The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01535

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text

l^wiisltUEIlDipidliigun
Combining TNI JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
10 31 Number 27
Miami, Florida, Friday, July 5, 1957
Price 23c*
mATIONS CONTINUING
labor Zionists Favor
\merican Federation;
ye Jerusalem Meet
JEW YORK(JTAVA resolution favoring the establishment of a
cratically constituted Zionist Federation in the United States was
ted here this week by the Labor Zionist Assembly at a special meet-
[of its executive committee. Representing the Labor Zionist Or-
in Threatens
Separations Cut
JONN (JTA) An implied
cat by Finance Minister Fritz
laeffer that indemnification
restitution payments to vkr-
Its of Nazism would be slashed
|er the national elections in
Member was protested this
ek from the Central Council of
ri in Germany.
a speech. Dr. Schaeffer as-
ted that the Bonn Parliament
not "officially pondered the
sequences" of the indemnifies-
legislation it has written and
t< these laws may have to be
fised" after the elections. This
eat was voiced at a time when
r victims have reason to hope
tl the indemnification program
ght be completed by its target
|e192.
Dr. Schaeffer charged that
damnification legislation will
Continued on Page 2A
ganization of America, Farband
Labor Zionist Order, Pioneer Wo-
men and Habonim, the Assembly
executive committee met in order
to provide guidance on policy mat-
ters to ii, delegates at the meeting
of the World Zionist Actions Com-
mittee which will be held in Je-
rusalem beginning July 11.
The establishment of territor-
ial Zionist Federation in all
countries was voted by the World
Zionist Congress in Jerusalem
last year. Since then, negotia-
tions for setting one up in the
United States have been going
on among the American Zionist
groups. Various proposals have
been put forward and will be dis-
cussed at the actions committee
conclave.
Th object of the proposed Fed-
eration is to broaden the Zionist
base and. without impinging on
the autonomy of the various groups
or upon thi-'r specialized areas of
activity, provide coordination and
central direction in the fields of
work which all have in common.
Egypt Defies U.S.
On Gulf Freedom;
Hints of Violence
BOBBIE'S out. Dublin Lord
Mayor Robert Bnscoe step-
ped down Tuesday as first
Jewish chief executive of
thousand-year-old Irish cap-
ital city. He won office June
29, 1956 after hat draw in
deadlock and quit same
way, when luck of Irish turn-
ed to James Carroll, who
came out top man in new
hat draw following city coun-
cil 21-21 deadlock.
-WASHINGTON(JTA)Egypt Wednesday defied the stand taken
by the United States last weekend that the Gulf of Aqaba is an inter-
national waterway and that Israeli shipping must not be molested there,
or in the Suez canal. In a broadcast from Cairo Aly Sabri. Col. Nasser's
chief political aide, challenged the U.S. view and said: "if Israeli ships
try to force their way through the Suez Canal or the Gulf of Aqaba. we
will prevent them. If Israel attempts to obtain foreign assistance in
such a move, the outcome will be the same as the outcome of the
tripartite invasion."
The attitude of the U.S. Govern*--------------------------------------------
ment with regard to Israel's right, bar Israeli shipping from the Suez
to use the Gulf of Aqaba and the and Aqaba waterways. It was a
Suez Canal was made known by the I reply to a demarche delivered by
State Department last weekend in diplomats of the 11 countries to
a note to 11 Arab nations. The! Secretary of State Dulles on May
note rejected the Arab contention I 24
that Egypt is within its rights to
Fedayeen Move Quarters
To Pull Gag on UN Force;
Increased Infiltration Noted
The United States reply sup-
ported Israel's rights to passage
through the Suet Canal and said
this country does not believe
Egypt has any rightful claim to
barring Israeli shipping under a
"self-defense" provision of Arti-
cle 51 of the United Nations
Charter which Egypt has been
citing.
neral Zionists Vote to Postpone Issue
Merger With Rightist Herat Party
TEL AVIV(JTA>After a sharp Internal fight, the Centrist General Zionists closed their annual
mention last week end with a decision to put off indefinitely the issue of merger with the right wing
ru party. The merger issue was disposed of by a secret ballot vote to turn the problem over to a
cial committee which suggested that the party's "new executive could study the possibilities and condi-
such merger."
+ Another dispute, this one involv-
ing organizational differences be-
tween two factions, was settled by
a compromise. The groups were the
Popular faction, headed by Joseph
Saphir and Joseph Serlin. which
had a heavy majority in the con
vention of 600 delegates, and the
Union faction headed by Peretz
Bernstein and Israel Rokach.
The compromise substituted for
the single party chairmanship a
chairman and an executive chair-
Continued on Page 6 A
On the Aqaba matter, the U.S.
note also supported Israel and re-
iterated that American ships would
TEL AVIV(JTA)Egypt has transferred the headquarters of her I use ,he *ley n the course of
fedayeen command from Gaza to El Arish. in the Sinai Peninsula, to nrml commerce and join with
keep the United Nations Emergency Force from discovering the move-1 0,ners to secure general ret
ment of fedayeen gangs, the Israel press reported this week. ,t,on of ,hls ri*ht- The note was
______________________________^ The report points out that the' *<*"* "Wf- Iraq. Jordan
' transfer of fedayeen headquarters Arabia. Sudan. Syria. Tunisia and
contradicts Egyptian statements to Lebanon Libya. Morocco Saudi
UNEF commander Maj. Gen. E. L I Vemen was f"vWd through
M. Burns that it has dispersed ,n; diplomatic channels
fedayeen units and Palestinian! on the broad question of inno-
Arab formations. It asserts that c,,, ,r.,nM, jnto lhe Ku|j_ the noll.
Palestinian and fedayeen recruits | Cl(ed Egypt'i own statement of
are receiving specialized com-|jan. 28. 1950 assuring that Evp-
mando training at a base in the ,,., occupation of Tiran and San-
Suez Canal zone and will later be ] aflr. ,hc Iw bdgsMk at the mouth
returned to the El Arts* camp. ,,, ,h). ,.ulfi wu!d in no way lnt(....
Foreign Ministry circles dismis- fere with free passage. Accord-
sed Egyptian claims that the fe- mg to the IS note. Israel's transit
'runty Will Rule on Hildy
hCoy Adoption Here Monday
Jewish couple's petition to
upt the Catholic child who has
cd with them almost since
th will be acted on next week
a circuit court judge here. On
inlay. Judge John W. Prunty
II determine whether Hildy Mc- +
, fl. child of an unwed Catho-
mother, will become Hildy
Ms.
|The petition of adoption has
en filed by her foster parents,
and Mrs. Melvin Ellis, of
(irritz dr., Normandy Isle. They
a Jewish couple engaged in a
t-year legal fight to keep the
holic girl. If the judge grants
ir petition, their legal strug-
will be. over.
The Ellises have had to flee
live in hiding to escape a
ssachusetts law which would
ne taken Hildy from them.
Their petition to adopt Hildy
has gone unopposed by both
Hildy's natural mother and the
State of Massachusetts, neither
of which has retained counsel
Continued on Page 7A
ige 7A
Continued on Page 7A
Jewish Organizations Watch
Situation of Soviet Jewry
LONDON (JTA) The prob-
lems of Jewry in Eastern Euro-
pean countries, particularly So-
viet Jewry, are being kept "con-
Orthodox Oppose Withdrawal Move
FALLSBURGH, NY. (JTA) The Orthodox
Rabbical Council of America closed its 21st annual
convention here with an overwhelming rejection at
a special session of two proposals for the withdrawal
of its members from the Synagogue Council of
America and the New York Board of Rabbis.
The votes were the latest development in a
lengthy struggle among Orthodox Jewry over par-
ticipation in organizations which also have Conser-
vative and Reform representation.
The proposals were introduced by Rabbi Da-
vid B. Hollander, of the Bronx, N.Y., who as RCA
president last year spearheaded a fight for mem-
ber withdrawal from the SCA and the Board of
Rabbis.
The delegates elected Rabbi Solomon J. Sharf
man to a second term as president. In an earli-r
meeting, an educator urged Orthodox Jews to spend
an additional $23,000,000 next year to strengthen
Jewish education on all levels. The recommenda-
tion was made by Dr. Joseph Kameinetsky, executive
Continued on Page 2A
tinuusly in mind" by leaderv of
World Jewish organizations. Bar-
nett Janner. president of the
Board of Deputies of British Jews,
told a meeting of the board here.
He revealed that during his re-
cent visit to the United States he
had conferred with leaders of the
Conference on Jewish Material
Claims Against Germany on these
matters.
In Poland, he said, the Jewish
community is being given more
"elbow room" and contact is
again allowed with Jews in other
countries.
No opportunity for contact
between Western Jewry and
Jews in Poland, USSR or other
Communist countries will be
missed, Mr. Janner said. He
Continued on Page 6 A


?**&*?*i<*~

*J&lst>nc*jcfo_
Fiiday. July 5, l9s?
Page 2-A______________ ~-
OrthodoxOppose Withdrawal Move
Continued from Page 1 A
director of the National Society for Hebrew Daj
"\ majority of American Jews tend to idcntiiy
themselves with the synagogue because ot social and
other reasons rather than "genuine religious prompt-
ings" according to a special report presented to the
concluding convention session.
The findings were disclosed in a paper deln (red
jointly by Dr. Bernard Lander. Hunter College -"
oIO|W and his brother. Na.h.,n UO*r, I.....**>
identific........^S^J^SSTiSi
center of "stridenl anti-religious thought and his
StrueintheAmerkantateUectualcoiiuwiBitjr.
the sociologists reported_________ _____
Highest Grade in ham
I Morris A Tcnenbaum. of North
Mum, Beach, made the hiKhest
, grade In the Florida Certified Pah-
; lie Accountant exam given in 1956.
I Tcnenbaum. of 1080 NW 175th I
q received his certificate and pla-1
,,,. recently at semiannual con-
vention oi the Honda Institute ol
CPA .'i >' Pettnbyri Hi hi
USOCiated with the firm ot Weis
glftBJ |*4l Marder in Miami.
^^^- GORDON ROOFING AlJ"
SHin METAl WORKS I
431-440 SW 22. At. HI \mA
Have vour 'I repaired no*-. i
atufaetory Won, bl;ttr
IiHmnM Mi
Bonn Leader Threatens Slash in Reparations
Continued from Page 1 A
'obligate Germany to pay some-
thing in tha neighborhood of
$4,000,000,000 rather than the
less than half that sum origin-
ally estimated. He blamed these
payments, which amount to no
more than one percent of the
annual Federal budget, for the
current inflationary trend in
government spending.
The executive of the Central
Council of Jews in Germany, at
a session this week, called Dr.
Schaeifer"s remarks "distressing'"
and "rash"' and demanded "un-
equivocal clarification"' by th
Federal Government. The Jews
charged that the Finance Minis-
ter's threats violate democratic
principles. They specifically no-
ted that Dr. Schaeffer did not ex
press criticism of far larger f\
penditures to benefit othc r
groups, specifically the payment
of pensions tor former Nazi offi-
cials
Dr. Schaeffer's words are par
tlcularly significant because ol the
powerful position he holds in
West German public life and the
fact that he is one of the conten-
ders to succeed 81-year-old Chan-
cellor Konrad Adenauer ousted
from the post of Minister-Presi
dent of Bavaria by the American
Military Government in 1945 and
"excluded for political activit] for
life" shortly afterwards, he was
within five years in a position al-
most to torpedo tne negotiations
for the Israel-German reparations
pact.
EVERYBODY'S
TALKING
ABOUT
T,
|dW
Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsh
MS WOMAN AVtNW, MIAMI lUa
PtWM JI 1-35*5
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M. HVphan
HEBREW ROOK STORE
417
* d nrik in.
TeJeftwM JI 1 9017
watiw NU6404W surmes
for SyM|>|i an* Privet* 111*
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AMI NMMWIS FtUCNTU
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S. Miami Optimists Elect Betz Prexy
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U L M J J jTfjii nONT PLATE ami WINDOW WAS
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I Famifrt Teai, teveled Hlrrtt
fttafrvariaf 0r SawcMff
.
South Miami Optimist Club will
in-tall new officers Sunday at an
outdoor barbecue at Tahiti Beach
New officers arc: president. Wjl
ham Betz; vice president, Charles
Talks are Scheduled
Quakerbridge study group will
meet Tuesday evening al the Won-
derland Nursery, 1401 SW 87th
avc. A lecture on "Dynamic Psy-
chology" will be delivered by Mrs
Bernard Kaplan, and discussion
will be lead by Mrs. Martin Roth
Dr. Sidney Moss will discuss
"Problem Solution." and Milton
Spool will speak on The I'sychol
ogy of Humor."
Knder. secretarj Dr Robert M
Taylor; treasurer. Eli Gerstein
Directors: one year, J. J.
Brown, Dr. Bailey Hinton, J.
Richy; directors, 2 years, Julius
Kaiser, Jack Davis, Dr. Richard
Putman; sergeant-alarms, Lynn
Loomis.
The 30 members ol Ihe South i
Miami Optimist ( lub h.i\ bei n
active in communit) affairs, which
include sponsorship ol the soft-ball |
team ol Pinet rest School
New community projects foster-
ing healthful activities [or young
stors are contemplated during the
next fiscal year.
See the furnished
model apartment
4, TODAY!
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ACT NOW on the 9th
ANNIVERSARY OF ISRAEL
By Investing in Israel Bonds
Coll Mnyshie Friedbcrg, JE 8 4969
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OCULISTS' PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED
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Friday. July 5. 1957
KMmlstt rJcrkMan
Poge 3-A
vmphrey Exposes Arab Exploitation of Refugee Problem
By HUBERT H. HUMPHREY
United States Senate
Copyright t9S7 Jawiih Talagraehic
Agency Esclusiva
Washington
Israel is a friend of the United
States. There can be no doubt
ibout this. She is a natural ally.
Without any formal treaty of al-
liance, we have in the people and
EDITOR'S NOTE: Hubert H.
Humphrey is the Democratic
party Senator from Minnesota.
Active in Senate foreign affairs,
he recently returned from a tour
of the Middle East, where he had
on-the-spot interviews with the
area's top leaders.
government,.of Israel a ,loyal and
trave ally This unwritten aili-
knee is based upon mutual under-1
(landing and respect.
our interests are closely aligned.
Israel Is not only anti-Commun-
ist, but she is pro-freedom. She is
^nti Communist because many of
hi r people already know what it
has meant to live under dictator-
ship in other lands. She is anti-
:ommunist because of her relig-
laith and cultural tradition.
She is pro-freedom because the
cople of Israel are individualis-
tic: the prophets of old taught
[hem the meaning of human dig-
lity. The history of Israel is one
t>i fighting against oppression
in king liberation and emancipa-
jon. Besides that, the people of
srael know and have proven that
Incdom affords the best oppor-
tunity for a productive society and
general happiness.
The Israeli* are prepared to
I defend that freedom. They have
developed the strength in both
I economic end military term* to
1 defend thermalva*. I am con-
vinced that Urael now ha* the
I respect of her neighbors. But
[the people and leadership of l-
I do not wont to spend their
'resources and time on military
I matters; they seek to release
themselves from the burden of
petrolling) the borders and pay-
ing the heavy costs of military
[ equipment.
While Israel's army is the best
the Middle East, it should not be
forgotten that their regular and
Standing army is, indeed, a very
ill one. The secret of Israel's
nilitary strength is her reserves,
ind the quick and efficient mobil-
ization nl those trained reserves.
The young men and women of Is
ti] are all trained to defend their
tountry. And defend it they have
tnd will, because they believe in
It. It is their country. It belongs
lo the people. It is their hope for
(today, and their promise for to-
norrow.
1 saw and felt this spirit during
|he Independence Day parade in
Tel Aviv. Units of the Israeli arm-
id forces passed us in review.
There was no doubt as to the high
norale, the strength, the health.
nd the vigor of these men and wo-
men Added was the display of the
Russian-made equipment that the
Israelis captured from the Egyp-
tians in the recent Sinai campaign.
There was thunderous applause
|lrom better than 500.000 people
vho lined the parade route in Tel
Uiv. The Israelis are proud of
I heir Army, Navy and Air Force
The point is that a solution must i Human lives cannot be left to
be found. There are elements that remain as mere political pawns;
could lead to a solution; if the world opinion must force dispersal
rhns miiflrtd
and their record of valor and he-
roism.
But the people of Israel are
not militarists; they seek to live
in peace with their neighbors.
They seek to find the answers to
Arab-Israeli difficulties. Those
difficulties include the adjust-
ment of boundaries and borders,
the Arab refugees, the boycott
by the Arab nations of the Israeli
commerce, and the denial to Is-
rael by Egypt of use of the Suei
Canal. There ere other prob-
lems, but these are the main
ones.
I talked to Prime Minister Ben
Gurion quite frankly about all
these problems, and I found him
understanding and longing for
solution.
He was not intransigent or ob-
stinate on the refugee question.
He is perfectly willing that Israel
shall take back into its borders
some of the refugeesand, indeed,
already hasbut be made it quite
clear that it would be impossible
to take them all back. To do so
would threaten the very security
of the state. He further indicated
the desire of Israel to compensate
those who had lost their lands. But
he made it quite clear that most
of the Arab refugees left Israel not
because they were driven out, but
because their leaders asked them
to leave with the promise that the
Israelis would be driven into the
sea and then the Arabs could
come back and not only have their
old lands but more that would be
taken away from the Israelis.
Of course, those Arab plans did
not work out. The Israelis won
the war. and the refugees were out
of the country. This is not to say
that there were no attacks upon
Arabs, because they were by some
of the extremist groups. However,
the government of Israel had asked
the Arabs to remain. Those that
did stay live in peace within Israel
today.
The question now, of course, is
not just who was right or wrong.
United States and the United Na
tions keep pressing for an answer
and that we ought to do.
The settlement of the Arab refu-
gee problem must be given priority
on the world's agenda.
The feet is thet the Areb states
heve for ten yeers used the Pal-
estinian refugees as political hos-
tages, in their struggle with Is-
rael. As a matter of concerted
policy, these people heve been
kept penned up in the camps in
conditions of wretched hopeless-
ness in order to embarrass Isreel
before the eyes of the world.
While Arab delegates have com-
plained in the' United Notions
over the plight of their brother*
in the refugee camp*, nothing
ha* been done to essist them lest
political leverage over ltr*l be
lost.
and resettlement of these refugees
one way or another.
But above all else, my tour has
reaffirmed my own deep convic-
tion that the only realistic basis
for any effective American policy
toward the Middle East must rest
first of all on the firm assumption
that Israel is an integral part of
the regionand there to stay.
CHINCH \
BUGS?
WI ItlMINATI THIM AND
OUAtAMTfl TOUI LAWN*
TO II CHINCH IUO Hit .
I TO APRIL 1, It**. 2-
'> Phone: FR 9-1761M
TRULY NOLEN.mc
Seaifc c t i Letts* Pm' CtPfrtl fit.
Workers Village
Due for Israel
Jewish National Fund Council of
Greater Miami will hold its third
annual dinner Sunday evening,
Dec. 8. at the Seville hotel.
Daniel M. Broad, president of
the Council, this week announced
the in-advance date for the event.
He said thet "this will be the
first function in e three-year pro-
gram to establish the Miami
Rabeti Nachalah (Greater Miami
Workers Village) in Israel.
Guest of honor at the event will
be well-known philanthropist and
Miami Beach hotelwoman Jennie
Grossinger.
For A
Real
Holiday
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Page 4-A
+ t~tnrrkm*n
Friday, jpir 5, ljsf

vjenist Meridian
Pubinhtd avary Friday tine. tMV by tha ImM
riorldian at 120 N. C. Si*th Blraat. Miami It. 2*Jj
tnttred aa aacond-claaa maHar July 4. 1M0. at tha Poit
Offica of Miami, Fla.. under tha Act of March 3, 1871.
Tha Jewlih Florldlan hat abaorbed the Jew ah Un ty
and the Jewith Weekly. Member of tha Jawlah Teia-
araphic Agency, Seven Artt Feature Syndicate. World-
lde Newa Service. National Editarlal Aaaociation, Amer.
'can Aaaociation of Engliah-Jawiah Newepapera, Florida
Praai Aaaociation. ______________^______________
FRED K. SHOCHET............Editor and Publisher
LEO MINDLIN......................................News Editor Volume 31
OFFICE and PLANT 120 KlW*^
Telephones FR 4-1141 FR 4-zu_____(
6 Tamuz 5717
Friday, July 5, 1957
Number 27
Another Honor for Miami
Miami is again honored. Another of the
community's active personalities has been
chosen for a position of top national leader-
ship.
He is E. Albert Pallot, new president of
District Grand Lodge 5, B'nai B'rith.
Pallot was installed into office during the
lodge's 81st annual convention in Miami Beach
last week.
Pallot has an enviable record in Jewish
and general community affairs. The B'nai B'rith
honor accorded him in recognition of this
achievement also reflects on Greater Miami's
continuing development as a significant met-
ropolitan area.
Applicable to All Jewry
The 68th annual convention of the Central
Conference of American Rabbis on Miami
Beach is over and qone, but some of the issues
raised at the conference will be discussed for
a long time to come.
Perhaps as controversial as any of the
questions aired here were those set forth by
Rabbi Samuel S. Mayerberg, of Kansas City,
Mo., who among other things called for a
streamlined observance of Passover and Suk-
koth.
In summarizing the essence of the Reform
movement. Rabbi Mayerberg lashed out at a
principal weakness its "utter lack of dis-
cipline" which, he charged, is leading many
Reform Jews to revert to traditional practices
in a number of instances.
We do not presume to criticize the rabbi,
but perhaps his suggestions with regard to
Passover and Sukkoth represent, in themselves,
sufficient reason for the reversion on the part
of many to traditional Judaism.
However doctrinal an issue this may be.
Rabbi Mayerberg's larger criticism of the Re-
form movement is equally applicable to Jews
of every shade of thought.
Lashing out at Jewish community leaders
"who frequently iqnore the prayer service and
who openly boast they are not religious," the
Kansas City spiritual leader called for "self-
imposed and voluntarily accepted disciplines
(which) would have a far-reaching effect on
developing a sense of adherence to Judaism
and a feeling that our faith gives guidance and
power to human life."
It seems to us that a similar program for
Jewry everywhere can hardly be considered
out of order. That Rabbi Mayerberg was will-
ing to assume the blame, presumably as a
dangerous trend in Reform Judaism only, is in-
dicative of his deep feeling in this regard and
his sincere desire to rectify it.
Some Interesting Statistics
A Bureau of Jewish Education study pub-
lished in The Jewish Floridian last week indi-
cates some interesting trends with regard to
Greater Miami's Jewish child population.
A startling statistic is that over 900 new
students were added to the rolls of Jewish
schools between 1956 and the current year.
During the past nine years, registration has
increased from 909 to 4.538 students in local
Sunday schools; from 891 to 3,124 students in
afternoon schools.
During the same period of time, there has
been an increase from nine to 30 schools in
the area and from 60 to 264 teachers.
All in all, the Bureau's statistics indicate an
unduphcated registration of some 7,000 stu-
dents in Greater Miami's Jewish schools or
about 90 percent of the Jewish child population.
While, accordinq to the Bureau, this leaves
an estimated 1,000 "Jewish illiterate" children
still to be reached, the briqht side of the fiqure
places Miami above the national average of
30 percent enrollment, particularly for Jewish
communities in the South.
This speaks well for the many wise parents
here, who are seeinq to their children's reliq-
ious education, and suggests to the few negli
gent ones that a needy job still remains to be
BIRTHDAY OF FREEDOM fOR AIL
The Old German Issues
A captain in the new West German Army
has been suspended for hurling anti-Semitic
insults against a half-Jewish enlisted man.
Opined the Munich Abendzeitung: "Ima-
gine what a Jewish, half-Jewish or quarter-
Jewish soldier must feel when he has to stand
at attention before such an officer, who before
long will no doubt be wearing the decoration
awarded him by the Jew killer Hitler."
The Abendzeitung is outraged and seeks
to be kind. But the editorial language is some-
how strange to our ears and little different from
the officer's insult. Even to the righteous there
exist the old German issues of being Jewish
or fractionally Jewish.
Dulles' Rapid Fire Denial
Secretary of State Dulles' rapid fire denial
last week of this nation's alleged role in settlinq
the Arab refugee problem would have been
humorous were it not so tragic.
In his sharp refutation of a rumor that
Uncle Sam had begun talks with friendly gov-
ernments on the feasibility of a new interna-
tional effort to solve the refuqee dilemma, Mr.
Dulles struck a blow at "Egyptian propagan-
da," which seems to preclude such a possibility
at this time.
The propaqanda alleges that the United
States, in collusion with Israel and friendly
Arab nations, is plottinq a settlement at the
expense of the refugees.
The rapid fire denial of the allegation, it-
self, serves two propagandists aims:
1. It assures pro-Israeli forces everywhere
but where it counts- in Israel- that the
sinister international aims of the Egyptian
government do not go unrecognized;
2. It allays the general fear that, when the
chips are down. Arab considerations will
be given top priority-and at the expense
of Israel if necessary.
nHnnBU.Ln0n? u ^V* ims ,akes in, consider-
at on the phqht of the Arab refugees, them-
selves. Mr. Dulles' attitude was, ,n reality To
diHerent from that of the Arab leaded'^who
use the refuqee situation to further their point
cal ends. For these reasons, it could hardly
allay the fears of Israel and her supporters
who see in this divisiveness further evTdence
of chicanery in Mr. Dulles' foreign diplomacy.
during the week
n.H i see it
by LEO MINDLIN
H(
IOWARD PAfT is one of
many writers who m>
cum bed to the lure of the Com-
munist party in the belief that
it was his mission to carry the
message of proletarian ascend-
ancy for all mankind to read.
The doctrinaire elements 0(
' Marxist philosophy set itself as
a single enemv against the lecond prevalent force in twentieth ccn-
turv literaturethe adaptation of new scientific methods by both
critic and artist. Specifically, this meant a struggle launched againit
psychological and poet novelists- writers who seized upon the work
,.l lUlU and Freud In broad social terms, the battle was to typify the
individual against (he mass, with the individual symbolizing the hate-
ful privilege of capitalism and the mass relating to the rise of the
proletarian body.
Certainly, tha Freudian aesthete could not be coerced into the
fracas. Enmeshed within the framework of his private dream world
a world in Communist terms capable of existence only among the
rail if lost in series f two columns m Hummti !#.
The first appeared in The Jewish florUiun ef litnt 21.
leisure classesh? identified with the substance of economic deter-
minism only when he went hungry and held as alien to hie art the
crudities of political and social consideration. It was therefore left
to such as Howard Fast to find the enemy and route him out.
Fast was a particularly excellent addition to Moscow's propagan-
da mill; not only was he a novelist and short story writer, but he also
proved himself as a critic of no mean proportion. "Literature and
Reality" is perhaps the chief substance of his critical writing, which
bean on Fast's ideologic defection from Western democratic thought.
Firm in the belief that the writer must communicate "the nature of
reality to masses of people," he set down his testament of faith in such
unshakeable terms as these:
a
StIZtD BY DIUMMA Of HIS OWN MAKING
"IF ALL THE terror and armed might of the imperialist world could
' not wipe out the Marxists who existed three short decades ago.
then certainly the situation today is one of inevitable transition. Of
all the historical aras men knew, capitalism is the shortest and the
central, most salient fact of today is that capitalism is moving off the
stage of history This is the reality of today, and at the core of
that reality is the mighty Union of Soviet Socialist Republics ."
This was written in 1950. Seven years later, on Feb. 1. 1957. Fat
announced his break with the Communist party. In record time, the
news reached every corner of the capitalist world, whose impending
doom he so frequently predicted The presumably hundreds of mil-
lions of Soviet citizens who admire his work still know nothing about
it. Bogged down by an official censorship that sifts his books and
newspapers, the Soviet citizen is not permitted to read of Mr. Fast's
latest defection.
It is perhaps this more than anything elsehis shock of censor-
ship recognitionthat turned him away from the society whose ban-
ner Fast once waved so frenetically. The inevitable dilemma implicit
in the "reality" he hawked so mightily in the marketplace of Com-
munist philosophy has now seized him: if "their (the writer's) art and
their glory" is communicating the nature of reality, the artist must
be willing to make of reality what the mass wills it for the sake of
defeating the egotistic, privileged enemy. A case in point is the
Soviet populace, which still holds Howard Fast a hero.
a a a a
ootst/ons of coNscifNCf MGiN ro piAcui mm
IN MID-MARCH, I-'.i-t engaged in an exchange of letters with PravHa
war correspondent Boris Polevoi, who is also secretary of the
Soviet Writers Union. The Utters were a follow-up to a February
noie to Russian author Boris Isakov, in which Fast asked Isakov to
tell Polevoi of his decision to break with the Communist party.
Abruptly, all fan mail to Fast in the United States ceased: although
ample evidence cxi-ts thai Buch mail is still being written by his
uninformed admirers and intercepted by Russian postal authori:
It i~ clear from the mid March exchange that Polevoi answered
Fast's message relayed to him through Boris I-akov. for it is men-
tioned subsequently; but the reply never reached the United States.
The second letter to Fast is Interesting for a number of reasons: Writ-
ten In Russian, it is accompanied by an "official" Russian translation,
whose subtle shadings propagandistically outdo Polevoi in his con-
trolled sorrow over Fast's decision; like all Communist dogma, it is
betrayed by a typical vocabulary"sensation-mongering," "unscru-
pulous ravings," "frenzied vituperations" and others: nowhere is
there I whit of individual personality; only intcllectualisation marks
its measured criticism.
Fast's reply is infinitely more significant. The disenchantment
revolves around two questions: "Can no one leave the Communist
party honestlj and openly, criticise Soviet leadership honestly and
openly, and still be treated as a part of mankind?" and "But has it
ever been dishonorable to follow the dictates of one's own con-
science?"

HfTOajC WAS ONCf HIS STOCK IN TtADf
pAST'S FIRST question to Polovol answers itself: "Your own letter
says that you still regard me as a friend, in spite of what I have
done intimating that I have done something dishonorable and tra-
gic.' The answer to th" second questionand Fast's answer must
be Ins break with Communism is total negation of the substance of
his book, literature and Reality." If it he honorable to follow the
dictates of one's own conscience, then one demands the right to in-
dividual discretion whether in art or other endeavors. This can
nl> be found in th Western world, where human destiny is forged
on the belter skelter of compet.tion; where mass action is frequently
held susp.et. and lu-re afforta at indoctrinationFast's erstwhile
glorj goal for the artist are met with supremely stiff-necked opi*>~>"
turn. r '
Left, therefore, are repeated and naive remonstrations of faith
in freedom, with fitfully urgent requests that his tformer) belief i
communism as a democratic faith be proved not misplaced. Left are
""' Pleas for answei \r- we children or fools that
'"'!'. ; planatlooa is always to be m't
with rhetorii be asks.
''"" '''"''"'' own stack in trade. In hi
viou. attack against u......who tailed recognise "the central social
llJ ','' 0U1 bis criticism of "the old doctrine of art-for-
ii K? u'V"1'" maintains an illusion of Independent
thought, rast had seized upon the delicate Czech Jew Frans Kafka
Continued on Paso 7A


FridovJulyMSS?
Pa
NCRAC Confab Spotlights Row Over
Future of Jewish Life in America
3^4
1
CLEVELAND (JTA> The pre
diction that distinctive forms of
Jewish life in the United States will
di-.ippear within the next 25 years
Wa<- made here last week by Prof.
Philip M. Hauser, chairman of the
Sociology Department of the Uni-
DAV7D UUMAH
I versify of Chicago, in an address be-
fore the plenary session of the Na-
tional Community Relations Ad
I visorj Council which represents six
I national Jewish organizations and
38 local Jewish Community Coun-
|cil> throughout the country.
With the mobility of social, eco
Inomic and geographic trends, it will
I be imreasingly difficult for the
I Jewish troup to maintain its iden-
tity in the coming generations,"
[Dr Hau.-er said. The Chicago so-
Iciolog.st cautioned his listeners
that Jewish insistence upon the
Imaintenance of distinctive Jewish
value~ and culture patterns could
lead to tbc creation of a new form
| of ghdiouation.
David L. Ullman, of Philadel-
phia wit alacted charman of the
Natiorl Community Rotations
Advisory Council at the closing
meeting of its three-day plenary
Teenkqers Present Hag
Teen-agers will present a flag to
Ithe congregation of Dade Heights
Jewish Community Center at a
I meeting Sunday evening. Plans
Ifor a July 27 swim dance and rum-
Image sale will also be discussed.
las well as membership in the con-
Igregaticn'.N new bowling league.
Mien here. He hot been a vice
chairman for several years.
Ullman succeeds Bernard H. Tra-
ger. of Bridgeport, who served
four successive terms and now be-
comes a permanent member ex-
officio of the NCRAC executive
committee.
Sidney Z. Vincent, assistant
executive director gf the Cleve-
land Jewish Community Fed
eration. challenged Dr. Hauser
sharply. Vincent pointed out that
the demographers had been com-
pletely wrong in their estimates a
generation ago. Similarly, he said,
repeated predictions since 1920 on
the inevitable drwindling of a dis-
tinctive Jewish life in America had
b^en upset by the continuing and
increasing rigor of Jewish com
munity life
"Despite the great drives for-
ward conformity," Vincent taid,
"Jewish life in America hat
grown in depth and vitality." He
pointed to the increased stress
on Jewish education, the matur-
ing of Jewish community struc-
tures, the adaptability of Jewish
agenciet of all kinds to new prob-
lems, and the continued clutter-
ing of (he Jewish population in
support of his opinion.
A major function of the Jewish
community relations agencies, in-
cluding those represented in the
NCRAC, Vincent said, was to help
assure that the Jewish community
Will Head
Duquesne Group
Rev. Vernon F. Gallagher, presi-
dent of Duquesne University of
Pittsburgh, has announced the ap-
pointment of John Serbin, of Mi-
ami, as chairman of the Florida
Alumni Committee for Duquesne
University.
Serbin received hit BA degree
in business administration and
hit LLD from Duquesne and is
associated with me manufactur-
ing firm of Serbin, Inc. He is
last year's campaign chairmen of
the Combined Jewish Appeal.
Other residents of the Greater
Miami area on the committee are
James J. Boyle. John A. Maracci,
George M. Absalom. Jr.. Mrs. Ce-
cilia M. Milano. Gerald L. Zimmer-
man. Philip A. Campo, Frank J.
Ambrose and Harvey R. Cohen.
I
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eaerel Pirecre* fretieeat
did not become isolated from the
main stream of American life and
that it would grow in spiritual dis
tinctiveness as part of the plural
culture of America.
Dr. Hauser in speaking of dis-
this country said that much of what
has been called "anti-Semitism" is
not anti-Semitism at all. The use
of this term to describe certain
specific types of prejudic* that
Jews have faced in America is "un-
crimination against minorities in warranted and unfounded," he said.
He conceded that Jews perhaps oc-
cupy a certain special place as
scapegoats, but he contended that
the pattern of prejudice aimed at
Jews is the same as that aimed by
the "oldsters" in American com-
munities against all newcomers.
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Page 6-A
General Zionists Postponing
Merger With Rightist Herut

Continued from Pagt 1 A
man. The compromise, however,
gave veto power t the chairman.
A third group, the Union faction.
rejected the compromise because
the convention had bypassed a vote
on merger with Herut, the primary
dive of the Union faction. Mr
Under strict Kosner Supervision
Mashgisch on Premises
Catering for All Occasions
Bernstein was elected chairman
and Mr. Saphir was named chair-
man of the executive.
The delegates approved a resolu-
tion to contact all elements favor-
ing national centralization and free
initiative for Israel's economic lite
with the goal of coordinating such
elements. Another resolution crit-
icized Prime Minister Davl l Ben
Gurion for "belittling" Zionist r-
ganlzations. The delegates also
urged lower taxation among a num-
ber of economic demands.
The finest in Kosher Dining
in Air-Conditioned Comfort
OPEN DAILY
From 4:30 P.M. to 9.30 P.M.
940 71st Street
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Rooms available to suit every need and taste,
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Jewish Groups
Watch Satellites
Continued from Page 'A
aid that the greatest value in
the recent visit tn Britain of
Rumanian Chief Rabbi Moses
Rosen was in the ^establish-
ment of a long interrupted re-
lationship.
Solomon Toff, chairman of the
hoards Israel committee, told th-
deputies thai although the Brit-
ish Governmenl acknowledges Its
friendly attitude toward Israel H
"rather lags behind public opin-
ion- which, he noted, is friendly
toward Israel He hit the Soviel
Union's sale ol arm- '" the Arab
countries, noting that the deliv-
, rj of submarines to Egypt had
caused consternation in Israel
Soviet Envoy
In Sub Talk
TEL AVIV ITA viel Am-
bassador Alexander Abramov Wed-
. discussed Moscow's sending
o| submarines to Egypt with Is-
rat I's Foreign Minister Golda Meir.
I: was assumed that the discussion
took place at Mrs. Men- request.
No detail- ol the talk'- were dis-
closed
The British Embassy here Wed-
nesday denied report-, that the
British Government was engaged
in talk- with Egypt on resumption
of diplomatic relations. The Em-
bassy -aid it was "equally untrue"
that Britain had any intention to
pay reparation- to Egypt lor the
Suez intervention last November.
Friday, July 5. 1957
On hand with Councilman Harold B. Spaet of Miami Beach
Yo discuss Home's curtailed admissions po icy are officials
o, Jewish Home for Aged Daniel Board, director. Abe Kurman.
president. Spaet. and Maurice Pertotem. executive director.
Home announced recently that restricted facilities must bring
admissions to close for time being.
liLINCOLN MANOR
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CATERING
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nu/3
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Under Rabbinical Supervision
OPEN HOUSE WEDDINGS BAR MITZVAHS RECEPTIONS

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nm
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SI. Collins **


Friday, July 5, 1957
-JmAstoflcrMlan
Fast Returns to Realm of Free Human Conscience
Pag* 7-A
Continued from Page 4A
as beinj? symbolic of "very near the top of the "cultural dune heap
of reaction' ..."
Kafka was a reactionary in Fast's eyes for more reasons than
Kafka's private dream world lit by a smitten Jewish ego and devoid
of questions easily identifiable with Marxist doctrine. Kafka was a
reactionary precisely because he was a practicing Jewthat hard core
of morality not easily ground up into the anonymity of Communist
nicdiocracy.

WRf ARE MO 4NSWMS TO MIS QUESTIONS
IN 1957, felled by the need "to follow the dictates of ones own con-
science." Fast wrote in his letter to Polevoi: "Can it do more
harm th^n has already been done to tell us why Jewish writers were
murdered by your government, why Bulganin uses anti Somitism as
foreign policy, why the whole disgraceful theory- of anti-Semitism
.,. born and used in your land?"
When Polevoi visited the United States in 1955. he told Fast that
tin Soviet Yiddish writer, Kvitko, was more popular than ever. "And
?. y~why- Jjri*" Fast asks in his mid March letter, "did you tell
in vnnr '" 5Z T^ ^ KVitk W"S aIJVe a"d *"<* ving
pJZ.J*mT USe y0Ur "****>' when he was among those
executed and long since dead? ..
.___I?* Wi".n" ne u now Yit"k Pfeffer died? The Poles in-
formed us that Khrushchev attempted to use anti-Semitism to sway
the mner struggle in Poland. Why does no one deny this?"
ro all his whys, there is no answer from Polevoi. Nor is therr-
answer to his final plea: "Tell me that anti Semitism is over and
done with. There is only answer in Howard Fasts own words writ
ten long ago: "Red-baiting, anti-Sovietism, anti-Communism are the
mortal enemies of literature, and indeed of any art because they
. deny the existence of the central social reality of our times."
In Howard Fast's defection is his denial of this central social
realityand the silence from Boris Polevoi and the cessation of let-
ters from his erstwhile Russian admirers, though they still write him
faithfully every day. In his repugnant reaction to the anti-Semitism
of the Kremlin is his returning insistence as a free human spirit in
every soul everywhere.
McCoy Adoption
Seems Assured
Continued from Pago 1A
in th* case. Last month, th*
Ellisos won a fight to stay in
Florida whon Oov. Collins re-
fused to permit their extradi-
tion to Massachusetts on a
kidnap charge.
A secret report of the Florida
Board of Public Welfare which u
said to favor the Ellises is ex-
pected to aid their case. Ben
Cohen and John S. Lloyd, their
attorneys, say they are prepared
for any eventuality resulting
from the judge's decision. Both
lawyers are working without
fees
I
Egypt Defies U.S. Stand Fedayeen Move to Bluff United Nations Force
On FfPpHniTl fif WataiX Contino.dfromPag.iA prevented from stealing agricul- suits from the recent order by Gen.
VI I CCU VI VI IdlClJ dayeen units had been disbanded. !tural equipment by settlement Burns to his troops not to fire on
Continued from Page 1 A
rights ( led before the Sinai war.
After withdrawal, "the principles
ol mteri i'ional law regarding free
and inr.ocenl passage again be-
came ..: cabtf to Israeli traffic in
the Gull < i Aqaba."
The United States called for
solution of differences in ac-
cordance with the spirit of the
United Nations and said this
Beach Zionist Will Hold
Vection Meet Thursday
Miami Beach Zionist District will
hold annual election of officers
Thur-:. \ evening. July 11, at the
DiLicio h' lei.
Nominating committee, consist-
ing ol Al Ossip, chairman, Dave
Goodwin. Jack Fishman. Dr. Ar-
thur Shapiro, Ed Marger and Ben
Appei. will present the slate of
candi Joseph i'ardo, member of the
board ol directors, is in charge of
entertainment.
country would take into account
any future decision by the In-
ternational Court of Justice re-
garding the Aqaba Gulf. The
note said the United States "sup-
ports the continued stationing of
the United Nations Emergency
Force at the Straits of Tiran be-
lieving that the force contributes
importantly to peace in the
are*/'
On Israel's Suea rights, the note
cited the United Nations Security
Council resolution ol Sept. 1, laoi.
It also noted the six principles of
the Security Council resolution of
Oct. 13, 1956, particularly the one
reaffirming "free and open transit
through the canal, without discrim-
ination, overt or covert." Egypt's
belligerency rights were question-
ed on the matter of denial of pas-
sage to Israeli shipping.
The United States called atten-
tion to the Charter of the United
Nations which speaks ol settlement
of disputes "in conformity with the
principles of justice and interna-
tional law."
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dayeen units had been disbanded.)
The marauders may be less active,
these circles said, but they are
still operating from the Gaza Strip
and the numerou* mine ambas-
cades along the Strip are obviously
the work of trained fedayeen. It
is possible that the units have
been dispersed, the Foreign Min-
istry sources Rranf. but the organ-
ization with its officers still exists.
Increased infiltration activi-
ties were noted in the Gaza Strip
border area as two infiltrators
were killed and two others fled
beck to the Strip when they were
intercepted by an Israeli petrol.
The patrol fred on the infiltra-
tors when they ignored a call
to halt. The two who were killed
wore khaki and had food for two
or three days.
Army officals said that infiltra-
tion into Ncgev settlements has
increased recently and that in sev-
eral cases the infiltrators were
tural equipment by settlement
guards. Israelis believe that the
increase in cross-border raiding re-
Burns to his troops not to fire on
infiltrators unless they are attack-
ed.
Now ... a dignified residence for
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To Miamicma Who Are) Expert. In Th Art CM Relaxation
ENJOY THE BEST OF VACATIONS
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f* the e.c
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je*ist>norffl*L
Pcge 8-A
Friday, July S. 1957
Sa^mMMSTnstaHOfficers
I UMIiy of ,c osKrove. Vivian Coagrove. Mtrilyn
The Young 0*^^"'^ iC',I IKreed. Sanford FY*f. Calvin Gou!,!,
Dade^un.y held itsinau^a. bar, ja. ^ Richd Knight_ ^
h'So^P^wasHo.HaM;in
on, circuit judge, Dade county.
riven, annimu -*, .-.... iiU|
(lerald Klein. Richard Knight. Al
Lange.
Thomas E. Lee. Jr.. Harold Mc-
Mullen. Alice Marlin. Joseph Mur-
e, uaac uv- .......
phy. Sidney Shofron. Edward Swan.
To.stm.sUr for th. *"'" j Co*laP. Wesley Jackson.
S^WlJSt^ffl^S CarUng Stcadm.n. Florence Differ,
dent of the Youno. Democratic Verier. Ronnie Jabara.
Clubs of the State of Florid..
invocation was bj Hon. JUy Pair-
son, circuit Judge, Dade count!
The newl> eleoted officers ana
directors Installed for tbe coming
year are:
I. v ; jident; Ron-
K ppel, tirsl vice preddjoli
m lei < nd vice
president; and Roxcj 0 Haft, *
u-iaiy transuwr.
Directors are Robert ApW. James
Boozer. Burnestine' Suite, Frank
" coe discus** m** mm \^tJSLm\ot^^-
Capitol Hill Dhahran Policy Rapped
NEW YORK The Ameri-
can Jewish Congress Monday call-
ed upon Sen. J- W. Fuloright.
taairman of the Senate Foreign
relations Subcommitte" which is
row studying American Middle
last policy, to investigate our
S )vernment's "policy of acquits-
. nee in discriminatory Saudi
Arabian policies."
The request to Sep. Fulbright
.i- made in a communication
i run Dr. Israel Goldstein. AJl
tress president. It was accom-
jnied by a 24-page report d<
i. iling the terms of tlv* U.S. lease
. n the Dhahran Airfield In Sau li
Arabia, which challenges the
practices of the Saudi Arabian
g nernment in excluding Amer-
ican Jews, members of the U.S.
Armed Forces, to the Dhahran
Airfield and in refusing to allow
; .lblic Christian religious services
tor American personnel serving
at the field.
In foreword to the compre-
hensive report which is entitled
"What Price Bias: The Dha-
hran Airfield," Thomas K. Fin-
lettsr, who was U.S. Secretary
of the Air Force in 19S1 when
'he principal Dhahran lease
was negotiated, asserts: "The
United States is now assisting
S.udi Arabia in its discrimina-
tory practices by screening
American military personnel
assigned to service at Dhahran
. This seems to me a state
of affairs which should not be
accepted and should be stop-
ped."
"I cannot agree with the i lea
I inletter continue.-, "that any one
ase such as Dhahran is vital. I
i 0 not believe that the need for
the Dhahran air base in any way
requires u to sacrifiCa the prin-
ciples in which the American
people believe. I think that the
value of the Dhahran base i rel-
ative!} small and that ii van be
replaced, but that the value ol
the principle involved is high
and cannot be renl.
The request to Sen Fulbright
called attention to the tact that
the r S. lease on Dhahran was re-
newed by the State Department
in April. 1957. "without any pro-
vision torbidding discrimination
against American citizens," de-
spite th? unanimous declaration
of the U.S. Senate deploring such
discrimination.
On July 26. 1956. the Senate
adopted S.K. 323. declaring that
it regarded any distinctions
among American citizens by for-
eign countries based on their in ,
dividual religious affiliation as'
incompatible with the relations
that should exist between nations.
The resolution went on to de-
clare that in any future negotia-(
tions with foreign states "every j
reasonable effort should be made
to maintain this principle." Since
the U.S. renewal on Dhahran was
concluded in the form of execu-
tive agreements rather than trea-
ties, the lease has not been sub-
mitted to the Senate for ratifica-
tion.
Resource*
Over
100,000,000.00
deral
Savings andLoan Association
LAROEBT and OLDEST IN MIAMI ACM
ATTENTION w: CONSUMERS
THE UNITED BAIABATIM VAAD HAKASHRUTH OF GREATER MIAMI
hereby serves notice that it can verify the Kashruth ONLY of those
establishments that have the VAAD LICENSE. All VaatTSupervised
poultry must have a special Vaad Seal bearing Vaad name. Be sure
of Kashruth look for VAAD SEAL.
Lincoln Road at Washington Avenue
665 Washington Ave. 7lst and Harding Awe.
260 Sunny bles Blvd.
and YOl'R MAHi; VI M All.KOV
I
I
i
MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY
THE CEMETERY OF DISTINCTION
FOR DISCRIMINATING FAMILIES
5505 N.W. 3rd Street Phone MO 1-8201
BUS 19 PASSES MOUNT NEBO
Psydiiofrisi, film Scheduled
By Mental Health Society
:>r. Paul s. Jarrett, psychiatrist,
l discuss the film "Feelii
Depression," at the monthly film
discussion program of the Mental
Health Society of Greater i
16 in the Miami Public Li-
rj auditorium.
This .is the fifth in he set
"Making Yyu.r Emotions Work for
xi u." offered as a public service
'. the Mental Health Society in
cooperation with the library. Ad-
mission is free.
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THE CORMAC
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*i7J 7t II SOUTHWEST Ilk STREET
Mxt to Corner ul 33r4 Avenue
M ~v. r,. Jt,
I i *.!, stevaMMi
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- .1
.pt .t. ..- h, nai.. m>. *. m
... %.., >... ri sss>
. 1- ...fc lifl
'-' i- .....um Cesb seh $
H.......<<.r~e
1*1 .11,,,., r..w m .Mk
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I '' mtkr% Mfui ml | ^
,.. >lis mIK * Mali $ cseiet if atyUhat m secssts
% ael tar pieeaw
* Caatiateel far bit
k oa states eftai erefl
1 aest cMseatti sm H
189
vm y.4 t 1 tm I
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>MAOi.lr coeoATtON
4M M w Imam* Amm
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PNONES: ] W 4-5922
> HI 4 5921
nasaai 1 -, w. ^, r~ mmm .1 ** 1
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s. fmast >,. ,w,4 ,
alj
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SHADltr CORTORATION I
NWJrtM ,^l4,
NM H IJJ77
<#
C-


Friday, July 5. 1957
c/Vofes front the ./Q*U>i\
The following it another in a tertet of articles prepared by MNtal
leaders here for The Jewish Flondtan "Rabbinical Corner" in cooper-
ation with the Greater Miami Rabbinical Assn. Rabbi Abraham
Herton, of T,fereth Israel Xorthside Center, it coordinator of (bit
Assn. program.
Food of the Community
Is Knowledge of Judaism
^^^^^ftrHUrr
By
RABBI HERBERT BAUMOARO
South Dad* Jewish Center
Some of you may be familiar
with the story of the old Jew who
first cautioned his grandson
against lighting matches on th
Sabbath and men proceeded to
smoke a cigarette. A bystander
was perplexed by this seeming
lark of inconsistency on the part
of this seemingly pious Jew. H
went up to the old man and ask-
ed. 'Tell me, sir. Why did you
forbid the lad to light a match
and then light one yourself? Is
it any less wrong for you to vio-
latc th- Sabbath?" Whereupon
the old Jew answered. "It is writ-
ten. 'V'shomru V'nay Yisroel es
H.i Sli.ibbos.." ("H is written.
And the children of Israel shall
keep the Sabbath'.")
I'nfortunately, this story is de-
scriptive of most Jewish adults
Most Jewish parents open-
I) admit, "I belong to the syna-
gogue for the sake of my child-
CANDLEUGHTING TIME
6 Tamuz 8:57 pjn.
Sabbath <^<
ren." The implication is that the
parent does not want or need
Jewish education or affiliation.
Judaism is for children.
A few years ago, I spoke in the
pulpit of the Orthodox synagogue
in Klmont. L.I., .is part of a com-
munity program. I pointed to a
prayer-book and said, "Some of
us open the prayer-book from
the left, and others of us open it
from the right, but none of us
can translate more than a few
words of the Hebrew." After the
program, the Orthodox rabbi and
his members agreed with me that
there is one thing Reform Jews
and Orthodox Jews share in
common; they are all ignorant of
even the most basic Jewish teach-
ings. Needless to say, wc would
not exempt our Conservative col-
leagues from this generalization.
Of modern. American Jewry we
can unfortunately say, "Ignor-
ance is our badge."
In brief, there are differences
in practice between traditional
and liberal Jews, but there is
hardly a difference in under-
standing the heart of Judaism
We must then conclude that the
most pressing task to which the
synagogue must address itself to-
day is not the education of the
child, but the education of the
adult Jew. Most synagogues to-
day are making a serious and
somewhat fruitful attempt to
*4M. NfffBtffr BAUmCAKD
. innorance our berfge
reach the child, but few synago-
gues arc attempting to reach the
adult in an intelligent way.
Some synagogues have what is
called an "Adult Education Pro-
gram." Frequently this means
that on a few occasions in the
year a speaker other than the
rabbi will be invited to speak to
the congregation. Some synago-
gues go beyond this and have a
series of formal classes: although,
to be sure, not too much study is
expected of the self-sacrificing
students. Few synagogues are
wise enough to make every as-
pect of its program an avenue of
"adult education."
The time has come for us to ad-
mit in American Jewish life that
the synagogue must be first a
house of study before it can be in
truth a house of worship. The
problem of service-attendance
can be licked only after the prob-
lem of adult study is conquered.
Once we can face up to this ele-
mentary fact, we will then iind
ways to reach the minds of our
people. No meeting in which the
synagogue is involved should be
just a business meeting.
If the board of trustees -ieet.;,
the first minutes of the meeting
should be devoted to some aspect
of Jewish study. Afterwards, the
business of the meeting will be
conducted on a higher plane. If
the Sisterhood meets, the matter
of the donor luncheon should be
secondary to a consideration of a
"DVar Torah." Perhaps some of
the bickering over trivial maUcrs
will be thereby eliminated. We
have too little in our synagogue
life which lifts and deepens.
When we realize that the entire-
synagogue program should be a
facet of "adult education," then
we will begin to reach our pcopie.
Psychologists teach that otten
when a person refuses to take
nourihment, it is the sign of the
absence of the will to live. Re-
ligiously speaking, the food of
the Jewish community is a know-
ledge of Jewish teachings and
experience through the centuries.
By refusing to partake of this
ai 9-a
nourishment, we Jews are expres-
sing the will to suicide. Whether
or not one is a Reform, CoMser-
vative, or Orthodox Jew, loyalty
to Judaism demands that one
know, do and teach the basic tc.
cts of our faith. There can be no
intelligent doing and teaching
without knowledge.
The adult Jew must be shaken
out of his complacency. He mu-t
be confronted with the fact Btat
a refusal to study on his part is
a vote for the death of Judai >.::.
He must come to feel that devo-
tion to study is a vote for Juc'a
ism, that he and Judaism will
live and not die only insofar a> he
proposes to absorb and project
the living word. Each adul> Jew
must come to share that pride
in himself as a depository of the
wi-dom of his fathers which *
expressed in the words of the
Prophet who declared that tiie
day would come when non-Jews
would grab hold of th" garment
of the Jew and exclaim, "We
want to go with you. for we have
heard that God is with you!"
ervtces in
(greater AGUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle
vs. Orthodox. Rabbi Isaac Ever.
e %
ANSHE EMES. 2535 SW 19th
** Cantor Samuel Salkow.
, I- i" Saturday a.m.
r*r Mi'svaa |i.. winatnn, son ..f
Mr an Ml II.

BETH OAVID. 2425 SW 3rd ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Yaakov Rosen-
b'9. Cantor William W. LI p. an.
'*:U pm. Xrrmon: -H.brxl.
1 '' American i'......
' a.m.

, "TH EL. 500 SW 17h eve. Or-
hodox. Rabbi Sbmeryahu T. Swlr-
1*9.

BETH EMETH. 12250 N.W. 2nd
t. Conservative. Rabbi David W.
1 "arson.
, ';'' '" P "i S.itnrilnv I
1 '.'' "" < ill. Mil.I
I i: low.
e
, BETH ISRAEL. 4000 Prairie ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi H. Louis Rott-
|nnn.
' '1' m, Saturday 8:J0 a.m.

BETH JACOB. 301-311 Washing-
Is." "I" 0rW*- *bbl Tiber
|*rn. Cantor Maurice Memcbes.
.
BETH RAPHAEL. 135 NW 3rd
' 0r1hodex. Rabbi Arle Becker.
^^x. Rabbi Joseph E. Racbev
''. m
lami
' .., .L1UDERDALK *ANU*L. KNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid
. And>** *- F. Lauder- eve. Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehr-
Jale. Reform. Rabbi Marius Ran- field. Center Abraham Self,
on.
MIAMI HEBREW CONGREGA-
TION. 1101 SW 12th ave. Orthodox.
Rabbi Simon April. Cantor Berele
Kelemer.
I rlla> 6 ii.in. Saturday |:M a.m.
Si iniiTi "Weekly Pori li n
SOUTH DADS JEWISH CEN-
TER. Reform. R-bbi Herbert M.
Baumgard.

SOUTHWEST JEWISH CENTER.
4438 SW Stb at. Conservative. Rab-
bi Abraham Levitan.

TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM. 4144
Chase ave. Liberal. Rabbi Loon
Kronish. Cantor Samuel Kelemer.

TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 1701
Washington avo. Conservative.'
Rabbi Irving Lehrman. Cantor Is-
rael Reich.
temple Israel. 137 ne 19th
St. Reform. Rabbi Joseph Narot.
Cantor Jacob Bornstein.
Friday 1 I", pm chapel eervtcea to]
be ..n.lii, i.-.i b> k.ii.i.i Morria w '
draff.
TEMPLE *JUDEA. 320 Palermo!
ave. Liberal. Rabbi Morris Skop.

TEMPLE NER TAMID. To be
erected at 80th st. and Tatum water- ,
way. Conservative.
Pridn I M p m .11 T*M CoHDm |
Suluril.i\ : a in.
TEMPLE SINAI of North Miami.
131st st. and N.E. 6th avo. Re
form. Rabbi Benno M. Wallacb.
ZAMOKA JEWISH CENTER. 44
Zemore eve. Conservetive. Rabbi
B. Loon Hurwitz. Cantor Rudo'ph
Brill.
I'l iiluy i .'.ii p in S., ; j|
>' i i < n "Weekly Portion. Bei n
Ailhnr. xi.n of Mi ,.i.l Mi- III c
(jordoo. i*' honofod on tin.....
of Mh forthcoming weddlnsj.
ASSISTANT TEACHER
wanted for afternoon Hebrew School
and Sunday School. Write foil de-
tail*: education, eiiperience. reter-
encea. salary deeired. Write t-
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM,
Hollywood. Florida
HEBREW ACADEMY. 918 6th
t. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander
?>rose>
e e e
HIALEAH MIAMI SPRINGS. 951
flamingo way. Conservative.
e e e
HOMESTEAD CENTER. 183 NE
Bth tt Homestead. Conservative.
Morris Gertt officiates.
e e e
HOLLYWOOD TEMPLE BETH
EL. 1645 Polk St., Hollywood. Re-
form. Rabbi Minard Klein,
e e
HOLLYWOOD BETH SHOLEM.
1725 Monroe St., Hollywood. Con-
servative. Rabbi Samuel Lerer.
a e e
HOLLYWOOD TEMPLE SINAI.
2030 Polk St., Hollywood. Conserv-
ative. Rabbi David Shapiro. Cantor
Yehodah Heilbraun.
a e
ISRAELITE CENTER. 3198 SW
24th ter. Conservetive. Rabbi Mor-
ton Malevsky.
rlrtdaj r. as imi attkreae1 s a.m.
Dau Mltsvaa si.mm ia,, .-.ii i.r Mi
-h.i Mrs. trunk Ml
MONTICELLO PARK. 164th st.
and NE 11th ove. Conservative.
Rabbi Isaac Lerer. Cantor Jacob
Goldferb.
KiH.i\ f:M M in Bervtoea eotSduoted
b) < ".int. i- .i.i. ob Ooldfarb Baturdai
i a in.
a e
NORTH DADE CENTER. 13630
W. Dixie hwy. Conservative. Rabbi
Henry Okolica. Cantor Maurice
HaV.
i-ri'i... ^ r. i in. s>rni,n "OtMoa
r tin Father*rart I." Haturdaa I
am. Itar Mlin.ih Ralney, son "i Mi
.mil Mi- San fold KIvhiiiaii
e e
NORTH SHORE CENTER. 620
75th st. Conservative. Rabbi Mayor
Abramowitz. Canter Edward Klein.
TEMPLE ZION. 5720 SW 17th
st. Conservative. P.abbi Alfred
Waxman.
* e
TIFERETH ISRAEL. 6500 N.
Miami ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Abraham Herson. Cantor Albert
Glantx.
i-'i.... < ''i p ni Rervln it. ,i
bj \i irah. ii II i". mi*.
prealdi n i Ha i ui da I .. at
Paleti Unveiling
The .lcluurii.il of a monument .
to the aSfSMfy of the late i
JACOB PALfTZ
formerly of 1776 S.W. 13th St.
Miami
u>ill take place
Seadey, Job; 7 et 10:00 AM.
al Mount Nebo Cemetery wxt'i
Rabbi Herbert HaumnarJ
0ffniJ!lIll(
Mr Pjlrt; i- Mrvivod hy h;-
v'.iir. Sarah; ton, Alan; taw
lUuKhtcr.. Ann Wiener and
Mona Margoist; and five gram:
ichildrcn.
FnenJ.t and relatives are ir
i|Ur. TORAH TEMPLE. 1254 West^
ave. American Judaism. Rabbi'
Abraham Cassel.
MAM WANTfO 10 ACT AS
RABBI t CANTOR
far Hif h Nethfoy Services et Home-
stead Jewish Cemmenity Cooler.
Pleaie cewroct Mr Mewssen at
Circle 7-9948
* ond Whad .,n.i s.
..ml
lah?tL WAY J,W,SH CENTER
|jy0" Bej.min B|#eh Conwrv,.
ERADulH,CHTS JE"W,SH CEN-
CtGLcR0^NADA. 50 NW
L Conrvatlve. Rabbi Leo
GORDON E^X
FUNERAL HOME
M/emi'i Pianttr Jtwish fvmtiul Ham*
FR 3-3431
FRanklin 9-1436
710 S.W. 12th Ave. Miami
, HARRY GOROOH, rVetleeaf
m CORDON, fvnrraf Director
7
CANTOR
BRILLIANT LYRIC TENOR
10 years' experience with largo
Metropolitan Congregations.
Available for High Holy Days
in Miami or the South. Write
Cantor A. B., c/o Box 2973,
Miami 13, Florida
Ossip Unveiling
The dcd.idlu.ii of a Tnnuumeii:
to the mrmorv of the U:e
JOSEPH OSSIP
Ave .
Miami Bi
will tak- place
Sunday, July 7th, at 12 noon
at Mourn Sinai Mem.
Par*. Ceme.-i u ith
Rdhhi T*aakod Rn-enherg
. Floating.
Fnendt (/ ilie jamil\ are
requeued to aiiend.
MJGUST BROS ft>:/
HOTEL... MOTEL... HOME
Or APARTMENT HOUSE OWNERS
Wo ere Wore to servo yea with COMPLETE LINE OF LINENS
CANNON SHEETS BLANKETS SPREADS
PILLOW CASES BATH TOWELS
it DISH TOWELS
DRAPES CURTAINS BED PADS RUGS
TABLE CLOTHS PLASTIC GOODS
Connon Womsurto Fieldcrest Pacific
AIR CONDITIONED
II MASL* SSPAN0L
MIAMI
WHOLESALE
CORPORATION
D. SIR0TT. rrus.
127
N.E. 9th St.
PR 1-8737
PARKINS
SW?


JeHlstncrldtoH


r

rdoy- July 5. 19S7
Fcge 10-A
HILARY 3ii\DLiX
In HebreVand Judaism, a Mutual Relationship for Eternity
ill tlUUICVV OIIU ^MWW f heginniiw. of the alphabet, straight through Blb
HEBREW: THE ETERNAL LANGUAGE. By William
Chomsky. 321 pp. Philadelphia: Th. Jew.sh Pub-
lication Society of America. $4.00.
I HAVE ALWAYS been baffled by the ease with which
people disregard their language. Great hordes of
American students, for example, shy away from BtgUfft
courses: taking for granted their ability to communicate,
thev assume their knowledge of speech supremely suffi-
cient But language >s really much more than communi-
cation It Is the mold into which our whole conception
Of the universe is poured: it orders our thought
To learn a new language, particularly one outside ol
the Standard Average European family to which
English belongs, is to explore in totally different patterns
<1 thinking. English, for instance, is a bipolar langUJ
we see the world in terms of things and action- (nouns
II.IAIIV SALPETER
and -pace, form and formlo-sness. reality
Ihe Hopl Indian, this Is all HOB-
monistlcally, according to
duration; his verbs are tenseles-
n,s world is. therefore,
coni-
and verbs), lime
and Imagination But to
sense. He analyaes natu
events with more or less
having instead validity.
pletely different from ours.
Dr. Chomsky's fascinating book Is no MOM
are complacent about their Hebrew, simply hfMUt.
can read and understand It. Although hi
larized an deasy to read, it is also scholarly, studded wun
Ot and reference,. Don't pick it up then, unless you
re prepared to be enthralled, to be late to meal-. 0 m --
ppo.ntment- Its that good. Otherwise you mas And
yourself in the position ol the little girl who reported on
:, book about penguins. "This book." she wrote carefully,
"tells me more about penguins than I care to know.
Dr. Chomsky takes the story of Hebrew lrom
they
hook is popu
the
Anti-Semitism and the Hungarian Revolution
Jerusalem
THOUSANDS OF THE men. women and children who
crossed the small bridge at Andau from Hungary
to Austria last November and December were Jew-. The
majority of them have since arrived in Israel.
The refugees brought memories ol Soviet tanks crush-
ing the Budapest revolts, of frenzied mobs mercilessly
murdering agents of the hated Communist Secret 1'olae.
They also brought with them a heated and continuous de-
bate: Had the Hungarian revolt an anti-Semitic color
or not?
The argument evidently started on the day the revolt
broke out In Israel, however, it recently crystalized
around a novel published in Tel Aviv in Hungarian. The
author of the hook. Krvin Abadi, was not in Hungary dur-
ing the revolt hut chum- to have collected the material
from hundred- oi refugees who witnessed and participated
in the revolt.
The hero of the story is a young man. scarcely out of
his teens, a son of Jewish parent- His father was killed
during the Second World War. and his mother later re-
married a non-Jew. The boy grew up without an> Jewish
education, and only in general term-, was he aware of his
Jewishness. Educated in the Communist youth movement-,
he is a loyal and active party member whose very idealism
rnngs him into the circle* that prepared the revolt. But
gradually he discovers that anti-Semitism exists even in
if Win SCHWARTZ
Communist regimes, even in
Communist revolts: when
the revolt is crushed and he is forced to flee, he finds nil
waj to l-rael and to a conscious Jewish life.
Mercifully, the literary merits ol the book have been
left outside the -cope ol the argument, which concentrates
on the question ol and Scmitism. Though the Hungarian
Immigrants Assn.'s Cultural Department organized sev-
eral literary di-cu-ion evenings, it was the historic facts
and not the belletn-tic values that were contested.
Organized in the form of a -Literary Tribunal," the
discussion featured a "prosecutor" and a "defense counsel."
Th*. former charged that the book creates the impression
that the Hungarian revolt was anti-Semitic and it was the
entry of the Soviet troop- which saved Hungarian Jewry
from massacre. In fact, however, it was the entry of Soviet
troops which evoked anti Semitic excesses, from the nioli-,
the "prosecution" claimed.
The "Counsel for the Defense." on the other hand,
maintained that the Soviets' entry indeed prevented a
general anti-Semitic outburst in revolting Hungary, and
that the very seeds of the revolt already had some anti-
Semitic coloring.
The first piece of evidence offered by the "prosecu-
tion was a letter by a young couple now living in Israel,
who claimed to have actively participated in the revolt.
The husband, an electrical engineer, was working in the
communications division of the revolution's headquarters.
Voyage of the Mayflower in Retrospect
THERE WERE SOME J which brought
Columbus the new world, but there were no Jews
en the Ma] eider Prof. Schlesmeer
ei Harvard's history facu wrote that if you looked
ever the p i .r. you might sus-
pect that the pa the Red Sea rather
than the Atlantic. The- name- on the Mayflower pa
ger list are almost HebraicSeth, Gideon. Noah and Aaron.
The dissenters and Puritans sot their name-, for the most
part, from the Old Testament The Old Testament doesn't
tare so well with some moderns, but it built up America.
innni nr a. lift
Racial Issue Skirted
Hollywood
ROBERT ROSSEN, WHO made himself a name a- the
* director of the Oscar-winning All the King's Men,"
several year- ago, now has completed "Island in the Sun."
iir-t in a series ol top-budget features Darryl K. Zanuck is
producing for 20th Century-Fox release. The filming of
Alec Waugh's explosive novel of racial tension in the West
Indies ha- been a challenge to both the director and the
producer. The picture has all the ingredients of a SUi
lul -creen venture; a star-studded cast lead by Jam. -
Mason. Joan Fontaine and Dorothy Dandridge. with fine
individual performances: the breath-taking heautv of Bar-
bados caught in a series of semi-documentary vignettes
and last, not least, the personality and calypso son.- oi
Harry Belafonte.
Yet, Alfred Haves' screen treatment i| svnthetic and
mi-too-contrived. Of course, there is no ready-made an-
*wer to the race issue. But the picture even misses a
Iear definition of th? question itself. The story mush-
rooms in many directions and the overlapping si'tuations
never pay off. We are not so sure that the screen approach
o the delicate problem will do more good than harm in
the relationship between whites and colored in the troubled
west Indies and elsewhere.

July 1 was "Jerry Lewis Homecoming Day" in New
seevetyfW,hn if lT>US New*-born comedian toured
seven of the state s biggest communities on behalf of his
first solo starring film. Paramount'* "The Delicate Delin-
quent Lewis visited in Newark, Irvington. Elizabeth
Mornstown Patterson. Hackensaek and Jersey Uty to
mark the begmnmg of a national tour that will take him
rlrl, Th' *-*"*' east' south and west-f
promotion of the movie.
The Pilgrims' knowledge of Judaism, at least while
they were in England, must have been confined to what
they got from the Bible, but in Holland it is possible that
they got to know some Jews in the flesh. Upon being
kicked out of England, they had fled to Holland where all
refugees from oppression went at the timeincluding the
Jews. Spinoza was not yet born when the Pilgrims stop
ped over, but Hembrandt was a young fellow at the time
anil I wouldn't be surprised hut that on some days, you
could have seen the Pilgrims who came on the Mayflower,
Rembrandt and some Dutch Jews walking on the same
Dutch street. While Rembrandt was not a Jew. he seemed
to have an appreciation of the type- that were persecuted.
Had the Pilgrims remained longer in Holland, doubtless
Rembrandt might have left us some portraits of them. ...
he did of the Dutch Jews ol the da]
Today we -peak in hallowed terms of the Pilgrims
who came on the Mayflower, but in their own day they
Wi n a- little to be envied as the refugee- we see about
us today. We don't -peak today of those uprooted and
crossing seas to seek a home. We -peak of them as dis
placed persons, immigrants, refugees. Pilgrims has a high-
falutin tone. Well, the Mayflower people didn't know tin y
were Pilgrims either.
ROKIS SMOLAR
earliest beginnings of the alphabet, straight through Bib-
Heal and mishnaic Hebrew, to its present revitahzation
as a modern vernacular. Sidesteps along the way note the
difference between classical and post-Biblical Hebrew, ex-
plore the -nil being-discovered noa Biblical source, f lle.
I in u through which old words are restored to the langu.
age and pursue the evolution of the vowel system.
one of the most interesting sections deals with the
method by which new words are coined; during the past
23 years, some 10.000 words have come into the language.
M,ilu. nee- ol Yiddish, Russian, Arabic, Aramaic and others
appear: it is Ihe job of the Hebrew Languag.- Academy
In see that the syntax and grammar of the language guide
the admission and form of these new arrivals.
There are such piquant observations as "evidence
punts to the assumption that the so-called Ashkenazic pro-
nunciation reallv -terns fig"1 Palestine Sephardie .
may have been impofted/Snto Spain from BabjrtfjD": and
ur cursive script possesses traces of the old Hebrew
script. An alphabet of Old Hebrew",'in which the Tea
Commandments may have been written, is included.
one could only wish that Dr. Chomsky, with his
scholar's method, would have pushed further into Hebrew
philosophically, into a metalinguistic discussion, perhaps.
There seems a vehemence, a purposefulness, implicit in
the very structure of the language. The letters, themselves,
u Edmund Wilson noted, have the look of being cut in
stonea "taking for granite" with a difference. In the
strange Umelessness of Biblical verbs, is there not a
dimension of eternity'' Can we not say that a people who
conceive of life in so unified a fashion, building word
upon word from a common base, have monotheism im-
plicit in their conception of reality?
Dr. Chomsky's fine book, like all such, is a little dis-
turbingone always wishes there had been more.
jjHfgg FRiEDMAN
They Get Fresh View
Washington
IINITED STATES MILITARY personnel have received of-
** fieial educational training material objectively des-
cribing Arab collaboration with Soviet Russia and injus-
tices against Israel.
American soldiers and sailors stationed in the United
States and throughout the world have received "Depart-
ment of Defense Pamphlet 3-2 It was prepared by the
Office of Armed Forces Information and Education.
The publication is indicative of growing displeasure
in top U.S. military circles over Egyptian President Na-ser.
"But he's not a President in the American sense: he's
really a dictator." This is quoted directly from the De-
fense Department pamphlet. It contrasts with cautious
State Department expressions which delicately avoid of-
fending Nasser.
Defense Department Pamphlet 3-2 states: "The Arab ]
states refuse to make peace with Israel or even to admit
its right to exist They maintain an economic boycott of
the country, and Egypt has prevented Israel's ships from
using the (Suez) canal The oil pipeline from Iraq to the
Israel port of Haifa Is closed sometimes they talk of
pushing Israel into the sea."
The pamphlet reports that the most serious and diffi-
cult problem of the Arabs is "grinding poverty." Yet "re-
actionary elements have little concern for improving life
for the masses." On "only one subject are the Arab coun-
tries united opposition to Israel."
Russian efforts to persuade the Arabs that Moscow
back-, them against Israel are described. Anti Western
and "anti-Israel propaganda have convinced many Arabs
that the Soviet Union is their friend. They were further I
convinced of this by Soviet actions m the United Nations]
and the offer of volunteers' to help Egypt .'
IS servicemen are now told in training lectures that j
purchases ol Communist arms by Egypt and Syria have;
been followed by Soviet military advisers and technicians)
The Cairo and Damascus radios broadcast pro Soviet j
views over the whole Arab world, but the tragic events
in Hungary got little mention ... In Syria. pro-Soviet!
elements U the army have strong influence ."
60,000 Immigration Visas Thusfar Unused
^HEN THE IMMIGRATION year ends next Sunday, some
, 6^L1AnH'rlcan immigration visas will expire un-
used. This huge number of visas has gone to waste in
prac.cally every one of the past few years This despite
he fact that there are tremendous numbers of people in
various countries seeking entrance to the United States
To cite only the 5.000 Jews exiled from Egypt for
whom American Jewish organizations are asking u-"a- The
basic immigration quota for the year is fixedI at14B rw
visas and the 60.000 which expire annual y c nn ,foe
Lta ssrovcr and *that m
.ion. S'tr^^sa-f **isia
swna52SSais5
vision of the present immigration laws. This reque-t hall
long been advanced by Jewish and other organizations i|
this country President Truman insisted on it. and sol
d-.es President Elsenhower,
One of Pre-ident Eisenhower's recommendations M
(ongress is the creation of a pool of unused quota visr"
to be distributed "on a first-come, first-served basis." Sue
a change would be very helpful for many Jews and nou-*
Jews who wish t emigrate from countries like PolandJ
Kumania and other lands for which a very small America*"
H''" wa" fl8ed '" 'W4 when the quota system was estal^
"sned. However, (ongress has shown no inclination tl
ao president Eisenhower's bidding and is. in fact, oppose* j
Under President hisenhower's proposals, regular quota]
vawJl?,,on WOuld incree 7, a year Bul 'ongress is reluctant to revise im
gratiou patterns and policies no matter now obsolete the
fr,,m i, '" Kr,'al pUy- especially when the immigratf
and .?. C"un,,nes who *n,ereJ the United States duril
and after World War n have proven themselves so us"
to the economic interests of the country.


Fridayjuhr.5,.1957
partnership. The firm will main-
tain offices at One Lincoln Road
bldg.
*>*ftf, Ifr/ggg^__
LtGAL NOTIC1
Alex Rosen, head of nation-
al recruitment program of
Council on Social Work Ed-
ucation, has been named as-
sociate professor of social
work at Yeshiva University.
He will assume post in Sep-
tember.
Partnership Dissolved
Albert M. Lehrman this week an-
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HERKRY GIVEN that
ISMd. desiring to ,i,Ka.,. In
A It H i OMPANl al II N K lt Av,-
MM, Miami. Florida, Intend to r.
ame with the Cterfc ..r th..
< II .nil ( our I of |,...... CoUDtVl l
l-WJ ackerman
THEODORE T s INDLER
-VW.T/.-lM-*-' "U""r8
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
,.NoT''*,: ,la HBREMT OIVEN that
In bualneiN under th.- rktltlou. name
of.1 LAYBOY (.1 MIAMI ui T4m N K
3rd < ourt, Miami. Florida. Inteodi to
register said name with the Clark <>t
the Ct.ult Court of li.ni.. r.iunty
FlorlrL.
ALC.iN CORPORATION
iNole iiwii'i'l
t/i.lfrtt-M *" A'Con' ,,,",',",
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IH HKRKIiY OIVKN that
the undersign, d. desiring to engage
"I uai{*l!f ""der the fl' tltlouM name
of RICH WoODTL'RNlNC at M N.W.
21st Terrace. Miami. Florida, Intend*
to register said name, with th. I '!, i,
of the Circuit Court of Dade Countv.
Florida.
_._-,_ NORMS RICH, sole owner.
BARNETT PELTS
Attorney for A|>t>llcant
minced the dissolution of his taw'RJ-SSIjJ" UW*' Mlaml S:'' In,u
The
J. M. UPTON INSURANCE
AGENCY, INC.
Is Pleased to Announce That it Has
Moved to New and Larger Quarters
to Serve Our Expanding Clientele
Better and More Efficiently .
136 N.E. FIRST STREET
(A Few Doors East of Former Location)
"COMMTl INSUtANCl SOtVKl SIHCt l2"
TELEPHONE NUMBERS ARE THE SAME
FH 1-5481 FR 9-0343
FR 1-8819
LEGAL NOTICE
Page lljA y
cN eTJlE.^,RCU,T COURT OF THE
aa&YSJ -iyO'CIAL CIRCUIT. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Wii ,,,\,H.ANCERV "< 2027M
U H.1.IAM I' It.MS, HI,
Plaintiff.
V1CTOMNE A l KAIS,
l a fendant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO VICTORINE A CRAI8
Sti r. I
New Orleans, Ix.uislana
T!,,,V U;K HEREHT NOTIFIED that
a Hill of t omidaint for Divorce ),.,.
-1 against you. and vou are
required to aarve a ,..,,> of your An-
war or 1'leadlng to the II,l| .,f c,.
,',...?,',~n..,h* Plaintiff attorney.
ROBERT V HADER. M20 Waal Klas-
hrr Htreet, .ianii. Florida, and
'.'. *'"."' ,n ,h*" ,f'*'- "f > Clerk of
the < lr.uH Court on or h. Tore the !Snd
da> of July. in:-,',. If von fi.il | no so,
a Decree fro I'unfrwo will be .
against vou.
DATKIi this 1th day of June. l-.7,
at Miami. Hi.de CotMtv. ki..i|,i.,
' I LEATHBRMAM, Clerk, Clrcnll
(seal) Court Hade County, Florida
In JOAN KNEEDEN
6/n-i.T/r.-ii '"'""> ,',"k
2 MEr,COUi'TV JUOCE8- COURT
LN^K FOR DADE COUNTY
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE. Ne. 40S5SA
In Re ESTATE of. ^^
MF.YEE B. .IAWITZ,
Decaaaed
_ ..NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To AM Creditors anil All Persona Hav-
Fst te "r "*"m"nd" Against Bald
,,Y,U' "nd *''" of >ou r* hereby no-
tified and required to present any
Ci i"*" demands which yon. or
either of you. may have again*! the
estate of MEYKR II. JAWITJ! de.
eased. Isle of I>ade County. Florida,
to the II..notable County Jit.li;,- ,,f
Iade County, and file the same In
their offices In the County Courthouse
in Dade County, Florida, within eight
calendar months from the .late ..f i h.
first iMihll.-ulion hereof Saul ,1
<>r demands to opfl iln th< leeal ad-
dress of the < lalnuint and In he sworn
tr. and i.t.senfed a aforesaid, or asm.*
win be barrad. s. gactlon 7J3.H of
the Utr. Probate A.t
Data June l. A.I) 1^:,7.
JENNIE IAWITZ. II'1.1 \.\ .1 WVIT7,
anil BERTHA UORRIHON
As Kxerutota of the l.sst Will and
Te-tam.nt of METER I! JAW1TZ. I >.-

KOV \ i: i: & MAN NIn i M kr
t.'O lAnrohi l:,i Miami Baaca, Fla.
,\ ttol M- \e,'lltol S
; ti Is, : -.-i;
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES' COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No, fMMA
In ItK I :-'., ,,f
SAM l'l!i ii'VK |i, ,|
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All creditors and All Peraonj
Having claims or Demands Asa
Bald !. lati
S St bj notified and required
'". ''' '" anj I..HM, and demand!
" Bit It ...ii mi) have imaiiist Hi, ,
of BAM PHOCTK. deceased,
otjnjy. Florida. .,, the i
Judges of Oade County, and file tile
rflcea In the Countj
LV.'i'i County, i
within eight calendar mom ha from Hi.
.late ,,f th. firat publlcallon I
or the same Kin be barrad
JENNIE HENDERSON
MOBiasraocTc: ,:"""r,x
fttif^ K"K,S,-':" Attorney*""""'
1/14-2DM 7*8 ''"" N"i""1,
TO:
NOTICF. UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS IIKKKiiY GIVEN th.n
ii,.I. i--1; I, a ii
blialneaa under Ihe f\> titi- t- n.i.ie of
Q li R i: N ': s DR E B B SHOP and
GREENE'8 .il Miai.i. Florida Inlenda
to Najieti '.i-.h th.- Clark
of i'. Couri of Dade Co
Florida.
II. T. ORRENE
S.i,. OWM
t :d:". 7 :.-12
NOTICE TO DEFEND
-r?,,iC>E.roOF ^BLICATIOn'
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FL^.Er.VH.iU.CIAL"'CUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR QADr
c?^,VYt- 'N CHANCERV.r?.. Sg|fi2
' Altol, K. i.i i\ii:.\i:i ,
1'l.ilntiff,
RTDVESTEIl" A. I.i.MIHHi,,,, .,,
known as lALVATORE LomSaRDO
uefendaat.
t.,SUIT FOR DIVORCE
MI.VI SIKH A MiMHAIIMi
also kn.,wu as
SAI.VA'K iRR I.OMBARDO
t<12 Monroe St,,.,
Paasal, Nin Jersey
D.ii BTLVBSTER ,\ LOMBARDO
IiapihT0*1' ": "ALVATORE LOM.
BARDO arc bareby notified thai .,
Bill Of < pmulalnl for Divorce has b. en
filed again-! vo. an,| .,, ,, JJ
t'i.";;"' ? '"',> "f >"'" Answ.., Z
ii-"i't .K I'..'*"' "'" "' Cmplalnl on
ViA-c'f'T-';',", A""" Mt^sfilJ. m:i
i,A ,,*' K.\ lAV Kv"" nfl "-
nj, ii ,u I u i s,,.. m,,,,,,, |
',' '"' nit the .. glnal Anaw. i
'J......na in the off,,,. .,, ,h.. nUrb
'th ""> of July. I!.-,: it ..,..,
0 a... judgment b) default w.,| ,,,.
taken against >., ,01 the relief
man,I.,I In th. I: 11 ,., c, mulalnt
This no,,,., ahall b.- ,,b|lshed .,n. .
each we, I: for foui roneetutlve K
In THE JEWISH FLorTdian
I'ii.vk AND ORDERED at Miami.
Honda. I his ,jJl .!..> of Jaw \ D
'' Il I.EATHERMAN.
' l;.k. cir, i ,t ,
i- Count) i
Bl WM. w. BTOCKIN
-VERB HEIMAN KAPlK5l ""'"
I Is mi J, !
' 11 --:.>. |
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
olicit* your legal notfcwe.
We appreciate your
patronage and guarantee
accurate service at legal
rates .
Phone FR 4-4366
lor messenger serrlce
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
KrSTrrJj: IK HK]tVY>*:atKN th.t
the undi i signed, desiring" Io"nit' in
bualnear under the fictitious name >,f
PAI l. B INN Bl -'!" N Miami A venae.
Miami. Kloil.ia. Intends to register
name with the Clerk of the Clr jit
Court of Dade Cojinty, Kloiida.
ADKI.K SOLOMON, Sole Omi.tr
ki:ssi.kr i;ai:s
Attorneys fof A|.|)ll.-ant
]? S W. 1st Street
H-21-:ft. 7/8
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN
the iindei.sium .1 .!-irtng to engage in
biisti,. -s iin.l.: the fictitious nani. f
BVINOA HltoTHERK at SJ1I N.W
North River Drive. Miami. FWn i
intends to legistet said nauo- with
Clerk of the Circuit Com t of i i
County. Florida.
mryiNO isiciiFc
m.|i\ Idu.il propi let .r.
kiiit wki.i.isch. Attorney
HM-17 c,,,,Kr.s, Hnil'llng
l/H-JDM, 1 ,
%tl#
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES- COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE.
No MM3-A
'in R, 1>'TA I K OF
II >A J.\i K IN, I'., i-ed
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
-To All Credit.,is ad All !' daa
Ila\itiK Claims or Demand* \
Bald Relate:
You. and each of you are hereby
'. and t,.|iiIm- i -laims and demands wlncli you, or
either of you. may have against the
eatate ,f IDA JACKSON", d.....laed,
if i lade i oirit>. Fl.,1 Ida, to ine
Honorable County Judges of D.ide
1 .....ity, and ill. th.- same In their
____NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
.Noil. E IB HEREBY GIVEN
l< .be ii. mlous nam.....
i iii.M i \ i..\.-.- set it<:h w \.-n
thrifty I.ASS
STOTCH wash
at number 7^, N w ,,), >i,.,.t |n lhr
Mian i. Florida, Int, n i. t ,.-n-
it>i the Clerk .,f
ol Dad
IN COUNTY JUDGES' COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
No. 16133 B
RE OH I \Ti: IF
v. \l.l..\CK HIOOB,
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR FINAL
DISCHARGE
vi, il' "i: I- ,. b) given that I
a final r> poi t and p, tltlon for
I ecutor of
u \i.l. tCEaMIOOB ,!.
and tl i iv of Aug lal
gopl) to the Hunorabht FRANK I!
i.iN'i; County Judfa t I
ii,.ilia. fo. approval ol
and f.u final d acharg
. of WALL
IIKJCP d<
Thla 11th .1 iv ol June. IS T
A I BERT HUTCHINBON.
IKOVNER A- MANNHEIM] :
I Alb, 11 Hut. hinson.
Ho, i.la
' M i ml. n.-iida. thl.
day of June, |7.
ECGENE H SIM. in
Sole i ner
GOI.DSI \N I eOLDBTEIN
nit
JIM W, al I laglei >t .Miami, Fla
I iz
III
in i i nt) I'oiirthouse in---------
Dade County. Florida, within ight ; IN THE COUNTY JUDGES' "COURT
I .-in the da: of ti'e IN
calendar m
m pubga all, n h. i-
or demands !. contain the legal ad
areas of th. la nanl and t.. I,
: a.s aforarald, or aanta
, i be i Bee Bectl
':", Probat, Act.
-
H KTRICKLER
i.ii.iji: i rRicKi br
the i. lal w ill
and Teatamenl ol IDA JACKSON,
v,|
MYERH, HEIM \ N a K AIM. IN

Personal Loar.s
Checking Accounts
Auto Financing
Home Improvement Loans
BANK BY MAIL
PHONE FRanklin 1-1391
The
Dan la Bank
'Ou' rnenrt/y flonl
lut) north 0| holly *,ooo on Oo'nia Bepcn Blvd ,AiA
Dania Florida
if-.
I
Cngravi *i C tnpt nj
commercial
social
hotel
STEEL
Dlt
menograirij
invitatlpni
ountem.nlf
Dial FRanklin :!-4(i:J j
116 n.e. sixth tlraaf
mlimi 32, florid*
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 41021. B
In Rl
JL'ROME B W kk.vi.i:
I '......!
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Utd VII P,
.in'- i I tnanda Against
I
d
f JKR.'MH
'

I
, ',. ERN
the
LEON \ rSI -Ti iv v
rd M at
IN THE CIRCl'IT COURT. fitS JiT-
OICIAL CIRCUIT. OADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
No 202*8?
llll tCE NCI 1. CA.Mi '
ntlff
RICH VRD HENRY CAM1
I i. lend.ml .
NQTICt SY PUBLICATION
' i|.l>. II,
j-our an
alth ti,
t.\ COHEN, plaiiitlfl s ait,., -
HP>. II is BMg Miami, ||...
Ion. :'l. |95I
i: H LEATHBRM t.N, Cb rh ol
1.....' th.- cir. I i
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS IIKKKHY OIVKN that
t h. underalsnedi, tiaalrtns to ansaS'
n.ler the fa tltloua n in
.,,r \ i.i iv I t .1 < ST. IRE al nun i
\ w tvenue in the <'it\ of
..is to register the
..ml n.me with th.- clerk of the
' ,.f l i.,.ie Couaty, Klo
Di't < at MUtml, Hoi Ida this l^th
.1., | ol I'in.
DOR" iTHT S. 1111. i-/.
HENRY M CAIN
At.....o foi Vpp anl
W Plagler st Miami, I
.'. JI-M, 7 i-U
IN
IN
In
THE COUNTY JUDGES' COURT
AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
N N
III-" Sihia I'.tttl, also
- s> h la i'loi toe R,, .1,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
T-. til ed
I l.t \ \ |
i-
,
sen) an> lalma and d, i
ilnal tl.t i
I, a known .t- -
i County J
i
'

,1 n i
Ilaml, I ....
. Miami, .
I

l Hill |.
V. D. ,,;,,.
-'I. 7/J-1J-1I '
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
V OIVEN
;. ;
, of
RICH > RD 9 lii.f. iR \n.!:s al -l "1
N \\ ._li tvenue, Miami, Florida, In-
'' Iht Circuit Court ol I
!
JEROME K LEVIN
i II. Hi ILDSTEIN
H m:> II.D s. u.< ,\|. in
.;. >L1 'M \ N a .;, .i.i IRTEIN
i.i t I Att. neys foi R, giei ra ntg
MM M
ATTENTION ATTORNEYS!
CORPORATION Ol TUTS
Lowest Prices Quickest Delivery
in South Florida
Call the JEWISH FLORIDIAN at
I IM-Cilili


Page 12-A
k*tdJk*#*L
JndQyJuly 5.19&7
(c
.3}
I
HENRY M. FLAGLER
(1830-1913)
Miami ones ics birch and early develop-
ment to the vision, generosity and pio-
neering spirit of Henry M. Flagler. He
helped Miami grow from a village to
great metropolitan area.
fc>
h
FLAGIER FEDERAL SAVINGS
I is the fastest growing Savings Institution in
ihe Ninon. In the spirit of the great Ml
for whom e were named, we ere gfrul
ll C-. for the privilege of working foe end grow
~s ing with this progrcsaivc tree.
IT'S TIME TO SAVE-THRU JULY 10
FLAGLER DAYS are here again!
at FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
EACH Flagler Federal savings account is
insured up to $10,000 by Federal Savings
and Loan Insurance Corporation.
All savings accounts opened or added to on
or before the 10th will earn dividends farom
the 1st at the current rate of 3la0..
i*

SELECT ONE OF THESE BEAUTIFUL GIFTS FREE WITH ACCOUNTS OF
$50 OR MORE OPENED ON OR BEFORE JULY 10. (one to a family)
Km
FOR THE LADIES
REVLON "SATIN-SET"
Large 11 oz. size. The
w under ful.w or Id-famous
pin-curl spray-set and
hair spray.
LADY BUXTONV
FRENCH PURSE '
Fashionable intique-
%hne lop gram cow-
hide. Double bill com-
partmentroomy torn
pur*esp.ue for key*,
card*, charge plates.
/
t O I THE MEN
WATERMAN'S
"SAPPHIRE" PEN
Heav i I v gold-
plated with
, t he famous
i "|ewel" point.

\1
B U X TON "STATESMAN" BILLFOLD
Top gram saddle cow hide w nh paienied stitch-
less construction guaranteed to ouilast*the
leather-a bcauulul gilt ol lileume quality.
ATTENTION NEW RESIDENTS
It is simple and easy to transfer your funds to Flaglet
Federal Savings. We will collect principal, plus interest
or dividends due June 30th, and issue you a Flagler Sav-
ings Passbook. Just come by with your passbook and sign
a transfer draft, or mail us your passbook and we will send
you a transfer draft. There is no delay, inconvenience or
"red tape," and no loss of dividends or interest. You'll
ENJOY saving at Flagler Federal-end your savings will
earn at the current dividend rate of Y/i%\
"DEDICATED TO THRIFT"
FLAGLER
FEDERAL
SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIAliON
OF MIAMI
JTl
M'.II
if EM Raj.
SAVINGS
WM-
100 N.E. 2nd Ave.
Open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., including
Saturday, thru July 10
Phone FRanklin 3-3671
Free Parking in the Garage
Paul H. Marks, President
se habla espanol
AND DON'T FORGET THE BIG FLAGLER DAYS
MATCH-THE-PICTURES" CONTEST ClOS/NG JULY 10,
You con win a $100 soving, account, a po.r of U. of M. football
season tickets (value $55) or one of many oth.r valuable prim
VISIT US TODAY. Look over the old Miami scenes in our
wmdows-and get your free picture-folder entry-blonkl
No cost or obligation!
^u.
wa ~.-,i. ,r,0 ^ 0i0 ,i(:i
I. II. I .1
XIVi
co-ati >> t win*, on
lminwi) m rout*
*. sav ,np iTSir^: aa:*- *-*


fiV
. U
n
j
her!
Birth-daze ... for Mr. and Mr.. Ronald Berger
a little pink bundle. Jan Elian, on June 12 .
Proud and happy are grandparents Esther and
Sidnay Schwarti, of 107 W. Rivo Alto dr.. and
Mr*. Arnold Epstein, of Chicago And Max A.
Schwartz, of Miami Beach, is looking at the world
through pink-colored glasses, toohe's the great-
The Air Force gets a new Flight Surgeon next week Dr.
pi- p Wainatain, Jr., son of Or. and Mr*. Philip Weinstain, of 1516
l\\ 12th st.. has just completed his internship at Colorado General
[o-pital in Denver ... He dons the blues on July 7 .
His wife, blonde and pretty Dorothy (nee OahUfl). and a former
Jianii Bcacil resident, will make a short visit to her parents. Dr.
Lnd Mrs. Hyman Liekwr of Phoenix, Arizona, where Dr. Llahn is
I Surg19 t the VA Hospital Then she will rejoin Philip
i (imi) in Alabama, before they travel to Randolph Field in
I
II .<> a quickie-note from'the 'Travaling ToppeJ?*" Borta
ii.' Jack paused in Billing, Montana, to examine the "wild west-'
km! I' ind it positively exhilarating From there they go to
ban I rancisco, Las Vegas, and on down to Mexico City Barta
lint- ihey keep saying "there's gold in them there hills," but
lhc'11 settle for oil! Such an eminently practical approach must
be 'I i. to the influence of husband Jack with A. M. Kidder
Dd Sons.
I est rider on the pre nuptial merry-go-round is pretty and
bopiil-i: Linda Elian Kaptan, daughter of the Loon Kaplans, of 1795
few 1 "h t Linda's wedding to Richard Ian Brickman is sched-
uled I.t July 14 at the Seville Dick's parents are Mr. and Mr*.
I. Jackson Brickman, of 825 84th st. Both sets of parents are
longtime Miami residents, and extremely active in community
affair-
I-.-I Wednesday Mrs. Mai L. Shapiro gave an evening kitchen
Ibower, in which the hostesses were all childhood friends of
Linda's July 6 plans include a Smorgasbord supper party at
tie Leo Ackarmans, followed by another supper party July 10 at
111- Riva Alto home of Mr. and Mrs. Maurica Furmm .
Thi following day the girls will get together for a hen party
It the Kaplan home, given by Linda's mother and sister. Rita
Kot lo he out-done, Harvey Brickman is throwing a stag party for
Irother Dick the same night ... A luncheon at the Algiers July 12
V ted by Mrs. Bertha Rinzlar and Mrs. Bon Singer The
brickman* will give the rehearsal dinner at the Seville the day
efon the wedding. July 13 After Sunday, of course, the new
Hr. and Mr*. Richard Brickman will start giving their own parties.
> >
Rabbi Aria Backer, of Beth Raphael Congregation, and his
(hbit/c r, i..-be. Rita Nancy Eikin, were honored at a surprise dul-
ler party at the Sterling hotel on June 29 Hosting the affair
ken- president of the congregation Julius Saparo and Mr*. Sepero.
mg in the festivities, and basking in the light of a big
kr with candles, were 10th wedding anniversary celebrants Mr.
nd Mrs. Ralph Krieger and Mr. and Mr*. Benjamin Agronov .
thi Kriecjer* are secretary of the congregation and president of
he M^erhood, respectively, while the Agronov* are recording sec-
Mar) -isterhood officer, respectively .
Al participating in the Beth Raphael "family" get-together
fere \ .(.president Abraham Barati and many fellow officers, in-
Mudme Mr. and Mr*. Sam Siegel, Mr. and Mrs. Jo*eph Swart.. Mr.
knd Mrs. Abash Par I, the Adolph Hammer* and Mr*. Til lie
friedman.
>><
'rently-concluded B'nai B'rith District 5 Convention here
|a and new friends, galore ... at the opening cocktail recep-
jin Bultimoreans with a special affection for Florida were th?
Tjanry Siegals their daughter and son in-law are Miami Beach '
>r. and Mr*. Mayor Eggnatz ... Ida Rutaoll was hosting a table
: rithren with her husband, only a nodding length away
pom Morris Lunch family of Dickens ave. Morris, Matilda
1 hter, Barnica (Bunny) .
Luncheon set next day saw the new Chai Chapter-ettes with
(resident Either Lorman, v.p. Rom Kelts, Bella Rosanthal, Ruth
'per, Jeanne Feldman and Edna Bolford Talented Edna paints.
1 her art right over into her own dress designs Saw
pMiver.' ncers George Lofcoe and date Gail Ackarman, of the
L*o Ackermans iryjng Oxenhorn of Hollywood. Fla. .
Thai was Dr. Jakob Rosanthal of Forest Hills with pen in hand
rmerly on the Palestine Post, he's now special writer for
And Frank Smulson, Normandy Isle Food Fair man-
'i". tilling of his long term interest in B'nai B'rith.
Rev. and Mr*. Jacob D. Katz, of 1321 14th ter.. entertained
i friends recently in honor of daughter Phyllis' grailua-
F1"'11' Miami Beach High School Tajented Phyl was awarded
Piour>t-ar scholarship to the CM. and no wonder ... She won the
T eni h Medal, was National Honor Society secretary, vice pr-si
' Anchor Club and winner of the Anchor Service Award as
"Handing member of the year .
" was also a Thespian and member of the Quill and Scroll
Vice president of her home-room, club editor of the year-
lor h An n"nor "Indent in the top ten percent academically
lion ,wo >ears And alternate speaker for the gradua-
L'WflM's The UM better look out There's a female
wricane heading their way!
Mimi
|o thf
'Mr*. Morton A.) Grant, of 8858 Byron ave.. journeyed
elta t" e west lo attend the national council meeting of Sigma
ort h V'l' *or"r"y- hc|d this year at the French Lick Sheraton n-
"ric'i. uT Fren'ls Lick. Indiana Iota Alpha Pi alums met at
aWmrm ^*nf,' North Miami Beach home Tuesday to plan their
MPartm ^ "nd discuss final decoration plans for the sorority
"* in the new Panhellen.c house at the UM.
iran'dd mharr,ed **' U'M Symphony Orchestra) Volpe'*
K. v Jughu-r. Ginger Drayfut, to Laurence Gravin, in flOChWteT,
I'
|l>'rthcl
WllSi8**"* r",,<,r #rn*'d S. Poinor counted more than 200
' ""ory messages received for hi* recently celebrated 78lh
d. 0(7<
ovnan s
lUorU
^lirMvJislbJEIIioinildliiain
Miami. Florida, Friday, July 5, 1957
Section B
Recently installed were these new officers of
Women's Division of Surfside-Bal Harbour-Bay
Harbor Islands Chamber of Commerce by
Mrs. Anna Brenner Meyers at their luncheon
recently in Balmoral hotel. Standing (from
left) are Mrs. Jane Spier and Mrs. Edward Fox.
vice presidents; Mrs. Rhaa Gladwin, presi-
dent; Mrs. George W. Valentine and Mrs. Fay
Carney, vice presidents; Mrs. Shirley Green,
recording secretary; Mrs. Beulah Butler, par-
liamentarian; and Mrs. Mercedes Nicholson,
assistant to president. Seated aze (from left)
Mrs. Lynne Morin. secretary; Mrs. Lillian S.
Cole, executive president, and Mrs. Freda Le-
vine, treasurer.
Council Scholarship Assists in Reunion
Enjoying a reunion here after
not seeing each other for 21 years
are Simon Seiden. of Miami, and
his niece. Mrs Ilanna Goldman, of
Israel At that time. Seiden 'left
his native Poland. Mrs. Goldman
went from Poland to Israel in 1950.
Mrs. Goldman, a psychologist,
came to the United States in Sep-
tember, 1956. on an overseas schol-
arship granted by the National
Council of Jewish Women.
She studied at New York Uni-
versity, working in clinical psy-
chology in their graduate school.
She has also visited famed elin-
Rabbi Narot Elected
Rabbi Joseph Naroi, spiritual
leader of Temple Israel, was elect-
ed to the national board of direc-
tors of the Central Conference of
American Rabbis, at its 68ih na-
tional convention in Miami Beach
last week.
ic* in Boston, Washington, Chica-
go and Michigan in order to com-
pare the moat modern method*
and their interpretation.
Mrs. Goldman received her early
training at the University of Kra-
kow. Before coming to this coun-
try, she worked for the Ministry
of Health in Jerusalem at an adult
mental hygiene clinic, working to-
gether with a psychiatrist and a
psychiatric social worker. She has
taught herself to speak English,
solely though reading it.
Mrs. Goldman is generous in her
praise of the Council of Jewish Wo-
men for their part in helping hei,
as well as the other people of her
country. One of the conditions of
Council's scholarship is that she
return to work in her own country
for at least a year, so that the
people there may benefit from
what she has learned. Mrs. Gold-
man is planning to return to israil
on July 19.
MISS MUKIU MAMMON
Miami Girl Wins
UM Scholarship
Muriel Naurison. daughter of
Mrs. Edith Naurison. 802 SW 27th
rd. has been awarded a two-year
fully paid scholarship to the Uni-
versity of Miami, which is being
presented to her by the Miami
C'nitan Club
Muriel, who is a 16-year-old
student at Miami Senior High
School, won the award for her
essay on "The Homo First
School of Citiienahip," which
wa chosen from among a total
of 2,157 e**ys submitted by stu-
dent* in tan high schools in Dade
county.
This was the Miami Civitan's
31st annual essay contest. Entries
were judged by members of the
University of Miami English de-
partment.
This is the second essay contest
Muriel has won. She was awarded
the D.A.R. gold medal in junior
high school for her essay on
"Uncle Sam Grows Up." She plans
to prepare for a t-aching career.
Mrs. Irma Ehrenreich, president of Ladies' Auxiliary, North
Shore Post 677, Jewish War Veterans, at wreath ceremonies
before Cenotaph on Washinqton ave., Miami Beach, during
special Memorial Day exercises. Looking on are Mrs. Evelyn
LeVine. immediate past president; and Mrs. Fay Koch, past
president
Pearhtein to bo Speaker
Maurice Perlstein, executive di-
rector of the Jewish Home for the
Aged, will be guest speaker at a
luncheon meeting of Miami Beach
B'nai B'rith Lodge Tuesday noon
at the DiLido hotel. Lodge presi-
dent is Jack M. Fink.
i


lM*f**#aV***?2C.
Page 2-B
Announce Mt. Sinai Nursing Program
annoi
Quick and easy as flippinq lid off a iar, this light, satisfying
summer luncheon can be created in one minute or less, using
ready-to-serve Manischewitz Kosher foods. Manischewitz Ge-
filte Fish provides requisite proteins with minimum of calories.
Manischewitz Borscht doubles in brass as both nourishing food
and refreshing drink And Tarn Tarn Crackers provide source
of carbohydrate energy, light, -flaky texture and delicately
tempting taste. _______^^______________
.....r.-r-J
rail sesMon in Septembei inu
I be the onl) P
i i, .1.1 n tin- South,
course to be held n iu
.,, ,mh others throughout tn
Sj Hospital. Dallas, rex, and
education al Ml -
tha, examination.' for entrance to
the postgraduate course wi
held Aug. 7 at the hospital A
licensed practical nurses will be
considered, Mrs R
sr.Kl.KH.....I HWrwed pri
nursing programs are pnfnd
However, others will be con
,.,l providing the) meet the en
lr:,m- requirements a e( bj the
admissions committee, including
the written and phys cal examina-
tion.
"Since enrollment is limited,
applications for admission should
be submitted as fr I" advance
as possible," Mrs. Ross advised.
"A personal interview is requir
ed before a student may be ac-
cepted."
The school will give two tt
bours-a-week eouriea m post-grad-
uate problems. The eoorse is ob-
stetric nursing, which begins Sept
25 will include i week
and experience in prenatal care,
, labor and delivery, nursery, pre
mature nurserj and postpartum
hospital nursing care
| The second course will be given
opei ......f*fr**' *f
erini in ,Mtn,m";
Hating nuratal ft*
Kmajo. and minor oper-tlcs*
preparatio. ol *"*"
autocla '""' nur>inK re'
sponsibihtii
-,.,.. wishing i" PPl* ma> cnn'
,ad ,. wrlti Mrs Rom >j 'he
School of Practical Nursi,
Sinai HoaplUI. 4atM) MUmH.]
ami Beach. Out oftown
who wish to take the ex
Aug. 7 may be housed.
nurses' residence and
personal interview th.. m
day.
i he School of Practical Ni
is the only one in Honda,
ed by state and national auth
and the Veterans Adminiitr
Mt COOL, MAN, COOL
uniK nature's own |jg
quick'quencher!
MANISCHEWITZ
borscht
in the NEW REUSABLE DECANTER with" the JTWIST OFT OP
Hilda Finds Peace in Atonement
Hilda von Hippel is a Christian
who came to Israel throe
years ago from Germany. Since
the summer of 1955. sh; has been
working in the hospitals of Malben,
the Joint Distribution Committee
program in Israel tor sick, handi-
capped and aged Immigrants
She is a gentle-voiced woman
blonde hair and tiny blue
i i'- that seem to look beyond you
at something in the.distance sonic
si urce of deep joy brightly re-
>d in her countenance. Gently
stroking the brow of a patient at
the Naharia hospital for chronic
diseases (Malben's newest, establish'
ed with United Jewish Appeal
funds). Hilda smiled and said: "Mal-
ben has given me the chance to do
exactl) what I came here for. I
wan! to stay in Israel for the rest
ot my life, helping and comforting I Var*- She received her training
those who need me." ar a private hospital in Hamburg
and later worked as nursing-sister
The 50-year-old nurse has been in a small town in the north of
following her profession for 30 Germany.
MM von HfPPfl
spirit
Slenderizin*... n' Appetizin'! d\
COOL SUMMER A
SALADS made with
Hilda von Hippel I
member ol a Protestant order, and
after the outbreak ol war she work
ed both as nurse and la) preai hi r
1 took in a fugitive Jewish w man,
living together with her i
room She helped more
tangible realization ol whal the
Jen were suffi
"As school children we had been
taught that the Jews are being pun-
ched i tcrnally for then- part in the
< rucifixion ol Jesus Hut ." Hilda
paused for a moment and then for
the first lime raised her voii > we
Germans 'crucified' -i\ million in-
nocent beings u hat punishment
must he meted out to II
After the war she gave lectures
in many communitiees, trying to
impress German audiences with
the justice of their suffering.
"There were many nf us who. like
myself, were innocent of any di-
rect act against Jews. But I had
become convinced nf our common
guilt; and it was with great joy
that I surrendered to an irresist-
ible call to go tn the reestablish-
ed Jewish homeland and put my-
self body and soul at its service."
Hild

Israel W ,| she
.
tl tt
helped ll
bl hei ).. ri
f0| \
ed as ., prival
" h-'!l '
A bull H
I II.

' difficult chroi
German) hav ,
ateiy and wh.
Irn ii/IU..........
Breakstone's
makec it
BETT0
Hilda
Woon/jgfcf Cruise $/afe(j
I
^ "orotli, n,,,,.
\H0tsmt6FWl
Weather forecast-bridal shower ahead.
If you're the hostess on this happy f
occasion, serve easy-fixing frcajn chicken
a la king on HOLSUM toast. And hers,
good advice lor a bride-to-be
HOLSUM BREaM) makes any
**?} meal taste more delicious.^ a-1
Make it
Serve it with... (
HolsumBie
*a j7 taste better ..
Q houuo *awai
Good Any Time!
US OOVTINSMCTtO,
PICKLED, COOKED and SMOKED MEAT PROO^
- naSsm oisrttBuross or thi sqpin .*
COASTLINE PROVISION CO., #|
855 BISCAYNE ST., MIAMI BEACH
PHONES: ni'% J
H"AN PIARt


May. ?"y 5, 1957
Being triple? The "B'nai B'rith's" here are the triplet sons of
I id Mrs. Jercme Lerman, 331 NW 144th st. That's Robert
Jlc.-rbeinq held by officiatinq mohel Cantor William L. Lipson
(-or is it Michapl Bruce?or David Charles?
\he Has Dedicated Her Life
To Educating the DP Needy
f ten >c:irs aso, a young Por-
languagc teacher named
Levj came to America on
inci] of Jewish \v >-
'i to learn to be a
il worker, Her parpuK
'-. to normalcy the
J.-h ui ol Hitlcrism.
\ nth. 1 lebondl is back in
"i rk again, on h"r way to
\ an and Hungarian
a in Brazil.
man displaced per-
il i ir Jewish victims of the
hoehrenwauJ. was closed this
he had helped prepare its
to return to the outside
ing represented the
epding of large-scale pro-
W arid War II refugees. De-
U work in Kurope was com-
td, and she was moving on with
l this new era.
I WANT MY llllf"
^3 hk ii
and be sun if %
FLORIDA
DAIRIES
HOYOCtNIItD
Vitamin "D" Milk
"Milk Products"
Oocrs rVaftefsd
KL fR 4-2621
*' Mi**! Daflvary
DC80KAH LIVY
". ifc#y war* atltep"
Deborah's is the ?tory of the prob-
lems of healthor rather, the prob-
lems of readjustment to the normal
world which arose from ill headth
among the survivors of European
Jewry who were liberated by the
Allies from concentration camps
and places of hiding.
At the end of the war. she was
leading an uncomplicated life as a
Latin and French teacher at ;i Lis-
bon high school. When Jewish refu-
gee children began pouring into the
city, she volunteered to help. Sec
Sug<"tine
NOW
You Can Drink
All The
Iced Tea You
Want
WITHOUT
Gaining A Single
Ounce
4-Oz. Size Bottle Only 75c
At Uatilng Pood Stores
FOOD PRODUCTS
NOJHATAi1
FOOD
MARKETS
Aimn-m
The WMf ST HOTf IS **> RESTAURANTS
, unw woo onnautoai. k
R04 m \v\>
o> >,< n^rtfmm
ing the shocking extent of physical
and emotional disturbances among
them, she decided to seek special
training.
A similar realization of the need
for trained personnel to work with
the survivors led NOW t establish
its overseas scholarship program in
1946. Council sought ideali-lu
young social and public heafth
workers who would be capable, al-
ter advanced study, of trainng or
-upervismg others. Deborah w,i>
in the first group of students to
arrive. Council sent her to grad-
uate school al McGlil University in
Montreal.
Upon graduation, she v.,.
promptly hired liy the Joint Dis-
tribution Commit toe for work with
refugee! who had tubercalo
widespread flint sin among survi-
vors. She became a troublosbooter
in hospitals, and tanitoria in Ger-
many aud Switzerland,
By the time *he was sent to Camp
Foeztrenwald, most refugeei were
makinK their way again in the out-
side world. Poenrenwald held 2,000
people who were afraid to leave its
protective walls. Deeply-maimed
in spirit, known ;i- tha "bard core"
ClMfl, they Included men and wo-
men unwilling to believe that they
were cured of illness, and young
people who had known nothing ex-
cept the camps since they were
children. Hundreds now had child-
ren of their own. All effort, at
rehabilitation up to 1953 had failed
A team of highly trained experts,
including Deborah, set about a last-
ditch effort to redeem them. It
took four years of intensive work
to persuad? the Foehrenwald resi-
dents that normal life, work, re-
sponsibility, are interesting and
worthwhile, and within their reach.
In Deborah's words. "They were
asleep, and we had to force them to
wake up; to help them really want
to live again. They did not want
to learn to take care of themselves.
Often we had to push them, to make
them angry enough to want to fight
back, in order to reach them."
When finally the last of Foehren-
wald's residents were preparing to
leave, in November, 1956. Deborah
was sent to Vienna. Seventeen
thousand Hungarian Jewish refu-
goaa waited there for visas to other
lands. She stayed until most of them
had emigrated, and then accepted
the job with the United IDAS Ser-
vice which i- taking her to Sao
Page 3-B
Paulo. She will supervise a re-
settlement program for newcomers.
Deborah feols that her career
reached a certain climax when aha
walked through the United HIAS
office in New York recently. For
there, waiting for papers, sat one of
the most difficult of her former
"hard core" families at Foehren-
wald. A young mother, father and
three children, they had wanted
only to be "patients" in the camp.
But after four years of Deborah's
mixture of persuasive talk and stiff
prodding, they were now in New
York, eager to work, learn and take
part in the excitement of living.
^/BUTTER
'd Kic/m
VMuARINE
-
Em/me&li TASTEBETtERu/iti,
UNO KOSHER
FRANKFURTERS
w
So magically easyso wonderfully good
you'll be a Wilno fan from the very "
first bite. All pure prime beefalways
plump, tender and juicy. And the
secret blending of the imported spices give
them the tangy, tantalizing flavor
mmm! Go get themtry them
you'll love them I
WILNO KOSHER
SALAMI FRANKFURTERS CORNED BEEF BOLOGNA
1
3
FEATURED AT ALL BETTER GROCERIES,
DELICATESSENS. KOSHER MARKETS
WIINO KOSHER SAUSAGE CO. (Of Chicago)
MIAMI BRANCH
Jill N.W. 10th AVENUE Phon. FR 4J42J



Page 4-B
+Jewi&fkridfari
Friday.



Turner Selected to Head United Fund's
First Dade County Campaign
rvice to boj made bj
II, was a British
i
\ Greater Miami community outstanding
leader, acting on the advice he gave local council:
civic and business leader., over Boy Scout.
. month ago, last week accepted Turner's experience in campa
the biggest challenge of the United includes successful leadership oi
the 1952 drive ol the Dade chapter,
American Red Cross, one itions uniied t negotiate with
the United Fund. He was state
chairman for the National Rei
Cross Fund Campaign in 1955.
The new campaign chairman
formerly served as a member of
ihe budget committee of the Wel-
fare Planning Council, budgeting
organization for the Community
Chest drives.
Turner served as chairman of the
Commonitj Chest-Welfare Planning National Fund" Council award
Council housing committee, whose rteceni jewisn n
work eventually lead to the building recipients are sealed (let to right Mrs. Loui,
of the Baron de Hirsch Meyer Com- Marcus. Mrs. Robnt Garber. Mrs. Joseph Alex-
munity Services bldg where the ander. Mr. Harry Feldman and Mrs. Ida Wes-
Chesl and 13 oi its agencies are now se] Standing are Mesdames Juliu Rosenstein.
housed at 395 NW" l-t st.
The United Fund is expected to
auneh its public campaign in Jan-
uary with corporations and employ-
ees organizing drive- late llu- year
Ceil Seqal. Miriam Proas, Nathan
and J. Z. Stadlan. Not shown are Mem
Esther Cutler, Malka Shklair. Frieda Ka3
Jack Davis, Fannia Wallowitz and '
Fishman.
Campers in Joyful GMJCC Program]
JOHN 8. TURMM
Fund of Dad" Countychairman of
the new organisation's first drive.
.John B. Turner, vice president
a director of the Orange State
Oil Co.. has been named to the
top campaign pest by John S.
Knight, voluntary president of the
Fund.
On Apr. 29. Turner told 65 Dade
c ,ic and business leaders, meeting
in the i olumbus hotel, who had
voted unanimously for a United
Fund: "'This job is not a simple one.
You, the first line leaders, must
out of semi-retirement and
pledge your full support to this
paign. it is not a job for the
d assistant office boy."
Selection of Turner to head the
first drive was hailed by volun-
'ary workers in many organiza-
tions whoss campaigns here are
expected to be merqed in the
single appeal.
r his outstanding endeavors in
II of many civic organizations
1 ner won ihe Outstanding Citizen
\ -.ml in 1954 from the Dade chap
i the National Conference of
1 hristians and Jews
He served as chairman ol the
4 Community Chest campaign
which successfully topped it- ti,.
141,000 goal, and was nan ed
1 oi the Red Peath
for the 1954-55 term
Outstanding as a leader in Seoul
Turner i- a holder of the Sil
aver, highest local award for
Bitter on Podium;
Sebastian is Guest
John Bitter, permanent conduc-
tor oi the University ol Miami
'Symphony Orchestra, returns to
i the podium after a short vacation
| to conduct the fifth pop concert
Sunday m the air-conditioned Mi-
ami Beach auditorium.
Hi- soloist will be John Sebas-
tian, harmonica virtuoso who. with
Idiier. will introduce "Concerto."
by Boccherini, for harmonica its
firs) orchestra performance in the
United Stati -
Son of a Philadelphia banker,
Sebastian has been an extraor-
dinary performer o;i the har-
monica since childhood. At 12,
he gave his first public perform-
ance as solist with John Phillip
Sousa's band. While in high
school, he won a national con-
test which brought him an offer
to teach the harmonica to classes
of mountaineers in the Southern
highlands.
W nh ra lio discovering the pop.
ular young artist, the musii
wil oi Sebastian were h
ross the countrj on such net-
work programs a; "We the Pi
Pie," "The Cami l I ravan." "Hi!-
J*"* Snow." 'Jack Smith
Show' "Texaco Star Theater." and
"Chesterfield Show In ,i. ,,.,,.
vision medium, be is a fre.
star on such top progi ,nu
WESTERN MEAT COMPANY
Hotels Restaurants J"rf..K. i .
2122 N w 7th Avenue Clubs Institutions
Miami 37, Florida "e "637
RTjrq rCr?I,ML^Yin jwwrottcuaumo
JOHN SIBAiVAH
Sullivan's "Toasl ol the :
Ihe "Kale Smith SI
With critic-composer \
Thomson and conductor-pianisi
Leonard Bernstein, he
gave a New York recital in I
Hall, He was
with Ih
y. the NBC Orel
Radio i itj M ; i< H
Ihe list h
Han has inspired
Penally lor ||,, |
Aaron Copland, Darius Mill

vaness, ;,n,i ( h-,ri,
na Lnaries Sorrentino
''"'' imposed an.....Seated
"ncerto to Sebastian the rel
Sugarine Posts I
Added Dividends
III'"' I HU '
"I manufacl irei
r d
Reported t0 k* k.
''"^^tributornf 'l'1'?"'
Durin thai period ih
hexperi(
eroaw in rn"< "i-
* todew.....,,
Camp cook-outs, carnivals, trips
"around thi world, Disneyland
and th" Israeli scene hinhliRhtcd |
the program oi the lir-t three i
week- I th. [o II da) i imps spoil- i
sored by the Grantor Miami Jew-j
ish Communiu "enter serving
more than -wo children in the
i Miami
At Camp Shalom sponsored by
the Beach Branch ol OMJi I
theme (or the second week w.i-
thal "i Israel with campers boaib
! m folk dancing, singing.
the annual which will im-
held Sunday on the grounds "f the
Beach Bran h Iron 4 to 7 p ir. Mr-
St..nle\ Fromm i- Da\ ('amp rh.ur-
nian with Mrs Solomon Kann in
chargi ati lor Um
earmval
Town Branch, which operate*
Camp MAKA BEE, is *|vo plan-
ning its annual carnival Thurs-
day, July 11, with a dinner avail-
able lo youngsters and adults.
Mrs. Oscar Evans is chairmen of
Camp MA KA BEE One of the
highlights of the season will be
a trek to Camp Greyrpldi. with
the overnight hike on July and
!>r..nch
I the.
hi Ol the
weeks of camp Imaginary tnaj
taken to foreign lands in whidj
customs of such countntti
China, Alaska. Hawaii and
were studied Several oi
groups made costume- in ami
crafts, and sans the song;
danced the dance- of the
they vi-ited HlgbJjgatJaj]
weeks activities will hetheL
of Disneyland and a Western
out at Greynolds Park.
<>f the Day Camp comsvitshj
Mr- Israel Waxman
(amp Hoajl i- plaaaikj toi
duct a camp show on The
July 11.
The senior campers danci.J
1; talent show and a laint i
and athletic program wits I
other three eemp* umto
sponsorship of OMJCC. A I
wide cook-out is plannea
Greynoids Park July 1J.
men of this Day Camp ia i
of the fund raising prefreal
the (imp showrs is Mrs. I
Denn.
The first period of case i
on July 12. with Ih -ecood|
beginning on Monday. Jttj!
There are a few -elected ra
in the Southwest camp
Kaditnah. and in the Miami I
Camp MA KA BEE
ftrfrfcTI
K5U7f
TO LOW
CALORIE MEALS
Solve that weighty proWee
serve plenty of nutritious.
August Bros, bread
from select spring wheat flu*-
contains no hertesj
PUMPfRNKKEl gOUW^J
B ACE I $ VIENNA *M '
HUNCH *
RAaVl
A

*


ily 5, J957
py y
sv *^H
*swe Macaw
SUMMER
DAY CAMP
AftS 3to6
wrst am/
I Mayer Abramowitz, spiritual leader of
Shore Jewish Center, greets registrants
lmer day camp program gs Mj. Hope
ji, head counselor, looks on. Registrants
right) are Susan Voluck, Corinne Fein-
Lingaton is
illed in Office
Ted Lingaton was installed
ni of the State Department
Ida Ladies' Auxiliary, Jew
Veterans, at a convention
Ikztec motel June 9.
officers installed were
ts Michael Marks, senior
resident; Obie Roeenrhal,
vice president; Lester
I treasurer.
Imes Max Kern, conduct-
Ily Levy, chaplain; Paul Sil-
| patriotic instructress; Joe
tfuard; Jack Pritt. histor-
ix Rubin, recording sec re
f(\ Victor Friedman, MOM-
! secretary,
fidney Horn, national guard,
ailing officer.
stein, Daniel Schulman and Jonathan Gold-
berg. Summer day camp for children from
three to six years of age will be conducted be-
tween 9 a.m. and 4 pjn.. Monday through Fri-
day.
Extended Israel
Stay on Agenda
Charles Charkowsky, of 528 W.
28th .st.. Miami Beach, will sail'for
Israel this summer, where he will
make an extended stay.
Charkowsky is active with the
Greater Miami chapter, American
Friends of the Hebrew University.
While in Israel, he will inspect
th- university at Jerusalem, to
which he is a substantial contribu-
tor.
He and Mrs. Charkowsky left
Miami last week for New York,
where they joined Dr. and Mrs.
J. M. Rogoff at fhe Rogoff sum-
mer home in Belle Island, Roway-
*; ton. Conn.
The Charkowskys and Rogoifs
will make the trip to Israel to-
gether. Dr. Rogoff, also actively
identified with the Hebrew Univer-
sity, is a national vice president of
the American Friends. He is noted
for his discovery of adrenal cortical
extract, used in the treatment of
Addison's disease.
ii

CHAKUS CHAKKOWSKY
BB Plaque Goes To Friedman
Judge Milton Friedman is the citation to Milton A. Friedman for
W
KS. Tt IIHGATON
- IS .
recipient of an award for his ser
wees to the B'nai B'rith Youth
Commission between 1950 and
1956.
The award plaque was present-
ed to Judge Friedman in cere-
monies held during the District
Grand Lodge 5 convention in Mi-
ami Beach laet week.
William Wexler, Savannah, Ga.,
international vice president of
B'nai B'rith. made the presenta-
tion, which reads:
"The B'nai B'rith Youth Com-i
mission gratefully presents this
I i ii '
' Weekly Card Gomes
Temple Ner Taraid Sisterhood
wil hold weekly card games every
| Monday noon at the Biltmore Ter-
race hotel. Chairman u Mrs.
Charles Raab.
outstanding services to Jewish
youth as a member of the Commis-
sion 19501956."
Work At Chicago Gallery
artist Charles R. Jacobson, His unique styie which makes ex- "Composition 210" was "recently
^tttSftt\m*m USe f "ture-materials^quir^forthep^m^tco.-
pel. has been invited to ex
the Sherman Hotel Art
in t'hicago.
b director Harry Linsky
pelted Jacobson to assemble
of his latest "Aztec i.v
[' it) Ii for a special one-man
finning July 1. Theme'ma-
or the>e pictures was ac-
e rip to Mexico.
ftson has been a non-ob-
p* inter for more than 25
Pi'ving studied at the Chi-
Icademy of Fine Arts, and
(University of Illinois. He
^d five one-man exhibits in
*nd his controversial pic-
included in nearly 100
collections throughout
"ted States.
such as builders' sand, lucite. cork,
wood, and stainless steel, has been
the subject of discussions in na-
tional trade and professional pub-
lications, notably Interiors, Arts
and Architecture, and-Architectural
Design.
Jacobson's work has been on
exhibit locally at the Joe and
Emily Lowe Gallery, Miami
Beach Art Gallery, Four Arts Gal-
lory of Palm Beach, and the High
Museum in Atlanta, Ga. His
lection at Brandeis University in
Walthem, Mass.
Examples of Jacobson's non-ob-
jective paintings may be seen at
the Delano hotel. University of Mi-
ami, Hillel Foundation in Coral
Gables, and in more than 30 private
Galen Hall Vacation
Easy for Floridians
When summer sets in. it's turn-
about time, time for Miamians to
migrate north for well-deserved va-
cations. With Florida only four
hours away by air, Daniel Burack.
managing director of Galen Hall
Hotel & Country Club in Werners-
ville, Pa., has made arrangements
for his limousines to meet all Flor-
idian guests at the Philadelphia
airport and speed them off to In--
mountain retreat.
Located high in the heart of the
Pennsylvania Dutch country, the
resort has the look of an English
country manor, but is an up-to-date
manor in every MUSS of the word.
This year, Galen Hall boasts com-
plete air-conditioning, a remodeled
1)1 hole championship golf course
with two pros on hand, additional
kitchens providing round-the-clock
service (including al fr*sco dining
at the shady glen swimming pool,
one of the nation's largest) and a
completely remodeled and luxur-
ious main lobby.
There is a choice of th? elevator
equipped main house or the quiet
EVERYBODY'S
TALKING
ABOUT
+'.
m
.*-:
JV
jrjf. COOPERATIVE
'4--
I
APARTMENTS
Miami Beach's
tallest and finest
See the furnished
model apartment
TODAY!
.. Open 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
I

LEGAL NOTIC1
--------------- j -i.rr**~ ..<_... anriMS *s isac >jim i
collections throughout the Greater privacy of one of the cozy English
Miami area.
Jacobson is director of the pub
cottages sequestered in th? nearby
pine groves. Matching the quality
licity division of Greater Miami of the food is the care and atten-
I Jewish Federation. I tion received from th? staff.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
tfOTICE is HUREBT UIVBN
the uikI.m-iKtii .1 d< -Innr to <-w:h>
IniHlneaa under the rtctiltoui ....
ks \.-s. i.-i ATE* at Dad<
KlarMa ntvnda ; r-ealMm *i.l i
lih Hi. l. ik ..r th, c'ln ill
I < "< utn> Florida.
I K URBNNBR
Sole |...
pier Session
Hment Up
fi< ial registraUon figur?s for
pversity of Miami's first
session, which got under
r 17, shows gain of,nearly
Dents over 1856 enrollment,
par Ernest M. McCracken
p total enrollment at BJB2.
'"'st summer session at-
tudents.
lime students number 7.-
7j*h an estimated Evening
I" enrollment of Ml. Last
l0ure f0r the first sum
*'on were 2,434 day and
nin9 students.
pi summer session, offer
Nwnatelv 250 daytime anu
rlnK rourses for credit ..n
"Pus. ends July 24. Tin?
h'-Mon is schedoled Jul>
* 30.
|' of vu; summer session
fren H Steinbach.
THE NEW
JEWISH FAMILY BIBLE
This tremendous bible, just released by Menoroh Press, so long owoited by the
Jewi-.h World, is now reody lor your inspection ond occee.tonce. All bronches or Judaism
Orthodox. Conservative and Reform have pined hoods in br.ng.ng this t.rst ed.fon to
you Great men of all walk, of Jewish rel.g.cus life, such as Robb. Morris Gutstc.n
Robb. David Graubort, Robb. Dav.d de Solo Pool. Robb. Solomon Groysel Robb, Albo
Hillel S.lver ond Robb. Edgor S.skin hove oil g.ven of the,, knowing, ond understanding
Beautiful colored p.ctures of the potr.orchs, prophet,, the heroes ond heroines of
biblical history or, wonderfully brought to hfe by one of th, worlds greatest pointers
Jacob Borpbin.
The universally accepted Mosoretic te>t is used, which makes the Scriptures vividly
clear m the s.mplest English words. Also bound w.th.n this volume is a fom.lv record
section where the closest tie of Jewish life becomes more than o bond .t becomes
iisiory and her.toge. Also .ncluded .s o Bible Encycloped, where those things per-
taining to Jew.sh religious life moy be found ot o glonce.
We ore interested In
interviewing a lew high type
soles representatives. Phone Hlghlond
8-3017 ot 9 AM. lor oppointment
BIBLE HOUSE, 2726 W. Flogler St., Miami, Flo!
rtWcet. o^JFj" m '"" d'"n *" JEWISH FAMILY B,BL
NAME ...............................
ADDRESS .................
PHONE
*


Page 6-B
I

Sn tL IQcalm of Society
Miss Singer Now Mrs. Richard Stone
Marlene Lois Singer became Mrs. Rich rd Ber
nan! Stone in 6:30 p.m. wedding rites Sui
30. at the Fontainebleau hotel. Rabbi Jos<
Temple Israel, and Rabbi Irvin I
Emanu-El, officiated before the ci ;
jn the Grand ballroom.
The "bride is the daughter of Mr Wil-
liam D. Singer, 694S Granada blvd., i
The groom's parents are Mr. and Mrs, All
8031 Atlanta way. Miami Beach.
Given in marriage by her lather, the
a gown designed especially for her b>
Oro. featuring white peau de soil
long .sleeves and formal-length tram. P
de soie were spaced at the uetk and h i the
bell-shaped skirt.
From the back of the fitted princi -
two wide streamers were fashioned to a I
and fell Into the formal-length tram. Thi |
soie pouffs alternated with alencon lace motifs, em-
broidered with paillette^, seed pearl- and pearl lily-
of-the-valley bells.
The bridal headpiece was a demi
alencon lace, pearls and paillette- and embroidered
pure silk illusion fingertip-length veil. Hei
included a cascade of lily ol the valley, white orchids
and hybrid white delphinium.
Matron of honor was Mrs. Marvin Jacobs, ol
New Orleans. La., the bride- sister, Miss I
Kaplan, of Miami, was maid of honor. Bridesmaids
included Miss Jackie Gureasko,
New Orleans, and the Misses Bev-
erly Shapiro. Beverly Katims and
Barry Garber, all of Miami. Flower
girls were the bride's nieces, Car-
olyn and Joanie Singer,
Best man for his brother was
Nathaniel Stone. Ushers included
Hubert Stone and Benjamin St.....>,
the groom's brother-. Joseph Par- Carol Ann Schwartz, daughter ol
do. David Leslie, Victor Eber, Mr. and Mrs Paul Schwartz, T516
Lawrence Singer, the bride's bro- Adventure ave., became the bride
Iher. Marvin Jacobs, brother in-law of Fredrick W Heineman, son of
of the bride, Henrv Hohauser. the late Mr. and Mrs, Harold

MRS. RICHAKD STONf
Grecian Neckline
Feature of Mrs.
HeinemanV Gown
mony on Sundav, June 30. Miss
Henry
Jules Channing, Norman Somber,..
Richard Maloy. Jordan Bittel,
Kichard Brickman and Alex Gor-
don.
Newlywed Mrs. Stone attended
Miami Senior High School and was
a June, 1957 graduate of Vander-
bilt University, receiving her AB
degree in English magna cum
laude.
Heineman. Rabbi Mortem Malav-
sky. of the Israelite Center, per-
formed the 4 p m. ceremony.
Maid ol honor .,- Lois Wachtel.
Matron of honor was Mi- Arman-
do Stettner, sister ol the bride.
Carol Ann Harris was flower uirl
Best man was Thomas Eugene
Douglas
The bride -elected a nvlon chif-
She is a member of Phi,
Beta Kappa. Her social sorority fon ballerina-length wedding .nun
was Alpha Epsilon Phi. At Van- i featuring ., Grecian neckline with
derbilt. she was president of the shoulder drap and fitted bodice
Women's Advisory Council. and bouffant -kirt Her three tier-
Mr. Stone is a graduate of ''(l Fm"1' '""""", ve" ''''I from
Georgia Military College and re- "' '"'i,rN ""' '"descent se-
ceived his AB degree from liar-! <,"-!','v
vard in 1949. His law degree is I ,n'hn,u'i te ol Miami
from Columbia University. He is 8 School. Mr. Heineman
a practicing attorney iii'Miami 's f *[aduate '' Miami Senior High
School
Following a trip to Puerto Rico! After a garden reception at her
and.tie Virgin Islands, the couple home. lhe couple left or thS
will be at home on Miami Beach.
fcftfffii it
Meister, Kratzer
To Live on Beach
Rabbi Irving Lehrman officiated
at the marriage of Irene Jawitz
Meister and Marshall Kratzer on
Sunday, June 23.
The brde is the daughter of Mrs
Jennie Jawitz. 1320 South Biscayne
Point rd.. and the late Meyer I
Jawitz.
The groom's parents are Mr. and
Mrs. Isadore Kratzer, ol 501 75th
St The ceremony took place in
he home of the bride's mother.
Decorations were of palms, pink
peonies, white gladioli and baby
breath Besl man was Sidnej Sch-
lo^er, brother-in-law ol the,
""' ,""1" wore an antique pink
pown o reembroidered chamKy
Hr face veil ol French illu-
ton was held i ,..,,. h,
';' matching chiffon, she
anied a contemporary i,,,,,,,,,,,,
? '^^v-UeyeSreTS
two hybrid white orchids
Matron of honor and sister of
hybrid vanda oSfc^fiJ**
Janet Meister in '2
white organdy P and
garAderfononwedndthdenner S "*
powers weTdlsi S d 1?%
stone Flower Shops k"
Upon completion of a honeymoon
honeymoon in the Poo
New York Upon their r-turn
| they will live .!, North Miami
Gotham Town
For Weisbergers
i'
unGray
md Edmund
I Wed
the I -
li,,
liliesoM
i. .


* "*uuu wam
'rip to Jamaica and h....
new.yweds wilI VJ^T' ,h'
^ron aVe Miami Beach.
8350
Block Coti Oeiree
"
Um
major in clinii '' Wllh i
Previousl, SSLfW.....
^ from New \, "| ***
1951. Wk UnhFtrahj ,
*L
\V3GUST BROS iTv
-^-'> .#s,, Kf
Miss Spatz Weds
Paul Degenshein
patz, l.VW Bay
VOW1 with
, ;. I -til ly at
.....lay. -lune
ol the
.>
K mei
! ,i lullerina-
p. Me,l chatitilly
lice, long
iffant skirt of
I with bkta
lh I rench
hi I to a eiown
. ied w ith l.ice and
Brooklyn o.l-
i-i i ber degree in
versify of Mi
.i ol Phi Delta
i iry <
attended New
lie i- in lui-mess
I'M Graduates
Wed in New York
: ire on the
' rj of Mr. and
s, hwart/ who
June 30. in
the Hotel Plaza New York City
Thi the former Mi-s
rowito, daugh-
\lr and Mrs Harry Mayero-
ave Coral
Mr m rt/. the
live at 2M3
Miami Beach, and in
i hose a gown
de mho with
alencon lace, fash-
ioned in a bell -ilhouette with a
cathedi
y tiara held her fin-
n veil, and she
carried white orchids and stephan-
Ottl M
Mr- Albert Geyef was her cou-
bonor dressed in
length pink chiffon and carry-
pink and white roaet.
1 isten ol the bridegroom,
Mr- Harr) Ku-km and Mrs Ar-
Ke&sler, were attendants.
included Miaa Ronnie
! Miami bV m h
the bridegroom's
r girl Marshall
rother, was
best i
was he|,| ,n (he
md ballroom
i'1'' will live at 2545
I Beach after
tab o| the
I Miami.
"'/ also attended Mary
and waa prev
.. sorority
M Mr Schwartz uTaS
I>elta fraternity.
barge, ister, n-
i room
rahanoff, Miaa Henri
"d Mr- Buddy
the, HendMtl
brotnet of
be* man
Gilbert. Buddy
Richard Kush-
herof.he
M ring
held ,n
, and.
U I from
.....my
College.
i Utm
Ba4,i#
*"*'k H.I,
T
.IflMV

W*J9&r~
. ravi afcnfla]
^!
mn. *4tot Ktwam
1
aurs. tomuHD wW
MR. BUSINESS*"*
and MRS. HOUSPP3
W torn tea r'l r* ^*|
mh.r: rf ** *^j
,t. Imii "..t saj"
, CWMl "
PHKtlli WHO Tf
SajfPOIT Of TMf ta.IL.-,
jtwna nomi o "" ,
MsMefadM H ""^g]
Mr. Uhf k"*^
" ST*"
(ImW


5. 1957
ficiates at
ter's Vows
tr, daughter of Hahbi
inuicl S. Lerer, 1314
(Bollywood, and Alan
Bi Mr. and Mrs. Lee
-ingdale. N.Y.. were
natrimony at Temple
Hollywood, Sunday,
^er, spiritual leader of
and his nephew. Rabbi
Brer, of North Miami
armed the ceremony.
persons were present
mony and reception.
.. a dinner was held, at
social hall for mem-
Lerer and Karp fam-
fficers and board mem-
Temple.
m" '-^ST^BbI
"Vv^^tH
*#h|H
mm
<^|

MM. ALAN KARP
ler, Orkin Exchange Vows
ling band that Jack Lee
pcil on the finger of his
( lane Sophia Dressier,
no that her mother re-
bride.
lighter of Dr. and Mrs.
dialer, 201 NW 32nd pi..
>f Mr. and Mrs. Aaron
Jo 94th st.. Bay Harbor
pre married Saturday,
the Algiers hotel. A
and dinner followed.
irriette Heller, Harmon
I, NY, was maid of lion
ly Escott, of New York,
lan. Edmund H. Dress-
of the bride, and Ste-
per. Port Chester, N.Y.,
wore a ballerina-length
rh. Hilly lace and nylon
lace appliques. Her fin-
inch illusion veil fell
own of seed pearls. She
^o orchids on her bro-
Je confirmation Bible.
dp graduated cum laude
University of Miami. She
Jved her MA degree in
from the I'M. She is
of Alpha Epsilon Phi
Cappa Phi.
k.i. obtained his BS, MS
degrees from Columbia
University. Formerly with the U.&
tax court in Washington. D.C, he
is now a tax lawyer in Oklahoma
City, where the couple will live
after a honeymoon in Jamaica.
Baum, Grossman
Beth David Vows
Heard Saturday
Beth David Congregation was
th~ setting for the Sunday, June
30. wedding of Miss Barbara Carole
Baum and Richard Grossman, and
the following reception.
The bride is the .1 mghter of Mr.
and Mrs. Murray Raum. 1735 S\V
17th ct. She chose a gown of
chantilly lace and tulle with a
chapel train. A matching U- rap
trimmed with seed pearls held her
illusion veil. Her flowers were
orchids on a Bible.
Sheila Rotoff, maid of hon-
or, wore a white lace aheath over
blue taffeta and carried yellow
roses. Bridesmaids were Miss
Minna Leff. Miss Elinor Bogi h
and Miss Thea Shapiro.
The bridegroom is (he son of
Mr. and Mrs Henry Grossman, 226
SW 15th ave. His best man was
Gerald Hoffman. Chicago, III.
Ushers were Joseph Harvey
Baum. brides brother. Herman
Scidel and Elton Kerness.
The coupl" will live at 1897 I'nral
Way after a honeymoon in Vera-
dero Beach and Havana. Cuba.
Page 7-B
M*S. JACK OMIN
Uon to Speak
Outdoor Forum will
>k by Dr. Abraham Wolf-
rday evening on "Food
Dr. Jacques Fresco, Mi-
|>"logist. is also scheduled
il.lress on -Cities With
The Forum meets at 121
liami Beach.
ilaekstone
>wer shops
' trt y*
121 hoars
phont j| MJfl
UST BROS R>.
Is thi r\f w '
Miss Finberg Will.
Be Assistant Exec
Irwin Benjamin Wednesday an-
nounced the opening of the Nan
tasket Youth Center, in Kenberma,
Mass.
Staff appointments for the com-
ing season were revealed by execu-
tive director Leo Snyder.
Miss Edna B. Finberg, of 621
Jefferson iv., Miami Beach, will
-*-in serve at assistant to the
executive director. Miss Finberg
has served in the capacity for
the past eight years.
Miss Finberg was founder of the
Louis D. Brandeis Women's Club
and was recently elected vice pres-
ident, with Mrs. Harry Schuldiner
as president.
a II. Bukstel
LleJJinq C-ixmi/i
ontullant
Enjoy th* specialized services of
our Wedding Consultant
Complete selection shown in the
comfort of your home
Only $17.95 for 100
Redding Invitations Bar Mitzvah Invitations
Social Stationery
/M**u*y-%*yt*jr
"4 N. I. 4lb Street
W- '-** rt*-bli- S-4434
I efasliii el
Merr-y MM*
*.'**-*--
MKS. KICHAKS CKOSSMAH
ding vows Saturday. June 20. The
ceremony took place in Temple
Beth Sholom.
The bride is the daughter of
Judge and Mrs. Philip Schliss. ;
9132 Bay dr., Surfside. Mr. Budow
sky's parents are the Max Budow
skys, 1132 Euclid ave., Miami
Beach.
Milton C. Goodman and Misi
Ann Harder attended the couple as
best man and maid of honor
The bride's other attendants
were Miss June Goldin, MiM Bar
bara Chak. Miss Dianne I'erle/-
man. Mrs. Shirley Waitzman and
Miss Cheri Lynn Schlissel, a sister
of the bride, was a junior brides-
maid.
The bride wore a peau de soie
gown with aleiieon lace appliques,
chapel length veil and carried
white orchid> and stephanoiis
Ushers were David Sehliss(], ihe
bride's brother. Joseph (Settler,
Sydney Wrublc and Larry Wruble.
The bride graduated from Miami
High School and the University of
Miami. Mr. Budowsky obtained
his BA and BBA degrees at the
University of Miami.
KISS SUSAU WtlNSTOCK
Weinstocks Tell .
Susan's Betrothal
Mr. and Mrs. Sydney A. Wcin-
toek, of 4420 Adams ave., an-
nounce the engagement of their
daughter, Susan, to Milton Harold
Schemer, son of Mr. and Mrs. Big-
mund Schermer, 1611 Euclid ave.
The bride elect is a graduate of
Miami Beach High School and at-
tended the University of Texas at
Austin, and is now a student at
the University of Miami She is
a member of Sigma Delta Tau so-
cial sorority.
Mr. Schermer is a graduate of
Miami Beach High School and is
engaged in the stock brokerage
business on Miami Beach.
No date has been set for the
wedding.
POSITION WANTED
Child Care, Reliable. Practical
Nursing, etc., Cook. M.B. Area.
I Cell 1-3 P.M JE 1 9362
Room 26
MKS. UKJAMIH BUDOWSKY
Karen's Jewelry
Mother's Heirloom
Her mother's heirloom pearls
was the jewelry Miss Karen Sheila
Schlissel wore when she and Ben-
jamin Budowsky exchanged wed-
SUNSHINE FASHIONS'
res. D.8. pat. oft
MIAMI MIAMI MACM FT. lAUDtlDAlf WOT PALM MACS
******* ......
!*.*.**.'



Friday,
.
Page 8-B
?

.
J

i

i

Lace Gowns, Veils
For These Brides
, Korn daughter of, carried the rings.
' rn 3168 NW th Following a tour of Honda
>,h 'J b F.shbein were | couple will live at 231 SW SJ
23 m LaunttOD, LI The bride is a graduate of
MISS 0/W/050N
MISS HARR-i
w;ss rvfxua
Their Betrothals Are Revealed Here
A winter wedding is being plan-
ned by Miss Doris Lee Harris and
Martin Goldstein.
She is the daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. ,'ack Harris of Metairie. La
He is the son of Mrs Harry Gold-
Stein, 858 Euclid ave., Miami
Beach, and the late Mr. Goldstein.
Miss Harris is a graduate of
Sophie Newcomb College, where
she was president of the senior
ilass. and elected to "Who's Who
in American Colleges and Univer-
sities."
Mr. Goldstein graduated magna
cum laude from the University of
Miami where he was a member of
Sigma Alpha Mu and Alpha Epsi-
lon Delta. He is a member of the
sophomore class in the University
of Miami medical school.
Goldintr Jackson
Mr and Mrs. Max Goldiner. 1435
Normandy dr.. announce the en-
gagement of their daughter. Hilda,
to Bernard Jackson, son of Mrs. |
Harry Landa. 924 Meridian ave..Idr., Miami Beach, and th
,-., 0, Miami wnere
member oi Delta 1
ight last year Protosjoiu
si
;:,: Whit. cottonjjj-
M, uffeta and fuigertjp
Hid -cqu...
"a 5 h-ofher
broth Korn?l^S
inJ After a woddtal
U t0 the Adirondack* the couple
will live in the Brons
The bride, who now lives in New
York was active in Miami Little
Ihealer, Bnai Bnth. torn** and
jl Women and the Uiu-
and the late .Max Jackson. They Brodsky. and Richard II Kline of
will be married Oct. 20. j Norfolk, Va.. plan an October wed-
Miss Goldiner attended the Uni- ( ding
versity of Alabama and the Uni-1
versity of Miami where she was a
member of Delta Phi Epsilon
Mr. Jackson graduated from
Roosevelt College in Chicago.
st. Her tatlr-r .s.hr late Bdward
UYxler.
Mr. Herskowitz is the son of Mr.
and Mr*, lsadore Herskowitz. 4700
Granada blvd
They plan a late December wed-
ding.
The bride elect graduated from
Miami Senior High and attended
the University of Miami, where -he
was a member of Alpha Lambda
Delta and Delta Phi Epsilon
The bridegroom-to-be also grad- .
uated from Miami Senior High and Technical Institute. Zeta Beta lau
attended the University ot Flor- ajid Pi Tau Pi fraternitic-
ida. where he was a member of Pi; ...
Lambda Phi. Davidson Lassk
He graduated from the timer Mr and Mrs l^ f. Davidson,
sity of Miami, where he was a _>( ^ (.ora, Wav Mian)j and
member of Scabbard and Blade. He
was recently commissioned a
ond lieutenant in the U.S. Arm) gagO&eoi of their daughter. Joyce "^ ^((h fi|(ed b()dlcl. and bertha
" Tillie. to William Lassk. son ot Mr (l,||ar
Mill Carol Miller was maid oi
honor and Mrs. Robert Parent, the
(room's sister, matron of hon
or. Th. Misses Sharon and Arlcnc
Badanes were bridesmaids. Joyce
Mayers was Dower girl
Mr Parent wa- best man. and
Richard Clein, Hainan Clein, bride's
Spector Dons is ,. graduate ol brothers and h n Weiss ushered.
Miami Senior High Me is the ion Jeffrj Parenl carried the rial
Brodsky Kline
Miss Faj H. Brodsky,
of Mrs. Jack Brodsky, ol 680") Ba)
Ion sorority. She taugh (. .. she at-
a, Golden Glades ^gjTiS Academy of
*T-m is *+* of .he h^^^ itn c4 lln
Universit) ol Virginia. ^ .J^'KBI New York. BOM
Motor- School of Merchandising ^ork.
and Management. C|#jn Radoff
He is a member ol the advisory jjelene Sue Clem and Sam-
board of William and Man ( ollege ^ ^^ ^^ married jun 23 in
Miami Hebrew Congregation, where
the reception was held.
They travelled to Rainbow
Springs, before returning to Miami
July 2 to live
oi 3401 Coral Way. Miami and The bride, daughter of Mr. and
.k Mrs B-rrv Clein. of 330 NW 44tn
l-mopano Beach, announce th'- en Mr, Hju I Mn^ ^^ ^
and Mr- Adoli Lassk, of Jackson-
ville.
Barkan Spector
Mrs Bessie barkan. 1453 SW 2nd
- announces Ibe engagement oi
her daughter, Don-, to Sheldon G
Mr and Mrs. Irving Kim- ol
Lynnhaven. Va., arc his parents
Senior High. Mr. Kurland atten
the University of Florida and i
graduate of the University
Miami.

Levinson Gilt,
Miss Robert Faye Lewn*on. thJI
daughter of Mr. and Mr. Harrtl
Lester Levinson, 121o loi.st -1
Miami Bdch.
came the
of Martin I
Galex SuiKiaj"]
une 30. m ^t^\
pie Israsl
The bridegr
is the son of Mr. 1
and Mr-. Wilbwl
Leon Gajajt, ||
Rock Island, M,
Miss Levinm
wore a gown oil
hand embroider-1
d tull- tnmrnts
*ith jeweled mo-
tifs. It had a I
jouffan: ruffles!
MM. CAM skirt and a trail
Miss Nannette Shilste! of Men-1
phis. Tenn was her cousin's nuisl
of honor. Bridesmaids were Mini
Lynn Schwartz and Miss Judith I
Solloway.
Sheldon Rosenfeld. Des Momes,!
la., was best man. Ushetl wertl
Marvin Levinson. bride- brother,!
Martin Sandier, cousin of t be]
bride, and Edward Seidenfeld ol|
Des Moines.
A dinner followed the ceremony. I
The couple will hone)moon ill
Miami Beach and Chicago and lw|
in Rock Island. III.
Mrs. Galex is a graduate of M*-l
Mi-- Brodsky is 1 gradual ol ol Mr. and Mr-, il Spector of Tor-
Miami Beach High School and the onto, Canada
yraduated from Miami High ami Beach High School. She anil
her husband are graduates of tall
State University of Iowa
Kottler Cohen
Mr and Mrs. Harry Bottler, 651 j
SW 66th ave.. announce the en-
gagement of their daughter. Nor-
ma. to Nathan Cohen. 6130 SW
45th st. He is the son of Mr. and !
Mrs. Samuel Cohen ol New York |
City.
...
Robinson Adelberg
Mr. and Mrs. Albert S. Robinson
< 1 Mattapan, Mass.. announce the
engagement of their daughter.
Phyllis Elaine, to John Adelberg.
515 15th st., Mi-
imi Beach, son of
.ir-. Tessie Adel
Mi-- Robinson
s a graduate of
; 11 -1 o n Univer-
it>. Mr Adel
ereg is a grad-
late of the Uni-
ersity of Fior-
ds and receive
lis Master's di
:ree in dtj
i p I a 11 -
ung from Har-
vard Universit}
School of Design.
Fortia Sesal
Mr. and Mrs. Henry IVrUg. 9H\
W. 48th st. Miami Beach, farmed, I
of New York, announce the bum
riage of their daughter. Sally. U
David H. Segal, son of Mrs. Harry |
Segal of Richmond. Va.
The ceremony took place June 111
in the study of lemple Emaau-B.
After a wedding trip I Nairn, |
the couple will live in Richmond.
MRS. R&DOff
MRS. KUKIAUD
MRS. fISHBfIN
'Midget Musicale'
Features Students
The Algiers hotel was the receat
lit* of a "midget musicale' t
which Mrs. David A. Flea), 21*
SW 10th st. Miami, presented S7
MISS ROBINSON
Weinberg Robinson
Mr. and Mrs Morris W. Wein-
berg. 2264 SW 2nd St., announce the
engagement of their daughter Len-
nie. New York. NY. to garnet!
Robinson. Jr. H is the son ol Mrs
Belle Robinson. New Rochelle \ Y
and Barnett Robinson. Park ave!!
New York.
Weinberg attended Miami
High School, graduated from Ste-:
phens College and Tufts University
and now is working on hei M
degree at Columbia University.
Mr. Robinson is a veteran of the
Ki r. an war He is a graduate of
Washington and Lee University and
the New York University Law
School.
An August wedding in Temple
Emanu-EI is planned.
.
Waxier- Herskowitz
Engagement of Miss Holene
Wexler and Bernard Paul Hers-

are
Gloria
Danny Rosengren, Rita Grossbeio.
Roher. Judy Harris, NUcki Nedbor. Anne H^ Z^^^J h'd ^ awcSS
ardB^nRd,ern Cen c1 Qre Unda We'n- How;
kowitz is announced bv her mother I H Rn t, B Uen,f re Unda Wln.
** B-.il. Wexler,951 SW S 2 SvSfeS?"*"'?< **.
School
Mr Rsdofl 1- the -on of Mr and
Mrs Abe Radoff. 2sc NW 27th -t
Weiss Kurland
Wedding and reception of Mis.
Rosalind Weiss and Sheldon Conrad
Kurland look place June 23 in the
1 'andli li^ht Inn.
Bar parent- are Mr and Mr.-.
.lack Weiss 130 sw 51st d and
he 1- the son of Mr- Flora Kur
land 2398 SW 25th ter and the
late Sidne) Kurland
The bride wore a ballerina length
gown ol white French lace own
ta
Miss I! k lull. ( 111 .! maid of
wore pmk nylon tulle and
i pmk < Barbau
Feldman was (lower girl.
an ol Baltimore
t man and Michael Fried her piano students to a capac'V
audience of some 500 per-ons.
Highliflhts of the rcitl wers
the performance of "Dance
the Wave*/' by Miami came**"
ManaZucci and dedica-ed '
Mrs. Hess, aetd premiere ptrj
iaamanci of "Carelyn Wal'i,
wretten lor and Oe^icated
Mrs. Hess by bee 11-*aar-c4d stv
den* Diane Troaabatta.
Participants in the pro;ram i|
eluded Richard ldels. Candy H
man. Bobby Lopez. Judy GoM
stein, LcsUe Fishbein. Carol Luo*
Bonnie Herman. Bonnie Brsroa
George Sehonwetter. Elaine Ara
ovitt, Donald Bogish. Su-an Bert*.
Kenneth Tobin. Nancy LattJ]*j
Janet Rabinowiti. Keith Pi;
Sara Green. Gayle Gloer. Barwri
Burney. Susan Melnick R"1*"
Covin, Susan Adams Sara R<**
son. Iteoise Heilbron. Roberta
sing. Jeffrey Ram.
Barbara Podell. Cynth.a R*>^* ]
Marsha Friedberg. Bryna ^"^
Penny Goldberg. Michael A^
den. Beverly Marks. Linda :><* |
man. Diane Blitt. BarbarJ^
tovsky. Iris Wolf. m**L
<^il Lasarus. mane Troavb*'"
Fratsk WbeaUey. Barbara
Vlyne Tendrich. J^111? K\Jt\
Johanna Stein. Michael Chast.
Apner. Patty Paris.
Gail Arooowitr I>ane *a I
ski. Roberta Stepk.n. PB'l,j
Sehonwetter. Diane Grime'-
Idov, Janet Lipsctnitz, Aon *
hagen and Nan Cotton
stein, Fred Bernev Mr, n w. t7na t*old'
ney. Joyce Gold and Elea-
awa
Also
=awRa- s


L July 5. 1957
forkshop Lists Block Director
f. ii...-,I nkairatui t\f four \i..ru ,,( .Int. ,
ban B Rood, chairman of
1 ,| the Jewish Vocational
i ednesday announced the
, Donald S. Block a*
rtor ol the Jewish Voca-
\\. rk.-hop.
bock i. a clinical psychologist,
ceived his BA degree a,
York I nivtrrity and his Mas-
four years of duty as a naval <>ifi
cer.
BUck't rnponibilities will in-
clude maintenance end tuptrvit-
ion of the Sheltered Workshop,
which I* to be located at the Jew-
ish Home for the Aged, 151 NE
52 nd st.
','," George Washington primo function of the workshop
Me recently comple-d 's Pr"v,d\ suitable employment
______ for aged and handicapped Jewish
persons who are unable to finil em-
ployment in industry. The work
shop is subsidized by tin- Gctatar
,n-^gers Pressnt r7g
: will present a flag to ] Miami Jewish Federation"
( ol Rood said that lie
I
egation of Pade Heights
L ommunlty Center at. a
Ltjna Sunday evening.
. cxp-cts
the workshop to be in full opera-
tion within two weeks.
_*Jen1st HcridUagi

DOMALO BLOCK

Page 9-B
Investment Service Expands Horizons
Harold R. Hirschfield and Assoc-
iates. 407 Lincoln rtl.. investment
consultants in all types of Florida
prnportie-. Wednesday announced
th" opening of an additional ser
vice for investor!
The new MTVaM is a syndicate
that will enable both larsc and
sniall individual investors or
group to make purchases in large
ereagS and ocean front land in
Florida.
Hirschfield, seeing the need for
Offering tcrtlge inve^'ment oppor-
tunities to individuals with as lit-
tle as $1,500 to invest, has worked
[ cut a group plan for hi., clients.
"We first screen all acreage
property to make sure it meets
the client's requirements; name-
ly location, good physical char-
acteristics, proper prices and
terms, and appreciation poten-
tial for the future."
"We then offer the investor,
i modest and substantial, an
opportunity to participate."
Many of the company's investors
are members of the medical pro-
fession, as well as residents from
Ohio, New Jersey. Pennsylvania,
and as distant as Mexico City.
The Syndicated Investors Divis-
ion of Harold R. Hirschfield and
Associates has already sold over
$4,000,000 in Florida properties.
..<',
The STATE of the UNION
OF MEMBERS AND MANAGEMENT
HE new milestone reached by Washington Federal
Savings almost $30,000,000 in assets in four and
a half years is no accident.
It signifies more than being a pleasant and convenient
repository for savings, and an instrument for sound loans.
It-transcends the security of insured savings accounts and
the payment of liberal dividends.
It is rather the result of a lively membership and its t*
progressive management working together in the best $10,408,643
interests of our community and all its people.
A steadily increasing number of savers has placed complete
faith in our management and its policies; management has $6,010,029
rewarded this trust by a sound and rapid growth that
stems from an acute awareness of the human side of
financial transactions, and by an active and devoted
interest in the intimate and everyday problems of "just
folks". A union of aims and efforts.
$29,449,077
$24,430,788
$15,802,403
We will never be content that we are doing enough. We
are planning now to enlarge our facilities and we shall
continue to expand our principal stock in trade:
Personal Service of the highest degree.
$250,000
1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 JUNE 30,1957
STATEMENT OF CONDITION
JUNE 30, I9J7
ASSETS LIABILITIES AND RESERVES
Cash on Hand and in Banks t $ 1,063.222.98
U.S. Government Bonds ....... 1,787.243.91 Loans in Protest '.% t 2,777,287.19
U.S. Government Agency Notes. ., 1.300,000.00
First Mortgage Loans .' t 24,586,858.69 Advance-Federal Home Loan-Bank .] 260,000.00
Other Loans........., s. t 28,230.75 Other Liabilities/ .. ., 108,27". 1 1
Federal Home Loan Bank Stock .... 320.000.00
BMg. Improvements and EquipmentNet 258,789.78 Surplus and Reserve* 4 t % 996,48 L96
Deferred Charges and Other Assets 104,731.62 TOTAL LIABILITIES
TOTAL ASSETS ?.**,, $29,449,077.73 AND RESERVES ,V. 529,449,077.73
WASHINGTON FEDERAL
3/2%
CURRENT
DIVIDENDS
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
MIAMI BEACH
1244 WASHINGTON AVENUE JE 8-8452 Free Parking
1120 NORMANDY DRIVE UN 6-9667 Free Parking
JACK 0 GORDON, Fratldml
MRVTON GAYNOR, Vka **
ciAuof nmu
OFFICERS AND ROARD Of DIRECTORS
ARTHUR M COURSHON, Chairman ol mt Board
GEORGE W. WRSCM, V.P., Comptroller EN GIUER. V, JACK R. COURSHON
-'
1


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Palmer Takes He!m Of Beth H Cong.



*?.* v.*-* v Urn >***


Pope Tells AX Leaders
Anti-Semitism Must Co
r .IrfT nM a
. '-
.tip *r
Crcnin Joins City
Convention Bureau


:d Leaders C !?d
ScaiBr set
tftaban to Attwd '
Spedi U i mb*


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Kids fft 2 :- :-z
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Bccfritl
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EKS Hr\D*Y & DRY CIXtM


July 5. 1957
+Jelsi)fhrktk*r)
Page 11-B
^V
SsafgSifcM
t
obeis of Hillel AZA softball team won an-
tournament sponsored by B'nai B'rith
i Organiiation. They are pictured with
lin and president of runner-up team. Royal
AZA. Left to right (front) are Harold Rtfas.
Dtmchick. Bob Fischer. Greater Miami
director, Stuart Blumin, Royal Palm AZA
lin Gary Rovin. Dan Ostrowsky, Sheldon
Bott. Burt Ban-, and Arthur Purteh. Rar are
Richard KirscrsW. president of Royal Palm
AZA. Steve Kneapler. Ben Siael. captain of
Hillel AZA team Larry Parnes, Jerry Feinstein.
president of Hillel AZA, and Ross Sandier, past
president of Florida Region AZA. Hillel won
with 7-2 record.
Oi
i f it a r ie s
NAT
I
I
HAN LIEBERMAN
Kaj Harbor dr.. died
erlj from Trenton, N.J..
i Juvenile fuinliiu,
and a Mason. Nurvlv-
;!, Ida. two ilaushter*.
Iteth and !*)>>Ili: two
Ma Honey and Mm. Nan
ino brothers, 1 r\ luar And
s. virea anil l>urlal were in
ll.lltnan Kiinernl Cha-
nt I... I arrangement-
MRS ESTHER ALTER
! na m\ ., died June 24.
) sal nan from Rua -
husband, Solo-
< .lune 2& at Hi\
Mi mortal i'ha|.el. with
I! i*ii Park.
MRS ANNA LEVINE
I ,1 died J une 24 A
h Is aurvlved
:i>' daucbtet-.
' ... k. Mrs Ftoahn Ber-
|M Moron Its, Mr., i .
'i I Mrs S.vlvla BrokOff;
Hoien in.t t\\->
in (i Horvtcsa areis in
v 11 ii Mewman-Oordon
In chart* "f local si
RICHARO AM5TER
aw., died June 24.
i.i ribbon whole.
I hots five real -
III- wife. Kvel> n.
Kervleee m
vvllh local arrangements
H. n Ii Memorial Chapel
ISAOORE I. HABER
11. of S.-.4 Washington av died June
:; .} retired taxi OPOratOf for the
Mercury Cab On., he had II wd here
iv win.. Ha wan a member of the
Miami Iteai-h BBta l.ndite and (kid
rVllnwa Surviving are hla wife. Jen-
nie: a eon. I>a\iil, and two daughter*.
Mra Itorothi Mahlman and Mra. Ila-
< hel l>rlmner. Kervlres were June tt
at Mellmaii Funeral I'hapel. with
burial In Mt Sloal Cemetery
A realdent here Hi wars, he 1-
ed by hi., wife, Lillian; two sons, Ban-
Cord and Herbert: in- mother, three
brother! and five al-teia Service*
were inly I at Cordon Funeral MOlDe,
with iiuihii in Mt. Neko Cemetery.
nwrlal Chapel, With burial In Mt. Nebo
'.....tery.
MRS. EOITH MARKS
4>. of mi Michor*.n a\.-. rued i ina 11
She la survived by her husband, Sey-
mour; ami three enn, J.i>. Kit hard
ami Ronald. Rervloee wore June Id el
ll-'ln an Funeral i'hai>el. with burial
in mi. Rhtai remoteir
MRS. FANNIE FAY
I*, "f IM Ni: 7MI. -t di.,1 .lune | i
Her late huaband, Larry, waa rounder
of 'he i',i\ mus i i>s d Mr*.
nt ",- active in music and choral
her. She leaves two one,
PJortj and Arthur; a "later, M">
ii- man N K .r|, and .i brotbt i Harri
i. Ootdln.
ABRAHAM BINKOW
SB, of ism n.,11,,,,:., i i rt|H,| j,,..
In NVw fork. Hi eras .. resident bare
'.,i aeven >eara. rfirvl i a,
mi., l&ayhle: Ihree sona, Charlaa,
and ,., \i. _
I. .ii Kin. Sirvii en were June 21 In
It.
MRS. ROSE BLOCK
17. of i'.r, sw Tab at., died June ft, a
resMent her. f,,i u rears, she is sur-
viv. d bj two daujrhtei Id i
(Jreeaa and Miss Sadie niock; one
grandi hlld and two (treat-era
dun .-, rvU-M were Jum u lordon
Funeral Home, with burial in Mi N. I,
MRS. FANNIE GREENFIELD
It of 300 9th at., died June 17 A tel-
dent here eight year*, she la survived
by four dauahter*. afrn Clara Young.
iMra Helen Roaen. Mra llelene l.lfter.
and Mrs, Sally Werner: and i
llera. S'ei vlcea Were June H ai Rival'
aide-lte-ach MemorlaJ Obapd, with
burial in l*hlladcl|>hia-
r.
MRS. CONSTANCE O. BURSTEIN
tl, forin,il\ of Miami, died In a New
Jeraey hotel fire June tf Crttlcalll in-
jured In the fire, which daotroyoo lbs
Khde hotel In MoUOl PYoadonii Wefia
her husband. Ii win. and their -
month-old dausttter, l>eboiah The
hotel la owned DJ ber husband's fam-
ily Mrs Itiu-i.ln. who was graduated
from Miami Set..... High Hchool in
i!.",3. wrote i achool fashion column
for a local da!!) newsfaapei while In
high acbool Hhe att.nded the I'm
verolt) ol Miami for one foai Othor
eurvlvoi n i. her parents, Mr. anil
Mm Sam Oruber, and two alaters,
\li 11.....lb) > iiw .' i/ and M
Uruher Ira
III at Mt Nebo Cemetery, with Oor-
OS I'limral HoUM In 'lutrge 01 ,u
ransen
JACOD BALOFSKY
i riled June 2."> A re-
..... tuler, he was
I hen 11 ) sal He la ur-
M Hailow. and a
' I.ill in VX.rh-Wr. Rer-
''. :n Newman-Ooi
Hon itii builal in Ml.
MINNIE E. O0LDBLATT
ave died June 2"..
in. ii s ago Iroin
ni builal weie In
' 'i N*. a man-i'.urcton Ku-
gi of an .inseiii. nt

MRS. CELIA ABRAMS
72. of T.I2 JefferBOn a\e, died June
7*. A resident here [0 real she Is
mrv red bl Ibree dausbters, Mrs Syl-
via Sherman. Mr* Bail) Helpbenateln,
.mm] Mr.- Hsatrlee Itshef; atnl .i aoi
Irving. She waa a n ontb< "f tin-
Karband Borlet] of M n Srr-
vi. i- Bare la Won fork; with River-
aide Beach Memorial Chapel In charne
of local arraneementa.
JACOB A. AILION
if Mil* Abbott ave., died June 17. A
, manufacturer- i. |,i e.ent.,t|\... he hid
; lived here four years Surviving are his
wife, treae; thr.-,- eons, Richard, i,n-
laid and David; and two dSUghtCI
Mra. Arthur Kuran and Mi- Mil
Sneidor Services were June Ih at l'.i\ -
i >.i, h Memorial < Inapel.
HUGO J. BLOCK
*:.. ..f i7" s\v Mil i, r died Jam II ,\
retired electrokMjtst, he had bean a
i, -i lent l.ele 1 ", lea- Sill Ml ..
; elude hi- wire, s.u.ih m,. eoni Irwln
and Bdmond; and a daugh','. Hi
.Indlth K,emerma:i. Bervleoa weri
l at Riveraldi -Beai h Men......
!!, with burial In Btai of David C
,te| >
MRS. VILMA BERKEY
r.7. of IS NSV lllth m died June IK
\ h ..lent here nine montl
leervva haj huaband, Hetiaau. svrvi,...
and builal were in Nee Tork. iti
lin. i -ide-iie.ii h Memorial Cbapol In
esarBe Of Nn-al arrangement.
JOHN ESTRECMER
V". of 17". Ni: :.i.th ter.. died June 22
A resident here 14 year-, he leaves his
wife, p'rancee; iw,, brotnen ehd a ais-
tei Bsrvlcee were June _; ., i River-
Ide-Kench Memorial Phnpel, with
I. in In Mt Sinai Cemeti
WILLIAM H. CARVIN
62. of 2124 StV ISth ave died June 22
a retired ie.,i estate sjrent, he had
lived here aeven years. He i- but
Vlved by his wife, IJIIIan; a dauchter.
Mis. Julian BenJamla: a son. Dr How-
ard tliivln: four biothera. two
and aiv grandchildren Bsrvlcee wen
June 2i it fjordon Kunoral Home, liii
builal In Mt. Nebo t'emeterv.
membeJ of the Sisterhood of Temple
Beth Shnlcm. She helped Organ ISS
Hlld ix;>- 11 ,-,i-nrei i.f II" Miack lair
operated b) the women'e ausillari al
Mt Si...i Hospital Burvlvon In I
her htiabond, Uldor; i son, Charles: a
brother, three Mater* and Iwo grand-
, iiidren Bei rlcei arere Julj I
Newman -Gordon Funeral Home, with
builal in Mi Nebo Cemetery,
HOWARD KOLE
2',. "f I"!" NVV 1 Ifith at., died July I.
An Bwslatant manaaror of a sh>
hi had Bved hen- rrve yeai
Ing aie hla mother, Mrs- Cora K -
verateln: his rather, William Kaye: a
brother and a ilater s.i-. were
in New Tork, with Riverside-!*
Memorial ChapoJ In charge of arranso-
menta locally.
Amity Club Nans Joint
AUair with Social Council
Amity Club of the Greater Miami
Jewish Community Center will
meet jointly with the B'nai B'rith
Social Council Saturday- evening at
the Alcazar hotel.
The Hub. for single men and
women between th? ages of 25 and
89. will hear Coral Cables marri-
age consultant Dr. Donald Schult/
On Tuesday evening, the club
will meet at the Beach Branch of
tho Greater Miami Jewish Com-
munity Center. 1923 Bay rd.

LOUIS ALKON
died June :
merchant, he came
Burvlvlng ere his
i ichter, Mi The*
' id hero and a graml-
i unes M al New
i al Homo, a Ith
Nehu Cemetery,
Q0ZV0N
rUNIIAL N0M|
JIUoMa I.TtTT
BORIS ETINOOFF
69. of HH.'i HW 2nd ave died June 19
\ r i,d dairy owner, he had lived
h, re and Waa a member of
Temple Judee He leaves hla wife,
Anna: two sons. Alvin and VVIlb
and iwo grand, hidi, n Bel vices
Julv 2 .it Gordon l*uneraJ Home, wi >
burial in Ml. Nebo femet, )
MORRIS HARROW
:.. of 1114 N\V Ith lei died June 29
A retired grocer, he waa a realdent
here eleht \ at KUrvIv'""
wife. Ida. and IWO SaSters, Mrs. Frieda
Manti II and Mrs Belli lAriieteii
i li were June ::u .it llordon l-~uner.il
n ,, |th builal In Ml Neb" r.-m-
.t i)
WILLIAM KRIEMER
T ,. n| ll rlW lllll St .lie.I lune n
A resident here ii yeara, ha is eur-
rived by l.i- erlCe, Beckle
were Jum l t Rlvi -ni- i: h
uioruii Chapel, with burial In Nea
rlc, S J
MRS. SARAH SADOLr"
n. of 41.-. SW llth ave., died June I-
A resident here 2** yeara, -lie i- mm-
vimsi by her buabajid, Harry; thr-e
sona, l.oiu-. Bll and Nathan S. ii'.ii I.
and a dauchter, Mi- Lena Hch'aei
Services and burial were In Newark.
with (lordon Funeral Home In charge
of arrangement- locally.
OAVIO SOLOMON
7".. ..r I set I'r. re< av< dh d June >
A r, tired belldlns i on
i.. agn I Ii lee
, || i s,.., ad 'I. hro
. Sen i
burial were In Atl.ntn City, with
. h Mem,,i u.l Ii '
charge of arranseatents locally.
LOUIS JACOBSON
:,7. nf Itafl sw Mth di. d J ibi
DOUGLAS MARK MILES
7. of 7:P" MW 16th ler.. died Jum
lotikemi.1 He 1^ survived b) his i.ai-
IA .iml Mi- Mthui i: Mllea Jr.,
his sister, Andrea, and his anind-
inotlor. Mr- II. lie r'ink Services were
.lune :! at Rive We Beach Mem u .il
Chapel, wltb burial In Minn; Mi i
Part.
ASE aTTcOLOSTEIN
73. of ii Hay dr., died June i> \ re-
tired drc.-s manufacturer, he
resident here imin yeara Burvlvlni
are hla wife, Adeline; two daughters:
ami a setter, Mra Qertrude Meyers
Service were la Fbi Rocaawa) f i d, ith Rli. I.,. Kea h Memorial
t'hain I in oharge ol local arrangemi nta.
IRVINQ KAUFMAN
27. of 71" NK 17Sth ter. died June -1-'
A haberdashery sales".,,n, he had i-.....
a realdent here aix years Burvlvlnf are
in- father, l lavld; two brotb< : i"
Jacob and Mflton; and two alaters lira
Bstelle Trabter and Miss Lillian K.ui-
man Hervicei wen I im -' at New- j
man ^(lordon Funeral Home, with
burial in New Y,mW
MRS. CLARA GUBERMAN
01, .,f 1,116 NW 2nd p| died Jum ..
bne i- eurvtved i" aei husband, l.e,,n.
a -,.n. Keubeti. a dauajater, Mi- l: i
(larbett: and four grandchildren
tei I Ii Wei I ll.. t ... Ml
sin.11 tv under the dlri
' im don Funeral Home.
MOE NEWMAN
72. of mt Marseille dr.. died June 22.
A ladiei pocketbook talesman, he had
lived here five years. Survivors include
hn wife, Hattit; a daughter. Mrs. I
Clair Buzzill: and a son. Oick. Ser-
vices and burial were in New York,
with Riverside- Beach Memorial Cha-
pel in charge of local arrangements.
MRS. KATE W. GREENBERG
c I... v dr dhil June Bl A I
. in be m years, -he ,i I l
......abei nf Hadaaaaa, charter mei
ber of Temple ReUa Sholeui and I
To S*nr You is
Our Pleasure
Ed. J. Vischi
Real Estate in All
its Branches
124M NX 71k AVIhJU*
Phase Ft 4-4** 1
R. H. Shaddick
REALTOR
SALES PtOfftTT NUNAENIENt
MOKTGAGt LOANS__________
ft 6WAL0A AVINUC
Shaddick Building
CORAL GASLES
Ph. Hlehlond 1-2591
DiILY PICK-UPS TO NEW YORK
M. LIEBERMAN & SONS
S^TlEBERMANfc!
,-
>CAl AND LONG DISTANCE MOVING TO AND FROM
W JERS>Y a PHIUDELPMIA IALTIMORI
AltAMT o WASHINGTON BOSTON
PROVIDENCE end all ether -cat. Wckly Service
fire Proof Constructed Storage Warehouse
|55 Collins Ave., Miomi Beach Dial JE 8-8353
SAMUEL HAIMOFF
.'. of lied June 13
A former resldejil of New York, he Is
i I., hla wife Aii. and
i 'h 11, ( Kwitaerland Ser\leee \\ i ,
.inn, nt lti\e i ., Bee M
with burial la lasfea Bl
mi,ii,i Park.
MAX SOLLOWAY
M, Of l""l iV Ith -l di.d lin, If V
,l\m,. di alei I lived here
It yeari Hurvlvlns an bta wife. Freda;
four auns, s.i ... Barnea, Henri and
Sidney; three ditujchtei*. Mr- Htith
liudarln, Mri Marian Wfhnlck, and
Midb Hollows) and i aleter, Mn
pa wire June 10
nt (lordon >'.....'.ii Home, with inni.il
III .Mt Sli, i
MRS. IDA MANDELL
U, of Mil Laks Ram nest dr died
lune i Survive le s daugh-
ter, Mra li.ii I.. s.i\i
were June IS .'I MveraMe-Boarh IJe
LOTS ACREAGE
HOMES RENTAL
Norman E. Butler, Realtor
13030 N.V>. 7th Ave. MO 1-1440
10,000 ACRE RANCH
ON A HIGHWAY
t $100 ner Acre
JEFFCOTT REALTY
INVESTMENTS
2400 Firit Street
FORT MYERS, FIA.
EDISON 5-4421
UNIQUE SYNDICATED FLORIDA
INVESTMNT PROGRAM
Available to Florida residents
with $1,500 to S? 00,000 to Invest.
Ideal for professional and retired ioiks. An op-
portunity to participate in large prime Florida
acreage and ocean front properties. We have a
staff of competent real estate personnel that
makes a complete and extensive survey for
choice Florida investments.
"It is wiser to have a small investment in a
large and successful project than to be the
sole owner of a small average parcel of
property."
HAROLD HIRSCHFiELD ami
ASSOCIATES
407 Lincoln Road Suite HE
Miami Beach Federal Bldg.
JE 8-6223
FlOfflBA'S SrNOrCArfD INVISTIMNT SOCIALISTS
THE McCHNE COMPANY
APPRAISERS COUNSELORS
ADRIAN McCUNE MAI.
MARION C McCUNE, M.A.I.
151 N.E THIRD STREET
MIAMI
BstsfclUltcd llt


PRICES GOOD THRU JULY 11
we sai
u. s. nm
and U. S.
meatgrak]
FREEZER STOCK UP SALE
at FOOD FAIR KOSHER MARKETS!
163rd St. Shopping Center North Miami Beach
2091 Coral Way Miami
19th St. at Alton Road Miami Beach
PRIME
or
CHOICE
RIBS of BEEF
Average Weigh:
30-35 lbs."
ib.
69
c
PRIME or CHOICE
Beef
FOREQUARTERS
PRIME or CHOICE
Beef
ARM CHUCKS
Average Weight
175 lbs.
Ib.
47
C
Average Wtifbt
100 lbs.
., 49
CAPONS-CAPONETTES
HEN TURKEYS
BROILERS-PULLETS
Choose from Our Large
* Selection of Specialties
For the Gourmet
MILK FED FIRST CUT
VEAL CHOPS
ib 89
FRESH KILL BO LOCALLY ^
AT OUR OWN KOSHi* POUITRYPUOfT
KOSMCP MADE AND PACKAGED
FOR VOUR FREEZER J
Chicken Fat Calves Liver Lamb Tongues
Vec! Tongues Steer Tongues Calves Lungs
Calves Feet Calves Brains Steer Uver
Oxtails Max's Stuffed Kishka
Averoje Weight
> lb. Rack
c
TRIMMED
BREAST of BEEF
Avprnna Ui.:_L.
Average Weight
10-12 lbs.
lb.
95
c
WHOLE
BONELESS
Shculder Roast
791
Average Weight
12-14 lbs.
lb.
DOUBLE THE VALUEAT^oI^Tr^-------------------------.
leading stamp plan! FREE FINE GIFT? *****'' I*" "* *"
wving MERCHANTS GREEN STaudc ** Vu"ve a,wy wanted H*
----------------._____________' AMPS... |V$ so eajy t<) m boo|t$!


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