The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01368

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
lie\wi^lh-IElliD!Pidliiaun
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Number 17
MIAMI. FLORIBA. FRIDAY. APRIL 23. 1954
Or. Ralph Bunchc
. may play active role
rt Nobel Prize Winner Promoted
>n? UN Role is Seen
7or Dr. Ralph Bunche
LtNGTON UTA) Dr.
(unche, who as UN media-
taght about the Arab-Israel
E> agreements in 1949, may
(active role in the coming
In seeking settlement of the
(East situation, it was re-
here this week.
[Nobel Prize winner was
br promotion from director-
[the IN Trusteeship Divi-
Ihe post of Under Secretary
JL'N. In this job, his assign-
Kuld be that of UN trouble
Tand one of the first ques-
Jiat would come his way
Ibr that of solution of the
tacl impasse.
lunche has already been put
the job of coordinating an
Ich towards settlement
economic development of
la
changes in the organiza-
jsctup of the United Nations
Isee Benjamin A. Cohen, of
[transferred from the infor-
\ department to the Assistant
ryship fr Trusteeship Af-
Col. Alfred G. Katzin, of
(Africa, in charge of the per-
1 department; and Robert
(in. of France, to be chief of
Bailment of economic and so-
Hairs.
eptrtment Tells Stand
[ Stale Department mean-
I announced its stand this
Ion the current developments
! Arab-Israel situation in a
Jient in which it was empha-
Ithat Ihe United States Gov-
ern will seek to strengthen
rmistire control machinery of
tailed Nations.
full text of the statement
is follows: "All of our efforts
reeled to the ultimate goal of
keful adjustment of relations
ken the Arab states and Is-
J Before the goal is reached
Israel and Ihe Arab states will
T to modify their present atti-
pe first step forward should
ke renunciation of force as
to ittain political objectives
Ihe substitution of cooperation
lie parties among themselves
Wth the United Nations, truce
JMsion organization in trie con-
|of their armistice obligations.
fur objective during the cur-
J Security Council discussion is
pa to bringing about such eo-
lation and to discovering means
lengthen the armistice control
Finery of the United Nations,
relieve the interests of all con-
fed will be served best by such
Tward step."
ne statement was issued to the
Continued en Page 10 A
PRICE: TEN CENTS
Russia Stands With
Arabs in Near East
Dispute, Byroade Says
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) Is-1
rael this week denounced a Leba-
MM attempt to force the Security j
Council to commit itself to a con-1
demnation of the alleged Israeli!
attack on the Jordanian village of j
Nahalin in exchange for Arab
agreement to a general discussion
by the Council on Jordan-Israel
relations.
The Arab demand, supported by
the Soviet Union, that the Council
first consider the complaint against
Israel, plurrged the Security Coun-
cil into a procedural morass from
which it could not find an egress
in two heated and protracted ses-
sions.
The Western Powers, with the
backing of a majority of the mem-
bers of the Council, stood out for
an overall discussion of the Jordan
Israel situation. They accepted a
Brazilian Colombian compromise
under which the agenda would be \
adopted as it stood, and there
would be general discussion with
the question reserved for a later
stage of a joint or separate resolu-
tions on the issues involved.
The Lebanese delegate offered to
accept this compromise if the Coun-
cil would first vote a condemnation
of Israel on the Nahalin incident
or promise to do it immediately
after the General discussion.
On this position, Israel Ambassa-
dor Abba S. Eban scathingly rc-
! marked that "It would be very
' grave if the heavy loll of innocent
Jewish bloodshed, including that
at Scorpion Pass and Kissalon.
should encounter irreverent indif-
ference, while lesser casualties
Record $750,000 on Way to
UJA from Greater Miami
A record loan of $750,000 to the
United Jewish Appeal by five local
banks was negotiated recently
through the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, it has been announced
by Carl Weinkle, Federation presi-
dent.
The loan is part of a national
drive by the United Jewish Appeal
to secure funds from 100 Ameri-
can communities for urgent reha-
bilitation programs in Israel. These
projects, involving resettlement of
newcomers, relief, health and wel-
fare work, are carried out through
UJA's three constituent agencies:
the Joint Distribution Committee, j In addilion, it was pointed out
United Israel Appeal and United
Service for New Americans.
Speaking for the Federation Fi-
by Federation officials, this loan.
together with those of other cities,
. will help relieve the strain that
nance Committee, which was re-j has been placed on Israel because
sponsible for initiating negotiations
with the local banks, community
leader Max Orovitz, stated: "Pro-
ceeds of the UJA loan project will
be utilized to accelerate the work
of the agencies, to upbuild Israel's
economy and strengthen its demo-
cratic way of life so that the na-
tion can go forward in freedom and
peace."
Lipton Makes Award Presentations
Bell, Mrs. Staats are
Named 'Outstanding1
Lt. General Leon William John-
son was principal speaker at the
seventh annual presentation of
awards honoring the outstanding
man and woman of the year 1953 in
Dade County.
Called up before a large crowd
to receive the acclaim voted them
by residents of Dade County as
outstanding citizens were Mrs. J.
and Jack Bell.
He
ev-
nual Lend-A-Hand campaign,
has also been identified with
ery worthwhile civic and philan-
thropic cause in the Miami area.
Mrs Staats is volunteer service
chairman for the Dade County
Chapter of the Red Cross and area
chairman cf the Heart Association
Fund drive. In addition, she is
vice president of the Coral Gables
War Memorial Youth Center As-
Pigures on
Israel Not
[Revealed
WASHINGTON (JTA)-The For-
operations Administration
SH *now,n testimony before
"PMe Foreign Af fain Commit-
LZ'TVk ,hi,t development as-
bsran, lh recuests have been
atelT '" inc,ude approxi-
ainfl30000000 for the Near
i'ch must be divided among
N-ortn sLhY-he 0ffice of Near
is ma i, *s,aan" Africa Opera-
mdll' 'his information public
Continued on Pag ,0A
Riley Staats and Jack Ben. ^^jon and president of the Uni
The presentation of awards took i gj of Mjami women's Club,
place on Wednesday evening at) Active in church work, Mrs
Bayfront Park Bandshell and was
under the sponsorship of Shoiem
Lodee, B'nai B'rith, with additional
support derived from the Dade
Federal Savings A Loan Association
of Miami, Joseph M. Lipton, presi
dent, who made the presentation.
Miami attorney, Sanford V
Swerdlin was chairman of the Con
mittee. Others included Marx Fat
er, Joseph A. Rayvis Marvin Rau
zin. Judge William L P-.
ing Saal. Jack Block, H. A. Froscl.
and Everett W. Liner.
On the Judges Committee wen
Senior Judge George E. Holt, char
man. Ralph Renick. George Bee
be, Thomas W. Hagan. Aaron toui
shon and Mrs. Stanley Milledge
Bell, Miami Herald columnist, i-
noted for his support of the van
ety Children's Hospital and the an-
Continued on Page 5 A
of its short term indebtedness aris
ing out of the fact that dollar re
quirements necessary to handle the
mass immigration in the first years
of Israel's existence were so great-
ly in excess of the gift dollars avail-
able to meet them.
The $750,000 loan to the UJA.
shared by the five commercial
banks of Greater Miami, will be re
paid to the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation over a period of five
years.
Leonard Abess, prominent local
banker and community welfare
worker, played a major role in
transacting the record-breaking
loan. Abess was congratulated for
his individual effort at the last
meeting of the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation Executive Commit-
tee. Serving on the UJA Finance
Committee were Orovitz, Sam
Blank, Joseph Cherner, Samuel
Friedland, Howard Kane, Dan B.
Ruskin and Carl Weinkle.
Fruchtman affixed his signature
to the $750,000 check in the pres-
ence of Jewish leaders and a host
of community dignitaries. They
lauded the vision and confidence of
the Miami community financial in-
stitutions in the State of Israel and
urged vigorous support of the Com-
bined Jewish Appeal by each and
every family here.
which armed Arab troops have suf-
fered should be the subject of pre-
judicial observations against Israel
at the Security Council. We now
hear of an extraordinary Lebanese
proposal that the powers commit
themselves to judgment on the si-
nificence of the Nahalin inciden*.
without any discussion of the vio-
lent Arab siege and assault of
which that incident is a symptom
and a result. The Security Council
j will surely adopt a balanced, moral
course. It is time to stop discrimin-
; ating against the victims and ca>-
; ualties of violence."
I Russia Backing Arabs, American
Official Says
In Washington meanwhile. Henry
A. Byroade, Assistant Secretary
State for Near Eastern Affairs, told
the House Foreign Affairs Commit-
tee this week that "Russia now
clearly has taken sides in the Ara':
Israel problem." He indicated that
the Russians have taken the side of
the Arabs.
Mr. Byroade told the congress-
men that the Soviet Union ha>
twice vetoed United Nations resolu-
tions pertaining to Arab-Israel dif-
ferences and said "my Arab friend -
feel that Soviet Russia was shov-
ing friendship to them."
(An assurance was given the com-
mittee by Mr. Byroade that the
State Department will require guar-
antees from Arab nations receiving
military assistance from the United
States that such arms will not be
used against Israel. He expressed
the hope that within a few year-
both Arabs and Israelis would be
"convinced of American impartial-
ity." At present, he said, each side
acuses the United States of favor-
ing the other.)
Special UN Body Planned
A proposal that a special Secur-
ity Council subcommission be form-
edwith Israel and Jordan as
members and under the possible
chairmanship of United Nations
Secretary' General Dag Hammersk-
joldto consider relations between
the two states, was discussed by
Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden
and Secretary' of State John Foster
Dulles at their meeting in London
this week, the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency has learned.
The 'two statesmen had a num-
ber of proposals before them on
handling Israel-Jordan relations
which they saw as the key to paci-
fication of the Middle East. How-
ever, the Security Council subcom-
mission idea found greatest favor
in the eyes of the Western diplo-
mats because the establishment of
such a unit would be a procedural
matter and therefore not subject to
Continued en Pete 10 A
Pay TO THE
oaoKHOF
Miami Beach. Florida
MERCANTILE NATIONAL BANK
THE OMttt JaW3H aJWUL
s-rs^rlrR stWkas!: Sara xssrr
*>. 1005
I 790,000.00
DotXAJua


PAGE 2 A
*l*i*tncrk**n
Ruth Goldschmidt to Visit Miami Area;
Will Speak Before UN Group, U of M
Miss Ruth Goldschmidt. Director
of Public Affairs of the Consulate
General of Israel in New York, will
visit Greater Miami on Thursday
and Friday. April 29 and 30. A
number of community events have
been arranged in connection with
Miss Goldschmidt's visit.
While in the area, she will dis
cuss with local leaders and organ
izations current developments ano
progress in the State of Israel
On Thursday. April 29. at 11:30
a.m.. Miss Goldschmidt will be in
terviewed by Kirby Brooks over
radio station VVQAM. At 12:15
p.m., on the same date, she is
scheduled to address the luncheon
meeting of the Miami Optimist
Club at the Seven Seas Restaurant
Following the Optimist Club
luncheon, on April 29. Miss Gold
schmidt will attend the meeting of
the United Nations Association to
be held in the Everglades Hotel.
On Friday. April 30. Miss Gold i
schmidt is scheduled to lecture be-1
lore classes at the University of j
Miami, and she will also speak at
a faculty luncheon there on the
-.line day.
Miss Goldschmidl settled in Is-
poiiu.i aqi jnourinojqi uo;siA9{3l
pun oipej -uijojin|d ojnpo| uo
|BjaU90 oiqnsuo.) .H|| |o-JP'I!Y l!l
'I'M J" Jo|.).J!(l 88 .\||Ji!ll.'.> I'MJIJ
-JO i.>u ill .)i|qnd UP.nj.tmv ',nl "1
[dBjs] p.)|i.ulj.'iui -i:i) ipruiqasp|og
- -1 Iv 'sjaaA .'ui|i pad -'Mi ioj
[ajs] |o in luioaaAOO ->m
.';. .! JOJ
f .nil in aaiAjas ssajd pro
;: )" jo); i IMJ *mi
PS
-
-
-
.. T?u\" *qi
.
. ,
u: in : ..\
SHM PUF|8UJ Ul p^JJFJS
.- ujaAOUi isiuotz oql ;
. 00003 j^h chsi u' |*I
She was heard weekly on
a New York radio station in a ser-
ies of broadcasts on "Life in Israel
Today."
In the summer of 1951 and 1952.
at the invitation of New York I'ni-
versity, Ifiaa Goldschmidt joined
the faculty of the university to act
as co-director of NYU'J workshop!
in "Israel's Life and Culture." a!
>i\ week course held in Israel.
Miss Goldschmidl is instructor ol
an Ill-Service course for teachers
on the "Culture and Civilization of
Miss ffvffi GoHtchmHt
Israel." offered by the Board of
Education of New York City in co-
operation with the Israel Office of
Information.
Nephrosis Chapter Schedules
Fashion Show Wednesday
Greater Miami Chapter ol the
National Napbrosii Foundation will
sponsor i benerit coffee and fash
ion show ;it the
Seacomber Surl
comber on Wed-
lu -day. April 28.
2 p in.
i hairman o i
the affair is Mrs
ii o i die Fisher,
uith Mrs. Anne
___iGreen and Mrs
A m->^
Theme of the
afternoon will be
modeling, with
Uu, of Miami, pre-
b> Roberta Model Guild of
la Mrs Sam Silver will give
the commentary
Procnedl are for the work of the
local chapter of the foundation to-
ward the establishment of a ward
here.
Reservations may be made with
Mrs. Green at 67-1840.
I Federation Prepares
Slate of Officers
Dan B Ruskin. honorary, presi
dent of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, has been named chair-
man of the 1954 Nominating Com
Orittee to elect Federation officers,
H baa btM announced by Federa-
tion president Carl Weinkle.
A data of officers will be pre-
sented at the 16th annual meeting
h< Federation set for May 20 at
'the Di Lido Hotel.
Serving as members of the Norn
mating Committee with Ruskin are
Joseph Duntov. Mrs. Aaron Farr.
i Stuart Gordon. Rabbi Leon Kro
rush, Joseph Lipton. Ben Meyers,
Dr. Joseph Narot and Jacob Sher.
Two alternate members named
in order to assure a full comple-
ment at each meeting are Mrs. Leo
Ackerman and Mrs Harry Platoff.
------J------------------------
Miller Named President
as North Dade Elects
Benjamin Miller has been named
president of the North Dade Jew-
ish Center at an election meeting
held here last week. Other officers
named were Jay Burton Keys, vice
pre-ident. Arnold Stern, financial
secretary; Jacob Friedland, treas-
urer.
Board of Directors include Dr.
William K. Boros. Bernard Catz,
Harold Shopmaker, David Good-
man. David Greene, Joseph Rosen-
feld and Maurice Lebow.
MEMORIAL Slivici.
will be held Sunday, April 25th, at 9.30
thi
JEWISH HOME FOR the
ISO N.l. 53rd STRUT
Gil
Rabbi Abramowitz
Addresses Club "No. 1
Rabbi Mayer AbramovMt/. spir
1tt1.il leader of North Shore Jew-
ish center, addressed members oi
Club No. 1. Pioneer Women's Or-
ganization, at I meeting held in
Kneseth Israel Congregation
Thursday evening. Mrs J Stadlan.
cultural chairman, arranged the
program which featured a djscus-
sion of Passover
*tn. iilrtr
Call
INSPECTION ckin
Florida Hadassah
Plans Conference
Florida region of Hadassah uill
hold its fourth conference in Tarn
pa at the Tampa Terrace Hotel.
May 1-3. On the occasion of the
sixth year oi Israels nationhood.
theme of the conference will be
"Adventures in Jewish Living."
Mr- Herman Klausner. regional
president now m Israel, will return
to highlight the conference pro
gram with a special message
Conference chairman is Mrs
David Cowen, ol Tampa, with Mrs
Thomas Weiss, also of Tampa, act
Ing as vu-e chairman. Advisor u
tfri Ezra Shapiro, of Cleveland,
0 national vice president of Ha-
dassah
Some 300 delegates are expected
to attend the regional affair, ac-
cording to Mrs Charles Adler,
Tampa chapter president, and Mi -
Samuel S. Fraiberg. local advisor
SEABOARD SLASHES FARES
FOR YOUR TRIP NORTH!
> 30-DAY ROUND-TRIP COACH FARES*
IFFICTIVE MAY IS
*Plu nominal reierved teat charge on
Streamliner*, and reduced Federal tax.
tavii coavoarAau /
uAtoAto srasAMimias \,
For Reservation!
tftoii phont 12-4411, or coll In
run: 173 E. Healer St., 2204
M.W. 7th .tnM, Miami, or 1553
ELEVENTH ANNIVERSARY
of the
WARSAW GHETTO
will be observed on
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 1954
t 30 p.m. at the
FLAMINGO PARK
11th Street and Jefferson Ava.
Miami Beach, Florida
PROMINENT SPEAKERS
Program
1 Greater Miami Jewiah Folk
Chorus
Iniim It Kunnnan. Conductor
2. Booker T. Washington High
School Chorus
lira Williams, CoadaMoT
ADMISSION FREE
S|M.||S.i|.-.| ll\ tht-
EMMA LAZARUS I El 'I :i: \TH IN
1-----------Tt-i oi ii mini......
-*<4^>-
Call 2-1776
Member of B'nal I rith
*^2^
350 Lincoln Road
Mexxanina Phone 5-5411
Entrance on Washington Are.
OCULISTS
Prescriptions Filled
Lenses and Frames
Duplicated
Large Selection in Latest
Styles
Wairiington Avenue,Miami leech.
W. J. ICMT. OH aepreeetMa-
Mvee alee e* Key W..I. Havana.
N......Jomoleo. Pwerte Bke.
DAY WORKERS
S6 one Fere
Htel Me ids r.rt.rs Dihweker
Colered Moidi-Pert Time er Fall
TinH in Private He-tes
ACE EMPLOYMENT
1S7 N.C. let Ave. Ph. *
_____ N Cherge to Employer
S. J. Freediiia_
A M. Rephnn
HEBREW BOOK STORE
Between Fourth and Fifth Sta
rot Synaooguae aad PitTasa
Use. Also tot He***
Talipliu S-SoiT
Israel Certtficatea
SAM HIRSCH PrM,n
_OHJiTAOE. IN person
SYLVIA SIDNEY
HER ONLY lOCAl APPEARANCE i,
"O MISTRESS MINE'
OPENING
SATURDAY, APRIL 24
AIR CONDITIONED
BILTMORE PLAYHOUSE
151 N E. 40th ST., MIAMI
PH. 7-1842 FOR RESERVATIONS
Bo Office
Now 0M
10 J.m ttKu,
Free Pa,,,^
ONE OUT OF TEN!
Isn't it lust and Fair that with 10
Judges Serving on the Circuit
Court. 1 out oi 10 oi them should
be a qualified woman lawyer?
Li ANNA BRENNER
CIRCUIT. C
E GROUP
[pq Polltl Wv.)

Holiday Greetings
CORAL GABLES LAUNDRY I
DRY CLEANING CO.

250 MINORCA AVENUE
#?W GABLES
Phone 4-6458
CHAPILS IN MIAMI AND MIAMI HI
Services in tne true spirit
of tne Jewisn tradition...and
dedicated to ease trie burden
oi the bereaved.
iversirtf
MEMORIAL MNl.#
FUNERAL 0IRECT0IS
Parking TWO CONVENIENT LOCATION8
Miami B Miami
West Flagler ft 20th Ave.
Phont f-6*4
^-r^jsT-S
rhontH
... ait Il',a0
sdwaso T. nbwman, Funeral Director ^^ A^,
h vo- 76th Street and *miUT1\lv0
1**\
in nbw vork: 76th Street i
aaooKLYN saoNX


APftlL 23, 1954
Calls Special Bond Meeting
day; To Discuss Kickoff Here
-Jmisfiffork/iar
PAGE 3 A
fecial meeting has been
or Monday by Jacob Sher,
Miami chairman of the
Israel Bond Organization,
s plans for a kickoff din-
[v in May to launch the new
,,,! Issue. A 1954 target
lOOO has been set for the
ea.
nceting will discuss an ap-
late, place and speaker
function, which will coin-
closely as possible with
Jh Anniversary of the State

fctated that prominent civic,
and communal leaders
ticipating in the plans for
Bversary celebration togeth-
representatives of major
I organizations.
sixth anniversary of Israel
I than a milestone in the cal-
B( .Jewish history," Sher de-
More than 600.000 Ameri-
|ail purchasers of Israel
(ha\e firmly established a
Mstick of economic aid for
It is significant that the
nnivcr-ary of Israel coin-
ith the flotation of the Is-
pelopment Bond Issue.
Bond proceeds have ac
[II the economic growth of
luring the past three years
expansion of basic indus-
Drtension of agricultural
ly the creation of a network
latinn system! and increased
Ttimi of electric power. Is-
velopment Bonds will hnain
tempo of economic and
cial activity which is trans
; Israel from an underdevel-
rca into a thriving, self-sus-
! country, the most stable in
Adults Form
ill Team Here
ns Adult League of the Town
Greater Miami Jewish
unity Center, this week an-
the formation of its soft
bam for the Center Softball
Men between the ages of
i 25 are eligible.
^tice begins on Minriav. 11:30
: Shenandoah Park. SW 22nd
Dd 19th st.. according to the
ncement. In charge at the
re Gerald Rothbard and Mor-
bberman I-eague play will
(on Sunday. May 2.
sty Will Meet
lamic Psychological Society
later Miami will meet on Fri-
pening. April 23, 8 p.m., at
ie of Mr and Mrs. S. Etting-
il SW 18th st. Dr. S. Moss
lire 11 Hutner will direct
dramatics.
(ctur
*loasv Vote
May Ith
s ill l>roii|i 5
fall Lever tt-A
for
J. FRITZ
GORDON
1 *'''' ill Adv .
the Middle East, with a record of
steady progress in terms of human
liberty and the economic well be
ing of its citizens."
Th" meeting Monday will be in
the form of a luncheon meeting in
the Biscayne Terrace Hotel at 12 30
p.m.
"Practically every tield of en-
deavor in the young republic has
been stimulated and encouraged by
the flow of Israel Bond capital."
Sher stressed, setting among the
major examples an increase in an-
nual agricultural production, ex-
cluding citriculture. from SI 12 500 -
000 to $222,000,000, in electric
power capacity, from 70,000 kilo-
watts, to 180,000 kilowatts, and in
annual industrial production from
$45,000,000 to $850,000,000.
Caribbean Settlements
To Mark Tercentenary
NEW, YORKJews in Jamaica.
the Virgin Islands, and the Domini-
can Republic are planning to join
in celebrating the 300th anniver-
sary of Jewish settlement in the
United States. Dr. Israel Goldstein,
associate chairman of the Ameri-
can Jewish Tercentenary, declared
this week.
Dr. Goldstein, who is president
of the American Jewish Congress
and Rabbi of Congregation B'nai
Jeshurun, returned to New York
after a month-long visit to Jewish
communities in the Caribbean. He
was accompanied by Mrs. Gold-
stein, who is a member of the na-
tional Tercentenary committee.
Dr. Goldstein discussed Tercen-
tenary plans with Jewish leaders in
Kingston. Jamaica and St. Thomas,
the Virgin Islands. Both communi-
ties, he said, are considering the
preparation of Jewish histories of
their respective islands, Tercenten-
ary Sabbath observances and other
Tercentenary activities tying in
with the celebration on the main-
land. He stated that a similar
program was being explored in So
sua, Dominican Republic, the
youngest Jewish settlement in the
Western Hemisphere, founded in
1940.
Donor Lunch Set
For April 28th
Dora Stein Sisterhood of the Is-
raelite Center will hold its third
annual donor luncheon on Wednes-
day, April 28, 12 noon, at the Strath
Haven Hotel.
A "Fashion Show for Jewish Liv-
ing" will be presented. Models will
include the Mesdames Jack Kro-
nenberg, Harry Golen, Charles
Oretsky, Pauline Seek, Herman
Solomon, Abe Matersky, Bernard
Sirkus, Jack Toppell, Norman Ber-
grin, Phillip Barocas, Nat Fragin
and Miss Lillian Jacobs.
Also featured will be two child
models, Miss Paula Bergrin and
Steven Solomon. Mrs. William
Dickson and Mrs. Oretsky will be
wardrobe mistresses.
Script for the show is through
the courtesy of the National Worn
en's League, of which the Dora
Stein Sisterhood is an affiliate.
Mrs. Harry Silvcrman will be com
mentator. Mrs. S. L. Cohen is direc-
tor of the-program. which will in
elude a vocal selection by Mrs. Ma
tersky, with Miss Jacobs at the
piano.
Mrs. George Graham and Mrs. Al
Rothberg are luncheon co-chair-
man. In charge of reservations is
Mrs. Barocas.
" THE Hi A K T
or not id a
Camp
UMatbll
a<
For Boys
' 4 Hoort
'" Mi.mi
Donor Luncheon at Algiers
North Shore" Jewish Center will
hold its annual donor luncheon at
the Algiers Hotel on Tuesday, April
27th. In charge is Mrs. Melvir. Alt-
man. _m
WHUt IMH WfV HAS BUN A
SIKIOUS NUO OUTBKtAK
Fee ot $3S0 lor I weeks ini:ludes
transportation, laundryand horse
bock riding. Philip. $. Cho.'on, Edu-
cational Director of North Shore Jew-
'Uh Confer, will. 24 years of camp
experience, Com* Director.
FOR FIMTHIR INFORMATION
CALL 16-4576

. -

Hillel House now under construction on the University of Miami campus.
Hillel Cornerstone Ceremony Scheduled for May 23rd
Cornerstone ceremony for the
new Hillel House on the University
of Miami Campus will .take place
Sunday, May 23, 4 p.m., according
to Sidney M. Aronovitz, president.
Marshall Named to
GMJCC Extension Staff
The addition of Marsh 'Doc' Mar-
shall to the extension staff of the
Greater Miami Jewish Community
Center was announced this week.
Marshall is supervising the arts
and crafts activities of the resi-
dents of the Jewish Home for the
Aged, one of the extension services
of GMJCC.
He is a veteran of many years
of leadership in camping and scout-
ing.
Author to Address Society
Dr. Meyer Golob, formerly of the
staff of Columbia University, New
York, will speak before the Miami
Society for Ethical Culture on Sun-
day, April 25, 11 a.m., at the Lind-
sey Hopkins School. His subject is
"Reflections on Retirement." Prof.
Mark Waldman will preside.
Chairmen and committees have
already been set in motion to make
plans for the occasion, according
to Aronovitz.
In charge of the hosts committee
is Milton Friedman. Co-workers
are David Provus, Haruld Turk.
Stanley Caiden, Charles Frucht-
man and Sol Goldstrom. Participat-
ing in the invitations committee
are Mrs. Sydney Suss, Mrs. Tina
Katz, Miss Edith Simmons and Gil-
bert Schwartz.
House chairman is Nathan Adei-
man. and participating are Dr.
Donald Michelson, Joseph Raj vis,
Mrs. Bernard Hoffman, Harvey
Herman and Jerry Adelman. Mrs.
Ida Optner and Gilbert Balkin are
in charge of publicity.
Participating in planning are
Dr. Michelson, Walter Kovner, and
Jack Falk. Telephone committee
consists of the Mesdames Fred Bin-
der, Minn Past, Eli Rainbow, Ben
Lebow, Dave Alper, Mae New-
mark. Alfred Reich, Jessie Miller,
Williams and Rosalie Deutsch.
Importance of Variety Hospital Outlined at Meeting
Importance of Variety Children's
Hospital to Dade County and South
Florida was outlined by Leo Adeeb.
Miami Beach businessman and
chairman of the hospital's 1954
$100,000 fund raising campaign, at
a joint luncheon of civic group
committees in Miami Beach this
week.
"Treatments-free or paid, ac-
cord to the circumstances of the
child's parentswas furnished to
thousands of ill and injured chil-
dren last year." Adeeb said, "aside
from the infantile paralysis cases
for which Variety Hospital is best
known.
Pointing out that the hospital is
not restricted to the treatment of
polio cases exclusively, Adeeb
urged community support of the in-
stitution because of its charitable,
non-profit nature.
Current campaign for 1954 oper-
ating funds has netted nearly half
the goal so far, Adeeb said, adding
that the entire sum is expected to
be subscribed by the middle of
May.
WIN $25 IN
HOME MILK'S
BIG CONTEST
Each week HOME MILK selects one of its
quality dairy productsyou send us your
favorite recipe using that product ... if your recipe is judged
best by the contest judges, you will win $25! and your
photo and recipe will appear in this newspaper!
CONTEST RULES
This week's contest closes at midnite Saturday. Entries
must be postmarked before thai time to be eligible
Write or print your recipe clearly and give your name and
address with each entry. You may submit as many entries
as you wish each week.
Winner of this week's contest will be announced in this
newspaper 1 week aftsr last day for submitting entries.
Winner will receive HOME MILK'S check for $25.00 (check
may be made to your favorite charity, if you prefer), and
photo of winner, together with recipe, will appear in this
newspaper.
All recipes submitted become the property of HOME M!IK
Company and no entries can be returned.
Decisions will he mode by a specialty selected panel of
judges, whose decisions will bo final.
Employees of the HOME M!IK Company and their families
are not eligible to enter these contests.
This week's contest ends mid-
nite Saturday, May 1, and
features HOME MILK's HALF &
HALF (hall light cream and
half milk). Send your entry to
HOME MILK, 2451 N. W. 7th
Avenue. Miami, and you may
win S25 for your favorite recipe
using HALF & HALF !
Actual stale laboratory
tests prove HOME MILK
exceeds state nutrition re-

quirtments by 13.1%.
SERVE YOUR FAMILY PURE HOME MILK WITH HIGHER NUTRITIVE VALUE


PAGE 4A
>L~i*,rkw*MgL
H&ay
Published avery Friday since U27 by the Jewish
Floridian at 120 N. E Sixth Street, Miami 18. F">r'at
Entered at second-class matter July 4, 1930, at the Poat
Ofic-^f Miami, Fla., under the Act of March s. >.
The Jewish Floridian hae absorbed the Jewish Unty
and the Jewish Weekly. Member of the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate, World-
wide News Service. National Editorial Association. Amer.
ican Aaaociation ol English-Jewish Nswspapers. Florida
Press Association._____________________________ -----
FRED K. SHOCHET............Editor and Publisher Vo]ume 2Q
LEO MINDLIN.................................. News Editor_____________
llillol IIOIIS," 4111 I .IIM|MIS
Many of us do a lot of talking about ihe im-
portance of continuing our Jewish culture and
traditions among the youth of this nation, but
few of us do much in a positive way toward
achieving that end.
Hillel House on the University of Miami cam-
pus is a concrete example of our effort to foster
cultural and social programs for Jewish stu-
dents attending school here. Time was when
those who wanted to participate in such pro-
grams had to leave the campus grounds.
The old Hillel House was a make-shift on
Ponce de Leon blvd. and inconvenienced stu-
dents with odd off-hours. Unless thev were
free from class for a considerably lengthy per-
iod, they had to forego the opportunity afforded
by a visit at Hillel.
This major obstacle will now be overcome
with the new house going up on the corner of
Miller rd. and the Dixie Highway. A corner-
stone ceremony is being planned by the Great-
er Miami Hillel Council for the latter part of
May. We think that they have done a fine job.
quietly and efficiently.
It would be a good idea for all of us to take
cognizance of this worthy project. Jewish stu-
dents at the University of Miami will benefit
greatly as a result. Their need for a cultural,
educational and social center that combines
the leisure of voluntary participation with the '
significance of professional guidance in a uni-
versity atmosphere is great.
vJemsfifloridian
OFFICE and PLANT -MO N E. Sbcth Street
Telephones 2 1141 2-8212_________
^t.^?"^!^'
mth of the "'
SUBICP.IPT
One Year >
ON P. A T E :
Two Years---------
15.00
Friday. April 23, 1954
Nisan 20, 5714
Number 16
^/^.^"*A^.^V/^*^^^^ During The Week... A,7^
By LEO MINDLIN
-/\-XW-'W"'W-'W-'Vv'W\^v\_
IT TAKES INTEGRITY TO CRITICIZE .
ones intellectual and emotional identifiCatin V1 "**
outroots prejudice of the worst sort ,h0 kiH .u "i
one's own limitations. Israel is central in m, ,h,,**, outraged by the calculating way in which tiJT "^'N
the dispute between the Jewish State and ,hP ?'>**
censed by the suave diplomacy that is now Jh. J^l
down the river of expediency. w,,ln yotjA
But I also become fearful for Israels future *s. ,
own methods in many instances I beein t .. *"'
identification when I find that the Jewish suT/i '*
which are irreconcilable with certain fundamentT^
ample of this is the recent "trade" made by Ci 1ft?
a repelling piece of maneuvering that, in modern h
judicial and social history spinning rearward someiw
To insure the safety of a universal draft law inou -
government wooed and won the political supportZT"
ment only after it had been granted in turn the now.
riage and divorce.
smaller numbers of Israelis are now seeking
permanent exit visas than heretofore, and it is
anticipated that a leveling-off will soon take
place.
It is certainly not difficult to understand how
some Jews become disenchanted after their ar-
rival in Israel. Requirements for living in a
pioneer land are difficult, indeed. To be asked
to share rationing and downright deprivation
s minds rather than in the struggle to after years of exile and. in many cases, physi-
^nT TV, e ?m.. 5* Se?Si' Came: ? meS' Cal ,0r,Ure- ,axes ,he *gi5 n occasion,
sage of hope to the downtrodden and leaves *-v.uiuii.
for its sister ships the duty of protecting our But ,ne sixty-eight Jews who returned to Ru-
shores at home. mania after living for a time in Israel and the
bitter disappointment they are experiencing.
The Courier is virtually a floating radio trans- aCMing ,0 rePrts bom Istanbul this week,
mitter. Somewhere in the Eastern Mediterran- should serve as an example for other Israelis
THUS HAVE RELIGION AND SECULAR rule in I*
fusedan eventuality against which every free-think
during the past three centuries has militated As a In
vidual. I have identified, myself with movements here
taming this separation. But in my identification with the j
I find that I am inadvertently torced to accept the inn
hgious dogma upon secular law I must make clear that l
posed to Orthodox regulatory doctrine as such. What I dot
with uncontrollable vehemence, is the resultant stiflBfJ
which has been the shameful harvest of the government's
the religious elements
I would be no less than false to my intellectual andi
identification so far as Israel is concerned if I did not admit
cern in this regard. I would be similarly false if I failed)
what I consider an extremely sensitive remark made by A
tary of State Henry A. Byroade last week a remark '__
on the failure of Israel's foreign policy since its bovishea
the international scene in 1949. and one which does not -hi
State in its best light.
LEST I IMMEDIATELY BE ACCUSED of negative I
the basis of these critical observations and in the face of i
professed identifications, let me say at this point that |
By made's speech before the Dayton World Affairs Council i
a masterpiece of poetic muddlement based on a naive allegorf]
and Ahmed, representing Israel and the Arab League,
the border of "middle-of-the-road" thinking and which reu
Israel's emigration problem is certainly a untenable propinquity to political nihilism with the As
serious one. but official reports have it that' tary's constant asseveration that America had inherited
"A LITTLE MORE CHAOS DOESN'T HURT ME"
I m .KiniM-dl roiiiiiioilif v
1 l\s>.-ir of Hope
The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Courier is an
unusual ship, for it is engaged in the battle of
ean last week, it beamed a Passover prayer to
Jews trapped behind the Iron Curtain, telling
them that tyrants cannot long endure or injus-
tice rule forever.
It seems to us that we too. endowed with the
privileges of living in a free nation, can profit
by that message.
Andrei Vishinsky of the Soviet Union, presi-
dent of the Security Council this month, denied
seeking exit visas without due consideration.
The "returnees" are apparently living in tem-
porary Jiousing and have found no employ-
Zionist leaders. Israel may be currently ex-
periencing difficulty, but it is the difficulty of
an awakening land. While temporary short-
ages plague some, freedom nurtures all.
It is this last commodity which abound
a reguest by the Israel delegation that Mon- ,ewish bla,e nd which may be had with-
out coupons Of all people, Israel's new citi-
zens certainly understand that.
day's session relating to the Near Eastern dis-
pute be postponed because of Passover.
But Mr. Vishinsky did postpone the UN
body's meetinq when he learned of the illness
of Dr. Charles Malik, Lebanese member of the
Security Council who speaks for the Arab
states.
We can not conceive of any representative
peoples' request being turned down by the
world organization in this regard. Festivals
sacred to Judaism, Islum or Christianity would
certainly be accorded the respect due them
at the hands of another nation.
Soviet Russia's denial of the Israeli request
reflects not only its policies based on expedi-
ency, alone, but also its virtual Godlessness.
The Coast Guard Cutter Courier's message
to those unfortunate Jews trapped behind the
Iron Curtain threfore gives us faith in the future,
for we are reminded of the fact that people of
all creeds have been silenced by tyrants no
less ruthless than the ancient Egyptian task-
'he tide of that histor^ and^cuedZ ,
master but that the struggle for freedom con- War of Liberation. We believe that
tantly enlarges man's ambition ultimately to the he
govern his own destiny.
situation one which it essentially did not want.
"The United States has been thrust into the Middle I
suddenly and without adequate national preparation,''
said. He explained ouc government's about-face and inter
the fact that the American people acted in large measure Mi
pathy and horror at the outrages committed against the Je4(
in Europe during the past twenty-five years.
In this sense, he stunted history or at least underscored wodijj
tivity to the outrages suffered by the Jews during the paittwf
years of benevolent Christian rule.
Let me also point out that Secretary Byroade made tool
the fears felt by the Arab nations before a Jewish republkl
midst and too little of the needs of an infant democracy beat|
fissional ravagers on its borders. In emphasizing the Arab I
trayed the essential blindness that is a part of our State f
so far as the entire region is concerned.
What nations did he mean? Which governments'"
Shishakly's Syria, which experienced a Druze slaughter i
by "the strong man" and which witnessed his flight toei
Arabia two weeks later? Did he mean Mossadegh's not yet-fa
in Iran? A new and shaky government burn in Lebanon!
The ousted, returned and last Sunday again ousted regime<
Naguib in Egypt?
THESE ARE SOME OF THE MATTERS which eipertl
prosecution i?n~ 9. asked to serve as ; advisor to our government on Near Eastern. South As.au ail
osecution witnesses in trials of Rumanian! affairs, failed to take into account in his personification of*.
felt by the Arab states. These indeed are matters which pnaar
at the United Nations and in Washington generally "?'
when they presume to speak for the Arab "peoples. i"
recognized, representative governments in the *\enf*rJ^
leaders woo spectors there, fragments of their hope in the oan^i
expanding Communism. k
Flailing about as he did, referring to American JeT7
special interest." warnini! these interests that I'.S'ore*J|i
represent the majority of this country's people and setuoj
for an increasing deafness with which Zionist groups an; i-
to meet in official circles. Secretary Byroade fortu'" Lj
fundamental factor (hat is central to the Israel Problen!
I alluded before as a weakness in the Jewish States ma ^
"To the Israelis I say that you should come Irui) ^
yourselves-as a Middle Eastern state and see your ^^
that context rather than as a headquarters or nuc'T;' jj|
of worldwide grouping of peoples of a particular rei is ,. ^
must have special rights withiB and obligations to trie
ON THE FACE OF IT SUCH an observation can ^ ^
trading upon the cheapest sort of prejudices Pre*a'e ^
and anti Israel spheres. Coupled with Secretary *>" -j
about "special interests." it warns American Jewry ^
nous and future time a choice between citizensnip f
identification may have to be made. It smacks of tie
hurled against the "Internationalist Jews' Ana
dieted cuts in Foreign Operations Aid to I>rael- integrity"d
But it seems to me that it is precisely here ner ^^
ed for the process i,| stripping away superficial >Vtarv $*_
<>( .i more essential core. Fortuitously or n< '. j()fS not I00*'
upon a fundamental matter. And it is that lsr^ ^um**,
i'sell as a Mid
garding from too close quarters the CBaracna- m ~-; ^ |
too seriously and perhaps too literally the speec ^ (
well paid professional hangers^n to the Zn"- in tke'
dangerously refer to it as "that bastion of derm*
East." ^fcl
In that sense, Israel wilfully robes itMl*i\e!!S t**0}
where drabness is yet the norm. Israel does loo* ^i
Western standards (Ben-C.urion alone has gone w M,
thusfar made a minimal effort in the process ox rtusj*'
In the midst of this extremely willful and modern ^t\
portunism which it has learned to emulate trow
TIW Warsaw <.!< i,, ||>ad
JewserelyearS T,' 5 Apii' 19' SOme 50000
Jews residing ,n Poland's Warsaw Ghetto rose
Jewish history is dotted
with the continuing
persecution of a oeonli. ih uUmmu,n?
eff the hi. P^P'e that could not ward
^"^r,ra^ sum
the moral
everywhere.


IaPRIL 23, 1954
Bell, Mrs. Stoats Receive
landing Citizens' Award Here
+Jmist>ncrM/a,r
PAGE 5 A
nued from P9 1 A
so president of the Coral j-
Lnen's Club, secretary of I
lational Advisory Board j
tables and is responsible
tins the annual partici-
fcrippl'd children here in
Bowl parade of floats.
[Johnson was one of the
flying officers of the
force and served as As-
Ljei of Staff for Opera-
Ithat command during its
period. He accompanied
Jh Air Force to England
|942 In January. 1943, he |
command of the 44th
foup and. in June of that
the group to Africa on j
fhr Ninth Air Force for'
on the I'loesti oil fields j
Workmen's Circle
Slates Third Seder
Branch 692, Workmen's Circle,
its Women's Club and the Y. L.
J'<"'-l7 School are arranging a tra-
ditional Third Seder at the closing
of the Passover holidavs on Sun-
day. April 25, 6 p.m.. 25 Washing-
ton ave. ,
Reading of the Haggadah compil-
ed by contemporary Jewish poets
and writers will he done by chiU
dren of the Yiddish school. Sing-
ing parts will be performed bv the
Nelson family, including Mrs". Lil-
lian Nelson and her children, Mrs.
David Drucker and Judge and Mrs.
Ted Nelson, who will also lead com-
munity singing.
Joseoh Duntov and Louis Lauvln,
principal of the Peretz School, will
direct the Seder.
Pupils of the Peretz School par-
ticipating in the reading of the
Haggadah are Chaim Davis, Michel
Graff. Riva Kaplan, Norma Klein,
Niel Haiduck, Marsha Kremer and
Leah Zebit.
If. General Johnson
Medal of Honor, General Johnson
has been awarded the Distinguish-
ed Service Medal. Silver Star, Le
gion of Merit, Distinguished Flying
Cross with one Oak Leaf Cluster,
and the Air Medal with Three Clus-
ters. His foreign decorations in-
clude the French Legion of Honor
in the (Wade of Chevalier, French
Croix de Guerre. Belgian Croix de
| Guerre and the British Distinguish-
ed Flying Cross.
Spring Social Due
Jack A. Abbott, president of the
Men's Club of Temple Beth Shol-
om, announces the annual spring
socia' and card party of the organ-
ization on Monday evening, April
26, 8:30 p.m., in the Temple's ban-
quet hall. Frank Kamen and Al-
bert Rosen are co-chairmen of the
event.
JWV Auxiliary to Meet
Norman Bruce Brown Ladies'
Auxiliary will hold its first social
meeting for the new term on Wed-
nesday, April 28, at the Republi-
can Club, 1947 West Flagler st.
Joseph lipfon
nia. For his part in that
Mral Johnson was awarded
rational Medal of Honor.
|VF Day. General Johnson
gncd as Chief of Personnel
Headquarters USAF, lat-
niiis Deputy to the Assist -
of Air Staff for Person-
Ljiril, 1947. he was assigned
Sic An Command as Com-
General of the Fifteenth
ce at Colorado Springs,
L'SAK returned to England
Jirst time since World War
General Johnson organized
|rd Air Division there in
1948. as a separate major
)d of id,. United States Air
the division provided facil-
Kosher Heinz Baby Foods Provide
Bases for Well-Rounded Infant Diet
Sanford Jwerdlin *'*,k
P maintenance and support
I *c Air Command aircrafl
"njl training missions t<
and for transport aircrafl
I in u Prlin Airlift Mean
In h,H lrUdry 195- Gener'
I" had been appointed, in ad
fclhar? duties' Chief of
lfor ik ,:Mstance Advisory
mn^ to the Congressional
Taken for granted today is the
right of babies to look forward to
a healthy, full life-span. But this
modern miracle has not always
been man's natural heritage.
Since time began mcountless in-
fants have been winnowed out; only
the strong or fortunate survived.
And all the concern and compas-
sionate care of mothers and medi-
cal men alike were powerless to
prevent this heartbreak.
It has been only in our own time
?hat science found a key to the
saving of baby lives through proper
nutrition. That health and strength
come from within, as a result of
feeding rather than by external
treatment, is one of today's epoch-
making discoveries which does
credit to modern science and indus-
try, as well.
Today, baby, dressed in loose
comfortable clothes, clean and
sweet smelling from frequent bath-
ing, finds unprecedented strength
and energy in a long time of safe,
nutritious, easily-digested foods
prepared especially for him.
A Jewish mother may confident-
ly walk into her local food store,
select anyone of the more than 25
Heinz strained foods, 20 junior
foods or four pre-cooked cereals
bearing the encircled U of the
Union Orthodox Jewish Congrega-
tions of America, and know that
she is buying "good health" for her
child. All these "kosher" foods con-
tribute their share to a well-bal-
anced diet for baby.
Iron deficiency or anemia, one of
the more common deficiencies
among infants, can be curbed by
feeding a child iron-fortilied, pre-
cooked cereal. Through intensive
research in laboratories of one of
the nation's leading food proces-
sors and baby food producers, pre-
cooked barley, oatmeal, rice and
:ereal food have been fortified
*ith a generous amount of free
.ron.
The tripling of the blood volume
and doubling of the total hemo
!lobin within the first year of an
infant's life makes. an outside
source of iron like these cereals es
iential for the prevention of nu-
ritional anemia.
Doctors and nutritionists now
recognixe that an infant, although
his requirements are less, needs
exactly the same nutritional prop-
erties proteins, c a rbohydrates,
fata, vitamins and minerals re-
quired by a growing school child or
a working adult. Science has prov-
ed that while the old-fashioned diet
of large quantities of milk grew
plump babies, the strongest babies
are the result of a well-rounded
diet.
Additional sources of iron can be
found in strained and junior beets
and spinach.
Vitamin A for the young baby is
supplied by strained carrots, apple-
sauce, apricots and applesauce,
apricots with oatmeal, squash,
sweet potatoes and peaches.
Peas, spinach, sweet potatoes
all add vitamin C to the baby's diet.
Strained tomato soup contributes
both vitamin A and C, while vege-
table soup, infant style, is impor-
tant for vitamin A (thiamine and
niacin).
While not every individual
strained or junior food can be
earmarked as a rich source of a
specific nutrient, added together,
they make for a well-balanced,
healthful diet. Today's pediatri-
cians and family doctors, with few
exceptions, recommend the early
introduction of a wide gamut of
foods.
The Heinz company now is offer-
ing a spill-proof, unbreakable nylon
tumbler with which to teach the
high-chair set the use of a cup.
Mothers and doctors across the na-
tion hailed the plastic tumbler
which was introduced last year as
the greatest way ever devised to
bridge the transition from bottle
to cup. The new nylon type is of
the same design but more durable.
It can even be boiled for steriliza-
tion.
Readers may obtain the new ny-
lon tumbler by sending 50 cents in
coin and 12 labels from Heinz Baby
Foods to H. J. Heinz Company, Box
57 Department 255, Pittsburgh 30,
Pennsylvania. The plastic tumbler
is still available for 25 cents in coin
and six labels. The nylon comes in
pink and blue; the plastic is blue,
pink, yellow and ruby.S.T.
Ginrmts
RUTH GROSS
AGENCY, INC.
All forms of Isuarawcc
IINC01N DREXEl BIDC-Reo* 207
420 LINCOLN ROAD
PHONE 51-5341
Newly elected officers of the Florida State Federation of B'nai
B'rith Women's Chapters are pictured following the 18th an-
nual convention of the Florida State B'nai B'rith Federation
held at the Biltmore Terrace Hotel, Miami Beach. Shown are
(seated, left to right) Mrs. Morris Murcus, Orlando, second vice
president; Mrs. Jack R. Wien, Miami Beach, president; Mrs.
William B. Wolfson, Tampa, first vice president. Standing (left
to right) are Mrs. Frank Bayer, West Palm Beach, treasurer;
Mrs. Benjamin Rosenfield, Jacksonville, third vice president;
Mrs. Ted Robinson, Hialeah, secretary; Mrs. Ben Goldfaeld,
Daytona Beach, counselor; and Mrs. Dan Danart, Ft. Lauder-
dale, historian.
SIMCHAH
AN UNUSUAL JEWISH-AMERICAN DAY CAMP
FOR BOYS and GIRLS BETWEEN 4-12 YEARS
To be conducted at the Floridian Hotel
540 WEST AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH
APPLICATIONS NOW BtlNG ACCEPTED WRITE OR PHONE B6-57B2
Pool on Premises Israeli Dancing Arts and Crafts
Fishing Sports Hot Lunches
Dietary Laws Observed
LEVER 3-B
Elect
MICHAEL A.
PELLE
YOUR CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE
Group 1
PULL LEVER 3-B
1951
1953
DANTE FASCELL CO-SPONSORED
THE BILL THAT UNMASKED THE
KLU-KLUXKLAN.
DANTE FASCELL INTRODUCED
AND fOUGHT FOR THE ANTI-
DYNAMITE LEGISLATION.
Rinq the Bell for


PAGE 6 A
+ if**Ut ntskfi&r
J2*DAY
Floriee Kotkin Becomes Mrs. Weiner in
Double Hini\ CantDelight Ceremony Here
pure
foil from a
pearl head-
of pure silk illusion
matching lace and
piece.
Matron of honor wu her m-Ut.
Mrs Merle Sidle. Maid of honor
The marriage of Miss Florice
K tkin and Herbert L. Weiner took
p.'ace on Sunday, April 11. at the
Ei-cayne Terrace Hotel. Rabbi Mor-
ris Skop officiated at the double
ring candlelight ceremony
The bride, daughter of Mr. and was Miss Barbara Ross The) "ore
Mrs. Harry Kotkin. 1344 SW 17th peacock nylon tulle and Pakistan
U.-.. was given in marriage by her[over taffeta ballerina length fitted
father. Her bridal gown was styled ^.^ am| ^^^ >klr( wilh a).
:n white imported chantilly lace .
ard nylon tulle over satin with a ^mating panel! of tulle and pa-
shoulder baring neckline edged in kistan. Fiache type stole, matching
scallops, fitted bodice and a full | headpieces with veils and white
I: re skirt with a scalloped edge. d(lV(,s completed their outfit!
he skirt was underscored with ( Bes( man fm Roh(,,., weiner.
er of nylon tulle that ended in bn)Ihpr ,., ,,nM,m [jshen in-
weep train. Her fourtiered veil
eluded Kurt Weiner, Jack Kotkin
and Merle Sidle Flower Birl was
niece ol the bride Marcia Sidle her
dress styled similar to Ihe attend-
ants' Mrs Morris Baron kept the
guest book
The bride i- a native Mi.mii.in
She graduated from Miami High
School, attended the Universitj of
Miami and was a member of Alpha
Epsilon l'hi Sorority she ma a
teacher ;it Highland Park Elemen-
tary School.
Mr Weiner .>s born in Chicago,
III., graduated from Lake View
High School, attended the Univer-
sitj "f Illinois, ami was member
ol Alpha Epsilon Pi Fraternit) He
served with the is Navj and i-
no associated ith the Rubinstein
Co., ol Chicago After j hones moon
in Jamaica. W.I. the couple will
make their home in i hieago
Koretzkys Plan
To Reside on Reach
Mrs Murrj Koretzkj in-
I making their home in Miami
late ol
tl i irdinal
Hotel R ibbi
rman officiated at the
he bride is the [orn r Helene
: Ml I., i Bi .-!>.
i \ .i .. : thi late
mel B Brod; Mr K iretzk) is
i- the son ol Mr. and Mrs Harrj
K retzk). 6415 La Gorce dr
Irving Goldburg ol Plainfield,
N : gave in niece in marriage
Her sister Mrs Herbert Popok,
nan N.J md Robert Bmn
" Louis' tile K-. attended the
c< pie.
he groom's father has Keen ac
e in local philanthropic, cultural
I religi in circles tor many
an He i a member ol Greater
Mi imi Jewish Federation, Mount
lai Hospital. B'nai B'rith, Sh item
Ige, and the Jewish Home (or
Aged A Fust Degree Mason,
i- BUO a memlx r of the Hoard
Temple Emanu-EI and the He
. w Academy
A dinner party followed in the
I |oda Boom of the hotel
Mils Barbara Greenfield
Miss Greenfield
Plans for June 11
Mr and Mrs Irving Greenfield,
4o star (aland, announce the en
gagement of their daughter. Bar-
bara, to Frank Jordon Levin, son
of Mr and Mis Max Lex in. And-
over, Man and Miami Beach.
The bride to be ia i graduate of
Whitefield School and attended the
t niveraitj ol Miami
Mr Levin attended Suffolk Uni
versit) at Bosion. ud ipent two
years In service in Germany.
The couple are planning a June
wedding at Miami Beach
\TERMITEA
TROUBLE
f
FREE INSPECTION
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BONDED INSURED
MIAMI
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Miss Hauhen's Troth
Told by Her Mother
The engagement of Miss Rita
Hauben to Manuel Albert has been
announced by the bride-elects
mother. Mrs. Mollie Hauben, 215
30th st., Miami Beach.
The couple first met on the eve
of Valentine's Day. Miss Hauben
is a graduate of Miami Beach High
School, attended the University of
Cincinnati and graduated from the
Manhattan Medical and Dental
School, New York.
Mr. Albert is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Irving Albert, of Chicago, III.
He is in the Jewelry business there
The couple plan an August wed
ding in New York and will live in
Chicago.
*
\\ Ml. t Kathtl
Mrs. Marker* I. MTtNMr
Miss Astrpfskv
Weds Mr. Serkin
April 11 was the date of the wed
ding of Marilyn June Astrofsky and
Reuben Serkin. liabbi Max Shapiro
officiated at Beth David Congrega-
tion.
Matron of honor was Mrs Nathan
Ostrofsky, aunt of the bride. San-
dra s'lKin. niece of the bride-
groom, was junior bridesmaid.
Flower girl was Kena Serkin and
the bridegroom'- nephew, Mark
Serkin. acted as ringbearer (lak-
ers included Martin and Edward
Astrofsky, brother of the bride,
Hartley Ostrofsky. cousin of the
bride Larrj Grossman, Morton
Erstling and Sanford of Susamaa.
The new Mrs Serkin is the
daughter of Mr and Mrs. Samuel
I. Astrofsky, Boston, Mass She at-
tended school in Boston and is a
member ol National Honor Societ)
Mr Serkin is the son of Mr. and
Mrs Ben Serkin, 6801 SW 16th st.
He is a native of M.aini and was a
member of the l.'.S Air Force.
Alter a wedding trip to Mexico.
Use COUpie will be at home at 5900
SW 48th st.
Lois BevenVsl
Told by PeinhJ
Mr. and Mrs. Albert N
7505 Buccaneer aw.
Island. Miami Beach.i
engagement of their c
Beverly, to Murry
Miami. s,in of Mr and )h|
Bernkrant. Ellenville, N.lj
The bride-to-be attended!
versit> ol Miami and com...
schooling at Mount Siiuil
in medical technology
Mr. Bernkrant attended!
University, at Ithaca, Neil
He i> now in the Denljlf
Business in Miami.
The couple are planningfi
wedding
rjkl l*.\ CARLYL
^Tfr\.V_MJ Lj Tkt Satin's Outstasdlag ff
Itwlsh Camp lor Beys I Girls
CV'
HENDERSONVILLE. N. C.
Dir.ef.r. Wilton L. MooVor. Principal
V'oodword Hlnh School. Cincinnati, Ohio
At* Hr hracaara: Mn. Jm Ariwla. Owmt. (SO
Marlaiaa A.. Mini Lac., Pa. SI I15. Mm. A.
A. ,,., im s.W. 2H *.. Ph. 4l-54o.
Mr, Marry &r.,., J500 S.W. at* St., Miami.
h. 41-it20.
HORSUUtl
rt.TEH SMII
nmn m
GOLF-TUB ,
o OVERNIGHT TM
MODERN CURB
Oieii' irt urn *
ri in.
k-bv<
SM*

mt*f KOSHER CATERERS]
Weddings Bar Mitzvahs
Buffets Garden Parties
CATERING
A Complete Sen ice
No Party Too Small No Party T i l' 775 Dade Boulevard "*
Phone 5-V95? If No Aiwwei Call 8*'-07*
I < If Rjbbmuil Suet
9fS
B'nai B'rith Women
Hold Seated Luneh
B nai B nth Women of Coral Ga
Mea r.Tentu hou i aaatod iunch.
eon at the fond Gable, Woman's
i luh.
Mi- Betty Gold, chairman, was
-"'>" Mrs BeaSaal Waitres-
W and cigarette girls were uni-
formed In Bna, Britb colon of
hlue and whit.
:Among those present were Bea
Saal. HennHta U,dr. Betty Gold.
She.r HRrenCti BeUy Bodian- A""
Sheir Row Heines. Nettie Crop-
per. Jerry !,, ,.th ,,
<"se (.oldenberg. Annette Gans
rfiuS r,,','nan' Hora Sarbey. Id.
me SfeMe,Ehreikranz- .ri.n Son,
Judy Whs. Rae AvicR
Ehn0' V. ('n,0rer' Sue Hirsh and
tlinor Freeman.
l=r:.g!S?:.gg.:.gg.:gg>g^g->^B,:>^5-:,aS'V-ag'v
/Viirdi
(lie hoiiie of
SUNSHINE FASHIONS
r. U.H. pt off.
Miami Miami Bosch tt. Laudordala '*,,, P*to
r4

TOO WILL FIND
THE MOST COMPLETE SELECTION
of .,
BOYS AND GIRLS WEAR ON MIAMI BEA J
at
MORRIS BROTHERS MIAMI &
12S1 WASHINGTON AVENUE


APRIL 23. 1954
+Jewish Fhridiar)
PAGE 7 A
Rosens Weil
Eugustine
|th as the date of the
fof Shirley Jaffe. of St
I and Dr. Howard Rosen,
he rites were held in the
ton in the ballroom of the
JLeon Hotel. A reception
there.
dnev M. Lefkowitz, Rab-
i Sparer and Cantor Rob-
officiated at the cere-
i marriage by her father,
was attended by Mrs.
,clin. sister of the bride-
> matron of honor. Brides-
Lrc Mariie Jaffe. sister of
t, and Diana Jaffe, a cou-
|njrl (Jsdin served as best
J ushers were Nathan Gold,
Han. Solon Freeman, Phil-
ktein and Irving Lfchtter.
hen included Dr. Gene Us-
JLarry Jaffe.
tide i> the daughter of Mr.
[ Julius Leonard Jaffe, Av-
De. Davis Shores. She grad-
jom Ketterlinua High School
End attended Newcomb Col-
lw Orleans, where she Was
L-r of Alph Epsilon Phi
risen is the son of Mr. and
.. Rosen, 2000 Liberty ave.,
beach He was graduated
, University of Florida and
hi- degree at the Univer-
taryland. where he was a
ol Alpha Omega dental
|ty
Jouple will honeymoon in
hern part "t the state. Up-
return. they will live at
bnce de Leon blvd., Coral
->
rey Kane receives the
to the City of Miami
from Mayor Harold
P-'O at c lawn party hon-
the occasion of his Bar
poh. Harvey is the son
f'.: and Mrs. Hal Kane,
Abbott ave His grand-
er is Morris Nasatir, di-
b: of the Jewish Classical
heard over station
FPB.
THE NEW
?amp Osceola
I F0R BOVS AND QIRL8
>n Mills R.ver & Silver Lake
f cre Shoe, North Carolina '
kock Ridinq Privof. loka
Swimming Poo/
Copable Seasoned Staff
Men? Physician and Hurst
J Drtctors:
|HIBERT and BELLE SILVER
"IBuccante- Ave, Miami Beach
M'2l Limited Enrollment
3D
.PHOTOGRAPHY
nutl TM| tXOUlSin TRUE TO-
LTT.S! 0f T0" WEDDING,
F MfnVAH. ANNIVERSARY.
0* PARTY IN 3D
ALSO Black & WHITE
K ThfmCASO'S
'"EM NO OBLIGATION
RALPH BARGTEIL
JW 83-8431
Food Fair 0pen*
Wednesday was opening date for
the 47th super market uni(t of Food
Fair Stores of Florida, Inc., at 9400
Harding ave., in Surfside. This is
one of Food Fairs largest in South
Florida and one of the most mod-
ern anywhere in the South.
Innovations include moving belt
check-out counters, magic eye
doors and a combination of indirect
and Thinline lighting fixtures. Mar
ket sections include those for meat,
Auxiliary fo Hold Elections
Greater Miami Women's Auxil
iary to the Jewish Home for the
Aged will hold its annual election
meeting at the Algiers Hotel on
Tuesday, April 27. Mrs. Sol Silver-
man will preside at the meeting
scheduled to take up its agenda at
1 p.m. Mrs M. Graham will report
on the "Break the Bank" brunch
scheduled for the Algiers Hotel on
May 11.
Store in Surfside
produce, dairy, delicatessen, frozen
foods and grocery. There is also
a special service providing cut-to
order extra thick Blue Ribbon
Prime and Choice steaks and chops.
The new market includes over
5,000 square feet of storage, re-
ceiving, refrigeration and prepara-
tion space which requires the serv-
ices of some thirty persons alone.
Low display fixtures, known as
gondolas, enable both shopper and
employee to look over the entire
store from any spot.
In a recent nationwide survey,
Food Fair was counted as the sev-
enth largest food chain in the na-
1 tion and the 14th largest retail es-
tablishment. This growth has tak-
' en place in 34 years.
Samuel Friedland, of Miami
Beach, is chairman of the Board
of Food Fair. Duties Of president
now rest with Louis Stein at Food
Fair peneral headquarters in Phil
adelphia.
Talonl Show Set
At llialoah
Ladies' Auxiliary of the Hialeah-
Miami Springs Jewish Center Will
present a "We-No-How" talent
show on April 25 at 8 p.m.
All local talent will participate,
and prizes will be given for the
best talent. First prize is a week-
end for two at the Cavalier Motel.
Iris Maxwell will present danc-
ing classes. Judges for the show
are Hialeah Police Chief Warner,
Miami Springs Police Chief, Miami
Police Lt. Ford, Mr. Peevy, recre-
ational director of the Youth Cen-
ter.
Off to Duncraggan
Blanche and Sid Lewis are en
route to Hendersonville, North Car-
olina, where they will begin prepa-
rations for the formal opening of
Duncraggan Inn on June 1st.
Mrs. Howard Rosen
Wedding Rites Unite
Stern, Fischer
Home wedding April 15 united
Miss Estelle Stern and Joseph
Fischer.
Their marriage is announced by
the bride's parents. Mr. and Mrs.
Max Stern, 2265 SW 25th ter. The
ceremony was performed by Rabbi
Morton Malavsky and was followed
by a dinner at the Delano Hotel.
Mr. Fischer is the son of Mrs.
Samuel Fischer, of Olean. N. Y.,
and the late Mr Fischer
The former Miss Stern received
an AB degree in foreign affairs
from George Washington Univer-
sity, where she was editor of the
university newspaper and a mem-
ber of Mortar Board, national sen-
ior women's honorary. She did
graduate work there while working
at the Bureau of Social Science Re-
search in Washington, D. C.
Mr. Fischer is a graduate of the
University of Arizona. He had a
teaching fellowship at the Univer-
sity of New Hampshire.
After a month's honevmoon in
Europe, the couple will live in
Burma, where the groom will be
working on a research project for
Johns Hopkins at the University of
Rangoon.
B'nailVrith Women
Plan Games, Officer
Installation Dinners
Emma Lazarus Chapter of B'nai
B'rith Women will hold its instal-
lation dinner at the Shelborne Ho-
tel on Sunday, April 25, 6 p.m.
Guest, speaker will be Rabbi Mor-
ris Skop. spiritual leader of the
Coral GaMe* J'-wLsh Center.
Mrs. Alfred Reich will be nam-
ed president. Other officers who
will assume posts include the Mes-
dames Tina Katz. Ethel Soatzer
and Danny Lapin, vice presidents;
Miriam Greene, recording secre-
tary; Saul Tashman. corresponding
secretary; Tina Fisher, financial
secretary: Minn Litman. treasurer.
Edith Fleischer, parliamentarian;
and Lenore Curtis, counselor.
Installation chairman is Editn
Fleischer. Mrs. Harry Kaufman,
past vice president of Women s
District No. 5. past president of
B'nai B'rith Women's Council of
South Florida and first president
of Miami Beach Chapter B nai
B'rith Women, will in-tall the new
officers _______
WE DELIVER AND SPREAD!
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CERTIER LANDSCAPE i SOILS CO.
Phene 86-I3SS
A-l EMPLOYMENT
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OW TO
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PROTECTS CARPETS!
IT'S 0D0RLESSI
CAN YOUR CLOTHES PASS
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Clotheastored in mothball*
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paying particular attention to seams.
folds and cuffs. Store in
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dosed
PROTECT CARPETS
Spray carpeta tarefully, especially In
corners and under furniture whera
moth larvae feed.
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r REALKILL "


FAGE 8 A
*Jei*tHvrid**n
ntlDAY,
Israel's Industry Expanding
By NURA LASKY a further Impetus. It HI """
Jewish Telegraphic Agency r,.;,r a time as the period tA HSM
.1ERUSAI.FM-I.ast January, ac- immiSra.i..n which follow,,! on Ihe
I -ding to the latest statistics. Is
1 exported twice a- many indus-
al goods than during the corre
heels of Israel's establishment in
1948. when an intlatioiian 6COI1
onu made even venture worth
spending month of 1953. The total "hile. because the I -
U Still comparatively small worth local population bought eveiythtaB
aether $2,500.000but if the It could lay hands on.
.i|||v upward m,,u| r<,l,nl m the first years ol statehood,
months is maintained throughout moreover, the Government was in
year, the authorities' target ol terested ." attracting private tor
M4 mill.on tor 1954 might well U' eign investment into industry, and
reached or even surpassed. Pi"l favorable conditions were
:ndustrial exports began rising offered to anyone read) to set up
last summer, and the nu.nher -.1 plant considered "worthwhile
rting factories reached 750 bj meaning that either il offered en
end of 1953 The increase was port possibilities or it would pro
ught about bj the completion duce goods which would otherwise
various factories: the conclusion ** ""Ported Little was asked, how-
i more bilateral trade agreements ever, whether such goods were In-
to other soft-currencj countries; deed vital lor a poorcountrj whose
also by the institution of a ntt-atl task was absorption of mas
re favorable exchange rate and
ertain measure ol de-control In-
side the country which enables
nufacturers to obtain more or
- regular raw material replace
- ni. and with this assurance Ihej
( seek loreign market- lor their
duel-
lie oue-tion has been asked re
. tedl) also by Gardner Patter
. oi Princeton (Jniversitj. in the
marj issue ol "Foreign Affairs '
nether Israel can ever become a
-e- ni poor immigrants: hoe much
could be saved bj importing mate
rials and processing them in the
country; and whence raw material
replacements would come
And as in 1952. tin- inflationary
eeonomj gave waj to a disinflation-
ary one when the local pound was
devalued and led to a shortage ol
read] cash industry was one of the
first to feel the pinch The picture
began to uiihlur Now Israel had to I
- rious exporter ol manufactured """I"''"' '" earnest, both internally
. d- For -he is poor in natural ""l also in overseas market- It
resources, all her markets are fai ....." became obvious that many
i) becausi ol the \rsb States fectorlesshould never had been set
iistence in their economic UD "together
expands il -coins also increasingly
worthwhile to produce those goods
which initially show a low margin
n exchange earnings
because all their material- are mi
ported The k.i.-i I I i "el" vehicle
atjtemhh plant in Haifa, which be-
gan epemtmg early in 1954. is a
ea-e in point initials it WM 'nit an
assembl) plant Of imported parts.
Today, Oianj parts come from Is-
raeli factories, thus saving the coav
omj up to 33 percent of foreign
curreno In 1953. s5.20o.ooo worth
ol can "ere sent overseas, and
figures for the current year are es-
timated to double, if all goc- ac
cording to schedule.
Israel's best customer for manu-
factured goodl has of late been
Turkey, which during 1953 took
nearij 37 percent of total indus-
trial export- That country', one'of
Israel closes! neighbors, which
has during the past lour years been
undergoing an enormous develop
men) period with liberal American
financial aid. is a "natural'' mar-
ket for Israeli goods, ranging from
ear- and tire- to cement, kero-cne
itoves sheet glass, medicines,
building materials and tooth paste
Despite keen competition from tier
many and other members of the
European Payments Union to
which Turkey belongs, Israeli
good- have gained a firm foothold
in that country, and her clearing
account with Turkey has lately
^^ glM^^
A check for $750,000 payable to the United Jewish III
signed by Charles Fruchtman. treasurer of the GreatetL
Jewish Federation, as Dr. Benjamin B. Rosenberg (left ft,
tion director, looks on. The check represents a loans*
from five local banks as part of a national drive lor L
urgently needed in Israel for rehabilitation of newcossM
To Create Memorial
Warsaw Ghetto AUffl
Thousand- of Greater!
will gather at Flamingo hsj
ckade against Israel and output
l efficiency standards ol l-rae
Now something like industrial
planning i- emerging, (or expert
r force are low A combination ence and setbacks are hotter mas-
. these criteria makes competition ten than economist- advice Two
in the world market difficult, even facts crystallize: industries using
igh wages are lower than in as man) local!) cultivated or other-
n) other countries wise available materials, and those
It was m the thirties that "in- min* <''* n,w materials and re-1
dustrialization" began when man) Quiring m the processing special]
German Jews, fleeing the Nazi re- skllls "r rnuch labor, have a good j
. ie. transferred their assets K> chance of survival, the first be-
e-tine m th, form of industrial caus? of their hard currency earn
< lipment and raw materials Thi- ,n capacity, and the latter be '
od the country m good stead cause, at the new rate of H. l 80
' ring the second world war. when ,0 ,nt" dollar, manpower is cheap.
Allied forces in the Mediterran- ,nI" '"'' former group belong cit-
an.i purchased from local in- nw by-products, groundnuts turned
-try whatevet w.,- available ln' oil, and goods produced from
Wearing apparel, processed food Hbre plants, etc And the latter
ffs, metal product- and a large Strop includes such items as indus-1
et) ol other daily require trial diamond-, watches, certain
its were bought up b) the var 'mm- of fashions
s armies, and industry received But at the industrial potential
Mizrachi Women's Organization
of Greater Miami will hold a dance
and variety show at the Black-! Wedn,M''> fvenins;. Apn^
.... ._____ Pay tribute to the heroes a"
stone Hotel on Sunday. Apn 25. i ,,,____ .
r | Warsaw Ghetto uprising a
been working to "Israel's credit-. ,8 D m The af{air win establish a 1953 Sponsors are the^
meaning Turkey sells her less than memorial in the children's village zarus Fedt ration
she buys from her. at Raanana, Israel, for the late Dina LEGAL N
This situation is about to be rec-
tilied. however, by the imminent \ and Henry Chill. Chairman is Mrs.
signing it is hopedof a $20 mil j Alfred E. Stone. Co-chairman is
lion trade pact for the supply of M y .. .
goods in each direction Similarly. Mrs lsrael Yu"sn
the contention of the Turkish
Trade Ministry that Israel's price- Sk pinned Monday
were in some instances higher than
those ruling in the world market,
seems to have been taken heed of,
after an initial upset in Israeli In-
dustrial circles For Israel cannot
"Our Staff in Satire." a skit, will
be presented by members of the
Louise Chapter Board. American
afford losing that market, even if j Jewish Congress, at a meeting Mon-
new trade pacts signed in the past day Aprii 26. 1 p.m.. at the Cadil
lac Hotel. Elections are scheduled
few weeks with Ifaly and Finland
-the former a new one. the latter
a broadened extension of an exist-
ing onewill bring further orders
to local industry, with a large part
of them assembled products.
It is significant, however, that
for the first time items mentioned
n these trade pacts include goods
lor which the planners prophecy a
sound future such a- groundnuts,
wool (rum locally raised sheep, and
machinery and products who-,
manufacture requires a good deal
of skill and labor Maybe in the
not too distant future l-rae!'s
dream ol becoming the Near East's
"Little Switzerland'' can yet be re-
alised
at the meeting.
.............
......
Holiday Greetings mil c*r
friends and fair ami
DUDLEY & FARTHING
Printers
820 FIFTH STIIET
MIAMI BEACH
fhtnt 5g-450S
........................
*V>'V,,'W>>"',V"V"V"V*""V
"VVV**'"^***
HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL OUR
FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Doctors Clinical Laboratory
1004 Huntinglon Building
Miami
Phone 3-6553
H. W. Hamilton. Medial Technologist
THEY'VE BEEN WORKING ON THE RAILROAD John V.
Duggan. 90. Florida's oldest living railroad engineer, remi-
r.isces with Acting Gov. Charley Johns. The latter is a former
railroad conductor with 30 years seniority. The occasion of
Johns' visit to Duggan's home, 3022 NE 2nd ct., Miami, was the
50th anniversary of the veteran's first run from Miami to Jack-
sonville.
BLUE MOUNTAIN CAMPS
BOYS GIRLS
High in the Pocono Mountains. 90 miles from
Philadelphia or New York City
' tSSSL uC ""' "*" ",h' *"+ ** u-
Mass* sssenWea ft* ..ch MM** chili.
34th SEASON SAME OWNERSHIP-MANAGEMENT
Health i t *'mm*r "' umm, Tfcw ^j h t j^
'"- Cam..,*.,, witk fhrlmm tMr#M-frt(#
MRS. JULIAN NEWBAUER I
4411 NAUTH0S MlVI. MIAMI BfACH
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L APRIL 1354
nized Anti-Semitism in America
ges Tactics Radically, Report Says
*Jm1siffegf(gQrT_
PAGE 9 A
,,.,
ired an'i-Semitism h a s
its tactics radically dur-
ast seven years, the Amer-
ish Committee warns in
d document. "Anti-Semitic
in the United States: A
'and Appraisal," published
public by Dr. Joseph M.
rg. Creator Miami Chapter
lit, '"< report is part of a
iiny American Jewish Com-
Iresearcfa project on the gen-
kbject of bigotry.
L| In the report as among
the cold war brought about the
present tense atmosphere of our
national life." Since World War
II. these groups have spent millions
of dollars to advertise their views
through all media, the report adds.
"There is much room in the mar-
ket-place of the ideas for opposing
viewpoint on a multitude of issues
national and international, politi
cal, social and economic," the A.1C
Obituaries
Mrs. Anna Rubin Novack^33
wife of Ben Novack, Miami Beach
building contractor, died of cancer
Tuesday in a hospital.
Mrs. Novack, who lived at 4150
Nautilus dr., was a graduate of
Miami Senior High School and the
University of Miami. She was a
member of Temple Israel and be-
longed to Westview Country Club.
Besides her husband, she is sur-
vived by two sons, William 5, and
Stephen, 3'2; three daughters, Jan,
7, Audrey and Patricia, 2; her par-
report concludes. "That is the ents' ,Mr and Mrs- Morris Rubin;
glory of American democracy. But two sisters. Mrs. Millicent Belvener
the public must be shown how to and Mrs- L'"'an Swiren, and a
Memorial Chapel, followed by burial
in Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
MAURICE GERMAIN
{4-year-old auditor for the Veterans
Administration, died Friday. He cama
in Miami n> yaara ago from Pateraon,
Nl.. and lived at ittl BW 18th Bt.
Ha as u member of the Thanre 'lass
and 88era of the Scottish Rita. tfurvlv-
Ina ara IiIh wife, Francea; his mother,
Mrs. Anna (ierniaiu. Mlainl. anil three
brothers. Bendoaa were held Mondi y
in the Miami Craapel >! Gordon Funer-
al Home.
recognize and reject the ideological
imen'ting^anti-Semitism counterfeiters who would past on
their publications are i a^ ,,egal tender their hollow coins
McGinley. of Union, N.J.. of bigotry."
The recent report of the House
Committee on Un-American Activi-
ties, headed by Rep. Harold H.
Velde (R. 111.) confirms the AJC
findings. In its annual report, is-
sued Feb. 6, 1954. the Congression-
al group warns on page 5:
"There are presently at work
within the United States various
and sundry hate' groups, the lead-
ers of which, while masking their
activities under the guise of pa-
triotism and devotion to the re-
publican form of government, are
in fact spreading dissension, dis-
cord, bigotry and intolerance. In
many instances, these organizations
select ultra patriotic names and de-
vices to conceal their true and
her of the bi-weekly tabloid,
iron Sense"; Gerald L. K.
of Los Angeles, who pub-
"Thc Cross and the Flag"
tads the Christian National-
ly, also known as the Chris-
[Ndtionalist Crusade; and
I, Britton, also of Los An-
publisher of various slick
(anti-Semitic tracts.
achieve a proper perspec-
Ithe AJC report explains, "it
lessary to understand that
[anti-Semites have abandoned
former brash and obvious tac-
more skillful hate-mon-
ind cunning publicists have
leveloped a sense of public
They exploit current
hate issues, toning down, if
Eliminating, open anti-Semi-
|They aim to win the support
kpectable elements, rather
fthc lunatic fringe following
they so highly prized in
an Front days."
nting out that today's anti-
es have learned "how to salt
debate with hate propa-
' the AJC report says that
nationalists" groups offer
ent platforms for this
Extreme isolationism,
|ition to foreign aid, unreason-
pstility to the United Nations,
^mnation of both major politi
ties and agitation for "a
nment of political forces,"
nong the themes falsely stres-
the ultra-nationalists, the
adds,
hile some of the ultra-nation-
Igroups espouse retrogressive
jimic reforms," the AJC report
Mies, and others have politi-
(ims. all favor extremist tech-
Is in combating communism
pvinging. wild accusation tac-
*'hich indiscriminately charge
als with being communistic.
^-nationalists are now appeal-
the American people on
basis. c(|uating everything they
with communism, subver-
and a newly-invented phe-
fcnon creeping socialism.'
hiring the past decade, ultra-
Inalist organizations have in-
ked immeasurably and they
offer tempting opportunities
Bfiltration by anti-Semitic de-
ls- In setting out to cultivate
' gmups, the professional bigol
his hand adroitly, exploiting
(articular political issues which
currently the focus of concern
Itranationalist circles."
fce AJC report states that ultra-
pnahsts made little headway
the average American "until
brother, Arnold, all of Miami
Beach.
Services were held Wednesday in
Temple Israel, with burial in Mt.
Nebo Cemetery.
MAX GRUMET
88, Of '*'il IVnn.sylvaniH ave., Mian::
Beach, who cama hare ali yeara ano
from New York, died Sunday. He
owned a dry cleaning, atora. Burvlvora
Include his wife. Roae. Barvlcaj and
burial were in New fork, with Beach
Memorial Chapel in charge of local
arrangementa,
MACK GURVITZ
<.. of s.,.,ii Byron ava., Miami Beach,
died Saturday. Services were held in
New \..rk with Beach Memorial Chan-
el in charge locally. Mr. Ourvita had
'"'" winter resident here for 15
yeara. He leavea hla wife, Eva,
LOUIS KAUFMAN
at, a wlntei realdenl hare for the past
20 yeara, di.-.i Saturday in a local
hospital. Services were held In Chi-
cago with Beach Memorial Chapel in
charge of local arrangementa He waa
a hotel owner In Chicago. He laavea
Ills wife. Baas, ami a eon, Arnold.
MRS. BESSIE EINSOHN
88, of I4M NW 10th st, who came
here ii years ago from New York,
died Sunday in a hospital She haves
her huaband, Jacob; two sons, Milton,
oi New York, and Murray, of Cali-
fornia; two daughtera, Belma, of Mi-
ami, and Mis Beatrice Pine, of Ml-
dangerous purposes. The subject; SEl^ BtSK Miami: 'ESrlSS
of the 'hate' attacks are individuals "''"' ,"'1'1 Tuesday m Riverside Me-
MRS; ANNA ZOVOLOFF
r,.-,, of 182* svv 18th ave., passed away
Saturday, Servloaa were held In New
York, with Gordon's Miami Funeral
Home m charge ol local arrangementa.
Mrs. Zovoloff came here eight yeara
ago from Philadelphia and leavea her
hushall'l, Samuel.
MRS. ROSE WEINTRAUB
"0, of 841 Jefferaon ave., Miami Reach,
passed awa) Saturday. Services were
held ill BoHton, Mass., witn KlVt-j sine
Memorial Chapel, Miami Peach, in
barge of local arrangementa Mrs.
VV'eintra uh came here nine yaara ago
from .\,w York and la survived bj a
brother and a slsier.
MRS. GERTRUDE BROWN
87, of MSO SVV :;:;ul ave.. a residenl
here for six yaara, died Sunday, Berv-
ie.s ware held In Boston, with Cordon
Miami Funeral Home in charge of lo-
cal arrangementa she leaven her hua-
band, Jacob, two sons, a daughter,
three brothera and two alatera,
or groups of religious and racial
minorities among American citi-
zens. The Committee is by no
means unaware of these activities,
and investigation and documenta-
tion will proceed to the end that
the individuals concerned may be
disclosed for what they are. In
the opinion of the Committee,
there are no degrees to subversion.
It is not sufficient to be simply
anti-Communist It one is anti- Am-
erican at the same time."
Founded in 1906, the American
Jewish Committee, with chapters in
44 principal cities and members
in more than 550 American com-
munities, is the pioneer American
organization combatting bigotry,
protecting civil and religious rights
of Jews and advancing the cause
of human rights.
mortal Chapel, Miami Beach, with bur-
ial In Mi. Sinai Cemetery,
3iayor Support**
Voi'vllv tor Post
Miami Mayor Abe Aronovitz ad-
dressed a political rally at Charles
Vocelle for Congress headquarters
on Saturday and endorsed the can-
didate.
Vocelle told his supporters, "1
am gratified to have the support of
such an outstanding citizen as May-
or Aronovitz. and I shall do my
utmost to merit the confidence that
he and all others have placed in
PVT. SYDNEY MAGER
28, W'as killed Baturda} In an auto
accident on the New Jeraey turnpike.
Services Were held Wednesday in
ltench Memorial Chapel. Burial fol-
lowed in Mi. Nebo Cemetery. I'm
Magef came from New York sis yeara
ago and lived with his parents", the
Rev and Mrs. Morria D. Mager, 4553
N Hay rd Miami lleach. Id-sides his
parenta, lie is survived by a brother,
Gerald, and a sister, Claire. Before he
was taken into Army service nine
months ago, hi1 was a law student
al tile University of Miami. He was
a niemher of Tan ESpallon Rho legal
fraternity and an officer <>f Young
Judaea organization.
ALBERT HABIB
1.2-year-old hotel employe, died Mon-
day. Service* were held Tuesday ill
Riverside .Memorial Chapel, Miami,
with burial In Mt. Sinai Cemetery.
Mr. Hablb la aurvlved by his wife.
Jeannie, a brother and two sisters.
DR. ALTER S RESLER
dentist. 85, of New York City, an an-
nual winter visitor, died Sunday He
was living at May Harbor Islands,
Miami lleach. Riverside Miami Beach
Chapel sent the body to New Jorfc
for services and burial. Burvlvlng are
hla wife, Tillle, who was with him;
a lirother, and three sisters in New
York.
me
Vocelle's campaign manager, Sid-
ney L. Segall said, "The open en-
dorsement of Charles Vocelle for
United States Congress by Abe
Aronovitz strongly indicates the de-
sire of all forward-looking citizens
to elect a man who places principle
and respect for the rights of peo-
ple over and above, political ex-
pediency." ^______________
/ I
**
JOSEPH HERSCHBAUM
:,4. of V.'.) 77th st., Miami Beai h,
pass,,! away Sunday, Bervloea were
held ill Riverside Memorial Chapel,
with burial in Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
Mr llei si Idiaum, a meal salesman.
came here five years ago from New
York City. He is aurvlved by hla wife.
Marx. ________
MEYER GREENBLATT
OS of 1911 SVV 87th ave. a wholesale
fund broker, died Sunday. He came
hen- l< months ago from Chicago.
Services were held In Chicago with
Riverside Memorial Chapel in charge
of local arrangements.
BARNETT BROWN
R of 1292 BW l.'.th St.. passed away
Monday. April l-\ al his residence.
Survived by his wife, Quwle, and one
sister Mrs. Marlon raves Services
were held al Miami Riverside,
aunt followed in Mt. Nebo Ce
MRS. HENRIETTA BERMAN
57, oi 1012 Euclid ave., Miami Beai h
died Tuesday. She came from New
York iS yeara ago, Surviving are her
husband, Walter, ami three brothers
and a sister. Bervlcea were held
Thurada) in Riverside Memorial Chap-
el, M....... i leai it
ABRAHAM SINGER
81, co-owner ol Tayatee Bakery, died
.,ii April 12 He cm,- from Detroit l.i
yeara ago and lived al 10078 Bast Bay |
Harbor dr., Miami Beach, singer was)
a member of the Miami Beach Amer-
ican Legion Cost 88 and the Miami
Beach Cika Lodgre. Burvlvlng are nia
wife, Sophie; two sons. Joseph and
l>r. Jack; four daughters, Kranies.
Jeanette, Mis Ida Wtoner and Mrs
Ruth Goldsmith; and eight grandchil-
dren. Service- were at Cordon's Mi-
ami Beach Chapel on April 14th, with
interment in Mount Nebo Cemetery.
HARRY SMOLIN
r.l, of 1 I'd Meridian ave.. died on April
13 at home. He was the owner of
itelle Smolin's garment store on Wash-
ington axe.. Surviving are his wife.
It.-lie; two lii-others and a sister.
Services ami burial were in New Cork,
with Miami lleach Riverside in charge
of local arrangements. Smolln came
to Miami lleach 111 years ago.
DAVID STROMBERG
Sfi. of 34."iO Garden ave.. Miami Beach,
died on Apiil 8. A retired hutcher. he
came here 10 years ago from New-
York. Survivors Include five daugh-
ters, Mrs. Kdna Winii. Mrs. Lillian
Schwartz, Mrs. 1 lorogny Simon, Mrs.
Sarah Kalin and Ms Ruth Koppel,
and a sun. Sam. Bervloea and inter-
ment were In New York City, with
Miami Beach Riverside in charge of
local arrangements.
Inter-
Cenietery.
HELEN GOLDSTEIN
-,1 ,.f 8820 North Miami Avenue pass-
m____.. .... :i II In -I l.i.-:,
I,ry for interment
HANNAH JAFFE
-.7 of Harbor Lights Motel, Wlndlaw
Key, passed away Tuesday. Aorll W.
a, h,., residence Survived bj ;
hushand, Harrv. and on. s.. I I..J-
hen. Remains were sent to hlcago
for services ami Interment bj Miami
Riverside. ________
MINNIE OXMAN
of MO nvv 10th .' Passed.awas
MATHILDE ROSTHAL
71, of MM SW 21st St., died on April
.",. She came here from New York 21
\e.irs ago and is survived by her hus-
iiand, Samuel: a son. Robert .1 ; two
daughters. Mrs Harold Cohen and
Mrs. Bmanuel Htrechberger; a broth-
er, two sisters, three grandchildren,
Including itart Cohen, and a great-
grandchild. Services were ,.|1 April
6 at Cordons Miami Chapel, with
interment in Mount Nebo i .111.1,1.v
IDA KORNBLUM
77. a resident of il- Blackstone Hotel,
died on April 9. She had come from
New York seven years ago. Surviv-
ing are a son. Samuel; three daugh-
ters, Mrs Dor* Welntraub, Mrs Esth-
er Wohlfeld and Mrs. Bella Ni.r. 11
berg Services and interment were in
New York. With Miami Itiveiside In
charge of arrangements.
ABRAHAM PROPPER
73, a retired tailor who came
Morris B. Frank was unani-
mously re-elected president
of Beth Jacob Congregation
Tuesday evening. This is
Frank's third successive term
in that office. He was also
president of Beth Jacob for
five years before resigning to
accept other congregational
duties. Also named were
David Whitman, vice presi-
dent; Leo Meyer, vice presi-
dent; Marcie Liberman, treas-
urer; Al Hellman. recording
secretary; and Louis Shafkin,
financial secretary.
Sifh ia Sill 111'if to
Star in Hirseh
Production Hen*
During the past three years, Sam
Hirseh has produced and directed
plays at the University of Miami's
Ring Theatre and the Casablanca
Playhouse.
Beginning Saturday night,
Hirseh launches a new theatre ven-
ture. He has remodelled the old
Biltmore Theatre at 151 NE 40th
st.. changed the name to the Bilt-
more Playhouse and will present
a series of popular Broadway hits
there during the summer months.
Hirseh has signed Sylvia Sidney
to star in the opening play, "O"
Mistress Mine." The play was made
famous on Broadway by the Al-
fred Lunts.
Appearing with Miss Sidney will
be Rex O'Malley. prominent actor
who starred in the original play.
"The Man Who Came to Dinner."
O' Mistress Mine" will run for
two weeks as will all other vehicjes
Hirseh plans to present this sum-
mer.
"I am quite confident that the
theatre-goers will like our new lo-
cation. We have plenty of free
parking and the theatre is com-
pletely air conditioned." Hirseh
said.
from
died
New York seven years ago, died on
Vprll He lived at IMS SVV Mill St.
Surviving are his wife. Lena; two
sons. Charles and Irving; and a
daughter. Nettl llnnimell Services
and interment wen in New York, with
Beaoh Memorial Chapel in charge ol
arrangement*. .
LEGAL NOTICE
Pmuel Friedland. president of Temple Emanu-FJ. ia shown re-
P'ng the amended charter authorizing the change of me
*ne of Miami Beach Jewish Center to Temple Emanu-El from
9e George A. Holt, Senior Circuit Judge. Dade County. Ob-
Pg the ceremony are Rabbi Irving Lehrman (left), spiritual
ES "he syngogue, and George J. Talianofi (right), vice
K* Temple Emanu-El has a membership of over 1.000
,u'es. It wag founded in 1940.
MRS. IDA QENESON
7-, of 1040 NK IMrd st., d-.ii Wei -
i.,'s,l-,v Anrll II S.I vices were held
"'s',,. Tort Clt, Gordon's Mtam
Kunerul Home w is In chare* Of local
irrsiurements. she is survived to he
huXml. .Vhiaham. one >,, M
daughter.
miss oloria'shapiro
-.,; ,:"- 4tl> "t.. Miami Beach,
s ii- larv ... the civ of Miami Beach
staff psvchoiogisi. di.-d Saturday
morning in a hospital she came here
mJ aTs aa.......i ** secretary of the
Bvl icuae fnlversilv Alumni Assoela-
Cm at Miami Heach. and > Sunday
*S stbs few*
S^stX^r^i1.
s,,vcs were held Monday In Bench
Tvehnion Head to
lie Honored Here
A group of Greater Miamians
will honor Dr. William Fondiller,
honorary president of the Ameri
can Technion Society at a gather
ing which will be held at the home
of Mrs. Jennie Grossinger, 5941
Pinetree dr.
Dr. Fondiller will tell the group
the role that the Israeli technical
school is playing in the present
trying days in that country.
Leo Rutstein, field director for
the Society, is making his head-
quarters in Miami Beach and says
that "the support Greater Miami
is giving to Technion is wonder-
ful, and hope that many more Mi-
amians will take the opportunity
to hear and take pride in the
task that the school is doing."
Local leaders spearheading the
meeting are Joseph Cherner, Rabbi
Irving Lehrman and Meyer A. Ras-
kin, president of the local chapter.
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICK IS HKKKHY C.IVKN t"r
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name-it
ROSECRKST GIFTS, .1 SHI Miracle
Mile, Coral Gables, intends to regi-
said name with the Clerk of the I
cull Court of Dade County, Floi
Ii. H.KSI..VVV OW91EJKO
Sole Owner
KE88L-BR A GABS
Attorneys for Applicant
\-\-i \\ Piaster si.
4/88-30 Ti/7-14________
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY. No. 167J2i
MART IVNI-: MORTOK, I'lainiiff,
MILTON it NORTON. Defendant,
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: MILTON K MORTON
80th Al' I SHAPE
apo ;."i. e/o I'M
New York, NY.
You -ii e hereby notified thai a
, complaint for Divorce has
fled against you. and you are
quired to serve a cops "'" ><>"' A
,',, Pleading to the Bill ol m
on the Plaintiffs Attorney, HRNRJ
M CAIN, 8618 VV.--I PlaBler 81
Miami, Ma and file the original Ans-
wer or Pleading in the office of the
Clerk of the Cir. ui' Court on or e-
fore the IWh day ol May. 1884. f you
fail to do so. judgment by default Will
he taken against you for the i.
demanded In the Hill of oinplslnt
DONE AND ORDERRD at Miami,
Florida, this 6th day of April. A,l>.
1954- R B I.KATHKKMAN.
Clerk. Circuit ."ourt.
Pail, i-iiiinty. Icloi-Ma
BY WM. VV ST.X'KIN
(Circuit Court Seal)
l>eputy Cleric


PAGE 10 A
>Jcnist>fhr*&L
_FRH)AY
Figures on Israel Not Revealed
Continued from Page 1 A
but did not break down the total
figure to show h >w much Israel or
any other country in the Near
East would receive individually
Meanwhile, however, FOA mum
in -aid that while aid In l-racl wa-
lo be continued, the program in
that country would decline because
of the success of previous opera
tinns and (hat not .is much monej
would be spent there as previous-
ly. On the other hand, il was noted
Near East would Ik- afforded Israel governments can justify to their
although it >s own people the permanent *ettlc-
i- .is yet unclear,
known that other allocations are
being simultaneously asked for
mutual defense assistance, mutual
defense support, and technu
operation Whether the latter cate-
gorii will be available to i-i
not known although it is i ramed
thai Israel should benefit Iron
technical i inds
The FOA made it kn iwn that the
that aid for the Arabs will be
slightly increased as the degree of Arab states and Israel hav, been
need indicates
Israel and the Arab states were
characterized as countries In which
the problems are rapidly changing
and for that reason government of-
ficials feel it would be wiser not to
specify at this time any specific
amount for Israel or individual
Arab states.
Whether additional fund- be-
the S130.000.000 cited for the
(onion Socks
11 l*OU|l .* l*OKt
An 18-month record a- Dade
County circuit Judge, praised b>
attorneys and the public alike, is
pointed to by the galax) oi friends
of J. Frits Gordon as a factor in
hi- campaign for election as Cir
cuit Judge in Group 5.
Gordon has lived and practiced
law in Dade County for 30 years
and "has made a notable record in
his profession and gained a splen-
did name throughout the count)
for his civic and fraternal activi-
ties," his supporters indicate.
While circuit judge. Gordon did
much to prevent final divorce ac-
tions He reunited reportedly a
good many couples on the binge
of breaking for keeps, destroying a
home and adversely affecting chil-
dren involved, according to reports
here.
"I have long pointed to the high
percentage ol juvenile delinquen-
cy resulting from the broken
home, and thus, a- a circuit judge,
determined to prevent as many
broken homes a- possible.'" he ex-
plained. "The exceptional record I
made there has drawn much praise
from every segment of Dade Coun-
ty"
Scholarship to Hebrew
University Given at
Miami Chapter Meeting
informed that the United States In
bssiasing the needs ol individual
countries foi assist! no will give
considerable weigh) to the d
to which there i- a willingness to
cooperate in the solution ol region-
al problems such as the use oi the
waters of the Jordan ba-m on I
regional basis'."
Extraordinary Effort* Noted
The FOA reported that it found
it "encouraging" to note that the
water development plan submitted
bj Presidential representative Eric
Johnston "is being seriouslj stu-
died and appraised b) the interest
id countries "
The-e tact- were revealed when
the FOA issued a regional narrs
live statement explaining its ideas
on the assistance program in the
Near East for the fiscal year of
1955 The report stated that the Is
rael Government has taken "ex-
traordinary measures" in recent
months to put its economy on an
orderly basi-
"These measures."' the report
said, "plus a substantial increase in
exports and the realization of Ger-
man reparations payments, has
brightened the economic outlook
considerably, but not to a degree
where further development aasiat-
ance is no longer necessary. It is
estimated that there can be a sub-
stantial reduction from the
amounts of this type of assistance
furnished in prior years The FOA
noted that "American and other
free world Jewry have made signi-
ficant contributions" to helping to
resettle refugees arriving in Is-
rael and to establish the economy
of the state.
Citing what was described as
nearly a million" Arab refugees,
the report said these Arabs repre-
sent "a continuing source of fric-
tion and an unbearable strain on
the economy of the Arab states in
which they have been given ref
Ufa To help solve this problem.
ment "f the refugeea "
Aid will be given in the fiscal
year of 1953 I > undertake such
projects m Jordan. Syria, Leh.i
non. and Egypt.
The l-'n \ reported 'bat despite
certain diflercnces. "support tor
Mnencan policj has remained
in Greece, Turkey and Is-
rael li added thai la the
Arab states, where bitterness on
the subject ol Israel militates
against full accord, there is a cer-
tain body of goodwill, to which
American assistance has made a
significant contribution."
New UN Role
Seen for Bunche
Continued from Pag* 1 A
press by Henry Suydani. press offi-
cer of the State Department Mr.
Council ScL
Russia Stands
With Arabs in
East Controversy
Continued from Page 1 A
veto in the Security Council by the
S nriel Union.
The British were pictured as op-
timistic about their chances of get-
ting Jordan to participate in such
a conference, despite its refusal to
come to a meeting called by the
IN Secretary General under the
term- of Article XII of the Israel
Jordan armistice agreement.
In addition, it was learned, the
governments of the United States
and Britain will seek to impress
upon Israel and the Arab States
that border incidents must cease It
is believed likely that Dulles and
Eden discussed penalties to be im
posed on those states which refuse
to cooperate in ending the border
warfare. However, an official
spokesman refused to comment on
this aspect of the talks.
Other specific proposals for sta-
bilising the Israel border situation
were also discussed and will be
pursued further in diplomatic
talks. It was stressed when the
talks between the two foreign sec-
retaries were announced that Brit-
ish Middle East experts had been
called into the meeting.
Mrs. Herb s,her
<"< Greater Miarai
al Counefj of
pledge lunches
Suydam declined to answer ques lhai the annual itt,
tion* baed on Ihe statement, uj "n April 28.at ljS'1'
ing thai he was not in a position to A~ in former
interpret it. | mem|Ws in far**
Israel Greets Statement
XJlls policy statement was greet
ed by Abba S Kuan, the Israel Am
bassador In a meeting with Assist
ant Secretary of State Henry A
Byroade, the Israeli envoy said that
the Department's hope that co
operation rather than force would
characterize the relations of the
countries of the Middle East ex-
'"" Ul" a<1 aw,
' 'heir h^l
Money raj
further Council'i LL
P'S" born, their um^J
-hips, overseas pn,^1
munity services.
Mrs Han* Sch.ii i
, ^airman, and Ma ip_
pressed precisely what the Israel l n'"rman 'or the Mia*]
Government has been trying to em-1 ,r8eof *n
phasize all along.
Mr Eban added that Israel only
hoped her neighbors would come
to understand the necessity for di
rect cooperation. Later, he made
known that he would make an ad-
dress in the near future in which
might be found Israel's view of the
relationship of the Jewish State
with world Jewry and other sub-'
ject.s mentioned by Mr. Byroade,
last week at Dayton. Ohio!
Meanwhile, the views expressed
by Mr. Byroade found warm ap-
proval for the American Council
for Judaism. Lessing J. Rosenwald.
the Council's president, commend-
ed Mr. Byroade for emphasizing
"an important principle underly-
ing the proper relationship of the
State of Israel to Jews throughout
the world."
Some 60 persons attended
meeting of the Greater Miami I,ne *OA recommended that atten- )
Chapter. American Friends of the ''on be given to 'creating new eco J
Domic opportunities in the Arab
stales, for bolh refugees and non-
refugees, in order to create a poli-
tical climate in which the country
T
Hebrew University, at the home of
Mrs Jennie Grossinger, 5941 Pine
Iree dr.
Principal speaker was Dr Berth
eld Fried!, of the University of Mi-
ami, and iormer exchange pint, -
M>r to the Hebrew University at
Jerusalem. Israel. Harry Simon-
hoff. program chairman, alao ar
ranged for the showing of a film.
"House on the Hill." which related
the historic development oi Israel's
only university since it- formation
30 yean ago
Money for scholarships was l;i\
en to the chapter during tin coui se
of the meeting according to Mrs
Oida Rubin, president. Principal
gift was made bj David Provus
The newly formed group, which
celebrated the Hebrew University's
30th anniversary on April 1, plans
its next meeting at the Coral Ga-
bles home of Dr, and Mrs Philip
Gotlieb.
To Attend Annual Meet
NEW YORK CITY Mrs. David
L. Zielonka. of Tampa, Fla.. a vice
president of the National Federa-
tion of Temple Sisterhoods, will
participate in ehe annual meeting
of the Executive Board of the or-
ganization at its national head-
quarters here in the House of Liv-
ing Judaism-Berg Memorial, April
26 to 30. Mrs. Zielonka is chair-
man of the Department on Religion
and Education.
Keep Your Cities ond
Your County
Lever 14- A
William W. (Bill)CHARLES
YOUR REPRESENTATIVE
LegislatureGroup 1
i IM I i, il Adv I
f
\
c
{
I1
}
\
JUDGl
RAYMOND!
Judge of
Dade County's!
Smoil Claims
(in the courlfconstl
PULL
LEVER
Senator Collins
liar I; in Miami
Miami personal appearance of
Senator LcRoy Collins during his
campaign visit this week will be at
a free barbecue to be held on Sat-
urday, from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., at
NW 7th ave. and 97th st accord-
ing to Harold Vann. his campaign
chairman for Dade County.
The candidate for governor was
to arrive in Miami Thursday He
will appear at 8:30 p.m. on WTVJ's
program. "What's the Story?" He
returns to the same station Friday,
at 7:45 p.m.. and again on Satur-
day at 4:30 p.m.
John MeCarty will speak for Col-
lins at 8:45 p.m., Friday, over tele-
\ Urion station WITV and radio sta
tion WIOD.
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Thr \ vru tin*** Frankfurter**. Cornod Beef. Blogn
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Phones 307212 **
230 N.W. 5th Street. Miami. Florida


IPRIL23, 1954
phood Art Calendar Honors
[h Settlement in America
*J**i*#fc#**#7
PACE 11 A
| m.lred years of Jewish
Ibievcment in North Am-
fceing commemorated by
hod Art Calendar for
year 5715 (1954-55), an-
Irs. Hugo Dalsheimer,
f lid., president of the
federation of Temple Sis-
lendar was prepared as
L nation-wide celebratibn
{centenary of Jewish set-
, New Amsterdam which
fanned by Jewish organ-
Jhrnughout the country
ling coordinated through
Mean Jewish Tercenten-
bmmittee.
calendar is published
Jb\ the National Feder-
iTemple Sisterhoods, one
Vge^t Jewish women's or-
,s in the world. The
Division of the Union
Kcan Hebrew Congrega-
National Federation of
Sisterhoods, was organiz-
Ears ago. largely through
|s of Mrs. Abram Simon,
on, D.C.
_ issue of the art calendar
Ced with original art work
from filmstrips depicting the set-
tlement of the Jews in New Am-
sterdam, Haym Salomon's contri-
bution to the American Revolu-
tion, the philanthropic and patri-.
otic actions of Judah Touro and
the'efforts of Dr. Isaac Mayer Wise
to organize the Union of Ameri-
can Hebrew Congregations and to
train Rabbis, as well as with other
photographs of historic signifi-
cance.
eyers Says Her
bee Qualifies
[ Circuit Judge Post
years experience as a
qiiip me to serve as Cir-
le. Anna Brenner Meyers,
| for the post in Croup 5,
to her supporters at
ide meeting this week.
years work in law in-
fo rii nee in all courts.
Sieve that I have the
knowledge of the law a
Udge should have," she de-
Officers of New Branch
To be Installed
Officers of the newly formed
Poale Zionist Branch of Greater
Miami will be installed on Monday
evening, 8 p.m., at the Royal Hun-
garian Restaurant.
Isaac Hamlin, national executive
secretary of the Histadrut, will be
installing officer. Jacob Pearson
will assume the office of chairman.
Other officers are Shlome Hal-
perin, vice chairman; Samuel Ler-
ner, treasurer; Louis Dukler, finan-
cial and corresponding secretary;
Mrs. Sonia Robbins, recording sec-
retary; Mrs. Anna Sorin Bild, in
charge of publicity.
Executive Committee includes
Ben Minenberg, Dr. S. Wilensky.
Dr. A. Raset, J. Z. Stallan and Mrs.
Miriam Halperin.
Third Seder Planned
A third Seder celebration of the
Workmen's Circle Y. L. Peretz
School, 1545 SW 3rd st., will take
place on Saturday, April 24. at
6:30 p.m. Pupils of the school will
recite and sine the Haggadah. Luba
Roy and Paul Milstone will pre-
sent a program of Passover melo-
dies.
Reproduced in the Sisterhood Art Calendar from the filmstrip.
"Isaac Mayer Wise: Master Builder of American Judaism,"
produced by the Union of American Hebrew Congregations.
Business, Professional CJA Units
Announce Quotas at Westview Club
pyer- also stressed her long
in social work and
writ ion. and her work as
Ischuol teacher, registered
nd community leader as
to make her ready to serve
lit Judge.
Paris (owarl
lAsis Platform
Faris Cowart, local civic leader
and businessman and a candidate
for the elective position of Dade
County P u rchasing Agent an-
nounced this week a platform of
ol working tth thou- equal opportunity and impartial
people in thesTcapacities '
The top ten business and profes-
sional units of the Combined Jew-
ish Appeal were cited this week by
trades chairman Sam J. Heiman
for their outstanding effort in the
closing weeks of the current cam-
paign.
Heiman stated that despite a na-
tional leveling off in general bus-
s-eas and Israel agencies must be
strengthened so that service to
Jewry in need everywhere will not
be lessened."
The Combined Jewish Appeal
goal for this year is SI,491.806.
which represents the minimum
ii'iii.ii icrvriiii till in u' i.tiiti nil'
iness conditions throughout Dade I operating budgets for 54 separate
ten me the opportunity to
I depth in understanding
land it is only by under-
I people and their motives
fcfully evaluating the facts
t that a judge can serve the
fvho come before her prop-
i equitably." she said.
Promised when elected to
Bie true human values in-
|in every case, and to serve
justly, fairly and with
I
George S. Okell
RE-ELECT
'EORGE S.
KELL
[STATE LEGISLATOR
GROUP 1
DADE COUNTY
'KAY OKfll
ANOTHER TfR/M
Ji!l_^2li consideration for all Dade County
business firms.
In this connection, he declared
he will establish a complete basis
of impartiality in the treatment of
all bids submitted to the Purchas-
ing Department. One of his prim-
ary concerns will be "the determin-
ation of securing the best quality
of commodities required at the
minimum cost, in order that the
taxpayers' dollar will be expended
wisely and properly. In addition, a
record of all transactions complet-
ed by the department will be plac-
ed on public record for. review at
all times."
Cowart has expressed the hope
that the voting public will show a
greater interest in the elective post
"that has been overlooked in the
1 past." He points out that the Pur-
chasing Department is as equally
important as all other elective
; posts in which the voters are con-
i cerned.
"Approximately S5.000.000 to S6.-
000.000 have been purchased in the
past year from local and out-of-
I town business firms, and it should
! be remembered that it is the tax-
j payers' money which is being used
! for this purpose," the candidate
: said. "It is my intent, however, to
I confine the purchases of all mate-
rials and supplies required by the
County of Dade to local establish-
ments."
Cowart, who has been m semi-
retirement for the past several
years, states he will devote full
time, "and if need be whatever ad
County in 1954. pledges in the Bus-
iness and Professional Division
were holding their own in compar-
ison with last year's campaign ef-
fort. Nearly 70 percent of the cam-
paign quota has been achieved to
date, Heiman stated, with more
than 40 trades and professions con-
tinuing to solicit their prospects.
Of the ten units, the Utilities
Group achieved 191.1 percent over
its quota. ;uid the Personal Serv-
ices Group was in second place
with 108 percent. The Produce Di-
vision is just under 90 percent of
its quota, and the Insurance Group
has announced.87 percent of its
campaign goal.
The Real Estate Division last
week passed 86 percent of quota,
and the Accountants Division an-
nounced 83.7 percent. The Welfare
and Health Group report 78.8 per-
cent collected, and the Food unit
has 76.7 percent. The Restaurant
Division is at the *76.2 percent
mark, and Banks and Investments
reached 76 percent early this week.
Heiman paid tribute to the 375
trades group chairmen, workers
and their wives at a dinner dance
last Thursday at Westview Country
Club, at which time latest reports
were turned in by the campaign-
ers.
The Hotel Division, headed by
Jack Muravchick, has passed the
SIOO.OOO mark. In the cleanup cam-
paign, he is assisted by Joe Rose,
Jacob Lansburgh. Joseph Dallett,
Doug Raff, and Jack Fishman.
Lou Goldman and Arnold Seeder,
of the Winter Residents Division,
have asked all workers to report
coverage of all outstanding pledge
cards. The cleanup committee in
this division includes William
Blechman, Tom Kravitz, William
Agranove. M. David Elwitt, Joseph
Kahn. Solomon London and David
Phillips.
"This will be the last opportunity
for business and professional men
and women throughout Dade Coun-
ty to assume their responsibility to-
wards their fellow-man through
the Combined Jewish Appeal, said
Heiman, as he urged business men
to make their contributions to CJA.
"Our local health and welfare in-
stitutions need funds to continue
beneficiary agencies at home and
abroad.
Florida Author Night
To Close Series
Last program of the Miami Pub-
lic Library's Florida Author Night
1953-54 series will be held on April
29 at 8:30. Speakers will be Eve
Tellegen and Victor Lindlahr.
Miss Tellegen was born in Han-
over, New Hampshire, and was edu-
cated at the American Academy of
Dramatic Arts. She has acted in 25
Broadway plays and in three coast-
totcoast tours, lectured on personal
dynamics and has appeared on
many radio and television pro-
grams. She has also done many
opera and fashion show narrations.
Miss Tellegen has written about
2,000 scripts for WGBS, WQAM and
WTVJ.
Lindlahr was born in Kalispell,
Montana, and educated in the Chi-
cago College of Osteopathy. He was
a practicing osteopathic physician
for a number of years, then adop-
ted radio broadcasting as his pro-
fession and was food commentator
over Mutual, ABC and NBC net-
works until 1953.
Since that time he has devoted
his time exclusively to the filmed
television series, "You Are What
You Eat." He is the author of
many booklets and books on var-
ious-phases of diet and food prepar-
ation, including "Eat and Re-
duce."
Chairman of the evening will be
Helga H. Eason, head of the De-
partment of Community Relations.
ditional time is necessary, to per- ^^ this growing community
form the supervision of this ", more ,nan M nalional, over-
part ment."
Holiday Greetings to All Our Friends and Patrons
Central Press, Inc.
Utablished 1919
FINE PRINTING
wt satisfy w most ckitkal
108 N.W. Ut AVENUE
Phone 3-7611
LET'S FACE FACTS
Can Charley Johns' Opponents Name One
Benefit They Have To Offer Us in Dade County?
THE ANSWER IS "NO"
Acting Governor Charley Johns is ON RECORD to give
the people of Dade County those things we need most.
That, folks, is government with a "heart and soul."
HERE ARE THE FACTS
He Offers:
Elimination of the requirement to file Homestead fcxemp-
tion application each yeor.
Complete elimination of tcxes on Household Furniture.
A State of Florida Office Building in Miami to bring our
State government closer to us.
Replacement of old drawbridges over Miami River with
modern high-level spans or tunnels.
No Other Candidate Offers Any Of These
Benefits To The People Of Dade County
Remember
A VOTE FOR JOHNS IS
A VOTE FOR YOU
"HEART AND SOUL FOR FLORIDA"
Headquarters:
120 S. E. Third Ave.,
Phone: 9-2494
(Paid Pol. Adv.)
__. Authorized by:
Van C Kussrow, Trees.


PAGE 12 A
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|liB\wiisltU0liDipidiigun
FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 1954
SEC. B
ypt Condemned by UN
Body for Warlike' Acts
/IV (JTA Egypt has
fcdemned by the Israel-
Mixed Armistice Com-
lor warlike acts" which
flagrant violations" of
It-Israel armistice agree-
ruling came as a re-
ar attacks last Wednesday
early Thursday morning
Jjraeli patrols and Israel
|!_ including women and
L on roads and in settle-
long the Gaza strip bor-
|the raids and ambushes,
elis were killed and 20
tnded.
yptians refused to attend
Marion's meeting at which
they were condemned. At first
they insisted they had not had
enough time to read investigators
Aaron Named President
Of Jewish Welfare Board
CLEVELAND (JTA) A 1954
budget of $2,232,155 was adopted
here last week at the concluding
session of the biennial convention
gi the National Jewish Welfare
nard. The delegates also elected
Charles Aaron, Chicago attorney
and communal leader, president of
the JWB to succeed Irving Edison
of St. Louis, who was named honor-
ary vice president.
The 700 delegates called upon
welfare funds throughout the coun-
try and the New York United Jew-
ish Appeal, of which the JWB
ous situation" prevailing along the
Gaza strip on the Egyptian-Israel
enough time to read investigators" border where the raids were stae-1'"LTT"' "' """-"" l,,e i K
reports of the incidents, whereupon ed and blamed the Egyptians*? {l^TSe wiTV^tel
the United Nation. rha,rm9 f ,h- "infiltrations which have been ag-'
the United Nations chairman of the
commission gave the Egyptian
delegates two hours to study the
reports. When the Egyptians still j
refused to attend two hours later,
the Commission continued its meet-
ing and voted the condemnation.
In strong terms holding the
Egyptian authorities responsible
for the attacks, the Commission
found that the ambushes were
"carried out by Egyptian military'
or para-military forces." The Com-
mission's resolution expressed
"great concern" over "the danger-
ill to Participate in Annual Meet
itional Federation, Temple Women
tORK CITYMrs. Leon J.
West 42nd St., Miami
irho is a member of the
Board of the National
on of Temple Sisterhoods,
tcipate in its annual meet-
lational headquarters here
House of Living Judaism-
Imorial, April 26 to 30. .
Ell is a member of the or-
i's Department on Human
which is also scheduled
in connection with the
|re Board meeting.
Ihe week, a'teadership
I Institute will be conduct-
liss Jane Evans, executive
(of the NETS, which is the
Is Division ol the Union of
In Hebrew Congregations,
pal organization of Reform
htl Judaism in America.
pi the largest Jewish wom-
inizations in the world, the
1 Federation of Temple Sis-
bands together 85.000
Jin 500 Sisterhoods, serving
land humanitarian causes,
out the United States and
I of Canada, Cuba, Panama,
ped Kingdom, the Union of
Mrica and Australia.
contribution toward inter-
> understanding, the Sister-
tonduet Institutes on Juda-
IChurili Women, designed to
p them with the beliefs, tra-
^and rituals of Judaism,
ban 10,000 Christian church
I have been guests of the Na-
iFederation of Temple Sis-
|s and its local Sisterhoods
Institutes.
ng the other activities of the
Won are its work on behalf
|blind. efforts to improve in-
put relationa, the publish
various educational mate-
M the conducting of Leader-
fining Institutes.
Abram Simon, of Washing
I C who founded the NFTS
is honorary president. Mrs.
[Dalsheimer of Pikesville,
"d. is president.
gravated by the last Egyptian ag-
gressive acts."
The Commission called on the
Egyptians to "put an immediate
end" to such or other aggressive
acts, holding them violations of the
armistice agreement, demanded
that the Egyptian authorities pun-
ish those responsible for the "in-
tolerable" situation.
The MAC's ruling supported
completely the Israeli contentions,
made Friday when the UN body
was requested to hold an emer-
gency meeting, that the raids were
part of a "calculated military at-
tack" by the Egyptians.
The first of the ambushes was
staged last Wednesday night when
an Israeli military vehicle on the
Israel side of the border was fired
on near the Saad Road. An hour
expressed confidence that Ameri-
can Jewry is "determined to main-
tain and support without interrup-
tion or minimization a program of
meeting the religious and welfare
needs of our youth in the armed
forces." Similar confidence was
voiced that American Jewry is "de-
termined to make a maximum con-
tribution to the maintenance of the
highest level of civilian morale
through the support of Jewish com-
munity centers served by and af-
filiated with the JWB."
Bringing to a close the celebra-
tion of the centennial of the Jew-
ish community center movement,
the convention reaffirmed a "state-
ment of principles of Jewish cen-
ter purposes" adopted by the 1948
convention, and formulated a sup-
plementary credo. This credo de-
scribed the center "as a striking
symbol of our Jewish communal
way,
General Matthew Hiia way
Chief of Staff of the U.S.
Army, who lauded the role of tue
JWB in caring for the welfare and
morale needs of American Jewish
servicemen. Philip M. Klutznick,
president of B'nai B'rith, who also
addressed the delegates, called up-
on President Eisenhower and Sec-
retary of State Dulles to restate
the American policy of peace and
security in the Middle East.
later, an Lsraeli patrol was attack- unity;" as a "common
ed a short distance away, at Beri.
Within another hour and a half,
a civilian truck was attacked in
the same area, at Zikim. Early
Thursday morning, Egyptians at-
tempted to break into Moshav
Shouva, a settlement near Saad.
At Moshav Shouva, two hand I
grenades were tossed by the Egyp-1
tians at a building in which 17
women and children, who had at-
tended a wedding in the colony,
were taking refuge. The grenades,
like much of the spent ammunition
found at the sites of all four at- <
tacks, bore British markings and
insignia of the Egyptian armed |
forces.
place for all Jewish groups within
the community;" as an agency with
a "central and unique role in the
Jewish community, complementing
the good purposes and necessary
services of many other institutions
and organizations in Jewish life;"
as an institution to whose program
"Jewish content is fundamental;"
and a force which "furthers the
democratic way of life" and which
through its total program "seeks to
develop and enrich the human per-
sonality."
The threatened closing of the
JWB's servicemen's center in Hei-
Rabbi's Resignation Accepted
Paul Goldberg, chairman of the
Board of Zamora Jewish Center,
this week announced that the Cen-
meeting j ter nas accepted the resignation of
its spiritual leader, Rabbi Max
Landman. He said that services are
being held daily at the Center and
that arrangements are in the proc-
ess of being made with the Bureau
of Jewish Education for the con-
tinuation of the Hebrew and S-ri-
day1 Schools.
Mrt. Leen VI
Rummage Sale On
The Israelite Center is running a
rummage sale at 127 NW 5th st.
Proceeds are for the Center and
Religious School. In charge of Rum-
mage Sale is Mrs. J. Kronenberg.
Roosevelt Temple Adds
New Members Here
Roosevelt Temple No. 33, Pyth-
ian Sisters, initiated 36 new mem-
delberg, Germany, was averted, at j bers Wednesday evening.
The initiation was under the su-
least until December 31. 1954. The
club will remain open for the bal-
ance of the year even though it
means the JWB will incur a defi-
cit of $25,000, which is not in the
JWB's present budget.
Among the speakers at the con-
vention was Gen. Matthew B. Ridg-
pervision of Mrs. Morris Cotzin,
Mistress of Works and Past Chief.
In addition to regular class,
Roosevelt Temple is also initiating
12 new members lor four sister
Temples of the district.
Wing Bout to be
red at Men's Meet
Club of Temple Emanu-
hold its next meeting in
lrm of a supper on Wednes-
M>nl 28. at 7 p.m., in the
l social hall, according to
lrv'ng Cypen. president.
hon of new officers and di-
5 lr the coming year will be
following the supper. Cantor
f Brummer will render vocal
Rons.
ure of the evening's enter-
P will be the viewing of a
p- bout when Cy Gottfried,
"Ports expert, will provide
S10nal comment. Al Ossip is
chairman.
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jSumi 23N,w*sih $TRIET phone$ 3 721~3'4225


PAGE 2 B
+je!MJ!yBUL
.FRIDAY,
Brandeis Women
Set Spring Lunch
Greater Miami Chapter of the
National Women's Committee of
Brandeis University will hold an
annual spring luncheon meeting on
Friday, April 30, 12 noon at the
Algiers Hotel.
Introduction will be by Mrs. Max
, A. Schwartz, with the preface be-
ing rendered by Mrs. Alexander
' Robbins. ^
Mrs. Ben Zion Ginsburg will pre-
sent the president's report, with
election of officers following. In-
stallation will be by Rabbi Irving
Lehrman, spiritual leader of Tem-
ple Emanu-EI.
Mrs. Harold Turk is in charge of
the program. Musical renditions
will be by Mr. John Bedetti. of the
University of Miami School of
Music and internationally known
soloist of the Boston Symphony
Orchestra. Also to appear will be
Mr. Robert Strassburg, pianist,
composer and conductor.
Hostesses will be the Mesdames
Ginsburg. Turk. Aaron Farr. Eman-
uel Goldstrich. Robert Green. Alex-
ander Robbins. Nathan Strauss.
Harold Thurman. Sidney Aronovitz,
.Martin Belle.
The Mesdames Jean C. Lehman.
Seymour Satin. Ralph Spero. Mil
ton-Sirkin. Harry Platoff. Julian
Weinkle. Donald Rubin. Sidney
Schwartz. Meyer Kggnatz. Joseph
Duntov and John Temple
Officers of the chapter, in addi-
tion to Mr>. Ginsburg, are the lies
dames Turk, honorary president; j
Alexander Robbins. Robert Green, j
Aaron Parr, Emanuel Goldstrnh.
Nathan Strauss and Harold Thur-
man. vice presidents. Sidney Aro-j
novitz. treasurer: Martin Belle, re-[
cording secretary; Jean C. Leh-
man, corresponding secretary; Sey-
mour Satin, financial secretary;
and Ralph Spero. assistant tinan
Cial secretary.
Horton Stepa
I p 4 umpaiqn
Mallory H. Horton. candidate for |
circuit judge, (iroup Five, stepped
up his campaign this week with a
schedule of speaking engagements
which will take him throughout the
(Jreater Miami area. Michael I.sen-
berg. Morton's campaign treasurer,
said here.
A former special agent for the
FBI, Horton served as assistant
state attorney general in Miami
from 1949 to 1952. He is making
his first bid for elective office in
the current campaign.
The candidate has been a resi-
dent of Dado County since 1925
and is a native Floridian. He at-
tended local elementary schools
and high schools and was gradu-
ated from the University of Miami
Law School in 1936.
During his term as assistant at-
torney general. Horton was report-
edly instrumental in enforcement
of the "bookie wire bill."
Mm* Ormilti
Annual Meeting at
Mount Sinai Set
Max Orovitz. president, this week j
announced that the 5th annual j
meeting of Mount Sinai Hospital
will be held Thursday evening.
April 29. 8 p.m., at Mount Sinai, i
4300 Alton rd.
An original one at-r pray entitled
"An Annual Report Come to Life."
written and produced by Mrs. Syl- ]
via Chertkof, director of public re-
lations at Mount Sinai, will be pre-
sented The cast includes the First
Drama Tri... with Mrs Cershon Mil-
ler. Boris I'ntcher and Bob Lyons.
Mrs. Miller is director.
Additional cast and staging will
unhide (iershon Miller. Mrs. Rey-
nolds Olin and Miss Harriet Kap-
lan
Samuel Gertner. executive direc-
tor oi the hospital, met here with
the committee for the meeting to
complete plans for the e\ent. The
committee includes Joseph Rose,
chairman. Joseph Lipton and David
Phillips.
It was also announced here that
the Women's Auxiliary will act as
hostesses and serve refreshments.
Rrgitttration for
Bay Vampn.
Half tomplete
One hundred fifty boys and girls
have already been enrolled for the
three summer day camps of the
Greater Miami Jewish Community
Center in a record breaking first
three weeks of registration, it WSJ
announced by Emanuel Tropp. di
rector of activities.
These enrollment figures far
exceed any previous experience in
signing up children for Center day
camps this early in the year,"
Tropp said.
The enrollment thus far brings
the Center camping program up to
half its capacity of three hundred.
The staff of these camps, which
totals 52 group leaders and super-
visors, is nearly complete at this
time, with only a few openings re-
maining for male counselors, Tropp
added.
Arrangements are now being
made for the use of swimming
pool facilities to provide an inten-
sive program of swimming instruc-
tion for all campers.
GMJCC-Hialeoh Leisure
Time Program Revealed
Greater Miami Jewish Commu-
nity Center and Hialeah-Miami
Springs Jewish Center have con-
cluded a joint agreement for lei-
sure-time services.
Stanley C. Meyers and Harold
Kravitz, presidents of the organ-
izations, announced the initiation
of GMJCC's professional guidance
of the Hialeah program under Her-
bert Soule. extension supervisor.
Already under way are the "Is-
raelites," a club for boys ages nine
through 11, meeting every Friday
afternoon at the Hialeah Jewish
Center under the leadership of
GMJCC's health and physical edu-
cation supervisor, Abraham Koch
stein.
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1*01 S.W. 23rd Ave.. Ph. 4S-411S
'pOilMpHI ''Sat^OV *tJ1
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Let's Look At
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Heard and disposed of more]
than 15.000 important cases
awing bis 11 yean oe the]
bench.
Re-Elect ___
CIRCUIT JUDGE
MARSHALL C
WISEHEARJ
A POOD JUIXH WITH A GOOD *^^j
4A ?amp.****** *|
PULL
LKVIR


I APRIL 23, 1954
bHMnnriraM
PAGE 3 B
lents Alerted
to Support
[5OOO Jewish residents in
vjami were alerted this
be rcadv for a visit from
Tr in behalf of the Greater
bmbined Jewish Appeal.
; to an announcement
[K. Shochet, publisher of
|sh Floridian and general
I of the CJA Committee of
Idred. two streamlined vol-
]roups have been organized
emaining prospects to tell
of CJA's services and to
Ltributions for support of
bal campaign.
|ign chairman Aaron M.
I joining with Shochet in
dination of the final drive
General Mobilization Divi-
|id that "Workers in the
lees of One Hundred on the
jd in town will visit all
fc wherever they are, with-
raphic restriction."
|so announced that all mo-
chairmen, vice chairmen
n supervisors will be out
Moor bells in an effort to
maximum coverage no mat-
te prospects reside. Auto-
Beets have been organized
outlying areas and to fa-
swift cleanup and to bring
feminity phase of the cur-
jipaign to a successful con-
Ibefore May 6, the date set
j>aign officials for a final
tally.
J few days, a neighbor will
|you in behalf of the Great-
ni Combined Jewish Ap-
Jjochet and Kanner said. "If
le a moment, he'll tell you
Aoric and courageous strug-
[economic independence in
Sell tell you of border dan-
fmers who till the soil car-
ries for protection, children
Bad their daily walk to the
louse.
also tell you of a miracle
iocracy, of 700,000 Jews
pf houses built, of the sick
and of freedom surging
wing. And he'lf tell you of
tn Jewish community in
Miamihow a generous
ution will keep the doors
I Mount Sinai Hospital, Jew
ne for the Aged, the On-
Jewish Social Service
from your heart. In this
prough the Combined Jewish
, you will help preserve hu-
fenity everywhere."
fee J. Talianoff, Miami
chairman of the Committee
1 Hundred, and George Chert-
pmi chairman, are confident
will be instrumental in
|he streamlined volunteer
for CJA Callers;
Final Drive
bringing the community drive to
its 1954 quota.
Workers who have gone forward
immediately after the successful i
M-Day drive to enlist as volunteers
in the Committee of One Hundred
include Sallie Alexander. Gilbert J.
Balkin, Mrs.' Icviug Cypen, Edna
B. Finberg, David Freedmah,
Mayshe Friedberg, Seymour Gel-
ber, Jacob Grunberg, Al Hellman,
Isaac Hirsch, Ida Horowitz, Nina
Lazebnik, Zipporah Levine. Lena
Mintzes, Abraham Morris, Henry
Nadelman, Gil Rappaport, Sally
Rosen, Eugene J. Schwarz, Harry
Seligman, J. Z. Stadlan.
Pauline Thurston, Raymond L.
Wise. Mrs. Ella Wollman, Mr. and
Mrs. Henry Seitlin, A. Budd Cutler,
Irving Strauss. Tobias Simon, Isi-
dore Cohen. Belle Levin, Mr. and
Mrs. Hyman Kam, Esther Good-
man, Abraham Swartz, Lillian
Goodman, Jack Regal, Oscar Rap-
paport, Harry Gordon, Mrs. Simon
April.
Rudolph E. Briu, Mrs. Jessie
Gertman, Mrs. Fannie Kay, Mr. and
Mrs. Morris Laster, B. H. Liberman,
Harry Nissel, Robert L. Robinson.
Mrs. Minnie Rosen, A. P. Rosen-
berg, Irving Saal. Betty Schneider,
Mr. and Mrs. M. Seeman. Mrs. Celia
Segal, Oscar Zeltzer and Jacob Vic-
tor.
|Board to Meet
of the Beth David Syna-
[PTA will meet on Monday
April 26, 8 p.m., at the
Pf Mrs Nathan Davidow, 333
po ave.. Coral Gables.
Compare
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with any other brand
ffAlff*/
ten Compare
ETIEY TEA
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trWK!
JSSB Plans
Annual Meeting
Leon Kaplan, chairman of the
Nominating Committee of the Jew-
ish Social Service Bureau, this
week announced his committee's
slate of nominees to the Board of
Directors of that agency.
Nominated for reelection are
Mrs. Moe Feingold, Mrs. Stanley C.
Myers, Judge William Pallot, Dr.
Emanuel Pushkin, Herbert E. Scher
and Mrs. Monte Selig. Being pro-
posed as new members of the
Board of Directors are Mrs. David
Kirsch, Morris Klass, Alexander
Rubin, Dr. Stanley Weinkle and
Bernard Wexler.
Election of directors to the
Board of the Jewish Social Service
Bureau will be held at the annual
membership meeting of the Jewish
Social Service Bureau scheduled as
a Sunday morning brunch on May
9, at 18:30 a.m. This year, the meet-
ing of the Bureau returns to Miami
Beach and will take place at the
Shelborne Hotel.
Mrs. Stanley C. Myers, president,
said that the meeting will be or-
ganized around the general theme
of "New Chapters in the JSSB
Story" and will include reports to
the Jewish community on the re-
cently developed program of voca-
tional service and on the question
of a Jewish foster care program.
Listen To
SCHACHTER'S
New Yiddish Program
fvtry Sunday, WMBM. 11 **
This rtrom I* tfca "- "* **
largest listening aoSiaeCa
'torts Jtwlih Pallasae-tr
NORMAN R. LYONS. News
HAROLD TURK, Caaacitaes. earf
SNOSHANA VKTOt
Members of Pioneer Women's Organization, Club No. 2, will
be honored for their activity in behalf of numerous local phil-
anthropic and cultural programs here. Shown are Millie Win-
ner and Pearl Gratz, first and second vice chairmen of Moetzot
Hapaolot; Sophie Krantz. chairman of ways and means; and
Rose Aster and Rose D. Yong, co-chairmen of Jewish National
Fund. On the committee of arrangements are Ida Powell,
president; Lena Mintzes, chairman of Moetzot Hapaolot; and
Ida Bookspan. the chairman.
< ll.lllllH'l- V.IIII.'S
Coniniittoo Heads
Committee chairmen appoint-
ments for the Miami Beach Cham-
ber of Commerce were announced
this week by Freeland B. Cresap,
president.
Heading the Advertising Com-
mittee is Herb Gimbel, of the Herb
Gimbel Company, who announced
a meeting of his committee will be
held during the last week in April.
Activities of the Safety Commit-
tee were designated to Allen Lip-
kin, replacing Burton Kahn, now
a Board member. A meeting of the
new Safety Committee will be held
8:15 a.m., April 26, in the Sea Gull
Hotel.
Others named were Harry Zuck
ernick, Civic Affairs; Leo Eisen-
stein, Courtesy; H. Earl Smalley,
Jr., Cruise Club; Roy E. Jones, Edu-
cation; Ike Parrish, Hospitality;
Don Mucklow, Marine; E. N. Mat-
thews, National Affairs; Col.
Charles G. Mettler and Porter Nor-
ris, Pan American; Budd A. Mayer,
Sports; Carl T. Hoffman, State It
County Affairs; Milo Bennett,
Transportation; Ray Sterling and
Gus Geiger, Zoning.
Dr. Martinez to Speak
At Spinoza Forum
Dr. J. M. Martinez, author of
"Man in Nature and Behavior," will
be guest speaker on Saturday after-
noon, 3:30 p.m., at the Spinoza Out-
door Forum on trie 'awn of the
home of Dr. Abraham Wolfson,
11th st. and Ocean ct. Dr. Martinez
will review his book and answer
questions. Irving Strauss, artist,
will preside. Julius Frank, of Mi-
ami Beach, will speak briefly on
mathematical recreations.
MIAMI BEACH
1104 Lincoln Rd.
Ph. 5 3812
SUIFSWE
9473 Hording Ava.
Ph. 16 6171
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George E.
HOLT
Nineteen Continuous
Years Public Service
Law Maker
Six Yean a
Legislator
Tried
Thirteen Years a
Circuit Court Judge
Experienced
Associate Justice
Florida
Supreme Court
Proven
Law Professor
Civic Leader
Lawyer
Benefactor
Retain
George E.
HOLT
CIRCUIT COURT
JUDGE
GROUP 1


PAGE 4B
ITUDAY
Full Text Of ADL Report On Anti-Semitism In Ge
*.
(EDITOR'S NOTB: Follow-In* are
MkIiIIkIUs of what is believed to *
the most intensive invesilKallnn of ItH
kind made In American \isitor tit
(ierntany alnre the end of Work) war
II. This statement Is issued thinUKh
HICOQ office ,>f the United Btatee
High Commissioner for ilciinany
on completion "t one-month study
tour at tin- imitation of the IVcl.-ral
Republic of Germany by Jacob AJaon,
treasurer. Itenjamtn It Epstein, na-
tional dlrectora ami Nathan C, Keith.
national public relatlona director of
the Anti-Defamation Least.....f B'nal
B'rith. All are from N",\\ rork Cltj I
During the past month we have
had atn opportunity to visit eight
of the major cities of West Ger-
many including Berlin. We have
talked with a great many leaders in
German public life in govern-
ment, in the political parties, in
civic work, religion and education.
We have also consulted with writ-
ers, editors, political commentators.
Finally, we have spoken extensive-
ly with Americans in Germany, of-
ficials of our government and oth-
ers; and with leaders of the tiny-
Jewish communities that remain or
have been revived in Germany.
We concerned ourselves primar-
ily with two matters: (li current
developments in the attitude of
Germans toward civil rights and
the democratic processes; (2) con-
ditions of life among the remain-
ing ,22 to 25 thousand Jews in Gar-
many. A concomitant matter of
course was the question of Jewish-
Christian relationships in the coun-
try.
We found no simple answers to
our question-, for Germany today
on the issue. Thus the government homes and other ,n u^nsJ^J
was able to put through the Israeli very few fj^*j^ff8w
German restitution program ami ^**J*^J^gg.
to act favorably upon pensions, and rebirth of .a nourishing Jewish life
restitutions for Jews in Germany < are poor indeed unle.s_there is a
and upon government subsidies for marked change in trends But tl1c
Jewish communal services without few mho continue tOJ^OTtoOer-
at any time having tangibly expre* many are in the main older peoph
sed popular support for the.-e
measures. Israeli representative-
informed us that theJ3onn author!
ties have been not only correct but
helpful in all facets of Israeli Ger
who'can live out their days with
some comfort through their pen-
sion- or restored property.
At the same time, we have been
heartened by what we regard as
man negotiations. In our own dis jne initial development in free Ger-
cu.-.-ions we have found reflection many ot a healthy complex of vol-
of this attitude on the part of gov- j untary organizations of citizens de-
ernment leaders. President Theo-, voted to promoting an understand-
dor Html' statement that Germans jnR ()( the democratic processes,
must accept "collective shame" for liberal education, civic affairs and
what happened under the Nazi re inter religious cooperation. No
gime has been taken seriously in i democratic society, we believe, can
government circles and has result-' succeed without effective partici-
ed in official acts seeking to make pation in public affairs by the
some amends for the tragedy of great mass of citizens, and this can
the Hitler period.
The assurances, however, which
only be done through a multiplicity
of such voluntary civic groups. We
we have received in some quarters j have had the opportunity to meet
that anti-Semitism no longer exist"
in Germany are not borne out by
the evident facts. Most Germans.
it i- true, are embarrassed by Hi -
iu--ion of Nazi persecutions; they
seek to avoid it and block it out
of their minds. And indeed it is
cruel memorv. But it is too much
a considerable number of educa-
tors, ministers, liberals and public-
spirited people who have taken the
initiative in the development of
such organizations. They face a
formidable task. They are hamper-
ed by lack of resouroes, and by con-
siderable resistance among older
to expect that a generation subject- people. They are placing their
ed to the Intensive anti-Semitic in-j faith in the youth. As one such
doctrinal ion of the Nazi- should so leader said to us: "In Germany
quickly rid itself of it- deep -seated democracy is always ordered after
hate- Opinion-testing since the ; a lost war." As a result, he points
war ha- at no time revealed a out that the average German does
otters a very complicated sociaj Kroat lessening of anti-Semitism in not accept the responsibility of par-
p.cture. It i- a nation which, after ,hl. ,r,Hlp uh|(h ,.,.,, ,hrmIJ,n |hp tlclpallon m dlscusslon of publlc
".'.,','1 ':::'::.':..I"'! ^i'": ": Way -N';'" Piod. Public incidents in- affairs. Another, who is primarily
volving Jewish matters have often concerned with civil rights, declar-
out from under the rubble of war
and at the same time is enjoying
a flourishing business boom, It is
till an occupied country, hut has
achieved a striking amount of in-
brought forth further evidence of
tin- anti-Semitic feeling. Only
among the youth that knew not
Hitler doe- reliable opinion-te-tmy
ed that many Germans understand
0 little of their basic civil rights
that they rarely question the ruling
of the most potty official. "During
' lev en ",n re,;.; *"? S2 '"> f anti-Semitic the Nazi period, people just forgot
ma eleven million refugees pr,.jUdICe. Indeed, the degree to what civil rights were!"
trom the East, nut shows no signs u.u.nh h v.,,, ... j j .u
.., .......i ..... ......., w hull the Na/i- succeeded in their AmnnP th<>> nmnonr oii r.
ot .-ocial unrest despite crowded
condition- and considerable unem-
ployment; and particularly in Ber
lin which i- i frontier bastion
against communism in the cold
war. Equally important are MOM
less tangible factors which affect
the thinking and the action- of
German- German- them-elve-
indoctrination i- revealed by the
fact that, despite the war cata-tro
phe. (iermans do not reject Na/i-m
with the same intensity with which
they reject the parallel authontar
iani-m and tyranny of communism.
Nevertheless, it should be stated
that at the pre-ent time neo-Naz-
have commented to u- upon the ">m a,1(' NaiiaiM as organized politi
country's failure thlU far to throw ''''' '',v''ment appear to be at very
oil the habit of traditionalism vwth lnw eDO At ,he las< general elec-
ItS -tiong feudal and authoritarian ""ns ,hrst' element* did not suc-
coloration Likewise many Ger-JCew' in r,',ur"ing a -ingle repre-
mans seem to suffer from a haunt s<'" ing sense of shame or guilt, ac- Adenauer government's succe-- m
companied by a deep sense of their ,lu' GOnomic field has served to
own rectitude that can only be <""' ,he Rund from under the
con-idered as psychological com- Nazi-minded Par,"'s
pensatlon. Our saddest experience- of
This perhaps explain- on the one Course related to our visits with
hand the cleavage we have found "ur co-religionista of the reestab-
between Germans generally and ''Nnpfl Jewish communities The
their government in matter- of r,'mn;,nt "t the once proud and
Jewish restitution, .mil on the oth- dynamic Jewish community of Ger-
er hand the government- ability "^a^ '" n"w reduced to about j
to proce
lack of
Among these pioneer civic or-
ganizations, we have found excel-
lent programs projected by par-
ents' associations, civil rights
groups, church and ministerial or-
ganizations, and the Gesellschaft
fur Chri-tlich-Judische Zusammen-
arbelt A source of considerable
support and stimulation for these
groups is the Bundeszentrale fur
Heimatdienst, an agency of the
Federal government which pre-
pares and disseminates educational
materials on democratic concepts
and practices. It utilizes all of the
media of mass education; its pro-
gram is sound. This agency has
made a major contribution to a
er hand the governments ability >"<"> IS now reduced to about
to proceed with it- policy despite ^f'0^0, p,pl' "f an average age
lit i ,, close to 60. Ihese people live un-
lack_ of outspoken public support to themselves very largely on -mall
SUNRAYPARK
HEALTH RESORT
HOTCl- SANITARIUM
ace am cowwusscsmcb"
MIAMI r LOR IDA
I WANT MY MILK
stipends provided by government
pensions, funds realized through
re-titutions of property or outright
relief subventions Even this small
community, however, maintain- it-
synagogues, hospitals, old age
See or Phone Me
NAT GANS
3-4S16 4-tMl
LIFE INSURANCE NEEDS
Metropolitan Life Ina. Co.
S07 Blecayne Bidg.
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General Repair on all Make Trurk. Caf#
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M
IAMI TITLC
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THIe Intereace Pelkiet ef
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124 SHORELAND ARCADE
TELEPHONE 9-1892
knowledge among the masses of
Germans of the horrible persecu
tions that took place under the
Nazis. Its effectiveness however is
limited by the size of its somewhat
inadequate budget.
In our inquiries, we sought to
pay special attention to the prob-
lem of teaching in the elementary
and high schools. We found every-
where among leaders in the educa-
tional field a recognition that the
hidebound traditionalism of Ger-
man schools is a stumbling block
to the democratization of Germany
The authoritarian spirit that pre-
vails in the schools, the stress on
the mere accumulation of informs
tion rather than discussion.and in
dependence of thought, and the
embarrassment with which most
teachers approach the teaching of
recent history, so that in effect
their teaching stops with the era
of Bismarck, are all factors in the
situation.
We have found, however, that
forward-looking school supervisors
have sought to grapple with this
problem in the past three or four
years. Many new and fine texts
have been prepared for use in so-
cial studies and civics classes cov-
ering the history of the past 20
years. Modern teaching techniques
as we know them in the United
States, have been encouraged.
These innovations, however, meet
great resistance among the senior
teaching group and even among \
younger teachers who have been j
brought up on the old traditional j
methods. As the school superin-
tendent of one major city told us:
"The picture has improved since
1945. but it is still questionable
how many teachers follow through.
I am not optimistic, but I am hope
ful that we are moving ahead."
It should be remembered that
he Nazis ptkt ^
teacher, JT *2*
*>n>e -J these JM
Wn readily be*
about the Jewish
a Particular prob|W
d they Z
hough some of UvTb,
the events and Jfl
and bestiality of Jfl
Nevertheless, loo ,>
d""e in the school.,*
latent anti-Semiiisn,.
checks show is p^
he youngest groups j,
tion.
Memorial
To bo
Sisterhood of tBM
Jewish Center will
rial Pulpit Bible to u
memory of Clara *^_
mer officer and megfe]
Education Committee, (|
over Memorial Servim*a
tcr on Sunday, April i,l
The Bible will be |
Mrs. Sam Goodman, |
the Sisterhood, and tu,
ed by Rabbi Morris A, L
the -Center The Bible it|
for all scripture readispf
out the year. The gift hI
with the names of I
cers.
Sigma Delta Tn til
Election of officers l
by the Sigma Delta Tal
League at its regular i
Tuesday evening, April 8,1
Emanuel Goldstnch. Ml
ave., will be hostess at uel
meeting.
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HONEY BREAD and HONEY
Made from rye flour and honey
without the use of fat, sugar or
syrup. Calorie count of 58 per
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recommended for low-sodium I
Oisfriftefee' by
C0CHRAN DISTRIBUTING CO., 161 N.E. 30th |
SPACE NOW RENTII
(OFFICE and STORE)
1400 N.W. 36th STREET
Space In this new, modem, air conditioned buildi*
th Allapattah Branch office of Dado Federal Sarief
and Loan Association of Miami is now a*
ailabk"
selBct tBnanU. Elevator SBrvica to offices on
thai
bai*
floor is providod. Part ol tho second floor space
columns designed for mombers oi the medical pr^;
ion. Tho Allapattah Branch of the Miami IJJJ
Library will toon occupy space on the around ^
Othor spacs suitable lor oxclusive shops
available. *
LARGE FREE OFF-STREET PARKING AREA
DADE FEDER
SAVINGS
AND LOAN

anno
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For Inlormation Inquire Mr. Butcher or ^
Dado FbobtoI Sayings. 1440 N.W. 36th SW*
6S-S448.
BROKERS PROTECTED


PHIL 23. 1954
bBAL SHORTS
^Jfml^n^tf^
PAGE 5B

omic Assistance to
fbe Cut Drastically
fcGTON (JTA) State
It sources unofficially
Reports that Israel's eco-
tcchnical assistance al-
ibi- year will be substan-
tial!. They refused to
on specific reports that
L 1 will be drastically cut
Li 70 million dollars ap-
]a >car to somewhere be-
JBnil 50 millions this year.
Jto an Associated Press
|e total for the Middle
he new year will be about
0. of which Iran will re-
looo.ooo.
German Jews Mark Allied
Liberation of Nazi Survivors
HAMBURG (JTA) Solemn me-
morial services in various parts of
Germany marked the ninth anni-
versary of the liberation of Nazi
concentration camps which fell in-
to the hands of victorious Allied
troops on V-E Day in 1945. At the
towering shaft of the Bergen-Bel-
seo memorial, a group of Jews
from Hamburg, Hanover and other
cities, assembled to bow their
heads and hear prayers.
Parliament Passes
pension for Refugees
(JTA) A second gov-
mendment to the Social
, Act. providing pension ]
in emigrants who were
J to leave Austria for po-
Bifiious or racial reasons,
adopted by Parliament
government eliminated
tory restrictive clauses
| draft bill. The bill orig-
| excluded from the bene-
i measure emigrants who
Iti.kI to Austria in 1951
land had remained in the
bore than 90 days.
British Commonwealth
Jewish Groups Meet
LONDON (JTA) A conference
of representatives of Jewish organ-
izations throughout the British
Commonwealth is being convened
here for June 20th, it was announc-
ed here by Dr. Abraham Cohen,
president of the Board of Deputies
of British Jews. Details of the
conference agenda have not yet
been finalized, Dr. Cohen said, but
representatives are expected to
come here from many Jewish com-
munal organizations in the Com-
monwealth, Dr. Cohen told a Board
meeting.
in Bonn Government
Deter British Support
)N (JTA) The British
ent has rejected sugges-
it refuse to support Ger-
rmament or membership
uropean Defense Commu-
allegedly notorious ex-
re removed from the West
ICovernment. Arthur Lew-
M.P.. who raised the is-
bged that VYaldemar Kraft,
Twithout portfolio, Emanu-
kkt r. Minister of Housing,
jodor Oberlander, Minister
tiled Persons, in the Ade-
Jlbinet had all been mem-
the Hitler Elite Guard.
(iticizes Rabbi Salit's
at Lunch
[YORK (JTA) The action
liorman Salit, president of
pgogue Council of Amer-
voiced criticism of the
(Nations handling of Arab-
Jfaputes at a State Depart-
fct Office Department lun-
ln Washington last week,
fcrply criticized in a state-
Jsued hereby the American
[Committee. The statement
ft. Salit's comments on that
"a grievous offense
I the spirit of international
lican Senators,
Issmen Ask Act Change
BTNGTON (JTA) Three
Ml Senators and five Re-
in members of the House
|ti) introduce a bill to rewrite
^Carran Walter Immigration
*e bill would remove the
pees specified by President
fwer in his April 6, 1953
F Sen. Arthur V. Watkins,
m of the Senate Immigrat-
Pbeommittee. It would end
Jura' Mid administrative in-
P that have appeared in the
Ps< rat ion of the law and
1 Provide for the pooling of
quotas.
American Zionists Welcome
View on Arab-Israel Dispute
WASHINGTON (JTA) The po-
sition taken by the United States
in the Security Council in calling
for a full review of Arab-Israel re-
lations was welcomed last weekend
by the American Zionist Council
for Public Affairs. In a statement
by Louis Lipsky. chairman of the
group, the council said it welcomed
"the position taken by Ambassa-
dor Henry Cabot Lodge for the
United States delegation at the Se-
curity Council calling for a review
of the entire Arab-Israel conflict."
Israeli Minister in Paris
Confers with Georges Bidault
PARIS (JTA) Foreign Minister
Georges Bidault last weekend re-
ceived Israeli Minister Yaacov Tsur
in what was described as a "most
cordial" interview concerning the
Israel-Arab conflict and its consid-
eration by the United Nations Se-
curity Council. It is understood
that M. Bidault was deeply con-
cerned with Israel's desire to relax
the tensions along its borders and
its desire for a final peace settle-
ment with the Arabs.
I Cabinet Considers
on Gaza Strip
A'SAI.KM (JTA) The Israel
| considered the situa-
Pons the Israel-Egyptian bor
W a area Allowing a
P" W the Israel-Egyptian
I Armistice Commission to
'" Uypt for four attacks
territory. The Ministers
Tmiw an in,erim budget
n'"W Pounds for develop-
[1Purposes for the next two
0 keeP Projects now in
" ir"m closing down. The
expenditures will be pre-
,or approval to the Parlia-
"New Name Dance" \
Due Here Sunday
A "New Name Dance" is sched-
uled by the Young Adult Group of
Temple Emanu-El for Sunday,
April 25, at 9 p.m., in the Social
Hall of the Temple.
The dance will celebrate the
group's change of name from the
Young Adult Group of the Miami
Beach Jewish Center in accord-
ance with the change in name of
the congregation.
Heading the social committee is
Debbie Graboyes, assisted by Ar-
lene Weisblatt, Bob Stone, Donald
Marks, Phyliss Goldstein, Sue
Schepper and Elaine Schwartzman.
Some of the many guests currently in Miami Beach for the
holiday season seen vacationing at Andron's Loon Lake Hotel,
located 1,800 feet high in the pollen-free Adirondacks. Loon
Lake Hotel is operated under the ownership-management of
David S. Andron and Dave Levinson, two prominent Miami
Beach hotelmen.
Bond Sales on Rise, Dade Chairman Says
service) purchases, now add up to
$17,723,970, which is 11.9 percent
ahead of the same period last year,
Harry H. Bassett. chairman of
the Savings Bonds Committee for
Dade County, this week said that
the sale of E and H bonds had tak
en a sharp rise in Florida during
the month of March.
The sales in Dade County were
$1,264,165 for the month, while the
statewide volume was $5,603,109,
an increase of 31.9 percent over
March of last year.
Savings Bond sales for the first
three months of 1954, including
the state's pro-rata share of Fed-
eral employee (uniformed and civil
Bassett said.
Zionists, Progressives in
Israel Confer on Single Slate
TEL AVIV (JTA) Negotiations
between the General Zionists and
the Progressive Party leading to
submission of a single list in the
next elections to the Israel Par-
liament have been proceeding
here. Dr. Nahum Goldmann, chair-
man of the Jewish Agency Execu-
tive, presided at two meetings here
of representatives of the two cen-
trist parties to discuss this co-
operation, it was learned.
Jews in Poland Must
Indicate Zionist Affiliation
LONDON (JTA) Polish Jews
are required to indicate whether
they have ever belonged to "any
Zionist party" in applying for new
identification cards which all Pol-
ish citizens will have to carry in
the future, according to a report
received here from Warsaw. Ap-
plicants for these cards must fill
out a form answering about tw
questions. In answer to one ques-
tion, the applicant must indicate
whether he has ever belonged to
a Fascist movement. The very next
ouestion poses "Zionist party af-
filiation. _
Dulles and Eden Discuss
Israel Border Difficulties
LONDON (JTA) The situation
in the Middle East, with special
reference to the position along the
frontiers of Israel, was the main
subject discussed today a a meet-
ing of Secretary of State John Fos-
ter Dulles and Foreign Secretary
Anthony Eden, according to a for-
eign Office announcement.
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i

PAGE 6 B
kSs!mU^&&=
nan
A Story for the Passover
By SONIA KLINE
I loneliness,
"he night air caressed his OVer. on the night of the first
cheeks. The darkness had already Seder, was to be truly alone,
cloaked the tops of the distant I
mountains of Jordan, creating a'
black void in the shadowy night.
He stood not far from the precious
water tower, his fingers twined
through the rifle sling, surveying
the horizon.
He tried to stop thinking any
thoughts that might deflect his
seise of caution. Tonight he was
from the immigrant camp.
They had warned him of the
. danger But they had also said that
He was back at the watertojer; ^^ ^ m^ ,
now, looking upward past l^ f ^J Ujjderncss to be won. Courage was
girders to the big concrete vatthat j ^ w>$ ^ nee(J.
held the vital water Twice in the Frecdom {rom te and true
last month, border marauders had ; neyer won b ,he ,,,
tried to filter through to the set- P*
would be in serious trouble
He dared not let his eyes stay-
immigrant camp. He had come
thousands of miles, shifting from
one DP camp to another. His son
...try. the eye of protection for J ,nv one t Perhaps to- one W camp>o a"" "~
Hu, ira ttimpnt Nearlv a I,XV! .. ....... j ^ h ,m had even been born in a DP camp.
the entire settlement. Nearly a
. dred lives, including those of
Us own wife and young son. rested
in he balance of his alertness. He
breathed deeply of the dead night,
listening for strange sounds among
the living breath of the wilder-
nei s.
The tide of his thoughts swept
in around him as he walked the
.lit from the water tower to the
furthest edge of the "safe terri-
Sometimes they intruded. A
swell of sadness would suddenly
. gulf him. Perhaps if he had not
been hardened to bitter storms of
terror and tragedy, he might have
d ed.
was not terror and tragedy, or
even danger that bothered him
He pulled up the collar of
hi jacket as the cooler night air
began t" sweep in from the hills
Ht felt alone, utterly alone and
m not far off down the dirt road.
Sarah and David sat at the Seder
. le Tonight was the first Seder
tonight was his turn at guard
luty. Perhaps he felt unduly sorrj
!i : him-elf. he thought. But even
night OMIMMM^5J *jj : displaced. without a country to call
h.rnseir Jldttoj nd a sad ^ > ^ (hought about
disheartened /*)**' u"' long and hard before he made
had reasoned. They were paying
ung
and clicked off the safety. He
listened. There was only the fa-
miliar hush of the wilderness. Ts-
sured that it was safe, he swung
the rifle back over his shoulder
and continued his walk
Sometimes a dissonant voice
his way because they had faith in
his courage.
He remembered how he had
been unable to sleep, how he had
risen in the middle of the night
and walked through the maze of
would well up from the settlement ^ pathways that ^p.^ed the
beyond, carried on a puff of breeze
He thought of his son David ask-
ing the four questions ... to whom.
to whom could a son ask the four
questions A father's place is with
hi- son at the Seder, he told him-
self, feeling a nerve in his jaw-
begin to palpitate.
Why was all this, he asked him-
self. It was a question he frequent-
ly asked. Tonight he asked it in
a soft whisper to the black night.
He had come to Israel in search
of peace, but there was no peace.
One never gets used to danger, he
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tin huts of the immigrant camp.
All these people, he had thought,
brought here out of misery^ .
and in return only faith, blind
faith in the future of an idea, and
in the courage of the people who
would carry it out.
It was because in some undefined
way he felt that he must pay this
debt of courage that they had come
to the border settlement. And here
he was walking about in the dead
of night, with a weapon of death
ready to fire at a hairsbreadth. And
it was Passover, the night of the
first Seder. It was this thought
that made him doubt his courage.
He reached the highest point of
the area, stood upon it and sur-
veyed the horizon. Beyond in the
darkness was another land from
which men had come to pillage and
destroy. He must be watchful, he
told himself, fighting hard against
the temptation to run back down
the dirt road to the settlement. He
heard a rustle among the dunes
ahead and cocked his rifle again.
He swung in a semi-circle to the
direction of the sound. He stood
deathly still, breathing softly. The
sound stopped. Lifting his foot,
he took a step forward and had
just time to see the jackal jump
into the clear and away into the
brush.
He sighted with relief and put
the rifle back on his shoulder, wip-
ing the cold sweat from his fore-
head with the end of his sleeve.
This would be the perfect time for
something to happen, he thought,
feeling the sweat drip down his
back, chilling him. He was de-
pressed and his depression was
making him jittery, perhaps trig-
ger happy. Why was he out here,
he asked himself? Why? On Pass-
over Why?
These were the thoughts he must
fight against. How far along in
the Seder were they now? To miss
a Pattern Seder. His first Seder
in Israel, because of this. He pat-
ted the rifle sling and shook his
head. Even in the DP camp they
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*. W. Wafer,
had carried on the traditions of the
holiday, holding a Seder in a suit
able comer of the barracks. He
shivered at the thought Now he
was getting maudlin. He laughed
at himself.
He waa still fighting against the
bitterness that was chipping away
at his composure when be beard
the kicking of the pebbles. The
sound was coming from the jtoaQ
that led to the settlement. He put
bis ear to the ground waiting for
the rhythm of the sounds. Yes,
they were footsteps, he observed
quietly to himself. He stood up
and unslung his rifle again. Soon
the intruder would approach. If
it was a friend, he would shortly
give the long low whistle of recog-
nition. One had to watch both di-
rections carefully.
If it is a friend, he told himself
cocking his rifle again, he will
stop short at the post, about fifty
feet from the tower. He would
give the whistle then get the re-
turn. If there was no whistle there
would be trouble.
The steps came closer, quick
steps, with no pretense of cau-
tion. He estimated where the steps
should stop and looked into the
blackness ahead, still unable to see
a form emerge. Then he saw a
form, slight, quick, perhaps a small
man, almost running. The form
went beyond the post. It was al-
most to the water tower, the pre-
cious water tower.
He would have to act quickly
before the person could reach the
tower. Even then, a neatly placed
bomb would make his efforts fruit-
less.
"Stop or I shoot," he called into
the black night. His heart beat
wildly. His finger drew in the
slack of the trigger. The footsteps
stopped.
"Who are you?" he called again
relieved that the figure obeyed his
command.
"Father it's David. Your son
David."
He swallowed hard and slid the
safety catch swiftly into place
Then he swung the rifle back on
bis shoulder.
"Can I come now?" David asked.
"Come," he said, against his bet-
ter judgment. He must be doubly
"reful now win,
"F>u*'." I.TL
came closer. "*'
the rittdowy"^
,osca>thehor^^l,,,
7 brouttt son, sv.
S'der, Father," tjuT**
,n8 "P a doth bgti,"1
swne ***** m^
*e wine MdT,"
toes." m'*l
He was deeph iraw.,'3
? to benddo^ff
hands around his so, Jj
ed not show any en-7j
t only took nWi
thing to happen
"Thank you, Dart-
starting again on kj.,
walk. HefeHthsw,?
beside him. He didnl |
anymore, but he
feeling of security.
"You had better go j,
David." he said with
There was no answer In
whose light step still i
side him.
"Please, David," he *
there was no answer Iran
He dared not look don \
heard the boy clear heft
"F2thcr," he said. "Rl
"Yes."
"Mah nish tah n
hazeh ."
The boy chanted th |
four questions softly a|
night The father i
down as his vision ln
tears, but he could led I
age surge again through I
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[ APRIL 23. 1954
+ l*l*hn*rldfc*n
PAGE 7B
eri can Notables... Simon wolf: The Jew of ism
By HARRY SIMONHOFF
t ttwoMfl fhma, fmttHwrtmm m tmUn tmtHltd,
HMtt, ; Mm a.W/ifcW m Am Jewh* HtUImm
llht t,rctmHnmr ctUtkrithm of Jewish set if taunt i
}sftf.-TNMiriJ
ar 1848 was critical tor-European liberalism. In
revolutions the democratic elements lost out,
emporariU-. .The U.S.A. gained valuable adher-
cause of freedom from slavery soon to be con-
j most bloody war to preserve the Federal Union,
pe immigrant 48ers from Germany came Simon
d of 12 who until his 87th year would uphold
patriotic fervor, the democratic and liberal ideals
during childhood.
of learning and devotion to Judaism he no doubt
Ifrom his father, a teacher of Hebrew. Passing
respects of successful business with his uncles
and, he chose the less profitable career of law
affairs. In his 24th year, he served as alternate
\o the Democratic conventions of 1860 at Charles-
[Baltimore. But Lincoln and the slavery issue
him to the new Republican Party. After Ft.
he volunteered for army duty and was rejected
ni of defective eyesight.
Lincoln
readable book, "The Presidents I Have Known
i to 1918." Simon Wolf tells of his relations with
rsidenl from Buchanan to Wilson. He could have
Harding, whose term began after the book's
on. One anecdote is typically Lincolnian. As
closing his office one evening, a message came
a Jewish-Jwy condemned to be shot the follow-
for deserting. He simply had to see his dying
[Simon Wolt could not reach Lincoln till 2 a.m.
Dg was bad since Sec. of War Stanton had threat
esign if the President pardoned another deserter,
kraight tace Lincoln complained lack of influence
| administration, least of all with the Secretary of
olf asked what would the President have done
bv's place. He answered with a telegraphic par-
coin ha 1 no occasion to regret his act when he
iggj^"" oy was kilted in battle at
WhS nO!' 2 w" "" to render sin"l service.
bUSEEZlSH Union amy-the *enerai h ct-
SSi ii?.nter 2; li which commanJ Jew. to
iSn u tary d!rtnct WmAlUH of several states.
diS? t0 C"?1 tbe unair ord*r" But in the Presi
ESS c.ampa,S"of the opposing Democrats were
attacking a candidate who showed such slight regard for
human or constitutional rights. Wolf, an effective speaker
ZSI&2*. e,ections- campaigned for Grant and ab-
solved him of anti-Semitism. His efforts were evidently
appreciated. Appointed Recorder of the District of Colum-
bia Wolf was inclined to refuse the office as interfering
with his active law practice. On hearing that objections
were raised on account of religion, he entered the fight
and won by unanimous confirmation.
Roumania
Jews had no complaints about Grant's attitude. No
president before him had made as many Jewish appoint-
ments. He offered the cabinet post of Treasurer to Joseph
beligman and named Edward S. Solomon Governor of the
Washington Territory. Wolf was chiefly responsible for
the selection of Benjamin F. Peixotto as U.S. Consul to
Bucharest. The President tried earnestly to ease the
persecution of Jews in the newly formed Kingdom of the
Roumanians, who like beggars on horseback, were abus-
ing their freedom from Turkish ^oppression. Long after
PeixottoAs death, Wolf worked for the emancipation of
Roumanian Jews, and was one of the small group which
induced Theodore Roosevelt to send the note of Sec. John
Hay on Roumania. '
Simon Wolf was often referred to as "Ambassador of
Jews in the U.S. to Washington." This estimate was con-
firmed by anti-Semites, who assailed him as the Jewish
lobbyist. He earned both titles. For over half a century
he labored unceasingly to help his coreligionists. Official-
ly he represented the Board of Delegates of American
Israelites which in 1878 on his motion merged with the
Union of American Hebrew Congregations. He was also
the spokesman in Washington for the Independent Order
of B'nai B'rith.
His energies seemed without limit. Active in his own
Synagogue, he was also a founder of the Baltimore Orphan
Asylum. He established the Atlanta Hebrew Orphan
Asylum, remained its president for almost three decades,
and almost single-handed collected the then large sum of
$130,000. His services to the Masons, the new Red Crow
Association, the German and non-sectarian charities were
no less conspicuous.
Russia
Most important were his extended services in behalf
of Russian Jewry. At the start of Grant's second term.
Wolf attended a Cabinet meeting called to devise some
means of preventing the expulsion of Jews from Bessa-
rabia. During four decades, in fact until the U.S. abro-
gated its treaty with Russia in 1911 contrary to the wishes
of President Taft, Wolf worked continuously to ameliorate
Russian anti-Jewish policies. He took the lead in inducing
Theodore Roosevelt to forward the "Keshineff Massacre
Petition" prepared by Leo M. Levi, President of the
B'nai B'rith.
In immigration matters. Wolf was more successful.
Always on hand to smooth out a bureaucratic snarl, he
was able to assure the entrance of people the officialdom
would send back. Papers of refugees who escaped the
Russian border were often not quite in order. It took
years of labor with the help of other prominent leaders
to maintain the "open door" policy to immigrants, es-
pecially for such paupers who were receiving support from
philanthropic societies. The Hebrew Sheltering and Im-
migrant Aid Society celebrated Wolf's 80th birthday and
stated in its 1916 Bulletin that he was instrumental in
preventing the deportation of at least 103,000 Jewish im-
migrants.
Simon Wolf's consulship in 1881 to Egypt was of little
importance in point of service. Far more useful were his
labors in historic research, which appeared in the book
"The American Jew as Patriot, Soldier and Citizen." Writ-
ten to silence the lying detractors who repeated the libel
that Jews did nothing on the battlefield to save the Union,
he proved from State and Federal records that the Jewish
quota of soldiers was larger in percentage than the general
population.

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Congress Building
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Your Circuit Judge
from
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Qualified by 9 years experience as
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His outstanding record merits
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(I'd. Political Adv.)
f*WWWWW
pLEASE REMEMBER TO VOTE TUESDAY, MAY 4th J
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A Member of
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Miami Knifhti of ColumboaMan of the Yaar 1953
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I'd. Political Adv.)

4





*
i
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4
A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER
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715 N.W. 62nd Street
PHONES 7-4596 and 7-6519
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ROYAL BAKING
COMPANY
601 N. W. 7th Street
To All Passover Greetings
Lagoon Restaurant and Bar
YOUR PATRONAGE APPRECIATED
23 SUNNY ISLE BOULEVARD
Passover Greotinas to All Our Friends and Patrons
LIN F0NG CHINESE AMERICAN RESTAURANT
7321 COtUNS AVENUE PH. 86 5581
HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO All OUR TKIIHOS AND PATRONS
FLAGLER MIRROR PLATE GLASS CO.
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HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL OUR
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4050 N.W. 29th STREET
Tel. 64-0251 .
<'<
M^


PAGE 8 B
+ ym*i*tinerkm*tL
RELIGIOUS DIRECTORY
FLAGLER GRANADA JEWISH
COMMUNITY CENTER will hold
Friday evening -ervices at 6:30
p.m. Services for the second days
day and Sunday at 9 a.m. and 6:45
p.m. Rev. Leo Heim will officiate
and render the mus.cal portions of
the liturgy, assisted by pupils of
the Hebrew School. Subject of his
set "ii Saturday morning is sched-
Ull as: How Importan! is Free-
( Yi/kor will be on Sunday at
. m. Rev. Heim will preach on
the topic: "Why Yizkor on a Festi-
val ol Freedom."
NORTH DADE JEWISH CEN-
TER will usher in the last two day-
USOver on Friday evening at
8:15 p.m. Cantor Maurice Neu will
rei er the musical portions id the
liti gy, assisted bj the Center
Choir under the direction of Lu-
Moore. Rabbi Henrj Okolica
officiate and preach on the
"Redemption." Saturdaj
morning servicei are at 9 a m. Eve-
: | services an scheduled for 7 |
p m Services fur the second day of
ver will begin at 9 a.m., with
Vi. ir slated for 10 am.
BETH DAVID SYNAGOGUE will
usher in the concluding daj oi
Pa: -over on Fridaj at sunset Sat
i.-i. j and Sundaj sen ices an al
i m with Rabbi Max Shapiro
i antor Maurice Mamches offi
g During the Saturdaj morn
service, the double Bar Atiti
oi Robert, -in ol Mr- Ethel
1 el, and Irving, son of Mr. and
S Louis Haberman, will take
Liskor i- slated for Sonda)
morning at 1" am. when Rabbi
iro will preach on the topic i
\\. Free Men Special stn
services will be held hoth;
.:ic- al lo 30 a m Floral offer
. will be sponsored bj Mr and
Herbert Sher. Dailj services
It 7:30 am. and 6:30 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI oi Hollywood
. hold Friday evening servicei
30 p.m. Morris Margulies, tor-1
national director of the Zion
rganization ol America, will
i. .nest speaker Rabbi David Sha-
wiii officiate, with Cantor Jo-
W Malek rendering the musi
Cl portion of the liturgy The
pie Choir will assist, under the
ection oi Rev Mordechai Haal
Mr and Mr- Joseph Baum
v be honored c n the occasion ol
th< r 25th wedding anniversarj
will sponsor the Oneg Shab-
following Saturdaj morning
st ices are .it >t a m Evening serv-
M will he at 6 p in Sundav morn-
i: Passover services are at 9 a.m.,
with Yizkor scheduled tor 10 30
a:' Rabbi Shapiro will preach.
TIFERETH JSRAEL NORTH-
SIDE CENTER will hold Friday
evening services at 6:30 p.m. Bat
111 ay morning services are at 9
a i Rabbi Louis (assel will preach
on the topic: "Sing a Song of
Spring Cantor Albert Glantz will
render the musical portions of the
1 Jit orgy. Sunday morning Passover
servkaa will be at 9 a.m. with
YuJtor scheduled for 10:30 am
Special prayers will be offered in
memory of the Warsaw Ghetto mar
tyr- Rabbi Cassel will discuss: "Is-
raelLand of the Living."
BETH EL CONGREGATION will
.hold Passover services at sundown
on Friday evening. Saturday and
Sur.day morning services are at
8:30 a.m. Rabbi Shmaryahu Swirsky
wi/1 officiate and preach on both
da; s. Subject of his sermon Satur-
1 day is: "The Eternal Song of an
Undying People" Yixkor will be
I at 10 a.m. on Sunday, at which time
j the Rabbi will discus- When Mos-
es Wept Cantor Nathan Zeichner
will render the musical portions oi
the liturgy Evening service- Sat-
urdaj and Sunday are at 6:45 p.m.
*
BETH ISRAEL CONGREGATION
will hold service- on Fridaj it" 6
p.m. Paaaover services are on Sal
unlay and Sundav morning- at 9
! a.m. Mincha is scheduled for 6 p.m.
Dailj services are at 7:30 am. and
6:30 p.m.
HEBREW ACADEMY will hold
Friday evening service- at 6:80
Saturday morning services ire al 0
am. Ra'hbi Alexander Gross will
preach on the topic: "PaSSOVer
the Holulav of Spring" Evening
services are scheduled for 6:15
p.m. Sundaj morning services,
marking the la-t days of Passover,
will begin at 8 45 a n Yizkor i-
-cheduled for 10:30 am with Rab-
in Gross discussing "Memories ol
the Past" Dailj services are held
at 7 80 a ill and 6 40 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM will
hold Friday evening services al
8:18 p m. Rabbi Leon Kronish will
officiate and preach on the topic
\ World I'd Like Saturday
morning services are at 10:45 am
Yizkor i- scheduled lor that time
Cantor Samuel Kelemer will ren
der the musical portions oi the lit
urgj
*
AGUDATH ISRAEL HEBREW
INSTITUTE Will hold Friday eve
rung services al 6 30 p.m followed
hv Maariv for the seventh day of
Passover, Saturday morning serv-
ice are al 9 am., with Rabbi Isaac
Ever officiating and preaching on
the topic: "The Practicability and
Probability of Complete Redemp
tion." Mincha will be at 6:30 p.m .
followed by Maariv. Sunday morn-
ing services are at 9 a.m.. with Yiz-
jgU**-"
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all over the free world rome lurh
comment! the*e from readers
oi THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
MONITOR, an international daily
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"The Monitor it mutt read-
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You, too, will find the Monitor
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kor following at 10:30 a.m. The
Rabbi will discuss "Memorial Serv-
icei Break of Dawn for American
Orthodox Judaism Mincha will be
a) g M p m (ollewed by Maariv.

TEMPLE EMANU-EL will hold
ptidaj evening services at 6:30
p in Saturday and Sunday morning
services, marking the last dav- of
Passover, will include services at
officiate and preach the .sermon-.
with Cantor Philip Brummer ren
dering the musical portions of the
liturgy Vi/kor will be held on Sun
daj at 10:80 a.m. and 1230 p.m.
TEMPLE ISRAEL of Miami will
hold Friday evening services at
8:15 p.m.. with Rabbi Joseph Narot
officiating and preaching on the
topic: "Sholom Alayhem on Broad
w.i> Saturdaj morning services
are at II a HI and will include the
Yizkor memorial. Cantor Jacob
Hoin-tein will render the musical
portion- ol the liturgy
a

KOSHER
I FOR
: Sassover
111
E LECT
Lj*
KENDRICK
YOUR
PURCHASING
AGENT
IF YOM' WANtl
&&* I
A MAN who will devote his full time to the business of mokiij
$5,000,000 worth of purchases each year for County Departments.
A MAN who pledges and guarantees every seller in Dade County tH
he shall not be discriminated against in selling to the County.
* ?
A MAN who will provide public records on all purchases he makes-
who will not tolerate secret fifes and secrecy in official acts.
* *
A MAN who has a reputation for fairness a background as o Nafiff
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* *
A MAN who will not tolerate a poffcy of favoritism a torn ***
only guide to purchasing will be "the best possible at least cost."
We Need a Man Like-
J KENDRICK
Distributed by Hi-Grade Food Co.
1733 N. W. 7th ATsmtto Phon. 9-S45*
(I'd. Political A.lv )


APRIL 23.1954
"JfeMfaftJfcrftftar
PAGE 9 B
s Were Murdered in Warsaw 11 Years Ago
tr marks the 11th anniver-
modern epic of Jewish
ft, the conquering Nazis
Warsaw's Jews into a wall-
n of the city, creating Eur-
fest ghetto. Then, system-
toe Germans set about ex-
(ng all life within the
They were almost clinical
death drive, trying one
ol destruction after anoth-
rvation, the setting of one
linst another, spiritual de-
b7 outright murder.
_, in 1943, the Jews of the
ghetto made a futile, hope-
1 incredibly brave decision
Ittacked the Germans. The
I almost no weapons; they
jieir minds and bodies
the armed might of the
fcey could not possibly win.
ost of them, it was a mo-
[the greatest triumph.
bthor, Dr. Philip Friedman,
Jewish historian, assem-
Wr heroic story from eye-
jaccounts, memoirs, battle
documents and defiant last
Its, which are published in
ook, "Martyrs And Fight-
3crmans decided to liqui-
Warsaw ghetto complete-
rdle.-s of cost. On April
at 2 a.m., the first mes-
bnccrning the Germans' ap-
fcrmed from the outermost
pon posts. These reports
clear that German gen-
| aided by Polish policemen,
pcirclins the outer ghetto
80-yard intervals.
nergency alarm to all battle
vas ordered. At 2:15 IS
later all groups were
|at their battle stations. The
hipul.it Mil had been inform-
Ihe imminent danger, and
I the ghetto inhabitants mov-
ntly to previously prepared
and and hideouts in the
ind attics of buildings.
phly silence enveloped the
i.m. the Germans in groups
*- fours and fives so as
arouse suspicion, began
ling into the "inter-ghetto"
Here they formed into pla-
knd companies. At seven
[motorized detachments, in-
a number of tanks and
B vehicles, entered the ghet-
lUery mobilized outside the
The SS were ready to at-
losed formations, stepping
lly and loudly, they march-
[ the seemingly dead streets
central ghetto. But no .
Id not scare the Jews nor
km by surprise. When the
|s those the intersection at
nd Zamenhofa Streets for
jvouac area, battle groups
ded at the four corners of
pet opened concentric fire
The home-made hand gre-
Y the Jews' began exploding
"here. The lone machine pis-
| shots through the air in
bursts ammunition had
conserved carefully. Rifles
1 "ring a hit further away.
[Germans attempted a re-
but their path was cut. Ger-
pad soon littered the street.
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The remainder found no cover in
the neighboring stores and house
entrances. The "glorious" SS
thereupon called tanks into action
to cover the remnants of two com-
panies. But even the tanks seemed
to be affected by the Germans' bad
luck. The first was burned out by
one of the incendiary bottles, the
rest dared not approach. The fate
of the Germans caught in the Mila
Street-Zamenhofa Street trap was
settled. Not a single German left
alive .
(Simkhah Rathayzer pseudo-
nym "Kazik" was 18 years old
at the time of the uprising. Since
1946, he has lived in Israel. Here
is his report of Tuesday, April 20,
the first day of Passover, 1943):
At three o'clock in the afternoon,
I was standing on guard at the
scouting post where there was a
fuse to switch on the mine. Then,
from the direction of Franciszkan-
ska Street a detachment of about
300 Germans turns into Walowa
Street in our area. With one hand
I grabbed the fuse, with the other
I pressed down the alarm clock.
Suddenly a terrific detonation is
heard. I see bodies flying into the
air, hands and feet separately.
Eighty to 100 dead can be counted.
The rest are withdrawing in great
disorder.
We meanwhile are occupying our
positions and waiting. One hour
passes, then another. The Germans
are assembling again; they are de-
liberating. A few higher officers
have arrived. All of a sudden we
hear voices at our walls. The Ger-
mans are pouring into the court-
yard. They are marching in goose-
step. Their faces are frightened,
and they clutch their rifles, ready
to fire. Actually they don't walk,
they rather run, remaining close
to the walls of the buildings all the
time.
My comrade and I let the first
six pass. It is not worthwhile to
waste a hand grenade on such a
small group. Behind them a whole
band is coming. We have two hand
grenades of our own make, two in-
cendiary bottles and small arms.
"Shlamek, fire" I call to my com-
rade and hurl my hand grenade
into the middle of the bunch.
There is an explosion ... a few
dead. We toss the incendiary bot-
tles, and more Germans are caught
by flames. They are sending up a
THE ENTIRE
COMMUNITY
PROGRAM
oi
wJewish Foram
On The Air"
EVERY SUNDAY
10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
Station: WMIE (1140 on dial)
Wifh Vr/oo fturt
Produced and Dlrtctti
hell of bullets. Since we possess
only one more hand grenade, which
we want to keep for later, we with-
draw. We climb higher and take
up our positions at the side of our
other comrades. Suddenly all be-
comes quiet. The Germans have
fled.
After half an hour they appear
again, and again this time we greet
them with hand grenades and in-
cendiary bottles. They shoot rap-
idly and then they withdraw, leav-
ing behind their dead and wound-
ed. One of the Germans has caught
a glimpse of a girl on our position.
"Hans, look," he shouts to his com-
rade, "a woman'" They all start
shooting at her. But the girl does
not withdraw. She gives them the
welcome they deserve ..
(In a report to his superior, the
German commander, General Juer-
gen Stroop, gives an overall survey
of his operations:)
When the Reichsfuehrer SS
(Heinrich Himmler) visited War-
saw in January, 1943, he ordered
the SS and Police Leader for the
District of Warsaw to transfer to
Lublin the armament factories and
other enterprises of military im-
portance which were installed with-
in the ghetto, including their per-
sonnel and machines. When we in-
vaded the ghetto for the first time,
the Jews and Polish bandits suc-
ceeded in repelling the participat-
ing units, including tanks and arm-
ored cars, by a well-prepared con-
centration of fire .
The main Jewish battle group,
mixed with Polish bandits, had al-
ready retired during the first and
second day to the so-called Muran-
owski Square. There, it was rein-
forced by a considerable number of
Polish bandits. (The Germans
could not admit that they had been
beaten by Jews, and tried to create
the impression that considerable
Polish underground forces were in-
volved in the fighting, which was
not true.) Its plan was to hold the
ghetto by every means in order to
prevent us from invading it. The
Jewish and Polish standards were
hoisted at the top of a concrete
building as a challenge to us.
The number of Jews forcibly
taken out of the buildings and ar-
rested was relatively small during
the first few days. It transpired
that the Jews had taken to hiding
in the sewers and in specially erect-
ed dug-outs. We learned in the
course of the large-scale action that
the whole ghetto was systematical-
ly equipped with cellars, dug-outs
and passages connected with the
sewer system. Thus, the Jews were
able to maintain undisturbed sub-
terranean traffic. They also used
this sewer network for escaping in-
to the Aryan part of the city. Con-
tinuously, we received reports of
attempts of Jews to escape through
the sewer holes. While pretending
to build air-raid shelters, they had
been erecting dug-outs within the
former ghetto ever since the au-
tumn of 1942.
Over and over again, new battle
groups consisting of 20 to 30 or
more Jewish fellows, 18 to 25 years
of age, accompanied by a corre-
sponding number of women, kin-
dled new resistance. The women
were equipped the same as the
men. Not infrequently, these wom-
en fired pistols with both hands.
It happened time and again that
these women had pistols or hand
grenades concealed in their bloom-
ers up to the last moment to use
against the men of the Waffen SS,
Police or Wehrmacht.
(The resistance of the Jews was
so strong, Stroop later reported,
that it could be broken only by
"relentlessly using all our forces
and energy by night and day.")
The Germans eventually resorted
to fire, smoke candles and ex-
plosives, blowing up entire build-
ings. On April 23, Himmler issued
his order to complete the coaio-
ing out of the Warsaw ghetto with
the greatest severity and relent'ess
tenacity. This meant destroying
the entire Jewish residential area
by setting every block afire.
The ghetto was burning. For
days and nights it flamed. The
fire consumed house after house,
entire streets. Columns of smoke
rose, sparks flew, and the sky re-
flected 4 red, frightening glow.
Nearby, on the other side of the
wall, citizens of Warsaw strolled,
played and enjoyed themselves.
They knew that "the Jews vere
burning." The wind blew smoke
and soot in their direction. Sparks
scattered and now and then a hoase
outside the ghetto would catch fife.
But these were immediately ex-
tinguished. Only in the ghetto no
one hastened to put out the flanes,
to come to the rescue.
The partisans' stand was so de-
termined that the Germans had
been forced to abandon all ordi-
nary fighting methods and the om-
nipotent flames were now able to
accomplish what the Germans
could not do. Thousands of people
perished in the conflagration. The
stench of burning bodies was ev-
erywhere. Charred corpses lay
around on balconies, in window re-
cesses, on unburned steps. The
flames chased the people out from
their shelters, made them leave the
prepared hideouts in attics and
cellars. Thousands staggered about
in the courtyards where they were
Continued on Page 10 B
Simon UtOM
M3 S.W. 17tfc At.
M-54M
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PAGE 10 B
-Jewish IkrkMan
Shot em i^odge
Debate* I ntier
Way Here
Sholom Lodge. B'nai B'rith's
eighth annual debate contest, un-
der the chairmanship of Alan Kess
ler. got under way Monday night
at the University of Miami. Partici-
pating schools were Miami Senior
High School. Coral Gables Senior
High School, Miami Beach Senior
High School. Miami Jackson High
School. Miami Edison High School
and Technical High School.
This year's subject was "Resolv-
ed That the Legal Rule- of Evi-
dence Should Govern Testimony
Jews Were Murdered in Warsaw
Ghetto Battle Eleven Years Ago
Continued from Page 9 B
Germans snnounced that everyone
j who came out would be taken to
easy prey for the Germans who im- '. Wl,r|<; ;,]| the others would be shot
prisoned them or killed them out M (iru.(.
right. Tired beyond all endurances,
they would fall asleep in drive
ways, entrances, standing, sitting,
lying and were caught asleep by a
passing German's bullet .
Not Infregnently." Stroop re
ported lo his superiors, "the Jews
stayed in the burning buildings mi
til. because of the heat and the
fear of being burned alive, they
ession'al InTesUgat' Preferred to jump down from the cr> oul:
upper stones, after having thrown selves Let s not fall into their
alive." The suicides began.
. articles into the street from the patois jammed and the owners
coach, go to Washington. D.t. for, burnjn bmldw^ Wllh In,.lr
all-expense con ^^ bn|kt,n_ |h s(l|, ..,, ,
The tighten entrenched
themselves near the entrance and
waited with their weapons ready.
Finally the Germans began to send
pa into the bunker. They let in a
small quantity of gas, then stopped,
trying to break the defenders" spir-
it with prolonged suffocation. A
terrible death faced the 120 fight-
ers.
Aryan Wjlnnr was the first to
'Come, let us destroy our-
ing Committees.'*
The winning team, with their
one week on an
ducted tour, besides receiving I
large loving cup to be held one
year Debatora receive individual
cups and medals depending on how
they place in the contest
Judge- for the preliminaries
were Edward Forer, Murraj Shear
and Phillip Wein-u in Semi-finals
Wednesday were judged by Ed
ward Resnick, Stanlej Fred and
Clifford Selwood.
This year, the Food Fair Founda-
tion i- assisting B'nai B'nth finan-
cially.
Johns Emphasizes
Six-Plank Platform
In an action-packed two-da) vi-it
to Miami this week. Acting Gover- tIOV*l StsTSMMfl
nor Charley Johns vigorously em- g|il||fS-,1g)|-mMk!
phasized his six major Dade County I ",' IM "
cr.Avl across the street into blocks
of buildings which had not yet
been set on fire
(On Ma) 8. the Germans discov-
ered and raided the headquarters
at htila 18 They senl heavy rein
forcements to surround the place
A fierce battle lasted two hours.
when the Germans realised thai it
was impossible t" take the posl
t ion by force, the) tossed .1 smoke
bomb inside the headquarters and
placed explosive, at the entrances
to the bunker 1
The "toughs and the civilians
surrendered. But none of the fight-
ers. The call was repeated. The
proposals at a series of rallies held
at neighborhood campaign head
quarters and at the homes of ev-
en] of his supporters.
On all occasions, the Governor
pledged his support to the elimin
W. D "Bill" Joyce. Dade County
Purchasing Agent, seeking to suc-
ceed himself, this week emphasized I
that he "is fully qualified through I
many years of experience to carry-
out these functions for the best in-
Mionof taxes on household furnish-1'ercs,s .?f ,nc taxpayers of Dade
ings. administrative legislation for i Coun,>'
the automatic renewal of home- j Joyce further stated that "in
stead exemptions, the acquisition view of the rapid growth of Dade
or construction of a State of Flor-1 County, the job of purchasing in-
ida building to house the 57 agen i telligently and wisely has become
cies now scattered over a wide I one of major importance to the
area, new high bridges or tunnels | community, as a large portion of
acro-s or under the Miami River to ; the tax dollar is spent through the
relieve the city's traffic congestion.! purchasing office."
state funds for a Medical School at j The candidate is Past Post Com-
y of Miami, and $5. mander of the American Legion
158.200 in state funds for the con
struction of new roads and streets
in Dade County.
An unusual feature of the Gov-
ernor's appearance at the neigh
and the Veterans of Foreign Wars,
an active member of the Military
Order of World Wars. Forty and
F.ight. Purple Heart, Third Divi-
sion Society, Elks and Moose
hands
Pistol
begged their friends to kill thcrii.
But no one dared to take the life
dt a comrade Lutek Rorblatt fired
four shot, at his mother but.
wounded and bleeding, she still
moved Then someone discovered
a hidden exit, but only a few sue
ceeded in Betting out this way. The
Others slowl) suffocated in the gas.
Thus the best of the Jewish fight-
ers met death. 100 in all; among
them the beloved commander.
On May 16 the Warsaw syna-
gogue was blown up and the large-
scale action ended. The martyrs
and fighters of the Warsaw ghetto
had left their imperishable mark
on history.
On May 24. Stroop reported these
final statistics to higher headquar-
ters:
"Of our total of 56.065 caught,
about 7.000 were destroyed in the
former ghetto during large-scale
operation. 6,925 Jews were destroy-
ed by transporting them to Tre-
blinka Camp No. 21; the sum total
of Jews destroyed is therefore
13,929. Five to six thousand Jews
were destroyed by being blown up
or by perishing in the flames ."
IT S "MART TO SEE THf
IN MUMf
ph i Ce7 j ,-3: BlSC 61 VL
horhood headquarters' rallies and Lodges. Lions, South Florida Ang-
private receptions was the presen- lers Club, a member of the Munici-
tation of the Miami produced 16 pal Finance Officers Association of
mm sound film. "This Is Your, the United States ;.nd was presi
Life," depicting the highlights of ; dent of the.National Convention of
Governor Johns' personal and poll Veterans of Foreign Wars held in
tical career. I Miami in 1949.
He is an honorary member of the
'National Association of Purchasing
Agents and the Miami Police Bene-
I volent Association, has played an
active part in the Red Cross, De-
leiise Council, Tuberculosis Associ-
! ation and the Children's Service
Bureau.
Joyce is married, has two chil-
dren and resides at 5210 West Flag-
ler Street.
Vocelle Appoints Aide
In Congressional Drive
Charles L. Vocelle. candidate for
IS Congress, this week announced
the appointment of Olin W Todd
as a member of his campaign steer-
ing committee.
Todd is well known in Masonic-
circles in Dade and Monroe County
and is a partner in one of Florida's
leading business firms.
Todd is the father of candidate
Ynceile's wife. Betty Todd Vocelle.
Builders if Imirtal
Memorials fir tbi
pm O mm
Jewish Trail
Look for the 2-Story White
Building
Thurnnnd Monument Co.
MARKERS $40.00 PLUS
CEMETERY CHARGES
Open Sundays Phono 4-3249
;v)GUST BROS RVf
la the atsr'
PALMER'S MIAMI MONUMENT CO.
Serving the Jewish
Community Since 1926
And Only
JEWISH
MONUMENT
BUILDERS
Large Stock
On Hand For
Immediate
Deliveryl
Exclusive Dealers
ROCK of AGES
MEMORIALS
3'4//-/s S.W. 8th Street
ftooii* Ootftt
Yiddish Classical Hour
NEW STATION NEW TIME
STATION WWPB
1450 on Your Dial
WWPB proudly presents
YIDDISH CLASSICAL
HOUR
with
Tke D... .f j.wi.1, (MIMlMm
MORRIS NASATIR
IVIRT SUNDAY
in
*:30 ID11 Mfc
linen Te Our
New Feature
" JUST A
MIAM
JWV Post to Aid in
Hialeah Defense Effort
Hialeah Miami Springs Jewish
War Veterans Post 681 has offered
it- support to the Civil Defense el
tort lor Hialeah.
The post will assist by serving as
emergency police Dr. Stanley Wall
man. committee co-chairman with
Dr. Leon Ki sen man and Ted Linga-
ton. announced that members at
tend meetings every Thursday
night at the North Hialeah Klemen
tary School, where they receive in
struction in policing and first aid
Commander Max Goldstein urged
that all citizens of the community
attend the meetings and serve in
the formation of the Hialeah
Emergency Hospital.
FRIDAY.
*oulr .,, ~ q
DRYWOOD
R
bill
s,r*Bht 5 y,
TRUliMOlEi,
MIAMI -ui^
82-6441
"mi
MIAMI BEACH-t
Ml
5-3444
MOVING IS SO EASY...WHEN YOul:
V~Zjk*
VanLm
' 1 m 1 i 0 1 d c -1 ml One il
lo! Distance ind D o r t Oier .-.'>
SNORT OR lORC-TlRM
STORnOE AVAIIMIC
IN Oil TWO.
MODEM.7-ST0r
WAREHOUSES
Fireproof Construction
Only Private Storage Rooms
M Greater Miami Silver
ndR*|VuHs.
100% A. D.T. Automate
fire and Deviltry Protection
w**Home.r' ."*''/ rW*l
PHONE
.iif* ""en t.
II
glass i%\;ii\
STORE moUT PLATE sad WTJTDOV OUfj
rrmltux, Tope, BlTQjiftd Mlrrora nad Roeilverinfl Oer I
LA& Glass and Mirror Wi
IX S.W. 8th SL PHORZ
MORRIS ORUS
/RVI.VG
MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY
THE CEMETERY OF DISTINCTION
FOR DISCRIMINATING FAMILIES
Rabbi S. M. MachteL Director
5505 N. W. 3rd St Phone 87-8201
3w ^Aetidied Jlemow*
iPev/t/c c/tooe fGetdo*u/ci //te
finetf in fitneux/be\vfce
- A service that loaves a
lotting remembrance
of beauty and rnveronco
and th* utmost In
considerate ottonfion at a
tint* when most needed j
GORDON
FUNERAL HOME, fr*
MIAMI MIAMI***
710 S.W. 12th AVE. 1333 DAW
rh.W43l Ph.5-7677
ft. M. 0RNMTT. *** O**^


IPBIL 23. 1954
>AL NOTICE
. Jnder fictitious
,1 desiring to engage In
r the, fii-llllous name of
|!tV. t 9S0 S.W. 1st
,i' t<' register aald name
,lk ,,f Hi.' circuit Court of
> i--i. .i-i ,i|IN B. LAKE
, (H IS .1. LII'TON
JM-glKS K. I.KNNON
Owners
ZIVKKKMAN
, Applicants
it Street
ider'f'ctitYous
Jame law
.- HKKKIIY (ilVES that
rned, deKlrlng to engage In
idcr the fictitious name of
\PHY. at 1(8 N.E. B4th
Intend to register *ald
,1,.. Clerk of the Circuit
ad.- County, Florida.
MORRIS FINKtioLD
(-V AMIS, Owners
\p J, SAKOWITZ
- Applicants
BUIg.
UNDER FICTITIOU8
NAME LAW
IS HEREBY GIVEN that
med, desiring to engage In
der the fictitious name of
-XT MIMKOORAI'HINO *
SERVICE at 2347 8. W. 22nd
o register said name with
; the Circuit Court of Dade
Jarles M. FREEFIELD
Irian free field
|e under fictitious
NAME LAW
18 HEREBY GIVEN that
fagned, desiring to engage in
bii.ii : Die fictitious name of
UNO DOCKS, at 520 West
jml licauh. Florida Intends
...nl name with the Clerk
cull Court of Dade County,
JEROME G. LANGER
IRCUIT COURT OF THE
TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
DADE COUNTY. FLOR-
JCHANCERY. No. 1IS221
lUK'iWN ANGELOTTI.
1'laintlff
L. ANOELOTTI,
Defendant.
ICE BY PUBLICATION
MAI'RICE L. ANOELOTTI
hl7*e2'i, Co. B,
Bit:ii.'I Hattalion
ft, i o Postmaster
York, New York.
IRK HEREBY NOTIFIED
II for Annulment of Marriage
I against yoU In the above
I 'I you are hereby re-
larrvc a copy of your Answer
.lill of Complaint on the
I attorneys, and file the orlg-
e office of the Clerk of the
t on or before the 17th-
l'i|, otherwise a decree
will l> iejr>d against
^tlce shall be published once
; for four consecutive weeks
J JEWISH FI.'IKIDIAN.
this i-li dav of April, lS.'.t.
I". It. l.KATHERMAN.
Clerk, circuit Court
By: M. K. MURRAY,
I>eputy Clerk
SILVER A MULLOY
for Plaintiff
ken Building, Miami, Florida
LEGAL NOTICE
+Jm>lst> ihrtdian
PAGE 11 H
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THF
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
W? IS* DADE COUNTY FLOR
IDA. IN CHANCERY. No 167806
JOSEPH B. KLElNWirHsTVs,.
known as JoZEF KLEINW1CH8
n Halllliff
sina 'hVrstkin KLBlNWicm
NOTICE BY PUBLICATfoN"""-
TO: SINA BUR8TEIN KLEINWICH8
residence unknown
YOU ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Hill oi Complaint for Annulment
.f'S,. f'V''1 Klnst you In the
above em It led .ni.e and von are here-
by required t,, wjrve a eopy of your
Answer I., II,,.- Bill of Complaint on
the Plaintiffs attorneys, anil file the
original in the office of the Clerk of
the Circuit Court on or before the 7th
day of May. I!.:,4. otherwise a Decree
Pro Confesso will lie entered aguinH
you.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in the JEW ISII FLOKIDIAN.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this 1st
day of April, 1954.
E H. l.KATHERMAN,
Clerk, circuit Court
By M. C. GREEN,
(Seal) Deputy Clerk
I'ALLOT, SILVER & ML'LLOY
Attorneys for I'laintlff
701 Congress Bldg., Miami, Fla.
4/S--U-23-30
NOTICE UNDER'FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
AL'S SELF SERVICE LAUNDER.
ETTE, at 501 East th Street, in the
City of Hlaleah. Florida. Intends to
register the said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
DATED at Miami, Florida, this 30th
day of March, 1954.
ELIA8 SCHL'LMAN
Sole Owner
FREDERICK N. BARAD
Attorney at Law
420 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, Fla.
4/9-16-23-30
ICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
I NAME LAW
IK IS HEREBY GIVEN that
rsigned. desiring to engage In
\imil.-i Hi, fictitious name of
N SANITATION COMPANY,
IV. 79th St., Intend to register
_ with the Clerk of the ir-
Srt "f Dade County, Florida.
nWAKIl HILL
IBRAHAM KAPSON, Owners
N ciiiu.sHON
tor Applicants
Wn i:.i Miami Beach -
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
|NTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
R, ,.'N AND FOR DADE
[V. IN CHANCERY. No. 168167
"I NPHY, Plaintiff,
^M JOSEPH Dl'NI'HY.
.__ I >.!> lolaiit.
if, ,0F PUBLICATION
ILI.IA.M JOSEPH DUNPUT
I I llk.lown *
!' hir. i.v ordered and required
f of your answer to the
runiplauit for Divorce, a cop]
*n is enclosed herewith, on
l-attorney, and file the orlg-
Ithe office of the Clerk of the
It'tuit of Hade County, Florida,
T""; ">- Hth day of May. 19.-.4.
"* the .,ii,nations of said bill
taken as onfessed by you.
" April 1:1, mr.4
K, (1 I.EATHERMAN,
Merit of the Circuit Court
By \\\i \v. STOCKING,
J- RAnT' CUfrk
f>' <"< Plaintiff
Is*''-- '.'"J1"'"!.. Miami 32. Fla.
IE cTDrB,V PUBLICATION
INTm ?,Ve.T COURT OF THE
KbV.-Dici*l circuit, in
BchaI?.! county. FLOR-
M*> PRABQBR, Plaintiff
Suit" cel^Klt- '"'ndant.
, ,F0 DIVORCE
"Kl.l.Ni: PHAECER, 718
P* A*-nne liiooklyn, New York.
E ,,, I"","1'"1 l,,at ""I of
" 'f"':' v"r'-' has been filed
icon,' V"' v"" "re required to
lh. I iiy"ur Answer or Plead-
ff" ;'" "r Complaint on the
," '']"> \. HAROLD KHA-
u nd ti ,!";"1' Miami Bench,
Win"T, '"",.'rl1"'" *"""
"the office of the Clerk
v ,., "ur|. "" or before the
>iL,; 'V '"'' lf >"U 'nil t"
I i II. .'."!, '"r Ul- "M dc-
S a Nit ,i ','' r"U'lalnt.
this 1,'" "';'t'-:i' ." Miami,
> day of April. |M.
,,,' ': VTHEIt.MAN
h> '"Depu^C,^
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
IAJRRAINE APARTMENT HOTEL,
at 2601 Collins Avenue. In the City of
Miami Beach. Dade County, Florida,
intends to register the said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of I lade
County, Florida, dated at Miami
Beach, Florida, this 5th day of April,
1M,
JACOB SOLOMON
YETTA SOLOMON
MORTIMER J. SOLOMON
ELEANOR 8. FRIEDLAND
HARRY ZCKERNICK
Attorney for Owners
420 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, Ela.
4/9-18-23-3U
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business nnder the fictitious name of.
TAM1AMI CABINET SHOP, at 2734
SW'ISth Ijtne. Miami 33, Florida, in-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
JERRY KIRK
FRANK COHN
Attorney for Tamlaml Cabinet Shop
4/9-16-23-30
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
NIKL ONIELL TIE-BEAM FORM
ERECTORS, at 94J N.W. 40th Street.
Intends to register said name with the
Clerk of the -Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
MARGARET ONIELL, Owner
DeCOSTAS, MAEIt A- FLOYD
Attorneys for Applicant
607 Blscayne Bldg.
4/2-9-16-23
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE. No. 32362-B
In Rr: ESTATE OF
LAWRENCE JoNES, Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claim- or Demanda Against Said
Estate ,
You. and each of you, are hereby
notified and required to present any
claims and demands which you, oi
either of you, may have acainst the
estate of LA WHENCE JONES, de-
ceased late of Hade County. Horl'l.i.
to the Hon W. h. BLANTON, County
Judge of Dade County, and file the
same in his office in the County Court-
house in Hade County, Florida. Within
eight calendar months from the date
of the first publication hereof. Said
claims or demands to contain the legal
address of the claimant and to be
sworn to and presented as aforesaid,
or same will In- barred. See !GtioU
120 of the 1933 Probate Act.
otherwise known as
1.1I.L1E MAE JONES j
As Executor of the I*st Will
nml Testament of
LAWRENCE JONES. Deceased
ARONOVITZ, ARONOV1TZ
A CAIDIN
Attorneys for Lilllc Mae Jones
4/I6-28-80 5/7 _______;
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW ____. ,
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
?he undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious n",e "'
WINDOW FRAME FORM CO.. a
East Mrd St., Hlaleah, Florld.a tatMda
to register said name rflth th,' erk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Count),
norida.______
DFRWIN CORP.
1123 East 23rd Street
Hlaleah. Florida
AARON M KANNER ___
Attorney for DCRWIN CORP.
4/9-1S-23-30
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN tfcat
the undersigned, deslrlnf, "'K"'-
business under the WI"mAS
IMS' AVNE S A 1" 1T?Kl A" -|\ .1
>s-riiHF at 7200-02 Pis'-a.\n mu.,
.Ml. mi 'intends ,......1st.-r said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit i ourt of
Dade -"i^i,,",-;:"j;lHsll.v.-:i(STEIN
BERT BAOER
Attoi n, i for Applicant
810 Blscayne Bldg.
4/9-11-28-M
In r^2rP%2ovT
FLOMina ,oRDAOe COUNTY,
n.LrD,AATATFt!,?)EATE' No- 31949B
To^AUr! ", m|:*'"MAN. n.-ceased
I Al 1 l.iedltoi s and All Persons llav-
SrtateT r l)e"",n'18 Against Said
iuJS|lii*5i.*'cb "' you. "" hereby
.ins .'."i" r"1"'";11 '" PMsant any
liw ,lc"1-""1" Which you. or
either of you, may have against the
estate of ARTHlli HIR8CHMAN I -
V.n", '.i'e'e, W:,>IK' ('^""V. M'CM-
f.f ilL Hon"rWo cnty Jndirea
n A?? V/."JhlV M" Z.,!! 'i'Lfl7" .'" "'- County pourt-
house In Dade Coiinu, llorida, within
,r ,1 t'"',''":l',r "!"'iis from the data
or the first publication hereof. Said
claims or demands to contain the legal
". "' 9" ''lain.ant and to l,e
sworn to and presented as aforesaid,
or same will be barred.
Date April 6th. A.l> IfS4
IRWIN E. KOTT
As -Ancillary Administrator
Cum Testainento Annex,, of
the Ijisi will and
I i-stainent of
ARTHUR HIRSCHMAN,
MYERS, HELM AN & KAPLa'n""^
Attorneys for Ancillary Administrator
t urn Testamento Annexo
4,!"-16-23-30
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
____ NAME LAW
.hNOTICE, ,S "KRKBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
,''. '',' HOTRI' at 131.", :,th Street,
-Miami Beach, Florida intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade Countv, Florida.
JEROME G. LANQER
4/9-16-2:1-30
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
_ NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
SSSiSSSLS"'*1* '"'' "ctltlous name "f
CENTURY WOODCRAFT CO., at
1701 Bird Road, Miami, intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade Countv.
Florida.
GRACE VAN MANBN
Sol,- Owner
MYERS. HEI.MAN A KAPLAN
Attorneys for Applicant
K.-.ll Be] bold Bldg.
4/23-30 5/7-14
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to enKage In
business under the fictitious name of
HIGH FIDELITY associates, at
MSI Blscayne Blvd.. Miami, Intend to
register said name with the Clerk of
the ( h-cult Court of Dade County,
Hoi Ida.
ROBERT GREENBERGand
______LARRY KASS.MAN, Owners
ROBERT M. DEEHL
Attorney for Applicants
09 Sevl.old HldK.
4/2-U-l,i-23
CERTIFICATE OF CORPORATE
DISSOLUTION
IN THE NAME AND BY THE
AUTHORITY OF THE STATE
OF FLORIDA
TO ALL To whom THESE PRES-
ENTS SHALL COME, GREETINGS:
Whereas,
LEO BHEINER. MIAMI. Fl.uRIDA
STANLEY 11. SPIELER,
MIAMI. FLORIDA
CAROL B. PREIDIN.
MIAMI. FLORIDA
did on the 11th day of September,
A d 19S2, oause to be Incorptstated
under the provisions of Chapter H"S.
i 1.....1.1 Statutes, FRIED-GOLD OOR-
pOUAi'HiN, a corporation, with its
principal place of business at Miami,
Dade County, in the State of Florida,
and whereas the stockholders of such
corporation did April, A.D. 1954, cause to be filed in
the office of the Secretary 6f Slate of
the State of Florida, a Consent of all
the stockholders under the provisions
of said Chapter 60S. Florida Statutes,
showing the dissolution of such cor-
poration.
Now, therefore, the Secretary of
State does hereby certify to the fore-
going and that he Is satisfied that the
reoiilrements of law have been com-
piled with.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF. I
have hereunto set my hand
and have affixed the Great
Seal of the State of'Florida, at
Tallahassee, the Capital, this
the Fourteenth day of
April, A.D. 19..4,
R. A. GRAY.
.... Secretary of State.
(SEAL)
I .'.: ,i
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA. IN PROBATE. No. 32430-B
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
In Re: ESTATE OF
ABRAHAM RI'BIN. Deceased,
To ALL CREDITORS AND ALL
PERSONS HAVINC, CLAIMS OR DE-
MANDS AOAINST SAID ESTATE:
You, and each of you, are hereby
notlfied and required to present any
claims and demands which you, or
either of you. may have against the
Estate of' ABRAHAM RUBIN, De-
ceased, late of Suffolk County, Massa-
chusetts, to the Hon. County Judges
of Dade County, Florida, and'file the
same In their offices In the Dade
Countv Courthouse, Miami, Florida,
within eight (M calendar months from
tlie date of the first publication here-
of. Said claims or demands to con-
tain.the legal address of the claimant
and to be sworn to ami presented is
aforesaid, or same will be barred. See
Section 120 of the 1933 Prolate Act.
Dated this 7th day of April, 19o-l.
GEORGE J. TAUANOFF,
As Ancillary Executor of the
Last Will anil Testament of
ABRAHAM RI'IHN. Deceased
OEORGE J. TALIANOFF ESQ.
IM Lincoln Road, Miami Beach. Ha.
4/H1-23-30 3/7
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name oT
RKOIL MOTORS, at 1..00 N.W .th
Wenue, Miami. Florida. Intends to
register said name with the t lerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida. coss|N mot,ins. INC
oVb/a Regil Motors
Bv: MICHAEL SOSSIN,
Becy.-Trees.
GERSHON S MILLER
Attorney for Applicant
f0 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach. Fla.
4" 16-23-30 1/7______________________
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned. d*sirlng to engage In
business under th* "S'U.UVlwRV
CASH REGISTER sAI.Ks & BERJ-
.,.;, sit North Miami Avenue. Mi-
ami. Florida, intend to register said
name with the Cl.rk of the Circuit
Court of Dade countv. Florida.
JURA HAM SI-SS.MAN. Vi inter.-.
I.KWIS UXBY, '(, interest
THOMAS RYAN, 'j Interest
ISltvKL A BRA MS
Attorney for Cash.Register Sales
A Service
4/U-M-JO 5/7
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA. IN CHANCERY. No. 164,275.
AGNES LITTLES, Plaintiff,
vs.
MILLAHD LITTLES, Defendant
... ... NOTICE TO APPEAR
IN rilE NAME 1 if THE STATE
OF EL11KIDA
To: MILI.ARD LITTLES,
c/o Ruby Johnson
3821 Folaon Street
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
ALL UNKNOWN heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors or other parties
claiming by, through, under or against
MILLAR!) LITTLES:
AM) ALSO, as to the above-named
defendant-Individual, if he be deceas-
ed, and all unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors or other parties
claiming by, through, under or against
such defendant: and also
ALL OTHER and unknown persons
having or claiming to have any right.
title or interest in the propel t\ which
is the subject matter of this suit, said
property lying and being In Dade
County, Florida, and more particularly
described as follows:
Lots Nine (9) and Ten(lO) |n
Block Six (6) of DIXIE
HEIGHTS GARDENS, accord-
ing to the Plat thereof, recorded
In Plat Book 21, at Page 32, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
YOU AND EACH OF YOU are here-
by notified that a suit has been filed
in the above-named Court by the
above-named plaintiff for the purpose
of obtaining a divorce a vinculo man 1
monii of and from the defendant and
a fee simple Interest in the undivided
one-half Interest of the defendant,
MILLAR!) LITTLES, in and to the
property herelnabove and partlcular-
1} described,
YOU ARE HEREBY ORDERED and
required to file your appearance,
pleading or answer In said suit on or
before the 30th day of April. ISM. and
in default of such appearance, plead-
ing or answer a decree pro confess.*
will be entered against you aid each
of you, an.l judgment by default will
be taken against you for the relief
demanded in the Amended Bill of
Complaint.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Dade County. Florida, this 2!lth day
of March, 1954.
E. B. LEATHERMAN,
clerk of the Circuit Court
By: WM. W. BTOCKINO,
Deputy Clerk
BEN ESSEN
Attorney for Plaintiff
til Seybold Building, Miami, Florida
4/2-9-16-L'3
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY (JIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
A. ABBOTT AWNING FLAG CO.
(NOT INC.), and BUILT-WELL
AWNING CO. (NOT INC.), at 133 B.W.
22nd Avenue, Intend to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
HERMAN SIEGENDORF
JOHN QLUCK
KKSSLER & GARS
Attorneys for Applicants
17S2 W. Flagler St.
4/2-9-16-23
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES' COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA. IN PROBATE, No. 32441 B
In Re: ESTATE OK
ROSE SNYDER. Deceased
To All Creditors and All Persons I iv-
IHSJ claim- 01 Demands Against :-:iii!
Estate:
You, and each of you, are hereby
notified and required to present any
claims and demands which you, or
either of you, may have against thn
estate of ROSE SNYDER. deceased
late of Lucas County, Ohio, and .!.-
County, Florida, to the "Hon"' |Te
County Judges of Dade Oourttv. ml
file the same In their offices In (tin
County Coui-tlions'- In Dade County,
Florida, within eight calendar in, -hs
from the date of the first pulilii Itlon
hereof. Said claims or demand-* to
contain the leyal address of the c'- >n-
ant and to be sworn to and prese-ited
as aforesaid, or same will be barred.
Date March 30, A.D. 19J4.
HENRY M. CAIN.
As Ancillary Admlnlstrat ir
1' T.A. of the Estate of
ROSE SNYDER, Dei .-as.
HENRY M. CAIN
Attorney for Estate of Rose Sny ler
2.".18 W. Flagler St., Miami, Fla.
4/2-9-16-23
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY OIVEN that
he undersigned, desiring to enttM In
business under the fictitious nai
A.A.A. CHAIR RENTALS AND
sales, at Mo N.E. 1st Ave.. Miami,
intend to register said name with the
Cl.rk of the Circuit Court of I tde
Count)', Florida.
MA (RICE BIRSCli
RALPH BIRSCH
4/16-23-30 5/7
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious nan.? of
RALEIGH CLEANERS & LAUNDRY,
at 2048 Blscayne Blvd.. intend to leg-
ist, -i- said name with the Clerk of the.
Circuit Court of Dade County, llor-
ida.
MVER MATLOFF
MARIAN MATLOri''
Owners ,
MANUEL I.CBEL
Attorney for Applicants
(21 W. Flagler St.
4/16-23-30 V?
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IB HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious nan of
ROOSEVELT HOSPITAL, at 5642
N.E. 2nd Avenue. Miami. Fla., in-
to register said name with the 1 ark
of the circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
ROOSEVELT HOSPITAL
SANITARIUM, INC.,
.1 Florida Corporation,
Sole Owner
SUMMER. FRANK WESTON
Attorneys for Roosevelt
Hospital Sanitarium, Inc.
1 Lincoln Road Bldg.
4,16-23-30 6/7
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN
CHANCERY. No. 1681S8
VINCENT HECKTol.D. Plaintiff,
THERE8E MILLER BBCKTOLD,
1 lefendant.
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
TO: THERESE MULLER
BECKTOLD
, 0 Mulli-r
242 Nassau Avenue
Brooklyn. New Ya/fc
You are hereby notlffeo* that a Bill
of Complaint for Divorce has been fil-
ed against you and you ate hereby
required to sei v.- a copy of your Ans-
wer to the Bill of Complaint on Plain-
tiff's attorney and Hie the original
Answer in the office of the Clerk of
the Circuit Ctoiirt, on or before the
17th day of May, 19.-.4; otherwise, the
allegations contained in said Bill of
Complaint will be taken as confessed
against you.
Dated this 13th day of April. 19.'.4.
K B LKATIIERMAN,
, Cl.uk of Circuit Court
By: R. H. RICE, .IR
(Seal) Deputy Clerk, (Seal)
GEORGE .1 TALIANOFF. ESQ.
Attorney for Plaintiff
420 Lincoln Road. Miami Bench. Fla.
4/i6-23-:;u
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engam- In
business under the fictitious name of
DOVER ACTS., at 1120-1130 Diesel
Avenue. Miami Bench. Florida. Intend
to regtst, r said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court o( Dade County,
Florida.
LEON GOLDBERG
CLARA tiOUDBERG
4/16-23-30 :,'7
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious nan... of
STATE MORTGAGE COMPANY, at
4 1 N.E. 1st Ave.. Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County. Florida.
DAVID FRIEDMAN. Osner
4/16-23-30- 3/7
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that
he undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
AUTOMATIC MAYTAG LAUNDRY.
at 5500-02-114 N.W. 2nd Avenue. Mi-
ami. Morlda. Intends to reglstei mid
name with the clerk'of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
SAMUEL C. KAHN
SIDNEY EFRONSON
Attorney for Samuel C. Kahn
I0J Blscayne Building. Miami, Kiudl
1 IC-2S-M 5/7
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN th.c
the iin.lersiKiied. desiring to engage III
business under the fictitious name of
QUINIELA BAR. at tK N W. 37tli
Ave, intends to register said r -1
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
1 1.ole County. Florida
WALTER ZELLER, Owner
KES8LER & GARS
Attorneys for Applicant i
1782 W. Hagler St.
4/16-2:1-30 5/7
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
fJewisti Ifkrid kin
solicits your legal notices.
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Phone 2-4366
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2-4366


PAGE 12 B
+.lmisl>ncr&&&t-
League of Women Voters to Hear
Panel on May Primary Election
tioldberg Voted
Medal ot Merit
NEW YORK Chaplain (Capt.)
Joshua L Goldberg, district chap-
lain of the Third Naval District and
staff chaplain of the eastern Sea
Frontier, has been voted the an-'
nual Four Chaplains Medal for]
Merit by the Four Chaplains Me- fhojopic fgrU ffi ***. -hand knowledge of the i
morial Association, it was an-
nounced yesterday by Rabbi Jo-
seph H. Lookstein. chairman of the
Commission on Jewish Chaplaincy
of the National Jewish Welfare
Board.
Chaplain Goldberg, who is the
liaison between the Commission on
Jewish Chaplaincy, official body
for recruiting, endorsing and sen
meeting on Friday at the Monte
Carlo Hotel.
-Whafs -it Stake in Mav" will be managing
. ussion. Beach Sun, bringing to the group a
with Dr
for the Miami Daily News and tele
vision commentator, and Ed Richer,
editor of the Miami
Citizen* lnilorst's Klein
After screening the five candi-
dates, the Citizens Action Commit-
tee has official!) endorsed Harvey
R Klein for the legislature in
Group 2 at the county-wide Demo
ing Jewish chaplains in all branch- cratic primary May 4. according to
es of the armed forces, and the
Navy Chaplains Division, will re-
ceive the medal on Monday. April
26. at the annual armed forces and
veterans' dinner meetini; of the
Brotherhood of Temple Ohabei
Shalom. Boston. Presentation of the
gold medal and citation will be
made by the Rev Father Edward J
Carney, former national chaplain of
the American Legion, who was
awarded the medal last year.
Judge Wear*
C on f union About
Claimtt Court
Judge Raymond G. Nathan, of
the Dade County Small Claims
Court, this week issued a statement
aimed at clearing up what he
termed "confusion among the vot-
ers" regarding his court.
Judge Nathan is a candidate to
retain his post on the court, a posi-
tion he has held since appointment
over ;i year ago by the late Go>
Dan McCarty.
"So many people have told me
thej want to support me but think
thej will be voting against the Jus
Judge Nathan said,
Nothing could be further from
the truth. The .11' courts are not
concerned in this election. As a
matter of fact. I have received fine
support from among the Justices ni
the Peace in the county." he said
tiei of the Peace in their district."
No matter where a voter li\<'- in
Dade county, he can vote for the
Small Claims Court, since it is a
county-wide court, the Judge point-
ed out.
Judge Nathan has heard the rec
ord number of over 8.600 cases dur
ing the last year, involving more
than 26.000 persons.
The judge has been a Dade Coun-
ty resident for more than 33 years
He is a graduate of the Universit]
of Florida and University of Miami
Law School.
Mrs Kathryn Crawford, member-
ship chairman.
Rollo Karkeet miami attorney,
and chairman ol the Citizens Ac
tion Committee, explains that Ix-
fore winning endorsement of the
committee a candidate is screened
U to his ability, platform, charac-
ter, standing in the community
and his general qualifications
Endorsement is based on a point
system, and Klein was given a
rating of 125. the highest in any
group for the legislature or con-
gress. Mrs Crawford said.
Paramount planks in the Klein
platform include elimination of the
power of the Florida Milk Commis
sion to fix milk prices, revision of
the state constitution to make pos-
sible increased representation for
Dade County in the legislature, full
length Florida turnpike, fair dis-
tribution of tax money for Dade
County and more and better roads
for Dade
Floyd Submits Record
For Voters' Approval
Robert L. Floyd, candidate for
Circuit Judge, in talks this week
asked voters throughout the coun-
ty to think of themselves as em-
ployers about to hire a key era-
ployee.
"You know my record." Floyd
said, "as attorney agent in the FBI.
and a mayor ol Miami and state
representative, while earning my
living In Ihe courts as an attor-
ney
Floyd urged voters to study his
record for length and scope of
legal practice and for "broad qual-
ifications of tested public service."
T.Y. SERVICE
No Charge For Call
N'lghta, Mundays, Holldayi
I'mxrrsal T V Phone 11-1387
IMMEDIATR TV SERVICE
DAILY, Kl NPAYS. HOLIDAYS
10 AM la n P M 1} far 'ill
Wi4 Television Hi U-lItl
THE FIRST DOS TRACK IN FLORIDA TO HAVE
AUTOMATIC T0TALISAT0RS AT EVERY MUTUEL WIRD0WI

mmM
w
See Your
' Daily Newspapers '
For Direct Bus Routes
To The Track
'Ottfi
^'eoi,!,,
l*A-
TRACK
/ 0 N IY \
I fUTURITY '
TRACK J
\ IN FLA./
ol the May Primaries
Mrs Maurice Scrotta will act as
moderator.
Mrs Charles Stein and Mrs. Har-
ry Brown are in charge of the
luncheon following.
Additional items on the program
include an explanation of the clas-
sifications of the ballot by Mrs.
Robert J Yaffey. voters service
chairman A report on the I-eague
state Convention held. April 6 8,
will be given by Mrs Bernard Stev-
ens who was elected to the State
Board for 1954 56
Beginning April 26. the Beach
League will maintain voting in-
formation tables throughout the
city.
Skit Due at Meeting
Officers of the Miami Beach
Louise Chapter of the American
Jewish Congress will put on a skit
for the Miami Chapter at the next
regular mw,inu
Ka,"""Wear
J* Hanev C
State Ug,S|,tur(
sPeaker.
Elecf
NbIF^ ROBERT L
F L OYD
CIRCUIT JUDGE
COMMITTU TO lUCt IOIIII I. IIOrQ CIICUII
115th Street Between N.E. 2nd and N.W. 7th Aves
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Full Text

PAGE 1

PAGE 10 A >Jcnist>fhr*&£L _FRH)AY Figures on Israel Not Revealed Continued from Page 1 A but did not break down the total figure to show h >w much Israel or any other country in the Near East would receive individually Meanwhile, however, FOA MUM in -aid that while aid In l-racl walo be continued, the program in that country would decline because of the success of previous opera tinns and (hat not .is much monej would be spent there as previously. On the other hand, il was noted Near East would IKafforded Israel governments can justify to their although it >s own people the permanent *ettlci.is yet unclear, known that other allocations are being simultaneously asked for mutual defense assistance, mutual defense support, and technu operation Whether the latter categorii will be available to i-i not known although it is i ramed thai Israel should benefit Iron technical i inds The FOA made it kn iwn that the that aid for the Arabs will be slightly increased as the degree of Arab states and Israel hav, been need indicates Israel and the Arab states were characterized as countries In which the problems are rapidly changing and for that reason government officials feel it would be wiser not to specify at this time any specific amount for Israel or individual Arab states. Whether additional fundbethe S130.000.000 cited for the ( %  onion Socks 11 l*OU|l .* l*OKt An 18-month record aDade County circuit Judge, praised b> attorneys and the public alike, is pointed to by the galax) oi friends of J. Frits Gordon as a factor in hicampaign for election as Cir cuit Judge in Group 5. Gordon has lived and practiced law in Dade County for 30 years and "has made a notable record in his profession and gained a splendid name throughout the count) for his civic and fraternal activities," his supporters indicate. While circuit judge. Gordon did much to prevent final divorce actions He reunited reportedly a good many couples on the binge of breaking for keeps, destroying a home and adversely affecting children involved, according to reports here. "I have long pointed to the high percentage ol juvenile delinquency resulting from the broken home, and thus, aa circuit judge, determined to prevent as many broken homes apossible.'" he explained. "The exceptional record I made there has drawn much praise from every segment of Dade County" Scholarship to Hebrew University Given at Miami Chapter Meeting informed that the United States In BSSI asing the needs ol individual countries foi assist! no will give considerable weigh) to the d to which there ia willingness to cooperate in the solution ol regional problems such as the use oi the waters of the Jordan ba-m on I regional basis'." Extraordinary Effort* Noted The FOA reported that it found it "encouraging" to note that the water development plan submitted bj Presidential representative Eric Johnston "is being seriouslj studied and appraised b) the interest id countries The-e tactwere revealed when the FOA issued a regional narrs live statement explaining its ideas on the assistance program in the Near East for the fiscal year of 1955 The report stated that the Is rael Government has taken "extraordinary measures" in recent months to put its economy on an orderly basi"These measures."' the report said, "plus a substantial increase in exports and the realization of German reparations payments, has brightened the economic outlook considerably, but not to a degree where further development aasiatance is no longer necessary. It is estimated that there can be a substantial reduction from the amounts of this type of assistance furnished in prior years The FOA noted that "American and other free world Jewry have made significant contributions" to helping to resettle refugees arriving in Israel and to establish the economy of the state. Citing what was described as nearly a million" Arab refugees, the report said these Arabs represent "a continuing source of friction and an unbearable strain on the economy of the Arab states in which they have been given ref Ufa To help solve this problem. ment "f the refugeea Aid will be given in the fiscal year of 1953 I > undertake such projects m Jordan. Syria, Leh.i non. and Egypt. The l-'n \ reported 'bat despite certain diflercnces. "support tor Mnencan policj has remained in Greece, Turkey and Israel li added thai "• %  la the Arab states, where bitterness on the subject ol Israel militates against full accord, there is a certain body of goodwill, to which American assistance has made a significant contribution." New UN Role Seen for Bunche Continued from Pag* 1 A press by Henry Suydani. press officer of the State Department Mr. Council ScL Russia Stands With Arabs in East Controversy Continued from Page 1 A veto in the Security Council by the S nriel Union. The British were pictured as optimistic about their chances of getting Jordan to participate in such a conference, despite its refusal to come to a meeting called by the IN Secretary General under the termof Article XII of the Israel Jordan armistice agreement. In addition, it was learned, the governments of the United States and Britain will seek to impress upon Israel and the Arab States that border incidents must cease It is believed likely that Dulles and Eden discussed penalties to be im posed on those states which refuse to cooperate in ending the border warfare. However, an official spokesman refused to comment on this aspect of the talks. Other specific proposals for stabilising the Israel border situation were also discussed and will be pursued further in diplomatic talks. It was stressed when the talks between the two foreign secretaries were announced that British Middle East experts had been called into the meeting. Mrs. Herb s, her <"<• Greater Mi arai al Counefj of pledge lunches Suydam declined to answer ques lhai the annual itt, tion* baed on Ihe statement, uj n April 28.at ljS' 1 ing thai he was not in a position to A ~ in former interpret it. | mem| Ws in far** Israel Greets Statement XJlls policy statement was greet ed by Abba S Kuan, the Israel Am bassador In a meeting with Assist ant Secretary of State Henry A Byroade, the Israeli envoy said that the Department's hope that co operation rather than force would characterize the relations of the countries of the Middle East ex'"•" Ul a<1 aw, 'heir h^l Money raj further Council'i LL P 'S" born, their um^J -hips, overseas pn,^ 1 munity services. Mrs Han* Sch.ii i ^airman, and Ma ip_ pressed precisely what the Israel l n '" rman 'or the Mia*] Government has been trying to em-1 ,r8eof *n phasize all along. Mr Eban added that Israel only hoped her neighbors would come to understand the necessity for di rect cooperation. Later, he made known that he would make an address in the near future in which might be found Israel's view of the relationship of the Jewish State with world Jewry and other sub-' ject.s mentioned by Mr. Byroade, last week at Dayton. Ohio! Meanwhile, the views expressed by Mr. Byroade found warm approval for the American Council for Judaism. Lessing J. Rosenwald. the Council's president, commended Mr. Byroade for emphasizing "an important principle underlying the proper relationship of the State of Israel to Jews throughout the world." Some 60 persons attended meeting of the Greater Miami I ,ne *OA recommended that atten) Chapter. American Friends of the '' on be given to 'creating new eco J Domic opportunities in the Arab stales, for bolh refugees and nonrefugees, in order to create a political climate in which the country T Hebrew University, at the home of Mrs Jennie Grossinger, 5941 Pine Iree dr. Principal speaker was Dr Berth eld Fried!, of the University of Miami, and iormer exchange pint, M>r to the Hebrew University at Jerusalem. Israel. Harry Simonhoff. program chairman, alao ar ranged for the showing of a film. "House on the Hill." which related the historic development oi Israel's only university since itformation 30 yean ago Money for scholarships was L;I\ en to the chapter during tin coui se of the meeting according to Mrs Oida Rubin, president. Principal gift was made bj David Provus The newly formed group, which celebrated the Hebrew University's 30th anniversary on April 1, plans its ne xt meeting at the Coral Gables home of Dr, and Mrs Philip Gotlieb. To Attend Annual Meet NEW YORK CITY — Mrs. David L. Zielonka. of Tampa, Fla.. a vice president of the National Federation of Temple Sisterhoods, will participate in ehe annual meeting of the Executive Board of the organization at its national headquarters here in the House of Living Judaism-Berg Memorial, April 26 to 30. Mrs. Zielonka is chairman of the Department on Religion and Education. Keep Your Cities ond Your County Lever 14A William W. (Bill)CHARLES YOUR REPRESENTATIVE Legislature—Group 1 i IM I • i, il Adv I f \ c { I 1 } \ JUDGl RAYMOND! Judge of Dade County's! Smoil Claims (in the courlfconstl PULL LEVER Senator Collins liar I; in Miami Miami personal appearance of Senator LcRoy Collins during his campaign visit this week will be at a free barbecue to be held on Saturday, from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., at NW 7th ave. and 97th st according to Harold Vann. his campaign chairman for Dade County. The candidate for governor was to arrive in Miami Thursday He will appear at 8:30 p.m. on WTVJ's program. "What's the Story?" He returns to the same station Friday, at 7:45 p.m.. and again on Saturday at 4:30 p.m. John MeCarty will speak for Collins at 8:45 p.m., Friday, over tele\ Urion station WITV and radio sta tion WIOD. ^~^~*^^*~**^**^***'**~*~*r~^*^*~*~\*~*+^f*'*****^*^ W. M <*• BiOSUER EOR PASSOVER -zt-r: Thv World* Mont Exriting flavor BEEF, ail EEB choice BEEF! Thr \ vru tin*** Frankfurter**. Cornod Beef. Blogn Formost Kosher Sausage Co Phones 307212 ** 230 N.W. 5th Street. Miami. Florida



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PHIL 23. 1954 bBAL SHORTS ^Jfml^n^tf^ PAGE 5B omic Assistance to fbe Cut Drastically fcGTON (JTA) — State It sources unofficially Reports that Israel's ecotcchnical assistance alibiyear will be substantial!. They refused to %  on specific reports that L 1 will be drastically cut Li 70 million dollars ap]a >car to somewhere beJBnil 50 millions this year. Jto an Associated Press |e total for the Middle he new year will be about 0. of which Iran will relooo.ooo. German Jews Mark Allied Liberation of Nazi Survivors HAMBURG (JTA) — Solemn memorial services in various parts of Germany marked the ninth anniversary of the liberation of Nazi concentration camps which fell into the hands of victorious Allied troops on V-E Day in 1945. At the towering shaft of the Bergen-Belseo memorial, a group of Jews from Hamburg, Hanover and other cities, assembled to bow their heads and hear prayers. Parliament Passes pension for Refugees (JTA) A second gov%  mendment to the Social Act. providing pension ] in emigrants who were J to leave Austria for poBifiious or racial reasons, adopted by Parliament government eliminated %  tory restrictive clauses | draft bill. The bill orig| excluded from the benei measure emigrants who ITI.KI to Austria in 1951 land had remained in the bore than 90 days. British Commonwealth Jewish Groups Meet LONDON (JTA) — A conference of representatives of Jewish organizations throughout the British Commonwealth is being convened here for June 20th, it was announced here by Dr. Abraham Cohen, president of the Board of Deputies of British Jews. Details of the conference agenda have not yet been finalized, Dr. Cohen said, but representatives are expected to come here from many Jewish communal organizations in the Commonwealth, Dr. Cohen told a Board meeting. in Bonn Government Deter British Support )N (JTA) — The British ent has rejected suggesit refuse to support Gerrmament or membership uropean Defense Commuallegedly notorious exre removed from the West ICovernment. Arthur LewM.P.. who raised the isbged that VYaldemar Kraft, Twithout portfolio, Emanukkt r. Minister of Housing, jodor Oberlander, Minister tiled Persons, in the AdeJlbinet had all been mem%  the Hitler Elite Guard. (iticizes Rabbi Salit's at Lunch [YORK (JTA) — The action liorman Salit, president of pgogue Council of Amervoiced criticism of the (Nations handling of ArabJfaputes at a State Departfct Office Department lunln Washington last week, fcrply criticized in a stateJsued hereby the American [Committee. The statement ft. Salit's comments on that "a grievous offense I the spirit of international lican Senators, Issmen Ask Act Change BTNGTON (JTA) — Three %  Ml Senators and five Rein members of the House |ti) introduce a bill to rewrite ^Carran Walter Immigration *e bill would remove the pees specified by President fwer in his April 6, 1953 F Sen. Arthur V. Watkins, m of the Senate ImmigratPbeommittee. It would end J ura Mid administrative inP that have appeared in the P s < rat ion of the law and 1 Provide for the pooling of quotas. American Zionists Welcome View on Arab-Israel Dispute WASHINGTON (JTA) — The position taken by the United States in the Security Council in calling for a full review of Arab-Israel relations was welcomed last weekend by the American Zionist Council for Public Affairs. In a statement by Louis Lipsky. chairman of the group, the council said it welcomed "the position taken by Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge for the United States delegation at the Security Council calling for a review of the entire Arab-Israel conflict." Israeli Minister in Paris Confers with Georges Bidault PARIS (JTA) — Foreign Minister Georges Bidault last weekend received Israeli Minister Yaacov Tsur in what was described as a "most cordial" interview concerning the Israel-Arab conflict and its consideration by the United Nations Security Council. It is understood that M. Bidault was deeply concerned with Israel's desire to relax the tensions along its borders and its desire for a final peace settlement with the Arabs. I Cabinet Considers on Gaza Strip A'SAI.KM (JTA) The Israel | %  *• considered the situaPons the Israel-Egyptian bor W a area Allowing a P" W the Israel-Egyptian I Armistice Commission to %  '" Uypt for four attacks %  •• territory. The Ministers Tmiw an in,erim budget n'•"W Pounds for develop[1Purposes for the next two 0 kee P Projects now in %  ir "m closing down. The expenditures will be pre,or approval to the Parlia"New Name Dance" \ Due Here Sunday A "New Name Dance" is scheduled by the Young Adult Group of Temple Emanu-El for Sunday, April 25, at 9 p.m., in the Social Hall of the Temple. The dance will celebrate the group's change of name from the Young Adult Group of the Miami Beach Jewish Center in accordance with the change in name of the congregation. Heading the social committee is Debbie Graboyes, assisted by Arlene Weisblatt, Bob Stone, Donald Marks, Phyliss Goldstein, Sue Schepper and Elaine Schwartzman. Some of the many guests currently in Miami Beach for the holiday season seen vacationing at Andron's Loon Lake Hotel, located 1,800 feet high in the pollen-free Adirondacks. Loon Lake Hotel is operated under the ownership-management of David S. Andron and Dave Levinson, two prominent Miami Beach hotelmen. Bond Sales on Rise, Dade Chairman Says service) purchases, now add up to $17,723,970, which is 11.9 percent ahead of the same period last year, Harry H. Bassett. chairman of the Savings Bonds Committee for Dade County, this week said that the sale of E and H bonds had tak en a sharp rise in Florida during the month of March. The sales in Dade County were $1,264,165 for the month, while the statewide volume was $5,603,109, an increase of 31.9 percent over March of last year. Savings Bond sales for the first three months of 1954, including the state's pro-rata share of Federal employee (uniformed and civil Bassett said. Zionists, Progressives in Israel Confer on Single Slate TEL AVIV (JTA) — Negotiations between the General Zionists and the Progressive Party leading to submission of a single list in the next elections to the Israel Parliament have been proceeding here. Dr. Nahum Goldmann, chairman of the Jewish Agency Executive, presided at two meetings here of representatives of the two centrist parties to discuss this cooperation, it was learned. Jews in Poland Must Indicate Zionist Affiliation LONDON (JTA) — Polish Jews are required to indicate whether they have ever belonged to "any Zionist party" in applying for new identification cards which all Polish citizens will have to carry in the future, according to a report received here from Warsaw. Applicants for these cards must fill out a form answering about tw questions. In answer to one question, the applicant must indicate whether he has ever belonged to a Fascist movement. The very next ouestion poses "Zionist party affiliation. Dulles and Eden Discuss Israel Border Difficulties LONDON (JTA) The situation in the Middle East, with special reference to the position along the frontiers of Israel, was the main subject discussed today a a meeting of Secretary of State John Foster Dulles and Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden, according to a foreign Office announcement. GORDON ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORKS 414 S.W. 22nd AVE. Ph. 4-5860 Have your roof repaired now; you will save on a new roof later "Satisfactory WorK by Experienced Men" Completely Air Conditioned IHI BIST .IN KOSHER FOODS KOSHER RESTAURANT A DELICATESSE A Unique Experience in Dining Pleasure TRADITIONAL FRIDAY NIGHT DINNERS $2.50 Delicatessen to Take Home 1141 WASHINGTON AVE. OPPOSITE CITT HAH MIAMI BEACH Open Daily 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. MENDELSOHN'S KOSHER CATERERS WEDDINGS KOSHER FINEST CATERING SUVKl FOR BAR AWTZVAHS, AND OTHER SOCIAl AffAM Alt* Serving Organization Functions Our Restaurant mu4 Catering Service Under Complete Supervision of RABBI MOSES MESCHEIOFF AND THE BETH JACOB VAAD HAKASHRUTH Try the Mkiws Kosher Dishes Served at Our Restaurant ft#3 MENDELSOHN'S fffl CORNER 41st ST. & ROYAL PALM AVE., MIAMI BEACH Dinners and A La Carte Air Conditioned Telephone 58-7074 TRADITIONAL DINNERS ONLY ON FRIDAY MASGIAH ON PREMISES



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I APRI L 23, 1954 •bHMnnriraM PAGE 3 B lents Alerted to Support [5OOO Jewish residents in %  vjami were alerted this %  be rcadv for a visit from Tr in behalf of the Greater bmbined Jewish Appeal. ; to an announcement [K. Shochet, publisher of |sh Floridian and general I of the CJA Committee of Idred. two streamlined vol]roups have been organized emaining prospects to tell %  of CJA's services and to Ltributions for support of bal campaign. |ign chairman Aaron M. I joining with Shochet in dination of the final drive General Mobilization Divi|id that "Workers in the lees of One Hundred on the jd in town will visit all fc wherever they are, withraphic restriction." |so announced that all mochairmen, vice chairmen %  n supervisors will be out Moor bells in an effort to %  maximum coverage no matte prospects reside. AutoBeets have been organized outlying areas and to faswift cleanup and to bring feminity phase of the curjipaign to a successful conIbefore May 6, the date set j>aign officials for a final tally. J few days, a neighbor will |you in behalf of the Greatni Combined Jewish ApJjochet and Kanner said. "If le a moment, he'll tell you Aoric and courageous strug[economic independence in Sell tell you of border danfmers who till the soil carries for protection, children Bad their daily walk to the louse. also tell you of a miracle iocracy, of 700,000 Jews pf houses built, of the sick and of freedom surging %  wing. And he'lf tell you of tn Jewish community in Miami—how a generous ution will keep the doors I Mount Sinai Hospital, Jew ne for the Aged, the OnJewish Social Service from your heart. In this prough the Combined Jewish you will help preserve hufenity everywhere." fee J. Talianoff, Miami %  chairman of the Committee 1 Hundred, and George Chertpmi chairman, are confident will be instrumental in |he streamlined volunteer for CJA Callers; Final Drive bringing the community drive to its 1954 quota. Workers who have gone forward immediately after the successful i M-Day drive to enlist as volunteers in the Committee of One Hundred include Sallie Alexander. Gilbert J. Balkin, Mrs.' Icviug Cypen, Edna B. Finberg, David Freedmah, Mayshe Friedberg, Seymour Gelber, Jacob Grunberg, Al Hellman, Isaac Hirsch, Ida Horowitz, Nina Lazebnik, Zipporah Levine. Lena Mintzes, Abraham Morris, Henry Nadelman, Gil Rappaport, Sally Rosen, Eugene J. Schwarz, Harry Seligman, J. Z. Stadlan. Pauline Thurston, Raymond L. Wise. Mrs. Ella Wollman, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Seitlin, A. Budd Cutler, Irving Strauss. Tobias Simon, Isidore Cohen. Belle Levin, Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Kam, Esther Good•man, Abraham Swartz, Lillian Goodman, Jack Regal, Oscar Rappaport, Harry Gordon, Mrs. Simon April. Rudolph E. Briu, Mrs. Jessie Gertman, Mrs. Fannie Kay, Mr. and Mrs. Morris Laster, B. H. Liberman, Harry Nissel, Robert L. Robinson. Mrs. Minnie Rosen, A. P. Rosenberg, Irving Saal. Betty Schneider, Mr. and Mrs. M. Seeman. Mrs. Celia Segal, Oscar Zeltzer and Jacob Victor. |Board to Meet of the Beth David Syna[PTA will meet on Monday April 26, 8 p.m., at the Pf Mrs Nathan Davidow, 333 po ave.. Coral Gables. Compare IETLET TEA with any other brand ffAlff*/ ten Compare ETIEY TEA "ith my other brand trWK! JSSB Plans Annual Meeting Leon Kaplan, chairman of the Nominating Committee of the Jewish Social Service Bureau, this week announced his committee's slate of nominees to the Board of Directors of that agency. Nominated for reelection are Mrs. Moe Feingold, Mrs. Stanley C. Myers, Judge William Pallot, Dr. Emanuel Pushkin, Herbert E. Scher and Mrs. Monte Selig. Being proposed as new members of the Board of Directors are Mrs. David Kirsch, Morris Klass, Alexander Rubin, Dr. Stanley Weinkle and Bernard Wexler. Election of directors to the Board of the Jewish Social Service Bureau will be held at the annual membership meeting of the Jewish Social Service Bureau scheduled as a Sunday morning brunch on May 9, at 18:30 a.m. This year, the meeting of the Bureau returns to Miami Beach and will take place at the Shelborne Hotel. Mrs. Stanley C. Myers, president, said that the meeting will be organized around the general theme of "New Chapters in the JSSB Story" and will include reports to the Jewish community on the recently developed program of vocational service and on the question of a Jewish foster care program. Listen To SCHACHTER'S New Yiddish Program fvtry Sunday, WMBM. 11 ** This rtrom I* tfca "•* ** largest listening aoSiaeCa '••torts *• Jtwlih Pallasae-tr NORMAN R. LYONS. News HAROLD TURK, Caaacitaes. earf SNOSHANA V KTOt Members of Pioneer Women's Organization, Club No. 2, will be honored for their activity in behalf of numerous local philanthropic and cultural programs here. Shown are Millie Winner and Pearl Gratz, first and second vice chairmen of Moetzot Hapaolot; Sophie Krantz. chairman of ways and means; and Rose Aster and Rose D. Yong, co-chairmen of Jewish National Fund. On the committee of arrangements are Ida Powell, president; Lena Mintzes, chairman of Moetzot Hapaolot; and Ida Bookspan. the chairman. < ll.lllllH'lV.IIII.'S Coniniittoo Heads Committee chairmen appointments for the Miami Beach Chamber of Commerce were announced this week by Freeland B. Cresap, president. Heading the Advertising Committee is Herb Gimbel, of the Herb Gimbel Company, who announced a meeting of his committee will be held during the last week in April. Activities of the Safety Committee were designated to Allen Lipkin, replacing Burton Kahn, now a Board member. A meeting of the new Safety Committee will be held 8:15 a.m., April 26, in the Sea Gull Hotel. Others named were Harry Zuck ernick, Civic Affairs; Leo Eisenstein, Courtesy; H. Earl Smalley, Jr., Cruise Club; Roy E. Jones, Education; Ike Parrish, Hospitality; Don Mucklow, Marine; E. N. Matthews, National Affairs; Col. Charles G. Mettler and Porter Norris, Pan American; Budd A. Mayer, Sports; Carl T. Hoffman, State It County Affairs; Milo Bennett, Transportation; Ray Sterling and Gus Geiger, Zoning. Dr. Martinez to Speak At Spinoza Forum Dr. J. M. Martinez, author of "Man in Nature and Behavior," will be guest speaker on Saturday afternoon, 3:30 p.m., at the Spinoza Outdoor Forum on trie 'awn of the home of Dr. Abraham Wolfson, 11th st. and Ocean ct. Dr. Martinez will review his book and answer questions. Irving Strauss, artist, will preside. Julius Frank, of Miami Beach, will speak briefly on mathematical recreations. MIAMI BEACH 1104 Lincoln Rd. Ph. 5 3812 SUIFSWE 9473 Hording Ava. Ph. 16 6171 CUSTOM TAILOflNG 1104 LINCOLN ROAD Miami Beach •473 HAWING AVENUE Surfside HABERDASHERY 30fh tur on Miami Beech Tillie Lewis' KOSHER DIET PLAN provides a wide selection of Tasti-Diei Foods for enjoyment at Fleishig'e and Milchig'e meals. enjoy rich-tasting Kosher SALAD DRESSINGS ...losepounds a week! Ct riifted Koihtr and Porvt b t RASH J. H. KAUAG Taffy salads drenched in tongy, zippy Tasti-Diet Salad Dressing contain up to 76% less calorie*. Tillie Lewis TASTI-DIET SALAD DRESSING 1W.UE HWIS TASTI-DIET CHEFS DtfJSINO • WHIPPED DRESSING AIM Syiopy r,in •* *•• ••••"• men r •'*•'• •' *•* '••'*• MARGARET ANN and KWIK CHEK STORES FOOD FAIR CARLS MARKETS STORES MIAMI RETAIL GROCERS STORES TANNER and i THRIFTT STORES FREDERICK'S MARKET SHELL'S SUPER STORE STEVENS MARKET and at your favorite food start George E. HOLT Nineteen Continuous Years Public Service • Law Maker • Six Yean a Legislator • Tried • Thirteen Years a Circuit Court Judge • Experienced • Associate Justice Florida Supreme Court • Proven • Law Professor Civic Leader Lawyer Benefactor Retain George E. HOLT CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE GROUP 1



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PAGE 4A >L~i*§,rkw*Mg£L H&AY Published avery Friday since U27 by the Jewish Floridian at 120 N. E Sixth Street, Miami 18. F "> r a t Entered at second-class matter July 4, 1930, at the Poat Ofic-^f Miami, Fla., under the Act of March s. > !" The Jewish Floridian hae absorbed the Jewish Unty and the Jewish Weekly. Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate, Worldwide News Service. National Editorial Association. Amer. ican Aaaociation ol English-Jewish Nswspapers. Florida Press Association. FRED K. SHOCHET E ditor and Publisher Vo]ume 2 Q LEO MINDLIN News Editor llillol IIOIIS," 4111 I .IIM|MIS Many of us do a lot of talking about ihe importance of continuing our Jewish culture and traditions among the youth of this nation, but few of us do much in a positive way toward achieving that end. Hillel House on the University of Miami campus is a concrete example of our effort to foster cultural and social programs for Jewish students attending school here. Time was when those who wanted to participate in such programs had to leave the campus grounds. The old Hillel House was a make-shift on Ponce de Leon blvd. and inconvenienced students with odd off-hours. Unless thev were free from class for a considerably lengthy period, they had to forego the opportunity afforded by a visit at Hillel. This major obstacle will now be overcome with the new house going up on the corner of Miller rd. and the Dixie Highway. A cornerstone ceremony is being planned by the Greater Miami Hillel Council for the latter part of May. We think that they have done a fine job. quietly and efficiently. It would be a good idea for all of us to take cognizance of this worthy project. Jewish students at the University of Miami will benefit greatly as a result. Their need for a cultural, educational and social center that combines the leisure of voluntary participation with the significance of professional guidance in a university atmosphere is great. vJemsfifloridian OFFICE and PLANT -MO N E. Sbcth Street Telephones 2 1141 — 2-8212 • ^t.^?"^!^' m th of the "' SUBICP.IPT One Year •> ON P. A T E %  : Two Years 15.00 Friday. April 23, 1954 Nisan 20, 5714 Number 16 ^/^.^"*A^.^V/^*^^^^** censed by the suave diplomacy that is now JH£. J^l down the river of expediency. w,,ln • yotjA But I also become fearful for Israels future *s. own methods in many instances I beein t „.. *"' identification when I find that the Jewish suT/i '* which are irreconcilable with certain fundamentT^ ample of this is the recent "trade" made by Ci 1ft? a repelling piece of maneuvering that, in modern H judicial and social history spinning rearward someiw „ To insure the safety of a universal draft law i no u government wooed and won the political support Z T" ment only after it had been granted in turn the now. riage and divorce. smaller numbers of Israelis are now seeking permanent exit visas than heretofore, and it is anticipated that a leveling-off will soon take place. It is certainly not difficult to understand how some Jews become disenchanted after their arrival in Israel. Requirements for living in a pioneer land are difficult, indeed. To be asked to share rationing and downright deprivation s minds rather than in the struggle to after years of exile and. in many cases, physi^nT TV, e ? m .. 5* Se ? S i Came : ? meS Cal ,0r,Ure ,axes ,he *gi5£ n occasion, sage of hope to the downtrodden and leaves *-V.UIUII. for its sister ships the duty of protecting our But ,ne sixty-eight Jews who returned to Rushores at home. mania after living for a time in Israel and the bitter disappointment they are experiencing. The Courier is virtually a floating radio transa £ C M ing ,0 re P rts bom Istanbul this week, mitter. Somewhere in the Eastern Mediterranshould serve as an example for other Israelis THUS HAVE RELIGION AND SECULAR rule in I* fused—an eventuality against which every free-think during the past three centuries has militated As a In vidual. I have identified, myself with movements here taming this separation. But in my identification with the j I find that I am inadvertently torced to accept the inn hgious dogma upon secular law I must make clear that l posed to Orthodox regulatory doctrine as such. What I dot with uncontrollable vehemence, is the resultant stiflBfJ which has been the shameful harvest of the government's %  the religious elements I would be no less than false to my intellectual andi identification so far as Israel is concerned if I did not admit cern in this regard. I would be similarly false if I failed) what I consider an extremely sensitive remark made by A tary of State Henry A. Byroade last week a remark '__ on the failure of Israel's foreign policy since its bovishea the international scene in 1949. and one which does not -hi State in its best light. LEST I IMMEDIATELY BE ACCUSED of negative I the basis of these critical observations and in the face of i professed identifications, let me say at this point that | By made's speech before the Dayton World Affairs Council i a masterpiece of poetic muddlement based on a naive allegorf] and Ahmed, representing Israel and the Arab League, the border of "middle-of-the-road" thinking and which reu Israel's emigration problem is certainly a untenable propinquity to political nihilism with the As serious one. but official reports have it that' tary's constant asseveration that America had inherited "A LITTLE MORE CHAOS DOESN'T HURT ME" I m .KiniM-dl roiiiiiioilif v 1 l\s>.-ir of Hope The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Courier is an unusual ship, for it is engaged in the battle of ean last week, it beamed a Passover prayer to Jews trapped behind the Iron Curtain, telling them that tyrants cannot long endure or injustice rule forever. It seems to us that we too. endowed with the privileges of living in a free nation, can profit by that message. Andrei Vishinsky of the Soviet Union, president of the Security Council this month, denied seeking exit visas without due consideration. The "returnees" are apparently living in temporary Jiousing and have found no employZionist leaders. Israel may be currently experiencing difficulty, but it is the difficulty of an awakening land. While temporary shortages plague some, freedom nurtures all. It is this last commodity which abound a reguest by the Israel delegation that Mon, ,ewish bla,e nd which may be had without coupons Of all people, Israel's new citizens certainly understand that. day's session relating to the Near Eastern dispute be postponed because of Passover. But Mr. Vishinsky did postpone the UN body's meetinq when he learned of the illness of Dr. Charles Malik, Lebanese member of the Security Council who speaks for the Arab states. We can not conceive of any representative peoples' request being turned down by the world organization in this regard. Festivals sacred to Judaism, Islum or Christianity would certainly be accorded the respect due them at the hands of another nation. Soviet Russia's denial of the Israeli request reflects not only its policies based on expediency, alone, but also its virtual Godlessness. The Coast Guard Cutter Courier's message to those unfortunate Jews trapped behind the Iron Curtain threfore gives us faith in the future, for we are reminded of the fact that people of all creeds have been silenced by tyrants no less ruthless than the ancient Egyptian task'he tide of that histor^ and^cuedZ master but that the struggle for freedom conWar of Liberation. We believe that •tantly enlarges man's ambition ultimately to the he govern his own destiny. situation — one which it essentially did not want. "The United States has been thrust into the Middle I suddenly and without adequate national preparation,'' said. He explained ouc government's about-face and inter the fact that the American people acted in large measure Mi pathy and horror at the outrages committed against the Je4( in Europe during the past twenty-five years. In this sense, he stunted history or at least underscored wodijj tivity to the outrages suffered by the Jews during the paittwf years of benevolent Christian rule. Let me also point out that Secretary Byroade made tool the fears felt by the Arab nations before a Jewish republkl midst and too little of the needs of an infant democracy beat| fissional ravagers on its borders. In emphasizing the Arab I trayed the essential blindness that is a part of our State f so far as the entire region is concerned. What nations did he mean? Which governments'" Shishakly's Syria, which experienced a Druze slaughter i by "the strong man" and which witnessed his flight toei Arabia two weeks later? Did he mean Mossadegh's not yet-fa in Iran? A new and shaky government burn in Lebanon! The ousted, returned and last Sunday again ousted regime< Naguib in Egypt? THESE ARE SOME OF THE MATTERS which eipertl prosecution i?n~ 9 asked to serve as ; advisor to our government on Near Eastern. South As.au ail osecution witnesses in trials of Rumanian! affairs, failed to take into account in his personification of*. felt by the Arab states. These indeed are matters which pnaar at the United Nations and in Washington generally "• % when they presume to speak for the Arab "peoples. i" recognized, representative governments in the *\ en f*rJ^ leaders woo spectors there, fragments of their hope in the oan^i expanding Communism. k Flailing about as he did, referring to American JeT7 special interest." warnini! these interests that I'.S' ore *J|i represent the majority of this country's people and setuoj %  for an increasing deafness with which Zionist groups an; ito meet in official circles. Secretary Byroade fortu '" Lj fundamental factor (hat is central to the Israel P roblen I alluded before as a weakness in the Jewish States ma ^ "To the Israelis I say that you should come Irui) ^ yourselves-as a Middle Eastern state — and see your ^^ that context rather than as a headquarters — or nuc'T;' jj| of worldwide grouping of peoples of a particular rei is ,. ^ must have special rights withiB and obligations to trie ON THE FACE OF IT SUCH an observation can ^ ^ trading upon the cheapest sort of prejudices P re a e ^ and anti Israel spheres. Coupled with Secretary >" -j about "special interests." it warns American Jewry ^ nous and future time a choice between citizensnip f identification may have to be made. It smacks of tie hurled against the "Internationalist Jews' Ana dieted cuts in Foreign Operations Aid to I>raelintegrity"d But it seems to me that it is precisely here ner ^^ ed for the process i,| stripping away superficial >V tarv $*_ <>( .i more essential core. Fortuitously or n< '. j ()fS not I 00 *' upon a fundamental matter. And it is that lsr ^ ^um**, i' sell as a Mid garding from too close quarters the CBaracnam ~-; ^ | too seriously and perhaps too literally the speec ^ ( well paid professional hangers^n to the Zn"- in tke' dangerously refer to it as "that bastion of derm* East." ^fcl In that sense, Israel wilfully robes itMl i \ e !!S t** 0 } where drabness is yet the norm. Israel does loo* ^i Western standards (Ben-C.urion alone has gone w M thusfar made a minimal effort in the process ox rtu sj*' In the midst of this extremely willful and modern ^t\ portunism which it has learned to emulate trow TIW Warsaw <.! %  < i,, ||>ad Jew s e rel yearS T,' 5 Apii 19 SOme 50000 Jews residing ,n Poland's Warsaw Ghetto rose Jewish history is dotted with the continuing persecution of a oeonli. ih u U mmu,n ? eff the hi !" P^P'e that could not ward ^"^r,ra^ SUM the moral everywhere.



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PAGE 2 B +je!MJ!y£BUL .FRIDAY, Brandeis Women Set Spring Lunch Greater Miami Chapter of the National Women's Committee of Brandeis University will hold an annual spring luncheon meeting on Friday, April 30, 12 noon at the Algiers Hotel. Introduction will be by Mrs. Max A. Schwartz, with the preface being rendered by Mrs. Alexander Robbins. ^ Mrs. Ben Zion Ginsburg will present the president's report, with election of officers following. Installation will be by Rabbi Irving Lehrman, spiritual leader of Temple Emanu-EI. Mrs. Harold Turk is in charge of the program. Musical renditions will be by Mr. John Bedetti. of the University of Miami School of Music and internationally known soloist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Also to appear will be Mr. Robert Strassburg, pianist, composer and conductor. Hostesses will be the Mesdames Ginsburg. Turk. Aaron Farr. Emanuel Goldstrich. Robert Green. Alexander Robbins. Nathan Strauss. Harold Thurman. Sidney Aronovitz, .Martin Belle. The Mesdames Jean C. Lehman. Seymour Satin. Ralph Spero. Mil ton-Sirkin. Harry Platoff. Julian Weinkle. Donald Rubin. Sidney Schwartz. Meyer Kggnatz. Joseph Duntov and John Temple Officers of the chapter, in addition to Mr>. Ginsburg, are the lies dames Turk, honorary president; j Alexander Robbins. Robert Green, j Aaron Parr, Emanuel Goldstrnh. Nathan Strauss and Harold Thurman. vice presidents. Sidney Aro-j novitz. treasurer: Martin Belle, re-[ cording secretary; Jean C. Lehman, corresponding secretary; Seymour Satin, financial secretary; and Ralph Spero. assistant tinan Cial secretary. Horton Stepa I p 4 umpaiqn Mallory H. Horton. candidate for | circuit judge, (iroup Five, stepped up his campaign this week with a schedule of speaking engagements which will take him throughout the (Jreater Miami area. Michael I.senberg. Morton's campaign treasurer, said here. A former special agent for the FBI, Horton served as assistant state attorney general in Miami from 1949 to 1952. He is making his first bid for elective office in the current campaign. The candidate has been a resident of Dado County since 1925 and is a native Floridian. He attended local elementary schools and high schools and was graduated from the University of Miami Law School in 1936. During his term as assistant attorney general. Horton was reportedly instrumental in enforcement of the "bookie wire bill." Mm* Ormilti Annual Meeting at Mount Sinai Set Max Orovitz. president, this week j announced that the 5th annual j meeting of Mount Sinai Hospital will be held Thursday evening. April 29. 8 p.m., at Mount Sinai, i 4300 Alton rd. An original one at-r pray entitled "An Annual Report Come to Life." written and produced by Mrs. Syl] via Chertkof, director of public relations at Mount Sinai, will be presented The cast includes the First Drama Tri... with Mrs Cershon Miller. Boris I'ntcher and Bob Lyons. Mrs. Miller is director. Additional cast and staging will unhide (iershon Miller. Mrs. Reynolds Olin and Miss Harriet Kaplan Samuel Gertner. executive director oi the hospital, met here with the committee for the meeting to complete plans for the e\ent. The committee includes Joseph Rose, chairman. Joseph Lipton and David Phillips. It was also announced here that the Women's Auxiliary will act as hostesses and serve refreshments. Rrgitttration for Bay Vampn. Half tomplete One hundred fifty boys and girls have already been enrolled for the three summer day camps of the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center in a record breaking first three weeks of registration, it WSJ announced by Emanuel Tropp. di rector of activities. •These enrollment figures far exceed any previous experience in signing up children for Center day camps this early in the year," Tropp said. The enrollment thus far brings the Center camping program up to half its capacity of three hundred. The staff of these camps, which totals 52 group leaders and supervisors, is nearly complete at this time, with only a few openings remaining for male counselors, Tropp added. Arrangements are now being made for the use of swimming pool facilities to provide an intensive program of swimming instruction for all campers. GMJCC-Hialeoh Leisure Time Program Revealed Greater Miami Jewish Community Center and Hialeah-Miami Springs Jewish Center have concluded a joint agreement for leisure-time services. Stanley C. Meyers and Harold Kravitz, presidents of the organizations, announced the initiation of GMJCC's professional guidance of the Hialeah program under Herbert Soule. extension supervisor. Already under way are the "Israelites," a club for boys ages nine through 11, meeting every Friday afternoon at the Hialeah Jewish Center under the leadership of GMJCC's health and physical education supervisor, Abraham Koch stein. 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Re-Elect — CIRCUIT JUDGE MARSHALL C WISEHEARJ A POOD JUIX H WITH A GOOD *^^j 4A &f •amp.****** *| PULL LKVIR



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PAGE 4B ITUDAY Full Text Of ADL Report On Anti-Semitism In G e *. (EDITOR'S NOTB: Follow-In* are MKIIIIKIUS of what is believed to •*• the most intensive invesilKallnn of ItH kind made In American \isitor tit (ierntany alnre the end of Work) war II. This statement Is issued thinUKh HICOQ — office ,>f the United Btatee High Commissioner for ilciinany — on completion "t %  one-month study tour at tinimitation of the IVcl.-ral Republic of Germany by Jacob AJaon, treasurer. Itenjamtn It Epstein, national dlrector a ami Nathan C, Keith. national public relatlona director of the Anti-Defamation Least f B'nal B'rith. All are from N",\\ rork Cltj I During the past month we have had atn opportunity to visit eight of the major cities of West Germany including Berlin. We have talked with a great many leaders in German public life — in government, in the political parties, in civic work, religion and education. We have also consulted with writers, editors, political commentators. Finally, we have spoken extensively with Americans in Germany, officials of our government and others; and with leaders of the tinyJewish communities that remain or have been revived in Germany. We concerned ourselves primarily with two matters: (li current developments in the attitude of Germans toward civil rights and the democratic processes; (2) conditions of life among the remaining ,22 to 25 thousand Jews in Garmany. A concomitant matter of course was the question of JewishChristian relationships in the country. We found no simple answers to our question-, for Germany today on the issue. Thus the government homes and other ,n u ^ ns J^J was able to put through the Israeli very few fj^*j^ff8w German restitution program ami ^**J*^J^gg. to act favorably upon pensions, and rebirth of .a nourishing Jewish life restitutions for Jews in Germany < are poor indeed unle.s_there is a and upon government subsidies for marked change in trends But tl1c Jewish communal services without few mho continue tOJ^OTtoOerat any time having tangibly expre* many are in the main older peoph sed popular support for the.-e measures. Israeli representativeinformed us that theJ3onn author! ties have been not only correct but helpful in all facets of Israeli Ger who'can live out their days with some comfort through their pensionor restored property. At the same time, we have been heartened by what we regard as man negotiations. In our own dis j ne initial development in free Gercu.-.-ions we have found reflection many ot a healthy complex of volof this attitude on the part of govj untary organizations of citizens deernment leaders. President Theo, voted to promoting an understanddor Html' statement that Germans j nR () ( the democratic processes, must accept "collective shame" for liberal education, civic affairs and what happened under the Nazi re inter religious cooperation. No gime has been taken seriously in i democratic society, we believe, can government circles and has result-' succeed without effective particied in official acts seeking to make pation in public affairs by the some amends for the tragedy of great mass of citizens, and this can the Hitler period. The assurances, however, which only be done through a multiplicity of such voluntary civic groups. We we have received in some quarters j have had the opportunity to meet that anti-Semitism no longer exist" in Germany are not borne out by the evident facts. Most Germans. it itrue, are embarrassed by Hi iu--ion of Nazi persecutions; they seek to avoid it and block it out of their minds. And indeed it is cruel memorv. But it is too much a considerable number of educators, ministers, liberals and publicspirited people who have taken the initiative in the development of such organizations. They face a formidable task. They are hampered by lack of resouroes, and by considerable resistance among older to expect that a generation subjectpeople. They are placing their ed to the Intensive anti-Semitic in-j faith in the youth. As one such doctrinal ion of the Nazishould so leader said to us: "In Germany quickly rid itself of itdeep -seated democracy is always ordered after hateOpinion-testing since the ; a lost war." As a result, he points war haat no time revealed a out that the average German does otters a very complicated sociaj Kroat lessening of anti-Semitism in not accept the responsibility of parp.cture. It ia nation which, after hl r Hlp uh|(h ,„.,.,, hrmIJ n |hp tlclpallon m dlscusslon of publlc ".'. 1 •':::'::.':..I"'! ^i'": ": Way N ; '" Piod. Public incidents inaffairs. Another, who is primarily volving Jewish matters have often concerned with civil rights, declarout from under the rubble of war and at the same time is enjoying a flourishing business boom, It is —till an occupied country, hut has achieved a striking amount of inbrought forth further evidence of tinanti-Semitic feeling. Only among the youth that knew not Hitler doereliable opinion-te-tmy ed that many Germans understand •0 little of their basic civil rights that they rarely question the ruling of the most potty official. "During %  lev en ",n re,;.; *"? S2 '— %  "> f anti-Semitic the Nazi period, people just forgot ma eleven million refugees pr ,.j U d IC e. Indeed, the degree to what civil rights were!" trom the East, nut shows no signs u .u.nh h„ v.,,, ... J J %  .u .., i w hull the Na/isucceeded in their AmnnP th<>> nmnonr oii „r. ot .-ocial unrest despite crowded conditionand considerable unemployment; and particularly in Ber lin which ii frontier bastion against communism in the cold war. Equally important are MOM less tangible factors which affect the thinking and the actionof GermanGermanthem-elveindoctrination irevealed by the fact that, despite the war cata-tro phe. (iermans do not reject Na/i-m with the same intensity with which they reject the parallel authontar iani-m and tyranny of communism. Nevertheless, it should be stated that at the pre-ent time neo-Nazhave commented to uupon the >m a,1( NaiiaiM as organized politi country's failure thlU far to throw ''''' '' ,v ''ment appear to be at very oil the habit of traditionalism vwth lnw eDO At ,he las < general elecItS -tiong feudal and authoritarian "" ns ,hrst element* did not succoloration Likewise many Ger-J Cew in r, ,ur "ing a -ingle repremans seem to suffer from a haunt s <'""•<"> IS now reduced to about to proceed with itpolicy despite ^f' 0 ^ 0 p, !" pl f an average age lit i ,, close to 60. Ihese people live unlack_ of outspo ken public support to themselves very largely on -mall SUNRAYPARK HEALTH RESORT HOTClSANITARIUM ace am COWWUSSCSMCB" MIAMI r LOR IDA I WANT MY MILK stipends provided by government pensions, funds realized through re-titutions of property or outright relief subventions Even this small community, however, maintainitsynagogues, hospitals, old age See or Phone Me NAT GANS 3-4S16 — 4-tMl LIFE INSURANCE NEEDS Metropolitan Life Ina. Co. S07 Blecayne Bidg. It W. Flagler St. And Be Sure n-a FLORIDA DAIRIES HOMOGENIZED Vitamin "D" Milk "Milk Products" DBCTO Protected TEL. 2-2621 Greater Miami Delivery Visit Our Farm at Sue ef Blre) fU. B Snaeeer Creek General Repair on all Make Trurk .„„ Caf# _^_. Eltrlc and Acetylene Weldln* COULTON BROS. GARAGE •40 S.W. trh $trH Gomptek and £>eperu/atte JU/e Seimce M IAMI TITLC & GlrstractCo. 25 YEARS OF TITLE SERVICE IN DADE COUNTY ESCROWS ABSTRACTS TITLE INSURANCE THIe Intereace Pelkiet ef """*" C'y Title iBMraace Ce, CaBifal, Surpht i ttier. **eta' $3,000,000 124 SHORELAND ARCADE TELEPHONE 9-1892 knowledge among the masses of Germans of the horrible persecu tions that took place under the Nazis. Its effectiveness however is limited by the size of its somewhat inadequate budget. In our inquiries, we sought to pay special attention to the problem of teaching in the elementary and high schools. We found everywhere among leaders in the educational field a recognition that the hidebound traditionalism of German schools is a stumbling block to the democratization of Germany The authoritarian spirit that prevails in the schools, the stress on the mere accumulation of informs tion rather than discussion.and in dependence of thought, and the embarrassment with which most teachers approach the teaching of recent history, so that in effect their teaching stops with the era of Bismarck, are all factors in the situation. We have found, however, that forward-looking school supervisors have sought to grapple with this problem in the past three or four years. Many new and fine texts have been prepared for use in social studies and civics classes covering the history of the past 20 years. Modern teaching techniques as we know them in the United States, have been encouraged. These innovations, however, meet great resistance among the senior teaching group and even among \ younger teachers who have been j brought up on the old traditional j methods. As the school superintendent of one major city told us: "The picture has improved since 1945. but it is still questionable how many teachers follow through. I am not optimistic, but I am hope ful that we are moving ahead." It should be remembered that •he Nazis ptkt „^ teacher, JT *2* *>n>e -J these JM Wn readily be* about the Jewish a Particular prob| W £ d they Z hough some of UVTB, the events and J fl and bestiality of Jfl Nevertheless, loo ,„> d ""e in the school.,* latent anti-Semiiisn,. checks show is p^ he youngest groups j, tion. Memorial To bo Sisterhood of tBM Jewish Center will „ rial Pulpit Bible to u memory of Clara *^_ mer officer and megfe] Education Committee, (| over Memorial Servim*a tcr on Sunday, April i,l The Bible will be | Mrs. Sam Goodman, | the Sisterhood, and tu, ed by Rabbi Morris A, L the -Center The Bible it| for all scripture readispf out the year. The gift hI with the names of I cers. Sigma Delta TN til Election of officers l by the Sigma Delta Tal League at its regular i Tuesday evening, April 8,1 Emanuel Goldstnch. Ml ave., will be hostess at uel meeting. *W'W'W'W-\~-\ !" rfWW


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IPRIL 2 3, 1954 phood Art Calendar Honors [h Settlement in America *J**i*#fc#**#7 PACE 11 A | m.lred years of Jewish Ibievcment in North Amfceing commemorated by hod Art Calendar for year 5715 (1954-55), an%  Irs. Hugo Dalsheimer, f lid., president of the federation of Temple Sislendar was prepared as L nation-wide celebratibn {centenary of Jewish set, New Amsterdam which fanned by Jewish organJhrnughout the country ling coordinated through Mean Jewish Tercentenbmmittee. calendar is published Jb\ the National FederiTemple Sisterhoods, one Vge^t Jewish women's or,s in the world. The Division of the Union Kcan Hebrew CongregaNational Federation of Sisterhoods, was organizEars ago. largely through |s of Mrs. Abram Simon, on, D.C. issue of the art calendar Ced with original art work from filmstrips depicting the settlement of the Jews in New Amsterdam, Haym Salomon's contribution to the American Revolution, the philanthropic and patri-. otic actions of Judah Touro and the'efforts of Dr. Isaac Mayer Wise to organize the Union of American Hebrew Congregations and to train Rabbis, as well as with other photographs of historic significance. eyers Says Her bee Qualifies [ Circuit Judge Post years experience as a qiiip me to serve as Cirle. Anna Brenner Meyers, | for the post in Croup 5, to her supporters at ide meeting this week. years work in law info rii nee in all courts. Sieve that I have the knowledge of the law a Udge should have," she deOfficers of New Branch To be Installed Officers of the newly formed Poale Zionist Branch of Greater Miami will be installed on Monday evening, 8 p.m., at the Royal Hungarian Restaurant. Isaac Hamlin, national executive secretary of the Histadrut, will be installing officer. Jacob Pearson will assume the office of chairman. Other officers are Shlome Halperin, vice chairman; Samuel Lerner, treasurer; Louis Dukler, financial and corresponding secretary; Mrs. Sonia Robbins, recording secretary; Mrs. Anna Sorin Bild, in charge of publicity. Executive Committee includes Ben Minenberg, Dr. S. Wilensky. Dr. A. Raset, J. Z. Stallan and Mrs. Miriam Halperin. Third Seder Planned A third Seder celebration of the Workmen's Circle Y. L. Peretz School, 1545 SW 3rd st., will take place on Saturday, April 24. at 6:30 p.m. Pupils of the school will recite and sine the Haggadah. Luba Roy and Paul Milstone will present a program of Passover melodies. Reproduced in the Sisterhood Art Calendar from the filmstrip. "Isaac Mayer Wise: Master Builder of American Judaism," produced by the Union of American Hebrew Congregations. Business, Professional CJA Units Announce Quotas at Westview Club pyeralso stressed her long in social work and writ ion. and her work as Ischuol teacher, registered nd community leader as to make her ready to serve lit Judge. Paris (owarl lAsis Platform Faris Cowart, local civic leader and businessman and a candidate for the elective position of Dade County P u rchasing Agent announced this week a platform of ol working tth thouequal opportunity and impartial people in thesTcapacities The top ten business and professional units of the Combined Jewish Appeal were cited this week by trades chairman Sam J. Heiman for their outstanding effort in the closing weeks of the current campaign. Heiman stated that despite a national leveling off in general buss-eas and Israel agencies must be strengthened so that service to Jewry in need everywhere will not be lessened." The Combined Jewish Appeal goal for this year is SI,491.806. which represents the minimum II'III.II icrvriiii£ till in u' i.tiiti nil' iness conditions throughout Dade I operating budgets for 54 separate ten me the opportunity to I depth in understanding land it is only by underI people and their motives fcfully evaluating the facts t that a judge can serve the fvho come before her propi equitably." she said. Promised when elected to Bie true human values in|in every case, and to serve justly, fairly and with I George S. Okell RE-ELECT 'EORGE S. KELL [STATE LEGISLATOR GROUP 1 DADE COUNTY 'KAY OKfll ANOTHER TfR/M Ji!l_^2li


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PAGE 2 A *l*i*tncrk**n Ruth Goldschmidt to Visit Miami Area; Will Speak Before UN Group, U of M Miss Ruth Goldschmidt. Director of Public Affairs of the Consulate General of Israel in New York, will visit Greater Miami on Thursday and Friday. April 29 and 30. A number of community events have been arranged in connection with Miss Goldschmidt's visit. While in the area, she will dis cuss with local leaders and organ izations current developments ano progress in the State of Israel On Thursday. April 29. at 11:30 a.m.. Miss Goldschmidt will be in terviewed by Kirby Brooks over radio station VVQAM. At 12:15 p.m., on the same date, she is scheduled to address the luncheon meeting of the Miami Optimist Club at the Seven Seas Restaurant Following the Optimist Club luncheon, on April 29. Miss Gold schmidt will attend the meeting of the United Nations Association to be held in the Everglades Hotel. On Friday. April 30. Miss Gold i schmidt is scheduled to lecture be-1 lore classes at the University of j Miami, and she will also speak at a faculty luncheon there on the -.line day. Miss Goldschmidl settled in Ispoiiu.i aqi jnourinojqi uo;siA9{3l pun oipej -uijojin|d ojnpo| uo |BjaU90 oiqnsuo.) .H|| |o-JP'I!Y l! l 'I'M J" Jo|.).J!(l 88 .\||Ji!ll.'.> I'MJIJ -JO i.>u ill .)i|qnd UP.nj.tmv ,n l "1 [dBjs] p.)|i.ulj.'iui -i:i) ipruiqasp|og -1 Iv 'sjaaA .'ui|i pad -'Mi ioj [ajs] |o in luioaaAOO ->m %  %  ; %  • %  • % %  JOJ f .nil in aaiAjas ssajd pro ;: )" jo); i IMJ *mi PS %  .. T?u\" *qi %  %  %  u: in %  : ..\ SHM PUF|8UJ Ul p^JJFJS .•ujaAOUi isiuotz oql ; 00003 J^H CHSI u' |*I She was heard weekly on a New York radio station in a series of broadcasts on "Life in Israel Today." In the summer of 1951 and 1952. at the invitation of New York I'niversity, Ifiaa Goldschmidt joined the faculty of the university to act as co-director of NYU'J workshop! in "Israel's Life and Culture." a! >i\ week course held in Israel. Miss Goldschmidl is instructor ol an Ill-Service course for teachers on the "Culture and Civilization of Miss ffvffi GoHtchmHt Israel." offered by the Board of Education of New York City in cooperation with the Israel Office of Information. Nephrosis Chapter Schedules Fashion Show Wednesday Greater Miami Chapter ol the National Napbrosii Foundation will sponsor i benerit coffee and fash ion show ;it the Seacomber Surl comber on Wedlu -day. April 28. 2 p in. i hairman o i the affair is Mrs ii o i die Fisher, uith Mrs. Anne iGreen and Mrs A m->^ Theme of the afternoon will be modeling, with Uu, of Miami, preb> Roberta Model Guild of la Mrs Sam Silver will give the commentary Pr o c ne dl are for the work of the local chapter of the foundation toward the establishment of a ward here. Reservations may be made with Mrs. Green at 67-1840. I Federation Prepares Slate of Officers Dan B Ruskin. honorary, presi dent of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, has been named chairman of the 1954 Nominating Com Orittee to elect Federation officers, H baa btM announced by Federation president Carl Weinkle. A data of officers will be presented at the 16th annual meeting h< Federation set for May 20 at 'the Di Lido Hotel. Serving as members of the Norn mating Committee with Ruskin are Joseph Duntov. Mrs. Aaron Farr. i Stuart Gordon. Rabbi Leon Kro rush, Joseph Lipton. Ben Meyers, Dr. Joseph Narot and Jacob Sher. Two alternate members named in order to assure a full complement at each meeting are Mrs. Leo Ackerman and Mrs Harry Platoff. J Miller Named President as North Dade Elects Benjamin Miller has been named president of the North Dade Jewish Center at an election meeting held here last week. Other officers named were Jay Burton Keys, vice pre-ident. Arnold Stern, financial secretary; Jacob Friedland, treasurer. Board of Directors include Dr. William K. Boros. Bernard Catz, Harold Shopmaker, David Goodman. David Greene, Joseph Rosenfeld and Maurice Lebow. MEMORIAL Slivici. will be held Sunday, April 25th, at 9.30 • thi JEWISH HOME FOR THE ISO N.l. 53rd STRUT Gil Rabbi Abramowitz Addresses Club "No. 1 Rabbi Mayer AbramovMt/. spir 1tt1.il leader of North Shore Jewish center, addressed members oi Club No. 1. Pioneer Women's Organization, at I meeting held in Kneseth Israel Congregation Thursday evening. Mrs J Stadlan. cultural chairman, arranged the program which featured a djscussion of Passover *tn. iilrtr Call INSPECTION CKIN Florida Hadassah Plans Conference Florida region of Hadassah uill hold its fourth conference in Tarn pa at the Tampa Terrace Hotel. May 1-3. On the occasion of the sixth year oi Israels nationhood. theme of the conference will be "Adventures in Jewish Living." MrHerman Klausner. regional president now m Israel, will return to highlight the conference pro gram with a special message Conference chairman is Mrs David Cowen, ol Tampa, with Mrs Thomas Weiss, also of Tampa, act Ing as vu-e chairman. Advisor u tfri Ezra Shapiro, of Cleveland, 0 national vice president of Hadassah Some 300 delegates are expected to attend the regional affair, according to Mrs Charles Adler, Tampa chapter president, and Mi Samuel S. Fraiberg. local advisor SEABOARD SLASHES FARES FOR YOUR TRIP NORTH! > 30-DAY ROUND-TRIP COACH FARES* IFFICTIVE MAY IS *Plu nominal reierved teat charge on Streamliner*, and reduced Federal tax. TAVII • coavoarAau / uAtoAto srasAMimias \, For Reservation! tftoii phont 12-4411, or coll In %  %  run: 173 E. Healer St., 2204 M.W. 7th .tn M Miami, or 1553 ELEVENTH ANNIVERSARY of the WARSAW GHETTO will be observed on WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 1954 t 30 p.m. at the FLAMINGO PARK 11th Street and Jefferson Ava. Miami Beach, Florida PROMINENT SPEAKERS Program 1 Greater Miami Jewiah Folk Chorus Iniim It Kunnnan. Conductor 2. Booker T. Washington High School Chorus lira Williams, CoadaMoT ADMISSION FREE S|M.||S.i|.-.| ll\ thtEMMA LAZARUS I El 'I :i: \TH IN 1 T t-i o i ii mini -*<4^>Call 2-1776 Member of B'nal I rith *^2^ 350 Lincoln Road Mexxanina — Phone 5-5411 Entrance on Washington Are. OCULISTS • Prescriptions Filled • Lenses and Frames Duplicated • Large Selection in Latest Styles Wairiington Avenue,Miami leec h W. J. ICMT. OH aepreeetMaMvee alee e* Key W..I. Havana. N J omoleo. Pwerte Bke. DAY WORKERS S6 one Fere Htel Me ids r.rt.rs Dihweker Colered Moidi-Pert Time er Fall TinH in Private He-tes ACE EMPLOYMENT 1S7 N.C. let Ave. Ph. N Cherge to Employer S. J. Freediiia_ A M. Rephnn HEBREW BOOK STORE Between Fourth and Fifth Sta rot Synaooguae aad PitTasa Use. Also tot He*** T a l ip l i u — S-SoiT Israel Certtficatea SAM HIRSCH Pr M n „ _OHJiTAOE. IN PERSON SYLVIA SIDNEY HER ONLY lOCAl APPEARANCE i, "O MISTRESS MINE' OPENING SATURDAY, APRIL 24 AIR CONDITIONED BILTMORE PLAYHOUSE 151 N E. 40th ST., MIAMI PH. 7-1842 FOR RESERVATIONS Bo Office Now 0 M 10 J.m ttKu, Free Pa,,,^ ONE OUT OF TEN! Isn't it lust and Fair that with 10 Judges Serving on the Circuit Court. 1 out oi 10 oi them should be a qualified woman lawyer? £Li ANNA BRENNER CIRCUIT. C E GROUP [pq Polltl Wv.) Holiday Greetings CORAL GABLES LAUNDRY I DRY CLEANING CO. 250 MINORCA AVENUE #?W GABLES Phone 4-6458 CHAPILS IN MIAMI AND MIAMI HI Services in tne true spirit of tne Jewisn tradition...and dedicated to ease trie burden oi the bereaved. iversirtf MEMORIAL MNl.# FUNERAL 0IRECT0IS Parking TWO CONVENIENT LOCATION 8 Miami B< k Miami West Flagler ft 20th Ave. Phont f-•6*4 ^-r^jsT-S rhontH !" ... ait Il' a0 %  SDWASO T. NBWMAN, Funeral Director %  ^^ A ^, %  H %  vo76th Street and miUT1 \l v0 1**\ IN NBW VORK: 76th Street i aaooKLYN • saoNX



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PAGE 6 A + if**Ut ntskfi&r J2*DAY Floriee Kotkin Becomes Mrs. Weiner in Double Hini\ CantDe light Ceremony Here pure foil from a pearl headof pure silk illusion matching lace and piece. Matron of honor wu her M-UT. Mrs Merle Sidle. Maid of honor The marriage of Miss Florice K tkin and Herbert L. Weiner took p.'ace on Sunday, April 11. at the Ei-cayne Terrace Hotel. Rabbi Morris Skop officiated at the double ring candlelight ceremony The bride, daughter of Mr. and was Miss Barbara Ross The) "ore Mrs. Harry Kotkin. 1344 SW 17th peacock nylon tulle and Pakistan U.-.. was given in marriage by her[ over taffeta ballerina length fitted father. Her bridal gown was styled ^.^ am| ^^^ >klr( wilh a) :n white imported chantilly lace „ ard nylon tulle over satin with a ^mating panel! of tulle and pashoulder baring neckline edged in kistan. Fiache type stole, matching scallops, fitted bodice and a full | headpieces with veils and white I: re skirt with a scalloped edge. d(lV( s completed their outfit! he skirt was underscored with ( Bes( man fm Roh( ,,., weiner. er of nylon tulle that ended in bn)Ihpr „, „,., ,, nM m [jshen inweep train. Her fourtiered veil eluded Kurt Weiner, Jack Kotkin and Merle Sidle Flower Birl was niece ol the bride Marcia Sidle her dress styled similar to Ihe attendants' Mrs Morris Baron kept the guest book The bride ia native Mi.mii.in She graduated from Miami High School, attended the Universitj of Miami and was a member of Alpha Epsilon l'hi Sorority she ma a teacher ;it Highland Park Elementary School. Mr Weiner .>s born in Chicago, III., graduated from Lake View High School, attended the Universitj "f Illinois, ami was %  member ol Alpha Epsilon Pi Fraternit) He served with the is Navj and ino associated ith the Rubinstein Co., ol Chicago After J hones moon in Jamaica. W.I. the couple will make their home in i hieago Koretzkys Plan To Reside on Reach Mrs Murrj Koretzkj inI making their home in Miami late ol tl i irdinal Hotel R ibbi rman officiated at the he bride is the [orn r Helene : Ml %  I., i Bi .-!>. i \ .i .. : thi late %  mel B Brod; Mr K iretzk) is ithe son ol Mr. and Mrs Harrj K retzk). 6415 La Gorce dr Irving Goldburg ol Plainfield, N : gave in niece in marriage Her sister Mrs Herbert Popok, nan N.J md Robert Bmn "• Louis' tile K-. attended the c< pie. he groom's father has Keen ac • e in local philanthropic, cultural I religi in circles tor many an He i a member ol Greater Mi imi Jewish Federation, Mount lai Hospital. B'nai B'rith, Sh item Ige, and the Jewish Home (or %  Aged A Fust Degree Mason, iBUO a memlx r of the Hoard Temple Emanu-EI and the He w Academy A dinner party followed in the I |oda Boom of the hotel Mils Barbara Greenfield Miss Greenfield Plans for June 11 Mr and Mrs Irving Greenfield, 4o star (aland, announce the en gagement of their daughter. Barbara, to Frank Jordon Levin, son of Mr and Mis Max Lex in. Andover, Man and Miami Beach. The bride to be ia i graduate of Whitefield School and attended the t niveraitj ol Miami Mr Levin attended Suffolk Uni versit) at Bosion. ud ipent two years In service in Germany. The couple are planning a June wedding at Miami Beach \TERMITEA TROUBLE f • FREE INSPECTION 5 YR. GUARANTEE • BONDED • INSURED MIAMI 3-5210 MIAMI BEACH 58-7341 NATIONAL EXTERMINATORS, Inc. Miss Hauhen's Troth Told by Her Mother The engagement of Miss Rita Hauben to Manuel Albert has been announced by the bride-elects mother. Mrs. Mollie Hauben, 215 30th st., Miami Beach. The couple first met on the eve of Valentine's Day. Miss Hauben is a graduate of Miami Beach High School, attended the University of Cincinnati and graduated from the Manhattan Medical and Dental School, New York. Mr. Albert is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Irving Albert, of Chicago, III. He is in the Jewelry business there The couple plan an August wed ding in New York and will live in Chicago. \\ %  Ml. t Kathtl Mrs. Marker* I. MTtNMr Miss Astrpfskv Weds Mr. Serkin April 11 was the date of the wed ding of Marilyn June Astrofsky and Reuben Serkin. liabbi Max Shapiro officiated at Beth David Congregation. Matron of honor was Mrs Nathan Ostrofsky, aunt of the bride. Sandra •s'lKin. niece of the bridegroom, was junior bridesmaid. Flower girl was Kena Serkin and the bridegroom'nephew, Mark Serkin. acted as ringbearer (lakers included Martin and Edward Astrofsky, brother of the bride, Hartley Ostrofsky. cousin of the bride Larrj Grossman, Morton Erstling and Sanford of Susamaa. The new Mrs Serkin is the daughter of Mr and Mrs. Samuel I. Astrofsky, Boston, Mass She attended school in Boston and is a member ol National Honor Societ) Mr Serkin is the son of Mr. and Mrs Ben Serkin, 6801 SW 16th st. He is a native of M.aini and was a member of the l.'.S Air Force. Alter a wedding trip to Mexico. Use COUpie will be at home at 5900 SW 48th st. Lois BevenVsl Told by PeinhJ Mr. and Mrs. Albert N 7505 Buccaneer aw. Island. Miami Beach.i engagement of their c Beverly, to Murry Miami. s, in of Mr and )h| Bernkrant. Ellenville, N.lj The bride-to-be attended! versit> ol Miami and com... schooling at Mount Siiuil in medical technology Mr. Bernkrant attended! University, at Ithaca, Neil He i> now in the Denljlf Business in Miami. The couple are planningfi wedding r jk l l*.\ CARLYL ^ %  T fr\.V_MJ Lj Tkt Satin's Outstasdlag ff Itwlsh Camp lor Beys I Girls CV' HENDERSONVILLE. N. C. Dir.ef.r. Wilton L. MooVor. Principal V'oodword Hlnh School. Cincinnati, Ohio At* Hr hracaara: Mn. Jm Ariwla. OWMT. (SO Marlaiaa A.. Mini Lac., Pa. SI I15. MM. A. A. ,,., im s.W. 2H •*.. Ph. 4l-54o. Mr, Marry &r.„,.„, J500 S.W. at* St., Miami. h. 41-it20. • HORSUUtl • rt.TEH SMII • nmn m • GOLF-TUB o OVERNIGHT TM • MODERN CURB Oieii' irt urn ri in. K-BV< SM* £mt*f KOSHER CATERERS] Weddings Bar Mitzvahs Buffets Garden Parties CATERING A Complete Sen ice No Party Too Small No Party T i l'" Mrs BeaSaal WaitresW and cigarette girls were uniformed In Bna, Britb colon of hlue and whit. :Among those present were Bea Saal. HennHta U, d r. Betty Gold. She.r H R renC ti BeUy Bodian A"" Sheir Row Heines. Nettie Cropper. Jerry !,„, ,„. th ,, %  <"se (.oldenberg. Annette Gans rfiuS r,, nan Hora Sarbey. Id. me S feM e Ehre i kranz .ri.n Son, Judy Whs. Rae AvicR • Ehn 0 V ( n,0rer Sue Hirsh and tlinor Freeman. l=r:. g!S? : .gg .:. gg .: gg > g^g ->^B : > ^5-: aS'V-ag' v /Viirdi (lie hoiiie of SUNSHINE FASHIONS •r. U.H. pt off. Miami %  Miami Bosch tt. Laudordala • '* • ,, P to r 4 TOO WILL FIND THE MOST COMPLETE SELECTION of ., BOYS AND GIRLS WEAR ON MIAMI BEA J at MORRIS BROTHERS MIAMI & 12S1 WASHINGTON AVENUE



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PAGE 12 B +.lmisl>ncr&&&tLeague of Women Voters to Hear Panel on May Primary Election tioldberg Voted Medal ot Merit NEW YORK — Chaplain (Capt.) Joshua L Goldberg, district chaplain of the Third Naval District and staff chaplain of the eastern Sea Frontier, has been voted the an-' nual Four Chaplains Medal for] Merit by the Four Chaplains Mefhojopic fgrU ffi ***££. -hand knowledge of the i morial Association, it was announced yesterday by Rabbi Joseph H. Lookstein. chairman of the Commission on Jewish Chaplaincy of the National Jewish Welfare Board. Chaplain Goldberg, who is the liaison between the Commission on Jewish Chaplaincy, official body for recruiting, endorsing and sen meeting on Friday at the Monte Carlo Hotel. -Whafs -it Stake in Mav" will be managing ussion. Beach Sun, bringing to the group a with Dr for the Miami Daily News and tele vision commentator, and Ed Richer, editor of the Miami Citizen* Dan McCarty. "So many people have told me thej want to support me but think thej will be voting against the Jus Judge Nathan said, Nothing could be further from the truth. The .11' courts are not concerned in this election. As a matter of fact. I have received fine support from among the Justices ni the Peace in the county." he said tiei of the Peace in their district." No matter where a voter li\<'in Dade county, he can vote for the Small Claims Court, since it is a county-wide court, the Judge pointed out. Judge Nathan has heard the rec ord number of over 8.600 cases dur ing the last year, involving more than 26.000 persons. The judge has been a Dade County resident for more than 33 years He is a graduate of the Universit] of Florida and University of Miami Law School. Mrs Kathryn Crawford, membership chairman. Rollo Karkeet miami attorney, and chairman ol the Citizens Ac tion Committee, explains that Ixfore winning endorsement of the committee a candidate is screened U to his ability, platform, character, standing in the community and his general qualifications Endorsement is based on a point system, and Klein was given a rating of 125. the highest in any group for the legislature or congress. Mrs Crawford said. Paramount planks in the Klein platform include elimination of the power of the Florida Milk Commis sion to fix milk prices, revision of the state constitution to make possible increased representation for Dade County in the legislature, full length Florida turnpike, fair distribution of tax money for Dade County and more and better roads for Dade Floyd Submits Record For Voters' Approval Robert L. Floyd, candidate for Circuit Judge, in talks this week asked voters throughout the county to think of themselves as employers about to hire a key eraployee. "You know my record." Floyd said, "as attorney agent in the FBI. and a mayor ol Miami and state representative, while earning my living In Ihe courts as an attorney Floyd urged voters to study his record for length and scope of legal practice and for "broad qualifications of tested public service." T.Y. SERVICE No Charge For Call N'lghta, Mundays, Holldayi I'mxrrsal T V Phone 11-1387 IMMEDIATR TV SERVICE DAILY, Kl NPAYS. HOLIDAYS 10 AM la n P M 1} far 'ill Wi4 Television Hi U-lItl THE FIRST DOS TRACK IN FLORIDA TO HAVE AUTOMATIC T0TALISAT0RS AT EVERY MUTUEL WIRD0WI mmM w See Your Daily Newspapers For Direct Bus Routes To The Track 'Ottfi ^'eoi,!,, l*ATRACK / 0 N IY \ I fUTURITY TRACK J \ IN FLA./ ol the May Primaries Mrs Maurice Scrotta will act as moderator. Mrs Charles Stein and Mrs. Harry Brown are in charge of the luncheon following. Additional items on the program include an explanation of the classifications of the ballot by Mrs. Robert J Yaffey. voters service chairman A report on the I-eague state Convention held. April 6 %  8, will be given by Mrs Bernard Stevens who was elected to the State Board for 1954 56 Beginning April 26. the Beach League will maintain voting information tables throughout the city. Skit Due at Meeting Officers of the Miami Beach Louise Chapter of the American Jewish Congress will put on a skit for the Miami Chapter at the next regular mw, inu K a, """„ W ear J* Hanev C State Ug, S |, tur( s Peaker. Elecf NBIF^ ROBERT L F L OYD CIRCUIT JUDGE COMMITTU TO lUCt IOIIII I. IIOrQ CIICUII 115th Street Between N.E. 2nd and N.W. 7th Aves BETTER VALUE BETTER SERVKE BETTER CREDIT TERMS ot NORTON TIRE 0 SPECIAL U.S. ROYAL FULL-CAPS • lOOK UK I NtW • tl if. 1IKI NtW • OUAAANTHO IfKf NtW 670 x 15 $ 7.93 710 x 15 $ 8.77 760x15 $ 9.83 700 x 15 .. .$ 9.80 800 x 15 .. .810.80 820 x 15 ...$10.80 ( % 

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|liB\wiisltU0liDipidiigun FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 1954 SEC. B ypt Condemned by UN Body for Warlike' Acts /IV (JTA — Egypt has fcdemned by the IsraelMixed Armistice Comlor warlike acts" which •flagrant violations" of It-Israel armistice agreeruling came as a rear attacks last Wednesday early Thursday morning Jjraeli patrols and Israel |!_ including women and L on roads and in settlelong the Gaza strip bor|the raids and ambushes, elis were killed and 20 tnded. yptians refused to attend Marion's meeting at which they were condemned. At first they insisted they had not had enough time to read investigators Aaron Named President Of Jewish Welfare Board CLEVELAND (JTA) — A 1954 budget of $2,232,155 was adopted here last week at the concluding session of the biennial convention g i the National Jewish Welfare nard. The delegates also elected Charles Aaron, Chicago attorney and communal leader, president of the JWB to succeed Irving Edison of St. Louis, who was named honorary vice president. The 700 delegates called upon welfare funds throughout the country and the New York United Jewish Appeal, of which the JWB ous situation" prevailing along the Gaza strip on the Egyptian-Israel enough time to read investigators" border where the raids were stae-1'"LTT"' "' """-"" l,,e i !" K reports of the incidents, whereupon ed and blamed the Egyptians*?£ {l^TSe wiTV^tel the United Nation. rha,r m9 „ „f ,h"infiltrations which have been ag-' the United Nations chairman of the commission gave the Egyptian delegates two hours to study the reports. When the Egyptians still j refused to attend two hours later, the Commission continued its meeting and voted the condemnation. In strong terms holding the Egyptian authorities responsible for the attacks, the Commission found that the ambushes were "carried out by Egyptian military' or para-military forces." The Commission's resolution expressed "great concern" over "the dangerill to Participate in Annual Meet itional Federation, Temple Women tORK CITY—Mrs. Leon J. West 42nd St., Miami irho is a member of the Board of the National on of Temple Sisterhoods, tcipate in its annual meetlational headquarters here House of Living JudaismImorial, April 26 to 30. Ell is a member of the ori's Department on Human which is also scheduled in connection with the |re Board meeting. Ihe week, a'teadership I Institute will be conductliss Jane Evans, executive (of the NETS, which is the Is Division ol the Union of In Hebrew Congregations, pal organization of Reform htl Judaism in America. pi the largest Jewish wominizations in the world, the 1 Federation of Temple Sisbands together 85.000 Jin 500 Sisterhoods, serving land humanitarian causes, out the United States and I of Canada, Cuba, Panama, ped Kingdom, the Union of Mrica and Australia. contribution toward inter> understanding, the Sistertonduet Institutes on JudaIChurili Women, designed to p them with the beliefs, tra^and rituals of Judaism, ban 10,000 Christian church I have been guests of the NaiFederation of Temple Sis|s and its local Sisterhoods Institutes. ng the other activities of the Won are its work on behalf |blind. efforts to improve input relationa, the publish various educational mateM the conducting of Leaderfining Institutes. Abram Simon, of Washing I C„ who founded the NFTS is honorary president. Mrs. [Dalsheimer of Pikesville, "d. is president. gravated by the last Egyptian aggressive acts." The Commission called on the Egyptians to "put an immediate end" to such or other aggressive acts, holding them violations of the armistice agreement, demanded that the Egyptian authorities punish those responsible for the "intolerable" situation. The MAC's ruling supported completely the Israeli contentions, made Friday when the UN body was requested to hold an emergency meeting, that the raids were part of a "calculated military attack" by the Egyptians. The first of the ambushes was staged last Wednesday night when an Israeli military vehicle on the Israel side of the border was fired on near the Saad Road. An hour expressed confidence that American Jewry is "determined to maintain and support without interruption or minimization a program of meeting the religious and welfare needs of our youth in the armed forces." Similar confidence was voiced that American Jewry is "determined to make a maximum contribution to the maintenance of the highest level of civilian morale through the support of Jewish community centers served by and affiliated with the JWB." Bringing to a close the celebration of the centennial of the Jewish community center movement, the convention reaffirmed a "statement of principles of Jewish center purposes" adopted by the 1948 convention, and formulated a supplementary credo. This credo described the center "as a striking symbol of our Jewish communal way, General Matthew Hiia way Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army, who lauded the role of tue JWB in caring for the welfare and morale needs of American Jewish servicemen. Philip M. Klutznick, president of B'nai B'rith, who also addressed the delegates, called upon President Eisenhower and Secretary of State Dulles to restate the American policy of peace and security in the Middle East. later, an Lsraeli patrol was attackunity;" as a "common ed a short distance away, at Beri. Within another hour and a half, a civilian truck was attacked in the same area, at Zikim. Early Thursday morning, Egyptians attempted to break into Moshav Shouva, a settlement near Saad. At Moshav Shouva, two hand I grenades were tossed by the Egyp-1 tians at a building in which 17 women and children, who had attended a wedding in the colony, were taking refuge. The grenades, like much of the spent ammunition found at the sites of all four at< tacks, bore British markings and insignia of the Egyptian armed | forces. place for all Jewish groups within the community;" as an agency with a "central and unique role in the Jewish community, complementing the good purposes and necessary services of many other institutions and organizations in Jewish life;" as an institution to whose program "Jewish content is fundamental;" and a force which "furthers the democratic way of life" and which through its total program "seeks to develop and enrich the human personality." The threatened closing of the JWB's servicemen's center in HeiRabbi's Resignation Accepted Paul Goldberg, chairman of the Board of Zamora Jewish Center, this week announced that the Cenmeeting j ter nas accep ted the resignation of its spiritual leader, Rabbi Max Landman. He said that services are being held daily at the Center and that arrangements are in the process of being made with the Bureau of Jewish Education for the continuation of the Hebrew and S-riday 1 Schools. Mrt. Leen VI Rummage Sale On The Israelite Center is running a rummage sale at 127 NW 5th st. Proceeds are for the Center and Religious School. In charge of Rummage Sale is Mrs. J. Kronenberg. Roosevelt Temple Adds New Members Here Roosevelt Temple No. 33, Pythian Sisters, initiated 36 new memdelberg, Germany, was averted, at j bers Wednesday evening. The initiation was under the suleast until December 31. 1954. The club will remain open for the balance of the year even though it means the JWB will incur a deficit of $25,000, which is not in the JWB's present budget. Among the speakers at the convention was Gen. Matthew B. Ridgpervision of Mrs. Morris Cotzin, Mistress of Works and Past Chief. In addition to regular class, Roosevelt Temple is also initiating 12 new members lor four sister Temples of the district. Wing Bout to be red at Men's Meet Club of Temple Emanuhold its next meeting in l rm of a supper on WednesM>nl 28. at 7 p.m., in the l social hall, according to lrv 'ng Cypen. president. %  hon of new officers and di5 lr the coming year will be following the supper. Cantor f Brummer will render vocal Rons. ure of the evening's enterP will be the viewing of a pbout when Cy Gottfried, "Ports expert, will provide S10nal comment. Al Ossip is chairman. KOSHER FOR PASSOVER -DE? W3 Demand Israel Kosher THE WORLiTS 3MOST EXCiTiXG FLAVOR You just don't know how good a frankfurter can be until you taste these plump and juicy fSMH beauties. Enjoy the matchless flavor of western corn-fed beef superbly blended with subtle seasonings. Beef, alf Beef, choice Beef! FRANKFURTERS • CORNED BEEF SALAMI • BOLOGNA • PASTRAMA bllob(i)ii)WjSiiiis/ Under the supervision of Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky and the Greater Miami Vaad Hakashruth ISRAEL NATIONAL KOSHER SAUSAGE CO., Inc. JSUMI 23 N ,w s ih $TRIET phone$ 3 721 ~ 3 4225



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APRIL 23. 1954 +Jewish Fhridiar) PAGE 7 A Rosens Weil Eugustine |th as the date of the fof Shirley Jaffe. of St I and Dr. Howard Rosen, he rites were held in the ton in the ballroom of the JLeon Hotel. A reception %  there. dnev M. Lefkowitz, Rabi Sparer and Cantor Robofficiated at the cerei marriage by her father, was attended by Mrs. ,clin. sister of the bride> matron of honor. BridesL rc Mariie Jaffe. sister of t, and Diana Jaffe, a cou|n j r l (Jsdin served as best J ushers were Nathan Gold, Han. Solon Freeman, Philktein and Irving Lfchtter. hen included Dr. Gene UsJLarry Jaffe. tide i> the daughter of Mr. [ Julius Leonard Jaffe, AvDe. Davis Shores. She gradjom Ketterlinua High School End attended Newcomb Collw Orleans, where she Was L-r of Alph Epsilon Phi risen is the son of Mr. and .. Rosen, 2000 Liberty ave., beach He was graduated ,• University of Florida and hidegree at the Univertaryland. where he was a ol Alpha Omega dental |ty Jouple will honeymoon in hern part "t the state. Upreturn. they will live at bnce de Leon blvd., Coral -> rey Kane receives the to the City of Miami from Mayor Harold P-'O at c lawn party honthe occasion of his Bar poh. Harvey is the son f'.: and Mrs. Hal Kane, Abbott ave His grander is Morris Nasatir, dib: of the Jewish Classical heard over station FPB. THE NEW % amp Osceola I F 0R BOVS AND QIRL8 > n Mills R.ver & Silver Lake f cre Shoe, North Carolina kock Ridinq Privof. loka Swimming Poo/ Copable Seasoned Staff %  •Men? Physician and Hurst J Drtctors: |HIBERT and BELLE SILVER "IBuccanteAve, Miami Beach M '2l Limited Enrollment 3D .PHOTOGRAPHY nutl TM| tXOUlSin TRUE TOLTT.S! 0f T0 WEDDING, F MfnVAH. ANNIVERSARY. 0* PARTY IN 3D ALSO BLACK & WHITE K THFM CASO 'S '" EM NO OBLIGATION RALPH BARGTEIL JW 83-8431 Food Fair 0pen* Wednesday was opening date for the 47th super market uni(t of Food Fair Stores of Florida, Inc., at 9400 Harding ave., in Surfside. This is one of Food Fairs largest in South Florida and one of the most modern anywhere in the South. Innovations include moving belt check-out counters, magic eye doors and a combination of indirect and Thinline lighting fixtures. Mar ket sections include those for meat, Auxiliary fo Hold Elections Greater Miami Women's Auxil iary to the Jewish Home for the Aged will hold its annual election meeting at the Algiers Hotel on Tuesday, April 27. Mrs. Sol Silverman will preside at the meeting scheduled to take up its agenda at 1 p.m. Mrs M. Graham will report on the "Break the Bank" brunch scheduled for the Algiers Hotel on May 11. Store in Surfside produce, dairy, delicatessen, frozen foods and grocery. There is also a special service providing cut-to order extra thick Blue Ribbon Prime and Choice steaks and chops. The new market includes over 5,000 square feet of storage, receiving, refrigeration and preparation space which requires the services of some thirty persons alone. Low display fixtures, known as gondolas, enable both shopper and employee to look over the entire store from any spot. In a recent nationwide survey, Food Fair was counted as the seventh largest food chain in the na1 tion and the 14th largest retail establishment. This growth has tak' en place in 34 years. Samuel Friedland, of Miami Beach, is chairman of the Board of Food Fair. Duties Of president now rest with Louis Stein at Food Fair peneral headquarters in Phil adelphia. Talonl Show Set At llialoah Ladies' Auxiliary of the HialeahMiami Springs Jewish Center Will present a "We-No-How" talent show on April 25 at 8 p.m. All local talent will participate, and prizes will be given for the best talent. First prize is a weekend for two at the Cavalier Motel. Iris Maxwell will present dancing classes. Judges for the show are Hialeah Police Chief Warner, Miami Springs Police Chief, Miami Police Lt. Ford, Mr. Peevy, recreational director of the Youth Center. Off to Duncraggan Blanche and Sid Lewis are en route to Hendersonville, North Carolina, where they will begin preparations for the formal opening of Duncraggan Inn on June 1st. Mrs. Howard Rosen Wedding Rites Unite Stern, Fischer Home wedding April 15 united Miss Estelle Stern and Joseph Fischer. Their marriage is announced by the bride's parents. Mr. and Mrs. Max Stern, 2265 SW 25th ter. The ceremony was performed by Rabbi Morton Malavsky and was followed by a dinner at the Delano Hotel. Mr. Fischer is the son of Mrs. Samuel Fischer, of Olean. N. Y., and the late Mr Fischer The former Miss Stern received an AB degree in foreign affairs from George Washington University, where she was editor of the university newspaper and a member of Mortar Board, national senior women's honorary. She did graduate work there while working at the Bureau of Social Science Research in Washington, D. C. Mr. Fischer is a graduate of the University of Arizona. He had a teaching fellowship at the University of New Hampshire. After a month's honevmoon in Europe, the couple will live in Burma, where the groom will be working on a research project for Johns Hopkins at the University of Rangoon. B'nailVrith Women Plan Games, Officer Installation Dinners Emma Lazarus Chapter of B'nai B'rith Women will hold its installation dinner at the Shelborne Hotel on Sunday, April 25, 6 p.m. Guest, speaker will be Rabbi Morris Skop. spiritual leader of the Coral GaMe* J'-wLsh Center. Mrs. Alfred Reich will be named president. Other officers who will assume posts include the Mesdames Tina Katz. Ethel Soatzer and Danny Lapin, vice presidents; Miriam Greene, recording secretary; Saul Tashman. corresponding secretary; Tina Fisher, financial secretary: Minn Litman. treasurer. Edith Fleischer, parliamentarian; and Lenore Curtis, counselor. Installation chairman is Editn Fleischer. Mrs. Harry Kaufman, past vice president of Women s District No. 5. past president of B'nai B'rith Women's Council of South Florida and first president of Miami Beach Chapter B nai B'rith Women, will in-tall the new officers WE DELIVER AND SPREAD! T0PS0IL BY CONTRACT CERTIER LANDSCAPE i SOILS CO. Phene 86-I3SS A-l EMPLOYMENT SERVICE •T H. B. W •••• Phon# AL MKIDENBERO, Owner OW TO OTH DAMAGE Effective!// Economically! Easily! PROTECTS CARPETS! IT'S 0D0RLESSI CAN YOUR CLOTHES PASS THE "ELEVATOR TEST" ? Clotheastored in mothball* usually have that embarrassing "tell-tale" odor. And moth balls may not give complete protection. 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%  i PAGE 6 B KSS!MU^&& = nan A Story for the Passover By SONIA KLINE I loneliness, "he night air caressed his OV er. on the night of the first cheeks. The darkness had already Seder, was to be truly alone, cloaked the tops of the distant I mountains of Jordan, creating a' black void in the shadowy night. He stood not far from the precious water tower, his fingers twined through the rifle sling, surveying the horizon. He tried to stop thinking any thoughts that might deflect his seise of caution. Tonight he was from the immigrant camp. They had warned him of the danger But they had also said that He was back at the watertojer; § ^^ ,„ ^ m ^ now, looking upward past l ^ f ^J Ujjderncss to be won. Courage was girders to the big concrete vatthat j ^ w>$ ^ nee(J held the vital water Twice in the Frecdom {rom te „ an d true last month, border marauders had ; • neyer won b he ,„„,, tried to filter through to the setP* would be in serious trouble He dared not let his eyes stayimmigrant camp. He had come thousands of miles, shifting from one DP camp to another. His son ...try. the eye of protection for £J nv one t Perhaps to one W camp>o a !" "" "~ Hu, !" ir a ttimpnt Nearlv a I,X V! .. ....... J „„^„ h ,„M had even been born in a DP camp. the entire settlement. Nearly a dred lives, including those of Us own wife and young son. rested in he balance of his alertness. He breathed deeply of the dead night, listening for strange sounds among the living breath of the wildernei s. The tide of his thoughts swept in around him as he walked the .lit from the water tower to the furthest edge of the "safe terri• Sometimes they intruded. A swell of sadness would suddenly • gulf him. Perhaps if he had not been hardened to bitter storms of terror and tragedy, he might have d ed. was not terror and tragedy, or even danger that bothered him He pulled up the collar of hi jacket as the cooler night air began t" sweep in from the hills Ht felt alone, utterly alone and M not far off down the dirt road. Sarah and David sat at the Seder le Tonight was the first Seder tonight was his turn at guard luty. Perhaps he felt unduly sorrj !i : him-elf. he thought. But even night OMIMMM^5J *jj : dis p laced without a country to call h.rnseir Jldttoj nd a sad ^ > ^ (hought about disheartened /•£*)**' u"' long and hard before he made %  had reasoned. They were paying ung and clicked off the safety. He listened. There was only the familiar hush of the wilderness. Tssured that it was safe, he swung the rifle back over his shoulder and continued his walk Sometimes a dissonant voice his way because they had faith in his courage. He remembered how he had been unable to sleep, how he had risen in the middle of the night and walked through the maze of would well up from the settlement ^ pathways that ^p.^ed the beyond, carried on a puff of breeze He thought of his son David asking the four questions ... to whom. to whom could a son ask the four questions A father's place is with hison at the Seder, he told himself, feeling a nerve in his jawbegin to palpitate. Why was all this, he asked himself. It was a question he frequently asked. Tonight he asked it in a soft whisper to the black night. He had come to Israel in search of peace, but there was no peace. One never gets used to danger, he WTVJ TELEVISION PROGRAM SCHEDULE Friday thru Monday (Apr. 23-26) MORNING FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY 7.00 7:15 V 30 7.45 %  | Today Tut Pat Mu I 1CO 8:15 8.30, 8:45 Teal Pal Mu. | I 9:00 I> %  • I • • t 8 bool 9:15 St! > It Rich 9.45 !•• Be Ann led Lamp I'mo Vi l> t"iig School .. 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Money : Rather Public Service Weatherman .la. k of BpOTtl rl Doug Kdwarda Rennk Report! tin huts of the immigrant camp. All these people, he had thought, brought here out of misery^ and in return only faith, blind faith in the future of an idea, and in the courage of the people who would carry it out. It was because in some undefined way he felt that he must pay this debt of courage that they had come to the border settlement. And here he was walking about in the dead of night, with a weapon of death ready to fire at a hairsbreadth. And it was Passover, the night of the first Seder. It was this thought that made him doubt his courage. He reached the highest point of the area, stood upon it and surveyed the horizon. Beyond in the darkness was another land from which men had come to pillage and destroy. He must be watchful, he told himself, fighting hard against the temptation to run back down the dirt road to the settlement. He heard a rustle among the dunes ahead and cocked his rifle again. He swung in a semi-circle to the direction of the sound. He stood deathly still, breathing softly. The sound stopped. Lifting his foot, he took a step forward and had just time to see the jackal jump into the clear and away into the brush. He sighted with relief and put the rifle back on his shoulder, wiping the cold sweat from his forehead with the end of his sleeve. This would be the perfect time for something to happen, he thought, feeling the sweat drip down his back, chilling him. He was depressed and his depression was making him jittery, perhaps trigger happy. Why was he out here, he asked himself? Why? On Passover Why? These were the thoughts he must fight against. How far along in the Seder were they now? To miss a Pattern Seder. His first Seder in Israel, because of this. He patted the rifle sling and shook his head. Even in the DP camp they Jack •• i ;i. a.-. HI Fred w.n [ng I Tou Bet Life Burns A. Alien Plraatone 11 mr I 1 Love Lucy | My Kv. Story 9:00 S.lidtz Puiyhuuae P..III Intrigue 9:15; I 9:30! Mr MrXutley Meet Millie 9:45' The W.-b What's M. Line! Studio one 10:00 Gillette Fights 10:30 10:45! Old Ti'tie N'ewwreel Martha Itav, lilt Parade 11:001 N. Weather 11:15; Topper 11:30 11:46 Wo'ld Premiere Place The race Thai* My Boy l>on Molienliarh ilvll Buttons Toaat ..f Town This Is V. Lite I % %  | Mr, Mrs. North TV Then tar 12:00, 12:15 12.30 12:45 -Sign Off Sat. .N lit real. Sign Off News-Wether Mar. H'd Badge Slrn Off J.. UNI N ROM | MIAMI BEACH. FLA j PH'iNE 5-297H f Htliimy Gretfinfs It All Our r>i*a1s ana 1 Patreni BEACH DECORATORS INC 1M2 ALTON MAO Alice rieraey IMHir Cretfma, fa All Oar t ri.aa-i ..Pga,,., BROWNSVILLE DRUG STORE N.W. 27th AVENUE MOM 44-7233 %  *. W. Wafer, had carried on the traditions of the holiday, holding a Seder in a suit able comer of the barracks. He shivered at the thought Now he was getting maudlin. He laughed at himself. He waa still fighting against the bitterness that was chipping away at his composure when be beard the kicking of the pebbles. The sound was coming from the jtoaQ that led to the settlement. He put bis ear to the ground waiting for the rhythm of the sounds. Yes, they were footsteps, he observed quietly to himself. He stood up and unslung his rifle again. Soon the intruder would approach. If it was a friend, he would shortly give the long low whistle of recognition. One had to watch both directions carefully. If it is a friend, he told himself cocking his rifle again, he will stop short at the post, about fifty feet from the tower. He would give the whistle then get the return. If there was no whistle there would be trouble. The steps came closer, quick steps, with no pretense of caution. He estimated where the steps should stop and looked into the blackness ahead, still unable to see a form emerge. Then he saw a form, slight, quick, perhaps a small man, almost running. The form went beyond the post. It was almost to the water tower, the precious water tower. He would have to act quickly before the person could reach the tower. Even then, a neatly placed bomb would make his efforts fruitless. "Stop or I shoot," he called into the black night. His heart beat wildly. His finger drew in the slack of the trigger. The footsteps stopped. "Who are you?" he called again relieved that the figure obeyed his command. "Father it's David. Your son David." He swallowed hard and slid the safety catch swiftly into place Then he swung the rifle back on bis shoulder. "Can I come now?" David asked. "Come," he said, against his better judgment. He must be doubly "reful now win, F>u *'." I.TL came closer. "*' the rittdowy"^ ,osca •>thehor^^ l,,, 7 b routtt son, sv. S'der, Father," tjuT** ,n 8 "P a doth bgti," 1 swne ***** m ^ *e wine MdT," toes." m '*l He was deeph iraw.,'3 ? to benddo^ff hands around his so, Jj ed not show any en-7j t only took nWi thing to happen "Thank you, Dartstarting again on kj., walk. HefeHthsw,? beside him. He didnl | anymore, but he feeling of security. "You had better go j, David." he said with %  There was no answer In whose light step still i side him. "Please, David," he there was no answer Iran He dared not look don \ heard the boy clear heft "F2thcr," he said. "Rl "Yes." "Mah nish tah n hazeh ." The boy chanted th | four questions softly a| night The father i down as his vision ln tears, but he could led I age surge again through I Haiiaay GrMtiititi.il fritnii mi fitrag 0. S. BAKB fine Ut\ GfB 351 N.W. 27th AVa* Pktnt 44-3151 *WWWWWWWWWW*rf" Fossett's Prescription Pha Huntlngton Medical Building 164 S.I FIRST STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA One of the Uirgesf and Most Complete ht Pharmacies in the WorM W. 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APftlL 23, 1954 Calls Special Bond Meeting day; To Discuss Kickoff Here -Jmisfiffork/iar PAGE 3 A fecial meeting has been or Monday by Jacob Sher, Miami chairman of the Israel Bond Organization, s „ plans for a kickoff din[ v in May to launch the new ,„,,! Issue. A 1954 target lOOO has been set for the %  ea. nceting will discuss an aplate, place and speaker function, which will coinclosely as possible with Jh Anniversary of the State • fctated that prominent civic, and communal leaders ticipating in the plans for Bversary celebration togethrepresentatives of major I organizations. sixth anniversary of Israel I than a milestone in the calB ( .Jewish history," Sher de••More than 600.000 Ameri| a il purchasers of Israel (ha\e firmly established a Mstick of economic aid for It is significant that the nnivcr-ary of Israel coinith the flotation of the Ispelopment Bond Issue. Bond proceeds have ac [•II the economic growth of luring the past three years expansion of basic indusDrtension of agricultural ly the creation of a network latinn system! and increased Ttimi of electric power. Isvelopment Bonds will hnain tempo of economic and cial activity which is trans ; Israel from an underdevelrca into a thriving, self-sus! country, the most stable in Adults Form ill Team Here ns Adult League of the Town Greater Miami Jewish unity Center, this week anthe formation of its soft bam for the Center Softball Men between the ages of i 25 are eligible. ^tice begins on Minriav. 11:30 : Shenandoah Park. SW 22nd Dd 19th st.. according to the ncement. In charge at the re Gerald Rothbard and Morbberman I-eague play will (on Sunday. May 2. sty Will Meet lamic Psychological Society later Miami will meet on Fripening. April 23, 8 p.m., at ie of Mr and Mrs. S. Ettingil SW 18th st. Dr. S. Moss lire 11 Hutner will direct dramatics. (ctur *loasv Vote May Ith s ill l>roii|i 5 fall Lever tt-A for J. FRITZ GORDON 1 %  '''•' ill Adv the Middle East, with a record of steady progress in terms of human liberty and the economic well be ing of its citizens." Th" meeting Monday will be in the form of a luncheon meeting in the Biscayne Terrace Hotel at 12 30 p.m. "Practically every tield of endeavor in the young republic has been stimulated and encouraged by the flow of Israel Bond capital." Sher stressed, setting among the major examples an increase in annual agricultural production, excluding citriculture. from SI 12 500 000 to $222,000,000, in electric power capacity, from 70,000 kilowatts, to 180,000 kilowatts, and in annual industrial production from $45,000,000 to $850,000,000. Caribbean Settlements To Mark Tercentenary NEW, YORK—Jews in Jamaica. the Virgin Islands, and the Dominican Republic are planning to join in celebrating the 300th anniversary of Jewish settlement in the United States. Dr. Israel Goldstein, associate chairman of the American Jewish Tercentenary, declared this week. Dr. Goldstein, who is president of the American Jewish Congress and Rabbi of Congregation B'nai Jeshurun, returned to New York after a month-long visit to Jewish communities in the Caribbean. He was accompanied by Mrs. Goldstein, who is a member of the national Tercentenary committee. Dr. Goldstein discussed Tercentenary plans with Jewish leaders in Kingston. Jamaica and St. Thomas, the Virgin Islands. Both communities, he said, are considering the preparation of Jewish histories of their respective islands, Tercentenary Sabbath observances and other Tercentenary activities tying in with the celebration on the mainland. He stated that a similar program was being explored in So sua, Dominican Republic, the youngest Jewish settlement in the Western Hemisphere, founded in 1940. Donor Lunch Set For April 28th Dora Stein Sisterhood of the Israelite Center will hold its third annual donor luncheon on Wednesday, April 28, 12 noon, at the Strath Haven Hotel. A "Fashion Show for Jewish Living" will be presented. Models will include the Mesdames Jack Kronenberg, Harry Golen, Charles Oretsky, Pauline Seek, Herman Solomon, Abe Matersky, Bernard Sirkus, Jack Toppell, Norman Bergrin, Phillip Barocas, Nat Fragin and Miss Lillian Jacobs. Also featured will be two child models, Miss Paula Bergrin and Steven Solomon. Mrs. William Dickson and Mrs. Oretsky will be wardrobe mistresses. Script for the show is through the courtesy of the National Worn en's League, of which the Dora Stein Sisterhood is an affiliate. Mrs. Harry Silvcrman will be com mentator. Mrs. S. L. Cohen is director of the-program. which will in elude a vocal selection by Mrs. Ma tersky, with Miss Jacobs at the piano. Mrs. George Graham and Mrs. Al Rothberg are luncheon co-chairman. In charge of reservations is Mrs. Barocas. THE Hi A K T or not ID A CAMP UMATBLL A< For Boys '• 4 Hoort '"• Mi.mi Donor Luncheon at Algiers North Shore" Jewish Center will hold its annual donor luncheon at the Algiers Hotel on Tuesday, April 27th. In charge is Mrs. Melvir. Altman. „_— m WHUt IMH WfV HAS BUN A SIKIOUS NUO OUTBKtAK Fee ot $3S0 lor I weeks ini:ludes transportation, laundryand horse bock riding. Philip. $. Cho.'on, Educational Director of North Shore Jew'Uh Confer, will. 24 years of camp experience, Com* Director. FOR FIMTHIR INFORMATION CALL 16-4576 %  %  % %  Hillel House now under construction on the University of Miami campus. Hillel Cornerstone Ceremony Scheduled for May 23rd Cornerstone ceremony for the new Hillel House on the University of Miami Campus will .take place Sunday, May 23, 4 p.m., according to Sidney M. Aronovitz, president. Marshall Named to GMJCC Extension Staff The addition of Marsh 'Doc' Marshall to the extension staff of the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center was announced this week. Marshall is supervising the arts and crafts activities of the residents of the Jewish Home for the Aged, one of the extension services of GMJCC. He is a veteran of many years of leadership in camping and scouting. Author to Address Society Dr. Meyer Golob, formerly of the staff of Columbia University, New York, will speak before the Miami Society for Ethical Culture on Sunday, April 25, 11 a.m., at the Lindsey Hopkins School. His subject is "Reflections on Retirement." Prof. Mark Waldman will preside. Chairmen and committees have already been set in motion to make plans for the occasion, according to Aronovitz. In charge of the hosts committee is Milton Friedman. Co-workers are David Provus, Haruld Turk. Stanley Caiden, Charles Fruchtman and Sol Goldstrom. Participating in the invitations committee are Mrs. Sydney Suss, Mrs. Tina Katz, Miss Edith Simmons and Gilbert Schwartz. House chairman is Nathan Adeiman. and participating are Dr. Donald Michelson, Joseph Raj vis, Mrs. Bernard Hoffman, Harvey Herman and Jerry Adelman. Mrs. Ida Optner and Gilbert Balkin are in charge of publicity. Participating in planning are Dr. Michelson, Walter Kovner, and Jack Falk. Telephone committee consists of the Mesdames Fred Binder, Minn Past, Eli Rainbow, Ben Lebow, Dave Alper, Mae Newmark. Alfred Reich, Jessie Miller, Williams and Rosalie Deutsch. Importance of Variety Hospital Outlined at Meeting Importance of Variety Children's Hospital to Dade County and South Florida was outlined by Leo Adeeb. Miami Beach businessman and chairman of the hospital's 1954 $100,000 fund raising campaign, at a joint luncheon of civic group committees in Miami Beach this week. "Treatments-free or paid, accord to the circumstances of the child's parents—was furnished to thousands of ill and injured children last year." Adeeb said, "aside from the infantile paralysis cases for which Variety Hospital is best known. Pointing out that the hospital is not restricted to the treatment of polio cases exclusively, Adeeb urged community support of the institution because of its charitable, non-profit nature. Current campaign for 1954 operating funds has netted nearly half the goal so far, Adeeb said, adding that the entire sum is expected to be subscribed by the middle of May. WIN $25 IN HOME MILK'S BIG CONTEST Each week HOME MILK selects one of its quality dairy products—you send us your favorite recipe using that product ... if your recipe is judged best by the contest judges, you will win $25! and your photo and recipe will appear in this newspaper! CONTEST RULES This week's contest closes at midnite Saturday. Entries must be postmarked before thai time to be eligible Write or print your recipe clearly and give your name and address with each entry. You may submit as many entries as you wish each week. Winner of this week's contest will be announced in this newspaper 1 week aftsr last day for submitting entries. Winner will receive HOME MILK'S check for $25.00 (check may be made to your favorite charity, if you prefer), and photo of winner, together with recipe, will appear in this newspaper. All recipes submitted become the property of HOME M!IK Company and no entries can be returned. Decisions will he mode by a specialty selected panel of judges, whose decisions will bo final. Employees of the HOME M!IK Company and their families are not eligible to enter these contests. This week's contest ends midnite Saturday, May 1, and features HOME MILK's HALF & HALF (hall light cream and half milk). Send your entry to HOME MILK, 2451 N. W. 7th Avenue. Miami, and you may win S25 for your favorite recipe using HALF & HALF Actual stale laboratory tests prove HOME MILK exceeds state nutrition requirt ments by 13.1%. SERVE YOUR FAMILY PURE HOME MILK WITH HIGHER NUTRITIVE VALUE



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PAGE 8 B + ym*i*tinerkm*tL RELIGIOUS DIRECTORY FLAGLER %  GRANADA JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER will hold Friday evening -ervices at 6:30 p.m. Services for the second days t a m Evening servM • will he at 6 p in Sundav morni: Passover services are at 9 a.m., with Yizkor scheduled tor 10 30 a:' Rabbi Shapiro will preach. TIFERETH JSRAEL NORTHSIDE CENTER will hold Friday evening services at 6:30 p.m. Bat 111 ay morning services are at 9 a i Rabbi Louis (assel will preach on the topic: "Sing a Song of Spring Cantor Albert Glantz will render the musical portions of the 1 Jit orgy. Sunday morning Passover servkaa will be at 9 a.m. with YuJtor scheduled for 10:30 am Special prayers will be offered in memory of the Warsaw Ghetto mar tyrRabbi Cassel will discuss: "Israel—Land of the Living." BETH EL CONGREGATION will .hold Passover services at sundown on Friday evening. Saturday and Sur.day morning services are at 8:30 a.m. Rabbi Shmaryahu Swirsky wi/1 officiate and preach on both da; s. Subject of his sermon Satur1 day is: "The Eternal Song of an Undying People" Yixkor will be I at 10 a.m. on Sunday, at which time j the Rabbi will discusWhen Moses Wept Cantor Nathan Zeichner will render the musical portions oi the liturgy Evening serviceSaturdaj and Sunday are at 6:45 p.m. • BETH ISRAEL CONGREGATION will hold serviceon Fridaj it" 6 p.m. Paaaover services are on Sal unlay and Sundav morningat 9 a.m. Mincha is scheduled for 6 p.m. Dailj services are at 7:30 am. and 6:30 p.m. HEBREW ACADEMY will hold Friday evening serviceat 6:80 Saturday morning services ire al 0 am. Ra'hbi Alexander Gross will preach on the topic: "PaSSOVer the Holulav of Spring" Evening services are scheduled for 6:15 p.m. Sundaj morning services, marking the la-t days of Passover, will begin at 8 45 a n Yizkor i-cheduled for 10:30 am with Rabin Gross discussing "Memories ol the Past" Dailj services are held at 7 80 a ill and 6 40 p.m. TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM will hold Friday evening services al 8:18 p m. Rabbi Leon Kronish will officiate and preach on the topic •\ World I'd Like Saturday morning services are at 10:45 am Yizkor ischeduled lor that time Cantor Samuel Kelemer will ren der the musical portions oi the lit urgj AGUDATH ISRAEL HEBREW INSTITUTE Will hold Friday eve rung services al 6 30 p.m followed hv Maariv for the seventh day of Passover, Saturday morning service are al 9 am., with Rabbi Isaac Ever officiating and preaching on the topic: "The Practicability and Probability of Complete Redemp tion." Mincha will be at 6:30 p.m followed by Maariv. Sunday morning services are at 9 a.m.. with YizjgU**-" the letter* atari. Then from all over the free world rome lurh comment! %  • the*e from readers oi THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, an international daily newspaper! "The Monitor it mutt reading for straight-thinking people. ." "/ returned to school after a lapse of IH years. I uill get my degree from the college, but my education comes from the Monitor. ." "The Monitor give* me ideal lor my work. ," "/ truly enjoy ill company. ." You, too, will find the Monitor informative, with romplete world new*. You will ditcove* a con•trurtive viewpoint in every ncwi •lory. Uae the coupon below for a iperial Introductory tubacripiion. — 1 monlhi (or only 13. "Ik. < krblua s.~. KM* 0. S.t... Si.. BMtaa II. Mm., U. |. a,. IMa i. Tk. CamlMa tcaam Maaaai kor following at 10:30 a.m. The Rabbi will discuss "Memorial Servicei Break of Dawn for American Orthodox Judaism Mincha will be a) g M p m (ollewed by Maariv. • • • TEMPLE EMANU-EL will hold ptidaj evening services at 6:30 p in Saturday and Sunday morning services, marking the last davof Passover, will include services at Saturdaj morning services are at II a HI and will include the Yizkor memorial. Cantor Jacob Hoin-tein will render the musical portionol the liturgy a KOSHER I FOR : SASSOVER 111 E LECT LJ* KENDRICK YOUR PURCHASING AGENT IF YOM' WANtl &&* I A MAN who will devote his full time to the business of mokiij $5,000,000 worth of purchases each year for County Departments. A MAN who pledges and guarantees every seller in Dade County tH he shall not be discriminated against in selling to the County. &f A MAN who will provide public records on all purchases he makeswho will not tolerate secret fifes and secrecy in official acts. A MAN who has a reputation for fairness a background as o Nafiff M'tamian — a man whose honesty is proved in U. S. Army records. A MAN who will not tolerate a poffcy of favoritism a torn %  ** only guide to purchasing will be "the best possible at least cost." We Need a Man LikeJ KENDRICK Distributed by Hi-Grade Food Co. 1733 N. W. 7th ATsmtto Phon. 9-S45* (I'd. Political A.lv )



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[ APRIL 23. 1954 + l*l*hn*rldfc*n PAGE 7B eri can Notables Simon wolf: The Jew of ism By HARRY SIMONHOFF t ttwoMfl fhma, fmttHwrtmm m tmUn tmtHltd, HMtt, ; MM a.W/ifcW M AM Jewh* HtUImm l lht t,rctmHnmr ctUtkrithm of Jewish set if taunt i }sftf.-TNMiriJ ar 1848 was critical tor-European liberalism. In revolutions the democratic elements lost out, emporariU-. .The U.S.A. gained valuable adhercause of freedom from slavery soon to be conj most bloody war to preserve the Federal Union, pe immigrant 48ers from Germany came Simon d of 12 who until his 87th year would uphold patriotic fervor, the democratic and liberal ideals during childhood. of learning and devotion to Judaism he no doubt Ifrom his father, a teacher of Hebrew. Passing respects of successful business with his uncles and, he chose the less profitable career of law £ affairs. In his 24th year, he served as alternate \o the Democratic conventions of 1860 at Charles[Baltimore. But Lincoln and the slavery issue him to the new Republican Party. After Ft. he volunteered for army duty and was rejected ni of defective eyesight. Lincoln readable book, "The Presidents I Have Known i to 1918." Simon Wolf tells of his relations with rsidenl from Buchanan to Wilson. He could have Harding, whose term began after the book's on. One anecdote is typically Lincolnian. As closing his office one evening, a message came a Jewish-Jwy condemned to be shot the followfor deserting. He simply had to see his dying [Simon Wolt could not reach Lincoln till 2 a.m. Dg was bad since Sec. of War Stanton had threat esign if the President pardoned another deserter, kraight tace Lincoln complained lack of influence | administration, least of all with the Secretary of olf asked what would the President have done BV'S place. He answered with a telegraphic parcoin ha 1 no occasion to regret his act when he igg j^"" oy was kilted in battle at WhS nO!' 2£ w "" to render si n "l service. bUSEEZlSH Union amy t he enerai h ctSSi i i?. nter 2; li which comman J %  Jew. to iSn u£ tary d rtnct WmAlUH of several states. diS? t0 C "? 1 tbe un£air ord r But in the Presi ESS c ampa, S" o f •. the opposing Democrats were attacking a candidate who showed such slight regard for human or constitutional rights. Wolf, an effective speaker ZSI&2*. e,ections campaigned for Grant and absolved him of anti-Semitism. His efforts were evidently appreciated. Appointed Recorder of the District of Columbia Wolf was inclined to refuse the office as interfering with his active law practice. On hearing that objections were raised on account of religion, he entered the fight and won by unanimous confirmation. Roumania Jews had no complaints about Grant's attitude. No president before him had made as many Jewish appointments. He offered the cabinet post of Treasurer to Joseph beligman and named Edward S. Solomon Governor of the Washington Territory. Wolf was chiefly responsible for the selection of Benjamin F. Peixotto as U.S. Consul to Bucharest. The President tried earnestly to ease the persecution of Jews in the newly formed Kingdom of the Roumanians, who like beggars on horseback, were abusing their freedom from Turkish ^oppression. Long after PeixottoAs death, Wolf worked for the emancipation of Roumanian Jews, and was one of the small group which induced Theodore Roosevelt to send the note of Sec. John Hay on Roumania. Simon Wolf was often referred to as "Ambassador of Jews in the U.S. to Washington." This estimate was confirmed by anti-Semites, who assailed him as the Jewish lobbyist. He earned both titles. For over half a century he labored unceasingly to help his coreligionists. Officially he represented the Board of Delegates of American Israelites which in 1878 on his motion merged with the Union of American Hebrew Congregations. He was also the spokesman in Washington for the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith. His energies seemed without limit. Active in his own Synagogue, he was also a founder of the Baltimore Orphan Asylum. He established the Atlanta Hebrew Orphan Asylum, remained its president for almost three decades, and almost single-handed collected the then large sum of $130,000. His services to the Masons, the new Red Crow Association, the German and non-sectarian charities were no less conspicuous. Russia Most important were his extended services in behalf of Russian Jewry. At the start of Grant's second term. Wolf attended a Cabinet meeting called to devise some means of preventing the expulsion of Jews from Bessarabia. During four decades, in fact until the U.S. abrogated its treaty with Russia in 1911 contrary to the wishes of President Taft, Wolf worked continuously to ameliorate Russian anti-Jewish policies. He took the lead in inducing Theodore Roosevelt to forward the "Keshineff Massacre Petition" prepared by Leo M. Levi, President of the B'nai B'rith. In immigration matters. Wolf was more successful. Always on hand to smooth out a bureaucratic snarl, he was able to assure the entrance of people the officialdom would send back. Papers of refugees who escaped the Russian border were often not quite in order. It took years of labor with the help of other prominent leaders to maintain the "open door" policy to immigrants, especially for such paupers who were receiving support from philanthropic societies. The Hebrew Sheltering and Immigrant Aid Society celebrated Wolf's 80th birthday and stated in its 1916 Bulletin that he was instrumental in preventing the deportation of at least 103,000 Jewish immigrants. Simon Wolf's consulship in 1881 to Egypt was of little importance in point of service. Far more useful were his labors in historic research, which appeared in the book "The American Jew as Patriot, Soldier and Citizen." Written to silence the lying detractors who repeated the libel that Jews did nothing on the battlefield to save the Union, he proved from State and Federal records that the Jewish quota of soldiers was larger in percentage than the general population. 1, Greetings fa All Our friends and Patrons BROOKS BENOIX LAUNDERETTE GREETINGS THE CORNELL COMPANY ROOFING 8c SHEET METAL 4100 N. W. 28th Street Phone 64-0676 Miami Convalescent Home LEO ALLEN. Director S35 S.W. 12th Avenuo Phonei 9-5437 and 9-0271 Specializing in Car* to the Elderly anc Chronically III. 24-Hour Nursing Serv ice. Special Diets Strictly Observed Private and Semi-Private Rooms. 104 S.W. 8th STRUT dtr New Manmetment Phone 4-2645 TO All GREETINGS TAMIAMI PLUMBING CO., Inc. .. ii— 1 P W 13 James B. Bvrgin Greetings • Rein Insurance Agency • AUTOMOBILE • ION0S • fill • WINDSTORM • COMPENSATION • LIABILITY Serving South Dade County and South Miami in one great ... every new mtific improvent known to Oil Industry 8525 SO. DIXIE HIGHWAY Phono 67-4161 TO ALL ... A HAPPY HOLIDAY 1^ crifs _„,* %  John Shuov AND COLUMBUS HOTEL In The Heart of Miami 312 N. E. First Street PHONE 3-2671 OTOr? NCf JO NfrV TRIPLE HD IMOTOB Oil THIS WEEK' Phone 82-5659 Congress Building RE-ELECT JUDGE Stanley Milledge Your Circuit Judge from | Group 3 on May 4th Qualified by 9 years experience as your Circuit Judge His outstanding record merits your approval (I'd. Political Adv.) F*WWWWW p LEASE REMEMBER TO VOTE TUESDAY, MAY 4th J Help Elect FANS COWART DADE COUNTY PURCHASING AGINT A Member of Wion.il Confarance Christian* and Jaw*— Award of Marit 194? N tre Da'mo Alumni Association-Man of tho Yaar 1952 • Miami Knifhti of Columboa—Man of the Yaar 1953 Order of Ahapa—Outstanding CWiien T953 N 'NETEEN YEARS ACCOUNTING BACKGROUND PARTIAL CONSIDERATION FOR ALL BUSINESSES A PROFESSIONAL MAN FOR A PROFESSIONAL JOB 1 Pull Lever 25 A %  I'd. Political Adv.) 4 i 4 A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER Spolter Electrical Supplies, Inc. Lighting Fixtures 6700 N.W. 7th Avenue 715 N.W. 62nd Street PHONES 7-4596 and 7-6519 GEORGE P. KARNEGIS ROYAL BAKING COMPANY 601 N. W. 7th Street To All Passover Greetings Lagoon Restaurant and Bar YOUR PATRONAGE APPRECIATED 23 SUNNY ISLE BOULEVARD Passover Greotinas to All Our Friends and Patrons LIN F0NG CHINESE AMERICAN RESTAURANT 7321 COtUNS AVENUE PH. 86 5581 HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO All OUR TKIIHOS AND PATRONS FLAGLER MIRROR PLATE GLASS CO. 1432 W. FLAGliR STREET PH. 65-5373 HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS MONAHAN'S ELECTRIC CO. 4050 N.W. 29th STREET Tel. 64-0251 <•'< M^



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PAGE 10 B -Jewish IkrkMan Shot em i^odge Debate* I ntier Way Here Sholom Lodge. B'nai B'rith's eighth annual debate contest, under the chairmanship of Alan Kess ler. got under way Monday night at the University of Miami. Participating schools were Miami Senior High School. Coral Gables Senior High School, Miami Beach Senior High School. Miami Jackson High School. Miami Edison High School and Technical High School. This year's subject was "Resolved That the Legal Ruleof Evidence Should Govern Testimony Jews Were Murdered in Warsaw Ghetto Battle Eleven Years Ago Continued from Page 9 B Germans snnounced that everyone j who came out would be taken to easy prey for the Germans who im'. Wl r |< ; ; ,]| the others would be shot prisoned them or killed them out M (iru ( right. Tired beyond all endurances, they would fall asleep in drive ways, entrances, standing, sitting, lying and were caught asleep by a passing German's bullet ••Not Infregnently." Stroop re ported lo his superiors, "the Jews stayed in the burning buildings mi til. because of the heat and the fear of being burned alive, they ession'al InTesUgat' Preferred to jump down from the cr> oul: upper stones, after having thrown selves Let s not fall into their alive." The suicides began. articles into the street from the patois jammed and the owners coach, go to Washington. D.t. for, burnjn bmldw ^ Wllh In ,. lr all-expense con ^^ bn|kt n |h s(l| „.„.,, „, The tighten entrenched themselves near the entrance and waited with their weapons ready. Finally the Germans began to send pa into the bunker. They let in a small quantity of gas, then stopped, trying to break the defenders" spirit with prolonged suffocation. A terrible death faced the 120 fighters. Aryan Wjlnnr was the first to 'Come, let us destroy ouring Committees.'* The winning team, with their one week on an ducted tour, besides receiving I large loving cup to be held one year Debatora receive individual cups and medals depending on how they place in the contest Judgefor the preliminaries were Edward Forer, Murraj Shear and Phillip Wein-u in Semi-finals Wednesday were judged by Ed ward Resnick, Stanlej Fred and Clifford Selwood. This year, the Food Fair Foundation iassisting B'nai B'nth financially. Johns Emphasizes Six-Plank Platform In an action-packed two-da) vi-it to Miami this week. Acting GovertIOV*l StsTSMMfl nor Charley Johns vigorously emg| il ||fS-, 1 g)| -mMk! phasized his six major Dade County I % %  •• IM %  %  • % %  cr.Avl across the street into blocks of buildings which had not yet been set on fire (On Ma) 8. the Germans discovered and raided the headquarters at htila 18 They senl heavy rein forcements to surround the place A fierce battle lasted two hours. when the Germans realised thai it was impossible t" take the posl t ion by force, the) tossed .1 smoke bomb inside the headquarters and placed explosive, at the entrances to the bunker 1 The "toughs and the civilians surrendered. But none of the fighters. The call was repeated. The proposals at a series of rallies held at neighborhood campaign head quarters and at the homes of %  even] of his supporters. On all occasions, the Governor pledged his support to the elimin W. D "Bill" Joyce. Dade County Purchasing Agent, seeking to succeed himself, this week emphasized I that he "is fully qualified through I many years of experience to carryout these functions for the best inMionof taxes on household furnish-1' ercs,s .? f ,nc taxpayers of Dade ings. administrative legislation for i Coun, >' the automatic renewal of homej Joyce further stated that "in stead exemptions, the acquisition view of the rapid growth of Dade or construction of a State of Flor-1 County, the job of purchasing inida building to house the 57 agen i telligently and wisely has become cies now scattered over a wide I one of major importance to the area, new high bridges or tunnels | community, as a large portion of acro-s or under the Miami River to ; the tax dollar is spent through the relieve the city's traffic congestion.! purchasing office." state funds for a Medical School at j The candidate is Past Post Comy of Miami, and $5. mander of the American Legion 158.200 in state funds for the con struction of new roads and streets in Dade County. An unusual feature of the Governor's appearance at the neigh and the Veterans of Foreign Wars, an active member of the Military Order of World Wars. Forty and F.ight. Purple Heart, Third Division Society, Elks and Moose hands Pistol begged their friends to kill thcrii. But no one dared to take the life dt a comrade Lutek Rorblatt fired four shot, at his mother but. wounded and bleeding, she still moved Then someone discovered a hidden exit, but only a few sue ceeded in Betting out this way. The Others slowl) suffocated in the gas. Thus the best of the Jewish fighters met death. 100 in all; among them the beloved commander. On May 16 the Warsaw synagogue was blown up and the largescale action ended. The martyrs and fighters of the Warsaw ghetto had left their imperishable mark on history. On May 24. Stroop reported these final statistics to higher headquarters: "Of our total of 56.065 caught, about 7.000 were destroyed in the former ghetto during large-scale operation. 6,925 Jews were destroyed by transporting them to Treblinka Camp No. 21; the sum total of Jews destroyed is therefore 13,929. Five to six thousand Jews were destroyed by being blown up or by perishing in the flames ." IT S "MART TO SEE THf IN MUMf PH i Ce7 J ,-3: BlSC 61 VL horhood headquarters' rallies and Lodges. Lions, South Florida Angprivate receptions was the presenlers Club, a member of the Municitation of the Miami produced 16 pal Finance Officers Association of mm sound film. "This Is Your, the United States ;.nd was presi Life," depicting the highlights of ; dent of the.National Convention of Governor Johns' personal and poll Veterans of Foreign Wars held in tical career. I Miami in 1949. He is an honorary member of the 'National Association of Purchasing Agents and the Miami Police BeneI volent Association, has played an active part in the Red Cross, Deleiise Council, Tuberculosis Associ! ation and the Children's Service Bureau. Joyce is married, has two children and resides at 5210 West Flagler Street. Vocelle Appoints Aide In Congressional Drive Charles L. Vocelle. candidate for IS Congress, this week announced the appointment of Olin W Todd as a member of his campaign steering committee. Todd is well known in Masoniccircles in Dade and Monroe County and is a partner in one of Florida's leading business firms. Todd is the father of candidate Ynceile's wife. Betty Todd Vocelle. Builders if Imirtal Memorials fir tbi pm O mm Jewish Trail Look for the 2-Story White Building Thurnnnd Monument Co. MARKERS $40.00 PLUS CEMETERY CHARGES Open Sundays Phono 4-3249 ;v)GUST BROS R V f la the atsr' PALMER'S MIAMI MONUMENT CO. Serving the Jewish Community Since 1926 And Only JEWISH MONUMENT BUILDERS Large Stock On Hand For Immediate Deliveryl Exclusive Dealers ROCK of AGES MEMORIALS 3'4//-/s S.W. 8th Street ftooii* Ootftt Yiddish Classical Hour NEW STATION — NEW TIME STATION WWPB 1450 on Your Dial WWPB proudly presents YIDDISH CLASSICAL HOUR with Tke D... .f j.wi.1, (MIMlMm MORRIS NASATIR IVIRT SUNDAY in *:30 ID11 Mfc linen Te Our New Feature %  JUST A MIAM JWV Post to Aid in Hialeah Defense Effort Hialeah Miami Springs Jewish War Veterans Post 681 has offered itsupport to the Civil Defense el tort lor Hialeah. The post will assist by serving as emergency police Dr. Stanley Wall man. committee co-chairman with Dr. Leon Ki sen man and Ted Lingaton. announced that members at tend meetings every Thursday night at the North Hialeah Klemen tary School, where they receive in struction in policing and first aid Commander Max Goldstein urged that all citizens of the community attend the meetings and serve in the formation of the Hialeah Emergency Hospital. FRIDAY. *oul r „.,, ~ q DRYWOOD R bill s,r *Bht 5 y,„ TRUliMOlEi, MIAMI -ui^ 82-6441 •"mi MIAMI BEACH-t Ml 5-3444 MOVING IS SO EASY...WHEN YOul: V~ Zj k VanLm 1 m 1 i 0 1 d c •-1 ml One il lo! Distance ind D o • r • t •Oier %  .-. %  '> SNORT OR lORC-TlRM STORnOE AVAIIMIC IN Oil TWO. MODEM.7-ST0r WAREHOUSES Fireproof Construction Only Private Storage Rooms M Greater Miami • Silver ndR*|VuHs. 100% A. D.T. Automate fire and Deviltry Protection w **Home.r' ."*''/ rW*l PHONE .—iif* "•"••en t. II GLASS i%\;ii\ STORE moUT — PLATE sad WTJTDOV OUfj rrmltux, Tope, BlTQjiftd Mlrrora nad Roeilverinfl Oer I LA& Glass and Mirror Wi IX S.W. 8th SL PHORZ MORRIS ORUS /RVI.VG MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY THE CEMETERY OF DISTINCTION FOR DISCRIMINATING FAMILIES Rabbi S. M. MachteL Director 5505 N. W. 3rd St Phone 87-8201 3w ^Aetidied Jlemow* iPev/t/c €


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L APRIL 1354 nized Anti-Semitism in America ges Tactics Radically, Report Says *Jm1s§i ffegf(gQrT_ PAGE 9 A ,,., ired an'i-Semitism h a s its tactics radically durast seven years, the Amerish Committee warns in d document. "Anti-Semitic in the United States: A 'and Appraisal," published public by Dr. Joseph M. rg. Creator Miami Chapter lit, '"<• report is part of a iiny American Jewish ComIresearcfa project on the genkbject of bigotry. L| In the report as among the cold war brought about the present tense atmosphere of our national life." Since World War II. these groups have spent millions of dollars to advertise their views through all media, the report adds. "There is much room in the market-place of the ideas for opposing viewpoint on a multitude of issues —national and international, politi cal, social and economic," the A.1C Obituaries Mrs. Anna Rubin Novack^33 wife of Ben Novack, Miami Beach building contractor, died of cancer Tuesday in a hospital. Mrs. Novack, who lived at 4150 Nautilus dr., was a graduate of Miami Senior High School and the University of Miami. She was a member of Temple Israel and belonged to Westview Country Club. Besides her husband, she is survived by two sons, William 5, and Stephen, 3' 2 ; three daughters, Jan, 7, Audrey and Patricia, 2; her parreport concludes. "That is the ents Mr and Mrs Morris Rubin; glory of American democracy. But two sister s. Mrs. Millicent Belvener the public must be shown how to and Mrs L '"'an Swiren, and a Memorial Chapel, followed by burial in Mt. Nebo Cemetery. MAURICE GERMAIN {4-year-old auditor for the Veterans Administration, died Friday. He cama in Miami n> yaara ago from Pateraon, Nl.. and lived at ittl BW 18th Bt. Ha as u member of the Thanre 'lass and 88era of the Scottish Rita. tfurvlvIna ara IIIH wife, Francea; his mother, Mrs. Anna (ierniaiu. Mlainl. anil three brothers. Bendoaa were held Mondi y in the Miami Craapel > %  Gordon Funeral Home. recognize and reject the ideological imen'ting^anti-Semitism counterfeiters who would past on their publications are i a ^ ,egal tender their hollow coins McGinley. of Union, N.J.. of bigotry." The recent report of the House Committee on Un-American Activities, headed by Rep. Harold H. Velde (R. 111.) confirms the AJC findings. In its annual report, issued Feb. 6, 1954. the Congressional group warns on page 5: "There are presently at work within the United States various and sundry hate' groups, the leaders of which, while masking their activities under the guise of patriotism and devotion to the republican form of government, are in fact spreading dissension, discord, bigotry and intolerance. In many instances, these organizations select ultra patriotic names and devices to conceal their true and her of the bi-weekly tabloid, iron Sense"; Gerald L. K. of Los Angeles, who pub"Thc Cross and the Flag" tads the Christian Nationally, also known as the Chris[Ndtionalist Crusade; and I, Britton, also of Los Anpublisher of various slick (anti-Semitic tracts. achieve a proper perspecIthe AJC report explains, "it lessary to understand that [anti-Semites have abandoned former brash and obvious tacmore skillful hate-monind cunning publicists have leveloped a sense of public They exploit current hate issues, toning down, if Eliminating, open anti-Semi|They aim to win the support kpectable elements, rather fthc lunatic fringe following they so highly prized in an Front days." nting out that today's anties have learned "how to salt debate with hate propa' the AJC report says that %  •nationalists" groups offer ent platforms for this Extreme isolationism, |ition to foreign aid, unreasonpstility to the United Nations, ^mnation of both major politi ties and agitation for "a nment of political forces," nong the themes falsely stresthe ultra-nationalists, the adds, hile some of the ultra-nationIgroups espouse retrogressive jimic reforms," the AJC report Mies, and others have politi(ims. all favor extremist techIs in combating communism— pvinging. wild accusation tac*'hich indiscriminately charge als with being communistic. ^-nationalists are now appealthe American people on basis. c(|uating everything they with communism, subverand a newly-invented phefcnon — creeping socialism.' hiring the past decade, ultraInalist organizations have inked immeasurably and they offer tempting opportunities Bfiltration by anti-Semitic delsIn setting out to cultivate %  gmups, the professional bigol his hand adroitly, exploiting (•articular political issues which currently the focus of concern Itranationalist circles." fce AJC report states that ultrapnahsts made little headway the average American "until brother, Arnold, all of Miami Beach. Services were held Wednesday in Temple Israel, with burial in Mt. Nebo Cemetery. MAX GRUMET 88, Of '*'il IVnn.sylvaniH ave., Mian:: Beach, who cama hare ali yeara ano from New York, died Sunday. He owned a dry cleaning, atora. Burvlvora Include his wife. Roae. Barvlcaj and burial were in New fork, with Beach Memorial Chapel in charge of local arrangementa, MACK GURVITZ <• %  .. of %  S.,.,II Byron ava., Miami Beach, died Saturday. Services were held in New \..rk with Beach Memorial Chanel in charge locally. Mr. Ourvita had '"'" %  winter resident here for 15 yeara. He leavea hla wife, Eva, LOUIS KAUFMAN at, a wlntei realdenl hare for the past 20 yeara, di.-.i Saturday in a local hospital. Services were held In Chicago with Beach Memorial Chapel in charge of local arrangementa He waa a hotel owner In Chicago. He laavea Ills wife. Baas, ami a eon, Arnold. MRS. BESSIE EINSOHN 88, of I4M NW 10th st, who came here ii years ago from New York, died Sunday in a hospital She haves her huaband, Jacob; two sons, Milton, oi New York, and Murray, of California; two daughtera, Belma, of Miami, and Mis Beatrice Pine, of Mldangerous purposes. The subject; SEl^ BtSK Miami: 'ESrlSS of the 'hate' attacks are individuals "''"' "' 1 1 Tuesday m Riverside MeMRS; ANNA ZOVOLOFF r,. ,, of 182* svv 18th ave., passed away Saturday, Servloaa were held In New York, with Gordon's Miami Funeral Home m charge ol local arrangementa. Mrs. Zovoloff came here eight yeara ago from Philadelphia and leavea her hushall'l, Samuel. MRS. ROSE WEINTRAUB "0, of 841 Jefferaon ave., Miami Reach, passed awa) Saturday. Services were held ill BoHton, Mass., witn KlVt-j sine Memorial Chapel, Miami Peach, in %  barge of local arrangementa Mrs. VV'eintra uh came here nine yaara ago from .\,w York and la survived bj a brother and a slsier. MRS. GERTRUDE BROWN 87, of MSO SVV :;:;ul ave.. a residenl here for six yaara, died Sunday, Bervie.s ware held In Boston, with Cordon Miami Funeral Home in charge of local arrangementa she leaven her huaband, Jacob, two sons, a daughter, three brothera and two alatera, or groups of religious and racial minorities among American citizens. The Committee is by no means unaware of these activities, and investigation and documentation will proceed to the end that the individuals concerned may be disclosed for what they are. In the opinion of the Committee, there are no degrees to subversion. It is not sufficient to be simply anti-Communist It one is antiAmerican at the same time." Founded in 1906, the American Jewish Committee, with chapters in 44 principal cities and members in more than 550 American communities, is the pioneer American organization combatting bigotry, protecting civil and religious rights of Jews and advancing the cause of human rights. mortal Chapel, Miami Beach, with burial In Mi. Sinai Cemetery, 3iayor Support** Voi'vllv tor Post Miami Mayor Abe Aronovitz addressed a political rally at Charles Vocelle for Congress headquarters on Saturday and endorsed the candidate. Vocelle told his supporters, "1 am gratified to have the support of such an outstanding citizen as Mayor Aronovitz. and I shall do my utmost to merit the confidence that he and all others have placed in PVT. SYDNEY MAGER 28, W'as killed Baturda} In an auto accident on the New Jeraey turnpike. Services Were held Wednesday in ltench Memorial Chapel. Burial followed in Mi. Nebo Cemetery. I'M Magef came from New York sis yeara ago and lived with his parents", the Rev and Mrs. Morria D. Mager, 4553 N Hay rd Miami lleach. Id-sides his parenta, lie is survived by a brother, Gerald, and a sister, Claire. Before he was taken into Army service nine months ago, hi 1 was a law student al tile University of Miami. He was a niemher of Tan ESpallon Rho legal fraternity and an officer <>f Young Judaea organization. ALBERT HABIB 1.2-year-old hotel employe, died Monday. Service* were held Tuesday ill Riverside .Memorial Chapel, Miami, with burial In Mt. Sinai Cemetery. Mr. Hablb la aurvlved by his wife. Jeannie, a brother and two sisters. DR. ALTER S RESLER dentist. 85, of New York City, an annual winter visitor, died Sunday He was living at May Harbor Islands, Miami lleach. Riverside Miami Beach Chapel sent the body to New Jorfc for services and burial. Burvlvlng are hla wife, Tillle, who was with him; a lirother, and three sisters in New York. me Vocelle's campaign manager, Sidney L. Segall said, "The open endorsement of Charles Vocelle for United States Congress by Abe Aronovitz strongly indicates the desire of all forward-looking citizens to elect a man who places principle and respect for the rights of people over and above, political expediency." ^ / %  • I % %  ** JOSEPH HERSCHBAUM :,4. of V.'.) 77th st., Miami Beai h, pass,,! away Sunday, Bervloea were held ill Riverside Memorial Chapel, with burial in Mt. Nebo Cemetery. Mr llei si Idiaum, a meal salesman. came here five years ago from New York City. He is aurvlved by hla wife. Marx. MEYER GREENBLATT OS of 1911 SVV 87th ave. a wholesale fund broker, died Sunday. He came henl< months ago from Chicago. Services were held In Chicago with Riverside Memorial Chapel in charge of local arrangements. BARNETT BROWN R of 1292 BW l.'.th St.. passed away Monday. April l-\ al his residence. Survived by his wife, Quwle, and one sister Mrs. Marlon raves Services were held al Miami Riverside, aunt followed in Mt. Nebo Ce MRS. HENRIETTA BERMAN 57, oi 1012 Euclid ave., Miami Beai h died Tuesday. She came from New York iS yeara ago, Surviving are her husband, Walter, ami three brothers and a sister. Bervlcea were held Thurada) in Riverside Memorial Chapel, M i leai it ABRAHAM SINGER 81, co-owner ol Tayatee Bakery, died .,II April 12 He cm,from Detroit l.i yeara ago and lived al 10078 Bast Bay | Harbor dr., Miami Beach, singer was) a member of the Miami Beach American Legion Cost 88 and the Miami Beach Cika Lodgre. Burvlvlng are nia wife, Sophie; two sons. Joseph and l>r. Jack; four daughters, Kranies. Jeanette, Mis Ida Wtoner and Mrs Ruth Goldsmith; and eight grandchildren. Servicewere at Cordon's Miami Beach Chapel on April 14th, with interment in Mount Nebo Cemetery. HARRY SMOLIN r.l, of 1 I'd Meridian ave.. died on April 13 at home. He was the owner of itelle Smolin's garment store on Washington axe.. Surviving are his wife. It.-lie; two lii-others and a sister. Services ami burial were in New Cork, with Miami lleach Riverside in charge of local arrangements. Smolln came to Miami lleach 111 years ago. DAVID STROMBERG Sfi. of 34."iO Garden ave.. Miami Beach, died on Apiil 8. A retired hutcher. he came here 10 years ago from NewYork. Survivors Include five daughters, Mrs. Kdna Winii. Mrs. Lillian Schwartz, Mrs. 1 lorogny Simon, Mrs. Sarah Kalin and Ms Ruth Koppel, and a sun. Sam. Bervloea and interment were In New York City, with Miami Beach Riverside in charge of local arrangements. InterCenietery. HELEN GOLDSTEIN -,1 ,.f 8820 North Miami Avenue passM %  _.. .... :i II In -I l.i.-:, I,ry for interment HANNAH JAFFE -.7 of Harbor Lights Motel, Wlndlaw Key, passed away Tuesday. Aorll W. a h,., residence Survived bj ; hushand, Harrv. and on. s.. I I..Jhen. Remains were sent to hlcago for services ami Interment bj Miami Riverside. MINNIE OXMAN of MO NVV 10th .' Passed.awas MATHILDE ROSTHAL 71, of MM SW 21st St., died on April .",. She came here from New York 21 \e.irs ago and is survived by her husiiand, Samuel: a son. Robert .1 ; two daughters. Mrs Harold Cohen and Mrs. Bmanuel Htrechberger; a brother, two sisters, three grandchildren, Including itart Cohen, and a greatgrandchild. Services were ,.|1 April 6 at Cordons Miami Chapel, with interment in Mount Nebo i .111.1,1.v IDA KORNBLUM 77. a resident of ilBlackstone Hotel, died on April 9. She had come from New York seven years ago. Surviving are a son. Samuel; three daughters, Mrs Dor* Welntraub, Mrs Esther Wohlfeld and Mrs. Bella Ni.r. 11 berg Services and interment were in New York. With Miami Itiveiside In charge of arrangements. ABRAHAM PROPPER 73, a retired tailor who came Morris B. Frank was unanimously re-elected president of Beth Jacob Congregation Tuesday evening. This is Frank's third successive term in that office. He was also president of Beth Jacob for five years before resigning to accept other congregational duties. Also named were David Whitman, vice president; Leo Meyer, vice president; Marcie Liberman, treasurer; Al Hellman. recording secretary; and Louis Shafkin, financial secretary. Sifh ia Sill 111'if to Star in Hirseh Production Hen* During the past three years, Sam Hirseh has produced and directed plays at the University of Miami's Ring Theatre and the Casablanca Playhouse. Beginning Saturday night, Hirseh launches a new theatre venture. He has remodelled the old Biltmore Theatre at 151 NE 40th st.. changed the name to the Biltmore Playhouse and will present a series of popular Broadway hits there during the summer months. Hirseh has signed Sylvia Sidney to star in the opening play, "O" Mistress Mine." The play was made famous on Broadway by the Alfred Lunts. Appearing with Miss Sidney will be Rex O'Malley. prominent actor who starred in the original play. "The Man Who Came to Dinner." ••O' Mistress Mine" will run for two weeks as will all other vehicjes Hirseh plans to present this summer. "I am quite confident that the theatre-goers will like our new location. We have plenty of free parking and the theatre is completely air conditioned." Hirseh said. from died New York seven years ago, died on Vprll %  He lived at IMS SVV Mill St. Surviving are his wife. Lena; two sons. Charles and Irving; and a daughter. Nettl llnnimell Services and interment wen in New York, with Beaoh Memorial Chapel in charge ol arrangement*. LEGAL NOTICE Pmuel Friedland. president of Temple Emanu-FJ. ia shown reP'ng the amended charter authorizing the change of me *ne of Miami Beach Jewish Center to Temple Emanu-El from 9e George A. Holt, Senior Circuit Judge. Dade County. ObPg the ceremony are Rabbi Irving Lehrman (left), spiritual ES he s yngogue, and George J. Talianofi (right), vice K* Temple Emanu-El has a membership of over 1.000 ,u 'es. It wag founded in 1940. MRS. IDA QENESON 7-, of 1040 NK IMrd st., d-.ii Wei i.,'s,l-,v Anrll II S.I vices were held "'s',,. Tort Clt, Gordon's Mtam Kunerul Home w is In chare* Of local irrsiurements. she is survived to he huXml. .Vhiaham. one > %  „,, M %  daughter. MISS OLORIA'SHAPIRO -.,; „,:•"4tl> "t.. Miami Beach, s iilarv ... the civ of Miami Beach staff psvchoiogisi. di.-d Saturday morning in a hospital she came here m J aTs aa i ** %  secretary of the Bvl icuae fnlversilv Alumni AssoelaCm at Miami Heach. and > Sunday £*S£ STBS few* S^stX^r^i 1 s,,v„cs were held Monday In Bench Tvehnion Head to lie Honored Here A group of Greater Miamians will honor Dr. William Fondiller, honorary president of the Ameri can Technion Society at a gather ing which will be held at the home of Mrs. Jennie Grossinger, 5941 Pinetree dr. Dr. Fondiller will tell the group the role that the Israeli technical school is playing in the present trying days in that country. Leo Rutstein, field director for the Society, is making his headquarters in Miami Beach and says that "the support Greater Miami is giving to Technion is wonderful, and hope that many more Miamians will take the opportunity to hear and take pride in the task that the school is doing." Local leaders spearheading the meeting are Joseph Cherner, Rabbi Irving Lehrman and Meyer A. Raskin, president of the local chapter. NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICK IS HKKKHY C.IVKN t"r the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name-it ROSECRKST GIFTS, .1 SHI Miracle Mile, Coral Gables, intends to regi• said name with the Clerk of the I cull Court of Dade County, Floi Ii. H.KSI..VVV OW91EJKO Sole Owner KE88L-BR A GABS Attorneys for Applicant \-\-i \\ Piaster si. 4/88-30 — Ti/7-14 NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY. No. 167J2i MART IVNI-: MORTOK, I'lainiiff, MILTON it NORTON. Defendant, SUIT FOR DIVORCE TO: MILTON K MORTON 80th Al' I SHAPE APO ;."i. e/o I'M New York, NY. You -ii e hereby notified thai a „, complaint for Divorce has fled against you. and you are quired to serve a cops "'" ><>"' A ,',, Pleading to the Bill ol m on the Plaintiffs Attorney, HRNRJ M CAIN, 8618 VV.--I PlaBler 81 Miami, Ma and file the original Answer or Pleading in the office of the Clerk of the Cir. ui' Court on or efore the IWh day ol May. 1884. f you fail to do so. judgment by default Will he taken against you for the i. demanded In the Hill of oinplslnt DONE AND ORDERRD at Miami, Florida, this 6th day of April. A,l>. 1954 R B I.KATHKKMAN. Clerk. Circuit ."ourt. Pail, i-iiiinty. Icloi-Ma BY WM. VV ST.X'KIN (Circuit Court Seal) l>eputy Cleric



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FAGE 8 A *Jei*tHvrid**n ntlDAY, Israel's Industry Expanding By NURA LASKY a further Impetus. It HI %  """ Jewish Telegraphic Agency r ,. ; ,r a time as the period tA HSM .1ERUSAI.FM-I.ast January, acimmi S ra.i..n which follow,,! on Ihe I -ding to the latest statistics. Is 1 exported twice amany indusal goods than during the corre heels of Israel's establishment in 1948. when an intlatioiian 6COI1 onu made even venture worth spending month of 1953. The total "hile. because the I -• U Still comparatively small worth local population bought eveiythtaB aether $2,500.000—but if the It could lay hands on. i|||v upward m ,, u| ,„ r< l ,„ nl m the first years ol statehood, months is maintained throughout moreover, the Government was in year, the authorities' target ol terested ." attracting private tor M4 mill.on tor 1954 might well U' eign investment into industry, and reached or even surpassed. Pi"l favorable conditions were :ndustrial exports began rising offered to anyone read) to set up last summer, and the nu.nher -.1 %  plant considered "worthwhile rting factories reached 750 bj meaning that either il offered en end of 1953 The increase was port possibilities or it would pro ught about bj the completion duce goods which would otherwise various factories: the conclusion ** ""Ported Little was asked, how%  i more bilateral trade agreements ever, whether such goods were Into other soft-currencj countries; deed vital lor a poorcountrj whose also by the institution of a ntt-atl task was absorption of mas re favorable exchange rate and ertain measure ol de-control Inside the country which enables %  nufacturers to obtain more or regular raw material replace ni. and with this assurance Ihej ( seek loreign marketlor their duellie oue-tion has been asked re •. tedl) also by Gardner Patter oi Princeton (Jniversitj. in the marj issue ol "Foreign Affairs nether Israel can ever become a -eni poor immigrants: hoe much could be saved bj importing mate rials and processing them in the country; and whence raw material replacements would come And as in 1952. tininflationary eeonomj gave waj to a disinflationary one when the local pound was devalued and led to a shortage ol read] cash industry was one of the first to feel the pinch The picture began to uiihlur Now Israel had to I rious exporter ol manufactured """I"''"' '" earnest, both internally dFor -he is poor in natural •"" l also in overseas marketIt resources, all her markets are fai became obvious that many i) becausi ol the \rsb States fectorlesshould never had been set iistence in their economic UD "together expands il -coins also increasingly worthwhile to produce those goods which initially show a low margin n exchange earnings because all their materialare mi ported The k.i.-i I I i "el" vehicle atjtemhh plant in Haifa, which began epemtmg early in 1954. is a ea-e in point initials it WM 'nit an assembl) plant Of imported parts. Today, Oianj parts come from Israeli factories, thus saving the coav omj up to 33 percent of foreign curreno In 1953. s5.20o.ooo worth ol can "ere sent overseas, and figures for the current year are estimated to double, if all gocac cording to schedule. Israel's best customer for manufactured goodl has of late been Turkey, which during 1953 took nearij 37 percent of total industrial exportThat country', one'of Israel closes! neighbors, which has during the past lour years been undergoing an enormous develop men) period with liberal American financial aid. is a "natural'' market for Israeli goods, ranging from earand tireto cement, kero-cne itoves sheet glass, medicines, building materials and tooth paste Despite keen competition from tier many and other members of the European Payments Union to which Turkey belongs, Israeli goodhave gained a firm foothold in that country, and her clearing account with Turkey has lately ^^ glM^^ A check for $750,000 payable to the United Jewish III signed by Charles Fruchtman. treasurer of the GreatetL Jewish Federation, as Dr. Benjamin B. Rosenberg (left ft, tion director, looks on. The check represents a loans* from five local banks as part of a national drive lor L urgently needed in Israel for rehabilitation of newcossM To Create Memorial Warsaw Ghetto AUffl Thousandof Greater! will gather at Flamingo hsj ckade against Israel and output l efficiency standards ol l-rae Now something like industrial planning iemerging, (or expert r force are low A combination ence and setbacks are hotter mas. these criteria makes competition ten than economistadvice Two in the world market difficult, even facts crystallize: industries using igh wages are lower than in as man) local!) cultivated or othern) other countries wise available materials, and those It was m the thirties that "inmin <''* n,w materials and re1 dustrialization" began when man) Quiring m the processing special] German Jews, fleeing the Nazi reskllls r rnuch labor, have a good j ie. transferred their assets K> chance of survival, the first bee-tine m th, form of industrial caus ? of their hard currency earn < lipment and raw materials Thi,n capacity, and the latter be • od the country m good stead cause, at the new rate of H. l 80 ring the second world war. when ,0 ,nt dollar, manpower is cheap. • Allied forces in the Mediterran,nI '"'' former group belong citan.i purchased from local innw by-products, groundnuts turned • -try whatevet w.,available ln oil, and goods produced from Wearing apparel, processed food Hbre plants, etc And the latter %  ffs, metal productand a large Strop includes such items as indus-1 et) ol other daily require trial diamond-, watches, certain its were bought up b) the var 'MMof fashions s armies, and industry received But at the industrial potential Mizrachi Women's Organization of Greater Miami will hold a dance and variety show at the Black-! Wedn,M '' > fvenins;. Apn^ .... Pay tribute to the heroes a" stone Hotel on Sunday. Apn 25. i ,,, „. r | Warsaw Ghetto uprising a been working to "Israel's credit 8 D m The af{air win establish a 1953 Sponsors are the^ meaning Turkey sells her less than memorial in the children's village za rus Fedt ration she buys from her. at Raanana, Israel, for the late Dina LEGAL N This situation is about to be rectilied. however, by the imminent \ and Henry Chill. Chairman is Mrs. signing it is hoped—of a $20 mil j Alfred E. Stone. Co-chairman is lion trade pact for the supply of M y .. goods in each direction Similarly. Mrs l srael Yu sn the contention of the Turkish Trade Ministry that Israel's priceSk „ pinned Monday were in some instances higher than those ruling in the world market, seems to have been taken heed of, after an initial upset in Israeli Industrial circles For Israel cannot "Our Staff in Satire." a skit, will be presented by members of the Louise Chapter Board. American afford losing that market, even if j Jewish Congress, at a meeting Monnew trade pacts signed in the past day Apri i 26. 1 p.m.. at the Cadil lac Hotel. Elections are scheduled few weeks with Ifaly and Finland -the former a new one. the latter a broadened extension of an existing one—will bring further orders to local industry, with a large part of them assembled products. It is significant, however, that for the first time items mentioned n these trade pacts include goods lor which the planners prophecy a sound future such agroundnuts, wool (rum locally raised sheep, and machinery and products who-, manufacture r equir es a good deal of skill and labor Maybe in the not too distant future l-rae! 's dream ol becoming the Near East's "Little Switzerland'' can yet be realised at the meeting. Holiday Greetings • mil c*r friends and fair ami DUDLEY & FARTHING Printers 820 FIFTH STIIET MIAMI BEACH fhtnt 5g-450S *V > 'V ,, 'W > >"' V"V"V"V*""V "VVV**'"^*** HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS Doctors Clinical Laboratory 1004 Huntinglon Building Miami Phone 3-6553 H. W. Hamilton. Medial Technologist THEY'VE BEEN WORKING ON THE RAILROAD John V. Duggan. 90. Florida's oldest living railroad engineer, remir.isces with Acting Gov. Charley Johns. The latter is a former railroad conductor with 30 years seniority. The occasion of Johns' visit to Duggan's home, 3022 NE 2nd ct., Miami, was the 50th anniversary of the veteran's first run from Miami to Jacksonville. BLUE MOUNTAIN CAMPS BOYS • • • GIRLS High in the Pocono Mountains. 90 miles from Philadelphia or New York City tSSSL uC •"•"'• "*" h *"—+ %  ** u • Mass* sssenWea ft* .. ch MM** chili. 34th SEASON SAME OWNERSHIP-MANAGEMENT Health —i t *' mm r "•' umm, Tfc w ^J h t J^ • %  '—"Cam..,*.,, witk fhrlmm tMr#M-frt(# MRS. JULIAN NEWBAUER I 4411 NAUTH0S MlVI. MIAMI BfACH MWM€ $t-724g NOTICE UNDER r'C T ITI0n| NAME LAW y NOTII'K is IIKKKKY ,;mij n| lot I'IIMH.---undri lh^ fi.-iillo m Kk.11 HI'.N'SKT V ini.tl tH Rosd, Intrmti. to r^i.i.i ki ilh Ih.,'l.ik "f Hii'%  uH (Ml I '.ni. Oaunli Unrlds AI IE KA1S] 1 %  — ', T-14 NOTICE UNDER FICTlTWll NAME LAW NOTK'K IS IIKKKKY i;iTB| lh^ linilt't M^II^II. ili-nirinf to n l>ulnrii11M1I.1 Ihr (Irlltloill IIBIKI. >' I I.M'K. .11 ITI1 3t| .HrtlU' Ml '""Ml t-llh lh art^ rounij-JIT UtA.NK KEOtt IlKKTHA BflBJ HBNRT U CAIN Attonir\ f„i Vi •j-,1u' r:. %  '• St., Miami. tX I n — :, T-ll NOTICE BY PUBLICATSU IN THE CIRCUIT COURT jrr ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CiRCt FLORIDA IN AND FOR COUNTY IN CHANCERY."*" i:|,\VAi:i. M 11TOOLE. 11"* 11 VN\I 1 11 n-'i.K W ?*H SUIT FOR OIVORCt •I-,, IEANNK f I'T'Kil.lBox :i v..'i -* ?L ,,f CumplHliil f"i I' •i..l ,. • % %  I'' ••' VSJBBI lhl-i t ", r !'.K > -1 1 ri,rff£P inK AW. 1 tM.ro. ML ;-• "j", rt., ,0, Judmrnl te .1*^ ,n Hi. BIU "' ,„.,„.• -ii'ii • E rt.. BO, JII,IKIII.-I %  • • %  ; ^BfB taken urnInH you '"! ,. ',k*S Thii>"'" -" %  '" T,ilt.l*l ,'l ,. rk ,-ln-ult OgJ uli 1 our] Man ""^S^COvifrSl 1N THE 'aRC-UlT ^ ^jtj ELEVENTH JUDICIAL u -^ rLOIRIDA ,J N rH *^cERV.N "' SU T FOR "': ,.,TFjrl T,, rtwKPM MARTIN n 111 %  I %  I: > Jl> ^.,„i t-S* .tJj ;;:. 1 %  •* fault *"l '" '7''',, invi: VN-Vrf^** 1 list 1-In-ill >' f 1, '. *•!# M-lnnil '-"V-uv" HKNR' V,/ rblnli" •MS We-i l;V" 4/SJ-JO



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PAGE 12 A *Je*lstrkrk*>n FRIDAY CELEBRATINI THE GRAND OPENING Of OUR 47th STORE 9499 HARDING AVE., SURFSIDE, MIAMI BEACH SAVE AT ALL 47 STORES BLUE RIBBON U.S. CHOICE CHUCK ROAST lb. SUNSHINE SWEETS SUGAR FYNE-TASTE PEANUT BUTTER LB. BAG WITH PURCHASE OF $5 OR MORE without order r.g. prk. LARGE 20-OZ. JAR G GOLDEN GRAIN GRADE "A 90 SCORE CREAMERY BUTTER LB. ROIL 59c ORANGES INDIAN RIVER FANCY HOME GROWN PASCAL CELERY NATURAL COLOR DOZ. C



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APRIL 23. 1 954 "JfeMfaftJfcrftftar PAGE 9 B s Were Murdered in Warsaw 11 Years Ago t r marks the 11th annivermodern epic of Jewish ft, the conquering Nazis Warsaw's Jews into a walln of the city, creating Eurfest ghetto. Then, systemtoe Germans set about ex(ng all life within the They were almost clinical death drive, trying one ol destruction after anothrvation, the setting of one linst another, spiritual deb7 outright murder. _, in 1943, the Jews of the %  ghetto made a futile, hope1 incredibly brave decision Ittacked the Germans. The I almost no weapons; they jieir minds and bodies the armed might of the fcey could not possibly win. ost of them, it was a mo[the greatest triumph. bthor, Dr. Philip Friedman, Jewish historian, assemWr heroic story from eyejaccounts, memoirs, battle %  documents and defiant last Its, which are published in ook, "Martyrs And Fight3crmans decided to liquiWarsaw ghetto complete%  rdle.-s of cost. On April at 2 a.m., the first mesbnccrning the Germans' apfcrmed from the outermost pon posts. These reports clear that German gen| aided by Polish policemen, pcirclins the outer ghetto 80-yard intervals. nergency alarm to all battle vas ordered. At 2:15 — IS later — all groups were |at their battle stations. The hipul.it Mil had been informIhe imminent danger, and I the ghetto inhabitants movntly to previously prepared and and hideouts in the ind attics of buildings. phly silence enveloped the i.m. the Germans in groups *fours and fives so as arouse suspicion, began ling into the "inter-ghetto" Here they formed into plaknd companies. At seven [motorized detachments, ina number of tanks and B vehicles, entered the ghetlUery mobilized outside the The SS were ready to atlosed formations, stepping lly and loudly, they march[ the seemingly dead streets central ghetto. But no Id not scare the Jews nor km by surprise. When the |s those the intersection at nd Zamenhofa Streets for jvouac area, battle groups ded at the four corners of pet opened concentric fire The home-made hand greY the Jews' began exploding "here. The lone machine pis| shots through the air in bursts — ammunition had conserved carefully. Rifles 1 "ring a hit further away. [Germans attempted a rebut their path was cut. Gerpad soon littered the street. NOW Too Can Drink All The Ireii Tea YOB fVeat WITHOUT Gamin* A Klnjrle Ounce. fTORS RECOMMEND S U G A R I N E FOR prncs. OVERWEIGHTS LOW CALORIE DIETS Mtrinlc £ MMaM ^gg ^olTFi ttening 1 •tt Bottle..Only 75o [AIUBLE AT YOUR ^ FOOD STORI The remainder found no cover in the neighboring stores and house entrances. The "glorious" SS thereupon called tanks into action to cover the remnants of two companies. But even the tanks seemed to be affected by the Germans' bad luck. The first was burned out by one of the incendiary bottles, the rest dared not approach. The fate of the Germans caught in the Mila Street-Zamenhofa Street trap was settled. Not a single German left alive (Simkhah Rathayzer — pseudonym "Kazik" — was 18 years old at the time of the uprising. Since 1946, he has lived in Israel. Here is his report of Tuesday, April 20, the first day of Passover, 1943): At three o'clock in the afternoon, I was standing on guard at the scouting post where there was a fuse to switch on the mine. Then, from the direction of Franciszkanska Street a detachment of about 300 Germans turns into Walowa Street in our area. With one hand I grabbed the fuse, with the other I pressed down the alarm clock. Suddenly a terrific detonation is heard. I see bodies flying into the air, hands and feet separately. Eighty to 100 dead can be counted. The rest are withdrawing in great disorder. We meanwhile are occupying our positions and waiting. One hour passes, then another. The Germans are assembling again; they are deliberating. A few higher officers have arrived. All of a sudden we hear voices at our walls. The Germans are pouring into the courtyard. They are marching in goosestep. Their faces are frightened, and they clutch their rifles, ready to fire. Actually they don't walk, they rather run, remaining close to the walls of the buildings all the time. My comrade and I let the first six pass. It is not worthwhile to waste a hand grenade on such a small group. Behind them a whole band is coming. We have two hand grenades of our own make, two incendiary bottles and small arms. "Shlamek, fire" I call to my comrade and hurl my hand grenade into the middle of the bunch. There is an explosion ... a few dead. We toss the incendiary bottles, and more Germans are caught by flames. They are sending up a THE ENTIRE COMMUNITY PROGRAM oi w Jewish Foram On The Air" EVERY SUNDAY 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Station: WMIE (1140 on dial) Wifh Vr/oo fturt Produced and Dlrtctti %  hell of bullets. Since we possess only one more hand grenade, which we want to keep for later, we withdraw. We climb higher and take up our positions at the side of our other comrades. Suddenly all becomes quiet. The Germans have fled. After half an hour they appear again, and again this time we greet them with hand grenades and incendiary bottles. They shoot rapidly and then they withdraw, leaving behind their dead and wounded. One of the Germans has caught a glimpse of a girl on our position. "Hans, look," he shouts to his comrade, "a woman'" They all start shooting at her. But the girl does not withdraw. She gives them the welcome they deserve .. (In a report to his superior, the German commander, General Juergen Stroop, gives an overall survey of his operations:) When the Reichsfuehrer SS (Heinrich Himmler) visited Warsaw in January, 1943, he ordered the SS and Police Leader for the District of Warsaw to transfer to Lublin the armament factories and other enterprises of military importance which were installed within the ghetto, including their personnel and machines. When we invaded the ghetto for the first time, the Jews and Polish bandits succeeded in repelling the participating units, including tanks and armored cars, by a well-prepared concentration of fire The main Jewish battle group, mixed with Polish bandits, had already retired during the first and second day to the so-called Muranowski Square. There, it was reinforced by a considerable number of Polish bandits. (The Germans could not admit that they had been beaten by Jews, and tried to create the impression that considerable Polish underground forces were involved in the fighting, which was not true.) Its plan was to hold the ghetto by every means in order to prevent us from invading it. The Jewish and Polish standards were hoisted at the top of a concrete building as a challenge to us. The number of Jews forcibly taken out of the buildings and arrested was relatively small during the first few days. It transpired that the Jews had taken to hiding in the sewers and in specially erected dug-outs. We learned in the course of the large-scale action that the whole ghetto was systematically equipped with cellars, dug-outs and passages connected with the sewer system. Thus, the Jews were able to maintain undisturbed subterranean traffic. They also used this sewer network for escaping into the Aryan part of the city. Continuously, we received reports of attempts of Jews to escape through the sewer holes. While pretending to build air-raid shelters, they had been erecting dug-outs within the former ghetto ever since the autumn of 1942. Over and over again, new battle groups consisting of 20 to 30 or more Jewish fellows, 18 to 25 years of age, accompanied by a corresponding number of women, kindled new resistance. The women were equipped the same as the men. Not infrequently, these women fired pistols with both hands. It happened time and again that these women had pistols or hand grenades concealed in their bloomers up to the last moment to use against the men of the Waffen SS, Police or Wehrmacht. (The resistance of the Jews was so strong, Stroop later reported, that it could be broken only by "relentlessly using all our forces and energy by night and day.") The Germans eventually resorted to fire, smoke candles and explosives, blowing up entire buildings. On April 23, Himmler issued his order to complete the coaioing out of the Warsaw ghetto with the greatest severity and relent'ess tenacity. This meant destroying the entire Jewish residential area by setting every block afire. The ghetto was burning. For days and nights it flamed. The fire consumed house after house, entire streets. Columns of smoke rose, sparks flew, and the sky reflected 4 red, frightening glow. Nearby, on the other side of the wall, citizens of Warsaw strolled, played and enjoyed themselves. They knew that "the Jews vere burning." The wind blew smoke and soot in their direction. Sparks scattered and now and then a hoase outside the ghetto would catch fife. But these were immediately extinguished. Only in the ghetto no one hastened to put out the flanes, to come to the rescue. The partisans' stand was so determined that the Germans had been forced to abandon all ordinary fighting methods and the omnipotent flames were now able to accomplish what the Germans could not do. Thousands of people perished in the conflagration. The stench of burning bodies was everywhere. Charred corpses lay around on balconies, in window recesses, on unburned steps. The flames chased the people out from their shelters, made them leave the prepared hideouts in attics and cellars. Thousands staggered about in the courtyards where they were Continued on Page 10 B Simon UtOM M3 S.W. 17tfc At. M-54M THIS IS A GOOD YEAR FOB AN Electric Hone Food Freezer/ e ELECTRIC FREEZER Sove on your food bill, and shopping time; enjoy out-of-season delicacies; prepare delicious meals at a moment's notice—with a modern electric HOME FOOD FREEZER. 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IAPRIL 23, 1954 Bell, Mrs. Stoats Receive landing Citizens' Award Here +Jmist>ncrM/a,r PAGE 5 A nu ed from P9 1 A %  so president of the Coral jLnen's Club, secretary of I lational Advisory Board j tables and is responsible tins the annual particifcrippl'd children here in Bowl parade of floats. [Johnson was one of the flying officers of the • force and served as AsLjei of Staff for OperaIthat command during its period. He accompanied Jh Air Force to England |942 In January. 1943, he | %  command of the 44th foup and. in June of that the group to Africa on j fhr Ninth Air Force for' on the I'loesti oil fields j Workmen's Circle Slates Third Seder Branch 692, Workmen's Circle, its Women's Club and the Y. L. J'<"'-l7 School are arranging a traditional Third Seder at the closing of the Passover holidavs on Sunday. April 25, 6 p.m.. 25 Washington ave. „, Reading of the Haggadah compiled by contemporary Jewish poets and writers will he done by chiU dren of the Yiddish school. Singing parts will be performed bv the Nelson family, including Mrs". Lillian Nelson and her children, Mrs. David Drucker and Judge and Mrs. Ted Nelson, who will also lead community singing. Joseoh Duntov and Louis Lauvln, principal of the Peretz School, will direct the Seder. Pupils of the Peretz School participating in the reading of the Haggadah are Chaim Davis, Michel Graff. Riva Kaplan, Norma Klein, Niel Haiduck, Marsha Kremer and Leah Zebit. If. General Johnson Medal of Honor, General Johnson has been awarded the Distinguished Service Medal. Silver Star, Le gion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross with one Oak Leaf Cluster, and the Air Medal with Three Clusters. His foreign decorations include the French Legion of Honor in the (Wade of Chevalier, French Croix de Guerre. Belgian Croix de | Guerre and the British Distinguished Flying Cross. Spring Social Due Jack A. Abbott, president of the Men's Club of Temple Beth Sholom, announces the annual spring socia' and card party of the organization on Monday evening, April 26, 8:30 p.m., in the Temple's banquet hall. Frank Kamen and Albert Rosen are co-chairmen of the event. JWV Auxiliary to Meet Norman Bruce Brown Ladies' Auxiliary will hold its first social meeting for the new term on Wednesday, April 28, at the Republican Club, 1947 West Flagler st. Joseph lipfon nia. For his part in that Mral Johnson was awarded rational Medal of Honor. |VF Day. General Johnson gncd as Chief of Personnel Headquarters USAF, latniiis Deputy to the Assist of Air Staff for PersonLjiril, 1947. he was assigned Sic An Command as ComGeneral of the Fifteenth ce at Colorado Springs, L'SAK returned to England Jirst time since World War %  General Johnson organized |rd Air Division there in 1948. as a separate major )d of id,. United States Air the division provided facilKosher Heinz Baby Foods Provide Bases for Well-Rounded Infant Diet Sanford Jwerdlin *'* ,k P maintenance and support I *c Air Command aircrafl n jl training missions t< an d for transport aircrafl I in u Prlin Airlift Mean In h,H l rUdry 195 Gener I" had been appointed, in ad fclhar? duties Chief of lfor ik ,: Mstan ce Advisory mn ^ to the Congressional Taken for granted today is the right of babies to look forward to a healthy, full life-span. But this modern miracle has not always been man's natural heritage. Since time began m countless infants have been winnowed out; only the strong or fortunate survived. And all the concern and compassionate care of mothers and medical men alike were powerless to prevent this heartbreak. It has been only in our own time &f hat science found a key to the saving of baby lives through proper nutrition. That health and strength come from within, as a result of feeding rather than by external treatment, is one of today's epochmaking discoveries which does credit to modern science and industry, as well. Today, baby, dressed in loose comfortable clothes, clean and sweet smelling from frequent bathing, finds unprecedented strength and energy in a long time of safe, nutritious, easily-digested foods prepared especially for him. A Jewish mother may confidently walk into her local food store, select anyone of the more than 25 Heinz strained foods, 20 junior foods or four pre-cooked cereals bearing the encircled U of the Union Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America, and know that she is buying "good health" for her child. All these "kosher" foods contribute their share to a well-balanced diet for baby. Iron deficiency or anemia, one of the more common deficiencies among infants, can be curbed by feeding a child iron-fortilied, precooked cereal. Through intensive research in laboratories of one of the nation's leading food processors and baby food producers, precooked barley, oatmeal, rice and :ereal food have been fortified *ith a generous amount of free .ron. The tripling of the blood volume and doubling of the total hemo !lobin within the first year of an infant's life makes. an outside source of iron like these cereals es iential for the prevention of nuritional anemia. Doctors and nutritionists now recognixe that an infant, although his requirements are less, needs exactly the same nutritional properties — proteins, c a rbohydrates, fata, vitamins and minerals —required by a growing school child or a working adult. Science has proved that while the old-fashioned diet of large quantities of milk grew plump babies, the strongest babies are the result of a well-rounded diet. Additional sources of iron can be found in strained and junior beets and spinach. Vitamin A for the young baby is supplied by strained carrots, applesauce, apricots and applesauce, apricots with oatmeal, squash, sweet potatoes and peaches. Peas, spinach, sweet potatoes— all add vitamin C to the baby's diet. Strained tomato soup contributes both vitamin A and C, while vegetable soup, infant style, is important for vitamin A (thiamine and niacin). While not every individual strained or junior food can be earmarked as a rich source of a specific nutrient, added together, they make for a well-balanced, healthful diet. Today's pediatricians and family doctors, with few exceptions, recommend the early introduction of a wide gamut of foods. The Heinz company now is offering a spill-proof, unbreakable nylon tumbler with which to teach the high-chair set the use of a cup. Mothers and doctors across the nation hailed the plastic tumbler which was introduced last year as the greatest way ever devised to bridge the transition from bottle to cup. The new nylon type is of the same design but more durable. It can even be boiled for sterilization. Readers may obtain the new nylon tumbler by sending 50 cents in coin and 12 labels from Heinz Baby Foods to H. J. Heinz Company, Box 57 Department 255, Pittsburgh 30, Pennsylvania. The plastic tumbler is still available for 25 cents in coin and six labels. The nylon comes in pink and blue; the plastic is blue, pink, yellow and ruby.—S.T. Ginrmts RUTH GROSS AGENCY, INC. All forms of Isuarawcc IINC01N DREXEl BIDC-Reo* 207 420 LINCOLN ROAD PHONE 51-5341 Newly elected officers of the Florida State Federation of B'nai B'rith Women's Chapters are pictured following the 18th annual convention of the Florida State B'nai B'rith Federation held at the Biltmore Terrace Hotel, Miami Beach. Shown are (seated, left to right) Mrs. Morris Murcus, Orlando, second vice president; Mrs. Jack R. Wien, Miami Beach, president; Mrs. William B. Wolfson, Tampa, first vice president. Standing (left to right) are Mrs. Frank Bayer, West Palm Beach, treasurer; Mrs. Benjamin Rosenfield, Jacksonville, third vice president; Mrs. Ted Robinson, Hialeah, secretary; Mrs. Ben Goldfaeld, Daytona Beach, counselor; and Mrs. Dan Danart, Ft. Lauderdale, historian. SIMCHAH AN UNUSUAL JEWISH-AMERICAN DAY CAMP FOR BOYS and GIRLS BETWEEN 4-12 YEARS To be conducted at the Floridian Hotel 540 WEST AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH APPLICATIONS NOW BtlNG ACCEPTED WRITE OR PHONE B6-57B2 Pool on Premises • Israeli Dancing • Arts and Crafts • Fishing • Sports • Hot Lunches Dietary Laws Observed LEVER 3-B Elect MICHAEL A. PELLE YOUR CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE Group 1 PULL LEVER 3-B 1951 1953 DANTE FASCELL CO-SPONSORED THE BILL THAT UNMASKED THE KLU-KLUXKLAN. DANTE FASCELL INTRODUCED AND fOUGHT FOR THE ANTIDYNAMITE LEGISLATION. Rinq the Bell for



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lie\wi^lh-IElliD!Pidliiaun Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY Number 17 MIAMI. FLORIBA. FRIDAY. APRIL 23. 1954 Or. Ralph Bunchc may play active role rt N obel Prize Winner Promoted >n? UN Role is Seen 7 or Dr. Ralph Bunche LTNGTON UTA) — Dr. (unche, who as UN mediataght about the Arab-Israel E> agreements in 1949, may (active role in the coming In seeking settlement of the (East situation, it was rehere this week. [Nobel Prize winner was br promotion from director[the IN Trusteeship DiviIhe post of Under Secretary JL'N. In this job, his assignKuld be that of UN trouble Tand one of the first quesJiat would come his way Ibr that of solution of the tacl impasse. lunche has already been put %  the job of coordinating an Ich towards settlement economic development of la changes in the organizajsctup of the United Nations Isee Benjamin A. Cohen, of [transferred from the infor\ department to the Assistant %  ryship f r Trusteeship Af%  Col. Alfred G. Katzin, of (Africa, in charge of the per1 department; and Robert (in. of France, to be chief of Bailment of economic and soHairs. eptrtment Tells Stand [ Stale Department meanI announced its stand this Ion the current developments Arab-Israel situation in a Jient in which it was emphaIthat Ihe United States Govern will seek to strengthen rmistire control machinery of tailed Nations. full text of the statement is follows: "All of our efforts %  reeled to the ultimate goal of keful adjustment of relations ken the Arab states and IsJ Before the goal is reached %  Israel and Ihe Arab states will T to modify their present attipe first step forward should ke renunciation of force as %  to ittain political objectives Ihe substitution of cooperation lie parties among themselves Wth the United Nations, truce JMsion organization in trie con|of their armistice obligations. fur objective during the curJ Security Council discussion is pa to bringing about such eolation and to discovering means lengthen the armistice control Finery of the United Nations, %  relieve the interests of all confed will be served best by such Tward step." ne statement was issued to the Continued en Page 10 A PRICE: TEN CENTS Russia Stands With Arabs in Near East Dispute, Byroade Says UNITED NATIONS (JTA) — Is-1 rael this week denounced a LebaMM attempt to force the Security j Council to commit itself to a con-1 demnation of the alleged Israeli! attack on the Jordanian village of j Nahalin in exchange for Arab agreement to a general discussion by the Council on Jordan-Israel relations. The Arab demand, supported by the Soviet Union, that the Council first consider the complaint against Israel, plurrged the Security Council into a procedural morass from which it could not find an egress in two heated and protracted sessions. The Western Powers, with the backing of a majority of the members of the Council, stood out for an overall discussion of the Jordan Israel situation. They accepted a Brazilian Colombian compromise under which the agenda would be \ adopted as it stood, and there would be general discussion with the question reserved for a later stage of a joint or separate resolutions on the issues involved. The Lebanese delegate offered to accept this compromise if the Council would first vote a condemnation of Israel on the Nahalin incident or promise to do it immediately after the General discussion. On this position, Israel Ambassador Abba S. Eban scathingly rc! marked that "It would be very grave if the heavy loll of innocent Jewish bloodshed, including that at Scorpion Pass and Kissalon. should encounter irreverent indifference, while lesser casualties Record $750,000 on Way to UJA from Greater Miami A record loan of $750,000 to the United Jewish Appeal by five local banks was negotiated recently through the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, it has been announced by Carl Weinkle, Federation president. The loan is part of a national drive by the United Jewish Appeal to secure funds from 100 American communities for urgent rehabilitation programs in Israel. These projects, involving resettlement of newcomers, relief, health and welfare work, are carried out through UJA's three constituent agencies: the Joint Distribution Committee, j In addilion, it was pointed out United Israel Appeal and United Service for New Americans. Speaking for the Federation Fiby Federation officials, this loan. together with those of other cities, will help relieve the strain that nance Committee, which was re-j has been placed on Israel because sponsible for initiating negotiations with the local banks, community leader Max Orovitz, stated: "Proceeds of the UJA loan project will be utilized to accelerate the work of the agencies, to upbuild Israel's economy and strengthen its democratic way of life so that the nation can go forward in freedom and peace." Lipton Makes Award Presentations Bell, Mrs. Staats are Named 'Outstanding 1 Lt. General Leon William Johnson was principal speaker at the seventh annual presentation of awards honoring the outstanding man and woman of the year 1953 in Dade County. Called up before a large crowd to receive the acclaim voted them by residents of Dade County as outstanding citizens were Mrs. J. and Jack Bell. He evnual Lend-A-Hand campaign, has also been identified with ery worthwhile civic and philanthropic cause in the Miami area. Mrs Staats is volunteer service chairman for the Dade County Chapter of the Red Cross and area chairman cf the Heart Association Fund drive. In addition, she is vice president of the Coral Gables War Memorial Youth Center AsPigures on Israel Not [Revealed WASHINGTON (JTA)-The Foroperations Administration S H now n '• testimony before "PMe Foreign Af fain CommitLZ'T Vk ,hi,t development asbsran, l h rec u ests have been atelT£ !" '" inc,ude approxiainfl 30000000 for the Near i'ch must be divided among N-ortn < n ? he Ar b s, es sLhYhe 0ffice of Near •is ma i, s,aan Africa Operamdll 'his information public Continued on P ag 0 A Riley Staats and Jack Ben. ^^jon an d president of the Uni The presentation of awards took i gj of Mjami women's Club, place on Wednesday evening at) Active in church work, Mrs Bayfront Park Bandshell and was under the sponsorship of Shoiem Lodee, B'nai B'rith, with additional support derived from the Dade Federal Savings A Loan Association of Miami, Joseph M. Lipton, presi dent, who made the presentation. Miami attorney, Sanford V Swerdlin was chairman of the Con mittee. Others included Marx Fat er, Joseph A. Rayvis Marvin Rau zin. Judge William L P-£. ing Saal. Jack Block, H. A. Froscl. and Everett W. Liner. On the Judges Committee wen Senior Judge George E. Holt, char man. Ralph Renick. George Bee be, Thomas W. Hagan. Aaron toui shon and Mrs. Stanley Milledge Bell, Miami Herald columnist, inoted for his support of the van ety Children's Hospital and the anContinued on Page 5 A of its short term indebtedness aris ing out of the fact that dollar re quirements necessary to handle the mass immigration in the first years of Israel's existence were so greatly in excess of the gift dollars available to meet them. The $750,000 loan to the UJA. shared by the five commercial banks of Greater Miami, will be re paid to the Greater Miami Jewish Federation over a period of five years. Leonard Abess, prominent local banker and community welfare worker, played a major role in transacting the record-breaking loan. Abess was congratulated for his individual effort at the last meeting of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation Executive Committee. Serving on the UJA Finance Committee were Orovitz, Sam Blank, Joseph Cherner, Samuel Friedland, Howard Kane, Dan B. Ruskin and Carl Weinkle. Fruchtman affixed his signature to the $750,000 check in the presence of Jewish leaders and a host of community dignitaries. They lauded the vision and confidence of the Miami community financial institutions in the State of Israel and urged vigorous support of the Combined Jewish Appeal by each and every family here. which armed Arab troops have suffered should be the subject of prejudicial observations against Israel at the Security Council. We now hear of an extraordinary Lebanese proposal that the powers commit themselves to judgment on the si£nificence of the Nahalin inciden*. without any discussion of the violent Arab siege and assault of which that incident is a symptom and a result. The Security Council j will surely adopt a balanced, moral course. It is time to stop discrimin; ating against the victims and ca>; ualties of violence." I Russia Backing Arabs, American Official Says In Washington meanwhile. Henry A. Byroade, Assistant Secretary State for Near Eastern Affairs, told the House Foreign Affairs Committee this week that "Russia now clearly has taken sides in the Ara ': %  Israel problem." He indicated that the Russians have taken the side of the Arabs. Mr. Byroade told the congressmen that the Soviet Union ha> twice vetoed United Nations resolutions pertaining to Arab-Israel differences and said "my Arab friend feel that Soviet Russia was shoving friendship to them." (An assurance was given the committee by Mr. Byroade that the State Department will require guarantees from Arab nations receiving military assistance from the United States that such arms will not be used against Israel. He expressed the hope that within a few yearboth Arabs and Israelis would be "convinced of American impartiality." At present, he said, each side acuses the United States of favoring the other.) Special UN Body Planned A proposal that a special Security Council subcommission be formed—with Israel and Jordan as members and under the possible chairmanship of United Nations Secretary' General Dag Hammerskjold—to consider relations between the two states, was discussed by Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden and Secretary' of State John Foster Dulles at their meeting in London this week, the Jewish Telegraphic Agency has learned. The 'two statesmen had a number of proposals before them on handling Israel-Jordan relations which they saw as the key to pacification of the Middle East. However, the Security Council subcommission idea found greatest favor in the eyes of the Western diplomats because the establishment of such a unit would be a procedural matter and therefore not subject to Continued en Pete 10 A Pay TO THE oaoKHOF Miami Beach. Florida MERCANTILE NATIONAL BANK THE OMttt Ja W3H aJWUL s-rs^rlrR stWkas!: Sara xssrr *>. 1005 I 790,000.00 DotXAJua



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IPBIL 23. 1954 >AL NOTICE JNDER FICTITIOUS ,1 desiring to engage In r the, fii-llllous name of |!TV. t 9S0 S.W. 1st ,i' t<' register aald name lk ,,f Hi.' circuit Court of > i--i. .i-i iejr>d against ^tlce shall be published once ; for four consecutive weeks J JEWISH FI.'IKIDIAN. %  this i-li dav of April, lS.'.t. I". It. l.KATHERMAN. Clerk, circuit Court By: M. K. MURRAY, I>eputy Clerk SILVER A MULLOY for Plaintiff ken Building, Miami, Florida LEGAL NOTICE +Jm>lst> ihrtdian PAGE 11 H IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THF ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN W? IS* DADE COUNTY FLOR IDA. IN CHANCERY. No 167806 JOSEPH B. KLElNWirHsTVs,. known as JoZEF KLEINW1CH8 n Halllliff SINA 'HVRSTKIN KLBlNWicm NOTICE BY PUBLICATfoN"""TO: SINA BUR8TEIN KLEINWICH8 residence unknown YOU ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Hill oi Complaint for Annulment .f'S,. f'V'' 1 Klnst you In the above em It led .ni.e and von are hereby required t,, wjrve a eopy of your Answer I., II,,.Bill of Complaint on the Plaintiffs attorneys, anil file the original in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before the 7th day of May. I!.:,4. otherwise a Decree Pro Confesso will lie entered aguinH you. This notice shall be published once each week for four consecutive weeks in the JEW ISII FLOKIDIAN. Dated at Miami, Florida, this 1st day of April, 1954. E H. l.KATHERMAN, Clerk, circuit Court By M. C. GREEN, (Seal) Deputy Clerk I'ALLOT, SILVER & ML'LLOY Attorneys for I'laintlff 701 Congress Bldg., Miami, Fla. 4/S--U-23-30 NOTICE UNDER'FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of AL'S SELF SERVICE LAUNDER. ETTE, at 501 East th Street, in the City of Hlaleah. Florida. Intends to register the said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. DATED at Miami, Florida, this 30th day of March, 1954. ELIA8 SCHL'LMAN Sole Owner FREDERICK N. BARAD Attorney at Law 420 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, Fla. 4/9-16-23-30 ICE UNDER FICTITIOUS I NAME LAW IK IS HEREBY GIVEN that %  rsigned. desiring to engage In \ imil.-i Hi, fictitious name of N SANITATION COMPANY, IV. 79th St., Intend to register with the Clerk of the irSrt "f Dade County, Florida. %  nWAKIl HILL IBRAHAM KAPSON, Owners •N ciiiu.sHON tor Applicants Wn i:.i Miami Beach CIRCUIT COURT OF THE |NTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF R, ,.' N AND F OR DADE [V. IN CHANCERY. No. 168167 • "I NPHY, Plaintiff, ^M JOSEPH Dl'NI'HY. .__ I >.!> lolaiit •if, 0F PUBLICATION ILI.IA.M JOSEPH DUNPUT I I llk.lown !'•• hir. i.v ordered and required f •' of your answer to the runiplauit for Divorce, a cop] *£n is enclosed herewith, on l -attorney, and file the orlgIthe office of the Clerk of the It'tuit of Hade County, Florida, T""; ">Hth day of May. 19.-.4. "*• the .,ii,nations of said bill taken as onfessed by you. "• April 1:1, mr.4 K, (1 I.EATHERMAN, Merit of the Circuit Court By \\\i \v. STOCKING, £ %  JRANT' CUfrk f>' <"< %  Plaintiff Is*''-'.'"J 1 "'"!.. Miami 32. Fla. IE cT D r B V PUBLICATION INTM ?,Ve. T COURT OF THE KBV.DICI L CIRCUIT, IN BCHAI?.! COUNTY. FLORM*> PRABQBR, Plaintiff SUIT" cel^ Klt '" %  '• %  ndant. F0 DIVORCE "Kl.l.Ni: PHAECER, 718 P* A*-nne liiooklyn, New York. E ,,, I""," 1 '" 1 l,,at ""I of f "':' v r '-' has been filed icon,' V"' v "" r e required to lh. I ii y ur Answer or Pleadff" ;'" r Complaint on the ," %  ']• %  ">• \. HAROLD KHAu nd ti ,! ; 1 Miami Bench, Win "T, '""„ .' rl 1 "'" *""" "the office of the Clerk v ,., ur| "" or before the >iL,; V '"'' lf >"U 'nil t" I i II. .'."!, '" r Ul "M dc S A Nit ,i ','' r "U'lalnt. •this 1„,'" "' ; 't'-:i' ." Miami, •> day of April. |M. %  ,,,' ': VTHEIt.MAN h> '"Depu^C,^ NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of IAJRRAINE APARTMENT HOTEL, at 2601 Collins Avenue. In the City of Miami Beach. Dade County, Florida, intends to register the said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of I lade County, Florida, dated at Miami Beach, Florida, this 5th day of April, 1M, JACOB SOLOMON YETTA SOLOMON MORTIMER J. SOLOMON ELEANOR 8. FRIEDLAND HARRY ZCKERNICK Attorney for Owners 420 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, Ela. 4/9-18-23-3U LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business nnder the fictitious name of. TAM1AMI CABINET SHOP, at 2734 SW'ISth Ijtne. Miami 33, Florida, intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. JERRY KIRK FRANK COHN Attorney for Tamlaml Cabinet Shop 4/9-16-23-30 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of NIKL ONIELL TIE-BEAM FORM ERECTORS, at 94J N.W. 40th Street. Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the -Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida. MARGARET ONIELL, Owner DeCOSTAS, MAEIt AFLOYD Attorneys for Applicant 607 Blscayne Bldg. 4/2-9-16-23 IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA. IN PROBATE. No. 32362-B In Rr: ESTATE OF LAWRENCE JoNES, Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persons Having Claimor Demanda Against Said Estate You. and each of you, are hereby notified and required to present any claims and demands which you, oi either of you, may have acainst the estate of LA WHENCE JONES, deceased late of Hade County. Horl'l.i. to the Hon W. h. BLANTON, County Judge of Dade County, and file the same in his office in the County Courthouse in Hade County, Florida. Within eight calendar months from the date of the first publication hereof. Said claims or demands to contain the legal address of the claimant and to be sworn to and presented as aforesaid, or same will Inbarred. See G tioU 120 of the 1933 Probate Act. otherwise known as 1.1I.L1E MAE JONES j • As Executor of the I*st Will nml Testament of LAWRENCE JONES. Deceased ARONOVITZ, ARONOV1TZ A CAIDIN Attorneys for Lilllc Mae Jones 4/I6-28-80 — 5/7 — ; NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that &f he undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious n" ,e "' WINDOW FRAME FORM CO.. a East Mrd St., Hlaleah, Florld.a tatMda to register said name rflth th,' erk of the Circuit Court of Dade Count), norida. DFRWIN CORP. 1123 East 23rd Street Hlaleah. Florida AARON M KANNER Attorney for DCRWIN CORP. 4/9-1S-23-30 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN tfcat the undersigned, deslrlnf, "' K "'business under the WI" m AS IMS' AVNE S A 1" 1 T ? Kl A -|\ .1 >s-riiHF at 7200-02 Pis'-a.\n mu., .Ml. mi 'intends .1st.-r said name with the Clerk of the Circuit i ourt of Dade -"i^ i ,,",-;:"j; lH sll v .-:i ( STEIN BERT BAOER Attoi n, i for Applicant 810 Blscayne Bldg. 4/9-11-28-M IN r ^2rP% !" 2ovT FLOMina ,£o R „ DAOe COUNTY, n. L r D A ATA T F t! ? ) E ATE No 31949B To^AUr! "„, m| :*'"MAN. n.-ceased I Al 1 l.iedltoi s and All Persons llavSrtateT r l)e "" ,n 18 Against Said iuJS| l ii*5i.*' cb "' you %  ""•• hereby .ins .'."i" r" 1 "'"; 11 '" PMsant any %  liw ,lc 1 -"" 1 Which you. or either of you, may have against the estate of ARTHlli HIR8CHMAN I V.n", '.i'e'e, W:,> I K ( '^"" V M'CMf.f ilL— Hon "rWo c„„nty Jndirea n A?? V/." Jhl V M IfS4 IRWIN E. KOTT As -Ancillary Administrator Cum Testainento Annex,, of the IJISI will and I i-stainent of ARTHUR HIRSCHMAN, MYERS, HELM AN & KAPLA'N""^ Attorneys for Ancillary Administrator t urn Testamento Annexo 4,!"-16-23-30 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW h NOT I CE ,S "KRKBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of ,' %  '. '' HOTRI' at 131.", :,th Street, -Miami Beach, Florida intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade Countv, Florida. JEROME G. LANQER 4/9-16-2:1-30 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In SSSiSSSLS"'* 1 '"'' "ctltlous name "f CENTURY WOODCRAFT CO., at 1701 Bird Road, Miami, intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade Countv. Florida. GRACE VAN MANBN Sol,Owner MYERS. HEI.MAN A KAPLAN Attorneys for Applicant K.-.ll Be] bold Bldg. 4/23-30 — 5/7-14 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to enKage In business under the fictitious name of HIGH FIDELITY ASSOCIATES, at MSI Blscayne Blvd.. Miami, Intend to register said name with the Clerk of the ( h-cult Court of Dade County, Hoi Ida. ROBERT GREENBERGand LARRY KASS.MAN, Owners ROBERT M. DEEHL Attorney for Applicants •09 Sevl.old HldK. 4/2U -l, i -23 CERTIFICATE OF CORPORATE DISSOLUTION IN THE NAME AND BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA TO ALL To WHOM THESE PRESENTS SHALL COME, GREETINGS: Whereas, LEO BHEINER. MIAMI. Fl.uRIDA STANLEY 11. SPIELER, MIAMI. FLORIDA CAROL B. PREIDIN. MIAMI. FLORIDA did on the 11th day of September, A D 19S2, oause to be Incorptstated under the provisions of Chapter H"S. i 1 1.1 Statutes, FRIED-GOLD OORpOUAi'HiN, a corporation, with its principal place of business at Miami, Dade County, in the State of Florida, and whereas the stockholders of such corporation did nant and to be sworn to and prese-ited as aforesaid, or same will be barred. Date March 30, A.D. 19J4. HENRY M. CAIN. As Ancillary Admlnlstrat ir 1' T.A. of the Estate of ROSE SNYDER, Dei .-as. HENRY M. CAIN Attorney for Estate of Rose Sny ler 2.".18 W. Flagler St., Miami, Fla. 4/2-9-16-23 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE is HEREBY OIVEN that •he undersigned, desiring to enttM In business under the fictitious nai A.A.A. CHAIR RENTALS AND SALES, at Mo N.E. 1st Ave.. Miami, intend to register said name with the Cl.rk of the Circuit Court of I tde Count)', Florida. MA (RICE BIRSCli RALPH BIRSCH 4/16-23-30 — 5/7 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious nan.? of RALEIGH CLEANERS & LAUNDRY, at 2048 Blscayne Blvd.. intend to legist, -isaid name with the Clerk of the. Circuit Court of Dade County, llorida. MVER MATLOFF MARIAN MATLOri'' Owners MANUEL I.CBEL Attorney for Applicants (21 W. Flagler St. 4/16-23-30 — V? NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IB HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious nan %  of ROOSEVELT HOSPITAL, at 5642 N.E. 2nd Avenue. Miami. Fla., into register said name with the 1 ark of the circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. ROOSEVELT HOSPITAL SANITARIUM, INC., .1 Florida Corporation, Sole Owner SUMMER. FRANK WESTON Attorneys for Roosevelt Hospital Sanitarium, Inc. 1 Lincoln Road Bldg. 4,16-23-30 — 6/7 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY. No. 1681S8 VINCENT HECKTol.D. Plaintiff, THERE8E MILLER BBCKTOLD, 1 lefendant. ORDER OF PUBLICATION TO: THERESE MULLER BECKTOLD %  0 Mulli-r 242 Nassau Avenue Brooklyn. New Ya/fc You are hereby notlffeo* that a Bill of Complaint for Divorce has been filed against you and you ate hereby required to sei v.a copy of your Answer to the Bill of Complaint on Plaintiff's attorney and Hie the original Answer in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Ctoiirt, on or before the 17th day of May, 19.-.4; otherwise, the allegations contained in said Bill of Complaint will be taken as confessed against you. Dated this 13th day of April. 19.'.4. K B LKATIIERMAN, Cl.uk of Circuit Court By: R. H. RICE, .IR (Seal) Deputy Clerk, (Seal) GEORGE .1 TALIANOFF. ESQ. Attorney for Plaintiff 420 Lincoln Road. Miami Bench. Fla. 4/i6-23-:;u NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engamIn business under the fictitious name of DOVER ACTS., at 1120-1130 Diesel Avenue. Miami Bench. Florida. Intend to regtst, r said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court o( Dade County, Florida. LEON GOLDBERG CLARA tiOUDBERG 4/16-23-30 — :,'7 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious nan... of STATE MORTGAGE COMPANY, at 4 1 N.E. 1st Ave.. Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida. DAVID FRIEDMAN. Osner 4/16-23-30— 3/7 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that • he undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of AUTOMATIC MAYTAG LAUNDRY. at 5500-02-114 N.W. 2nd Avenue. Miami. Morlda. Intends to reglstei mid name with the clerk'of the Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida. SAMUEL C. KAHN SIDNEY EFRONSON Attorney for Samuel C. Kahn I0J Bl s c a yne Building. Miami, Kiudl 1 IC-2S-M — 5/7 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN th.c the iin.lersiKiied. desiring to engage III business under the fictitious name of QUINIELA BAR. at tK N W. 37tli Ave, intends to register said r -1 with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of 1 1.ole County. Florida WALTER ZELLER, Owner KES8LER & GARS Attorneys for Applicant i 1782 W. Hagler St. 4/16-2:1-30 — 5/7 ATTENTION ATTORNEYS! fJewisti Ifkrid kin solicits your legal notices. We appreciate 'your patronage and guar ant ee accurate service at legal rates Phone 2-4366 lor messenger service ATTENTION ATTORNEYS! CORPORATION OUTFITS Lowest Prices — Quickest Delivery in South Florida Call the JEWISH FLORIDIAN at 2-4366