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The Jewish Floridian ( April 16, 1954 )

UFJUD

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Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY 28—Number 16 MIAMI. FLORIDA. FRIDAY. APRIL 16, 1954 PRICE: $1.00 %  J > H Iff % %  ... %  •. %  ^.. rlrci 'Wl -'.-.'•/' f MPMf* pie Diplomats Leave Meeting in Wake of Clattering Chairs \ab Feelings Hurt at 'Goodwill' Affair; >r. Salit Apologizes to State Department WJTON (JTA) — Profuse s, it was hoped this week, I diplomatic incident Involv|l'nited States Government, states and Rabbi Norman President of the United m of Ameria. hcident arose in connection Iwrate ceremonies marking I of a new eight-cent stamp I a picture of the Statue of [and the motto "In God We Salit participated in the f" P r <>8ram with President and representatives of Nic nd Protestant faiths *Presentative of the Jewish faith and pronounced the benediction. Later, at a goodwill luncheon given by the State Department and Post office Department, attended by many dignitaries and the diplomatic corps, Dr. Salit upset diplomatic procedure and launched into a political speech which resulted in the Arab guests angrily leaving the room. Dr. Salit began by reference to America's religious faith in freedom and democracy. But when he referred to Israel as "the only true democracy in the Near East." the Arab ambassadors began to stir uneasily in their chairs. Finally, Dr. Salit mentioned Arab raids into Israel territory, specifically implicating Jordan. Secretary of State John Foster Dulles glared at Dr. Salit. The Arabs conspicuously banged their seats back, and paraded noisily out of the room. An aide to Mr. Arthur Summerfield arose from his seat and rushed after the Arabs. He begged them to return to.the meeting, explaining that he considered them to be honored guests. He said there had been no opportunity to see Dr. Sallt's remarks in advance. The Arabs refused to return unless permitted a chance to reply to the "Zionist attack." They accused Dr. Salit of "exploiting" a religious address to make a "political attack" on them. At the program's end, Secretary Dulles visibly annoyed at Dr. Salit, got up and stalked out of the room with Assistant Secretary of State HenryA. Byroade at his heels. President Eisenhower was not present in the hall where the incident occurred. Postmaster General Summerfield later addressed an official letter of apology to each of the four Arab Ambassadors involved. He enclosed a letter of apology which he received from Dr. Salit. Mr. Summerfield wrote the ambassadors from the four Middle Eastern countries that Dr. Salit's comments were "a source of deep personal regret" to him. The Postmaster General included letters from Dr. Salit to him and to Secretary of State Dulles as "a further evidence of our desire to correct this unfortunate incident." Elmo Hutchinson on the 'Hunt' Again *•*, won J 0 /j t *•"* • t.U,i., JTA UNITED NATIONS—New border incidents, indicating a concerted plan by the Arab States to keep the Middle East pot boiling and Israel on the defensive aloru every front, were reported this week as the ponderous machinery of the United Nations, braked by use of parliamentary technicalities, moved slowly towards an overall study of the situation. These were the major developments of a week in which general deterioration of the situation proceeded unchecked, and nerves and patience approached the snapping point. The Security Council began consideration of Jordan and Israel complaints and promptly became involved in a procedural wrangle over a major principle. Should the Council consider the complaints piecemeal, in the order in which they were submitted or should it proceed boldly to overall consideration of the entire Jordan-Israel question as an entity and seek a comprehensive solution? Lebanon strongly and lengthily argued for the former course. The United States, Britain, France and a majority of members of the Council called for the latter. At Tel Aviv, the Israeli military spokesman reported new violations of Israel's frontiers by forces from Jordan, Egypt and Continued on Page 3 A Big Powers Wrangling Over Agenda West Seeks Overall Study, Consideration Of Palestine Issues UNITED NATIONS (JTA>—What was on the surface a procedural wrangle over minor points but which actually involved a major principle, held up the Security Council this week and delayed examination of the dangerous Middle East security situation. At issue was. ostensibly, agenda procedure, with Lebanon demanding that the Council take up Jordan and Israel complaints and countercomplaints, one by one, in the order in which they were submitted to the Council. What actually was at issue was the question whether the Council, after years of peacemeal handling of this explosive issue, could take an overall approach to the question in its en'irety and seek an overall solution. This latter course was what Israel had sought for weeks and which the Arabs had strenuously resisted. This week, in the Council chamber, the United States. Britain and France, as well as other members of the Council, spoke up strongly in favor of this course of action. They took this position in the fact of an ill-concealed warning from the Lebanese delegate. Dr. Charles Malik, that the Arab States would be unfavorably influenced toward the Western Powers by their insistence on general debate. The Arab spokesman protested that the Western Powers "always appear to be opposed to the Arab thesis," and said it was "not a very helpful thing." He urged them to "ponder the effect of this constant unfortunate appearance," to which their "conduct gives rise." Dr. Malik went on to say, "you cannot, at the point of a gun, force the Arabs either into a general debate or around a conference table." While Council president Andrei Y. Vishinsky of the Soviet Union, indicated support of the Arab position. Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., head of the American delegation, told the Council that the present situation had to be treated 'very seriously." The conflicting complaints Continued on Pag* 10 A HmiM Stmutn .t rMkKt American aid



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FAGE 2 A Fannie Selig Named Chairman of Women's Division for Israel Bonds Mrs. Fannie Selig has accepted impelled the State of Israel to float *JmMJ*r!d**L chairmanship of the Women's Division, State of Israel Bond Organization, succeeding Mrs. Matilda Hairier, who has been named chairman of Communities for Florida State, it "was announced J this week bv Greater Miami chairman Jacob Sher> Mrs. Selig, who resides at 725 West Di Lido dr.. has distinguished munity endeavor since her arrival in the Greater Miami area. Making the announcement. Sher declared, "I have worked with Mrs. Selig many times in the past, and I fully realize her tremendous potential. We are indeed proud to have her active participation in the Bond organization." At the same time, Sher announced a campaign to obtain members in Greater Miami for the "Guardians of Israel," a national organization of Americans who are rendering outstanding sen-ice to the development of the State of Israel. Membership in the "Guardians of Israel" is based on the purchase of $1,000 in Israel Development Bonds during 1954. Sher said. "By their purchase of $1,000 in Israel Development Bonds."' he explained, "members of the Guardians of Israel' register their determination to watch over Israel's economic security Their name is derived from brael'l traditional 'Shomrim' or 'Guardiaiu,' who protect the frontiers of the country. In the same manner, members of the 'Guardianof Imel' stand watch over Israel's..economic frontiers." % Sher emphasized the decisive role which funds derived from Israel's fir.-t Bond issue—the Independence Issue—have played in the economic growth of Israel. "More than 600.000 American purchasers of Israel Independence Bonds." he pointed out. "have made it the most successful bond issue floated by a foreign government in the I'nited States since World War II. It was the success of its first issue which the Development Issue and to make thitype of financing a continuing feature of its program." "Israel Development Bonds." he stressed, -provide the dollar;, vshjch Israel heeds to fulfill lafo.scale program of economic development: the continued expansion of industries and agriculture, the construction of roads, harbors, and herself in various fields of com-! railways and the further development of its export trade which has already substantially reduced its traditional foreign trade deficit." A luncheon meeting in Miami and an evening meeting in Miami Beach will be held Monday. April 26. Sher reported, for the express purpose of planning details of a kickoff function for the Development Issue early in May. Plans for the formation of the "Guardians of Israel," Sher indicated, were set forth at the International Planning Conference for Israel, which met in Washington in March. The first international conference for economic aid to Israel, the Washington meeting inaugurated the Israel Development Bond campaign on a worldwide scale. Holiday Deadline OfficM and plant of Tht Jewish Floridian will clot* for the Passover Holidays at sundown Friday, April 16th, and are scheduled to open again the following Tuesday morning, April 20th. Copy for publication in The Jewish Floridian of Friday, April 23rd, must bo on our desks not later than Tuesday morning at 10 a.m. WLiacota, Entrance on w„ PwKription.piJI Lenses cad Fn DupHcotui Lwq* SeUcfc-iJ Style, Mrs. rMNNt S##J TERMITES SWARMING? MU 'OHO' FREE INSPECTION m Dr. Boorstein to Address Hebrew Speaking Group Hebrew Speaking Group of Praetor Miami will meet on Tuesday evening. April 20th. at the home of Mr and Mrs. Saul Punish. 742 Michigan ave. Dr. Samuel W Boorstein. of New York City, will be guest speaker and discuss "Medicine in the State of IsraA" He will also show slides depictiA orthopedic programs. HarnFl'erach will give a resume of the daily reading from the Prophets, with David Freed man I scheduled to review current events. Irving Shalom and Mrs. Harry Perach will lead the group in communal singing. Dr. Boorstein is an orthopedic; surgeon and heads the orthopedic sections of Fordham and Bronx Hospitals in New York. He is also a lecturer in medicine at New York I University. Call 2-1776 Member of S'nol B'rltti Lee to Talk Saturday "Peace Time Uses of Atomic En, ergj-" will be the topic of a lecture I by Charles H. Lee on Saturday afternoon, 3 30 p.m.. at the Spinoza 1 Outdoor Forum on the lawn of the home of Dr. Abraham Wolf son, 11th st. and Ocean ct. Lee is a retired New York engineer who has r made his home on Miami Beach. He has lectured extensively on astronomy and atomic energy. Irving Strauss will preside and conduct the question and answer hour. 4.M.JCC Plans Golf Clinic The Greater Miami Jewish Community Center, Town Branch, will hold its golf clinic and demonstration on Tuesday evening, April 20th. at 8 p.m. There will be a showing of the films, "Golf Stars in Action," illustrating leading professionals hitting wood and iron shots at the Hale America and Tarn O' Shanter Tournaments in Chicago in 1943 and 1944, and "Golf Championships" The demonstration, it is noted Education Committee Kaplan will be held the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center in coiv junction with its golf instruction program under the tutelage of George Astor. MATZOH witkiUiaiUi m famots stoe 1884 Let's Look At The Record Heard and disposed of more rim 15.000 i mp ortant coses during bis 11 years on the .noii an* Re-Elect— CIRCUIT JUDGE MARSHALL C. WISEHEART PASSOVER DAY WORKERS U h |. We Cha rge to Emetervr [ A fftOOD JUDGC WITH A GOOD MCOM lift PULL Ji LEVCR *A S* •!• Irt'i'draan & M. HVntiun HEBREW BOOK STORE 41T Weahiaytoo Are. Miami Beech Beterean fourth and Pifth 8to Hebrew *~**Qlo— For PROD ARE KOSHER K) R PAS50Y|| 27 N.W. 4th St. Ph. 2-17M !" fshewtf fh# Sfstpftrvisifm #f Greater Miami Vaad Hakashrus ** 'M RARRI JOSEPH i. RACKOVSRY, Director J f %¡ YOU'VE TRIED THE REST .. NOW TASTE WHIPPED ItlTTtR SOW Clf AM CREAM COTTAK < GARDEN SAIAD COTTAGE SAIT FREE POT CHEESE COTTM CHERRY KREAM CHEESE CHIVE CREAM CHEESE PINEAPPLE


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futchinson on the 'Hunt' Again from Pag* A +'JewistHcrkUnr, PAGE3A with an eye to in|,he Security Council Tp, made a number of gainst Israel. They [attempted Israeli raid another Jordan village. Some of these complaints were being "investigated" by the remains of the Israel-Jordan Mixed Armistice Commission—Cmdr. Elmo Hutchison, USN, and two Jordan officers. At Cairo, the Arab League studied measures to put pressure on the United States to cut economic aid to Israel. And in Washington, Foreign Operations Administrator Harold Stassen revealed plans to reduce the American aid program to Europe and the Middle East so as to apply a greater proportion of the reduced assistance funds to aid programs for the Far East. AT THE SEDER AND ALL THROUGH THE HOLIDAYS... North Shore Center to Sponsor Two Sedorim North Shore Jewish Center will sponsor two Sedorim on Saturday and Sunday evenings, April 17 and 18. Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz will officiate, with Cantor Edward Klein chanting the Passover ritual. Highlighting the Passover Service will be special Youth services conducted by Rabbi Abramowitz for all children of the North Shore area on Sunday and Monday afternoons, at 10:30 a.m. Following the services, the PTA will serve Passover delicacies. > i %  r-\W A TRADITION IN JEWISH HOMES -*-_ AXWELL HOUSE THE ORIGINAL ASSOVER COFFEE SERVED BLACK or with cream... no other coffee in the world pleases the Yiddish Ta'am like freshly ground, vacuum packed Maxwell House... because there is no other goodness on earth like Its rich aroma and taste. That's why Jewish people everywhere agree that to "Good to the Last Drop" flavor means: X CrlHt*d by RABBI HIRSCH KOHN of New York TA'AM VOS IZ AINS IN DER VELT! MM A PRODUCT OF GENERAL FOODS



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PAGE 4 A + Iewi*t>rk>rk*yr7 Published very Friday line* 1*37 by th Jtwiih Floriaian at 120 N. E. Sixth Street, Miami 18. Florida Entered aa second-claaa ma'ter July 4. 1130. at the Poet OltiLe-ol Miami, Fla., under the Act of March S. 1S7S. The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly. Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndicate, Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association. Amir. lean Association of English-Jewish Newspapers, Florida Press Association. FRED K. SHOCHET E ditor and Publisher wjemsti Meridian OFFICE and PLANT 120 N. E. Sixth Str* Telephones 2-1141 — 2-8212 The Jewish Horldlan does not guarantee theKahroth of the merchandise advertised In Its columns. SUBSCRIPTION RATES One Year $3.00 Two Year. $5.00 LEO MINDLIN N Editor Friday, April 16, 1954 Volume 28 .H m Number 16 Nisan 13, 5714 The Passover Seder and Freedom V.'e are anticipating the First Seder of Passove: on Saturday evening, and we will enter into the festivity with a sense of gladness, for reccing the Haggadah is always an occasion during which one may experience a sense of spiritual exhilaration. h .s the Story of the Exodus, and we will be apprised once again of the manner in which the Israelites were taken from their Egyptian bondage with a firm hand and an outstretched ana. In that light, the First Seder will give us an opportunity to ponder upon man's eternal bc'Je to lift himself up out of conditions of enslavement and to mark the moments of his victories over tyranny and oppression. As we see it, Passover this year continues to hold significance in this regard. The Israelites' return to their land is still upon us as an historic fad but seems destined to remain in the almost impalpable future so long as the infant Jewish republic needs our economic assistance and so .ong as it must stand guard against the rape of Mi borders by enemy neighbors. But we are gregarious creatures, souls whose nee a for social activity and recognition reaches beyond the immediate community, and in turning to the events that swiftly move the world at large we find a similar scene: men everywhere struggling to shake the binding shackles of bondage and men everywhere watching for the safety of the freedom they have so dearly attained. salvation. In similar manner, perhaps, have they loet their way, accepting false faiths and barren notions and giving vent to prevalent disbelief. Humanity may, indeed, be doing obeisance to the golden calf that once stood at the foot of Sinai. But the Haggadah will tell us that there is THE STORM OF ANTI-SEMITISM TUB IWPUVI WT AMIt-SKMITISM which TOW throughout the Soviet empire a year ago, and which following Stalin's death, still continues. Although th*r"*' trying to conceal the facts from the outside world it v* ish leaders in Czechoslovakia, Rumania and HU 0w sentenced behind locked doors, while in East Germ 8 ^ ***. person of Jewish origin has been purged from public "if* 11 ** Many observers are asking why Communist reeim.. r sary to throttle Jewish life. The answer is revealed in „ lished book. "The Jews in the Soviet Satellites' <eles). Ervin Polak Vlttl$lwl_ ,_ K „,„ ._ .... T* I Hanus Lomsky (Gabriel Lieben). Their original Jewish namai The Story of the Exodus and the Great Reharangue on the floor for hours and to enadded to their audited names wherever needed to stress towf tun is thus the story of our time East stands Snare the UN bodv in additional procedural i identity. The sevehth'defendant. Mrs. Marie Svermova. was deal unnnnUi. H I I /. 1 > m ...... .Is fhimi.lr,i ftfiaiio la.ni.h "ImitAr" Hflii Slink" One Ot 0 pitted against West, and within this main division, smaller nations stand against each other. Our mighty struggle during World War II r.as since been placed into miniature significance by our battle in Korea and what now seems a coming struggle in Indo-China. T.-ere are those of us who despair at the prospect of continuing wars and at the dark shadow of a foreboding future. For it seems that our world is now two teams who "play ca!ch" with the most destructive fireball ever devised and that a "miss" will be too terrible a consequence to contemplate. In this sense, wrangles. Andrei Gromyko and Jacob Malik, his colleagues at varying times, have employed similar methods to get more than their fair share of Russian propaganda into the United Nations air. The current Israel-Arab agenda controversy is a case in point, whe the Soviet has betrayed its unalterable support of the Arab position while pretending neutrality in the matter. Demanding the consideration of charges as they have been filed by the UN truce commission, Vishinsky thus assures the fact that the Nahalin affair, during which Israeli troops allegso-e of us observe with outraged feeling hu"r? at,aclted a Jordanian grouping, will Temerity's game of chance with its own destiny. Ce,ve Securi, y Council attention. As we see it, the Haggadah on Saturday evening may serve to alleviate some of the tensions within us. The Israelites' exodus meant leaving bondage behind for a visible salvation. But that salvation, we find at our Seder tables, wes not intended to come easily. It was purchased at the price of forty years of wandering in the desert and of losing the way along the i tice ^""""ion. abstained from voting by-paths of hopelessness, despair and spiritual grounds of "insufficient evidence." incredulity. The Russians seem to be using every oppor:.i similar manner, perhaps, do men of our lunity to ply their point of view upon a world own time struggle now in the desert, seeking already weary of them and their tactics At the same time, the Scorpion Pass massacre will be put aside. Constituting an attack by Jordan regulars against a bus and resulting in the murder of twelve Jews, it was ignored by world opinion when Cmdr. Elmo Hutchinson. U.S. observer on the Israel-Jordan Mixed Armon as the mistress fWP^he Jewish "traitor" Otto Sling, one executed in the first Slansky trial. She received a life term; i were given sentences ranging from fifteen to twenty-five yean All of the defendants mentioned above were Communist! only connection with Jewry was their Jewish origin. • • • • AT THE SAME TIME, AUTHENTIC former leaders of J munities in Czechoslovakia, Rumania and Hungary' were r !" 1 series of secret trials. Several hundred such leaders had w in Communist jails since 1948 and 1949. In Prague, on August 7, 1953, nine former leaders of i Jews were secretly tried on charges of "treason" and "economic One was condemned to death and his sentence commuttd to for life; eight others received sentences up to twenty-three > December, 1953, Erno Osher, a former Zionist leader in Brain condemned to ten years in prison. Several dozen others, a Zionists, remained, in a Bratislava jail, awaiting trial. Is Rumania, the first secret trial against former Je> took place in August, 1953. Among other offenses, the deter p %  accused of being imperialist agents because they had beipe British parachutists from the Gestapo during the war. Edgar Kenner. who refused to confess and defended hl5 *rjJjiJ tions, was sentenced to sixteen years at forced labor, wi defendants received sentences of ten years and more. In a second trial. Mrs. Susanne Benvenisti and| J ?_ -i leaders of the Rumanian section of the World Jewls .\Xro*l accused of having received foreign money for Zionist were sent to jail — the farmer for ten years, the latter ton In Hungary, Judith Steiner, an employee of the t* !" "^ Budapest, was sentenced to four years in prison in ue"T Of the prominent Hungarian Jews arrested in J n "* r) ^ 0 Stoeckler, President of the Budapest Jewish co""""""'-..,^ president of the community in Debreczen; Dr. Ual0 J^iJ| director of the Jewish Hospital; and many others, r^r munieado. Stoeckler and Benedek. generally n *f^.Zjjm munist, were nevertheless reported to have received nea i s George Schay, former leader of the Jewish youth orgw !" a was sentenced to five years Jn jail in another secret tn 1953.



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IY, APHIL 16. 1954 +JmlstifhrMiam b Quarter Way Reached than a quarter of its way Variety Hospital is Leo Adeeb, Mif..00 ooo goal is the current ami Beach automobile dealer. Vice !*. (){ 1,000" drive on bechairman are Daniel J. Mahoney, r the Variety Children's Hosof the Miami Daily News, and Jack Bell, columnist for the Miami Herald. Robert I'entland, Jr., is treasurer. PAGE 5 A Burton Kahn to Hood Fascell Campaign on Boach Burton Kahn, Miami Beach automobile dealer, has been chosen to head Dante B. Fascell's Congres sional campaign on Miami Beach, it was revealed this week. In accepting the chairmanship of the Beach campaign. Kahn announced that a meeting of Miami B>ach Fascell supporters will be Teresa Ronson to Sing Teresa Ronson, dramatic soprano, will sing an extended program at Monticello Park Jewish Center on Wednesday. April 21, 9 cm. A Passover musical program has helcblattt ulthe \wek. Currently, FasceH'-lsDComiteling his fourth year in the Florida state legislature. been planned, along with Jewish folk songs, classical and current song hits and community singing. Miss Ronson studied at Julliard School of Music and was with the American Theatre Wing in New York. She opened Bertha Foster's recital this season and is presently a member of the Fern Sherman Opera Co. She will be accompanied fit the piano by Rose M. Rooin. YOU CAN m,U6Wt FAVORITE /tecfeeIN HOME MILK'S BIG CONTEST! Your favorite recipe can win $25.00 in the HOME MILK weekly contest. Here's how it works: Each week HOME MILK will select one of its quality dairy products. See list of selected products and contest dates below., You send us your favorite recipe using this product. The HOME MILK product selected for the first week's contest is Home Milk SOUR CREAM. Write down your favorite recipe using sour cream and send it to HOME MILK. The winning recipe will be awarded the $25.00 HOME MILK prise, and your photo and recipe will appear in this newspaper. Remember, there's a new contest and a different winner every week I CONTEST RULES Each week's contest closes at midnit: Saturday. Entries must be postmarked before that time to fee eligible. Write or print year recipe clearly and give year nanw and address with each entry. You may submit as many entries you wish each week. Mail entries to HOME M!IK, 2451 H.W. 7th Ave., Miami. Winner of each week's contest will be announced in this newspaper 1 week after lest day far submitting entries. En week's winner will receive HOMI MIIK'S cheek for $25.00 (check may be made to your favorite charity, if you prefer), and photo of winner together with recipe will appear in this newspaper. All recipes submitted become the property of HOMI M!IK Company and no entries can be returned. Decisions will be made by a specially selected panel of judges, whose decisions will be final. Employees of the HOME MIIK Company and their families ore not eligible to enter these contests. "ri/Al STATE lABOf AT0v riSTS MOVE HOME MILK EXCEEDS STATE HUWTION etfEMEr,TS IT H.1% SERVE YOUR FAMItY PURE HOME MILK WITH HIGHER NUTRITIVE VALUE 6 BIG CONTESTS! 1. SOUR CREAMEntries mast be postmarked before mi dn rf o Smturiay, April 24. 2. WHIPPING CREAM (Half Heavy Cream and Half Light Cream) — tmtrkt mast be post marked before midnite Saturday, May '3. DRY COTTAGE CHEESE Entries mast be post marked before midnite Saturday, May S. 4. HEAVY WHIPPING CREAM tntrlat matt be postmarked before midnite Saturday, May 15. 5. LIGHT CREAMtntriat mast be postmarked before mUniH Slarimy, May 22. 6. HOMOGENIZED MILK Intriat matt be postmarked before mianife Saturday, May 29. HOME MILK IS KOSHER FOR PASSOVER Kosher milk and dairy products for Passover supervised and endorsed by the Greater Miami Vood Hakasbras, Rabbi Joseph E. Sockovsky, Director. 2.4-SI N.W.7 !" A VINUK*rV\lAMI,FLA. PHONE-MIAMI 2-76* rr. LAUDBftOAUB **47j



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PAGE6A Sidney Aronovitz Named President Of Florida B'nai B'rith Federation nuw. Miami Back: PaeJ Eastern. Fort Laaderdale: Piofeseor SasMseJ Proctor. Cmmille; David GorMJB. st Petersburg: Sam %  •!" %  naif irfi anl Bee Goldfield. Daytona Beach, reposal vice preseoenu. ^r~Mrs. Jack B~ Wein. Miami Beach, reetected president of the Sidney M. Aronovitz. Miami attorney, was elected p r tj ia ret of the Florida Slate Federation of B'nai B'rrth Lodges at the Federation'* 18th annual convention held in the Bi it more Terrace Hotel. Miami Beach. April 10-12 Aronovitz sue ceeds Edward I. Cutler, of Tampa. iMher officers 'ele/ted were DarSTWolper St PHer.burg. presFlorida State FederaUon of real ident-eleet; Gilbert J Balkin. MiB'rith Women's Chapters. Abo ami. secretary: Sam Bobbins. Talelected were the Mesdames Ur and George Leliam Wotfana. Tampa. 1st rice president: Morris Mams. Orlando. 2nd nee president: Ben GokMield. Day tona Beach. 3rd rice president: Frank Bayer. West Palm Beach inn Ted f to aias en Hialeah secretary: and Dan Danart. Fort Lauderdale. historian A resolution urging enactment of a state law prohibiting tory advertising mously. The resolution is aa oatgrowth of a report, made last year by the Florida regional office. AntiDefamation League of B'nai B nth. which alleged numerous instances of discnminatory resort advertising. In presenting the resolution, de•igned ~as an aid in eliminating thu blight of resort discrimination." Federation officials pointed out that Virginia last month enacted a statewide act prohibiting discnminatory commercial adverHajaj s* Newly elected officers of the Florida Stale Federation of B'nai B'rith Lodges are lowing the 18th annual convention of the Florida State B'nai B'rith Federation BUtmore Terrace Hotel. Miami Beach. Shown ore (seated, left to right: Dand). ney M. Aronovitz and Edward I. Cutler. Standing (left to right) are George S. Lei Robbins. Milton A. Friedman. Louis Ossinsky. Sr.. Charles Daniels, Ben Gokifiekfi Balkin and E. Albert Pallot. Sammtl G*l4ittt* Goldstein Asks Voters To Study Qualifications Samuel GoIdstSta, candidate for the Board of Public Instruction. District 3. thu, week asked voters to place emphasis upon qualificatory rather than platform" Basically, the needs of Dade's school system include increased facilities to alleviate overcrowding, particularly in the elementary schools. Goldstein said Women Heeded as Circuit Judges, Mrs. Meyers Declares With handling divorces and separations a major job of the Circuit : Court, one out of the county's 10 circuit Judges should be a qualij fied woman attorney. Anna Brenner Meyer-, candidate for Circuit Judge in Group 5. declared here thu week. Mrs. Meyers noted that women are serving as judges of Circuit Courts and other high courts in 22 states, "and in the opinion of attorneys practicing before them. and of the press, are doing an outstanding job." Mrs. Meyers also said that "modSotin Soys Lows Must be Strengthened Dan Satin, candidate for the State Legislature in Group 2. in addressing his supporters all over. the county, this week strongly emphasized the importance of strengthening the laws having to do with the municipalities in this county having a greater voice in the legislation which affects them. "Home rule, wherein the munici-. pahties have a direct voice in legislation, is and should continue to be a fundamental precept in our or Passover this year include whip local government," Satin said, "and' Ped butter, sour cream, cream cot I will exert every effort to amplify, tage cheese, garden salad cottage, the voice of the municipality in the *'t tree P< cheese. State Legislature if elected." Other products Kosher for PassSatin further advocated the reover are cottage cheese, cherry vision of the State Constitution to kream cheese, chive cream cheese, provide, among other things, for! pineapple cream cheese. Grade A additional representation fron life mixed eggs and Grade A llrdv a N Dairy l*rodii*l* kosli For Passover I M Berdy's Dairy Products, main taining their offices and plant at 27 NW 4th st.. have announced that their products are Kosher for Passover. Kashruth is sunervis^d b* the Greater Miami Vaad Hakashruth under Rabm Joseph B. Rackovsky. director. Products authorized as Kosher Tel. IMMS B,| Jimmy ran, R WDY Package L O U N GC-| Family SrrW MM* | ENTEHTAII 13420 N.W. 7th MIAMI. FLOR ern American women are playing U es srtsd, th e essdidata proausincrMlin g Jy impor tant roles 5 politics and business. They deal in and own property, and many women work side-by-side with their husbands in business." She declared that "numerous women enter the professions, and certainly, with women taking such important roles in political, business and professional life, they should also serve in our courts." The candidate stressed that she ed to support plans for the im mediate future to provide facilities for an ever-expanding school population that "will put the school system here ahead of its needs, as is done by progressive business organizations." Goldstein emphasized that sal%  rlsa for teachers must warrant their staying in the profession, devoting their efforts to teaching in all its facets. 'has had 22 years of experience in '.all courts and has had years of social work and crime prevention. Mrs. Meyers pointed out that sh s*£ Kostoff Unveiling The dedication of a monument to the memory of the late Henrietta Kostoff, formerly of 707 SW 15th Street, was held Sunday. April 11th at 2 p.m. on the K. of P. Plot at Mt. Sinai Memorial Park Cemetery with Rabbi S. T. Swirsky officiating. Mrs. Kostoff is survived by her husband Murray, a son Seymour and a daughter. Mrs. Barbara Solomon, all of Miami. Mrs. Kostoff was a chartered member and Port Chiel of Roosevelt Tent, Miami Temple No. 33. K. of P. Arrangements were in charge of Palmer's Miami Monument Company. COMPUTE M l* M.L a* Ji"M TAW* HM COLLEGE COFFEE SHOP 214 AIMW *| COMlM** MUM t* 1 "* t Al" Tl 1651 M.w. t*J'* i HOLIDAY •ffT'" J BILL SHEPARD RICTWCJU CONTACT* 4t0 I. >S* STttfT, MAUAN



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Up^jysu leidelberg (Will Stay December up — The threatened „ National Jewish Wel. Servicemen's Club and Heidelberg. Germany, I averted, at least until 81 1954, Charles Aaron, |J] president of JWB, fc session of the organfjonal convention. recreation and religifor American Jewish ionnel in the Ameri[of Germany, the JWB j have been cldsed on eause of lack of funds. operating continuous[ since 1946. gained that tha club un open for the balance %  even though it meant |would incur a deficit of In ratifying action tkh is not in JWB's presBWB's executive commitLvention endorsed AarRhat "we are sure that if ]can Jewish communities Ustand the significance tision they; will respond kponsibility. even as we %  PACE. 7 A Omr Confer Will Delight You ml Our TRADITIONAL SEDER SERVICES MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS EARIY PRICES VERY REASONABLE Special Ratei far Groups or Children Royal Hungarian Restaurant 731 WASHINGTON AVENUE TELEPHONE 58-5401 Hebrew Academy honor student Warren Teitelman. selected Youth of the Month by Miami Beach Exchange Club, receives an award at the Saxony Hotel from Exchangite Paul Enfiekl. Looking on i* Msgr. William Barry, guest speaker at the luncheon. flub Affair Due spring social and card Temple Beth Sholom lb will be held on MonIng. April 26. 8 p.m., in lie's Banquet Hall. Jack H, president, announced khments will be a feafction. Co-chairmen of the [ Frank Kamen and Al*r*tfo*t*tOim IM4MANM1 ]rk ST. Make Your iRtservAions Early MM ssover Holidays M jeer family and friends at ear IKTIT KOSHER HOTEL outstanding Well own Young Israeli Cantor and Singer, IRON WEINGARTEN. I conduct the Sedurim In the True Beauty pnd Tradition of the Passover Phone 15-6701 Slat* Heady tor Election Meeting Following slate of officers and directors witl.be brought in" for election to the annual election meeting of the Sisterhood of Temple Beth Sholom on Wednesday,' April 21, according to an announcement by Mrs. Bert S. Klee, Sisterhood president: President—Mrs. Irving B. Kap% Ian; vice presidents—Mrs. Morris Alpert, Mrs. Joseph L. Arkin, Mrs. Wolfie Cohen. Mrs. Arthur Courshon; recording secretary — Mrs. Samuel Falick; corresponding secretary—Mrs. Michael Mersel; financial secretary—Mrs. Benjamin Sabin; treasurer—Mrs. Maurice B. Shein; chaplain—Mrs. Leon Kronish; social secretary—Mrs. Samuel Kelemer. For two-year directors—The Mesdames Irving Bachrach, Abe Blatt, Jack Chutkow, I. A. Durbin, Joseph Fenias, Charles Gertler, Gilbert Goldman, Eli Meltzer, Bess Nelson, Harry Orleans, Helen Rajna, Irving Roth man. Fred Sommerstein, Joseph Shawmut. Ralph Spero, Louis Stuff. Max Weitz. Joseph Wolf. Simon Wolff, Abraham Zinnamon. One year' directors — The Masdames Ralph Benach. Irving Blasberg, Maif Brustein, Barry Cameron, Ralph 1 Cobb, Jacob Fishman, Emanuel Goldstrich, Harry W. Greenberg, Daniel Herman, Ida Kars, Morrv B. Morris. Donald Murray, Abe Schwartz, Louis Shapiro, Hyman Silver. Irving Westin, Harold Wynn and William Yanowitz. Unexpired term—The Mesdames Norman Babel, Camille Baum, Samuel Beckerman, I. C. Greenberg, David Harris, Milton Jacobs, Walter Jacobs. Reuben Levin. Benjamin Mandell, Herman Ries, Sidney Schwartz, Benjamin Seidler, Charles Silvers. Mrs. Aaron Fair was chairman of the Nominating Committee which will be presenting the slate at the meeting. KOSHER SHEL PESSACH $11 TWO NIGHTS BY RESERVATION ONLY Cempietefy Air Cone*ifionee* THI HS JJH KO SHER FOOtS KOSHER RESTAURANT DELICATESSEN A Union* Experience in Dining Preatere TRADITIONAL FRIDAY NIGHT DINNERS $2.50 Delicatessen to Take Heate 1141 WASHINGTON AVE. OPPOSITE CITY HALL MIAMI REACH Open Oaily 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday 5 p.m. te t p.m. Serving Strictly Kosher Passover Ratals STAR RESTAURANT • A I R V VfCITARfAN m mi MS H Serving Breakfast — Lunch — Dinner — Alao a la Carte 841 WASHINGTON AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH PH. 5*182 Now in Our Eleventh Year Air-Conditioned Try the Delicious Kosher Dishes Served at Our Restaurant "fl#3 MENDELSOHN'S %  fljQ CORNER 41st ST. I ROYAL PALM AVE., MIAMI BEACH NOW TAKING RESERVATIONS FOR THE SEDERS AND ENTIRE WEEK OF PASSOVER Telephone 58-7074 KOSHER MENDELSOHN'S "*< CATERERS "*" •" %  %  "' %  KOSHER flHlSJ CATERING SERVICE FOR RAR AHTZVAHS, WEDDINGS AND OTHER SOCIAL AFFAIRS Alsa Serving Organization Functions Oar Restaurant ana 1 Catering $*rvk*i Unoer Complete Supervision of RARR1 MOSES MESCHHOFF AND THE BETH JACOB VAAO HAKASHRUTH YOUR HOLIDAY DINING PLEASURE MTIONAL [ASSOVER SEDERS feted b r tk ttMowtfd CANTOR ELISHA CERNEB irOeB Vi — e oasutod b r CHOIR and Organ "M'TEO RESERVATIONS FOR IOTH NIGHTS ONLY $10 R*r person per night ($J2.5f far One High!) Far Reservations Phone St 0111 ON THE OCEAN AT LINCOLN HOAP Sltotu GaAe. 4 H| Good Food Mumi BcJeh



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PAGE 8 A +Jewlst>n****>I35AY. Miss Bertman Weds Jerrv Goodman in Candlelight Bites In a double ring candlelight ceremony at the Shelborne Hotel, on April 4th, at 5:30 p.m., Miss Mar'ene Bertman became the bride of Jerry Goodman. Rabbi Irving Lehrman officiated. The bride is the daughter of Mr. ;.nd Mrs Louis Bertman, 1024 Michigan ave. Mr. Goodman is the ss. Gaitni Fr, (in skive Freer To Reside on Ruth Haber and Gu. man, formerly of Net' and now residents ol lb were married on Tue 13!h. Both are active in rehj cal, civic and .welfare tions. Mr. Freeman, pa-: prtaj the Brooklyn Chapter of | York State Society of I Engineers, is a retired d| neer. He served the City of] for many years. He is aia] ber of the Miami Beach I 1601. Bl'O Elks. Mr. and Mrs. Freeman side at 827 Jefferson Beach. Florida. WJLM J M CARLYL VJILn M M I I fr ft* Statfc's Outstariiif ^ Itwith Camp loi Boys ( Girls _. HENDERSONVILLE, N. C. Oir.cfor, Wiafaa L. Mndtr, Principal V'oodward High Scho.l. Ctaciaaatl. Ohio Atk far hrnSTH Mrs. J*H AmM. OWMT. MO Mrl<*laa A..., Miami iMtt, PS. SB-Silt: Mrs. A. A. Hay*-. Jl3 S.WF. • St.. Ph. 4S-MW; Mrs. O-rry Annan. MM S.W. MS St.. Mhml. Ph. 4S-SVM. HORKIKt I WATER SMITJ raivtn UB, COlf-TlBIJ 0VHRI6HT fftj MODERN mm 1 IMIW i>< 1 • fimiii. :-:<=3*;^*SS*3S*SE*SvS3j^! \ \ ScmUf KOSHER CATEREI Weddings • Bar Mitzvahs Buffets • Garden Parties CATERING A Complete Service No Party Too Small — No Party T. Largt 775 Dade Boulrvard Miami Beach Phuna 5-9952 If No Answer Call 84-:07 Under Rdbbinicil Supemjion %. the homo of SUNSHINE FASHIONS *rec. V.H. pL off. Miami Miami Baach Ft, Laudardala • Wtst N" YOU WILL FIND THE MOST COMPLETE SELECTION ol BOYS AND GIRLS WEAR ON MIAMI at MORRIS BROTHERS MIAMI 1281 WASHINGTON AVENUE



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5 A y, APRIL 16, 1954 lampion Golfer Roslyn Swift Exchanges iVVS With Maxson Berber in Hollywood +Jmisi>nr*a~.„ PAGE 9 A Lne-clav. March 31st, was the TcWen'by Miss Roslyn Swift • marriage to Maxson Bergcr Hollvwood Beach Hotel. Miss is the daughter of Mr. and .'gen w. Swift. 1609 Tyler Mt Hollywood Beach. Ir Berber s ,ne son ** r TLOUIS L Bcrger, Buffalo, N.Y. if Marius Ranson. of Ft. LauL.]e officiated at the 6 p.m. Uony. Jo"" Peturca. accorist offered traditional nuptial le.Best man was Lewis Berger, r of the groom. K bride chose a nylon tulle fertoa gown over taffeta, a gathi tulle side panel emphasizing [bouffant skirt, with" handclipJ organdy roses and brilliant lers decorating the panel. The Xrcd waist finished with boat Cine outlined in organdy roses Jtulle capsleeves. |er five-tiered veil of French 11|nn fell from a coronet of or|dy roses outlined with seedfls. She carried a bridal Bible, | gift of her mother, centered I two white hybrid orchids and ered with lily-of-the-valley. • only jewelry was a strand of j tls. gift of the groom. fctron of honor was the bride's Jher, attired in a brown lace Terina over shellpink taffeta. carried shellpink cymbidium kids on a brown velvet fan backIwith pink maline. Vs. Berger, mother of the [om, chose a blue lace gown and re a pink cymbidium orchid cort Floral designs were executhy the Blackstone Flower Shops. Jon completion of an extended leymoon trip to Hawaii and Calipia. the newlyweds will reside Buffalo and New York. Irs. Berber is well known In ling circleits "Cookie" Swift, ring won a number of championbs as an amateur golfer. —:• Will C'ori. Siefd fes Siegel Wii ft


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PAGE 10 A -MstiikricMagL Big Powers View Agenda Continued from Pago 1 A could not be separated into airtight compartments. The issues, Mr. Ludge insisted, must be treated as inter-related, and he said this was the only practical way if the Security-Council were to continue to play a positive role in this area. The American delegate complained that there had been no improvement in the border situation since toe Kibya incident, and he warned Iti4t the policy of reprisal and retaliation must stop. He said the Kabalin incident clearly called for condemnation. Sir Pierson Dixon, British delegate, mentioned the killing by Jordanians of 11 Israelis at Scorpion Pass, in the Negev, and the "organized attack" on Nahalin village in Jordan, and added that he hoped no further incidents or attacks would occur while the Council was considering the problem. "The situation is already grave enough with out that." he said. He called for "a thorough discussion of the whole problem.*' French delegate Henri Hoppenot said that he considered that the complaint against Israel and the Isj raeli complaint against Jordan w ere only parts of the general Palestine question. He recalled that, Mr. Vishinsky had recently favored | simultaneous discussion of the Is-1 raeli complaint against Egypt > nfl ; the Egyptian complaint against Is • rael, as "two aspects of the same I matter." He supported the view on | discussion of the two complaints together, and expressed hope for a I constructive solution of the prob-1 lem as a whole." • | When these questions are settled, and Israel finally gets the floor in the Council, it will emphasize that a total and complete breakdown of the armistice agreement between Israel and Jordan is now evident and will suggest that the Council review that agreement. Israel Ambassador Abba S. Eban said this week at a press conference. Mr Eban said that, if the Security Council would bring Israel and Jordan together under the provision of Article XII of the armistice agreement, it could "mark a turn ing point in this unhappy story Article XII. the clause which makes a meeting between Israel, 19 and Jordan compulsory'' wa 'he most important part of the whole' Johns Film Shown "This Is Your Life."' a Miamiproduced 16-mm sound film high lighting the life story of Acting | Governor Charley Johns, was pre-, sented at the Johns' N oi taV JWI campaign headquarters. 6609 NW 7th ave on Thursday evening The film runs approximately 15 minutes and the narration is by John Behney. former Broadway actor and star of the Coconut Grove Theatre productions. The Bar Mitzvah of David Lawrence Tedlow, son of Mr. end Mrs. Samuel Tedlow. 4390 North Michigan ave.. will be held on Saturday I-.orning. April 17th. at Temfie Emanu-El. David is a seventh grade student at f-.autilus Junior High School and attends the Religious School of Temple EmanuEl. ONE GRADE FUEL OIL Clean Economical BOILERS — OIL BURNERS REPAIRS INSTALLATIONS Serving MIAMI BEACH At Any Hour Radio Dispatched AMBER FUEL OIL INC. Dial 58-0735 ACE RUG niWilts 26 S.W. South River Drive Phones 9-1155 & 82-2007 RUGS CLEANED. DYED and DEMOTHED Carpet Laying and Repairing FURNITURE CLEANING To All ... A Most Happy Holiday WESTBROOK MOTORS Wrecker Service — Expert tody end Fender Retiring Painting and GlaM Work — Mechanical Work :75T PALM AVENUE. HIALEAH. FLORIDA PM. M 1486 TO ALL PASSOVER GREETINGS Woody's Standard Service Lubrication Specialists — Oas • Oils • Batteries Tires "Service with a Smile" 477 N.W. 5th STREET PHONE MH TO ALL GREETINGS *. M. ousmmnv Roofing and Metal Craftsmen "Ne 5ufc5f.fi/te for fiawrieiKt" Crvftsasee Throughout the Teers 1940 N.W. 17th AVENUE PHONE 3-8208 I armistice agreement. Mr. Eban said. No precedent existed, he went on. for one party to refuse to meet with another as Jordan has refused to attend the conference convoked by the UN Secretary General. The Israeli representative said that Israel wanted a peace settlement. But short of that, its minimal requirement was a restoration of the Israel-Jordan armistice agreement in its full integrity. Parts of an agreement, he concluded, could not be operative while other parts were in force. He added that Jordan could not have just the articles of the armistice agreement which it wanted. Miami to Tel Aviv Via Pan Am*>ru and Israel Airlines ^^ ROUND TRIP AS LOW AS SIM 90 Plus $10.15 Tax PAN AMERICAN 2 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD. MIAMI 1*51 WASHINGTON AVENUE. MIAMI BEACH Telephone 64-5411 A Happy Passover to All Our Friends and Patron. 1-oeb Gottfried RED ROAD. HIALEAH Phone 88-2258 ELECT KENDRICK YOI'R PURCHASING AGENT IF YOU WANT: A MAN who will devote bis foil time to the business of making $5,000,000 worth of purchases each year for County Departments. A MAN who pledges and guarantees every seller in Dodo County that ho shall not be discriminated against in selling to the County. A MAN who will provide public records on all purchases be makes who will not tolerate secret fifes and secrecy in official acts. A MAN who has a reputation for fairness — a background as a Motive Miamiao a man whoso h one st y is proved m U. S. Army records. A MAN who will not tolerate a policy of favoritism a man whose oafy guide to purchasing will bo "the best possible at least cost." We Need a Man Like"' KENDRICK MM I'ulllk-Ml Adv.)



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lY. APRIL 16.HS4 -Jmtohthridtogi ational Council Adopts $688,750 Budget PAGE 11 A LEW YORK—A national budget I $688,750 for the 1954-95 fiscal L was passed by the Board of CL. tors of the National Council Jjewish Women at the concluding U, 0 n of its annual spring meetn \,w York AprH Orri to 9th. I in additional sum estimated at Lut S2.000.000 is expected to be lent bv the 245 Council Sections ing the yea' for tne,r local lalth welfare and education prohms. The 61-year-old organizabn has over 100,000 members oughout the country. frhe national budget will cover Vdance and service to local prolams of community welfare, servlo the foreign born, and eduItion and social action r as well as 1 $50,000 grant to support the laining of Israeli high school lathers at the School of Education {Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Ll scholarships for advanced Judy in the United States to stuTnts with leadership ability in kids of social welfare and edufcion from Jewish communities Iroad. Hails Freedom llfrs. Irving M. Engel, President Council, keynoted the opening Ission of the Board meeting with i address hailing the progress of freedom campaign which the fcuncil has been conducting with co-spon.sorship of the national loung Women's Christian Associlion. IMrs. Engel reported that more Ian 200 Sections of the Council Iroughout the country have alfcady translated the freedom camlign into programs of community Btion. The campaign was launchover two years ago "to help eate a climate more conducive to free expression." Noting that the Council was among the first pubHe service organizations to undertake a program to combat threats from within to American democracy, Mrs. Engel welcomed the fact that other organizations nave now undertaken efforts in behalf of civil liberties. She declared that, while public organizations must feel a temptation to "play it safe," their actions in this field are "really no gamble at all, because they cannot conceivably exist without freedom." The Council President urged a continued and vigorous fight against those powerful interests which are attempting to subvert those American liberties which are the fundamental heritage of the Constitution and Bill of Rights. She cautioned that "at this moment there seems to be a turning point in favor of freedom and justice, but there is no assurance that the extremists and fanatics will now be repudiated." Adopt New Program A new program was given a goahead signal by the Board of Directors. "To aid in the advancement of democratic ideals," the Council will offer women community leaders of other countries the opportunity to visit with women's organizations in the United States, to observe the responsibilities assumed by private citizens in this country for community advancement, and to study the techniques employed for such purposes. Under the new women leadership plan, the Council will offer fellowships to Jewish women from abroad "who evince leadership ability and who are engaged as volunteers in community activities." The women leaders will be brought to the United States for three to six months, at the expense of the Council. Among conditions set forth by the Board of Directors for the candidates and the communities from which they will be selected are: 1. The Jewish community or a responsible Jewish agency in the foreign country must have confidence in the leadership role of women and interest in increasing its scope and making it more effective; 2. The candidate must have acknowledged status in her own community; 3. She must have experience and interest in the cultural and social welfare of her community, both Jewish and general; 4. She must agree to return to her country to apply the results of her experience. "It is hoped," said the Board of Directors, "that this experience will reinforce the capacity for leadership of Jewish women in their communities and encourage and strengthen women's groups for community welfare. Council sees this also as an opportunity to exchange information and experience; and to learn from women of other lands the ways in which they have been effective in their own communities." Oppose Curtailment A request to Congress to grant the full budget requested by the State Department for its International Educational Exchange Programs was made by the Board of Directors. The programs are threatened with drastic curtailment by a budget cut which has been recommended by the House Appropriations Committee. Expressing "gravest concern" at the recent action of the Appropriations Committee, the Board declared that the programs "are of paramount importance, in promot-' ing international good relations at a time when they are vitally needed, and in furthering an under-. standing of the United States in ; other countries." As evidence that results highly Continued on Pag* 12 A FOR RENT YEAR-ROUND NEW UNFURNISHED 1-BEDROOM APTS. AMH Only Steve and refrigerator furnished. Air-conditioning and heating urn'. /•9 p;r month. See Jake Gordon, IJ14 S.W. 6m St., h. 12-662"?. S A T I X : ."// • I GROUP 2 CAMP UMATILLA FOR BOYS-iosf 4 Hows from Miami In the heart ef Florid*. Fee of $350 for 8 weeks inclwdes tronsportatien, lonnery and horseback riding. Philio S. Chaiten, Educational Director of North Shore Jewish Center, with 24 years of coma experience,, Camp Director. For farther information call 16-4576. 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Heather JTN IODI X j DIAMOND CRYSTAL Weather-pruf Brand Salt • great new salt that flows freely even in damp, sticky %  ther. It's the world's first truly free pouring sale DIAMOND CRYSTAL SALT CO.



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PAGE 12 A + fr*i4>tk,r*lkM National Council Adopts Budget Continued from Pago 11 A beneficial to the United States are being achieved through student exchanges, the Board disclosed thai in the overseas scholarship program maintained by the Council since 1946 it has been demonstrated that the students v return to their homelands with an enhanced appreciation of the American way of life, of the American concepts of individual worth, and with a train ing in American techniques for use in their chosen fields." Ninety-seven scholarships to students from 15 countries have been granted to date under the Council's scholarship program. Revision Asked In another development the Council's Board of Directors orotested the lack of action by Congress in this session for amendment of the McCarran-Walter Immigration Act. "Despite President Eisenhower's strong condemnation of some of that law's provisions over a year ago, he has not yet requested Congress to take steps to amend it; nor is any action being taken in | Congress to do so," the Board st ;it ed. The Council has maintained pro grams of service to the foreign born for over 50 years. The organ-1 ization's leaders pointed out that "the Council welcomed the Refugee Relief Act. itself no substitute for basic revision of our immigration : law. in the hope that it would per-1 mit speedy action to admit several hundred thousand victims of econonfc hardship and political per-1 secution. Even this temporary j n.easure. however, has so far prov-1 ed ineffective. Because of the ovj erwhelming difficulties of admin-' istering its complex requirements,: only six persons have come in under its requirements in over a I year." Urging correction of "unjust and i discriminatory features" of the im-1 migration and naturalization law, I the Board said that such amendment "would hearten the peoples of the free world and enhance the prestige of the United States everywhere. This prestige has suffered as a result of the McCarran-Walter ActSpecifically the Board called on the President to recommend and the Congress to effect revisions in the law to increase the total immigration quotas: to give humanitarian consideration in immigration to the pressing needs of refugees and displaced persons; to eliminate all discrimination within the quota based on race or national origin: and to provide just treatment of loyal aliens and naturalized citizens. The Board of Directors, viewing the mounting crisis in the Middle East as "not a series of unrelated incidents, but a major international problem affecting the peace of the world," called for immediate United Nations consideratejri of means to establish peace in the total area. The Board urged that this coun try use "its utmost powers of persuasion and leadership to make certain that the United Nations Security Council consider the problem in its entirety and not on the ineffective piecemeal basis which has prevailed in the past." The United States, as well as the other nations of the world must accept responsibility for the present crisis, the Council leaders declared. Expressing "shock" at the "continuing series of killings, in most cases of innocent people" in a chain in which each action is claimed to be vengeance for a prior act of hostility, the Board asserted: "Clearly the situation in the Middle East is now out of hand. The terror that prevails on the borders of Israel and its Arab neighbors is the product of forces of hate and violence which have reached gigantic proportions. It is the inevitable outcome of the failure of peace in this area." The Board demanded "immediate action, effectively implemented by all the power and forces at the command of the United Nations" I for establishment of peace in the total area, to follow the Security Council's deliberations. They stat; ed that "the world can no longer afford to pass resolutions,'conduct investigat ions and issue reports M individual incidents." Only firm United Nations hand ling of the problem in its entirety will put an end to preparations j for war and the endless series of "incidents" in the area, and "only in this way will this terrible dan; ger to the peace and secunU "I the world be ended." the Board said. It called "graWK than ever" the present responsibility of the Unit ed States in handling of the Middle Eastern crisis. (Text of the Board of Directors' statement is attached at end of this release.) Executive Director Report In her annual report to the Board, Mrs. Elsie Elfenbein. Execu tive Director of the Council, sur veyed six months of accomplishments in the completion of an internal reorganization. She anounc \ ed that a field staff has been organized and trained since last October, to visit the 245 communities where there are Council Sections, give direct service in the development of local projects, and relay views and experiences between the Sections and the national office. Mrs. Elfenbein reported that new equipment for audio-visual education is being sent to the School of Education of Hebrew University, which the Council supports. Under the Council's overseas scholarship program, two students recently completed their training in the United States and returned to Israel—one a specialist in education of mentally retarded children, one a specialist in adult education. For the coming academic year, the scholarship subcommittee is considering applications from Morocco, Tunisia. France and India, as well as Israel. However, the bulk of applications are expected to come from the latter country. As a result of a request from the Israel Ministry of Welfare, the Council is sponsoring an American social work specialist in Israel, Miss Adele Aronowitz. to conduct in service training in social work agencies there. Miss Aronowitz I embarked for Israel March 26th. Reviewing the work of the Council* Public Affairs CotaAtlttWe. Mr* Elfenbein rep***** 1 rh a Council representative. Mrs. Maur"KV FnwdlmdiT of Baltimore, testified on discrimination in employment before the subcommittee on civil rights of the Senate Committee on Labor and Public Welfare, and that the t'nuncil also offered statement! to Congressional and administrative groups on the BrickI er Resolution, the Genocide Convention Housing and the Equal Rights Amendment Of the Council's Community Services, the executive director repoi led that, with the growth of influence of professional community leaders through welfare council-, cn.nmunity chests and Jewish federations, "social service and education projects today usually involve highly technical processes. Whelhcr technically staffed or not. the standards set are generally high and the project is usually exposed to the community's inspection." As a result. Mrs. Elfenbein said, the Council's community service projects in the fields of aging, mental health, recreation and education and health services tend increasingly to be tailor-made to their communities, and to differ from each other. Emphasis is being placed by the national organization on helping to teach local Sections and their chairmen "how to understand and use the community resources; bow to find the best available local people for supervision and for training volunteers: to develop techniques of finding and training volunteers for integration into Council's program; to find means of preserving Council's identity hi the comrrfuniiy. Council Sextsans maintain, co-sponsor or give voluntary service in over 800 community projects. The Board of Directors also voted to climax a program of study of American Jewish Family Life, which Council Sections will begin next fall, at the organization's national biennial convention. 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ly, AP RIL 16. 1954 nemorate Warsaw |to Uprising J 1H h anniversary of the UpIflf the Warsaw Ghetto inhabiI which occurred on Passover ,3 snd lasted for 42 days, 'commemorated by the en > circle Branches 692, Id 1050. their Women's Clubs Wo Y.^Psretz Schools on Cjavvenin.'April2Z:8p.m; y>hifigt" ^vfiWiC ^iai --cript from the jpurce* rtyrology literature has been -Jed for the occasion by Jo%  Dun \ I'articipants in the lg ttii! he Joseph Birnbaum, ]Fi>hman. Chana and Louis i n William Paskoff. J. Dun Lriih.mi \\ hitehouse and Sam iground music of Ghetto [will be supplied by Mrs. LilNelx %  %  ekah Lodge to Meet Lhinc liebekah Lodge No. 9 told its regular meeting on fev. April 20. 8 p.m.. in the in: Hall. 25 Washington ave. ch Unveiling (dedication of a monument to tiemorv of the late Louis I, formerly of 312 Ocean dr., |i Beach, was held Sunday, 11th at 9 a.m. at Mt. Nebo Itery with Kabbi Max Shapiro iting Arrangements were in fc> of Palmer's Miami MonuI Company. GREETINGS jRTHWEST PLUMBING I SUPPLIES PHONE 14-3242 FOR SERVICE 7642 N.W. 17th PLACE NEWELL & FIERCE GENERAL CONTRACTORS Commercial Residential 9 N.W. l-JEUNE ROAD %  HONE 44032 NOME IMPROVEMENT LOAMS AWNING m BUILDING —— }M*r Grcefints fo mil *r friends oni Palrans Delmonico's Restaurant 1 SW. 37th AVENUE Tur Hosts lm on* 1 Al Oclm.nic* PUt] OF FAITHFUl SERVICE TO f PAYERS OF OAOE COUNTY Mhcf Your Dade County PURCHASING AGENT ^'"'om D. t Bill" Joyce %  ""HmWlTY TO THIS "*TANT OFFICE aJJ^Utlcai AdJ Teenagers to View Class Distinction "Are Teenagers Faced With the Problem of Class Distinction?" will be the subject of a discussion on the "Youth Views" radio show over station WIOD Jhis Saturday. Moderator will be Al Freehling. Guests will include, Arthur Jacobs •*, Ara, Miami High School; Charles Srhoot, Hi Y, Coral Gables High School; Mary Ann Patrick, president, Y Teens, Miami High School; and Jack Woodall, Hi Y, Miami Jackson High School, -Jmlstirtrr**^. WANTED • P ?5. L MARK bo !" in Rumania in 1904. He married in Reghin, Rumania, at the age of 41 in the year 1940. His wife, Regina, is 38. They have a son, George, about 4, and lived in Boras, Sweden, until their departure for the United Mates as emigrants in 1952. He is being sought by his cousin ROSALIE DEU'HJJL, BKONNER, of 2556 Overtook rd., Cleveland, Ohio. She was born on Sept. 6. 1927 in Targu-Mures, Rumania. She is the daughter of Hermann and Blanka (Konigstein) Deutel. She formerly resided at 3420 Barclay ave., Montreal, Canada. PAGE 13 A 1 Young Zionists Schedule Oneg Shabbat Friday Mickie Doych, president of the Miami Young Zionist District, announced an Oneg Shabbat at her home, 980 SW 7th st., for Friday, April 16, 8:30 p.m. Rev. Herman Doych will lead a discussion on the Sabbab Haggadol. The district's regular meeting will be held on Tuesday, April 20. 8:30 p.m. at the Bureau of Jewish Education. Harold G. Shapiro will discuss the destruction of the second temple and the Roman Empire. HilUmy Grtttinms fo all Mr frnnit mud Customers BISCAYNE ELECTRIC CO. 609 N.W. 12th AVENUE „ ,„., TeL 2-2351 When Prices are Stable... You can P^a4cf


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PAGE 14 A tbmt&ntwfmarL Saal Named Head Of Miami Zionists Irving Saal, veteran Zionist and Miami community leader, has been elected president of the Miami ZionM District. The District is the oldest df the ten chapters of the Zionist Organization of America in South Florida. Saal, in addition to being vice p-> ident of the Miami Zionist District tor the past three years, is alsc a member of the Southeastern Region Administrative Committee, Zionist Organization of America and has tor the past five years been a member of the Board of Governors of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. He is co-chairman of the IntraCity Shopping Area for this year's Combined Jewish Appeal and is past chairman of the City of Miami Combined Jewish Appeal drive. Saal is also a member of the Board of Directors of the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center and is a former officer and presently an active member of Sholem Lodge, B'nai B'rith. Cther officers who will assist Saal in leading the District for the coming year are: vice presidents, Moses Meyer and Al Quadow; Rabbi Max Shapiro, chairman of the Board; treasurer, Abe Kasow; financial secretary, Mrs. Hymaa Sootin; correspondent secretary. Mrs. Louis Falk; recording secretary, Louis Falk. "Book of Life" is Theme for Hannah Senesch Lunch; Angels, Cherubs Named The "Book of Life" was the | Greenfield, Nettie Lane. Ben Martheme of the Youth Aliyah luncheon held Monday at the Sans Souci Hotel by the Hannah Senesch Group of Hadassah. Donation to the luncheoa was "chai." but Mrs. Jack J. Falk. chairman, recogniied those whose donation was more than $18 and who inscribed additional pages. Those who gave $80 or more were "angels," and those -who gave S25 or more were designated "cherubs." The angels and cherubs each received a plant from Mrs. Falk as Mrs. Morris Alpert called upon 1 them for recognition. A narration Nussbaum, Dennis Quittner IrWaf Seal Ftshions to be Shown At Nephrosh Affair Greater Miami Chapter of the National Nephrosis Foundation will spcEsor a benefit coffee and fash Johns to De interviewed GMJCC Basketeers Hit Parochial Boys. 54-52 Basketball season reached its official end at the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center, Town Branch, this week with a win by the Post-Center IS and under boys over St. John's Parochial School in a close overtime contest, score 5452. Sid Goldstein climbed the seesaw affair for the Center boys by dropping in a winning driving layup shot with seconds remaining. With the basketball season over, after school boys at the GMJCC are organizing their soft ball units for team play to begin next month. by Mrs. Irwin Weihstein and songs by Cantor Abraham Seif, accompanied by Hy Fried, followed. In a brief nuisance. Mrs. Falk singled out for spatial n ut la n Mrs. William Feuar. president of Hannah Senesch* Mrs. Ben B. Wolff, chairman of hospitality, and Mrs. Lillian Atlass, who made the boutonnieres for each guest. Angels for the day ware the Mesdames Eli Berensoa. JackJ. Falk, Morris Falk, William Feuer, David Glosser, Anne Gordon, Irwin quit, David Provus and Anne Van Gelder. Cherubs tor the day were the Mesdames Morris Alpert, Lillian Atlass. Maurice Bennett, Sidney Block, Charles Bushell. Barry Cameron, Sol Cohen, Morris Essman. Charles Gettleman.' George Gillman, Abe Greenberg, Felix Halzband. Paul Jacobs, Isidor Janshaw. Rose Kohl, Maurice Klein, Harry Lieberman, Robert'' Merritt, Jack Muravchick, Henry Nelson. Milton SUSP 0H **C I and PabW^ BALDWIN MortgowCo. BALDWIN Insurance Atj^cy, MO Btocoyn. S*3L ^ : 1 The Mesdames Herman Phillips, Abe Robinson, SamuelRosen, John Serfain. Lewis Serbia. Julius Seligman. Leonard Weinstein. Taicher and Irwin Gable. B'nai B'rith Women to Election of officers will take place at the next meeting of B'nai B'rith Woman of Coral Gabies in the Coral Gables Jewish Canter on Tuesday, 8:30 p.m. KGUlARHOMESatYlQi iUeuiar vt.it. t. „„, he, ^51 *>••#• and mr* •owiontcn MYW000 TEW ERADICATED nriof ronr MITND MraisM Y..r Ou.rM.te • Draw.od .r SubUrrMiun Tnn,: MIAM S4i ate.?*. **. 12-6441 MIAMI IEACH 174| AK* M f 5 3444 ion show at the Seacomber-Surfconcber on Wednesday. April 28, 2 DJBJL Chairman of the affair is Mrs. G oldie Fisher, with Mrs. Anne Green and Mrs. Lila Stein assisting. Theme of the afternoon will be modeling, with fashions by Alix, of Miami, presented by Roberta Morel Guild of Florida. Proceeds are for the work of the local chapter of the foundation toward the establishment of a ward here. Reservations may be made with j Mm. Green at 67-1840. Acting Gov. Charley Johns will be interviewed by Miami Beach City Councilman Harold Turk on the Jewish Variety House Sunday, April 18th. 12 noon, wver station WMBM. Jacob Schachter is director of the program. 36th YEAI CEJWIN CAMPS'! '! Jer.is. N. V. CM. I*| PKOCRCSSIVC. EDUCATIONAL. NON-COMMEHCIAL CAMPS L inj and water sports; aesthetic actit ities: resident doctors and nurses; Sabbath and d)Ctar> lams observed; cultural influences. Id.al Summer Cams. f*r Bays and Oiris. 5 t. IS Botac $420. St*i lot drllriflii t boikltl X A. a. M aaafcaa a, H. l. s.in.,, DU.,I„, HI W. it4 Jr.. HeT.rk 24 • T 7-0211 S A T1 N : I'IK s/ in III INI III m GROUP 2 5 16C To Acnmmtdmf Owr Jtwish Customers SHELL'S "WORID'S LARGEST FOOD STORE" 5941 N.W. 7th AVENUE MIAMI, FLA.



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MV APRIL 16. 1954 Jml*linrw**mn Jam Douglas Gardens to Attend roundbreaking of Ablin Memorial Here PAGE 15 A' ,n,e 1.000 persons jammed the Ids of Douglas Gardens to atA he historic groundbreaking nios Sunday for the Ablin plan lira nWJe*i.* rftme for rs Jack Ablin/. the Wate Jack lin's widow, Mrs. Marvin Schero Donald Owen Ablin, her daughand son, and members of the jin family from Texas and Misri were present for the occaresident Abe Kurman began the ..monies by welcoming members [the Ablin family and paying tribto all who planned and worked the new memorial. He also paid fcute to the cooperation the me has received from the GreatMiami Jewish Federation, Mount ,ai Hospital and other Federation ncies. i. J. Kopelowitz, chairman of Board, spoke qLMM? late Jack plin and stated .WT%#>elled ,gession not refrogis*i0i If he a motto, it was "working—not ping.' On these very grounds ich we were consecreting for the Ablin Memorial, we are today filling Jack Ablin's dream." Baron de Hirsch Meyer, vice jver Gifts hospital coordinators Tessie SolJon and Charles Persell this week bounced that Jewish War Veterk Posts and Auxiliaries of Dade |d Broward Counties have begun eir yearly distribution of PassIcr goodies to all patients at the ntt Veterans Administration Hosjtal. Coral Gables. Each patient eives a bag containing Matzo, earoons, fruit, Passover candy Id a Haggadah. president of the Home and cochairman of the Ablin Memorial campaign, highly praised the work of the Building Committee which is chaired by S. L Bernbaum and WWWed ,th|e,..flrthw^that oiy 5W?R $'3Wi!*8* n J^njediately., He advised the audience that $243, 000 had been raised for the Ablin Memorial and that additional $57,000 were needed in order to com plete and equip the building. Approximately $30,000 were rais ed in a few minutes after de Hirsch Meyer's plea. "It is certain that the balance needed will be pledged to the Home within the next two weeks," he said. Col. Jacob M. Arvey, noted national Democratic leader, Board member of the Home and life time friend of Jack Ablin, presided at the gathering. David Phillips, vice president of the Home, ^presented the Board of Directors in paying tribute to pioneer liUlW* by unveiling a bronze plaq pioneers wi Special tribute was paid to Mrs. Isidor Cohen who founded the Home in 1940. Miami Beach Vice Mayor Harold B. Spaet responded for the pioneers, saying "they saw and appreciated the need long before the community, in general, was aware of its existence. "They were the GI's in Geriatrics. And it is fitting and proper that a permanent memorial be erected to their initiative and foresight." Mrs. Anna Washburne, a wheel chair resident of the Home, spoke for the 60 residents saying, "We, especially those of us who are disabled and incapacitated, had looked forward with longing to the reality of the Ablin Memorial." jueand presenting the mn individual scrolls. II X Jicers of the newly formed Municipal Judges Association of ade County look on as Circuit Judge Pat Cannon (seated) prepares to sign the organization's charter. Standing are (left Jo right) Charles A. Whiteacre, treasurer. Hialeah municipal judge; Sam I. Silver, president. West Miami municipal judge; peorge Hollahan, vice president. South Miami municipal pdge; and Charles J. Bodner, secretary. El Portal mayor and %  nunicipal judge. The association is preparing for its first neeting later in the month. STa^! ^ 0 !" dbreaking ceremonies of the Ablin Memorial at the Jewish Home of the Age* 2122 rL"? \S? V d P ^ illip8, Miami Boach Vice Ma V r Harold SP 06 *' ** %  Isidor Cohen! :.' founder, Daniel M. Broad and Mrs. Benjamin Appel. *•-*(( %  % %  n -* Passover Greetings fo the Jewish Community of Souffc Florida GREATER MIAMI CHAPTER Painting and Decorating Contractors Ass'n. Puufr GreefiMfs to Out Many friesdi KREBS STUDIO OF FURNITURE AND ANTIQUES *• %  • %  SHUT TIL M-4124 — — —— %  —•— %  —^fusovu otnrmcs TO ALL out WMOS AKO cwromts Ann's Snack Shop 115X7 WIST MXK MMWAY Holt Supporter Says Judge Represents Interest of Florida Judge George E. Tolt, senior circuit judge in the 11th Judicial Circuit Court, is a candidate to succeed himself to his Group 1 seat, subject to the Democratic Primary on May 4. The Judge has practiced general civil law in the courts of Florida for 19 years. During that time, Judge Holt served a total of six years, or three successive terms, in the Florida State Legislature at Tallahassee. He has many times served as an associate justice in the Supreme Court of Florida. He will again serve in that capacity this month. "Judge Holt's representation ol the interests of the average Florida citizen has resulted in much good in the enactment of laws beneficial to the people of Dade County and of the state," a supporter said this week. "Among the laws enacted, in which the judge was instrumental in securing passage, were the Old Age Assistance Act, the Unemployment Compensation Act, the Workman's Compensation Act and abolishment of the poll tax." Judge Holt also was instrumental in securing the appointment of the commission which made the recommendations that culminated in the creation of the Everglades National Park, the supporter said. "Judge Holt has consistently concerned himself with the betterment of the public school system, the improvement of University of Florida facilities, those of the Florida State University and of the University of Miami in Coral Gables." The judge has served as Dade chairman for March of Dimes campaigns for three years and one year as Florida State chairman. Judge Holt is now and has for the past ten years been treasurer and director of the Dade County Chapter of the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. The judge has served a total of 13 years as a circuit court judge. He was appointed in 1941, by the then governor and now United States Senator Spessard L. Holland. He became the senior circuit judge of Dade County in 1949. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS hi A\ *J FI A W NOTtCE Wi HEREBY GIVEN that the underpinned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of ROOSEVELT HOSPITAL, at 5642 N B 2nd Avenue, Miami, Pla., Intends to' register said name With the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida. RO )SEVK T HOSPITAL, SANITARH'M, INC., a Florida Corporation. Sole Owner SOMMER. FRANK WESTON Attorney* for Roosevelt Hospital Sanitarium, Inc. l Lincoln Road Bldg. 4-16-23-30 — V7 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undertimes. desiring to engage In business under the firth:lous name of STATE .MORTGAGE COMPANY, at 44 N E. 1st Avs.. intends to register %  aid name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida, cult l ou r iAV „, nuBl> ^ ANowner 4/16-JJ-30 — 5/7 Mrs. Jack Ablin and Col. Jake Arvey study the finished plcfn of the Ablin Memorial, groundbreaking for which took place' %  '" at Douglas Gardens, Jewish Home of the Aged, last Sunday. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thnt Ihe undersigned, desiring to engage 111 business under the fictitious name of DOVER .WTS. at 1120-1130 Drexel Avenue, .Miami Bench, 1 loilda. intend to register said name with the Chirk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, north. LEON GOLDBERG CLARA GOLDBERG 1/16-23-30 — 1/1 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN thai the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of MODERN SANITATION COMPANY, at 460 N.W. Tilth St.. intend to register said name with lite Clerk of the circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. EDWARD Hi;.!. ABRAHAM KAP8QN, owners COUR8HO.N & colltSHo.N Attorneys lor Applicants 215 Lincoln lid.. Miami Be* b 1/16-23-30 I : LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY. No. 168167 TESSIE HI NI'IIY. Plaintiff. vs. WILLIAM JOSEPH DUNPHY, I '--fenilnnt. ORDER OF PUBLICATION TO: WILI.l \M JOSEPH IX'NPHY Residence I'nknown You are hereby ordered and required to serve a copy of your answer lo the Mill of Complaint for Divorce, a OOP) of which Is enclosed herewith, on plaintiff's attorney, and file the original in the office of the clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida, on or heiot c the 14th day of May, IW4. otherwise lite allegations of said bill will be taken as confessed by you. DATED: April IS, IM4 E. 1!. LEATHERMAN, Clerk of the Circuit Court By All, \V. STOCKING, Deputy Clerk SAMUEL .1 RAND Attorney for Plaintiff 10(17 Olympia lluildlug. Miami .12, Fas, 4/1S-23-30 — I 7 NOTICE V PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY. No. IMOSSJ. CHARLES PRAEGER, Plaintiff vs. HELEN'E PRAEGER, Defendant. SUIT FOR DIVORCE You. HELENE PRAEGER, 718 Flushing Avenue, Brooklyn, New York, are hereby notified that a Bill of Complaint for divorce has been filed against you. and you are required to serve a copy of your Answer or pleading to the Hill of Complaint on the plaintiffs attorney. HAROLD SHAPIRO. 927 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach, Florida, and file the original Answer or Pleading In the office of the Clerk of the Circuit conn, on or before the 14th day of May, 1S.">4. If you fall to do so. Judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the Bill of Complaint. DONE AND 0R4PEHED at Miami, Florida, this 13th day of April, isr.4. E B. LEATHERMAN Clerk Circuit Court Dade County. Florida By R. H. RICE. JR (Circuit Court Seal) Deputy Clerk 4/16-2J-30 — 6/7 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR OADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY. No. 168221 GLORIA BROWN ANGELOTTI. Plaintiff. vs. MAURICE L. ANGELOTTI. Defendant. NOTICE BY PUBLICATION TO: SOT. MAI'RICE I. ANGELo:Tl It A 11176220, Co. II, .122 Signal Battalion APO 79. c/o Postmaster New Yotk, New York. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIHD th.it a Hill for Annulment of Marriage has been filed against you in ihe above entitled cause and you are hereby required to serve n cop\ of your Answer to the Rill of Complaint on the Plaintiff's attorneys, an.I file the original In the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before the 17th day of May, IW4, otherwise a de re.' pro confeaso will be entered aa you. '1 his notice shall be published < nrV ach w.ek for four consecutive weeks in THE JEWISH Fl.OItlDIAN. Hated this 14th day of April, 10 K LEATHERMAN. clerk. Circuit Court By: M. R. MURRAY. (Seal) Deputy Clurlc I 'ALLOT. SILVER & MULLOY Attorneys for Plaintiff 701 Congress Building, Miami, Florida 4/16-23-36 — :./7 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THft 11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY. No. 1681*8 VINCENT BECKTOLD, Plaintiff, vs. I IIEUESE MULLER BECKTOLD, Defendant. ORDER OF PUBLICATION TO; THERESE MULLER BECKTOLD c/o Muller 742 Nassau Avenue Brooklyn, New York You are hereby notified that a Bill of Complain) for Divorce has hen fined against you and you are heresy required to serve a copy of your Answer to the Hill of Complaint on Plaintiffs attorney and file the original Answer In the office of the Cterk of the Circuit Court, on or before tBe 17th day of May. 1934: otherwise, tne allegations contained in said Bit! bf Complaint will be taken as confessed against you. Dated this 13th day of AprH, 1954. E. B. LEATHERMAN. Clerk of Circuit Court By: R. H. RICE. JR. (Seal) Deputy Clerk I GEORGE J. TALIANOFF, ESQ. attorney for Plaintiff 420 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, Fta. 4/16-23-30 — 6/7 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business* under the fictitious name of RALEIGH CLEANERS .v l.AI'NDRY, at 204< Blscayne Blvd.. Intend to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. MYER .MATLOFF MARIAN MATLOFF Owners MANUEL LUBEL Attorney for Applicants 623 W. Flutter 8t. t 4/16-tt-l0 — 6/7



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PAGE 16 A • Jen 1stncrkMan FRIDAY, ABU, 1 IS! I i in 1 1 I I We Reserve the Right to Limit Quantities! Shop Where Selection Is Complete Quality High, And Prices Low 11 APPROVED PASSOVER FOODS AT ALL FOOD FAIR and CARLS MARKETS MAR PARV MIAMI MARGARINE All purpose KOSHER—can be used with MILK or MEAT STRICTLY KOSHER AT OUR STORES ON MIAMI BEACH AND S.W. MIAMI HOROWITZ and MARGARETEN MATZOHS C LB. J BOX $1.69 Horowitz and Margareten MATZOHS o z 34c BOX J*tC R O K E A C H BORSCHT QUART 27c ROKEACH SHAV 24 OZ. BOTTLE 27c I 1 ROKEACH PRUNE JUICE 39c QUART ROKEACH GEFELTE FISH NYAFAT PT. LARGE SIZE 59c 69c i FRESH CAUGHT WISCONSIN I *^% A W^ W^fc CLEANED AND GROUND FREE | \^/V JLV-l GROUND FREE LB. | Complete Selection of Fresh Caught Freshwater Fish 29c! I J Manischewitz Matzos 5 L BBOX1 7 5 Manischewitz Matzo Meal „ oz 35c] Streit's Matzos oz. 3 4C Streit's Matzos ,. 5 LB BOX 1 ] Caramel Kosher Chicken Fat 1S0 z. 1. I H & M Matzo Meal f Ferfel or Cake Meal „ z 3 H & M Egg Matzos 12 oz 4 9c] H & M Whole Wheat Matzos i,cJ7| H & M Macaroons is o*89( H & M Egg Noodles or Barley n o,2 ( ROKEACH mM Strawberry or Raspberry Preserves > ** Rokeach Cherry Preserves > 35c| 4i Wm SUPER MMKflS TO SVf FLOMOA iHTM SOUTH MIAM I IM I. Matt M-r. WOT MIAMI IMS I. f4fl H*THIALIAM MIAMI •171 J.W. M (Hi Hw.m A.. i ,7V IT K.W. U4 It. "• Mil N.W. MM U. IT. uuoiP* i! Uttfttf 1 102* WW" %  *"• %  MIM> *;* M9J*!*A* l.w. Mk Am W. M w 4ta. •* A 1> *• *"*•"• 441 HMMk Mi* w f ALMHACH MM A Htm 4M AT.. A • &f •> I7M Mr* IM. CORAL CABltS IM MltKl* Mil* 114 Nat* 4, LM MA aiM hm M UM MIAMI 1IAC H It* A Alt*. BM4 74.S 4 CMm AY*. tit N i mt W •. 7M 41* M. 17*1 AMm 1**4 WORTH MIAMI m M.I. ii$t • lltOI W. Otak> Mr. IMM N.W. m AM. HOttYWOOP MIT Tftat It. lilt i. %  •Ami Mw. HU I. Wi *T. JAMW0J21 IM M. Dtofc % ••• %  iviHA ItACM 17M •••*•• HOMKTjA P. w.^i-t** 1 ** in



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lewrisJUilond&jun FLORIDA FRIDAY. APRIL 16. 1954 SEC. B •ael Turns to Task of lombatting Unemployment PASSOVER \ y NURA LASKY Telegraphic Agency UEMWith the end of season not far off, eonbowing in Israel over the nent problem. For it likely that the 13,000 men in, most of them unskilIre now picking and packpading oranges, can all be [in the economy. At least them, particularly those the Coastal "Iain's "Citrus I be knocking at the doors |bor exchanges, hoping i to day that some sort of be found for them. But nment has little money to relief jobs. It has allonall sum for pre-Passover lease the situation. cally, unemployment figJnot alarming. The Labor |s weckl.. reports fluctuate 3,500 and 18,000—the latabout three percent of labor force. However. 1 many who do not report kchanges daily, and in adhere are those thousands in relief and emergency en to twelve days a month far less than they need their families' most eleI requirements, ployment relief is not paid to those who have no i any funds accumulating (unions are spent for relief 1 For sheer cash relief, it is jemoralizing and might crelor among the population ould be content with dole ither about finding work. the Social Welfare Minributes small sums to famose breadwinners cannot cause of health reasons, Education Ministry prr> arm meal u day to school of the poor for a very fee. But not to all—its fs not big enough for that. ployment firs', reared its I in the summer of 1952, as suit of the government*s onomic Policy" which fo stop the inflation from K further by creating a of internal currency and the issuance of Treasury """ds and the printing ^nt of Israel was | Listed in HIAS Files iSALEM — A four-decade 'in the files of HIAS, the I imm.grant Aid Society, in fork, as to who was the L "*ho accompanied David Fn when he was detained Fican immigration officials few York port in 1915, was T resident Itzhak Ben Zvi r recently received a HIAS, P on m his office. feL President who %  K'bb, Dr. Mordechai Nurok, If the HIAS Board in te w Klementinovsky, HIAS S.K i J ISrael M eMCbem in"" s director in Israel, ZL \ Ursten HIAS PbJj" director in the Sodloi ,h dqUarters in Ne r old the group that it waj accom Pan.ed Mr. Ben-Gurr n they arrived in th UnU IT Turkish documents 7 had fl ed Russia. s H 1ASNewYorkin *>d"H BinGuri !" d Lho v bccn deta ned by C nU j n '915. and that ravened 0 n their be" he HIAS shelter. of more bank notes. It was anticipated that some people would be thrown out of work, and economists thought that a slight manpower surplus might improve work and output standards which were low during the boom days of the State's first four years of existence. Building activity and public works were greatly restricted because unlimited funds were available no longer. Many factories, faced with raw material shortages because there were no longer loans with which to buy them and because of shrinking con sumption in the country since everybody had less money now, laid off some of their workers or closed down, at least several days a week. Suddenly, many of those who till then had always felt sure that they could go on picking the job they wanted, were confronted with nothing to pick from. It was hoped that the manpower surplus would eventually drift into agriculture which has to expand further if Israel wants to grow all the food she eats. This would also have righted a wrong situation, by distributing the'population in conformity with demographic requirement^ for during the years of mass immigration, cities mushroomed beyond" absorption possibilities and terrfMe overcrowding became an unavoidable by-product. In these slums, and in the ma'barot, we now find the bulk of the unemployed, while in the rural areas hundreds of farmsteads are deserted. Naturally, the argument comes from every quarter that so long as there are such empty farmsteads, the authorities—both government and naWon^l institutions — should not waste precious money on nonremunerative emergency works. such as broadening highways or planting forests. But on the other hand, only the fittest should be settled on the land, for farming requires physical strength. And one disappointed ex-farmer returning to the city to line up again outside the labor exchange prevents half a dozen prospective farmers from "taking the plunge." Over 75 nereent of the unemployed have no skills whatever. They are now immigrants, mainly from Oriental countries, who never learned a trade, and many of them cannot even read and write j in any language. Of the remaining | 20 odd percent, more than half are j "semi-skilled," meaning they too j had no trade training and acquired ] some skill while working in a cer! tain job. Altogether, there are few j really skilled workers, and often exchanges search far and wide for good tradesmen in certain professions. The answer to such a situation is, of course, trade training, and this is undertaken on a considerable scale by the Labor Ministry under the auspices and with the guidance of the United Nations and American T. C. A. But creation of a skilled labor force takes time under the best of circumstances, and all the more so if the human material is to a large extent made up of yet unsettled new immigrants | from dozens of countries. And it takes money, of which Israel is so desperately short. Thus, the effects of trade training may not become felt for some time to come. Short-term r e m edies against spreading unemployment — and spread it will while the money shortage continues to make itself felt with growing intensity—are, according to economists and labor leaders, diversion of workers into development projects and as farmhands. Development projects, however, financed out of the special Development Budget which obtains its revenue from counterpart funds of the US Independence and Continued on Pag* 4 B The search for Chomelz before Passover State Federation Delegates of B'nai B'rith Women Attend Buffet Here Mrs. Bernard Hoffman, president of B'nai B'rith Women's Council of South Florida, chaired a buffet supper for delegates of the Florida State Federation of B'nai B'rith Women who held their convention in Miami Beach last weekend. The buffet was held at the home of Mrs. David Alper, 1715 Calais dr., Miami Beach, on Saturday evening. Mrs. Ida Optner, vice president of District No. 5, was chairman of the event, and Miss Edith Simmons was co-chairman. Serving on the receiving line along with Mrs. Hoffman were vice presidents of the Council Mrs. Sidney Suss, Mrs. Gerald P. Soltz and Miss Edyth Fleischer. Mrs. Maurice A. Goldberg, president of B'nai B'rith Women's District Grand Lodge No. 5 of Clarksburg. Maryland, and Mrs. Jack B. Wein, president of the Florida State Federation of B'nai frith Women, were honored guests. KOSHER FOR PASSOVER now -.r: Demand Israel Kosher THE WORLD'S MOST EXCiTiNG FLAVOR You just don't know how good a frankfurter can be until you taste these plump and juicy /SMil beauties. Enjoy the matchless flavor of western corn-fed beef superbly blended with subtle seasonings. Beef, all Beef, choice Beef! FRANKFURTERS • CORNED BEEF SALAMI • BOLOGNA • PASTRAMA Under the supervision of Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky and the Greater Miami Vaad Hakashruth ISRAEL NATIONAL KOSHER SAUSAGE CO., Inc. MIAMI 230 NW 5th STREET phones 3 721 3 4225



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PAGE 2 B > i*~iUifk**0!*n Seek to Check Soviet Veto Power } By BORIS SMOLAR Jewish Telegraphic Agency WASHINGTON NOTES: What Can be done to check Soviet "veto tactics" in the United Nations which may lead to grave development! hi the Arab-Israel issue? This question weighs heavily on the minds of important officials in Washington, and no answer appears in sight There is a good deal of confusion felt in Washington as a result of the Kremlin's policy to increase tension between Israel and the Arab countries by using the veto in the UN Security Council .... It is realized that Moscow attempts deliberately to create chaos in the Middle East in order to strengthen the Communist forces in Egypt and Syria at the present time, when the internal situation in these countries is very shaky And it is also clearly seen that Moscow has aligned itself with the Arab countries in the Communism also has a strong American tourists to live very influe in Syria In the midst cheap* in the£J J ,.els .A of chaos it may be easy for the number J ^ this year and Communist* in Egypt to sete £*. na ccrta £ly compete with power Naturally. Israa* could* ^J""^" hotels in a not ait by idly should a Crmmu> nist or pro-Communist regime take over in Egypt or in Syria Military action by Israel might not be called for, but political action is already necessary ... It is in this light, that some groups in Washington see the possible developments. QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS: Israeli consulates in the United States are receiving inquiries from potential tourists as to whether it is safe to visit the Jewish State with Arab-Israel tension mounting I am being asked to assure Jews in this country that they can safely make their plans to visit Israel without the slightest hesitation The Israeli consulates will be the first to warn American Jews United Nations in order to "pun^g^^ visiting Israel should there ish" Israel for being pro-American This should, logically, lead the Slate Department to give greater sfrength—morally and otherwise— to Israel However, this not the case. The feeling in the State Depart men t is still strongly in favor of appeasing the Arabs The confusion is even greater since the danger of Egypt going Communist is not at all ruled out in Washington The danger is now closer than ever before There is a certain intellectual class in Egypt with outspoken pro-Communist be the slightest danger ... At ores ent no such danger exists and is not foreseen for the future ... On the contrary Israel is feverishly preparing for the tourist season, which starts this month and is expected to last this year way into the end of the summer Last year about 36.000 tourists visited Israel .. They spent about $8,000,000 This year the number of tourists is expected to be even larger This is because the new rate of it possible for loaning" oxchance makes the best American hotels in accommodation as well as in prices. • > • ^wJEWISH MARTYRS: Many books have been published on the Warsaw Ghetto, on the Naii mass murder of Jews there, and on the courageous uprising against the Nazis ... Now the Club of Polish Jews in New York has published an anthology on the Warsaw Ghetto containing selections from more than 800 books, pamphlets and unpublished documents The book—which appeared under the title "Martyrs and Fighters"—gives a vivid picture of the inhuman sufferings of the Jews in Warsaw from the very first day when the German army entered the city until the liberation of the rained city Edited by Philip Friedman, noted Jewish historian, the anthology represents a permanent record of both Nazi barbarism and Jewish heroism The selection of the material for the volume was done in a way which gives the reader a chronological idea of the tortures which the 3.000.000 Jews in Poland suffered under the Nazis Due to the efforts of Maximilian Friede, a former Jewish judge in Warsaw, the volume will find its way into hundreds of libraries in the United States ... An appreciation in the book reveals that the Ami DrHEINZ @ FOODS ARE NOT KOSHER tFOR PASSOVER Our advertising in Jewish publications all year has stressed the (Q) seal of approval of THE UNION OF ORTHODOX JEWISH CONGREGATIONS OF AMERICA, which is on the labels of more than 40 Heinz Varieties. Those Heinz @ Varieties are Kosher... / but only for fifty-one weeks a year. Therefore, to remove any misunderstanding that may exist, > we make our annual statement:... Heinz


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~J*# *W w PAGE3B dinner. Seating has been limited to 350 guests, with a cocktail party at 6:30 p.m. preceding the banquet. Harry Cohen and Al Jacobs, banquet chairmen, have added George Fox, Dave Levinson, Morris Lansburgh and Alfred Stone. 1 3* PRODUCTS nte of Dorsey High School receive prizes from The Jewish Floridian, followinq their pg an essay contest sponsored by the Ad Club of Greater Miami: Leo Mindlin (riqht) n ts checks of $25, $15 and $10, as well as honorable mention certificates to the top five fsts at Dorsey. Bradford Wyckoff deft), Ad Club executive, looks on. Newspapers Lhout Greater Miami distributed prizes in various hig h schools here. Proposes Four Point Program for Dado County Charley Johns this week anhis sponsorship of four easures of interest to resiDade County, jour proposals include elii of state and county taxes timid furniture, automatic | of homestead exemptions, jction or acquisition of a Milding in Miami to house Kate agencies now scattered area in 27 different Iocsml construction of either |iel bridges or tunnels over rr.the Miami River to refcami's acute traffic conjec^rating upon the proposals, aid that he will propose "as linistration bill at the next I of the legislature a bill to for the complete eliminastate and county taxes on ok! furniture. Also at the reI the Dade County tax assesball propose administration pon eliminating the requirei renew Homestead Exemppplications each year," he i is no reason why these re| cannot be made automation year in the same manr t voters' registration is carontinuously without res' proposal that a State of i Building be constructed or I in Miami was, he explaineded to bring all of these land their hundreds of worker a single roof for the convenience and economy of the people of Dade County." Finally, Johns charged that the growth of Miami is being retarded because of critically serious traffic congestion in its vital downtown business area. "One cause is the continued use of old, low-level drawbridges over the Miami River. One of these the SE 2nd ave. bridge, seriously interferes with the flow of traffic over a vital State and Federal highway. "I propose either modern highlevel spans or tunnels to correct this situation, and I shall seek the means of providing State funds and engineering surveys to aid the City of Miami to correct these evils." John Hodiak is Starred In Passover Radio Show The first United Jewish Appeal radio program of the 1954 campaign will be a special Passover preservation to be heard over the ABC network on Tuesday, April 20, from 10:35 to 11 p.m. Entitled. "Beautiful to See," the radio drama stars stage and screen actor John Hodiak and features a special Passover message from UJA general chairman Edward M. M. Warburg. KOSHER FOR PASSOVER For the Sabbath and every occasion when only the best is good enough! R7 itr: no£tf -ico I B MANISCHEWITZ America's Favorit* KOSHER WINE rtniicu AM Mmu IT muta sw CMMNT. IRC ma IUMML. nmn. r. liehtht MstriftetsM NATIONAL WINES. INC. WM BUNK, Pros. Pheoo S473S *0SHIR FOR PASSOVER Adams to Address Hotel Group Banquet An address by Joe H. Adams, Florida State Hotel Commissioner, will be among highlights of the annual banquet of the Miami Beach Hotel Association to be held on Sunday, May 2nd, at the Saxony Hotel. According to MBHA president Saul S. Cohen, Adams will stress pertinent facts concerning local hotel operations and their significance nationally. He will share the spotlight with the three Democratic gubernatorial candidates, Acting Governor Charley Johns, Senator LeRoy Collins and Brailey Odham. Closing date on the new edition of the Buyers' Guide, published each year by the Association, has been set for April 20th. The committee in charge of the publication indicated that the book will be timed for distribution to the dinner guests and should match previous efforts which reached several hundred pages. Former Governor Fuller Warren, who was honored by the Hotel Association for his administration's efforts in behalf of Florida tourism, will act as toastmaster during the {JUNE ^BUTTER vm BIG PASSOVE COFFEE FROM KOSHER FOR PASSOVER B0RDENS Srrlerfy iwacrvlMtf by /rf?h £z& R.bbi $. aathin ••* vl—# 'Car Rebel $. Win.grd ^tl0W ^*T New of your grocer's in the some familiar jar. Magnified croti-tectlont ihow bif difference in instant coffee*. SORDEN'S o I.UIH fil/.rf with mlrrlmvmr tr,itm\i •* —114 c*A*-n mir-flH twit. This difference moons a rldior cup of coftoo ovory lmo-now Border's gives you up to 33% MORI FLAVOR. JEWS! NOW! A coffee so different from all other instants that every spoonful gives you up to... 33% MORE FLAVOR! FLAVOR It what yew went in coffee! And true, wonderfully rich flavor is what yew get in today's Kosher for Passover Sorden's. Completely different ...if$ enfffce any other coffee in the world, instant or ground! Sorden's now, •xclutive Flavor-Control protest keeps all the flavor IN-and all the air OUT —of each tiny crystal of real, 100% pare coffee. Ivory spoonful actually gives VOW wp le 33% %  sore Savor, richer flavor. I Enjoy it black at fleiihio/e mealt or with cream at mikhlg'e mealt — on Passover, the Sabbath and every day. Servet yew money, tea —23< or more compared with every pound of ground ceffeol TASTE ITI COMPARE ITI YOU'LL BE CONVINCED! ITS THE RICHEST INSTANT OF THEM ALL!



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PAGE 4 B +j*>*is*nuitaMi GLOBAL SHORTS Turkish Press Disapproves of Arab Action Against Israel ISTANBUL (JTA) — A large sectic n of the Turkish press has voiced ri:>approval of the Arab countries' pr:icy against Israel and has expressed fear that this campaign frill further put off the prospects of peace and security in the Middle 1 • t. with which Turkey is deeply t r.cerned. Although the Turkish press disapproves of the recent Israeli acts of retaliation, it has 1 id that the Arab states are to blame for the present state of ten sicn which has produced these acts. Friends of the Hebrew I'niversity throughout the country, according to an announcement by Dr. George S. Wise, national president of the organization. The Hebrew Inner sity was inaugurated on April 1. 1925 by Lord Arthur Balfour. whose policy statement on behalf ot the British government had formed the basis for Jewish Palestine. Israel Turns to Task of Routing Unemployment Continued from Paoa 1 B President Names Mew Envoy To Israel; Minister to Iceland WASHINGTON (WNS) — Presi dent Kisenhewer has named Edward B. Lawson. a career diplomat. American Ambassador to Israel a.< I successor to the late Monnet B. Development Bonds and German | D av i.. w ho died in Israel. Mr. LawReparations, are confined mainly, „,„ now Minister to Iceland, has Dr. Goldmann Urges Strong Ties Between Israel, World TEL AVIV (JTA)—The finding (f a solution to the problem of the icture of relations between Israel and world Jewry is most diffi c t for this generation, but every i. lporary measure must be taken -trengthen both sections of the ish people — in Israel and ji v ,road — Dr. Nahum Goldmann, i irman of the World Jewish i on Li:tss, declared at a symposium here arranged by the Israel section t i the World Jewish Congress. Authorities Asked to Curb Paper Insulting Nazi Victims VIENNA (JTA) — The Peoples Party Association of Racial Persecutees. affiliated with the major party in the government coalition, the Catholic Peopled Party, ha> demanded that the authorities take legal action against the newspaper "Salzburger Nachrichten" for insulting the memory of Nazi victims. The newspaper recently opposed plans for the erection of a statue to an "Unknown Inmate of a Concentration Camp." asserting that the average Austrian citizen does not think that the victims of Nazism died "honorable" deaths. Agency Leader Sees Danger In Declining Immigration LONDON (JTA) —The crisis In i "migration is the gravest danger; threatening Israel today, "much; graver" even than the political and <. nqmic difficulties of the State. E iahu Dobkin. member of the Jewish Agency executive, declared I ere at the closing session of the 53rd annual conference of the BritZionist Federation. Mr. Dobkin si essed that the further consoliinn of Israel, in fact its very ex.-"ence. "depends on the renewal ci immigration." Orthodox Conference Proclaims Support of Israel NEW YORK I JTA i —A me %  support to the "brave defenders the borders of Israel" who are standing guard against the threat I possible attack from the Arab tee was sent here by more than : uO delegates attending the closi.-g session of the First National -Terence of Religious Jewry for Israel The conference was called '; the Mizrachi and Hapoel Mizr. hi organizations of America in c njunction with a number of other Orthodox groups. Dutch Queen Lends Art Objects for Jewish Exhibit THE HAC.l'E (WNS) Queen Juliana and Princess Wilhelmina loaned objects of their private art collection to an exhibit of Jewish re ligious ornaments in the city of Deventer. it was disclosed here this week. The Amsterdam Museum similarly cooperated with a number of paintings by outstanding Jewish artists. Physician Gets Tel Aviv Prize for Medical Research TF.L AVT Zondek. wo cologist ha> municipality for medical pound award %  WUTA rWf:<:: .sftei y Hem \)—Prof. Bernard amous Israeli gyneived the Tel Aviv enrietta Szold prize research. The 500 was made for Prof. Zondek's research over the past 30 years. Anti-Semites Angling for Respectable' Elements NEW YORK (WNS)—Many antiSemites have "abandoned their former brash and obvious tactics and ;:re aiming instead" to win the ,-_pport of respectable elements rather than the lunatic fringe "they SO highly prized and wooed in Christian Front days." the American Jewish Committee this week cautioned in a brochure made public by its president Irving M. Er.gle. German Professor Impressed With Jewish State FRANKFORT (JTA) — Prof. Franz Boehm. former head of the German team which with an Israeli group negotiated the German-Israel reparations pact, returning here from a three week visit to Israel, gave a glowing account of his experiences in the Jewish State. Deeply impressed with what he had seen of the building, industrial and agricultural developments of the Jewish State. Prof. Boehm declared that what Israel "mainly needs" is another 1.000.000 immigrants. to areas where there are no accumulations of unemployed, such as the Negev. Thus, it would mean moving people nway from their present homes, and for that many are not yet ready. Since many kibbutzim (communal settlements) are no longer able to hire farmhands—again because of credit restrictions—the government, national institutions and big marketing concerns have made a beginning to establish large estates, mainly for the cultivation of Industrial crops, and to work them with hired labor. This method of expanding the agricultural area, which has been recommended repeatedly by visiting experts (among them Professor Eli Ginzberg of Columbia University, whose report has just been published) brings two benefits: it absorbs unemployed and it may instil in them a love of the soil and draw them awav from the exchanges. The Agriculture Ministry is cooperating in this scheme with funds and advice. In addition, as unemployment deepens, some of the more sensi ble among the unemployed are beginning to change their minds and ioin the "city to farm movement." Several hundred families moved to the land during the past couple of months or so, and many more are registering daily. For the time being, that apd trade training seem the only possibilities to reduce the ranks of those begging for work. Both are constructive and should solve the problem in the months and years to come. been recalled to take over the new post. The nomination of'Mr. Law -on. who.has been in the foreign Service since 1980. is subject to Senate confirmation. Dr. Narot ipeaks in Alabama Dr. Joseph Narot. spiritual leader of Temple Israel, was principal speaker at a state-wide convention of Alabama Reform Synagogues Sunday. April 11th, in Montgomery, it was announced by Myer O. Sigal. of Macon. Georgia, president of the Southeast Council of the L'nion of American Hebrew Congregations, which is sponsoring the conference. Dr. Narot's address was "Newer Trends in Reform Judaism." M Hebrew a Ml k hr Greeting SalesmtJ to take line regular line. WrfoiJ HEBREW niBUsifeJ 79 Delancey St. SUNMfi HEALTH RE Mom-win FOUCTH -MIAMI; t*£ v \jGUST BROS fcv" I f hi Hi \I A MOST-fWPY PASSOVER Spolter Electrical Supplies, Inc. Lighting Fixtures 6700 PHONrS fy. 7*4 Aonuo S 7-4596 and 7-6519 Jewish Congress Condemns Iraqi Detention of Israelis NEW YORK (WNS)—The Iraqi vernment's illegal detention of i-.ree Israeli citizens was denounced here this week by the World ewish Congress as "a flagrant violation of the accepted international | ractice of civilized nations and an affront to the conscience of the international c o m m unity." The cr.arge was made here at a press conference by Dr. Maurice L. Perlzweig, director of the World Jewish Congress International Affairs Department and its consultant to the United Nations Economic and Social Council. Veterans Criticize Official for Anti-Jewish Sentiments BONN (JTA)—The German Association of Wounded War Veterans and Dependents sharply criticized anti-Semitic remarks by a Major Ewert. a leading official of the Union of German Soldiers, another veterans group, who attacked the German Supreme Court at Kar* ruhe for having several Jews or half-Jews among its 10 justices. The Association of Wounded Veterans, with a total membership of 1.500. 000. is the only German veterans group which opposes the neo-Nazi and militaristic outlook of the other veterans groups in this country. See or Phont Me NAT GANS 3 4618 — 4 9981 LIFE INSURANCE NEEDS Metropolitan Life I no. Co. •07 Biacayna Bldg. It W. Flagier St. THE ENTIRE COMMUNITY PROGRAM of "•Jewish I or ii in On The Air" EVERY SUNDAY 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Station: WMIE (1140 on dial) With Various Feofurei Produced and Directed far Fete Hebrew University's Entry into Thirtieth Year NEW YORK (WNS)—The begincing of the 30th year of the HebrewUniversity of Jerusalem. Israel's ( nly university, was ce'ebrated tin-; week by chapters of the American B'irai B'rith Mokes Awards NEW YORK — Robert Moses. Gotham's expert on New York traffic and municipal problems. Al Rosen, third baseman of the Cleveland Indians, and Robert K. Christenberry, chairman of the New York State Athletic Commission, are among the personalities who received the B'nai B'rith Sports Lodge No. 1840 annual awards for! outstanding achievement. The pres%  entation was made recently at the | annual dinner of B'nai B'rith Sports Lodge No. 1840 in the Hotel Astor here. KOSHER FOR PASSQyfr nun uw.s TASTI-DIET LOW CALORIE FOODS AM Tatti-Diol Foodi shown or litttd htr Or* certified Kotlitr for f mio.ir by l.bb, j. H. (.albas 7wn TILLIE LEWIS, America's first woman in Foodi. Her Orthtdox background in a Brooklyn home gave her A**f understanding of Josssh dietary needs. TlU f .tr\/C TASTI-DIET >fOv ENJOY WEET FRUI1 ND JELLIES. and loso pounds right through t* TASTI-DIET FRUITS AaricoM Kedere fioi lortl.ii Pcara Dork Swoot OWriei Ya*ow Cling Ftaclwt Ytllew Freetteat PoeckH TASTI-DIET TASTI-DIET JELLIES Atp-arUfht AagrioJoaV G..,. J.My TASTI-DIET "SWEETNIN" MAMAIET ANN ana KWIK CHEK STORES FOOD PAN CAMS MARKETS STORES MIAMI RETAIL GROCERS STORES TANNER and B-THRIFTY STORES FREDERICK'S MARKET SHELL'S SUPER STORE STEVENS MARKET and ot year favorite food start Directors and Staff MERCANTIIJ] NATIONAL BANK MIAMI BEACH Extern! Cordial PASSOViK CrTlfT/rVG* SIMOH SEIDEN S03 S.W. 17ra A... •2-S4I0! A. L. MAILMAN Chairman of the Board SHEPAROBKO* Presi** 1 % 



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pf ion of Cotte* Trade ecpaniize US. Markits ORLEANS-Disruption of tain American coffee trade L reduced US buying would L\ie an American market for Khan three billion worth of good.one of the nations [and Broth****. New OrIaddressing Lions International „ut that if North Ameri drink less coffee, South leans will be unable to buy Xachincry, automobiles and [items in an annual $3,477,) shopping list. | ee is the chief export and %  pal money crop of Brazil, hbia, El Salvador, Guate[Haili. Nicaragua and Costa lie said. It is also high on the Iy crop list" of Venezuela, |or. Honduras and the Dominitpublic. he added. L curtailment of our buying free from our neighbor nations only mean a reduction of %  buying from us. It might also 1 that some of the slack would ken up by European countries X ire have helped with dollars I the end of World War II. The 1 price ol coffee in West Ger. for example, is $2.70 per H," he said, "and West Gerii itepping up its purchases." jto Attend Student ler at Beth David lh David Religious School conId its annual students' model in preparation for Passover bnday morning. ne 700 students of the Hebrew I Sunday School participated ^e ceremony. Portions of the adah were read and chanted. rangements were under the vision of Mrs. Louis Hartz and nittee. bee Fetter, Martin Bialow, Jerbevin, Ellen Bolker, Sandra bidell and Susan Schwartzman acted the Seder under the dibit of Jerome B. Gordon. IvHUtnHjrlfUn, PAGE S B IMl BEACH I Lincoln Rd. Hi. 5-3112 n SUIFSIOI 9473 Hording Av. Ph. 1*4171 twte CUSTOM JAILOKIHC 1104 LINCOLN ROAD Miami Beach 473 HARDING AVENUE Surfside HABERDASHERY pOffc rear on Miami loach r\i> A Listen To SCHACHTER'S fw Yiddish Proaram ^rHrll Y ', WM8M "hlMl %  £** lWlH M4IMCO .'"• Jiwiih >t -"irihn BLYONS. New. TURK, COBMII,,^, MMJ W **U SMCTOt ^^ZXl^onp^t:^ 5 IerrY LmdZOn Qnd "• R Fo e8 'Nooh WWTVL Parrish is Chairman Ol Horton Campaign Miami attorney G. David Parrish has been named chairman of Mallory H. Horton's campaign for circuit court judge, Group five, it was revealed this week. The newly appointed chairman is a graduate of the University of Florida. Horton is making his first bid for elected office in the current race. A former special agent for the FBI, he has served as assistant state attorney general in Miami. The 40-year-old candidate is a native Floridian and has lived in Dade County since 1926. He is a graduate of the University of Miami law school. Article by Mrs. Brown Appears in UAHC Organ An article by Mrs. A. L. Brown, author and chairman of interfaith activities for Temple Emanuel, of Ft. Lauderdale. appears in the current issue of the magazine, "American Judaism." Mrs. Brown is one of eight contributors to a literary symposium on the subject, "Mommy, Why Do I Have to Be Good?" Formulating a reply to this question which parI ents might use, Mrs. Brown writes, "When you are good you get a i warm glow inside ... A person i who is good or does good (the two are the same) gets a kind and j friendly expression on his face. j The person who doesn't gets to %  look mean. What kind of a face do you want to have?" Author of the book, "Cavewoman to Clubwoman," Mrs. Brown is a frequent contributor to literary periodicals. The magazine, "American Judaism," published in New York City, is the official national organ of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, parent body of the 500 Reform Jewish Temples in the United States. GORDON ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORKS 414 S.W. 22nd AVE. Ph. 4-5860 Have your roof repaired now; you will save on a new roof later "Satisfactory Work by Experienced Men" BIRDS EYE For tastier Passover meals, puff these delicious Birds Eye Kosher and Parve juices, fruits and vegetables on your shopping listfinest quality and value! FROSTED FOODS KOSHER ,.. PASSOVER |RP# CONCENTRATED ORANGE JUICE -"! CONCENTRATED LEMONADE Strictly supervied by RABBI J. H. RAIBAG ALL QUICK-FROZEN FRUITS Strictly jupervited by RABBI AARON L. ARAK MOOUCTS OF GENERAL FOODS I Judge of Stature Re-eJecf Judge George E. HOLT Nineteen Continuous Years Public Service • Law Maker • Six Years a Legislator • Tried • Thirteen Years a Circuit Court Judge • Experienced • Associate Justice Florida Supreme Court • Proven • Law Professor Civic Leader Lawyer Benefactor Retain George E. HOLT CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE GROUP 1


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PAGE 6B ^JmisJinorHmuj Miami Beach Schedules Music Week Observance; Ruth Brotman is Chairman Miss Ruth Brotman. lyric coloratura soprano and founder of the Miami Beach Music and Arts League, has been named chairman of the Miami Beach observance of National Music Week slated May 1 9. The event will be observed in over 400 cities throughout the UnitMay 6, 8:30 p.m., the Thomas Armour Ballet will be presented at a •'Ballet and Drama" night in Flamingo Park, together with Eve Tellegen and Pat Bromber'g. May 7, 8 p.m.. Al Lesser will chair a program, "Around the World with Film and Song." at Flamingo Park; May 8. 8 p.m ed States. President Dwight Eisenprogram arranged by Mia H rot man hower is national chairman. All programs and concerts to be held in connection wilh the festival here are being arranged by Miss Brotman for the third successive year. The following is the schedule of free events: April 30. 6:45 p.m.. Paul Bruun interviews Miss Brotman over station WKAT; May 1. 3 p.m. Noah Tyler acts as moderator in a program entitled "Unity Through Music" over television station WTVJ. with the Histradrut Chorale featured: May 2. 8:30 p.m.. Flamingo Park. National Music Week ofcially is launched, with Mayor Harold Shapiro acting as toastmaster and the Miami Beach Civic Orchestra under conductor Laurence Trembly accompanying Arnold Simms, soloist. May 3. 8:30 p.m.. at Greenfield Hall at 180 Palm Island. Ruth Greenfield and Leonard Kellar will act as chairman at a "Composers' Night."with Dr. David Prensky, moderator: May 4. 7 p.m.. Margaret Vomen will direct a "Youth Program." with children's choirs, students and instrumental ensembles at Flamingo Park; May 5. 8:30 p.m. Mrs. Albert Pick and Bruun will act as moderators in a "Stars of Tomorrow" program at the Community Center. 2100 Washington ave.: and Anita Karns at Pier Park, with Mayor Abe Aronovitz. of the CitJ of Miami, acting as moderator, presenting an "All Nationality" arrangement, featuring folk tonfl and dances in national costumes by over 12 nationalities; May 9. 8:30 p.m., the University of Miami Symphony Orchestra, with John Bitter conducting and Eugene DuBois as soloist, at the Miami Beach Auditorium. Other radio features will include May 3. 9:30 p.m.. "Progress of Music in Miami Beach." with Mrs. Marie Volpe. Robert Duff. John Coleman. Mrs. George Pawley. Joe Mooney and Miss Brotman over station WKAT: May 8. 4:30 pm.| "Promising Talents over WGBS; and May 8. 11:45 a.m.. "Stars of Tomorrow." over WMIE. R. H. Liberman (right) installs "M Day" sign at Beth David Congregation as volunteer workers Jack Regal, Samuel Shaub and Benjamin Maun stand by ready for their assignments. Stephen S. Wi* r^f 1 dwwhwnib,*,^ •• Sam* for ^£ the MonteCrioHowS J"y. April 22nd, ip^"' Dirr Sauso^' Famoui Din Wi^l nd Siu^ A Your FMorih I "77N.W.8UtSj PHONE 78-05)1 Group Show on in Grove Group show and guest arti-t exhibition now at the Mirell Gallery. 18 Anthony arcade. Coconut Grove, I includes paintings by Ulman. Johnson. Harri. Sammarteno. Summer-' all and Fisher. The show is scheduled to run the entire month of April and "runs the gamut of expression in today's art through realism, expressionism and abstraction" according to Edmund O. Weyhe. director. North Shore Sisterhood To Hold Donor Lunch The Sisterhood of North Shore Jewish tVnter will hold its annual donor luncheon on April 27th at the Hotel Algiers, Mrs. Louis Cohen, president of the organization, announced. Chairman of the function, which i M heduled for 12:30 p.m., is Mrs. Shirley Altman. Assisting her are the Mcsdames Faye Rosenthal, Gus Solomon, Dorothy Sklar, Josephine Romer and Joanne Slansky. Over 100 women are expected to attend the affair. Included on the entertainment roster are Buddy Walker and Mai Malkin and his orchestra. .4 II.4PPV PASSOVER D L B R O W S CAFETERIAS IN MIAMI BEACH 330 Lincoln Road IN BROOKLYN Utica Avenue at Eastern Parkway Kings Highway at 17th Street IN MANHATTAN 7th Avenue at 38th Street III I All. SHOP Washington Ave. & Lincoln ltd. uganne NOW Tea Oea DHsk All The lea* TM Xmm Want wrmorT Gaining A Start* OiKfc DOCTORS RECOMMEND SUGARINE DIABCTICS. OVERWEIGHTS AND LOW CALORIE DIETS VSare u.rmlni I Guaranteed Non-Fattdning — at— tto iaM o — attar n M a l-Oz. Size Bottle..Only 75o AVAILABLE AT YOUR LOCAL FOOD STOK1 NO BETTER VALUE w NEW YORK! PALMER'S MIAMI MVmii's On* And Only JEWISH MONUMENT BUILDERS Large Stock On Hand For Immediate Delivery! MONUMENT CO. Serving the Jewish Community Since 1926 Exclusive Dealers ROCK of AGES MEMORIALS 3T77-/S S.W. 0th Straw fboam e-eeiU SAVI Tt*. SAVI MONEY. Vawtt .*lay yew >tay in-Maw York %  <>.. ... yen tie* ai in* Irieaaty •retie'eat Hotel. Only on* block l.oTime* Sqwere ond Madison Severe Gereaa. A tew annul*! walk te todlo City ond elfcoe 'eatevi ottroctieat. 400 oihoc live roomi, eoca ~.* pr,.01. OoNN tkl radio. (Talevitlea ovoilobl* en raqueil.) Aa*l bed ei oll-aederol* rot*i: from $4 "ingle—$6 double Garage Accommedolion* Write tor FEE descriptive booklet arid "Special Courtesy Card" Joseph Lerinli, Managing Director ion* J. Finnell, Monogar Horn <&** President ITH ST, WEST OF MOADWAY AV'.GUST BROS Rw i QUALIFIED TO SERVE as Circuit Jeooe by 12 Years' Experience in All Courts, end few Extensive Service ia Social Work and Crime Prevention. few Can Vote far Hr Wherever YM live ia Daii County! :Li ANNA BRENNER A an CIRCUIT COURI_JUDGE GROUP (I'd. rolltl.al Arlv ) V^A^^V*^^^^^^^^^^^^^* ''WWW AVAILABLE AT ALL LEADING MARITTS Clicquot Club KOSHER FOR PASSOVER GINGER ALE AND SPARKLING WATEI in full 32 ounce quails KOSHER FOR n Under the uperruioJ-] RABBI MOSES MESCHELOFF of Conaregation Bath Miami Beach nos? 11M tettreW ami a*frilefay SOUTHB BEVERAG • INC. PHONE 64-7633 "•'^''V^w^V^V^V'V^^VV'VV



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16.1954 *Jmuiin*M+ aM • PAGE 71 man Rights Supported ORK (JTA) The Co|Board of Jewish Org.nL a meeting held here [jorf Astoria Hotel, unanwided to support the Uviduals a nd organizaLion the United Nations Reservation" on matters human rights, without their grievances beir national governardinating Board, which Illative status with the lions, is composed of repL s of B'nai B'rith, Board L „f British Jews and tican Board of Jewish [Leaders of the three or\ as well as leaders of Lmunities in Latin AmEcipated in the meeting. L issued after the meetI iljp M. Klutznik. B'nai lonal president, said that Vg has also given attention to questions involved in UN Charter revision. "Our views on that subject will be made known from time to time," the statement said. "But we were unanimous in the conclusion that the United Nations must be .supported as the best available instrumentality for achieving peace and human understanding in the world. In this connection, we look with extreme disfavor on the position taken by some to utilize the discussion of charter revision as a means of annihilating the United Nations Organization." Two proposals introduced in the United Nations Human Rights Commission which would have given individuals and organizations the right to petition the UN on violations of human rights, were withdrawn this weekend by their sponsors. One proposal was submitted by France and the other was presented jointly by Chile, Egypt, the Philippines and Uruguay. The proposals met with strong opposition in the commission. DeMolay Are Hosts Order of the DeMolay, Hibiscus Chapter, Miami Beach, were hosts to the Fort Meyers Chapter on Friday night at Hibiscus Lodge, when a degree was conferred on out-oftown guests, it was announced here by Leo Meyer, chairman of the Advisory Board. Twenty-five members of the Ft. Meyers Chapter participated. Mothers' Circle of the local chapter, of which Mrs. Abraham Berman is president, were hostesses at a reception and buffet supper following. II %  UtfSi/ j The Farr Family EXTENDS PASSOVER GREETINGS TO THE ENTIRE JEWISH COMMUNITY and particularly to those who during the past year have given so generously of their time and service to the many, many worthwhile charitable and philanthropic causes sponsored by the splendid organizations in this area and to these community organizations Farr Tours wishes to express its appreciation for the opportunity to be of service in various ways whenever called upon. Farr Tours and Travel Service 2315 Collins Avenue Phone 5-5327 6638 Collins Avenue Phone 86-1472 PASSOVER CKttTINGS FLOWERS INC. 451 HIAIEAH DRIVE, ESSEX VILLAGE, HIALEAH Corsages and Cut flowers for All Occasions Mrs. lila B. Beck, Mgr. Tel. 88-2717 rs her, Greater Miami chairman of the St ate of Israel Bond Organization, is shown ex| the new Development Issue at a luncheon of community leaders m the BiscOyne [Hotel. Left to right at the head table are Mrs. Louis Glasser. Sher. Manfred L. Minzer, nager, Joe Cherner and Carl Weinkle. Mrs. Glasser and Cherner are members of the pi Governors. %  y friends ant Patrons PmtoMtr Orootinmt rtS BACK at the Bokery 624 N.E. 79th Street | SPECIALIZING IN CORN, tYI AMD PtNBWtNICKlE HEAD CAKES AND PASTRIES FOB TIM HOLIDAYS GREETINGS FOR THE PASSOVER TO OUR MANY FRIENDS AND PATRONS Commercial Oil Corporation J. A. Moore FOR SERVICE CALL 7-2169 IN.W. 7th AVE. MIAMI. FLORIDA — ...... .. %  GREETINGS Commercial Refrigeration and Soda Fountain Repairs -1 u Sandman Refrigeration Phone 64-3411 H Our Mffifry Pair* IS • %  • Frie4i CALL FOR i Gadcm.fbp' TagtegBc ~=A 10 Hi ... SiKTJWSS MAGIC CITY SHADE & DRAPERY CORPORATION nt HJ. *7t mm PHONE 7-4S3B O <•••.•"" • VISIT ONE TODAY IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD A HIPPY Pewem Te AN Oer Fries* eerf Pentes TWIN-CITY TRANSIT CO., INC. 525 ALTON MAD MIAMI BEACH PHONE 58-2292 I. I. tomot, Pros. A Hmppr Pmstomr To All Our friomds ••* Patrons BISCAYNE TERRACE DRUG STORE 340 BISCAYNE BOULEVABD MIAMI PHONE 999B7 Mr.—d Air., lee* Xrk* Mr. oW *•'• Are* M wil *— aerf SM, Mltkmol Afaa DADE FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI Extends 1 GREETINGS to the JEWISH COMMUNITY of SOUTH FLORIDA on the PASSOVER HOLIDAYS IUSWESS MOUUSt 9 AM to 3 PM W**Moyi, 9 AM to 12 Noon Soturdoy* ...and, our Broneh Offk* or* ooon *och Mdoy *v*nina until PM %  %  '",,, AUapattoh Branch Main Offie* Tomtoml Broneh 11400 N.W. 36Hi Shot 45 N.E. Pint Avon** 1901 S.W. 6th Sir*** Dade Federal JOSEPH M, UPTOM, r*iid.nt Our Resources Exceed 53 Million Dollars OUR RESERVES EXCEfD 3V4 MILLION DOLLARS



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PAGE 8 B Jewish****** Passover Saturday Evening he Holiday of Passover during evening servic tborn, "Tannot B'Chorim." was observed on T the conclusion of a Tahnudic Tractate, following -.= --. — £ rnds of Jews here, as well as throughout the nation and the world, will gather tor the rum ^S^^'viSZ Z&lZSZi ^ on Saturday. Earlier the Fa* of tb ""lursday morning. April Iotn, n the early morning services. Ten in the Holiday of Passover during evening services on aaruraay. ~ F.-stborn. "Tannot B'Chorim." was obse.ved on Thursday mornmg Apnl 15th with a Sayum. Seder at the conclusion of Saturday evening services. HEBREW ACADEMY will hold Jriday evening services at 6:25 p -n. Saturday morning services are scheduled for 7 a.m. Mincha \. ill be at 6:15 p.m. Sunday morning services are scheduled for 9 a -n. Rabbi Alexander Gross will ings at 10:30 a.m. A eongregation-, From 445 al Seder will be held Saturday eve-' B "--,0 *• ning at 6:30 p.m. • • • KNISITH ISRAEL CONGREGATION will hold Friday evening services at 5:45 p.m. Saturday morning services are at 7 a.m. Louis Dublin will conduct a class in Talmud from 2 until 4:45 p.m. Cooper "win"""'**-1 %  !WV and Momu, ^ 830 a.m. CaMw W'U oflldate "•W trading *>nm in tbt Social' evening serrie. ices at 5 p.m. Rabbi Moses Meschevening services at 6:30 p.m. Sateloff will officiate and preach on \ urday morning services are at | the topic: The Eve of Passover.", a.m. Passover will be ushered In Evening services will continue on Saturday evening at 7 p.m. Sunthrough 6:15 p.m. Saturday morn-; day morning services are at 8:30 ing services are at 8:30 a.m. Junior, a.m.. when Rabbi Simon April will ,*WW>WWWWWWWVi ;.! 7:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. • • • DOWNTOWN SYNAGOGUE will celebrate the first day of Passer on Saturday evening at 7:15 p.m.. with its first public Seder. Rabbi Arie Becker will officiate. :. -isted by C. Perl and E. Siegel JI Alexander uross vwu ing services die %  < o.w %  • — —— ..reach on the subject: "What Shall congregation will meet at 9 a.m. officiate and preach on^tatopw. v.e Answer Our Children?" Minunder the direction of Benjamin "Fruit of Our Struggle On Sunc>-a will be at 6:15 p.m. "PassoverKaminetzky. Kiddush will be serv day morning, the Rabbi will dis^ % %  lidav of Faith." will be the subl e d by the Sisterhood with Mrs cuss: "Do You Believe in Mir ieet of a sermon bv Rabbi Gross | Abraham Bergman and Mrs. Aaron arles'" Evening services will be %  during services on Monday mornWeingarten acting as hostesses, at 6:30 p.m. Cantor Berate Kele ( ing at 9 a.m. Mincha will be at ', Passover will be ushered in at 7 mer will render the musical por0 20 p.m. Daily services are held p.m. on Saturday evening, with tions of the liturgy. Cantor Aaron Weingarten chanting < • • the traditional service Rabbi Mesj WEST MIAMI JEWISH CENTER cheloff will discuss: "Half Slave wl) | no | d p r j(j a y evening services and Half Free" during Sunday |( 6: 5 p m Saturday morning morning services. On Monday sprv j ccs are at 8:30 a.m. Passover morning, the Rabbi will preach on wjll ^ usne red in on Saturday the topic: "Today's Children." evcnmg at 6:45 p.m. Sunday mornSunday and Monday morning senjng serv i ce s are at 9 a.m. Rabbi service! are" at '^ are at 8:30 am with Sunday AIfrcd Wa xman will discuss: "Pre30 a!m. Rabbi Becker will chant evening aarvlCM scheduled for 6:15 ^ cious Freodom •• Evening services liturgy and preach on the top-j P m # are scheduled for 6:30 p.m. AnThe Fifth Son and the Fifth I nual communal Seder will be held 1> Evening services are at 7! ANSHE EMES CONGREGATION on Sunday evening at 8 p.m. n m.. with the second public Seder' will hold Passover services Friday • • • I. wing at 7:30 "The Voice of evening at 6:45 p.m. Saturday and ; TIFERETH ISRAEL NORTHJerusalem," is the subject of a' Sunday morning service* are at SIDE CENTER will hold Fridav sermon to be delivered by the Rab8:45 am Rabbi Abraham Sachs evening services at 6:30 p.m., with hi during Monday morning sen-J will officiate and preach on the Rabbi Louis Cassel officiating. Canat 8:30 am. j topic: "Passover Sacrifice' Eve-1 for Mbert G i ant2 win ren der the ning sen ices are at 6:45 p.m. on musical portions of the liturgy. NORTH DADE JEWISH CENSaturday On Monday morning at Saturday morning services will be TER will hold Friday evening sen8:45 am. Rabbi Sachs will discuss: at 9 a m At 6:3o p m p ass0V er ices at 8:15 p.m.. with Rabbi Henry "Freedom of the Past and Future." W JH be ushered in. Sunday and icolica officiating. Men's Club Mondav morning services are at 9 ill assist. President Andrew! NORTH SHORE JEWISH CENa m Evening services will be at hwartz will preside. Combined TER will hold Friday evening sen-, 630 p.m. Rabbi Cassel will deunder the direction of Lu-. ict s at 8:15 p m.. with Rabbi Mayea ij ver the sermons. Ie Moore, will assist Cantor! Abramowitz officiating and preach; • • • aurice Neu in rendering the mujng on the irmon: "Th-Ota* TEMPLE EMANU EL wi „ hold Ml portions of the liturgy The Da> of the Lord Cantor Edward F jd ev ninl! vr .. iee a nH Shabbat following will be unKlein will render the musical por!" > „T^C^t sinker will be ,r the sponsorship of the Men's turns of the liturgy, assisted by %  1 ub. Pre-Passover services are on the Center Choir under the direc; iday morning at 8:30 a.m. Saturturn f A. Louis Mechlowitz. Saty morning services will be at 9 urday morning sen-ices are at 8:45 a.m., with Passover formally u-h ;i m %  "hen the Rabbi will discus. i ed in at 7 p.m. Sunday morning "The Fullness of Judaism. Lee. services will be at 9 am., with ">•> Of Mr and Mrs. Lee Howard, children of the Sunday School parw 'i" become Bar Mitzvah during win1 1 ipa.ing Annual PaMOVtr Seder the service. Paaaover will be ush1 :11 be obscned as I community ere d n n Saturday evening at 6:45 nction on Sunday evening at 6:30 P m Sunday morning senices are m. Rabbi Okolica will officiate at 8:45 a.m.. when "C hildren Need onday morning services are at 9 an Anuer will IKHahbi Abrama m.. when the Rabbi will discust ""'""' aermon. Evening seniciare reedom Quest I at 6:45 p.m. Honda) morning, at : 8:45 a.m. Rabbi Abramowitz will i'" Sa,urd > *v""* p.m. TEMPLE SIN A. of Hollywood I d — "** Dare Not Delay." ~ !" %  at 9 BETH DAV.D SYNAGOGUE will hold Friday evening services at 6 p.m. Saturday morning services are at 9 am. Rabbi Max Shapiro and Cantor Maurice Mamches will officiate, with the Rabbi discussing cut Try a Delicious HONEY BREAD anV HONEY Made from rye flour and honey without the use of fat. sugar or syrup. Calorie count of 58 per usual slice. Salt-free variety recommended for low-sodium die* Ofstriawftd y C0CHRAN DISTRIBUTING CO., 161 N.E. 30th .s school, honoring Shabbat Hag I lol. will present a cantata. "What i Torah?" Rabbi David Shapiro ill officiate. Cantor Joseph W. ":alek and the Temple Choir under '.'ie direction of Rev. Mordechai haalman will render the musical portions of the liturgy. The Oneg I nabbat following will be sponsortd by Mr. and Mrs. Louis Kravetz : nd Dr and Mrs. Norman N Wru el. Saturday morning senices an at 9 a.m. Rabbi Shapiro will :>reach on the Weekly Portion. Passover services will be on SatI rday evening at 6 p.m. Sunday a.m. Evening services will be at 6:45 p.m. Monday senices are also at 9 a.m. Rabbi Lehrman will preach at both Festival senices. • • • TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM will will hold Friday evening services the Weekly Portion Passover will' at 8:15 P m Rabbi Leon Kronish be ushered in on Saturday evening wi off 'ciate and preach on the at 6:45 p.m. Sunday and Monday opic: Wna t Pride Idealism?" morning senices are at 9 a.m. Rab-! Th,s ls ,he third h a series of serbi Shapiros central theme for the' mons nn "t'nsung Heroes of Our bnlMa* I.-\ re We Free Men? .. Time." Saturday morning services holiday is: During the Sunday morning servTime." are at 10:45 a.m.. when the Bar orning services are at 9 a.m.. with a m u der ,he direction of Jerice. Alan, son of Mrs Lillian Shalfi. M tzvah 0 f Ira Shapiro, son of Dr. will become Bar Mitzvah. A special and Mrs Arthur Shapiro, will take students senice will take place pIace Passover will be ushered in on Sunday and Monday at 10:30 o n Saturday evening at 6:45 p.m.. ;> children's senice scheduled for •-0:30 a.m. Mincha will be at 6 p.m.. with a traditional community Seder conducted by the Rabbi and Rev. Haalman scheduled for 7 ;. m. • • • ISRAELITE CENTER will hold! I riday evening services at 6:30 p.m. Saturday morning services I re at 7:30 a.m. Mincha will be at 0:45 p.m.. ushering in Passover. Sunday morning services are at .:30 a.m. Rabbi Morton Malaysky %  i ll preach on the topic: "Pass,ng Over to Freedom." Evening en-ices are at 7 p.m. Monday lorning services will be at 8:30 : .m. "Meaning of Pesach" is the >pie of a sermon to be delivered : y Rabbi Malavsky. Mincha is %  heduled for 6:45 p.m. • • • BETH JACOB CONGREGATION v ill hold Sabbath Hagadol servome Gordon. Louis Gadon and Gregory Rosencranz. Floral offerings will be by Mrs. Louis Margulies Daily services are at 7:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. with a congregational Seder held in Banquet Hall. Cantor Samuel Kelemer will render the musical portions of the liturgy K L B T Li ,$ AEL of Miami •" I ^5 .p^B^oSSTf.rS hold Friday evening senices at sundown. Saturday morning -senofficiating. Subject of the serr is scheduled as: "Passover and ices are at 7 a.m. Passover will be | Easter The Meaning of Their' a"t 6 er 45 nm 1 ^""^ ^ n i8 | Similarit.es and Differences'(,„ at 645 p.m. Sunday and Monday | tor Jacob Bornstein will render the ShTanVV 1 "J 30 am Rabbi mUSiCal V** !" h7 murgy i Shmaryahu Sw.rsky will officiate Saturday evening, Passover iiU he and discuss: "One Kid Speaks to the World" and "When the Ledgers are Red the Minority Peoples See Black." Cantor Nathan Zeichner will render the musical portions of the liturgy. Public Seder is on Sat urday evening. 7:30 p.m., in the Dora August Memorial Hall and will be conducted by Rabbi Swirsky and Cantor Zeichner. • • • MIAMI HEBREW SCHOOL AND CONGREGATION will hold Friday ushered in at 6 p.m.. with a gregational Seder dinner following at 6:30 p.m. Sunday morning services are scheduled for 11 a m • • • Tc C R ^ L t CA8LES JEW *H CENZi ^"KKl d „ Friday eV ni *"VRabbi Morris Skop will officiate and MaUch. .t the United Nal Mc PasSover wrvic wi be held on Saturday and Sunday morn/rs TE I2EAL mm Mother OLD-FASHIONED GEFILTE FISH KOSHER (0) PAREVE Aeody fo Sww t^vUr m KINO snavnwNM* Ml D'M


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,v APRIL 16. 1954 Ll5^*Arjr*ftv7 PAGE 91 Trip Coach Fares Will be Reduced ng Summer Months on Seaboard ad trip coach fares from New Philadelphia. Baltimore, rfd'on and other Eastern ho all Florida points served ceaboard Railroad, and likeNorthbound, will be greatly for the summer season, *to announcement made El W. J. F'cht. general pasgent for the Seaboard RailIn Miami. live May 15th, to September I round trip coach tickets isit the new fares will be good days. Stopovers will be alchildren under 12 will be for half fare, and the new .re tickets will be honored [seaboard trains including the nlined Silver Meteor and SilItar | making the announcement, I stated "the purpose of inaugthese reduced round trip fares is to stimulate summer lion travel to Florida. For he added, "we have been fcly engaged in promoting fares will also be available northbound to Florida residents when planning their summer vacation or business trips to Richmond, Va., and points north. When asked how much savings this would mean for a trip between Miami and New York, Ficht replied, "Excluding tax, the present one-way coach fare is $38.52; with the new rate the round trip coach fare will be $62.56 — a savings of $14.46 for those who make the round trip within 30 days. For a period extending beyond 30 days and up to six months round trip tickets are available at a reduction of 10 percent. When added to the recent savings of Federal tax on transportation, vacation trips between Florida and Eastern cities, including New England and the mid-West by rail, will become more attractive than ever. The Seaboard also announced that its advertising program for the summer has been doubled, and to further carry its story to poten B'nai B'rith Women To Hear Discussion B'nai Brith Women of Miami will meet on Wednesday, April 21, at the Republican Club, 1900 W Flagler st. Thomas Lipe, Dale Carnejfc Institute instructor, will speak on "How to Live a Richer and Happier Life." A mental quiz with photography and audience participation will follow. Mrs. Herman J. Goldstein gave a luncheon for outgoing officers and Board members on April 14. Delegates, Mrs. A. Z. Alpert, Mrs. M. Lazarus. Mrs. M. H. Meyers and Mrs. N. Spiegelman, who attended the State Federation Convention on Miami Beach, made their reports. la as kg the past decade we have Florida change from a winter to a year round vacationbe fare reductions announced (are just another indication ir desire to ou'er the best in lion packages to our patrons." new reduced round trip a vacation mecca and dial vacationists, the line is providiing travel agents.and others in the vacation field with full information about the slash in travel costs. The line also will continue its budgetpriced meals inaugurated last summer. The fare reduction is just part of the Seaboard's vacation package this season. A great number of package tours — all-expense trips 40 YOUR BOY OR iHtlTOATOP rISH CAMP! TiaHT.wttic oe fOUK WtfK CAMP PtiQOS OMN 5^"} *~ • Mill! I1T C IT mm ATOP THE CUMBERLAND MOUNTAINS of TEMESSEE WARM. SUNSHINY DAYS-COOL. PLEASANT NlCMIS [Three Hundred Acres t Beau [trhl Mountain Country with l Ninety -Six Acre Srinfl-Fed PriI Age Including: vete Lake in the Ctnttr I HeoK.ful, stimulating physical I U T". *"IL ond mental activity la a I | !" ,r s "" n 9 pleasant Jewish atmosphere — I 0,,,l,, ., DltTARY LAWS OBSERVED • I %  tor r "ooting MRS. BEA KOMISA* Fonctag Owner and Director K2S ^rer Twenty-five Years of CampI Athletics I Experience. Far Brochure end I Tennis fleriaotion 168 Third Avenae, I !" #ry •rlk, Nashville, Teanessot. | % %  "• r Y Miami, Florid.'. Rnpresentattve: MRS. ERNEST CHERNOFF 1601 8.W. 23rd Avo., Ph. 4S-4119 Comp/ete Camp Program far Children from • to 16 Years of Creative Art Ceramics Dramatics Arts ond Crafts Charm Program Dancing Fishing Trips Out Norse Back — are being offered in cooperation with travel agents, hotels and other interests. These popular tours include transportation, hotel accommodations and depending upon the particular wants of the individual, a variety of other things such as sightseeing, rental automobiles, meals and other niceties can be included on an all-expense basis for a surprisingly reasonable amount, according to Ficht. j50iipir *S* *pv srm ftabbl Joa*Dh L. Rackovskr B45 Michigan Avenue Miami Bench Phono S-359S -^-——~_ : T? General Repair on all Make Trucka and Cars Electric and Acotyleno Weldina COULTON BROS. GARAGE Wr:k Rebuilt — Bodjr Repair* and Painting Preo Pick-Up and Uollvary — Wrecker Servlro %  N 3-2244, 2-o*52 840 S.W. Btfc Street To the Jewish Community in South florida We Extend Sincere Greetings Most Wishes tor A Happy Passover Season THE MIAMI BEACH KENNEL CLUB 4! LACK ESAR F0R6E Gourmet Club Wl.N'R CBXdaB MMAIBAM JamouA, J-tfL CHARCOAL BROILED STEAKS LAMB CHOPS 4/ i CHICKEN / 9 RISIN IAKID JMSIITITKRI Phone /4V 817-7170 CDMLMtF9..S,WUMm Governor Johns r extends Passover Greetings The Jewish Festival of Passover, which poignantly commemorates the beautiful blessing of FREEDOM, comes at a time when it can and should inspire Americans of ALL FAITHS to re-affirm their determination to keep our own blessing of Freedom and Fair-Play strong and on high. No people in this wide world of ours better understand and cherish the genuine meaning of "being free" than the Jewish people. The Jew has been ready to lay down his very life in every generation for the right to be free and to remain loyal and devoted to the ancient religious heritage of his ancestors. His many sacrifices for FREEDOM must never go in vain. As Acting Governor of the State of Florida, I send you my heartfelt good wishes and blessings for a most happy and joyous Passover season. May that week of festive Service and Prayer inspire you to continue giving of yourselves as Americans towards the strengthening of the glorious American way of life — symbolized so strikingly by the Passover story. May the significant Passover message arouse all of you, dear friends, to also continue your world-famed humanitarian work and help for the less fortunate of the world. Last but not least, may I ask that you offer a special prayer during the Festival of Freedom that the Divine Being send our land, and the world-over, lasting and blessed PEACE. Most cordially yours, Charley Johns Governor -,. GREETINGS Hibiscus Baking Company (Formerly Gleason's) PIES — C A K E S — P A S T R I E S 1732 S.W. 8th STREET 3-6717 — PHONES — 9-5087 A. C. ALLER, President and General Manager Serving 11:30 a.m. HI closing 7444 BISC/tYNE BLVD. Phone: 84-7759 Best Wishes for an Enjoyable Passover 744 COLLINS AVENUt 75lrl STRUT 475 41i* STREi' SHERIDAN A.i J convenient Miami Beach locations, plus Save by Mail Chase Meml Savings H/t 1100 LINCOLN ROAD 425 41st STREET 7474 COLLINS AVENUE LN OAD I Charles L. Clements, Sr. President Chase, of ItOO Lincoln Road, presents Adolphe Menjou in "Favorite Story," 9:30 PM, Mondays, WTVJ



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PAGE 10 B -Jcwisfifk***** HS^im.\ Passover Shows Freedom is Won By PHIL BAUM The Passover Seder eternally reminds us that religious liberty comes hard arid that freedom is not found but won. The all-too-prevalent tendency to regard religious freedom as conclusively established or indefeasible is daily challenged by the facts. Clearly, religious minorities in the United States are not enslaved or reduced to making bricks without straw as in the time of the Pharaohs. On the other hand, we are witness to a calculated and insistent attempt to undermine the concept of separation of church and state, the keystone of religious liberty in this country. The men who designed our system of government understood that in any multi-religious community, the only meaningful way to safeguard freedom of belief is by scrupus separation of the realm of the church from the realm of the State and by the imposition of an White prohibition against atptby either to interfere with other. They incorporated these i victions into our Constitution. Not content with this restriction. a .1. : • i sectarian bodi< ne covert device after another. e sought to bend state facilities I heir own purposes But it i the It--on of Ions experience that no may i" made of public propby any sectarian group withMcesa MI> trespassing upon rights of other religious groups, | especially of other religious minorj hies. In truth, the double guaranty of separation of church and State and of religious freedom are and the same. This is perhaps plainest in the pt he schools although it obtains ecjally everywhere. The public' schools are the staging areas of cemocracy They represent the one piece where we must insure that children are permitted to join in cc nmon activity without regard for considerations of race or creed Whenever religious practices have been introduced in the public school classroom, they have had a dr. isive and disturbing effect, saddling the child who is a member of a minority religion with the imr -lble burden of sensing himself at et apart and excluded. The Con.-• ution provides ample protection •gated insinuation of sectarian c (trine into jjublic institutions. What is needed is sufficient courses, imagination, and conviction to mfke significant use of these protections. The kind of action that can be ehective is exemplified in a recent ca-e won by the American Jewish Congress' Commission on Law and Social Action. The case involved the campaign of the Gideons International, a fundamentalist Protestar.t missionary society, whose aim fl to win men and women for the Lord Jesus Christ," to distribute its Bible, consisting of the King James (Protestant) version of the NewTestament and the Psalms and Proverbs of the Old Testament, through the public schools. Catholics and Jews expressed vigorous opposition to the campaign when it reached into the public schools of Rutherford^ New Jersey. The Supreme Court of New Jersey, in a unanimous and precedentj making decision written by Chief I Justice Arthur T. Vanderbilt. ruled the program of the Gideons Inter, national unconstitutional. Authorities believe that this decision will 1 stand as a landmark in the biateT) of religious liberty in the United States. The determined effort to breach %  ad discredit the principle ot >ep;i ration of church and state is being pi • taad on many fronts: the recommendation of public grants for pri rate parochial education, the use of state censorship to ban materials deemed offensive by HUM religgroups, and the Increasingly blatant luggesttons that public school classrooms be turned over IgsOUl instruction. In all of the onslaught against i rri the baste premises of our democracy can he held in check only bj vigorous and informed community action. In a slightly different area, the American Jewish Congress has assumed the lead in a series of I iaM attempting to establish the prinContmued en P*g* 14 B YAHRZIIT DATES AT A GtANCI I FREE TO OUR READERS! Seventh Edition Of Famoue *4Year Hebrew-English Calendar COM Up To 106&. *<^*V* I V^*'V > ^ < *^'V\ ^\^\_^W'W'W-0-^W>\^W'W, I WANT MY MILK FLORIDA DAIRIES HOMOGENIZED TEE. 2-2S2I Cheater Miami Dettrsry % teat On* Para, at %  eagetf BlrS Bsj aa a w M pr HOLIDAY CJfffrir.CS MAJESTIC BAKERY 7911 N.E. 2nd AVENUE rVill open a new branch after Pssievtr Specioliiing in Feed of Svaer.er at 1043 WEST FIACLEK STREET Wafdl far it tt**** > w A Happy %  MV#r Te All Oar Frrpads umd •afreet BARKUi ENVELOPE MFG. CO. 2740 S.W. 28th LANE MIAMI Phone 83-7598 Harry Barkin r HAPPY PASSOVtR test* INCORPORATED fsfpfc/ilrlrP 1904 • MANUFACTURERS OF INSECT WIRE SCREENING ALUMINUM — BRONZE — STEEL — IRIDITED FACTORIES: MIAMI. FLORIDA LOCIHAVEN. PENNA. GREETINQS *llukt'" Mansene's *paghlii ll4inM4 k PIZZA PIE Orders to Take Out 291 N.W. 37th Arn. Phone) 48-2356 Opp. Wont Flaaler Rog Track own; ROflREI SO SWEET! SO HEAVY-BOMB! SODEUCKHIS! You'll love Hs reti old-f oshioned go f tiriioisTiiES co., me, (mmwujj fMSfri#*r#4f mf World Wld Importing & Exporting Ca ft, rlejide A Happy Pan*ov+r To AU Our Frtemds and Patrons North American Airlines 1835 CoBra* Atro. Miami Boach 310 E. Flanier St. Phono S8321 a-0R %  %  %  "on this Passover Holiday the festival of liberation, we Join people all over the world wishing for Peace and Prosperity. In our opinion, there is no better place in the world lor enjoying Peace and Prosperity than Miami Beach. We have developed and are maintaining one of the finest urban transportation systems anywhere in the world and—as has been so often declared—a good transportation system is absolutely essential for the growth and prosperity of any community." 3rU Miami Btach RaUuwuj> &•



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+Jent,ncr/cMari PAGE 11 B fad's City of the Aged Brings Peace and Dignity ~* |AtV IN ROSKNFELD Lours hang heavy for the L not at the Pardes Hanna Cmp net far south of Haifa. _L who sees Neve Avoth, Cme of the Parents," would Jed. Neve Avoth, part of the Hanna camp, is a miserable T place of dusty, unpaved Id wooden shacks. For there U no decent permanent [for these 2,750 newcomers, more than 1,000 are over j of age. Lt Neve Avoth there is a pc program designed to keep J busy and as contented as [while they wait—some pa%  nd with resignation, some impatience which is so i people who have only a left. They wait for the Cow being built with United [Appeal funds by Malben, W Distribution Committee's fin Israel for the aged, the klly ill and other "hard aseamong the immigrants. than a dozen work-shops, ed by skilled craftsmen. fcrl use their hands and dekills. The total number of .le there who are engaged t is today nearly 500. I trades including tailoring litting, plastics and carpen%  e mechanics and basket spinning and tinsmithing. laged work not for money, the pleasure of it and in maintain their self-rehey receive only 0 Israel j a month for their efforts, jen those who do not or Conor receive a bit of pocket [from the financially hardI Jewish Agency, which is a iary of the United Jewish any of the aged, it is not rouse themselves to such two-thirds of the residents : Avoth are Rumanians who i Israel with the expectation heir children would follow, pt hope was crushed by Ru> regime and they can look I only (o a life without their fcs around them. Though they bent by the weight of many fthey continue to work. They work four hours daily. those who flock to the pops are 39 men and women years of age. is a man of 80 who not rks in metal but has ina whole group of his felWdents of Nave Avdth in this branch of handicraft; the members of this work group have produced water sprinklers, doll carriages, tea tables, smoking stands and doll beds. A man of 75, aided by his aged wife, directs a women's dressmaking shop where six others spend productive hours. Old folks from Persia are making Persian carpets; others have turned out lovely chess sets. Recently, Tel Aviv had the opportunity to see and purchase some of the products of the aged. The Jewish Agency arranged an exhibit, and the aged themselves took the hour-long journey from Pardes Hanna to arrange the exhibit-ale room and to act as-volunteer sale! personnel. They did this, though no extra money came to them from the sales; the proceeds went to buy new materials. But they plunged with enthusiasm into the project and the result was a great success. Tel Aviv came oy U hundreds. When the exhibit was over, the sales people went back to their temporary homes to make new dolls, new smoking stands, new carpets, and to make happy days for themselves. All these men and women are among the 60,000 aged and sick persons, both in Israel and other parts of the world, who are dependent on American Jewry's continued generous support of the United Jewish Appeal. Greetings TEPEE CLUB 5722 S.W. 8th STRICT Passover Greetings To Our Many Friends Mr. and Mrs. Michael A. Peile and DONNA SUSAN %  • •<• .;—;—; — ;••: NEWELL & PIERCE 9NMTIM Nl DNIH1ANV SNV01 1NIW3A0MM MOH ICOSt 1NOIM avo Minim MN nfJMftS* • |a>(MMMMJ v SaOiDValNO) 1VMN19 | Phone 4-5751 m supputs TROP AQUARIUM and Pet Shop TftOPfCAl FISH AN ACCESSORIES 114 N.W. 42nd AVENUE MIAMI, FLORIDA IT IS WITH PLEASURE WE EXTEND A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL i J HOIIDH GREETINGS < III S \ll \KI SKA FOOD IIOI Si: 3906 N.W. 36th STREET Telephone 64-4113 Our Specialties: Steamed Clam* Maine Lobsters — Chesapeake Bay Oysters — Stone Crabs Best Wishes far a Happy Passover APEX PEST CONTROL SERVICE 35S2 N.W. 22nd AVENUE Tel. 64-2087 Earl WkMori A Happy Passover Te All Oar friends and Patrons Alma Heauty Salon 403 WASHINGTON AVE. MIAMI BEACH Phone 58-1735 Alma and Rudy RONNIE'S DRUG STORE, INC Far frtt Delivery of Prescriptions — Drags Cosmetics ANYWHERE ON THE BEACH DIAL 58-2442 2200 COLLINS AVENUE VISIT OUR f O f NT A in Joseph Waldman AND FAMILY of the Victor Hotel ,.„„„.„.„. Extend Best Wishes for the Passover to the Entire Jewish Community Peoples Water and Gas Company Extend Best Wishes to the Jewish Community for A HAPPY PASSOVER MIAMI BEACH HOLLYWOOD FORT LAUDERDALE j -** J. $ Passover Greeting* From the Tall Corn Country $ dubuque Packing Co, Dubuque. Iowa Packers of KOSHER BEEF, VEAL and LAMB Florida Htprtunlalhtt Softer Brokerage Company Harry Softer. President Offices: 24 N.W. 7th Street, Miami Phane 3 5463 Dittrihutort Miami Provision Company 1062 N.W. 22nd Street Miami. Fla. Phone 2-8413



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PAGE 12 B vJewlstifhrAMtVJ J^APmu Volunteer Groups Formed to Aid in Cleanup of Pledges for CJA Drive .... Tk H ISM ••r'rtmmiHppv of UK Two streamlined volunteer groups, the "Committee of 100 in behalf of CJA. will lead a final cleanup in the General Mobiliza tion Division, it has been announced by Fred K. Shochot. publisher of The Jewish Florid ian find, general chairman. A committee of 100 veteran w inkers in Miami and Miami Beach organized immediately after announcement was made of the successful one-day M-Day drive here last week. George J. Talianoff. Miami Beach attorney, will head the Beach group, and George Ch.ertkof will direct the Miami committee. Function of the two committees will be to ontact the remainder of prospects not visited by M-I)a> volunteers and to complete the job in a switt two-week drive. "The Greater Miami Jewish com nuinity is anxious to give once they are approached "by a CJA volunteer," said Shocbet, commending the two committee! ;it their first Dilation meeting. "Campaign officials are convinced of this fact in view of returns showing that 30 percent of all contributions recciv ed to date in the General Mobiliza tion Division are new gili~ Campaign chairman Aaron M Kanner advised that although the two committees will concentrate their efforts in the Miami and Miami Beach areas, other workers in North Hade. Monticello Park. Hiaj. Miami Springs. Coral Gables and Homestead are continuing to cover remaining prospects assigned to them in the original General Mobilization campaign. The two "Committees of 100" are now in the process of formation, Shochet announced, and volunteer are being sought in all other I Jl divisions, in the closing weeks of our 195* Combined Jewell Appeal <;r?:iter Miami .leur> iBven %  opportunity to help H~ 0WH '•*• institutions, schools, hospitals, >T*ten and Home for the Aged," t$U Carl Weinkle. president .>t Greater I Miami Jewish Federation "We can also meet our respon| sibility to the democracy of Israel 1 —a land of hope and light and tree' dom. The Israeli farmer and pion : eer wants peace, ne e ds peace, seeks l„..„ %  ,—to build a democratic land and bless it with his labors Bui like the early American settler, he must plow his field with I rifle at his side—in the event of ambush, at tack and assault. "Yet his main concerns are lit'' growth and freedom This nun and the flee land he buildmoat not stand alone. Americans must help as never before to strengthen the economy of Israel to the State can achieve economic independence and ultimate freedom," Weinkle declared Volunteers who wish to serve with the "Committee of 100" either in Miami or in Miami Beach may call the Greater Miami Jewish Fed eration at 58-4331. Vizcaya Treasures Lobby display of the Miami Beach Public Library' during the month of April will present treasures from Villa Vizcaya. Dade County Art Museum. (complete and 5bependaMe o7i//e SeWtce M IAMI TITLC & Obstruct Co. I Nominations for Shroder Award NKW YORKAnnouncement of i the opening of nominations for the I (554 William J. Shroder Memorial Award was made this week by Wil ] ham Kosenwald. Net. York, chair man, and Stanley C. Myenk.CjM^ 1 ', ,1 Gables, mwber "f fe *> miltee. The"a*nnl was es>aM1*h* %  ;* "Then, or. son*. 57 Stot. ofl.c^ ol ^ j M.omi a.M wictafy scattered over 27* c0 n S .'^i at high rental rot.s. I •• !" u ^ TMiorm--" *? cf o Stat. of F.or,do Office Bu.ld.ng ^^bj int.rwt of economy and public conv. kefi un* all of thw. offie ond their hundreds oi on. roof."—CHARLEY JOHNS YB.NIV:.F5M*SOyHW'"' BENEFIT OF SO MANY!!! rtandeo" 1 K*rl! ^B V -M \L ... TSM *e^ ^^ *Vi ISMM: S-JtM



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[APRIL 16. 1954 • -JewishfhrkUan PAGE 13 B i Tova Ronni to Appear at Third %  %  %  by Histadrut on April 21st Held Lin national executive I ihc Histadrut in Amer jjj Tova Ronni, one of htstandins young inter0 ng and folklore, will be rt (he traditional Third hssover which will take E Hibiscus Lodge Aadi' Wednesday evenining, fc:30 p.m. L,l Seder is being sponge Israel Histadrut Comfcreater Miami, and the t-gadah to be used has Ired by local members of %  ttee. is celebrating his 30th 4( lcr of the Histradut | in the I'nited States and |j years in world Zionist secretf.ry of the LaBor bnization of America, at Jook Review \w on Beach 1, of the August Moon." |. Vein Sneider, was the "wed at the fifth anntial Lheon of the Hadassahfbook review series. C*hLl Kelamer. of Temple Ifim. presented the musiTm. including his own fcr.s. and was accompanied led. Icheon and program were |ony Hotel on Tuesday at I charge of reservations I Harry Platoff, of 1435 tnue. Miami Beach, and ^mes Frank Barer, EdEn, Joseph Could, Henry Abelson. Gerald Soltz, sin, Harry Weiss, D. S. „...> %  Weitzkin, Dorothy Miss Lillian Goodman. llian Atlass and Mrs. Max [were in charge of decorIs. Morris Alpert was cofof all the chapters, and Weinstein was the retended many World Zionist Congresses, has been a member of the Jewish Agency for Palestine, the United Israel Appeal, Farband Labor, Zionist Order and the League for Labor Palestine. He has just returned from a visit to Israel, where he conferred with President Ben-Zvi, Prime Minister Moshe Sharett, David BenGurion and other leaders of the Histadrut. Miss Ronni has appeared in villages, settlements, kibbutzim, immigrant camps and cities all over Israel, has broadcast over the Jerusalum radio station and lias travelled all over the Middle East. She is renowned for her dramatic interpretations. Officers of the Israel Histadrut Committee of Greater Miami in elude Israel S. Shapoff, honorary •hairman; Rabbi Leon Kronish, chairman; Mrs. Bee Jaffer, cochairman; Manuel Burstcin and Ben Minenberg. associate chairman; Milton Miller, .treasurer; and Mrs. Anna Soren BilcL. secretary. Board of Directors consist of Saul Ashkenaty, N. Bookspan, Max Freidson, Jack Fishman, S/ Halprin, Mrs. Sophie Krantz, Rabbi I. Lehrman. Rabbi Moses Mescheloff, Mrs. Joseph Mintzes, Nathan Ostrov, Mr. and Mrs. B. Powell. Mrs. Lena Pushkin, Dr. Harry Queen, Burnett Roth, Mrs. Tillie Sandier. Mrs. Anna Seltzer, Henry Seitlin, Rabbi Max Schapiro, Harold Turk. /Whs Tova Ronni Let Menu Planners Shop at TANNER'S AND B-THRIFTY FOOD STORES • 17S3 N.E. 2nd Avc. • 1263 W. Flafler St. • 5735 iird Rd. • 6190 S.W. 1th Sf. • 1906 Pence De Leon Blvd. • 13020 N.E. 8fh Av. Carol Gables North Miomi KOSHERFORPASSOVER Certified by Rabbi J. M. Charlop and Rabbi S. Reiehman *H WORRY About Your FOOD A Complete Catering Service Beautiful Hors D'oeurree Made to Order Rental of CHINA SILVERWARE LINENS Entertainment and all other details arranged for your formal and informal affairs PHONE 3-5463 NIGHTS, SUNDAYS & HOLIDAYS S3-19M JACK & JILL CATERERS M N.W. 7th St. Off Miami Ave. 100% PURE COFFEE NATURAL, RICH, MELLOW WASHINGTON'S fc INSTANT COf FEE THE ONLY INSTANT COFFEE SO GOOD ... it has to be> LOCKED IN TIN For Seder Enjoyment AND SUN 3>aMei PRIDE AND PLEASURE IN AGAIN ANNOUNCING THAT IT WILL BE PRIVILEGED TO SERVE ITS MANY JEWISH PATRONS WITH **£& Under the Supervision of Beth Jacob Yaad Hakashrus Rabbi Moses Mescheloff Congregation Beth Jacob. Director PHONE 5-5537 NOW! TO INSURE YOUR REQUIREMENTS Mm* or order from route salesman



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P AGE MB i Passover Shows Freedom is Won Continued from Pag* 10 B ciple that unemployment compensation benefits may not be denied persons who, because of their religious convictions, refuse employment requiring Saturday work. At the present time, some states deny benefits to such persons. Cases challenging these rulings are now pending in the state courts, the most recent of which involves a Seventh Day Adventist in Ohio. This case was argued before the New School Building to Include Professional Stage Plans for the opening of the newLear School Auditorium were announced this week by Mrs. Ida Lear, director-principal of the Lear School. The new auditorium is being built just north and adjacent to the present coral rock mansion which houses twenty class rooms, library, offices and dining room facilities. The 60-foot by 100-foot completely fire-proofed CBS structure will seat over 300 students and will be used for school dances, parties and other group educational programs. At the north end of the auditorium, a fully equipped 29-foot by 40foot stage will permit professional type theatrical productions and will have the latest type of theatrical lighting and audio systems A built in motion picture screen will be available for the showing of educational films. %  Ohio Supreme Court on March 9 byLeo Pfeffer of the American Jew' ish Congress. On March 31. the Court handed down a decision fav1 orable to the Seventh Day Adven| tist. This is considered an important victory for religious liberty. An even more acute problem with serious repurcussions in inter' faith relations arises out of the adoption of children across religious lines. The most frequent controversy stems from the desire of a .!( wish couple to adopt a child born of a Catholic mother The Catholic Church takes a strong position against such adoptions and through its efforts, a large majority of states have enacted legislation aimed at restricting—if not completely prohibiting—such adoptions. On April 5, a case of this sort %  was argued by the AJCongress before the Supreme Court of Massaj I chusetts The case involves the wish 1 of a Catholic mother to have her | twin children adopted and raised as Jews by the Jewish couple to whom she had turned them over at the time of their birth. A Massachusetts law. however, requires that "when practicable" a child j should be adopted only by persons of the same religious persuasion as the natural parents. There is no conflict between the child's welfare and the mother's wishes; both factors would recommend the adoption by the Jewish couple. All parties concede that it would be to the greater advantage to the child for the adoption to proceed. The state law is the sole deterring factor. The constitutional issue squarely presented is whether, by refusing to permit the adoption, the state is not abridging the mother's religious liberty by forcibly restraining I her from permitting her child to be raised in a religion other than her own inherited religion; and secondly, whether such a statute does not constitute illegal state aid to religion in violation of the prohibitions of the First Amendment. Any brief inventory of the major threats to separate can touch only lightly upon some of the most important areas. Cnfortunately. there is more work to do than there is community willingness to do it. Solution of these problems depends upon an increasing awareness of the dangers of diluting the principle of separation and of narrowing the scope of religious freedom. For those already aware, the agenda is overcrowded. LEGAL MOTICK NOTICE UNDKR FICTITIOUS fat an Bat f 1 at W NOTICE IS HKKKHV GIVEN thai •hiundersBJBed, .I.HI rlnit t.. engage |, L under ihe fl.tltl.M.i:s. a I Sll \ i: l-t Avf,, Miami. Intend to n-glstcr said name with the Clerk of tiir Circuit curt ail l"i• • i Ma MAI KICK lUR.s.M ii.vi.rn itiii.-.ii i/is-n-ss — 5/7 WTVJ TELEVISION PROGRAM SCHEDULE Friday thru Monday( April 16-19) MORNING FR DAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY 7 00 7:30 Todaj Tent Pat.. Mo Today I 00 rWture 1MB 1:1* i::o 8*5 S 00 D:n Dung B hoTo EC Annced li lH,ug School S-15 T.-t l\.t.. MM, I 1-30 Strike II Rich ban ka It Rio*. 9:5 || Chiistuphers 1C:00 The Little Show Super Cm u, I-at.m Into Ft The Lie KTiow IS : 12 V, 1 1 .' Ij,-y I I Valiant L*4) • 0:30 Jack Paar >hw I Capt. Midnight Look lp. Uv* Oar) Moors Inditv 1 11:00 Del Russo •s ••30 NVnu Magic "45 Spate Patrol Johnny Jupiter I Tilmnph't Hi. Arthur Uodfrey Menu Magic %  J 00 I've tl'.t New, 12:15 Love of Ufa 12 30 Baarch POT Tumor. 13:45 Guiding Lathi AFTERNOON UiK Tup B Bch'l of Air i 1 re Ool New* Lowe of Life I'n Bub F*nles S'r. h For T..rn. Guiding Light j 00 BrUBCB With Judy Roj Rogera I M in Review ( Br'ch W. Judy I2' e. ., I Income Tax 1:30! Gary Moore 1:45| 200 Cobba Cornel Talent Ranch 2:15 230 At Jackie's House Mr Wizard 2:46| Capt. Horn Ju\enlle Jury I Gary Moore cart'n-O-Vllta I Jamie stor\ Cobba Corner l'e.uh Valley of Family Jackla'l House 3 00 Big Payoff 3:15 2 30 Kate .Smith 3 45 | St'dio of World Pepsi Playh'ae Itig I'ayoff B'nal li'rith I Paul Win. in u Kate Smith 4:00 Ale. Gibson 4:15 4:30. 4:45' Uncle Martin Vou Aie There I l>l< W. r'th'r Mr l.-.pers | :0 g ( j'7"' *„ Nli,k,> Amateur Hour s„„ A.Wenture <-flenn. Mi.kev' -i* •'iipi-rmaii M I pi^. i.-,.. 530 Bporta Hlllte* Baatar Proa i:45 Shoppei's Guide News-Weather EVENING K i.l Shopper'* Child. 6:00 Political 6:10 Wcathi-iman 6:15 Jack of All Sports ; K.-.i Skelton Meat Hi.praaai Pollti. ..i ft net in. in • R*nTk h0 He7or, r ; ar,y ; U, o P Ran I £ U *•''"'"" S2A"SSv* 6.45 Renl.-k Reportmg | Renlck Repoita 1 Reni. k Report* 7:?5 Koo Si:, %  % %  %  I!ra do, k '-"o •' "•', '"!. Is Y. L.fe 7:S0 Doug Edwards Two P. Money Private lea I Obit u a rlei SOLOMON MANDEL 7ii. ..f IS0I Moaaajro at.. Coral Gables, died on April 3rd In a local hospital. He la survive)! by four sons, Benjamin. H Robert, Harry and Charles; one %  laughter. Rosiland P a lta ar; and one nlstri Sarah Adler. Remains were r'til to Brooklea, N.Y.. for services %  IIKI Interment by the Miami Riverside. HARRY KAY ii RW Itk ave. died on March nth Rervlcee were on March list. with lntermt-nt in Mount Nebo Cemeian FANNIE KOSSTRIN s. of *_• Kuclld ave.. died >.n Man h 30th. Riverside Miami Itea.h Chapel was in charge of arrangements. SARAH TOGO &f of Ml Ksuunola Way. died on March !*th Beach Memorial Chapel was in i harge of arrangements JACOB MAZER ilied here on April 1st. A resident of Philadelphia., and a retired acoustical engineer, he is survived by his wife, Fannie: daughters. Mrs Leonard H. Roi.enl.era: and Mrs. A. Allen Simon; and several grandchildren Remains were sent to Philadelphia for •.ervic ea and Interment by Miami Beach Riverside. 7:46 Eddie Fisher 6:00 Mama 8:16! 8:30' I've Got A Secret E 45 I Doug Edwards I. 1" Theater Comedy Hour I Burns A Allen Firestone Hour MILTON SCHUBERT 51. of 23(1 Pine Tree dr. died on March list. A cabana manager, he came from Cedarhurst. L.I.. seven years ago and is survived by his wife, Ida: two daughters. Mrs. Helen Lawson ami Mrs. Maxine Rosenberg: two sisters, including Mrs. Evelyn Miller. and a hiother Services were on April tnd at Beach Memorial Chapel, with interment in Mount Nebo Cemetery. SARAH APPLEBAUM .. of MM Alton rd.. died on April l-t She ..ime to Miami IT aril from N-w Yoik eight years ago S-n %  April bid in the Miami Baaoa >e Chapel. With btnlul in Mount Sinai <"emeter> Mrs. Applehnum is -ur\i\e.l l.y her husband. Joseph ., on. Arthur: three daughters. Mis Bella WoHaon. Mis Adeline Konren, •BBJ :.n.i MIS Miriam AraoM; five sisters ami three brothere. ISAAC YOURKAWITZ Jt, died Aprfl ist in a local afrtnltal v %  of the Jewish Home for the Aged, he came from Pa'. There are no survivors ware on Api.l tad In the Miami Chapel of Gordon'! Funeral lth burial in Mount Nebo .emeter> ALECK S. BARUSCH SL of tiTs\v n,i st died on April .:' •-" ,v • April tad in Gordon Miami rhapel, with burial In Mount Nebo Ceatater) t ^ eN >V~MT FELOMAN Infant daught.-, of M .,„,, Mr s ,,, Hel.lma,,. flM BW llth st ,| *P !" IM i....lor,', Fu nera | Home, Miami, was In charge of arr.nigein.-nts ., ANNIE LEBER %  I. of 1610 Collliu ave. diad ..„ A,„,| 1st RJverride Miami Beach Chapel was in i Barge ..f arraacan ROBERT KAABE old son o ( M, aad Mrs. Jack 1 • M ,-,,, ave. died April ;•' V' 'rtrtj Children %  H,.,. He Is survived b> a brother, Barry; ..mi ,,,., MMW lK „ tl "^ '•rett.1 Servl ere oil April 411. hti Miami Reach RrveraMe .h.„...| jrlttl inieinient in M,.,,,,, sinal SaB^ NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE is HKUEHY CUVBN that the iin.leisignved, deelrlna to engaxe In business UIMIW the lictilious uaiue of LYNK • 10 I'l I'AltTMKNT HTORE, at 7106-01 ltlst-ayne Blvd.. Miami, intends to realster aald name with the cieik of the Clri-ull Court of County, Florida. I HII.IP B. SII.VKRSTEIN BERT SAG Ell Attorney for Applicant 810 nisca>ne HlJg. 4. 6-16-B8-M 9:00: Sxhlitz Playhouse Ft>iin Intrlgu* i; i;. Theatre I I Love Lucy M..;t Millie | You Bet Life I My Fav. Story 9:30, Mr. MiNutley 9:45i 10:00; Gillette Fight* 10:30; 10:46 Old Time N'ewsreel Martha Rave .rade Die Web Whats M. Line 8tu.Hu one 1140! News. Weather 11:15[ Topper 11:30' 11:461 World Premiere Place The Face, Don Hollelll.a.li News -Wetllei TW .• m. e. Mr .i Mr North I Man B d Badge That s My Boy I Eversh'p Th'lre The Vagabonds -. ROSE J *COBSON ui *.. w n, r visitor and resident of annT in. *f ." """'ve.! I.v two Albert and Loala; and a daughM Burial *,,| %  arrloa. (rare in New York city. d t .* A MueL • JACOBSON Jh 'in i'V S ?l *"\ h v • "•*! April ^h, n ;iJ;:r:'fVr ve':'^iM: in ll'neh i it rv,r '" ,• %  on April 5th %  11 4th She had llveil here for it WT&IMS^^S 5th In Miami Beach l:iv...,,e %  „:,' with interment In Mount N..,„. mln; nn.i dautThter Mr. AL \v.ft' NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME I—AW NOTU-E IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of STATE MORTGAGE CO.; EQl'ITABI.K INVESTMENT CO.. at lt N.E. First St.. Intends to realster said names with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida. MORRIS' RAY FRIEDMAN, tlwner 1/16 — l/t-9-16 Miami Convalftcnt Horn* LEO ALLEN. Director SSS S.W. Itth Avenue Phones >-541, and 9 0878 •aoclaliilng In Care te the Elderly anc Chronically III. 24-Hour Nursing Serv ice. Special Diets Strictly Observed Private and Semi-Private Rooms. £U**-' CSUA* the letter* start. Then front all over the free world come each comment* as theeo f rom reeoVri •f THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, aa iataraaUoaal daily -Th* Monitor is mast reo~. Nl i w i Si Bull. It. MM... V. 9. A. Pi,*** aaa l M %  1-. IS TW. CsrMisa • %  keaaa. I mini 61. (ss-*> RK3 <•• (•—e) ran • iiinNct THE RID mill RESTAURANT SMVfCf QUALITY FOODS •001 IfKATNi I0UUVARD Phoaa l-340 SEASON'S GREETINGS MIL and MRS. HENRY SHIER and Family HENRY'S AUTO & TRUCK PARTS 2038 N. W. 27th AT*. PHONE 64-6554 UCAl: NDTK E K1O. E uff" •"•""der^a^^lafTQ,name *i.k .? nd to >A.M .1 VI'KSI.V t„ either of yoa, ma V L""*] flee, ir, So^y-M Dade t ounty, PI,,J, calendar month, lr !" r,v' first |.ubli.-a„o„ her^a or demand, to contain ,fl to and presentee a. ,£! sume will | w U.rre,l *l Date March 1, A I) i,u I.IIJ.1K STR1CKJJT As Kxecutrier, *n W III and Te,t,mJ HTKR8 sA HVAsr?y NOTICE UNDER FICT NAME LAW the undesigned, deslrine u,. if rtiy. u n,Xrr ,h 'ictiuosii PALM I.A1NHRY. at io]" BV Miami, Intend to n name with the t'lrrk ot Court of Dade roaaty, ft, MORRIS 'pre*— TOaWDORK VYvKOwKn Attorney for A|.plicanti Ml Seyh.,1,1 nidg. 4/-l-;a-:.. NOTICE UNDER FICTIT NAME LAW NOTICE IS HKREBT GIV the undesigned, deilrinf lav, huslness iinl.-i the fictinoui HOl'THWKST MlMKOGRAPi MCTTKR SKHVICEitafft] St. Intend to regliter said m, the Clerk of tlir Circuit CoMtj County. Kkirlda. CHARLES M. niE__ MA III AN v-RKKFIEli] t/-l-M-3il NOTICE UNDER FICTIT NAME LAW NOTICE Is HKREBT GP the undesigned, desiring to i tiueine-,. under the flrtlliMi I (il'I.K KISIIINi; rXM'KS. ill Avenue, Ml.iml Reach, ntrtkl to register said name with thj of the Circuit Court of Daw C Florida. JEROVEG. I 4/J-1S-M-30 NOTICE UNDER flCTfl NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBT GP. the un.liTr-iKned. deslnottot business under the firtitioetl, WINlKiW h'l'.AME P'RMCtL East 23rd St Hialrah. 1d*tl to register said name with %  of the Circuit Court of D**M Florida. ni'RWIN CORP. 1113 KaM :!rd Strut, lllaleah, Honda AARON M KANNKIt Attoraey for OCR". IN i /9-l-I3-3 H THI CIRCUIT COURT! LEVENTH JUDICIAL C*. NO FOR DAOE C0UNTY.I >A. IN CHANCERY. ATHAN 0 WAT.MAN. NOTICE BY PUBL CATMINNIE K \YAT.\H-N 760 Grand (-oncowsi Bronx. Sea SSfte VIH Ti.r ARE '" :lt:, '\,| it a Hill "' Complaint mi been fil"l again*! JSM ,e en I cause nd >••! required l • mr *1 iawei i" in* B1 0 !i Plaintiff >• attorney". i ( Inal ill the .'"l" %  _, Circuit Court on or aa, of Aprft ". : ll 0, l ", ,.,. pro confesn "i" "' ;:'„:;;:,',. ^n**h seek f"i '•'"'SffiEfin THE JEWISH "^HPr" t,-.l at Miami. rTurn* M I .r'l-KATHttg c'ierk "->""^| !.,,uity fhtt ....LOT. SILVER J : E Attorney, ''"•„' "i"il"j|lst -... .•,,„..-.i:nldinf. *"— — 4 2-K-l* E A ... IDA. N M TO: th haHO)Vr by An the <>ri| the 7th Iex-re again This raeh in 1. Dat day PAL! ."1 3 :s IN THE COUNTY iUBOrtJ In He FREI> )-III.<<% %  either Of estate of ed late < the Hon County Jii file the To All <'"-" ,,t r ?; ra ,nd &*\ Ing Claims or DeawE "'""' : .oh of vou. *ai You, ,, .' a L,,l?ed'l >^i notified .ad requgj vk &| tSTAt m-r- •" "fi ia County Co u rthu* r ,„^M Florida. -' ,hin 0 f ,w nntjS. bom Ihe date of "J aefl contain the ', to anJ3 .,nt ..nd to „,n "'"J 1 ^ as aforesaid, or ^ u %  oo Section 1 J/M */* %  % 



PAGE 1

LIGAL NOTICI /TBCUIT COURT OF THE K"rHANCERY. No. 187463 |f 0 &. I'latntlff '.. oivi'HAR. Defendant. iricE BY PUBLICATION ILIJAM OWCIIAR Ifirvant Avenue r'VnK'HERBBY NOTIFIED wu of Complaint for Divorce L„ f ed against you In the f,ntl ed !" u and you are I'".ified to serve a copy of your %  fti the Bffl of Complaint on IT attorneys, and f I e the orlgKg* office '•' the c,<,r ?H 0f ^ Court on or before the 2h Iwil ISM; otherwise, a DerAP Confeao will be entered Conine shall be published once 1 SSTfoV four '"nkcutlve week. r.lKWISII n/lRIDIAN. at Miami, FIoHda, this Mn I"*'"?' f 4 I.EATMERMAN. Clerk, Circuit CourtBy: WM. W. STOCKING. Deputy Clerk v SILVER A MVUhOT ay* for Plaintiff tmf l*ldg.. Miami. PlK 1/2-9-1 T(C E UNDER FICTITIOUS I NAME LAW SCE IS MKREHY OIVEN that crsigncd. desiring to engage m %  under the fictitious name of OK FRANCINK. at 530 NW avenue, Miami. Dade County, intends to register aald name Clerk of the Circuit Court of Bounty. Florida. _• 1 CATHKRINK M. LITTLE, (Sole Owner) IT M. CAIN ley for Applicant Flagler St.. Miami, Fla. r iwners hjNfJ. Zl'CK HUMAN ppjCH neys for A indicants IW 111 Street H-M LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE fi-EVENTM JUDICIAL. CIRCUIT "5 AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLOR IDA. IN CHANCERY. No IBTBOB JOSEPH B. KLEINWICHB. aim, known as JOZEF KLEINWICHH V8 I'lalntlff SINA BUR8TEIN KLE1NWICHS NOTICE BY PUBLICATION""' TO: 8INA RfRKTEIN KLEINWICHB residence unknown YOU ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Bill of Complaint for Annulment hat been filed against vc.u in the above entitled cause and you are hereby required to serve a copy of your Answer to the Bill of Complslnt on the Plaintiff's attorneys, and file the original In the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before the 7th day of May, 1954. otherwise a Decree Pro Confessu Will be entered againxt you. This notice shall'be published once earn wvfek for four consecutive weeks In the JEWISH FLORID!AN. Dated at Miami, Florida, this 1st day of April, 19S4. E. B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk. Circuit Court By M. C. QRKEN, (Seal) Deputy Clerk PA I J.Of. RILVER A MULLOY Attorneys for lTalntlff 701 Congress BMg., Miami. Fla. 4/9-16-SS-SO DTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW TICK IS HEREBY GIVEN that %  dersiBiicd, desiring to engage In kn umler the fictitious name of |IY IMPORT, at 14.16 Washington be, Miami Meai h, Intends to regIsald name with the Clerk of the It Court of I hide County, Florida. NETTIE URBACH 4/2-9-16 IHE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE •JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND I DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN P.?Y. No. 167446 BE J. JACOBS and %  EPHIKK JACOBS, his wife, 1 MAMIE GIDDON8, l'laintlffa, I ASHLEY and T.l'CY ASHLEY. l*ife, et al. Defendants. NOTICE TO APPEAR • JV.. ASHIKV '""> LUCY ASHLEY, his wife, J-'-ii Lycaster I, 1 ':', 1 .':" "• Mi.-hlgan P ,„•',,','• A -' M 1-FY and GENE %  JWHLKY, Ins wife, -Jrovi. city, OhUi K5gTA 'HOP and JOHN V s H"l'l.. her husband Fn Off|,. e Box 471 EiS*.". 0 ?N '""h Carolina %  MAI LINK I.YDA and ERNEST %  i .l DA, her husband I,',','„';..'• :l1 North Carolina %  f.'" 11 Office IU.X 471 Bhw.nan,,,. North Carolina K A ii T ^ AltT ,,n(1 VIRGB. STl'AliT, his wife, 0"t Office lt„ x 471 TilTv.!'" n T ,? orth Carolina. intee, tl" 1 devl8 e*atees, hTi' '"'"'•". assignees, creditor %  i THf"'"' """'""ors in InterVsh ri nM claiming by. •ma, U '" l S r or against such of Eltv J" (loa<1 aH helr of B. B. knlci'n'i. .' sed.""J"' !" { B. B. ASHLEY. iShvJ ant ?.„K. U .., ,her ner nn %  and i„ ,v lcn '' tm or Interest. I suit" h '' '"""PeMy im-oived in tu A t il „l I J KRK P T NOTIFIED l* br,? as k *f'!. flled *anst you I to-wf, 0 owln K described prop|BTiSL 1 %*% te 8LrlLM |&f(|ii l n Tf EN fc" he WM (the North MA* 20H0 ^ feet PKNTY ,,? l?, S .•• of Tract l"n II NI ,' K OARDENS. record,. I | n PUt B(>ok .,, %  'He \„,".i l n P1 B-'kn t?RR and ll'f', m i f £" ""orneys. fe 1 in S? off? ^ ; ,,d ,np ,hr ffi> May""* fl" x£ l X,f, ;" r h matloni of Yi. ,4 otherwise taken as confessed by PwUpAlb.-W 1 *! "' %  • l :, "' '-EATHERMAN. j! rk „" f ,h 'lr-ult Court By W W. RTOCK1NG l~ /M.„ D ,>0,y ** NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE 18 HEREBY OIVEN that the undersigned, .desiring to engage la business under *tie fictitious name of ALB HELP SKKVK'K LAUNDERETTE, at 501 East 9th Street, in the City of Hlaleah, Florida, Intend* t register the said name with the'Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. DATED at Miami, Florida, this SOth day of March, 1I4. EI.IA8 8CHULMAN Sole Owner FREDERICK N. BARAD Attorney at Lw 430 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, Fla. 4/9-16-23-30 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that 'he undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of I-ORRAINE APARTMENT HOTEL, at 2601 Collins Avenue. In the City of Miami Keach, Dade County, Florida, intends to register the said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida, dated at Miami Beach, Florida, this 5th day of April, 1954. JACOB SOLOMON YE'I'I'A SdlaiMON MORTIMER .1. Snl.OMON ELEANOR S. FRIEDLAND HARRY ZUKERNICK Attorney for Owners 420 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach. Fla. 4/9-16-23-30 LEGAL NOTICE PAGE 15 B IN ^O^Y^D^S^IOURT L-, ^^.U 0 FOR DADE COUNTY M%rTAT§of AT N 3,MJ d T. A *n <' ,; 'i.. Hnu "' HMAN deceased To All Creditors and All Persons HavEstate r Demand Against Said „,.Tm J and J eacn of y. are hereby notified and required to present any i.C. H d nemands which you, or either of you, may have against the estate of AKTHlUt HUU4CHMAN. de^.n"*, a i*" *2 Wayne Cobnty. Ml.hlK f^i> ,h 5 Honorable County Judges \'l .iUlL' ? m,,y .' and fl,e ,he ""m In their offices In the County Courthouse in Dade County, Florida, within eight caJendar months from the date of the first publication hereof. Said eljlms or demands to contain the legal address of the claimant and to be sworn to and presented as aforesaid, or same will be barfed. Date April 6th, AD. 1954. IRWIN E. KOTT As Ancillary Administrator Cum Testament.. Annex.) of the Last Will and Testament of ARTHUR HIRSCHMAN, MYERS, HEIMAN & KAPLAN 1 ** Attorneys for Ancillary Administrator Cum. Testaiiieuto Annexo 4/9-16-23-30 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS fcj A aj CIA \A/ NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name cf TAMIAMI CABINET BHOP, at 2734 SW 2Mb 1-aiie. Miami 3J, Florida. Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade • %  ••;'• s County, Florida. Squired to JERRY KIRK PRANk COHN Attorney for Tamlaml Cabinet Shop 4/9-16-23-30 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engnge in business under the fictitious name of HOLIDAY MOTEL, at 72K0 S.W. 8th Street, Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. SAMUEL TUFSirtNSKY MORTON L. BEIOEL Attorney for Applicant 19 W. Flagler St. i/H — 4/2-9-16 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE is HF:RF:BY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engnge In business under the fictitious name of ACTIVE COLLECTION AGENCY, at 7ii4 Biscavne Building. Miami, Florida, Intend to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. ROBERT .1. LEWIHON MAX P ENOEL DAVID M. GONSHEK Attorm-\ f..r Active Collection Agency 764 Hiscayne Hldg. 3/26 — 4/2-9-16 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW t NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the /li-'illi'i.'C. I,R i5, fnxi NIEL O'NIEI.L TIE-BEAM EORM ERECTORS, at 945 N.W. 40th Street, Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. M Flond A ET olnjer DeCOSTAS, MAER FLOYD Attorneys for Applicant 7 Blscayne BWg. 4/2-9-16-23 IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR OAOS COUNTY. FLORIDA. IN PROBATE. No. 32362-B In Re: ESTATE OK LAWRENCE JONE8. Dui-eased NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persons Maying Claims or Demands Against Said Estate: .,,,. You. and each of you. are £"•? notified and required to present any claims and demands which you. oi .ith.1 of you, may have against tne estate of LAWRENCE JoN^J'' ceased late of lade County. F orlda i.. the Hon. w. F BLANTON. County Judge of Dade County, and file the same In his office in the County Court. house In Dade Counts. 1-lor.da 1th n eight calendar months from the date of the first publication hereof. Said claims or demands to contain the ler.n address of the claimant and to be sworn to and presented as afesa or same will be barred. See Section |M .,f the 1933 Probate Act. Date April S. AJ>. ^ /s/ 1.11.1.IK MAI. THOMAS, otherwise known as ULLIi: MAE JONES As Executor of the Lst Will and Testament of lw>„a LAWRENCE JONES, Deooaaod ARONOV1TE, AKONOVITZ Attoniojs for Llllle >•*• *"*•• 4/14-2J-30 — tfl NOTICE iY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF -tfif.'J?* IN AND p OR DADE £? U N I V -J N CHANCERY. No 167926 EL1ZA14ETH LYONS, Plaintiff vs. ALAN LYONS, Defendant SUIT FOR DIVORCE TO: ALAN LYONS :toB East 57th Street New York, N.Y. You are hereby notified that a Bill of Complaint for Divorce has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your Answer or Pleading to the Bill of Complaint on the plaintiffs Attorney, SEYMOl'R B. L1EBMAN, 605 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, F'lorlda. and file the original Answer or Pleading in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before the 10th day of Hay. 1954. If you fall to do so, judgment by default will he taken against vou for the relief demanded In the Bill ..f Complaint. DONE AND ORDERED at Miami. Florida, this 6th day of April, A.D, 1954. E. B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk, Circuit .Court, Dade County, Florida B) WM \v. STOCKING, (Circuit Court Seal) Deputy Clerk A 1-16-tS-M NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY. No. 167923 MARY JANE NORTON. Plaintiff, Vs. MlLToN R. NORTON, Defendant, SUIT FOR DIVORCE TO: MIL I'oN R, NORTON fiOth A.PC SHAPE APO 55, c/o I'M New York. N.Y. You are hereby notified that a Bill of Complaint for Divorce has been filed against you, and you are reserve a copy iif your Answer or Pleading to the Bill of Complaint on the plaintiff's Attorney, HENRY M. CAIN, 2518 West Flagler Street, Miami. Fla., and file the original Answer or Pleading In the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before the 10th day of May, I9S4. If you fall to do so, Judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded In the Bill of Complaint. IIONE AND ORDERED M Miami, Florida, this 6th day of April, A.D. NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOU8 NAME LAW NOTICE IK HEIUCBY OIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of HIGH FIDELITY ASSOCIATES, at 3688 Blscayne Blvd., Miami, Intend to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. ROBERT OREENBERO and „„.~ I'ARRY KASSMAN, Owners RORF7HT M. DEEHL Attorney for Applicants 0.i Sevhold Bldg 4/2-9-16-2$ 1954. E. R. LEATHERMAN, Clerk, Circuit Court, Dade County, 1torida Bv WM W. STOCKING. (Circuit Court Seal) Deputy Clerk 4/9-16-23-30 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLOR' OA .; IN CHANCERY. No. 164,275. AONES LITTLES. Plaintiff, vs. MILLARD LITTLES. Defendant IK, !" ,, NOTICe TO APPEAR IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OP P!A)RIDA TO: MILLARD LITTLE8, c/o Ruby Johnson 3821 F'olson Street Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ALL UNKNOWN heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors or other parties claiming by, through, under or against MILLARD LITTLES; AND AL80, aa to the above-named defendant-Individual, if he be deceased, and all unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors or other parties claiming by, through, under or against such defendant; and also ALL OTHER and unknown persons having or claiming to have any right, title or Interest in the property which is the subject matter of this suit, said property lying and being in Dade County, Florida, and more particularly described as follows: Lots Nine <9) and Ten(lO) In Block Six (6) of DIX I F: HEIGHTS GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof, recorded In Plat Book 21, at Page 32, of the Public Records of Dade County, Florida. YOU AND F3ACH OF YOU are hereby notified that a suit has been filed In the above-named Court by the above-named plaintiff for the purpose of obtaining a divorce a vinculo matrlmonil of and from the defendant and a fee simple interest in the undivided one-half Interest of the defendant. MILLARD LITTLES. In and to the property hereinabove and particularly described. YOU ARE HEREBY ORDERED and required to file your appearance, pleading or answer In said suit on or hefore the 30th day of April, 1954, and In default of such appearance, pleading or answer a decree pro ennfesso will bo entered against you and on on of you, and Judgment by default will he taken against you for the relief demanded In the Amended BUI of Complaint. DONE AND ORDERED at Miami, I'.ide County. Florida, this 29th day of March, 1954. E. B. LEATHKRMAN, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: WM. W. STOCKING. Deputy Clerk BEN ESSEN Attorney for Plaintiff v: Beybold Building, Miami, Florida 4/2-9-16-23 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of A. ABBOTT AWNING & FLAG CO. (NOT INC.), and BUILT-WELI. AWNING CO. (NOT INC.). at 133 S'.W. 22nd Avenue, Intend to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of IJade County, Florida. HERMAN SIEGENDORF JOHN GLUCK KESSLER A OARS Attorneys for Applicants 17X2 W. Flagler St. 4/2-9-16-23 IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA. IN PROBATE. No. 32430-B NOTICE TO CREDITORS In Re: KSTATK OF MIRAHAM RUBIN. Deceased. TO ALL CREDITORS AND ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST SAID ESTATE: You. and each of you. are hereby notified and required to present any claims and demands which you. or either of you. may have against the Estate of ABRAHAM RUBIN, Deceased, late of Suffolk County. Massachusetts, to the Hon. County Judges of Dade County, Florida, and file the same In their offices in the Dade County Courthouse, Miami. Florida, •within eight (S) calendar months from the date of the first publication hereof. Said cfciims or demands to contain the legal address of the claimant andto-be sworn to and presented u aforesaid, or same will be barred. See Section 120 of the 1833 Prolwta Act. Dated this "th day of Aprl1.19.ri. GEORGE J. TALIANOr*F-. As Ancillary HKerulor of the Last Will and Testament of ABRAHAM Rl'HfN. Deceased GEORGE J. TAI.lANoFF. ESQ. 120 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, Fla. 4/16.23-10 — &/7 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE COUNTY JUDGES' COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE, No.-32441 B In Re: ESTATE OF ROSF. SNYDKR. Deceased To All Creditors and All Persons 11-vIng Claims or Demands Against Said Estate: You, and each of you, are hereby notified and required to present any claims and demands which you. or either of you, may have against the estate of ROSK SNYI>RR, dec.-a i late of Lucas County. Ohio, and Dade County, Florida, to the Honorable County Judges of Dade County, a-'d file the same In their offices in tha County Courthouse In Dade CountyFlorida, within eight calendar month* from the date of the first publicat: >n hereof. Said claims or demands to contain the legal address of the cud ant and to be sworn to and present, d as aforesaid, or same will be barred. Date March 20, A.D. 1954. HENRY M. CAIN. As Ancillary Administrator C.T.A. of the Estate of I ROSE SNYDER, Deceased. HENRY M. CAIN Attorney for Estate of Rose Snyder 251S W. Flagler St., Miami, Fla. 4/2-9-16-23 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN thit the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name <-( GULP HOTEL at 1815 5th Stret, Miami Beach, Florida Intends to register said name with the Clerk at t'.e Circuit Court of Dade County, PlorUa, JEROME G. LANGER 4/9-16-23-30 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IK HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage li business under the fictitious name of ROOSUVBLT HOSPITAL LABORATORY, at 5625 N.E. Second Ave., Miami. Florida, intends to register sa'd name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida. HAROLD GEORGE SHAPIRO, (Sole Owner) HENRY M. CAIN Attorney for Applicant 2518 W. FTagler St., Miami. Fla. 3/26 — 4/2-9-16 | NOTICE UNOER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HF:RF:BY GIVEN that • he undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name f AUTOMATIC MAYTAG LAUNDRY. at 5500-02-04 N.W. 2nd Avenue, -V. anil, Florida, Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the cln t Court of Dade County. Florida. SAMIEL C. KAIIX SIDNEY EFRONSON Attorney for Samuel C. Kahn 7"2 Hiscayne Building, Miami, Florida 4/1S-23-30 — 5/7 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of REGIL MOTORS, at 1500 N W 7th Avenue, Miami. Florida, intends to register said name with the Clerk of >lhe Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. poRSIN MOT oRS, INC. d/b/a Regil Motorsi Bv: MICHAEL SOSSIN, 'Secy.-Treas. GBR8HON s. MILLER Attorney for Applicant 4!0 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach. Fla. 4 m-23-SO — 5/7 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW -NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of CASH REGISTER RALES a BERN ICE i't KM North .Miami Avenu, Miami. Florida. Intend to register said name with the Clerk of tbo Oreull Court of Dad*'County. Florida. ABRAHAM St'SSMAN. 'A Interest LEWIS LANDY. ', Intereet THOMAS' RYAN, M Interest ISRAEL ABRAMS Attorney for Cash Register Sales NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE COUNTY JUDGES' COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE, No. 29858-B In Re: ESTATE OF' SAM PRANK, Dec-cased To All Creditors and All Persons Having claims or Demands Against Said Estate: You. and each of you, are hereby notified and required t. present any claims and demands which you, or either Of you. may have against tinestate of SAM PRANK, deceased late of New York County, New York, to the Honorable County Judges of I>ade County, and file the same in their offices In the County Courthouse in Dade County. Florida, within eight calendar months from the date of the first publication hereof. Said claims or demands to contain the legal address of the claimant and to be sworn to and presented as aforesaid, or same will be barred. Date March l!>. AD. 19M /s/ LAWRENCE J FRANK, As Ancillary Administrator ("(•A of the Estate of SAM FRANK, deceased MYERS, HEIMAN AKAPLAN Attorneys for Ancillary Administrator CTA 1/26 — 4/2-9-16 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS 1IEREHY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of pmillDA REALTY A BUSINESS BROKERS, at 235 W. Ptafler St.. Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. .. MAURICE SUSSMAN KESSLER • GARS Attorneys fbr Applicant 17*2 W. Flagler St. J/26 — 4/2-9-16 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that' the undersigned, desiring to engage la business under the fictitious name '< QUINDSLA BAR, at 235 N.W Ave., intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. WALTER ZELLER, Owner KESSLF3R & GARS Attorneys for Applicant 1782 W. Flagler St. 4/16-29-30 — 6/7 IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE CODNTY. FLORIDA. IN PROBATE, No. 32435 B In Re: ESTATE OF PHILIP SHLACKMAN. Decease! NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Per s ona II iing Claims or Demands Against S:i l-.'st :ite: You. and each of you, are hereby notified and required to present any claims and demands which you, or either of vou. mav have against the estate of PHILIP SHLACKMAN, deceased late of Dade County. Florida, to the Hon. County Judges of Dadi County, and file the same In the!:' office ill the County Courthouse In Dad.County. Florida, within eight calendar months from the date of the first publication hereof, claims or demands to contain the leglil address of the claimant and to be sworn to and presented as afon or same will be barred. See Section IN of the 1933 Probate Act. Date March 22. A.D. 1954. /s/ MORRIS SHLACKMAN. As Administrator of the Estate of PHILIP SHLACKMAN. Deceased, /s/ MAX R. SILVER Attorney for Administrator 3/26 — 4/J-9-16 ATTENTION ATTORNEYS! vJenisti ncrSdSoHn solicits your ! appreciate your patronage and cjuaranWe accurate service at legal rates Phone 2-4366 for messenger service ATTENTION ATTORNEYS! CORPORATION OVTFITS Lowest Prices — Quickest Delivery in South Florida Call the JEWISH FLORIDIAN at 2-43G6



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PAGE 16 B ywrtflflli FRIDAY. Sherwin Levine to Assist Rabbi Ranson In Community-Wide Seder at Hollywood Sherwin Levine, Miami Beach cantor, will participate with Rabbi Marius Ranson in the communitywide Passover Seder at the Hollywood Beach Hotel on Saturday. April 17th, 6:30 p.m. Held under the auspices of Temple Emanu-El, of Ft. Lauderdale, this will be the sixth annual Seder attended by Jewish residents of Broward and Dade Counties. A resident of Miami Beach for only a few months. Cantor Levine. who is not quite 30 years old, is a graduate of the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, studied at the, Julliard School of Music in New York and in Rochester served as cantor under Rabbi Philip Bern stein. He also conducted his own tc!ov:sion program and later played leading roles in operas at the Eastman Theater of Music. Moving to New York, he served as cantor for leading Jewish Tern-; pies in New York and toured the country in concert roles. Dr. Julius A. Greenhouse, of 1741 Cleveland rd.. Miami Beach, is cochairman of the Miami area for this Seder, serving with MrM.ir ius Ranson. of Ft. Lauderdale. and Mrs H. C, Schlafer. of Hollywood. Serving with Dr. Greenhouse are Mrs Albert Fishbein and Mrs Samuel Gluckman. both of Miami Beach, and Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Keller, of North Miami. Sherwin Irvine Composer's Sonps To be Published Ada Greenfield, of 8874 Carlyle ave.. has returned from an extended stay in New York, with two new songs accepted for publication and to be released soon. Publishing under the name of • Ada Greenfield Morley. she wrote the lyrics for the two songs, as 1 will as to a number of songs al-1 ready published. The new compositions are entitled 'Softly." with mu>ic written by her daughter Janice, and "The Legend of the Goldfish." a children's song to be published as a choral, with music composed by Miami's Olive Dungan. who wrote two other songs in collaboration with her. One of these songs. "When in My Heart." was recently >,ung by Meti ropolitan opera star Roberta Peters on a cross country personal concert tour. \Ut. Workshop thw Tuesday Miami Beach Chapter of B'nai B'rith presented an anti-Defama tion League Workshop at the home of Mrs. David Alper. president. 1715 Calais dr.. Normandy Isle, on Tuesday. A round table panel discussion included such topics as "The Mc Carran Immigration Act." Resort lh-crimination" and "How to Make Democracy Work in Your Community." Gilbert Balkin. director of the Florida Regional Office. Anti-Defamation League, Jpresent to answer relevant questions. Chairman and moderator was Mrs. Aaron Barron. Panelists were MrAl*' Swartz. Mrs. Ida Optner. Mrs Leo Rubin and Mrs. Ida Goldman. I Florida Author Night Presents Music By Local Composers Florida Author Night of April 15th at the Miami Public Library featured Miami composers. The music of Olive Dungan and Major Bob Crawford was played Olive Dungan's composition* have been sung by Lauritz Mclchlor. H Gladys Swarthout and Rose Bamp'fon. Major Crawford is the composer of the famous Arjny Air (Vrps song. Other artists on the program I were Hilda Ares, soprano; Betty Booth, alto; Richard Bullman, baritone; Dorothy Arms, men-soprano; Jack Miller, tenor; Melanie Kulhanjian, lyric-soprano; Warner Harman and Betty Haseltine. pian1-!Chairman of theevening was Larry Coe, president of the Miami Music Teachers' Association. 1 Tiny Tot Seder Set noo.,, n Tiny tot Seder was presented by X"^ nd n nursery school children of the the adul" rtP*" 11 "* *• three Greater Miami Jewish Com-! story and hn*?' SS 4r T.1.1 n Ph. S3-1WS for NEW FILTERS far rour AIR CONDITIONER CALL "PHYLLIS THE FILTER GIRL" 82-8038 BETTER VALUE 1 BETTER SERVICE 1 BETTER CREDIT \ TERMS of NORTON TIRE CO |e> j r/// .A Stt SPECIAL U.S. ROYAL FULL-CAPS • tOOK 1IKI NfW • WfA* UKf NfW • •UAHANTnO UKf NfW 7H/S WEEK ONLY^* Off UP TO 670 x 15 710x 15 760 x 15 700 x 15 800 x 15 820 x 15 $7.93 $3.77 $9.53 S 9.50 $10.50 $10.50 Exchange ON U. S. ROYALS InK.n,. WM..|||| J0< litr. IXCHANGI R(FtS TO %  ICAPASU CASING 0 AM S2.M EASY TERMS 00 Gets You ROLLING U Cnllt o—ari T T* Cl Tl. trt IMt %  !>— • %  "' BRAND NEW U.S. TIRES 600 x 16 1 1 .95 670 x 15 1 3 95 650 x 15 1 2.95 710 x 15 M 650 x 16 1 3.95 760 x 15 1 6 98 H*$ Tax .MOST RESPECTED GUARANTEEWorld fomous U.S. Royol Lifetime Guorontee. Every tire sold by Norton Tin Co. is fully covered by this ouorontee without limit os to time or mile* \ NORTON : TIRE ? STORES SfKVINS fioaioA OVIK 7 TIAKS "^L MIAMI 500 W. Flogltr MIAMI BEACH Norton Pollot Tire Co 1454 Alton Rood MIAMj 4900 N.W. 2nd A*.



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BARNES Cast Stone Shop SI STONEWORK TO ORMR NTflS GRILLIS PLAQUES ler* PititM H— Mmrtth 262 N.W. 54* 6TRIIT MIAMI Phses 7-0114 SEASON'S GREETINGS Styles ItT Garden il N. W. 1st COURT GREETINGS y C. H. LYNE Foundry and Machine Company (not inc.) Established 1*04 05-109 N. W. Fifth Street Phone 3-6481 GREETINGS TO ALL Ho riila Gas Corporation &f S E R V I C E MIAMI BAGEL BAKERY Telephone 2-2498 1938 N.W. 17th AVENUE ^flAMI 35. FLORIDA ANOTHER MOSES NEEDED PASSOVER GREETINGS FOUR WAY NURSERY 2313 N.W. 36th Street PHONE 64-4412 TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS GREETINGS PARK'S MEN'S SHOP 221 E. Flagler Street PHONE 9-2291 A Happy Passover To All Fithian Studios Distinguished Private School Dancing — Drama Radio — Speech 323 W. 47th STREET MIAMI BEACH BEST WISHES FOR A A HAPPY HOLIDAY FLORIDA FUEL OIL INC. 830 N.W. 73rd Street Phone 89-1661 Best Wishes To All Gino Hair Stylist 1057 WASHINGTON AVE. Miami Beach Phone 58-4478 A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY TOHNNIE & MACK BODY SHOP "By the Railroad Track" Painting—Color Matching SEAT COVERS Body and Fender Repairs 74 N. E. 20th Street PHONE 9-4043 To All Greetings WESTERN MEAT CO P^N.W.7m V 5?. LESALE H OME INC. Miami VISIT OUR COMPLETE TOY BHARTMENT ARMY-NAVY STORES VE T E R A ,J| IDI'PLOI OUTLET F "" L MAIL OHDEW: ANr... alt mail erdsc t. 1*14 SleiayM %  !**• 1214 "WCAYNK BLVD. Phone Mill


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PAGE 2 C *in*i**ncrkm*r)A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY TO ALL Miami Beach Checker Cabs, Inc. 24-Hour Service U-DRIVE IT CARS • PHONE 5-3411 TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER HECTOR SUPPLY CO. Branches—Homestead. West Palm Beach. Belle Glade FL Pierce EVERYTHING FOR THE GARDEN—LAWNS—FARMS ATWILL and COMPANY Not Inc. Investment Securities 605 Lincoln Rd. — Miami Beach. Fla. Firtt National Bank Bldg. — Miami Fla. Ph. 5-5816 Ph. 82-2636 "THE CORNED BEEF KING" Charlie** Air Conditioned MARKET VIEW RESTAURANT CHARLES FRIEDMAN. Proprietor Phone 82-9181 2195 N. W. 12th Avenue Miami. Florida HOLIDAY GREETINGS dri-jfas COMPANY INC. 1829 N.E. SECOND AVENUE MIAMI 32. FLORIDA A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL MARTINIQUE HOTEL 6423 Collins Avenue Miami Beach GREETINGS ALL FLORIDA SURETY COMPANY 409 BISCAYNE BUILDING MIAMI 32. FLORIDA SERVICE QUALITY GOOD WILL Celebration of Passover Throughout the A By HARRY CUSMING JTA Passover, one of the oldest forms of religious observance, has been a holiday for some 3.500 years. It began in the hoary dim past as a festival of physical freedom — a sort of crude and primitive rite intended to free men each year from the devastations of nature. It later developed into a holiday dedicated to social freedom, commemorating the liberation of the Israelites from slavery' and finally becoming a festival of human freedom, celebrating the principles of liberty itself, of which the liberation is but a symbol. • Modern archaelogiral evidence makes it possible for us to accept the theory that the Passover observance began as a family celebration by the Hebrew shepherds long before the Exodus from Egypt. The festival is believed to have been a popular Spring holiday when members of every family sacrificed a lamb at full moon. It was after the Exodus from Egypt, when the Hebrews won their freedom from the oppressing Egyptians, that the festival assumed new historical meaning. Passover was not always observed as it is today. In the early days of Hebrew history it was marked by a primitive rite centered about the sacrifice of the Paschal Iamb and unleavened bread. A marked transition in the observance of Passover occurred after the destruction of the Second Temple. During the days of the First and Second Temples, thousands of pilgrims would crowd into Jerusalem. Every inn was filled, and many private homes opened their doors to the farmers, herdsmen and craftsmen who came from all parts of the land. Those who could not find shelter in homes and inns set up tents in the public squares of Jerusalem, or in the outskirts of the city. E*ry Corner cf World Durini the days of the Second Temple, these pilgrims did not come only from the villages and towns of Palestine but from every corner of the then known world. Dressed in multi-colored and varied costumes, the pilgrims spoke many languages and dialects representing the varied cultures of Egypt. Babylonia, Greece, Rome and other lands. It was after the destruction of the Second Temple, when the Hebrew sacrificial cult came to an end, that Passover began to assume the role of the great family home festival. Because the system of sacrifices had been halted, it might have been assumed that Passover, the main feature of which was the Paschal offering would disappear. Instead of declining, Passover attained a still greater importance on the Jewish calendar. Remembered historically as the anniver9e$ H" Ifv IkfaV aaaaalaaH^fflH i 1 Portrait of a Yemenite woman in Israel painted by. arti*t Notu Koslowsky. Once head of a wealthy h in Aden, she will sit at her Passover table in Israel "GLASS FOR EVERY PURPOSE" Distributors Libbey. Owens. Ford Glass Co. It Insulux Gla. RWk 1601-1619 N.W. 7th Ave.. Miami N. Florida Phon. ISn MIAMI 36. FLORIDA sary of the deliverance from Egyptian servitude, it became the symbol of freedom and liberty for generations to come. While the traditional cerem6nial of Passover in the desert and later in Palestine was the Paschal sacrifice, the Seder home ritual became the mode of observance. Of course, the early beginnings of the Seder were also noted during the days of the Second Temple. (The soalled Last Supper of Jesus is a striking example or the earlier forms of the Seder ritual). The name "sf|r for the Pass over home ritual was very well chosen. ITie term means order, arrangement or program, and is descriptive of the various rites and rituals which go into making up the accepted traditional Passover eve ritual. It may be mentioned in passing that the Siddur, the daily prayer book has a much longer name, "Siddur Shel T'filot," the order of the prayers. The popularity of the Jewish prayer book hod resulted in cutting down the title to one word—Siddar, .meaning or der or arrangement, The Seder wooM have no meaning or character without the popular little text used during the ritual—the Haggadah. The Haggadah is a tiny anthology of prayers, legends and commentary on the significance of Passover in the birth, growth and destiay of the Jewish people. Much of the Haggadah text was written some 18 or 19 eentm uries ago. and the compK goes back a little less taa sand years. If one is to I the newer Haggadot of I groups within the there are some-texts created within the past I are becoming very many Jews in the Unitefl Seder Ritual Snail The development of ( ritual did become the centuries. Howenr.1 been and these contiaatj tain Jewi-hcoasswaitieil served the rite with mas tion from the establa The Marranos, the sa Spain and Portugal, i Passover rite which •_ to the Paschal obsemisj cient times than to tit] of celebration. The no direct contact wilhj Since they had no U i books, they dependedl the Latin translation all They based their ioaf| cepts of Judaism on edition of the BibleJ that many changes place in the manner i and ritual. In trying to live is knew nothing about II ment of Judaism uries, but sought to primitive mode of HeW" among the Israelites J of the prophets and PT Contirwedon PM' TO OUR MANY PATRONS AND FRIENDS GREETINGS V. JL HOECHERL COMPANY PAINTERS AND DECORATORS 20 N.E. 29th STREET PHONE 3-0621 U fa. ,*,. jrmitk Cimmum lt r the •steads Ms %  • Wishes He e Nappy •ASSOVft HOLIDAY Mount Nebo THE CEMETERY OF DISTINCTION FOR DISCRIMINATING FAMILIES 5505 N.W. 3rd Street Phone 87-W01



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I APRIL 16, 1954 '•JewlstifhrMlar; PAGE 3 C C Plays Host at a Sed er M 0SES A. LEAVITT JTA L Shcmer this year, the fjstribution Committee will B t at (he Seder table _o to 1.000 men and women, of whom those around the only "family" left to [ will be a memorable occa| be memorable not because _i first time JDC has been st at Passover, for many have encountered JDC's Ijty in other lands — in in Moslem countries, hmong them are men and I who reached the goal of .earns—Israel—months and to, and who have since that und themselves relegated _| of shadow life in the re[oenter of Pardess Hannah. I life because there were or families to sustain I the Jewish State," and beIother living facilities were tto them elsewhere. I this Passover, at the Vil1 the Aged at Ein Shemer, [ at last found a "family" faoly Land—the family of for Malben, the JDC probehalf of aged, ill and pped newcomers to Israel, ast been able to expand its B, has at last begun to make ps in a program of aid to the hich will eventually see all 2,700 men and women of the Hannah reception center ed to the hospitals, cusIcare centers and old-age |which are a part of Malben's of more than 90 instituproughout the Holy Land. will their happiness be ppiness of this Seder, of a [come true, but it will be a less multiplied because this Seder will be a token and a harbinger of other and happier Seders yet to come. Since the end of World War II, JDC has spent $3,100,000 for special Passover appropriations. With this sum it has sent nearly 20,000,006 pounds of matzolh, matzoh meal, shmurah flour, wine and other Passover supplies to needy men, women and children in more than 20 countries. And this aidaid provided chiefly by American Jews through the United Jewish Appeal—which for hundreds of thousands has been a symbol of assistance in the fight against hopelessness and despair, means reassurance once again this year that the needy and the helpless have not been forgotten. Those seated at the Seder table in Ein Shemer are rich with a sense of kinship — not only for those upon whose aid they depend, but for the hundreds and thousands of others seated at the same moment at other JDC Seder tables. A kinship for those celebrating Seders in all of the 93 Malben institutions in Israel, in the other old-age homes, in the hospitals, custodial care centers, the sanitaria, as well as for those newcomers who have been able to establish their own homes because of the assistance they received from Malben sheltered workshops or rehabilitation loans. In Moslem lands, too, there will be others of the great JDC "family" breaking the unleavened bread. In Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria and Iran, JDC's assistance represents only a small part of the aid which the agency has undertaken to provide this year to 100,000 men, women and children in combatting malnutrition and disease. In the ghettos of dozens of North African cities and towns, in isloated hinterland villages, JDC aid has never ceased to be regarded as something of a miracle. JDC food and medical care have brought life to thousands of youngsters who would otherwise have died; JDC anti-trachoma centers have saved other tens of thousans from blindness; JDC educational and vocational training assistance has made it possible for them to dream of a useful and fruitful life as free men. But more than that, JDC assistance, even the least of it, has been that concrete sign of reassurance and faith which was equally essential for their continued survival. Many there are who have been JDC's guests in other years, and who no longer need this aid. But of the 165,000 men, women and children whom JDC must aid during 1954 there are thousands for whom there would be no Passover without JDC. An orphan in a children's home in France, a 16-yearold mother in a mellah of Casablanca, a youth suffering from TB in a hospital in Israel who can put dimly remember anything of life except concentration camps and medical institutions. For all of them, and the others, JDC's aid this Passover is sustenance not for the body alone, but for the soul. However, though they may be the last survivors of once large famiies, though husbands, wives, children and parents may have been stolen from them by the passage of the years, by Nazi brutality, by hunger or disease, they are today a part of a world-wide "family" made up not only of those in need but also those who—through JDC —have joined to meet this need. KEN ROBERTsTlFT SHOP CHINA GIFTS Distinctive Imported and Domestic Pieces 68 MIRACLE MILE Phone 83-2698 22-year-old Julia Shilai (left) smiles even though she needs a wheelchair to get around, en, having brought her to her first Passover in Israel, will guard her future, as well, are little Chana-Gitta and her father, part of a JDC transport of TB victims and their from Germany to Sweden. ______ ClffllKCS •-* ee the MOST UAUTIfUL (flmminf K~m) and tkt MMfST Ntfro Dining Room ami assembly Hall in # %  • Savth CAN SEAT 700 OUR 10UN0E NEWLY DECORATED Mary Elizabeth Hotel i_ ? 42 NW 2nd AVENUE. MIAMI. FLORIDA [•• J Ave., Miomi, Fie. "H,ar, Owe*. ami 0*w-*-" • M1M WESLEY E. GARRISON, INC. REAL ESTATE 6th STRffT Bulldfe** 2701 N.W. 6th (Palatxr PHONE 85-2574 TO ALL A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER EDWARDS PRODUCE co. N.W. 22nd Street Ph. 2-60 Greetings MARVIN'S BARBER SHOP (Flamingo Village) Hours: 8:30 a_n. to 6 p.m. Saturday: 8:30 a_n. to 7 pan. 9455 N.W. 17th AVENUE • (Formerly on Flagler Street) U All ... A Haaay Haliiay Marcel Flowr Sh*p A C4mfUTI HOMAL SUtKt Art with thwart TlUsfct" 51 5323 101 5 • 41st St. -t MrMie Ave. Miami keck. Urn. A HAPPY PASSOVER MURPHY 1 MILLS Corporation """"I PIT ROCK—3-4 ROCK—SCREENINGS fffl FILL—PEA ROCK MASON SAND 2601 N. W. 75th Street Phone 89-2521 GREETINGS TO ALL ENNESS GARMENT CO. INC. Fashion Mart Bldg.. 127 N. W. 2nd St -*-lCH-_IOALLA MOST HAPPY PASSOVER Nationally Famous Seafood — also Chocken Steak Chops Open Every Day from 11:30 a.m. till 9 p.m. — Open All Summer EDITH and FRITZ 3236 K. Miami Avenu* Phone 2-5830 TO ALL ... THE SEASON'S BEST WISHES STYLECRAFT BAG MFGS. Indies Handbags by STYLECRAFT 31 N. E. 17th STREET GREETINGS RHODES, INC. 400 N. MIAMI AVENUE A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER •_* JUDGE W. F. BLANTON SAME LOCATION G. D. MARPLE ELECTRIC CO. APPLIANCES — REPAIRS 124 So. Miami Avenue Phone 2-5467 HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL Hurst Drillin^ A Equipinont Co. SALES AND SERVICE 9-4776 1429 N.W. 7th Avenue Miami. Florida TO ALL A HAPPY PASSOVER MIAMI TRANSIT CO.



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PAGE 4 C +Jewish HcrkMairi I!!2AY. APR* 111 TOALLA MOST HAPPY PASSOVER DR. RICHARD SENA CORAL GABLES HOSPITAL 3151 COCONUT GROVE DRIVE CORAL GABLES A Most Happy Passovtr To All Wont You Uav-a-Tampa Cigar? "They're Better" Eli Witt Cigar and Tobacco Company 73 N.W. Eighth Street Phone 2-8185 TO ALL A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER FLORIDA PROCESSING CO. JOSEPH COHEN. WILLIAM RUBIN and WILLIAM KLINE 27th STREET HIALEAH COMPUTE NURSING CARf Eastview Nursing Home 1216 S.W. 2nd AVI., MIAMI PHONE • 7382 New, Modern Equipment Attractive Surroundings Kindly, Courteous, Intelligent Care Registered Nurse Varied, Interesting, Well-Airy, Comfortable, Homey Atmosphere Moderate Rotes ibexcclled Service. CONVAltSClNTS, INVALIDS, CHRONIC CAM, ffc. MIA.Ml REAL ESTATE AGENCY 1034 duPont Building Phone 2-4033 MORE POPULAR EVERY DAY SOUTHERN BREAD AND CAKE COLUMBIA BAKING COMPANY FOR SERVICE CALL 2-5117 TO OUR MANY FRIENDS AND PATRONS A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER MARIO HAIRDRESSER Hair Stylist 537 LINCOLN ROAD — Phone 5-3481 MIAMI BEACH Dr. Albert Einstein and the Universe on His 75th Birthday By A. W. AUSTRO "I cannot believe that God plays dice with the cosmos," Proi Einstein told an expectant world abcut a year ago when, summing up his latest theory, he expressed the hope that eventually the laws would be found to prove that the Universe is governed by cause and effect, ruled by immutable laws under which individual events are predictable. When Kinstein released his new formula — understandable only to i.small number | '^nte'iiz*! Matteli' as' "a horse of scion;.!" for sing # harness, not cutout for tandem or teamwork." frequently abandoned his scientific Sinai for a while to lend his prestige to the among the Jews capahl and h'cauc he trowh'JSl the injuM.ce on the ll"' world a. large ,„,, that is constantly and unrla, under attack-his oT2 I this instance. Years befJSl of Nazism. the papers shouted. "New Einstein Theory Unifies Basic Concept of Universe." while the photographers moved in on the Sage of Princeton, begging. "A nice big smile, Herr Professor ." Throughout his life, Einstein believed that the universe could be covered with one great theory' Had he. on the eve of his seventy-fourth birthday, di-covered the laws reducing the physical universe in its totality to a few simple fundamental concept s that unify all its ostensibly unrelated manifestations two movements that are close to his heart, namely, Zionism and Pacifism. While deeply Impressed by the ethical values of the Old Testament, Einstein has little, if anything, in common with Jewish orthodoxy. If he felt that Zionism was aggressive or narrow-minded, he would not have sponsored it, as he has been doing for three decr ir, stein notv, deep pam how the


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Ly. APRIL 18. 1954 —+Jcni*t> tlrMi^r PAGE 5C iberty and Modes of Discipline ICta By I. M. GREEN over might perhaps be called s t Fourth of July celebration man history. But like the seIndependence Day celebraci America and other modern r... this Jewish festival of freej uiven a deep religious sigin keeping with the Jew-; of religious nationhood, iberation from the bondage of ;ryptian Pharaohs was a libergranted by God Almighty, fcm given fr a purpose—the : n of a kingdom of priests, people" that would obey commandments and serve as iiel of conduct to the other na tf the earth. %  ..> Paover imparts the les' %  : [rei riom is a great, a noble provided it is used for great r ible purposes. In our mod rlii that lesson has been so and so tragically forgotten. -.: the past centivy new nabave arisen in Europe and in hich, having achieved their om and independence, immebegan to misuse their new1 liberty. A sovereign nation, declared, has a right to do hing it pleases, has a right to te all human canons of justice Decency in its relationship with r nations, has the right—even to serve its own selfish even if that means violation e rights of others, even if such Ution causes untold suffering misery to those who live under fftrent flag and speak a differanguage. Germany, Italy, JaHussia — these are nations :n recent times have misused ireedom and independence brought tragedy to millions of .virtualToday Egypt, the land which Jews were freed in antirm-v is misusing its freedom rent I-rael-bound ships from sitg the Suez Canal, in direct Ion of its solemn internation •mat ion-. so our contemporary world turmoil, when it is not actualv-ar In the name of freedom r ot some particular nation he internal Working class/' Bt are being enslaved. In thi" of freedom Russia tella d that the Germans and t ES have no right to free elec 1 that Austria must remain er an occupied country, and in tome of freedom the Arab Intrles would destroy the freecf the infant state of Israel. Jfc* name of preserving free ican institutions from the r> of i immunism our AmerJcCarthys and Jenners would W* liberals of freedom of exfjjflfr. would abolish fundamen^Jftrn.u: principles of liberty gve always been held sacre since the establishment of •ublic Its beginning to look %  I topsy-turvy world Of dicpRMps flfscribed by George U in his celebrated novel, in which black is called ind slavery is called freeMIAMI BEACH FIRST NATIONAL BANK 1651 ALTON ROAD Ufi. T MIAMI BEACH DW t • ._._.._ SOUTHERN TILE COMPANY TILE — MARBLE — TERAZZO 2500 S.W. 28th Lane Phones 4-6037 — 83-8475 PttVI freedom is a great, a noble thing ." This Israeli fisherman makes a final check of his nets before going to sea in search of food. He is free now, determining the limits of his existence in the land of his fathers. His Great Return from exile will highlight the meaning of Passover this year. lit* Passover holds the lesson for the world that freedom in the long run is worthless unless it is accompanied by self-discipline on the part of individuals and nations, a self-discipline that curbs selfish instincts, that makes men aware of their sense of duty and responsibility toward their fellow-men and that leads them to act in accordance with that awareness. Passover teaches us that the freedom of the jungle, of dog-eat-dog, of "every man for himself and the devil take the hindmost," is not the kind of life which human beings were meant to lead under God. Only a few weeks after Passover comes the festival of Shavuoth which celebrates the giving of the LAW on Mount Sinai while the Jews were •till wandering in the Egyptian desert on their way .to iba Promised Land Thus freedom from Egyptian bondage becomes merged with ideas of man's ethical responsito which the Israelites themselves when they actteigrah. ftotfHfaca liberty and disseeni contrary ideas, contrary ways -of life and conduct. How can one be really free while submitting to -a code of conduct that often runs contrary to his personal instincts, desires, whims? Only when one realizes that in Man himself there is a conflict between two kinds of freedom between his lower and higher natures, between his unconscious, animal-like desires and his conscious human be liefs. can JV conflict be resolved through Hrissumption by Man himself ew i Voluntary self-discip line UutflMs from a strong social. relujipujTfaith in justice, kind ness. humility— that trinity of ethical values which Judaism bequeathed to the Western world through the mouth of the prophet Micah—so that the higher freedom may win out. Voluntary self-discipline assumes a freedom of choice— the choice whether one's lower or higher instincts should be dominant in one's personal conduct. It restricts freedom only to the extent that it doesn't allow one's animal instincts to get out of hand and damage irreparably one's higher inclinations. Despite all the pagan, inhuman ideas of what Man's relations to his fellow-man should be, ideas that have spread themselves like a blight over the modern world, there are still millions of people everywhere who realize that only by following these eternal truths of Judaism can our civilization be served from destruction. They are aware that the unfreedom which is known as dictatorship can only be overcome by a freedom which is based on individual and collective self-discipline, on a ireedom which is religious -because it frees Man's nobler instincts while subduing his baser ones. Will this higher freedom prevail in the world against that lower form, the freedom of the jungle, which in reality means only slavery for human beings? Our mechanized, machine-like world" of the present which tends to disregard Man's soul and to cater more and more to his bodily comforts—because thereby lies great material profit and power for the few—has made the struggle for the re-education of men more difficult. And so religious teachers have now a greater burden to bear than formerly when the breakdown of religious belief and practice was not as complete. Yet, it is on the success or failure of religious teaching that the future of our civilization rests. BEST WISHES FROM DWYER'S METAL SHOP 1329 N.W. 74th Street Phone 78-4551 HOTEL AND RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT REPAIRS I Sincere Wishes For A HAPPY PASSOVER Seven-Up Bottling Co. of Miami Inc. SHERMAN J. TOBIN AND FAMILY WHY PARK OUTDOORS? Store your car In the only Bonded, Insured, Fireproof Storage Garage at MIAMI INTERNATIONAL Airport Free 24 hour Courtesy Car Service to and from all PASSENGER Terminals. INTERNATIONAL PARKING GARAGE, INC. 4641 N.W. 36th STREET PHONE 88-1304 Opp. Eastern Air Lines H. L. ROBERTSON PLUMBING — PHONE 83-2695 Heating and Gas Installations "We Cover Greater Miami" Miami, Florida 3148 S.W. 22nd Street GREETINGS TO ALL Cooper Motor Sales, Inc. YOUR OLDSMOBILE DEALER 1607 PONCE DE LEON BOULEVARD. CORAL GABLES I PHONE 48-8704 THE KEYS ARE WAITING! DRIVE OUR SPECIAL "ROCKET" SHOW CAR TODAY1 PASSOVER GREETINGS TO ALL OUR FRIENDS MIAMI BEACH BOAT SUPS, INC. 1928 PURDY AVENUE Phone 5-5385



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PAGE 6 C +Jeist>norkMan FRIDAY, *H4| To All Happy Passover Emerson Service A Repairs AUTHORIZED FACTORY SERVICE Restaurant Equipment — Reliable • Experienced 3450 N. Miami Are. Phone 3-7270 TO ALL ... wmwm BURT CONSTRUCTION COMPANY 1225 N.W. 7th STREET MIAMI, FLOKIDA TO All SIASOHS MffTINCS WHITE'S TRUCKING SERVICE, INC 2173 N.W. 12* AVENUE PHONE 3-2211 TO ALL GREETINGS SKINNER ORNAMENTAL IRON WORKS 1595 S.W. 8th STREET PHONE 82-2913 GREETINGS MONSALVATGE & CO. of MIAMI. INC. WHOLESALE CIGARS AND CANDIES S8 S. W. First Street Phone 2-5156 JOII\ A. MOORE AND HSCAYIYE I \.l\l I m\. ro. Blue Prints — Photostats — Drawing Materials Pick-up and Delivery Service (Opposite the Courthouse) 47 N.W. FIRST STREET Phone 3-3666 SINCERE WISHES FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER EARNEST OVERSTREET AND ASSOCIATES OF THE COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR'S OFFICE GREETINGS! DEE RIDINGS Smith Hamilton Shop GRINDING SERVICE 231 S.W. 8th STREET PHONE 3-25M GREETINGS TO ALL CONSTRUCTION PRODUCTS CORP. HI IIMM\ or in -*,„,. cases wen of individual indemnification. In the Luxembourg Agreement, West Germany did undertake to improve the legislation governing individual indemnification, and a Federal Law to that effect was put on the books. In practice, however, it has so far remained a dead letter. Many a Nazi victim clearly entitled to indemnification is actually worse off today that he was a year ago. A story is making the rounds of two Jews who consulted a specialist in nervous diseases. The first complained that he was unable to understand the Indemnification Law as it applied to his case. For him the doctor prescribed a mild sedative. When the second patient remarked that he, for his part, had no trouble understanding the Law, the physician put in a hurry call for the paddy wagon. The technical complexities of Inliberated from Nazi camps in 1945. Today, a large proportion of the survivors are reduced to penury and privation. Bearing this'' in mind. West Germany undertook to advance pension payments to those who would have been entitled to them in the normal coarse of events, no matter whether their former congregation was located in West or East Germany, the. obligation to carry oat this program, without awaiting the implementation of a comprehensive but slowmvin Indemnification Law, was laid down in an annex to the Lux emoourg Agreement that was signed in September of 1992 by the German Federal Republic and the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany. Half a year later, the German Government issued .the necessary directives. They pjxjwde that pay demnification are indeed such that menu, computed retroactively to it would fill a hefty tome just to touch upon the highlights. Claims against the former Reich do not even fall within the purview of the Federal Indemnification Law. Nor, for practical purposes, do rabbinical pensions and payments to survivors of Nazi medical experiments. October 1992. will amount to 89 percent of the last salary for the Rabbi or communal official. 48 percent for hit widow, 20 percent for full orphans under the age of eighteen and 12 percent for halforphans. Annual payments may not exceed the equivalent of $2,890. nor should they fall below South Africa who served il congregation as full-tine I for 25 years. There is I ed ex-cantor who found I Colombia The former I an East German orphaiufti Israel, is pushing 90; the 1 a cantor from South In England we find thej mind has been disturbed i parents were deported mil in 1942, as well as the i two growing children i master husband was I gen-Belsen and the ailiagl of a gravedigger. Victims of Ea The small town tescheri penniless in Frankfurt months ago. or the oM! passed away at the Mil year, after more than > I tury of service as bead I Berlins Jewish Hospitali ready drawing their sions. but they remiii many who. after they hat' to survive Hitler, lived P lives worrying where nW rent was coming frosui Some years ago. General of the United l proached Bonn with thej that it do something" sate the surviving medical experuaenti Nazi doctors As it %  first communicstioaf | Cantinuad • *5i TO ALL GREETINGS < AWTHO*. In*. Store Planning Engineer* 1301 N.W. 7th AVENUE MIAMI. FLORIDA 821671 82-1671 • Hill Refrigerators and Market Fixtures • Puaex-Hubbard Reach-in. • Bulznan Stool Shelving • Biro Power Saw. 24-HOUR SERVICE SEASON'S BEST Wlsi&iAtQ ALL .•> 1 SWEET INSURANCE AGENCY SECURITY BUILDING Phone 2-2675 in


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APftlL 16, 1954 Jew!st Tier Minn %  Mi >#^. PAGE 7 C ft?' ^ **>;'j oen celebrate the Festival of Freedom in hospitals, on board ship, in strange and families overseas, and at installations here in the U.S., Jewish GIs and sick and wounded as celebrate Passover. These scenes, which will be reenacted throughout the world this vere made possible by the American Jewish community and its agency for serving the Wonal, religious, morale and welfare needs of Jewish GIs and hospitalized veterans, Tional Jewish Welfare Board. Sed St er in Otrange rlaces PI, fl GEORGE PERRY i you've never heard of it, fr-3 in Greenland is just a Island with a small group located about 300 miles i North Pole. For the few Iservicemen in of dedicated service ~s*le by JWB, which has been conducting "Operation Passover" for GIs since 1917. Almost 150.000 Jewish .servicemen, will assemble, for Passover, this year, and scores.of mass seders will be staged by Jewish chaplains and local ArmedJ Services Committees in the USjuyl ip. 49 countries, overseas.. JEneDj you w/^je greeting vpiu; nevgmgfl. last Ne^Vear wifh L'Sho, nah Toy,ah, JWB Passoyer.preparations were getting under way. Let's look in at a typical Passover planning session held'last fall at JWB headquarters. Let's examine the map and study the little places with the map tacks on them. In the northerly posts ot the North East Command the little flags show Keflavik in Iceland, Narsarsuak and Sondrestrom and Thule, in Greenland, Goose Bay, Labrador, and St. Johns, Newfoundland. Don't look fr/r a' full-time Jewish chaplain in those regions, for there isn't one. Ttifcr* year, as in years past, a Jewish chaplain from the states will be, flown by the Air Force to the area. He will make the 74)00 mile tour in a plce loaded with JWB Passover supplies. Roam over tile big map on the wall, and there ire map, tacks showing American Jews in Sidi Slimani, Rabat, Nouasseur, Port Lyautey in North Africa; Athens; Gibralter; Trieste and Ismir. Turkey. No one is overlooked at Passover and the Jewish chaplain's magic carpet gets to the remotest spots on the globe. Take the chaplain in the Philippines, for example. Before the holiday, he makes a six-Weeks tour from Cavite to Subic Bay, gets out to the coastguardsmen at the remote stations in the interior and then makes a flying trip to the lonely fellows down in Karachi, New Delhi and Calcutta, India, and manages to include in his mission Bangkok in Thailand, and Saigon, French Indo-China. No less doughty is the JWB-USO worker in Panama, who makes a 10,000 mile swing around the Caribbean getting into the hard to find places in Cuba, Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico and the British West Indies, and for good measure stops off at the US missions scattered over Latin America. Make the Passover Cook's tour with me and visit (in spirit) your son or your neighbor's4x>y in Otsu, Continued en Page 13 C WEB'S W CO„ Inc. P E. Flaalec Sire* PHONE 3-2197 ttSPHCH CO. NE 1st Avenue ./ c .. DAN CHAPPELL 1004 Biscayne Building A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER Henry E. Mangels Company Wholesalers 0 tUtlUnMbehM 36o0 N.W. 58th St., Ph. 65-1391 A HAPPY PASSOVER WEEK TO ALL II. A. Vivian REALTOR "Over 25 years In Miami'' Now in New Location: 1683 N.E. 123rd Street North Miami Phone 84-0261 A Happy Passover To All TENNESSEE POULTRY 4 EGGS 1340 S.W. 8th STREET MIAMI Phone 9-2585 TO All ... A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER ENJOY MORE "POLAR ICE CREAM" POLAR ICE CREAM CO., INC. 2120 N.W. 11th Avenue Phone 9-4881 To All ... A Most Happy Passover MACK CONSTRUCTION CO. 6462 S.W. 8th STREET PHONE 17-8591 Doors Windows Architectural Mil/work 535 N.W. list St. Phone 2-3186 TO All GREETINGS S AM tIt ORIGINALS MR. and MRS. GEORGE B. FELLER Manufacturers of Exclusive Sportswear — Beachwear 2621 N.W. 2nd Ave., Miami 37, Florida Phone 2-2661 Greetings To All MR. and MRS. JOHN E. PORTE GREETINGS MODERN SHOWER DOOR MANUFACTURERS, INC. Wholesale Retail free Esfimofes Immediate Deliveries 3498 N.W. 7th STREET PHONE 64-2141 ifl |fj MRS. W. F. ROCKWELL .4 JO ALL GREETINGS B. B. Leigh. Pres. R. C. Singer. Vice-Pres. & Sec. H. Goyen, Treas. Members National Food Brokers Assn. All Codes BONACKER & LEIGH, INC. MERCHANDISE BROKERS "We Cover South Florida" P.O. Box 2210 — 1134 N.W. 22nd Street — Miami 13. Florida For Complete Banking and Trust Services... 1ST AIII SHED <02 FLAGLER AT FIRST tiember: Federal Reserve System • Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.



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PAGE 8 C +Jmis*rfrrk*o*L FRIDAY. APWC] TO ALL A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER STEVENS MARKET 5737 N. W. 27th Avenue N. W. 62nd Street and 27th Avenue THE BEST THE MARKET AFFORDS AT REASONABLE PRICES Chaim Weiimann—Scientist And Leader of Zionism 600 N. W. 10th Street EXTENDS GREETINGS OF THE SEASON TO ITS FRIENDS AND PATRONS Telephone 3-6332 HUNTER LYON, INC. 901 So. Miami Ave. 3-3331 INSURANCE GREETINGS >IH OltMM K-liOYlKTT PLUMBING CONTRACTORS 9443 W. Railroad Avenue (Henuart Mill Building) MIAMI SHORES. FLORIDA FOR SALES. SERVICE OR REPAIRS PHONE 7-4793 GREETINGS jrom JACK FISHMAN. President llramlett Equipment & Supply Co. INCOMPOBATED 800 N. E. First Ave. Miami Phone 9-0618 Equipment and Supplies for Hotels. Restaurants and Clubs By DR. EPHRAIM KATCHALSKI Science and Zionism were inter%  /oven in Chaim Weizmann "s life from the outset of his intellectual coaecioUMiea*. As scientist and statesman ho labored for many w ars to create and consolidate scientific institutions in Israel, to assemble Jewish aeieatlsti here, and in raise science and scholarship to the highest leveli While yet a student Weizmann Dad been captivated by Professor Hermann Shapira's project of a Hebrew University. Following the publication in 1902 of the widelvknown brochure "Die Juedische Hoehshule" which he wrote together with Bert hold Fciwel. Weizmann threw himself wholeheartedly into the effort of enlisting the support of the Zionist Congress for the undertaking; and the corner stone for the Hebrew University w.ilaid on Mount Scopus in Jerusalem in April. 1918. whilst Allenby's forces were still fighting in the country. Although engrossed in the plans for this institution of higher learning. Dr. Weizmann did not remain oblivious to the promotion and development of other academic institutions During the stress of the first World War he was responsible, together with Ahad Ha'Am and Shmaryahu Levin for molding the Hebrew character of the Technion at Haifa, and many years latrr, in 1934. he opened the Daniel Sieff Research Institute at Rehovoth. He gathered at this Institute some of the outstanding Jewish scientists in the fields of chemistry' and biology, and found the opportunity to return to his own inquiries into fermentation and polycyclic compounds during the lull in his Zionist activities which had been imposed upon him. Upon attaining the age of scvent> years, Dr. Weizmann was asked l>\ his friends what he would consider the most appropriate tri butc: and he replied that he would be able to find happiness in a scientific institution in Israel which would encompass all branches of .it - irea Institute into the Weizmann Institute of Science. In establishing the Hebrew University, the Sielf Research Institute and the Weizmann Institute of Science. Dr. Weizmann founded the most important institutions of free inquiry in the country, and thereby laid the cornerstone for science generally in renascent Israel. On his passing, the Government of Israel and the Jewish Agency, together with his friends in Israel and outside, undertook to mm '£ I Dr. Chaim Weizmann. the late first President of least | sents a Torah to former President Harry S. Truman on l casion of his laet trip to the United States. maintain and expand his constructive enterprise by setting up Yad Weizmann which will comprise additional Institutes lUtt Physics. Genetics. General Biology and'other branches as part of the Weizmann Institute. His personal charm, his persjHcacity and his far-ranging knowl edge in all branches ol the natural sciences enabled Unarm Wciznraen to win over to his scientific unfjgr takings in Israel not only Jewish savants, such as Einstein. F.hrllcli. Wilhtaetter, Habcr and Chain, but also outstanding nen Jewish sci tists who contributed their time arid energy to rsislrig the statin" ards of our institutions. Meri like Sir Robert Robinson. Leopold Rusicka. Louis Fieser and Vladimir Ipatieff became friends of the Zionist movement and enthusiastic supporters of the scientific advancement of Israel under the personal influence of "the most emi nent Jewish scientist and statesman of our age. Weizmann's concept of Jewish science and his evaluation of the role it was destined to play in the upbuilding of the ntfW Israel were summed up cogently' in the address which he delivered at the opening of the Hebrew University in 1925: "It seems at first sight paradoxical that in a land with so sparse a population, in a land where everything still remains to be done, in a land crying out for such simple things as ploughs, roads uy bours, we should begin bji %  a centre of spiritual and tual development. But it Is on adox for those who know 'Mi of the Jew. It is true thatd social and political problem face us and will demand theirf tion from u>. We Jews know,| | ever, that when our miadij^ fullest play hen we hawk] ire for the ilevelopment ol i Consciousness, then COM we attain the fulfilment fl needs. In the darkest ageii existence we found prolettt J shelter within the walls 1 schools and colleges, an* %  devoted study of Jewish i the tormented Jew found' 'and consolation. AmidaTir did squalor of the gbetwj j stood schools of learning I numbers of young Jew i feet of our rabbis and tt Those schools and colleges 1 ;.%  i.-ir• rscrvi>ir where' were stored up during* I ages ot persecution and iJ lectual anil spiritual energy on the one hand, helped 1 tain our national existence.I the other hand blossomed the benefit of mankind wi the walls ot the ghetto sagas of Babylon and J" Maimonides and the GH the lens polisher of AT and Heinrich Heine and t Continued on P* TO ALL A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER DENMARK'S ART STONE Structural—Ornamental I Modern Man* Garage Grille-Garden Sets-" Stone—Plaster 1MS1 H.W. Sewrth Avenue PhW 7-S Pacific & Supply fr "BULLY SERVICE' %  ILL" FAXON. FOUNDER Not Incorporated Specializing In Fir Timbsrf 601 N.W. 11th St. Phone 2-3163



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\H 16. 1954 "JtolsliihrMibri PAGE 9 C bt's Jews in Today's World WJC r Haggadah recounts he Jews in Pharaoh's ly that the youngest able to recite the to the Exodus. The s in modern Egypt, went so far as to convey his best;port Office has lately begun wishes, accompanied by a box of \ii clearly imprinted mind. |{h century Exodus Egypt is proceeding lenti-m. The facts heist exodus — compiled Jewish Congress' Inish Affairs — sheds on the status of felhostile land, but alIcute Middle Eastern which menaces the les of the free world. B rec that the posiJews has improved since General Moj's accession to pow___iost paradoxically, s migrated from the monih during 1953, dual exodus continues. Iral Nasuib has displayiendihip toward his uated 40,000 Jews — is unparalleled in ent history — Egyptian Ihck's remain uneasy insecure, he initial stage of the war in 1948, discrimilinst Jews, accompanied js, was rampant throughjui The mounting xeno| restrictions imposed on I— traceable to the vioof nationalism which has Middle East and parEgypt s continuing dislliri'.,::: on the Suez Canal having a direct effect rish position, for Jews fcr Arabs nor, in the raafcises, Egyptian citizens. either nationals of forIries or stateless. Barture of Jews has been fblow to Kgypt's already onomy. Observers feel b's tokens of friendship i tendered not necessarily llicituili of the Jews, but It of concern for the counIncial -late of health. Ire these tokens of friendi Naguib has visited Jew..ml their institutes made warm declarasolemn pronouncements eligion-l-.ould be respecti promi-'d the Jews that | be tre.it'.-il exactly as oths, provided they observe Cairo's Jewish schools, id been looted and fired he infamous "Black Saturhave been permitted to pt and re equipped by the omimiiuty [were signs that the Macfrts Club which was closi outset of the Arab-Israel tould reopen. Naguib paid Visits to the Cairo Jewish land to Cairo's Great SynaTRosh lla-honah. He even candy, to a little Jewish girl who was hospitalized for injuries sustained during army jnancuve. Ail of Naguib's marittestalions of friendship have been widely publicized. At the same time, Egyptian Jewry has officially expressed its gratitude for Naguib's attitude. Last May, for example, the Grand issuing to Jews who request it a "laisscz passer" bearing the notice that it is given "for no return." To add to these ominous portents, no certainty exists that Naguib's friendliness Coward the Jews Is shared by other members of the ruling group. Leading Egyptian newspapers are employing former Nazi editors. FLORIDA MEDICAL LABORATORY %  %  %  —: I to all Jews ££ ^ ~ ^3^3^ of that country to give their full support to Naguib's government, asserting that all discriminations based on color, race or creed had been removed. The Grand Rabbi urged for Naguib's health during a recent illness. And Egyptian newspapers carried* photographs show ing Naguib embracing the Grand Rabbi during his holiday visit to the Great Synagogue. Despite all of the manifestations of friendship and the absence of official measures against the Jews, the position of Egyptian Jewry remains precarious. Otic fundamental reason for this is that there is little, if any, future for the Jews, and particularly for young Jews. Another reason is the dark economic picture. Imports from abroad have virtually ceased, and the slump in cotton prices has seriously aggravated the situation. Still another factor is the citizenship status of the Jews: the majority of those Jews who are not foreign nationals are stateless. Most of the Jewish businessmen retain their "foreign" citizenship, and foreigners — particularly Britons — are viewed by Egyptians with grave animosity. The position of stateless persons with regard to travel is difficult, and the Passpelled. A number of repressive measures have been enacted aimed at foreign Jews. All of these acts were climaxed by the arrest, last November, of nine men and ^JSt^J^HJ? Pra y f0l,r wome ". barged with "Zionist and Communist propaganda" in behalf of Mapam. The eleven were arrested by the special anti-Zionist section of the Egyptian police established by the "revolutionary committee." The arrests seriously disturbed the Jewish community, and both the Grand Rabbi and the President of the Cairo community attempted to intervene in behalf of the prisoners. Eight of the eleven went on trial before a military court in Alexandria last December and the verdict in the trial has not yet reached the western world. On top of these arrests came new regulations to expel or not to readmit aliens who had visited Israel. The tense situation in the Middle East at the present time affects, of course, all Jews who live in the Arab world. For Egypt's Jews, however, the situation is especially complex, since they are caught in the swift currents of political upset, popular hatred of all foreign ers, a deteriorating economy, Arab enmity and finally, the Sue/, dispute. TO ALL PASSOVER GREETINGS THE TOWN RESTAURANT 153 N.E. 1st Street BREAKFAST LUNCHEON DINNER Music Air Conditioned 7 A.M. to 2 A.M. Closed Sunday Ph. 2-4733 PASSOVER GREETINGS TO ALL HIALEAH • MIAMI SPRINGS BANK "A friendly Bank" (Member of F.D.LC.) 101 HIALEAH DRIVE HIALEAH, FLORIDA Telephone 88-8431 HAPPY PASSOVER COLLINS GARAGE 24-HOUR WRECKER AND MECHANICAL SERVICE 6901 N.W. 7th AVENUE — PHONE 84-2591 115 S.W. 2nd STREET — PHONE 3-7308 To All Greetings OSCAR BLASIUS Meridian Ave. Miami Beach Busy and cheerful youngster at the Mizrachi Women s Children's Village and Farm School in Raanana, Mtrel. takes pride in clean-up preparations before Passover. Grateful to Youth Aliyah, she has recently come from Egypt, where the position of Jewry remains precarious. TO ALL A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY WISHES W -A. GLASS DOKHORN PRODUCE Phone 9-8411 2143 N. W. 12th Avenue LORA PACK SPORTSWEAR FOR WOMEN 639 Lincoln Road PHONE 5-1916 GREETINGS TO ALL L. C. MOIIIIIS. Inc. PAVING CONSTRUCTION 2581 N.W. 72nd STREET PHONE 65-2421 TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER MacVicar Wells, Inc. Complete Building Supplies I. D. MacVICAR President FRANK J. WELLS Vice President TO ALL A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY PARK MADISON STUDIO PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHERS 205-07 Lincoln Bldg. 350 Lincoln Road Phone 5-5260 Miami Beach, Florida OILS — FRAMES — MINIATURES TO ALL PASSOVER GREETINGS Cauley & Martin, Inc. COMPLETE INSURANCE FACILITIES "Protection to Fit Your Risk" PHONE 9-3426 1522 DuPONT BUILDING MIAMI 32. FLORIDA HAPPY PASSOVER JACK'S GROCERY & MARKET 192 N. W. 14th Street Phone 2-8865 COMPLETE LINE OF GROCERKS AND MEATS JACK ROHER, Proprietor TO OUR MANY FRIENDS AND PATRONS GREETINGS CLARK & LEWIS CO. WHOLESALE GROCERS 34 N. E. 11th Street Phone 3-3103



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PAGE IOC -JcnisMorkMar) FRIDAY AWH, Southeastern Finance Co. PHONE 2-7005 duPont Building Miami TO ALL — PASSOVER GREETINGS CUSTOM CRAFT MFG. CO., INC. and PERRY INDUSTRIES and WM. J. ALLEN and CHAS. HABLOW 450 N.W. 14th STREET MIAMI TO ALL — PASSOVER GREETINGS Dixie Uns Corporation Moe Longer 405 So. Dixie Highway Coral Gables HARRY C. SCHWEBKE AND ASSOCIATES LAND SURVEYORS 4841 N.W. 2nd Avenue Miami PHONE 89-1646 To All Passover Greetings WASH AND SAVE THE MAYTAG WAY 79th Street Wash-E-Teria "You will be pleated with our Complete Facilities and Service 11M N.W. 79th STREET. MIAMI. FLORIDA Phone 7S-S1S1 FOR READY-MIXED CONCRETE PHONE 48-2080 Allied Concrete Products, Inc. 2800 S. W. 31st Avenue. Miami. Florida (One Block North of Dixie Highway) FRANK S. WUELKER. President -__ TO OUR MANY FRIENDS HOLIDAY GREETINGS Rader Engineering Co. CONSULTING ENGINEERS 111 N.E. 2nd Avenue Phone 94741 Miami. Florida ^_ __ %  ii GREETiXGS When In Search For Definitely Better Furniture and Home Furnishings At Reasonable Prices Remember The Name WOODRUM'S ONE OF FLORIDA'S LARGEST AND FINEST HOME FURNISHERS AIR CONDITIONED NORTHEAST SECOND AVE. AT SEVENTY-THIRD STREET MIAMI Phone 84-1625 J .^ ^ 1 8 **£ #vP^3 5J A new "generation" of the earth marks Pa neighbors who seek to see the Jewish State tic task—the upbuilding of their homeland. this year in Israel. Despite yed. young Israel moves ahead in 1 Emblem of National Unity as A Prime Minister Views By MOSHE SHARETT. Prime Minister of Israel We are fortunate in that we arc biassed with festivals and anniversaries, and one of the felicitous characteristics of the Jewish calendar and of the Jewish religion is, that from time to time it lifts us to the heights of history and permits us to review our path through the past and envisage our way to the future. It enables us to see the various tendencies in their true historical meaning. We are fortunate that the history of our generation has been blessed by the fixing of the anniversary of the founding of the Jewish National Fund. When we look back at the greatness and the beauty of the past decades of the Keren Kayemeth Leisrael. and especially of the last few years, we celebrate the victory of a great ideal in its realization. It I.N characteristic of every great idea, that is not an end in itself. but that in its wake it gives birth to other creative processes and i opens new horizons to the people I who bring about its realization Thus, the idea of the Jewish National Fund, classic in its simplicity, lamely, that the land is the property of the entire people, naturally carriers with it the principle of Jewish self-labor. The Keren Kjyetneth has become, thereby, the cornerstone of rural development, a great enterprise for production, and the economic backbone of the State, of Israel. Who knows, however, if this glorious undertaking'would have been accomplished unless, shortly after its conception, another phenomenon had appeared? A phenomenon that had, seemingly, no connection with the Jewish National Fund, but that has really rescued it from the danger of calcification. I am thinking of the pioneer workers' movement in Israel—this ever-growing group, the finest of the settlers, who have demonstrated the hunger of the entire nation for the land and gave the first push to the wheels of the Jewish National Fund. They gave the Fund its determination and the impetus to redeem the land. They created a living slogan that would appeal to all: Land for the Workers of the Land; Land for the Masses Who Wish to Settle on the Land Thus was created the living social motivation for theKeren Kayemeth. The magnificent combination was conceived: a dynamic force sprung from a popular movement, allied with a great national institution. The Jewish National Fund thus has become in our time s creative instrument and an invaluable asset of our nation Under the flag of the State of Israel, the Fund was given new freedom for expanding its land holdings, was given new masses of settlers; and, for its part, the State inherited an extremely useful organization in the field of land policy—for agricultural settlement, for industrial production and for housing projeet s in urban and rural areas. We have been fortunate to fcame seen in our lifetime the realization of s miracle such as is givea to lew countries only—the national ownership of the land and the attainment of a natiaafl —without any of the social! ances that have marred '.Ml alization of land in othe The principle and traciaaj tional land has always to us, the idea of public-* for the benefit of all hut with us. It became an i of the Zionist MovemeiU the Yishuv and now in tat! without revolutions. wiuwr| san conflicts or struggle) 1 ideologies. It came at if i The greatness of this i' bodied in terms of peaftj and unity. Not only did itl into a cause of conflict contrary, it has been the supreme emblem oil unity in the State of 1 the Diaspora The Jewish I Fund has become the sya* entire enterprise, belong' Jewish people as a whofcj ren Kayemeth is the fo all agricultural develo this, in turn, is the soil our hopes for eventual' independence and social I The Jewish National forms yet another serv.i a real meaning to a f in the life of the nation i immemorial-the love ft of Israel among the Diaspora. It w botli young a purpose in theiri work devoted to me Israel; to the chiktt schools, to the studentt*I versities. to the volunteer' Continued on PfJ l a V f tMM 4 *344 HENRI'S RtSTAURAHT HHttJ 6MMAN-ASMMCAN CUIilHl 31*1 PONCI M LEO* iivo. COtAl CASUS, fu. %  fITIfftl HILLIARD RUG CLEANERS Service sad Utitlmcfim Tkreaa***. H r—rt MM S.W. Ufa TEMACE PHONE 4-4341 Phone 17-1343 Autol PBOCTQEAND SON BODY WORE SEAT COYEBS TAILOR MADE 3311 Douglas Road • ifTO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND ACQUAINTANCE HAPPY PASSOVER L L POWELL & SONS 165S Lenox Avenue SEASOHS GkEETIHCS TO OCR !" ,E> THE SPORTS CENTER 1 Klntfa *f Bail Op* PMriSian Hal* US Watt Avanua. Miami Saach Crt



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*Je*MFhrHin Ml PAGE 11C e Eloquent Mr. Abba Eb an IARTHUR LEWIS JTA NATIONS—As a result [occupation of the Securwith the Palestine dislong. Ambassador Abba become the best known. I It is a cultured voice, high pitched and sibijmellifiuous and always I. Many a delegate who Uwavs agree with the IsT w iU make a point of [will even go out of his [so. because of the classispoken, the roundness JUing phrases, the rich %  words. Mr. Eban suffers iiper-abundance of eloiiich must surely be conbe the delegates' gold he United Nations where bmacy is so openly prac|HI at a press conference, duclory remarks, made tithout notes, have been [last for fully half-an-hour been a dazzling display JEit> Away from the great table of the Security impressive chamber, the ^prescnlative can be as as bitingly sarcastic as is delivering a prepared |i to which hours of have been given. fil to detect the slightest Dterrogation in what you Eban answered one cornt who delivered a speech an asked a question, "But pess I >hall attempt to define aspects of the subject M" Oder forty, the Israeli rep|\e is not only the head of ntion whose offices are in fk. but the head of the Emj Washington as well. (Sevfthe smaller countries do their American Ambassaas representative; New [is one of them and New p Leslie Knox Munro was 1 chairman of the Security ently but also chairman usteeship Council.) Mr. [at the top of his governeign service, he is one il's few ambassadors; as a an whose eloquence is |admired, he is one of the pwn Israelis. inner and accent, he has bmpared so often with a diplomat that it is difficult i that he was never in the (Office He likes pin striped fe has rather a distant air tfm which makes the Arabs • During the war, Mr. Eban fa the British Government, [intelligence forces in the [East where his knowledge tic languages wae invalu*ks Hebrew, Arabic, Turkman, as well as French and l\' "<< %  of course, English. Pletely bilingual in He1 English, having learned ^•t the knee of his grand"^ brought up the boy in South Africa, his father having died when he was a baby. But is he as eloquent in Hebrew? And could he be? A scholar. Mr. Eban won a triple first at Oxford University and would have become a Don at the end of the war if it had not been for Chaim Weizmann who persuaded him to join the Jewish Agency. Like so many of the present leaders of Israel, he was a protege of the first great president of the State. From the days of his youth in England, he has been a dedicated Abfco Ebon ... a dedicated Zionist Zionist, and, as Israeli representative, he has driven himself to the point of collapse. In fact, he did faint from overwork during the first Security Council debates on the Egyotian blockade of the Suez Canal. That was some two and a half years ago, and the Council adopted a resolution ordering the blockade to end, a resolution which the Egyptians contemptuously ignored. Aside from reading which he does omnivorously. Mr. Eban's main relaxation is golf which he plays as well as President Eisenhower and almost as enthusiastically. Of a somewhat shy disposition, he much prefers small intimate parties to the large diplomatic receptions which he has to attend and where he stays only so long as courtesy demands. During the past year, there have been a number of changes in the aids and advisors Mr. Eban has in the delegation. Arthur Lourie, who was his chief deputy, has returned to Jerusalem and has been succeeded by Mordecai Kidron who looks like a dashing British officer and did serve with distinction in the South African army during the last World War. As the Israeli deputy representative, Mr. Kidron has the rank of minister. He does much of the diplomatic leg-work; he keeps contact with other delegations. He is the man "in the diplomatic huddles" and ha takes part in ail the "diplomatic coming and going" here. Harry Zinder has also gone back to Israel. He was the chief press officer and the esteem in which he was held by the correspondents here was demonstrated by the number who turned out to say goodbye to him when the United Nations Correspondents Associate gave him a farewell luncheon. Mr. Zinder's place has been taken by Joshua Justman, a former Israeli correspondent here. The new director of the delegation's press relations was once deputy director of the information department of the Jewish Agency in Palestine; he moved to Palestine in 1934. He has, as his assistant, Hanan BarOn, who has been with the delegation for some time. These and all the members of the delegation work on a speech which Mr. Eban gives; they worry about what is going to be said and what effect it will have on the general public, they check the facts again and again to be sure they are accurate, they search for arguments and quotations. Diplomacy is a co-operative effort, like so much else in life. There are delegation meetings and general discussions, and each one has a responsibility for a certain part of a speech or statement. There are some ticklish problems. How can the Israeli representative tell the Security Council that it does not know much about the Egyptian blockade of the Suez Canal and that he is going to give the whole story of this act of piracy again? That is a tough assignment for anyone. However, it was done and done in such a way that no one felt offended. Here Is what Mr. Eban actually said: "With such a wealth of varied experience assembled around this table, upon which lies a resolution which the Security Council has already adopted, it might seem unnecessary to summarise the previous phases of the question, or to argue points which the Security Council has already resolved. I understand, however, that it is the desire of many delegates, as it is the right of world opinion, to have their memory revived concerning the history of his important international question." But who else but Mr. Eban could have written that paragraph? The fact is that he does write all his own speeches. The members of the delegation assemble much of the material for him. suggest ways of presenting the case, but in the end, he pens his own fine phrases. In this, the Israeli representative is different from any other delegates who often sound as though they are reading unfamiliar scripts. He spends many hours in writing a speech, many days in polishing it; he has been known to work through the night on an important statement. Mr. Eban's voice is well known here because of the way in which the Palestine Dispute has occupied the Security Council; his eloquence is hard come by. GIFFEN INDUSTRIES* INC. Serving Miami Since 1930 Telephone 48-2651 ROOFING BY GIFFEN For All That's Best In EVERY KIND OF ROOFING ALL TYPES OF SHEET METAL WORK VENTILATION SOLAR WATER HEATERS. BOOSTERS POURED-IN-PLACE GYPSUM ROOF DECKS CORAL GABLES. FLORIDA i PASSOVER GREETINGS TO ALL SNIDER-JONES, INC. Manufacturers oi Trade Wind Gift Jellies MIAML FLA. PHONE 87-2730 GREETINGS Phone 2-9457 VENETIAN SERVICE STATION SINCLAIR GASOLINE — GOODYEAR TIRES 1504 N. Bayshore Drive Miami. Florida >/A^^^^^*r'V^ ^^^^ rf \/^^A*/A*^^^^^ 'V^ ,rf \*^A*^A-/^.^ TO ALL GREETINGS TYRIJS T. TRIM* aH 1520 PONCE DE LEON BOULEVARD PASSOVER GREETINGS TO ALL Security Abstract Co. 44 N. E. 1st Ave. PASSOVER GREETINGS TO ALL MEL JACI • HERMAN KALER PRODUCE COMPANY 2121 N. W. 13th Avenue Phone 24197 GREETINGS Gulf Stream Quick Foods, Inc. QUICK FREEZING — COLD STORAGE MIAMI KEY WEST 26 N.E. 27th St Phones 82-2671 — 82-2672 Mc ARTHUR JERSEY FARM DAIRY, INC. niOM FARM TO YOU 6851 N. E. Second Avenue Phone 84-4521 GREETINGS MADER & COMPANY P. & O. DOCKS MIAMI HARDEMAN INSURANCE AGENCY, INC John V. Hardeman and John V. Hardeman. Jr. 266 Almeria Arena* Phone 83-4607 Best Wishes for Passover 1 Camwo *>ra PUt. Coconut Grove *ji vriaatt lor ranovw i 11 • • %  • Wainwrf ght Sons Phone 83-1621 Hartley's Aato Top Shop The Best In Materials and Workmanship 1234 N.E. 1st Avenue Phone 34897 GREETINGS MILONE PLASTERING COMPANY 7150 N. W. 3rd Avsmue PHONE 84-7041 TO ALL... GREETINGS ASPHALT PAVING COMPANY Phone: Miami 67-2551 Box 786. Coral Gables. Fla. %  Tl



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PAGE 12 C *jmi**nt>rkl*M FRlDJY.j TO OUR MANY CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS MOST HAPPY HOLIDAYS A. 6. FOOD STORES (FOOD TOWN) "QUALITY t009 AT CONPET/TJVE PRICES" 411 West 41st Street Faith and American Pass 0 i Miami Beach IT IS A PLEASURE TO EXTEND A HOLIDAY GREETING TO JEWRY EVERYWHERE HERBERT A. FRINK MIAMI BEACH Maurice E. Kerr TO OUR MANY FRIENDS A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER We Soccialht in Bonds and Insurance 308 S.E. 2nd AVENUE Phone 25174 WARD PAVING CO. CONTRACTORS STREETS ROADS SIDEWALKS 1731 N. W. 54th Street Phone 89-2711 MIAMI ETTINGER QUALITY sii IDE & IBIJMI co. Wf. BUILD THE UST AND III BUILD THE REST VENETIAN HINDS WINDOW SHADES PHOTECTO SUN SHADES 1*r STORE WINDOWS 400 N.W. 2nd AVENUE MIAMI. FiOilOA Pkeae 9-2434 TO ALL GREETINGS RUSSELL HOUSE MOVERS BONDED— I N S U R E D "No Substitute for Experience" PHONE 7-4978 7250 N.W. 1st AVE. MIAMI. FLORIDA Hopkins-Carter Hardware Co. 139 South Miami Avenue PHONE 2-5194 By DR. DAVID end TAMAR DE SOLA POOL JTA In Jewish homes this Passover the immemorial words of the Haggadsh will be repealed: "He brought us forth from bondage Ro freedom, from subjection to redemptioB, tfom sorrow to Joy, from mourning to festivity, and from darkness to great light This coming year will be one of added remembrance. Three hundred years ago, our torefsthi m i i on tincontinent a com munit) destined to become within three centuries the Urges! single Jewish settlement in all the long historj of the Children of Israel Earl) in the year 1654. Jewish In.ton repeated itself. It happened in Brazil J< wi from Spain and Portugal had IKthe first explorers colonisers and settlers of (real country. The inordinate distance that separated them from the Iberian 1'eninsula gave them a ol security from the dangers of the InauiaiUoa The coming ot Dutch rule added to their sense of well-being, and the coming of Jew-, from Holland brought to the Brazilian Jewish community leadership, scholarship and vigor. Bjt the curtain fell upon this happy interlude with the end of Dutch dominion. Jews who could, returned to hospitable little Holland. Of those who left Brazil, between January and April, 1854. one stormtossed group reached the harbor of Nieuw Amsterdam, early in September of that year. They were the Founding Fathers of Congregation Sheanth Israel in the City of New York, and of the American Jewish community. As we gather on the Passover in freedom and thanksgiving it would not be amiss to recall the momentous journey of those Jewish pilgrims and pioneers. Three thousand years and six hundred miles away from the Red Sea, traversed "under portents in heaven and on earth, blood and fire and pillars of smoke." Another crossing took place from a pursuer no less fearsome than Pharoah witn nu cnariots. On Passover, 1954, we may read from an oft-quoted Hebrew chronicler, David Franco-Mendes, how one of the ships that left Brazil was captured by Spanish pirates on the high-seas. "But God caused a savior to arise unto them, the captain of a French ship, arrayed for battle, and he rescued them from the hands of the outlaws who had done them violence and oppressed them, and he conducted them until they reached New Holland. And none of them was missing praised be God." These founders of the Jewish community of North America brought with them a deep faith. The freedom we enjoy, they secured. They did not find freedom / i) %  M Juda Touro arrives in New Orleans, the man i come American Jewry's most famous philantl penniless from Rhode Island, Touro became a i a merchant The fortune he made went to iyi_ trial" Mtd lh Bunker F'll mon"ment. lanuarTS the 100tb/aanivr3Cu-y of Judah Touro's death. when thev came. They helped for<>e older survivors with dignity and strength the sorrowful changed* strength the American heritaee of significance of theI liberty. The story of that achievevear—storvof JevitJ ment must fill us with gratitude for | America. No per the past and courage for the fu-, enrd its path. No weakened its loyal}.] grew with the fn Twelve genrationj tore It is a sorv that can be read uninterruntedlv in thp record of an individual congregation, which alter thre hunn -u • %  *< s stanus as l j P ws have" followed"! a symbol of faith and freedom in I f u | lnat Cim in £* %  the United States. After the holocaust which came brought devotion asij loved land. Ech to historic Jewish communities in. make America groii PASSOVER GREETINGS SALES — MOTOROLA — SERVICE EDDIE'S RADIO SERVICE 3209 N.W. 7th Avenue Phone 3-6564 Service On AD Makes Auto and Home Radios and Television Europe in our times, few alas are the Jewish congregations which can count their age in centuries. Shear it h Israel in the City of New York which might well have been regarded as a scion of a youthful the dreams of the hopes for the future.' of 1954 should be i by the union of our | memories with; our three hundred] country, now finds itself among the can past. IKHIIFIUTION IN GD Continued from Pat* 6C United Nations, the Federal Government did not turn it down. Due,to the nature of the medical experiments, and to the habit of many of the "scientists" concerned to make sure that no living witnesses remained, only some 750 survivors were able to take advantage of the Bonn invitation to file claims. More than one third have been rejected, and upward of 300 cases not yet decided. A young German woman physician noted for her pro-Jewish sympathies, Dr. Laura Schaefer, was recently the first emissary of Bonn to visit Israel, where she examined the approximately 100 resident appli cants. A lump-sum compensation averaging $1,000 has been paid in the cases where medical finding of German goveWBfj corroborated thei manent injuries. $600,000 has beta] four West Germsrl 1951 to 1955, by program is ei eluded. Thanks to a good will, the is in sight. the machinery rabbinical and claims The mar tion applicants r*J of medical exp er German Rabbis, would wish thitJ cases, the Genual the same modicum ol| though it may not | pressive when sill the backdrop of tatj called it forth' PASSOVER GREETINGS Airway Bar and Restaurant PACKAGE GOODS AVAILABLE STEAKS—CHICKEN • "Visit Our Dubonnet Room" 8727 N.W. Seventh Avenue Phone 89-9227 If is a pleasure to txltni o mil Mr Jewish friends and Patrons Sincere Passover Greetings 222 N.W. 26th STREET A. H. BECKER PHONE 2-3705 Robbins Roofing & Sheet Metal Co. 222 N. W. 26th Street Phone 2-3705 A. H. BECKER A Happy Passover HIGHLAND PARK PHARMACY Complete Drug Service 936 N. W. 7th Avenue Phone 2-7541 BEST WISHES FOR A Happy Passover Mays Transfer Inc. Local and Long Distance Furniture Moving 4305 N. W. 2nd Ave. Phone 78-6440 Specializing in Mevin, Mfcajajaj, 1 SEASON'S BEST WISHES 4 GEORGE J. BERTMtf Realtor 420 LINCOLN ROAD, MIAMI BEACH TO ALL A MOST HAPPY H0UJHide & Seek Children *jm THE CHILDREN'S SHOP OF DISTWCT1 -J GIFTS APPAREL TOTS TO TEENS SOS Biltmore Way Coral Gables pb oi< TO ALL GREETINGS — EnJV V"" r ***'' HOWE H "Reasonable Prices MOO COLLINS AVENUE re IW



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ML 16, 1954 +Jewis*Fhrkigan PAGE 13 C IZMANN—SCIENTIST Hi LEADER OF ZIOI I from F>age 8 c \ of the links in the [chain of intellectual i „' S scientific career federahly interrupted Activities. But he w> able not only to corifcnical education but Ja most distinguished %  to our knowledge of Td applied chemistry. [hihigher technical Liebermann's laborfechnical High School trlottenburg, headed When the latter was „ to become Profesg, Weizmann accomland four years later Iph.O. He was a "priLi Geneva University 11904. and it was here Hied his investigations I of polycyclic comJiaboration with Deichherland. Dr. Weizmann ...hester in England. nc he was able to set themical laboratory, to I students at the uni[to occupy a notable the first-class scienthc faculty at Mani Professor PerWn, Jr., tor Ernest Rutherford. bancln-ter that WeizJ out his most importpes in fermentation, in jof organic compounds field ol polymerisation. (giving practical appli1 to his formulae also lised here. He continbe first world war to develop as far as possible the work he had done during the fruitful period in Manchester, and with the opening of the Sieff Research Institute at Rehovoth in 1934, and his ttuPDorary retirement from political life, hit longing to return to science was at last fulfilled. From *he"outeet of the second world war Dr. Weizmann and his principal associate Dr. Ernst Bergmann devoted their whole time to investigations in synthetic fuel and rubber and this work too won recognition by the Allied Powers. Weizmann's scientific discoveries resulted from an inquiring mind and the passion to decipher the secrets of nature. Yet in all of his investigations and discoveries he sought not so much to satisffy his intellectual curiosity as to try to harness the results for the alleviation of human welfare and the enrichment of society. At first he copied nature in his work on the synthesis of pigments, but in the course of time he endeavoured to master nature bjn exploiting the tremendous energy contained in plant products and oil by converting them into staple products through biology and chemistry. Most of Dr. Weizmann's work was done in the field of applied chemistry, but he did not ignore theoretical chemistry. Knowledge and practice were remarkably combined in his personality and through is great vision he perceived the close ties between Israel's agriculture and industry and Israel's science, and the great role which science was destined to play in the economic and cultural life of the country. One need only recall the classic incident of Lord Peers visit to Dr. Weizmann in his laboratory at Rehovoth in 1936 to find the parallel of this close integration. "What are you doing, Dr. Weizmann?" asked the chairman of the Royal Commission. The great scientist-statesman, who was busy at his laboratory bench, replied: "I am creating absorptive capacity." I believe that his genius in extending the absorptive capacity of this country, as indeed of the world at large, served him alike in the fields of science and statesmanship. The scientific achievements of the first President of the State of Israel not only pointed the way to the utilization of raw materials generally disregarded and laid the foundation for new branches of natural science, but also shaped new methods for alleviating human conditions everywhere by showing that nature could be fully harnessed for human welfare. Ettie Kay Formerly Kay's Blouse Shop Exquisite "All Handmade" Nylon Blouses Lace and Tucked Net Model far Dressy Occasions Tailored Shirts by Gabey Crepe and "All Wool" Jersey Blouses far Soils Handsomely Beaded Sweaters of Orion, Wool and Cashmere •",>.* 1 M water "operation" from the one met with when I the Jews out of Egypt. But this "Blueprint lor Water" ly as significant on the occasion of Passover in the Tish State, for it enriches a land eroded by thousands of neglect. MOVE* CRUJINCS IUINGS feaver Rexali Drug Stores JJndAve. Ph.3-4665 / %  62nd St. Ph. 7-J202 W1 Way Ph. 4-7621 KrS Ave -Ph. 7-2011 f 725 Bird Road lp PY PASSOVER toiversity I of Miami 5 *AL GABLES MIAMI BEACH ABSTRACT & TITLE COMPANY. Inc. Compute Abstract and Till* Insurance service THE ONLY ABSTRACT PLANT IN MIAMI BEACH 1630 Lenox Avenue MIAMI BEACH TO ALL GREETINGS Sorrento Hestaurant FINE ITALIAN FOODS PIRATE'S COVE We Ceier To Partial 3060 S.W. 8th STREET PHONE 48-9263 SEDER FOR THE Gl Continued from Page 7 C Hokkaido or Sendai, Japan. Take a look in at Agana in Guam or Kniwetok in the Pacific; get acquainted with all the lonely GIs in icelocked Adak, or Big Delta, or Kodiak in Alaska. A Jewish chaplain, or a specially designated GI, or a USO-JWB worker will lead in the chanting of the Echod Mi Yodea and a breath of home (and some more substantial Passover foods) will be contained in the Passover Jood packages sent by Women volunteers from JWB's Women's Organizations' Division in scores of communities back home. And of course, in the US, where there are also remote, bleak and isolated desert and mountain stations aplenty, dust-covered cars with JWB Armed Services volunteers, Jewish chaplains and JWB field staff will jog over desert roads to Twenty-Nine Palms and China Lake, California, and make their stops at Big Spring Air Force Base, Goodfellow Air Force Base and Red River Arsenal, down in Texas. And on their route you'll find spots like Walker Air Force Base in New Maxico, the Nellis Air Force Base near Las Vegas, or maybe Camp Hale—on a mountain top at Leadville, Colorado, or the Dugway Proving Ground in the Utah Desert. Even at the Los Alamos Atomic Energy Labratory and at the atom bomb sites at Camp Desert Rock in Nevada and the White Sands Proving Grounds in New Maxico there will be a bright holiday look come Passover. Nuta's Yacht Basin 1884 N. W. North River Drive Phone 2-3067 INSURANCE FOR ALL COMMERCIAL & INDUSTRIAL REQUIREMENTS Phones 3-5761 3-4312 901 NX. 2nd AVE. 54 MIRACLE MILE ORAL CABLES DOUGLAS NURSING HOME 1408 N.E. Bay shore Place FOR THE CARE OF THE CHRONICS AND CONVALESCENTS Special diets—Reasonable rate • R.N. en slaty continually Completely renovate*' under new ownership of MR and MRS. S. L. THOMAS For Appointment — 82-5395 GREETINGS TO ALL "Jkia mii Tirat ffxclustvm 4ain+ Star TINGLE PAINT CO. 49 S.W. FIRST ST. MIAMI, FLA. TO ALL... "• % %  % %  "" A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER RUBBER INC. Charles T. Spencer 159 N.E. 29th STREET PHONE 3-6201 MERCURY LITHOGRAPHING CO. "545 N.*W; 5th Street MiamL Florida Telephone 82-6567 EXPERTS IN MULTICOLOR OFFSET P. RICHARDSON Insulation Firebrick • Tanks Traps and Regulator! 1141 So. Alhambra Circle Warehouse: 1047 N. W. 22nd Street Phone 87-9586 Phone 87-9586 GREETINGS HOWARD BACKUS TOWINO — LIGHTERING WHOLESALE SAND — CRANE RENTAL 1201 N. W. South River Drive — P. O. Box 681 Yard Phone 3-5019 Res. Phone 7-1042 MIAMI 4. FLORIDA GREETINGS Open 9 A.M. to 6 PM. Evenings by Appointment Ph. 7-7977 Help Yourself to Beauty! IIIWIVS BEAUTY SALON 652 N.E. 125th Street North MiamL Florida TO ALL GREETINGS MIAMI COAL & OIL CO. and MIAMI CRYSTAL ICE & COLD STORAGE CO.. INC. 1100 N.W. 21st Terrace Phone 2-7896



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PAGE 14 C *>Jeistnu*M^n FRIDAY Peerless Manufacturing Co. Manufacturer oi Corrugated Cartons and Cartons for Fruit Candies 23 N. E. 74th Street P*one 7-0953 HOLIDAY GREETINGS PICK-UP AND DELIVERY ZANDER'S LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANERS 3466 N. Miami Avenue P^one 821343 Compliments of the Season MIAMI f\ |.| CWUlAlll$ 141 L Flo.ler V L Jfr 4 Miretlt Mil. H. 24135 ^HXAJIJ^ H.MM THl SHOIS YOU'VE KNOWN AND 10VID fOt HAM TO ALL GREETINGS HENRY A. POHL. INC.. Slat* Distributors GRAY MARINE MOTORS CONTINENTAL INDUSTRIAL ENGINES GASOLINE and DIESEL 410 N. E. 13th Street Phone 2-1577 GREETINGS TO OUR MANY FRIENDS MIAMI DIAMOND CENTER Mr. & Mrs. Jacob Rabinowitz Mr. & Mrs. David Rabinowitz Mr. & Mrs. Morris Rabinowitz Mr. & Mrs. Sol Goldstein TITLE INSURANCE A delimit insurance contract instead of an OPINION as to the condition oi title. Longford Building, Miami — 82-5618 ESCROWS — ABSTRACTS FIDELITY TITLE COMPANY — TOM BLAKE i La Vigne Electric 163 N. E. 24th Street—Phone 2-1759 605 Lincoln Road TO ALL GREETINGS I. W. IIIWAI COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY" Phone 58-2923 GREETINGS TO ALL SKAGSETH YOUR FRIENDLY STATIONERY STORE 114 N.E. 2nd Ave—M.4d!l 14M N.W. 36th SI.-4S-4SA3 7We N.E. 2nd Av._7W511 U07 Washington Ave_5.M4 Newly arrived infants from Moslem lands are washed at a IDC child-care cet ticipahng in their first Seder in Israel. Too young to ask the traditional Four I will nonetheless be observers of an ancient festival which marks the Great EINSTEIN AND THE UNIVERSE ON HIS 75TH Glfil Continued from Pees 4C of cruelty and hatred," was stronger than his desire to be left alone, so he accepted an appointment to the Commission pour la Cooperation Intellect tiello of the League of Nations. Only upon noticing that the League did not function satisfactorily and that, instead of preventing the use of force altogether, it urged the weak nations to submit to the demands of the big powers, did he resign. It was only Hitler's assumption of power that caused Einstein to modify his extreme views on pacifism. Realizing that this was not the time for upholding pacifist ideas <"When the time comes to preserve life then we have to fight back"), he persuaded himself that the Fascists would stop at nothing, and that the present civilization would be destroyed by the new barbarians if they would not be crushed in time. Having left Germany shortly before Hitler had become Chancellor of the Reich, Einstein demonstratively broke all his relationships with the Reich and resigned from the Prussian Academy. Once Nazism had forced Einstein to alter his views, he continued to fight the Brown Plague as a humanist as well as in his capacity "t a scientist. As is commonly | known by now, it was Einstein's early discovery that under certain conditions matter could be chang-' ed into energy and vice versa,; which enabled the scientists to construct the atomic bomb. Worried about the possibility that the Nazis might produce the weapon before 1 the Americans. Einstein, in August 1939. wrote a letter to President Roosevelt saying that a bomb could be produced which, "exploded in a port might very well destroy the whole port together with the surrounding territory." Fortunately, Einstein advice to accelaa erate research on the practical use of uranium did not fall on deaf ears, so that six yean after the scientist had mailed his letter the first atomic bomb was dropped from a U.S. airplane. But the fact that the war ended with an Allied victory did not cause him to stop worrying about the state of the world. Among other suggestions, he developed a plan for the preservation of peace despite atomic bombs. Asked What weapons would be used in a Third World War, he made this char act eristic reply: "I don't know. But I can tell you what they'll use in the fourth— rocks!" In this connection I remember distinctly his appearance, a couple of years ago, on Mrs. Roosevelt's television program. Talking on atomic energy -and world peace, he warningly raised s finger ss though he were, not in s studio, but in a schoolroom crowded with naughty adolescents. "The first problem is to do sway with mutual fear and distrust," the sage asserted. "In the last analysis, every kind of peaceful cooperation among men is primarily based on mutual trust and only secondly on institutions such as courts of justice and police." There are very few people equipped to judge on Einstein's accomplishments in physics, and I am not one of them. But I heartily agree with that colleague of his who once remarked that Einstein was the only scientist of whom he would say that, after subtracting all his achievements in his particular field, he would remain just as distinguished as betore. Einstein measures up to Spinoza's ideal "Free Man" — sober in his judgments, always acting in good faith, and showing equal courage whether he elects to give battle or to retreat. Emerson, too. would have been fool) The latter may not be, American philosopberii, character is even higbwl lect, thinking being H yet living being the _, but his whole life has kta] roboration of the lib opher's penetrating! Emerson, our septu_, freethinker, but far fnn| atheist (though to this i bigots can be found i who foolishly link the' Relativity, a purely it* with the emotional i the agnostics and nil stein is merely opposed I in a personal God to %  appeal for the fulfilment wishes, whom they en fluence by means of prayer. He links the I God who can be puces] human being with the I priesthood, and he i vast power frequently | hands of priests. Still Id fundamentally from thesf tury scientists who. pnsu discoveries, thought tbeys) pense with the idea of il Being As a matter cfl stein considers himself I] religious man: "The most beautiful! can experience is the i is the sower ot all tnsj science. He to whom tknj is a stranger, who can s| wonder and stand rapt f as good as dead. To what is impenetrable Ml exists, manifesting itsi] highest wisdom and thel ant beauty, which our fll| can comprehend only %  • primitive forms tbisf this feeling, is at the eaf religiousness. In this this sense only, 1 WQ ranks of devoutly reli GREETINGS HOLIDAY GREETINGS FRANK O. PHI ITT, Inc. —INSURANCE— 350 NX 15th STREET PHONE 2-3169 '. White Rock 3300 MARY STREET MAM. FLA. Phone 83-1633 TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY To Jewry Everywhere "RICHARD "DICsT BERENSON And Associates MIAMI FBOISTON -WE COVER THE' THESHERWIN ."— 14 N.f. Jtas A.e. IMS W. Bsfler ""•jT.sj. i • n* n, MM t-*, Ph. ss-sts) 3 •**"! %  %  'HIM,, SHSMH %  %  !>. r*. SS-STM — ** %  •IS Peace Be lees Mve. MIS Herrttse St 144* M.W. Je* "•• •will



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18. 1954 +Jewish Fhrkfctn PAGE 15 C OF lUt <| from Paea 2 C to learn that although Lt familiar with the He,dar. they managed to ith Jewish observances. i the matter is that they ierve the Jewish holidays to the Hebrew calendar, the Jewish celebrations istian months. Yom Kipai basis, was observed on day after the new moon ber. Passover was celethe full moon in March. Inquisition learned of rvances, the Marranos 'ed to change their plans. anced the celebrations pthe Seder was celebrated toys after the appearance moon in March, instead 9 days. ft* the sixteenth day that nobaked their matzot. |wo preceding days, which to their peculiar Hebrewcalendar, were really I they did not eat bread or mring their clandestine ey ate an entire sheep. icipants wore their traloes and held staffs in ids, just as the ceremony bed in the Bible. Observance Africa uliar Passover observthe Marranos found its he New World. In Mexico, Jews even .smeared the sheep on their doorposts med in the Bible. (Exodus e of the unusual Passover of the Marranos was that g the waters of a river or with willow branches, them was a reminder of tag of the waters of the This custom was probably with the use of the wilches on Succot. millions of Jews observe eve with the reading of gadah and the usually actraditions of the Seder, i one tiny band of men, and children who celebrate ival as it was done in the the ancient Israelites. Livhe vicinity of Mount GeriPalestine, these people as the Samaritans, carry on passover in a manner which ve ceased for some two d years. sually accepted theory has at the Samaritans were the colonists who settled in ter the country was crushAssyria. However, modern al research has proven that sent Samaritans are not ts of the pagan colonists in the Northern kingdom 1 by the conquerors of SaNor are they to be identiflNehemiah's opponents, of rcian period. Actually, research authorities claim that the Samaritans of today are really a tiny remnant of an ancient and great Jewish sect, who were always strongly religious, with faith in one God and strictly observing the Torah. They never recognized the Biblical books beyond Joshua as holy. In other words, they accept only the Hexateuch, that is the Five Books of Moses and Joshua. They believe that Shechem, the present Nablus, was the Holy City and that the holy mountain was not Zion, but Mount Gerizim. The Samaritans and the other Jews became blood enemies who-despised one another in the very same manner as the Karaites and Rabbinic Jews hated eat* other centuries later. It is this strong group, now numbering a handlpl of souls, which continues, to tmJi4av,.to observe Passover in a manner which Jews ceased to prattlSe 1 19 centuries ago. Today, on the eve of Passover, their colony is teeming with activity, as they prepare to slaughter the Paschal Lamb and carry out every detail as prescribed by tne laws of Moses. Theirs is a strange Judaism, tinged even with a slight heathenism such as that which influenced our forefathers many centuries agoT To the modern student of Jewish lore, the Samaritan rite is the nearest expression of Passover as practiced by Moses and the Israelites. Their observance is so primitive that it even differs from the Passover in the days of the Second Temple. They know nothing about the use of wine, of the Charoset, or eating the meal at a comfortable table. Even the practice of reclining during the Passover eve meal is strange to them. The principal rite in the Samaritan Passover observance consists of sacrificing a sheep and eating it, in a great hurry, with matzot and bitter herbs—as was done by the ancient Israelites. Leading the ritual is their high priest who performs rites very similar to those of the priests in ancient times. Falasha Jews Another sect which performs the Passover lamb sacrifice is that of the Falashas of Ethiopia. Known as the Black Jews of Abyssinia, they, too, follow a primitive type of Judaism based only on the Bible. Because they do not know Hebrew they follow and observe the laws of the Bible by reading them in an Ethiopian translation. On Passover eve, they assemble in their synagogue, and a lamb is sacrificed in the name of the entire Falasha community. A fascinating Passover observance is that of the Jews in the Caucasian mountain region. Sitting on the ground, they observe their Seder by being dressed in THE ACES their best clothes, with a pistol at their sides. The womenfolk are bedecked in jewels, and the young girls wear flowers in their hair. When the group reaches that portion of the Haggadah which declares that in every generation every Jew must feej as it he himself had been redeemed from Egypt, a dramatic presentation is introduced. The Rabbi or Chacham, as he is known, wraps a piece of matzeh in a piece of cloth, places it on his shoulder and after walking a short distance, declares: "In this way our forefathers went out of the land of Egypt, their kneading troughs bound up in their clothes upon their shoulders." A young man is selected to play the part of a wandering Jew arriving from Jerusalem bringing tidings that the redemption is approaching. The youth goes outside and then knocks on the doors. He is re-admitted and a conversation on this order follows: "Who are you and what do you want?" "I am a Jew and I wish to observe Passover, our season of deliverance, with you." "How do we know you are a Jew?" "I wear a four-cornered garment with fringes." There are many other questions and finally the "stranger" declares: "I come from Jerusalem, the holy city; the road is long and filled with obstacles. "He then breaks into tears, and suddenly he is invited to come into the house. He stands with a sword at his side, a staff in his hand and a sack on his shoulders. Joy breaks out and the visitor is asked many questions. "What is happening in Jerusalem. How are our brothers? Is the Messiah coming soon? ." The masquerader then relates of Jerusalem, of the beautiful fields and mountains of Israel, of the holy places. He assures the listeners that the sages of the holy city have had signs which indicate that the days of the Messiah are fast approaching. The long history of Passover has had many changes and evolutions. However, it has retained one feature from the beginning up to the present time—that of being a Jewish family celebration. Since the days in the desert of Sinai until now, as American Jews gather about their festive board, it has been a festival which unites all members of the family circle at one table, at one happy feast. In joining together in family unity, Jews observing the Seder, relive and share their collective memories of the heritage of Israel. They strengthen their hopes to live as Jews and as free men. Milgrim, Inc. \\ om en's Apparel 738 LINCOLN ROAD v PHONE 5-3429 MIAMI BEACH i TO AIL... HAPPY PASSOVER R. K. Cooper, Inc. 2733 PONCE DE LEON BOULEVARD Phono 83-4654 GREETINGS MAYFLOWER RESTAURANT, 80 S.E. Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida Serving: CLUB BREAKFAST — from 25c LUNCHEON — from 85a DINNER — from 1.00 Open Daily 7 a-m. to 1 aan. TO ALL... GREETINGS WEST INDIES FRUIT COMPANY 605 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD Phone 82-8473 Jtat JKUgm got



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PAGE 16 C *Jeisiifk**Man For the finest in Metal Work JOHN STAMFORD & SONS ORNAMENTAL METAL WORKERS 3615 N.W. 46th Street Telephone 64-7918 BRONZE ALUMINUM IRON 1733 ALTON ROAD Tel. 58-4134 GREETINGS FRANK J. ROONEY GENERAL CONTRACTORS 5880 N. E. 4th Avenue Phone 7-6695 TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY M A R V B IC L K A N E R S SERVICE and QUALITY CLEANING Mrs. Luclle P. Neher. Owner 16 CORAL WAY PHONE 48-2554 IKE OF Continued from P IOC to the common man. and to every Jewish home where the Blue-andW hue Box of the JNF. by its very presence, has added a special meaning to all family celebrations and simchot mitzvah. This little box enables the Jews, scattered though thev are throughout the world, by the" small act of their daily contribution of a few coins, to become partners in the redemption of their homeland, in the creation of a new Wdet* and in the cementing of a firm foundation for the future. After the Declaration of the State, I saw in my travels through i the countries of the Diaspora in I North and South America, in West! ern Europe, and in South Africa, a I special type of volunteer for whom %  the Keren Kayemeth is a symbol, an eternal light, a beacon that brightens the remotest places of the Dispersion, warming the heart SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL $ NATIONAL PRODUCE CO. OF MIAMI, INC. Wholesale Produce — Crate to Carload 1229 N.W. 21st Street Phone 3-6491 Ph. 84-5494 VIM ELECTROLUX CORP. 7819 Biscayne Boulevard INMAN MIAMI, FLORIDA All C O N (I T I o Nil N. MIAMI AVL AT FIRST ST. H.o. 9-1141 BEST WISHES for a HAPPY PASSOVER Moihe SJioreff impetus to redeem and never extinguished. These people, bound by their tendered ; and finest feeling! to Israel, to the land of Israel, and to the dynamic i development of the land, are repaid by the noble purpose Riven to I heir lives and everything they do. They devote decades to this work; they grow up in it. j;row 0 | ( i j n j t an j die with the feeling that they have performed a real and living service and helped to create something that would bear fruit forever. From yet another point of view the Jewish National Fund expresses the essence of our objectives. From the hour that the Jewish National Fund started on its path till the present day. it was, it is, a fighting institution. The men at the helm had to show firmness and reason, cunning and daring. I remember the great Strug gle fought by the Keren Kayemeth for the redemption of Emek Heier and Emek Zebulun. the Eastern and Western portions of Emek Yexreel, and areas in Beit Sha'an and Galilee; and what great obstacles had to be overcome at every step of our return to the land, its settlement, its farming, its protection and conservation All this time the Jewish National Fund fought a bitter security battle and a difficult political struggle. Who from amongst us. the veterans, doesn't remember the days of the White Paper and the Land Transfer Regulations, which seemed to lock us in stocks of only 5 percent of the entire country? How many cunning ruses and how much stubborn effort were expended in overcoming these difficulties? We smashed fences, breached walls and broke out of our narrow prison to freedom. Today the Jewish National Fund stands at the right hand of the State of Israel and the State give; its support to the Jewish National fund. The Fund is reclaiming wide areas of wasteland by aforestation; it has planted 25 million trees since the establishment of the State, as compared with 10 million in all the years preceding. National land has formed the basis of 300 new settlements founded in the past five or six years. TO A LL %  • GREETINGS US. ROYAL TIRES AMAUE (Pennsylvania) M0T0B r* DADE TIRE CO, he. 1501 N. MIAMI AVENUE JT Phone 3-8445 TO ALL HOLIDAY GREETINGS GREENLEAF & CR0! JEWELERS 1000 Lincoln Road Palm Beach-247 Worth A —— YOUR TRANSFER PROBLEI ES TRANSFER 48 N.W. 7th Street YACHTS AND MOTOR VESSELS Office Phene S2-579S IMMHM I W. F. M ll.tskov MARINE SURVEYOR GASOLINE I DIESEL 943 S.W. North River Drive f. 0. Rex 178* TO ALL HOLIDAY GREETINGS ALEXANDER D. SMI1 Real Estate 382 Miracle Mile. Coral Gables — Phontl and 3365 S.W. 3rd Avenue — Phone M G K §i E T a v a s from YOUNG REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COF PAUL E. HELLIWELL 'REBUILT BATTERIES 12 Month Guarantee—$7.50 up, exch. EXPERTS OH STARTER AND GENERATOR —REASONABLE PRICESBATTERIES — GENERATORS STAH HI VOLT BATTERY 1880 N.W. 7th Avenue DORN %  MARTIN DRUG PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 5898 Sunset Drive GREETINGS D D U MAKERS OF FINE CANDffS BONDED FRUIT SHIPPED 1121 Woehlngton Avenue TO ALL PASSOVER GREETINGS Florida B-lldf rs §•**** 100 N. E. 1st Are.



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MID SCHWARTZ Agency L„rf Raising Ce*wM JllNCOlN ROAD BUILDING [WisfceM ** U 5 Istablishei 1949 %  'We livcuit rer Successful Gracious LMn$" toft SCHOOL I WISHES YOU ALL WRY HAPPY PASSOVl* Through High School ic Commercial Courses. 75on Spaciout, Beautiful Indoor-Outdoor Classes, tents Accepted for Shoct Period!. IEST AVE. PH. 5 U>PY PASSOVER THE IK1STLER COMPANY luPONT BUILDING %  MIAMI. FLORIDA Phone 2-5154 t Monthly Payment in i Area on Horn* Loans [LOWEST RATES Mortgage Insurance Charge GREETINGS IT'S Roofing Company Tied on continuously 11920 — thru "booms." ssions" and hurriIn a great many \ it has maintained roofs pe same families and i thru two generations. ae not "Super-roofers" kre make every effort to worthy job. We conI that when we install a lit is our responsibility |it has outlived the term as for which the class bf was intended. Sincerely yours, Bill Palmer Phone 3-6244 MEW! in one great • • every new entific improve•nt known to OU Industry ciri,, '••wet' % .V ,ajM(i/H ^MOTOff NGf !" NfW TRW HD IM0T0R OIL THIS WEE K! J^f^MUEIoiHidliigiio MIAMI. FLORIDA FRIDAY. APRIL 18. 1954 SEC. D GREETINGS Frank Fischer — Steel Erector. Inc. 5706 NX 2nd AVENUE PHONE 84-1738 VOGUE Laundry and Clean* !" PHONE 5-7489 The Best For Less Office and Plant 1425 20th Street MIAMI BEACH • 11 r i w I $ RELIABLE PLUMBING, INC. "Tear Pofronoge Appreciates"' 193 NX 119th STREET PHONE 19-4297 TO ALL GREETINGS Stern Electrical Engineering RCA Radios — Television Sales and Service 5138 S.W. 8th STREET Phone 4-6540 Marine latjint Overhaul and tastelletiea Distributers Rensetb Marine Eneieei MIAMI MARINE ENGINEERS 411 S.W. 2n AVENUE MIAMI 36, FLORIDA F. W. Searsea C A. Itwter TI I POS M" MSJS Happy Passover To All My Friends Augiit Studio INTERIOR DECORATTNG 1230 Alton Road GREETINGS! ^Un-ps" Chirk GOLF PROFESSIONAL Biltmore 3t Granada Courses Lessons by Appointment Compute Una of Golfing Equipment Phone Biltmore 4-0649. 48-0410 Granada 48-9909. 4-9143 GREETINGS MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW YORK S10 Langford Bldg. PHONE 8-4747 Sincere Wishes to All Our Relatives and Friends for A Happy Passover Mr. and Mrs. George Chertkof AND FAMILY v a*WW% Now 8 Location* To Serve You Warshaw-Settle PRESCRIPTION PHARMACIES Stan No. 1 2340 Pone* Do Loon Boulevard Phona 4S-2S07 Store No. 2 Coral Cables Bus Terminal Phono 4S-4612 Also Open Evenings and Sundays Prescriptions Filled Promptly Cosmetics Candies Gifts Elizabeth Arden. Helena Rubinstein FREE DELIVERY ^*yrf>V*V*"V* l V'y'W*>* < *'V > 'W'V* A HAPPY PASSOVER LEWIS BEAUTY SHOPPE 1355 Washington Ave. MIAMI BEACH GREETINGS TOM DUPREE REAL ESTATE 741 Dad* Bird. MIAMI BEACH PHONE 58-5224 PASSOVER GREETINGS NATIONAL TITLE COMPANY and ASSOCIATES -J TO All GREETINGS Roekmoor f Garage New I/ne'er New Management 211 N.E. 59th STREET Phone 84-7441 TO ALL A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER James E. Roche PAINTING CONTRACTOR 217 N.E. 97th STREET Phone 78-5852 SINCERE HOLIDAYS GREETINGS FROM NORMANDY SCHOOL L£0 HUBERMAN 1021 Biarrits Drive PHONE 86-6811 MIAMI BEACH TO ALL PASSOVER GREETINGS We Specialize In • Hotel Contracts • Custom Finishing e Sand Blasting • Tropical Refinishing Dade Refinlshers 5002 E. 10th LANE HIALEAH, FLORIDA Phone 88-6846



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PAGE 2 D i~i<*Th*k#*r> TO ALL GREETINGS!! JANES REALTY COMPANY Not Incorporated KENDALL. FLORIDA — Phone 67-3651 HOMESTEAD. FLORIDA — Phone 1303 POMPANO BEACH — Phone 9815 A. W. JANES. Registered Broker HOLIDAY GREETINGS WEBER, THOMPSON & LEFCOURT ACCOUNTANTS AND AUDITORS Shoreland Arcade Phone 3-6251 HOLIDAY GREETINGS CHRISTOPHER MOTORS Plymouth — DeSoto 1200 N.E. 2nd Avenue Phone 3-3341 TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER W. CARROLL WILSON Real Estate Appraiser & Consultant duPont Building A HAPPY PASSOVER MILLER MACHINERY AND SUPPLY CO. Formerly MTLLER-LENFESTEY SUPPLY CO. 127 N. E. 27th Street Phone 82-5484 BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER Custombilt Furniture Mfg. Co. 100 N.E. 40th Street Phone 78-4781 Showrooms Corner 79th St. and Biscayne Blvd., Phone 78-4244 RAIIHI and MRS. S. 31. .11 \4 III II MR. and MRS. MORTON ST1TSKY STELLA REGINA and LEO JAY Extend To All Jewry Best Wishes for A HAPPY PASSOVER Mrs. Sadie Fagan Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hershbein and Children Extend Passover Greetings To All Th Remarkable Career of Sculptor Jacob Epstein By ALFRED WERNER On Ike lest day of last year Great Britain's Queen Elliabeth II completed a lengthy honor list while sailing with her husband to New Zealand on her commonwealth tour. Among the acceptable names she radioed from the mid-Pacific to who. like Max Weber and Abraham Walkowitz, were deitl— d to leave their mark on the 20th century art. In the "Gay Nineties" some of the very individuals who were to mould American opinion, American letters, and American arts in the early part of the twentieth century. England was that of the American-1 were roaming the East Side with bom sculptor, Jacob Epstein, upon whom knighthood was beetowed. There is nothing unusual foe British Kings and Queens to bestow some of the highest honors available in the Empire on persons of the Jewish. Moslem or any other non-Christian faith. Nor do the sovereigns discriminate against individuals born outside England and the British Commonwealth. But the selection of Epstein is curious and. at the same time most gratifying because, in the past, he was a stormy petrel of modern art, and for several decades, a center of heated controversies. As recently as 1945. when the artist offered his huge winged Lucifer to London's Tate Gallery, the gift was rejected because there was disagreement as to the figure's merits; in 1952, however, the Tate trustees reversed their position, and the following year public opinion was ready to put the coveted "Sir" before his Biblical first name, to bestow on the septuagenarian an honor denied to such British colleagues of his as Frank Dobson or the late Eric Gill. American Jews have every rea* son to be proud of Epstein, for though lie spent the better part of his life in England, and has long been a naturalized British subject, he is a product of New York schools. •' -0 Epstein was born in 1880, on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. He was one of a group of gifted boys its pushcarts and peddlers, its long-bearded patriarchal Jews in the Ghetto, its Italians, Irish and Chinese. But Jacob did not join the other Jewish youngsters on his street in warding off the Irish boys, nor did he observe the holidays in the synagogue with his parents, recent immigrants from Tsarist Russia. Worlds apart from his large. Yiddish-speaking family, the adolescent withdraw and spent his time reading "Las Miserables," "The Brothers Karamazov," "Leaves of Grass" and even the New Testament. He attended political meetings to hear Prince Kropotkin, Eugene Debs, and the single taxer Henry George, addressing the crowds. At other times he would simply wander about the streets, sketching the odd characters who engaged his interest. "Rembrandt would have delighted in the East Side," Epstein remarked, at the peak of his fame: "I imagine that the feeling I have for expressing a human point of view, giving human rather than abstract implications to my work, comes from these early formative years." As a teen-ager, Epstein attended the life class at the Art Students League uptown, but always held himself aloof from his fellow-students. He cared neither for their bad jokes nor their bad beer. He loved to drop into Durand Ruel's Gallery on Fifth Avenue where he admired, not only the French ImW prsssionistj, but ican "rebels" *' George Innet, All Thomas Eakins moved tobetur' Jacob refused to W shook their heads bi •o stay here, happy J ion. And thus Ja^ j the rickety old corner of Raster Streets Re lived UM like a shed thai a i just an iron bediteaTj s, '>ve. and JacobT' sketches and types on them. paining] Jacob Epstein was born and grew up on this teeming street in the Lower East Side of Manhattan. By cooking huw,. Paying only $4 rest, I to make ends meet OBI and he was contenta] that amount by sellingskL There was so much tail sketch, for instance. actor. Jacob Adler, t his Second Avenue i poet, Morris Rosenfeld.il a tailor's sweetshop. OaJ stein received a I was asked to illustrate 1 Hapgoods book about | Side This volume, "IVjj the Ghetto." appeared %  the age of twenty, I mastered the art oh self through a few, i tive bold lines. It it i no American publisher ( this remarkable work. With the money he | work, supplemented bjj income from a rnaguiK] bought a steamship France on a trans-octal to the first World War,i cation was considered! less the artist had sun He toiled hard at the ] Beaux Arts, but was i tinue in his anatomjt the green arm of a. handed around for i fainted. In 1905. this can" (as he wasnid fessors and students) I to London without idea that he was come a Londoner, a Bn and the husband of; tish girl. On the otktj England he was tat; count U-.-!. controveniey many adversaries. He t a gallery "* ner tW j visitor had explained:, like to take Ep-tinortl er -hop and have his I ped off." A confused f ed British Prime Mi fainted as he was urn his monuments in Hydel as time went on. mortf people understood his r and agreed with hia Now and then Jew I artist for occupying the symbols of a reliW Continued w '* GREETINGS BARBER LUMBER CO., INC. 901 N.W. 71st St, Miami. Florida Phone 7-0417 Courteous Service — Good Lumber — Reasonable Prices SEASON'S GREETINGS REED CONSTRUCTION CORP. Engineers and Contractors 1345 20th Street Miami Roach, Flo. FOUNDATIONS DOCKS GUNITINO BASCULE AND FIXED BRIDGES CONCRETE STEEL COMPLETE DINNERS with • large variety 0 f entrtti FROM $1.20 Jerry's Restaurant S, NE ?.! N CL V, DE8: Choice of apseDa*rt, Beverage. Fr„ P.rtilng Op.t, 24 Hour. Air Conditioned By th* Airport Bervlns "The rV-xt of th. Kur." 3Sth Street and LeJeune Rd Phone 64-5341 SEASON'S BEST WISHES TO ALL TEFfTS GOWNS BRIDAL & EVENING WEAR 3546 Coral Way 1341.2 "WHERE THE ELITE MEET" SHANGRI-LA Authentic Chinees Dishes LUNCHEONS — DINNERS Elks Club Building 15 N. E. 3(4 Avenue PHONE INtt OPEN TILL UK Orders Put Up to Take Out We Wire Flowers Phone tll-7113 EM and STAN'S FLORIST Bridal Bouquets — Cut Flowers Potted Plants — Funeral Wreaths Flower Shop and Nursery CORSAGES — We Deliver 14*01 W. DIXIE HWY. NORTH MIAMI BEACH Dial II then 85980 ,!REETINS" ElTc RESTAUBANT <'*} i *T US CATER '"r_| Bu U*&0 !" • If" /•' WiRBIM'Sl>* TI <***'Id Ml*"



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V APRIL 16. 1954 *Je*istn*ridltor PAGE 3 D -*it %  '^ % % % % % % % % % % % % %  ^ % % % % % % % % % %  MelaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaVsaaalsaaaleBaWaaaaaaaaaaaaaH officials of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith shown on a four-week study J West Germany. They traveled at the invitation of the Bonn Government. Jacob Alson I, treasurer of the League, is chairman of the group that includes Benjamin R Epstein kd from left), ADL's national director, and Nathan C. Belth (left), its public relations diL Mr. Alson is accompanied by his wife. The group is visiting Frankfurt, Bonn, CoI, Dusseldorf, Essen, Munich, Hamburg and Berlin, surveying civil rights and reliqious lions in West Germany. ie Fate of the Old Rashi Shul By SAM MILLER JTA blS—When Nazi vandals set the synagogue in this Rhineown during the November ks of 1938, the walls remainDding — they had already the vicissitudes of better years. (solidity irked the local Nazi I In 1942, with Allied bombs on German cities, they : special machinery into the ral shell 'that remained of nagogue and, with trained in attendance to see to neighboring houses were tigered, blew up the walls. field of rubble was left IJews had, with short interis, prayed morning and night I Almighty for more years, it pved, than in any other house ship in Europe. pioneer Jewish settlers in i are so lost in antiquity that popular legend identified >s members of the tribe of din who had migrated to the |of the Rhine directly from llestine of Biblical times. It likely, though, that the pws came here together with nan legionaires. Around the LOOO at any rate, records of pognc Fair show among the a Jewish merchant from ne Middle Ages, the Rhine of Speyer, Worms and Mainz pee)—known in Hebrew by Ibreviation "SHUM," formed [contracted initials of the trio —were renowned among Jews everywhere as centers of wealth and learning that enjoyed far-reaching privileges granted by various Emperors. Not so long ago the ceiling of the synagogue in a city as far away as Mohlilev in White Russia was decorated with a mural showing an idealized picture of Worms. The scholars who made their homes here transformed Worms into one of the oustanding kehillot of Europe. In the shadowy interior of the Worms synagogue, founded by the childless couple Jacob and Rachel a generation earlier, a young man who later became the beloved Bible commentator Rashi studied in the 11th century at the feet of Isaac Ben Eliezer Halevi and Jacob Ben Yakar of Worms, both great Talmudists. From there Rabbi Eleazar Ben Yehuda Ben Kalonymos, the Tosafist and liturgical poet known throughout Jewry as the "Rokeah," introduced the Cabbalah into Germany. During the third Crusade, a mob of pilgrims killed his wife and two daughters. Rabbi Meir of Rothenburg (12201293), the universally acknowledged "Light of the Exile" who was also known as "Maharam," was born in Worms and buried in the local cemetery when, years after his death, his body was redeemed from the hands of Emperor Rudolph. Rabbi Meir had set out for the Holy Land, but the German sovereign simply caused him to be thrown into a fortress so as to discourage other Jews from emigrating. Seven long years the recognized leader of German Jewry was held for ransom, but he remained steadfast in his refusal to permit his co-religionists to purchase his freedom, lest such a precedent inspire the Emperor to repeat this species of blackmail. Unyielding to the end, Rabbi Meir passed away in prison. Other gaonim, too, were buried in the Worms cemetery—in 1427, for example, Morenu Jacob Ben Moses Malevi, the eminent "Maharil." In later centuries, the progress of the times was reflected in the activities of the distinguished sons of the Worms Community. One of them, Samson Wertheimer, became the potent Vienna financier and Court banker of the 18th century, a great Talmudic scholar and benefactor of Jewry. More than 100 years ago, it was in Worms that, probably for the first time in Germany, a professing Jew was elected mayor of his native city. In 1934, when Jews celebrated the Synagogue's 900th anniversary, Worms was still a flourishing Community with more than 1,000 members. Today not one is left who could even say kaddish for them: two elderly women make up the city's resident' Jewish population, and there is no foreseeable chance that congregation will ever again be reconstituted. Worms, which epitomized the spiritual glory that was German Jewry's in another day, now symbolizes its extinction. The two women may continue to live there for many years to come, and possibly one of the erstwhile Continued on Page 12 D GREETINGS eigaard & Preston Builders, Inc. I Ponce de Leon Blvd. ONE 83-8014 CORAL GABLES I Passover Greetings • *• Tail & Company I 8017 N.E. 2nd Ave. MIAMI V. t.alardi PW Biacayne Blvd. ^* ALL HIS FRIENDS HA PPY PASSOVER GREETINGS JOHN A. MATTHEWS 620 SECURITY BLDG. MIAMI. FLA. Up-to-Date Van Service LEW M. CISCO Transfer & Storage 328 N. E. 2nd Avenue PHONE 2-5411 TO JEWRY EVERYWHERE It'i a Pleasure to Extend GREETINGS TYCOON TACKLE SHOP. Inc. 400 S.W. Mnd Avenua METALLIC ENGINEERING CO. Specializing in Alloy Metals 275 S. W. 6th STREET SHOP PHONE 9-5634 GREETINGS Reg's Appliances "VM CM C SUM, U Wt WtSriNGHOUSt" 12440 NX. 7th AVENUE PHONE 7-7767 When Friend* Drop In During the Holiday* Serve Delicious Cakes and Cookies from SAVORY BAKE SHOP 1684 ALTON ROAD PHONE 585121 A HAPPY PASS0VCR TO ALL MR. and MRS. LOUIS MILNICK SREETIIIGS TO ALL E. B. LEATHERMAN DADE COUNTY COURT HOUSE TO OUR MANY FRIENDS AND PATRONS MUCH HAPPINESS DURING THE HOLIDAY SEASON H O B A R T Miami Restaurant Equipment 905 N.E. 1st AVENUE PHONE 9-2655 To Our Many Friends and Acquaintances A Most Happy Passover W SHAFER and MILLER GENERAL CONTRACTORS 6500 CELLINI STREET Phone 67-3330 AIAAK" r*W^*^*'*WA^'W'W'W'WA>>s'W'W'W'W'W*W'WA*P* GREETINGS CEMENT BLOCK INDUSTRIES CERTIFIED CEMENT BLOCKS £ Immediate Delivery pi JACK SWERDLIN 4490 S.W. 74th Avenua—Off Bird Rd. PHONE 87-7690



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PAGE 4 D Jen isifhrkKnr FRIDAY. APRai A Happy Nl l ll'W to the Jewish Community J. E. LUDICK 620 N.E. 125th STREET To All Passover Greetings Lagoon Restaurant and Bar YOUR PATRONAGE APPRECIATED 23 SUNNY ISLE BOULEVARD TO ALL A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER NASH MIAMI MOTORS, INC. 545 N. E. 15th Street Miami. Florida Phone 9-2626 WHEN SHOPPING ASK FOR ANITRA FASHIONS AT YOUR FAVORITE STORE miflV A LEE IMPORTERS, IIVC. 7343 Collins Are.. Miami Beach 252 Coral Way, Miami 86-2419 909 SEASON'S GREETINGS Furnishers A Installers Inlaid Linoleum — Asphalt Tile Rubber Tile "EVERY INSTALLATION GUARANTEED"* Phone for Fres Estimates 42SS N. W. 7th AVENUE PHONE 7 TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER DOUGLAS LUMBER COMPANY MR. AND MRS. HERBERT NAURISON AND DAUGHTER MURIEL ANN LUMBER AND OTHER BUILDING MATERIALS Phones 48-246548 9862 3775 South Dbde Highway Miami. Honda Advances Recorded in all Sectors of IsraePs E With the approach of its sixth ,,;i as an independent State, Israel irecording new advances ; -one development towsid nk Independence, industry. ilture, eonmonicatloBB, I trade each n the r suits of run! work an.I sacrifice by the men and women of Israel, and ipacl of large-scale li : leans through their purchases of state of Israel Bonds. The past twelve months *aw the : i m a economic trend. nh Israel increasing its exports and |hing its imports drastic illy This more favorable balance of | trade is the result of an increase in the number and si/e of industrial plants, which are producing more %  oft and hard—good commodities than ever before: the expansion of agricultural projects, which are _;< itly improving supplies of food, and the accelerated pace of mineral exploration and development. which is providing phosphates and potash for export. Other contributing factors in the establishment of the new economic pattern were the gains made in the field of transportation, which included the following: The completion of a 48-mile highway from Beers heba to S'dom. ] which now provides easy transport facilities to and from Israel's coast, and has been a vital spur to the reactivation of potash production at the Dead Sea. The enlargement of the capacity of Haifa Harbor from 1.300.000 tons to 4.000.000 Ions. The expanded harbor will make Israel a major trade center for the entire Middle Eastern area. The construction of a new railway from Tel Aviv to Hadera. which now provides as essential link between the two major coastal cities of Tel Aviv and Haifa. Much of this wide industrial. agricultural, mining and commercial growth has been accomplished with proceeds from the Israel Bond Issue. Although Israel's battle for economic self-sufficiency has been difficult, the tide is turning. With continued financial aid from Israel bond investors in this country and in Canada. Israel is expected to experience a large increase in its export trade. Israel's trade deficit dropped to $223,885,000 during 1953. as compared to $314,157,000 in 1952. Imports decreased by $76,874,000 while exports increased from $44.402.000 to $57,890,000. This improvement in foreign trade marks a sharp upward move in Israel's program for economic independence. Private investment capital, including funds derived from the Israel Bond Issue, helped Israel increase its industrial efficiency. In conoitiy< Coffee plants now successfully grown in Israel. Era hero aro the results of eight years ok trial and error i mentation carried forward with the aid of Israel Bond) 1952. there were some 9.000 industrial enterprises and workshops in operation. By the end of 1953, the figure had risen to more than 10. 000. During the same period, the number of factory workers increased from 105.500 to 120,000. Elec trical power capacity rose from 125.000 kilowatts to 180,00 kilowatts. Israel Bond dollars have helped to establish or expand dozens of huge industrial firms, including the Nesher Cement Company, Yuval Gad Pipelines Ltd., Palestine Economic Corporation and the Mekorat Water Works Company. Agriculturally. Israel advanced rapidly during the past year. The area under cultivation increased from 737,50 acres to 875.000 acres, while the area under irrigation rose from 100.000 acres to 138.000 acres. The farm worker corps reached a high of 75.000. compared to.fc.000 in 1852 This Passover. Israel, utilizing Israel Bond funds, is going for ward with its huge nation-wide water conservation program, which includes the following major irrigation projects that are scheduled for completion by 1957: The Huleh Valley Project, which will supply water to the entire valley and provide a source of hydroelectric power. The Kishon Valley Fnoject, which will supply Haifa, sal meet the water problems of th jRirrounding area. Taking advantage of some of the areas which have already been made fertile, Israeli scientists and agricultural experts, in conjunction with American and United Nations SEASON'S GREETINGS >ewman, Iturk & < allioiiii REALTORS Real Estate & Mortgages 813-15 First National Bank Bldg MIAMI. FLORIDA AMERICA'S HEADQUARTERS FOR FOOD SERVICE EQUIPMENT Supplies, Furnishings, Equipment f e r HOTELS, RESTAURANTS, CLUBS, RESORTS, SCHOOLS, HOSPITALS, INSTITUTIONS such as CHINAWARE, GLASSWARE, SILVERWARE, ETC. EDWARD DON & COMPANY Phone 24125 1400 N. MIAMI AVE. MIAMI 32. FLA. %  M GREEN PLANT FOOD On Youx Lawn? Startling results cm b. obf"'.i f wm this rich plant food M. e £ COB, i minerals that will help keep chinch bugs out of your lawn. Sold exdualTely HUGHES SEED STORE M 8. Miami Ave. Ph. 3.831, SRifTINCS E. II. Grappe Associates, Inc. TIME and SIGNAL SYSTEMS 31 SO H.W. 7th STRUT %  tea* 44 1571 TO 411 Mf FffiENDS AMP ACQl/4/JTAKCES CtftTNrSS Thomas Perkins 1SSJ SUMSET BRIVE 17-41 IS technicians have developed 1 and soil conditions with' grow many crops that hartl before been seer, in Israel j crops as sisal, bananas, coffaj peanuts, cotton, sugar beets] juncous. a source for the 1 ture of choice paper, hart] grown successfully under guidance Israel's more favorable of trade has also resulted a expansion of the new Stated! ing and chemical operation] cause of a decrease in the I trade deficit, the be able to allocate morel ing the coming year for 1 velopment of Israel's sources. This year, Israel's ma expected to earn or sare I in hard currency. By 195*. 1 are expected to reach Sill as a result of stepped-up| tion in the copper mines all the iron mines of Galilee! north and of the Negn south, and the basic plants near the Dead Set The first shipment of from the Dead Sea left I* a foreign market a fe* ma and full scale exploitation l phate and ceramic deportl" Negev has already bepa. developments will w d a the foreign currency ga* Besides these gains. lsruTIJ eral development programs the creation of basic m


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iy, APRIL 16. 1954 +Jewlsti rhrKttan PAGESD hese Things Have I Seen Rabbi Ephreim F. Einhorn i over two years ago I visited bb countries, in the disguise .totestant minister. The disvas necessary since, as a. Jew, I have been refused the necJ fisa< I toured these ceuntom Morocco, through Egypt, Iraq, to the Borders of L my earliest childhood I fcen fascinated by the exciting of the great Jewish masjho had so profoundly influrabic culture and contribnmeasurably to the splendor nic rule for centuries. rived in Tangier, North on the first leg of a trip Las t take me into a world of [and ancient civilizations, and first time in my life I saw rdic Jews in ghettos which, li.-ery. squalor and despair, de[description. Worse sights, ler, were in store for me as tnued my trip into the Spanjne of Morocco and saw the r> of Tel nan and Alcazarquivflil. ten, and even twelve peoi,t-pi in small rooms, which [in fact nothing but holes in [roll. As if their terrible povH.TP not enough to blast their they enjoyed the status of sts. The Arabs treat them as and the Spanish police. .-. ami other authorities will endanger" their policy of |i.uge ;md friendship to the cfor the sake of mere Jews, fill side with the Arabs in cal dispute. t, Fez and Casablanca were I of the cities I visited in the fch zone of Morocco. Fourteen jnd Jews still remained in the (ghetto) of Rabat. They in daily fear of their lives. jt.'ni threats and periodic posuch as those in Oujda and |i a, where sixty of their felws were killed, had turned into frightened creatures I of their own shadows. They jtraid of the future: they know hen the French Jeave, theff at the mercy of the Arabs '.ere will be no escaping. ^tld Monsieur Marchat, the iter diplomatique in Rabat, my impressions, and he re! 'The Jews and Arabs live • %  : %  together," and when I reI to the pogroms he shrugged kfcoulders and remarked, "Of e, these things will happen." (i eight) thousand Jews still Promise and Performance I in Casablanca, like the fof Rabat, Fez. Marrakech and communities in Morocco do jvh "'ito happen" to them. no,4onger put any stock in lance or promises, 1 was soon N out how right they are. |-r visiting Oran, Algiers and I arrived in Tripoli where I [received by the first Prime i r ui the newly-created Unitpngdom of Libya, Mahmud Bey psscr During a meeting in his TO office, which lasted for more than an hour, he assured me that there would not be any repetition of the pogroms of 1945. (in which one hundred thirty Jews were killed) and of 1948, (in which thirteen were killed). He suggested that it would be best to forget the past, and expressed the conviction that the Jews would enjoy such freedom and security and those who had already moved to Israel will wish to return. Of course, the United Nations Trusteeship Council nominally still administered the country, and those assurances we're apparently designed to allay their; doubts and fears. This same Mun-' tasser, however, has now forbidden I the Jews all contact with Israel.' They are not allowed to emigrate there, let alone return. I vividly re( call my visit to the "hara," the lo-! cal ghetto. The children were suffering from trachoma, and many of them were tuberculosis cases. In one courtyard home the women were busily engaged scrubbing the floors in preparation for the Sabbath; a tiny little stool in the center of the room, which served as a table for the entire family, alreadyhad halot and candles on it early on a Friday morning. They look forward to the coming of the Sabbath with great expectations; it is the one great compensation for their otherwise drab and miserable existence. I de hope that the seventeen blind children who had been picked up from the gutter by the Joint Distribution Committee and trained in several crafts, were able to reach Israel in time. Mr. T. R. Blackley, the British Resident General of Libya, told me that since twenty-five thousand out of thirty-five thousand Jews had already emigrated, the acute housing conditions have been somewhat relieved, and the Arabs would be less likely to attack again. In the Land of Egypt After a short stay in Benghazi, I flew to Cairo. The Semiramis Hotel, in which I stayed, was one of the most luxurious in Egypt. All around it were huge palaces guarded by police day and night, yet everywhere—in front of the hotel and throughout the city—I saw hundreds of Egyptians in rags, sleeping or squatting in the gutters. Disease, filth, and indifference on the part of the leaders, are the common characteristics of Egypt, Lebanon, Iraq, and the other countries I was yet to visit. The man in the street was terribly envious of the so-called "Palestine refugees," who are pampered, spoilt, overfed, and have all the advantages of medical science at their disposal. They are guarded and as preciously watched over as the inmates of the harems. No fellah in his wildest dreams ever hoped for such a good fortune. Activities are organized for children of all ages in the camps, and extensive welfare and educational programs have been instituted. Shower baths and clubs are found in many of them. Many Egyptians are well aware of the fact that the "refugees" are practically the only ones in their part of the world who do not suffer Continued on Page 10 D Young Jew from Kurdistan now residing in Israel and attired in his native regalia of the aristocrats to welcome Passover. The painting is by Nota Koslowsky. I MOST HAPPY IISSOVER TO ALL Bon Cleaners & Laundry Irving Kornicks 26 N.W. 5th STREET Phone 2-5214 >; Convenient Inexpensive ce w d. Aluminum or Steel >*e Door Sales PRESENTS "•* & Industrial Door. ,Nw -36thSL Ph. 64-5011 GREETINGS LEE'S Established 32 years 324 N. E. 13th Street Manufacturer* Wholesale Retail Fishing Tackle Repairing Underwater Equipment SEASON'S GREETINGS $ MR. and MRS. ALFRED STONE of theBLACKSTONE HOTEL GREETINGS Hollopeter & Post, Imc. REAL ESTATE SALES & RENTALS 153 N.E. 3rd Street Phone 3-7376 S. H. KRESS A CO. 5-10-25C STORE 1201 Washington Avenue MIAMI BEACH. FLA. HAPPY PASSOVER FROM TSAOI -* %  MIAM'I COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY MR. and MRS. AL BERMAN of the HI-GRADE FOOD CO. 1733 N. W. 7th Ave. MIAMI Ph. 9-8456 m EXTEND BEST WISHES TO ALL THEIR FRIENDS AND PATRONS FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER MR. AND MRS. HARRY MARKOWITZ and Family Tommy Robby Jerry WISH THEIR RELATIVES AND FRIENDS A HAPPY PASSOVER THAT ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS MAY ENJOY A HAPPY PASSOVER JSTHE SINCERE WISH OF THE AUGUST FAMILY and AUGUST RROS. BAKERY 361 S. W. Eighth Street Phone 2-2792 SINCERE WISHES FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER AL MEIDENBERG AND STAFF A-1 EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 37 N. E. 5th Street BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER MR. fc MRS. MAX FRIEDSON American Builders Supply. Inc. 2728 S.W. 28th Lane PHONES 4-2296 — 4-6206 Tropical Marine Agency, Inc. Ship's Suppliers Groceries, Meats, Vegetables Jj and Hardware PIER 3, COMMERCIAL DOCK "£ PHONE 3-5284 Niil Garcia



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PAGE 6 D +Jewish fhrkliari FRIDAY. MR. and MRS. STEPHEN F. KESSLER Charles Jeffry and JoAnn Extend Best Wishes to Their Family and Friends MR. AND MRS. HARRY GENET SAUL AND "BUBBY" GENET 5101 Lakeview Drive EXTEND BEST WISHES TO ALL FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER — Legislators are Disappointed By MILTON FRIEDMAN JTA PASSOVER GREETINGS Deering Awning and Furniture Co. Serving Greater Miami — Coral Gable* — Miami Beach Beach. Lawn and Porch Furniture COMPLETE AWNING SERVICE 4000 PONCE DE LEON BOULEVARD (Corner Bird Road) Phone 83-7600 IN A HURRY CALL KfMBALL MURRAY THE LUXURY DRY CLEANERS 5705 N.W. 2nd Avenue Phone 78-5521 GREETINGS Investors Diversified Services. Inc. MORTGAGE LOAN DEPARTMENT Room 300 1st National Bank Building CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY FLORIDA MACHINERY CORP. Contractor Equipment Woodworking and Metal working Machinery 316 S.W. NORTH RIVER DRIVE PHONE 9-0647 \\ WHIN'CTON Those RepubliL nn< whn sincerely seek to revise %v discriminatory MrCarran-Walter Immigration Aci and secure passage of civil rights legislation ssion are dishea r ten e d by the Mint* "f the White House to support them. The I'onuressinnal session is well under way It has brought with it evidence that President Eisenhower has abandoned the stand he so clearly enunciated last session against the McCarran-Walter Act. Also, he knocked the props from UMkr the Ives Humphrey CivH Rights Bill by telling a press conference that he did not share Secretary of Labor Mitchell's views favoring the bill. The President led a liberal Republican-Democratic coalition in a vigorous and successful fight against the Bricker Amendment. He took important executive steps to eliminate anti-Negro segregation. But his general attitude toward legislative action on the McCarran-Walter and civil rights issues has caused concern among liberal Republicans. This is an election year Mr. Eisenhower has tried to find a middle of the road approach in order to please both the progressive and conservative wings of the Republican Party. On some questions of hieh policy he has succeedj ed. Whether he pleased all fac-j tions of his party by his handling Of the McCarthy problem is open I to question. His retreat from McCaiTan-Walter repeal is another example of a vital problem attended by intensely conflicting partisan pressures. The president's failure to support Republican Senator Ives and Secretary Mitchell, a member of his own cabinet, in efforts to put through a civil rights bill is not surprising. On this score the Presi# dent's opponents may denounce his stand but they must admit his conlsi.ncy. For his opposition to any \ civil rights law with enforcement powers was clearly and consistent> ty expressed during the 1952 election campaign. The McCarran Walter revision question, however, is a matter on which the President gave his solemn word. East Coast Fisheries, Inc. West Flaqler Street—At the Bridge A Happy Passover to All Our Friends and Patrons FRIENDSHIP HOUSI 747 LINCOLN ROAD MIAMI BEACH INOWlfS I T 0 M07 COLLINS AVENUE MIAMI BEACH In 1952, Mr. Eisenhower made his opposition to the McCarranWalter Act crystal clear. Consistent with his pledge, he strongly urged Congress to revise the Act. This was on the occasion of his 1953 State of the Union Message. Later, in 1953, he listed specific complaints against the Act which had been drawn to his attention. He sent the list to Chairman Watkins of the Senate Immigration Subcommittee with a request for action. The Watkins reply rejected the President's request under the pretext that the Republican Party was in a strong position on the immigration issue owing to the passage of a compromise version of an 1953 Emergency Refugee Act. This act not only failed to revise the Mc( irran Walter regulations but actually embodied the same concepts in a form which some considered even worse than the McCarran Walter Act itself. The new act provided for the admission of 214.000 refugees from Communism and others in excess of r*ular quotas. But so many restrictions were added that only four persons were able to get in during six months in which the act was in force. The act has been nevertheless described by the White House as one-of the ten greatest legislative achievements of the new Administration. Meanwhile, during the commotion over the 1953 Refugee Act, McCarran-Walter revision was sidetracked. Evervone waited until the air cleared. They looked forward to the January, 1B54, State of the Union Message by President Eisen hower. They looked in vain. He failed to mention the act. On March 17th, the President decided that he had no intention of Becoming "a bull in a China shop' — far aa McCarran-Walter reslsion Viet rmiSMt I •••Wtrtrfin is concerned. He erpluki] respondents that as we %  to the principles of I Fathers, the closer we M solving the McCarran-Witej lem. Some of the con looked at him. They we were moving closer hi Founding Fathers or gotag U opposite direction. Mr. Eisenhower's remain reply to a question posed I gro reporter. The reporteri Vice President Richard H,| as saying that "Every xt discrimination or prejudice^ United States hurts much as an espionage | turns over a weapon to i enemy." (Mr. Nixon said I report several months agoi discrimination in the I causes foreign nations to I favorable opinions of this ( Citing the Nixon state reporter asked Mr. he thought discrimination I ed in the McCirrio-WjIjaJ damages our foreign relaH whether he was doing about liberaliiing the at | President tnen annouscsil would not transform "a bull in a China shop" H things. He said the State 1 ment had made no McC ter complaints to him. Recipes for Passover ^*\r'V^\**'-'V^^^W" / N*^A^^^ -V '*Wi cup chopped, Beat the egg sugar and mix th grated rind of V4 lemon, crushed pineapple, matzoh flour and stiffly beaten egg whites. Pour mixture into a greased pudding dish and sprinkle with chopped nuts. Bake in a moderate oven until browned eapple well, add ughly. Add (about 30 minutes). Lamon PuH •' p 1 cup water Vt cup oil tt teaspoon salt 1 cup matioh flour Bring to a boil "I* and matzoh flour. Sims*? until the mixture le**I the pan. Remove from and allow to cool. M >\ at a time, beating U* %  with each addition. BW by spoonsful into a P*"*5 pan and bake in ajga 45 minutes. >/"••• %  *• Centimiedonr'ajttf 1 U''WWWWW^^rf*W^ a ^WJ >^ywy TO ALL — PASSOVER GREETINGS WM. I. ALLEN and CHAS. HABLOW CUSTOM CRAFT MFG. CO., INC and PARRY INDUSTRIES and 450 N.W. 14th STREET MIAMI ToAU... A 3iost Happy Pasnover MOORE Compliments of I MB. AND MRS. JOSEPH URAM SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL FURNITURE THE BEST THROUGH THE AGES 4012 N. E. 2nd AVENUE TO ALL .. GRHBTrtaS Weber's Ice Cream Company 2301 N.W. 2nd'AVENUE Phono S-04B3 fcSTHECafll Truck Body 7l4K.W.wH TO ALL.-.P^ GREETINGS \eolite *+\ 3900 H.W.*** PHONE ^



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PRIL 16. 1954 ***lsl>nDr*ftor7 PAGE 7 D and the Land of the Rajah; ilA H. HADDAD bnvalescing in Calcutta eived a telegram from luartecs in Jerusalem dito proceed to Cochin, la. not included in the Tedule of my trip to that Far East, [ire, lying some 20 miles jiodern Cochin, had atfjews as a haven of reffcenter of trade from the Jies. Some historians beIthc first Jewish settlers arrived there with ion's fleet. Others hold lochin Jews are descenJje tribes taken into capBhalmanezer of Assyria iehow may have found %  to Malabar. Other theorist they may be of Perj stock, or that they are is of the Jews taken to Nebuchadnezzar. is of Cochin, however, that soon after the de|f the Second Temple (70 Jews had escaped an captors, and landed on |r coast, where they were received by the Hindu allowed to settle in difIrtHI thi' country. The nadc their home in Crani miles north of modern %  ccessive Hindu rulers acfcm liberal treatment—so bat in the course of a few Ihey rose to political emips ancient community is tents to emigrate to Ise. sooner or later, it will ed in the melting pot of kered tribes of Jacob. An fbacteriologist accredited nistry of Health and the gency, arrived in Bomla month ago to cure EleI and I'hilariae among the |ws. These are the two diseases which have npeded the admission to i tribe that has been posfcce the War of Indepen|h a messianic fervour to brothers here. I day in Bombay, I set out together with Dr. A\ B. resolute Cochin Jewish r had pleaded the case of unity in Israel recently. A hde by plane brought us Imitivc aerodrome of CoB)r. Salem and I, walking le shabby airport building, pi the colonnaded veranookinj; the runway, there oup of men, fine-looking, ely tall, their dark brown ktly bearded, white skullDroidered with colourful overing their heads. dressed in local garkg white cotton shirts over i trousers or striped hotis. wore light sandals, but per were barefooted withlion. Later in Ernakulam, er meeting a refined woman-doctor and looking aghast at her bare feet. She explained that Mother Earth was too sacred to be trodden on by footwear. One after the other, the venerable leaders of the Enakulam, Parur, Mala and Chendamangulam congregations greeted me with "Baruch Haba" in clear Sephardic pronunciation, and bestowed on my neck garlands made of heavysmelling jasmine or of gold thread elaborately adorned with stars and tassels, while a handsome little boy presented me with a beautiful nosegay. What is the truth about the origin of the Jews of Cochin? The most up-to-date conclusions about these facts are well related in the thorough study of that ancient Community published in 1950 by Mr. S. S. Koder, the President of the South-India Jewish Association who was a Jewish representative in the Cochin Legislative Council from 1925 to 1948. Thanks to a valuable collection of manscripts and documents he possesses in his bulky library and to his wide fa miliarity with the manners, customs, traditions and dialects of the Jews of Cochin, where he was born, Mr. Koder may today be considered the only undisputed authority on the subject. According to him there is one historical fact that can be definitely established: from the 5th to the 15th Century C.E. the Jews of Cranganore had virtually an independent Principality, ruled by a prince of their own race. The oldest and most authentic documents related to that period are the two famous copper plates which are jealously preserved in an Iron chest inserted into the thick wall at the entrance of the Pardesi Synagogue of Jewtown, Cochin. As the trustee of this synagogue, Mr. Koder, who holds the key of the precious iron receptacle, kindly showed me the two plates in the course of my visit, and explained to me their historical importance. The first plate is about 20 cm Ion" and 10 cm. wide. Engraved on both its sides in the old Tamil (Vatteluthu) script is the famous "Sassanam" or Charter given in 379 C.E. by the then ruling King, Bhaskara Ravi Varma, to Joseph Rabban, the leader-prince of the Community, by which the King ceded to the Jews of Cranganore some territories known as Anjuvannam. A replica of the original copper plate is in possession of the Bezalel Museum. The text reads as follows: "Hail, and Prosperity: The following gifts were graciously made by him who had assumed the title of King of Kings, His Majesty the King Sri Parkaran Iravi Vanmar, whose ancestors have been wielding the sceptre for many hundred thousands of years, in the thirtysixth year after the second year, on the day on which he dwelt in Muyiricote, was pleased to make the following gifts. We have granted to Joseph Rabban the village of Anjuvannam, together with the seventy-two proprietary rights, tools on boats and carts, the revenue and the title of Anjuvannam, the lamp of the day, a cloth spread in front to walk on, a palanquin, a parasole, a Vaduga (i.e. Telugu) dru, a trumpet, a gateway, a garland, decoration with festoons, and so forth. We have granted him the land tax and weight tax; moreover we have sanctioned with these Copper Plates that he need not pay the dues which the inhabitants of the other cities pay the Royal palace, and that he may enjoy the benefits which they enjoy. To Joseph Rabban, Prince of the Anjuvannam and to his descendants, sons and daughContinued on Pag* 11 D These are the sons of Jacob and Sara Suga-Uker, Mordecai. Moses and Japheth. The entire family is now in Israel, brought there with tjie aid ofehe United Jewish Appeal •ill TIM c $ JAIUSTER HOTEL (BARBER SHOP I 0 N D I T I 0 N E %  Meiikurlaa. | JAIUSTER AKADI I *, FLORIDA 1 **151 3-7MS 6 "*. Manager lKT K*l SHVKI • *•• %  • AeJHlMS >lwn Bird Ellis [CBOtt CONTtACTOi 1 *•' Gveranrece' 1 • Corned./ Wirlag P *•" %  57H. 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Roofer BONDED ROOFING SHEET METAL HARDWARE 5201 N.W. 36th AVENUE Phones 64-7934 — 64-7783 SEASON'S GREETINGS DALLETT'S GARAGE AND SERVICE STATION 340 Twenty-third Street PHONE 5-6721 MIAMI BEACH HOLIDAY GREETINGS A. M. TRANSFER & CRANE SERVICE Boats Machinery Office Safes Household Concrete Pouring Move Anything 31 Years oi Experience in the Greater Miami Area 239 N. W. 26th STREET PHONE 9-8959 — 87-6486 TIP-TOP SUPER MARKET. Inc. TIP* TOP SUPER MARKET^ 27 N.W. 5th STREET "The Finest Foodstuffs the Market Affords at Reasonable Prices" Capt. E. V. Rickenbacker Chairman oi the Board of Eastern Air Lines joins with the entire EAL Family in wishing our good friends a Very Happy Passover -•>



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PAGE 8 D ••JmMj fkrjcmSJHn>AT., Greetings To All NATHAN DAVIDOW Office Supplies. Of fire Furniture MR. FOSTER'S STORK 33 N.E. FIRST AVE. VK^ESF GREETING CARDS ENGRAVING TO ALL GREETINGS LAWREXCE UMBER CO. F. H. A. FINANCING Miami 1. Florida The Traditional 'Lons' Pass !" 667 N.W. 14th Street PHONE 3-3663 TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS .WE WISH A HAPPY PASSOVER COULTON BROTHERS SERVICE STATION & GARAGE 825 S.W. 8th COURT PHONE 2-6652 wishes you a HAPPY PASSOVER 1300 BISCAYNE BLVD. PHONE 9-5411 By PHILIP RUBIN JTA The Seder service, impressive as it is, onlv ushers in the great Passover festival It gives the theme for the whole weeks celebration, it samples the particular foods and drinks that are to be imbibed during the entire eight days. The dramatic story related at the Seder, that of the freezing of the Israelites from Egyptian bondage, is the leitmotif of the rest of the holiday. Those of us who remember the long preparations for Passover in | Europe and among the Jewish immigrants' t<> this country in times put might perhaps be inclined to regard the two Seder nights a 1 the climax of the Pavxover celebration, though by no mc;iiis its end. Orthodox Jews always began to take note 1 of this most joyous of all Jewish festival! almost a month before its official arrival. Almost immediately after Purim, in the month of March when in most places the cold Ml still severe and the thick layer of snow along the streets had not yet begun to melt, Jewish housewives would commence their spring house cleaning in honor of the approaching holiday. Since none of the •'chometidige" dishes that were being used all the year around, except the glassware, could be used during the Passover week, mothers would be occupied with the problem of buying new dishes for the holiday. Ordering the Passover foods and drinks was an even bigger problem. How much matzoths. matto-meal and wine and mead would the family really need for the eight day-.'' Should better or somewhat inferior grades of mt-"| zoths and wine be bought? Poor people had to watch their pennies in those days, though on the other hand they did want to enjoy the festival as much as possible. Then there was the problem of buying new clothes for the children That was a big item of expense and had to be carefully considered As a child. I would always be decked run" in a new blue serge suit on th* eve of the holiday, as would my playmates By the time Thu Biblical figure, a patriarch from Kurdistan, wifl, j hand, wai among the early settlers in new Israel. He) with him there the tradition of the "long" Passover. The ritual of the Sedorium was then more rigorously adhered to than it is today among most American Jews, excepting the strictly Orthodox. Even small boys were expected to recite the Haggadah from beginning to end. besides sailing the Four Question* ot It Was fun to find the •'aflkam*n," the* piece of matio that had been hidden •way, and a pleasure to open the door for the entrance of Elijah tin Prophet and to sing "Chad Oath/a." Duifng the first two mornings of the holiday days when work is not permitted, one went with one's father to "schul" where of the first day. the "Shir Hashirint* the Song of Solomon, was recited. The Holiday dinner on those first two days were nearly as good 'as the Seder suppers. There was the same Happy Holiday Greetings horn George E. Fox and the Entire Staii ol the hollaWy arrived the streets of <*.„ the s me malzobaTl soup, our town would become muddy from the thawing of the snow and so my new suit would become mudspattered—a thinR which would cause much heartache to my poor parents who had stinted themselves to make me look respectable. Finally came the night before the festival when the ceremony of searching the "chometz," unleavened bread, took place and the burning of the "chometz" next A FUll aiOCK ON TMI OCIAN FIOK 32*4 TO 33r >. k. MIAMI BEACH (OMMI1IU Alt CONDITION! THE WORLD'S FINEST I t/:t of a Century u-ith Ford WISHING ALL OF YOU A REAL HAPPY HOLIDAY 3fc>V/ SAM MURRAY FORD DEALER Hugh Larramore Donald Neese Passenger Car Division—1917 Biscayne Blvd. Truck & Equipment Division—65 N.E. 27th St. morning when it was "sold" to t Rabbi who in turn was supposed "sell" it to a Gentile. After twelve o'clock noon on that day no more "chometz" could be eaten, but neither could any matzo be taken until the arrival of the Seder late in the evening. About all a hungry boy could get during that long stretch was a dish of potatoes. four days, as during then festival, one was excuse^ ing to chaider" Hfbwj Children might then got nearby woods or me* see what trees and florctl readv in bloom if thf| playing tag or ball or i game that interested them] The last two days o(| might be called a sort I climax in the celeb they are true holidays i is not permitted, wbee tfc) and suppers are festive I tie wine is drunk, *beir roll nuts instead of is, if there are any wtl| home by this time after ( of them had been the women folk are tiredi long and arduous labor it] I and washing dishes andt I rather rest in bed or Mil go visiting or receivht] | And on the last mon festival women, too. synagogue to recite "m prayer for the dead to be! of the loved ones they tall Then on the last dayi the same wine (though onty one in stead of four cups could be drunk i. and in addition such a delicacy as "taiglach" or some other tasty dessert that Mother had prepared. On the afternoons of those first two days boys would roll nuts, instead of the usual marbles. Holiday visits among neighbors and friends begins to develop a gnj would only take place on late after (or "chometz," for toe noons of the second day, since during the afternoon of the first day the women wouM~V busy cooking fo,r the second Sector night. There followed "^he four inter mediate days of the Passover festival which are called "cho ha'ino ed," days which are not quite holidays—since one is permitted to work—but are not quite ordinary week-ends either. During those leavened bread one has all year round and the one is not permitted]* ing the Passover we* piece of good, nourish* stead of the crumbly cat ••matzo'" Even on mi when the holiday is oB one cannot yet obtain from a Jewish baker, had been baked durhfj TO OUR MANY VALUED JEWISH FRIENDS OUR SINCERE GOOD WISHES FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER THURMOND MONUMENT COMPANY We Buy. 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f>RIL 16. 1954 +J**islirk>rkKaHH :ice and Immigration Policies PAGE 9 D • %  AMPBELL BRUCE o. Marcus Steinberg, a jasinessman, visited Caliriikeil what he saw. He \ Canada, sold his busiIcked off again to Cali' |aii,n admitted for per\idence. By the late (,ad taken out first citi.ers. hereafter Steinberg was p excellent position in Mf he hurried over. Lin„ California ports were (Jjil for months, so Stein_J his first papers in his bff to Vancouver, British [and there embarked. At he presented his Amerip to the immigration au|He was passed without time, Steinberg applied pal papers. Instead of the i he had so eagerly awaitI a cold shock: He was an twfully in the United Jc had failed to get a relinii before flying the few oss I he Canadian border pssane for Hawaii. r; was stunned. He had (resident of the United |r almost 20 years. Indig1 returned to California to his citizenship. He never chance. Immigration aupromptly lodged him in lere he was kept five I then deported to Canada. flypaper adherence to the the law worked a severe on Steinberg. But even [ his harmless oversight him forever, in the eyes 1 Immigration Service, as krt of monster. He repeatIs permission to come back Jornia — just to visit old -but every request is rewithout explanation. a law abiding person," rg protests. "I have never nvicted of a crime either in iteel States or Canada. I am fessman and I desire only to United States. Why is this ke refused me?" Answer, of course, lies with ration—and it need not say. perg's plight points up two flaws in our immigration -the law itself, and its addition. The law invests too [power in little men, who pield it without common, or [discretion. The law is rigid, Ministration despotic. The jster> in its administrators an IP of hostility toward the Whether he is a refugee seekiven from tyranny or a disced visitor to our shores. McCarran Walter Act—the pation and .Nationality Act of ^was touted by its sponsors omnibus measure 'designed to clarify and codify all the immigration statutes. Clarfax Rheinstein, professor of the University of Chicago, told the President's Commission on Immigration and Naturalization: "I would like to say ... as a lawyer [what] may look a bit petty and perhaps insignificant, but I don't think it is [I] refer to the technical defects. To put it more popularly, nobody can understand it af all, it is so complicated May I invite your attention to Section 202 which I think nobody can understand until he has read it 12 times. I have read it now thirteen times, and I think I understand it. If and when a revision of this law is undertaken, I hope to goodness somebpdy will be called in as an expert in English. As it stands now. it is an abomination of the English language. ." Codify? The law retains the worst of the prejudices incorporated in old statutes, and it adds more than 100 new restrictive features. Ironically, for a nation that is the world's leading democracy and bulwark against communism, its immigration law makes racism a national policy. The law did remote, at long last, the racial barrier to immigration and naturalization. But then it destroyed this achievement by erecting a barrier just as formidable—a modified Oriental Exclusion Act. This is the infamous Asia-Pacific triangle, embracing 21 quota areas from Afghanistan to Japan and alloting to each a minimal annual quota of 100, with the exceptions of Japan (185) and China (105). No matter where you were born, no matter what your nationality, if one-half of your ancestry is Oriental, the McCarran Act automatically makes you an Oriental. Thus, if you were born in London of an English father and a Burmese mother, you are a British subject in the eyes of all except the McCarran Act, which consigns you to the restricted Burma quota. Yet Great Britain, with an annual quota of 65,364, utilizes less than a quarter of that number. Rabbi Judah Nadich of Boston told the President's Commission: 'This bigoted slur upon the Asians and individuals of Asian extraction must be read within the context of international politics. Gratuitous insult woven into the legal fabric of a nation upon whose leadership the free world depends, serves to upset a delicate balance of power, alienate desperately needed friends and helps thrust them into the Soviet orbit." Rabbi Nadich cited the Filipinos as a case in point. After their independence was proclaimed in 1946, they encountered no specific racial barriers. But the McCarran Act ends that. Now a person of Filipino background, born outside the vast Asiatic-Pacific triangle, must "trace his genealogical ties and satisfy irrational criteria of acceptability if I he wishes to become a United States citizen." The McCarran Act deals a discriminatory slap at the Negroes of the British West Indies by setting up a special quota of 100 for each of Great Britain's colonies in this hemisphere. About 1,000 Negroes emigrated yearly from Jamaica to the US under the large British quota. TKe McCarran Act cuts that flow, small as it was, by 90 per cent. The national-origins formula discriminates against immigrants— predominately Catholic now, heavily Catholic and Jewish in pre-war days—from southern and eastern Europe. It has always done so by design. The architects of this formula made no bones about it. The late Senator James A. Reed of Missouri, who tacked it onto the 1924 Immigration Act, to take effect five years later, bluntty told his colleagues: "I thir* 'most of us are reconciled to the idea of discrimination. We have got to discriminate." Congressman Emanuel Celler of New York, a member of the House during that 1924 debate, recently told the President's Commission: "It [the formula] was deliberately adopted to proscribe not only southern and eastern Europeans, but also Catholics and Jews. That is the unvarnished truth. I heard it stated time and time again on the floor of the House. ." Such is what the law long ago set out to do—with malice aforethought. It seems incredible that our great democracy should harbor within its body politic two little police states but such indeed are the immigration and consular services. The McCarran Act grants consuls absolute, non-reviewable power over visas— an autocracy that breeds arrogance and damages our prestige abroad. Likewise, under sanction of the law, immigration officials at home have traditionally displayed a callous brutality toward aliens. Consider the case of the Edward Chans. In a way, they were lucky their ordeal happened in 1950—before the McCarran-Walter Act. Chan, a native American, went to Shanghai some years ago and there married a Chinese secretary who spoke fluent English. Their only child was stillborn. To ease the pangs of their loss they immediately adopted a week-old baby, reporting the adoption to the American consul. Some say they were foolish, because citizenship does not descend to an adopted child, but the Chans are conscientious people. That meant the child could come here only on a quota immigrant visa, for which there always is an interminable waiting list. When the Communists began closing in on Shanghai, the consul granted Mrs. Chan a nonquota visa as the wife of a US citizen. Out of the goodness of his heart he eventually gave the boy, now 10 years old, a temporary visa, but by that Continued M fgc 11 D GREETINGS <*• t. CMMMI Coleman Solar Service Ns BOOSTERS • NEW SYSTEMS • REPAIRS f 428 S.W. 27th AVENUE | 62S1 H.W. 2nd STREET Phone 87-8349 JEWELS SILVER WORKS OF ART Furniture, Antiques and Curios INTERNATIONAL FINE ART GALLERIES 122 Lincoln Rd.. Miami Beach A. SCHORR. Rtpreientatire Business Phone 58-1025 Residence Phone 5-2503 PASSOVER GREETINGS GUNN & GUNN GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS 161 N.W. 52nd Straat 73912 GREETINGS Phone 3-8758 CHARLES SEVERO, Mgr. Est. 1922 Empire Employment Agency CULINARY AGENCY OF FLORIDA 714 N. E. First Avenue LICENSED AND BONDED Specializing in HOTEL, RESTAURANT AND CLUB EMPLOYEES 10 AU... GMUlHGi Howling'* Market 117 MWACIE MIIE PkMMi 4*441 M-5IM GIERSCH ENGINEERING CO. 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Clock, Omtor LONG DISTANCE MOVING*Now'vorVrChicago I^Tt^S^ PART LOADS DIRECT SERVICE An 9 tte Ourn and Operate Our Ouru fleet of Moving Vans PHONE 3-062S FOR ESTIMATE AMERICAN VAN & STORAGE 2125 N.W. Ut COURT TO ALL A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY Fidelity Construction Corporation GENERAL CONTRACTORS Ph. 88-6423 51 Forrest Drive. Miami Springs Tropical Typewriter Service ^TSSS 1 ? -~ ,) 3,M C0,JU WAY "-Eri*j n.v^!,o^ e lbby S haVe -^n^hinf you need for the office j** 1 "?" y— *• W Hem a viH p££ n4%fA Best Wishes To All for Passover NATIONAL TITLE COMPANY HUNTINGTON MEDICAL BLDG. Main Office PHONE 2-7624 Branches: Fart Lauderaale, Miami Beach THESE KIT THI NGS HE MIME 01 [ffij Continued from Page 5D I Continued from Page 5 D from any disease, cold, hunger, misery and injustice. It can be readily understood that the "refugees"' are being used as political tools. Distinguished visitors from the West have been deeply moved by the sight of so many people living in tents instead of houses, squatting on the ground in stead of working; they compare them with the standards they themselves are accustomed to. and presume that the natives enjoy such comfort and luxuries. What these visitors do not know is that their homes—if the miserable hovels in which they live could ever be called that—are infested with rats, that their bodies are full of vermin, a fate from which the "Palestine refugee'' has been mercifully snatched by an arch enemy of Western civilization, the Grand Protector, the international villain. Hajj Amin al-Husayni, the ex-Mufti of Jerusalem, who. with the help of the higher Arab Committee, ordered the Arabs to leave their homes and flee to neighboring countries "for a short time, until the united Arab armies cast the Jews into the sea.'' The flight of six thousand Arabs from Tiberias in one day. the flight of sixty thousand Arabs from Haifa in one day. and of nearly seventy thousand from Jaffa in four days, was not accidental. They were ordered to run; they were told that they would be branded as traitors and punished accordingly by the victorious armies, if they remained in their homes. Yet, to the world they proclaimed that the Arabs were fleeing for their lives because the Jews threatened to annihilate them. Fury and Fancy That the Arab leaders constantly use their own people as tools and stooges for the maintenance of a status quo. and in order to further their political and nationalistic ambitions, should be clear to every impartial student of Middle Eastern affairs. In the Lebanon and in Iraq, where I spent a great deal of time discussing internal and external problems with numerous prominent loaders. I found an almost dedicated determination to divert the attention of the miserably unhappy mom from the real source of their plight Any and every excuse and pretext is pounced upon in order to achieve that purpose An endless struggle for power and even greater riches is waged between factions and families of the ruling classes The price always remains the same the complete exploitation of the native. The fury and hatred deliberately engendered against the Jews in their own countries and against the "Goliath." Israel, is just another variation of the unending diatribe against Britain, the U.S.A.. and other imaginary and hypothetical monsters. The sons of the foremost famiIf i 00 x This diver in Haifa's "Little Harbor" makes the scape different from that found by the Israelites of oldt their Exodus and Return. Working to upbuild the new] State, he will pause from his labors this weekend lo i Passover and his own return from exile. lies in Bagdad, students and graduates of foreign universities, told me in the presence of their parents that they were ready to march against Israel at %  moment's notice in order to avenge the "insult" to their people. The jails of Bagdad were at that time filled to capacity with Jewish men, women and children, including the leaders of the community. They had previously been under guard in the desert where, as a last resort, and unable to endure any longer, they started a hunger strike, with fatal results to many. I asked one of the leading attorneys, members of whose family are in the diplomatic service, the reason for their imprisonment, and he told me without the winking of an eyelid that it was because Israeli spies had tried to establish a Communistic regime. I tried to point out to him that I had never heard anyone refer to Israel as a Communistic country, let alone of ambitions to spread Communism in other parts of the world. He answered by thumping his breast with both fists, and shouting, "It's true, believe me, I know!" When I asked him as to whether the Jews were tortured in prison, he replied, "Yes, of course, we have to obtain convictions." I tried to point out that the world might look skeptical ly at convictions obtained by such methods, that indeed the trials in Budapest, Prague, Warsaw and Moscow had inspired very little confidence throughout ta>] world, but with an air ol | he said. "The same thing i] in the United States." The Jewish community till considered to be the olittl world. Almost from the I Abraham, who was bora ft] through the First Exile iai then known as Babylon, oil Second Exile, when the gral( ish universities of Sun mil pedutha flourished, to the | of the Exilearch. and down! our own century during vtadj Kadoories and the Sanaa contributed much to the I their birth. Jews have lived %  ] uninterruptedly, in large i Yet, over one hundred iweajfj sand made their way to Is only the shirts on their ba many with mementos of I tures inflicted on their I Attention end Diitridej Cunningly, the leader*I their peoples' anger will M on the Jews in their midst I Israel. They know their | pride, they know that in tketj and exertion required to i the "omsit," they will soal, their own miserable a With the war-cry, Allah *' they divert attention ft* I selves, the real perpetnta crimes against the peopJ*. If the Arab leaders had ( Continued en Pit* • C I I T I N C $ PNONI 3-4311 OfficM W.fcft taspecter '•' Mat tatfway WILSON I CO. 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PRO, 16, 1954 -Jewlstnorki/an PAGE 11 D REACHES INTO THE LANDS OF THE RAJAHS „ed from P9 7 D .„ his nephews, and to flaw who married his .„ natural succession, so [world and the moon exinam shall be" his hereLsion, Hail." an rulers must have atfat importance to the Uer>, so much so that the anted to Joseph Rabban ^ Parkaran was endorsed er kings, the commander Es. and the Prime MinisLg to I. M. Jost, eminent iorian of the 19th centIcharter must have acthe Jews of Malabar the jlow the strict sumptuary filing at this period, such the expressly specified Jrs." The leaders or Prined; their Princesses, yelchildren, green; the Iwhite; and those who nourning, blue. Furthercastes of artisans were among the Jewish set{the carpenters, the bra: smiths, the gold-and-silnen. and the distillers of ip. This list affords firstIrmation about the origin (lain present-day occupahe working-class among lof Cochin. kws of Malabar had atlace. wealth and prosper] the protection of the tolllers of Cranganore, so %  that for a thousand years he 15th century C.E.) they ] unchallenged masters of folly independent Princij Shingly, the name given bid Chinese in the earliest Cranganore, known to the Is Muzkiris. The Jews it not only a haven of It also a centre of trade', at that time the biggest |ial outlet to the Arabian he Jewish Raj of Malabar [number and importance. ame wealthy, and they aclarge number of native jrho adopted the Jewish 1 were later emancipated, Increasing in number and Following the caste distincfcong its non-Jewish neigh) community soon split into fcrly defined "castes," vie, fcyuhasim" or families of We lineage, the "Meshurle liberated slaves. Both I more or less resemble the les. |the extinction of the line i Rabban, dissension arose I Joseph Azar, a Jew of a nily, and one of,his broththe chieftainship of the pity of Anjuvannam. The ps brother, backed by a sukumber of freed slaves, at|nd slaughtered many of T>o came under the banner Ider brother. Sara Ktora, 19, a girl typical of the Jews of Cochin. A calamitous crTwar broke out, which resulted in the intervention of the neighbouring princes who quelled the rebellion and put the treacherous brother to flight. The story is told that he escaped to Cochin by swimming across the backwaters with his wife on his shoulders. But the damage was beyond repair. The intervening Princes of Cranganore dispossessed the Jews of their Principality of Anjuvannam, and Joseph Azar, 72nd and last Prince of the Jews, had to abandon his realm and seek refuge in nearly Cochin and in 1524, on the pretext that the Jews of Cranganore were interfering with the pepper trade, the Mohammedans, backed by the Zamorin of Calicut, made an onslaught on the Principality and broke into the town, burning and destroying houses and synagogues. Those who escaped the sword and fire of the Zamorin found refuge in Cochin, but Cranganore, which is estimated to have had a population of 80,000 at the time, has never rebuilt. Thus came to an end the one bright episode in the history of the Jews in the East. In the annals of the Malabar community, this calamity is second in tragic importance only to the destruction of Jerusalem 1500 years earlier. The Cochin Jews shun the site of the devastated town to this day, and if their business brings them thither, they leave before sunset. A handful of Shingly sand finds a place in the coffin of every dead Malabar Jew beside the soil of the Holy Land. Beside a small hill known as "Jooda Kunnu" or "Jewish Hill," the copper plates which they have taken with them to Cochin are the only reminder of that forgotten Jewish outpost. TO ALL ... A HAPPY PASSOVER t MR. and MRS. JULIUS JAY PERLMUTTER J Lawrence C, Reaina V., and Carole Perlmutter TO ALL GREETINGS TU. ALL ^.a&ti iivus I k Investors Insurance Agency,Inc. E. F. CHENAULT — R. L. MORRIS — V. S. THOMASON CALL 2-6065 FOR ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE 505 S.W. 8th STREET JUSTICE AND IMMIGRATION POLICIES Continued from Page 9 D time the Communists had taken Shanghai and the family was trapped. They tried a daring stunt. Mrs. Chan posed as a well-to-do matron, accompanied by her man-servant and his child, and thus they made their way to Knowloon, and across to Hong Kong. From there they sailed for America. Chan landed at San Francisco without difficulty; he had an American passport. His adopted son was refused entry. The inspector said the boy was a quota immigrant not in possession of a regular quota vista. Mrs. Chan, although bearing a valid nonquota visa, was also denied admission "as an accompanying alien whose protection is re quired by the rejected alien on account of infancy." A medical officer had certified that the mother's care was necessary for the welfare of the child because, to quote his singular diagnosis, "the child cried when out of her presence." Mother and child were held in detention for six months. During that time Chan could see his wife and son only on regular visitors' days—twice a week, a half hour each visit, separated from his family by a triple thickness of finemesh screen, in a small crowded room noisy with voices shouting in a variety of tongues. They were finally paroled into the United States for the purpose of applying for suspension of deportation on the ground of economic detriment to the citizen husband-father. They were then arrested and given a hearing to determine whether deportation would indeed result in hardship. The hearing officer so found, and Congress eventually approved. This was a needless ordeal for the Chans. Actually, the immigration authorities at the outset could have admitted Mrs. Chan permanently and the child temporarily on the visas they presented. Then the boy could have applied for a stay of deportation. However^ when questioned by a Board of Special Inquiry, Mrs. Chan frankly admitted that the boy wanted to stay with his parents. So the board took the view that the child—because he wished to be with his parents—had committed fraud by intending to remain here permanently, whereas he arrived on a visitor's visa! Mrs. Chan's reward for honesty was good compared to what would happen now, under the present law. IAPPY PASSOVER >•• tha Market Afferds It Reasonable Prices Alaxandar and Family *">". Harry fc Sol of the ECASH MARKET JR.*. uth Street MIAMI. FLORIDA p 1? 5 N. W. 16th St GREETINGS TO ALL O. J. L G. Jorgensen Schreffler CONSULTING ENGINEERS BUcayne Building Miami I BEST WISHES TO MY EWISH FRIENDS M.N.UPP Nell-Thomas .Machinery. Inc. CONSTRUCTION WOODWORKING INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY 1920 N. W. Miami Court BEST WISHES FOR A VERY HAPPY PASSOVER SHAW BROS. OIL CO. Exclusive Distributor! ei Pur* Oil Company Product, in SouthEastera Florida GREETINGS Concrete Hoisting Steel Erected Bar Joists Set Clam and Drag 1 N. POPENHAGER — CRANES — PHONE 83-2652 2534 LINCOLN AVE. COCONUT GROVE, FLORIDA To All Season's Greetings JOHN A. GAUTIER YOUR DADE COUNTY TAX ASSESSOR A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL KING BAKE SHOP IRVING and MILTON POARSKY 1894 S. W. Eighth Street Miami BILL WRIGLEY of tt It 14.1 IV ENGRAVING COMPANY, WISHES HIS MANY JEWISH FRIENDS t A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER MR. AND MRS. H. A. SILVERS AND FAMILY of the B & W ELECTRIC CORPORATION 555 NORTH MIAMI AVENUE EXTEND BEST WISHES TO ALL FOR A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER Best Wishes for a A Nappy Passover *1 COUNCILMAN BERNARD A. FRANK A Nappy Passover To AH Our Friends FISCHER'S BAKE SHOP 7423 COLLINS AVENUE For a Fine Selection off Holiday Cakes & Cookies Pk.ni 1*4*12 Cl.sed Saturday at SUIMUWM



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PAGE 12 D Jewish ncrkBtw nHDAY.i T. All Our fritnds and Patrons A Mat Happy PHSWSf The Prom Shops 760 • 41ft STRICT, MIAMI BEACH 263 MIRACLE MILE, CORAL CABLES THE FATE OF THE 1.000 YEAR OLD To All Happy Passover GARY of MIAMI. % %  <• Morris Greenwald 5 S. W. 2nd AVENUE. MIAMI. FLA. I iVhls Kiisloin Kover.s AUTO SEAT COVERS • TOPS. ETC. PICK UP AND DELIVERY SERVICE 2341 N. Miami Avenue Phone 3-2389 T M I MIRACLE WEDGE Overhead Door Company of Miami, Inc. Miami 38, Florida SALE SERVICE INSTALLATION 7111 Biscayne Blvd. Telephone 78-5513 GREETINGS When Gifts are in Order — a Lasting Gift from The ORCHID PATIO Orchid Plants for Home or Garden Culture 1075 N.E. 79th STREET MIAMI. FLORIDA Open Sundays PHONE 7-3641 Visitors Welcome WE SHIP ASYWHERE IN THE U.S.A. GREETINGS T. S. BUDD OPTICIAN 122 S.E. 1st Street. Miami. Florida Phone 9-1451 262 Andulusia Phone 4-0291 Coral Gables BUT WISHES FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER HARIIIS FOOD PRODIXTS Man.ifacturerg and Dutributo't VAVONNAISE • PICKLES • CONDIMENTS 4421 N.W. 23rd Ave. Miami, Florida SPICES Ph. 64-9747 SINCERE WISHES FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER MARKOWITZ BROS., INC. MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS 5600 N. E. 4th Avenue Phone 89 2411 Burons tc Flagler Street Phone 9-3771 0 PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS Since 1897 :: \% %  Continued from Peye 3D wine dealers, store owners or lawyers may return, but Jewish life is at an end. Shortly alter American troops occupied the city in 1945. the MlliUrj Governor encouraged the Munii ip.il Custodku) <>f Monuments. Dr. Illert. to have tfie entranceway to UH Synagogue reconstructed with the original stones that were st,II litteriaf the area. He also had the indent cemeterv and the mikvah put in order. In the former, where so many giants of Judaism found their last resting place, a %  H I '.::.' which was put up in the year 1044, before the Norman invasion of England, bears mute witness to the age-old tradition of the Community. The ritual bath, still in servteeable condition today, was built Li 1186. Evan during the Nazi period. Dr. Illert had salvaged from the wreckafe ol the Synagogue the famed "Hashi Chair." which is believed to have been used by the great popular expounder of Bible and Talmud It is now a showpiece of the local St Andrew's Museum, where devout Jews come to view it on occasion. The museum also disptayi some stone tablets from the Synagogue, together with a number of ritual objects and Torah Scrolls. Whether the one inscribed by Rabin Meir of Rothenburg while the Emperor Rudolph held him for ransom in Ensisheim fortress is among them, Dr. Illert has tried to ascertain, but so far to no avail. In a glass case we find a precious festival prayerbook written in 1272 and consisting of two illuminated manuscripts adorned with vignettes that represent Jewish scenes. Next to it is the fire scorched cover. with silver ornaments, of a machzor from the Renaissance period. There are medieval documents, such as Imperial rescripts confirming privileges of the Jewish Com munity. or offering safe conduct to certain members thereof. Parts of the Hebrew archives of the kehillah. which go back to the 17th century, are also at the disposal of interested acholars. All these exhibits the museum was permitted to retain as a permanent loan, on condition that the municipality take care of the cemeteryA trickle of Jewish visitors come to gaze at these monuments and souvenirs of a Jewish Worms th.it is no more. Busloads of pilgrims have even made the long trip from the DP camp at Foehrcnwcltl. south of Munich. They all dop at the spot in dwonlown Wornwhere the Synagogue used to stand—the Romanesque nucleus erected in 1034. the Gothic style wing added in 1213 and the K.-ishi Chapel" that was constructed in 1624 Thoughtfully, they sur vey the rubble strewn plot left behind not by an ^discriminating 1 wartime bombing raid, but by the evil men win. brought these raids upon themselves. Watching these visitors has suggested to some Worms boosters of the chamber-of-commerce type that, if the Synagogue were to be restored, it might be developed into a major tourist attraction. Not every city, after all, is in the for tunate position of Frankfurt to have a Goethe House that can be reconstructed for the sake of pay ing guests, and ope must make do with what one has. Published reports have placed the cost of a faithful reconstruction job at half a million marks, but ex perts believe that less than half that sum—perhaps $50.000—would actually be needed. Even though the mayor of Worms, Heinrich Voelker. is among the advocates of restoring the Synagogue, he does not want to dip into the city treasury for this purpose. His attempts to secure grants from the state and federal governments have met with little success to date. During the pest two months, the Jewish and Gentile press of many countries reported "Worms Synagogue To Bo Rebuilt," to quote a headline from the principal organ of British Jewry. The official German-language daily of the US High Commission asserted that Jewish leaders in Germany would welcome a restoration of the venerable Synagogue "as a further significant step towards the reconciliation of the German and Jewish peoples." A collection,was to be taken soon among Jews in London, the article further said. Similar articles appeared in publications in Germany and the US. All these stories have little basis in fact. Concrete plans are quite unknown to the kehillah at Mainz, which now encompasses Worms, to the State Association of Jewish Communities and to the representative body of the Jews in Germany, the Central Council. All three, indeed, are pronouncedly unenthusiastic about the idea of lavishing .1 Continued from Page 4D phosphoric acid, phosphate salts, soda ash and other chemical prod ucts. The development program also provides that Fertilizers and Chemicals. Ltd.. Israels largest indus trial enterprise and the major chemical producing firm in the Middle East, will complete its synthetie ammonia plant in a few months The company already operates a super-phosphates plant in Haifa Further proposals provide for the immediate construction and ex pankion of other chemical factories for the manufacture of ammonia, sulphate, potassium sulphate, dical cium phosphate, nitric acid and ammonium ji it rate. With regard to ceramic mate rials, intensive exploitation has been confined to special types of ball clay and glass unit] on feldspar and qaaittj the research stage, I" itown ceramic nwi resulted in the cessatioal and sand imports, andlj able reduction of ballr cla> imports. Effort-aati made I" develop expMtJ tinfield. There are other the Israel Government] gin in the coming i in g ,!,. eioJoiBion| h Works: the f ChemM ils, % %  •• %  M Mining industries,tW operated c Storm **"j TO ALL • • A Most Happy %  AHTHJ^gJrJ u^OLST^j ManufseW^ CusW^ ^Ate u PHONES*^



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ML 16. 1954 Jeni\l fkrHian PAGE 13 D I MANY THINGS HAVE MINE 01 EYE! SEEK from P9 10 D ir,| for the welfare of hole, they would have [as, a part of their altli. <>r the fabulous |f„ r th American, would | considerably in resetJugec< and making them Ing. It would also have governments occupied factivo projects, instead If a "second round." pie Are Piwm [the welfare of the peo|icst from their minds; nands for the complete of the refugees, and R1 to listen to any reactions, indicated to me Ltion of a definite objecfcver I went, I heard of land plans to organize Is. to give them military Dd to have them infil(sracl at all costs. The ore than four hundred ^ing the last few years salinn of the success ol Arab leaders made no tor plans to have the re%  ve as a fifth column, to I with arms and ammuthe neighboring coun) hasten the downfall of i a frontier of nine hun[kilometers along which an enemy who never claiming the imminence ond round," it would be j of folly and irrcsponsiprmit the refugees to relering with and restrictkssage of goods through Canal to Israel ports in the United Nations Selincil resolution of Sep1951; in applying sancertain ships visiting Island firms doing business )\ contrary to the intent of the General Armistment; in denying radio i the Philippine Airlines their use of Israel's inThe season's first citrus exports herald the coming of spring and the Passover in Israel. temational airport; 1 'Lydda, in defiance of existing international conventions and the United Nations Charter, the Arab rulers have clearly demonstrated to the world their complete disregard of the United Nations and the interest and welfare of their own people. In instituting and vigorously pursuing a policy of intimidation, terror, highway robbery (the imposition of special taxes, fines, and finally the confiscation of the property of over 150,000 Iraqi Jews), torture, and public hangings of innocent people (the leading Jew in Basrah was hanged on a tree before youths were hanged on the public his wife and family; two Jewish gallows in Bagdad, in January, 1952), the Arab leaders have brazenly proclaimed to the world their utter contempt for the rights of man and the sanctity of human life. Dangling the Sword Last May the Foreign Minister of Syria declared that 'The Arab States are placed under the threat of extinction as long as there lives in the heart of the Arab World that aggressive gang called Israel We shall not rest until we eliminate that gang from the country it is trying to turn into a fortress for itself This country will only serve as a grave for that gang." One month later Mohammed Naguib, the President of Egypt, said that "Peace with Israel will only increase this danger, since she will be able to crush the Arab countries en masse. The only solution is Israel's disappearance." On November second Hussein, King of Jordan, asserted that Jordan's policy will continue to be "no peace with Israel." Just a few days ago, on January nine, the new King Saud of Saudi Arabia told a visiting press delegation from Jordan that "Israel to the Arab World is like a cancer to the human body A Happy Passover to all Our friends and Patrons Darby's Restaurant 216 Lincoln Rttad ******-> Greetings... MILWAUKEE BEVERAGES "BLATZ" "Milwaukee's Finest Beer' 1344 N.W. 23rd STREET Phone 82-1405 and the only way of remedy is to uproot it just like a cancer We Arabs total about 50 million. Why don't we sacrifice 10 million of our number to live in pride and self respect?" These statements of poliay on the part of the most prominent spokesmen of the Arab ruling clique, resulting in the slaughter and maiming of thousands of Jews by armed hands slipping into Israel thousands of times, should leave no doubt in anyone's mind as to the real reason for their continued and unswerving demand for the repatriation of the "Refugees." To secure the destruction of Israel with the help of the repatriated "Refugees" is, olearly, the plan of the Arab political leadership. The Arabs have little cause for grievance against the West; during the last few decades they have gained independence over an area of one and one-half millions of square miles, yet they wish the world to believe that the eight thousand square miles conceded to Israel by the United Nations represent an injustice of such magnitude to them, that all their thoughts and actions must be influenced by it. Democracy Vs. Feudalism It does not require too intimate a knowledge of the situation in the Middle East to know that the Arab rulers consider the Western Democracies a danger to their own feudal system. Israeli democracy, on their own doorsteps, presents, they believe, a direct threat to their continued exploitation of the people. Information about the freely elected leaders of Israel; the right to vote enjoyed by all, including the women; free education and mental care; the minimum wage schedule, and the functioning of Continued on Pag* 15 D and MRS. SILVERMAN and the VER PAINT iOMPANY W. FIRST STREET |COLLINS AVENUE Miami Beach [for All Their Pairom 1 m Friends a Poppy Passover t D *Y OR EETINO l s H0RES GARDEN ** th Av.nu. f H CUT PUOWER, AT AL| TIMES GREETINGS FROM LOUIS OAKEN & FAMILY (Sliced or UnsUced—Frenchwhite whole. Wheat Breads) Hard Holla. Dinner Rolls. Bagels ARNOLD'S BAKERY Superior Bakery Products Fresh Fruit Pies, Fruit Coffee Cakes, Tea Cakes. Party NoTelties Genuine Old Fashioned Rye. Corn Bread. Pumpernickle "Remember the address" 1757 Coral Way Ph. 83-7839 Cemefimeefs %  I Mr. Sam Mungtn •47 N.W. 451* STtllT RADIATORS REPAIRED CLEANED RECORED JERRY'S RADIATOR SERVICE 2035 N.W. lit AVENUE Pboaa 821431 A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER TO All S. J. HALPE 420 Lincoln Rood Realtor 1 • Vll = == ^/1F fffRVfff^^^A ^* 28 N.W. 20th STREET, MIAMI, FLORIDA, PHONE 9-4667 ALL MATS BY DIRECT PRESSURE fASSOVtK GREETINGS MEYERS BEACH FLOWER SHOP flowers for Every Occasion t 1445 ALTON ROAD TEL. 5-1020 GREETINGS FISHER JEWELRY 1433 S.W. Ith STREET PHONE 2-2468 PASSOVER GREETINGS from IZZIE and SAM TENDRICH, Owners HUDSON TRAIL MOTORS, INC. 1305 S.W. 8th STREET Telephone 2-2667 Greetings Miami Glass Co., Inc. ••III. ItJS" CLASS FOR ALL PURPOSES • MIRRORS one SUSS TOPS CONTRACT WORK WHOLESALE e STORE FRONT CONSTRUCTION 2320 W. FLAGLER STREET PHONE 83-1618 HOLIDAY GREETINGS Lillian Corro/ff FLAMiNGO FLORIST Corsages, Hants, Cut Flowers from $2.50 up 540 N.W. 79th STREET T.I. 84-2963, Nights 894261 SECURITY TRUST COMPANY "Tresf end Estate Administration Exclusively" 131 SHORELAND BUILDING 119 EAST FLAGLER STREET MIAMI 32, FLORIDA Tel. 12-4661



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PAGE 14 D Jelstotk**l**r)_ GUTTMAN AND LAPOFF Kosher Moats and Poultry EXTEND BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER TO THEIR FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS 325 Collins Avenue Telephone 58-1031 Miami Beach A HAPPY PASSOVER HOTEL & RESTAURANT EMPLOYEES & BARTENDERS VMO> LOCAL 133 A. F. OF L. ALVARO GONZALEZ. JR.. President MORRIS G. DRAPKIN. Secretary-Treasurer 240 N.E. 8th Street Phone ****. TO ALL GREETINGS Commercial Bank of Miami Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 6015 N.W. 7th AVENUE PHONE 7-5744 "TOALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS HAPPY HOLIDAY GREETINGS AL PFLEIGER TAXIDERMIST 15899 N. E. Sixth Avenue North Miami Phone 816-5991 TAYLOR CONSTRUCTION CO. GENERAL CONTRACTORS 2875 North Lejeune Road Miami PHONE 64-9761 6 1IIfIN CS ; AMERICAN CHEMICAL COMPANY SANITARY and JANITOR SUPPLIES 277 WEST FLAGLER STREET PHONE 9-1807. GREETINGS MAIMIWMi;. Incorporated SASH AND SCREEN SERVICE ALLEN L. PARRISH. Manager 3427 N. Miami Avenue Miami, Florida Phone 3-5491 MR. AND MRS. MAURICE COHN AND FAMILY and the World Wide Liquor Co. EXTEND BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER TO THE ENTIRE JEWISH COMMUNITY SINCERE WISHES FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER i BARNETT'S INC. 134 NX First Street MIAMI'S FINEST OFFICE SUPPLIES The Red Sea is a Rich Bl ue By D. SCHOCHER The story of the crossing of the Red Sea by the Israelites ll the high mark of the Exodous episode, which Passover commemorates. Oddly enough, the Red Sea is not red. The waters are rather bluish Perhaps bluish green would best describe them. There has been j much theorizing by scholars how the sea acquired its name. It is true there are specks of reddishness in the waters but hardly in sufficient accents to justify the name. Some attribute the name to the mountains nearby which in phases of the sunset take on a reddish hue. Others think the name comes from red or copper skinned peoples who once dwelt on the adjacent peninsula. When the Israelites succeeded in crossing safely over the sea, it is written, "then Moses sang." And today in Israel, the high feature of the celebration of Passover outside of the synagogue and the Seder is the "Shirat Yam." The young people go to the beaches and sing again the song which Moses sang after the crossing of the sea. We can easily understand the exultation of the great leader of the Exodous. The Israelites are in flight. Behind them are the pursuing Egyptians—in their chariots and all the paraphernalia of military power. In front of them are the turbulent waters of the Red Sea. It is the alternative of death or—re-enslavement from behind or death by drowning in front. It seems an utterly hopeless situation. But a strong east windrsays the Bible, arose and drove the waters back, making walls on both sides, through which the Israelites passed through in safety. Such a strong east wind would not be unusual. The Red Sea is noted for its storms and the power of a strong wind to reduce the level of water has been frequently noted even in the United States. The Red Sea has more than historic interest. It is the waterway which separates two continents— Asia and Africa. Some believe that tens, of thousands years ago, Asia and Africa were one continent and that the Red Sea was then continuous with the Mediterranean. The Red Sea is about 1,400 miles long and little more than 200 miles wide. It is peculiar in the fact that no rivers run in it and yet it is not much saltier than oceans generally. Another thing of note is the abundance of life, vegetable and animal, with which it abounds. It teems with exotic fish. The fierce shark is fond of its waters. Already the sharks are being exploited economically. His skin makes good handbags and the internal organs of the shark are rich in vitamins. Six years ago. when the Jewish State was first established, Elath, t&m* z "3**-a Wash day for a housewife in a village near Elath. Ski ago, the seaport city had only one building. The I whoqp shore it stands now begins to thrive once i the Red Sea port city was a city of one building, made of sunburned brick. Today, Elath might be taken for a small but growing American western town. Beside the fisheries, it draws strength from the exploitation of Israel's copper and iron resources', which are being financed with Israel bonds. Nearby is the ancient city of Etbion-Gever, where, according to the Bible, the Queen oil to see King Solomon King Solomon first I a marine fleet, which 1 and peacocks and raaj^ dities from a far any I some have speculated *( It is not unthinkable I not distant future, ships take off from this Red! such world round; THE CAREER OF SIR JACOB 0 Continued frem *••• 2 D his own. But Epstein never concealed his origin. Besides, an artist has to serve all creeds, and all nationalities. He belongs to mankind, never to a single group of people alone. Epstein's Jewishness. as revealed in his work, has been noted by anti-Semitic hotspurs like the Mosleyites who defaced his statues with swastikas, but also by unbiased critics who registered it without much ado. Epstein is most widely known for his portrait busts. When making a portrait in stone, he is as honest in his artistic approach as when he ventures into other realms of sculpture. Philistines of many countries would have gladly forgiven him his •'montrosities," and even paid him excellent fees, had he consented to portray them flatteringly in stone or bronie. But the artist refused to forget, for convenience's sake, that a portrait, though faithful to the sitter, must be shorn ii ficialities and now that it is the artist's I create a "perfect likenei^ dimensional photognpil ing the external aspetSI ter, but to analyze his | Twentieth century i gone far beyond stands at the beginning* But the work of "Sir! remain a source of ii many generations to i holds true particularly i where, as the sculptor" Arnold Auerbach. ed, his "invigorating im been "incalculable."" pr:nse> Epstein's vitality instinctm ical penetration to the life of the seaa*l hibited translation au forms" and "intensity! freed the younger men %  ••from the tame tradWJ ured copies from the' and from sentimental i To All Passover Greetings Sunshine iieantu Salon 550 41st STREET MIAMI BEACH Phone 5-1624 A Happy Passover To All Our Friends and Customers Mr. and Mrs. Beck of the APEX CLEANERS & LAUNDRY Adelman's Pipe A Steel Co. A Most Happy Passover To AU Our Friends end Patrons FOX BRAKE SERVICE MM H. E. 2nd Ave. J-S530 Nathan Adelman Charles Adelman Hv Coverraan AND FAMILIES EXTEND TO ALL A HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL.. • I HAPPY PASSO^ MR. and MRSSAM JOSEPHfflr FAMHY of the MIAMI SB| 675N.W.5th* HAPPY PASSO^ paper %  *•* Manufacture' AUTISTIC PAPE^ I4i,mi Islam** 1 ** „ Bid* 144 MIAMI



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APRIL 16. 1954 +Jmlslirk>rMkri PAGE 15 D fclPES TO ACCENT THE PASSOVER MEAL TABLE [inued from Page •*> the side an* stuff with Jring mixture. Beat 2 eggs Ldd J 4 cup sugar, 1 tablejato starch, 1 tablespoon j juice of 1 lemon, grated Memon and 1 cup water, fa double boiler until it J Fill the puffs and sprinfcowered sugar. ir Fluffy Matxoh Balls (chicken fat beaten eggs hot chicken broth Upoon salt s matzoh flour e hot chicken fat and beat well with an egg kdd the other ingredients „._ balls about the size" of \ and allow to cool. Boil tffc (broth and drop the matzoh (to the boiling soup, cover 120 minutes. Stuffed Breast of Veal breast of veal rtatoes (spoon salt aspoon pepper %  i ip fried onions %  p minced celery Iblespoons fat pp matzoh flour the meat with a wet cloth y an opening between the nd the bones to receive the H Peel and grate the potaDd mix with salt, pepper, nions, well beaten eggs, eelami matzoh flour. Fill the |and sew opening together. sliced onions into the botJ a roaster, and put meat on Jthe onions, adding a V cup ler to the roaster. Sprinkle pd pepper over it, cover the and place in a hot oven. Jfor 2 hours basting the meat Iroastiny. Yields 10 portions. nty Pocket Pudding For Passover hips water pip chicken fat easpoon salt kups matzoh flour kup raisins lb. honey hblespoons sugar pupoon cinnamon eaten eggs pg the water and chicken fat oil. Add salt, matzoh flour fcix thoroughly. Add well beatwhen the mixture is cold. ] i inch rounds from small of the dough and place a | piece of raw chicken fat and Bns on each. Pinch the edges together and place into a greased pudding dish. Pour the warm honey over it and sprinkle sugar mixed with cinnamon. Cover and bake in a moderate oven until browned. • • Matzoh and Prune Pudding 2 matzohs 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon cinnamon 3 eggs V4 lb. washed prunes Vt lb. chopped walnuts Vi cup sugar Vi cup melted chicken fat Soak the matzohs in hot water until the water is cold. Drain and squeeze dry. Add to the matzohs salt, cinnamon, well beaten eggs, diced prunes, walnuts, sugar and fat or other shortening. Pour mixture into well greased pudding pan and bake in a moderate oven 45 minutes. THESE MANY THINGS HAKE I SEEN Continued from Pago 13 D propaganda exalting the state and the Knesset, the parliament of Israel, has leaked through the Arab curtain. The seven thousand miles or more separating the Arabs from the United Staff* make it impossible for thenvty appreciate the advantages of oBWeracy as exempli fled here. FrfssWhat distance the Arab finds it difficult to believe that the average working man in the United States owns a car, a house with a bathroom, a radio set, and other fabulous and, to him, incredible possessions. Arabs have told me that they bitterly resented being fed such impossible "lies," asking, "Do they think we are such fools as to believe that all the people are effendis?" Accurate and quite believable reports about Israel's vibrant democracy, however, come from across the border and from fellow Arabs. I am convinced that if the Arab masses are to be encouraged away from the empty promises of Communism, it will not be by means of condition of the people in the Western countries, but by a demonstration of democracy in action on their own doorsteps. The Arabs are treated in Israel as Jews have never been treated in any Arab country. In an all-Arab city such as Nazareth, the mayor, the judges, the teachers and the police, are Arabs, paid by the government of Israel. Arab teachers have been encouraged and trained by the Jewish government of Israel to take care of the education of the Arab minority. All Arab children, boys and girls, go to school, and Arab women have voted for the first time in their history. Democratically-elected Arabs represent the interests of their fellows in the parliament of Israel. A potentially explosive situation could yet be resolved if only the United Nations would make it unmistakably known that it will not tolerate a second round against Israel's integrity. As the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel's one university, marks the beginning of its 30th year of service to the Jewish people and all humanity. Israeli guards enter an armored bus fox the fortnightly convoy to the University's buildings on Mount Scopus. Despite Article VIII of the Israel-Jordan Armistice Agreement providing for free use of the buildings ou Mount Scopus, the University has been forced smce 1948 to conduct its program in irnprovised^^ >TT ELECTRIC. INC. HDENTIAL


PAGE 1

PAGE 16 D 9>Jmistncrk&*n FRIDAY American Notables... Warder Cresson: The Jew of 1848 By HARRY SIMONHOFF {Hmrry Simonholft clown, constituting a serial MM Amtrican Hotakles, il .em, pub/JsheW by The Jewilfc WM"" •i srf f tnt tercentenary celebration ot Uwitk utthmnt M the United Slatts.-Th* Uitors.) Seldom do we see Jews converted to Christianity. But far more rarely do we hear of Christians embracing Judaism. If we rule out those cases of marriage for financial betterment, the scarcity of proselytes to the faith of Moses is not too easily explained. Rarity of Converts to Judaism This paucity of converts does not stem from the burdensome rites demanded by Orthodoxy. There is something in the psychology of a genuine proselyte that srasps quite eagerly at the onerous practices of a new faith. The unpopularity of Jews may possibly deter the more worldly. Yet the history of many a "ger tzedek" %  -imply proves that a seeker of religious truth is never frightened by persecutions from without or by the refcentments within the new congregation he enters. A plausible explanation lies in the unwillingness of Jews to welcome an apostate from another religion. Everything is done to discourage the stranger who comes knocking at the synagogue door. He is assured that his soul can be saved in his ancestral faith if he leads a blameless life. The ger is accepted only after he demonstrates the sin cerity of his conversion beyond all doubt. Such, at le;i-l Wai the experience of a Quaker from Philadelphia The Quaker Warder Cresson was given to Bible study and religious speculation. At the age of thirty, he wrote. 'Babylon the Great is Falling.'' a diatribe against Catholicism. In the same book he deplores the evil of the times and exhorts his own Quakers to a better life. But the religion of the Friends was not quite satisfying. Spiritual unrest drove him to try several other sects which appealed for the moment. In 1840. he met Rabbi Isaac Leeser. and thi leader of American Orthodoxy created an impression that ultimately changed the life and faith of Warder Cresson. Missionaries Early in the 13th century piilews, particularly older men were seized with a desire to forsake the galut and in the Holy Land. But before dying they would marry and bring forth children. This led to an increase in the population of "luftmenchen' without support of any kind E?m agriculture, commerce, or industry. Thc.r wrenched novcrtv inspired some English missionaries o form the London Society for Conversion of Jews." At Jerusalem the pickings in the vineyard of the Lord seemed too good l0 ^ A r LSSamissionaries looked %  -*• tfi harvest for souls .n the Holy Land. They sensed the benefit to their own prestige if the growing power of the UAA. would be represented by a consulate in Palestine. They were also aware of the religious yearnings in Warder Cresson and saw in him excellent material for a missionary It seemed therefore an inspiration from heaven that induced Washington to appoint Warder Cresson the first American Consul at Jerusalem Cresson had a wife with six children and operated a successful farm near Philadelphia. Only strong religious cravings could prompt him to leave home and forego the prospects ol material success He felt the sacrifice and wrote I left all these in pursuit of the Truth and for the sake of Truth alone In the city, holy to three faiths, he was most impressed by the tenacity of its impoverished Jews, who resisted the blandishments of the missionaries. The soul snatchers promised not only salvation but offered a yearly stipend that meant affluence to the hungry dwellers in filth and squalor. In Leeser's Occident. Cresson wrote some scathing denunciations, castigating the wellfed self sufficiency of the missionaries in the midst of starvation Conversion Instead of fraternizing with the missionaries, the American Consul sought out Jerusalem's noted rabbis. He studied Hebrew and was soon able to delve into the 24 massive folios of the Talmud. Fondness for the mystical led him into the portals of the Cabala. The whole man became immersed into the Jewish spirit. He identified himself with the Sephardic group and formally applied for admission into the community of Israel. The Chief Rabbi cast ;i side glance at the missionaries and Moslems and became apprehensive. It was less than a decade since the notorious Damascus affair demonstrated that Christians and Mohammedans can fuse hates into a joint persecution of Jews The Beth Din (Rabbinical Court) interposed their learned objections. But the 50 year old consul overcame all opposition and entered the Covenant of Abraham. In 1848 Warder Cresson became Mich*| C A Commission of Lima,. The convert returned to Ph iU Z2 making a fair disposal ,,, h:s p *JJ*a. H. his family and return to |, ve Z£ % found himself in an asylum. A J2?*' been filed by his wife and famiJjIR* 1 him. A cause celebre followedov M'N heard; physicians, psychiatrist', and I? 1 fied. The press over the land argued ku* stared at him in the streets, F,naiw.S?*g evidently concluded that conversion toiJ^T pnma facie*evidence of insanity Th.i 1 --"'H ordered released. x

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
April 16, 1954

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01367

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
April 16, 1954

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01367

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
28Number 16
MIAMI. FLORIDA. FRIDAY. APRIL 16, 1954
PRICE: $1.00
j >
H Iff
- ....^..
rlrci
'Wl
-- '.-.'/'
!
f
MPMf*
pie Diplomats Leave Meeting in Wake of Clattering Chairs
\ab Feelings Hurt at 'Goodwill' Affair;
>r. Salit Apologizes to State Department
WJTON (JTA) Profuse
s, it was hoped this week,
I diplomatic incident Involv-
|l'nited States Government,
states and Rabbi Norman
President of the United
m of Ameria.
hcident arose in connection
Iwrate ceremonies marking
I of a new eight-cent stamp
I a picture of the Statue of
[and the motto "In God We
Salit participated in the
f" Pr<>8ram with President
' and representatives of
Nic nd Protestant faiths
*Presentative of the Jewish
faith and pronounced the benedic-
tion.
Later, at a goodwill luncheon
given by the State Department and
Post office Department, attended
by many dignitaries and the diplo-
matic corps, Dr. Salit upset diplo-
matic procedure and launched into
a political speech which resulted in
the Arab guests angrily leaving
the room.
Dr. Salit began by reference to
America's religious faith in free-
dom and democracy. But when he
referred to Israel as "the only true
democracy in the Near East." the
Arab ambassadors began to stir un-
easily in their chairs. Finally, Dr.
Salit mentioned Arab raids into Is-
rael territory, specifically implicat-
ing Jordan. Secretary of State John
Foster Dulles glared at Dr. Salit.
The Arabs conspicuously banged
their seats back, and paraded nois-
ily out of the room.
An aide to Mr. Arthur Summer-
field arose from his seat and rush-
ed after the Arabs. He begged them
to return to.the meeting, explain-
ing that he considered them to be
honored guests. He said there had
been no opportunity to see Dr.
Sallt's remarks in advance. The
Arabs refused to return unless per-
mitted a chance to reply to the
"Zionist attack." They accused Dr.
Salit of "exploiting" a religious ad-
dress to make a "political attack"
on them.
At the program's end, Secretary
Dulles visibly annoyed at Dr. Salit,
got up and stalked out of the room
with Assistant Secretary of State
Henry- A. Byroade at his heels.
President Eisenhower was not pres-
ent in the hall where the incident
occurred.
Postmaster General Summerfield
later addressed an official letter of
apology to each of the four Arab
Ambassadors involved. He enclosed
a letter of apology which he receiv-
ed from Dr. Salit.
Mr. Summerfield wrote the am-
bassadors from the four Middle
Eastern countries that Dr. Salit's
comments were "a source of deep
personal regret" to him. The Post-
master General included letters
from Dr. Salit to him and to Secre-
tary of State Dulles as "a further
evidence of our desire to correct
this unfortunate incident."
Elmo Hutchinson on the 'Hunt' Again
**,
won J0/jt
*"* t.U,i.,
JTA
UNITED NATIONSNew bor-
der incidents, indicating a con-
certed plan by the Arab States to
keep the Middle East pot boiling
and Israel on the defensive aloru
every front, were reported this
week as the ponderous machin-
ery of the United Nations, braked
by use of parliamentary techni-
calities, moved slowly towards an
overall study of the situation.
These were the major develop-
ments of a week in which general
deterioration of the situation pro-
ceeded unchecked, and nerves
and patience approached the
snapping point.
The Security Council began
consideration of Jordan and Is-
rael complaints and promptly be-
came involved in a procedural
wrangle over a major principle.
Should the Council consider the
complaints piecemeal, in the or-
der in which they were submit-
ted or should it proceed boldly
to overall consideration of the
entire Jordan-Israel question as
an entity and seek a comprehens-
ive solution?
Lebanon strongly and lengthily
argued for the former course. The
United States, Britain, France
and a majority of members of the
Council called for the latter.
At Tel Aviv, the Israeli mili-
tary spokesman reported new vio-
lations of Israel's frontiers by
forces from Jordan, Egypt and
Continued on Page 3 A
Big Powers
Wrangling
Over Agenda
West Seeks Overall
Study, Consideration
Of Palestine Issues
UNITED NATIONS (JTA>What
was on the surface a procedural
wrangle over minor points but
which actually involved a major
principle, held up the Security
Council this week and delayed ex-
amination of the dangerous Middle
East security situation.
At issue was. ostensibly, agenda
procedure, with Lebanon demand-
ing that the Council take up Jor-
dan and Israel complaints and
counter- complaints, one by one, in
the order in which they were sub-
mitted to the Council. What actu-
ally was at issue was the question
whether the Council, after years of
peacemeal handling of this explos-
ive issue, could take an overall ap-
proach to the question in its en'ire-
ty and seek an overall solution.
This latter course was what Is-
rael had sought for weeks and
which the Arabs had strenuously
resisted. This week, in the Council
chamber, the United States. Britain
and France, as well as other mem-
bers of the Council, spoke up
strongly in favor of this course of
action. They took this position in
the fact of an ill-concealed warning
from the Lebanese delegate. Dr.
Charles Malik, that the Arab
States would be unfavorably influ-
enced toward the Western Powers
by their insistence on general de-
bate.
The Arab spokesman protested
that the Western Powers "always
appear to be opposed to the Arab
thesis," and said it was "not a very
helpful thing." He urged them to
"ponder the effect of this constant
unfortunate appearance," to which
their "conduct gives rise." Dr. Ma-
lik went on to say, "you cannot, at
the point of a gun, force the Arabs
either into a general debate or
around a conference table."
While Council president Andrei
Y. Vishinsky of the Soviet Union,
indicated support of the Arab posi-
tion. Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., head
of the American delegation, told
the Council that the present situa-
tion had to be treated 'very seri-
ously." The conflicting complaints
Continued on Pag* 10 A
HmiM Stmutn
. .t rMkKt American aid


FAGE 2 A
Fannie Selig Named Chairman of
Women's Division for Israel Bonds
Mrs. Fannie Selig has accepted impelled the State of Israel to float
*JmMJ*r!d**L
chairmanship of the Women's Di-
vision, State of Israel Bond Organ-
ization, succeeding Mrs. Matilda
Hairier, who has been named chair-
man of Communities for Florida
State, it "was announced Jthis week
bv Greater Miami chairman Jacob
Sher>
Mrs. Selig, who resides at 725
West Di Lido dr.. has distinguished
munity endeavor since her arrival
in the Greater Miami area.
Making the announcement. Sher
declared, "I have worked with Mrs.
Selig many times in the past, and
I fully realize her tremendous po-
tential. We are indeed proud to
have her active participation in the
Bond organization."
At the same time, Sher an-
nounced a campaign to obtain
members in Greater Miami for the
"Guardians of Israel," a national
organization of Americans who are
rendering outstanding sen-ice to
the development of the State of
Israel.
Membership in the "Guardians
of Israel" is based on the purchase
of $1,000 in Israel Development
Bonds during 1954. Sher said.
"By their purchase of $1,000 in
Israel Development Bonds."' he ex-
plained, "members of the Guard-
ians of Israel' register their deter-
mination to watch over Israel's eco-
nomic security Their name is de-
rived from brael'l traditional
'Shomrim' or 'Guardiaiu,' who pro-
tect the frontiers of the country.
In the same manner, members of
the 'Guardian- of Imel' stand
watch over Israel's..economic fron-
tiers." %
Sher emphasized the decisive
role which funds derived from Is-
rael's fir.-t Bond issuethe Inde-
pendence Issuehave played in the
economic growth of Israel. "More
than 600.000 American purchasers
of Israel Independence Bonds." he
pointed out. "have made it the most
successful bond issue floated by a
foreign government in the I'nited
States since World War II. It was
the success of its first issue which
the Development Issue and to make
thi- type of financing a continuing
feature of its program."
"Israel Development Bonds." he
stressed, -provide the dollar;, vshjch
Israel heeds to fulfill lafo.-
scale program of economic develop-
ment: the continued expansion of
industries and agriculture, the con-
struction of roads, harbors, and
herself in various fields of com-! railways and the further develop-
ment of its export trade which has
already substantially reduced its
traditional foreign trade deficit."
A luncheon meeting in Miami
and an evening meeting in Miami
Beach will be held Monday. April
26. Sher reported, for the express
purpose of planning details of a
kickoff function for the Develop-
ment Issue early in May.
Plans for the formation of the
"Guardians of Israel," Sher indi-
cated, were set forth at the Inter-
national Planning Conference for
Israel, which met in Washington in
March. The first international con-
ference for economic aid to Israel,
the Washington meeting inaugur-
ated the Israel Development Bond
campaign on a worldwide scale.
Holiday Deadline
OfficM and plant of Tht
Jewish Floridian will clot* for
the Passover Holidays at sun-
down Friday, April 16th, and are
scheduled to open again the fol-
lowing Tuesday morning, April
20th. Copy for publication in
The Jewish Floridian of Friday,
April 23rd, must bo on our desks
not later than Tuesday morning
at 10 a.m.
WLiacota,
Entrance on w
PwKription.piJI
* Lenses cad Fn
DupHcotui
' Lwq* SeUcfc-iJ
Style,
Mrs. rMNNt S##J
TERMITES
SWARMING?
MU 'Oho'
FREE INSPECTION m
Dr. Boorstein to Address
Hebrew Speaking Group
Hebrew Speaking Group of
Praetor Miami will meet on Tues-
day evening. April 20th. at the
home of Mr and Mrs. Saul Punish.
742 Michigan ave.
Dr. Samuel W Boorstein. of New
York City, will be guest speaker
and discuss "Medicine in the State
of IsraA" He will also show slides
, depictiA orthopedic programs.
HarnFl'erach will give a resume
of the daily reading from the
Prophets, with David Freed man I
scheduled to review current events.
Irving Shalom and Mrs. Harry Per-
ach will lead the group in com-
munal singing.
Dr. Boorstein is an orthopedic;
surgeon and heads the orthopedic
' sections of Fordham and Bronx
Hospitals in New York. He is also a
lecturer in medicine at New York
I University.

Call 2-1776
Member of S'nol B'rltti
Lee to Talk Saturday
"Peace Time Uses of Atomic En-
, ergj-" will be the topic of a lecture
I by Charles H. Lee on Saturday
, afternoon, 3 30 p.m.. at the Spinoza
1 Outdoor Forum on the lawn of the
. home of Dr. Abraham Wolf son,
11th st. and Ocean ct. Lee is a re-
tired New York engineer who has
r made his home on Miami Beach.
He has lectured extensively on as-
tronomy and atomic energy. Irv-
ing Strauss will preside and con-
duct the question and answer hour.
4.M.JCC Plans
Golf Clinic
The Greater Miami Jewish Com-
munity Center, Town Branch, will
hold its golf clinic and demonstra-
tion on Tuesday evening, April
20th. at 8 p.m.
There will be a showing of the
films, "Golf Stars in Action," illus-
trating leading professionals hit-
ting wood and iron shots at the
Hale America and Tarn O' Shanter
Tournaments in Chicago in 1943
and 1944, and "Golf Champion-
ships"
The demonstration, it is noted
Education Committee
Kaplan will be held
the Greater Miami
Jewish Community Center in coiv
junction with its golf instruction
program under the tutelage of
George Astor.
MATZOH
witkiUiaiUi
m
famots stoe 1884
Let's Look At
The Record
Heard and disposed of more
rim 15.000 important coses
during bis 11 years on the
.noii an*
Re-Elect
CIRCUIT JUDGE
MARSHALL C.
WISEHEART
PASSOVER
DAY WORKERS
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ACE EMPLOYMENT
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We Charge to Emetervr
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A fftOOD JUDGC WITH A GOOD MCOM
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Beterean fourth and Pifth 8to
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For
PROD
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7*0. Street
i A*


futchinson on the 'Hunt' Again
from Pag* A
+'JewistHcrkUnr,
PAGE3A
with an eye to in-
|,he Security Council
Tp, made a number of
gainst Israel. They
[attempted Israeli raid
another Jordan vil-
lage. Some of these complaints
were being "investigated" by the
remains of the Israel-Jordan Mix-
ed Armistice CommissionCmdr.
Elmo Hutchison, USN, and two
Jordan officers.
At Cairo, the Arab League stu-
died measures to put pressure on
the United States to cut economic
aid to Israel. And in Washington,
Foreign Operations Administra-
tor Harold Stassen revealed plans
to reduce the American aid pro-
gram to Europe and the Middle
East so as to apply a greater pro-
portion of the reduced assistance
funds to aid programs for the Far
East.
AT THE SEDER
AND ALL THROUGH
THE HOLIDAYS...
North Shore Center to Sponsor Two Sedorim
North Shore Jewish Center will
sponsor two Sedorim on Saturday
and Sunday evenings, April 17 and
18. Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz will
officiate, with Cantor Edward Klein
chanting the Passover ritual.
Highlighting the Passover Serv-
ice will be special Youth services
conducted by Rabbi Abramowitz
for all children of the North Shore
area on Sunday and Monday after-
noons, at 10:30 a.m.
Following the services, the PTA
will serve Passover delicacies.
> i

. r-\W

A TRADITION
IN JEWISH HOMES
-*-_
AXWELL HOUSE
THE ORIGINAL
ASSOVER COFFEE
SERVED BLACK or with cream... no other coffee
in the world pleases the Yiddish Ta'am like freshly
ground, vacuum packed Maxwell House... because
there is no other goodness on earth like Its rich
aroma and taste.
That's why Jewish people everywhere agree that
to "Good to the Last Drop" flavor means:
X
CrlHt*d by
RABBI HIRSCH KOHN of New York
TA'AM VOS IZ AINS IN DER VELT!
MM
A PRODUCT OF GENERAL FOODS


PAGE 4 A
+ Iewi*t>rk>rk*yr7
Published very Friday line* 1*37 by th Jtwiih
Floriaian at 120 N. E. Sixth Street, Miami 18. Florida
Entered aa second-claaa ma'ter July 4. 1130. at the Poet
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and the Jewish Weekly. Member of the Jewish Tele-
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wide News Service, National Editorial Association. Amir.
lean Association of English-Jewish Newspapers, Florida
Press Association.
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wjemsti Meridian
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LEO MINDLIN................................. N
Editor
Friday, April 16, 1954
Volume 28 .h m Number 16
Nisan 13, 5714
The Passover Seder and Freedom
V.'e are anticipating the First Seder of Pass-
ove: on Saturday evening, and we will enter
into the festivity with a sense of gladness, for
reccing the Haggadah is always an occasion
during which one may experience a sense of
spiritual exhilaration.
h .s the Story of the Exodus, and we will be
apprised once again of the manner in which
the Israelites were taken from their Egyptian
bondage with a firm hand and an outstretched
ana. In that light, the First Seder will give us
an opportunity to ponder upon man's eternal
bc'Je to lift himself up out of conditions of en-
slavement and to mark the moments of his vic-
tories over tyranny and oppression.
As we see it, Passover this year continues to
hold significance in this regard. The Israelites'
return to their land is still upon us as an historic
fad but seems destined to remain in the almost
impalpable future so long as the infant Jewish
republic needs our economic assistance and
so .ong as it must stand guard against the rape
of Mi borders by enemy neighbors.
But we are gregarious creatures, souls whose
nee a for social activity and recognition reaches
beyond the immediate community, and in turn-
ing to the events that swiftly move the world
at large we find a similar scene: men every-
where struggling to shake the binding shackles
of bondage and men everywhere watching for
the safety of the freedom they have so dearly
attained.
salvation. In similar manner, perhaps, have
they loet their way, accepting false faiths and
barren notions and giving vent to prevalent
disbelief. Humanity may, indeed, be doing
obeisance to the golden calf that once stood
at the foot of Sinai.
But the Haggadah will tell us that there is
THE STORM OF ANTI-SEMITISM
TUB IWPUVI WT AMIt-SKMITISM which TOW .
throughout the Soviet empire a year ago, and which *
following Stalin's death, still continues. Although th*r"*'
trying to conceal the facts from the outside world it v*
ish leaders in Czechoslovakia, Rumania and'hu 0w"
sentenced behind locked doors, while in East Germ8^ ***.
person of Jewish origin has been purged from public "if*11**
Many observers are asking why Communist reeim.. r
sary to throttle Jewish life. The answer is revealed in *
lished book. "The Jews in the Soviet Satellites' < Press). Written by Peter Meyei and other East EuroE"* ^
this book, describes n derail the step-by-step desiruM^*!?1
communities in the,, satellite, countries starting from7h '
Reds took control. It analyses the forces behind CommunL
ism and explains why Soviet dictatorships adopt anti
means of retaining power.
Semitiaj.
During the coming year, additional reports of Red
the Jews may be expected to filter through the Iron Curt ""
WHEN THE TRUMPED-UP CHARGES against the Mosw.1
doctors were withdrawn on April 4, 1953, many observers I
Soviets were shelving anti-Semitism. This view was support*!
cations of a new Russian policy of "softness" or conciliation
gression abroad, less repression at home.
As soon as Malenkov had consolidated his control of thti
government, it became apparent that the Communists were
ating from their traditional policies. Just as they sabotaged!
talks in Korea and resisted efforts to negotiate German and l
peace treaties, they also continued their persecution of the J!
Lavrenti P. Beria, former Number Two man of the s^-l
Command, was charged with "criminal, anti-party and antiSutJ
ties," and was held for trial by the U.S.S.R. Supreme Courtl
Beria was no less responsible foe Red anti-Semitism than wen?
leagues, it was he who had quashed the case against the docta,
move designed to discredit his enemies and advance his otij
within the party. His fall from grace marked the triumph of t
favored a harsh policy toward minority groups. Since his t
subsequent execution, several Communist leaders of the van
Russian Soviet republics have been purged.
Stalin's blatant anti-Semitism had three foreign policy
gaining support of neo-Nazis in East Germany; appealing to j
tionalists in the Middle East; and encouraging the support of]
American Fascistic groups around the world. I'niversal protajf
parently convinced the Kremlin that overt anti-Semitism was tail
no reason for despair, that the golden calf is, relations, especiaUv for a eouutry that had ,ong labored J1
perhaps the greatest test of man's faith in his myth of friendship for all minority groups. Halting their "shot*]
intelligence and that once subdued as a notion
his free destiny is assured. Passover this year,
as we see it, is thus a time of hn and an oc-
casion for gladness. It will reaffirm our belief
in ourselves and strengthen our view of the
future.
-.-.
They Never Seem to Tire
A month-by-month study of the procedure
employed by presidents of the Security Council
at the United Nations has apprised us of the
fact that they express themselves infrequently
and focus their energies on maintaining par-
liamentary discipline among the many dele-
gates who seek to make known their opinions
about matters of international policy.
But this month's president of the Council,
Russia's Andrei Vishinsky, is a singular ex-
ception. As we see it, he takes added advan-
tage of his post, recognizing himself on more
occasions than he would otherwise receive as
the Reds resumed their practice of unpublicized persecution.
Even after revocation of the charges against the Moscow i
the Communist campaign against alleged members of the w
"Zionist fonaauracy" coatfbued unabated. On April 16. IX
fajechoslovak Fefceign Minister Vaclav David repeated all toe |
of the Rudolf Siatsky trial befjre the Political Committee of I
era! Assembly of the United JgaUons in New York and accused!
of being an "espionage and saJMtage agency of American imperil
The Czechoslovak press continued the "anti Zionist' campaign.

A SERIES Of TRIALS AGAINST accomplices of Slansky;
leged members of the "Jewish conspiracy" was conducted th
1953 and continued in 1954.
On May 26. 1953. four Czechoslovak diplomats stood trial ml
Three were Jews: Rudolf SLrhsky's brother, Richard, and EdvanlJ
stucker. former "tm lin liu QliiiTHi i to brael. were sentenced)
imprisonment; Pavel Kavan.Ytaner official of the Ci
bassy in London received twenVfive years in jail
On August 7, 1953. Mordechai Oren, a left wing Mapam i
the Israel parliament, received fifteen years in jail on the usual I
of espionage. Two months later, Simon Orenstein, former cos
attache of the Israel mission in Prague, was sentenced to fortaij
for life. Thirteen diplomatic notes from the Israeli Cover
tested the arrest of these Israel citizens and asked permission fc^
matic representatives to see them, without avail. Oren and i
were held incommunicado, forced to "confess" and convicted iif
trials.
On January 29, 1954, another Prague trial was conducted!
seven alleged accomplices of Slansky. Six were described as "I
bourgeois nationalists." They were Jarmila Paussigova. Mikotor
chief representative of. the Soviet deleqation eles). Ervin Polak Vlttl$lwl_
,_ K,____._ .... T* I Hanus Lomsky (Gabriel Lieben). Their original Jewish namai
The Story of the Exodus and the Great Re- harangue on the floor for hours and to en- added to their audited names wherever needed to stress towf
tun is thus the story of our time East stands Snare the UN bodv in additional procedural i identity. The sevehth'defendant. Mrs. Marie Svermova. was deal
' unnnnUi. H__I__I /-____. 1 > m ...... .Is fhi- mi.lr,i ftfiaiio la.ni.h "ImitAr" Hflii Slink" One Ot 0
pitted against West, and within this main di-
vision, smaller nations stand against each
other. Our mighty struggle during World War
II r.as since been placed into miniature signifi-
cance by our battle in Korea and what now
seems a coming struggle in Indo-China.
T.-ere are those of us who despair at the
prospect of continuing wars and at the dark
shadow of a foreboding future. For it seems
that our world is now two teams who "play
ca!ch" with the most destructive fireball ever
devised and that a "miss" will be too terrible
a consequence to contemplate. In this sense,
wrangles. Andrei Gromyko and Jacob Malik,
his colleagues at varying times, have employ-
ed similar methods to get more than their fair
share of Russian propaganda into the United
Nations air.
The current Israel-Arab agenda controversy
is a case in point, whe the Soviet has betray-
ed its unalterable support of the Arab position
while pretending neutrality in the matter. De-
manding the consideration of charges as they
have been filed by the UN truce commission,
Vishinsky thus assures the fact that the Na-
halin affair, during which Israeli troops alleg-
so-e of us observe with outraged feeling hu- "r? at,aclted a Jordanian grouping, will Te-
merity's game of chance with its own destiny. Ce,ve Securi,y Council attention.
As we see it, the Haggadah on Saturday eve-
ning may serve to alleviate some of the ten-
sions within us. The Israelites' exodus meant
leaving bondage behind for a visible salvation.
But that salvation, we find at our Seder tables,
wes not intended to come easily. It was pur-
chased at the price of forty years of wandering
in the desert and of losing the way along the i*tice ^""""ion. abstained from voting
by-paths of hopelessness, despair and spiritual grounds of "insufficient evidence."
incredulity.
The Russians seem to be using every oppor-
:.i similar manner, perhaps, do men of our lunity to ply their point of view upon a world
own time struggle now in the desert, seeking already weary of them and their tactics
At the same time, the Scorpion Pass mas-
sacre will be put aside. Constituting an attack
by Jordan regulars against a bus and resulting
in the murder of twelve Jews, it was ignored by
world opinion when Cmdr. Elmo Hutchinson.
U.S. observer on the Israel-Jordan Mixed Arm-
on
as the mistress fWP^he Jewish "traitor" Otto Sling, one
executed in the first Slansky trial. She received a life term; i
were given sentences ranging from fifteen to twenty-five yean
All of the defendants mentioned above were Communist!
only connection with Jewry was their Jewish origin.

AT THE SAME TIME, AUTHENTIC former leaders of J
munities in Czechoslovakia, Rumania and Hungary' were *r1' .
series of secret trials. Several hundred such leaders had w
in Communist jails since 1948 and 1949.
In Prague, on August 7, 1953, nine former leaders of i
Jews were secretly tried on charges of "treason" and "economic
One was condemned to death and his sentence commuttd to
for life; eight others received sentences up to twenty-three >
December, 1953, Erno Osher, a former Zionist leader in Brain
condemned to ten years in prison. Several dozen others, a
Zionists, remained, in a Bratislava jail, awaiting trial.
Is Rumania, the first secret trial against former Je>
took place in August, 1953. Among other offenses, the deter p
accused of being imperialist agents because they had beipe
British parachutists from the Gestapo during the war. '
Edgar Kenner. who refused to confess and defended hl5*rjJjiJ
tions, was sentenced to sixteen years at forced labor, wi
defendants received sentences of ten years and more.
In a second trial. Mrs. Susanne Benvenisti and| J?_-i
leaders of the Rumanian section of the World Jewls .\Xro*l
accused of having received foreign money for Zionist
were sent to jail the farmer for ten years, the latter ton
In Hungary, Judith Steiner, an employee of the t*"^
Budapest, was sentenced to four years in prison in ue"T
Of the prominent Hungarian Jews arrested in Jn"*r)^0,
Stoeckler, President of the Budapest Jewish co""""""'-..,^
president of the community in Debreczen; Dr. Ual0-J^iJ|
director of the Jewish Hospital; and many others, r^r
munieado. Stoeckler and Benedek. generally n*f^.Zjjm
munist, were nevertheless reported to have received nea i s
George Schay, former leader of the Jewish youth orgw a,
was sentenced to five years Jn jail in another secret tn
1953.


IY, APHIL 16. 1954
+JmlstifhrMiam
b Quarter Way Reached
than a quarter of its way Variety Hospital is Leo Adeeb, Mi-
f..00 ooo goal is the current ami Beach automobile dealer. Vice
!*. (){ 1,000" drive on be- chairman are Daniel J. Mahoney,
r the Variety Children's Hos- of the Miami Daily News, and Jack
Bell, columnist for the Miami Her-
ald. Robert I'entland, Jr., is treas-
urer.
PAGE 5 A
Burton Kahn to Hood
Fascell Campaign on Boach
Burton Kahn, Miami Beach auto-
mobile dealer, has been chosen to
head Dante B. Fascell's Congres
sional campaign on Miami Beach, it
was revealed this week.
In accepting the chairmanship
of the Beach campaign. Kahn an-
nounced that a meeting of Miami
B>ach Fascell supporters will be
Teresa Ronson to Sing
Teresa Ronson, dramatic sopra-
no, will sing an extended program
at Monticello Park Jewish Center
on Wednesday. April 21, 9 cm.
A Passover musical program has
helcblattt ulthe \wek.
Currently, FasceH'-lsDComiteling
his fourth year in the Florida state
legislature.
been planned, along with Jewish
folk songs, classical and current
song hits and community singing.
Miss Ronson studied at Julliard
School of Music and was with the
American Theatre Wing in New
York. She opened Bertha Foster's
recital this season and is presently
a member of the Fern Sherman
Opera Co.
She will be accompanied fit the
piano by Rose M. Rooin.
YOU CAN

m,U6Wt FAVORITE /tecfee-
IN HOME MILK'S BIG CONTEST!
Your favorite recipe can win $25.00 in the
HOME MILK weekly contest. Here's how it
works: Each week HOME MILK will select one
of its quality dairy products. See list of selected
products and contest dates below., You send us
your favorite recipe using this product. The
HOME MILK product selected for the first
week's contest is Home Milk SOUR CREAM.
Write down your favorite recipe using sour
cream and send it to HOME MILK. The
winning recipe will be awarded the $25.00
HOME MILK prise, and your photo and recipe
will appear in this newspaper. Remember,
there's a new contest and a different winner
every week I
CONTEST RULES
Each week's contest closes at midnit: Saturday. Entries
must be postmarked before that time to fee eligible.
Write or print year recipe clearly and give year nanw and
address with each entry. You may submit as many entries
you wish each week. Mail entries to HOME M!IK, 2451
H.W. 7th Ave., Miami.
Winner of each week's contest will be announced in this
newspaper 1 week after lest day far submitting entries.
En week's winner will receive HOMI MIIK'S cheek for
$25.00 (check may be made to your favorite charity, if
you prefer), and photo of winner together with recipe will
appear in this newspaper.
All recipes submitted become the property of HOMI M!IK
Company and no entries can be returned.
Decisions will be made by a specially selected panel of
judges, whose decisions will be final.
Employees of the HOME MIIK Company and their families
ore not eligible to enter these contests.
"ri/Al STATE lABOf AT0v riSTS MOVE HOME MILK EXCEEDS STATE HUWTION etfEMEr,TS IT H.1%
SERVE YOUR FAMItY PURE HOME MILK WITH HIGHER NUTRITIVE VALUE _
6 BIG CONTESTS!
1. SOUR CREAM-
Entries mast be postmarked before midnrfo
Smturiay, April 24.
2. WHIPPING CREAM (Half Heavy
Cream and Half Light Cream)
tmtrkt mast be post marked before midnite
Saturday, May '-
3. DRY COTTAGE CHEESE -
Entries mast be post marked before midnite
Saturday, May S.
4. HEAVY WHIPPING CREAM -
tntrlat matt be postmarked before midnite
Saturday, May 15.
5. LIGHT CREAM-
tntriat mast be postmarked before mUniH
Slarimy, May 22.
6. HOMOGENIZED MILK -
Intriat matt be postmarked before mianife
Saturday, May 29.
HOME MILK IS KOSHER
FOR PASSOVER
Kosher milk and dairy products for Pass-
over supervised and endorsed by the
Greater Miami Vood Hakasbras, Rabbi
Joseph E. Sockovsky, Director.
2.4-SI N.W.7AVINUK*rV\lAMI,FLA.
PHONE-MIAMI 2-76*
rr. LAUDBftOAUB **47j


PAGE6A
Sidney Aronovitz Named President
Of Florida B'nai B'rith Federation
nuw. Miami Back: PaeJ Eastern.
Fort Laaderdale: Piofeseor SasMseJ
Proctor. Cmmille; David Gor-
mjb. st Petersburg: Sam !".
naif irfi anl Bee Goldfield. Day-
tona Beach, reposal vice prese-
oenu. ^r~-
Mrs. Jack B~ Wein. Miami Beach,
reetected president of the
Sidney M. Aronovitz. Miami at-
torney, was elected prtjiaret of the
Florida Slate Federation of B'nai
B'rrth Lodges at the Federation'*
18th annual convention held in the
Bi it more Terrace Hotel. Miami
Beach. April 10-12 Aronovitz sue
ceeds Edward I. Cutler, of Tampa.
iMher officers 'ele/ted were
DarSTWolper St PHer.burg. pres- Florida State FederaUon of real
ident-eleet; Gilbert J Balkin. Mi- B'rith Women's Chapters. Abo
ami. secretary: Sam Bobbins. Tal- elected were the Mesdames U-
r and George Le- liam Wotfana. Tampa. 1st rice pres-
ident: Morris Mams. Orlando. 2nd
nee president: Ben GokMield. Day
tona Beach. 3rd rice president:
Frank Bayer. West Palm Beach
inn..... Ted ftoaiasen. Hialeah
secretary: and Dan Danart. Fort
Lauderdale. historian
A resolution urging enactment of
a state law prohibiting
tory advertising
mously. The resolution is aa oat-
growth of a report, made last year
by the Florida regional office. Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai B nth.
which alleged numerous instances
of discnminatory resort advertis-
ing.
In presenting the resolution, de-
igned ~as an aid in eliminating
thu blight of resort discrimina-
tion." Federation officials pointed
out that Virginia last month en-
acted a statewide act prohibiting
discnminatory commercial adver-
Hajaj

s*
Newly elected officers of the Florida Stale Federation of B'nai B'rith Lodges are
lowing the 18th annual convention of the Florida State B'nai B'rith Federation
BUtmore Terrace Hotel. Miami Beach. Shown ore (seated, left to right: Dand).
ney M. Aronovitz and Edward I. Cutler. Standing (left to right) are George S. Lei
Robbins. Milton A. Friedman. Louis Ossinsky. Sr.. Charles Daniels, Ben Gokifiekfi
Balkin and E. Albert Pallot.
Sammtl G*l4ittt*
Goldstein Asks Voters
To Study Qualifications
Samuel GoIdstSta, candidate for
the Board of Public Instruction.
District 3. thu, week asked voters
to place emphasis upon qualifica-
tory rather than platform"
Basically, the needs of Dade's
school system include increased fa-
cilities to alleviate overcrowding,
particularly in the elementary
schools. Goldstein said
Women Heeded as Circuit
Judges, Mrs. Meyers Declares
With handling divorces and sep-
arations a major job of the Circuit
: Court, one out of the county's 10
circuit Judges should be a quali-
j fied woman attorney. Anna Bren-
ner Meyer-, candidate for Circuit
Judge in Group 5. declared here
thu week.
Mrs. Meyers noted that women
are serving as judges of Circuit
Courts and other high courts in 22
states, "and in the opinion of at-
torneys practicing before them.
and of the press, are doing an out-
standing job."
Mrs. Meyers also said that "mod-
Sotin Soys Lows
Must be Strengthened
Dan Satin, candidate for the
State Legislature in Group 2. in
addressing his supporters all over.
the county, this week strongly em-
phasized the importance of
strengthening the laws having to
do with the municipalities in this
county having a greater voice in
the legislation which affects them.
"Home rule, wherein the munici-.
pahties have a direct voice in leg-
islation, is and should continue to
be a fundamental precept in our 'or Passover this year include whip
local government," Satin said, "and' Ped butter, sour cream, cream cot
I will exert every effort to amplify, tage cheese, garden salad cottage,
the voice of the municipality in the *'t tree P< cheese.
State Legislature if elected." Other products Kosher for Pass-
Satin further advocated the re- over are cottage cheese, cherry
vision of the State Constitution to kream cheese, chive cream cheese,
provide, among other things, for! pineapple cream cheese. Grade A
additional representation fron life mixed eggs and Grade A
llrdvaN Dairy
l*rodii*l* kosli
For Passover I m
Berdy's Dairy Products, main
taining their offices and plant at
27 NW 4th st.. have announced that
their products are Kosher for Pass-
over.
Kashruth is sunervis^d b* the
Greater Miami Vaad Hakashruth
under Rabm Joseph B. Rackovsky.
director.
Products authorized as Kosher
Tel. IMMS B,|
Jimmy ran,
R WDY
Package
L O U N GC-|
Family SrrW Mm* |
ENTEHTAII
13420 N.W. 7th
MIAMI. FLOR
ern American women are playing
U essrtsd, the essdidata proaus- incrMlingJy important roles 5
politics and business. They deal
in and own property, and many
women work side-by-side with their
husbands in business."
She declared that "numerous
women enter the professions, and
certainly, with women taking such
important roles in political, busi-
ness and professional life, they
should also serve in our courts."
The candidate stressed that she
ed to support plans for the im
mediate future to provide facilities
for an ever-expanding school popu-
lation that "will put the school
system here ahead of its needs, as
is done by progressive business or-
ganizations."
Goldstein emphasized that sal-
rlsa for teachers must war-
rant their staying in the profes-
sion, devoting their efforts to
teaching in all its facets. 'has had 22 years of experience in
'.all courts and has had years of
social work and
crime prevention.
Mrs. Meyers pointed out that
sh<- was "first in this campaign to
advocate establishment of a recon-
cilation department in the Circuit
Court to help prevent the breaking
up of homes and marriages.
tinued. "that if business and mu-1 experience
nicipalities can obtain federal
funds to build new plants, houses,
hotels, airports, then certainly our
schools, which are the basic foun-
dations of the perpetuation of
Americanism, should receive addi-
tional long-term federal aid."
Born in Salem. N.J.. in Septem-
ber, 1915. Goldstein received the
AB degree from Duke University
in 1937. did post graduate work
at Temple University in education-
al practice and theory and gradu-
ated from the University of Miami
Law School in September, 1953.
He was a high school teacher in
Salem from 1937 to MM During
World War II, Goldstein saw over-
seas duty in North Africa and Italy
and was released from service, as
a captain in the Air Foges, in 1946.
A member of the firm of 'iol.l
man and Goldstein, the candidate
resides with his wife and daugh-
ter, Sandra, at 1947 NW 6th st.
Crawford to Speak Before
Friends of Seven Lively Arts
William Crawford, n a t ionally
known newspaperman, will lecture
on "I've Got News For You" on
Friday, April 16, 8:30 p.m.. at the
Miami Beach Community Center's
Friends of The Seven Lively Arts.
Crawford, who is an editorial
writer for The Miami Daily News,
was formerly director of publicity
for the Democratic National Com-
mittee during Franklin D. Roose-
velt's tenure of office.
Dade County and a lieutenant
ernor. stringent child molestation
legislation, a through turnpike to
the Georgia line, lower auto license
fees and higher pay for teachers.
large white eggs.
Goldstone Unveiling
The dedication of a monument to
Satin further emphasized that he' the memory of the late Nettie Gold-
would do everything possible to
preserve the present homestead ex-
emption laws.
Wise Hadassah Says
Bon Voyage at Party
A luncheon was given here by
Mrs. Louis Gold at her home in
honor of Mrs. David Frankel, chair-
man of Israel Supplies for the
Stephen S. Wise Group of Hadas-
sah.
Mrs. Frankel. who with her hus-
band will sail for Europe aboard
the Isle de France on May 4. was
bid Bon Voyage by members of
stone, formerly of 1052 Jefferson
Avenue, Miami Beach, %UI take
place Tuesday. April 20th at 2 p.m.
at Mt. Nebo Cemetery with Rabbi
Leon Kronish officiating. Mrs.
Goldstone is survived by three
daughters: Mrs. Rose Kirschner.
Mrs. Marion Brown of Miami Beach
and Mrs. Anne Kasner of Heulett.
L.I., NY. Arrangements are in
charge of Palmer's Miami Monu-
ment Company. Friends and rela-
tives are asked to attend.
MsMsy SredMft ft 0*1
ml ttttm
Al SMIK'S PAMTi
Ul NX 125*1
TH.M-SM
m oiinn
(II It llll
Anberg Unveiling
The dedication of a monument
the group and congratulated on the ,0 tne memory of the late Louis
occasion of her 35th wedding anni-! Lanberg, formerly of 921 Jefferson
versary. Avenue, Miami Beach, was held
A banquet cloth was presented to | Wednesday, April 14th at 11:30
Mrs. Frankel by the sewing section am. at Mt. Sinai Memorial Park
of the group.
Cemetery with Rabbi Abraham Cas-
sel officiating. Mr. Lanberg is sur-
| vived by his wife Sayde; two sons,
I Irving and Jonas and two daugh-
' ters. Mrs. JeanetteBordon and Mrs.
(Jertrude Greenberg. Arrangements
were in charge of Palmer's Miami
Monument Company.
Albert Comanor, executive director oi the Jewish Social Srv
ice Bureau (left, chats with delegates to'th. cSTa,2S
[?!.e.,,U^_o1 Un!!fd Servte*. fo' Nw Americans held
at the
Hotel Plaza in New York City. From left to riqh
Petluck, assistant executive director of USNA EtavJd I bI!'
Detroit. Mich Ri hard Dammann. president of AsJ,%*
a"rndnoho[0New Am-rkan-; and > s*
Kostoff Unveiling
The dedication of a monument
to the memory of the late Henriet-
ta Kostoff, formerly of 707 SW
15th Street, was held Sunday. April
11th at 2 p.m. on the K. of P. Plot
at Mt. Sinai Memorial Park Ceme-
tery with Rabbi S. T. Swirsky offi-
ciating. Mrs. Kostoff is survived by
her husband Murray, a son Sey-
mour and a daughter. Mrs. Barbara
Solomon, all of Miami. Mrs. Kos-
toff was a chartered member and
Port Chiel of Roosevelt Tent, Mi-
ami Temple No. 33. K. of P. Ar-
rangements were in charge of Pal-
mer's Miami Monument Company.
COMPUTE M
l* m.l a* Ji"M
TAW*
HM
COLLEGE
COFFEE
SHOP
214 AIMW *|
COMlM**
MUM t*1"*
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t*J'*,i
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BILL SHEPARD RICTWCjU CONTACT*
4t0 I. >S* STttfT, MAUAN


Up^jysu
leidelberg
(Will Stay
, December
up The threatened
National Jewish Wel-
. Servicemen's Club and
. Heidelberg. Germany,
I averted, at least until
81 1954, Charles Aaron,
|J] president of JWB,
fc session of the organ-
fjonal convention.
, recreation and religi-
for American Jewish
ionnel in the Ameri-
[of Germany, the JWB
j have been cldsed on
eause of lack of funds.
, operating continuous-
[ since 1946.
gained that tha club
un open for the balance
even though it meant
|would incur a deficit of
In ratifying action
tkh is not in JWB's pres-
BWB's executive commit-
Lvention endorsed Aar-
Rhat "we are sure that if
]can Jewish communities
Ustand the significance
tision they; will respond
kponsibility. even as we

PACE. 7 A
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MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS EARIY PRICES VERY REASONABLE
Special Ratei far Groups or Children
Royal Hungarian
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731 WASHINGTON AVENUE
TELEPHONE 58-5401
Hebrew Academy honor student Warren Teitelman. selected
Youth of the Month by Miami Beach Exchange Club, re-
ceives an award at the Saxony Hotel from Exchangite Paul
Enfiekl. Looking on i* Msgr. William Barry, guest speaker at
the luncheon.
flub Affair Due
spring social and card
Temple Beth Sholom
lb will be held on Mon-
Ing. April 26. 8 p.m., in
lie's Banquet Hall. Jack
H, president, announced
khments will be a fea-
fction. Co-chairmen of the
[ Frank Kamen and Al-
*r*tfo*t*tOim
IM4MANM1 ]rk ST.
Make Your
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Mm
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M jeer family and
friends at ear
IKTIT KOSHER HOTEL
outstanding Well
own Young Israeli
Cantor and Singer,
Iron weingarten.
i conduct the Sedurim
In the True Beauty
pnd Tradition of the
Passover
Phone
15-6701
Slat* Heady tor
Election Meeting
Following slate of officers and
directors witl.be brought in" for
election to the annual election
meeting of the Sisterhood of Tem-
ple Beth Sholom on Wednesday,'
April 21, according to an announce-
ment by Mrs. Bert S. Klee, Sister-
hood president:
PresidentMrs. Irving B. Kap%
Ian; vice presidentsMrs. Morris
Alpert, Mrs. Joseph L. Arkin, Mrs.
Wolfie Cohen. Mrs. Arthur Cour-
shon; recording secretary Mrs.
Samuel Falick; corresponding sec-
retaryMrs. Michael Mersel; finan-
cial secretaryMrs. Benjamin Sa-
bin; treasurerMrs. Maurice B.
Shein; chaplainMrs. Leon Kro-
nish; social secretaryMrs. Sam-
uel Kelemer.
For two-year directorsThe Mes-
dames Irving Bachrach, Abe Blatt,
Jack Chutkow, I. A. Durbin, Joseph
Fenias, Charles Gertler, Gilbert
Goldman, Eli Meltzer, Bess Nelson,
Harry Orleans, Helen Rajna, Irv-
ing Roth man. Fred Sommerstein,
Joseph Shawmut. Ralph Spero,
Louis Stuff. Max Weitz. Joseph
Wolf. Simon Wolff, Abraham Zin-
namon.
One year' directors The Mas-
dames Ralph Benach. Irving Blas-
berg, Maif Brustein, Barry Camer-
on, Ralph1' Cobb, Jacob Fishman,
Emanuel Goldstrich, Harry W.
Greenberg, Daniel Herman, Ida
Kars, Morrv B. Morris. Donald Mur-
ray, Abe Schwartz, Louis Shapiro,
Hyman Silver. Irving Westin, Har-
old Wynn and William Yanowitz.
Unexpired termThe Mesdames
Norman Babel, Camille Baum, Sam-
uel Beckerman, I. C. Greenberg,
David Harris, Milton Jacobs, Walter
Jacobs. Reuben Levin. Benjamin
Mandell, Herman Ries, Sidney Sch-
wartz, Benjamin Seidler, Charles
Silvers.
Mrs. Aaron Fair was chairman
of the Nominating Committee
which will be presenting the slate
at the meeting.
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Sltotu GaAe. 4
H| Good Food Mumi BcJeh


PAGE 8 A
+Jewlst>n****>-
I35AY.

Miss Bertman Weds
Jerrv Goodman in
Candlelight Bites
In a double ring candlelight
ceremony at the Shelborne Hotel,
on April 4th, at 5:30 p.m., Miss
Mar'ene Bertman became the bride
of Jerry Goodman. Rabbi Irving
Lehrman officiated.
The bride is the daughter of Mr.
;.nd Mrs Louis Bertman, 1024
Michigan ave. Mr. Goodman is the
s rr.<:- 8340 Byron ave.
Matron of honor was Mrs. W.
Kanon. of New York City, sister
of the groom. Maid of honor was
Elair.e Glaser.
Acting as best man was Fred
Singer. Stanley Bertman was ush-
er.
The bride selected a strapless
imported chantilly lace gown over
blush pink silk illusion tulle, a
fitted bodice, bouffant skirt and
bolero jacket with a Queen Anne
r Her fingertip illusion blush
pink veil was attached to a tiara
of .' eed pearls. She carried white
orchid! on a Bible.
For something borrowed, the
bride wore a gold wedding band
which belongs to the groom's pa
terr.al grandmother.
Mrs. Goodman chose a delicate j
p organza cocktail-length gown,
fitted bodice, bouffant skirt and
orchid corsage.
I. Bertman selected a navy
sheath (Iran complemented by an
orchid corsage.
e bride is a graduate of Mi-
j'mi Beach High School and attend-
be University of Miami. She
Exchange Club scholarship
Ot and a member of Phi Sig-
Mgma Sorority
Goodman attended the Uni-
ty of Florida and University I
mi, where he was affiliated,
Pi Lambda Phi- Fraternity, i
At present he is in service with
the U.S. Army. i
A reception and formal dinner.
wed the ceremony at the Shel-,
rue. The couple will spend thoir
ymoofl in New Orleans and!
MtUe at Fort Bliss. El PtSO,
Ti : -
Diane Silverman Chooses Nylon Tulle
Kor Wedding Saturday to Leonard Treister
Miss Diane Silverman and Leon-
Bosalie Cross to
Beside in Illinois
Miss Rosalie Anne Gross and Dr.
Emanuel M. Herzon were married
In Temple Emanu-EI on April 8th.
Rabbi Irving Lehrman officiated,
and a reception followed the cere-
mony in the Nautilus Hotel.
The bride is the daughter of Mrs.
Julie Gross. 1620 Pennsylvania ave.
Dr. Herzon is the son of Mr. and
Mickcv Harris is
Bar Nfitzvah
tekey Harris, son of Mr and I
Ml Alexander Harris, celebrated i
his Bar Mitzvah on Saturday morn-
inp. April 10th, at Congregation.
Jacob. Rabbi Moses Mesche-
officiated. assisted by Cantor
A. n Weingarten.
A reception followed the cere
mi y in David Whitman Hall. and.
open house was held at the home ;
Saturday afternoon.
rn in Philadelphia, the con-:
firr-ed moved here with his fam-1
ily live years ago and resides at!
1043 6th st. He is a pupil at South i
Bcr.h Elementary School and is j
active in the athletic program of
Washington Avenue Recreation
PU :.
Ojt-of-town guests included Mr.
anil Mrs. Louis Goldes and Mr. and
Mrs. Herbert Cohen, of Philadel
phia, and Mr. and Mrs. Philip Kap-
lan and Mr. and Mrs. N. Price of
Atlantic City.
ard E. Treister were married in
a 7 p.m.. ceremony by Rabbi Leon
Kronish on Saturday at the Holly-
wood Beach Hotel.
The bride is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Bernard A. Silverman,
4588 Alton rd. Mr. Treister is the
son of the Arthur Treisters, 1220
Lenox ave.
Given in marriage by her father,
the bride wore a white lace and
nylon tulle gown made with fitted
bodice, portrait neckline and long
sleeves, ending on a point over
each hand.
A full tulle skirt ended in a
cathedral train, and her full length
illusion veil fell from a cap of
matching lace and seed pearls. She
carried lilies of the valley and
white orchids on a white Bible.
Mrs. David Pass was matron of
honor for her sister. Other attend-
ants included Mrs. Kenneth Treis-
ter. Mrs. Lawrence Perlmutter,
Miss Sue Stahl. Miss Iris Thorpe
and Miss Elaine Taylor.
They were attired in bouffant
gowns of Nile green tulle and a
deeper shade of green taffeta.
Their flowers were white tulips
and ivy.
Best man was Kenneth Treister,
brother of the bridegroom. Ushers
included Ted Schwartzman. Chuck
Sokol. Marwin Cassel. Terry Cohen,
Benedict Silverman. brother of the
bride. David Pass. Don Mayerson.
Chuck DeLarlo, Don Barmack and
Stanley Brodsky.
The bride graduated from Miami
Beach High School and attended
the University of Georgia and the
1 rv versify of Alabama. She was
a pledge of Sigma Delta Tau Soror-.
My.
Mr. Treister also graduated from
Miami Beach High School and at-
tended the University of Miami,
where he was a member of Zeta
Beta Tau Fraternity and Omicron
Delta Kappa Honorary. He is now
an attorney with Morehead, For-
rest. Gotthardt and Orr.
Following their wedding trip to
Jamaica. Haiti and Puerto Rico, the
couple will reside at 1164 E. Bay
Harbor.
Int ,
Mrs. Emanuel M. Herien
Mrs Joseph L. Taub, Chicago. 111.
Mr. Taub was best man. Maid of
honor for her sister was Miss Sa-
bina Gross.
The brides tiered chantilly lace
gown was designed with pearl en-
crusted bodice. Fingertip-length
veil and white orchid~bouquet com-
pleted her costume.
The maid of honor wore rose taf-
feta and net and carried roses
The couple will honeymoon in
Chicago and reside in Elgin. 111.
The former Miss Gross attended
Miami Beach High School and the
University of Miami. She has been
a Doris Crane model.
Dr. Herzon is a specialist in ear,
nose and throat and plastic sur-
gery.
Rubin* Civc Spring
Buffet for Fifty
Mr. and Mrs. Simon E. Rubin
gave a spring buffet dinner for
50 people in the patio of their
home. 6454 Pinetree dr. circle, on
Saturday evening, April 10th.
Mrs. Rubin was assisted by her
mother, Mrs. Richard Roth, and
aunt, Mrs. William Odz. Others
helping the hostess included Mrs.
Jack earner and Mrs. Jack Falk.
The Rubins' daughter, Sandra
Lynn, will have a seventh birthday
party for 20 friends on Saturday
morning, April 17th. Lunch will
be served, and moving pictures are
scheduled to be shown later.
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Italian, p fcygJeJ., ^4 MmrM
Directors
HERBERT BELLE SILVEI
pS*!uV.",n", Av#- M,,mi *eh
Ph. M.tlZI LiniitM Enrellm.nt
*>s. Gaitni Fr,
(inskive Freer
To Reside on _
Ruth Haber and Gu.
man, formerly of Net'
and now residents ol lb
were married on Tue
13!h.
Both are active in rehj
cal, civic and .welfare
tions.
Mr. Freeman, pa-: prtaj
the Brooklyn Chapter of |
York State Society of I
Engineers, is a retired d|
neer.
He served the City of]
for many years. He is aia]
ber of the Miami Beach I
1601. Bl'O Elks.
Mr. and Mrs. Freeman
side at 827 Jefferson
Beach. Florida.
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5Ay, APRIL 16, 1954
lampion Golfer Roslyn Swift Exchanges
iVVS With Maxson Berber in Hollywood
+Jmisi>nr*a~.
PAGE 9 A
Lne-clav. March 31st, was the
TcWen'by Miss Roslyn Swift
marriage to Maxson Bergcr
. Hollvwood Beach Hotel. Miss
is the daughter of Mr. and
.'gen w. Swift. 1609 Tyler
Mt Hollywood Beach.
Ir Berber 's ,ne son **r' "
Tlouis L Bcrger, Buffalo, N.Y.
if Marius Ranson. of Ft. Lau-
L.]e officiated at the 6 p.m.
Uony. Jo"" Peturca. accor-
ist offered traditional nuptial
le.Best man was Lewis Berger,
r of the groom.
K bride chose a nylon tulle
fertoa gown over taffeta, a gath-
i tulle side panel emphasizing
[bouffant skirt, with" handclip-
J organdy roses and brilliant
lers decorating the panel. The
Xrcd waist finished with boat
Cine outlined in organdy roses
Jtulle capsleeves.
|er five-tiered veil of French 11-
|nn fell from a coronet of or-
|dy roses outlined with seed-
fls. She carried a bridal Bible,
| gift of her mother, centered
I two white hybrid orchids and
ered with lily-of-the-valley.
only jewelry was a strand of j
tls. gift of the groom.
fctron of honor was the bride's
Jher, attired in a brown lace
Terina over shellpink taffeta.
carried shellpink cymbidium
kids on a brown velvet fan back-
Iwith pink maline.
Vs. Berger, mother of the
[om, chose a blue lace gown and
re a pink cymbidium orchid cor-
t Floral designs were execut-
hy the Blackstone Flower Shops.
Jon completion of an extended
leymoon trip to Hawaii and Cali-
pia. the newlyweds will reside
Buffalo and New York.
Irs. Berber is well known In
ling circle- its "Cookie" Swift,
ring won a number of champion-
bs as an amateur golfer.
- :
Will C'ori. Siefd
fes Siegel Wii
ft fiss Gloria Siegel and Irving
stein are engaged to be mar-
They have chosen the sum-
fseason for their wedding. The
Tw-elect s parents. Mr. and Mrs.
[ms Siegel. 441 SW 35th ave.,
announcing the couple's en-
Iwient.
Piss Siegel now lives in New
I and is employed by the law
1 of Baar, Bennett and Fullen.
I all*nded Brooklyn College, the
fwwity of Miami and the Ber-
^ school.
r Kornstein. of Bayonne, N.J.,
T" executive with the Hallmark
f ogram Co He is active in the
pne Jewish center and in Hud.
Ttounty philanthropic work.
pe couple will |ive in New Jer-
fjollowmg their marriage.
3D
JH0T06RAPHY
"Ls0 BLACK WHITS
WH BARGTEIL
.fone 83-8431
Miss toalrict I. Blaustein
Mr. Fern to Wed
Beatrice Blaustein
The engagement of their daugh-
ter, Beatrice Louise, to Ronald N.
Fern is announced by Mr. and Mrs.
Morris A. Blaustein, Yonkers, N.Y.
Mr. Fern is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Michael R. Fern. 214 NW 84th
st
Miss Blaustein, who lives at 814
Lenox ave., graduated from Yonk-
ers High School and attended the
University of Miami, New York
University and Charron-Williams
Commercial College in Miami.
Mr. Fern graduated from Dickin-
son High School in Jersey City,
N.J., and the School of Commerce
at New York University. He served
for two years in the Second Arm-
ored Division during World War
IL
The couple plan a June wedding
with Rabbi Leon Kronish, of Tem-
ple Beth Sholom, officiating. They
will reside in the Miami area after
a motor trip through the state.
Ardmore
Michael David Shagan, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Michael
Shagan, 1400 Lenox ave., will
celebrate his Bar Mitzvah at
Temple Emanu-El on Satur-
day morning, April 17th. Rab-
bi Irving Lehrman will offi-
ciate. An eighth grade stu-
dent at Miami Beach Junior
High School, Michael attends
the Religious School of Tem-
ple Emanu-El.
Ardmore
Ira Shapiro, son of Dr. and
Mrs. Arthur Shapiro, 431 W.
29 st., will be Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday morning, April 17,
at Temple Beth Sholom. Rab-
bi Leon Kronish will officiate.
Irvine Named President
Of Flamingo Lodge
Bernard Levine has been named
president of Flamingo Lodge, B'nai
B'rith.
Other o'ficers include Frank
Biel, 1st vice president; Dave
Sachs, 2nd vice president; Frank
Kershner, 3rd vice president; Rick
Lippman, recording secretary.
William Thompson, treasurer;
Martin Adelman, financial secre-
tary; Martin Foreman, correspond-
ing secretary; Bob Thompson, war-
den; Paul Hammel, guardian; Jack
Kirschbaum, chaplain.
Ted Robinson, Mitchell Wolfson,
Dr. L. Eisenman and Dr. S. Wald-
nan, trustees.
mist Haoar **"
Miss Shore Plans
Wedding to Doctor
Miss Eleanor Shore will become
Mrs. Seymore Ginsburg in Boston
this June. Her fiance is an assist-
ant professor of mathematics at
the University of Miami.
The bride-elect's parents. Mr. and
Mrs. Solomon Shore, of 1766 Michi-
gan ave., announce the couple's en-
gagement. Dr. Ginsburg is the son
of Mr. and Mrs. William Ginsburg,
StaUn Island, N.Y.
Miss Shore graduated from Mi-
ami Beach Senior High School,
where she received an award for
secretarial proficiency. She attend-
ed Bryant and Stratton Business
College in Boston and is now em-
ployed by George Kronengold
Travel Service.
Dr. Ginsburg received the BS de-
gree cum laude from the City Col-
lege of New York. In 1949. he re
ceived the MS degree from the
University of Michigan and was
granted the PhD degree there three
years later. _
He was elected to Phi Beta Kap-
pa and to the Society of Sigma Xi,
national research society. He has
Uught at the University of Miami
since 1951.
PERSONALLY
SPEAKING
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Newman,
of 60 SW 52nd ave., announce the
birth of their son, Michael Paul,
at Doctors Hospital on Monday, Ap-
ril 5th. Grandparents are Mr. and
Mrs. Wolf Retskin. of Miami Beach,
and Mr. and Mrs. Gustav Weissber-
ger, of the Bronx, New York. The
Newmans also have a daughter,
Judy Wendy.
k i* -h
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Protzel, of
1207 Meridian ave., will spend the
Passover holiday in Teaneck, N.J.,
with their children, Dr. and Mrs.
Martin R. Protzel and Mr. and Mrs.
Seymour Protzel.
David Rosner
and Family
take this opportunity to wish their
many friends and patrons here
and throughout the 48 states a
Kosheren and Frayliehen Pesach
and
thank them one and all for the
wonderful response and reception
they accorded his new hotel
fd t U rs imtfrJ notil pool caianas
ON THE OCEAN *7tk STREET. MIAMI BEACH
on its premiere 1953-54 season
which was most successful
Dining Room Open to the Pnbiie
tor the Entire Patutorer Week
(Sedarim excluded)
Closing Winter
Season
May 2nd
DIETARY LAWS
Reopening Summer
Season
June 22nd
Closing Labor Day


PAGE 10 A

-MstiikricMagL
Big Powers View Agenda
Continued from Pago 1 A
could not be separated into air-
tight compartments. The issues, Mr.
Ludge insisted, must be treated as
inter-related, and he said this was
the only practical way if the Se-
curity-Council were to continue to
play a positive role in this area.
The American delegate complain-
ed that there had been no improve-
ment in the border situation since
toe Kibya incident, and he warned
Iti4t the policy of reprisal and re-
taliation must stop. He said the
Kabalin incident clearly called for
condemnation.
Sir Pierson Dixon, British dele-
gate, mentioned the killing by Jor-
danians of 11 Israelis at Scorpion
Pass, in the Negev, and the "organ-
ized attack" on Nahalin village in
Jordan, and added that he hoped
no further incidents or attacks
would occur while the Council was
considering the problem. "The situ-
ation is already grave enough with
out that." he said. He called for "a
thorough discussion of the whole
problem.*'
French delegate Henri Hoppenot
said that he considered that the
complaint against Israel and the Is- j
raeli complaint against Jordan
w ere only parts of the general Pal-
estine question. He recalled that,
Mr. Vishinsky had recently favored |
simultaneous discussion of the Is-1
raeli complaint against Egypt >nfl;
the Egyptian complaint against Is
rael, as "two aspects of the same I
matter." He supported the view on |
discussion of the two complaints !
together, and expressed hope for a I
constructive solution of the prob-1
lem as a whole." |
When these questions are set-
tled, and Israel finally gets the
floor in the Council, it will empha-
size that a total and complete
breakdown of the armistice agree-
ment between Israel and Jordan is
now evident and will suggest that
the Council review that agreement.
Israel Ambassador Abba S. Eban
said this week at a press confer-
ence.
Mr Eban said that, if the Secur-
ity Council would bring Israel and
Jordan together under the provi-
sion of Article XII of the armistice
agreement, it could "mark a turn
ing point in this unhappy story "
Article XII. the clause which
makes a meeting between Israel, 19
and Jordan compulsory'' wa- 'he
most important part of the whole'
Johns Film Shown
"This Is Your Life."' a Miami-
produced 16-mm sound film high
lighting the life story of Acting |
Governor Charley Johns, was pre-,
sented at the Johns' NoitaVJWI
campaign headquarters. 6609 NW '
7th ave on Thursday evening The '
film runs approximately 15 min-
utes and the narration is by John
Behney. former Broadway actor
and star of the Coconut Grove
Theatre productions.
The Bar Mitzvah of David
Lawrence Tedlow, son of Mr.
end Mrs. Samuel Tedlow.
4390 North Michigan ave..
will be held on Saturday
I-.orning. April 17th. at Tem-
fie Emanu-El. David is a
seventh grade student at
f-.autilus Junior High School
and attends the Religious
School of Temple EmanuEl.
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TO ALL PASSOVER GREETINGS
Woody's Standard Service
Lubrication Specialists Oas Oils Batteries Tires
"Service with a Smile"
477 N.W. 5th STREET PHONE MH
TO ALL GREETINGS
*. m. ousmmnv
Roofing and Metal Craftsmen
"Ne 5ufc5f.fi/te for fiawrieiKt"
Crvftsasee Throughout the Teers
1940 N.W. 17th AVENUE PHONE 3-8208
I armistice agreement. Mr. Eban
said. No precedent existed, he
went on. for one party to refuse to
meet with another as Jordan has
refused to attend the conference
convoked by the UN Secretary Gen-
eral.
The Israeli representative said
that Israel wanted a peace settle-
ment. But short of that, its mini-
mal requirement was a restoration
of the Israel-Jordan armistice
agreement in its full integrity.
Parts of an agreement, he conclud-
ed, could not be operative while
other parts were in force. He added
that Jordan could not have just the
articles of the armistice agreement
which it wanted.
Miami to Tel Aviv Via Pan Am*>ru
and Israel Airlines ^^
ROUND TRIP AS LOW AS SIM 90
Plus $10.15 Tax
PAN AMERICAN
2 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD. MIAMI
1*51 WASHINGTON AVENUE. MIAMI BEACH
Telephone 64-5411
A Happy Passover to All Our Friends and Patron.
1-oeb Gottfried
RED ROAD. HIALEAH
Phone 88-2258
ELECT

KENDRICK
YOI'R
PURCHASING
AGENT
IF YOU WANT:
A MAN who will devote bis foil time to the business of making
$5,000,000 worth of purchases each year for County Departments.
* *
A MAN who pledges and guarantees every seller in Dodo County that
ho shall not be discriminated against in selling to the County.
* *
A MAN who will provide public records on all purchases be makes -
who will not tolerate secret fifes and secrecy in official acts.
* *
A MAN who has a reputation for fairness a background as a Motive
Miamiao a man whoso honesty is proved m U. S. Army records.
* *
A MAN who will not tolerate a policy of favoritism a man whose
oafy guide to purchasing will bo "the best possible at least cost."
We Need a Man Like-
"' KENDRICK
MM I'ulllk-Ml Adv.)


lY. APRIL 16.HS4
-Jmtohthridtogi
ational Council Adopts $688,750 Budget
PAGE 11 A
Lew YORKA national budget
I $688,750 for the 1954-95 fiscal
L was passed by the Board of
CL.tors of the National Council
Jjewish Women at the concluding
U,0n of its annual spring meet-
n \,w York AprH Orri to 9th.
I in additional sum estimated at
Lut S2.000.000 is expected to be
lent bv the 245 Council Sections
ing the yea' for tne,r local
lalth welfare and education pro-
hms. The 61-year-old organiza-
bn has over 100,000 members
oughout the country.
frhe national budget will cover
Vdance and service to local pro-
lams of community welfare, serv-
lo the foreign born, and edu-
Ition and social actionr as well as
1 $50,000 grant to support the
laining of Israeli high school
lathers at the School of Education
{Hebrew University in Jerusalem,
Ll scholarships for advanced
Judy in the United States to stu-
Tnts with leadership ability in
kids of social welfare and edu-
fcion from Jewish communities
Iroad.
Hails Freedom
llfrs. Irving M. Engel, President
Council, keynoted the opening
Ission of the Board meeting with
i address hailing the progress of
freedom campaign which the
fcuncil has been conducting with
' co-spon.sorship of the national
loung Women's Christian Associ-
lion.
IMrs. Engel reported that more
Ian 200 Sections of the Council
Iroughout the country have al-
fcady translated the freedom cam-
lign into programs of community
Btion. The campaign was launch-
over two years ago "to help
eate a climate more conducive to
free expression." Noting that the
Council was among the first pub-
He service organizations to under-
take a program to combat threats
from within to American democ-
racy, Mrs. Engel welcomed the fact
that other organizations nave now
undertaken efforts in behalf of
civil liberties. She declared that,
while public organizations must
feel a temptation to "play it safe,"
their actions in this field are
"really no gamble at all, because
they cannot conceivably exist with-
out freedom."
The Council President urged a
continued and vigorous fight
against those powerful interests
which are attempting to subvert
those American liberties which are
the fundamental heritage of the
Constitution and Bill of Rights. She
cautioned that "at this moment
there seems to be a turning point
in favor of freedom and justice,
but there is no assurance that the
extremists and fanatics will now
be repudiated."
Adopt New Program
A new program was given a go-
ahead signal by the Board of Di-
rectors. "To aid in the advance-
ment of democratic ideals," the
Council will offer women commu-
nity leaders of other countries the
opportunity to visit with women's
organizations in the United States,
to observe the responsibilities as-
sumed by private citizens in this
country for community advance-
ment, and to study the techniques
employed for such purposes.
Under the new women leader-
ship plan, the Council will offer
fellowships to Jewish women from
abroad "who evince leadership abil-
ity and who are engaged as volun-
teers in community activities."
The women leaders will be
brought to the United States for
three to six months, at the expense
of the Council.
Among conditions set forth by
the Board of Directors for the can-
didates and the communities from
which they will be selected are:
1. The Jewish community or a re-
sponsible Jewish agency in the for-
eign country must have confidence
in the leadership role of women
and interest in increasing its scope
and making it more effective; 2.
The candidate must have acknowl-
edged status in her own commu-
nity; 3. She must have experience
and interest in the cultural and
social welfare of her community,
both Jewish and general; 4. She
must agree to return to her coun-
try to apply the results of her ex-
perience.
"It is hoped," said the Board of
Directors, "that this experience
will reinforce the capacity for
leadership of Jewish women in
their communities and encourage
and strengthen women's groups for
community welfare. Council sees
this also as an opportunity to ex-
change information and experi-
ence; and to learn from women of
other lands the ways in which they
have been effective in their own
communities."
Oppose Curtailment
A request to Congress to grant
the full budget requested by the
State Department for its Interna-
tional Educational Exchange Pro-
grams was made by the Board of
Directors. The programs are
threatened with drastic curtail-
ment by a budget cut which has
been recommended by the House
Appropriations Committee.
Expressing "gravest concern" at
the recent action of the Appropri-
ations Committee, the Board de-
clared that the programs "are of
paramount importance, in promot-'
ing international good relations at
a time when they are vitally need-
ed, and in furthering an under-.
standing of the United States in ;
other countries."
As evidence that results highly
Continued on Pag* 12 A
FOR RENT YEAR-ROUND
NEW UNFURNISHED
1-BEDROOM APTS.
AMH Only
Steve and refrigerator furnished.
Air-conditioning and heating urn'.
/9 p;r month. See Jake Gordon,
Ij14 S.W. 6m St., h. 12-662"?.
S A T I X :
."// I
GROUP 2
CAMP UMATILLA FOR BOYS-iosf 4 Hows from Miami
In the heart ef Florid*. Fee of $350 for 8 weeks inclwdes tronsportatien,
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Director. For farther information call 16-4576.
To Our Clients and Friends
and to Jewry Everywhere
We Extend Our Best Wishes
torn
Very Happy Passover Season
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PAGE 12 A
+ fr*i4>tk,r*lkM
National Council Adopts Budget
Continued from Pago 11 A
beneficial to the United States are
being achieved through student ex-
changes, the Board disclosed thai
in the overseas scholarship pro-
gram maintained by the Council
since 1946 it has been demonstrated
that the studentsv'return to their
homelands with an enhanced ap-
preciation of the American way of
life, of the American concepts of
individual worth, and with a train
ing in American techniques for use
in their chosen fields."
Ninety-seven scholarships to stu-
dents from 15 countries have been
granted to date under the Coun-
cil's scholarship program.
Revision Asked
In another development the
Council's Board of Directors oro-
tested the lack of action by Con-
gress in this session for amend-
ment of the McCarran-Walter Im-
migration Act.
"Despite President Eisenhower's
strong condemnation of some of
that law's provisions over a year
ago, he has not yet requested Con-
gress to take steps to amend it;
nor is any action being taken in |
Congress to do so," the Board st ;it
ed.
The Council has maintained pro
grams of service to the foreign
born for over 50 years. The organ-1
ization's leaders pointed out that
"the Council welcomed the Refugee
Relief Act. itself no substitute for
basic revision of our immigration :
law. in the hope that it would per-1
mit speedy action to admit several
hundred thousand victims of eco-
nonfc hardship and political per-1
secution. Even this temporary j
n.easure. however, has so far prov-1
ed ineffective. Because of the ov- j
erwhelming difficulties of admin-'
istering its complex requirements,:
only six persons have come in un-
der its requirements in over a I
year."
Urging correction of "unjust and i
discriminatory features" of the im-1
migration and naturalization law, I
the Board said that such amend-
ment "would hearten the peoples
of the free world and enhance the
prestige of the United States every-
where. This prestige has suffered
as a result of the McCarran-Walter
Act-
Specifically the Board called on
the President to recommend and
the Congress to effect revisions in
the law to increase the total im-
migration quotas: to give humani-
tarian consideration in immigration
to the pressing needs of refugees
and displaced persons; to eliminate
all discrimination within the quota
based on race or national origin:
and to provide just treatment of
loyal aliens and naturalized citi-
zens.
The Board of Directors, viewing
the mounting crisis in the Middle
East as "not a series of unrelated
incidents, but a major internation-
al problem affecting the peace of
the world," called for immediate
United Nations consideratejri of
means to establish peace in the
total area.
The Board urged that this coun
try use "its utmost powers of per-
suasion and leadership to make
certain that the United Nations Se-
curity Council consider the prob-
lem in its entirety and not on the
ineffective piecemeal basis which
has prevailed in the past."
The United States, as well as the
other nations of the world must
accept responsibility for the pres-
ent crisis, the Council leaders de-
clared.
Expressing "shock" at the "con-
tinuing series of killings, in most
cases of innocent people" in a
chain in which each action is claim-
ed to be vengeance for a prior act
of hostility, the Board asserted:
"Clearly the situation in the Mid-
dle East is now out of hand. The
terror that prevails on the borders
of Israel and its Arab neighbors
is the product of forces of hate
and violence which have reached
gigantic proportions. It is the in-
evitable outcome of the failure of
peace in this area."
The Board demanded "immedi-
ate action, effectively implemented
by all the power and forces at the
command of the United Nations"
I for establishment of peace in the
total area, to follow the Security
! Council's deliberations. They stat-
; ed that "the world can no longer
afford to pass resolutions,'conduct
investigat ions and issue reports M
individual incidents."
Only firm United Nations hand
ling of the problem in its entirety
! will put an end to preparations
j for war and the endless series of
"incidents" in the area, and "only
in this way will this terrible dan-
; ger to the peace and secunU "I
the world be ended." the Board
said.
It called "graWK than ever" the
present responsibility of the Unit
ed States in handling of the Mid-
dle Eastern crisis.
(Text of the Board of Directors'
statement is attached at end of
this release.)
Executive Director Report
In her annual report to the
Board, Mrs. Elsie Elfenbein. Execu
tive Director of the Council, sur
veyed six months of accomplish-
ments in the completion of an in-
ternal reorganization. She anounc \
ed that a field staff has been or-
ganized and trained since last Oc-
tober, to visit the 245 communities
where there are Council Sections,
give direct service in the develop-
ment of local projects, and relay
views and experiences between the
Sections and the national office.
Mrs. Elfenbein reported that new
equipment for audio-visual educa-
tion is being sent to the School of
Education of Hebrew University,
which the Council supports.
Under the Council's overseas
scholarship program, two students
recently completed their training
in the United States and returned
to Israelone a specialist in educa-
tion of mentally retarded children,
one a specialist in adult education.
For the coming academic year, the
scholarship subcommittee is con-
sidering applications from Moroc-
co, Tunisia. France and India, as
well as Israel. However, the bulk
of applications are expected to
come from the latter country.
As a result of a request from
the Israel Ministry of Welfare, the
Council is sponsoring an American
social work specialist in Israel,
Miss Adele Aronowitz. to conduct
in service training in social work
! agencies there. Miss Aronowitz
I embarked for Israel March 26th.
Reviewing the work of the Coun-
cil* Public Affairs CotaAtlttWe.
Mr* Elfenbein rep*****1 rh a
Council representative. Mrs. Maur"-
kv FnwdlmdiT of Baltimore, tes-
tified on discrimination in employ-
ment before the subcommittee on
civil rights of the Senate Commit-
tee on Labor and Public Welfare,
and that the t'nuncil also offered
statement! to Congressional and
administrative groups on the Brick-
I er Resolution, the Genocide Con-
vention Housing and the Equal
Rights Amendment
Of the Council's Community
Services, the executive director re-
poi led that, with the growth of
influence of professional commu-
nity leaders through welfare coun-
cil-, cn.nmunity chests and Jewish
federations, "social service and
education projects today usually in-
volve highly technical processes.
Whelhcr technically staffed or not.
the standards set are generally
high and the project is usually ex-
posed to the community's inspec-
tion."
As a result. Mrs. Elfenbein said,
the Council's community service
projects in the fields of aging, men-
tal health, recreation and educa-
tion and health services tend in-
creasingly to be tailor-made to
their communities, and to differ
from each other. Emphasis is be-
ing placed by the national organ-
ization on helping to teach local
Sections and their chairmen "how
to understand and use the com-
munity resources; bow to find the
best available local people for su-
pervision and for training volun-
teers: to develop techniques of
finding and training volunteers for
integration into Council's pro-
gram; to find means of preserving
Council's identity hi the comrrfu-
niiy. Council Sextsans maintain,
co-sponsor or give voluntary serv-
ice in over 800 community pro-
jects.
The Board of Directors also vot-
ed to climax a program of study
of American Jewish Family Life,
which Council Sections will begin
next fall, at the organization's na-
tional biennial convention.
FOR SAU
On Miami 1^
77 HIBISCUS Dti*
KoyZieqler
EideaVi y,,
H29N.W.3rdSt
Ph. 82-5240

!F YOU SUFFER
L*+ M i L\M "f HEADACHE
rP% I It NEURALGIA.
_ NEURITIS
RELIEF
with
TKe way thousand's of
physicians ana dentists r
Hfai'S WMr Anocin is lid* doctor's
prescription. TKot is, Anocin conloint not
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Ten minutes from downtown 1419 N.W. South RivtT Of.
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Open mil ytmr
Sanel Beer, M.D.. Director Phone 9-0992
eartUdi
jU
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aV
r&etinqi
FLORIDA STATE THEATRES'
naffr Assovit to all out mints ako cusToatrs
EPECMJRE BAKERY
210 HE. 1st AVENUE
JEW/SH STYLl UtlAD AND CAM
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II N.E. 26th Street
Phone
KOSHER
PASSOVER
res: ic;
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Phones 3-0721-2
-34225


ly, APRIL 16. 1954
nemorate Warsaw
|to Uprising
J 1Hh anniversary of the Up-
Iflf the Warsaw Ghetto inhabi-
I which occurred on Passover
,3 snd lasted for 42 days,
'commemorated by the
_en> circle Branches 692,
Id 1050. their Women's Clubs
Wo Y.^Psretz Schools on
Cjavvenin.'April2Z:8p.m;
y>hifigt" ^vfiWiC '
^iai --cript from the jpurce*
rtyrology literature has been
-Jed for the occasion by Jo-
Dun,\ I'articipants in the
lg ttii! he Joseph Birnbaum,
]Fi>hman. Chana and Louis
in. William Paskoff. J. Dun
Lriih.mi \\ hitehouse and Sam
iground music of Ghetto
[will be supplied by Mrs. Lil-
Nelx ''
ekah Lodge to Meet
Lhinc liebekah Lodge No. 9
told its regular meeting on
fev. April 20. 8 p.m.. in the
in: Hall. 25 Washington ave.
ch Unveiling
(dedication of a monument to
tiemorv of the late Louis
I, formerly of 312 Ocean dr.,
|i Beach, was held Sunday,
11th at 9 a.m. at Mt. Nebo
Itery with Kabbi Max Shapiro
iting Arrangements were in
fc> of Palmer's Miami Monu-
I Company.
GREETINGS
jRTHWEST PLUMBING
I SUPPLIES
PHONE 14-3242
FOR SERVICE
7642 N.W. 17th PLACE
NEWELL & FIERCE
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
Commercial Residential
9 N.W. l-JEUNE ROAD
HONE 44032
nome improvement loams
awning m building

}M*r Grcefints fo mil *r
friends oni Palrans
Delmonico's
Restaurant
1 SW. 37th AVENUE
Tur Hosts
lm on*1 Al Oclm.nic*
PUt] OF FAITHFUl SERVICE TO
f PAYERS OF OAOE COUNTY
Mhcf Your Dade County
PURCHASING AGENT
, ^'"'om D.
t Bill" Joyce
""HmWlTY TO THIS
"*TANT OFFICE
aJJ^Utlcai AdJ
Teenagers to View
Class Distinction
"Are Teenagers Faced With the
Problem of Class Distinction?" will
be the subject of a discussion on
the "Youth Views" radio show over
station WIOD Jhis Saturday.
Moderator will be Al Freehling.
Guests will include, Arthur Jacobs
*, Ara, Miami High School;
Charles Srhoot, Hi Y, Coral Gables
High School; Mary Ann Patrick,
president, Y Teens, Miami High
School; and Jack Woodall, Hi Y,
Miami Jackson High School,
-Jmlstirtrr**^.
WANTED
P?5.L MARK- bo in Rumania
in 1904. He married in Reghin,
Rumania, at the age of 41 in the
year 1940. His wife, Regina, is 38.
They have a son, George, about 4,
and lived in Boras, Sweden, until
their departure for the United
Mates as emigrants in 1952.
He is being sought by his cousin
ROSALIE DEU'Hjjl, BKONNER, of
2556 Overtook rd., Cleveland, Ohio.
She was born on Sept. 6. 1927 in
Targu-Mures, Rumania. She is the
daughter of Hermann and Blanka
(Konigstein) Deutel. She formerly
resided at 3420 Barclay ave., Mon-
treal, Canada.
PAGE 13 A
1
Young Zionists Schedule
Oneg Shabbat Friday
Mickie Doych, president of the
Miami Young Zionist District, an-
nounced an Oneg Shabbat at her
home, 980 SW 7th st., for Friday,
April 16, 8:30 p.m. Rev. Herman
Doych will lead a discussion on the
Sabbab Haggadol.
The district's regular meeting
will be held on Tuesday, April 20.
8:30 p.m. at the Bureau of Jewish
Education. Harold G. Shapiro will
discuss the destruction of the sec-
ond temple and the Roman Empire.
HilUmy Grtttinms fo all Mr frnnit
mud Customers
BISCAYNE ELECTRIC CO.
609 N.W. 12th AVENUE
_ ,., '
TeL 2-2351
When Prices are Stable...
You can P^a4cf .
And, this organization, for
one, always has and shall
endeavor to continue
in every way within its
power to maintain
reasonable, stable prices.
This we promise... plus
constant research to
improve wherever possible
the quality of every
concrete product we
manufacture... and a
sincere effort to give our
customers an individual
service whether the job
is large or small.
So, when you build... just
pick up your phone and
PHONE 2-7261


PAGE 14 A
tbmt&ntwfmarL
Saal Named Head
Of Miami Zionists
Irving Saal, veteran Zionist and
Miami community leader, has been
elected president of the Miami Zi-
onM District. The District is the
oldest df the ten chapters of the
Zionist Organization of America in
South Florida.
Saal, in addition to being vice
p-> ident of the Miami Zionist Dis-
trict tor the past three years, is
alsc a member of the Southeastern
Region Administrative Committee,
Zionist Organization of America
and has tor the past five years been
a member of the Board of Gover-
nors of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation.
He is co-chairman of the Intra-
City Shopping Area for this year's
Combined Jewish Appeal and is
past chairman of the City of Miami
Combined Jewish Appeal drive.
Saal is also a member of the Board
of Directors of the Greater Miami
Jewish Community Center and is
a former officer and presently an
active member of Sholem Lodge,
B'nai B'rith.
Cther officers who will assist
Saal in leading the District for
the coming year are: vice presi-
dents, Moses Meyer and Al Quad-
ow; Rabbi Max Shapiro, chairman
of the Board; treasurer, Abe Ka-
sow; financial secretary, Mrs. Hy-
maa Sootin; correspondent secre-
tary. Mrs. Louis Falk; recording
secretary, Louis Falk.
"Book of Life" is Theme for Hannah
Senesch Lunch; Angels, Cherubs Named
The "Book of Life" was the | Greenfield, Nettie Lane. Ben Mar-
theme of the Youth Aliyah lunch-
eon held Monday at the Sans Souci
Hotel by the Hannah Senesch
Group of Hadassah.
Donation to the luncheoa was
"chai." but Mrs. Jack J. Falk.
chairman, recogniied those whose
donation was more than $18 and
who inscribed additional pages.
Those who gave $80 or more
were "angels," and those -who gave
S25 or more were designated "cher-
ubs." The angels and cherubs each
received a plant from Mrs. Falk as
Mrs. Morris Alpert called upon
1 them for recognition. A narration Nussbaum, Dennis Quittner
IrWaf Seal
Ftshions to be Shown
At Nephrosh Affair
Greater Miami Chapter of the
National Nephrosis Foundation will
spcEsor a benefit coffee and fash Johns to De interviewed
GMJCC Basketeers Hit
Parochial Boys. 54-52
Basketball season reached its of-
ficial end at the Greater Miami
Jewish Community Center, Town
Branch, this week with a win by
the Post-Center IS and under boys
over St. John's Parochial School in
a close overtime contest, score
5452.
Sid Goldstein climbed the see-
saw affair for the Center boys by
dropping in a winning driving lay-
up shot with seconds remaining.
With the basketball season over,
after school boys at the GMJCC
are organizing their soft ball units
for team play to begin next month.
by Mrs. Irwin Weihstein and songs
by Cantor Abraham Seif, accompa-
nied by Hy Fried, followed.
In a brief nuisance. Mrs. Falk
singled out for spatial nutlan
Mrs. William Feuar. president of
Hannah Senesch* Mrs. Ben B.
Wolff, chairman of hospitality, and
Mrs. Lillian Atlass, who made the
boutonnieres for each guest.
Angels for the day ware the Mes-
dames Eli Berensoa. Jack- J. Falk,
Morris Falk, William Feuer, David
Glosser, Anne Gordon, Irwin
quit, David Provus and Anne Van
Gelder.
Cherubs tor the day were the
Mesdames Morris Alpert, Lillian
Atlass. Maurice Bennett, Sidney
Block, Charles Bushell. Barry Cam-
eron, Sol Cohen, Morris Essman.
Charles Gettleman.' George Gill-
man, Abe Greenberg, Felix Halz-
band. Paul Jacobs, Isidor Janshaw.
Rose Kohl, Maurice Klein, Harry
Lieberman, Robert'' Merritt, Jack
Muravchick, Henry Nelson. Milton
SUSP 0H**CI '
and PabW^
BALDWIN
MortgowCo.
BALDWIN
Insurance Atj^cy, .
MO Btocoyn. s*3l ^ :
1
The Mesdames Herman Phillips,
Abe Robinson, Samuel- Rosen, John
Serfain. Lewis Serbia. Julius Selig-
man. Leonard
Weinstein.
Taicher and Irwin
Gable. B'nai B'rith
Women to
Election of officers will take
place at the next meeting of B'nai
B'rith Woman of Coral Gabies in
the Coral Gables Jewish Canter on
Tuesday, 8:30 p.m.
KGUlARHOMESatYlQi
iUeuiar vt.it. t. he, ^51
*># and mr* owiontcn
MYW000 TEW
ERADICATED
nriof ronr Mitnd ,
MraisM Y..r Ou.rM.te
Draw.od .r SubUrrMiun Tnn,:
MIAM
- S4i ate.?*. **.
12-6441
MIAMI IEACH 174| AK* Mf
5 3444
ion show at the Seacomber-Surf-
concber on Wednesday. April 28, 2
DJBJL
Chairman of the affair is Mrs.
G oldie Fisher, with Mrs. Anne
Green and Mrs. Lila Stein assisting.
Theme of the afternoon will be
modeling, with fashions by Alix,
of Miami, presented by Roberta
Morel Guild of Florida.
Proceeds are for the work of the
local chapter of the foundation to-
ward the establishment of a ward
here.
Reservations may be made with j
Mm. Green at 67-1840.
Acting Gov. Charley Johns will
be interviewed by Miami Beach
City Councilman Harold Turk on
the Jewish Variety House Sunday,
April 18th. 12 noon, wver station
WMBM. Jacob Schachter is direc-
tor of the program.
36th YEAI
CEJWIN CAMPS'!
'! Jer.is. N. V. CM. I*|
PKOCRCSSIVC. EDUCATIONAL.
NON-COMMEHCIAL CAMPS
L inj and water sports; aesthetic actit ities:
resident doctors and nurses; Sabbath and
d)Ctar> lams observed; cultural influences.
Id.al Summer Cams.
f*r Bays and Oiris. 5 t. IS
Botac $420.
St*i lot drllriflii t boikltl X
a. a. Maaafcaaa, H. l. s.in.,, du.,i,
HI W. it4 Jr.. He- T.rk 24 T 7-0211
S A T1 N :
I'ik s/ in iii ini iii m
GROUP 2 5 16C
To Acnmmtdmf Owr Jtwish Customers
SHELL'S
"WORID'S LARGEST FOOD STORE"
5941 N.W. 7th AVENUE
MIAMI, FLA.


mV APRIL 16. 1954
Jml*linrw**mn
Jam Douglas Gardens to Attend
roundbreaking of Ablin Memorial Here
PAGE 15 A'
,n,e 1.000 persons jammed the
Ids of Douglas Gardens to at-
A ,he historic groundbreaking
" nios Sunday for the Ablin
plan lira nWJe*i.* rftme for
rs Jack Ablin/. the Wate Jack
lin's widow, Mrs. Marvin Schero
Donald Owen Ablin, her daugh-
and son, and members of the
jin family from Texas and Mis-
ri were present for the occa-
resident Abe Kurman began the
..monies by welcoming members
[the Ablin family and paying trib-
to all who planned and worked
the new memorial. He also paid
fcute to the cooperation the
me has received from the Great-
Miami Jewish Federation, Mount
,ai Hospital and other Federation
ncies.
i. J. Kopelowitz, chairman of
Board, spoke qLMM? late Jack
plin and stated .WT%#>elled
,gession not refrogis*i0i If he
a motto, it was "workingnot
ping.' On these very grounds
ich we were consecreting for the
Ablin Memorial, we are today
filling Jack Ablin's dream."
Baron de Hirsch Meyer, vice
jver Gifts
hospital coordinators Tessie Sol-
Jon and Charles Persell this week
bounced that Jewish War Veter-
k Posts and Auxiliaries of Dade
|d Broward Counties have begun
eir yearly distribution of Pass-
Icr goodies to all patients at the
ntt Veterans Administration Hos-
jtal. Coral Gables. Each patient
eives a bag containing Matzo,
earoons, fruit, Passover candy
Id a Haggadah.
president of the Home and co-
chairman of the Ablin Memorial
campaign, highly praised the work
of the Building Committee which is
chaired by S. L Bernbaum and
WWWed ,th|e,..flrthw^that oiy
5W?R $'3Wi!*8*n. J^njediately.,
He advised the audience that $243,
000 had been raised for the Ablin
Memorial and that additional $57,-
000 were needed in order to com
plete and equip the building.
Approximately $30,000 were rais
ed in a few minutes after de Hirsch
Meyer's plea. "It is certain that
the balance needed will be pledged
to the Home within the next two
weeks," he said.
Col. Jacob M. Arvey, noted na-
tional Democratic leader, Board
member of the Home and life time
friend of Jack Ablin, presided at
the gathering.
David Phillips, vice president of
the Home, ^presented the Board
of Directors in paying tribute to
pioneer liUlW* by unveiling a
bronze plaq
pioneers wi
Special tribute was paid to Mrs.
Isidor Cohen who founded the
Home in 1940. Miami Beach Vice
Mayor Harold B. Spaet responded
for the pioneers, saying "they saw
and appreciated the need long be-
fore the community, in general,
was aware of its existence.
"They were the GI's in Geria-
trics. And it is fitting and proper
that a permanent memorial be
erected to their initiative and fore-
sight."
Mrs. Anna Washburne, a wheel
chair resident of the Home, spoke
for the 60 residents saying, "We,
especially those of us who are dis-
abled and incapacitated, had look-
ed forward with longing to the
reality of the Ablin Memorial."
jueand presenting the
mn individual scrolls.
II
X
Jicers of the newly formed Municipal Judges Association of
ade County look on as Circuit Judge Pat Cannon (seated)
prepares to sign the organization's charter. Standing are (left
Jo right) Charles A. Whiteacre, treasurer. Hialeah municipal
judge; Sam I. Silver, president. West Miami municipal judge;
peorge Hollahan, vice president. South Miami municipal
pdge; and Charles J. Bodner, secretary. El Portal mayor and
nunicipal judge. The association is preparing for its first
neeting later in the month.
STa^! ^0dbreaking ceremonies of the Ablin Memorial at the Jewish Home of the Age*
2122 rL"? \S?Vd P^illip8, Miami Boach Vice MaVr Harold SP06*' ** Isidor Cohen! :.'
founder, Daniel M. Broad and Mrs. Benjamin Appel. *-*((
n-*
Passover Greetings fo the Jewish Community
of Souffc Florida
GREATER MIAMI CHAPTER
Painting and Decorating
Contractors Ass'n.
Puufr GreefiMfs to Out Many friesdi
KREBS STUDIO OF FURNITURE AND ANTIQUES
*. shut
TIL M-4124
---------------------------------- ^-----------------------------------------------
fusovu otnrmcs to all out wmos ako cwromts
Ann's Snack Shop
115X7 WIST MXK MMWAY
Holt Supporter Says
Judge Represents
Interest of Florida
Judge George E. Tolt, senior cir-
cuit judge in the 11th Judicial Cir-
cuit Court, is a candidate to suc-
ceed himself to his Group 1 seat,
subject to the Democratic Primary
on May 4.
The Judge has practiced general
civil law in the courts of Florida
for 19 years.
During that time, Judge Holt
served a total of six years, or three
successive terms, in the Florida
State Legislature at Tallahassee. He
has many times served as an asso-
ciate justice in the Supreme Court
of Florida. He will again serve in
that capacity this month.
"Judge Holt's representation ol
the interests of the average Florida
citizen has resulted in much good
in the enactment of laws beneficial
to the people of Dade County and
of the state," a supporter said this
week.
"Among the laws enacted, in
which the judge was instrumental
in securing passage, were the Old
Age Assistance Act, the Unemploy-
ment Compensation Act, the Work-
man's Compensation Act and abol-
ishment of the poll tax."
Judge Holt also was instrumental
in securing the appointment of the
commission which made the recom-
mendations that culminated in the
creation of the Everglades National
Park, the supporter said.
"Judge Holt has consistently
concerned himself with the better-
ment of the public school system,
the improvement of University of
Florida facilities, those of the
Florida State University and of the
University of Miami in Coral Ga-
bles."
The judge has served as Dade
chairman for March of Dimes cam-
paigns for three years and one
year as Florida State chairman.
Judge Holt is now and has for the
past ten years been treasurer and
director of the Dade County Chap-
ter of the National Foundation for
Infantile Paralysis.
The judge has served a total of
13 years as a circuit court judge.
He was appointed in 1941, by the
then governor and now United
States Senator Spessard L. Holland.
He became the senior circuit judge
of Dade County in 1949.
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
hi A\ *J F- I A W
NOTtCE Wi HEREBY GIVEN that
the underpinned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
ROOSEVELT HOSPITAL, at 5642
N B 2nd Avenue, Miami, Pla., Intends
to' register said name With the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida. RO,)SEVK, T HOSPITAL,
SANITARH'M, INC.,
a Florida Corporation.
Sole Owner
SOMMER. FRANK WESTON
Attorney* for Roosevelt
Hospital Sanitarium, Inc.
l Lincoln Road Bldg.
4-16-23-30 V7
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undertimes. desiring to engage In
business under the firth:lous name of
STATE .MORTGAGE COMPANY, at
44 N E. 1st Avs.. intends to register
aid name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County. Florida,
cult l-ouriAV, nuBl>^AN- owner
4/16-JJ-30 5/7
Mrs. Jack Ablin and Col. Jake Arvey study the finished plcfn
of the Ablin Memorial, groundbreaking for which took place' '"
at Douglas Gardens, Jewish Home of the Aged, last Sunday.!'
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thnt
Ihe undersigned, desiring to engage 111
business under the fictitious name of
DOVER .WTS. at 1120-1130 Drexel
Avenue, .Miami Bench, 1 loilda. intend
to register said name with the Chirk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County,
north.
LEON GOLDBERG
CLARA GOLDBERG
1/16-23-30 1/1
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN thai
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
MODERN SANITATION COMPANY,
at 460 N.W. Tilth St.. intend to register
said name with lite Clerk of the cir-
cuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
EDWARD Hi;.!.
ABRAHAM KAP8QN, owners
COUR8HO.N & colltSHo.N
Attorneys lor Applicants
215 Lincoln lid.. Miami Be* b
1/16-23-30 I :
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY. No. 168167
TESSIE HI NI'IIY. Plaintiff.
vs.
WILLIAM JOSEPH DUNPHY,
I '--fenilnnt.
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
TO: WILI.l \M JOSEPH IX'NPHY
Residence I'nknown
You are hereby ordered and required
to serve a copy of your answer lo the
Mill of Complaint for Divorce, a OOP)
of which Is enclosed herewith, on
plaintiff's attorney, and file the orig-
inal in the office of the clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida,
on or heiot c the 14th day of May, IW4.
otherwise lite allegations of said bill
will be taken as confessed by you.
DATED: April IS, IM4
E. 1!. LEATHERMAN,
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By All, \V. STOCKING,
Deputy Clerk
SAMUEL .1 RAND
Attorney for Plaintiff
10(17 Olympia lluildlug. Miami .12, Fas,
4/1S-23-30 I 7
NOTICE V PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLOR-
IDA. IN CHANCERY. No. IMOSSJ.
CHARLES PRAEGER, Plaintiff
vs.
HELEN'E PRAEGER, Defendant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
You. HELENE PRAEGER, 718
Flushing Avenue, Brooklyn, New York,
are hereby notified that a Bill of
Complaint for divorce has been filed
against you. and you are required to
serve a copy of your Answer or plead-
ing to the Hill of Complaint on the
plaintiffs attorney. HAROLD SHA-
PIRO. 927 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach,
Florida, and file the original Answer
or Pleading In the office of the Clerk
of the Circuit conn, on or before the
14th day of May, 1S.">4. If you fall to
do so. Judgment by default will be
taken against you for the relief de-
manded in the Bill of Complaint.
DONE AND 0R4PEHED at Miami,
Florida, this 13th day of April, isr.4.
E B. LEATHERMAN
Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By R. H. RICE. JR
(Circuit Court Seal) Deputy Clerk
4/16-2J-30 6/7
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR OADE COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA. IN CHANCERY. No. 168221
GLORIA BROWN ANGELOTTI.
Plaintiff.
vs.
MAURICE L. ANGELOTTI.
Defendant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO: SOT. MAI'RICE I. ANGELo:Tl
It A 11176220, Co. II,
.122 Signal Battalion
APO 79. c/o Postmaster
New Yotk, New York.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIHD
th.it a Hill for Annulment of Marriage
has been filed against you in ihe above
entitled cause and you are hereby re-
quired to serve n cop\ of your Answer
to the Rill of Complaint on the
Plaintiff's attorneys, an.I file the orig-
inal In the Office of the Clerk of the
Circuit Court on or before the 17th
day of May, IW4, otherwise a de re.'
pro confeaso will be entered aa
you.
'1 his notice shall be published < nrV
. ach w.ek for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH Fl.OItlDIAN.
Hated this 14th day of April,
10 K LEATHERMAN.
clerk. Circuit Court
By: M. R. MURRAY.
(Seal) Deputy Clurlc
I 'ALLOT. SILVER & MULLOY
Attorneys for Plaintiff
701 Congress Building, Miami, Florida
4/16-23-36 :./7
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THft
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN
CHANCERY. No. 1681*8
VINCENT BECKTOLD, Plaintiff,
vs.
I IIEUESE MULLER BECKTOLD, .
Defendant.
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
TO; THERESE MULLER
BECKTOLD
c/o Muller
742 Nassau Avenue
Brooklyn, New York
You are hereby notified that a Bill
of Complain) for Divorce has hen fin-
ed against you and you are heresy
required to serve a copy of your Ans-
wer to the Hill of Complaint on Plain-
tiffs attorney and file the original
Answer In the office of the Cterk of
the Circuit Court, on or before tBe
17th day of May. 1934: otherwise, tne
allegations contained in said Bit! bf
Complaint will be taken as confessed
against you.
Dated this 13th day of AprH, 1954.
E. B. LEATHERMAN.
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: R. H. RICE. JR.
(Seal) Deputy Clerk I
GEORGE J. TALIANOFF, ESQ.
attorney for Plaintiff
420 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, Fta.
4/16-23-30 6/7_____________________
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business* under the fictitious name of
RALEIGH CLEANERS .v l.AI'NDRY,
at 204< Blscayne Blvd.. Intend to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Flor-
ida.
MYER .MATLOFF
MARIAN MATLOFF
Owners
MANUEL LUBEL
Attorney for Applicants
623 W. Flutter 8t. t
4/16-tt-l0 6/7


PAGE 16 A
Jen 1stncrkMan
FRIDAY,
ABU,
1
IS!
I
i
in
1
1
I
I
We Reserve the Right
to Limit Quantities!
Shop Where Selection Is Complete
Quality High, And Prices Low 11
APPROVED
PASSOVER
FOODS
AT ALL FOOD FAIR
and CARLS MARKETS
MAR PARV
MIAMI
MARGARINE
All purpose KOSHERcan be used with
MILK or MEAT
STRICTLY KOSHER
AT OUR STORES ON MIAMI BEACH
AND S.W. MIAMI
HOROWITZ and MARGARETEN
MATZOHS
C LB. J BOX $1.69
Horowitz and Margareten
MATZOHS "oz 34c BOX J*tC
R O K E A C H
BORSCHT
QUART
27c
ROKEACH
SHAV
24 OZ.
BOTTLE
27c I
1
ROKEACH
PRUNE JUICE
39c
QUART
ROKEACH
GEFELTE FISH
NYAFAT
PT.
LARGE
SIZE
59c
69c
i
FRESH CAUGHT WISCONSIN
I *^% A W^ W^fc CLEANED AND
GROUND FREE
| \^/V JLV-l GROUND FREE LB.
| Complete Selection of Fresh Caught Freshwater Fish
29c!
I
J
Manischewitz Matzos ............ 5lbbox175!
Manischewitz Matzo Meal oz. 35c]
Streit's Matzos oz.34c
Streit's Matzos ,.5 lb box 1 ]
Caramel Kosher Chicken Fat 1S0z. 1. I
H & M Matzo Mealf Ferfel or Cake Meal z 3
H & M Egg Matzos 12 oz49c]
H & M Whole Wheat Matzos i,cJ7|
H & M Macaroons is o*89(
H & M Egg Noodles or Barley .........................n o,2(
ROKEACH mM
Strawberry or Raspberry Preserves................................> **
Rokeach Cherry Preserves.........................................................> 35c|
4i Wm SUPER MMKflS
TO SVf FLOMOA iHTM
SOUTH MIAMI
IM I. Matt M-r.
WOT MIAMI
IMS I. f4fl H*T-
HIALIAM
MIAMI
171 J.W. M (Hi
Hw.m a.. i ,7V
IT K.W. U4 It. "
Mil N.W. MM U.
it. uuoiP*i!
Uttfttf1
102* WW" *"
mi- M> *;*
m9J*!*a*
l.w. Mk Am W. M w 4ta- A 1> *"*"
441 HMMk Mi* w f ALMHACH
MM A Htm
4M At.. A ?> '
I7M Mr* Im.
CORAL CABltS
IM MltKl* Mil*
114 Nat* 4, lm ma
aiM hm m um
MIAMI 1IACH
It* A Alt*. Bm4
74.S 4 CMm Ay*.
tit NimtW. .
7M 41* M.
17*1 AMm 1**4
WORTH MIAMI
m m.i. ii$t
lltOI W. Otak> Mr.
imm n.w. m am.
HOttYWOOP
MIT Tftat It.
lilt i. Ami Mw.
HU I. Wi *T.
JAMW0J21
IM M. Dtofc ?
iviHA ItACM.
17M *
HOMKTjAP.
w.^i-t**1 **
in


lewrisJUilond&jun
FLORIDA
FRIDAY. APRIL 16. 1954
SEC. B
ael Turns to Task of
lombatting Unemployment
PASSOVER
\y NURA LASKY
Telegraphic Agency
UEM- With the end of
season not far off, eon-
bowing in Israel over the
nent problem. For it
likely that the 13,000 men
in, most of them unskil-
Ire now picking and pack-
pading oranges, can all be
[in the economy. At least
them, particularly those
the Coastal "Iain's "Citrus
I be knocking at the doors
|bor exchanges, hoping
i to day that some sort of
be found for them. But
nment has little money to
relief jobs. It has allo-
nall sum for pre-Passover
lease the situation.
cally, unemployment fig-
Jnot alarming. The Labor
|s weckl.. reports fluctuate
3,500 and 18,000the lat-
about three percent of
labor force. However.
1 many who do not report
kchanges daily, and in ad-
here are those thousands
in relief and emergency
en to twelve days a month
far less than they need
their families' most ele-
I requirements,
ployment relief is not paid
to those who have no
i any funds accumulating
(unions are spent for relief
1 For sheer cash relief, it is
jemoralizing and might cre-
lor among the population
ould be content with dole
ither about finding work.
the Social Welfare Min-
ributes small sums to fam-
ose breadwinners cannot
cause of health reasons,
Education Ministry prr>
arm meal u day to school
of the poor for a very
fee. But not to allits
fs not big enough for that.
ployment firs', reared its
I in the summer of 1952, as
suit of the government*s
onomic Policy" which
fo stop the inflation from
K further by creating a
* of internal currency and
the issuance of Treasury
"""ds and the printing
^nt of Israel was
| Listed in HIAS Files
iSALEM a four-decade
'in the files of HIAS, the
I imm.grant Aid Society, in
fork, as to who was the
L "*ho accompanied David
Fn when he was detained
Fican immigration officials
few York port in 1915, was
T resident Itzhak Ben Zvi
r recently received a HIAS,
Pon m his office.
feLPresident. who -
K'bb, Dr. Mordechai Nurok,
If the HIAS Board in te
w Klementinovsky, HIAS
S.Ki"JISrael'MeMCbem
in""s director in Israel,
ZL\ Ursten- HIAS Pb-
Jj" director in the Sod-
loi ,h dqUarters in Ne*
rold the group that it waj
' accomPan.ed Mr. Ben-Gur-
rn they arrived in th- UnU_
IT Turkish documents
7 had fled Russia.
sH1ASNewYorkin
*>d"H BinGuri" d
Lho v bccn detaned by
CnU- jn '915. and that
ravened 0n their be-
",he HIAS shelter.
of more bank notes. It was antici-
pated that some people would be
thrown out of work, and econom-
ists thought that a slight manpower
surplus might improve work and
output standards which were low
during the boom days of the State's
first four years of existence. Build-
ing activity and public works were
greatly restricted because unlimit-
ed funds were available no longer.
Many factories, faced with raw ma-
terial shortages because there were
no longer loans with which to buy
them and because of shrinking con
sumption in the country since ev-
erybody had less money now, laid
off some of their workers or closed
down, at least several days a week.
Suddenly, many of those who till
then had always felt sure that they
could go on picking the job they
wanted, were confronted with noth-
ing to pick from.
It was hoped that the manpower
surplus would eventually drift into
agriculture which has to expand
further if Israel wants to grow all
the food she eats. This would also
have righted a wrong situation, by
distributing the'population in con-
formity with demographic require-
ment^ for during the years of mass
immigration, cities mushroomed
beyond" absorption possibilities and
terrfMe overcrowding became an
unavoidable by-product. In these
slums, and in the ma'barot, we now
find the bulk of the unemployed,
while in the rural areas hundreds
of farmsteads are deserted.
Naturally, the argument comes
from every quarter that so long as
there are such empty farmsteads,
the authoritiesboth government
and naWon^l institutions should
not waste precious money on non-
remunerative emergency works.
such as broadening highways or
planting forests. But on the other
hand, only the fittest should be
settled on the land, for farming re-
quires physical strength. And one
disappointed ex-farmer returning
to the city to line up again outside
the labor exchange prevents half
a dozen prospective farmers from
"taking the plunge."
Over 75 nereent of the unemploy-
ed have no skills whatever. They
are now immigrants, mainly from
Oriental countries, who never
learned a trade, and many of
them cannot even read and write
j in any language. Of the remaining
| 20 odd percent, more than half are
j "semi-skilled," meaning they too
j had no trade training and acquired
] some skill while working in a cer-
! tain job. Altogether, there are few
j really skilled workers, and often ex-
changes search far and wide for
, good tradesmen in certain profes-
sions. The answer to such a situa-
tion is, of course, trade training,
and this is undertaken on a consid-
erable scale by the Labor Ministry
under the auspices and with the
guidance of the United Nations
and American T. C. A. But creation
of a skilled labor force takes time
under the best of circumstances,
and all the more so if the human
material is to a large extent made
up of yet unsettled new immigrants
| from dozens of countries. And it
takes money, of which Israel is so
desperately short. Thus, the effects
of trade training may not become
felt for some time to come.
Short-term r e m edies against
spreading unemployment and
spread it will while the money
shortage continues to make itself
felt with growing intensityare,
according to economists and labor
leaders, diversion of workers into
development projects and as farm-
hands. Development projects, how-
ever, financed out of the special
Development Budget which ob-
tains its revenue from counterpart
funds of the US Independence and
Continued on Pag* 4 B
The search for Chomelz before Passover
State Federation Delegates of B'nai
B'rith Women Attend Buffet Here
Mrs. Bernard Hoffman, president
of B'nai B'rith Women's Council of
South Florida, chaired a buffet
supper for delegates of the Florida
State Federation of B'nai B'rith
Women who held their convention
in Miami Beach last weekend. The
buffet was held at the home of Mrs.
David Alper, 1715 Calais dr., Mi-
ami Beach, on Saturday evening.
Mrs. Ida Optner, vice president
of District No. 5, was chairman of
the event, and Miss Edith Simmons
was co-chairman.
Serving on the receiving line
along with Mrs. Hoffman were vice
presidents of the Council Mrs. Sid-
ney Suss, Mrs. Gerald P. Soltz and
Miss Edyth Fleischer.
Mrs. Maurice A. Goldberg, presi-
dent of B'nai B'rith Women's Dis-
trict Grand Lodge No. 5 of Clarks-
burg. Maryland, and Mrs. Jack B.
Wein, president of the Florida
State Federation of B'nai frith
Women, were honored guests.
KOSHER FOR PASSOVER
now -.r:
Demand Israel Kosher
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You just don't know how good a frankfurter can be until you taste
these plump and juicy /SMil beauties. Enjoy the matchless flavor
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Beef, all Beef, choice Beef!
FRANKFURTERS CORNED BEEF
SALAMI BOLOGNA PASTRAMA
Under the supervision of Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky and
the Greater Miami Vaad Hakashruth
ISRAEL NATIONAL KOSHER SAUSAGE CO., Inc.
MIAMI 230 NW- 5th STREET phones 3 721 3'4225


PAGE 2 B
> i*~iUifk**0!*n
Seek to Check Soviet Veto Power
} By BORIS SMOLAR
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
WASHINGTON NOTES: What
Can be done to check Soviet "veto
tactics" in the United Nations
which may lead to grave develop-
ment! hi the Arab-Israel issue? .
This question weighs heavily on the
minds of important officials in
Washington, and no answer ap-
pears in sight There is a good
deal of confusion felt in Washing-
ton as a result of the Kremlin's pol-
icy to increase tension between Is-
rael and the Arab countries by us-
ing the veto in the UN Security
Council .... It is realized that
Moscow attempts deliberately to
create chaos in the Middle East in
order to strengthen the Communist
forces in Egypt and Syria at the
present time, when the internal
situation in these countries is very
shaky And it is also clearly
seen that Moscow has aligned itself
with the Arab countries in the
Communism also has a strong
American tourists to live very
influe in Syria In the midst cheap* in theJJ,.els .A
of chaos it may be easy for the number J ^ this year and
Communist* in Egypt to sete *.na" ccrtaly compete with
power Naturally. Israa* could* ^J""^" hotels in a
not ait by idly should a Crmmu>
nist or pro-Communist regime take
over in Egypt or in Syria Mili-
tary action by Israel might not be
called for, but political action is
already necessary ... It is in this
light, that some groups in Wash-
ington see the possible develop-
ments.
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS:
Israeli consulates in the United
States are receiving inquiries from
potential tourists as to whether it
is safe to visit the Jewish State
with Arab-Israel tension mounting
. I am being asked to assure
Jews in this country that they can
safely make their plans to visit Is-
rael without the slightest hesita-
tion The Israeli consulates will
be the first to warn American Jews
United Nations in order to "pun- ^g^^ visiting Israel should there
ish" Israel for being pro-American
. This should, logically, lead the
Slate Department to give greater
sfrengthmorally and otherwise
to Israel However, this not the
case. The feeling in the State
Depart men t is still strongly in fav-
or of appeasing the Arabs The
confusion is even greater since the
danger of Egypt going Communist
is not at all ruled out in Washing-
ton The danger is now closer
than ever before There is a cer-
tain intellectual class in Egypt with
outspoken pro-Communist
be the slightest danger ... At ores
ent no such danger exists and is
not foreseen for the future ... On
the contrary-, Israel is feverishly
preparing for the tourist season,
which starts this month and is ex-
pected to last this year way into the
end of the summer Last year
about 36.000 tourists visited Israel
. .. They spent about $8,000,000 .
This year the number of tourists
is expected to be even larger .
This is because the new rate of
it possible for
loaning" oxchance makes
the best American hotels in accom-
modation as well as in prices.
> ^w-
JEWISH MARTYRS: Many books
have been published on the War-
saw Ghetto, on the Naii mass mur-
der of Jews there, and on the cour-
ageous uprising against the Nazis
... Now the Club of Polish Jews in
New York has published an anthol-
ogy on the Warsaw Ghetto contain-
ing selections from more than 800
books, pamphlets and unpublished
documents The bookwhich
appeared under the title "Martyrs
and Fighters"gives a vivid pic-
ture of the inhuman sufferings of
the Jews in Warsaw from the very
first day when the German army
entered the city until the liberation
of the rained city Edited by
Philip Friedman, noted Jewish his-
torian, the anthology represents a
permanent record of both Nazi bar-
barism and Jewish heroism .
The selection of the material for
the volume was done in a way
which gives the reader a chronolo-
gical idea of the tortures which the
3.000.000 Jews in Poland suffered
under the Nazis Due to the ef-
forts of Maximilian Friede, a for-
mer Jewish judge in Warsaw, the
volume will find its way into hun-
dreds of libraries in the United
States ... An appreciation in the
book reveals that the Ami Dr-
HEINZ @ FOODS
ARE NOT KOSHER
t- FOR PASSOVER
Our advertising in Jewish publications all year
has stressed the (Q) seal of approval of THE UNION OF
ORTHODOX JEWISH CONGREGATIONS OF AMERICA,
which is on the labels of more than 40 Heinz Varieties.
Those Heinz @ Varieties are Kosher...
/ but only for fifty-one weeks a year.
Therefore, to remove any misunderstanding that may exist, >
we make our annual statement:... Heinz but NOT KOSHER FOR PASSOVER.
H. J. HEINZ COMPANY
PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA
MAKERS OF THE VARIETIES
famation League of the B'nai B'rith
"has helped generously" to make
the anthology "a permanent record
for the annals of history" Dr.
Friedman, editor of "Martyrs and
FigMars," lived through the Ger-
man occupation of Poland ... A
distinguished scholar, he was
founder and director of Poland's
Central Jewish Historical Commis-
sion whose records provided author
John Hersey with much of the ma-
terial for his beat selling "The
Wall" Since 1046, Dr. Fried-
man has been Dean of the Jewish
Teachers Seminary of New York
and a teacher at Columbia Uni-
versity.
r*J
Con9'M Mt |
H**, rOSC||
"It is up to i_
weak spot* |n o^
occur," declare,
didate-Dante B. m
continued hu|
series of Greater]
ngagements.
Concerning loqi.
year-old letWatwttrfi
oward wntinuin/3
federal interest it |
national airport and ft.
at Homestead and Oial
lso promised to
fort to secure the
to establish (be
trade mart here.
Pascell has bee* |,
Greater Miami for 2ti
ried andhastwoehin
ran for political .^
when he was elected Wi
legislature. Two yean
was unopposed fori
V
PoAAover
(^reetincp


~J*#*Ww.

PAGE3B
dinner. Seating has been limited
to 350 guests, with a cocktail party
at 6:30 p.m. preceding the ban-
quet.
Harry Cohen and Al Jacobs, ban-
quet chairmen, have added George
Fox, Dave Levinson, Morris Lans-
burgh and Alfred Stone.
1
3* PRODUCTS


nte of Dorsey High School receive prizes from The Jewish Floridian, followinq their
pg an essay contest sponsored by the Ad Club of Greater Miami: Leo Mindlin (riqht)
nts checks of $25, $15 and $10, as well as honorable mention certificates to the top five
fsts at Dorsey. Bradford Wyckoff deft), Ad Club executive, looks on. Newspapers
Lhout Greater Miami distributed prizes in various high schools here.
Proposes Four Point Program for Dado County
Charley Johns this week an-
his sponsorship of four
easures of interest to resi-
Dade County,
jour proposals include eli-
i of state and county taxes
timid furniture, automatic
| of homestead exemptions,
jction or acquisition of a
Milding in Miami to house
Kate agencies now scattered
area in 27 different Iocs-
ml construction of either
|iel bridges or tunnels over
rr.the Miami River to re-
fcami's acute traffic conjec-
^rating upon the proposals,
aid that he will propose "as
linistration bill at the next
I of the legislature a bill to
for the complete elimina-
state and county taxes on
ok! furniture. Also at the re-
I the Dade County tax asses-
ball propose administration
pon eliminating the require-
i renew Homestead Exemp-
pplications each year," he
i is no reason why these re-
| cannot be made automati-
on year in the same man-
rt voters' registration is car-
ontinuously without re-
s' proposal that a State of
i Building be constructed or
I in Miami was, he explain-
eded to bring all of these
land their hundreds of work-
er a single roof for the con-
venience and economy of the peo-
ple of Dade County."
Finally, Johns charged that the
growth of Miami is being retarded
because of critically serious traffic
congestion in its vital downtown
business area. "One cause is the
continued use of old, low-level
drawbridges over the Miami River.
One of these the SE 2nd ave.
bridge, seriously interferes with
the flow of traffic over a vital
State and Federal highway.
"I propose either modern high-
level spans or tunnels to correct
this situation, and I shall seek the
means of providing State funds and
engineering surveys to aid the City
of Miami to correct these evils."
John Hodiak is Starred
In Passover Radio Show
The first United Jewish Appeal
radio program of the 1954 cam-
paign will be a special Passover
preservation to be heard over the
ABC network on Tuesday, April 20,
from 10:35 to 11 p.m.
Entitled. "Beautiful to See,"
the radio drama stars stage and
screen actor John Hodiak and fea-
tures a special Passover message
from UJA general chairman Ed-
ward M. M. Warburg.
KOSHER FOR PASSOVER
For the Sabbath
and every occasion
when only the best
is good enough!
R7 itr:
notf -ico
I
B
MANISCHEWITZ
America's Favorit*
KOSHER WINE
rtniicu am Mmu it muta sw cmmnt. irc
ma iumml. nmn. r.
liehtht MstriftetsM
NATIONAL WINES. INC.
WM BUNK, Pros. Pheoo S473S
*0SHIR FOR PASSOVER
Adams to Address
Hotel Group Banquet
An address by Joe H. Adams,
Florida State Hotel Commissioner,
will be among highlights of the
annual banquet of the Miami
Beach Hotel Association to be held
on Sunday, May 2nd, at the Sax-
ony Hotel.
According to MBHA president
Saul S. Cohen, Adams will stress
pertinent facts concerning local ho-
tel operations and their signifi-
cance nationally. He will share the
spotlight with the three Democratic
gubernatorial candidates, Acting
Governor Charley Johns, Senator
LeRoy Collins and Brailey Odham.
Closing date on the new edition
of the Buyers' Guide, published
each year by the Association, has
been set for April 20th. The com-
mittee in charge of the publication
indicated that the book will be
timed for distribution to the din-
ner guests and should match previ-
ous efforts which reached several
hundred pages.
Former Governor Fuller Warren,
who was honored by the Hotel As-
sociation for his administration's
efforts in behalf of Florida tourism,
will act as toastmaster during the
{JUNE
^BUTTER
vm

BIG
PASSOVE
COFFEE
FROM
Kosher
FOR
Passover
B0RDENS
Srrlerfy iwacrvlMtf by /rf?h z&
R.bbi $. aathin vl# 'Car
Rebel $. Win.gr-d ^tl0W ^*T
New of your grocer's in
the some familiar jar.
Magnified croti-tectlont ihow bif .
difference in instant coffee*.
SORDEN'S
o
I.UIh fil/.rf with mlr-
rlmvmr tr,itm\i 114
c*A*-n mir-flH twit.
This difference moons a rldior cup of cof-
too ovory lmo-now Border's gives you
up to 33% MORI FLAVOR.
JEWS!
NOW!
A coffee so different
from all other instants
that every spoonful
gives you up to...
33%
MORE
FLAVOR!
FLAVOR It what yew went in coffee! And true,
wonderfully rich flavor is what yew get in
today's Kosher for Passover Sorden's. Com-
pletely different ...if$ enfffce any other coffee
in the world, instant or ground!
Sorden's now, xclutive Flavor-Control prot-
est keeps all the flavor IN-and all the air OUT
of each tiny crystal of real, 100% pare coffee.
Ivory spoonful actually gives VOW wp le 33%
sore Savor, richer flavor.
I Enjoy it black at fleiihio/e mealt or with
cream at mikhlg'e mealt on Passover, the
Sabbath and every day. Servet yew money, tea
23< or more compared with every pound of
ground ceffeol
TASTE ITI COMPARE ITI YOU'LL BE CONVINCED!
ITS THE RICHEST INSTANT OF THEM ALL!


PAGE 4 B
+j*>*is*nuitaMi
GLOBAL SHORTS
Turkish Press Disapproves of
Arab Action Against Israel
ISTANBUL (JTA) A large sec-
tic n of the Turkish press has voiced
ri:>approval of the Arab countries'
pr:icy against Israel and has ex-
pressed fear that this campaign
frill further put off the prospects of
peace and security in the Middle
1 t. with which Turkey is deeply
t r.cerned. Although the Turkish
press disapproves of the recent
Israeli acts of retaliation, it has
1 id that the Arab states are to
blame for the present state of ten
sicn which has produced these
acts.
Friends of the Hebrew I'niversity
throughout the country, according
to an announcement by Dr. George
S. Wise, national president of the
organization. The Hebrew Inner
sity was inaugurated on April 1.
1925 by Lord Arthur Balfour.
whose policy statement on behalf ot
the British government had formed
the basis for Jewish Palestine.
Israel Turns to
Task of Routing
Unemployment
Continued from Paoa 1 B
President Names Mew Envoy
To Israel; Minister to Iceland
WASHINGTON (WNS) Presi
dent Kisenhewer has named Ed-
ward B. Lawson. a career diplomat.
American Ambassador to Israel a.<
I successor to the late Monnet B.
Development Bonds and German | Davi.. who died in Israel. Mr. Law-
Reparations, are confined mainly, now Minister to Iceland, has
Dr. Goldmann Urges Strong
Ties Between Israel, World
TEL AVIV (JTA)The finding
(f a solution to the problem of the
icture of relations between Is-
rael and world Jewry is most diffi
c t for this generation, but every
i. lporary measure must be taken
-trengthen both sections of the
ish people in Israel and
jiv,road Dr. Nahum Goldmann,
i irman of the World Jewish i on
Li:tss, declared at a symposium
here arranged by the Israel section
t i the World Jewish Congress.
Authorities Asked to Curb
Paper Insulting Nazi Victims
VIENNA (JTA) The Peoples
Party Association of Racial Perse-
cutees. affiliated with the major
party in the government coalition,
the Catholic Peopled Party, ha> de-
manded that the authorities take
legal action against the newspaper
"Salzburger Nachrichten" for in-
sulting the memory of Nazi vic-
tims. The newspaper recently op-
posed plans for the erection of a
statue to an "Unknown Inmate of a
Concentration Camp." asserting
that the average Austrian citizen
does not think that the victims of
Nazism died "honorable" deaths.
Agency Leader Sees Danger
In Declining Immigration
LONDON (JTA) The crisis In
i "migration is the gravest danger;
threatening Israel today, "much;
graver" even than the political and
<. nqmic difficulties of the State.
E iahu Dobkin. member of the Jew-
ish Agency executive, declared
I ere at the closing session of the
53rd annual conference of the Brit-
Zionist Federation. Mr. Dobkin
si essed that the further consoli-
inn of Israel, in fact its very ex-
.-"ence. "depends on the renewal
ci immigration."
Orthodox Conference
Proclaims Support of Israel
NEW YORK I JTA i A me
. support to the "brave defenders
. the borders of Israel" who are
standing guard against the threat
I possible attack from the Arab
tee was sent here by more than
: uO delegates attending the clos-
i.-g session of the First National
-Terence of Religious Jewry for
Israel The conference was called
'; the Mizrachi and Hapoel Miz-
r. hi organizations of America in
c njunction with a number of other
Orthodox groups.
Dutch Queen Lends Art
Objects for Jewish Exhibit
THE HAC.l'E (WNS) Queen Jul-
iana and Princess Wilhelmina loan-
ed objects of their private art col-
lection to an exhibit of Jewish re
ligious ornaments in the city of
Deventer. it was disclosed here this
week. The Amsterdam Museum
similarly cooperated with a number
of paintings by outstanding Jewish
artists.
Physician Gets Tel Aviv
Prize for Medical Research
TF.L AVT
Zondek. wo
cologist ha>
municipality
for medical
pound award
WUTA
rWf:<::
.sftei
y Hem
\)Prof. Bernard
amous Israeli gyne-
ived the Tel Aviv
enrietta Szold prize
research. The 500
was made for Prof.
Zondek's research over the past 30
years.
Anti-Semites Angling for
Respectable' Elements
NEW YORK (WNS)Many anti-
Semites have "abandoned their for-
mer brash and obvious tactics and
;:re aiming instead" to win the
,-_pport of respectable elements
rather than the lunatic fringe "they
SO highly prized and wooed in
Christian Front days." the Ameri-
can Jewish Committee this week
cautioned in a brochure made pub-
lic by its president Irving M.
Er.gle.
German Professor Impressed
With Jewish State
FRANKFORT (JTA) Prof.
Franz Boehm. former head of the
German team which with an Israeli
group negotiated the German-Israel
reparations pact, returning here
from a three week visit to Israel,
gave a glowing account of his ex-
periences in the Jewish State.
Deeply impressed with what he had
seen of the building, industrial and
agricultural developments of the
Jewish State. Prof. Boehm declared
that what Israel "mainly needs" is
another 1.000.000 immigrants.
to areas where there are no accu-
mulations of unemployed, such as
the Negev. Thus, it would mean
moving people nway from their
present homes, and for that many
are not yet ready.
Since many kibbutzim (commu-
nal settlements) are no longer able
to hire farmhandsagain because
of credit restrictionsthe govern-
ment, national institutions and big
marketing concerns have made a
beginning to establish large estates,
mainly for the cultivation of Indus-
trial crops, and to work them with
hired labor. This method of ex-
panding the agricultural area,
which has been recommended re-
peatedly by visiting experts (among
them Professor Eli Ginzberg of
Columbia University, whose report
has just been published) brings two
benefits: it absorbs unemployed
and it may instil in them a love of
the soil and draw them awav from
the exchanges. The Agriculture
Ministry is cooperating in this
scheme with funds and advice.
In addition, as unemployment
deepens, some of the more sensi
ble among the unemployed are be-
ginning to change their minds and
ioin the "city to farm movement."
Several hundred families moved to
the land during the past couple of
months or so, and many more are
registering daily. For the time be-
ing, that apd trade training seem
the only possibilities to reduce the
ranks of those begging for work.
Both are constructive and should
solve the problem in the months
and years to come.
been recalled to take over the new
post. The nomination of'Mr. Law
-on. who.has been in the foreign
Service since 1980. is subject to
Senate confirmation.
Dr. Narot ipeaks in Alabama
Dr. Joseph Narot. spiritual leader
of Temple Israel, was principal
speaker at a state-wide convention
of Alabama Reform Synagogues
Sunday. April 11th, in Montgom-
ery, it was announced by Myer O.
Sigal. of Macon. Georgia, president
of the Southeast Council of the
L'nion of American Hebrew Con-
gregations, which is sponsoring the
conference.
Dr. Narot's address was "Newer
Trends in Reform Judaism."
M Hebrew
a Ml k hr
Greeting
SalesmtJ
to take
line
regular line. WrfoiJ
HEBREW niBUsifeJ
79 Delancey St.
SUNMfi
HEALTH RE
Mom-win
FOUCTH
-MIAMI;
t*
v\jGUST BROS fcv"
I f hi Hi \I '
A MOST-fWPY PASSOVER
Spolter Electrical
Supplies, Inc.
Lighting Fixtures
6700
PHONrS
fy. 7*4 Aonuo
S 7-4596 and 7-6519
Jewish Congress Condemns
Iraqi Detention of Israelis
NEW YORK (WNS)The Iraqi
vernment's illegal detention of
i-.ree Israeli citizens was denounc-
ed here this week by the World
. ewish Congress as "a flagrant vio-
lation of the accepted international
| ractice of civilized nations and an
affront to the conscience of the in-
ternational c o m m unity." The
cr.arge was made here at a press
conference by Dr. Maurice L. Perlz-
weig, director of the World Jewish
Congress International Affairs De-
partment and its consultant to the
United Nations Economic and So-
cial Council.
Veterans Criticize Official for
Anti-Jewish Sentiments
BONN (JTA)The German Asso-
ciation of Wounded War Veterans
and Dependents sharply criticized
anti-Semitic remarks by a Major
Ewert. a leading official of the
Union of German Soldiers, another
veterans group, who attacked the
German Supreme Court at Kar*
ruhe for having several Jews or
half-Jews among its 10 justices. The
Association of Wounded Veterans,
with a total membership of 1.500.
000. is the only German veterans
group which opposes the neo-Nazi
and militaristic outlook of the
other veterans groups in this coun-
try.
See or Phont Me
NAT GANS
3 4618 4 9981
LIFE INSURANCE NEEDS
Metropolitan Life I no. Co.
07 Biacayna Bldg.
It W. Flagier St.
THE ENTIRE
COMMUNITY
PROGRAM
of
"Jewish I oriiin
On The Air"
EVERY SUNDAY
10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
Station: WMIE (1140 on dial)
With Various Feofurei
Produced and Directed far
Fete Hebrew University's
Entry into Thirtieth Year
NEW YORK (WNS)The begin-
cing of the 30th year of the Hebrew-
University of Jerusalem. Israel's
( nly university, was ce'ebrated tin-;
week by chapters of the American
B'irai B'rith Mokes Awards
NEW YORK Robert Moses.
Gotham's expert on New York traf-
fic and municipal problems. Al
Rosen, third baseman of the Cleve-
land Indians, and Robert K. Chris-
tenberry, chairman of the New
York State Athletic Commission,
are among the personalities who
received the B'nai B'rith Sports
Lodge No. 1840 annual awards for!
outstanding achievement. The pres-
entation was made recently at the |
annual dinner of B'nai B'rith
Sports Lodge No. 1840 in the Hotel
Astor here.
KOSHER FOR PASSQyfr
nun uw.s TASTI-DIET
LOW CALORIE FOODS
AM Tatti-Diol Foodi shown or litttd htr
Or* certified Kotlitr for fmio.ir by
l.bb, j. H. (.albas
7wn
TILLIE LEWIS,
America's first woman in Foodi. Her Ortht-
dox background in a Brooklyn home gave her A**f
understanding of Josssh dietary needs.
TlU f .tr\/C
TASTI-DIET
>fOv
ENJOY
WEET FRUI1
nd JELLIES.
and loso pounds right through t*
TASTI-DIET FRUITS
AaricoM Kedere fioi
lortl.ii Pcara
Dork Swoot OWriei
Ya*ow Cling Ftaclwt
Ytllew Freetteat PoeckH
TASTI-DIET
TASTI-DIET JELLIES -
Atp-arUfht
AagrioJoaV G..,. J.My
TASTI-DIET "SWEETNIN"
MAMAIET ANN ana KWIK CHEK STORES
FOOD PAN CAMS MARKETS STORES
MIAMI RETAIL GROCERS STORES
TANNER and B-THRIFTY STORES
FREDERICK'S MARKET
SHELL'S SUPER STORE
STEVENS MARKET
and ot year favorite food start
Directors and Staff
MERCANTIIj]
NATIONAL
BANK
* MIAMI BEACH
Extern! Cordial
PASSOViK CrTlfT/rVG*
SIMOH SEIDEN
S03 S.W. 17ra A...
2-S4I0!
A. L. MAILMAN
Chairman of the Board
SHEPAROBKO*
Presi**1'


pfion of Cotte* Trade
ecpaniize US. Markits
ORLEANS-Disruption of
tain American coffee trade
L reduced US buying would
L\ie an American market for
Khan three billion worth of
good.- one of the nations
[and Broth****. New Or-
Iaddressing Lions Internation-
al ut that if North Amer-
i drink less coffee, South
leans will be unable to buy
Xachincry, automobiles and
[items in an annual $3,477,-
) shopping list.
|ee is the chief export and
pal money crop of Brazil,
hbia, El Salvador, Guate-
[Haili. Nicaragua and Costa
lie said. It is also high on the
Iy crop list" of Venezuela,
|or. Honduras and the Domini-
tpublic. he added.
L curtailment of our buying
free from our neighbor nations
only mean a reduction of
buying from us. It might also
1 that some of the slack would
ken up by European countries
X ire have helped with dollars
I the end of World War II. The
1 price ol coffee in West Ger-
. for example, is $2.70 per
H," he said, "and West Ger-
ii itepping up its purchases."
jto Attend Student
ler at Beth David
lh David Religious School con-
Id its annual students' model
in preparation for Passover
bnday morning.
ne 700 students of the Hebrew
I Sunday School participated
^e ceremony. Portions of the
adah were read and chanted.
rangements were under the
vision of Mrs. Louis Hartz and
nittee.
bee Fetter, Martin Bialow, Jer-
bevin, Ellen Bolker, Sandra
bidell and Susan Schwartzman
acted the Seder under the di-
bit of Jerome B. Gordon.
IvHUtnHjrlfUn,
PAGE S B
IMl BEACH
I Lincoln Rd.
Hi. 5-3112
n
suifsioi
9473 Hording Av.
Ph. 1*4171
twte
CUSTOM JAILOKIHC
1104 LINCOLN ROAD
Miami Beach
473 HARDING AVENUE
Surfside
HABERDASHERY
pOffc rear on Miami loach

r\i>
A
*
Listen To
SCHACHTER'S
fw Yiddish Proaram
^rHrllY',WM8M' "hlMl
**' lWlH M4IMCO
.'" Jiwiih >t-"irihn
B- LYONS. New.
TURK, CobmII,,^, mmJ
W**U SMCTOt
^^ZXl^onp^t:^5' IerrY LmdZOn Qnd R Fo"e8'- Nooh W- WTVL
Parrish is Chairman
Ol Horton Campaign
Miami attorney G. David Parrish
has been named chairman of Mal-
lory H. Horton's campaign for cir-
cuit court judge, Group five, it was
revealed this week. The newly ap-
pointed chairman is a graduate of
the University of Florida.
Horton is making his first bid
for elected office in the current
race. A former special agent for
the FBI, he has served as assistant
state attorney general in Miami.
The 40-year-old candidate is a
native Floridian and has lived in
Dade County since 1926. He is a
graduate of the University of Mi-
ami law school.
Article by Mrs. Brown Appears in UAHC Organ
An article by Mrs. A. L. Brown,
author and chairman of interfaith
activities for Temple Emanuel, of
Ft. Lauderdale. appears in the cur-
rent issue of the magazine, "Amer-
ican Judaism."
Mrs. Brown is one of eight con-
tributors to a literary symposium
on the subject, "Mommy, Why Do I
Have to Be Good?" Formulating a
reply to this question which par-
I ents might use, Mrs. Brown writes,
"When you are good you get a
i warm glow inside ... A person
i who is good or does good (the two
are the same) gets a kind and
j friendly expression on his face.
j The person who doesn't gets to
look mean. What kind of a face
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Author of the book, "Cavewoman
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frequent contributor to literary
periodicals. The magazine, "Amer-
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York City, is the official national
organ of the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations, parent
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I
Judge
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Re-eJecf
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George E.
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Nineteen Continuous
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Law Maker
Six Years a
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Tried
Thirteen Years a
Circuit Court Judge
Experienced
Associate Justice
Florida
Supreme Court
Proven
Law Professor
Civic Leader
Lawyer
Benefactor
Retain
George E.
HOLT
CIRCUIT COURT
JUDGE
GROUP 1


PAGE 6B
^JmisJinorHmuj
Miami Beach Schedules Music Week
Observance; Ruth Brotman is Chairman
Miss Ruth Brotman. lyric colora-
tura soprano and founder of the
Miami Beach Music and Arts
League, has been named chairman
of the Miami Beach observance of
National Music Week slated May
1 9.
The event will be observed in
over 400 cities throughout the Unit-
May 6, 8:30 p.m., the Thomas
Armour Ballet will be presented
at a 'Ballet and Drama" night in
Flamingo Park, together with Eve
Tellegen and Pat Bromber'g.
May 7, 8 p.m.. Al Lesser will
chair a program, "Around the
World with Film and Song." at
Flamingo Park; May 8. 8 p.m
ed States. President Dwight Eisen- program arranged by Mia H rot man
hower is national chairman. All
programs and concerts to be held
in connection wilh the festival here
are being arranged by Miss Brot-
man for the third successive year.
The following is the schedule of
free events:
April 30. 6:45 p.m.. Paul Bruun
interviews Miss Brotman over sta-
tion WKAT; May 1. 3 p.m. Noah
Tyler acts as moderator in a pro-
gram entitled "Unity Through
Music" over television station
WTVJ. with the Histradrut Chorale
featured: May 2. 8:30 p.m.. Flamin-
go Park. National Music Week of-
cially is launched, with Mayor Har-
old Shapiro acting as toastmaster
and the Miami Beach Civic Orches-
tra under conductor Laurence
Trembly accompanying Arnold
Simms, soloist.
May 3. 8:30 p.m.. at Greenfield
Hall at 180 Palm Island. Ruth
Greenfield and Leonard Kellar will
act as chairman at a "Composers'
Night."with Dr. David Prensky,
moderator: May 4. 7 p.m.. Margaret
Vomen will direct a "Youth Pro-
gram." with children's choirs, stu-
dents and instrumental ensembles
at Flamingo Park; May 5. 8:30 p.m.
Mrs. Albert Pick and Bruun will
act as moderators in a "Stars of To-
morrow" program at the Commu-
nity Center. 2100 Washington ave.:
and Anita Karns at Pier Park, with
Mayor Abe Aronovitz. of the CitJ
of Miami, acting as moderator, pre-
senting an "All Nationality" ar-
rangement, featuring folk tonfl
and dances in national costumes by
over 12 nationalities; May 9. 8:30
p.m., the University of Miami Sym-
phony Orchestra, with John Bitter
conducting and Eugene DuBois as
soloist, at the Miami Beach Audi-
torium.
Other radio features will include
May 3. 9:30 p.m.. "Progress of
Music in Miami Beach." with Mrs.
Marie Volpe. Robert Duff. John
Coleman. Mrs. George Pawley. Joe
Mooney and Miss Brotman over sta-
tion WKAT: May 8. 4:30 pm.|
"Promising Talents over WGBS;
and May 8. 11:45 a.m.. "Stars of To-
morrow." over WMIE.
R. H. Liberman (right) installs "M Day" sign at Beth David
Congregation as volunteer workers Jack Regal, Samuel Shaub
and Benjamin Maun stand by ready for their assignments.
Stephen S. Wi* r^f1
dwwhwnib,*,^
Sam* for ^
the MonteCrioHowS
J"y. April 22nd, ip^"'
Dirr Sauso^'
Famoui Din Wi^l
nd Siu^
A Your FMorih I
"77N.W.8UtSj
PHONE 78-05)1
Group Show on in Grove
Group show and guest arti-t ex-
hibition now at the Mirell Gallery.
18 Anthony arcade. Coconut Grove, I
includes paintings by Ulman. John-
son. Harri. Sammarteno. Summer-'
all and Fisher. The show is sched-
uled to run the entire month of
April and "runs the gamut of ex-
pression in today's art through
realism, expressionism and abstrac-
tion" according to Edmund O.
Weyhe. director.
North Shore Sisterhood
To Hold Donor Lunch
The Sisterhood of North Shore
Jewish tVnter will hold its annual
donor luncheon on April 27th at
the Hotel Algiers, Mrs. Louis Co-
hen, president of the organization,
announced.
Chairman of the function, which
i M heduled for 12:30 p.m., is Mrs.
Shirley Altman. Assisting her are
the Mcsdames Faye Rosenthal, Gus
Solomon, Dorothy Sklar, Josephine
Romer and Joanne Slansky.
Over 100 women are expected to
attend the affair. Included on the
entertainment roster are Buddy
Walker and Mai Malkin and his
orchestra.
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President
ITH ST, WEST OF MOADWAY
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i
QUALIFIED TO SERVE
as Circuit Jeooe by 12 Years' Experience
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16.1954
*Jmuiin*M+aM
PAGE 71
man Rights Supported
ORK (JTA) The Co-
|Board of Jewish Org.n-
L a meeting held here
[jorf Astoria Hotel, unan-
wided to support the
Uviduals and organiza-
Lion the United Nations
Reservation" on matters
human rights, without
their grievances
beir national govern-
ardinating Board, which
Illative status with the
lions, is composed of rep-
Ls of B'nai B'rith, Board
L f British Jews and
tican Board of Jewish
[Leaders of the three or-
\ as well as leaders of
Lmunities in Latin Am-
Ecipated in the meeting.
L issued after the meet-
Iiljp M. Klutznik. B'nai
lonal president, said that
Vg has also given atten-
tion to questions involved in UN
Charter revision.
"Our views on that subject will
be made known from time to
time," the statement said. "But we
were unanimous in the conclusion
that the United Nations must be
.supported as the best available in-
strumentality for achieving peace
and human understanding in the
world. In this connection, we look
with extreme disfavor on the posi-
tion taken by some to utilize the
discussion of charter revision as a
means of annihilating the United
Nations Organization."
Two proposals introduced in the
United Nations Human Rights
Commission which would have giv-
en individuals and organizations
the right to petition the UN on
violations of human rights, were
withdrawn this weekend by their
sponsors. One proposal was sub-
mitted by France and the other was
presented jointly by Chile, Egypt,
the Philippines and Uruguay. The
proposals met with strong oppo-
sition in the commission.
DeMolay Are Hosts
Order of the DeMolay, Hibiscus
Chapter, Miami Beach, were hosts
to the Fort Meyers Chapter on Fri-
day night at Hibiscus Lodge, when
a degree was conferred on out-of-
town guests, it was announced here
by Leo Meyer, chairman of the Ad-
visory Board.
Twenty-five members of the Ft.
Meyers Chapter participated.
Mothers' Circle of the local chap-
ter, of which Mrs. Abraham Ber-
man is president, were hostesses at
a reception and buffet supper fol-
lowing.
II
UtfSi/
j
The Farr Family
EXTENDS PASSOVER GREETINGS TO THE
ENTIRE JEWISH COMMUNITY
. and particularly to those who during the past year
have given so generously of their time and service
to the many, many worthwhile charitable and
philanthropic causes sponsored by the
splendid organizations in this area .
. and to these community organizations Farr Tours
wishes to express its appreciation for the
opportunity to be of service in various
ways whenever called upon.
Farr Tours and Travel Service
2315 Collins Avenue
Phone 5-5327
6638 Collins Avenue
Phone 86-1472
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451 HIAIEAH DRIVE, ESSEX VILLAGE, HIALEAH
Corsages and Cut flowers for All Occasions
Mrs. lila B. Beck, Mgr.
Tel. 88-2717
rs
her, Greater Miami chairman of the St ate of Israel Bond Organization, is shown ex-
| the new Development Issue at a luncheon of community leaders m the BiscOyne
[Hotel. Left to right at the head table are Mrs. Louis Glasser. Sher. Manfred L. Minzer,
nager, Joe Cherner and Carl Weinkle. Mrs. Glasser and Cherner are members of the
pi Governors.
y friends ant Patrons PmtoMtr Orootinmt
rtS BACK at the Bokery 624 N.E. 79th Street
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MIAMI. FLORIDA
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OUR RESERVES EXCEfD 3V4 MILLION DOLLARS


PAGE 8 B
* Jewish******
Passover Saturday Evening
he Holiday of Passover during evening servic
tborn, "Tannot B'Chorim." was observed on T
the conclusion of a Tahnudic Tractate, following -.= --.
rnds of Jews here, as well as throughout the nation and the world, will gather tor the rum
^S^^'viSZ Z&lZSZi ^ on Saturday. Earlier the Fa* of tb
""lursday morning. April Iotn, n
the early morning services. Ten
in the Holiday of Passover during evening services on aaruraay. ~ .
F.-stborn. "Tannot B'Chorim." was obse.ved on Thursday mornmg Apnl 15th with a Sayum.
Seder at the conclusion of Saturday evening services.
HEBREW ACADEMY will hold
Jriday evening services at 6:25
p -n. Saturday morning services
are scheduled for 7 a.m. Mincha
\. ill be at 6:15 p.m. Sunday morn-
ing services are scheduled for 9
a -n. Rabbi Alexander Gross will
ings at 10:30 a.m. A eongregation-, From 445 ,
al Seder will be held Saturday eve-' B "--- ,0 *
ning at 6:30 p.m.

KNISITH ISRAEL CONGREGA-
TION will hold Friday evening
services at 5:45 p.m. Saturday
morning services are at 7 a.m.
Louis Dublin will conduct a class
in Talmud from 2 until 4:45 p.m.
Cooper "win"""'**-1
* !WV
and Momu, ^
830 a.m. CaMw
W'U oflldate
"W trading
*>nm in tbt Social'
evening serrie.
ices at 5 p.m. Rabbi Moses Mesch- evening services at 6:30 p.m. Sat-
eloff will officiate and preach on \ urday morning services are at |
the topic: The Eve of Passover.", a.m. Passover will be ushered In
Evening services will continue on Saturday evening at 7 p.m. Sun-
through 6:15 p.m. Saturday morn-; day morning services are at 8:30
ing services are at 8:30 a.m. Junior, a.m.. when Rabbi Simon April will
,*WW>WWWWWWWVi
;.! 7:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.

DOWNTOWN SYNAGOGUE will
celebrate the first day of Pass-
er on Saturday evening at 7:15
p.m.. with its first public Seder.
Rabbi Arie Becker will officiate.
:. -isted by C. Perl and E. Siegel
ji Alexander uross vwu ing services die .< o.w .-------- -.......... -
..reach on the subject: "What Shall congregation will meet at 9 a.m. officiate and preach on^tatopw.
v.e Answer Our Children?" Min- under the direction of Benjamin "Fruit of Our Struggle On Sun-
c>-a will be at 6:15 p.m. "Passover- Kaminetzky. Kiddush will be serv day morning, the Rabbi will dis-
^lidav of Faith." will be the sub-led by the Sisterhood with Mrs cuss: "Do You Believe in Mir
ieet of a sermon bv Rabbi Gross | Abraham Bergman and Mrs. Aaron arles'" Evening services will be
during services on Monday morn- Weingarten acting as hostesses, at 6:30 p.m. Cantor Berate Kele (
ing at 9 a.m. Mincha will be at ', Passover will be ushered in at 7 mer will render the musical por-
0 20 p.m. Daily services are held p.m. on Saturday evening, with tions of the liturgy.
Cantor Aaron Weingarten chanting <
the traditional service Rabbi Mes- j WEST MIAMI JEWISH CENTER
cheloff will discuss: "Half Slave wl)| no|d prj(jay evening services
and Half Free" during Sunday .|( 6:,5 p m Saturday morning
morning services. On Monday sprvjccs are at 8:30 a.m. Passover
morning, the Rabbi will preach on wjll ^ usnered in on Saturday
the topic: "Today's Children." evcnmg at 6:45 p.m. Sunday morn-
Sunday and Monday morning sen- jng services are at 9 a.m. Rabbi
service! are" at '^ are at 8:30 am with Sunday AIfrcd Waxman will discuss: "Pre-
30 a!m. Rabbi Becker will chant evening aarvlCM scheduled for 6:15 ^ cious Freodom Evening services
liturgy and preach on the top-j P m- # are scheduled for 6:30 p.m. An-
The Fifth Son and the Fifth I nual communal Seder will be held
1> Evening services are at 7! ANSHE EMES CONGREGATION on Sunday evening at 8 p.m.
n m.. with the second public Seder' will hold Passover services Friday
I. wing at 7:30 "The Voice of evening at 6:45 p.m. Saturday and ; TIFERETH ISRAEL NORTH-
Jerusalem," is the subject of a' Sunday morning service* are at SIDE CENTER will hold Fridav
sermon to be delivered by the Rab- 8:45 am Rabbi Abraham Sachs evening services at 6:30 p.m., with
hi during Monday morning sen-J will officiate and preach on the Rabbi Louis Cassel officiating. Can-
- at 8:30 am. j topic: "Passover Sacrifice' Eve-1 for Mbert Giant2 win render the
ning sen ices are at 6:45 p.m. on musical portions of the liturgy.
NORTH DADE JEWISH CEN- Saturday On Monday morning at Saturday morning services will be
TER will hold Friday evening sen- 8:45 am. Rabbi Sachs will discuss: at 9 a m At 6:3o p m pass0Ver
ices at 8:15 p.m.. with Rabbi Henry "Freedom of the Past and Future." wjh be ushered in. Sunday and
icolica officiating. Men's Club Mondav morning services are at 9
ill assist. President Andrew! NORTH SHORE JEWISH CEN- a m. Evening services will be at
- hwartz will preside. Combined TER will hold Friday evening sen-, 630 p.m. Rabbi Cassel will de-
- under the direction of Lu-. ict's at 8:15 p m.. with Rabbi Mayea ijver the sermons.
Ie Moore, will assist Cantor! Abramowitz officiating and preach-;
aurice Neu in rendering the mu- jng on the irmon: "Th-Ota* TEMPLE EMANU.EL wi hold
Ml portions of the liturgy The Da> of the Lord Cantor Edward F jd ev.ninl! vr..iee, a, ,nH
Shabbat following will be un- Klein will render the musical por-> T^C^t sinker will be
,r the sponsorship of the Men's turns of the liturgy, assisted by
1 ub. Pre-Passover services are on the Center Choir under the direc-
; iday morning at 8:30 a.m. Satur- turn f A. Louis Mechlowitz. Sat-
y morning services will be at 9 urday morning sen-ices are at 8:45
a.m., with Passover formally u-h ;i m "hen the Rabbi will discus.
i ed in at 7 p.m. Sunday morning "The Fullness of Judaism. Lee.
services will be at 9 am., with ">> Of Mr and Mrs. Lee Howard,
children of the Sunday School par- w'i" become Bar Mitzvah during win- 1
1 ipa.ing Annual PaMOVtr Seder the service. Paaaover will be ush1 -! '
:11 be obscned as I community ered *n n Saturday evening at 6:45
- nction on Sunday evening at 6:30 P m Sunday morning senices are
- m. Rabbi Okolica will officiate at 8:45 a.m.. when "C hildren Need
onday morning services are at 9 an Anuer will Ik- Hahbi Abram-
a m.. when the Rabbi will discust ""'""' aermon. Evening senici- are
reedom Quest I at 6:45 p.m. Honda) morning, at :
8:45 a.m. Rabbi Abramowitz will i'" Sa,urd> *v""* p.m.
TEMPLE SIN A. of Hollywood I d "** Dare Not Delay." ~ at 9
BETH DAV.D SYNAGOGUE will
hold Friday evening services at 6
p.m. Saturday morning services
are at 9 am. Rabbi Max Shapiro
and Cantor Maurice Mamches will
officiate, with the Rabbi discussing
cut

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Dr. Jacob H. Cunningham, director
of the Florida region. National Con-
ference of Christians and Jews
Rabbi Irving Lehrman will offici-
ate. Saturday morning services are ,
, at 9 a.m. The Rabbi will preach ]
| on the Weekly Portion, and Cantor
musical portions of the liturgy The
Bar Mitzvoth of Michael, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Shagan. and 1
David, son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel
TV-How. will take place during the
service Passover will be ushered
:' 8:30 p.m Pupils of thv religi-1
> .s school, honoring Shabbat Hag
I lol. will present a cantata. "What
i Torah?" Rabbi David Shapiro
ill officiate. Cantor Joseph W.
":alek and the Temple Choir under
'.'ie direction of Rev. Mordechai
haalman will render the musical
portions of the liturgy. The Oneg
I nabbat following will be sponsor-
td by Mr. and Mrs. Louis Kravetz
: nd Dr and Mrs. Norman N Wru
el. Saturday morning senices
an at 9 a.m. Rabbi Shapiro will
:>reach on the Weekly Portion.
Passover services will be on Sat-
I rday evening at 6 p.m. Sunday
a.m. Evening services will be at
6:45 p.m. Monday senices are also
at 9 a.m. Rabbi Lehrman will
preach at both Festival senices.

TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM will
will hold Friday evening services
the Weekly Portion Passover will' at 8:15 Pm Rabbi Leon Kronish
be ushered in on Saturday evening wi" off'ciate and preach on the
at 6:45 p.m. Sunday and Monday ',opic: "Wnat Pride Idealism?"
morning senices are at 9 a.m. Rab-! Th,s ls ,he third h a series of ser-
bi Shapiros central theme for the' mons nn "t'nsung Heroes of Our
bnlMa* I.- -\re We Free Men?.. Time." Saturday morning services
holiday is:
During the Sunday morning serv-
Time."
are at 10:45 a.m.. when the Bar
' orning services are at 9 a.m.. with a m u"der ,he direction of Jer-
ice. Alan, son of Mrs Lillian Shalfi. Mtzvah 0f Ira Shapiro, son of Dr.
will become Bar Mitzvah. A special and Mrs Arthur Shapiro, will take
students senice will take place pIace Passover will be ushered in
on Sunday and Monday at 10:30 'on Saturday evening at 6:45 p.m..
;> children's senice scheduled for
-0:30 a.m. Mincha will be at 6
p.m.. with a traditional commu-
nity Seder conducted by the Rabbi
and Rev. Haalman scheduled for 7
;. m.

ISRAELITE CENTER will hold!
I riday evening services at 6:30
p.m. Saturday morning services
I re at 7:30 a.m. Mincha will be at
0:45 p.m.. ushering in Passover.
Sunday morning services are at
.:30 a.m. Rabbi Morton Malaysky
ill preach on the topic: "Pass-
,ng Over to Freedom." Evening
en-ices are at 7 p.m. Monday
lorning services will be at 8:30
: .m. "Meaning of Pesach" is the
>pie of a sermon to be delivered
: y Rabbi Malavsky. Mincha is
heduled for 6:45 p.m.

BETH JACOB CONGREGATION
v ill hold Sabbath Hagadol serv-
ome Gordon. Louis Gadon and
Gregory Rosencranz. Floral offer-
ings will be by Mrs. Louis Mar-
gulies Daily services are at 7:30
a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
with a congregational Seder held
in Banquet Hall. Cantor Samuel
Kelemer will render the musical
portions of the liturgy
k LBTLi ,$*AEL of Miami "
I ^5 .p^B^oSSTf.rS
hold Friday evening senices at
sundown. Saturday morning -sen-
officiating. Subject of the serr
is scheduled as: "Passover and
ices are at 7 a.m. Passover will be | Easter The Meaning of Their'
a"t 6er45 nm 1 ^""^ ^ni8 | Similarit.es and Differences'(,
at 645 p.m. Sunday and Monday | tor Jacob Bornstein will render the
ShTanVV1 "J30 am Rabbi mUSiCal V** h7 murgy i
Shmaryahu Sw.rsky will officiate Saturday evening, Passover iiU he '
and discuss: "One Kid Speaks to
the World" and "When the Ledgers
are Red the Minority Peoples See
Black." Cantor Nathan Zeichner
will render the musical portions of
the liturgy. Public Seder is on Sat
urday evening. 7:30 p.m., in the
Dora August Memorial Hall and
will be conducted by Rabbi Swirsky
and Cantor Zeichner.

MIAMI HEBREW SCHOOL AND
CONGREGATION will hold Friday
ushered in at 6 p.m.. with a
gregational Seder dinner follow-
ing at 6:30 p.m. Sunday morning
services are scheduled for 11 a m

TcCR^LtCA8LES JEW*H CEN-
Zi ^"KKldFriday eV'ni" *"V-
Rabbi Morris Skop will officiate
and MaUch. .t the United Na-
lm- cPasSover wrvic" wi be
held on Saturday and Sunday morn-
/rs te i2eal mm
Mother
OLD-FASHIONED
GEFILTE FISH
KOSHER (0) PAREVE
Aeody fo Sww
t^vUr m kino snavnwNM*
Ml D'M KOSHER FOR P,
M0TMR-S FOOD ftOOUCTS, I
VER
of
MU
UL A JJ P U R P 0 St
BTOHE FRONT 9LKTZ aad W1KDOW CUB]
Mirrors and Rtilrtng Owl
and Mirror Vint
PHOKII
fRVI.VG
ruralture T
I- Ai.
138 S.W. *b St
MORRIS ORLIN
MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY
THE CEMETERY OF DISTINCTION
FOR DISCRIMINATING FAMILIES
Rabbi S. M. Machtei. Director
5505 N. W. 3rd St Phn 87-8201
c/wote^oidon*fa (Ae
fittest in fltneta/Wtotice
A jervice that Uove o
lotting remembranca
of beauty and reverence
and the utmoit in
comidarata attention at a
lima when most needed
GORDON
FUNERAL HOME,H
MIAMI
710 S.W. 12th AVE.
Ph.3-3431
MIAMI BEAjj
,333 DADE ^
n. 5-7677
B.N.


,v APRIL 16. 1954
Ll5^*Arjr*ftv7
PAGE 91
Trip Coach Fares Will be Reduced
ng Summer Months on Seaboard
ad trip coach fares from New
Philadelphia. Baltimore,
rfd'on and other Eastern
ho all Florida points served
, ceaboard Railroad, and like-
Northbound, will be greatly
for the summer season, *-
to announcement made
El W. J. F'cht. general pas-
gent for the Seaboard Rail-
In Miami.
live May 15th, to September
I round trip coach tickets is-
it the new fares will be good
days. Stopovers will be al-
children under 12 will be
for half fare, and the new
.re tickets will be honored
[seaboard trains including the
nlined Silver Meteor and Sil-
Itar
| making the announcement,
I stated "the purpose of inaug-
these reduced round trip
fares is to stimulate summer
lion travel to Florida. For
he added, "we have been
fcly engaged in promoting
fares will also be available north-
bound to Florida residents when
planning their summer vacation or
business trips to Richmond, Va.,
and points north.
When asked how much savings
this would mean for a trip between
Miami and New York, Ficht re-
plied, "Excluding tax, the present
one-way coach fare is $38.52; with
the new rate the round trip coach
fare will be $62.56 a savings of
$14.46 for those who make the
round trip within 30 days. For a
period extending beyond 30 days
and up to six months round trip
tickets are available at a reduction
of 10 percent. When added to the
recent savings of Federal tax on
transportation, vacation trips be-
tween Florida and Eastern cities,
including New England and the
mid-West by rail, will become more
attractive than ever.
The Seaboard also announced
that its advertising program for
the summer has been doubled, and
to further carry its story to poten
B'nai B'rith Women
To Hear Discussion
B'nai Brith Women of Miami
will meet on Wednesday, April 21,
at the Republican Club, 1900 W
Flagler st.
Thomas Lipe, Dale Carnejfc In-
stitute instructor, will speak on
"How to Live a Richer and Happier
Life." A mental quiz with photog-
raphy and audience participation
will follow.
Mrs. Herman J. Goldstein gave
a luncheon for outgoing officers
and Board members on April 14.
Delegates, Mrs. A. Z. Alpert, Mrs.
M. Lazarus. Mrs. M. H. Meyers and
Mrs. N. Spiegelman, who attended
the State Federation Convention
on Miami Beach, made their re-
ports.
la as
kg the past decade we have
Florida change from a winter
to a year round vacation-
be fare reductions announced
(are just another indication
ir desire to ou'er the best in
lion packages to our patrons."
new reduced round trip
a vacation mecca and dial vacationists, the line is provid-
iing travel agents.and others in the
vacation field with full information
about the slash in travel costs. The
line also will continue its budget-
priced meals inaugurated last sum-
mer.
The fare reduction is just part
of the Seaboard's vacation package
this season. A great number of
package tours all-expense trips
40 YOUR BOY OR
iHtlTOATOP
rISH CAMP!
TiaHT.wttic oe
fOUK WtfK CAMP
PtiQOS OMN
5^"} *~ Mill! I1T C IT
mm
ATOP THE CUMBERLAND
MOUNTAINS of TEMESSEE
WARM. SUNSHINY DAYS-COOL. PLEASANT
NlCMIS
[Three Hundred Acres t Beau
[trhl Mountain Country with l
Ninety-Six Acre Srinfl-Fed Pri- I Age Including:
vete Lake in the Ctnttr I
HeoK.ful, stimulating physical I uT".,*"Il-
ond mental activity la a I |*,r s""n9
pleasant Jewish atmosphere I *0,,,l,,_ .,
DltTARY LAWS OBSERVED I tor*r "ooting
MRS. BEA KOMISA* Fonctag
Owner and Director K2S
^rer Twenty-five Years of Camp- I Athletics
I Experience. Far Brochure end I Tennis
fleriaotion 168 Third Avenae, I *"#ry
rlk, Nashville, Teanessot. | "rY
Miami, Florid.'. Rnpresentattve:
MRS. ERNEST CHERNOFF
1601 8.W. 23rd Avo., Ph. 4S-4119
Comp/ete Camp Program far
Children from to 16 Years of
Creative Art
Ceramics
Dramatics
Arts ond Crafts
Charm Program
Dancing
Fishing
Trips Out
Norse Back
are being offered in coopera-
tion with travel agents, hotels and
other interests. These popular
tours include transportation, hotel
accommodations and depending up-
on the particular wants of the indi-
vidual, a variety of other things
such as sightseeing, rental auto-
mobiles, meals and other niceties
can be included on an all-expense
basis for a surprisingly reasonable
amount, according to Ficht.
* j50iipir *S* *pv srm
ftabbl Joa*Dh L. Rackovskr
B45 Michigan Avenue
Miami Bench
_____ Phono S-359S_________
-^-- ~_-------:----------------T?
General Repair on all Make Trucka and Cars
Electric and Acotyleno Weldina
COULTON BROS. GARAGE
Wr:k Rebuilt Bodjr Repair* and Painting
Preo Pick-Up and Uollvary Wrecker Servlro
N 3-2244, 2-o*52 840 S.W. Btfc Street
To the Jewish Community in South florida
We Extend Sincere Greetings
Most Wishes
tor
A Happy Passover Season
THE
MIAMI BEACH
KENNEL CLUB
4!
LACK
ESAR
F0R6E
Gourmet Club
*
Wl.N'R CBXdaB
MMAIBAM
JamouA, J-tfL
CHARCOAL BROILED
STEAKS
LAMB CHOPS 4/ i
CHICKEN / 9
RISIN IAKID J-
MSIITITKRI
Phone /4V
817-7170
CDMLMtF9..S,WUMm
Governor Johns
r extends
Passover Greetings
The Jewish Festival of Passover, which poignantly com-
memorates the beautiful blessing of FREEDOM, comes at a
time when it can and should inspire Americans of ALL
FAITHS to re-affirm their determination to keep our own
blessing of Freedom and Fair-Play strong and on high. No
people in this wide world of ours better understand and
cherish the genuine meaning of "being free" than the Jewish
people. The Jew has been ready to lay down his very life
in every generation for the right to be free and to remain
loyal and devoted to the ancient religious heritage of his
ancestors. His many sacrifices for FREEDOM must never
go in vain.
As Acting Governor of the State of Florida, I send you my
heartfelt good wishes and blessings for a most happy and
joyous Passover season. May that week of festive Service
and Prayer inspire you to continue giving of yourselves as
Americans towards the strengthening of the glorious Amer-
ican way of life symbolized so strikingly by the Passover
story. May the significant Passover message arouse all of
you, dear friends, to also continue your world-famed
humanitarian work and help for the less fortunate of the
world. Last but not least, may I ask that you offer a spe-
cial prayer during the Festival of Freedom that the Divine
Being send our land, and the world-over, lasting and blessed
PEACE.
Most cordially yours,
Charley Johns
Governor
-,.
GREETINGS
Hibiscus Baking Company
(Formerly Gleason's)
PIES CAKES PASTRIES
1732 S.W. 8th STREET
3-6717 PHONES 9-5087
A. C. ALLER, President and General Manager
Serving
11:30 a.m.
HI closing
7444 BISC/tYNE BLVD. Phone: 84-7759
Best Wishes for an
Enjoyable Passover
744 COLLINS AVENUt
75lrl STRUT
475 41i* STREi'
SHERIDAN A.i
J convenient Miami
Beach locations, plus
Save by Mail
Chase Meml Savings
H/t
1100 LINCOLN ROAD
425 41st STREET
7474 COLLINS AVENUE
LN OAD
I
Charles L. Clements, Sr.
President
Chase,of ItOO Lincoln Road, presents
Adolphe Menjou in "Favorite Story,"
9:30 PM, Mondays, WTVJ


PAGE 10 B
-Jcwisfifk*****
HS^im.\
Passover Shows
Freedom is Won
By PHIL BAUM
The Passover Seder eternally re-
minds us that religious liberty
comes hard arid that freedom is not
found but won.
The all-too-prevalent tendency to
regard religious freedom as con-
clusively established or indefeasi-
ble is daily challenged by the facts.
Clearly, religious minorities in the
United States are not enslaved or
reduced to making bricks without
straw as in the time of the Phar-
aohs. On the other hand, we are
witness to a calculated and insis-
tent attempt to undermine the con-
cept of separation of church and
state, the keystone of religious lib-
erty in this country.
The men who designed our sys-
tem of government understood that
in any multi-religious community,
the only meaningful way to safe-
guard freedom of belief is by scrup-
us separation of the realm of
the church from the realm of the
State and by the imposition of an
White prohibition against at-
pt- by either to interfere with
other. They incorporated these
i victions into our Constitution.
Not content with this restriction.
a .1. : i sectarian bodi<
ne covert device after another.
e sought to bend state facilities
I heir own purposes But it i the
It--on of Ions experience that no
may i" made of public prop-
by any sectarian group with-
Mcesa mI> trespassing upon
rights of other religious groups, |
especially of other religious minor- j
hies. In truth, the double guaran-
ty of separation of church and
State and of religious freedom are
and the same.
This is perhaps plainest in the
pt he schools although it obtains
ecjally everywhere. The public'
schools are the staging areas of
cemocracy They represent the one
piece where we must insure that
children are permitted to join in
cc nmon activity without regard
for considerations of race or creed
Whenever religious practices have
been introduced in the public
school classroom, they have had a
dr. isive and disturbing effect, sad-
dling the child who is a member
of a minority religion with the im-
r -lble burden of sensing himself
at et apart and excluded. The Con-
.- ution provides ample protection
gated insinuation of sectarian
c (trine into jjublic institutions.
What is needed is sufficient cour-
ses, imagination, and conviction to
mfke significant use of these pro-
tections.
The kind of action that can be
ehective is exemplified in a recent
ca-e won by the American Jewish
Congress' Commission on Law and
Social Action. The case involved
the campaign of the Gideons Inter-
national, a fundamentalist Protes-
tar.t missionary society, whose aim
fl to win men and women for the
Lord Jesus Christ," to distribute its
Bible, consisting of the King James
(Protestant) version of the New-
Testament and the Psalms and Pro-
verbs of the Old Testament,
through the public schools. Catho-
lics and Jews expressed vigorous
opposition to the campaign when it
reached into the public schools of
Rutherford^ New Jersey.
The Supreme Court of New Jer-
sey, in a unanimous and precedent-
j making decision written by Chief
I Justice Arthur T. Vanderbilt. ruled
! the program of the Gideons Inter-
, national unconstitutional. Authori-
ties believe that this decision will
1 stand as a landmark in the biateT)
of religious liberty in the United
States.
The determined effort to breach
ad discredit the principle ot >ep;i
ration of church and state is being
pi taad on many fronts: the recom-
mendation of public grants for pri
rate parochial education, the use
of state censorship to ban materials ,
deemed offensive by hum relig-
groups, and the Increasingly
blatant luggesttons that public
school classrooms be turned over
IgsOUl instruction. In all of
- the onslaught against
i rri the baste premises of our
democracy can he held in check
only bj vigorous and informed
community action.
In a slightly different area, the
American Jewish Congress has as-
sumed the lead in a series of I iaM
attempting to establish the prin-
Contmued en P*g* 14 B
YAHRZIIT DATES
, AT A GtANCI I
FREE TO OUR READERS!
Seventh Edition Of Famoue *4-
Year Hebrew-English Calendar
Com Up To 106&.
*<^*V*IV^*'V>^<*^'V The aw edition of the calendar!
All Hebrew and English dataa
from 1931 to 155. AU Jewish
holidays to 19S4.
Thie publication ha* arranped with ana of
our advertiaera to eeeura for our raadara
thai lateat edition of tha famous I4-Yaar
Calendar at no coat. For a f re* copy. Just
write s poet-card or letter to:
H. J. HfINZ CO., Depf. n
Prmbwra," 30, Pa.
Passover Candi
tosher I/Pesoch
ies
* r.DB7 nr:
Archer Fruit Company
317 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach
Phone 5-6950
ARCHIE BRICK
r^WVW^\_^w>\-^\^\_^W'W'W-0-^W>\^W'W,
I WANT MY MILK
FLORIDA
DAIRIES
HOMOGENIZED
TEE. 2-2S2I
Cheater Miami Dettrsry
?teat On* Para, at
eagetf BlrS Bsj aa awMpr
HOLIDAY CJfffrir.CS
MAJESTIC BAKERY
7911 N.E. 2nd AVENUE
rVill open a new branch after Pssievtr
Specioliiing in Feed of Svaer.er
at
1043 WEST FIACLEK STREET
Wafdl far it

tt****
>w
A Happy MV#r Te All Oar
Frrpads umd afreet
BARKUi ENVELOPE
MFG. CO.
2740 S.W. 28th LANE
MIAMI
Phone 83-7598
Harry Barkin
r
HAPPY PASSOVtR
test*
INCORPORATED
fsfpfc/ilrlrP 1904

MANUFACTURERS OF INSECT WIRE SCREENING
ALUMINUM BRONZE STEEL IRIDITED
FACTORIES:
MIAMI. FLORIDA LOCIHAVEN. PENNA.
GREETINQS
*llukt'" Mansene's
*paghlii ll4inM4k
PIZZA PIE
Orders to Take Out
291 N.W. 37th Arn.
Phone) 48-2356
Opp. Wont Flaaler Rog Track
own;
ROflREI
SO SWEET!
SO HEAVY-BOMB!
SODEUCKHIS!
You'll love Hs reti
old-f oshioned go
f tiriioisTiiES co., me, (mmwujj
fMSfri#*r#4f mf
World Wld Importing & Exporting Ca
ft, rlejide
A Happy Pan*ov+r To AU
Our Frtemds and Patrons
North American
Airlines
1835 CoBra* Atro.
Miami Boach
310 E. Flanier St.
Phono S8321
a-0R
'
"on this
Passover Holiday
the festival of liberation, we Join people all over the world
wishing for Peace and Prosperity.
In our opinion, there is no better place in the world
lor enjoying Peace and Prosperity than Miami Beach.
We have developed and are maintaining one of the
finest urban transportation systems anywhere in the world
andas has been so often declareda good transportation
system is absolutely essential for the growth and prosperity
of any community."
3rU Miami Btach RaUuwuj> &


+Jent,ncr/cMari
PAGE 11 B
fad's City of the Aged
Brings Peace and Dignity
~*
|AtVIN ROSKNFELD
Lours hang heavy for the
L not at the Pardes Hanna
Cmp net far south of Haifa.
_L who sees Neve Avoth,
Cme of the Parents," would
Jed. Neve Avoth, part of the
Hanna camp, is a miserable
T place of dusty, unpaved
Id wooden shacks. For there
U no decent permanent
[for these 2,750 newcomers,
more than 1,000 are over
j of age.
Lt Neve Avoth there is a
pc program designed to keep
J busy and as contented as
[while they waitsome pa-
nd with resignation, some
impatience which is so
i people who have only a
left. They wait for the
Cow being built with United
[Appeal funds by Malben,
W Distribution Committee's
fin Israel for the aged, the
klly ill and other "hard
ase- among the immigrants.
than a dozen work-shops,
ed by skilled craftsmen.
fcrl use their hands and de-
kills. The total number of
.le there who are engaged
t is today nearly 500.
I trades including tailoring
litting, plastics and carpen-
e mechanics and basket
, spinning and tinsmithing.
laged work not for money,
' the pleasure of it and in
maintain their self-re-
hey receive only 0 Israel
j a month for their efforts,
jen those who do not or Con-
or receive a bit of pocket
[from the financially hard-
I Jewish Agency, which is a
iary of the United Jewish
any of the aged, it is not
rouse themselves to such
two-thirds of the residents
: Avoth are Rumanians who
i Israel with the expectation
heir children would follow,
pt hope was crushed by Ru-
> regime and they can look
I only (o a life without their
fcs around them. Though they
! bent by the weight of many
fthey continue to work. They
work four hours daily.
those who flock to the
pops are 39 men and women
years of age.
is a man of 80 who not
rks in metal but has in-
a whole group of his fel-
Wdents of Nave Avdth in this
branch of handicraft; the members
of this work group have produced
water sprinklers, doll carriages, tea
tables, smoking stands and doll
beds. A man of 75, aided by his
aged wife, directs a women's dress-
making shop where six others
spend productive hours. Old folks
from Persia are making Persian
carpets; others have turned out
lovely chess sets.
Recently, Tel Aviv had the op-
portunity to see and purchase some
of the products of the aged. The
Jewish Agency arranged an ex-
hibit, and the aged themselves took
the hour-long journey from Pardes
Hanna to arrange the exhibit-ale
room and to act as-volunteer sale!
personnel.
They did this, though no extra
money came to them from the
sales; the proceeds went to buy
new materials. But they plunged
with enthusiasm into the project
and the result was a great success.
Tel Aviv came oy U hundreds.
When the exhibit was over, the
sales people went back to their
temporary homes to make new
dolls, new smoking stands, new
carpets, and to make happy days
for themselves.
All these men and women are
among the 60,000 aged and sick
persons, both in Israel and other
parts of the world, who are depen-
dent on American Jewry's continu-
ed generous support of the United
Jewish Appeal.
Greetings
TEPEE CLUB
5722 S.W. 8th STRICT
Passover Greetings
To Our Many Friends
Mr. and Mrs. Michael A. Peile
and DONNA SUSAN

<
.;;; ;:
NEWELL & PIERCE
9NMTIM Nl DNIH1ANV
SNV01 1NIW3A0MM MOH
ICOSt 1NOIM
avo Minim mn
nfJMftS* |a>(MMMMJ
v
SaOiDValNO) 1VMN19 |
Phone 4-5751
m supputs
TROP AQUARIUM
and Pet Shop
TftOPfCAl FISH AN ACCESSORIES
114 N.W. 42nd AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA
IT IS WITH PLEASURE
WE EXTEND
A MOST HAPPY
PASSOVER
TO ALL
iJ
HOIIDH GREETINGS
< III S \ll \KI SKA FOOD IIOI Si:
3906 N.W. 36th STREET Telephone 64-4113
Our Specialties:
Steamed Clam* Maine Lobsters Chesapeake Bay Oysters Stone Crabs
Best Wishes
far a
Happy Passover
APEX PEST CONTROL SERVICE
35S2 N.W. 22nd AVENUE
Tel. 64-2087
Earl WkMori
A Happy Passover Te All Oar
friends and Patrons
Alma
Heauty Salon
403 WASHINGTON AVE.
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 58-1735
Alma and Rudy
RONNIE'S DRUG STORE, INC
Far frtt Delivery of
Prescriptions Drags Cosmetics
ANYWHERE ON THE BEACH
DIAL 58-2442
2200 COLLINS AVENUE
VISIT OUR fOf NT A in
Joseph Waldman
AND FAMILY
of the
Victor Hotel ,....
Extend Best Wishes for the Passover
to the
Entire Jewish Community
Peoples Water and Gas Company
Extend Best
Wishes
to the
Jewish
Community
for
A HAPPY PASSOVER
MIAMI BEACH HOLLYWOOD FORT LAUDERDALE
j
-**
. .
J.
$
Passover Greeting*
From the Tall Corn Country
$
dubuque Packing Co,
Dubuque. Iowa
Packers of
KOSHER BEEF, VEAL and LAMB
Florida Htprtunlalhtt
Softer Brokerage Company
Harry Softer. President
Offices: 24 N.W. 7th Street, Miami
Phane 3 5463
Dittrihutort
Miami Provision Company
1062 N.W. 22nd Street
Miami. Fla.
Phone 2-8413


PAGE 12 B
vJewlstifhrAMtVJ
J^APmu
Volunteer Groups Formed to Aid in
Cleanup of Pledges for CJA Drive
.... TkH Ism r'rtmmiHppv of UK
Two streamlined volunteer
groups, the "Committee of 100 in
behalf of CJA.-' will lead a final
cleanup in the General Mobiliza
tion Division, it has been an-
nounced by Fred K. Shochot. pub-
lisher of The Jewish Florid ian find,
general chairman.
A committee of 100 veteran
w inkers in Miami and Miami
Beach organized immediately after
announcement was made of the
successful one-day M-Day drive
here last week.
George J. Talianoff. Miami
Beach attorney, will head the
Beach group, and George Ch.ertkof
will direct the Miami committee.
Function of the two committees
will be to ontact the remainder of
prospects not visited by M-I)a> vol-
unteers and to complete the job
in a switt two-week drive.
"The Greater Miami Jewish com
nuinity is anxious to give once they
are approached "by a CJA volun-
teer," said Shocbet, commending
the two committee! ;it their first
Dilation meeting. "Campaign
officials are convinced of this fact
in view of returns showing that 30
percent of all contributions recciv
ed to date in the General Mobiliza
tion Division are new gili~
Campaign chairman Aaron M
Kanner advised that although the
two committees will concentrate
their efforts in the Miami and Mi-
ami Beach areas, other workers in
North Hade. Monticello Park. Hia-
j. Miami Springs. Coral Gables
and Homestead are continuing to
cover remaining prospects assigned
to them in the original General
Mobilization campaign.
The two "Committees of 100" are
now in the process of formation,
Shochet announced, and volunteer
are being sought in all other I Jl
divisions, in the closing weeks of
our 195* Combined Jewell Appeal
<;r?:iter Miami .leur> i- Bven
opportunity to help H~ 0WH '*
institutions, schools, hospitals, >t*-
ten and Home for the Aged," t$U
Carl Weinkle. president .>t Greater
I Miami Jewish Federation
"We can also meet our respon-
| sibility to the democracy of Israel
1 a land of hope and light and tree-
' dom. The Israeli farmer and pion
: eer wants peace, needs peace, seeks
l..,to build a democratic land
and bless it with his labors Bui like
the early American settler, he must
plow his field with I rifle at his
sidein the event of ambush, at
tack and assault.
"Yet his main concerns are lit''
growth and freedom This nun
and the flee land he build- moat
not stand alone. Americans must
help as never before to strengthen
the economy of Israel to the State
can achieve economic indepen-
dence and ultimate freedom,"
Weinkle declared
Volunteers who wish to serve
with the "Committee of 100" either
in Miami or in Miami Beach may
call the Greater Miami Jewish Fed
eration at 58-4331.
Vizcaya Treasures
Lobby display of the Miami
Beach Public Library' during the
month of April will present treas-
ures from Villa Vizcaya. Dade
County Art Museum.
(complete and 5bependaMe o7i//e SeWtce
M
IAMI TITLC
& Obstruct Co.
I Nominations for
Shroder Award
NKW YORK- Announcement of i
the opening of nominations for the
I (554 William J. Shroder Memorial
Award was made this week by Wil ]
ham Kosenwald. Net. York, chair
man, and Stanley C. Myenk.CjM^1',
,1 Gables, mwber "f fe *>
miltee.
The"a*nnl was es>aM1*h* year bv the Council of Jewish Fed-
eration- and Welfare Funds as a
continuing living tribute to the
i.lcal- of Its, founder and first
president It is given annually to
organizations under Jewish aus-
pice- which are judged to have
j made outstanding contributions to
' local, regional, national or inter-
national welfare.
Shroder. a distinguished Cincin-
nati lawyer and banker, was an
active leader in Jewish and non-
sectarian causes on the local, na-
tional and world scenes. He was
president of the Council from 1932
U) IS38, and served as chairman
! and member of the Board until
his death in 1952. The Council is
the national association of 250 lo-
ci central community organiza-
tion- representing more than 800
Jewish communities throughout
the United States and Canada.
There will be two winners of the
award. Rosenwald and Myers de-
' dared. One will be a community
i with more than 20,000 Jewish popu-
l lation and the second a community
with less than 20.000 Jewish popu-
! lation. In asking for nominations
i for the 1954 Shroder Memorial
Award, they emphasized that en-
tries must be received by the com-
mittee by September 15. 1954. The
award will be made at the General
Assembly of the CJFWF in Novem-
ber. 1954
irs SMART TO SEE THl
U0ABOt<0$
IN MIAMI
PH 3 0&74 73'2 EiSC I-
15 YEARS OF TITLE SERVICE III DADE COUNTY
ESCROWS ABSTRACTS TITLE INSURANCE!
Title Insurance Policies <
Kansas City Title Insurance C*.
Copitol, Surplus I Reserves
ttctti $3,000,000
124 SHORELAND ARCADE
TELEPHONE 9-1892
SPACE NOW RENTING
(OFFICE and STORE)
1400 N.W. 36th STREET
Space in this new. modern, air condi'ioned building ol
the Allapattah Branch office of Dade Federal Savings
and Loan Association of Miami is now available to
select tenants. Elevator service to offices on the second
floor is provided. Part of the second floor space has wet
columns designed for members of the medical profes-
sion. The Allapattah Branch of the Miami Public
Library will soon occupy space on the ground floor.
Other space suitable for exclusive shops is still
available.
LARGE FREE OFF-STREET PARKING AREA
DADE FEDERAL
SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
4MHe*iysjCLM*'-
*.! i-_-l
For Information Inquire Mr. Butcher or Mr. Tigar.
Dade Federal Savings, 1440 N.W. 36th Street Phone
65-6448.
BROKERS PROTECTED X~
Builders if Inimoftal
Memorials fir tit
xraff $ maa
Jewisl Trail
Look for the 2-Sto'y White
Building
Thurmoid Monument Co.
MAFKFPS $40.00 PLUS
CEMETERY CHARGES
Open Sundays Phone 4-3249
Joint Seminar Held
At Hebrew Academy
A Passover seminar sponsored
jointly by the Room Mothers and
Father's Club of the Hebrew Acad-
emy took place on Tuesday eve-
ning, in the Academy Auditorium,
Mrs. Alexander Kogan, chairman
of the Room Mothers, announced,
The Seder, with its numerous re-
ligious cere monk:*, was .conducted
entirely by the adult class of the
Academy. Meanings of the cere-
monials were explained by individ-
ual students.
Mrs. Sushannah Spector, instruc
tor of the adult group, prepared a
special dramatic skit presented dur-
ing the evening's program.
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross, prin-
cipal. spoRe on the educational val
ues of the Passover Holiday.
Isaac Uvb WJ
Elect Oilier
-"'leh'rtionofofjj
l-evin Lodge R. ~S
?'<*& b!*3
Congregation on w*f
Apnl 20th, 8:30 t^l
Nominees ind^V '
stein, president; Q i
vice president; Slot M
vice president; A| %J*
Jack Kalk, moMor tf
warden.
Maurice Serotta em
Levin. Mort perr, J
Levinson. trustee*
secretary; and Al &
man of Membership (
Installation is
May 15th.
Yiddish Classical Hour
NEW STATION NEW TIME
STATION WWPB
1450 on Your Dial
WWPB proudly presents
YIDDISH CLASSICAL
HOUR
with
The Dt.n .f iMfcl Cowooatators
MORRIS NASATIR
sT*" ^ CVItY SUNDAY
Insj
9:30 Is 11 .... MstM T. 0., New Fsstsrs
H J UH IS JUST A
smT% HAH
CM**
uttft
XIX'
&*

*.(MOU

tV
f
CHARLEY
JOHNS
Heart and Sou
Never Before So Much
For The Benefit Of So Many
Yej. never before so much to benefit sc "^
Thol is the Chorley Johns Program fcr Do* Liw-
And, furthermoreNever before in the nitforfi
Florida has ANY candidate *or Governor Q"ven w
'heart and soul" thoughtAND ACTION-'- W
Florida's long neglected Metropolitan orea.
NOW MAD THIS!!
HOMISTIAD IXEMPTIOH RENEWAL*
At the Reaue.t .f Ik. D.4. Co-ry T *^.
"I will present, as on Adm.n.stration meosure,
completely eliminate the requirement for onnuoi
cf Homesteod Exemption applications.
TAX ON HOUSEHOLD 'URN,,T""Al-J
AIm the Request .( Ihe Da-* Co""*T JecsoToH
'I also shall propose an Administration %]A
pletely tliminaling the Personal Property tcx on
KoW Furnishings.'-CHARLEY JOHNS
REMOVE MIAMI TRAFFIC BOC^^
"Old low level drowbr.dges ,h,' "Vrv^
ef our largest city. I shall 'n,n*"^ Iht Cft f
seek means of providing State 1^;^ Riv **
Miami replace the*, old bridge,i over M-o hnS
tunnels or high level spans CHAklx
STATE OF FLORIDA "'">;* *
"Then, or. son*. 57 Stot. ofl.c^ol, ^ j
M.omi a.M wictafy scattered over 27* c0nS.'^i
at high rental rot.s. I u^ TMiorm--" *?!
cf o Stat. of F.or,do Office Bu.ld.ng ^^bj
int.rwt of economy and public conv. kefi un*
all of thw. offie ond their hundreds oi
on. roof."CHARLEY JOHNS
YB.NIV:.F5M*SOyHW'"'
BENEFIT OF SO MANY!!!
rtandeo"1
K*rl! ^B V *-M\L
... TSM *e^ ^^ *- Vi
ISmm: S-JtM


[APRIL 16. 1954
-JewishfhrkUan
PAGE 13 B
i Tova Ronni to Appear at Third
' by Histadrut on April 21st
Held
Lin national executive
I ihc Histadrut in Amer
jjj Tova Ronni, one of
htstandins young inter-
0ng and folklore, will be
rt (he traditional Third
hssover which will take
E Hibiscus Lodge Aadi-
' Wednesday evenining,
fc:30 p.m.
L,l Seder is being spon-
ge Israel Histadrut Com-
fcreater Miami, and the
t-gadah to be used has
Ired by local members of
ttee.
is celebrating his 30th
4(lcr of the Histradut
| in the I'nited States and
|j years in world Zionist
" secretf.ry of the LaBor
bnization of America, at -
Jook Review
\w on Beach
1, of the August Moon."
|. Vein Sneider, was the
"wed at the fifth anntial
Lheon of the Hadassah-
fbook review series. C*h-
Ll Kelamer. of Temple
Ifim. presented the musi-
Tm. including his own
fcr.s. and was accompanied
led.
Icheon and program were
|ony Hotel on Tuesday at
I charge of reservations
I Harry Platoff, of 1435
tnue. Miami Beach, and
^mes Frank Barer, Ed-
En, Joseph Could, Henry
Abelson. Gerald Soltz,
sin, Harry Weiss, D. S.
...> Weitzkin, Dorothy
Miss Lillian Goodman.
llian Atlass and Mrs. Max
[were in charge of decor-
Is. Morris Alpert was co-
fof all the chapters, and
Weinstein was the re-
tended many World Zionist Con-
gresses, has been a member of the
Jewish Agency for Palestine, the
United Israel Appeal, Farband La-
bor, Zionist Order and the League
for Labor Palestine.
He has just returned from a
visit to Israel, where he confer-
red with President Ben-Zvi, Prime
Minister Moshe Sharett, David Ben-
Gurion and other leaders of the
Histadrut. Miss Ronni has appear-
ed in villages, settlements, kibbut-
zim, immigrant camps and cities
all over Israel, has broadcast over
the Jerusalum radio station and
lias travelled all over the Middle
East. She is renowned for her dra-
matic interpretations.
Officers of the Israel Histadrut
Committee of Greater Miami in
elude Israel S. Shapoff, honorary
hairman; Rabbi Leon Kronish,
chairman; Mrs. Bee Jaffer, co-
chairman; Manuel Burstcin and
Ben Minenberg. associate chair-
man; Milton Miller, .treasurer; and
Mrs. Anna Soren BilcL. secretary.
Board of Directors consist of Saul
Ashkenaty, N. Bookspan, Max
Freidson, Jack Fishman, S/ Hal-
prin, Mrs. Sophie Krantz, Rabbi I.
Lehrman. Rabbi Moses Mescheloff,
Mrs. Joseph Mintzes, Nathan Os-
trov, Mr. and Mrs. B. Powell. Mrs.
Lena Pushkin, Dr. Harry Queen,
Burnett Roth, Mrs. Tillie Sandier.
Mrs. Anna Seltzer, Henry Seitlin,
Rabbi Max Schapiro, Harold Turk.
/Whs Tova Ronni
Let
Menu Planners Shop at .
TANNER'S
AND--------------
B-THRIFTY
FOOD STORES
17S3 N.E. 2nd Avc.
1263 W. Flafler St.
5735 iird Rd.
6190 S.W. 1th Sf.
1906 Pence De Leon Blvd. 13020 N.E. 8fh Av.
Carol Gables North Miomi
KOSHERforPASSOVER
Certified by
Rabbi J. M. Charlop
and Rabbi S. Reiehman *H
WORRY
About Your
FOOD
A Complete Catering Service
Beautiful Hors D'oeurree
Made to Order
Rental of
CHINA SILVERWARE
LINENS
Entertainment and all other
details arranged for your
formal and informal affairs
PHONE 3-5463
NIGHTS, SUNDAYS & HOLIDAYS
S3-19M
JACK & JILL CATERERS
M N.W. 7th St. Off Miami Ave.
100% PURE COFFEE
NATURAL, RICH, MELLOW
. WASHINGTON'S fc
INSTANT COf FEE
THE ONLY
INSTANT COFFEE
SO GOOD
... it has to be>
LOCKED IN TIN
For Seder
Enjoyment
AND
SUN 3>aMei
PRIDE AND PLEASURE IN AGAIN ANNOUNCING
THAT IT WILL BE PRIVILEGED TO SERVE ITS
MANY JEWISH PATRONS WITH
**&
*


Under the Supervision of
Beth Jacob Yaad Hakashrus
Rabbi Moses Mescheloff
Congregation Beth Jacob. Director
phone 5-5537 NOW!
TO INSURE YOUR REQUIREMENTS
Mm*
or order from route salesman


PAGE MB ----------i
Passover Shows Freedom is Won
Continued from Pag* 10 B
ciple that unemployment compen-
sation benefits may not be denied
persons who, because of their relig-
ious convictions, refuse employ-
ment requiring Saturday work. At
the present time, some states deny
benefits to such persons. Cases
challenging these rulings are now
pending in the state courts, the
most recent of which involves a
Seventh Day Adventist in Ohio.
This case was argued before the
New School Building to
Include Professional Stage
Plans for the opening of the new-
Lear School Auditorium were an-
nounced this week by Mrs. Ida
Lear, director-principal of the Lear
School.
The new auditorium is being
built just north and adjacent to
the present coral rock mansion
which houses twenty class rooms,
library, offices and dining room fa-
cilities. The 60-foot by 100-foot
completely fire-proofed CBS struc-
ture will seat over 300 students and
will be used for school dances, par-
ties and other group educational
programs.
At the north end of the auditor-
ium, a fully equipped 29-foot by 40-
foot stage will permit professional
type theatrical productions and will
have the latest type of theatrical
lighting and audio systems A built
in motion picture screen will be
available for the showing of educa-
tional films.
Ohio Supreme Court on March 9 by-
Leo Pfeffer of the American Jew-
' ish Congress. On March 31. the
Court handed down a decision fav-
1 orable to the Seventh Day Adven-
| tist. This is considered an impor-
tant victory for religious liberty.
An even more acute problem
with serious repurcussions in inter-
' faith relations arises out of the
adoption of children across relig-
ious lines. The most frequent con-
troversy stems from the desire of a
.!( wish couple to adopt a child born
of a Catholic mother The Catholic
Church takes a strong position
against such adoptions and through
its efforts, a large majority of
states have enacted legislation aim-
ed at restrictingif not complete-
ly prohibitingsuch adoptions.
On April 5, a case of this sort
was argued by the AJCongress be-
fore the Supreme Court of Massa- j
I chusetts The case involves the wish 1
of a Catholic mother to have her |
twin children adopted and raised
! as Jews by the Jewish couple to
whom she had turned them over
! at the time of their birth. A Massa-
chusetts law. however, requires
that "when practicable" a child
j should be adopted only by persons
of the same religious persuasion as
the natural parents. There is no
conflict between the child's welfare
and the mother's wishes; both fac-
tors would recommend the adop-
tion by the Jewish couple. All par-
ties concede that it would be to the
greater advantage to the child for
the adoption to proceed. The state
law is the sole deterring factor.
The constitutional issue squarely
presented is whether, by refusing
to permit the adoption, the state is
not abridging the mother's relig-
ious liberty by forcibly restraining
I her from permitting her child to be
raised in a religion other than her
own inherited religion; and sec-
ondly, whether such a statute does
not constitute illegal state aid to
religion in violation of the prohibi-
tions of the First Amendment.
Any brief inventory of the major
threats to separate can touch only
lightly upon some of the most im-
portant areas. Cnfortunately. there
is more work to do than there is
community willingness to do it.
Solution of these problems depends
upon an increasing awareness of
the dangers of diluting the princi-
ple of separation and of narrow-
ing the scope of religious freedom.
For those already aware, the agen-
da is overcrowded.
LEGAL MOTICK
NOTICE UNDKR FICTITIOUS
fat an Bat f 1 at W
NOTICE IS HKKKHV GIVEN thai
hi- undersBJBed, .I.hIrlnit t.. engage |,L
under ihe fl.tltl \ \ \ CHAIR KKNTAI.S ANf)
>.M.i:s. a I Sll \ i: l-t Avf,, Miami.
Intend to n-glstcr said name with the
Clerk of tiir Circuit curt ail
l"i i Ma
MAI KICK lUR.s.M
ii.vi.rn itiii.-.ii
i/is-n-ss 5/7
WTVJ TELEVISION PROGRAM SCHEDULE
Friday thru Monday( April 16-19)
MORNING
FR DAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY
7 00 7:30 Todaj ' Tent Pat.. Mo Today
I 00 rWture 1Mb
1:1*
i::o
8*5
S 00 D:n Dung B ho- To EC Annced li lH,ug School
S-15 T.-t l\.t.. Mm, i
1-30 Strike II Rich ban ka It Rio*.
9:5 ______________________||_______________Chiistuphers _____________
1C:00 The Little Show Super Cm u, I-at.m Into Ft The Lie KTiow
IS:12 V,1"1.' Ij,-y I I Valiant L*4)
0:30 Jack Paar >hw I Capt. Midnight Look lp. Uv* Oar) Moors
Inditv 1
11:00 Del Russo
- s
30 NVnu Magic
"- 45
Spate Patrol
Johnny Jupiter I
Tilmnph't Hi.
Arthur Uodfrey
Menu Magic
J 00 I've tl'.t New,
12:15 Love of Ufa
12 30 Baarch Pot Tumor.
13:45 Guiding Lathi
AFTERNOON
UiK Tup
B Bch'l of Air i 1 re Ool New*
Lowe of Life
I'n Bub F*nles S'r. h For T..rn.
Guiding Light
j 00 BrUBCB With Judy Roj Rogera I M in Review ( Br'ch W. Judy
I2' e. ., I Income Tax
1:30! Gary Moore
1:45|
200 Cobba Cornel Talent Ranch
2:15
230 At Jackie's House Mr Wizard
2:46| "
Capt. Horn Ju\enlle Jury I Gary Moore
cart'n-O-Vllta I
Jamie stor\ Cobba Corner
l'e.uh Valley
of Family Jackla'l House
3 00 Big Payoff
3:15
2 30 Kate .Smith
3 45
| St'dio of World Pepsi Playh'ae Itig I'ayoff
B'nal li'rith
I
Paul Win. in u Kate Smith
4:00 Ale. Gibson
4:15
4:30. "
4:45'
Uncle Martin Vou Aie There
I l>l< W. r'th'r Mr l.-.pers
|:0g (j'7"' *Nli,k,> Amateur Hour s A.Wenture <-flenn. Mi.kev'
-i* 'iipi-rmaii m i pi^. i.-,..
530 Bporta Hlllte* Baatar Proa
i:45 Shoppei's Guide News-Weather_________
EVENING
K i.l
Shopper'* Child.
6:00 Political
6:10 Wcathi-iman
6:15 Jack of All Sports ;
K.-.i Skelton
Meat Hi.- praaai Pollti. ..i
ft net in.in
R*nTkh0He7or,r;ar,y ; U,oP Ran" I U *''"'"" S2A"SSv*
6.45 Renl.-k Reportmg | ______________. Renlck Repoita1 Reni. k Report*
7:?5 Koo Si:, '"' I!ra"do,-k '-"o "', '"!. Is Y. L.fe
7:S0 Doug Edwards Two P. Money Private lea I
Obit u a rlei
SOLOMON MANDEL
7ii. ..f IS0I Moaaajro at.. Coral Gables,
died on April 3rd In a local hospital.
He la survive)! by four sons, Benjamin.
H Robert, Harry and Charles; one
laughter. Rosiland Paltaar; and one
nlstri Sarah Adler. Remains were
r'til to Brooklea, N.Y.. for services
iikI Interment by the Miami Riverside.
HARRY KAY
ii RW Itk ave. died on March
nth Rervlcee were on March list.
with lntermt-nt in Mount Nebo Ceme-
ian.
FANNIE KOSSTRIN
s. of *_ Kuclld ave.. died >.n Man h
30th. Riverside Miami Itea.h Chapel
was in charge of arrangements.
SARAH TOGO
?. of Ml Ksuunola Way. died on
March !*th Beach Memorial Chapel
was in i harge of arrangements
JACOB MAZER
ilied here on April 1st. A resident of
Philadelphia., and a retired acousti-
cal engineer, he is survived by his
wife, Fannie: daughters. Mrs Leon-
ard H. Roi.enl.era: and Mrs. A. Allen
Simon; and several grandchildren Re-
mains were sent to Philadelphia for
.ervic ea and Interment by Miami
Beach Riverside.
7:46 Eddie Fisher
6:00 Mama
8:16!
8:30' I've Got A Secret
E 45
I Doug Edwards
I. 1" Theater
Comedy Hour I Burns A Allen
Firestone Hour
MILTON SCHUBERT
51. of 23(1 Pine Tree dr. died on
March list. A cabana manager, he
came from Cedarhurst. L.I.. seven
years ago and is survived by his wife,
Ida: two daughters. Mrs. Helen Law-
son ami Mrs. Maxine Rosenberg: two
sisters, including Mrs. Evelyn Miller.
and a hiother Services were on April
tnd at Beach Memorial Chapel, with
interment in Mount Nebo Cemetery.
SARAH APPLEBAUM
.. of MM Alton rd.. died on April
l-t She ..ime to Miami IT aril from
N-w Yoik eight years ago S-n......
April bid in the Miami Baaoa
>e Chapel. With btnlul in Mount
Sinai <"emeter> Mrs. Applehnum is
-ur\i\e.l l.y her husband. Joseph .,
on. Arthur: three daughters. Mis
Bella WoHaon. Mis Adeline Konren,
bbj :.n.i mis Miriam AraoM; five
sisters ami three brothere.
ISAAC YOURKAWITZ
Jt, died Aprfl ist in a local afrtnltal
v of the Jewish Home for
the Aged, he came from Pa'.
There are no survivors
- ware on Api.l tad In the
Miami Chapel of Gordon'! Funeral
lth burial in Mount Nebo
.emeter>.
ALECK S. BARUSCH
SL of tiT- s\v n,i st died on April
.:' -",v April tad in
Gordon Miami rhapel, with burial
In Mount Nebo Ceatater)
t ^eN>V~MT FELOMAN
Infant daught.-, of M, .,,, Mr, s,,,
Hel.lma,,. flM BW llth st ,| .
*P IM i....lor,', Funera| Home,
Miami, was In charge of arr.nigein.-nts
., ANNIE LEBER
I. of 1610 Collliu ave. diad .. A,,|
1st RJverride Miami Beach Chapel
was in i Barge ..f arraacan
ROBERT KAABE
old son o( m, aad Mrs. Jack
1 M ,-,,, ave. died April
;' V' 'rtrtj Children H,.,.
He Is survived b> a brother,
Barry; ..mi ,,,., MMW, lKtl "^
'rett.1 Servl ere oil April 411.
hti Miami Reach RrveraMe .h....|
jrlttl inieinient in M,.,,,,, sinal SaB^
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE is HKUEHY CUVBN that
the iin.leisignved, deelrlna to engaxe In
business uimIw the lictilious uaiue of
lYNK 10 I'l I'AltTMKNT
HTORE, at 7106-01 ltlst-ayne Blvd..
Miami, intends to realster aald name
with the cieik of the Clri-ull Court of
County, Florida.
I HII.IP B. SII.VKRSTEIN
BERT SAG Ell
Attorney for Applicant
810 nisca>ne HlJg.
4. 6-16-B8-M
9:00: Sxhlitz Playhouse Ft>iin Intrlgu* i; i;. Theatre I I Love Lucy-----
M..;t Millie | You Bet Life I My Fav. Story
9:30, Mr. MiNutley
9:45i
10:00; Gillette Fight*
10:30;
10:46 Old Time N'ewsreel
Martha Rave
.rade
Die Web
Whats M. Line
8tu.Hu one
1140! News. Weather
11:15[ Topper
11:30'
11:461 World Premiere
Place The Face, Don Hollelll.a.li News-Wetllei
tw m. e. Mr.i Mr" North I Man B d Badge
That s My Boy I
Eversh'p Th'lre The Vagabonds
-. ROSE J*COBSON
ui *.. w'n,'r visitor and resident of
annT in. *f ." """'ve.! I.v two
Albert and Loala; and a daugh-
M Burial *,,|
arrloa. (rare in New York city. d
t .*A.MueL JACOBSON
Jh 'in i'V S?l *"\h .v' "*! April
^h,n;iJ;:r:'fVr ve':'^iM:
in ll'neh iitrv,r'" on April 5th
11 4th She had llveil here for it
WT&ImS^^S
5th In Miami Beach l:iv...,,e ':,'
with interment In Mount N..,.
mln; nn.i dautThter Mr. aL \v.ft'
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME IAW
NOTU-E IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
STATE MORTGAGE CO.; EQl'ITA-
BI.K INVESTMENT CO.. at lt N.E.
First St.. Intends to realster said
names with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
MORRIS' RAY FRIEDMAN, tlwner
1/16 l/t-9-16
Miami Convalftcnt Horn*
LEO ALLEN. Director
SSS S.W. Itth Avenue
Phones >-541, and 9 0878
aoclaliilng In Care te the Elderly anc
Chronically III. 24-Hour Nursing Serv
ice. Special Diets Strictly Observed
Private and Semi-Private Rooms.
U**-'
cSua*
. the letter* start. Then front
all over the free world come each
comment* as theeo from reeoVri
f THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
MONITOR, aa iataraaUoaal daily
-Th* Monitor is mast reo far mtrmikllhinkim$
"I rsfamasf fo srikoof a/ier a
fepse / 1$ roars. / will get
my eWgraa from the coffcfe,
oaf my miutmtiun
from lita Mooilor. .
Th, Monitor gim* me
/or my work.-. ."
"f iraiy m/oy lu
You. too, will find the Monitor
inlormalire, with complete world
new*. Yoa will discover a eon-
Mractiv* viewpoint la every aw*
story.
Uso the coapon below for ape*
rial Introductory b*cripti*n
3 month* for only $3.
m **a*eeas****(***9aa**966l
Tk CWMU SalMte Msahar
t>~. Nliwi Si Bull. It. Mm... V. 9. A.
Pi,*** aaal m
1-. IS TW. CsrMisa
* keaaa. I mini 61.
(ss-*>
RK3
< (e) ran

iiinNct
THE RID mill RESTAURANT
SMVfCf QUALITY FOODS
001 IfKATNi I0UUVARD
Phoaa l-340
SEASON'S GREETINGS
MIL and MRS.
HENRY SHIER
and Family
HENRY'S
AUTO & TRUCK PARTS
2038 N. W. 27th At*.
PHONE 64-6554

UCAl:
Ndtk e k1o.e uff"
"""der^a^^lafTQ,-
name *i.k .? nd" to
>A.M .1 VI'KSI.V t
either of yoa, maV L""*]
flee, ir, So^y-M
Dade t ounty, pi,,j,
calendar month, lrr,v'
first |.ubli.-ao her^a
or demand, to contain ,fl
to and presentee a. ,!
sume will |w U.rre,l *l
Date March 1, A I) i,u
I.IIJ.1K STR1CKJJT
As Kxecutrier, *n
W III and Te,t,mJ
HTKR8sAHVAsr?y
NOTICE UNDER FICT
NAME LAW
the undesigned, deslrine u,.
ifrtiy.un,Xrr ,h* 'ictiuosii
PALM I.A1NHRY. at io]"
BV Miami, Intend to n
name with the t'lrrk ot
Court of Dade roaaty, ft,
MORRIS 'pre*
TOaWDORK VYvKOwKn
Attorney for A|.plicanti
Ml Seyh.,1,1 nidg.
4/-l-;a-:..
NOTICE UNDER FICTIT
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HKREBT GIV
the undesigned, deilrinf lav,
huslness iinl.-i the fictinoui
HOl'THWKST MlMKOGRAPi
MCTTKR SKHVICEitafft]
St. Intend to regliter said m,
the Clerk of tlir Circuit CoMtj
County. Kkirlda.
CHARLES M. niE__
MA III AN v-RKKFIEli]
t/-l-M-3il
NOTICE UNDER FICTIT
NAME LAW
NOTICE Is HKREBT GP
the undesigned, desiring to i
tiueine-,. under the flrtlliMi I
(il'I.K KISIIINi; rXM'KS. ill
Avenue, Ml.iml Reach, ntrtkl
to register said name with thj
of the Circuit Court of DawC
Florida.
JEROVEG. I
4/J-1S-M-30
NOTICE UNDER flCTfl
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBT GP.
the un.liTr-iKned. deslnottot
business under the firtitioetl,
WINlKiW h'l'.AME P'RMCtL
East 23rd St Hialrah. 1d*tl
to register said name with
of the Circuit Court of D**M
Florida.
ni'RWIN CORP.
1113 KaM :!rd Strut,
lllaleah, Honda
AARON M KANNKIt
Attoraey for OCR". IN i
/9-l-I3-3
H THI CIRCUIT COURT!
LEVENTH JUDICIAL C*.
NO FOR DAOE C0UNTY.I
>A. IN CHANCERY.
ATHAN 0 WAT.MAN.
NOTICE BY PUBL CAT-
MINNIE K \YAT.\H-N
760 Grand (-oncowsi
Bronx. Sea SSfte VIH
Ti.r ARE '":lt:,'\,|
it a Hill "' Complaint mi
been fil"l again*! jsm
,e en.......I cause nd >!
required l mr *1
iawei i" in* B1" 0' !i
Plaintiff > attorney". i (
Inal ill the .'"l" "_,
Circuit Court on or -
aa, of Aprft ".,:ll0,l",
,.,. pro confesn "i" "'
;:':;;:,',. ^n**-
h seek f"i ''"'SffiEfin
THE JEWISH "^HPr"
t,-.l at Miami. rTurn*
' M" I .r'l-KATHttg
c'ierk "->""^|
!.,,uity fhtt
....LOT. SILVERJ: E
Attorney, ''"' "i"il"j|lst
-... .,,..-.- i:nldinf. *"
4 2-K-l*
E
A...
IDA.
N
M
TO:
th
ha-
HO)Vr
by
An
the
<>ri|
the
7th
Iex-re
again
This
raeh
in 1.
Dat
day
PAL!
."1
3 :s
IN THE COUNTY iUBOrtJ
In He
FREI>
)-iii.<<-
either Of
estate of
ed late <
the Hon
County Jii
file the -
To All <'"-",,t"r?;ra,nd &*\
Ing Claims or Deaw-
E"'""': .oh of vou. *ai
You, ",,.'aL,,l?ed'l >^i
notified .ad requgj vk&|
tSTAt m-r- "fi ia
County Courthu* r,^M
Florida. -',hin0, f,w nntjS.
bom Ihe date of "J aefl
contain the '- to anJ3
.,nt ..nd to ,n "'"J1^
as aforesaid, or ^ u
oo Section 1
J/M */*"


LIGAL NOTICI
, /TbCUIT court of the
K"rHANCERY. No. 187463
|f 0&. I'latntlff
'.. oivi'HAR. Defendant.
iricE BY PUBLICATION
Ilijam owciiar
Ifirvant Avenue
r'VnK'HERBBY NOTIFIED
wu of Complaint for Divorce
L f ed against you In the
f,ntl ed u and you are
I'".ified to serve a copy of your
fti the Bffl of Complaint on
IT attorneys, and f I e the orlg-
Kg* office '' the.c,<,r?H0f^
Court on or before the 2h
Iwil ISM; otherwise, a De-
rAPConfeao will be entered
Conine shall be published once
1 SSTfoV four '"nkcutlve week.
r.lKWISII n/lRIDIAN. .
at Miami, FIoHda, this Mn
I"*'"?' f'4I.EATMERMAN.
Clerk, Circuit Court-
By: WM. W. STOCKING.
Deputy Clerk
v SILVER A MVUhOT
ay* for Plaintiff
tmf l*ldg.. Miami. PlK
1/2-9-1
T(CE UNDER FICTITIOUS
I NAME LAW
SCE IS MKREHY OIVEN that
crsigncd. desiring to engage m
under the fictitious name of
OK FRANCINK. at 530 NW
avenue, Miami. Dade County,
intends to register aald name
_ Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Bounty. Florida. 1
CATHKRINK M. LITTLE,
(Sole Owner)
It M. CAIN
ley for Applicant
' Flagler St.. Miami, Fla.
r ITICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
ricK IS IIKRKRY OIVEN that
Iderrlgned, desiring to engage |n
km under the flctltlouB name of
EvENl'!: LAND CO., at 26 N W
[Street, Miami, Florida. Intend*
|itei s. ill Court of Dade County,
HARRY L. DAVIS
tRY ft KLEIN
key for Harry I* Davia
feeivne Rnllding, Miami, Florida
4/2-9-16
bTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
'ICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
bderMKii. -d. desiring to engage In
ku under the fictitious name of
REALTY, at 990 S.W. 1st
Intend to register said name
be Clerk "f the Circuit Court of
I County. Klorida.
JOHN E. UKE
LOUS .1 I.ll'TON
JACQCE8 K. LENNON
> iwners
hjNfJ. Zl'CK HUMAN *
ppjCH
neys for A indicants
IW 111 Street
H-M
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
fi-EVENTM JUDICIAL. CIRCUIT "5
AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLOR
IDA. IN CHANCERY. No IbTbOb
JOSEPH B. KLEINWICHB. aim,
known as JOZEF KLEINWICHH
V8 I'lalntlff
SINA BUR8TEIN KLE1NWICHS
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION""'
TO: 8INA RfRKTEIN KLEINWICHB
residence unknown
YOU ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Bill of Complaint for Annulment
hat been filed against vc.u in the
above entitled cause and you are here-
by required to serve a copy of your
Answer to the Bill of Complslnt on
the Plaintiff's attorneys, and file the
original In the office of the Clerk of
the Circuit Court on or before the 7th
day of May, 1954. otherwise a Decree
Pro Confessu Will be entered againxt
you.
This notice shall'be published once
earn wvfek for four consecutive weeks
In the JEWISH FLORID!AN.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this 1st
day of April, 19S4.
E. B. LEATHERMAN,
Clerk. Circuit Court
By M. C. QRKEN,
(Seal) Deputy Clerk
PA I J.Of. RILVER A MULLOY
Attorneys for lTalntlff
701 Congress BMg., Miami. Fla.
4/9-16-SS-SO
DTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
TICK IS HEREBY GIVEN that
dersiBiicd, desiring to engage In
kn umler the fictitious name of
|IY IMPORT, at 14.16 Washington
be, Miami Meai h, Intends to reg-
Isald name with the Clerk of the
It Court of I hide County, Florida.
NETTIE URBACH
4/2-9-16
IHE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
I DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN
P.?Y. No. 167446
BE J. JACOBS and
EPHIKK JACOBS, his wife,
1 MAMIE GIDDON8, l'laintlffa,
I ASHLEY and T.l'CY ASHLEY.
l*ife, et al. Defendants.
NOTICE TO APPEAR
JV.. ASHIKV '""> LUCY
ASHLEY, his wife,
J-'-ii Lycaster
I,1':',1.':" Mi.-hlgan
P ,',,',' A-'M1-FY and GENE
JWHLKY, Ins wife,
-Jrovi. city, OhUi
K5gTA 'HOP and JOHN
Vs" H"l'l.. her husband
Fn Off|,.e Box 471
EiS*.".0?- N'""h Carolina
MAI LINK I.YDA and ERNEST
i.l DA, her husband
I,',','';..':l1' North Carolina
f.'"11 Office IU.X 471
Bhw.nan,,,. North Carolina
KAiiT^AltT ,,n(1 VIRGB.
_ STl'AliT, his wife,
0"t Office ltx 471
TilTv.!'"nT ,?orth Carolina.
intee, tl"1. devl8. e*atees,
hTi' '"'"'". assignees, cred-
itoriTHf"'"' """'""ors in Inter-
Vsh ri ,',""nM claiming by.
ma, U'"lSr or against such of
Eltv J" (loa<1' aH helr" of B. B.
knlci'n'i. .' t rtain.?!" """ "",y and al1 Pr-
>sed.""J"' { B. B. ASHLEY.
iShvJ ant ?.k.U ..,,her ,ner"nn"
and i ,v lcn'' tm or Interest.
I suit" h'' '"""PeMy im-oived in
tuAtill IJKRKPT NOTIFIED
l* br,?as k*f'!.flled *anst you
I to-wf,,0"owlnK described prop-
|BTiSL1%*%te8LrlLM
|&f(|iilnTfENfc" he WM
(the North mA* 20H0^ feet
PKNTY ,,? l?,S, ,,., of Tract
l"n II .NI,'K OARDENS.
record,. I |n PUt B(>ok .,,
'He \- ,".iln. P1" B-'kn
t?RR and ll'f', mif" ""orneys.
fe1 in S? off? ^ ;,,d ,np ,hr
ffi> May""* fl" xlX,f,;"r h*
matloni of Yi. ,4' otherwise
" taken as confessed by
PwUpAlb.-W1*! "'
l:, "' '-EATHERMAN.
j!rk"f ,h' 'lr-ult Court
By W W. RTOCK1NG
l~ /M.D*,>0,y **
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, .desiring to engage la
business under *tie fictitious name of
ALB HELP SKKVK'K LAUNDER-
ETTE, at 501 East 9th Street, in the
City of Hlaleah, Florida, Intend* t
register the said name with the'Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
DATED at Miami, Florida, this SOth
day of March, 1I4.
EI.IA8 8CHULMAN
Sole Owner
FREDERICK N. BARAD
Attorney at Lw
430 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, Fla.
4/9-16-23-30
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that
'he undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
I-ORRAINE APARTMENT HOTEL,
at 2601 Collins Avenue. In the City of
Miami Keach, Dade County, Florida,
intends to register the said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida, dated at Miami
Beach, Florida, this 5th day of April,
1954.
JACOB SOLOMON
YE'I'I'A SdlaiMON
MORTIMER .1. Snl.OMON
ELEANOR S. FRIEDLAND
HARRY ZUKERNICK
Attorney for Owners
420 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach. Fla.
4/9-16-23-30
LEGAL NOTICE
PAGE 15 B
In ^o^y^d^s^Iourt
l-, ^^.u0 for dade county
M%rTATofAT* N- 3,MJ d
T.A*n,<',;'i..Hnu"'HMAN' deceased
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
Estate r Demand" Against Said
,.TmJandJeacn ,of y. are hereby
notified and required to present any
i.C. H"d nemands which you, or
either of you, may have against the
estate of AKTHlUt HUU4CHMAN. de-
^.n"*, ai*" *2 Wayne Cobnty. Ml.hl-
Kf^i> ,h5 Honorable County Judges
\'l .iUlL' ?m,,y.' and fl,e ,he ""m
In their offices In the County Court-
house in Dade County, Florida, within
eight caJendar months from the date
of the first publication hereof. Said
eljlms or demands to contain the legal
address of the claimant and to be
sworn to and presented as aforesaid,
or same will be barfed.
Date April 6th, AD. 1954.
IRWIN E. KOTT
As Ancillary Administrator
Cum Testament.. Annex.) of
the Last Will and
Testament of
ARTHUR HIRSCHMAN,
MYERS, HEIMAN & KAPLAN1**-
Attorneys for Ancillary Administrator
Cum. Testaiiieuto Annexo
4/9-16-23-30
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
fcj A aj CIA \A/
notice IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name cf
TAMIAMI CABINET BHOP, at 2734
SW 2Mb 1-aiie. Miami 3J, Florida. In-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade ;' s
County, Florida. Squired to
JERRY KIRK
PRANk COHN
Attorney for Tamlaml Cabinet Shop
4/9-16-23-30
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engnge in
business under the fictitious name of
HOLIDAY MOTEL, at 72K0 S.W. 8th
Street, Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
SAMUEL TUFSirtNSKY
MORTON L. BEIOEL
Attorney for Applicant
19 W. Flagler St.
i/H 4/2-9-16_______________________
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
notice is hf:rf:by GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engnge In
business under the fictitious name of
ACTIVE COLLECTION AGENCY, at
7ii4 Biscavne Building. Miami, Florida,
Intend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida. .....
ROBERT .1. LEWIHON
MAX P ENOEL
DAVID M. GONSHEK
Attorm-\ f..r Active Collection Agency
764 Hiscayne Hldg.
3/26 4/2-9-16
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW t ,
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the /li-'illi'i.'C.I,Ri5, fnxi
NIEL O'NIEI.L TIE-BEAM EORM
ERECTORS, at 945 N.W. 40th Street,
Intends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County.MFlondA. et olnjer
DeCOSTAS, MAER FLOYD
Attorneys for Applicant
7 Blscayne BWg.
4/2-9-16-23 _
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR OAOS COUNTY.
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE. No. 32362-B
In Re: ESTATE OK
LAWRENCE JONE8. Dui-eased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons May-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate: .___.,,,.
You. and each of you. are "?
notified and required to present any
claims and demands which you. oi
.ith.1 of you, may have against tne
estate of LAWRENCE JoN^J''
ceased late of lade County. F orlda
i.. the Hon. w. F BlaNTON. County
Judge of Dade County, and file the
same In his office in the County Court.
house In Dade Counts. 1-lor.da 1th n
eight calendar months from the date
of the first publication hereof. Said
claims or demands to contain the ler.n
address of the claimant and to be
sworn to and presented as afesa .
or same will be barred. See Section
|M .,f the 1933 Probate Act.
Date April S. AJ>. ^
/s/ 1.11.1.IK MAI. THOMAS,
otherwise known as
ULLIi: MAE JONES
As Executor of the Lst Will
and Testament of lw>-a
LAWRENCE JONES, Deooaaod
ARONOV1TE, AKONOVITZ
Attoniojs for Llllle >* *"*
4/14-2J-30 tfl
NOTICE iY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
-tfif.'J?* IN AND pOR DADE
?UNIV-JN CHANCERY. No 167926
EL1ZA14ETH LYONS, Plaintiff
vs.
ALAN LYONS, Defendant
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: ALAN LYONS
:toB East 57th Street
New York, N.Y.
You are hereby notified that a Bill
of Complaint for Divorce has been
filed against you, and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your Answer
or Pleading to the Bill of Complaint
on the plaintiffs Attorney, SEYMOl'R
B. L1EBMAN, 605 Lincoln Road, Mi-
ami Beach, F'lorlda. and file the orig-
inal Answer or Pleading in the office
of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on
or before the 10th day of Hay. 1954.
If you fall to do so, judgment by de-
fault will he taken against vou for
the relief demanded In the Bill ..f
Complaint.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this 6th day of April, A.D,
1954.
E. B. LEATHERMAN,
Clerk, Circuit .Court,
Dade County, Florida
B) WM \v. STOCKING,
(Circuit Court Seal) Deputy Clerk
A 1-16-tS-M
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY. No. 167923
MARY JANE NORTON. Plaintiff,
Vs.
MlLToN R. NORTON, Defendant,
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: MIL I'oN R, NORTON
fiOth A.PC SHAPE
APO 55, c/o I'M
New York. N.Y.
You are hereby notified that a Bill
of Complaint for Divorce has been
filed against you, and you are re-
serve a copy iif your Answer
or Pleading to the Bill of Complaint
on the plaintiff's Attorney, HENRY
M. CAIN, 2518 West Flagler Street,
Miami. Fla., and file the original Ans-
wer or Pleading In the office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court on or be-
fore the 10th day of May, I9S4. If you
fall to do so, Judgment by default will
be taken against you for the relief
demanded In the Bill of Complaint.
IIONE AND ORDERED M Miami,
Florida, this 6th day of April, A.D.
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOU8
NAME LAW
NOTICE IK HEIUCBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
HIGH FIDELITY ASSOCIATES, at
3688 Blscayne Blvd., Miami, Intend to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
ROBERT OREENBERO and
.~ I'ARRY KASSMAN, Owners
RORF7HT M. DEEHL
Attorney for Applicants
0.i Sevhold Bldg
4/2-9-16-2$
1954.
E. R. LEATHERMAN,
Clerk, Circuit Court,
Dade County, 1- torida
Bv WM W. STOCKING.
(Circuit Court Seal) Deputy Clerk
4/9-16-23-30
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLOR-
'OA.; IN CHANCERY. No. 164,275.
AONES LITTLES. Plaintiff,
vs.
MILLARD LITTLES. Defendant
ik, ,,NOTICe TO APPEAR
IN THE NAME OF THE STATE
OP P!A)RIDA
TO: MILLARD LITTLE8,
c/o Ruby Johnson
3821 F'olson Street
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
ALL UNKNOWN heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors or other parties
claiming by, through, under or against
MILLARD LITTLES;
AND AL80, aa to the above-named
defendant-Individual, if he be deceas-
ed, and all unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors or other parties
claiming by, through, under or against
such defendant; and also
ALL OTHER and unknown persons
having or claiming to have any right,
title or Interest in the property which
is the subject matter of this suit, said
property lying and being in Dade
County, Florida, and more particularly
described as follows:
Lots Nine <9) and Ten(lO) In
Block Six (6) of DIX I F:
HEIGHTS GARDENS, accord-
ing to the Plat thereof, recorded
In Plat Book 21, at Page 32, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
YOU AND F3ACH OF YOU are here-
by notified that a suit has been filed
In the above-named Court by the
above-named plaintiff for the purpose
of obtaining a divorce a vinculo matrl-
monil of and from the defendant and
a fee simple interest in the undivided
one-half Interest of the defendant.
MILLARD LITTLES. In and to the
property hereinabove and particular-
ly described.
YOU ARE HEREBY ORDERED and
required to file your appearance,
pleading or answer In said suit on or
hefore the 30th day of April, 1954, and
In default of such appearance, plead-
ing or answer a decree pro ennfesso
will bo entered against you and on on
of you, and Judgment by default will
he taken against you for the relief
demanded In the Amended BUI of
Complaint.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami,
I'.ide County. Florida, this 29th day
of March, 1954.
E. B. LEATHKRMAN,
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: WM. W. STOCKING.
Deputy Clerk
BEN ESSEN
Attorney for Plaintiff
v: Beybold Building, Miami, Florida
4/2-9-16-23
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
A. ABBOTT AWNING & FLAG CO.
(NOT INC.), and BUILT-WELI.
AWNING CO. (NOT INC.). at 133 S'.W.
22nd Avenue, Intend to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of IJade County, Florida.
HERMAN SIEGENDORF
JOHN GLUCK
KESSLER A OARS
Attorneys for Applicants
17X2 W. Flagler St.
4/2-9-16-23
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLOR-
IDA. IN PROBATE. No. 32430-B
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
In Re: KSTATK OF
MIRAHAM RUBIN. Deceased.
TO ALL CREDITORS AND ALL
PERSONS HAVING claims or DE-
MANDS AGAINST SAID ESTATE:
You. and each of you. are hereby
notified and required to present any
claims and demands which you. or
either of you. may have against the
Estate of ABRAHAM RUBIN, De-
ceased, late of Suffolk County. Massa-
chusetts, to the Hon. County Judges
of Dade County, Florida, and file the
same In their offices in the Dade
County Courthouse, Miami. Florida,
within eight (S) calendar months from
the date of the first publication here-
of. Said cfciims or demands to con-
tain the legal address of the claimant
and- to-be sworn to and presented u
aforesaid, or same will be barred. See
Section 120 of the 1833 Prolwta Act.
Dated this "th day of Aprl1.19.ri.
GEORGE J. TALIANOr*F-.
As Ancillary HKerulor of the
Last Will and Testament of
ABRAHAM Rl'HfN. Deceased
GEORGE J. TAI.lANoFF. ESQ.
120 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, Fla.
4/16.23-10 &/7_______________
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES' COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA. IN PROBATE, No.-32441 B
In Re: ESTATE OF
ROSF. SNYDKR. Deceased
To All Creditors and All Persons 11-v-
Ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You, and each of you, are hereby
notified and required to present any
claims and demands which you. or
either of you, may have against the
estate of ROSK SNYI>RR, dec.-a i
late of Lucas County. Ohio, and Dade
County, Florida, to the Honorable
County Judges of Dade County, a-'d
file the same In their offices in tha
County Courthouse In Dade County-
Florida, within eight calendar month*
from the date of the first publicat: >n
hereof. Said claims or demands to
contain the legal address of the cud
ant and to be sworn to and present, d
as aforesaid, or same will be barred.
Date March 20, A.D. 1954.
HENRY M. CAIN.
As Ancillary Administrator
C.T.A. of the Estate of I
ROSE SNYDER, Deceased.
HENRY M. CAIN '
Attorney for Estate of Rose Snyder
251S W. Flagler St., Miami, Fla.
4/2-9-16-23
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN thit
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name <-(
GULP HOTEL at 1815 5th Stret,
Miami Beach, Florida Intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk at t'.e
Circuit Court of Dade County, PlorUa,
JEROME G. LANGER
4/9-16-23-30
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IK HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage li
business under the fictitious name of
ROOSUVBLT HOSPITAL LABORA-
TORY, at 5625 N.E. Second Ave., Mi-
ami. Florida, intends to register sa'd
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
HAROLD GEORGE SHAPIRO,
(Sole Owner)
HENRY M. CAIN
Attorney for Applicant
2518 W. FTagler St., Miami. Fla.
3/26 4/2-9-16_______________________|
NOTICE UNOER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HF:RF:BY GIVEN that
he undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name f
AUTOMATIC MAYTAG LAUNDRY.
at 5500-02-04 N.W. 2nd Avenue, -V.
anil, Florida, Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the cln t
Court of Dade County. Florida.
SAMIEL C. KAIIX
SIDNEY EFRONSON
Attorney for Samuel C. Kahn
7"2 Hiscayne Building, Miami, Florida
4/1S-23-30 5/7
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
REGIL MOTORS, at 1500 N W 7th
Avenue, Miami. Florida, intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
>lhe Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida. poRSIN MOToRS, INC.
d/b/a Regil Motorsi _
Bv: MICHAEL SOSSIN,
'Secy.-Treas.
GBR8HON s. miller
Attorney for Applicant
4!0 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach. Fla.
4 m-23-SO 5/7_______________________
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW .
-NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
CASH REGISTER RALES a BERN
ICE i't KM North .Miami Avenu, Mi-
ami. Florida. Intend to register said
name with the Clerk of tbo Oreull
Court of Dad*'County. Florida.
ABRAHAM St'SSMAN. 'A Interest
LEWIS LANDY. ', Intereet
THOMAS' RYAN, M Interest
ISRAEL ABRAMS
Attorney for Cash Register Sales
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES' COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE, No. 29858-B
In Re: ESTATE OF'
SAM PRANK, Dec-cased
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You. and each of you, are hereby
notified and required t. present any
claims and demands which you, or
either Of you. may have against tin-
estate of SAM PRANK, deceased late
of New York County, New York, to
the Honorable County Judges of I>ade
County, and file the same in their
offices In the County Courthouse in
Dade County. Florida, within eight
calendar months from the date of the
first publication hereof. Said claims
or demands to contain the legal ad-
dress of the claimant and to be sworn
to and presented as aforesaid, or same
will be barred.
Date March l!>. AD. 19M
/s/ LAWRENCE J FRANK,
As Ancillary Administrator
("(A of the Estate of
SAM FRANK, deceased
MYERS, HEIMAN A- KAPLAN
Attorneys for Ancillary
Administrator CTA
1/26 4/2-9-16
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS 1IEREHY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
pmillDA REALTY A BUSINESS
BROKERS, at 235 W. Ptafler St.. In-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida. .. _
MAURICE SUSSMAN
KESSLER GARS
Attorneys fbr Applicant
17*2 W. Flagler St.
J/26 4/2-9-16 ______
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
notice is hereby given that'
the undersigned, desiring to engage la
business under the fictitious name '<
QUINDSLA BAR, at 235 N.W
Ave., intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
WALTER ZELLER, Owner ,
KESSLF3R & GARS
Attorneys for Applicant
1782 W. Flagler St. ,
4/16-29-30 6/7
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE CODNTY.
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE, No. 32435 B
In Re: ESTATE OF
PHILIP SHLACKMAN. Decease!
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persona II i-
ing Claims or Demands Against S:i
l-.'st :ite:
You. and each of you, are hereby
notified and required to present any
claims and demands which you, or
either of vou. mav have against the
estate of PHILIP SHLACKMAN, de-
ceased late of Dade County. Florida,
to the Hon. County Judges of Dadi
County, and file the same In the!:'
office ill the County Courthouse In
Dad.- County. Florida, within eight
calendar months from the date of
the first publication hereof,
claims or demands to contain the leglil
address of the claimant and to be
sworn to and presented as afon
or same will be barred. See Section
IN of the 1933 Probate Act.
Date March 22. A.D. 1954.
/s/ MORRIS SHLACKMAN.
As Administrator of the
Estate of
PHILIP SHLACKMAN.
Deceased,
/s/ MAX R. SILVER
Attorney for Administrator
3/26 4/J-9-16
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
vJenisti ncrSdSoHn
solicits your ! Wt> appreciate your
patronage and cjuaranWe
accurate service at legal
rates .
Phone 2-4366
for messenger service
ATTENTION ATTORNEYS!
CORPORATION OVTFITS
Lowest Prices Quickest Delivery
in South Florida
Call the JEWISH FLORIDIAN at
2-43G6


PAGE 16 B
ywrtflflli
FRIDAY.
Sherwin Levine to Assist Rabbi Ranson
In Community-Wide Seder at Hollywood
Sherwin Levine, Miami Beach
cantor, will participate with Rabbi
Marius Ranson in the community-
wide Passover Seder at the Holly-
wood Beach Hotel on Saturday.
April 17th, 6:30 p.m. Held under
the auspices of Temple Emanu-El,
of Ft. Lauderdale, this will be the
sixth annual Seder attended by
Jewish residents of Broward and
Dade Counties.
A resident of Miami Beach for
only a few months. Cantor Levine.
who is not quite 30 years old, is a
graduate of the Eastman School of
Music in Rochester, studied at the,
Julliard School of Music in New
York and in Rochester served as
cantor under Rabbi Philip Bern
stein. He also conducted his own
tc!ov:sion program and later played
leading roles in operas at the East-
man Theater of Music.
Moving to New York, he served
as cantor for leading Jewish Tern-;
pies in New York and toured the
country in concert roles.
Dr. Julius A. Greenhouse, of 1741
Cleveland rd.. Miami Beach, is co-
chairman of the Miami area for
this Seder, serving with Mr- M.ir
ius Ranson. of Ft. Lauderdale. and
Mrs H. C, Schlafer. of Hollywood.
Serving with Dr. Greenhouse are
Mrs Albert Fishbein and Mrs
Samuel Gluckman. both of Miami
Beach, and Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Keller, of North Miami.
Sherwin Irvine
Composer's Sonps
To be Published
Ada Greenfield, of 8874 Carlyle
ave.. has returned from an extend-
ed stay in New York, with two new
songs accepted for publication and
to be released soon.
Publishing under the name of
Ada Greenfield Morley. she wrote
the lyrics for the two songs, as1
will as to a number of songs al-1
ready published.
The new compositions are en-
titled 'Softly." with mu>ic written
by her daughter Janice, and "The
Legend of the Goldfish." a chil-
dren's song to be published as a
choral, with music composed by
Miami's Olive Dungan. who wrote
two other songs in collaboration
with her.
One of these songs. "When in My
Heart." was recently >,ung by Met- i
ropolitan opera star Roberta Peters
on a cross country personal con-
cert tour.
\Ut. Workshop
thw Tuesday
Miami Beach Chapter of B'nai
B'rith presented an anti-Defama
tion League Workshop at the home
of Mrs. David Alper. president.
1715 Calais dr.. Normandy Isle, on
Tuesday.
A round table panel discussion
included such topics as "The Mc
Carran Immigration Act." Resort
lh-crimination" and "How to Make
Democracy Work in Your Commu-
nity."
Gilbert Balkin. director of the
Florida Regional Office. Anti-De-
famation League, j- present to
answer relevant questions.
Chairman and moderator was
Mrs. Aaron Barron. Panelists were
Mr- Al*' Swartz. Mrs. Ida Optner.
Mrs Leo Rubin and Mrs. Ida Gold-
man.
I Florida Author Night
Presents Music
By Local Composers
Florida Author Night of April
15th at the Miami Public Library
featured Miami composers.
The music of Olive Dungan and
Major Bob Crawford was played
Olive Dungan's composition* have
been sung by Lauritz Mclchlor.
H Gladys Swarthout and Rose Bamp-
'fon. Major Crawford is the com-
poser of the famous Arjny Air
(Vrps song.
Other artists on the program
I were Hilda Ares, soprano; Betty
Booth, alto; Richard Bullman, bari-
tone; Dorothy Arms, men-soprano;
Jack Miller, tenor; Melanie Kul-
hanjian, lyric-soprano; Warner
Harman and Betty Haseltine. pian-
1-!-
Chairman of the- evening was La-
rry Coe, president of the Miami
Music Teachers' Association.
1 Tiny Tot Seder Set noo.,, n ,
Tiny tot Seder was presented by X"^ "nd n -
nursery school children of the the adul" rtP*"11"* *
three Greater Miami Jewish Com-! story and hn*?'SS* munity Center schools on Friday I day '**,
you KNOW
HIS RECORD
Elect
V
FLOYD
CIRCUIT JUDGE
COMMITTEE TO lltCT IOIEIT I. ElOVD CilCJU
JUDGE. 1
T.V. SERVICE
No Charge For Call
Night*. Sunday*. Holidays
fmvuTial T V. Phoni -T
IMMEl'IA IK TV BEKVICE
DAILY, Si NDAYS. HOLIDAYS
10 AM. to 11 )' M
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for NEW
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"PHYLLIS THE FILTER GIRL"
82-8038
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Exchange
ON U. S. ROYALS
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IXCHANGI R(FtS TO ICAPASU
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1454 Alton Rood
MIAMj
4900 N.W. 2nd A*.


BARNES
Cast Stone Shop
SI STONEWORK TO ORMR
NTflS GRILLIS PLAQUES
ler* PititM H Mmrtth
262 N.W. 54* 6TRIIT
MIAMI
Phses 7-0114
SEASON'S
GREETINGS
Styles
ItT Garden
il N. W. 1st COURT
GREETINGS
y
C. H. LYNE
Foundry and Machine
Company
(not inc.)
Established 1*04
05-109 N. W. Fifth Street
Phone 3-6481
GREETINGS TO ALL
Ho riila Gas
Corporation
?SERVICE
MIAMI
BAGEL
BAKERY
Telephone 2-2498
1938 N.W. 17th AVENUE
^flAMI 35. FLORIDA
ANOTHER MOSES NEEDED
PASSOVER
GREETINGS
FOUR WAY
NURSERY
2313 N.W. 36th Street
PHONE 64-4412
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS
AND PATRONS
GREETINGS
PARK'S MEN'S SHOP
221 E. Flagler Street
PHONE 9-2291
A Happy Passover To All
Fithian Studios
Distinguished Private School
Dancing Drama
Radio Speech
323 W. 47th STREET
MIAMI BEACH
BEST WISHES FOR A
A HAPPY HOLIDAY
FLORIDA FUEL OIL
INC.
830 N.W. 73rd Street
Phone 89-1661
Best Wishes To All
Gino Hair Stylist
1057 WASHINGTON AVE.
Miami Beach Phone 58-4478
A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY
TOHNNIE & MACK
BODY SHOP
"By the Railroad Track"
PaintingColor Matching
SEAT COVERS
Body and Fender Repairs
74 N. E. 20th Street
PHONE 9-4043
To All Greetings
WESTERN MEAT CO
P^N.W.7mV5?.LESALE-HOME"'
INC.
Miami
VISIT OUR COMPLETE TOY BHARTMENT
ARMY-NAVY STORES
VETERA,J| IDI'PLOI OUTLET
F""L MAIL OHDEW: ANr... alt mail erdsc t. 1*14 SleiayM !**
1214 "WCAYNK BLVD. Phone Mill
**1 *W. 7th AVK. (Edison Cental) PI -
KlIfG MIDAS STORE fHiataah) Phen* 5M3
M$ S.W. |,h ST. fTamUml Trail) Phone IT-MM
TO ALL .
GREETINGS
G. C STEMBUR, INC.
GENERAL INSURANCE
BONDS
226 Shorelond Building
I
W. C "Bill"
LANTAFF
Your Cuugreeemon
TO ALL JEWISH CITIZENS ..
PASSOVER GREETINGS
WALKER CASKET COMPANY
286 N.E. 67th Street Phone 78-8715
GREETINGS
Your Local Ford Dealer
HUSKAMP MOTOR CO.
4565 PONCE DE LEON BLVD.
CORAL GABLES
PHONE 67-5676


PAGE 2 C
*in*i**ncrkm*r)-
A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY TO ALL
Miami Beach Checker Cabs, Inc.
24-Hour Service
U-DRIVE IT CARS PHONE 5-3411
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER
HECTOR SUPPLY CO.
BranchesHomestead. West Palm Beach. Belle Glade
FL Pierce
EVERYTHING FOR THE GARDENLAWNSFARMS
ATWILL and COMPANY
Not Inc.
Investment Securities
605 Lincoln Rd. Miami Beach. Fla.
Firtt National Bank Bldg. Miami Fla.
Ph. 5-5816
Ph. 82-2636
"THE CORNED BEEF KING"
Charlie** Air Conditioned
MARKET VIEW RESTAURANT
CHARLES FRIEDMAN. Proprietor
Phone 82-9181
2195 N. W. 12th Avenue Miami. Florida
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
dri-jfas
COMPANY INC.
1829 N.E. SECOND AVENUE
MIAMI 32. FLORIDA
A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL
MARTINIQUE HOTEL
6423 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach
GREETINGS
ALL FLORIDA SURETY COMPANY
409 BISCAYNE BUILDING
MIAMI 32. FLORIDA
SERVICE
QUALITY
GOOD WILL
Celebration of Passover
Throughout the A
By HARRY CUSMING
JTA
Passover, one of the oldest forms
of religious observance, has been
a holiday for some 3.500 years. It
began in the hoary dim past as a
festival of physical freedom a
sort of crude and primitive rite
intended to free men each year
from the devastations of nature. It
later developed into a holiday dedi-
cated to social freedom, commem-
orating the liberation of the Israel-
ites from slavery' and finally be-
coming a festival of human free-
dom, celebrating the principles of
liberty itself, of which the libera-
tion is but a symbol.
Modern archaelogiral evidence
makes it possible for us to accept
the theory that the Passover ob-
servance began as a family celebra-
tion by the Hebrew shepherds long
before the Exodus from Egypt. The
festival is believed to have been a
popular Spring holiday when mem-
bers of every family sacrificed a
lamb at full moon.
It was after the Exodus from
Egypt, when the Hebrews won
their freedom from the oppressing
Egyptians, that the festival assum-
ed new historical meaning. Pass-
over was not always observed as
it is today. In the early days of
Hebrew history it was marked by
a primitive rite centered about the
sacrifice of the Paschal Iamb and
unleavened bread.
A marked transition in the ob-
servance of Passover occurred after
the destruction of the Second Tem-
ple. During the days of the First
and Second Temples, thousands of
pilgrims would crowd into Jerusa-
lem. Every inn was filled, and
many private homes opened their
doors to the farmers, herdsmen and
craftsmen who came from all parts
of the land. Those who could not
find shelter in homes and inns set
up tents in the public squares of
Jerusalem, or in the outskirts of
the city.
E*ry Corner cf World
Durini the days of the Second
Temple, these pilgrims did not
come only from the villages and
towns of Palestine but from every
corner of the then known world.
Dressed in multi-colored and var-
ied costumes, the pilgrims spoke
many languages and dialects repre-
senting the varied cultures of
Egypt. Babylonia, Greece, Rome
and other lands.
It was after the destruction of
the Second Temple, when the He-
brew sacrificial cult came to an
end, that Passover began to as-
sume the role of the great family
home festival. Because the sys-
tem of sacrifices had been halted,
it might have been assumed that
Passover, the main feature of
which was the Paschal offering
would disappear.
Instead of declining, Passover at-
tained a still greater importance
on the Jewish calendar. Remem-
bered historically as the anniver-
9e$
H" Ifv IkfaV aaaaalaaH^fflH

i 1
Portrait of a Yemenite woman in Israel painted by.
arti*t Notu Koslowsky. Once head of a wealthy h
in Aden, she will sit at her Passover table in Israel
"GLASS FOR EVERY PURPOSE"
Distributors Libbey. Owens. Ford Glass Co. It Insulux Gla. RWk
1601-1619 N.W. 7th Ave.. Miami N. Florida Phon. ISn
MIAMI 36. FLORIDA
sary of the deliverance from Egyp-
tian servitude, it became the sym-
bol of freedom and liberty for
generations to come.
While the traditional cerem6nial
of Passover in the desert and later
in Palestine was the Paschal sacri-
fice, the Seder home ritual became
the mode of observance. Of course,
the early beginnings of the Seder
were also noted during the days of
the Second Temple. (The soalled
Last Supper of Jesus is a striking
example or the earlier forms of the
Seder ritual).
The name "sf|r for the Pass
over home ritual was very well
chosen. ITie term means order, ar-
rangement or program, and is
descriptive of the various rites and
rituals which go into making up
the accepted traditional Passover
eve ritual. It may be mentioned in
passing that the Siddur, the daily
prayer book has a much longer
name, "Siddur Shel T'filot," the
order of the prayers. The popular-
ity of the Jewish prayer book hod
resulted in cutting down the title
to one wordSiddar, .meaning or
der or arrangement,
The Seder wooM have no mean-
ing or character without the popu-
lar little text used during the rit-
ualthe Haggadah. The Haggadah
is a tiny anthology of prayers, le-
gends and commentary on the sig-
nificance of Passover in the birth,
growth and destiay of the Jewish
people. Much of the Haggadah text
was written some 18 or 19 eent-
m
uries ago. and the compK
goes back a little less taa
sand years. If one is to I
the newer Haggadot of I
groups within the
there are some-texts
created within the past I
are becoming very
many Jews in the Unitefl
Seder Ritual Snail
The development of (
ritual did become
the centuries. Howenr.1
been and these contiaatj
tain Jewi-hcoasswaitieil
served the rite with mas
tion from the establa
The Marranos, the sa
Spain and Portugal, i
Passover rite which _
to the Paschal obsemisj
cient times than to tit]
of celebration. The
no direct contact wilhj
Since they had no U
i books, they dependedl
the Latin translation all
They based their ioaf|
cepts of Judaism on
edition of the BibleJ
that many changes
place in the manner i
and ritual.
In trying to live is
knew nothing about II
ment of Judaism
uries, but sought to
primitive mode of HeW"
among the Israelites J
of the prophets and PT
Contirwedon PM'
TO OUR MANY PATRONS AND FRIENDS
GREETINGS
V. JL HOECHERL COMPANY
PAINTERS AND DECORATORS
20 N.E. 29th STREET PHONE 3-0621
U fa. ,*,. jrmitk Cimmumltr the
steads Ms Wishes He e Nappy
ASSOVft HOLIDAY
Mount Nebo
THE CEMETERY OF DISTINCTION
FOR DISCRIMINATING FAMILIES
5505 N.W. 3rd Street Phone 87-W01


I APRIL 16, 1954
'JewlstifhrMlar;
PAGE 3 C
C Plays Host at a Sed
er
, M0SES A. LEAVITT
JTA
L Shcmer this year, the
fjstribution Committee will
Bt at (he Seder table _o
to 1.000 men and women,
. of whom those around
* the only "family" left to
[ will be a memorable occa-
| be memorable not because
_i first time JDC has been
st at Passover, for many
have encountered JDC's
Ijty in other lands in
in Moslem countries,
hmong them are men and
I who reached the goal of
.earnsIsraelmonths and
to, and who have since that
und themselves relegated
_| of shadow life in the re-
[oenter of Pardess Hannah.
I life because there were
or families to sustain
I the Jewish State," and be-
Iother living facilities were
tto them elsewhere.
I this Passover, at the Vil-
1 the Aged at Ein Shemer,
[ at last found a "family"
faoly Landthe family of
for Malben, the JDC pro-
behalf of aged, ill and
pped newcomers to Israel,
ast been able to expand its
B, has at last begun to make
ps in a program of aid to the
hich will eventually see all
2,700 men and women of the
Hannah reception center
ed to the hospitals, cus-
Icare centers and old-age
|which are a part of Malben's
of more than 90 institu-
proughout the Holy Land.
will their happiness be
ppiness of this Seder, of a
[come true, but it will be a
less multiplied because this
Seder will be a token and a har-
binger of other and happier Seders
yet to come.
Since the end of World War II,
JDC has spent $3,100,000 for spe-
cial Passover appropriations. With
this sum it has sent nearly 20,000,-
006 pounds of matzolh, matzoh
meal, shmurah flour, wine and
other Passover supplies to needy
men, women and children in more
than 20 countries. And this aid-
aid provided chiefly by American
Jews through the United Jewish
Appealwhich for hundreds of
thousands has been a symbol of as-
sistance in the fight against hope-
lessness and despair, means reas-
surance once again this year that
the needy and the helpless have
not been forgotten.
Those seated at the Seder table
in Ein Shemer are rich with a
sense of kinship not only for
those upon whose aid they depend,
but for the hundreds and thousands
of others seated at the same mo-
ment at other JDC Seder tables. A
kinship for those celebrating Se-
ders in all of the 93 Malben institu-
tions in Israel, in the other old-age
homes, in the hospitals, custodial
care centers, the sanitaria, as well
as for those newcomers who have
been able to establish their own
homes because of the assistance
they received from Malben shel-
tered workshops or rehabilitation
loans.
In Moslem lands, too, there will
be others of the great JDC "family"
breaking the unleavened bread. In
Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria and Iran,
JDC's assistance represents only a
small part of the aid which the
agency has undertaken to provide
this year to 100,000 men, women
and children in combatting malnu-
trition and disease. In the ghettos
of dozens of North African cities
and towns, in isloated hinterland
villages, JDC aid has never ceased
to be regarded as something of a
miracle. JDC food and medical care
have brought life to thousands of
youngsters who would otherwise
have died; JDC anti-trachoma cen-
ters have saved other tens of thou-
sans from blindness; JDC educa-
tional and vocational training as-
sistance has made it possible for
them to dream of a useful and
fruitful life as free men. But more
than that, JDC assistance, even the
least of it, has been that concrete
sign of reassurance and faith which
was equally essential for their con-
tinued survival.
Many there are who have been
JDC's guests in other years, and
who no longer need this aid. But
of the 165,000 men, women and
children whom JDC must aid dur-
ing 1954 there are thousands for
whom there would be no Passover
without JDC. An orphan in a chil-
dren's home in France, a 16-year-
old mother in a mellah of Casa-
blanca, a youth suffering from TB
in a hospital in Israel who can put
dimly remember anything of life
except concentration camps and
medical institutions. For all of
them, and the others, JDC's aid this
Passover is sustenance not for the
body alone, but for the soul.
However, though they may be
the last survivors of once large
famiies, though husbands, wives,
children and parents may have
been stolen from them by the pass-
age of the years, by Nazi brutality,
by hunger or disease, they are to-
day a part of a world-wide "family"
made up not only of those in need
but also those whothrough JDC
have joined to meet this need.
KEN ROBERTsTlFT SHOP
CHINA GIFTS
Distinctive Imported and Domestic Pieces
68 MIRACLE MILE
Phone 83-2698
22-year-old Julia Shilai (left) smiles even though she needs a wheelchair to get around,
en, having brought her to her first Passover in Israel, will guard her future, as well,
are little Chana-Gitta and her father, part of a JDC transport of TB victims and their
from Germany to Sweden._____________'___________________
ClffllKCS
' -* ee the MOST UAUTIfUL (flmminf K~m) and tkt MMfST
Ntfro Dining Room ami assembly Hall in # Savth
CAN SEAT 700 OUR 10UN0E NEWLY DECORATED
Mary Elizabeth Hotel
i_ ?42 NW- 2nd AVENUE. MIAMI. FLORIDA
[ J Ave., Miomi, Fie. "H,ar, Owe*. ami 0*w-*-" M1M
WESLEY E. GARRISON, INC.
REAL ESTATE
6th STRffT
Bulldfe**
2701 N.W. 6th
(Palatxr
PHONE 85-2574
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER
Edwards produce co.
N.W. 22nd Street Ph. 2-60
Greetings
MARVIN'S
BARBER SHOP
(Flamingo Village)
Hours: 8:30 a_n. to 6 p.m.
Saturday: 8:30 a_n. to 7 pan.
9455 N.W. 17th AVENUE
(Formerly on Flagler Street)
U All ... A Haaay Haliiay
Marcel Flowr Sh*p
A C4mfUTI HOMAL SUtKt
Art with thwart
TlUsfct" 51 5323
101 5 41st St. -t MrMie Ave.
Miami keck. Urn.
A HAPPY
PASSOVER
MURPHY 1 MILLS
Corporation """"I
PIT ROCK3-4 ROCKSCREENINGS fffl
FILLPEA ROCK MASON SAND
2601 N. W. 75th Street Phone 89-2521
GREETINGS TO ALL
ENNESS GARMENT CO. INC.
Fashion Mart Bldg.. 127 N. W. 2nd St
-*-lCH-_-
IOALLA MOST HAPPY PASSOVER
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Open Every Day from 11:30 a.m. till 9 p.m. Open All Summer
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TO ALL ... THE SEASON'S BEST WISHES
STYLECRAFT BAG MFGS.
Indies Handbags by
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31 N. E. 17th STREET
GREETINGS
RHODES, INC.
400 N. MIAMI AVENUE
A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER
_*
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SAME LOCATION
G. D. MARPLE ELECTRIC CO.
APPLIANCES REPAIRS
124 So. Miami Avenue Phone 2-5467
HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL
Hurst Drillin^ A Equipinont Co.
SALES AND SERVICE 9-4776
1429 N.W. 7th Avenue Miami. Florida
TO ALL
A HAPPY PASSOVER
MIAMI TRANSIT CO.


PAGE 4 C
+Jewish HcrkMairi
I!!2AY. APR*
111
TOALLA MOST HAPPY PASSOVER
DR. RICHARD SENA
CORAL GABLES HOSPITAL
3151 COCONUT GROVE DRIVE
CORAL GABLES
A Most Happy Passovtr To All
Wont You
Uav-a-Tampa
Cigar?
"They're Better"
Eli Witt Cigar and Tobacco Company
73 N.W. Eighth Street Phone 2-8185

TO ALL A MOST
HAPPY PASSOVER
FLORIDA PROCESSING CO.
JOSEPH COHEN. WILLIAM RUBIN and WILLIAM KLINE
27th STREET
HIALEAH
COMPUTE NURSING CARf
Eastview Nursing Home
1216 S.W. 2nd AVI., MIAMI
PHONE 7382
New, Modern Equipment Attractive Surroundings Kindly, Courteous,
Intelligent Care Registered Nurse Varied, Interesting, Well-Airy,
Comfortable, Homey Atmosphere Moderate Rotes ibexcclled Service.
CONVAltSClNTS, INVALIDS, CHRONIC CAM, ffc.
MIA.Ml REAL ESTATE AGENCY
1034 duPont Building Phone 2-4033
MORE POPULAR EVERY DAY
SOUTHERN
BREAD AND CAKE
COLUMBIA BAKING COMPANY
FOR SERVICE CALL 2-5117
TO OUR MANY FRIENDS AND PATRONS
A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER
MARIO HAIRDRESSER
Hair Stylist
537 LINCOLN ROAD Phone 5-3481
MIAMI BEACH
Dr. Albert Einstein and the
Universe on His 75th Birthday
By A. W. AUSTRO
"I cannot believe that God plays
dice with the cosmos," Proi
Einstein told an expectant world
abcut a year ago when, summing up
his latest theory, he expressed the
hope that eventually the laws
would be found to prove that the
Universe is governed by cause and
effect, ruled by immutable laws
under which individual events are
predictable. When Kinstein re-
leased his new formula under-
standable only to i.small number | '^nte'iiz*! Matteli' as' "a horse
of scion;.- for sing.# harness, not cutout for
tandem or teamwork." frequently
abandoned his scientific Sinai for
a while to lend his prestige to the
among the Jews capahl
and h'cauc he trowh'JSl
the injuM.ce on the ll"'
world a. large ,,,
that is constantly and unrla,
under attack-his oT2 I
this instance. Years befJSl
of Nazism.
the papers shouted. "New Einstein
Theory Unifies Basic Concept of
Universe." while the photographers
moved in on the Sage of Prince-
ton, begging. "A nice big smile,
Herr Professor ."
Throughout his life, Einstein be-
lieved that the universe could be
covered with one great theory' Had
he. on the eve of his seventy-fourth
birthday, di-covered the laws re-
ducing the physical universe in its
totality to a few simple fundamen-
tal concepts that unify all its os-
tensibly unrelated manifestations
two movements that are close to
his heart, namely, Zionism and
Pacifism.
While deeply Impressed by the
ethical values of the Old Testa-
ment, Einstein has little, if any-
thing, in common with Jewish or-
thodoxy. If he felt that Zionism
was aggressive or narrow-minded,
he would not have sponsored it, as
he has been doing for three dec-
r-ir,stein notv, ,
deep pam how the againvt Jews in many
universities prevented *a
ed youth from embarkinti.
academic career. "
Hebrew
Realia^J
Mich sights.. While most German
children draasnt of marching in
1 !me parades as adults, Albert told
his parents: "When 1 grow up. I
don't want to be one of those poor
people."
Einstein, who changed his citi-
zenship several times, and has
been a citizen of the I'nited States
for two decades, 'never cared for
any kind of aggressive nationalism.
nor was he ever a member of a
political party. On the other hand.
this solitary thinker, who once
University hT,
the pet idea of Chaim *'
would enable many thw*
ish professors and studmta
velop their abilities as fn*(
Einstein gladly accepts'
mann's invitation to tour t.
ed States to help raise la
the establishment of the |
sity. He has been a
the University's Board oil
nors since its establishn_
its Institute of Physics Is I
after him. At the opena,,
Palestine Pavilion at the Set
World's Fair. Einstein
to deliver th? main adi
though he were the official I
Zionism not to hit liking. 'he' would j sador of Eretl Israfl
not hesitate to object to them. | Einstein discovered the I
But why did Einstein, known as' hl8 pa^lsm m,his "*]
a foe of nationalism, espouse Zi-, ness Thl~ Pacifism, hurt (
onism? -Because he sees in Zion- "deepest antipathy to everjl
ism the only active movement' Continued on Pa* 14Cj
;(
, I ades or longer, and whenever he
into one all-embracing ****** ; no,iced tendencies and trends in
Re had not. And. like Moses, he
may. perhaps, not enter the Prom-
ised Land, though he himself has
taken us very' close to the Realm
of Truth.
This year, on the fourteenth of
March. Einstein quietly celebrated
his seventy fifth birthday in his
old fashioned-frame house on Mer-
cer Street, protected hy his secre-
tary from countless would-be-in-
truders. He does not wish to add
honors to those bestowed upon him
and they are myriads. To give
an example, he* has been accorded
an honor never before bestowed
upon any living scientist: his gen-
tle face is enshrined on the facade
of a house of worship. New York's
Riverside Church, over whose en-
trance are the sculptured images
of immortal leaders of humanity.
Last year, the projected College
of Medicine tit New York's Yesh-
ivah University was named for him
But when, after the death of Weh
mann. Prime Minister Ben-Gurion
asked the scientist whether he
would like to be nominated for the
Presidency of Israel. Einstein po-
litely turned down the offer: "I
have never in my life undertaken
task that I could not fulfill to
the satisfaction of my conscience."
His conscience has always been
his best guide, and from his very
beginnings he has always been a
"conscientious objector." Even as
a child he heartily disliked mili-
tarism. Though born and raised
in Bismarck's sabre-rattling Ger-
many, he differed from other Ger-
man youngsters in that they en-
thusiastically watched the glamor-
ous parades of the German army
while he, Albert, used to cry at

^ F -**1^ ^"^ M
JkPt' t| 'afBsr '
ji laaw '

/j
-.mm
Newt*"]
Dr. Einstein plays hoet at his home in Princeton, iw
to the late Dr. Chaim Weizmann. first President ot w
the occasion of the latter'* last trip to the United\m
States.
GREETINGS TO ALL
MIAMI PLUMBING
SUPPLY CO.
21S6 M. w. 27th Avenue
MIAMI. FLORIDA
S. Halperin Phone 64-2221
A
LARGE
VARIETY
OF ENTREES
TO CHOOSE FROM
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50 West Flagler Street
CORAL WAY
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Phono 4 1345 249 Coral War
Try Our Fimom Whipped Cream Pie* 2Sc
TYLER'S
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Opt- lam.
rpT- PARKING AiR CONDITIC I.
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
! Por Many Jewuh Friends
^nd Patrons .
LARRY MARKS & CO.
120 N. W. 2nd Street
For Better Health Visit fie
Miami Health Institute
General Diagnosis and X-Ray
Physics'! Therapy Body
Conditioning Colonic
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7235 Biscayne Bonlevard
PHONE 7-7MS
PRECAST
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3044 S.W. 28th I**
PHONE 4-2503

* Bond
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Ly. APRIL 18. 1954
-_________+Jcni*t> tlrMi^r
PAGE 5C
iberty and Modes of Discipline
ICta
By I. M. GREEN
over might perhaps be called
st Fourth of July celebration
man history. But like the se-
Independence Day celebra-
ci America and other modern
r... this Jewish festival of free- j
uiven a deep religious sig-
in keeping with the Jew-;
of religious nationhood,
iberation from the bondage of
;ryptian Pharaohs was a liber-
granted by God Almighty,
fcm given fr a purposethe
: n of a kingdom of priests,
people" that would obey
commandments and serve as
iiel of conduct to the other na
tf the earth.
..> Paover imparts the les-
'.: [rei riom is a great, a noble
. provided it is used for great
r ible purposes. In our mod
. rlii that lesson has been so
and so tragically forgotten.
-.: the past centivy new na-
bave arisen in Europe and in
hich, having achieved their
om and independence, imme-
began to misuse their new-
1 liberty. A sovereign nation,
declared, has a right to do
hing it pleases, has a right to
te all human canons of justice
Decency in its relationship with
r nations, has the righteven
to serve its own selfish
even if that means violation
e rights of others, even if such
Ution causes untold suffering
misery to those who live under
fftrent flag and speak a differ-
anguage. Germany, Italy, Ja-
Hussia these are nations
:n recent times have misused
ireedom and independence
brought tragedy to millions of
.virtual- Today Egypt, the land
which Jews were freed in an-
tirm-v is misusing its freedom
rent I-rael-bound ships from
sitg the Suez Canal, in direct
Ion of its solemn internation
mat ion-.
so our contemporary world
turmoil, when it is not actual-
v-ar In the name of freedom
r ot some particular nation
he internal Working class/'
Bt are being enslaved. In thi"
of freedom Russia tella
d that the Germans and t
es have no right to free elec1
that Austria must remain
er an occupied country, and in
tome of freedom the Arab
Intrles would destroy the free-
cf the infant state of Israel.
Jfc* name of preserving free
ican institutions from the
r> of i immunism our Amer-
JcCarthys and Jenners would
W* liberals of freedom of ex-
fjjflfr. would abolish fundamen-
^Jftrn.u: principles of liberty
gve always been held sac-
re since the establishment of
ublic Its beginning to look
I topsy-turvy world Of dic-
pRMps flfscribed by George
U in his celebrated novel,
' in which black is called
ind slavery is called free-
MIAMI BEACH
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
1651 ALTON ROAD
Ufi. "T MIAMI BEACH DW t

._._.._
SOUTHERN TILE COMPANY
TILE MARBLE TERAZZO
2500 S.W. 28th Lane Phones 4-6037 83-8475

PttVI
. freedom is a great, a noble thing ." This Israeli fisher-
man makes a final check of his nets before going to sea in
search of food. He is free now, determining the limits of his
existence in the land of his fathers. His Great Return from
exile will highlight the meaning of Passover this year.
lit*
Passover holds the lesson for the
world that freedom in the long run
is worthless unless it is accom-
panied by self-discipline on the
part of individuals and nations, a
self-discipline that curbs selfish
instincts, that makes men aware of
their sense of duty and responsi-
bility toward their fellow-men and
that leads them to act in accord-
ance with that awareness. Passover
teaches us that the freedom of the
jungle, of dog-eat-dog, of "every
man for himself and the devil take
the hindmost," is not the kind of
life which human beings were
meant to lead under God. Only a
few weeks after Passover comes
the festival of Shavuoth which cele-
brates the giving of the LAW on
Mount Sinai while the Jews were
till wandering in the Egyptian de-
sert on their way .to iba Promised
Land Thus freedom from Egyp-
tian bondage becomes merged with
ideas of man's ethical responsi-
to which the Israelites
themselves when they ac-
tteigrah.
ftotfHfaca liberty and dis-
seeni contrary ideas, con-
trary ways -of life and conduct.
How can one be really free while
submitting to -a code of conduct
that often runs contrary to his per-
sonal instincts, desires, whims?
Only when one realizes that in Man
himself there is a conflict between
two kinds of freedom between his
lower and higher natures, between
his unconscious, animal-like de-
sires and his conscious human be
liefs. can JV conflict be resolved
through Hrissumption by Man
himself ew i Voluntary self-discip
line UutflMs from a strong so-
cial. relujipujTfaith in justice, kind
ness. humility that trinity of
ethical values which Judaism be-
queathed to the Western world
through the mouth of the prophet
Micahso that the higher freedom
may win out. Voluntary self-discip-
line assumes a freedom of choice
the choice whether one's lower or
higher instincts should be domi-
nant in one's personal conduct. It
restricts freedom only to the ex-
tent that it doesn't allow one's ani-
mal instincts to get out of hand
and damage irreparably one's high-
er inclinations.
Despite all the pagan, inhuman
ideas of what Man's relations to his
fellow-man should be, ideas that
have spread themselves like a
blight over the modern world,
there are still millions of people
everywhere who realize that only
by following these eternal truths of
Judaism can our civilization be
served from destruction. They are
aware that the unfreedom which is
known as dictatorship can only be
overcome by a freedom which is
based on individual and collective
self-discipline, on a ireedom which
is religious -because it frees Man's
nobler instincts while subduing his
baser ones.
Will this higher freedom prevail
in the world against that lower
form, the freedom of the jungle,
which in reality means only slavery
for human beings? Our mechan-
ized, machine-like world" of the
present which tends to disregard
Man's soul and to cater more and
more to his bodily comfortsbe-
cause thereby lies great material
profit and power for the fewhas
made the struggle for the re-edu-
cation of men more difficult. And
so religious teachers have now a
greater burden to bear than form-
erly when the breakdown of relig-
ious belief and practice was not as
complete. Yet, it is on the success
or failure of religious teaching that
the future of our civilization rests.
BEST WISHES FROM .
DWYER'S METAL SHOP
1329 N.W. 74th Street Phone 78-4551
HOTEL AND RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT REPAIRS
I
Sincere Wishes For
A
HAPPY
PASSOVER
Seven-Up Bottling Co.
of Miami Inc.
SHERMAN J. TOBIN
AND FAMILY
WHY PARK OUTDOORS?
Store your car In the only Bonded, Insured, Fireproof
Storage Garage at MIAMI INTERNATIONAL Airport
Free 24 hour Courtesy Car Service to and from
all PASSENGER Terminals.
INTERNATIONAL
PARKING GARAGE, INC.
4641 N.W. 36th STREET PHONE 88-1304
Opp. Eastern Air Lines
H. L. ROBERTSON
PLUMBING PHONE 83-2695
Heating and Gas Installations
"We Cover Greater Miami"
Miami, Florida
3148 S.W. 22nd Street
GREETINGS TO ALL
Cooper Motor Sales, Inc.
YOUR OLDSMOBILE DEALER
1607 PONCE DE LEON BOULEVARD. CORAL GABLES
I
PHONE 48-8704
THE KEYS ARE WAITING!
DRIVE OUR SPECIAL "ROCKET" SHOW CAR TODAY1
PASSOVER
GREETINGS
TO
ALL
OUR '
FRIENDS
.
MIAMI BEACH
BOAT SUPS, INC.
1928 PURDY AVENUE
Phone 5-5385


PAGE 6 C
+Jeist>norkMan
FRIDAY,
*H4|
To All Happy Passover
Emerson Service A Repairs
AUTHORIZED FACTORY SERVICE
Restaurant Equipment Reliable Experienced
3450 N. Miami Are. Phone 3-7270
to all ... wmwm
BURT CONSTRUCTION COMPANY
1225 N.W. 7th STREET
MIAMI, FLOKIDA
TO All SIASOHS MffTINCS
WHITE'S TRUCKING SERVICE, INC
2173 N.W. 12* AVENUE
PHONE 3-2211
TO ALL GREETINGS
SKINNER ORNAMENTAL IRON WORKS
1595 S.W. 8th STREET PHONE 82-2913
GREETINGS
MONSALVATGE & CO. of MIAMI. INC.
WHOLESALE CIGARS AND CANDIES
S8 S. W. First Street Phone 2-5156
JOII\ A. MOORE
AND
HSCAYIYE I \.l\l I m\. ro.
Blue Prints Photostats Drawing Materials
Pick-up and Delivery Service (Opposite the Courthouse)
47 N.W. FIRST STREET
Phone 3-3666
SINCERE WISHES FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER
EARNEST OVERSTREET
AND ASSOCIATES OF THE
COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR'S OFFICE
GREETINGS!!
DEE RIDINGS
Smith Hamilton Shop
GRINDING SERVICE
231 S.W. 8th STREET PHONE 3-25M
GREETINGS TO ALL
*
CONSTRUCTION PRODUCTS CORP.
HI IIMM\<- MATERIALS
JAL-WIN
STEEL WINDOWS STEEL BUCKS
ALUMINUM WINDOWS
Millwork Noils Steel Specialties
3501 N. MIAMI AVE.
*
Indemnification in G
By HERMANN WIENER
JTA
BONN For niah onto nine
years, the leaders of postwar Ger-
many have been pledging speedy
and adequate compensation to
tho-e whom the Nazi* robbed, jail-
ed and crippled, whom they drove
into exile, whose kin they mas-
! sacred and whose careers they cut
short. The immeasurable suffer
i ing inflicted upon Jews can never
! begin to be made good by cash, it
is true, but even a few thousand
marks of indemnification are of
substantial help in securing medi-
cal treatment, starting a new ca-
reer or rendering less onerous the
declining years of the elderly.
In examing the situation today,
one must guard against the prev-
alent confusion of individual in-
demnification which generally
signifies cash compensation from
public funds for loss of liberty,
health and property with either
restitution or reparations. Resti-
tution, which under Allied legisla-
tion and Allied supreme judicial
control is proceeding as well as
of Nazism may be from the IV^T f ^ *
it of view of equity and morals, f ?n,lsh c"ltt" lone
With regard to claims against
the Reich the pre 1945 German
state nothing whatever has been
done so far. In general, German
ieM cation is strong in all strata of the
population at all administrative
and Judicial echelons. No matter
how good the case of a Jewish vic-
tim
point
the outlook for a settlement is us-
ually quite bleak, at least for the
next year or two.
PsnSfOflS tor RSDwfS
Fortunately, one development of
the past nine months runs counter
to the general trend of bureau-
cratic obstructionism. This is par-
ticularly gratifying because the
benefits accrue to the devoted ser-
vants of Germany's erstwhile Jew-
ish community who, in the well
organized Jewish life that flour-
ished in Germany prior to Hitler's
advent, were assured of a pension
upon reaching retirement age.
At the height of the Nazi cata-
clysm, the German State abolished
all Jewish congregations and took
ermany
;"1" per year f0Mh( "
"s *Ww. rurrwt 2
not taken imo ^
To pre screen awSj
this measure U
Jewish Material Q.
Advisory Com
Sternstrasse, in
J3U,
can be expected, means the return I over ,heir as8ets- ta consequence.
to the original Jewish owner of I fven those few communities which a great boon to the elirjW
a ( hll'A hnnn VIA m-t nkllnllnJ aaa ~ Fill
ish communal work^
The CommitteeuaponaL
pletion of its task!^3
of checking some L
tions'and forwarding!
proper German autl
whom the decision
great majority ol i
already been
ones still can be fikd7
The Germans ban
more than one-third i
so far and hope to
complete the prograjjifl
of 1954. In the H ...
budget, the appronrutJ
item is $1.5 million, had
assumption that month]
w.ll run to the equhal
on the average.
This regular income k-1
identifiable possessions he can put
his (inuer on Houses and real es-
state are a good example, perhaps
a business that is still a going con-
cern, sometimes furniture or a
stamp collection.
The term reparations" refers to
certain obligations Germany has
assumed towards the state of Is-
rael, and to a lesser extent towards
the Jewish collectivity outside of
Israel, on the basis of the Luxem-
have been re-established in pres- folk who were chased I
entday West Germany, generally lands after giving their
with an impoverished membership
ranging from one-thirtieth to one-
hundredth of the pre-Hitler figure,
are in no position to discharge the
pension responsibilities of their
predecessors. The smaller commu-
nities, as well as those in the area
which used to be Eastern Germany,
have in effect ceased to exist
Thousands of former German
to the service of Judassf
they can look forward stjjf
ance to their monthly
What sort of people i
Typical are the 73-ye
bi and teacher from
makes his home in Great 1
blind like the rhasan
from a small town in East(
who is in an Israel instiM
These obliga- RaDbis and other congregational or like the wizened old gentle
bourg Agreement
tions are being honored in a man -I communal officials cantors.
ner that is reasonably satisfactory, teachers, kosher slaughterers, so-
Tha Carman Record LciaJ. WOrkers' "^t?- "dminis-
. I trative employees, field organizers
No such favorable account can, fled Germany while there was
be given with respect to the status | ve4 time> or in -*,,. cases wen.
of individual indemnification. In
the Luxembourg Agreement, West
Germany did undertake to improve
the legislation governing individual
indemnification, and a Federal Law
to that effect was put on the books.
In practice, however, it has so far
remained a dead letter. Many a
Nazi victim clearly entitled to in-
demnification is actually worse off
today that he was a year ago.
A story is making the rounds of
two Jews who consulted a special-
ist in nervous diseases. The first
complained that he was unable to
understand the Indemnification
Law as it applied to his case. For
him the doctor prescribed a mild
sedative. When the second patient
remarked that he, for his part, had
no trouble understanding the Law,
the physician put in a hurry call
for the paddy wagon.
The technical complexities of In-
liberated from Nazi camps in 1945.
Today, a large proportion of the
survivors are reduced to penury
and privation. Bearing this'' in
mind. West Germany undertook to
advance pension payments to those
who would have been entitled to
them in the normal coarse of
events, no matter whether their
former congregation was located
in West or East Germany, the. ob-
ligation to carry oat this program,
without awaiting the implementa-
tion of a comprehensive but slow-
mvin Indemnification Law, was
laid down in an annex to the Lux
emoourg Agreement that was sign-
ed in September of 1992 by the
German Federal Republic and the
Conference on Jewish Material
Claims Against Germany.
Half a year later, the German
Government issued .the necessary
directives. They pjxjwde that pay
demnification are indeed such that menu, computed retroactively to
it would fill a hefty tome just to
touch upon the highlights. Claims
against the former Reich do not
even fall within the purview of the
Federal Indemnification Law. Nor,
for practical purposes, do rabbin-
ical pensions and payments to sur-
vivors of Nazi medical experi-
ments.
October 1992. will amount to 89
percent of the last salary for the
Rabbi or communal official. 48 per-
cent for hit widow, 20 percent for
full orphans under the age of
eighteen and 12 percent for half-
orphans. Annual payments may
not exceed the equivalent of
$2,890. nor should they fall below
South Africa who served il
congregation as full-tine I
for 25 years. There is I
ed ex-cantor who found I
Colombia The former I
an East German orphaiufti
Israel, is pushing 90; the 1
a cantor from South
In England we find thej
mind has been disturbed i
parents were deported mil
in 1942, as well as the i
two growing children i
master husband was I
gen-Belsen and the ailiagl
of a gravedigger.
Victims of Ea
The small town tescheri
penniless in Frankfurt
months ago. or the oM!
passed away at the Mil
year, after more than > I
tury of service as bead I
Berlins Jewish Hospitali
ready drawing their
sions. but they remiii
many who. after they hat'
to survive Hitler, lived P
lives worrying where nW
rent was coming frosui
Some years ago.
General of the United l
proached Bonn with thej
that it do something"
sate the surviving
medical experuaenti
Nazi doctors As it *
first communicstioaf |
Cantinuad *5-
i
TO ALL GREETINGS
< AWTHO*. In*.
Store Planning Engineer*
1301 N.W. 7th AVENUE
MIAMI. FLORIDA
821671 82-1671
Hill Refrigerators and
Market Fixtures
Puaex-Hubbard Reach-in.
Bulznan Stool Shelving
Biro Power Saw.
24-HOUR SERVICE
SEASON'S BEST
Wlsi&iAtQ ALL
.>
1
SWEET INSURANCE AGENCY
SECURITY BUILDING
Phone 2-2675
in Ben W. SUverman and Miliord S. Pu*el
COPLAN PIPE & SUPPLY CO, l&
Pho*'
WhoWeal. Plumbing njrtur^.-)jli,i
3120 N. E. 2nd Ave.
. WhoU
Briggs Beauryware Plusnbing Fixtures


APftlL 16, 1954
* Jew!st Tier Minn
Mi
>#^.
PAGE 7 C

ft?'
^

**>;'j

oen celebrate the Festival of Freedom in hospitals, on board ship, in strange and famil-
ies overseas, and at installations here in the U.S., Jewish GIs and sick and wounded
as celebrate Passover. These scenes, which will be reenacted throughout the world this
vere made possible by the American Jewish community and its agency for serving the
Wonal, religious, morale and welfare needs of Jewish GIs and hospitalized veterans,
Tional Jewish Welfare Board.
Sed
St
er in Otrange rlaces
PI,
fl GEORGE PERRY
i you've never heard of it,
fr-3 in Greenland is just a
Island with a small group
located about 300 miles
i North Pole. For the few
Iservicemen I helicopter wvfi deliver a
of Passover supplies a few
fon the advent of. the Fes-
Liberation. which should
i bitterness of what will be
illest seder in the most
lv and frigid point in the
[tome 4.000 miles away in
\ts there will be another
I seder-this time for one
fin a Public Health Service
t. the leprosarium in Car-
uisiana, a very remote
pre on the Passover night a
lemng as a part-time chap-
Wujh the Commission on
IfiMplaincy of the National
j.WelUre Board will recite
5-questions with his lone
W.SUnley stein, who has
~\(#r more than ten years.
Q.Carville represent two
|*R>in of dedicated service
~s*le by JWB, which has
been conducting "Operation Pass-
over" for GIs since 1917. Almost
150.000 Jewish .servicemen, will as-
semble, for Passover, this year, and
scores.of mass seders will be staged
by Jewish chaplains and local
ArmedJ Services Committees in the
USjuyl ip. 49 countries, overseas..
JEneDj you w/^je greeting vpiu;
nevgmgfl. last Ne^Vear wifh L'Sho,
nah Toy,ah, JWB Passoyer.prepara-
tions were getting under way. Let's
look in at a typical Passover plan-
ning session held'last fall at JWB
headquarters. Let's examine the
map and study the little places
with the map tacks on them. In the
northerly posts ot the North East
Command the little flags show Ke-
flavik in Iceland, Narsarsuak and
Sondrestrom and Thule, in Green-
land, Goose Bay, Labrador, and St.
Johns, Newfoundland.
Don't look fr/r a' full-time Jewish
chaplain in those regions, for there
isn't one. Ttifcr* year, as in years
past, a Jewish chaplain from the
states will be, flown by the Air
Force to the area. He will make the
74)00 mile tour in a plce loaded
with JWB Passover supplies.
Roam over tile big map on the
wall, and there ire map, tacks show-
ing American Jews in Sidi Slimani,
Rabat, Nouasseur, Port Lyautey in
North Africa; Athens; Gibralter;
Trieste and Ismir. Turkey. No one
is overlooked at Passover and the
Jewish chaplain's magic carpet gets
to the remotest spots on the globe.
Take the chaplain in the Phi-
lippines, for example. Before the
holiday, he makes a six-Weeks tour
from Cavite to Subic Bay, gets out
to the coastguardsmen at the re-
mote stations in the interior and
then makes a flying trip to the
lonely fellows down in Karachi,
New Delhi and Calcutta, India, and
manages to include in his mission
Bangkok in Thailand, and Saigon,
French Indo-China.
No less doughty is the JWB-USO
worker in Panama, who makes a
10,000 mile swing around the Car-
ibbean getting into the hard to
find places in Cuba, Virgin Islands,
Puerto Rico and the British West
Indies, and for good measure stops
off at the US missions scattered
over Latin America.
Make the Passover Cook's tour
with me and visit (in spirit) your
son or your neighbor's4x>y in Otsu,
Continued en Page 13 C
WEB'S
W CO Inc.
P E. Flaalec Sire*
PHONE 3-2197
ttSPHCH
CO.
NE- 1st Avenue
./ c ..
DAN CHAPPELL
1004 Biscayne Building
A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER
Henry E.
Mangels Company
Wholesalers
0
tUtlUnMbehM
36o0 N.W. 58th St., Ph. 65-1391
A HAPPY PASSOVER
WEEK TO ALL
II. A. Vivian
REALTOR
"Over 25 years In Miami''
Now in New Location:
1683 N.E. 123rd Street
North Miami
Phone 84-0261
A Happy Passover To All
TENNESSEE POULTRY
4 EGGS
1340 S.W. 8th STREET
MIAMI
Phone 9-2585
TO All ... A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER
ENJOY MORE "POLAR ICE CREAM"
POLAR ICE CREAM CO., INC.
2120 N.W. 11th Avenue Phone 9-4881
To All ... A Most Happy Passover
MACK CONSTRUCTION CO.
6462 S.W. 8th STREET PHONE 17-8591
Doors Windows
Architectural
Mil/work
535 N.W. list St.
Phone 2-3186
TO All GREETINGS
S AM tIt ORIGINALS
MR. and MRS. GEORGE B. FELLER
Manufacturers of Exclusive Sportswear Beachwear
2621 N.W. 2nd Ave., Miami 37, Florida Phone 2-2661
Greetings To All
MR. and MRS. JOHN E. PORTE
GREETINGS
MODERN SHOWER DOOR MANUFACTURERS, INC.
Wholesale Retail
free Esfimofes Immediate Deliveries
3498 N.W. 7th STREET PHONE 64-2141
ifl |fj
MRS. W. F. ROCKWELL
.4 JO ALL GREETINGS
B. B. Leigh. Pres. R. C. Singer. Vice-Pres. & Sec.
H. Goyen, Treas.
Members National Food Brokers Assn. All Codes
BONACKER & LEIGH, INC.
MERCHANDISE BROKERS
"We Cover South Florida"
P.O. Box 2210 1134 N.W. 22nd Street Miami 13. Florida
For Complete
Banking and Trust Services...
1ST AIII SHED
<02
FLAGLER AT FIRST
tiember: Federal Reserve System Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.


PAGE 8 C
+Jmis*rfrrk*o*L
FRIDAY.
APWC]
TO ALL A MOST
HAPPY PASSOVER
STEVENS MARKET
5737 N. W. 27th Avenue
N. W. 62nd Street and 27th Avenue
THE BEST THE MARKET AFFORDS AT REASONABLE PRICES
Chaim WeiimannScientist
And Leader of Zionism
600 N. W. 10th Street
EXTENDS GREETINGS OF THE SEASON
TO ITS FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Telephone 3-6332
HUNTER LYON, INC.
901 So. Miami Ave.
3-3331
INSURANCE
GREETINGS
>IH OltMM K-liOYlKTT
PLUMBING CONTRACTORS
9443 W. Railroad Avenue (Henuart Mill Building)
MIAMI SHORES. FLORIDA
FOR SALES. SERVICE OR REPAIRS PHONE 7-4793
GREETINGS
jrom JACK FISHMAN. President
llramlett Equipment & Supply Co.
INCOMPOBATED
800 N. E. First Ave. Miami Phone 9-0618
Equipment and Supplies for Hotels. Restaurants and Clubs
By DR. EPHRAIM KATCHALSKI
Science and Zionism were inter-
/oven in Chaim Weizmann "s life
from the outset of his intellectual
coaecioUMiea*. As scientist and
statesman ho labored for many
w ars to create and consolidate sci-
entific institutions in Israel, to as-
semble Jewish aeieatlsti here, and
in raise science and scholarship to
the highest leveli
While yet a student Weizmann
Dad been captivated by Professor
Hermann Shapira's project of a
Hebrew University. Following the
publication in 1902 of the widelv-
known brochure "Die Juedische
Hoehshule" which he wrote togeth-
er with Bert hold Fciwel. Weizmann
threw himself wholeheartedly in-
to the effort of enlisting the sup-
port of the Zionist Congress for
the undertaking; and the corner
stone for the Hebrew University
w.i- laid on Mount Scopus in Jeru-
salem in April. 1918. whilst Allen-
by's forces were still fighting in
the country.
Although engrossed in the plans
for this institution of higher learn-
ing. Dr. Weizmann did not remain
oblivious to the promotion and de-
velopment of other academic insti-
tutions During the stress of the
first World War he was responsi-
ble, together with Ahad Ha'Am and
Shmaryahu Levin for molding the
Hebrew character of the Technion
at Haifa, and many years latrr, in
1934. he opened the Daniel Sieff
Research Institute at Rehovoth. He
gathered at this Institute some of
the outstanding Jewish scientists
in the fields of chemistry' and bi-
ology, and found the opportunity
to return to his own inquiries into
fermentation and polycyclic com-
pounds during the lull in his Zion-
ist activities which had been im-
posed upon him.
Upon attaining the age of scv-
ent> years, Dr. Weizmann was ask-
ed l>\ his friends what he would
consider the most appropriate tri
butc: and he replied that he would
be able to find happiness in a sci-
entific institution in Israel which
would encompass all branches of
.it - fulfilled, and his friends in the
United States of America and Great
Britain were privileged to erect
a living monument to him in his
lifetime by expanding the Sieff Re-
> irea Institute into the Weizmann
Institute of Science.
In establishing the Hebrew Uni-
versity, the Sielf Research Insti-
tute and the Weizmann Institute
of Science. Dr. Weizmann founded
the most important institutions of
free inquiry in the country, and
thereby laid the cornerstone for
science generally in renascent Is-
rael. On his passing, the Govern-
ment of Israel and the Jewish
Agency, together with his friends
in Israel and outside, undertook to
mm
'
I
Dr. Chaim Weizmann. the late first President of least |
sents a Torah to former President Harry S. Truman on l
casion of his laet trip to the United States.
maintain and expand his construc-
tive enterprise by setting up Yad
Weizmann which will comprise ad-
ditional Institutes lUtt Physics.
Genetics. General Biology and'oth-
er branches as part of the Weiz-
mann Institute.
His personal charm, his persjH-
cacity and his far-ranging knowl
edge in all branches ol the natural
sciences enabled Unarm Wciznraen
to win over to his scientific unfjgr
takings in Israel not only Jewish
savants, such as Einstein. F.hrllcli.
Wilhtaetter, Habcr and Chain, but
also outstanding nen Jewish sci
tists who contributed their time
arid energy to rsislrig the statin"
ards of our institutions. Meri like
Sir Robert Robinson. Leopold Ru-
sicka. Louis Fieser and Vladimir
Ipatieff became friends of the Zi-
onist movement and enthusiastic
supporters of the scientific ad-
vancement of Israel under the per-
sonal influence of "the most emi
nent Jewish scientist and states-
man of our age.
Weizmann's concept of Jewish
science and his evaluation of the
role it was destined to play in the
upbuilding of the ntfW Israel were
summed up cogently' in the ad-
dress which he delivered at the
opening of the Hebrew University
in 1925:
"It seems at first sight paradox-
ical that in a land with so sparse
a population, in a land where ev-
erything still remains to be done,
in a land crying out for such simple
! things as ploughs, roads uy
bours, we should begin bji
a centre of spiritual and
tual development. But it Is on
adox for those who know 'Mi
of the Jew. It is true thatd
social and political problem
face us and will demand theirf
tion from u>. We Jews know,|
| ever, that when our miadij^
fullest play hen we hawk]
ire for the ilevelopment oli
Consciousness, then com
we attain the fulfilment fl
needs. In the darkest ageii
existence we found prolettt
J shelter within the walls
1 schools and colleges, an*
' devoted study of Jewish i
the tormented Jew found'
'and consolation. AmidaTir
' did squalor of the gbetwj
j stood schools of learning
I numbers of young Jew i
feet of our rabbis and tt
Those schools and colleges 1
;.- i.-ir- rscrvi>ir where'
were stored up during*
I ages ot persecution and iJ
lectual anil spiritual energy
on the one hand, helped 1
tain our national existence.I
the other hand blossomed
the benefit of mankind wi
the walls ot the ghetto
sagas of Babylon and J"-
Maimonides and the GH
the lens polisher of AT
and Heinrich Heine and t
Continued on P*
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER
*
DENMARK'S ART STONE
StructuralOrnamental I
Modern Man** Garage Grille-Garden Sets-"
, StonePlaster
1MS1 H.W. Sewrth Avenue PhW*
7-S
Pacific
& Supply fr
"BULLY SERVICE'
"ILL" FAXON. FOUNDER
Not Incorporated
Specializing In Fir Timbsrf
601 N.W. 11th St. Phone 2-3163


\H 16. 1954
"JtolsliihrMibri
PAGE 9 C
bt's Jews in Today's World
WJC
r Haggadah recounts
he Jews in Pharaoh's
ly that the youngest
able to recite the
to the Exodus. The
s in modern Egypt,
went so far as to convey his best;port Office has lately begun
wishes, accompanied by a box of
\ii-
clearly imprinted
mind.
|{h century Exodus
Egypt is proceeding
lenti-m. The facts he-
ist exodus compiled
Jewish Congress' In-
ish Affairs sheds
on the status of fel-
hostile land, but al-
Icute Middle Eastern
which menaces the
les of the free world.
Brec that the posi-
Jews has improved
since General Mo-
j's accession to pow-
___iost paradoxically,
s migrated from the
monih during 1953,
dual exodus continues.
Iral Nasuib has display-
iendihip toward his
uated 40,000 Jews
is unparalleled in
ent history Egyptian
Ihck's remain uneasy
insecure,
he initial stage of the
war in 1948, discrimi-
linst Jews, accompanied
js, was rampant through-
jui The mounting xeno-
| restrictions imposed on
I traceable to the vio-
of nationalism which has
Middle East and par-
Egypt s continuing dis-
lliri'.,::: on the Suez Canal
having a direct effect
rish position, for Jews
fcr Arabs nor, in the raa-
fcises, Egyptian citizens.
either nationals of for-
Iries or stateless.
Barture of Jews has been
fblow to Kgypt's already
onomy. Observers feel
b's tokens of friendship
i tendered not necessarily
llicituili of the Jews, but
It of concern for the coun-
Incial -late of health.
Ire these tokens of friend-
i Naguib has visited
Jew- ..ml their institu-
tes made warm declara-
solemn pronouncements
eligion- -l-.ould be respect-
i promi-'d the Jews that
| be tre.it'.-il exactly as oth-
s, provided they observe
Cairo's Jewish schools,
id been looted and fired
he infamous "Black Satur-
have been permitted to
pt and re equipped by the
omimiiuty
[were signs that the Mac-
frts Club which was clos-
i outset of the Arab-Israel
tould reopen. Naguib paid
Visits to the Cairo Jewish
land to Cairo's Great Syna-
TRosh lla-honah. He even
candy, to a little Jewish girl who
was hospitalized for injuries sus-
tained during army jnancuve.
Ail of Naguib's marittestalions of
friendship have been widely pub-
licized. At the same time, Egyp-
tian Jewry has officially expressed
its gratitude for Naguib's attitude.
Last May, for example, the Grand
issu-
ing to Jews who request it a "lais-
scz passer" bearing the notice that
it is given "for no return."
To add to these ominous por-
tents, no certainty exists that Na-
guib's friendliness Coward the Jews
Is shared by other members of the
ruling group. Leading Egyptian
newspapers are employing former
Nazi editors.
FLORIDA MEDICAL LABORATORY
*

_

:---------
I
to all Jews ^ ~ ^3^3^
of that country to give their full
support to Naguib's government,
asserting that all discriminations
based on color, race or creed had
been removed. The Grand Rabbi
urged
for Naguib's health during a re-
cent illness. And Egyptian news-
papers carried* photographs show
ing Naguib embracing the Grand
Rabbi during his holiday visit to
the Great Synagogue.
Despite all of the manifestations
of friendship and the absence of
official measures against the Jews,
the position of Egyptian Jewry re-
mains precarious. Otic fundamen-
tal reason for this is that there
is little, if any, future for the Jews,
and particularly for young Jews.
Another reason is the dark eco-
nomic picture. Imports from
abroad have virtually ceased, and
the slump in cotton prices has ser-
iously aggravated the situation.
Still another factor is the citizen-
ship status of the Jews: the ma-
jority of those Jews who are not
foreign nationals are stateless.
Most of the Jewish businessmen
retain their "foreign" citizenship,
and foreigners particularly Brit-
ons are viewed by Egyptians
with grave animosity. The position
of stateless persons with regard to
travel is difficult, and the Pass-
pelled. A number of repressive
measures have been enacted aim-
ed at foreign Jews. All of these
acts were climaxed by the arrest,
last November, of nine men and
^JSt^J^HJ? -Pra-y f0l,r wome". barged with "Zionist
and Communist propaganda" in be-
half of Mapam.
The eleven were arrested by the
special anti-Zionist section of the
Egyptian police established by the
"revolutionary committee." The
arrests seriously disturbed the Jew-
ish community, and both the Grand
Rabbi and the President of the
Cairo community attempted to in-
tervene in behalf of the prisoners.
Eight of the eleven went on trial
before a military court in Alexan-
dria last December and the verdict
in the trial has not yet reached the
western world. On top of these ar-
rests came new regulations to ex-
pel or not to readmit aliens who
had visited Israel.
The tense situation in the Middle
East at the present time affects, of
course, all Jews who live in the
Arab world. For Egypt's Jews,
however, the situation is especially
complex, since they are caught in
the swift currents of political up-
set, popular hatred of all foreign
ers, a deteriorating economy, Arab
enmity and finally, the Sue/, dis-
pute.
TO ALL PASSOVER GREETINGS
THE TOWN RESTAURANT
153 N.E. 1st Street
BREAKFAST LUNCHEON DINNER
Music Air Conditioned 7 A.M. to 2 A.M.
Closed Sunday
Ph. 2-4733
PASSOVER GREETINGS TO ALL
HIALEAH MIAMI SPRINGS BANK
"A friendly Bank"
(Member of F.D.LC.)
101 HIALEAH DRIVE
HIALEAH, FLORIDA
Telephone 88-8431
HAPPY PASSOVER
COLLINS GARAGE
24-HOUR WRECKER AND MECHANICAL SERVICE
6901 N.W. 7th AVENUE PHONE 84-2591
115 S.W. 2nd STREET PHONE 3-7308
To All
Greetings
OSCAR BLASIUS
Meridian Ave.
Miami Beach
Busy and cheerful youngster at the Mizrachi Women s Chil-
dren's Village and Farm School in Raanana, Mtrel. takes
pride in clean-up preparations before Passover. Grateful to
Youth Aliyah, she has recently come from Egypt, where the
position of Jewry remains precarious._________________________
TO ALL A MOST
HAPPY HOLIDAY
*
*
WISHES

W-A. GLASS
DOKHORN PRODUCE
Phone 9-8411
2143 N. W. 12th Avenue
LORA PACK
SPORTSWEAR FOR WOMEN
639 Lincoln Road
PHONE 5-1916
GREETINGS TO ALL
L. C. MOIIIIIS. Inc.
PAVING CONSTRUCTION
2581 N.W. 72nd STREET PHONE 65-2421
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER
MacVicar Wells, Inc.
Complete Building Supplies
*
I. D. MacVICAR
President
FRANK J. WELLS
Vice President
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY
PARK MADISON STUDIO
PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHERS
205-07 Lincoln Bldg. 350 Lincoln Road
Phone 5-5260 Miami Beach, Florida
OILS FRAMES MINIATURES
TO ALL PASSOVER GREETINGS
Cauley & Martin, Inc.
COMPLETE INSURANCE FACILITIES
"Protection to Fit Your Risk"
PHONE 9-3426
1522 DuPONT BUILDING MIAMI 32. FLORIDA
HAPPY PASSOVER
JACK'S GROCERY & MARKET ,
192 N. W. 14th Street Phone 2-8865
COMPLETE LINE OF GROCERKS AND MEATS
JACK ROHER, Proprietor
TO OUR MANY FRIENDS AND PATRONS
GREETINGS
CLARK & LEWIS CO.
WHOLESALE GROCERS
34 N. E. 11th Street
Phone 3-3103


PAGE IOC
-JcnisMorkMar)
FRIDAY
AWH,
Southeastern Finance Co.
PHONE 2-7005
duPont Building
Miami
TO ALL PASSOVER GREETINGS
CUSTOM CRAFT MFG. CO., INC. and
PERRY INDUSTRIES
and
WM. J. ALLEN and CHAS. HABLOW
450 N.W. 14th STREET
MIAMI
TO ALL PASSOVER GREETINGS
Dixie Uns Corporation
Moe Longer
405 So. Dixie Highway Coral Gables
HARRY C. SCHWEBKE
AND ASSOCIATES LAND SURVEYORS
4841 N.W. 2nd Avenue Miami
PHONE 89-1646
To All Passover Greetings
WASH AND SAVE THE MAYTAG WAY
79th Street Wash-E-Teria
"You will be pleated with our Complete Facilities and Service-'
11M N.W. 79th STREET. MIAMI. FLORIDA Phone 7S-S1S1
FOR READY-MIXED CONCRETE PHONE 48-2080
Allied Concrete Products, Inc.
2800 S. W. 31st Avenue. Miami. Florida
(One Block North of Dixie Highway)
FRANK S. WUELKER. President
-__
TO OUR MANY
FRIENDS
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
Rader Engineering Co.
CONSULTING ENGINEERS
111 N.E. 2nd Avenue Phone 94741
Miami. Florida
^- __ ii
GREETiXGS
When In Search For Definitely Better
Furniture and Home Furnishings
At Reasonable Prices
Remember The Name
WOODRUM'S
ONE OF FLORIDA'S LARGEST AND FINEST
HOME FURNISHERS
AIR CONDITIONED
NORTHEAST SECOND AVE. AT
SEVENTY-THIRD STREET
MIAMI
Phone 84-1625
J .^ ^ 1
8 ' ** #vP^3 5j -
A new "generation" of the earth marks Pa
neighbors who seek to see the Jewish State
tic taskthe upbuilding of their homeland.
this year in Israel. Despite _
yed. young Israel moves ahead in 1
Emblem of National Unity as
A Prime Minister Views
By MOSHE SHARETT.
Prime Minister of Israel
We are fortunate in that we arc
biassed with festivals and anniver-
saries, and one of the felicitous
characteristics of the Jewish calen-
dar and of the Jewish religion is,
that from time to time it lifts us to
the heights of history and permits
us to review our path through the
past and envisage our way to the
future. It enables us to see the
various tendencies in their true
historical meaning. We are fortu-
nate that the history of our gener-
ation has been blessed by the fix-
ing of the anniversary of the found-
ing of the Jewish National Fund.
When we look back at the great-
ness and the beauty of the past
decades of the Keren Kayemeth
Leisrael. and especially of the last
few years, we celebrate the victory
of a great ideal in its realization.
It i.n characteristic of every great
idea, that is not an end in itself.
but that in its wake it gives birth
to other creative processes and i
opens new horizons to the people I
who bring about its realization '
Thus, the idea of the Jewish Na-
tional Fund, classic in its simplic-
ity, lamely, that the land is the
property of the entire people, nat-
urally carriers with it the principle
of Jewish self-labor. The Keren
Kjyetneth has become, thereby,
the cornerstone of rural develop-
ment, a great enterprise for pro-
duction, and the economic back-
bone of the State, of Israel.
Who knows, however, if this glor-
ious undertaking'would have been
accomplished unless, shortly after
its conception, another phenome-
non had appeared? A phenomenon
that had, seemingly, no connection
with the Jewish National Fund, but
that has really rescued it from the
danger of calcification. I am think-
ing of the pioneer workers' move-
ment in Israelthis ever-growing
group, the finest of the settlers,
who have demonstrated the hunger
of the entire nation for the land
and gave the first push to the
wheels of the Jewish National
Fund. They gave the Fund its de-
termination and the impetus to re-
deem the land. They created a liv-
ing slogan that would appeal to all:
Land for the Workers of the Land;
Land for the Masses Who Wish
to Settle on the Land Thus was
created the living social motivation
for the- Keren Kayemeth. The mag-
nificent combination was conceiv-
ed: a dynamic force sprung from a
popular movement, allied with a
great national institution.
The Jewish National Fund thus
has become in our time s creative
instrument and an invaluable asset
of our nation Under the flag of
the State of Israel, the Fund was
given new freedom for expanding
its land holdings, was given new
masses of settlers; and, for its part,
the State inherited an extremely
useful organization in the field of
land policyfor agricultural set-
tlement, for industrial production
and for housing projeets in urban
and rural areas. We have been for-
tunate to fcame seen in our lifetime
the realization of s miracle such as
is givea to lew countries onlythe
national ownership of the land and
the attainment of a natiaafl
without any of the social!
ances that have marred '.Ml
alization of land in othe
The principle and traciaaj
tional land has always to
us, the idea of public-*
for the benefit of all hut
with us. It became an i
of the Zionist MovemeiU
the Yishuv and now in tat!
without revolutions. wiuwr|
san conflicts or struggle) 1
ideologies. It came at if i
The greatness of this i'
bodied in terms of peaftj
and unity. Not only did itl
into a cause of conflict
contrary, it has been
the supreme emblem oil
unity in the State of 1
the Diaspora The Jewish I
Fund has become the sya*
entire enterprise, belong'
Jewish people as a whofcj
ren Kayemeth is the fo "
all agricultural develo
this, in turn, is the soil
our hopes for eventual'
independence and social I
The Jewish National
forms yet another serv.i
a real meaning to a f
in the life of the nation i
immemorial-the love ft
of Israel among the
Diaspora. It w
botli
young a purpose in theiri
work devoted to me
Israel; to the chiktt
schools, to the studentt*I
versities. to the volunteer'
Continued on PfJ
laVftMM 4 *344
HENRI'S
RtSTAURAHT
HHttJ 6MMAN-ASMMCAN CUIilHl
31*1 PONCI M LEO* iivo.
COtAl CASUS, fu.
fITIfftl
HILLIARD RUG
CLEANERS
Service sad Utitlmcfim
Tkreaa***. H rrt
MM S.W. Ufa TEMACE
PHONE 4-4341
Phone 17-1343
Autol
PBOCTQEAND SON BODY WORE
SEAT COYEBS TAILOR MADE .
3311 Douglas Road
if-
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND ACQUAINTANCE
HAPPY PASSOVER
L L POWELL & SONS
165S Lenox Avenue
SEASOHS GkEETIHCS TO OCR ,E>
THE SPORTS CENTER
1 Klntfa *f Bail Op* PMriSian Hal*
US Watt Avanua. Miami Saach
Crt


*Je*MFhrHin
Ml
PAGE 11C
e Eloquent Mr. Abba Eb
an
Iarthur lewis
JTA
NATIONSAs a result
[occupation of the Secur-
with the Palestine dis-
long. Ambassador Abba
become the best known.
I It is a cultured voice,
high pitched and sibi-
jmellifiuous and always
I. Many a delegate who
Uwavs agree with the Is-
T wiU make a point of
[will even go out of his
[so. because of the classi-
spoken, the roundness
JUing phrases, the rich
words.
Mr. Eban suffers
iiper-abundance of elo-
iiich must surely be con-
be the delegates' gold
he United Nations where
bmacy is so openly prac-
|hi at a press conference,
duclory remarks, made
tithout notes, have been
[last for fully half-an-hour
been a dazzling display
JEit> Away from the great
table of the Security
impressive chamber, the
^prescnlative can be as
as bitingly sarcastic as
is delivering a prepared
|i to which hours of
have been given.
fil to detect the slightest
Dterrogation in what you
Eban answered one cor-
nt who delivered a speech
an asked a question, "But
pess I >hall attempt to de-
fine aspects of the subject
M"
Oder forty, the Israeli rep-
|\e is not only the head of
ntion whose offices are in
fk. but the head of the Em-
j Washington as well. (Sev-
fthe smaller countries do
! their American Ambassa-
as representative; New
[is one of them and New
p Leslie Knox Munro was
1 chairman of the Security
ently but also chairman
usteeship Council.) Mr.
[at the top of his govern-
eign service, he is one
il's few ambassadors; as a
an whose eloquence is
|admired, he is one of the
pwn Israelis.
inner and accent, he has
bmpared so often with a
diplomat that it is difficult
i that he was never in the
(Office He likes pin striped
fe has rather a distant air
tfm which makes the Arabs
During the war, Mr. Eban
fa the British Government,
[intelligence forces in the
[East where his knowledge
tic languages wae invalu-
*ks Hebrew, Arabic, Turk-
man, as well as French and
l\' "<< of course, English.
Pletely bilingual in He-
1 English, having learned
^t the knee of his grand-
"^ brought up the boy in
South Africa, his father having
died when he was a baby. But is he
as eloquent in Hebrew? And could
he be?
A scholar. Mr. Eban won a triple
first at Oxford University and
would have become a Don at the
end of the war if it had not been
for Chaim Weizmann who per-
suaded him to join the Jewish Ag-
ency. Like so many of the present
leaders of Israel, he was a protege
of the first great president of the
State.
From the days of his youth in
England, he has been a dedicated
Abfco Ebon
... a dedicated Zionist
Zionist, and, as Israeli representa-
tive, he has driven himself to the
point of collapse. In fact, he did
faint from overwork during the
first Security Council debates on
the Egyotian blockade of the Suez
Canal. That was some two and a
half years ago, and the Council
adopted a resolution ordering the
blockade to end, a resolution which
the Egyptians contemptuously ig-
nored.
Aside from reading which he
does omnivorously. Mr. Eban's
main relaxation is golf which he
plays as well as President Eisen-
hower and almost as enthusiasti-
cally. Of a somewhat shy disposi-
tion, he much prefers small in-
timate parties to the large diplo-
matic receptions which he has to
attend and where he stays only so
long as courtesy demands.
During the past year, there have
been a number of changes in the
aids and advisors Mr. Eban has in
the delegation. Arthur Lourie, who
was his chief deputy, has returned
to Jerusalem and has been succeed-
ed by Mordecai Kidron who looks
like a dashing British officer and
did serve with distinction in the
South African army during the last
World War. As the Israeli deputy
representative, Mr. Kidron has the
rank of minister. He does much of
the diplomatic leg-work; he keeps
contact with other delegations. He
is the man "in the diplomatic hud-
dles" and ha takes part in ail the
"diplomatic coming and going"
here.
Harry Zinder has also gone back
to Israel. He was the chief press
officer and the esteem in which he
was held by the correspondents
here was demonstrated by the num-
ber who turned out to say good-
bye to him when the United Na-
tions Correspondents Associate
gave him a farewell luncheon. Mr.
Zinder's place has been taken by
Joshua Justman, a former Israeli
correspondent here. The new direc-
tor of the delegation's press rela-
tions was once deputy director of
the information department of the
Jewish Agency in Palestine; he
moved to Palestine in 1934. He
has, as his assistant, Hanan Bar-
On, who has been with the delega-
tion for some time.
These and all the members of
the delegation work on a speech
which Mr. Eban gives; they worry
about what is going to be said and
what effect it will have on the gen-
eral public, they check the facts
again and again to be sure they are
accurate, they search for argu-
ments and quotations. Diplomacy is
a co-operative effort, like so much
else in life. There are delegation
meetings and general discussions,
and each one has a responsibility
for a certain part of a speech or
statement.
There are some ticklish prob-
lems. How can the Israeli repre-
sentative tell the Security Council
that it does not know much about
the Egyptian blockade of the Suez
Canal and that he is going to give
the whole story of this act of pir-
acy again? That is a tough assign-
ment for anyone. However, it was
done and done in such a way that
no one felt offended. Here Is what
Mr. Eban actually said:
"With such a wealth of varied
experience assembled around this
table, upon which lies a resolution
which the Security Council has al-
ready adopted, it might seem un-
necessary to summarise the pre-
vious phases of the question, or to
argue points which the Security
Council has already resolved. I un-
derstand, however, that it is the
desire of many delegates, as it is
the right of world opinion, to have
their memory revived concerning
the history of his important inter-
national question."
But who else but Mr. Eban could
have written that paragraph? The
fact is that he does write all his
own speeches. The members of the
delegation assemble much of the
material for him. suggest ways of
presenting the case, but in the end,
he pens his own fine phrases. In
this, the Israeli representative is
different from any other delegates
who often sound as though they
are reading unfamiliar scripts.
He spends many hours in writ-
ing a speech, many days in polish-
ing it; he has been known to work
through the night on an impor-
tant statement. Mr. Eban's voice is
well known here because of the
way in which the Palestine Dispute
has occupied the Security Council;
his eloquence is hard come by.
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Serving Miami Since 1930
Telephone 48-2651
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VENTILATION
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i
PASSOVER GREETINGS
TO ALL .
SNIDER-JONES, INC.
Manufacturers oi Trade Wind Gift Jellies
MIAML FLA.
PHONE 87-2730

GREETINGS
Phone 2-9457
VENETIAN SERVICE STATION
SINCLAIR GASOLINE GOODYEAR TIRES
1504 N. Bayshore Drive Miami. Florida
>/A^^^^^*r'V^,^^^^rf\/^^A*/A*^^^^^,'V^,rf\*^A*^A-/^.^
TO ALL GREETINGS
TYRIJS T. TRIM* 'aH
1520 PONCE DE LEON BOULEVARD
PASSOVER GREETINGS TO ALL
Security Abstract Co.
44 N. E. 1st Ave.
PASSOVER
GREETINGS
TO ALL
MEL JACI HERMAN
KALER PRODUCE
COMPANY
2121 N. W. 13th Avenue
Phone 24197
GREETINGS

Gulf Stream Quick Foods, Inc.
QUICK FREEZING COLD STORAGE
MIAMI KEY WEST
26 N.E. 27th St Phones 82-2671 82-2672
Mc ARTHUR JERSEY FARM DAIRY, INC.
niOM FARM TO YOU
6851 N. E. Second Avenue
Phone 84-4521
GREETINGS
MADER & COMPANY
P. & O. DOCKS
MIAMI
HARDEMAN INSURANCE AGENCY, INC ,
- John V. Hardeman and John V. Hardeman. Jr.
266 Almeria Arena* Phone 83-4607
Best Wishes for Passover
1 Camwo*>ra PUt. Coconut Grove
*ji vriaatt lor ranovw
i
11 Wainwrf ght Sons
Phone 83-1621
Hartley's
Aato Top Shop
The Best In Materials and
Workmanship
1234 N.E. 1st Avenue
Phone 34897
GREETINGS
MILONE
PLASTERING COMPANY
7150 N. W. 3rd Avsmue
PHONE 84-7041
TO ALL...
GREETINGS
*
ASPHALT PAVING COMPANY
Phone: Miami 67-2551
Box 786. Coral Gables. Fla.
Tl


PAGE 12 C
*jmi**nt>rkl*M
FRlDJY.j
TO OUR MANY CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS .
MOST HAPPY HOLIDAYS
A. 6. FOOD STORES
(FOOD TOWN)
"QUALITY t009 AT CONPET/TJVE PRICES"
411 West 41st Street
Faith and American Pass0i
Miami Beach
IT IS A PLEASURE TO EXTEND A HOLIDAY GREETING
TO JEWRY EVERYWHERE
HERBERT A. FRINK
MIAMI BEACH
Maurice E. Kerr
TO OUR MANY FRIENDS A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER
We Soccialht in Bonds and Insurance
308 S.E. 2nd AVENUE Phone 25174
WARD PAVING CO.
CONTRACTORS
STREETS ROADS SIDEWALKS
1731 N. W. 54th Street Phone 89-2711
MIAMI
ETTINGER QUALITY sii IDE
& IBIJMI co.
Wf. BUILD THE UST
AND III BUILD THE REST
VENETIAN HINDS WINDOW SHADES
PHOTECTO SUN SHADES 1*r STORE WINDOWS
400 N.W. 2nd AVENUE MIAMI. FiOilOA
Pkeae 9-2434
TO ALL GREETINGS
RUSSELL HOUSE MOVERS
BONDEDINSURED
"No Substitute for Experience"
PHONE 7-4978
7250 N.W. 1st AVE. MIAMI. FLORIDA
Hopkins-Carter Hardware Co.
139 South Miami Avenue
PHONE 2-5194
By DR. DAVID end
TAMAR DE SOLA POOL
JTA
In Jewish homes this Passover
the immemorial words of the Hag-
gadsh will be repealed: "He
brought us forth from bondage Ro
freedom, from subjection to re-
demptioB, tfom sorrow to Joy, from
mourning to festivity, and from
darkness to great light
This coming year will be one of
added remembrance. Three hun-
dred years ago, our torefsthi m
i i on tin- continent a com
munit) destined to become within
three centuries the Urges! single
Jewish settlement in all the long
historj of the Children of Israel
Earl) in the year 1654. Jewish
In.ton repeated itself. It happened
in Brazil J< wi from Spain and Por-
tugal had Ik- the first ex-
plorers colonisers and settlers of
, (real country. The inordinate
distance that separated them from
the Iberian 1'eninsula gave them a
ol security from the dangers
of the InauiaiUoa The coming ot
Dutch rule added to their sense of
well-being, and the coming of Jew-,
from Holland brought to the Bra-
zilian Jewish community leader-
ship, scholarship and vigor. Bjt the
curtain fell upon this happy inter-
lude with the end of Dutch domin-
ion. Jews who could, returned to
hospitable little Holland.
Of those who left Brazil, between
January and April, 1854. one storm-
tossed group reached the harbor of
Nieuw Amsterdam, early in Sep-
tember of that year. They were the
Founding Fathers of Congregation
Sheanth Israel in the City of New
York, and of the American Jewish
community.
As we gather on the Passover in
freedom and thanksgiving it would
not be amiss to recall the momen-
tous journey of those Jewish pil-
grims and pioneers. Three thou-
sand years and six hundred miles
away from the Red Sea, traversed
"under portents in heaven and on
earth, blood and fire and pillars of
smoke." Another crossing took
place from a pursuer no less fear-
some than Pharoah witn nu cnar-
iots. On Passover, 1954, we may
read from an oft-quoted Hebrew
chronicler, David Franco-Mendes,
how one of the ships that left Bra-
zil was captured by Spanish pirates
on the high-seas.
"But God caused a savior to arise
unto them, the captain of a French
ship, arrayed for battle, and he res-
cued them from the hands of the
outlaws who had done them vio-
lence and oppressed them, and he
conducted them until they reached
New Holland. And none of them
was missing praised be God."
These founders of the Jewish
community of North America
brought with them a deep faith.
The freedom we enjoy, they se-
cured. They did not find freedom
/


i)

M
Juda Touro arrives in New Orleans, the man i
come American Jewry's most famous philantl
penniless from Rhode Island, Touro became a i
a merchant The fortune he made went to iyi_
trial" Mtd lh Bunker F'll mon"ment. lanuarTS
the 100tb/aanivr3Cu-y of Judah Touro's death.
when thev came. They helped for<>e older survivors
with dignity and strength the sorrowful changed*
strength the American heritaee of significance of theI
liberty. The story of that achieve- vearstorvof JevitJ
ment must fill us with gratitude for | America. No per
the past and courage for the fu-, enrd its path. No
weakened its loyal}.]
grew with the fn
Twelve genrationj
tore It is a sorv that can be read
uninterruntedlv in thp record of an
individual congregation, which
alter thre hunn -u *< s stanus as l jPws have" followed"!
a symbol of faith and freedom in I fu| "lnat Cim in *
the United States.
After the holocaust which came
brought devotion asij
loved land. Ech
to historic Jewish communities in. make America groii
PASSOVER GREETINGS
SALES MOTOROLA SERVICE
EDDIE'S RADIO SERVICE
3209 N.W. 7th Avenue Phone 3-6564
Service On AD Makes Auto and Home Radios and Television
Europe in our times, few alas are
the Jewish congregations which
can count their age in centuries.
Shear it h Israel in the City of New
York which might well have been
regarded as a scion of a youthful
the dreams of the
hopes for the future.'
of 1954 should be i
by the union of our |
memories with;
our three hundred]
country, now finds itself among the can past.
IKHIIFIUTION IN GD
Continued from Pat* 6C
United Nations, the Federal Gov-
ernment did not turn it down.
Due,to the nature of the medical
experiments, and to the habit of
many of the "scientists" concerned
to make sure that no living wit-
nesses remained, only some 750
survivors were able to take ad-
vantage of the Bonn invitation to
file claims. More than one third
have been rejected, and upward of
300 cases not yet decided. A young
German woman physician noted for
her pro-Jewish sympathies, Dr.
Laura Schaefer, was recently the
first emissary of Bonn to visit Is-
rael, where she examined the ap-
proximately 100 resident appli
cants.
A lump-sum compensation aver-
aging $1,000 has been paid in the
cases where medical finding of
German goveWBfj
corroborated thei
manent injuries.
$600,000 has beta]
four West Germsrl
1951 to 1955, by
program is ei
eluded.
Thanks to a
good will, the
is in sight.
the machinery
rabbinical and
claims The mar
tion applicants r*J
of medical exp
er German Rabbis,
would wish thitJ
cases, the Genual
the same modicum ol|
though it may not |
pressive when sill
the backdrop of tatj
called it forth'
PASSOVER GREETINGS
Airway Bar and Restaurant
PACKAGE GOODS AVAILABLE
STEAKSCHICKEN "Visit Our Dubonnet Room"
8727 N.W. Seventh Avenue Phone 89-9227
If is a pleasure to txltni o mil Mr Jewish friends and Patrons
Sincere Passover Greetings
222 N.W. 26th STREET
A. H. BECKER
PHONE 2-3705
Robbins Roofing & Sheet Metal Co.
222 N. W. 26th Street Phone 2-3705
A. H. BECKER
A Happy Passover
HIGHLAND PARK
PHARMACY
Complete Drug Service
936 N. W. 7th Avenue
Phone 2-7541
BEST WISHES
FOR A
Happy Passover
Mays Transfer Inc.
Local and Long Distance
Furniture Moving
4305 N. W. 2nd Ave.
Phone 78-6440
Specializing in Mevin, Mfcajajaj,
1
SEASON'S BEST WISHES 4
GEORGE J. BERTMtf
Realtor
420 LINCOLN ROAD, MIAMI BEACH
--------------------TO ALL A MOST HAPPY H0UJ-
Hide & Seek Children *jm
THE CHILDREN'S SHOP OF DISTWCT1 -J
GIFTS APPAREL
TOTS TO TEENS
SOS Biltmore Way Coral Gables
pboi<
TO ALL GREETINGS EnJV V""r ***''
HOWE H
"Reasonable Prices
MOO COLLINS AVENUE
re IW



ML 16, 1954
+Jewis*Fhrkigan
PAGE 13 C
IZMANNSCIENTIST Hi LEADER OF ZIOI
I from F>age 8 c
\ of the links in the
[chain of intellectual
i 'S scientific career
federahly interrupted
Activities. But he w>
able not only to cori-
fcnical education but
Ja most distinguished
to our knowledge of
Td applied chemistry.
[hi- higher technical
Liebermann's labor-
fechnical High School
trlottenburg, headed
When the latter was
to become Profes-
g, Weizmann accom-
land four years later
Iph.O. He was a "pri-
Li Geneva University
11904. and it was here
Hied his investigations
I of polycyclic com-
Jiaboration with Deich-
herland. Dr. Weizmann
...hester in England.
nc he was able to set
themical laboratory, to
I students at the uni-
[to occupy a notable
the first-class scien-
thc faculty at Man-
i Professor PerWn, Jr.,
tor Ernest Rutherford.
bancln-ter that Weiz-
J out his most import-
pes in fermentation, in
jof organic compounds
field ol polymerisation.
(giving practical appli-
1 to his formulae also
lised here. He contin-
be first world war to
develop as far as possible the work
he had done during the fruitful
period in Manchester, and with the
opening of the Sieff Research In-
stitute at Rehovoth in 1934, and
his ttuPDorary retirement from po-
litical life, hit longing to return
to science was at last fulfilled.
From *he"outeet of the second
world war Dr. Weizmann and his
principal associate Dr. Ernst Berg-
mann devoted their whole time to
investigations in synthetic fuel and
rubber and this work too won rec-
ognition by the Allied Powers.
Weizmann's scientific discover-
ies resulted from an inquiring
mind and the passion to decipher
the secrets of nature. Yet in all
of his investigations and discover-
ies he sought not so much to satisf-
fy his intellectual curiosity as to
try to harness the results for the
alleviation of human welfare and
the enrichment of society. At first
he copied nature in his work on
the synthesis of pigments, but in
the course of time he endeavoured
to master nature bjn exploiting the
tremendous energy contained in
plant products and oil by convert-
ing them into staple products
through biology and chemistry.
Most of Dr. Weizmann's work
was done in the field of applied
chemistry, but he did not ignore
theoretical chemistry. Knowledge
and practice were remarkably com-
bined in his personality and
through is great vision he perceiv-
ed the close ties between Israel's
agriculture and industry and Is-
rael's science, and the great role
which science was destined to play
in the economic and cultural life
of the country. One need only re-
call the classic incident of Lord
Peers visit to Dr. Weizmann in his
laboratory at Rehovoth in 1936 to
find the parallel of this close in-
tegration.
"What are you doing, Dr. Weiz-
mann?" asked the chairman of the
Royal Commission.
The great scientist-statesman,
who was busy at his laboratory
bench, replied: "I am creating ab-
sorptive capacity."
I believe that his genius in ex-
tending the absorptive capacity of
this country, as indeed of the world
at large, served him alike in the
fields of science and statesmanship.
The scientific achievements of the
first President of the State of Is-
rael not only pointed the way to
the utilization of raw materials gen-
erally disregarded and laid the
foundation for new branches of na-
tural science, but also shaped new
methods for alleviating human con-
ditions everywhere by showing that
nature could be fully harnessed
for human welfare.
Ettie Kay
Formerly Kay's Blouse Shop
Exquisite "All Handmade" Nylon Blouses
Lace and Tucked Net Model far Dressy Occasions
Tailored Shirts by Gabey
Crepe and "All Wool" Jersey Blouses far Soils
Handsomely Beaded Sweaters of Orion, Wool and Cashmere
",>.*
1
M water "operation" from the one met with when
I the Jews out of Egypt. But this "Blueprint lor Water"
ly as significant on the occasion of Passover in the
Tish State, for it enriches a land eroded by thousands
of neglect.
MOVE* CRUJINCS
IUINGS
feaver
Rexali
Drug
Stores
JJndAve. Ph.3-4665
/ 62nd St. Ph. 7-J202
W1 Way Ph. 4-7621
KrS Ave-Ph. 7-2011
f725 Bird Road
lpPY PASSOVER
toiversity
I of Miami
5*AL GABLES
MIAMI BEACH
ABSTRACT &
TITLE COMPANY. Inc.
Compute Abstract and
Till* Insurance service
THE ONLY ABSTRACT
PLANT IN
MIAMI BEACH
1630 Lenox Avenue
MIAMI BEACH
TO ALL .
GREETINGS
Sorrento
Hestaurant
FINE ITALIAN FOODS
PIRATE'S COVE
We Ceier To Partial
3060 S.W. 8th STREET
PHONE 48-9263
SEDER FOR THE Gl
Continued from Page 7 C
Hokkaido or Sendai, Japan. Take a
look in at Agana in Guam or Kni-
wetok in the Pacific; get acquaint-
ed with all the lonely GIs in ice-
locked Adak, or Big Delta, or Ko-
diak in Alaska. A Jewish chaplain,
or a specially designated GI, or a
USO-JWB worker will lead in the
chanting of the Echod Mi Yodea
and a breath of home (and some
more substantial Passover foods)
will be contained in the Passover
Jood packages sent by Women vol-
unteers from JWB's Women's Or-
ganizations' Division in scores of
communities back home.
And of course, in the US, where
there are also remote, bleak and
isolated desert and mountain sta-
tions aplenty, dust-covered cars
with JWB Armed Services volun-
teers, Jewish chaplains and JWB
field staff will jog over desert
roads to Twenty-Nine Palms and
China Lake, California, and make
their stops at Big Spring Air Force
Base, Goodfellow Air Force Base
and Red River Arsenal, down in
Texas. And on their route you'll
find spots like Walker Air Force
Base in New Maxico, the Nellis Air
Force Base near Las Vegas, or may-
be Camp Haleon a mountain top
at Leadville, Colorado, or the Dug-
way Proving Ground in the Utah
Desert.
Even at the Los Alamos Atomic
Energy Labratory and at the atom
bomb sites at Camp Desert Rock in
Nevada and the White Sands Prov-
ing Grounds in New Maxico there
will be a bright holiday look come
Passover.
Nuta's
Yacht Basin
1884 N. W. North River
Drive
Phone 2-3067
INSURANCE FOR ALL
COMMERCIAL & INDUSTRIAL
REQUIREMENTS
Phones 3-5761 3-4312
901 NX. 2nd AVE.
54 MIRACLE MILE
ORAL CABLES
DOUGLAS NURSING HOME
1408 N.E. Bay shore Place
FOR THE CARE OF THE CHRONICS AND CONVALESCENTS
* Special dietsReasonable rate
R.N. en slaty continually
Completely renovate*' under new ownership of
. MR and MRS. S. L. THOMAS
For Appointment 82-5395
GREETINGS TO ALL
"Jkiamii Tirat ffxclustvm 4ain+ Star*
TINGLE
PAINT
CO.
49 S.W. FIRST ST. MIAMI, FLA.
TO ALL..."' ""
A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER

RUBBER INC.
Charles T. Spencer
159 N.E. 29th STREET
' PHONE 3-6201
MERCURY LITHOGRAPHING CO.
"545 N.*W; 5th Street MiamL Florida
Telephone 82-6567
EXPERTS IN MULTICOLOR OFFSET
P. RICHARDSON
Insulation Firebrick Tanks Traps and Regulator!
1141 So. Alhambra Circle Warehouse: 1047 N. W. 22nd Street
Phone 87-9586 Phone 87-9586
GREETINGS
HOWARD BACKUS
TOWINO LIGHTERING
WHOLESALE SAND CRANE RENTAL
1201 N. W. South River Drive P. O. Box 681
Yard Phone 3-5019 Res. Phone 7-1042
MIAMI 4. FLORIDA
GREETINGS
Open 9 A.M. to 6 PM. Evenings by Appointment Ph. 7-7977
Help Yourself to Beauty!
IIIWIVS BEAUTY SALON
652 N.E. 125th Street North MiamL Florida
TO ALL GREETINGS
MIAMI COAL & OIL CO.
and
MIAMI CRYSTAL ICE & COLD STORAGE CO.. INC.
1100 N.W. 21st Terrace Phone 2-7896


PAGE 14 C
*>Jeistnu*M^n
FRIDAY
Peerless Manufacturing Co.
Manufacturer oi
Corrugated Cartons and Cartons for Fruit Candies
23 N. E. 74th Street P*one 7-0953
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
PICK-UP AND DELIVERY
ZANDER'S LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANERS
3466 N. Miami Avenue P^one 821343
Compliments of the Season
MIAMI f\ |.| CWUlAlll$
141 L Flo.ler V L Jfr 4 Miretlt Mil.
H. 24135 ^HXaJIJ^ H.MM
THl SHOIS YOU'VE KNOWN AND 10VID fOt HAM
TO ALL GREETINGS
HENRY A. POHL. INC.. Slat* Distributors
GRAY MARINE MOTORS
CONTINENTAL INDUSTRIAL ENGINES
GASOLINE and DIESEL
410 N. E. 13th Street Phone 2-1577
GREETINGS TO OUR MANY FRIENDS
MIAMI DIAMOND CENTER
Mr. & Mrs. Jacob Rabinowitz
Mr. & Mrs. David Rabinowitz
Mr. & Mrs. Morris Rabinowitz
Mr. & Mrs. Sol Goldstein
TITLE INSURANCE
A delimit insurance contract instead of an OPINION
as to the condition oi title.
Longford Building, Miami 82-5618
ESCROWS ABSTRACTS
FIDELITY TITLE COMPANY TOM BLAKE
i
La Vigne Electric
163 N. E. 24th StreetPhone 2-1759
605 Lincoln Road
TO ALL GREETINGS
I. W. IIIWAI
COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY"
Phone 58-2923
GREETINGS TO ALL
SKAGSETH
YOUR FRIENDLY STATIONERY STORE
114 N.E. 2nd AveM.4d!l 14M N.W. 36th SI.-4S-4SA3
7We N.E. 2nd Av._7W511 U07 Washington Ave_5.M4
Newly arrived infants from Moslem lands are washed at a IDC child-care cet
ticipahng in their first Seder in Israel. Too young to ask the traditional Four I
will nonetheless be observers of an ancient festival which marks the Great
EINSTEIN AND THE UNIVERSE ON HIS 75TH Glfil
Continued from Pees 4C
of cruelty and hatred," was strong-
er than his desire to be left alone,
so he accepted an appointment to
the Commission pour la Coopera-
tion Intellect tiello of the League
of Nations. Only upon noticing
that the League did not function
satisfactorily and that, instead of
preventing the use of force alto-
gether, it urged the weak nations
to submit to the demands of the
big powers, did he resign.
It was only Hitler's assumption
of power that caused Einstein to
modify his extreme views on paci-
fism. Realizing that this was not
the time for upholding pacifist
ideas <"When the time comes to
preserve life then we have to fight
back"), he persuaded himself that
the Fascists would stop at nothing,
and that the present civilization
would be destroyed by the new
barbarians if they would not be
crushed in time. Having left Ger-
many shortly before Hitler had be-
come Chancellor of the Reich, Ein-
stein demonstratively broke all his
relationships with the Reich and
resigned from the Prussian Acad-
emy.
Once Nazism had forced Einstein
to alter his views, he continued
to fight the Brown Plague as a
humanist as well as in his capacity
"t a scientist. As is commonly |
known by now, it was Einstein's
early discovery that under certain
conditions matter could be chang-'
ed into energy and vice versa,;
which enabled the scientists to con-
struct the atomic bomb. Worried
about the possibility that the Nazis
might produce the weapon before 1
the Americans. Einstein, in Aug-
ust 1939. wrote a letter to Presi-
dent Roosevelt saying that a bomb
could be produced which, "explod-
ed in a port might very well de-
stroy the whole port together with
the surrounding territory." For-
tunately, Einstein advice to accel-
aa
erate research on the practical use
of uranium did not fall on deaf
ears, so that six yean after the
scientist had mailed his letter the
first atomic bomb was dropped
from a U.S. airplane.
But the fact that the war ended
with an Allied victory did not
cause him to stop worrying about
the state of the world. Among oth-
er suggestions, he developed a plan
for the preservation of peace de-
spite atomic bombs. Asked What
weapons would be used in a Third
World War, he made this char
act eristic reply:
"I don't know. But I can tell
you what they'll use in the fourth
rocks!"
In this connection I remember
distinctly his appearance, a couple
of years ago, on Mrs. Roosevelt's
television program. Talking on
atomic energy -and world peace, he
warningly raised s finger ss
though he were, not in s studio,
but in a schoolroom crowded with
naughty adolescents. "The first
problem is to do sway with mutual
fear and distrust," the sage as-
serted. "In the last analysis, every
kind of peaceful cooperation among
men is primarily based on mutual
trust and only secondly on insti-
tutions such as courts of justice
and police."
There are very few people
equipped to judge on Einstein's
accomplishments in physics, and I
am not one of them. But I heartily
agree with that colleague of his
who once remarked that Einstein
was the only scientist of whom he
would say that, after subtracting
all his achievements in his particu-
lar field, he would remain just as
distinguished as betore.
Einstein measures up to Spi-
noza's ideal "Free Man" sober
in his judgments, always acting
in good faith, and showing equal
courage whether he elects to give
battle or to retreat. Emerson, too.
would have been fool)
The latter may not be,
American philosopberii,
character is even higbwl
lect, thinking being H
yet living being the _,
but his whole life has kta]
roboration of the lib
opher's penetrating!
Emerson, our septu_,
freethinker, but far fnn|
atheist (though to this i
bigots can be found i
who foolishly link the'
Relativity, a purely it*
with the emotional i
the agnostics and nil
stein is merely opposed I
in a personal God to _
appeal for the fulfilment
wishes, whom they en
fluence by means of
prayer. He links the I
God who can be puces]
human being with the I
priesthood, and he i
vast power frequently |
hands of priests. Still Id
fundamentally from thesf
tury scientists who. pnsu
discoveries, thought tbeys)
pense with the idea of il
Being As a matter cfl
stein considers himself I]
religious man:
"The most beautiful!
can experience is the i
is the sower ot all tnsj
science. He to whom tknj
is a stranger, who can s|
wonder and stand rapt f
as good as dead. To
what is impenetrable Ml
exists, manifesting itsi]
highest wisdom and thel
ant beauty, which our fll|
can comprehend only
primitive forms tbisf
this feeling, is at the eaf
religiousness. In this
this sense only, 1 WQ
ranks of devoutly reli
GREETINGS
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
FRANK O. PHI ITT, Inc.
INSURANCE
*
350 NX 15th STREET
PHONE 2-3169
'.
White Rock
3300 MARY STREET
MAM. FLA.
Phone 83-1633
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY
To Jewry Everywhere
"RICHARD "DICsT BERENSON
And Associates
MIAMI FBOISTON
-WE COVER THE'
TheSherwin ." -
14 N.f. Jtas A.e. IMS W. Bsfler ""jT.sj.
i n* n, mm t-*, Ph. ss-sts) 3 **"!,
* 'HIM,, SHSMH !!>. r*. SS-STM **
IS Peace Be lees Mve. MIS Herrttse St
144* M.W. Je* "
wi-
ll


18. 1954
+Jewish Fhrkfctn
PAGE 15 C
OF
lUt<| from Paea 2 C
to learn that although
Lt familiar with the He-
,dar. they managed to
ith Jewish observances.
i the matter is that they
ierve the Jewish holidays
to the Hebrew calendar,
the Jewish celebrations
istian months. Yom Kip-
ai basis, was observed on
day after the new moon
ber. Passover was cele-
the full moon in March.
Inquisition learned of
rvances, the Marranos
'ed to change their plans.
anced the celebrations
pthe Seder was celebrated
toys after the appearance
moon in March, instead
9 days.
ft* the sixteenth day that
no- baked their matzot.
|wo preceding days, which
to their peculiar Hebrew-
calendar, were really
I they did not eat bread or
mring their clandestine
ey ate an entire sheep.
icipants wore their tra-
loes and held staffs in
ids, just as the ceremony
bed in the Bible.
Observance Africa
uliar Passover observ-
the Marranos found its
he New World. In Mexico,
Jews even .smeared the
sheep on their doorposts
med in the Bible. (Exodus
e of the unusual Passover
of the Marranos was that
g the waters of a river or
with willow branches,
them was a reminder of
tag of the waters of the
This custom was probably
with the use of the wil-
ches on Succot.
millions of Jews observe
eve with the reading of
gadah and the usually ac-
traditions of the Seder,
i one tiny band of men,
and children who celebrate
ival as it was done in the
the ancient Israelites. Liv-
he vicinity of Mount Geri-
Palestine, these people
as the Samaritans, carry on
passover in a manner which
ve ceased for some two
d years.
sually accepted theory has
at the Samaritans were the
colonists who settled in
ter the country was crush-
Assyria. However, modern
al research has proven that
sent Samaritans are not
ts of the pagan colonists
in the Northern kingdom
1 by the conquerors of Sa-
Nor are they to be identi-
flNehemiah's opponents, of
rcian period. Actually, re-
search authorities claim that the
Samaritans of today are really a
tiny remnant of an ancient and
great Jewish sect, who were always
strongly religious, with faith in one
God and strictly observing the
Torah. They never recognized the
Biblical books beyond Joshua as
holy. In other words, they accept
only the Hexateuch, that is the
Five Books of Moses and Joshua.
They believe that Shechem, the
present Nablus, was the Holy City
and that the holy mountain was not
Zion, but Mount Gerizim. The Sa-
maritans and the other Jews be-
came blood enemies who-despised
one another in the very same man-
ner as the Karaites and Rabbinic
Jews hated eat* other centuries
later.
It is this strong group, now num-
bering a handlpl of souls, which
continues, to tmJi4av,.to observe
Passover in a manner which Jews
ceased to prattlSe1 19 centuries
ago. Today, on the eve of Passover,
their colony is teeming with activ-
ity, as they prepare to slaughter
the Paschal Lamb and carry out
every detail as prescribed by tne
laws of Moses. Theirs is a strange
Judaism, tinged even with a slight
heathenism such as that which in-
fluenced our forefathers many
centuries agoT
To the modern student of Jew-
ish lore, the Samaritan rite is the
nearest expression of Passover as
practiced by Moses and the Israel-
ites. Their observance is so primi-
tive that it even differs from the
Passover in the days of the Second
Temple. They know nothing about
the use of wine, of the Charoset, or
eating the meal at a comfortable
table. Even the practice of reclin-
ing during the Passover eve meal
is strange to them.
The principal rite in the Samari-
tan Passover observance consists
of sacrificing a sheep and eating
it, in a great hurry, with matzot
and bitter herbsas was done by
the ancient Israelites. Leading the
ritual is their high priest who per-
forms rites very similar to those
of the priests in ancient times.
Falasha Jews
Another sect which performs the
Passover lamb sacrifice is that of
the Falashas of Ethiopia. Known
as the Black Jews of Abyssinia,
they, too, follow a primitive type of
Judaism based only on the Bible.
Because they do not know Hebrew
they follow and observe the laws
of the Bible by reading them in an
Ethiopian translation. On Passover
eve, they assemble in their syna-
gogue, and a lamb is sacrificed in
the name of the entire Falasha
community.
A fascinating Passover observ-
ance is that of the Jews in the
Caucasian mountain region. Sit-
ting on the ground, they observe
their Seder by being dressed in
THE ACES
their best clothes, with a pistol at
their sides. The womenfolk are be-
decked in jewels, and the young
girls wear flowers in their hair.
When the group reaches that por-
tion of the Haggadah which de-
clares that in every generation
every Jew must feej as it he him-
self had been redeemed from
Egypt, a dramatic presentation is
introduced.
The Rabbi or Chacham, as he is
known, wraps a piece of matzeh in
a piece of cloth, places it on his
shoulder and after walking a short
distance, declares: "In this way
our forefathers went out of the
land of Egypt, their kneading
troughs bound up in their clothes
upon their shoulders."
A young man is selected to play
the part of a wandering Jew arriv-
ing from Jerusalem bringing tid-
ings that the redemption is ap-
proaching. The youth goes outside
and then knocks on the doors. He
is re-admitted and a conversation
on this order follows:
"Who are you and what do you
want?"
"I am a Jew and I wish to ob-
serve Passover, our season of deliv-
erance, with you."
"How do we know you are a
Jew?"
"I wear a four-cornered gar-
ment with fringes."
There are many other questions
and finally the "stranger" de-
clares: "I come from Jerusalem, the
holy city; the road is long and
filled with obstacles. "He then
breaks into tears, and suddenly he
is invited to come into the house.
He stands with a sword at his side,
a staff in his hand and a sack on
his shoulders. Joy breaks out and
the visitor is asked many questions.
"What is happening in Jerusalem.
How are our brothers? Is the Mes-
siah coming soon? ."
The masquerader then relates of
Jerusalem, of the beautiful fields
and mountains of Israel, of the
holy places. He assures the listen-
ers that the sages of the holy city
have had signs which indicate that
the days of the Messiah are fast ap-
proaching.
The long history of Passover has
had many changes and evolutions.
However, it has retained one fea-
ture from the beginning up to the
present timethat of being a Jew-
ish family celebration. Since the
days in the desert of Sinai until
now, as American Jews gather
about their festive board, it has
been a festival which unites all
members of the family circle at one
table, at one happy feast.
In joining together in family
unity, Jews observing the Seder,
relive and share their collective
memories of the heritage of Is-
rael. They strengthen their hopes
to live as Jews and as free men.
Milgrim, Inc.
\\ omen's Apparel
738 LINCOLN ROAD v PHONE 5-3429
MIAMI BEACH i
TO AIL... HAPPY PASSOVER
R. K. Cooper, Inc.
2733 PONCE DE LEON BOULEVARD
Phono 83-4654
GREETINGS
MAYFLOWER RESTAURANT,
80 S.E. Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida
Serving:
CLUB BREAKFAST from 25c LUNCHEON from 85a
DINNER from 1.00
Open Daily 7 a-m. to 1 aan.
TO ALL...
GREETINGS
WEST INDIES FRUIT COMPANY
605 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD
Phone 82-8473

Jtat JKUgm got TO ALL A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER
*
* IN LOS ANGELES ............................ IT'S MIKE LYMAN'S
* IN CHICAGO ............................................ IT'S HENRICI'S
* IN NEW YORK ................................................ IT'S LINDY'S
* IN MIAMI BEACH IT'S .
Will I*'11*"S
RESTAURANT SANDWICH SHOP
No. 1 Lincoln Road Collins Ave. at 21 St.
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
Houser Company, Ine.
Fire and Casualty Insurance '
Florida Bond and Mortgage Co.
Mortgage Loan* & Investment*
Honser Realty Co., Ine.
Real Estate Property Management
First National Bank. Miami Phone 3-2648
To Our Patrons and Friends A Most Happy Holiday
. Chi Wk Ctnof
EXPERT WORKMANSHIP
34t2 N.W. 7th Street Phone 444742
TO ALL GREETINGS
SHENANDOAH CANDIES
PHONE 4-0831
514 S.W. 22nd Avenue
Miami, Florida
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER
Richie Plumbing Supply, Ine.
NEW AND USED PLUMBING SUPPLIES
2116 N.W. 27th Aye. Telephone 64-4537 Miami Flo,
THE LEVIN FAMILY


PAGE 16 C
*Jeisiifk**Man
For the finest in Metal Work
JOHN STAMFORD & SONS
ORNAMENTAL METAL WORKERS
3615 N.W. 46th Street
Telephone 64-7918
BRONZE ALUMINUM IRON

1733 ALTON ROAD
Tel. 58-4134
GREETINGS
FRANK J. ROONEY
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
5880 N. E. 4th Avenue
Phone 7-6695
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY
M A R V B I- C L K A N E R S
SERVICE and QUALITY CLEANING
Mrs. Luclle P. Neher. Owner
16 CORAL WAY PHONE 48-2554
IKE
OF
Continued from P IOC
to the common man. and to every
Jewish home where the Blue-and-
W hue Box of the JNF. by its very
presence, has added a special mean-
ing to all family celebrations and
simchot mitzvah. This little box en-
ables the Jews, scattered though
thev are throughout the world, by
the" small act of their daily contri-
bution of a few coins, to become
! partners in the redemption of their
homeland, in the creation of a new
Wdet* and in the cementing of a
firm foundation for the future.
After the Declaration of the
State, I saw in my travels through
i the countries of the Diaspora in
I North and South America, in West-
! ern Europe, and in South Africa, a
I special type of volunteer for whom
the Keren Kayemeth is a symbol,
an eternal light, a beacon that
brightens the remotest places of
the Dispersion, warming the heart
SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL
$
NATIONAL PRODUCE CO. OF
MIAMI, INC.
Wholesale Produce Crate to Carload
1229 N.W. 21st Street Phone 3-6491
Ph. 84-5494
VIM
ELECTROLUX CORP.
7819 Biscayne Boulevard
INMAN
MIAMI, FLORIDA
All C O N (I T I o Nil
N. MIAMI AVL AT FIRST ST. H.o. 9-1141
BEST WISHES
for a
HAPPY PASSOVER
Moihe SJioreff
. impetus to redeem
and never extinguished. These
people, bound by their tendered ;
and finest feeling! to Israel, to the
land of Israel, and to the dynamic i
development of the land, are repaid
by the noble purpose Riven to I heir
lives and everything they do. They
devote decades to this work; they
grow up in it. j;row 0|(i jn jt anj
die with the feeling that they have
performed a real and living service
and helped to create something
that would bear fruit forever.
From yet another point of view
the Jewish National Fund ex-
presses the essence of our objec-
tives. From the hour that the Jew-
ish National Fund started on its
path till the present day. it was,
it is, a fighting institution. The
men at the helm had to show firm-
ness and reason, cunning and dar-
ing. I remember the great Strug
gle fought by the Keren Kayemeth
for the redemption of Emek Heier
and Emek Zebulun. the Eastern
and Western portions of Emek Yex-
reel, and areas in Beit Sha'an and
Galilee; and what great obstacles
had to be overcome at every step
of our return to the land, its set-
tlement, its farming, its protection
and conservation All this time the
Jewish National Fund fought a bit-
ter security battle and a difficult
political struggle. Who from
amongst us. the veterans, doesn't
remember the days of the White
Paper and the Land Transfer Regu-
lations, which seemed to lock us in
stocks of only 5 percent of the en-
tire country? How many cunning
ruses and how much stubborn ef-
fort were expended in overcoming
these difficulties? We smashed
fences, breached walls and broke
out of our narrow prison to free-
dom.
Today the Jewish National Fund
stands at the right hand of the
State of Israel and the State give;
its support to the Jewish National
fund. The Fund is reclaiming wide
areas of wasteland by aforestation;
it has planted 25 million trees
since the establishment of the
State, as compared with 10 million
in all the years preceding. National
land has formed the basis of 300
new settlements founded in the
past five or six years.
TO ALL GREETINGS
US. ROYAL TIRES
AMAUE (Pennsylvania) M0T0B r*
DADE TIRE CO, he.
1501 N. MIAMI AVENUE JT
Phone 3-8445
TO ALL HOLIDAY GREETINGS
GREENLEAF & CR0!
JEWELERS
1000 Lincoln Road
Palm Beach-247 Worth A

YOUR TRANSFER PROBLEI
ES TRANSFER
48 N.W. 7th Street
YACHTS AND MOTOR VESSELS
Office Phene S2-579S ImMhm I
W. F. M ll.tskov
MARINE SURVEYOR GASOLINE I DIESEL
943 S.W. North River Drive
f. 0. Rex 178*
TO ALL
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
ALEXANDER D. SMI1
Real Estate
382 Miracle Mile. Coral Gables Phontl
and
3365 S.W. 3rd Avenue Phone M
g k i e t a v a s
from
YOUNG REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COF
PAUL E.
HELLIWELL
'rebuilt batteries
12 Month Guarantee$7.50 up, exch.
EXPERTS OH STARTER AND GENERATOR
REASONABLE PRICES-
BATTERIES GENERATORS STAH
HI VOLT BATTERY
1880 N.W. 7th Avenue
DORN MARTIN DRUG
PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS
5898 Sunset Drive
GREETINGS
* D D U
MAKERS OF FINE CANDffS
BONDED FRUIT SHIPPED
1121 Woehlngton Avenue
TO ALL PASSOVER GREETINGS
Florida B-lldf rs ****
100 N. E. 1st Are.


MID SCHWARTZ
Agency
Lrf Raising Ce*wM
JllNCOlN ROAD BUILDING
[WisfceM **U5*
Istablishei 1949
'We livcuit rer
Successful Gracious
LMn$"
toft
SCHOOL
I WISHES YOU ALL
WRY HAPPY PASSOVl*
Through High School -
ic Commercial Courses. 75-
on Spaciout, Beautiful
Indoor-Outdoor Classes,
tents Accepted for Shoct
Period!.
Iest AVE.
PH. 5
U>PY PASSOVER -
THE
IK1STLER
COMPANY
luPONT BUILDING
MIAMI. FLORIDA
Phone 2-5154
t Monthly Payment in
i Area on Horn* Loans
[lowest rates
Mortgage Insurance
Charge
GREETINGS
it's Roofing Company
Tied on continuously
11920 thru "booms."
ssions" and hurri-
In a great many
\ it has maintained roofs
pe same families and
i thru two generations.
ae not "Super-roofers"
kre make every effort to
worthy job. We con-
I that when we install a
lit is our responsibility
|it has outlived the term
as for which the class
bf was intended.
Sincerely yours,
Bill Palmer
Phone 3-6244
MEW!
in one great
every new
entific improve-
nt known to
- OU Industry
ciri,,
.
'wet'
%
.V
,ajM(i/H
^MOTOff
NGf NfW TRW HD
IM0T0R OIL THIS WEEK!
J^f^MUEIoiHidliigiio
MIAMI. FLORIDA
FRIDAY. APRIL 18. 1954
SEC. D
GREETINGS
Frank
Fischer
Steel Erector. Inc. -
5706 NX 2nd AVENUE
PHONE 84-1738
VOGUE
Laundry and Clean*
PHONE 5-7489
The Best For Less
Office and Plant
1425 20th Street
MIAMI BEACH
11 r i w I $
RELIABLE PLUMBING, INC.
"Tear Pofronoge Appreciates"'
193 NX 119th STREET
PHONE 19-4297
TO ALL GREETINGS
Stern Electrical
Engineering
RCA Radios Television
Sales and Service
5138 S.W. 8th STREET
Phone 4-6540
, Marine latjint Overhaul
and tastelletiea
Distributers Rensetb Marine Eneieei
MIAMI MARINE
ENGINEERS
411 S.W. 2n AVENUE
MIAMI 36, FLORIDA
F. W. Searsea C A. Itwter
TiIpoSM" MSJS
Happy Passover To All
My Friends
Augiit Studio
INTERIOR DECORATTNG
1230 Alton Road
GREETINGS!
^Un-ps" Chirk
GOLF PROFESSIONAL
Biltmore 3t Granada Courses
Lessons by Appointment
Compute Una of Golfing
Equipment
Phone Biltmore 4-0649. 48-0410
Granada 48-9909. 4-9143
GREETINGS
MUTUAL LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANY
OF NEW YORK
S10 Langford Bldg.
PHONE 8-4747
Sincere Wishes to All Our
Relatives and Friends for
A Happy Passover
Mr. and Mrs.
George Chertkof
AND FAMILY v
a*WW%
Now 8 Location* To Serve You
Warshaw-Settle
PRESCRIPTION PHARMACIES
Stan No. 1
2340 Pone* Do Loon Boulevard
Phona 4S-2S07
Store No. 2
Coral Cables Bus Terminal
Phono 4S-4612
Also Open Evenings and Sundays
Prescriptions Filled Promptly
Cosmetics Candies Gifts
Elizabeth Arden. Helena Rubinstein
FREE DELIVERY
^*yrf>V*V*"V*lV'y'W*>*<*'V>'W'V*
A HAPPY PASSOVER
LEWIS
BEAUTY SHOPPE
1355 Washington Ave.
MIAMI BEACH
GREETINGS
*
TOM DUPREE
REAL ESTATE
741 Dad* Bird.
MIAMI BEACH
PHONE 58-5224
PASSOVER
GREETINGS
NATIONAL TITLE
COMPANY
and
ASSOCIATES
-J
TO All GREETINGS
Roekmoor f
Garage
New I/ne'er New Management
211 N.E. 59th STREET
Phone 84-7441
TO ALL .
A MOST
HAPPY
PASSOVER
James E. Roche
PAINTING CONTRACTOR
217 N.E. 97th STREET
Phone 78-5852
SINCERE HOLIDAYS
GREETINGS
FROM
NORMANDY
SCHOOL
L0 HUBERMAN
1021 Biarrits Drive
PHONE 86-6811
MIAMI BEACH

TO ALL .
PASSOVER
GREETINGS
We Specialize In
Hotel Contracts
Custom Finishing
e Sand Blasting
Tropical Refinishing
Dade
Refinlshers
5002 E. 10th LANE
HIALEAH, FLORIDA
Phone 88-6846


PAGE 2 D
i~i<*Th*k#*r>
TO ALL GREETINGS!!
JANES REALTY COMPANY
Not Incorporated
KENDALL. FLORIDA Phone 67-3651
HOMESTEAD. FLORIDA Phone 1303
POMPANO BEACH Phone 9815
A. W. JANES. Registered Broker
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
WEBER, THOMPSON & LEFCOURT
ACCOUNTANTS AND AUDITORS
Shoreland Arcade
Phone 3-6251
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
CHRISTOPHER MOTORS
Plymouth DeSoto
1200 N.E. 2nd Avenue Phone 3-3341
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER
W. CARROLL WILSON
Real Estate Appraiser & Consultant
duPont Building '
A HAPPY PASSOVER
MILLER MACHINERY AND SUPPLY CO.
Formerly
MTLLER-LENFESTEY SUPPLY CO.
127 N. E. 27th Street Phone 82-5484
BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER
Custombilt Furniture Mfg. Co.
100 N.E. 40th Street Phone 78-4781
Showrooms Corner 79th St. and Biscayne Blvd., Phone 78-4244
RAIIHI and MRS. S. 31. .11 \4 III II
MR. and MRS. MORTON ST1TSKY
STELLA REGINA and LEO JAY
Extend To All Jewry
Best Wishes for
A HAPPY PASSOVER
Mrs. Sadie Fagan
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hershbein
and Children
Extend Passover Greetings To All
Th
Remarkable Career of
Sculptor Jacob Epstein
By ALFRED WERNER
On Ike lest day of last year Great
Britain's Queen Elliabeth II com-
pleted a lengthy honor list while
sailing with her husband to New
Zealand on her commonwealth
tour. Among the acceptable names
she radioed from the mid-Pacific to
who. like Max Weber and Abraham
Walkowitz, were deitld to leave
their mark on the 20th century art.
In the "Gay Nineties" some of the
very individuals who were to
mould American opinion, American
letters, and American arts in the
early part of the twentieth century.
England was that of the American-1 were roaming the East Side with
bom sculptor, Jacob Epstein, upon
whom knighthood was beetowed.
There is nothing unusual foe
British Kings and Queens to be-
stow some of the highest honors
available in the Empire on persons
of the Jewish. Moslem or any other
non-Christian faith. Nor do the sov-
ereigns discriminate against in-
dividuals born outside England and
the British Commonwealth. But the
selection of Epstein is curious and.
at the same time most gratifying
because, in the past, he was a
stormy petrel of modern art, and
for several decades, a center of
heated controversies. As recently
as 1945. when the artist offered his
huge winged Lucifer to London's
Tate Gallery, the gift was rejected
because there was disagreement as
to the figure's merits; in 1952, how-
ever, the Tate trustees reversed
their position, and the following
year public opinion was ready to
put the coveted "Sir" before his
Biblical first name, to bestow on
the septuagenarian an honor de-
nied to such British colleagues of
his as Frank Dobson or the late
Eric Gill.
American Jews have every rea*
son to be proud of Epstein, for
though lie spent the better part of
his life in England, and has long
been a naturalized British subject,
he is a product of New York
schools. -0
Epstein was born in 1880, on the
Lower East Side of Manhattan. He
was one of a group of gifted boys
its pushcarts and peddlers, its
long-bearded patriarchal Jews in
the Ghetto, its Italians, Irish and
Chinese.
But Jacob did not join the other
Jewish youngsters on his street in
warding off the Irish boys, nor did
he observe the holidays in the syna-
gogue with his parents, recent im-
migrants from Tsarist Russia.
Worlds apart from his large. Yid-
dish-speaking family, the adoles-
cent withdraw and spent his time
reading "Las Miserables," "The
Brothers Karamazov," "Leaves of
Grass" and even the New Testa-
ment. He attended political meet-
ings to hear Prince Kropotkin, Eu-
gene Debs, and the single taxer
Henry George, addressing the
crowds. At other times he would
simply wander about the streets,
sketching the odd characters who
engaged his interest. "Rembrandt
would have delighted in the East
Side," Epstein remarked, at the
peak of his fame: "I imagine that
the feeling I have for expressing a
human point of view, giving human
rather than abstract implications to
my work, comes from these early
formative years."
As a teen-ager, Epstein attend-
ed the life class at the Art Students
League uptown, but always held
himself aloof from his fellow-stu-
dents. He cared neither for their
bad jokes nor their bad beer. He
loved to drop into Durand Ruel's
Gallery on Fifth Avenue where he
admired, not only the French Im-
W
prsssionistj, but
ican "rebels" *'
George Innet, All
Thomas Eakins '
moved tobetur'
Jacob refused to W
shook their heads bi
o stay here, happy J
ion. And thus Ja^ j
the rickety old
corner of Raster .
Streets Re lived um
like a shed thai a i
just an iron bediteaTj
s,'>ve. and JacobT'
sketches and
types on them.
paining]
Jacob Epstein was born and grew up on this teeming street
in the Lower East Side of Manhattan.
By cooking huw,.
Paying only $4 rest, I
to make ends meet obi
and he was contenta]
that amount by sellingskL
There was so much tail
sketch, for instance.
actor. Jacob Adler, t
his Second Avenue i
poet, Morris Rosenfeld.il
a tailor's sweetshop. OaJ
stein received a I
was asked to illustrate 1
Hapgoods book about |
Side This volume, "IVjj
the Ghetto." appeared
the age of twenty, I
mastered the art oh
self through a few, i
tive bold lines. It it i
no American publisher (
this remarkable work.
With the money he |
work, supplemented bjj
income from a rnaguiK]
bought a steamship
France on a trans-octal
to the first World War,i
cation was considered!
less the artist had sun
He toiled hard at the ]
Beaux Arts, but was i
tinue in his anatomjt
the green arm of a.
handed around for i
fainted.
In 1905. this
can" (as he wasnid
fessors and students) I
to London without
idea that he was
come a Londoner, a Bn
and the husband of;
tish girl. On the otktj
England he was tat;
count U-.-!. controveniey
many adversaries. He t
a gallery "*ner tWj
visitor had explained:,
like to take Ep-tinortl
er -hop and have his I
ped off." A confused f
ed British Prime Mi
fainted as he was urn
his monuments in Hydel
as time went on. mortf
people understood his r
and agreed with hia
Now and then Jew I
artist for occupying
the symbols of a reliW
Continued w '*
GREETINGS
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901 N.W. 71st St, Miami. Florida Phone 7-0417
Courteous Service Good Lumber Reasonable Prices
SEASON'S GREETINGS
REED CONSTRUCTION CORP.
Engineers and Contractors
1345 20th Street
Miami Roach, Flo.
FOUNDATIONS DOCKS GUNITINO
BASCULE AND FIXED BRIDGES CONCRETE STEEL
COMPLETE DINNERS
with large variety 0f entrtti
FROM $1.20
Jerry's Restaurant
S,NE?.!N-CLV,DE8: Choice of apse-
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Fr P.rtilng Op.t, 24 Hour.
Air Conditioned
By th* Airport
Bervlns "The rV-xt of th. Kur."
3Sth Street and LeJeune Rd
Phone 64-5341
SEASON'S BEST WISHES
TO ALL
TEFfTS GOWNS
BRIDAL &
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3546 Coral Way 1341.2
"WHERE THE ELITE MEET"
SHANGRI-LA
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LUNCHEONS DINNERS
Elks Club Building
15 N. E. 3(4 Avenue
PHONE INtt
OPEN TILL UK
Orders Put Up to Take Out
We Wire Flowers
Phone tll-7113
EM and STAN'S
FLORIST
Bridal Bouquets Cut Flowers
Potted Plants Funeral Wreaths
Flower Shop and Nursery
CORSAGES We Deliver
14*01 W. DIXIE HWY.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
Dial II then 85980
,!REETINS"
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RESTAUBANT <'*}
i *T US CATER '"r_|
Bu. U*&0
If"
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WiRBIM'Sl>*TI
<***'Id
Ml*"


V APRIL 16. 1954
*Je*istn*ridltor

PAGE 3 D
-*it
'^^MelaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaVsaaalsaaaleBaWaaaaaaaaaaaaaH
officials of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith shown on a four-week study
J West Germany. They traveled at the invitation of the Bonn Government. Jacob Alson
I, treasurer of the League, is chairman of the group that includes Benjamin R Epstein
kd from left), ADL's national director, and Nathan C. Belth (left), its public relations di-
L Mr. Alson is accompanied by his wife. The group is visiting Frankfurt, Bonn, Co-
I, Dusseldorf, Essen, Munich, Hamburg and Berlin, surveying civil rights and reliqious
lions in West Germany.
ie Fate of the Old Rashi Shul
By SAM MILLER
JTA
blSWhen Nazi vandals set
the synagogue in this Rhine-
own during the November
ks of 1938, the walls remain-
Dding they had already
the vicissitudes of better
years.
(solidity irked the local Nazi
I In 1942, with Allied bombs
on German cities, they
: special machinery into the
ral shell 'that remained of
nagogue and, with trained
in attendance to see to
neighboring houses were
tigered, blew up the walls.
field of rubble was left
IJews had, with short inter-
is, prayed morning and night
I Almighty for more years, it
pved, than in any other house
ship in Europe.
pioneer Jewish settlers in
i are so lost in antiquity that
popular legend identified
>s members of the tribe of
din who had migrated to the
|of the Rhine directly from
llestine of Biblical times. It
likely, though, that the
pws came here together with
nan legionaires. Around the
LOOO at any rate, records of
pognc Fair show among the
a Jewish merchant from
ne Middle Ages, the Rhine
of Speyer, Worms and Mainz
pee)known in Hebrew by
Ibreviation "SHUM," formed
[contracted initials of the trio
were renowned among Jews ev-
erywhere as centers of wealth and
learning that enjoyed far-reaching
privileges granted by various Em-
perors. Not so long ago the ceiling
of the synagogue in a city as far
away as Mohlilev in White Russia
was decorated with a mural show-
ing an idealized picture of Worms.
The scholars who made their
homes here transformed Worms in-
to one of the oustanding kehillot
of Europe. In the shadowy interior
of the Worms synagogue, founded
by the childless couple Jacob and
Rachel a generation earlier, a
young man who later became the
beloved Bible commentator Rashi
studied in the 11th century at the
feet of Isaac Ben Eliezer Halevi
and Jacob Ben Yakar of Worms,
both great Talmudists. From there
Rabbi Eleazar Ben Yehuda Ben
Kalonymos, the Tosafist and liturgi-
cal poet known throughout Jewry
as the "Rokeah," introduced the
Cabbalah into Germany. During the
third Crusade, a mob of pilgrims
killed his wife and two daughters.
Rabbi Meir of Rothenburg (1220-
1293), the universally acknowledg-
ed "Light of the Exile" who was
also known as "Maharam," was
born in Worms and buried in the
local cemetery when, years after
his death, his body was redeemed
from the hands of Emperor Ru-
dolph. Rabbi Meir had set out for
the Holy Land, but the German
sovereign simply caused him to
be thrown into a fortress so as to
discourage other Jews from emi-
grating. Seven long years the recog-
nized leader of German Jewry was
held for ransom, but he remained
steadfast in his refusal to permit
his co-religionists to purchase his
freedom, lest such a precedent in-
spire the Emperor to repeat this
species of blackmail. Unyielding to
the end, Rabbi Meir passed away in
prison.
Other gaonim, too, were buried
in the Worms cemeteryin 1427,
for example, Morenu Jacob Ben
Moses Malevi, the eminent "Ma-
haril." In later centuries, the prog-
ress of the times was reflected in
the activities of the distinguished
sons of the Worms Community.
One of them, Samson Wertheimer,
became the potent Vienna financier
and Court banker of the 18th cent-
ury, a great Talmudic scholar and
benefactor of Jewry. More than
100 years ago, it was in Worms
that, probably for the first time in
Germany, a professing Jew was
elected mayor of his native city.
In 1934, when Jews celebrated
the Synagogue's 900th anniversary,
Worms was still a flourishing Com-
munity with more than 1,000 mem-
bers. Today not one is left who
could even say kaddish for them:
two elderly women make up the
city's resident' Jewish population,
and there is no foreseeable chance
that congregation will ever again
be reconstituted. Worms, which
epitomized the spiritual glory that
was German Jewry's in another
day, now symbolizes its extinction.
The two women may continue to
live there for many years to come,
and possibly one of the erstwhile
Continued on Page 12 D
GREETINGS
eigaard & Preston
Builders, Inc.
I Ponce de Leon Blvd.
ONE 83-8014
CORAL GABLES
I Passover Greetings
Tail & Company
I8017 N.E. 2nd Ave.
MIAMI
V. t.alardi
PW Biacayne Blvd.
^* ALL HIS FRIENDS
HAPPY PASSOVER
GREETINGS
JOHN A. MATTHEWS
620 SECURITY BLDG.
MIAMI. FLA.
Up-to-Date Van Service
LEW M. CISCO
Transfer & Storage
328 N. E. 2nd Avenue
PHONE 2-5411
TO JEWRY EVERYWHERE
It'i a Pleasure to Extend
GREETINGS
TYCOON
TACKLE SHOP. Inc.
400 S.W. Mnd Avenua
METALLIC
ENGINEERING CO.
Specializing in Alloy Metals
275 S. W. 6th STREET
SHOP PHONE 9-5634
GREETINGS
Reg's
Appliances
"Vm cm c SUM, U Wt
WtSriNGHOUSt"
12440 NX. 7th AVENUE
PHONE 7-7767
When Friend* Drop In During the Holiday* Serve Delicious
Cakes and Cookies from
SAVORY BAKE SHOP
1684 ALTON ROAD PHONE 585121
A HAPPY PASS0VCR TO ALL MR. and MRS. LOUIS MILNICK

" SreetIiIgs to all
E. B. LEATHERMAN
DADE COUNTY
COURT HOUSE
TO OUR MANY FRIENDS AND PATRONS .
MUCH HAPPINESS DURING THE HOLIDAY SEASON
H O B A R T
Miami Restaurant Equipment
905 N.E. 1st AVENUE
PHONE 9-2655
To Our Many Friends and Acquaintances
A Most Happy Passover
W
SHAFER and MILLER
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
6500 CELLINI STREET
Phone 67-3330
AiAAk"
r*W^*^*'*WA^'W'W'W'WA>>s'W'W'W'W'W*W'WA*P*
GREETINGS ____
CEMENT BLOCK INDUSTRIES
CERTIFIED CEMENT BLOCKS
Immediate Delivery pi
JACK SWERDLIN
4490 S.W. 74th AvenuaOff Bird Rd. PHONE 87-7690


PAGE 4 D
*Jen isifhrkKnr
FRIDAY.
APRai
A Happy Nllll'W to the
Jewish Community
J. E. LUDICK
620 N.E. 125th STREET
To All Passover Greetings
Lagoon Restaurant and Bar
YOUR PATRONAGE APPRECIATED
23 SUNNY ISLE BOULEVARD
TO ALL
A MOST HAPPY
PASSOVER
NASH MIAMI MOTORS, INC.
545 N. E. 15th Street Miami. Florida
Phone 9-2626
WHEN SHOPPING ASK FOR
ANITRA FASHIONS
AT YOUR FAVORITE STORE
miflVA LEE IMPORTERS, IIVC.
7343 Collins Are.. Miami Beach 252 Coral Way, Miami
86-2419 909
SEASON'S GREETINGS
Furnishers A Installers
Inlaid Linoleum Asphalt Tile
Rubber Tile
"EVERY INSTALLATION GUARANTEED"*
Phone for Fres Estimates
42SS N. W. 7th AVENUE PHONE 7
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER
DOUGLAS LUMBER COMPANY
MR. AND MRS. HERBERT NAURISON
AND DAUGHTER MURIEL ANN
LUMBER AND OTHER BUILDING MATERIALS
Phones 48-2465- 48 9862
3775 South Dbde Highway Miami. Honda
Advances Recorded in all
Sectors of IsraePs E
With the approach of its sixth
,,;i as an independent State,
Israel i- recording new advances
; -one development towsid
nk Independence, industry.
ilture, eonmonicatloBB, I
trade each n the r'
suits of run! work an.I sacrifice by
the men and women of Israel, and
ipacl of large-scale li
: leans through their
purchases of state of Israel Bonds.
The past twelve months *aw the
: i m a economic trend.
nh Israel increasing its exports
and |hing its imports drastic illy
This more favorable balance of |
trade is the result of an increase in
the number and si/e of industrial
plants, which are producing more
oft and hardgood commodities
than ever before: the expansion of
agricultural projects, which are
_;< itly improving supplies of food,
and the accelerated pace of mineral
exploration and development.
which is providing phosphates and
! potash for export.
Other contributing factors in the
establishment of the new economic
pattern were the gains made in the
field of transportation, which in-
cluded the following:
The completion of a 48-mile high-
way from Beers heba to S'dom. ]
which now provides easy transport
facilities to and from Israel's coast,
and has been a vital spur to the re-
activation of potash production at
the Dead Sea.
The enlargement of the capacity
of Haifa Harbor from 1.300.000 tons
to 4.000.000 Ions. The expanded
harbor will make Israel a major
trade center for the entire Middle
Eastern area.
The construction of a new rail-
way from Tel Aviv to Hadera.
which now provides as essential
link between the two major coastal
cities of Tel Aviv and Haifa.
Much of this wide industrial.
agricultural, mining and commer-
cial growth has been accomplished
with proceeds from the Israel Bond
Issue. Although Israel's battle for
economic self-sufficiency has been
difficult, the tide is turning. With
continued financial aid from Israel
bond investors in this country and
in Canada. Israel is expected to
experience a large increase in its
export trade.
Israel's trade deficit dropped to
$223,885,000 during 1953. as com-
pared to $314,157,000 in 1952. Im-
ports decreased by $76,874,000
while exports increased from $44.-
402.000 to $57,890,000. This im-
provement in foreign trade marks
a sharp upward move in Israel's
program for economic indepen-
dence.
Private investment capital, in-
cluding funds derived from the Is-
rael Bond Issue, helped Israel in-
crease its industrial efficiency. In
conoitiy<
Coffee plants now successfully grown in Israel. Era
hero aro the results of eight years ok trial and error i
mentation carried forward with the aid of Israel Bond)
1952. there were some 9.000 indus-
trial enterprises and workshops in
operation. By the end of 1953, the
figure had risen to more than 10.
000. During the same period, the
number of factory workers increas-
ed from 105.500 to 120,000. Elec
trical power capacity rose from
125.000 kilowatts to 180,00 kilo-
watts.
Israel Bond dollars have helped
to establish or expand dozens of
huge industrial firms, including the
Nesher Cement Company, Yuval
Gad Pipelines Ltd., Palestine Eco-
nomic Corporation and the Mekorat
Water Works Company.
Agriculturally. Israel advanced
rapidly during the past year. The
area under cultivation increased
from 737,50 acres to 875.000 acres,
while the area under irrigation rose
from 100.000 acres to 138.000 acres.
The farm worker corps reached a
high of 75.000. compared to.fc.000
in 1852
This Passover. Israel, utilizing
Israel Bond funds, is going for
ward with its huge nation-wide
water conservation program, which
includes the following major irriga-
tion projects that are scheduled for
completion by 1957:
The Huleh Valley Project, which
will supply water to the entire val-
ley and provide a source of hydro-
electric power.
The Kishon Valley Fnoject, which
will supply Haifa, sal meet the
water problems of th jRirrounding
area.
Taking advantage of some of the
areas which have already been
made fertile, Israeli scientists and
agricultural experts, in conjunction
with American and United Nations
SEASON'S GREETINGS
>ewman, Iturk
& < allioiiii
REALTORS
Real Estate & Mortgages
813-15 First National Bank Bldg
MIAMI. FLORIDA
AMERICA'S HEADQUARTERS
FOR
FOOD SERVICE EQUIPMENT
Supplies, Furnishings, Equipment
f e r
HOTELS, RESTAURANTS, CLUBS, RESORTS,
SCHOOLS, HOSPITALS, INSTITUTIONS
such as
CHINAWARE, GLASSWARE, SILVERWARE, ETC.
EDWARD DON & COMPANY
Phone 24125
1400 N. MIAMI AVE. MIAMI 32. FLA.
M GREEN
PLANT FOOD
On Youx Lawn?
Startling results cm b. ob-
f"'.i fwm this rich plant food
M.e ,COB,i minerals that
will help keep chinch bugs out
of your lawn. Sold exdualTely
HUGHES
SEED STORE
M 8. Miami Ave. Ph. 3.831,
SRifTINCS
E. II. Grappe
Associates, Inc.
TIME and SIGNAL SYSTEMS
31 SO H.W. 7th STRUT
tea* 44 1571
TO 411 Mf FffiENDS AMP
ACQl/4/JTAKCES CtftTNrSS
Thomas Perkins
1SSJ SUMSET BRIVE
17-41 IS
technicians have developed 1
and soil conditions with'
grow many crops that hartl
before been seer, in Israel j
crops as sisal, bananas, coffaj
peanuts, cotton, sugar beets]
juncous. a source for the 1
ture of choice paper, hart]
grown successfully under
guidance
Israel's more favorable
of trade has also resulted a
expansion of the new Stated!
ing and chemical operation]
cause of a decrease in the I
trade deficit, the
be able to allocate morel
ing the coming year for 1
velopment of Israel's
sources.
This year, Israel's ma
expected to earn or sare I
in hard currency. By 195*. 1
are expected to reach Sill
as a result of stepped-up|
tion in the copper mines all
the iron mines of Galilee!
north and of the Negn
south, and the basic
plants near the Dead Set
The first shipment of
from the Dead Sea left I*
a foreign market a fe* ma
and full scale exploitation l
phate and ceramic deportl"
Negev has already bepa.
developments will wd a
the foreign currency ga*
Besides these gains. lsruTIJ
eral development programs
the creation of basic m exploit other resources,
posits of rock phosphatesj
and Dead Sea salts are e*
be the basis for a htf* j
industry that will produeeo
ed phosphates, sulpha
Continued on Pf l,,J
MOUDAT MHTPW
llarbetne
totes* h Or **
H JWeK*
11705 H.W. 7* *
t.l ???a
c 11 f r 1 *.&
Ed. *. V'""
g|Al ESTATE W A" n^
I4 HJL "\
H


iy, APRIL 16. 1954
,__________+Jewlsti rhrKttan
PAGESD
hese Things Have I Seen
Rabbi Ephreim F. Einhorn
i over two years ago I visited
bb countries, in the disguise
.totestant minister. The dis-
vas necessary since, as a. Jew,
I have been refused the nec-
J fisa< I toured these ceun-
tom Morocco, through Egypt,
Iraq, to the Borders of
L my earliest childhood I
fcen fascinated by the exciting
of the great Jewish mas-
jho had so profoundly influ-
rabic culture and contrib-
nmeasurably to the splendor
nic rule for centuries.
rived in Tangier, North
on the first leg of a trip
Las t take me into a world of
[and ancient civilizations, and
first time in my life I saw
rdic Jews in ghettos which,
li.-ery. squalor and despair, de-
[description. Worse sights,
ler, were in store for me as
tnued my trip into the Span-
jne of Morocco and saw the
r> of Tel nan and Alcazarquiv-
flil. ten, and even twelve peo-
i,t-pi in small rooms, which
[in fact nothing but holes in
[roll. As if their terrible pov-
h.tp not enough to blast their
they enjoyed the status of
sts. The Arabs treat them as
and the Spanish police.
.-. ami other authorities will
! endanger" their policy of
|i.uge ;md friendship to the
c- for the sake of mere Jews,
fill side with the Arabs in
cal dispute.
t, Fez and Casablanca were
I of the cities I visited in the
fch zone of Morocco. Fourteen
jnd Jews still remained in the
(ghetto) of Rabat. They
in daily fear of their lives.
jt.'ni threats and periodic po-
such as those in Oujda and
|i a, where sixty of their fel-
ws were killed, had turned
into frightened creatures
I of their own shadows. They
jtraid of the future: they know
hen the French Jeave, theff
at the mercy of the Arabs
'.ere will be no escaping.
^tld Monsieur Marchat, the
iter diplomatique in Rabat,
my impressions, and he re-
! 'The Jews and Arabs live
: together," and when I re-
I to the pogroms he shrugged
kfcoulders and remarked, "Of
e, these things will happen."
(i eight) thousand Jews still
Promise and Performance
I in Casablanca, like the
fof Rabat, Fez. Marrakech and
communities in Morocco do
*jvh "'i- to happen" to them.
no,4onger put any stock in
lance or promises, 1 was soon
N out how right they are.
|-r visiting Oran, Algiers and
I arrived in Tripoli where I
[received by the first Prime
i r ui the newly-created Unit-
pngdom of Libya, Mahmud Bey
psscr During a meeting in his
to office, which lasted for
more than an hour, he assured me
that there would not be any repeti-
tion of the pogroms of 1945. (in
which one hundred thirty Jews
were killed) and of 1948, (in which
thirteen were killed). He suggested
that it would be best to forget the
past, and expressed the conviction
that the Jews would enjoy such
freedom and security and those
who had already moved to Israel
will wish to return. Of course, the
United Nations Trusteeship Coun-
cil nominally still administered the
country, and those assurances we're
apparently designed to allay their;
doubts and fears. This same Mun-'
tasser, however, has now forbidden I
the Jews all contact with Israel.'
They are not allowed to emigrate
there, let alone return. I vividly re- (
call my visit to the "hara," the lo-!
cal ghetto. The children were suf-
fering from trachoma, and many of
them were tuberculosis cases. In
one courtyard home the women
were busily engaged scrubbing the
floors in preparation for the Sab-
bath; a tiny little stool in the cen-
ter of the room, which served as a
table for the entire family, already-
had halot and candles on it early
on a Friday morning. They look
forward to the coming of the Sab-
bath with great expectations; it is
the one great compensation for
their otherwise drab and miserable
existence. I de hope that the sev-
enteen blind children who had
been picked up from the gutter by
the Joint Distribution Committee
and trained in several crafts, were
able to reach Israel in time.
Mr. T. R. Blackley, the British
Resident General of Libya, told me
that since twenty-five thousand out
of thirty-five thousand Jews had
already emigrated, the acute hous-
ing conditions have been somewhat
relieved, and the Arabs would be
less likely to attack again.
In the Land of Egypt
After a short stay in Benghazi, I
flew to Cairo. The Semiramis Ho-
tel, in which I stayed, was one of
the most luxurious in Egypt. All
around it were huge palaces guard-
ed by police day and night, yet ev-
erywherein front of the hotel and
throughout the cityI saw hun-
dreds of Egyptians in rags, sleep-
ing or squatting in the gutters.
Disease, filth, and indifference
on the part of the leaders, are the
common characteristics of Egypt,
Lebanon, Iraq, and the other coun-
tries I was yet to visit. The man in
the street was terribly envious of
the so-called "Palestine refugees,"
who are pampered, spoilt, overfed,
and have all the advantages of med-
ical science at their disposal. They
are guarded and as preciously
watched over as the inmates of the
harems. No fellah in his wildest
dreams ever hoped for such a good
fortune. Activities are organized
for children of all ages in the
camps, and extensive welfare and
educational programs have been in-
stituted. Shower baths and clubs
are found in many of them. Many
Egyptians are well aware of the
fact that the "refugees" are prac-
tically the only ones in their part
of the world who do not suffer
Continued on Page 10 D
Young Jew from Kurdistan now residing in Israel and attired
in his native regalia of the aristocrats to welcome Passover.
The painting is by Nota Koslowsky.__________________________
I MOST HAPPY
IISSOVER TO ALL
Bon Cleaners
& Laundry
Irving Kornicks
26 N.W. 5th STREET
Phone 2-5214
>; Convenient Inexpensive
"ce wd. Aluminum or
Steel
>*e Door Sales
PRESENTS
"* & Industrial Door.
,Nw-36thSL Ph. 64-5011
GREETINGS
LEE'S
Established 32 years
324 N. E. 13th Street
Manufacturer*
Wholesale Retail
Fishing Tackle
Repairing
Underwater Equipment
SEASON'S GREETINGS
$
MR. and MRS.
ALFRED STONE
of the-
BLACKSTONE HOTEL
GREETINGS
Hollopeter
& Post, Imc.
REAL ESTATE
SALES & RENTALS
153 N.E. 3rd Street
Phone 3-7376
S. H. KRESS
A CO.
5-10-25C STORE
1201 Washington Avenue
MIAMI BEACH. FLA.
HAPPY PASSOVER
FROM
tsaoi -*
MIAM'I COCA-COLA
BOTTLING COMPANY
MR. and MRS. AL BERMAN
of the
HI-GRADE FOOD CO.
1733 N. W. 7th Ave.
MIAMI
Ph. 9-8456
m
EXTEND BEST WISHES TO ALL THEIR FRIENDS AND
PATRONS FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER
MR. AND MRS. HARRY MARKOWITZ
and Family
Tommy Robby Jerry
WISH THEIR RELATIVES AND FRIENDS
A HAPPY PASSOVER
THAT ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS MAY ENJOY
A HAPPY PASSOVER
JSTHE SINCERE WISH OF THE
AUGUST FAMILY and
AUGUST RROS. BAKERY
361 S. W. Eighth Street Phone 2-2792
SINCERE WISHES FOR A
HAPPY PASSOVER
AL MEIDENBERG AND STAFF
A-1 EMPLOYMENT SERVICE
37 N. E. 5th Street
BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER
MR. fc MRS. MAX FRIEDSON
American Builders Supply. Inc.
2728 S.W. 28th Lane
PHONES 4-2296 4-6206
Tropical
Marine
Agency, Inc.
Ship's Suppliers
Groceries, Meats, Vegetables Jj
and Hardware
PIER 3, COMMERCIAL DOCK "
PHONE 3-5284
Niil Garcia


PAGE 6 D
+Jewish fhrkliari
FRIDAY.
MR. and MRS. STEPHEN F. KESSLER
Charles Jeffry and JoAnn
Extend Best Wishes to Their Family and Friends
MR. AND MRS. HARRY GENET
SAUL AND "BUBBY" GENET
5101 Lakeview Drive
EXTEND BEST WISHES TO ALL
FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER

Legislators are Disappointed
By MILTON FRIEDMAN
JTA
PASSOVER GREETINGS
Deering Awning and Furniture Co.
Serving Greater Miami Coral Gable* Miami Beach
Beach. Lawn and Porch Furniture
COMPLETE AWNING SERVICE
4000 PONCE DE LEON BOULEVARD
(Corner Bird Road)
Phone 83-7600
IN A HURRY CALL
KfMBALL MURRAY
THE LUXURY DRY CLEANERS
5705 N.W. 2nd Avenue
Phone 78-5521
GREETINGS
Investors Diversified Services. Inc.
MORTGAGE LOAN DEPARTMENT
Room 300
1st National Bank Building
CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY
FLORIDA MACHINERY CORP.
Contractor Equipment
Woodworking and Metal working Machinery
316 S.W. NORTH RIVER DRIVE
PHONE 9-0647
\\ WHIN'CTON Those Republi-
L nn< whn sincerely seek to revise
%v discriminatory MrCarran-Wal-
ter Immigration Aci and secure
passage of civil rights legislation
ssion are disheartened by the
Mint* "f the White House to sup-
port them.
The I'onuressinnal session is well
under way It has brought with it
evidence that President Eisenhow-
er has abandoned the stand he so
clearly enunciated last session
against the McCarran-Walter Act.
Also, he knocked the props from
UMkr the Ives Humphrey CivH
Rights Bill by telling a press con-
ference that he did not share Sec-
retary of Labor Mitchell's views
favoring the bill.
The President led a liberal Re-
publican-Democratic coalition in a
vigorous and successful fight
against the Bricker Amendment.
He took important executive steps
to eliminate anti-Negro segrega-
tion. But his general attitude to-
ward legislative action on the Mc-
Carran-Walter and civil rights is-
sues has caused concern among lib-
eral Republicans. This is an elec-
tion year
Mr. Eisenhower has tried to find
a middle of the road approach in
order to please both the progres-
sive and conservative wings of the
Republican Party. On some ques-
tions of hieh policy he has succeed- j
ed. Whether he pleased all fac-j
tions of his party by his handling
Of the McCarthy problem is open I
to question. His retreat from Mc-
CaiTan-Walter repeal is another ex-
ample of a vital problem attended
by intensely conflicting partisan
pressures.
The president's failure to sup-
port Republican Senator Ives and
Secretary Mitchell, a member of
his own cabinet, in efforts to put
through a civil rights bill is not
surprising. On this score the Presi-#
dent's opponents may denounce his
stand but they must admit his con-
lsi.ncy. For his opposition to any
\ civil rights law with enforcement
powers was clearly and consistent-
> ty expressed during the 1952 elec-
tion campaign. The McCarran Wal-
ter revision question, however, is a
' matter on which the President gave
his solemn word.
East Coast Fisheries, Inc.
West Flaqler StreetAt the Bridge
A Happy Passover to All Our Friends and Patrons
FRIENDSHIP HOUSI
747 LINCOLN ROAD MIAMI BEACH
INOWlfS I T 0 .
M07 COLLINS AVENUE MIAMI BEACH
In 1952, Mr. Eisenhower made
his opposition to the McCarran-
Walter Act crystal clear. Consistent
with his pledge, he strongly urged
Congress to revise the Act. This
was on the occasion of his 1953
State of the Union Message. Later,
in 1953, he listed specific com-
plaints against the Act which had
been drawn to his attention. He
sent the list to Chairman Watkins
of the Senate Immigration Sub-
committee with a request for ac-
tion.
The Watkins reply rejected the
President's request under the pre-
text that the Republican Party was
in a strong position on the immi-
gration issue owing to the passage
of a compromise version of an 1953
Emergency Refugee Act. This act
not only failed to revise the Mc-
( irran Walter regulations but
actually embodied the same con-
cepts in a form which some consid-
ered even worse than the McCar-
ran Walter Act itself.
The new act provided for the ad-
mission of 214.000 refugees from
Communism and others in excess
of r*ular quotas. But so many re-
strictions were added that only
four persons were able to get in
during six months in which the act
was in force. The act has been nev-
ertheless described by the White
House as one-of the ten greatest
legislative achievements of the new
Administration.
Meanwhile, during the commo-
tion over the 1953 Refugee Act,
McCarran-Walter revision was side-
tracked. Evervone waited until the
air cleared. They looked forward
to the January, 1B54, State of the
Union Message by President Eisen
hower. They looked in vain. He
failed to mention the act.
On March 17th, the President de-
cided that he had no intention of
Becoming "a bull in a China shop'
far aa McCarran-Walter reslsion
Viet rmiSMt I
Wtrtrfin
is concerned. He erpluki]
respondents that as we
to the principles of I
Fathers, the closer we M
solving the McCarran-Witej
lem. Some of the con
looked at him. They
we were moving closer hi
Founding Fathers or gotag U
opposite direction.
Mr. Eisenhower's remain
reply to a question posed I
gro reporter. The reporteri
Vice President Richard H,|
as saying that "Every xt
discrimination or prejudice^
United States hurts
much as an espionage |
turns over a weapon to i
enemy." (Mr. Nixon said I
report several months agoi
discrimination in the I
causes foreign nations to I
favorable opinions of this (
Citing the Nixon state
reporter asked Mr.
he thought discrimination I
ed in the McCirrio-WjIjaJ
damages our foreign relaH
whether he was doing
about liberaliiing the at |
President tnen annouscsil
would not transform
"a bull in a China shop" H
things. He said the State 1
ment had made no McC
ter complaints to him.
Recipes for Passover
^*\r'V^\**'-'V^^^W"/N*^A^^^
,'-v'*W PASSOVER GREETINGS
M. LIEBERMAN & SONS
of Brooklyn. N.Y.
LOCAL and LONG DISTANCE MOVING
Miami Beach Office: 655 Collins Avenue
Phones 5-7147 and 58-2013
By Mrs. Refine Frischwasser
JTA
Marxoh Pudding
4 eggs
2 3 cup sugar
<2 lemon
2 cups crushed.
% cup matzoh
>i cup chopped,
Beat the egg
sugar and mix th
grated rind of V4 lemon, crushed
pineapple, matzoh flour and stiffly
beaten egg whites. Pour mixture
into a greased pudding dish and
sprinkle with chopped nuts. Bake
in a moderate oven until browned
eapple
well, add
ughly. Add
(about 30 minutes).
Lamon PuH p
1 cup water
Vt cup oil
tt teaspoon salt
1 cup matioh flour
Bring to a boil "I*
and matzoh flour. Sims*?
until the mixture le**I
the pan. Remove from
and allow to cool. M>\
at a time, beating U*
with each addition. BW
by spoonsful into a P*"*5
pan and bake in ajga
45 minutes. >/" *
Centimiedonr'ajttf1
U''WWWWW^^rf*W^a^WJ
>^ywy
TO ALL PASSOVER GREETINGS
WM. I. ALLEN and CHAS. HABLOW
CUSTOM CRAFT MFG. CO., INC and
PARRY INDUSTRIES
and
450 N.W. 14th STREET
MIAMI
ToAU... A 3iost Happy Pasnover MOORE Compliments of I MB. AND MRS. JOSEPH URAM SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL

FURNITURE THE BEST THROUGH THE AGES 4012 N. E. 2nd AVENUE TO ALL .. GRHBTrtaS Weber's Ice Cream Company 2301 N.W. 2nd'AVENUE Phono S-04B3
fcSTHECafll
Truck Body
7l4K.W.wH
TO ALL.-.P^
GREETINGS
\eolite *+\
3900 H.W.***
PHONE ^


PRIL 16. 1954
***lsl>nDr*ftor7
PAGE 7 D
and the Land of the Rajah;
ilA H. HADDAD
bnvalescing in Calcutta
eived a telegram from
luartecs in Jerusalem di-
to proceed to Cochin,
la. not included in the
Tedule of my trip to that
Far East,
[ire, lying some 20 miles
jiodern Cochin, had at-
fjews as a haven of ref-
fcenter of trade from the
Jies. Some historians be-
Ithc first Jewish settlers
arrived there with
ion's fleet. Others hold
lochin Jews are descen-
Jje tribes taken into cap-
Bhalmanezer of Assyria
iehow may have found
to Malabar. Other theor-
ist they may be of Per-
j stock, or that they are
is of the Jews taken to
Nebuchadnezzar.
is of Cochin, however,
that soon after the de-
|f the Second Temple (70
Jews had escaped
an captors, and landed on
|r coast, where they were
received by the Hindu
allowed to settle in dif-
Irt- hi thi' country. The
nadc their home in Cran-
i miles north of modern
ccessive Hindu rulers ac-
fcm liberal treatmentso
bat in the course of a few
Ihey rose to political emi-
ps ancient community is
tents to emigrate to Is-
e. sooner or later, it will
ed in the melting pot of
kered tribes of Jacob. An
fbacteriologist accredited
nistry of Health and the
gency, arrived in Bom-
la month ago to cure Ele-
I and I'hilariae among the
|ws. These are the two
diseases which have
npeded the admission to
i tribe that has been pos-
fcce the War of Indepen-
|h a messianic fervour to
' brothers here.
I day in Bombay, I set out
together with Dr. A\ B.
resolute Cochin Jewish
r" had pleaded the case of
unity in Israel recently. A
hde by plane brought us
Imitivc aerodrome of Co-
B)r. Salem and I, walking
le shabby airport building,
pi the colonnaded veran-
ookinj; the runway, there
oup of men, fine-looking,
ely tall, their dark brown
ktly bearded, white skull-
Droidered with colourful
overing their heads.
dressed in local gar-
kg white cotton shirts over
i trousers or striped hotis.
wore light sandals, but
per were barefooted with-
lion. Later in Ernakulam,
er meeting a refined
woman-doctor and looking aghast
at her bare feet. She explained that
Mother Earth was too sacred to be
trodden on by footwear.
One after the other, the vener-
able leaders of the Enakulam, Pa-
rur, Mala and Chendamangulam
congregations greeted me with "Ba-
ruch Haba" in clear Sephardic pro-
nunciation, and bestowed on my
neck garlands made of heavy-
smelling jasmine or of gold thread
elaborately adorned with stars and
tassels, while a handsome little boy
presented me with a beautiful nose-
gay.
What is the truth about the orig-
in of the Jews of Cochin?
The most up-to-date conclusions
about these facts are well related
in the thorough study of that an-
cient Community published in 1950
by Mr. S. S. Koder, the President
of the South-India Jewish Associa-
tion who was a Jewish representa-
tive in the Cochin Legislative Coun-
cil from 1925 to 1948. Thanks to a
valuable collection of manscripts
and documents he possesses in his
bulky library and to his wide fa
miliarity with the manners, cus-
toms, traditions and dialects of the
Jews of Cochin, where he was born,
Mr. Koder may today be considered
the only undisputed authority on
the subject.
According to him there is one
historical fact that can be definite-
ly established: from the 5th to the
15th Century C.E. the Jews of
Cranganore had virtually an inde-
pendent Principality, ruled by a
prince of their own race.
The oldest and most authentic
documents related to that period
are the two famous copper plates
which are jealously preserved in
an Iron chest inserted into the
thick wall at the entrance of the
Pardesi Synagogue of Jewtown, Co-
chin. As the trustee of this syna-
gogue, Mr. Koder, who holds the
key of the precious iron receptacle,
kindly showed me the two plates in
the course of my visit, and explain-
ed to me their historical impor-
tance.
The first plate is about 20 cm
Ion" and 10 cm. wide. Engraved on
both its sides in the old Tamil (Vat-
teluthu) script is the famous "Sas-
sanam" or Charter given in 379 C.E.
by the then ruling King, Bhaskara
Ravi Varma, to Joseph Rabban, the
leader-prince of the Community, by
which the King ceded to the Jews
of Cranganore some territories
known as Anjuvannam.
A replica of the original copper
plate is in possession of the Bezalel
Museum. The text reads as fol-
lows:
"Hail, and Prosperity: The fol-
lowing gifts were graciously made
by him who had assumed the title
of King of Kings, His Majesty the
King Sri Parkaran Iravi Vanmar,
whose ancestors have been wield-
ing the sceptre for many hundred
thousands of years, in the thirty-
sixth year after the second year, on
the day on which he dwelt in Mu-
yiricote, was pleased to make the
following gifts. We have granted
to Joseph Rabban the village of An-
juvannam, together with the sev-
enty-two proprietary rights, tools
on boats and carts, the revenue and
the title of Anjuvannam, the lamp
of the day, a cloth spread in front
to walk on, a palanquin, a parasole,
a Vaduga (i.e. Telugu) dru, a trum-
pet, a gateway, a garland, decora-
tion with festoons, and so forth. We
have granted him the land tax and
weight tax; moreover we have
sanctioned with these Copper
Plates that he need not pay the
dues which the inhabitants of the
other cities pay the Royal palace,
and that he may enjoy the benefits
which they enjoy. To Joseph Rab-
ban, Prince of the Anjuvannam and
to his descendants, sons and daugh-
Continued on Pag* 11 D
These are the sons of Jacob and Sara Suga-Uker, Mordecai.
Moses and Japheth. The entire family is now in Israel, brought
there with tjie aid ofehe United Jewish Appeal_____________
ill TIMc $
JAIUSTER HOTEL
(barber shop
I 0 N D I T I 0 N E
Meiikurlaa.
| JAIUSTER AKADI
I *, FLORIDA
1 **151 3-7MS
6"*. Manager
lKTK*l SHVKI
AeJHlMS
>lwn Bird Ellis
[CBOtt CONTtACTOi
1 *' Gveranrece'
1 Corned./ Wirlag
P *" 57H. COURT
*** 34, FLORIDA
* *7 SOW
IttlfffM
GARDEN* SEED SHOP
Careen SapsHas mi Vn-Grttn
Insecticides mi IUmmM
be* i Pat Seealit
AIAUCTS mi CANARKS
f ree Mhtrr frmwl J"'
2755 CORAl WAY
?t-1014
houoay uturms
The Flower Lane
110 NX be AVENUE
Creative Carsejes
Dramatic Hewar Arraaaeaieats
Tal. 3473*
SEASONS GREETINGS
Hand Painted Novelties
Marinda's
Gift Shop
Greeting CardsOriginal Gifts
1009 Lincoln Rood
Phone 5 3581
With Best Wishes For A
Happy Holiday
Season
Collins Glass and
Mirror Co.
1008 5th STREET
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-7697
TO ALL HAPPY PASSOVU
ANT 0 MS CONTINENT A I
'''Air Conditioned Restaurant1'
French and Italian Cuisine Steaks with Mushrooms
Incomparable Dining in New Setting "0b the Way te Tropical Park"
4521 S.W. BIRD ROAD Keapen in October
PASSOVER GREETINGS
Adelphi Paint & Color
Works, Inc.
WISHING YOU A HAPPY PASSOVER
GEO. OBENOUR, JR. Roofer
BONDED ROOFING
SHEET METAL HARDWARE
5201 N.W. 36th AVENUE
Phones 64-7934 64-7783
SEASON'S GREETINGS
DALLETT'S
GARAGE AND SERVICE STATION
340 Twenty-third Street
PHONE 5-6721
MIAMI BEACH
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
A. M. TRANSFER & CRANE SERVICE
Boats Machinery Office Safes Household
Concrete Pouring Move Anything
31 Years oi Experience in the Greater Miami Area
239 N. W. 26th STREET
PHONE 9-8959 87-6486
TIP-TOP SUPER MARKET. Inc.
TIP* TOP
SUPER MARKET^
27 N.W. 5th STREET
"The Finest Foodstuffs the Market Affords at Reasonable Prices"
Capt. E. V. Rickenbacker
Chairman oi the Board of
Eastern Air Lines
joins with the entire EAL Family
in wishing our good friends a
Very Happy Passover
->


PAGE 8 D
JmMjfkrjcmS-
JHn>AT.,
Greetings To All
NATHAN DAVIDOW
Office Supplies. Of fire Furniture
MR. FOSTER'S STORK
33 N.E. FIRST AVE. VK^ESF
GREETING CARDS ENGRAVING
TO ALL GREETINGS
LAWREXCE UMBER CO.
F. H. A. FINANCING
Miami 1. Florida
The Traditional 'Lons' Pass
667 N.W. 14th Street
PHONE 3-3663
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS
.WE WISH A HAPPY PASSOVER
COULTON BROTHERS
SERVICE STATION & GARAGE
825 S.W. 8th COURT
PHONE 2-6652
. wishes you a
HAPPY PASSOVER
1300 BISCAYNE BLVD. PHONE 9-5411
By PHILIP RUBIN
JTA
The Seder service, impressive as
it is, onlv ushers in the great Pass-
over festival It gives the theme for
the whole weeks celebration, it
samples the particular foods and
drinks that are to be imbibed dur-
ing the entire eight days. The dra-
matic story related at the Seder,
that of the freezing of the Israelites
from Egyptian bondage, is the leit-
motif of the rest of the holiday.
Those of us who remember the
long preparations for Passover in |
Europe and among the Jewish im-
migrants' t<> this country in times
put might perhaps be inclined to
regard the two Seder nights a1- the
climax of the Pavxover celebration,
though by no mc;iiis its end. Ortho-
dox Jews always began to take note
1 of this most joyous of all Jewish
festival! almost a month before its
official arrival. Almost immediate-
ly after Purim, in the month of
March when in most places the
cold Ml still severe and the thick
layer of snow along the streets had
not yet begun to melt, Jewish
housewives would commence their
spring house cleaning in honor of
the approaching holiday.
Since none of the 'chometidige"
dishes that were being used all the
year around, except the glassware,
could be used during the Passover
week, mothers would be occupied
with the problem of buying new
dishes for the holiday. Ordering the
Passover foods and drinks was an
even bigger problem. How much
matzoths. matto-meal and wine and
mead would the family really need
for the eight day-.'' Should better
or somewhat inferior grades of mt-"|
zoths and wine be bought? Poor
people had to watch their pennies
in those days, though on the other
hand they did want to enjoy the
festival as much as possible.
Then there was the problem of
buying new clothes for the chil-
dren That was a big item of ex-
pense and had to be carefully con-
sidered As a child. I would always
be decked run" in a new blue serge
suit on th* eve of the holiday, as
would my playmates By the time
Thu Biblical figure, a patriarch from Kurdistan, wifl, j
hand, wai among the early settlers in new Israel. He)
with him there the tradition of the "long" Passover.
The ritual of the Sedorium was
then more rigorously adhered to
than it is today among most Amer-
ican Jews, excepting the strictly
Orthodox. Even small boys were ex-
pected to recite the Haggadah from
beginning to end. besides sailing
the Four Question* ot It Was fun
to find the 'aflkam*n," the* piece
of matio that had been hidden
way, and a pleasure to open the
door for the entrance of Elijah tin
Prophet and to sing "Chad Oath/a."
Duifng the first two mornings of
the holiday days when work is not
permitted, one went with one's
father to "schul" where of the
first day. the "Shir Hashirint* the
Song of Solomon, was recited. The
Holiday dinner on those first two
days were nearly as good 'as the
Seder suppers. There was the same
Happy Holiday Greetings horn George E. Fox
and the Entire Staii ol
the hollaWy arrived the streets of <*. the sme malzobaTl soup,
our town would become muddy
from the thawing of the snow and
so my new suit would become mud-
spattereda thinR which would
cause much heartache to my poor
parents who had stinted themselves
to make me look respectable.
Finally came the night before the
festival when the ceremony of
searching the "chometz," unleav-
ened bread, took place and the
burning of the "chometz" next
A FUll aiOCK ON TMI OCIAN FIOK 32*4 TO 33r >. k.
MIAMI BEACH
(OMMI1IU Alt CONDITION!
THE WORLD'S FINEST
I
t/:t of a Century u-ith Ford
WISHING ALL OF YOU
A REAL HAPPY HOLIDAY
3fc>V/
SAM MURRAY
FORD DEALER
Hugh Larramore Donald Neese
Passenger Car Division1917 Biscayne Blvd.
Truck & Equipment Division65 N.E. 27th St.
morning when it was "sold" to t
Rabbi who in turn was supposed
"sell" it to a Gentile. After twelve
o'clock noon on that day no more
"chometz" could be eaten, but nei-
ther could any matzo be taken un-
til the arrival of the Seder late in
the evening. About all a hungry
boy could get during that long
stretch was a dish of potatoes.
four days, as during then
festival, one was excuse^
ing to chaider" Hfbwj
Children might then got
nearby woods or me*
see what trees and florctl
readv in bloom if thf|
playing tag or ball or i
game that interested them]
The last two days o(|
might be called a sort I
climax in the celeb
they are true holidays i
is not permitted, wbee tfc)
and suppers are festive I
tie wine is drunk, *beir
roll nuts instead of
is, if there are any wtl|
home by this time after (
of them had been
the women folk are tiredi
long and arduous labor it]
I and washing dishes andt
I rather rest in bed or Mil
' go visiting or receivht]
| And on the last mon
festival women, too.
synagogue to recite "m
prayer for the dead to be!
of the loved ones they tall
Then on the last dayi
the same wine (though onty one in
stead of four cups could be drunk i.
and in addition such a delicacy as
"taiglach" or some other tasty des-
sert that Mother had prepared.
On the afternoons of those first
two days boys would roll nuts, in-
stead of the usual marbles. Holiday
visits among neighbors and friends begins to develop a gnj
would only take place on late after (or "chometz," for toe
noons of the second day, since dur-
ing the afternoon of the first day
the women wouM~V busy cooking
fo,r the second Sector night.
There followed "^he four inter
mediate days of the Passover fes-
tival which are called "cho ha'ino
ed," days which are not quite holi-
dayssince one is permitted to
workbut are not quite ordinary
week-ends either. During those
leavened bread one has
all year round and the
one is not permitted]*
ing the Passover we*
piece of good, nourish*
stead of the crumbly cat
matzo'" Even on mi
when the holiday is oB
one cannot yet obtain
from a Jewish baker,
had been baked durhfj
TO OUR MANY VALUED
JEWISH FRIENDS
OUR SINCERE GOOD WISHES
FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER
THURMOND
MONUMENT COMPANY
We Buy. Sail and Rant
Now and Usad
Pow.r Mowers and Trimmers
Pick-up and Delivery
Lawn Mower
Center
D A.uthi>,riz*d Service and Parts
Red Clinton Briggs & stratton
1501 N.W. 7tth St.. Miami. Fla.
Phone 7-35*1
$*k DaNrary Oaattty
PRESCRIPTION PHARMACISTS
C0MP.1ETI DINNER
wNftf rue Noanr rous far
HOTEL PHARMACY
LINCOtN AITON
MIAMI -tWCH
Mmm 5*425
GREETING* FROM
Orange
Blossom
AMERICA'S FINEST
FRESH FRUIT JUICE
PASSOVER
GREETINGS
PRINT.*
ARTS
720 N. W- *w l
>*"%
TO ALL
SEASON
BESTWISHE5
TAVERN I
3680 Corel*" I


f>RIL 16. 1954
+J**islirk>rkKaHH
:ice and Immigration Policies
PAGE 9 D
...... '
AMPBELL BRUCE
o. Marcus Steinberg, a
jasinessman, visited Cali-
riikeil what he saw. He
\ Canada, sold his busi-
Icked off again to Cali'
|aii,n admitted for per-
\idence. By the late
(,ad taken out first citi-
.ers.
hereafter Steinberg was
p excellent position in
Mf he hurried over. Lin-
California ports were
(Jjil for months, so Stein-
_J his first papers in his
bff to Vancouver, British
[and there embarked. At
he presented his Ameri-
p to the immigration au-
|He was passed without
time, Steinberg applied
pal papers. Instead of the
i he had so eagerly await-
I a cold shock: He was an
twfully in the United
Jc had failed to get a re-
linii before flying the few
oss I he Canadian border
pssane for Hawaii.
r; was stunned. He had
(resident of the United
|r almost 20 years. Indig-
1 returned to California to
his citizenship. He never
chance. Immigration au-
promptly lodged him in
lere he was kept five
I then deported to Canada.
flypaper adherence to the
the law worked a severe
on Steinberg. But even
[ his harmless oversight
him forever, in the eyes
1 Immigration Service, as
krt of monster. He repeat-
Is permission to come back
Jornia just to visit old
-but every request is re-
without explanation.
a law abiding person,"
rg protests. "I have never
nvicted of a crime either in
iteel States or Canada. I am
fessman and I desire only to
United States. Why is this
ke refused me?"
Answer, of course, lies with
rationand it need not say.
perg's plight points up two
flaws in our immigration
-the law itself, and its ad-
dition. The law invests too
[power in little men, who
pield it without common, or
[discretion. The law is rigid,
Ministration despotic. The
jster> in its administrators an
Ip of hostility toward the
Whether he is a refugee seek-
iven from tyranny or a dis-
ced visitor to our shores.
McCarran Walter Actthe
pation and .Nationality Act of
^was touted by its sponsors
omnibus measure 'designed
to clarify and codify all the
_ immigration statutes. Clar-
fax Rheinstein, professor of
the University of Chicago,
told the President's Commission on
Immigration and Naturalization:
"I would like to say ... as a law-
yer [what] may look a bit petty
and perhaps insignificant, but I
don't think it is [I] refer to the
technical defects. To put it more
popularly, nobody can understand
it af all, it is so complicated
May I invite your attention to Sec-
tion 202 which I think nobody can
understand until he has read it 12
times. I have read it now thirteen
times, and I think I understand it.
If and when a revision of this law is
undertaken, I hope to goodness
somebpdy will be called in as an ex-
pert in English. As it stands now.
it is an abomination of the English
language. ."
Codify? The law retains the
worst of the prejudices incorpor-
ated in old statutes, and it adds
more than 100 new restrictive fea-
tures. Ironically, for a nation that
is the world's leading democracy
and bulwark against communism,
its immigration law makes racism
a national policy.
The law did remote, at long last,
the racial barrier to immigration
and naturalization. But then it de-
stroyed this achievement by erect-
ing a barrier just as formidablea
modified Oriental Exclusion Act.
This is the infamous Asia-Pacific
triangle, embracing 21 quota areas
from Afghanistan to Japan and al-
loting to each a minimal annual
quota of 100, with the exceptions
of Japan (185) and China (105).
No matter where you were born,
no matter what your nationality, if
one-half of your ancestry is Orien-
tal, the McCarran Act automatically
makes you an Oriental. Thus, if you
were born in London of an English
father and a Burmese mother, you
are a British subject in the eyes of
all except the McCarran Act, which
consigns you to the restricted Bur-
ma quota. Yet Great Britain, with
an annual quota of 65,364, utilizes
less than a quarter of that number.
Rabbi Judah Nadich of Boston
told the President's Commission:
'This bigoted slur upon the Asians
and individuals of Asian extraction
must be read within the context of
international politics. Gratuitous
insult woven into the legal fabric
of a nation upon whose leadership
the free world depends, serves to
upset a delicate balance of power,
alienate desperately needed friends
and helps thrust them into the
Soviet orbit."
Rabbi Nadich cited the Filipinos
as a case in point. After their inde-
pendence was proclaimed in 1946,
they encountered no specific racial
barriers. But the McCarran Act
ends that. Now a person of Filipino
background, born outside the vast
Asiatic-Pacific triangle, must "trace
his genealogical ties and satisfy ir-
rational criteria of acceptability if
I he wishes to become a United
States citizen."
The McCarran Act deals a dis-
criminatory slap at the Negroes of
the British West Indies by setting
up a special quota of 100 for each
of Great Britain's colonies in this
hemisphere. About 1,000 Negroes
emigrated yearly from Jamaica to
the US under the large British
quota. TKe McCarran Act cuts that
flow, small as it was, by 90 per
cent.
The national-origins formula dis-
criminates against immigrants
predominately Catholic now, heav-
ily Catholic and Jewish in pre-war
daysfrom southern and eastern
Europe. It has always done so by
design. The architects of this for-
mula made no bones about it. The
late Senator James A. Reed of Mis-
souri, who tacked it onto the 1924
Immigration Act, to take effect five
years later, bluntty told his col-
leagues: "I thir* 'most of us are
reconciled to the idea of discrimi-
nation. We have got to discrimi-
nate."
Congressman Emanuel Celler of
New York, a member of the House
during that 1924 debate, recently
told the President's Commission:
"It [the formula] was deliberately
adopted to proscribe not only
southern and eastern Europeans,
but also Catholics and Jews. That
is the unvarnished truth. I heard
it stated time and time again on
the floor of the House. ." Such is
what the law long ago set out to
dowith malice aforethought.
It seems incredible that our great
democracy should harbor within its
body politic two little police states
but such indeed are the immigra-
tion and consular services. The Mc-
Carran Act grants consuls absolute,
non-reviewable power over visas
an autocracy that breeds arrogance
and damages our prestige abroad.
Likewise, under sanction of the
law, immigration officials at home
have traditionally displayed a cal-
lous brutality toward aliens.
Consider the case of the Edward
Chans. In a way, they were lucky
their ordeal happened in 1950be-
fore the McCarran-Walter Act.
Chan, a native American, went
to Shanghai some years ago and
there married a Chinese secretary
who spoke fluent English. Their
only child was stillborn. To ease
the pangs of their loss they imme-
diately adopted a week-old baby,
reporting the adoption to the
American consul. Some say they
were foolish, because citizenship
does not descend to an adopted
child, but the Chans are conscien-
tious people. That meant the child
could come here only on a quota
immigrant visa, for which there
always is an interminable waiting
list.
When the Communists began
closing in on Shanghai, the consul
granted Mrs. Chan a nonquota visa
as the wife of a US citizen. Out of
the goodness of his heart he even-
tually gave the boy, now 10 years
old, a temporary visa, but by that
Continued m fgc 11 D
GREETINGS
<* t. CMmmi
Coleman
Solar
Service
Ns
' BOOSTERS
NEW SYSTEMS
REPAIRS
f428 S.W. 27th AVENUE
|62S1 H.W. 2nd STREET
Phone 87-8349
JEWELS SILVER
WORKS OF ART
Furniture, Antiques and Curios
INTERNATIONAL
FINE ART GALLERIES
122 Lincoln Rd.. Miami Beach
A. SCHORR. Rtpreientatire
Business Phone 58-1025
Residence Phone 5-2503
PASSOVER GREETINGS
GUNN & GUNN
GENERAL BUILDING
CONTRACTORS
161 N.W. 52nd Straat
7- 3912
GREETINGS
Phone 3-8758
CHARLES SEVERO, Mgr.
Est. 1922
Empire Employment
Agency
CULINARY AGENCY OF
FLORIDA
714 N. E. First Avenue
LICENSED AND BONDED
Specializing in
HOTEL, RESTAURANT AND
CLUB EMPLOYEES
10 AU... GMUlHGi
Howling'*
Market
117 MWACIE MIIE
PkMMi 4*441 M-5IM
GIERSCH ENGINEERING CO.
CONSULTING ENGINEERS
AND LAND SURVEYORS
3104 CORAL WAY
Telephone 83-7080
TO All PASSOVER GREETINGS
SWIFT & COMPANY
Ketreshinglu yours
Sirif/'s lee Cream
PHONE 48-6555
SEASONS GREETINGS
BARK AND BARR, INC.
NUMBERS UtMhhti 1924
61 E. 2nd Street Hialeah
PHONE 88-2818
TO ALL PASSOVER GREETINGS
SERVICE WITH A SMILE
NORISLE SERVICE
"NEAR YOUR FAVORITE CAUSEWAY"
2057 71st Street Miami Beach
WITH BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER
JOSEPH JORDAN
REAL ESTATE BROKER
12395 N.E. 6th Avenuo Phcne 7-1687
GREETINGS /
ALBRIGHT STANDARD SERVICE
STANDARD OIL PRODUCTS
Complete Service "With a Smile"
2065 S.W. EIGHTH STREET "On the Trail" PHONE 3-9365
TO ALL A HAPPY
HOLIDAY
JUDGE WALTER H. BECKHAM
JUVENILE COURT
TO ALL .
HAPPY PASSOVER
EL BOLERO BAR
3181 CORAL WAY PHONE 83-8390
GREETINGS
FROM
i
J. R. SPRADLEY & CO.
FOOD BROKERS
18 N. W. 14th Stroot MiamL Fla.
TRAIL CAFETERIA
ANDY FRAZIER. Owner
2546 S.W. 8th Street Phone 83-6255
(AIR CONDITIONED)
- Food To Please All The Family -
DAILY SPECIAL ENTREE: LUNCH 29c DINNER 49fc
FREE PARKING


PAGE 10 D
+Je*isl>ncrk0M>
reetfsfi
TILECRAFT, INC.
NATHAN S. HE, President
John (Heppy) Hopwood Scott Southard
1S3 N.E. 10th STREET
Jack Diosi
PHONE 2-4124
GREETINGS
SIDNEY DeWOLF & SON. Inc.
Builders Contractors
44 N. W. 8th Avenue Phone 33067

A HAPPY PASSOVER TO
ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
VANDERBILT HOTEL
2009 COLLINS AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-0761
Sincere Wishes
For A
HAPPY PASSOVER
DELTA
A I R
LINES
TICKET OFFICE 300 NX 1st ST.
Phone 9-8476
GREETINGS
HOLLHM.WS It 11ST U RAXT
N.W. 79th STREET at 7th AVENUE
THE BEST OP FOODS With Fri.ndly Service
Air Conditioned o popu|-r prie Amp|# p,rking
ffllMlhl in DIES FOR DISHAYS GREETING CARDS FANCY COT-OUTS
LEATHER GOODS BOXES ETC.
Also Complete Dit Cutting Stroke 18 Yeori* Experience
CLARK BROS. DIE SERVICE
2214 N.W. 21th ST.-**. 44-4313-Mi.mi, Flo. RaWt s. Clock, Omtor
LONG DISTANCE MOVING*- Now'vorVrChicago I^Tt^S^
PART LOADS DIRECT SERVICE An9
tte Ourn and Operate Our Ouru fleet of Moving Vans
PHONE 3-062S FOR ESTIMATE
AMERICAN VAN & STORAGE
2125 N.W. Ut COURT
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY
Fidelity Construction Corporation
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
Ph. 88-6423
51 Forrest Drive. Miami Springs
Tropical Typewriter Service
^TSSS1? -~,) 3,M C0,JU way "-Eri*j
n.v^!,o^e-lbby S haVe -^n^hinf you need for the office
j**1* "?" y W Hem a viH p n4%fA
Best Wishes To All for
Passover
NATIONAL
TITLE
COMPANY
HUNTINGTON MEDICAL BLDG.
Main Office
PHONE 2-7624
Branches: Fart Lauderaale, Miami Beach
THESE KIT THINGS HE MIME 01 [ffij
Continued from Page 5D I -----.
Continued from Page 5 D
from any disease, cold, hunger,
misery and injustice.
It can be readily understood that
the "refugees"' are being used as
political tools. Distinguished visit-
ors from the West have been deep-
ly moved by the sight of so many
people living in tents instead of
houses, squatting on the ground in
stead of working; they compare
them with the standards they them-
selves are accustomed to. and pre-
sume that the natives enjoy such
comfort and luxuries. What these
visitors do not know is that their
homesif the miserable hovels in
which they live could ever be
called thatare infested with rats,
that their bodies are full of ver-
min, a fate from which the "Pales-
tine refugee'' has been mercifully
snatched by an arch enemy of
Western civilization, the Grand
Protector, the international villain.
Hajj Amin al-Husayni, the ex-Mufti
of Jerusalem, who. with the help
of the higher Arab Committee, or-
dered the Arabs to leave their
homes and flee to neighboring
countries "for a short time, until
the united Arab armies cast the
Jews into the sea.'' The flight of
six thousand Arabs from Tiberias
in one day. the flight of sixty thou-
sand Arabs from Haifa in one day.
and of nearly seventy thousand
from Jaffa in four days, was not
accidental. They were ordered to
run; they were told that they
would be branded as traitors and
punished accordingly by the vic-
torious armies, if they remained in
their homes. Yet, to the world they
proclaimed that the Arabs were
fleeing for their lives because the
Jews threatened to annihilate
them.
Fury and Fancy
That the Arab leaders constant-
ly use their own people as tools
and stooges for the maintenance of
a status quo. and in order to fur-
ther their political and nationalis-
tic ambitions, should be clear to
every impartial student of Middle
Eastern affairs. In the Lebanon and
in Iraq, where I spent a great deal
of time discussing internal and ex-
ternal problems with numerous
prominent loaders. I found an al-
most dedicated determination to di-
vert the attention of the miserably
unhappy mom from the real
source of their plight Any and
every excuse and pretext is
pounced upon in order to achieve
that purpose An endless struggle
for power and even greater riches
is waged between factions and
families of the ruling classes The
price always remains the same the
complete exploitation of the native.
The fury and hatred deliberately
engendered against the Jews in
their own countries and against the
"Goliath." Israel, is just another
variation of the unending diatribe
against Britain, the U.S.A.. and
other imaginary and hypothetical
monsters.
The sons of the foremost fami-
If


i
00
x

This diver in Haifa's "Little Harbor" makes the
scape different from that found by the Israelites of oldt
their Exodus and Return. Working to upbuild the new]
State, he will pause from his labors this weekend lo i
Passover and his own return from exile.
lies in Bagdad, students and grad-
uates of foreign universities, told
me in the presence of their parents
that they were ready to march
against Israel at moment's notice
in order to avenge the "insult" to
their people. The jails of Bagdad
were at that time filled to capacity
with Jewish men, women and chil-
dren, including the leaders of the
community. They had previously
been under guard in the desert
where, as a last resort, and unable
to endure any longer, they started
a hunger strike, with fatal results
to many. I asked one of the leading
attorneys, members of whose fam-
ily are in the diplomatic service,
the reason for their imprisonment,
and he told me without the winking
of an eyelid that it was because Is-
raeli spies had tried to establish a
Communistic regime. I tried to
point out to him that I had never
heard anyone refer to Israel as a
Communistic country, let alone of
ambitions to spread Communism
in other parts of the world. He an-
swered by thumping his breast
with both fists, and shouting, "It's
true, believe me, I know!" When
I asked him as to whether the Jews
were tortured in prison, he replied,
"Yes, of course, we have to obtain
convictions." I tried to point out
that the world might look skeptical
ly at convictions obtained by such
methods, that indeed the trials in
Budapest, Prague, Warsaw and
Moscow had inspired very little
confidence throughout ta>]
world, but with an air ol |
he said. "The same thing i]
in the United States."
The Jewish community till
considered to be the olittl
world. Almost from the I
Abraham, who was bora ft]
through the First Exile iai
then known as Babylon, oil
Second Exile, when the gral(
ish universities of Sun mil
pedutha flourished, to the |
of the Exilearch. and down!
our own century during vtadj
Kadoories and the Sanaa
contributed much to the I
their birth. Jews have lived]
uninterruptedly, in large i
Yet, over one hundred iweajfj
sand made their way to Is
only the shirts on their ba
many with mementos of I
tures inflicted on their I
Attention end Diitridej
Cunningly, the leader*I
their peoples' anger will M
on the Jews in their midst I
Israel. They know their |
pride, they know that in tketj
and exertion required to i
the "omsit," they will soal,
their own miserable a
With the war-cry, "Allah *'
they divert attention ft* I
selves, the real perpetnta
crimes against the peopJ*.
If the Arab leaders had (
Continued en Pit*
C I I T I N C $
PNONI 3-4311
OfficM W.fcft taspecter
'' Mat tatfway
WILSON I CO.
WAMONOS WATCHES JCWEUY
*or ItoM I It|
121 N.I. IltST STRUT
MIAMI 32, FIOCIOA
. Pod.1/
A "w Hmmm n am o.r
'Heads oad Pmttma
Chris-Croft
Nnrsery
11975 VV. DIXIE HIGHWAY
NORTH MIAMI
Phone 74543
Otto Kuehl
TO ALL ... A MOST
HAPPY PASSOVER
John F. AlUnoi
LANGFORD BLDG.
TO ALL GREETINGS
Rainbow Juice &
Fruit Shipping Co.
209 71st STREET
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 86-92*0
Tiros mi Tokos -
Itflatf Son**
LASSETER TEXACO
*...' muum *
ROAD SM,(I
2412 N.W. 27* **
MIAMI, ROHM
turn***
I. f. -**- ***
rm rurf ft**


PRO, 16, 1954
-Jewlstnorki/an
PAGE 11 D
REACHES INTO THE LANDS OF THE RAJAHS
ed from P9 7 D
. his nephews, and to
flaw who married his
. natural succession, so
[world and the moon ex-
inam shall be" his here-
Lsion, Hail."
an rulers must have at-
fat importance to the
Uer>, so much so that the
anted to Joseph Rabban
^ Parkaran was endorsed
er kings, the commander
Es. and the Prime Minis-
Lg to I. M. Jost, eminent
iorian of the 19th cent-
Icharter must have ac-
the Jews of Malabar the
jlow the strict sumptuary
filing at this period, such
the expressly specified
Jrs." The leaders or Prin-
ed; their Princesses, yel-
children, green; the
Iwhite; and those who
nourning, blue. Further-
castes of artisans were
among the Jewish set-
{the carpenters, the bra-
: smiths, the gold-and-sil-
nen. and the distillers of
ip. This list affords first-
Irmation about the origin
(lain present-day occupa-
he working-class among
lof Cochin.
kws of Malabar had at-
lace. wealth and prosper-
] the protection of the tol-
llers of Cranganore, so
that for a thousand years
he 15th century C.E.) they
] unchallenged masters of
folly independent Princi-
j Shingly, the name given
bid Chinese in the earliest
Cranganore, known to the
Is Muzkiris. The Jews
it not only a haven of
It also a centre of trade',
at that time the biggest
|ial outlet to the Arabian
he Jewish Raj of Malabar
[number and importance.
ame wealthy, and they ac-
large number of native
jrho adopted the Jewish
1 were later emancipated,
Increasing in number and
Following the caste distinc-
fcong its non-Jewish neigh-
) community soon split into
fcrly defined "castes," vie,
fcyuhasim" or families of
We lineage, the "Meshur-
le liberated slaves. Both
I more or less resemble the
les.
|the extinction of the line
i Rabban, dissension arose
I Joseph Azar, a Jew of a
nily, and one of,his broth-
the chieftainship of the
pity of Anjuvannam. The
ps brother, backed by a su-
kumber of freed slaves, at-
|nd slaughtered many of
T>o came under the banner
Ider brother.
Sara Ktora, 19, a girl typical
of the Jews of Cochin.
A calamitous crTwar broke out,
which resulted in the intervention
of the neighbouring princes who
quelled the rebellion and put the
treacherous brother to flight. The
story is told that he escaped to
Cochin by swimming across the
backwaters with his wife on his
shoulders.
But the damage was beyond re-
pair. The intervening Princes of
Cranganore dispossessed the Jews
of their Principality of Anjuvan-
nam, and Joseph Azar, 72nd and
last Prince of the Jews, had to
abandon his realm and seek refuge
in nearly Cochin and in 1524, on
the pretext that the Jews of Crang-
anore were interfering with the
pepper trade, the Mohammedans,
backed by the Zamorin of Calicut,
made an onslaught on the Princi-
pality and broke into the town,
burning and destroying houses and
synagogues. Those who escaped the
sword and fire of the Zamorin
found refuge in Cochin, but Crang-
anore, which is estimated to have
had a population of 80,000 at the
time, has never rebuilt. Thus came
to an end the one bright episode in
the history of the Jews in the East.
In the annals of the Malabar
community, this calamity is second
in tragic importance only to the
destruction of Jerusalem 1500
years earlier. The Cochin Jews
shun the site of the devastated
town to this day, and if their busi-
ness brings them thither, they
leave before sunset.
A handful of Shingly sand finds
a place in the coffin of every dead
Malabar Jew beside the soil of the
Holy Land. Beside a small hill
known as "Jooda Kunnu" or "Jew-
ish Hill," the copper plates which
they have taken with them to Co-
chin are the only reminder of that
forgotten Jewish outpost.
TO ALL ... A HAPPY PASSOVER t
MR. and MRS. JULIUS JAY PERLMUTTER J
Lawrence C, Reaina V., and Carole Perlmutter
TO ALL GREETINGS
TU. ALL ^.a&ti iivus I k
Investors Insurance Agency,Inc.
E. F. CHENAULT R. L. MORRIS V. S. THOMASON
CALL 2-6065
FOR ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE
505 S.W. 8th STREET
JUSTICE AND IMMIGRATION POLICIES
Continued from Page 9 D
time the Communists had taken
Shanghai and the family was trap-
ped.
They tried a daring stunt. Mrs.
Chan posed as a well-to-do matron,
accompanied by her man-servant
and his child, and thus they made
their way to Knowloon, and across
to Hong Kong. From there they
sailed for America.
Chan landed at San Francisco
without difficulty; he had an Amer-
ican passport. His adopted son was
refused entry. The inspector said
the boy was a quota immigrant not
in possession of a regular quota
vista. Mrs. Chan, although bearing
a valid nonquota visa, was also de-
nied admission "as an accompany-
ing alien whose protection is re
quired by the rejected alien on ac-
count of infancy." A medical offi-
cer had certified that the mother's
care was necessary for the wel-
fare of the child because, to quote
his singular diagnosis, "the child
cried when out of her presence."
Mother and child were held in
detention for six months. During
that time Chan could see his wife
and son only on regular visitors'
daystwice a week, a half hour
each visit, separated from his fam-
ily by a triple thickness of fine-
mesh screen, in a small crowded
room noisy with voices shouting in
a variety of tongues.
They were finally paroled into
the United States for the purpose
of applying for suspension of de-
portation on the ground of eco-
nomic detriment to the citizen hus-
band-father. They were then ar-
rested and given a hearing to de-
termine whether deportation would
indeed result in hardship. The
hearing officer so found, and Con-
gress eventually approved.
This was a needless ordeal for
the Chans. Actually, the immigra-
tion authorities at the outset could
have admitted Mrs. Chan perma-
nently and the child temporarily
on the visas they presented. Then
the boy could have applied for a
stay of deportation. However^ when
questioned by a Board of Special
Inquiry, Mrs. Chan frankly admit-
ted that the boy wanted to stay
with his parents. So the board took
the view that the childbecause he
wished to be with his parentshad
committed fraud by intending to
remain here permanently, whereas
he arrived on a visitor's visa!
Mrs. Chan's reward for honesty
was good compared to what would
happen now, under the present
law.
IAPPY PASSOVER > tha Market Afferds It Reasonable Prices Alaxandar and Family *">". Harry fc Sol of the ECASH MARKET JR.*. uth Street MIAMI. FLORIDA p 1?5 N. W. 16th St GREETINGS TO ALL O. J. L G. Jorgensen Schreffler CONSULTING ENGINEERS BUcayne Building Miami

I----------------
BEST WISHES TO MY EWISH FRIENDS M.N.UPP Nell-Thomas .Machinery. Inc. CONSTRUCTION WOODWORKING INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY 1920 N. W. Miami Court
BEST WISHES
FOR
A VERY HAPPY
PASSOVER
SHAW BROS.
OIL CO.
Exclusive Distributor! ei
Pur* Oil Company
Product, in South-
Eastera Florida
GREETINGS
Concrete Hoisting Steel Erected
Bar Joists Set Clam and Drag 1
N. POPENHAGER
CRANES
PHONE 83-2652 2534 LINCOLN AVE. '
COCONUT GROVE, FLORIDA
To All Season's Greetings
JOHN A. GAUTIER
YOUR DADE COUNTY
TAX ASSESSOR
A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL
KING BAKE SHOP
IRVING and MILTON POARSKY
1894 S. W. Eighth Street
Miami
BILL WRIGLEY of
tt It 14.1 IV ENGRAVING COMPANY,
WISHES HIS MANY JEWISH FRIENDS t
A MOST HAPPY PASSOVER
MR. AND MRS. H. A. SILVERS AND FAMILY
of the
B & W ELECTRIC CORPORATION
555 NORTH MIAMI AVENUE
EXTEND BEST WISHES TO ALL FOR A
MOST HAPPY PASSOVER
Best Wishes for a
A Nappy Passover
*1
COUNCILMAN BERNARD A. FRANK
A Nappy Passover To AH
Our Friends
FISCHER'S BAKE SHOP
7423 COLLINS AVENUE
For a Fine Selection off
Holiday Cakes & Cookies
Pk.ni 1*4*12 Cl.sed Saturday at SuimUwm


PAGE 12 D
* Jewish ncrkBtw
nHDAY.i
T. All Our fritnds and Patrons A Mat Happy PHSWSf
The Prom Shops
760 41ft STRICT, MIAMI BEACH
263 MIRACLE MILE, CORAL CABLES
THE FATE OF THE 1.000 YEAR OLD
To All .
. Happy Passover
GARY of MIAMI. !<
Morris Greenwald
5 S. W. 2nd AVENUE. MIAMI. FLA.
I iVhls Kiisloin Kover.s
AUTO SEAT COVERS TOPS. ETC.
PICK UP AND DELIVERY SERVICE
2341 N. Miami Avenue
Phone 3-2389
T M I

MIRACLE WEDGE
Overhead Door Company of Miami, Inc.
Miami 38, Florida
SALE SERVICE INSTALLATION
7111 Biscayne Blvd. Telephone 78-5513
GREETINGS
When Gifts are in Order a Lasting Gift from
The ORCHID PATIO
Orchid Plants for Home or Garden Culture
1075 N.E. 79th STREET MIAMI. FLORIDA
Open Sundays PHONE 7-3641 Visitors Welcome
WE SHIP ASYWHERE IN THE U.S.A.
GREETINGS
T. S. BUDD
OPTICIAN
122 S.E. 1st Street. Miami. Florida
Phone 9-1451
262 Andulusia Phone 4-0291 Coral Gables
BUT WISHES FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER
HARIIIS FOOD PRODIXTS
Man.ifacturerg and Dutributo't
VAVONNAISE PICKLES CONDIMENTS
4421 N.W. 23rd Ave. Miami, Florida
SPICES
Ph. 64-9747
SINCERE WISHES FOR A
HAPPY PASSOVER
MARKOWITZ BROS., INC.
MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS
5600 N. E. 4th Avenue Phone 89 2411
Burons
tc
Flagler Street
Phone 9-3771
0
PRESCRIPTION
SPECIALISTS
Since 1897
-

:: \% -
Continued from Peye 3D
wine dealers, store owners or law-
yers may return, but Jewish life
is at an end.
Shortly alter American troops
occupied the city in 1945. the Mlli-
Urj Governor encouraged the Mu-
nii ip.il Custodku) <>f Monuments.
Dr. Illert. to have tfie entranceway
to Uh Synagogue reconstructed
with the original stones that were
st,II litteriaf the area. He also had
the indent cemeterv and the mik-
vah put in order. In the former,
where so many giants of Judaism
found their last resting place, a
hi-'.::.' which was put up in
the year 1044, before the Norman
invasion of England, bears mute
witness to the age-old tradition of
the Community. The ritual bath,
still in servteeable condition to-
day, was built Li 1186.
Evan during the Nazi period. Dr.
Illert had salvaged from the wreck-
afe ol the Synagogue the famed
"Hashi Chair." which is believed
to have been used by the great
popular expounder of Bible and
Talmud It is now a showpiece of
the local St Andrew's Museum,
where devout Jews come to view it
on occasion. The museum also dis-
ptayi some stone tablets from the
Synagogue, together with a number
of ritual objects and Torah Scrolls.
Whether the one inscribed by Rab-
in Meir of Rothenburg while the
Emperor Rudolph held him for
ransom in Ensisheim fortress is
among them, Dr. Illert has tried to
ascertain, but so far to no avail.
In a glass case we find a precious
festival prayerbook written in 1272
and consisting of two illuminated
manuscripts adorned with vignettes
that represent Jewish scenes. Next
to it is the fire scorched cover.
with silver ornaments, of a mach-
zor from the Renaissance period.
There are medieval documents,
such as Imperial rescripts confirm-
ing privileges of the Jewish Com
munity. or offering safe conduct
to certain members thereof. Parts
of the Hebrew archives of the ke-
hillah. which go back to the 17th
century, are also at the disposal of
interested acholars. All these ex-
hibits the museum was permitted
to retain as a permanent loan, on
condition that the municipality
take care of the cemetery-
A trickle of Jewish visitors come
to gaze at these monuments and
souvenirs of a Jewish Worms th.it
is no more. Busloads of pilgrims
have even made the long trip from
the DP camp at Foehrcnwcltl. south
of Munich.
They all dop at the spot in dwon-
lown Worn- where the Synagogue
used to standthe Romanesque
' nucleus erected in 1034. the Gothic
style wing added in 1213 and the
K.-ishi Chapel" that was construct-
ed in 1624 Thoughtfully, they sur
vey the rubble strewn plot left be-
hind not by an ^discriminating
1 wartime bombing raid, but by the
evil men win. brought these raids
upon themselves.
Watching these visitors has sug-
gested to some Worms boosters of
the chamber-of-commerce type
that, if the Synagogue were to be
restored, it might be developed into
a major tourist attraction. Not
every city, after all, is in the for
tunate position of Frankfurt to
have a Goethe House that can be
reconstructed for the sake of pay
ing guests, and ope must make do
with what one has.
Published reports have placed
the cost of a faithful reconstruction
job at half a million marks, but ex
perts believe that less than half
that sumperhaps $50.000would
actually be needed. Even though
the mayor of Worms, Heinrich
Voelker. is among the advocates of
restoring the Synagogue, he does
not want to dip into the city treas-
ury for this purpose. His attempts
to secure grants from the state and
federal governments have met with
little success to date.
During the pest two months, the
Jewish and Gentile press of many
countries reported "Worms Syna-
gogue To Bo Rebuilt," to quote a
headline from the principal organ
of British Jewry. The official Ger-
man-language daily of the US High
Commission asserted that Jewish
leaders in Germany would welcome
a restoration of the venerable Syna-
gogue "as a further significant step
towards the reconciliation of the
German and Jewish peoples." A
collection,was to be taken soon
among Jews in London, the article
further said. Similar articles ap-
peared in publications in Germany
and the US.
All these stories have little basis
in fact. Concrete plans are quite
unknown to the kehillah at Mainz,
which now encompasses Worms, to
the State Association of Jewish
Communities and to the representa-
tive body of the Jews in Germany,
the Central Council. All three, in-
deed, are pronouncedly unenthusi-
astic about the idea of lavishing
.1
Continued from Page 4D
! phosphoric acid, phosphate salts,
soda ash and other chemical prod
ucts.
The development program also
provides that Fertilizers and Chem-
icals. Ltd.. Israels largest indus
trial enterprise and the major
chemical producing firm in the
Middle East, will complete its syn-
thetie ammonia plant in a few
months The company already oper-
ates a super-phosphates plant in
Haifa
Further proposals provide for
the immediate construction and ex
pankion of other chemical factories
for the manufacture of ammonia,
sulphate, potassium sulphate, dical
cium phosphate, nitric acid and am-
monium ji it rate.
With regard to ceramic mate
rials, intensive exploitation has
been confined to special types of
ball clay and glass unit]
on feldspar and qaaittj
the research stage, I"
it- own ceramic nwi
resulted in the cessatioal
and sand imports, andlj
able reduction of ballr
cla> imports. Effort-aati
made I" develop expMtJ
tin- field.
There are other
the Israel Government]
gin in the coming i
ing ,!,. eioJoiBion|
h Works: the f
ChemM ils, M.
Mining industries,tW
operated c most el the nations!
ations and dtjvelopir
cohol. Ltd., hich_
|y grown sugar -**"'
and other chemicals.*^
Ceramic Works, UJ_
TO ALL A MOST
HAPPY PASSOVER
ETHEL
ALAN. GERI
and
HENRY S. GREENBAUM
GREETINGS
Herbert Diamond
& Co.
1340 N.W. 27th Ays.
Miami 35, Florida
Telephone 64-6031
SEA SHELLS &
FLOWER SUPPLIES
PHONE 2-9392
Max's Delicatessen
and Restaurant
IMPORTED TABLE LUXURIES
Fancy GroceriesSmoked Fish
Appetizers and Dairy Products
1131 W. Flagler St., Miami
TO AU .
HAW MSSOVft
CHARLES ML EWING
P LUMSING MATINS
CONTRACTS*
G & E METAL I
Grill* **i
PwckhW
CsN>
Storm **"j
TO ALL
A Most Happy
AHTHJ^gJrJ
u^OLST^j
ManufseW^
CusW^,^Ateu
PHONES*^


ML 16. 1954
* Jeni\l fkrHian
PAGE 13 D
I MANY THINGS HAVE MINE 01 EYE! SEEK
from P9 10 D
ir,| for the welfare of
hole, they would have
[as, a part of their
altli. <>r the fabulous
|fr th<- cultivation of
Inrl-i of acres of crim-
fpd land. If the Arab
anv regard for the
L,.,.,...- they would
L,\ them with open
'Nations economic ex-
|in Ilia* Iraq must in-
Tricultural population
| one-half million per-
fcnuntrv is to be eco-
bund. They also say
, ,. in fact, Syria had
||n permit one-half mil-
froni their delta re-
in Syria. Even in I.c-
fcmallest of trie Arab
lc area under irriga
[increased five-fold. If
i in Syria for one-half
Itians. there should be
Bht hundred thousand
[whose plight Syria is
sponsible.
bf dollars have been
United Nations for
I of the refugees. This
|aril> American, would
| considerably in reset-
Jugec< and making them
Ing. It would also have
governments occupied
factivo projects, instead
If a "second round."
pie Are Piwm
[the welfare of the peo-
|icst from their minds;
nands for the complete
of the refugees, and
r1 to listen to any rea-
ctions, indicated to me
Ltion of a definite objec-
fcver I went, I heard of
land plans to organize
Is. to give them military
Dd to have them infil-
(sracl at all costs. The
ore than four hundred
^ing the last few years
salinn of the success ol
. Arab leaders made no
tor plans to have the re-
ve as a fifth column, to
I with arms and ammu-
the neighboring coun-
) hasten the downfall of
i a frontier of nine hun-
[kilometers along which
an enemy who never
claiming the imminence
ond round," it would be
j of folly and irrcsponsi-
prmit the refugees to re-
lering with and restrict-
kssage of goods through
Canal to Israel ports in
the United Nations Se-
lincil resolution of Sep-
1951; in applying sanc-
ertain ships visiting Is-
land firms doing business
)\ contrary to the intent
of the General Armis-
tment; in denying radio
i the Philippine Airlines
their use of Israel's in-
The season's first citrus exports herald the coming of spring
and the Passover in Israel.
temational airport;1'Lydda, in de-
fiance of existing international con-
ventions and the United Nations
Charter, the Arab rulers have clear-
ly demonstrated to the world their
complete disregard of the United
Nations and the interest and wel-
fare of their own people. *
In instituting and vigorously pur-
suing a policy of intimidation, ter-
ror, highway robbery (the imposi-
tion of special taxes, fines, and
finally the confiscation of the prop-
erty of over 150,000 Iraqi Jews),
torture, and public hangings of in-
nocent people (the leading Jew in
Basrah was hanged on a tree before
youths were hanged on the public
his wife and family; two Jewish
gallows in Bagdad, in January,
1952), the Arab leaders have braz-
enly proclaimed to the world their
utter contempt for the rights of
man and the sanctity of human
life.
Dangling the Sword
Last May the Foreign Minister of
Syria declared that 'The Arab
States are placed under the threat
of extinction as long as there lives
in the heart of the Arab World
that aggressive gang called Israel
. We shall not rest until we eli-
minate that gang from the coun-
try it is trying to turn into a fort-
ress for itself This country will
only serve as a grave for that
gang." One month later Mohammed
Naguib, the President of Egypt,
said that "Peace with Israel will
only increase this danger, since she
will be able to crush the Arab coun-
tries en masse. The only solution
is Israel's disappearance." On No-
vember second Hussein, King of
Jordan, asserted that Jordan's pol-
icy will continue to be "no peace
with Israel." Just a few days ago,
on January nine, the new King
Saud of Saudi Arabia told a visit-
ing press delegation from Jordan
that "Israel to the Arab World is
like a cancer to the human body
A Happy Passover to all
Our friends and Patrons
Darby's Restaurant
216 Lincoln Rttad ******->
Greetings...
MILWAUKEE BEVERAGES
"BLATZ"
"Milwaukee's Finest Beer'
1344 N.W. 23rd STREET
Phone 82-1405

and the only way of remedy is to
uproot it just like a cancer .
We Arabs total about 50 million.
Why don't we sacrifice 10 million
of our number to live in pride and
self respect?"
These statements of poliay on
the part of the most prominent
spokesmen of the Arab ruling
clique, resulting in the slaughter
and maiming of thousands of Jews
by armed hands slipping into Israel
thousands of times, should leave
no doubt in anyone's mind as to the
real reason for their continued and
unswerving demand for the repat-
riation of the "Refugees." To se-
cure the destruction of Israel with
the help of the repatriated "Refu-
gees" is, olearly, the plan of the
Arab political leadership.
The Arabs have little cause for
grievance against the West; during
the last few decades they have
gained independence over an area
of one and one-half millions of
square miles, yet they wish the
world to believe that the eight
thousand square miles conceded to
Israel by the United Nations repre-
sent an injustice of such magnitude
to them, that all their thoughts and
actions must be influenced by it.
Democracy Vs. Feudalism
It does not require too intimate
a knowledge of the situation in the
Middle East to know that the Arab
rulers consider the Western Democ-
racies a danger to their own feudal
system. Israeli democracy, on their
own doorsteps, presents, they be-
lieve, a direct threat to their con-
tinued exploitation of the people.
Information about the freely
elected leaders of Israel; the right
to vote enjoyed by all, including
the women; free education and
mental care; the minimum wage
schedule, and the functioning of
Continued on Pag* 15 D
and MRS.
SILVERMAN
and the
VER PAINT
iOMPANY
W. FIRST STREET
|COLLINS AVENUE
Miami Beach
[for All Their Pairom
1m Friends a
Poppy Passover
tD*Y OREETINO,
l sH0RES GARDEN
** th Av.nu.
fH CUT PUOWER, AT
AL|- TIMES
GREETINGS FROM
LOUIS OAKEN & FAMILY
(Sliced or UnsUcedFrench-
white whole. Wheat Breads)
Hard Holla. Dinner Rolls.
Bagels
ARNOLD'S BAKERY
Superior Bakery Products
Fresh Fruit Pies, Fruit Coffee
Cakes, Tea Cakes. Party NoTelties
Genuine Old Fashioned Rye.
Corn Bread. Pumpernickle
"Remember the address"
1757 Coral Way Ph. 83-7839
Cemefimeefs
I
Mr. Sam Mungtn
47 N.W. 451* STtllT
RADIATORS
REPAIRED CLEANED RECORED
JERRY'S RADIATOR
SERVICE
2035 N.W. lit AVENUE
Pboaa 821431
A
MOST
HAPPY
PASSOVER
TO All
S. J. HALPE
420 Lincoln Rood
Realtor
1 Vll
===^/1F fffRVfff^^^A
* ^*

28 N.W. 20th STREET, MIAMI, FLORIDA, PHONE 9-4667 ALL MATS BY DIRECT PRESSURE
fASSOVtK GREETINGS
MEYERS BEACH FLOWER SHOP
flowers for Every Occasion
t
1445 ALTON ROAD
TEL. 5-1020
GREETINGS
FISHER JEWELRY
1433 S.W. Ith STREET
PHONE 2-2468
PASSOVER GREETINGS
from
IZZIE and SAM TENDRICH, Owners
HUDSON TRAIL MOTORS, INC.
1305 S.W. 8th STREET
Telephone 2-2667
Greetings
Miami Glass Co., Inc.
III. ItJS"
CLASS FOR ALL PURPOSES
MIRRORS one SUSS TOPS CONTRACT WORK WHOLESALE
e STORE FRONT CONSTRUCTION
2320 W. FLAGLER STREET
PHONE 83-1618
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
Lillian Corro/ff
FLAMiNGO FLORIST
Corsages, Hants, Cut Flowers from $2.50 up
540 N.W. 79th STREET T.I. 84-2963, Nights 894261
SECURITY
TRUST
COMPANY
"Tresf end Estate Administration
Exclusively"
131 SHORELAND BUILDING
119 EAST FLAGLER STREET
MIAMI 32, FLORIDA
Tel. 12-4661


PAGE 14 D
Jelstotk**l**r)_
GUTTMAN AND LAPOFF
Kosher Moats and Poultry
EXTEND BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY
PASSOVER
TO THEIR FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS
325 Collins Avenue
Telephone 58-1031
Miami Beach
A HAPPY PASSOVER
HOTEL & RESTAURANT EMPLOYEES & BARTENDERS
VMO> LOCAL 133 A. F. OF L.
ALVARO GONZALEZ. JR.. President
MORRIS G. DRAPKIN. Secretary-Treasurer
240 N.E. 8th Street Phone ****.
TO ALL GREETINGS
Commercial Bank of Miami
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
6015 N.W. 7th AVENUE
PHONE 7-5744
"tOALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
HAPPY HOLIDAY GREETINGS
AL PFLEIGER
TAXIDERMIST
15899 N. E. Sixth Avenue North Miami Phone 816-5991
TAYLOR CONSTRUCTION CO.
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
2875 North Lejeune Road Miami
PHONE 64-9761
6 1IIfIN CS
; AMERICAN CHEMICAL COMPANY
SANITARY and JANITOR SUPPLIES
277 WEST FLAGLER STREET PHONE 9-1807.
GREETINGS
*
MAIMIWMi;. Incorporated
SASH AND SCREEN SERVICE
ALLEN L. PARRISH. Manager
3427 N. Miami Avenue Miami, Florida
Phone 3-5491
MR. AND MRS. MAURICE COHN AND FAMILY
and the
World Wide Liquor Co.
EXTEND BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER
TO THE ENTIRE JEWISH COMMUNITY
SINCERE WISHES FOR A
HAPPY PASSOVER
i
BARNETT'S INC.
134 NX First Street
MIAMI'S FINEST OFFICE SUPPLIES
The Red Sea is a Rich Bl
ue
By D. SCHOCHER
The story of the crossing of the
Red Sea by the Israelites ll the
high mark of the Exodous episode,
which Passover commemorates.
Oddly enough, the Red Sea is
not red. The waters are rather blu-
ish Perhaps bluish green would
best describe them. There has been j
much theorizing by scholars how
the sea acquired its name. It is
true there are specks of reddish-
ness in the waters but hardly in
sufficient accents to justify the
name. Some attribute the name to
the mountains nearby which in
phases of the sunset take on a
reddish hue. Others think the name
comes from red or copper skinned
peoples who once dwelt on the ad-
jacent peninsula.
When the Israelites succeeded in
crossing safely over the sea, it is
written, "then Moses sang." And
today in Israel, the high feature of
the celebration of Passover outside
of the synagogue and the Seder is
the "Shirat Yam." The young peo-
ple go to the beaches and sing
again the song which Moses sang
after the crossing of the sea.
We can easily understand the
exultation of the great leader of
the Exodous. The Israelites are in
flight. Behind them are the pursu-
ing Egyptiansin their chariots
and all the paraphernalia of mili-
tary power. In front of them are
the turbulent waters of the Red
Sea. It is the alternative of death
orre-enslavement from behind or
death by drowning in front. It
seems an utterly hopeless situation.
But a strong east windrsays the
Bible, arose and drove the waters
back, making walls on both sides,
through which the Israelites passed
through in safety.
Such a strong east wind would
not be unusual. The Red Sea is
noted for its storms and the power
of a strong wind to reduce the
level of water has been frequently
noted even in the United States.
The Red Sea has more than his-
toric interest. It is the waterway
which separates two continents
Asia and Africa. Some believe that
tens, of thousands years ago, Asia
and Africa were one continent and
that the Red Sea was then continu-
ous with the Mediterranean.
The Red Sea is about 1,400 miles
long and little more than 200 miles
wide. It is peculiar in the fact that
no rivers run in it and yet it is not
much saltier than oceans generally.
Another thing of note is the
abundance of life, vegetable and
animal, with which it abounds. It
teems with exotic fish. The fierce
shark is fond of its waters. Already
the sharks are being exploited eco-
nomically. His skin makes good
handbags and the internal organs
of the shark are rich in vitamins.
Six years ago. when the Jewish
State was first established, Elath,
t&m*
z
"3**-a

Wash day for a housewife in a village near Elath. Ski
ago, the seaport city had only one building. The I
whoqp shore it stands now begins to thrive once i
the Red Sea port city was a city of
one building, made of sunburned
brick. Today, Elath might be taken
for a small but growing American
western town. Beside the fisheries,
it draws strength from the exploita-
tion of Israel's copper and iron re-
sources', which are being financed
with Israel bonds.
Nearby is the ancient city of Et-
bion-Gever, where, according to
the Bible, the Queen oil
to see King Solomon
King Solomon first I
a marine fleet, which 1
and peacocks and raaj^
dities from a far any I
some have speculated *(
It is not unthinkable I
not distant future, ships
take off from this Red!
such world round;
THE CAREER OF SIR JACOB 0
Continued frem 2 D
his own. But Epstein never con-
cealed his origin. Besides, an artist
has to serve all creeds, and all na-
tionalities. He belongs to mankind,
never to a single group of people
alone. Epstein's Jewishness. as re-
vealed in his work, has been noted
by anti-Semitic hotspurs like the
Mosleyites who defaced his statues
with swastikas, but also by unbi-
ased critics who registered it with-
out much ado.
Epstein is most widely known for
his portrait busts. When making a
portrait in stone, he is as honest
in his artistic approach as when he
ventures into other realms of sculp-
ture. Philistines of many countries
would have gladly forgiven him his
'montrosities," and even paid him
excellent fees, had he consented to
portray them flatteringly in stone
or bronie. But the artist refused to
forget, for convenience's sake, that
a portrait, though faithful to the
sitter, must be shorn ii
ficialities and now
that it is the artist's I
create a "perfect likenei^
dimensional photognpil
ing the external aspetSI
ter, but to analyze his |
Twentieth century i
gone far beyond
stands at the beginning*
But the work of "Sir!
remain a source of ii
many generations to i
holds true particularly i
where, as the sculptor"
Arnold Auerbach.
ed, his "invigorating im
been "incalculable.""
pr:nse> Epstein's
vitality instinctm
ical penetration .
to the life of the seaa*l
hibited translation au
forms" and "intensity!
freed the younger men
from the tame tradWJ
ured copies from the'
and from sentimental i
To All .
Passover Greetings
Sunshine
iieantu Salon
550 41st STREET
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-1624
A Happy Passover To All
Our Friends and Customers
Mr. and Mrs. Beck of the
APEX CLEANERS & LAUNDRY
Adelman's Pipe
A Steel Co.
A Most Happy Passover
To AU Our Friends
end Patrons
FOX BRAKE SERVICE
MM H. E. 2nd Ave.
J-S530
Nathan Adelman
Charles Adelman
Hv Coverraan
AND FAMILIES
EXTEND TO ALL
A HAPPY PASSOVER
TO ALL.. I .
HAPPY PASSO^
MR. and MRS-
SAM JOSEPHfflr
FAMHY
of the
MIAMI SB|
675N.W.5th*
HAPPY PASSO^
paper **
Manufacture'
AUTISTIC PAPE^
I4i,mi Islam**1**
Bid* 144
MIAMI


APRIL 16. 1954
+Jmlslirk>rMkri
PAGE 15 D
fclPES TO ACCENT THE PASSOVER MEAL TABLE
[inued from Page *>
the side an* stuff with
Jring mixture. Beat 2 eggs
Ldd J4 cup sugar, 1 table-
jato starch, 1 tablespoon
j juice of 1 lemon, grated
Memon and 1 cup water,
fa double boiler until it
J Fill the puffs and sprin-
fcowered sugar.
ir Fluffy Matxoh Balls
(chicken fat
! beaten eggs
hot chicken broth
Upoon salt
s matzoh flour
e hot chicken fat and
beat well with an egg
kdd the other ingredients
._ balls about the size" of
\ and allow to cool. Boil tffc
(broth and drop the matzoh
(to the boiling soup, cover
120 minutes.
Stuffed Breast of Veal
breast of veal
rtatoes
(spoon salt
aspoon pepper
i
ip fried onions
p minced celery
Iblespoons fat
pp matzoh flour
! the meat with a wet cloth
y an opening between the
nd the bones to receive the
H Peel and grate the pota-
Dd mix with salt, pepper,
nions, well beaten eggs, eel-
ami matzoh flour. Fill the
|and sew opening together.
! sliced onions into the bot-
J a roaster, and put meat on
Jthe onions, adding a V cup
ler to the roaster. Sprinkle
pd pepper over it, cover the
and place in a hot oven.
Jfor 2 hours basting the meat
Iroastiny. Yields 10 portions.
nty Pocket Pudding For
Passover
hips water
pip chicken fat
easpoon salt
kups matzoh flour
kup raisins
lb. honey
hblespoons sugar
pupoon cinnamon
eaten eggs
pg the water and chicken fat
oil. Add salt, matzoh flour
fcix thoroughly. Add well beat-
when the mixture is cold.
]i inch rounds from small
of the dough and place a
| piece of raw chicken fat and
Bns on each. Pinch the edges
together and place into a greased
pudding dish. Pour the warm honey
over it and sprinkle sugar mixed
with cinnamon. Cover and bake in
a moderate oven until browned.
*
Matzoh and Prune Pudding
2 matzohs
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon
3 eggs
V4 lb. washed prunes
Vt lb. chopped walnuts
Vi cup sugar
Vi cup melted chicken fat
Soak the matzohs in hot water
until the water is cold. Drain and
squeeze dry. Add to the matzohs
salt, cinnamon, well beaten eggs,
diced prunes, walnuts, sugar and
fat or other shortening. Pour mix-
ture into well greased pudding pan
and bake in a moderate oven 45
minutes.
THESE MANY THINGS HAKE I SEEN
Continued from Pago 13 D propaganda exalting the state and
the Knesset, the parliament of Is-
rael, has leaked through the Arab
curtain. The seven thousand miles
or more separating the Arabs from
the United Staff* make it impos-
sible for thenvty appreciate the ad-
vantages of oBWeracy as exempli
fled here. FrfssWhat distance the
Arab finds it difficult to believe
that the average working man in
the United States owns a car, a
house with a bathroom, a radio set,
and other fabulous and, to him, in-
credible possessions. Arabs have
told me that they bitterly resented
being fed such impossible "lies,"
asking, "Do they think we are such
fools as to believe that all the peo-
ple are effendis?" Accurate and
quite believable reports about Is-
rael's vibrant democracy, however,
come from across the border and
from fellow Arabs.
I am convinced that if the Arab
masses are to be encouraged away
from the empty promises of Com-
munism, it will not be by means of
condition of the people in the
Western countries, but by a dem-
onstration of democracy in action
on their own doorsteps.
The Arabs are treated in Israel
as Jews have never been treated
in any Arab country. In an all-Arab
city such as Nazareth, the mayor,
the judges, the teachers and the
police, are Arabs, paid by the gov-
ernment of Israel. Arab teachers
have been encouraged and trained
by the Jewish government of Is-
rael to take care of the education
of the Arab minority. All Arab chil-
dren, boys and girls, go to school,
and Arab women have voted for
the first time in their history. De-
mocratically-elected Arabs repre-
sent the interests of their fellows
in the parliament of Israel.
A potentially explosive situation
could yet be resolved if only the
United Nations would make it un-
mistakably known that it will not
tolerate a second round against Is-
rael's integrity.
As the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel's one university,
marks the beginning of its 30th year of service to the Jewish
people and all humanity. Israeli guards enter an armored bus
fox the fortnightly convoy to the University's buildings on
Mount Scopus. Despite Article VIII of the Israel-Jordan Arm-
istice Agreement providing for free use of the buildings ou
Mount Scopus, the University has been forced smce 1948 to
conduct its program in irnprovised^^
>TT ELECTRIC. INC.
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iterations of All Kinds
North Miami Arenue
PHONE 3-6294
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is Blake-Max Schoenield
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MIAMI '
Phones 48-2671 48-2672
FOSTER
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CONTRACTING
ALTERATIONS
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Paul Foster. Pres.
2264 W. Flacjler Street
MkxmL Florida
A. F. GIVEN
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319 N. E. 2nd Ave.
* Phone 3-5373
MIAMI FLORIDA
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2719 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Phone 48-2591
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970 S.W. Bin Street
Phone 3-0574
GREETINGS
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255 AlHAMBRA CIRCLE
Phones 13-2511 4-0123
CORAl CARLES
M. ii. GARMS
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622 S.W. 27th Avenue Phone 4-0836
R. W. BROWN and CO.
A Complete Line of Fertilizers for All Occasions
INSECTICIDES and SUPPLIES
Call 87-2616
6110 S.W. 72nd Street
South Miami
Utzinger's Musical Instrument Service
The Only Complete Repair and Refinishing Service in Miami
Martin Band Instrument* Factory Methods and Parts used
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11 and 13 N. E. 5th St. Phone 9-3554 Miami 36. Fla.
TO ALL HAPPY PASSOVER
THE MIAMI AGENCY. INC.
GENERAL INSURANCE
II. H. WOODSMAIX, JR.
682 N.E. 124th St. North Miami Phone 84-0615
RAMSEY NURSING NOME
24-Hour Nursing Service Chronics and Convalescents
All Rooms on Ground Floor 5 Acres Nice Grounds
8715 N.W. 32nd AVENUE Phone 7-5752
TO ALL .
A HAPPY PASSOVER J
Charles Reed
MIAMI SANITORIUM
and Neurology Institute
For Diagnosis and Treatment of Mental and Nervous Disorders,
Alcoholism and Drug Habituation
NORTH MIAMI AVENUE at 79th STREET
Phone 7-1824 Phone 84-5354
MIAMI, FLORIDA
TO OUR MANY FRIENDS
MOST HAPPY HOLIDAYS
-4j.UMlNUM-Sta!i Tor
tMlistf Mtra light
84-5561
JAICO, INC .
'41 N.W- 14th ST.. MIAMI. FLA.


PAGE 16 D
9>Jmistncrk&*n
FRIDAY
American Notables... Warder Cresson: The Jew of 1848
By HARRY SIMONHOFF
{Hmrry Simonholft clown, constituting a serial MM
Amtrican Hotakles, il .em, pub/JsheW by The Jewilfc WM""
i srf f tnt tercentenary celebration ot Uwitk utthmnt M
the United Slatts.-Th* Uitors.)
Seldom do we see Jews converted to Christianity. But
far more rarely do we hear of Christians embracing Ju-
daism. If we rule out those cases of marriage for financial
betterment, the scarcity of proselytes to the faith of Moses
is not too easily explained.
Rarity of Converts to Judaism
This paucity of converts does not stem from the bur-
densome rites demanded by Orthodoxy. There is some-
thing in the psychology of a genuine proselyte that
srasps quite eagerly at the onerous practices of a new
faith. The unpopularity of Jews may possibly deter the
more worldly. Yet the history of many a "ger tzedek"
-imply proves that a seeker of religious truth is never
frightened by persecutions from without or by the re-
fcentments within the new congregation he enters.
A plausible explanation lies in the unwillingness of
Jews to welcome an apostate from another religion. Every-
thing is done to discourage the stranger who comes knock-
ing at the synagogue door. He is assured that his soul can
be saved in his ancestral faith if he leads a blameless life.
The ger is accepted only after he demonstrates the sin
cerity of his conversion beyond all doubt. Such, at le;i-l
Wai the experience of a Quaker from Philadelphia
The Quaker
Warder Cresson was given to Bible study and religious
speculation. At the age of thirty, he wrote. 'Babylon the
Great is Falling.'' a diatribe against Catholicism. In the
same book he deplores the evil of the times and exhorts
his own Quakers to a better life. But the religion of the
Friends was not quite satisfying. Spiritual unrest drove
him to try several other sects which appealed for the
moment. In 1840. he met Rabbi Isaac Leeser. and thi
leader of American Orthodoxy created an impression that
ultimately changed the life and faith of Warder Cresson.
Missionaries
Early in the 13th century pii- lews, particularly older
men were seized with a desire to forsake the galut and
in the Holy Land. But before dying they would marry
and bring forth children. This led to an increase in the
population of "luftmenchen' without support of any kind
E?m agriculture, commerce, or industry. Thc.r wrenched
novcrtv inspired some English missionaries o form the
London Society for Conversion of Jews." At Jerusalem
the pickings in the vineyard of the Lord seemed too good
l0^ArLSSa- missionaries looked -* tfi
harvest for souls .n the Holy Land. They sensed the bene-
fit to their own prestige if the growing power of the UAA.
would be represented by a consulate in Palestine. They
were also aware of the religious yearnings in Warder
Cresson and saw in him excellent material for a mis-
sionary It seemed therefore an inspiration from heaven
that induced Washington to appoint Warder Cresson the
first American Consul at Jerusalem
Cresson had a wife with six children and operated a
successful farm near Philadelphia. Only strong religious
cravings could prompt him to leave home and forego the
prospects ol material success He felt the sacrifice and
wrote I left all these in pursuit of the Truth and for the
sake of Truth alone In the city, holy to three faiths, he
was most impressed by the tenacity of its impoverished
Jews, who resisted the blandishments of the missionaries.
The soul snatchers promised not only salvation but offered
a yearly stipend that meant affluence to the hungry dwell-
ers in filth and squalor. In Leeser's Occident. Cresson
wrote some scathing denunciations, castigating the well-
fed self sufficiency of the missionaries in the midst of
starvation
Conversion
Instead of fraternizing with the missionaries, the Amer-
ican Consul sought out Jerusalem's noted rabbis. He
studied Hebrew and was soon able to delve into the 24
massive folios of the Talmud. Fondness for the mystical
led him into the portals of the Cabala. The whole man
became immersed into the Jewish spirit. He identified
himself with the Sephardic group and formally applied for
admission into the community of Israel. The Chief Rabbi
cast ;i side glance at the missionaries and Moslems and
became apprehensive. It was less than a decade since the
notorious Damascus affair demonstrated that Christians
and Mohammedans can fuse hates into a joint persecution
of Jews The Beth Din (Rabbinical Court) interposed their
learned objections. But the 50 year old consul overcame
all opposition and entered the Covenant of Abraham. In
1848 Warder Cresson became Mich*|C
A Commission of Lima,.
The convert returned to PhiUZ2
making a fair disposal ,,, h:s p*JJ*a. H.
his family and return to |,ve Z %
found himself in an asylum. A J2?*'
been filed by his wife and famiJjIR*1!
him. A cause celebre followed- ov m'N
heard; physicians, psychiatrist', and I?1!
fied. The press over the land argued ku*
stared at him in the streets, F,naiw.S?*g
evidently concluded that conversion toiJ^T
pnma facie*evidence of insanity Th.i1--"'H
ordered released. x A Pioneer for Vo^iut,
In Jerusalem, the American prosily., an
hardi and became a leader in thTrowJ
thought about relieving the appeffliTiZ
to evaluate the "Chalukah." the chihtvjS1
supported almost the entire Jewish popBlkTi-
degradrag effects of the inadequate doles thai
from "pushkies" the Meir bal Haness boa.!
the homes of pious Jews in all lands He M
the inevitable corruption that aecompaiuT
and often unfair distribution of the chanty ft
Quite naturally the Philadelphia farmer m
conclusion that the soil was the proper supwtj
by God for bis creatures. He rejected the gttajfc
bag Jerusalem Jews were lazy, shiftless natt
wiffing to work. The practical American!*!
victions to the test He purchased land a'
Rephaim near Jerusalem and was abb it
Jewish poor made excellent, efficient farm'
preached and wrote constantly about the i
lifting effects of agriculture His words,
duced results. About the same time Judah'
Orleans and Sir Moses Montefiore of Eaj.
interested in similar projects Warder Cresm]
among the forerunners of Zionism for being 1
advocate agricultural colonies for the Jews mi
When the American "ger zedek" died bj
entire community followed his coffin for bal
Mount -of Olives. Regarded a saint, his gran I
shrine to which the devout offered prayers.
tunn c s
MURRAY'S MEN'S and BOYS' WEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Samuels and Daughter, Cynthia
1712 N.W. 36th STREET PHONE 5 3*41
TO 411... GREETINGS
GALWOOD FLOOR & WALL COVERINGS, INC
1722 PONCE DE IE0N BIVD.
PH. 4-1550
BLANCHE & SID
LEWIS
Extend Pauover greetings to '
their many friends and trill be
happy to welcome them at
Duncraggan Inn
Hendersonrille. N. C.
Season June October
DR. A. SCHREIBER
af
2036 S.W. FIRST STREET
MIAMI 35. FLORIDA
Seeciafiiina in the Non-iurgical Treatment ot:
HERNIA (reefer*), HEMORRHOIDS (tiles), PROSTATE GIAN05,
VARKOSE VEINS ACNE
Pbeae 7*7J Mee,,. i H 5 ,.,
SEASONS GREETINGS
Phone 7-6288 84-7763
SHEET METAL SPECIALTY CO.
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL
CONTRACTORS
573 N.W. 71st Street
R. M. BOTTOM
Miami. Florida
SINCERE WISHES
TO
ALL MY
JXWISH FRIENDS
W. CECIL WATSON
Clerk of Criminal
Court
1
i t f f F I N C S
Edward A. Kelly A Sons. Ik]
1265 N.W. 22ne" STREET M
TO All CtffTMCS
COMMUNITY BARBER SHOP
IMS ALTON ROM *
To All Greetings
Schuler-Davenport, Inc.
LAND SURVEYOIS
5804 SUNSET DRIVE
Phono 67-2970
To oil our Friends...
if is 0 pleasure to extend
A HAPPY PASSOVER
UNIVERSAL DIXIE
CONSTRUCTION CO.
8403 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Phone 78-2745
A
HAPPY
PASSOVER
TO ALL
DR. and MRS.
MANNING I. HOSNICK
and Family
To All A Most Happy Passortr
Abbot1 t Gardens Private Set*!
NURSERY THRU 8th GRADE
7705 ABBOTT AVE. PH0W
A HAPPY PASSOVER
C DANA WOODMAN
BE ALT OR
157 Alhambra CbcU
LUIGI'S RESTAURANT
RICCIO'S
on the 7th Street Causewaj
"NEW" Blue Gr
Room Lounge

Op*n 'Til 5 A.M.
Phone 7-9555
TO ALL GREETINGS
FINEST ITALIAN-AMERICAN FOOD
7411 COLLINS AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
GREETINGS
Tmw Embroidem
66 N.W. 22nd AVE. .
) ALL