer-
|ffairs and I'nited Nations reports. Our Amer-
(fairs program is designed to bring to our
jcrs the information they need to analyze im-
jt current issues, thereby helping them to
ppate intelligently in public affairs.
Henrietta Szeld Day
lire once aain planning a chapter indoctrina-
jDn day late in September, when the chapter
Inators will meet with their group counter-
land any other members who seek such self-
Tvement. in a series of workshops to dissem-
Itechniques and teach the implementation of
ll directives as well as to conduct lively
i>n and answer sessions.
lie situation in Israel during the past months
Wed for an unprecedented degree of devotion
T Part of all f us. And though it has been
(ratifying to note the manner in which
ah women have responded to the emergency
? greatly increased needs, much still remains
I done.
r observance of founders daybeloved Hen-
|&old-wili take place early in December
II be known throughout this community as
Some of our groups will have one large
|nd others will have a series of them in the
Tof their members. Money raised through
ort will be channeled into our Medical Or-
jjuon and Medical Center funds and will be
[w further the "core" of Hadassah's work in
IV hospitals and welfare stationstthroughout
!th and breadth of Israel.
Like other Zionist organizations, Hadassah
serves too as an agency for the Jewish National
Fund, as well as the Development Corporation for
Israel (through which Israel Bonds are sold). Be-
cause we are aware that without these fundamen-
tals of economy no nation can long exist, Hadassah
strongly urges all its members to become bond-
holders and to subscribe to Jewish National Fund
through contributions to Blue Boxes and purchases
of Tree certificates.
Therefore, when asked recently, "What is so
special about Hadassah?" our national president
replied. "Hadassah is not a superior organization,
it merely has a superior motive."
As the official American representative of
Youth Aliyah. Hadassah is proud to have been a
force in this movement since its inception 23 years
ago. We have served as mother, teacher and friend
to over 85,000 Jewish children who now call Israel
their home. Because of their varied backgrounds,
and the lands from which they came, each group of
youngsters presented new problems; but Youth Ali-
yah's sensitive, dynamic program led by thoroughly
trained teachers has succeeded in reclaiming these
children.
We have been fortunate in Miami in having
women whose interest in children is so great that
they have chosen to become "Imas" or Mothers in
Israel, and make annual contributions to this pro-
ject in amounts sufficient to maintain a child in
Israel for an entire year.
By MRS. JOSEPH SHAPIRO
President, Miami Beach Chapter of Hadassah
AS we usher in another year of the long history
of our people, we pause to evaluate our re-
sponsibilities to ourselves, to our country, to our
people, and to mankind. If we are to be faithful
to our glorious heritage, we must accept the chal-
lenge of our times and be thankful for having been
given the opportunity to help preserve the con-
tinuity of the Jewish people.
In Hadassah, we have a comprehensive pro-
Cram that encompasses, through Youth Aliyah, the
rescue and rehabilitation of the youth coming from
Egypt, Africa and countries behind the Iron Cur-
tain. In a large measure, we have assumed the
health problems that face Israel today. We are in
the process of completing a new Medical Center,
on the outskirts of Jerusalem, that will serve as
a center of teaching, nursing, and research.
On the American scene, we endeavor to imbue
our membership with the ideals and concepts of
creative Jewish living. We have a definite educa-
tional program through our study-groups, book-
reviews, and the study of Hadassah's new publica-
tion, "Great Ages and Ideas of the Jewish People."
To bring this book to the attention of our mem-
bership, our book reviewer, Mrs. I. M. Weinstein,
will analyze a chapter of this book, in addition to
the regular book review, throughout the series.
Through our American affairs program, we endeav-
or to give our membership a better understanding
of their duties and privileges as American citizens.
We are continuing and enlarging our Youth Activ-
ity work, bringing to our youth an awareness of
their rich heritage; a love for Judaism; and a prep-
Continued on Page 9 B
'"d Mr. Morris Kaler
- Md family
Xk^Z Re,a<"'" J Friends
1AHAPPT XEW TEAR
[*<*. Leonard J. Kalish
"d children,
I All TuVtd *"rf JIM
?J Olives and Friend,
l^PPT NEW TEAR
L^PPT NEW TEAR
BS?5^" ** *
LJ^PT.HEW TEAR

Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan
Wishes All His Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
- Mr. and Mrs. Loon Kaplan
and children, Rita and Stanley, and
Mr. and Mrs. Richard I. Brickmen
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Murray Kaplan
and family
Wuh AH Their Relative! and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Kasow
and sen, Harvey David
of 2100 S.W. 31st Av.no.
With All Their Relatives and Fnendt
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Katsen
and children, Barry and Lawrence,
and Mr. and Mrs. Molvyn K arson
With All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Kaufman
and children
With All Their Relative* and Fritndt
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
K
Mr. and Mrs. Mvrray H. Kaufman
and Mis* Mary Ann
Wuh All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mrs. Rose Kaufman
and family
With AJI Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Sanford H. Koan
eno wetnity
Wuh All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. William Kesselmen
and Michael
With AH Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Joromo Kiroball
and son, Sanford
Wuh AH Their Relatives and Friendt
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
N.lli. Klnfl
Wishes All Her Relatives and Friendt
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
am
Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Kippnes
Wuh All Their Relatives and Fnendt
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Dr. and Mrs. Maurice Klein
and son, Gerald
Wuh AH Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mb.*od Mts^Morrfc Klajn...
and Maxine
Wish AH Their Relatives and Friendt
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Korach
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Jack I. Korenblit
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Koretxky
and family
Wish AH Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Harvoy E. Kramer
and children, Ellen and Gordon
Wish AH Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Herman Kramer
Wuh AH Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Louis A. Krams
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Marcus Kraus
and family
Wuh AH Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. William R. Kress
and son
Wish AH Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Saul Krongold
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Molly and Gus Kurland
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Dr. and Mrs. Alexander Kushner
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
sT<
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Lachman
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Irving Laibton
and sons, Alan Richard and Jeff
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Landsman
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Moo Linger
and children, Sandra and Lester
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Isidore Langnor
and family
Wish AH Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Aaron S. Levor
and sons,
Joseph, Mussio and Chaim
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Murray Laxarus
Prances, Arthur and Nancy
of MM S.W. 1Mb Awomm
Wish AH Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Dr. and Mrs. Idward G. Loar
Wuh All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Richard E. Loar
Wuh AH Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Ignati Lob
and family
Wish AH Their Relatives and Friend*
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. J. M Lelchuk
arid son, Lewis Steven
Wuh All Their Relatives and Fnendt
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
aTa
Mr. Sheldon N. L.lchuk
Wishes AH Hit Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Richard E. Lencer
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Fnendt
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Leslie
and sons,
David, Rodney and Johnny
Wish All Their Relatives and Friend*
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Ehiol and Naomi Lesowodor
Wish All Their Relatives and Fnendj
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Ely Levin
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Levin
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Levin
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Dr. and Mrs. Leo M. Levin
and children,
Jane Abby, Deborah Ruth,
Adrienne and Albert
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Dr. and Mrs. Nathaniel Levin
and sons
Wish AH Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lovino
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Sam F. L.vit.n
and family
Wish AH Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Levy
Wish AH Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice I. Levy
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Lewin
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Lieberman
Roslyn, Irwin, Joyce, Lynn,
Myron, Jeffrey, Allen
Wish All Their Relatives and Friendt
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. James David Liebman
and children,
Laura, Henry and Rosanna
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Miss Sylvia Liebow
Wishes All Her Relatives and Fnendj
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Lindor
and son, Elliott
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Albert A. Lipsky
Wuh AH Their Relatives and Fnendj
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M Upton
Ronald, Marilyn and Harriott
Wuh AH Their Relatives and Fnendl
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Upton
and daughters. Iris and Dolsio
Wuh All Their Relatives and Fnendt)
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Max Lithman
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friendt
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Lwby
Dr. and Mrs. Frank S. Colo
and family
Mr. and Mrs. Chester J. Luby i
and daughters
Mr. Sam Luby, Jr.
Wish AH Their Relatives and Friendt
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
9m
Mr. and Mrs. Wallace N. Meer
and family
With AH Their Relatives and Friendt
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
f I



I
T
Page 6 B
*Jewtol>ncridBar)
i i
a *4/l?W* Say t4^4JHoSt Jtm JVew ,%r
M
Mr. and Mrs. Harry I. Magid
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Dr. and Mrs. Irwin H. Makovsky
Donna, Jay and Randy
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
- A HAPPT NEW YEAR
Mrs. Margaret Malek
and family
Wish All Their Relatives rfnd'Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Irving Marcus
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Marcus
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. Ben Marin
Wishes All His Relatives and Friend.
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Nemser
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Mr. Edward T. Newman and
Mrs. Freda Newman
With Ail Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Nurenberg
and family
'A AM Their" Relatives arid Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
. o
Mr. and Mrs. William Oberman
and family
All Thei' Relume* and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAK
Mr. and Mrs. John Oddo
Itiuei and Friends
A HAPPT NEW 1 EAR
Celia M Marks
Wishes All Her Relatives and Friend*
A HAPPT NEW 1 EAR
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Orchow
and family
All Their Relatives and Fnenc
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Marks
' and daughters,
Susan and Melinda
Wish All Their Relatives and Friend*
A HAPPT NEW ) EAR
Mr. Bernard Martin
U A., Hu Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW' TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Orlin
and family
Ail Their Rriar:: e> and Fnends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Orlin
and family
A A 1 and Friends
A HAPP-) \W TEAR
Mr. Sam L. Matx
Wishes Ail His Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW 1 EAR
Mr. and Mrs. Max Meisel
Lewis Tobi, Steven and Rachel Ann
U uh All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Albert E. Ossip
and daughters,
Gayle Esta and Deborah Jann
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPy NEW TEAR
#...
Mr. and Mrs. Louis B. Melnick
and family
Wild All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. David Meltz
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Robert M Merritt
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Dr. and Mrs. Herman Meyer
and children,
Samuel, Arna and Josiah
Wisn All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Bernie and Grace Pallant
and children
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW-' TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Pardo
and children,
Michele, Alissa and Jeffrey
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPy NEW' TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Leo Meyer
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Irving Parnass
and children,
Michael, Judy, Barbara
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Max A. Parries*
and daughter. Sheila Rae
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Paul
Wish All Their Relatives and Fnend<
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Miller
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Justus Miller
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. end Mrs. Robert Miller
and children,
Harel Carmi and Daniel Lee
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Mindlin
and family
Wuh AH Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley C. Myers
and family
Wuh All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
'iV ,
Mr. and Mrs. Howard N. Pelzner
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friend-
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Pepper
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Pepper
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Perlin
Wish All Their Relatives and Fnends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Nadler
Barbara, Larry and Senferd
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Sadye Nathan
Wishes All Her Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Dr.-and Mrs. Harry Needelman
and children,
Felicia and Richard Stephen
Wish Ail Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Judge and Mrs. Theodore Nelson
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPy NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Earl Pertnoy
LoU, Sidney, Ronnie, Sandi
Wish All Their Relatives and Friend,
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
tx, PW* **" wW Phillip*
Wuh All Their ReJatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TAR
Mr. and Mr*. Edward A. Pl.tkin
and family
Wish All 'Their,Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Pont
nd children.
Wish All Their RHa.ive, and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Popkin
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell Potter
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
I KM I
KDAWAt
\
\-.
\
At planninq committee function for Israel
Bond drive during High Holy Days. Seated
(left to right) are Rabbi Morris Skop, president
of Greater Miami Rabbinical Assn.; William
Bornstein and Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz. co-
chairmen of Holy Day Israel Bond appeal;
and Daniel Brisker, Israeli youth leaders,
guest at planning session. StUu,
Rabbis Jonah Caplan, Yeshiva Uni
gional director; Leo Heim, Hialeu-
Springs; Tibor Stern, Beth Jacob; Sin|
Miami Hebrew Congregation; Louiil
Torah Temple; and David Lehrfield, I
Israel.
Local Bond With Israel Assui
By JACOB SHER
Chairman, Greater Miami Committee
State of Israel Bonds
AS the year 5717 draws to a close, and Jews
throughout the world celebrate the New Year,
I would like, as chairman of the Greater Miami
Committee State of Israel Bonds, to express my
gratitude to the many people in this area who have
given so unstintingly of their time, efforts and
monies to help Is-
rael in her gal
lant effort to
wards economic
independence.
It was these
same people who
were responsible
for the record-
breaking $9 2 5,-
000 in the sale of
Israel Bonds here
in the Greater
Miami area in
1956. This year,
the goal is $1,-
125.000. but we
have only sold
less than half
our goal in the
first e i g h t I
months of the
year.
With the mon-
ey from the sale
JAiOU SUM
of bonds, Israel has accomplished his
achievements in housing, road buildup
ture. irrigation, industry and mining. li
rning to know that there are Israel Bond!
every drop of water, in every green neii
every new cotton plantation, in every i
and in every new development project
The people of Israel know of all thei
here, both rich and poor who first pu
and then in turn put their life and souli
"salesmen of Israel." These are the nntj
men who buy bonds in amounts from!
dreds of thousands of dollars in an q
the deep-rooted desire to be in partita
the heroic new country that is the re-tori]
Now once again comes a special call I
mier David Ben Gurion who asks foril
fort to be made in the form of an Israeli
peal to be made in the synagogues da
Holidays. Housing for the hundreds of I
of immigrants who are flocking to Inaal
over the world has become one of the I
ing problems for that country today.
Israel has not permitted the pn
nomic problems or Arab hosilitiesor I
factor to interfere with her commit!
come all Jews who seek a home. Thei
creased immigration in amounts exp
ceed 150,000 this year has brought to i
pressing need to expand and accelerate
nomic development in order to provide i
ing units at a cost of some $90,000,000, i
Continued on Page II B

Mr. and Mrs. Irving H. Propper
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friend*
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Milford S. Purcoll
and family
Wish Ail Their Relative* and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Rabin
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friend.
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. end Mrs. Saul Rabin
... oni Hi family
Wish All The,, ReUuves and Friends
______A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M Rabinowita
and family
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mr*. Barney Raftenberg
and family
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Max Rappeport
and family
Wuh AH Their Relative* and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Reek in
and family
Wuh All Their Relatives and Fnends
A HAPPT HEW TEAR
Mr. and Mr. Loo Ratnor
Wuh All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TAR
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Ravits
children and grand-children
Wuh All Their Relative, and Fnends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
U.sdMrs.*riiiel
and children
Wuh All Their RelMJ
A HAPPT KF* Tl
Mr. and Mr*. S*^'
end fa*"*
Wuh All The.r M***'
A HAPPT NEW"
Mr. and Mrs. I. Lj
endfawh-
Wish AH Their IWiU*''
A HAPPT HtWjl
Mr. and Mrs. William Reimer
and daughter, Barbara
Wuh All Their Relatives and Fnends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Reinhard
nd family
With All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. JH* *j,
Wuh AH Their *j ft
A HAPPT NfAVJ^
and 1"'"' i I
Wu, a.. rk^Mfffi
A HAPPT W_^
s^H
*>**?&&


27; 19W*

*"t**r*xmo*
a 4H IV. & "^4 JIU JLm -JKi ,p"
rican Jewish Committee Here
By HAROLD B. SPAET
prudent, Greater Miami Chapter
American Jewish Committee
i to aid persecuted Jews in Czarist Rus-
spurred some of America's most-4Mb-
I men to form the American Jewish Com-
1906. Among them were Louis Marshall,
-Arfnlf LewisoBr-Feux Warburg, Cy-
Itr, J"lius
yd, Sol
(k and
ISulzberg-
knew.
[equality
ensur-
lews until
it is
for all.
Mean
Commit-
oldest
organi-
levoted to
ties and
rights.
ly for
kt for ev-
il, regard-
I his relig-
tee aroused American opinion against the persecu-
tions of Jews abroad, especially under the Czarist
regime. A treaty with Russia, made in 1832, was
abrogated by the U.S. when American Jews desir-
ing to visit Russia were treated as second-class
citizens.
or or an-
I*
HAMOLD SPAiT
. eeriecvtiM ae mere
ugh the
Its. the
nee has pursued these aims:
fo foster mutual respect among the many
lous, ethnic and racial groups within Amer-
increase self-respect and self-under-
(ing among American Jews.
To protect freedom of speech, press and
on and strengthen such institutions as the
[school which help keep democracy strong.
To ensure equal opportunities for all Amer-
in education, employment, housing and
rfacet of Ife, so that each man may advance
own merits, not be penalized for his re-
I. color or ancestry.
To help Jews in other lands to live in se-
and dignity as equals among their coun-
to affirm their Jewish faith and to
hen their communal and religious in sti-
lo promote the principle of human rights
out the world.
broad-gauged program is vigorously ad-
iy the 26,000 men and women who belong
L'ommittee.
y. as in yesteryear, its roster includes such
hed leaders as Jacob Blaustein, Irving M.
Herbert H. U-hman, Samuel D. Leidesdorf.
(Joseph M. Proskauer, Judge Simon H. Rif-
Wph E. Samuel, Baron de Hirsch Meyer, to
t a few of its present officers.
Miami chapter is headed by such prom-
nunity leaders as Harold B. Spaet, pres-
avid B. Fleeman, executive committee
and Kurt Peiser, advisory board chair-
|The Miami office is directed by Seymour
[Southeast area director, from headquarters
"Congress bldg.
early Nineteen Hundreds, the Commit-
Uptiolding Freedom Today
the Twenties, increasing signs"of anti-Semitism
in America, coupled with efforts to restrict im-
migration to this country from Eastern Europe, led
the Committee to initiate a broad educational pro-
gram stressing the incompatibility of prejudice and
The relationship of Jews in Israel to Jews in
other areas of the world was expressed by Israel
Prime Minister David Ben Gurion, who recently
told a delegation of American Jewish Committee
'leaders that ". while Israel is open for all Jews
who desire or need to come and live in it the
State of Israel represents and speaks only on behalf
of its own citizens and in no way represents or
speaks on behalf of Jews of any other country."
As a part of its multi-faceted program in be-
half of freedom and improved human relations
throughout the world, a delegation of Committee
leaders, headed by president Irving M. Engel, un-
dertook a 15,000-mile, fact-finding survey and con-
sultative mission in Europe, North Africa and Is-
rael. In the course of the three-week mssion the
delegation was granted the first special audience
ever accorded a Jewish group by Pope Pius XH in
the eighteen years of his pontificate.
In addition to the audience with the Pope and
Continued en Page 10 B
Family Service Horizons
Continued from Page 3 B
actually give such guidance to 120 persons, mostly
youth. With this entire program now having come
before the community planning committee of Fed-
eration for review, the most important question
being considered is the re-establishment of an in-
dependent Jewish Vocational Service agency.
Only a Beginning
A MOTHER significant and promising advance was
the conclusion of an agreement with the Jew-
ish community of neighboring Hollywood, extend-
ing Jewish Family Service services to that com-
munity. Any resident of that area may now ob-
tain family and child care help from us, with the
Hollywood Jewish Federation underwriting the
cost of this service. This arrangement is of course
in its initial stages and we have much to do to
carry the word to our added population that this
service is now available.
We think this is only a beginning. We have
committed ourselves to the development of a
branch office on Miami Beach and we need to give
attention to family needs in other areas. Recently,
for example, we have had several families from
Key West coming to us for service.
The experiences of Jewish Family Service, the
activities in which.it participates, the community
developments which impinge on it, underline the
Continued on Page 14 B

ft
(*}'* Benjamin Rimer
1 "**- Harry B. Rimer
m children
mmt HEW TEAR
N Mrv lri9 Rofcjn^n
*M family
HAPn XEWTEAR
I > family
P ^P1 \EW TEAR
*"* children,
ihappy--," and Pnend*
NEW TEAR
LJJH; Shery. Ron,,,
vr i \fc\V TEAR
Mr. and Mr*. Joseph Rose
Mr. Richard Reee
Dr. and Mm. Harold Unger
and family
Mr. and Mae- Benedict Silverman
and family
Wiih All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Rosen
and family
Wtih All Their Relumes and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs, Richard. Rosen
and family
Wish All Then Relative! and Friend*
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Lester Rosenberg
and sons, Michael and Gary
Wish Ail Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. David Reeenthal
end family
of 912 N.W. Win Street
Wuh All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
ml
Mr. and Mrs. Angel Ross
Dorene Lee and Patti Esta
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs, David Roth
and family
Wsh All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Nat Roth
end family
Wish. All Therr Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. H. Rothstein
and family
Wuh All Their Relative! and Friend!
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. end Mrs. Sol Revin
and children. Dewy and Linda
Wuh All Their Relames and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Karl M Rubin
nd sens, Bruce end Oery
Wiitl All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. end Mrs. Milton Rubin
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
fl
Mr. and Mrs. Irving Seel
daughter. Vita
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mrs. Tessie Sedovsky
Wishes All Her Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. George J. Saft
and children, Sandra and Allen
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mr*. Jack Saifmen
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Gary I. Salzman
and family
Wish Tou
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mr*. Herbert Sander*
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mr*. Sidney M. Senders
and sons, Jerome and David
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. William Sane*
and son*, Harold and Kenneth
Wuh All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Schaffer
and family
Wish AH Their Relative! and Friends
A HAPPY NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Irving Scharxman
Wuh All Their Relatives and Friend!
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Irving Schenker
and family
Wish All Their Relative! and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Sigtnund Schermer
sen, Milton
Mr. and Mrs. Harry G. Rosenberg
daughter, Shelley
Wuh All Their Relative! and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. end Mrs. Sel ScWmme*
Wiih AH Their Relative! and Friend!
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Alex Schneidman
Wuh All Their Relatives and Friendi
A HAPPY NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Abe Schonfeld
and family,
Nancy, Donna and Wayne
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPY NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Schwartz
and sons, Gary and Gregg
Wish All Therr Relative! and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Schwartz
and family
Wuh AH Their Relatives and Friendi
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Robert I. Schwartz
and children, Laura and Ricky
Wuh All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Schwartrman
and children,
Sween, Linda and Barnett David
Wuh All Their Relative! and Friendi
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Dr. and Mrs. Jandon Schwarz
and children, Helen-Jo and Harold
Wuh All Their Relative! and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Dr. and Mrs. Jack Seitlin
and family
Wiih AH Their Relative! and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Mkhaol Selker
Wish All Their Relative! and Friends
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
Mr. and Mrs. John N. Serbin
and family
Wiih All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW YEAR
S
Mr. end Mrs. Lewis I. Serbin
and family
Wish AH Their Relatives and Friendi
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Serranr
Wuh All Their Friendi
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Dr. and Mrs. C. Leon Shallower
and children, David Irwin, Lester
Frederick, and Mark Alan,
and Mr. and Mrs. Harry Sir
Wish All Their Relative! and Friendi
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Shapiro
of 1015 Stiliwater Drive
Wish All Their Relative! and Fnendf
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Max L. Shapiro
son. Bob, and daughter, Beverly
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Gustav Shaw
and sons, Michael and Robert
Wish All Their Relative! and Friend*
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mr*. Max Sheinman
and family
Wish AH Their Relatives and Friendi
A HAPPY NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Leon Shiff
daughters, Riva and Mikki
Wish All Their Relatives and Friendi
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Shnayarson
WinJi All Therr Relative! and Friendi
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
Mrs. Margaret Shopiro
and family
Wish AH Their Relative! and Friendi
A HAPPT NEW YEAR
Mrs. B. Shopnick
Wiihe* All Her Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Or. end Mrs. Samuel S. Siker
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friendi
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mr*. Ben Silver
May Ellen, Ariene end Deris
Wish All Their Relative! and Friend*
A HAPPJT NEW TEAR
Mr. end-Mrs, Meat R. Sihree-
sons, David and Ira,
and daughter, Gail
Wuh All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPY NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Silverman
and family
Wish. All Thau. Relative* and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Isidore B. Simkowirs
and children, Elizabeth,
Michael, Sarah and Philip
Wish All Their Relative! and Friend*
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. George A. Simon
and family
Wish All Therr Relatives and Friends
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
Mr. J. D. Simon
Wuhei All His Relative! and Friendt
A HAPPT NEW YEAR
Mr. end Mrs. Sam Simon
end family
Wuh AH Their Relatives and Friend*
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
Mr. end Mr*. Harry Simonhoff
Wish AH Their Relative! and Friend*
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. end Mrs. Oscar S. Sindell
and family
Wish All Their Relative! and Friend*
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. end Mrs. Milton Sh-fcin
and children,
Dick, Ruthie and Josh
Wish AJi Their Relatives and Friendi
A HAPPT NEW YEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Skier
Wish AH Their Relative! and Friendi
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
Rabbi and Mrs. Morris A. Skop
and family
Wish All Their Relalives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mrs. Mary Sley
and family
Wish All Therr Relatives and Friend*
A HAPPT NEW TEAR


If
Pcge 8 B
r-Jeviit fkr/Jnr
Frida
****!
The Home's Auxiliary Pitche
Mr. Donald G. Smith
and family
Wiah All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPy NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Sobel
and daughters, Marcia and Helen
\V i h AH Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
M
Mr. and Mr*. Meyer Teigman
and daughter, Adele
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPy NEW TEAR
Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Sokoloff
and family
Wi.h All Their Relatives ami Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Solomon
Wish All Their Relatives anJ FrietiJs
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Murray M Sparaga
and son. Jay Lee
W..h All Their Relatives a>iJ FrieiiJs
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Thompson
and Mrs. Ban Lassar
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Harold G. Tobin
and son, Wayne
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. David R. Topp
Robert* and Martin
With AU Their Relative, and Friends
A HAPPT NEU TEAR
W
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Spactor
and family
h All Their Relatives aid Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Sparbar
and family
All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Sparo
and family
Wuh All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW 1 EAR
Mr. and Mrs. Martin Spilka
and family
V : h Al! Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT \EU TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Z. Spingarn
V. h Ail Their Relatives and Friend*
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
tt
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Toram
ish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Trachtman
A Ail Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT \fcW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Samual Traurig
and son, Laonard
All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT .V U TEAR
Mrs. Ban Turchin
and family
With AU Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEU TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Barnard Tytall
and childran,
Mark Philip and Charyl Sua
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW T EAR
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Spivack
and family
V. h All Their Relatnes and Fnends
A HAPPT NEW' TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Joshua Z. Stadlan
and family
V. h All Their Relatives and Friend]
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
-
Mr. Sydney Stanley
and childran, Dannis,
Deugias, Jean Nancy and Kenneth
U:,h All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Stain
and sons, Larry, Mark and Stavan
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Aba H. Steinberg
Wwh All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Laonard Stern
ard childran, Eugene and Rogar
V. .h All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Dr. and Mrs. Harold Ungar
and family
Wish AU Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
w
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Varnall
and family
Wuh All Their Relative] and Fnends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. Gilbert A. Viola
Wishei All His Relatives and Friends
A HAPPy HEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Joel J. Vogal
and tans,
Stavan Craig and Howard Jay
Wish All Their Relative] and Friend]
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
WT
Mr. and Mrs. Maxwell Waas
and family
Wuh All Their Relatives and Friend]
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Jay Stem
and family
Wit* All Their Relative] and Fnends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Stevens
and family
Wuh All Their Relatnes and Fnends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Stiebal
and daughter, Myfca
Wish Ail Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Waldman
and son, Mr. Shaldon Waldman
W ish All Their Relatives and Fnends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Samual Waldman
nd family
U ish All Their Relatives and Friends
_____A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Tha Wall Family
W.sh All Their Relatives and Fnends
______A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Straifart
and family
W.-h AU Their Relatives and Friends
______A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Max Swartz
nd sans. Pater and David
Wish All Their Relatives and Fnends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Swerdlin
nd family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs, Al Warren
and family
Wh All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. .nd Mrs. Nat A. Warshew
,, <* ">n, Mark
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mrs. Matilda Waahton
... "<* family
W,sh All Their Relatives and Fnends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
By MRS. SOL SILVERMAN
President, Woman's Auxiliary
Jewish Home for tha Aged
LJOW often we have heard the poets and philos-
" ophers say that old age should be a tranquil,
golden twilight of life. How earnestly we seek
peace and security when our fruitful years have
come to an end. And how devoutly we pray ...
"When my strength faileth, forsake me not." This
is why we are
mindful of our
sacred responsi-
bility to the res-
idents living in
our Jewish Home
for the Agedan
assumption of re-
s p o n s ibility to
bring new hope,
dignity, and the
fulfillment of an
enriched, more
meaningful way
of life to our res-
idents. It is more
than a slogan
that we have
adopted for our-
selves, but a
pledge to be ful-
filled and a creed
to be lived by.
The residents'
total needs shall
s
Roes our deep appreciation for her httfai
visits to the Home to take resident, 'f^
ant Sunday afternoon drive. CaZ^M
of movies at the Home by Mrs. Llov?,! *
Junior Auxiliary, who have undertake,,l"
project throughout the year, has ,, '
MKS. SOt SUVHftMN
. special contribution!
always be our guiding principle.
It is heart-warming for me to look back on my
six years as Auxiliary president and view the phe-
nomenal growth and progress which our Home has
achieved. In my first year of office, we were car-
ing for 38 elderly folks. The following year we
were able to serve 60 people. Two years later, with
the dedication of the Ablin Memorial bldg.. we had
reached a new high of 83. Now, as we mark the
beginning of a new year, there is a need to fur-
ther expand our bed capacity in order to meet the
overwhelming pressures of those who are desper-
ately reaching out for the security and protection
of the Home. It is my deep hope that their plea
will be answered in the not too distant future.
It is a pleasure for me to report on the work
and developments of the new additions to our
Home family the Hollywood Women's Auxiliary,
under the leadership of Mrs. Stanley M. Becker-
man, and the Junior Auxiliary, headed by Mrs.
Lawrence Silverman.
Together we will work as brothers and sisters
for all the fathers and mothers for whom the Home
has provided. The new auxiliaries will strengthen
the hands and heart of the Home.
The growing stature of our family by the two
new auxiliaries is assurance that the future holds
further successes and achievements for the Home.
Both auxiliaries have made tremendous strides in
their brief existence. The Hollywood Auxiliary has
already contributed $5,000 toward a room in a fu-
ture pavilion of the Home, and the Junior Auxiliary
is well on its way towards raising a similar amount.
A New Pavilion
yHERE are two special service contributions by
each auxiliary which deserve mention. To
Mrs. Jerry Goldman, of the Hollywood Auxiliary,
great joy to the residents The r,
program is reflected by the overflow,!7%'
of both ambulatory and non-ambulatory,
Among the many outstanding auxhw]
held during the year, was the life Zi
luncheon on Jan. 14, honoring Mrs u2
ger, beloved pioneer worker for the Home jj
munity. As an expression of gratitude bv Z1
bership at large, there was a spontaneous?
of pledges to name a new pavilion in her I
It is impossible to evaluate the work.
auxiliary in terms of dollars The amounts!
are faithfully raised by the auxiliary's acti
indeed concrete evidence of the develops.
progress of our auxiliary. Primarily a funt,
organization, the auxiliary pledges $18.0Mi_
toward the Home's maintenance costs. Tnal
are the many medical bills involving the,
medical needs of residents, and to this we j
our Sidney Appel Medical Fund. Last years.
penditures were $800; this year with an i
resident population, it was almost doubled!
such vital items as drugs, vitamins, i
apy, dentures, eye glasses, braces and i
This year, a special project was sp
the auxiliary when it financed the pri
25,000 beautiful picture post-cards of |
dens. For our membership, these cards i
portable showcase to show and interpret ini
color the work of our Home.
Seme Auxiliary Programs
COR our occupational therapy-leisure
gram and for the many special afl
bring added joy into the lives of our i
turn to the Sophie Sherry Happy Day sod I
Funds. Through the wonderful volunteer)
of the National Council of Jewish Women
the direction of the Greater Miami JewissJ
munity Center, our residents have learned I
again,' to create again, to live again.
For happy occasions, as my caleidiri
the auxiliary sponsored picnics, concerts,!
parties, traditional holiday and festival
tions and boatrides. As one of our
residents whispered to me during one of tshj
rides, "I'm really living it up." Whit:
"naches" can we "shop"!
Our Sara Czech Trift Shop has grown If \
and bounds, and we have helped here also.i
in material support, but in needed service i
The auxiliary helps in picking up clothingi
chandise and many of the members
working in the shop to help display and i
merchandise. This, too, is our "labor of I
it, too, comes back to the residents.
The physical therapy program at the 1
opening up new vistas for our residents.
given up as helpless have been restore* tsl
ness and self-reliance.
In behalf of our Auxiliary and *]
members, and the residents of the Hoaw.1
happy and prosperous new year to all our
in the Greater Miami community.
w
Dr. and Mrs. I. Newton Weinkle
and daughter, Romello
Wuh All Their Relative! and Fnend,
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
*
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Tannan
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
______A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Dr. and Mrs. Harry Tarr
and children.
Stave, Bernard and Barbara
Wish All Thm Relatives and Fnendj
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Wassermen
and family
All Their Relates and Fnends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Morris W. Weinbera
and daughter
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Weinkle
and sons,
Richard, Donald and Dana
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
e
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Weies
and family
Wish All Their Relatives *nd Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. Morris Weston
Wishes All His Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Weinstein
and daughters,
Dan* Dee and Deborah Ann
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weiner
nd Barbara
All Their Relatives and Fnends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Weinkle
All The,, Relative, and Fnend,
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr and Mrs. Murray C. Weinthal
W,h All Their Relative, and Fnend,
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Weiss
m T *,??* Stu*rf "d Marty
All Their Relatives and Fnends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Max Weisa
''"aVapp^1'1"^-^
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Sanford I. Warehouse
and family
o* MS N.I. 123rd Street
Wish All Their Relatives and Fnends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Irvine Wilpon
and family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Alex Winnie*
and family
Wuh All Then- Relative, and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
Mr. and Mr*. Simon Wolff
,., and family
W..h All The.r Relative, and Friends
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
*J
Mr. and Mrs. Msx *j
and sons, Ernest u*
Wish All The.r Relativ^*j
A HAPPT NEVV U
Mr. and Mrs. I. *
nd famd.
Wuh All Their K-elatit"^.
A HAPPT NEW Itm
Mr. and Mrs. AJt *
and fn"t
Wuh All Their R^'J&I
A HAPPT HE* T
fcBi*jSJ
^d,n.,R.r^^,
Wuh All Their R^'VWj
A HAPPT NBW
^iamsra**
*' and*'**
Alan Jar
andi""*
.a"
*"k "JXH&**
A HAPPT


September 27, 1957
+Jewistncridian
Page 9
EXTEND GREETINGS
test Developments at Mt. Sinai
Continued from Peea 4
nity at large the best possible refuge from
and disease, regardless of race or creed.
private medical service became a most
a of the teaching program which has al-
en emphasized at Mt. Sinai. In surgery, the
ij0n of the best in surgical knowledge was
bed by extension of the Professor Protem-
ogram. improvement of house staff training
Kirch in surgical techniques.
Sinai has a fine record in the field of Cardi-
ff all-time high of 6,271 electrocardiograms
jen in 1956. In the Department of Pathol-
67 lurgical specimens were examined, and
apsies were performed. The Clinical Lab-
i performed 156,543 tests.
volume of radiologic examinations in-
j 28 per cent in 1956, and the Schonander
filming equipment was acquired to increase
prove service to the patient.
outpatient department markedly inereas-
|service to the community with the opening
(Dental and Hard-of:Hearing clinics. The 22
I treated 9.078 patients.
I ill departments, we are pleased to record
in techniques, care and equipment.
the fiscal side, Mt. Sinai is a beneficiary
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation,
ifferential deficit has formerly been carried
yearly fund-raising "Jubilee Night of
This year, as president of the board, I an-
that Jubilee would be discontinued be-
|tbe board felt the community would be hit
many fund raising activities for the new
Professional Approval
year, an operating budget for the hospital
IJ2.520.3ti2 is anticipated, which will create
uating deficit of $271,147. Of this, approx-
'$180,000 will come from Federation funds.
|uves a deficit of $99,480 which will be met
! activities of the trustees.
he operating deficit reflects the care of free
I patients, the out-patient clinics, social ser-
ents and the teaching program. Mt. Sinai
ues to meet increasingly demanding require-
| for service with a corresponding efficiency.
nerican Hospital Assn. has consistently given
pital a Grade A hospital rating. Our teach-
I training programs have also had the con-
approval of the American Medical Assn.
I American College of Surgeons, as well as
Icertifying boards.
pally, the board of trustees and I maintain
our own vigilant supervision of the income, cost
and efficiency of each department.
No hospital or medical center can remain static
insofar as medical.progress is concerned. Mt. Sinai
Hospital's research programs have pushed forward
to such an extent since their inception three years
ago, that they are subsidized more generously each
year by grants from the Federal Government, na-
tional research foundations and private individuals.
Their cost of operation is not included in the hos-
pital's operational budget or deficit. Many of the
projects are on a cooperative basis with the faculty
of the University of Miami.
Outstanding Contribution
IN this analytical survey of the progress and pos-
sible failures of Mt. Sinai Hospital, we truth-
fully cannot record any outstanding departure from
our goals. Both in our long and short range plans
for the hospital, we have met with gratifying suc-
cess that has characterized the planned efforts of
our executive director, Samuel Gertner, and the
medical, nursing and ancillary staff.
Our recent introduction of the Intensive Nurs-
ing Service program, wherein patients are located
in definite areas according to the nature and se-
verity of their illness, has proven to be a definite
advancement in the care of patients.
Despite the present inadequate physical fa-
cilities at Mt. Sinai Hospital, the board of trustees
and the Jewish community can congratulate them-
selves that they have made an outstanding contri-
bution to this area.
We all look forward to completion of the new
hospital buildings to meet the realization of our
long-cherished dream for one of the finest hospitals
in the country.
Miami's Hadassah
Continued from Page 5 B
i to meet the challenge of adult life.
More Mombors Needed
NOWLEDGING the increased need of Hadas-
*' services, how can this problem be solved?
I only one answer: members, more mem-
Ifflore American Jewish women to assume
l^e of this tremendous responsibility. Never
d history, has it been so important that
Continued on Pap* 15 B
A certain smile One of meet happy places
at Mt. Sinai is its nursery.__________________
.
liuTi""-Wi,li,m ****
[AHAPPT \t\V TEAR
PJJ" fWant and Fnends
I^HAPPY \w TEAR
' *nd Mrs. Harry Zaret
and family
L^APPl \W TEAR
|Iu*dMr$OKar~Zoltior
AHADi;,K''a"""fl"d Friend*
I^HAPfM v:\v- tear
0|" Thanks
>*. t, ,h. -, -JlT
r*wu hoeie, fta fc. j^.
""' ortefm,, th M.
**, thus fkimt c*f-
**** Inlmm IMm
?' **#
- THI
New Year Greetings
to all
Our Friends .
Ruth and Charles Jacobson
South Dade Jewish Center
ITS IABM, OfrXItS AND iOAM Of DIIECTOBS
Extends Best Wishes For A Happy and Prosperoos
Hew Year U All Their Members and Friends
M. lAUMCAM WMMf OHsV
Preside**
In behalf of the
FLORIDA CHAPTER OF
YESHIVA UNIVERSITY '
we wish to extend best wishes for a happy,
healthful and prosperous New Year to all the
Officers, Members, Friends and Patrons of the
Chapter.
Leo Robinson
President
Jack A. Cantor
Chairman Executive Committee
Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan
Regional Director
THE UNITED BALABATIM VAAD
HAKASHRUTH OP GREATER MIAMI
Extends sincere greetings to our Community
and to Jewry Everywhere
on the Occasion of the New Year
May Torah > True Judaism deepen the religious fervor
of our People and the Banner of Tradition fly high
and proud.
We pray that our Hallowed Religious Way of Life
and Kashruth as an Integral Facet of it
shall become a meaningful and vitalizing force
in our Days and Years.
May the rear 5718 see
ISRAEL THE PEOPLE and ISRAEL THE STATE
secure and living in a World at Peace.
}
1
KAMI SMMARYAMU T. SWIRSKY
CfeoiraiM, trofcfcmicol Ceeacil of
Grtofrr Miami
c
wwwww-
r'WWWWWWWWW
Av\XWA.
Sincere Best Wishes for a Happy Hew Year to all
oar Officers, /Members of the Board, Members,
their families, and Friends
mm
i

ZAMORA JEWISH CENTER
(comnmir AM cowwtjod and renovated;
The Only Conservative Congregation in Coral Gables
RABBI B. LEON HURWTTZ
GUEST CANTOR JOSEPH W. MALEK
CANTOR RUDOLPH BRILL
NATHAN DA VIDOW. PRESIDENT
THE SISTERHOOD. PTA MEN'S CLUB.
JUNIOR CONGREGATION. U.S.Y. GROUP. *
HEBREW AND SUNDAY SCHOOL
THE BOY SCOUT TROOP. "
and the OFFICERS. FACULTY
AND PUPILS OF THE HEBREW ACADEMY
:
i
I
i

1
Last Minute Reservations May Be Made
By Calling HI 1-7132


i



r i '
<
m
*
'
1


I
JemisfifhrHton
The Officers and Directors of the
Greater Miami
JEWISH CEMETERY ASSOCIATION
Extend To All Jewry Their
Most Sincere Wishes For A
HAPPY AND HEALTHY NEW YEAR
Operating:
JEWISH SECTION
Woodlann Park Comet pry
______., AWL -
Mount Sinai Memorial Park
25 Acres of Beautiful Family Plots
Proudly Located on Opa Locka Boulevard
1125 N.W .137th Street (Near 7th Avenue)

Affiliated Congregations
Congregation Beth David
Congregation Beth Jacob
Congregation Beth El
Miami Hebrew School & Congregation
Sisterhood Chesed Shel Emeth
iJ -
;
%
Congregations, Societies and Organizations
Who Mow Own Individual Sections in
Mt. Sinai Cemetery
Congregation Beth David
Congregation Beth Jacob
Congregation Beth El
Miami Hebrew Congregation
Downtown Synagogue (Old Beth David)
Congregation Beth Tetilah of Miami Beach
Tifereth Israel Northside Center
North Dade Jewish Center
West Miami Jewish Community Center
Louis Brandeis Benevolent Association
Workmen's Circle. Miami and Miami Beach Branches
Jewish National Workers Alliance
Shandloff Lodge. Jewish Peoples Fraternal Order
Sephardic Brotherhood of Greater Miami
Sephardic Social & Benevolent Circle
Roosevelt Lodge. Knights of Pythias of Miami
Maccabee Lodge. Knights of Pythias of Miami
Miami Beach Lodge. Knights of Pythias
Jewish Bartenders Union
Now Planning and Under Consideration
ALL JEWISH MASONIC SECTION
JEWISH WAR VETERANS SECTION
OFFICERS:
_..,. Hymen P. Gelbut. President
Ph.iip Berkowitz. Fir.t Vice President Mitchell Shape-. Secretary
Leo Meyer, Second Vice 1'ieKidcnt Abraham Pepper. Trauma*
DIRECTORS:
Meney Glantz. Mre. Israel Goldberg, Harvey Herman. Sam Miller.
Morns Rabinowiti. Joe Rutantky. Mra. Rachel Sakowitz,
Isidore Schwartz, Robert Schweitzer, Al Zipper
L'Shona Tova Tikesevu
CONGREGATION ANSHE EMES
HAPPY NEW YEAR GREETINGS
from Hi*
Murray Solomon Post and Auxiliary No 243
JEWISH WAR VETERANS
Lit
THE RABBI. OFFICERS, and MEMBERS
I of
The Israelite Center

3198 S.W. 24th Terrace T-n
'and ALL ITS AUXILIARIES and COMMITTEES
EXTEND THEIR GREETINGS TO ALL THEIR FRIENDS
FOR A VERY HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
DAVID GUTTENMACHEI MORTON MALAVSKY
,nMmtt Rabbi
.}
L.
1
;
Shown at last January's annual meeting of
Greater Miami chapter, American Jewish
Committee, in Eden Roc hotel. Seated (left
to right) are Richard Wolfson, Charles Gold-
stein, Dr. Jack Kapchan and Jerome
mayer. Standing are Mrs. Charles Fn
stein, Seymour Samet, Ernest London, ]
George Baum and Alvin Cassel.
American Jewish Committee Hi
Continued from Pago 7 B
conferences with Prime Minister Ben Gurion and
other high Israel officials, the delegation met with
government leaders in Morocco, Tunisia, France
and Italy.
Growing Communist Influences
QN the basis of Committee conferences with high
dignitaries of the Roman Catholic Church, the
Committee was assured of a decided attitude to
combat the age-old problem of discrimination
against Jews. The delegation was also assured of
a view full of sympathy and understanding with
respect to Israel. The Committee is encouraged to
believe that Pope Pius XII is vitally concerned
with a constructive program in the Middle East
designed to lead to a durable peace in that troubled
part of the world.
One of the looming threats in the world today
is the danger of growing Communist hegemony in
the Middle East, particularly following the pro-
leftist military coup in Syria. The Committee has
lung sounded sharp warnings against the threat of
imperialistic Communism and has specially pointed
to mounting anti-Semitism behind the Iron Curtain.
Two carefully documented volumes based on re-
ports from the Committee's European experts
"The Jews in the Soviet Union" (1950) and "The
Jews in the Soviet Satellites" (19S3) revealed the
facts about the Kremlin's new march of crime.
These, disclosures, have done much to inform .the
Western World that communism, no less than naz-
ism, uses anti-Semitism as a divide-and-conquer
weapon in a global campaign against demo
Until there is real proof of the USSR'il
ly intentions, the Committee will continue its
gram to restore full religious and cultural I
for all minorities in the Soviet Union.
With offices in Paris and Buenos Aires, e
pondents in the major cities of Europe and I
Africa, the Committee is equipped to
mandate to protect the civil and religious i
of our coreligionists abroad.
After World War II, the Committee
an unprecedented scientific exploration of |
dice in cooperation with leading universiuesj
monumental five-volume "Studies in Prajl
sponsored by the Committee's Scientific
Department, was hailed by the Annals of the!
ican Academy of Social and Political Scwl
"the first really major scientific attack upnf
problem of intergroup hostility"
To Keep Democracy Strona
BELIEVING that democracy's most powerhij
* fense lies in those human rights wfcdr
munism would destroy, the Committee has i
measures that would curtail civil liberties i'
to silence Communists. In concert with
tional Council of the Churches of Christ in ul
the National Catholic Welfare Conferee*
other organizations, the Committee has
Government procedures to protect the na
curtty while preserving individual rights I
process of law.
One example of their far-reachingiefM"
RABBI and MRS.
MINARD KLEIN
wish the members of
Temple Beth El of Hollywood
and the Jewish community
of South Florida
a Happy New Year
*tw Tear C,eef.Mi fe Our Hmmkmtl, Ikmk fimilltt ** *''**
MIAMI BEACH LODGE NO. 1591 B'MAI WITH
JACK M. FINK, President
SINCERE WISHES FOR
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
TO ALL JEWRY
RABBI and MRS.
MARIUS RANSON
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
FORT LAUDERDALE
HARRY H. COHEN
DEPARTMENT COMMANDER, JEWISH WAR VETERANS Of
and FRIEDA COHEN
Wish th.ir Friendi a Happy and Prosperous N* v, Temple Israel of Miami
its raiiis, omens -* memsiks
tMt4 ( the Jawiafc NerMetW sad Ht **** "*"
A VERY MAPPT, PROSPEROUS AMI REAITHT MfW


September 27,1357
. ,-
+Je*istinerJcMar7
Page HB
I'S JEWISH ORGANIZATIONS EXTEND GREETINGS
life is the Supreme Court's epochal de-
"Liawing "Ci"1 *>*r*aUon ,n the Public
A great deal oi th* s**entwc -evidence
h that derision concerning the efects of
dice upon personality grew out of the studies
|"ther researches stimulated by the Committee.
r the leadership of Col. Nathan B. Rood, the
i chapter has worked with other civic groups
lCeful accommodation to the Supreme Court
on in lhc ,)ade countv PubIic schools.
Bbe Committee's activities in Dade county hflye ^
[yu'peo* bfthe falTh that^freenom "of" choice
(diversity of views among American Jews are
finance with the American pattern. We seek
I separate Jewish enclave presuming to act on
[ of a segregated Jewish community, but vol-
gssociations, speaking for their members,
[in concert with other Jewish and non-Jewish
i in areas of common agreement.
field of religious education is another
jge concern of the Committee. Disdain for
dherents of other faiths has been all to com-
an undesirable trait in religious education.
[prejudices are self-seeding growths of ignor-
|ind fear.
for the past 20 years, the Committee has work-
: Drew Theological Seminary, the National
til of Churches of Christ in the U.S., and other
Jous bodies, to study Christian text books. Hos-
fand offensive references to Jews and other
i have been replaced with accurate and pos-
I materials.
he Committee also urges frank appraisal of
trials used in Jewish religious education. It is
erating in this task with the Dropsie College
Hebrew and Cognate Learning. It also seeks
timulate the preparation of new materials to
her understanding among Jews of the diversity
[is America, of the basic differences between
jismand Christianity and their common ground
El
[Simultaneously the attempts to introduce re-
|us instruction in the public schools of Florida
i been protested by us. Working with leaders
nagogues. church and civic organizations, the
ni chapter, through the leadership of Rabbi
ph Narot, gave impetus to an educational ef-
| which interpreted the religious, pedagogic and
I reasons for opposing such plans.
To Inturt Equal Opportunity for All
H, as in years past, the Committee is working
|to eliminate discrimination and segregation
I the American scene. But full equality of op-
Unity will not be realized until the last strong-
of prejudice in Americasocial discrimina-
-is overcome. It implies the inferiority and
sirabihty of a person on the basis of the group
i hich he is identified, and not on the basis
lis individual worth. Social discriminaton ser-
Ito perpetuate the infection of bigotry, for it
ptly authorizes other discriminations.
| Whether it be exclusion of Jews from housing
i island in Miami Beach, or from the equal op-
unities for a job or entrance into a university,
[members are concerned and involved in ef-
i to make for positive change.
I As the Committee commences its second half-
pry, its members have pledged themselves to
I an Institute of Human Relations. Here, in
Iselting of the Committee's permanent home at
[w and 56th st in New York City, would be
a new style "arsenal of democracy." The
>*'i cornerstone would bear the inscription:
Wed to Man's Understanding of His Fellow
The Committee's Institute of Human Relations,
the first of its kind in America, will have centers
concerned with research in Group Prejudice, Mass
Communications, Social Action, Foreign Affairs
and Jewish Community Services. It will house a
library singularly equipped for the study of civil
rights, civil liberties and intergroup relations. It
will serve as^ hub for research and practical ap-
plication. Universities in America and abroad will
be invited to have their scholars and graduate stu-
dents utilize fully the Institute's scientific facil-
ities To pursue their*studies in (Tie fields of inter-
group and human relations. Ultimately, it might
become a center to which opinion moulders all
over the nation would turn.
The American Jewish Committee establishes
its Institute of Human Relations with the fervent
prayer that it will serve to advance that day when
all men shall be accorded equal rights and when
'persecution, with all its train of horrors, shall be
no more."
Bond With Israel
Continued from Pago 6 B
vide jobs for the newcomers. These units cost ap-
proximately $3,000 each.
High Holy Day Campaign
UlE here in the Greater Miami area have pledged
ourselves to sell enough Israel Bonds during
the High Holy Days to pay for 150 housing units.
Last year 15 local temples were responsible for the
sale of almost $200,000 in Israel Bonds. This year,
there will be many additional synagogues that will
participate in the High Holy Days campaign.
For numberless generations, it has been tradi-
tional that at some point during the solemn ob-
servances of Rosh Hashona and Yom Kippur, the
congregation should be called upon to support its
Jewish brethren in the community, in the nation,
or throughout the world. The symbolic notes of the
Shofar (ram's horn) blown during this ceremony is
a call to help less fortunate brothers.
This year, in practically every city in Amer-
ica, Orthodox, Conservative and Reform congre-
gations have planned to devote some portion of the
High Holy Day services to appeal for support of the
State of Israel through the Israel Bond program.
The Rabbinical Assn. of Greater Miami, headed by
Rabbi Morris Skop, president, has fully endorsed
the High Holy Days synagogue appeals drive for
the State of Israel Bonds.
It is most fitting that the synagogue should be
the scene for this heightened Israel Bond effort
during the High Holy Days. The concept of render-
ing assistance to the growing democratic State of
Israel is consonant with the highest principals of
the American and Jewish traditions.
The provision of homes and jobs to those who
have been driven from their homes and lands is
an act of faith and piety which merits the fullest
support, and I sincerely hope that the people of
Greater Miami will once more respond in outstand-
ing measure to the call.
There is no better time, no better way to ex-
press love for Israel, and faith in its future, than
by the purchase of Israel Bonds during the High
Holy Day observances, and Greater Miami Jewry,
with its splendid tradition of dedication to the gal-
lant little country, will establish new national rec-
ords of response to this year's appeal during the
High Holy Days of the year 5718.
H Wishes for a Happy and Prosperous New Year
r'Und Mrs. Benjamin B. Bosenberg
Robert and Paul
&. u. H,0H HOI-WAY GREETINGS
w Withe, for Healthy, Joyful and Reliejous Now Yoar
BETH ISRAEL CONGREGATION
dort F
"tman. President
H. Louis Rottmen, Rabbi
Jacob Kaufman, Gabbai
-"
Temple Sinai
rflE NEW REFORM CONGREGATION IN NORTH DADE
ITS SISTERHOOD and MEN'S CLUB
&fMd Their Greetings For A Very Happy
New year To All Their Friends
Tmpl. rw, B,ENNO WALLACH, Rabbi
"'e: 12500 N.E. 8th Avonuo Phono PL 1-0234
Rabbi and Mrs.
IRVING LEHKMAN
and their children
DAVID and ROSALIND
Extend Best Wishes for a
JOYOUS NEW YEAR
To All Their Friends-of the
Greater Miami Community
REV. and MRS.
ABRAHAM SEIF
end Childree)
HOWARD IEON, DEBORAH
mmi ALAN
WISH All THEIR MMDS
a very MAM NEW YEA*
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
i
extends wishes for
a most Joyous New Year io>all
i
The Sisterhood
The Men's Club
The P.T.A
The Perfect Circle.
The Forty-Niners
The Young Adult Group
The Theater Guild
and all affiliated Youth Groups
'\M^^^^^^^n^M^^^^^^S^^^^^^n^^^^>~^U^V^X-^K_
wwv
Mrs. Frances Rubin
' Now Residing at the Delano Hotel
Honorary President
of
Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood
and Community Worker
Mot wisnine fe eerioo> saye
Takes fnis means of expressing
Her Sincere Coed Wishes fe All
for
VERY HAPPY, HEALTHY and PROSPEROUS
HEW YIAR
Branch 692 Workmen's Circle of
Miami Beaeh
extending its best wishes to its members, friends and all
Jewrya Happy, Healthy and Prosperous New Year.
isnsn .T31B nw1? Joseph Birnbaum; Secy.
MRS. IDA JACOBS POWELL
PRESIDENT OF PIONEER WOMEN'S ORGANIZATION ClUR NO. 2
I Irene's Cretfines fe Ail Her Members oad Friends
far a Very Haear New Yoar
GREATER MIAMI COUNCIL
OF PIONEER WOMEN
EXTENDS GREETINGS TO ALL GREATER MIAMI JEWRY
MRS. FRED SANOLER. President I
Club I..........................................Mrs. S. WUensky. president ,
Club II ........................................Mrs. Barnoti Powell, president
Golda Myerson Club ..............Mrs. Oscar Zeltzer. president
Kadimah Chapter .....................Mrs. Moses Meyer, president '
Coral Gables Chapter..............Mrs. Milton Green, president I
Tikvah Club ..............................Mrs. S. Seeman, president
Beba Idelson Club....................Mrs. Jacob Cosow. president
.
1





-<'
K
*'. 1" 1

I
?
v
.


Page 12 B
+Jewisiincr*0aun
i i
GKtlTINGS:
May I take this opportunity of extending very
beet wishes for the New Year to each and every
one of you !
As Chairman of the State of Israel Bond Organisa-
tion in Miami, I am most grateful for the cooperation
received during the past year with the sale of the
new Development Issue in this area.
I hope that those of you who have not as yet made
their purchase will contact me as soon as they can
in the New Year.
And those who have purchased your bonds: I
need your help in securing new investors in the State
of Israel so that Greater Miami will top its objective
of SI. 125.000 for this year.
May good health and prosperity be your reward
in the New Year.
tfr-Vi

JACOB SHER
Greater Miami Chairman
State of Israel Bonds

THE GREATER MIAMI WOMEN'S AUXILIARY
TO THE JEWISH HOME FOR THE AGED
Ixlends Joyoui New Tear Greetings 7o 4// Their Members end friendt
MRS. SOI SI1VERMAN, President
Temple Beth Sholom
"The Liberal Congregation M ffe* teach"
Affiliated with the Union of American Hebrew Congregation!
F CHASI AVENUI ot 41st STRUT MIAMI BEACH
M HAY THAT OUR HtW HOUSE OE PEACE Ml HMA10
A MEW [KA Of PEACE fOR HUMANITY
To Our Members and Eriends of the Greater Miami Jewish Community
OUR SINCERE WISHES EOR THE NEW TEAR
TIFERETH ISRAEL NORTHSIDE CENTER and its SISTERHOOD
Robbi Abraham Herson
Marshall H. Comis
President of Congregation
Contor Albert Glanti
Mrs. M. Eisenberq
President of Sisterhood
SOL GOLDMAN
EXTENDS HIS BEST WISHES FOR A
HAPPY, HEALTHFUL AND CONSTRUCTIVE HEW TEAR
To the Officers. Directors and Staff of the
BUREAU OF JEWISH EDUCATION and the
GREATER MIAMI JEWISH FEDERATION;
To the Rabbis and Jewish Teachers and to the many friends
of Jewish Education throughout Greater Miami
TMI RABBI, THE OfFKEIS AND MEMBERS
f the
MontieMo Park Congregation
anno usi mms rot mi new tear to the entire mrnn community
JStt******
MIAMI'S JEWISH ORGANIZATIONS EXTEND BE[jj
It Is Our Earnest Hope and Prayer that the
New Year 5718 Will Mark a Period of Good
Will and Understanding in America and
[f Throughout the World.
FLORIDA REGION
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
OF CHRISTIANS AND JEWS
M. J. KARL, Regional Director
THE COM6WED JEWISH APKAl
MEATEft MIAMI'S KESKXSf TO Hfl WtttK OF JEMW U -CVWYWlttE
AMOUNTS RAISE0_*l9-7
itfow
1933
MO
tcHt
1942
1941
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
t949
I960
19SI
!9S2
1963
1954
1955
13S6
1957
?92,745. N u
92,245.
121371.
115.239. -.
140,070.
242,540.
365,206.
..ft:*..****/
990.000. v _
829,000.
Maun
1,100,000.
I" 1,200,573. f
1,201,608.
1,158,244. '
MM 1,217,841.
It. 150.850. ^
**m 1,251,000.
\<
1,525.0
Chart shows progress of Combined Jewish CJA. Note $1,485,000 total for 1948-f
Appeal since first campaign in 1939. This newly-established State of Israel was i
year's total approaches $1,800,000 and may ed by Arab League armiesin idol
surpass it before official launching of 1958 1947 and 1949 figures, both of which it|
Miami's Central Planning Agei
Continued from Pag* 2 B
the growth of our Combined Jewish Appeal since
the year of its organization in 1939 indicates a
really remarkable achievement from the $82,743
raised in 1939 to the $1,800,000 which will be rais-
ed in 1957.
When 1 was campaign chairman in 1954, we
raised $1,150,000 and we jumped from 7,000 to
9.000 contributors. Under the leadership of the sub-
sequent chairmen. Sam J. Heiman and then John
Serbin. we have in 1957 almost 12.000 contributors,
and. as 1 stated before, close to or more than $1,-
800.000.
However, as wonderful as these increase* may
be. they have still not kept pace with the tremen-
dous forward spurt which our community experi-
enced in the last 20 yearsin the growth of pop-
ulation; in the development of our Jewish commun-
Ity; in our economic growth: in our importance as
a wonderful metropolis. Creator Miami, in h
not to-distant future, will have more than 1,000,000
population. AlthouKh we have had no census taxes
of the Jewish population for some years, we can
estimate our present population to be upward of
70.000. and we shall soon be a Jewish community
of more than 100.000.
I believe that a realistic achievement in fund-
raising should be a minimum of 15.000 contributors
and more than S2.000.000 in funds raised. This is
not simply a former campaign chairman's ambitious
campaign goal. Vjut rather a realistic and sober ap-
praisal of the minimum amount that will have to
be raised if Miami Jewry is to begis to meet its
responsibilities in comparison with her sister com-
munities to the national, overseas, and local causes
which the Jewish community should and must sup-
port.
UUITH rapid growth come unusual dema
facilities which are provided by the i
supported by Federation. These include I
facilities and health services provided by Hi
the Home for the Aged, leisure time activita]
youth services provided by the Jewish Cei
vices of the Bureau of Jewish Educatiat,]
tional services, and child care and family I
as well as problems in community rela
civic defense work, which are the concern I
cies like the Anti-Defamation League, the I
can Jewish Committee and the American!
Congress.
How to plan with the other agencies!
viding the best possible services and in makaj
that every dollar raised is spent wisely a(
major function of Federation. This is our|
community planning.
It was through community planning. I
the leadership of the agencii concerned.I
Bureau of Jewish Education .<- establish
ago. and that this year, we sponsored the l
Jewish education conducted by the Amen'-
of Jewish Education. The recommcndationil
study will be received shortly, and they r
form the basis for a rational, ordered*
guide-posts for our handling of the
needs and problems in Jewish education)
community.
It was through community planmnjj
decision was reached to build a new Mt..
pital. and it was through constant consults
the help of Federation staff that Ml. SinsJ
barked on the $7 million Development -
of which has already been raised through thi
Gifts Group, and the other half of which
raised in the year ahead in the Jewish and f
community.
It is through the process of coinmunifl
Atuy the Hew Year mJier in the
Mesii.nic era el j.tfice, freedom,
human tvu.lify, i*d world pc.ct.
KAMI DAVID SHAPIRO
SfT*OUi MANN, rV.,Urt
*4 Office,, IntI, Mrf
TEMPLE SINAI
Tin it wish mmmn cum*
Of N0UYW00D, FLORIDA
MRS. ISRAEL GOLDBERG
President of
CHESED
SHEL EMESS
her Officers and
Roard of Directora
extend to their members
and many frienda
bst wishes for a
Happy New Year
The Officer*, the Board of Directors. theSK
the Students and Affiliate Groups
THE HEBREW ACADEMY
Extend a Happy New Year
to the
Greater Miami Jewish Community
B.LMNMI
***$##,
a*t
_ MNMMfN Affft
tot!**, Seirew Atmdtmi *?***


L September 27, 1957
_+JewisfincrMton
Page I3B
EXTEND CREEK
. Federation is setting up a study wtth the
.Community Center leadership, whereby
f nxt year we sha" re-examine the scope of
L,er\s services and develop better under-
i of the areas in which the Center should
I its services and where the priorities may be.
A Central Organisation
(UNITY planning means cooperation among
Sinai Hospital, Jewish Home for the Aged,
^deration, in undertaking a study of the
of the chronically ill* and the best ways
in our Jewish community can meet them
i the services of the existing agencies, and
better and more effective joint planning
brimming.
Lwhere i" this section there are discussions
tership <>f our agencies of their programs
ecially of the problems that lie ahead. I
at those he read carefully. They demon-
kw our community has grown and how our
[have tried to meet the constant challenge
i and improved services. They also reflect
in which we have fortunately learned to
pd plan together so that ultimately our peo-
better served, and the dollars raised are
itork where they can do the most good.
|j. then, in essence, is the major function of
pity planning, in which Federation will have
|in increa.-mgly effective role in the coming
leration is also the central organization for
lan 60 of our local organizations, our syna-
Lour fraternal organizations, our community
(agencies, our civic defense agencies. In
Organizations covering all aspects of Jewish
pal lifereligious, cultural, philanthropic,
Ml. health and welfare.
Icause of tin- central position ( Federation
Ih it represents the totality of our organized
(community. Federation has been called up-
! more active interest and service In the
I welfare of our Jewish community.
I me briefly cite a few examples of these
they will affect future directions:
Ith the cooperation of the Greater Miami
teal Assn. and the Women's Auxiliary of Mt.
hospital, Federation established this year a
Incy program to offer spiritual comfort to
s who have no temple or synagogue affilia-
On an experimental basis, this program is
arried on at Ml. Sinai and Jackson Memorial
lls. Federation's community planning com-
|ha> been charged with the responsibility of
Tug the program and presenting recommen-
I as to its future status.
Critical Developments Overseas
(operation with Anti-Defamation League,
[mean Jewish Committee, Jewish Labor
*e, and other community relations agen-
ideralion has been instrumental in the for-
(of a joint advisory committee on religion in
[schools.
[quick response to the Mid-Fast crisis which
I >n October of last year. Federation organ-
Icommittc,. on the Mid-East crisis in close
fion with the Zionist Council, as well as
0,her urbanizations. This committee met
p as a clearing house for organizational
Fand programs with respect to the critical
Iments overseas,
h* request of the Zionist Council, the board
of governors of Federation authorized the establish-
ment of a community-wide committee for dear-
th""?. .T^""0" f commu"y Programs
wh.ch will be carried on next year in observance of
Israel s tenth year of independence.
The staff and other resources of Federation
have been at the service of organizations who
brought forward series of problems ranging from
fund-raising to programming. Federation has thus
been helpful to Hillel Foundation in its re-assess-
ment of its organization and programs serving the
students of the University of Miami.
In response to the prqbjeni 6f the multiplicity
of appeals. Federation was^nsTruflMilirl It, tni^es-
?ablishment of the Contributors Appeals Council.
In May, some 100 community leaders met to survey
the local situation. Today Carl Weinkle heads the
Appeals Council, which will try to develop a pro-
gram for orderly review of fund appeals and for the
better coordination and control of the multiplicity
of drives which reach our community each year for
a variety of causes.
A most significant development affecting the
welfare of our community, and in which Federation
is taking an increasingly important role, has been
the establishment of the United Fund. The execu-
tive committee of Federation has gone on record
endorsing the principle of United Fund and in urg-
ing members of the Jewish community to give of
their time and effort and resources in assuring its
success.
Three of our Jewish local agenciesthe Jewish
Family Service, Jewish Community Center and the
Jewish Home for the Agedwill be members of
the United Fund. At the present writing Federa-
tion and the leadership of the agencies concerned
are meeting with the leadership of the United Fund
to work out lines of cooperation and to clarify prob-
lems for the benefit of the United Fund as well as
Federationbut even more importantly, for the
benefit of the agencies supported by the United
Continued on Page IS B
Research to explore unknown and alleviate
man's ills goes forward at Mt. Sinai Hospital,
non-sectarian facility supported by Greater
Miami Jewish Federation.
EMPLE JUDEA OF CORAL GABLES
Extends its Blessings
80 Advent of our Religious New Year
5718
'UGlfR-GAANADA JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
'* *r happy miw tea* re au its
50 N.W. 51st P1ACI
AUMBMS MM FRIEND$
RABBI MRS. LEO HEIM end See
ef the
Jialeah-Miami Springs Jewish Center
.!.. ",th" "Mr CeM.ee.es, Nehrew Teachers,
' '""it mmi mtmkm at the Ce-ere.eti.n far a
""r. SeelwV ami rVeeeecee* Mew rear
RABBI and MRS.
SAMUEL LERER
Wish lor all Jewry and particu-
larly the members and officers
of Temple Beth Sholem,
Hollywood,
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS
NEW YEAR
RABBI and MRS.
DAVID SHAPIRO
Extend Best Wishes for a
HAPPY NEW YEAR
to the members oi
TEMPLE SINAI
The Jewish Community Center
Hollywood. Florida
sad to All Jewry
The American Friends of the
Hebrew University
of Jerusalem
i^nsn nans nz&H
940 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach
MR. and MRS. NATHAN H. SPIEGELMAN
*ion-~ -" |M r.n r- -iju 4if) g #'''11 'r'f\t MiUfi
and Children, Bob and Linda, Max, Fred and Guy
Wish All Their Relatives ana' Friend's A Happy and Prosperous New Tear
;
Oar Sinctresf Wishes To All 01 Oar Friend's ant Te All Isrmtl
for A Happy New Yaar
RABBI DR. and MRS. M. J. SAFRA and FAMILY
MIAMI BEACH


THE SPINOZA OUTDOOR FORUM
124 11th STREET, MIAMI BEACH
DR. ABRAHAM WOLFSON, Chairman
Ixtaais fe All
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
Best Wishes lor Happy an*" Prosperous New Tear
te All Oar Members and Friends tram
GOLDEN AGE FRIENDSHIP CLUB
of Greater Miami Jewish Community Center
1536 BAY ROAD
MIAMI BEACH
The Sisterhood
oi
Congregation Beth Ttilah
EXTENDS TO ITS
MEMBERS, FRIENDS AND THEIR FAMILIES
BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
Mrs. Rachel Katz, President
Mi
"4i
i*
..
HADASSAH
Extends te fhe
ENTIRE JEWISH COMMUNITY
Best Wishes lor Happy, Healthy end Prosperous New Yamr
THE MIAMI BEACH CHAPTER THE MIAMI CHAPTER
Mrs. Joseph Shapiro, President Mrs. Irwin liss. President
CREETfNCS TO All
NORMAN BRUCE BROWN AUXILIARY
NO. 174 JEWISH WAR VETERANS
The Jewish Home For the Aged
151 N.E. 52nd STREET
Extends Best Wishes
for the Mew Year
te the Entire Jewish Community
'
1
i *
Br. Tfter H. Stars Center Beatrice BsMBJsl
L'SHONO 70VA TIKESEVU
GongAeyatioit Reih %aco&
Extent's te its Members end Friends and to All Jewry
BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
DAVID WHITMAN, President
"And the lord Shell By Kin* Over AH The Eerth. fn bet Day
Shell the lord Be One and Nis Name One"


Page 14B
f-Jewish ftcrHlar
l^******
ill
The Rabbi, Cantor, Officers, Members I Sisterhood of
KNESETH ISRAEL CONGREGATION
1415 Euclid Avenue
Miami Beach
v | J Extend Best Wishes for
*p A HAPPY AND HEALTHFUL MEW YEAR
RABBI DAVID LEHRFIUD CANTOR ABRAHAM SF.IF
LOUIS DUBLIN, President
y -MRS. FRANCES ULllAfJ, Slsterhfd President
REGISTER YOUR CHILD NOW IN OUR HEBREW SCHOOL
Wfffln *tni*** nwfry
A Happy and Prosperous
New Year
\ North Shore Jewish Center
\ Sisterhood
620 75th Street
Miami Beach, Florida
\
\
i
Men's Club
P.T.A.
Young Marrieds
Friendship Club
USY
,_i>. sw
THE OFFICERS and DIRECTORS of
Congregation Beth Tfilah
935 EUCLID AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH
Extend To All its Members Friends and Worshippers,
I Best Wishes for a Very Happy, Healthy
and Prosperous New Year
RABBI JOSEPH E. RACKOVSKT ISIDOR H. KRAMER, Pr.iaeBt
Bikur Cholem Kosher Convalescent
Um, Home of Greater Miami
$
MRS. ISIDORE COHEN. President and OFFICERS
Extend Greetings and Beet Wishes for the New Year
to All Their Members and Friends
Happy New Year To Our
Members and Friends
Golden Age Friendship Club
MIAMI JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
TOWN BRANCH
MIDI'S JEWISH DRGAWIZATIONS EXTEND m

Jewish Family Service includes these top pro-
fessional staff workers (left to right): Donald
S. Block, director of Jewish Vocational Work-
shop, MA degree in clinical psychology from
George Washington University, most recent-
ly officer in U.S. Navy, previously with Spring
Grove State Hospital in Maryland; Seymour
Siegel, supervisor of Department of Services
for Aged of Jewish Family Service, Master
of Social Work degree from University of
Pennsylvania, previously assistant super-
visor with JFS for three years and Assn. of
Jewish Children in Philadelphia; Mrs. Rhoda
Albert, child placement caseworker
of Social Work degree from School dU
Work at Columbia University, coming,
from Jewish Youth Service of Brooklyn;,
Ivan H. Cohen, family counselor and i
man of special Welfare Planning
committee concerned with disturbed",
ren, Master of Science degree from Cola-
University's New York School of Social W|
previously with Linden Hill School
thorn, N.Y., where he was assistant i
supervisor.
Wide Horizons of Family Sei
Continued from Page 7 B
growth and ferment of the Miami scene and else-
where. We have the strongest sense that we are
on the threshold of new and improved forms and
concepts of service. I could not begin to list all
the indications of this, but some require mention.
T his year a United Fund was created, and Jewish
Family Service has become a member of the Fund.
We joined with other Federation agencies to
consider how the Jewish agencies would be inter-
related with the Fund. This year Metropolitan
Government came into being and members of our
board and staff assumed major responsibility in
forming up the organization and ordinances of the
Departments of Hospitals and Welfare. The sur-
vey of family and child care services being con-
ducted by the Welfare Planning Council of Dade
County was very busy in the private agency area,
with visits being made to our agency by study com-
mittees and with active participation by three of
our board in similar committees. Our executive
contributed his consultative help to the Geriatrics
Clinic at Jackson Memorial Hospital and to other
community projects. We laid plans for the en-
largement of our Sheltered Workshop, applying for
a grant from United Help, a national organization
distributing restitution funds.
Response to Need
IJNDOUBTEDLY the most dramatic event of the
past year was the Hungarian affair, where in
a few short weeks we all saw the explosion of revolt
and the exodus of refugees with our own commun-
ity sharing so directly in the work of rescue. Fed-
eration responded vigorously, making it possible
for Jewish Family Service to receive more than 35
families between November, 1956 and Mar*,|
Our long experience in immigrant cart
clear cooperative relations between our
agencies,.especially Mt. Sinai Hospital and I
tional Council of Jewish Women, enabled ust
cept and handle this emergency without did
We are not inclined so much "to look I
future" as to anticipate* it. In our "age of i
we do not expect any lessening in persouTj
sions and problems of family adjustment, I
see our duty clear to respond to need and. a|
as we are able, to prevent problems. So wf
tinue to urge new or improved services. Ini
ing we also report on current inadequacies, 11
mal, effectively organized program of Familyf
Education, group education on family matte
needed. So is a homemaker service, to stn
and hold together the family disrupted by I
or death. We have requested funds to den
small treatment home for disturbed childresj
for the placement of a few children in
treatment institutions. An experimental
integrate psychiatric and casework treatn
also been suggested.
As I said at the outset it is the professioadj
iber of the agency, its adherence to fine i
of practice, which gives Jewish Family
any social agency, its unique usefulness. Out!
standards are attested to by our memberships
Family Service Assn. of America and the -
Occupational Council, and our accreditation I
American Psychological Assn and the w
Vocational Guidance Assn. We have submit
application for membership in the Child
League of America and will be studied by I
ganization at the end of this year.
ORAH CHAPTER
of the
MIZRACHI WOMEN'S
ORGANIZATION
WKHK TO EXTfNO THEM NEW YtU
CMiTINCS TO /Sit THF-a MAMIES
AHO FRIENDS AND JEWtT
miTM-HEM
MM. IRENE MILIEU, President
The Sisterhood
i
Temple Beth
Sholom
fxtea* lf mam
f Mr*
Jewish CommMjfy
' rfct year ekemd
THE RABBI and BOARD OF DIRECTORS of
TEMPLE ZION
Extend Best Wishes for a Happy New Yea
to Their Members and the Entire Jewish CemaM
OUR SINCERE WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW TEAR
The Hebrew Teachers Ass**
of Greater Miami
jatioi
ilk


Llpfrmber27.i9SX
*Jm*#TfkrHften
Page 15B
||'S JEWISH NIZITIOliS EXTEND GREETINGS
li's Central Planning Agency
Continue from Peee 13 B
L federation, and in behalf of the thousands
tie who are served by these causes.
Lterestetl. intelligent and alert leadership is
Tjj, evcry phase of community endeavor. Fed-
, bas recognized its responsibility to help
, new leadershipnot only for the specific
-jTJIonc under Federation'sauspices, but
fphases of agency and organizational service.
|L this direction have been the educational in-
0f the Women's Division, the organization
i Young Executive Seminar, and the estab-
i (his year of the Presidents' Award.
rt award, which will go to the two young
t women who have distinguished themselves
pmunity service, will carry an award of an
j*.paid trip to the General Assembly of the
fcl of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds
Kiuld to stimulate greater participation on
: of our younger leadership in community
A Summation
IE is no question but that the manifold
itivities of our committeesthe budget com-
fc, community planning committee, campaign
[itieesserve as excellent educational experi-
(for an increasing number of potential as well
Lve leaders.
Ihth the constant expansion of our community,
springing up almost over night of new
nities with their specific needs and prob-
land also potential for participation in the
I community, we have begun to give serious
lion to the strengthening of our outlying areas
i tying them more closely to the work of the
ill community.
ft have carried our campaign into most o/, the
Wipalities in Dade county. This year the
live committee of Federation authorized the
pyment of a full time staff member for the
i of (developing the campaigns in the vari-
Jntlying communities and in helping them with
(community organization problems.
ere is much to be done in the development
of the new areas, and this should be rated as high-
est priority for Federation attention and activity.
This then is a review of the scope of Federa-
tion s interests and activity and some projection
of its work Inthe year ahead.
It is Importantvery importantthat we rec-
ogniz4lnt the job of Federation Js not that f one
man or even that of one group of men and women.
The work of Federation is carried on by thousands
who contribute to it, hundreds of volunteer cam-
paigners, and also hundreds of men and women
who serve on the board of governors, on the various
committees, and who are members and leaders of
our various agencies. These men and women, in
the final analysis, determine what kind of a com-
munity we are to have and how it is to respond to
the needs of its citizens.
The ongoing 365-day-a-year job of Federation
requires the best of staff that our community can
afford. No agency, no program of service, can long
operate without competent staff to carry out the
policy of voluntary leadership, and to give guidance
to the day to day work of its many-fold program
of service.
In one word. Federation must represent the
effective team work of professional staff, volunteer
leadership and community participation and in-
terest. It is my conviction that Federation through
its achievements has been able to demonstrate that
such team work is possible and that it works. It
is my hope on the threshold of the New Year that
the Jewish community of Greater Miami will in an
ever-increasing degree participate actively in the
fund-raising, community planning, and community
service of Federation and its agencies. This we
shall do for the continued growth and strengthen-
ing of our organized Jewish communal life and for
the benefit of our entire communityand especial-
ly of the men, women and children who call our
community their home.
Miami's Hadassah
Continued from Pago 9 B
[American Jewish woman be identified with
*h. To meet the exigency of these times,
w planned an all-out membership campaign
i starts Oct. 21. We will culminate our cam-
Ion Feb. 3, 1958, with a gala membership cele-
k at the Miami Beach auditorium.
prt of the elaborate program for that day will
"Israeli Fashion Show." The gowns that will
deled have all been designed and made by
fouth Aliyah children in Hadassahs own Vo-
I School. The cost of admissionyour paid-
pmbership card. To give our membership and
en a better understanding of how to proceed,
J*r to meet our goals, we are presenting a
Conference on Mondav, Oct. 7, at the
F* hotel.
^ is the earnest prayer of the Miami Beach
Mf Hadassah that this be a year of peace.
Graduation exercises "Today, with 30
Jewish schools in Dade county, the Bureau is
still staffed with two professionals facing al-
most impossible demands." Bureau receives
operating assistance from Federation funds.
SHOLEM LODGE
B'NA! B'RITH OF MIAMI
ITS OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS
Extend to Their Members and
Jewry Everywhere
kst Wishes for a Most Happy. Healthy
and Prosperous New Year!
HARRY S. SCHWARTZ, President
__..., _.,,,;,
i>i -* i rwiH ) i-- .
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
YIVO INSTITUTE
for JEWISH RESEARCH
E. Lesowoder, President
Dr. J. Sherman, Vice President
Morris Honigbaum, Treasurer
B. Morrison, Secretary
FLA. WOMEN'S DIVISION
American Jewish
Congress
Wishes H members
A Hmppy, Health? **
trepserous New Yemr
lOUtSE BRANDEIS CHAPTEt
MIAMI CHAPTEt
SOUTH FLORIDA COUNCIL
DAM MEN'S CHAPTER
AGUDATH ISRAEL HEBREW
INSTITUTE
7101 CARtYLE AVENUE MIAMI BEACH
won naio mvr?
T we herewith extend our best withes tT"
te our beloved founder and SpiritI leader
RABBI DR. ISAAC HIRSH EVER and HIS FAMILY
Officers, Director, Members, Sttterbtod Oftjotfltinioitr Seat Holders,
s well as to ail our well-wishers in Greater Miami
MAY THt NEW ft Alt BRING THE REALIZATION OF ALL OUR HOPES,
comnm redemption to our people
.*" end a |V?V
SOLUTION TO AFFUCTED HUMANITY ~
SAMUEL A. FELDMAN, President
SISTERHOOD OF AGUDATH ISRAEL "*"""
MRS. HENRY GROUDAN, President
LORBER CHAPTER
JEWISH NATIONAL HOME FOR ^Wffi
ASTHMATIC CHILDREN AT DENVER
Extends Best Wishes To All
A Happy and Prosperous New Year to All
NORTH SHORE JEWISH CENTER SISTERHOOD

*
The Officers and Members ol the
HIAIEAH MIAMI SPRINGS JEWISH CENTER,
SISTERHOOD and MEN'S CLUB
Extend best wishes for the New Year
to the entire Jewish Community

Rabbi Simon April. Cantor Berele Kelemer
the Sisterhood, the Men's Club and the entire Membership of the
Miami Hebrew Congregation
Extend to All Best Wishes for a Happy New Year
-
THE BIALIK BRANCH of the LABOR ZIONIST FARBAND
Wish All Members and friends a Happy and Prosperous New Year
J. Z. Stadian, Chairman Max Astor and A. Liebman, Secretaries
A Mast Joyous, Peaceful New Year to All Miirachi Women,
their families and the enfire Jewish Community
Mizrachi Women's OrganizationMiami Beach Chapter
MRS. I. B. EISENSTEIN, President

1
I 1
?
'
1
.
.

1

THE JEWISH NATIONAL WORKERS' ALLIANCE
BEN GURION BRANCH NO. 304
Wishes the Jews and Chaverim All Over Ihe World A Happy New Year 1
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
I. FORMAN, President M. FREIDLIN, Secretary
Sincere New Year Greetings te The Jewish fhrldimn end the Enfire Communify
National Women's Committee of Brandeis University
Greater Miami Chapter
MRS. SIDNEY M. SCHWARTZ, President
NORTH DADE JEWISH CENTER and AUXILIARIES
EXTEND NAPPY NEW YfA* GREETINGS TO ALL THEIR fMtNDS AND NEIGHBORS
13*30 WEST DIXIE HIGHWAY


Page 16 B
+Jewish fhrkUain
sSSgJSS**.!

1
TOGETHER WE BUILD our Jewish Community
BUILDING
DEMOCRACY
5718
r,"'rn
The Officers and Board Mei
of
GREATER MIAMI JEWISH FEDERAT
and it a member community merviee aqt
III RE Al OF JEWISH I IM < \1
SOL GOLDMAN, I
LOUIS SCHWARTZMAN,
JEWISH FAMILY Nlltvi
ALVIN CASSEL
ALBERT COMANOR,
MT. SINAI IIOSPI
. max orovitz.
samuel gertner.
JEWISH HOME FOR Till- At
ABE KURMAN.
MAURICE PEARLSTEIN,
SERVICE TO NEW AMERICA
National < on mi I of .low ish Wi
MRS. JEAN C. LEHMAN.
MISS MINNIE FEINBERG,
RAROX DE HIRSCH LOAN 111
ALBERT QUADOW,
GREATER MIAMI JEWISH I OMM1 M IA CEff
MRS. MILTON SIRIIN,
BUILDING EFRAIM GALE.
OUR
YOUTH
Ai
BUILDING
FOR
HEALTH
the 60 national and
affiliated organ*
serving you and your cor
extend their Bent W]
tor a Year ot Peare. Health and Happi
Greater Miami Jewish Federatioi



hat 'Holy' Means in the Holy Days
i i
fries lor the Hew fear
jom raker
(plumbing
SERVICE
1240 Burlington
Phone
MU 1-3862
Opa-Locka, Fla.
T
\eu> Tfdr Greetings
[RANSONE'S
URSERY and FLORIST
>331 N.W. 79th Street
Phone PL 9-5461
biscus 3 for $1.00
for All Occasions
OPEN 8 to 8
I Daily and Sunday
I Wishes for ihe \ew "Year
I SUNLIGHT SCHOOL
BEAUTY CULTURE
i Culture a Vocation of
ness and Independence
D. A. Julius, Pres.
Phone FR 4-9998
pl 1 N.W. 2nd Avenue
Miami
Wishes |, the ^eitf T,ar *
1L EVANS'
'> futility
Cleaners
|* Ni 59th Street
ftone PL 9-2324
|*es for the New rear
GENTRY
PUJMBING
COMPANY
*** 22nd Avtnsjo
J* 4-3975
i^J^wiisltUEIIiOiciidPlaun
Mipmi, Florida, Friday, September 27, 1957
Section C
Mi
*** Florida
Identification With Life Rather
Than Withdrawal is Mark of Piety
By RABBI SAMUEL M. SILVER
rl High Holy Days are a good time to seek un-
derstanding of what Judaism means by
"holy."
The word is used very frequently. Like so
many words from the religious lexicon it has even
found its way into colloquialisms.
To many people something that is holy is
something that is separated from the phenomena
of normal living. A holy object must be treated
with special veneration. It must be kept in a par-
ticular place. It must be handled gingerly. I
must be displayed only on solemn occasions. It is
somehow detached from our regular, day to-day
experiences.
So it is with the High Holy Days. They are a
period apart from the rest of the year, in the opin-
ion of many. They represent a peak in the year.
We ascend and then descend. During this season
we deviate from our normal habitat, worshipping
at length, and in general wrenching ourselves loose
from our conventional regimen.
This extraordinary posture of what we think
is piety is in keeping with a popular conception of
what holiness implies.
It would be well, therefore, for us to use this
period of contemplation to discover, once and for
all, that the idea of holiness outlined above is not
a Jewish one.
In Judaism holiness is not measured by the
degree to which you remove yourself from life. It
is determined by what you do in the very thick of
your daily life.
In Judaism sacred vessels are treated with
respect, but not with awe. They are net objects
Continued on Page 12 C
Best Wishes for the Mew Year
Day Phone
PL 4-6031
Nite Phone
PL 1-6408
JIMMIE
REYNOLDS
PLUMBING
CONTRACTOR
12047 W. Dixie Hwy.
Miami, Florida
'Hew Year Greetings
CROW'S
AMOCO
STATION
24-Hour Road Service
Phones FR 9-9195 FR 44184
1660 W. Flaaler Street
Best Wishes for A Happy >iew Year
FREEMAN
CARRfJRETOR
AMD-
ELECTRIC
3501 N.W. 7th Avenue
, Phone FR 4-5515
Miami
Best Wishes for A Happy Mew Tear
KELLY'S
NURSERY
2950 N.W. 132nd Terrace
Miami
Phone MU 8-6461
Best Wishes for the New You
TROPICAL
PLUMBING.
mc
247 Almefia
Avenue
Card Gables,
Florida
Phone
HI 4-1056



h

?*
'


Page 2C
9Jenistfhrkltan
I^L^^p
Best Wishes for a Ho.\*y Kew Year
LEES DINETTE CENTER
Wrought Iron Dinette Sots Coffeo Tables Lamps Chin* Closets
Picturei Novelties W* Speclallie In Custom Work
6231 S.W. 8th Street
MOhawk 7-4459
TO ALL GREETINGS .
PAN AMERICAN BRUSH, PAINT A JANITORS' SUPPLIES
Paint Brushes Household Brushes "Pan American Brooms"
241 W. Flagler Street Phone FR 1-5084
Best Wishes for a Happy New Year .
IAUMGARDNER AUTO TAG AGENCY, INC.
1375 N.W. 36th Street Maori 42. Florida
NE 5-1082 Phones NE 5-2S23
Best Wishes for a Happy New Year ...
MR. AND MRS. MAX W. TEMCHIN
NEW YEAR GREETINGS .
FRIENDLY PAINT STORES INC.
WI 7-5323 16503 NX 6th Avenue
BEST WISHES FOR THE NEW YEAR
HIALEAH SPEEDWAY
STOCK CAR RACES EVERY SATURDAY N1TE
To All... Hapny New Year
A. S. JONSON LABS.. INC
PLASTIC EYES. PLASTIC EARMOLDS. SMALL PLASTIC
OBJECTS COSMETIC DENTISTRY (Plastic. Gold. Steel)
Pacific Building phone FR A.IMb

TO All... HAPPY HOLIDAYS
ART MART
PLASTIC SIGNS
ELECTRIFIED PLASTIC SIGNS
((Plenty of Parking)
6315 N.E. 2nd Ave.
"Art Mart"
Phone PL 9-6788
To All... A Most Happy Pew Yeor
SUN PLASTICS
JOSEPH and MAURICE CEASAROTTI
PLASTIC and METAL SIGNS and LETTERS
(Wholesale)
1042 N.E. 29th St.
TW 7-2596
SEASON'S MEETINGS TO All...
SERIGRAPH CORPORATION
DECALS. POSTERS. BUMPER STRIPS.
WWDOW DISPLAYS
2141 N. Miami Awe.
ftmtR 1-3366
Rosh Hashona in Today's Woi
By DR. HELEN HIRSCH
OUR life is a pilgrimage and on New Year's day
we stand at the cross-roads. These are pro-
foundly serious days of introspection stressing the
feeling of the high responsibility which life puts on
all of us.
Neither Rosh Hashona nor Yom Kippur has
any relation to nature nor to any historic event in
the past. They are only concerned with the life of
the individual, with his religious feelings and his
problems.
The solemn season of the High Holy Days be-
gins and ends with the shrill blasts of the shofar,
symbolizing the achievments and struggle of the
past and the promise of happiness in the days to
come. Behind us lies an old year, and all unknown
before us, veiled in uncertainty, is the new, one.
Bow can we better our course in the comtats rear
than on the eternal reed of our Tot-in whose "ways
are ways of pleasantness and all its paths are
peace?"
Prayer for Life
fJUHIN praying fervently for the great gift of
life, we think over the chapter we have fin-
ished and our thoughts unfailingly turn to the new
one about to begin in the great book of Hie and
forcefully revert to the book's fateful last page.
The theme of our New Year is a complex one,
but since the destruction of the second Temple, its
main meaning and stern admonition has always
been "penitence." It is a Day of Judgment (Yom
Hadin) and a Day of Memory (Yom Hazikoron). It
is the day in which we are judged in heaven, when
we are exhorted to ponder on the past, the fleeting
present and an uncertain future before us.
This is the stern lesson of the High Holidays;
when praying for the great gift of life, we are
told to take stock and ponder over life's signifi-
cance. Each year, we pass a milestone on our road,
and each year, on this solemn day, we are bidden
to remember the end of our journey. We are re-
minded to renounce the material for the spiritual
and we look up imploringly to the finger post for
direction. How shall we invest the great fortune-
lifeGod has given us?
A Par.hie
^MRBB brothers had inherited a vast fortune
from their parents. And when the legacy
was divided among them, each chose his own way
of investment.
Artist's view of scene in a Spanish svnaqoaue
.s^BiiS.rssSho,ar u L ^
Xew Year Gteetm

GRAY'S
SERVICE
STATION
Shell Products
"GENERAL REPAIRS"
NTS RE. 2nd Awanue
Phone FR 1-9513
Michael Gray, Prop.
Hew Yetr Grating.
GATIGNY
SUNOCO SERVICE STATION
Tires Accessories Batteries
GOOD LUBRICATION
801 N.W. 119th Stow*
Phone MU 8-9252
Jeph Useiof. Prop.

Shofar wilh open book containing ,
Blowing Shofar on Rosh Hashosn."
lions are specific on Tekiah.
Tsruah.
The eldest decided to put all hi* l
movable goods so that he could, at all i
pose of them and realize his securitiet
The second sought profit and securitjd
estate of which, so he thought, nobody m
him.
The youngest, however, spent all htas I
on learning, acquiring a store of knovk
tiringly cultivating his mind and heart.
Then war broke out, the country mi
and all property was confiscated. Onlj utd
est brother was able to make good ute t(|
siduously acquired knowledge for his on |
and for his two brothers who had become!
This old parable teaches us not to anus]
alone, for they may not always mean the i
sired security, but also to acquire those i
possessions which no power in the world, i
aster, can take from us.
We are living today in a materialist*,!
nological age where the sweatshops hawj
peared, where men have more leisure, i
ever, has brought to the fore a great
a panting greed, which threatens to
interest in our precious heritage of wisdom
in the study of the Torah's eternal precs)
the thoughtful, loving observance of oar I
High Holy Days with their deeply ddvig]
stirring rituals.
In our quick-living times, these dan 4
us to pause in our panting, exhausting11
material goods, to become introspective and*
our hesitant thoughts toward.- reflection!
olutions of an uncertain future. We app
New Year with a feeling of trepidation ii\
rors of the past loom large in our
science.
At this time of human destruction
has ceased to be of any value during the I
of persecutions and wars, we are stirred I
one great yearning: fervently we pray
Almighty to grant us the great gift of "li
our trembling lips move in a silent prayer "
us in the Book of Life, O Lord." At the sigbuj
Rreat sorrows and the many troubles
mankind in a world in constant upheaval i
brink of war, we cry to God Almighty to |
only one gift, the great gift of life.
Our strength and security in the f
and uncertainty shall be the knowledge W]
way of God Almighty is the way for Bj
in this direction, however distant the gor
Continued on Page 11 C
New Tear Greeting* '<> AH
LOMBARDOS Italian Restaurc
SPECIALIZING IN ITALIAN FOOD
Serving the Finest Pin* Pies Home-Made l"**"*
Chicken Caccietera Seer and N.Y. State Tar* *
4612 U Jaune Hood Phone MO W*31
Bern Wuket for a H.mj New Tr
MU 11561
The Lee Chalet Nursing Hoi*
The Nursint Heine with the Homey Am*****"
EVELYN S. COLMAN, Owner & W-
1150 N.W. 120th Srewt Miami 50. **


27. 1957
*Je*isf>ncrktk>r)
ilogue About Buildings of Future
Paq* 3C
By DR. ALFRRD W1RNRR
oung architect, with the ink still fresh on
Lj, diploma listened respectfully to hii aged
Le and employer, discussing on synagogue
.tlure-
built my first synagogue shortly after the
I ,|^ Korean War," the septuagenarian re-
your father must have become Bar Mittvah,
I in the same building, at least in one that
i very much like it. The synagogues of that
[had many common features; they were lo-
|ja residential suburbs, amidst trees, sur-
j by beautiful lawns, and the emphasis was
H, excellent accoustics, comfortable pews."
llhere much opposition to the new style on
1 of American Jewry?" trie young architect
curiously.
Jieie has always been, and there will always
Ifeifjty towards challenging new ideas, to-
MNtVenri "xpertmerrrv ftrthe'frfrles, many
strongly and sincerely resented the sim-
lor, as they would call it, 'nakedness' of the
loupes of worship. The huge, expensive, over-
ited 'showcases' built before the Great De-
fcn to resemble Egptian, Assyrian, or Moor-
(laces, or even Christian churches, were still
Some of them were no longer in use,
I congregation had moved into suburbia. But
ptiquated notion that a House of God must
Lily decorated and that simplicity was syn-
bus with poverty was still held by some
Bow odd! Were not the men and women of
tfties devoted to a style then called, I be
[functional? To judge by photographs, this
|generation that, for their homes, wanted big
-, gaily-colored walls, light simple furni-
Form and Function
their homes, yes. But there were some
| eld-timers'as old-fashioned as I must seem
i now, my young friendwho were reluctant
ply the slogan. 'Form follows Function,' to the
of wor>hip. who, in other words, found
bg absurd and illogical in Jewish temples
.adorned with gold and silver, supported by
Imarble columns, and dimly lit by stained
| windows, made you think you were in a
basilica Do you know, by the way, that
mlutionary demand that form must always
r a building's purpose and task, had first been
[by the son of a rabbi?"
did not know that. Wasn't that Dankmar
Ut He was burn in Germany and brought
! United Slates when still a child. Prior to
|eath in 1900. Adler designed many syna-
ehurches, theatres, and office buildings
: .Middle West. The great Frank Lloyd Wright
early days served an apprenticeship with
[and his partner, Louis Sullivan. But to come
our topic-it was most fortunate that, in
>ars after the Second World War, when Amer-
htnosed a tremendous religious revival and
building boom, there was no lack of some
|talented, very gifted young architects who
ded in making rabbis and trustees of syna-
itake advantage of twentieth century mater-
N techniques. They convinced them that
[was neither an 'everlasting' nor a 'typically
w >!, and that a temple, in order to be
Wate, had only to be in harmony with the
i of American Judaism. Whether a congre-
ss Orthodox. Conservative or Reform, the
M from large apertures was necessary so
American Jewish Committee's projected $1.-
500,000 Institute of Human Relations in New
York City. "Houses should be built fresh for
every generation ."
that the prayerbooks could be read without eye
strain, and good accoustics, so that the sermon
could be heard. Pews had to be comfortable and
arranged so that every congregant would observe
distinctly the ceremonies at and around the Aron
Kodesh."
"Please forgive me, if my question sounds
surprisedwas comfort all that was required? If I
remember correctly, my professors told us that
good old Vitruvius insisted that a building, in order
to be perfect, must have 'beauty,' in addition to
'utility' and 'strength.' The synagogues of your
timesome, I understand, are still standing, but I
have had no chance to see themmust have looked
very much like any better public building, devoid
of anything to distinguish them from a school, or
a library ."
Abstract Art Vo*u
lUflHAT you are now saying, my young friend,
was said by critical people forty or fifty
years ago. Even those in favor of a contemporary
style complained that some architects, in their
understandable objection to anything recalling the
old 'gingerbread' style, sometimes went too far in
their reaction: they replaced the overdecorated
stone boxes of the past with constructions of ce-
ment, steel, and glass so utterly devoid of orna-
ments as to be tedious taken in at a glance, they
did not call for second look. But I can assure you
that we architects were quick to realize that some-
thing important was missing: emotional content,
in accord with the building's purpose. We came
to the conclusion that a barely visible Star of Da-
vid or Menorah over the entrance, in a window, or
somewhere on the wall, was not enough. We de-
cided to call upon painters, sculptors, mosaicists
Continued on Paso 13 C
Best Wishes for a Hy>.v Nw Tear
DUFFY'S IRON PRODUCTS
CUSTOM FURNITURE ROOM DIVIDERS
ANYTHING IN WROUGHT IRON
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PHONE FR 4-2626
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as to the condition of title.
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I. D. MacVICAR
President
FRANK J. WELLS
Vice President
}^ew Year Owrtfesi to A" .
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Phone PL 4-1637
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rjmistncrktian
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27.
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
HAPPY HOLIDAY GREETINGS
AL PFLEVGER
TAXIDERMIST
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TO ALL OUR FRIENDS
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
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PHONE Ft 3 6213
MIAMI, FLORIDA
To My Many Friends and Patrons A Most Happy New Year
MRS. HELEN.BOND
Perfect Corset Shop
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TO ALL GREETINGS
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E. F. CHENAULT R. L. MORRIS V. S. THOMASON
CALL FR 4-4065
FOR ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE
505 S.W. 8th STREET
TO ALL HAPPY
NEW YEAR
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Miami
GREETINGS
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GENERAL CONTRACTORS
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Phone PL 9-6695
TO ALL GREETINGS
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GREETINGS TO ALL
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PORTABLE WELDING MACHINES FOR RENT
rofce* Farts M.We Stroi* As Now
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SEASON'S GREETINGS
LEONARD T. WILSON AND ASSOCIATES
wii so\ itooi i\4. eo.
SHEET METAL SHOP
1105 Filth Street ~- OOM
1690 Alton Road ^ Wl"

SINCERE AND GOOD WISHES
FOR A HEALTHY. HAPPY AND
PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO
OUR MANY FRIENDS AND
CUSTOMERS.
THE CROWN PRESS, IXC.
324 Collins Avenue Miami Beach. Florida
HARRY GERBER. Mar. Phon. m m
America's Jewish Family Evot
By MELVIN GREEN
THE success of American Jews in adapting them-
selves to the needs and the freedoms of
America's industrialized economy may be produc-
ing one of the most mobile, isolated and stress-
ridden families in Jewish history.
This is the picture of the modern Jewish
family which emerges from an analysis by Colum-
bia University sociologist Sidney Aronson, who
has summarized recent research studies on the
Jewish family in the United States.
Dr. Aronson, in presenting his findings to the
Second General Assembly of the Synagogue Coun-
cil of America, declared that the middle class white
urban Protestant family has become a kind of
model for the Jewish family.
Most of the features of the "typical" Amer-
ican familycontrary to the view both of Pro.
testants and emulating Jewsare not ''natural*'
at all. if the comparison is with the family pat-
terns of the old world from which came most
Americans or their ancestors. In the history of
the family as a social institution, the American
version is quite unique.
In the same way. Dr. Aronson pointed out. the
Jewish family of the old world and of the early
period of the ghetto, is both "natural" and very
different from the American Jewish family of
today.
What are some of the unique features of the
modern American family, which are true in large
degree both of the non-Jewish and Jewish family
alike?
One is the custom of "free mate choice," which
historically is very unusual, says Dr. Aronson.
Much more typical historically is the "institution
of arranged marriage." Dr. Aronson notes that ar-
ranged marriage was the normal pattern of the
European shtetl and that "marriage for love was
a privilege of poverty. To the Jew. as to so many
people in the world, love was the result of mar-
riage and not a prerequisite to it."
Independence of Spirit
j^NOTHER striking feature of the American fam-
ily is its composition of husband, wife and
dependent children. In the old world, the family
meant all relations, typified by the idea of the
Jewish "mishpocheh," The joint household of three
generations living under the same roof in the
shtetl was common. A three-generation family
Jewish or otherwise is practically non-existent
in modern American suburbia.
Equally unusual is the isolation of this two-
generation family. Young married couples are
not only supposed to live alone but they are also
supposed to live on their own. The right to be old
enough to get married and to move away from
m-law interference" carries with it the obliga-
tion on the young newlyweds to build and support
their new household without outside help.
u,7!'iS.Tdern American family is not only iso-
lated but for the same reasons, it is also unsup-
ported. Even in times of severe troubles, the two
young adults try to work out their problems on
the,r own. No help is expected from the two sets
of In-laws, either in setting up the new household
or it. working out problems arising in the mar-
riage. A point not noted by Dr. Aronson is that
he demand for in-laws as baby-sitters is high and
lucky feels the couple who has at leas, one set
of in-laws who wm mn, b^,,^
ves
American Liberties Medallion was
to Sen. Herbert Lehman (left) by ,
Pronkauer in name of American Jewish I
mittee during Lehman's final days as L
senator representing New York State."...
factors of the desire for success and
symbols of success also have treme
fluence on this pattern of living ..."
thereby "assuming" the "right"' to offer
tions on child-rearing.
Another historically unusual feature
family is that its structure is symmetrical!
neither patriarchal nor matriarchal. Witaaj
immediate family. Dr. Aronson finds, that i
metry '"is indicated by a relationship o(
between husband and wife." This is an
he also notes, which can be more apparent I
real.
Mobility and Opportunity
A MOTHER distinctive feature is the dear]
feelings of responsibility to needy
whether the need is for help in the form of
or in attention and love. Thanks partly to
security and pensions, married sons and da
are "let off the hook" in providing support i
parents. The aged in the United States to
become separated and isolated from their
children. Apparently there has never been
historycertainly not in Jewish history-*
comparable to the "colonies of elderly
which have mushroomed in the warmer
the United States.
From the sociological viewpoint, this
family is a response to industrialization, u
tion and, in more recent years, suburbani
Continued on P9 > GIWINGS
V
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Ben Wuhei for t Happy H'f "('"
BUCK MORRIS TIRE CO.
FIRESTONE DISTRIBUTOR
5226 W. Flagler St Phone HI 3-4986 and HI &


. September 27, 1957
".Iphis* fkrklitr

md Where My Fathers Died'
By ALFRED H. PAUL
LIE and her husband, Lee, were deeply dis-
appointed, hut trying hard not to show
jJl how badly they felt. Their son. Bill, they
Certain, had let Grandpop down.
r afraid. Grandpop," said Adelle, "yoar two-
tture was wasted on Bill."
smiled as she said it, but it was clear that
annoyed. For two hours that evening,
[the family had finished the sumptuous meal
, the Yom Kippur fast. Grandpop had been
^t conversation with 14-year-old Bill at the
[of the dining room table. Adelle and Lee
snatshes of the long discussion. They
Grandpop showing Bill his 200-year-old
fp the volume containing the special prayers
jHashona and Yom Kippur. They bad heard
[of Bill's questionswhich teemed eager; had
} that he appeared to be iatensely interested
Ihing that Grandpop was saying. Now,
r, Bill had gone upstairs to prepare for
I p> was in the shower. And throughout the
! bis adolescent voice resounded, a voice rang-
Deertainly from the raggy remnant of child-
soprano to a basso as yet far from firm or
and.
f'And listen to what he is singing," continued
i still apologetic.
["Anyway, that's better than his usual rock 'n
er solos." said Lee. He, too, was embar-
Bill was singing two lines, over and over again:
I Where My Fathers Died; .Land of the Pil-
ls' Pride."
Ks'ow what has 'America' got to do with what
land Bill were talking about?" said Adelle to
lid man.
rl think," added Lee, starting to walk upstairs,
I tell him to pipe down."
"Don't," advised Grandpop. "Dont. I know
1 know."
Rabbi Amnon of Mayence
ANDPOP had been showing Bill his valued
oW Mahzor. printed at Mete, in Hebrew
Germanic-Yiddish translation, printed on
[1788.
II didn't know Jews lived there that long ago,"
Bill.
|Grandpop turned the pages. He came to the
iw called Unetanna Tokef." Bill recognized
jwords as, softly, Grandpop chanted them; Bill
I heard that prayer that day at the synagogue.
r'lt means." explained Grandpop, "let us give
Pgth to the sacredness of the Daythe Day of
iNew Year and the Day of Yom Kippur."
pdpop intoned the words and interpreted them
F
|"0n Rosh Hashona the Lord inscribes the
lent: and on Yom Kippur the verdict is seal-
Jwho shall live, and who shall die; who will
I flame and who by water; who by sword and
j by hunger: who by pestilence, who by ."
|"But this is so awful, Grandpop."
[And Grandpop told Bill about Rabbi Amnon
pence who, jn the Fourteenth Century, first
M that prayer. The Archbishop of Mayence
[had Rabbi Amnon's hands and feet amputated
?use the Rabbi had refused to convert to Chris-
Vy. On New Year's Day, Rabbi Amnon had
""brought to the synagogue. There, he re-
' this prayer: "Unetanna Tokef." When the
1 bad finished his prayer, he diedend imme-
r^b|s body disappeared. Three nights later,
Rabbi Amnon appeared in a dream before the
tamous Rabbi Kalonymus. recited the prayer again
On Yom Kippur. Rabbi Kalonymus chanted "Une-
tanna Tokef." And. since then, this prayer has
been part of the Rosh Hashona-Yom Kippur ritual.
Bill wanted to know how far back Jews had
lived in that old city of Mayence, and said he had
never heard of the place. Grandpop told him it is
the city now known as Mainz. He told of the very
old Jewish community in Mayence; of the ancient
Jewish communities of Speyer, Worms and May-
ence which, as far back as the year 1150, made an
alliance and organized a synod which met period-
ically until the end of the Fourteenth Century. He
told Bill about how the Jews of Mayence fought
against conversion; of how, in 1348 and in 1349
they took to the .streets to fight against forcible
conversion; of how, when they saw the fight was*
lost, they set fire to their homesmothers killed
their own children and committed suicide to escape
baptism; those who were still alive jumped, en
masse, into the flames of their own burning homes.
Bill shuddered but asked for more. Grandpop
told him about the bravery of the Jews fighting
forcible baptism during the Christian Crusades.
"That is where some of our fathers died,"
said Grandpop.
And suddenly Bill perceived the explanation
to something that had puzzled him ever since he
had been in about the third grade. He had never
told this to anyonenot even to his mother Adelle,
not even to his father Lee.
Prayer* of Necessity
BILL confessed that uneasiness, for the first time
in his life, to Grandpop. He could never
quite sing those words in America, those words
"Land where my fathers died." "Because my fa-
thers," Bill said, "you, and my father, did not die
Continued on Pag* 14 C


^ UNITED HIA
|^| SERVICE PL
Changing name of historic Astor Place, New
York City, to an equally historic name, United
Hias Service Place, are these immigration of-
ficials by order of Mayor Robert Wagner, who
greeted internationally famous Jewish migra-
tion agency on behalf of New York City.
". all of these were our fathers. There were
Jews who fought in the Revolutionary War in
America; and in the Civil War, on both sides;
and in the Big World Wars.''________^^^^
Ben Wishes for a Happy Tiew Tear
|flte Guardian Life Insurance Co.
of America
ELMER J. MUNC AGENCY
UntN*
WOOP LIFt, HOSPITAL *J SURGICAL PLANS
l-Ha Accident n*t Health Meier Medical
Telephone FRamkJm 1-3468
1036 S.W. 1st Street Miami
Best Wishes for HMy Mew Y4r

J M. Montgomery Roofing Co.
r*San
DIAL HI 8*159
Lor* At*. Cowd Gables. Flo.
A Meaey *" Tear fa tee
Jeerras CesMMMJrjr
eilas eW Nreafflaf
I MAC* MMTWmM
A
HAPPY
NEW YEAR
TO ALL
CORONET
CHOCOLATES
1260 WaseJiMjtoa Ays.
Masai Beach
Paqe 5C
A HAPPY AND PKOSPtKOUS NEW YtAK
70 ALL OUR MINDS AMD PATKOHS
MODERN AWNING SHUTTERS
ALL ALUMINUM
5701 N.W. Jstn luurtT
i jii.nrii
Pfceee NE5 0469
i *
Holiday Greetings to AU
MORTGAGE LOANS
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LOW INTEREST RATES FREE INSPECTIONS .
R. K. COOPER, inc.
2733 PONCE DE LEON BOULEVARD W
CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA
I
Greetings to All .
ALBERT PICK HOTELLA ',
You Will Enjoy Your Stay Hers jv
i
BAY HARBOR ISLAND
9601 E. Bay Harbor Drivs UN 6-7328
11
TO ALL GREETINGS
i I
HARRY'S AUTO SERVICE
AUtO H6JNIfrll*J
TMKMN MACES 2150 N. W. 95th SL PL 44708'

V
GREETTNGS1
T. J. James Const. Company, Inc.
Phone MU 8-8621
ROCK FILL SAND
"WE MOVE THE EARTH"
1700 N.W. 119th SL

GREETINGS TO ALL
When Better Automobiles Aro Built
Buick Will Build Thorn
Sheehan Buick. Inc.
2301 S.W. Ith St. (ou the Trmil) Miami, Florid.
Phono HI 4-1661
AMERICA'S HEADQUARTERS
POP.
FOOD SERVICE EQUIPMENT
Supplies, Furnishings, Equipment
f e r
HOTELS, RESTAURANTS, CLUSS. RESORTS.
SCHOOLS, HOSPITALS, INSTITUTIONS

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EDWARD DON & COMPANY
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MIAMI 32. PLA.


Page 6C
*Jmistintsr**t*n
m
2
To All... Season's Best Wishes
Tropical Paper & Wax Company
Wax Paper, Fr.titr Paper, PsMmJHISB Paper, 'Tropical"
1111 East 24th Street Hialeah, Florida
TO ALL ... GREETINGS
SHENANDOAH CANDIES. INC.
PHONE HI 6-0831
514 S.W. 22nd Avenue Miami. Florida
2SLnmk
.]
SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL OUR FRIENDS
Adams Glass Service
15 If Purely Acenue. Miami Beach
Phone JE 8-0851
TO OUR MANY FRIENDS. A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
Davis Boiler A- Iron Works. Inc.
BOILERMAKERS AND CERTIFIED WELDERS
Ph. PR 4-6030 1980-88 N. Miami Ave.
Reconditioned Boilers for Sale and Repairs Day or Night Anywhere.
Smokestacks and Tanks.
GREETINGS
J. E. SHAW
CONTRACTORS
348 Minorca Avenue Phone HI 8-7493
SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL OUR
FRIENDS AND PATRONS
J. A. Cantor Associates, Inc.
1451 N BAYSHORE DRIVE
Phone FR 4-9081
SEASON'S GREETINGS
DALLETT'S
GARAGE AND SERVICE STATION
340 Twenty-third Street
MIAMI BEACH
PHONE IE 1-6721
TO ALL GREETINGS
RITZ HOTEL
mtFkAGlBl PWFHW1S1
"cm m rue memv
KAHDEMAN INSURANCE AGQtCT, H*C
Mm V. Hasdeonem and John V. Hasdesnem. fc.
dMeatffts Aefe UeMNfy Peffcf
2TO Ponce De Loon Blvd.
10 3-ttrj7
ft. el. Wainwright & Sons
1135 COMMOMtf PIAZA COCONUT OMVf H. HI 3-HJ1
Telephone TU 84431
NIKIJA KHKUSHCHIV
. iftamrfess mmtl-Umititm
ntsiotm
. Wf far ihei^jief
WIOT UISCH
MMakaH
The Year's Most Important Sto
By BEN GALLOB
YJUHAT were the biggest Jewish news stories ef
** 5717?
That brings up another question: What aw
the tests for choosing such stories? One yardstick
is space. The events which got the most space
automatically qualify. Another way is to try to
choose the developments most likely to influence
Jewish life for some time to come.
This second method has been used in my se-
lection of nominations for the ten major Jewish
news stories cf 5717. This approach produced two
developments centered in Israel, seven in the Uni-
ted States and one classed as international.
1. The fall campaign by Israel against Egypt
in the Sinai Peninsula and its aftermaths.
As a Jewish story, the two developments most
likely to endure were the destruction of the mil-
lions of dollars in Soviet arms gifts and the cor-
responding decline in Egyptian dictator Nasser's
military capacity to harm Israel; and the opening
of the Gulf of Aqaba for Israeli commerce with the
African and Asian worlds.
2. The arrival in Israel of the first substan-
tial immigration from Iron Curtain countries.
While the Soviet Union maintained its rigid
ban against emigration, some of the satellites
notably Polanddecided to permit their Jewish
nationals to leave.
The decision was one by-product of the up-
heavals in the Soviet satellite empire following the
downgrading of Stalin. The degree to which such
immigration hoped-for but non-existent during
the first eight years of Jewish statehoodhad be-
come important numerically was indicated in re-
ports that at least 23.000 Polish Jews arrived in
Israel during the year.
3. The display of unflinching courage by
American Jewry in supporting Israel's thrust into
Sinai as well as Israel's position in the diplomatic
struggle over final withdrawal.
Issues Were Sharpened
JHI reaction of the Eisenhower Admhtrstnrtton
. Kl.Vhe Smai can,Pa8n and the Administra-
tion battle to force unconditional withdrawal mark-
ed he lowest point in American-Israeli official
relations since Israel's creation.
The issue was sharpened also for American
Jews by the public and bitter disapproval of PreT-
iden. Eisenhower, one of the most popular SZ
Executives in American history. But there was
J5?!!!!L!!!!!f)L?!^^ Jew? 7-
ageously and clearly made it plain they I
President of the United States and hit I
partment were wrong in judgment and
attitude toward Israel's case.
4. The greatest outpouring of conti
to Israel through the United Jewish Abl
Israel Bonds since 1948, the peak year of i
Although final figures were to be i
the evidence was impressive that America]
had met with record gifts the demands of|
mendous new immigration and resettlement'
Jewish communities reported total contrik
for the year higher than those of 5708. the]
Israel's establishment. Other communities, ij
year's giving, topped their total contribab
the entire nine-year period.
5. The shortage of teachers and
workers for Jewish educational and
stitutions which had reached a danger point j
Jewish educators, like their colleagues a]
eral education, were being pulled by i
economy into better-paid jobs. One J
cational convention after another heard |
that the entire Jewish education structure |
the crippling prospect not only of being i
find teachers for growing enrollments botj
of holding what it had in both teachers i
ministrators. The National Conference for J
Social Work reported a shortage of M
fessionals. And nowhere was there any i
hope that ways could be found to soil
problem.
6. The triumphant American tour of I
Briscoe, Dublin's first Jewish Mayor.
Fight for Adoption
?HE amalgam of Irish and Jewish u
with Orthodox Judaism in a nimbi
Irish-born Jew proved an irresistible atti
every kind of American. In the best seise)
tern. Mayor Briscoe's visit was a public i
achievement for American Jews. They
beneficiaries of the delighted approval for I
as an Irishman from a public for which i
for all things Irish is part of the Amenca]
of life.
Everywhere that Mayor Briscoe ap
his inexhaustible supply of Irish jokes and'
wit, bis outspoken double-barreled uV
charmed the Irish and heartened the Jew*, j
7. The successful fight of a eMMJNj
couple to keep a Catholic-born Ao^..
Hiidy McCoy Ellas may not be the mo* i
Continued en Pee* 13C
Ncu Tear Greetings
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, frptember 27, 19*7
*Je*Hi>ncr*te>n
1W7C
Actor Returns to His Home
By ABRAHAM BROWN
lY Drewson. one of the great actors of our
Rooked about him, trying to get a lasting
JnhT impressive surroundings in the great
in Jerusalem. This was the climax of
viji, to Israeland the memory of this
touliona service would be cherished in a
corner of his heart.
than two weeks ago, he had stood on the
th* plane that had just landed at Lydda
Mir Tel Aviv. The photographers snapped
!re after another as he waved to the crowd,
    h the better profile. And then he had been
    jded by the eager throng, led by the Tourist
    representatives and people from Habimah
    Israel actors' groups. He shook the out-
    ti hand? and signed autograph books and
    pager And all the while, he -was, wail lag
    ji, infectious smile, saying over and over,
    .'.. Shalojj^. Shaloas." ^
    jj he remembered wondering at the time,
    total I come before?" Surely, in the last few
    when he wasn't making so many films, he
    managed to take a month off for a trip
    As a matter of fact, he had been Ihink-
    iusly about making the trip about two years
    it was just before that Broadway play came
    He had promised himself that as soon as
    j'j run was over, he would go.
    nry Drewson loved his Jewish background
    as he loved the theatre. He often recalled
    ply religious atmosphere of his childhood
    i. A lover of music, he remembered the nos-
    emotion he had felt recently when he came
    a composition by Darius Milhaud entitled
    Seren Branched Candelabrum," a poignant
    description of the seven important holi-
    f the Hebrew calendar. It brought back the
    awe and the excitement of those hallow-
    monies and observances especially the
    Days, it was this remembrance that
    ade him decide that the New Year would
    most appropriate time to visit Israel.
    Ht Traveled the Land
    RE was so much to seehe must see every-
    |thing! It was like the curtain going up
    time he was the audience, straining his
    i to absorb every detail of every scene of a
    i that was 3.000 years in the making.
    i his guide from the Tourist office he had
    jl want to start right awayI want to see
    klem, Tel Aviv, Haifathe cities and the set-
    ptsand the Negevyes, from Beersheba to
    And then a soft, far-away look came to
    i and he said, "And please, don't forget to
    e to Safed."
    id so it was that the great actor had traveled
    I down and across the land of Israel. Every-
    i the people knew him and clustered around
    nd before long he was able to surprise and
    It them by carrying on a simple conversation
    |hrew.
    > Jerusalem, he was the guest of high govern-
    | official", whom he had admired for many
    He remembered how he had worried over
    p crise. during recent years and each time
    I consoled himself with the reminder, "Don't
    -they ha\e some great and wise men over
    -they'll know what to do."
    hen he was face to face wth Israel's leaders,
    P list of questions he'd had on his mind
    somehow elementary and' almost self-ex-
    They spoke to him of Israel's great
    la>d of the problems that would have to be
    d solved The people of Israel, they said,

    were making every sacrifice demanded of them,
    but they could not carry the increased burden of
    building up the country with homes and jobs for
    the new waves of immigrants. They would need
    the increased help and partnership of American
    Jews through greater investment in Israel Bonds.
    Drewson understood now the real importance of his
    "personal appearances" at various Israel Bond
    meetingsand he regretted that he hadn't made
    more of them.
    Struck By Phoaphata
    BETWEEN the actor and his guide there had de-
    veloped a comradeship and understanding,
    as between two old friends. Their visits to factories
    and farms invariably led to long discussions about
    the history of the particular project. Drewson's
    driving insistence on getting all the facts and ex-
    amining the minutest details was a constant source
    of wonderment to the Israeli guide, who found him-
    self engaged in rather profound analyses with his
    famous chaffed* On rrtore than oW occasion* We1'
    smiled inwardly at the image of the actor he'd had
    in mindbefore he met Drewson. A charming
    borea theatrical titan too tired to thinka man
    who could project human courage, dignity and
    tragedy before a camera or an audiencebut in
    real life only a hollow shell.
    What had struck the guide particularly was the
    actor's uncompromising thoroughness, as for in-
    stance at the phosphate mines near Dimona. He
    followed each step- of the complicated process, from
    the noisy drilling of the phosphate rock in the sur-
    face pits, to the loading and unloading at the pro-
    cessing plant. "You export phospnates, don't you?"
    he asked. "How much? Where?" Drewson's
    whole manner, as he asked his perceptive ques-
    tions, suggested not the popular notion of a jaded
    actor, but rather the cold, statistical business exec-
    utive. "And the by-product of these rock phos-
    phateswhat do you do with it?" He was referring
    to the uranium, which Israeli scientists had suc-
    ceeded in extracting as part of the phosphate re-
    fining process. Now Drewson had the learned air
    Continued on Page 15 C
    "... at the phosphate mines near Dimona.
    He followed each step of the complicated pro-
    cess, from the noisy drilling of the phosphate
    rock in the surface pits, to the loading and
    unloading at the processing plant."
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    1
    "

    Page 8 C__________________________________________
    To Our Many Friends and Acquaintances ...
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    Branches:
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    Phone NE 5-8912
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    GENERAL INSURANCE
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    To All Our Friends. Patrons & Acquaintances Happy New Year
    Tad's Broadway Battery & Ignition
    BATTERIES GENERATORS STARTHH
    1721 N.W. Mtfc STRUT, MIAMI. FLORIDA NWNI NE 41331
    A Rosh Hashona Question Boi
    By RABBI SAMUEL j. FOX
    1A/HY It It Customary to Refrain from Sleeping
    * on the Afternoon of Rosh Heshone?
    Several reasons are offered for this tradition.
    Some quote a rabbinie saying that "he who sleeps
    on Rosh Hashona sleeps away his fortune." Some
    claim thai sleeping on Rosh Hashona afternoon is
    a sign of disinterest and apathy in the process of
    judgment. It is not fitting to sleep in the court-
    room when the judge is presiding. Rosh Hashona
    is the day of judgment and demands the courtesies
    due the process of justice. .
    Others claim that when a person is asleep
    hi- soul is entrusted to the powers on high. Having
    his soul in their power they are in a position to
    make a derision as to whether or not the individual
    is entitled to receive it back again. Staying awake,
    causes a man to retain his soul and prevent the
    judgment from being passed upon it sines one.
    cannot pass judgment without the defendant being
    present.
    UUHY It It Customary to Especially Wear Seme-
    thing Now on the Second Night of Roth
    Hashona?
    There is a difference of opinion among the
    early authorities as to whether the blessing of
    Shehechiyonu" should be made when lighting the
    candles and making the Kiddush on the second
    night of Rosh Hashona. In order to avoid the pos-
    sibility of doing the wrong thing it became cus-
    tomary for the housewife to wear something new
    for the first time when lighting the candles on the
    second night of Rosh Hashona. The male who
    makes Kiddush on the second night either wears
    something new or saves a new fruit, which he has
    not eaten this season yet, for this occasion, so that
    the new garment or new fruit would call for the
    blessing regardless of whether the second night of
    the festival does or does not.

    Ml MY I. the Shofar Blow* from the Piece Where
    "* the Terah It Read?
    Two reasons are generally advanced for this
    requirement. First, this place is one upon which
    the concentration of the congregation is focused
    and centralized. Its original central location made
    it a point from which all could hear the Shofar.
    Secondly, sounding the Shofar from that point re-
    minds us that the Shofar was sounded when the
    Torah was given at Sinai. The Shofar notes thus
    remind us of our responsibility to uphold the com-
    mandments and study the Torah.
    Y^HY It It that Only One Person Blows the Shofar
    While the Rett Listen. Instead of Having
    Everybody Blow a Shofar of His Own?
    Some of the later commentaries ask this ques-
    tion on the grounds that there are some holiday
    commandments which each one is required to carry
    out. such as the Lulav on Succoth. etc. A number
    of explanations are offered. Some explain that
    blowing the Shofar is a talented performance which,
    not everyone is capable of. s>o as not to embarrass
    those who do not know how, one man is appointed
    in the synagogue to blow the Shofar while the rest
    listen. Some explain that this is also done to avoid
    confusion and promote decorum. If everyone blew
    his own Shofar, one might be blowing one of the
    '
    Sounding the Shofar from where tbTa
    read reminds us that the Shofar *
    sounded when the Jews received the I
    SinaL The blasts thus remind us to
    the commandments and to study To
    notes while another could already be w
    other. This would present a bewildering i
    Thus only one man blows the Shofar. Sou.
    out that having only one Shofar blown in tbtj
    agogue is a symbol of unity The biblical 1
    referred to as mentioning only one shoL
    means of unity and cooperation amongst tbe|
    of Israel.
    M#HY Do Some Jews Customarily Rifri* I
    " Eating Nutt en Rosh HeshoM?
    Two reasons are given for this practktl
    is eased on the contention that rating null si
    minder of sin, since the Hebrew letters tslj
    the word for nut (Egozj and the Hebrew!
    are audible in the spelling for sin (Cbet)
    same numerical value. On the holiday |
    ment all references to sin are avoided, I
    are eliminated too. The other reason h
    tical consideration. Elating nuts bring :
    tion to the throat including coughing ail' i
    instincts. This tends to serve as a
    fluence during the congregation service*.!
    services on Rosh Hashona are traditionally I
    and they require greet concentration,
    caution was taken so that the worshippers I
    comfortable as possible.
    1JUHY Does the Rabbi ef the Synaoog"'
    W the Name of Each Shofar Not. Befeee|
    Blown By Hie Appointed Person?
    This is done so as to make sure that I
    son who blows the notes blows the
    each time without any mistakes The reqott
    for the notes and their order are in**
    technicalities. It becomes the respon
    the rabbi to watch for those things awl J
    prevent mistakes from occurring and also I
    scribe the proper procedure in case one is i
    NEW YEAR GREETINGS
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    Gables Standard Service
    "ROAD SERVICE'
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    member 27, 1957
    *Je*istifk>rhfc*n
    Page 9C
    Sees a New Year at School
    By ANITA ENGLE
    .jnal __ When I asked my 12-year-old
    hn, and his friends what Bosh Hashona
    ^^jm. they just looked at me.
    ,,05 a new year at school," they said,
    , different teachers."
    hjnfi else1" "Well, after two months holi-
    Ibegin the year all fresh and new, and will-
    ^jp the country."
    ring how full of the festivals the children
    I was surprised to find myself unable
    j my further response.
    11 was a child in Canada, we know that
    honu and Yom Kippur were the holy
    year, and if we never appeared in
    it any other time, we appeared then,
    [to read the services, if only in English.
    Ithe other hand, the other festivals, which
    naturally out of the seasons here, and fit so
    V into the pattern of Israel "life, hardly
    (thing to children in most other countries.
    Lfused therefore, to accept the usual pat
    w, that children in Israel are by nature
    us, and persued the subject further.
    sn't it mean anything special to you when
    the prayers at synagogue?""I asked Jon-
    No Taste in English
    HAN'S big hazel eyes opened wide, and
    ' answered with a question, as is the way
    pbras 'Why Immaleh, (little mother )you
    i read Hebrew all the year round at school,
    should it be different when I read the
    [at synagogue? Of course I understand them
    ! more, because every year we go deeper
    er into the Torah at school."
    tthan was now launched on his favorite
    , the Torah. He picked up our big family
    which has the English and Hebrew side
    "When I hear the words in English, they
    I any taste for me," he said. "One of the
    v-t

    yi
    1
    %*"
    pt Itzhak Ben-Zvi extends hearty Maxel
    d tractor operator on recent visit
    > area. there is no gap between
    people from whose history was
    Bible, and the lews who are again
    istory in Eretz Israel."
    Light shines againif a new kind of lightin
    Israel. Modern industrial enterprise brings
    light bulb manufacture to Jerusalem. "... is-
    n't it possible that our prayers are already
    answered that the Jewish people have
    once again been written in the Book of Life?"
    happy things about living in Israel is that you can
    get the real taste of the Bible in Hebrew. If I
    read the Bible in English, I don't feel that my
    forefathers are speaking to me, because it wasn't
    their language."
    To himlike to other children in Israelthe
    Bible is a living book. Our forefathers who wrote
    it speak directly to him. "They explain our his-
    tory, they show us mistakes, and dangerswhen a
    king didn't go with God, you know what happen-
    ed!" Jonathan nodded his head meaningfully.
    "The Bible showed us how we could make our-
    selves stronger and better by caring for justice,
    and the righta of the people." continued Jonathan.
    The way he said "tzedick, only txedick," made me
    realize how deeply ingrained in the Jewish people
    is this passion for justice. And how meaningless
    the word is for the greater part of the world. As
    long as we had harped on "justice" before the tri-
    bunal of nations, we were just regarded as nud-
    nicks. The world only sat up and took notice when
    we showed that we could fight as well.
    No Gap in History
    f^UR children get their history from the Bible,
    their literature, their ethics, their patriot-
    ism, their holidays, their geography, their smiles.
    Even nature study has its roots in the Bible, for
    Israel's seasons and their growths are the same
    now as then.
    A thousand years is but a day to our children.
    For Jonathan, Sisera's defeat by the Israelites
    4,000 years ago at Kiryat Haroshetnext to where
    we liveis just as vivid as Allenby's defeat of the
    Turks in the same area, only 40 years ago.
    One spring day we issued from the house for
    a Shabbath walk. The sky was like a blue dome
    overhead, and the sun's rays beat straight down
    on us. "It was just such a time as this," Jonathan
    Continued on Page 11 C
    M
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    122 S.W. 27th Avenue Phone NI 6-083


    >
    Page IOC
    9-JmislJ flerkMan
    ^!L?^W!
    A Happy New Year
    to all our friends
    Mr. and Mrs. Allen Goldberg
    (KiriNCi
    MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW YORK
    A. W. Olsom Victor Htltana'tr
    9o s.w. it sheet
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    TO Alt ... A AWST HAPPT NIW MM
    D. W. BURTON
    IfP Electrical Contractor
    Phone TU 7-2087
    1910 E. 4th AVENUE
    MALEAH
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS
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    Pho.it Ml 37179

    BEAUTY SALON
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    COHAL GABLES
    MR. and MRS. HENRY M. CAIN
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    COUNCILMAN and MRS.
    BERNARD A. FRANK
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    FENIMORE APARTMENT HOTEL
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    Deflation of Ancient Jewish V;
    By PHILIP RUBIN
    OVER the years my eyes and ears, and probably
    your eyes and ears too, have been assailed
    by preachments by Jewish writers, rabbis and Jew-
    ish laymen, preachments whose aim was to prove
    that, at least insofar as ethics is concerned, there
    really are no fundamental differences between
    Judaism and Christianity, that the ethics of Jesus
    M proclaimed in the New Testament are purely
    Jewish ethics and that we Jews can therefore ac-
    cept Jesus as a Jewish prophet, even if we cannot
    accept Him as the Messiah and Son of God, born
    of a virgin.
    This tendency to wipe out all distinctions in
    ethical philosophy between Judaism and Chris-
    tianity, a tendency that has been called "Jewnitar-
    ianism." is still with us here in the United States,
    has not abated during toe past generation, has if
    anything become stronger in American Jewish re-
    ligious thinking, and may weaken American Jew-
    ish comimmaI Hfe considerably in the years to
    come if we don't make a strenuous effort to halt
    it. It is a tendency which is mainly to be found
    among Jews here who are either affiliated with or
    are ideologically close to Reform Judaism, though
    it is also to be found among the children of Con-
    servative, and even of Orthodox Jews, who did not
    receive a Jewish education worthy of the name.
    It is. of course, basically a pert of the trend
    toward what we usually call assimilation, of the de-
    sire of a minority religious-cultural group which
    finds, or thinks it finds, some opening1 through
    which it can merge with the majority religious-
    cultural group. If this type of Jew cannot, for
    one reason or another, join the Unitarian Church,
    he can as loudly as possible proclaim his close kin-
    ship with this heretical Christian group and thus
    receive the plaudits of some Christians at least.
    Deviation from Tradition
    IJOT so many years ago, in a midwestern city
    where I had come to work on the local Jew-
    ish paper, I was introduced to a Jewish lawyer of
    that town. Immediately after the introductions,
    he told me that he had once taught Sunday School
    in the local Reform Temple and then blurted out:
    "Why didn't the Jews accept the New Testament?
    There's so much more warmth to it than to the-
    Old Testament!" When it comes to the warmth of
    feeling that is to be found in this or that religious
    book, there is no arguing the matterit is entirely
    a question of individual reaction. And I didn't
    argue the matter, though I was surprised to find
    that a man who had taught Jewish Sunday School
    coudn't find enough warmth of feeling in the
    Psalms (from which Christians too have drawn so
    much inspiration over the ages), in the Song of
    Songs, the Book of Isaiah and so on.
    But we have many "Jewnitarians." rabbis and
    Jewish intellectuals who presume to speak in the
    name of Judaism, who are more subtle in their
    pronouncements on this matter than the midwest-
    cm Jewish lawyer, who do not directly call upon
    Jews to accept the New Testament but who engage
    in such mental acrobatics that their hearers are
    finally led to believe that the Old and the New
    Testaments are really one and that if one accepts
    the former one may just a., well accept the other.
    Only recently I attended a lecture here in New
    York by a young man under thirty on the subject
    of "Jewish Thought in New Testament Times." The
    lecture was held under non-Jewish auspices before
    a small mixed audience of Jews and Christians.
    The young man. of whom I had never heard before,
    was introduced as a rabbi who is now engaged in
    House of Living Judaism. New YoAi
    per right insert shows lobby of
    low, Dr. Maurice N. Eisendrath.
    Union of American Hebrew
    shown with Oscar Lcuarus, win
    House's chapel ". thousands 2
    rabbis, writers and lecturers on
    and teaching true Judaism .. is f|
    States .
    scholarly research and lecturing on"
    Though I do set wish to identify him anyi
    I can assure the reader of his solid Jtvisj
    ground, which starts with his childhood ii j
    sidic atmosphere in the Old Country.
    There were two points made during I
    which I afterwards challenged: (1) En
    which Jesus preached can be found in the 1
    (2) Jesus was in reality an adherent of I
    sees, the main Jewish sect of his day. the i
    tative exponents of Judaism. How.
    he square the doctrine of "putting up the j
    cheek" with Judaism? How could he
    Jfsus with the Pharisees when, accordinjl
    New Testament, Jesus proscribed them. I
    followers not to be "like the Scribes
    SOBt" Wouldn't it be more plausible to i
    Jesusas many Jews and Christians have i
    ted him, particularly since the discovery!
    Dead Sea Scrollswith the sect of Essera.1
    ish communistic sect which was outside I
    stream of Jewish life in those days?
    The Pacts Are Hazy
    hJO, the young rabbi insisted stub
    was a Pharisee, and as to his i
    or that sect, "the New Testament put his mouth which he never said." With i
    the doctrine of "putting up the other ch
    was said in approval of the old Mosaic la
    eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth," butj
    themselves had by the time of Jesus mo-
    severe, perhaps cruel, form of justice by
    ting for it a money payment as penalty *|
    jury done, said the rabbi.
    The Intelligent reader should find
    culty in seeing through the sophistries* I
    juggling, involved in the reply, which
    produced here almost verbatim. Do '
    tians or Jews, know anything else about to
    what the New Testament tells us about I
    there any records of those days about JeoJ
    contradict the New Testament1 No, law
    Continued on Paflt 11 C
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    If.fcptwd*'27'1957
    JmisltnarMkui
    ft Hashona in Today's World
    Contim"* from Pae 2 C
    ascent. are to be found the perfection
    [fulfillment of man's life upon this earth.
    The Day of Aronomont
    PARE to meet Thy God, O Israel. Sfeek ye
    Lord and ye shall live!" These words
    Ae shepherd of Tekoa, are the eternal
    [of Yom Kippur, of the day of fasting and
    of the holiest day of the year.
    'keynote of this solemn day is spoken in
    religious poem, the Unesaneh Tokef,
    rising Gods greatness, depicts how the
    the great shepberfi, before whom all
    flings pass for judgment on Yom Kippur,
    cs who shall live and who shall die, who
    itined to W*idajr'
    i Butpri
    xnt&* vil fle
    [this holy fast day, we are reminded again
    that man is like a fragile potsherd, a
    i shadow, a dream that vanishes. But God
    lasting.
    la beautiful prayer which is recited on Kol
    lightthis solemn introduction to the day
    nianceman is compared to various kinds
    Lriais and Cod to a craftsman: God is the
    |man the clay. God is the mason, man the
    the smith, man the pliable metal, God
    yer, man the warp and woof:
    p! As the potter mouldeth plastic clay
    i forms his varying fancy does display,
    i in thy hand, 0 God of love are we,
    I bond regard, let sin be veiled from Thee.
    > on a Kol Nidre eve. Rabbi Levi Yitzchok
    jjichev remarked that the generation of to-
    superior to the previous ones. In days
    )/, people dared to tell lies in the very house
    Whenever they beat their hearts in con-
    Year at School
    Continued from Pago 9C
    at Abraham our*father sat in the door of
    L and they came to visit him."
    fait time was that?" I asked, "after lunch?"
    said Jonathan, quite matter-of-fact. "In
    M of the day." When we returned home,
    pn found the reference for me. Genesis 1.
    It is only a bare sentence, but my little
    | had been able to clothe it with its back-
    ! of scenery, and could even feel the rays
    [sun on his face, for this was his scenery as
    the sun he too had felt from earliest
    wonder, then, that in the minds of our
    [Israelis, there is no gap between the Jewish
    | from whose history was created the Bible,
    Jews who are again creating history in
    l "We must continue our history, aid
    [the Bible fatter and fatter," Jonathan -
    to me, and my mind began to speculate on
    ! very distant generation would handle the
    ! of the Sinai Campaign.
    tkn have passed through terrible dangers.
    sacrificed much, and no doubt will be
    I Pon to make many more sacrifices. But
    ] KwiWe that our prayers are airway n-
    [ d the Israeli child is a living symbol
    *wih people have once again been written
    ook of Lile?
    ilom.
    fession, 'Oshamnu-we have been guilty; bogadnu
    gozlanuwe have dealt falsely and dishonestly," it
    was all rtes Not a single word they uttered in
    tneir penitential confessions was true' Today
    however, our generation recites the same confes-
    sion and every single word is true, the very essence
    of truth "For that alone," he concluded, "for
    telling the truth, we deserve inscription in the
    Book of Life."
    A Deflation of Values
    Continued from Pago 10 C
    and since there .aren't, we Jews.and Christians
    must necessarjly equate Jesus with the New Test-
    ament, regard them as indissolubly linkod. just as
    we must regard Moses and the Old Testament, or
    King David and the Old Testament, as indissolubly
    linked, because we have no other records of these
    religious leaders than those that are to be found
    in the Hebrew Bible.
    Differences Are Manifest
    THIS writer would be the last to deny that there
    are areas of agreement between Judaism and
    Christianity. He would even be willing to admit,
    if better Jewish scholars than he could prove it to
    him, that Trude Weiss-Rosmarin in her book. "Ju-
    daism and Christianitythe Differences," exagger-
    ated those differences to a considerable extent.
    But when these "Jewnitarians"scholars or other-
    wiseendeavor by sophistry to prove that there
    are no differences whatsoever in the ethics of Ju-
    daism and Christianity he rises up in revolt. He
    feels he has a right to protect because he has
    enough knowledge about Judaism to defy even the
    scholars, if you wish to call them such, among the
    "Jewnitarians."
    It is true, as the young rabbi says, that the
    severe law of "an eye for an eye" was softened in
    later times, but does this mean that Judaism also
    accepted the doctrine of "putting up the other
    cheek?" Of course not. Judaism is a religious
    way of life which reckons with the possibilities of
    human nature, which tries to uplift that human na-
    ture instead of going entirely contrary to it. Juda-
    ism, based as it is on the concept of justice, can-
    not demand of its followers that they "resist not
    evil."
    All this is so elementary that surely a young
    man who bears the title of rabbi should have
    known it. There he is, however, the young Jewish
    spiritual or intellectual leader, with his ideology of
    basic agreement between the ethics of Judaism and
    Christianity, ready to lend a helping hand to the
    assimilatory forces, since he believes that this rep-
    resents the wave of the future.
    Such people have to be constantly indoctrin-
    ated with the true spirit of Judaism. It isn't an
    easy job in this present-day American atmosphere
    in which we are living, in this atmosphere of con-
    stant technological advances which have an ever
    greater tendency to robotize people, to standardize
    individuals and groups, to wipe out precious re-
    ligious-cultural traditions, particularly if they are
    the religious-cultural traditions of a minority
    group. But our American rabbis and lay leaders,
    who may begin to despair as they note the assim-
    ilatory tendencies in American Jewish life, particu-
    larly among the non-Orthodox, should ask them-
    selves: When was it ever an easy thing to remain
    a Jew? "gchwer tai sain a Ytd," "hard to be a
    Jew," was our cry throughout the centuries.
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    Page 12C
    +JeistirhrkMar
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    'ludaism declares that holiness, which can
    be called the glow which conies from living
    in accordance with our higher capacities,
    is derived from the utilization of religious
    ideals and the constant embodiment of the
    meaning of religious ideals and L
    stant Embodiment of the meaning
    iou symbols and rituals into the|
    our normal actions and passions,"
    What Holy' Means in Holy Dai
    Continood from Pi
    1 c
    invested with magical qualities, but they are
    mementoes of what you must do every day if you
    are to impart a touch of meaningfuiness to your
    existence.
    Holiness Pert of Lift
    JEWISH Torahs are well-worn, and should be,
    " for the Torah is not venerated as a mystical
    relic but is to serve as a guide for your course of
    activities every week. The Kiddush cup can be
    touched, handled, and fingered by all, for it has
    no other purpose but to remind you that, in the
    midst of commercial and domestic transactions ft
    is incumbent upon you to engender sweetness if
    you are to live up to God's expectations. The
    Shofar is a holy object in Judaism, not because it
    can produce some miracle but because it is ceil
    to conscience, a call that you are supposed to heed
    not only in the synagogue but in the office, in the
    neighborhood where you live and in the home.
    In short, in Judaism holiness is not something
    apart from life, but something which is a part of
    life. Judaism declares that holiness, which can be
    called the glow which comes from living in ac-
    cordance with our higher capacities, is derived
    from the utilization of religious ideals and the
    constant embodiment of the meaning of religious
    ideals and the constant embodiment of the mean-
    ing of religious symbols and rituals into the fabric
    of our normal actions and passions.
    What it Expected
    pJOLINESS, therefore, in Judaism is not a qual-
    ity; it is a process. Objects and acts are not
    endowed with an independent quality known as
    holiness; they become so by the nature of their
    usage.
    To illustrate the Jewish idea of holiness, let
    us take a few examples. Money would certainly
    not normally be regarded as a sacred item; it
    represents utter materialism and is a symbol of
    cupidity. But when you take some of your money
    and. denying yourself something you might yearn
    for, donate it to a good cause, you have achieved
    an act of holiness. Indeed, then the money itself
    is transformed from something seculars!
    thing sacred. You have made it holy kjj
    you have put it to. You have perforaaU
    fice. And if you will look up the orirj)
    word, sacrifice, you will discover that tJ
    to make sacred.
    The Pharisees, those badly maligned i_
    of the Jewish faith whom we designate i
    rabbis," have filled the Talmud with
    how holiness can be achieved.
    They have told us that lust, canaliaeaj
    vated through a decent family life, ea I
    formed into love.
    They have told us that ambition, i
    only to the gratification of one's ego, but j
    the point where one is ambitious to i
    can be lifted to the point of holiness.
    They have told us that the human
    joy can be hallowed so that we can ult
    rive as much delight from giving as we i
    ly derive from getting.
    They have told as that hatred, din
    individuals but at evil, can be the sourctl
    good.
    So in our synagogues on the High 1
    let us, with renewed insight, understiaJj
    expected of us if we are to live up to the I
    holiness a la Judaism.
    "In Judaism holiness is not measu
    degree to which you remove V<>
    life. It is determined by what you!
    vary thick of your daily life/'
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    NO'


    September 27, 1957
    ^Jenlstiflork/iatrj
    logue About Buildings of Future
    Contmotd front Pafe 3 C
    -wmenting the facade, *ould enhance
    aBd make perfectly clear the spiritual
    J of the edifice."
    [termed abstract" or 'non-figurative' was
    we then. Did American Jews permit it
    ^embellish the House of God?"
    ironic that many people who had no
    in art recommended abstract art as
    They argued that it was more akin
    and more productive of an austere
    josphere than realistic art which, they
    [bound to distract the worshipper. Act-
    art, far from being a pacifying ele-
    [tohot controversiessimply because the
    [ worshippers, particularly in cities with-
    eum\an<
    Ifgplhrwv,
    ".> n frpcitipm argument. ~me
    [member-, however, who had seen exhl-
    IMondnan. Kandinsky, and Klee, and of
    i of American disciples, were fascinated
    lew offerings. Many an individual came
    IgoRue mainly on account of the publicity.
    or otherwise, that accompanied the in-
    of a ntther controversial Burning Bush
    I, or the unveMing of a quite unorthodox
    artdment- muraland stayed on to hear
    on, and even joined in the prayer!"
    a bit hard for me to get a clear idea of
    temple- were likehow insufficient the
    hs are. and even the small models they
    ! museums. But I believe I have a fair
    fce of our ritual objects, for enough have
    [ to our days, and I must saythey seem
    far behind the work ef architect,
    nd sculptor ."
    Buildings Can Be Art
    SE do not blame it on the craftsmenwe
    Ld excellent silversmiths in the 'fifties. But
    [congregation moved to a new, up-to-date
    ritual silver, Ark, Torah curtain, and
    rtable objects were moved too. This would
    kn fine, had not these objects often been
    d, coldly manufactured items, purchased
    brch supply stores. It took a good deal of
    pn to convince the trustees that pseudo-
    I silver and overdecorated textiles were not
    r.g with a modern synagogue, which drew
    kistically sophisticated men and women.
    Ro lecture, often for hours, not only to the
    but even to the rabbis, to put over such
    Year's Top Stones
    Continued from Pag* A C
    pld in American history but it would be
    jfind a more noted one. The dramatic
    [Melvin Ellis and his wife with red-haired,
    Hildy stirred hearts throughout the
    fix decision of Florida Gov. LeRoy Collins
    [the EUises to live in Florida, in rejection
    chusetts extradition demand on kidnap
    *ts. produced a mountain of congratula-
    tes to the Governor and to the happy
    [case contained threats of ugly inter-relig-
    p "hicn happily never developed. It was
    Continued on Pago 15 C
    basic concepts a*-that the beauty of an object lay
    in the purity in which its material was expressed,
    or that form, molded with grace, should always
    make the function of an object clear. But once
    we had won them to our ideas, it was not difficult
    to find the skilled craftsmen who could use their
    tools with the ease with which a virtuoso plays his
    violin, and who, above all had integrity and aesthe-
    tic discernment."
    "As a designer of synagogues, do you not feel
    angry that not many of your works have survived?
    Do you feel that the men who razed your buildings
    were lacking gratitude by doing so?"
    "Your question demonstrates, my dear friend,
    that you think as one would expect a young man
    to think. I am seventy-five, and I am fully aware
    tJM much of what 1 built thirty or torty years
    S Utterly obsolete, if it hadjufgiikd
    _ l*Hd>D*t>ai> bt la** omt^Kn
    they are essentially utilitarian, be they factories
    or synagogues. They serve the needs of people m
    and they ought to serve them well. Did you ever"
    read Nathaniel Hawthorne? Houses should be built
    fresh for every generation, he declared, and I am
    in full agreement with him. Buildings must be
    truthful, must be built in the appropriate style of,
    the time. When I was young, I spoke to some fam-
    6us architects who Were then as old as I am ncr9/~
    tHey had no qualms about indiscriminately mixing
    building styles of periods as much as three or four
    centuries apart, and were angry because fewer
    and fewer people would heed. I believe in change,
    my friend. If I were to sermonize. I would stress
    the changing needs of men along with the un-
    changeability of mankind's fears and hopes. For,
    as Ecclesiastes put it, and I have nothing to add to
    his words, 'The earth shall endure forever
    Stern College for Women of Yeshiva Univer-
    sity. "... architects ... in their understandable
    objection to anything recalling the old 'gin-
    gerbread' style, sometimes went too far in
    their reaction: they replaced the overdecora-
    ted stone boxes of the past "_____________
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    NEHI BOTTLING CO.
    538 N.W. 24th Street
    Phone FR 3-6287
    GREETINGS
    DIXIE FARMS PRODUCTS
    WHOLESALE MEATS and PROVISIONS
    519 N.W. 23rd StVtat Phon. FR 1-3494
    To All ... A Most Happy New Year
    Howard S. R?eder
    BROKER
    603 BISCAYNE BLVD.
    Phone FR 3 5482
    ffOf ff'lV (.KIITIVf.S
    M
    *
    JM '
    N.W. 36th STREET at 7th AVENUE
    PHONE NE 5-7551
    TO OUR MANY FRIENDS and PATRONS GREETINGS
    CLARK & LEWIS CO.
    WHOLESALE GROCERS
    34N.E. 11th Street
    Phone FR 3-3108
    To Our friends We ixtend Our Sinceresf Wishes Far
    Health and Success For The Coming Ytmr
    MR. MORTON R. FELLMAN (Consulting Engineer)
    MRS. MORTON R. FELLMAN and Daughters SHELLEY and LESLIE
    Of ST WISHtS fOt A HAPFT NCW YtAK
    Custombilt Furniture Mfg. Co.
    Showrooms and Factory: 100 NE. 40th Street
    Phone PL 8-4781
    ,
    *'
    DR. and MRS. MILTON SANES GOLDMAN
    and daughters Rose Hannah and Lynn Esta
    2335 Meridian Avenue, Miami Beach
    Extend Best Wishes for the New Year
    to their Friends and Relatives
    StASOtTS CIEETJNCS TO All
    It AIJLVS BAKERY
    Ask far "lAtfrS HOmtMADt DAIMTllS" i. wary st.r.
    Aba Feeey Ceakies
    ItM S.W. 27th AVENUE PHONE HI 1-9134

    JUDGE and MRS. RAYMOND G. NATHAN
    and Family '
    Fxfend" Best Wishes far A Happy New Year


    Page 14 C
    CKtlJINCS
    CORAL GABLES INSURANCE, INC.
    All fOHMS Of IHSUK AN C
    113 AIMERIA AVENUE
    Phone HI 3 2555
    "JfeNfeft/fonMRntf
    Fridai
    CORAL CABLES
    MR. AND MRS. HARRY MARKOWITZ
    and Family
    Thomas Robert Jerry
    Wish Their Friends and Relatives a Haooy New Year
    ---
    II a it n n \ # w Y v a r
    from
    HUNTINGTON MEDICAL BUILDING
    S.E. 1st STREET at S.E. 2nd AVENUE
    100'; Air Conditioned, including Healing
    FOR OFFICE
    SPACE
    CALL
    The Keyes Co.,
    REALTORS-FR 1-3592
    To Our Many Friends and Patrons...
    Most Happy Holidays
    HILSON ROOFING CO.
    "rVf TOP 'EM All"
    3065 S.W. 37th Avenue
    Phone HI 6-9937
    TO All CRlf TINGS
    MANZE TILE COMPANY
    CALL US FOR ESTIMATES PL *-26l
    1370 N.W. 54th STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA
    70 All GREETINGS...
    W. j. KNO X
    CIVIL and CONSULTING ENGINEER LAND SURVEYOR
    MIAMI SPRINGS, FLORIDA RHONE TU 8-2573
    MR. and MRS. LOUIS BARRISH
    of the
    GOOD-BAR PLUMBING SUPPLY CO.
    EXTEND BEST WISHES FOR NEW YEAR
    2011 HAYES STREET HOLLYWOOD 22609
    HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA mm FR ,.,
    GREETINGS
    AMERICAN CHEMICAL COMPANY
    SANITARY and JANITOR SUPPLIES INDUSTRIAL CHEMKAiS
    3601 N.W. 60* Str~t Pho.^^4-7653
    TO All SIASOMS REST WISHES
    TROPi-PAK FOOD PRODUCTS INC.
    3.63 M.W. 47* STREET ^
    America's Jewish Family Evolvi
    Continued from P*t 4C
    personal terms, the factors of the desire for suc-
    cess and for the symbols of success, also have tre-
    mendous influence on this pattern of family living.
    The economic opportunities created by indus-
    trialization require two kinds of mobility geo-
    graphical and vertical. Geographically, a man must
    be ready to move to whatever part of the United
    States is required for a better position. Vertically,
    he must also be free to move up the ladder of suc-
    cess Freedom from kinship ties is necessary to
    both kinds of mobility.
    The man wife-child family pattern interferes
    least with the demands of the industrial society.
    The two-generation family has the basic effect of
    isolating its members from relatives. This isola-
    tion means lett contact between the adults of the
    modern family and their relatives. This situation,
    in turu. fits the demands made by the,struggla.fx>r
    MitTfWMri*r timnrflhe yi>tff.f^4UtSle, p(ti&i-
    larly the husband. There isn't much time left for
    his family, let alone his parents, brothers and sis-
    ters and other relatives.
    This family is nicely adapted to the demands
    of twentieth-century American industrialism but
    there is a price. Apparently this family is less
    satisfactory as a vehicle both for individual satis-
    factions and the perpetuation and transmission of
    values in which the familyespecially the Jewish
    familyhas been of critical importance through-
    out history. ,
    Jtwi Likt Other*
    ANOTHER price is the frequent absence of in-
    tegration between the husband and wife of
    this modern American family. Dr. Aronson blames
    this on "the husband's over-involvement 4vith suc-
    cess and the wife's over-involvement with the com-
    munity and joint under involvement with the
    home."
    Even children, historically a strong integra-
    ting force in marriage relationships, are sometime
    resented "because they curb the individualistic
    activities of both husband and wife."
    Dr. Aronson's thesis is that the present-day
    Jewish family is very much like the non-Jewish
    family. In fact, he believe that the Jewish home
    in America "is more American than most other
    homes in the United States." The forces which
    have produced the modern American family" "are
    especially operative in the Jewish family."
    The lone exception seems to b? the concept
    of romantic lave which has not yet become strong
    enough among American .lews to weaken endoga-
    nious restrictions that is. American Jews are still
    marrying .lews.
    In most other respects, however, the American
    Jewish family may be more mobile, more isolated.
    mere individualiaic. more unsupported and sub-
    ject to greater pressures than comparable non-Jew-
    ish urban and suburban families
    It is a Jewish family strikingly different from
    the Jewish families of the past by which Jewish
    continuity was assured, particularly in terms of
    mutual Jewish aid. "The Jewish family today is
    very mobile."' says Dr. Aronson, "and mobility and
    strong family solidarity are mutually exclusive."
    rIpV^I
    Tr\

    ^i
    MR*
    Striking feature of the American L
    composition bf husband, wile andl
    children. In the' old world, the lam
    all relations, typified by the idea of l
    mishpocheh.' (This). .. is practi
    existent in modern American subu
    Land Where My ftj
    Continued from Piat S C
    herehow could I sing those words-then
    to me dishonest."
    And Grandpop explained further.
    our fathers died there, at Mayenee. Sou
    gas chambers built by Hitler. Some? in ing in the Warsaw Ghetto, fighting the 4
    Others in the Sinai campaign conducted M
    in 1056. All, all of these are our fathen. I
    were Jews who fought in the Revolutionary!
    America; and in the Civil War. on both t
    in the Big World Wars. Back in Nat
    there were Jews in the armieson both i
    Grandpop told Bill the story ol
    general under Napoleon who had
    soldier muttering strange words each time!
    fired his gun. The general asked the mail
    was saying. The man explained: "I an i
    general; each time I fire, I say the
    prayer that every Jew must say before I
    you see mon general, my ball may I
    Jew across the lines. And he. heaven I
    not have the time to say the Shema before!
    killed him."
    "Sing those lines." said Grandpop. "sii||
    Bill, loud and clear. You have a right tol
    for freedom, for many freedoms, your I
    your many fathers, they have died Bill, I
    died."
    Bill looked once more at the old Malt
    read the single line of type he could una
    a line in Roman characters; "A Mete, ch
    Antoine, Imprimeur ordinaire du Roi."
    Grandpop looked at Bill, road theft
    "Some day. Bill." he said, "some
    am gonetell your father, tell Lee. thai I
    this old Mahzor. is yours "
    "Thanks, Gramp." said Bill. And
    to prepare for bed.
    *
    And as Lee sucked at his professorial!
    noyed by his son's loud braying of the n*
    verses that seemed so irrelevant; and as Al
    cidod to try to drown out Bill's voice V\
    on the hi-fi. Grandpop repeated:
    "Don't children: don't; I know why: I
    A HAW Nfw TEA* TO ALL
    tl. S. Asburv
    REALTOR
    765 Arthur Godfrey Rd.
    *** JI 1-0444
    HAPPY NEW YEAR
    FAR EAST RATTAN
    SOUTH FLORIDA'S ONLY DIRECT IMPORTER
    OF RATTAN
    FROM HONG KONG AND THE PHILIPPINES
    BUY DIRECT AND SAVE
    MIAMI, FLORIDA
    50 N.E. 11th STREET
    TILCPHONE FR 9-7431
    '0 All...
    MOST HAW HIW VIA*
    VERO BEACH
    ASSOCIATE, IMC.
    424 SiYBOU ILK.
    nW Ft 4-3*34
    ** UTATI
    Beit Wishes for a HaMtJ \tu- tt
    Bennett's Shell Rood Service
    Firestone-1W A Merle* CnpWt* rk* "
    Motor Tune-Ue Open 24 Heurs Whtel Align**"' *
    10300 N.W. 27th Avwmia J*00* "
    Ben Wuh for HJMf 'Htiv T""
    JACK CHERRY'S CITY'S SERVI
    "Drive h, S.f.ty wirtl cherry'a ConpM* Avt $"""
    HOAO SERVICE MPAI*
    5485 Palm At., at 55th St **
    Phone MU 8-0962


    V
    . September^, 19S7
    +Jeist>ncrfi&3*7
    Actor Returns to His 'Home'
    Continued from Page 7 C
    rist m the realm of pure physics as he
    to the guide's attempt to explain the
    uses of atomic energy.
    .guide was a young man of twenty-four, a
    0f Sinai, and in the best physical condi-
    the assignment with Dawson, which he
    rted to be a lark, was turning out to be a
    whirlwind experience. The young man
    tinning to tire from the pacebut not Drew-
    ! ictor appeared able to draw upon hidden
    of energy, and regardless of the long
    j the arduous journeys, appeared always
    ^smiling and warmly interested as at the
    of his tour. Several times, (he guide
    [to* verge of asking him how ht managed
    , jurb seemingly inexhaustible stamina.
    c -Ay, toward the end of their tour, they .
    to'one of the new housing projects "for
    its. As he accompanied the actor through
    : dwellings, the guide spoke almost apol-
    Uy about the simplicity of the family hous-
    |ts. Drewson's reaction sartled him with its
    "These are good, solid homes, my
    what's more, they're here, ready for
    That mean* they eaa alert ea their
    ht away. You don't need fancy trimmings
    lit levels to build Israel."
    On me Way to Safes'
    conversed with a group of immigrants in
    [front of the housing .project, Drewson once
    displayed his genius for dealing with people
    I occurred to the young guide that this was
    tX of the actor's strength. In the process
    kplete communication with these men and
    I and children, he seemed to enter their lives
    nth themand he came away invigorated
    Itreshed.
    Walling these experiences and impressions
    visit to Israel. Drewson was awakened from
    Ttrie. The Rosb Hashona service had ended.
    ley remained in Jerusalem through Yom
    \, and. in the intervening period, he met the
    abbi. "Another one of Israel's great and
    en," Drewson thought to himself. It had
    tremendous three weekshe had seen a
    tart of the country, met many of its leaders
    oken to hundreds of people. There remain-
    : one more thing he had to do. The young
    |who knew him quite well by now, read his
    bill 1 take you to Safed now?" he asked.
    les." Drewson replied, "it's time .for Safed."
    1 they headed north to the Galilee, the young
    koodercd why the -actor had specified this
    trip to Safedwas there someone he knew there'
    He was on the point of asking, when Drewson said,
    JfLT ~ d y0U know the old metery in
    Safed?"
    "Yes, of course, I know it very well."
    The actor was pensive for a moment. "A rel-
    ative of mine is buried there," he said.
    At the gate to the old cemetery, Drewson ex-
    plained, "My great-grandfather, whose name I bear,
    is buried here. Of course, his name wasn't Henry
    Drewsonit was Hersch Draizin."
    When they stood before the grave, the actor
    looked somehow tired, older and slightly bent "My
    great-grandfathen/' he said, ."came to Israel to die.
    Today, he would have comedo Israel to live."
    l f
    !
    *
    ^^^^'^BBBBaBBBl
    [don't need fancy trimmings and split
    rebuild Israel."
    The Year's Top Stones
    Continued from Page 13 C
    a case of paternal love versus rigid sanctions writ-
    ten into a state law, and in the court of public
    opinion, the BHiaes won hands down. It was an
    interesting sidelight that the Bostoa couple were
    favored not as -Jews tut' as a childless couple
    threatened with loss of hard-won parental happi-
    ness by an unfeeling law. They won- their fight
    when, on July lOj Dade Circuit Judge John Prunty
    gave legal custody to the Ellises, and Hildy be-
    came their true daughter.
    8. The growing crisis for Jews in the integra-
    tion struggle in the deep South.
    Of all events impingiag on American Jews,
    this was the one least marked by explosions into
    public view. Occasionally, a roving Jewish reporter
    would describe the enormous squeeze on Southern
    Jews, caught between local segregation pressures
    and their traditions as Jews. In more practical
    evaluations, the middle class Jewish merchant
    was portrayed as trapped in a murderously-tight-
    ening vise between his Negro customers and white
    suppliers, both ready to use their economic power
    against him.
    9. The impact of suburbia on American Jews.
    Khrushchev Anti-Semitism
    A Brooklyn College sociologist, reporting to the
    Second General Assembly of the Synagogue
    Council of America, described the suburban Jew-
    ish family of 5717 as perhaps the most mobile, most
    tension-ridden and least rooted Jewish family in
    Jewish history. '.
    Whether such a family could carry on the
    historic function of the JewLsh. family in trans-
    mitting Jewish values and standards may become
    the single most significant problem in American
    Jewish Hfe.
    10. The shameless denial of, Nikita Khrush-
    chev of the right of Russian Jews' to continue their
    own culture and the elimination of Jews from So-
    viet positions. -,
    The durability of Russian anti-Semitism and
    Stalin's genocidal activities against the captive
    Jews of the Communist empire were widely ex-
    posed in the post-Stalin earthquake. In the jungle
    struggle for power between anti-Stalinists and
    Stalinists which followed Stalin's death and down-
    grading, both sides resorted to anti-Semitism.
    The destruction of Yiddish culture in the So-
    viet Union, the unabashed anti-Semitism of Khrush-
    chev and the continuing eruptions of anti-Jewish
    acts at both governmental and popular levels
    reached a point during 5717 that even the Jewish
    Communist press in the United States could no
    longer remain silent.
    fmkp to % Many friends .
    MICHAEL FOX
    CHIEF OF .POLICE
    MIAMI BEACH
    Best Wuhej /or a Hw> New Tear
    MARTIN KIRIK
    PAINTING CONTRACTOR
    ,,lfca5th
    Phone FR 33758
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL
    AL'S AUTO
    SERVICE
    Tune-Ups, Electrical Service
    Carburetor Specialist
    Automotive 4 Marine
    2037 N.W. 95th Street
    Day PL 9-5122 Nlte MU 1-1995
    Beit Wtthf fit the New Year
    CHRISTOPHER'S
    SERVICE
    STATIOX
    Gas Oil Accessories
    EXPERT REPAIRING
    1245 S.W. fed Avenue -
    Phone Fit 1 9221
    _________________________________________________Page 15 C
    Beit Wishes for a Happy New Tear
    PROWLER TELEVISION SERVICE
    Phone NE 5-2171 2812 N.W. 36th Street
    ,.* ,
    Best Wishes for a Happy New Tear
    BROADMOORPHARMACY
    PRESCRIPTIONS FREE DELIVERY
    8700 N.W. 32nd Ave. Open 5 hi 10 MU 1-4473

    Ben WnW if Hr.iy New Tear
    . 1 '
    BUSY BEE DAY NURSERY ~
    Ages 2-8 Transportation
    5141 N.W. 2nd Ave.
    Miami
    Phone PL 1-8054
    Best Wishes for a Happy New "fear
    L. K. Comstock and Co., Inc.
    A FLORIDA CORPORATION
    Huntington Bldg. 168 S.E. 1st Street
    FR 9-5891 Howard Nichols Miami, Fla.
    Best Wisries for a Happy New Tear
    THE CENTRAL RESTAURANT
    NOW IN NEW BUILDING
    Serving Fine Feed At Reasonable Frices
    (Free Parking for Customers)
    2710 W. FLAGLER STREET

    MR. and MRS. NIKOLAS Props.
    Best Wishes for a HapPyJUew tear
    Phone PL 8-1458
    'I
    GORDON HARDWARE COMPANY
    14020 W. Dixie Hwy.
    North Miami
    Best Wiihes for a Happy New Tear
    111
    LIVE and LET LIVE
    DRUG STORE
    A GOOD DRUG STORE
    3520 N.W. 17th Ave. Miami Fla. Phone NE 5-5203
    TO ALL GREETINGS .
    ALHAMBIA TUI CO., INC.
    CONCRETE PRODUCTS
    3070 S.W. 38th Court Phone HI 3-5382


    Page 16C
    *-Jewistncrkiari
    Friday,
    ^Pmln;

    J
    .
    Florida's Largest Exclusive
    Truck Dealer
    HOWE E. MOREDOCK COMPANY
    America's Greatest Truck Value
    International Harvester
    550 N.W. 6th AVE.
    FR. 1-6433
    USED TRUCK DEPARTMENT
    4135 N.W. 27th AVE. NE 4-7676
    *
    *
    Greetings To All
    Coral Gardens Motel & Apfs.
    "Apartments Designed for Gracious living"
    3622 S.W. 8th Street Miami, Florida
    Phone HI 6-9980
    *
    Best Wishes for a Happy New Tear .
    Phone FR 4-3101 Teletype: Miami 281
    i GORDON GRAVES
    and Company, Inc.
    Alain Of/ice: 30 Broad Street, New Tork 4, N.T.
    * INVESTMENT BANKERS
    410 Pan American Bank Building
    Miami 32, Florida
    ^^^WWW
    A
    HAPPY
    NEW YEAR
    TO ALL
    f
    DR. and MRS.
    MANNING J. ROSNICK
    and Family
    O. M. PUSHKIN
    YOUR MIAMI BEACH CHIEF BUILDING INSPECTOR
    Extends Greetings to All
    NEW tlAK 6KET/N6S
    FOSTER
    Electric Co.y Inc.
    CONTRACTING
    ALTERATIONS
    SERVICE
    Paul Foster, Pres.
    2264 W. Flaqler Street
    Miami, Florida
    Phone HI 8-2671
    GREETINGS
    JACK SWERDLIN
    44W S.W. 74NI ta^4M M M. mmm ?m
    CEMENT BLOCK INDUSTRIES
    CERTIFIED CEMENT BLOCK*
    Immediate D*Utt
    Bosl Wishes for a Nappy New Tear .
    *
    NORTH DADE
    ROOFING CO.
    14010 N.W. 20th Court
    Phone MU 1-0442
    Miami 50, Florida
    A & B Septic
    Tank Co.
    SEPTIC TANKS
    Installed and Repaired
    DRAIN FIELDS RELAID
    Free Inspection
    3400 N. W. 38th Are.
    Phone NE 4-7052
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATR0N3
    KENILWORTH HOTEL
    Open Alt Year
    OCEAN FRONT AT 102nd STREET
    BAL HARBOUR. MIAMI BEACH
    Phone UN 6-2711
    F. A. Sheahani
    Ml. LEO CIMENT
    t Iht
    DIXIE PICTURE FRAME CO.
    Exteiias New Ytmr Creefiaei to All Hit
    fritnds and Pefreai
    3540 N.W. 54th STKET
    fceae NE 5 1241
    A Happy New Tear fo AM Our
    Friend"! aetf *afreai
    Atlantic
    Kf|uipmcnt Co.
    1220 N. Miami Avenue
    Phone FR 3-0316
    Te Our Mmmy FrieWt, Fetreju ...
    Aceeaiataaces .
    most HAr-r-r holidays
    CRESCENT ELECTRIC
    trial Elecirkiaai Ceetreetar.
    teM M. laces, lea,
    fceee MU 1.3479
    14110 N.W. 27th AVENUE
    OM-IOCJU, HOMO*
    NEW YEAR GREETINGS
    AVIS RENT-A-CAR
    OLDTS INC. LICENSEE
    2830 N.E. 2nd Avenue
    Bosi Wishes for a Nappy New Tear ...
    Phone NE 5-0927
    shower
    enclosure
    corporation
    of America
    3254 n.w. 38th street
    miami, florida
    ----------- --------------------------------------------------------------
    6 EtTINGS I I
    Dm IMieflS
    Smith Hamilton Shop
    cimgms service
    231 l.w. tkSTMET r**n

    CllfT/NCJ
    BLY'S GARAGE
    General Repairs
    All Models
    232 S.W. 2nd Ave.
    Ptone FR 14804
    ^MN ROOFING AND
    SHE" METAl WORKS
    mm sw 22.. SLTmL
    at,'^,.?,or>' Wo?K by "
    TO ALL .
    SEASON'S
    BEST WISHES .
    Miami Tomato Corporati
    Tomatoes. Packing & Shipp",9|
    1040 East 26th Street
    HIALEAH. FLORIDA
    5->233S*^E*2S'


    leir Finest Attribute: Understanding

    the
    ALLISON
    HOTEL
    ^261 Collins Avenue
    Miami Beach
    SotCheskis
    Milton Bakst

    Greetings from
    Jf.tf.MfES
    BEER WINE.
    Hamburgeri in Town"
    Jimmie & Nat
    1369 S.W. 8th STREET
    Phone FR 4-9830
    FLORIDA STATE
    RMINATING CO.
    mi MRS. UN NMEN
    usr wishes rot a
    AW Nfw YEAR
    417 LINCOLN ROAD
    MIAMI BEACH
    Ph.ne JE 1-0219
    r ui Prosperous New Year
    | M Our Friends and Pafreai
    | WVIERA PIAZA HOTEL
    ! M7 20th STREET
    MIAMI BEACH
    ** JI 1-4143
    "* Cahen, President
    """ Kantor, Treasurer
    !e
    f1 A" Greeftrigs
    ROPICAL
    CHEVROLET
    'S MOST MODERN
    N Greater Miam"
    *! H. 1-9724
    ' ^"YW Boulevard
    .
    i^KwiyUEIIiOiciidliiaun
    Miami, Florida. Friday. September 27, 1957
    Section D
    - .
    "The Working Mothers' Organization of
    Moetzet Hapoalot, the sister organization of
    the Pioneer Women in Israel, knows that per-
    sonal contact gives the new immigrant a
    stronger sense of belonging to the living
    community of Israel."
    For Pioneer Women Israels People
    Are a Precious Chalice to be Loved
    By ALLEN ROBERTS
    BORIS was a carpenter from Eastern Europe.
    * When he arrived in Migdal-Ashkelon just a
    few weeks ago he found the new freedom hard to
    understand. His new friends are builders, weavers
    and machinists. They have the benefits of trade
    unions which stand up for the rights of labor.
    "It is a strange feeling," Boris declared, "to
    be" able to talk to everyone, stranger and friend
    and have no fear that someone will inform on you."
    "Behind the Iron Curtain," Paula his wife said.
    "I had to draw the blinds before I lit the Sabbath
    candles."
    The couple's 12-year-old daughter, Haiah. who
    was born in a forest where her parents were mem-
    bers of an anti-Nazi guerrilla band, was not per-
    mitted out after night had fallen lest she be stoned.
    In Migdal-Ashkelon, a rural center with a pop-
    ulation of 20,000, sixteen miles from the hot-spot of
    Gaza and two miles from biblical Ashkelon. there
    is an interesting assortment of people. The town
    has skilled artisans from Eastern Europe and mid-
    dle-class immigrants from Egypt. A typical emi-
    grant is Sarah who came from Port Said, Egypt, to
    Israel a few weeks ago. Marcel her husband is a
    mechanical engineer who was employed at the Suez
    Canal. The family which includes three daughters
    Daniella. Yona and Maiahled a comfortable
    existence in a surburb of Port Said. When Nasser
    began his anti-foreign campaign the family were
    among the first to leave Egypt. Marcel has be
    come integrated into the community of Israel. He
    is now employed in a large factory near Migdal-
    Ashkelon.
    They are Brave
    SINCE the Sinai episode over 5.000 Egyptian Jews
    have arrived in Israel. The dictator of the
    Nile had sequestered their funds and for the most
    part these former prosperous middle class Jews
    came into the country penniless.
    Former lawyers, writers government officials,
    businessmen and other white collar professionals
    find adapting themselves to a new country a diffi-
    cult problem. Israel cannot utilize the profession-
    als immediately and many face the prospect of a
    temporary period where they may have to work at
    manual laboran appalling prospect. But most of
    the new arrivals face the situation bravely and
    realistically.
    A scant four weeks ago ten families (six from
    Hungary and four from Egypt) arrived at Migdal-
    Ashkelon from Haifa. Volunteers from the Work-
    ing Mothers' Organization were there to greet the
    newcomers. Tea and cake was served and there
    was talk and an attempt to make the new immi-
    grants feel that they were wanted.
    "On our first night here," Boris' wife Paula
    said, "we had supper with a family that has been
    in Israel for five years. They have become our
    best friends." The Working Mothers 'Organiza-
    tion of Moetzet Hapoalot, the sister organization of
    the Pioneer Women in Israel knows that personal
    contact gives the new immigrant a stronger sense
    of belonging to the living community of Israel. A
    new family, on their arrival are given beds, mat-
    tresses, some furniture, kitchen utensils, crockery
    and some pocket money. The breadwinner must
    be put to work as soon as possible. That function
    i.-, assumed by the Histadrut "absorption" office.
    Should there be no employment openings in
    the newcomer's profession or craft he is immediate-
    ly placed on public works projects such as road-
    building, pipe-laying, forestry and other projects.
    The men are taught by instructors on the job. A
    diamond cutting factory was recently established at
    Migdal-Ashkelon by the Histadrut and the Ministry
    of Labor and among its new employees were ten
    young immigrants from Hungary. A Hungarian
    journalist and a woman economist with particularly
    Continued on Page 11 D
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    Eban-Profile of a Top Dip|(
    '.is
    By NATHAN ZIPRIN
    AOPBFSSINfr tha UN General Assembly of May
    11, 1949, on th? occasion of Israel's admit-
    tance to the family of nations. Ambassador Eban
    remarked that Israel was "new in the art of prac-
    tical statecraft." If Israel has now mastered that
    art, a good deal of the credit belongs to thsjrouth-
    ful diplomat whose name is legend in millions of
    American homes of all faiths.
    Eban's meteoric rise to statesmanship will
    never be forgotten by those who listened to his
    memorable address of July 13, 1948, when he re-
    minded the Security Couneil that Arab advances
    into Israel on May 26 of that year in defiance of a
    May 22 Council demand for an unconditional cease
    fire constituted not only a threat to Israel, but a
    test of the moral power of the family of nations
    in an hour of crisis. His voice was sonorous, hi
    bearing was almost majestic and his delivery was
    weighted with conviction and grace. Here was a
    young voice with the quality and ring of the old
    prophets. When he was finished there was gen-
    eral recognition, among friend
    and foe, that here was a states-
    man of immeasurable stature
    and an articulate voice with the
    power of chastisement and per-
    suasion.
    In fact, it has been said that
    one of Israel's most authentic
    miracles, was the emergence of
    this youthful diplomat, who was
    to lead his country through the
    maze and wilderness of the Uni-
    ted Nations.
    This writer has always felt
    that Ambassador Eban is not
    only endowed with statesman-
    ship and spokesmanship but
    with the stuff of which literary
    men are made. His recently
    published collected addresses
    under the aptly-named title
    'Voice of Israel," confirms this
    belief.
    Orators are noted for using
    lofty phrases. Eban's phrases, when they rise above
    mundane expression, are not in that category
    There ,, complete lack of triteness when he uses
    lofty phrases, for they stem from a sensitivity for
    word and an intuitiveness of pen. Whenever Eban
    rises .bove the level of ordinary aemantics-and
    this ,s the rule with him rather than the exception
    he is as self searching about the phrase as he is
    about ,he theme. No mere orator could have coin
    ed the phrase the air of Israel is alive with the
    tumult of creation" and no mere rhetoricZ
    could speak of .srae.'s hour of nistory %%
    s eminence amongst the authentic moments of
    climax in human history."
    Meter at Words
    LISTENING to his addresses, one has the feeling
    lesslv u^th ,h'S WrdS Were gUshin* forth ***
    On Lh .kC PWCr and rny,hm of a waterfalrr-
    On reading them that impact is not lost. On the
    contrary, the essence of the word takes added
    meaning against the background of the written
    discern in the ind.vidual addresses. For what
    spirals from the pages of the book is no^onTy a
    Portrait of Israel's most capable pleader on the
    transcending his immediate preoccupation.
    J^j!^_^^j^tm in fu stature as
    scholar and interprets of the Jewish
    the weave of history Most i/U8 MH
    for his defense of Israel and its SS
    councils of the nation. f0rge,Ung2^
    achievements of articulateness in oik.
    as hi* brilliant retort to Prof.
    haresiad -falsehood about Jew"
    Eoan is a master of the pen and J
    and while the collected week! '
    chronicle of the events of the day th
    the story of the man who penned them ft i
    said of Eban that he has few peer's m"
    skill. He roost certainly has few sup
    ter of the word. No mere diplomat",
    penned the image and the vision that ]
    birth was "a drama conceived in mtje
    and acted in the sight of eternity."
    Eban's presentation of Israels tm\
    world and American public opinion bat |
    terful by all standards But there u
    equally important facet in the picture -|
    versatility, breadth of interest, historic _
    and critical evajuatioi"
    the fact of the exutaaj
    rael settle anything?"
    on the third
    his reply was that "tk3
    tutes the final anfw.tr ii|
    -existence of the rtiu|
    nature and quality.'
    went on, must capture!
    brew roots and retain 1
    ish roots "but in our
    with recapturing Hebw
    Jewish roots, we mint i
    avoid the pitfalls of
    ism."
    H'
    AM4 fIAN
    .. re
    e it msiault
    Inner Re*lectio*!
    IS sense of historic J
    tive came to fore ul
    dress he delivered at the]
    Theological Seminary of j
    ica, in which he develo
    thesis that "there are ml
    in history so different itj
    and yet so alike in i
    as the American
    the eighteenth century and the establid
    Israel's independence in the present daj;
    and hence "for any American to remain I
    even indifferent to Israel's struggle lot i
    dence would require of him to turn his baefcj
    most revered national memories of his i
    pie."
    Reflective perhaps of his deeper
    Eban's kcJectisn of the Veshiva Uiuveratjl
    of his moat incisive and most signifxar.il
    debunking Professor Toyabee's heresy w
    ish history and the Jewish path in history
    come to you," he told the spellbound ti
    "not in my diplomatic capacity but
    student of human history and letters,!
    spite from contemporary affairs." A
    to an assault upon Israel's historic repute]
    serted, "is not a mere exercise in acadei
    troversy" but one affecting "the very ea
    Israel's destiny in life and thought" and I
    proceeded to decimate Toynbee with fact i
    gue and sarcasm. He called Toynbee's I
    tion of Jewish history a grotesque aberrat*
    daring that "if Jsrael was a fossil cent111
    then its survival is certainly an archaism
    restoration a grotesque paradox."
    Eban is a colorful personality, wit" **
    diplomacy and in all that is touched by toj
    and mind. The collected speeches confina
    we had known all along.
    SINCERE WISHES
    TO
    ALL MY
    JEWISH FRIENDS
    *
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    Clerk of Criminal
    Court
    THE SALVATION ARMY
    needs
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    f September 27, 1957-
    *JmistfcridHGUi
    [jlitary History: 'Operation Sinai'
    By BEN KATAN
    . test, the Israeli operation against Egypt in
    the Sinai Peninsula and its aftermaths ranks {/**
    single most important event of the Jewish
    The welfar" of iTaeJ if not the only signifi-
    1 interest of Jews throughout the world. But it
    Lainly a ke>' intejest and any major event
    Mjng Israel automatically is a big Jewish story.
    over, there was no single development any-
    else in the Jewish world during 5717 to
    Lge the dominance of the Sinai story.
    Ipje actual military operation had local, re-
    am! international significance. It demon
    i once again that Israel's armed forces, sub-
    bing .kill and courage for shortages of ultra-
    equipment, were more than a match for
    hsrript army of a Mideast police state, even
    h "hat army was bountifully equipped with
    fewest and deadliest weapons from the Soviet
    c
    Equally important was the destruction of per-
    j 90 percent of the millions of dollars worth of
    |ei war equipment of which Egyptian Dictator
    kt had so confidently counted for use in
    Lhing Israel at a moment of hig^
    I the flew Soviet submarine gif|
    BBthe importance' of rile al
    |of Nasser's dream of a mecHanizea blitzkrieg
    is! Israel.
    Ilhe Sinai operation was a decisive factor in
    iegi"ning of the downgrading of Nasser's ven-
    bs efforts to dominate his Arab neighbors and
    Ibem to his anti-Western and anti-Israel
    hoi The destruction of Nasser's military po-
    ll! also was the indispensable preliminary for
    |og it possible for the Eisenhower Doctrine to
    ; functioning. Israel's deflation on the Sinai
    s of Nasser's self-projected image to the Arab
    *sa; the Arab leader who could destroy Israel
    |e-stial before other Arab leaders could pull
    lrcm Nasser's anti-Western crusade.
    Gain for World Security
    HEL'S struggle to retain some gains from its
    |brill:ant desert victory had equally significant
    national ramifications. In the long debate
    followed in the United Nations on with-
    hl. Israel made its case and won worldwide
    pithy as never before.
    [Tha! sympathy was most clearly manifested in
    Ireaction of intense disapproval among all of
    rrica'= allies to the announced readiness of the
    shower Administration to impose crippling
    kmic sanctions as a means of forcing complete
    jtli withdrawal from the Sinai Peninsula,
    per the Eisenhower Administration would
    ly have clamped down the ultimate sanctions
    nstl.-rael will probably not be known until key
    prican officials in the drama publish their me-
    What is known is that the hostility of
    Ttca's allies to all-out American sanctions
    gthtneel Israel's determination to risk the
    fower wrath that had compelled the British
    Ilhe French to pull out of Egypt pell-mell.
    [The argument will continue indefinitely on
    flher Israel won any durable security gains
    i the United Nations debate. But it is hardly
    ft that the creation of the United Nations
    pfgency oFrcethe first truly international po-
    | force in world historywill be rated as any-
    ' tot a gain for world security.
    | How long UNEF will last and how long it will
    "in on the Gaza Strip border and at Sharm el
    kh not even the UN secretariat seems to know.
    [the precedent of an international police force
    When war came to Middle East last Oct. 28,
    American students in Israel, unable to join
    army, volunteered as medical aides. They
    drove ambulances, rolled bandages, worked
    in laboratories and helped move wounded
    They labored from sunset to dawn,
    idfc covered with blood, their hearts
    for suifering they witnessed.
    as a stabilizing element on explosive borders has
    been set.
    They Stood Up to Him
    AS long as Egyptian guns were in position at
    Sharm el Sheikh, Israeli shipping was bar-
    red from the waterway and Elath was a dead port.
    At the very least, the UNEF stabilizer at Sharm
    el Sheikh is giving Israel a chance to build up the
    all-important precedents for the international sta-
    tus of the waterway.
    The effectiveness of the UNEF tranquilizer
    should not be casually dismissed. There has been
    a tremendous drop in infiltrations into Israel and
    the reoccupation of the Gaza Strip by Egypt was
    not accompanied by a resumption of fedayeen
    raids. The Arabs have been making menacing
    noises every time a ship has passed through the
    Gulf of Aqaba bearing Israeli cargo, but the fact is
    that the ships are going through the Gulf of Aqaba
    and the Straits of Tiran at the mouth of the Gulf.
    Not the least of the consequences of the Sinai
    operation was the test which developed for the
    loyalty to Israel of American Jews. The after-
    math included the development of an open and
    avowed conflict for the first time in the history of
    American Zionism between the overwhelmingly
    pro-Israel sentiments of American Jews and the
    hostile position of a President of the United States
    about an act of Israel.
    Dwight D. Eisenhower appealed to all Amer-
    icans to support a policy which his Jewish audi-
    ence felt was wrong. He warned that Israel's
    course was dangerous to American security, a
    plain statement that those Americans who sup-
    ported it conceivably might be hurting the security
    of their country.
    If ever any Jewry might have been expected
    to run for cover and leave Israel in the lurch, it
    was an American Jewry confronted by the anti-Is-
    rael anger of the President of the United States.
    Nothing of the sort happened. Jews through-
    out the United States stood firm, challenged the
    Tightness of the Eisenhower stand, as each new de-
    velopment unfolded. ^^^
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    Extend Best Wishes To All For A Happy New Year
    TO ALL A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY
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    M. mOKDlCAl HHM
    ."Judaism os o Civilhatiin"
    OR. MOIHE DAVIS
    "IsreeZ-Reft im ChrMiieriea"
    1MK UHn
    "Collar, of rmfo
    Rich Year in Jewish Book Output
    By HAROLD U. RIBALOW
    ^NCE again, as we measure Jewish literary ac-
    complishments with the coming of a new
    year, we are pleasantry surprised by the'rich and
    varied contributions- made in an area .generally
    celled ikvwsh literature." Every once in a while.
    columnists, facing white paper and a deadline, offer
    the view that American-Jewish writing is undis-
    tinguished and that the American-Jewish reading
    public indifferent to the little writing that is pub-
    lished.
    As usual, the columnists write more to fill the
    empty white space than because they have know-
    ledge at their fingertips. Not so long ago. one
    English-Jewish editor bewailed the quantity and
    quality of Jewish writing. I can only hope that
    the compilation which follows finds its way into
    his hands. Not that he will acknowledge his er-
    rors. Such pessimistic viewers seldom do. The
    facts, however, are easily ascertainable.
    For example, since last Rosh Hashona, here
    are some of the more intriguing works of fiction
    which American readers, Jewish and non-Jewish
    alike, could have purchased. See if they do not
    bear up well at this time of season.
    Critical Acclaim
    gERNARD Malamud gave us "The Assistant"
    (Farrar, Straus and Cudahy), a remarkable
    story about a Jewish grocer and his family and a
    guilt-ridden Italian who invades their lives. When
    a review copy of Malamud's story reached this
    writer, he praised it enthusiastically to his friends.
    When the novel was officially published six weeks
    later, it elicited rave reviews all over the nation
    as a genuine work of art. It will be read for years
    to come, for its passionate understanding of the
    human heart and for its skillful delineation of a
    Jewish genre hitherto overlooked by American
    writers: the little poverty-stricken family strug-
    gling for a livelihood in a Gentile neighborhood.
    Adele Wisemans "The Sacrifice" (Viking)
    was probably the most highly praised Jewish novel
    of many seasons, although to this critic the praise
    was too generous. Nevertheless, this symbolic
    novel about an old Jew and the tragic turn a love
    affair takes, has been accepted as a serious work
    of art by leading literary critics and has earned
    for young Miss,Wiseman the applause of thousands
    as well as many astute reviewers.
    Other young writers made auspicious debuts
    this past year, most notably Sam Astrachan, with
    "An End to Dying" (FarVar. Straus and Cudahy). a
    shrewd narrative of Jewish family life, stretching
    from Europe, to the United States and
    Europe again. There is vivid writing here (
    ially when the very young author (in his i
    when he actually wrote the book) retells ,
    vftntAifffB Of his'^pw* in Russia decades a
    Astraqhfln has *uice won aa award for him
    and one expects very fine things irm hi*
    aid Green, a TV man. also wrote an ambi
    Jewish novel, which was a book club sek
    and attained best sellerdom. Although it
    many of the slick attributes of mass sellers, C
    "The Last Angry Man" (Scribners) does mm
    an interesting Jewish doctor as its major |
    nist. Not as good a book as its sales ind
    is nevertheless, a popular one.
    Runaway Best-Seller
    QNE of American Jewry's prominent
    Meyer Levin, after years of good, but <
    looked books, finally made it with a runawajl
    sell: "Compulsion" (Simon and Schuster),
    the actual notorious Leopold-Loeb murder I
    Not entirely a "Jewish" book, Levin does not <
    look some interesting psychologicaland Je
    aspects of this horrifying crime. Surely,
    pulsion" belongs in this annual listing, for I
    veals how a skilled Jewish novelist can write i
    an unsavory case, introduce the Jewish th
    and yet keep the sensationalism to a mia
    and offer a degree of understanding on a |
    case.
    This does not complete the distinguished!
    of Jewish fiction, although there is space onl
    a handful of titles. "The Marked One" by.
    Picard (Jewish Publication Society) offt
    translation, some remarkable stories of
    life in the Germany before Hitler's era
    Complete Novels of Nathanael West"
    Straus and Cudahy) brings back to the p
    the novels of a Jewish artist who died before J
    time and whose work was long in obscurity
    revival in West shows us that this sensitive,.
    and bitter Jewish novelist was one of the I
    we have had in two or three decades.
    And. finally, we have the work of a nun i
    gave us what this writer considers one o'""'
    thoughtful and interesting Jewish novels in|
    years. Michael Blankfort's "The Strong "
    (Little Brown). This is a story about an Or*
    modern American rabbi and hi* love fori"
    he cannot marry. It brings to our attenuMt
    tain problems of Jewish law, but also proves'
    an American-Jewish novelist can draw
    Continued on Page 14 D
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    , September 27, 1957
    -Jewish thridtor?
    tistic Achievement During 5717
    year
    By ALFRED WIRNER
    5717 was highlighted by two impor-
    , events: the opening of to art gallery at
    [ThLior Herzl Institute. New York, and the
    nniversary celebrations of New York's Jew-
    iwUum. Pu'"8 its vnil 8pace "^ other Ta'
    to use for periodic exhibition* of Israeli
    *\ crafts, the Herzl Institute hopes to help
    L and artists of Israel in two ways:
    Bt making available to Israeli artists space
    a commercial gallery, would be prohibi-
    B cost; and by accepting for display only
    wrks which meet a professional standard
    Inwnt years, exploitation of the ever-present
    el sentiment has imposed upon an unsus-
    Ljug, artistically naive, public "Israeli art"
    j from mediocre to downright bad).
    Lovely Israeli stamps, artistic book plates per-
    to Zionist history and the aesthetic grop-
    of Israeli children as well as four one-man
    were on view. Joel Rohr, who after 23
    i in the United States migrated to Palestine in
    showed delicately balanced, rhythmically
    pictures of Kibbutz activities, ancient sites,
    i and flowers in bloom. Ruth Levin, wife of
    Levin, counsellor at the Israel Embassy,
    Ived her good taste and versatility in drawings
    l paintings, her subject matter ranging from
    aits to large Victorian interiors, and her land
    i shifting from Israeli vistas to sun-drenched
    let in New Mexico. There were spontaneously
    Hed flower pieces and freely conceived still
    i by Jenny Maiselis. A series of tempera pan-
    .The Ten Plagues," a Passover decoration used
    the Kibbutz Hatzor, was the center of young
    Ibth Oren's show: her offerings revealed sen-
    jrity, and her strong color the yearning for joy-
    |eipressiveness.
    Bottomless Treasure Chest
    LY t decade has passed since toe opening of
    the Jewish Museum in a Gothic-style man-
    i it Fifth ave. and 92nd st. donated by Felix
    | Warburg's widow. So deeply has the Museum,
    scores of exhibitions, lectures, and other
    nities influenced the taste and augmented the
    ge of hundreds of thousands ef residents
    |Kt* York (and, through loan exhibitions, mil-
    i in other cities from the Atlantic to the Pa-
    that it is now hard to believe American
    ever managed without this bottomless
    wire chest.
    , Two exhibitions of the first half of 1957 are
    Table: "Artists of the New York School: Sec-
    I Generation.'' and the 10th Anniversary Show.
    ! former acquainted us with the talents of 28
    young men and women. No restrictions as
    tyle and subject matter were imposed on these
    i who. in fact, seemed to have been encour-
    I by the enthusiastic curator. Dr. Stephen S.
    pa, to be as bold ai they wished.
    For the anniversary celebration, about a hun-
    I priceless ceremonial objects had been loaned
    Ith* C'uny Museum in Paristhe bulk of the
    ws Strauss Rothschild Collection. S/)me items
    four and oven five hundred years oW, and
    show included unusual Chanuka lamps and
    boxes as well as elaborately wrought golden
    riage rings of Italian craftsmanship. In addi-
    soroe 50 works of classic and modern art were
    by friends of the Museum. Among those
    "res was a lovely small Rembrandt, seen in
    'York for the first time. Titled "The Biblical
    /r'est' 't shows the sorrow-wracked features
    Paging artist, and the rich impasto color
    eristic of his late work.
    The effort to express love for God through
    creating beautiful objects for His worship and His
    commandments is as ancient as Judaism itself."
    These lines were written by Dr. Louis Finkelstein
    chancellor of the Jewish Theological Seminary of
    America, perhaps with the intention to encourage
    American Jews to build better and nobler syna-
    gogues, and to furnish them with the best products
    of craftsmanship and skill. As the spiritual re-
    awakening, accompanied by good times, continued
    throughout the year, many postwar synagogue edi-
    fices were brought to conclusion, while new ones
    were started, mainly in suburban communities.
    Jews, like other groups, continued to require up-
    to-date religious buildings, and courageous mod-
    ernism remained triumphant over nostalgic pretti-
    ness.
    Architects Found Ingenious
    pilT in 5717 architects were still wrestling with
    the two problems confronting them when
    the building boom began after V-J Day. Whereas
    the Christian house of worship gradually and log-
    ically developed from the medieval cathedral to-
    wards the light and simple 20th century church
    building, architects had had to create the modern
    synagogue out of a void, as it were. In many cases,
    an edifice, built in, say, 1946, within ten years
    proved to be too small for the rapidly expanding
    congregation, and a new architect had to solve the
    difficult task of blending his own creation (the
    additional structures) with the older building,
    sometimes still a bit "conservative" in its aesthetic
    expression.
    On the whole, however, our architects have
    managed to solve these problems ingenuously. Be-
    tween Massachuetts and California, dozens of ex-
    cellent temples have sprung up during the last
    year, synagogues expressing the unobtrusive dig-
    nity, the soothing quietness so appealing to the
    man of today. A recent and most welcome fea-
    ture ought to be noted: the love for nature, satis-
    Modern dance artist Pearl Lang and David
    Lober rehearse production, "Falls the Shadow
    Between," for presentation at Brandeis Uni-
    versity's fourth Festival of Creative Arts dur-
    ing past Hebrew year 5717. Drama was set
    to music by Meyer Kupferman.______________
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    Pag* 6D
    +Jemsbftork*(*n

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    MACK CONSTRUCTION CO.
    4*1 S.W. Ith STRICT
    MAX STEIN, Owner
    PHONE MO 14S1
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    "Flair of Miami"
    454H.W.5.*VIH MUM, ,.. ,.
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    PLUMBERS Established 1924
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    Hialeah
    fridqy^^
    27,
    Israel-Land of Modern Mir;
    By HUBERT H. HUMPHREY
    United States Senate
    This ortrefe wei wrfrfae rer the Sawis* Tale-
    oraphic Afcecr 7 ** *' Himpknr
    t04hn.) Wescriama ail rmpreniam ewd ae-
    lervefrONI during e teer ef Itreaf as pert ef a
    toreien relaffans Ituey mission fete hVt MMdfc
    Eait.
    IN one of the oldest areas of the world in terms of
    history, it is quite an experience to find per-
    haps the most youthful spirit of the Twentieth
    Century. That is the paradox of Israel today. Is-
    rael's a country rich in tradition. Every mile of
    its land is like a chapter of Ancient History. Yet,
    it is today a nation filled with dreams of tomorrow,
    motivated, strengthened and sustained by a cen-
    turies-old culture and faith.
    Israel is a political and economic oasis in the
    Middle Eastern desert of feudalism, economic im-
    balance, and grave social inequities. Indeed, there
    is a most remarkable spirit of national unity in the
    State of Israel. There is a sense of pride in na-
    tional accomplishments and con-
    fidence in the national ability
    to meet whatever Jhe*' iulnre
    ' AnfcuTnVman* wAJm-
    prcssions of Israel, etched deep-
    est in my memory perhaps is
    the evident spirit of youth.
    Every place you see children,
    and in every walk of life young
    people are taking a decisive and
    important role.' Coupled with
    the enthusiasm of youth, one
    notices the strength and steadi-
    ness i>f those who have found
    early maturity by the shoulder-
    ing of responsibility.
    In Israel the attention is
    upon people and water, rather
    than upon privilege and oil.
    The Israelis have proven
    themselves skilled conservation-
    ists and excellent farmers. They
    have turned rock into soil, bar-
    ren hills into forests. Water is
    regarded as a precious resource. There is an over-
    all comprehensive nationwide plan to obtain max-
    imum utilization of water resources. Pipeline con-
    struction, small dams, and well-drilling operations
    are pressed forward, particularly in the southern
    part of the country. Irrigation makes possible as
    many as three crops a year in some agricultural
    areas. The land is fertile and productive, when
    the life-giving water is made available.
    Impressed by Observation*
    I was tremendously impressed with what I saw
    the terracing, the tree-planting, the orchards,
    and the fields of grain. Upper and Lower Galilee
    are very productive areas, and particularly beau-
    tiful The Hills of Judea are again being made
    fertile and productive. One gets the feeling in
    Israel that everything is possible.
    When the long-established Hebrew University
    was cut off from Israel by the Armistice Agree
    ment of 1949, thereby leaving the Hebrew Univer-
    sity in Old Jerusalem on the Jordanian side of the
    border, the Israelis determined to build a new uni-
    versity. Yes, a new Hebrew University is now
    under construction in the suburbs of New Jerusa-
    lem. It has a beautiful location, and will be one
    of the great centers of learning and culture in the.
    Middle East. To those Americans who are the
    friends of Hebrew University, may I say that to
    see it is to be. proud and pleased,*!
    work. prcased *h the I
    And then there i, the newHaW,
    under construction on a towerinj hii.
    the valley into the city of New ,! .
    life a sentinel guarding ,he ZS*i
    of the people. H.dassah Hospi,"fS "*
    the greatest medical centers in ,n 7EuLt
    d State, have given .7r.iX
    Asia. It is well under construction C*
    much work and energy the ladies ofiS?
    fatafl
    construction of the hospital, it made me
    and happy to tee this magnificent health '
    becoming a reality. It will be staffed
    trained doctors, nurses and technicians,
    I visited the new Port of Elath. l saw t
    struction of the eight-inch pipeline from
    Beersheba the building of docks and
    ments in the harboryes, and the oil tank L
    the head of the pipeline. I saw a freighter ^i
    port from Africa. The day before there had I
    another oil tanker from Iran.
    Israeli Virtues
    CLATH has grown fromi
    munity of around
    2,000 .in the last two ya
    and is expanding rapsdtj.j
    erywhere there is buildup
    homes, new roads, water, |
    modern sanitary facilities. I
    Israel plans to build)
    more pipelines a
    a 32-inch line. Her pn
    capital. The French
    dicated an interest. Sun
    light of the uncertainty i
    Suez Canal, alternative!
    for the shipment of oil I
    iterranean ports for westen|
    rope should be assured.
    I saw the copper
    which is being constructed!
    the site of the copper
    King Solomon. This pn
    plant when completed
    duce copper that will
    ready market in Europe,!
    ly strengthening Israel's economy.
    It has taken vision and courage to mikl
    necessary investment, and it takes imagination,
    great faith, plus physical stamina, just to I
    this copper processing plant. One can hardlyi
    prehend the magnitude of the problems in*.
    the transportation of the necessary
    terials, the recruitment of skilled labor, the i
    ible engineering problems in the construd
    this modern refining facility.
    But the Israelis are doing itjust as the
    accomplished everything else they have
    taken.
    Israel will need more capital if she is
    tinue her program of progress and devek
    But above all, she needs faith from people i
    of Israel.
    The aeople of Israel are convinced
    a great future. They already have a
    history. What Israel needs now is the
    and faith of her friends.
    Israel and Old West
    THE spirit and story of Twentieth Century I
    1 is reminiscent in many ways of
    American West. .
    One finds the same easy informality. Wj
    feeling of self-reliance, and the same kind oil
    Continued on Paea '5 D
    sin. Nutitr miMMKtr
    . covered the cownfry
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    MIAMI
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    Devon Motell Calos
    TO MY MANY FRIENDS AND ACQUAINTANCES
    A Very Happy New Year
    I. Me ADAMS
    New r*t-r Grti\tv*s from
    fyfi\
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    3345 N.W. 7th AVENUE Phone FR *-16*
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    Jewish thrkUam
    olow and Modern Journalism
    !2
    7D
    By PHILIP RUSKIN
    I is the story of a great journalist, of a fer-
    [ vent Zionist, of a prolific author writing in
    iguages. a man of whom Rabbi Stephen S.
    [said: "He was a master of Jewish learning,
    jric figure in the tradition of Jewish letters
    itlped io shape the living Hebrew tongue
    Uout.the Jewish world as pioneer in many
    ttual social and literary enterprises."
    khum Sokolow was a descendant of the fam-
    Lbalist Nathan Shapiro whose grandson Sam-
    ; rabbi anil one of the earlier leaders of the
    : movement, settled in Sokolow, from which
    Bily took its name.
    jorn 1860 in W'ysograd, Nahum was five years
    ben his parents moved to Plock where the
    hs given the best Hebrew teachers; he eager-
    Wd the rxles. Bible and Talmud, but was
    Wat the rudiments of secular subjects and
    Led his talent as a writer at an early age.
    Days of Youth
    |a youth while still wearing the traditional
    , kaftan and peoth (side locks), he continued
    tular studies without the help of a teacher
    irsing himself in the study of history and
    Thanks to a brilliant memory and
    [perception Nahum became one of the. best-
    ncd mind- in his native Poland and seott his
    [spread all over Europe and Russia, j
    rther with a tew young, courageous friends,
    started publishing a hand-written news
    i in Hebrew and in his leisure hours trans
    [two of Schiller's five-act dramas "The Rob-
    1 and "Mary Stuart" into Hebrew; he also
    l numerous articles for Hebrew-language pa
    His earliest contributions in Hebrew ap-
    I in 1873 when he was 13 years young.
    lit 18, he married the pretty daughter of
    Hi; Isaac It Segal in Makow and for the next
    wears, his family was provided for by his
    tin-law. This allowed Nahum to devote much
    I to his studies. Although he had never at-
    lany "gymnasium" nor university, he was so
    to study, so enthusiastic about acquiring
    Hedge that, burning his midnight oil, he Tearn-
    TKh more than the average student. Endowed
    |in unusual talent for languages, he mastered
    l early ai(e Russian, Polish, French, English,
    psh, Italian and German.
    "Harzefirah"
    IER a disappointing period, during which
    young Nahum tried to make a living as a
    wsmanall attempts failed miserablyhe
    W to devote his life to journalism. In 1875.
    an contributing to "Hatxefirah." a Warsaw
    [ly newspaper in Hebrew, and soon his articles
    I their way also into other publications. Creat-
    |or himself an ever-widening circle of enthu-
    readers. Sokolow was invited in 1881he
    21 years oldto take charge of the "Hat-
    W" as its editor.
    llnder Sokolow's devoted and able guidance.
    pper made remarkable progress. His sensi-
    Malway. on the pulse of h'is readers, Soko-
    Nullfully in:mduced new interesting features,
    ed talented contributors. He saw to it that
    *>rah became known as the best-informed
    among all who read Hebrew. And his- en-
    ws were crowned by success. Every Friday
    * published his "feuilleton" to give his
    *bbath readers light and enjoyment. In
    IsJ, efiralr ''ecune a daily newspaper.
    pkolow who. in the beginning, had preferred
    ?ttna to the Holy Land for Jewish immigra-
    r^nded the first Zionist Congress in Basle.
    The young Nahum Sokolow with his wife and
    first-born son, Lucian, in Warsaw1880. At
    18, he married the pretty daughter of wealthy
    Isaac H. Segal in Makow.
    Switzerland, in 1897, as a journalist and wrote ob-
    jective and critical reports on the meetings. Later,
    however, he changed his mind, full heartedly en-
    dorsed Herzl's Zionism and gave it prominent space
    in the Hebrew and Yiddish press.
    Sokolow the Diplomat
    AT the outbreak of World War I in 1914, Sokolow
    moved to London and joined Chaim Weiz-
    mann in his Zionist activities. He proved to be an
    exceedingly able diplomat for important missions
    on the Continent. He was responsible for securing
    the unanimous approval of the Balfour Declaration
    by the French and Italian Governments and by the
    somewhat reluctant governments of Poland, Ru-
    mania and South Africa. At the Versailles Peace
    Conference, Sokolow, acting as president of the
    Committee of Jewish Delegations, submitted his
    carefully drawn up proposals on Jewish minority
    rights.
    After Herzl's untimely death. 1904. Sokolow
    became general secretary to the Zionist party now
    under the, leadership of David Wolfsohn. With
    his family. Sokolow moved to the old German town
    of Cologne where he edited "Die Welt," the Zionist
    mouthpiece founded by Herzl. But this was hardly
    enough for Sokolow's over-active, brilliant mind.
    He founded "Haolom," the official Hebrew organ
    of the Zionist organization and edited it jointly
    with Moses Kleinman. In 1943. it was still pub-
    lished in Palestine.
    Chairman of the Zionist Executive from 1920
    to 1931. he visited the United States many times
    on Zionist missions. When Weizmann tendered his
    resignation as president of the Zionist Organiza-
    tion, Sokolow was unanimously elected as his suc-
    cessor and held this office for four years. Later, he
    became president of the Keren Hayesod (Palestine
    Foundation Fund), and head of a special commit-
    Continued on Paga 16 D
    W Wishes for theHoliday Season
    RUDY'S PAINT & BODY SHOP
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    LAWRENCE DRUG
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    m Happy Raw rear
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    8017 NX 2nd At*.
    MIAMI
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    W. R. BONSAL COMPANY
    DRY CONCRETE MIXES
    SAKRETE
    1775 N.E. 205th Street
    North Miami Beach
    Best Wishes tor the New Year
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    EASY METHOD DRIVING SCHOOL
    Phone for Information Door to Door Service
    MIAMI N. MIAMI FT. LAUDERDALE
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    HOLIDAY GREETINGS
    JAY JACOBS
    FAMILY DRUGS IXC.
    18100 N.E. 19th Ava. North Miami Baach Wl 5-1131
    '
    Hest Wishes tor a Happy New Year
    TEXACO SAYLES SERVICE STATION
    i
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    CHIC SAYLES
    IWJOifll
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    To AU a Most iiappg ftew Year
    *
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    8690 N.W. 22nd Ave. Miami Ph. PL 8-8555


    Pago 8D
    -JenisMorMtotv
    I:

    BEST WiSHES FOR
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    SPECS
    TV, RECORD & CAMERA STORE
    1566 S. DIXIE HIGHWAY CORAL GABLES
    FT. LAUDERDALE HOMESTEAD

    GREETINGS
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    Gulf Stream Quick Frozen Foods, Inc.
    QUICK FREEZING COLD STORAGE
    26 N.E. 27th St.. Miami Phone FR 1-2671
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL
    Pan American Construction Co.
    ASPHALT PAVEMENTS
    P.O. Box 618 Miami Spring.. Fla.
    Asphalt Plant, 7800 N.W. 74th Su Medley
    Florida Band and Mortgage Co.
    Mortgage Loans & Invoohuouls
    Hoaser Realty Co., Inc.
    Real Estate Property Management
    Hoaser Company, lor.
    Fire and Casualty Insurance
    Firat National Bank Bldg., Miami
    Phone FR 3-2648
    TO ALL A MOST
    HAPPY NEW YEAR
    DR. and MRS. ELLIOTT C COHEN and Family
    580 W. 49th St. Miami Beach
    A Happy
    New Year

    Dubrow's- Lincoln
    Cafeterias
    330 LINCOLN ROAD
    MiamiBwach Brooklyn, N. Y.
    The Past Jewish Year in Gen
    By SAM MILLER
    IN the German Federal Republic, the major event
    of Jewish significance brought by the twelfth
    year after the collapse of Nazism was the long-
    overdue completion of the legislative program cov-
    ering the fields of indemnification and restitution.
    Payments climbed to a level where, for the first
    time, some hope could be entertained that the
    German state may yet redeem its undertaking to
    settle all claims by early 1963.
    The new Federal Indemnification Law for in-
    dividual Nazi victims had entered into effect in
    July of 1956. It began to be applied early this
    year, after promulgation of the three principal im-
    plementation regulations. The first one deals with
    pensions for widows and orphans of Hitler victims,
    the second with compensation for those who were
    invalided by Nazi maltreatment in concentration
    camps or jails, the third one with the redressing
    of economic damage and of injuries to professional
    advancement.
    Status of Indemnification
    IN the seven years prior to October 1953, about
    $150 million was made available to Jewish
    and non-Jewish victims of Nazism, in accordance
    with the state and the zonal legislation then in
    force. Under'the since-superseded 1063 Indemni-
    fication Law, the individual states of West Ger-
    many and the Federal Treasury jointly disbursed
    $62 million in 1955-56. The following year, this
    figure increased to about $250 million. In the cur-
    rent budgetary year ending next March, the Bonn
    parliament has approved Federal expenditures of
    $225 million, $82 million more than the figure pro-
    posed by the Ministry of Finance. Together with
    the contributions of the individual states this will
    amount to something like $440 million, provided
    the appropriation is used in full for the purpose
    intended.
    Prior to 1056 this was not the case, because in
    those years administrative procrastination was such
    that part of the modest annual appropriations had
    to be returned at the close of each fiscal year. Now.
    however, the processing of applications has been
    stepped up to a point where it is believed that the
    entire sum can actually he paid out. It must be
    borne in mind that a considerable share of indem-
    nification awards accrue to non-Jewish victims of
    Nazism.
    Even the present rate of payment, although
    substantially higher than at any time in the post-
    war era, is not adequate to fulfill the pledge of the
    Bonn Goverment that all indemnification claims'
    are to be settled by 1063. Federal Minister of Fi-
    nance Fritz Schaeffer recently stated that the flood
    of applications received since passage of the new
    law seems likely to push the over-all cost to the
    neighborhood of $4 billion. It may well be that this
    estimate is too high, particularly since it was made
    in the course of a public speech alleging that the
    Bonn legislature had "not sufficiently pondered the
    consequences" of the indemnification laws it
    adopted and at the same time warning that these
    laws may have to be revised "after the elections"
    in September.
    Restitution
    |N fact, many claims are being rejected. On the
    other hand, not all applications have been
    received as yet. the final deadline being next
    March, so that it is too early to compile accurate
    statistics. But even if the aggregate past and fu-
    ture indemnification outlay is assumed to be S3
    billion, the present rate of payments is clearly in-
    w"''f Over the decade since the first indem-
    **
    fj>
    West German indemnification is also
    ed by reparations payments to InoU
    of Bonn's responsibility toward pre-HaLI
    ish community dessimated by Nazi rakl
    boat slides down ways in West Germmj
    yard, demtined for Israel's merchant ft
    part payment toward some $860,0001]
    parations tow.
    nification laws were enacted, a total of Its]
    $500 million has been disbursed. Thus ia_
    penditures of at least 450 million are reqain
    increase of an additional 60 percent in
    now attained.
    Eight years after the establishment oft
    man Federal Republic, five-sixths of the i
    cation obligations acknowledged by Wot]
    many's legislators remain unsatisfied. For!
    whom the Nazis jailed, crippled and
    cause they were Jews, for those whom u*?j
    into exile, whose kin they massacred and l
    careers they cut short, the pace of inden
    certainly does not come up to justified I
    tions. As for the scope of indemnificatMaJ
    in February 1907 rejected a complaint bj|
    European countries that the pertinent
    excludes most Nazi victims among their i
    tionals. All this is true, but it must be i
    thai the indemnification program is
    in tor better shape than ever before.
    German individuals and business fmwl
    for the past nine years been compelled to I
    "identifiable" property acquired from Jen I
    Nazi duress, and this phase of restitution i
    ended: Jewish victims have had no recoumj
    ever, where the German state was itself I
    proprietor. In July, the last major pillar ml
    to the relevant legislative structure with tail
    delayed enactment of a measure pr
    restitution of identifiable Jewish property
    iiscated by the former German Reich ind I
    dering of compensation therefor. Jewish i
    who within Germany were deprived by ta
    of assets such as securities, jewelry, wortal
    and machinery will be compensated within I
    few years, and at any rate no later than 1
    the Federal Republic has limited its
    bility to a maximum of $360 million.
    The year under review marked the awl
    period during which one-time (ierman
    civil of I
    lie servants could file pension claims
    their dismissal by the Nazis for racial or i
    reasons. In an important ease outside tat
    Continued on Pag* 10 0
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    EXTEND BEST WISHES FOB THE NEWJJAR
    * TO THE ENTIRE JEWISH COMMUNE


    September 27, 1957
    +Jm>lsi>nor*UaHn
    it Old Transliteration Phobia
    Page 9D
    By EDITH BROOSKY
    VKt catalog of known American allergies,
    rid a hitherto unexplored and na-
    me
    ansliterationphobia.
    [variety: trai
    . history of this seizure is hfy. Not so its
    Z Thev include a galloping paralysis of
    out, inducing a spluttering and stuttering
    the most honey-spoken of men; a wild
    of the eyeballs; the emission from the
    lrynx of snortings and croakings which
    jrly approximate the sound of a tea kettle
    jts lid: a sense witlessness and confu-
    pd finally helpless silence.
    Dsliterationphdbia, be it noted, is a pecu-
    ,ish diseuse. affecting men, women and
    i alike. It is transmitted not by a virus or
    by a paper bearing printed or mimeo-
    symbols. The allergy nearly always
    [out indoors in synagogues, Jewish cen-
    *ting halls but there have been verified
    Jof occurences outdoors as well, at rallies,
    sites and the like. Reports of its onset are
    kably uniform in this respect: the seizure
    l the moment a jolly program chairman has
    oted a song sheet and cries out, "Now, let's
    ;in Hebrew." I have seen strong men and
    [ women reduced to mewling idiocy -at this
    ei Valiantly they try to wrap their tea*
    [ibeut maddening nonsense syllables spelled
    nglish letters but purporting to be Hebrew
    What comes out is not Hebrew, not Eng-
    o! anything but gibberish. A clear case of
    Itentionphobia.
    Jonsider an examplea relatively simple one
    kn letter-for-letter from a songbook distrib-
    py a great Jewish organization: "Tzeys-chem
    malachay ha shalom/malachay elyon/Mi
    malchey ham'lawcheem/Hakawdosh bor-
    The familiar melody aside, how does an
    Mrained eye react to that very first word?
    And the English-trained tongue? It
    In the several ensuing seconds of utter
    on, the piano and the song leader have
    I on their merry way, leaving the troubled
    I filtering tongue to catch up if they cau.
    ^en too often, the eye and the tongue shut
    ansliterationphobia.
    An Abreviatfon
    this is not. I confess, a dispassionate ac-
    | tount of the malady. An acute sufferer. 1
    tc a loathing of transliterations, not only be-
    [they make me (and others) feel.like.maun-
    baboons, but because they are dishonest.
    [pretend to be Hebrew, but manifestly they
    They foster the illusion of Hebrew-com-
    mon, which is arrant rubbishtranslitera-
    Then, too, they are imprecise and inaccu-
    |The Festival of Lights, for example, is vari-
    Upelledand variously pronouncedHannu-
    panukah, Chanuko. Is it Shevuot, Shabuot,
    A
    I beyond all these reasons, transliterations
    i abomination because they are a deterrent
    t study of Hebrew. Those Jews who get along
    "1 gagging on the simplified pap of translit-
    s contend with some justice that they
    |not bother to learn Hebrew. Here it is ersatz,
    Wed and d^torted, but pidgin-Hebrew, alas.
    I find particularly lamentable ia that
    WMgogues. educators and organisations ap-
    p tolerate and even to propagate the prac-
    Wbo mak.s the transliterations? Who circu-
    |tkem? Who cries out, "Let's sing in He-
    nd then hands out aaumbo-jumbo that
    [kread upside down or backwards, for all
    its intrinsic meaning? Where do we find the trans-
    literated prayers and the special printed cards con-
    taining the transliterated kaddish for mourners?
    Now, the obvious reply of our educators et al,
    would be: "K's better than nothing. (Like the char-
    acter in Sholem Aleichem who, being twitted
    about his habit of wearing eyeglass frames without
    lenses, replied, "Well, it's better than nothing") If
    we don't give our people transliterations, they
    can't join in our activities." To this unworthy ad-
    mission I move (and do I hear any seconds?),
    "Fine. Until Jews can learn to read their own lang-
    uage in the original, let there be quiet." In reality,
    the stillness would hardly be absolute: we would
    hear a great chirruping of accurate syllables from
    the youngsters of the Hebrew schools, from the
    boys and girls who are learning Hebrew in their
    high schools, from the senior generation, of course,
    and from the handful of the middle generation
    who have gone back to Hebrew in their adult
    years. In time, I venture, the silenced parents of
    the school-children would lift their heads from the
    tyranny of transliterations and learn Hebrewin
    self-defense.
    That others should share my phobia is appar-
    ent in isolated Jewish community newspapers
    around the country which have taken to running
    Hebrew columns for their readers. This is encour-
    aging. A blight, however, is the practice of one or
    two which carry Hebrew lessons in translitera-
    tions!with the well-intentioned but wholly mis-
    leading exhortation, "Hebrew's a cinch!" Hebrew,
    it should be clearly understood, is not a cinch.
    Neither is good English.
    Speaking vs. Singing
    THIS allergy, then, has a specific remedy: He-
    brew. And the way to begin to apply the
    cure is to learn the Hebrew alphabet. For Ameri-
    can Jews who can give split-second identifications
    for 57 or 557 different varieties of products and
    trademarks on TV. in supermarkets and at auto
    shows, the memorization of 22 little symbolsthe
    total number of letters in the Hebrew alphabet
    need not be too strenuous an exertion. After the
    22 letters come the various vowel signs; and after
    these, the beginning of vocalizing Hebrew words in
    their original, unadulterated, guaranteed genuine
    and majesticform.
    Paradoxically, the same tongue that stumbles
    over English transliterations can, with practice,
    untrippingly enunciate the Hebrew original. The
    Roman letters seem to act as a stumbling block.
    The senses, anticipating familiar English sounds
    and meanings out of the 26 symbols, rebel at the
    deception. It is as if our senses hung out a sign:
    "Interloperskeep out." Our eyes, tongues, ears,
    throats and minds call the hoax. The accustomed
    association is English with English, Hebrew with
    Hebrew. Scramble the association translitera-
    tionphobia.
    In the depth of my transliterationphobic fever,
    I contemplate with a jaundiced eye our latter-day
    Jewish geniuses who have foisted upon us this
    fraudulent device for perpetuating ignorance. For
    eighteen centuries or more, the Jewish people
    cherished Hebrew. For everyday use, they created
    a lovely and endearing languageYiddishwith
    its own forms and literature, which carefully and
    respectfully incorporated a good portion of He-
    brew words. Our enlightened 20th century Jews,
    intent upon linguistic improvements, have fash-
    ioned something new under the sun: we have ex-
    ercised the spirit of an ancient and noble langeage
    and forced it into the unyielding and inhospitable
    mold of a second language.
    Greetings
    BILL AUSTIN FORD. Inc.
    HHKT TRADE-IN VAIUM UTIST EQUIPMENT fOt SHVKE
    "W{ APPtfCMTI DOING BUSmtSS WITH TOO"
    HN.W. 27th Avenue
    Phone NE 5-0311
    ENGINEERS
    IVEYORS
    PHOTOSTATS
    BLUEPRINTS
    fccayne Engineering Co.
    .King
    St
    (Opp. Courthouee) Phone FR 3-5525
    . i
    LEVELS
    TRANSITS
    Te Art Oar fritnit sad Patreas
    A Meat Haser New Umr
    Smmwl C. KtHr
    Miami Truck
    Sales
    7100 N.W. 7th AVENUE
    MIAMI, FlOeiDA
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
    OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
    iollins
    Rexall Mtrug*
    7450 COLLINS AVENUE
    MIAMI 1EACH
    Phones UN 64630 UN 6-5919
    "OUI PURPOSE" YOUR TRANSPORTATION AND PLEASURES
    SIKES MOTORS
    2742 S. W. 8th Street ?|
    "Bade Again In The Used Car Business" %
    We Ask Ovr Many Meads to Came See U*
    BEST DEAL IN TOWN HI 3-8808
    t,

    3
    \

    The Mei Yin Restaurant
    Extends Holiday Greetings To All
    SPfCIAUZING IN CANTONESE DISHtS
    1660 Collins Avenue
    Phone JE 8 2166

    / !
    ft
    *
    TO ALL GREETINGS
    Terrozzo ^ j'j
    For The Floor Beautiful
    .... *
    A. TERRAZZO COMPANY '
    IOMN MAGNOLE, Owner
    545 N. W. 54th Street PL 4-0060
    i. .
    GMEBTING8
    When In Search For Definitely Better
    Furniture and Home Furnishings
    At Reasonable Prices
    Remember The Name
    WOODRUM'S
    ONE OF FLORIDA'S LARGEST AND FINEST
    HOME FURNISHERS
    AIR CONDITIONED \\
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    L
    NORTHEAST SECOND AVE. AT
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    MIAMI
    PUm PI 4-1625
    ,
    >



    Page 10 D
    Best Wishes for a Happy A>*r Year
    CAROUSEL RESORT APT. MOTEL
    Private Beach, Pool, CoHee Shop
    19051 Collins Ave. Ph. Wl 7-2636
    9-JmisHhrkMMi
    BIST WISHES TO ALL
    Ecltaflex Bolta-Ouilt Bolta Saran Beslape Boltaflex Distributor
    MIAMI PLASTIC FABRICS
    5am Stdtk
    113 N.I. 9th STUKT, MIAMI, FIORIDA PHONl F 47156
    i It
    Season's Greetings
    Webb Construction Company
    "Wt AIM TO PUASt TOO"
    1400 N.E. 125th Street Ph. PI 4-7921 PL 9-0580
    BEST WISHES FOR THE NEW YEAR
    VMChtm salox or BKAI TV
    Specialiiing in Light Ash and Silver Blond*
    MO 7-0824 62S6 SOUTH DIXIE
    Hest Wishes for a Happy Xvn Year
    MIAMI SHORES PHARMACY
    9540 N.E. 2nd Ave.
    Ph. PL 7-1585
    Rest Wishes for a Happu \ew Year
    Nu-Life Carpet Cleaning Co.
    C. W. BRADLEY
    Highland 8-9775
    Rear. 1806 Ponce de Leon Blvd. Coral Gables
    Free Pick-Up and Delivery Regardless of Distance
    Hest Wishes for the \ew Year
    ALAN SHOE REBUILDING
    All Types of Shoe Repair Including
    flNEST CUSTOM WORK "30 Tears Experience"
    2351 GALIANO
    lust OH Miracle Mile phone m ^2m
    The Past Jewish Year in
    Continued from Pse 8 D
    of direct government action, the Conference on
    Jewish Material Claims Against Germany and the
    directors of the I.G. Farben chemical firm will
    make available, once full ratification has been
    achieved, the amount of $1,150,000 in an out-of-
    court settlement of all claims by the slave laborers
    exploited during the war in plants which I.G. Far-
    ben operated near Auschwitz, with manpower sup-
    plied by the 9S from among the inmates of the
    dreaded death camp.
    Germany and Isreel
    UMEST Germany continued to live up to the terms
    of her Reparations Agreement with Israel
    and. even during the Middle East crisis at the end
    of 1956. declared there were no grounds for re-
    stricting or cutting off deliveries. This occurred
    at a time when considerable Arab pressure was
    brought to bear and when the Foreign Minister of
    Communist East Germany urged that the repara-
    tions flow "to arm the, Israeli aggressors" be halt-
    ed, indeed that it should be redirected to Egypt "so
    as to make good the damage and Injury done to
    that country by Israeli troops."
    This firm stand of the Bonn Government did
    much to improve the atmosphere between Israel
    and West Germany, although formal diplomatic
    relations have not yet been established. Both the
    chairman of the German Social Democratic Party,.
    Erich Ollenhauer. and the president of the power-
    ful German Trade Union Federation, Willi Rich-
    ter. visited Israel, which on its part facilitated the
    training of tourist visas to non-Jewish Germans.
    A German girl enrolled at the Hebrew University,
    even winning a scholarship, and a permanent Ger-
    man news agency correspondent was accredited in
    Israel.
    Through commercial arrangements made out-
    side of reparations channels, West Germany and
    West Berlin imported 650.000 cases of Israel or-
    anges and grapefruit last year, thus absorbing bet-
    ter than 8 percent of Israel's total citrus fruit ex-
    ports and moving into second place among its cus-
    tomers. A trade agreement authorizes Israel to
    ship $9.5 million worth of oranges and grapefruit
    to the German market during the current season
    and the next one. In the same two-year period,
    Germany is to purchase other Israeli goods for
    $4.75 million, about half of which will be made up
    of agriculturual items.
    I
    IT wm the end of an er. b ,
    1 Foehrenwa.d, the last V^H
    TTV'T1 'ts doors in r^rim**
    of its hard-core inmates had been < '
    to German cities. As a rule the I ,
    munities assumed the social se^
    connected therewith.
    This development was one idicitiaa
    increasing consolidation which the
    are undergoing. In the messages i^T*
    casion of the last Rosh Hashon w"'
    alities of West Germany, tlic'S'T
    this consolidation with particular 2j
    Six synagogue, were dedicated during
    and cornerstones laid for three others Rau/j
    been inducted in Hamburg. Munich and
    0B. Postwar Germany's first permanent
    home for Jewish children was opened in t|
    Forest. In general, expansion and imw.
    was noticeable with respect to youth actirl
    ganized for the nearly 2,000 Jewish child
    youngsters now in Germany.
    Communal membership showed a
    creese. Some of it is traceable to the inl
    Foehrenwalders. Further, a limited at
    German Jews are returning from other
    Also, the reunion of Germany with the W
    toxy affected the 500 Jews who make th|
    there and brought about the adhesion of i
    Synagogue Community" to the Central
    Jews in Germany.
    German Attitude*
    ANTI-SEMITIC and chauvinistic manifa
    were not uncommon during the yea.
    a score of cemetery desecrations, the wa
    most systematic example of which oco
    Hitler"s birthday, they ranged to venom-fu
    cles, and from the attempted revival of the |
    Youth" to court verdicts colored by pro-Nat]
    pathy.
    But there were many events of a far <
    character, events that justified a more hoi
    look. In the first place it was the image i
    Frank that prompted, among large numbers!
    man young people especially, a spontt
    surge of sympathy for the Jewish victims i
    persecution. An unprecedented 300.000 <
    sold of the pocketbook edition of her
    the dramatized version thereof was peria
    fore hushed audiences in a dozen cities.
    # **'
    TO ALL GREETINGS
    FRANK AREYALO
    FREIGHT FORWARDING
    1012 Chamber of .Commerce Bldg. Phone FR 3-4533
    United Jewish Appeal announced $44,865,000 Warburg, UJA honorary chairman,
    collected during first half of 1957 -, largest Israel Ambassador Abba Ebon t-
    sum for similar Deriod since 1949. Left to late* Sen. Lyndon Johnson (D-Tex) a
    right are Rabbi Herbert Friedman. UJA exec- liam Rosenwald looks on. Occasion*
    utive vice president; Dr. Nahum Goldmann, cent national rescue conference in Nei
    JwLAgncy^hairnKin; Edward M M. City.
    To All... Holiday Greetinys
    CARS "A" POPPIM' CAR WASH
    5 CAR WASHES $5.00 SAVE $2.50
    Originators of Car Washes in Washington, D.C
    Established 15 Years
    1 MX. 79th Street a#r North Miami Ave.
    GREETINGS
    LEE'S
    i ombsm 95 tm
    324 N. E. 13th Street
    Manufacturers
    Wholesale Retail
    Fishing Tackle
    Repairing
    Underwater Equipment
    A Hepey Htw Tear fe All O.r
    ftkM mi- fMrW
    BARKIN ENVELOPE
    MFC. CO.
    2740 S.W. 28th LANE
    MIAMI
    Phone HI 3-7598
    Harry Barkin
    COMPLIMENTS OF...
    MASTERS OF MIAMI, INI
    49 Beacom Blv.. at 22nd Avt. & Flogl" St.
    One o4 Amorka's Largest Discount Ho*#
    OTHER MASTER STORES
    New York City Westchester New J
    Washington. D C. York, Pa.
    ssr
    HARRY C. SCHWEBKE
    AND ASSOCIATES UNO SURVEYORS
    -M* if m mnm mumr
    laeteeaBfe Me* Free** Struct
    4*41 N.W. 2-e AVOMM
    PHONE PL 14577
    "AMI, FLOtIA
    3141
    I***1


    21,1*7
    vJntfrtJlair***?
    Precious Chalice to be Loved
    Page 11D
    lifications were recommended for a sW
    I in Hebrew.
    H^KIiii'tT of the Council
    ling Women's Council always on the job
    irtes employment project* for an area
    newcomers have been settled. For ex-
    men immigrants from North Africa and
    European countries who are partic-
    u[ in the creating of exquisite handi-
    jt in touch with the proper outlet for
    A mattress factory where twenty
    jien are being trained and a special
    r waitresses and hotel employees has been
    [L (he Working Women's Council at a fine
    l Ashkelon.
    school will give vocational training and
    L Hebrew. The graduates will not have
    Ivery long before finding employment since
    is a well known summer resort and an
    Kupat Holim rest-house will be opened
    Chin the next few months.
    Working Women's Council also assists
    Lilies on other levels as well. There was a
    Mm the Working Women's Council was
    lu seven nursery schools in Migdaf-Ash-
    (Aflhough the town authorities have assum-
    j responsibility the Council still runs two
    (establishments and plans to open two new
    Tihe near future. For the teen-agers the
    [arranges for the nearby Kibbutzim (farm
    hives! to give them vocational training, a
    I education and a greater understanding of
    nstitutes good citizenship.
    1 nurseries conducted by the Moetzet Ha-
    (Working Women's Council) sister organiza-
    [the Pioneer Women in Israel is rendering
    peed.
    kery day." Surah, a North African immi-
    clared. as she looked in the direction of
    black-eyed children "they ask me. Will
    i (nurseryi open soon Ima (mother)?"
    nurseries play a most important rofe in
    I the youngsters adjust to a totally new en-
    pit At the same time it gives the mother
    to find gainful employment.
    Great Expectations
    , now is employed in a school kitchen in
    oe of the Council's institutions. In the
    filing room 300 children are served a hot
    isiting of vegetable soup, fish balls, po-
    d and a fruit pudding. Her daughter,
    ill dressed in European school uniform
    ttings and a navy blue uniformit an un-
    faht among the bare-legged, informally
    [Israeli children.
    |Mpect," Paula said, "to have money for
    : for my child very soon."
    pi's second daughter, a three-year-old whose
    i Lah. is in a Working Women's Council
    That particular nursery is in a new cot-
    two nurses tend to the needs of 25
    L Woollies and other clothes worn by the
    lotuens of Israel were shipped from the
    | States by Israel Supplies of the Pioneer
    i new in this land," said Paula, "but I can
    N that all these projects sponsored by
    *" Women and its sister organization in
    l**<*t Hapoalot (Working Women's Coun-
    Twiployment project* and employment di-
    ' vocational training, guidance, education,
    m* classes ln Hebrew, the day nurseries.
    Kitchens and nursery schools are all of
    ... women immigrants from North Africa and
    the Eastern European countries who are par-
    ticularly adept in the creating of exquisite
    handicrafts are put in touch with the proper
    outlet for their wares."
    extreme importance in integrating ail the new-
    comers into the community of Israel. It is only
    through such means that wc will be able to make
    aM of uscoming from so many diverse cultures
    into good citizens of Israel."
    A Social Revolution *
    TENDING to the needs of the new immigrants
    is only one phase of the work of the Moet-
    zet Hapoalot, the Working. Women's Council of Is-
    rael, sister organization of the Pioneer Women. At
    No. 157 in the main street of the Ajami quarter
    of Jaffa in a house which gives one an aura of
    peace and retirement from the vicissitudes of life
    you will find Mrs. Balazia Khoury known to her
    friends and pupils as Sltt Balazia Khoury.
    Mrs. Khoury settled in the ancient town of
    Jaffa nine years ago and has since that time been
    active in charity and social work. The Working
    Women's Council, fully conscious that the privi-
    lege of Israeli citizenship must extend to all the
    inhabitants of the nation, established a workshop
    for the training of Arab women in the arts of sew-
    ing and embroidery. Mrs. Khoury was selected to
    supervise the embroidery courses and direct the
    club. During the nine years of the club's existence
    130 students have been graduated. Many of them
    have been able to earn a living as a result of the
    skills acquired at the club.
    "A quiet social revolution is taking place in
    the Arab community of Israel," Mrs. Khoury says.
    "Nobody would have ever imagined even ten years
    ago that fathers and relatives of our students would
    have ever permitted unmarried women to leave
    their houses and find a vocation or employment
    outside them."
    Thoy Marry Early
    THERE were 16 Moslem and Christian girls work-
    ing at embroidery in the room when Mrs.
    Khoury made Uat statement. Most of the girls
    were illiterate when they entered the school and
    took courses in both Hebrew and Arabic twice a
    week. The club sponsored by the Working Wo-
    men's Council and the Pioneer Women also con-
    ducts cultural sessions and lectures in the after-
    noons although a systematic educational cause is
    not possible due to the turnover in the student
    body. This is due to the fact that the girls marry
    at an early age.
    Since the Working Women's Council began its
    Continued on F*aga 13 D
    A Most Happy New Year
    Paul Faske
    "WAY UWfOftM 4 TOWil SUPPLY CO.
    *U Urwttnqn____
    ATLAS ROOFING C0.f INC.
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    c.ii ft i-am
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    NEW YEAR TO ALL
    from
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    Del Prado Hotel
    Formerly of 124th Street and Biscayne Boul.vird
    FRANK BARESSES
    Italian-American Restaurant
    NOW AT
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    2875 Northwest Lejeune Road Miami
    PHONE NE 4-9761
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    THE TOWN RESTAURANT
    153 N.E. 1st Street
    BREAKFAST LUNCHEON DINNER
    Music Air Conditioned 7 A.M. to 2 AJM.
    Closed Sunday
    Phone FR 4-4733
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    GREETINGS
    WALKER CASKET COMPANY
    286 N.E. 67th Street Phone PL 8-8715
    U All... A Happy Holiday
    Marcel flower Shop
    "A Camplne Fl.ro/ Stnht" Art with Flowers
    801 Arthur Godfrey Rd. Miami Beach Phone IE 8-5523
    P. RICHARDSON & SON
    Insulation Firebrick Tanks Traps and Regulators
    1047 N. W. 22nd Street
    Phone FR 1-5782
    FOR READY-MDIED CONCRETE PHONE HI 8-2060
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    (One Block North of Dixie Highway)
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    r
    Page 12 D
    *Jewist>rtar*&*i
    Friday.
    "A Mm*) *"
    HIALEAH MIAMI SPRINGS BANK
    (Member of F.DJ.C.)
    101 HIALEAH DRIVE
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    CMUTUWS TO 00* AMNr WINDS
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    BRANT ORCHID SUPPLY
    "Complete Orchids Service and Storage"
    2970 S.W. 27th AVENUE Phone HI 3-5544
    Grootings
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    Architectural
    W-iwrk
    535 N.W. 11th STMfT, MIAMI, flOIIDA
    AS NIAK AS THt ItltfHOHl: ft 4-3)1*
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    JEWELERS
    1000 Lincoln Road
    TO ALL GREETINGS
    150 N.W. 21st Street
    f^WAMI
    Miami
    I'Jl II T III |
    SUPERIOR GENERAL ELECTRIC APPLIANCES
    Open Monday and Friday 'til 9 p.m.
    355 N.W. 7tfc AVEHUt fag, frM p^i., r ,0Nt H 44311
    McARTHUR JERSEY FARM DAIRY. INC.
    FtOM fAIM TO rOU
    6151 N.E. S.cond Avenu.
    Phono PL 44521
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    To Our Many Patrons and Friends. A Most Happy New Year
    Tamer's Upholstering Company
    3700 N.W. 37th Avenue
    Phone NE 5-0216
    ATLANTIC ENGINEERING CO.
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    MS W. Flagler Street
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    MnimI n 3-4743
    S'Ffcinbe,]
    I
    Fredric R. Mann (left), chairman of board of
    directors of America-Israel Cultural Founda-
    tion, receives Renoir painting, "Femme Nuex
    de Dos," valued at $150,000. bequeathed by
    late Wilhelm Weinberg to AICF in memory
    of his wife and three children, victims of Nazi
    invasion of Holland. With Mann Jt
    right) Carl Weil. Sol Frieder SJifc
    ter. executors of Weinberg estate
    will be sent to Tel Aviv Museum one.
    ficiary institutions of America-Israel (
    Foundation.
    Artistic Achievement During 51
    Continued from Pago 5 D
    fied by careful landscaping, and by allowing the
    large synagogue windows to frame the never de-
    ceiving magic of sunlight, sky and trees.
    An increasing number of artists have been
    called to dedicate their talents to the embellish-
    ment of synagogue and community centers. I can
    mention just a few. There is Erna Weill whose
    large relief, "Jacob's Dream," was installed on the
    wall of the Teaneck (N.J.) Jewish Community
    Center (ecstatic in origin, yet subdued by wise
    craftsmanship, her semi-abstract bronze avoids the
    obvious, allowing the beholder to continue with
    his mind where the artist left off). The wrougbt-
    bronze menorah. sculptured by Nathaniel Kaz for
    Temple Beth Emeth in Albany, N.Y., is most ele-
    gant and impressive in the intricate pattern form-
    ed by the subtly entwined slender stems that carry
    the lights. Herbert Ferber, Ibram Lassaw, Helen
    Frankenthaler and Abraham Rattner designed
    sculptures, mosaics and tapestry for Temple Anshe
    Chesed in Cleveland and the Temple of Aaron
    Congregation in St. Paul, Minn., works which,
    while non-realist, retain at least some rudimen-
    tary graphic links to the religious tenets that in-
    spired them; hence, the beholder does not have to
    struggle too long to reconcile form with the content
    signalled by the title. Incidentally, the foundation
    of a Jewish Ceremonials Club in Marion, a suburb
    of Philadelphia, might be mentioned, to indicate
    the extent to which American Jews have become
    conscious of the importance of expressing "love
    for God through creating beautiful objects for
    His worship." Listed among the goals of this uni-
    que club is this: To improve the quality and in-
    crease the quantity of Jewish ceremonial objects
    in the home and synagogue. *
    As if to honor him on the eve of his 70th birth-
    day, three American publishers have brought out
    books on Marc Chagall. One of them is a biogra-
    phy, written by the artist's life-long friend, Lion-
    ello Venturi. The professor is not sufficiently in-
    formed about the Jewish sources of Chagall's art,
    and sometimes, in an effort to understand and
    describe Jewish life and lore, makes curious mis-
    takes. But he compensates by his brilliant de-
    lineation of Chagall's main characteristics: the
    poetic intermingling of dream and real
    version of the sUtic into the _,
    hegemony of completely free imaginaba|3
    tellectual abstraction.
    Chagall's Works Publish*
    pOSSIBLY the most beautiful book otj
    was "Marc Chagall: lllustu
    Bible." Commissioned by the dealer Vol
    than a quarter of a century age,
    first version, then abandoned it and |
    Middle East to study the actual
    people of the Hebrew Bible. Back in 1
    gan a new set of etchings, and had
    plates by the time of Vollard's death i
    the whole set, plus a few additional
    and. drawings, is available to Chagall's I
    admirers. From ancient Israel the ;
    three kinds of super-human .people
    the great pathfinders, starting with Noaki
    ing with Moses; the leaders of the i
    reformers. One is struck by Chagall's I
    has delightful treatment of animals), kj I
    abundance of his fantasy (especially in I
    ialization of prophesies), and by tbe i
    ing of village Yiddish culture with |
    tality of archaic and almost barbaric I
    There is, finally, "Chagall: His Grasl
    in which the artist once more revetb I
    an Oriental story-teller who considml
    merits of everyday reality as so maBfj
    stones out of which to erect fanciful f
    dreams. The etchings, woodcuts, and I
    were selected from more than 20
    albums.
    5717 saw the passing of several
    men. Hugo Ballin, known for his wi
    tions of the B'nai B'rith Temple on Wil
    Los Angeles, died in Santa Monica *
    76. Moses P. Halperin, who died in
    the age of 64, was a gentle and learoeij
    well as one of the most distinguished I
    American synagogues. In collaboration |
    mund Braverman, he designed modem I
    many Middle Western and Canadian I
    Jerusalem came word that Mordecai N
    ed away at the age of 58.
    to m ..
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    27. 1957
    Jen litfhrkMkM)
    Hashona Brings it to Mind
    By DAVID SCHWARTZ
    _j)Y looking too spick and span the
    Ebbing of I he house for New Ye*r the
    let clothe-' we children got, the honey on
    tjswteten the New Year ... the Chaleh
    i of a ladder symbolizing the prayers
    | to Heaven.
    owd going to the synagogue, the many
    liigh prices for tickets to enter the syn-
    l who preferred seemingly to stand out-
    hmoos instead of inside and praying
    ,in the galleries all prettied up, the old
    beards and "yarmulkes" and wrapped
    Eawls, a picture a Rembrandt would
    ihted to paint.
    Ed gag about the man without a ticket
    I the policeman standing in front of the
    ihe just wanted to go in to see somebody
    Jiceman replying, "Well, okay, but if I
    I praying you'll get it."
    Yiddish story about the man who came to
    jogue with a pillow explaining he wanted
    to" a good year.
    Bong prayersmy brother amazed at my
    [fini ihich was a double sin on Rosh Hashona.
    [beautiful poem B/'BjS*il,!ffitftts at&tit
    |hona coming as nature's foliage' turns 1o
    d. Freud > humorous story about two
    ting on the eve of Rosh Hashona in the
    ! and one sighing to the other: "Well, an-
    has passed."
    Icld Confederate veteran who used to visit
    Illy on Rosh Hashona, and who said he had
    Edtr Lee. We used to call him "Lee-Shana
    yH custom of asking forgiveness and making up
    with your enemies before Rosh Hashona,
    the story about the two women who mad*> up
    "Let's be friends now," said the first, "and I want
    to wish you for the New Year whatever you wish
    me."
    "So you are starting up again," shouted the
    second.
    The blowing of the ram's horn, the worship-
    pers beating their breasts as they confess their
    sins, the story about the man who was beating his
    breast with both hands, explaining that he had
    Come in late and wanted to make up for lost time.
    The ceremonial "Tashlich," the symbolic cast-
    ing of one's sins in the river, the time when papa
    took us boys to "tashlich"' and my brother said it
    was a good thing there was a big river in the town
    and that even with that, the river would probably
    turn muddy from all the sins.
    The moving story of Rabbi Ammon of Mayence
    and the composition of the "Unthanne Tokef," the
    beautiful words of "Uvchen Ten Pachdecha" which
    amounts really to a prayer for a United Nations:
    "Put they awe on all mankind that all whom Thou
    hast created may join in one society."
    The awesome sounds of the words announcing
    that Rosh Hashona was judgment day: the story of
    the
    Days
    New Year.
    The way the Rosh Hashona prayers seem to
    assume that we have all committed pretty nearly
    all the sins in the catalog. If what we say is true,
    we should all be indicted by the grand jury. "We
    have sinned, we have robbed, we have falsified,
    we have spoken vainly. Apparently Judaism does
    not think one man is much better than the other
    and the best much better than the worst.
    Rabbi oL, Berdicheff who on the High Holy
    s "ordered" God to' give his people a happy
    us People a Precious Chalice to be Loved
    Continued from page 11 D
    i among Arab women, 250 have attended
    nd other courses and an additional 250
    language and other cultural courses.
    ) has nine salaried instructors and club sec-
    nd 13 volunteer workers.
    Ifber young woman who is in the forefront
    1 the benefits of modern life to Arab wo-
    |Kuiha Dervish. Miss' Dervish's achieve-
    i the large Arab community in Nazareth
    I the praise of many a seasoned social work-
    jdirects many of the club's activities which
    classes in housekeeping, sewing, basic
    nd Hebrew and sessions in folk dancing
    ma.
    I reasons for the difficulties encountered
    |Arab women is stated best by Mr. Jarjura,
    [woman who is active in the work of bring-
    enment to people who", to a large extent
    | living in the past.
    r men." she declared, "know so little about
    i its aims and functions. If they were bet-
    ed, they would ease traditional object-
    i even encourage their women to partici-
    Iruitful activities."
    [activities of the Working Women's Coun-
    Project sponsored by its sister organ-
    [fioncer Women, does not confine itself
    ' le"ding assistance to the newcomers nor
    ""cation ot the Arab and Christian women
    fcr i, a'" inc,udes among its activities
    wsnment ot Kanot, the agricultural High
    Kanot. young boys and girls are taught
    they receive a secondary school education. Kanot
    is a recognized High School and its requirements
    are laid down by the Board of Education. Kanot
    trains a special kind of farmer. The Israeli young
    are taught not only to become skilled tillers of the
    soil but also about the world outside. Biology,
    how to milk a cow, feeding the chickens, learning
    how to give injections to the barnyard denizens,
    currying horses and operating the power equip-
    ment are all in the day's work for the student at
    Kanot. Kanot connotes grafted boughs or plants
    onto hardier roots. It is a fitting name for an in-
    stitution which is grafting the youth of the land
    on the old soil of Israel.
    pcome
    expert farmers. At the same time
    ". fully conscious that the privilege of Is-
    raeli citizenship must extend to all the inhab-
    itants of the nation (they) established
    a workshop for training of Arab women ."
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    Page 13D
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    FLORIDA PROCESSING CO., INC
    JOSEPH COHEN. WILLIAM RUBIN and WILLIAM KLINE
    2790 W. 3rd COURT
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    SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL
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    Tax Consultant Accountant


    Pag 14D
    K
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    At Y*h Service Title Transfers Tags ffc.
    NEwton 4-0051
    Rich Year in Jewish Book Outu
    Continued from Page 4 D
    authentic as against fictional Jewish issues to
    create a meaningful book. A controversial book
    because of its themes. "The Strong Hand" is strong
    fiction and surely deserved a better fate than it
    enjoyed this past year.
    Outstanding Non-Fiction
    ^N non fictional levels, there also were many
    outstanding works. This critic found Solomon
    Simon's "My Jewish Roots" (Jewish Publication
    Society!, an evocation of a young Jew's life in a
    European village, a most memorable volume, clas-
    sic in its simplicity and full of genuine Jewish
    lore. "Louis Marshall: Selected Papers and Ad-
    dresses" (Jewish Publication Society) edited by
    Charles Resnlkoff, is also an attempt at revealing
    a man's life, a great American Jewish leader, not
    an obscure boy in Europe. It is totally different
    of course from the Simon book and is coupled with
    it only because it is so valuable a contribution to
    American Jewish history. No doubt, ther? is al-
    ways a second side to the controversies outlined in
    this two-volume edition, and perhaps we shall
    some day be given the other side. The material
    found here, however, is fascinating on its own,
    especially to one who is not well versed-in Jewish
    communal life of the 1920s.
    Other lives have been encased in books this
    past year. Eddie Cantor has done well with his
    autobiography "Take My Life" (Doubleday), and
    Eve Merriam has given us a nice little biography
    on "Emma Lazarus" (Citadel). Hugo Bieber and
    Moses Hadas published "Heine" (JPS) and again
    managed to make the great German-Jewish poet
    attractive.
    There have been some impressive works of
    scholarship as well, including some reissues and
    reprints of Jewish classics. Louis Ginzberg's
    "Legends of the Bible" (Simon and Schuster) is
    based on the enormous "Legends of the Jews" and
    proves again, if proof were needed, that his scholar-
    ship was far-ranging and fascinating: Leo Schwara.
    an indefatigable editor, has offered "Great Ages
    and Ideas of the Jewish People" (Random House),
    to which a handful of notably Jewish scholars con-
    tributed long, brilliant chapters on various eras in
    the Jewish history. Dr. Mordecai If. Kaplan's
    "Judaism as a Civilization," which was first made
    available more than twenty years ago. has been
    reissued by Yoseloff. And Rabbi Joseph L. Baron,
    in "A Treasury of Jewish Quotation*" (Crown| has
    produced an impressive work of Jewish scholar-
    ship.
    One cannot overlook the following choice
    titles: "The American Jew" (Theodor Herzl Foun-
    dation) by Ben Halpern. a serious analysis of
    American Jewish lite and the relationship of this
    Jewish community with the State of Israel; "Th'.
    Tales of Rabbi Nachman" (Horizon) by Martin Bu-
    ber. and "Myth and Guilt" (BnrilMNr) by Theodor
    Reik. another provocative study by the brilliant
    Reik, this time on the collective guilt feeling of
    nun. tracing it from the beginning of Biblical time
    to date.

    %
    Mid-F.s-t TitUs
    yHEN. of course, we have a spate of titles on
    Israel, Zionism and the Middle East. Than
    seems to be no end to the curiosity of Americans
    concerning this critical area of the world, and one
    cannot mention every book in this field. Bet it is
    significant that some of the very best were pub-
    lished this past year, almost ten years after the
    establishment of the State.
    Brandeis University's creative art i
    a highpoint in recognition of
    Top photo is William Schuman, comp.
    president of Julliard School of Musk.
    axe Stuart Davis, New York artist; u,
    liarn Carlos Williams, distinguish^ |
    cian-po4?t. First annual presentation oft
    to these artists was made in New Ycrkj
    son Rockefeller, representing Bra
    veraity's creative arts commission |
    Hebrew Year 5717.
    Three books on Israel itself seen to I
    ter of special significance. The titles i
    themselves and scarcely need further i
    dation. They are Abba S. Eban's "VoiKf
    (Horizon), a remarkable collection o( tar]
    sador's most notable addresses; Robert I
    "100 Hours to Suez" (Viking), a militi
    of Israel's victory' over Egypt's force*;)
    butz: A Venture in Utopia'' (Yale) Nj
    Spiro, a sober sociological and psychok
    of the accomplishments of Israel's kin1
    This is not to say that these threej
    the only excellent,volumes on Israel.
    few more, but only a few: The Kremhfcl
    and the Middle Bast" (Yoseloff) by Juddf
    a journalistic and documented account NJ
    tionship involved with Communism.
    Israel's existence in the Middle East;jj
    of Zionist Profiles" (Farrai. Straus as*]
    by veteran Zionist Louis l.ipsky, a
    penetrating vignettes of important
    sonalities; "The Literature of Modern 1
    lard-Sehuman) by Reuben Wallenrod,.
    analysis of Israel's leading writers: aotU
    Marvin Lowenthals "The Diaries fThi
    (Dial), a volume long awaited, and wr&4j
    for.
    Anthologies on Israel have not bNa|
    Continued on Paot "
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    . September 27, 1957
    *JmUtfhrici**Mi
    Page 15D
    rael -- Land of Modern Miracles
    I cove
    Continued from Pape D
    . darjnS by which a pioneer people lives.
    i the topography reminds an American of
    wast-
    red Israel from the Lebanon border on
    i to the Gulf of Aqaba in the south, and
    tt,e Mediterranean to the Jordanian border
    .jst. Even the remote area around the Port
    is much like our own Southwestern desert.
    American can feel very much at home in
    that is, an American Who ldfes adventure,
    ho realizes that our own greaj country was
    little nation wedged between the sea and
    jca and Israel have rauc* in common.
    ^tries had to fight for independence. Both
    Lnrful forces for many vears^aligned against
    [The people of both countries bad to conquer
    mess. Each people learned to sacrifice, and
    In both nations there ic a spirit of equal -
    lich lends dignity to' labor and strengthens
    ; toward achievement and progress.
    it any wonder, therefore, that Americans
    ithetic to the State of Israel? We-Aner-.
    K people who dedicate their Qfegrgtfs' to
    .creating and developing th* piiyiieitBnd
    resources We like people who can face
    without fear. Te be frank about it, we
    pie who are willing to stand up and fight
    I rights. And, indeed, we have a high re-
    nd respect for people who have la arced and
    ed the art of self-governmentwho believe
    ere is a strong friendship between the Uni-
    ces and Israel.
    B. G.'t Israeli Qualities
    I of the dedication and drive and spirit of
    {.confidence so evident everywhere in Israel
    nplified in Prime Minister Ben Gurion.
    i an earlier article, I commented on the spirit
    loth so evident in Israel. That youthful spirit
    I the exclusive possession of the young, as I.
    found when 1 met and talked with the
    I Minister.
    1

    .^BU^
    in
    la applying modern methods, both i..
    I~7 a,nd ^onomic problems that it faces.
    "> tune with the times."
    Israel plans to build two more pipelinesa
    16-inch and a 32-inch line. Her problem is
    capital, "v The French have indicated an in-
    terest"
    It was my privilege to have a twe-hour-kmg
    visit with this great leader. He is a student of his-
    torya scholar in his own right. He speaks nine
    different languageshe is a student of lawhe is
    a talented oratorand skilled in the democratic
    processes of parliamentary government. Yet with
    it all he has humility befitting a great leader. Ben
    Gurion typifies his country: He is rugged, cour-
    ageous, imaginative. Ben Gurion seems to combine
    some of the qualities and characteristics of An-
    drew Jackson and Franklin D. Roosevelt, with a
    noticeable dash of Harry Truman. Seasoned by
    maturity and experience, he too is young in heart.
    Ben Gurion spoke imaginatively and vigorous-
    ly about Israel's growing economy, and particu-
    larly about plans for development of the Negev.
    There is no doubt in his mind that the great south-
    ern desert tion. In fact, it must be, if Israel is to absorb the
    increased population and its stream of immigrants.
    Ben Gurion effectively dramatized the need for a
    great increase in agricultural and industrial pro-
    duction. Israel, be said, needs two4 things badly-
    tillable land, and capital. -
    Visit with Pramier
    ' IN that engaging two-hoor visit with/Ben Gurion,
    not once did he t*trn his attention end mind
    -(to the past.' He spoke only of'the present and the
    /future. He spent little time .on" Israel's foreign
    ' troubles. His mind seemed, concentrated upon Is-
    rael's internal development. He spoke of tbe great
    responsibility which would be Israel's this coming
    year in providing home* and-jobs, for better than
    a hundred thousand new immigrants.' Iii fact, I
    gathered from my visit with Ben Gurion that the
    task of absorbing a MW H*am of immigrants,
    rather than relations with Arab neighbors, may
    turn out to be the most crucial problem facing
    Israel.
    Israel is applying modern methods, both in
    political and economic problems that it faces. She
    is in tune with the times. It has always amazed
    me that Israel has been able to preserve represen-
    tative government in these pressing and trying
    times. Others of lesser faith and moral stamina
    might have yielded to the temptations of political
    dictatorship. ______________
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    Page 16D
    rjewlsiirhrldlan
    Friday,
    S^Ptembu;
    Rich Year in Jewish Book Output
    Continued from Pae* 14 D
    either. Moshe Davis of the Jewish Theological
    Seminary offered "Israel: Its Role in Civilization"
    (Harper), with essays by leading Jewish and non-
    Jewish thinkers and scholars. Abelard-Schuman
    made available "Tehilla and Other Israeli Tales,"
    edited by Yitzhak Shenhar, and Yoseloff published
    "Israel Argosy No. 4," edited by Isaac Halevy-
    Levin. Both volumes contain good stories by rep-
    resentative Israeli authors. Abelard-Schuman also
    issued Ben Halpern's translation of Hayim Haras'
    novel on Yemenite life, "Mori Sa'id."
    The dozens of volumes listed and briefly de-
    scribed in this article are the literary highlights
    of the past year, but they merely indicate the
    wealth of the literature made available for those
    interested in Jewish creativity and scholarship.
    The American Jewish Year Book, itself worth men-
    tion here as an outstanding volume, publishes each
    year a scholarly bibliography of Jewish books.
    And the annual Jewish Book Annual also does an
    excellent Job to apprise us of what is published
    from year to year. Anyone who studies the field
    will be left with a single overwhelming impres-
    sion. In spite of some pessimistic observers, who
    probably are unaware of everything that is hap-
    pening in literature, Jewish literature in thin coun-
    try is far from sterije or uninteresting. It flour-
    ishes: even if some'are uaawere of the wealth
    given to us year after year.

    Sokolow and Modern Journalism
    Continued from Pago 7 O
    tee of Hebrew culture to serve as political repre-
    sentative as well. He was active to his last moment
    when he died of heart failure in London on May
    17, 19W, at the age of 76.
    Sokolow was a brilliant man of letters, an ob-
    jective and sagacious writer, an authoritative, well-
    informed journalist, an excellent translator, a witty
    speaker with a mirror-like memory and an ency-
    clopedic fund of knowledge. His speeches left a
    lasting impression upon his thrilled, enthusiastic
    audience. When he was over 70. he went to the
    United States and South Africa on important mis-
    sions to Palestine for fund-raising.
    Sokolow was not only the most prolific, but
    also the most distinguished Hebrew writer of his
    generation. He had published more than 4.500
    articles. 30 books in Hebrew, Yiddish. English,
    German. Polish; he introduced the European "feu-
    illeton"a humorous observation on Jewish life
    and general affairsthe counterpart of the Amer-
    ican column.
    Combined Groat Wisdom
    ^OKOLOW'S range of subjects was extensive: he
    wrote a book on geography, another on anti-
    Semitism, a "Primer for the Study of English,"
    many essays on Zionism, and others. He translated
    into Hebrew Gustave Karpeles' "Geschichte der
    deutschen Literatur" and Herzl's "Altneuland,"
    also the first part of Graetc's "Geschichte der
    Juden."
    Sokolow combined great wisdom and mellow
    judgment with wide cosmopolitanism and Jewish
    sagacity. A man of great culture and rare erudi-
    tion in numerous fields, he modernized and en-
    riched the Hebrew language. He had an excellent
    style and wrote equally well in several languages.
    A relentless, enthusiastic fighter for Zionism
    in its early days, Sokolow was a warm-hearted man,
    a deep thinker, a publicist who during his whole
    life fought for the successful spreading of Jewish
    culture and learning, a great diplomat whose diplo-
    macy was based on faith and on his unswerving
    conviction in the justice and final victory of the
    Jewish cause.
    He was a citizen of the world, a man of great
    eloquence and refined manners, of whom Theodor
    Herzl said: "He possesses all the basic culture of
    the modern age and conscientiously pursued the
    everyday events proving himself a journalist in the
    best sense of the term."
    9y //

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    I! of the Shofar Through the Ages

    1

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    Miami. Florida. Friday, September 27. 1957
    Section E
    "The Third Allegory," painting by Ben Shahn in collection
    oi Jewish Community Center of Buffalo, N.Y., strikes an es-
    pecially timely note during Ten Days of Awe. "Ushered in
    by the Shofar, the High Holy Days are also ushered out by
    the Shofar, for the long blast of Tekiah ends the Fast of Yom
    Kippur and the individual Jew resumes his normal
    business of life, more deeply conscious, however, of the
    divine spark within him, and more deeply aware of his
    heritage as a Jew."
    What the Music of This Instrument
    Portends in Retrospect of History
    By ELEANOR WEISBERG
    TEKIAH, Shevarim Teruah, Tekiah. the Shofar
    blowa on Rosh Hashona calling the people to
    pause in their earthly pursuits and to direct their
    attention to their spiritual well-being. Awake, ye
    sleepers! and ye stupefied ones, bestir yourselves,
    the sound and the very tones inspire Its hearers
    with awe. These were the sounds that were heard
    when the Terah was given to Israel, and these were
    the sounds that were raised when the walls of
    Jericho fell. These are the sounds destined to
    blow when the son of David reveals himself, and
    when Ged leads the exiles of Israel into their land.
    Heard in every synagogue throughout the world on
    the High Holy Days and steeped in traditions of the
    past, the Shofar is a symbol of the heritage of
    Judaism.
    Unlike other musical instruments, it has never
    varied In structure from its prehistoric simplicity
    and thus becomes an eternal monument commem-
    orating the events on Mount Sinai when God,
    through Moses, gave Israel His Commandments.
    "And all the people perceived the thunderings, and
    the lightnings, and the voice of the horn, and the
    mountain smoking; and when the people saw it.
    they trembled, and stood afar off."
    Tekiah. Shevarim Teruah, Tekiah. the Shofar
    blasts out a second time on Rosh Hashona in this,
    the twentieth century, and the sound, legends say.
    is supposed to confuse Satan and make him think
    the Messiah is coming. The sounds ring out for a
    third time and Satan becomes dumbfounded be-
    cause he thinks Hie Resurrection is at hand and his
    power is at an end. The Bible abounds with refer-
    ences to the Shofar as a signal horn of war and here
    we have the timeless struggle of the conflict be-
    tween good and evil.
    The Shofar, however, represents the spiritual
    part of the body and the first blasts of the Tekiot
    and the whole purpose of blowing is to awaken the
    Higher Mercy, to call upon God to be kind. Usually
    made out of the horns of a ram, the Shofar recalls
    to God the binding of Isaac. "Why do we sound the
    horn of a ram?" Maimonides wrote. "God said:
    Blow me a ram's horn that I may remember unto
    you the binding of Isaac the son of Abraham, and
    I shall account it unto you for a binding of your-
    selves before me." On the other hand, in order not
    to recall to God the incident of the idolatrous wor-
    ship of the Golden Calf, the horns of the ox or cow
    are banned from ever being made into a Shofar.
    A Spiritual Fanfare
    CURVED in shape in order to symbolize the con-
    trite hearts of the children of Israel bending
    toward their Father who is in Heaven, the Shofar,
    though it may not be painted in .colors, may be
    carved with artistic designs. Representative in a
    way of a sacrifice to God, and thereby necessita-
    ting perfection, the Shofar may not be used for
    ceremonial purposes if there is a rent or hole in
    it that affects its sound.
    The Shofar was used to proclaim danger and
    to terrify the enemy in ancient times and both of
    Continued on Page IS E
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    Page 2 E
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    ------------------------------------------------------j~~J| 27, i|
    Story of the Revered Ketubah
    By DR. BLANCHE KATZEN
    THERE l- no evidence in the Bible of the exist-
    MM oi written *<>n!rait in connection with
    marriage. The Bible describes in detail the mar-
    I a( Isaac lo Rebecca, of Jacob to I^eah first and
    tu Rachel afterwards, but there was no written con-
    tract.
    The stay in the bitter exile of Babylon had
    taught the Jews the importance of drawing up
    legal documents and so it came about that shortly
    after the end of the exile, the marriage contract
    or Ketubah was introduced in the 2nd century
    B.C.E. In the "Book of Tobit" written anterior to
    the destruction of the Temple, we find one of the
    lir.-t written marriage documents.
    The reason for setting forth a solemn written
    contract was to give protection to the woman so
    that she might be assured that her husband would
    not be allowed to treat her as a mere handmaid
    or a purchased slave whom he could dismiss at his
    free will. The Ketubah is a solemn pledge coupled
    with an oath that all liabilities are put on the man
    and only a moral one rests with the woman. The
    Ketubah protects the woman even after her hus-
    band's death and after he has divorced her. Should
    he divorce her or leave her a widow, part of the
    property returns to her.
    The "Get" or letter of divorce of "severence"
    is much older than the Ketubah and is found in
    the Bible. It was given to the woman after her
    husband had divorced her.
    Content* of the Ketubah
    THIS special document setting forth the obliga-
    tions the husband took upon himself as re-
    gards his wife, contained the names of the groom .
    and the bride and of their parents and grand-
    parents; it contained the sum of money the bride-
    groom gave to the bride as a giftthis was not a
    price he paidJewish women were not for sale,
    but it was for her future protection, if and when
    she should ever have recourse to it. It also was a
    protection for her in the case of the husband's
    sudden death or economic troubles.
    The Ketubah sets forth economic clauses to
    DTOM0I the bride should the husband go on a jour-
    ney and not .return and should she not know
    whether he was alive or whether she had become a
    widow in legal terminology, she was then an
    Agunah unable to remarry, powerless to claim
    the property, exposed to cruel hardships. So the
    Ketubah wisely provided a clause to protect her
    in such a case. Thia same clause also stated that
    the husband should not venture on a journey with-
    out the consent of his wife.
    At the end of the document were the signa-
    tures of the witnesses who had to be men of sus-
    tenance and enhanced character; sometimes,
    though not necessarily, the groom added his own
    name.
    A Work of Elaborate Art
    THESE ancient marriage documents were elab-
    orately hand-written by professional scribes
    to convey the impression that this contract was as
    much a gift as a legal document. It teaches us to
    appreciate Jewish penmanship and opens up a new.
    valuable treasure house of Jewish art. The most
    beautiful old Ketubahs were illuminated manu-
    scripts and written in Italy in the 17th and 18th
    centuries.
    A colorfully decorated and illuminated Ketu-
    bah dated Mantua (Italy) 1678 has a pair of ram-'
    part lions flanked by flowers. The Hebrew text
    I?
    r*jmSi
    *r <-'
    mi

    i>*~ ***>*#<*,


    Ketubah from Curaceo, Dutch Antilles.*
    1828. Hebrew text is surrounded by i
    flower omements and shows picture
    groom and bride and graceful figure oi C
    ity with two children.
    indicates that the husband Moshe Sulam J
    wife. Stella Hailproon (both from famous I
    had as witnesses Rabbi Moshe son of
    Zacuta and Menachem Samson Basilea.
    The beautiful Ketubah pictured here is (I
    1828 and comes from Curacao. Dutch Antilles,]
    Hebrew text is surrounded by exquisite I
    naments and shows the pictures of the i
    bride and the graceful figure of Charity
    children.
    Small symbolic pictures and Hebrewi
    woven into the labyrinth of lines.
    Even Adam and Eve. tho first couple ail
    were sometimes included in the illustration!
    plifying the eternal truth that only in the]
    dienee of God's law can a nation survlte.
    In the course of 25 centuries, the Retail
    gone through many an adjustment to envin
    has yielded to a variety of conditions, utl
    has remained essentially faithful to Jewial,
    and content. The Jewish Museum in Net]
    City has one of the largest collections of I
    including the Adler and Friedman colle
    the Jewish Theological Seminary of America.1
    are also many beautiful examples in the Mi
    of trie Hebrew Union College of Cincinnati.
    The origin of the Ketubah goes back |
    purchase price (mohar) which the bridegi
    dinarily paid to the father. Ketubah means"
    is written." This is expressly mentioned in 11
    rus of the 5th century B.C.E. containing the I
    extant Ketubah and embodying legal el
    which recur in the Talmud
    The old Ketubahs arc invaluable soured
    ments and represent one of the most !*
    chapters in the early history of Jewish civil*
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    BEHNST0N


    September 27. 1957
    +Jewls*Fhrldkbi
    Ml
    tie of the Jewish Woman Today
    Page 3E
    By PHILIP M. KLUTZNICK
    telo sound controversial. I tread with deep
    Bui I have 0M- unshakable convic-
    "Wtint women have a place and a purpose
    I scheme of things. The presence of women
    [ social order is not only an adroit maneuver
    ut, it is unmistakably a satisfying arrange-
    tt, as with most creatures of necessity
    women impose difficult responsibilities.
    _m to the male mind, gifted through the cen-
    [with" a superior fallibility on the subject of
    distressing problems persist: What, pre-
    cis woman's purpose? And where is her prop-
    ese have been the core of man's classic di-
    Each era of man gingerly probes the com-
    jof womanand what to do about her. And
    fht is pondering deeply, in the solemnity of
    |at wisdom, the answers are constantly being
    [upon himby women.
    some men are wise ... as some are
    rise. Therefore, in approaching the subject
    nen, wisdom, it seems to meis not to.
    |ou may challenge this as cowardice on my
    llntcfetthc Mibteefuge, gallantry. %
    met* and >nata have bjjfei dodjfcied to
    ns and sreat beauty, and the g-wlBed mm have been stirred and shaken
    i deceiving appearance of their delicate frail-
    Ut the dominant characteristic of Women
    [thai counts lor mostis the quality of their
    ttence.
    jennie may have trouble making up her mind.
    hen she doesit is strength, irresistible and
    owering.
    leminine persistence is what challenged and
    lately put to rout the wisdom of the ancient
    ^Goldsteh. 18, of Silver Springs, Md.,
    panonal president oi B'nai B'rith Girls,
    Inrst shot in coast-to-coast campaign be-
    pnducted by teen-age youth to promote
    lot Salk polio vaccine. Dr. Otis L. Ander-
    h'sisicnt surqeon qeneral of U.S., watch-
    *; Barbara Groben administer innocula-
    _ American women have in their
    w hands both strength and power for ac-
    eishing a iremendous goal at the point
    1 human relationships can be most ef-
    b m our search for a tranquil society less
    *ned with tensions, feats and nervous
    Ms.
    philosophers of Cato, and Aristotle and their
    contemporaries, who held strong notions on the
    need for women to be unseen and unheard. Fem-
    inine persistence has successfully nullified the con-
    viction of even that architect of American liberal-
    ism Thomas Jefferson. He warned us that politics
    could not suffer the calamity of women at the vot-
    ing polls or m the councils of government.
    Revealing Statistic*
    JHE founders of B'nai B'rith were indeed far-
    sighted men. The principles with which they
    endowed the Order are still our credo, 114 years
    later.
    Women have come a long way since 1909 when
    the first B'nai B'rith chapter was chartered. We
    have women industrialists and women corporate
    executives. We have women who wear the uniform
    of a soldier.
    Women do the buying in America. Women pay
    more than 40 percent of all income taxes. One-fifth
    of the nation's income is earned by women.
    Women hold title to at least 40 percent of
    our nation's 30 million homes. They own 65 per-
    cent of the mutual savings funds. They are the
    beneficiaries of 80 percent of all life insurance
    policies. Today, as many girls as boys attend
    college.
    Women run the schools. They are the force
    that sustain our religious institutions, Th'sy de-
    termine what appears in the magazines and in the
    movies; what will be heard on radio and seen on
    television.
    In my time, I have been shaved by a woman,
    driven in a taxi by a woman, and counseled in a
    legal matter by a woman. Each was competent
    at her task.
    The crown of Great Britain is worn-by a wo-
    man. The foreign affairs of Israel are executed
    by a woman. The talk about a woman in the White
    House some day becomes less fanciful with each
    generation.
    "Twentieth-century America," says the dis-
    tinguished historian Henry Steel Commager.
    "seems to be a woman's country. Traditionally,"
    he says, "women rule the home. But in America
    they also design it, build it, furnish it, direct the
    activities and fix its standards."
    There are worried souls among the male spe-
    cies whose alarm at the rising strength of women
    is reflected in their devious support of an Equal
    Rights amendment to the Constitution. They figure
    the law may be needed to protect them some day.
    Personally, I'm an optimist. Whatever heights are
    reached by the persistence of women, I am con-
    fident in my own mind that man will not become
    obsolete. The role of my sex is no less consequen-
    tial to the survival of all we believe in.
    It has been said that "America was born of re-
    volt, flourished on dissent and grew great on ex-
    perimentation." If women were denied full par-
    ticipation in our era of revolt, there is no ques-
    tion but that they contributed to the character of
    our dissent by their own struggle for political, so-
    cial and economic emancipation. But it is in the
    latter-day era of experimentation that American
    women have made their distinctive contributions
    to our national development.
    Without recourse to charts or graphs, or the
    data of learned scientists, but on the basis of my
    own keen observationand what my dear wife
    tells meI find a wholesome absenc? of timidity
    in the political and social attitudes of American
    women.
    It becomes them.
    Finally, women insist on living longer. So, all
    Continued on Pag* 14 E
    HAPPY NEW YEAR
    Bt Ihe Market Affords
    Reasonable Prices
    Alexander and Family
    [ HTman. Harry fc Sol
    of the
    *E CASH MARKET
    fjf' Ulh s"
    . MIAMI, FLORIDA
    P* 17M N. W. 18,h St.
    * "*r H011DAV ro All
    f'fln< Mrs. Harry J. Swu
    qnd Daughter
    Ui
    *STATI
    ** Oener.l hMpajaj
    *mGT0NAVIN0i
    Ml BUCK
    Best Wishes For A
    HAPPY NEW YEAR
    Mr. and Mrs.
    Harry Gordon
    and Family
    5227 Alton Road
    MIAMI BEACH
    'CHARM For Your WINDOWS"
    ALL TYPES OF CORNICES
    COVERED OR PAINTED
    SUP C0VMS mi KUPHOISTEIY
    King Company
    "On the Trail"
    3473 S. W. 8th STREET
    Phone HI 6-6872
    TOPS IN CORNICES
    CUSTOM MAW MAMS
    unimcs
    ADAMS SERVICE
    Pelt Adams
    ADAMS STEAM CLEANING CO.
    Nat Incorporated
    Roof Cleaning a Specially
    1952 N.E. MIAMI COURT
    Phone FR 3-9357
    FRANCINE, fiVC.
    WHOLESALE
    BEAUTY SUPPLIES
    1442 West Flagler Street
    Phone FR 4-8571
    WISHES ALL A
    MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
    Mr. and Mrs. Harry Pearl
    ana romny
    wish aff their friends
    - AND HARRY WISHES HIS CUSTOMERS -
    A HAPPY AMD PKOSPIROUS NEW YEAR


    5
    H

    It
    IfJI W I S H t S FOR A HAPPY
    AMD HEALTHY NEW TEA*
    Mr. and Mr*. Auntin Mlurke and Son

    :
    ; jj

    4
    *
    i
    BEST WISHES FOR A HEALTHY, HAPPY
    ANDPROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
    MR. & MRS. EUGENE J. WEISS
    AND FAMILY
    1650 S. W. 21st STREET

    SEASON'S BEST WISHES
    BYRNES M KSKKV
    General Nursery and landscaping Stock
    House Plants and Fruit Trees Sail by the Bushel or Load
    F. DARltNG Owner
    2660 S.W. 27th Avenue Phone HI 6-9211
    BILL WRIGLEY of
    WRIGLEY ENGRAVING COMPANY
    WtSHfS HK MAMY HWKH fKliNBS A MOST HAPPY NEW TEAR
    122 N.E. 6th STREET MIAMI *
    Hi
    4t ;
    To All Greetings
    R. & H. MARINE SERVICE
    Red and Helena Rutler Outboard Specialist
    Evinrude Motors Thunderbird Boats Sales & Service
    Phone TU 8-3068
    62 East 2nd Street
    Hialeah, Fla.
    A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
    FURS EXCLUSIVELY BY
    PINTO
    1642 Euclid Avenue Phone IE 1-7066
    I
    StASOM'S GREETINGS
    KENNEDY t ELY INSURANCE INC.
    AH furmt of Insurance
    1313 S.W. 22nd Street
    Phone FR 1-5541
    TO ALL GREETINGS "Since 1922"
    JOE GUTHRIE'S REPAIR SHOP
    GENERAL AUTOMOBILE REPAIRING *
    "OUR WORK IS AS GOOD AS THE BEST"
    3828 N. W. Second Avonuo Miami. Florida
    Mo*o PI 7-11M
    4-
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL ]
    MIAMI MILITARY ACADEMY
    35 Acres on Bay Small Classes All Sports Catalogue
    10601 BISCAYNE BLVD. Phone PL 7-4921


    Page 4E
    +Je*istFk>rldlair
    Y^2:t****
    ii
    SINCERE WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    AL MEIDENBERG AND STAFF
    A-1 EMPLOYMENT SERVICE
    37 N. E. 5th Street
    THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI
    SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
    extends its best wishes for a peaceful and joyous
    NEW YEAR to its many patrons and friends who
    have helped make this season a success.
    .J
    To All A Most Haooy New Year .
    D.G. Steel Rule Die Mfg. Co. of New York
    Steel Rule Dies Die Cutting
    221 N.W. 26th St. FR 9-1382
    To All A Most Happy New Year .
    MILLS A. NOVENE
    BETTINA OF MIAMI, INC.
    AFTERNOON and COCKTAIL DRESSES
    2110 N.W. Miami Court
    FR 9-8047
    Sl\< ERE WISHES FOR A
    HAPPY NEW YEAR
    MAYOK KOBIKT WAGM*
    . ht refused courtesies
    JOHN fOSTlK DUUIS
    , Smv4 wm vrtceptht
    "r $. Ttiw
    hit vJcw im
    Mr. and Mrs. Sherman J. Tobin & Family
    SEVEN-UP BOTTLING CO.
    Miami, Florida
    Discrimination at Dhahran Base
    By DR. EDWARD B. GLICK
    ^NE of this country's leading experts on the Mid-
    " die East, Prof. George Ixnczowski, concluded
    a recent book by asking "whether the American
    ideals of democracy and self-determination have
    not too often been subordinated to expediency,
    thus robbing American policy of the moral advan-
    tage thai it once possessed and that it might well
    try to regain in the present revolutionary era in
    the non-Western world." Perhaps there is no bet-
    ter example of the subordination of the ideals of
    democracy to the demands of expediency than the
    discriminatory situation at the American-leased
    airfield at Dhahran. Saudi Arabia, where American
    Christians are restricted in the practice of their
    religion -and American Jews are excluded both
    from the base and the country.
    The United States obtained permission to
    build, maintain, and use the Dhahran airfield, loca-
    ted on the western shore of the Persian Gulf not
    far from the headquarters of the Arabian American
    Oil Company (Aramco), in 1945. Continually ex-
    tended for brief periods of time, the lease was re-
    newed in 1951 for five years and again in April of
    this year for an additional five years. Despite the
    fact that we have in the last decade spent some
    $50,000,000 in construction alone, all new "instal-
    lations and constructions" as well as all "fixed
    properties" at Dhahran belong to Saudi Arabia.
    The 1951 agreement, the basic document gov-
    erning our rights and obligations at Dhahran, stip-
    ulates that American military and civilian aircraft
    may land, take off. refuel, and make use of the
    technical services of the airport. In return, the
    United States, besides building and maintaining the
    facilities, provides the weather information, radio
    communications, air rescue, and aircraft operations
    services not only for her own military planes, but
    also for all civilian aircraft which the Saudi Ara-
    bian government authorizes to use the Dhahran
    airfield.
    Bias Is Tolerated
    QERTAINLY no one. least of all a civilian un-
    connected with the defense establishment or
    the government, can presume to challenge all of
    the purely military considerations responsible for
    Americas acquisition of the Dhahran airfield. How-
    ever, what can be questioned and what the State
    and Defense Departments have still not satisfac-
    torily justified, is the atmosphere of bias associ-
    ated with the base from our very first connection
    with it. Among the clauses of the 1951 agreement
    are provisions requiring the United States Mission
    to submit "a detailed list of the names
    tity" of its members and employees so thai
    will not be included individuals "object
    the Saudi Arabian Government."
    Under the terms of the 1957 renewal.)
    ernmenl has further agreed to supply
    bia Wi'fr $50.000;.000 worth of military eqg
    to construct new facilities at the base, to i
    a training program for the Saudi Arei
    Force, to augment its present advisory
    for the Saudi Arabian Army, to train m,
    sonnel for the desert kingdom, and to help 1
    expansion of the port of Damman.
    If the Mission is requested by the
    send out or replace any of its personnel.
    do so "promptly." Furthermore, all civile
    trading firms and their workers must
    "not be unacceptable to the Saudi
    eminent." Lastly, the American Mission, i
    sonnel, and its employees must in their'.
    tivities" (which apparently includes their t
    affiliations and observances) "take into
    the local customs and laws in effect ii|
    Arabia."
    The practical effect of these provisions!
    American Jewish military personnel, reg
    their qualifications or the need for their t
    are never posted to Saudi Arabianor are J
    can Jews permitted to be employed by,
    any other private American firmand
    Americans may not publicly practice or <
    symbols and insignia of their religion.
    States chaplains at Dhahran do not wear I
    on their lapels and must conduct religious I
    in buildings which do not have the our*
    pearance of a church. Furthermore, tow
    dents. Catholic priests find it necessary to I
    their religious functions without wearing I
    tomary clerical garb.
    The State Department has sought to i
    the discriminatory exclusion of American|
    servicemen by invoking the canons of inters.
    usage. For example, a May 22. 1956 offidaj
    ment by the Departments Public Service* P
    notes inter alia: "International law and
    recognize the fundamental ri>:ht of a
    state to determine whether and under w
    ditions aliens may enter its territory."
    an obvious attempt to shift the onus entii
    Saudi Arabia, the statement also says: The I
    States has made no agreement concerning I
    sign men t of military personnel of the Jewisij
    to Saudi Arabia, although the assignment ol
    Continued on Pgt 13 E
    LUNDY'S
    MARKET
    1435 Washington Avt).
    Wish Their Friends and
    Customers
    A VERY HAPPY NEW YEAR
    CRKTINGS TO Alt
    FLORIDA BURLAP AND
    BAG CO., Inc.
    Otofer. ; .,,., 4 c#M#n
    *ipi* Cl.fk Miw turf,,
    S0 N.W. tOth STMIT
    '# n I-B766
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
    OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
    MIAMI BEACH
    KEY SHOP
    110 5H. STMIT
    Mmm JI I 54M
    LffcfcM
    Compliments
    ol
    MR. AND MRS.
    JQSEPH URAM
    SEASON'S GREETINGS
    TO ALL
    AMM/'SAMTfRWtf:
    151 IX W W- **"
    M St. lt ST ***
    141 MliAClf MRf, COW '
    IMS UHCOIN WAP. *
    A Happy Ntw r*^
    Our Friend* P
    A Lanli?
    735 WASHINGTON AV
    MIAMI BEACH
    Phone IE l"f
    William *ellr
    Harvey Cypr-5


    -September 27,. 1957
    *JeistiFhrin
    0-- The Citadel of Scholarship
    By BOB BREWER
    end of World War I in 1918 when the old
    lrinHungarianMonarchy was cut to pieces
    -new independent states were formed, the
    t Poland evolved a well-defined political pol-
    protect the rights granted them by the
    1 of Versailles. New Jewish schools sprang
    ,'yiddish and Hebrew languages acquired a
    Jise on life Literature in both languages
    fte flourish.
    j 1925, a handful of Jewish scholars met in
    Lid decided to found a citadel of Jewish
    V the Yiddish Scientific Institutethe Yivo.
    jjwere to study Jewish life in the past and
    [research work in Yiddish and Hebrew lit-
    L. The results of such thorough research
    be presented to the public in a bi-monthly
    Ltionthe Yivo Bleter.
    tcm Vilna, its central seat, branches were
    y established in Paris, Berlin and other cities
    W Europe However, the work of the Yivo
    hrely handicapped by the lack of academic
    tg among Jews. Undeterred, Yivo opened
    i Aspirantur, a graduate co-educational
    [to train researchers in social sciences. It
    Jan immediate success and so, only a few
    [later, a preparatory school^, Proaspirantur,
    Hded. Soon a flock of newly-trained, ambi-
    |u!d enthusiastic research workers competed
    sfully with old established' and highly-re-
    I European research centers.
    fter a decade, the fame of the Yivo, of its
    ;j| schools and excellent publications, at-
    the attention of the learned world of all
    hes. Guest professors from everywhere, in-
    \i Yale and Harvard universities held lee-
    Ed furthered the aims of the young institute
    learning.
    tcouraged by warm recognition and by an
    bcreasing number of eager scholars, the Yivo
    |td, in 1939, many important research projects
    irge scale and, last but not least, the trans-
    ition of all her schools into a regular Yeshiva
    isity. Shortly after, however. World War II
    I cut. It meant the end of the Yivo in Poland.
    Trantfor to New York City
    v, the Yivo was transferred to New York
    Kre it continued its publications in English.
    [the familiar European scene which had been
    tnary center of research, the Yivo transferred
    [wests to the fertile American scene shedding
    on the struggling pioneers that came here
    1 years ago (1654) and .on their valuable
    Mions to the building up of America and
    I economic structure. Yivo published several
    [relumes on "The History of the Jewish Labor
    %nt in the United States*a reference work
    : value Another fertile field for the in-
    Ption work as done by the Yivo, were the
    Ted accomplishments of the many Jews trans-
    J to these free shores from Nazi-ravaged
    me ,0 i,s unswerving policy of seeking ever
    'venues of approach to a problem, the Yivo
    Fl an autobiographical contest for immi-
    which brought some 250 entries telling the
    i of their lives in Europe, their plight under
    w. their escape to America and their ad-
    "' After careful screening, most of the
    *as utilued in many social studies.
    Literary Endeavors
    M'vo translated into English and published
    lowing important books: A. A. Roback "The
    * 'Sh Li,eratur*." Jacob Lestchinsky
    gration for the past Hundred Years," S.
    Mendelsohn "The Battle of the Warsaw Ghetto"
    and many others.
    la*,8*" the Y'vo has done more- much "ore- In
    l43, at the occasion ef the centenary of L M
    UUenthals birth (he was an outstanding figure in
    the Haskala movement and later Zionism), the
    Yivo presented to the public a carefully selected
    Llltenthal Exhibit visualizing his life in the frame-
    work of his epoch. Another splendid exhibit de-
    picted Jewish life in Poland in between the two
    World Wars.
    From its crammed headquarters in 123rd st.,
    west of Broadway, the Yivo moved downtown into
    the heart of New York. From an adjoining hotel
    it bought the palatial Vanderbilt mansion of Fifth
    ave. and 86th st., for one million dollars. The spa-
    cious building overlooks Central Park and houses
    its impressing archives and a well-stocked library
    open to all.
    Ours is the generation which has, on the one
    hand, lived through the greatest tragedy in Jewish
    history, and, on the other, has witnessed the re-
    surgence of the Jewish state. The Yivo, continu-
    ing its deep interest in Jewish social science, stud-
    ies and interprets the experience of this generation
    in terms of Jewish historical developments and in
    the light of world events. Yivo is the only insti-
    tution in the world to conduct thorough research
    in the history and development of the Yiddish
    language, literature and folklore.
    Library and Archives
    THE Yivo Library numbers a hundred thousand
    volumes, among them many unique books and
    manuscripts. The collection of past and current
    Jewish periodicals from all over the world is one
    of the largest in existence.
    Its archives are the most complete in the whole
    world as far as records of modern Jewish life are
    concerned, and number about one million items.
    Of special interest and value is the immense
    collection of material pertaining to the Nazi an-
    nihilation of European Jewish communities and to
    the life of the survivors, Included in this collec-
    tion are hundreds of personal memoirs, autobio-
    raphies and similar documents throwing light on
    Continued on Pate 14 E
    Yivo House, formerly
    Fifth ave. and 86th st
    looking Central Park
    Vanderbilt Mansion, on
    ., New York City, over-
    , ^KTIiai SERVICE '
    Ahtmtiooi Addition
    "ton Bird Ellis
    UCIWlD CONTRACTOR
    ^ *"k G.orootooe
    " CmmmtcM MTMaf
    ** 57m COURT
    *'* FlOtlOA
    *"*> MOW
    ^ST HAPPY HOLIDAY
    Mranvn
    ^MottgeEs Company
    *.m*-ii
    TO ALL OUR FRIENDS.
    RELATIVES AND
    ACQUAINTANCES
    A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
    Mr.* Mrs.
    Harry W. Fields
    14*4 COUIMS AVI., WARN HACH
    lllinNlf
    6 I E METAL PRODUCTS CO.
    OriWt
    Porch ReiUef
    Cotton Moot AojariM-
    Stem $lwrtt#rs
    IM N.W. 14M STRUT
    MM l-tfll
    Mario* EofiflO Overhool
    ad Inttollotioo
    Caraoan Moriot tafia**
    MIAMI MARINE
    ENGINEERS, INC
    41R J.W. Xad M
    mum 3o, no*!**
    C.A.I
    ToJeeheae n -MS
    BLU-GREEK
    PLANT FOOD
    On Year Lawn?
    Startling results con be ob-
    tained from this rich pleat food
    which contains minerals that
    will help keep chinch buff out
    of your lawn. Sold oxclutiToly
    "hughes
    ICED TOBJB
    114 S. MU-iA... ra-piMTn
    Page 5E
    THAT ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS MAY ENJOY
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    IS THE SINCERE WISH OF THE
    AUGUST FAMILY and
    AUGUST BROS. BAKERY
    361 S.W. Eighth Street Phona FR 4,2792
    TO OUR MANY FRIENDS
    OUR SINCERE WISHES
    for a
    HAPPY NEW YEAR
    i 1

    i I
    Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Gottesman


    ROSH HASHONA GREETINGS TO
    ALL OUft FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS
    wnan nsm nxr1*
    MR. and MRS. HYMAN ZAIDMAN
    DADE KOSHER MARKET
    Best Wishes for the New Yew ...
    L & R BODY SHOP
    QUALITY BODY end PAINT WORK
    "Where the Best Coals Less"
    Jimmy "Red" Holmes, Owner
    I
    I
    Hi
    rl
    i
    2030 N.W. 10th Avenue
    Phone FR 9-8294
    Holiday fireetingn to All
    AETNA ELECTRICAL SUPPLY CO.
    WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS
    Phones: NE 5-0939 NE 50930
    2940 N.W. 72nd Street Miami. Florida
    >. '
    Baros Family
    and Miami Rug Co.
    I
    f
    TO ALL GREETINGS
    Grentner Brothers DeSoto Agency
    Sooth's Leowing DeSoto Dealer
    I7f* S.W. th STRRET
    osn cam eaxawrr
    MIS N.W. L. J E OWE ROAD
    RHOMR FR J-5704

    To All Our friends and Patrons... A Happy New fear
    RIMIAWfR "School Timt h Neee Tim*"
    ]
    S^Btf^f^tMs
    i
    < O M P a N
    Mil liatayae ifco.-Wi. PR 14414 Opea Moaooy ooo rriooy Evaaiaat
    RaMwie, Acroeoak, Roaler oo4 CawesaH Naooo
    Tho ReMwta Eloctroak Oraeaa Thaaiea lloilrooU Qisoai



    Page E
    TO ALL GREETINGS
    SAM DEUTCH'S
    HOTEL and RESTAURANT SUPPLY
    Strictly Kosher
    MEATS POULTRY and PROVISIONS
    Boasted Poultry Our Specialty
    953 Washington Ave. IE 8-0221
    vjmlstithridklnn

    11
    MIAMI REAL ESTATE AGENCY
    1034 diiPont Building Pheee Ft 4-4033
    TO ALL GREETINGS
    l I
    FARREY'S, INC.
    Wholesale Hardware
    7225 N.W. 27th AVENUE PHONE PL 4-5453
    Happy New Year to All Our friends. Customers and Family
    TOWER TACKLE CO.
    2197 N.W. 7th AVE., MIAMI Ph. FR 9-2201
    Top Quality Merchandise at Florida's Lowest Prices
    Fishing Tackle
    Skin Diving Equipment
    # Electrical Appliances
    # Archery Supplies
    "Known from Coast-to-Coast"
    BEST WISHES
    FOR THE
    NEW YEAR
    VAF.-M/Sfc
    %MUP?,CI
    TO THE
    ENTIRE JEWISH
    COMMUNITY
    MIAMI FEDERATION OF MUSICIANS
    LOCAL 655. A. F. of M.
    GREETINGS .
    HUGH KIRKLAND
    Phone MU 8-4736
    Masonry Stone Brick
    Uon^hat M Ploa coMtmiUon team < b^u, ^ fc#
    35 E. 57th ST.
    MMLEAH, FU.
    TO OUR MANY PATRONS AND FRIENDS
    SEASON'S GREETINGS
    Fillup with Billups
    Tires Batteries Accessories
    BILLUPS
    C E
    S T A T
    O N S
    S E R V
    THROUGHOUT THE SOUTH
    In Miami:
    201 N.W. 27th AVENUE PHONE NE 5-8176
    9001 N.W. 7th AVENUE PHONE PL 1-9211
    U.S. 1-HOMESTEAD
    GREETINGS
    Ormsby Pen Shop
    "STOP IN Wt AM AT YOUR SERVICE'
    55 N.E. 1st STREET
    tiffriffi
    PH. FR 14417
    A New Year of Awesome Revi
    By CHARLES AARON
    President, National Jewish Welfare Board
    f\Ht of the miracles of modern age is the ex-
    ^ traordinary economic development that has
    taken place over past few hundred years, enabling
    man to span oceans, open continents, conquer the
    air and attain to material wealth and comforts un-
    dreamed of by man in an earlier society. With this
    extraordinary advancement in a material sense has
    come a concomitant in the form of the worship of
    bigness and the growth of an unbridled spirit of
    materialism in our lives that has departed from the
    focus on man, to a concentration on the things that
    serve him. I see in this the antithesis of the spirit
    of our Jewish New Year shortly to be observed by
    Jews the world over. It is the impersonality of the
    material drive that can profit from the perspectives
    offered by the New Year spirit, which bids man
    place his sights on the inner man, on his spiritual
    and ethical life and his relations to his fellowmen.
    In the dramatic notes of the Shofar there is
    the call to man to be human, to establish a truly
    human and humane society with a social and ethi-
    cal character. In this sense we do not think of a
    community as merely a mathematical conceptthe
    whole merely equal to the sum of its parts, but
    rather an entity with a soul and purposededica-
    ted (o man and his great needs as a human being
    in which the needs of one is the responsibility of
    the whole.
    This New Year imperative finds its flowering
    and exemplification in our country in the growth
    of Jewish communal life with its manifold social
    and welfare agencies, all dedicated to serving man,
    not as a matter of charity, but because of his essen-
    tial worth and dignity as a human being. This is
    . L'Hadlik ner shel Shabbos." Blessing of
    Sabbath candles, given here by Girl Scout at
    Fnday evening services in summer camp,
    typifies concern of young people for Jewish
    heritage. At Jewish Community Centers affil-
    iated with and served by National Jewish
    Welfare Board, youngsters enjoy variety of
    activities. '

    Visit to bedside of hospitalized ve
    New Year deed of charity for Jewish u_
    Across U.S., patients in VA hospitals wj|
    brate Rosh Hashona and Yom Kippuimt
    ial services under auspices of National]
    ish Welfare Beard.
    aboundantly highlighted in the workofthej
    which in its manifold work strives to keen
    people wellin body and spirit, which aims)
    plajit the idea of the worth of the individ
    which teaches people to respect one another a|
    democratic atmosphere of our Jewish Com
    Centers.
    Ethical and Moral Achievement
    IT'S concern extends to wherever young,
    cans stand guard at the most rsmotel
    of the world. In these frequently desolate j
    overseas, often without any community or <
    ity resources, JWB serves the GIsgiving I
    sense of their worth, giving them the
    the midst of isolation that the comraunKfj
    home is concerned, and giving to their i
    service meaning and satisfaction.
    The notion of the New Year ethic
    from the Bible and our sages. It also ial
    the fabric of our Ajnerican traditions pr>
    by our-founding fathers. The Rosh Hashoat]
    abhors second class citizenship, rejects
    and all forms of totalitarianism including*]
    of personality," placing its stress sharply J
    and his worth.
    The Jewish New Year is not a time of \
    ingless revelry, but rather one of inner i
    tion, for it stands as a constant reminder!
    that we are able to attain to the highest \
    ethical and moral, achievements if we live aj
    framework of the ethical blueprint which ]
    pride of our people.
    The New Year is indeed a challenge to I
    set our sights that we may have a world inj
    all may live in comity, in which mutual
    the highest virtue. Rosh Hashona offers i
    ed vistas of good and plenty for all and tail
    pects of living in a society in which the
    hood of man is not an empty precept.
    TO ALL .
    GREETINGS
    Mrs.
    V. C. PLUMMER
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS
    norissioMAi dog crooking
    fOODli SOCIALIST
    The
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    TO ALL OUR FRIENDS i
    ACQUAINTANCES A
    NEW YEAR GREETINGS]
    INfe. and Mrs. Saul
    and Family
    5833 DevonsWw *
    SEASONS GREETS |
    MR. and MBS.
    HENRY SHTEB
    and Family
    2038 N. W. 2^th At*
    PHONE ***


    27, 1957
    *Je^isiifcridiann
    looks are Tools for Scientist;
    Page 71
    By JULIAN L. MELTZEK
    rt [reading
    lit his side
    large tome and, taking notes on a
    The scene, which can be duplicated
    udj"room.s of research institutes or uni
    in any part of the world, is common
    Mfor the casual onlooker to dismiss with a
    gfter a cursory glance. Nothing very in-
    5 in it. he reflects.
    this particular scene does happen to be
    .jng it has been taken at Rehovoth, the
    Israel where President Chaim Weizmann
    I tn last (wo decades of his life alternating
    scientific experimentation and statesman
    I e_ jn the Jacob C. Goldenberg Library of
    1 Weizmann Institute of Science, the bearded
    r Kientist and his clean-shaven colleagues are
    r themselves informed of what is happening
    | torld outside. Scientific literature is their
    funk with hundreds of fellow-researchers in
    countries.
    Scan* is Dramatic
    ERE is drama, too, in the familiar scene
    [drama which is none the less exciting for being
    jtn from all but the observant. For the scien-
    quietly reading the book M trjgquil car-
    j is engaged in one of the dost drajkatic eon-
    i known in the history of mankind. Ever since
    [restless human mind first began to probe the
    Jteries of the seemingly inexplicable, man has
    i pitting his brains and the skills of broaden
    [scientific knowledge against the reluctance of
    hre to yield her secrets.
    I In the constant quest for scientific truth, the
    ring exploration into nature's inner fastnesses,
    [printed word has become an indispensable staff
    he scientific wayfarer groping through the maze
    |trds a wider path.
    I The sum total of the printed word represents
    I accumulated and tested knowledge of the
    ntist's predecessors and contemporaries in the
    I realm of inquiry. It is the portal to a deeper
    lerstanding of the recondite problems which
    [is tackling.
    The perusal of scientific literature is just as
    I Haber Library was donated to Dr. Chaim
    pmann ov^ 20 year* ago by famed Ger-
    1 tewish chemiat and Noble Prize laureate
    died in exile. This is view of one of
    's reading rooms at Weizmann Insti-
    i Rehovoth.
    mportant to the research worker as his work at
    he aboratory bench. It means as much to him as
    twisting and turning the glass faucets of test-tubes
    and retorts, peering at mysterious solvents and
    compounds through a micrometer gauge
    These books and journals of learned societies
    in all parts of the world-and the Weizmann In-
    stitute s scientists are widely represented by pa-
    pers in these journals-are part of his essential
    equipment. They are part of the research work-
    er s tools.
    The Weizmann Institute of Science spends
    some 15,000 Israel pounds annually on books and
    scientific periodicals. It is not a large amount. In
    fact, it is very small by American institutional
    standards. At the current rate of exchange, the
    sum is equivalent to a little over $8,000 in Amer-
    ican currency. That isn't much to keep the life-
    stream of a scientific institute going.
    At an average of 15 Israel pounds per scientific
    work, the amount allocated suffices for about 1,000
    books. Then there are periodicals to pay for and
    subscriptions to scientific journals. The amount
    is a very minimum one.
    The Weizmann Institute reciprocates by dis-
    tributing 120 volumes of its annual collection of re-
    prints to correspondents abroad, both institutional
    and individual.
    The last collection of scientific paper reprints
    issued by the Weizmann Institute and Daniel Sieff
    Research Institute was Volume 16/17 for 1952-53.
    It contained 153 papers devoted to completed re-
    search projects in Mathematics-Physics, Organic
    Chemistry, Physical-Organic Chemistry, Physical
    Chemistry, Biochemistry-Biophysics and Biology
    undertaken by Weizmann Institute scientists. A
    1953-54 edition is about to be published.
    Institute's Own Reprints
    NEVERTHELESS the Institute makes the best it
    can do with the limited means available. It
    is on the exchange list of leading universities, li-
    braries and research institutions in the world. The
    Library of Congress in Washington, DC, for ex-
    ample, is among the world-famed bodies that send
    duplicates of scientific reprints and papers to the
    Weizmann Institute of Science at Rehovoth
    During 1954, the Weizmann Institute's three
    principal libraries received about 800 new books
    and 350 miscellaneous scientific periodicals. These
    accretions brought the total collections to well over
    12,500 volumes of scientific works and bound
    journals.
    The Institute's scientific literature is housed
    in the Fritz Haber Library, donated to Dr. Weiz-
    mann over 20 years agowhen he opened th.e
    Daniel Sieff Research Institute at Rehovothby the
    famous German-Jewish chemist and Nobel Prize
    laureate who died in exile; the Jacob C. Golden-
    berg Library, established as a memorial by his
    family to a prominent Jewish resident of Minne-
    apolis, Minn.; and the Asher Selig and Malka Gros-
    singer Library, pcasented to the Institute's Depart-
    ment of Experimental Biology by friends of Mrs.
    Jennie Grossinger, of New York and Miami Beach,
    in memory of her parents.
    In addition, there are' smaller departmental
    libraries which hold their own particular books and
    periodicals.
    Three full-time librarians are employed by the
    Institute.
    Weizmann and Einstein Books
    ANY of Dr. Chaim Weizmann's own books and
    the volumes he used in his lifetime of research
    Continued on Paa 12 E
    M
    * GREETINGS TO ALL
    * i MMMn tkrt 1 lxt,n4 Florida Gas Corporation
    11** 6/eti M (| frlmit nd
    *i Acquointaaces Laudenrale Gas Corporation
    O. B. WHITE "BUTE FLAME
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    111 6400 M.W. 7tti AVENUE
    ^ Phone PL 1-1873



    RECAST
    i*a. M fftaper Oew rear
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    W^W FRAMES 2028 N. E. 2d Ave.
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    TO ALL GREETINGS
    Mr. and Mrs. Wm. L. Sheade
    Sheade Bedding
    and Mattress Co.
    123 N.W. 23rd STREET
    heae F 14848

    600 N. W. 10th Street
    EXTENDS GREETINGS OF THE SEASON
    TO ITS FRIENDS AND PATRONS
    Telephone FR 3-6332
    t

    i ?
    .
    i

    SEASON'S BEST WISHES
    George J. Bert man & Associates
    KeoUmr
    940 LINCOLN ROAD BLDG.. MIAMI BEACH
    . I
    SEASON'S BEST WISHES
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    IN A HURRY CALL
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    THE LUXURY DRY CLEANERS
    5705 N.W. 2nd Avenue Phone PL 8-5521
    i
    AMERICAN LAUNDRY
    6220 N.W. 2nd A\ *nue
    GREETINGS
    FROM
    J. R. SPRADLEY & CO.
    FOOD BROKERS
    5905 It.tP. 12th AVENUE
    Phone PL 4-2578
    *>
    Federal Title & Insurance Co.
    Extends Sincere** Holiday
    Greetings To All
    1527 WASHINGTON AVENUE
    MIAMI BEACH
    .
    $


    Page 8E
    JmisttkjrkHan
    .^J^- SPtamb*
    27.
    w
    \ ;
    V
    (Holm
    (Likrsftin
    ^
    -*&
    4
    ii!
    DAVID MANASTER, Prtiidtnl
    KOSHER
    Z10 N
    SAUSAGE
    of
    CHICAGO
    COASTLINE PROVISION CO.
    155 BISCAYNE ST.
    MIAMI BEACH
    DISTRIBUTORS
    ii*
    To All A Most Happy New Yoor ...
    RUMBA CIGAR COMPANY
    Hand Made Cigars "RUMBA"
    1872 W. Flogler Street
    FR 90083
    Israel's Great Strides During 5ft
    Best Wishes for the New Year ...
    FLEETW00D INDUSTRIES
    Manufacturer, and Designer, of Mica Kitchen Cabinet.
    COMPLETE REMODELLING
    245 S.W. 6th Street
    By MEYER STEINOLASS
    PHE Year 5717. now drawing to a close, has been
    ' the most difficult for the State of Israel since
    the early days of Statehood, when Israel faced the
    invading armies of the Arab countries. Forced to
    act in defense of her security through the Sinai
    operation. Israel had to devote a heavy proportion
    of her resources to defense.
    This need, and the economic strain which it
    entails, continues today. Yet, despite this, Israel
    has recorded economic advances of decisive im-
    portance. She has been able, with the aid of Is-
    rael Bond funds, to keep pace with her rapidly
    growing population, which is now nearing the 2.-
    000,000 mark. This figure includes approximately
    100.000 Jewish immigrants from Egypt, Hungary
    and other lands who have entered Israel since last
    Roth Hashona. Newcomers are continuing to come
    in at a rapid rate.
    The problem of providing adequate housing
    for immigrants is uppermost in the minds of Is-
    rael's leaders. Prime Minister David Ben Gurion,
    addressing an Israel Bond delegation which visited
    Israel last May. characterized the immigrant hous-
    ing situation as "the most urgent problem facing
    Israel this year."
    Israel's primary task today is the construction
    of 30.000 permanent housing units. To help meet
    this emergency, Israel is building permanent
    homes, not tents or shacks, to house its newcom-
    ers. The total cost for this essential project will be
    about $90,000,000.
    The Israel Bond Organization recently issued
    a special Housing Bond in the denomination of
    $3,000, the cost of a single family unit, to help
    finance the construction of these 30,000 housing
    units. Each unit will accommodate a family. The
    housing provided under this plan is being built
    and made available to new immigrants on the basis
    of long-term loans by the Israel Government.
    Expansion Everywhere
    IN addition to providing homes for Israel's new-
    comers. Israel Bond funds, which thus far have
    covered more than one-third of the country's main
    Development Budget allocations, are being used
    for the development and expansion of Israel indus-
    tries and agricultural projects, and the exploitation
    of its natural resources. The impact of Israel
    Workmen open bale of domestic tobacco in
    one of factories of Bejazano Brother. Com-
    pany, leading cigarette manufacturer, which
    receives assistance of fund, derived from
    State of Israel Bond Mies in U.S.

    Communities throughout America
    tensified their Israel Bond efforts in I
    provide permonent housing for mori |
    100.000,ixnmigints expected to arrive y
    during poming, Hebrew Year. Special |
    Israel Housing Bond is being issued, i,
    senting cort of single housing unit for]
    comer..
    Bonds on these economic endeavors hai i
    jobs for Israel's citizens, including its imn
    During the past 12-month period, Israel)
    potential of 26,000 newcomers in the emplm
    market, excluding housewives, children
    handicapped, placed 16,000 immigrants in i
    industrial enterprises, including the cbe
    tile, pharmaceutical, building, metal and |
    dustries, in various professions in the arbs|
    sciences, and on the land, mostly in settle
    throughout the Negev.
    Agriculturally, the country tradition
    benefitted from its newcomers, as evidenced)
    important progress made in farm areas tinx
    the country. Since Israel celebrated its first |
    Hashona nine years ago, nearly 500 net i
    ments have been founded, including 70 i
    the Negev. Agricultural production rose I
    total Of 873,000,000 in 1948 to $268,200.0001
    During this period, Israel's cultivated area in
    ed from 412,500 acres to almost l.000,000,;
    the area under irrigation more than qu
    from 72,000 acres to approximately 300,000.
    Israel's fanners, with the aid of baA\
    dollars, have increased their use of electric I
    to boost the production of such crops as I
    flax, coffee, peanuts, barley, wheat, tobacco,^
    beets and many kinds of fruits and vegetal!
    rael, which utilized 260,000,000 kilowatt-lw
    electricity for agricultural purposes last
    compared with 65,000.000 in 1949. is exp
    earn or save a minimum of $300,000,000 ttaia|
    as a result of a large-scale increase in I
    production.
    Encouraging Growth
    CARM production will improve still f
    1858, when the new irrigation pipeline I
    built from the Yarkon River to the Eastern r
    is completed. The pipeline is expected
    Continued on Paso I
    FR 3-9885 FR 1-6906
    SlNCflf WIMfS
    TO Alt jfWftr
    for.
    *AW Nfw TI48
    MM. JACK HIRSCH
    and Son
    MUIY
    GREETINGS
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    M0 Bar Road
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    GEORGE DEM
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    Artistic Picture r
    Oil Pointing8
    Fin. Print" ^tam*d


    ,. September 27, 1957
    ^JewistinorkMart
    Past Year for Britain's Jews
    Page 9E
    By GEOFFREY D. PAUL
    London
    ||TlS_-na(ional and domestichave domin-
    I the Anglo-Jewish scene this past year.
    Israel forces marched into the Sinai Pe-
    lt nearly a year ago, the solidarity and sup-
    Call sections of the community were quickly
    [manifest. But when the Anglo-French forces
    Led, Jews >')lit "r^enly along the lines of
    political affiliation, with very few excep-'
    mile those Jews who normally supported the
    Lvitive Party gave the Suez adventure their
    Lport. those who favor the Labor Party made
    ([heir opposition. In the ensuing parliamen-
    jebatfs, Jewish Labor MP's who number
    [than 20 compared with two Jewish Conserva-
    (lembersvoted with their party against the
    iiment. with a resultant outcry from Jewish
    vatives who saw in this vote a betrayal of
    lile Laborites insisted that the Anglo-French
    in Egypt and the campaign launched Jjy Is-
    Lere two spearate and differently motivated
    (ions, Conservatives held that both had one
    ; defeat of Nasserand tftft to oppose the
    to oppose the other. Th% brunt of the
    fell upon Barnett Janner, Socialist MP
    Belong Zionist who is president of the British
    t Federation.
    attack on Mr. Janner by those opposed
    i party's policy and to his own vote against
    ivernment was carried into the Board of Dep-
    |o( which he is also president. After an acri-
    ws debate, at the height of the Suez affair,
    >ard with an overwhelming majority adopted
    lolution of confidence in its presidentbut
    [the proviso that this was in no way to be
    ] as an expression of opinion by the Board
    rin favor or in opposition to the action taken
    Majesty's Covernment."
    Issue Suddenly Collepeed
    HER Jewish Labor MP to come under at-
    idc during the year was Maurice Orbach, who
    i secretary of the Trades Advisory Council,
    ation which works under the auspices of
    I of Deputies in defense of harmonious
    |ial relations between Jew and Jew, and
    I Christian. Mr. Orbach had been quoted
    fag that he regarded Nasser as his "brother."
    ulted in an immediate outcry from several
    of the community, helped along by the
    H of a redoubtable political columnist in
    the national newspapers.
    [fc matter was the subject of constant ques-
    oncussion at Board meetings." But the
    I issue suddenly collapsed when, after what
    | though was tar too long a delay, it was ex-
    '" Deput.es that Mr. Orbach had been
    'out of context and that what he had in fact
    s that there had been a time when he could
    parted Nasser as his brother, and that this
    L7,ed l0 secrpt talks in which he had been
    *"h ,he Egyptian dictator. The subject
    (discussions has never been made public.
    ^issues were of such general interest as
    to make the columns of the national press. But
    of Perhaps more lasting concern to the community
    at large was a dispute that did not: the continuing
    mab,.,,y of the Board of Deputies and the Anglo-
    Jew,.sh Association to agree on some form of co-
    operation btWe*n ,hem This d.spue has now
    been dragging on for years. The Board holds that
    any form of agreement must safeguard its position
    as the only democratically-elected and representa-
    t.ve body of British Jewry; the Anglo-Jewish Assoc-
    at.on charges that the Board seeks its virtual dis-
    solution. No early agreement is in sight.
    Another matter which has given cause for gen-
    eral concern and has aroused interest outside of
    the Jewish community is the boycott imposed by
    the Arab League on all British firms which have
    even the most remote connections with Israel or
    Jews. Giant industrial concerns were found to
    haye given in to Arab demapds and to have relin-
    quished their connections with Israel. There are
    many who feel that the Government has not done
    enough to oppose this boycott and allegations were
    made during the year that, the London Chamberof
    Commerce had given its reluctant support to
    spreading Arab boycott propaganda. This is a
    matter of which much more is expected to be heard
    during the coming year.
    Anti-Semitism at Low Ebb
    QN one front the "community can register a not-
    able success. The well-financed and carefully-
    organized campaign against shechita was brought
    to an abrupt halt at the end of 1955 when a Con-
    servative MP, R. Crouch, was unsuccessful in his
    move to introduce a measure in the House of Com-
    mons which would have prohibited shechita. He
    was opposed in the debate on his motion by a Jew-
    ish member of his own party, Sir Henry d'Avigdor
    Goldsmid. However, despite the recent death of
    Mr. Crouch, who had led the fight against shechita
    for years, the campaign has been renewed and the
    community has been warned that its right to
    slaughter meat in the manner required by the Jew-
    ish religion is still far from being finally assured.
    Most observers are agreed that the past year
    has seen anti-Semitism touch its lowest ebb. For
    this, much credit must go to the daring exploits of
    the Israel Army which has given every Jew much
    cause for pride and most Englishmen a new respect
    for the Jewish people as a whole. Pre-war fascist
    leader Sir Oswald Mosley continues his political
    activities but has refrained from attacking Jews.
    There is a potential threat to peaceful com-
    munity delations in the activities of an organiza-
    tion called the League of Empire Loyalists, an ex-
    tremist group which advocates a sort of Common-
    wealth isolationism and includes among its mem-
    bers many notorious anti-Semites. Leaders of the
    League have thought it worthwhile to form alli-
    ances with Arab student groups in this country
    and together they have organized a number of
    anti-Zionist meetings. But it is a tribute to the
    good sense of the British people that little interest
    has been shown in its anti-Jewish propaganda.
    [ HOLIDAY SEASON
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    Ixltmis New Tear Greetings to the Entire Jewish Community
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    Page 10 E
    *Je*islirk>ridlk>ri
    i^LS^be.27
    MfW VM* GREETINGS
    SALES MOTOROLA SERVICE
    EDDIE'S RADIO SERVICE
    3209 N.W. 7th AVENUE
    Phone FR 3-6564
    Jessie Sampter- Pioneer, Poet
    e<
    Service en Mi Makes Aulo ami Homt floeJIoi ani TeleWiien
    "THE DOT BARBEQUE SAUCt IN TOWN"
    II lltlUS FOOD PRODUCTS
    Manufacturers and Distributors
    Mayonnaise Pickles Condiments
    7340 N.W. 35lh Ave. MiamL Fla. Phone NE 4-9747
    Spices
    Ed Steckler Men's Wear
    EXTENDS NEW YEAR GREETINGS TO ALL
    UNCMN ROAD MIAMI BIACH
    C E T I N C $
    Pyramid Tile Company
    WE DO QUALITY WORK AND Hit OUAUTt MATERIALS
    Ml S.W. 32nd AVENUE PHONE HI 1-35*1
    TO ALL GREETINGS
    Emerson Service & Repairs
    AUTHORIZED FACTORY SERVICE
    Restaurant Equipment Reliable Experienced
    3450 N. Miami Ave. Phone FR 3-7270
    BEST WISHES TO ALL FOR
    HAPPY HOLIDAYS
    KAMMER & WOOD
    Electrical Contractors
    327 N.W. 54th STREET
    PHONE PL 1-3621
    Mr. and Mrs. ARTHUR APPLE
    and Sons LARRY and JEFFREY
    of the
    ASSOC1 All |i PHOTOGRAPHERS
    Extend Greetings for A Happy New Year
    Phone HI 4-1539 Auto pa\nimf
    PROCTOR AND SON BODY WORKS
    ,,e ~ SEAT COVERS TAILOR MADE
    3388 Douglas Road Miami. Florida
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL .
    Jordan Building Maintenance, Inc.
    Complete Maintenance and Cleaning
    Office Buildings Homes Hotels
    24-HOUR SERVICE
    1856 Purdy Ave. Miami Beach Phone JE 8-8189
    By TINA JOFFE
    THIS is the dramatic story of a great, warm-heart-
    ed woman, physically handicapped in her early
    childhood days, who by sheer will power, helped by
    a keen mind and a perspective spirit, grew into
    Jewish maturity which drove her away from her
    native New York and induced her to settle perma-
    nent lv in Palestine.
    Jessie Ethel Sampter. authoress, poetess, social
    worker and pioneer, was born in New York City on
    Mar. 22. 1883, and was raised in a well-to-do home
    on Upper Fifth ave. Her father Rudolph whom she
    adored, was a German immigrant who. together
    with Felix Adler, became one of the founders of
    Ihc Ethical Culture movement in New York City.
    In the days of her early youth, Jessie was at-
    tracted to the Unitarian Church, but when stricken
    by infantile paralysis and confined to bed for a
    long time, she eagerly immersed herself in the
    study of the Old Testament. Thus she found her
    way back to her Jewish roots and she now began
    studying Jewish history and the Hebrew lamuate.
    She started observing the tradi-
    tion-steeped Jewish festivals
    with their colorful, deeply-delv-
    ing rituals and felt her whole
    oul filled with the sacred fer-
    vor of the oldest faith.
    At a reception for Israel
    Zangwill, she met the Russo-
    American authoress Mary An-
    tin. The two girls became great
    friends and staunch supporters
    of Zionism. Later, Jessie made
    the acquaintance of Henrietta
    Szold and Dr. Mordecai Kaplan
    and under their guidance, be*
    came first an ardent student
    and then an enthusiastic teach-
    er of Zionism. She became great-
    ly interested in Hadassah's self-
    sacrificinji work in Palestine
    and although the attack of in-
    fantile paralysis had left her a
    semi-invalid, she went to the
    Holy Land in 1919 taking up permanent residence
    there. From 1924 to 1934, she was active in relief
    work and a dearly loved teacher of the Yemenite
    immigrant children.
    Happy in Writing
    A FTER an extensive trip to America in 1925, she
    returned to Palestine in 1926 and started hav-
    ing her own house built in Rehoboth. A year later,
    she moves in happily and sings jubilantly:
    Out >' tild tailh ;mil rinks.
    < "it "f th,- land ;ini sea,
    Tiu- brothers or mj flesh Mid t><. Have made a house t"i me.
    She was happy there and eagerly writing. In 1929.
    however, incited by the Mufti, new violent Arab
    riots broke out. In her poem "Ishmael, My Bro-
    ther" she pleads:
    lahmael, my l>r..ih<>i-. lift not your hand against mine.
    Have / not one father? i n..t thin land hi* thi
    We are .in.- flesh and blood, we have one neel
    and hunger.
    Ishma.l, lift n..t your handI am the engager.
    After the riots, she writes a poem dedicated to
    Hagannah (Self Defense):
    Necessity makes murderers of us all
    If we would keep on IK ins
    The (entice I and sweetest ,,f s all
    nrowi harsh and unfor*lvln|r
    And he whose heart was wise
    I" prune and shape n tree
    Meats in his hands and eyes
    1 he la nee tor Injury.
    GREETINGS TO ALL
    Yitaro Paimtimg Company
    Veer Safiifecties Owr Picon.,.
    1170 S.W. 4th STREET ^ M11
    In 1931, Jessie went again to Ame
    relatives and this time took her In'" "*l
    Tamar along. She gave a serie, ST* *"'
    umbia University about her em. *c,Url
    tine, while Tamar attended .nwT**
    When they returned in the same yea?T **
    down to their busy life in Rehoboth 7*
    of her communal work was the soliriJ
    the Yemenite kindergarten. ,0us **i
    Thn Greet German Holot.wt
    THI horrible disaster of Germany's kwn
    the Nari heel, shocked Jessie's inZi
    the Nnii heel shocked Jessie's 2!
    in Rehqboth and to do something for her
    brethren. M
    With the funds obtained from the sale in
    ed by generous help of American friends ski
    a Rest Home for the Aged in Givat Brenner
    she settled permanently and together with
    rietta Scold devoted all her life to sheltering,
    gee children and grownups. Without any ra
    eration, she devoted heri
    body and sensitive soul to I
    and feed the refugees
    Nazi-dominated Europe,.
    4o a friend: The ideal"
    guides us is... to give i_
    needs, and get from each
    '; ever he can give.''
    The Lett Stretch
    OVINGLY teaching Yn
    children, helping btrj
    ed refugees, writing ea
    English and Hebrew, all tiki
    cupied her time day and i
    In March 1938, she had ul
    tack of pneumonia; she 1*1
    Hospital of Petach Tikvail
    recovered, but was stric
    malaria in August. She I
    working, however, finish.
    translation of Bialik's chill
    poems. "Far Across the Sea,"!
    MM SAAWW sent them to New York f|
    . of Urn she sees) lication. Feeling her end I
    she wrote with a feverishi
    commenting on Kohelet which was publishedi
    her death. On Nov. 11, 1938. she writes tij
    sister: "I am feeling vary well now." Twl
    hours later she closed her eyes forever.
    Jessie Sempter's Work
    PHIS is a collection of poems printed se
    "The New Palestine" and later publish
    Bloch Publishing Company in New York
    Thanks to a generous subvention by the
    National Fund, Jessie, open eyed and alwqij
    ceptive, made an extensive trip through the 1
    ol Jesreel befriending the young men and i
    mostly college-bred, all recent immigrants
    tirelessly and gratefully were working the I
    earth and building the villages of the
    homeland. In the Prologue, she exclaims juh
    I Went home to the Kmek.
    I rode alone through the fields and *2"J!
    Hut everywhere I came hands were *.
    greet me. ,,...ii
    Hands stretched forth to meet me ,md drasi"
    Lovingly, like a tender mother her only*
    so Jessie describes the humble kibbutzim I
    people happily tilling the fertile soil. Of*!
    tanned, healthy barefoot children she sinfAJ
    had come here from all parts of a hate-M|
    Continued on Ptfc* ' U Oar MMy FrfcMc and Acquaittmct %
    to Extend a Most JlfpM IUw Yaw
    John P. Connelly
    2955 M.W. 17th Avert** nj. .
    weW4-WW
    Air CwMrrtWnirvf, Ref rigeratio. 4 StOMt Mttrs
    U. A. Local Union
    GREETINGS
    Herbert Diamond
    A Co.
    1340 N.W. 27th A*.
    Miami 35. Florida
    Telephone NE 4-6031
    SEA SHELLS &
    FLOWER SUPPLIES
    TO ALL...A
    HAPPY HOLIDAY
    John Shoey
    AND
    COLUMBUS HOTEL
    la Th- rtaart of Miami
    312 N. E. Flmt Stennt
    MM] ra 3-M71
    MR. and MRS.
    L SILVERMAN
    nd th*
    SILVER PAINT
    COMPANY
    111* S. W. PntST STREET
    M3 CQLZJMJ AVENUE
    Mlnmi Bench
    ISH -Ol All THtel PArtONS
    AM ftllNDS
    A NAOT MM IE A*
    A Wr Tear H Aff Omr
    4 hrls-4 i~f<
    11975 W. DUIE HIGHWAY
    NORTH MIAMI
    Phonn PL 7-4543
    Otto Kunhl
    TO AU A MSI WrfTl
    A. J. Wa
    MMMl w"**
    7122 NX 2nd A*
    MIAML HA
    9km *U*
    U 0* W" m '
    A *0T **"*"
    T0P$-*T <# I
    ckm***"
    iw H* ** "


    SMjembar 27, 1957
    ****1sl>rbrA&H,
    ael's Great Strides During 5717
    Continual from P0 will be sterjrwd n m.m* .. ____
    Pege 11E
    Continued frent
    acres of wasteland into fertile soil, and add
    Ltted $15,000,000 worth of crops to Israel's
    I ipicultural production. Israel is also work-
    itfveral other major irrigation and deep-well
    [projects throughout the country.
    industry, as in agriculture, Israel has been
    , maintain an encouraging rate of growth. As
    Ration of its continued expansion as a key
    icturing and commercial center, Israel cites
    jjise of the production and consumption of
    t power. Total sales of electric power have
    quadrupled since 1949, from 329,000
    Itt-hours to 1.200,000 kilowatt-hours, while
    jsumption for industrial purposes trebled.
    17,000,000 kilowatt-hours to 390,000,000 kilo-
    jing the past 12 months, industrial produc-
    icreascd in value to almost $700,000,000 as
    I with $226,600,000 in 1949. The industrial
    t increased to 132,000 in 19S6. Today,
    [are some 21.000 industrial enterprises and
    ; in operation in Israel.
    nificant strides have also been made in the
    ffication of industry. With Israel BJRaj) aid,'
    Icmestic ami export markets were tSttlish
    [ihe'Useof IsraeuVsteel, pipes, tires Hr& rub-
    jods, electrical appliances, paper products.
    kr<. refrigerators, radio sets, diesel engines.
    mis and motor car assembly. Many of the
    ties i:i Israel utilize local raw materials to a
    prable extent, and some use them exclus-
    l's chemical and mining industries, which
    r expect to earn or save $20,000,000 in hard
    |ry. are receiving significant impetus from
    Tond proceeds. By the end of 1958, savings
    ipKted to reach $25,000,000, as a result of
    Idup production in the oil fields of Heletz.
    pper mines of Elath, the iron mines of Gal-
    fthe North and of the Negev in the South,
    tephate deposits near Kurnub, and the basic
    1 plan:- near the Dead Sea, which are op-
    [ with the aid of Israel Bond funds.
    Mineral Wealth
    [development of Israel's mineral wealth is.
    Kept in the case of oil, under the direct su-
    |n of the Ministry of Development, which
    s six companies that exploit Israel minerals
    rge scale More than $60,000,000 has been
    I in or loaned to these companies through
    (investments and Israel Bond allocations in
    helopment Budget. Among the major com-
    liavolved are the following:
    s Phosphates Company Ltd., whose out-
    Iphosphate rock reached approximately 116.-
    p with a total value of $1,335,000 in 1956.
    Tipany s output is expected to double in 1958.
    rtilizers and chemicals Ltd., the largest of
    PtaVrises. utilizes Negev phosphate rock
    ? production of superphosphates and dical-
    pmphate, but also runs plants producing
    P.wlphuric acid and other chemicals.
    |w wlue of its total production rose from
    Tin 1955 to S6.380.000 in 1956, the plant's
    Production is expected to expand to $11,-
    fteins the next two years.
    t Dead Sea Works, which for several years
    P m a period of transition and reorganiza-
    I tlT be3innin8 t0 shw signs of rapid pro-
    I me output of potash rose from 16,000 tons
    31,500 tons in 1958 and is expected to
    by the end of 1957. It is anticipated
    Pj increased Bond assistance, production
    SI' ,bf!,SteP,fad.nUP ,0 10000 tons in MM and 135
    wrricullrTS f'Srae''S improved P>ction in
    agr culture and industry, and its advances in min-
    eral development, Israel', exports increased byT9
    percent, from $88,200,000 in 1955 to $105,000000
    nrnlff," I* 5""* le8ding homers for its
    products were Great Britain, the United States Bel-
    gium F.n.and Turkey. West Germany, Switze -
    land, France. Sweden, Holland. Denmark. Norway
    Cyprus, Canada, Italy, Greece and Burma.
    Black Gold
    JINCE Israel last observed Rosh Hashona, the ec-
    onomic project that has had an enormous in-
    fluence on the country's economic outlook has been
    the 144-mile oil pipeline from Elath to Beersheba
    which was completed in 100 days with the finan-
    cial backing of Israel Bond funds. Built at a cost
    of $7,700,000, of which $5,500,000 was derived from
    Israel Bonds, the oil pipeline can pump crude oil
    at the rate of 1,000,000 tons a year, which amounts
    tv half of Israel's consumption. As a result of the
    :^mP3^K^ the p'Pcline- Israel.expects to save
    chari*W^'00 ann^a"y ln Ul1 transportation
    Israel's new oil pipeline is being extended
    from Beersheba. through the oil fields of Heletz, to
    the Mediterranean coast. From there, tankers will
    carry the oil 95 miles up the coast to Haifa for
    refining and ultimate use in Israel. The annual
    capacity of Haifa's refinery is 4,000,000 tons.
    One of the major factors in the success of the
    pipeline project was the ability of Israel to man-
    ufacture its own steel pipes. The pipes arc pro-
    duced at a factory in Ramie which was established
    in 1952 with Israel Bond assistance.
    Another important achievement, one that will
    have a far reaching effect on Israel's ultimate goal
    ol economic self-sufticiency, is the economic devel-
    opment which is taking place in and around Elath,
    Israel's port on the Gulf of Aqaba, and its gateway
    to the countries of Africa and Asia. Elath is being
    built up as a major seaport, as an industrial cen-
    ter for the processing and utilization of minerals
    Continued on Page 12 E
    Israel Bonds play vital role in building Jew-
    ish State's tourist trade. Utilizing Israel Bond
    funds, General Mortgage Bank has, during
    past four years, granted loans to hotel opera-
    tors for construction of dozens of tourist ho-
    tels, including Acadia hotel at Herzlia on Med-
    iterranean seacoast, shown here.
    purs
    ftCO.be.
    f^FlagUrSire*
    *0* Ft j.27
    Greetings To Our
    Jeish Friends and
    ** MARKS
    *C0.
    I" ** 2nd She.,
    VOGUE
    Laundry and Cleaner*
    MOM JC 0-0711
    The Best For Leas
    Oilice and Plant
    1425 20th Street
    MIAMI BEACH
    TO ALL OUH FRIENDS
    AND PATRONS
    GREETINGS
    PARTS MEN'S SHOP
    221 E. Fkxgler Street
    Ph.et Ft 9 2291
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    MO ONEY
    IRONWORKS
    Machine Shop
    12M N. W. 2Mi Street
    Phone NE SK72
    PORTABLE EQUIPMENT
    Acetylene and Electric
    Welding
    L. F. DAVIS
    cntriKsJ
    Carrell Musk & Art Center
    Two fine Herts le Serve Your
    Musical Needs
    3645 N.W. 17th AVENUE
    Pk.nt NE 5-3711
    292 ARAGON AVENUE
    Phone HI 6-0200
    THE OPERA GUILD
    OF
    GREATER MIAMI
    Wishes all its Members ef the Jewish Faith
    A Very Happy, Prosperous and Healthy New Year
    ARTURO Dl FILIPPI
    Artistic Director and General Manager
    GMIETINGS
    K. M. Jones Real Estate
    W. 0. Wefce, Mf r.
    WE SPECIALIZE IN ACREAGE AND BUSINESS PROPERTIES
    639 N.W. 102nd Street Miami
    Phone PL 1-8636
    tUe|'rti & 'M '.'> l|0>-|-i.l'.I
    FLORIDA MEDICAL LABORATORY
    732 DuPont Bldg.
    6915 Red Road (212 Red Sunset Bldg.)
    IP

    X*

    It
    ii
    . i
    MAY THE NEW YEAR BRING
    Happiness Joy and Prosperity
    TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
    AND TO ALL JEWRY
    i
    Schrager's, Inc.
    1001 WEST FLAGLER STREET
    MIAMI. FLORIDA
    Phone FR 4-0707
    "HIGHEST TYPE PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY"
    it .
    To Our Many friends and Patrons-Much Happiness During the Holiday Season
    H0BART MIAMI RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT
    905 N.E. 1 ct Avenue Phone FR 9-2655
    GREETINGS
    .1*1
    iji
    1

    All-White Cleaning & Coating Co.
    CLEANING & COATING DONE TO YOUR SATISFACTION
    PheaeNllMte
    301 0REC0 AVL
    COtAl GAILEJ
    TO AU UST WISHIS Km NAPPr HOUtAYS
    AG6-RATE STONE CORPORATION
    '' i iit'
    72M N.W. Inn AVENUE
    PHONE PI 4-9141
    GREETINGS
    COTTAGE INN
    "CHICKEN IN THE ROUGH"
    Quality Quantity
    Reasonable
    2235 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD PHONE FR 3-8470


    Page 12E
    +Jelstrk>ridltan
    I^fL^^

    27,
    i .
    Jo Our Clients and friends
    and to Jewry Everywhere
    We Extend Our Best Wishes
    for*
    Very Happy Mew Year
    Sovlegs A Uo AtMCltlM
    Lincoln Road at Washington Avenue
    665 Washington Ave. 71st and Harding Ave.
    260 Sunny Isles Blvd.
    RABBI and MRS. S. HI. M AMI 11 I
    MR. and MRS. MORTON STITSKY
    STELLA REGINA. LEO JAY and JERRY HOWARD
    Extend To All Jewry
    Best Wishes for
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    HAPPY NEW YEAR
    E. B. LEATHERMAN
    DADE COUNTY
    COURT HOUSE
    tfffT I N 6 S
    HAVEN MANOR SANITARIUM
    fndowed ami Incorporated Kesidenlial and Transient Reasonable tain
    24-Hoer Nursing Car* for Convalescents Invalids Aged Registered Nurses
    0. I. THARP, Director LILES W. GRIZZARD, Director
    2629 N.W. 17th AVENUE, MIAMI, FLORIDA
    Mrs. Sadie Fagan
    Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hershbein
    and Children, Edyse, Martin and Andrea
    EXTEND NEW YEAR GREETINGS TO ALL
    TO ALL SEASON'S BEST WISHES
    CURTISS B. HAMILTON
    YOUR MAYOR OF NORTH MIAMI
    Alt. ~4 UfS. Al UmAN ef th.
    -*AU. J?"CRADK FOOD C^'
    72M N.W. Mth Ave. MIAMI |
    f W Best *., to AN Mr Frtoa* ft Mrsei tor A
    M S4S7S
    New Vew
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS
    A. M. TRANSFER & CRANE SERVICE
    Boats Machinery Office Safes Household
    Concrete Pouring Move Anything
    31 Years of Experience in the Greater Miami Area
    239 N. W. 26th STREET
    Phone FR 9-8959
    Books are Tools for Scientists
    Continued from Pooo 7 I
    are among the prized collections at Rehovoth.
    Its treasures, too, include the 58 volumes of
    collected reprints donated to Dr. Weiimann many
    years ago by another great scientistAlbert Ein-
    stein.
    The Institute subscribes to about 500 overseas
    periodicals in addition to receiving many hundreds
    of reprints on an exchange basis.
    The Einstein Collection is a remarkable and
    fascinating one for even the layman who leafs
    through it. The 58 volumes contain several thous-
    and reprints of scientific papers, essays and studies
    in English, French, Italian and German. They were
    sent to Dr. Einstein from frends and admirers in
    all parts of the world.
    Some of the reprints bear Einstein's notations
    in his own handwriting, evidence that the papers
    were not just tossed aside after receipt.
    The papers are on a variety ot subjectsMath-
    ematics, Chemistry, even Astronomy. As one goes
    through the volumes, a striking caption hits the
    eye here and there out of the long procession of
    abstruse titles and even more abstruse formulae
    and equations.
    No one in 1939 knew what the consequences
    were likely to be, for example, of a brochure writ-
    ten by Dr. Use Meitner and Dr. O. R. Frisco and
    published in Copenhagen that year. But hindsight
    endows its title with emphatic iterest: "On the
    Products of the Fission of Uranium and Thorium
    Under Neutron Bombardment." Here the paper is,
    in the volume marked "M" for the initial of the
    first collaborator.
    Albert Einstein began collecting these papers
    and reprints way back in 1904. The dates of the
    publications range from 1904 to 1939a period of
    35 years, certainly productive of a vast colection
    of reprints sent to a man whom the entire scientific
    world holds in veneration.
    There are papers dated 1904; 1906 (the year
    Einstein published his first general theory of rel-
    ativity); 1920; 1924. "The Absolute Magnitudes of
    Long-Period Variable Stars" by Paul W. Merrill and
    Gustaf Stromberg is a reprint frfom the Astro-
    physical Journal in 1924, as is also "Space Veloci-
    ties of Long-Period Variable Stars of Classes Me
    and Se," by both men.
    Taken from the Philosophical Magazine of
    Great Britain for October 1904 is Dr. George Jaffe's
    "On the Conductivity of Gases Contained in Small
    Vessels," the result of experiments done at Trin-
    ity College, Cambridge University.
    The reprints came to the modest study at
    Princeton. N.J., from all parts of the world
    Europe, the United States. India. There is even
    one contained in the volumes from Dr. Weizmann
    himself and his collaborator. Dr. E. D. Bergmann,
    on "Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons." a research
    project for which they became famed.
    Yes. there is drama in scientific literature
    even though the contents may strike the non-scien-
    tific reader as dull and hopelessly bewildering. It
    is the drama of man's refusal to know anything
    except the full truth about the world in which we
    live; the drama of men seeking scientific know-
    ledge so that he may win better sustenance for
    himself and his kind from Mother Nature.
    And at the Weizmann Institute of Science in
    Israel, scientific literature is also a bridgethe
    bridge the scientists of a young yet progressive
    and forward looking State developing its instru-
    ments for technological advancement, and their
    overseas fellow-workers in the common cause of
    amassing knowledge through inquiry.
    Reading room in Jacob C. Goldenbergfc
    at Weizmann Institute, established as i
    morial by his family to a prominent |
    resident of Minneapolis, Minn.
    Israel's Great Strides1
    Continued from Page 11 E
    discovered in the Negev, and as a resort arul
    estimates that it will require $150,000.0001
    next ten years to accomplish this aim.
    Sense of Satisfaction
    kJORE than $15,000,000 in Israel Bond fui
    already been invested in the develop
    Elath, which is the fastest growing town i
    today. Israel expects Elath to double its |
    tion, from 2,500 to 5.000. before the end i
    year; in five years, it should reach at least]
    Israel expects Elath to overtake Haifa I
    key center for trade and foreign commerce!
    tion, Israel anUcipates the use of the
    tween Elsth and Beersheba, approximately!
    cent of the area of Israel, as a settlement i
    its future population. This area, which i
    ent contains only one-half of one percent i
    nation's population, can provide homes for
    than 500.000 immigrants in the next tea!
    Since Israel believes that its population will I
    3.000,000 in the next decade, with the
    of Beersheba playing a major role in man
    increase possible, the development of
    and of Elath is essential for Israels future I
    Israel can feel a sense of satisfaction I
    economic achievements during nine and I
    years of statehood. Yet the tasks of deveai
    and immigrant absorption, coupled with I
    nomic stains resulting from the need to i
    the defense establishment at a high level
    a heightened mobilization of economic
    during the New Year now beginning.
    Israel Bond dollars must play a dec
    making that possible.
    i
    GUABANTY TITLE &
    ABSTRACT CORP.
    awhacis isctows
    Vnil INSURANCE
    Wet FlagW Stree*
    Pseee FR 9-4*44
    Peter Kent, Inc.
    "Anything That'. Good Enouoh to
    Sell /s Good Enouah to
    Take Back"
    170-178 W. Flaaler St
    TO All CHfTfNCS
    SNOW WHITE CLEANERS
    ft UUNMtY
    Veer SerfIstocf to* Ovr Pfeeeswe
    724 COUtttS AVMM
    * 4-2SS7
    M All A AM MACK ITS
    UlLIAH DURKANT'S
    H0WEK SHOP
    TtOtAl FASMJONIST
    fewers tr Mre MAIM 8-7111
    2J 41st ST1UT
    CKttTIHGS TO All
    INSURANCE AWT***!
    Selliaar
    ill..-
    EDWARD P. CW*|
    i iaitM
    18912 N.W. 7* '"*]
    .1488
    C. V. GmI**^
    inset*'11
    M4 IISCATltl **H
    , au m H


    - September 27. 1957
    *Jeisti fhrSdOa,
    V)
    iscrimination at Dhahran Base
    Page 13 E
    Continued from Pase 41
    i is presently prohibited by Saudi Arabian
    Millions."
    President Truman's Vhw
    ijOCH as the 1951 agreement was concluded
    Ljns the Truman Administration, Mr. Tru-
    jinterpretation of its restrictive provisions
    I fee considered the most authoritative and
    ily ought to be binding upon the State
    _nt. The former President has explained
    agreement was "not intended to bar Amer-
    Lrs or any other Americans" and that Saudi
    Ibis the right to exclude persons from Dhah-
    Lfy "on an individual and not on a race or
    [bisis." In other words, while our govern-
    ing uphold King Saud's right to bar object-
    individual Americans, it is contrary to our
    [tradition and to the agreement to support
    I [he exrlu-ion of a whole group of American
    ' i becau.-e of their religion.
    let. the apparent complacency of the United
    I in the face of Saudi Arabian discrimination
    I Americans has not gone unchallenged. On
    k 1956 the IS. Senate unanimously adopted
    fcution which specifically^J^MMsJUk "pri-
    Ciple of our Nation tbJCHviS be no
    JEin among t'nited States citizens based on
    Imlfrldtial religious affillati3fW: (arid tnat)
    L attempi by foreign nations to create such
    rtions. generally is inconsistent with our
    Wes." At their Presidential nominating con-
    Ins of last summer, the Republicans as well
    [Democrats adopted platform planks oppos-
    reign discrimination against Americans such
    r exists in Saudi Arabia. Last fall, both the
    lent's Committee on Government Contracts
    ; President s Committee on Government Em-
    |eat Policy asked the Departments of State
    tfense to secure an end to the discriminatory
    (ces involving Americans in Saudi Arabia.
    spite th<< Senate resolution and the actions
    fling public and private individuals, the State
    Jtoient renegotiated the Dhahran agreement
    bril without obtaining any changes in the
    t of discrimination. When asked about this
    ws conference on April 23, 1957, Mr. Dulles
    kttd that King Saud was unreceptive because
    > refusal of Mayor Wagner of New York to
    " official courtesies to the visiting Saudi
    i monarch.
    Arabia's Rich Stake
    been argued, quite effectively, that any
    ious attempt by the United States to press
    Arabia on this question might result in the
    lation of Aramco'a concession to exploit
    [Arabia's nil if not the loss of the right of
    pted States government to make use of the
    airfield. Recently, an even more per-
    (note has been added. Pressure upon Saud,
    N, would upset America's policy of trying
    |Siudi Arabia and other Arab countries away
    V Soviet K-ypi -Syrian orbit. JusMiow much
    I do these arguments have?
    'one can realistically ignore the relation-
    ween the Dhahran installations and Saudi
    ^position as one of the world's leading re-
    * of petroleum. Undoubtedly the exist-
    ' oil in Saudi Arabia, as well as Aramco's
    'Position there, greatly influenced the de-
    r'thelnit.,! States to acquire leasing rights
    "n and to accommodate herself to the pre-
    ld idio*yncracie of Saudi Arabia. But
    h government has apparently failed
    of thTSuK Vhe petroleum ** **
    us and n..r ?* .f* at ,eaSt <^"ent upon
    us and our good w.ll as we are upon them. In the
    dietas nT? lhWBd"n' 8Uthor of Mid
    dle East-Oil and the Great Powers," -the Arab
    ?bI2f2 rn,ries are much morc -bp2
    or ,h*.i *? ,'nCume the West can & them
    Z^I u"d f ,he laUer's ahility t0 transport.
    need of KS V* ,he Wg* 8S a wh"- ^ta
    need of Middle East oil." m 1955 Saudi Arabia
    rece.ved more than a quarter of a billion dollars
    or approximately seventy-one percent of her gov-
    ernmental budget, in payments from the Arabian
    American Oil Company. It is, consequently ex-
    ceedmgly difficult to conceive that she would in-
    terfere with the Aramco concession-or with our
    airbase-,f the United States were to insist upon
    non-discriminatory treatment of our citizens.
    If past experience offers any indication of
    future action, it is worth recalling that neither af-
    ter America's support of the partition of Palestine
    nor after our diplomatic recognition of Israel did
    Saudi Arabia stop the flow of oil to the West. In
    fact, on February 27, 1948 a correspondent of the
    New York Herald-Tribune reported from Dhahran
    that despite Arab bitterness against America for
    favoring the creation of the Jewish State, the late
    King Ihn Saud, father of the present ruler, had
    assured Aramco that St* oil concession -would not
    be taken away. Nor, it must be remembered, did
    Saudi Arabia, unlike some of her neighbors, in-
    terrupt for even a moment the export of petroleum
    during the recent crisis over the Sinai Peninsula
    and the Suez Canal. If she did not take so drastic
    a step in these situations, which clearly benefited
    Israel, it seems highly unlikely that Saudi Arabia
    would oust either Aramco or the United States Air
    Force or abruptly change her attitude toward
    Egypt solely because we demanded that the rights
    of all American citizens be respected, a circum-
    stance which involves not Israel but only the rela-
    tions between the United States and Saudi Arabia.
    Principle vs. Expediency
    MNQUESTIONABLY, Dhahran is of importance to
    the United States. It is of equal if not greater
    value to Saudi Arabia, a fact often overlooked. But
    must the price for it be the curtailment of the
    rights of a group of Americans? Further, is the
    airfield so vital that principle must capitulate to
    expediency?
    Thomas K. Finletter, Secretary of the Air
    Force in 1951 when the principal Dnanran agree-
    ment was signed, stated the issue well in his fore-
    word to the pamphlet on the Dhahran airfield re-
    cently published by the American Jewish Congress.
    Said Mr. Finletter:
    Tinn- has boon much unfounded lalfc aboui the
    "vital" n.....>8*lt) ,,T the Dhahran airfield to (he
    latereata of tin United Btatea. I think I am rea-
    eonabl) awar* of tha Importance of tha baae
    etructure of our Air PVirce and i cannol agree
    with ili>- Idea thai any one baae tuch aa DhaJiran
    Is vital, I happen to believe thai our baae atruo-
    lurc should ie strengthened well bayond Us prea-
    .111 itate but there are many places other than
    rinahran when- ;i rabatltutc baae for Dhahran
    anil the additional banes which are needed could
    1., located. 1 'i" noi ballave thai the need for tha
    Dhahran .tit baae In any a/ay require! us to aacri-
    flca the principle* In which the American people
    believe I think, in short, that the value <>f the
    Dhahran bane In relatively email and thai it can
    he replaced, hwl that the value of the principle
    Involved Is hlsh and cannot he replaced.
    And the principle involved, without which this
    country will never regain 'the moral advantage it
    once possessed" in its conduct of foreign affairs,
    is that there can be no distinctions made or toler-
    ated among Americans because of their religion,
    race, or creed.
    onus 1
    BILL TINDER
    * "OFESSIONAI
    hMn Course
    'UlM Appoinlm.nf
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    William Sane
    DIVISION MANAGER
    Prudential
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    1401 S. W. First St., Miami, Fla.
    WISHES HIS FRIENDS
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    Phones: FR 44541 MO 4-4973
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    CHARLES VAYDA
    DIAMOND SETTER JEWELRY
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    Open Monday and Friday 'til 9
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    To All A Most Happy New Year ..
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    YOUR
    COUNCILMAN NORTH MIAMI BEACH


    1
    To Our Many Friends and Acquaintances
    A MOST HAPPY NEW YEA*
    TROPICAL PLAN SERVICE
    SAM MUMFORD
    1712 S.W. 1st Street
    FR 4-0672
    NfW YEAR GREETINGS .
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    w
    Page 14E
    fJewish flcrid/iaun
    J^^pta*^

    I)

    *
    BEST WISHES
    f o x a
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    i
    MR. and MRS. SAMUEL fMIDLAND
    and Family
    WISH THEIR RELATIVES AND FRIENDS
    A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
    Season's
    #rt't'i i* nys
    J. "Ed
    Larson
    To All A Most Happy New Year .
    HIALEAH BLOCK COMPANY, INC.
    Service TU 8-1991
    QUALITY CEMENT BLOCKS
    2567 E. 11th Avenue Hialeoh, Flo.
    'WHERE TO GET THEM'
    Hopkins-Carter Hardware Co.
    MARINE SUPPLIES PANTS and VARNISHfS FISHING TACKLE
    NAUTICAL CHARTS SHIPMATE ft WILLIS BOTTLED GAS "
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    CORRE CLEANERS
    HARRY M. ROLLNICK
    THEODORE WEINSTOCK
    1622 Alton Road, Miami Beach
    6310 N.E. 2nd Avenue, Miami
    JE 1-9408
    PI 8-3352
    Role of the Jewish Woman Ti
    &.18&I
    Continued from Pag* 3 E
    in all, the path of the modern woman is strewn
    with opportunity.
    Serious Responsibilities
    IN short: American women, working through vol-
    untary associations, have in their joined hands
    both strength and power for accomplishing a tre-
    mendous goal at the point where human relation-
    ships can be most effective in our search for a tran-
    quil society less burdened with tensions, fears and
    nervous disorders. It is my fond hope that this
    splendid beginning may be followed by similar ex-
    ploration of the problems of youth, of adult educa-
    tion, vocational adjustment, and the like.
    A very fine editor produced an anthology somn
    j ears ago which depicted the frailties of our civil-
    ization between the first and second world wars.
    She aptly called it, The Aspirin Age."
    It appears that wc have advanced ourselves ac-
    cordingly. We are now in the Miltown Age.
    You will agree with me that the therapy for
    our social ills and community problems will not be
    found in tranquilizing pillsno more than aspirins
    solved anything in the 20's and 30's.
    The (asks that confront the American com-
    munity today impose serious responsibilities upon
    our women. They are a challenge to their vigor,
    their knowledge, their good senseand the amaz-
    ing quality of their persistence.
    And challenge begets challenge. For in our
    scheme of things, each generation must struggle to
    warm itself in a brighter sun. In that respect,
    women's work is never done.
    Our youth are in rebellion. Our schools are
    unequal to the standards we demand for our child-
    ren. Our older folks are haphazardly neglected.
    The relief of these and so many other, basic prob-
    Yivo The Citadel
    Continued from Pago 5 E
    Jewish life under Nazi occupation and on Jewish
    adjustment in post Hitler Europe.
    Yivo publishes the following periodicals: "Yivo
    Bleter," in Yiddish, and "Yivo Annual." in English,
    comprising studies in all branches of social science;
    "Yidishe Shprakh," a magazine devoted to the prob-
    lems (if standard Yiddish: "Yedis fun Yivo" (News
    ol the Yivo), published in Yiddish and English six
    times a year.
    Since 1340. Yivo published 16 volumes of "Yivo
    Bleter," aggregating over 6.000 pages; 8 volumes of
    "Yidishe Shprakh." containing 1.200 pages; 30 num-
    bera ol "Yedics fun Yivo." with illustrations of rare
    document-, totalling 480 pages; one regular-sized
    volume nl the "Yivo Annual" and one double vol-
    ume, totalling 645 pages
    In addition. Yivo ha- established a noteworthy
    record in hook publication. Many volumes on Jew-
    ish history, culture, sociology, linguistics, econom-
    ic- and demography, issued in Yiddish and in Eng-
    lish, are included among its publications, as are
    valuable collections of original documents bearing
    on Jewish problems.
    Between 1940 and 1948. Yivo published ove.'
    30 books, totalling over 7,000 pages. Included in
    this series, to mention only a few. are the two first
    volumes of "The History of the Jews in Warsaw,"
    by Dr. Jacob Shatzky; "The Struggle Between Has-
    kalah and Hassidism in Galicia," by Dr. R. Mahler;
    "The Jews in France," edited by E. Tcherikower;
    Continued on Pago 15 E
    *

    .
    "The foreign affairs of Israel are t
    a woman." Foreign Minister Golda n
    recent trip to U.S., speaks with Lawra,
    Lasky, of Boston, New England naiad
    man for State of Israel Bonds. Mb,'
    achievement as one of world's top (
    nullifies Thosaas Jefferson's warning"' j
    politic* could'not suffer the calamity,
    men at the voting polls or in the I
    government."
    lems of our time can come about only witkl
    vice.and support of the Volunteer Woman
    And to the woman who professes Juis
    add additional responsibilities.
    She must continue to play her part-
    has done so well in the pastin the
    effort to aid our co-religionists who art <
    by tyranny and deprivation. In this hourdj
    she must engage herself wholeheartedly i
    strengthen the cause and conviction of I
    ilarly, she must broaden her role as a Je
    and mother to enhance her own household i
    spiritual beauty of our sacred traditions.
    are to persist and flourish in our Judaism,!
    stance for our survival will come not as i
    the synagogue or any other Jewish instill
    but from the Jewish home.
    History tells us that in the Biblical enI
    was man's chattel. She didn't belong to I
    gue of Women Voters in those days. She!
    speak her mind. Her freedoms were
    her rights severely limited. A suggestion!
    riarchy would horrify her. She was on tfc|
    end of the double standard. Nntwithsta
    repressed role in Biblical society, she wal
    petuating force for Jewish survival. She wu|
    wife of Abraham, and mother of Isaac..
    Mother of the Hebrew people." She was I
    who secured Isaac's bleating for her youi
    Jacob, for she recognized in him the wortj
    further the cause of Israel She was Deb
    and prophetess, who inspired her peoptej
    tory She was Rachel and Leah, whose!
    Jewish motherhood influenced generatk
    People She was Miriam, who saved]
    brother Moses from destruction, and
    wisely as he rose to kingly leadership.
    These were unemancipated womeo.
    were Jewish women instilled with a rt;
    to maintain the tradition of the Jewish I
    is the strength of our survival
    Today, in all the glory of her eman
    this is still the first responsibility of the'
    woman. She dare not fail in it.
    GREETINGS
    Reg's
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    '"! con be Stiff, If If!
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    PHONE PL 7-7767
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    September 27, 1957
    *4>is) IkriUt,
    || of the Shofar Through History
    Continued from Pg 1 E
    , have been incorporated into the cere-
    Shofar blowing on Rosh Hashona. The
    however, was also used in ancient Pales-
    summons when laws, orders, and insti-
    fra.i to he proclaimed, was heard at every
    ujejsion, and was heard at the corona
    kings and even these uses are incorporated
    'present day service.
    Rosh Ha-hona when man remembers the
    j of the world, God remembers the deeds
    [creatures, and Israel remembers its special
    i as His witness, God inscribed the wholly
    L- into the Book of Life, the wholly wicked
    rgook of Death, and suspends the inter-
    It, until Yom Kippur.
    J reasons are always given for the blowing
    fshofar on Rosh Hashona, and in his pampli
    |lhe ShofarIts Use and Origin" the late
    Adler, former president of the Jewish The-
    I Seminary of America, lists those outlined
    Saadia Gaon.
    r,\. Because this day is the beginning of the
    i on which God created the world and thus
    |o reign over it; and as it is!customary at
    ation of kings to sound the trumpets and
    to proclaim the commencement of their
    e. in like manner, publicly proclaim, by
    rd of the cornet that the Creator is our
    I thus says David, "With trumpets and the
    i the cornet shout ye before the Lord."
    As the New Year is the first of the ten
    lial days, we sound the Shofar as a proc-
    to admonish all to return and repent,
    f they do not. they cannot plead ignorance.
    cs.been fully informed. Thus also we find
    I kings publish their decrees that none may
    gnorance thereof.
    |r! To remind us of the law given on Mount
    fit is said, Exodus 19:16, "and the voice of
    |net was exceedingly loud," and that we
    : bind ourselves to the performance thereof.
    a-
    N m shape in order to symbolize the
    11f1}* of the children of Israel bend-
    Fw their Fathar who is in Heaven, the
    i -Muqh it may not be painted in colors,
    ^ved with artistic de=iqns."
    lSrHUri.anCeS-tJ0rs di<1, Whcn lhoy "A" Lord has sa.d, will we do, and be obedient."
    Fourth. To remind us of the prophets who are
    compared watchmen blowing the trumpets
    27! kid 33:4" "**"" heareth the
    sound of the cornet and takcth not warning, and
    he sword cometh and taketh him away, his blood
    Ehall be upon his own head, but he that taketh
    warning shall save his life."
    Th Virtot of Tarror
    piFTH. To remind us of the destruction of the
    Holy Temple, and the terrifying alarm of the
    enemy s warriors shouting to battle as mentioned
    in Jeremiah 4:19, "because tho'u hast h-ard, oh mv
    soul, the sound of the trumphet, the alarm of war "
    and. therefore, when we hear the sound of the
    cornet, we ought to beseech the Almighty to re-
    build the Holy Temple.
    Sixth. To remind us of the binding of Isaac
    who willingly submitted himself to the will of
    Heaven; thus ought we also willingly submit even
    to death itself, for the sanctification of the unity
    of His holy name.
    Seventh. That when we hear the sounding of
    the cornet we may, by the dread thereof, be in-
    duced to humble ourselves before the Supreme
    Being, for it is the nature of these martial wind
    instruments to produce dread and terror. As the
    prophet Amos observes, "shall a trumpet be blown
    in a city and the people not be terrified?"
    Eighth. To remind us of the great and awful
    day of judgment on which the trumpet is to be
    sounded as mentioned, Zephaniah 1:14-16: "The
    great day of the Lord is near, it is near and has-
    teneth much, a day of the trumpet and of shouting."
    Ninth. To remind us to pray for the time when
    the outcasts of Israel are to be gathered together,
    as. mentioned. Isaiah 27:13, "and it shall come to
    pj.ss in that day. the great trumpet shall be sound-
    ed and those shall come who were perishing in the
    land of Assyria."
    Tenth. To remind us of the resurrection of the
    dead and the firm belief thereof, as the prophet
    Isaiah saith, "Yea, all ye that inhabit the world, and
    that dwell on the earth, when the standard is lift-
    ed up on the mountain, ye shall behold when the
    trumpet is sounded, ye shall hear."
    Ushered in by the Shofar, the High Holy Days
    are also ushered out by the Shofar for the long
    blast of Tekiah ends the Fast of Yom Kippur, Day
    of Atonement, and the individual Jew resumes his
    normal business of life, more deeply conscious,
    however, of the divine spark within him, and more
    deeply aware of his heritage as a Jew.
    Yivo The Citadel
    Continued from Pag* 14
    "Studies in the History of Rumanian Jews," by Dr.
    J. Kissman. Among the books published in Eng-
    lish, in addition to the Yivo Annuals, are "Hitler's
    Professors." by Dr. M. Weinrcich and "Peretz," by
    Prof. Dr. S. Liptzin.
    Leading figures in all branches of Jewish
    sciences and literatures are associated with Yivo
    which has become both a place of research and
    study for the scholar and an institution of educa-
    tion and deep-delving information for the layman.
    It is this dual nature and extensive, thorough func-
    tioning of the Yivo that distinguishes it from all
    other institutions of higher Jewish learning.
    ^GREETINGS TO ALL
    fhinpoi Miami
    1 K'nds of Caps for
    1 Wmen. Children
    } SW 8th Street
    Ph. FR 14852
    ftoAY GREETINGS
    Zoning and
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    A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
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    Ph. FR 3-4665
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    Page 15E

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    lf-


    j!

    Page 16 E
    *Je*lst>Fk>ridiari
    Frid
    fyJSIJb* 27.,
    Jessie Sampter- Pioneer, Poetess
    Continued from Pao* 10 E
    baiting Europe, who. well-fed and carefree, play
    in the green meadows and fields. In an ever-grow-
    ing awe and in shy wonder she sings of the Prom-
    ised Land, of its young settlers, of the untiring
    tillers of the blessed soil who had known harsh
    oppression and who daily praise God Almighty for
    the freedom of their land. Here Jessie learns from
    firsthand experience what true religious faith
    means:
    You that do not live rellrion. Mfl laU rrliti..n.
    You think faith hn> t.. da with belief.
    You think faith has to do with bow >" keep
    Your dishes or arrange vow .t:n i of rest No.
    Kaith In a fellowship, f.iith la .. Hfe,
    Faith is a boml and i* b Brand Pluckod for the Firo
    THIS collection of poems is. as she confesses her-
    self "the salvage of thirty years of expression
    on poetry and my words flow for him who
    listens." It was published in 1936 by The Jewish
    Publication Society in Philadelphia
    These jubilant poems, true paeans in praise
    of God and the Holy Land, read like modern
    Psalms. There is a fervent prayer for rain, there
    are glowing songs depicting the hard work of the
    untiring pioneers, there is a deeply-felt love song
    of a girl:
    l'ut fluwera In my hair. lad.
    And take m\ grateful hand,
    I or we've onl) tnla to iharoi lad.
    The love Of our land.
    Farming, tilling the black hard earth all
    these strenuous chores seem easy in the beloved
    land oi hope and fulfillment. Jessie jubilantly ac-
    claims every tree, every root, every blade Of grass,
    each little birdlor they all take on a new mean-
    ing, a new deeply felt importance in the Holy Land.
    In the majestic poem "White Fire," she praises
    God Almighty ending each stanza with a eulogy of
    Him who is "the white fire of my thoughts
    She sings of the spring, of the fertilizing rain
    of all those phenomena of nature taken for granted
    everywhere else, but which take on new meaning
    and importance in the Holy Land.
    Earlier Works
    BEFORE she went to Palestine. Jessie had written
    a number of important books such as "The
    Great Adventurer The Book of the Nations"
    (1917,. -Guide to Zionism" (1920) begun in the
    I nited States and finished in Palestine. "The Seek-
    er" is a philosophic adventure, an educational ex-
    periraent of early adolescent days. "Modern Pal-
    estine" (1933) gives a description of life* in the
    kibbutzim. Many of her later poems and stories
    were published in Palestine and in American mag-
    azines such as "Opinion," "The Jewish Frontier"
    and others.
    All of Jessie Sampter's writing, but before all
    her inspired poetry pouring out from a loyal, de-
    voted Jewish heart, was influenced by her newly-
    found faith. Of Zion she sang, slowly rising out of
    destruction and ashes, of the beloved "Alt-Neu-
    land" as Theodor Herzl called it longingly. Her
    warm songs of love and peace came straight from
    her compassionate, motherly heart welcoming the
    eternal wanderers eager to settle in the promised
    land.
    This shy, peace loving, frail woman whose
    poems are very much alive in Palestine, has not
    lived to see the establishment of the State of Is-
    rael, the realization of a millenniaold dream. But
    in her prophetic soul, she must have sensed it:
    "Next year," t aajr, "next year, Jerusalem!"
    Seeking your Borrow for my well-content,
    Vour RnclentneM for my eternal youth,
    ah.i filled with hone thai tremblei like a fear
    n could not i- tin- year- well, then nexi ,-eai
    NOW
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    Capt E. V. Rickenbacker
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    NEW YEAR GREETINGS
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    Best Wishes
    hr
    A Happy ft w Year
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    le Challenge to Our Public Schools

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    ^J^w^lWEIIoqidliiauB
    Miami, Florida, Friday, August 16, 1957
    Section F
    Al Capp (left), famed cartoonist and creator
    of Li'l Abner, presents first of three Li'l Abner
    Sunday pages promoting brotherhood at
    school and home to officials of Anti-Defama-
    tion League of B'nai B'rith. Sequence, which
    has appeared in 600 newspapers here and
    abroad, tells of adventures of Li'l Abner and
    square-eyed people who come to Dogpatch
    and face intolerance because they appear
    different to average Dogpatcher. Presenta-
    tion was made at Al Capp's studios in Bos-
    ton, Mass.
    'Secular Religion' Confuses Todays
    Young and Divides the Family
    By PHIL BAUM
    ?HE opening words of the First Amendment of
    the U.S. Constitution declare that "Congress
    shall make no law respecting an establishment of
    religion." When not unnecessarily obscured, the
    meaning of this sentence is quite simple. It en-
    tails a reciprocal relationship of non-interference
    by all state agencies on the one hand and all
    church bodies on the other. Applied to public
    education it means that religion has no business in
    the schools and schools have no business in re-
    ligion.
    The principle of separation of Church and
    State, particularly in the field of public educa-
    tion, is not something abstract and theoretical; it
    i:; a necessary and practical guardian of the welfare
    of American children, and particularly of children
    adhering to minority faiths. Experience has shown
    that whenever religion intrudes into the public
    schools, sooner or later Jewish children will be
    hurt.
    Despite its clear warning, the principle of sep
    aration through one subterfuge or another is
    abridged or violated in hundreds of school dis-
    tricts across the country. This is rarely done overt-
    ly, of course. Few openly urge that the public
    schools be handed over to religious interests. On
    the contrary, even the advocates of religion in the
    schools will affirm their adherence" to the First
    Amendment.
    Firm Opposition
    AMONG the specific programs they advocate are
    Christmas celebrations, released time relig-
    ious instruction, and Bible readings in the class-
    room. The observance of Christmas and other re-
    ligious holidays, they argue, offers a needed rich-
    ness and warmth to the public school and helps
    improve interculrural understanding. Released
    time programs, they hold, help counteract the "ma-
    terialist" atmosphere in the public school and do
    not "really" interfere with regular school activi-
    ties. Finally, they insist that the reading of the
    Bible encourages more informed understanding of
    the common spiritual heritage underlying all Wes-
    tern culture;.
    The American Jewish Congress stands firmly
    opposed to these views. Religion in the home, in
    the church and in the synagogue it maintains, NT
    ves incomparably to ennoble the spirit of man-
    kind. Religion in the public schools, however, no
    matter how dressed up or watered down, serves
    only to harass, hurt and dislocate children of mi-
    nority faiths and to impair wholesome classroom
    relationships. The injury done by sectarianism in
    the schools is a matter of public record. Unfor-
    tunately, that record is not a matter of widespread
    public knowledge. A few of the mass of case his-
    tories on file at the AJCongress which reveal the
    actual experiences of Jewish children are discus-
    sed below. Jewish parents are urged to study the
    sample experiences and to judge for themselves
    how "harmless" as the proponents of public
    school religion insist the practices really are.
    Holiday Observances
    THE Christmas holiday season generally is herald-
    ed as a time of warmth, understanding and
    good fellowship. But celebrations in the school
    often ensure that the season has precisely the op-
    posite effect.
    The overwhelming pressure upon children to
    participate in holiday festivities is reflected in the
    following excerpt of a letter sent by the father of
    a Jewish child to the president of the Board of
    Education of Yonkers, N.Y.:
    My oMaal daughter. (Jilda, who Is In tlic sixth
    grade .iiul who had alwa>* earned encomiums Cor
    conduct and scholastic attainment, has been
    made the object i>f nwbrtdled prejudice for hav-
    hiK. In lady-like fashion, asked to be .xcused
    from participating '" the singing of Christmas
    hymns. Her claroom teacher and her principal
    pi cached tolerance to her and aald tolerance con-
    sisted of singlnK the Christmas hymns. Mich
    praaauri whs put upon the child that she war
    forced Into an emotional outburst. This exhibi-
    tion In the classroom had a loKlcal sequel. After
    QIMa was belabored by her classmates with such
    epithets as "Christ-killer" who reluaea to alng
    hymns to Jesus Chrlsl.
    When subjected to such pressures, Jewish
    children often find it easier to submit than to re-
    sist. It is not surprising, therefore, that many
    Jewish children seek subterfuges to produce the
    appearance of cooperation in the school celebration
    without at the same time genuinely participating in
    violation of their religious convictions. These de-
    vices are a response to the almost painful need of
    the child to preserve both his classroom status and
    his identity with his family religion. Thus, one
    letter reports that a little Jewish girl assured her
    mother. "I was wearing a mezuzah all the time I
    was singing Christmas carols."
    Change in Nomenclature
    THE intrusion of sectarian Christmas observances
    into the schools moreover necessarily con-
    fronts the Jewish child with a bewildering differ-
    Continued on Page 12 F
    TOALL...
    A MOST
    HAPPY NEW YEAR
    MILTON
    WEISS
    '


    tij
    - R H

    '
    GREETINGS
    Little River
    Laundry and
    Dry Cleaners
    Joe Fineberg
    345 N. E. 80th Street
    Phone PL 71657
    Miami Florida
    . I


    .
    NEW YEAR GREETINGS
    John II. Orr, In*.
    Building Construction
    Quarry Keystone
    485 N. W. 54th Street
    *'

    for ffie
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    KINZEL'S
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    13010 N.W. 7th AVE.
    MU 8-0741


    Page 2F
    +Jmlstnuridiain
    Friday,
    Septeol*,

    f;
    11
    I
    To Our Clients and
    Friends
    and to the
    Entire Jewish Community
    We Extend Our
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    for the
    New Year Holidays
    BOULEVARD NATIONAL BANK
    of MIAMI
    5120 BISCAYNE BOUIEVAID, MIAMI
    Member f.O.I.C. ftitral fftstrvt System
    HAPPY NEW YEAR
    llAMO\ PL I M III M CO.
    ' 7MS.W.-Mrf,-Av*iu
    PHONES FR 3-1*11 on* Ft 1-5312
    TO ALL GREETINGS
    I III-: I'Altlklli SHOP
    BETTER BUDGIIS CAGIS COUIPMINT COMPUTE UNI Of BMD SUPHItS
    4401 N.W. 7lh Avenue Phone PL 4-3402
    TO ALL MY FRIENDS AND ACQUAINTANCES
    MOST HAPPY HOLIDAYS
    RALPH F. MILLS
    YOUR HIALEAH COUNCILMAN
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    Lawn Sprinkling System Pumps Wells
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    To 411 My Friends and Acquaintances .
    Season's Best Wishes
    Harvie S. DuVal
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL
    Keystone Point Shopping Center
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    and Most Ideal Waterfront Community"
    BISCAYNE BOULEVARD at 126th STREET
    BEST WISHES FOR THE NEW YEAR SEASOn FRQM
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    Next Year's Doings in Jerusah
    By EDITH BRODSKY
    ii^EN." says the Jewish Encyclopedia, "is the
    ' number of completion, of perfection, of foun-
    dation." and in the spring of 1958. Israel will have
    rounded out ten years of existence. Of the three
    qualities mystically attributed to that number, Is-
    rael claims certainty only in the last, and only pro-
    gress toward completion and perfection. But tliat
    is surely enough to warrant an unusual celebration
    nothing less than a whole year of it, from the
    spring of 1958 to the spring of 1950.
    "The theme," said Meyer W. Weiagal, who was
    drafted by Prime Minister Ben Gurion to direct
    the festival year, "will be peace, and the whole
    world is invited. The theme is peace," he repeat-
    ed, "not only because it is the basic Jewish tradi-
    tion, but because the world has developed a lop-
    sided image of Israel. Ten years ago the image
    was lopsided, too, but in another direction.
    It was said the Jew could not fight. Today it
    is said he is too much of a fighter. Israel figures
    in the world's consciousness as a combative na-
    tion. The fault is not ours. We came to build in
    peace, we were driven to fight in self-defense; and
    we fought so well that the world is forgetting what
    and how wellwe have built. The headlines of
    war have crowded out the reports of Israel's far
    more significant achievements. We want to use this
    year-long decennial celebration to reorient the
    world's outlook. We want the world to come and
    look at Israel in its totality, to see it in the his-
    toric perspective not of ten years, but of world
    history, to see it as one of the great laboratories
    of the twentieth century, a symbol of stability and
    progressive influence in the Middle East and the
    world."
    Anyone whose memory joes back ten years
    will understand what Mr. Weisgal is driving at.
    Only ten years ago, as Abba Eban recently re-
    minded the United Nations, "we wore not here."
    This seems so incredible that we must force our
    minds back over the maelstrom of events to try and
    recapture that exact moment of birth. Was it only
    ten years ago? Leading up to that moment, there
    were the investigating commissions that futile,
    purposeless, infuriating parade; there was the dis-
    integrating Mandate, powerless to govern yet pow-
    erful enough to turn back the frail rescue ships;
    there was the illegal aliyah beating against the
    spite walls built by Bevin and the British Foreign
    Office; there was partition on Nov. 29, 1947, and
    on Nov. 30, the beginning of the Arabs' unrelent-
    ing campaign of hostility.
    TwoFeld Pwrswte
    CROM the historical records, it is possible to re-
    construct the mood of the world prior to the
    birth of the state; how, after World War n, in
    Eban's words:
    "It became horribly but seriously possible that
    every nation would be granted its freedom,
    amongst those which had suffered under the
    heel of tyranny, except the people which had
    suffered the most From this spiritual peril
    the community of nations cleansed itself be-
    latedly, perhaps a little too grudgingly, but
    nevertheless decisively, when it ordained and
    later recognized the establishment of Israel.
    Thus, the renewal of Israel's sovereignty, though
    ostensibly a fact of political organization was,
    in the deeper sense, an act of universal equity."
    But this equity Israel had to defend alone
    when, on May 15, 1948. the day after the proclama-
    ion of the State, the troops of Egypt, Iraq, Jordan,
    Lebanon and Syria marched in invasion. It was
    then that Israel stood before the world as a "fight-
    F'.....-
    *
    *A
    ". Israel ia its totality (is).. .|
    in the historic perspective not of
    but of world history, to see it as (
    great laboratories of the twentieth .,
    symbol of stability and progressive i
    in the Middle East and the wcild."
    ing" nationa true and yet distorting pictm
    for ten years, because of the world's indi
    and forgetfulness, Israel's announced pk
    very heart of the Zionist inspiration*!
    national life consecrated to a vision of I
    and peace" entered upon a hitter phase off
    lion. And the climax of the frustratioc i
    the autumn of 1956 when Israel's defense i
    the Sinai Peninsula set the seal on the woi
    conception.
    Next year's festival, then, hat a tw
    pose: to recall to the nations Israel's on
    abiding bright hope and promise; and to i
    the evidence it can offer that this hope i
    promise are is process of fulfillment,
    is only fair tq say that for ten yean,
    overt and covert warfare. Israel and
    people have been cheated out of a proped
    tion. j
    A word is in place regarding Ben
    choice of the man to plan and direct thisj
    celebration. Meyer Weisgal's colorful-
    Zionist worker, editor, theatrical pr
    prime mover in the founding of the
    Institute of Science, of which he is now I
    tive bead, provides him with a unique fa
    perience for this assignment. It was Weij
    produced the brilliant spectacles. Tsi*
    ol a People" and "The Eternal Road ."Itt
    gal who directed the Palestine Pavillkun
    York World's Fair in 1939 and the extra
    successful "Jewish Day" at the 1933 Ch
    This last-named feat he accomplished |!M
    Dr. Weizmann to fly from London to Cr
    a single day. Soldier's Field, with 131.9
    was too small.
    Largest Number of Visit**
    WEISGAL generates ideas and energy I
    same force that Grand Coulee gesVj
    tricity. It was last July, during one of"
    Continued on Pi "F
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    *
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    of Miami
    CORAL GABLES
    A Happy New Year to AH
    Our Friends and Patrons
    Jefferson Hotel
    L LEVINE, Mgr.
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    MIAMI BEACH
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    NEW YEAR
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    7200 N.W. 7th A v..
    PHONE PL 2-7621
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    Phone LOgan 4-1811
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    H, September 27, 1957
    ****ist Heritor
    Jewish Community Rises Again
    By MOSES A. LEAVITT
    iyour world atlas if you have one. Turn
    ' (^ece. Put your finger on Athens and
    -,, your finger half-way up the east coast
    j come to a fly-speck called Volos.
    fij reasonably certain that until this moment
    I never heard of Volos. It is also reason-
    -rlain that Volos will never play a leading
    tie affairs of the world, since its total pop-
    j> not more
    than a few thousand. But for
    ib run iiiuic ____... .,
    (5 of the world Volos has a special meaning.
    Volos this Rosh Hashona there will be the
    gnai services to welcome in the New Year.
    a, there will be a Jewish community to
    15718.
    niniature, Volos represents the history of
    !ia Jewry during the past 20 years.
    f not generally known, but the fact is that
    s of Greec? suffered more from Nazi per-
    _ perhaps than any other Jewish community
    world. Before Germany invaded Greece the
    population stood at 75,477. Through out-
    iacre and through deaths in various con-
    Rjon camps 65,451 Greek Jews were killed
    end of the war found Greece with a Jewish
    Son of approximately 10,000.
    ; largest Jewish community in Greece be-
    twarwa- Salonika, which numbered 56,000.
    nmuniry dated from the Spanish expulsion
    urted 48 synagogues, each orh* named after
    rIn Spain wtiwe Ihe- particular> rlv lived. Jews were active in every trade and
    Dion and the stevedore's guild was 100 per-
    besish. Only 1,950 Salonika Jews survived
    t Nazi occupation, a loss of 96 percent. Two
    unities, Zanthi and Serres, lost 99 percent of
    population. Twelve other communities lost
    [than 90 percent. Strangely enough, the Jew-
    u.'ation of Athens increased during that per-
    i 3,000 to 4.930, due to those who fled to
    that city Unique was the Jewish com-
    | cf Lante. a small inaccessible island in the
    i Sea. During the two years of occupation
    |eraans never got to that islandand there
    i births and no deaths. The population re-
    ) at the figure of 275.
    I*los Community Stricken by Earthquake
    I Jews of Volos were comparatively fortunate.
    M) last only 26 percent of their number
    1 the Nazi occupation. But the end of the
    {pad a community ruined, its synagogues d.e-
    ils remaining 570 Jews impoverished
    per. the immediate and efficient aid of the
    [Distribution Committee enabled us to mu
    ifficulties and to solve the great prob-
    psmulated due to war and persecution." ac-
    'i David Levy, the president ol the Jewish
    ' Volos at the time.
    Fjanw the earthquakes of 1954 and IM6.
    Tlime of the i quakes, due to emigration,
    immunity had shrunk to about 300
    Iwmne ;i, decad* following the end of
    ' more than 4.000 Jews migrated from
    f'M'' "' ,iu:l> t< Israel and the U.S.).
    PtMk el rebuilding was too much for the
    **en '' nrnunity. The Joint Dis-
    FI Committee stepped in with immediate
    a, They w?rc all prepared to leave either
    Parts of Greece or to other countries. It
    7, cnr| "' "le 400-year-old history of the
    'community r Volos.
    Mo1 sit by idly and watch a Jewish
    itt" '"fl'c,s lhe hea,th of a" *
    ]*x^a special fund was set up together
    from this fund to enable them to rebuild their
    granted for the same purpose by the Greek Gov-
    ernment. Forty-three families, totalling 132 Z
    dmduals. were thus helped to build stronger and
    more .secure dwellings on their own property
    64 people, who had no property on which to build,
    no means of their own (about 100 members of the
    community had already moved elsewhere) JDC
    et up barracks for them in which to live tempor-
    arily. Under the supervision of the Central Coun-
    cil a modern, earthquake-resistant apartment de-
    velopment was erected. The houses were just com-
    pleted this spring, when another severe earthquake
    hit Volos. The new housing went unscathed Early
    this summer the dedication exercises were held
    and the 64 men. women and children moved out of
    the barracks and into their new homes The old
    barracks erected by JDC are now being reconvert-
    ed into a community center.
    Today there are fewer than 100 Jewish fam-
    ilies, numbering 272 persons, in the Jewish com-
    munity of Volos. They are all better housed than
    they mete befece the earthqwk*. Their synagogue
    is rebuilt, their children receive Hebrew instruc-
    tion and they will soon have their first community
    center.
    A Community Has Been Saved
    J^ Jewish community has been saved and it is a
    cause for rejoicing, not only for the Jews
    Continued on Page 13 F
    Typical of Hungarian refuaees crowding port
    in Italy for passage to freedom. "All over the
    world in the 43 Rosh Hashonas which have
    passed since the foundinq of th9 Joint Distri-
    bution Committee, the beginninq of each New
    Year has brought with it the promise that for
    those still in need the coming year would be
    better.
    MR-, and MM.
    **T SOLOMON
    fc *"* Sons
    pray and Seymour
    ''*""'""' CeiMfteMf,
    P" "" WMN for
    "" *FlrMi Niw Tee*
    MMl and MIAMI
    J*Y NEW YEAR TO OUR
    :;DS AND PATRONS
    ****** c.
    LJ^. Diribut0r,
    lndChildr.n.lW
    -l2N*.lCOUBT
    ^ FR 9.5912
    A Happy New Year to All
    Our Friends and Patrons
    SHERRY'S
    FOB BEAUTIFUL SHOES
    2336 PONCE DE LEON BLVD.
    CORAL GABLES
    Phone HI 8-8947
    The Winokurs
    BEST WISHES FOR THE
    HOLIDAY SEASON
    JAWS Sfth ST. GRILL
    -MILE LONG HOT DOGS-
    N.W. 54th St & 13th At*.
    Miami, Fla.
    HOLIDAY
    GREETINGS
    titablishei 1944 UN 4-2147
    Jf
    *>
    JPr"
    HindbwH Jewelry AccMterit*
    7320 Collins A*.., Miami leech 41, Fie.
    JERRY MACK
    Radiators
    Cleaned Repaired Exchanged
    (Mew er Uttl)
    All COKES MANUFACTURER AN*
    GUARANTIED IN MIAMI If
    JERRY & MACK
    REPAIR SERVICE
    2034 N.W. 2nd Ave. FR 9-2603
    Met Griffin
    Page 3F
    Mr. Pumpernik sez:
    A Very Happy New Year Te Ah
    RESTAURANT
    67th I Collins
    ' I
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
    OUR FRIENDS
    Physicians & Surgeons Laboratory
    ONE LINCOLN ROAD BUILDING
    MIAMI BEACH
    Phone JE 1-0287
    A MOfcJT JMPPy NKW JFEARjTO A^., f j,
    II ol I v wood >lai I rss Company
    153 N.E. 73rd STRICT
    Nathan and Morton Nash
    MIAMI, FLORIDA
    ~rrr
    HAW MtW TEAR TO ALL ,_*
    "BILL" STEPIJENSON
    1S143 N.E. 19th AM. NORTH MIAMI REACH Phone Wl 7-3S20
    SAM TRAURIG and WALTER TRAURIG
    Extend Best Wishes to all their friends
    lor a Happy New Year
    ALL FORMS OF
    3033 COIAI WAT
    MIAMI. FLORIDA
    Phone HI 8-1771
    i[
    GREETINGS ARE EXTENDED
    WITH THE SINCERE AND FERVENT WISH
    FOR GENEROUS BLESSINGS OF
    GOOD AND HAPPINESS
    THROUGHOUT THE WORLD.
    *'
    '
    Riverside-Beach
    Memorial Chapel

    IRVING BLASBERG
    ABE EISENBERG
    LARRIE BLASBERG
    *


    Page 4F
    *Jewisi>ncrk#an


    m
    EXTENDS
    SEASON'S GREETINGS
    TO ALL
    I
    IU 79th STREET CAUSEWAY MIAMI BEACH
    Open 5 p.m. to 2 a.m. reservations UN 5-3735
    ii;
    New Year
    , Greetngs
    li;
    RONEY PLAZA HOTEL

    To All... Greetings
    POWELL SEATING AND
    SUPPLY COMPANY
    Formerly C & A Soles Service
    FOLDING CHAIRS and FOLDING TABLES
    ALL TYPES OF SEATING FOR CLUBS, UNION HALLS, CLASSROOMS, ETC.
    A. T. (AD Powe/I
    "The Seating Headquarters for the South"
    52 N.E. 51 st Street Phone PL 8-1954
    HAPPY NEW YEAR TO All OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
    COMMERCIAL FISHING SUPPLY CO.
    54 SOUTHWEST SIXTH STREET
    TELEPHONE FR 4-*44
    GREETINGS TO ALL
    ENNESS GARMENT CO. INC.
    Fashion Mart Blda.. 221 N.W. 1st Court
    TO ALL GREETINGS
    H. J. SANBORN
    Good Plumbing
    23 N.W. 11th Street Ph. FR 4-3002
    Miami
    Miami, Florid*
    KST WISHES FOR THE HOLIDAY SEASON
    MISSING URK KEY SHOP. IXC.
    heae FR 3-523B
    221 N.W. 8th AVENUE
    MIAMI
    OUR BEST WISHES FOR A
    HAPPY AND HEALTHFUL NEW YEAR
    Sally and Harold Spaet
    Lucky and Hal
    SINCERE WISHES FOR
    GOOD HEALTH AND MUCH HAPPINESS
    The Pelles
    MICHAEL MILLICENT,
    DONNA and TONY
    Dilemma for a Southern Mil
    AlfX MI11E*
    . fait* if Mty
    By MILTON FRIEDMAN
    Washington
    THE dilemma of Jews living South of the Mason-
    Dixon line is best illustrated by a current
    "joke."
    Two men appeared in Cohen's clothing store
    in a Southern town. One acted as spokesman and
    made known the
    purpose of the
    visit "Mr. Co-
    hen." he said,
    "we it-present
    the White Citi-
    zens Council be-
    ing organ i zed
    here. We would
    like your contri-
    bution."
    But Cohen
    did not care to
    contribute.
    "Well," Btld
    the visitor. "Mr.
    Cohen, would
    .Mm want your
    daughter to
    marry a Negro?"
    C (i h e n re-
    plied: "I wouldn't
    want my daugh-
    ter to marry any
    kind of goy."
    It would be wronR to consider Cohen guilty of
    "anti-goyism." Here was a case of a simple. law-
    abiding Jew just trying to live a Jewish life as he
    saw it. His religious instincts.told him of the basic
    evil in the anti-Negro segregation system. The
    Jewish organizations to which he belonged were on
    record for the peaceful integration of the public
    schools.
    Cohen saw the White Citizens Council as the
    Ku Klux Klan in a new guise. The more ostenta-
    tious expressions of hate had been toned down and
    made socially acceptable. A few insecure and im-
    mature Jews joined the Citizens Council, craving
    an illusory approval by their white neighbors. But
    the Cohens of the South wanted nothing to do with
    organized racism. Its odor, although even lor the
    moment not directed at Jews, reeked obnoxiously.
    It is nevertheless true that the Cohens of the
    South have no desire to be martyrs. They wish
    good relations with while and colored alike. Yet
    ;. growing tendency exists to force Southern Jews,
    who ask only to be left alone, to take a stand.
    Latent Anti-Semitism
    ALEX Miller, the national community services
    director of the Anti-Defamation League, re-
    ported that the Jews of the South implore their
    national organizations to avoid taking stands in
    favor of the Supreme Court decision to end school
    segregation. Many Southern Jews sincerely be-
    lieve in "gradualism" as the road to integration.
    They feel that statements issued in New York by
    Jewish organizational professionals do not reflect
    the Southern member's views.
    Gov. Frank G. Clement of Tennessee last fall
    ordered National Guard troops to back up a Fed-
    eral court order opening schoolrooms in the town
    of Clinton without regard to race. This drew re-
    sentment from bigots. A short time later Gov.
    Clement was invited to address a dinner in sup-
    port of Israel. Participants in the Jewish fund
    raising affair were grieved to learn that non-Jewish
    pickets representing a White Citizens Council had
    appeared with signs insulting their guest. One sign
    said "See You. Later. Integrator." The affair hint-
    ed at the latent anti-Semitic not,.,
    the rtaee of the turbulent S^'
    John Kaapet, a New Jersey hnr-
    ed create strife in the Clinton aS^"llW'>
    it plain that Jews were his target ^'i
    groea. But an all-Southern iurviln ^U|"
    ot contempt of court ThU ffi^
    of extremism. Most Southerners oppij-l
    TJjev merely wanted to see the NcK^
    Jews in Southern states have been*
    socially from their non-Jewish neighbor ttl
    Northern cousins. Friendly business J
    contacts always existed. But when the^L'i
    down. Jews and Christians go their separate
    Historically, with very few excepu South has been free of the type of vioJettf
    Semitism that has marred community relatk
    Boston and other Northern cities Emphasis
    prejudice In the South has been directed:
    Negro. The Jews are relatively few a
    larger eities.
    Jews in the South have been elected i
    ernors, members of the IS Congress, nuy
    to other high elective offices. Some served j
    distinction in Confederate ranks. ThougkJ
    Robert E. Lee led pro-slavery forces he i
    of. tbe.;.crude anti-Semitism of the Northern1
    mander, G#n. U. S. Grant.
    On the Spot
    IJNTIL recently, Southern Jews have lived<
    fortably among their neighbors Even I
    social segregation generally caused the
    tion of separate country clubs, many Jews I
    was a blessing in disguise. Inter-marriage I
    major problem in communities where Jewish)
    have few suitable co-religionists to choose I
    as mates. So Jews and non-Jews went their]
    arate ways socially with the best wishes tf]
    same elders who gathered for interfaith Ion
    Today the Jew finds himself on the spoil
    of brotherhood, justice, and equality dictate]
    port of the Negro. Economic and social |
    push the Jews in another direction. The I
    Jew wants his Northern cousin to know that i
    but human.
    It is
    question I
    F. ,. __ be a n satf
    ^^/ simply.
    .^Bi Jews are I
    to find an i
    consistent
    their
    values,
    not want ti|
    pushed by]
    White
    Councils Ml
    They era*)
    derstandinf I
    Northern (
    lonists. SI
    have dis|
    their heriti
    joining or
    porting the I
    like groupa]
    most r*
    dent that H
    tion will be
    ed out that will build peace and progress J
    South on the foundations of interracial andr
    faith harmony. They look forward to a law, I
    on social justice, that affords all Americans j
    same rights.
    JOHN RASPER
    . erstwhile Cfiaren hero
    A Ha.., New Year te All
    Our Friends and Patrons
    < of ion Pharmacy
    FREE DELIVERY
    MM N.W. 35th Street
    Phone NE 5-6476
    Closed Sundays & Holidays
    Mrs. Marie O. (Cotton) GiObs
    GRff TINGS TO All
    ?Van Merry Henaam t aAerris G.U
    TAVERH
    l*it e C..I Refretkia,
    Drlafc with ttm Frieerf,
    101 N.W. 17th AVENUE
    - MIAMI, FLORIDA
    Holiday
    Greetings
    to our
    Patrons and
    Friend* j;|
    22nd off Collins, Miami Beach
    Phone IE 8-4345
    A Happy ^JZl'
    Oer fritnit mi wM"
    Jim Wood
    Land Clearing
    5924 CORAL WA^
    Ph. MO 7-
    JIM WOOD
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO J
    CARWOOJ
    AXC. BEAGLE *
    Boardina *-<*'
    12500 S.W.l02d A*
    WtofDixiHya,


    to,. September 27, 1957
    I'
    *Je*istiFk>rMia
    Page 5F

    antique Jewish wedding ring, from rabbis, wedding rings were to be made of
    Don of Victoria and Albert Museum in metal without any jewels.
    On. "According to a strict ruling of the
    Mi This Ring, I Thee Wed...'
    By RUTH MORRIS
    (old Biblical riddle asks: "What is sweeter
    Bban honey and stronger than a lion?" The
    Lr is: "Love."
    lince Biblical times, it was the first duty of
    [is to marry off their children. And h al-
    [has been their most cherished hope to see
    children's children, before all the sons of
    I sons according to the Psalmist and the
    rbs.
    i ancient times, weddings usually took place
    | beautiful month of Adar when "the winter
    the rain is over and gone; when the flowers
    1 on the earth; when the time of singing is
    | and the voice of the turtle is heard in our
    (Song of Songs 2:11-12). To the-Prophet
    h, the most distinct feature of desolation in
    nd was the absence of 'the voice of mirth and
    : of gladness, the voice of the bridegroom
    i voice of the bride." (7:34, 25:10, 33:11).
    one form of contracting marriage (kid-
    i), consisted in the giving of a sum of money
    | an object of value to the bride by the groom,
    i a natural transition to make this object a
    Thus the use of the coin was abandoned and
    | it the last vestige of the outward form of
    disappeared from Jewish marriage.
    Ily, the custom became so common that
    "With this ring ." ("betabba'ath zo
    became part of the binding ceremony of
    Why No Jewell
    CORDING to a strict ruling of the rabbis, wed-
    | ding rings were to be made of metal without
    ls. The reason given for this strange nil-
    ^a the impossibility to estimate at a glance
    1 value of a jewel when no one could tell
    diately whether or not the ring presented
    proper worth of money.
    I great number of valuable old wedding bands
    i bwn preserved in The Jewish Museum in
    [York City, but the world's greatest collection
    I uV Victoria and Albert Museum in London.
    ' the rare old rings pictured here. Number
    i left to right) is a gold ring, the bezel in
    i of a gabled building, which is frequently
    |nd represents either the beautiful old Tem-
    I Jerusalem (King Solomon's Temple), or one
    modern counterpartsthe synagogue. The
    ring in the middle is
    chiselled.
    made of bronze, richly
    The third, made of gold, is a wide hoop with
    two rows of filigree bosses; the bezel is square
    vrfth applied foliage and bears the frequently used
    inscription "ALT." an abbreviation for "Mazel Tov."
    A very rare ring is now being exhibited in the
    Victoria and Albert Museum, London. It shows
    on its sides the creation of Eve, man's downfall and
    the expulsion from the Garden of Edena sample
    of highest craftsmanship and unequalled artistry.
    Symbolism of the Wadding Ring
    IN the words of the Torah binder "May he grow
    up for the Chupa," there may be seen the
    paramount importance attached by Jews to mar-
    riage. Regarded as a religious duty of man ay]
    woman, the marriage ceremony was emphasized by
    a great number of rituals, the first step being a
    gift from the groom to the bride as a visible sign
    of their union. And the ring became the symbol
    and token of this union. Meant at that time as a
    ritual object not to be worn in everyday life, it
    was of unwieldy size.
    The ring represents the picture of the circle
    no beginning and no end. And this is its deep
    meaning, for the ring has always been the symbol
    of eternity. For the old Egyptians it was god Phoe-
    nix who represented the symbol of eternal return
    rising out of the asheswithout beginning nor
    end. Phoenix means "year" and the year is the time
    measure of the circle, for it encircles "Time"
    (Chronos) in its eternal round.
    The word "ring" (tabba-ath) appears once in
    Genesis 41/42, six times in the "Book of Esther"
    (111:10-12), VIII:2-8, twice and 10: the ring of
    Ahasuerus.
    Legend has it that the Pharaohs of Egypt were
    the first to sketch the circle as a symbol of eternity
    and to believe that the ring was a heavenly sign
    that life, happiness and love had no beginning and
    no ending.
    Symbol of Life
    THAT rings should be rarely alluded to in the
    Old Testament might seem to be proof that
    they were not extensively worn in the Land of Is-
    rael as some have assumed. The finest ancient
    Hebrew signet ring is said to be one of the time
    Continued on Pege 13 F
    'ifTIN S
    WUHKD EATON
    DANCE STUDIO
    "* r. Hi i.fc, u
    " 1 Hmm"
    * MlA AVENUE
    *Al CABLES
    RMM F| mj$o
    !
    fct? Ywr'oA110ur
    fr*ia and Patron.
    '** osn
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS
    i
    Ht-FiDELMTY7
    Concert Hall
    Realism
    hyfir
    BoroW Armstrong
    Alan Hool
    Specialit in Hi-Fidelity
    CONCERTO
    ROOM
    1722 Pooco do Loon Blvd.
    Phono HI -5240
    SIASOWS GHtTMCS
    offia

    MS
    CMLU SAIICS, FtOMM
    rtw*MMt

    A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR
    FRIENDS AND PATRONS
    Keystone Tourist Court and
    Ace Trailer Sales
    6307 N.E. 2nd AVENUE
    MIAMI
    Phone 84-6295
    George W. Laacho
    H
    ! '
    A MOST HA?ft HOLIDAY
    t i i i r; h i
    FOREIGN FREIGHT 6 AM FORWARDERS
    FORWARDING CO.
    rJL0.No. 711
    is? nx nt stun, mum
    boot IX-12M P. 0. M 4047
    OMco-SlOVModMSt.
    DENMARK'S PATIO BARBECUE & EQUIPMENT
    STRUCTURAL-ORNAMENTAL
    Modern Meoftlt Cora,, Grills Cerdte StIt f.tltry SfOMO Hatter
    123S1 M.W. 7th AVENUE phone MO 1-4*41
    HAP ft NEW TEA* fr,m
    SOBEL & WEINBERG
    R E A 1 T 0 R S
    ONE IINCOIN ROAD, MIAMI REACH Phone JE S-444S
    \
    BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    from tho Foremost Photographers oi the South
    252 I. Flagler St. in fhe Ropor Building Ph. FR 3-8617
    NEW YEAR GREETINGS TO ALL .
    MR. mi MIS. MAM SIOTKIN of the
    NEW YORK ME AT MARKET
    7S7 41ft STREET, MMMf if AC* PNONI JI 1-4071



    MM... Most Happy Holidays
    Dr. Joe Hall
    DADE COUNTY SUPERINTENDENT OF
    PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

    TO ALL GREETINGS
    HUDNAP OIL CORPORATION
    Power Up With Power X Sinclair Super Products
    Diir* With Car* Uo Sinclair
    out RJMPt service wiu MiASf row
    *>
    .
    10300 Control Boulevard. N. Miami
    Ph. PL 9-2169
    GREETINGS TO ALL
    OLIN*S PAINT and BODY SHOP
    O. L. Pinion, Owner
    LACQUER SYNTHETIC BAKED ENAMEL
    "Housing Voo It Our Pleasure"
    116 N. E. 29th Stre*t FR 1-6591
    Palm Island of Miami
    TNI REMNARB FAMILY
    MIAMI, F10RA


    Page 6F
    vJmisiifkrKMan

    COPPER SKILLET
    1999 71st Street Normandy Isle on the Causeway
    TO OUR MANY JEWISH FRIENDS
    AND CUSTOMERS .
    NEW YEAR GREETINGS
    "Enjoy the finest where your welcome is not
    measured by the amount you spend."
    ^^^|
    SI VM>\ of MIAMI
    JOE INFANTE. PRESIDENT
    DISTRIBUTORS OF STYLON PRODUCTS
    TILE ,-ind ACCESSORIES FLAMINGO TILES
    SUMMITVILLE QUARRIES GLAMOART MOSAICS
    1400 N.W. 54th St MIAMI Phone PL 4-3809
    I;
    TO ALL... MOST HAPPY HOLIDAYS
    King Arthur Homes
    Embassy Homes
    9471 Caribbean Bfdg. Miami, Florida
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
    J. Dalai COIFFURE DESIGNER
    Miracle Mile, Coral Cobles. Ph. HI 6-2565
    83 hundred, little River. Ph. PI 4-9525
    Suburban Salon, South Miami, Ph. MO 6-8571
    forty-one, Miami Beach. Ph. JE 8-6531
    Season's Greetings To All Our Friends and Patrons
    Paul's Carpet Co. Inc.
    2412 N. Miami Avenue 4797 S.W. 8th Street
    Phone FR 4-8435 Phone HI 4-6082
    HAPPY NiW YEAR TO 411
    MIAMI FISH & LOBSTER CO.
    5711 N. W. 7th Avenue
    Phone PL 4-3667
    HOTELS, RESTAURANTS and INSTITUTIONS SUPPLIED
    Miami
    GREETINGS FROM JACK AND ROSE KAABE
    NEWS TOWER GRILL
    "WE AIM TO PLEASE"
    Lunch*. Sandwich*! Soft Drinks
    IN THE NEWS TOWER
    Greetings 7o 4/1
    Alexander Orr & Associates, Inc.
    PLUMBING HEATING
    Residential Commercial Industrial
    S,r,i~, H.. Srtmf, Hi.mi Area Site ,9,5
    66 HE. 39th STREET Phone pt ,.246i
    1119 16th STREET. MIAMI BEACH Ph. JE 1-3546
    Concrete Hoisting
    Bar Jciiti Set
    GREETINGS
    Steel Erected
    N. POPENHAGER" "* *"
    CRANES
    Phone HI 3-2652 ,534 UJ
    COCONUT GROVE. FLORroA AV#DUe
    Fr*y.S.
    'or***.

    Sylvia sroNtr
    . omom fhe fisted
    fDWAffZ) C. ROBINSON
    . Kiddle of ffic Night"
    smut r wnrrfts
    .f-ff.1 w I
    The Past Year's Broadway So
    By JACK H. GORDUN
    THE New year on Broadway corresponds in a re-
    in.'!( way, of course, to our Rosh HatbOM.
    B 'ii arrive in September. We often reminisce
    year after the curtain lias n >ne down
    or, ii .iihI recall some of the hi^hli^hts. I remem-
    ber the first New Yen- alter I w^s Bar Mitzvah.
    I wat proud I was included in the family circle of
    discussion. The reason in this particular year?
    I look my place as a man in the prayer minion.
    Thinking back, I realize how clannish we were
    in our family. This general attitude. I believe, is
    true of the Jew everywhere. Perhaps, our wan-
    denim (or centuries throughout the world has
    given us l;o<)(I reason not to extend easily and
    wholeheartedly beyond our immediate small circle.
    It was probably linked originally to the feeling
    S safety in numbers, and the feeling persists. It's
    too bad that the Jew must feel this constant need
    of safety.
    In theatre, it is very different. (Tannishness
    crosses ethnic and religious ties and it is replaced
    with a respect for talent. In theatre, talent is a
    religion in itself. Here, man understands and ac-
    cept ^ his brother as a member of the human fam-
    ily.
    The Jew outside the theatre points with justi-
    fiable pride to his brother who is contributing in
    Broadway's popular field. He even brags a little
    about him quite understandably, too. One often
    brags about successful members of his family.
    Here are some of Jewish faith that make us, as
    .'( ws, proud because of their accomplishments on
    Broadway last year: Paul Muni of "Inherit the
    Wind"' produced by Herman Shumlin; Joseph
    Schildkraut of "Diary of Anne Frank "co-starring
    Susan Stiasberg. produced by Kermit Bloomgarden
    and directed by (iarson Kanin; and Edward G. Rob-
    inson of -.Middle of the Night" written by Paddy
    (born Sidney) Chaeyfsky.
    Th List is Long.
    r
    AMN Yankees" and "The Pajama Game" were
    written by Richard Adler and the late Jerry
    Ross. Howard (aine is now being featured in
    Damn Yankees." Mr. Caine is a man to watch; in
    four years h has already played in five Broadway
    hits and is destined for stardom. Born Cohen, he
    is paradoxically playing the role of Mr. Applegate
    the Devil.
    "Hatful of Rain" and "Girls of Summer" boast-
    ed Shelley Winters. "Mr. Wonderful" was pro-
    duced by Jule Styne, and the fantastically success
    ful My Fair Lady" by Herman Levin, with Jay
    Lorner doing the book and h,ics (w jL
    Loesser won the Critics circle Award fort,
    sic. book and lyrics of -The Mot Happy .
    Lillian Hellman wrote the book and LeonL|
    n the music for the critically-favM^
    dide." Al Capp provided >r .-.
    i r "L'il Abner." "v
    U. Uallach Marred,:) MajorJarlJ
    are Ringing" found Judj i: .. Sydney Chaplin featured (These two irei
    ed an item off-stage, as well as or, Comden and Adolph Green wrote the book i
    ics with Jule Styne furnishing the mukl
    "Bells."
    George Axelrod wrote Will Succta
    Rock Hunter" and produced A Y;>ittoi(
    Planet," featuring David Burn- Menasdul
    nick, as its star, kept "Uncle Willie'' alive l_
    ning far beyond its expected duration. Bertl
    could be seen starring m "Hotel Paradiso."
    The list is long and I've probably
    many, like director Harold Clurman. produce]
    Cohen and actors Sylvia Sydruy and Luther I
    and many, many others.
    Understanding of Show Business .
    UMHEN a brilliant set is designed by sou
    Ralph Alswang, the dancing is eho
    by Jerome Robbins. or any of the above i
    are singled out in praise for contributing!
    success of the theatrical year, it doesn't
    whether he was confirmed in a church or tj
    agogue.
    In Broadway circles, a story is oftea I
    It is of the stuttering actor who '.ells of hit|
    audition as a TV announcer. "I d d-didn't|
    the Job. You know why? The d-d-director a^
    anti-Semitic." Jew and non-Jew laugh at I
    surdity of this story altogether. They knot |
    the speech impediment and not racial intolej
    that gave the job to someone else. Jewiod]
    Jew in the theatre know that the man wbo|
    job fits the role best and has the most tale*]
    Charleton Heston, a non-Jew. was:
    lected to play the role of Moses in "The
    mandments." Some years ago John
    rave notices for his brilliant portrayal of I
    ish lawyer, George Simon, in Elmer Rtf*'1
    sellor-at Law." When this play was ad
    TV a few years ago, Alfred Drake, an ItaB
    birth, portrayed the Jewish lawyer, and
    luva. a Jew, played Drake's Italian partner.
    helped each other with the language and infl"
    Continued on Po 10F
    r. and Mrs.
    MAX PEPPER
    AND FAMILY
    EXTEND BEST WISHES
    ior a
    HAPPY NEW YEAR
    To All Their Frieds
    and Relatives
    A HAPPY HEW TEAR TO ALL*
    Whan Tou Think of
    BOTTLES
    think of
    Magic City Bottle
    S, Supply
    13M N.W. 23rd STREET
    ** NI 4-6551
    Specializing in glass container
    problems for drug, beverage
    food and cosmetic packers.
    Beat Wtmhea
    ior the
    HoUdoy Station
    DICK
    RICHMOND
    - Hn Men's Clefhes -
    201 E. Flaoler StriiV
    Mum FR 1-1531
    Miami, Florida
    New Year Gftel'W
    1312* W. OUUC HWY. ""*
    Registered Pharmcast
    Always on Duty
    A Happy New Ye* to-
    Our Frkn* """j
    West Flagler
    Garage
    1930 WEST FLAGtfSTi
    MIAMI
    JimHoun.hell.^


    +Jc*lstincrMton
    the Fruit of Their Philosophy
    By GEORGE COHEN
    eg before has a feeling of the eternity of
    Irtish tradition and history been more acute
    . troubled days. Out ancestors, in their
    Mtuai lifp. in tneir attitude on tne burning
    of the day, have coined many fitting
    and expressions. These phrases, so fa-
    L, earlier generations, seemed to have sunk
    blivion.
    ri such oblivion lasted a short period only.
    Lv Have come alive again; more than that,
    U only have come to life, but they have
    0 stay, having nothing lost of their actuality
    i the fast moving age of the atom. Deeply
    Uhical (noughts, aphorisms and wise say-
    In their original form and not distorted by
    lommenK will be quoted in this essay.
    jay thing- turn out right!" This hopeful
    Lies from Nahum, the Tannaite who coined
    [used it frequently.
    Uisdom is better than weapons of war,"
    1 9) has never been of more striking actu-
    i these days.
    Ifot in t!" warning by experience bought
    Lghest wisdom lie! but to be forewarned and
    Vfallthis is highest wisdom" says Joseph
    iac Kimhi (1103-1170).
    Galurh Jews
    Idea Jew, means to be in the Galuth every-
    where" complains Franz Itosenzweig in his
    [published in 1935. And he continues: "If the
    i Jew is being attacked, he must not use
    L|y Torah as a protective shield, but should
    [before the Torah and protect the holy
    : early as 1878. Karl Emil Franzos, in his
    filing book "Asia" states: "Every country has
    ; it deserves "
    1882, Juda Loeb Pinkus, in his much dis-
    I book "Auto-Emancipation" wrote: 'To be
    | because one is a Jew or to be protected for
    reasonthis is equally em harassing for
    |raian feelings as Jews."
    11911, the famous novelist Jacob Wasserman
    i his novel "My Way as a German and as a
    lit is the greatest tragedy in the Jew's exis-
    Ithai two feelings are constantly conflicting
    I tortured soul; the feeling of superiority and
    Wing of stigma."
    [Town Without Jews" was a frequently quoted
    (asplendid novel by Hugo Bettauer, publish-
    IVienna in 1922. Bettauer was later shot and
    ' an early Hitler disciple (IBS).
    pour certificate of baptism is your ticket to
    *n culture" complains Heinrich Heine, the
    **\
    LbMHbMLbPV' V. sfc
    l%1 '
    ^k "
    ^^ Psss^^r^ ^H LKrWl
    Dhs^F^"**
    P^shtdyinq Talmud. Etching is by Her-
    apostate who, despite everything, was a Jew to his
    caller-Jew? *"*"? has been c0"temptuously
    called a Jew s paper,' we know this word is meant
    as an .nsult. but we shall not fail to turn iHnTo
    a word of honor" states Theodor Herzl in the fS
    Famous Sayings
    JHE famous Jewish playwright at the turn of this
    century, Ludwig Fulda, also renowned for his
    masterful translations of French and Norwegian
    Plays, states in his "Proverbs in Prose:" "If ,ime
    is money, then everybody without exception lives
    far above hls means." In the same book, he says-
    Mortal man resembles an actor who never knows
    how the play will end in which he is privileged to
    play a part during one act only."
    ixtei?*?'? ^erne' in his "Letlers from Paris"
    UBAJ) states the proverbial truth: "Help yourslf
    and heaven will help you." Was he inspired by the
    moral uttered in one of La Fontaine's "Fables-
    reading "Aide-toi et le ciel t'aidera?"
    This same Boerne pronounced the famous
    much-quoted "Statesmen, like an openfaced sand-
    wich, are always falling on the soft side!" intro-
    ducing thus a somewhat political note into the
    Jewish proverb "Buttered bread always falls on
    its ponem." In his book "How to Get Along with
    People" (1824), Boerne wisely states: "Sow hearts
    and you will reap hearts."
    "A greater miracle than the tough vitality of
    the Jew in history is the preservation of Jew-hate"
    writes Bernard Auerbach in 1869. And the same
    author coined the phrase that became world-fam-
    ous: "Music alone speaks a universal language and
    needs no translation." ("On Heights" 1865).
    "Not the murdered is guilty but the victim"
    was the sensational, much discussed, legally con-
    troversial title of a collection of short stories by
    Franz Werfel (1920).
    "Tohuwabohu"this Hebrew word for "chaos"
    has crept into many languages and was also the
    title of a best seller novel by Sammy Groneman
    published in a chaotic Germany two years after
    the end of World War I.
    On th* Lighter Sid*
    ^JERE are a few Yiddish proverbs, short and
    pithy: "Ufe is the greatest bargain, you get
    it for nothing." "Better an honest patsch than a
    false kiss." "Do you know from where the often-
    quoted word "nebbich" comes? It stems from the
    Hebrew "nevuehim" and means "lost" or "mixed-
    up." Esroigim after Sukkoththis means either
    an offer that comes too late or obsolete news!
    "Hast du-halt; weyst du-schweig; kennst du-tu!"
    And last, but not least: "Hire a servant and do it
    yourself."
    All these quotations, proverbs and sayij
    have been culled from a vast storehouse of wise.-,
    filled with inexhaustible material. "If you have
    learning, you will never lose your way." And the
    Almighty said to King Solomon: "Choose that
    which thou dost prize above all else."
    Unhesitatingly, Solomon replied: "I would ask
    for Thy daughter. Wisdom, then all else will be
    mine." King Ptolemy of Egypt once asked a wise
    Jew: "Why is it that so few people strive after
    wisdom?" And the learned Jew answered: "Be-
    cause most people regard the acquisition of wealth
    as the chiefest goal; the wise, however, knows that
    riches alone cannot, bring happiness and that the
    fruits of wisdom are much more precious: for
    they alone bring joy to the heart and peace to the
    mind."
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    Page 8F
    Je*istHer Mian
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL
    THE BUI OF WE COUNTY
    at the 163rd Street Shopping Center
    n
    t
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    BEST WISHES FOR WE NEW YEAR .
    GOODY SHOES
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    FOR THOSE OF THE JEWISH FAITH
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    A Happy New Ttor to All Our Frienrfi and Patrons
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    Biseayne Electrie Co.
    ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS
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    W. Simttrtly Offer Our Vary Ce.d Wishes
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    HAPPY NEW YEAR TO THE JEWISH COMMUnTtT
    JAMES NELSON
    SEPTIC TANK CONTRACTOR
    Tmkf Cle..,*. Dr.in liaes |UM New ln,tallo.i,,
    170 N.W. 7RH, STREET, MUM,, FlORtOA gg ^
    Holiday Greetings to Our Friends
    Crossly Window Corporation
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    MIAMI (47). FLORIDA
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    twfc. Mm
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    Recent Events i
    DAVID BEN CUtrON
    ... ft* sfo*4 firm
    By MILTON FRIEDMAN
    Washington
    ISRAEL-American relations reached their lowest
    and highest points in 'he dramatic sequence
    of events since last Rosh Hashona.
    From these events, Israel has emerged more
    significantly than ever as a vital world force. He.-
    p o s i t i on is far
    stronger than it
    was last Rosh
    Hashona. Israel's
    brave thrust into
    Sinai last Au-
    tumn at first
    seemed to some
    a questionable
    risk. But it ha-
    paid great re-
    wards and in-
    creased the sta-
    ture of Israel on
    the world scene.
    Last Rosh
    Hashona found
    Israel facing an
    ever increasing
    Arab military
    build-up. Nasser's
    Egyptian army
    received shipload
    after shipload of
    Russian arms. A
    joint Egyptian-Jordanian-Syrian pact had been for-
    mulatedaimed entirely at Israel's destruction.
    Fedayeen raids had reached a spiteful new tempo.
    Israel was barred from the Gulf of Aqaba and the
    Suez CanaL The United States continued to refuse
    to sell arms to Israel while placing the onus for
    regional tension on the Jewish State.
    Then, on Oct. 29. Israel electrified the world.
    In a brilliant 100-hours campaign Israel occupied
    Gaza Strip and its fedayeen bases. She opened
    the Aqaba Gulf by plunging across Sinai to seize
    Sharm el Sheikh, coastal point which Egypt ex-
    ploited to maintain its unlawful blockade. Is-
    raelis, using mainly French arms, destroyed heavier
    Egyptian forces equipped with the highly-vaunted
    Russian weapons and MIG jets. An estimated $50,-
    000.000 in war booty was mixed.
    But the United States denounced Israel's act-
    ion without adequately considering the context in
    which it nad occurred. American policy makers
    rushed to the United Nations to defend the totter-
    ing dictatorship of Nasser. Despite Nasser's known
    record of pro-Communist collaboration, the United
    States sided with him against three friendly Free
    World nations Israel, Britain and France. The
    United States was bidding for the goodwill of the
    so-called "Arab-Asian" bloc.
    * Economic Aid Suspended
    THE United Nations demanded withdrawal of
    forces. Britain and France were forced to
    comply, largely because of Soviet intervention
    threats. But Israel was reluctant. What would be
    gained if the situation existing prior to the war was
    re-established?
    President Eisenhower took his case against
    Israel to the nation by a personal television ap-
    pearance. Secretary of State Dulles exerted all
    pressures that he could muster to coerce Israel in-
    to withdrawing its forces. Economic aid was sus-
    pended. The State Department refused to issue
    passports for Israel. The burden was placed on
    Israel while Nasser gloated.
    But Israeli Premier Ben Gurlon stood firm. He
    maintained, correctly but firmly, that Israel would
    U.S. Dipiom
    withdraw, hut only under asM l.
    blockade was not to be retS^
    of Aqaba. The Gaza Strip Z^ at H
    a commando bam. United Natilt^1
    move in. ns l0*ei,
    An extended an.- tense Am.
    in Washington resulted fuSS^
    ceptance of the Israeli posS *"**
    AbnriSte;KaG,da Mdr ^1
    DulTes mCt Ume 3nd ^ *
    Finally, an elaborate system of
    was evolved. Israel was to
    announce jtjj
    drawal. Immediately thereafter the rL
    would recognize Israels shipping ri iTJ,
    dorse the Israeli assumptions re ardn ^
    Strip. This went off as planned exceotTw
    many Israelis feared, the Gaza Strip 1/
    became the base of hostile commando
    Under policing of the United Nations
    Forces, the area nevertheless was soon til
    by Nasser authorities. But UNEF did i
    "dayeen activity to some degree. The n\_
    uation was far from ideal but not quite ij]
    before the Sinai campaign.
    Israel's hopes were actually realized, l_
    in the Gulf of Aqaba. Ships moved into the|
    port of Elath which enjoyed a hearteniaij
    U.S. tankers brought oil to Elath. Oil ade
    domestic needs began to flow through 11_
    line from Elath across the Negev. The'
    States stood by its pledge that it would a,
    ledge Israel's right to use the disputed
    waterway.
    Policy Had Collapsed
    THE United States resumed economic liij
    rael. Passport restrictions were lifted!
    opinion showed an increasing acceptance i
    Israeli position. U.S. military officers pnaj
    raeli performance in the Sinai campaign.
    problems became known across America]
    Gulf of Aqaba and Suez blockades against]
    were brought home to many Americans.
    In Washington, it was feared that Q|
    Eastern policy had collapsed to the degree |
    whole new approach was urgent. The I
    tion conceived the "Eisenhower Doctrine' ^
    the whole Near Eastern region against <
    ism. But Secretary Dulles took pains to |
    that the doctrine was not directly concert
    the Arab-Israel dispute.
    CM. NASSER
    . liHiiiaRUfcaweohip
    Continued on Ptr '3 F
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS
    TO ALL
    INSECT
    WUUE SCREEN
    CORP.
    1055 E. 16th Street
    HIALEAH. FLA.
    TO ALL ... A MOST
    HAW NEW TEAR
    MR. and MRS.
    SAM JOSEPHER and
    FAMILY
    of the
    MIAMI SEA
    *OOB COMPANY
    W N. W. Sth S*ro*
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    ELECTRONIC
    EQUIPMENT
    COMPLY
    2701 N.W. 42nd Street
    Phone NE 5-0421
    Miami. Fla.
    CHEMICAL SPECIALTIES
    tffs. America* C.taefrci
    ill .H3
    Private) Labels
    Agricultural Chemicals
    HIS VW. it* $.. m. M ut2
    I'll ntu
    1402 PONCE DE LEON I
    CORAL GABLES
    Phone HI fr7#
    tumwt ****
    SARA* itttftf'1
    * ** Q* 2L*
    RI0TBS es4 U*V\d\



    September 27, 1957
    _________+Jeist> FhridHan
    Traditional Woman of Valor
    AHD it was because the Jewish women-in con-
    i^e a feeling as though some unearthly crea- ^ their enslaved Oriental sistersfree-
    Iture
    leeui's -----"-------------------------------- nu -------- """ sistersiree-
    had presided at my birth and when I '*r?* P"1 ln Public assemblies and made the
    llolhe world, stabbed me with these word.: J**"* Wou, through music and dancing
    b.H be sensitive, you shall be great-hearted lJlM,8es 21-21). that they became the fighting pre-
    m ..'.. .hail see thines as few can see curs for women's rights, for which their non-
    Lble, you shall see things as few can see
    I j, %'w wm ... but you shall be a Jewess'
    f' my whole life is a continual bleeding."
    Ymrt'e Rachel Levin (1771-1833) who had
    !jSthe first literary salon in Berlin and who
    limagnet of intellectual life. In the literary
    Lents of the day, her salon played the lead-
    )e an() she was among the first to understand
    ognize the genius of Goethe. She dominated
    outh of the impressive and sensitive Heinrich
    who could never forget "her enigmatic,
    Bcbcly, sensible mystical smile."
    thel is a true representative of the Jewish
    J, who is the subject of many wonderful pas-
    , lithe Bible and Proverbs; and it is of grat
    tal-historical interest to trace woman's his-
    [down to its very rootthe
    , or "female" seen as part
    male. "She shall be called
    (woman i. because she
    [taken out of 'ish' (man)"
    sis 2:23) The English
    "woman" derived from
    I old English "wif man,"
    Is nothing else but the 'fe-
    I man.'
    knit the Lord said: 'It is not
    I that man >hould be aloner
    I make a h.'lpmate for
    (Genesis 2. 18). The He
    names i-hah." "naveth
    meaning "lady." "mis-
    ' show woman's important
    I in life. While other Orien-
    oples made slaves out of
    I and completely dominated
    1 Jewish laws always insist-
    In honoring women and in
    them the very aame
    Is is were granted to men.
    |is the mistress of her home for "In all that
    i saith unto thee, hearken unto her voice."
    isis 21, 12).
    Women Extolled in Proverb.
    i main theme of the immortal "Song of Songs"
    I is woman's moral purity; many allusions to
    (excellence are found in the Proverbs, such as
    rtuous woman is a crown to her husband."
    12. 4).
    |h his famous "Proverbs," King Solomon says:
    t light is not extinguished by night."
    |Hany proverbs of all nations praise woman's
    1 such as "A faithful wife becomes the truest
    pMderest friend." Proverbs (18, 22), it is said:
    IMo findeth a good wife, findeth a good thing
    [obtameth the favor of the Lord." And only
    'lines farther (Prov. 19, 4), we read: "Houses
    Inches are the inheritance of fathers; but a pru-
    |*ife is from the Lord." And again: "A woman
    lor who can find? For her price is far above
    (31, 10'.
    |ln Hebrew poetry, women are called "Daugh-
    |dZion" or Daughters of Jerusalem." Jewish
    is the story of woman's glorification; for
    Rebecca, It ,chel and Leah are all mothers
    nation
    [Iknes. who owes his life to his sister Miriam
    1 25, 26>. tells us how woman gladly sacri-
    Itaeir jewelry and their precious mirrors for
    lction of the "Tent of the Meeting."
    Jewish sisters had to struggle for centuries. Judges
    prophetesses, singers and rulers they were Wise'
    brave and patriotic they were, always ready to
    make important decisions and sacrifices to help
    their communities in distress.
    A wise woman made an end to. the rebellion of
    Sheba. son of Bichri (II Samuel 20-22). and it was
    clever Abigail who kept David from the guilt of
    shedding blood (I Samuel 25-25). Huldah, the fam-
    ous prophetess, was contemporary of Jeremiah; it
    was intrepid Judge Deborah who organized the
    campaign against Jabin. King of Canaan, and the
    captain of his host, Sisera, and saved Israel from
    the heavy yoke.
    From their early youth, Jewish boys are being
    taught to honor the woman
    their mother and later the
    woman their wife. There
    are many Talmudic sayings de-
    fining the position of the wo-
    man, such as:
    "A man must always honor
    his wife, for upon her depends
    the blessing in the home." (Ba-
    ba Metzia 59a).
    "A man should eat less than
    he can afford, but should honor
    his wife and children more than
    he can afford."
    And did not courageous
    Esther dare her royal husband's
    displeasure and brave death to
    save her people from wicked
    Haman's nefarious plans?
    Sarah Mother of Israel
    Miriam fondles Moses. Oil
    painting is by Philip Veitz
    (1793-1877).
    THE symbol of the ideal Jew-
    ish woman has always
    been Sarah, Abraham's faithful
    consort. In the Midrash we
    read of the cloud of glory that lingered over her
    home and of the perpetual light that brightened it
    on workdays. Sarah, kind-hearted and hospitable
    as Abraham, was called the "Mistress of the home
    of the four doors," because their house gave the
    wanderers welcome from every side. Sarah talked
    to her women-friends about the only and one God
    who was Lord of the heavens, thus faithfully help-
    ing her husband in his task to spread monotheism.
    Because Sarah raised her son Isaac in the love
    and fear of God, he readily consented to sacrifice
    his young life, for his mother never tired of teach-
    ing him the holiness of God's will. Isaac was deso-
    late when he lost her. Only years later was he com-
    forted when Rebecca proved to be as loving and
    good as Sarah. To her truly applies the verse
    "The woman's good deeds bring blessing upon her
    family." (Proverbs, 14, 1).
    But why did kind-hearted, wise Sarah insist
    that Abraham drive away Hagar and her son Ish-
    mael? It was neither jealousy nor mean pettiness,
    but there was an important reason: a wild and un-
    ruly boy was young Ishmael, spoiled and petted by
    his doting mother. So Sarah, bringing up Isaac
    as a God-fearing, disciplined young lad. was afraid
    of the danger of associating him with a wicked
    playmate with whom he would have passed his
    days and of whom he would have learnt only evil.
    Sarah lived 127 years, a beautiful and blame-
    less life. Her story is an inspiring lesson to every
    woman in Israel.
    [holiday greetings
    ">AMS STEAM
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    Rainbow Juice &
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    MOTN*SS
    CHARLES M. EWING
    J -
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    Carpenters' District Council
    2955 N.W. 17th AVENUE
    Miami 42, Florida '
    Telephone NE 5-5207
    JOHN L HICKEY
    President
    H. E. MORRIS
    Sec'y.-Treas.
    E. JIMMY JONES m
    Business Representative
    HAROLD E. LEWIS MARVIN L. HAMMACK
    LYMAN WILLIAMS ARTHUR E. STEWART
    Assistant Business Representatives
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    4
    Season's Greetings
    PAN AMERICAN
    Metal Products Co., Inc.
    i
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    and Children ffl
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    DeTARDO'S ITALIAN AMERICAN RESTAURANT
    Air Conditioned
    1211 71st STIEET, MIAMI IEACN
    PHONE UN 6-236*
    TO ALL GREETINGS FROM JULIUS SAPERO ^
    LAWRENCE LUMBER CO.
    F. H. A. FINANCING
    9300 N.W. 39th At.bu* Pkone MU 19571 '


    Peg* 10 F
    vknistftcrktian
    Frid
    ^J^PUmUrj,
    ...** A
    NEW YEAR GREETiNGS
    from the Home of Fine Shoes
    155 E. Flagler Sf.
    lie nation
    Miami
    Holiday Greetings to All...
    BONDED COLLECTION AGENCY
    1163 N.W. 3rd AVENUE
    MIAMI. FLORIDA
    HAPPY N t W r F A
    COLLINS GARAGE
    24-HOUR WRECKER AND MECHANICAL SERVICE
    6901 N.W. 7th Ave.-Pa. PL 42591 115 S.W. 2nd Sf.-Ph. FR 3-7308
    NEW YEAR GREETINGS
    VENETIAN SHORTWAY SEDAN SERVICE
    TWIN CITY TRANSIT
    14th STREET and SOUTH BEACH JITNEYS
    RADIO CABS AIR CONDITIONED SEDANS
    14th and Washington Phone FR 4-0100
    MW YEA* cntniNcs TO All
    Sutcliffe's Gifts and Toys
    7331 COLLINS AVENUE
    PHONE UN 6-6013
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
    OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
    Bonfire Restaurant
    HICKORY ROASTED FOOD OVER OPEN BON-FIRE
    1700 N. BAY CAUSEWAY
    79th Street Causeway
    Phone UN 5-3431
    Jock (Casey) Kaselman
    Son Winer
    To AH Greeting* .
    BERNARD!, HEAT0N
    & HILL
    MARRM.E and STONE
    CONTRACTORS
    3030 S.W. 38th Court
    Phone HI 3-8519
    "We Will He Pleased
    To Bid
    Your Next Project"
    Jacob Philadelphia- Magician
    1187
    iNE
    BT ERWIN FETTERS
    of the most interesting personalities in
    magic, the greatest magician in the world dur-
    the 18th century, the "King of Conjurors" as he
    was called, was Jacob Meyer Philadelphia. He
    waa the son of one of ih first Jewish families
    Milling in 1726 in Philadelphia and Provincial
    I'ennsvlvania.
    They were al! poor people from Galicia fleeing
    Russian persecution. The Meyer family settled in
    lirrmantown and on Aug. 14. 1735. a boy was born
    and given the name of Jacob. Little did his par-
    ents suspect that he would become famous and that
    his life would be filled with great adventures, so
    strange indeed, that it can be compared only with
    that of Joseph Balsamo, Count Alexander Cag-
    liostro.
    Young Jacob was given a fair education; he
    studied higher mathematics and the mechanic arts.
    From early childhood days on, he was interested in
    the fascinating art of magic and immersed himself
    in the study of the Cabballah and
    other books of Jewish mysticism.
    He passed his nights with quaint
    experiments and soon won fame.
    But how could one be a great ma-
    gician with the very- prosaic name
    of Jacob Meyer? So he dropped
    his prosaic surname and called
    himself after his native town, Jacob
    Philadelphia, or Philadelphus Phil-
    adelphia.
    The Duke of Cumberland, in-
    trigued by the insistent rumors of
    Philadelphia's erudition and mystic
    experiments, summoned him to his
    court in England, where he spent
    seven) years on the Duke's estate
    winning fame and fortune in his
    triple role as astrologer, alchemist
    and conjuror. After the Duke's
    death, he lectured before learned
    bodies and attracted world-wide at-
    tention. He had started his success-
    ful career by titling himself "Artist
    of Mathematics and Magic" and he
    must have been exceptionally successful for his
    name is honorably mentioned in a "docte English
    magazine" during 1756 and 1759.
    Extensive Traveller
    tNCOURAGED by his phenomenal success, Phil-
    adelphia began travelling all over Europe and
    Asia displaying his great skill and erudition before
    many emperors, kings and members of royal
    families.
    In 1771. he was in St. Petersburg (Russia),
    where Catherine n showed an unusual interest in
    him as an artist and as a man. In 1773. he showed
    his famous and much applauded ghost-conjuring
    trick (an illusion skillfully obtained by means of
    vapors) in Vienna and received 300 Thalers from
    the enchanted emperor for his performance.
    In January 1777. he was scheduled to lecture
    at the famous University of Goettingen, but refused
    to appear after the town had been placarded with
    anti-Semitic posters which ridiculed him as a
    performer of miracles and extraordinary feats of
    magic.
    *lng Frederick invited him to Berlin and
    greatly admired his skill But soon the rhrewd
    King of Prussia found the magician uncanny and
    even dangerous and expelled him from his court,
    so Philadelphia wandered through South Germany
    and rrance. came in touch with revolutionary ele-
    ments, but returned to Prussia in 1783. He was
    jranted a special audience by Frederick the Great
    and applied for position of inter*,,.
    trade promoter between pS,t''>
    States. He had worked out 'ri.?d,,ht
    though a layman's one, wherein IT* *
    far-sighted principle that "fro ?mbo*
    goods." He ked a tremend^s uT^
    roy.lt.es. but Frederick, famou8\^*S*,
    ed pars.mony and stinginess, flatl5 *H
    fer. The following year, the Ibi ^"H
    treaty anticipated by the ahr^pgj-j
    Story of the Portrait
    yyHILE in Nuremberg in 1778, h*,, J
    W. Bock, engraved his portrait. whkk
    hangs in the Museum of the Pennsylvania,
    ical Society. The small engraving shows i
    benign countenance, past middle age, cll
    A professional wig covers the head
    scriptlon is in the German of the early
    vania settlers and gives his name and date 7a
    At the bottom, it bears the i
    praise "In raris rarissimus"
    means that Philadelphia ta|
    of the greatest men of his I
    Date and place when and t_
    the engraving was made, |
    neath the portrait.
    There is no proof nor (
    that he married late and
    Judaism. Many quaint legend^
    ter around him in the last A
    of his adventurous life, bat all
    facts are shrouded in i
    Neither the year nor the
    his death ar? definitely knonl
    last lectures are said to bin)
    held in Switzerland in 1781.
    An Evaluation
    JACOB PHILADELPHIA
    Swirl
    PHILADELPHIA'S perfo:
    were simple and can he I
    in old magic books. He ,
    before gaping audiences "Tstj
    gic Inkstand." "Bacchus,"
    Ghosts," and other tricks _.
    acclaimed then and obsolete today. His faaef
    med more from his fascinating personality i
    mysticism with which he was shrewd
    surround himself. Above all, he was greathl
    ed by the stupidity and credulity of the 1
    masses, unschooled and unenlightened as they;
    in those days. Schiller, E. T. A. Hoffman,!
    and others mention Philadelphia and .
    great art as exciting, nerve-racking, the
    legerdemain.
    The Broadway Sc
    Continued from Peoe 6 F
    of their respective roles; yet they would hull
    miscast had they portrayed the roles befitting
    own backgrounds.
    Jew has played Catholic. Catholic *tj
    Protestant has played both, and talent h*|
    them all.
    Ask a Gentile actor what he thougateM
    Muni as Clarence Darrow or Joseph Schildttr
    Otto Frank or Judy Holiday as the sympatM
    tl telephone operator, and in Hansen's DWl
    or in Sardi's. he'll close his eyes with almosMj
    lous reverence and proclaim "the P*,t(*
    he won't add or think: "even though he's a J*
    HefMoy Gretfieas
    SIGHTSEEING
    GLASS BOTTOM BOAT
    COMRADE II
    Trip* Dell, 10:10 la ana 2:00 p.m.
    Chamber of Ceaimerco Decks
    5th aaa ALTON ROAD
    MIAMI BEACH
    Wieeo JE 1.3922
    r. 0.r Mm, frtnit m PatrMs.
    * MOST HAPPY NEW YlAt
    ***KUA'S
    CAR suon
    44 *t 1st STtEET
    HAPPY
    NEW YEAR

    Mr. and Mrs.
    JEROME H. WEINKLE
    Daughter*. Carolyn and Linda
    and Sou. Louis and Steven
    A Htppy an Year To All My Friends
    and Patrons
    Smn*I PfUaek
    REALTOR
    60S Lincoln Road
    Phono JEM 174
    A Heap? N
    rTi*
    Sol MegrfeU
    R EALTOH
    605 LINCOLN 90 |
    Phone IE *#*1
    Mw fear 6rlW u ""
    Mss, Frieod* *" r**|
    RIVIERA MW*H
    mm***0*
    res-.*'4**


    ><*
    T*
    r^v. Sepmb*r 27, 1957
    v-Jewisii norKhnn
    !Xt Year's Doings in Jerusalem
    Continued from Pae 7 F
    . Uy hectic visits to America, coincident
    Puurricane Audrey, that he gave me his ebul-
    |imnt of the plans in progress.
    pThis tenth Yom Atzma'ut, or Independence
    Iwbteh will inaugurate the festival years," he
    [-will be 'different.' for if will only be the
    ' e io what we might call the Sh'nath Atz-
    [nd-pendencc year. The parades which arc
    hied to be held in consecutive order on April
    [Jerusalem. Haifa and Tel Aviv will be diverse
    Lacier. Taken together, they will be like tin
    W to the themes of an opera. One will high-
    [israel's cultural and scientific achievements:
    will have a military motif; and the third
    jre-, tiv holiday temper. The Prime Min
    -and probably thousands of visitors and I-
    lin his wake-will attend all three.
    Miming with that day," he continued, "we
    Ibe bringing ihe world to Israel, as a visitor,
    ler that we may bring Isracfao the world."
    bringing "the world" to Israel, when transla-
    te practical terms, means attracting a min-
    Icf 100.000 visitors from all fields of endeavor
    om many countries. The largest number of
    -sin any previous year has '-----1 jflilUt iThr
    fc-that those I0OO00 will I
    r-pwp!e who \cill come to.^Oj fif*"
    land not merely to perform airVHrfluty
    hes about scheduling conferences, congresses
    Tours have already been mounting "by the
    |tligious groups. Already one American cor-
    |on. a nationally-known firm that annually
    OiliMS to it- top-performing distributors,
    tiering a ship for approximately 500 dealers
    I visit Israel as the guests of the company.
    Movements Afoot
    OR Jewish organizations such as the World
    Irtish ('(ingrcs-. the B*nai B'rith and Hadas-
    i already contemplating conventions in Is-
    IOthersthe American Jewish Congress and
    pen's Division and the Pioneer Women, for
    Meare moving ahead to organize pilgrim-
    j Synagogues large and small in every land
    king encouraged to sponsor at least one min-
    Yb
    o build in peace, we were driven
    ]M sell-defense; and we louqht so well
    " world is forqettinq whatand how
    1 have built."
    Pnme Minister Ben Gurion will ciiend each
    of three parades in Jerusalem, Haifa end Tel
    Aviv Apr. 24 of new Hebrew Year. Parades,
    symbolizing Israeli achievement, are part of
    Tenth Anniversary cebbrcSon. Here Ben
    Gunon speaks with Dr. Joseph J. Schwartz, of
    Israel Bond Organization, during lalter's re-
    cent visit to Jewish Stale.
    van of iravl'er The response here. Weisgs3 <].
    closed, has been "overwhelming."
    Supplementing the stream of idea- i wing
    from the planners, thousands of suggestions have
    been pouring in from well-wishers around the
    globe. There is a movement afoul, for example, to
    celebrate 10.000 Bar Mitzvah ceremonies in Israel.
    In this same area, some propose to substitute a trip
    to Israel for the usual gifts and parties for the Bar
    Mitzvah boys and the Bas Mitzvah girls. Another
    project would stimulate the formation of delega-
    tions from every city and town bearing a Biblical
    name. This summer the AJCongress' Women's
    Division carried out a program that can be readily
    adapted or duplicated next year by schools, col-
    leges and interested groups anywhere: granting
    study-vacation scholarships in Israel to talented
    college students.
    The foregoing illustrates only half the aim of
    the planners; the other halfto bring Israel to the
    worldis a full-sea'? enterprise in itself. The
    idea of Israel and the meaning of Jewish history
    cannot be projected by staging a county fair or by
    stringing up colored lanterns and bright bunting.
    For the festival to fulfil its purpose, the 100,000
    visitors must leave the country with a fresh and
    balanced understanding of Israel's purpose.
    Exhibits, exhibits by the dozen, will be just
    one means of fostering this desired understaning.
    The most Ambitions exhibition, to be hold in Je-
    rusalem for about six months, will dramatize Is-
    rael's accomplishments in every major field of ac-
    tivity: agriculture, education, commerce and in-
    dustry, the arts, science. A second national ex-
    hibition, "Land of the Bible." will spread out over
    virtually the entire country. Israel's archeologists
    are already in the field preparing the individual
    sites.
    Some Stellar Attractions
    A PART from these large-scale productions, there
    will be scores of shows featuring the best
    work not only of Israel's artists but also of the
    world's leading talents. In the fiold of music, we
    can expect a rich and variegated series of concerts
    by Israeli orchestras and individual instrumental-
    ists and vocalists, as well as by world-famous or-
    Continued on Pago IS F
    pBSON BROTHERS
    1*1 CRATE CO.
    HWTTb^ viOITAIll
    WIMN
    1 "* 2lt Terrace
    [2? ^ THEIR
    ' *W) PATRONS
    V NEW YEAR
    ' $,wi" c*i,
    8ftii||
    GREETINGS
    from fft
    RED
    BARN
    CCUB

    Northwest 7fth Street
    and 37th Avenue
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL
    Compliment* oi
    Admiral Jalousie
    A Awning Co.
    712 NX. 128th Street
    Phone PL 8-7055
    North Miami
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS
    Albrizio
    Hate Designed lor You
    Your Material or Ours
    Graylnn Hotel
    132 SSL First Avenue
    Phone FR 4-5179
    Miami. Fla.
    Page 11 F
    THE PERSONNEL OF
    WEINKLES
    Liquor Stores
    WISHES EVERYONE
    A Most Happy New Year
    tstab'.ished 1935
    15 STORES SERVING SOUTH FLORIDA
    Greetings To All
    Skagseth
    Your Friendly Stationery Stores
    M'AMI MIAMI BEACH
    3977 N.W. 24lh St.-Ph. NS r-5381 fr6SC i 3r Md*V ;H*M IQSl
    46 S.E. 1st Sr.-1ti: PR 1-4611 -------
    7936 N.E. 2nd Ave.-Pli. PI 8-0511'

    NEW YORK DELICATESSEN
    AND RESTAURANT
    BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    SEASON'S GREETINGS
    12th Av<. Community Market
    WE NEVER CLOSE
    CORNER 12ih AVENUE and 7ih STREET, N.W. MIAMI. FLA.
    A Happy New rear fo All Our Patrons and friends
    TWIN CITY GLASS COMPANY
    515 WEST AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
    Morton Weiss Phane JE 8-6141 Andrew Moadcl
    Best Wishes to All for a Happy New Year
    Beach Electric Motor Repairs
    812 5th Street IE 8-397*
    Uest Wishes for the Holiday Season
    FONDA TERRAZZO COMPANY
    TERRAZ10 FOR THE FLOOR BEAUTIFUL
    Phone Wl 71941
    15771 West Dixie Highway
    GREETINGS
    TO OUR MANY FRIENDS IN MIAMI,
    MIAMI BtACH AN* THROUGHOUT
    All Of SOUTH flOHIDA OH
    R0SN HASHOMA
    HILL YORK
    Air Conditioning and Refrigeration
    1225 S.W. Sth STRUT, MIAMI
    FR 1-1411
    njaaj
    BBBBBBBBBBBBBai


    Page 12 F
    *Jmt*tkrkHaai
    =SSL5**b*27
    Best Wishes from
    CLAUGHTON THEATRES
    CKCIE NORMANDY TRAIL
    NEW HOLLYWOOD THEATRE, Hollywood
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    TARAK DISTRIBUTING, Inc.
    3401 M.W. 36th STRUT PHOMI NE 5-2531 MIAMI, FLORIDA
    HAPPY NEW YEAR
    from
    THE SEYBOLO BUILDING
    36 N.E. 1st STREET, MIAMI, FLORIDA
    Air Conditioned Offices New Availablt
    Asphalt Till Floors Flourescent Fixtures
    Call
    THE KEYES COMPANY
    REAITORS-HI 3-3593 or FR 4-7922
    SEASON'S GREETINGS TO All OUR WINDS AND PATRONS
    MR. and MRS. MURRAY SCHWARTZMAN
    and Family
    REALTOR
    528 Lincoln Road Phone JE 1-0569
    TO ALL MY FRIENDS AND ACQUAINTANCES
    fefe SEASONS GREETINGS
    GEORGE PFAFFENDORF
    ! i*iaei MmMgar, totcker W.rkawa aad Allied Trades Lotel #44$,
    I A.F.I. C.I.O.
    1119 W. Flagler Street
    MIAMI
    BENNETT OPTICAL SERVICE
    Prescriptions Filled
    Broken Franes & Lenses Duplicated
    "Acousticon Hearing Aids" R. A. Bennett Owner
    918 E. 25th St (79th))
    Phone TU 7-5941
    Hialeah. Ha.
    Hillcraft Engraving. Inc.
    commercial hotel social
    FT* K. S.och.1 immtt I. Hill tmMpk I. Crytth KM Ajf,
    Wedding Invitations Bar Mitivah Invitations
    Social Stationery
    t hianufactorors of
    ~ Genuine Steel Die Eniravtd St at ionery
    W- 116 n.e. 6th street
    Ph-na r-R 3-4*34
    Challenge to Our Public Schools
    Continued from PaflO 1 F
    ence in religious belief in which the public school
    and the home, the two focal points of his life, are
    arrayed in opposition. The mother of a child at-
    tending public school in a Chicago suburb during
    the 1957 Christmas season wrote to the AJCongress:
    The Christmas festivities In his room. ml moM
    noUbt) the stortes of the birth of Christ illsturb-
    ,.,l iv <.n greatly. He was quite oonfuned. ply-
    ing us wlih question" untl listening eaferly to all
    mention of "hrlst. either on TV or In general con-
    veranttons tie finally arrived at his own com-
    uromlae with the statement: "Nobody really
    knows. MaytM It's true and maybe It Isn't. Tou
    don't reallv know." This to me exhibited a slight
    partiality to believing his teacherwhose word la
    law in a childrather than his parent*.
    Attempts have been made to represent Christ-
    mas as a folk holiday in which all may join equally
    without sectarian difference. The various customs
    of the holiday, such as carols and Christmas trees,
    are regarded as "beautiful" or "pleasant" in them-
    selves. However, a change in nomenclature makes
    little difference in matters of conscience. When
    a Jewish child in a suburban Long Island school
    last Christmas objected to singing Christological
    carols, she was told by her teacher that she ought
    to participate because the carols were not "relig-
    ion" but "art." This change in terminology made
    little difference both to the child who "felt funny"
    when finally persuaded to participate and to her
    parents who felt that her rights had been infringed.
    Many of those who have been most insistent
    upon retaining the entrenched position of Christ-
    mas in the schools have also done the most to dis-
    pel any notion that it can be celebrated as a neu-
    tral, religiously bland observance, without dog-
    matic or traditional reference. Several Catholic
    diocesan papers published the following editorial
    during the 1955 Christmas season:
    Wi believe that the time has come for Christmas
    In the public school system and ever> where else
    to declare In outright fashion that the United
    States by culture, tradition and full rlfht li a
    Christian country and must not be allowed to
    ohanca,
    For that reason Christmas In schools must be
    kept a distinctly Christian feast with a Christian
    purpose. It should not be diluted with Chanuka
    or with religiosity generally. The Christmas
    carol, the Christmas story, the Christian worship
    at Christmas must be preserved and given a cher-
    ished place In our public life and therefore la
    our public schools.
    Place of Chanuka
    THESE papers need not have been so exercised.
    The joint Christmas-Chanuka celebrations have
    had results almost uniformly unsuccessful and dis-
    mal. Even when well-intentioned, the efforts to in-
    sinuate Chanuka into the schools usually result in
    a rather lame competition of an improvised Cha-
    nuka menorah on the one hand with the whole
    well-publicized panoply of Christmas on the other.
    As presented in the public schools generally by a
    faculty that itself has no grasp of the meaning of
    the holiday or of its place in Jewish religious life,
    Chanuka becomes a kind of appendage to Christ-
    mas or a self-conscious exercise in intergroup re-
    lations rather than a distinctive unique religious
    experience in its own right. The Maccabbees are
    given no chance of ranking with the Christ child,
    and indeed, with the treatment accorded in the
    schools, in terms of the emotions of the child, they
    rarely come in ahead of Rudolph the Red-Nosed
    Reindeer.
    The American Jewish Congress recognizes that
    it may be too much to expect that public school
    authorities soon will be persuaded to forego all
    participation in Christmas or even Easter obser-
    vances. It can and ought to be demanded, how-
    ever, that the more egregiously sectarian practices
    be avoided.

    "When subjected to such pressures,
    children often find it easier to submit I
    resist It is not surprising, therefore, i
    many Jewish children seek n
    produce the appearance of cooperation a]
    school celebration without at the sams]
    genuinely participating in violation oil
    religious convictions.
    A MONO the most common devices empl
    use the public schools for religious |
    is the so-called released time program. I'm
    system, a portion of the regular school A*f\
    aside for religious instruction. Since toe I
    decision by U.S. Supreme Court in IMS. I
    time classes generally are considered legal I
    conducted away from the school prenisei t
    ever, the indispensable feature af the i
    program is that it is enforced by public)
    authority; an absence from a religious i
    truancy to be disciplined and excused i
    absence from any ordinary public school i
    The released time program imposes 11
    of religious segregation no less real than r"
    segregation imposed upon Negroes in the I
    For more than 15 years the adverse effedt
    separation of children in the school roosj
    religious lines has been a matter of
    authoritative criticism. A prominent
    educator has written: "When proceduretol,
    the youngsters for their religion' classes4
    gates Americans as Catholics. Lutherattj
    Protestants, Jews, cultists, smaller
    churchgoing pupils, a consciousness of
    cleavage is inevitable and it is baneful
    Describing the operations of released I
    es in the South, one observer wrote:
    There are established period*.*{?%]
    study in all the stomonUrysM y
    community maintains a ""};-L
    marlly because of the tremendous pr*
    Continued on Past 14 F
    0 t f I T I N 6 S
    J. AND W. PLUMBING
    SERVICE, INC.
    1222 M.W. l*ft STRUT
    Fboae M S-441S
    Tost Joy
    "***. FLOtttA
    NEW YEAR GREETINGS
    C. I. KISTLER
    COMPANY
    *aPOHT BUILDING
    MIAMI. PLOHIDA
    Ptoao PR 4 5154
    .I*2!*T *****
    iiiitiiiii
    All Work Rswonllin
    Factory Soocittcotiens
    MIAMI JACK
    SfltYKE
    TsirtiiaMMs ts
    TRRAtJUC JACKS, StlAM JOXNVS
    10 S.W. SMh AVTMM
    n au ... omctjncs
    A I M AUTO StlVICE
    SiRVXI STATION
    iyatetoa -ifwe RssiR i
    *? N.W. HO. RIVER OttYI
    'FR0.OJ77
    ' Oafere T se Row 4Wf
    TO AU .
    MffTMnM
    CusM
    1140 If. MIAMI AV
    Wrtf **
    A HAfff ***
    riA.rU
    DiArWKO^
    IROOoA*****
    ISM I* '**-


    ,, September 27, 19S7
    *Je> it Fieri Jinn
    ent Events in U.S. Diplomacy
    ruHnutd from Paee I F tv. m___ .
    Continued from Pees I F
    [ faith at a U.S. air base in Saudi Arabia.
    I stud's openly proclaimed hostility toward
    Ftse United States promised him arms, in-
    yjet planes.
    jjaly because of alarm over the Egyptian-
    ftjis with the Kremlin, the Arab states mov-
    | the United States, embracing the Eisen-
    [Doctrine. Egypt and Syria denounced the
    j and supported Russia. They became in-
    jK isolated.
    joble loomed in Jordan. Nasser supporters
    to bring that kingdom under total domina-
    J the Egyptian-Syrian camp. But anti-Nasser
    Bls won out The regime of King Hussein
    yarded by Washington despite its continued
    ations of hostility toward Israel. The Uni-
    ties agreed to give Jordan a considerable
    [ of military equipment. At the same time.
    towed under the Eisenhower Doctrine to
    ril.
    net saw the spectacle of American arms be-
    jn free to four hostile Arab nations: Jor-
    Uli Arabia. Iraq, and Lebanon. The United
    [still refused even to sell arms to Israel.
    Ihile. Russia provided weapons in a continu-
    um to Eg) pi and Syria.
    Troubled W
    and Israel had 'become firm sSfci
    ! Israeli Air Force was now by far the best
    I Sear East Its French Mystere jets had
    I the skies of MIG's during the short Sinai
    te Israeli Army had been strengthened con-
    lly by captured Egyptian tanks and guns.
    Jewish Community Rises Again
    Continued from Pag* 3 F
    %i, not only for the Jews of Greece, but for
    iwrywhere.
    bat JDC has done on behalf of the Jews in
    [-largely with funds provided through the
    nis of the United Jewish Appealis only
    detail in the gigantic canvas of post war
    Throughout Western Europe, JDC has
    I to rebuild community institutions, to es-
    new and independent welfare agencies, to
    nmunities to stand on their own feet.
    pb Rosh Hashona since the war has focused
    tention of world Jewry on new problems.
    ML At the height of the DP era, we all
    vicariously in the hundreds of services con-
    Jin Germany, Austria and Italy. Hundreds
    ands of men, women and children had to
    1 to find new homes; other thousands were
    ns, vocational training and other econom-
    tetance to help thejn integrate into the eco-
    lol the countries in which they took up their
    kcs.
    pRosh Hashona, our thoughts turn to the
    "(North Africa, and to those who have come
    [the past year from Hungary, from Egypt,
    Tland and other areas.
    I over the world in the 43 Rosh Hashonas
    |hve passed since the founding of the Joint
    Then Committee, the beginning of each
    |r has brought with it the promise that for
    "I in need the coming year would be bet-
    s year too, for the hundreds of Jewish ref-
    K>m Hungary and from Egypt who are still
    upon JDC for assistance, the New Year
    IN* that before the year has ended, they
    will have found peace and a decent future.
    For 43 years JDC's history has reflected all of
    the catastrophies and distasters which have befall-
    en the Jews of the world. It was against this back-
    ground that the message which Charles H. Jordan,
    the JDC director-general for overseas operations,
    sent to the Jews of Volos, took on additional sig-
    nificance. The message was a high point of the
    ceremonies inaugurating the low rental housing
    project in Volos.
    This Rosh Hashona. as we each of us add up
    the balance sheet of the year just passed, we can
    add the word "Volos." And we can add it to the
    positive side of the ledgerfor in Volos a Jewish
    community has been saved.
    With This Ring...'
    Continued from Page 5 F
    of King Jerobeam II (790 749 B.C.E.) found at Mag-
    gidi. It was the seal of Shammai, the King's Min-
    ister of State. It is of jasper and bears the finely
    engraved figure of a lion. The form is oval and
    the seal measures 3.7 by 2.7 cm.
    The word "ring" occurs in Exodus XXX:22
    where it tells of the offerings of the people of Is-
    rael in the desert; in Numbers XXX:50 and in
    Canticles V:14 where it possibly might be rendered
    with "rods."
    From the earliest times on the ring, of what-
    ever material, has always been a symbol of life
    to which great importance has been attached from
    cradle to grave.
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    Page 13F
    "" '*>

    tEgZ&r1*deve,opment SK JXZ
    Russia continued fish.ng troubled waters
    Three Russian submarines arrived in Eevot rZ
    S Fora,thlseWa,Chhed *-* clre
    . i u *"* submar'n wel-e a threat not onlv
    asa,o, otcer free natins s* the
    U.S. Sixth Fleet. Soviet naval penetration of he
    tyJSSS- by EgyPt and S*ria' became a sub
    ject of Washington concern.
    More and more, Washington realized that the
    ^rlnHW yn"- BUt the ,her Ar8b toteS, the
    nendly ones, retained their bitterly hostile atti-
    ude toward Israel. However, the Arab front had
    been split. Pakistan, a Moslem nation opposed pre-
    Vlousy ,0 Israel's existence, accepted a premise
    solution WaS t0 SUy a"d Urged Steps t0 a
    0
    The Arab refugee problem was viewed more
    seriously in Washington as a source of infection
    that must be removed. As efforts moved forward
    to shield the area as a whole against Russia, a de-
    sire emerged in Washington to make bolder new
    opproaches to a solution of internal regional strife.
    Israel-American relations by late summer were
    almost unbelievably better than during the tense
    days of winter. The two countries had reached
    mutual understanding over a wide area. Some
    problems remained. But Israel's strength and mil-
    itancy had won for her respect and status to a
    degree unthinkable before the Sinai campaign.
    A Happy New Year
    To All Oar
    Friends and
    Patrons
    a *>] L
    CO.
    1 1 '.'
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    ..
    1

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    Makers ef
    ABC JALOUSIE WINDOWS JALOUSIE DOORS SLIDING CLASS DOORS
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    AWNING WINDOWS
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    Phone Wilson 7-2676
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    ADRIAN THAL
    FURRIERS
    ALBERT HERMAN, Manager
    716 LINCOLN ROAD
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    G & II Auto Service
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    PHONE HI 4-2421 RONNIE THALER
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL
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    REALTORS
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    HIALEAH
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    Mr. and Mrs. Beck
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    i
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    665 S.W. 8th Street
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    Phone FR 9-4576


    Page 14F
    vJmlstncrkMan
    =^5**.i

    1!
    EXTENDING TO YOU
    T3iwn row n*
    IN EVERY WAY
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    Central Bank & Trust Co.
    N.W. 36th STREET AT 13th AVENUE
    "BANK WHtKl YOU CAN BORROW"
    Member Metal Deposit Insurance Coroorefion

    %'
    A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
    To All Our Tenants and Friends
    CONGRESS BLDG.
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO
    ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
    Louis F. Gillingham
    Guild Opticians
    1680 MERIDIAN AVENUE
    Phone IE 1-9703
    MIAMI BEACH
    To All Best Wishes for a HAPPY NfW YIAR
    Abbey-Starr Photographers
    273S CORAl WAY, MIAMI PHONE HI 6 2283
    PHONE PI 1-6021 10-ITear Guarantee Cooling Product
    PEARCE ROOFING ROOF COATING CO., INC.
    Repairs Guaranteed
    ROOFS OF All TYPES HOT OR COID PROCESS
    commercial Roof Maintenance Residential
    502 N.W. 54th STREET MIAM, r,0|,|0A
    GREETINGS
    Lehnhard-Burgess Corporation
    Insurance Ad'iusters
    ALL MM fO* THE COMPANIES
    2828 Blscayne Blvd. Pb_ ra 9.47Q8
    SIASONS GREETINGS
    I MIAMI BEACH TRANSFER & STORAGE CO. .
    J. F. Davldsen, Owner
    1426 ALTON ROAD, MIAMI BEACH
    PHONE JE 4-2011
    Sincere Withes to All Jewry far M.st Happy New Veor
    SCHIFF'S MARKET
    MR. and MRS. J. SCHIFF
    1600 Lenox Avenue. Miami Beach Phone JE 1.3751
    The Dedication of a de Rothschild
    By S. SINGiRMAN World Zionist Organization from lh
    ,N whatever countries the tfothschi.ds lived, their ^l^t"^ gj a *J
    1 name has always been closely associated with expressing his profound I? 1 ^ "3
    Jewish life and Jewish aspirations. the Government of Israel wf ,he 9t^tl
    James Armand de Rothschild, son of Edmond death o( hjs fa,her *ho said: SuJ
    de Rothschild of Paris, settled in London. England. Rothschild, I do not know 7 "" *****
    In true and generous Rothschild tradition, ho con- ^hom ,e af(airs any jew ^
    tinued his fathers persistent affiliation with Jew- nMrt who knew $o .*'*? close
    ish causes and his many benefactions for the Holy for Israe, ,nd wh him '*hat was htHfl
    Land taking over the presidency of the PICO such deep ,ove fm ** d'd so nU(h ^]
    (Palestine Jewish Colonization Organization) with pirst World War he wa ellare Dun,
    !( ililnfl :ii 1 1 ,(n -nil, ...... .11 ,_ n.v..~.*v.> o- .- .-/ >...
    its widespread agricultural enterprises in Israel,
    for which his father had helped lay the foundation.
    James Armand had inherited considerable
    wealth from his father and a great-aunt. But he
    was much more than the well-known race horse
    owner: he was actively interested in literature and
    the arts. In 1906. Trinity College, Cambridge, pub-
    lished his book "Shakespeare and His Day." Later
    James became co-editor of a philological publica-
    tion "A Miscellany of Studies in Romance Langu-
    ages" (1932).
    He went through World War I
    with the British Forces seeing ac-
    tive duty in Franco and Palestine
    and winning the Distinguished
    Conduct Medal. Like his father,
    he was deeply interested in the
    problems of the Holy Land and
    made an extensive automobile tour .
    of it in 1921.
    A liberal member of Fa rim
    ment from 1929 to 1945. he spoke
    in December 1942, with a deep
    emotion, which he did not conceal,
    to a hushed, awed House of Com-
    mons about the cruel sufferings of
    the Jewish victims of Nazi perse-
    cution. In 1943. he served as
    Joint Parliamentary Secretary of
    the British Ministry of Supply.
    Some Added Statistics
    pROM 1941 to 1944. ho was a trus-
    tee of the gigantic Wallace
    Collection, one of the world's most
    valuable art collections. It had
    been amassed by Sir Richard Wal-
    lace and is housed now at Herford House, Lon-
    don, under government supervision James was
    well prepared for such trusteeship being the co-
    owner, together with his first wife Thcrose, of one
    <>f the largest collections of gold and silver objects
    I imoges enamels and ivories of rare workmanship
    and highest artistry,
    This unique collection, of which a proftuab
    Uustrated catalogue can be wen in the Now York
    Public Library, Art Division, -hows hundreds of
    antique gold and tilver tankards chalices richly
    Uus cups, plaqqes and other objects
    beauty. Therese had inherited this coll-so-
    her father ( hades de Rothschild, a dis-
    cerning collector for manj years who, at his death
    in 1866 had bequeathed II to his rive daughters
    James Armand da Rothschild died in London
    "'] M',v7 l178 He left an estate
    """' ''""""i pounds (approximately $32-
    .XJO.OOO.. the largest estate left in England
    since a decade. Inheritance taxes amounted to T-
    million pounds
    -wJV'V"' he h?a-UM'" null varying from
    3.000 to 10.0(10 pounds to tho Jewish Board of
    Guardians and to various Jewish hospitals He also
    designated his widow to be president of the Pal-
    estine Jewish Colonization Organization.
    Among the hundreds of roofages of condolence
    pouring in from tho Jewish Agency, from the
    of the Jewish Legion who fought for 1..
    of the Land of Israel.
    Zionism Dear to Him
    f
    JAMES f> ROTHSCHtlD
    . ."anew M muck"
    '^S a member of Parliament he w hj*
    s.nnHiC0d fr h'S C standing in every debate in which he
    during the Mandatory period. By his
    Jewish people has lost a groat son, a sci^
    illustrious family, and Israel has lost, JJ
    devoted friend The Jewisfc.
    will not forget him."
    James de Rothschild1!.
    was at all times raised ia ]
    protest against the perse
    his Jewish brethren. Zio,
    always dear to his hgan j_
    ,name will forever be linfe]
    the author of'the Bailoutf
    tion. A president of the _
    Blind Society, he was at all
    generous and always gave L
    sums without any publicity.]
    was kindly by nature,
    compassionate. His deai ]
    deeply mourned by Jewry 1
    the world.
    And the words of the I
    come to mind: "He hath 1
    he hath given to the ne
    righteousness endureth
    and his horn shall be
    glory." (Psalm 112:19).
    This was the eulogy
    Rabbi Hertz dedicated to his father
    the same words are true for the son.
    Challenge to Schc
    Continued from Page 12 F
    f Hi.' 1 j
    i. 11 i .1 \.
    11. nil doi
    bottei en *
    1
    11 I>'il Ki II ldi-r It'a 11 Tin 1 'In
    her "'l<> ii
    It < lot ]
    I. 1 vf Iclen
    In an effort to evaluate the practical!
    tho released time program in New York,
    number of affidavits were filed l>y Jcwi-haa
    Jewish students and by their parents. 1
    among the affidavits was the following froij
    ish student in a Brooklyn public school:
    Wh.-ri Hi- i.l. ...-.a tiro. I
    left behind. The reli iwfl hlMreii -
    boat my lielnii Jewlli and
    nun h aware of tbi fu.-i Dial I 'l',l|,':|,
    with them. 1 endun 1 h eai *> "''
    an.I decided I would lik*- I" e aWS S
    othera to the ehun h center ratbei i"-"1
    Continued on Page 1SF
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL |
    JACK'S OUTBOARD
    MOTORS, INC.
    NEW and USED BOATS
    MOTORS and TRAILERS
    280 N.W. 79th Street
    Phone PL 7-7000
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    APARTMENTS
    7C19 Abbott Ave. Miami Beach
    ' 4 tVsaf Neppy New Y-r
    "WWW QUALITY AMD MfCff AUfT"
    *utkia Interior Decanters
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    omimos TO *u
    mm v
    SIGN *W
    Bulletin Boards,
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    1107 N. Miami A*|
    FR 1-0291
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    Expart Pep 13480 W.W*Hwr-
    No. Miami.. n*
    Niqh. PL *


    T>
    September 27, 1957
    *Jewistitk>r*ff(M
    illenge to Our Public Schools
    Page 15 F
    Conitnoed from Pa 14 P
    ,,,., mvwH '" *'"'h h;iniM.meni. I asked
    '", mother ii.TmlwIon to participate In the re-
    !. d lime program anil to accompHny my Cnth-
    ,maten to their religious center, but Hhe
    ',','i.',. ii ... As a result of argument* about
    '" ;i.l.iiili.i|>atlon In released time, my i,fS railed me such names as "fhrlst-kMl. r '
    ,nJ dt.i> Jew.
    Bible Reading in Classrooms
    many persons, Bible reading in the schools
    seems at first sight not only unobjectionable
    Lffirmatively desirable. The Bible', it is argued,
    her ail commonly thought to be the foundation
    American public school system and a tradi-
    ! and indispensable part of the educational
    icultural scene. The Old Testament especially
    (eluded among the sacred canon of all Western
    L ,nd differences between the various trans
    L, such as the Protestant King James and the
    Lie Douay versions, are so alightsome school
    Ijils contendas to be without significance. In
    event it is argued, both the New and CMd Tes-
    inls are among the greatest works of literature
    R'estern world possesses and ought to be read
    heir intrinsic literary, merit by everyone re-
    less of his religious convictions.
    atk-ing though these arguments may be, they
    .lily contradicted in the clasy%oj.w in Ud,
    pible is not regarded as merely another literary
    rpiece to be equated with Shakespeare,
    le or Milton, nor, given the" subjective religious
    ision of most faculty members and students,
    [ever likely to be so regarded. The Bible, after
    s Revealed Truth. It is, moreover, an entirety
    [< such, the whole of it is received wiUi the
    ration and awe due a work held to be sacred
    |lmost every religious group that we encounter.
    Difficulties Encountered
    E version of the Bible most often read and dis-
    I Iributed in the schools is the King James or
    lestant version. For Catholics, however, this
    ion of the Bible is proscribed under pain of sin.
    Iitholic under ordinary circumstances may own
    I its text. As recently as 1956, the commun-
    ICliffside Park. N.J., was faced with a tense
    religious situation because the parents of the
    lolk children in the public schools protested
    iquirement that their children listen to read-
    | out of the Protestant version of the Bible.
    : is, therefore, no answer tor public school
    ritives to say that the difference between
    ) versions of the Bible are minor and incon-
    o*l. It is not for any school board or lor
    | representative of the secular state to pass
    wit upon religious differences or to indicate
    e*lherents of religious creeds that feelings
    ' over doctrinal matters are in fact
    [Difficulties encountered by Jewish children
    l not only from the psychological stress to
    they are inevitably subjected but from the
    Wm physical antagonisms and -hatreds that
    ly arc engendered by classroom New Tes-
    P recitation.
    Ihthe summer of 1956 the mother of a Jewish
    idik8 PUbl'C SCh0l in Long ,s,and re'
    " that following classroom reading of the New
    nent her son had become embroiled in a
    1.11 ,heo,0ical controversy. Contrary to
    tw!v ,hc New T^tament. he insisted
    w God has ,,0 name." His Christian class-
    fnaiedtely responded that the Biblical pas-
    L j' had read "Proves that our Lord is
    *^ChnM.. Among chjldren as among
    IwuJ1mUS Sputes may insPire violence and
    P!^on these children was resolved,
    "hoo.0gronundh: ?* !" *** n the "*
    argument with two non-Jcwish chij^n'who crit-
    icized her for not believing as th->v did i. .ii
    anything to be done abot/th" eristic reSC
    coHMdered as desirable, even though 7 beS
    Testament, to Jewish children?"
    .ho ACa"adian rabbi to a public address described
    unahll UP" PUb'iC Seh001 child who wer"
    unable to accept the "standardized creed" profe"
    SJnan KrS: "DMenS f bi,ter P'e fr he!p and
    3*2 t rme ,0 me frm Jcwish thers
    with shocking descriptions of the effect on thelr
    children of this religious instruction. For. examp
    a little Jewish g,rl told her mother, We Jews are
    Jt.'s^r*-- -*-i.
    Ntod for Community Action
    yHE practices in the public schools that give rise
    to the incidents described here are not only
    deplorable^ In most instances, they are unlawful
    ! < UliJSF' howevcr- even explicit recognition
    of the Ulegality of their acts will not prevent local
    I of education and local school administra-
    tors from y.eld.ng to aggressive sectarian agencies
    who incessantly demand entry into public educa-
    tion.
    Local school officials, both lay and profes-
    sional, are generally persons of good will who
    would not knowingly hurt any child committed to
    their care. Unfortunately, they are frequently un-
    able to resist intensive sectarian pressures.
    Often, too, they are completely unaware of the
    harm caused to children of the Jewish and other
    minority faiths by sectarian intrusions. Under
    such circumstances it is increasingly plain that
    effective defense of the sschools and the protec-
    tion of school children depend upon a sharing of
    intelligent public concern rather than upon the
    efforts of any single group of specialists or profes-
    sionals. This is truly a communal responsibility.
    Next Year's Doings
    Continued from Pat* II F
    che.vtras and stars of the opera and conceit stages
    with whom Weisgal is now jn communication. Is-
    raeli drama, and dance troupes will carry heavy
    schedules. Augmenting their productions will be
    performances by such distinguished visiting com-
    . panics asit is expectedEngland's Royal Ballet
    and America's ANTA, and by theatrical stars from
    the international constellation.
    These stellar attractions will not be clustered
    together during any one particular period but will
    be spotted throughout the festival year. Empha-
    sizing the heterogeneous nature of the country and
    of its visitors, the planners have set aside special
    weeks"America Week," "Australia Week," "Can-
    ada Week" down through the atlas.
    The one event that may properly be called the
    "high point" of the year, the one undertaking that
    will most concisely symbolize Israel's enduring
    ideal will take place in the hills of Jerusalem. It
    will be at once a reenactment of ancient history
    and a rehearsal of history to come. It is a pageant,
    to be performed by the world's greatest artists,
    which will unfold through music, the dance, song
    color and light, the theme of the festivalpeace.
    p-.$I0NS6ITM$
    j t RALPH WOOISEY
    MINT SERVICE
    ** Ceafracf
    hhtw ,,}
    I ''? i a Go.s lamteatot"
    ^ H.W. 7* avinui
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    f,,, sritfo
    JW*. Restored
    ^ Lamp,
    Hi 3-5086
    7 ALL CKHTINCS
    SPEED-WAY COLLISION
    Custom Work Auto Painting
    BODY REPAIR
    Ed Crutchiield
    3274 N.W. Mth Street
    Phone NE 4-1371
    "We Civ. fterchMft ree Sternal"
    EDISON
    ELECTRKftL FIXTURE CO.
    Ijtholesule Distributors
    ELECTRIC SUPPLIES and
    LIGHTING FIXTURES
    CAll Ft 34114
    1009 5. W. tth STREET
    (Tamiami Trail)
    GREETINGS
    B. W. THACKER
    AGENCY
    TYPEWRITERS
    Adding Machines
    Check Writers
    SOLD RENTED
    REPAIRED
    314 N.I. 1st AVENUE
    SEASON'S GREETINGS
    DADE METAL
    FABRICATIONS, Inc.
    ORNAMENTAL IRON
    FABRICATIONS
    4798 E. 10th Las*
    HIALEAH
    Phono MU 8-6611
    Host Wishes tor the
    New Year lioiiduus
    Heavy
    Constructors
    Miami, Florida


    -
    TO ALL GREETINGS
    Hialeah Lumber Company, Inc.
    ________Complete Lint of Building Materials
    4931 EAST 10th AVENUE ~ HIALEAH. FLA.
    Phono MU 1-3571
    ?*mr?m*m*T- T
    *'^F ..
    To AU .
    A Most Happy New Year
    The Julius Jay Perlmutters
    ?H1I
    TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS HAPPY NEW YEAR
    STATE HARDWARE & BUILDERS SUPPLY CO.
    '/OS N.W. 7th Atobuo Miami. Florida
    *> *> ^
    TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
    The Montgomery Motel
    15710 COLLINS AVENUE
    MIAMI BEACH
    v
    To AU Our Friends
    and Aeauaintanees
    A Most Happy New Year
    R. L 0'Donovan, Inc.
    ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS
    3635 N.W. 34th SHwtt
    Phone NE 51423
    j


    Page 16 F
    *Jmlst Frida
    800 E. 25th ST.
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    AL BOREN, Mgr.

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    SOUTH MIAMI
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    4gl 1 J I

    13360 N.W. 7th AVE.
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    JAMES NORRIS, Mgr.
    HP
    102 S. KROME AVE.
    HOMESTEAD
    HOWARD KAUEN, Mgr.
    1454 ALTON ROAD
    MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
    SIDNEY HOLLANDER, Mgr.
    500 W. FLAGLER STREET
    MIAMI 36, FLORIDA
    HAROLD HURLOCK, Mgr.
    MIAMI, FLORIDA
    4900 N.W. 2nd AVE.
    DON QUALTROUGH, Mgr.
    =25i*^*W.!
    NORTON TIRE CO,
    AND
    B.F. Goodrich
    NEW YEAR
    TO THEIR MANY CUSTOMERS and FRIENDS!
    Meet Miami's Top Tire Team...
    w.
    HOWARD, \OIK I O V LOUIS, RONALD
    Extend Best Wishes for A Happy Nem I'i
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    Inited Jewish Appeal During 5717
    |AU
    \\7wn ntw nut
    ^GATTIS
    TkW* ***P
    Iph & Service
    COMPLETE STOCI
    JEEP PARTS
    I tftaaUze in Usew |BM|pBJ
    , to All Specifications
    (Wholesale)
    (1 N.W. 27 Ave.
    PL 1-28
    30LIDAY GREETINGS
    yi
    flLLA BAKERY
    Jts ol Fine Cakes and
    ,es, Bread and Hard Rolls
    CHALLAH BREAD
    Made on Fridays
    |3235 N.W. 7th Avenue
    Phone MU 1-0542
    Open Daily 7-9
    Sundays 'til 6
    Closed Mondays
    Wishes for the
    w Year. .
    LUMBER
    |buiiding materials
    KMODILM
    [ARCH CREEK
    I LUMBER CO.,
    inc.
    15255 W. DIXIE
    Wl 73441
    Withes for a
    fey Hew Year
    yHMuma in:
    ^OW PLATING
    of
    ^HARDWARE
    and
    | ^MOBILE PARTS
    P PLATING
    1460 N-W. 7th AVL
    * 3-7139
    ^|M>JEIIiciidliiaiR
    Miami, Florida, Friday, September 27. 1957
    Section G
    Americans Respond to the Needs
    Of Oppressed Brethem Overseas
    By RABBI HERBERT A. FRIEDMAN
    JHE outgoing year, 5717. will surely go down in
    the annals of Jewish history as one of the
    most momentous. In fact, so much happened in
    so relatively short a period that it might take sev-
    eral years before we can digest and comprehend
    the full meaning of the past year's noteworthy
    events. }
    It was a year of strife and bloodshed, a year of
    renewed refugee terror and flight. It was also a
    year of magnificent courage and warm-hearted
    response to a humanitarian appeal. Never have
    the ties of understanding between the people of
    Israel and American Jewry been stronger.
    The world was electrified when the Sinai cam-
    paign developed early in 5717, following months
    indeed, years, of harassment and insecurity. Yet'
    Israel had often warned her neighbors to call off
    the almost nightly border raids. And in the United
    Nations Israels spokesmen declared time and again
    that no nation could stand by idly while its citizens
    were being robbed and murdered by gangs from
    across the border.
    Israel's '100-Hour" engagement of Egypt's
    forces brought a greater sense of security to her
    people. But it did more than that, of course. It
    punctured the illusion of Nasser's invincibility and
    halted Egypt's steady build-up of men and material
    in the Sinai peninsula, which could have had but
    one purpose: the launching of a full-scale war
    against Israel.
    Tied in with its natural quest for physical se-
    curity was Israel's knowledge that she must pro-
    vide a safe refuge for new thousands of Jewish
    refugees seeking a haven. A spectacular devel-
    opment in the flow of refugees into the country
    was taking place. The Hungarian revolt in Nevem-
    ber, 1956, touched off a massive flight of some
    180,000 Hungarian men, women and children into
    neighboring Austria. About 17,000 of these were
    Jews, men, women and children who must have
    new homes.
    U.S. Jewry Gives Aid
    I had the opportunity to visit the Austrian camps
    where I met these refugees. Clutching their
    children and their pitiful, few possessions, they
    had escaped, past border patrols, deadly mines
    and other terrible dangers. Now, they were home-
    less, but not friendless. It was heartwarming to
    see the help that was reaching them from the UJA
    through the Joint Distribution Committee, which
    once again was performing a magnificent job of
    providing sustenance, counsel and friendship. It
    was you, the Jews of America, who provided the
    food, clothing and shelter, and who enabled most
    of the refugees to find new homes in Israel, the
    United States and other free lands.
    Meanwhile, a dramatic new flow of Jewish
    refugees had developed from a most unexpected
    source. For varying reasons, Poland had decided
    to permit its Jewish citizens to be reunited with
    members of their families in Israel. From Rosh
    Hashona 9717 to the beginning of July, close to
    30,000 Polish Jews had immigrated to Israel and
    thousands more were waiting to come. They were
    moved by every available form of transportation
    by train, ship and plane, and by every possible
    route. Once again huge sums of money were re-
    quired immediately. And once again the United
    Jewish Appeal, through the Jewish Agency, was
    called upon to provide the necessary funds to pay
    for the high transportation costs, the food and
    shelter.
    But perhaps, the saddest flight of Jews in 5717
    came from Egypt, where a new dictator sought to
    emulate Hitler by enacting a Nationality Law. Nas-
    ser deprived Jews of their businesses, property
    and rights, threw msny into concentration camps
    and forced thousands to leave. By June it was es-
    timated that almost half of Egypt's estimated 50.-
    000 Jewish population had been driven out. The
    remaining Jews were living in constant fear and
    waiting for the day they could get out.
    Some 100,000 refugees entered Israel during
    past Hebrew Year 5717 and a similar number
    is expected to arrive during next 12 months.
    Scenes like above were common sight at
    Lydda Airport and at Haifa, where refugees
    poured in from Hungary, Poland, Egypt and
    other North African countries. Tremendous
    cost of rescuing and resettling refugees has
    been borne by United Jewish Appeal.
    Overseas Study Mission
    LJERE again, the Jewish Agency was called upon
    to pay the heavy expenses involved in as-
    sisting the refugees to flee for their lives and to
    help them start life anew. The Agency informed
    all air and shipping companies that it would pay
    the transporation bill for any Jew forced out of
    Egypt who had no funds. In Italy, JDC executive
    vice chairman Moses A. Leavitt and I were able to
    meet the first ship that brought these penniless
    victims of tyranny. They told us of the cold ter-
    ror under which they lived, of the brutal police
    treatment, of how they had been robbed of every
    possession. Their reports brought to mind the
    stories I had heard a dozen years ago from the lips
    of survivors of Nazi Germany.
    While these momentous developments were
    taking shape, American Jewry responded with
    characteristic imagination and generosity. In Octo-
    ber, 1956, a UJA Overseas Study Mission of 85
    prominent community leaders from every part of
    the country made a flying on-the-spot survey of
    refugee problems in Israel and Europe. In Paris,
    they heard from JDC representatives about the cru-
    cial needs of Jews coming from East Europe and
    North Africa.
    In Israel, where the group spent most of its
    time, they conferred with the top leadership of the
    Jewish Agency and the government, including
    Foreign Minister Golda Meir. Finance Minister Levi
    Eshkol and Dr. Giora Josepthal, then still treas-
    urer of the Agency, Israel's economic, fiscal and
    immigration projects, child care and old-age cen-
    Continued on Page 9G
    GREETINGS
    VENETIAN NURSING ft
    CONVALESCENT HOME
    rOK All mt CASES
    1330 N.E. BAYSHORE DRIVE
    Miami. Fla. Ph. FR 9-7S40
    NATHAN K. SPECTOR
    IRVHW BAM
    JUminirtrafrt
    GREETINGS
    CHRIS BODY CO.
    Manufacturers of
    CUSTOM TRUCK BODIES
    Trailmobile Parts and Service
    2155 N.W. 26th Ave.
    Phone NE45153
    .
    New Year's
    Greetings
    COMPLETE
    DAIRY SERVICE
    GAIL B0RDEN MILK
    HOMOGENIZED VITAMIN D MILK
    GRADE "A" MILK
    BUTTERMILK
    DUTCH CHOCOLATE DRINK
    WHIPPING CREAM
    COTTAGE CHEESE
    LADY BORDEN ICE CREAM
    ani Other Dairy Products
    Mkt
    DAIRY PRODUCTS
    for Home Delivery
    Phone PL 4 8661
    Seasoe's Greetings
    from
    JOE COHEN
    and
    MANNY SMITH
    Your Hosts of
    MIAMI REACH'S MOST BEAUTIFUL
    DIMIHG ROOM
    and
    BIRD
    i


    Page 2G
    *Jewist>fk>r*cUaun
    Frid
    aY- S^pt*^
    27,



    E LORILLARD CO.
    makers :of Old Gold
    and Kent Cigarettes
    wish you
    a Happy New Year
    1 fiu*
    XENT
    1-OR THE
    BEST TASTE
    YET ... !
    (If. V
    Mt
    ti
    - *..*"'
    -KIN
    s.re
    TO ALL HOLIDAY GREETINGS
    RED COACH GRILL
    1455 Biscay ne Bird.
    Phone FR 9-40Q8
    Gl(fTINCS
    KREMSER RADIATOR COMPANY
    1237 N.E. 1st AVENUE PH. FR 33246 FR 12257
    Serviced Repaired Cleaned Re-cered
    H 0 l / D 4 Y I f 17 f N J TO 411
    i:su:s SILVERSMITHS
    Repairing, Plating, Restoration, Rep/ace Stainless Knife Blades
    1287 N.W. 27lh Ave. Alt Work an Premises Ph.n. Hi 4-0119
    Best Wishes for a Happy New Year ..
    FURNITURE TRENDS
    181 GIRALDA AVENUE CORAL GABLES
    Phone HI 4-3131
    Best Wishes lor the New Year .
    RUSSELL W. HOUSTON and MAYS, Inc.
    INSURANCE AGENCY
    FIRE WIND AUTOMOBILE THEFT MARINE
    r c n' t?T'S ** ** A Types Liability
    Russell W. Houston, Pres. Roeer KdwarH iw/ c
    I Jas. C. McCleitand. Vice Pres. **" RuT? SS&'8&
    1142 W: Roofer Street Phone FR 1-1671
    (FREE PARKING IN REAR)
    The Tender Teens of Teen-Ai
    Bv MAX F. BASR
    IMAGINE an American city in the year 1957 in
    ' which 97 percent of the people have not gone
    beyond the seventh grade. Two-thirds of the mem-
    bers of the City Council are in this category of par-
    tial literacy. Even the Mayor, a philanthropist and
    good fundraiser, speaks proudly of the fountain
    pen he received at the big party celebrating his
    graduation from the seventh grade. He is dis-
    creetly silent about his lack of further schooling.
    The president of the board of education, hav-
    ing missed high school history, publicly recalls the
    Gettysburg Address as Washington's last statement
    to the American people. In a trial on charges of
    embezzlement, the city controller is exonerated of
    criminal intent; the evidence shows he was never
    exposed to high school arithmetic. The controller
    slaps a libel suit against the local newspaper for
    characterizing him as a "nefarious politician." But
    the editorunfamiliar with high school English
    had really meant "gregarious."
    Manufacturing activity is limited to handi-
    crafts since very few townsmen have the educa-
    tional background for studies in engineering or
    the skilled crafts. Surgery and dental work in town
    are done by the barbers. Alarmed by the shortage
    of good officer material, the commander of the
    American Legion post lauds the junior high school
    for its "confirmation ceremony." which keeps some
    youngsters in school until they're fifteen.
    Is this a fantasy? When applied to Jewish ed-
    ucation it is tragically true. Only three to four
    percent of American Jewish youth continue their
    Jewish education into the high school years. Jew-
    ishly illiterate youth become Jewishly illiterate
    adults who head our synagagues and temples. Jew-
    ish centers and welfare funds. Knowing little about
    the Jewish past, they will shape the destiny of the
    Jewish future.
    Adult Jewish Education
    JEWISH educators, in their frustration, seem to
    to have given up on the high school level.
    But now that our expanding population is bulging
    in the teen years, and interest in Jewish education
    is widening, we have the opportunity of making
    some progress in secondary Jewish education.
    Some of us are concerned with Jewish educa-
    tion during the college years and afterward. Since
    the People of the Book were never considered
    learned, but always learning, the importance of
    adult Jewish education is evident. Howeve/. much
    of our effort on the adult level will remain futile
    until we forge the link of Jewish education on the
    high school level. No one has ever succeeded in
    structuring a third and fourth Hoor on a building
    that lacks a second story.
    Why lose the precious years of youth which
    are crucial-in the emotional and intellectual de-
    velopment of the individual? This is the age in
    which young people are beginning to search for
    the meaning of life. This is the stage of life in
    which youth strive vigorously to shake off adult
    standards and controls. It is precisely during the
    high school years in which young Jewish people
    should drink deeply of the Jewish heritage and
    build a solid foundation for further personal
    growth as American Jews.
    In recent years government agencies, such as
    the Department of Labor, the Office of Education,
    and the Department of Defense, have combined
    with educators in a campaign to encourage young
    people to remain in high school. We need some
    such campaign on behalf of Jewish high school
    education.
    We cannot overlook the inadequacy of pres-
    ent day facilities and personnel to meet the re-
    H " *.

    jf
    tin m -
    Wktt p
    "Only three to four percent of American]
    ish youth continue their Jewish edu
    the high school years." Here, Shofar'
    in Germany. U.S. serviceman recei*>J
    struction from Chaplain (Maj.) Oscar M. I
    schutz on blowing of Shofar at military L,
    quarters prepared for High Holy Daw|
    Jewish Welfare Board.
    quirements for Jewish secondary education.
    boards of Jewish education are deeply entj
    in problems bound up with expanding prog
    elementary Jewish education; they are giving I
    attention to continuing programs. Nonethela
    there Is a demonstrated desire for Jewish i
    on a continuing basis the Jewish community i
    find a way to provide the facilities and pen
    A Fresh Approach
    f^NE of the reasons for the faint interest ill
    ondary Jewish.education is the an
    the curricula and the teaching methods. |
    of study are mainly transplantations of
    matter from the schools of eastern Europe. I
    is needed is a fresh approach to cur
    veiopment focusing on those aspects of the J
    heritage which are relevant to the live* of.J
    teen-agers in modem America. There it* i
    to be a revolution in teaching methods, iffi
    the center of attention is shifted from subjttM
    ter to the individual youngster and his'
    and intellectual needs as a developing:
    ish person. If the learning experience ii thel
    ish school were made more stimulating and<
    ing to the student, this in itself woaW
    the demand. The young Jewish student migttl
    be more likely to look upon his Bar Mita*|
    Confirmation as commencement day instead ofj
    eration day.
    The Summer Institute
    A promising approach to Jewish education I
    teen-agers is through summer camps ocj
    stitutes. Interesting experiments along this
    have been conducted by B'nai B'rith, the 9
    Synagogue, and the Brandeis Camp Institutes.
    Continued on P*9 10G
    A Hoppy New Tear I*
    M % rr*a*
    B. C. Kennel t
    FIRE C HI E T
    Miami Beach
    Florida
    A Happy New Year to All
    Our Friends and Patrons
    louanne of Miami, Inc.
    Women's Apparel
    2724 N.W. 2nd AVENUE
    Pfceat ft 9-ISS*
    Louis Ross
    M. L C. TAIASCM Md ST Aft
    ef
    TARASCH PHARMACY
    IXJIHD BIST WISHIS f OR A
    nappy ncw nai
    1315 N.W. 7th AVENUE
    Fkeae NA 1-7M1
    c R I t r / N c $
    Cherries Irf.nl
    MIRACLE CLEANERS
    "OeORUSS DRY CIEANNW
    **SJM "Precised seed Tre.fed"
    m n.l 79th strut, umi river
    FkM NA 1-9*4]
    Mr. and Mrs. Low*
    fitted MMf entll**1
    t*k Mm* **<*""
    MIAMI VOGUE MFG. I
    320 N.W. 2** JT,KI
    HOLIDAY GBEETINGS
    CRANSTON'S DRIYf*
    Chining mi frrfj
    Owned and 0p*
    Little lot Cran*0D
    52 *W. ***
    Phone PL **?
    Miami f*


    Friday, September 27, 1957
    *Je*isiiFk>ridlian
    adassah Builds for Health Today
    ? .. Cl iahii <;*i PPTCD ____
    Page 3G
    By ELIAHU SALPETER
    Jerusalem
    were invited to lunch by Mr. Harris, the
    public relations director of Hadassah in Is-
    ji We dined in the doctors' and nurses' cafe-
    ri, in Ziv Hospital, one of the many buildings
    tupied hy Hadassah institutions in Jerusalem
    1948, when the Mf. Scopus Medical Centre
    came a small Israel enclave behind the Arab
    and since then (inaccessible except for a
    tnightly convoy of policemen and maintenance
    .cnnel passing under United Nations auspices
    oufh the Jordan-held parts of Jerusalem.
    While we tried to keep up a cheerful appear-
    eating the meatloaf-and-potatoes served in a
    jv clean but a little depressing hospital atmos-
    bere, Mr. Harris briefed us on the present state of
    using affairs of Hadassah. The institutions are
    ! very centrally located, in over a dozen build
    tgs made available in 1948 to Hadassah by the
    Egwss of various non-Jewish bodies. The Eng-
    |,h Mission Hospital; for example, was made avail-
    He to Hadassah's maternity, children's, skin and
    Ilium departments; the Hadassah Nursing School
    accommodated within the precincts of St.
    eph's Convent; and Hadassah's TB Hospital was
    Niifd in buildings belonging to the Ethiopian
    fansulate.
    Mr. Harris suggested that we inspect the pro-
    ws of the building wbrk at the Hadassah-Hebrew
    fcrmwity Medical Centre irt Ein Karem, west of
    usalem, which will be the largest medical in-
    kilution in the Middle East after completion, some
    [jmc in 1960. We were advised that the buildings
    the University Medical School are also under
    struction. and were asked to make sure, if by
    ny chance we thought of writing something on
    is subject, to say always "Hadassah-Hebrew Uni-
    sity" Medical Centre, but stick to the "Hebrew
    taiversity-Hadassah" order of words when speak-
    I of the Medical School.
    It is a kind of gentlemen's agreement between
    i two institutions, since part of the total budget
    the entire project is collected in the United
    lites by Friends of the Hebrew University. As a
    utter of fact. Mr. Harris explained, the total bud-
    L T \ L?wenthal' of Pittsburqh (left).
    oT^f ?? ch,aian oi Women's Divis-
    fromMrir IOf BondS' receives WY**
    from Mrs. Alexander Simon, of New York, one-
    tane national Bond chairman of Hadassah.
    lor Israel Bonds purchased in Hadassah's
    country-wide campaign in behalf of Israel
    Band issue.
    get of the School and the Medical Centre is about
    15 million dollars, of which 10 million have already
    been collected, seven entirely by Hadassah, and
    three jointly by Hadassah and the Friends of the
    Hebrew University.
    4W
    * f A } ft HIJ / at 1 #t A mi 1l' Wm

    RwI^^ttBl
    Miriam Freund, national president of Ha-
    Nsah, siqns contract with Zelig Lavon, rep-
    taenting Shikum Ovdim Ltd.. housing cor-
    ^tion of Histadrut, for construction of 600
    ousing units at Kiryat Hadassah. five miles
    wt of Jerusalem. Kiryat Hadassah is being
    wted primarily to house staff of $15,000,000
    dassah-Hebrew University Medical Center.
    * v?der construcun. Left to right are La-
    n;MissLoula D. Lasker, national" Hadassah
    "nan. of Kiryat Hadassah; Dr. Freund;
    Dr. Kalman J. Mann, director general
    HMO.
    Already on th Way
    ^E took a cab and drove to the building site.
    After a few miles on the Ein Karem road,
    we turned off on a new, asphalt, up-hill road we
    never knew existed. Actually it did not exist until
    recently when it was built especially for the traffic
    to the new Hadassah buildings. Finally we reached
    the top of one of the rocky hills and were imme-
    diately surrounded by the bustle of construction
    work. The highest crane we ever saw (imported
    especially for this construction) was swinging some-
    where in the blue sky, hoisting concrete blocks to
    the top of one of the scaffolded steel-and-concrete
    skeletons.
    We were advised that this is the skeleton of
    the Medical School, six floors of it already con-
    structed. It is hoped that the skeleton will be com-
    pleted this summer, but it will take two more
    yean bJtore the entire building is completely fur-
    nished. The skeleton of the Henrietta Szold Ha-
    dassah School of Nursing is already erected. Ex-
    cavations have been completed for the foundations
    of the out-patients department of the University
    Hospital and a considerable part of the founda
    tiona has already lieen poured." we were informed.
    The .Medical Center's architect is Joseph Neu-
    feld. a member of the A.I.A. (American Institute of
    Architects) and A.H.A. (American Hospital Assn.).
    Among his other tasks, positions and memberships,
    Mr. Neufeld is also visiting professor in Community
    Health Planning at Yale, special consultant to the
    American Psychiatric Assn., and to the Rockefeller
    Foundation in the field of Mental Health Planning.
    Quoting Mr. Neufeld, Mr. Harris informed us
    that the new Medical Centre will be divided
    through expansion joints into various units a
    statement we could hardly contradict.
    'HAPPY NEW YEAR"TO ALL
    |WR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
    Chris' Beauty
    Salon
    [Pitiful hair styling
    16?2 ALTON ROAD
    MIAMI BEACH
    Phone IE 8-1912
    3- nd Mrs. Laurelli
    T0 ALL GREETINGS
    YE*RS EXPERIENCE"
    B.I- Repmng
    R,^n3. Painti;g
    ,3V*' 8h STREET
    *** FR 4-7804
    BEST WISHES FOR NEW YEAR
    ART'S NURSERY AND
    LANDSCAPE CO.
    M N.E. 7*th St., Miami
    Phone: PI 7-255!
    Marvef GoUilein
    lerm'e Seltv*
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS
    4^5 mi
    \tUj
    Open 6 a.m. lo 12 p.m.
    Sunday to Thursday
    6 a.m. to 2 a.m.
    FRIDAY & SATURDAY
    S852 South Dixie Highway
    TO MY FRIENDS
    AND CUSTOMERS
    A Very Hdppy New Year
    HARRY'S
    KOSHER MEAT
    MARKET
    243 Collins Avenue
    Miami Beach
    Nfw mi
    greetings
    PRINTING
    ARTS
    1300 N.W. 29th Street
    Jack, Hut, Human and Al Teiiler
    Season's Greetings...
    'rtn%
    SIDNEY MEYER MITCHELL WOLFSON
    WTYJ Channel 4 JBSmVXnm
    and WOMETCO THEATRES
    CARl SURF
    MIAMI CAMEO
    MIRACLE MAYPAIR CENTER
    TOWN TOWER ESSCX
    ROSETTA SUNSET
    nd BOULEVARD DRIVE-IN 27th AVE. DRIVE-IN
    CORAL WAY DRIVE-IN NORTH DADE DRIVE-IN
    t
    I
    STRAND
    PARKWAY
    . I

    Best Wishes for the Xetv Year
    MAGIKIST RUG CLEANERS
    Serving the Greater Miami Area"
    3601 N.W. 46th Street
    WAl NE 4-7541 or NE 4-8941
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    Richie Plumbing Supply, Inp.
    9i ,* m w1^ P1 USED PLUMBING SUPPLIES
    2116 N.W. 270, Ave. Telephone NE 4-4537 Miami. Ha.
    THE LEVIN FAMILY
    Best Wishes for a Happy ew Year ...
    SEA-LORE ORIGINALS
    Be Disfincfive $ Jf|
    Learn to Make Beautiful Seascapes. ''%4
    Jewelry, Handbags and Shell Novelties
    Phone PL 8-8226 8871 Biscoyne Blvd.

    Holiday Greetings To Our Many Friends'
    $
    Construction Products Corp.
    BUILDING MATERIALS
    6865 N.W. 36th Avenue Phone NE 5-0411
    4{l
    TO ALL GREETINGS
    *
    *'
    Monarch Sheet Metal Works, Inc.
    Residential Commercial Industrial *
    171 S.W. 17th AVL Hi Ft 3.7M1
    1'
    BEST WISHES FOR A NAPPY NEW TEA*
    SLENDER LA IIV REDUCING WAY
    5773 S.W. th Street ** m MM|
    KST W.JNfJ roe A NAPPY NtW UAt-
    PONSE DE LEON PAINT A WALLPAPER SUPPLIES
    2714 Ponce it Lm Br*4. CORAL GABLCS Ph.ne HI 4-40*3

    NEW tlAM GREETINGS
    LOL1-POP 14M.4.llt \ SHOPPE INC.
    CNHOtrrS WEAK
    1201 N.E. 143H StfMt Nwtfc MfamJ IkS Pfc^,, wi MM


    Page 4G
    vJewistFlcrlcttani
    I^y-stpm^y,
    1357
    '
    I
    ^4 Prosperous Hew Year
    to All Our Jewish Friend*
    i
    From
    Members of
    ASSOCIATE GMm


    I
    vores sign or ijimlity.
    si:iiy.< i: xsi\ iioxksty
    Associated Grocery Slorcs ever 2C3 members strong.
    Local people Living here with you enjoying
    Florida Representing over 20o oi South Floiida's
    grocery business.
    "THERE'S ONE OF US NEAR YOU.
    SHOP IN ONE TODAY.."
    ffl
    itesi Wishes tor the Xeiv Year
    HIALEAH CONVALESCENT HOME
    195 WEST 27th STREET
    HIALEAH, FLORIDA
    Call Tl t-t332
    or write for brochure
    HI
    T
    TO ALL... SEASON'S BEST WISHES
    Alan S. Boyd
    YOUR FLORIDA RAILROAD & PUBLIC
    UTILITIES COMMISSIONER
    The MAYFLOWER RESTAURANT
    HOME STYLE COMPLETE DINHERS
    SPICIAL CHILDREN'S MINI)
    ALL BAKING DONE ON PREMISES
    Now Serving Beer and Wine to Add to Dining Pleasure
    "GOOD fOOD fOR ALL THf FAMILY"
    Right on U.S. I
    Biscayne Blvd. & S.E. 1st St.
    FREE PARKING
    GREETINGS
    MADER & COMPANY
    P. 4 O. DOCKS
    MIAMI

    TO OUR MANY
    FRIENDS
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS
    Rader and Associates
    ENGINEERS & ARCHITECTS
    111 N. E. 2nd Avenue
    Phone FR 13551
    Miami, Florida
    TO ALL A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY
    Paul L. Hutchinson and Joseph P. Cole
    HUTCHINSON SERVICE STATION
    1155 Collins Avenue
    PHONE 58-3402
    I Knew Sholem Asch Way Back
    By BERNARD G. RICHARDS in one of his earlier short stories til]* .
    | knew Sholem Asch when he came to the United JjjJ **Ln^nd'illon^oJwrT* *
    States for the second time in 1914. I met him ,ne gntt jehudah Loeh Pe V*" then thai
    different occasions at public gatherings, at welcomed and encouraged Sholem A ,uta*
    tings held in aid of the European sufferers, at certain apprehensions and Sholem iu^ f*""*
    #-------------* !. i>......l.,\ D.liaf rnmrnill.. an/i ... _----. '" *'CIChem Inri
    on
    meeting- .
    conferences of the People's Relief Committee, and
    also in the cafes and restaurants wherein the East
    Side literati would foregather, and which the fam-
    ous Jewish writer loved to frequent.
    One of the meetings which I had with Asch
    was devoted to an interview which I wrote for The
    New York GlotM and which was publish?d in thit
    piper -in Nov. 30. 1914. Tins article lies before
    me II I write, the text voicing Mr. Asch ~ 1'iwnt
    enthusiasm for all .Jewish things, especially the
    ress Of Jewish labor, of Jews returning to the
    soil, i>"th in Palestine and other lands, and the
    picture of the youthful idealist, which looks out
    II this is s.i different from tin
    he came to be in later years, though his rift;
    and wonderful power-, of expression were always
    the same and fully acknow-
    ledged.
    Mr. Asch was then especial*
    ly eloquent in hK exultation <>f
    the growth and advancement of
    Jewish labor in the United
    Suite-, which aiming other
    things he described to me as
    Km groase moralische kraft"
    (a great moral force). It was
    Sholem Asch who, as I then
    said, "spoke these words, and
    his tall figure grew taller than
    ever, and his long, waving arms
    almost reached the ceiling as he
    referred to the crowds of Jew-
    ish laborers ascending the ele-
    vators. His beautiful head was
    thrown backward, and as he ex-
    pressed his strong feeling of
    affection for the Jewish work-
    ingman. a sudden moisture
    seemed to glisten in his large,
    limpid eyeseyes which the be-
    holder will never forget."
    "I am not a Zionist," he then explained, "but
    when there is a celebration going on among my
    people I feel entitled to be one of the joyous guests.
    When the celebration happens to be the eventful
    resettlement of Jews in their ancient homeland, it
    is a matter of great concern to me. Palestine is
    the cradle of the Jewish people, and it is sacred
    to us all. I went there because I wanted to tea
    with my own eyes the beginning of the new Jew-
    ish life there. There is a great deal that has yet
    to if. improved, but I can tell you that things are
    ning to stir. I found great changes for the
    better on my second visit, and I am not yet
    satisfied."
    New Impulses
    yHIS Sholem Asch who was welcomed here in
    those days with so much fervor and adulation
    was the man who came to us with the reputation
    of having written a story like "The Little Town "
    a play like The Dream of My People" and. of
    course, a number of notable boks like "Reb Sch-
    lomo Nogid," The Mother." "Kidush Hashem."
    Der Thihm Jid" and other books and plays all
    authentic and characteristic presentations of Jew-
    ish life.
    Then came a different time with new impulses
    and perhaps temptations which led to certain de-
    viations and departures, and which involved a more
    controversial theme of discussion. In a sense' Mr.
    Asch's deviations of later years were anticipated
    according to reports, felt uneasv about thM l'
    course of the young writer of extraordinary ,7*!
    It was from the time of his re *
    United States, and even from earlier nu^
    Asch was a prolific contributor to the nnJT
    ,U wish Daily Forward. He became the prV'
    friend of Abraham (ahan. the dvnamic eduL,
    ihis pa,per and pioneer Jewish labor leader in the
    United States. Asch was also the colleague and
    late of a whole galaxy of outstanding Jew";
    writers in the United States, just as he was beta
    then an important figure in the Jewish literary dr-'
    i k >>1 Warsaw.
    Severe Criticism
    THEN, after contributing a number ol his doJI
    which were published a in th.. daily!
    and writi ._ number ot-j
    short stun, s, he
    han the man cript of The
    Naaarene." Here the celebrated j
    editor not ly drew the line,'
    Hit grew (orintis. He
    to publish Asch's presentafiot!
    of Jesus. In keeping with a coiH
    tract, Asch for a considerable
    time remained on the payroll of J
    The Forward without any of his,
    writings appearing in the paper, i
    This and the subsequent books,:'
    permeated by the romance ol i
    the early Christians and the'
    spirit of that evolving faith,
    elicited even more criticism ^
    from Jewish circles and led to
    intense controversy. Cahan hi1
    self felt so outraged that be
    wrote a Yiddish book against]
    Asch and his new type of work,
    disputing the historic premises
    of "The Nazarene" and other)
    books and their basis of the
    Testament accounts.
    i
    SHOltM ASCH
    . life-Jea-f Irmptalitm
    Ne
    Then came Chaim Lieberman. long a leading
    member of the staff of The Forward, who wrote I
    in severe criticism of Asch's attitude toward Chris--!
    tiantty, publishing two books against him. one [
    Yiddish and one in English. Left without an ortj
    let for his Yiddish writing, Asch for a time co|
    trihuted to the communist Yiddish daily, The]
    Freiheit.
    Perhaps the most penetrating analysis and I
    most severe criticism of Asch's new work cam!
    from a great Hebrew scholar. Prof. ( haim Tcher-[
    novitt, widely known under his pen name of Rail
    Tzair. who was for many years associated with the!
    Jewish Institute of Religion, now merged with the
    Hebrew Union College. Rav Tzair. in his writings, |
    practically accused Asch of apostasy.
    A strange, if not mysterious, phenomenon was
    this towering and bold figure, having the persi*
    fence and aggressiveness to scale all the walls el
    the Ghetto, with energy and industry that was only
    matched by his consuming ambition, pouring out
    book after book for the outside world that were
    not even printed in their original language at
    home, writing his works in an execrable Yiddish,
    yet with such power and passion and sweep of
    imagination as to make possible their transforma-
    tion in impeccable and polished English. From
    behind the barriers of a literary world in rum
    Continued on Pag* SG
    J3*'t Wiste. The Heart of Fashion
    in Tropical America


Full Text
Fbj*4_A_
Tgqy.Vrtwri,-,,
+Je*i$rflcr&&n
- w^my ** *-* OFFICE and PLAHT 120 Mi. Sixth &-
rssDr SKOCKET
f^inr and PbMwr
Sew. Edhor Volume 31
Friday. September 27. 19S7
2 Ttabri 5718
umber 39
3 -or -ere
raewr: this is c
-xl :x-_-r; by a* aa
z IkM Gaaai
si the
aai aMe)
17 as Dr- Theodor
crfy as 1903 denied his
j H^ci freedom, we
sassy has acted upon its
/?oj#7 Hashona 5718:
Glance at Tomorrow
Seen Through Past
"HUUU May You be hv
Sood Yea This a the tradi-
-T.e Jews oder one csouier
-yer for cm
fj m '-'
. twelve no:-'
.-. vj:
I a
-- to our progress as a
an weak-
ly oi Greater sfiami
been all sorts oi developments trom a
overseas point of vew. Where
- we commented
thea "evelopmenu
aa opmioni thus expressed did not always
meet v. renal approval there wcs r.e
.'.appy .on that differences are
.stance of human liberty and that they ex.. e
%st and frequently constructive thought
Rosh Hashor.a .s a 'lxne for introspection lor
examination of one's innermost feelings. Were "he
events making up the past Hebrew Year 5717
assimilated in the best way possible? Did we. as
r.aman beings, play at least a small part in them?
Was our thought indeed constructive, or were we
observers only of the panoply of human experience?
And. as observers, were we merely satisfied to pass
silent judgment or not even to judge or to care?

THESE are centrally significant quest.ons for a Jew
individually and for the Jewish people as a
group. Few are the humans with o% much spiritual
self-autonomy as the Jews'; and few therefore are
the humans with as much responsibility to act upon
this self-autonomy as the Jews bear. The fact is that
where the Jew fails this responsibly, he fails not
only his tradition and all other Jews; he fails him-
self, as well.
Ba
Herxi
s::--"-
pay
va-
st Btmwm Tea \' gfla warn*
Sqfaonciiy Aznencan Jewry
t challenges of its history when
_-e -ecrv.e "-.:-
to ester, the scams directed
acam her wuh 3 ^<"mi^ campaign a the
e Pres.-er." Elsenhower con-
aaaal ai wm .~ ai aaajal ajaaaa aaje>
- :- ; .;/.-: '. scr.C-cns uniea Isrre. asCBHl
down unconditionally the American Jewish cora-
-. --^xanudated acted proudly upon
r.e strength of American deznoc-
..ei .- respect :or mroonty bebet

PITT .* was to the credit of this nation's understand-
iaj that vocal Jewish identification with Israels
;.-.t during the Hebrew Year 5717 found support
not just in a minority whose spiritual relationship to
-.-- >*.>.-. Baa *: awaai afl ..-. a aajaaj sj
bi paaaaa 1 aafaaf tt eaaaaai desp.te
as Presidents polices, acting out of respect for
-e-rency and fair pkry. This mass mobilization of
sentiment galvanized Jewry right down to the local
-unity level, and Greater Miami moved to meet
.:s share of the responsibility.
From voluntary cooperation with a Federation
" clearing bouse" that advised organzations and indi-
viduals en the wisdom or folly of their intended stcte-
-er.ts to the press, meetings, public rallies, etc.. to
the Jewsn community's parucpation in emergency
ed Jewish Appeal quotas above and beyond
. UJA commitment. M.crr.. rc-.ed a. own
~es to the collected voice c: Ameriaa Jewry,
z beleaguered Israel that he would prevaiL
A parallel kg wh.ch our comnu
r.e rr.ass Jewish immiaration developing
cf President Nasser's flMla Kk campa.g.n
r. >wry es well as the Jewish
and Comrr.ur_3t cppress.on fol-
eak of n there. No le*s did
al assistance go to the Jews of
e -any Hungarian families who ar-
''"- Bg a past Hebrew Year to take
;er.:e cenaj us as new Americans.
.
HfBU ita --..-.: loosd endeavor gears itself heavJy
loward overseas responsibility of this kind.
mi Jewry recognizes a similar responsibility to^
wad itself, fa this regard, the Jewish community
dunng 5717 raised a record sum of money through its
Combined Jewish Appeal to deal with the expand-
ing needs of the area's inordinate growth.
Thus Mt. Sinai Hospital's new and beautiful
quarters began to be erected on Collins Island ad-
jacent to its present site. Under a new Federation-
ML binai arrangement, the annual All-Star Jubilee"
defaVt h^L^^i ThC hamtal's operational
deficit henceforth devolves as a more duect commit-
ment upon the organized Jewish community.
In a similar reaard, other Jewish agencies made
notable progress, ezpanswn wnw as well as in
ach.evement To meet the demand for leiave^ime
activity in the burgeoning North Dade area the
Greater Miam, Jewh Commun.ty CenWr at the con-
dumon of 5717 opened a North County Branch there.
waefe is already in fuU function.
PeabeticaJJy coping with the increcsiao mm
c: reared per*"''* nere, as wen as w-th tbs ds_
for its aememm. the Jewish Home tor the Aadbl
final week, of the la* Hathr Year re^Xj
would accept no now app^aS
funha
entry nnhl mneer nonce; and. ^. -..e ya a
o^eod. the Home looks forward to mrHw wuh
rertrcron through organised consm^nitv nl<
methods-
No less we other Jewish agenr.es. inda
the Bureau of Jewish Education and -wish fai
Screfce. appraising their record of ac-.evemsal
jsssising then continuing nesds to --^ich thai
tastic growth of Greater Miami Jewry.

QNE of the important occurrences of the
year was tne increased alone
Federation, the Jewish community s re.-.ral pk_
orgamzanon. and its cognate in the general
muniry. United Fund, surceesot tc Dads co
Community Chest
Three Jewish age news now pcr.z.pate in I
ted Fund, and Jewish leaders here only recently i
ibHiiiiiuI then wholehearted support oi it. Ba
developing interrelationships also erected the |
for asserting the Jewish community s und
fund-raising nes ds for upward of 55 national cm
ternatiooal Jewish agencies includinq tht tm
dcus requirements of the State of Israel in add
to Miami s Jewish agencies whose budgets are l
eration responsibdines.
The increasing identification between the ]
and general communities was seen cs a good I
lot both. The partial sponsorship United Fund I
upon itself in regard to the Jewish agencies
only a natural development these agencies. 1
ail serve residents oi the Greater Micmi area
But the Jewish community's und.mmished I
needs required the kind of restressina that pic
into proper focus Miami Jewry's understandinadl
relationship to the general community, as weQf
of us responsibility to Jewry oversees and in Is
?HESE are but passing views into a Jew of the ]
ing problems of the Hebrew Year 5717 1
of them previously taken up in far crecter del
these columns. As commentary or. an out-
year, they ateo serve to raise the cur"c.n on thei
where will be played the events of the con
twelve-mcnth period.
For human experience is fundamentally f|
cil. The problems of yesterday are the proble
tomorrow. That we. in Dade county, thusfar
ed the heated imbroglio of mteqration and n
postponed the battle against efforts at introdo'
religious instruction into the public school sf
does not mean that the Hebrew Year 5718 will f
leave us indifferent or inert.
Our liturgy durinq Rosh Hash or. a asks:
shell live? Who shall die? Who shall |
by sword? Who by fire? These art 1
mere words. Fa the people of Israel, only
after the advent of 5717. they were teal enough]
the sands of the Sinai, with Egyptiar. hordes
before them. For the Jews of Hungary and
hiding from the perils oi Communist tyranny onj
one hand and Hitler-like atrocity on the other.
were questions filled with significance in
survival.
Let them therefore not be mere wards in'
own hearts. Nar do they have to be #*J}
future. like the past, will be one to live, as well I
to observe, on the basis oi time-honored and ha
ed Jewish tradition. We pray the answers toj
questions will redound to a rich and fruitful
community durinq 5718 to a happy Aa,^J
a peaceful Israel, to a humble and creative r
kind.


dov,
September 27. 1957
+Je*ist fhridian
biles Slaps Red Intervention, Dag Seeks UNEF in Israel
vu NATIONS(JTA)Sec-
Lm oi Slate John Foster Dulles,
. oj the Bi2 Power ministers to
"re,, the twelfth General Asscm-
|K.,.,cd world
on the Middle
Ie" v.-.. ...
|K l!lSed world attention this
* on the Middle Hast with a
ibst Soviet "indirect aggres-
ii the area endangered world
Ipnl the history of Soviet el-
ite get a Middle East foothold,
! that "this Soviet Com-
mit iffort has-made- the-tWost
uj,,, in Syria where Soviet bloc
,eie exultantly received and
tre political power has increav
hbeen taken over by those who
La upon Moscow." He said
Soviet acl^ may perhaps lin-
ing!) lead ,hl' recipients of So-
(arms into acts of direct ag-
Andrti Gromvko, the Soviet
Idijttr, replied the next day
11 renewal of Russian pro-
,|i for four-power agree-
ml on the renunciation of the
i of force in the Middle East
(of interference in the intern-
Hiiri of eny country in that
_. Neither Dulles nor Gromy-
[referred indirectly or by name
I IsrMl in their lengthy ad-
Mi-
llies told the General Assem-
ui ihe I'nite I States may in-
troduce 'concrete proposals" at the
current session in an effort to
"tranquillize the scene."
A spokesman for the Israel dele-
gation called the Dulles speech "an
important discussion of the dangers
created by the heavy rearmament
and incitement of Syria." A Syrian
spokesman said Syria "is not threat
ening any of its neighbors."
Exactly what Israel issues were
Dkety to be considered at the cur-
rent Assembly session appeared
uncertain. Sir Leslie Munro. the
new Assembly president, said Arab-
Israel issues were expected to come
up only in relation to the United
Nations Emergency Force and the
Arab refugee problem
He said the UNEF matter
would bo on the agenda when UN
Secretary General Dag Ham-
marskjold reports on the present
status of UNEF and possible
plans for a permanent UN force.
The Secretary-General's report
will deal with the organization,
deployment, operation and finan-
cing of UNEF.
The question of deployment was
likely to revive the issue of placing
UNEF contingents on Israel's side
of the Gaza Strip demarcation line.
an objective dear to Hammarsk-
jold, who believes his authority for
disposing UNEF forces in the Mid-
dle East will be greatlv stren UL& are not elusively n I
Egyptian territory
Tribute to UNEF was paid hv
Prince Van W.ithayakon of Thai-
land, the outgoing Assembly presi-
dent, in opening the session. Me
Mid UNEF "has rendered signal
serv,ces to the cause of peace by
hoping to restore tranquillity to
this region, it has deserved well
of the United Nations and we owe
it a great debt of gratitude "
ne rso emm:mem' general
source of satisfaction" the accep-
tance by Egypt of compulsory jur-
isdiction of the International Court.
of Justice in regard to "disputes '
arising out of tha Con^tintinoole
Convention of 1888 relating to pas-
sage of shipping through the Suez
Canal.
Religious Services Scheduled
fn Cemeteries Sunday
Religious services will be held at
cemeteries throughout the Greater
IVnami area Sunday, Sept. 29.
The services are a long-standing
tradition, involving the visiting of
burial sites between Rosh Ha.shona
and Yom Kippur.
Greater Miami Cemetery Assn.
Wednesday announced that persons
desiring to participate in these ser-
vices should make individual ar-
rangements with the spiritual lead-
ers of their congregations.
i\
i
Ir
f
1

Welcome guest in Israel. John K. Tetaqah. general secretary
of Ghana Trade Unions, is greeted by Pinhas Lavon. general
secretary of Ilistadrut, Israel's labor federation. Tetagah's re-
cent visit to Jewish Stcte as gue3t of Histadrut precedes arrival
of a larger delegation of Ghana trade unionists who will study
stri'rture nn<\ activities of Histadrut.
<\
>.
'*>.
*i

*'

i


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NDS
*U SHOt STOP*
l*n Every
Monday
* Friday
W 9 P.M.
teShoe Sivie
Don't miss
these values
at the finest
high grade
icellotion
Stare
m the South
2302 PONCE DE LEON BLVD.
CORAL GABLES
PHONE HI 8-5500


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