The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01336

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Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
ihdteiJMMUEto

Combining THE JEWISH UIRXY and WE JEWISH WEEKLY
fSnrnfE 27-Numb W
MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1953
SEC. A
PRICE: TWO DOLLARS
V'






BARUCH WRITING
JEREMIAH'S PROPHESIES
5714
ROSH HASHANAH
For he shall be as a tree
planted by the waters,
. Its foliage shall be luxuriant;
Neither shall cease from yielding fruit.
J.r.m.oh XVII S
1953-1954
Cordial
i


PAGE 2 A
. fautncricmpr__
FRIDAY,
^TEMBQi
Rabbis Issue Joint Statement Here;
Urge Purchase Of Bonds On Holy Days
Bonds, the
In a joint lUtWMll i-mu-.I thi> inents in Si.it.- ol Israt
WMk, Rabbit urged tn.it liiciter voimc nation's number, oi imiO
Miami JewT) make the High Moly ,, ,.mplo\ed ha- risen to <<*
}** ^^-^f ^<^-Zu*n;l^n nboole. a.mosf *
ol Slate >'t lM.->el Bonds
I'tie statement wa> MUMMMed by
Mn Loud Glaaaar chairman tar
..re.iter Miami. State ot Israel
Bonds .in.I Issued by the Greatot
Miami Kahbmt.al Ass.viation
In then .all, the spiritual '..a.i
els Ntiesse.t the significance oi l-
rwal Bond purchases at the Hi*h
Hot) Da) atasaa
Oi the occasion of the New
\ aai Israel has clearly demon
half a million BtJOBla, almost IV
much as the total population "hen
the Stale a- horn ti\e yWI Iff
In this parted, the consumption of
electric DOWN BM move than dou
tad, as has the total irrigated
area of the country
'Much howexer remains to ftjfj
done it Israel is to continue to
progress towards her .coal of eco-
nomic independence "
Mrs GtaaMf explained that the
National Economic Conference for
.%-. .-.. .-- .-..,. ......... .\*inu*i r.*-\"ii\M.* V-M>~ "
stratcd its ettectixc participation m bra*) ,u concentrate on the de-
the worldwide struggle to defend velopment of a program of mast
democracy the Rabbis said Is muni aid to Israels economic
reel's demotion It the (MM al &* growth during the remainder of
.torn is consonant with the finest jni> ^,r ind the early months of
Jewish traditions which are tind j^m this is the final year of the
big a meaningful evprv.vsiov. :i\ Is i^ac! Independence Bond Issue
ral v rah) a* a partner M Amer whsxse sale terminates Mb) 31 14-
tea and the other MttaBS fi the \\,. i^re in Mianu are confident
MftMc world Supp.\rt to Is ..at it will awt the most intensive,
rani | seawdr growth kg the pur mart yet undertaken to increase
Bonds rvprescets a .^ Pjipher of Bond holders."
. \. -. tht BMat
- Amer-
ican ai at culture
we recall the basic precept which
- adittoa
BMstara
.....
- .. .
-
- --
i
. i \ cm an mat
^epcem h
. -
.vaaur-sifcp .i tikf Staoe
Ifcs. nrmwriint that
.
ravra .- "jc km
i pajaa ^- .-a*
JMa i eat
Academy Adds
To Facilities
Rabbi Alexander S Gross, princi
pal of the Hebrew Academy, this
week revealed that .are* addilHuial
classrooms and a remodel kinder
yarten have Been constructed at
the present Academy building. 908
tith Street in view of the record
n-'^i-tr.ition n.* tskinf; place daib"
at the Hebre^'Academy office "
RrferrirHr W'thrs yearthe sev
enth in the history of the Academy
as the -Sabbatical Year in
Academy education." Rabbi Gross
said that this will be the first year
in which the school will be com-
pelled to introduce parallel grades
up to and including the fourth
year "More than 90 children." he
said, "will be coming to the He-
brew Academy from the Surtside.
Normandy Isle and Bay Harbor
areas. TO service these areas, an
additional charter bus has been
provided supplementing our pre-
vious transportation facilities."
Rabbi Gross also Indicated that
the intermediary and higher grades
hare already been closed to fur-
ther registration
The frontispiece of The Jewish Floridian Nt
Year Edition is frem an engraving depicting ^
youthful Baruch as he sets down th* proph^u.
of Jeremiah. Permission to use the illutfrttu.
is through the courtesy of the Co'stPlmoltv*
wet Company and the Joseph Jacobs OrgsoW
tien, New Ynrk.
CHICKEN SOUP
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"DirtribaHKl by PALM DtSTBIBJJTOHS. 1HC.
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liWwlial^'
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Gettoboujoidat^Ofliis/
Of
Best Wisoes fo Everyooe
for a
HAPPY NEW YEAR
BEEF, all BEEF, choice
-
You just ioo t know how good x fexaicurter as be
Jrese piump tod jtnor tCMtt >^-^" Inyow
^ ^Hi cont-feii beef superbiy blended wick
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gEpTT-TMBERjl. 1953
PAGE 3 A
Program To
,w CJA Needs
demy award winner Jane
^n will be joined by Randolph
,nd Charlton Heston in a
J television dramatization
Erf Three 1-ives. on Sunday.
JJber 13th. 11:30 a.m., over
Z WTVJ. it has been announc-
Z rarl Weinkle. president of
I Greater Miami Jewish Feder-
al half hour Hollywood produc-
es being shown in the Miami
,1 for the first time through
lauspices of the Federation to
, to Greater Miami viewers a
rayal by top movie stars of the
saving work in Israel and over-
, of the United Jewish Appeal
s constituent agencies,
u film was directed by Ed-
i nymtryk. Weinkle will bring
lew Year's message to Greater
i viewers at the close of the
mm.
INK Reelected
ist Executive
I 56th Annual Convention
I the Zionist Organization of
[erica, which concluded August
Seymour B. Liebman, at-
j of Miami Beach, was re-
ied to the National Executive
iimittee. according to a state-
fct by Fred Jonas, president of
j Miami Beach Zionist District.
liebman has long been active in
p4 affairs and is a member of
/National Board of Governors
|be Bonds for Israel Campaign
-.ice president of the North
I Jewish Center.
le will make a report on con-
|icn proceedings at the public
fling of the Miami Beach Zion-
i-trict to be held Monday, Sep-
21st.
nicriic
DAMPPCHASER
imi ciotir o*ri>
REVENTS MOLD MILDEW
MUSTY ODORS RUST
*ii No Attention 01 Approval
lKOO.00 PROTECTION FOR ONLY
$6.95
lie Installation, 5 Yr. Guarantee
SALE AT ALL LEADING
[OEPT. AND HARDWARE
STORES
for (nformofion:
CALL 3 8249
|HiRRY H. WAYNER, Distributer
10 All .
|pfV MfW YEAR
CHARLES M. EWIN6
NUMBING l HEATING
CONTRACTOR
1 *W HAPPY NEW Yf At
[WALDRON'S BACKHOE I
CRANE SERVICE
f "C A V A T I N G
w *AST 60th STREET
HIAIEAH
HM M-5741
Y *WT HAPPY NEW YEAR
KST COAST PAINTING
COMPANY
,U* N.W. 32.. STREET
rh. 444171
Zamora Men Name
New Officers
New officers elected by the Za-
mora Jewish Center Men's Club
this week are:
Louis Kroll, president (re-elect-
ed); Hi Hamburg, vice president;
Earl Rubin, financial secretary;
Morris Moskowitz, corresponding
secretary; and S. William Locke,
recording secretary.
The new Board of Directors in-
cludes: Max Priedson, Sam Tan-
nenbaum, Robert Robinson, Saul
Haber, Dr. Nathan Gillman, Sol
Ryder, Lewis Isroelit, Paul Gold-
berg and Sidney Firtig. Jerry Rob-
inson is the new parliamentarian.
Chaplain is David Bagley.
It was announced that a send-
off to all college students will be
given on Saturday, 8 p.m., at the
Center.
New Beach Motel
Now Under Construction
The Monterrey Motel is now un-
der construction on Belle Island
and the Venetian Causeway.
A first urrrt of the motel will of-
fer 52 guest rooms, a lobby, pool,
cabana club and coffee shop. These
facilities will be finished in time
for a Christmas Day opening.
The owners are Arthur and Jack
Courshon, local attorneys; Michael
Steckloff, apartment house owner;
and Jack Gordon and Milton Gay-
nor, insurance executives.
Hannah Senesch Hadassah Installs Rabbi Irving Lehrman will install newly elected officers of the Hannah Senesch Group of Hadassah, at a luncheon is the Saxony Hotel on September 14th, at 12 noon. Mrs. William Feuer is president. A special welcoming ceremony will honor new members who are now enrolling. Mrs. Abraham Cassel has arranged the musical program for the afternoon. Mrs. Lillian Atlas is in charge of decorations. Reservations are being taken by Mrs. Ralph Spero Mrs. Julius Rosen-stein will be assisted by the Sponsor Committee as hostesses. Dear Friends: Thanks for the vote of confidence. Thanks for making us feel you want our kind of Theatre. Because of your support during our summer season, I am happy to announce that a. full season is definitely in the offing for the Casablanca Players. Watch the papers for the exact date. Well be expecting you around the middle of October. Ill be seeing you. Sincerely, |k ^bJ| Sam Hirsch, Director 4*i ^fl Q Casablanca Players. Inc. bJ45 Collins Avenue
350 Lincoln Road Mexxanina Phone 5-5419 Entrance on Washington At*. OCULISTS Prescriptions Filled Lenaee and Frames Duplicated Large Selection in Latest Styles
To Our Many Friends and Acquaintances A /Most Nappy New Year SHAFER and MILLER GENERAL CONTRACTORS 6500 CELLINI STREET Phone 67-3330

11


On the Oca* of 67th St.
MIAMI REACH, FLORIDA
ani tht ffosner Family
DAVE ESTHER SAM
til
SAM and BLANCHE SIOTNKK
wish roe aii jEwer -
I'SHOMA TOVA TIKlStVU
Now Rearing Completion
OPENING DECEMBER 1st
HtlMIUl SEASON 1*53-54
II
rseaTy rWsests i the NEWEST ADOITIOII TO FAMIOUS MIAMI BEACH HOTIlS
EssectoMy mlmmm4, dtsid mmi tmmttrmtfd fa start Mm eeae* mmi fcrsvMe
tee ultimaf to heftf Mto fer AaMrkee Jewry -
ihi usr woeo m immnm mine rm utmost in cemtMttnct
... and of course the American Plan with Dietary Laws
scrupulously adhered to
* Private Sandy Beach
* Cabana Colony
* Dairy Snack Bar
* The Sterling Room
* 150 Ixtro Large Rooms
* Spacious Lobbies
* Card Room
* TV Room
* Dining Room with Ocean Vista seating 400 and Catering to Private Functions
* Synagogue Swimming Pool Solarium
* The Supreme in Environment and Air Conditioning and Heating Comforts


FAGE 4 A
+ lt**i FRIDAY, SEPTEMRFB M
.
1
Published every Friday ilnee 1927 by the J'n
Floridian at 121 N. E Sixth Street. Miam 18, Florjda
Entered ai second-class matter July 4. 1930, at the Post
Office of Miami. Fla.. under the Act of March i- '*'
The Jewish Flondian has absorbed the Jewish Un ty
and the Jewish Weekly. Member of the Jewish Ti.
oraph.c Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndicate. World-
wide News Service. National Ed.toriai Association. Arner.
.ran Association of Enaih-Jwish Newspapers. Florida
vJenisr fieriJian
OFFICE end PLANT 120 N. E. Sixth Stree-
Telephones 2-1141 2-8212
Th. !..~ish Morldian does not nanuitM the Kash-
mir, ____
s u
One Year
SCR'PTION RATES:
*J00 Two Year,
5 0C
Press Association.
FRED K. SHOCHET............Editor and Publisher Vo]ume 27
IEO MINDLIN.................................. News Editor
Friday. September 11, 1953
Number 37
Tishri 2. 5714
As We Face the New Year 5714
great a danger as ever. The
establishment of the State of
Israel five years ago eased
many tensions borne by the
Jew in exile. It gave him a feel-
ing of security and underscor-
ed the fact that subsequent Hit-
lers will not have a9 easy a
time of murdering with im-
punity as was experienced be-
fore. It gave him a sense of
belonging and a touchstone oi
national pride.
But, it seems to us. that this
pride is not the pride that
springs from participating in
the Jewish tradition. It is a pride that has
many pitfalls, not the least of which has
been the apparent easing up of watchful-
ness that maintained Jewish identity dur-
ing twenty centuries of exile. The estab-
lishment of the State of Israel has, in
many quarters, brought a relaxation of
endeavor aimed at maintaining communal
During these days between Rosh Hashonah
and Yom Kippur, it would therefore be fitting
for us to consider the means we can employ to
guard against this false sense of relaxation.
As we see it, the American Jewish community
We are now in the midst of the high Holy has a two-fold responsibility if it is to be a
. Dcys. Rosh Hashonah will be over Friday vigorous community at all. It must recognize
right, symbolizing the launching of the He- that the creation of Israel has brought added
-'ew New Year 5714. ion Kippur comes in responsibilities while eliminating none that
but a week. During that period, a time when were carried before. In this regard, American
we ponder on our transgressions and prepare Jewry, and the Miami Jewish community as an
:z: the moment when tradition tells us that the integral part of it, must devote a significant
Jewish fate is sealed, it would be fitting to portion of its energies to insure the new repub-
Tnvf^f"a,ture'as"e11 as ,he abundance. lic-s ultimate success. This means aclive
ct our contribution to the community. r
' \ ticipation in fund campaigns.
During The Week .. .a i sGe lt
By LEO MINDLIN
THE SLICHOT SERVICE SATURDAY at midnight was ,hc n~.
for a good deal of consideration. All of humankind mi.m ha ""M
in reflection to ponder on the matter oi penitence and Iranier """M
There was much for which to beg clemency in judgment" Th v"
5713 witnessed many deeds that would best not have been d*
that could have been done more reasonably ... on or
There was our government's refusal to sign the United Nat
sponsored Genocide Pact which found its original inspiration in A
can leadership but which Is now regarded by us as an infringcmeT"'
the internal affairs of foreign nations. Senator John Bricker com, -iQ
a list of some sixty signatures for his resolution designed to pre
the IS from entering into such overseas agreements. Thus havT'
gone on record: we shall,' again, say nothing to those governments wh!
find it convenient to exterminate ethnic groups. We snail nfrain fr!l
being meddlers. We shall remain politically "moral" ...
There was the State Department's advised policy to accept funk-
offers of "aid" in military matters from former Nazi henchmen Th
| dore Blankenhorn visited with President Eisenhower to discuss Eu^
pean Army trends and Germany's contribution to the North Atlant"
ly Organization. Blankenhorn had been thrown out of the Unit
s in 1938: security officials discovered he was a Third Keich sn
Our sages have told us that a man's happi-
ness can only lie in ins satisfaction with the
portion of material bounty that God has seen
i:t to bestow upon him. But they have also
told us that a man's happiness depends upon
the degree to which he identifies himself with
Ihe society in which he lives. Thus, it would
seem to us, that happy is the man who does
not spend his days in material abandon, in a
constant search to aggrandize his position ma-
terially and economically, and who aportions
a significant amount of his energies in the
direction of strengthening his ties with the com-
munity.
As we see it. personal salvation is an issue
that must be decided in terms of social con-
sciousness; private ambitions starve the soul,
make the eyes shortsighted and the ears deaf.
Like the godheads of the idolator, the material-
ly ambitious human being can not speak, hear
or see. But the man who is ambitious for the
good of his group and for humanity at large
finds solace in the prospect of existence and
has little cause to question the meaning of life.
Communal identification is thus an accepted
mode of being for the Jew. His cultural, spir-
itual and religious activities are the measure
of his success as a human being. It is this
identification that has kept the Jew a unified
people during two thousand years of exile;
with it. he was dispersed but watchful. With-
out it, he would have been dispersed and for-
gotten. A good deal of this watchfulness is
the result of pride in a glorious tradition.
At this Moment of Awe. we suggest that
separation from the community remains as
But equally important is the participation in
cultural and spiritual activities so that syna-
gogues and centers may flourish and so that
youth mcy become acquainted with its ancient
tradition as a guard against cultural anarchy
and loss of traditional identification.
We ask on these Holy Days: Who will
live; who will die? If the question is not mere-
ly rhetorical, and if we are truly impressed by
its import, then we must recognize that the
death of the Jewish soul is primary as an issue
in this regard. Death by fire and the sword
which we mention in our prayers, horrible
though it is, rarely challenges the survival of
a people. But death of the spirit brings man
low at all times. History is an index of much
demise; the Jew has been singular in his will
to maintain the truth and the everlasting na-
ture of his tradition. As an example of such
historical exception, he can carry on only by
living according to the wisdom of his sages'
advice.
We, at The Jewish Floridian, take this op-
portunity of wishing Greater Miami Jewry a
flourishing New Year. As in the past, our
columns will continue to be dedicated to the
principle that Jewish survival and its essential
goodness are interrelated and that this survival
depends upon continued identification with an
active community. In thi regard, we shall,
as before, attempt to carry on the tradition
of cultural enlightenment and betterment.
. Treat
State
: Now. he chatted with the President about top secret matters
! well he might have; German military men this year were invited for
the first time to view the technical advances made by American am.
1 nautic.fi engineers ...
There was Secretary of State John Foster Dulles fact findior
tour through the Near East. Secretary Dulles came back with an auri
of disenchantment about him. He learned more in a month, he said,
about the problems of the area than he had gleaned from many years
; of experience as a diplomat in Washington. This did not speak well
I for Washington intelligence, nor did the State Secretary s disenchant.
ment speak well for his knowledge of the fundamental tensioiu under-
lying the Arab-Israel conflict.
Mr. Dulles aimed to be impartial, but he did not forget to present
Egypt's General Naguib with a pair of American made pistols ou
General was responsible for calling Israel the cancer of the Middle
East.) Mr. Dulles also used Arab terminology in "explaining the area*
I difficulties, a feat that seemed all the more remarkable in light of the
fact that he admitted to being confused. Notably, Mr. Dulles nude
much of the Moslem fear of the "Zionist threat" which had priori^
before the fear of Russian Communist expansion. Mr. Dulles failed t
delineate the fact that he was expressing an Arab viewpoint and not
his own .
THE YEA* 5713 WAS THE YEAR of the passage of an infamoiB I
piece of legislation. The McCarran-Walter Immigration Act survived
j despite the veto of former President Truman who had termed- it in
"abomination." Under its "provisions, visa agencies oversea^ have un-
questioned power to operate according to their pet discrimination!
Designed to keep subversive elements from entering the United States.
it is a perfect shield for former Nazis and Fascists who seek to land 1
here. The notorious Croatian murderer, a Hitler puppet dunm; World!
War II, Ferdinand Artukovic. basks somewhere in American freedoa |
despite the f3ct that the British and Yugoslav governments have peg-
ged him as a high ranking war criminal .
There was an Emergency Immigration Act, sponsored by Presi I
dent Eisenhower and passed despite considerable Congressional oppo-
sition. It will admit 214.000 refugees here during the next two yean
above existing quotas as set forth by the McCarran-Walter Law, This
will presumably adjust present inequities whereby current immigra-
tion policies show marked favoritism toward Britains and Germans.
The former use less than half of their quota annually, and the latter
ship to our shores undesirable newcomers with unsavory military pasts.!
But the President's Emergency Act has been emerging as a shield
to hide a promise made on Inauguration Day regarding revisions to
the McCarran-Walter Act. Senator Arthur Watkins has openly asked
President Eisenhower not to press for revisions at least until the
expiration of the emergency legislation and Senator McCarran
boasts that the President will not touch his law .
THERE WAS THE MUTUAL SECURITY Aid Act of 1953 which is I
reminiscent of recent American handling of jet'aircraft di-tribution
in the Middle East. Jets were slated for delivery in a one-to-one ratio,
with each of the seven Arab nations receiving one aircraft along with
Israel's being shipped the same number. Mathematical equality here
remained blind before political expediency, and Israel found itself
outnumbered seven-to-one in the area's increasing imbalance This
year, MSA funds will be "equitably" dispensed according to the same
lack of logic .
There was political crisis in Israel on two major occasions, both
testing the sovereignty of the government. Permission to sing labor
anthems" and to fly "labor flags" that obviously reflect foreign politi-
cal affiliations was finally denied. Yet. within a matter of months, dur-
ing the same Year 5713. the Israel government found itself acting ac-
cording to the best state tradition of Europe's Middle Ages Making
a "package deal" with the Orthodoxy, it granted secular powers to
religious leaders, thus entering upon a road leading to compromise,
confusion and the devision of sovereignty .
There was the diplomatic break in relations between Israel and
the USSD and subsequent renewals of these relations. Israel promised
to enter into no agreement with powers that are inimical to Soviet
interests. This placed the Jewish state on an uncomfortable picket
fence so far as the West is concerned, a position which it did not
occupy since 1948 .
There was the Russian attempt to discredit Konrad Adenauer and
Adenauer's Peace With Israel movement in the face of the USSR re-
newal of relations with Jerusalem. This confusion, no confusion to the
foreign diplomat, found Adenauer called a warmonger and Western
tool. In the midst of the harangue, Secretary of State Dulles unoffici-
ally warned the Germans that they had better return Herr Adenauer
to office as Chancellor, thus proving that former President Truman
was not the only one who can make what the Republicans last Novem-
ber called "mess" and "political blunders." Dulles labelled the pros-
pect of an Adenauer defeat a catastrophe.
This delightfully illustrates that our government never interferes
with the internal matters of foreign nations and that we are perfectly
right when we refuse to become a party to the Genocide Pact. We wu
tolerate discrimination nowhere
For this reason, the Year 5713 witnessed the Administrations for-
mation of a committee to enforce fair employment practices in Federal
contract labor that does not even begin to touch the delicate issue
civil rights an issue over which the Democratic Party tripped aai
fell when America, last November, voted to insure states' rights J
particularly the right for each state to be prejudiced in human matten
if it so desires ...
There was much for which to beg merciful judgment last Saturday
night so much that there was hardly enough time to think about"
of our transgressions.


+J&*ist>ncr/(fiajn
PAGE 5 A
[federation Opens
Pall Season Here
Thf Executive
Committee of the
IVM m J-ish Federation
|GT ,1.1 '-' "fficial lim of the season on M.d,y
l"^m September 14th, 6 p.m..
"fttanorial Hoom of Mount
|c,n Hn-Pit^'.''"as been announc-
liI by Federation ('resident Carl
Kf'eO member, of the 1954
I ,ive irroup arc expected to
IS I welcome Dr. Benjamin B. Rosen-
ILe executive director, who as-
|"wd h.s new post on August 1st.
II agenda will include current
Iteration problems and a discus-
[lion of community planning for the
Ifuture.
I According to the newly announc-
L policv made public this week
C president Wrinkle, the Execu-
tive Committee will hold dinner
meetings during 1954 at the var-
ious local beneficiary agencies dur-
C which agency officers and di-
rtors will play host to the group.
"Earlier this week. New Year
greetings from the Federation
president, its trustees and Board
If Governors were sent to more
than 20.000 Jewish families in the
Greater Miami area.
)r. Rothblatt
To Speak
Pr Hayim Rothblatt, Associate
.ofessor of Hebrew Literature
land Bible at the College of. Jewish
Studies in Chicago, will address
the Hebrew teachers of Greater
Miami on Saturday, September
Il2th. 8:15 p.m.. at the Bureau of
Uewish Education. 135 NW 3rd Ave-
nue.
Dr. Rothblatt's subject will be:
[Literary Merits Of The Bible. The
[lecture is being sponsored by the
[Bureau of Jewish Education and
|the Hebrew Teachers' Association
|bere.
David Freedman, instructor at
[the Miami Beach Jewish Center,
Kill act as toastmaster. A social
I evening will follow.
Beach Center Plans Teen Age Service
Saul Stanley Jonas is now in-
terning at the Lawson Gen-
eral Hospital in Atlanta,
. Georgia. The son of Mr. and
Mrs. Fred Jonas, he gradu-
ated from Emory University
Medical School in June, 1953,
and passed the Florida Board
in August.
Rabbi Lehrman Speaks
Rabbi Irving Lehrman, spiritual
leader of the Miami Beach Jewish
Center, presented a Rosh Hashonah
message to the community on Sun-
day during Jacob Schachter's Jew-
ish Variety Hour over radio station
WMBM
For the first time in the history
of the Miami Beach Jewish Center,
;i special High Holiday service will
be introduced by Rabbi Irving
Lehrman for the teen age youth of
the Center concregattonal family.
announced Samuel Pricdland.
president.
The services, to take place on
both days of Rosh Kashonafa at ll
a.m., on Kol Nidrc night at 6:30 !
p.m., and Yom Kiapur at 11 a.m.. in '
the air conditioned Center Dining I
Room, will be conducted by Eugene
Wciner, a rabbinical student in the
Pre-Theological School of the Jew-
ish Theoiogical Seminary of Amer-
ica.
The complete service planned by
Rabbi Lehrman is being arranged
specially for the young people.
Weiner, who will conduct the serv-
ices under the direction of Saul
Rabin, Center Educational direc-
tor, was Bar Mitzvah at the Miami
Beach Jewish Center. His gradua-
tion from Miami Beach Senior
High School was distinguished by
awards he received representing
the highest achievements in schol-
arship and athletics.
Rabbi Lehrman's sermons will
be transmitted to the Dining Room
by loud speaker. The worshippers
! will also hear the traditional Kol
Nidrc chant by Cantor Philip Brum
[ mer
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4S Michigan Avenua
Miami Batch
Phone S-359S
S. .1. Freedmaii
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417 Washington At*.
Miami Beach
Between Fourth and Fifth Su
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Tot Synagogues and Privsio
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'#!


PAGE 6 A
Jmisi>ghr&m
TODAY. SEPTEMBBt u
Porush Named To
Academy Staff
Dr. Irwin H. Makovsky, chairman
of the Board of Education of the
Hebrew Academy, this week an-
nounced the appoinUnfiMol'ttralk
born Saul Porush to its faculty for
the current school year.
A native of Jerusalem, educated
in the academies of higher learn-
ing in Israel and a graduate of
Alumna, one of the oustanding
Teachers" Seminaries, Porush will
fill the post of instructor in the
Senior Division of the Hebrew Aca-
demy.
While the English Department
conforms to the curriculum of the
Dade County School system, the
Hebrew Department. Rabbi Alex-
ander S. Gross, principal, pointed
out, is conducted from the first
through the eighth grades, in the
Hebrew tongue.
A Hebrew scholar and gram-
marian. Porush has been associated
with the Seattle Hebrew Academy
-ince 1946. as its consultant in
curriculum planning and also as in-
structor of modern Hebrew and
Hebrew Grammar. Prior to 1946.
he was principal of the Associated
Hebrew Schools of Seattle, a posi-
tion which he held since his arriv-
al in the United States in 1940.
Porush and his wife. Chaya.
daughter of Rabbi Shnairson, will
live in Miami Beach with their
childern. Naftali. 17. a Rabbinical
student at the Chicago Seminary,
daughter, Vona. age 11. a pupil of
the Hebrew Academy, and Israel,
age 3.
Senator Lehman Hails
Jewish Education month
Jewish Education Month was
heralded by New York State Sen-
ator Herbert H. Lehman, honorary
president of the American Associa-
tion for Jewish Education, this
'ttWk tsnuonno
"One of the most important
things that America stands for is
religious freedom. That does not
mean that we are an irreligious
people; it means we place the re-
sponsibility for religions and the
religious education of our children
in the conscience of every' citizen,"
he said, in announcing the month
which is running from September
8th through October 8th.
"Let us give our children their
religious heritage," he said, "and
strengthen the faith that strength-
ens America."
Programs on radio and televi-
sion, as well as distribution of
Jewish education material, will be
sponsored by the Bureau of Jewish
Education here during Jewish Edu-
cation Month. A directory of
schools, giving addresses, type of
schools, area served and directors
is available at the office of the
Bureau for all those needing di-
rection in registering their children
during the coming period through
September 20th. Most schools will
officially open sessions on Sunday.
September 13th. for Sunday school,
and Monday. September 14th. for
afternoon schools.
75
&
-o0UST BROS RV*
15 thv or W __
HAPPY NEW YEAR
TO ALL

MR. and MRS. HERBERT SIIEll
KENNY and ARTHUR
2111 S.W. 21st Street
BREAKSTONE'S
|ir in
Wish You and All is,ml
A HAPPY A\D
PROSPEROI S NEW YEAR
English Classes For How
Americans Open RegistratJon
Mrs. Joel Belov, chairman of the
National Council of Jewish Wom-
en's English classes for new Araer-
icaps, has announced the organiza-
tion of'hew classes under the joihl
sponsorship of Council and the
Dade County Vocational School.
Registration for beginners, inter-
mediate and" ktfv'anced English
courses wlftJSe held on Tuesday
evening, September 8th, from 7:30
to 9:30 p.m., at Temple Beth El,
500 SW 17th Avenue. The classes
are non-sectarian and are open to
all foreign-born residents of this
area.
/S%vik*fc i
Coffee Shop
Tag Day Funda
B'nai B'rith Women's Council of
South Florida on a recent Greek
and Korean relief Ta* Day, col
lected funds which will be giv-
en to chairman at' tit* Keftesn'ftillcfrtW
and to the Greek*Embassy in Wash-
ington for the children in disaster-
torn Greece, Mrs. Bernard Hoff-
man, president, announced this
week.
400

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Moke Your Reservations for the High Holy Days
AT THE AIR-CONDITIONED
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23rd STREET1 BLOCK WEST OF RONEY PLAZA
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^ otpteMBER 11. 1953
* Jewish fhrkMafi
PAGE 7 A

personally
Ipeaking
d Mrs. 0*orge Worpert
Tm European tour. Their
Lb are currently taking them
& the fjords of Norway.
it ^ Barbara Loeb. of 425 East
Ho Drive, Miami Beach leave.
Fvassar College. Poughkeepsle.
'.York to enroll as a first year
Lt Miss Loeb, a graduate of
pi Beach High School, is the
ahier of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis L.
long time Miami residents.
6 a *
in Anna B. Berow, of 280 Euc-
Menue, Miami Beach, is return-
|hom* for the holidays, after
Ijng the summer with her
en in Hot Springs and De-

and Mrs. S. M. Machtei
[Sunday for Hot Springs. Ar-
Ls. During their absence from
[city, they will also attend the
Dual Cemetery Association
mention slated for Dallas. Tex-
iRabbi Machtei is vice president
|Mount Nebo Cemetery here.
ing their Dallas visit. Rabbi and
i Machtei will spend some time
i their relatives, Mr. and Mrs.
jy Stitsky. residents there. Af-
la post convention tour of Mex-
Itbev will return to Miami.
Jewish Floridian Offices
Will Observe Holiday
... TM offices of the Jewish fferidi.n
mill remain cfeeed en f mt f .Viewing
days of these weeftsi
OSH HASHONAH from Send.w.,
September 9th, through Sundown,
September 12th (Thursday and
Friday).
TOM KIPPIM treat Sandewn, Sep
tensbor IIMi, threea* S.no-.wn,
Inatinshsr 19* (Saturday).
SUKKQTH frees Sundew., Septem
her I3rd, thr eh, Sundown, Sep-
teosber 24th (Thursday and Fri-
ary).
SIMCHAT* TORAN from Sundown,
Stptt mm*f 30tfc, tfcc#*jfc Sun-
down, October 3rd (Thursday and
Mm.
HAPPY HOLIDAY
from
SrlV/A and HIRB HABER
of
Miracle Children's
Centre
290 MIRACLE MILE
'Near Miracle Theatre)
"toys' and Girls' Toes
Through Size 14"
Mayor Shepard Broad
Extends New Year Greetings
Office of the Mayer
Bay Harbor Islands City Hall
We, of Bay Harbor Islands, ex-
tend wannest greetings to all
who observe and celebrate Rosh
Hashonah. the Jewish New Year,
and join with them in their
solemn prayers for peace and
plenty everywhere.
Mayor Shepard Broad
Max Stevens Killed
In Montana Crash
Max Stevens, 95, of 5225 NE 5th
Avenue, Miami, and owner of Stev-
ens Super Market, was killed last
week in an auto accident, in Mop-
tana. Accompanied.J>y,his iirifc.wjjo
was critically injured, the couple
collided with an oil tank truck
near Crow Agency,, Montana.
The Stevens ware on their wj*
home from a Canadian .vacation, at
Lake Louise. It wasthjs tirst time
that they had been out of the
United States.
Mr. Stevens was returning to
attend the second anniversary cele-
bration of the opening of his super
market on NW 27th Avenue at
62nd Street. He came to Miami
in 1932 Since that time, be built
up one of the largest family-owned
grocery organizations in Greater
Miami, with a gross business well
over the $6,000,000 mark.
Rabbi Joseph Narot conducted
services at Riverside Memorial
Chapel, Miami Beach, with inter
ment in Graceland Memorial Park.
Survivors, in addition to Mrs.
Stevens, include a son, Bernard;
brothers, Henry and Abe; daugh-
ter; Mrs. Richard E. Lencer; and
sister, Mrs. Dave Melnick.
. i .i
Jewish Forum Of Air
Has Holy Day Program
A Rosh Hashonah program was
featured on Simon Seiden's Jewish
Forum of the Air last Sunday.
Seiden said that a special re-
corded message was heard from
Chief Rabbi Isaac Halevey Herzog,
of Jerusalem. Special Slichot pray-
ers were featured.
Guest speaker was Rabbi Max
Shapiro, spiritual leader of Beth
..David Congregation.
MILTON SADOfF, C. P. A.
UMIT I. SCHWARTZ, C. P. A.
announce the ano^lo*1hk*'1WW''"'>'''^ 8* bUMt
undor the firm name of
S a d o f f & Schwartz
Certified Public Accountant!
717 Seybeld Building
Miami 32, Florid.
MM

TO ALL .
GREETINGS
George .
Stembler
GENERAL INSURANCE
BONDS
226 Shoreland Building
MRViNG SOLOMON
M.LD.A.S.
L'Shona Tova Tikesavu
Compliments of the Season
MIAMI
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Ph. 4-4714
1953-51
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PAGE 8 A
+ klstfhrkitr>r
FRIDAY, SEPTEMbpd
\
Sheila Zalka Weds Arthur Kline In
Double Ring Ceremony At Ronev Plaza
The Ocean Lounge of the Roney
I'laza Hotel was the scene of the
!ouble ring ceremony on Sunday
evening which united in marriage
Miss Sheila Marlene Zalka. daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel Zal-
a. 1446 Lenox Avenue, Miami
Mrs. frank T. Kautt
.Miss Metzger Weds
Frank T. Kauff
In a douuie ring ceremony on
ist 30th, at the Saxony Ho-
tel. Hiss Ann C Hetzger, daugh-
ter of Mr and Mr- Allen S Men
ger, 869 Fairway Drive. '
rmerb of Baltimore,
the bride of Prank T
if Mr- Gertrude
\ venue. ar.d the
S'arol ::':
was Robert Shuman.
: of honor
5 rs wi .-< Richard A v
bride, and David
An and luncheon fol-
wed at thi Saxony Hotel
The bride selected a princess
of French chantilly lace and
nylon tulle. The off shoulder neck-
line was outlined with hand clip-
ped lace. The full skirt ended in
-i chapel train Her four-tierred
ti nch illusion veil fell from a
cap of matcnins lace and seed
pearls She carried white orchids
-tephanotis.
After an extended honeymoon.
the couple will make their
:t 665 Fairway Drive. Miami
Eeach.

Mrs. Terry Kant
Miss Janet Brin Becomes Bride of
Terry Kane; Chooses Tulle Gown
Miss Janet Ann Brin became the
bride of Terry Kane at the Miami
Beach Jewish Center on August
30th Rabbi Irving Lehrman offi
ciated.
The former Miss Brin is the
niece of Mr. and Mrs Nathan
Schaen 462 Warren Lane. Key
jroe Mr Kane i- the ton ol
Mrs Anna Kane. 1009 Meridian
Avenue, Miami Beach.
The bride selected a cown styled
in white nylon tulle and chantilly
lace over satin with a shoulder bar-
ing neckline and long sleeves edg-
ed by scalloped lace Her fitted
bodice and bouffant tulle -kin.
with lace panels down the front
and back, extended into a sweep
train
Matron of honor was Mrs Harold
Kufeld. cousin of the bride Joy-
Kane was bridesmaid Vickie Ellen
Kufeld was flower girl, with Jeff
Shapiro acting as usher Murray
Krell was best man for the groom
A reception and dinner followed
the ceremony at the Mumr* Beach
.'ew :-h Center After an extended
honey moon in Mexico, the couple
will make their home in Havana.
Cuba.
j Out-of-town guests at the wed-
| ding included Mr. and Mrs'. H. A.
Kane, Ol Havana; Jean and Bernice
Lipschutz. of Brooklyn: Dr. Myron
Brin. brother of the bride. Boston:
i and Mrs Henry Brin. Sumter.
' South Carolina
Beach, and Mr. Arthur J. Kline,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Saul Kline,
1735 SW 13th Avenue, Miami.
Given in marriage by her fath-
er, the bride wore a cocktail-length
gown of imported antique ivory
lace, especially designed for her,
on sheath lines with appliqued lace
petals accenting the neckline and
short sleeves. A matching fitted
cloche and white kid gloves com-
pleted her costume. She carried
I white satin prayer book adorned
with golden throated white orchids.
Mrs. David B. Hipsman was her
sister*! only attendant. She wore
i pink chiffon cocktail dress with
shirred bodice and bouffant skirt.
Her headpiece was a matching fit-
ted cloche, and she carried a nose-
gay of pink and white carnations.
Mr. Harold Jacobs, the groom's
uncle, acted as the best man. A
eception and dinner in the Im-
perial Room of the Roney followed
the ceremony.
Among out-of-town guests were
Mrs. Rose Jacobs, the groom's
.'randmother. of Newark, New Jer-
sey; Mr. and Mrs. Harold Jacobs,
of Union, New Jersey; Mr. and
Mrs. Bernard Jacobs, of Maple-
wood, New Jersey, with their sons;
and Mr. and Mrs. Jack Friedman,
of Baltimore. Maryland.
After a wedding trip to New
Orleans and a cruise to the Car-
ibbean and South America, the
couple will be at home at 2421
Lake I'ancoast Drive. Miami Beach.

Mrs. Arthur Kline
'!,ft
A three-month L:/thday party is
being planned for Jeffrey Davis
on. He was born at the North
j Shore Hospital on June 25th. Guest
i of honor will be Jeffrey's 18 month-
old sister. Sharry Hope. Parents
are Mr. and Mrs Vale Ogron. 1201
NW 22nd Court. Mr. and Mrs.
Mortimer \V. Breitbart, of 1075
MS 65th Street, and Mr. and Mrs.
Meyer Ogron. former Surfside
re-idents and now of Chicago, are
grandparents of the children.
tr it it
Ruth Haber. of 737 Jefferson
Avenue. Miami Beach, will leave
for New York on September 14th,
to visit her family and friends, af-
ter an absence of five years. She
plans to return home on October
4th
MIAMI BEACH BRIDE who
will make her home in New
York is the former Barbara
Fisher, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Morris A. Fisher. 3300
Collins Avenue. She was
married to Sheldon Snyder
cf New York in a Miami
3each ceremony and the
couple honeymooned in the
Fort Montague Beach Hotel.
Nassau. The bridegroom is
'he son of Mr. and Mrs. Jos-
eph Snyder. Poughkeepsie.
New York.
Silverman, Pass Say
Vows At Hoiu-y
Nassau b the honeymoon desti-
nation of David Becker Pass and
his bride, the former Gloria Silver-
man They were married in the
Ocean Lounge of the Ronev Plaza
Hotel on September 3rd. with Rab-
bi Leon Kronish officiating
The hnde i- the daughter of Mr
ind Mr- H A Sihennan of 4588
Alton Road Mr Pass ii the son
of Mr and Mrs. Keeve Pass of
Atlanta
Given in marriage by her father.
the former Mi- Silverman wa- at-
tired in a gown of white chantilly
lace gore satin with illusion neck
line Her six tiered veil of silk
French illusion fell from a lace
bonnet She carried lilies-of-the-
valley on her aunt's Bible
Miss Diane Silverman. the brides
f twin sister, was maid of honor
The bridegroom's sister. Miss Mir-
iam Pass, and Miss Carole Wien
were bridesmaids.
i Mr. Pass was his son's best man
The bride's brother. Benedict Sil
verman. Charles Held and Donald
Lynn, of Atlanta, and Frank Ber-
j ick ushered.
A dinner in the hotel's Imperial
| Room followed the ceremony.
I The bride graduated from Miami
Goulds Will Be At
Home October 1st
The former Harriet Roslyn
and Calvin C. Gould were mania
in a ceremony performed by j
bi Leon Kronish at Temple
Sholom on August 19th
The bride is the daughter of]
and Mrs. Benjamin Fox, 5983 !
6th Street. The bridegroOaft
ents are Mr. an I Mrs Hi
Gould, 2801 Indian Creek
Miami Beach.
A graduate of Jack-on Men
Hospital's School of Nursing,
bride now works for the
County Blood Bank Mr.
graduated from the I niversity |
Miami Law School an I is I
licing attorney here.
The couple will be at home |
336 SW ih Avenue. Miami.
October 1st.
K^

Mrs. OotM I. fmu
Beach High School and attended
the University of Georgia, where
she belonged to Sigma Delta Tau
Sorority.
Mr. Pass is a University of Geor-
gia senior and belongs to Phi Ep-
silon Pi Fraternity and Phi Kappa
Literary' Society.
Mrs. Marvin t. PopJtin
Silverstein, Popkin
Wed In Charleston
The former Arline Silverstein
and Marvin Leo Popkin were mar-
ried in Synagogue Emanuel.
Charleston, South Carolina, by
Rabbi Lewis Weintraub on Aug-
ust 23rd The bride is the daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. George W. Sil-
\tein. Charleston residents.
Mr P.ipkin is the son of Mr and
Mrs Herman Popkin. 1045 Lenox
Avenue. Miami Beach
Miss Elenor Lesser was maid of
honor. Acting as matron of honor
was the bride's mother. .Brides-
maids included Rachel Rephan.
Carol Fox and Barbara New. Flow-
er girl was Myra Toporek.
William Jay Niler served as best
man. Ring bearer was Gerald
Berg. Seating guests were Donald
Fox, Howard HorowiU and Richard
Bernard.
A wedding reception followed at
the Frances Marion Hotel in
Charleston.
After a wedding trip to Mexico, I
the couple will be at home in;
Gainesville, where Mr Popkin is
a student at the University of Flor- {
Ida.
Mrs. CaMe C. fiaeM
Gables Chapter Proi*1
The Coral Gables <-'W
B'nai B'rith Women to "*?
busy with its activities at the
riety Children's Hospital C
project is the motor corps *
means of which polio P^Vy \
transported from their hom rf
the Physiotherapy IW8/1?!^,*
the hospital. Mrs Frank Swk
is chairman of the project


SEPTEMBER 11. 1953
Jewlst, fkrMtor,
PAGE 9A
Cohens Honeymoon In Veradero Beach;
Bride Is Former Hermene Silversteen
A morning ceremony at the
Monte Carlo Hotel on Sunday unit-
ed in marriage Miss Hermene Sil-
versteen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Max Silversteen, 615 84th Street,
and Jay I. Cohen, son of Mrs. Idell
Cohen and the late Leo Cohen, 1120
Venetian Way.
Rabbi Irving Lehrman officiated.
Al Sokol offered traditional nuptial
violin solos. Best man was Jules
Cohen, brother of the groom.
were Mr. H. D. Silversteen, uncle
of the bride, from Louisville, Ken-
tucky; Mrs. Lillian Krantz, aunt of
the bride, from New York City;
Mr. and Mrs. M. Guttman, aunt
and uncle of the groom, from Chi
cago; and Mr. and Mrs. George
Meyer, also from Chicago.
The bride is a graduate of Miami
Beach High School and attended
the University of Miami. The
groom also is a graduate of Miami
ri, ; m__i--_ k u Bach High and attended the Uni-
ganza gown with short sleeves and
matching gauntlets. Her shoulder-
Werner Kahn Photo
Jay f. Oh*.
Mr. and Mrs. Irving Cypen, of 1352 13th Terrace,
Miami Beach, have recently returned from a three-
week vacation which included visits to Philadelphia.
New York'City and the Concord Hotel in Kiamesha
Lake. New York.
Mist Saearfra Korer
length veil of French illusion was
held in place by a Juliet cap of
pink organza. She carried a white
satin Bible centered with two white
hybrid orchids and showered with
demure roses.
Mrs. Ted Dorch was matron of
honor. She wore ice blue lace and
carried a modified colonial of pink
carnations. Flower girl was Laur-
en Roesing, wearing white organdy
pinafore and cartying a pink bas-
ket with rose petals.
Mrs. Silversteen, mother of the
bride, and Mrs. Cohen, mother of
the groom, wore teal blue taffeta
and beige organza respectively.
Both chose orchid corsages. Floral
designs were executed by the
Blackstone Flower Shops.
A wedding luncheon at the
Monte Carlo followed the cere-
mony. Among out-of-town guests
versity of Florida. He graduated
from the University of Miami Law
School, is a member of Zeta Beta
Tau Fraternity and the Dade Coun-
ty Bar Association and is at pres-
ent active as executive director of
the Miami Beach Apartment House
Association.
For her going away costume, the
bride chose a powder blue linen
ensemble with navy accessories
and double white orchid corsage.
Upon completion of a honeymoon
trip to Veradero Beach. Cuba, Mr.
and Mrs. Cohen will reside at 9401
North Bay Harbor Terrace. Miami
Beach.
Alexander Miller Speaks
Alexander F. Miller, of Atlanta,
Georgia, will be guest speaker be-
fore the Miami Beach Lodge, B'nai
B'rith, at its weekly luncheon
meeting on Tuesday, September
15th, 12:15 p.m.. at the Mei Yin
Restaurant. Mr. Miller is Southern
aigcr, Brodsky Troth Is Revealed
of Delta Phi Epsilon Sorority.
|ilr. and Mrs. Saunder Karger,
5959 La Gorce Drive, Miami
ach. announce the engagement
their daughter. Saundra, to
ar.ley Brodsky, son of Mrs. Jack
sk) and the late Mr. Brodsky.
Ba> Drive, Miami Beach.
|. it. le elect attended the Uni-
.:tv of Miami and is a member
Mr. Brodsky graduated from the
University of Miami in 1951. He
is a member of Zeta Beta.Tau Fra-
ternity and Lead and Ink Honor-
ary. ,
*A formal home garden wedding
is planned for December.
taken s Honeymoon
II Nassau
KisMaril>n Nierenberg, daugh-
Mrs. Harry Neham.
24 2n 1 Street, Miami Beach.
kame the bride of Marvin Oaken,
Ir 'if Mr and Mrs. Louis Oaken,
|20 (oral Way, at the Lincoln
poor or. August 29th. Rabbi Mor-
Skop officiated.
|During the ceremony, the form-
Miss Nierenberg carried her
pr.dmother> Bible in a cascade
orchi
paid of honor was Miss Ann
pick, a friend of the bride. Arn-
Oaken was best man for his
tother.
Wewlywed Mrs. Oaken is a grad-
p ol Miami Beach High School.
Oaken also attended Miami
M Hii;h. as well as Florida
late University.
|A reception followed the cere-
V"iy. Among out-of-town guests
pMr and Mrs. Miro Abitabal.
Bogota. Colombia.
''"'' honeymoon trip to
[jMU. the couple will reside at
8th Street. Miami Beach.
Mrt. Martin Oaken
IMIklngton Stuilio
DEPENDABLE DOMESTIC HELP
RELIABLE DAY WORKERS
A-l EMPLOYMENT
SERVICE
S7 N. E. 5th Street Phon B401
AL MEIDENBERQ. Ownif
We extend best wishes for
A VERY HAPPY MEW YEAR
to our many friends and patrons
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1261 WASHINGTON AVENUE
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PAGE IDA
*u~4*hfkfkUam
FRIDAY, SBPTKMw
SEASONS GKltTlNGS TO All OUR WINDS
swsmmm electric co
ELECTRICAL (OHIIACTOU
3/00 N.W. 32nd AVENUE, MIAMI
Phone 64-5213
..

TO OUR MANY PATRONS AND FRIENDS
GREETINGS
V. J. HOECHERL COMPANY
PAINTERS AND DECORATORS
20 N.E. 29th STREET PHONE 3-0621
McARTHUR JERSEY FARM DAIRY, INC.
rWI..
TROM FARM TO YOU
6851 N. E. Second Avenue Phone 84-4521
TO OUR MANY JEWISH CLIENTS AND FRIENDS
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
from the
PAN AMERICAN BANK OF MIAMI
Interest on Regular Savings Accounts
ON BALANCES UP TO '25,000.00
Compounded Semi-annually Payable June 1st and Dec. 1st
SAVINGS INSURED UP TO -10,000.00
Complete Commercial Banking Services
DRIVE-IN TELLERS BANK BY MAIL
PAN AMERICAN BANK
. SI 1st ST. ji 3rd Vl PHOM W-S461
MEMttB KLiBAi RE SERVE SYSTEM
EDEB* DEPOSIT INSU*NCE-CORPORATION
Greater Miami's
Synagogue Directory
Unlnt for MVa So*****
penfance, SfcaMaf T***ove*, mill **
held to synagogues tore****** ?*
area on Saturday, Sip**** **
A Hit ef synagogues I* aaMfifcaof to
Th, )iml$h tktWm ItoltotoM Dfwe-
reap Shohbot T*fsevefc e#extoa>s
,ne first ef fh. High Holy Days.
Tw. Kippur services feltow M Sjrt-
urdey, September I ft*.
Miami Beach-Rabbi Irving I^hrmajj.
Conservative, 1701 Wain. Ave.. M.B.
Miami Hebrew SchoolRabbi tftinon
April, Orthodox. 1101 8W 1XU Ave..
Montieel'lo Park Rabbi Borla Rack-
ovsky, Conservative, 164th Street
anil NK 11th Avenue. North Miami
ItOach.
North Qad Conservative. 1.1630 W.
M.\ie Highway, North Miami.
way, North Miami.
North ShoreRabbi Mayer Abrarao-
wlu. Conservatlvey DO 7&U 8t,
Miami Beach. _
Tempi. laraai-Ur. JaMtikLMaTUi, B-
forin. 1S7 NK l?th St.. MlamLjM
TernpJ. Sinai, The Jawuah CrfnWtWilty
Cenr of Hollywood, Rabbi DavW
Shapiro. Conservative, TOSO rolk St..
Hollywood.
Trfarath laraai Rabbi Louie Cassel,
ti.".00 N. Miami Ave., Miami.
Week MiamiKabbi Altred Waxman.
conservative. 5720 8W 17U St..
Miami.
Young lerael Orthdox. 4001 Chaae
Ave.. Miami Beach.
Zamora Rnhbl Mas M. Undraan,
Conservative, 44 Zumora Ave., Coral
Gables.
Afludath laraelRatsot laaac Ever. Or-
thodox. 52o 78th St.. Miami Beach.
Beth David Rabbi Max Shapiro,
Conservative. 2625 8W rd Av..
Miami. "
Bath ElDr. Shmaryahu Swireky. Or-
thodox, 500 8W lTth Ave., Miami.
Berth JacobRabbi Moaea Mescheloff.
Orthodox. JU1-S11 Wash. Ave., M.B.
Bath SholomRabbi Leon Kronlsh,
Liberal. 4144 Cn.iae Ave., M.B.
Beth TttlahRnbM Joseph Rackov-
sky, orthodox, 93.". Euclid Ave.. Mi-
ami ltoaoh
Coral QableaRabbi Morria Skop. Lib-
eral. DO Palermo Ave.. C. Oablea.
Downtown Synagogue Rabbi Aryah
Becker, orthodox. Ill Hw 3rd Aw..
Miami
Flafller.GranadaReverend Leo Helm,
Conservative, 50 NW ilst I'lace.
Miami.
Hebrew Academy Rabbi Alexander
Cross. Orthodox. 918 6th St.. M.B
Hialeah.Miami Springs Rabbi Etarn
Kt tinner. Conservative, 911 K. 4th
.\\, Hialeah.
Israelite Center Rabbi Morton
Malavsky, Conervatlve, 319S SW
24th T.i Miami.
Kneseth isiaai ....obi Abraham Caa-
ael. orthodox, 1411 Euclid Ave..
Miami I'.each.
CHAPELS IN MIAMI AND MIAMI BEACH
Jewish Funerals
according to the family's tradition
Whether orthodox, conservative or reformed
services are desired. Riverside I many years of
experience are your Maurance that every detail
will be minutely observed.
AIR-CONDITIONED
HAPPY MEW YEAR
/
INCORPORATED
ItfaaWtoaMd 1*04
MANUFACTURERS Of INSKT WHtl SCIIENING
ALUMINUM BRONZE STEEL IRIDITED
MCIJIIH,
tf
Memorial Cliapel
TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS
AEhom
West Flagler 8c 20tli Ave. Plione 9-2664
Miami Broth
FREE PARKING 1236 Washington Ave. Phone 5-7777
24-HOUR AMBULANCE SERVICE
EDWARD T. NEWMAN, Funeral Director ABE EISENBERG. Treasurer
IN NEW YORK: 76h Street and Amsterdam Ave.
BROOKLYN BRONX LONG ISLAND
Cantor Joseph W. Malek will
be heard during High Holy
Day services, accompanied
by a choir of 25 persons, at
Temple Sinai, Jewish Com-
munity Center of Hollywood.
Cantor Malek is also a prac-
ticing attorney on Miami
Beach.
''GREETINGS"
i \mtn
CENTRE
2108 PONCE DE LEON BLVD.
Phone 48-6817
4. M. Sorolro Dorothy Sorefca
OfpA
LOCIHAVEN, PENNA.
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO
ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Josie's Knit Shoppe
Hand Made Bags and Yarns
Covered Buttons
1447 WASHINGTON AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH 39. FLORIDA
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
JOHN N. WILKINSON
ROCK FILL
3115 MUNDY STREET
Phone 48-7476
MR. and MBS. ISIDOKt SH01NM.D and FAMllY of
THE LITTLE BAKE SHOP
2127 CORAl WAY
Wish all their Friends and Patron! a Nanny Naur l*mt
Closed Saturdays Phone 41-7241
H 0 I I D A r GREETINGS
JOE DEMURO
THE SPAGHETTI AMD MIA KING
Well Known Throughout the Northeast for the last 18 Years
lor the Finest Italian Foods
Com* in and Meet rho Mm Who Tor-ad Down a furtunt for tot
Secret of the Sauce that Made Him Famous
OPEN 4 P.M. 1 A.M., INCLUDING SUNDAY
6234 N.E. 2nd AVENUE PHONE 7-9541
free Parking to the Rear
TO ALL... HAPPY NEW YEAR
R. K. Cooper. Inc.
2733 PONCE DE LEON BOULEVARD
Phone 83-4654
To AM...Greetings
Shinn Construction Company
12345 WEST DIXIE HIGHWAY
NORTH MIAMI


L^Y. SEPTEMBER 11. 13
^**WA*^**W^^.*^^*^v^*^*<
llABBiS TO OFFICIATE AT ANNUAL CEMETERY PILGRIMAGE
Sunday, September 13th
Rabbis of the Greater Miami Rabbinical Association will conduct
jnemorial services on the followinfl schedule:
, D m WoodlawnAll Rabbis to be present for Community
Service.
i 2 p.m.. Mount Nebo.
' 3 p.m., Mount Sinai and Graceland.
1:30 p.m., Reform Services at Graceland.
Members of the Greater Miami Jewish Community having loved
ones in any of these cemeteries are asked to be present for the
Memorial Prayers at the time and place scheduled above.
Mmfeftj%rftftv7
PAGE 11 A
Shown above is the Beth David Choir which assists Rabbi Max Shapiro and Cantor Maurice
Mamches during the High Holiday services. From left to right (front row) are Cantor Mam-
ches, Dorothy Sponder, Norma Reiff, Hillel Glover, Miriam Donnerstag, director, Evelyn Sal-
^.^5',^aWjiShaPiro- Rear row are Reuben Idels, Murray Baum. Nat Salander and Don
I Miami Beach officials are expected to attend the annual Yom
IKippur Night Dance of the Miami Beach Lodge, B'nai B'rith.
Ischeduled for September 19th, at the Delano Hotel. B'nai
I B'rith women are co-sponsors of the affair. Above are Mrs.
[Harold Shapiro, wife of the Miami Beach Mayor, and Mrs.
I Henry Lebow, a member of the committee, looking on at one
[of the prizes held by Charles (Chick) Goldberg, manager of
Delano Hotel.
Jacques Torczyner, chairman of
he ZOA Committee on World Zion-
Atfairs and a vice president of
ne ZOA. emphasized That "the
unction of the world Zionist
liovement is to help the Jewish
eople survive in a modern world
Inhere assimilation and foreign to-
alitarian ideas threaten to capture,
kur youth and our intellectuals."
Benjamin G. Browdy, past presi-
dent of the ZOA and a member
of the Jewish Agency executive,
urged all Zionists "to throw them-
selves into the work of Jewish edu-
cation and Jewish community or-
ganization the Jewish schools,
federations, the welfare funds and
Jewish community councils in
all Jewish communities throughout
the United States."
TO OUR MANY FRIENDS
MOST HAPPY HOLIDAYS
ALUMINUMGlass Top-
per ftr extra light
WASHINGTON The situ-
ation in the Middle East, in-
cluding Israel, was reviewed
at length by Jacob Blaustein,
president of the American
Jewish Committee, during a
conference here with Assist-
ant Secretary of State Henry
A. By r, ade, who is in charge
of Near Eastern Affairs.
BIST MUSHES fOR A
HAPPY HOLIDAY
'"' ffecfro
Neon Sign Co.
75 N.W. 6th STREET
MIAMI, FLORIDA
Phone 9-5750
We Buy. Sell and Rant
New and Used
Power Mowers and Trimmers
Pick-up and Delivery
Lawn Mower
Center
Authorized Service and Parts .
Red Clinton Briggs & Stratt-ml
1501 N.W. 79th St., Miami. Ft
Phone 7-3588
1
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
Spolter Electrical
Supplies, Inc.
Lighting Fixtures
715 N.W. 62nd Street
PHONE 7-6519
MR. arid MRS. WILLIAM AGRANOVE
960 Bay Drive, Miami Beach
Extend Best Wishes for the New Year
to their Friends and Relatives
lT la tne B *r'
A Hapfy *nJ Prosperous tiew Tear
To Ail Our Friends and Patron;
Westwood
Hoi el
230 31th STREET
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-7646
GREETINGS FROM
Orange
Blossom
AMERICA'S FINEST
FRESH FRUIT JUICE
VICTOR
tXTlNOS KIT WISHtS KM
TMf NEW TEA*
SHELIORNE HOTEL
BEAUTY SALON
1801 Collins Avows*
Phone 5-1271
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
MIAMI SHORES PHARMACY
9540 N.E. 2nd AVENUE
Phone 7-1585
84-5561
74, U MLC0' INC
7N.W. 54th ST.. MIAMI, FLA.
A Happy and Prosperous New Year to all Our Friends and Patrons
Loeb & Gottfried
RED ROAD. HIALEAH
Phone 88-2255
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
TilIVUK>M-ItTJ4lAT0S.RA>ES-WASMERS-TIIUSATrt(llIS.AUT0$E(tV NONE 37413 Srscsr. 600 N.C.FIRST Ml.
ALBERT EINSTEIN Says:
"If v/eeM be very desirable thof Hut
took receive the consideration it eier-
ifs in Jewish circles ."
A CHALLENGE TO JEWRY
A Discussion on Basic Jewish Problems
by Joseph L. Tepeer
rhis provocative book, just publlsl
llscodses th,> (hi.-., problems upp<
noel mi the mlns)j of Amerlcaa Mws.
(I I Qlvee an .! j-
tntl-sensltism, mid Indicate* Its fiit
-.ii (!) i '"i ere the rel >' ioa f
American Jews with, and tnei......la -
lion to\\.irl>. Israel. (3) W)l
mulnut efforts now being made i>
parochlelhie Jewish life In -'
iIh,i win us MKalnsi ct-IiirninK to nh.
practises n in>lKirt..nt booh fur Jew and non-Jew
like. Order your copy nh
>oupon beloD Onlj lt.SO. Money bick
in 5 days if not satisfied. VANT.V
PRESS, INC., 121) VY. 3lt St. I
York I.
5-Day. Money.Back Guarantee
Vantage Press, Inc.
1 120 W. 31st St.. New York |
I Please send me a copy of A
CHALLENGE TO JEWRY, by Jos
I L. Tepper. at $2.50. If not satisfied,
. I may return the Dook for full re-
1 fund within 5 days.
| G Payment enclosed Send C.O.D.
Name
Address
I


PAGE 12 A
+ l?i FRIDAY, SEPTEMbfp
11, i
Fourth Year of High
Holy Days in Korea
(Editor^ Note: American Jewish men and women
in uniform, among the UN forces on the ridges and
mutilated battlefields of Korea where the fighting
Is now silenced, are preparing for the observance
cf the solemn Da>s of Awe, the fourth High Holy
Day observance ia this global testing ground The
following are excerpts from Chaplains- reports on
the occasion of Rosh Hashonah 5713 I
EXROITE TO KOREA Chaplain Meyer Blech^
1 have experienced something our sages of old ;
never visualized having a Yom Kippur drop out of
the calendar by virtue of crossing the International I
Date Line at precisely the I wrong < hour
At any rate, a mere technicality could no more ;
keep us from sacredly observing our Day of Atone j
ment last year than rugged terrain can stop a chap :
lain from seeking out his -congregants" And H
we Jewish personnel18 of usaboard the I'SNS |
General E T. Collinsheld full Yom Kippur sen
ices and found them, as always, deeply inspiring
To us. under these life-and-death circumstances, the
LShanah Tova greeting had special fervor and
r.eanmg One more noteand this could be genu-
ine American-Jewish curiosaYom Kippur 5713 was
the first Day of Atonement in my life that began
en the evening of one date. September 28th. and
ended technically two days later. September 30th

HQ El'SAK Advanced Chaplain Herbert Teitel-
One of the most awesome things about our
Rosh Hashonah service a> the mighty number of
who attended more than 500 The location was
the 3rd Division Replacement Company. For this
service we pitched a huge tent and. with almost
Sinaitic appropriateness, began our Erev Rosh
Hashonah worship with the ancient Mah Tovu-'How
goodly are thy tents. 0 Jacob.

HQ I CORPS Chaplain Herbert Bnchtoi The
High Holy Days are. much more than in civilian life.
i tremendously meaningful climax in our year Be-
tween Chaplain Teitelbaum s Rosh Hashonah serv-
ices and mineboth conducted in this sectorthere ,
were something over a thousand Army men partici j
pacing. Together Teitelbaum and I sweated out the
pitching and wiring of our ponderous circus tents. ,
the building of benches to accommodate that tre-
mendous number of worshippers, the complicated
M I I MSNMf and billeting them and all
housand-and-one things that needed attention
irrangeraent My service up front was held
within range of the enemy's gunsand rather close
to our own. The rolling booms of the artillery, both
. I I -:.>. set up a thundering counter-
nt to our prayers and lent them an extra-
nary urgency
ratST MARINE DIVISION Chaplain Samuel So-
' be!-Both iBdOOfl and out-that is. in chapels and m
the field the Yonum Noraim were observed through
1 out the divi-i-n Wherever possible, appropriate fev
tirities food, drink, talk' were held at the conclu-
sion of the service* One Of the most interesting
events in connection with our High Holy Days here
was a Rosh Hashonah greeting to the Jewish men.
bv the General, which appeared in the Division
ne >paper on Bosh Hashonah morning under a head-
line in Hebrew type. There were several special
Holv Dav projects, including the production of an
original LShanah Tova card of local interest, which
the men sent by the thousands to fnends and rela
uves back home In fact, even non-Jewish Gil got
hold of these cards and sent them as greetings to,
their Jewish friends both in and out of service. An-
other fine project was the tape recording of spot
greetings to the families of our men. these record-
ings being played by disk jockeys in the various
home towns of the men on duty here.
I
!
HQ X CORPS (Chaplain Morris Margolies)"On
the first day of the year it is inscribed, and on the
Day of Atonement the decree is sealed who
shall live and who shall die. ." 1 have uttered this
prayer in many congregations on many a Rosh
Hashonah. Last year, the majority of the Congre-
gation were soldiers of the front lines in Korea.
They faced death daily They experienced life most
keenly For them, the prayer contained a meaning
which is brutally concrete. Lieutenant Benbasat
i- the son of Mr. Yomtov Benbasat. of FOB 1519.
Istanbul. Turkey, and serving in the Turkish Bri-
gade, somewhere in Korea. He is one of the finest
gentlemen I have ever met and his humility, sin-
cerity and Jewish piety made a profound impres-
sion upon me. So did his rendition of the Haftara on
the first day of Rosh Hashonah 5713 in the best
Sephardic tradition I wept unashamed "For in
tents did I cause the children of Israel to dwell
when I took them forth from the land of Egypt." The
soldiers who came from far and wide to worship
with us on Rosh Hashonah and Yom Kippur were
quartered in a little village of tents which the au-
thorities put up the night before their arrival. The
picture reminded me so much of a IRbbuti in Israel.
And. believe it or not. the Jews were overwhelming-
ly the majority of all personnel in oar area during
the High Holidays Private Charles Davidson,
whose Hebrew name is Ezekiel. sounded the Shofar.
I could not but see. in my mind's eye. the vision
of Ezekiel in the Valley of the Dry- Bones. Korea is a
land haunted by ghosts, living and dead. Disease.
despair and disaster are everywhere in evidence, a
Vallev of Dry Bones if there was one.

=>V*"_ _
EXTENDING TO YOU
nran raw iw*
IN EVERY WAY
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
Central Bank & Trust Co.
N.W. 36th STREET AT 13th AVENUE
"BANK WNEtE tOU CAN BOttOW '
Member ftitml Otpasif Imurmmct Ctfretion
Greetings
TO OU* MANY FNKN0S IM SOUTH HOKIDA
UPON THE ADVENT Of MSN HASHONAH
HILL YORK
Air Conditioning and Refrigeration
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TO OVt MANY fMHDS .
iEST WISNES EOt A NAPPT NEW TEAt
SUPERIOR WINDOW COMPANY
MANUFACTURERS OF ALUMINUM WINDOWS
5300 N.W. 37th AVENUE
o*r
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Sine* 1939 of the Mttoft's
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Extra heavy aluminum
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H h milk plfvnt mt ifn4 Best Wishes tar *
m ***n N Tear U AM jj
US Clarities Near last Stand
WASHINGTON iJTA) Israel
Ambassador Abba Eban said last
week before returning to Israel
that as a result of a series of
talks with various high officials in
the State Department, he is now in
a position to give the Israel Gov-
i eminent "a very clear picture on
how the United States is think-
ing" on a great variety of sub-
jects.
The ambassador made his state-
ment following a conference with
AadBhMri Secretary of State Henry-1
A Byroade in charge of Near East-
i em affairs This conference round-
i ed out a series of talks Mr Eban
! had with State Department officials
I prior to his scheduled departure
for Jerusalem for consultation with
members of the Israel Government
Mr Eban emphasized in his state-
ment that "the whole field of com-
mon interests between the Unit-
ed States and Israel was reviewed
by Mr Byroade and him "in a
very detailed and very friendly
.-pint "
The United States stands pat on
its announced intention of taking
action to prevention any violations
of the Israel Arab armistice lines.
j the State Department has informed
I Representative Edna F Kelly, of
j New York.
Thurston B. Morton. Assistant
j Secretary of State, in answer to a
j atwrv by the congress woman, said
of the present Israel-Arab boundar-
I les that "the United States Gov-
ernment takes no position other
than to recognize these as valid
armistice lutes until agreement is
'; reached on permanent boundaries
between the countries concerned "
GREETINGS TO ALL
BENDIX LAUNDERETTE
COMPLETE DRYING SERVICE
rOUt SOUTHWEST STATION
2769 S.W. 22nd STREET
Phone 48-9258
WISHING A MOST HA/Pr ANB HOSHKOUS NEW TfAl
70 All OUt FtMNOS
PRITCHARD PAINT & GLASS CO.
PHOtt WJ1
I^AJM. F10A
SS2 N.W. 5th STRICT
ANB tE-BOTLB TNE BEST
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MIAMI, 'l0
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f-2434


pAY. SFPTEMBER 11. 1953
* Iwist nnrlfHr,
PAGE 13 A
,/ Sues for
Back Pay
By the JTA
BDELBERG An American
soldier stationed in this
Pfc. Rudolf Wachsmann, has
Lht suit in the court of the
I nigh Commission against the
iFarben chemical trust, asking
Mivalenl of S200.000 in back
,,l damages fr slave labor
-med and sufferings endured
[him during the Nazi era in
I notorious Buna-Monowttl syn-
rubber plant
ise he is a Jew,
Hunann was taken to a concen-
| from his native Op-
in L'pper Silesia, when he
i uile 14 years old. In
he wa> transferred to the
rminalion camp at Oswiecim
work at Monowitz
plant constructed there by
arben lo reap benefit from the
a.) exploitation of concentra-
camp labor He remained at
lamp till 1945. then was ship-
I to Buchenwald and later was
[rated b> American troops. He
fcigrated to the United States
the DP Act and was drafted
the Arm) last year.
I'achmann'N mother and brother
killed in the gas chambers
Oswiecim. His father was beat-
death before his eyes. He
elf suffered beatings and tor-
including hanging by the
fct- in mid air. as well as two
II fractures, two broken ribs, a
ken arm and a broken leg.
Ii- American attorneys, M. Phil-
ILorber and Henry G. Vogel.
i of New York but now prnctic
in Heidelberg, seek $180,000
lamages. for permanent impair-
pt of body and mind interest,
and attorneys' fees and a
a S18.000 in back pay.
auc he is a
[occupation forces, Wachmann
I able to bring this civil artion
pre a court of the US High
pxissinn K j> not
sver, whether the American
will accept jurisdiction,
loitert Wollheim, a German
1 r. living in New York, who
a Monowitz .-.lave laborer at
same time as Wachmann, but
did not claim irreparable im-
minent of his mental and physi-
Ihealth recently won a $2,500
gment for hack pay and dam-
fin a German lower court. That
(lift ha been appealed to a Ger-
i Superior Court by the IG-Far-
tru.t.
? *,-:,-.,
American and Israeli representatives ot Lapidoth and Kerr-
McGee stand before the first of three rig3 with which LaniHoth
will begin drilling operations in the Jelish staTe next rEonh
Oil Drilling Operation To Begin In
Israel; Rigging Ready For Export
NEW YORtf-3ftJlopments of| Ia'tAjM?
great importance to the future of|
Israel's hard-presst.: economy werei
made known here this week, when
it was announced that the presence
in Israel of oil in commercial quan-
tities may now be regarded as
more than speculation.
Abraham Dickenstein, president
of the American Palestine Trading
Corporation, said that drilling
equipment has already arrived in
Israel and, 'together with Senator
Robert S. Kerr, of Kerr-McGee Oil
Industries, announced that the first
crew would be leaving for Israel to
start actual drilling operations at
once. Drilling, Dickenstein said,
would begin on one of the sites
where the AMPAI. inspired and fi-
nanced Lapidoth-Israel Petroleum
Company has acauired licenses cov-
ering some 500,000 acres of leases.
"In the past a great deal of pub-
licity has been generated by the
prospect of oil discovery in Israel,
Dickenstein stated, "but this is one
of the first concrete steps toward
proving that the geologists' encour-
aging reports can be substantiated
member of the by actual finds "
The "encouraging reports" re-
ferred to by AMPAL's president
were primarily those brought back
yetm\a\ft^byHtfoi PfJWhlKfcPtiJP"* has
now become part of the world pe-
troleum literature, and Lapidoth's
LI/ 45fvt
p'l'ers ol a deep-well water
pet near S'dom, which is be-
I financed with State of Israel
funds this week discovered
alt deposits, with a first layer
fness of more than three and a
Teet. Further explorations are
S''ing on to determine whether
mg these deposits is com-
feasible.
WMER'S FINER BAKERY
lommr fanhh horns;
|SUR OF DAVID BRAND RYE
* PUMPIRNKKII
1171 S- W. 8th STRUT
'hone 3-1653
|' *osr happy nfw re a*
wrSDI FURNITURE mmi
S"N FUN PATIO SHOP
14350 81SCAYNI RIVD.
WlTH MIAMI REACH
'"ONE 116-3*12
Happy Ntw Ytor Te All
friends and Patrons
Oar
M. 1. C. TAKACH and STAH
f
TARACH PHARMACY
2201 N.E. 163rd STREET
NORTH MIAMI* BEACH
Phene I1-6-3I74
0-pran has been associat d with a
number of successful oil discover-
ies in California, Iraq, Saudi-Ara-
bia and, during and after World
War II. as chief consultant for the
United States Navy's oil develop-
ment program in Alaska.
Foran reports that "visible evi-
dences on the surface, coupled with
subsurface geology, indicated that
no more promising geological struc-
tures has remained yet undrilled
throughout the rest of the world.'
He further stated, "I am not given
to exaggeration, but I am pre-
pared to stake my experience of
35 years in the field as geologist
as well as my professional reputa-
tion on the availability of oil in
commercial quantities in Israel."
Senator Kerr, of Oklahoma,
president of Kerr-McGee, pledged
his organization's complete cooper-
ation in making this venture a suc-
cessful one. "We are confident,"
Senator Kerr said, "that oil will be
found in Israel and hope that we
can drill the countrys first dis-
covery."
TO ALL GREETINGS
Commercial Bank of Miami
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
6015 N.W. 7th AVENUE
PHONE 84-0661
i:
TO OUR MANY FRIENDS AND ACQUAINTANCES
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
R. H. MILLS, JR.
CONSTRUCTION COMPANY
ri
860 EAST 4th AVENUE
HIALEAH. FLORIDA

'
n
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
Harris Refrigeration Company
J. J. Harris
801 S.W. 1st STREET
Phone 3-6114
1-1
BUT WISHES fOR THf NtW TEAR
Art landscape co.
192* Bay Read, Miami Beach
ART'S NURSERY
990 N.E. 79th Street, Miami
Harvey
Btrnie
Caidsttm
Seltvan
Sincere Good Wishes to all my Friends
MINNIE McWHORTER

Greetings To All
Philpott Construction Company
9901 EAST BROADVIEW DRIVE
BAY HARBOR ISLAND
Phone 86-2254

t
StASOHS CAHT/NGS
Christine
Carrigan
TO ALL OUR PATRONS
AND FRIENDS A MOST
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Iw+uWi viumtp
/W DO MOT SAY TcT\
>-----\MXI/VJAlTRY-J
we doit ^
RI6HT/WE J
SATISFY/)
ster7
EV0Y
TIME/
PLUMBING
C0NTHACTIN6 -XMtM
2980 CORAL WAY
$%*? 48-3264
^-W in MIAMI
DOZWOF^^rBTUWS
To All Our Friends .
A MOST HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
17 YEARS OF EXPERT MANUFACTURING
For a Sight-Satisfying Awning at a Practical Price
PHONE 88-8424 or 88-6641 TODAY!
NO DOWN PAYMENT^-,^-^-^^^^^^^^^ FREE
FHA TERMS i^^^Tl____ESTIMATES
WITHOUT Oil ICATION >
MteaUctertii ol
AluuieB *nJ
CUn |iloiii
./- FACTORY LOCATED
1134 E. 27tli ST.. HIALEAH
Yi ttrfm


PAGE 14 A
L*ui,rk>r*M9i7
FRIDAY, SEPTFMwpb
'
Jerusalem Issue Restated
NEW YORK (JTA) Rabbi Irving implies the spiritual and cultural
Miller last week expressed surprise
at the recent statement by Secre
tary of State John Foster Dulles
criticizing the transfer of the Is-
raeli Foreign Ministry to Jerusal-
em. Emphasizing that "the United
States is on record as favoring
an arrangement for the Holy-
Places which would not disturb the
sovereignty and the political in-
stitutions of Jerusalem."
Rabbi Miller said: "We do not
believe that Mr Dulles means to
olter this policy, although his state
ment has served to produce con-
.-iderable bewilderment."
He blamed "a large and well
tinanced propaganda m?hine
which is focusing its atten'on on
Washington for a stream of nu>in
lurmation on the question."
The ZOA president described the
disintegration of American Jew-
ry." he stated. "We now have an
unprecedented opportunity to ere
ate a richer, more meaningful
American Jewish life, in which Is-
rael will serve as a sustaining cul
tural influence, and we believe
that increasing numbers of Amer
ican Jews are today in search of
precisely such a life. Zionism will
be the answer to their questif we
ensure that the program of our or-
ganization is carried forward in an
inspiring way."
In his appraisal of the future
program of the Zionist Organiza
tion of America. Rabbi Miller de-
clared that it must continue to
provide initiative and inspiration
in the area of economic activity for
Lsrael. He also stressed the need
for a strong and dynamic organiza-
Zionist position as being "unalter I tion. which would not divert its en
ably opposed to the supply of arms
in any of the Arab states as long
a< they persist in their refusal to
nake peace with Israel and con-
tinue to threaten renewed war
lare."
He said that the way to hasten
a final solution to the problems of
the Middle East and pave the way
lor real security on the entire re-
gion was for "our government to
inform the Arab countries that
they cannot expect to receive mili-
larj ..stance from the United
States unless and until they sign
e peace treaty with Israel."
Israel Needs America
Rabbi Miller appealed for the
continued active and sympathetic
interest of the American people
.'I con.-tructive statesmanship on
the part of the American Govern-
ment if Israel is successfully to
- Ive her problems.
"Such statesmanship and sup.
port have enabled Israel to over-
the economic and political
cutties of the past five years,
Stated. Today, when our coun-
try is seeking definitive solutions
1 r the problems of the entire Mid
i k Bast, it is more essential than
that the American people
should understand how the respec-
live interests of the United States
and Israel continue to run along
Faralle! lir. -
Sets Forth Position
Touching upon the relationship
between American Jewry and Is-
rael the ZOA leader declared:
'There is nothme ambiguous about
cjr political allegiance to the
I nited States or our conception of
h life We have no intention
>: explaining' ourselves because
!' i- not necessary for us to do so.
We shall continue to affirm our
point of view in a positive manner,
certain that we are hereby giving
expression to the high ideals and
' interests of America
Rabbi Miller expressed his be-
lief that "there is a futureeven
a great onefor the American
Jewish community We reject the
notion that Israels establishment
A HAPPT \E\V YEAR TO ALL
UR FRIE\DS A\D PATRONS
FRIENDLY
BEAUTY SHOP
2185 S.W. 1st Street
MIAMI
PHONE 2-7857
Devon Matell
A Happy New Year To Ail
Our Friends and Clients
t*. .4. -lanus and
issnritilts
ENGINEERS
220 Mlrarle Mile
CORAL GABLES
Phone 48-6394
ergies in "prolonged public phil-
osophizing on the theme of Israel
and the Diaspera." "
Neumann Proposes Council
Establishment of an American
Council for Israel "to promote con-
certed action on the part of all seg-
ments of American Jewry and the
fostering of settlement in Israel
not only from the lands of oppres-
sion but from all parts of the free
world." was proposed by Dr. Eman-
uel Neumann, member of the Jew-
ish Agency F.xecutive. who also
called for a united front of all
American Zionist groups. He sug-
nested creation of a joint commit-
tee of representatives of the Zion-
ist movement and of Israel "to
work steadily and systematically i fund raising "
during the coming months, in an
effort to reach full agreement on
principles and policies and com-
plete coordination of effort in the
future with respect to the role and
function of world Zionism."
"Only if Israel and the Zionist
movement are of one stand, speak
with one voice and act in full ac-
cord can Zionism regain its full
effectiveness." Dr. Neumann de-
clared.
Non-Zionist Representation
Dr. Israel Goldstein, member of
the Jewish Agency Executive and
chairman of the World Confereda-
tion of General Zionists, called for
fuller participation by the Zionist
movement in the affairs of the
American Jewish community. He
placed on the debit side its failure
to join "in the effort t^Mfegu-^
American democracy arM world*
mindedness against the insidious
attempts to undermine both."
Dr. Goldstein found the Zionist
movement "lagging in the effort
being made to organize the Ameri-
can Jewish Community on a demo-
cratic basis He warned that fail-
ure to throw its full organizational
strength into this program can on-
ly jeopardize the future of Zion-
ism in this country.
He voiced support of the pro-
posal to enlarge the Jewish Agency
to include non-Zionists, who. he
said, "have the moral right to be
represented and to have a voice
in the Jewish Agency program of
immigration and setlement in Is-
rael, in view of their splendid
leadership and participation in the
Pixley Sign Service, inc.
432 E. 9th STREET HIALEAH. FLORIDA
Walls Truck* Windows Gold Leaf
Cards Paper Cut Outs Silk Screen
PHONE 88-9517
~mz
'I .Hi
453 41st SHUT, MIAMI BEACH
Holiday
iirvvling*
from
Jerry Deuteh
AT OUR MIAr DCRARTMfNT:
Finest Available
Strictly Kosher
TOP GRADE
MEATS & POULTRY
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ALWAYS Ovalilv Reeve Rif ALWAYS
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with a
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m
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laUti icxtntifk dittlovmmt to At room air eondititntr
maktt xl a fabuUnu BEAT-PUMP AM ktmtt At tarn*
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when it's chilly, you'll got plenty of
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AIR CONDITIONING
)
And this modern, reveree-cycle heat is
cheeper too. The cost h leu then half
for the same amount of heet from elec-
tric coils or other gadgets using electric
power. Phone Hill York today, or stop
in end see this York miracle.
REFRIGERATION
HILL YORK
PHONE 82-1411
ISM 1121 J.W. IIOHTN STSStT
MIAUI
AM CONDITIONS IS NOW A WCISSITY FOR. NfA*LY IVIIT SUSINfSS


LEGAL NOTICE
"TTire BY PUBLICATION
N1TriHCUIT COURT OF THI
.1" "llri JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
I ELEVENTH juuiw DADE
'i05tR I CHANCERR. No. 16*414
ESaCE HOFFMAN, riatatlfl.
loft
IcABI
'j, HOFFMAN, PjfjRtoat
r FOR DIVORCE
.ARV,j HOFFMAN, K.I- I). #1.
|T<' 'T .(in! Pennsylvania.
. '" hVrebj notified thai a Bill
|H>......",'-,':,' or Pleading In the
'',," clerk ,,f the Circuit Court
l"":' 'J ,,,,,. the ITth day ..f October,
ft. 1/vou fail to do ho. judgment by
li'f.ul ''" yu for the relief
It ,ll I In the HI" Complaint.
|"i|, n i ""all be published once
I 5 .ik for four consecutive week*
I."tHF JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
eTrJuJE AND oltKERED at Miami.
K32: this Jrt day of September.
' ,.: n LEATHERMAN.
Clerk, Circuit Court.
i. i'li County. Florida.
Ii, M R. MURRAY
lirirruit Courl Seal) Deputy Clerk.
IlivKliS HEIMAN & KAPLAN.
^r^ruLM-^'n^M""".. Florida.
Ej.ii-s '-_______________
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
I NOTICE IS HEREBY fJIVEN that
L. undrreiKni-d. desiring to engage In
ti.inw ondei the fictitious name of
KbBIO WHEEL DRIVB-IN. at 2255
tnut'hweit IJnd Avenue. Miami. Flor-
|di Intend to register said name with
Che Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
I'nuntv. Florida.
BERNARD T. PALEY
SKYMOUR I'ALKY
REINER a SPIELER
EtMneyi fo' Applicants
i i: Building, Miami, Florida
I IHI-23 !" -'
MOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Jn THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
RiLEvENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. 142364
Luce mack, Plaintiff,
\>
IIS MACK, Defendant
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
Jf, i.nris MACK
|A. i. Lulls MACK, are hereby
> thai i Kill of Complaint for
1 filed against you.
i ilred to serve a copy
L Heading to the
on the plaintiffs
Iitorni BEN K88EN, S23 Seybold
pulldlni Florida, and file the
Answer or Pleading In the
bfici of the circuit Court
in .,r tx ii h daj "f i "otober,
H you fail to do so. Judgment
ev defualt will l- taken against rou
rellel demanded In the Hill
fcf Compli
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
ortda, th.- 2nd day of September,
. :
K R. LEATHERMAN,
Clerk, circuit Court,
Dade County, Florida
H> \l C GREEN,
Circuit Cotn t s.;, 11 Deputy Clerk
attorney for I'lalntirf
JiKN E88BN
fel Seybold Building, Miami, Florida
1 1-Il-lS-tf
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
XOTICK is HEREBY GIVEN that
p undersigned, desiring to engage In
Vlines* under the flctitloua name of
fllK SHORK HOTEL, at 1351 Collins
ve. Miami Beach, Intend to register
?I name with the Clerk of the Clr-
Wl Court ,.f Dade County, Florida.
VMI iVtS* AU!K1{T ZCCKERMAN
SI0.00 DISCOUNT
|M tfU mCHANICAlir PEtFfCT
USED CARS
|Iere is a car to suit your budget
|mi anyone mentioning this add
"ill receive a ten dollar ditceeat
lownrd the purchase el any oute-
[Mobile on the lot.
fvery Cor Under $500.00
RAY HOADLEY
2040 S.W. 8th STIIIT
Phone 82-6042
SUNRAYfARK
HEALTH RESORT
HOTEL- SANITAJrfUM
Ma am
MIAMI-n fimBA
rtUDAY GREETING CARDS
Sadye G. Rose
2"5 CORAL WAY
Phone 48-0781
Greeting Csrde for
All Occasions
Stationery Nap-
kins and Matches
'lain or
1'ersonallzed
e Paper Table Covers
and Towels
g!f Wrapping and
Ribbons
Joys and Party
Favore
> School Suaallee
,e aifte
LEGAL NOTICE
'Jmrisiiru****,,
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOU
___ NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HKRKIIY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name ,,f
FLAMINGO O'CLAN MAR, at 64:,5
S.W. 8th Street. Miami, Intend to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dude County.
Florida.
_____ WEAL CECELIA DOYLE
kkhslkr t. oaks
Attorneys for Applicants
1782 W. F'lagler Si
9/11-1X-2.1 In.2
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to -naage In
business under the fictitious name of
PKNN-WAY FOOD MARKET, at
1447-49 Pennsylvania Avenue. Miami
Beach, Intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
HYMAN OOTTESMAN
EVA BRANDMAN
Sole Owners
DIANA rOOPKRHMlTH
Attorney for Applicants
Z35 Lincoln Road
9/4-11-18-25
IN COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
No. 2S404
RE: ESTATE OF
ALBERT M.-HERMAN, Deceaseds I
NOTICE OF INTWMdn TO MA rig
APPLICATION FOR FINAL
DISCHARGE
NOTICE Is hereby given that we
have filed our final report and petition
for Final Discharge as Executors of
the estate of ALBERT M. HERMAN.
dei eased, and that on the 30th day
of September, 1955, will apply to the
Honorable \V, F. HI.ANTON, Countv
Judge of Dade County, Honda, for
approval of said final report and for
final discharge as Executors of the
Estate of ALBERT M. BERMAN, de-
censed.
This 18th day of August, 1953.
WALTER C. KOVNER
MILTON R. MANMIEIMER
Co-cxecutors and Attorneys
for the Estate of
ALBERT M. HERMAN.
Deceased.
8/21-28 9/4-11
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
LAN8DOWNE ACTS., at 1280 Drexel
Avenue .'00 13th Street. Miami
Baa eh, Florida, intend to restate! said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
PHILIP DRKSNICK
SYLVIA DRESN1CK
8'28 9/4-11-18
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES' COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE, No. 30639-B
In He; EHTATE OF
LEON GOODMAN, a/k/a
LEON ALEXANDER GOODMAN',
I >eceased
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You, and each of you, are hereby
notified and required to present any
claims and- demands which you, or
either of you, may have against the
Mate of LEON GOODMAN, deceased
late of Dade County. Florida, to the
Honorable County Judges of Dade
County, and file the same In their
offices in the County Courthouse In
Dade County, Florida, within eight
calendar months from the date of the
first publication hereof. Said claims
or demands to contain the legal ad-
dress of the claimant and to be sworn
to and presented as aforesaid, or same
will be barred.
Date August ISth, A.D. 1953.
ELIZABETH GOODMAN
As Executrix of the Last Will
and Testament of
LEON GOODMAN. Deceased.
HAROLD ZINN
Attorney for Elixabeth Goodman
8/21-28 9/4-11
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
h.isness under the fictitious-name of
MIAMI BROOM co, and DIXIE
I Room co.. .,, .too N w :,6tn Ave,
, ii!" >, "iSrtf '." r,'l"ter ald name
with the ( lerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade I oiinty, Flot Ida
WILLARI. Wolll. GEML'TH
Sole Owner
MARX !-\\unit
Attorney for Applicant
Congress Itldg.
8/28 9/4-11-18
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
IHKfMTH JUD1C.AL CIRCUIT OF
PJrpRIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY. No. 182150
RAY LA ROCCA, Plaintiff
vs.
LOUIS LA ROCCA. Defendant
AMENDED ORDER OF
_1. PUBLICATION
TO: l.ocis LwV ItOCCA
3034 Mathews Ave.
Bronx. New York
You are hereby notified that a Bill
of Complaint for Divorce has been
riled against you In the above styled
cause and you are required to serve
a copy of your Answer on the plalnt-
ffrs attorney and file the original In
the Office of"the Clerk of the Circuit
Court In and foaHDade County. Flor-
JM*jmAr.t*1art the th day of Oc-
*".'''. It you rail to do so,
blnta^cipjiitiy/'iJcfaaie ltfW;toJ;?.u fU the relief, defluvnded
ItT ih* Bill of Complaint.
Dated at Miami. Dade County. Flor-
ida this 28th day of August, 1933.
E. B. LEATHERMAN,
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: M. .43. GREEN,
I>eputy Clerk
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
MANUEL LURED ,
Attorney for Plaintiff
823 W Flagler St., Miami. Florida
9/4-11-18-25
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
TROPICAL FIX IDS OF FLORIDA, at
4421 N.W. 23rd Avenue, Miami. Intend
to register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
MoKKIs HARRIS
LEONARD HARRIS
BEN HARRIS
JACK MILLER. Atlv
4iil( Mil Ave, Miami Beach
9/4-11-18-25
DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP
BY CONTINUING PARTNERS
AND
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
The partnership of Sam Mallen,
H.iri> Mallen, ana Max Mallen, doing
business as Sam Mallen Co. mot Inc.),
MM B.W. "th Street. Miami, Florida,
has been dissolved by mutual consent
on August 25. 1953. Sam Mallen has
retired from the said partnership
Harry Mallen and Max Mallen will
continue the said business under the
same name at the same address and
Intend to register the said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Dade
County, Florida.
S'AM MALLEN
HARRY MALLEN
^-^.n-ir^^
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA. IN CHANCERY. No. 161967
LAN.NII-: BAJBafOREi Plaintiff,
vs.
WILIJE HAISMOltK, Defendant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO: WILLIE HAISMORE.
address unknown.
You are hereby notified that a Bill
of Complaint for Divorce has been
filed against you, and you are requir-
ed to serve a copy of your Answer or
Pleading to the BUI of Complaint on
the plaintiff's attorney, BEN E88BN,
823 Seybold Building, Miami, Florida,
and file the original Answer or Plead-
ing In the office of the Clerk of the
Circuit Court on or before the 21st
day of September, 1953. If you fall
to do so. Judgment v default will be
taken against you for the relief de-
manded In the BUI of Complaint.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this 17th day of August, 1953.
E. B. LEATHERMAN,
Clerk, Circuit Court,
Dade County, Florida.
By WM. W. STOCKING,
Deputy Clerk
BEN E8HEN, ESQ.
Attorney for Plaintiff
823 Seybold Building. Miami, Florida
8/21-28 9/4-11______
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
JOE DEMURO "THE SPAGHETTI
AND PIZZA KING", at 6234 N.E. 2nd
Avenue, Miami, Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County. Florida.
CARMRLA DEMURO
KESSLER & GARS
Attorneys for Applicant
1782 W. Flagler St.
8/28 9/4-11-18
IN JCOUNTY JUDGES' COURT
""DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
No. J9333
RE: ESTATE OF
MORTON SAM FAGAN, Deceased
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR FINAL
DISCHARGE
NOTICE Is hereby given that I have
filed my final report and petition for
Final i>i.-. Marg, as Administratrix of
t),,- sstati of MORTON SAM FAG w.
d; and that on the 22nd daj
of September, 1W8, I win anpl) In the
ii ble W F BLANTON, Count)
judge of Dade County, Fiouda. for
approval of said final report and for
final discharge as Administratrix of
the Estate of MoKToN SAM FAGAN,
This lth day of August DM
/ml EVELYN 8 Ii KRSII HE1N,
As Administratrix of the
Estate of
MORTON SAM FAGAN,
deceased
MTERS, HEIMAN KAPLAN
Attorneys for Administratrix
l/Il-M i/l-ll
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN that
the under.dgned, desiring to engage la
business under the fictitious name of
KENNEDY FURNITURE CO., at 3621
N.W. 54th St., Miami, Intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dude County. Flor-
ida.
DAVID MARCUS
MASON FORER
Attorneys for Applicant
129 N.E. 1st St.
8/28 9/4-11-18
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
BELL-AIRB APARTMENTS, at 1034
Drexel Avenue, Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
1036 WASHINGTON AVENUE
CORPORATION
8/21-28 9/4-11
IN COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
No. 28314-B
RE: ESTATE OF
STEPHEN GENCHEFF,
also known as
BTOYAN GENCHEFF,
also known as
8TOIAN GENCHEFF. Deceased
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR FINAL
DISCHARGE
NOTICE Is hereby given that I have
filed my final report and petition for
Final Discharge as Administrator Cum
Testamento Annexo of the est
STEPHEN GENCHEFF, k/a 8TOT-
AN GENCHEFF. n'k/a STolAN
OENCHEFF, deceased: and that on
the Lltll dai ol September. IMS. will
apply t" the Honorable FRANK B.
dowUNO, Count) Judge of Dadw
County, Florida, for approval of said
. port and for final dli chares as
Administrator Cum to An-
ne*., of the Estate ol STEPHEN
OENCHEFF, a k a STOl \.\ GEN-
CHEFF, a k a 8TOIAN GENCHEFF,
decen-cd.
This iMh day of August. MM.
LEO BHBINER, Administrator
c.t.a. of Estate of Stephen
Gencheff," a/k'n Stoyan
Gencheff, a/k/a Stolan Gencheff
SHEINER A SPIELER
Attorneys for
Leon Shetner, Administrator c.t.a.
104 Roper Building, Miami 12, Florida
8/21-M 1/4-11
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
990 BUILDING, at 990 S.W. First
Street. Miami, Florida, Intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Flor-
ida.
LINol.I) CORPORATION
By: Sam Seltlln, President
Attest: R. Louis Seltlln,
Secretary
8/21 9'4-ll-18
NOTICE UNDER f tCTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE Ifl HEREBY GIVEN thnt
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
TROPICAL KOSHER FX>D MAR-
KKT. at KILT, Washington Ave.. Miami
Beach, Pla., Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
JACK 1'O.MERANTZ, Sole Owner
MALVIN ENGLANDER
Attorney for Owner
311 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach
8/14-21-28 9/4
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY. No. 162052
ELLA RUBIN EDGEWORTH,
Plaintiff.
jyC-HARD L.^pbsVr-ORTH,
Defendant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: RICHARD L. EDGEWORTH
You, RICHARD L. EDGEWORTH.
address unknown, are hereby notified
that a Bill of Complaint for Divorce
has been fllet Jfgainst you. and you
are required to serve a copy of your
Answer or Pleading to the Bill of
Complaint on the plaintiff's Attorneys,
KESSLER & GAR8, 1782 West Flag-
ler Street. Miami, Florida, and file
the original Answer or Pleading In the
office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court on or before the 24th day of
September. 1953. If you fall to do
so. judgment by default will be taken
against you for the relief demanded
In the Bill of Complaint.
DONE AND iiRHERED at Miami.
Florida, this 20th day of August, A D.
1953.
E. B. LEATHERMAN,
Clerk, Circuit Court,
Dade County. Florida
By M. C. GREEN
(Circuit Court Seal) Deputy Clerk
g/21-28 9/4-11
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY "GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
coRAl.Y. CORALY LAMPS AND
SHADES, at 21<>l Ponee i Leon
Blvd.. Coral Gables, Florida, Intend
to register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
BENJAMIN KRASNOW
SYLVIA KRASNoW
HENRY M CAIN. Atty.
Mil West Hagler Stie.-t, Miami, Flu.
I/4-11-18-2S
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring ts engage In
business under the flctltlols name of
"FLffRIDA WEATHER-KRAFT
PRODUCTS CO.", at 7301 N.E. Miami
Court. Miami, Florida, intend to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Flor-
ida.
I. ABRAMS
I. PHILLIPS
EDWARD S. RESNICK
Attorney for I. Phillips and I. Abrams
8/28 9/4-11-1S
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
BUPEBJOR MARKET, at 1071 S.W.
8th Street. Miami. Florida. Intends
to register said name with the Ctark
of the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
JENNIE MINTS
lirTNF.Il HUTNER
520 Olympla Bldg.. Miami
8/2S 9/4-11-18
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
BARKER OF MIAMI, at 1038 71st
Street. Miami Beach. Florida, Intends
to register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
HARRIET KERN, Sole Owner
8/21-28 9/4-11
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
M A M C I A W
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious nsme of
KAPPY'S. at 1466 Collins Avenue. Mi-
ami Beach. Florida, Intends to regis-
ter said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Flor-
ida.
KAPKAUF INC.
Samuel Kaplan. Pres.
/2S 9/4-11-18
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
D and I> SUNDRIES, at M01 N\V
17th Avenue. Miami, intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade Countv, Florida.
WARREN A DALRYMPLE
WEBSTER D DAWBON
Sole Owners
KESSLER ,\ OARS
Attorneys for Applicants
\;*-i \\ Flagler Btrei t
V 4-11
PAGE 15 A
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTI.-E IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
FLORIDA MORTGAGE BROKERS, at
MS W. Flagler St., Miami, Int.-n ,
to register Said name with the tie <
of t,he Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
IRVING RUSKMAN
BENEDICT KILVERMAN
Attorney for Applicant
541 Seybold Bldg.
8/21-28 9/4-11
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
VICTORIA ROOMING HOUSE, at 537
S.W. 2nd Street, Miami, Florida, in-
tend to register said name with tin-
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dado
County, Honda
NICK STEF, H Interest
VICTORIA STEF, Vi lntercit
MONROE DIXON
Attorney for Owners
8/21-28 9/4-11
IN COUNTV JUDGES' COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
No. 28218-B
UK: ESTATE OF
OWEN CUNNINGHAM. Deceased
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR FINAL
DISCHARGE
NOTICE Is hereby given that I have
filed my final report and petition for
F'inal Discharge as Ancillary Adm
Istrator, c.t.a. of the estate of OWF. J
( I NN1NGHAM. deceased; and that
the 16th day of September, 1958. I
win apply to the Honorable FRANK;
B. DOW LING. County Judge of I >a ,-
County, Florida, for approval of sa:rl
final report and for final discharge
as Ancillary Administrator, c.La. of
the Estate of OWEN CUNNINGHAM,
deceased.
This 18th day of August. 1953.
/s/ LBON KAPLAN
Ancillary Administrator, c.t.a..
Estate of
OWEN CUNNINGHAM.
deceased.
MYERS, HEIMAN & KAPLAN
Attorneys for Ancillary Administrator
MO Seybold Bldg., Miami, Fla.
- 9/4-11
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN th>-
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name
NORTH DADE PLUMBING SERVICE
at 12400 CrotOn Road, Keystone !'.:
Miami, l>ade County, Florida. Intel I
to register said name with the C
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun;>,
Florida.
M W. PHILLIPS. JR.
RICHARD KRIBOER FINK
Attorney for Applicant
112 Congress Building, Miami, Floridx
v n-a 9/4-11
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN tht
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
JONATHAN POST OF FLORIDA.
431 Lincoln Rd. and 7128 Collins Av,- ,
Miami Beach, Florida, intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County. Floi li
DANIEL H. I1KRMAX
ALBERT I.. ROSEN
Attorney for Daniel H. Herman
740 71st St., Miami Beach, F'la.
8,21-M 9/4-11
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HKRKBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
QUINIELA BAR, at *35 N.W. 37Ui
Avenue, Miami, intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of I>ade County. Florida
ARCH IK B. and
SOPHIE VLERBBOMB
KESSLER GARS'
Attorneys for Applicants
4 S.W. 22nd Ave.
8/21-28 9/4-11
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HKRKIIY GIVEN th:.*
the undersigned, desiring to engage i'i
business under the fictitious name of
PENNY POST OF" F'U'RIHA. at var-
ious locations In Dade County, Flor-
ida, with Its principal place of busi-
ness, at 7128 Collins Avenue. Mlano
Beach. Florida, intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County, Floridj..
DANIEL H. HERMAN
ALBERT L ROSEN
Attorney for Daniel H. Herman
740 71st St., Miami Beach. Fla.
8/21-28 9/4-11
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
Tka J.wlsh noridlan S4>-
Batte year laxjal notice*.
Wt 6jnppgvctaM> yom
puti ouatja and tjuaroaV
kaa) occuraW S4MTlOe> logo] rota*. Phona 2-1141
MB maasangar aarrlcvt.
SEITLIN & COMPANY
PERSONAL
AND
COMMERCIAL
COVERAGES
PHONE 9-3836
IS N. E. las ST. MIAMI St. FLA.


PAGE 16 A
*-J^isHhrkMaiT_
FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER
11. 19
W^i
Food Fair wishes the
entire Jewish
Community a Happy
Prosperous New Year
Now 25
Air Conditioned Food Department Stores
to Serve You
MAYFAIR CALIFORNIA STYLE
COTTAGE
CHEESE
2 29c
FOOD FAIR IS
ALWAYS YOUR
HEADQUARTERS
FOR
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NEVER FROZEN WISCONSIN
fresh
Caught
Cleaned
and
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CARP
lb.
Also a complete selection of Fresh
Water Fish including Pike, Buffalo
Carp and Whitefesh
BLUE RIBBON B. S. CHOICE BONELESS
ROUND ROAST B
69
BLUE RIBBON U.S. CHOICE
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U.S. No. 1 CALIFORNIA
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Only Eight
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I r <> s h I if S I i v v d
BEEF
L I V E R lb 39c
U.S. No. 1 Quality
TOMATOES 2 ctns. 29c
INSTANT Regular 1.55 Value
NESCAFE COFFEE
6-OZ.
JAR


jsh *>* and patro
. ponl Hair Stylist
** phpn. 48-15
jWCEHE HOLIDAYS
OHEET1HGS
FROM
Inormandy
SCHOOL
L20 HUBERMAN
1021 BiairiU Drire
PHONE 86-6811
MIAMI BEACH
Th Jgwislhr FhMrWBkMn
^^^^^^^^nanrnrna ** ir r ii irc/ ii ii ^n ii icPmia
MIAMI FLOrUDA
FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 11. 1953
SEC. E
TO
SEASON'S


dr. W. H. ELLIS
39 R 13th Street
Miami, Fla.
PHONE 3-3453
GREETINGS
We Specialize In
Hotel Contracts
* Custom Finishing
* Sand Blasting
Tropical Retinishing
Dade
Refinishers
5002 E. 10th LANE
HIALEAH. FLORIDA
Phone 88-6846
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
AAA
LETTER SERVICE
Offset and Job Printing
Mimeographing Multigraphing
130 NX 2nd AVENUE
Phone 9-0041
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Paterno
GREETINGS
HI
C. H. LYNE
|Foundry and Machine
Company
(not inc.)
Established 1904
105-109 N. W. Fifth Street
Phone 3-6481
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
SHOREHAM NORMAN
Hotels & Villas
Ocean FrontFifth to Sixth Sts.
Miami Beach
N. Liebling, Pres.
H. J. Stupell, Mgr.
INSURANCE FOR ALL
DMMERCIAL & INDUSTRIAL
REQUIREMENTS
Phone 3-5761
Phones 3-5761 3-4311
901 N.E. 2nd AYE.
TO ALL GREETINGS
Weber's
!* Cream Company
* N.W. 2nd AVENUE
Phone 9-0483
Greeting.
Iw 0ui Many Jewish Friends
*ad Patrons
MUTH FLORIDA
LIQUOR
DISTRIBUTORS
INCORPORATED
8.W. ThW Street
PHONE 2-7M4
Nate's
Yacht Rania

1884 N. W. Norm Hirer
Drive
Phone 24017
JERRY & MACK
RADIATORS
Cleaned
Repaired A
Exchanged
(New or Used)
ALL CORES MFG. 4
GUARANTEED IN MIAMI
By JERRY & HACK
2034 N. W. 2nd Are.
PH. 2-4735
BEST WISHES
FOR A
MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
PROVIDENT JEWELRY
and
LUGGAGE COMPANY
24 N. Miami Avenue
SEASON'S GREETINGS
GREETINGS
*
SINCERE WISHES
TO
ALL MY
JEWISH FRIENDS
W. CECIL WATSON
Clerk of Criminal
Court
i
HART ELECTRIC
ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS
RESIDENTIAL INDUSTRIAL
COMMERCIAL
154 RE. 13th St 3-13f
LOUIS
e e e
Your Hairdr
WHERE
INDIVIDUAL
SERVICE
IS GIVEN
Beauty
SALON
1735 CORAL WAY
SPECIALIZING IS ALL
BRANCHES OF BEAUTY
CULTURE
PHONE 48-4328
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
TO ALL MY FRIENDS
Dr. # E. Carlson
3129 Coral Way
Miami
Phone 4-9012
GREETINGS
TOM DUPREE
REAL ESTATE
741 Dade Bird.
MIAMI BEACH
PHONE 58 5224
t
A HAPPY NEW TEAR TO ALL
OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Folsam Printer v
Social Stationery
Commercial Forms
50 Years' Experience
900 LE JEUNE ROAD
MIAMI
Phone 48-9389
George W. Foisom


PAGE 2 B

iigLS[u'
MR. AND MRS. SAMUEL fRIEMAND
and Family
WISH THEIR RELATIVES AND FRIENDS
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
ALBERT HAUER JACOB L. LEVINE
AIRCARGO BROKERAGE CO.
Custom House Brokers and Forwarders
Pacixic Btdg. : Phone 9-2396
Symbolism of the New Year.
HAPPY NEW YEAR
COLLINS GARAGE
24-HOUR WRECKER AND MECHANICAL SERVICE
6901 N.W. 7th AVENUE PHONE 84-2591
115 S.W. 2nd STREET PHONE 3-7308
To All Happy New Year
I mm ison Service & Repairs
Restaurant Equipment
3450 N. Miami Ave.
Reliable Experienced
Phone 3-7270
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
C & A Sales Service
World's Greatest Public Sealing ValueSamson Folding Chain
also Church Pews and Furniture
2973 N.W. 17th AVENUE. MIAMI
PHONE 82-4275
Al Powell. Manager
A HAPPY AND"pi6sPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
BISCAYNE-SOUTHERN PRINTERS
JOB AND COMMERCIAL PRINTERS
605 S. MIAMI AVENUE
MIAMI
Phone 3-8041 Nights 64-9821
Mr. and Mrs. Eddie Schaefer
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO
ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
ZION FOOD CENTER
1429 WASHINGTON AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH. FLA.
Phone 5-3418
PHILIP ROMER SAM SUSSMAN
__ *MMM""~--------iiinsiia
GIERSCH ENGINEERING CO.
CONSULTING ENGINEERS
AND LAND SURVEYORS
3104 CORAL WAY
Telephone 83-7080
By Harry Cushing
Jewish Tcltgraphic Agency
Rituals and ceremonials have been for thousands
of years part of the Jewish religion because of the
effort to bring the existence of a spiritual and
therefore invisible God before the minds of the
people. Because Jewish law forbids a pictorial repre-
sentation of God. the Jewish people have developed
an intricate system of rituals, signs and ceremonials
as symbols and reminders of God's omnipresence.
Viewed from that perspective, many of the cus-
toms which at first glance seem to be relics of a
superstitious period are actually the impressive
signs of a God Who is merciful, just and interested
in the works of Hfs creation.
The observances of Rosh Hashonah and Yom Kip-
pur are couched in much symbolism and ceremonial.
There is much spiritual preparation even before
the actual celebration of Rosh Hashonah. In fact,
the entire month of. Elul, which precedes the Hebrew
New Year, is dedicated to special supplications, and
penitential prayers are recited in the synagogue.
On the first day of Elul, at the end of the morning
services, there begins the blowing of the Shofar.
The Shofar blasts at the conclusion of each morn-
ing's service signifies that the season of penitence
is near. The prayers in the synagogue are said with
deeper fervor. There are extra Psalms to be recited.
Pious Jews put in more time studying the holy
books.
The solemnity of the month of Elul is evident
especially in the cemeteries where visits are made
to the graves of relatives and loved ones. Visiting
the cemeteries and praying before the graves dur-
ing crises go back for centuries. In Chassidic com-
munities, it was the custom to visit the graves of
Chassidic Rabbis and leave slips of papers upon
which were penned petitions and requests.
Generally, the attitude has been that the prayers
expressed at the graves of righteous ancestors would
serve as intercession on the theory that Z'Chut Avot,
the Merits of the Fathers, help their descendants.
These visits to the cemeteries and praying to the
dead have become so popular in modern times that
a special liturgical collection has been created and
is known as Ma'aneh Lashon, the Answer of the
Tongue. The name of the booklet is based on the
verse in Proverbs 16:1: "The preparations of the
heart are man's, but the answer of the tongue is
from the Lord."
A product of the seventeenth century, the Ma'aneh
Lashon has appeared in many editions in the past
three hundred years, including German, Yiddish and
English translations. A sequel to the Ma'avar Yabok,-
which is a manual of the ritual of death and burial
and includes also prayers on visiting graves, the
Ma'aneh Lashon specifically contains prayers to be
recited at the grave of each relative.
The month of Elul is climaxed with a series of
S'lichot or Supplication services which begin on the
Sunday preceding Rosh Hashonah. The first S'lichot
service is held on Saturday at midnight before Rosh
Hashonah. After that, the services are held early
each morning until the holiday.
Historically, the first penitential prayer was of-
fered by Moses when he asked that Israel be for-
given for the sin of the Golden Calf. (Exodus 32:11).
The Psalms of David include numerous penitential
prayers. However, it was the Men of the Great Syna-
MM
.;*
/
A..
At Kfar Zkenim, a Yemenite Jew reads I
Seier Torah, the ancient Scroll of Law,
gogue who fixed the daily recital of the sp
penitential prayer, S'lach Nah, which is part of j
daily Shmoneh Esrei or Amidah prayer.
Later, during the Geonic period, the S'lichot |
the week before Rosh Hashonah wore intr
The first printed S'licha Book was published I
Soncino in 1487, and the second was published!
Prague in 1529.
One of the prevalent customs connected with j
Jewish New Year is the sending of Rosh
greeting cards. These cards usually carry the Heh
inscription. LShanah Tovah Tikasavu V'sach
May You Be Inscribed And Sealed For A
Year. Known by their shorter name as Sh
Tovah cards, they express the wish that the recipij
be written down for a year of health, happiness i
contentment.
The text of the Jewish New Year greeting!
based on the belief that God judges all manh
on Rosh Hashonah that the fate of each
is written into the great Book of Memorial on
"Hashonah and the final decision is sealed on
Kippur. We find the first reference to such be|
in the Mishna where according to Rabbi
"Three books are opened on Rosh Hashonah.
is for the out-and-out wicked, a second for
truly righteous and a third for those in betwej
The righteous are at once inscribed and sealed!
life; the wicked for death. Judgment of the tn
group is suspended until Yom Kippur. Should
of that group attain merit during these days, hj
inscribed for life, otherwise for death.'' (Rosh
shonah, 16-A-B).
It is the contention of Isaac Hirsch Weiss in]
famous work. Dor Dor V'Dorshav, (Book ID.
156) that Rabbi Judah ben Ilai was the one
Continued on Next P*9
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
TO ALL
D.W.McCOY.Inc
REAL ESTATE
In All Its. Branch**
1549 S. W. 8th Street
Phone 9-2245
TO ALL A MOST
HAPPY HOLIDAY
CITY AUTO
PARTS
Morris and Bill Zuckannan
41 79 N.W. 20th St
Ph. 9-1457
Best Wishes To All
pino Hair Stylist
1057 WASHINGTON AVE.
Miami Beach Phone 58-4478
ONE GRADE FUEL OIL
Clean Economical
BOILERS OIL BURNERS
REPAIRS INSTALLATIONS
Serving MIAMI BEACH
At Any Hour Radio Dispatched
AMBER FUEL OIL
INC.
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New Year Greetings To
* QUALITY
* SERVICE
MIAMI
BAGEL
BAKERY
Telephone 2-2498
1999 N.W. 17th A>
MIAMI 35. FLORIDA


SEPTEMBER 11. 1953
+Jewish flvrkiiari
Rosh Hashonah 5714
i
CntiB-d from Prscedliif P9
the idea that Rosh Hashonah was the
udpnent. This idea of Judah ben tlai, one
important Tannaim, was not entirely
hout a thousand years before the Jews
wuhed their kingdom under David, the
already regarded their New Year as a
udement. However, Rabbi Judah was the
,be Jews to conceive that idea.
J contention is quite correct because in the
nubbi Akiba the idea of a Day of Judgment
Hashonah was not yet prevalent among
For according to Rabbi Jose, "a man is
[J*ry day," and Rabbi Nathan theorized that
\b judged every hour." -
Bosh Hashonah is a Day of Judgment,
ent against an evil decree was carried
food customs of the holiday. It is the
[tTeat sweets and avoid sour foods. This
jes back for more than a thousand years
Lentioned in the Responsa of the Gehonim.
| of honey is usually on the table during the
I Reals of Rosh Hashonah and for the meal
,the Yom Kippur fast. The honey spread on
| t the beginning of each meal is symbolic
for a sweet year.
Rosh Hashonah is the Day of Judgment,
j also the custom in many communities to
bead of some animal, usually that of a
Tfor the head represents leadership. Eating
head of a sheep implies the hope that
I not descend the ladder of misfortune but
[continue to succeed and be a leader.
i the most characteristic ceremony of Rosh
is the symbolic observance of Tashlich.
[first day of the holiday, just before sunset.
Ions are formed to the banks of a brook or
id the final verses from the Book of Micah,
! with the words, "And Thou wilt cast all
liquitTes in the depths of the sea," (7:19), are
b. Crumbs of bread, symbolic of broken prom-
> God and sin, described in the Talmud as "the
pio the dough," are thrown into the water. The
Hten reference to the Tashlich custom may
comment, in the Antiquities by Josephus
|10 par. 23) when referring to Halicanassians'
[ permitting the Jews to "perform their holy
ording to the Jewish laws and have their
I prayer by the sea according to the custom
fathers."
I Zohar, too, probably refers to the Tashlich
ny when it says that "whatever falls into
P. is lost forever ... it acts like the scape-
r the ablution of sins." (Zohar, Leviticus 101A
[interpretation that the Tashlich ceremony is
1 based on the verse in Micah does not please
ny authorities of Jewish religious lore theo-
t the custom originated rather as a reminder
nam and Isaac. The Sefer Maharil, which
I in 1425, gives us the first direct reference
iky the Midrashic legend of the Sefer Haya-
i customis explained as a reminder of the
the Binding of Isaac incident
[* legend, which also appears in Midrash
~ (Vayera 22), Satan made a wager with
'Abraham would not stand the test to offer
1a sacrifice He, therefore, made a con-
tort to hinder Abraham in every way.
>jrbBf Sataj^ajw tiat Abraham was determined to
carry out God's command, he threw himself across
Abraham's path as a deep stream. Abraham and
Isaac nevertheless plunged into the waters even up
to their necks. They prayed for divine aid, where-
upon the river disappeared.
The Gaon of Vilna concurs with the opinion of
Rabbi Jacob ben Moses Halevi (Maharil) that the
Jews go to a stream on Rosh Hashonah to remind
God of the merits of Abraham and Isaac and
through them win favor for their descendants.
The ten days between the beginning of Rosh
Hashonah and the end of Yom Kippur are known
as the Ten Days of Repentence. Special penitential
prayers are included in the regular prayers. The
Sabbath between Rosh Hashonah and Yom Kippur
is known as Shabbat Shuvah or the Sabbath of
Repentence. This Sabbath is more solemn than the
other Sabbaths of the year, and the Rabbi's sermon
is usually a special effort to arouse the people to
true repentence.
Just as the Tashlich ritual is a characteristic cere-
mony on Rosh Hashonah, the Kapparot ceremony is
a significant feature before the observance of Yom
Kippur. The persistence of a custom which holds
an appeal for the masses, even though the highest
authorities have opposed it, is found in the cere-
mony of Kapparot, performed two days before Yom
Kippur.
Much older than the Tashlich ritual, the Kapparot
ceremony was popular among the Jews of Babylonia
in the tenth century. The Responsa of the Gehonim
indicates that in those days the rich Jews used a
ram in the performance of the ceremony, as a re-
minder of the ram of Isaac. Later, a rooster came
to be used. The custom consists of taking a fowl
and reciting certain passages including the following
formulas "This is a substitute for me; this is in ex-
change for me; this is my atonement. This cock (or
hen) shall be consigned to death, while I shall have
a long and pleasant life and peace."
After the fowl is slaughtered, it is eaten during
the meal preceding Yom Kippur. Spreading from
Babylonia, the Kapparot custom was accepted in
many Jewish communities all over the world. Many
Rabbis warned the people against the custom be-
cause of its implied origin in idol worship. For ex-
ample, the custom of swinging the bird around the
head is an attempt to frighten the devil. The en-
circling ceremony is based on the concept of primi-
tive men known as the "magin ring."
In studying the development of the rituals and
ceremonials, it is to be noted that Jewish observ-
ances, including those of Rosh Hashonah and Yom
Kippur, are so many links in that powerful, unend-
ing chain which stretches from the hoary past,
when our ancestors still clung to the beliefs and
superstitions their pagan neighbors have developed,
to the purified and spiritualized ceremonials which
we know today. It was the farsighted Men of the
Great Synagogue and the generations of Rabbis
that followed, who instituted our observances and
ceremonies, intended them to serve as a means of
strengthening the covenant between Israel and God.
The moral and spiritual worth of Rosh Hashonah
and Yom Kippur are hallowed institutions. Through
the lessons they teach they have sustained Juda-
ism's hope in a world that will bring closer the
realization of man's divine mission.
___________________________________________________PAGE 3B
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
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toon* 2-5197
HAPPY NEW YEAR
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^olesalers
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Phone 7-0314
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Distributing Co.
T. T. BUSH
PHONOGRAPHS
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Phone 34623
ABBOTT ELECTRIC. INC.
RESIDENTIAL
INDUSTRIAL
COMMERCIAL
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Alterations of All Kinds.
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PHONE 3-82S4
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OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Twin-City Transit
I .. Ine.
525 ALTON ROAD
MIAMI BEACH
PHONE 58-2292
E. L. Jones. Pres.
M
SEASON'S GREETINGS
CORAL GABLES
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
MIAMI SHORES
PERRINE

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"Protection to Fit Your Risk"
PHONE 9-3426
920 DuPONT BUILDING MIAMI 32. FLORIDA
GREETINGS
THE PATIO SHOP
YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME TO VISIT AND SHOP.
WE AIM TO PLEASE.
3650 Coral Way Phone 48-2920
GREETINGS
BARBER LUMBER CO., INC. t
Courteous Service Good Lumber Reasonable Prices
901 N.W. 71st St. Miami, Florida Phone 7-0417
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
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PACKAGE GOODS AVAILABLE
STEAKSCHICKEN "Visit Our Dubonnet Room"
8727 N.W. Seventh Avenue Phone 89-9227
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9. W. IIW\AC
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Phone 58-2923
For Complete
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CSTAUISHED
l02
FLAGLEH AT FIRST
M*m&er: federal Reserve System Federal Deitoslt Insurance Corp.


PAGE 4 B
+Je*istinorX*an
iSSSLffigau.
GREETINGS
T. S. BUDD
OPTICIAN
122 S.E. 1st Street. Miami. Florida
Phone 9-1451
262 Andulusia Phone 4-0291 Coral Gables
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Shoreland Building
119 E. FLAGLER STREET
MIAMI
PHONE 82-4661
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR
FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Alfred Lesser & Sons, Inc.
420 LINCOLN ROAD
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-7913
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO
ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
George S. Levenson, Inc.
GENERAL INSURANCE
4007 CHASE AVENUE
Phone 58-6553
GEORGE S. LEVENSON JAMES D. LEVENSON
GREETINGS TO OUR MANY JEWISH FRIENDS
EARL V. H1LSOX COMPANY
Merchandise Broken
Miami Jacksonville Tampa
SEASONS GREETINGS
LEONARD T. WILSON AND ASSOCIATES
WILSON ROOFING CO.
SHEET METAL SHOP
1105 Fifth Street Phone 5-9976
1690 Alton Road
SEASON'S
GREETINGS
TO
ALL
OUR
FRIENDS
MIAMI BEACH
BOAT SUPS, INC.
.
1928 PURDY AVENUE
Phone 5-5385
The United States and Israel
By MILTON FRIIDMAN '"*-
Jewish telegraphic Agency
WASHINGTONWill the new administration re-
vise its policy toward Israel? This is the question
still being asked after almost a year of Republican
rule.
Congressional friends of Israel agree that the
United States should be impartial. But they ere
apprehensive lest the administration's pursuit of
what Mr. Dulles described as "impartiality" brings
about developments harmful to Israel.
American support of Israel was not a controversial
issue during the 1952 election campaigns because
both Republicans and Democrats agreed in principle
that Israel had become an important part of the
free world. Both presidential candidates openly ex-
pressed friendship for Israel and devotion to the
Zionist cause. The Republicans, however, cam-
paigned with the sweeping slogan "time for a
change." President Eisenhower's victory found Zion-
ists worried if the "change" would also aply to the
brotherly alliance
developed b y
Harry S. Truman
and his Democra-
tic Administra-
tion with Israel.
The new ad-
ministration took
over amidst re-
ports that Secre-
tary of State
John Foster Dul-
les was preparing
a "new look" in
American policy
in the Arab-Is-
rael area. Mean-
while, the State
and Defense De-
partments con-
templated heavy
munitions ship-
ments to bolster
the government
of Egyptian Pre-
mier Mohammed
Naguib. Despite
President Eisenhower
. found Zionists worried
Naguib's continued hostility against Israel, Egypt
was seen as a potential strongpoint around which
to rally the Arab League against Communism. Na-
guib was praised, and Israel ignored, in "Armed
Forces Talks" prepared for the U S armed services
by the Defense Department. But Egypt Showed an
inclination to flirt with Communism while fulminat-
ing against Great Britain over the presence of
British troops in the Suez Canal Zone. The U S was
forced to shelve its big plans for Naguib.
In February, the eyes of the world shifted to
Israel as the Soviet Union severed diplomatic rela
tions with that country in keeping with an all-out
communist offensive against "Zionists." Israel
turned to President Eisenhower for support as a
free-world ally. There was no answer except in very
vague terms. Dulles asked Congress to tone down
expressions on behalf of Israel and Jewish victims
of Communism. He explained that he did not wish
te give the Arabs
the impression that
the U S was pro-
Israel. Stalin's death
brought a reversal
of Soviet strategy
and diplomatic rela-
tions between Israel
and Russia have
now been resumed.
The State Depart-
ment denied that it
was modifying
American friendship
for Israel. Adminis-
tration spokesman
said that President
Eisenhower was ob-
jectively considering
the needs of both
Arabs and Jews.
But anti-Zionists in
the State Depart-

Secretary DWI
. prepares "
ment found the courage to creep out of their I
One State Department official read an inflan
anti-Jewish speech before a high level Wa_
conference. The conference was made up of i
sentatives of such big business firms as the {,
National Bank and the Arabian-American Oil |
pany. Prepared by Iraqi Minister Abdullah
Bakr, the speech was read on the Arab's
Edwin M. Wright, State Department offle
charge of Turkish Affairs. It questioned the I
of American Jewry and alleged that Jews i
reliable citizens throughout the world.
Anti-Zionists exploited, the "objectivity" ft,
to urge President Eisenhower to appease the]
states at the expense of Israel. Since the Adn.
tion sought desperately to secure Arab coop.,
in a defense command against Communism, itl
urged that Israel be sacrificed for this purpose.]
President Eisenhower listened patiently to bothi
in his own official family, as well as to the fa
representatives of the Arabs and Zionists.
pledged friendship to both Arabs and Jews,.
his Secretary of State took the initiative by |
ning a flying visit to the Near East.
Dulles returned from his trip with a defeiti
titude toward Near Eastern peace His radio:
to the nation on the trip was closely studiedl
clues to future develop
Dulles employed
L^gue^njira^ola H
ferring to "expansionis
onism" without troublii
disassociate himself
such propaganda catch
On the other hand,
acknowledged for the,
time that Arab ee
warfare is being
against Israel But he pr
Dictators Naguib of "
and Shishekly of Syria.)
two principal instigator
the economic warfare
The Secretary of State]
istered in favor of
when he said in the
radio report that the
states eventually would I
to consider Israel as aj
manent part of the
Central N.e.ie
. centinyes keslility
Continued on Page 12
A Happy New Year To AU
Our Friends and Patrons
Star Printing
Service
1391 S.W. 8th STREET
MIAMI
Phone 3-0932
NEW YEAH GREETINGS
WILLIAM E. COOK
930 Eyerglo.de* Concourse
PHONE 88-8041
RENTALS SALES
MIAMI BEACH AND
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*
MR. AMD MRS.
SEASONS GREETINGS
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end Patrons
FOX BRAKE SERVICE
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PHONE 8-2291


S^TEMBERU^W
+Jewls*rkrkto*r
PAGE 5-B
/

NEW YEAR GREETINGS
ARKIN CONSTRUCTION CO., INC.
General Contractors
1827 Purdy Ave. Phone 58-4325
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
**&*> *\
those observing Roah Hashonah 5714
m[ Israel, are (left) an orthodox Jew from
, taught a new handicraft by one of the V
at the Malben Village for the Aged in Ein
Eastern Europe and (right) a Yemenite woman
illage's social workers.
bsh Hashonah (or the Helpless
By Charles Passman
\i\nk begins to settle over the hills of Ephraim,
{procession of whiteclad figures begins to wind
I through the lanes of Ein Shemer, a small
; halfway between Haifa and Tel Aviv, on the
"of the Israel coastal plain. The procession is
irkable not only for its raiment the tradi-
l garb worn by orthodox Jews on Rosh Hashon-
I Yom Kippur but also for the age of those
, Everyone in the long line is more than 60
i old For this is a unique village in a unique
a complete community of aged, all of
l recent immigrants.
most of them, this is the first New Year
i they are spending in the village It has been
Wished by Malben, the Joint Distribution Com-
t's program in Israel. Most of the old folk
| been in the country two or three years. But,
; they had no means and no place to go, until
I they had been unable to leave the tents and
gated iron shacks of the immigrant camps, in
i their more .ortunate fellow-immigrants spent
periods. And, were it not for American
and its contributions to the United Jewish
il. none of the 1,000 aged of Ein Shemer
|ld be able to spend their first New Year's Eve
village that will be home to them for the
| of their lives.
id so in the synagogues of Ein Shemer (there
[four small ones to permit immigrant groups
i all parts of the world to celebrate the high
lays in the manner to which they have been
stomed all their lives) as well as in synagogues
I smaller old-age homes set up by Malben in
' parts of the country a thousand old men
I women are thinking, this Rosh Hashonah, of
Ithose across the sea who have made it possible
I them to find shelter for the evening of their
*lk through these little synagogues would
it the diverse strains in Israel's present popu-
I no less vividly than does a stroll through the
ling streets of Tel Aviv.
I On Shemer, for example, services are held in
the Ashkenazi (Western European) tradition, in
Sephardic style (by Jews from Greece, Bulgaria and
Turkey whose migration from Spain hundreds of
years ago is proclaimed by the fact that they all
know Ladino) and in Yemenite fashion. Walking into
the Yemenite synagogue, one is immediately struck
by a singular phenomenon! that half the men
appear to be reading the prayer books upside-down
or sideways. This does not mean that they cannot
read on the contrary. Their strange ability was
born in years of training in the small cheders of
the desert villages, where books were a rare treasure
and a dozen or more pupils had to share one copy
seated in a circle around their teacher.
Equally striking in their synagogue is the beauty
of the Scroll of Law, written on thick leather with
an ink derived from native plants of Yemen and
inscribed by means of goose quills or other feath-
ers. On the other hand, their womenfolk, seated in
a separate room, are not able to read at all be-
cause, since women do not play an esseetial part in
orthodox Jewish ritual, it was considered unneces-
sary to teach them to read.
Another group of Malben patients who are par-
ticularly joyous this New Year are the residents of
the Jaffa old age home because they have been
able to extend the hospitality of their synagogue to
resident of a nearby housing project for new immi-
grants. Feeling elated that they can offer something
to the younger generation, they have gladly opened
their doors to their new neighbors.
Stories of this kind could be told about Rosh
Hashonah observances at a great many of the hos-
pitals, custodial care centers and sheltered work-
shops which Malben has established for sick, invalid
and handicapped immigrants all over the country
such as the story of wheelchair patients of the
Machaneh Yisreal Hospital, who mingle on New
Year's Day with personnel from the nearby airport
of Lydda, giving to youngsters recovering slowly
from polio a chance to discuss earnestly with visit-
ing airmen the mechanics of jet propulsion.
And the new years also brings hope to the many
Continued on Pago 15
few rear To All Oor
Christ-Croft
Nursery
"W.DIXIE HIGHWAY
HOHTH MIAMI
phone 7-4543
Otto Kuehl
HApPY NEW YEAR
* the Market Affords
UlUuonabla Prices
** Alexander and Family
*. Haxxy let
of the
CASH MARKET
****. m* asa -
"* 17 N. W. lit* St
BEST WISHES
TO MY
JEWISH FRIENDS
M. H. LIPP
GREETINGS TO ALL
Florida Gas
Corporation
"BLUE FLAME
O AS"
6400 H.W. 7th AVENUE
S-1673
Beet WishM For A
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Mr.aidMi%
5227 Alton Road
MIAMI BEACH
E. STBECEER
Truck Body Build#>r
714 N. W. list
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
DOCTORS' CLINICAL LABORATORY
1004 HUNTINGTON BUILDING
MIAMI
Phone 3-6553 H. W. Hamilton. Medical Technologist
TO ALL .
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR

WEATHER-TIGHT COMPANY
PUMPS
1812 NORTH LE JEUNE ROAD
PHONE 64-0731
TO OUR MANY FRIENDS, A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
Davis Boiler & Iron Works, Ine.
BOILERMAKERS AND CERTIFIED WELDERS
Ph. 2-M30 1980 88 N. Miami Are.
Reconditioned Boilers for Sale and Repairs Day or Night Anywhere.
Smokestacks and Tanks.
GREETINGS TO ALL
"The Most Modern in the South"
PLASTERING BY
D'ANGELO PLASTERING CO.
450 N.W. 71st STREET, MIAMI PHONE 19-6924
GREETINGS ARE EXTENDED
WITH THE SINCERE AND FERVENT WISH
FOR GENEROUS BLESSINGS OF
GOOD AND HAPPINESS
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD.
*
RIVERSIDE
MEMORIAL
OHAPEL
MIAMI
Edward T. Newman
FuMTtl Director
MIAMI BEACH
Ab Eisenberg
Treasurer

a


PAGE 6B
+Jeist>rk>rk&w

TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
Leonard's Store
741 N. W. 2nd Ave.
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY
jfj
MARVEL CLEANERS
SERVICE and QUALITY CLEANING
Mrs. Ludle P. Neher. Owner
16 CORAL WAY PHONE 4-1242
To All ... A Most Happy New Year
CHARLES W. HALE, SR.
COMMERCIAL CASUALTY INSURANCE CO.
2012 PONCE DE LEON BLVD. CORAL GABLES
TO ALL GREETINGS
JUDGE FRANK B. DOWLING
Dade County Court House, Miami, Fla.
GREETINGS
Concrete Hoisting
Bar Joists Set
Steel Erected
Clam and Drag
N. POPENHAGER
CRANES
PHONE 83-2652 2$34 LINCOLN AVE.
COCONUT GROVE. FLORIDA
GREETINGS
Phone 2-9457
VENETIAN SERVICE STATION
OTICLAIR GASOLINE GOODYEAR TIRES
Miami, Florida
1504 N. Bayihore Drive
TO ALL GREETINGS
Investors Insurance Agency, Inc.
E. F. CHENAULT R. L. MORRIS V. S. THOMASON
CALL 2-6065
FOR ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE
505 S.W. 8th STREET
TO ALL GREETINGS
RUSSELL HOUSE MOVERS
BONDEDINSURED
"No Substitute for Experience"
PHONE 7-4978
7250 N.W. 1st AVE.
MIAMI, FLORIDA
HAPPY NEW YEAR
The Hantinglon Medical Bailding
UALTOftS
For Office Space
Please Call BuUding
Manager3-2330
AGENTS
A Uniquely American Groui
By United States Senate* Herkert H. Lehman
The 100th anniversary of an interesting, whole-
some and uniquely American activity, the Jewish
Community Center movement, is to be celebrated
with a six-month observance of varied character,
beginning in the fall of this year.
My intimate association with Jewish communal
developments over an all-too-substantial number of
years has made it possible for men to be an eye-
witness to the remarkable growth and stirring de-
velopment of this movement. For a good part of this
period, I was privileged to participate in the work
of several Jewish Community Centers in New York.
In my younger days, I was a member of the 92nd
Street YMHA. My late brother, Irving, who was
FESTIVAL: A magnificent pageant marks
one of the many Holy Days tor Y members
in New York's Academy of Music in 1879.
president of the 92nd Street YMHA and of the
National Jewish Welfare Board, the national asso-
ciation of Jewish Community Centers and YMHA's,
regarded the Center as one of the key institutions
in Jewish life.
Had he lived to participate in the Centennial of
the Jewish Community Center, he would have been
as proud as I am, and as every other American
should be, of the magnificient contribution of the
Center to the enrichment of Jewish group life in
America, the advancement of good citizenship and
the furtherance of the American way of life.
The century since the first Center, the Baltimore
YMHA, was founded, has been marked by vast
epochal changes in the social, political and cultural
life of mankind. During that span, few communities
in history have grown so great in numbers, status
and achievement and inherited such grave responsi-
bilities as has American Jewry. Never in my memory
was there a time when the ideals and objectives of
the Jewish Community Center were more urgently
needed by American Jewry than today.
Since 1854, millions of boys and girls and men
and women have been benefited by Centers. In each
stage of its development, the Center has responded
to. the problems and needs of the time. Whether
the need was for Americanization, vocational train-
ing, physical education, child care or war service,
the Centers were never found wanting. What the
Centers have done and are doing to stimulate lead-
ership among young people is of the utmost im-
portance. In this field, they have been of inestim-
able help in counteracting the loss of spiritual and
cultural values. The Centers, together with the
home, school and synagogue, have M.
down our traditions. In fortifying JJ "
with a sense of inner security and in *
a lasting feeling of Jewish self.idenu"V
Centers have been uniquely success,.
One of the most striking things about J
Community Center is its name. When it Z|
only as YMHA or YWHA, its name had 4 [
character. Today, even those who retain ft 1
out of sentiment and tradition no longer,
young men and women. Centers today are,
by and for the whole community and
whole community. No agency in the )t
munity is more aptly named than the j
munity Center, for in its name is epH
whole program.
It is Jewish in purpose, communitywide J
and service, and it is a center of Jewith
activity.
A unique organizational contribution of
Jewry to Jewish life and to the general
community, the Center is a distinctive n..,
the American Jewish scene. It is committed I
five Jewish survival, to strengthened family J
to the growth of a sound community, its |
foster democratic traditions. A vigorous _
democracy, the Center gives the Americ
those enriching experiences which help
a better Jew and a better citizen and
happier and more useful person.
The manpower and leadership for the |
shattering task of lifesaving and lifeb
J 5
L ^ e m & &* wi
*T' (A
X %
CORNERSTONE LAYING: President
Coolidge (front row, center) witnesses
.monies in Washington, DC marking]
erection of the Jewish Community
there. Photographed in 1925.
which we have all engaged during the last 1
as well as for many other vital community 1
came in no small measure from the human 1
nurtured and trained by Centers. The
American Jewish leadership in our gcnerati
Who's Who of men and women who came out
Centers. The forums, seminars, institutes,
and lectures which constitute so large a part I
Center program have helped mold community I
ing and action on the critical issues of our I
At a time when the nations of the world j
toad to peace thorny. Centers are teaching 1
hundreds of thousands of people of all ages 1
Continued on Page 11
Up-xo-Daie Van Service
LEW M. CISCO
Transfer & Storage
328 N. E. 2nd Avenue
PHONE 14411
AdelmniTs Pipe
St Steel Co.
and
Nathan Adelman
Charles Adelman
Hy < overman
AND FAMILIES
EXTEND TO ALL
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
Efectrehu Mat eed Service
JIM
INMAN
27^ N.E. llth STREET
MIAMI, FLORIDA
MM 3-1464
A Happy and Prosperous Hew tear
To All Our Friends and Patrons
D. Klein
Wholesale Toys
1412 20th STREET
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 58-4161
Dorothy Klein Tuteur
Ernest Tuteur
TO ALL GRr
Dudley M.
CAWTHOti
Store Planning Engii
1301 N.W. 7th A)
MIAMI. FLORIDA
81-1671 Wl|
Hill Refrigerators and|
Market Fixtures
Pufier-Hubbard Hac
Bulman Steel Shelf*
Bko Power Saws
24-HOUR SERVIj


..^rgTMBg 11, ,1953
>Jelst>nHr*&**
PAGE 7g
the Life, of n A
Day in
" Hadassan s oreen
>h'
N
urses
/. r

, firel generation Israelis are the key to
Jewish State's future as the New Year
\ik approaches. Their nurses, like Ruth
hovsky Halevi, make endless sacrifices
| the name of health and medical progress.
By Ruth Lasker
lUch Hadassah's public health nurse go down
I main street of Jerusalem's Mea Shearim, or the
I (market i of the Bukharian Quartet, or the big
ityard of the Hungarian Houses. You can recog-
her easily; she wears a green uniform and
: a big leather case, and it takes her a long
to move on. She is stopped every few feet
Er by an old patient expressing his gratitude or
[i potential one telling his troubles.
M to the cflnto and tall me all about it,"
I the nurse, extricating herself from the hand
|p of a wrinkled babushka. She is cornered a few
farther by an old man who wants injections
Chaim got" Finally she reaches the shabby
I of the first bed-patient on her day's schedule,
we she supplies medication and spreads good
h Alishovsky Halevi is one of Hadassah's elev-
G'reen Nurses who bring medical aid to the
Mants of Jerusalem's poorer districts and near-
nubarot and hill settlements. In' addition to
* visiting nurse duties, they staff a number of
' to which patients iTtek each" day with a
of real and imagined ail'fnentt and with
Mag confidence.
1" ** Israe'. where Ruth works, the people live
"*y lived many decades ago-Jn ghetto-like,
lightless and airless, dilapidated buildings, close to
the Jordan frontier. They took a terrific beating dur-
ing the fighting.
Ruth didn't always work there. In fact, for six-
teen months. Ruth didn't work at all because she
had her own baby to care for. Then she began to
wonder where she would be more useful at home
or in the nursing services and decided that her
years of training as a nurse and midwife at Hadas-
sah's nursing school should not be wasted. Besides,
she was needed.
"If I work," she told her engineer husband,
Moshe Halevi, "and get a full-time maid, we'll prob-
ably neither gain not lose by it financially. But I
can do a lot of good." Moshe said it didn't matter to
him whether she washed baby clothes or donned
her uniform again, so long as she was happy.
So one day last spring, she reported to Hadassah.
"Can you use me?" she asked Rehuma Druckman,
Hospital and District Medical Service chief. Could
Hadassah use this bright slender girl with a reputa-
tion for thoroughness and hard work! Ruth under-
went a month's specialization training. She worked
in various clinics in the city, also in a canvas-hutted
maabara for a while, where conditions were pretty
grim and people had to learn from scratch about
sanitation and hygiene. Then she was transferred to
Beth Israel, the Jerusalem district of yeshiva bocher-
im arid peddlers.
For the past twelve years, Hadassah district
nurses, like Ruth, have been bringing the hospital
to the patient's home.' It' solves a number of proh-
lems: it lessens pressure "on hospital beds arid" in
many Instances makes the patient's illness easier to
bear. Long-term patients are given physiotherapy
and diversional therapy (a kind of occupational ther-
apy). Special attentions, like delicacies and little
pleasures, are reserved for patients suffering from
incurable diseases. If the need is great, the nurse
provides clothes for the children.
More often than not, Ruth has to help with advice
on non-medical problems, for she is trusted. "What
shall I do?" asks Mr. S., a bearded middle-aged man,
whose main occupation is studying the Talmud. He
is in complete despair. "My wife, under the influ-
ence of her wicked sister, deserted me. What shall
I do with the four children?" He used to sell soap,
candles and matches at street corners, when he
wasn't in the beth hamedrash. Then he developed
stomach ulcers and had to stay in bed. Ruth helps
get the children cared for and promises him a fort-
night's "good living" at Hadassah's convalescent
home in the city. After that, he will have to find
light work.
In the next house, Ruth demonstrates by sign
language the old woman speaks only a "Persian
dialect how the daughter, a mental case beset
with bedsores, should be washed each day and placed
oh a rubber ring. The old mother bathes the patient
every day and Is happy when she' sees Ruth smiles
appreciatively. The'husbahd, a part-time grave dig-
ger, is given chits, for'tree mnk'.'
And so oh, from case to case. In each place Ruth
Continued en Pae 12
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO
~ "^LL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
VANDfRBILT HOTEL
2009 COLLINS AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-0761


600 N. W. 10th Street
EXTENDS GREETINGS OF THE SEASON
TO ITS FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Telephone 3-6332
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
OUR FRIENDS
Physicians & Surgeons Laboratory
ONE LINCOLN ROAD BUILDING
MIAMI BEACH
Phone. 5-0287

lHAPPT\\v TEAR TO ALL'
PUR mE\DS AND PATROLS
Magnet Wearing
Apparel Inc.
FASHION MART BLDG.
MIAMI
Phone 2-0191
lH I ,kny Friends and Patrons
Wman Klein
Interiors
745 41st STREET
WJAMI BEACH
phont 58-4633
TO OUR PATRONS
AND FRIENDS A MOST
HAPPY NEW YEAR
NEWTS
PUCE
Top* Seat Coven
Good Work to Not Cheap
Cheap Work to Not Good
"LET NEWT DO IT"
1095 N.W. 36th STREET

Phone 84-7111
BEST WISHES FOR A
A HAPPY HOLIDAY
FLORIDA FUEL OIL
INC.
850 H. W. 73rd Street
Phone 89-1661
GREETINGS!
TRAIL
Tackle Shop
LIVE SHRIMP
Fresh Mullet and Shrimp
"Everything for .the Fisherman'
1715 S.W. 8th Street
Phone 2-9656
A Happy New Year To All Our Friends and Patrons
LESLIE HOTEL
1244 OCEAN DRIVE. MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-3368 Isidore Nutsdorf
BARBARA JANE DRESS SHOP
EXTENDS BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
2121 Coral Way Phone 48-8050
E. SAFER. Proprietor
A Happy New Year To All Our Friends and Patrons
CHASE DRY CLEANERS
' 423', N.W. 24Ih ST., MIAMI
Phon. 2-8862
' 111
.1 Most Happy
New Yemr
To All
JACK C. BINKLEY
CONTRACTOR
1737 11th STREET
MIAMI
ALUMINUM WROUGHT IRON
MADE AND INSTALLED BY
-^
CARUSO IRON WORKS
Manufacturers of Ornamental Iron Work
Rear of Aviation Building
3240 N. W. 27th Ave. Phone 64-6362
. ... i
i


PAGE 8 B
+ y**i*tncr***n
flUPAY. SEPTEMBfr
n*.
GREt^TINGS
FROM
J. R. SPRADLEY & CO.
FOOD BROKERS
18 N. W. 14th Sweet
*
>
Miami. Fla.
TO ALL GREETINGS
U.S. ROYAL TIRES
AMALIE (Pennsylvania) MOTOR OIL
DADE TIRE CO., Inc.
1501 N. MIAMI AVENUE MIAMI. FLORIDA
Phone 3-8445
TO ALL NEW YEAR GREETINGS
Dixie list* Corporation
Moe Longer
405 So. Dixie Highway Coral Gables
Peerless Manufacturing Co.
Manufacturer of
Corrugated Cartons and Cartons lor Fruit Candies
23 N. E. 74th Street Phone 7-0953
Office Supplies. Office Furniture
MR. FOSTER'S STORE
33 N.E. FIRST AVE. PHONE 3-7694
GREETING CARDS ENGRAVING
SEC MANUFACTURING COMPANY
tl N.E. 26th Street
Phone 3-5351
A Happy New Year To All Our Friends and Patrons
J. L. Cleaners Laundry & Tailors
NM S.W. 8th STREET
MIAMI
A Happy New Year To All Our Friends and Patrons
G & R Auio Service
MSI BIRD ROAD. MIAMI
Ronnie Thaler
Phone 4-SS37
GREETINGS
FINCHER
OLDSMOBILE
Inc.
WE BUY SELL TRADE
Buy With Confidence
1740 HE. SECOND AVENUE
Phone 3-8351
The Jewish Year in WashingfeJ
Smator McCarthy
... is he anti-Semitic?
Jewish Telegr.phk Agency
WASHINGTONControversial tactics of Congres-
sional committees concerned with subversive activi-
ties drew the attention of major Jewish organiza-
tions since last Rosh Hashonah. Amidst warnings
from Jewish leaders that McCarthyism was creating
an atmosphere conducive to anti-Semitism, virtually
all major Jewish groups went on record against
abuses of the Bill of Rights.
A by-product of the Republican victory at the
polls last November was the emergence of Senator
Joseph R. McCarthy as chairman of the Senate Com-
mittee on Government Operations. This gave the
Senator sweeping investigative powers which he lost
no time in exert-
ing. He maintain-
ed that he was
solely after Com-
munists, and only
disloyal persons
need fear attack.
But his oppon-
ents felt that he
characterized as a
Communist any-
one who disa-
greed with his ex-
treme right-wing
political convic-
tions.
Elements in
the Jewish com-
munity raised the
question of
whether Senator McCarthy and other members
of Congress who used similar tactics could properly
be considered fitting objects of "Jewish interest."
An affirmative answer came when extremist at-
tacks on religious life were threatened. Rabbinical
and anti-defamation organizations spoke out in un-
mistakable terms.
Many people wanted to know: "Is McCarthy anti-
Semitic?" Some undertook to answer this question
by saying that, if one would use his own standards
of guilt by association, things might look pretty bad
for the Senator. They pointed out his insertion of
anti-Jewish material by Upton Close in the Con-
gressional Record, aid to Nazi war criminals and
efforts to free them from prison, participation in
the anti-Semitic campaign against confirmation of
the appointment of former Assistant Defense Sec-
retary Anna Rosenberg, and the widespread sup-
port given him by the lunatic fringe of anti-Semites
in this country and neo-Nazis in Germany. But no
responsible Jewish organization officially described
Senator McCarthy as prejudiced against the Jewish
religious faith.
The careful and objective consideration afforded
the Senator on the issue of anti-Semitism by Jewish
organizations apparently did not coincide with the
standards he used in judging others. In the course
of a Meet The Press telecast, he hurled charges of
"flagrant anti-Semitism" against Senator A. S. Mike
Monroney, of Oklahoma. Senator McCarthy used as
the basis for his allegations the assertion that Sen-
ator Monroney was guilty of religious bigotry be-
cause he opposed the tactics of two McCarthy aides.
The two aides, whose questionable conduct drew
widespread scorn, happen to be Jews, fc^
bert H. Lehman, of New York, took the floor *,
Senate to defend Senator Monroney while ft,
BTRh and other leading Jewish groups whS
Senator Monroney as a fair-minded
sprang to his support.
Jewish organisations vigorously opposed ci
nism and were anxious that the most effective
possible be taken against subversion. But they f.
and opposed
destruction j
civil liberties
extremists ,
in the guise
opposing
munism, sou*
to blur the vit
distinction
tween fob
and Communisi
A warning I
\ "already the I
rosive
has begun"
which fear
"corroding
_ liberties, tu
Master Ltkmmn citizen agiii
. baa ae seelaaies citizen" was ,
sued in Harry Truman's last major expression
President. Mr. Truman said that "every dimu_
of our tolerance, each new act of enforced
formity, each idle accusation, each demonstr
of hysteriaeach new restrictive lawis one .
sign that we can lose the battle against fear-
inquisition, the star chamber, have no place nil
free society."
Jacob Blaustein. president of the American
ish Committee, told an AJC meeting in Chic
that "few anti-Semites are devoting their efforts i
present to open anti-Semitic propaganda or
assaults on Jews." Instead, he said, "many of
are operating in the disguise of anti-Commu
Mr. Blaustein observed that "We are facing hert|
far more dangerous problem than the old-fashia
anti-Semitic agitationfar more insidious and
more complex."
President Eisenhower sought to avoid confront
Senator McCarthy, but he did take effective
on two issues. They clearly served as rebukes to t
Senator. Jewish organizations, painfully aware <
what followed book-burnings in Nazi Germany, I
encouraged when President Eisenhower spoke
at Dartmouth against American book-burning I
ties obviously inspired by Senator McCarthy.
Senator McCarthy defied even his own con
by seeking to retain an extremist named Dr. J.
Matthews as staff director. President Eisenh
took decisive action. The President informed
National Conference of Christians and Jews of I
disapproval of Dr. Matthews' broad charges of i
loyalty against Protestant clergymen. Dr.
found himself forced to resign. Senator McCx
accepted the resignation "reluctantly." Dr.
thews was the same man who helped Senator
Carthy launch the red-smear campaign against
Anna Rosenberg.
Rabbi Ira Eisenstein, president of the Rat
Continued on Page 11
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO OUR
FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Berson Co.
Wholesale Distributors
Ladies' and Children's Wear
324 W. FLAGLER STREET
Phone 84912
William N. Berson Irwin Labbie
A Happy and Prosperous New Year
fo All Ova Friends and Patrons
Stule Mieautu
10 S.E. 1st STREET
MIAMI
Phone 82-7763
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
GUARANTEE
EXTERMINATING CO.
3211 S.W. 22nd Terrace
Phone 83-3970
A Happy New Year To All
On Friends and Patrons
Flan Vale*
2920 Ponce de Leon MeeL
49-9333
A Happy New Year To Au|
Our Friends and Patrons
Charehil-
Api. Hotel
3801 INDIAN CREEK DRIVE]
Phone M657
Irving Nash David Becker|
A Happy New Year To AU
Owr Friends and Patrons
Fowler A
(solden. In*'.
REALTORS
19 W. FLAGLER STREET
80523


^tnAT smEumjkJM.
*'Jm4si>fturMM+*i
iding
PAGE 9 B
r o.
t'
Israel cities have personality. Considering especial
. tbe small area of the Jewish state, the towns
manifest striking indrriduaHty. Bran the smaller
towns seem to possess their own special character.
In the dark, one can tell the difference between
Jerusalem and Tel Aviv or between Tel Aviv
d Haifa.
Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, only an hour's ride apart,
like children, one of whom resembles his moth-
er's family and the other his father's. Jerusalem
is a Picasso painting. Geometrical designs. Hills
and valleys juxtaposed. Many planes and oftimes
startling colors.
Tel Aviv is a cover of the Saturday Evening Post.
Lying beside the Mediterranean, all in one plane.
Modern. Comfortable. The thoughts you have in
Jerusalem are not the thoughts you have in Tel
Aviv. Nor the clothing you wear. In winter, you
are in your overcoat in Jerusalem, huddling beside
the naptha heater. In Tel Aviv, your white suit
will do and you can go bathing.
Jerusalem is antiquity plus the future. The Wail-
ing Wall, the Tower of David, the streets a panorama
ol the world, monks and priests of all faiths. Rabbis
in kapotes In the cafes sit diplomats, politicians,
men with schemes. Dreamers who will prove to you
that the Lowdermilk plan will bring those lakes to
Jerusalem, which the Bible says are due in the
Great Day.
Tel Aviv is bubbling, throbbing, dynamic. It is
is pragmalic a- the Weekly Portion which Jews read
on Sabbath afternoon. It repeats with Hillel, "If
not now. whonn" It cares not for antiquity and is
not concerned with the far away future.
Haifa is a sister city which has some of the
features of Jerusalem and some of Tel Aviv. Haifa
has the mountain and the sea. Standing in her port,
now being enlarged by funds of Americans sub-
scribed to Israel Bonds, one gets a sense of the flow
of the world. Perhaps this is the great bridge be-
tween the West and the newly awakening giant of
Asia.
"Jerusalem is the city of yesterday, Tel Aviv
[ the city of today and Haifa the city of tomorrow,"
says the epigram Abba Hushi, Mayor of Haifa, talks
of building the broadest boulevard in the world and
i plans a free port for Haifa.
Beersheba, gateway to the desert, five years ago
was a small hash of Arab mud hovels, but it goes
back to the primeval days of Israel's past. It is the
city associated with the patriarch Abraham who so-
journed there attracted by the fact that he found
water there. He dug seven wells, hence the name
Beersheba Henry Morgenthau, Jr., head of the
Israel Bond campaign, visiting Beersheba last year.
Picked up a handful of the yellow sand and let it
Pk slowly through his hand, saying, "This is part
of the fortune of Israel." Not the water, bat the
unds near Beersheba, which have been found rich
kaolin and for a variety of glass-making purposes,
*" the attraction of Beersheba today.
EUtb, farthermost outpost of the Negeb is but
n mfam town yet. but it has the seeds of growth.
" m ls an earlv rising town. At six in the morning,
J^W"* is at work, later in the day, it becomes
vety warm. It is best to take advantage of the
cool of the early morning and knock off later when
the son comas down ia all of IU intensity. The
night, are cool and if the afternoons are very warm,
you can go fishing. Catch a shark or two. At Lake
Kinnereth, .there is sardine ffshtng. It's very differ
ent at Elath. The Israelis have ideas you can do
A HAPPY NEW YEA*jT^. .,..-*
OUR FRIENDS AND PATROlfcT "* ^t***"
11* *m 'm* ._e_
universiTy Laos
CORAL GABLES'
PHONE 4-2523
MR. AND MRS. HARRY MARKOWITZ
and Family
To in in v Bobby Jerry
WISH THEIR RELATIVES AND FRIENDS
A HAPPY NEW YEAR


TO ALL A MOST
HAPPY NEW YEAR
MR. AND MRS. MAX STEVENS
and FAMILY
STEVENS MARKET
5737 N. W. 27th Avenue
N. W. 62nd Street and 27th Avenue


In this young man's features are written the
strength and determination with which Is-
rael's cities will meet the new year. Over-
burdened with economic responsibilities, sur-
rounded on all sides by hostile nations, the
young democracy must be kept strong for
whoever may wish to come. But this young
man is a builder of towns, as well as of the
countryside, and the future lies secure in his
strong hands and sharp axe.
things with sharks. Their skins make good leather
for shoes and for handbags, and they are a rich
source of vitamins. Sharks are tricky, too. Everyone
knows what to be "a shark at cards" means. Per-
haps its a good place for poker players.
Nearby Elath are the ancient coppermines of King
Continued on Page IS
A Happy New Year To All
ur Frier.ds and Patrons
B v Road Hotel
1828 Bay Road
Miami Beach. FU.
* MRS. FRANK HANKER
A Happy Now Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
Lemon City
Drug Store
6045 NX 2nd AVENUE
Phone 78-9770
Frank Zumwalt
A Happy and Prosperous New
Year To All My Friends
and Patrons
Samnei Paltack
, REALTOR
605 Lincoln Rood
Phone 5-1174
A HPPy New Year To All
"r Friends and Patron*
lir*UMii>nv Hotel
iKOCoUina A,
Phoa, 54811
A Happy New Year To All
Oar Friends and Patrons
Miami PrmlMf
Co.
IMS JLW.'llet T
Sincere Wishes
For A
HAPPY NEW YEAR

DELTA
AIR
LINES
TICKET OFFICE 300 NX let ST.
Phone 9-8476
HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
JACK allTSTICE
THE SURFSIDE REALTOR
Ml* Hardieaj Aveaae
PHONE I* 14*4


A Happy New Year To AH
Oar Friend, and Patrons
Marseilles Hotel
1741 COLLINS AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
58-5711
A Happy New Year
To AU Omr
Friend* and Patrons
7Unt& rfmexica*
/tintutet
1635 Cottns Ave.
318 E. Flagaar St.
9*321
I


PAGE 10 B
*Jewlsl>Hor*MM
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER
EMBER 11, 1953
COMFORTABLY AIR-CONDITIONED
COCKTAIL LOUNGE
Old Saratoga Inn
'771h St."and Bisciyne Blvd. npa.JJtt;^'$'21**
'PEN DAILY 4 P.M. TO CLOSING SUNDAY" MOM 12 NOON
DELICIOUS DINNERS
JMELDA HAGERTY, Owner and Operator Plenty of Parking Space
+.'. '
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
I
Mel Warshaw Inc.
JAY ORIGINALS
2100 N.W. 1st COURT
PHONE 9-5614
MIAMI
Mel Warshaw
A KAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
J. Baldi Miracle Mile Beauty Salon
COIFFURE DESIGNER
330 MIRACLE MILE
CORAL GABLES
Phone 4-2565
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
OUR FRIENDS AND CLIENTS
LANGFORD BLDG.
121 S.E. 1st STREET
MIAMI
Fkcne 3-2933 Joseph J. Schauers. Mgr.
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
INTERIOR DECORATORS
Fine Furniture
732 41st STREET
MIAMI BEACH
GREETINGS ON THE NEW YEAR
ACE LETTER SERVICE, INC.
116 N. E. 6th Street Phone 3-8486
Miami. Florida
To Aii...
A Most Happy
Xeu- Year
[
13th FLOOR SECURITY BUILDING
PHONE 82-7581
Here is the future-of Kiriath Bialistock as the New Year 5714 approaches. The settlement in
the Galilee Hills is named in horibr of the famed Polish city. These youngsters, most of them
born while their parents were fleeing from tyranny, will inherit the land a land made
fertile by Israel's pioneers.'"
The Battle Against Erosion
By DR. WALTER C. LOWDERMILK
Today, civilization is running a race with famine;
and the outcome is still in" doubt. Any country that
does not grow its own food is in a precarious posi-
tion iii the world, for the United Nations has not yet
guaranteed access of all countries to needed raw
materials for industries or to feed'their peoples. No
mistake is beitig made then when national and
private effort' is concentrated on the growing of
foods and fats for survival of the" State.
With the long misused and damaged soil of Israel,
to ransom the soil is not enough. For many years,
besides redeeming the land, the Jewish National
Fund has recognized and has carried out works of
reclamation t o
prepare the land
for settlement.
But only a begin-
ning in this good
work has been
made. For the
task of making
full and suitable
use of all kinds
of land, of rain
waters that fall
on them and of
waters in streams
and underground.
is a complex and
challenging un-
dertaking. The
time has come to
take a took at the
job ahead in the-'
light of Soil and
Water Conserva-
tion.
Land and jts use with conservation then, is the
foundation for survival of the State'. Mow to use the
Jr. WeHtf C. limJtrmilk
. .*. ceasarvetiea apart
land to the best advantage is an urgent problem.
Instead of finding a primeval land of forests and
grass lands and clear streams full of fish, the pio-
neers of Palestine found a land with its hills denud-
ed of trees and of soil, with the sand dunes advanc-
ing inland, with lowlands in pestilential marches and
its grass lands eaten into the ground by goats and
camels. The rolling land cultivated in patches to
grains showed marks of heavy erosion. Only the
hillsides that had been terraced in ancient times
with stone walls and had been kept in repair had
held their soils in place. Here, old olive trees are
still growing and producing the staple crop of olives
The older settlements have not been so seriously
afflicted with sou" erosion as newef settlements and
the great area of abandoned lands hastily ploughed
up and sowed to grain. For one thing, many of the
older settlements were located on flat or gently
sloping land where hazards of erosion are low or in
the rocky hills where the original cover of soil has
already for the most part been washed away. It is
on new plantations, on the hastily ploughed up lands
and on the steeper lands on which many new set-
tlements are located that soil erosion is now serious-
ly destructive.
Works called for in a soil conservation program.
necessary to safeguard and to increase productivity
of the lands of Israel, are included under three
groups of activities. It includes the classification of
many kinds of land for the most suitable uses with
adequate protection in use. Some kinds will be most
suitable for cultivated crops, some for orchards and
vineyards, some only for pasture and open range,
some only for forests, some for public parks, some
for cities and some for industrial sites. Together
with this type ot land elassrficstton are prescribed
the' ways by which the land when so used must be
safeguarded against wastage especially by soil ero-
sion.
Other activities include the design, layout and
-
Continued en Pe#e 14
DAN CHAPPELL
1004 Biscayne Building
A Happy New Year To All Our Friends and Patrons
Adore Mieautu Salon
SIS W. 41ft STREET. MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-9713 Mrs. May Pridgen
TO ALL .
SINCERE GREETINGS
IGLOO, INC.
For WESTTNGHOUSE
OF MIAMI
Phone 48-4534
2614 S.W. 8th STREET
2636 S-W. 8th STREET
Hartley's
Aul Top Shop
The Bast In Material* and
*"r "rkTncnfhip
1234 N.E. 1st Avenue
Phone 34997
GREETINGS
HoghJ.
Canny
AUTO TAG
AGENCY
6001 N.W. 7th AVE.
RICHTERS
JEWELRY CO.. Inc.
160 E. Floatar Street
PHONE 3-2197
DULANEYS
of MIAMI BEACH, be
FOOD MARKET
411 W. 41st St Pk 5*441


rwlDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1953
+ lf~itinr,r+*Tr
PISI EVENTS OF THE JEWISH TEAR III WASHINGTON
PAGE 11 B
Cintinued from Page I
Assembly of America, called on all Rabbis to op-
pose the "terror and intimidation" spread by the
McCarthyites. "According to Jewisbatraditions," said
the Rabbi, "the
true prophets
were always
those who spoke
the truth regard-
less of consequen-
ces. As leaders
of our people, we
must uphold the
sacred right to be
different. We
Jews have most
to lose from the
unchecked forces
of conformity as
we have most to
gain from free-
dom, from the as-
sertion of indiv-
iduality."
Senator McCarthy aimed insinuations of disloy-
alty at Senator Herbert H. Lehman and others who
questioned his methods. The charge against Sen-
ator Lehman was that the New Yorker made "il-
legal" use of Senate free mailing privileges be-
cause he mailed out a speech critical of Senator
McCarthy Senator Lehman said he had no apology
to make, for he had only used the same mailing
privileges available to all other members of Con-
gress. Comparing McCarthyism with Fascism, Sen-
ator Lehman told the Senate that Senator McCarthy
seeks to intimidate into silence those who are afraid
to take a chance of being attacked.
Comparing Professor Albert Einstein with the
Prolttfr Eimttfim
, compared with C
lets
Communists, Senator McCarthy described him as
"an enemy of America." This language was familiar
to the great scientist who was offered but declined
the presidency of Israel. To Professor Einstein, it
was all somehow reminiscent of a political fanati-
cism he had once fled.
Rabbi Bernard Mandelbaum, dean of students at
the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, told
an inter-faith conference at Charlottesvllle, Virginia,
that American freedom is threatened with "spiritual
paralysis" because "the McCarthys, Jenners, Mc-
Carrans and the like invoke the name of democracy,
but defy fundamental religious propositions." Not
only did the national organizations of Orthodox,
Conservative and Reform Rabbis adopt resolutions,
but the entire National Community Relations Ad-
visory Council, embracing Jewish groups from coast-
to-coast, went on record.
The issue was met squarely by Henry E. Schultz,
national chairman of the Anti-Defamation League
of Bnai Brith. "In the ADL," Mr. Schultz said, "we
had had a unique opportunity to watch the profes-
sional bigots, the super-patriots, the dark reaction-
aries, under the pretense of fighting Communism-
striking not at Communism, but the free institutions
which have made America great. Such a coalition
faces us with a constant threat, for it gives sanction
to bigotry and provides an atmosphere in which or-
ganized anti-Semitism can play upon the fears of
people. With the shadow of war over us. the danger
of acute, violent anti-Semitism is always present."
There was no question but that American Jews,
like other Americans concerned with preserving
freedom, are worried lest Congressional investigators
destroy the very liberties they avowedly seek to
protect.
THE HISTORY OF II UNIQUELY AMERICAN INSTITUTION
Continued from Pass 6
classes how to live and work and play together. In
Centers, young people have found that there need
be no lost generation. One of the most remarkable
things about the Jewish Community Center is that
it has always been hospitable to all approaches to
Jewish life and a bridge Unking every phase of
Jewish life. A platform for all views, the Center is
a veritable community crossroads.
This I regard as highly significant. Organizations
whose programs strengthen emotional security, in-
spire faith in democracy, and help allay fears and
ease tensions are an invaluable asset to our national
welfare at any time. In these crucial times, they
are an indispensable element in our arsenal of free-
dom. The organized leisure-time-group activities
made possible by Jewish Community Centers play
an essential role in affording wnolesome releases
from the anxieties and tensions and fears that beset
every home and every family and svsry community
under the pressures to which we are subject.
Children and old folks, whose needs are too often
neglected in a crisis, find the Jewish Community
Centers particularly concerned with their recrea-
tional and social problems. Young people perplexed
and uncertain about tomorrow, find renewed cour-
age and inspiration in the Center program. As bread-
winners take defense jobs or go on active military
uty, the Center plays a significant part in helping
o maintain family stability. The educational pro-
wof the Center is a great asset in shaping
public opinion and action at a time when an in-
formed, alert and intelligent citizenry is a critical
necessity.
Centers now serve a large and evergrowing num-
ber of people of all ages in hundreds of communi-
ties. The opening of new buildings, enlarging pro-
grams and spheres of service, expanding staffs, big-
ger budgets, growing membership, the wider use of
outdoor facilities and camps, extension of service
to all age groups and all neighborhoods these are
evidences of a vital, progressive movement that is
demonstrating a unique capacity for meeting new
needs and anticipating them. Through the World
Federations of YMHA's and Jewish Community Cen-
ters, the movement is spreading its beneficient in-
fluences to the rest of the democratic world.
"~^
wnn smut coo* wishes roK iviir happhkss thkough tot yiat
Anthony and Mary Beantu Salon
310 72ns STIEfT
PHONI I* 4623
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
AVANTS NURSERY
FLORIST SHOP
FASHIONS IN FLOWERS
4475 S. W. 8th Street Phone 4.7949

GREETINGS
Gulf Stream Frozen Foods, Ino.
QUICK FREEZING COLD STORAGE
MIAMI KEY WEST
26 NX 27th St. Phones 82-2671 82-2672
WWWW-WA.
^*<*"''^'*<*'* ADULT EDUCATION: An evening claw in
English meets in the early '20's at New York
City's 92nd Street Y.
A Happy New Yea* To All
Our Friends and Patrons
State Wide
Exterminating Co.
Et 1 t 3 4
7662 N.W. 17th PLACE
MIAMI
Phone 84-3242
A. V. Burchneld
T 0ur P Happy New Year
** and MRS. JOE WENGER
WEN-DIX
F"d and FertUUsr Supplies
12W7 N.E. 14th AVENUE
NORTH MIAMI
A Happy Ne*
Our Friends
Year To All
and Patrons
Advance
Press, Inc.
CREATIVE PRINTERS
152 S.W. 1st STREET
MIAMI
Phone 2-8014
A. B. Carter. Prea.
CORINNE'S
HOUSE OF NEEDLECRAFT
7969 N.E. 2nd AVENUE
Little River Arcade
Telephone 84-3209
Beaded Bag Supplies. Bwsds
sad Trimmings Knitting
Crocheting Supplies
Gifts Made To Order
Free Instruction All Samples
on Display for Sale
GREETINGS!
Imps" Clark
GOLF PROFESSIONAL
Biltmore 8r Granada Courses
Lessons by Appointment,
Complete line of Golfing
Equipment
Phone Biltmore 4-0*49. 48-M10
Granada 48-9909. 4-9143
A Hsppy Nsw Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
Aee-U-Drive, Inc.
1031 5th. STREET
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-7029
Samuel Feingold
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Bruce G. Dodd
Owner and Operator of
AIR LINE CATERERS and SUNSHINE SANDWICH CO.
PHONES 64-9811 88-4817

A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Wieder of California Inc.
Women's Apparel
1433 N.E. MIAMI PLACE
MIAMI
PHONE 3-0555
Sam Wieder
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
KAUFMAN PRESS
Printing Offset Mimeographing
150 NX 3rd STREET
In Rear of Arcade
PHONE 2-3587
Joseph Kaufman
GREETING S
GULF BUM TitII SERVICE
3529 N. E. Second Avenue
Phone 3-4113
GREETINGS
FRANK J. ROONEY
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
5880 N. E. 4th Avenue
Phone 7-6895
/


PAGE 12 B
A HAPPY NEW. YEAR TO ALL
CUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
VAGABOND CLUB
(Closed now but re-opening in December)
732 BISCAYNE BLVD.
Phone 2-1598
HENRY M. NEYLE. General Manager
*Je*i&ikiML
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER U. 1953
THE WITEISTITES WD BUELMHBlt
A Happy and Prosperous New Year To All Our Friend, and Patrons
FLAMINGO DRESS SHOP
818 LINCOLN ROAD. MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-4901
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Pkcne 9-5921
A. R. TILE, INC.
Manufacturers of
CEMENT DECORATED FLOOR TILE"
Miami. Florida
2131 N.W. 8th Avenue
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Bonfire Restaurant
HICKORY ROASTED FOOD OVER OPEN BON-FIRE
1700 N. BAY CAUSEWAY
79th Street Ccnwway
Phone 84-4451
Sam Winer Abe (Sparky) Nissenbaum
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Mam-Zel's Fashions
WOMEN'S APPAREL
RESORT & CRUISE WEAR
2308 COLLINS AVENUE
Phone 58-3961
Sfs
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO
ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Abbe Venetian Blind, Inc.
263 N.W. 5th STREET
MIAMI
Phone 9-9751
Continued from Poe 4
Eastern community. However, he referred in anoth-
er portion of Ml speech to "the area presently con-
troUed by Israel.- This phrase strongly connoted
the Arab Leagues refusal to recognize the legality
Of permanence of Israel's borders.
A conspicuous policy shift was indicated when
DuJIm .-aid th.it M>me" Arab refugees "could be
resettled in the area presently controlled by Israel."
The Truman Administration, about two years be-
fore, abandoned the mass movement of Arab ref-
ugees into Israel as unfeasible and undesirable.
Arab leaders insist on mass repatriation to Israel.
They have cruelly prevented the rehabilitation and
resettlement of their own people in the wide ex-
panse of Arab territory. The return of huge num-
bers of Arabs to Israel is an impossible proposal
because the returnees would become a powerful
fifth column ready to destroy Israel in the event of
renewed Arab aggression. Because Dulles revived
this main point of Arab League policy, the Arabs
were encouraged to resist United Nations resettle-
ment schemes and otherwise continue their recal-
citrant attitude toward Israel.
Essentially, the Eisenhower high command put
foremost among the goals of its foreign policy the
allaying of the Arab world's "deep resentment" of
American support of Zionism. The administration's
intentions were set forth by Dulles who said that
henceforth an "impartial" policy would be applied
to Israel. He explained that he feels that the Arabs
"are more fearful of Zionism than of Communism,
and they fear lest the United States become the
backer of expansionist Zionism."
Powerful elements within the administration tried
and are still trying to convince President Eisen-
hower that we must ally ourselves with the hostili-
ties of the Arab states in order to win their friend-
ship. This line also maintains that
we must forfeit Arab friendship if
we help Israel. The American Zion-
ist Council answered that it would
"not help any of the peoples of
the Near East if we punish one
people or state to appease an-
other."
The Zionists found little logic
to the argument that American
support of Israel has cost America
the goodwill of the Arabs and that
we would regain that goodwill if
we were to reduce aid to Israel.
Arab antagonism against Israel
feeds on the hope that the United States will yield
to this propagandathat a change in administration
in Washington would mean a decline in American
aid for Israel. Some day, the Zionists hope, Arabs
will come to understand that Israel cannot be liquid-
ated by propaganda, economic boycott and intimida-
tion. Then, they feel, there will be a chance that
informed and progressive Arab elements may bring
peace after realizing that the real enemies of the
Arabs are poverty, disease and feudalism rather
than the people of Israel who hold out their hands
in brotherhood.
Dulles indicated during Congressional considera-
tion of Mutual Security legislation, including aid for
Israel, that a regional approach to the Near East
including common projects might reconcile Arab-
Israel differences. The Zionists felt that he was
less realistic in proposing arms shipments to the
Arabs when there is no present indication of peace-
ful intentions on their part. In fact, Jordanian raids
across the Isrfel frontier were increased to the ex-
tent that Israel formally requested the State Depart-
ment to intercede.
Congress, as a whole, responded to Israel's needs.
Israel took aid reductions similar to those applied
against other nations. But there still seemed to be no
clearly defined policy toward the Near East as the
new administration moved toward the end of its
first year in office. There was hope of understanding
and realism. But there was also fear that the Arabs
might interpret vacillation as a cue for an intensi-
fication of anti-Zionism.
Tr
, fritndlineif
Capt. E. V. Rickenbacker
President and General Meneeer of -
Eastern Air Lines
joins with the entire EAL Family
in wishing our good friends a
Very Happy New Year
l DAY IN THE LIFE OF
Continued from Page 7
unpacks her leather bag and places sterilized sy-
ringes, bottles and bandages on a neat plastic cloth
she brings along, unfolds a white apron and sets to
work with quick, quiet movements. Ten to fifteen
visits a daysome patients visited twice daily-
then back to the clinic to prepare for the doctor
and to assist him. In between, the card index must
be kept up to date, orders must be written for con-
valescence, materials and medicines from the spec-
ial pharmacy which Hadassah maintains for welfare
cases.
One of Hadassah's eleven Green Nurses is sta-
tioned at the Rothschild-Hadassah-University Hospi-
tal. She maintains contact with the patients' fam-
ilies, and, if the patient is a breadwinner, sees to
it that wife and children have enough to eat.
Once the patient is ready for discharge, the nurse
of the district is alerted to maintain post-hospital
care, and the hospital physician turns over his rec-
ords to the district physician. Thus the recuperating
patient Is in safe hands. Neither ignorance nor
passivity will prevent his full recovery, because
both the doctor and the Green Nurse serving bis
district will watch over him.
Ruth keeps watch over her own family, too.
Jacki, the blonde two-year old, is well looked after
by the young Egyptian maid. By the time Mosbe
comes home around 5 o'clock, Ruth has already done
the shopping and carried her purchases up the
seven flights of, stairs. There is rarely enough elec-
tricity for the elevator.
And there is even a small surplus each month,
for trained nurses had their wages upped recently.
That makes Ruth extra proud. Every now and then,
with a grandiose gesture, she offers to take Mosne
out in the evening to a movie or dinner. "And pay
for a baby sitter?" asks Moshe. "Oh no. the dear
old ladies next door (one is 73 and the other 80) are
happy each time we step out so they can watch over
their pet Jacki."
Lucky Ruth, good baby-sitters are hard to come
by, even in Jerusalem.
A Happy Hew Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
Flora*
Heautu Salon
1457 DREXEL AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
'Phone 5-7561 Misa Flora
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
ark A Shop
I'harmafy
2503 N.W. 37th STREET
MIAMI
Phono Mim
Albert Zeitzew
A HAPPT NEW TEAR TO ALL
OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
RONNIE'S DRUG
STORE. Inc.
2200 COLLINS AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
Phono 51-2442
Ronnie Ellis
A Happy Hew Year To All
Our FriesKta and Pstrow
II in*t Fharmaey
027 N.W. 7th AVENUE
MIAMI
Phone W-40M
Raymond Hinst
A Happy Now Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons -
Service
Plumbing .
10 COLLINS AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 51 1379
A*mll*wToToAl>
Our Friends and ?
Taylar 9rmg C*
100 7 Let STREET
MIAMI BEACH
Phone l-W


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11. 1953
**WfsV>raMfr*7
PAGE 13 B
Producti6W!Greets the Year
With Progress in Commerce
By HENRY MORGENTHAU, JR.
It is interesting to reflect, as we prepare to cele-
brate the New Year, on the depth and extent of the
changes wrought in Israel since the young nation
celebrated its fuwt Rosh Rashonah as an independent
State five years ago. Our own lives may have seen
great changes in these five years, but for the Ameri-
can Jewish community as a whole the amount of
change has been small indeed compared to the his-
toric developments in Israel, and indeed to the very
changes in Israel's natural landscape.
The most outstanding change in Israel is of course
the fact that this year 700,000 more Jews will be
celebrating Rosh Hashonah there than five years
ago This central fact, the hundreds of thousands of
new settlers who have been welcomed to Israel to
rebuild their lives and to build happier lives for
their children, has affected every area of life in
Israel, from agriculture to industry, from explora-
tion and pioneering to commerce and transport.
This Rosh Hashonah finds Israel's farm population
almost doubled, with more than 330 new settlements
founded in the last five years. Several hundred
thousand acres are now under cultivation by people*
who had no prior farming experience but are now
doing their part to help feed Israel. Israel's farmers
produce enough vegetables to keep the market abun-
dantly supplied, and just about enough fruit. Local
livestock feed production has made great progress:
five year- ago. barely 40 per cent of the feed requir-
ed was grown in Israel, but today, with- twice as
much livestock to be fed, 70 per cent is produced
in Israel.
With the coming year, however, Israel's agricul-
tural planners look to development of the country's
water resources to make possible the irrigation of
larger and larger areas of the nation's farm land.
Aided b> Israel Bond dollars, the irrigation program
has already made possible the introduction of a
number of new crops, and the country's agricultural
base is king broadened more and more.
On thf industrial front, Israel greets the New
Year with confidence that she is becoming one of
the most important industrial and commercial cen-
ters of the Middle East. She is justly proud of the
fact that leading American firms have established
Plants in the country, including Kaiser-Frazer, Phil-
co. the Jerusalem Shoe Corporation (equipped with
General Shoe Corporation machinery). General Tire
and Da) ton Tire and Rubber.
With the inception of the State of Israel Bond
drive in the United States nearly two and a half
>ears ago, Israel's industrial activity spurted for-
'rd, aided by a flow of investment dollars for basic
wonomir development projects. Factory construction
"w gone ahead at an accelerated pace, with Haifa's
Nesher Cement plant now producing 400,000 tons
of cement per year, and the two new plants of the
Shimshon cement factory, already producing cement
at the rate of 300,000 tons a year.
American purchases of Israel Bonds have speeded
the construction of the new plants of Fertilizers and
Chemicals, Ltd., Israel's largest industry. Utilizing
the vast phosphate deposits of the Negev desert.
Fertilizers and Chemicals is well on its way toward
producing all the chemical fertilizers needed for
Israel's agriculture. In the coming year, expansion
of this plant with the aid of Israel Bond investments
will make possible the export of ammonium sul-
phates, superphosphates and potassium sulphate.
New industries have brought in their wake new
urban developments, with Israel's three major cities.
Tel Aviv, Haifa and Jerusalem, expanding to be-
come the homes of textile factories, flour mills, food
processing plants, machine shops and other enter-
prises. Haifa Harbor's facilities have been enlarged
to increase its capacity as Israel's largest port from
1,300,000 to 4,000,000 tons a year. In addition, such
ancient settlements as Beersheba, a few years ago
only a sleepy Arab village and now the industrial
hub of the Negev, have mushroomed into new
frontier boom towns.
The Negev itself has been the scene of the most
dramatic changes. This forbidding desert area, five
years ago an unexplored wasteland, is now the site
of around-the-clock exploration, research and mining
Continutd on Ntxt Pag*
Glass in numerous forms is now being pro-
duced in Israel as part of the expansion of
all elements of the country's economy under
the impact of American investments in the
State of Israel Bond Issue. A glass blower
shapes a beaker.
A Hippy Ntw Year To All
Ovr Fri.ndi and Patrons
llondlx
Lannderland
2268 S.W. 8th STREET
MIAMI
for Prompt Pick Up and
Delivery Call 48-4510
HAPPY
HOLIDAY
McAllister Flower.
"8T M with Flowers
ut Say H with Oufs"
GREETINGS
Phone 3-8758
CHARLES SEVERO, Mgr.
Est. 1922
Empire Employment
Agency
CULINARY AGENCY OF
FLORIDA
714 N. E. First Avenue
LICENSED AND BONDED
Specializing in
HOTEL, RESTAURANT AND
CLUB EMPLOYEES
TO ALL .
GREETINGS
Mrs.

V. C. PLUMMER
A Happy Ntw Yoar To All Our
Friends and Patrons
Alma
Beauty Salon
403 WASHINGTON AVE.
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 58-1735
Alma and Rudy
A Hippy Ntw faor To All Ofr
frhmd* mmi Pofroas
BISCAYNE TERRACE
DRUG STORE
340 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD
MIAMI
Phono 9-9M7
Rose and Jack Zwick
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEArTTO
ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Mount Royal Manor
The Shi ii tier ma II*
6061 COLLINS AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 86-1451
* '

PROMPT SERVICE
K-W APPLIANCE SERVICE
Phono 4 9822
SALES AND SERVICE
640 S. W. 22nd Avenue
SEASONS GREETINGS
DALLETT'S
GARAGE AND SERVICE STATION
340 Twenty-third Street

..
PHONE 5-6721
MIAMI BEACH

TO ALL GREETINGS
AMERICAN TERRAZZO & TILE CO.
1915 N.W. Miami Court
Phone 9-3601
To All Happy New Year
GARY of MIAMI, Inc.
Morris Greenwald
5 S. W. 2nd AVENUE MIAMI. FLA.
TO ALL .
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
RUBBER INC.
Charles T. Spencer
159 N.E. 29th STREET
PHONE 3-6201

A Happy and Prosperous New Year to all Our Friends and Patrons
Spie and Span Laundry
12535 W. DIXIE HIGHWAY, NORTH MIAMI
1*317 DIXIE HIGHWAY, NORTH MIAMI BEACH
Phono 7-4W4 Benjamin GollOT

A Happy and Prosperous New Year To
All Our Friends and Patrons
Alum A Lock
Awning & Shatter Co.
AEMJMimJM AWNiNG
SHUTTERS
3595 N.W. 54th STREET
Phone 64-0671
NATHAN WALBERG. Pros.
..


PAGE 14 B
*Jmisii#fcr**V7
FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER
H.1953
i
TO OUR MANY FRIENDS AND PATRONS
- A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
MARIO HAIRDRESSER
Hair Si ylis t
537 LINCOLN ROAD Phone 5-3481
Branches at the Algiers Casablanca
Lombardy Sherry Frontenac
MIAMI BEACH
GREETINGS
DRAKE & DRAKE
Carpets Linoleums Workroom and Installation Service
3825 N. W. 2nd Are.
Phone 7-2021
GREETINGS
When Gilts are in Order a Lasting Gift from
The ORCHID PATIO
Orchid Plants for Home or Garden Culture
1075 N.E. 79th STREET MIAML FLORIDA
Open Sundays PHONE 7-3641 Visitor* Welcome
WE SHIP ANYWHERE IN THE U.S.A.
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Central Press, Inc.
Established 19 19
Fine Printing
We Satisfy the Most Critical
108 N.W. 1st AVENUE
PHONE 3-7611
LONG DISTANCE MOVING New York Chicago Los Angeles
PART LOADS DIRECT SERVICE
We Own and Operate Our Own Fleet oj Moving Vans
PHONE 3-0625 FOR ESTIMATE
AMERICAN VAN & STORAGE
2125 N.W. 1st COURT
GREETINGS TO ALL
y
U. S. PLASTERING COMPANY
PLASTERING LATHING STUCCO
TO PLEASE YOU
NO JOB TOO SMALL OR TOO BIG
Phone 2-8115
1736 S.W. 6th Street
Miami. Florida
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR
FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Robinson-Weinberg Co.
ROYAL ASCOT
144 N.W. 23rd STREET
MIAMI
PHONES 2-1109 2-0784
TO ALL .
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
from
Tri-City Electric Co., Inc.
2900 N.W. 7th STREET
THE VIGOROUS BATTLE AGAINST EROSION OF THE LAND
Continued from Pafle 10
stakeout of the ground according to contours, of
measures, works and prescriptions for conserving the
soil and rains that fall on it and for bettering the
productivity of the soil by drainage or by irrigation.
The most important of these measures against wast-
age of soil are designed to control and to conserve
storm waters. They are also the most urgent. Well
protected and managed forests generally give us
good control of storm water and soil erosion on
hilly lands. But in Israel, the problem of soil wast-
age by soil erosion is far more acute on cultivated
fields and pastures. Overhead sprinkling, unless
properly regulated, may also cause erosion of bare
soils.
The young applied science of soil conservation
has much to offer the Israel Government and the
Jewish National Fund in making full use of all
kinds of land of the country. This new technology
now has a backlog of experimental information and
practical experience that can be of great help to
Israel, in improving its methods and practices in the
use of land.
A number of worthwhile and important ctivities
that arouse popular interest have been promoted by
the Jewish National Fund. Foremost among these
are afforestation, with a specially strong appeal,
drainage and reclamation of pestilential swamps, the
rebuilding of terrace-ways and the clearing away of
stones to get at the soil. This work must be the
basis for the full redemption of the land of Israel.
Soil conservation must be the basis of an important
appeal for support of this historic, ennobling and
prophetic venture of the redemption of Zion.
In my studies of the past thirty years in many
lands to discover how man may work out a lasting,
or if you please, a righteous adjustment to the Good
Earth, I find that land is more than an 'economic
commodity. Land is life. It is a part of a state as its
people are. Nowhere is this truth better demonstra-
ted than in Israel.
Israel, while working in its own interest, is be-
coming a pilot area in building both on misused and
erosion-wasted lands a demonstration of how a people
may reverse the long decline that has blighted the
cradle of western civilization from the Garden of
Eden until today. Restoration of these old lands is
necessary' in the full redemption of the land by
Israel. But in doing so, the people of Israel are
showing the way to poverty-stricken and under-de-
veloped parts of the world that now comprise fully
1,500.000,000 people, how to earn some of the good
things of life, too. These areas now are a seed bed of
social unrest and violent revolution that endangers
the peace of the world. The Jewish settlements fur-
nish a pattern for the release of the energies and
capacities of so great a number of the world's popu-
lation. These settlements may well be studied to
this end.
Let me repeat what I first offered over the radio
in Jerusalem in 1939 as the Eleventh Commandment
which I dedicated to the good work of the Jewish
liflr
-letflements, then existing, in rebuilding the wasted
lands of Israel. It follows: XI. "Thou shalt inherit
the Holy Earth as a faithful steward, conserving its
resources and productivity from generation to gen.
eration. Thou shalt safeguard thy fields from soil
erosion, thy living waters from drying up, thy for.
ests from overgrazing by the herds that thy de-
scendants may have abundance forever. If any shall
fail in this good stewardship of the land, thy fruitful
fields shall ^become sterile, stony ground or wasting
gullies, and thy descendants shall decrease and live
in poverty or perish from the face of the earth."
PRODUCTION HAILS
1HE NEW YEAR
Continued from Preceding Page
of mineral treasures which hold the promise of new
wealth for Israel. Here the partnership of the Amer-
ican Jewish community and Israel's pioneers, as it
has found expression in the Israel Bond drive, has
borne perhaps its finest fruit. Israel Bond dollars
have aided in the opening up of the hidden resources
of the Negev and have revealed the existence of
phosphates, copper ore, glass sand, manganese and
other important resources.
The year 5714 will inevitably see a large-scale in-
crease in the exploitation of the Negev's riches, in
addition to the progress that will be made in Israel's
cities and on her farms. It promises to be a year of
feverish activity and industrial progress, if the
tempo of American investment can be maintained
and increased, and a year in which Israel will con-
tinue to demonstarte to the world the inexhaustible
wellsprings of Jewish vitality and creativeness.
Milk, a scarce commodity in Israel, will soon
be available in increased quantities to meet
the needs of the young republic's expanding
population. The Tnuva Dairy was recently
completed at a cost of 1,000.000 Israe
Pounds. With Israel Bond funds, the plant
will soon be able to operate around the clock.
To All
Greetings
MRS. OSCAR BLASIUS
1688 Meridian Ave.
Miami Beach
EGETABLES
ITAMINS
ICTORY
ELEFEKER
PRODUCE CO.
1215 N.W. 21st St. Ph. 3 8795
GREETINGS
American Pharmacy. Inc.
744 N. E. 2nd Are. Ph.3-4665
Marshall's Drug Store
653 N. W. 62nd St Ph.7-1202
Marion Drug Store
1701 Coral Way Ph. 4-7621
Rockmoor Pharmacy
5901 N. E. 2nd Arm. Ph. 7-2011
Red Bird Pharmacy
5725 Bird Road
GEORGE P. KARNEGB
ROYAL BAKING
COMPANY
601 N. W. 7th Street
A Happy New rter U Mil 0t
fritmii 4 NMM
Barkin Envelope
Mfg. Co.
2740 S.W. 28th LANE
MIAMI
Phone 83-7598
Harry Barkin
GREETINGS
THE
CORNEL! COMPANY
ROOrWa It SHEET METAL
4100 H. W. 2tth Street
Phone 64-0676



gTOAYjSEgTEMBER 11. 1953
-7^ r UlUll
+Je*is*fhrkfr*n
. i.
PAGE 15 B
MSNU FQH ISRAEL'S HELPLESS PEOPLE
Continued from Pag* 5
who are still waiting for their turn the thousands
of aged, the hundreds of invalids and the handi-
anped workers. For Malben is building new homes
for old folks, expanding its facilities for those who
need institutional care and seeking new ways and
means of integrating those with permanent handi-
caps into the economic life of their new country.
It is just over three and a half years since Malben
was founded. In this period, no less than 35,000 new
immigrants have benefited directly from Malben
j^yjjes by receiving hospital treatment, often
for prolonged periods, by attending one of the out-
patient clinics which supply orthopedic appliances,
artificial limbs, spectacles, dentures and even motor-
ized tricycles for the legless and paralyzed, or by
entering a custodial care'center for chronic patients
or one of the ten old age homes for the thousands of
old folk who came to Israel with no money and no
one to welcome them.
The landmarks of the past year are: the abolition
of waiting lists for TB patients no mean achieve-
ment considering that a known 4,000 TB sufferers
have entered the country since 19W, at a time when
exising bed capacity for TB patients was only 500;
the completion of the largest TB hospital in the
Middle East, which Malben established at Be'er
Yaacoy and opened in stages from mid-1951 onward;
and the opening of a unique institution a home
for aged, chronic TB patients who, while able to
walk about, cannot mingle with the community at
large because of the danger of infection, yet do not
need hospital care.
Another milestone was the official inauguration
of the Ein Shemer Village For The Aged, a com-
plete community of a thousand old immigrants. Its
facilities are being further extended so that an-
other 500 aged will soon be able to leave their tents
or corrugated iron huts in immigrant camps, where
they may have spent up to three years since their
arrival in the country. Life in the Village For The
Aged will mean for them not only an improvement
in accommodation but a move to what will be their
home for the rest of their lives, integration into a
permanent community and the chance to be as
useful and productive as their physical condition
permits. For nearly all the work of the village
from vegetable growing to bookkeeping is done
by the residents themselves.
The changes in Israel's economic climate that have
taken place of late have increased the difficulties of
integrating into the economy those immigrants with
Permanent handicaps who might have found work
'hen all labor was at a premium. These are the
Wind, victims of trachoma, the Oriental eye-disease;
the hundreds suffering from several internal diseas-
es contracted in concentration camps or as the result
of starvation and miserable housing conditions in
Oriental ghettos; and the many amputees, cripples
m partially paralyzed who form a grave problem
even in a more absorptive economy.
Malben therefore has had to redouble its efforts
o find work for them, to establish additional shel-
wred workshops where they can be given jobs
suited to their physical condition, and to extend its
constructive loan project, under which those able
to operate small shops and services with the aid of
their families receive long-term loans and training
to enable them to establish such enterprises. No
less than 2,000 families have been rehabilitated by
this project, while 500 handicapped workers, in-
cluding more than a hundred blind, have now been
found employment in twenty sheltered workshops.
Thus, to thousands the past year has brought
health, work, or a place for the evening of their
lives. But to thousands of others it has meant mark-
ing time, waiting impatiently for their turn to come
in the long list of those still awaiting treatment and
services. Some 5,000 aged are still in immigrant
camps; hundreds of invalids need care and atten-
tion, and 3,000 handicapped workers long for the
chance to become useful citizens.
The new year offers hope for many of them.
Malben is already constructing two large new homes
for an additional 1,000 aged, which will bring the
total nurtiber of old folks under Malben care to well
over 3,000. Another custodial care center is nearing
completion, new workshops are planned and under
construction.
To thousands throughout Israel, Rosh Hashonah
5714 thus begins a year which may bring them the
security and the happiness which have been denied
them for so long.
A BLENDING OF THE
PAST AND THE FUTURE
Continued from Pago 9
Solomon, discovered by Dr. Nelson Glueck in the
course of archaeological research.
Elath has become a quasi official testing ground
and laboratory for the conquest of the desert. Here
scientists are testing flowers and plants suitable
for the Negeb. Elath boasts of a unique Desert
Museum.
Caesaria, once famed for its amphitheatre and
Hellenic lavishness, is rising from its ruins destined
apparently in its present reincarnation to simpler
splendors as a fishing center. A huge fishing wharf
has been completed.
Tiberias, to whose health-giving spas the Romans
travelled in ancient days, is another town destined
to greater growth. Safed, in the Upper Galilee, has
a beauty all of its own and it, too, is developing a
peculiar uniqueness. For long associated as a veri-
table capital of Cabalistic and mystical Judaism,
today it has become a rendezvous for Israeli artists.
Indeed, there are many things wanting in Israel,
but individuality seems not to be one of themat
least as far as towns go.
FOLLOW THE CROWD
COTTAGES
The Cockalorum
Restaurant & Bar
OPEN
8:30 A.M. to 4:00 AM.
Phon. 81-67190
Mknal 3. Florida
GREETINGS
*
CARSON'S
MOTOR INN
AUTO REPAIRS
Phono 2-3586
502 N. E. 2nd Avenue
BEST WISHES
W. A. GLASS
Happy Holiday To All
|j
Williams Optical
Dispensary
Complete Eye Glass Service
1218 N.W. 3rd AVENUE

TO ALL .
A MOST HAPPY
NEW YEAR
Acme Cabinet
400 N.W. 24th STREET
Phono 94197
*-=
A HAPPY 'AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO
r ',
ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Surfside Gulf Service Station
9401 HARDING AVENUE
Phone 86-2324
FRANK AYLOR

TO ALL .
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
Universal Chemical Mfg. Co.
Bring Your Chemical Problems To Us
2780 WEST FLAGtER STREET
MIAMI. FLORIDA




GREETINGS TO ALL
COMMODORE noTl I
Where the Guest is Boss
II NX. 8th Street phone 2-9827
>-
A Happy New Year To Ail Our Friends
Super Service Dry Cleaners and Laundry
3890 Bird Rd. at Ponce do Loon Blvd.. Coral Gables
Phono 4-6752 Harry and Colia Cohen, and Son Robert
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL

1
MR. AND MRS. DAVID STUZIN
TO ALL .
HAPPY NEW YEAR
RED COACH GRILL
1455 Biscayne Blvd.
PHONE 9-4008
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Hildreth Printing Service
Commercial printing
34 E. NINTH STREET
Uti Tl HIALEAH
PHONE 88-7621
M. William Hildreth
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
AIRLINE BRAKE & WrtEEL ALIGNING CO.
3701 N.W. 36th STREET
A Happy and Prosperous New Year
To All Our Friends and Patrons
KENILWORTH HOTEL
Open Ail Year
OCEAN FRONT AT 102nd STREET
BAL HARBOUR. MIAMI BEACH
Phone 86-2711
F. A. Sheahan. Mar,


PAGE 16 B
-Jewish/******
""DAY, SEPTEMBER n
BEST WISHES FROM ...
DWYER'S METAL SHOP
1329 N.W. 74th Street Thaam 78-4551
HOTEL AND RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT REPAIRS
TO ALL GREETINGS
HENRY A. POHL. INC.. Stale Distributor*
GRAY MARINE MOTORS
CONTINENTAL INDUSTRIAL ENGINES
GASOLINE and DIESEL
410 N. E. 13th Street Phone 2-1577
ATLAS
Rug Cleaner*
Meving and Stera#e
54 N. E. ?th St.. Miami. Ph. -7J
Local and Lang Diatanca Mown*
AGENTS: BMVVAN LINE*
s on OPEN and SHUT
CASE-
open
...they provide ven-
tilation & controlled
air flow.
...they become un-
obstructed picture
windows.
Waterproofed vone ends
Closing force is equally distrib-
uted. Balanced vones prevent
binding, assure simple operation.
Florida State
Exterminating Co.
MR. AND MRS. BEN NIREN
EXTEND BEST WISHES FOR A
HAPPY NEW YEAR
503 Meridian Avm. 5-0219
Miami Beach
PORCH or I iEZEWAY
^m^
\lOU*'c
4525 PONCE DE LEON BOULEVARD
Phone 67-5681
To All ...
I Mo*1 Happy
\ew Year
ATLANTIC
MILLWORKS
A. B. CLARK
7636 RE. 4th COURT
Phone 78-6763
AHAPPrmwYm
p I 953*5714
fro
vx
^
LI j-**t tmt m. Ubtlu Jrii
We wish all our friends and
patrons and all the Jewish
people a year of health,
happiness and prosperity
Vof .. smokt OLD GOLDS

AHEAD
THE HAPPIEST NEW YEAR EVER
Each new year, our Electric Age brings forth more
modern electric convenience*. And each new year,
more people use more Sunshine Service Electricity.
That's why Roddy's Company is building and planning
additional power units. And that's why you can
depend on Sunshine Service to bring you .
gSjfr
I FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY
*"^*VV
*"V~WV

"^^V
K"V



m ft, 1~ *ow M"*
>ELMAN FAMILY
M4 *H#H'
"l 0L FHIEND8 AND PaT.ONS
Beauty Craft Salon
|185,UoxAT...Mi.iB^eh
h,j.71l3 Mrs. Bertha M. Levy
A
HAPPY
NEW YEAR
TO ALL
DR. and MRS.
IG I. ROSNICK
and Family
HAPPY NEW YEAR
TO ALL
Bancroft Hotel
1501 Collins At*.
MIAMI BEACH
To All...
A Most Happy
V#?ir Yvar
MOORE
FURNITURE
^ BEST THROUGH
THE AGES
, *12 N. E 2nd AVENUE
i^ewiyiif!te>iEiidliigun
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends and Customers
Mr. and Mrs. Beck oi the
APEX CLEANERS & LAUNDRY
MIAMI. FLORIDA
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11. 1953
SEC. C
David Surprises his
Father on New Year
Lundy's Market
1435 Washington Ave.
Wish Their Friends end
Customers
A VERY HAPPY NEW YEA11
By WARREN ADLER
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
David lay fully dressed on the cot in the front
room of the canvas house. He did not want to go
out. Instead, he stared blankly at the makeshift
roof through which shafts of bright sunlight darted
downward and played along his legs.
"David," his mother called from the vegetable
garden in front of the house. He hesitated, not
wanting to answer, content with the silence of the
small room. Only the zip of the sprinkler in the
garden intruded upon his thoughts. "Why don't you
come out and get some sun?"
He had had enough of the sun, he thought. The
image of the heavy globe of fire that hung like a
yellow balloon in the sky above the settlement made
him close his eyes with disgust. He had fought
this sun with his heart, he told himself. He had
fought it as David had fought Goliath, as Jacob had
fought the angel, and now he could not stand the
sight of it.
"How long can this go on?" his mother asked,
poking her head into the entrance of the house, her
eyes saddened with concern. He turned his face
toward the canvas wall.
"This is very silly, David. Your father and I are
very disturbed." Then when there was still no
answer: "Don't you care if we're disturbed?" Bend-
ing over the cot, she put a cool hand on his fore-
head. Then, when he did not stir, she shook her
head and went back to the vegetable garden. He
was sorry that he did not answer his mother. But
he was afraid that the first words to come out would
be followed by a torrent of tears. He could do noth-
ing right, he told himself. Now the whole Shuval
knew all about what he had done. "Hah, there goes
the great planter," they would call after him if they
saw him. But they would not see him. He would
stay put right here on the cot and they could call
him what they wanted. Maybe it would be better if
he went back to Tel Aviv.
In Tel Aviv the family had had a little apartment
always heavy with the smell of fish. His father had
worked as a mechanic in a bicycle repair shop, and
when he went home he would sit for hours on the
little terrace overlooking the narrow noisy street.
His father seemed always to be brooding about
something. Even the lines on his face had arranged
themselves into a sad expression. "I have lived in
cities all my life," he would say. "In Roumania.
Now in Israel. Do you remember Roumania, David?"
A faded image of an old house in a wider street,
with the clip clop of horses' hooves going past at
night floated by. He had not answered then, shrug-
Continued on Page 13
UMZ JUNCTI
MAURA WtiT
RtrM vmw
NATAWT*'
/
urrttHoaMUA
SHIFAYM
MtWUYA
TO ALL .
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
DERBY BAR
AND PACKAGE STORE
915 Washington Avenue
MIAMI BEACH
A Happy and Prosperous Hew fear
To All Our Friends and Patrons
Max Paul
JEWELER
424 LINCOLN ROAD
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-1837
IlL AVIV NOR
TtL AViv
The Hadera-Tel Aviv Railway, first rail line
to be completed in Israel since the young
republic was established five years ago, was
constructed with the assistance of investment
capital from the State of Israel Bond Issue.
The new railway, which was officially open-
ed recently at special ceremonies held in
Kefar Vitkin, links the port cities of Tel Aviv
and Haifa, a distance of 58 miles. David's
youthful spirit is the spirit that drove Israel's
engineers to build this first in a chain of rail
networks connecting all of the Jewish State's
industrial and mining center*____________
Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Saffer
and Family
Extend Their Best Wishes
TO ALL FOR A
HAPPY NEW YEAR
A Naoay "* >" To *"
0*r fritmds and Pafrans
Shrimp Spot
f I $ H / N C TACKlf
1307 N.E. BAYSHORE PLACE
Phone 2-9322
feel Maaeef
Our
New Year's Wish
"Peace, Health, Prosperity
and Good Will To All"
HOME OF SUNSHINE FASHIONS


To All ... A Most Happy and
Prosperous New Year
Atlantic Iron
Works
Commercial Industrial
Residential
lob Financing
ALL TYPES OF
ORNAMENTAL IRON
88-5322
1066 E. 24th STREET
HIALEAH


PAGE 2 C
+Jewisi>ncrkfiar
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER
11.11
O. M. PUSHKIN
YOUR MIAMI BEACH BUILDING INSPECTOR
Extends Greetings to All
FLORIDA MEDICAL LABORATORY
TNI
MIRACLI WIDOI
Overhead Door Company of Miami, Inc.
Miami 38. Florida
SALE SERVICE INSTALLATION
7111 Biscayne Bird. Telephone 71-5513
.IOII \ A. MOORE
AND
nisr \v\i; i:\.i\i:i;iii\\ CO.
Blue Prints Photostats Drawing Materials
Pick-up and Delivery Service (Opposite the Courthouse)
47 N.W. FIRST STREET
Phone 3-3666
GREETINGS
HOWARD BACKUS
TOWING LIGHTERING
WHOLESALE SAND CRANE RENTAL
1201 N. W. South River Drive P. O. Box 681
Yard Phone W019 Res. Phone 7-1042
MIAMI 4. FLORIDA
TO ALL .
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
W. G. Welbon Properties
Service Through the Years
129 S.W. 12th AVENUE
PHONE 3-0226
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
TO ALL
Mr. and Mrs. Wesley E. Garrison
YOUR REPUBLICAN LEADER
HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL
SALES MOTOROLA SERVICE
EDDIE'S RADIO SERVICE
3209 N.W. 7m Avenue Phone 3-6564
Service On AH Makes Auto and Home Radios and Television
FOSSETT'S PHARMACY
At the EntranceHuntington Building
168 S. E. First SL MlamL Flo. Phone 2-7691
THE LARGEST AND MOST COMPLETE
PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY IN THE WORLD
W. E. FOSSETT. Proprietor
Happenings at the United Nation*
By ARTHUR LEWIS
Jewish Telegraphic Aoency
UNITED NATIONSThe past year was an event
ful one for Israel at the United Nations, although, at
the beginning, it gave no sign of being such. In fact,
the question of Palestine was left off the provisional
agenda of the Seventh General Assembly, the first
time that this has occurred since it arose. Its omis-
sion was generally welcomed here, the view being
that yet another rancorous debate on this perennial
issue would not advance the cause of conciliation
and peace, but, at the last moment and for obvious
propaganda purposes, the Arabs insisted on its dis-
cu-.-ten However, it was a case of the biter bit, and
the Sons of the Prophet emerged from the ensuing
international melee with their honor saved only by
a piece of parliamentary trickery.
Most of the world supported Israels appeal for
"direct negotiations" with the Arabs, and many of
the Western delegates made it apparent that they
regarded the Arab refusal to meet as chisttash aad
absurd. As a result of the Assembly's debate on
Palestine, the chances of a peace settlement seemed
to have improved, but they were soon spoiled by
the late Soviet campaign against the Jews which
culminated in the so-called anti-Serastie debate in
the second part of the Assembly, one of the most
unpleasant and portentously evil occurrences in the
short history of the United Nations.
Among the other events here, there were the
usual recriminations over the armistice agreements,
the usual number of notes handed into the Security
Council by the Arab representatives, protesting al-
leged Israeli vio-
lations. The only
demarche made
by Israel was a
document giving
a "complete and
coherent" picture
of the depreda-
tions caused by
Arab marauders,
mostly from Jor-
dan, which was
not submitted to
the Security
Council at all,
but was circulat-
ed as a document
to all member
states. The latter
had a somewhat1
spectacular ef-
fect, for, within
a few days, the
Jordanian gov-
ernment signed an agreement to prevent infiltration
from its side of the border.
One of the most constructive developments during
the past year at the United Nations was Israel's
release of a million pounds sterling of blocked Arab
accounts. Although this was negotiated through the
Palestine Conciliation Commission, it was done with-
out any quid pro quo whatsoever, and it made a
deep impression on delegates here as a generous
act of statesmanship. Yet, the Arabs had the ef-
frontery to look this gift horse in the mouth, and
the Jordanian government refused to allow its
Indigent refugees to collect their deposits unless the
Ambassador fbmm
. he is abased
wording on the application forms was ,k
Once again, Israel demonstrated its deep h
conciliation and understanding by humon"*
Arabs and altering the wording. The money k\ *
paid out now.
Although it was at the behest of the Arib.
the Arabs alone, that the Seventh General Ass
bly, which, because of its late start was spbvl
two, was forced to debate the Palestine qu^.J
Israel took the opportunity of this discussion*
present its peace proposal, and the Israeli rep
tative, Abba S. Eban's speech on this matter"
very well received. Of course, Mr. Eban went I
all the technical considerations of a settlement I
the Arab states, such as security and the qu
of boundaries and refugees. He proposed a
aggression pact which would prevent local outb
and allow for a limitation of military budgets.
stressed that the frontiers could only be ehia
by "negotiations and agreement" and suggested |
the parties concerned should consider adju
which would re-unite villages with their lands i
eliminate demilitarized zones. As far as the red
were concerned, he referred to Ms goventmenfii
lease of the blocked Arab accounts, and he felt i
the problem might be solved by "cooperative i
gional effort."
What caught the imagination of the diplon
here and the world generally was Mr. Kban's i
of a future in which the Biblical lands would I
come lands of milk and honey. The Israeli
sentative listed five ways in which economic i
operation could benefit the welfare of the
Middle East. They included replacing the "pn
boycott and blockade by normal economic relation!
the development of markets within the region i
cooperation between the states in the use of I
natural resoruces as the Dead Sea and the riven i
the area, and in stopping the advance of the i
Mr. Eban offered the Arabs the service of
experts in various fields to help them in raising 1
living standards in their countries.
The Israeli representative urged the General
sembly to take "the historic step of recomme
a direct and freely negotiated peace" without'
conditions of I
kind" and
subsequent
in the Ad
Special Co
tee where
Palestine
tion was takeni
first is rega
not only as sal
dorsement of |
but also as a<
dorsement of |
peace pr
The vote in f*
of the eight |
er resolution ol
ing for direct I
gotiations wi|
overwhelming
32 in favor to 1
against with
abstentions;
was more tbas|
two-thirds majority and would have meant
bly approval.
However, the Arabs who bad never taken sudj
-t*ea*-M
CeWe Mrtrsea
A HAPPY HEW TEAR TO ALL
OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Allapattah
Cleaners, In<^
1M6 N.W. 38th STREET
MIAMI
Phone 2-6411
To All .
Happy New Year
and Season's Greetings
Auerbach Paint Co.
1671 ALTON ROAD
A HAPPT NEW TSAR TO ALL
OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Ringer*
Jeweler*
2309 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gablee
Phone 48-2327
Kenneth P. Ringer
A Happy New Yesx To All
Our Friends end Patrons
Smiiiy's Garage
The Original Smittyi Oarage
4350 N.W. 32nd Avenue
Phone 84-1232
W. H. Smith, Owner
A Happy New Year To
All My Friends
D. Kennett
FIRE CHIEF
Miami Beach
Florida
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends ar.d Patron*
Kreb's Studio*
An Extensive Selection d
Furniture Reproduction*
of All Periods
321 NJE. 79ft *
Phone 4-41i.


Yj^TTMBER 11, 1953
+JmisJinor*Han
PAGE 3C
bbuilding of the State: A Vital
Program or Activity ror the Year
By JACOB AUERBACH
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
^nj- methods are used to gauge the progress of
Li as one year ends and another begins. Statistics
. employed to show the number of dunams under
jlivation. the sums of foreign capital invested,
total kilowatt-hours used by industry or the
Mge of ships entering Haifa port. Photographs
trast the tents and corrugated huts of twelve
nths ago with the growing number of stone and
ncrete immigant dwellings today. These methods
good ones. But they merely pinpoint certain
tangible aspects of Israel's development. There
many other facts: the social and cultural inte-
rn of immigrants, for example, or the growing
pact of Israels culture on the rest of world Jewry,
ich are equally important but which must be
ed over a period of many years in order to be
perly evaluated.
Among the best indices of Israel's over-all prog-
are the activities of the Jewish Agency. The
ency plays a part in virtually every phase of
s growth, from the purchase of American
dors and combines lor agricultural development
the propagation of Hebrew language study and
Kural exchanges between Israel and communities
road. The multitude of Agency activities, of
urse, is carried out with funds contributed to the
ited Jewish Appeal in America and to similar
peals throughout the world.
The past year has been a period of consolidation
r Israel. Mass immigation, which reached its peak
1950-51, has tapered off for the time being. The
State of Israel
and the Jewish
Agency have
been concentrat-
ing their efforts
on the settlement
of the new immi-
grant population
which, during the
year, passed the
700,000 mark
(total population
1,000,000). Spe-
cial emphasis has
been placed on
land settlement
Israel is basi-
Of. *.(,um G.M-,.,. caUy an agr.cul.
repa,at, .t,.fr tura, country
mt 950.000 acres were under cultivation last year,
Maining more than 580 Jewish settlements But
Wisiderable areas remain to be settled and culti-
Wtd. mainly in the Jerusalem Corridor, the Negev
d Western Galilee. It is in these areas that
P work of the Jewish Agency's Agricultural Col-
piution Department is most evident. By midsum-
. the department had set up 50 new agricultural
uges accommodating more than four thousand
lilies. Nineteen, located in the Negev are of a
SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL
NATIONAL PRODUCE CO. OF
MIAMI, INC.
Wholesale Produce Crate to Carload
1229 N. W. 21st Street Phone 3-6491
TO ALL NEW YEAR GREETINGS
THE TOWN RESTAURANT
153 N.E. 1st Street
BREAKFAST LUNCHEON DINNER
Music Air Conditioned 7 A.M. to 2 A.M.
Closed Sunday
Ph. 2-4733
< I

GREETINGS
MAYFLOWER RESTAURANT
80 S.E. Biscaync Boulevard, Miami, Florida
Serving:
CLUB BREAKFAST from 25c LUNCHEON from 75c
DINNER from 1.00
Open Daily 7 a.m. to 1 a.m.
T
They pour a cement foundation for a new
home. This will make one less immigrant
tent or corrugated hut.
new type, owned outright by the Jewish Agency.
The settlers who work the land will take over own-
ership when their numbers increase and their finan-
cial position becomes secure.
Neg.v tillages Aided
These new villages as well as hundreds of older
settlements in the process of expansion, benefit from
the activities of the Jewish Agency's Procurement
Department in New York which has purchased $70,-
000,000 worth of material for Israel, mainly agricul-
tural and irrigation equipment and livestock. This
equipment is stored in Agency compounds through-
out Israel and distributed to settlements as their
needs arise. Last spring, the Procurement Depart-
ment shipped 2,900 mules and mares to Israel for
ploughing in areas unsuitable for tractors.
Like agriculture, Israel's industry has developed
rapidly. Foreign investments in the neighborhood of
$150,000,000 were made during the past five years.
The Jewish Agency's Economic Department set up
Continued on Page 15
TO ALL HOLIDAY GREETINGS
ALEXANDER D. SMITH
Real Estate
382 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables Phone 83-5213
and
3365 S. W. 3rd Avenue Phone 9-7651
YACHTS AND MOTOR VESSELS
Office Phone 82-S795 Residence Phone 78-6060
W. F. MeClaskey
MARINE SURVEYOR GASOLINE 8c DIESEL ENGINES
343 S.W. North River Rrive
P. O. Box 1788 Miami. Florida
Washing and Polishing Lubrication Batteries Tires
Mechanic on Duty Pick-Up and Delivery
71st Street Serviee Station
H. GOLDMAN
SHELL SERVICE
337 71st Street. Miami Beach Phone 86-9170
A Happy New Year To All
ur Friends and Patrons
SEVENTY-FIRST ST.
SHOE REPAIRING
713 COLLINS AVE.
*IAM1 BEACH
Phone 86-5521
A Happy New Year To All
*V Friend* and Patron*
s- Z. Bennett
*! Estate Appraiser
235 Lincoln Road
^oal Beach, Flo.
Phone 58X745
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
Ray Terrace
Apt. Hotel
INS BAY DRIVE
Normandy Hie
Miami Beach. Fla.
Phone 86-9X27
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
Atlantic
Equipment Co.
1220 N. Miami Avenu*
Phone 3-0316
To Our Many Friends
and Acquaintances .
HAPPY NEW YEAR
. If. Reynolds
INSURANCE
730 DfGRAHAM BLDG.
Phone 2-58*7
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
Boyle's
Pharmacy
2435 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD
MIAMI
Phone 9-5743
TO ALL .
SEASON'S BEST WISHES
American Photo Company
811 S.W. 8th STREET
PHONE 3-9788
HUNTER LYON. INC.
901 So. Miami Ave, 3-3331
INSURANCE
WISHING TO ALL JEWISH CITIZENS .
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
WALKKR CASKET COMPANY
535 N. W. 24th Street Phone 3-3689


PAGE 4C
f **'#> n*rHfr*m
FRIDAY, SEPTFMftrp
BEST WISHES TO ALL
GEORGE'S CARPET SHOP
927 N. W. 7th Avenue
REBUILT BATTERIES
12 Month Guarantee$7.50 op, txch.
EXPERTS ON STARTER AND GENERATOR REPAIRS
REASONABLE PRICES____
BATTERIES GENERATORS STARTERS
HI VOLT BATTERY MFG.
1880 N.W. 7th Avenue Phone 9-06
SEASON'S BEST GREETINGS
From
FEUER & EISENSTEIN
Realtors
"Personalized Sen-ice"
W I Feuer Leo Eisenstein
235 Lincon Road Phone 58-8665
Miami Beach, Florida
A Happy and Prosperous
New Year To All Our
Friend* and Patrons
Morton Apartment Hotel
42nd Street on the Ocean
Miami Beach Phono 58-7444
Alamo Hotel
42nd Strtot J> Indian Crook
Miami Beach Phono 5-2106
Ocean Spray Hotel
42nd Street A Collins
Miami Beach
Phono 5-1221
DREIER HOTELS MANAGEMENT
Themes J. Clinton, Gtntral Mer.
^^^^>^^.*^^*^^^^
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR
FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Wallpaper Distributors, Inc.
5142 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD
MIAMI
Phone 78-0922
SINCERE WISHES FOR A
HAPPY NEW YEAR
AL MEIDENBERG AND STAFF
A-1 EMPLOYMENT SERVICE
37 N. E. 5th Street
GREETINGS
BAY-BEE DIE-DEE DIAPER SERVICE
"Greater Miami* First"
AN EXCLUSIVE LAUNDRY FO*
DIAPERS k BABY CLOTHES
2111 N. W. 10th Avenue Phono I-SU3
BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
MR. Ic MRS. MAX FRIEDSON
American Builders Supply. Inc.
2728 S.W. 28th Low
PHONES 4-2296 4-6206
Jewish Martyrs Seek Refuge
In Germany Once Againi
TO AU ... A MOST HAfri NfW 11 A*
BYRON HOLDREN & ASSOCIATES
United Benefit life Inference Meteol Benefit Healtn t Accident Ann
Pnent 12-1533 Security B.jlsino

By ARTHUR GREEN
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
BERLIN The West Berlin Jewish Community
has addressed a letter to Soviet High Commissioner
in Germany, Vladimir Semenov, the polished diplo-
mat who since his appointment several months ago
has steered an ostentatiously moderate course in
East Germany and under whose auspices several
Thousand Germans are being discharged from pris-
on. The letter was a moving appeal fo'r the release
of Jewish prisoners now held in Soviet or Soviet
zone jails.
So far, there has been no reply, and none of the
Jews behind bars has been set at liberty. But the
petition of the Berlin kehilla has at least drawn
attention to the fate of those half-forgotten East
German Jews who, having survived Hitler, fell vic-
tim to Stalin and his slavish would-be imitator in
Germany, Walter Ulbricht.
Few facts are more effectively suppressed behind
the German iron curtain than the lot of those ar-
rested by the secret police, the dreaded SSD. In-
terestingly enough, and in contrast to the situation
in Hungary or Rumania, SSD boss Wilhelm Zaisser
never tolerated a single Jew in the ranks of his
organization.
It is as impossible to make a nose count of arrest-
ed Jews as it is to ascertain what happened to those
who are known to have been clapped into jail. Some
have certainly died, a few have been taken to the
Soviet Union, a number may have been released
with strict instruction not to communicate with any
friends they may have had in the West. Several
are still in custody, a number that is not inconsider-
able when it is borne in mind that the total number
of Jews in East Berlin and East Germany was al-
ways well below 5,000.
Four Types of Prisoners
Those who rot in the prisons of the German Com-
munist regime and of the Soviets may be said to fall
into four categories, ranging from the Jewish-born
apostates, who but yesterday served as the jailers'
willing henchmen and apologists, to martyrs of the
Jewish cause about whom far too little is known in
the West. Let us consider a number of typical
cases.
Most of the Communists who have run afoul of
the party line, perhaps only because they headed
West in their flight from Hitler or because they
have relatives in the free world, never identified
themselves as Jews or maintained ties with the
Jewish community. Among them are high ex-gov-
ernment officials such as Paul Baender, former State
Secretary fn the Ministry of Trade and Commerce,
who may perhaps escape a heavy sentence for "ec-
onomic sabotage" now that the planned trials of
several former Cabinet Ministers seem to have been
abandoned.
Others were party functionaries pure and simple,
such as Josef Schleifstein and his wife, who jointly
headed the Department For Indoctrination of th,||
Communist Party in West Germany until they w 'I
lured to East Berlin and arrested a few mm.
jedrs ago I
Hans Schrecker, editor of a Leipzig Communist
per, belongs to those whose writings, while in fuJ
accord with the party line, did not anticipate 2
next hairpin curve. Finally there are those wbn.1
because of their wartime stay in Mexico or SwitaJ
land, are particularly suspected of having been in.
fected by Trotskyism, Titoism and Americanu
This sub-group comprises the former boss of
Bavarian Communist Party, Sperling; Saxony!
Bruno Goldhammer, ex-manager of the East Berikl
Radio Station; and the station's erstwhile editor*!
chief, Polish-born Leo Bauer, whose real name see|
to be Rudolf Katx.
The second group includes those whose -entente!
although often unduly severe, are not wholly artel
trary. Black-marketing on a large scale may btl
involved. These activities were not infrequently|
carried out by Slavic-speaking DP's with the coal
nivance of Soviet and German Communist trawl
officials, until one day there was a falling-out amotil
the partners.
Those convicted on trumped-up economic cha:
compose a third category. They may have the I
chances for relief in the temporarily milder ati
phere of the moment. A fairly typical case is I
of Adalbert Kaba-Klein, former Soviet Zone chess I
champion and a hotelkeeper on the island of Rue-I
gen, who in April of this year was sentenced to teal
years' penal servitude for asserted violation of raj
tioning regulations. The verdict against Kaba-KleiiJ
who was known for his adherence to regulations,!
was generally regarded as a means of intimidate
and driving out of business other private hotd-l
keepers on the island. Similarly, the February sen-I
tencing of three Jews in the Berlin suburb of Kleia-l
Machnow on charges which dealt mostly with the I
alleged violation of housing regulations was a device I
to overawe and cow the rebellious residents of thtl
town. Klein-Machnow's postwar mayor, Fritz Roses-1
baum, was sent down the river for six years, Nathal
Pikarski for four years and Willi Stein for ten yean|
Martyrs fee Judaism
The most tragic group, the fourth one, is thai oil
Jews woo were among the handful managing til
survive in Germany herself, only to be thrown in|
Communist jails because of their devotion to
cause of Judaism. -
One such man appears to be Dr. Hesse, a Haiti
lawyer now serving a 10-year sentence. AnotD*f "]|
the unknown Magdeburg Jew who last Fet
spoke up for the Jews then under bitter Comnw-1
nist attack as "Zionist agents." In imposing a three-1
year jail term upon him for '"incitement to racial
hatred," the judge used this Alice-in-Wondering
"dialectical" logic:
"Spies and agents constitute a separate race
By their behavior they have excluded them-
Continued en Page *
A Happy New Tear re All
0*r Fritmdi end Perrons
Palmland
Printers
1934-36 8.W. 8th STREET
MIAMI
Phone 82-4138
fdwerd aVeseaWf, *er.
A Mmmwr Mew rear To AN Omr
fritmdi one* Petr.ni
Art Mirror
Works
3802 N.E. 2nd AVENUE
MIAMI
Phone 894212
A HAPPY NEW TEAR TO ALL
When You Think of
BOTTLES
think of
Magic City Bottle
& Supply
1380 N.W. 23rd STREET
Phone 34783
Specializing in glass container
problems for drug, beverage,
food and cosmetic packers.
TO AU GREETINGS
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. L. Sheade
Sheade Bedding:
and Mattress Co.
123 N.W. 23rd STREET
Phone 82-3846
A Neaay New Tear T. AM
Oer Meads e-d re*""
Cramer
Auto Service
80S OKEECHOBEE ROAD
HIALEAH
Phone 68-3044
t/eraee Crasser
ii i aaa Hi _
A NAfPT NfW flAK TO AU OS
WINDS AMD t*nm
Coral Wan
lleautu Solo*
1755 CORAL WAY
MIAMI
4-71M


grPTEMBER 11. 1953
+Jewish fkrkUar)
PAGE 5C
wenty Years of Immigration
/**
By ASHER PENN
Jt is now just twenty years since the Nazi beast
red to power in Germany and rushed to devour
' Jewries of Central and then Eastern Europe.
Jeer's bloody juggernaut uprooted millions of Jews
Irom the homelands where they had lived for gen-
ie lions These chapters, written in the blood of six
jillion murdered Jews, a million of them children
Ci suckling babes, are the- saddest-in the long
history of Jewish martyrdom. But the Nazi "super-
which. according to its sadistic architect,
rould endure a thousand years, is now destroyed and
lead, while the people it sought to destroy by gas
I flame live to perpetuate their ancient traditions
freedom and human dignity. The eternal Jewish
ople, who dur-
Hs millenial
kustory had sur-
vived its worst
nd bitterest cne-
nies, now in this
nentieth c-e-n-
y. had manag-
| to survive the
irorst of all Jew-
ish enemies
Hitler with his
[scientific race
bnnihilation.
Spurred by
khesc tragic dec-
ide, the Jews
rose in their
strength and
orked miracles.
twenty cen-
Ituries of Jewish
Ihomele s s n e s s
[they restored Me-
[dinath Yisracl. the modern Jewish state. Tens of
thousands of German Jews and many Jews from
lother countries and various continents have emigrat
led to Israel in the past score of years. But circum-
Istances prevented many homeless Jews from going
Ito the new democracy. During the last twenty years,
I the United States has given shelter to more than
1300,000 Jewish wanderers. This migration was di-
Ivided into two periods, one, covering pre-war and
I World War II years, and the other extending from
11945 up to the present.
A look at the composition of the Jewish immiga-
Ition to America during those two periods reveals
an interesting contrast. From 1934 to 1945, of the
180,000 Jewish refugees coming to the United States,
75 per cent, or 120,000, were born in Germany, 15
per cent, or 24,000, in Poland, and 10 per cent, or
bout 16,000. in Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Rumania
and other countries. However, beginning with 1945,
the country of origin statistics reverse themselves.
Of 140,000 Jews coming to United States since 1945,
II per cent, or 105,000 originated in Poland, 15 per
tent, or 21.000 in Germany and Austria, and 10 per
nt, or about 15,000, in other countries. Therefore.
until the end of World War D, three of every four
Jewish refugees coming to America were born in
i Germany, whereas, since the war ended, three of
ery four have been Polish Jews.
In the face of the formidable roadblocks of quotas
d other restrictions thrown in the paths of new-
Jwlht Sfreicher
. seeer $tate destroyed
comers by our outmoded immigration laws, how
did these 300,000 Jewish immigrants manage to come
and resettle here during the war years and after?
To get an accurate reply to these questions, this
writer turned to the United Service for New Ameri-
cans, a voluntary social welfare agency, which is
directly concerned with the immigration of Jewish
survivors to the United States and their resettle-
ment here. I studied its various departments and
had long talks with department heads. From the
mass of facts and details I gathered there, I put to-
gether the mosaic of a planned, systematic migra-
tion without parallel in the whole of Jewish history.
Migration experts consider this feat of organized
immigration and resettlement conducted by the
American Jewish community to be the most suc-
cessful ever accomplished.
For the first time, a large scale migration in-
volving tens of thousands was based on the prin-
ciple of selecting appropriate communities of re-
settlement for newcomers and arranging for their
reception and maintenance there before they left
the countries of residence. Naturally, the establish-
ment of 300,000 newly arrived Jews in America was
not accomplished without problems, headaches and
endless planning. First the proper administrative
machinery had to be set up. No single Jewish or-
ganization in the early thirties was equal to the giant
task and many changes, mergers and reorganizations
were necessary.
When uneasy German Jews first came to America
on tourist permits to "look over the land," American
Jewry was totally unprepared to resettle large num-
bers of refugees in any systematic manner. But there
were in existence such old-established Jewish or-
ganizations as the HIAS and the National Council
of Jewish Women with noteworthy achievements in
aiding Jewish immigrants to their credit. Hitler's
bloody program for annihilating German Jewry
roused American Jewish leaders to plan swiftly for
rescuing as many of their co-religionists as possible.
Along with leaders of other faiths, they created in
1934, the National Coordinating Committee, which
integrated and coordinated efforts in behalf of all
war refugees. About the same time, a movement was
also started in New York to save celebrated Jewish
scholars from the Nazi terror. The National Coor-
dinating Committee operated until 1939, when the
National Refugee Service Was organized by leaders
in the Jewish community. This organization began
developing and applying the scientific techniques
of immigration and resettlement which have been
polished and perfected by its successor agency
the United Service for New Americans, created in
1946 by a merger between the National Coordinating
Committee and a department of the National Council
of Jewish Women.
A major problem of the newly planned program
was avoiding the mistakes made in earlier mass mi-
grations. Too many times, groups of immigrants
have landed in new countries completely ignorant
of its customs, living habits, geography and job
opportunities. To often this situation had started
them aimlessly wandering in the new country
never taking root and finally, in frustration, return-
ing to the country which they had left. In unplanned
immigration and resettlement, new people invariably
concentrate themselves in a few large cities under
Continued On Page 9
GRKETINCIS
El Toreador
!tVJU5ANT NIOHT CLUB
FIUtiee for P.rtle. from if MO
, People
SJ' Cour" t*al " > n Wk_ 12 jj hi 5
14,, D'AL 4-tN*
u i?"E HIGHWAY
Hat Mi,? M'f,hw''"*
J Brings You to Front Door
e-rn.
* Happy Hew Year To All
0ur Frieridt and PUroni
M. .1. Spfro
FASTER WATCHMAKER
AND JEWELER
127 NJL Ut AVENUE
MIAMI
PHONE 9-0382
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
M. &R.
IKubinslcin
JEWELERS
131 MS. 1*4 STREET
MIAMI
Phon. 82-9878
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
V. II. Hart
Watch Making
Jewelry Repairing
1688 ALTON ROAD
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 58-9598
A HAPPT NEW TEAR TO ALL
OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Essex Village
Pharmacy
441 HJALEAH DRIVE
a* law tntm Theatre
HJALEAH
Murray Steir, Prop.
A Happy New Year To AH
Our Friends and Patron*
PHYSICIAN'S BLDG.
LABORATORY
1431 N. BAYSHORE DRIVE
MIAMI
PHONE 823274
ATWILL and COMPANY
Not Inc.
Investment Securities
605 Lincoln Rd. Miami Beach, Fla.
First National Bank Bldg. Miami. Fla.
Ph. 5-5816
Ph. 82-2636
MR. AND MRS. HARRY GENET
SAUL AND "BUBBY" GENET
5101 Lakeview Drive
EXTEND BEST WISHES TO ALL
FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR

MRS. W. F. ROCKWELL
SINCERE WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
EARNEST OVERSTREET
AND ASSOCIATES OF THE
COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR'S OFFICE

TO OUR MANY FRIENDS AND PATRONS .
SEASON'S GREETINGS
Lindgren Plumbing Company
Contractors Repairs Service
1837 N.W. 17th AVENUE
PHONE 2-0210

A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO
ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Sossin
REGIL MOTORS
SELECTED CARS
1500 N.W. 7th AVENUE
Phone 9-2261
Res. 86-8959
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
JONES PLUMBING
CONTRACTING SUPPLIES
9534 N.W. 7th AVENUE
MIAMI
PHONE 7-2582
r-s^-V/^-wv~^~v
"WVW
i**^^**m**^**t'
''W'W'W'W'W'W'W-'W'W^W'W'W'W'W'W'WAm*
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
Mercer Hardware & Paint Store
DONT BORROW RENT IT
Over 100 Tool Rental*
Complete Line ol Hardwejre
LUKE TERRY, Owner
- i
2817 N.W. 7th STREET
PHONE 842451
"V*^'"*W',V"'V*^*^'"V*,V~W',V"V^'">*,V*V",V,W',^'">''"V^V*
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO
ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Deauville Package Store
6640 COLLINS AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA
Phones 86-2802 86-7181
4


PAGE 6 C
+JtmisHk>rk*ari
FRIDAY.
SEPTEMBER
il-19
Jl. II. GARRIS
CIVIL AND CONSULTING ENGINEER
622 S. W. 27th Ayenue Pnon* 48-9875

WARP PAVING CO.
CONTRACTORS
STREETS ROADS SIDEWALKS
1731 N. W. 54th Street Phone 89-2718
MIAMI
P. RICHARDSON
Insulation Firebrick Tank* Trap* and Ragulaton
1141 So. Alhambra Circle Warehouse: 1047 N. W. 22nd Street
Phone 87-9586 Phone 82 5782
To All Greetings
WESTERN MEAT CO- MISC.
WHOLESALE HOME FREEZE
2122 N. W. 7th Ave. Miami
TO ALL A MOST
HAPPY HOLIDAY
WM. J. ALLEN and CHAS. HABLOW
CUSTOM CRAFT MFG. CO.. Inc.
1830 N. W. MIAMI COURT
MIAMI
GREET1NT1
CEMEXT BLOCK INDUSTRIES
CERTIFIED CEMENT BLOCKS
Immediate Delivery
JACK SWERDLIN -----'
4490 S.W. 74th AvenueOff Bird Rd. PHONE 87-7696
NEW YEAR GREETINGS TO OUR MANY FRIENDS
MIAMI DIAMOND CENTER
Mr. & Mrs. Jacob Rabinowitz
Mr. & Mrs. David Rabinowitz
Mr. & Mrs. Morris Rabinowitz
Mr. & Mrs. Sol Goldstein
MIAMI BEACH
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
MB Alton road
MIAMI BEACH
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
FRANK Ob PRMTT. I....
INSURANCE
350 N.E. 15th STREET PHONE 2-3169
ALL MIAMI MOTORS. INC.
FORD PARTS SERVICE
CARS AND TRUCKS
1550 N. Miami Ay. Phone 9-2711 Miami Fla.
A Year of Austerity is Israel's
Major Source of Coura<
By SAMEUL BROWN
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
It used to be said in Jerusalem that on the day
before Rosh Hashonah every Jew had a chicken
in one hand and a melon in the other. Austerity
regulations are relaxed for the .High Holy Days.
Last year, the Jews were, told they could have all
the melons they wanted but were asked to save
the seeds.
In the colorful panorama of Rosh Hashonah in
Israel, perhaps it is the Yemenites, those Jews said
to resemble most our forefathers of ancient Israel,
who make the most striking impression. Approach-
ing a Yemenite settlement from a distance on Rosh
Hashonah, one might suspect that he is viewing a
field of white flowers. It is a strict point with the
Yemenite Jews on Rosh Hashonah to be arayed from
head to toe in white, symbolizing the purity of heart
with which we present ourselves before the All
Mighty on the High Holy days.
Rosh Hashonah is a wonderful time for the Israeli
florists. There are Jews in Israel who do not go to
synagogue on Rosh Hashonah, but one would scarce-
ly find a house without some flowers on the holiday.
The synagogues are packed to capacity on Rosh
Hashonah in all their gradations from the grand
Jeshurun Synagogue of Jerusalem, headed by the
Chief Rabbi Herzog, to the numerous "stublach"
where a few minyanim recite their prayers, with
Chassidic ecstacy.
The practice of dipping the bread in honey,
symbolizing the hope for Happy New Year, seems
. *>,
*2*
?&
1 I i s
1 1 1 < I
1 1 t i i mmfc
- 1 1 i
1 1 1 H r-P*
1 1 trz ~
K V
/ N, -'" MB :3d
Mh^.
*& ti
Wifl
.:*- ^Vksast
j 3|
He will build a strong economy. Israel Bond
dollars and his engineering talent are re-
vitalizing the Jewish Slat*.
to be universal among all Jews. Another fairly com-
mon practice is to design the challeh to harmonize
with the spirit of Rosh Hashonah. The loaf may take
rounded shape, symbolic of the hope of a balanced,
well rounded year; sometimes poetic imaginations
may. take more daring, forms, with the loaf being
manipulated in the form of the wings of a bird.
M V \ \ M
An electric generator grows in her hand -I
as does Israel with the aid of the bond issue]
symbolizing the thought that God will take us und
his protective wings.
The pious.Jew of course will not refrain fr
Tashlich, journeying to sea, river, creek or
artificial reservoir of water to unload his ye
accumulations of sins. In Haifa and Tel Aviv, ta
is the Mediterranean Sea suitable for this puro
The Jordan and Lake Tiberias will service
adjoining communities. In the interior of the N'e
the various reservoirs created by the new irrigatiai
system, financed by Israel Bonds, will serve ta
purpose. It was presumably only with the pur[
of irrigating and making fruitful the dry land I
the irrigation system was designed, but if it i
serves to irrigate the souls, who shall object?
Rosh Hashanah is a thing of spiritual stock
ing in Israel, but it is also a time of taking
of the land of Israel. The press of Israel bio
forth in large editions with surveys of the year |
and prospects for the new year.
The past year has been one of continued austeritj
in Israel, but the shining through of the sub
many of the dark spots is a harbinger of a bright)
year ahead. The greatest advance during the
year was undoubtedly in the field of agriculh
As little as two years back, there was a great i
age of vegetables, and it had increased to such i
extent, that there was an actual surplus, and
marketing board has been set up to divert the i
plus to canning factories for exports. Similarly, i
few years back. Israel had to buy from the ou
most of its fodder for cattle sod poultry. Today I
overwhelming proportion is homegrown and
looks confidently to being entirely self-sufficient I
this article in a short time.
Great strides have been made in industry.
1950 to 1953, the investment center of the
Minister of Commerce approved 1,500 new indu
enterprises. Israel now exports a variety of prod
ranging all the way from automobile tires
phosphates to womens wear and. pencils.
The great snag in the development of Israel I
Continued on Page IS
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
BENSON
PHARMACY Inc.
1444 COLLINS AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 58-1112
Ceorge R Stevens
''W'WWWW"
To All Our Friends and Patrons
Duma's
Nnrsery
3801 N.W. 36th AVENUE
MIAMI
Phone 64-4041
George P. Duma
A HAPPT HEW TEAR TO ALL
OUR FR1EHDS AND PATRONS
Cameo. Cleaners
1331 N.W. 36th STREET
MIAMI
Phone 7-0301
Mrs. Lillian Otto
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
Dean Cleaners
A Laundry
12938 N.W. 7th AVENUE
NORTH MIAMI
Phone 89-9144
Elias Thaw
A Happy New Year To
All My Friends
DR. DANIEL
N. HOHNE
Pacific Building
Miami
Phone 14514
MR. & MRS.
NATHANIEL J. KLEW
and Family
of 3040 Alton Road
Miami Beach, Fls.
With all their Relatives a*i
Friend, a Happy and Prosper"^
Sew Year


Ay, SEPTEMBER U. 1953
* Jew 1st IkrkH^r
PAGE 7C
luseum. Works Show
Jewish, Greek Ties
Wsr Implements
j.with FleridUn Naws Faatura
I The thousands of antiquities brought to this coun-
I ,j,e American Fund for Israel Institutions for
Mentation in the From The Land Of The Bible
theological Exhibit has raised stirring interest.
I The exhibit is being presented by the American
lod in cooperation with the Association of Israel
fuseums and consists of priceless items from Israel
{veiling the romantic story of mankind from the
0f the first primitive attempts of prehistoric
Hagolan during the excavation of a village of the
Neolithic Age. The site was discovered in 1M2, on
the banks of the Yarmuk River, during an arche-
ological survey of the Jordan Valley. The material
found shows that the economy of the Yarmukian
population was horticulture in its most primitive
stage, and, according to the late Dr. M. Stekelis, not-
ed Israel archeologist, one of its outstanding fea-
tures is its art objects.
Carving and engraving were practiced to produce
objects having ritual significance in connection with
the fertility cult of a pure matriarchate. The pres-
ence of such art work leads to the conclusion that
the inhabitants possessed a highly developed spir;
itual life.
A stone menorah on exhibit was found in Tiberias
and dates back to the 3rd Century CE.
Observant Jews of the Talmudic (Byzantine) per-
iod fixed representations of a temple facade sym-
bolizing the Lost Temple of Jerusalem on to the
prayer-wall or East-wall (i.e., facing toward the Holy
City) of their houses, hence the name Misrah, which
means East. Such reliefs from the Talmudic period
and from Palestine are extremely rare, and the
plaster relief included in the display is on loan from
the collection of R. Jonas, Haifa.
Axes, spearhead and arrowheads of the third and
second millennium BCE were used as implements of
war. Some of these belong to the period of the
patriarchs. They are on loan from the collection
of Dr. Walter Moses. Tel Aviv, Israel.
to create a life in the wilderness through the
! of the patriarchs, the union of the Hebrew tribes
|jnder the law of Moses, the rise and fall of the
eat Jewish Kingdom, the Persian epoch, the Hel
nistic era. the Roman invasion and the Byzantine
triod including over 2,500 dramatic items from
i small coin to a seven ton statue.
Included among the antiquities is a bronze lamp
rith handle in the shape of a seven-branched candle-
lick of about the 4th Century CE The handle of
I lamp was made in the shape of the candlestick
nwnorah), with one side supported by a lulav and
og, the symbol of Sukkoth, and the other side
supported by a shofar.
Bronie lamps of this kind are extremely rare.
ere are many pottery lamps of the Byzantine and
tonan period decorated with Jewish symbols,
ugh the symbols in the shape of the handle prob-
Ply followed the often-used Christian fashion of
Ike period when the handle of the choicest lamps
[ fashioned in the form of religieus symbols
lamp is part of the collection of Mrs. Miriam
Schloessinger.
Also being shown is a miniature bronze bust of
* Greek god of the sun, Helios (Roman period),
I'hich was found in the Jerusalem region. It meas-
lr ibo 3>, inches in height. The resemblance
|to the Statue of Liberty is striking.
Astylized head of stone was discovered at Shaar


Tess.lt
* Happy New Year To Ail
w Friends and Patrons
American Horn*
Laundries & Cleaners
*5 S.W. 8th STREET
MIAMI
Phono 83-5687
K HPPy New Year To All
* Friends and Patrons
[breswel Cleaners
* laundry. Inc.
5788 S.W. 8th STREET
MIAMI
Phono 67-2448
Chria Roberts)
HANDSEL
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INSTALLATIONS
MAINTENANCE fc REPAIRS
481 N.W. Lojouns Road
Phono 48-3006
A Happy Newt Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
Oliveros Motor
Service
200 N.E. 18th STREET
MIAMI
Phones 2-4612 82-5178
SINCERE WISHES
for a
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Mr. and -Mrs.
Abe Aronovitr
and Family
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
Louanne of Miami
. Women's Apparel
3544 N. MIAMI AVENUE
PHONE 94559
Louis Rom
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
BLUE >l \ltl I \ I I Ml I IM is
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NORTH MIAMI BEACH
GRAND NATIONAL IMPORTERS, INC.
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309 N. W. 9th Avenue
Miami
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
WEBER, THOMPSON & LEFCOUOT
ACCOUNTANTS AND AUDITORS
Shoreland Arcade
PHONE 3-6393

HOLIDAY GREETINGS
4 HICIMOl'lll It MOTORS
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1200 NX 2nd Avenue Phone 3-3341
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73 N.W. Eighth Street Phone 2-8185
MERCURY LITHOGRAPHING CO.
545 N. W. 5th Street Miami. Florida
Telephone 92-6567
EXPERTS IN MULTICOLOR OFFSET
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FIRE WINDSTORM CASUALTY
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COMPLETE SI 00
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NEW YEAR
GREETINGS
TO OUR FRIENDS
AND PATRONS
Try Our Famous Whipped Cream Pies 25c
TY LER S
RESTAURANTS



. -


PAGE 8 C
>kmi**nt>r*mn
FRIDAY, SEPTfmbce

Striving
to
Make
Every
Day
of
Every
Year
a
Better
One
for
Mankind
Mmv Hospital
THE
CITY
OF
MIAMI
extends to the
Jewish residents
of this community
sincere best wishes for a
HAPPY
NEW YEAR
THE CITY COMMISSION
Chelsea Senerchia. Mayor
Perrine Palmer, Jr. H. Leslie Quigg
William Wolfarth Robert H. Givens. Jr.
E. A. Evans, City Manager

Happenings in Hollywood
By LEON GUTTERMAN
Jtwish Telegraphic Agency
HOLLYWOOD The year in Hollywood found
writers, directors and producers Bible-minded and
dipping into the Bible for subjects, themes, char-
acters and plots for motion picture production.
Past huge successes of Biblical films were respon-
sible for this religious avalanche. Biblical subjects
drew huge audiences, even the oldsters and more
select patrons. The spectacular aspects of Biblical
films, too, lent themselves particularly to widescreen
exhibition.
MGM director Mervyn LeRoy's Quo Vadis, based
on the famous Sienkiewicz novel, furnished the story
for what is. to date, the most "colossal" and "stu-
pendous" film to be shown on the screen. For
nearly three hours, one never lost sight of the fact
that it was primarily a spectacle, and should be
seen and judged as such.
Glamorizing the decadence of luxury-loving Rome
in all its excess-
es, with massive
sets and colorful
crown scenes, the
film showed the
triumphant r-e-
turn of victorious
armies, the cele-
bration and wor-
ship of Roman
gods, the slaugh-
ter of Christians
in the arena by
lions, the burn-
ing of Rome, and
the evil genius of
psychopathic Ne-
ro himself.
Cecil B. De-
Mille, always a
leader in pictur
izing stories from
the Bible, com-
pleted The Ten Commandments for filming, which
was to be his most ambitious motion picture to date.
The profitable returns piled up by David And Bath-
sheba made 20th Century-Fox studio Bible-conscious,
and both writers and producers were working on
appropriate subjects. One of these. The Robe, was
awaiting release at the cost of $4,600,000.
Twentieth Century's executive producer Daryl
Zanuck completed preparations on The Egyptian,
based on the best selling novel, and slated filming
for an extensive location in Egypt. Producer Samuel
G. Engel and writer Philip Dunne were both pre-
paring similar subjects. Engel completed The Queen
Of Sheba, based on the Book of Solomon, and Dunne
scheduled The Story of Jezebel from the Old Testa-
ment Book of Kings.
Producer Robert L. Lippert completed Sins of
Jezebel, with Paillette Goddard in the title role.
Producer Sam Katzman finished Slaves of Babylon
with Maurice Schwartz, and Producer Jerry Wald
was readying The Story of Mary Magdalene for Rita
George itntl
. produces film
Hayworth from an original script by Harry Kl
Former MQM head Lola B. Mayer has the J^'l
Joseph And His Brethren, which he has annour. I
he definitely will produce. The film may be ph^l
gra. phed in cinerama. '
The year in Hollywood also saw producer Sta 1
Kramer offering High Noon, a Western drama wh
was more the study of a fear-ridden community \
a formula action story. Irony is bitter as huS
frailty, and self interest caused decent citizens io|
desert their marshal one by one and left him
wage single handed a fight which was theirs
well as his. The film won worldwide acclaim.
the public flocked to see it.
In Warner Brothers', The Jazz Singer. audientd
got a really fine portrayal of the home life -,! ,1
Jewish cantor and his wife who were distinguished!
and cultured people. The home customs and cere-|
monies, the temple services and sacred music of i
Jewish faith were presented in impeccable taste]
The weakness of the picture was that Corned
Danny Thomas, so at home on the nighiclub stage]
seemed unconvincing as a son of the cantor's farau>.j
MGM producer Dore Schary emphaMzed in The]
Hoaxters an unusual analogy between a carnivalI
medicine man and his worthless snake oil and the]
power-mad dictators with their venomnu.- curc-atts,!
in a 37 minute documentary showing Mussolini. Hit-j
ler, Tojo and Stalin as the medicine men who poi,]
oned the minds of their people
As a result of
their deadly
"snake oil," one
world war has al-
ready wrought
i t s devastation
and another is
threatened. Fac-
t u a 1 newsclips
showed the
might of the dic-
tators and point-
ed up the pattern
o f totalita r i a n
propagand: des-
truction of reli-
gious belief, con-
tempt of the
United Nations
and the shifting
love-hate Ameri-
can policy. Men-
tion was made of
democracy's role in combating enemies through the 1
UN, NATO, SHAPE and the Marshall Plan, wiu\|
the emphasis resting on unceasing vigilance.
In The War Of The Worlds, producer GMr*-H
fashioned a Mock-busting science-fiction shocks I
from the H. G. Wells 55-year-old novel The storn
was intensified by its changed setting into an enj
in which no form of destruction may prove iSf**j
sible.
With the scene shifted from Britain to Calif or*]
Continued on Peee 12
Maorice Schworti
. ill Slaves ol BaiylM
A HAPPT HEW TEAR TO ALL
OUR FRIEHDS AHD PATRONS
SKI EKHY'S
FOR BEAUTIFUL SHOES
2336 PONCE DE LEON BLVD.
CORAL GABLES
Phone 4*8947
The Winokurs
SEASONS
GREETINGS
John I". Frazurf
REALTOR
115 71st STREET
MIAMI BEACH
r*-**~>-"W\,-'W'WWWV
Now 2 Location! To Serve You
Warshaw-Settle
PRESCRIPTION PHARMACIES
btor. No. 1
2340 Poneo Do Leon Boulivird
hen* i
torn No. t
Coral Qabloa But Terminal
Phone 41-4512
Alao Open Kveninji and Sunday*
Preeertptlene Filled Promptly
Cotmetice Cantflao Oifta
Elisabeth Arden. Helena Rublnatotn
FREE DELIVERY
NEW YEAR'S GREETINGS
AND BEST WISHES
from
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Farbor
owners of
Hebrew National
Restaurant &
Delicatessen
"The Best in Kosher Food"
143T Washington Ave.
Miami Beach
A HAPPT NEW TEAR TO M
OUR PRIEHDS AND PATRONS
Cherry**
Dre** Shop
1906 COLLINS AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-3194
Mr. and Mrs. Louis A- Cherry
A MOST HAPPY
NEW YEAR TO ALL
Le Bon Cleaners
& Laundry
Irving Kornicks
26 N.W. 5th STREET
Phone 2-5214


nv SEPTEMBER 11. 1953
+Jelsi>nr*+M+r
PAGE 9C
fENTY YEARS OF IMMIGRATION 10 AMERICA
Continued from Pag* 5
hvsical and economic circumstances. Clinging
rfullv to "Id customs and the mother tongue, they
slow to adjust to American, culture and they
" easy prey to economic exploitation.
United Service for New Americans kept these
rtoric immigration pitfalls in mind as it developed
'unprecedented system of distributing newcomers
j smaller communities throughout the United States
there local cooperating committees could devote
ial attention to their problems of housing, em-
ployment, language and social integration.
Hr. Arthur Greenleigh, executive director of the
nited Service for New Americans, who is an inter-
tionally recognized expert in the migration field,
nints out that not one of the more than 300,000
irish immigrants who came to America during the
ist twenty years has been deported on the ground
kit he had become a financial burden upon the
*rican Government. This impressive fact is an
tcellent measure of the success of the USNA
tinned program.
[Not long ago. Mr. Greenleigh returned from a
ijssion during which he visited a number of Euro-
tan countries where thousands of Jewish refugees
fe still not securely settled. They are living in
ermany. Austria. France, Italy, Greece, Belgium,
iolland and North Africa. Almost eight years after
(WIT, thousands of these uprooted Jews in Europe
ok hopefully toward the United States of America.
hose shores for centuries have meant protection
nd security to helpless people of all lands.
(Although acutely aware of the restrictive Mc-
krran Immigration Law which puts obstacles in the
0 of most future immigrants, these helpless Jew-
i refugees, together with the helpless wanderers of
|her faiths, still hope that America will again ex-
I a friendly hand to them. _
In the meantime, however, a small immigration of
ish refugees to America still continues. From
r to five hundred Jewish immigrants are entering
!country monthly under Provision 3(c) of the Dis-
I Persons Act. which will remain in effect until
toe, 1954. and under normal immigration laws,
pout half of the Jews who are now entering the
nited State- me from Germany and the other half
fones from France. Belgium and Sweden. Those now
ning in under the DP Act applied for their visas
hrs ago, and many applicants still await them,
nder the provisions of this act, effective in 1948
Jd amended in 1951. about 346,000 persons of
nous nationalities were admitted to this country
! the expense of 50 per cent of the immigration
jiotas of the countries of origin of these immigrants.
pus. quotas of many countries are "mortgaged"
P years to come.
[Before the Emergency DP Act was operative, for-
ler President Harry S. Truman had issued the
an Directive which permitted thousands pf
Jfugees from Nazism to find haven here. Following
nediately upon Germany's defeat, it snatched
nusands of Jews from the gas chambers and
fns and brought them to America on military
nsports This writer will never forget that morn-
r of Monday. May 20, 1946, when the American
t. Marine Fletcher, arrived with the first groups
Mews just freed from concentration camps. The
*b playing hymns, the mingled tears of sadness
1W, the reunions of wife and husband, brother
1 aster, 8re snarp,y e(ched in ^ me|nory
|*h has developed since that bright day that
W the first shipload of homeless people to
*nca. Practically all of the Jewish immigrants
epped down the gangplank of the Marine
Fletcher into a new life are now econeaaically secure
citizens of the United States. Out of the more than
three hundred thousand Jewish immigrants who
entered America during the twenty years since
Hitler set out to conquer the world, about one-half
settled in New York, while the rest are living in
more than 300 cities and towns where there are
Jewish communities. In each of these towns the
local Jewish communities, under the leadership of
the United Service for New Americans, helped the
Jewish newcomers to establish themselves, both
economically and socially.
These two decades of'new Jewish immigration
have given America an unprecedented number of
outstanding intellectuals. The Nation's culture and
economy have been vastly enriched by the scien
tists, engineers, teachers, religious leaders, artists
and writers who fled European totalitarianism. Some
of the scientists are helping the defense effort im-
measurably by their contributions in atomic research
and development. Many young Jewish refugees are
serving in the Armed Services of their new coun-
try. The first American prisoner of war released in
Korea was a Jewish refugee. Another released PW,
brought to America by United Service for New
Americans, had formerly been imprisoned by the
Nazis in Europe.
SEEK REFUGE
Continued from Page 4
selves from the race into which they were born.
Criminal Zionists are not Jews. On the con-
trary, it is anti-Semitic to speak up for Zion-
ists."
But it is the names of two deeply religious and
dedicated Jews in this category that should be writ-
ten in the hearts of Jews everywhere, for they went
to their doom "al kiddush hashem." Erich Nelhans
and Fritz Katten, both of whom had undergone the
nerve-racking experience of living "underground,"
with false papers, in Nazi Berlin.
After the collapse of Nazism, Nelhans became the
first president of the post-war Berlin Jewish Com-
munity. When Polish Jews approached him for help
in getting to Palestine so that they could fight in
the Haganah, he helped without checking their cre-
dentials too closely. Because of this, a Soviet mili-
tary tribunal charged him with aiding members of
the Red Army to desert. A man even then of al-
most 60 and broken in health, he was sent off to a
Siberian labor camp. All intervention availed noth-
ing, and there has been no word from him in many
years.
Fritz Katten was a younger man who, after the
war, rose to be a vice president both of the Berlin
police and of the Berlin Jewish Community. An
Orthodox Jew, he also headed the Berlin Mizrachi.
In 1948, he was arrested, in good part because he
had used the authority of his office as a vice presi-
dent of the Berlin police to facilitate and expedite
JDC relief shipments to the Jewish communities of
the Soviet Zone. When he was released, his friends
urged him to move to West Berlin, even offered him
a position in Jewish social work. He refused, confi-
dent 4ha. he would be completely rehabilitated. One
day, the Communist authorities cracked down again.
This time, they sent him to the penitentiary at
Bautzen, Saxony, for a 15-year term. His wife rec-
ently fled to West Germany with her son.
I HAPPT ,\av TEAR TO ALL
N FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Mme. Cooper's
Corset Shoppe
710 LINCOLN ROAD
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 58-6740
1 "APPr Kew yEAR TQ ALL
p FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Terminix
Service, Inc.
I "0H.W. 17th AVENUE
MIAMI
Jkone 9-8488
" O. Eorneet
WM' 1^ ta
T*mitt Control
T. Omr Mimy friends We txHmi Bttt
Wishes ft A Repay N Tear
Tom's Toasted
Peanuts
Peeeet latter Saadwkket
Dtliciaes Ceadles
Potato Chips
Disfrntoters
Clark R. Parker Sales Co.
A RAPPT RRV At TO Ml
OUt fKltNDS AMD fATKOHS
Poinciana
Sales Co.
Toys, NeveRies, Carataei Seoelles
mmI Party Pawn
2252 W. FLAGLER STREET
Phona 4-5375
Mr. aad Mrs. AtfrW lev
A Happy and Prosperous Hew Tear
To All Our Friends and Patrons
ANDRE'S
Plaza Hairdressers
2816 Ponce Da Leon Blvd.
CORAL GABLES
Phone 48-8659
A ep*y 'mt re All
Omr fritmds sad Pefreea
It,I Auto
Travel Service
350 LINCOLN ROAD
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-7369
Mr. mi Mn. mtrnuri Joyce
TO ALL OUR, FRIENDS TWQljIiATBOI
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
- ?
."
i
DOUGLAS LUMBER COMPANY
MR. AND MRS. HERBERT NAURISON
AND DAUGHTER MURIEL ANN
LUMBER AND OTHER BUILDING MATERIALS
Phones 48-246548-9862
3775 South Dixie Highway MiamL Florida
...I. Ull1M!!ii,1|llMH.|t, BJBJBJJBBJBBJ BJBJBJBfl BJBJBJBJ.....BJBJBBBJRJ ......RRJRJ ,1 BJ |
TO THE ENTIRE JEWISH COMMUNITY
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
2134 Northwest Miami Court Miami 37, Florida
TO ALE. OER E HIf Y##s
ANEE PATRONS
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
^Doldnq. at fliwoA. ?
REMEMBER!
DEMONSTRATION PROVES



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THE BALDWIN ELECTRONIC ORGAN


PAGE IOC
+Je*lsl>rk>rkUari
TODAY, SEPTEMBER uZ]
f;
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
HECTOR SUPPLY CO.
BranchesHomestead, West Palm Beach. Belle Glade
Ft Pierce
EVERYTHING FOR THE GARDENLAWNSFARMS
TO ALL GREETINGS !
JANES REALTY COMPANY
Not Incorporated
KENDALL. FLORIDA Phone 67-3651
HOMESTEAD, FLORIDA Phone 1303
POMPANO BEACH Phone 9815
A. W. JANES, Registered Broker
WHY PARK OUTDOORS?
Store your car in the only Bonded. Insured. Fireproof
Storage Garage at MIAMI INTERNATIONAL Airport.
Free 24 hour Courtesy Car Service to and from
all PASSENGER Terminals.
INTERNATIONAL
PARKING GARAGE. INC.
4641 N.W. 36th STREET PHONE 881304
Opp. Eastern Air Lines
9
SECURITY TRUST COMPANY
SHOUUND IUIL0IN*
MIAMI
Trust and Estate
Administration Exclusively
Shoreland Building
Miami. Florida
GREETINGS
ALL FLORIDA SURETY COMPANY
409 BISCAYNE BUILDING
MIAMI 32. FLORIDA
GREETINGS
MAINTENANCE,
SASH AND SCREEN SERVICE
ALLEN L. PARRESH. Manager
3427 N. Miami Avenue Miami. Florida
Phone 82-7531
GREETINGS TO ALL
J>jtwj* 9*4 Antustrm Oulm* gears'
TINGLE
PAINT
CO.
4 .W. FIRST ST. /AI A*\l. FLA.
It is fhatwrt fe txitmd t, mil n> Immak friends 4 Paf rM
Simctrt Withes it (he Ntw Veer
222 N.W. 26Hi STMET A. H. BECKER PHONE 2-3705
Robbins Roofing & Sheet Metal Co.
222 N. W. 26th Street Phon. 2-3705
A. H. BECKER
The grapes have been harvested and this young lady is all smiles. A symbol oi the detenu- {
nation to strive forward, she represents the increasing desire of Israel's youth to assist in the
raising of the young Slate's food supply. Through the United Israel Appeal, a constituent
agency oi the UJA. many city residents are moving to outlying settlements, in a special Town
To Country program. Other United Jewish Appeal agencies are the Joint Distribution Com-
mittee and the United Service for New Americans.
Rosh Hashonah: A Challenge
By DR. JOSEPH J. SCHWARTZ
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
If international events of the recent past have
taught us anything, it is to shun the easy prediction
and the prophecy that the next morning's news has
too often disproved. As we approach the New Year
5714, therefore, it must be with wonder and humil-
ity, and awareness of the fact that i is our mission
not so much to predict the future as to help shape
it.
In the world of Jewish affairs, this is particularly
true. American Jews have demonstrated over the
past decade and a half that men are not always help-
less against the moving tide of history. By the force
of their understanding, made effective through their
generosity, they have found it in their power to alter
the course of events. This has been demonstrated
in one dramatic episode after another in the
obligation of Europe's DP camps, in the creation
of the living state of Israel, and in the accomplish-
ment of the great homecoming of hundreds of thous-
ands of homeless people to the new state.
American Jewry has proven its comprehension of
the basic truth that what happens to any Jewish
community anywhere in the world is the concern
of the American Jewish community for practical
as well as hiaatlitlr reasons.
Today, the Jews of America are involved in a
continuing historical process and must continue I
demonstrate a mature insight into their role. In I
years 5713, news of hostility toward the Jews
the Soviet world was not greeted with resign*
or mute despair but encouraged American Je
to increase support of the UJA in the hope
strengthening Israel and, whenever the opportui
might come, of speeding the resettlement of
Jews of Eastern Europe within the borders of I
Jewish State. Now that changes in the Soviet i
ernment and the resumption of diplomatic relatk
between Israel and the Soviet promise a pertu^
less insecure time for Jews in that part of the wa
the real issues must not be forgotten in the clia
of optimism.
In the coming year 5714, it seems apparent
Israel and Eastern Europe will remain the two i
vital points of Jewish interest.
Let it be hoped that it will be possible to
range for the large-scale immigration of Eastefl
European Jews to Israel 182,000 of whom
already registered for emigration.
Certainly, it will be necessary, at any rate.
continue the aid to those Jews still in need
Western Europe and the help which has nuo>
CaHhwad en Next Page
GREETINGS
Earl T. Chandler
PLUMBING HEATING
REPAIRING
3Ut N.W. 57th Street
Phone 64-8721
PAGE'S GARAGE
Automotive Service With
A Reputation
"PROMPT SERVICE"
2331 S.W. 32nd Am. Ph. 48-7102
DAN W. PAGE. Proprietor
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS
NEW YEAR TO ALL
from
The Platt Family
A Happy New Year To All Our
Our Friends and Clients
Oboler & Clarke
Consulting Engineers
605 LINCOLN ROAD
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 58-3307
A HAPPT NEW TEAR TO
OUR FRIEHDS AND PATRON*]
Jolan's Beauty
Shop
642 6th STREET
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-7928
Ira Gottfried
A HAPPT NEW TEAR TO tf
*OUR FRIENDS AND PATRO^
Elnita Fashions
Manufacturer* of
Better DMrt*
3240 N.W. 27th AVENUE
MIAMI
Phone 64-7821
Chauncey Stone
Henry Taubei


|T,vjFPTEMBER 11. 19S3
+Jplst>n*jr*&n
PAGE 11 C
flB HflSHfllflHL57J4: fl COMPLEX CHALLENGE
Continued from Preceding Pa
I ficant inroads among the Jews of North Africa in
"bating disease, in nourishing the hungry, in
| .paring young people for a means of livelihood
^education and training.
But the main focus of attention, whatever the im-
gration opportunities that occur, will be on Israel,
L country which has made enormous and fabulous
Progress jn its first five years but which is engaged
in a grim if undramatic battle on the economic front.
It is important to consider the great advances that
Israel has made to be aware of the. far-reaching
Ljoniiicance of that progress. Israel is one of the
*t democratic experiments of our time. In recent
i we have seen vast areas of territory fall under
Communist influence. But Israel is one of the few
irets in which the world has recently seen the rise
i new democracy, and Israel has written proud
i in the story of democracy. In Israel's bustling
, in the justice of its courts, in its free schools
fcnd free elections, in the freedom of its citizens,
the enormous contrast which Israel presents to
e surrounding countries of the Middle East, is new
|e^imony to the soundness of the democratic way.
But it must not be forgotten that Israel faces a
1 of grave problems. Lewis Mumford once wrote
hat if you come into any big city you will really
i five cities side by side, in all stages of develop-
lent between the medieval past and the ultra-
Bodera present Here is an old house, and a family
flinging to ancient ways: here is the plumbing and
ppointments of an earlier century; here is a modern
building; here is another which points to the style
lot the future.
This is a thought most applicable to the State of
reel. In that land are the customs of. attitudes of
(everal ages; communities exist within each com-
Dunity.
! Here is an ancient Arab village; there a group of
f'emenite Jews reluctant to depart from the cus-
s of their ancestors; there a settlement of native
sraelis as modern as today's newspaper. One can
e architecture that goes back to Biblical times, or
I architecture of tomorrow on a white street in
Aviv. One can see farms where primitive
ploughs move slowly through the field* elsewhere
I streamlined tractor. In Israel, where the threads
f history can be traced from the origins of civiliza-
ion to the current moment, it has been said that
can traverse twenty centuries in the course of a
ingle day.
It is necessary to weld these many ways of living
1one "Perative economy. The, task is enormous.
! problem* are not always headline news that
1 % it is all the more important that American
"** continue to be concerned.
^erican Jewry's response to the UJA in the year
TJJI will be pivotal in determining Israel's future.
are unknown factors, imponderables that
* difficult in some respects to foresee that
It is not known how much, aid Israel will
J*>* the United State government in the
months ahead. It is not known how Israel will be
able to work out its relations with its neighbors.
It is not known whether immigration will be great
or small. But one fairly known factor is that Amer-
ican Jews will continue their magnifioant support
of the young democracy, through the United Jewish
Appeal.
What precisely will be the purposes for which
UJA funds will be needed in the year 5714? It is
too early to anticipate the entire program, but as
of this moment, certain projects in the early months
of the New Year clearly will call for UJA funds to
make them possible.
It is estimated that in the immediate period ahead
some 330,000 persons all immigrants to Israel
since establishment of the state will require the
services of the United Israel Appeal, principal
agency of the UJA.
These services must include maintenance in the
maabaroth (transition camps) of nearly 200,000 peo-
ple; economic aid to 30,000 families (some 120,000
individuals) engaged in farming; maintenance help
to 16,000 boys and girls in more than 250 educa-
tional and vocational centers.
Then there is the area of Israel's irrigation plans,
an ambitious program vital to the country's hopes
in the sphere of agriculture. The Jewish Agency,
receiving its funds from the UIA, will endeavor to
bring an increased area of 150,000 dunams under
irrigation, representing an addition of 25 percent
to the present total. Much has been written of the
marvelous plans for moving the beds of rivers, for
finding ways to bring water from its sources to dry
areas by manufacturing and setting down ingenious
networks of pipelines and dams and reservoirs. The
dollars must be forthcoming to continue this great
work which is already under way.
At the same time, funds will be needed to estab-
lish some 40 new settlements for 4.000 families
(comprising 16,000 people) who are living in the
maabaroth, and to move 8,000 more people to estab-
lished villages.
A successful UJA can mean that 24,000 dwellers
in the maabaroth can be given the opportunity to
engage in farming.
, It can mean the building of 10,000 modern houses
to provide substantial living quarters for 40,000 per-
sons, replacing their cement huts and shacks.
It can mean that as Israel receives its first pay-
ments of the German Reparations Agreement, these
goods can be freed for the purposes for which they
were intended the purchase of other essential
goods, machinery, raw materials and equipment, to
speed Israel's industrialization and further economic
independence.
A successful UJA also can mean the continuance
of Israel's hope to develop better relations with its
CanthMMd an Page 14
GREETINGS TO ALL
TILECRAFT, Inc.
NATHAN LEE
H. A. MacINNES
153 N.E. 10th STREET
JOHN HOPWOOD
CHARLES JORDAN
PHONE 2-6126
Pittsburgh Testing Laboratory
Serving Florida
MIAMI JACKSONVILLE TAMPA

Inspection and Testing
Chemical and Physical Analysis
Phone 48-8293
4301 N.W. 7th STREET MIAMI
R. W. BROWN and CO.
A Complete Line oi Fertilizers for AD Occasions
INSECTICIDES and SUPPLIES
Call 87-2616
274 SUNSET DRIVE SOUTH MIAMI

SEASON'S GREETINGS
REED CONSTRUCTION CORP.
Engineers and Contractors
1345 20th Street Miami Beach. Fkx.
FOUNDATIONS DOCKS GUNIT1NG
BASCULE AND FIXED BRIDGES CONCRETE STEEL
TO ALL GREETINGS
TVItlS T. TRIPP
1520 PONCE DE LEON BOULEVARD
TITLE INSURANCE
A definite insurance contract instead of an OPINION
as to the conalHon of title.
Longford Building. Miami 82-5618
ESCROWS ABSTRACTS
FIDELITY TITLE COMPANY TOM BLAKE
1 HPPV and Prosperous New
1-t To All My Friend*
<"d Patron*
REALTOR
15WoahlngtoaA.
Pnone 58-6623
HPP7 New Yes, To All
^ Friend* and P.iron*
| C Cleaners
*laundrv
*5 WASHINGTON AVE.
MIAMI BEACH
Paoa 5-9780
William k.^
Haivey Cypj,
i.
WELL.
HULLING
Installation of Complete
Sprinkling Systems
Pump.Sales and Service
CALL
7-2775
-ALL WORK GUARANTEED
Ce.
T hap
Iftrillin*
3530 S.W. 87th Place
GREETINGS
ft. W. THACKER
AGENCY
TYPEWRITEBS
Adding
SOLD REJiTED
123 N. E. let St
PHONE 2-11 IS
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
Tale s torng
Stare
Sl N.W. 42nd Avenue
MIAMI
4I-73M L. C Tate
A HAPPT HEW TEAR TO ALL
OUR FRIENDS A>0> PATRONS
llvauty
AIR-CONDITIONED
1273 S.W. 22nd STREET
MIAMI
Phone 3 OSM
Jvne Austin
FOR READY-MIXED CONCRETE PHONE 43-2060 _
Allied Concrete Products, Inc.
2800 S. W, 31st Avenue. Miami Florida
(On* Block North of Dixie Highway)
FRANK S. WUELXER. Prlo'sul
**1
TO ALL GREETINGS
B. B. Ulah. Pres. R. C. Singer. Vice-Pree. & Sec
H. Goyen. Treat?.
Members National Food Brokers Aeen. AH Code*
BOWrhIR IjaCsH. INC.
MERCHANDISE BROKERS
"We Coves- South Florida"
P.O. Box 2210 1134 N.W. 22nd Stroet Men! 13. Florida
Hopkins-Carter Hardware Co.


PAGE 12 C
+Jewistfk>r*JtofL
FRIDAY, SEPTEMttn,
SEASONS GREETINGS TO ALL OUR FR1E\DS AND PATRONS
Gati'ii *ia Carpets Ine.
1720 S.W. 8th STREET. MIAMI
Phone 82-6923
GREETINGS!
T. J. JAMES CONST. CO.
Phone 89-1841
ROCK FILL SAND
"WE MOVE THE EARTH"
1700 N.W. 119th St
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY
International Refrigeration Co.
Commercial Refrigeration
Equipment, Air Conditioning
Monthly & Yearly Service Contracts. Installation On All Make*
SALES AND SERVICE
24-Hour Service
3913 N.W. 60th St
Phone 78-7535
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY
Edwards MenV & Boys' Wear
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Samuels and Daughter Cynthia
3542 N.W. 17th AVENUE PHONE 3-9724
TO ALL NEW YEAR GREETINGS
STOLPMANN PLUMBING CO.
1853 West Avenue
Miami Beach. Fla.
PHONE 5-0481
TO ALL .
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
Douglas Convalescent Home
Stanley L. Thomas
1408 N.E. BAYSHORE PLACE
PHONE 82-5395
HARRY C. SCHWEBKE
AND ASSOCIATES LAND SURVEYORS
4119 N.W. 2nd Avenue
PHONE 7-2441
Miami
Best Wishes To All For
A Happy New Year
NATIONAL
TITLE
COMPANY
HUNTINGTON MEDICAL BLDG.
Main Office
PHONE 2-7824
Branches: Fort Lauderdale. Miami Beach
JEWISH HAPPENINGS IN
Continued from Pae
the wildly imaginative action of the original tale
was terrifyingly broadened into total annihilation
of life, itself. Brilliant, almost blinding technicolor,
some ingenious camera effects and unusual astron-
omical drawings helped to set the mood of terror as
the invaders landed in eerie space ships with death
rays that disintegrated all in their path.
Director Joseph L. Mankiewici gave the world a
great film in MGM's Julius Caesar. From Caesar's
ominous warning by the soothsayer, "Beware the
Ides of March," from the hushed murmers of the
conspirators to the final deadly deed and Mark
Anthony's oration over the dead body of Caesar, the
play moved to its climax with power and excitement.
The words were Shakespeare's, brought to life and
vigor by a superb cast.
Director Mankiewicz presented a vital and ab-
sorbing reflection of our own times with all their
potentialities for good or ill. The men of good will,
the demagogues and tyrants of 44 BCE, are with
us today. In its film form, the play gained visual
grandeur through the ability of the camera to fol-
low action to such settings as Caesar's atrium, the
home of Brutus, the tortuous streets of Rome, the
spacious public places, the majestic forum, the fields
of battle. This motion picture was a monumental
achievement for the screen.
Musically, producer George Jessel's Tonight We
Sing, was so fine a movie that one readily overlook-
ed the formula plot, some of which actually reflect-
ed the life of its hero, impresario Sol Hurok. Roberta
Peters, violinist Isaac Stern, Toumanova (as Pavlova)
and Jan Peerce added their talents to a festival of
music and ballet. This film was worthwhile for its
music alone, but also added up to satisfactory enter-
tainment for those who like to see show business
treated with a maximum of color and imagination,
regardless of prosaic facts.
Encased in a glowing technicolor setting, Irving
Berlin's Call Me Madam (produced by Sol Siegal), a
topical, satirical musical comedy was the first fea-
ture-length picture to offer Ethel Merman star bill-
ing; she performed as if she owned the medium,
ribbing official protocol with salty humor and rest.
There is nobody like her in show business, and the
loveable warmth of her characterization just can't
be explained, much less duplicated.
Essentially a chase film, producer Stanley Kram-
er's The Juggler, from the novel by Michael Blank-
fort, added depth to a powerful study of flight and
pursuit. Kirk Douglas was at his best as the famous
European juggler whose uncontrollable fear of im-
prisonment led him to see in every routine inter-
rogation the hated inquisition of the Nazis and in
every uniformed official, an SS trooper.
Joey Walsh was amusing as the devoted young-
ster who first broke through the juggler's iron de-
fenses, preparing him for an eventual readjust-
ment and to an ability to feel affection for others.
Taut direction and intelligent script and fast pace
supplied the ingerients of exciting drama.
A departure from the usual formula was the audi-
ence realization that the forces of the law are benev-
olent, so that we were 8* at once sympathetii
both the hunted and the hunters. The actual settia
in Israel, the world's newest nation, showed
processing of immigrants, as well as its well-on
cities, its pioneer farm communities and its bm
tension; scenery and atmosphere were treated
a natural sort of casualness. The sensitively dyn
musical score by George Anthiel was another i
to an unusual and absorbing picture.
Cooking for
Rosh Hashonal
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
Next week will mark the beginning of the Jew
New Year Rosh Hashonah. Among the traditia
dishes to be served with the coming of this I
is gefilte fish, chopped liver, chicken fric
chicken soup with farfel, noodles or mandlen, i
chicken or boiled, fruit compote and honey
sponge cake.
Children will have the unshelled nuts to play i
during festivities, so do have plenty on hand. Wnj
will be included on the menu and used for
mental as well as festive purposes.
Here is an excellent recipe for Manrielen, 11
stitute to be used in place of noodles in the ch
soup:
Mix V* cup flour and V teaspoon salt. Combe;
1 tablespoon fat and V* cup boiling water in:
pan. Keep over low heat until fat is melted.
flour all at one time and stir vigorously over I
heat until all of flour is moistened and
forms a ball and leaves the sides of the pan.
from heat.
Add 1 unbeaten egg. Beat thoroughly until!
thick dough is formed. Drop from the tip of 11
spoon onto a greased baking sheet, about half |
inch apart. Bake in 425 degree over 20 to 301'
utes or until mandlens are golden brown. M
about 150 crisp mandlens. You might like to
the mandlen in hot fat instead of being baked.
Another cake to add to your collection of di
ent cakes is a Polish nut cake.
Separate 4 eggs. Beat the yolks with a pinchj
salt until thick and lemon colored Add J
sugar by spoonfuls, beating after each addition I
light and thick. Add pound ground nuts, 1
spoon vanilla and 2 tablespoons fine cracker enn
Beat the 4 egg whites until stiff but not dry
fold into yolk mixture. Have two slip bottom"
inch cake pans lined with greased paper. Di
batter into two pans. Bake in a 350 oven, Wl
to 48 minutes. Sprinkle each layer with IT"
spoon of strong cold coffee. Fill and frost
mocha cream icing.
Mocha cream icing: 3 tablespoons hot coffee^
tablespoons dry cocoa, 1V4 cups confectioners r
* teaspoon vanilla. Make your coffee about
times as strong as usual, add to cocoa, stir
when smooth, add vanilla and enough sugar
spread.
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
Ruth's Jewelry Inc.
SANS SOUCI HOTEL
MIAMI BEACH
RUTH ZISSMAN
A HAPPT NEW TEAR TO ALL
OUR PR/ENDS AND PATRONS
Royal Fleet
Service
Parcel Delivery & Trucking
370 N.E. 75th STREET
MIAMI
PHONE 78-8795
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
Winterhaven
Hotel
1402 Ocean Driv e
Mkreil Beach. Fla.
Phoee 5-5571
A Hppy New Yew To All
Our Friends and Patrons
Gaylene Studios
DANCING SCHOOL
781 41st STREET
MIAMI BEACH
Ph. Si-T7M O. A. Spencer
GREETINGS
Apex Furniture-H
Upholstering to.'
UphoUUring
Mattrti Rtnovano*
1084 N.W. 5th AVEHUE]
MIAMI. FLORIDA
Phone 3-2762
IOALL...
A MOST
HAPPY NEW YEAR
O'Malley
SaUaurit*1*
Specialising In Yacht Vt
Canvas Work
ISM PORDY AVfl
Phone
5-71W


r cfptfMBER II. 1953
^L*2*2t*!r*n*r>
PAGE 13 C
AVID SURPRISES HIS FATHER ON ROSH HASHONAH
Continued frn Pw 1
his shoulders, unsure of the memory. He had
in Israel nearly half his lifetime, arriving six
ago.
cnmetimes his father would sit back in the chair
\Z terrace and look at the sky.
| .-here were things ." he said with nostalgia.
is silly to think about lt But yea ag0 in
umania on hot days we would have cold borscht,
cold delicious and sweet. Sometimes I think that
fniate'of that borscht would make me a happier
He put his hands behind his head and sighed
U,|y It made David very melancholy to see him.
I had been in the middle of last winter that his
Liber first mcntined moving to the country. He had
L> home very excited and red in the face. "There
[this new pipeline," he told them at dinner, "that
Li carry water into the Northern Negev. Here."
, took out a map of Israel and pointed with his
#er to a space between the Hebron Hills in
Uan and Gaza. "Beside the pipeline they are
Eg to build settlements, Shuvals, and by next
fcnng they will farm barley and ."
That is a year away," his mother had said, sens-
that his father had already jmmI* up his mind.
[here is plenty of time to-think about it."
I "No! If we decide, we wust go at the beginning
(June to help build the permanent buildings and
*nd the pipeline."
But your job. How will we live?"
"We will be paid for our labor. The funds will
hue from the United Jewish Appeal in America.
course, it will be hard. But think of it. A new
ke. We will have a new life."
I So they had come to Shuval 1. They had found
lere a neat row of white-washed canvas two-room
buses. In front of the houses, the pipeline threaded
ist through the settlement and into the parched
gev further to the East. Feeders stretched from
pipeline into each house. In front, a sprinkler
; provided tn irrigate a small vegetable garden.
the back of the houses stretched barren filds,
hich, when the irrigation feeders were extended
om the pipe, would be the site of the barley
kids.
| But before David had left Tel Aviv, he had gone
I the seed store There the man had given him the
seeds. With the seeds tucked away in an enve-
he felt a creat flush of anxiety and could not
ait until he had planted them in the ground.
(ter all, he was going to be a farmer.
| Of course, in order to keep the surprise, he had
plant his seeds far out in the field behind his
base where the barley was to be. He picked a spot
par a little rise in the ground and planted at the
end of the rise so that the patch would not be
Irible from the settlement. His great problem was
water. The vegetables in the garden with the
tinklers spraying them with water throughout the
was one thing, and his little beet patch far out
the field with no water except what he would
! to it was another thing. He would keep a can
er the sprinkler in the corner of the vegetable
den where it would attract little notice. Then,
en it had filled up, he would wait for the op-
ptune moment when no one was around and run
P his can of water to the beet patch. The other
"dren sometimes asked him where he was taking
1 water.
W will tell you later," he would say, rushing away
1 great haste Once when his father had come
home from a hard days work, exhausted and bfbk-
en in spirit, David would try to cheer hinV dp
"You wait until Rosh Hashonah, poppa Then you
will see the surprise I have for you." His father
would then pat him gently on the head and quickly
fall asleep.
Day after day in the blistering hot sun, David
would carry the cans of water to the little patch of
ground. Before many days, he saw little reddish
stalks pop through the sandy thin soil. He was cer-
tain that his beets would be ready in time.
"There is something very strange going on with
David," he heard his mother say to his father one
night. "He disappears for a short time many times
during the day. Do you know where he goes?" There
was no answer.
That had been two weeks ago, and he had stayed
inside the house ever since. He had talked to no
one. Outside, the sprinklers still zipped around in
their sockets. He could hear the voices of the
children playing near the pipes. "Is he still inside?"
His father's bronzed face looked into the entrance of
the house.
"David," he called. No answer. "David." Still no
answer. 'There is something you must see. It is a
surprise." The word seemed to revive him into en-
thusiasm. "Surprise," he told himself. But no, he
had seen the dry stalks himself. He had seen that
they had died. "David, you must come with me," his
father said firmly but with gentleness. There was an
unfamiliar ring of joy in his voice. David sat up
slowly in the bed and looked at his father. "There
is something that you must see." His father turned
and beckoned with his hand. David followed. Pass-
ing through the vegetable garden, David's mother
looked up from her weeding chore and watched
them cross the newly plowed fire-break into the
field where David had planted his beets. When they
had reached the little rise in the ground near where
the beet patch had been, David's father stopped and
looked over his shoulder at the boy. "There," he
pointed. "Do you see that?"
David followed his father's finger. For a moment
he had thought it would point out his beet-patch
filled with ripe plants, but it went beyond that to a
sliver of silver, caught in the glare of the sun.
"A pipe," David's father said. "A feeder from the
main pipeline. In the Spring there will be water in
this field and we'll be able to plant." David nodded
looking about the barren field that would one day
be rich and fruitful.
"This is the first feeder put in," David's father
explained. "It seems that everyone insisted that this
would be the first feeder. See it goes right to the
spot where you had planted your beets."
"Then my spot will be the first irrigated," David
said. He reached for his father's hand and looked
up into his smiling face.
"Are you happy now. Poppa?" he asked.
The father looked down at the boy and squeezed
his hand. %
"Not only am I happy," he said. "I am expectant.
Because of you I am going to have my cool delicious
borscht this Rosh Hashonah. Someone who has
grown beets in his vegetable garden is sending them
over to us."
The father and son stood there for a while looking
over the barren plains that swept outward to the
Hebron Hills. And David looked up at the sun and
discovered that he was no longer angry.
TO ALL A MOST pMW NEW YEAR MILTON A Happy Mew Year To AH Our Friends and Patrons Hnoulen MJd. FRUIT SHIPPERS 2207 COLLINS AVENUE Phone 58-1722 Wishing You Good Luck. Good Times and Much Happiness At This Holiday Season Dnde linen *, Inc. 539 Collins Are.. Miami Beach Phone 58-7854 Complete Wholesale Furnishers iox Hotels and Apartment Houses

t WEISS
A HAPPT NBW TEAR TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS Chris* Beauty Salon BEAUTIFUL HAIR STYLING 1672 ALTON ROAD MIAMI BEACH Phone 58-1912 Mr. and Mrs. Laurelli
Member of Board of Public instruction A HAPPY NEW YEAR WINDOW CLEANING SERVICE Fred and Herbert Abrama Cleaning Specialist! CHIMNEYS FLOORS WINDOWS 1113 Alton Rood PHONE 5-5907
TO ALL .
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
SNIDER-JONES, INC.
Manufacturers of Trade Wind Gift Jellies
MIAML FLA
PHONE 87-2730
BEST WISHES TO ALL
WASHBISH LIQUOR STORES
THREE FINE STORES TO SERVE YOU
2025 West Flagler Street
1245 S. W. 22nd Street
29 State Highway. South Miami

HAPPY NEW YEAR
FAR EAST RATTAN
SOUTH FLORIDA'S ONLY DIRECT IMPORTER
OF RATTAN
FROM HONG KONG AND THE PHILIPPINES
BUY DIRECT AND SAVE
50N.E. 11th Street
MIAML FLORIDA
Telephone 9-7621
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR
FRIENDS AND PATRONS
CROMWELL HOTEL
110 20th STREET
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-2141
The Cohen Family
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO
ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Beach Letter & Printing Co.
1846 WEST AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA
Phone 5-5951
HAROLD. JACK and IRVING RUBIN
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR
FRIENDS AND PATRONS
KENNY ELECTRIC CO
1835 BAY ROAD
MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA
Phone 5-7729
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO
ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Guild Opticians
LOUIS F. GILLINGHAM
830-1 LINCOLN ROAD MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-9703
i


PAGE 14 C
* kmistFkrkBnn
FRIDAY, SEPTTvmra,,
GREETINGS
MADER & COMPANY
P. & O. DOCKS
MIAMI
THE PAST YEAR'S EVENTS IT THE UNITED
iviHi

DORN MARTIN DRUG CO.
PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS
142 Sunset Drive
South Miami
A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY
Peering Awning and Furniture Co.
Serving Greater Miami Coral Gables Miami Beach
Beach. Lawn and Porch Furniture
COMPLETE AWNING SERVICE
4000 PONCE DE LEON BOULEVARD
(Corner Bird Road)
Phone 83-7600
TO ALL...
GR.EETINGS
il
ASPHALT PAVING COMPANY
Phone: Miami 67-2551
Box 786. Coral Gables. Fla.
TO ALL .
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
SWIFT & COMPANY
Refreshingly your*.
Swiff* ice Cream
PHONE 48-6555
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL .
A COMPLETE SERVICE FOR YOUR PONTIAC
TRAIL PONTIAC. INC.
665 S. W. 8th Street Phone 9-4576
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY CHANUKA
Abbott Gardens Private School
NURSERY THRU 8th GRADE
7705 ABBOTT AVE. PHONE 86-4816
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY
AL PFLEUGER
TAXIDERMIST
15899 N. E. Sixth Avenue North Miami Phone 816-5991
A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY TO ALL
Seevrity Abstract Co.
44 N. E. 1st At*.
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR
FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Hot Shoppes Caterers Inc.
MIAMI INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
PHONE 64-9022
Walter F. Gentry, Manager
fj i) Continued from Page 2
whipping before here, worked desperately in the
corridors and got the Phillipine delegation to intro-
duce an amendment when the matter came before
the Assembly. This amendment was a slick parlia-
mentary manouevre. for it would have fettered the
n,-^nations and destroyed the purpose of the reso-
lution. Although it was defeated, by mentioning the
"safeguarding of the Holy Places," the amendment
compromised many of the representatives of Roman
Catholic countries to such an extent that they ab-
stained on the resolution as a whole. Furthermore,
the Soviet bloc suddenly switched from abstention
to opposition. Thus the eight power resolution only
received 24 in favor to 21 gained and was defeated
as it failed to get the necessary- two-thirds majority.
Still, the majority of delegates had supported
"direct negotiations," but the Israeli position, to-
gether with the chances for a Palestine peace settle-
ment, were weakened by a series of events within
the Soviet bloc. The Slansky Trial, with its anti-
Semitic implications, was drawing to a close, and
there followed the arrest of the Jewish doctors in
the faked Kremlin plot and the Soviet rupture of
diplomatic relations wifh Israel. Public opinion was
aroused, and the Israeli delegation announced that
it would raise the question of the Soviet anti-Jewish
campaign under the Polish "package" item during
the second part of the Assembly.
The most important aspect of the "anti-Semitic
debate." which was one of the most vicious ex-
perienced here, was the way in which the Arabs
took the Soviet stand as a moral justification for
won
their <>wa camp** agitost the Jews Dest 1
fact that Mrs. Golda Myerson. who had come ^
specifically to lead the delegation in this d h
made a moderate speech without any particula i
erence to the Arabs, the Arab representatives^'!
it for a violent attack on Zionism as an alleged 1
spiracy not only as far as their own area was T\\
cerned but in the whole world. They developed IK I
thesis ad absurdum until they were actually claim, |
that the Jews were responsible for the Nazi murd
of the Jews. The Israeli stand gained the support
the Western delegates, but what was appalling ah,'
this debate, in which there was no resolution
no vote, was the way in which the Asians gave tacit]:
approval to anti-Semitism by saying not a
against it.
The debate was confused by outside development!
The death of Stalin preceded it, the release of ft
Jewish doctors occurred in the middle of it and th
Polish move to withdraw their resolution which n
regarded as a conciliatory act on the part of i
Soviet bloc, came just before the second Israeli j
tervention. However, Mr. Eban had to answer
Arab charges, but his reply resulted in a storm i
abuse and vituperation in which the Arabs sank I
personalities. m- ^
Although it was an unpleasant occasion, it
the first time that Israel as a Jewish state had tab
a stand against anti-Semitism in another countrjj
and the mere fact that it had done this in a public!
debate at the United Nations may have forced I
Soviets to change their policy, as they did do i
the Jewish doctors.
ROSH HASHQNAH 5714: A COMPLEX CHALLENGE
Continued from Page 11
neighbors, for a strong Israel will eventually con-
vince the Middle East that the country is not a pass-
ing phenomenon of contemporary history.
There are other, specific plans whose importance
is self-evident.
In addition to the program of the United Israel
Appeal agencies, the Joint Distribution Committee
in Israel must finance the Mafben program which
will render effective aid to some 6,000 people re-
quiring institutional medical care, doctors' services
and occupational therapy, while offering economic
and social aid to another 4,000 who seriously need it.
With JDC support, through the ORT training pro-
gram, the opportunity can be offered to 5,000 others
in Israel to learn a trade as tractor mechanics, elec-
tricians, radio technicians and the like helping
to develop an important reservoir of labor for Is-
rael's growing economy.
A glance at the situation in Europe shows an
urgent need for UJA funds in countries outside the
Iron Curtain.
Some 65,000 persons, including 15,000 remaining
Jewish DP's in Germany, Austria and Italy require
financial support and institutional care.
The aged, the incapacitated as a result of war and
persecution, the children living in JDC-operated
homes will, for some time to come, depend on UJA
funds, often their sole source of income and sur-
vival.
As for the 2,500,000 Jews behind the Iron Curtain,
their future too is still unpredictable, but the great-
est hope for large numbers of them is, as observed
earlier, to start again in Israel.
In the Moslem countries, where 900,000 Jewish
inhabitants still live in the midst of poverty
disease, a comprehensive welfare and reconstrud
program under the auspices of the JDC works I
stantly to make life more bearable. An irreducibl
minimum of 100,000 will need such help in
months ahead.
The goal of UJA-financed activities in the Moslei
areas will continue to be the eradication of
tagious diseases of trachoma, tinea, tubercuta
An unceasing effort is needed to raise the stand
of hygiene, especially in the field of infant care; I
give vocational training opportunities to the
people of the mellas; to expand economic aid in I
form of loans to artisans.
Meanwhile, the United Service for New An
cans' program of UJA-financed aid to newcomers I
the United States will continue to be impon
here.
The past nine years, from the end of World Wi;
II to the signing of the Korean armistice, havei
stituted a time of dramatic and crucial happenin
Upheaval and struggle have characterized this en
violent change and new political topographies. *
the midst of this the story of Jewish reconstruct
has been a bright thread woven through the
cloth of negative events.
Here at home American Jewry has reached a |
iod where the budget for local needs has to a li
extent been filled. Many of the post-war envisio
centers, hopsitals and synagogues are realities to
The Jewish community for the most part has"
pered. But Israel must continue to look to
Jews of America for support in that great venti
which is not yet fully realized.
A Happy and Prosperous New Year
To All Our Friends and Patrons
Jacques
Meauty Salon
677 Washington At*.
Miami Reach
PHONE 5-6866
Mr. Joseph
SEASON'S GREETINGS
King's
Shoe Robaiiders
Dry Cleaning & Laundry
The Beat on the Beach"
1879 ALTON ROAD
MIAMI BEACa FLA.
PH. 56-9487
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Jefferson Hotel
121 15th STREET
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-1141
EDISON
ELECTRICAL FIXTURE CO.
Wholesale Distributors
ELECTRIC SUPPLIES and
LIGHTING FIXTURES
Call 3-3114
1009 S. W. Ith STREET
(Temieznl Trail)
A Happy and Prosperous Ne* YM
To All Our Friends and Patwnj
LORENE'S SAL0N|
OF BEAUTY
5171 S.W. 8th STREET
MIAMI
Phone 48-1559
Lorene King
AH.PPyNewYMrToAllOr|
Friend. nd ?"
Michel***?*
521 LINCOLN BO*0
Phone 58-2931


Ay grPTEMBEB 11. 18*3
"Jewish fkrHinr,
PAGE 15 C
OF THE JEWISH STATE: II VITAL PROGRAM
Continued from Page 3
romote American investments in Israel, aids
IePntial investors with facts, figures and advice on
W ry aspect of Israel's economy. Virtually every
|Lv project initiated by an American investor
at one stage or another, through the offices
! I the Jewish Agency's Economic Department in
\ w York. During the last 12 months, the Economic
apartment reports, American investments in Israel
L toUUed about $10,000,000.
paralleling its physical progress U the growing
Iwareness of Israel as a center of Hebrew culture
iid Jewish religious heritage. Last June, a group
If Iwding American Jewish educators, researchers
od school executives went to Israel to participate
i a seven week lecture, ttudy and sight-seeing tour
jidcr the auspices of the Jewish Agency's Depart-
#nt of Education and Culture. The same Depart-
*nt in New York conducta an annual seminar on
trael culture for Jewish educators who are unable
i travel to Israel. This year's event took place in
Utnville, New York, with lecturers from the He-
tw University, Jerusalem, participating. Hebrew
leminars for educators and students were also con-
kcted in England and other European countries
pis year.
Earlier in the year a group of 20 undergraduate
kudents of leading Hebrew teachers colleges in the
plod States returned home after six months of
|tudy in Israel under the auspices of the Department
i Education and Culture. The courses which count-
I as credit toward their graduation were designed
i acquaint the future teachers with Israel's teaching
icthods and school system.
The Department of Torah Culture and Education,
f"hich inaugurated Torah Study Month in Jewish
Hmmunities throughout the United States last win-
,conducted a worldwide conference of Orthodox
msh educators in Jerusalem in August. The De-
artment also ran an international Torah essay con-
^t for teenagers and young adults. A correspond-
ince course in Torah and Talmud, prepared by the
epartment, circulates to over 1,000 students and
ducators each week.
Cultural Exchange Pro****
An event of a different nature was the Israel
lummer Institute, a cultural exchange program for
loung Americans which has been an annual project
P the Jewish Agency's Youth and Chalutziut De-
partment for the past five years. The curriculum
Irovides for about seven weeks in Israel, including
|iree weeks of lectures and study, extensive sight-
sing tours and a week or so to participate in life
a typical pioneer agricultural settlement. The
Pmrner Institute is one of the most popular Jewish
pney. Projects. This summer's enrollment of 136
N the largest to date.
Americans and other visitors who have five or
IwmT'k5 t0 Spend in brel ctn lemn Haarew quite
enuy by enrolling in one of several Ulaanim, in.
"^ejtudy courses, conducted by Um Jewish
Agency in various parts of the country. The Ulpanim
were devised four years ago as a means of teaching
Hebrew to immigrants. Last year they were open
to tourists and about 80 Americans have taken ad-
vantage of the courses so far. Registration is handled
by the Jewish Agency's Aliyah Department in New
York.
The Ulpan has proven a boon to American
professionals seeking jobs in Israel. They are also
aided by the Professional and Technical Workers
Aliyah office of the Jewish Agency on such matters
as housing and job placement. Such an organization
numbering some 300 American college graduates and
undergraduates has grown up independently during
the past year. The members, who join voluntarily,
are helped by the Agency's office to plan future
careers in Israel.
Perhaps the major historical event for Israel and
Jewry during the past year was the successful con.
elusion of an $822,000,000 restitution agreement with
Western Germany. The negotiations were initiated
by Dr. Nahum Goldmann, chairman of the Jewish
Agency. The Agency was one of the 22 major world
Jewish organizations comprising the Conference on
Jewish Material Claims Against Germany which
negotiated restitution for individual and community
property plundered by the Nazis.
Fields Kastom Kawers
AUTO SEAT COVERS TOPS. ETC.
PICK UP AND DELIVERY SERVICE
2341 N. Miami Avenue
Phono 3-2389
AUSTERITY: ISRAEL'S
GREETINGS TO ALL
Cooper Motor Sales, Inc.
TOUR OLDSMOBILE DEALER
1607 PONCE DE LEON BOULEVARD. CORAL GABLES
PHONE 48-8704
THE KEYS ARE WAITING!
DRIVE OUR SPECIAL "ROCKET" SHOW CAR TODAY!

y
TO ALL A MOST
HAPPY HOLIDAY

DOKHORN PRODUCE
2143 N. W. 12th Avenue
Phone 3-8411
TAYLOR CONSTRUCTION CO.
Continued from Page 6
the Israeli Minister of Finance, Levi Eshkol recently
pointed out, is simply the want of capital. In the
days of the Mandate, quite a large proportion of
Jewish immigrants came with capital of their own.
The hundreds of thousands who have come in since
the establishment of the State were penniless. This
lack, as Mr. Eshkol pointed out, must be filled now
by Israel Bonds.
The past year has been heartening in the finding
of additional minerals in the Negev and elsewhere.
Among the minerals now known to be found in the
country are phosphates, copper, feldspar, aluminum,
iron, gypsum and manganese and copper. The iron
deposits are more extensive than originally sup-
posed. The manganese may take on strategic and
political importance since Russia has in the past
been the chief source of this metal. Transportation
difficulties have impeded the working of the copper
and phosphate deposits, but their completion by the
new year is hoped for, and then these deposits can
be loaded on ships to bring Israel much needed
dollars.
Perhaps the new year may bring some pleasant
surprises. Should oil be found, as some American
geologists beliave it will, k will be a happy year
indeed for Israel.
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
2875 North Lejeune Road
PHONE 64-9761
aVuCauiL

GREETINGS
McCANN PLUMBING CO.
PLUMBING and HEATING
CONTRACTORS
Howard G. McCann. Owner
330 N.W. 71st STREET PHONE 84-9514
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
TO ALL
Mr. & Mrs.
Joseph Hut nor
| ^ and SELLS ACREAGE
1345 DREXEL AVE.
Phone 58-4984
I H.PPr nw Yea, To All
0ut Friend, .nd Patron.
Ptward Wright's
(arage
5801 N.W. 7th STREET
MIAMI
^one 87-0886
A Hapy New Year To All
Our Priends and Patrons
Sal Megdell
REALTOR
LINCOLN ROAD
38-8551
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
Rapid All
Bendix Laundry
944 S.W. 8th STREET
MIAMI
A Happy and Prosperous H*u> Tear
To All Our Friends and Patrons
Fisher Jewelry
1433 S.W. 8th STREET
MIAMI
Phone 2-2468
Milton Fishar
2-2203
Fernando Ojea
A HAPPT NHW TEAR TO ALL
OUR FRIEHDS AHD PATRONS
Walter McLean
& Son
IE WELERS
CONGRESS BLDG.
Phone 82-2181
HARDEMAN INSURANCE AGENCY, INC.
John V. Hardeman and John V. Hardeman. Jr.
266 Ahneria Avenue Phone 83-4607
MORE POPULAR EVERY DAY
SOUTHERN
BREAD AMD CAB
COLUMBIA BAKING COMPANY
FOR SERVICE CALL 2-5117
fir** H iftf.#>*
irom
Dairy Q
airy Vjfueen stores
Stoi
MIAMI
"Tin* Cone with the Curi em Tern"


PAGE 16 C
+J&igt&4g2L
FRIDAY, SEPTFM^,
THIS Y I A *
AS A LW A f S
Rest Wishes
f 0 A
Happy and
Prosperous
New Year
*
Holsum
rOUt NOM TOWN BAKERS
SINCl 1912
l)r. and Mrs.
A. K. Rosenthal
and Family
Extend to All Their Relauree
and Friends
Sincere Wishes For A
VERY HAPPY NEW YEAH
SAUL S. LEVINE and
STANLEY D. COHN
Certified Public Accountants
WISH A!.I. THKIR KKIKNI'S A
VERY HAPPY NKW YEAH
Season's Greetings To All Our Friends
Giovanni's
Restaurant
ITALIAN FOODS
1005 N.W. 79th STREET
MIAMI. FLA.
GREETINGS
ll.-ulc Blueprint
Co.
Free Pick-up and Delivery
Photostats Kodographs
Black Lines
Blue Prints Instrument Repair
No Job Too Large or Small
W. T- Mallard A- E. Preston
1520 N.W. 17th AVENUE
Phone 82-7259
GREETINGS
SUN LIFE
ASSURANCE CO.
OF CANADA
FOR INSURANCE CALL 3-1797
W. Keith Phillips Alex S. Cohen
Seymour Seigel Sam Katz
SHORELAND ARCADE
MIAMI. FLA.
A Happr New Yeer To All
Our Friends and Patrons
Jim Wood
Land Clearing
5924 CORAL WAY
PHONE 67-3602
JIM WOOD
A Happy New Year
To All
Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Beer
and Daughter,
SheUey Beth
A Happy New Tear To All Our
Fnendj and Patronj
Chesterfield Hotel
855 COLLINS AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-5831
r
mtricoM>
wwm
/W&&6
r

ew
Best Wishes For
A Happy New Yea
NEW YEAR GREETINGS

John B. Orr, Inc.
Building Construction
Quarry Keystone
PHONE 89-2424
485 N. W. 54th Street
lHt
All in one great
Oil every new
Scientific improve-
ment known to
the Oil Industry

tvici
"IJfcllllll
iMOTOr?
CHANGE TO NrV TRIPLt HD
K00LM0T0R Oil THIS WEEK!
5-5537
LAND 0' SUN DAISIES, Inc.
Miami Beach


j^ppy NEW YEAR
BUCHWALD & CO.
T...1IT NOVeltUS BB0"
J 160 W 34th Street
i^W YORK CITY
*! UNCOLN ROAD
"Telephone 58-1818
GREETINGS TO ALL
jUAMI PLUMBING
SUPPLY CO.
2151 K. W. If* Avenue
MIAMI, FLORIDA
$. Hale*"" Phon# *4-2M1
SEASON'S CHKETlllOl
LINCOLN
DEPARTMENT
STORE
[, I.W. Slxtj^oo-d SIMM
Phone 84-2941
MR. and MRS.
MAX M. SINGER
and Children
ANDREA and JIMMY
2201 S.W. 27th Terrace A.
Wish Their Relatives
and Friends
A Very Happy New Year
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
V
LEWIS
BEAUTY SHDPPE
1355 Washington *?
MIAMI BEACH
*
BEST WISHES
FOR
A VERY HAPPY
NEW YEAR
SHAW BROS
OIL CO.
Exclusive Distributors of
Pure Oil Company
Products in South-
Eastern Florida
mtewuik MtwMkm
MIAMI. FLORIDA
FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 11. 1953
SEC. D
_______ i
The Jews of England
By GEOFFREY D. PAUL
Jewish Telegraphic Ag.rxy
LONDON A Rabbj leaving South Africa has
predicted the end of that country's Jewish com-
munity within relatively few years; Zionists in Amer-
ica, we are told, are apathetic. This has been the
year of. the critics, with Britain no exception. Anglo-
Jewry, declare the detractors, is a second-rate com-
munity. *
For many in this country, the phrase has an air
of truth. Recent years have seen Britain's Jewish
community playing a minor role in the international
.affairs of the Jewish people. America his produced
the Jewish leaders and has given the lead. Anglo-
Jewry, lacking leaders with forceful personality, has
been forced to hitch its wagon to the American
caravan.
Not a little of the criticism heard here is part of
the British in the national sense consciousness
that this country's leadership in general internation-
al affairs has passed to the United States. And yet.
in many ways, the Anglo-Jewish community has
taken a firm and united stand on matters affecting
Jewish life which has in no wise been paralleled in
the States.
It was Anglo-Jewry that first raised its voice in
protest against the rearmament of Germany and
pointed to the dangers of neo-Nazi elements still
active in that country. Outside of France, Anglo-
Jewry was the first Jewish community to take an
interest in the affair of the Finaly children. Nor
has sufficient tribute been paid to the "back-room"
role played by members of this community in secur-
ing support for the Israel-German reparations agree-
ment among. German Socialists.
But the community has remained without a driv-
ing force. Since the departure from these shores of
the great Zionist leaders who made London their
headquarters, there has been no one man to com-
mand the attention and backing of the community.
Joint Palestine Appeal campaigns have achieved
fair results, Jewish National Fund endeavors have
been well supported, and the many other appeals
have received lesser donations. But it has been
a "Judaism-identification" of the pocket and not of
the heart.
The year has been marked by angry, and tradi-
tional, bickering between the Board of Deputies,
the representative body, and the Anglo-Jewish As-
sociation. There was a High Court case about the
granting of a Beth Din license to a butcher in which
disturbing facts about the internal organization of
the Jewish religious court came to light. There
have been occasions on which the authority of the
Chief Rabbi has been questioned.
Even some Zionists feel slighted. When the Jew-
ish Agency Executive met in plenary session in
July, American leaders were invited to attend the
sessions in which matters vital to Zionists in all
countries were discussed. There was no representa-
tive of British Zionism present at those meetings.
Israeli leaders in their references to Diaspora sup-
Continued on Page 15
BUJ GREEN
PLANT FOOD
On Your Lawn?
!ttl9 rMuU can be oh-
fe ,rom ,-hi* rich plaS food
wil tLiC0",a,n* minerals that
TYour? k**P ChlnCh bu OUl
^Tourlawn. Sold exchuiTely
HUGHES
SEED STORE
8- Miami Ave. Ph. S-8M1
Extend Best Wishes To All
For A Happy New Year
SALAMI
FRANKFURTERS KNOCKWURST
FOOD FAIR STORES
Sincere Wishes fox a
.. HAPPY NEW YEAR
- G. M. DYKES
IRON WORKS. Inc.
IS N. W. Third Street
Phone 82-5637
Sincere Wishes to All Our
Relatives and Friends far
A Happy New Year
Mr. and Mrs.
George Chertkof
AND FAMILY
Mr. and Mrs.
David Brown
and Family
WISH ALL THEIR
RELATIVES AND
FRIENDS
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
HAPPY NEW YEAR
THE
C.W. KISTLER
COMPANY
duPONT BUILDING
MIAMI, FLORIDA
Phone 2-5154
Lowest Monthly Payment in
This Area on Home Loans
LOWEST RATES
No Mortgage Insurance
Charge
. V. Galardi
20 S.E. 3rd Avenue
WISHES ALL HIS FRIENDS
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
TO ALL .
A MOST
HAPPY
NEW YEAR
James E. Roche
PAINTING CONTRACTOR
217 NX 97th STREET
Phone 78-5852
SEASON'S GREETINGS
TO OUR MANY FRIENDS
and Patrons
BALDWIN
Mortgage Co.
BALDWIN
Insurance Agency, Inc.
PHONE 2-8181
840 Biscayne Blvd.. Miami


PAGE 2 D
tJewistfhrkHan
PAY, SEPTEMBER n
cobbs fruit
preserving company
SEASON'S GREETWGS TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Johnny Electric Co.
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS
3524 N.W. 22nd Avenue. Miami Phona 71-4743
BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
HARRIS FOOD PRODUCTS
Manufacturer* and Distributor*
MAYONNAISE PICKLES CONDIMENTS
4421 N.W. 23rd Avt. Miami. Florida
SPICES
Ph. 64-9747
TO ALL ..
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
ST. JOHNS ELECTRIC CO.
S3 S.W. 8th ST.
PHONE 9-0463
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
SUN STATE SUPPLY CO.
6300 N. W. 7th Avenue
Phone 78-2575
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
OUR FRIENDS
UNITED TOURS
329 E. FLAGLER STREET
PHONES 2-8200 94)603
Bob Bellchcrmbers
TO ALL
LUIGI'S RESTAURANT
. GREETINGS
THE BEST IN FOOD
7419 COLLINS AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
7 Days Before Rosh Hashonah J *
By MOSES W. BECKBLMAN
It was an ordinary day in the history of the Joint
Distribution Committee. With Rosh Hashonah 5714
a little more than a week away, in art exhibit
opened in Paris featuring drawings done by some
of the 1.000 Jewish boys and girls, most of them
orphans, who live in JDC-supported homes and in-
stitutions in France. In Munich, Germany, a trans-
port of. "hard core" cases young people and old
people, the victims of Nazism whose scars are taking
longest to heal boarded a train for Norway. In
Casablanca, Morocco, a new class of ragged ghetto
children enrolled in the local Alliance Israelite
School. In Beershetai Israel, a grocery store opened
in an immigrant camp.
Those were ordinary events in the history of JDC
because they happen every day. But to. the human
beings whose lives-were touched by them, they were
moments of high drama. They nude up- those brief
instants in time when an old life is cast aside, reedy
to be forgotten, and a new life begins. It was fitting
that they took place only a short time before the
old year ended, and a new year opened.
These ordinary and extraordinary events are
bound together. One link connects the Jewish orphan
in France to the grocer in Beersheba. One chain
holds the tuberculous DP, bound for a new home in
Norway, to the street urchin in Morocco. That link,
that chain has been forged by the Jews of America
who through their support of the United Jewish
Appeal make the work of the Joint Distribution
Committee possible.
Noel Kempter
Among the paintings hung in the Paris salon are
several by Noel Kempler. 14 years old, one of nearly
a thousand Jewish war orphans still under JDC's
care in France. In 1945, when Noel first entered the
JDC orphanage which has become his home, the
psychiatrist attached to the institution asked the
child to draw a picture of himself aad of the house
he lives in. Noel sat down and sketched a house sus-
pended in space, constructed almost entirely of bars.
The self-portrait showed a thin, sad child dressed
in the striped clothing of a concentration camp
prisoner.
What was the story behind this tortured child?
When Noel was four years old, living in Paris during
the war, Nazi troopers arrested his parents and de-
ported them to a concentration camp from which
they never returned. Noel, visiting an aunt at the
time, was saved. But from that moment until the
day of liberation, the boy spent his days confined to
one room in a boarding house to prevent his dis-
covery by the Nazis. Images of concentration camps
began to haunt him. The world the four walls of
his room closed in.
When Paris was freed, Noel was placed in a JDC
home for Jewish war orphans. There, he began to
know gentleness and kindness again. The directors
of the home, a young married couple, made, sure
Noel ate hot, nourishing meals, they sent hime to
school, encouraged him to join the other children
at play. The warm, attractive way in which
Jewish holidays were celebrated awoke a new !/
est in the child, strengthened his feelings of b
part of a real family again. -
A second drawing by Noel, twelve month, itte
indicated improvement; and in the third itaW
trait the psychiatrist asked him to do a year %1
that, Noel showed his rehabilitation was complete
The picture revealed a smiling youngster jJ
cheeks the color of apples; behind him was i ha
red bouse; two roads led to it and a bright m\
shone on a happy scene. Today Noels guardian
know him to be a friendly and affectionate child
and a good student. This Rosh Hashonah Noel J
still under JDC care and must remain at the I
until he is graduated from high school. Then W'U I
go out into the world, strong and eager to make h*
maria
wfWPW at.
While the children's art work was still on display, I
a group of Jewish DP's stood on the platform of the |
Munich railroad station. They were "hard, con"
cases former tuberculosis patients and their dm-1
ilies, waiting for the train that would take then u
Norway in time to begin a new year in a new bod.
The Norway-bound DP's in the transport were not
the first group to resettle in Norway; other DP's
had left last year for the same country. Other I
groups of TB and post-TB cases from the DP area
have been accepted for resettlement in Swedes I
under a similar scheme worked out by JDC and the
Swedish Government JDC meets all costs in connee- j
tions with the projects, including transportation
charges and a lump-sum payment to the government
for each immigrant accepted.
Among those standing on the platform was Julius I
Z, and by his spirited interest in the coming event,
it was hard to realize that here was a man who had |
lost two families in two generations.
Julius was a boy in Poland when his wholo lam-1
ily his parents and six brothers and sisters
perished in a typhus epidemic following World War
I. Raised in a Warsaw orphanage, he learned the'
trade of a mechanic; by the time he was 24, Julius
was married and the father of a little girl. Then
Poland fell to the Nazis; Julius was thrown into i!
concentration camp and lost contact with his fan-1
ily. Returning after the war, he found his wife and I
daughter had died In the Warsaw ghetto. Nothing j
remained to keep him in Poland; he made his wtf
to a DP camp in Germany where, in 1946, JDC
doctors recognized serious TB symptoms in him.
Julius was assigned to a JDC-supported sanatorium
in Germany where he was slowly nursed back to
health. Rejected for immigration to half a dozen
countries because of his lung condition, he remained
in Camp Foehrenwald last remaining Jewish DP
camp in Germany until a special resettlement
plan worked out by JDC and the Norwegian Govern-
ment afforded him an extraordinary opportunity to
pick up his life again.
While Noel's drawings were on display, and Julius
Continued on Next Pag*
Badge and Mrs.
William L. Fallal
and Family
EXTEND BEST WISHES
foe the
NEW YEAR TO ALL
SEASON'S GREETINGS
MR. and MRS.
HENRY SHIER
AND
HENRY'S
AUTO & TRUCK PARTS
2MB N. W. 27th A-re,
PHONE 644*14
SEASON'S GREETINGS
*
MR. UUtl MRS.
ALFRED STONE
of the
BLACKSTONE HOTEL
A HABPT hlSW TEAR TO ALL
OUR PX1EHDS AND PATRONS
lolttnH
RpxaH ttrugH
7450 COLLINS AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
Phonos M-4M0 W"5919
* GREETINGS
Doigaard & Preston
Builders, Inc.
4083 Ponce do Leon Blvd.
PHONE 4-40 14
CORAL GABLES
MR. & MRS.
HARRY BLUMIN
and Family
of Miami Beach, Fla.
Wish All Their Relatives M*
Friends A Happy Net* **
-1


ffrtWH^SEPTEMBER 11, 1M3
>Je*is*norkte>n
PAGE 3 D
, Whp Shall Live, Who Put ?
*-
This is a portrait oi a Yemenite Jew who was
saved from Arab atrocities immediately after
the establishment oi Israel. The agonizing
expression on his face mirrors the two-thous-
and-year-long Jewish galuth. The portrait
was made in a camp in Tiberias by Note Kos-
lowsky. Noel Kempler may also become a
lamed Israeli artist some day.
Z. stood on the railroad platform waiting to board a
train for Norway, a 13-year-old product of the sun-
less mellah ((ghetto) of Casablanca enrolled in the
local JDC sponsored Alliance Israelite School. For
him, too. it would be a wonderful new year.
Moshe Zoubib lives in a one-room hovel with his
parents and a half-dozen brothers and sisters. There
is no running water and no electricity where he
lives; a slit in the wall lets in a shaft of light. Still,
Moshe is one of the luckiest Jewish youngsters in
North Africa. He lives In the street where JDC
undertook recently its experiment in mass trachoma
treatment. His father a cobbler recently re-
ceived a JDC loan to buy new tools. Most important
Moshe has had the chance to enter an Alliance
school.
There he'll learn to read and write and how to do
arithmetic; he'll study geography and history, and
even a little Hebrew. Soon, in the training farm in
back of the school, he'll be doing spring plowing and
picking oranges from orange trees. He'll have a hot
lunch at school each noon and a new pair of shoes
when he needs them. He'll undergo frequent and
regular health examinations and treatment, if he
needs it. (Large numbers of Jewish children in
Morocco suffer from trachoma, which leads to blind-
ness, and tinea, a form of scalp ringworm.) He'll
learn a Hebrew song and dance and know how to
Plant a garden and how to gather crops. And some
day, perhaps, if all goes well, Moshe Zoubib will
harvest fruit on Israel's soil, where he and scores of
thousands of Jews now living in the Moslem lands
hope to settle.
On the same day that little Noel Kampler's cray-
on drawings went on exhibition in Paris, on the very
morning that Julius Z. boarded his train for Nor-
way and Moshe Zoubib registered for the Alliance
School in Casablanca, a grocery store opened in
Beershcba.
There isn't much excitement or drama about a
grocery store. But Jacob A. thinks there is. Jacob is
from Rumania. When the Nazis came he took his
wife and son and went into hiding. When the Nazis
left he crawled out of the cellar that had become
the family home and determined he would go to
Palestine. There was a stopover in Cyprus first.
That's where Jacob first noticed the cough he
couldn't seem to get rid of. And in 1948 when the
family landed in Israel the cough became worse.
The doctors called it tuberculosis.
Jacob was referred to Malben and admitted into
a Malben TB sanatorium, one of nearly 100 hospi-
tals and other institutions operated by JDC in be-
half of thousands of sick, handicapped and disabled
immigrants to Israel. It was twenty-two months be-
fore he could be released, long months of medical
treatment and X-ray examinations and rest. But
Jacob was cured and released as fit to do light work.
Never again could he compete in the open labor
market his physical condition would never per-
mit it. But Jacob could work, could support his
family, could escape being a relief case for the rest
of his life if only there was a way. Malben found
that way. A JDC welfare worker suggested that,
with the help of his wife and 'teen-age son, Jacob
could probably operate a grocery store. A Malben
loan was arranged; premises were found in a new
immigrant camp; and a Malben instructor taught
Jacob A. how to buy replacement stocks, how to
price his goods, how to cut ration coupons and
keep accounts.
Just before Rosh Hashonah, the grocery store
opened. Jacob will pay back his loan, because he's
assured a steady clientele of several hundred cus-
tomers. (Under an agreement between Malben and
the Jewish Agency, all the stores and services that
are opened every time a new immigrant camp or
work village or farm colony is founded the groc-
ers and butchers and tailors and shoemakers
come from Malben lists, former patients able to take
up new lives of dignity and usefulness.) Thus far,
there are more than 2,000 storekeepers like Jacob
across the face of Israel whom Malben has helped
set up in business "hard core" cases who don't
have to be relief cases and drains on Israel's econ-
omy the rest of their lives; hard core cases who can
make their own contributions to the building of
Israel.
The four events described above took place in a
single day recently, as a year ended. But what of
the year ahead? What of the events which have not
yet taken place? What of those futures that have
not'yet been charted, the stories whose endings
have not yet been written?
What of the remaining Jews in Camp Foehren-
wald, observing Rosh Hashonah in the last Jewish
DP camp in Germany, who look desperately to JDC
for help in bringing to an end their years of home-
lessness? What of the 10,000 Jewish children in Iran,
Continued on P0 IS
To All A Most Happy New Year
NOBLE H. PARKER
REAL ESTATE
1623 Michigan Avenue
Miami Botch
Best Wishes For A
HAPPY NEW YEAR
HAY W It H. III
AUCTIONEER
Phone 2-2*60
for An Aiiction Ute The
"WRIGHT WAY"
BEST WISHES FOR
THE NEW YEAR
J. & M.
equipment
COMPANY
MM N. Miami Avenue
PHONE -4tTi
SEASON'S GREETINGS
Marion llullVr
REAL ESTATE
9577 Harding Avonue
Suxfsido
Phone 86-2423
BEST WISHES
F O R A
HAPPY
NEW YEAR
MR. & MRS.
STANLEY C
WASMAN, D.V.M.
1929 Purdy Arena*
MIAMI BEACH
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
TO ALL
Propeller Service
of Miami
20th St. International Airport
GREETINGS
EATABITE
1145 N. E. 2nd Avonue
PHONE 2-9361
HAPPY
NEW YEAR
Mr. A Mrs. Barney Bernstein
and Family
SEASON'S BEST WISHES
GEORGE J. BERTMAN
Realtor
420 LINCOLN ROAD, MIAMI BEACH
TO ALL A MOST
HAPPY NEW YEAR
FLORIDA PROCESSING CO.
JOSEPH COHEN. WILLIAM RUBIN and WILLIAM KLINE
27th STREET
HIALEAH
GREETINGS FROM JACK AND ROSE KAABE
NEWS TOWER GRILL
"WE AIM TO PLEASE"
Lunches Sandwiches Soft Drinks
IN THE NEWS TOWER
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
Phone 64-6961
SOUTHERN BRICK & TILE CO.
Manuiacturers of
DUNBRIK & DRAIN TILE
2300 N. W. 27th Avenue
P
SMALL'S BEACH & SPORTSWEAR
2301 Collins Avenue
EXTENDS TO ALL ITS FRIENDS AND PATRONS
SEASON'S GREETINGS
SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL
Miami Ventilated Awning &
Shatter I ?.. Ine.
Jack Dixon
Office 1646 N. W. 7th Avenue
Plant 1647 N. W. 7th Court
Benjamin Harrow
Phone 3-8503
Phone 3-8578
..----
Flaqler Street
Phone 9-3771
^JiJppaitmeHt^tdif
PRESCRIPTION
SPECIALISTS
Since 1897


PAGE 4 D
. frn/<#? fhrkUnn
'
SEASOKS GREETIHGS TO ALL OUR FRIENDS
IliM-.-ivm EMptrte Co.
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS
609 N.W. 12ih Avenue. Miami Phone 2-2351
Mr. and Mrs. Baron de Hirsch Meyer
EXTEND TO THEIR MANY
FRIENDS AND ACQUAINTANCES
BEST WISHES FOR THE
NEW YEAR
Harry and Bess Gersten
WISH ALL THEIR FRIENDS
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
MAYFAIR SHOPS
1133 Washington Avenue 2005 Collins Avenue
151 Sunny Isle Boulevard
WOMEN'S RESORT APPAREL
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO ALL
CHARLES M. TAYLOR
PLUMBING & REPAIRING
3834 S.W. 87th PLACE
MIAMI
PHONE 87-2998
To All ... A Most Happy New Year
CHARLES W. HALE, SR.
COMMERCIAL INSURANCE CO.
2012 PONCE DE LEON BLVD. CORAL GABLES
Holiday Greetings
To All
DANTE B. FASCELL
"Your State Representative"
157 Miracle Mile Coral Gables
r- ..
SINCERE WISHES FOR A
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Carpenters' District Council
2955 N.W. 17th AVENUE
Miami, Florida
I. E. SHEPPARD
President
H. E. MORRIS
Sec'y.-Treas.
GEORGE L. MITCHELL
Business Representative
MARVIN L. HAMMACK ARTHUR E. STEWART
LYMAN WILLIAMS
Assistant Business Representatives
Congregation in Khaki: the Armed
By LIONEL KOPPMAN
"On the first day of the year it is inscribed, and
on the Day of Atonement the decree is sealed, how
many shall pass away, and how many shall be born,
who shall live and who shall die ."
Among the millions of Jews throughout the world
who will usher in the Jewish New Year 5714 will
be a substantial number of young people consti-
tuting a congregation unique in many respects.
Their prayers will be the same as that of their fel-
low Jews, and the traditional greeting, "L'Shono
Tovah." will also be the same. But their clothes
and there are few variations among them In this
department will be different from those of other
Jem, and their "synagogues" will be training camp
chapels, tents, open fields, troopships, battleships,
USO-JWB Clubs, hospital wards, overseas houses of
worship, bedside alters, a leprosarium and make-
shift facilities, as well as Jewish Community Centers
and synagogues both near and far from domestic
military installations and VA hospitals.
The name of this congregation? Well, you could
call it Congregation in Khaki, or Congregation in
Uniform, or Congregation GI. It has no special name.
But its members are special they're the 150,000
young Jewish men and women in the U S Armed
Forces and in veterans hospitals. They come from
every kind of Jewish home Orthodox, Conserva-
tive, Reform and even unaffiliated. But they will
worship from the same siddur: The Abridged Pray-
er Book for Jews in the Armed Forces, edited and
published by the National Jewish Welfare Board.
Since 1941, the JWB has distributed more than
1,750,000 copies of its GI prayer book.
What do these prayer books mean to the GIs?
Let's listen to what an Army nurse in Korea has
to say.
"I am not alone in saying that I am grateful for
the many things the National Jewish Welfare Board
is doing here," she writes. "At the chapel, JWB
prayer books, mezuzahs and postcards are available,
and I have seen boys come in, pick up the books
and gently and thankfully pocket them Have
heard many, returned from the front lines, say that
having a prayer book was tremendous consolation
to them in their difficult days on the firing line."
These youthful worshippers are not required to
buy seats for the High Holy Days. Their ticket of
admission is the uniform they wear or the scars
and wounds of battle they carry. Their Rabbis?
Some of them they've only known for a few months
or will just meet for the first time. These Rabbis
more than 100 serving the military full time and
another 200 serving them part time constitute
the corps of devoted and dedicated Jewish military
chaplains recruited, properly endorsed and served by
the JWB Commission on Jewish Chaplaincy. The
commission is made up of the three major Rabbinical
bodies the Rabbinical Assembly of America (Con-
servative), the Rabbinical Council of America (Ortho-
dox) and the Central Conference of American Rab-
bis (Reform). These chaplains these men of God
serve at hundreds of installations and hospitals
in the U S and at camps and bases in Korea, Japan,
the Philippines, Hawaii. Guam, Okinawa, Indo-China,
SENDAI, JAPAN Captain David Raab,
XVI Corps Jewish Chaplain, has been com-
mended for outstanding work in creating bet-
ter relations between Americans and Jap-
anese nationals. Chaplain Raab is shown on
the right, at the Jewish Center sponsored by
the National Jewish Welfare Board, with a
number of Japanese who regularly attend
Sabbath services and also participate in the
singing of Hebrew and Yiddish songs at the
Oneg Shabbat. They are members of the
Japan-Israel Association, an organization to
promote understanding and cultural ex-
change between the two countries.
Siam, India, North Africa, Germany, France, Austria,
Great Britain, Italy, Cuba, Panama, Puerto Rico,
Trinidad, Virgin Islands, Alaska, Greenland. Iceland
and Newfoundland.
The average person has no idea what challenges
these spiritual morale-boosters in uniform face vir-
tually every day of their military careers They
must be flexible enough to do what several chap-
lains have already had to do on several occasions
officiate in the Philippines for Rosh Hashonah,
on the island of Guam for Yom Kippur and some-
where in Japan for Sokkoth; or, as another chaplain
had to do when eight men drove up after he had
completed the regular services, launch into a com-
plete new service for the recent arrivals.
They must also become accustomed to the sight
of tragedy. At the end of the day's devotions last
Rosh Hashonah in Seoul, Korea, a private told his
chaplain that he was leaving for the front the next
day. "Ill be back on Yom Kippur," he said I have
to say Kaddish for my father."
As be said, the soldier was back on Yom Kippur
but on a stretcher. A leg had been cut from his
body by Communist fire the evening before
Unlike their rabbinical counterparts in civilian
Continued on Next Paee
S. II. KRESS
* CO.
5-10-25* STORE
1201 Washington Avenue
MIAMI BEACH. FLA.
With Best Wishes For A
Happy Holiday
Season
Collins Glass and
Mirror Co.
1008 5th STREET
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-7897
TO OUR MANY VALUED
JEWISH FRIENDS
OUR SINCERE GOOD WISHES
FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
THURMOND
MONUMENT COMPANY
VOGUE
Laundry and Cleaners
PHONE 5-7489
The Best For Lees
Office and Plant
1425 20th Street
MIAMI BEACH
A MOST HAPPY
HOLIDAY
NATIONAL TITLE
COMPANY
end
ASSOCIATES
MIAMI BEACH
ABSTRACT &
TITLE COMPANY. Inc.
Complete Abstract and
Title. Insurance Service
THE ONLY ABSTRACT
PLANT IN
MIAMI BEACH
1630 Lenox Avenue
MIAMI BEACH


^prv SEPTEMBER 11, 1953
+Jewlsii nor Mian
PAGE 5D
Forces Pray Around the World
^
life these chaplains have no one Board of Trustees,
you arc their Board of Trustees. As one chaplain put
, "You, the American Jewish community, are my
Board, 1 am your investment."
Since June. JWB has been busy planning for the
wish Holy Day requirements of the largest number
of American Jews in uniform since World War II.
With the full cooperation of the transportation and
communication facilities of the U S Armed Forces,
jWB's shipment of supplies to the remotest corners
of the globe was completed weeks ago. These sup-
plies 600,000 prayer books, calenders, holiday
leaflets and greeting cards, huge quantities of blank
recording discs, skull caps, taleisim, candles and
candlesticks, shofars, wine, gefulte fish, kosher
meats and other food items were shipped to every
single spot where Jewish GIs might be on duty.
To these few places where no Jewish chaplain
may be available isolated hospital wards, at lonely
outposts or on shipboard JWB sent recordings of
the High Holy Day services. Thousands of holiday
gift packages were shipped abroad by local units
of JWB's Women's Organizations' Division for dis-
tribution by Jewish chaplains to the servicemen.
Careful logistic planning will assure the supplies
reaching .-hips at sea in time for Rosh Hashonah.
In the U S, local JWB Armed Services Committees
snd JWB Armed Services workers have everything
read> .'. r the thousands of members of Congregation
Khaki who may not get holiday leave. Working
closely \..th the Jewish chaplains in their area, these
committees and workers have arranged to transport
GIs and ambulatory' hospital patients to community
religk j' services and have planned for them to be
guests ;i! holiday dinners in private homes. Where
hospitalized veterans cannot be moved, the JWB
commit !- will spend the holiday at the hospital,
participating in services, distributing food and gift
package- and doing everything to make their holiday
as pleasant as possible. In addition, hundreds of
break;h< fast dinners for Jews in uniform and in
VA hi pitals will be held at the end of the Yom
Kippur worship.
For the first time since June, 1950, the end to the
fighting in Korea is arrived- But our Jews in uniform
are still there, on thy r(dged and mutilated battle-
field liiey are still in Occupied Europe, in Japan,
in England, France and North Africa, in the Med-
iterranean fleet off the Italian coast, jungle outposts
[^Oi *CTI
^>/^
JJJ
1 f r*iiifri
i | i
Li Ma. T" M
This Shoiar is sounded in battle-scarred syn-
agogues on the far flung earners of the earth.
Mr. and Mrs. Abraham !. Malofl
and Family
442 CADAGUA AVENUE. CORAL GABLES
Extend best wishes for the coming year
to the entire Jewish Community
GI's, a soldier, a sailor and a chaplain, as-
semble about the ancient Scroll of Law.
in the Caribbean, ice-covered bases in the Arctic,
islands of the Pacific and domestic installations.
Making it possible for these young men and
women to observe the High Holy Days spells morale.
And morale, according to our high government of-
ficials, is one of the best weapons we have. Here is
what one of them has said:
"We are providing our servicemen with the best
weapons, the best tanks and ships and planes that
we can produce, the best food and clothing, the
finest training and military leadership we can fur-
nish. But more much more is necessary if they
are to be the best possible soldiers of democracy.
In the sphere of morale-building, the home, the
church and the community must accept a major
responsibility. The National Jewish Welfare Board
is discharging its share of that collective responsi-
bility in an admirable manner. It deserves strong and
continuous support."
What do the GIs themselves say about the serv-
ices they receive? Here are excerpts from a few
typical letters:
"It is a very comforting feeling to know that those
at home are behind you in thought as well as in
action, and your organization has shown me that and
more for you have shown me that you stand for
the very essence of Judaism."
"We out here with the 1st Cavalry Division are
proud of our Chaplain. We're also proud of the
work you people of the JWB are doing out here
for we really know and appreciate the great amount
of time, trouble and money that is being expended
for our benefit."
"There is one thing that bothers me more than
anything else, and that is fear of being forgotten.
Unlike any previous wars, this one has aroused little
sympathy and understanding amongst you back
home. This arouses a gnawing anxiousness and dis-
content ... it was at a time when this discontent
was building toward a climax that I received your
gift, and I cannot properly express by gratitude for
it." i
Rosh Hashonah is a time for remembrance. A
you usher in the New Year, remember this unique
congregation, this Congregation in Khaki. Imagine
that you hear their voices, saying to you, "L'Shono
Tovah! Remember, it's Posh Hashonah for us, too.'
DR. and MRS. MILTON SANES GOLDMAN
and daughters Rose Hannah and Lynn Esta
2335 Meridian Avenue, Miami Beach
Extend Best Wishes for the New Year
to their Friends and Relatives
A. F. GIVEN
PUBLIC
ACCOUNTANT
319 N. E. 2nd Ave.
Phone 3-5373
MIAMI. FLORIDA
GREETINGS TO ALL
o.j.
lorgensen
L.G.
Schreffler
CONSULTING ENGINEERS
Biscayn. Building Miami
Greetings for a Most Happy
and Prosperous New Year
to Ow Many Friends and
Acquaintances
NAT and BOB
BERNSTEIN
SEASON'S GREETINGS
lula Jones
Flowers Tor All Occasions
DEL1VKRY
Cut FlowersPotted Plants
Corsages Funeral Designs
WeddingsParties
1910 S. W. 8th Street
2-5780 Phones 2-5384
GREETINGS
Meads Blake Mas: Jacks**
Shandlelere
ttt SO. MIAMI AVE.
MIAMI
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Tropical
Paper Box Co.
Manufacturers of
ARTISTIC PAPER BOXES
Miami International Air Depot
Bldg. 144 Phone 88-8459
MIAMI
SEASON'S GREETINGS
GRACEY ROOFING COMPANY
'Over 25 Years Experience in the Greater Miami Area"
"There is No Substitute for Experience"
85 N.E. 62nd STREET
Phone 84-8020
SEASON'S GREETINGS
HOMESTEAD RESTAURANT, Inc.
Meridian Ave. off Lincoln Rd.. Miami Beach Ph. 5-9609
MR. and MRS. NAT BRENNER
SEASON'S GREETIHCS TO OUR MANY FRIENDS AND PATROLS
Sabal Palm Bakery
FINE QUALITY PRODUCTS
5253 N.E. 2nd Avenue Phone 84-7422
To All ... A Most Happy New Year
orIIoward S. Reefer
BROKER 3I
777 BISCAYNE BLVD. PHONE 3-54W--
SEASON'S CREET/NGS TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
LIN FONG
CHINESE-AMERICAN RESTAURANT
7321 Collins Avenue. Miami Beach Phone 86-5588

Southeastern Finance Co.
PHONE 2-7005
duPont Building
Miami
SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL OUR FRIENDS
* BILLIE'S PLACE
SERVING FINE FOODS
Ml 8.W. 8h STREET. MIAMI
PHONE S-M44
SEASOHS GREETINGS TP ALL OUR FRIENDS
EARL'S IT DRIVE IN
reelrtel Lunch Dinner Curb Berries
53M W. Filler Street. Miami Phone 44499
BEST WISHES FOR A
HAPPY NEW YEAR




PAGE 6D
*Mm>isf> fhricMan
FRIDAY, SEPTfnthpd,,
SEASON'S GREETl*lOS TO. ALL i OV* FRIEHDS
RAY-MAR ELECTRIC CO.
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS
3043 S.W. 381h Court. Miami Phono 4-6416
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO ALL MY FRIENDS AND PATRONS

Manewitz Faces the Wall and
Meets the Angel of Death
1544 WASHINGTON AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH 38. FLORIDA
.-_-_-------.
......... i.....
HAPPY NEW YEAR
ROYAL CROWN COLA
Best By Taste Test
NEHI BOTTLING CO.
538 N.W. 24th Street
To My Many Friends and Patrons A Most Happy New Year
MRS. HELEN BOND
Perfect Corset Shop
1755 S.W. 8th STREET PHONE 9-9837
A HAPPY HOLIDAY
TO OUR CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS
TAYSTEE FOOD DISTRIBUTORS
16 N. E. Ninth Street Phono 3-5717
"PICKLE PRODUCTS AND APPETIZERS"
SEASOXS GREETINGS TO ALL OCR FRIENDS
Conrha Restaurant
SPANISH AND AMERICAN FOOD
1101 N. Miami Avenue Phono 2-9210
SEASONS GREETINGS TO ALL OCR FRIENDS
ALICE'S PASTRY SHOP
QUALITY PRODUCTS
120 S.E. 1st Avenue. Miami Phone 2-6368
........ .,_,
WISHING YOU A HAPPY NEW YEAR
6E0. 0BEN0UR. JR.
BONDED ROOFING
SHEET METAL HARDWARE
64 NX 73rd STREET
Phono 7-2612
GREETINGS
DIXIE FARMS PRODUCTS
WHOLESALE MEATS or.d PROVISIONS
51SN. W. 23rd Street p^ g^

SEASONS GREETINGS TO ALL OUR FRIENDS
DeTARDO'S ITALIAN AMERICAN RESTAURANT
1211 7Ut STREET, MIAMI BEACH PHONE 86-2366
TIP-TOP SUPER MARKET. Inc.
TIP-TOP
SUPER MARKET
27 N.W. 5th STREET
The Finest Foodstuffs the Market Affords at Reasonable Prices'
By LOOI5 LlMKY
SeV^W Arts FewturV
They thought of Death if at att as a far-off
station on long road-. Life" Was a game, and when
Death toppled OvW oi*e of tneW, atld he failed to
rise, they gave vent to th#fc gHet in loud lamenta-
tion and show. Their mourning #** the ritual of a
primitive people. Mourning ovef, fh*y went back
to their play refreshed.
But when Manewitz died it was like a convulsion
of nature. What a mighty stroke of the Angel of
Death to lay low
that giant! He
was a symbol of
strength and ag-
gression. Mighty
stars and manag-
ers stood in awe
of him. There
was no one brave
enough to tam-
per with his man-
u s c r i p t s. He
spoke arrogantly.
H e disregarded
convention and
refused to knuc-
kle under for ad-
vantage. And
now, there he lay.
stiffened out,
staring at the
ceiling.
The Yiddish Rialto was overwhelmed. It was felt
that there must be a dramatic exhibition of grief
worthy of the tragedy. If not now, when? A black
letter day in the annals of the theatre the day
of Manewitz's funeral. Let the orchestras play soft
music find the funeral marches and play them
with vigor; the 'cellos should wail and groan; the
violins should play with muted strings; let the
trombones blare. The stage should be set in black.
Put a few gigantic urns near the footlights on either
side. Drape mourning bands from the top gallery
down to the orchestra. Hang his enlarged portrait
in the center of the proscenium, and lower it for
all to see. When such a great man dies, art should
provide a performance that fits the occasion.
Let Winehefsky, the grandfather of Yiddish liter-
ature in America, write a series of articles describ-
ing the last painfal hours of the deceased (which he
did after he returned from his vacation in the Cat-
stills, much improved by the mountain air). Don't
tuft Bafanof away; let him also write of his friend
ship with Manewitz; who had persuaded him Bar-
anof, rented in appearance to Beethoven to com-
pose his twenty-first symphony. That symphony rests
in manuscript, unpublished for lack of funds, but
when it is finally published it will be dedicated to
the memory of the great Manewitz. Joel Antin is
entitled to the floor. That erudite journalist began
a series of articles that continued until the first
anniversary of Manewitz's death. They were articles
that exhausted the entire subject and, in conclu-
Isaee Pereti
bated en his sketch
sion. Antin promised that there was yet a book
be written. That promise as yet to be fulfilled u
resplendent Ritter cannot be denied the right to hk
word; he calls his secretary and dictates an article
of reminiscences about Manewitz; of course the
secretary will fill in the details; you may be sj
he will write the article to Hitter's satisfaction; m
you may also be sore that he will avoid all referent*
to the contracts broken by Ritter, to the roy,|tiw
not paid by Ritter.
What Manewitz had given to the Yiddish theatre
was the burden of this outpouring of mourning. h>
had written a large number of plays about fortr
in all. Many of them were not original. He had taken
suggestions from the dramas of all theatres. He had
rewritten operettas and farces, and adapted well-
known plays by giving them a Jewish slant. He had
paraphrased, in a Jewish setting, the best of Haupt-
man's tragic plays, and he had transplanted dozens
of the works of leading Russian dramatists. There
was integrity in his workmanship. His dialogue was
sensible and interesting. His wit was not of the
theatre, but in character drawing. It was said thy
he wrote plays to order. So did Shakespeare. So
did every dramatist who made the writing of plays
a profession. And writing plays became ManewiU's
profession. In short, he was the ablest man of letters
the Yiddish theatre had acquired. The repertoire of
all acting companies existed because of Manewitz's
work. They were the foundation of Madame I.ubella's
career in Mirele Efros, the reverse of the Jew-
ish King Lear: in Die Schechita, which was based on
a sketch by Perez; in Rosa Brandt. Hauptman's play;
in The Bastard, adapted from Victor Hugo Burlak
would have been a wind-bag of an actor if he had not
played in ManewiU's The Charlattan. the Krcutzer
Sonata, and together with Madame Lubella in all of
her plays. Ritter never would have achieved the
position he occupied in the theatre had it not been
for Manewitz's Jewish King Lear, a paraphrase of
Shakespeare's play, for his Der Fremder, for his
Elisha Ben Abrya and Der Maturef. Nor did he write
plays only for the stars. They were all good ensemble
plays.
In them every actor in the company was given
an opportunity. The character distinguished himself,
the villain and the comedian. He had a kind heart
also for the common people of the union, and seldom
wrote a play in which/there wast not place for the
chorus men and the chorus women, and he had no
objection, later on, if a song Ware introduced and
the orchestra be employed. He felt that the entire
theatre had to be fed, and he was the mother feeding
theffl with good parts and with opportunities for
service. This was the gist of what they wrote about
him in the press and- at memorial meetings, and
every scribbler who ever said "hello" to Manewitz
in a coffee-house toot pen m hand and wrote per-
sonal reminiscences and- anecdotes to his heart's
content. Their eulogies oozed with praise, for they
believed that of the dead nothing but good should be
spoken. j
The actor's union gave form to its sentiments in
long resolutions. Black bands were ordered earn
Continued en Ptr 12
GREETINGS
DOTSON RECAPS
OUTWEAR NEW TIRES
DIAL 9-2446
DOTSON TIRE
CO.
900 S. W. 8th STREET
GREETINGS
tt
Paramount
Soda Shop
253 East Flaqler Street
Miami, Florida
Phone 3-9244
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
Hvarh
Itt'caratorH.
file".
1682 ALTON ROAD
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-1403
Alice Tierney
SEASON'S OTEETTNGS
KATZIF
GROCERY
378 N. W. 8th Street
PHONE 2-9700
Greetings from
Billi* & Schwartz
Florida's First and Only Puttie
Halations sad Fund Raising
Counseling Finn
MIAMI BEACH
One Lincoln Rd. Bldg.
Telephone 5-7080 & 58-2454
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THE HOLIDAY
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1620 LENOX AVENUE
Phone 58-6565


jffiqy SEPTEMBER 11, 1953
+Jml3lifk>rkHar)
PAGE 7TJ
Brg(s$ays of Wit and PhibsppKy
\ <
By ELI A. ALMI
^AHDHWit'^LTOUVI
The Midrash legend concerning Moses' death is
Jh esthetic in its bearing upon the tragedy of this
ZL wd ell In*"**"1 uM y,nboUc for tbe
gj^ 0f Israel *** libswlsr and first leader
Ifotes was.
Voses the legend telb us. not wishing to die,
JL .bout himself a magic circle which would not
jL the Angel of Death to approach him. God
JJtf was therefore obliged to come dewn from
i^ He did so and put a kiss upon Moses' fore-
HMd This kiss ended Noses' Mfe.
Not unlike Moses, his people have refused to die
throughout centuries of persecution and suffering.
DM flw destruction of the Jewish state, the Romans
proudly proclaimed, "Judea capta ost," and believed
that Israel was annihilated.
But Israel has survived not only the mighty Rom-
jos. it has survived all its foes throughout the ages.
Hoses stubborn love of life passed on to his people.
R was to them their leader's last will and testa-
ment was directed: "And thou shalt choose life."
The survival of the Jewish people, despite the
persecutions and slayings perpetrated by its mighty
neighbors persecutions and slayings which have
nude the Jews the most tragic people in all human
history is as much to be wondered at as the cir-
cumstance that so small a people, as the Jews, living
in so small a land, as Palestine, has produced the
eternal Book, the Bible, which is the fountainhead
of the world's three greatest religions, the founda-
tion of all human culture and civiliration, the source
of all hope for mankind's future.
DARKENING THE SKIN OF THE SOUL?
Millions of men and women of white skin broil
themselves in the sun during the summer in order
to darken their skin and very frequently expose
themselves to the real danger of sunstroke. Even
in the winter time, they attempt to tan their skin
by going to sub-tropical climes or by the use of
artificial means. Strangely enough, many of the
millions of men and women who torture themselves
into transforming the color of their skin are chock-
ful of prejudices and hates against other people
whose skins have a naturally darker hue.
Lloyd George once, quite ingeniously, thus char-
acterized an anti-Semite: "He comes out of a
church where he has recited Hebrew psalms, where
he has listened to a sermon concerning a verse in
the Bible, and he pounees with both fists upon the
first Jew he meets, crying: 'Jew'!"
THE PHILOSOPHER AND
HUNCHBACKED GIRL
Moses Mendelsohn, the great Jewish-German phil-
mpher, was hunchbacked, -small of stature and
poor in appearance. His wife, however, was a beau-
tiiul and well-formed wosnan.
A story is told about Mendelsohn which, in truth,
fc connected with the life of another man, also a
huBchnack, who had lived several centuries before
Ok Jewish German philosopher.
howMcr, the story runs that while Mendelsohn
u courting the charming girl who was later to
become his wife, the attractive damsel would not
hear of a marriage between herself and the homely
Lothario. True, Mendelsohn was a philosopher, a
person highly thought of in Berlin, the friend of
Frederick the Great. But this was no inducement to
the lady to enter into matrimony with a crippled
young man.
But Mendelsohn would not give up. One day, as
he led his Inamorata up to a large mirror, he sard
to hen "Look in, my beautiful one." She 1M as he
had asked her, and, lo, she began to tremble. In
the looking glass she saw Mendelsohn in the form
of a tajl, handsome young man while, by contrast,
she descried herself in the shape of a person
humped in the front and back.
Mendelsohn explained the strange apparition.
"You know, my dear," said he, "that betose out
souls are sent down to earth in order to be embodied
in some newly-born human beings, the names of
those who are ultimately to marry oue another are
read out aloud in heaven. As I was about to be born,
I learned that the woman destined for me was to he
Continued en Page 10
MR. and MBS. STEPHEN F. KESSLER
Charles Jeffrey and Jo Ann
Extend Best Wishes to Their "Family and 'Friends
The entrance to the Jewish apiarter of Safed.
consisting of narrow, labyrinthine alleys, is
located on the western section of the steep
mountain of Canaan. The ancient streets
are dotted with "chadorim, yeshivoth. syna-
gogues, consjref/ations and kiosks. Tradition-
al religious backdrops dot'Israel's modem at-
mosphere rising out of the ruins of past his-
**Y- -_______________
Neff-TlHMnas
Machinery, Inc.
CONSTRUCTION
WOODWORKING
INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY
1920 N. W. Miami Court
GREETINGS
Hollopeter
& Post, Inc.
REAL ESTATE
SALES & RENTALS
153 N.E. 3rd Street
Wwne 3-737t
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
Rite Cleaners
104 8. W. 17th Avenue
Miami
Phone 3-6919

* mm* m w>'
TO ALL .
A MOST HAPPY *EW YEAR
FRED BY CALO
and His Boys
GREETINGS
Mar H> 4s>W tear Bssne Unity for the Unite* Rations
and Everlasting Peace to AllMonlrind
M OlllliA IJNF\ SERVICE
ISO M. W. Mtb STREET
To Our Many Patrons and Friends -A Most Happy New Year
Tnraerfe *^pholsterkig i mpanv
7230 NJE. Miami Court
Phone 84-6545
*
MR. AND MRS. MAURICE COHN AND FAMILY
and the
World Wide Liquor Co.
EXTEND BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
TO THE ENTIRE JEWISH COMMUNITY
GREETINGS
HOLLEMANS RESTAURANT
N.W. 79th STREET at 7th AVENUE
THE BEST OF FOODS With Friendly Service
Air Conditioned
Popular Prices
* Ample Parking
GREETINGS
MIL 0* E
PLASTERING COMPANY
7150 N. W. 3rd Avenue
PHONE 84-7041
GREETINGS
VICTOR'S
BpociaHrlng m
ITALIAN FOODS
Rlcotta
Fresh Italian Sausage
2013 N. Miami Are.
Phone 3-9974
TO ALL THE SEASON'S
BEST WISHES
Aeolite Neon
Sign Co.
404 S.W. 3rd Ave.
PHONE 2-0152
GREETINGS
from JACK FISHMAN, President
Rrnmlett ff^nipment eft Snpnly Co.
Fee Better Health Visit she
Miami Health Institute
General Diagnosis and X-Ray
Physical Therapy Body
Conditioning Colonic
Irrigations Cabinets and
Massage
7215 Biacayne Boulevard
PHONE 7-
900 N. E. First Ave. Miami Phone 94)618
Equipment and Supplies for Hotels. Restaurants and Clubs
To All Our Friend* and Patron*
A Mo*t llappu New Year
MURIEL SPORTSWEAR
1. RUBIN ARNOLD RUBIN
PAUL JABLON
2020 N.W. MIAMI COURT
MIAMI. FLA.



PAGE 8D
>****> !****#>
HtfftAY, 8EPTEMBER
MR. and MM3. SDONMJ3 S. LaVlGNE
joih with their children
MR. and MRS. MYRON COWEN
Son, Gary John, and Daughters, Elizabeth & Melinda
and
MR. and MRS. WALTER A. LaVIGNE
Daughters Leslie, Morley and Shelly
and Son, Elliot Mayer
In expressing their best wishes to all their friends lor a
HAPPY NEW YEAR
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
PECHTER'S BAKERY
1349 WASHINGTON AVENUE
Phone 5-7117
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND ACQUAINTANCES
HAPPY NEW YEAR
L L POWELL & SONS
REALTORS
1659 Lenox Arenu*
Phon. 5-3357
To All ... A Most Happy New Year
MRS. BESSIE GALBUT AND FAMILY
WASHINGTON SUNDRIES
244 5th STREET
MIAMI BEACH
SEASONS GREETDipS TO OL'R FRJ\"DS
THE SPORTS CENTER
\\ ne*e Fishermen Meet"
Largest IX'. Tackle Shop Tackle For Rent Tackle Repairs
All Kindt ot Bat Opp Fioridian Hotel Open 7 Days Phone 5-198
S35 Weil Anue. Miami Beach Ltw and Larry Gartenberg
""......-------------.................... .!! -
MR. AND MRS. S. J. SPECTOR
WISH ALL THEIR FRIENDS A HAPPY
AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS HAPPY NEW YEAR
STATE HARDWARE & BUILDERS SUPPLY CO.
7806 N.W. 7th Avenue MiamL Florida
PAULS RESTAURANT
KNOWN FOR GOOD FOOD
142 W. Flaglar Street. Miami. Florida
Phona 3-9221
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
GREEMAC PRINTERS
COMMERCIAL PRINTING LETTER PRESS
I AND LITHOGRAPHERS
QUALITY PLUS SERVICE
613 NX. 1st AVENUE
MIAMI
PHONE 9 9009
John Bieda
SEASONS GREETINGS TO OUR FRIENDS
AND PATRONS
Battista's Restaurant
142 S.W. 37th AVENUE
MIAMI
Phone 4-1962
Jane and Al Del Monico
Mean ins of the Synagogue
To the Active Community
By DR. SAMUEL BELKIN
President of Yashiva University
The synagogue in historic Judaism occupies, a
position much different than that of the church in
the non-Jewish world. In the latter, one's confession
of faith is entirely reflected by his identification
with a house of worship. The non-Jewish world, in
the main, speaks of the church as equivalent to the
totality of religion, and most -of its religions teach
that there is no salvation outside of it. The Jewish
Synagogue, on the other hand, has never claimed
to be the sole dispenser of salvation. Never has it
attempted to hold a mortgage upon the spiritual
life of the individual Jew.
Nevertheless, while the possibility exists for one
to be a good Jew individually, even if he does not
attend the synagogue, he cannot be a part of the
religious Jewish Community unless he is actively
identified with it
The entire concept of Jewish community has its
its origin in and
draws its vitality
from the syna-
g o g a e God"s
name is sancti-
fied, our Rabbis
tell us, only
through commu-
nity association.
In the Talmud,
the concept of
Tzibur is men-
tioned only with
reference to the
synagogue, for it
is only when we
join our fellow-
J e w s in syna-
g o g u e worship
and activity that
we affirm the
peoplehood of Is-
rael. We then
demonstrate the unity of belief and observance that
transforms us from a collection of individuals into
an integrated community. The Jewish concept of
community is then, above all, a membership of the
spirit, a religious communion.
Judaism does not recognize two independent
spheres of duty and activity. It does not character-
ize the duties that man has toward his fellow-man
and to the community at large as simply moral or
social obligations. It cannot be satisfied with other-
worldliness, alone, and regard what is of this world
as secular. It rather emphasizes that the comma
nity, to be vital and constructive, must be vested
with holiness and sanctity. Such holiness and sanc-
tity can exist only where both Community living
and the daily life of the individual are endowed
with spiritual elements.
The state of sanctity and holiness, which Judaism
Or. Samuel Mkim
. Ifppi at symb.1
requires, is achieved not so much by the dedicaf
of one's entire life to otherworldliness or by witt
drawing from the affairs of the material world
It is by one's ability to consecrate his social an"
secular activities to a higer moral and spiritual
purpose and dedicate his daily permissible acts to
a Godly motive. The supreme aim of Kedushah i,
the sanctification of the commonplace by hallowhu
the licit and by giving our earthly virtue a heavenly
ideal. It is our daily deeds "for the sake of heaven"
that constitute holiness.
Tradition has, therefore, never separated the con-
cepts that are inherent in the words Bet Kaknesset
and Bet Hatfilah. The first, freely translated, means
a community house, the second, a house of prayer.
The traditional synagogue is both of these u'
eternal protest against the separation of the secular
and the sacred in community activities.
This spiritual yet this-worldly character of the I
synagogue as a symbol of the Jewish community is
made possible through the Torah. Fundamental
to the religion of Israel is the concept that "the'
ignorant cannot be pious". (Let us always remember
that Judaism is the religion not only (if (he sage
but of the entire congregation of Jacob i The syna-
gogue was, from its beginnings, a House (if Study
in which instruction in the Torah the way of
Jewish life was an organic and indivi ibie part
of worship. It is not strange that the ancient Greeks
described the Jewish Synagogue as a place where
the religious and national philosophy ol Judaism
was expounded.
Our Sages sought to preserve this idea! even in
their legislation. A community, according to Jewish
law, may transform a House of Worship int i a House
of Study, although it may not reverse the process,
for the sanctity of the Utter is greater than that
of the former. Thus our sages recognize I, as we
must, that methodic instruction in the law and moral
precepts of the Tors* Is the foundation of Judaism.
Let us discover to what degree the traditional
functions of the synagogue have been preened in
America. There was a time when American Jewry
was considered the "spiritual step-child" of the
learned Jewish aristocracy of Europe. Today, how-
ever, but two centers remain which must preserve
all the ideals of Judaism Israel and the United
States. The most populous and influential Jewish
community resides in the United States. We have
the greater responsibility, therefore, to rebuild here
that which was destroyed overseas.
Now, what of the Synagogue in America? The
main problem that faces traditional Judaism on this
continent is not, altogether, the laxity in attendance
at synagogue services a serious enough c implant
It is rather the unfortunate fact that Jtiaism in
America has become the Judaism of the Synagogue
only, the fact that the entire religious life of Ameri-
can Jewry has become centered about the ynagogue
worship. One's loyalty to Judaism is r.) longer
Continued en Page It
SEASONS GREETINGS
ROOFING PAINTING
Gay Maleomb Co.
277 GIRALDA AVE.
CORAL GABLES
PHONE 44148
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS.
RELATIVES JUfD JEWRY
EVERYWHERE A MOST
HAPPY AHD PROSPEROUS
HEW YEAH
MR- and MRS.
I. A. DURBIN
and FAMILY
4*5 If. Bay Hoed *
Miami Beach
GREETINGS
Star Eleetric
Co.
"No Job Too Small or Large'
1515 S.W. 87th AVENUE
MIAML FLA.
Photw 87-5147
A Happy. Healthy and
Prosperous Naw Taai To
All Out Friends and Patron*
Baker *
War!. I or.
QUALITY PRINTERS
518 COLLINS AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-7829
Mr. and Mrs. George W. Baker
II h Wrrfc Pleasure f
Ijrfead 4 Mhtt Hop.'-
New rear U M
$
W. K. Thoina
SeserNrfeWeaf >
Paaffc lasfrac..**
A MOST HAPPY
NEW YEAR TO ALL
Tar nor** Sport
Shop
"Complete Line ol
Sporting Goods''
40 S.E. 1st Street
Phone 2-6S37


j0; crPTEMBER 11/1988
*JemteHfl*i#>:
ft
y.
page: 9 b
.* ^
ear in America
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
j#wi*h Talagraphk Aaancy
KW year will mark the celebration of the
anniversary of Jewish settlement in America.
did the first Jewish settlers the Jewish
Fathers" feel and celebrate their first
, Hashonah in America back in 1653 and 1654?
I them "Pilgrim Fathers." That tag has usually
i reserved for the English settlers who came ov-
I the Mayflower thirty years before the first
settlers. But the Jewish settlers of New
dam have also the right to be called Pilgrim
ere were many groups of Pilgrim Fathers, the
who came over to Delaware, the Quakers
I came to Pennsylvania. They were all Pilgrims
(fathers of the world that was to be America.
means to journey, to wander, and in that
1 the Jewish settlers of New Amsterdam were
Pilgrims than those who came on the
[lower, for the Jewish settlers were several
i Pilgrims. They had wandered from Spain to
d, from Holland to Brazil and had fled from
outh American country to New Amsterdam.
| when they arrived at New Amsterdam, they
re not sure that they had found a haven.
ere were only 23 Jews who came over in that
[settlement in 1654, but Governor Peter Stuyves-
|the Dutch governor of New Amsterdam, was
I they night prove a menace to his way of life.
lourse, the Dutch themselves were but a very
number, and the Indians didn't like their inf-
lation either.
e immigration problem that troubled these first
fch settlers (if New. Amsterdam three centuries
i probably still the major problem not only of
[lews, but of the whole world today. A world
! immigration is fluid is like a man with good
I circulation It is fundamentally sound. Con-
| today, if the surplus populations of Italy, Japan
oon could flow freely to the less densely popu-
\ countries, the tensions of the world would bo
I reduced. But no one loves an immigrant.
I only immigrants we have any praise for are
who immigrated long ago. If the Pilgrim
Jcrs who came on the Mayflower or the Jews
[came to New Amsterdam were to come in to-
I am afraid, we would look with the same con-
1 on them as they were subjected to three hun-
| years ago.
I Dutch were relatively more tolerant in those
|of the first Jewish settlers, but Governor Peter
want certainly possessed little of this fine
P> He not only did not like Jews, he had
I to prevent any settlers except those of his
[urch establish themselves in the new world.
'one legged but swell headed. He had vanity
' for four legs. It was not the Jewa, bat others
J Amsterdam who said that he aspired to be
"Grand Duke of Muscovy."
Wvesant urged as a pretext for the deportation
PJ Jews from New Amsterdam that they might
line a public charge, and he tried to do every-
* Possible to make his predictions come true.
J^*Jrbidden to open stores or trade with
tmt lr,m Spato to Jtoffmtf
tnm Mlmmt to Brazil .
the Indians. But the Jewish settlers were no supine
lot. They made Peter Stuyvesant "eat crow." They
appealed to the Dutch East India company, and
Stuyvesant was overruled.
There was a Jew who ran a butcher shop on what
is now Wall Street. His name was Asser Levy.
There is some reason to believe that Asser Levy was
also the shochet. One day, the sheriff came around
to Levy with a bill for a special tax.
"What is this?" asked Asser Levy.
It was a special tax placed on Jews by Governor
Stuyvesant in view of the fact that they do not join
with the others in standing guard. "I will not pay
the tax, and I demand that right to stand guard,"
replied the Jewish shochet.
Asser Levy won his point. Stuyvesant did- not
permit the Jews to build a synagogue, but it is prob-
able that on the first Rosh Hashonah in New Am-
sterdam, they held services at the home of one of
the settlers, and it is also very likely that the chazan
was Asser Levy.
Asser Levy was not only a brave man but appar-
ently an honest man, as is indicated by the fact
that several Christians of New Amsterdam named
him as executor of their wills.
It was a tense and vital time this period of the
first Jewish settlement in America. A time of many
wars, but a time also when the mind seemed to be
throwing off the old fetters. Newton had astonished
the world as Einstein today. Spinoza was blazing
new paths in philosophy. Rationalism flourished
alongside of an intensified mysticism. Shabbathai
Zevi was to come forth in a few years to proclaim
himself the Messiah. Spinoza's friend, Henry Orden-
burg, wrote to the Dutch philosopher that there
was a growing belief in the restoration of the Jewish
State, and Spinoza himself wrote that he thought
it entirely possible that they might return to their
ancient land again. "They might be chosen by God."
["PPT New Year To All
Fritnds and Patrons
piercer Auto
Service
f*l S.W. 8th STREET
MIAMI
Phono 83-1595
CUFF MERCER
fc* mV TEAR ALL
r**NDS AND PATRONS
Riviera Health
Resort
H! YUMUBJ STREET
C0RAL GABLES
I>hon 87-0078
i* BROADBENT. IWor
TO ALL GREETINGS
Stern Electrical
Engineering
RCA Radios Television
Sales and Servico
5138 S.W. 8th STREET
Phone 4-6540
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS.
RELATIVES AMD JEWRT
EVERYWHERE A lOST
HAPPY AMD PROSPEROUS
MEW TEAM
MR. and MRS.
M.LEDOVIT
and ramily *
472* Alton Road
Miami Beach
A HAPPT NEW TEAR TO ALL
OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Radio Sales &
Rental Co.
1726 ALTON ROAD
Plum* 5-1832
C. R. Gunn
A V SEASON'S ORBETi)
Warn
**f.
FRIENDS
A Happy New Yon To All
Our Frtondi and Patrons
Central
Garage
300 N.W. 8th AVENUE
MIAMI
Phone 3-7983
Anton and Williams
o,, i2E5j5 FOR ALL OCCASIONS FRESH DAILY
312 tin STREET. MIAMI BEACH PHONE 5-M72
GREETINGS TO ALL
ENNESS GARMENT CO. INC.
Fashion Mart Blda.. 127 N. W. 2nd St
Miami
GREETINGS AND BEST WISHES TO ALL
Mr. & Mrs. Max Shlafrock
M. S. CONSTRUCTION CO.

5410 N. W. 14th Avenue
Phone 84-2671
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
ALAMO FRIED CHICKEN
Delicious Golden Brown
2816 PONCE DE LEON BLVD. PHONE 4-2712
CORAL GABLES
MR. AND MRS. LEON BERG AND SON GILBERT
Southern Frnit Shippers
OF ALL WORTH-WHILE THINGS
739 WASHINGTON AVE.
EXTEND BEST WISHES TO ALL THEIR FRIENDS FOR A
NEW YEAR THAT BRINGS A SPECIAL GOOD MEASURE
HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM
MR. CARLTON J. COMBS
of the
COM IIS MANUFACTURING CO.

TO ALL .. NEW YEAR GREETINGS
Lagoon Restaurant and Bar
YOUR PATRONAGE APPRECIATED
23 SUNNY ISLE BOULEVARD
GREETINGS
. WALTER E. PEACH
ORGANIZATION
FREDERICK T. SHARMAN
Registered Broker
Phone 7-1404
9500 N. W. 7th Avenue
MIAMI
MAY THE NEW YEAR BRING
liuppinvHs. -toy and Prosperity.
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
AND TO ALL JEWRY
*
Schrager's, Inc.
1001 WEST FLAGLER STREET
MIAMI. FLORIDA
Phone 2-0707
"HIGHEST TYPE PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY"


I


PAGE 10 D
^JewistiihrtWar
raiDAY, SEPTEMKa u
.
BEST WISHES TO ALL OUR FRIENDS FOR
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
David R. RlfasHyland Rifas
Miami Tit Bo and Abstract Company
25 YEARS OF TITLE SERVICE IN DADE COUNTY
124 SMORELAND ARCADE
TELEPHONE
Mr. and Mrs. ARTHUR APPLE
and Sons LARRY and JEFFREY
of the
ASSOCIATED IMIOTOURAPHKRS
Extend Greetings for a Happy New Year ________
TO ALL GREETINGS
RALPH A. FOSSEY
REALTOR
5948 S.W. 73rd Si.. Barger Bldg. South Miami. Florida
PHONE 87-5303
Dad* County Resident Sine* 1908
A Happy and Prosperous
New Year
To All Our Friends
and Clients
CONGRESS BLDG
TO OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
GREETINGS
II lEY'S
Cathay House llostaurant
CHINESE AMERICAN CUISTNE
FAMOUS CANTONESE DISHES
227 22nd Street Phone 5-3590
MIAMI BEACH
WE HOPE THE YEAR AHEAD
WILL BRING YOU HEALTH & HAPPINESS
Mr. and Airs. Si
nel T. Sa p i r o
BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY MEW TEJHI
MR. AND MRS. ELI HURW1TZ
andYamily
Phono 83-7179
5r
BEAUTY SALON
Air-Conditioned
72 MIRACLE MILE
CORAL GABLES
; .. ...: ... .-
COLONEL JIM'S
Nth STREET CAUSEWAY
Lr
ImihHwmUf
Wei N. CiesirHsa Wlh Aey Otter Cefeoel iiat'i
FEATURING MILE LONG KOSHER HOT DOGS
AND JUMBO STEAK SANDWICHES
6BWNU PIT SARKCUE F000 FIT FOt A KING
OMOtS PET TO TAKl OtfT ft^U t4-5M4
MEANiNG OF THE SYNAfiDGU
Continued from Page 8
judged by his entire mode of living but by his as-
sociation and identification with a .House of Wor-
ship. True, traditional worship is a vital pert of the
totality of Judaism, but the ritual and service of
the synagogue, divorced from practice of Judaism
in one's private life, ia not a sufficient spiritual force
to preserve Judaism and the Jew.
What are the remedies to this ill? In our judg-
ment, a major effort must be made to reinstitute
the theme of Bet Hadtidrash in'tbe concept of syna-
gogue, to make the synagogue once mere the insti-
tute of religious education, to nuke instruction in
the Torah an organic part of worship and its most
prominent feature. It is through whatrmay be called
community learning that the creative function of
the synagogue can be revealed.
One cannot treat Jewish piety sad Torah learning
as separate and independent matters, for Jewish
practice is based upon Jewish learning. When a
non-Jew desires to be eceepted as a proselyte, be
is first instructed in the laws of the Torah and
acquainted with its commandments, even before the
ritual of circumcision is performed.
In America, now, nothing less than a conversion,
nothing less than an inner change is necessary, a
spiritual rededication to historic Judaism. Before
that can be achieved, it is necessary that our people
be instructed in the essence of Judaism. The syna-
gogue is today the only institution that can serve
as a center for this instruction in the principles and
practices of Judaism. The Synagogue must again be-
come the school, as it has been from time im-
memorial. The sermon must not be permitted to
become merely a discussion of "current events." It
must be an instructive talk on the fundamental prin-
ciples of Jewish theory and practice. The Friday
night lecture should deal with problems that pertain
to Judaism, as well as to Jews. The Rabbi may not
bo able to solve the problems of anti-Semitism, but
he is responsible for the clarification of the meaning
and purpose of Jewiihness.
The Synagogue has maintained its centrality in
Jewish life because it endeavored to channel the
daily activities of the individual through instruction
and worship. It was a spiritual dynamo which radi-
ated the light of Torah to every Jewish home. If
the synagogue does not wish to function in a void.
it must not permit the totality of Jewish living to
become limited to worship alone.
Synagogue worship, piety and reverence are preci-
ous elements in the makeup of a religious Jew, but
they must not quench the eternal Jewish thirst for
divine learning which is the source of Jewish piety.
Divine knowledge is unlike secular knowledge. It
possesses a power a spiritual mystic power all
of its own. The studying of Torah, itself, commu-
nicates religtousKy and morality. .
Our Sages toll us that since the destruction of the
Temple, God has no other dwelling place among
men than in the four ells of the HaUkhah, which is
llll I HI to saying that Judaism means, above
eeeayithsg uiat. Hfe according to 'the devise taw
of the Torah. There can-be no Jewish observance
or piety without Jewish learning. If we want an
observant, religious generation, it must he instructed
E TO THE
with Gods worn
given to us in the Tor*
immortal words of Rabbainu Saadia Gon
valid today. "Our nation is a nation only faT'
of the Torah." We require a traditional syo,
that will make the social, religious and educ
aspects of Judaism one interdependent unit.
In ancient tunes, when every Jew was j
Torah," and every Jewish home a little
the synagogue was nevertheless the centnti
tution in Jewish life. Today, the future of
depends upon our ability to create a spinal
intellectual environment based on the co
the indivisibility of Torah learning and wo.,
the dependence of our communal and social!
ore upon the spiritual teachings of our tta
In ancient times, the pious life of every in&
Jew bad its profound influence on the life i
spiritual commuAity. Today, the synagogue I
educating in Torah, must bring about the l
ment of a spiritual community which can
its influence upon the life of every Jew.
BRIEF ESSAYS OF
WIT AND PHILK
Continued from Pag* 7
hunchbacked. I prayed to God to amend hi, i
that I instead of you be born humpbacked u
you come into this world tall and beauuMJ
listened to my prayer and as you see o
my request."
Thus one of the most beautiful girls of
married the hunchbacked Moses Mendelsohn.
THE PHILOSOPHER AND THE KING
Concerning Mendelsohn, as concerning all i
men, many stories and anecdotes are told,
based on truth, some mere inventions. Onei
story revolving round the life of the Berlin,
philosopher, a story relating to the ptoblea|
chance or predestination is worth recoimli
Mendelsohn was one day, in a pensive
strolling along the streets of the German
Suddenly he was accosted by no less a per
than Frederick the Great who was dressed in I
in order to safeguard the secrecy of his royal I
"Where are you going, Mendelsohn?" the |
queried.
"I don't know," answered the philosopher.
Frederick considered the reply an offense tj
ally and ordered the arrest of his friend,
sohn.
However, as a friend and admirer of the I
German thinker despite the untoward,
which had impelled him to order his detentioij
king catted upon him in prison.
"Why. Mendelsohn, did you tell me you.1
know where you -were going?" Frederick I
"Because," answered Mendelsohn with a i
truly did not know. Tor how was I to know
was going to prison?"
H It With Pfeaaare That I fstead
NfW TIAt MNfTMMU
to a* a* Meads oad
O. B. WHITE
NtOtK 2-4010
4* M.W. first Street
L. 8B.VBBMAN
SILVER PAINT
COMPANY
111* S. W. FIRST STREET
853 COLLINS AVENUE
Wish for JU1 Their Patrons
ad Frionds a
happy mr rut
TO ALL .
SEASON'S
BEST WISHES
HAPPY HOUR
TAVERN
3680 Coral Way
PHONE 4-9437
A Happy Mow Vaar To All Our
Friend* and Peers
Heautft Sml+m
550 41st STREET
MIAMI BEACH
Phono 5-1624
MISS SUNSHINE
TO ALL ... GF
HiCHTEB
~*5 YEARS EXPERlEtf
Custom TJpholtdW
Furniture RtpainsS
Refinishing P,nn
Antiques SpecUUy
1343 S.W. tth STREET |
Phone 2-7804
NEW YEAR
GREETINGS
PRINTING
ARTS
720 w. w. *?*
JACK. JKSSE AND
TS1TLSR


SEPTEMBffliki^
+Jt*isl>nrTiri*un
PAGE 11 D
stadrut: Israel's Labor
Organization
ii
BY ELIEZER WHARTMAN
ioJtbe first words a-vlslter heart upon reach-
jd is Histadrut." II is not surprising, for the
, rf Israel is reflected in th* Mater? of the
rtt, and one is ineonceivaWe without the
patl's General Federation of Labor His-
i ovdim is a unique creation that has no
1 jn the world. It is at once a representative
Bloyer of labor. It owns and operates vast
and consumer cooperatives. It nuts the
K" largest health organization. It maintains
btete network of schools. Its food marketing
.tive feeds a major part of the population.
^sport corps carry almost all of the travelling
the traveller to Israel descends from his
| if he flew via Israel Airlines, he was patron-
la partially Histadrut financed enterprise.
]es are. if he came to stay for some time, that
javy baggage was carried on a Histadrut man-
freighter. Ho will travel to nearby Tel-Aviv
i or taxis, both run by cooperatives affiliated
histadrut. On the way he will see Histadrut
Aools and hospitals, giant factories and small
bops, all controlled by the labor organization,
river will be a union man, as will be the
coming in the opposite direction. The doc-
kted across the aisle, the Government clerk in
of him, the laborer repairing the road, the
to directing traffic, the farmer in the field.
usrwifc on the street corner all are mem-
bf the Histadrut. Half the population and
paiters of its wage earners enjoy the union's
In. The heads of the Government, including
|Mfnister David Ben-Gurion, President Yitzhak
and Speaker of the House were at one
hders of the Histadrut and are still members,
(the moment of his arrival, to the time of his
tare, the visitor to Israel will be confronted
turn by Histadrut enterprises and people.
cannot move without coming into con-
some phase of it.
(did the small, determined group or*rnen who
^led in the auditorium of the Haifa Institute
nology in December, 1929, to create a union
I that a scant 33 years later the membership
I organization would swell-from 4,400 to over
1 and would provide welfare and health serv-
I half a million more. It was as unorthodox a
i of workers as could possibly be imagined
ned up for the Haifa meeting, with most of
dsting of newly arrived intellectuals who,
tic reasons, had turned their backs on the
I type of work that they had previously per-
ld had deliberately chosen manual labor ia
Rather than its being a ease of a working
ing a labor movement, it was a case of
f ftoveiHent creating a working cltss.-
coontries of the world. Including our
is usually the. urban workers who found
Farm workers rarely participate and arc
mong the last to be unionized. In the
m Histadrut, however, it was the farm
,' *bo t0k the initiative, drawing in after
|*'workers in the city. Its founders visual-
'Hisudrut as *n oran which would not only
protect the interests of the worker, but which would
also radically change the Galut pattern of Jewish
life that had emsted since the time that Rome had
conquered Jueea and dispersed its inhabitants to
the four corners of the globe. For two thousand
years the Jewish people in the various lands in
which they had settled had had a lopsided economic
structure, there was no urban or rural worker base
to the society; rather it consisted, in the main, of
the mercantile and professional classes. Manual
labor was looked down upon.
The restoration of the dignity of the working man
was one of the cardinal principles of the new union.
Membership was opened to anyone who was not an
employer. This has brought into the union's ranks
people of all classes; lawyers, butchers, farmers,
doctors, candlestick makers, politicians, street clean-
ers, judges, etc.
Under the Histadrut's encouragement and direc-
tion, the number of collective and cooperative set-
tlements affiliated with it has grown to almost five
hundred. It now boasts of 965 consumer coopera-
tives with 412,000 members, 375 producer and serv-
ice co-ops with 15,000 members. Its giant Solel
Continued on Pa 14
The wife of a new Israeli farmer looks over
an important member of her egg laying es-
tablishment. Up until a few months ago, she
had never even been on q farm. She i* part
of the United Israel Appeal's new Town To
Country movement which encouragea city
residents to settle in the outlying areas.
New Year To All
'Friends and Patron*
Pi aim Hotel
p Coffin. Avanue
Miami Beach
Pnone 5-7381
^GREETINGS
Al Morris

4 a ij
1 fcECHOBEE RD.
P|"* 88-8341
Dr. Abraham
Wolfson
AND
The Spinoza
Forum
Wish For Al Jewry
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
A Happy New Yew To All
Our Friends and Patrons
BabacTs
Sparkling
Seltzer Co.
402 N.W. 6th STREET
Phone* 58-2763 82-0789
Home Delivery
BEST WISHES TO ALL FOH
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS
NEW YEAR
MR. and MRS.
Max Wolf man
and Son* Ernest & Stanley
IMS Draxel At*. Mtaaai Beach
Phone. 48-2671 48-2872
FOSTER
Electric Co., Inc.
CONTRACTING
ALTERATIONS
SERVICE
Paul Foster, Pres.
2264 W. Flagler Street
Miami, Florida
We Extend Sincere Best Wishes to All Our
Relatives and Friends
Dr. and Mrs. Alvin F. Gardner
and Daughter Ava Lee
SEASONS GREETINGS TO ALL OUR FRIENDS
ERIC G. DIKTSCH
PAINTING AND DECORATING
1658 N.W. 19th Street
Phone 3-6833
SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL OUR
FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Monahan's Electric Co., Inc.
Electrical Contractor*
4050 N.W. 29th STREET
MIAMI
PHONE 64-0251
SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL OUR FRIEHDS
COMPLETE PAINTING CO.
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
19 N.E. 28th Street. Miami Phone 9-7902
CORAL GABLES FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
2501 Ponce de Leon Boulevard. Coral Gables
104 No. Krome Ave., Homestead
A VERY HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
TO ALL GREETINGS
Junior's Restaurant
2947 COLLINS AVENUE (Collins at 30th Street)
MIAMI BEACH
DELIGHTFULLY AIR-CONDITIONED
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
. DANA WOODMAN
REALTOR
257 Alhambra Circle Phone 4-4264
TO ALL NEW YEAR GREETINGS
Phone 5-9018 Licensed and Insured
JOHN L. POWERS
PAINTING CONTRACTOR AND REPAIRS
Interior and Exterier
ALSO ROOFING CONTRACTOR
Roof Repair* and Tile Replacing
1616 Alton Road Miami Beach, Florida

TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS A MOST
HAPPY NEW YEAR


9 Stores Serving South Florida


*


PAGE 12 D
*. i^utn^rfrjitr
FRIDAY. SEPTTM^
11. IS
TO OUR MANY FRIENDS
OUR SINCERE WISHES
for a
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Gottesman
i'
A HAPPT NEW TEAR TO ALL
OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Frantone
lit-nu tii Salon
HARPER METHOD
4104 N. MERIDIAN AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-6280
Fran Donata
*
SEASOH'S GREETINGS TO ALL OUR FRIENDS
AL SMIK'S PAINT STORE
Sherwin-Williams Paints
688 N.E. 1251h Street. North Miami Phone 84-5383
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
Adelphi Paint & Color
Works, Inc.
HUEMTZ FACES Tit HI II MEETS TIE I[[
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
./i
Stembler Adams Frazier
Insurance Agency, Inc.
118 N.E. 1st AVENUE
PHONE 2-4174
-
i.ii 11:\ iM si mis. INC.
Serving Miami Since 1930
Telephone 48-2651
ROOFING BY GIFFEN
For All That's Beat In
EVERY KIND OF ROOFING
ALL TYPES OF SHEET METAL WORK
VENTILATION
SOLAR WATER HEATERS. BOOSTERS
POURED-IN-PLACE GYPSUM ROOF DECKS
CORAL GABLES. FLORIDA
Continued from Paoe 6
on the sleeve of every member. The vulgar opeiettas
were laid wide, and there was a cycle of "serious
plays, sad BroJWD Hearts was revived, which added
to the flood of tears.
There was no mistaking the fact that the Yiddish
theatre was in mourning. Manewitz's death ended
a chapter. He had written his last play. The curtain
had fallen on the last act of the last play. A new
chapter in the history of the theatre would have to
be written. Who were to be the authors, the design-
ers, the producers, and who were to act in the plays
that would be registered in that chapter? Until a
reply was forthcoming, let mourning have full swing.
The grief of one man was unnoticed. He was a
silent mourner. They called him Kemat. He was a
stout little fellow with a nose like a ferret's. He
pretended not to know what was going on in the
world except what related to Manewitz. That was
his work. He was the guardian of Manewitz's plays.
He knew the quality of his genius and was its
slave. He was in quick succession a peddler, a scene-
shifter, an usher and then, brushing up against
Manewitz at a rehearsal, he was transfixed by an
apparition and had his ears pierced for life. He had
his ears pierced as the slave of Manewitz's plays.
When Manewitz wanted to know anything about his
properties, so to speak who would play what, what
they owed him, what was going on in the theatre,
how many actors were used in this or that play
he sent for Kemat. .
He first acquired the habif of using Kemat for
errands. Then he proposed having him sleep in the
house. It was a sweeping gesture of hospitality. "Let
room be found for Kemat." There were seven chil-
dren and six rooms. "Give him a place in the gar-
ret," he said to his wife, a woman with mounrful
eyes. "Treat him like one of the family," he added,
sternly. She vanished into the kitchen. All right to
argue with the grocer or butcher, but not with the
tryant whom fate had assigned as her provider.
"Mr. Manewitz," said Kemat one day, "it's shame
ful how they cheat you."
"They are rogues," said Manewitz.
"But what robbers," said Kemat. "They falsify
their books. They pay three times and play for one.
They should be watched."
"They why don't you watch them?'' said Manewitz.
Kemat thus became the collector of his royalties.
Not being a bookkeeper, he kept the accounts in his
head. He watched the posters, the advertisements in
the press, and prowled around the theatres. He was
there with his reckoning on pay day, and would not
go away unsatisfied, even when he had to follow
the manager home. He knew all of Manewitz's plays
how many times they had been played, the. intake
of each play in terms of royalties, how many char-
acters in each, what stage business had been invent-
ed without Manewitz's authority, and who were the
saboteurs of Manewitz.
At the height of his success, his body had filled
out. His bank account had become respectable. He
owned a house in Brooklyn. Manewitz complained of
illness and had a doctor visit him. A ripple of
anxiety spread through all the coffee-houses fre-
quented by the acting fraternity. X-rays were taken,
medicine prescribed. Manewitz was ordered to bed.
He refused to remain for long, dressed himself and
went about the streets as usual. When the pain re-
turned, he sent for another doctor, and it was dis-
HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
osritio jtoon
STAR CLEANERS & DYERS
2343 N.W. 7th Avenue, Miami, Florid. Phone 2 2353
covered that it was a serious matter Th
ulcers in his stomach. Then there ,..
ormnou
whispers that it might be cancer. A shudder ripple
through the coffee-houses. Manewitz felt thc w
of the Angel of Death brush his cheek And
they covered him that night, he looked at tl
who were nursing him with a strange interest
they had to give him morphine to dull the pJ
confused his thoughts and deranged his vision WIU
he was bundled to bed and saw his trousers
hanger, he thought, sadly. Would ever his
them again? He lingered for months on a siekl
He looked like an ox whose vitals were being y
at by a monster. He hadn't the strength to'
him off. He felt it was useless to fight, it was u__
to think. So he turned his face to the waul
closed his eyes, he stretched out and felt
when he died.
Kemat witnessed the tragedy. He walked ab
streets, into the home, made inquiries and
away. His eyes were red, and he did not tl
days and days. When they mentioned cane*,]
was thrown into great excitement.
"Don't tell me he has cancer," he shouted L
when Manewitz's body was laid out on the floor j
covered with a sheet, he rejected the diag
"He was sick and tired of living. But just i
Continued on Next Paqe

.^
**:&

MILlf
and ICE CREAM
Extends to All Their Jewish Friends
SINCERE WISHES
FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
The ancient city of Safed, located anj
hill of Canaan in southern Galilee, isa^
city with a long history of Jewish **"
creativity. Because of its location. w
recent years has become an artists
Other such cities are rising on "*
through the indomitable spirit of Israel |
eers.
Mr. and Mrs.
George Goldberg
Owners of the
Sooth Seas Hotel
' Extend Season's
Greetings To All
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
Walter A. Frederick's
Market
845 N. W. 62nd Street

t-5651
Rice Window
Mfg. Co.
Established 1*34
Aluminum and Bronze Windows
Screens -r Venetian Blind Guides
Window Replacements
Maintenance
105 EAST 20th SRTEET
HIALEAH. FLORIDA
Dial 88-4563
GREETINGS
Commercial RsufajetuUun and
Soda Fountain Repairs
Refrigerate
Phone 64-3411
A Hsppr M **-J
Our Friends and P"-
Shelfey H<
1826 Collins ATta
Miami Beach
5-7611
GREETING
Phone l-**
A & A SIGN
SIGNS
c!!i-ii
WWDOW LETTEBj
OUR SPECIAL"
Metal. Gold L*
Walls. Trucks
MR. & MRS. H B|R
1743 S. W. 8h |>
Miami. Florid


BBBBBBesesBBSSSBBl
^v SEPTEMBER 11. 1953
+Jen I si) Her Mian
PAGE 13 D
Iffl WITH PATIENCE AND CALM DELIBERATION
feeling at peace with the world when his
i-had food, he had money in his pocket, he was
y, [ the back. You read it in the vile sheet
printed the articles that killed him. Who wrote
It was not an enemy. It was his best friend
ets al! of a sudden an idea that he must begin
the truth, and to tell the truth he must com-
Manewitz with Ibsen, Manewitz with,Shake-
and being a candid friend, he had to admit
Manewitz was an imitator, a plagiarist, a hack
r an{| that he even stole scenes from his
plays. Did you ever hear the like? Tell the truth
t anybody and there'll be nothing left of his
acter. The whole world would be destroyed by
All his life Manewitz told just enough of the
to enable the world to live. All his life he
[like a bear He prized loyalty and friendship
fought for friends, but when he saw this friend
a dagger in his back, he did not care to fight
more. He gave it up. He made up his mind to die,
when he made up his mind, 'not all the East
doctors could make it different. There was no
arguing with him."
feed, Manewitz was beyond the reach of argu-
especially any argument that Kemat could
oce.
i let us return to the stage where the memorial
(ices were being conducted. It was crowded with
prides uptown and downtown labor lead-
intelligenzia. settlement workers and artists,
essed in black Near the dressing-room, in a
r, Kemat found a scat. He could see the back
i speakers and was saved the pain of hearing
, His eyes were hot and dry. He tried to get
| the Manewitz family, but they were on the
rside of the stage; they had no part to play in
^xercise. except as mourners to weep copiously.
i went through the back entrance and took the
^ay to the cemetery. Again, at the grave, there
i crowd through which he could not break; he
| down, tried to see what was going on through
gs of the fortunate ones gathered around the
| in the ground He caught a glimpse of the
; being lowered. He moved from one end of
tie to the other, trying to break through the
men and women, but it was impossible.
tlike crying out loud to give expression to the
pain he felt when the body was lowered,
throat was closed and his lips would not
mob pressed against him and shoved
V from the grave.
lit was alone in his grief. His world had come
I when he had to keep on living in it He
York for a shack in the Catskills near
fc. where he spent the summer. When he
ri, it seemed as if time had stopped for him.
iunshaven, his clothes were dirty and ragged.
'1 barely drag hjs legs, and his eyes were
H sleep. He was seeking familiar scenes,
?absence of one face made them all leek
Had unfamiliar.
himself in Marcus's cafe, listening to
but of conversation. They were talking of
> Hh ears were -strained to hear the name
The actor's union threatened a strike.
I the threat by suggesting that he would
' the stage or make a tour of South
Bwlak was going to open the season with
a new play by Laker. Madame Lubella had a wonder-
ful play that came to her, it was said, via Madame
Duse. A newspaperman said that the dramatist of
the new season was to be Leon Grobyan. Another
threw Krolik's hat in the ring. They hao* forgotten
Manewitz.
Kemat wandered through the streets of the East
Side. He did not enjoy the autumn smells, the bustle,
of preparation for the holidays, the eager faces of
businessmen rushing about, satisfied that it was to
be a good season. The reference to Grobyan inspired
a thought. Perhaps there was a way for him to re
main with the theatre. He found Grobyan in an
apartment on Second Avenue, eating supper. He was
dismembering a herring with his fingers and stop-
ping his thirst with tea. The room was in disorder.
Grobyans wife quickly shoved several children into
another room and disappeared with them.
Still eating with relish, Grobyan motioned with
his head to Kemat to take a seat.
"What are you doing here, Kemat?" he inquired.
"Then you know nie," exclaimed Kemat.
"You damn fool, who doesn't know you," growled
Grobyan.
Encouraged by this friendly reception, Kemat
said:
"You know, I have been with Manewitz for fifteen
years, and he was always satisfied with me. All of
his plays I know, who has them, who plays them,
and how often."
"Of course, your occupation is gone, my friend,"
said Grobyan. "There won't be any more playing
of Manewitz. You will have to get yourself a new
job."
"That's the idea,
I did for Manewitz
Maybe I could do for you what
," said Kemat, eagerly.
do better for yourself. I have
how many plays most of them
even better," said Grobyan, "and
is dead, who but I am him natural
plays will be in great demand
"You could not
written God knows
are good, some are
now that Manewitz
successor, and my
this season."
"I could collect your royalties, you know," said
Kemat, "and, more than that, I would watch*them.
I wouldn't let them play any tricks with your plays.
These managers must be watched."
'That would never do," said Grobyan. "When I
sell a play, it is sold; lock, stock and barrel it be-
long* to the manager. It is because my plays don't
bother me after I sell them that I enjoy life."
Kemat looked at Grobyan sadly, and took his
hat He was in the wrong place after all. A theatre
led by Grobyan was not to his liking.
"A shoemaker, that's what you are," he muttered,
and made for the door.
Grobyan heard him, pushed the dishes away, and
moved toward him.
"That's an impudent rascal," he shouted. "Comes
to my house and calls me a shoemaker. Let me tell
you that Manewitz's plays are as dead as he is.
Those tedious plays he wrote were stolen from God
knows who. If anyone wants to play them now, they
will have to be revamped and adapted and remade."
"Whe is there that dares to do that?" asked
Kemat, looking back through the door.
The greatest Yiddish dramatist of this century
that's me," yelled Grobyan, as Kemat disappeared.
He was right. They never played Manewitz's plays
/ Continued en Page 15
I10 AU,... A MOST
jHAPPY NW yj^
MR. and MRS,
'"IJOSEPHERand
FAMILY
of the
AMI SEA
f COMPANY
"*'W.5thSr-t
175
New Y..r T. All
*itnd nd Clients
, fivelt Bid*.
m *-l STREET
JttB BEACH
!S 58-1570
^Edw
ard I. Singer
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
University
of Miami
CORAL GABLES
TO ALL .
A Most Happy New Year
mvara rather
ARTHUR SCHAFFEL
LEATHERCRAFT
UPHOLSTERERS
Manufacturers Designers
BanBoothsSelect
Cushions Walls Kitchen Hooka
REPAIRS
1140 N. MIAMI AVENUE
PHONE 34040
BOB MARTIN
MARTIN'S
lilt I U STORE
7070 Collins Avenue
PHONE 86-2040
GREETINGS
LEE'S
Established 32 years
324 N. E. 13th Street
Manufacturers
Wholesale Retail
Fishing Tackle
Repairing
Underwater Equipment
SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL OUR PR1EHDS
BARNHILL & SON
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS
464 LA VILLA DRIVE. MIAMI SPRINGS
Phono 88-3933
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
A. M. TRANSFER & CRANE SERVICE
Boats Machinery Office Safes Household
Concrete Pouring Move Anything
31 Years of Experience in the Greater Miami Area
239 N. W. 26th STREET
PHONE 9-8959 87-6486
SINCERE WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
Royal Beauty Supply Co.
ALBERT J. HIRSCH. President
119 N. E. Sixth Street
Exclusive Distributors
RAYETTE. REVLON. DUSHARME. BRECZ
All Nationally Known Sundries

SEASONS GREETINGS TO ALL OUR FRIENDS
BILL SHEPARD ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS
480 EAST 25th STREET, HIALEAH. FLORIDA
Phone 88-9851
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
Superior Septic Tank Co., Inc.
EXPERIENCED SINCE 1925
REPAIRS AND PUMPOUTS A SPECIALTY
936 N. W. 71st Street Miami. Fa. ph. 7-3220
To All My Friends and Acquaintances
A Most Happy New Year
$
Fred B. Hartnett
2836 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Cored Gables
SEASOHS GREETINGS TO ALL OUR FRIENDS
Boulevard Floral Gardens
Corsages Bouquets Cut Flowers Funeral Designs
8031 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD. MIAMI PHONE 2-5017
Open Evenings and Sundays
SINCERE WISHES
FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
u>
PHILIP BERKOWITZ
MR. and MRS. AL BERKOWITZ and FAMILY
MR. and MRS. ABE BERKOWITZ and FAMILY
MR. and MRS. HAROLD BERKOWITZ
MR. and MRS. LEO BRAVERMAN and FAMILY
MR. and MRS. WALTER MACKAUF and
FAMILY and DONALD BERKOWITZ
I


PAGE 14 D
rJmlstUcrldkui

TO ALL ma yflZ
lA A .;iT rtAPPY
" N"E W YEAR
i
T: ISRAEL'S L
J2EaIl!eptbiber u
Continued from P9 II
NASH MIAMI MOTORS, INC.
545 N. E. 15th Street
Phone 9-2626
Miami. Florida
. i..
| g n riola
Boneh trade union which builds many of the coun-
try's homes, factories and roads alone contains about
40.000 members. The factories which Histadrut owns
or controls turn out a large share of the nation's
rubber products, soap and detergents, cement, glass,
building materials, porcelain, pipes, electrical sup-
plies, processed food, textiles, etc.
To All ... A Most Happy New Year
Woocly's Standard erviee
Lubrication Specialists Gas Oils Batteries Tiros
"Service with a Smilo"
477 N.W. 5th STREET PHONE 3-9533
SINCERE WISHES FOR A
HAPPY NEW YEAR
MARKOWITZ BROS., INC.
MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS
5600 N. E. 4th Avenue Phone 89-2411
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY
Hide & Seek Children's Shop
THE CHILDREN'S SHOP OF DISTINCTION
GIFTS APPAREL
TOTS TO TEENS
Coral Gables
506 Biltmore Way
Phone 48-5929
HAPPY NEW YEAR
FROM
1BAOI #
MIAMI
BOTTLING COMPANY
SERVICE
QUALITY
GOOD WILL
"GLASS FOR EVERY PURPOSE"
Distributors Libbey. Owens. Ford Glass Co. at Insulux Glass Block
1601-1619 N.W. 7th Aye.. Miami 36. Florida Phone 2-1796
MIAMI 36. FLORIDA
HI\\ % LEE IMPORTERS, INC.
7343 Collins Ave.. Miami Beach 252 Coral Way. Miami
86-2419 4-6909
SEASON'S GREETINGS
GREETINGS
McCORMICK-ROYETT
PLUMBING CONTRACTORS
9443 W. Railroad Avenue (Renuart Mill Building)
MIAMI SHORES. FLORIDA
FOR SALES. SERVICE OR REPAIRS PHONE 7-4193
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
WMUThU
1733 ALTON ROAD
Tel. 58-4134
Histadrut's rise to its present commanding posi-
tion, though spectacular, has not been easy. The
organization, especially during its early years, had
to work against tremendous odds. Founded at a
time when an antagonistic British Mandatory Gov-
ernment was intent on perpetuating the feudal prac-
tices of its Turkish predecessor, the Histadrut found
it necessary to create an economy within an econ-
omy. Faced with the prospect of dealing with em-
ployers who took a dim view of hiring Jewish labor,
preferring rather to take on cheap Arab labor, the
Histadrut began an educational job backed up by
occasional strikes which still goes on today. See-
ing that the British, like their Turkish forbears,
were adept at taxing the Jewish community without
in turn providing basic necessities such as schools
and hospitals, the Histadrut founded its own edu-
cational and health services. Travel facilities then
being primitive and dangerous, the Histadrut en-
couraged the formation of bus cooperatives operat-
ing in and between cities and settlements. Noting
that private capital was unwilling to enter unde-
veloped areas, or invest in industries where there
was no assurance of a quick profit, the Histadrut
organized industrial cooperatives. In a sense the
Histadrut grew to power through the default of
private industry to invest in pioneering fields.
This securing of monopoly through default con-
tinues even today with Histadrut investing in such
outposts as Iseersheba and Elat. Though consider-
able friction has developed between private enter-
prise, which maintains that Histadrut, by virtue of
its huge exchequer, is monopolizing whole segments
of industry, and the Histadrut which claims that
private industry has shown little initiative and less
idealism, the two often manage to go into partner-
ship, usually with Histadrut becoming the junior
partner. The labor organization does not, as some
rumors would have it, seek agreements whereby it
will control the majority of the stock. There have
been cases where it has even loaned money to pro-
vate industries who were threatened with failure.
Though the action was prompted less out of a love
of the industrialist and more out of a desire to keep
Histadrut members from being thrown out of work,
the union's move did, nevertheless, save a number
of firms.
Labor unions are usually the last to press for an
expansion of immigration into their country, taking
the view rightly or wrongly that cheap immi-
grant labor will become a threat to their own work-
ers. They often hold that the flooding of the labor
market will bring down the price of labor. Not so
the Histadrut. From its inception it realized that
only by immigration, would the country develop.
tofg*mAnmve 8overnmem c
ensurea only by there being a Jewish maift T
the country, the Histadrut vigorously thlt '3
into the work of organizing the now famo ,
bet. the so-called "illegal immigration"
tine. Today an immigrant entering Israel '
free medical care by the Histadrut for three
His wife and children are frequently ciredTl
Histadrut social workers serving in {he ma'
work camps. He and his family can often foai
tadrut sponsored trade schools available to J
Histadrut-rrranaged employment centers help
find a job. A mobile Histadrut van will cornel
outlying maabara from time to time to pick
farm produce for sale in the city, sell him tot,
ties that he needs, or simply lend him books, j
The new immigrant receives the identical i
%jes as the veteran Histadrut member as i
he joins the labor organization These
include membership for him and his famu>k
Kupat Holim, the largest health service in the i
try, and eligibility for sickness, unemployiu,
old age benefits. If he is invalided through i
dustrial accident, he will receive a monthly i
and should he'die, his widow and orphans
given a cash grant.. The Histadrut will oftea]
him out with housing and loans, and encour,
to send his children to Histadrut sponsored i
His wife can, if she desires, receive traiaj
sewing, spinning and the domestic scieoeaJ.
Imahot Ovdot, the Working Mothers of Israeli
nurseries for children where she can leave her]
school age children while she helps support]
family. For single girls (46 percent of the Hi*
are women) hostels are available to help see I
over the critical housing shortage until they j
permanent homes. And for the working
girl, special evening schools have been set i
enable them to get an education while they t
On the cultural side, the Histadrut pubui
own dailes Davar for those who know I
and Omer for those who are learning; it.
own theatre, Ohel; it has its own publishing I
Am Oved, which has turned out over U)
copies of 360 titles during its nine year exist
it has its own mobile record and movie
and it has done pioneer work in making for I
relations between Jews and Arabs, both of |
are given the same membership rights.
To finance all these services, Histadrut
pay five percent of their salaries to the
treasury. However, because of the extensive I
of the social and health services the on
renders, membership dues do not cover the I
drut's expenditures, and the union has been I
to turn to its friends abroad for additional I
Dr. and Mrs.
CHARLES BECKWTTT
and Family
Wish All Their Relatives
and Friends
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
GREETINGS
MUTUAL LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANY
OF HEW YORK
510 Langford Bldg.
PHONE t-4747
GUARANTY TITLE &
ABSTRACT CORP.
50 W*t Flagler Sire*t
SEASON'S
GREETINGS
State
Finance Co.
1160 Wast Flagler Street
1223 N. E. 2nd Are.
AUTO FINANCING
PHONE 3-792
GREETINGS
FOR
A
HAPPY
NEW YEAR
1
LOUIE, PRISCILLA and
FRANK BANDEL
Dr. and Mr*.
EMANUEL PUS*
and Daughter
WisOi all their Friend
A Happy and Pro
NeVYear
FLOORING
3800 N. E. lit Atf
GREETING
JOHN A. MA1
620 SECURITY
MIAML FLA-


iv SEPTEMBER 11. 1953
>J**i6*thr*&,
I1ITISH JEWRY
SEEK M VITALITY
Continued from Pao* 1
have always made direct reference.to the Unit-
"states, with no mention of the contribution of
Uo-Jewry which is part of a great English speak-
, Jewish community in the British Commonwealth.
when the role of British Zionists has been
kknowledged. it has always been in the historical
"We shall never forget what you did for us
ne the fight against the Mandatory authorities."
hat of the things we are doing now? Angto-
jsks. Proudly it points to its hachsharah
the finest training establishments for young.
Abound pioneers that exist anywhere in the
rid with an "output" record far greater than
it of the United States. It can also draw attention
Le number of its sons serving Israel's nation life
Hiptomats and as experts ir many spheres.
Continued refusal by the American and Israel
ish worlds to recognise the great part than can-
I be played by Anglo-Jewry will result in one of
i happenings. British Jewry will either go isola-
ilst (which is doubtful in the extreme), or there
be closer identification with CenmeaweaRh
and the formation of a third Jewish power
Lser unity of the great Jewries of Britain, South'
hca, Australia and, possibly, Canada could only
[for the good of Israel and the Jewish people as
thole. Israel's position is not yet so secure that
can dispense with powerful advocates in the
or capitals of the world; the position of the
Irish people is not so tenable that they can sit
and say "we are safe we are free."
here are growing up in Anglo-Jewry today men
I women who will demand a more vigorous role
}he world affairs of Jewry. They will not be pre-
to accept instruction from any quarter, nor
they allow the derogatory "second-rate com-
Blty" to stick
L LIVE, DIE
Continued from Ptt* 3
I and hungry and afraid to leave the ghettoes
1 have been born into, who plead for a glass of
[ and a chance to go to school? When will the
fez triplets, three tiny images of humanity born
long ago into the hara of Tunis, get their first
pies of milk?
phen will the next "hard core" transport leave
many? And will there be place in it for Hein-
Huberman? Heinrich was snatched off the
ks of his native Warsaw by the Nazis when he
I a child of seven Today he lies in a hospital near
Rich. Doctors say he has no lung tissue left.
I his fierce longing to quit Germany and come
" keeps him alive. Shall this boy with the
[.drawn face and the glittering eyes, one of those
"sho bears Nazism's deepest wounds, be denied
Tl in Israel?
*n will Nessim Abigessis, a 12-year-old human
T of Marrakech, put down his weary arms and
M spade and hoe? Nessim sits in a dark alley
mellah of Marrakech every day of the week
W the Sabbath, flailing his little arms to fur-
Vthe human energy that turns a primitive lathe,
^night, as Nessim carries on his bent and
back the wooden planks at which' he
works, he passes the Jewish cemetery of Marrakech
It is a cemetery of the living, as well as the dead. In
little huts near the cemetery gates live the Jews
born 50 years too soon, the Jews born before the
JDC came to Marrakech. They are old and blind
and sick and weary, and death for them will come
as relief from pain, surcease from suffering. Each
mght, as Nessim trudges back from work, he sees
them. They sit patiently in front of the gates of the
cemetery and wait to die.
One day Nessim will be sitting where they do
now unless JDC aid reaches him too, unless JDC
can bring a decent future to this human motor as
it has to other Jewish boys and girls in the Moslem,
world, in Europe and in Israel.
The story of Heinrich Nuberman, lying on a bed
in a German hospital; of the Perez triplets of
Tunis and of Nessim Abigessis, trudging home frost
work in Marrakech are one story. These are the
stories the Jews of America are writing through
their support of JDC via the United Jewish Appeal
Perhaps by Rosh Hashonah 5715 there will be new
and happier chapters in these stories.
HUIITZ FKOIEUI
Continued from Page 13
again, as they were originally written. Scenes
were mangled, omitted, words exchanged, ending*
altered. It was a free world. When next they gave
one of them at the request of a dramatic elub, it
had to be given in the form of an adaptation and
under the name of Manewitz, as author, were the
words "Adapted by Leon Kobrin."
"An ungrateful world," muttered Kemat, now a
retired patriot. "It's bitter to lire.-
The portrait of Manewitz. in a gilded frame__
hangs in every Yiddish treatre. In the club rooms of
the actors' union his big, bulging eyes look down
upon the habitues as they play pinochle or poker,
exchange scandal and smoke cigarettes. In every
book written on the Yiddish treatre they devote a
chapter to Manewitz. His name is mentioned at ban-
quets. Joseph Barondess always arranges an annual
banquet in his memory, and delivers a eulogy of the
great dramatist. There was a man for you. Scenes
that touched the heart. You could weep and you
could cry. Words that had sense. He had a philos-
ophy of his own. What was it? Don't be a shagetx.
Read Joel Antin's articles that have been bound in
a volume, and he'll tell you. But he had everything
comedy, tragedy, ideals, problems. He was a man
of the theatre. He made the theatre what it is. He
is the master mind. This was the make-believe on
parade.
But Kemat knew what was in their hearts. Pre-
tense} They preferred' Grobyan's melodramas be-
cause there was money in them. They liked Krolik's
feeble stories for they had tears in them and the
public paid dearly for that which brought them the
satisfaction of weeping. They preferred the plays
Yokels came to see, for there were more Yokels in
the world than philosophers. Manewitz's words
those thick juicy words about which they would of-
ten brag in his lifetime gave the actors a head-
ache to memorize and besides, why should the public
think of the playwright when there were actors
who were dying for applause and appreciation?
Kemat sees them pass into the theatre. He hears
what they say when they leave after the perform-
ance. He listens to the off-stage views of the actors.
They can't bluff him. He knows them all. He shakes
his fist at them and mutters: "Hypocrites! Swine!
He gave you his life, left you pearls, and you perfer
shund!"
PAGE 15D
I
tew
UHTAFf
Y*w Congressman
A
MOST
HAPPY
NEW YEAR
TO AIL
^ Lincoln Road
Realtor
A Happy and. Prosperous New
Year To. Ml Our Pwend*
and Patrons
TW Dlfa FAMtLY
of King's Jewelers
of Lincoln Road
To Our Friends and Patrons
Happy New Year
United Wine
Stores, Inc.
. 402 N.W. 14 th STREET
PHONE 9-9344
HAPPY
- NEW YEAR
FRITZ
PAINTING CO.
PAINTING -DECORATING
am N.W. 7th Awsasstv
FRITZ RUHR, Owner
Phone 9-2200
TO ALL .
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Shell Lumber
Co., Inc.
L. D. Shell
2733 S.W. 27th AVENUE
Phone 484401
SINCERE AND GOOD WISHES
FOR A HEALTHY. HAPPY AND
PROSPEROUS NBW YEAR TO
OUR MANY FRIENDS AND
CUSTOMERS.
THE I HOW \ PRESS, INC.
1103 5th Street Miami Beach, Florida
HARRY GERBER, Mgr. Phone 58-7936
PETER'S DRIVE-UNDER
SPBCIALIZ1HG IH RIBS AHD CHICKEN
3799 N.W. 36th Street, Miami. Florida Phone 64-938S
S&S SWIIWUII SHOP
1757 N.E. Second Avenue rtiana 3 TIM
EXTEND ORBSTJNas
TO THEIR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
MR. A!\11 MRS. JOE
and FAMILY
1140 Venetian Way
EXTEND BEST WISHES TO ALL
FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR

WISHING ALL OF OUR JEWISH FRIENDS
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
Florida Eleetrie Motor Co.
H. E. GRANT, Owner
M. E. ASSALONE. Manager
PHONE 2-6147
237 N. W. Second Avenue
TO OUR MANY
FRIENDS j
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
Ruler Engineering Co.
CONSULTING ENGINEERS
1615 duPont Building Phone 9-4741
Miami, Florida
TO ALL A HAPPY
. NEW YEAR
IDEAL ROOFING & SHEET METAL CO.
SERVICE PHONE 78-5571
241 N. E. 73rd Street Miami
Pacific Lumber & Supply Co.
"BULLY SERVICE"
"BILL" FAXON. FOUNDER
Specializing in Fir Timber*
Ml KW. 11th St.
PEPSI-COLA COMPANY. LONG ISLAND. N. Y.
Franchised Bottler: PEPSI-COLA BOTTLING CO.. Miami


PAGE 16 D
W<#,ffrr**ar7
A
HAPPY
NEW
YEAR
T O A L L
i
CORONET
CHOCOLATES
12W Washington At*.
Miami Beach
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
To Our Many Jewish Friends
And Patrons .
LARRY MARKS & CO.
120 N. W. 2nd Street
A HAPPY NEW TEAR TO ALL
OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Mimi's Children's
Shop
120 MIRACLE MILE
Phone 83-4396
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Berman
SEASON'S GREETINGS
wman. Burk
& Calhoun
REALTORS
Real Estate & Mortgages
813-15 First National Bank Bldg.
MIAMI. FLORIDA
A Happy
New Year
to our
Patrons and
Friends
22nd OFF COLLINS
MIAMI BEACH Ph. 5-9038
BEST WISHES TO MY
MANY JEWISH FRIENDS
FRANK V. QUIGLEY
131 Alton Road
PHONE 5-2305
TO ALL ... A MOST
HAPPY NEW YEAR
A. D. F. Bloodworth
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS.
RELATIVES AND JEWRY
EVERYWHERE A MOST
HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS
NEW YEAR
Mi. and Mrs.
SIDNEY PEPPER
and FAMILY
1S00 S.W. lth AvenueMiami
HAPPY
NEW YEAR
Mr. and Mrs.
JEROME H. WEINKLE
Daughters. Carolyn and Linda
and Sons. Louis and Steven
MR. and MRS.
L L. REISMAN
and Family
Wish all their
Friends and Relatives
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
FRIDAY,
AMesi
T AM
- fc; Roger w._ n
mis.w.m*a^]
mxal FIO^
A Happy New Ytar To All
Our Friends and Patrons
O. S. Baker
Fine Turf Grasses
358 N.W. 27th AVENUE
MIAMI
Phone 64-3352
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
SEROTA
PLUMBING CO.
Installations Maintenance
Repairs
Prompt Service
CALL 58-2585
1728 ALTON ROAD
MIAMI BEACH
Safe Convenient Inexpensive
Choice Wood, Aluminum or
Steel
Rowe Door Sales
PRESENTS
Residential & Industrial Doors
2548 N.W. 36th St. Ph. 9-6732
*
IN wishing you a happy
New Year, The Herald
hopes for you every
possible blessing that
the New Year can bring
FLORIDA'S MOST COMPLETE NEWSPAPER
Tel. 89-9335 W Delivtr
Jimmy Pact, Proprietor
BANDY'
Pac*kag< Goods
LOUNGE BAR
Family Style Meals Serod
ENTERTAINMENT
13420 N.W. 7th AVENUE
MIAMI. FLORIDA
FOOD CENTERS
Complete Super Markets Serving
Greater Miami. Hollywood and Fort Lauderdale
Greetings and Best Wishes
For a Happy and Prosperous
NEW YEAR
5714
SEASON'S GREETINGS
T-SQUARE &
TRIANGLE CO.
1626 Lenox Ave. 5-2663
32 S.W. lit St. 3-4753
Blue Prints Photostats
Black 8c White Prints
RELIABLE SERVICE
For Architects and Engineers
Greetings To All Jewry
On The New Year
At Carls Markets
The Very iinvsl
Frankfurters
t onicd Beef
Ilologna
I'.IN||-;|[||;|
BEEF, all BEEF, choice BEEF.'
Fjormost Kosher Sausage Co.
230 N.W. 5th Street. Miami. Florid
Phone. 34W14- ^



Connellmun
and Mi*
UuriM'tt Roth
AND DAUGHTERS
Ljla Sue and Carlo Star
B AND SON
Samuel Scher
[extend the best of
wishes for a
happy new year
to all their friends
, ALL OUR FRIENDS AND
ACQUAINTANCES A
[MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
r. and Mrs. Saul QnUt
and Family
5833 Devonshire Bird.
BALIN'S BAKERY
|)94 s.W. 27th Ave Ph. 48-9124
EXTENDS SEASON'S
GREETINGS
Ito THEIR CUSTOMERS AND
FRIENDS
Inew
YEAR
GREETINGS
PIBLIC
GAS
CO.
7200 N. W. 7th Are.
PHONE 78-7621
MASONS BEST WISHtS
CAROUSEL
CHILDREN**
SHOP
423 LINCOLN ROAD
MIAMI BEACH
BUliaiHC REMODELING
Storm Prsol Roofs, Building and
Repairs, Asbestos Siding
Tite-On Construction
& Roofing
HWH 44 SOI 0, Day or Night
S426 N.W. 21st COURT
MIAMI, FLORIDA
*flr Payments Low m $1*40
Palmer's Roofing Company
lihas
carried on continuously
Ijiince 1920 thru "booms."
[j "depressions"
jmes. In a
and hurri-
great many
:ases it has maintained roofs
families and
||iar the same
I
i estates thru two generations.
jWe are not "Super-roofers"
I but we make every effort to
fa a worthy job. We con-
fer that when we install a
"Xrt il i3 our responsibility
*til it has outlived the term
^ '/ears for which the class
p roof was intended.
Sincerely yours,
Bill Palmer
Phone 3-6244
acJewiislh 0pafSkm
MIAMI. FLORIDA
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11. 1953
SEC. E
300 Years of Jewish
Life in America
By P. NIBUR
The City of New York, largesl city in the world,
with a population of more than eight million, is
this year celebrating its three-hundredth birthday.
The small town under Dutch rule, which was then
called New Amsterdam, (it acquired the name of
New York eleven years later when the British oc-
cupied the town) exactly three hundred years ago
received the right of local self-government.
A year later, in 1654, there arrived in New Ams-
terdam the first shipload of Jews, 23 in number,
the first Jews to land on the soil of what is now the
United States of America. They came to these shores
from Brazil, fleeing from the Portuguese who had
seized this colony from the Dutch and had begun
to install the inquisition there. A month earlier this
group had been preceded in New Amsterdam by the
arrival there of Jacob Bar-Simeon, who had come
directly from Holland and who was the first Jew
to land in North America.
Next year, 1954, New York Jewry will together
with the Jewries of many other American communi-
ties celebrate the 300th anniversary of Jewish settle-
ment, of Jewish life, in the United States. It will be
a great celebration which will find its echo in all
countries of the world where there are large or small
Jewish communities. The United States with its
five-and-a-half million Jews contains nearly half the
Jewish, population of the world and New York City
with its two-and-a-half million Jews contains nearly
half the Jewish population of the United States.
Never before in Jewish history have so many Jews
congregated in one community. New York City is
by far the largest Jewish city in the world. The
entire State of Israel, even today after the tremen-
dous number of immigrants who have been coming
to its shores during the past five years, still contains
a smaller number of Jews than the one city of
New York. New York City has as many, or perhaps
even more, Jews than are to be found in all of
Soviet Russia.
No city in the world has grown so fast during the
past three hundred years as has New York. And if
the city as a whole made giant strides, its Jewish
population, particularly during the last seventy
years when the great East European immigration
to the United States began, grew even faster. The
rapid growth of the city generally gave New York
Jews an opportunity to develop and make economic
progress and instilled in them a desire to remain in
this port city where they had landed from Europe,
instead of settling further inland.
However, New York's giant growth also served
to uproot from the city, to a large extent, its Ameri-
can religious-Anglo-Saxon cultural tradition and to
create the atmosphere of a place of wealth and pleas
ure seekers. In such an atmosphere it was difficult
for the Jewish immigrant to transplant in the New
York soil even if in a different form that
religious-cultural Jewish tradition he had brought
with him from the Old Country. Were it not for the
constant influx of new immigrants, were it not for
the great quantitative rise in numbers of New York
Jewry, its quality would have truly remained weak,
as the quality of Jewish life that existed here before
r
Happy New Year To All
My Friends
August Studio
INTERIOR DECORATING
1230 Alton Road
TO ALL GREETINGS
Rainbow Juice &
Fruit Shipping Co.
ONDED MMD
209 71st STREET
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 88-9250
GREETINGS
Roosevelt
Garage
Exoerfs Im Aoftmotivt Service
Mf Repairs
70 N.E. 13th STREET
PHONE 3-2442
Irvin Gordon
Harold Pont
of the
DELICATESSEN
and RESTAURANT
170 N.W. Fifth Street
MIAMI
NOW AIR CONDITIONED
Extend To All Their Patrons
and Friends
Sincere Wishes For A
Very Happy and
Prosperous New Year
*
GREETINGS
Ch.s. E. Common
Coleman
Solar
Service
TANKS
BOOSTERS
NEW SYSTEMS
REPAIRS
2428 S.W. 27th AVENUE
Phone 87-8349


PAGE 2E
GREETINGS
ADDIE
MAKERS OF FINE CANDIES
BOHDED FBDIT SHIPPERS
1121 Wonnington A
50-3614
Patient and Doctor Greet the
New Year Together in Italy
the
A HA?F:" NT*' YEAS
MILLEH MACHINERY AND SUPPLY CO.
r-
MiUsUXFESTEY SUPPLY CO.
1*7 K. E. 27* Stree* Phone 02-5434
Br MUKKAY GITLIN
Sow Msmrr Calm, the sethor of
aory. has pabtnkwrt a novel. The
InHf it* Tir Tiirti DP exodus
tiiy and is a veil kaon conUibulor to
S^CE=I WISHES FOH A
H A ? ? Y NEW YEAH
BARNETTS INC.
134 HE. Pant Street
MJUCS FINEST OFF1CZ SUPPLIES
The Doctor weal to the second class hotel where
was staying on Via Gnsardi. in a
of Basse not far froai the Tiber, rode up in
the ekiator and knocked at the door. Seen*; the
weary, ahnost cynical nairnim in the young man's
eyes. Doctor Blaatsrh asked nun no qeestions He
dad not even say: "Are yon the man who phoned
s the trouble*"
--SZ W3KSS :Z?. A HAPPY NEW YEAH
Custombilt Furniture Mfg. Co.
.X NX. 4>i Street Phono 78-4711
Siowrootns Corner 79*h S*- and Biscsyne BJrd, Phono 70-4244
DadcToa
IV Wuvd.-al.Ts S.ppl v C4.
ED. ?rrp.r os. v?r.
:::: n w 3h. street
Phone S4-SSC1
BXA1 A nAGAZT.VZ tcn:3ht
T4ir Embroidery Work ft
* N.W. 22=d AVL
PHONE
RABBI and MRS. S. M. M \< HTI I
MR. and MRS. MORTON STTTSKY
STELLA B-BeVa one LEO JAY
Extend To A^ Jewry
Best Wishes for
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
was lying- stretched oat on top of tbe
. folly dressed, and did not acknowledge
by expression He did not anbatton his shirt
when he saw the doctor approach with the stethe-
Too"re the doctor Go ahead aad find tbe
yoarself." his setf-inrotved and somewhat
silence seemed to say. "I'm not cooperating.
In only a bystander.-
Doctor Blawisch onbottoned the shirt and applied
the stethoscope So aniinmi. Blood pressure nor-
rt slightly rapid. Skin pale and some-
He sat down. Bat the patient did not
tarn his head or after a sound "Yon sent for me.
Mr Sandier, didst yon? What seems to be the
tToabii be asked finally.
~Xo. I didn't send for yea." said tbe young man.
- I *dVe that matched his facial expression.
pan didnt. who?"
-I doot know. Ask the hotel clerk."
Doctor Blaniseh went down to the hotel lobby.
to the manager's office The manager got up and
his hand This young American upstairs, has
lying on his bed for days, for weeks." be said
in Kalian. "He sees nobody-, he eats nothing. He
stares at tbe ceiling all day. Are you a doctor?"
-Yes. la a doctor Was it you who called the
Joint Clinic?"
-Yes."
-Why tbe Joint'"
Because tbe Joint is American, and he is Ameri-
. moat Italians the JDC. or the Joint, was an
lake the American Embassy, a clearing
far trouble.
did he register here?"
tee days njo."
t anybody been to see him?"
Perfaapa by the time another New Year ioIj]
around, thane youngsters. 01 since birth *q
tuberculoaia. will be well again. Here the
are shown resting on the porch of the Etcma
Children's TB hospital in Israel, one of 9
85 hospitals, old age homes, sanitariums and J
other inetiruhons in Israel supported by Md- j
ben. the Joint Distribution Committees pre.>
gram on behali of aged, ill and hendicapped
newcomers to the new state.
t he
i
': njnf"
a0s from his room All we
he's American. That we
Mrs. Sadie Fagan
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hershbem
and Children
Extend New Year Greetings To All
again. Robert
- left him. He looked
l_itL_IW d0e*r ""^ fWe*r Uut he
*** waannwere before. A young man ly-
the spirit sapped.
the past a shambles, the future an unknown pit I
studied the face for a moment Of course he
the map. It was himself. 1944.
The doctor sat down and looked out of ta|
window It was the middle of September, ow l.
those airy, light-spirited, pre-autumn Rome dan,l
The chestnut trees lining tbe streets reminded
doctor of the beech trees on the street he had aj
office on in Vilna before tbe war. A woman
past on the other side of the street, and ret_
him of his wife who had been one of the _
fortunate ones she had died of a heart attack |
Auschwitz. Across the tree-tops far out toward L_
east horizon the dome of Saint Peter refledei|
the pale, animated air of tbe city, and toward
left, as he leaned forward in his chair, he sawi
other dome of the synagogue.
Doctor Blaniseh turned from the window Anal
pressive sense or Rome's beauty mingled witi ua|
oppression of memory, perhaps had evoked it
remembered that in a few hours, the New Ye
Rosh Hasbonah would begin.
Suddenly the young American sat up in
"What's the matter, doctor? Arent you fe
well?"
*
Doctor Blaniseh shook his head, but Robert
ler got out of tbe bed. hurried to the bathroom i
en Peat 14
K. MIAMI AVt AT HST ST. *_ -al
BEST WISHES
for a
HAPPY NEW YEAH
TO ALL OOB FRIENDS,
RELATIVES AMD
ACQUAINTANCES
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAH
W. Field*
1600 Coffins Are. Miami Beach
TO ALL A MOST
HAPPY NEW YEAR
KeUj'8 Drive-..
Not ABsaatod with any
Drfee-Bi
DeBeiou, Seadwiehea
Curb
1 MO N.W. LE JEUNE RD.-4-7033
SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL OUR FRIENDS
Ocean Irni Restaurant
7143 Coffins Arenas. Bfaasnl Beach Phone 0*4338
South Shore Restaurant
155
Drive,
54301
TO AH...
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
A & R AUTO
REPAIR SHOP
Scientific Motor Tune Up Specialising In Transmission*
Ccunpleto Auto Repair All Work Guaranteed
Joe Acebal Owner
300DYEAR TIRES TUBES BATTERIES
"* 3*501 1J75 N.W. 29th Snvl


r-
PB1DAY, SEPTEMBER II. 19S3
^J^IstncrkMar
PAGE 3E
McCarran Act in Operation
By PHILIP BAUM
.
(Editor's Note: During the year 5713, the
controversial and discriminatory McCarran-
Walter Act has been governing the nation's
immigration policy and procedure. In this fea-
ture article are analyzed the provisions of the
law and its many inequities.)
A little over a year ago, liberal civic agencies by
i (he narrow margin of three votes in the Senate lost
their bitter fight to sustain former President Tru-
man's veto of the McCarran-Walter Immigation Act.
I As a result, since December, 1952, when the new
Jaw took effect, we have been living under an im-
migration measure that has subverted our prestige
abroad and imperilled the security and standing of
aliens and naturalized citizens at home.
The bill was passed in June, 1952, to take effect
December 24, 1952. In September, months before
the law was to become operative, Jewish organiza-
tions received word that the Visa Division of the
State Department had concluded that the McCarran-
Walter measure for the first time would require
prospective immigrants to furnish information re-
garding their "ethnic" classification and that this
I provision would
[require the list-
I ing of Jewish
I visa applicants as
la "special group."
IThere was not
the slightest in-
timation that
such data had
any relevant or
legitimate con-
Inection with the
I issuance of entry
documents. On
the other hand,
the dangers im-
plicit in the of-
I ficial inquiry into
religious or "eth-
loic" affiliation
I were obvious. As
I Rabbi Israel Gold-
I stein, President
I of the American
Jewish Congress,
I reminded t h e
State Department: "The risk of possible perversion
of information of this kind for the appeasement of
bias and prejudice is no less great in the field of
immigration than in the fields of employment and
education where it consistently has been deprecated
or forbidden by the Federal Civil Service Commis-
sion, the President's Commission on Higher Educa-
tion and the President's Committee on Civil Rights."
fafcfci IstmI GUtuin
t bin
Jewish Community Aroused
Only after condemnation of this requirement by
I n aroused Jewish community did the Department
of State ultimately rule that "ethnic affiliation" as
j used in the immigration laws would not be con-
strued as referring to religious attachment and that
Jewish visa applicants would not, therefore, be
subjected to interrogation about their Jewish back-
ground.
The cynicism of the McCarran-Walter Act is under-
bred by its so-called screening provisions, sup-
posedly drawn to protect us against infiltration by
subversives. This end i, hardly achieved by its cur-
Z!i', KP.retati0n Which flatly excludes "-Com-
munist, but permits the free and unimpeded entry
J"i,a,"d "fascists. Unlike earlier laws, the
McCarran-Walter Act limits the definition of ex-
cludable totalitarian" groups to those which have
,h ?, .ef?UOn tota"ta""> government "in
hl~T?.KUleS" By iDV0king the "*tunding
theory that the Nazi parties and the Fascist parties
confined their aggressions solely within their own
national borders or within the continent of Europe
immigration authorities in practice have been able
to avoid classification of these groups as "totalitari-
ans.
Rod Crpt For Nails
On the other hand, some persons have been ex-
cluded with even greater rigor than before. But the
nature of the excluded classes only highlights the
imperious character of the new law. Under the pre-
McCarran-Walter law, exclusion because of a crim-
inal record could occur only following conviction
of a crime involving "moral turpitude," that is, a
crime which our own judicial system would regard
as reprehensible or blameworthy. By dropping the
"moral turpitude" qualification and by permitting
exclusion upon conviction of any so-called non-
political crime, no matter how trivial, the new law
for the first time vests foreign courts with the power
to screen our immigrants. It commits us to ratify
the verdicts of totalitarian tribunals that operate
on premises hostile to our democratic concepts. To
take but one of many instances, the Belgian war-
bride of an American airman has been denied entry
under the new law because, while at slave labor for
the Nazis, she was convicted by Nazi courts of
falsifying documents to obtain food ration tickets.
We are saddled with an immigration act that ex-
eludes victims of Nazi courts while a red carpet
is spread before the Nazis.
Meanwhile, the original proponents of the Mc-
Carran-Walter legislation betray no sign of willing-
ness to modify or alleviate the Act's recist provi-
sions. For the past year, the McCarran-Walter clique
has met every suggestion for a change in the na-
tional origins quota system, the keystone of our
present immigration laws, with virulent if not slan-
derous opposition.
Racism Issue
The national origins quota system under which
the overall annual quota of 154,000 is allocated
among the various countries of the world in the
same proportion which persons deriving from those
countries bore to the total white population of the
United States in 1920, was enacted in 1924 by a
Congress caught up in the anti-alien excitement of
World War I. It represented then and represents
today a blatant attempt to shut out the so-called
"new immigrants" from southern and eastern Europe
and to encourage immigration of those of presum-
ably "superior stock" from northern and western
Europe.
The racism of the national origin quota plan is
supplemented by a provision which imputes to
peoples deriving from the so-called "Asia-Pacific
Triangle," a contaminating ancestry from which
they cannot escape no matter to what ends of the
earth they may flee. In apparent contradiction to the
national origin system, the new law requires that
Continued on Pago 12
TO ALL
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
MIAMI TRANSIT CO.
10 ALL GREETINGS
ft. M. DUSINBUKY
Roofing and Metal Craftsmen
" Sefafrfeta for fiaorfeacc"
CreftsaMa Tacsaitwrt tfc Yoars
l9<0 N.W. 17th AVENUE PHONE 3-8208
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS
A MOST HAPPY
NEW YEAR
BEN JUFFE AUCTION OUTLET
801 N. Miami Avenue
Phono 9-8973
To All Season's Greetings
Fowlers Sea Food
& Poultry Market
"Shop in the Gablas
No Parking Worries"
267 MINORCA AVENUE
Phone 4-1711
TO OUR MANY FRIENDS AND PATRONS
GREETINGS
CLARK & LEWIS CO.
WHOLESALE GROCERS
34 N. E. 11th Street Phono 3-3108
GREETINGS TO ALL
E. B. LEATHERMAN
DADE COUNTY
COURT HOUS E
TO ALL GREETINGS
LAWRENCE LUMBER CO.
F. H. A. FINANCING
667 N.W. 14th Street
PHONE 3-3663
Miami 1. Florida
HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM
ROSE-SAXON LUMBER CO.
"ROYAL SERVICE"

* LUMBER
MILL WORK
1050 N.W. 21st STREET
Phone 9-8333
MIAMI
"THE CORNED BEEF KING"
Charlie's Air Conditioned ]
MARKET VIEW RESTAURANT
CHARLES FRIEDMAN. Proprietor
_, Phone 82-9181
2115 N. W. 12th Avenue Miami, Florida I
GREETINGS TO ALL
SAM SLATKO
WEST GATE LIQUOR STORE
Choice Wines and Liquors
3124 N.W. 79th STREET
PHONE 7-9428
TO ALL ... NEW YEAR GREETINGS
I. Houston Gribblo
North Miami Tax Ass ass or
Happy Holiday Greetings from Myer Friedman
and the Entire Staff of
StOCK ON TNI OCIAN FROM SSed fO 8rd ST**.
MIAMI BEACH
PftfTllY Alt CONDITION!*
JH|. WORLD'S FINEST


PAGE 4 E
*Jmist fkrkf&r
FHIDAY.
SEPTEMBQ,
Gl'TTMAX UB LAPOFF
Kosher Meats and Poaltry
EXTEND BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY
NEW YEAR
TO THEIR FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS
325 Collins Arenue
Miami B*ach
Gershom Mendes Seixes: the
Jew of the Revolution
By HARRY SlMONHOFF
Seven Arts Syndic**
Telephone 58-1031
"ini*An.
Fvrniihirs A Installers
tolaMJ Liailiw Asphalt Tile
Rubber Tile
> s
l*ci~ *v r-rc EctaaiatM
Me un.e o-rsE
lu 1?8& the vestry of Shearith Israel Synagogue
l evened an jiphclio. for the position of a
' from -yearoid Gershom Mendes Seixes Aanericaa
bora, he was related to the elite > phmlii of the
congregation His father, a New Christian in Por-
tugal, had entered the covenant of
earned the danghter of Hones Levy.
. leader i* the Sen York rnmn-anity of early lath
reatnrr There mere n~> other anpiacants. and the
trustees ejected the jonthfnl -Rabbi' enthnsaasUc-
C!
i> our on. day by the semmary-tr^ ^bt ^
renanble. the Protestant Preacher far m^T
the Rav of bygone days. ^ "*
The MM -**. to. ^^ fc
his leadership. As the struggle nith Fnglana loon*
rrbnfha.nl ^nT^T"" J?***'"' *-
rymg osoe. Patrick Henry aught decUi-a *Z
IVWW* towaawMaaaaaaaafM. MTaau------t **
'" >, ^jW me liberty c- ....
death." Yet. there were oo ntUul nmec-t
-best people- of wealth and talents stood t_ "
Oown_ Most Ctototm. p-torv hi New YtrktT *
torn* It took conrng. a- h-h, for J
Seizes to throw hi his lot nith the ^beb^TS
-non by his aaore wealthy paruhioqen
*** Seixes akng in j^
rnong the Minute Ma,
after ^"asaingtofs
Sexxes refused to renaa
cbd not interfere sith
took ao chaoco;
d elose-i the
the Tarahs. the aim-
refuge m stot-
The
Active m
he had reason for
retreat from Lon( Irland
in New York. The
religious freedom, yet the
he preached a patriotic
synagogue He took
the candlesticks
ford. O
The majority oil.ui f Shearith Israel wen
patriots and fled, hi Philadelphia they gethtt with
other refugees, swelled the existing congremlbj
into the largest Jewish eounnunaty in Amerxa. A
vnaritnal lender was mtrtum}. and the Nen Tort
ers sent to Stratford for their cantor. He assisted
Makveh Israel, the congregatios that
the enrty ri|itaii. Hayas Salonn,
to his concha Rachel Pranks and Job.
liberal contratutuaas to the builchc.- fund of
a new qaatngau MUh the end of the war in sight
the dedaratio. took place and anrlnaed a special
the Pre ride ad and Congress-
of the US and -His EaxeOency George Wash-
After the Treaty nf Peace, anany war ref^ees
to then* homes. Semes aught have reruined
wuh Mikveh Israel hnt far the hnantent demand that
he retm a to Mew York. Before leering he. a- ?.abbi
and Haym Sahaman anal others petitioned the Pem-
syrraana author-dies to amend the state cor.>*..TuUoo
office that the Mew Testament was of divine
a larmnt nf the British
"on the tme fnath nf a Chnsuaa devised
nf Paruaaent
Mo action was taken. But the petnaan was no: wast-
shall ever be re
these United States.
aaMwi i= kj the
the first native
of Thomas
fcelefbre-
Judaisrfl.
*" Eoa*sh. The first to atiianjt interfaith ;ood
GHEETIKGS
3n Simmscs aa~ \Ekmi 5
copuh pk sappiy gx wl
M" hahmi mnl
;
HAPPY NEW YEAJ
%>LOX IHIMBIXtn CO.
ms.w. it* a>
9-lWl
yu
mm


1
TTUDAV. SEPTEMBER 11, 1953
"Jcwlstt rh)rfHnr>
- i
PAGE 5 E
Change
in
By DAVID I. MARMOR
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
As Israel's one and a half million Jewish citizens
take leave of the year 5713, they look back upon
the fifth >ear oi their reborn Statehood as on a year
0f consolidation during which they endeavored to
harness the dramatic and rapid events of the pre-
ceding fuur years. The strides taken during those
vears have been conditioned by the unprecedented
influx of more than 700,000 new immigrants who
more than doubled the existing Jewish community
of 650,000 at the time of the Declaration of Inde-
pendence.
The last year has witnessed a halt in this human
stream. Israel's immigration policy as embodied in
the Law of the
Return, whereby
every Jew has a
right to come to
and settle in the
country, contin-
ues unchanged.
However, the
great strain put
upon the resour-
ces available for
absorption by the
preceding influx
on the one hand,
and the prohibi-
tive restrictions
on potential im-
migrants from
Eastern Europe
on the other
hand, have
brought about a
marked decrease
in immigration
figures a decrease which began already in the
middle of 5712 and continued into 5713. The slow-
down in immigration has afforded the Government
and ;he nalion an opportunity to consider more
eato v and under less pressure some of the basic
inte.'ral issues facing the State.
Quest for Stability
In February, 1952. the Government, with the ap-
proval of the Knesset, introHtiterJ a hew economic
policy aimed at combatting inflation, increasing
Pew ctivity and encouraging exports and foreign
l"v. ments. The total Government budget of the
ear including allocations for defense was
ed from current revenue incomes, a measure
designed to curb inflation.
Greater economy and efficiency have been intro-
ouccd mi the administration. On the recommenda-
f a Cabinet efficiency committee, about 3,000
tioverament employees out of a total of 27,000
' e been discharged within the last few months.
e Israel pound has been brought in line with its
eaj alue This devaluation stimulates the foreign
vc :or to import the urgently needed foreign ex-
cn-r.se and enables the Israel exporter to compete
on jie foreign markets.
The overhauling of a national economy in Israel's
Present state is not a job to be done quickly. How-
wer, the results achieved so far are quite encour
."U. Inflation has been significantly, curbed, and
J^ore most consumer goods have been decon-
I* T 'Ol
sraels economy
Moiht Shmrttt
. friendship a cement***
trolled. During the first half of 1953, exports in-
creased by 19 percent as compared with the some
period of 1952.
The year 5713 has witnessed the first tangible
results of the hundreds of millions of dollars invest-
ed in agriculture and industry. The greatest develop-
ment has been observed in agriculture. Locally-
grown vegetables were almost sufficient to cover
local needs. The increase in production of other
staples reduced the country's dependence on food
purchases from abroad. Bananas were exported to
Europe. The citrus industry, which suffered severely
during World War II and the War of Liberation, is
now on the road to recovery. The 5713 season yield-
ed an export crop of nearly five and a half million
boxes as compared with 3,700,000 boxes in the 5712
season, an increase of 50 percent. Citrus has again
become one of the country's most important export
products and earner of foreign exchange.
Great strides in the implementation of irrigation
projects have been noted during the past year. The
damming of the Beit Natufa Valley in Galilee will
make it possible to store one million cubic meters of
water. The Yarkon-Negev pipeline, designed to di-
vert the waters of the Yarkon River, near Tel Aviv,
to the arid lands in the Negev, is near completion.
Shortage of pipes has been greatly alleviated by the
output of two large pipe plants which started pro-
duction last year.
Phosphate mining in the Negev and an additional
sulphuric acid plant completed recently are suffi-
ciently productive to supply Israel's growing agri-
culture with its
entire fertilizer
r e q u i r ements,
hitherto import-
ed. The first trial
shipment of phos-
phates abroad
was made in June
and indicates
prospects of a
profitable export
item and earner
of foreign ex-
change.
The industrial
progress of the
country, though
less outstanding
than the growth
of agriculture,
has nevertheless
been substantial.
New industrial
branches have
been established.
Tire and rubber
plants have al-
ready begun pro-
duction for the
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO
ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
LINCOLN INSTITUTE
1213 LINCOLN ROAD
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 58-3548
Or. Chaim rVeiimaaa
. founder last
local market, as well as for export. The exploitation
of the mineral resources of the Negev has laid the
foundation for a prosperous chemical industry. A
new 48-mile highway, a remarkable engineering
feat which connects the Potash Works in Sdom at
the southern tip of the Negev with Beersheba, the
Continued en Page 11
GREETINGS
GALAN-LEON CO. INC
DuPONT BUILDING
MIAMI. FLORIDA
IMPORTERS OF CUBAN CANNED PINEAPPLE
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
CHRISTINE'S BEAUTY SHOP
741 N.W. 62nd STREET
PHONE 74771
Phone 5-7111
ENFIELD'S
CAMERA
SHOP
Cor. Washington Ave.
409 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Fla.
GREETINGS
PARKER PLUMBING CO.
Leo Hoheuser
1903 West Ave., Miami Beach
1441 SW. 3rd St., Miami
Tel. 58-0472
GREETINGS
COTTAGE INN
"CHICKEN IN THE ROUGH"
Quality Quantity-
Reasonable
2235 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD PHONE 3-8470
TO ALL GREETINGS
H. J. SANBORN
Good Plumbing
23 N.W. 11th Street Phone 2-3002 Miami, Florida
J. W. Baroa Family
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
Star Construction
Company
1440 N,W. 21st Street
MIAMI 42, FLORIDA
ASSOCIATED DISPLAY CORPORATION
"CREATORS OF ATMOSPHERE"
C. M. HASKIN
141 N. E. 2nd Street Telephone 9-7289
Miami 32, Florida
"T
HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR CUSTOMERS.
FRIENDS AND FAMILY
SMASHiNG LOW PRiCES ON
FiSHMNG TACKLE
PAWT, HARDWARE. GOODYEAR TIRES AND APPLIANCES
UIHS 0J AMY ADVERTISEMENT ON NSNINC '44X11, APPl/AWCES,
rum M TIKIS and m guarantee TO UU IT fO* uss


AGE6 E
-Jmistrkr****
rMPAY. SPTru^
coartrrr
oar
Eastview Nursing Home
1?1 S.W. had AW.
v-TJU
* C
Immigration in the Jewish
State During the Past Year
rtwKytMif C#rt Vtytstvwv Mm m **
co$nr utxtXTS mvum
curs ttc

YOUR TRANSFER PROBLEMS
BRIDGES TRANSFER CO.
4S N.W. "th Street
Phone :-4"SI
rt M* *? iwi 4 aaasr mvtr in nat
Maurice E. Kerr
rt 4^ **> throws
erally. show greater measure 0
the MM of the premmt io of ^ "^
over its cure. Fir* come material ttktfb. J?
tally bousing, since there is no housing miUjT!!l
ret le the newcomer can pay ke,^
several 1 Israel finimili or
tcavs ri.vov snorrt
m tftaTOLw WkO OmO* lank TWatn
taaajnj .w ,w l Sumr. In 'w'iHV '-m*i aatf *fw
II q o Hair St gli *t s
1 t i fit f i i'hth
UN UIMST Mil COtAt HaUB W tad Im
'--' hr fta|
A Year of Happiness
To Everyone!
MIAMI LINCOLN-
MERCURY, INC.
Oe*X EVE3GJ&3S TZ. I
221 S^L I=>i AVESTZ
?h:nt :.*:
if
trrm

>CA>C aa JOKT ETZ3K3LADES. FLOJHDA
:
*

i? Scndfe Fiariaz iar Over
Tur-Tr-Sac Teo
- e tood s _. cr. :rr.rrcves c:s :epz.i-
mam work* ao c pipe in Israel's iarm neld*.
Abandance will sooc still the restless con-
rem ice the future that now make* some inv
sucrcctts th.r.k -^. terms oi moving on.
By ALEPH SHERMAN
Jewish Taltaraphic agency
TEL AVTVThe Israel pubbe has been awakened
' suddenly from its dreams of reaching- a population
oi 4400400 before the ead of the decade, by the
new* that for the first sax months of this j ear there
were mare i map ami than immigrants. The Immi-
gration OnciL a pahbc body representing the
meat departments, met ia July to consider the
problem bat failed to reach any clear-cut i iambi
'smns which they could press oa the Jewish Agency
and the Government Thxe-year s figures, ia fact.
seen: to set the seal once and for an oa the
the need foe a new stocktaking.
lmmagi ntiian had already begun to fall off sharply
las: ?ear when it totalled some 2JJ80. just twice as
much as the estimated 11 or U thousand emigrants
Fur the first six manthu of US3. unmigialiin is
down to SJKi. while eenjgrntaoa is estimated at
If one looks at quality instead of quantity, the
situatinr is far more senomv Three-quarters of those
iearmfc immigrated after the founding of the state,
but a quarter are veterans. Whereas most immi-
grants have been hrnnght hen at pubbr expense.
anc larpt numbers of them come from backward
rnunrnes. and mchsde women, children, aged, sick
and Hxnerme. thoae tearing are mostly people in the
"aamtutujw*- age groups, professional people or
others wht are confident that tbey can get into the
munmes nf thear destination, often Canada or the
Vnned States. Most possess skills the country can
il a3 mil iThal
""less b> .
buy a flat outright. Living standards in isne[
low. and the professional worker or high gove^
roent official finds that he earns little, if anytw
more than his doorman or chauffeur (*b sTji
course, a government, not private, employee.,
Though the food situation has improved m\
deaL and clothing is plentiful for those who bat
money, problems of servants, schooling and rephw.
ment of furniture, to mention only a few, are a^ i
difficult here than in any European or Ameno,
country.
Problems of employment also loom large, ud
there is the usual difficulty of the newcomer air i
country: though Israel welcomes all Jews, the insuto.
Uon of seniority is also very strong, and it is W
so easy for the newcomer to adjust to his chanad
status.
The ma
which has
People, sick,
mainly of petty
clination to go into agriculture and who swell tat
ranks of the unskilled workers for whom ort ha
to be made at a time when there is already hear/
unemployment- All this takes money and increasa
the taxation which weighs on the middle classes ml j
professional people. In this way. mass immigrauoa
is a contributory cause to
in Urge
hackward couotna,]
of children. oU
and social cases, cooaxr
wh--> aheu marked ia
Beside shortages here, there are controls, asf
mnny sections of the ha tint m world have usually
been extremely critical of government policies.
that some have f eJt that they would be better off
elsewhere Whether niai mat km of the Germn
Zionists (the hiinnnimaas party i inside the Got.
emment will after this to any great extent remains
to be
Suggestions made at the
altering the situauoi
"selectivity- rules for
of special facilities f
speaking countries and the
-Selectivity- was
numbers of sack.
pouring into the
stalwarts,
culties are tilling it to
tioa budgets As a result.
introduced m the
interpreted
lease so that
migrants are stall
or sick.
Council for
the relaxation of
the lntrodoctioa
from English
of emigration.
last year when the
and unproductive people
began to pall even on tkt
e Israel's economic diffr
ml its welfare and edoo
medical examinations wen
of i min tn ii sad i00*
to eoatain a bread-
the regnh
to say tkt
of new in-
cases, ajed.
amerally
out that its
statistics
of any
The liunugiation
pambe opinion gen-
nabatttif poist
_ imnugntitfl
only maketM

Tr m
Cimntimji
LEONARD L LTMEALL
and Family
mWI HX m AVEWJE
SEASOFTS GREETTNGS TO ALL OUR FRIENDS
Adams Glass Service
GREETINGS
STERN-CASE
MOTORS INC
BrY A CAR
avbe
4jro fbftm
VfiH 1K.4H GmEKTI\GS
US*.



JAY, SEPTEMBER_n,J953_
+JenlsiiFlcridiar
PAGE 7E
Treasury.df Holiday Wiscbfff^'
By MARTIN SILVER
rout Klppr Customs
in ancient days, Yom Kippur wu a holiday of re-
cing as weI1 as fasting- The Talmud relates that
that day it was customary for the youth to make
Berry and to congregate in vineyards for meeting
ed mates. Remnants of that custom are still
etained by Caucasian Jews whose daughters and
gather in the streets and dance to the tune of
ifes and other native instrument* played by pre-
mgement by non-Jewish musicians. In Tripoli,
"is customary for youngsters between the ages of
,ine and 12 to gather in the synagogue Yom Kippur
[ternoon and to dance to the tune of wedding
xhe dancing custom still exists among Jews
Abyssinia, but there both men and women par-
ticipate, separately of course. The custom of youth-
I rejoicing and dancing on Yom Kippur once pre-
iled in some Jewish communities in Rumania, but
was abolished on Rabbinic decree. During the
liddle Ages, it was customary for children and
dults to play games of nuts, a device designed no
oubt to ease the burden of fasting.
In ancient days, it was customary to wear white
obes on Yom Kippur, since the color white is a
nbol of rejoicing. This custom is still retained,
hough in most communities it is only the cantor,
he Rabbi and the extremely pious who wear white
laftons, or kittels. In extremely Orthodox syna-
ogues. most women wear white dresses or at least
Irhite shawls.
During the years of the Second Temple, the new
ponth would be announced by messengers who kept
Latch over the moon in Jerusalem. Messengers
Lould then be sent to the Jewish communities "chutz
faaretz" to advise them of the approaching holidays.
ecause it was realized that the messengers might
Jrrive too late, the practice developed among the
utside communities to add a day to the holidays,
i practice which still exists in Jewish communities
lutside of Israel. This custom, however, was never
Ipplied to Yom Kippur, probably because it involves
(asting on two days. Yet the Talmud records that
here were in fact many pious Jews who observed
J'om Kippur two successive days. The two-day cus-
om was observed by many Jews in Germany during
ie Middle Ages, and there are distant Jewish com-
nunitK". today still adhering to that practice.

|n Starch Of A Drunkard
It is told of the Zaddik Levi Itzhak 'Berdfehever
Ihat once, as he was readying himself to chant the
Pol Nidre. he suddenly paused, lit a candle and
broceeded with what appealed a diligent and thor-
ough search for some mysterious object under the
Mgogue chairs and benches. The cnassidim had
^nown the ways of the great taint, yet they were
orely baffled by this proaaic conduct moments be-
fore the most awesome minutes of the Yom Kippur
a. Finally, one of the oldest aad moat respected
ers rose from his paw and braved the
Ruction:
"tabbi. what is it you are looking lor?" Curtly
vi Itzhak replied that he was looking for a
*ani The congregants were stunned by the
*Ply. but not for long, for the Rabbi at once stepped
1 the altar for one of his famous remonstrations
Wh the Almighty.
"Master of the Universe," he whispered softly, "do
tell me, is there another people in the world like thy
people Israel? You have decreed that one must eat
and drink erev Yom Kippur and that the mitzvah
of regaling on the ninth day is as great as fasting
on the tenth day. Had you set aside such a day for
the other peoples of the world many drunkards
would be wallowing in the gutters toward the eve-
ning. But that is not the way of our people. They all
of them observed the mitzvah, and now they are
all here in the House of Worship. There isn't a sin-
gle drunkard to be found, nor has any one over-
slept. They are all here dedicated to do confession
and to beseech forgiveness from you. What other
choice have you. Almighty, than to condone them
and enter their names in the Book of Life for the
year to come?"
Awesome silence gripped the worshippers, for
now they were sure their prayers would not go un-
answered.

Latson From A Taller
Rabbi Elimelecb, of Lizensk, once told his pupils
that if they wished to learn how to conduct them-
selves erev Yom Kippur they could take a lesson
from the humble but pious tailor on the outskirts
of the town.
Sensing the importance of the Rabbi's admonition,
they proceeded to the tailor's house, where they
placed themselves under the windows in the hope of
detecting the concealed virtues of the man. The
tailor and his sons at the time were in the midst of
prayer. When they were through davening, they put
on their Sabbath raiment, lit candles and set the
table. The eating ritual was attended by much re-
joicing, but when it was over Berl the tailor pro-
ceeded to a shelf and pulled out a book in which
he meticulously recorded all the transgressions he
committed during the year.
Raising his eyes heavenward, the tailor reminded
the Master of the Universe that this was "the day of
reckoning between us," and then he proceeded iv
read off the sins he committed throughout the year.
When he finished reading the list of sins, the
tailor sobbingly went to another shelf and, pulling
out another and heavier ledger, turned again
toward heaven and spoke: "Master of the Universe,
now that I have listed my sins against you, I shall
read off the averoth you committed against me.
If justice is to guide our reckoning, you owe me
more than I am indebted to you. However, since it
is erev Yom Kippur, when it is customary to for-
give each other, I forgive your averoth against me,
and my household and all I ask of you is to forgive
us for the transgressions we committed against
you."
The tailor then filled a glass with whiskey, made
the appropriate benediction, and proclaimed loudly:
"L'chaim, Master of the Universe, we have condoned
each others' sins, and all averoth, thine and mine,
are wiped out."
When the pupils returned, they told the Rabbi
that they considered the tailor's conduct impudent
and desecratory of the occasion. But the Rabbi of
Lizensk thought otherwise, for he told his pupils:
"The Holy One, blessed be He, and His sacred
retinue had come to hear the words of Berl the
tailor as he'conversed in great simplicity and hu-
mility with the Almighty. His utterance brought re-
joicing to all heavens and the Almighty has granted
him forgiveness and to all Israel."
(I If11!
TRICE GARAGE
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE end ROAD SEIVKE
MM Dear f If Teraeeer CJvsJ
M BIRD ROAD PHONE 44422
*"" *'*** AW Jewry Per A Mesf Nappy Aad Prasparses New rer
SCHIFF'S MARKET
MR. aad MRS. J. SCHIf F
400 U"" ., Mleaai leech Meae 5 3751
10 ALL GREETINGS
ROYAL FLEET SERVICE
PAPCFl DIUVftf TWCMM
370 N.E. 71th STREET
Phone 784795
StASOM'S GKHTINCS
135 Miracle Mil.
CORA1 CABLES, FlOIOA
Pfca 134201
WITH BEST WISHES
FOR A VERY
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Mr. and Mrs. Leon Kay*
and Son
420 LINCOLN ROAD
MR. and MRS. LEWlS 'STERNSHEIN
and Children FRANCES, ALAN and DAVID
Wish Their Friends sad Relatives a Happy ami Prosperous New Tear
To Our Patrons and Friends A Most Happy Holiday
Crane Tile Company
XPERT WORKMANSHIP
3492 N.W. 7th Street Phone 644742

TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
Western Trail Auto Supply
67th AVENUE and THE TRAIL
WEST MIAMI
Phone 874497 Louis Leeda
GREETINGS
BIANCHI-THORNTON CO.
Sound INSURANCE Friendly SERVICE ~ j ,
PAN-AMERICAN BANK BUILDING
150 S.E. 3rd AVENUE
ROOM 417 PHONE 82-4621
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
PLANTATION FOODS. Inc.
VELDA ICE CREAM
"SMOOTH AS VELVET"
500 N.E. MIAMI GARDENS DRIVE
Phone Dial 81, then Dial 6-3511
To All .. Season's Greetings
JOHN A. 6AUTIER
YOUR DADE COUNTY
TAX ASSESSOR
GREETINGS
"SUM" WALDR0N
WISHES ALL HIS FRIENDS AND PATRONS
| A HAPPY ^11
| NEW YEAR
for NEW TIRES. RECAPS and BATTERIES, see
Waldron Tire Co.
t; YOUR PENNSYLVANIA TIRE DEALER
~! PHONES: 64-1529 64-0761 64-1520
WEST FLAGLER at 27th AVENUE T
"THE WALDRON CORNER"


Mli'Ht I
FACE IB
FHIWIT


NOLEN
ECONOMY EXTERMINATORS
MIAMI S-S161
MIAMI BEACH S4444
Jewry's Accomplishment in 571
>IR. nnd MRS. SAM SKITI.IX
Wad daughter* Barbara 'udsth and Harriett* Marsha
R WBRB
lO Ml
09 a HAPPY an: >rs nt\v year
NEW v EAR NGS TO A:.:
JACXS GROCERY & MARKET
. N VY. '.4A Stowee Phone S4SM
vVMKJTT UNE OF GROCERIES AXP MEATS
J \c s
10 v..: MOSI ratty :-?ol.tav
Kid olio (.inMnKiion rr|HraiiBi
oenesa: contractors
**; n m ~*y $**#< it, imhi
v >
\Zim Ave. i omitiMiiio Markn
iri iivci cioti
-.-v-x;-c vitv.t fcTV ... s-Rrr- K* xr.KHr. rut
5iT. .. REP*: R ECC VER
Ram **.->. v"iro^T ;5rr.h?jia* ahv {Im.-> Chairs
* .->-4 c^u7>tTvc *>smm : etc:
S GROSS* A N
rvRK mariso* sinm
B> EDWARD M. M. WARBURG
General Chairman, Unitad Jewish Appeal
For AmrrKin Jew*, whose deep and continuing
interest >n Jewish eents abroad has been amply
demonstrated man? times, the year 5713 was one of
the most challenging in recent times.
5713 opened on a note of emergency in Israel.
Jack D Wetter. IJA National Campaign chairman,
a ho surveyed conditions in the young State at the
time reported that it was facing a desperate dollar
shortage which seriously threatened the nation*!
economy
In a cable from Jerusalem he urged that swift,
broad scale measures be taken to improve the situa-
tion of more than
3A.V0O0 immi
grants stii! Imng
m tents and fhm-
shelters. to
prexeet farther
eats m the limit-
ed Israel fend n>
.--
v*de means for
nth mi did ir-
ngetxw and land
development .Aid
was sorely need-
ed also, he mdi
cared to farther
programs of we)
fare relief and
training in North
Utta
Ttx caU for
. -.
pmgB for cash
M a goal of
BS iW. W was set a mcoon eaergetiraUy led by
I s nation*, chairmen cahtnet members and a
Ml Cash Cabinet of lflD raaianii i j leaders.
Sirs: results of this Arm
More than half the leeuaed i
it. at m ashmjtflt) ac a I.' \
termer on October ".fr.h bnheed
undr-rstanduif and a**. Amenrax Jews
*"* "el* wmnwian the effects of what
Amtmssadnr Ahha Ebex dcaeriled as "The sharp
pane, k rapic &tmJk" m Israel.
drrwe* were
of the cash
? O t M t T 5.: ,
?J*?-J"' ..avoir Riac
"ban* .<&2Rf
OT*f PRANKS
i c c- f; a a x i a
S&T iJnraa: Root
Mean. Reach Fionae
MWlArTRE?
re ah
1 C I 11 r 11
OI TAT
ZARFT CONSTRUCTION COM.
Wet
Thcr it November as rcrnamaaty
mfv in* forward a* gather ir the
sun. rpQuirec there came with
the new> :~nn Easterr. Europe Anu-Sesutisne was
erurcinf hrhinc the Ire* Canaan
The r-vuf t-^^ anc fWnKwK whaoh taaaaadl
T-f Baaaatal by a seras* of gams events, includ-
jnr. imn-isnnmrn:? ir the Smiet I'naas
anr thf sntelih* counrnes ax arpouaed campjugx
'-npaganoa oi the severing of da>
tnmatK rctaunn> herweer. tax ITSSK an.-i lsrae;
f>nn Nrwemher throupfc March, the tension
moumec anr :tv ox-nes: concem was feh here f as
thr e-entua. tat* re IJW.iW Jew* a the Swatt
Tieaerrmmcr ir d rvervthinr. possdhar to preside
nractu-n men> n: u\c in- :hosr whe migbj emerge
rrnn- n,-hint :rw r-m Cunam Amencaa Jewry irr
raediatel swunt feBi actior.
TW nfhan af thf | mmt .Wnsh vppea] .mme
diateljr organued the eaamaign on ,
ban. calculated to enuat the best le^lerZ*
cooatry in the most effective manner TV
national chairmen, who had in the past ,
representatives of the constituent agenciej,"
augmented by five national campaign chain*-"I
the National Campaign Cabinet Wa nmtti*
that ever> part of the country was repr
it by one of its outstanding leaders
This gave the Cabinet the benefit of .,
finest leadership in the country Elected to
Cabinet were Morris W. Berinsteut of Syraaafi
former chairman of the L JA National Cat?'
Cabiaet; Joseph Holtzatan of Detroit Sol Lucta
of Cincinnati: and William Rosen*aid and
Weiler of New York.
The three national chairmen representir
coBstitneat ageaoes were Walter Biennger of
ton. for the United Service for New AaaL
Rudolph G. Sonneborn of New York I r ihe t:
Israel Appeal, and Rabbi Jonah B Wise o!
York far the Joint Dtstrihotion Committee.
The Cabinet was faibu streagthened by t-
poaataaent of Seated H. DarafL hooorar. pre-jk,
of the Aibed Jewish Appeal af Ph:ladelph^ salj
195S cn the Cahtnet s chairman Mr. Daroff h>^ bee:
af the most dynamic ataaui of the i. atine;
its inception.
was fully girded f uj]
i coatrast I :V liitirl
VJA ready sr.d a'^ie
need. And thai -;nie ioo.i
to offer haver, sad soccttl
crisis aw re:
of the l.'A
the hf*""t of tl
t 1th year of 'emtt The]
auaaawiia of U.-. sas
csj;
'SwOiijujc kx roudmc inuaair n amd an &
rael at Tanas. aaMaansams. oraatrr ^*
v.-was cmi cities and bsarr streets
AMERICAN AVNIN6 CO

Cloro. Tntiiaa
a-r J^oniru; Ih-aa Soha Rnga
sac larqpaa. Al Weak On
gg m Canal Wary
. I1> .iXKIX k FAMSUr
OUWO TWIP AS
Dus kUv* 1am
PAN AMERICAN
3 hMSCAYMt
roixa: asit sltwdt^ ?>A^E5Gaa enrs
^A1I5 one Wat & SSSTt 5T
r^k.
Sua-ram fcihuj PMMtoem
J>fc fhm j>a, Cngfc.
^*> Cataw Pwm
uww ntt ~
mm
"Jtenwrnhwr Jhr attdnaas*
M^ CVtra" Wajr Ph rj.m
1


If, SEPTEMBER lr.1960
+Jewish flcrldb%n
"he Ueblood of tfe'lKlegev
PAGE 5 E
mt
H
. A

F* -*!..'
f he wanderers are becoming fanners, as the
Lifting sands are converted into fertile fields.
Busters of tents are being replaced by hous-
L, water cisterns by the new pipeline ."
[)ne of those occasions so characteristic of the
State of Israel, when ancient tradition com-
ncnted modern progress, took place recently
i the opening of a new water pipeline. The pipe-
completed well in advance of Israel's Rosh
khonah celebrations, ran to Umm Betin, head
^rters of the Abu Ghaig Bedouins, about eight
es from Beersheba near the main road to Hebron
tans-Jordan.
douins in the past had always relied on winter
ps to fill their cisterns and would then struggle
(ough the summer months on short rations. But
winter these proved insufficient, and in the
nths that followed many animals died of thirst,
pel's Army lent a helping hand and transported
pr in tankers, but this was hardly a long-term
ntion. Blueprints were then drawn up by experts
| a network of pipelines to service the Bedouins,
uching off from the main irrigation pipelines
h being built with the aid of allocations from
Ite of Israel Bond investments.
p>e paper work was soon translated into action,
s actual construction neared completion, the
jlouins made plans for .a mass celebration of the
V water supply.
Keeks of preparation went into the Bedouins'
laniutinn of a Gala Day in the desert, to mark
t beginning of the end of their nomadic life, as
PI as another link in Israel's vast irrigation net-
r. spreading like a gigantic spider's web over
| entire country by the use of Israel Bond funds.
ImT'o6 fla' P'ain was chosen for the ath*rii.i
iu>e Bedouin tribes, quite close to the pipe ter-
?. and guest tents were pitched. Throughout
morning of a cloudy but dry day. jeeps, trucks
station wagons mingled with horses, camels and
Peys. Khaki shorts and European clothing were
fnpersed with the flowing robes of the tribes-
P^*ere roasted, barbecue-style, in one corner
of the plain, and huge basins of sparkling white rice
were prepared in another area. A profusion of native
delicacies added an Oriental flavor to the outdoor
banquet, with copper cans of fragrant coffee handy
for everyone. Pittah, the traditional Arab bread,
served as a lining for the tin bowls which were
filled with rice and lamb.
The guests were seated on mattresses and colored
mats. Representatives of the Mixed Armistice Com-
mission, who happened to be in the area studying a
topographical problem, were pleasantly surprised
when they dropped in and were invited to join the
fete, with both Jews and Arabs participating.
The greatest thrill of the festival afternoon came
with the gathering of a line of Arab horsemen on
pure thoroughbreds for a race across the desert
Sands. The race was won by the second son of a
sheikh with 25 wives. The winner was presented
with a medal which had been specially struck for
the occasion by his father.
Darkness closed in with dramatic suddenness,
symbolic of the swiftness with which a new life had
come 'to the wandering Bedouins, who after cen-
turies of wandering in the desert, are now turning
to agriculture for the first time.
The wanderers are becoming farmers, as the shift-
ing sands are converted into fertile fields. Clusters
of tents are being replaced by houses, water cis-
terns by the new pipeline, and the barefoot Arab
children are getting their first opportunity for reg-
ular schooling.
Basically, the transformation of the Bedouins is
due to the shiny steel pipes carrying water, the life-
blood of the Negev. Directly financing the manufac-
ture and laying of the pipes are the Israel Bond
purchases of hundreds of thousands of American
investors.
TO ALL .
HAPPY NEW YEAR
* apt. A. P. St. Phillip
IMMIGRATION IN THE
Continued from Page 6
countries' difficulties greater. "Look after those who
are already in the country better, especially skilled
immigrants from the Western countries," runs their
argument, "and when the country's absorbtative
capacity rises in this way, immigrants will be forth-
coming."
I spoke in the beginning about a new stocktaking.
Israelis look around them; Russia and Eastern
Europe are beyond scope of their policy, at present,
and they can only hope or pray that someday the
reservoir of Russian Jewry will again he allowed to
serve Israel's needs. If the poor and depressed Jews
of the backward countries are no longer to provide
"underprivileged" immigrants, Israel will have to
look, once again, to Zionist movements abroad to
send young and skilled people, not only from Eng-
lish-speaking countries and Latin America, but also
from the middle-classes of North Africa and Egypt,
most of whom look to France rather than to Israel.
Just recently, in fact, the Jewish Agency met in
plenary session to discuss reorganization of the
Zionist movement to meet present-day needs, in-
cluding "quality" immigration.
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
Richie Plumbing Supply, Inc.
1116 nu, AND U8ED PLUMBING SUPPLIES
W. 27th Ave. Telephone 64-4537 Miami. Fla.
THE LEVIN FAMILY
A*^A*\Art NEW YEAR GREETINGS
M. LIEBERMAN & SONS
of Brooklyn. N.Y.
L0C*L nd LONG DISTANCE MOVING
J^h Office: 655 Collins Ave. Phones 8-7147 and M-J013
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
Lang Roofing
Tile Co.
"WE AIM TO PLEASE'
430 N.W. 79th Street
Phone 89-2678
Mr. and Mm. Barney B. Lee and Son
Miami Tile Distributors Inc.
DISTRIBUTORS FOR
,rT,hi,ecturl Ohued Cley Wall Tile
w alette China and Chrome Accessories
Ceramic Floor Tile
Alabama Marble
'*59thT M*chlne8 and Supply
Ph. S4-M73
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
R. M. SPINK
STATION WAGON SERVICE
All Work to Your Satisfaction
"Established 10 Yean"
3151 N.W. 36th St.
PHONE 64-0331
Phone 82-8636 Hand Painted by Carrib
CAIIIKIII NOVELTY COMPANY
COMPLETE PLASTIC SOUVENIR LINE FOR ALL LOCALITIES
HAND PAINTED COMPACTS JEWELRY
CIGARETTE CASES
HARRY ROSEN BEN KAZAN
5 S.W. 2nd Avenut Miami, Florida
FLOOR
SANDING
DOING QUALITY WORKMANSHIP
FOR OVER 20 YEARS IN MIAMI
ACE TILE & FLOOR CLEANERS
2131 N.W. Slst St.
Phone 64-1293
GREETINGS
Coral Gables Pottery Shop
"Red Wood Patio Furniture
2931 Coral Way Phone 48-3055
A MOST HAPPY
NEW YEAR TO ALL
David H. Hendrick, Jr.
MAYOR OF CORAL GABLES
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
FURS EXCLUSIVELY BY
PINTO
1642 Euclid Avenue
Phone 5-7066

TO ALL .
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
Charles Reed
MIAMI SANITORIUM
and Neurology Institute
For Diagnosis and Treatment of Mental and Nervous Disorders,
Alcoholism and Drug Habituation
NORTH MIAMI AVENUE at 79th STREET
Phone 7-1824 Phone 84-5354
MIAMI. FLORIDA
BEST WISHES FOR A HEALTHY. HAPPY
AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
MR. & MRS. EUGENE J. WEISS
AND FAMILY
1650 S. W. 21st STREET
SALES SERVICE
GREETINGS
BUCK PLUMBING, INC.
4150 N.W. 7th Av.nue. Ph. 7 5718 :
L'Shono Tova Tikosevu
United Kosher Market
1553 S.W. 8th Street phone 3-2270
The Original Kosher Market, Owned by LOUIS E. KATZ
Under Supervision of the *
Greater Miami Vaad Hakashruth
~~
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
Mr. end Mrs. Abe Greenfield
Sewing Machines. Commercial and Domestic ".
Bought Sold Repaired Rented
EAST COAST MACHINERY CO.
332 West Fleeter St. Phone 9 3315 Miami M. Florida
I


PAGE 16 E
FBB>AY.
DAK 6AS CORPORATION
BOTTLED GAS
& APPLIA5 C E S
E9V XW rK3,
Pmomt tS-4S23
A HAPfT AKT JTrSTErCTS NTW TEAS
J. A. Cantor Associates, he
to the USSR t*Urims the death
pisatou il the rthmm a* the miuImI Jewish
easing of official pres-
ad satellite Europe Bat
it was 11 ah at that for teas of
Eastern Earape, Israel rraiitaol a
Israel's dears were, aad eoattone U be. aide opea
to Jew* fraai the Sonet world
Far a brief period hi December aad Jaauai.i.
several Bundled Jews af East Germany aianarril to
reach Western Earape There they were aided ay
with fJA fend? When and
hand-to-aaouth
persons who had
tag 1or the past tea
\cjyc szj-.Zt.
Pacae S&-69&3
~ Z l" A MOST rlAJFY
XT* flH
WILLIAM WBMSTOCK & SON
::-:- v.**; ^ U.-ve phone at-2245
W. < ARROLL WI1>>
Boa! Emcae Appraaar &
A MOST KAF7Y XEW YZAH
KB WAR l>s PROatt CE .
K.W. 22ac Street PV. 2-C9K

Mearhi> other far-reaching objectives of the
aevtoed actaoa af the *.mcrtcan Jewish ctaamunaty.
The effect.leness of this action was manifested
agase this past spring, whea a call far cash was
saaaded t meet tan tat and erflkal Beads ia all
the area* of aar effort, hat eapaoalK m hard-pressed
hrael
Climax of thssdrrre was the National Action Coa-
euriymJune whea SM3B1JX0 the treat
> faad ever gatheted at a stogie aaeettog
to. to a mighty deanmstrataon af devotion to
UJAs
aad serving together to 5713.
of the UJA have improved the
MOO persoas ia auay places.
the lasted Israel Appeal aad its bene-
the Jewish Agency aad Keren Tim aid.
The
North Africa
uto banner af the famous Maine* crganuatasa
Israel aided 10CJI0C And is the I noed States
warns thoasanch of !> h: pram these are the cold flares, la actaahty.
the aatohen traasfaae anc TTnlnJdaal
'* to wham have suffered and
I aB of whan have dreamed mod-
poace aad same bbbbbbb of
mdniaa.b that most IMA coo
they make their generous
fw ** todrndaah UJA aid took rarxms forms.
* **"0* "aae poaahie aWaste m the form of
** ** wpufj shelter, as well as to
steal cast grant* and hams This included aid in
**_UJA also helped
to build
>d .
110.000 danansi
the total number
ir"**tton 000.000 I
to aae* parched Nefn.
Bail's economic _
of basic foods codd |
reducing the
cast in vital i
to band 10 000 an, i
theatajma of tranaeatvi
from the lives of .
aothtog but temporary I
years.
I JA roads were atilned for broad and sse
BBdseal efforts that directly aided 96X100
women aad children, made remarkable strides i
the battle against sarh 11 topliaj diseases as la
culosas. tiaea and trachoma and helped ti
of the aged, touaeies aad toeapaeatated persoul
decree of physical iamrmi aunt few bad boptol
attain.
UJA fames also helped to provide training
14jOOO boys and carts to the MO educational asdi
taonal traintog centers cob darted under the
irinhto af Toath Anyah. As full-fledged fa
these ynaac people will brine their \outhful
skills to erring life to I
of land that are slowly
revitalised throughout Israel An additional il
boys and girts, who acquired aew ski.:- througti
rocram at OuTT schools in Israel, alto i
by UJA funds passed on through the
Distribution Committee.
la addition. Americaa Jews helped give th
of babaes thesr nhlk and school childrer. their I
lunches a North Africa, and youngsters then-1
tog there, to Israel, m Earape and in the li
States. Ia all these places, we helped to
homes, health, jobs, opportunities and
hope.
These are bat the J^fM't**1 of the roster of I
achievement to 371X They reflect veil and
the stage of ausmaty reached daring the Ui
Jewish Appeals fifteen years.
Behiad this
lies the groat
BEST WISHES FOB
AHAPPY HEW YEAt
BEST yVBHES
FOR THE
NEW YEAH

Z TZ
Tne F:
MIAMI FEDERATION OF MUSICIANS
LOCAL Rm A. r. of M.
Ok
of progress and
af the Amenfin Jewish
for Jews mufyvBBU'
Israel to stand as a tori
aad a nonua
cagennitT.
fJA fifteen years
far the expressH* <
af this, the United I
of Jewish commu
participation and i
af help.
TO THE
EHTIRE JEWISH
COMMUNITY
flobida
TO ALL GMZTDrGS
SHENANOOAH CANDIES
Mknni Tiodia
MR. and MRS. MURRAY SCHWABTZMAN
o I
^.aH


M* SEPTEMBER II. 19>3
>Jewist, nnr*a
^HE NEW Ctt/IPTCE IN ISRAEL'S ECOOTMIC POLICY
Continued from Poe $
of the Negev, was completed last spring,
road, coupled with the new installations in
Plants of the Potash Works, has already enabled
unption of extraction of Dead Sea minerals.
addition, Israel's oil prospects have been en-
. recently by the activities of foreign and
nestic oil companies. Seven companies have been
nted licenses under the Petroleum Law of Aug-
1952. Test drillings have begun.
de by side with these lights there lurk some
EL The deflationary measures, the devaluation
[the pound with its rising prices and other actions
New Economic Policy have naturally brought
Jrt a temporary decrease in economic activity.
wnment economizing has restricted public works
minimum. The result was an increase in unem-
pient. At the middle of the year, there were
unemployed. Although this figure amounted
A
^^
I'

--;-
., '>'
cut the tape to a new railroad route
ch will iacilitate the transport of produce.
only about four percent of the gainfully em-
(550.0001. the situation caused considerable
ra. An unemployment tax was levied by the
for the financing of development projects.
Histadrut (General Federation of Labor) allocat-
1,000.000 Israeli pounds from its pension funds
loans to municipal governments and other public
for unemployment purposes. A movement
town to village" designed to direct unem-
ed city dwellers to agriculture, which is in ur-
need of additional workers, was launched. In
lively short period of time during the past
approximately 2,200 urban workers' families
either absorbed by existing villages or formed
settlements. All of these measures combined
resulted in a gradual decrease in unemploy-
t In this connection, it is worthwhile to empha-
more than two-thirds of the unemployed are
workers.
21 Heshvan (November 9, 1952) the State of
and the Jewish people lost their Founder-
nt Dr. Chaim Weizmann. The great leader
tesman passed away at his residence in
"Wh at the age of 76.
pwamonth of traditional mourning the Knesset
tsa, urjit2btitBenzvi president f *"
Pioneer, soldier, scholar and statesman. President
Ben-Zvi has earned the general admiration, love and
respect of all the sections of the nation.
The beginning of the year witnessed another gov-
ernment crisis owing to the withdrawal of the Agu-
dath Israel from the coalition. Fortunately, the Gov-
ernment emerged from this crisis strengthened by a
broader coalition which includes Mapai, General
Zionists. Progressives, Hapoel Hamizrachi and Miz-
rachi. The five-party coalition Government and its
program were approved by the Knesset in Decem-
ber, 1952.
The 20-point program provides for the encourage-
ment of private foreign investment and the termina-
tion, as far as possible, of controls on economic
activities. A unified educational system is to be set
up doing away with the ideological trend system
of the past 30 years as being incompatible with the
new conditions. In the ramification of the unified
state education, religious schooling is to be assured
to all children whose parents desire it. The unified
education issue has been one of the main reasons
for the defection of the Agudath Israel from the
coalition and they continue to oppose it.
On the other extreme, unified education is op-
posed by the left-wing Mapam. The predominant
majority of the nation, however, considers the
measure of primary importance for the integration
and consolidation of the nation, composed as it is of
immigrants from more than 60 countries all over the
world, of various traditions and ways of life. Fol-
lowing the passage of an appropriate law in the
Knesset, the new school system will come into
being in the academic year 5714 and will mark an
important landmark in the national and cultural life
of Israel.
International Relations
There has been no change in Israel's main prob-
lem of her foreign policy, namely: peace with the
Arab states. However, Israel's position, that the
primary prerequisite for peace and the settlement
of the outstanding issues are direct negotiations be-
tween the Arab states and herself, has gained power-
ful support in the 1952-53 session of the General
Assembly of the United Nations. An eight-power
Continued on Pago 12
A communication system becomes the pulse
of a new land. Technology bridges the gap
made by two thousand years of exile.
Ramsey Nursing Home
24-Motit Nots/wc snmcf
CHRONICS AND CONVALESCENTS
Rooms on Ground Floor 5 Acres Nice Grounds
8785 N.W. 32nd AVENUE
Phone 7-5752
^ GREETINGS
GAFFNEY CONSTRUCTION. INC.
'OHM CAffMir CAM MHSM
3661 W. FLAGLER STREET *
Phone 4-0377
GKtITIHCS TO AIL
BANK
TAVERN
fafor Cool totrotaiao
Orimh with TOOT fr Jeitrfi
2101 N.W. 17th AVINUE
MIAMI, FIOMM
John
Johannes
FINE CUSTOM TAILOR
'The Orniinml John Joaaaats"
Expert Alteration!
Our New Location:
2292 CORAL WAY
Phone 4-7755
PAGE HE
TO ALL HAPPY NEW YEAR
VILLAGE PACKAGE STORE
PHONE 64-9124
2800 N.W. 22nd AVENUE
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
C. & H. HOME BUILDERS jj
"BUILDERS OF FINE HOMES"
7171 S.W. 13th Street 3531 S.W. 12th Street
Phonos 87-0774 48-5775
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY
FLORIDA MACHINERY CORP.
Contractor Equipment
Woodworking and Metal working Machinery
316 S.W. NORTH RIVER DRIVE
PHONE 9-0647
Jinkins Helpy Selfy Laundry and Dry Cleaning
Wash Your Own Clothes In Our Modern Maytag Washers
Use That Soft City Water for a Whiter Wash
We Sell. Soap, Bleach and Starch
2219 N.W. 28th Street Telephone 64-8021
ROSH HASHONA GREETINGS TO
ALL OUR FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS
Drcn nr.n rut?1?
MR. and MRS. HYMAN ZAIDMAN
DADE KOSHER MARKET
153 N.W. 5th STREET
PHONE 3-1430
SEASON'S GREETINGS from
Sidney Meyer Mitchell Wolfson
WOMETCO THEATRES
CARIB
MIAMI
MIRACLE
LINCOLN
TOWN
SURF
CAMEO
MAYFAIR
TOWER
ROSETTA
STRAND
BILTMORE
PARKWAY
CENTER
ESSEX
BOULEVARD DRrVE-IN
27th AVENUE DRIVE-IN
5714
1953
Greetings
on the
New Year
Our Sincere Wishes
to Everyone for
a Year of
Peace, Health and
Happiness
#
mi
L
TRACK
ONLY
/ FUTURITY
TRACK
IN Flfl
13th Street Between N E 2nd and N W 7th A


PAGE 12 E
*wfcf> FfrrMiM
TO ALL GREETINGS
=2g>AY^EPTEMBER
nno aknoio
GENERAL BUILDING COMPANY
CONTRACTOIS
1036 THIRD STREET MIAMI BEACH
TO ALL .
GREETINGS
H. H. Woodsmall Agency, Inc.
GENERAL INSURANCE
1114 Congress Bldg. Phone 82-7595
A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY TO ALL
Miami Beach Checker Cabs, Inc.
24-Hour Service
U-DRIVE IT CARS PHONE 5-3411
To All ... A Most Happy New Year
THE REINHARD FAMILY
Miami >cckwar Company
247 N.W. 25th STREET
MIAMI, FLORIDA
Season's Greetings To All Our friends and Patrons
FLASH ELECTKiCAh SERYiCE
GOODMAN and CAREY
Electrical Contractors Serving the Colored Community Exclusively
314 N.W. 16th TERRACE, MIAMI PHONE 9 6665
TO All StASON'S MEETINGS
Mrs. Liilhrr T. Hardifton
A ASSOCIATES
CONSTABLE, DISTRICT NO. 3
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
there's a "DIAMOND" in your Neighborhood
DIAL 9-7575
DIAMOND CAB ASSOCIATION
TO ALL SEASON'S GREETINGS !
WASH AND SAVt THE MAYTAG WAY
79th Street Wash-E-Teria
"YOU WILL Bf PUASCD WITH OUR COMPUTE
FACILITIES AND SERVICE"
1191 N.W. 79th STREET
MIAMI, FLORIDA
Phone 71-91M
REST HI S If I; *
for a
HAPPY NEW YEAR
if
MIL'
INDUSTRIES, INC.
FLORIDA'S LEADER IN
QUARRY. CONCRETE PRODUCTS AND
BUILDER'S SUPPLIES
3075 North Miami Avenue
Phone 2-7261
A YEAR UNDER TRE
US MCGARRAN ACT
Continued from Poqo 3
persons who derive as much as one-half of their
ancestry' from countries within this "Asia-Pacific
Triangle." which includes the whole of Afghanistan,
Burma, China. Inrio China. Korea, Japan and India,
are required to obtain visas under the miniscule
quotas granted those countries, no matter in what
place they actually were born. To keep out Italians,
Greeks and Slavs, the McCarran-Walter Act relies
on place of birth under the national origins quota
plan; to keep out Asians the law ignores place of
birth and relies on ancestry under the "Asia-Pacific
Triangle" provision. In either case, the Act treats
individual worth, merit and need as completely ir-
relevant.
New Emergency DP Law
Despite the unrelenting opposition of the Mc-
Carran-Walter bloc in Congress, advocates of a
humane and civilized im-
migration statute have
been untiring in press-
ing for revision of the
law. During the closing
days of the last session
of Congress, President
Eisenhower and the pres-
ent Administration suc-
ceeded in enacting an
emergency refugee bill
granting 214,000 extra
quota visas to expelees
and refugees during the
next three and one-half
years. The emergency
act, however, leaves in-
Senator McCarran
. troublesome law
tact the worst features of the McCarran-Walter Act
and disturbs none of its discriminatory provisions.
The emergency refugee measure may possibly help
to regain some of the status this country lost abroad
through the enactment of the McCarran-Walter law,
but we can never fully undo the harm wrought by
that legislation until its basic concepts, particularly
the national origins quota system on which it rests,
are repealed.
President Eisenhower recognized that fact dur-
ing his campaign for the Presidency last Fall when
he repeatedly promised to lead the fight against
the national origin plan. Last April, the President
sent a personal message to Senator Watkins. as
chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, urging
early Congressional consideration be given to chang-
ing ten of the most serious shortcomings of the
permanent McCaroan-Walter Immigration Law
omitting, surprisingly, any reference to the national
origins system. To date nothing had been done.
Enactment of the emergency bill demonstrates
what the President can achieve, even in the face
of determined opposition, when he chooses to exer-
cise forceful leadership. It is earnestly to be hoped
that the President will be spurred by the success-
ful passage of the temporary refugee measure to
redeem his election pledges for basic revision of the
permanent immigration laws.
J). 19
standing difference!1 Thirtytwo states .
the United States, the United Kingdom 7*1
Latin American states and many Eur '
British Commonwealth states, voted "in f, '
resolution in the Ad Hoc Political Commit'
fortunately, it failed to get the require^
majority in the plenary meeting.
The State of Israel, as Jewish pe0pie an
world, has been profoundly moved by the m i '
the Moscow accusations accompanied, as the
by anti-Jewish, anti-Zionist and anti-israely
ments. In denouncing this campaign the fLu
Minister. Mr. Moahe Sharett, declared on behllr
the Government, with the approval of the v
that "The State of Israel will not rest silent in
face of any attempt made by any power to del
the name of the Jewish people and of a da
threatening the masses of Jews wherever the,
be," The Israel Delegation to the United Ni
exposed this campaign of Incitement in the
Assembly of the United Nations.
In February, the USSR severed diplomatic
tions with Israel. Following an exchange of ta
between the Foreign Ministers, of the two stated
relations were resumed in July.
In regard to Israel-United States relations, |
Foreign Minister, Mr. Moshe Sharett, in his
foreign policy statement to the Knesset in
defined Israel-American relations in this
"Friendly relations with the United States and]
continued efforts to promote and strengthen (
friendship is one of the cornerstones of Israel's!
eign policy."
Israel's connections with Asian states have.
strengthened this year by establishing diploa
representations in Japan and Burma.

The year 5713 has been a further step in I
constructive endeavors to solve the many
involved in the historic past of rehabilitating I
ancient-new nation and country. The trials
achievements of the passing year inbues this ]
and vigorous democracy with confidence in
future.
.+*+.+.*.*+.**
^^^^^---i
>** ^* ^
ISRAEL'S NEW ECONOMY
Continued from Pan* 11
Draft Resolution called on the Arab states and Israel
"to enter at an early date into direct negotiations
for the establishment of the settlement of their out-
CERSHOM SEIXES: 1HE
Continued from Pane 4
will, he lectures on Jewish history in St
Church of New York, something hitherto unh
in America or Europe. When President Wash
calls upon the nation to set aside the last'
in November for prayer and gratitude, Seines^
an example to Christians and Jaws by open
synagogue for the first Thanksgiving Day.
Recognition
The capable, patriotic cantor was recog
religious leader by Jews and Christians. C4
scholars consulted him on questions (if interpn
in the Hebrew Bible. A trustee of the Hun
ciety, he was elected by the state legislature (
first Board of Regents for the University
State of New York. At the inauguration of I
Washington, he was present among the
clergymen, though not on the platform whidj
too small for the large concourse. One of
corporators of Columbia College, he served J
tee for 30 years and rendered important I
committees of this institution, which in iti
days was Protestant and denominational.
University struck a medal in honor of
Mendes Seixes and on its 175th anniver
veiled his portrait which hangs among the
tion's celebrities.
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
JosePs Pastry
Shop
444 41st St.. Miami Beach
Phono 58 5289
1098 Normandy Dr.. Miami Beach
Phone 86-1523
S. OKOUNEFF and Family
126 S.W. 16th At*.
wish the
President, Mr. BerkowiU
Rabbi Swirksy
Rabbi Krolowitz
President. Officers and
Members of
CONGREGATION BETH-EL
A Happy New Y.
GREETINGS
Overseas Transportation Company,
Insured-Bonded
SERVICE TO THE KEYS
Phone 3-3*15
236 S.WJI. RIVER DRIVE
A HAM AND UtOSHKOUS NtW it Alt
TO ALL OUK WINDS AND PATMNS
MODERN AWNING SHUTTERS
All AIiM Fifctr|U
5701 N.W. 35th COUtT
MAIM
Nwm 44-2*43


Lav SEPTEMBER 11. M63
+ *~ls/)nf)r*Hn
PAGE 13 E
g]lfE/lRS OF JEWISH LIFE IN THE UNITED STATES
continued from Pao* 1 Jews reooivp iwrmi<.i .____i ._ .. .
Continued from Pae* 1
I at immigration of the Eighties began attests
It was the mighty stream of immigrants which
-t up the Jewish heart-beat of New York Jewry,
before the arrival of the great East-European,
ddish-speaking immigration, Jewish life in New
C hari been developing slowly and in a fashion
T a)(jn t0 that of other Jewish communities in
Lem lands. The Jewish population was then
fall in comparison with the non-Jewish population
day Jews constitute nearly 30 percent of New
U's population) and its growth was very slow.
l then kept more or less to their traditional,
opean ways. The Spanish-Portuguese Jews, the
fardim, descendants of the earliest settlers, held
I to Orthodox ritual. The German Jews who foi-
led the Sefardim and who a century ago were
ie numerous in New York City than the Russian-
fish Jews also adhered to their European Jewish
Is, even when they made certain reforms in
rish religious practice. In Ihose days New York
r still maintained the atmoshpere of a provincial
m friendship, family loyalty and a feeling of
onsibility for one's fellow-man were still felt
Lly, among Christians as among Jews. In such
(atmosphere a strong feeling for Jewish survival
|ld also flourish.
i the space of this article it is impossible to give
than a cursory' idea of the colorful 300-year-
| history of the New York Jewish community
pe word "community" can be properly applied to
York Jewry, which to this day has no central
}munal organization authorized to speak in behalf
ill New York Jews. (Attempts to create such an
knization have been made from time to time,
| they always resulted in failure).
he history of New York Jewry, like the history
|he other older American cities on the Atlantic
ward and like the history' of British Jewry, can
divided into three periods: the period of the
Temony of the Spanish-Portuguese Jews, which
I around 170 years from the establishment of
Ijewish colony in New Amsterdam until around
f,when the German Jews became more numerous
the Sefardim; the era of the German Yahu-
, and finally the period of the last half-century
the Jews of East-European descent came to
I forefront by sheer force of numbers. Though
JEast-European Jewish population in New York
I become larger than the German-Jewish popula-
at the beginning of the Nineties of the last
y. and perhaps somewhat earlier, the German
still kept up their leadership of New York
"i life because of their wealth and influence,
jintrast with the poverty and insufficient Ameri-
ation of the Russian, Polish, Galician and Ru-
iJews.
11654, when the first shipload of Jewish immi-
refugees landed in New Amsterdam, Peter
nt, the anti-Semitic governor of the Dutch
to did not intend to let them remain in the
ft as permanent residents. But the directors of
utch West Indies Company, a private corpora-
hich was the real ruler of this American col-
I interfered in their favor and the Jews were
pd to remain and conduct business.
wtheless Jews were not allowed to erect a
We being permitted to pray only in private
* Only a generation later under British rule,
1 *w Amsterdam became New York, did the
Jews receive' permission to erect their first syna-
gogue, the Spanish-Portuguese Shearith Israel, which
functions to this very day and whose old cemetery
can still be found in the heart of Manhattan.
At the beginning of the eighteenth century New
York Jews received citizenship rights from the
British colonial legislature. Strange to say, while
Jews received the privilege of citizenship, that right
was still withheld from Catholics.
During the American colonial period New York
Jews were mostly engaged in foreign trade. They
were very well adapted for this kind of business
because of their family connections with the Ameri-
can West Indies islands and with Europe. The richest
Jew of those days, Louis Gomez, was the owner of a
number of ships that would carry wheat to Portugal
and other products to Amsterdam, Hamburg and
Dublin.
When the American Revolution started and the
thirteen British colonies declared their independ
ence of England, New York Jews were divided in
their sentiments, some siding with the revolution-
aries, others with the loyalists. Immediately after
the revolution the small New York Jewish commun
ity began to rise in wealth and influence. Jews were
among the founders in 1782 of the New York Stock
Exchange, today's world-famous Wall Street. Jews
became wealthy realtors, entered the fur business,
established factories of various sorts.
For more than a century and a half the Sefardic
Shearith Israel was the only synagogue in New York
City. It was strictly Orthodox and exercised a rigor-
ous control over the private religious life of its mem-
bers. In 1757, for instance, its trustees announced
that Jews who do not attend services, who keep their
places of business open on the Sabbath, who eat non-
kosher food or commit "other terrible crimes" will
be refused Jewish burial. Gradually however these
strict regulations were abolished.
The first Jewish school for children in New York
was established by Congregation Shearith Israel in
1731 and was called Yeshivath Minnath Erev. At
the beginning of the nineteenth century it was con-
verted into a day school where the children were
taught reading and writing, English and arithmetic,
as well as Hebrew. But as the Jewish population kept
growing the state of Jewish education in New York
became less and less satisfactory to those who had
Jewish survival at heart. Many parents became in-
different to the matter of giving their children a
Jewish education, and so the number of Jewish
educational institutions was very small compared to
the real need, while the few that were established
did not receive sufficient support. And even in the
present East-European era, when Talmud Torahs,
late-afternoon supplementary schools, are closing,
when the Orthodox Day Schools have hard sledding
financially and when Reform and Conservative Sun-
day Schools are found to give too meagre a Jewish
education, Jewish education remains the secret Jew-
ish problem in New York.
More than a century ago the German Jews be-
came influential in the general life of New York
of Jewish religious law, matters relating to mar-
riage, divorce, mikvah and so on.
In 1825. as mentioned before, the hegemony of
the Sefardim over New York Jewish life came to an
end. In that year the German Jews, who had become
a majority of the New York Jewish population, es-
Continu.d on Po* IS
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS
IWE WISH A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
OULTON BROTHERS
G A RAGE
LORA PACK
SPORTSWEAR FOR WOMEN
639 Lincoln Road
PHONE 5-1916
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
Mr. and Mrs.
JOSEPH R. STEIN
AND FAMILY
Sinew* Good WUw for a
Happy New Year
Dade Underwriters
Insurance Agency
RALPH D. HOLLANDER
3933 Biscayne Blvd. Miami
Phone 34642
G R E E T i N G S
YOUNG REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEEMAN
PAUL E.
HELLIWELL
MR. and MRS. AL BERMAN
of the
HI-GRADE FOOD CO.
1733 N. W. 7th Ave. MIAMI Ph. 9-8456
V
EXTEND BEST WISHES TO ALL THEIR FRIENDS AND
PATRONS FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
MacVicar Wells. Inc.
Complete Building Supplies
I. D. MacVICAR
President

FRANK J. WELLS
Vice President
GREETINGS
FERRELL SERVICE STATION
STANDARD OIL PRODUCTS
Complete Service "With a Smile"
2065 S.W. EIGHTH STREET "On the Trail" PHONE 3-9365
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
HOTEL & RESTAURANT EMPLOYEES & BARTENDERS
UNION LOCAL 133 A. F. OF L.
AL GONZALEZ. President
MORRIS G. DRAPKIN, Secretary-Treasurer
240 NX 8th Street Phone 3-7603
NEW YEAR GREETINGS TO ALL
Everett Whitton
Phone 84-2421
TRI-CITY TILE COMPANY
882 N.E. 79th STREET
MIAMI 38. FLORIDA
Far the finest in Metal Work
JOHN STAMFORD A SONS
ORNAMENTAL METAL WORKERS
3615 N.W. 46th Street
TeUphone 64-7918
BRONZE ALUMINUM IRON
GREETINGS TO ALL
SKAGSETH
YOUR FRIENDLY STATIONERY STORE
55 N.E. 1st St.M-4*ll t 14M N.W. 3e*h St.9-W11
7934 N.E. 2rv- Av..-7.-05U 1507 VV.st.ingt** Av*.-5-Ot4
"WE COVER THE EARTH"
ThkSherwin-Williams Gfe
7I4 U.MAH.- 1300 W. Filler St. 14M AH** M Mi**.i S-tb
Ml 71t St.. Mieeji Beach, Ph. 16-5*53 23 Meecheeea M., Mi. It 1510
ItJf Pmci De U*a Blvd. 2015 Harris*. St H*llyw**S Ft. taillliall


PAGE 14 E
+ kmi<&Fk>rklt*r>
ragAYJEPTEMlER
11,
MAYOR and MRS. HAROLD SHAPIRO
WOW* KIT WISMtS fO* A HAW *IW TIAM 70 THl
GRiAit* miami mm coMMmnr

SEASON'S GREETINGS
SHELDON & McMULLEN
INSURANCE AGENCY Inc.
4116 MERIDIAN AVENUE
PHONE 5-2151
TO ALL HAPPY NEW YEAR
Wm. D. "Bill" Joyce & Associates
DADE COUNTY PURCHASING AGENT
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY
PAUL L. HUTCHINSON
HUTCHINSON SERVICE STATION
1155 Collins Arenua
PHONE 58-9402
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
MARTINIQUE HOTEL
6423 Collins Avenue Miami Beach
VISIT OUR COMPLETE TOY DEPARTMENT
ARMY-NAVY STORES
VETERAN SURPLUS OUTLET
WE FILL MAIL ORDERS: Addreu all mail order* to 1214 Biacaync Blvd.
1214 BISCAYNE BLVD. Phone 3-3318
(S Block South of Start)
6301 N.W. 7th AVE. (Edison Center) Phone 89-1422
, KING MIDAS STORE I Hialeah) Phone 88-5363
6255 S.W. 8th ST. Tamiami Trail) Phone 67-3563
TO ALL HAPPY NEW YEAR
THE MIAMI AGENCY. INC.
GENERAL INSURANCE
II. II. WOODSMALL, JR.
682 N.E. 124th St. North Miami Phone 84-0615
THAT ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS MAY ENJOY
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
IS THE SINCERE WISH OF THE
-
AUGUST FAMILY and
AUGUST IlltOS. BAKERY
3tl S. W. Eighth Street Phone 2-2792
TO ALL GREETINGS
FARREY'S. INC.
Hardware
WHOLESALE RETAIL
1692 Alton Rood Miami Beach Phono 5-4621
PATIENT AND DOCTOR GREET THE NEW YEAR IN IT|]
Continued from Peee 2
filled a tumbler of water. "You looked," he said,
offering him the water, "as if you were going to
faint."
"I felt as if I would," said Doctor Blanisch.
Thanks."
What's the matter?"
"Haybe both of us are patients," said Doctor
Blanisch. "Are you Jewish?"
"Yes."
"American?"
"Yes. Chicago."
"Come here," said Doctor Blanisch. "Look out of
that window. Do you see a yellow dome to the left?
It stands out from the rest of the landscape."
"Along the Tiber."
"That's it. Do you know what that building is?"
"What is it?"
"Rome's synagogue."
"Do you know what day this is?"
"Monday."
"I mean its special significance."
"No. I dont."
"Rosh Hashonah starts at sundown. How would
you like to take a walk to the synagogue? In two
minutes we're at the Tiber and from there it's a
half hour's walk, no more."
Robert Sandier seemed to hesitate. He was stand-
ing in front of the doctor. "You're sweating, doc-
tor," he said. "Maybe I ought to apply the stethe-
scope to your heart and take your pulse."
"A walk will revive me," replied Doctor Blanisch.
"We seem to have revived each other," said Rob-
ert Sandier.
As they reached the street the young man turned
to the doctor and said: "What seems to be your
trouble, Doctor?"
Doctor Blanisch replied: "What seems to be
yours?"
"My wife died two months ago."
"Mine six years ago. I had two children, a boy and
a girl. You will find them all in Auschwitz."
"We were very close to each other," said Robert
Sandier, "my wife and I."
"So were we."
At their right the Tiber ran toward the sea, with
astonishing speed, churning up out of its bed a clay
liquid, once called golden by the Romans. The two
men walked side by side, slowly, under the beech
and chestnut trees toward the synagogue.
"I have too good a memory," said Robert Sandier.
'That's the trouble."
"Yes, it's the memory that interferes."
"I know that one has to go on. How? Out of
what? The whole world is a shambles. How can
one take courage from it? So I came to Europe to
forget and what I find here is that it makes you
feel even more alone. At least, doctor, you have
your profession I have nothing."
"Nothing?"
"Nothing. I was a schoolteacher. I've given that
up."
"Why?"
"Because nothing seemed to make sense any more.
So how could I teach nonsense?"
Doctor Blanisch turned left away from the Tiber.
"A shortcut," he said.
"What are you doing in Rome?" asked Robert
Sandier.
"I'm on the staff of the Joint working with refu-
gees. I myself am one. Perhaps you too."
"Yes, I've heard about the Joint. I've even helped
to raise money for it through the Unit*!
Appeal. And what do you do with them ?
gees?" *m-th(,
"We try to rehabilitate them."
"What's your technique?"
"We try to give them something to live for-
"Does it succeed?"
"In many cases."
"But apparently not in yours."
"Apparently not."
The doctor had taken the wrong turn. h-.
emerging in back of the synagogue, at Via rJ"
they found themselves in that area which
haps the most impressive of Rome, that part
history appears on a moving screen for those I
imagination to see it. At the left is Palatine I
Here the Roman emperors had lived in their i
Here is the Arch of Titus under which had i
Jewish slaves from Jerusalem two thousand"
ago. At the right is the Colosseum, that vi
which Jewish slave labor helped to build.
dous arches, mortar and stone prepared
and applied by human hands.
Robert Sandier had not seen Rome from i
vantage point For the past month he had been L
in bed in his hotel room. Occasionally he would
down for a cup of coffee.
"Look at all this!" exclaimed Doctor Bla
"Ruins! What did they build for? For w
what? All ruins! Like all these modern
will be ruins some day!"
Robert Sandier did not say anything for I
moments. He seemed to be seeing a vision Su4
ly standing there, he was conscious of a
perception. Two Jews a doctor from Vili
an American schoolteacher two thousand
later standing on the same ground where Jei
marched who would not give up their faith.
was a test of endurance, courage, faith, conti
of heritage. What meaning was there in
him and for the doctor?
"And to the right is the Theater of Ma
said Doctor Blanisch, "And right behind it |
see the yellow stone of the synagogue. Well
just in time for the services."
They walked on.
A man is born and dies. A man is made a i
of and dies. Rome was built and does it i
And have those who were the slaves building I
Colosseum died for all time? How could they 1
died, if now in Rome a Jewish doctor from
and an American Jew from Chicago can recall t
Robert Sandier thought.
Out of the ghetto streets the Jews of Rome i
moving toward the open door of the Synago#Jl
Rosh Hashonah services. Doctor Blanisch. the (
tor, and Robert Sandier, the patient, walked up I
steps. The synagogue was almost full.
Robert Sandier put his hand on the
shoulder. "We were once slaves in Rome,
Doctor Blanisch looked at him puzzled.
"And took at us now," continued Robert
"you've become a doctor and I a schoolte
Isn't that making progress?'"
The doctor glanced at him and seemed to i
stand.
"Wouldn't you call that successful rehabili
doctor?" said Robert Sandier.
The doctor nodded then with a sudden |
pressed the young American's right hand in
JEWELS SILVER
WORKS OF ART
Furniture. Antiques and Curios
INTERNATIONAL
FINE ART GALLERIES
12SS Lincoln Rd.. Muni Beach
A. SCHORR. Reprentattve
Business Phone 58-1025
Residence Phone 5-2503
A Happy Htw Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
West Flagler
Garage
1930 WEST FLAGLER ST.
MIAMI
Phono 2-2121
Jim Hounshell, Prop.
TO ALL GREETINGS
FRANK BARESE
ITALIAN AMERICAN RESTAURANT
12428 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD MIAML FLO*
Phono 7-9653
NEW YEAR GREETINGS TO ALL
HIALEAH MIAMI SPRINGS BANK
"A 'rieadfy Bmmk"
(Member of FJ5.LC.)
101 HIALEAH DRIVE
HIALEAH. FLORIDA
Telephone 884431


L^v SEPTEMBER II, 1SS3
Jewlstifhr***
m
PAGE 15 E
111 ([IBS DF JEWISH LIFE III THE UM1TED STATES
Continued from Papa 13
Itablished their B'nai Jeshurun Synagogue which
Id ,he Ashkenazic, rather than the Sefardic. rit-
lual This synagogue, which still functions today
lundcr the leadership of Rabbi Israel Goldstein and
E one of the leading Conservative congregations in
Ithe country, was in the beginning strictly Orthodox.
|ln its early years it would correspond with the Chief
Iflabbi of England and ask his opinion on matters
land began to put into the shade the rich, assimilated
ISefardim. They conducted large businesses and were
leaders in the communal life. But their Jewish edu-
cation was slight. Isaac M. Wise, founder of Ameri-
tan Reform Judaism, stated in 1847 that except for
two men, Leo Merzbacher and Max Lilienthal, there
wasn't one Jewish communal leader who could read
Hebrew without the vocal indications or who knew
nything about the literature or history of Jewry.
During the years of the American Civil War,
[861-65, New York Jewry had grown to such an ex-
Hit that 2.000 Jewish soldiers from New York City
ere to be found in the Northern armies that were
ting the Southern Confederates. During this war
ie banking firm of Seligman was for a time the
jancial agent of the Federal Government. On the
luestion of maintaining Negro slavery American
>ws were then divided in their opinion, just as
heir opinion had been divided during the Revolu-
inary War on the matter of American independ-
ce. One New York Rabbi, Michael Halperin, dur-
ig the Civil War conducted a verbal battle with
lother Rabbi who had maintained that the Bible
ilerates human slavery.
Reform Judaism in New York started among the
*rman, not the Sefardic, Jews, even though the
jefardim were a more Americanized and a wealthier
lement than were the Germans in the beginning.
Vn before the Civil War there were established
fie German Reform synagogues, Beth-El and Eman-
. Today Temple Emanu-el, which stands on aris-
eratic Fifth Avenue and was built at a cost of
7000.000, is the richest Jewish synagogue in the
forld.
[The first Orthodox synagogue of Eastern Jews
New York, the Beth Medrash Ha'Godol, which
iday remains standing on its original site on the
lower East Side, was also founded before the Civil
Far, in 1859. Although the Russian-Polish Jews
pre then small in numbers, they already had
bough numerical strength to erect an imposing
Ngogue structure, to quarrel among themselves
hr a "shone!" and to start a second shul.
[The last phase of New York Jewish history, the
^European one, is so recent that many people
^o are still alive have themselves experienced al-
- its entire course. During this era New YorV
y received a mighty blood transfusion from
p* J*te5t, wealthiest and most influential Jevish
fM>un.ty the whole world. During this era New
frt Jewry began to exert a tremendous influence
P only upon the rest of American Jewry but also
, the Jewr'es of other countries. From New York
iiwnducted the great relief effort on behalf of
-*i Jewry during and after World War I,
Mhrough the Joint Distribution Committee.
w ,??*' Yrkl t0' thm cwne ** leadership
Jewish Congress, of the World Congress for Yiddish
Culture, of the Yiddish Scientific Institute and of
every leading American Jewish organization with
the exception of B'nai B'rith, whose general head-
quarters are in Washington, though its Anti-Defa-
mation Leagues main office is also in New York
Here are to be found the main American Jewish
theological seminaries and the national headquarters
of Conservative, Reform and Orthodox Jewries. The
two leading Yiddish dailies, Forward and Day-
Journal, are published here, as well as a number
of Yiddish weeklies and monthlies and Jewish
books, in English and Hebrew. Here are to be found
most Jewish actors, musicians and painters.
It's a world in itself, this Jewish New York, yet
bound with a hundred ties to the rest of world
Jewry. It is the cultural center for American Jewry.
and to a large extent also for the Jewries of Latin
America and other countries. From here Jewish
cultural antennae are spread out to the four corners
of the earth. It is some comiort that such a center
should exist after the decimation of six million
Jews in Europe.
Next year, the 300th birthday of the oldest Jew-
ish community in North America, will be celebrated
by all American Jews as their own holiday. Great
preparations are now in progress for this celebra-
tion. Jews in other countries, to whom America
during the past couple of centuries symbolized free-
dom, hope, rescue, opportunity, will no doubt want
to partake in this festival, the celebration of the
birth of Jewish New York and of American Jewry.
GREETINGS
Your-Loeol Ford Dealer
HUSKAMP MOTOR CO.
4585 PONCE DE LEON BLVD. PHONE 67-5676
CORAL GABLES
Al. Braeman
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
The Catalina || el el
1732 Collins Ave., M. B.
IN A HURRY CALL
KIMBALL MURRAY
THE LUXURY DRY CLEANERS
5705 N.W. 2nd Avenue
Phone 784521
Best Wishes for a Happy Holiday
II. J. Wainwright & Sons
3135 Commodore Plaza Coconut Grova Phone 83-1621
A Happy \<>ir Year to the
Jewish Community
J. E. LUDICK
J
620 N.E. 125th STREET

Who Shall Live Who Shall Die Sup-
5". of ri",'en,the flght *" m e8UbUshment port of JDC through the United Jewish Appeal
, ,. will help to form the answer in the New Year
' York is the headquarters of the World 5714.
TO ALX
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
MR. AND MRS.
JULIUS JAY PERLMUTTER
Lawrence C. and Reoina V. Perlmutter
LUMBER PAINT HARDWARE MULWORK
GENERAL BUILDING MATERIALS
"Try Us For Super Service"
Peninsular Lumber Service, Inc.
2145 No. Miami Avenue
Phone 82-1571
GREETINGS
fe,^ PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
* UR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
DON S. COLEMAN
SOLAR WATER HEATERS
Hardwares
"IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD"
2614 S.W. 8th St. 44321
5920 N.E. 2nd Ave. 7-1566
6230 N.W. 7th Ave. 7-7774
MIAMI
Mr. and Mrs. Sanl Kenaolz
and Family
EXTEND BEST WISHES
TO THE ENTIRE JEWISH COMMUNITY
FOR A VHBY HAPPY NEW YEAR
3
3182 S.W. 21st STREET
4-74*
TO ALL A MOST
HAPPY NEW YEAR
ETHEL
ALAN. GERI
and
HENRY S. GREENBAUM
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
ENJOY MORE "POLAR ICE CREAM"
POLAR ICE CREAM CO., INC
2120 N.W. 11th Avenue Phone 9-4881
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY
To Jewry Everywhere
y
"RICHARD "DICK" BERENSON
And Associates
ISCAYNE FRONTON


PAGE 16 E
A Happy New Year
Monarch Auto Seat
Cover & Top Co.
N.W. 7th Are. and 36th St
MIAMI
PHONE Ml37
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
TO ALL MY
FRIENDS
Tom
Karaganis
A HAPPr HEW TEAR TO ALL
OUR FR1EXDS AND PATRONS
Gables Stationers
OFFICE SUPPLIES
129 GIRALDA AVENUE
(Opposite Post Office)
CORAL GABLES
Phone 464046
Sol and Selma Schreiber
Greetings
to
My Many Friends
for a
Happy New Year
LO ZITO
mi kh VMfe
Music For All Occasions
Call
2-3800 7-7312
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends and Patrons
Belvedere
Hotel
843 EUCLID AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-1103
Mr. and Mrs. B. Shull
and Mrs. Phillip
Mr. and Mrs.
L4 Sheiner
and daughter Joyce
Extend greetings to all
their friends for a very
Happy New Year

Peoples Water and Gas Company
K\HH mindful of the invaluable
contribution to the growth.of
thin community that ban been
provided by its Jewish citizens
uud residents, taken pleasure in
extending to all Jewry
sincere wishes tor
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
r E O P L E S ^jj|^|p4^ COMPANY
MIAMI BEACH
HOLLYWOOD FORT LAUDERDALE
1953
>rv,
5714
*->.
u nun UORDOX
amd
ike t.tntttt>\
take this opportunity
to express their sin-
cere wishes to all
Form
r a Happy and
Prosperous
New Year
GORDON FUNERAL HOME
IMAHUIL C0ID0N, *...*,,
710 SOUTHWEST 12th AVENUE
MIAMI
Phone 3-3431
1333 DADE BOULEVARD
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-7677
"DEDICATED TO THE SERVICE OF THE JEWISH COMMUNITY OF
GREATER MIAMI"


P-H
of Ifce
yOMEN
Hush- Studio
With ihtir ""* M"**1'
pwaifs eee" Fmrtutt
a ftMtM, FHWpW
f re**
f II I T I N S
AUTOMATIC UNDERGROUND
LAWN SPRINKLERS
Rainmaker Lawn Sprinkler
Systems, Inc.
270 N.W. S4th STREET
Phone 71-9626
U All... Greeting!
OR/fJVMl G4?DfMS
RESTAURANT
Good fooW
easonoele Prices
2401 N.W. 27th AVENUE
Phone 64-9317
HAPPY
NEW YEAR
[RAY ZIE6LER
Real Estate Broker
1129 N.W. 3rd St
Miller
Electric
Co.
Quality Contracting
and
Service
820 S. W. 4th St
fton* 9-2477
COMPLETE
DAIRY SERVICE
HOMOGENIZED VITAMIN D MIIK
GRADE "A" MILK
BUTTERMILK .
CREAM
SOUR CREAM
COTTAGE CHEESE
ICE CREAM
Wy Borden KE CREAM
T>orden's
'OR HOME DfcLiVERT
fhww 7-1411
MIAMI. FLORIDA
lEIoiciidliiaun
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1953
SEC. F
A Year of Jewish
Life in Germany
By SAM MILLER
Jo wish Telegraphic Agency
BONN As 1953 was ushered in, a prominent
German of good will called upon the German people
to turn this eighth year after the collapse of Nazism
into the "Jahr der Wiedergutmachung" a German
concept which comprises not only the restitution of
property, the paying of compensation or indemnifi-
cation and the furnishing of reparations goods, but
also the making of moral and spiritual amends.
Insofar as parliamentary processes and legislative
enactments go, this demand was fulfilled. It is a
different question, and one which hardly a serious
observer is prepared to answer in the affirmative,
whether any substantial section of the German peo-
ple is truly anxious to "make good" some small part
of the injuries inflicted by Germany upon the Jews
of Europe, whether Germans in appreciable numbers
have undergone a feeling of contrition, of that "col-
lective shame" once demanded by Federal President
Theodor Heuss.
In Germany, the year 5713 unrolled in the shadow
of the Reparations Agreement which, after pro-
tracted negotiations in The Hague, had been signed
in Luxembourg ten days before the last Rosh Ha-
shonah. On March 20, 1953, the pact was approved
by the German Bundestag. A week later, it entered
into effect with *he exchange of ratification instru-
ments at the United Nations. In June, Germany is-
sued the necessary implementation regulations,
whereupon the first orders could be placed with Ger-
man manufacturers. Already in July, the first two
boatloads of reparations goods left North Sea ports
for Tel Aviv. By August these shipments were
readied for use in the upbuilding of the Jewish
State.
Today, as the first iron beams with the "Made-in-
Continuod on Pag* 10
'*'
The City
of
MIAMI BEACH
*
yj
*
wishes to extend to the Jewish
citizenry of this area best
wishes for a happy and
prosperous New Year.
MR. and MRS. ^
MURRAY DACKS J
and Barry and Kenneth
WISH ALL THEIR FRIENDS
A VERY HAPPY >j
NEW YEAR '\\
GREETINGS
*
White Rock
i
3300 MARY STREET
MIAMI. FLA.
Phone 3-3341
MR. and MRS.
JERRY SCHERZER
and FAMILY
WISH A HAPPY NEW Yl41
TO THEIR FRIENDS
AND CUSTOMERS
promt ]o pmrBw rn
PARKWAY
;EAT5 ^ Am
Retail KOSHER Wholesale
12SS S.W. 22nd Si. Ph. 9-0968
A HAPPT NEW TEAR
1
Special
$57.50
Apt. House
Gas Stoves
JACKSON REFRIGERATION
SERVICE
721 5th St., Miami Beach
PHONE 58-0665


Page 2F
Hf*ist>nor*mM
JIS^SEmM^i!,

Travel Budqef"
Meals
IN THE FRIENDLY
SEABOARD dining cars
ON THE
SILVER METEOR SILVER STAR
BREAKFAST ... .1*
l0HCHE0H...$$j
D,MMtR,i.;cMd"rV,rJ.>
PIUS Reserved, reclining coach
seots. Modern private room or berth
sleeping cor occommodotions... Generous
lounge facilities for oil passengers...
REGISTERED NUKSE, <^W_____
PASSENGER SERVICE AGENT.
For ffwntUI pl** fhont
2-Mii or rail in ptrton
K3 E Fltfler Si KN W
7ih A'fouf. Ml a* I. or 1SS3
WaSlUfifftw A*-u# Miiitl
Beitr W J FU'HT.G P A.
Reprtttmamei lw it Key
VW 1: J! 11 1 j Niiiiu.
Jama.,a. I'utru B.co.
The Route of Courteous Service
TO ALL GREETINGS
Diamond Cleaners S Tailors
Joseph Klein
3655 WEST FLAGLER STREET
PHONE 83-7692
TO OUK MINDS AND PATROSS .
It is with pleasure we erfend
Sincere Season's Best Wishes
STATE'S GRILL
5932 N.E. 2nd AVENUE
Phone 89-9171
TO All ... A MOST HAW NEW YtAK
HARRY N. ZAPANTES
of the
PALLAS ATHENA RESTAURANT
Senriaa the same delicious and exotic foods that mode him famaus
imported Grecian wines and pour favorite drinlts served from
oar Cochfail lownae
PALLAS ATHENA OPEN DAILY
637 W. Flaaler St From NOON to 12 P.M.
Phone: 2-8816
TO ALL
. SEASON'S GREETINGS
PICKIN CHICKEN
MIAMI BEACH
107 22nd STREET PHONE 58-1163
BEST WISHES
1
JEsk, -^\ 4> tow Friendly Cbv7oJDe4ler' ^v
J0S5 W. Filler St., Ph. 94441
230 H.W. 7th Aw., Mi. TUU
Jewish children of the Iranian mellahs. They can not integrate into the economy of the coun-
try. Crushing poverty makes them bear the burden of tinea and trachoma. Nadgis puts them
into the class of the Indian "untouchable." <***- 1
oa^naaai __^1
The Jews of Iran and Poverty
By DR. NEHEMIAH ROBINSON
Director of the Institute of Jewish Affairs
World Jewish Congress
The level of poverty and living conditions affect-
ing nearly 80.000 Persian Jews is even worse than
in the notorious mellahs (ghettos) of Morocco. A
new study, just published by the World Jewish
Congress' Institute of Jewish Affairs, reveals that
Persian Jewry- socially and economically occupies
an inferior position in a country' seething with po-
litical and economic unrest, which is recognized as
the most explosive powder keg of the Middle East.
Iran's Jewish population, estimated today to be
between 85.000 and 80.000, has been subject to se-
vere economic and religious persecution ever since
the fifteenth century. A policy of nadgis. whereby
anything touched by a non-Moslem, especially if it
contained moisture, became ritually unclean, severe-
ly restricted Jews throughout the centuries not only
in their occupational pursuits but also in their daily
lives. The effect of these religious laws was to make
'<- legal and economic pariahs. Since Jewish
craftsmen could not count on Moslem patronage,
there were few artisans. Jews, especially outside
the capitol of Teheran, could not sell meat, fish or
vegetables to Moslems because all of them contain
moisture. The only occupations in which Jews made
a considerable contribution were as musicians, dan-
cers and singers. Contrary to the situation in neigh-
boring Moslem countries like Iraq or Syria. Jews
never played any role as bankers, court treasurers
or tax collectors because of the unfriendly attitude
of the Persian rulers. A decline in Jewish cultural
and educational standards inevitably followed the
severely repressed legal and economic position of
Iranian Jews.
Under the Pahlavi dynasty in the past three dec-
ades, the status of Persia's Jews has been improvrf.
Under Persian law, Jews are equals among equalt,
and the Jewish population has not been subjects
to outright official persecution by the government
However, certain restrictions are still enforced. Ni
Jew may be elected to Parliament by Moslems; only
one Jewish member represents the Jewish nunoritj.]
No Jew may become a judge. Promotion for Je
ish soldiers is rare. Civil service rosters are vir-1
tually closed. Jews are excluded from the legal pro-1
fession. and, despite their qualifications as teachers,
they find it nearly impossible to find employment |
in government schools.
Added to these restrictions, the Jews still sufferl
from social ostracism and from the lingering effects I
of the nadgis injunctions. Formerly, discrimination
was based on religion: conversion to Islam opened!
the way to social equality. Now, nationality is theI
criterion. In the wake of the recent violent political!
eruptions caused by the nationalization of the oil
industry, the expulsion of the British, the rise of I
the Tudeh (Communist) party, and the threats posnj
by the proximity of Soviet Russia, a mood of fierce I
nationalism has gripped the country'. The deposition
of Mossadegh hardly a month ago leaves all ill
chaos. Disquieting reports of outright anti-Semitisn I
reached the outside world during the first half of|
1952, although none became known since.
Of Iran',s estimated 80.000 Jews, only about <*|
percent may be considered wealthy; anotner tetj
percent belong to the middle class: and about thirty I
per cent eke out a precarious living. The remainder, I
whose living conditions are far below the minimual
existence levels of even the extiemely low Persia I
standards, desperately need assistance. For teij
hours' work a day, Jews, when fhey are fortunatt
enough to find work, earn about the equivalent of |
CoMinuad on Pag* 13
Sincere Wishes for
A
n appy
NEW YEAR
Seven-Up Bottling Co.
Miami, Ha.
SHERMAN J. TOBIN AND FAMILY


^mAY SEPTEMBER 11. 1953
*JewlsJintrlettnr>
Pg9 3F
Happenings in the Sport World
By BILL WOLF
Jewish Toltgraphic Agency
The biggest event of the year for fans interested
. Jews in sports will take place from September
20th through 29th, in Israel.
Some 1.000 athletes from all parts of the world
will gather in Israel to compete in the Maccabiah
Games, held every three years.
A team of 100 athletes from the United States
will participate', including a number of leading non-
jewish Olympic champions who are going along
to give exhibition performances. There will be large
teams from England and South Africa, and as at
the previous Maccabiah, Israel is expected to field
the largest aggregation.
In all, there will be competition in 19 sports. The
eyes of athletic enthusiasts from all over the world
will be on Israel during the period of the Maccabiah,
which has all the trappings of a little Olympics.
It is expected that the American team, sponsored
by the US Committee for Sports in Israel, will re-
turn with plenty of motion pictures in color so that
some of the spirit of the games can be recaptured
for audiences in this country.
BASEBALL The biggest baseball news of this
year's season was the tremendous performance of
Al Rosen. Al, play-
) ing one of his best
j years, was hitting
practically every-
thing in sight. He
showed promise of
being the Ameri-
. can League leader
\ in both the home
1 run division and
the runs batted in
competi t i o n as
, well a s finishing
high in the batting
average column.
Other baseball
notes: Cal Abrams
did better after
beinu switched to
a Pittsburgh uni-
form in a trade
from the Cincin-
nati Reds Joe
Ginsberg likewise improved and saw more action
as a catcher for the Cleveland Indians. Joe had
been traded from the Detroit Tigers ... Sid Gordon
continued a valuable player for the Boston Braves
... Sol Rogovin failed to hit the stride that was
expected of him as he got off to a slow start hurling
for the Chicago White Sox.
CHESS This isn't usually a sport that attracts
a lot of attention. Matches are held minus a lot of
fanfare, with only those who closely follow the
game paying attention. But this year the game of
chess suddenly shot into the headlines with plenty
of interest for Jewish sports fans. The reason: A
match was scheduled between the US chess team
and the Russian chess team, with Jewish players as
the chief contenders. For the US team, there was
Samuel Reshevsky, backed up by several other Jew-
ish stars. For the Soviet club there was world's
champion Milhail Botvinnik, with several other Jew-
'sh Players also starring on the Russian team. The
Al tosen
biggest news
Nat Holman
. bt gats credit
match appeared slated to be a good opportunity to
improve international sports relations and see some
Jewish sportsmen from Russia in action.
However, the match never came off. For some
reason, the US State Department ruled that the Rus
sian players could not live at the Russian Embassy
home in Glen Cove, Long Island. They would have
to" live in a New York hotel. The Russians resented
the restrictions, said they were insulting and called
off the trip.
BASKETBALL Top basketball story of the year
was the ordeal suffered by Nat Holman, one of the
"^ leading figures in
basketball. H o 1 -
| nan, who piloted
he City College of
New York cage
squad, was sus-
pended following
the basketball
scandals. College
authorities accus-
ed Holman of ne-
glect of duty and
improper conduct.
Holman protested
vigorously, said he
was being made a
scapegoat and
fought back in a
departmental trial.
Abe Saperstein's
Harlem Globetrot-
ters, celebrated
Negro basketball
team, kept going at its history making pace, playing
throughout the world and setting many new attend-
ance records. Saperstein was portrayed in a Holly-
wood film about the Globetrotters.
There were many Jewish stars, too numerous to
mention, on college and university basketball teams
throughout the country. One of the outstanding
coaches was Tubby Raskin, who had a leave of ab-
sence from Brooklyn College to pilot the Israel,
basketball team at the 1952 Olympic in Finland.
Israel's basketball team did itself proud by making
a powerful showing at the European basketball
tournament held in Moscow. Competing against
some of the best court clubs in Europe, the Israelis
placed fifth and astonished observers by their abil-
ity. The team from Israel had learned much since
the days when basketball was not very popular in
the country. A lot of credit goes to Nat Holman
and Tubby Raskin for furthering the sport to the
point that it is one of the top games in Israel at
the moment.
HERE AND THERE There were numerous Jew-
ish athletes holding down important positions on
college gridiron teams across the country last fall
. Sam Gerson, of Philadelphia, who is a former
Olympic star and a believer in keeping up friend-
ships between the athletes of many nations, con-
tinued his organizational efforts. Gerson worked to
expand the United States Olympians, an organization
for past Olympic stars, and started work on a new
project a similar organization on a international
scale.
Tragedy struck a promising baseball star. Herb
Continued on Page 12
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MRS. IYDIA MEAGHER, Managtr
ISAAC HABIF and FAMILY
Extend Best Wishes for a Happy New
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and invite you to visit them in Cuba
at the
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2235 S.W. 8th STREET


Page 4 F
*Jmlstincridian
jFlnral iFcstiuitit
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The synagogue must be simple in design, bearing out the function of its intent. It must be a
rallying point for the dispersed to fulfill its secular function. It must be a symbol of truth and
the Jewish faith in God to fulfill its religious significance.
By DR. ALFRED WERNER
Svn Arts Syndicate)
The Nazi malestrom leveled nearly all of the his-
toric synagogues of Europe, and it was just short
of a miracle that a few great edifices such as the
Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue of Amsterdam,
the Altneuschul of Prague, or the Scuola Spagnuola
of Venice emerged from the last war unscathed.
In this country, not a single House of Worship has
ever been touched by power-drunk troops. Syna-
gogues are razed in American cities but only because
the Elders have decided that the old building either
no longer fits the purposes of the congregation or
no longer satisfies the aesthetic needs of the new
generation of worshippers.
Though they may have cost a fortune, many of
the temples built here before the first World War
were nothing but poor imitation Moorish, Roman-
esque or Gothic. In this period, as the educator
Parrington wrote, good taste reached its lowest ebb;
it was an era of "chromo civilization" in which the
dignified culture of the 18th century gave way to
a loud and garish eclecticism. We can still enjoy
the simple and graceful structure of the Sephardic
Synagogue of Newport, Rhode Island, which is in
perfect harmony with the Georgian architecture of
the historic town, but 20th century American Jews
are finding it increasingly difficult to tolerate tem-
ples the facades of which,' all Stars of David not
withstanding, look either like Oriental palaces and
mosques or like medieval cathedrals.
But need the Jew be concerned about the outer
appearance of his synagogue? The answer is: "Yes
as much as he is concerned about his own ap-
pearance and that of his family upon entering the
House of Worship." While it is true that religious
fervor filled the "shul" where our grandparents
prayed, even though it may have been a dark and
dismal building on a neglected sidestreet. it does
not follow that the grandchildren, living in the
freedom of contemporary America, must continue
the tradition of pogrom-ridden Russia, Rumania and
Poland. As a matter of fact, the Talmud interprets
the Biblical phrase, "This is my God, and I will
adorn him," as a demand that every religious object
should be as attractive as possible. The 14th cen-
tury Spanish-Jewish thinker, Profiat Duran, exhort-
ed his co-religionists as follows: "The House of
Learning should be beautiful and pleasing in struc-
ture. This increases the desire for learning and
strengthens the memory because the viewing o(
pleasing forms and beautiful reliefs and drawings
rejoices the heart and strengthens the mind."
But what should our new temple look like? many
officers of congregations have asked, anxiously.
while studying sketches and blueprints. It must
not look like a church, but it should not resemble
a high school, a ranch or a garage, either. It should
be "modern" but not "to modern" since it
must not shock the older and more conservative
members.
But it shoud not be difficult to find the right
formula if one heeds .the aesthetic creed of the
outstanding vanguard architect, Dankmar Adler,
Continued on Pag* 11
J^-J^jl
I J GREETINGS ON THE
VI % NEW YEAR
Citizens
FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF HTALEAH



ppmav SEPTEMBER 11. 1953
W##> nrw/rH>*r>
Page 5F
Rosh Hashonali: Eve of Choice
The year now coming to an end may well be remembered as one of uncertain-
ty, hardship, danger and even terror for many millions of Jews in many part of
the world.
It was a year in which Jews came under assault from many directions at once
_ from the Kremlin, from its Satellites, from the Arab world, from a new qatherinq
of dark and evil forces. y
But if 5713 is to be remembered at all, it will be recalled as a year in which
American Jews met these assaults not merely with mighty outcries of anger and
horror, but with a powerful outpouring of action and funds.
American Jews, in reacting as bitterly to the Prague Trial as they did to the
outrages of Hitlerism, did so with this important difference:
In 5713, American Jews had ('.) a mighty instrument for action in the United
Jewish Appeal and (2) a ready-made place for the oppressed in the State of
Israel. And no time was lost in helping each to save lives.
Today, as we enter upon a New Year, the uncertainties and dangers of 5713
have not subsided. There are still 2,500,000 Jews in Eastern Europe whose safe-
ty and future remain a question mark. There are still hundreds of thousands of
Jews in the Moslem world living in fear.
In these circumstances, American Jews cannot and must not relax their vigil-
ance or their will to act. The United Jewish Appeal must be supported as
never before if lives are to be saved, if Israel is to be strengthened, if the free
way of life is to be preserved from its enemies.
In some respect the answer lies with us who shall live, who shall die, who
shall wander, who shall be at rest.
srael and the Jewish Exile:
Aspects of the UJA Crusade
NEW YEAR MEDITATIONS AND RESOLUTIONS
"WHOSOEVER HONORS THE T0RAH
SHALL HIMSELF BE HONORED"
mm
nama H-.i-u"

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Some of the most penetrating
and inspiring observations in American Jewish life
are uttered by leading American and Israeli figures
from the conference platforms of the United Jewish
Appeal.)
The year 5713 produced these outstanding quota-
tions at various UJA meetings:
American Jews axe beginning to get used to the
idea that building Israel will be a long job, a con-
tinuing piece of work for our generation. And I
think if our generation finishes that job, it will rep-
resent one of the greatest achievements in human
history.
When our generation, by one of those great
historical decisions which a generation sometimes
arrives at, decided to make an end to the situation
in Palestine and demanded the creation of a Jewish
State, and proclaimed the State and supported it,
we took on colossal responsibilities.
The generation which has made this decision
will not see its responsibilities discharged in four
or five years. It will take at least a lifetime.
"If our generation hands over to the next a Jew-
ish State which has not only the outward form of
an independent state, but which is a solidly estab-
lished and really economically independent state,
then we will have done something unforgettable in
Jewish history."
Dr. Nahum Goldman, Chairman
Jewish Agency for Palestine
Annual National Conference
Demember 13th
*
"We are determined that the iews in the Iron
Curtain countries shall be saved for a full Jewish
"fe Therefore we must strengthen our efforts
to obtain release for as many Jews as possible from
these areas.
"The gates are closed in some of these counties,
but not in all of them. We have W epeed up emi-
gration.
"We pledge to the Jews in those countries today
that we will never, never forget them or abandon
them. We will not retreat before any sacrifice to
have them with us."
Dr. Giora Josephthal, Treasurer
Jewish Agency for Palestine
Annual National Conference
December 14th
"Today, fifteen years after the founding of the
United Jewish Appeal, the center of our concern
is with the fate of a proud and democratic republic
the State of Israel where Jews may enter as
a right, and Jews in need of refuge and of a home
may have it.
"This state is confronted with many problems and
with great financial, economic and social difficul-
ties. But these are the kind of difficulties that we
feel privileged to grapple with, because in their
solution are hope, happiness and security for peo-
ple who over the years have been living in dozens
of no man's lands without hope, without oppor-
tunity, without peace, without security.
"In 1953 let there be no more no man's lands for
the Jews of Europe, the Jews of North Africa, of
the Middle East or of any other part of our dis-
turbed world. The only way in which we can make
this possible is by maintaining a strong Israel, a
viable Israel, an Israel able to house and to put to
work thousands of newcomers and knit thousands
of homeless people into one great, strong and self-
reliant nation."
Dr. Joseph J. Schwartz, Exec. Vice Chairman
United Jewish Appeal
Annual National Conference. December 14th

"Is it intelligent to assume that by the fifth year
Continued en Page 13
Rosh Hashana is a religious mile-stone when we pause
to meditate and take stock of our accomplishments in the
past and to make resolutions for the future.
In greeting the dawn of this NEW YEAR 5714. the
WILN0 KOSHER SAUSAGE CO.
pioneers in manufacturing "PURE BEEF Kosher delicatessen
products in America, are rededicating themselves to the
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j from coast to coast.
The Reputation of the Wilno Kosher Products was built
on Four Pillars:
KASHRUTH QUALITY FLAVOR SERVICE
Once again we are resolving to strengthen these pillars
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the Torah in our business dealings.
We wish our worthy Rabbis, the Mashgiach. o*ir distribu-
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PagwBF
+ lei
Friday, sptemwp. M
The Management of the
ALGIERS HOTEL
Extends Season's Greetings To All
Customs During the New Year
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
DURANTE & SONS
BUILDERS
180 GLENDALE DRIVE
MIAMI SPRINGS
TO ALL GREETINGS
C. RAYMOND VAN DUSEN
DADE COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR
FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Keystone Tourist Court and
Trailer Sales
6307 N.E 2nd AVENUE
MIAMI
Phone 84-6295
George W. Lasche
ebi f;
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS
John Uaneoi I: Mutual Hfe Mug.
MR. and MRS. WILLIAM RAFKINO and FAMILY
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
CUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Shore Club Hotel
Phone 58-7811
1901 COLLINS AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
TO ALL HAPPY NEW YEAR
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517 WASHINGTON AVENUE
OUR SINCERE WISHES
for a
HAPPY NEW YEAR
MERCANTILE
NATIONAL
BANK
-of-
MIAMI BEACH
MARCIE LIBERMAN
Vice President
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
QUESTION: Why is H cwstemery te eat sweets on
Rash Hashonah?
ANSWER: This is an old custom. Some trace it
back to the days of Ezra, the scribe, who com-
manded the people who returned to the Holy Land
from the first exile to eat sweets on the occasion of
this festival. The Talmud (Babli Horiyot 12a) men-
tions this custom as a means of providing an omen
for a sweet year. In the twelfth century we find the
Jews of France eating apples and honey.
An interesting explanation is given by one of the
sources which traces the connection between Judge-
ment and sweets in the Pentateuch, the Proph-
ets and the Writings of the Bible. The most
interesting of these accounts is the account where
Abigail brought sweets to King David who was on
his way to Nabal to wreak judgement and vengeance.
I Samuel 25:18) David himself thanked her for
greeting him with these symbols
of sweetness, such as wine, cakes
and raisins and preventing him
from causing bloodshed. This,
say the commentaries, happened
on the Day of Rosh Hashonah.
The parallel is self-evident.
Just as Abigail turned aside the
justified wrath of the King by
bringing offerings of sweetness,
so can the people of the world, in
their hours of judgement turn
aside the justifiable anger of the
Lord by deeds of kindness and mercy, charity and
devotion, love and sweetness. Eating sweets thus
serves not only as a sweet omen for the New Year;
but as a moral command for us to sweeten our dis-
positions and outlook on life in order to merit a
I good judgement at the divine tribunal on the Day
of Judgement.
QUESTION: Why is the forty-seventh chapter of
the Psalms recited seven times before the shofar is
first blown on Rosh Hashonah?
ANSWER: A number of interesting reasons are
offered for this custom. King David is said to have
recited this chapter when he captured the city of
Jerusalem and realized that there the Lord would
be recognized as the King over all mankind. Rosh
Hashonah. likewise, is a festival where we dream of
the universally recognized Kingship of the Almighty.
The reason for repeating the Psalm seven times
is considered by some as a means of having the
shofar blast, which is a call for mercy, pierce
through the seven heavens until it reaches the
throne of Judgement. Some see in this the seven
circuits which the Israelites made around Jericho
before the walls fell, blowing the shofar as they
went around. We, likewise, seek to break the walls
of indifference hatred and prejudice that stand in
the way of mercy.
QUESTION: Why is H necessary for the Rabbi
of the congregation to announce the name of each
sound of the shofar before ft is blown?
ANSWER: It was important that the notes be
sounded in their proper succession, each with its
own distinctive effort. In order to avoid the possi-
bility of error on the part of the man who blows the
shofar, it was customary for that note to be an-
nounced beforehand. Also, it is claimed, the con-
gregation is required to give full attention to the
different notes. Having them announced beforehand
readies it to listen to the next note it i, ^^1
plained that the Rabbi, or in his absence th *
ing and most learned elder, pronounces the nanf
of the notes, so that a man who is learned and 2
derstands the fuU meaning of the notes, chwt.
their respective names, lest the name be chanted b
a man who may innocently have conceived of th,
wrong conception of the note in his mind Rfc
then, the psychological setting of the congregation
which is of cardinal importance in the blowine a,
the shofar. 8 '
QUESTION: Why i th, festival of Rosh Hash,,,
the only festival which begins on the first day of
month on the Hebrew calendar?
ANSWER: It is. of course, quite natural that j
holiday such as the New Year should begin on the
first day of the first month of the year. However
the Rabbis make careful note of the fact that the
other major holidays come in the midst of the
month when the moon is at greater fullness. Rosh
Hashonah. they note, comes at a time when the
moon is practically at its smallest state or virtually
"hidden" from view.
It is further noted that the beginning of thi,
month is the only beginning not preceded by the
customary blessing of the new month usually re-
cited in the synagogue on the Sabbath before the
beginning of the month. Some claim that this was
so done so as to confuse Satan who awaits his oppor-
tunity to appear before the bar of judgement to
prosecute them. Not hearing it announced before-
hand he is thus considered outwitted.
Also, the Sun and the Moon are the two wit-
nesses to prove a man's guilt. The absence of one
renders the testimony inadequate. In addition to
these reasons, some claim that Rosh Hashonah is so
designed to make man himself the master of time,
so that he by his wisdom of calculation knows when
the time comes to plead for a New Year and lo
renew his faith and courage with the help of the
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Rosh Hashonah dinner menus hgure prom-
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the world. Hare, an Israeli workman pre-
pares for the New Year celebration and the
expected demand on the fish market.
wmlm
AnUttctml
MHwsrfc
$35 M.W. Hit
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A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
THE HUB
MIAMI CORAL GABLES LITTLE RIVER
TO AU SIAS0HS CIltTINCS
WHITE'S TRUCKING SERVICE, INC
W R.W. 12th AVINUf
PHONE J-8*'


f^nav SEPTEMBER 11. 1953
+Jewlstirk>ricUnri
[Religious Freedom: Prpbl
Of Church and State SeD.
Page 7F
By LEO PFEFFER
The most dramatic incident in the Church-State
I area during 5713 occurred not in the United States
but in France, and ita repercussions were felt
throughout the world. Much more was involved in
I the Finaly ritual kidnapping than merely dramatic
I interest, however; the case had deep significance for
Ichurch-State relations. Both France and the United
I States adhere to the principle of strict separation of
I Church and State. Under this principle, the custody
[and upbringing of orphaned children is a matter of
[state concern, to be determined in the light of the
[children's welfare, the deceased parents' wishes and
Ithe rights of close blood relative* However, dur-
ling the long Finaly controversy, this principle was
[flouted and the fate of the children became a mat-
tier of negotiation and agreement between ecclesi-
astical bodies, the Roman Catholic Church and the
Grand Rabbi of France. This was the most shocking
laspcct of the entire affair.
When the French high court refused to sanction
[this domination of Church and State and ordered
Ithe children delivered to their aunt, the Church
(authorities, perhaps apprehensive of rising world-
Iwide indignation, suddenly revived the agreement
they had made with the Grand Rabbi, which for
[months they had ignored. They were now willing
[to turn over the children, provided that their "Cath-
lolic" status should not be impaired and that they
Ishould be brought up in a "neutral" atmosphere
luniil they reached maturity. When, after eight
[heart rending years, the children's aunt finally re-
leeived the children, she did the only thing consis-
tent with human dignity and Jewish self-respect:
[she took the children to Israel to begin, at long last,
|a new life.
It is ironic that Church authorities in France and
[Spain were purportedly "horrified" by the aunt's
alleged breach of the agreement in taking the
Ichildren to Israelalthough her action, in con-
Itra-distinction to all the Catholic parties involved,
[was in complete conformance with the law of
I France.
Sunday Blue Laws
Not so happy was the outcome of a campaign by
[Sabbath-observing Jews in the United States. Ever
I since Colonial days, most of the states have had
| laws prohibiting work and business on Sunday.
A number of states have enacted amendments to
their Sunday laws exempting Sabbath-observing
iJews and other seventh-day observers from the
I operation of the Sunday laws. For half a century,
I the Jews of New York have attempted to obtain en-
lactment of such an exemption in the state with the
I largest Jewish population in America. Each year
they have failed. During the past year, however,
hopes ran high, for the Governor of New York re-
quested the legislature to appoint a committee to
investigate the operation of the law and make
I recommendations for ita modernization.
So clear was the justice of the Jewish claim, so
m-standing was the American tradition of relig-
ious liberty and so proud was the State of New
wk of its record in anU-diacrunination legislation,
that the Jews felt that they need but present their
ST ,0 the legislative committee and enactment of
the exempting amendment would follow as a mat-
ems
eparation

ter of course. Horeover, for the first time in the
half-century campaign the entire Jewish community
joined in the campaign. Also, for the first time in
American history, official Protestant support was
obtained for a relaxation of a Sunday law.
Thus, when the legislative committee held its
public hearing in New York City on January 15,
1853, hopes ran high. It therefore came as a shock
when, two months later, on the eve of the legisla-
ture's adjournment, the committee issued a report
rejecting the proposed exempting amendment. With
only the two Jewish members dissenting, the com-
mittee's report said, in effect, that since this is a
Christian country, the Jews would just have to ac-
commodate themselves to the practices of the mapor-
ity. A last-minute fight was made on the floor of the
legislature to reject the report and adopt the exemp-
tion, but it was hopeless. The legislature quickly
adjourned and all that was left was the determina-
tion of the Jewish community to renew the struggle
in the next legislative session.
Gideons' Campaign
The problem of religious intrusions upon the pub-
lic school system still remains the most vexatious
facing the Jewish community in American. The re-
cent attacks upon the public school, the never-
ceasing campaign of certain sectarian groups against
the "Godlessness" of public education and the deci-
sion of the United States Supreme Court upholding
the New York City released time program have all
combined to put the non-sectarianism of the public
school on the defensive. Recently, the Gideons In-
ternational, a fundamentalist, evangelical Protestant
association of business men, launched a nationwide
campaign to distribute cheap editions of the New
Testament to school children.
The New Testament is, of course, not acceptable
to Jews, and the Protestant or King James version
is not acceptable to Catholics. The Gideons' cam-
paign thus aroused a storm of controversy.
The Gideons' effort to introduce the New Testa-
ment within the public schools probably violates
the constitutional principle of separation of Church
and State. This was the ground for its rejection by
those public school authorities who were sufficiently
courageous to reject it. But the Gideons refused to
allow dougts as to constitutionality standing in their
way. It became clear that only a decision by the
United States Supreme Court could put a halt to
the campaign. In the Spring of 1953, at request of
the Jewish community of Rutherford, N. J., the
National Community Relations advisory Council, the
Synagogue Council of America, with the coopera-
tion of the Catholic Church, the legal staff of the
American Jewish Congress brought suit for an in-
junction. The complainants were parents of public
school children, one a Jew and the other a Catholic.
The trial took place in Hackensack, New Jersey.
Rabbinic witnesses testified that the Gideons' New
Testament was unacceptable to Jews and was in-
consistent with Jewish teachings. Distinguished edu-
cators, psychologists and social scientists testified
as to the bad social, inter-communal and psychologi-
cal effects of the program. Notwithstanding such
testimony, the trial judge ruled that since the
children were not compelled to accept the Bible
Continued en Pas* 14
T0 ALL ... A MOST-HAPPY NEW YEAR
WALL REALTY COMPANY
REAL ESTATE IN ALL ITS BRANCHES
251 N.W. 14th STREET
' Ml. .
Greetings
GEORGE S. OKELL
Your State Legislator
Biscayne Building
Miami
Mr. and Mrs. Moritz Drucker
and Family
"The Original Drucker"
Wish All Their Relatives
and Friends
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
A MOST HAPPY NEW
YEAR TO ALL .
Mr. and Mrs.
\AT ZILKA
and Family
41 N. W. 10th Street
GREETINGS TO ALL
from
BRODRIB
FURNITURE CO.
4115 N. W. 17th Are.
Phone 65-2241
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
OUR FRIENJ^AND PATRONS
Cooper's Roumanian Restaurant

211 22nd STREET
Phone 5-1533 s. Cooper
HOLIDAY DINNERS SERVED FROM 5 TO 10 P.M.
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
* IN LOS ANGELES............................ IT'S MIKE LYMAN'S
+ IN CHICAGO ............................................ IT'S HENRICI'S
* IN NEW YORK................................................ IT'S LINDYS
* IN MIAMI BEACH ITS .' .
WOLFIE'S
RESTAURANT SANDWICH SHOP
No. 1 Lincoln Road Collins Ave. at 21 SL

To All...Greetings
WILLIAM D. BORDEAUX
GREETINGS
Maxwell's Bonded Fruit Shippers
BONDED SHIPPERS OF FANCY FRUIT
Novelties Gifts Fresh Fruit Drinks
2300 S.W. 8th Street
MIAMI. FLORIDA PH. 48-4802
______^w________________________________________________

TO ALL GREETINGS
SKINNER ORNAMENTAL IRON WORKS
1595 S.W. 8th STREET PHONE 82-2913
*
La Vigne Electric
I..:
*
163 N. E. 24th StreetPhone 2-1759 I'
East Coast Fisheries, Inc.
West Flagler StreetAt the Bridge
A Happy New Year To III
Oar Friends aad Patrons
PARHAM'S
RESTAURANT
OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY
7301 COLLINS AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
PHONE 86-3021



Page 8 F
HHDAY, SEPTEMB
[TWBER U, m
u *
When Friends Drop in During the Holiday* Serve Delicious
Cakes and Cookies from
SAVORY BAKE SHOP
1M ALTON ROAD "MONE **
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL-MR. and MRS LOUIS MELN1CK
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
llousrr Company, Inc.
Fire and Casualty Insuranc*
Florida Bond and Mortgage Co.
Mortgage Loans & Investments
Houmt Realty Co.. Inc.
Real Estate Property Management
Hrst National Bank. Miami Phone 3-2648
i| TO ALL
I
I
GREETINGS
Dr. T. L. Lowrle
828 N.W. 3rd AVENUE
MIAMI FLORIDA
Best Wishes for a
A Happy New Year
COUNCILMAN BERNARD A. FRANK
Of course we riave Miami Diaper
Service.' Doesn't everyone?

And besides all those surgically sterile, fluffy, white
diapers, Miami Diaper Service furnishes us with 9 Eveready
Nursers (the best formula bottles ever), a deodorizing, porcelain
Storage Hamper, twice-a-week Pick Up and Delivery Service
ond a free subscription to BABY TALK Magazine I
PHONE TODAY!
In Hollywood and Homestead In Miami
ni Collect PHONE 48-1 7H
In Ft Lauderdale
2-25*1
to wft Mr. Stork Nfeiseff to Yr Stork er M*
Our Cfeslze stork it voila&to at no charge or ohlgiirkm
And, well toxi him to your parry and pick him up and take._
home again. ..for frcel-^ust give us a ring or drop us a note.
sTSSSl
Ot>a<0OnOaV c
mdtak.hswl
ipusonote.l
MIAMI DIAPER SERVICE
Mtn btr Nmtionml lmlituf of Diaper Services
4200 Aurora Street, Cerel Gables, Florida
tunari roia rw?
MAY YOU IE INSCIBD fO* A GOOD YtAf
Totalitarian Trends are Main
Threats of the New Year
By DR. ISRAEL GOLDSTEIN
President, American Jewish Congress end
Chairmen, Western Hemisphere Executive, World
Jewish Congress
In this solemn High Holy Day season. Jews every-
where are weighing the experiences of the past
year in order to fix their sights for the year 5714
which lies ahead. We have witnessed momentous de-
velopments in many areas of the globe. Together
with all peoples of the world, we join in hailing the
truce in Korea and devoutly pray that through the
agency of the United Nations, men can once again
resume the thread
of their lives with-
out fear of war.
While this stirring
event must heart-
en men of goodwill
eve rywhere, we
must still contem-
plate a future in
which the dark,
menace of totali-
tarianism contin-
ues to cast its evil
shadow.
During this past
year. Jews and
free peoples
t h roughout the
world were pro-
foundly shocked
and alarmed by
events in the So- francais d> lo ffactja*
viet Union and its
satellite s t a t es
where it appeared that Jews had been singled out
for especially ruthless treatment. The repudiation in
recent months by the Communist powers of this
anti-Jewish policy' has brought us immense relief.
We pray that the resumption of diplomatic rela-
tions between the USSR and Israel augurs that a
more enlightened and humane policy will be
adopted by the Kremlin towards its Jewish com-
munity. We must not. however, be lulled into re-
laxing our vigilance and intense concern for our
brethren behind the Iron Curtain.
We have also witnessed during the past year an
epochal and unparalleled event in Jewish history
with the successful conclusion of the reparations
negotiations with West Germany' This agreement
was made possible only because disparate Jewish
groups enthusiastically joined forces in a most in-
spiring demonstration of unity. We fervently hope
that such unity will be further strengthened and
consolidated in the year ahead.
In recent weeks. Jews the world over have noted
with deepest interest the proceedings of the Third
Plenary' Session of the World Jewish Congress,
where the representatives of Jewish communities
of more than 65 nations met to deliberate on mat-
ters of mutual concern. This conference dramatic-
ally and concretely expressed the will to unity of
the Jewish people and provided, as well, a vivid
demonstration of its will toward creative survival.
France's totalitarian menace
Events in Israel give us added assurance that
the young nation is continuing to develop in .
sonance with the highest ideals of democracy ^
Judaism. It is struggling heroically to overcome it,
grave economic and political difficulties Israel i,
still ringed by hostile nations who, we sincerely
hope, will soon be brought to realize the commo. I
prosperity and progress of the entire Middle East]
depend on a stable and enduring peace. W'e pr
that the good offices of the free nations will be
exerted toward promoting this end. At the begin,
ning of this New Year, it is fitting that we renew
our determination to render our utmost financial
and moral support to Israel so that she may achieve
durable peace and economic security.
At -home, Americans who venerate the noble tra-1
ditions of freedom and equal opportunity inheres*]
in our way of life have been dismayed by the efforts]
of some men to undermine that precious heritage.
Americans of all faiths and political groupings ban
been appalled by the abuse of Congress legitimate
right of investigation to spread fear and intimida-1
tion and to suppress freedom of expression Wi
have been horrified at the spectacle of some Araer-
ions' advocating the resort to the totalitarian ex-
treme of bookburning. However, it is gratifying thai
in recent months there have increasingly appeared i
vigorous condemnation of those excesses by lead-1
ing statesmen, clergymen, educators and publicists. I
Let us pray that this will strengthen our determina-
tion to withstand further unAmerican onslaughts oi j
our freedoms.
We are also confronted today with the funda-1
mental and inescapable task of bringing uur immi-j
gration law into conformity with American demo- ]
cratic principles and ideals. The passage of the-j
Emergeny Refugee Act will help to regain for our j
country some of the stature we lost abroad througsj
the enactment of the McCarran-Walter bill, but wj
shall never fully undo the harm wrought by that
legislation until its discriminatory provisions, and j
particularly the racist national origins system oi
which it rests, are repealed. Let us earnestly hope]
that the President will be encouraged by the sac-
cessful enactment of the refugee bill, which he|
sponsored, to redeem his election pledge for the |
revision of the McCarran-Walter Immigration law.
We Jews, who have throughout the century' I**11
among the foremost in cultivating the ideal* of:
human freedom and dignity, must in the year ahead j
rededicate ourselves to the continuing struggle for j
the triumph of those ideals with are inextricably j
linked with the heritage of Judaism. This preciout
religious and cultural heritage we must zealously
guard and enrich as we did in promoting the world-
wide dream of peace, progress and social justice
4 Ho,,, New rear T Tfce
Jtwiik Community
CHRIS DUNDEE
leiine ana- Wrrstfi'aa 'remoter
MIAJM MACN AUDITOtiUM
RADIATORS
IIPAIBIO CLEANED RECOKEO
nnrs radiator
SERVICE
2035 N.W. 1st AVENUE
Men
GREETINGS TO ALL
Shadyside Nursing Home
"A Home Away From Home"
3508 N.W. 19th TERRACE
PHONE 64-1981
TO ALL. .
GREETINGS
WEST INDIES FRUIT COMPANY
605 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD
Phone 82-8473


prDAY, SEPTEMBER 11. 19S3
+Jewist rtorklian
Page 9F
The Saga -Hsratfs Old Soil
By DR. ABRAHAM GRANOTT
r|d Prtsidtnt of Karen Kayameth in Jerusalem
The beginning of the year 5714 affords an oppor-
tunity to review the work of the Jewish National
Fund and list some of its achievements. Character-
ized by the 23rd World Zionist Congress held in
Jerusalem in 1952 as one of the major funds of the
1 Zionist Movement, serving as one of the chief instru-
Lcnts for the realization of Zionism, the Jewish
[National Fund has an interesting and impressive
Iftory to tell of land reclamation and land develop-
ment, which is part of the great saga of the State
of Israel.
A few figures will tell the story. The Jewish Na-
tional Fund now owns about 3,500,000 dunams. Of
these, 2.500,000 dunams have been redeemed since
Che establishment of the State, which means that
Le have been able to acquire within the last five
tears more than twice as much as we were in a
osition to redeem in almost helf a century. Eighty
ercent of the total Jewish agricultural land is in
[he hands of the JNF; four-fifths of the total agri-
cultural production of Israel derives from Jewish
National Fund land. Noteworthy in this connection
; the growth of the soil brought about through the
reclamation projects of the Jewish National Fund.
he JNF has added to the Jewish patrimony 300,000
bunams in the swamp regions and about 200,000
lunams in the hill areas of the Galilee, the Shomron
tnd Judea as well as in the wastes of the Negev.
All 350 new settlements launched since the found
ttion of the State in 1948 were established on land
provided by the Jewish National Fund.
Since the establishment of the State of Israel, the
INF has planted approximately 18,000,000 trees,
Jlmost three times the number planted in the course
|f half a century.
The Jewish National Fund is deeply interested in
Tigation, since water is second only to the land
elf as a prerequisite to Israel's development. Out
If the 3.500.000 dunams that are being cultivated
\j Jewish farmers in Israel today, less than 500,000
ire under irrigation. The Jewish National Fund is a
^ajor partner in Israel's foremost public water sup-
company, Mekorot, which has established the
ountrys principal water supply system and is re-
onsible fur the development of new resources. An
ndication of what is done to increase Israel's water
lupply is to be found in these figures. By the end
If 1951, the annual supply was 85,000,000 cubic
piers; in 1952, the water supply rose to 120,000,000
lubic meters. The pipeline to the Negev and the
pying of a second water main to Jerusalem are
ome of the recent achievements of our. water sup-
ply arm.
The Jewish National Fund has contributed greatly
the solution of the housing problem in Israel.
0,000 men, women and children are housed in rural
lousing developments, while 100,000 live in urban
lousing developments located on JNF land.
One might ask:"What are the tasks of the Jew-
C1 N,a,"onal Kund. now that we have a Jewish
*e?" Again, we let the figures tell their own
Rory.
! Out of the 20.500,000 dunams within the boun-
"WlI of the State only 5,000,000 are under cultiva-
W the rest is desert, rock, swamp and sand dune.
It is the task of the Jewish National Fund, after
WWng the soil of Israel as the possession of the
^People, to develop the land and prepare it for
cultivation and the settlement of the new immi-
grants who come streaming to the shores of the
Jewish homeland and those who, we hope, will come
from countries which hitherto were closed to Jew-
ish emigration. The establishment of the State of
Israel affords the Jewish National Fund a historic
opportunity to make rapid headway in the attain-
ment of its goal. That goal is to make room in Israel
for every Jew who needs or wishes to settle there
To support the new immigrants, large areas of land
must immediately be brought under cultivation To
keep the country's economy balanced about 20'/
of its people must be settled on land. Obviously, the
land should not become a source of private profit
or an object of speculation. The task of bringing
the land into the eternal possession of the Jewish
people and making it fit for settlement remains the
duty of the Jewish National Fund. In the first half
century of its existence, the JNF established the
foundations of the Jewish homeland; it is the task
of the Jewish National Fund, within the next decade
or so, to fill the vacant spaces of Israel's territory
and to transform waste and desert lands into a
garden of God.
The Jewish National Fund is now enaged on a
series of development and reclamation projects
which, when completed, will add to the fertility of
the country, rendering it capable of supporting a
large population.
The Huleh project in the Northern Galilee is one
of the greatest reclamation projects ever carried
out in Israel. Some 75,000 dunams of farmland-
enough to support 6,000 farming unitswill add
their produce to the growing achievement of Israel's
agriculture, when the work is completed. The first
stage of this project was completed in December
1952; the second was begun in June 1953 and will
be carried out by the Aggregates Construction Cor-
poration of Chicago of which J. R. Sensibar is presi-
dent. The forecast of potentialities in the Huleh en-
visages the utilization of abundant peat layers be-
neath the swamp. This peat may provide a source
Continued on Page 15
Striving
to
Make
Every
Day
of
Every
Year
a
Better
One
for
Mankind
**#
:.
(iHercg JMasptial
f R F F T I N P Q
MONSALVATGE & CO. of MIAMI. INC.
WHOLESALE CIGARS AND CANDIES
68 S. W. First Street Phone 2-5156
An enrichment plant to boost the strength of
Israel's phosphates is in full operation as
part of a first step in the establishment of an
expanded chemicals industry for the young
republic.
Red Adams Sightseeing Tours
GLASS TOP AIR CONDITIONED BUSES
For Reservations Phone 3-6371
Your Hotel or Motel Agent
3 NX 3rd AVENUE MIAMI
1627 COLLINS AVENUE MIAMI BEACH
JACOB SCHACHTER
Director
Jewish Musical Hour
Sunday
12 to 2 p.m.
WMBM 800 on Tour Dial
Wuhii to mink his iponwri far
tholr kind co-operation and -
ttndi boat wiihti to hit liatanara
and to all Jewry far a vary Happy
Now Yoar.
AMERICA'S HEADQUARTERS
FOR
FOOD SERVICE EQUIPMENT
Supplies, Furnishings, Equipment
f o r
HOTELS, RESTAURANTS, CLUBS, RESORTS,
SCHOOLS, HOSPITALS, INSTITUTIONS
such as
CHINAWARE, GLASSWARE, SILVERWARE, ETC.
EDWARD DON & COMPANY
Phone 82-2657
1400 N. MIAMI AVE. MIAMI 32, FLA.
HAPPY NEW YEAR
The SEYBOLD BUILDING
For Office Space
Please Call Building
Manager 2-7922
1k* l&uei Cc
/ KfAlTOHJ
AGENTS
T ALL...
A MOST HAPPT NEW TEAR
THOMAS J. KELLY
YOUR DADE COUNTY SHERIFF
Greetings to All Our
Patrons and Friends
Kolber
Bros.
VENETIAN BLINDS
2100 N.W. I3th AVENUE
Phone 3-6641
5714 y 1953-54
ROSH HASHONA GREETINGS
EMPIRE FURNITURE
takes this opportunity to extend
their best wishes to people
of the Jewish faith all
over the world


Page 10 F
+ le*lsiinor*JlatL
SiSLSSigji.
TO ALL A MOST
HAPPY NEW YEAR
DR. AND MRS. ELLIOTT C. COHEN
1650 S.W. list Street


T. F. LEJEUNE
General Contract*
Mortgage Loans
T. F. LE JEUNE
Owner
125 N.W. 54th STREET
MIAMI, FLORIDA
Phone 78-4266
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
ACME PRESS, INC.
Distinctive Printing Cards to Catalogs
Tags oi Every Description Printed or Made-to-Order
Patching Stringing Wiring
MIAMI INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
MIAMI
PHONE 88-1614
Everett E. Jones, Pres. George C. Schenk. Vice-Pres.
A H- Protpttoui Vu1 Tear To All Ot.r Fnends and Patrons
MEYERS of MIAMI
WOMEN'S APPAREL
5 S.W. 2nd AVENUE PHONE 3-1637
Sam Meyers Harold S. Meyers
HARRY AND FRIEDA COHEN
HOTEL M *V YORKER
ACE RUG CLEANERS
26 S.W. South River Drive Phonee 9-1155 & 82-2007
RUGS CLEANED, DYED and DEMOTHED
Carpet Laying and Repairing
FURNITURE CLEANING
Greetings To All
MR. and MRS. JOHN E. PORTE
GREETINGS TO ALL
STEADFAST VENETIAN BLINDS
9510 N.W. 7th AVENUE PHONE 7-6844
TO ALL GREETINGS
MIAMI COAL & OIL CO.
and
MIAMI CRYSTAL ICE 4 COLD STORAGE CO.. INC.
1100 N.W. 21st Terrace
Phone 2-7896
Phone 67-1343
Auto Painting
PROCTOR AND SON BODY WORKS
33M Douglas Road
SEAT COVERS TAILOR MADE
Miami. Florida
McrFarlin Constrwetion Company
ENCIHEERIHG CONTRACTORS
ROADS STREETS PARKING LOTS DRIVES
ASPHALTS TARS ROAD OILS
Since 1931
1085 K. W. 56th Street PlM>a- ,.3.5.
Miami tt. Florida
naif m WJSI
Continued rom efe 1 n West <
Germany" stamp are being twisted into place by
Haifa construction workers, as the first sacks of
German-made fertilizer are spread upon the fields
of a kibbutz in the Emek, just a year has gone by
since two diplomats, stiffly and without prior hand-
shake, affixed to a treaty without precedent in diplo-
matic history the signatures "Adenauer" and "M.
Sharett."
The Reparations Agreement provides that, in view
of the expense incurred by Israel for the integra-
tion of destitute Jews uprooted by Nazism and its
aftermath, the German Federal Republic will furnish
goods in the value of $710,000,000 to the State of
Israel over a period of 12 to 14 years. The types of
merchandise that may be ordered by Israel are listed
in agreed upon schedules, which will be revised from
time to time. In general the products should be of
German manufacture, although in certain cases they
may be of non-German origin. They must be suitable
for the economic life of Israel and not be resold to
third countries.
To place orders under the reparations treaty and
to supervise their execution, Israel established a
Purchasing Mission with semi-diplomatic status in
Cologne and a branch office in West Berlin. At the
present time the Mission has an Israeli staff of about
50, headed by Dr. Pinchas E. Shinnar, who has been
granted the personal rank of Minister, and by his
deputies Dr. Chaim Yahil and Dr. A. Bergmann.
Shipments worth $96,000,000 are to be made by
March. 1954. Thereafter, the annual rate of delivery
is to range from $60,000,000 to $74,000,000 until
1964. or 1966. The total will therefore run to more
than the $710,000,000 agreed upon to $817,000,000
to be exact.
The added $107,000,000 constitute a second obli-
gation assumed by Germany. In addition to direct
reparations to Israel, the Federal Republic under-
took to pay this sum to the Conference on Jewish
Material Claims Against Germany for the relief and
rehabilitation of Jewish victims of Nazi persecution
who do not live in Israel, as partial compensation
for those material losses which were inflicted upon
the Jews of Europe by Nazi Germany and which
can now be made good no longer. This payment
Germany will make in the form of supplemental
reparations deliveries to Israel, which in turn will
transmit the value thereof to the Conference, form-
ed by 23 major Jewish organizations of the Western
world. It is the first time that they have thus
been recognized at the international diplomatic level
as the authorized spokesmen of the Jewish people
outside of Israel.
Beyond the compacts entered into by Germany
with the State of Israel and with the Jewish organ-
izations, she also agreed at Luxembourg to take
all possible steps to carry out an adequate indemni-
fication program for individual victims of Nazism.
A bewildering array of compensation legislation
had, it is true, already been passed earlier by the
constituent states of the German Federal Republic
and by West Berlin, but these laws differed widely
and, quite aside from an administration often mark-
ed by ill will, proved inadequate in many respects.
In the British zone, these deficiencies were most
pronounced.
At Luxembourg, Germany pledged herself to unify
and improve this hodgepodge of state laws through
introduction of a federal law that would incorporate
benefits for some 30 specified classes of persecution
and persecutees. while being no more unfavorable
to Nazi victims than the statutes now applicable in
the US Zone.
A sweeping and unified indemnification law cover-
I'pTTnujp
In* West GerrtaV has beeH.manderf ^
ed. for six years or more. Numerous 1?
variance in detail, were worked out but it -
in June of 1933 that the Federal "nTl.e?,1!
duced a bill of its own into parliament IS *i
indemnification found it unsatisfactory in m "l
spects but. reasoning that a bad law wu m *
to no law at all, rallied behind it. The mS
fate often hung by a thread, was in the Jt 1
ed by Parliament at the last possible wXfiA
the adjournment. It will enter into effect n Si
tober 1st. *1
The law provides for direct payments to K.
victims, or their surviving dependents, h-J
illegal imprisonment (for each month they
held, former concentration camp inmates art 3
ceive the equivalent of $35), deprivation of
erty, loss of earnings and physical injuries resnl*
in a disability of a third or more. Payments 3
be spread over the next ten years, however vl
law is carried out in good faith, its overall (Jj
variously estimated at between 700 million and/
billion dollars.
The highlight of 3713 has been this trio of 1
tive enactments the Reparations Agreement,,
Israel, the pledge of a substantial payment ta |
Conference on Jewish Material Claims and the ^
sage of the Indemnification Law. The extent <
Nazi barbarity, for which they seek to atone |
some measure, was unparalleled. At the same t
it must be acknowledged that, as a voluntary 1
of a state which in this respect is fully sova
the reparations pact and the indemnification |
also have no precedent in history.
Great credit is due to those Germans who I
hard to bring all this about above all others!
cellor Adenauer, the late Kurt Schumacher, i
sor Franz Boehm and Dr. Otto Kuester. The Pa
liamentary deputies of the Social Democratic Pa
voted to a man for both the pact and the bilLi
though they are in bitter opposition to the
auer government. Among the governmental
lition, only a minority supported the pact and I
wholeheartedly. The moral courage of that mio
as well as that of the Social Democrats, is all I
greater because, as politicians up for re electioal
September, they are well aware that on these is
they do not reflect the prevailing mood of the I
man people.
When a cross-section of Germans was asked,|
a public opinion survey taken in the winter |
1952-53, whether they considered the Israel
ment or Arab trade relations more important.!
Germany, only 12 percent in Western Germanjj
22 percent in West Berlin came out for the foi
Even when all reference to Arab protests was 1
ted, only one West German in four thought thatj
Israel Agreement ought to be ratified.
Under these circumstances, will Germany
out the obligations she has assumed? To answer I
question, we must take into consideration
political, psychological and moral factors that 1
tate in favor of fulfillment, as well as the
turn and the vested interests generated by any I
scale program once it is underway. Prospects l
better than they were a year ago that, as lonf J
economic prosperity is not impaired thereby j
as long as the neo-Nazi resurgence can be kept'
in bounds by the dedicated democrats who still I
a number of key positions. Germany will
honor her undertaking toward Israel, towardil
Jews of the world and towards the individual'
tims of Nazism.
GREETINGS
Herbert Diamond
A ( o.
SEA SHELLS &
FLOWER SUPPLIES
Telephone 64-6031
1340 N.W. 27th A*e.
Miami 35. Florida "
GREETINGS
1
DADE COUNTY
DAIRIES
PHONE 84-0637
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO
ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
38atj ?IUiits
HEALTH FOOD*
107 N. E. 2nd Street, Miami J
Dietetic and Salt Free Foods
C I f T I N C J
SUPERIOR GENUAL ELECTRIC APPLIANCES
Opea Friday ead
4353 N.W. 7th AVBMK
MWM^I


SEPTEMBER H. 1953
Continued from P*8 4
follows function." Adler, the son of a Ger-
Rabbi, designed many theaters, hotels, exhibi-
halls. as well as synagogues in the Midwest
r the 'eighties' and 'nineties.' It was he who
I the need that a building be above all utili-
i 0t(,er words, a synagogue should be a syna-
t. But what is a synagogue? It is, primarily, a
of Assembly, which is the meaning of both
Hebrew Beth ha-Knesseth and the Greek syna-
It must meet the needs religious, educa-
and social of the congregation. Perhaps
I easier to define its character by stating what
(not It is not a church. The Christian, seeking
nfinite, wants his House of Worship to point up
eaven; hence, the preponderance of vertical
res: tall, narrow windows, high vaults and awe-
ting towers. Synagogues, however, should ex-
|horizontally, since they have always been com-
ity centers and rallying points for the dispersed
|o fulfill their secular functions, need large and
lighted premises to include lecture halls, li-
es, gymnasiums, workshops and playrooms.
of the old synagogue in Europe was the
Ihof the yard where a ceremony like the
|ing of the Moon took place and where weddings
be performed. In the America of today, the
(ions of the Schulhof are being served by large,
fended gardens where the congregants can
before or after services and classes and
the booth" for the Feast of Tabernacles may
i architect should know, or shoufd be informed
)ie Rabbi, that a synagogue, to be a Jewish
of Worbhip, must not be overwhelmingly im-
ive. neither theatrical nor overpowering.
eas a church is meant to be a monument to the
of God. the synagogue never aims to be a
of "art for religion's sake." This principle
often conveniently forgotten when well estab-
large congregations, proud of their import-
[ and wealth, commissioned the architects to
lice "showpieces," with huge portals, cupolas,
bned porticos and what not. Modesty does not
de beauty that kind of modesty which can
to the Hebrew sense of humility before
Congregations planning to squander millions
der to erect huge and lush buildings should re-
er that the Lord did not reveal himself to
i from a tall, majestic tree, but a small burning
| and that the Decalogue was given, not on one
great mountain peaks, but on the relatively
Mount Sinai.
R is a deep symbolic truth in these Rabbinic
pes which, if applied to contemporary syna-
T architecture, make it Hebraic, modern and,
Nally, in keeping with the American tradition
1 also favors simple and austere facades. For
" > reasons, a happy synthesis of exterior and
or was not found in Europe. When I visited
ghetto of Venice, I was astonished by the con-
I between the plain and almost ugly outside
TOice of the Scuola Spagnuola and its lavish,
ips too lavish baroque interior, the work of the
|JJ!~ Christian architect, Longhena. The Jews
*1 had very good reasons for making their
E
Page 11 F
THEIMA and JACK BEGIN
THE BEGLER SCHOOL
WISH ALL THEIR FKltNDS A HAPPY HEW YEAR
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
KING BAKE SHOP
IRVING and MILTON PIKARSKY
1894 S. W. Eighth Street Miami

Parts oi an airplane fuselage await place-
ment as workmen complete a road linking
repair shops of a giant overhaul aircraft
maintenance depot, which is being built at
Israel's Lydda Airport.
Houses of Worship look as unassuming as possible;
in addition, in many places they were forbidden
buildings higher than the local churches or mosques
and in some instances were compelled to build their
synagogues below ground level.
In free America, there are no such restrictions
for Jews or for other non-Christian religious groups.
We can build in peace and security our Houses of
Worship wherever we want to and in whatever style
we choose. We are guided only by our good taste
or by the lack of it. Fortunately, the number of
synagogues that are just big cathedrals without
crucifixes is rapidly decreasing. New York City and
the neighboring towns are, of course, leading the
movement towards streamlined new synagogues, but
many congregations in the Midwest and West have
been open to the spell of modernism, too. Young
Rabbis and members of congregations, Reform, Con-
servative or Orthodox, are willing to be led by such
first-rate architects as Erich Mendelsohn and Per-
cival Goodman who have designed a number of fine
functional synagogues Mendelsohn large and
beautiful temples in Cleveland and St. Louis, Good-
man the buildings for B'nai Israel at Millburn, New
Jersey, and Beth El at Springfield, Massachusetts.
There is, of course, no such thing as a "Jewish
style," for obvious historic and sociological reasons,
' and any attempt to create one artificially must end
in dismal failure. But there is such a thing as a
Jewish philosophy, a Jewish way of life. The painter,
Mortiz Oppenheim, expressed it very aptly when
visiting Rome more than a century ago. The pomp
of St. Peter's Cathedral impressed him as a theat-
rical exhibition calculated for its effect, in contrast
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
DENMARK'S ART STONE
StructuralOrnamental
Modern MantelsGarage Grill*Garden SetsPottery
StonePlaster
12351 N.W. Seventh Avenue Phone 7-6924
ANN and DAVE AUGUSTUS
tf
A. & G. PLUMBING CONTRACTORS
1065 N.E. 160th TERRACE, NORTH MIAMI BEACH Phone 816-3010
WISH ALL THEIR FRIENDS A HAPPY NEW TEAR
TO Alt...GREETINGS
MADAME LOUISE
READER
1709 N.W. 55th STREET
Holiday Greetings To All Oi Our Friends
INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER
MOTOR TRUCKS
FARM EQUIPMENT
REFRIGERATION
HOWE E. MOREDOCK
COMPANY
550 N.W. 6th AVENUE PHONE 82-6433
MIAMI. FLORIDA
ig*13
lASON'S BEST
lES TO ALL
SWEET INSURANCE AGENCY
SECURITY BUILDING
Phone 2-2675
m- AND MRS. H. A. SILVERS AND FAMILY
of the
B & W ELECTRIC CORPORATION
555 NORTH MIAMI AVENUE
EXTEND BEST WISHES TO ALL FOR A
MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
To All ... A Happy HelMey
Marcel Flower Shop
A COMPU1E f LOR At SERVICE
Art with fhwrt
Teles**** 51 5523
801 5 41st St. at Moridion Av*.
Miami Booth, Flo.
TO ALL .
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
Modern Terrazzo Company
"Fine Terrauo Work"
1564 N.W. 7th STREET
PHONES 9-6333 67-2913
....*,
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
TO ALL
II. A. Vivian
REALTOR
"Over 25 Ycors in Miami"
12387 NX. 6th Avenue
North Miami
Phone 84-0261
GREETINGS
Hibiscus Baking Company
(Formerly Gleason's)
PIES CAKES PASTRIES
1732 S.W. 8th STREET
3-6717 PHONES 9-5087
A. C. ALLER. President and General Manager
^**ARW.6WUU IAIlfS.fUorH.4MIM
ALL MATS BY DIRECT PRESSURE


Page 12F
\Uml*bfhrkftyr
^AY^SgTBfflg,
11,
:.$sb*s->s*s*s*s:+ss*^*ss*2
L'Shona Tova Tikesevu
m*t, KOSHER CATERERS
' Bar Mitzvahs
Garden Parties
Weddings
Buffets *
AT YOUR HOME. TEMPLE OR LEADING HOTELS
1701 Washington Avenue Miami Btac'.i
Phone 58-:JOJ or 84-:078 (Evening)
Under Complete Sufmisum of Greate' Miami \'*id Ha^*5in.th
;-:-S2

4 Ham New Year To All
Our friends
FISCHER'S BAKE SHOP
7423 COLLINS AVENUE
For a Fine Selection of
Holiday Cakes & Cookies
Phone 86-8982 Claied Wednesday at Sundown
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR CUSTOMERS
AND FRIENDS
GOVERNOR CAFETERIA
AND ENTIRE MANAGEMENT
Washington Avenue at 12th Street
PHONE 58-2979
GREETINGS TO ALL
*
CONSTRUCTION PRODUCTS CORP.
Ill II DIM, MATERIALS
JAL-WIN
STEEL WINDOWS STEEL BUCKS
ALUMINUM WINDOWS
Millwork Nails Steel Specialties
3501 N. MIAMI AVE.
*

Will Laws End Discrimination?


Will Mmshw
. reaction oqainst KKK
AJC Feature
Only twenty throe laws pertaining to civil rights
were enacted by State legislatures during the 1953
sessions just concluded, according to a survey is-
sued by the American Jewish Congress. The AJCon-
gress' analysis, prepared by Will Maslow, director
of the organiiation's Commission on Law and Social
Action, describes the 1953 crop of State civil rights
laws as "disappointing."
Pointing out that 44 State legislatures convened
this year. Mr. Maslow emphasized that of the 23
laws passed, only
a "handful are of
significance." The
State of Oregon
enacted a law for-
bidding racial o r
religious discrim-
ination by hotels,
restaurants and
other places of
public accommoda-
tion. The State of
Florida, the scene
of a series o f
bombings in 1951
directed against
housing projects,
synagogues and a
Catholic Church,
moved to cope
with this menace
by enacting a law
regulating the sale
and possession of dynamite and other explosives.
A similar statute was enacted by North Carolina.
The North Carolina legislature also passed a law
aimed at the Ku Klux Klan forbidding the wearing
of masks and the burning of crosses for the pur-
poses of intimidation and requiring the registration
of all secret societies. This is the sixth such law to
be enacted in the South in recent years, and. ac-
cording to Mr. Maslow, "reflects the widespread
popular reaction against the KKK."
The Iowa legislature, prompted by the nationally
publicized episode that occurred two years ago when
a private cemetery in Sioux City refused to allow the
burial of a Korean War veteran who was an Ameri-
can Indian, passed a law outlawing racial or reli-
gious discrimination by nonsectarian cemeteries.
The Washington legislature passed a similar law.
American Indians and Asians were direct bene-
ficiaries of the 1953 civil rights laws enacted in
California. Montana and New Mexico. These states
wiped off the statute books obsolete measures for-
bidding the sale of alcoholic beverages to American
Indians. (A Federal law containing the same pro-
hibition was repealed by the US Congress in the
session just ended.) Califoraians will vote at the
next election on a constitutional amendment to
eliminate disabilities now in force against alien
Asians.
Recognizing the special problems of observant
Jews, the Michigan legislature enacted a statute that
would permit voting by absentee ballot whenever
a state election falls on a Jewish holiday.
Connecticut. Massachusetts and Washington, in-
creasingly sensitive to discrimination practiced by.
some hotels and resorts against Negroes and Jews,
moved to strengthen existing public accommodation
statutes by extending their scope. Efforts to enact
similar laws in the resort states of New Hampshire
and Maine failed. Six other state legislatures
those of Arizona. Indiana. Montana, Nevada, West
Virginia and New Mexico defeated similar bills.
LOW PRICES ABE BORN HERE RAISED ELSEWHERE I
Proponents of civil rights legislation
their "sorest defeat." according to fc
analysis, in state campaigns for FEPc Th.
legislation resulting from such efforts in iT
was an "educational" measure adopted L5
which Mr. Maslow described as -weak Wn3
defeats were being recorded in the states ih!'
torial legislature of Alaska, after a WiniZ?,
in its Senate, enacted a strong FEPc law
Efforts to cope with the problem of discruni.
and segregation by educational institution/
equally unsuccessful. Mr. Maslows report contia
Bills aimed at eliminating discrimination M
Missouri, New Mexico and Connecticut. Tnej
lem of reducing racial or religious discriminj
private landlords was also no nearer soluti
report declared.
Assessing the reasons for civil rights fail,
states legislatures in 1953, Mr. Maslow
the "lack of agreement" within the domin
litical parties of the state legislatures on the,
ability of such legislation. "There stilt
exist an FEPC or civil rights constituency i
enough politically," he said, "to exact p|<
to punish those who betray them." Further,]
brevity of State legislative sessions, which i
once every two years, prevents widespread i
tion of public opinion in support of a specific]
Finally, Mr. Braslow stated, "the meagre civil i
harvest this year is not due to special circus
but is merely the continuation of a trend i
in after 1949." Since that year, which was tatl
water mark of a mounting tide of state civil t
legislation, the number of significant civil i
laws to be enacted at biennial sessions has i
sharply.
"With civil rights proposals stymied in
and most of the state legislatures adjourned |
1955." Mr. Maslow's analysis concluded, "civil i
agencies are giving increasing attention to j
legislative techniques to combat racial and i
discrimination In this area, as in so many i
he noted, "the legislatures are far behind tat]
pie.'
THE SPOUT
Continued from Page 3
Gorman, who had been with the St Louis I
was back playing for San Diego in the minortj
ed out in the midst of a game and died ill
pital shortly afterwards. Gorman, an outfieU
only 27 years old.
Brandeis University got a huge new
that holds 3,000 spectators for basketball'
Brandeis continued its policy of playing fa
Saturdays and further expanded its athlentj
gram Yeshiva University announced an (
ed athletic set-up for the coming year. Ye
the emphasis would be on the athletic de*
of the players.
The Rego Park Jewish Center of Qu]
York, was the victor in the annual natioaalj
ball toernament of the National Jewish
Board. The victory earned the Rego Park]
the honor of participating in the Maccabiib^
US squad.
Lou Spindell. one of the great Jewish
players who was outstanding 20 years ago, ]
those who feU victim to the McCarthyite
tions of the school system. Spindell was
from his teaching post in New York.
Greetings from
JIMMIES
BEER WINE
"Beat Harobujjrors is Town'
Jimmie & Nat
MS S.W. 8th STREET
Phone 2-9830
To All ... A Moet Happy
New Year
l. t. Beauty
Salon, Ear.
1480 WASHINGTON AVE.
PHONE 5-2125
MAMSON
mcMrr Mhuouki
fXFfatHIIMrOlJ
wo. JMtm m/utr mM0S ahd cvsrontf J
rm am or **" c'"nWi
TO ALL .
SEASON'S GREETINGS
Avedon Lighting and Electrical Pr<
INCORPORATED
57 NX. 8th STREET
PHONE 2-1636


DAY, SEPTEMBER 11. 1953
-Jenlstinnrirto*
>n
Page 13 F
JEK OF IBM l9tl,
AND THEfft POVEftTY
Continued from Page 2
j to ten cents. Especially tragic is the plight of
Lounger generation that cannot integrate itself
the economy of the country. As a result of the
iing poverty and the unhygienic conditions of
/there is an appalling incidence of diseases;
Lulosis and trachoma are rife and take a heavy
lot the undernourished population, especially
Ihildren.
Migration to Israel
brighter future for the Iranian Jewish popula-
cmerged with the establishment of Israel. From
lime of the founding of the new State until
jl, 1952. a total of 24,254 Jews immigrated into
|. Recently, however, emigration from Iran has
i small, in part because of. the poor circum-
es of the majority of Persian Jews who require
ttification and reeducation on the spot before
Could be well integrated in Israel. During the
four months of 1953, only 426 Jews emigrated
1 Persia to Israel.
fen worse than the oppressions suffered by the
[of Iran are the conditions afflicting the 5,000
of Afghanistan, an underdeveloped Asiatic
y. where living conditions resemble those of
|8th century. A second portion of the new
prepared by the World Jewish Congress' In-
of Jewish Affairs shows that until 1918, the
|of that nation lived in ghettos which had to
eked at ni^ht because of the enmity of the
al population.
seen 1918 and 1933, conditions improved, but
33. anti Jewish measures again began to be in-
Jied. Today, living conditions are still highly
irious. Jews do not leave their quarters at
[except in an emergency. The women are al-
! entirely confined to the courtyard of their
or to the precincts of the Jewish quarter.
en feel the oppression even more than adults;
I never dare leave the courtyard of their houses.
By, Jews need not live in ghettos, but most of
live in voluntary segregation for self-protec-
ice the end of the war, reports of open anti-
lie propaganda and arrests of Jews without spe-
I charges have reached the outside world. A
pn emigration to Israel was lifted by the end
po, and in the period from 1951 through May,
nearly 2.000 Afghan Jews arrived in the new
I There were practically no new arrivals from
Mistan during this year.
BIS OF THE UJII
Continued from Pago 5
|We Israel should be expected to have repulsed
paders, to have consolidated its full political
Wlomatic position, to have doubled its popula-
te have founded its free institutions and
o have achieved a balance between production
-nsumption and a well-ordered fiscal and ad-
Wive system?
p depend most urgently upon the United Jew-
N>Peal. The free dollars, uncommitted to spe-
[wvestment enterprises, have a vital place in
^nplex structure of our financial plan. Homes,
food and health are the sacred missions of this great
enterprise. Down through the ages, as we face this
'neaSIJl 1 ^^r^ <* Jewish optimum,
T^T "V1*""! ***** Ut Wrong and
of good courage; fear not, neither be dismayed -
Abba S. Eban
Ambassador of Israel to the US
National Leadership Conference,
October 18th

"In preparing for the worst, as far as the Jews
who live in hazard are concerned, we must seek, to
the best of our ability, to provide immediate means
for their exit from their present lands. We should
keep in mind, as we go about this task, that as we
rescue the enslaved and the victims of persecution
and threatened persecution, we are, at the same
time, recruiting men, women and children for the
legions of the free, for the forces of liberty and
democracy.
"The practical miracle of the recent past must be
repeated in the present Israel must be provided
with the means of receiving and absorbing the new
refugees in whatever numbers they come.
"To provide for a huge new influx of immigration
will require efforts dwarfing those made in the past.
Let let no man say that it cannot be done, when it
must be done. What has been accomplished must
be an augury of what can again be accomplished.
"As we love freedom and security and well-being
for ourselves, let us open pur hearts to those with
few blessings."
Senator Herbert H. Lehman of New York
National Action Conference, June 6th

A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR
FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Weather master Jalousie and
Window Mfg. Co.
JALOUSIES DIRECT FROM FACTORY TO YOU I
?>
Aluminum Jalousies
Glass Jalousies
e Venetian Windows
* Jalousie Doors
BEAUTY IN THE SYNAGOGUE
Continued from ; age 11
to the democratic unpretentiousness and proud sim-
plicity of the Jewish synagogues which, by compar-
ison, seemed "magnificent" to him.
Post-war architecture in this country is imbued
with the democratic spirit of Oppenheim's words.
Modern America rejects such atrocities of the past
as banks resembling Greek temples or industrial
research laboratories built with Doric columns.
Modern churches often consist of steel-framed
buildings, with simple brick or concrete walls, edi-
fices that fit our age rather than ape the past.
Hence, our synagogue builders have not to go for
inspiration to Hagia Sophia of Istanbul or to the old
California Missions. But architects are human beings
who give what is demanded of them, whatever their
artistic tenets. Their best intentions can easily be
thwarted by the timidity or ignorance of a congre-
gation. There is need for educating our Rabbis and
layman alike, need for explaining to them why styl-
istic throwbacks are less likely than more abstract,
more utilitarian buildings to express the spirituality
of our time. Incidentally, traditional synagogues are
more expensive than modern ones. Our people
must learn that, whether facade or interior, orna-
ments should be used only where absolutely needed,
that there is a dignity that stems from simplicity
and that there should always exist a close bond be-
tween building and natural environment.
Fortunately, we are eager to learn and quick to
grasp the essentials. We will be glad to exchange
false stylistic trends for honest architectural ex-
pression, and the confusion caused by eclecticism,
for good and clear design, bound to enhance the
serene beauty of a genuine Beth ha-Knesseth.
1890 N.E. 146th STREET
NORTH MIAMI
PHONE 816-2671
VISIT OUR NEW FACTORY
"THE HOUSE OF A THOUSAND JALOUSIES''
11
GREETINGS
PRICE AND COMPANY
FOR REFRIGERATION SERVICE
CALL 2-2728
1628 S.W. Flagler Terrace
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
SERVICE WITH A SMILE
\oisisi.i: SERVICE
"NEAR YOUR FAVORITE CAUSEWAY"
2057 71st Street Miami Ben
IT IS A PLEASURE TO EXTEND
HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL
PAT CANNON
CIRCUIT JUDGE
DuPONT BLDG. MIAMI, FLORIDA
TO ALL SEASONS GREETINGS
MAX PAUL
of the
W. M. CREAGH, LTD.
824 Lincoln Rood Miami Beach 1631 Jefferson Are.
ro au cm runes
BURT CONSTRUCTION COMPANY
"* 7th street
MIAMI, FLORIDA
L'SIIONO TOVO
MATZ0S
WINE
KOSHER
DELICACIES
UT~" n*Wtm f*t Cutty Bs*ctss tt fartnrts;
150 RIVINCT0N STREET NEW YORK CITY
To All Our Patrons
and Friends ... A
Moel Happy New Year
Tommy's
Rf*Nfanrnnl
847 N.E. let AVENUE
MIAMI. FLA.
To All Happy New Year
GRIFFIN MOTORS
Used Cart Bought Sold
850 N. W. 7th Ave.
Phone 9-3406
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
A. O. TRANSFER & WAREHOUSING CO.
HAULING
2041 N. Miami At..
MOVING
PHONE 5-234
BAGGAGE
335 Collins Are.
GREETINGS
When In Search For Definitely Better
Furniture and Home Furnishings
At Reasonable Prices
Remember The Name
WOODRUM'S
ONE OF FLORIDA'S LARGEST AND FINEST
HOME FURNISHERS
AIR CONDITIONED
NORTHEAST SECOND AVE. AT
SEVENTY-THIRD STREET
MIAMI
Phone 84-1625

HAPPY NEW YEAR
uiiSP n2ie roar*
HAPPY NEW YEAR
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Seas/tore food Products
13701 N.W. 27th AVENUE. OPA LOCKA. FLA.
PHONE 84-4324
HAPPY NEW YEAR
oron H2-IB r,:vft
HAPPY NEW YEAR
nron rein mvft
HAPPY NEW YEAR


Page 14F
+Jei&ncr*Ms*L
B^jmau^<
HAPPY NEW YEAR
TO OUH MANY CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS
____________l__
The Management
and Personnel
CILUM^KHW
LOUVEQ WINDOW
1385 NORTHWEST 27th AVENUE
fy.
NEW YEAR GREETINGS .
JAMES I. HILL DOROTHY WEBER
FRED R. GALEN
n gr a v i n g Company
commercial
social
hotel
ENGRAVED
calling cards
monograms
invitations
wedding announcements
dial 2 8 16 4
122 n. e. sixth street
miami 32, florida

Brandeis Looks
Into the Future
Representatives from cities throughout the coun-
tered on the 190-acre Waltham campus of
Brandeis I'niversity during commencement week
la-i June to attend the third annual National As-
sembly of the Brandeis University Associates.
The organization, composed of men banded to-
gether as "foster alumni" to assist in the dynamic
growth of the University, now encompasses a mem-
bership of 6.000. with chapters active in 41 states,
the District of Columbia and Canada.
A 25 percent increase in membership since last
year was revealed
by Milton Kahn.-
Bostonian and na-
tional chairman of
the Associates, in |
his annual report
which d i sclosed
also that Life
Membership had
doubled.
Contributions for
Life Memberships,
amounting to $2.-
000 each, are paid
into the general
fund of the Uni-
versity and help to
bridge the gap be-
tween University
income and expen-
ditures. .
A complete re-
vision in the oper-
ation of individual chapters was discussed and will
be put into effect during the coming year. In line
Aktwkmm 1. Seeker
. addresses Associates
Continued from Pag* 7
offered to them, the distribution was not illegal. The
decision was promptly appealed to a higher court.
The appeal is expected to be argued in late Sep-
tember or early October. Whatever its outcome, the
decision will in all probability be appealed to New
Jersey's highest court and then to the United States
l Supreme Court.
Other difficult Church-State questions which re-
mained unanswered during 5713 included the ap-
parently insoluble problem of Christmas and Easter
celebrations in the public school; the revived inter-
est in the released time plan not only by Protes-
tant and Catholic organizations but even by some
Orthodox Jewish groups; the use of public school
buildings for religious classes and services; the pol-
icy of an ever-growing number of municipalities
to adopt or apply zoning laws so as to exclude syna-
gogues from moving into wealthy residential areas;
the campaign of the Catholic Church to enact laws
prohibiting the adoption by non-Catholic (usually
Jewish) childless couples of children baptized as
Catholics on birth, even though the adoption is
greed to by the natural parents; the continued re-
fusal of a few states to grant unemployment bene-
fits to Sabbath observers refusing to accept a job
requiring work on Saturday; and the widespread
practice of holding examinations for civil service,
state scholarships and college entrance on Saturdays.
Key figures at Brandeis commencement
in June on the University's Waltham Mn
chusetts. campus, were deft to right)
Paul H. Douglas, who delivered the
mencement address and received an
orary degree; George Alpert, chairman i
the Brandeis Board-of Trustees and 2
of the first Brandeis honorary degree
Dr. Abram L. Sachar, president of the
versity.
with these plans, each chapter will function
separate entity, planning report meetings oil
progress of the University, as well as condii
membership work.
Elected to the office of national secreUrjl
Howard E. Wolf son. of Chicago. Illinois, preA
of Maremont Automotive Products, Inc., there!
Highlighting the Associates Assembly i
luncheon-meeting held in the Usen Commons i_
of the University and which was addressed byl
Abram L. Sachar, president.
Brandeis University, named for the late San
Court Justice Louis Dembitz Brandeis, openedl
doors in 1948 as the first non-sectarian kg
of higher learning to be founded by the
Jewish Community in the Western Hemis,_
Its 725 undergraduates, drawn from 28 sutaj]
12 foreign nations, work closely with the It i
bers of the faculty body. Plans are unde
open the first of its graduate schools this
a School of Arts and Sciences, with courses I
ing to Master of Arts and Doctor of Philo
grees.
Receives Brandeis Degree Rabbi 1
Ginsberg GeJt), Professor of Talmud and!
binics at the Jewish Theological Sen'
in New York, chats with Brandeis Uni
Professor Dr. Simon Rawidowicz on the |
tham. Massachusetts, campus oi the
sity. where he received one of the first 1
ary degrees in June.
GREETINGS
W. A. DICDNSON
TRANSFER CO.
STATEWIDE HEAVY HAULING
SSI NW. 7it Street
Phone W.45S2
r. 41/ Sessssri
|M1AMI BEACH MUNICIPAL
GOLF
DRIVING
RANGE
20th St. & Washington Are.
Golf professionals In
Attendance at
all times
PHONE 58-9367
TO ALL.. .
A MOST
HAPPY NEW YEAR
CAVALIER MOTEL
17545 COLLINS AVENUE
Phone 816-2661
SEASON'S GREETINGS
To Our Many Friends and Customers
AUSTIN BURKE
AND HIS EMPLOYEES
1628 Pennsylvania Avenue. Miami Beach
Telephone 55-1492


pAY( SEPTEMBER 11. 1953
*,Je*ist)FhriUtr
Page 15 F
Israel Bonds: Source of a Nation*!
Vitality and of a People's S
es ourviva
Rosh Hashonah has written itself deeply in the soul of the Jew Perhaps we
jwe for this a bit of a debt to Nature, which seems to preen itself for the holiday
The Jewish New Year comes, as Emma Lazarus wrote,
"When orchards burn their lamps of fiery gold, the grape qrows
like a jewel, and the corn a sea of abundance lies."
The changing tints of Autumn foliage seem in rhythm with the Holy Day The
pious Jew reviews his life and asks forgiveness of man and God throuqh the
symbols of tashlich. casting his sins into the water. The ram's horn is sounded in
he synagogue. At the family table, the bread dipped in honey symbolizes the
hope of a Happy New Year.
At Rosh Hashonah time, Aemican Jews have traditionally turned their thouqhts
to the problems of their brothers and sisters in other lands. Today, in this connec-
tion, we think primarily of the heroic men and women who are building the State
of Israel.
The pictures in Israel reflects significant progress. We do not expect a five-year-
old child to be adding to the family exchequer, and we should not expect a five-
year-old nation, which has been required to double its population in a few years to
be economically independent. Roads must be built, land irrigated, harbors expand-
ed, new industries constructed. Israel Bonds have been decisive in undertakinq
these pioneer tasks. These Bonds are truly Chaluz capital.
The coming New Year must witness intensified activity as Israel progresses to-
ward self-sufficiency. In this, again. Israel Bonds will play a decisive role. Rosh
Hashonah, 5714, provides the occasion for a rededication by all of us to trie task
of giving Israel the maximum assistance as she builds a strong, democratic nation
GREETINGS!!
DEE RIDINGS
Smith Hamilton Shop
GRINDING SERVICE
231 S.W. 8th STREET pHONE 3-2509
tHE MODERN SAGA OF ISRAELS ANCIENT SOIL REBORN
Continued from Pag* 9
power in Israel which has no natural fuel re-
urces; but above all it will provide fertilizers for
soil. As to the agricultural yield of the Huleh
lion, after drainage, it is estimated that it will
wide an adbundance of badly needed vegetables
the entire country and will bring a total of
ome of about $10,000,000 per annum.
line Jerusalem-Tel Aviv Corridor has held na-
pnal attention for a long time. It is the life-line of
! Jewish State, linking the Eternal City with the
ving new settlements on the Mediterranean
st It is little known that the Jewish National
fad has been carrying on an imposing work of
jtlimation of various kinds, through stone clear-
to terracing in the Jerusalem-Tel Aviv Cor-
tor, as in the other parts of the hill country, par-
falarly in Galilee. The importance of the work
in the fact that, in addition to creating the
(indations of a chain of Jewish settlements which
stand like a wall against any armed effort to
It off the Jewish capital from the rest of the coun-
f, it transforms land, which for centuries has been
nd unfit for cultivation, into good earth. It means
of new soil in Israel. Expensive though it
I the work is of high value, both from the point
(view of security and agricultural production.
he nobility and majority of the Forest of Mar-
now going up on the mountains of Judea in the
Jcinity of the Holy City of Jerusalem, have riveted
Mlic attention on our project which will commem-
hte the 6.000.000 of our kith and kin who were
ne to death in European lands by Nazis. Suffice
|to say that the green mansion which is to enshrine
f "*** of ""r sacred dead is proceeding apace.
" the history hallowed bills of Judea a great new
onument is rising.
I0" afforestation program has been carried on in
all parts of the country, from the North to the South.
But special mention should be made of our tree
planting in the Negev, through which a successful
attempt is being made to curb the movement of the
sand in large areas, to bind the soil and to help
collect water for irrigation purposes. Tourists visit-
ing the Negev can now plainly see rows of trees all
across the Negev, serving as a pictorial adornment
as well as a windbreaker.
TO ALL HOLIDAY GREETINGS
The O'Neal Block & Septic Tank Co., Inc.
1338 N. W. 29th STREET
PHONE 65-6431
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY
GREENLEAF & CROSBY
JEWELERS
1000 Lincoln Road
Palm Beach247 Worth Ave.
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
Venetian Short way Sedan Service
1133 N. E. Second Avenue Phone 3-3800
TO ALL .
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
YOUNG INDUSTRIES
PERRINE. FLORIDA
V4.>
A group of technicians at a pharmaceutical
company in Jerusalem, which is turning out
vitally needed medicines and drugs for the
citizens of Israel. Extremely penetrating
chemicals require protective masks.
"MCOUIWAY,
HOLIDAY CKttTIHGS
HEYNOkLBS Interior**
FINE FURNtTUM MAFEIIES CARPtTS
mii)
A MOST HAffY MfW r I AM TO ALL
Mr. and Mrs. Webb
. MOW AT 12S SA lt AVENUE
I JPPrts Tr.jitf fl.ifk Sf*cti>fi C#rtt
Ate* Ot*M
COMPLETE DINNERS
with large variety a e^traee
FROM 91J0
Jerry's Restaurant
DINNER INCLUDES: Choice af ipt<-
tuar. Salad, Vegetable. Chalaa .1
Deeeerl. Beverage.
Fr* Parfcl
Oa*r. 24 Haura
Im
Air Conditioned
By the Airport
Btrvlnf "The Food of the Star*"
Mlh Street and LaJeuns RdL
Phone. 64-5341
Insist on
AWNING
SHUTTERS
MMM
*v AJL>,:
7aW rfO-*M*-w A^Stm^ *** Vr4RE
m tea AW W Mat far mm M
WrW **, mi fa*
FOt HD ISTIteATI
phone na*
West Plm ReachPh. 3-1350
Ft. Laudcrdale Ph. 2-MOS
CLOSE 0
M7
The Yeru Best Wishes tor a
The Miami Beach
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Railway Company


Page 16 F
+ le*lstinrrk&n
TO All GKCmHGS
SNOW WHITE CLEANERS
I LAUNDRY
Ymmr Satisfaction Omr Utosurf
734 COUINS AVENUE
Phone 5-2557
PATTERSON BROTHERS
GROWERS MARKET
1329 N.W. 21st Terrace
WISH ALL THEIR
FRIENDS AND PATRONS
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
GREETINGS
Fl* MANCHU
CHINESE RESTAURANT
Food to Take Out
Family Style Dinners
Delivery Service
325 71st St
Ph. 86-4303
PHONE f-314*
YOU* THANSflB PtOtlEM
PtOAIPTIT HAN DUD
J. C TRANSFER
COMPANY
01 N.W. In, AVENUE
PftMt 9-314*
Strtkt Dtlitt.y Qitlit,
PRESCRIPTION PHARMACISTS
COMPLETE DINNER
WHERE THE HOME FOLKS EAT
HOTEL PHARMACY
LINCOLN 1 ALTON
MIAMI BEACH
nmmt 5 6425
GREETINGS TO All
N.t "Jt AMtbcr" Eatia, Pl.ct
Realty's Restaurant
Air Ctmiitiemea
M
Urn* 2-4651
200 N.t. 2a* AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA
To Omr Pafroni ami fritmit .
MOST HAW HOLIDAYS
D I N T Y
MOORE'S
RECREATION PARLOR
Pl Wimktrlf
SI NX lit STREET
MIAMI, FLORIDA
SERGE V. MANKELL
SIGNS
TWA* UTTUIHC
WALLS BOAADS
GoW Leaf
AU KINDS Of LETTERING
1719 S.W. lit STREET
Phone 82-3759
(Simtm 192S)
ragAY^SEPTENfflER
5714-1953
As you face the new year with vision and
courage, please accept the sincere wishes
of your many good friends here who
stand ready ... always ... to help you to
make your future brighter and happier.
THl TREND
IS TO THE .
3 Convenient Offices to Serve You
1400 N.W. 38th Street 45 N.E. First Avenue 1357 S.W. 8th Street
JOSEPH M. LIPTON. President
To Promote Thrift There's a FREE GIFT FOR NEW SAVERS at all offices
Onr ticsourcvs Exceed 49 Million Italian*
he Officers, Director* and Sale* Organization of
M
OUNT
EBO
u-ish to extend best wishes tor a
Happy, Healthy and
Prosperous New Year
(EIETEII
sacred to the memory of loved ones, dedicated to the
Jewish concept of Life Eternal, in a setting of tropical beauty
and peace, comforting to the dear ones left behind.
PERPETUALLY MAINTAINED
Our Safes CaaasaUars .
Sidney laraaaM Morton Stinky
""T Uv, Karrv Rote.
n)nWm%*M St Ilk
mrm ml yr street the yr row
we
J
mil
MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY, INC.
"The Cemetery ot Distinction
for Discriminating Families
5505 NORTHWEST 3rd STREET
Phono S7-S2*l


SDICERE WISHES
TO ALL JEWRY
FOR A
HAPPY NEW YEAR
jfr. and Mrs-
and son
SELIG
friends and PafreM
Commodore
Hotel
1360 COLLINS AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 58-1803
Dr. M. Goldfield
Owner and Manager
____-*.
BEST WISHES
FOR A
HAPPY
HOLIDAY
CORAL GABLES
HOSPITAL
3151 Coconut Grove Drive
PHONE 4-2525
To All ... A Happy
New Year
SOUTHERN
AWNING
COMPANY
"23 Years Canvas Experience'
MIAMI 38. FLORIDA
Awnings. Canopies, Trailer
Canopies. Tarpaulins.
Lawn Umbrellas
Lawn and Beach Equipment
Recovered
7927 N.W. 7th AVENUE
Phone 78-2514
SIMON SEIDEN
Program Director
WMIE
JEWISH FORUM
ON THE AIR
EXTENDS SEASON'S
GREETINGS TO
ALL HIS SPONSORS
AND LISTENERS
ifcJewiisb-IEIIotiidliiaun
MIAMI. FLQRjD^ Friday. SEPTEMBER II. 1953______________sec. G
Israel's Capital Born
Anew on Eve of 5 714
By JEROME K. BOIN
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
WASHINGTONIt is no secret that the opinions
of nations are subject to radical changes under the
impact of war and the passage of years.
Consider the problem of Jerusalem, split up be-
tween Israel and Jordan, and a continuing source of
controversy between Jews and Arabs and in the
United Nations.
Every year or two, the question pops up before
the UNShould Jerusalem be internationalized?
From a positive "yes" that obtained through 1949,
the UN is apparently slipping into an "I'm not sure"
attitude.
And, in the past five years, after a war and an
uneasy armistice that has yet to blossom into peace,
both the Jews and the Arabs have completely
changed their public stands on internationalization.
When Israel recently completed shifting its for-
eign ministry to Jerusalem, in line with steps to
make that city its capitol, six Arab states raised
angry voices in protest to the US State Department.
In addition, representatives of these statesEgypt,
Iraq, Syria. Lebanon, Saudi Arabia and Yemen
asked the US to press for internationalization of
Jerusalem.
The Arab representatives, in calling for interna-
tionalization, noted that the UN had decided "three
times by more than two-thirds majorities that the
whole Jerusalem area be lifted from political con-
troversy and made international."
In 1948, the Arab attitude was at the other side
of the pendulum. In a speech to the UN, Mahmoud
Fawzi of Egypt said internationalization "is most
clearly in violation of the right to self-determina-
tion which the people of Jerusalem should enjoy,
as well as any other people in the world." UN dele-
gates from Syria and Iraq attacked internationaliza-
tion on similar grounds.
The state of Jordan, which is in possession of the
Old City of Jerusalem, is todaylike Israela foe of
internationalization. For this reason it refused to
go along with the six other Arab states in their rep-
resentations to the State Department regarding
Jerusalem.
In the UN, the General Assembly in 1949, reaf-
firmed the internationalization plan but last year
failed to pass an amendment calling for adherence
to that principle. Among the nations opposing this
amendment was the United States.
Israeli officialdom received something of a jolt
when the US Secretary of State Dulles called the
Israeli Foreign Ministry transfer "inopportune" and
said it tended to aggravate Middle East tensions. An-
other reason he gave for objecting was that interna-
tionalization of Jerusalem still had the support of
a UN resolution.
Informed Israeli sources in Washington refused
to believe Dulles' words meant the US had become
a supporter of internationalization. And, despite the
Arab protests over Jerusalem, they were inclined
to doubt that the Arabs would try to introduce a
pro-internationalization resolution in the UN. The
possibility seemed too threatening that such a
resolution might be amended before passage to
provide only for internationalization of Jerusalem's
Holy Places. The latter plan has been suggested by
Israel.
There has been a good deal of comment at the
UN about the way in which the Soviet delegates
Continued on Page 7
MR. and MRS.
BENJAMIN PUCHKOFF
Wish their Childron: Mr. end Mrs.
M. B. Morris, Mr. and Mrs. H. feldmam
and their Children; ami Mitt tsther
Morris ami all their friends A Happf
Wld Prospcrsus New Year
Mr. and Mr*. Harry Solomon
and Sofit, MURRAY and SEYMOUR
[xtend to our friends tht Compliments
of tht Stafon and Beit Wishes far
Happy ami Prosperous New faar
311 Pence at Leon Rh/d.
TIDES II
ON THI OCIAN AT 12th ST.
ItWGnsi t\jv ?nn
ranan nno ruv'?
tonnm
To all our Friends
we express our
fondest desire that
the New Year be
filled with "Brocho-
Blessings" of Peace.
Health, Heppiness
and Prosperity for
all Israel.
Owners and
Manager!
S. M.
Qrundwerg
M. Newmark
W. Keeeelman
and Families
To All ... A Most Kappy
New Year
"Where Quality and
Price Meet"
Rutkin Interior
Decorators
SLIPCOVERS DRAPERIES
CORNICES
Guaranteed Satisfaction
UPHOLSTERING REFINISHING
REMODELING
Estimates Without Obligation
CALL 65-1821
4102 N. W. 17th Ave.
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
PAN AMERICAN
CHEMICAL CO.
Janitor Supplies
Sanltuiy Supplies
iHi TTr^^i r.% eBs^rw int*| iij^tj
TACOO PRODUCTS"
1201 N.W. 1st Avenue
PHONE 3-3955
Miami, Florida
New Year Greetings
K. II. Shaddick
REALTOR
Sales Property Management
Mortgage Loans
2719 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Phone 48-2591
CORAL GABLES


PAGE 2 G
JewistFtcrkBar
FRIDAY.
^TEMBER
11.19
Judge and Mrs. Norman R. Lyons
Extend Best Wishes for the Hew Year
The National Jewish Hospital:
B'nai BVith's Human Servia
Greetings To All
Alexander Orr & Associates, Inc.
PLUMBING HEATING
Residential Commercial Industrial
Stning the Greater Miami Area Since J915
66 N.E. 39th STREET Ph. 89-2461
1119 16th STREET. MIAMI BEACH Ph. 5-3546
Phones 5-1422 5-9591
Sport Tops Seat Covers
McMurray's Service Center
COMPLETE AUTO RtPAlRS AND PAINTING
1132 15th STREET MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
Ask for lack Sylla
TO Ml ... CRtlTINCS
MANFRED M. UNGARO
MIAMI, FLORIDA
1721 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD
HOLIDAY
GREETINGS
to our many
Jewish friends
RaileyMilam's
1676 ALTON ROAD
Ph. 5-735S
----------------------------_
From the single building institution it was
when opened by B'nai B'rith in 1899. the
National Jewish Hospital at Denver has
grown to a three-square-block campus occu-
pied by 14 buildings. Paralleling its physical
expansion has been the hospital's widely
recognized work in tuberculosis treatment,
research, rehabilitation and education.
By PHILIP HOUTZ
In all its 54 years, the National Jewish Hospital
at Denver has never had more inspiring reason to
engage in the stock-taking and the looking ahead
which traditionally accompany Rosh Hashonah than
now. as the year 5714 approaches.
We have come a long way. indeed, since our
hospital was opened by B'nai B'rith in 1899. as a
single-building institution. We have cared for more
than 50.000 tuberculous patients from upwards of
C.OOO communities in faithful adherence to our mot-
to: None May Enter Who Can PayNone Can Pay
Who Enter. We have maintained and accelerated our
march of progress in the face of two World Wars
and a depression. And now. as the New Year nears,
j we are disengaging ourselves from still another
major obstacle which crossed our path.
Recently, a cloudburst struck Denver. Our hospital
was hardest hit of any place in the city. Our kitchen
and store rooms were severely damaged. Supplies
were destroyed. More than 3.000.000 gallons of water
had to be pumped from hospital basements, and
the cost in dollars is going to be high.
But the 280 patients, including 50 children, not
only were unharmed, but they didn't miss a meal.
Thanks to the excellent cooperation of governmental
agencies and hundreds of kind hearted
women who volunteered to assist us we we"
to begin quickly the rebuilding and rehabiliL?
required, and once again we are in full militan,
suit of the progress which has characterized
Hospital's growth and advancement over the
For these thingsfor the high esteem in which
hospital is heldwe are most grateful. Ever
who has suported this humanitarian work, and
has helped to make this pioneer institution a hi
of health and hope for more than half a centu
has every reason to be proud. In addition to
forming life-saving work, the National Jewish
pital has become, throughout the American Je
Community which has supported it so genen
and so consistently, a source of pride and symb
the Brotherhood which has been the centu
dream of all Jews.
Just as we are doing now, those who estaML
the National Jewish Hospital annually took stock!
looked ahead. "In those days, at this season,"<
hospital's founders heard the cough of the coa_
tive which was so prevalent throughout the
All around them, they saw relatives and
suffer without proper care. Death took an
nately high toll. The founders of the National i
ish Hospital observed at first hand the ravagej]
this dread disease. These conditions comprised I
power which motivated those farsighted men
women to act.
Our generation is motivated more indirectly i
the continuation of this good work. The death i
among the tuberculous has been reduced drastical
sensationally. Today, those who support this
work rarely see the dire effects of the disease.
man's everlasting credit, it is true that today, i
out seeing for themselves, without being prom|K
by the fact that they are constantly surrounded I
dying men, women and children, supporters of I
National Jewish Hospital are keenly aware of i
need for continuation and extension of the assistu
required to help those who bear the double bu
of poverty and disease.
Yes, we have made much progress. Our biiildi
program is well under way. In the last 12 montl
we dedicated the Hearst Research Laboratories i
the million-dollar. 94-bed modern building for |
bulatory patients. The Heineman Building has I
rehabilitated and its facilities expanded so that I
number of children being treated now i- doublet
of a year ago. Fifty youngsters now benefit from I
combination of medical and loving care we are i
to give them, thanks to warm-hearted friends in I
walks of life who support, each according to I
means, this humanitarian work. And where o
only four years ago. tuberulous meningitis wui
hundred percent fatal,we now are able tosavel
lives of 61 percent of children attacked by thisi
vicious of all baby -killer.-.
Immediately ahead are construction of mo
surgical and clinical facilities at an estimated i
of $50,000 and the modernization of the Shoenbi
Building to improve our all-important rehabiliti
program.
Where once there was one small building.
structures now stand as monuments to the nob
of spirit and the generosity and humaneness of I
American Jewish Community. As one of the I
in a group recently visiting the hospital put it I
Continued on Pa 11
jSest pltsffcg Jor JV ffappg 5fefo !*
iti\ iicsiim: it\\k
MEMRER ftOUAL DfPOSET INSURANCE CORPORATION
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FRIDAY,
SEPTEMBER 11. 18S3
*JenIsflcr*f#>r7
PAGE 3 G
What Phil Klutznick Believes
n
By MAX BAER
when B ni B'rith elected Philip at. Klutinfck as
J international president, it selected a man whose
r J neadc T. good humor, his optimism, and his sensitive
'sard for the human elements that underlie every
^nation A successful lawyer, and an authority on
public housing who capped a brilliant career in the
federal government by building the prize-winning
lornmunity of Park Forest, Illinois, Klutznick has
Lko been a vital force in B'nai B'rith for more than
-** ica. The work is
j not alone one of
formal education.
We need to inspire
and to attach more
and more Jewish
sj young people to
as informed and
intelligent Jews is
fundam e n t a 1 to
the realization of
our ambitions for
our life in Amer-
enough to under-
stand and appreci-
ate its needs.
"The develop-
ment of our youth
20 years. His spe-
cial interest lies in
American Jewish
ma, m. fiwk youth and at m
... clarifies objectives he is still young
lorms and the practices of Jewish life in America.
He need to give them a sense of early belonging
|nd of participation in the great and moving events
hat are on us and before us," Klutznick told a rec-
Int B'nai B'rith District Grand Lodge convention.
Iphilip Morris Klut/nick was born in Kansas City,
Missouri, July 9. 1907. He is the son of Morris (de-
leased) and Minnie Klutznick, who immigrated to the
t'nited States from eastern Europe at'the turn of
|he century.
Klutznick was an honor graduate of Creighton
Lniversity Law School in Omaha, Neb. His move
Irom Kansas City to Omaha, his marriage to Ethel
piekes at the age of 22, and his introduction to
i'nai B'rith. all had their origin in his affiliation as
i charter member of Kansas City Chapter No. 2 of
Ihe Aleph Zadik Aleph (Junior B'nai B'rith), which
>as organized in 1924. The next year he was elected
Grand Aleph Godol (President of AZA). At the same
lime he became the first editor of the official AZA
hrgan, The Shofar. He also accepted the invitation
^f Sam Beber. founder of the AZA, to serve as the
t-time executive secretary of the rapidly growing
Junior B'nai B'rith.
Klutznick's active interest in the work of the AZA
Ind related youth organizations has never dimin-
ished When Beber resigned as president of the Su-
preme Advisory Council of AZA in 1941. after seven-
pen years of service, he was succeeded by Klutz-
nick who held the office for three years, then served
a consultant to the Youth Commission. In 1951.
Klutznick became by the unanimous vote of the 28th
International AZA Convention, the first recipient
P the Same Beber Distinguished AZA Alumnus
kward.
In the years when klutznick pioneered for the
AZA, he did not overlook the possibility of a career
Jn Jewish communal service.
The call of the law, however, still rang insistently
the young man's ears, so be hung out his shingle.
In his long career as an authority on housing,
Klutznick has held many State and Federal offices.
In May 1044 he was appointed by President Frank-
lin D. Roosevelt to aerve as Commissioner of the
Federal Public Housing AuVhM*y. i, this highly
responsible and vital work he had the complete
confidence of the Roosevelt and Truman administra-
tions, and earned the respect of key senators and
representatives from both, ad*.. f ,hc ais|e. In
1947 he received a Certificate ofTHerit from Presi-
dent Harry S. Truman for "outsttMHng fidelity and
meritorious conduct in aid of the war effort against
the common enemies of the United States and its
Allies in World War II."
After the war, Klutznick accepted the presidency
of American Community Builders and related pri-
vate companies. Under his direction they built
nearly 10,000 dwelling units in Park Forest, a town
thirty miles south of Chicago. It now has nearly
20,000 residents, with the ultimate population esti-
mated at nearly 30,000.
Klutznick's prominence in general public life has
never resulted in any diminution of his activities in
Jewish life. The new head of the B'nai B'rith is
intensely interested in the development of the Amer-
ican Jewish community. He believes that it must be
based on the primacy of religious and spiritual
values. "It is inconceivable that we could ever have
an American Jewish community that was not based
on religion," he once said in a synagogue address.
He believes that Jewish education ranks high in
importance with the synagogue or temple in respon-
sibility and is a community responsibility. Some
years ago, when he was president of the Omaha
Board of Jewish Education, he said: "I believe that
one of the fundamental tests of the kind of Jewish
community we shall develop will rest in our ability
to find the kind of Jewish education program which
meets with general approbation. Implicit in this ap-
proach is the need to clarify our objectives, improve
and modernize our methods and spread the benefi-
cial influences to an increasing number of young
people."
Klutznick's concept of American Jewish com-
munity life includes strong support for the State of
Israel. He has been a Zionist for a quarter of a
century. At the age of 22 he was elected president
of the Omaha Zionist District; and at 24 he be-
came vice president of the Southwest Region of the
Zionist Organization of America.
Klutznick sees no "dual loyalty" conflicts as be-
tween Israel and America. "We are completely con-
scious of the spiritual and cultural ties with our
brothers in Israel. We are no less conscious of our
single national allegiance to our own land Any
other notion would do violence to the unalloyed
patriotism of the American Jew and would be con-
trary to the best interests of both states."
In addition to his Zionist and Jewish education
activities he has been interested in the Jewish cen-
ter movement and was at one time very active in
the Jewish federations and welfare funds. The new
president of B'nai B'rith is a vice president of the
National Jewish Welfare Board and of the World
Federation of YMHA's and Jewish Community Cen-
ters. He has long been a member of the National
Jewish Committee on Scouting and of the National
Council of the Boy Scouts of America Last year.'
B'nai B'rith District Grand Lodge No. 6 gave him :
its Award for Service to Humanity.
Klutznick sees the responsibility of the B'nai
B'rith as one of throwing the weight of its strength
in members and tradition and resource in favor of
those causes which can best promote the develop-
ment of the finest type of American Jewish com-
munity. "We have people, several hundred thousand
of them, who have found in the Bnai B'rith that
Continued en P* 10

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SERVING HOURS 11 to 2 4 te I P.M.
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211 ALCAZAR, CORAL 6AILES
S t A S 0 M S GREETINGS
Sheldon & McMullen Insurance Agency, Inc.
4116 MERIDIAN AVENUE, MIAMI REACH
MM
MR. aaa MRS. HARRY SISSEIMAN and FAMILY of
HARRY'S SUNOCO SERVICE
WEST FIACIEI CORNER IE JEUNE ROAD
Wiik mil their fri'turfs mmd fat root a Moooy mmd Prosper mi
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Happy Mew Yt
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585 N.W. 36th STREET
MIAMI. FLORIDA
Telephone 84-6649
A Noooy Mow Toar To All OW frMi mmd PovroM
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RAYMOND NEASTIE. Owewr
44910
PIZZA! Vere Piixo
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VILLA CAPtJ
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r nit
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A HAPPY NEW YtAK
UNIVERSAL DIXIE
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COR. NX 7md AV
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PHOHE 2-IS0S
To AII ... A Most Happy Mew Yem
TOMAC'S LIQUORS
PACEAGE STORE
1440 WASHOfGTOM AVEHUE
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PAGE 4 G
+Jew is* rkrkBar
FRIDAY, SEPTEMKp,, ^
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO
| ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
SI-0371

^V\jL>bU^
O C k k I e a r
D*APEEt SHOP
JACK KLEAR
I S 6 ( ALTON ROAD
MIAMI EACH 31
OUR SINCEREST WISHES TO ALL OF OUR FRIENDS
AND TO ALL ISRAEL FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
DR. AND MRS. M. J. SAFRA AND FAMILY
MIAMI BEACH
TO OUR MANY PATRONS AND FRIENDS
SEASON'S GREETINGS
Fillup with Billups
Tires Batttries Accessories
BILLUPS
SERVICE STATIONS
THROUGHOUT THE SOUTH
In Miami:
6201 N.W. 27th AVENUE PHONE 65-9176
9001 N.W. 7th AVENUE PHONE 89-9211
FAYDA JEWELRY COMPANY, INC.
10 N.E. 3rd AVENUE
Wishes off its friends a Happy and Prosperous Mew itar
TO ALL MY FRIENDS AND ACQUAINTANCES
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
RICHARD MACK
Your Florida Railroad and
Public Utilities Commissioner
TO ALL GftffTfNCS
J. KENNETH BERRY, Inc.
CONTRACTOR
1614 LENOX AVENUE
MIAMI REACH
To All ... A Most Happy New Year
GLOBAL INDUSTRIES. Inc.
3750 N.W. 46th STREET Phone 64-0914
. H. A. "Red" MARTIN
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY
1 TillA\ STUDIOS
DANCING SCHOOL
323 W. 47th Street m^ ^
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY
NEW YEAR
WHITMORE ELECTRIC CO.
No Job Too Large or Too Small
Licensed and Insured
806 LANGFORD BLDG.
PHONE 82-5744
Technical Aspects of the 4
T. .
_______ eacher*s Future
UAHC FEATURE
With the great progress being made in pedagogy's
newest realmau^ja-vtsjaal educationteachers of
religion may sooqjbive to become disk jockeys and
motion picture operators.
In days gone by, a religious school teacher was
expected to have mastered the Bible, Jewish history
and facts about the Jewish religion. Today's relig-
ious school teacher is more likely to be a trained
person, with an academic background including sys-
tematic courses in the various subjects which com-
prise the curriculum. Increasingly, however, teach-
ers in congregational schools are being called upon
to acquire techniques which years ago seemed far
removed from the needs of the synagogue class-
room.
Take, for example, the teaching aids which have
been forthcoming from the recently created Audio-
Visual Department of the Union of American He-
brew Congregations, central body for American Re-
form temples. In the course of two years that agency,
headed by Samuel Grand, has produced six film-
strips, two motion pictures and two record albums.
Some of these are designed not only for classroom
use but for family consumption, so that parents
may also have to become acquainted with these new
media if they are to assist in the religious training
of their children.
Motion Pictures
The two motion pictures offered by the Union are
"firsts" of their kind. One of them tells the story
of Isaac and Rebecca, a romance of the Bible. The
other, entitled Reverence, stirringly dramatizes var-
ious verses from the Book of Psalms. These movies
constitute "firsts," for, although many Scriptural and
spiritual subjects have been cinematized before, all
previous production has emanated from Christian or
secular organizations. ,
Those who have seen these first religious films
ever to be produced by a Jewish organization are
impressed. After seeing the 10 minute filming of
Reverence, Mrs. Rose Spitz, of the Education De-
partment of the National Council of Jewish Women,
wrote: "Here is a pictorial reverie on nature's won-
ders matched by the magnificence of rtie great truths
of the Psalms. The result is a lyric and reverential
mood that can give inspiration to small Bible study
groups as well as to large mixed audiences." Mrs.
Jacob Rudin, an executive of the National Federa-
tion of Temple Sisterhoods, declared: 'The film
is a benediction in sound and color."
Made in Israel, Isaac And Rebecca, starring actors
from the Habima Theater, also impressed the ex-
perts. Miss Rahama Lee, editor of Film News,
thought it was "particularly memorable for warmth,
depth, color and authenticity." A Baptist minister.
Reverend Theodore Miller, of New York, saw the
film in the Union's audio-visual room and then
hailed it as "a gold mine of information usable
by all who wish to teach the Bible more effec-
tively."
Holiday* On Wax
Recordings are another way of teaching more
effectively. Religious school teachers may not find it
objectionable to turn disk jockeys when they have
the new Union holiday albums at their disposal.
The Story Of Chanukah is a dramatic account of the
Maccabean struggle, told and sung by professionals.
The narrator is none other than John Conte, whose
resonant voice has thrilled millions of Hollywood
and television followers. A non-Jew. Mr. Conte ex-
pressed his delight at being able to tell the Cha-
nukah story and asked the Union to call Upon .
again. The Union "did, and now Mr Conte's vo""
can also be heard in the Purim album A pasw"
album is currently in preparation.
The script used in the Purim album is the uorl
of Rabbi Sylvan Schwartzman, Professor of Ed
tion at the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Instib?.
of Religion. The Chanukah text was composed hi
Maurice Barrett, a veteran screen, sta^e and m,
vision personality, who serves as voluntary con
sultant for the Unions audio-visual projects.
Filmttrips
One of the newest of the audio visual devices
the filmstrip, in which slides are exhibited in con-
tinuous fashion, accompanied by a verbal text Thou
sands have already felt the reality of the forthcom
ing tercentenary of Jewish life in America by see- j
ing and hearing the Union's prize-winning filmstrip i
on The Jews Settle In New Amsterdam1654. The i
Sacred Tongue has been revivified in another strip |
on Around The World With Hebrew. Still another'
Union-wide filmstrip recounts the stirring biography
of Isaac Mayer Wise, the founder of American Re-|
form Jewish institutions. The narrator in the Wise
strip is another famous and familiar voice, that of i
Jay Jostyn, known to countless thousands as Mr.'
District Attorney. More filmstrips have been pro-
duced on such subjects as The Book Of Books: Aa
Introduction To The Bible; Inside The Family Of
Liberal Judaism; and Judah Touro.
Tomorrow's religious school teacher may have to
acqufre some new skills. On the other hand, tomor-
row's religious school promises to be much more ol a
lively place, and the facts of Jewish life will be more
graphically imprinted on the minds and hearts of;
Jewish children.
Helping to bring sight and sound to religious
education. Above. John Conte (left) and other
professional actors record Tho Story Of
Chanukah. Below, stars of the Habimah
group enact the roles of Rebecca, Isaac and
Abraham.
Clutter Construction Corp.
and
Clutter Homes, Inc.
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
COMMERCIAL BUILDING
and
HOMES
8340 N.E. 2nd Avenue Miami, Florida
Telephone 14-5459


Full Text

PAGE 1

D AY SEPTEMBER 11. 1953 -Jenlstinnrirto* >n Page 13 F JEK OF IBM l9tl AND THEfft POVEftTY Continued from Page 2 j to ten cents. Especially tragic is the plight of Lounger generation that cannot integrate itself %  the economy of the country. As a result of the iing poverty and the unhygienic conditions of /there is an appalling incidence of diseases; Lulosis and trachoma are rife and take a heavy lot the undernourished population, especially Ihildren. Migration to Israel brighter future for the Iranian Jewish populacmerged with the establishment of Israel. From lime of the founding of the new State until jl, 1952. a total of 24,254 Jews immigrated into |. Recently, however, emigration from Iran has i small, in part because of. the poor circumes of the majority of Persian Jews who require ttification and reeducation on the spot before Could be well integrated in Israel. During the %  four months of 1953, only 426 Jews emigrated 1 Persia to Israel. fen worse than the oppressions suffered by the [of Iran are the conditions afflicting the 5,000 of Afghanistan, an underdeveloped Asiatic y. where living conditions resemble those of |8th century. A second portion of the new prepared by the World Jewish Congress' Inof Jewish Affairs shows that until 1918, the |of that nation lived in ghettos which had to eked at ni^ht because of the enmity of the al population. seen 1918 and 1933, conditions improved, but 33. anti Jewish measures again began to be inJied. Today, living conditions are still highly irious. Jews do not leave their quarters at [except in an emergency. The women are al! entirely confined to the courtyard of their or to the precincts of the Jewish quarter. en feel the oppression even more than adults; I never dare leave the courtyard of their houses. By, Jews need not live in ghettos, but most of live in voluntary segregation for self-protecice the end of the war, reports of open antilie propaganda and arrests of Jews without speI charges have reached the outside world. A pn emigration to Israel was lifted by the end po, and in the period from 1951 through May, nearly 2.000 Afghan Jews arrived in the new I There were practically no new arrivals from Mistan during this year. BIS OF THE UJII Continued from Pago 5 |We Israel should be expected to have repulsed paders, to have consolidated its full political Wlomatic position, to have doubled its populate have founded its free institutions — and o have achieved a balance between production -nsumption and a well-ordered fiscal and adWive system? p depend most urgently upon the United JewN>Peal. The free dollars, uncommitted to spe[wvestment enterprises, have a vital place in ^nplex structure of our financial plan. Homes, food and health are the sacred missions of this great enterprise. Down through the ages, as we face this 'neaSIJl 1 ^^r^ <* Jewish optimum, T^T "V 1 *""! ***** Ut Wrong and of good courage; fear not, neither be dismayed Abba S. Eban Ambassador of Israel to the US National Leadership Conference, October 18th • • • • "In preparing for the worst, as far as the Jews who live in hazard are concerned, we must seek, to the best of our ability, to provide immediate means for their exit from their present lands. We should keep in mind, as we go about this task, that as we rescue the enslaved and the victims of persecution and threatened persecution, we are, at the same time, recruiting men, women and children for the legions of the free, for the forces of liberty and democracy. "The practical miracle of the recent past must be repeated in the present — Israel must be provided with the means of receiving and absorbing the new refugees in whatever numbers they come. "To provide for a huge new influx of immigration will require efforts dwarfing those made in the past. Let let no man say that it cannot be done, when it must be done. What has been accomplished must be an augury of what can again be accomplished. "As we love freedom and security and well-being for ourselves, let us open pur hearts to those with few blessings." Senator Herbert H. Lehman of New York National Action Conference, June 6th A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS Weather master Jalousie and Window Mfg. Co. JALOUSIES DIRECT FROM FACTORY TO YOU I ?> Aluminum Jalousies Glass Jalousies e Venetian Windows Jalousie Doors BEAUTY IN THE SYNAGOGUE Continued from ; age 11 to the democratic unpretentiousness and proud simplicity of the Jewish synagogues which, by comparison, seemed "magnificent" to him. Post-war architecture in this country is imbued with the democratic spirit of Oppenheim's words. Modern America rejects such atrocities of the past as banks resembling Greek temples or industrial research laboratories built with Doric columns. Modern churches often consist of steel-framed buildings, with simple brick or concrete walls, edifices that fit our age rather than ape the past. Hence, our synagogue builders have not to go for inspiration to Hagia Sophia of Istanbul or to the old California Missions. But architects are human beings who give what is demanded of them, whatever their artistic tenets. Their best intentions can easily be thwarted by the timidity or ignorance of a congregation. There is need for educating our Rabbis and layman alike, need for explaining to them why stylistic throwbacks are less likely than more abstract, more utilitarian buildings to express the spirituality of our time. Incidentally, traditional synagogues are more expensive than modern ones. Our people must learn that, whether facade or interior, ornaments should be used only where absolutely needed, that there is a dignity that stems from simplicity and that there should always exist a close bond between building and natural environment. Fortunately, we are eager to learn and quick to grasp the essentials. We will be glad to exchange false stylistic trends for honest architectural expression, and the confusion caused by eclecticism, for good and clear design, bound to enhance the serene beauty of a genuine Beth ha-Knesseth. 1890 N.E. 146th STREET NORTH MIAMI PHONE 816-2671 VISIT OUR NEW FACTORY "THE HOUSE OF A THOUSAND JALOUSIES'' 11 GREETINGS PRICE AND COMPANY FOR REFRIGERATION SERVICE CALL 2-2728 1628 S.W. Flagler Terrace TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR SERVICE WITH A SMILE \OISISI.I: SERVICE "NEAR YOUR FAVORITE CAUSEWAY" 2057 71st Street Miami B „ en IT IS A PLEASURE TO EXTEND HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL PAT CANNON CIRCUIT JUDGE DuPONT BLDG. MIAMI, FLORIDA TO ALL SEASONS GREETINGS MAX PAUL of the W. M. CREAGH, LTD. 824 Lincoln Rood — Miami Beach — 1631 Jefferson Are. ro AU cm runes BURT CONSTRUCTION COMPANY "•*• 7th STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA L'SIIONO TOVO MATZ0S WINE KOSHER DELICACIES UT ~" n*Wtm f*t Cutty • Bs*ctss tt fartnrts; 150 RIVINCT0N STREET NEW YORK CITY To All Our Patrons and Friends ... A Moel Happy New Year Tommy's Rf*Nfanrnnl 847 N.E. let AVENUE MIAMI. FLA. To All Happy New Year GRIFFIN MOTORS Used Cart Bought Sold 850 N. W. 7th Ave. Phone 9-3406 A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL A. O. TRANSFER & WAREHOUSING CO. HAULING 2041 N. Miami AT.. MOVING PHONE 5-234 BAGGAGE 335 Collins Are. GREETINGS When In Search For Definitely Better Furniture and Home Furnishings At Reasonable Prices Remember The Name WOODRUM'S ONE OF FLORIDA'S LARGEST AND FINEST HOME FURNISHERS AIR CONDITIONED NORTHEAST SECOND AVE. AT SEVENTY-THIRD STREET MIAMI Phone 84-1625 HAPPY NEW YEAR uiiSP n2ie roar* HAPPY NEW YEAR HAPPY NEW YEAR Seas/tore food Products 13701 N.W. 27th AVENUE. OPA LOCKA. FLA. PHONE 84-4324 HAPPY NEW YEAR •oron H2-IB r,:vft HAPPY NEW YEAR %  nron rein mvft HAPPY NEW YEAR



PAGE 1

S^TEMBERU^W +Jewls*rkrkto*r PAGE 5-B / • NEW YEAR GREETINGS ARKIN CONSTRUCTION CO., INC. General Contractors 1827 Purdy Ave. — Phone 58-4325 MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA **&*> *\ those observing Roah Hashonah 5714 M[ Israel, are (left) an orthodox Jew from taught a new handicraft by one of the V at the Malben Village for the Aged in Ein Eastern Europe and (right) a Yemenite woman illage's social workers. bsh Hashonah (or the Helpless By Charles Passman \i\nk begins to settle over the hills of Ephraim, {procession of whiteclad figures begins to wind I through the lanes of Ein Shemer, a small ; halfway between Haifa and Tel Aviv, on the "of the Israel coastal plain. The procession is irkable not only for its raiment — the tradil garb worn by orthodox Jews on Rosh HashonI Yom Kippur — but also for the age of those Everyone in the long line is more than 60 i old For this is a unique village in a unique — a complete community of aged, all of l recent immigrants. most of them, this is the first New Year i they are spending in the village It has been Wished by Malben, the Joint Distribution Comt's program in Israel. Most of the old folk | been in the country two or three years. But, ; they had no means and no place to go, until I they had been unable to leave the tents and gated iron shacks of the immigrant camps, in i their more .ortunate fellow-immigrants spent periods. And, were it not for American and its contributions to the United Jewish il. none of the 1,000 aged of Ein Shemer |ld be able to spend their first New Year's Eve village that will be home to them for the | of their lives. id so in the synagogues of Ein Shemer (there [four small ones to permit immigrant groups i all parts of the world to celebrate the high lays in the manner to which they have been stomed all their lives) as well as in synagogues I smaller old-age homes set up by Malben in parts of the country — a thousand old men I women are thinking, this Rosh Hashonah, of Ithose across the sea who have made it possible I them to find shelter for the evening of their *lk through these little synagogues would it the diverse strains in Israel's present popuI no less vividly than does a stroll through the ling streets of Tel Aviv. I On Shemer, for example, services are held in the Ashkenazi (Western European) tradition, in Sephardic style (by Jews from Greece, Bulgaria and Turkey whose migration from Spain hundreds of years ago is proclaimed by the fact that they all know Ladino) and in Yemenite fashion. Walking into the Yemenite synagogue, one is immediately struck by a singular phenomenon! — that half the men appear to be reading the prayer books upside-down or sideways. This does not mean that they cannot read — on the contrary. Their strange ability was born in years of training in the small cheders of the desert villages, where books were a rare treasure and a dozen or more pupils had to share one copy seated in a circle around their teacher. Equally striking in their synagogue is the beauty of the Scroll of Law, written on thick leather with an ink derived from native plants of Yemen and inscribed by means of goose quills or other feathers. On the other hand, their womenfolk, seated in a separate room, are not able to read at all because, since women do not play an esseetial part in orthodox Jewish ritual, it was considered unnecessary to teach them to read. Another group of Malben patients who are particularly joyous this New Year are the residents of the Jaffa old age home because they have been able to extend the hospitality of their synagogue to resident of a nearby housing project for new immigrants. Feeling elated that they can offer something to the younger generation, they have gladly opened their doors to their new neighbors. Stories of this kind could be told about Rosh Hashonah observances at a great many of the hospitals, custodial care centers and sheltered workshops which Malben has established for sick, invalid and handicapped immigrants all over the country — such as the story of wheelchair patients of the Machaneh Yisreal Hospital, who mingle on New Year's Day with personnel from the nearby airport of Lydda, giving to youngsters recovering slowly from polio a chance to discuss earnestly with visiting airmen the mechanics of jet propulsion. And the new years also brings hope to the many Continued on Pago 15 •* few rear To All Oor Christ-Croft Nursery "W.DIXIE HIGHWAY HOHTH MIAMI p hone 7-4543 Otto Kuehl HAp PY NEW YEAR •*• the Market Affords UlUuonabla Prices ** %  Alexander and Family *•. Haxxy let of the CASH MARKET *** %  *. M* as—a "* 17 N. W. lit* St BEST WISHES TO MY JEWISH FRIENDS M. H. LIPP GREETINGS TO ALL Florida Gas Corporation "BLUE FLAME O AS" 6400 H.W. 7th AVENUE •S-1673 Beet WishM For A HAPPY NEW YEAR Mr.aidMi% 5227 Alton Road MIAMI BEACH E. STBECEER Truck Body Build#>r 714 N. W. list A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS DOCTORS' CLINICAL LABORATORY 1004 HUNTINGTON BUILDING MIAMI Phone 3-6553 H. W. Hamilton. Medical Technologist TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR WEATHER-TIGHT COMPANY PUMPS 1812 NORTH LE JEUNE ROAD PHONE 64-0731 TO OUR MANY FRIENDS, A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR Davis Boiler & Iron Works, Ine. BOILERMAKERS AND CERTIFIED WELDERS Ph. 2-M30 1980 88 N. Miami Are. Reconditioned Boilers for Sale and Repairs Day or Night Anywhere. Smokestacks and Tanks. GREETINGS TO ALL "The Most Modern in the South" PLASTERING BY D'ANGELO PLASTERING CO. 450 N.W. 71st STREET, MIAMI PHONE 19-6924 GREETINGS ARE EXTENDED WITH THE SINCERE AND FERVENT WISH FOR GENEROUS BLESSINGS OF GOOD AND HAPPINESS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. % %  RIVERSIDE MEMORIAL OHAPEL MIAMI Edward T. Newman FuMTtl Director MIAMI BEACH Ab Eisenberg Treasurer a



PAGE 1

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis J. Brooks and Family Wish All Their Fnends and Relatives A HAPP1 HEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Budner and Daughter, Melody All The-.r Fnends and Relatites A HAPPT NEW TEAK Mr. Henry Butbin and Family Wish All Their Fnends and Relatives A HAPPT HEW YEAR Mr. and Mrs. Manuel Burstein and Family With All Their Fnends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR cJo Cill Vi/e Say CC IIlost (Happy I lew Ljear Miami Federation Looks Ahi (EDITOR'S NOTE: Dr\jenjamin B. Rosenberg is the in community work in aiv new executive direcujTof the Greater Miami Jewish Greater involvement n fV n ? S el1 *> Mr. and Mrs. Myer Edelman and Family Wi.li All The.r Fiends and Relatives A HAPP1 \E\V TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Edelstein Daughter, Sarah, and Son, Ralph Wish All Their Fnend< and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Eli Einbinder and Daughters and Mr. and Mrs. Leon Hirsch and Family Wish All Their Friends and Reldtire, A HAPPT NEW TEAR • • • w • • • Mr. and Mrs. Henry Cain and Son, Fred A'.' Their Fnends and Relalnes A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Chafeti and Daughter, Bessie Ann Wuh A'.. The-.r Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Jules P. Charming Their Fnends and Relatites A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Abe Eisenberg and Family Wish All Their Fnends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Sam Elgison Wuh All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Leon Ell •nd Daughter, Sandra Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Cherner and Family '. Their Fnends and RA HAPPT \E\V -(EAR Mr. and Mrs. Bernard L. Chernov* and Mother Their Fnends and Relatives A HAPPT \E\V TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Harry El son and Family All Their Friends dtOjVRelatirrs A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mr,. Nathan Enoff and Family Wish All Their Friends and Relumes A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Chertok and Daughter, Paula The.r Fnends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Ben Essen •nd Son, Richard All Their Friends and Relatives. A HAPPT NEW TEAK Dr. and Mrs. M. B. Cirlin and Family A The-.Fnends and R A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. William Clein and Family All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPP T NEW TEAR Mrs. Isidor Cohen and Family Wuh Ail Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR • • • ar • • • Mrs. Mollie Fahrer •nd Daughters, Clare and Janet All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Max Feit Mr. and Mrs. Saul Rose and Daughters of 19337 Monica Ave., Detroit, Mich. Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Cohen and Marcia Wish All Their Friends and Relatites A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Max P. Fold •nd Family Wuh All Their Fnends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Nat Coulton and Son A.'; Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Crystle Wuh All Their Friends and Relatites A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Abe Cutler and Sons, Jack and Eddie Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Feldan Daughter, Rachel, and Son, Albert Wish All Their Fnends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Fin* Wuh All Their Fnends and Relative, A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Jack M. Fink •nd Daughter, Carla Jane WUk All Their Fnends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Cutler and Son, Larry Wish All Their Fnends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR • • • Mw • • e Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Degoti •nd Daughter, Helena Wuh All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Sam Diemar •nd Children, Roberta, Iris and Irwin, of 17 East 64th Street Savannah, Georgia Wuh All Their Fnends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Drewich •nd Family Mrs. Lillian Fisher and Children •nd Mr. and Mrs. Pete Silverman and Children Wuh All Their Fnends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Dick and Naomi Fink Wuh All Their Fnendi and Relative* A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Morris Fisher lvn and Selma Fisher and Family O* 2237 S.W. 3rd Street Wuh All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Fistel Wuh All Their Fnends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Louis Fleishman and Family Wuh All Their Fnends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TE AR Mr. and Mrs. Sam Fliegler •nd Family Wuh All Their Fnends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Milton Dreyfus and Children Wish All Their Fnends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Duntov Wish Ail Their Fnend, and Relative* A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Foror •nd Children Henry, Minna Lea and Joseph Wuh All Their Fnends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Morris Fox and Children Wish All The.r Fnends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR (EDITORS NOTE: Df. jenjamin B Rosenberg is the new executive direcujrof the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, officially in. office since August 1st, he is known nationally-J^ a social worker and community organization Ixpcrt Dr. Rosenberg comes to Greater Miami after six years as director of Field Service for file National Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds. He received the Doctor of Philosophy degree from Johns Hopkins University and the AB and MA degrees from Ohio State University. He is also a graduate of the New York School of Social Work at Columbia University. Dr. Rosenberg is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and has held important offices in the American Association of Social Work and the National Conference of Jewish Communal Service. Published below, is a preview into Dr. Rosenberg's thinking as it relates to the function and goals of Federation here. His remarks were made during an interview with The Jewish Floridian and are compiled by the editors.) By DR. BENJAMIN ROSENBERG I think we will all agree that the outstanding characteristic which hits you in the face about Miami is its tremendous growth, especially in the last decade, and its Jewish community which has kept pace with this spectacular increase. Some tell me that there are 55,000 Jews in Miami. Others claim the number to be as high as 65,000 or 75,000. With such a rapid growth the community has had a hard time catching up with its needs. This is true of the general community, and the acute need for additional school facilities is just one expression. It is equally true of Jewish communal services. While tremendous strides were made during the past 12 years in fund raising as well as in the building and development of vital community services, there still appear to remain many important gaps in Miami's ability to meet the health, welfare, religious and cultural needs of its expanding Jewish community W !" S also P in ts up a number of the problems which the Greater Miami Jewish Federation will tace in the coming months and years. Our leaderitsSflTh" aw are of this and wiU Want t0 addre itself to them. Let me just mention one or two Last year there were some 7,500 contributors' to he Combined Jewish Appeal, representing about 15 percent of the estimated Jewish population. In other communities, the number of givers represent 30 and even 40 percent; in small communities it is even more. The number of workers in the campln was smaller than in most communities ofTnZ 21 **P then U wiU important to reach more people to get more "new Miamians" involved Or. tUmjamin Reseaaerf ". .. we thrive by experience" • e • W e e • in community work, in givine Greater mvolvement ofVopV^'r 1 1 lead to an increase in tota' "* served by the Federation But beyond this, the problem of P.H much different in Miami than in otST^^ Our central agencies have been c* le \ !" "*unprecedented sums during the p a i?' 0 that time, more than $1.000.000,000wL **i by the Federations of the J^ZS? building of Israel and the strengthZ?/ communal institutions in local com !" g f on the national scene COmn ""e3 With the passing of the crisis pe riod o( J waryea^th^^^^^ofuJ both in giving and in serving, although ,H have by no means diminished, it is ju] portant for us to do everything possible tel the awareness of community needs and m<2 cally as well as overseas, mobilize communiJ! menf and to help bring about a better Zi widespread understanding and acceptance J responsibilities which we, as Jews and as face I have been very much impressed with then of the Greater Miami Federation during tU 12 years, with the calibre of its leadership J the strides which the city's communal orga have made in a relatively short time If*. build well in the future, it will be because tktk dation has been so well prepared by those J so many years ago recognized the potentials tf| community for growth and for bringing a bom existence and a satisfying life to an increasian ber of our people Miami has grown to be one of the 10 Jewish communities in the country. In there come, Miami should achieve its position as | the 10 largest in the amount its citizens will fl overseas and national causes, in the strengthc institutions and in the vigor of its religious i social welfare institutions Federation, as we see it, has an impormtL to play in this continuing growth, but it deal stand apart from the community. It is, in fact, community—the people who invest it with life j with service. The direction Federation is to i will not depend on the will or the skill of ooeL or even of a small group of men. It will rather} ways try to respond to the interests and de the community itself I believe that the major objective of those ml present position of leadership, whether theji volunteers or professionals, should be to help t ulate greater interest and greater participaudj the affairs of the Federation, to involve and greater number in recognition of the needs mil sponsibilities which Federation represents aas| working and in giving to fill those needs How can we achieve this? ... It is not an i night job. The process will be slow. We will L to work with the old leadership: we will hmj work with the younger element and w ith ne many of whom come to Miami from a rich I ground of community service in their former | of residence. This is a never-ending job • • • We firmly believe that if Federation is to j a measure of success in this regard, it will coot greatly not only to Its own strength as an insun but also to the development of all local for experience shows that our central organii our Federations, are strongest in communities! Continued on Page 13 Mr. and Mrs. Mayer Frankel and Family Wuh All The.r Friend, and Relative A HAPPT NEW TEAR Dr. and Mrs. Marvin S. Freodl.nd and Son, Robert Wuh All The.r Friend* and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR • • • af*' Mr. and Mrs. William Friedman •nd Family Wi,h AH Their Fnend, and Relative, A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Frank and Family Wuh A" Thrir Friend, and Relative. A HAPPT NEW TEAR Reverend and Mrs. Solomon J. Freedman and Family Wuh All The.r Fnend, and Relat.te, A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Mortimer Fried and Children, Scott and Mark Wuh All The.r Fnends and Reiut.ve, A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Friedlend Wish All The.r Friend, and m ,[__ A HAPPT NEW TEAR Wuh All Their Fnend, and Relative, A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. .nd Mrs. M. O. Furman •nd Family All The.r Fnends and Relative, A HAPPT NEW TEAR • •§•• Mr. and Mrs. Irvine Go*' and Family Wi,h All Their Fnend, and W A HAPPT NEW T£M Mrs. Morris Gershon and Miss Polly Gershon Wish All Their Fnends and RAW A HAPPT NEW TEAR •••.• Mrs. Yetta Color and Daughters. Florence and Blossom Wish All The,rlFnend, and Relate, A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Monroe Celb and Family A HAPPT HEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Irving C*r and Family Wuh All Their Fnends and I Rd** A HAPPT NEW TEAR Dr. and Mrs. Samuel 9£* •nd Paul, Dickie an*J I Wuh All The.r Fnends and WH\ A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. W** <*" WiA All Tkeir Fnendi ^ A HAFFT NEW TfAR



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..^rgTMBg 11, ,1953 >Jelst>nHr*&** PAGE 7g the Life, of n A Day in Hadassan s oreen >h' N urses /. r firel generation Israelis are the key to Jewish State's future as the New Year \ik approaches. Their nurses, like Ruth hovsky Halevi, make endless sacrifices | the name of health and medical progress. By Ruth Lasker lUch Hadassah's public health nurse go down I main street of Jerusalem's Mea Shearim, or the I (market i of the Bukharian Quartet, or the big ityard of the Hungarian Houses. You can recogher easily; she wears a green uniform and : a big leather case, and it takes her a long to move on. She is stopped every few feet Er by an old patient expressing his gratitude or [i potential one telling his troubles. M to the cflnto and tall me all about it," I the nurse, extricating herself from the hand |p of a wrinkled babushka. She is cornered a few farther by an old man who wants injections Chaim got" Finally she reaches the shabby I of the first bed-patient on her day's schedule, we she supplies medication and spreads good h Alishovsky Halevi is one of Hadassah's elevG'reen Nurses who bring medical aid to the Mants of Jerusalem's poorer districts and nearnubarot and hill settlements. In' addition to visiting nurse duties, they staff a number of to which patients iTtek each" day with a of real and imagined ail'fnentt and with Mag confidence. 1" ** Israe '. where Ruth works, the people live "*y lived many decades ago-Jn ghetto-like, lightless and airless, dilapidated buildings, close to the Jordan frontier. They took a terrific beating during the fighting. Ruth didn't always work there. In fact, for sixteen months. Ruth didn't work at all because she had her own baby to care for. Then she began to wonder where she would be more useful — at home or in the nursing services — and decided that her years of training as a nurse and midwife at Hadassah's nursing school should not be wasted. Besides, she was needed. "If I work," she told her engineer husband, Moshe Halevi, "and get a full-time maid, we'll probably neither gain not lose by it financially. But I can do a lot of good." Moshe said it didn't matter to him whether she washed baby clothes or donned her uniform again, so long as she was happy. So one day last spring, she reported to Hadassah. "Can you use me?" she asked Rehuma Druckman, Hospital and District Medical Service chief. Could Hadassah use this bright slender girl with a reputation for thoroughness and hard work! Ruth underwent a month's specialization training. She worked in various clinics in the city, also in a canvas-hutted maabara for a while, where conditions were pretty grim and people had to learn from scratch about sanitation and hygiene. Then she was transferred to Beth Israel, the Jerusalem district of yeshiva bocherim arid peddlers. For the past twelve years, Hadassah district nurses, like Ruth, have been bringing the hospital to the patient's home.' It' solves a number of prohlems: it lessens pressure "on hospital beds arid" in many Instances makes the patient's illness easier to bear. Long-term patients are given physiotherapy and diversional therapy (a kind of occupational therapy). Special attentions, like delicacies and little pleasures, are reserved for patients suffering from incurable diseases. If the need is great, the nurse provides clothes for the children. More often than not, Ruth has to help with advice on non-medical problems, for she is trusted. "What shall I do?" asks Mr. S., a bearded middle-aged man, whose main occupation is studying the Talmud. He is in complete despair. "My wife, under the influence of her wicked sister, deserted me. What shall I do with the four children?" He used to sell soap, candles and matches at street corners, when he wasn't in the beth hamedrash. Then he developed stomach ulcers and had to stay in bed. Ruth helps get the children cared for and promises him a fortnight's "good living" at Hadassah's convalescent home in the city. After that, he will have to find light work. In the next house, Ruth demonstrates by sign language — the old woman speaks only a "Persian dialect — how the daughter, a mental case beset with bedsores, should be washed each day and placed oh a rubber ring. The old mother bathes the patient every day and Is happy when she' sees Ruth smiles appreciatively. The'husbahd, a part-time grave digger, is given chits, for'tree mnk'.' And so oh, from case to case. In each place Ruth Continued en Pae 12 A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO ~ "^LL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS VANDfRBILT HOTEL 2009 COLLINS AVENUE MIAMI BEACH Phone 5-0761 600 N. W. 10th Street EXTENDS GREETINGS OF THE SEASON TO ITS FRIENDS AND PATRONS Telephone 3-6332 A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR FRIENDS Physicians & Surgeons Laboratory ONE LINCOLN ROAD BUILDING MIAMI BEACH Phone. 5-0287 lH APPT\£\v TEAR TO ALL' P UR m E\DS AND PATROLS Magnet Wearing Apparel Inc. FASHION MART BLDG. MIAMI Phone 2-0191 lH


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Yj^TT MBER 11, 1953 +JmisJinor*Han PAGE 3C bbuilding of the State: A Vital %  Program or Activity ror the Year By JACOB AUERBACH Jewish Telegraphic Agency ^njmethods are used to gauge the progress of Li as one year ends and another begins. Statistics employed to show the number of dunams under jlivation. the sums of foreign capital invested, total kilowatt-hours used by industry or the M ge of ships entering Haifa port. Photographs trast the tents and corrugated huts of twelve nths ago with the growing number of stone and ncrete immigant dwellings today. These methods good ones. But they merely pinpoint certain tangible aspects of Israel's development. There many other facts: the social and cultural intern of immigrants, for example, or the growing pact of Israels culture on the rest of world Jewry, ich are equally important but which must be ed over a period of many years in order to be perly evaluated. Among the best indices of Israel's over-all progare the activities of the Jewish Agency. The ency plays a part in virtually every phase of s growth, from the purchase of American dors and combines lor agricultural development the propagation of Hebrew language study and Kural exchanges between Israel and communities road. The multitude of Agency activities, of urse, is carried out with funds contributed to the ited Jewish Appeal in America and to similar peals throughout the world. The past year has been a period of consolidation r Israel. Mass immigation, which reached its peak 1950-51, has tapered off for the time being. The State of Israel and the Jewish Agency have been concentrating their efforts on the settlement of the new immigrant population which, during the year, passed the 700,000 mark (total population —1,000,000). Special emphasis has been placed on land settlement Israel is basiOf. *.(,um G.M-,.,. caUy an agr cul repa,at„„, „„.t,.fr tura country mt 950.000 acres were under cultivation last year, Maining more than 580 Jewish settlements But Wisiderable areas remain to be settled and cultiWtd. mainly in the Jerusalem Corridor, the Negev %  d Western Galilee. It is in these areas that P work of the Jewish Agency's Agricultural Colpiution Department is most evident. By midsum. the department had set up 50 new agricultural u ges accommodating more than four thousand lilies. Nineteen, located in the Negev are of a SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL NATIONAL PRODUCE CO. OF MIAMI, INC. Wholesale Produce — Crate to Carload 1229 N. W. 21st Street Phone 3-6491 TO ALL NEW YEAR GREETINGS THE TOWN RESTAURANT 153 N.E. 1st Street BREAKFAST LUNCHEON DINNER Music Air Conditioned 7 A.M. to 2 A.M. Closed Sunday Ph. 2-4733 < I GREETINGS MAYFLOWER RESTAURANT 80 S.E. Biscaync Boulevard, Miami, Florida Serving: CLUB BREAKFAST — from 25c LUNCHEON — from 75c DINNER — from 1.00 Open Daily 7 a.m. to 1 a.m. T They pour a cement foundation for a new home. This will make one less immigrant tent or corrugated hut. new type, owned outright by the Jewish Agency. The settlers who work the land will take over ownership when their numbers increase and their financial position becomes secure. Neg.v tillages Aided These new villages as well as hundreds of older settlements in the process of expansion, benefit from the activities of the Jewish Agency's Procurement Department in New York which has purchased $70,000,000 worth of material for Israel, mainly agricultural and irrigation equipment and livestock. This equipment is stored in Agency compounds throughout Israel and distributed to settlements as their needs arise. Last spring, the Procurement Department shipped 2,900 mules and mares to Israel for ploughing in areas unsuitable for tractors. Like agriculture, Israel's industry has developed rapidly. Foreign investments in the neighborhood of $150,000,000 were made during the past five years. The Jewish Agency's Economic Department set up Continued on Page 15 TO ALL HOLIDAY GREETINGS ALEXANDER D. SMITH Real Estate 382 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables — Phone 83-5213 and 3365 S. W. 3rd Avenue — Phone 9-7651 YACHTS AND MOTOR VESSELS Office Phone 82-S795 Residence Phone 78-6060 W. F. MeClaskey MARINE SURVEYOR — GASOLINE 8c DIESEL ENGINES 343 S.W. North River Rrive P. O. Box 1788 Miami. Florida Washing and Polishing — Lubrication — Batteries — Tires Mechanic on Duty Pick-Up and Delivery 71st Street Serviee Station H. GOLDMAN SHELL SERVICE 337 71st Street. Miami Beach Phone 86-9170 A Happy New Year To All ur Friends and Patrons SEVENTY-FIRST ST. SHOE REPAIRING 713 COLLINS AVE. *IAM1 BEACH Phone 86-5521 A Happy New Year To All *V Friend* and Patron* s Z. Bennett *••! Estate Appraiser 235 Lincoln Road ^oal Beach, Flo. Phone 58X745 A Happy New Year To All Our Friends and Patrons Ray Terrace Apt. Hotel INS BAY DRIVE Normandy Hie Miami Beach. Fla. Phone 86-9X27 A Happy New Year To All Our Friends and Patrons Atlantic Equipment Co. 1220 N. Miami Avenu* Phone 3-0316 To Our Many Friends and Acquaintances HAPPY NEW YEAR £. If. Reynolds INSURANCE 730 DfGRAHAM BLDG. Phone 2-58*7 A Happy New Year To All Our Friends and Patrons Boyle's Pharmacy 2435 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD MIAMI Phone 9-5743 TO ALL SEASON'S BEST WISHES American Photo Company 811 S.W. 8th STREET PHONE 3-9788 HUNTER LYON. INC. 901 So. Miami Ave, 3-3331 INSURANCE WISHING TO ALL JEWISH CITIZENS NEW YEAR GREETINGS WALKKR CASKET COMPANY 535 N. W. 24th Street Phone 3-3689



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+J&*ist>ncr/(fiajn PAGE 5 A [federation Opens Pall Season Here T hf Executive Committee of the IV M m J-ish Federation | G T ,1.1 '-' fficial f\ocfie^ >fioeftek /tm Or/iK/ft f ew LOOK! I Got It! • 4 Bedrooms and 2 Betas • Block from Flatter Street • East of 12th Avenae COMPIETEIT FURNISHED TOTAl PRICE $10,500 EASY TERMS RAY ZIEGLER 1129 N.W. 3rd St. Ph. 82-5240 Miami Convalescent Home Mtcliliting in Care to the Elderly and Clinically III. 24-Hour Nureing Serv'" Special Diet. St-ictly Observed p "ate and Semi.Private Room.. LEO ALLEN. Director 335 S.W. 12th Avenue Phonei a.5437 and 9-0278 I GORDON ROOFING AND | SHEET METAL WORKS •"I five on a new reef later "Setl.fietory Ware by %  xporlenoed Men" ** £ JSL **" d easaas "•HONS 4-1" See or Phone Me NAT CANS ...3*818-4-Wtl "Ft INSURANCE NEEOS "ttrooontan Life Ina Ce. 007 Bliceyne Bldg. 1 W. Flagler t. from the Five Greater Miami Chevrolet Dealers Luby Chevrolet 1055 W. FIA61ER STREET, MIAMI Don Allen's Southern Chevrolet, Inc. 1125 N.E. 2nd AVENUE, MIAMI it A gooo **' Bernard £)c(ja/ [?JlS!f U "lMSURAN : : !" ER BLOG.. ., • C 2-05C Thiel Chevrolet Company 4111 S.W. 8th STREET, MIAMI Mmmimmx Trmil at l Jeune KaJ) Tropical Chevrolet 9000 N.W. 7th AVENUE, MIAMI Beach Chevrolet Corporation S40 ALTON ROAD, MIAMI REACH '#!



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flUDAY, SEPTEMBER 11. 1953 >Jenisli ffrricfian PAGE 5 H o/o Clu We Say (2 Tfiost (Happy Tlew TJt a ear Iducation Bureau Tabulates ~* Enrollment In Local Schools By LOUIS SCHWARTZMAN Executive Director, Bureau of Jewish Education A survey of registration in the Jewish schools of Greater Miami has been completed by the Bureau 0 f Jewish Education for the school year 1952-1953. The Bureau has first attempted to determine with ome accuracy the number of Jewish children of elementary and junior high school age in Greater tfiami through the aid of the Dade County Board cf Instruction and use of Yom Kippur method of abulation of Jewish child population. The Bureau ey indicates a total of some 5.500 Jewish children of school age in the Greater Miami area. Registration in the Jewish schools is indicated in |the table following. Sunday School registration [totals 2,928 composed of 1,538 girls and 1,390 boys. The afternoon school registration (including the Hebrew High School and the all-day schools) indicates a total registration of 1,725; of which 1,325 are boys, and 400 pre girls. Elimii a t i n g considerable duplication in %  the afternoon and %  Sunday schools land adding thereto Ian estimation of [some private inIstruction. the toft a 1 unduplicated %  number o f chilIdren exposed to Jewish education last year is estimated a t 3.850. This total enrollment figure represents 70 percent of Ihe total estimated Jewish child population (the same percentage as last year) and i n d i • cates that registration at the Jewish schools of Greater Miami is keeping pace with the growth of the Jewish population in this area. To the 70 percent registered students may be added another estimated 20 percent to include those children who registered during the course of the year and dropped out before February 1, 1953 and the many children who received some Jewish education in the years before and failed to register this year. Thus, the figures reveal that nearly 5,000 Jewish children of school age are receiving or have received some form of Jewish education at some time and that about 500 Jewish children in the Greater Miami area are not receiving any form of Jewish education at any time. The figure of 500 is the same as last year, again indicating that registration in the Jewish schools is keeping up with the increase in Jewish child population. Our objectives for next year are to break up this "hard core" of Jewish "illiteracy" and to bring Jewish education to all of our youth. REGISTRATION AT THE JEWISH SCHOOLS February 1953 • • • m • • • Sunday Afterno School School Schoo Beth David 638 212 Beth Jacob 35 85 Beth El 99 79 Beth El Academy (All Day).. 20 Beth Sholom 345 170 Cardiac Home 12 Coral Gables 340 141 Flagler-Granada 159 45 Hebrew Academy (All Day) 210 High School 40 Hialeah-Miami Springs 71 25 Israelite Center 46 25 Knesseth Israel 32 229 49 Miami Beach 142 Miami Hebrew School 82 86 Monticcllo 52 North Dad* 135 36 North Shnr* 67 132 Temple Israel 345 Tifereth Israel 55 28 West Miami 134 68 Workmen's Circle—Beach 45 Workmen's Circle—Town .. 35 Zamora 64 40 Mr. and Mrs. Max A. Parness and Daughter, Sheila Rao Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Harry Poarl and Daughters, Barbara, Phyllis, Marcia and Bernice Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. A. Pepper and Family Wish AD Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Morris Pepper and Family Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Popper and Family Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR • • • •• • • • Dr. Albert Reinherz and Family Wish All Their Friends and Relative! A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. I. L. Reisman and Family Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Dr. and Mrs. Julian Rickles and Family Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. David Ritas and Children, Harold and Harriet Wish AH Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Pertes and Family Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Edward Peyser and Family Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Platkin Son, Stanley, and Daughter, Alma Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR TOTAL 2,028 1,725 Comparison for Past Three Years '50-'51 3,000 2,582 Receiving Jew. Ed. .... Sunday school Afternoon school 1,281 Percent of Jewish children receiving education at one time 607c 'Sl-'52 3500 2.691 1,481 707c '52-'53 3,850 2.928 1,725 707. lewis Scawerfxasaa need for instruction It is interesting to note this year that the increase in the afternoon school registration of 244 is higher than the increase in the Sunday School registration of 237. It thus appears that the Jewish parents are becoming conscious of the need of more concentrated Jewish study than that provided in the Sunday Schools. This trend has revealed itself for the past two years and is in line with recommendation of the Union of the American Hebrew Congregations as well as with the past pronouncements of the United Synagogue and the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations. The increase in registration of girls in the after noon schools, a total of 400, also reveals the fact that the recent emphasis on training of literate Jewish mothers is also bearing fruit. The figures indicate that the registration of girls in the Sunday Schools is increasing above the past 50 percent average while the percentage of girl population in the afternoon school is now considerable over 20 per cent. Another sign of progress is evident. Almost 40 percent of the total Jewish population is now registered in the afternoon schools. The test of a good Jewish educational system is the close approximation of students at the Sunday School and the Afternoon Schools. A 40 percent registration in the After noon Jewish school is an excellent record for Jew ish schools in the South. Mrs. Fannie Rifas and Daughter, Evelyn Wish AH Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Rimer Dr. and Mrs. Harry B. Rimer Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Leslie C. Rome and Children, Stuart and Melanie Wish AH Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Platt and Family Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. Louis Pokress of 350 Lincoln Road Wishes All Her Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Isidore Pomerantz Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Romer and Family Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Jack Rosen and Children Sandra Ann and Alfred Paul Wish All Their Friends and Relative! A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Pomerantz and Children, Irene and Edward Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Harold Pont and Children Edwin Stephen and Judy Lyn Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Abe Price and Family Wish AH Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Dr. and Mrs. Herman G. Rosenbaum and Family Wish All Their Fnends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Morris Rosenblitt and Family Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Dr. and Mrs. Charles Rosenfeld and Carol Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Norman A. Rossman and Family Wish AH Their Fnends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Jack Pulver and Family Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Milford S. Purcel and Family and Mrs. M. D. Coplian Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR • • • 9g • • • • • • /o • • • Dr. and Mrs. Harry Needelman and Children Felicia and Richard Stephen Wisfc All Their Friends and Relative:. A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. nd Mrs. Irving Notaen and Family Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Jud 9 and Mrs. Theodore Nelson and Son, Jonathan w h All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs, David Newman and Son. Robert L. w "n All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. Edward Newman and Mrs. Freda Newman uh A Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR • • • IS • • • Mr. and Mr*. Milton Nussbaum and Daughters, Rene and Fredelle Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT N*W TEAR • • • f* • • • Mr. and Mrs. Prod Ochs and Daughter Wish AH Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs, Harry Ollphant end Son, Elmer Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mrs. Ida Orlonsky Wishes AH Her Fnends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Al Oshoroff and Family Wish AH Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR • e • e • e Mr. and Mrs. Harry Orlin and Family Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Albert I. Osaka Wish" AH Their Friends" and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR ,e e e ax • • • Bernie and Grace Pallant and Children Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs, Jack S. Pallet Wish AH Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Pardo and Daughter, Michele Wish All Their Pnends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Dr. and Mrs. Harry H. Queen of 919 S.W. 24th Road Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Henry Rabin and Family Wish AH Their Fnends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. MM PHr^. Jocttpfi RwNn Wish AH Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Rabmewtfz and Family Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Nat Roth and Family Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mrs. Rebecca Rothman of .the Corsair Hotel Wishes AH Her Fnends and Relative! A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Carl Rubel and Family Wish All Their Friends and Relative! A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mrs. Max N. Rubenstein and Family Wish All Their Friends and Relative! 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PAGE 1

^jpiv SKPTEMBER 11,1953 le+>l*tnrsrHlr%r\ PAGE 5G Maccabiah and its Significance By HARRY D. HENSHEL "H J :j)ITUR'S NOTE: Colonel HewkeUhas bean as[l^ed with amateur athletics for over 40 years. Ie is chairman of the United State Committee for Sports in Israel.) Israel, undergoing the rigors of austerity, political dissention and the ominous threat of war, is a sports loving country. However, the Israelis don't regard athletics as a mere recreational—participant or spectator—activity as we Americans do. There, sports serve the much more practical necessity of being a training for survival. To transform a desert into a garden and defend one's borders, physical strength and mental alertness are prerequisites of existence. Sports is a major means to this end. Sports are, therefore, not only encouraged in Isreal by the Government, but are part of the activities of every political party. Israel realizes, too, the advantages of sport as healthful recreation. It is one of the few diversions Israel can afford to enjoy. Illustrative of the attitude Israel's government has for sports is the con versation Foreign Minister Moshe Shared had with Mm> **•''•' tee-Cerlee members of the • • • %  '•• % %  Maccabiah United States Committee for Sports in Israel in the spring of 1952. Grave problems were as usual confronting Israel on economic, political and military matters at that time. But the Foreign Minister, who asked to meet with us as his first appointment on his arrival, told us that it was very important that an Israel team compete in the International Olympic Games scheduled for Helsinki later in the year. He urged our Committee to raise the foreign currency necessary for the project so that the government could husband its meager resources for more desperately needed purposes. The US Committee, had previously succeeded in obtaining admittance of Israel into the International Committee over the protests of the Arab countries and after the latter's delaying tactics had been finally defeated. Avery Brundage then vice president and now president of the IOC, had brought the matter to a successful conclusion through the inspiration of Charles L. Ornstein. Mr. Shar.tt had frankly felt that the matter of admission into Olympic competition was so important to Israel from the point of view of international Prestige and psychological effect upon its citizens that it ranked second only to gaining admission to the United Nations. Being admitted to the International Olympic Committee had bolstered the spirits of the people of Israel, who were in the depths of deprivation and sacrifice. It had given them the sense of belonging to the naUons of the world, in sports as well as politically. Sharetts appeal impressed us. In the midst of Americas Olympic fund raising in which most of were involved, it was difficult to have a separate „J|mpaign for Israel's Olympic team. Several of us, Therefore, endorsed bank notes of the US Committee on Sports m.I*?*nor a .aigrerftfc.mount to send a representative Israeli teanFro Helsinki. There the flag of this new nation was unfurled with 61 others Now, Israel felt that it J really did belong to the family of nations. Three months before the"girme started in Hel sinki, the US Committee for'SpoTts in Israel sent Morris "Tubby" Raskin, basketball coach at Brooklyn College, to Israel to tutor and prepare the basketball team for the competition. This was not our initial venture. Previously we sent the famed City College of New York basketball mentor, Nat Holman, to Israel to teach his famous techniques to the Physical Education staffs and numerous interested athletes. We had also sent Irving Mondschein, probably the greatest Jewish athlete of modern times, three-time national decathlon champion, to teach track and field for a year in Israel and with Raskin to accompany Israel's squad to Finland last summer. The American Jewish sportsmen serving with the US Committee for Sports in Israel work voluntarily to promote and stimulate the growth of sports in Israel. Our prime undertaking this year is sending 86 American Jewish athletes to Tel Aviv right after Rosh Hashonah to compete in the Fourth World Maccabiah Games in modern Ramat Gan Stadium. These American Jewish athletes will live with and compete against nearly 1,000 of their co-religionists from 30 nations, from the four corners of the world, in 19 sports. Of equal import—emotionally— is the fact that all these youths domiciled throughout the world, will spend Yom Kippur in the land of their forefathers. In addition to the 86 Jewish athletes we hope to send to the Maccadiah Games, the US Committee for Sports in Israel wants to send twelve non-Jewish American Olympic champions to compete in exhibition events. One is the Reverend Robert Richards, the worlds greatest pole vaulter. a Protestant Minister. From the idea of bolstering interfaith harmony, it is easy to see the desirability of having the Reverend Richards visit Israel. The Maccabiah Games are the most important international athletic competition of 1953. The worldwide publicity comparable to the Olympic Games wilj foster wholesome international attention on Israel. Our role doesn't end with sending the 86 athletes and twelve exhibition performers. The major responsibility of supplying food, beds, bedding, medical supplies, athletic equipment and similar items rests with us, too. In the 1950 Games at Tel Aviv, which were an outstanding success. Great Britain had a 91 man squad; South Africa had 61; while the US team numbered only 41. France, Switzerland and Holland each had 40. Fund raising is conducted carefully to avoid competition with United Jewish Appeal, by arrangement with and pledge to the Jewish Agency. Actually, practically all of us are workers for and contributors to UJA. There are many enthusiastic supporters of the cause. Each sport has a separate committee as in the Olympics, who select the teams and supervise financing the trip. Groups and localities have undertaken the sponsorship of one athlete or athletes from their community or area. The members of the various teams are soliciting Continued on Page 11 TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR Marks Atlantic Service Station Tires — Batteries Lubrication Specialists 668 N.W. 5th STREET A Happy New y#ar To ^ 0ur F "endi and Patrons fauiou* Cleaners Inc. 3 <54 N.W. 7th AVENUE MIAMI Phono 2-5701 SIASONS GRtlTINGS Original Van Plumbing Co., Inc. INC. Mac* If25 CONTACTING ALTERATIONS REPAIRS 4339 N.W. 1H PUCE Phone 7-4441 A Happy New Y—r To All Our trhttit aee" Parrew Chapman's Pharmacy 581 N.E. 125th STREET Phone 7-4778 A Happy and Prosperous New Year To All Our Friends • Mr. and Mrs. Tobias Sussman formerly of SUSSMAN DRESS CORP. A HAPPY NEW TEAR TO ALL OUR FRIEHDS AND PATRONS Mademoiaelle Itvauty Salon 1518 S.W. 8th STREET MIAMI Phone 9-1055 ANNA BLITCH MAY THE NEW YEAR BRING TO FRUITION THE HOPES AND ASPIRATIONS OF THE JEWISH PEOPLE THE WORLD OVER, AND A JUST AND EVERLASTING PEACE FOR ALL MANXIND Councilman and Mrs. Harold Turk and their children CORNELIA. JONATHAN and ROBIN TO ALL HAPPY NEW YEAR EL BOLE 3181 CORAL WAY RO BAR PHONE 44390 NAPpy NEW YEA* Kitty Kane Shop CNftOIEN'S A P P A R E I 1540 Washington hem Miami Beach Telephone 58 5654 GREETINGS SIDNEY DeWOLF & SON, Inc. Iluilders Contractor* 44 N. W. 8th Avenue Phone 3 3067 TO ALL HAPPY NEW YEAR George Bander a, Sr. REALTOR "Covering all of Dade County" 111 S.W. 12th Avenue Phones 82-7271 — 64-6418 GREETINGS J. E. SHAW CONTRACTORS 348 Minorca Avenue Phone 48-7493 TO ALL A HAPPY HOLIDAY JUDGE WALTER H. BECKHAM JUVENILE COURT BEST WISHES TO ALL FOR A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR II Florida Upholstery Supply Co. 814 N.E. First Avenue Phones: 9-3431-2 TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR Riverside Bake Shop Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Hasecke 104 Beacom Boulevard Phone 83-1687 Extending our SEASON'S COMPLIMENTS TO THE MANY PEOPLE IT HAS BEEN OUR PLEASURE TO SERVE 118 E. Flagler St.—Miami 418 Lincoln Rd—Miami Beach 200 Miracle Mile — Coral Gables •034 N.E. 2nd Ave. — Little River Edison Center other stores in Hollywood, Fort Lauderdale. Daytona Beach, Lakeland, Pensacola, West Palm Beach, Sarasota and Key West


,y SEPTEMBER 11. 1953
****** Fhrk*
, SEEK NEW VITALITY
Continued from Paso 1
have always made direct reference.to the Unit-
States, with no mention of the contribution of
UloJewry
which is part of a great English-speak-
r Jewish community in the British Commonwealth.
I When the role of British Zionists has been
kknowledged, it has always been in the historical
s- "We shall never forget what you did for us
' the fight against the Mandatory authorities."
Bt"what of the things we are doing now? Angto-
asks. Proudly it points to its hachsharah
the finest training establishments for young.
Abound pioneers that exist anywhere in the
Em with an "output" record far greater than
it of the United States. It can also draw attention
[the number of its sons serving Israel's nation life
I diplomats and as experts in many spheres.
Continued refusal by the American and Israel
i be played by Anglo-Jewry will result in one of
happenings. British Jewry will either go isola-
nist (which is doubtful in the extreme), or there
be closer identification with -Commonwealth
ry and the formation of a third Jewish power
Closer unity of the great Jewries of Britain, South
rica, Australia and, possibly, Canada could only
I for the good of Israel and the Jewish people as
hole. Israel's position is not yet so secure that
can dispense with powerful advocates in the
}jor capitals of the world; the position of the
Irish people is not so tenable that they can sit
fck and say "we are safe we are free."
there are growing up in Anglo-Jewry today men
I women who will demand a more vigorous role
|the world affairs of Jewry. They will not be pre-
to accept instruction from any quarter, nor
they allow the derogatory "second-rate com-
nlty" to stick.
SHALL LIVE, DIE
Continued from Peg* 3
Bed and hungry and afraid to leave the ghettoes
ly have been born into, who plead for a glass of
Ik and a chance to go to school? When will the
pe: triplets, three tiny images of humanity born
long ago into the hara of Tunis, get their first
|tles of BlJk?
phen will the next "hard core" transport leave
nany? And will there be place in it for Hein-
Huberman? Heinrich was snatched off the
ets of his native Warsaw by the Nazis when he
i a child of seven. Today he lies in a hospital near
rich. Doctors say he has no lung tissue left.
Py his fierce longing to quit Germany and come
Ikrael keeps him alive. Shall this boy with the
p.drawn face and the glittering eyes, one of those
swho bears Nazism's deepest wounds, be denied
I in Israel?
Pkn will Nessim Abigessis, a 12-year-old human
for of Marrakech. put down his weary arms and
F"P spade and hoe? Nessim sits in a dark alley
p roellah of Marrakech every day of the week
S,L JJJ human ener*y that turns a primitive lathe,
*"!! U Nessim carries on his bent and
1 back the wooden planks at which he
works, he passes the Jewish cemetery of Marrakech.
It is a cemetery of the living, as well as the dead. In
little huts near the cemetery gates live the Jews
born 59 years too soon, the Jews born before the
JDC came to Marrakech. They are old and blind
and sick and weary, and death for them will come
as relief from pain, surcease from suffering. Each
ntght, as Nessim trudges back from work, he sees
them. They sit patiently in front of the gates of the
cemetery and wait to die.
One day Nessim will be sitting where they do
now unless JDC aid reaches him too, unless JDC
can bring a decent future to this human motor as,
It has to other Jewish boys and girls in the Moslem,
world, in Europe and in Israel.
The story of Heinrich Nuberman, lying on a bed
in a German hospital; of the Perez triplets of
Tunis and of Nessim Abigessis, trudging home fro
work in Marrakech are one story. These are the
stories the Jews of America are writing through
their support of JDC via the United Jewish Appeal.
Perhaps by Rosh Hashonah 571S there will be new
and happier chapters in these stories.
mum fjees m
Continued from Page 13
again, as they were originally written. Scenes
were mangled, omitted, words exchanged, endings,
altered. It was a free world. When next they gave
one of them at the request of a dramatic elub, it
had to be given in the form of an adaptation and
under the name of Manewitz, as author, were the
words "Adapted by Leon Kobrin."
"An ungrateful world," muttered Kemat, now a
retired patriot. "It's bitter to live."
The portrait of Manewitz- in a gilded frame
hangs in every Yiddish treatre. In the club-rooms of
the actors' union his big, bulging eyes look down
upon the habitues as they play pinochle or poker,
exchange scandal and smoke cigarettes. In every
book written on the Yiddish treatre they devote a
chapter to Manewitz. His name is mentioned at ban-
quets. Joseph Barondess always arranges an annual
banquet in his memory, and delivers a eulogy of the
great dramatist. There was a man for you. Scenes
that touched the heart. You could weep and you
could cry. Words that had sense. He had a philos-
ophy of his own. What was it? Don't be a shagetz.
Read Joel Antin's articles that have been bound in
a volume, and he'll tell you. But he had everything
comedy, tragedy, ideals, problems. He was a man
of the theatre. He made the theatre what it is. He
is the master mind. This was the make-believe on
parade.
But Kemat knew what was in their hearts. Pre-
tense! They preferred Grobyan's melodramas be-
cause there was money in them. They liked Krolik's
feeble stories for they had tears in them and the
public paid dearly for that which brought them the
satisfaction of weeping. They preferred the plays
Yokels came to see, for there were more Yokels in
the world than philosophers. Manewitz's words
those thick juicy words about which they would of-
ten brag in his lifetime gave the actors a head-
ache to memorize and besides, why should the public
think of the playwright when there were actors
who were dying for applause and appreciation?
Kemat sees them pass into the theatre. He hears
what they say when they leave after the perform-
ance. He listens to the off-stage views of the actors.
They can't bluff him. He knows them all. He shakes
his fiat at them and mutters: "Hypocrites! Swine!
He gave you his life, left yon pearls, and you perfer
shund!"
PAGE 15 D
utrit
UMTAFP
'* Congressman
A
MOST
HAPPY
NEW YEAR
TO All
(,
420 ^coln Road
Realtor
A Happy and. Prosperous New
\ Ymr To Ml Our Frimads
and' Patron* -
FAMILY
of King's Jewelera
of Lincoln Road
HAPPY
- NIWYEAR
FRITZ
PAINTING CO.
PAINTING -DECORATING
38tt N.W. 7th Aei n
FRITZ RUHR, Owner
Phone 1-2200
To Our Friends and Patrons
Happy New Year
United Wine
Stores, I n*.
. 402 N.W. 14th STREET
PHONE 9-9344
TO ALL .
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Shell Lumber
Co., Inc.
L. D. Shell
2733 S.W. 27th AVENUE
Phone 484401
SINCERE AND GOOD WISHES
FOR A HEALTHY, HAPPY AND
PROSPEROUS NHW'YEAR TO
OUR MANY FRIENDS AND
CUSTOMERS.
THE CROWN PRESS, INC.
1103 5m Street Miami Beach. Florida
HARRY GERBER, Mar. Phone 58-7936
PETER'S DRIVE-UNDER
SPBCIALIZING IN RIBS AND CHICKEN
3799 N.W. 3iJh Street. Miami. Florida Phone 64-938S
S & S SANDWICH SHOP
1757 N.E. Second Avenue
Pfce**~2-n0
EXTEND GRSETJNOS
TO THHIR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
MR. AND MRS. JOE OHEN
and FAMILY
1140 Venetian Way ,.
EXTEND BEST WISHES TO ALL
FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
WISHING ALL OF OUR JEWISH FRIENDS
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
Florida Elet*trie Motor Co.
H. E. GRANT. Owner
M. E. ASSALONE. Manager
PHONE 2-6147
237 N. W. Second Arena*
TO OUR MANY
FRIENDS
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
Ruler Engineering Co.
CONSULTING ENGINEERS
1615 duPont Building Phone 9-4741
Miami, Florida
TO ALL A HAPPY
. NEW YEAR
IDEAL ROOFING & SHEET METAL CO.
SERVICE PHONE 78-5571
261 N. E. 73rd Street MUmi
Pacific Lumber & Supply Co.
"BfULLY SERVICE"
"BILL" FASDN. FOUNDER
Specializing In Fir Timbers
!C.W. 11th St.
PEPSI-COLA COMPANY. LONG ISLAND. N. Y. '!
Franchised Bottler: PEPSI-COLA BOTTLING CO.. Miami



PAGE 1

jffiqy SEPTEMBER 11, 1953 +Jml3lifk>rkHar) PAGE 7TJ Brg(£s$ays of Wit and PhibsppKy \ < By ELI A. ALMI ^AHDHWit'^LTOUVI The Midrash legend concerning Moses' death is Jh esthetic in its bearing upon the tragedy of this ZL wd el l In*"**" 1 uM •y ,nboUc for tbe gj^ 0 f Israel *** libswlsr and first leader Ifotes was. Voses the legend telb us. not wishing to die, JL .bout himself a magic circle which would not jL the Angel of Death to approach him. God JJtf was therefore obliged to come dewn from i^ He did so and put a kiss upon Moses' foreHMd This kiss ended Noses' Mfe. Not unlike Moses, his people have refused to die throughout centuries of persecution and suffering. DM flw destruction of the Jewish state, the Romans proudly proclaimed, "Judea capta ost," and believed that Israel was annihilated. But Israel has survived not only the mighty Romjos. it has survived all its foes throughout the ages. Hoses stubborn love of life passed on to his people. R was to them their leader's last will and testament was directed: "And thou shalt choose life." The survival of the Jewish people, despite the persecutions and slayings perpetrated by its mighty neighbors — persecutions and slayings which have nude the Jews the most tragic people in all human history — is as much to be wondered at as the circumstance that so small a people, as the Jews, living in so small a land, as Palestine, has produced the eternal Book, the Bible, which is the fountainhead of the world's three greatest religions, the foundation of all human culture and civiliration, the source of all hope for mankind's future. DARKENING THE SKIN OF THE SOUL? Millions of men and women of white skin broil themselves in the sun during the summer in order to darken their skin and very frequently expose themselves to the real danger of sunstroke. Even in the winter time, they attempt to tan their skin by going to sub-tropical climes or by the use of artificial means. Strangely enough, many of the millions of men and women who torture themselves into transforming the color of their skin are chockful of prejudices and hates against other people whose skins have a naturally darker hue. Lloyd George once, quite ingeniously, thus characterized an anti-Semite: "He comes out of a church where he has recited Hebrew psalms, where he has listened to a sermon concerning a verse in the Bible, and he pounees with both fists upon the first Jew he meets, crying: 'Jew'!" THE PHILOSOPHER AND HUNCHBACKED GIRL Moses Mendelsohn, the great Jewish-German philmpher, was hunchbacked, -small of stature and poor in appearance. His wife, however, was a beautiiul and well-formed wosnan. A story is told about Mendelsohn which, in truth, fc connected with the life of another man, also a huBchnack, who had lived several centuries before OK Jewish German philosopher. howMcr, the story runs that while Mendelsohn •u courting the charming girl who was later to become his wife, the attractive damsel would not hear of a marriage between herself and the homely Lothario. True, Mendelsohn was a philosopher, a person highly thought of in Berlin, the friend of Frederick the Great. But this was no inducement to the lady to enter into matrimony with a crippled young man. But Mendelsohn would not give up. One day, as he led his Inamorata up to a large mirror, he sard to hen "Look in, my beautiful one." She 1M as he had asked her, and, lo, she began to tremble. In the looking glass she saw Mendelsohn in the form of a tajl, handsome young man while, by contrast, she descried herself in the shape of a person humped in the front and back. Mendelsohn explained the strange apparition. "You know, my dear," said he, "that betose OUT souls are sent down to earth in order to be embodied in some newly-born human beings, the names of those who are ultimately to marry oue another are read out aloud in heaven. As I was about to be born, I learned that the woman destined for me was to he Continued en Page 10 MR. and MBS. STEPHEN F. KESSLER Charles Jeffrey and Jo Ann Extend Best Wishes to Their "Family and 'Friends The entrance to the Jewish apiarter of Safed. consisting of narrow, labyrinthine alleys, is located on the western section of the steep mountain of Canaan. The ancient streets are dotted with "chadorim, yeshivoth. synagogues, consjref/ations and kiosks. Traditional religious backdrops dot'Israel's modem atmosphere rising out of the ruins of past his**Y—Neff-TlHMnas Machinery, Inc. CONSTRUCTION WOODWORKING INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY 1920 N. W. Miami Court GREETINGS Hollopeter & Post, Inc. REAL ESTATE S ALES & RENTALS 153 N.E. 3rd Street Wwne 3-737t A Happy New Year To All Our Friends and Patrons Rite Cleaners 104 8. W. 17th Avenue Miami Phone 3-6919 %  %  %  %  %  %  m m m < w m^ i %  > w>' TO ALL A MOST HAPPY *EW YEAR FRED BY CALO and His Boys GREETINGS Mar H> 4S>W tear Bssne Unity for the Unite* Rations and Everlasting Peace to All M o n l rin d M OlllliA IJNF\ SERVICE ISO M. W. Mtb STREET To Our Many Patrons and Friends -A Most Happy New Year Tnraerfe ^ p ho lsterkig i mpanv 7230 NJE. Miami Court Phone 84-6545 MR. AND MRS. MAURICE COHN AND FAMILY and the World Wide Liquor Co. EXTEND BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO THE ENTIRE JEWISH COMMUNITY GREETINGS HOLLEMANS RESTAURANT N.W. 79th STREET at 7th AVENUE THE BEST OF FOODS — With Friendly Service Air Conditioned • Popular Prices Ample Parking GREETINGS MIL 0* E PLASTERING COMPANY 7150 N. W. 3rd Avenue PHONE 84-7041 GREETINGS VICTOR'S BpociaHrlng m ITALIAN FOODS Rlcotta Fresh Italian Sausage 2013 N. Miami Are. Phone 3-9974 TO ALL THE SEASON'S BEST WISHES Aeolite Neon Sign Co. 404 S.W. 3rd Ave. PHONE 2-0152 GREETINGS from JACK FISHMAN, President Rrnmlett ff^nipment eft Snpnly Co. Fee Better Health Visit she Miami Health Institute General Diagnosis and X-Ray Physical Therapy Body Conditioning Colonic Irrigations Cabinets and Massage 7215 Biacayne Boulevard PHONE 7900 N. E. First Ave. Miami Phone 94)618 Equipment and Supplies for Hotels. R e staurants and Clubs To All Our Friend* and Patron* A Mo*t llappu New Year MURIEL SPORTSWEAR 1. RUBIN ARNOLD RUBIN PAUL JABLON 2020 N.W. MIAMI COURT MIAMI. FLA. % 



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FAGE 4 A + lt**i


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If, SEPTEMBER lr.1960 +Jewish flcrldb%n "he Ueblood of tfe'lKlegev PAGE 5 E mt %  H A F* -* %  !..' f he wanderers are becoming fanners, as the Lifting sands are converted into fertile fields. Busters of tents are being replaced by housL, water cisterns by the new pipeline ." [)ne of those occasions so characteristic of the State of Israel, when ancient tradition comncnted modern progress, took place recently i the opening of a new water pipeline. The pipecompleted well in advance of Israel's Rosh khonah celebrations, ran to Umm Betin, head ^rters of the Abu Ghaig Bedouins, about eight es from Beersheba near the main road to Hebron tans-Jordan. douins in the past had always relied on winter ps to fill their cisterns and would then struggle (ough the summer months on short rations. But winter these proved insufficient, and in the nths that followed many animals died of thirst, pel's Army lent a helping hand and transported pr in tankers, but this was hardly a long-term ntion. Blueprints were then drawn up by experts | a network of pipelines to service the Bedouins, uching off from the main irrigation pipelines h being built with the aid of allocations from Ite of Israel Bond investments. p>e paper work was soon translated into action, s actual construction neared completion, the jlouins made plans for .a mass celebration of the V water supply. Keeks of preparation went into the Bedouins' laniutinn of a Gala Day in the desert, to mark t beginning of the end of their nomadic life, as PI as another link in Israel's vast irrigation netr. spreading like a gigantic spider's web over | entire country by the use of Israel Bond funds. ImT'o 6 fla P ain was chosen for the a t h *rii.i iu>e Bedouin tribes, quite close to the pipe ter?. and guest tents were pitched. Throughout • morning of a cloudy but dry day. jeeps, trucks %  station wagons mingled with horses, camels and Peys. Khaki shorts and European clothing were fnpersed with the flowing robes of the tribesP^*ere roasted, barbecue-style, in one corner of the plain, and huge basins of sparkling white rice were prepared in another area. A profusion of native delicacies added an Oriental flavor to the outdoor banquet, with copper cans of fragrant coffee handy for everyone. Pittah, the traditional Arab bread, served as a lining for the tin bowls which were filled with rice and lamb. The guests were seated on mattresses and colored mats. Representatives of the Mixed Armistice Commission, who happened to be in the area studying a topographical problem, were pleasantly surprised when they dropped in and were invited to join the fete, with both Jews and Arabs participating. The greatest thrill of the festival afternoon came with the gathering of a line of Arab horsemen on pure thoroughbreds for a race across the desert Sands. The race was won by the second son of a sheikh with 25 wives. The winner was presented with a medal which had been specially struck for the occasion by his father. Darkness closed in with dramatic suddenness, symbolic of the swiftness with which a new life had come 'to the wandering Bedouins, who after centuries of wandering in the desert, are now turning to agriculture for the first time. The wanderers are becoming farmers, as the shifting sands are converted into fertile fields. Clusters of tents are being replaced by houses, water cisterns by the new pipeline, and the barefoot Arab children are getting their first opportunity for regular schooling. Basically, the transformation of the Bedouins is due to the shiny steel pipes carrying water, the lifeblood of the Negev. Directly financing the manufacture and laying of the pipes are the Israel Bond purchases of hundreds of thousands of American investors. TO ALL HAPPY NEW YEAR apt. A. P. St. Phillip


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L^ Y. SEPTEMBER 11. 13 ^•**WA*^**W^^.*^^*^v^*^*< llABBiS TO OFFICIATE AT ANNUAL CEMETERY PILGRIMAGE Sunday, September 13th Rabbis of the Greater Miami Rabbinical Association will conduct jnemorial services on the followinfl schedule: D m Woodlawn—All Rabbis to be present for Community Service. i 2 p.m.. Mount Nebo. 3 p. m ., Mount Sinai and Graceland. 1:30 p.m., Reform Services at Graceland. Members of the Greater Miami Jewish Community having loved ones in any of these cemeteries are asked to be present for the Memorial Prayers at the time and place scheduled above. Mmfeftj%rftftv7 PAGE 11 A Shown above is the Beth David Choir which assists Rabbi Max Shapiro and Cantor Maurice Mamches during the High Holiday services. From left to right (front row) are Cantor Mamches, Dorothy Sponder, Norma Reiff, Hillel Glover, Miriam Donnerstag, director, Evelyn Sal^.^5',^ aWjiSha P iro Rear row are Reuben Idels, Murray Baum. Nat Salander and Don I Miami Beach officials are expected to attend the annual Yom IKippur Night Dance of the Miami Beach Lodge, B'nai B'rith. Ischeduled for September 19th, at the Delano Hotel. B'nai I B'rith women are co-sponsors of the affair. Above are Mrs. [Harold Shapiro, wife of the Miami Beach Mayor, and Mrs. I Henry Lebow, a member of the committee, looking on at one [of the prizes held by Charles (Chick) Goldberg, manager of Delano Hotel. Jacques Torczyner, chairman of he ZOA Committee on World ZionAtfairs and a vice president of ne ZOA. emphasized That "the unction of the world Zionist liovement is to help the Jewish eople survive in a modern world Inhere assimilation and foreign toalitarian ideas threaten to capture, kur youth and our intellectuals." Benjamin G. Browdy, past president of the ZOA and a member of the Jewish Agency executive, urged all Zionists "to throw themselves into the work of Jewish education and Jewish community organization — the Jewish schools, federations, the welfare funds and Jewish community councils — in all Jewish communities throughout the United States." TO OUR MANY FRIENDS MOST HAPPY HOLIDAYS ALUMINUM— Glass Topper ftr extra light WASHINGTON — The situation in the Middle East, including Israel, was reviewed at length by Jacob Blaustein, president of the American Jewish Committee, during a conference here with Assistant Secretary of State Henry A. By r, ade, who is in charge of Near Eastern Affairs. BIST MUSHES fOR A HAPPY HOLIDAY '"' ffecfro Neon Sign Co. 75 N.W. 6th STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA Phone 9-5750 We Buy. Sell and Rant New and Used Power Mowers and Trimmers Pick-up and Delivery Lawn Mower Center Authorized Service and Parts Red Clinton Briggs & Stratt-ml 1501 N.W. 79th St., Miami. Ft Phone 7-3588 1 A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR Spolter Electrical Supplies, Inc. Lighting Fixtures 715 N.W. 62nd Street PHONE 7-6519 MR. arid MRS. WILLIAM AGRANOVE 960 Bay Drive, Miami Beach Extend Best Wishes for the New Year to their Friends and Relatives LT la tne B *r' A Hapfy *nJ Prosperous tiew Tear To Ail Our Friends and Patron; Westwood Hoi el 230 31th STREET MIAMI BEACH Phone 5-7646 GREETINGS FROM Orange Blossom AMERICA'S FINEST FRESH FRUIT JUICE VICTOR tXTlNOS KIT WISHtS KM TMf NEW TEA* SHELIORNE HOTEL BEAUTY SALON 1801 Collins Avows* Phone 5-1271 A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR MIAMI SHORES PHARMACY 9540 N.E. 2nd AVENUE Phone 7-1585 84-5561 74, U MLC0 INC 7 N.W. 54th ST.. MIAMI, FLA. A Happy and Prosperous New Year to all Our Friends and Patrons Loeb & Gottfried RED ROAD. HIALEAH Phone 88-2255 A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL TilIVUK>M-ItTJ4lAT0S.RA>ES-WASMERS-TIIUSATrt(llIS.AUT0$E(tV (hi.-., problems upp< noel MI the mlns)j of Amerlcaa Mws. (I I Qlvee an .!• jtntl-sensltism, mid Indicate* Its fiit • -.ii (!) i '"i ere the rel >' ioa f American Jews with, and tnei la lion to\\.irl>. Israel. (3) W)l •mulnut efforts now being made i> parochlelhie Jewish life In -'• %  IIH,I win us MKalnsi ct-IiirninK to nh. practises nlKirt..nt booh fur Jew and non-Jew %  like. Order your copy nh >oupon beloD Onlj lt.SO. Money bick in 5 days if not satisfied. VANT.V PRESS, INC., 121) VY. 3lt St. I York I. 5-Day. Money.Back Guarantee Vantage Press, Inc. 1 120 W. 31st St.. New York | I Please send me a copy of A CHALLENGE TO JEWRY, by Jos • I L. Tepper. at $2.50. If not satisfied, I may return the Dook for full re1 fund within 5 days. | G Payment enclosed Send C.O.D. Name Addre ss I



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prDAY, SEPTEMBER 11. 19S3 +Jewist rtorklian Page 9F The Saga -Hsratfs Old Soil By DR. ABRAHAM GRANOTT r |d Prtsidtnt of Karen Kayameth in Jerusalem The beginning of the year 5714 affords an opportunity to review the work of the Jewish National Fund and list some of its achievements. Characterized by the 23rd World Zionist Congress held in Jerusalem in 1952 as one of the major funds of the 1 Zionist Movement, serving as one of the chief instruLcnts for the realization of Zionism, the Jewish [National Fund has an interesting and impressive Iftory to tell of land reclamation and land development, which is part of the great saga of the State of Israel. A few figures will tell the story. The Jewish National Fund now owns about 3,500,000 dunams. Of these, 2.500,000 dunams have been redeemed since Che establishment of the State, which means that Le have been able to acquire within the last five tears more than twice as much as we were in a osition to redeem in almost helf a century. Eighty ercent of the total Jewish agricultural land is in [he hands of the JNF; four-fifths of the total agricultural production of Israel derives from Jewish National Fund land. Noteworthy in this connection ; the growth of the soil brought about through the reclamation projects of the Jewish National Fund. he JNF has added to the Jewish patrimony 300,000 bunams in the swamp regions and about 200,000 lunams in the hill areas of the Galilee, the Shomron tnd Judea as well as in the wastes of the Negev. All 350 new settlements launched since the found ttion of the State in 1948 were established on land provided by the Jewish National Fund. Since the establishment of the State of Israel, the INF has planted approximately 18,000,000 trees, Jlmost three times the number planted in the course |f half a century. The Jewish National Fund is deeply interested in Tigation, since water is second only to the land elf as a prerequisite to Israel's development. Out If the 3.500.000 dunams that are being cultivated \j Jewish farmers in Israel today, less than 500,000 ire under irrigation. The Jewish National Fund is a ^ajor partner in Israel's foremost public water supcompany, Mekorot, which has established the ountrys principal water supply system and is reonsible fur the development of new resources. An ndication of what is done to increase Israel's water lupply is to be found in these figures. By the end If 1951, the annual supply was 85,000,000 cubic piers; in 1952, the water supply rose to 120,000,000 lubic meters. The pipeline to the Negev and the pying of a second water main to Jerusalem are ome of the recent achievements of our. water supply arm. The Jewish National Fund has contributed greatly the solution of the housing problem in Israel. 0,000 men, women and children are housed in rural lousing developments, while 100,000 live in urban lousing developments located on JNF land. One might ask:— "What are the tasks of the JewC 1 N a ," onal Kund now that we have a Jewish *e?" Again, we let the figures tell their own Rory. Out of the 20.500,000 dunams within the boun"WlI of the State only 5,000,000 are under cultivaW the rest is desert, rock, swamp and sand dune. It is the task of the Jewish National Fund, after WWng the soil of Israel as the possession of the ^People, to develop the land and prepare it for cultivation and the settlement of the new immigrants who come streaming to the shores of the Jewish homeland and those who, we hope, will come from countries which hitherto were closed to Jewish emigration. The establishment of the State of Israel affords the Jewish National Fund a historic opportunity to make rapid headway in the attainment of its goal. That goal is to make room in Israel for every Jew who needs or wishes to settle there To support the new immigrants, large areas of land must immediately be brought under cultivation To keep the country's economy balanced about 20'/ of its people must be settled on land. Obviously, the land should not become a source of private profit or an object of speculation. The task of bringing the land into the eternal possession of the Jewish people and making it fit for settlement remains the duty of the Jewish National Fund. In the first half century of its existence, the JNF established the foundations of the Jewish homeland; it is the task of the Jewish National Fund, within the next decade or so, to fill the vacant spaces of Israel's territory and to transform waste and desert lands into a garden of God. The Jewish National Fund is now enaged on a series of development and reclamation projects which, when completed, will add to the fertility of the country, rendering it capable of supporting a large population. The Huleh project in the Northern Galilee is one of the greatest reclamation projects ever carried out in Israel. Some 75,000 dunams of farmlandenough to support 6,000 farming units—will add their produce to the growing achievement of Israel's agriculture, when the work is completed. The first stage of this project was completed in December 1952; the second was begun in June 1953 and will be carried out by the Aggregates Construction Corporation of Chicago of which J. R. Sensibar is president. The forecast of potentialities in the Huleh envisages the utilization of abundant peat layers beneath the swamp. This peat may provide a source Continued on Page 15 Striving to Make Every Day of Every Year a Better One for Mankind **# :. ( iHercg JMasptial f R F F T I N P Q MONSALVATGE & CO. of MIAMI. INC. WHOLESALE CIGARS AND CANDIES 68 S. W. First Street Phone 2-5156 An enrichment plant to boost the strength of Israel's phosphates is in full operation as part of a first step in the establishment of an expanded chemicals industry for the young republic. Red Adams Sightseeing Tours GLASS TOP AIR CONDITIONED BUSES For Reservations — Phone 3-6371 • Your Hotel or Motel Agent 3 NX 3rd AVENUE — MIAMI 1627 COLLINS AVENUE — MIAMI BEACH JACOB SCHACHTER Director Jewish Musical Hour Sunday 12 to 2 p.m. WMBM — 800 on Tour Dial Wuhii to mink his iponwri far tholr kind co-operation and ttndi boat wiihti to hit liatanara and to all Jewry far a vary Happy Now Yoar. AMERICA'S HEADQUARTERS FOR FOOD SERVICE EQUIPMENT Supplies, Furnishings, Equipment f o r HOTELS, RESTAURANTS, CLUBS, RESORTS, SCHOOLS, HOSPITALS, INSTITUTIONS such as CHINAWARE, GLASSWARE, SILVERWARE, ETC. EDWARD DON & COMPANY Phone 82-2657 1400 N. MIAMI AVE. MIAMI 32, FLA. HAPPY NEW YEAR The SEYBOLD BUILDING For Office Space Please Call Building Manager 2-7922 1k* l&uei Cc / KfAlTOHJ AGENTS T ALL... A MOST HAPPT NEW TEAR THOMAS J. KELLY YOUR DADE COUNTY SHERIFF Greetings to All Our Patrons and Friends Kolber Bros. VENETIAN BLINDS 2100 N.W. I3th AVENUE Phone 3-6641 5714 y 1953-54 ROSH HASHONA GREETINGS EMPIRE FURNITURE takes this opportunity to extend their best wishes to people of the Jewish faith all over the world



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Connellmun and Mi* UuriM'tt Roth AND DAUGHTERS Ljla Sue and Carlo Star B AND SON Samuel Scher [EXTEND THE BEST OF WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL THEIR FRIENDS ALL OUR FRIENDS AND ACQUAINTANCES A [MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR r. and Mrs. Saul QnUt and Family 5833 Devonshire Bird. BALIN'S BAKERY |)94 s.W. 27th Ave„ Ph. 48-9124 EXTENDS SEASON'S GREETINGS ITO THEIR CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS INEW YEAR GREETINGS PIBLIC GAS CO. 7200 N. W. 7th Are. PHONE 78-7621 MASONS BEST WISHtS CAROUSEL CHILDREN** SHOP 423 LINCOLN ROAD MIAMI BEACH BUliaiHC REMODELING Storm Prsol Roofs, Building and Repairs, Asbestos Siding Tite-On Construction & Roofing HWH 44 SOI 0, Day or Night S426 N.W. 21st COURT MIAMI, FLORIDA *flr Payments Low M $1*40 Palmer's Roofing Company lihas carried on continuously Ijiince 1920 — thru "booms." [j "depressions" jmes. In a and hurrigreat many : ases it has maintained roofs families and ||iar the same I i estates thru two generations. jWe are not "Super-roofers" I but we make every effort to fa a worthy job. We confer that when we install a "Xrt il i3 our responsibility *til it has outlived the term ^ '/ears for which the class p roof was intended. Sincerely yours, Bill Palmer Phone 3-6244 acJewiislh 0pafSkm MIAMI. FLORIDA FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11. 1953 SEC. E 300 Years of Jewish Life in America By P. NIBUR The City of New York, largesl city in the world, with a population of more than eight million, is this year celebrating its three-hundredth birthday. The small town under Dutch rule, which was then called New Amsterdam, (it acquired the name of New York eleven years later when the British occupied the town) exactly three hundred years ago received the right of local self-government. A year later, in 1654, there arrived in New Amsterdam the first shipload of Jews, 23 in number, the first Jews to land on the soil of what is now the United States of America. They came to these shores from Brazil, fleeing from the Portuguese who had seized this colony from the Dutch and had begun to install the inquisition there. A month earlier this group had been preceded in New Amsterdam by the arrival there of Jacob Bar-Simeon, who had come directly from Holland and who was the first Jew to land in North America. Next year, 1954, New York Jewry will together with the Jewries of many other American communities celebrate the 300th anniversary of Jewish settlement, of Jewish life, in the United States. It will be a great celebration which will find its echo in all countries of the world where there are large or small Jewish communities. The United States with its five-and-a-half million Jews contains nearly half the Jewish, population of the world and New York City with its two-and-a-half million Jews contains nearly half the Jewish population of the United States. Never before in Jewish history have so many Jews congregated in one community. New York City is by far the largest Jewish city in the world. The entire State of Israel, even today after the tremendous number of immigrants who have been coming to its shores during the past five years, still contains a smaller number of Jews than the one city of New York. New York City has as many, or perhaps even more, Jews than are to be found in all of Soviet Russia. No city in the world has grown so fast during the past three hundred years as has New York. And if the city as a whole made giant strides, its Jewish population, particularly during the last seventy years when the great East European immigration to the United States began, grew even faster. The rapid growth of the city generally gave New York Jews an opportunity to develop and make economic progress and instilled in them a desire to remain in this port city where they had landed from Europe, instead of settling further inland. However, New York's giant growth also served to uproot from the city, to a large extent, its American religious-Anglo-Saxon cultural tradition and to create the atmosphere of a place of wealth and pleas ure seekers. In such an atmosphere it was difficult for the Jewish immigrant to transplant in the New York soil — even if in a different form — that religious-cultural Jewish tradition he had brought with him from the Old Country. Were it not for the constant influx of new immigrants, were it not for the great quantitative rise in numbers of New York Jewry, its quality would have truly remained weak, as the quality of Jewish life that existed here before r Happy New Year To All My Friends August Studio INTERIOR DECORATING 1230 Alton Road TO ALL GREETINGS Rainbow Juice & Fruit Shipping Co. •ONDED MMD 209 71st STREET MIAMI BEACH Phone 88-9250 GREETINGS Roosevelt Garage Exoerfs Im Aoftmotivt Service Mf Repairs 70 N.E. 13th STREET PHONE 3-2442 Irvin Gordon Harold Pont of the DELICATESSEN and RESTAURANT 170 N.W. Fifth Street MIAMI NOW AIR CONDITIONED Extend To All Their Patrons and Friends Sincere Wishes For A Very Happy and Prosperous New Year GREETINGS Ch.s. E. Common Coleman Solar Service • TANKS • BOOSTERS • NEW SYSTEMS • REPAIRS 2428 S.W. 27th AVENUE Phone 87-8349



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PAGE 14 E + kmi<&Fk>rklt*r> ragAYJEPTEMlER 11, MAYOR and MRS. HAROLD SHAPIRO WOW* KIT WISMtS fO* A HAW *IW TIAM 70 THl GRiAit* MIAMI mm coMMmnr SEASON'S GREETINGS SHELDON & McMULLEN INSURANCE AGENCY Inc. 4116 MERIDIAN AVENUE PHONE 5-2151 TO ALL HAPPY NEW YEAR Wm. D. "Bill" Joyce & Associates DADE COUNTY PURCHASING AGENT TO ALL A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY PAUL L. HUTCHINSON HUTCHINSON SERVICE STATION 1155 Collins Arenua PHONE 58-9402 A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL MARTINIQUE HOTEL 6423 Collins Avenue Miami Beach VISIT OUR COMPLETE TOY DEPARTMENT ARMY-NAVY STORES VETERAN SURPLUS OUTLET WE FILL MAIL ORDERS: Addreu all mail order* to 1214 Biacaync Blvd. 1214 BISCAYNE BLVD. Phone 3-3318 (S Block South of Start) 6301 N.W. 7th AVE. (Edison Center) Phone 89-1422 KING MIDAS STORE I Hialeah) Phone 88-5363 6255 S.W. 8th ST. Tamiami Trail) Phone 67-3563 TO ALL HAPPY NEW YEAR THE MIAMI AGENCY. INC. GENERAL INSURANCE II. II. WOODSMALL, JR. 682 N.E. 124th St. North Miami Phone 84-0615 THAT ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS MAY ENJOY A HAPPY NEW YEAR IS THE SINCERE WISH OF THE AUGUST FAMILY and AUGUST IlltOS. BAKERY 3tl S. W. Eighth Street Phone 2-2792 TO ALL GREETINGS FARREY'S. INC. Hardware WHOLESALE — RETAIL 1692 Alton Rood Miami Beach Phono 5-4621 PATIENT AND DOCTOR GREET THE NEW YEAR IN IT|] Continued from Peee 2 filled a tumbler of water. "You looked," he said, offering him the water, "as if you were going to faint." "I felt as if I would," said Doctor Blanisch. •Thanks." • What's the matter?" "Haybe both of us are patients," said Doctor Blanisch. "Are you Jewish?" "Yes." "American?" "Yes. Chicago." "Come here," said Doctor Blanisch. "Look out of that window. Do you see a yellow dome to the left? It stands out from the rest of the landscape." "Along the Tiber." "That's it. Do you know what that building is?" "What is it?" "Rome's synagogue." "Do you know what day this is?" "Monday." "I mean its special significance." "No. I dont." "Rosh Hashonah starts at sundown. How would you like to take a walk to the synagogue? In two minutes we're at the Tiber and from there it's a half hour's walk, no more." Robert Sandier seemed to hesitate. He was standing in front of the doctor. "You're sweating, doctor," he said. "Maybe I ought to apply the stethescope to your heart and take your pulse." "A walk will revive me," replied Doctor Blanisch. "We seem to have revived each other," said Robert Sandier. As they reached the street the young man turned to the doctor and said: "What seems to be your trouble, Doctor?" Doctor Blanisch replied: "What seems to be yours?" "My wife died two months ago." "Mine six years ago. I had two children, a boy and a girl. You will find them all in Auschwitz." "We were very close to each other," said Robert Sandier, "my wife and I." "So were we." At their right the Tiber ran toward the sea, with astonishing speed, churning up out of its bed a clay liquid, once called golden by the Romans. The two men walked side by side, slowly, under the beech and chestnut trees toward the synagogue. "I have too good a memory," said Robert Sandier. 'That's the trouble." "Yes, it's the memory that interferes." "I know that one has to go on. How? Out of what? The whole world is a shambles. How can one take courage from it? So I came to Europe to forget and what I find here is that it makes you feel even more alone. At least, doctor, you have your profession — I have nothing." "Nothing?" "Nothing. I was a schoolteacher. I've given that up." "Why?" "Because nothing seemed to make sense any more. So how could I teach nonsense?" Doctor Blanisch turned left away from the Tiber. "A shortcut," he said. "What are you doing in Rome?" asked Robert Sandier. "I'm on the staff of the Joint working with refugees. I myself am one. Perhaps you too." "Yes, I've heard about the Joint. I've even helped to raise money for it through the Unit*! Appeal. And what do you do with them ? gees?" *m-th(, "We try to rehabilitate them." "What's your technique?" "We try to give them something to live for"Does it succeed?" "In many cases." "But apparently not in yours." "Apparently not." The doctor had taken the wrong turn. h-. emerging in back of the synagogue, at Via RJ" they found themselves in that area which haps the most impressive of Rome, that part history appears on a moving screen for those I imagination to see it. At the left is Palatine I Here the Roman emperors had lived in their i Here is the Arch of Titus under which had i Jewish slaves from Jerusalem two thousand" ago. At the right is the Colosseum, that vi which Jewish slave labor helped to build. dous arches, mortar and stone prepared and applied by human hands. Robert Sandier had not seen Rome from i vantage point For the past month he had been L in bed in his hotel room. Occasionally he would down for a cup of coffee. "Look at all this!" exclaimed Doctor Bla "Ruins! What did they build for? For w what? All ruins! Like all these modern will be ruins some day!" Robert Sandier did not say anything for I moments. He seemed to be seeing a vision Su4 ly standing there, he was conscious of a perception. Two Jews — a doctor from Vili an American schoolteacher — two thousand later standing on the same ground where Jei marched who would not give up their faith. was a test of endurance, courage, faith, conti of heritage. What meaning was there in him and for the doctor? "And to the right is the Theater of Ma said Doctor Blanisch, "And right behind it | see the yellow stone of the synagogue. Well just in time for the services." They walked on. A man is born and dies. A man is made a i of — and dies. Rome was built — and does it i And have those who were the slaves building I Colosseum died for all time? How could they 1 died, if now in Rome a Jewish doctor from and an American Jew from Chicago can recall t Robert Sandier thought. Out of the ghetto streets the Jews of Rome i moving toward the open door of the Synago#Jl Rosh Hashonah services. Doctor Blanisch. the ( tor, and Robert Sandier, the patient, walked up I steps. The synagogue was almost full. Robert Sandier put his hand on the shoulder. "We were once slaves in Rome, Doctor Blanisch looked at him puzzled. "And took at us now," continued Robert "you've become a doctor and I a schoolte Isn't that making progress?'" The doctor glanced at him and seemed to i stand. "Wouldn't you call that successful rehabili doctor?" said Robert Sandier. The doctor nodded — then with a sudden | pressed the young American's right hand in JEWELS SILVER WORKS OF ART Furniture. Antiques and Curios INTERNATIONAL FINE ART GALLERIES 12SS Lincoln Rd.. Muni Beach A. SCHORR. Repr—entattve Business Phone 58-1025 Residence Phone 5-2503 A Happy Htw Year To All Our Friends and Patrons West Flagler Garage 1930 WEST FLAGLER ST. MIAMI Phono 2-2121 Jim Hounshell, Prop. TO ALL GREETINGS FRANK BARESE ITALIAN AMERICAN RESTAURANT 12428 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD MIAML FLO* Phono 7-9653 NEW YEAR GREETINGS TO ALL HIALEAH MIAMI SPRINGS BANK "A 'rieadfy Bmmk" (Member of FJ5.LC.) 101 HIALEAH DRIVE HIALEAH. FLORIDA Telephone 884431



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PAGE 2 G • JewistFtcrkBar FRIDAY. ^TEMBER 11.19 Judge and Mrs. Norman R. Lyons Extend Best Wishes for the Hew Year The National Jewish Hospital: B'nai BVith's Human Servia Greetings To All Alexander Orr & Associates, Inc. PLUMBING — HEATING Residential — Commercial — Industrial Stning the Greater Miami Area Since J915 66 N.E. 39th STREET — Ph. 89-2461 1119 16th STREET. MIAMI BEACH — Ph. 5-3546 Phones 5-1422 — 5-9591 Sport Tops — Seat Covers McMurray's Service Center COMPLETE AUTO RtPAlRS AND PAINTING 1132 15th STREET MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA Ask for lack Sylla TO Ml ... CRtlTINCS MANFRED M. UNGARO MIAMI, FLORIDA 1721 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD HOLIDAY GREETINGS to our many Jewish friends RaileyMilam's 1676 ALTON ROAD Ph. 5-735S From the single building institution it was when opened by B'nai B'rith in 1899. the National Jewish Hospital at Denver has grown to a three-square-block campus occupied by 14 buildings. Paralleling its physical expansion has been the hospital's widely recognized work in tuberculosis treatment, research, rehabilitation and education. By PHILIP HOUTZ In all its 54 years, the National Jewish Hospital at Denver has never had more inspiring reason to engage in the stock-taking and the looking ahead which traditionally accompany Rosh Hashonah than now. as the year 5714 approaches. We have come a long way. indeed, since our hospital was opened by B'nai B'rith in 1899. as a single-building institution. We have cared for more than 50.000 tuberculous patients from upwards of C.OOO communities in faithful adherence to our motto: None May Enter Who Can Pay—None Can Pay Who Enter. We have maintained and accelerated our march of progress in the face of two World Wars and a depression. And now. as the New Year nears, j we are disengaging ourselves from still another major obstacle which crossed our path. Recently, a cloudburst struck Denver. Our hospital was hardest hit of any place in the city. Our kitchen and store rooms were severely damaged. Supplies were destroyed. More than 3.000.000 gallons of water had to be pumped from hospital basements, and the cost in dollars is going to be high. But the 280 patients, including 50 children, not only were unharmed, but they didn't miss a meal. Thanks to the excellent cooperation of governmental agencies and hundreds of kind hearted women who volunteered to assist us we we" to begin quickly the rebuilding and rehabiliL? required, and once again we are in full milit an suit of the progress which has characterized Hospital's growth and advancement over the For these things—for the high esteem in which hospital is held—we are most grateful. Ever who has suported this humanitarian work, and has helped to make this pioneer institution a hi of health and hope for more than half a centu has every reason to be proud. In addition to forming life-saving work, the National Jewish pital has become, throughout the American Je Community which has supported it so genen and so consistently, a source of pride and symb the Brotherhood which has been the centu dream of all Jews. Just as we are doing now, those who estaML the National Jewish Hospital annually took stock! looked ahead. "In those days, at this season,"< hospital's founders heard the cough of the coa_ tive which was so prevalent throughout the All around them, they saw relatives and suffer without proper care. Death took an nately high toll. The founders of the National i ish Hospital observed at first hand the ravagej] this dread disease. These conditions comprised I power which motivated those farsighted men women to act. Our generation is motivated more indirectly i the continuation of this good work. The death i among the tuberculous has been reduced drastical sensationally. Today, those who support this work rarely see the dire effects of the disease. man's everlasting credit, it is true that today, i out seeing for themselves, without being prom|K by the fact that they are constantly surrounded I dying men, women and children, supporters of I National Jewish Hospital are keenly aware of i need for continuation and extension of the assistu required to help those who bear the double bu of poverty and disease. Yes, we have made much progress. Our biiildi program is well under way. In the last 12 montl we dedicated the Hearst Research Laboratories i the million-dollar. 94-bed modern building for | bulatory patients. The Heineman Building has I rehabilitated and its facilities expanded so that I number of children being treated now idoublet of a year ago. Fifty youngsters now benefit from I combination of medical and loving care we are i to give them, thanks to warm-hearted friends in I walks of life who support, each according to I means, this humanitarian work. And where o only four years ago. tuberulous meningitis wui hundred percent fatal,we now are able tosavel lives of 61 percent of children attacked by thisi vicious of all baby -killer.-. Immediately ahead are construction of mo surgical and clinical facilities at an estimated i of $50,000 and the modernization of the Shoenbi Building to improve our all-important rehabiliti program. Where once there was one small building. structures now stand as monuments to the nob of spirit and the generosity and humaneness of I American Jewish Community. As one of the I in a group recently visiting the hospital put it I Continued on Pa 11 jSest pltsffcg Jor JV ffappg 5fefo !* iti\ IICSIIM: it\\k MEMRER ftOUAL DfPOSET INSURANCE CORPORATION LESS TRAFFIC EASY PARKING 12th AVENUE NEAR FLAGLER FRIENDLY SERVICE



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PAGE 2E GREETINGS ADDIE MAKERS OF FIN E CANDI ES BOHDED FBDIT SHIPPERS 1121 Wonnington A 50-3614 Patient and Doctor Greet the New Year Together in Italy the A HA?F:" NT*' YEAS MILLEH MACHINERY AND SUPPLY CO. rMiU£sU£XFESTEY SUPPLY CO. 1*7 K. E. 27* Stree* Phone 02-5434 Br MUKKAY GITLIN Sow Msmrr Calm, the sethor of aory. has pabtnkwrt a novel. The InHf —it* Tir Ti—irti DP exodus tiiy and is a veil kaon conUibulor to S^CE=I WISHES FOH A H A ? ? Y NEW YEAH BARNETTS INC. 134 HE. Pant Street MJUCS FINEST OFF1CZ SUPPLIES The Doctor weal to the second class hotel where was staying on Via Gnsardi. in a of Basse not far froai the Tiber, rode up in the ekiator and knocked at the door. Seen*; the weary, ahnost cynical nairnim in the young man's eyes. Doctor Blaatsrh asked nun no qeestions He dad not even say: "Are yon the man who phoned s the trouble*" --SZ W3KSS :Z?. A HAPPY NEW YEAH Custombilt Furniture Mfg. Co. .X NX. 4>i Street Phono 78-4711 Siowrootns Corner 79*h S*and Biscsyne BJrd, Phono 70-4244 DadcToa %  IV Wuvd.-al.Ts S.ppl v C4. ED. ?rrp.r os. v?r. :::•: N w 3H. STREET Phone S4-SSC1 BXA1 A nAGAZT.VZ TCN:3HT T4ir Embroidery Work ft *£ N.W. 22=d AVL PHONE RABBI and MRS. S. M. M \< HTI I MR. and MRS. MORTON STTTSKY STELLA B-BeVa one LEO JAY Extend To A^ Jewry Best Wishes for A HAPPY NEW YEAR was lying stretched oat on top of tbe folly dressed, and did not acknowledge by expression He did not anbatton his shirt when he saw the doctor approach with the stetheToo"re the doctor Go ahead aad find tbe yoarself." his setf-inrotved and somewhat silence seemed to say. "I'm not cooper a ting. In only a bystander. Doctor Blawisch onbottoned the shirt and applied the stethoscope So aniin mi Bl ood pressure norrt slightly rapid. Skin pale and someHe sat down. Bat the patient did not tarn his head or after a sound "Yon sent for me. Mr Sandier, didst yon? What seems to be the tT oabi i — be asked finally. ~Xo. I didn't send for yea." said tbe young man. I *dVe that matched his facial expression. %  pan didnt. who?" -I doot know. Ask the hotel clerk." Doctor Blaniseh went down to the hotel lobby. %  to the manager's office The manager got up and his hand This young American upstairs, has lying on his bed for days, for weeks." be said in Kalian. "He sees nobody-, he eats nothing. He stares at tbe ceiling all day. Are you a doctor?" -Yes. la a doctor Was it you who called the Joint Clinic?" -Yes." -Why tbe Joint'" Because tbe Joint is American, and he is Ameri. moat Italians the JDC. or the Joint, was an lake the American Embassy, a clearing far trouble. did he register here?" tee days njo." t anybody been to see him?" Perfaapa by the time another New Year IOIJ] around, thane youngsters. 01 since birth *Q tuberculoaia. will be well again. Here the are shown resting on the porch of the Etcma Children's TB hospital in Israel, one of 9 85 hospitals, old age homes, sanitariums and J other inetiruhons in Israel supported by Mdj ben. the Joint Distribution Committees pre.> gram on behali of aged, ill and hendicapped newcomers to the new state. t he i ': njnf" %  • a0s from his room All we he's American. That we Mrs. Sadie Fagan Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hershbem and Children Extend New Year Greetings To All again. Robert left him. He looked l_i t L_I W d0e r ""^ fWe r Uut he ** waan nwere before. A young man lythe spirit sapped. the past a shambles, the future an unknown pit I studied the face for a moment Of course he the map. It was himself. 1944. The doctor sat down and looked out of ta| window It was the middle of September, ow L. those airy, light-spirited, pre-autumn Rome dan,l The chestnut trees lining tbe streets reminded doctor of the beech trees on the street he had aj office on in Vilna before tbe war. A woman past on the other side of the street, and ret_ him of his wife who had been one of the fortunate ones — she had died of a heart attack | Auschwitz. Across the tree-tops far out toward L_ east horizon the dome of Saint Peter refledei| the pale, animated air of tbe city, and toward left, as he leaned forward in his chair, he sawi other dome — of the synagogue. Doctor Blaniseh turned from the window Anal pressive sense or Rome's beauty mingled witi ua| oppression of memory, perhaps had evoked it remembered that in a few hours, the New Ye — Rosh Hasbonah — would begin. Suddenly the young American sat up in "What's the matter, doctor? Arent you fe well?" Doctor Blaniseh shook his head, but Robert ler got out of tbe bed. hurried to the bathroom i en Peat 14 K. MIAMI AVt AT HST ST. *_ -al BEST WISHES for a HAPPY NEW YEAH TO ALL OOB FRIENDS, RELATIVES AMD ACQUAINTANCES A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAH W. Field* 1600 Coffins Are. Miami Beach TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR KeUj'8 Drive-.. Not ABsaatod with any Drfee-Bi DeBeiou, Seadwiehea Curb 1 MO N.W. LE JEUNE RD.-4-7033 SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL OUR FRIENDS Ocean Irni Restaurant 7143 Coffins Arenas. Bfaasnl Beach — Phone 0*4338 South Shore Restaurant 155 Drive, 54301 TO AH... A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR A & R AUTO REPAIR SHOP Scientific Motor Tune Up Specialising In Transmission* Ccunpleto Auto Repair — All Work Guaranteed Joe Acebal Owner 300DYEAR TIRES — TUBES — BATTERIES %  %  3*501 1J75 N.W. 29th Snvl



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PAGE 8 G +Jeisi> Th>rHk*n ""PAY, SEPTEMBER n A Happy and Prosperous Mow Year to all our friends Mr. and Mrs. Allen Goldberg Greetings To All CORAL GABLES LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANING CO. 250 MINORCA AVENUE — Phone 4-6458 4008 RED ROAD — Phone 87-2876 CORAL GABLES The Officers and Directors of the Greater Miami JEWISH CEMETERY ASSOCIATION Extend To All Jewry Their Most Sincere Wishes For A HAPPY AND HEALTHY NEW YEAR Operating: JEWISH SECTION Wood I awn Park Cemetery AND Mount Sinai Memorial Park 25 Acres oi Beautiful Family Plots 1125 Opa Locka Boulevard Affiliated Congregations: Congregation Beth David Congregation Beth Jacob Congregation Beth El Miami Hebrew School & Congregation Sisterhood Chesed Shel Emeth Affiliated Groups and Congregations Now Owning Membership Sections in Ml. Sinai Cemetery Congregation Beth David Congregation Beth Jacob Congregation Beth El Miami Hebrew School and Congregation West Miami Jewish Community Center Louis Brandeis Benevolent Association Congregation Beth Tenlah oi Miami Beach Downtown Synagogue. Miami (Old Beth David) Workmen's Circle, Miami and Miami Beach Branch* Jewish National Workers Alliance Shandlofi Lodge. Jewish Peoples Fraternal Order Sephardic Brotherhood of Greater Miami Roosevelt Lodge. Knights oi Pythias oi Miami Miami Beach Lodge. Knights of Pythias Jewish Bartenders Union Now Planning ALL JEWISH MASONIC SECTION JEWISH WAR VETERANS SECTION and other Fraternal and Religious Groups H. M. DREWICH. President SAMUEL DICKSON. First Vice President LEO MEYER, Second Vice President A. PEPPER. Treasurer Sidney H. Palmer. Executive Vice President Prospects of Fair Employment In Government Contract Lai By The Jewish Tiifcsrephk Agency WASHINGTON — Wnft is the significance in President Eisenhower's treation of a new committee to help stamp ott Jon discrimination in Federallycontracted work? First, a look at the background. In 1941. President Roosevelt directed that a clause be inserted in government contracts banning employers involved from discriminating against workers on racial, religious or similar grounds. This and other anti-discrimination regulations outside of government were policed by the Fair Employment Practices Commission (FEPC). The FEPC was permitted to lapse in 1945, after the end of World War II. Immediately, discriminatory practices in industry, including plants under government contract, began mounting. Minority groups, especially Negro and Jewish, began to press for a government committee to help bring about compliance with the Roosevelt anti-discrimination clause. In December, 1951. President Truman created such a committee, though, under the reported threat of appropriations cuts in the Executive Department by Southern Democrats, he gave it only weak powers. It had no enforcement power and was a study group that did little besides submit an annual report. The Truman committee, with six public members and five from government contracting agencies, was not even specifically given the authority to receive complaints, though a number of complaints were levelled at it afterwards. It was merely told to study enforcement of the Roosevelt clause and recommend more effective government agency machinery for lorcing compliance from industry. President Eisenhower, in replacing the old committee with a new one, clearly implied that the Truman program was not working well. A review showed, his executive order said, "that the practices and procedures relating to compliance with the nondiscrimination provisions must be revised and strengthened to eliminate discrimination from all aspects of employment." As a matter of fact, the Truman committee was dying a slow death. For some months, the New York Times noted, the group had led only a "nominal existence." Most of its members had quit. And a Negro group spokesman said the committee was ready to take the election of Eisenhower as a signal to close down all activities until word was passed on' from Senator Lodge that the President-elect wanted to see the program continued. The Negro spokesman, an official of the National franklin D. ooie/f study hit clost Association for the Advancement of Colored P*., said industry also took the election to mean 2 emphasis on fair employment activity and J*Z up discriminatory practices. So, it appears that* President's creation of the new committee had ? dual purpose of giving new impetus to th e £ discrimination program and making clear vrhT Eisenhower stands on the question. The new committee is generally described a. J\ "action" group as compared to the purely stud! functions of the old committee. Spokesmen for *W Bnai B'rith. the NAACP and other such g r0 u! feel the Eisenhower group definitely packs mow muscle than its predecessor. One considerable vantage of the. new group, the NAACP man noted k that it is headed by the Vice President of the is The Eisenhower committee is larger than the Truman gamp, with eight public members and siil government representatives for a total of u nwg.1 bers. One public member is Fred Lazarus Jr. d] Cincinnati, vice president of the American Jewiaj Committee. It is empowered to: 1. Receive complaints of job discrimination and I require government contracting agencies to fu> A report on each case. 2. Study anti-discrimination enforcement pro*] dures by government agencies and suggest improvements. 3. "Encourage the furtherance of an educational program by employer, labor, civic, educational, religious and other voluntary non-governmental group j in order to eliminate or reduce the basic causes aodj costs of discrimination in employment.' (From us] President's executive order.) The committee will make semi-annual or annual] reports to the President. One of the most significant] things about the new committee was a statement br Presidential press secretary James Hagerty. He said the public members of the new committee "will be given considerable cooperation by the Administration and will receive broad powers by the Pre*] dent's direction." President Eisenhower signs the Emergency Refugee Act Out of the ranks of the newcomers will rise many laborers needing m< •* tteamm Salon 921 S.W. 27th Avenu MIAMI Phone 4-2090 Under Personal Su*gj*" ot IRENE NIELSEW



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PAGE 14 D *Jmist>OcrkUar !" DAY, SEPTEMBER n — — p TO ALL ; It nol* Boneh trade union which builds many of the country's homes, factories and roads alone contains about 40.000 members. The factories which Histadrut owns or controls turn out a large share of the nation's rubber products, soap and detergents, cement, glass, building materials, porcelain, pipes, electrical supplies, processed food, textiles, etc. ensured only by there being a Jewish To All ... A Most Happy New Year Woody*s .Standard S*rvi* Lubrication Specialists — Gas Oils Batteries Tiros "Service with a Smile" 477 N.W. 5th STREET PHONE 3-9533 SINCERE WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR MARKOWITZ BROS., INC. MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS 5600 N. E. 4th Avenue Phone 89-2411 TO ALL A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY Hide & Seek Children's Shop THE CHILDRENS SHOP OF DISTINCTION GIFTS — APPAREL 506 Biltmore Way TOTS TO TEENS Coral Gables Phone 48-5929 Histadruts rise to its present commanding position, though spectacular, has not been easy. The organization, especially during its early years, had to work against tremendous odds. Founded at a time when an antagonistic British Mandatory Government was intent on perpetuating the feudal practices of its Turkish predecessor, the Histadrut found it necessary to create an economy within an economy. Faced with the prospect of dealing with employers who took a dim view of hiring Jewish labor, preferring rather to take on cheap Arab labor, the Histadrut began an educational job — backed up by occasional strikes — which still goes on today. See! ing that the British, like their Turkish forbears, were adept at taxing the Jewish community without in turn providing basic necessities such as schools and hospitals, the Histadrut founded its own educational and health services. Travel facilities then being primitive and dangerous, the Histadrut encouraged the formation of bus cooperatives operating in and between cities and settlements. Noting that private capital was unwilling to enter undeveloped areas, or invest in industries where there was no assurance of a quick profit, the Histadrut organized industrial cooperatives. In a sense the Histadrut grew to power through the default of private industry to invest in pioneering fields. HAPPY NEW YEAR FROM MIAMI BOTTLING COMPANY SERVICE QUALITY GOOD WILL "GLASS FOR EVERY PURPOSE" Distributors Libbey. Owens. Ford Glass Co. fc Insulux Glass Block 1601-1619 N.W. 7th AT*.. Miami 36. Florida Phone 2-1796 MIAMI 36. FLORIDA Ml VVY LEE IMPORTERS, INC. 7343 Collins Arc Miami Beach 252 Coral Way. Miami 86-2419 44909 This securing of monopoly through default continues even today with Histadrut investing in such outposts as Beersheba and Elat. Though considerable friction has developed between private enterprise, which maintains that Histadrut, by virtue of its huge exchequer, is monopolizing whole segments of industry, and the Histadrut which claims that private industry has shown little initiative and less idealism, the two often manage to go into partnership, usually with Histadrut becoming the junior partner. The labor organization does not, as some rumors would have it, seek agreements whereby it will control the majority of the stock. There have been cases where it has even loaned money to provate industries who were threatened with failure. Though the action was prompted less out of a love of the industrialist and more out of a desire to keep Histadrut members from being thrown out of work, the union's move did, nevertheless, save a number of firms. Labor unions are usually the last to press for an expansion of immigration into their country, taking the view — rightly or wrongly — that cheap immigrant labor will become a threat to their own workers. They often hold that the flooding of the labor market will bring down the price of labor. Not so the Histadrut. From its inception it realized that only by immigration, would the country develop. could I majoriiil the country, the Histadrut vigorously threw jl into the work of organizing the now fa mous bet, the so-called "illegal immigration" to Pal tine. Today an immigrant entering Israel is A free medical care by the Histadrut for three m 0 His wife and children are frequently cared fl Histadrut social workers serving in Ihe mi/, work camps. He and his family can often find i tadrut sponsored trade schools available to Histadrut managed employment centers help find a job. A mobile Histadrut van will come I outlying ma'abara from time to time to pick i farm produce for sale in the city, sell him con ties that he needs, or simply lend him books. The new immigrant receives the identical i %  ties as the veteran Histadrut member as he joins the labor organization. These pri include membership for him and his family j| Kupat Holim, the largest health service in the i try, and eligibility for sickness, unemploymen old age benefits. If he is invalided through i dustrial accident, he will receive a monthly \_ and should he'die, his widow and orphans i given a cash grant.. The Histadrut will often I him out with housing and loans, and encourages! to send his children to Histadrut sponsored i His wife can, if she desires, receive tr. sewing, spinning and the domestic sciences. Imahot Ovdot, the Working Mothers of LsraeL 1 nurseries for children where she can leave bet I school age children while she helps support] family. For single girls (46 percent of the I are women) hostels are available to help see I over the critical housing shortage until they j permanent homes. And for the working girl, special evening schools have been set enable them to get an education while they i On the cultural side, the Histadrut pub own dailes — Davar for those who know and Omer for those who are learning; it: own theatre, Ohel; it has its own publishing I Am Oved, which has turned out over 1J copies of 360 titles during its nine year it has its own mobile record and movie and it has done pioneer work in making fur I relations between Jews and Arabs, both of i are given the same membership rights. To finance all these services, Histadrut pay five percent of their salaries to the treasury. However, because of the extensive I of the social and health services the on renders, membership dues do not cover the) drut's expenditures, and the union has beenf to turn to its friends abroad for additional I SEASON'S GREETINGS GREETINGS Mf^ORMICK-BOYETT PLUMBING CONTRACTORS 9443 W. Railroad Avenue (Renuart Mill Building) MIAMI SHORES. FLORIDA FOR SALES. SERVICE OR REPAIRS PHONE MM Dr. and Mrs. CHARLES BECKWTTT An4. Family Wish All Their Relatives and Friends A HAPPY NEW YEAR GREETINGS MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW YORK S10 Langford Bldg. PHONE 9-4747 GUARANTY TITLE & ABSTRACT CORP. 50 Wss Flagler Street SEASON'S GREETINGS State Finance Co. 1160 West Flagler Street •222 N. E. 2nd A*e. AUTO FINANCING PHONE 3-1792 GREETINGS FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR i LOUIE. PRISCILLA and FRANK BANDEL Pr, and Mrs. EMANUEL PUSHBN| and Daughter Wish all their Friend A Happy and Frosp| Nr* Year LOTSPEIC! FLOORING 3800 N. E. 1st AT GREETING JOHN A MA 1 620 SECURITY MIAML FLA



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PAGE 14 C kmistFkrkBnn FRIDAY, SEPTTvmra GREETINGS MADER & COMPANY P. & O. DOCKS MIAMI THE PAST YEAR'S EVENTS IT THE UNITED iviHi DORN MARTIN DRUG CO. PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 142 Sunset Drive South Miami A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY Peering Awning and Furniture Co. Serving Greater Miami — Coral Gables — Miami Beach Beach. Lawn and Porch Furniture COMPLETE AWNING SERVICE 4000 PONCE DE LEON BOULEVARD (Corner Bird Road) Phone 83-7600 TO ALL... GR.EETINGS i l ASPHALT PAVING COMPANY Phone: Miami 67-2551 Box 786. Coral Gables. Fla. TO ALL NEW YEAR GREETINGS SWIFT & COMPANY Refreshingly your* Swiff* ice Cream PHONE 48-6555 A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL A COMPLETE SERVICE FOR YOUR PONTIAC TRAIL PONTIAC. INC. 665 S. W. 8th Street Phone 9-4576 TO ALL A MOST HAPPY CHANUKA Abbott Gardens Private School NURSERY THRU 8th GRADE 7705 ABBOTT AVE. PHONE 86-4816 TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY AL PFLEUGER TAXIDERMIST 15899 N. E. Sixth Avenue North Miami Phone 816-5991 A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY TO ALL Seevrity Abstract Co. 44 N. E. 1st AT*. A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS Hot Shoppes Caterers Inc. MIAMI INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT PHONE 64-9022 Walter F. Gentry, Manager %  fj i) Continued from Page 2 whipping before here, worked desperately in the corridors and got the Phillipine delegation to introduce an amendment when the matter came before the Assembly. This amendment was a slick parliamentary manouevre. for it would have fettered the n, %  -^nations and destroyed the purpose of the resolution. Although it was defeated, by mentioning the "safeguarding of the Holy Places," the amendment compromised many of the representatives of Roman Catholic countries to such an extent that they abstained on the resolution as a whole. Furthermore, the Soviet bloc suddenly switched from abstention to opposition. Thus the eight power resolution only received 24 in favor to 21 gained and was defeated as it failed to get the necessary two-thirds majority. Still, the majority of delegates had supported "direct negotiations," but the Israeli position, together with the chances for a Palestine peace settlement, were weakened by a series of events within the Soviet bloc. The Slansky Trial, with its antiSemitic implications, was drawing to a close, and there followed the arrest of the Jewish doctors in the faked Kremlin plot and the Soviet rupture of diplomatic relations wifh Israel. Public opinion was aroused, and the Israeli delegation announced that it would raise the question of the Soviet anti-Jewish campaign under the Polish "package" item during the second part of the Assembly. The most important aspect of the "anti-Semitic debate." which was one of the most vicious experienced here, was the way in which the Arabs took the Soviet stand as a moral justification for won their <>wa camp** agitost the Jews De st 1 fact that Mrs. Golda Myerson. who had come ^ specifically to lead the delegation in this d h made a moderate speech without any particula i erence to the Arabs, the Arab representatives^'! it for a violent attack on Zionism as an alleged 1 spiracy not only as far as their own area was T\\ cerned but in the whole world. They developed IK I thesis ad absurdum until they were actually claim, | that the Jews were responsible for the Nazi murd of the Jews. The Israeli stand gained the support the Western delegates, but what was appalling ah,' this debate, in which there was no resolution no vote, was the way in which the Asians gave tacit]: approval to anti-Semitism by saying not a against it. The debate was confused by outside development! The death of Stalin preceded it, the release of ft Jewish doctors occurred in the middle of it and th Polish move to withdraw their resolution which n regarded as a conciliatory act on the part of i Soviet bloc, came just before the second Israeli j tervention. However, Mr. Eban had to answer Arab charges, but his reply resulted in a storm i abuse and vituperation in which the Arabs sank I personalities. m ^ Although it was an unpleasant occasion, it the first time that Israel as a Jewish state had tab a stand against anti-Semitism in another countrjj and the mere fact that it had done this in a public! debate at the United Nations may have forced I Soviets to change their policy, as they did do i the Jewish doctors. ROSH HASHQNAH 5714: A COMPLEX CHALLENGE Continued from Page 11 neighbors, for a strong Israel will eventually convince the Middle East that the country is not a passing phenomenon of contemporary history. There are other, specific plans whose importance is self-evident. In addition to the program of the United Israel Appeal agencies, the Joint Distribution Committee in Israel must finance the Mafben program which will render effective aid to some 6,000 people requiring institutional medical care, doctors' services and occupational therapy, while offering economic and social aid to another 4,000 who seriously need it. With JDC support, through the ORT training program, the opportunity can be offered to 5,000 others in Israel to learn a trade as tractor mechanics, electricians, radio technicians and the like — helping to develop an important reservoir of labor for Israel's growing economy. A glance at the situation in Europe shows an urgent need for UJA funds in countries outside the Iron Curtain. Some 65,000 persons, including 15,000 remaining Jewish DP's in Germany, Austria and Italy require financial support and institutional care. The aged, the incapacitated as a result of war and persecution, the children living in JDC-operated homes will, for some time to come, depend on UJA funds, often their sole source of income and survival. As for the 2,500,000 Jews behind the Iron Curtain, their future too is still unpredictable, but the greatest hope for large numbers of them is, as observed earlier, to start again in Israel. In the Moslem countries, where 900,000 Jewish inhabitants still live in the midst of poverty disease, a comprehensive welfare and reconstrud program under the auspices of the JDC works I stantly to make life more bearable. An irreducibl minimum of 100,000 will need such help in months ahead. The goal of UJA-financed activities in the Moslei areas will continue to be the eradication of tagious diseases — of trachoma, tinea, tubercuta An unceasing effort is needed to raise the stand of hygiene, especially in the field of infant care; I give vocational training opportunities to the people of the mellas; to expand economic aid in I form of loans to artisans. Meanwhile, the United Service for New An cans' program of UJA-financed aid to newcomers I the United States will continue to be impon here. The past nine years, from the end of World Wi; II to the signing of the Korean armistice, havei stituted a time of dramatic and crucial happenin Upheaval and struggle have characterized this en violent change and new political topographies. the midst of this the story of Jewish reconstruct has been a bright thread woven through the cloth of negative events. Here at home American Jewry has reached a | iod where the budget for local needs has to a li extent been filled. Many of the post-war envisio centers, hopsitals and synagogues are realities to The Jewish community for the most part has" pered. But Israel must continue to look to Jews of America for support in that great venti which is not yet fully realized. A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR To ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS Jacques Meauty Salon 677 Washington AT*. Miami Reach PHONE 5-6866 Mr. Joseph SEASON'S GREETINGS King's Shoe Robaiiders Dry Cleaning & Laundry The Beat on the Beach" 1879 ALTON ROAD MIAMI BEACa FLA. PH. 56-9487 A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS •Jefferson Hotel 121 • 15th STREET MIAMI BEACH Phone 5-1141 EDISON ELECTRICAL FIXTURE CO. Wholesale Distributors ELECTRIC SUPPLIES and LIGHTING FIXTURES Call 3-3114 1009 S. W. Ith STREET (Temieznl Trail) A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NE* YM To ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATWNJ LORENE'S SAL0N| OF BEAUTY 5171 S.W. 8th STREET MIAMI Phone 48-1559 Lorene King AH. PP yNewY M rToAllOr| Friend. nd ?" Michel***?* 521 LINCOLN BO* 0 Phone 58-2931



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SDICERE WISHES TO ALL JEWRY FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR jfr. and Mrsand son SELIG friends and PafreM Commodore Hotel 1360 COLLINS AVENUE MIAMI BEACH Phone 58-1803 Dr. M. Goldfield Owner and Manager _-*. BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY HOLIDAY CORAL GABLES HOSPITAL 3151 Coconut Grove Drive PHONE 4-2525 To All ... A Happy New Year SOUTHERN AWNING COMPANY "23 Years Canvas Experience' MIAMI 38. FLORIDA Awnings. Canopies, Trailer Canopies. Tarpaulins. Lawn Umbrellas Lawn and Beach Equipment Recovered 7927 N.W. 7th AVENUE Phone 78-2514 SIMON SEIDEN Program Director WMIE JEWISH FORUM ON THE AIR EXTENDS SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL HIS SPONSORS AND LISTENERS ifcJewiisb-IEIIotiidliiaun MIAMI. FLQRjD^ FRIDA Y. SEPTEMBER II. 1953 S EC. G Israel's Capital Born Anew on Eve of 5 714 By JEROME K. BOIN Jewish Telegraphic Agency WASHINGTON—It is no secret that the opinions of nations are subject to radical changes under the impact of war and the passage of years. Consider the problem of Jerusalem, split up between Israel and Jordan, and a continuing source of controversy between Jews and Arabs and in the United Nations. Every year or two, the question pops up before the UN—Should Jerusalem be internationalized? From a positive "yes" that obtained through 1949, the UN is apparently slipping into an "I'm not sure" attitude. And, in the past five years, after a war and an uneasy armistice that has yet to blossom into peace, both the Jews and the Arabs have completely changed their public stands on internationalization. When Israel recently completed shifting its foreign ministry to Jerusalem, in line with steps to make that city its capitol, six Arab states raised angry voices in protest to the US State Department. In addition, representatives of these states—Egypt, Iraq, Syria. Lebanon, Saudi Arabia and Yemen— asked the US to press for internationalization of Jerusalem. The Arab representatives, in calling for internationalization, noted that the UN had decided "three times by more than two-thirds majorities that the whole Jerusalem area be lifted from political controversy and made international." In 1948, the Arab attitude was at the other side of the pendulum. In a speech to the UN, Mahmoud Fawzi of Egypt said internationalization "is most clearly in violation of the right to self-determination which the people of Jerusalem should enjoy, as well as any other people in the world." UN delegates from Syria and Iraq attacked internationalization on similar grounds. The state of Jordan, which is in possession of the Old City of Jerusalem, is today—like Israel—a foe of internationalization. For this reason it refused to go along with the six other Arab states in their representations to the State Department regarding Jerusalem. In the UN, the General Assembly in 1949, reaffirmed the internationalization plan but last year failed to pass an amendment calling for adherence to that principle. Among the nations opposing this amendment was the United States. Israeli officialdom received something of a jolt when the US Secretary of State Dulles called the Israeli Foreign Ministry transfer "inopportune" and said it tended to aggravate Middle East tensions. Another reason he gave for objecting was that internationalization of Jerusalem still had the support of a UN resolution. Informed Israeli sources in Washington refused to believe Dulles' words meant the US had become a supporter of internationalization. And, despite the Arab protests over Jerusalem, they were inclined to doubt that the Arabs would try to introduce a pro-internationalization resolution in the UN. The possibility seemed too threatening that such a resolution might be amended before passage to provide only for internationalization of Jerusalem's Holy Places. The latter plan has been suggested by Israel. There has been a good deal of comment at the UN about the way in which the Soviet delegates Continued on Page 7 MR. and MRS. BENJAMIN PUCHKOFF Wish their Childron: Mr. end Mrs. M. B. Morris, Mr. and Mrs. H. feldmam and their Children; ami Mitt tsther Morris ami all their friends A Happf Wld Prospcrsus New Year Mr. and Mr*. Harry Solomon and Sofit, MURRAY and SEYMOUR [xtend to our friends tht Compliments of tht Stafon and Beit Wishes far %  Happy ami Prosperous New faar 311 Pence at Leon Rh/d. TIDES II ON THI OCIAN AT 12th ST. ItWGnsi T\JV ?nn ranan nno ruv'? tonnm To all our Friends we express our fondest desire that the New Year be filled with "BrochoBlessings" of Peace. Health, Heppiness and Prosperity for all Israel. Owners and Manager! S. M. Qrundwerg M. Newmark W. Keeeelman and Families To All ... A Most Kappy New Year "Where Quality and Price Meet" Rutkin Interior Decorators SLIPCOVERS DRAPERIES CORNICES Guaranteed Satisfaction UPHOLSTERING REFINISHING REMODELING Estimates Without Obligation CALL 65-1821 4102 N. W. 17th Ave. A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR PAN AMERICAN CHEMICAL CO. Janitor Supplies S anltui y Supplies iHi TTr^^i r.% eBs^rw int*| i i j^tj TACOO PRODUCTS" 1201 N.W. 1st Avenue PHONE 3-3955 Miami, Florida New Year Greetings K. II. Shaddick REALTOR Sales Property Management Mortgage Loans 2719 Ponce de Leon Blvd. Phone 48-2591 CORAL GABLES



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PAGE 6G %  %  • + % f mi IOAN ASSOCIATION &f MIAMI BEACH 1244 WASHINGTON AVENUE Between City Hall and the Pott Office" JACK D. GORDON President MICHAEL STECKLOFF Vice President BEN GILLER Vice President CHARLES SILVERS ARTHUR H. COURSHON Secretary GEORGE W. HIRSCH Vice President A Comptroller MILTON M GAVNOR Treasurer S. C. STAMPLEMAN CLAUDE PEPPER NEW KIRK III I 14 \| | SM\ AND HI;S I \i a AM Extends New Year Greetings SAM TRAURIG and WALTER TRAURIG Extend Best Wishes to all their friends for a Happy New Year ALL FORMS OF 3133 CMAl WAT MIAMI. FLORIDA PHONE 48-1771 A A Happy and Prosperous New Year To All Our Friends and Patrons r VIIIt I I KM I I m CO. 2180 S.W. 12th AVENUE. MIAMI Phono 2-3775 Superior Sheet Metal Works SEASON'S GREETINGS Albert Kinder 830 N. Miami Avenue p hone 3.3,53 GREETINGS TO ALL STEADCRAFT VENETIAN BLINDS 9510 N.W. 7th AVENUE p HO NE 7-6844 • Fixtures • Plumbing Supplies • Commercial • Residential Repairs & Maintenance 3 -1380 3 -0373 Nights 64-2364 Books and Israel's Currency On the International Scei By ADA OREN Jewish Telegraphic Agency in yjsria TEL AVIV—American books are now offered for sale in Israel ia greater numbers than ever seen here even before the great foreign publications famine of recent years. The United States government's decision to compete with the Soviet Union, which was the first country to offer Israel book Imports against payment in local currency, brought about this situation. Local readers of English fervently hope that Senator McCarthy's enquiry into the scheme — offered by the US to many nations — will not delete from the list of available titles cheap reprints of great world literature which may not meet his standards of Americanism but whose availability has greatly enhanced US prestige in predominantly liberal and cosmopolitan Israel. The United States government has so far insisted that these imports cost the Israeli purchaser no more than one Israeli pound per dollar (anti-Communist Russian language literature published in the US is subsidiary at half that rate). As Israelis still remember when there were practically no foreign currency allocations for book imports for months running, and even second hand pocketbooks could not be had except at lending libraries, there was an immediate buying spree when books became available. In the scheme's first year, orders — not sales — of American books probably amounted to no less than the total turnover of the Israel publishing trade. Time Magazine, for example, acknowledged that it is selling In Israel more copies than in Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Belgium, Holland, Denmark, Norway, or the whole of the Middle East including all Arab countries, Persia, Turkey, Greece and Cyprus. The progressing policy of deflation — the rising of prices of essentials while keeping the supply of money static — has already caused even pocketbooks to be bought in lesser quantities. More expensive fiction has dropped in sales, and there is no market at all for the small amount of even the lowest-priced trash which manages to dodge the rule that 90 percent of the US imports must consist of serious works. Complaints are often voiced that Israelis cannot afford the normal American editions of scientific and technological works. Their much cheaper and often better British or German counterparts, now practically unavailable or sold at a much higher exchange rate, are greatly sought after, and readers of English envy readers of Russian who can frequently get similar material for a fraction of the American price. Distributors of American imports are already offering to accept 12 monthly installments or any order worth 24 pounds and over, which is placed before September 1st, the date set for a Aim Ortm rise in book prices owing to exchange rat e ^H ments. They are offering reductions even faj; cent pocket and children's books. Meanwhile. Soviet book and per.odical Ui hj fallen off sharply as a result of local ill-will Ju! I ing the recent anti-Zionist campaign. quo u nations imposed following alleged unauthorized drawal of funds from blocked accounts by the L legation and the Israel government's -insane, „, more realistic prices be charged for such saJl British offer to accept 20 percent of th* nrW English book imports in local currency was rtjfl as the Israel government is unable to defray tjl! maining 80 percent. From other countries fcL arrive almost exclusively as travellers effects or the amount stipulated by the exporting country trade or credit agreements with the Israel gov ment, and in all cases they are expensive. The large-scale influx of American and Rua books naturally incensed local publishers, who 1 protected against competition only on Hebrew erature. There was no problem as long as inft provided money in plenty and foreign imports scarce. But the present overall shrinkage in „ chasing power is not likely to be compensated for 1 a widening of the reading public, in spite of L doubling of the Jewish population in the last itt| years, because most adult immigrants will nner | know Hebrew well enough to make it their Ian* of leisure reading. At times like these pub_ greatly resent having to pay for their printing L binding supplies three to five times the rate fin for American and Russian book imports, and e at that, encountering difficulties securing them i. having no hope for foreign currency allocations! modernization of plant. A Ministry of Culture and Education investigai committee, which was composed at the demand 1 the local publishers, heard a Treasury official 1 customs and surcharge reductions even on and binding materials destined for textbooks. I while, rebates are again not only demanded by 1 tomers but offered by booksellers themselves: their agents who visit homes. Dormant book cM are being revived and publishers are retrenching. The official intention seems to be to bridge I gap by raising prices of cheap imports through 1 ous taxes, starting from items which can at a 1 be classified not as books but as newspapers, 1 objects and toys. In its desire to avoid piling up large pound 1 mitments to foreign governments, the Israel eminent also insists that the USSR send almost I rlusively works printed in the Russian, and the I in the English language; and it is loth to the US offer to extend the agreement to films 1 musical records. If there is to be an extension,! Israel government would like it to apply to tory and school equipment and to cheap for the Hebrew book trade, even offering to hive I courtesy acknowledged in every single copy pri on such paper; but the small quantity of paper as yet available for local use under US 1 pices was destined exclusively for a Hebrew edition of an anti-Communist anthology. (iff rmts RUSTY PLUMBING CO. Senrieg Coral Cahlei, Cocoa*! Crave, S.W. Miami, Sa.th Mimml 2331 S.W. 32nd AVENUE Ph.ne 41.1376 537 N.W. 5th STREET G [ t T I N G S S. E. \ANN PIUMBING ami HEATING CONTRACTORS Pro-Cast septic Tanks 4615 IE JEUNE ROAD •boa* 4-25(0 A MAW NEW TEAR TO All DIAMOND-BERK INSURANCE AOENCT 1(20 S.W. 3r. AVENUE NWMS (2-7694 9-7509 • t ( E T I N 6 S L*? Rosselle /nite/lotions ami Repairs ffoctrk Seek* *155 N.W. 54th STREET % home 641251 A Happy *" 1" u Ul *' fritmit ami ••'•* DAVID FENTON II ALT0I "Specia/ii.'ag fa the 41sf ft ***| 529 41.1 ST., MIAMI ( •hoae 510631 0 I f E T I H • I KEN ROB!*** GlfT SHOP CHINA GIFTS Distimctive Imporlti —" Damtslic Mecel 61 MIRACll MIIE Phene (3 2691



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PAGE 8 H TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR OM.I II CLIXIC PHARMACY 1633 N.W. 35th Street Conger Building Phone 65-6723 VAL DAYTON. Owner **n#f meridian ""PAY.S EPTEM^ IT IS A PLEASURE TO EXTEND A HOLIDAY GREETING TO JEWRY EVERYWHERE HERBERT A. FRINK MIAMI BEACH GREETINGS TROUSSEAU SHOP "LINGERIE OF DISTINCTION" EXCLUSIVELY OURS' S25 Lincoln Road 6608 Collins Arenue 5-4864 86-2159 GREETINGS Investors Diversified Services, Inc. MORTGAGE LOAN DEPARTMENT Room 300 1st National Bank Building CORAL GABLES. FLORIDA A HAPPY NEW YEAR TAR AX IMSTRIIII IIVI-. Inc. 3401 N.W. 36th Street Phono 65-2531 MicrmL Florida BEST WISHES FOR THE NEW YEAR CASTLE DECORATORS Upholstering Slip Covers Draperies LEONARD MORIBER 555 S. W. 22nd Avenue PHILIP I. MORIBER Phone 2-7817 SEASON'S GREETINGS P0ST0N BRIDGE & IRON, Inc. "Steel Erecting" — "Crane Service" RALPH POSTON 741 S.E. 4th STREET, HIALEAH. FLA. Phone 88-9721 TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR HELENE POLKA'S JUNGLE CLUB N.W. 36th STREET AT 37th AVENUE LIKE A BREATH OF FRESH AIR You too will enjoy a breezy show i TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR INGMAN MOTORS, INC. DsSOTO AND PLYMOUTH "Factory Trained Mechanics" 1864 S. W. 8th STREET Phone 82-7571 GREETINGS Super Sagless Spring Corporation of Florida JOBBERS AWD MANUFACTURERS OF UPHOLSTERY SUPPLIES 1 A. P. LAND. Manager 1060 S.W. 27th AViNUE PHONE 83-2249 19531 < t*. f 'r:-x Officers and chairmen of the Women's Auxiliary, Mount Sinai Hospital. Front right) are the Mesdames Louis Glasser. vice president; Harold Spaet, president; Max Doh ] past president; Monte Selig, parliamentarian; Louis Krensky, honorary president and I* Ablin. second vice president. Rear row (leJft to right) are the Mesdames Isaac Levin eta man of Nurses' Welfare; Harry Platoff. treasurer of the Gift Shop; Philip Lefkowitz ponding secretary; Maxwell Hyman, assistant financial secretary; Max Dreyer treas Fred Jonas; Morri3 Goldin. first vice president; Leon Ell, chairman of arrangements (or me* ings; and Saul Herman, chairman of the Snack Bar. Mount Sinai Women Bring Cheer to Patients* Rooms MRS HAROLD B. SPAET, President Women's Auxiliary, Mount Sinai Hospital The Women's Auxiliary of Mount Sinai Hospital has a membership of 3.000. The various services are in charge of 40 chairmen. You will find our Pink Ladies throughout the hospital. Monies raised by the Snack Bar and Gift Shop provide the funds necessary for the Auxiliary's project. Mount Sinai School of Practical Nurs ing. Our School of Practical Nursing is graduating its second class on Tuesday evening. September 15th. at the hospital. Our School has high standards and excellent professional personnel. The Monte Selig Scho 1 a r s h i p Award has been establi shed in memory of a devoted Trustee of the hospital. The enrollment in the School is 29, and there are graduate practical nurses actively engaged in nursing. We are planning to start several courses for our volunteer Pink Ladies in the Fall. These are needed to bring a feeling of cheerfulness and warmth into the patient's room. Books, magazines and newspapers are supplied by the library book truck daily. The gay Hobby Therapy cart is wheeled into patients' rooms in both white and colored sections to do its morale building job. The charm of the cart with its exciting craftwork for patients "to do and make" brighten the long hours in bod and cunt be valued too highly for its therapeutic elleta Through our Babies' Alumni Fund, layettes purchased and provided for our 1. fortuufc babies. The Remembrance Fund provides the money he the extra thoughtful projects. Slippers and toiletris are provided when needed, or taxi fare occasional or a braee for an elderly patient Letters are written, errands run, and books and papers are read! to the patients. Our Wheel Chair and Tray Piak Ladies are always at hand to take a patient into %  the gardens or to feed a patient. Our Landscape! Committee supplies flowers and plants to brigbtea | the hospital and to sell at the Gift Shop. And to our loyal Ladies in Pink who have workai faithfully all during the hot summer months, goes) the appreciation of our community Mrs. Harold Saeef lishtMS their burden The Women's Auxiliary Gift Shop, located on the mezzanine floor, is a pleasant, wellstocked display of gifts far the patient. Mi*. David Bass, volunteer chairman, shows an assortment of articles to a Pink Lady. A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL llivaiiov Sculpture Studio 12755 NX. 14th Avs. Phone 78-1403 BEST WISHES FOR HAPPY HOLIDAYS City Laundry, I in*. 2160 N. W. 1st COURT \'\v French Benzol Cleaners A Laundry Quality — Plus Service Branch Stores All Over Dads County 99 S.W. 7th Street 6131 N.W. 32nd Avs. (Cor 62nd St) METALLIC ENGINEERING CO. Specializing in Alloy Metals 275 S. W. th STREET SHOP PHONE I-M34 TO ALL. A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR NORMAN SWABTZ Aii-temp Construction Corp. 706 S.W. 39th COURT PHONE &f -#*



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PAGE 16 E FBB>AY. DAK 6AS CORPORATION BOTTLED GAS & APPLI A 5 C E S E9V XW£ rK3, Pmomt tS-4S23 A HAPfT AKT JTrSTErCTS NTW TEAS J. A. Cantor Associates, he to the USSR t*U—rims the death pisatou il the rthmm a* the M I UIMI Jewish easing of official presad satellite Europe Bat it was 11 ah at that for teas of Eastern Earape, Israel rraiitaol a Israel's dears were, aad eoattone U be. aide opea to Jew* fraai the Sonet world Far a brief period hi December aad Jaauai.i. several Bun dle d Jews af East Germany aianarril to reach Western Earape There they were aided ay with fJA fend? When and hand-to-aaouth persons who had tag 1or the past tea \cjyc SZJ-.ZT. Pacae S&-69&3 ~ Z l A MOST rlAJFY XT* flH WILLIAM WBMSTOCK & SON ::-:v.**;— ^ U£.-VE PHONE at-2245 W. < ARROLL WI1>> Boa! Emcae Appraaar & A MOST KAF7Y XEW YZAH KB WAR l>s PROatt CE €•. K.W. 22ac Street PV. 2-C9K Mearhi> other far-reaching objectives of the aevtoed ac taoa a f the *. mcrtcan Jewish ctaamunaty. The effect.leness of this action was manifested agase this past spring, whea a call far cash was saaaded t meet tan tat and erflkal Beads ia all the area* of aar effort, hat eapaoalK m hard-pressed hrael Climax of thssdrrre was the National Action CoaeuriymJune whea SM3B1JX0 — the treat > faad ever gathet e d at a stogie aaeettog — to. to a mighty deanmstrataon af devotion to UJAs aad serving to ge t h er to 5713. of the UJA have improved the %  MOO persoas ia auay places. the lasted Israel Appeal aad its benethe Jewish Agency aad Keren Tim aid. The North Africa uto banner af the famous Maine* crganuatasa Israel aided 10CJI0C And is the I noed States warns thoasanch of > < m in si aaimi were assisted. h: pram these are the cold flares, la actaahty. the aatohen traasfaae anc TTnlnJdaal %  %  to wham have suffered and I — aB of whan have dreamed modpoace aad same BB BBBB B of m d n i aa. b that most IMA coo they make their genero us fw %  todrndaah UJA aid took rarxms forms. **" 0 "aae poaahie a—Wast e m the form of *—* %  **• % %  • %  w p ufj shelter, as well as to steal cast grant* and hams This included aid in **_UJA also helped to build >d 110.000 danansi the total number ir "** tton 000.000 I to aae* parched Nefn. %  Bail's economic of basic foods codd | reducing the cast in vital i to band 10 000 an, i theatajma of tranaeatvi from the lives of aothtog but temporary I years. I JA roads were atilned for broad and sse %  BBdseal efforts that directly aided 96X100 women aad children, made remarkable strides i the battle against sarh 11 topliaj diseases as la culosas. tiaea and t rach o ma — and helped ti of the aged, touaeies aad toeapaeatated persoul decree of physical iamrmi aunt few bad boptol attain. UJA fames also h el p e d to provide training 14JOOO boys and carts to the MO educational asdi taonal traintog centers COB darted under the ir i n hto af Toath Anyah. As full-fledged fa these yn aa c people will brine their \outhful skills to erring life to I of land that are slowly revitalised throughout Israel An additional il boys and girts, who acquired aew ski.:througti rocram at OuTT schools in Israel, alto i by UJA funds passed on through the Distribution Committee. la addition. Americaa Jews h el p ed give th of babaes thesr nhlk and school childrer. their I lunches a North Africa, and youngsters then-1 tog there, to Israel, m Earape and in the li States. Ia all these places, we helped to homes, health, jobs, opportunities — and hope. These are bat the J^fM't** 1 of the roster of I achiev eme nt to 371X They reflect veil and the stage of ausm a ty reached daring the Ui Jewish Appeals fiftee n years. Behiad this lies the groat BEST WISHES FOB AHAPPY HEW YEAt BEST yVBHES FOR THE NEW YEAH Z TZ Tne F: MIAMI FEDERATION OF MUSICIANS LOCAL Rm A. r. of M. OK of progress and af the Amenfin Jewish for Jews mufyvBBU' Israel to stand as a tori aad a nonua cagennitT. fJA fifteen years far the expressH* < af this, the United I of Jewish commu participation and i af help. TO THE EHTIRE JEWISH COMMUNITY FLOBIDA TO ALL GMZTDrGS SHENANOOAH CANDIES Mknni Tiodia MR. and MRS. MURRAY SCHWABTZMAN o I ^.AH



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•AGE6 E -Jmistrkr**** rMPAY. SPTru^ coartrrr oar Eastview Nursing Home 1?1 S.W. had AW. v-TJU •* C Immigration in the Jewish State During the Past Year %  rtwKytMif C#rt — Vtytstvwv Mm m •* %  •* %  co$nr utxtXTS mvum curs ttc YOUR TRANSFER PROBLEMS BRIDGES TRANSFER CO. 4S N.W. "th Street Phone :-4"SI rt M* %  *• %  ? iwi 4 aaasr mvtr in nat Maurice E. Kerr rt 4^ *•* %  > throws erally. show %  greater measure 0 the MM of the premmt io„ of ^ "^ over its cure. Fir* come material ttktfb. J? tally bousing, since there is no housing miUjT!!l ret le the newcomer can pay ke,^ several %  —1 Israel finimili or •TCAVS ri.vov snorrt m tftaTOLw WkO OmO* lank TWatn taaajnj .w w< i w tm l Sumr. In 'W'IHV '-m*i aatf *fw II q o Hair St gli *t s 1 t i fit %  £ %  f i I'HTH UN UIMST Mil COtAt HaUB W tad IM '--' %  hr ft a —| A Year of Happiness To Everyone! MIAMI LINCOLNMERCURY, INC. Oe*X EVE3GJ&3S TZ. I 221 S^L I=>i AVESTZ ?H:NT —:.*: if trrm >CA>C aa JOKT ETZ3K3LADES. FLOJHDA : i? Scndfe Fiariaz iar Over Tur-Tr-Sac Teo e tood s •_.— cr. :rr.rrcves c:s % %  :epz.imam work* ao c pipe in Israel's iarm neld*. Abandance will sooc still the restless conrem ice the future that now make* some inv sucrcctts th.r.k -^. terms oi moving on. By ALEPH SHERMAN Jewish Tal t araphic agency TEL AVTV—The Israel pubbe has been awakened suddenly from its dreams of reachinga population oi 4400400 before the ead of the decade, by the new* that for the first sax months of this j ear there were mare i ma p a mi than immigrants. The Immigration On—ciL a pahbc body representing the meat departments, met ia July to consider the problem bat failed to r each any clear-cut i iambi 'smns which they could press oa the Jewish Agency and the Government Thxe-year s figures, ia fact. seen: to set the seal once and for an oa the the need foe a new stocktaking. lmmagi ntiian had already begun to fall off sharply las: ?ear when it totalled some 2JJ80. just twice as much as the estimated 11 or U thousand emigrants Fur the first six manthu of US3. unmigialiin is down to SJKi. while eenjgrntaoa is estimated at If one looks at quality instead of quantity, the situatinr is far more senomv Three-quarters of those iearmfc immigrated after the founding of the state, but a quarter are veterans. Whereas most immigrants have been hrn n ght hen at pubbr expense. anc larpt numbers of them come from backward rnunrnes. and mchsde women, children, aged, sick and Hxnerme. thoae tearing are mostly people in the "aamtutujw* age groups, professional people or others wht are confident that tbey can get into the munmes nf thear destination, often Canada or the Vnned States. Most possess skills the country can il a3 buy a flat outright. Living standards in i sne[ low. and the professional worker or high go ve ^ roent official finds that he earns little, if anytw more than his doorman or chauffeur (*b sTji course, a government, not private, employee., Though the food situation has improved m \ deaL and clothing is plentiful for those who bat money, problems of servants, schooling and rephw. ment of furniture, to mention only a few, are a^ i difficult here than in any European or Ameno, country. Problems of employment also loom large, ud there is the usual difficulty of the newcomer %  air i country: though Israel welcomes all Jews, the insuto. Uon of seniority is also very strong, and it is W so easy for the newcomer to adjust to his chanad status. The ma which has People, sick, mainly of petty clination to go into agriculture and who swell tat ranks of the unskilled workers for whom ort ha to be made at a time when there is already hear/ unemploymentAll this takes money and increasa the taxation which weighs on the middle classes ml j professional people. In this way. mass immigrauoa is a contributory cause to in Urge hackward couotna,] of children. oU and social cases, cooaxr wh--> aheu marked ia Beside shortages here, there are controls, asf mnny sections of the ha tint m world have usually been extremely critical of government policies. that some have f eJt that they would be better off elsewhere Whether niai %  mat km of the Germn Zionists (the hiinnnimaas party i inside the GOT. emment will after this to any great extent remains to be Suggestions made at the altering the situauoi "selectivityrules for of special facilities f speaking countries and the -Selectivitywas numbers of sack. pouring into the stalwarts, culties are tilling it to tioa budgets As a result. intr o duc e d m the interpreted lease so that migrants are stall or sick. Council for the relaxation of the lntrodoctioa from English of emigration. last year when the and unproductive people began to pall even on tkt e Israel's economic diffr ml its welfare and edoo medical examinations wen of i min tn ii sad i 00 to eoatain a breadthe regnh to say tkt of new incases, ajed. amerally out that its statistics of any The liunugiati on pambe opinion gennabatttif poist imnugntitfl only maketM Tr m Cimntimji LEONARD L LTMEALL and Family mWI HX m AVEWJE SEASOFTS GREETTNGS TO ALL OUR FRIENDS Adams Glass Service GREETINGS STERN-CASE MOTORS INC %  BrY • A CAR avbe • 4jro fbftm VfiH 1K.4H GmEKTI\GS US*.



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PAGE 12 H A A/nnrHHUr .FRIDAY, SEPTEMRFB The GREATER MIAMI VAAD HAKASHRUTH mmm BBT MM A *wi posrf*oo$ *nv 1. And Advises the Public: A. Te bay basher products only in places where tfce ceiaareaol sign el endorsement is exposed; B. Te buy poultry only wbere the communal riaa el eederseeseat -••-; is attacked ta H; C. Te accept "Heady far •of", salted cakkeas only where they ere so identified by a special tag aa the planba ef tha chickeas; end 2. Informs the Public: that words in Hebrew sach as "Frishe Fleisch," "Baser," etc., ore aat preef that the stare sells kosher products; ead, a 4peiated star or sack words as "kosher" er "strictly kosher" b not o geareatee that the product is kosher unless aa authority aa the subject al Kasbrvth identifies it as kosher; and 3. Warns the Public: that wards sach as "kesber-style," "troditieool Friday night dinners," "traditieaal meals," and the use of a 6^ointed stor are misleading the public and are therefore a breach af the law af the cities' ordinonces. For Amy Other lofermofi'eo lefardiaf Keshrofh, Calf Oar Oirectar: RABBI JOSEPH E. HACKOVSKT at 5 3595 MIAMI'S JEWISH ORGANIZATIONS EXTEND GREE CANDLELIGHT TIME FOR 1953-54 (5714) 19 5 3 BAT OF WEEK Friday SPECIAL OCCASIONS 2nd day Rash Hoshonoh Ere* Sttabbes Tshuva Ere* Teas Kipper 2nd day Soccos Simcbas Torah Erev S habbo s Rosh Cbodesh Cheshvon Era* Shabbos BltlXAl PORTION OF THE WEEK Me-eriae t t^ rv Friday Harry Sirkia, Pros. H. Soofin, Secy. S. label, Treat. The Officers and Members of the Hial?ah-Miami Springs •Jewish Community Center Extend best wishes for the New Year to the entire Jewish Community TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM "The Liberal Congregation on the Beach" Chase Avenue at Forty-first Street A PRAYER THAT 5714 WILL BRING ENCOMPASSING PEACE AND DIGNITY TO ALL MANKIND 3rd day Cheaekeh Ira* Shabbos We-ocb .. lech 1'cee ... Ve-yeroh Cfie-ye Sereh To Was Va ye fiey _. Vo ysh/och Ve-yei-shev ENGtISH DATE September 11th September 18 th September 25lh October 2nd October 9th October 16th October 23rd October 30lh November 6th NeveenW 13th November 20in November 27th M.-kaJfl Vm-yi-mmU, i-a-ye-chi December 4th December 11th aVMeHHaMV llth December 25th Friday Friday 19 5 4 Ve-oy-re* Be rshadac* r$+ Rosh Chedesh Adar, 2nd Irea Shabbos ..._._ Mish-pa-f.'m Tr.m.h Trove* Ki Sisio .... Vmymkkmil Jeswary 1st J eanery Ith Jeaeery 15th Jeeeery 22nd Jeeeery 29th Febraary 5th Febrocry 12th Febraary 19th Febraary 26th CMBJU "WTlho 4:1 J 444 S:S* 5:4 5:41 St3S 5:28 S>2) im. — Ml Ml Sill 5:11 Sill Ml Ml 5:21 5:B 501 5:31 5:41 5:41 5:S4 5:59 4:11 Parim, Erev Shabbos Erev Shabbos Erev Shobbos THE RABBI and BOARD OF DIRECTORS of the WEST MIAMI JEWISH I'EVI lit Extend Best Wishes for a Happy New Year to Their Members and the Entire Jewish Community Friday A HAPPY NEW YEAR to the Members of the North Shore Jewish Center Our Families and Fner.ds MR. and MRS. A. LOUIS MECHLOWITZ GREETINGS y The President. Rabbi. Cantor, Officers and Directors of Congregation J^th #1 and its j^tsterijooh and the Entire Faculty of BETH EL MIAMI HEBREW ACADEMY and TALMUD TORAH Extend to all their Members. Worshippers. Friends and Jewry at large Best Wishes for a Happy and Prosperous New Year laf Bo-omor, Era* Erev Shabbos .... 2nd day Rosh Cbodesh Tamui Erev Shabbos P-kaday Vm-ykrm Umt Sh'mlmi rrJ-eh Me-froree Acherey Met Peisoch K'doihim favor Vhmr B'efcukesy Beaideer Hmtm B'ho-a .es'cfce Sh/ach Berate Friday Ire* Bash Chedesh Irev Shabbos Chodesh Timor Chokes Beie* Hm€k$ Mates Menacfceim Or Mas-ay March 5th 6:07 March 12th 4:19 Merck 19th (-14 Mercs 24th ,-i; *P'il 2nd l:N April 9th i:M Aaril 16th ..... 4:2; Aaril 23rd i: Aeril 30th : M *ey 7th :3t %  n i4th MI Mey 21st 445 May 28th ...... fell 4th 6:5! 11th 4:55 Jane llth 6:5! June 25th 6:51 July 2nd 4:5* Joly 9th 4:51 Joly lets 4:57 Joly 23rd 4:54 Era* Bash Hesheeeh S71S Ovorim, Char on Ve-et-cheees, Nache ttev •+*l B^eerriey Bf-seve Brfiorla. Jery 30th Aaeast 6th August 13th August 20th Aaeast 27th Seatembir 3rd Seatemher 10th September 17th Seatemher 24th Seatemher 27th 4:51 MS Ml 4:35 4:M 4:21 &f ill fcN ft* After !'* in, SonaS Tea Jewish FUr.d.an oresents the above celeeeer far the ceeweaieece ef Creator Miami Jewry. Ceateaiail list... af weekly candle liahtin, beers, as wall es the date, af priackeal observances aad tha aames ef I*. We* Partiaas of the Law, it moy be cllseed and saved as e ffehJa thr.aab.ot the year. The calendar was cess**, es edited by Rabbi Joseph E. Bacheasky. spirit.ol leader af Ceeereeetiea Beth Tflleh, Miami Beech. Rabbi letienrf* TT",* ** U "'*" ?! 0rtfc##M t#kW •* *•* %  -d Ca.ada. the Rabbmk.l Ceaacil ef America, the *ir< end tea Zi.n.st Orfaaisethta. Ha it director af the Creator Miami Vaad Nsseshielh. Mrs. Ida Jacobs Powell Preeidem PSoneer Women's Organization Club No. 2 Extefrds Greetings to All HOT Members and Friends far a Very Happy New Year LOUIS D. BRANDOS LODGE No. 199 and LADIES AUXILIARY Free Sontt of ittravl WISH THEIR MEMBERS AND FRIENDS A HAPPY NEW YEAR The Officers, the Board of Directors, the Staff and the Student Body of THE HEBREW ACADEMY Extend a Happy New Year to the Greater Miami Jewish Community ADULT SOCIAL GROUP (Unattached 28ers and Orer) c* the Miami Jewish Community Center 450 S.W. 19th AVENUE WISHES TO EXTEND NEW YEARS GREETINGS TO OUR MEMBERS AND FRIENDS



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PAGE 10 G t ^utfUfkU^r iSSSL^^giUsa It is our privilege to express Our appreciation to our many Friends for their kind consideration During the past year. I We Express Genuine Greetings and Wishes for a HAPPY NEW YEAR THE STAFF OF +Jewistincridton Selma Thompson Martin Spilka George looker 'red Hogarth rVm. 0. Hogarth Milton Balsam Beatrice Boat Leonard Verilli Minnie McMTkorler leo hAinilin /oseph Schrebnick 4( to Zifo Tom Benner, IT. Mel Campbell Christine Carriqon Betty Trapnell IT IS A MITZYAH TO SEND FOOD TO FRIENDS IN ISRAEL We Sell "SCRiP TO iSRAEL" $10 -SI 5 S2 5 Certificates GOOD FOR FOOD OR ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES This Service and Consultation is Given FREE by the Miami Beach Israel Zionist District ROOM 510 420 LINCOLN ROAD. Phone 5-0346 MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY THE CEMETERY OF DISTINCTION FOR DISCRIMINATING FAMILIES Rabbi S. M. Machtei. Director 5505 N. W. 3rd St Phone 87-8201 GLASS HI AS--The Immisrant's Haven By BEN TOUSTER, Preiident Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society As the New Year begins, the Jews of America should give thought to those of our people who live beneath the menacing cloud of hostility and poverty, unwelcome and unwanted. They call for help, and that help must come in large part, as always, from the Jews of the United States. With the enactment by Congress of the Refugee Relief Act of 1953. under which 214,000 non-quota immigrants will be admitted into the United States. HIAS. the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, hopes that other immigration countries of the world will be inspired to follow suit and open their doors to a fair share of Europe's displaced, homeless, destitute and refugee persons. Throughout the world, when a Jew must migrate, he turns instinctively to HIAS. It is not for nothing that for almost seven decades HIAS has been a byword, a familiar name, in Jewish households throughout the civilized world. The bright beacon of help for rootless and homeless Jews held aloft by HIAS has never been dimmed, and it shines brightest when the future of our people seems most dark and menacing. HIAS once again will face a grave challenge when the emigration flow starts out of the Old World in the near future. It will be confronted with heavy costs in processing, documentation and transporting the travelers to new homelands and in sheltering them when they arrive there. Yet the Jews of America, by their support of HIAS in the past, have demonstrated to the world that they do not count the cost of human souls in dollars and cents. So now. as we dedicate our lives in the New Year, Ben Touster aeaeen of help FOB EVERY PURPOSE %  TORE FRONT — PLATE and WIN DOW GLASS rurnltur Top*. Beveled Mixrori and ReattveriBg Our Specialty l-A(. Glass and Mirror Works 13S S.W. 8th St PHONE 3-4834 MORRIS ORUN IRVIXG CORDON The above is an architectural plan for the construction of a modern HIAS shelter in Beersheba. Israel. Expected to be ready for 1954 occupancy, the shelter will initially house technicians, educators and others coming to the Negev city to transform it into a modem metropolis. let us not neglect our duty to the Jews even, L who do not share in our good fortune In the United States, in Europe, in Austr i Israel, in Latin America and elsewhere th of HIAS goes on, and Jews who are in needI ml* are heartened in their dark times by the k„I, p that HIAS i. always working for them SI?" solves that, in the Jewish New Year 57147"!; continue to bend its efforts and will to kee holy work of rescue going, and to keep the law of hope lighted in the heart of every j ew to wh the future might look black indeed without ihl knowledge that our Society is constantly at his JJ WHAT mmwa BELIEVES: A Continued rrom Pag* 3 medium through which they can express their d* I votion to human causes. To lead such a compleme* i of human beings In so holy a cause is a privilege u I well as an awesome responsibility." In the controversy over the Maclver Report. Klin* i nick became the spokesman for the Anti-Defamation League of B"nai B'rith in the battle to preved the National Community Relations Advisory Count! from being transformed into a control council. T decision against affiliation with the new organtation was a painful experience. "I was among thou who sought with all my heart to avoid the departure of the ADL from the NCRAC," he assured a groti of local communal leaders. "It was with the greates reluctance that I had to agree that for the tins being there was no other alternative. To me it appeared that the forum of the NCRAC had bea changed from a voluntary, cooperative platform is which organizations could without compulsion seek areas of agreement to one in which as a practical I matter compulsion would become inevitable." The failure of the NCRAC negotiations has not disillusioned the B'nai B'rith leader in what hat always been his unswerving belief in cooperatiw action among organizations in matters of comraoa purpose. In a recent address on community organization, he declared: "We need more understanding of the simple idea of cooperation. Many people who speak about cooperation fail to recognize what it implies. This is one of our difficulties. Cooperation is itself i program and a job. It needs staff, money and tiae. The demands that are normally made on the President of a national organization are so great that t take on this additional load of cooperation witbovt preparing for it would result in strained, over-, worked and over-suspicious personalities entering the arena of cooperation unconditioned for participation in it. We need to recognize these facts anl prepare for them in each of our organizational efforts." The kind of leadership to which Klutznick would. have others aspire must exemplify more thai; breadth of interest. "It should be axiomatic." he h* j declared, "that those who lead have to believe in tat \ integrity of Jewish life and the Jewish religion A ; education which axe essential to its fullest develop-, ment. A leadership which believes in form iloot j without content is offering itself to pagan gods. %  I think it is consoling that we are learning *J strengthen our affiliations with the synagogue od the temple, that we are searching for better meani to educate in our classrooms and to develop instn ments of informal education. RABBI and MRS. DAVID SHAPIRO Extend Best Wishes for a HAPPY NEW YEAR to the members of TEMPLE SINAI The Jewish Community Center Hollywood, Florida and to All Jewry SINCERE WISHES FOR Ji HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALLTEWRY RABBI and MRS. MARIUS RANSON TEMPLE EMANU-EL„ FORT LAUDERDALE RABBI and MRS. ALEXANDER S. GROSS MIAMI BEACH Extend Best Wishes for A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAH to the officers. dir#jcto|* member, of tha H *g Academy •* •" lU jSl %  ted ornenisatiocs and to au Jewry. RABBI and MRS. SAMUEL LERER RABBI ARYAH BECKER Distributed by Mi-jirade rood Co. 1733 N. W. 7th Avenue Phone 9-8456 Wish for all Jewry and particularly the members and officers £ xtend Besl Wu,h f r a Happy of Temple Beth Sholem, N ew Year to *• Members and Hollywood, Oncers of the Downtown I Synagogue and to its affiliated A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS organizations and the Greater NEW YEAR Miami Jewish Community DR. and MRS. DONALD MICHELSON and Family EXTEND BEST WISHES TO ALL OF JEWRY FOR A YEAR OF JOY AND BLESSINGS



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PAGE 2 B %  ii£gLS[u' MR. AND MRS. SAMUEL fRIEMAND and Family WISH THEIR RELATIVES AND FRIENDS A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR ALBERT HAUER — JACOB L. LEVINE AIRCARGO BROKERAGE CO. Custom House Brokers and Forwarders Pacixic Btdg. —:— Phone 9-2396 Symbolism of the New Year. HAPPY NEW YEAR COLLINS GARAGE 24-HOUR WRECKER AND MECHANICAL SERVICE 6901 N.W. 7th AVENUE — PHONE 84-2591 115 S.W. 2nd STREET — PHONE 3-7308 To All Happy New Year I MM ison Service & Repairs Restaurant Equipment 3450 N. Miami Ave. Reliable Experienced Phone 3-7270 A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS C & A Sales Service World's Greatest Public Sealing Value—Samson Folding Chain also Church Pews and Furniture 2973 N.W. 17th AVENUE. MIAMI PHONE 82-4275 Al Powell. Manager A HAPPY AND"pi6sPEROUS NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS BISCAYNE-SOUTHERN PRINTERS JOB AND COMMERCIAL PRINTERS 605 S. MIAMI AVENUE MIAMI Phone 3-8041 — Nights 64-9821 Mr. and Mrs. Eddie Schaefer A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS ZION FOOD CENTER 1429 WASHINGTON AVENUE MIAMI BEACH. FLA. Phone 5-3418 PHILIP ROMER SAM SUSSMAN — __ MM !" M ~ i i i n s iia GIERSCH ENGINEERING CO. CONSULTING ENGINEERS AND LAND SURVEYORS 3104 CORAL WAY Telephone 83-7080 By Harry Cushing Jewish Tcltgraphic Agency Rituals and ceremonials have been for thousands of years part of the Jewish religion because of the effort to bring the existence of a spiritual — and therefore invisible God — before the minds of the people. Because Jewish law forbids a pictorial representation of God. the Jewish people have developed an intricate system of rituals, signs and ceremonials as symbols and reminders of God's omnipresence. Viewed from that perspective, many of the customs which at first glance seem to be relics of a superstitious period are actually the impressive signs of a God Who is merciful, just and interested in the works of Hfs creation. The observances of Rosh Hashonah and Yom Kippur are couched in much symbolism and ceremonial. There is much spiritual preparation even before the actual celebration of Rosh Hashonah. In fact, the entire month of. Elul, which precedes the Hebrew New Year, is dedicated to special supplications, and penitential prayers are recited in the synagogue. On the first day of Elul, at the end of the morning services, there begins the blowing of the Shofar. The Shofar blasts at the conclusion of each morning's service signifies that the season of penitence is near. The prayers in the synagogue are said with deeper fervor. There are extra Psalms to be recited. Pious Jews put in more time studying the holy books. The solemnity of the month of Elul is evident especially in the cemeteries where visits are made to the graves of relatives and loved ones. Visiting the cemeteries and praying before the graves during crises go back for centuries. In Chassidic communities, it was the custom to visit the graves of Chassidic Rabbis and leave slips of papers upon which were penned petitions and requests. Generally, the attitude has been that the prayers expressed at the graves of righteous ancestors would serve as intercession on the theory that Z'Chut Avot, the Merits of the Fathers, help their descendants. These visits to the cemeteries and praying to the dead have become so popular in modern times that a special liturgical collection has been created and is known as Ma'aneh Lashon, the Answer of the Tongue. The name of the booklet is based on the verse in Proverbs 16:1: "The preparations of the heart are man's, but the answer of the tongue is from the Lord." A product of the seventeenth century, the Ma'aneh Lashon has appeared in many editions in the past three hundred years, including German, Yiddish and English translations. A sequel to the Ma'avar Yabok,which is a manual of the ritual of death and burial and includes also prayers on visiting graves, the Ma'aneh Lashon specifically contains prayers to be recited at the grave of each relative. The month of Elul is climaxed with a series of S'lichot or Supplication services which begin on the Sunday preceding Rosh Hashonah. The first S'lichot service is held on Saturday at midnight before Rosh Hashonah. After that, the services are held early each morning until the holiday. Historically, the first penitential prayer was offered by Moses when he asked that Israel be forgiven for the sin of the Golden Calf. (Exodus 32:11). The Psalms of David include numerous penitential prayers. However, it was the Men of the Great SynaMM .•; %  •* %  / A.. At Kfar Zkenim, a Yemenite Jew reads I Seier Torah, the ancient Scroll of Law, gogue who fixed the daily recital of the sp penitential prayer, S'lach Nah, which is part of j daily Shmoneh Esrei or Amidah prayer. Later, during the Geonic period, the S'lichot | the week before Rosh Hashonah wore intr The first printed S'licha Book was published I Soncino in 1487, and the second was published! Prague in 1529. One of the prevalent customs connected with j Jewish New Year is the sending of Rosh greeting cards. These cards usually carry the Heh inscription. LShanah Tovah Tikasavu V'sach May You Be Inscribed And Sealed For A Year. Known by their shorter name as Sh Tovah cards, they express the wish that the recipij be written down for a year of health, happiness i contentment. The text of the Jewish New Year greeting! based on the belief that God judges all manh on Rosh Hashonah — that the fate of each is written into the great Book of Memorial on "Hashonah and the final decision is sealed on Kippur. We find the first reference to such be| in the Mishna where according to Rabbi "Three books are opened on Rosh Hashonah. is for the out-and-out wicked, a second for truly righteous and a third for those in betwej The righteous are at once inscribed and sealed! life; the wicked for death. Judgment of the tn group is suspended until Yom Kippur. Should of that group attain merit during these days, hj inscribed for life, otherwise for death.'' (Rosh shonah, 16-A-B). It is the contention of Isaac Hirsch Weiss in] famous work. Dor Dor V'Dorshav, (Book ID. 156) that Rabbi Judah ben Ilai was the one Continued on Next P*9 HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL D.W.McCOY.Inc REAL ESTATE In All Its. Branch** 1549 S. W. 8th Street Phone 9-2245 TO ALL A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY CITY AUTO PARTS Morris and Bill Zuckannan 41 79 N.W. 20th St Ph. 9-1457 Best Wishes To All pino Hair Stylist 1057 WASHINGTON AVE. Miami Beach Phone 58-4478 ONE GRADE FUEL OIL Clean • Economical BOILERS — OIL BURNERS REPAIRS INSTALLATIONS Serving MIAMI BEACH At Any Hour Radio Dispatched AMBER FUEL OIL INC. Dkd 584022 New Year Greetings To QUALITY SERVICE MIAMI BAGEL BAKERY Telephone 2-2498 1999 N.W. 17th A> MIAMI 35. FLORIDA



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PAGE 8 B + y**i*tncr***n flUPAY. SEPTEMBfr n*. GREt^TINGS FROM J. R. SPRADLEY & CO. FOOD BROKERS 18 N. W. 14th Sweet > • Miami. Fla. TO ALL GREETINGS U.S. ROYAL TIRES AMALIE (Pennsylvania) MOTOR OIL DADE TIRE CO., Inc. 1501 N. MIAMI AVENUE MIAMI. FLORIDA Phone 3-8445 TO ALL — NEW YEAR GREETINGS Dixie list* Corporation Moe Longer 405 So. Dixie Highway Coral Gables Peerless Manufacturing Co. Manufacturer of Corrugated Cartons and Cartons lor Fruit Candies 23 N. E. 74th Street Phone 7-0953 Office Supplies. Office Furniture MR. FOSTER'S STORE 33 N.E. FIRST AVE. PHONE 3-7694 GREETING CARDS ENGRAVING SEC MANUFACTURING COMPANY tl N.E. 26th Street Phone 3-5351 A Happy New Year To All Our Friends and Patrons J. L. Cleaners Laundry & Tailors NM S.W. 8th STREET MIAMI A Happy New Year To All Our Friends and Patrons G & R Auio Service MSI BIRD ROAD. MIAMI Ronnie Thaler Phone 4-SS37 GREETINGS FINCHER OLDSMOBILE Inc. WE BUY SELL TRADE Buy With Confidence 1740 HE. SECOND AVENUE Phone 3-8351 The Jewish Year in WashingfeJ Smator McCarthy ... is he anti-Semitic? Jewish Telegr.phk Agency WASHINGTON—Controversial tactics of Congressional committees concerned with subversive activities drew the attention of major Jewish organizations since last Rosh Hashonah. Amidst warnings from Jewish leaders that McCarthyism was creating an atmosphere conducive to anti-Semitism, virtually all major Jewish groups went on record against abuses of the Bill of Rights. A by-product of the Republican victory at the polls last November was the emergence of Senator Joseph R. McCarthy as chairman of the Senate Committee on Government Operations. This gave the Senator sweeping investigative powers which he lost no time in exerting. He maintained that he was solely after Communists, and only disloyal persons need fear attack. But his opponents felt that he characterized as a Communist anyone who disagreed with his extreme right-wing political convictions. Elements in the Jewish community raised the question of whether Senator McCarthy and other members of Congress who used similar tactics could properly be considered fitting objects of "Jewish interest." An affirmative answer came when extremist attacks on religious life were threatened. Rabbinical and anti-defamation organizations spoke out in unmistakable terms. Many people wanted to know: "Is McCarthy antiSemitic?" Some undertook to answer this question by saying that, if one would use his own standards of guilt by association, things might look pretty bad for the Senator. They pointed out his insertion of anti-Jewish material by Upton Close in the Congressional Record, aid to Nazi war criminals and efforts to free them from prison, participation in the anti-Semitic campaign against confirmation of the appointment of former Assistant Defense Secretary Anna Rosenberg, and the widespread support given him by the lunatic fringe of anti-Semites in this country and neo-Nazis in Germany. But no responsible Jewish organization officially described Senator McCarthy as prejudiced against the Jewish religious faith. The careful and objective consideration afforded the Senator on the issue of anti-Semitism by Jewish organizations apparently did not coincide with the standards he used in judging others. In the course of a Meet The Press telecast, he hurled charges of "flagrant anti-Semitism" against Senator A. S. Mike Monroney, of Oklahoma. Senator McCarthy used as the basis for his allegations the assertion that Senator Monroney was guilty of religious bigotry because he opposed the tactics of two McCarthy aides. The two aides, whose questionable conduct drew • widespread scorn, happen to be Jews, fc^ bert H. Lehman, of New York, took the floor *, Senate to defend Senator Monroney while ft, BTRh and other leading Jewish groups whS Senator Monroney as a fair-minded sprang to his support. Jewish organisations vigorously opposed ci nism and were anxious that the most effective possible be taken against subversion. But they f. and opposed destruction j civil liberties extremists in the guise opposing munism, sou* to blur the vit distinction tween fob and Communisi A warning I \ "already the I rosive has begun" which fear "corroding liberties, tu Master Ltkmmn citizen agiii baa ae seelaaies citizen" was sued in Harry Truman's last major expression President. Mr. Truman said that "every dimu_ of our tolerance, each new act of enforced formity, each idle accusation, each demonstr of hysteria—each new restrictive law—is one sign that we can lose the battle against fearinquisition, the star chamber, have no place nil free society." Jacob Blaustein. president of the American ish Committee, told an AJC meeting in Chic that "few anti-Semites are devoting their efforts i present to open anti-Semitic propaganda or assaults on Jews." Instead, he said, "many of are operating in the disguise of anti-Commu Mr. Blaustein observed that "We are facing hert| far more dangerous problem than the old-fashia anti-Semitic agitation—far more insidious and more complex." President Eisenhower sought to avoid confront Senator McCarthy, but he did take effective on two issues. They clearly served as rebukes to t Senator. Jewish organizations, painfully aware < what followed book-burnings in Nazi Germany, I encouraged when President Eisenhower spoke at Dartmouth against American book-burning I ties obviously inspired by Senator McCarthy. Senator McCarthy defied even his own con by seeking to retain an extremist named Dr. J. Matthews as staff director. President Eisenh took decisive action. The President informed National Conference of Christians and Jews of I disapproval of Dr. Matthews' broad charges of i loyalty against Protestant clergymen. Dr. found himself forced to resign. Senator McCx accepted the resignation "reluctantly." Dr. thews was the same man who helped Senator Carthy launch the red-smear campaign against Anna Rosenberg. Rabbi Ira Eisenstein, president of the Rat Continued on Page 11 A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS Berson Co. Wholesale Distributors Ladies' and Children's Wear 324 W. FLAGLER STREET Phone 84912 William N. Berson Irwin Labbie A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS New YEAR fo ALL Ova FRIENDS AND PATRONS Stule Mieautu 10 S.E. 1st STREET MIAMI Phone 82-7763 A Happy New Year To All Our Friends and Patrons GUARANTEE EXTERMINATING CO. 3211 S.W. 22nd Terrace Phone 83-3970 A Happy New Year To All On Friends and Patrons Flan Vale* 2920 Ponce de Leon MeeL 49-9333 A Happy New Year To Au| Our Friends and Patrons CharehilApi. Hotel 3801 INDIAN CREEK DRIVE] Phone M657 Irving Nash David Becker| A Happy New Year To AU Owr Friends and Patrons Fowler A (solden. In*'. REALTORS 19 W. FLAGLER STREET 80523



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^mAY SEPTEMBER 11. 1953 *JewlsJintrlettnr> %  Pg 9 3 F Happenings in the Sport World By BILL WOLF Jewish Toltgraphic Agency The biggest event of the year for fans interested Jews in sports will take place from September 20th through 29th, in Israel. Some 1.000 athletes from all parts of the world will gather in Israel to compete in the Maccabiah Games, held every three years. A team of 100 athletes from the United States will participate', including a number of leading nonjewish Olympic champions who are going along to give exhibition performances. There will be large teams from England and South Africa, and as at the previous Maccabiah, Israel is expected to field the largest aggregation. In all, there will be competition in 19 sports. The eyes of athletic enthusiasts from all over the world will be on Israel during the period of the Maccabiah, which has all the trappings of a little Olympics. It is expected that the American team, sponsored by the US Committee for Sports in Israel, will return with plenty of motion pictures in color so that some of the spirit of the games can be recaptured for audiences in this country. BASEBALL — The biggest baseball news of this year's season was the tremendous performance of Al Rosen. Al, play) ing one of his best j years, was hitting practically everything in sight. He showed promise of being the Ameri. can League leader \ in both the home 1 run division and the runs batted in competi t i o n as well a s finishing high in the batting average column. Other baseball notes: Cal Abrams did better after beinu switched to a Pittsburgh uniform in a trade from the Cincinnati Reds Joe Ginsberg likewise improved and saw more action as a catcher for the Cleveland Indians. Joe had been traded from the Detroit Tigers ... Sid Gordon continued a valuable player for the Boston Braves ... Sol Rogovin failed to hit the stride that was expected of him as he got off to a slow start hurling for the Chicago White Sox. CHESS — This isn't usually a sport that attracts a lot of attention. Matches are held minus a lot of fanfare, with only those who closely follow the game paying attention. But this year the game of chess suddenly shot into the headlines with plenty of interest for Jewish sports fans. The reason: A match was scheduled between the US chess team and the Russian chess team, with Jewish players as the chief contenders. For the US team, there was Samuel Reshevsky, backed up by several other Jewish stars. For the Soviet club there was world's champion Milhail Botvinnik, with several other Jew'sh Players also starring on the Russian team. The Al tosen biggest news Nat Holman bt gats credit match appeared slated to be a good opportunity to improve international sports relations and see some Jewish sportsmen from Russia in action. However, the match never came off. For some reason, the US State Department ruled that the Rus sian players could not live at the Russian Embassy home in Glen Cove, Long Island. They would have to" live in a New York hotel. The Russians resented the restrictions, said they were insulting and called off the trip. BASKETBALL — Top basketball story of the year was the ordeal suffered by Nat Holman, one of the "^ leading figures in • basketball. H o 1 | nan, who piloted he City College of New York cage squad, was suspended following the basketball scandals. College authorities accused Holman of neglect of duty and improper conduct. Holman protested vigorously, said he was being made a scapegoat and fought back in a departmental trial. Abe Saperstein's Harlem Globetrotters, celebrated Negro basketball team, kept going at its history making pace, playing throughout the world and setting many new attendance records. Saperstein was portrayed in a Hollywood film about the Globetrotters. There were many Jewish stars, too numerous to mention, on college and university basketball teams throughout the country. One of the outstanding coaches was Tubby Raskin, who had a leave of absence from Brooklyn College to pilot the Israel, basketball team at the 1952 Olympic in Finland. Israel's basketball team did itself proud by making a powerful showing at the European basketball tournament held in Moscow. Competing against some of the best court clubs in Europe, the Israelis placed fifth and astonished observers by their ability. The team from Israel had learned much since the days when basketball was not very popular in the country. A lot of credit goes to Nat Holman and Tubby Raskin for furthering the sport to the point that it is one of the top games in Israel at the moment. HERE AND THERE — There were numerous Jewish athletes holding down important positions on college gridiron teams across the country last fall Sam Gerson, of Philadelphia, who is a former Olympic star and a believer in keeping up friendships between the athletes of many nations, continued his organizational efforts. Gerson worked to expand the United States Olympians, an organization for past Olympic stars, and started work on a new project — a similar organization on a international scale. Tragedy struck a promising baseball star. Herb Continued on Page 12 Holiday Greetings INSURANCE 37 N.E. lit AT*. Miami Holiday Greeting* &


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SEPTE MBER 11. 1953 Jewlst, fkrMtor, PAGE 9A Cohens Honeymoon In Veradero Beach; Bride Is Former Hermene Silversteen A morning ceremony at the Monte Carlo Hotel on Sunday united in marriage Miss Hermene Silversteen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Max Silversteen, 615 84th Street, and Jay I. Cohen, son of Mrs. Idell Cohen and the late Leo Cohen, 1120 Venetian Way. Rabbi Irving Lehrman officiated. Al Sokol offered traditional nuptial violin solos. Best man was Jules Cohen, brother of the groom. were Mr. H. D. Silversteen, uncle of the bride, from Louisville, Kentucky; Mrs. Lillian Krantz, aunt of the bride, from New York City; Mr. and Mrs. M. Guttman, aunt and uncle of the groom, from Chi cago; and Mr. and Mrs. George Meyer, also from Chicago. The bride is a graduate of Miami Beach High School and attended the University of Miami. The groom also is a graduate of Miami ri,„ ;„ m i--_ K u —•. • Bach High and attended the Uniganza gown with short sleeves and matching gauntlets. Her shoulderWerner Kahn Photo Jay f. Oh*. Mr. and Mrs. Irving Cypen, of 1352 13th Terrace, Miami Beach, have recently returned from a threeweek vacation which included visits to Philadelphia. New York'City and the Concord Hotel in Kiamesha Lake. New York. Mist Saearfra Kor§er length veil of French illusion was held in place by a Juliet cap of pink organza. She carried a white satin Bible centered with two white hybrid orchids and showered with demure roses. Mrs. Ted Dorch was matron of honor. She wore ice blue lace and carried a modified colonial of pink carnations. Flower girl was Lauren Roesing, wearing white organdy pinafore and cartying a pink basket with rose petals. Mrs. Silversteen, mother of the bride, and Mrs. Cohen, mother of the groom, wore teal blue taffeta and beige organza respectively. Both chose orchid corsages. Floral designs were executed by the Blackstone Flower Shops. A wedding luncheon at the Monte Carlo followed the ceremony. Among out-of-town guests versity of Florida. He graduated from the University of Miami Law School, is a member of Zeta Beta Tau Fraternity and the Dade County Bar Association and is at present active as executive director of the Miami Beach Apartment House Association. For her going away costume, the bride chose a powder blue linen ensemble with navy accessories and double white orchid corsage. Upon completion of a honeymoon trip to Veradero Beach. Cuba, Mr. and Mrs. Cohen will reside at 9401 North Bay Harbor Terrace. Miami Beach. Alexander Miller Speaks Alexander F. Miller, of Atlanta, Georgia, will be guest speaker before the Miami Beach Lodge, B'nai B'rith, at its weekly luncheon meeting on Tuesday, September 15th, 12:15 p.m.. at the Mei Yin Restaurant. Mr. Miller is Southern aigcr, Brodsky Troth Is Revealed of Delta Phi Epsilon Sorority. |ilr. and Mrs. Saunder Karger, 5959 La Gorce Drive, Miami ach. announce the engagement their daughter. Saundra, to ar.ley Brodsky, son of Mrs. Jack sk) and the late Mr. Brodsky. Ba> Drive, Miami Beach. |. %  it. le elect attended the Uni.•:tv of Miami and is a member Mr. Brodsky graduated from the University of Miami in 1951. He is a member of Zeta Beta.Tau Fraternity and Lead and Ink Honorary. *A formal home garden wedding is planned for December. taken s Honeymoon II Nassau KisMaril>n Nierenberg, daughMrs. Harry Neham. 24 2n 1 Street, Miami Beach. kame the bride of Marvin Oaken, Ir 'if Mr and Mrs. Louis Oaken, |20 (oral Way, at the Lincoln poor or. August 29th. Rabbi MorSkop officiated. |During the ceremony, the formMiss Nierenberg carried her pr.dmother> Bible in a cascade orchi paid of honor was Miss Ann pick, a friend of the bride. ArnOaken was best man for his tother. Wewlywed Mrs. Oaken is a gradp ol Miami Beach High School. Oaken also attended Miami M Hii;h. as well as Florida late University. |A reception followed the cereV"iy. Among out-of-town guests p„Mr and Mrs. Miro Abitabal. Bogota. Colombia. ''"'•' %  honeymoon trip to [jMU. the couple will reside at 8th Street. Miami Beach. Mrt. Martin Oaken IMIklngton Stuilio DEPENDABLE DOMESTIC HELP RELIABLE DAY WORKERS A-l EMPLOYMENT SERVICE S7 N. E. 5th Street Phon B401 AL MEIDENBERQ. Ownif We extend best wishes for A VERY HAPPY MEW YEAR to our many friends and patrons MORRIS BROTHERS MIAMI BEACH 1261 WASHINGTON AVENUE g Hft l !!£§ the home of SUNSHINE FASHIONS Pt off. Mi*i Bcfc ft Lsuderdale WMI Palm Beach foundation for smartness YOUR 6M BRA You look your loveliest feel your loveliest wearing one of these luxurious Bali Bras, smoothly molding your figure to sheer glamour magic! The Bali Bra with band-easy support. MM Cotton, B cup, 32 to St .... afc 3^25 40 at Cotton, C cup, 32 to Nylon, B cup, 32 to 3B Nylon, C cup, 32 to 40 f 3 $ 3 Nylon, D cup, 32 to 42 .*. •4 00 s-Uiib 43 W. Blagtar Mai 3-331* 133 Mir. Mile, T. C. Mai S.1-3U2 mm S.K. rir.i s*. Mai s-iees 833* 9T.B. lad Arm. Mai ••-7*11



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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11. 1953 **WfsV>raMfr*7 PAGE 13 B Producti6W!Greets the Year With Progress in Commerce By HENRY MORGENTHAU, JR. It is interesting to reflect, as we prepare to celebrate the New Year, on the depth and extent of the changes wrought in Israel since the young nation celebrated its fuwt Rosh Rashonah as an independent State five years ago. Our own lives may have seen great changes in these five years, but for the American Jewish community as a whole the amount of change has been small indeed compared to the historic developments in Israel, and indeed to the very changes in Israel's natural landscape. The most outstanding change in Israel is of course the fact that this year 700,000 more Jews will be celebrating Rosh Hashonah there than five years ago This central fact, the hundreds of thousands of new settlers who have been welcomed to Israel to rebuild their lives and to build happier lives for their children, has affected every area of life in Israel, from agriculture to industry, from exploration and pioneering to commerce and transport. This Rosh Hashonah finds Israel's farm population almost doubled, with more than 330 new settlements founded in the last five years. Several hundred thousand acres are now under cultivation by people* who had no prior farming experience but are now doing their part to help feed Israel. Israel's farmers produce enough vegetables to keep the market abundantly supplied, and just about enough fruit. Local livestock feed production has made great progress: five yearago. barely 40 per cent of the feed required was grown in Israel, but today, withtwice as much livestock to be fed, 70 per cent is produced in Israel. With the coming year, however, Israel's agricultural planners look to development of the country's water resources to make possible the irrigation of larger and larger areas of the nation's farm land. Aided b> Israel Bond dollars, the irrigation program has already made possible the introduction of a number of new crops, and the country's agricultural base is king broadened more and more. On thf industrial front, Israel greets the New Year with confidence that she is becoming one of the most important industrial and commercial centers of the Middle East. She is justly proud of the fact that leading American firms have established Plants in the country, including Kaiser-Frazer, Philco. the Jerusalem Shoe Corporation (equipped with General Shoe Corporation machinery). General Tire and Da) ton Tire and Rubber. With the inception of the State of Israel Bond drive in the United States nearly two and a half >ears ago, Israel's industrial activity spurted for'rd, aided by a flow of investment dollars for basic wonomir development projects. Factory construction "w gone ahead at an accelerated pace, with Haifa's Nesher Cement plant now producing 400,000 tons of cement per year, and the two new plants of the Shimshon cement factory, already producing cement at the rate of 300,000 tons a year. American purchases of Israel Bonds have speeded the construction of the new plants of Fertilizers and Chemicals, Ltd., Israel's largest industry. Utilizing the vast phosphate deposits of the Negev desert. Fertilizers and Chemicals is well on its way toward producing all the chemical fertilizers needed for Israel's agriculture. In the coming year, expansion of this plant with the aid of Israel Bond investments will make possible the export of ammonium sulphates, superphosphates and potassium sulphate. New industries have brought in their wake new urban developments, with Israel's three major cities. Tel Aviv, Haifa and Jerusalem, expanding to become the homes of textile factories, flour mills, food processing plants, machine shops and other enterprises. Haifa Harbor's facilities have been enlarged to increase its capacity as Israel's largest port from 1,300,000 to 4,000,000 tons a year. In addition, such ancient settlements as Beersheba, a few years ago only a sleepy Arab village and now the industrial hub of the Negev, have mushroomed into new frontier boom towns. The Negev itself has been the scene of the most dramatic changes. This forbidding desert area, five years ago an unexplored wasteland, is now the site of around-the-clock exploration, research and mining Continutd on Ntxt Pag* Glass in numerous forms is now being produced in Israel as part of the expansion of all elements of the country's economy under the impact of American investments in the State of Israel Bond Issue. A glass blower shapes a beaker. A Hippy Ntw Year To All Ovr Fri.ndi and Patrons llondlx Lannderland 2268 S.W. 8th STREET MIAMI for Prompt Pick Up and Delivery Call 48-4510 HAPPY HOLIDAY McAllister Flower. "8T M with Flowers %  ut Say H with Oufs" GREETINGS Phone 3-8758 CHARLES SEVERO, Mgr. Est. 1922 Empire Employment Agency CULINARY AGENCY OF FLORIDA 714 N. E. First Avenue LICENSED AND BONDED Specializing in HOTEL, RESTAURANT AND CLUB EMPLOYEES TO ALL GREETINGS Mrs. V. C. PLUMMER A Happy Ntw Yoar To All Our Friends and Patrons Alma Beauty Salon 403 WASHINGTON AVE. MIAMI BEACH Phone 58-1735 Alma and Rudy A Hippy Ntw faor To All Ofr frhmd* mmi Pofroas BISCAYNE TERRACE DRUG STORE 340 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD MIAMI Phono 9-9M7 Rose and Jack Zwick A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEArTTO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS Mount Royal Manor The Shi ii tier ma II* 6061 COLLINS AVENUE MIAMI BEACH Phone 86-1451 PROMPT SERVICE K-W APPLIANCE SERVICE Phono 4 9822 SALES AND SERVICE 640 S. W. 22nd Avenue SEASONS GREETINGS DALLETT'S GARAGE AND SERVICE STATION 340 Twenty-third Street .. PHONE 5-6721 MIAMI BEACH TO ALL GREETINGS AMERICAN TERRAZZO & TILE CO. 1915 N.W. Miami Court Phone 9-3601 To All Happy New Year GARY of MIAMI, Inc. Morris Greenwald 5 S. W. 2nd AVENUE MIAMI. FLA. TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR RUBBER INC. Charles T. Spencer 159 N.E. 29th STREET PHONE 3-6201 A Happy and Prosperous New Year to all Our Friends and Patrons Spie and Span Laundry 12535 W. DIXIE HIGHWAY, NORTH MIAMI 1*317 DIXIE HIGHWAY, NORTH MIAMI BEACH Phono 7-4W4 Benjamin GollOT A Happy and Prosperous New Year To All Our Friends and Patrons Alum A Lock Awning & Shatter Co. AEMJMimJM AWNiNG SHUTTERS 3595 N.W. 54th STREET Phone 64-0671 NATHAN WALBERG. Pros. .. •



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Page 8 F HHDAY, SEPTEMB [TWBER U, m u When Friends Drop in During the Holiday* Serve Delicious • Cakes and Cookies from SAVORY BAKE SHOP 1M ALTON ROAD MONE ** A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL-MR. and MRS LOUIS MELN1CK HOLIDAY GREETINGS llousrr Company, Inc. Fire and Casualty Insuranc* Florida Bond and Mortgage Co. Mortgage Loans & Investments HOUMT Realty Co.. Inc. Real Estate — Property Management Hrst National Bank. Miami Phone 3-2648 i| TO ALL I I GREETINGS Dr. T. L. Lowrle 828 N.W. 3rd AVENUE MIAMI FLORIDA Best Wishes for a A Happy New Year COUNCILMAN BERNARD A. FRANK Of course we riave Miami Diaper Service.' Doesn't everyone? • And besides all those surgically sterile, fluffy, white diapers, Miami Diaper Service furnishes us with 9 Eveready Nursers (the best formula bottles ever), a deodorizing, porcelain Storage Hamper, twice-a-week Pick Up and Delivery Service ond a free subscription to BABY TALK Magazine I PHONE TODAY! In Hollywood and Homestead In Miami ni Collect PHONE 48-1 7H In Ft Lauderdale 2-25*1 to wft Mr. Stork Nfeiseff to Y—r Stork er M* Our Cfeslze stork it •voila&to at no charge or ohlgiirkm And, well toxi him to your parry and pick him up and take._ home again. ..for frcel-^ust give us a ring or drop us a note. sTSSSl Ot>a<0OnOaV c mdtak.hswl ipusonote.l MIAMI DIAPER SERVICE Mtn btr Nmtionml lmlituf of Diaper Services 4200 Aurora Street, Cerel Gables, Florida tunari roia rw? •MAY YOU IE INSCIB£D fO* A GOOD YtAf Totalitarian Trends are Main Threats of the New Year By DR. ISRAEL GOLDSTEIN President, American Jewish Congress end Chairmen, Western Hemisphere Executive, World Jewish Congress In this solemn High Holy Day season. Jews everywhere are weighing the experiences of the past year in order to fix their sights for the year 5714 which lies ahead. We have witnessed momentous developments in many areas of the globe. Together with all peoples of the world, we join in hailing the truce in Korea and devoutly pray that through the agency of the United Nations, men can once again resume the thread of their lives without fear of war. While this stirring event must hearten men of goodwill eve rywhere, we must still contemplate a future in which the dark, menace of totalitarianism continues to cast its evil shadow. During this past year. Jews and free peoples t h roughout the world were profoundly shocked and alarmed by events in the Sofrancais d> lo ffactja* viet Union and its satellite s t a t es where it appeared that Jews had been singled out for especially ruthless treatment. The repudiation in recent months by the Communist powers of this anti-Jewish policy' has brought us immense relief. We pray that the resumption of diplomatic relations between the USSR and Israel augurs that a more enlightened and humane policy will be adopted by the Kremlin towards its Jewish community. We must not. however, be lulled into relaxing our vigilance and intense concern for our brethren behind the Iron Curtain. We have also witnessed during the past year an epochal and unparalleled event in Jewish history with the successful conclusion of the reparations negotiations with West Germany' This agreement was made possible only because disparate Jewish groups enthusiastically joined forces in a most inspiring demonstration of unity. We fervently hope that such unity will be further strengthened and consolidated in the year ahead. In recent weeks. Jews the world over have noted with deepest interest the proceedings of the Third Plenary' Session of the World Jewish Congress, where the representatives of Jewish communities of more than 65 nations met to deliberate on matters of mutual concern. This conference dramatically and concretely expressed the will to unity of the Jewish people and provided, as well, a vivid demonstration of its will toward creative survival. France's totalitarian menace Events in Israel give us added assurance that the young nation is continuing to develop i n „. sonance with the highest ideals of democracy ^ Judaism. It is struggling heroically to overcome it, grave economic and political difficulties Israel i, still ringed by hostile nations who, we sincerely hope, will soon be brought to realize the commo. I prosperity and progress of the entire Middle East] depend on a stable and enduring peace. W' e pr that the good offices of the free nations will be exerted toward promoting this end. At the begin, ning of this New Year, it is fitting that we renew our determination to render our utmost financial and moral support to Israel so that she may achieve durable peace and economic security. At -home, Americans who venerate the noble tra-1 ditions of freedom and equal opportunity inheres*] in our way of life have been dismayed by the efforts] of some men to undermine that precious heritage. Americans of all faiths and political groupings ban been appalled by the abuse of Congress legitimate right of investigation to spread fear and intimida-1 tion and to suppress freedom of expression Wi have been horrified at the spectacle of some Araerions' advocating the resort to the totalitarian extreme of bookburning. However, it is gratifying thai in recent months there have increasingly appeared i vigorous condemnation of those excesses by lead-1 ing statesmen, clergymen, educators and publicists. I Let us pray that this will strengthen our determination to withstand further unAmerican onslaughts oi j our freedoms. We are also confronted today with the funda-1 mental and inescapable task of bringing uur immi-j gration law into conformity with American demo] cratic principles and ideals. The passage of the-j Emergeny Refugee Act will help to regain for our j country some of the stature we lost abroad througsj the enactment of the McCarran-Walter bill, but wj shall never fully undo the harm wrought by that legislation until its discriminatory provisions, and j particularly the racist national origins system oi which it rests, are repealed. Let us earnestly hope] that the President will be encouraged by the saccessful enactment of the refugee bill, which he| sponsored, to redeem his election pledge for the | revision of the McCarran-Walter Immigration law. We Jews, who have throughout the century' I** 11 among the foremost in cultivating the ideal* of: human freedom and dignity, must in the year ahead j rededicate ourselves to the continuing struggle for j the triumph of those ideals with are inextricably j linked with the heritage of Judaism. This preciout religious and cultural heritage we must zealously guard and enrich as we did in promoting the worldwide dream of peace, progress and social justice 4 Ho,,, New rear T Tfce Jtwiik Community CHRIS DUNDEE leiine anaWrrstfi'aa 'remoter MIAJM MACN AUDITOtiUM RADIATORS IIPAIBIO CLEANED RECOKEO nnrs RADIATOR SERVICE 2035 N.W. 1st AVENUE •Men GREETINGS TO ALL Shadyside Nursing Home "A Home Away From Home" 3508 N.W. 19th TERRACE PHONE 64-1981 TO ALL. GREETINGS WEST INDIES FRUIT COMPANY 605 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD Phone 82-8473



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V-l i y SEPTEMBER_lljJ9M_ •Jm>ist>nor*M7 PAGE 7H c/o 6t// vvfe SayCl Tilost (Happy Ylew IJear ISB: The Family Agerijcy c I i By ALBERT COMANOR ,iivc Director, Jewish Social Sorvlea Buroau i to have the opportunity to express New [Greetings l0 the Miami community, especially I one can reflect that the services the Jewish Service Bureau offers are being increasingly stood and used. We have been particularly dative of the interests shown by The Jewish lian in the progress made by our agency. This has been reflected in reports which have ap. from time to time. We are now given the lunity to summarize what has happened and to %  for the whole community some of the many Eons which have been asked of us. What kind of service does the mon throughout society and aTe lerious problems. Great numbers of people are perplexed about themselves, puzzled about decisions they must make, doubtful if they can get help and are often unnecessarily unhappy. Now every family has professional casework service available when help is needed. Is it true counseling it? that many people do not know about service or find it difficult to apply for %  • • • • • • Mr. Ud.ll and Mr*. Jack and Family Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPY NEW TEAR v.. Mr. and Mrs. Alex Van Straatan and Family Wish All Their Priends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Jewish Service give? The Social Albert Comonor problems discussed Social Bureau Jewish Service Bureau is a private social agency, a member of the Community Chest and of the Greater Miami Jewish Feder a t i o n which h e lps people with social or personal a d j u s t ment problems. Its way of helping is through the profess ional practice known as social casework. hat kind of people use the agency? people who come to the agency for help are who can't solve some personal or family dif)ty and who have decided they ought to try i something to solve the problems. They repre a broad cross-section of our population, with different kinds of occupations, including professional people and from all ranges onomic status. We see men, women and childpeople who compose family units and people I are unmarried. I think there is less awareness of the availability and nature of counseling help in Miami than in many other cities with large Jewish populations. That this should be so is quite understandable. In New York City where a family counseling service for the whole community has been publicized for the last twelve years, there is a very heavy demand for this help so that the agencies have lists of people waiting for continued service. Although help in family adjustment matters has been provided in Miami for some years, it is only recently that the agency has felt prepared to make a general announcement of its counseling help. Actually it is often not easy for people to bring themselves to ask for help with personal problems. Although the practice of caseworkers is controlled by a code of professional ethics and all social agencies are required to keep confidential any information given them, people who have not previously] used social work help cannot be sure of this before they have been told. Then, too, because of recency of the change in outlook of the family agency, many people are confused about what these agencies do. Some are inclined to think, because of what agencies used to be, that if they don't have a financial problem there isn't any place where they can get help. It is not unusual that people find it hard to evaluate their own problems and to learn what they might do for their own self protection. Consider physical illnesses, such as cancer, tuberculosis or heart disease. Large sums of money have been spent in a broad educational program carried on for years to try to teach people to recognize symptoms and to get help early. One might think that all this teaching and propaganda might be unnecessary, but we have learned that without all this effort many people will still fail to take care of themselves. It is even harder when emotional and social problems are the issue, because the individual sense of self esteem is involved. The problem is not just what is happening to us, but our own responsibility and actions are involved. Mr. and Mrs. Saul Von Zamft and Children, Steven and Elys* Wish All Their Fnends and Relatives A HAPPT HEW TEAR • • • TV • • • Mr. and Mrs. Simon Waist and Children, Judy and Danny Wish All Their Friends and Relative* A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. Weitz vW • • • Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Waldman and Son, Mr. Sheldon Waldman Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mrs. Hyman Y. Waldorf and Family Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mr*. Herman Wall and Family Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Philip Warshaw and Children Wish All •'heir Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR and Mrs. Max and Family Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mr*. Herman Wepman and Sons, Warran and Dennis Wish Al! Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mr*. Irving Wart In and Son, Allan Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Or. and Mrs. William Wkkman and Son*, Mark and Gary Wish All Their Friends and Relative* A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mr*. Samuel Wilchyk Wish All Their Friends and Relative* A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Nat William* and Family Wish AH Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mr*. Sidney Wassarman and Family Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Morris W. Weinberg and Daughter* Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mr*. Benjamin B. Wolff and Family Wish AH Their Friends and Relative? A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Simon Wolff Wish AH Their Friends ond Relativr* A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Max Wolfman and Son*, Ernest and Stanley Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Carl Wainkle and Family Wish All Their Fnends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mr*. Malvin Wainkla and Sons, Duka and Donie Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR • Dr. and Mr*. I. Newton Wainkla and Daughter, Romelle Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR It this different than the way it used to be? Does getting help imply failure? eial work in America began as an effort to I help to underprivileged people. That help was ally largely concerned with financial problems. professional and the agencies gained experii nd learned more about people, they were able help to more and more families with many ent kinds of problems. In the SO"s governJt agencies assumed the responsibility for flfr'al needs. These developments made it possible Ifamily agencies to offer their help to the whole kmunity and not just to people with financial olems. his is one of the most important social developnts of the century. Problems of personal and adjustment are not limited to any one group. il worries and anxieties, divorce and family • difficulties in child behavior are comWnen a person Is unable to get along with other people, can't find satisfaction in living, is unable to make a go of marriage, can't win affection from his children, then that person is involved in what has happened. In this sense there has been a personal failure. But the failure lies in the unhappiness and the problem, not in getting help in an effort to find happiness or to solve the problem.. A sincere attempt to get counseling help, to see wnat one must do in an effort to live more satisfactorily, this is the opposite of failure. Are all people who get counseling service helped? Ordinarily just acting on the resolutions to look squarely at one's problem with a professional caseworker is a helpful experience. How far one can Continued on Page 10 Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Weinstein and Daughters a) Dona Dee and Deborah Ann Wish Al! Their Fnends and Relatives A HA PPT NEW TEAR Weinttein Mr. and Mrs. Irving S. and Children Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Weinstein Wuh All Their Friends and Relative* A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mr*. Jerry Wei** and Son*, Stuart and Marty Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Jack Wucher and Family Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Martin Wucher and Sons, Raymond and Jay Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Milton Yaffa and Family Wish AH Their Friends and Relative* A HAPPT NEW TEAR Dr. and Mr*. Barnard Ye*ner and Family Wish All Their Friend* and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mr*. Albert Zalka Wish AH Their Friend* and Relative* A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mrs. Joel Zali* and Family Wish AH Their Friends and Relative* A HAPPT NEW TEAR Mf nd Mr*. Max Swarfs ["w Son*, p.ttr and David All Their Friends and Relative* HAPPT NEW TEAR I*nd Mr*. Jack Swardlin •nd Family All The.r Friends and Relatives HAPPT NEW TEAR Mr. and Mr*. Mayor Taigman and Daughter, Adele Wish All Their Friend* and Relatives A HAPPT NEW TEAR ••*••• %  •"


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^v SEPTEMBER 11. 19S3 IH'S SPIRITUAL LEADERS WILL WELCOME 5714 IT SERVICES + leistinnr/rf*+n m Rabbi Max Shapiro Beth David m Ifbbi Mosf s Meschcfoff Beth Jacob PAGE 13 G MWaQ Mbl fry in. Ltkrmmm Miami Beach Jewfth Center PH Joseph ftocjtevs** Beth Tfilak Kakkl l—m Kronish Both Sholom Tt "l l>r M | ROSH HASHANA (Greetings Jrunt Sip STall Com Country Dubuque Packing Company Dubuque. Iowa Packer! of KOSHER BEEF. VEAL and LAMB Wishes You a Very HAPPY NEW YEAR UI f/orida Representatives Saffer Brokerage Company Harry Saffer. Pres. Offices: 24 N.W. 7th Street, Miami Phone 3-5463 2310 Market Street, Jacksonvilh Phone 3-8289 810 Whiting St., Tampa Phone 2 8977 Distributors Miami Provision Company 1062 N.W. 22nd Street Miami Fla. Phone 2-8413 %  %  %  %  from the ,Mlntztx& MR. and MRS. I. L. MINTZER JACK and JACKIE and the Children, Michael and Bruce MR. and MRS. RAYMOND M. CHISLING and Judy



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j^ppy NEW YEAR BUCHWALD & CO. T...1IT • NOVeltUS • BB0 • J 160 W 34th Street i^ W YORK CITY *! UNCOLN ROAD "Telephone 58-1818 GREETINGS TO ALL jUAMI PLUMBING SUPPLY CO. 2151 K. W. If* Avenue M IAMI, FLORIDA $. Hale*"" Phon# 4 2M1 SEASON'S CHKETlllOl LINCOLN DEPARTMENT STORE [, I.W. Slxtj^oo-d SIMM Phone 84-2941 MR. and MRS. MAX M. SINGER and Children ANDREA and JIMMY 2201 S.W. 27th Terrace A. Wish Their Relatives and Friends A Very Happy New Year A HAPPY NEW YEAR V LEWIS BEAUTY SHDPPE 1355 Washington % •• MIAMI BEACH BEST WISHES FOR A VERY HAPPY NEW YEAR SHAW BROS OIL CO. Exclusive Distributors of Pure Oil Company Products in SouthEastern Florida mtewuik MtwMkm MIAMI. FLORIDA FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 11. 1953 SEC. D i The Jews of England By GEOFFREY D. PAUL Jewish Telegraphic Ag.rxy LONDON — A Rabbj leaving South Africa has predicted the end of that country's Jewish community within relatively few years; Zionists in America, we are told, are apathetic. This has been the year of. the critics, with Britain no exception. AngloJewry, declare the detractors, is a second-rate community. For many in this country, the phrase has an air of truth. Recent years have seen Britain's Jewish community playing a minor role in the international .affairs of the Jewish people. America his produced the Jewish leaders and has given the lead. AngloJewry, lacking leaders with forceful personality, has been forced to hitch its wagon to the American caravan. Not a little of the criticism heard here is part of the British — in the national sense — consciousness that this country's leadership in general international affairs has passed to the United States. And yet. in many ways, the Anglo-Jewish community has taken a firm and united stand on matters affecting Jewish life which has in no wise been paralleled in the States. It was Anglo-Jewry that first raised its voice in protest against the rearmament of Germany and pointed to the dangers of neo-Nazi elements still active in that country. Outside of France, AngloJewry was the first Jewish community to take an interest in the affair of the Finaly children. Nor has sufficient tribute been paid to the "back-room" role played by members of this community in securing support for the Israel-German reparations agreement among. German Socialists. But the community has remained without a driving force. Since the departure from these shores of the great Zionist leaders who made London their headquarters, there has been no one man to command the attention and backing of the community. Joint Palestine Appeal campaigns have achieved fair results, Jewish National Fund endeavors have been well supported, and the many other appeals have received lesser donations. But it has been a "Judaism-identification" of the pocket and not of the heart. The year has been marked by angry, and traditional, bickering between the Board of Deputies, the representative body, and the Anglo-Jewish Association. There was a High Court case about the granting of a Beth Din license to a butcher in which disturbing facts about the internal organization of the Jewish religious court came to light. There have been occasions on which the authority of the Chief Rabbi has been questioned. Even some Zionists feel slighted. When the Jewish Agency Executive met in plenary session in July, American leaders were invited to attend the sessions in which matters vital to Zionists in all countries were discussed. There was no representative of British Zionism present at those meetings. Israeli leaders in their references to Diaspora supContinued on Page 15 BUJ GREEN PLANT FOOD On Your Lawn? !ttl 9 rMuU can be ohfe ,rom hi rich plaS food wil tLi C0 ,a,n minerals that •TYour? k ** P ChlnCh bu OUl ^Tourlawn. Sold exchuiTely HUGHES SEED STORE 8 Miami Ave. Ph. S-8M1 Extend Best Wishes To All For A Happy New Year SALAMI FRANKFURTERS KNOCKWURST FOOD FAIR STORES Sincere Wishes fox a .. HAPPY NEW YEAR G. M. DYKES IRON WORKS. Inc. IS N. W. Third Street Phone 82-5637 Sincere Wishes to All Our Relatives and Friends far A Happy New Year Mr. and Mrs. George Chertkof AND FAMILY Mr. and Mrs. David Brown and Family WISH ALL THEIR RELATIVES AND FRIENDS A HAPPY NEW YEAR HAPPY NEW YEAR THE C.W. KISTLER COMPANY duPONT BUILDING MIAMI, FLORIDA Phone 2-5154 Lowest Monthly Payment in This Area on Home Loans LOWEST RATES No Mortgage Insurance Charge €. V. Galardi 20 S.E. 3rd Avenue WISHES ALL HIS FRIENDS A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR James E. Roche PAINTING CONTRACTOR 217 NX 97th STREET Phone 78-5852 SEASON'S GREETINGS TO OUR MANY FRIENDS and Patrons BALDWIN Mortgage Co. BALDWIN Insurance Agency, Inc. PHONE 2-8181 840 Biscayne Blvd.. Miami



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j0; crPTEMBER %  1 1/1988 *JemteHfl*i#> : ft y. PAGE: 9 b .* ^ ear in America By DAVID SCHWARTZ j#wi*h Talagraphk Aaancy KW year will mark the celebration of the anniversary of Jewish settlement in America. did the first Jewish settlers — the Jewish Fathers" feel and celebrate their first Hashonah in America back in 1653 and 1654? I them "Pilgrim Fathers." That tag has usually i reserved for the English settlers who came ovI the Mayflower thirty years before the first settlers. But the Jewish settlers of New dam have also the right to be called Pilgrim ere were many groups of Pilgrim Fathers, the who came over to Delaware, the Quakers I came to Pennsylvania. They were all Pilgrims (fathers of the world that was to be America. means to journey, to wander, and in that 1 the Jewish settlers of New Amsterdam were Pilgrims than those who came on the [lower, for the Jewish settlers were several i Pilgrims. They had wandered from Spain to d, from Holland to Brazil and had fled from outh American country to New Amsterdam. | when they arrived at New Amsterdam, they re not sure that they had found a haven. ere were only 23 Jews who came over in that [settlement in 1654, but Governor Peter Stuyves|the Dutch governor of New Amsterdam, was I they night prove a menace to his way of life. lourse, the Dutch themselves were but a very number, and the Indians didn't like their inflation either. e immigration problem that troubled these first fch settlers (if New. Amsterdam three centuries i probably still the major problem not only of [lews, but of the whole world today. A world immigration is fluid is like a man with good I circulation It is fundamentally sound. Con| today, if the surplus populations of Italy, Japan oon could flow freely to the less densely popu\ countries, the tensions of the world would bo I reduced. But no one loves an immigrant. I only immigrants we have any praise for are who immigrated long ago. If the Pilgrim Jcrs who came on the Mayflower or the Jews [came to New Amsterdam were to come in toI am afraid, we would look with the same con1 on them as they were subjected to three hun| years ago. I Dutch were relatively more tolerant in those |of the first Jewish settlers, but Governor Peter want certainly possessed little of this fine P> He not only did not like Jews, he had I to prevent any settlers except those of his [urch establish themselves in the new world. 'one legged but swell headed. He had vanity for four legs. It was not the Jewa, bat others J Amsterdam who said that he aspired to be %  "Grand Duke of Muscovy." Wvesant urged as a pretext for the deportation PJ Jews from New Amsterdam that they might line a public charge, and he tried to do every* Possible to make his predictions come true. J^*Jrbidden to open stores or trade with — tmt lr,m Spato to Jtoffmtf tnm Mlmmt to Brazil the Indians. But the Jewish settlers were no supine lot. They made Peter Stuyvesant "eat crow." They appealed to the Dutch East India company, and Stuyvesant was overruled. There was a Jew who ran a butcher shop on what is now Wall Street. His name was Asser Levy. There is some reason to believe that Asser Levy was also the shochet. One day, the sheriff came around to Levy with a bill for a special tax. "What is this?" asked Asser Levy. It was a special tax placed on Jews by Governor Stuyvesant in view of the fact that they do not join with the others in standing guard. "I will not pay the tax, and I demand that right to stand guard," replied the Jewish shochet. Asser Levy won his point. Stuyvesant didnot permit the Jews to build a synagogue, but it is probable that on the first Rosh Hashonah in New Amsterdam, they held services at the home of one of the settlers, and it is also very likely that the chazan was Asser Levy. Asser Levy was not only a brave man but apparently an honest man, as is indicated by the fact that several Christians of New Amsterdam named him as executor of their wills. It was a tense and vital time — this period of the first Jewish settlement in America. A time of many wars, but a time also when the mind seemed to be throwing off the old fetters. Newton had astonished the world as Einstein today. Spinoza was blazing new paths in philosophy. Rationalism flourished alongside of an intensified mysticism. Shabbathai Zevi was to come forth in a few years to proclaim himself the Messiah. Spinoza's friend, Henry Ordenburg, wrote to the Dutch philosopher that there was a growing belief in the restoration of the Jewish State, and Spinoza himself wrote that he thought it entirely possible that they might return to their ancient land again. "They might be chosen by God." ["•PPT New Year To All Fritnds and Patrons piercer Auto Service f*l S.W. 8th STREET MIAMI Phono 83-1595 CUFF MERCER fc* mV TEAR !" ALL r**NDS AND PATRONS Riv iera Health Resort H! YUMUBJ STREET C0R AL GABLES I>hon 87-0078 i* BROADBENT. IWor TO ALL GREETINGS Stern Electrical Engineering RCA Radios — Television Sales and Servico 5138 S.W. 8th STREET Phone 4-6540 TO ALL OUR FRIENDS. RELA TIVE S AMD JE WRT EVERYWHERE A lOST HAPPY AMD PROSPEROUS MEW TEAM MR. and MRS. M.LEDOVIT and ramily 472* Alton Road Miami Beach A HAPPT NEW TEAR TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS Radio Sales & Rental Co. 1726 ALTON ROAD Plum* 5-1832 C. R. Gunn A V SEASON'S ORBETi) Warn **f. FRIENDS A Happy New Yon To All Our Frtondi and Patrons Central Garage 300 N.W. 8th AVENUE MIAMI Phone 3-7983 Anton and Williams o,, i£2E5j5 FOR ALL OCCASIONS FRESH DAILY 312 tin STREET. MIAMI BEACH PHONE 5-M72 GREETINGS TO ALL ENNESS GARMENT CO. INC. Fashion Mart Blda.. 127 N. W. 2nd St Miami GREETINGS AND BEST WISHES TO ALL Mr. & Mrs. Max Shlafrock M. S. CONSTRUCTION CO. 5410 N. W. 14th Avenue Phone 84-2671 A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS ALAMO FRIED CHICKEN Delicious Golden Brown 2816 PONCE DE LEON BLVD. PHONE 4-2712 CORAL GABLES MR. AND MRS. LEON BERG AND SON GILBERT Southern Frnit Shippers OF ALL WORTH-WHILE THINGS 739 WASHINGTON AVE. EXTEND BEST WISHES TO ALL THEIR FRIENDS FOR A NEW YEAR THAT BRINGS A SPECIAL GOOD MEASURE HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM MR. CARLTON J. COMBS of the COM IIS MANUFACTURING CO. TO ALL .. NEW YEAR GREETINGS Lagoon Restaurant and Bar YOUR PATRONAGE APPRECIATED 23 SUNNY ISLE BOULEVARD GREETINGS WALTER E. PEACH ORGANIZATION FREDERICK T. SHARMAN Registered Broker Phone 7-1404 9500 N. W. 7th Avenue MIAMI MAY THE NEW YEAR BRING liuppinvHs. -toy and Prosperity. TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS AND TO ALL JEWRY Schrager's, Inc. 1001 WEST FLAGLER STREET MIAMI. FLORIDA Phone 2-0707 "HIGHEST TYPE PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY" I



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Pa ge 16 F + le*lstinrrk&n TO All GKCmHGS SNOW WHITE CLEANERS I LAUNDRY Ymmr Satisfaction Omr Utosurf 734 COUINS AVENUE Phone 5-2557 PATTERSON BROTHERS GROWERS MARKET 1329 N.W. 21st Terrace WISH ALL THEIR FRIENDS AND PATRONS A HAPPY NEW YEAR GREETINGS Fl* MANCHU CHINESE RESTAURANT Food to Take Out Family Style Dinners Delivery Service 325 • 71st St Ph. 86-4303 PHONE f-314* YOU* THANSflB PtOtlEM PtOAIPTIT HAN DUD J. C TRANSFER COMPANY •01 N.W. In, AVENUE PftMt 9-314* Strtkt %  Dtlitt.y Qitlit, PRESCRIPTION PHARMACISTS COMPLETE DINNER WHERE THE HOME FOLKS EAT HOTEL PHARMACY LINCOLN 1 ALTON MIAMI BEACH •nmmt 5 6425 GREETINGS TO All N.t "Jt AMtbcr" Eatia, Pl.ct Realty's Restaurant Air Ctmiitiemea M •Urn* 2-4651 200 N.t. 2a* AVENUE MIAMI, FLORIDA To Omr Pafroni ami fritmit MOST HAW HOLIDAYS D I N T Y MOORE'S RECREATION PARLOR P—l Wimktrlf SI NX lit STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA SERGE V. MANKELL SIGNS TWA* UTTUIHC WALLS BOAADS GoW Leaf AU KINDS Of LETTERING 1719 S.W. lit STREET Phone 82-3759 (Simtm 192S) ragAY^SEPTENfflER 5714-1953 As you face the new year with vision and courage, please accept the sincere wishes of your many good friends here who stand ready ... always ... to help you to make your future brighter and happier. THl TREND IS TO THE 3 Convenient Offices to Serve You 1400 N.W. 38th Street 45 N.E. First Avenue 1357 S.W. 8th Street JOSEPH M. LIPTON. President To Promote Thrift There's a FREE GIFT FOR NEW SAVERS at all offices Onr ticsourcvs Exceed 49 Million Italian* he Officers, Director* and Sale* Organization of M OUNT EBO u-ish to extend best wishes tor a Happy, Healthy and Prosperous New Year (EIETEII sacred to the memory of loved ones, dedicated to the Jewish concept of Life Eternal, in a setting of tropical beauty and peace, comforting to the dear ones left behind. PERPETUALLY MAINTAINED Our Safes CaaasaUars Sidney laraaaM Morton Stinky %  "T Uv, Karrv Rote. n)nWm%*M St %  Ilk mrm ml y—r street the y—r row we J mil MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY, INC. "The Cemetery ot Distinction for Discriminating Families 5505 NORTHWEST 3rd STREET Phono S7-S2*l



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Page 10 F + le*lsiinor*JlatL SiSLSSigji. TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR DR. AND MRS. ELLIOTT C. COHEN 1650 S.W. list Street %  T. F. LEJEUNE General Contract* Mortgage Loans T. F. LE JEUNE Owner 125 N.W. 54th STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA Phone 78-4266 A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS ACME PRESS, INC. Distinctive Printing — Cards to Catalogs Tags oi Every Description Printed or Made-to-Order Patching — Stringing — Wiring MIAMI INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT MIAMI PHONE 88-1614 Everett E. Jones, Pres. George C. Schenk. Vice-Pres. A HProtpttoui Vu 1 Tear To All Ot.r Fnends and Patrons MEYERS of MIAMI WOMEN'S APPAREL 5 S.W. 2nd AVENUE PHONE 3-1637 Sam Meyers Harold S. Meyers HARRY AND FRIEDA COHEN HOTEL M *V YORKER ACE RUG CLEANERS 26 S.W. South River Drive Phonee 9-1155 & 82-2007 RUGS CLEANED, DYED and DEMOTHED Carpet Laying and Repairing FURNITURE CLEANING Greetings To All MR. and MRS. JOHN E. PORTE GREETINGS TO ALL STEADFAST VENETIAN BLINDS 9510 N.W. 7th AVENUE PHONE 7-6844 TO ALL GREETINGS MIAMI COAL & OIL CO. and MIAMI CRYSTAL ICE 4 COLD STORAGE CO.. INC. 1100 N.W. 21st Terrace Phone 2-7896 Phone 67-1343 Auto Painting PROCTOR AND SON BODY WORKS 33M Douglas Road SEAT COVERS TAILOR MADE Miami. Florida McrFarlin Con strwetion Company ENCIHEERIHG CONTRACTORS ROADS — STREETS — PARKING LOTS — DRIVES ASPHALTS TARS ROAD OILS Since 1931 1085 K. W. 56th Street PlM>a,.3.5. Miami tt. Florida naif m WJSI Continued rom efe 1 n West < Germany" stamp are being twisted into place by Haifa construction workers, as the first sacks of German-made fertilizer are spread upon the fields of a kibbutz in the Emek, just a year has gone by since two diplomats, stiffly and without prior handshake, affixed to a treaty without precedent in diplomatic history the signatures "Adenauer" and "M. Sharett." The Reparations Agreement provides that, in view of the expense incurred by Israel for the integration of destitute Jews uprooted by Nazism and its aftermath, the German Federal Republic will furnish goods in the value of $710,000,000 to the State of Israel over a period of 12 to 14 years. The types of merchandise that may be ordered by Israel are listed in agreed upon schedules, which will be revised from time to time. In general the products should be of German manufacture, although in certain cases they may be of non-German origin. They must be suitable for the economic life of Israel and not be resold to third countries. To place orders under the reparations treaty and to supervise their execution, Israel established a Purchasing Mission with semi-diplomatic status in Cologne and a branch office in West Berlin. At the present time the Mission has an Israeli staff of about 50, headed by Dr. Pinchas E. Shinnar, who has been granted the personal rank of Minister, and by his deputies Dr. Chaim Yahil and Dr. A. Bergmann. Shipments worth $96,000,000 are to be made by March. 1954. Thereafter, the annual rate of delivery is to range from $60,000,000 to $74,000,000 until 1964. or 1966. The total will therefore run to more than the $710,000,000 agreed upon — to $817,000,000 to be exact. The added $107,000,000 constitute a second obligation assumed by Germany. In addition to direct reparations to Israel, the Federal Republic undertook to pay this sum to the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany for the relief and rehabilitation of Jewish victims of Nazi persecution who do not live in Israel, as partial compensation for those material losses which were inflicted upon the Jews of Europe by Nazi Germany and which can now be made good no longer. This payment Germany will make in the form of supplemental reparations deliveries to Israel, which in turn will transmit the value thereof to the Conference, formed by 23 major Jewish organizations of the Western world. It is the first time that they have thus been recognized at the international diplomatic level as the authorized spokesmen of the Jewish people outside of Israel. Beyond the compacts entered into by Germany with the State of Israel and with the Jewish organizations, she also agreed at Luxembourg to take all possible steps to carry out an adequate indemnification program for individual victims of Nazism. A bewildering array of compensation legislation had, it is true, already been passed earlier by the constituent states of the German Federal Republic and by West Berlin, but these laws differed widely and, quite aside from an administration often marked by ill will, proved inadequate in many respects. In the British zone, these deficiencies were most pronounced. At Luxembourg, Germany pledged herself to unify and improve this hodgepodge of state laws through introduction of a federal law that would incorporate benefits for some 30 specified classes of persecution and persecutees. while being no more unfavorable to Nazi victims than the statutes now applicable in the US Zone. A sweeping and unified indemnification law coverI'pTTnujp In* West GerrtaV has beeH.manderf ^ ed. for six years or more. Numerous 1? variance in detail, were worked out but it in June of 1933 that the Federal "nTl.e?, 1 duced a bill of its own into parliament IS *i indemnification found it unsatisfactory in m "l spects but. reasoning that a bad law wu M to no law at all, rallied behind it. The MS fate often hung by a thread, was in the Jt 1 ed by Parliament at the last possible wXfiA the adjournment. It will enter into effect n „ Si tober 1st. *1 The law provides for direct payments to K. victims, or their surviving dependents, h-J illegal imprisonment (for each month they held, former concentration camp inmates art 3 ceive the equivalent of $35), deprivation of erty, loss of earnings and physical injuries resnl* in a disability of a third or more. Payments 3 be spread over the next ten years, however vl law is carried out in good faith, its overall (Jj variously estimated at between 700 million and/ billion dollars. The highlight of 3713 has been this trio of 1 tive enactments — the Reparations Agreement,, Israel, the pledge of a substantial payment ta | Conference on Jewish Material Claims and the ^ sage of the Indemnification Law. The extent < Nazi barbarity, for which they seek to atone | some measure, was unparalleled. At the same t it must be acknowledged that, as a voluntary 1 of a state which in this respect is fully sova the reparations pact and the indemnification | also have no precedent in history. Great credit is due to those Germans who I hard to bring all this about — above all others! cellor Adenauer, the late Kurt Schumacher, i sor Franz Boehm and Dr. Otto Kuester. The Pa liamentary deputies of the Social Democratic Pa voted to a man for both the pact and the bilLi though they are in bitter opposition to the auer government. Among the governmental lition, only a minority supported the pact and I wholeheartedly. The moral courage of that mio as well as that of the Social Democrats, is all I greater because, as politicians up for re electioal September, they are well aware that on these is they do not reflect the prevailing mood of the I man people. When a cross-section of Germans was asked,| a public opinion survey taken in the winter | 1952-53, whether they considered the Israel ment or Arab trade relations more important.! Germany, only 12 percent in Western Germanjj 22 percent in West Berlin came out for the foi Even when all reference to Arab protests was 1 ted, only one West German in four thought thatj Israel Agreement ought to be ratified. Under these circumstances, will Germany out the obligations she has assumed? To answer I question, we must take into consideration political, psychological and moral factors that 1 tate in favor of fulfillment, as well as the turn and the vested interests generated by any I scale program once it is underway. Prospects l better than they were a year ago that, as lonf J economic prosperity is not impaired thereby j as long as the neo-Nazi resurgence can be kept' in bounds by the dedicated democrats who still I a number of key positions. Germany will honor her undertaking toward Israel, towardil Jews of the world and towards the individual' tims of Nazism. GREETINGS Herbert Diamond A ( o. SEA SHELLS & FLOWER SUPPLIES Telephone 64-6031 1340 N.W. 27th A*e. Miami 35. Florida GREETINGS 1 DADE COUNTY DAIRIES PHONE 84-0637 A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS 38atj ?£I U i i ts HEALTH FOOD* 107 N. E. 2nd Street, Miami J Dietetic and Salt Free Foods C I f £ T I N C J SUPERIOR GENUAL ELECTRIC APPLIANCES Opea Friday ead 4353 N.W. 7th AVBMK MWM^I



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