The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01123

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text
fewiisltJEIliDipidliiaun
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
5LUME22NUMBER 32
MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, AUGUST 12. 1949
PRICE TEN CENTS
EWS FLASHES
lines Explode
JERUSALEM, (JTA)An ac-
(entally started fire this week
nlodcd several mines in the no
fn'. land area of Mt. Zion.
There were no casualties as a
tuK of the unexpected blasts.
Lumber of tourists visiting the
Ltoi icul height were thrown into
| temporary panic as the ex-
osivcs were set off.
ligratc To Israel
ATHENS, (JTA)The Israeli
Insul lure has received assur-
Ices from the Greek War Minis-
Lr that Greek Jews whose age
hups have recently been called
for service with the armed
rces will be permitted to mi-
rate to Israel if they choose, it
ks learned here this week.
[Meanwhile, it was also revealed
La- the director of the Greek Air
Enistry will visit Tel Aviv next
lonth to negotiate and sign an
|r convention with the Jewish
ate. A trade pact between the
so nations is expected to follow
fce signing of the air convention.
i.-i/i Sentenced
WARSAW, (JTA)A Warsaw
(strict court this week sentenced
ranch L ucer, to five years imprisonment
pr making Nazi propaganda
jlms for the Germans during the
Jazi occupation. Petersile was the
Producer of many pro-Nazi short
ubjects including the notorious-
/ anti-Semitic film "Jews and
fyphoid."
>km1 Seized
FRANKFURT, (JTA) U. S.
Lrmy authorities at the port of
iremerhaven this week seized an
iraeli vessel, the Drommit, be-
|ause it was allegedly being load-
with an illegal consignment of
nachinery, including construction
nachines, tractors and automo-
biles.
The Army announcement re-
pealing the seizure said that the
nachinery was labelled as house-
Sold goods of Jewish immigrants
beaded for Israel. The Army of-
ficials said that the shipment,
vhieh came from Bergen-Belsen,
. the largest of its kind ever
overed.
Award Made
WARSAW, (JTA) Dr. M.
Golenbievsky, director of the Jew-
ish Health Society OSE in Poland
has been awarded the Polish gold
"Medal of Merit." The award was
made by the Police Vice Minister
for Health at a ceremony opening
a new 250-bed OSE sanatorium
for tuberculosis patients at Ot-
vock.
67 Communities Will Raise $12,000,000
Less This Year Than In 1948, Survey Shows
NEW YORK, (JTA)A total of i Funds says: "The current cam-
$54,191,000 has been raised to date|paigns show that American Jews
Israeli Income
Exceeds Outgo
TEL AVIV, (JTA)In its first
published statement of the fi-
nances of the state of Israel from
its establishment, on May 14,
1948, to March 31, 1949, the Fi-
nance Ministry revealed that for
its first ten and one-half months
the Israeli Government had a
revenue which was 1,355,000
($4,065,000) above its expendi-
tures.
For the first quarter of 1949, the
statement revealed, imports into
Israel amounted to 15,500,000
pounds, while exports came to
5,050,000 pounds. The United
States led the list of nations sell-
ing its products to Israel, account-
ing for 23 percent of the imports.
The British Commonwealth, ex-
clusive of Canada, sold the Jew-
ish state 12 percent of its imports;
Italy, seven percent; and the
Eastern European bloc, eleven
percent. Israel's chief customer
was Britain.
Test Houses
NEW YORK, (JTA) Three
types of small-pre-fabricated
houses are being sent .to Israel for
testing by the Palestine Economic
Corporation, it was announced
this week. The houses will be set
up by the end of August in va-
rious locations to ascertain their
suitability for Israel's climate as
well as to determine the cost for
a large-scale assembly program.
Jews Remain
LONDON, (JTA)The Jewish
Committee for Relief Abroad this
week reported that large num-
bers of Jews in Berlin have
changed their minds about im-
migrating to Israel "where con-
still in the pioneer
toward local campaign goals by
67 Jewish communities through-
out the country, according to a
report released this week by the
Council of Jewish Federations and
Welfare Funds. Some of these
communities completed their
campaigns in July, while others
are continuing their drives.
The reporting cities anticipate
a final total return of $58,990,500
for 1949, the report said. The
same communities raised $71,005,-
256 last year. These communities
include: Baltimore, which has so
far raised more than $3,000,000^
and will close its campaign in
September; Buffalo, which com-
pleted its campaign by raising its
quota of $1,200,000; Cincinnati,
which reached its goal of $1,600,-
000;' Cleveland, which completed
its drive after raising its goal of
$4,900,000; Detroit, which raised
$5,240,000 and is concluding its
campaign this month; Kansas
City, which reached its goal of
$1,210,000; Los Angeles, which
raised six million dollars toward
its $8,000,000 goal, but which is
continuing its campaign through
September.
The reporting cities also in-
cluded Miami, which concluded
its campaign last month after
raising $1,090,000; Newark, which
completed its drive after raising
its quota of about $2,800,000;
Philadelphia, which raised $5,-
700,000 but is still trying to reach
a total of $6,000,000; St. Louis,
which raised $2,650,000; San
Francisco, which secured about
$1,500,000; and Toronto, which
completed its drive after raising
$1,322,000. The report only gives
the results of spring campaigns.
Emphasizing that campaign re-
sults will this year equal or sur-
pass all previous years, with the
exception of the banner year of
1948, the report of the Council of
Jewish Federations and Welfare
take their responsibilities serious-
ly. When presented with the
challenge for supporting vital and
urgent needs, the American Jew-
ish communities can contipue ..o
raise tremendous sums of money
despite less favorable economic
conditions."
As compared with 1948, the
council's report makes the follow-
ing generalizations on the experi-
ences of this year as reported by
the communities:
1. Even though the experts aie
still undecided as to whether the
country is now in a "recession,"
"depression," or "mere levelling-
off process," there exists a fear
of the economic future which cut
sharply into big giving for cam-
paigns. Decreased contributions
this year from some big givers
foreshadows the problems to be
faced in-the 1950 campaign.
2. There were "manpower" dif-
ficultieslack of workers and less
intense coverage of prospects. The
climate of lessened interest in the
campaign applied to workers as
well as givers, indicating that the
impetus of startling headlines, so
(Continued on Page 13)
"RiSAWe(JT,A?-Altribute to gg are fg^JBJfiB
mrieh ?oohr.ioi-ine in T.nwer sla6e; *". .* __.:n_____:_ I-
wish technicians in Lower
llesia and particularly the Jew-
ish miners of the town of Valb-
fchich was published in Dziennik
IZachedni, leading newspaper of
pCatowide.
The newspaper reports that
there are 500 miners and several
thousand other Jewish techni-
Icians. The newspaper reported
Ithat many Jewish miners had in-
Icrcased their output to double
Ithe standards set by the mine
[management and that a group of
Jewish farmers in the same vicin-
lity had exceeded normal produc-
tion by 225 percent. The Jews
I were also praised for their
[brotherly attitude toward the
I Poles and for their cooperation.
Deadline Set
BUENOS AIRES, (JTA) Im-
migrants who entered Argentina
illegally up to July 8 of this year
when President Juan Peron
granted them a pardon must
legalize their status by October
1, 1949, the Director of Migration
I announced this week.
The announcement warned that
any person failing to register with
the Migration Department and
obtain the necessary documents is
liable to deportation to his coun-
try of origin or any other nation
which will agree to take him.
Thousand of Jewish DP's who
arrived in this country since the
end of the war are affected by
the ruling.
Soldier Honored
LONDON, (JTA)A former
Jewish paratrooper, Solomon
Weintraub, was awarded the
King George medal this week for
rescuing five women trapped in
*. fire in a Glasgow building.
about 5,000 Jews will remain in
Berlin permanently.
The report also reveals that
many Jewish applicants for U.S.
visas_whose applications have
been pending for three years-
were recently informed that they
would be transported to the
United States soon.
Greek Jews May
Leave For Israel
ATHENS, (JTA)Greek Jews
of military age may immigrate to
Israel on condition that they re-
nounce their nationality, declare
that they will never return to
Greece and "take with them all
members of their family," a GreeK
government order concerning the
emigration of Jews from this
country said this week.
The last part of the orderper-
taining to the movement of
families is 9onsldered0/4t0th!
vague and it is expected that
elucidation of the clause will be
requested. The government order
covers Jews now serving in the
Greek Army._____________
German Priority
WASHINGTON, -Whle
opposing liberalization of the US
DP immigration law-to admit
more Jewish and Catholic DPs
Sen. Pat McCarran, chapman of
the Senate Immigration Subcom-
mittee this week said at hearings
Si DP legislation that he is ex-
ceedingly sympathetic to Ger-
mans who would like= priority *
enter this country. Sen. McCarran
has bottled up in cornmaee the
House-approved Celler BUI to -a
S?t ovfr 300,000 DP's within
three years.
UN To Withdraw Truce
Machinery From Palestine
LAKE SUCCESS, (JTA)Arab and Jewish representatives
agreed this week at the U.N. Security Council on the earliest
possible withdrawal of the United Nations truce supervisory
machinery from Palestine.
The Israeli, Egyptian and Syrian deleqations expressed
this sentiment after being invited1
to comment on formal Soviet pro-
posals calling for the immediate
withdrawal of all United Nations
personnel from Palestine includ-
ing the Conciliation Commission
itself. The Russian proposals were
put forth in the form of amend-
ments to a joint Canadian-French
draft resolution drawn up in con-
sultation with Palestine media-
tor Dr. Ralph Bunche during the
weekend.
Under this resolution, the
Arab-Israeli armistice agreements
supersede the truce, but leave the
U.N. Security Council in full
charge of the cease-fire through
the United Nations chief of truce
staff. The acting mediator is re-
lieved of his responsibility and
Anti-Semitism Down
Canada Survey Shows
MONTREAL, (JTA)Anti-Semitism does not present an im-
mediate menace to the Jewish community of Canada today,
according to a survey made public here by Saul Hayes, execu-
tive director of the Canadian Jewish Congress.
Mr. Hayes points out that overt acts of prejudice are rarer
now than at any time since Hitler^1
in the United States. There Is no
discrimination against Jews in
civic organizations and public
facilities.
In a foreword to the survey, Mr.
Hayes mentions that in the years
before the war, under the stimulus
and with the assistance of foreign
anti-democratic groups, there was
waged an extensive and success-
ful campaign to separate Cana-
dian Jewry from the rest of the
Canadian community by arousing
hatred for the Jews. The effects
the U.N. Conciliation Commission
Heprived of anv responsibility for
implementing the armistice agree-
ments.
The effects of the Canadian-
French resolution, if adopted,
would be to lift the arms embargo
on the Middle East and, at the
same time, remove all military
responsibility from the Concilia-
tion Commission. The resolution
makes no reference to the free-
ing of Mt. Scopus or the lifting
of the Egyptian blockade, two
points raised by Israeli represent -
ative Aubrey Eban.
The question of the armaments
race raised by Mr. Eban in pre-
vious meetings appeared to vanish
as an issue when the two Soviet
delegates at the council failed to
make mention of the question.
Soviet delegate Semyon Tsarap-
kin and the Ukrainian delegate,
Dmitri ManuiLsky, were chiefly
concerned with allowing the
fmrties to work out their prob-
ems in direct negotiations with-
out "pressure" from the outside.
"The parties proved they are
mature enough to reach their own
agreements," Mr. Tsarapkin said.
He added that "there is no need
for any commission or any ob-
servers."
Dr. Bunche generally held that
complete elimination of the U.N.
personnel would injure the struc-
ture of armistice commissions and
expose to danger a number of
demilitarized zones, such as Mt.
Scopus which is entirely under
U.N. control. Mr. Eban suggested
that the council might eliminate
all truce supervisory personnel at
once, excepting the minin-um
numbers called for by armistice
agreements.
Norway's representative again
expressed the concern of his gov-
ernment over the unsolved as-
sassination of Count Folke Berna-
dotte. At the request of Mr.
Tsarapkin the council decided not
to vote early on the resolution.
came to power, and, although
there is no immediate cause for
undue concern, the resources of
the Canadian Jewish Community
are mobilized currently in the
defense of the Jewish position.
Among the highlights of the sur-
vey are the following:
1. The assumption that anti-
Semitism is more prevalent
among French Canadians than
among the English-speaking pop-
ulation is not valid; perhaps
French-Canadians are more frank I of this campaign were wide-
and inclined to admit prejudice spread and lasted well into the
than the Protestant Anglo-Saxon ^war period.
element. ?
gnS&ris&MSiMH Raab Resigns From Temple Isaiah
they align themselves with the
French Canadians linguistically,
culturally and politically.
3. Jews do occasionally en-
counter difficulty in buying and
renting homes, although this can-
not be considered a typical oc-
curence in Canada.
4. There is no discrimination
in hotels in Canada except in
vacation resorts. Discriminatory
practices in Canadian resorts are
roughly equal to the situation in
the United States. Such practices
appear to be increasing in fre-
quency both in Ontario and Que-
bec.
5. Discrimination against Jews
in social and business club again
would be best described as run-
ning parallel to similar practices
Pulpit, Will Work For Ph. D. Degree
The resignation of Rabbi David
Raab, spiritual leader of Temple
Isaiah, was announced this week
by Julius Jay Perlmutter, presi-
dent of the congregation. The
young rabbi founded the organ-
ization 16 months ago.
Rabbi Raab's resignation is ef-
fective September 1, after which
he will leave for Cincinnati where
he will begin study for a Ph. D.
at Hebrew Union College. The
degree is being offered for the
first time by the school.
Prior to organizing Temple
Isaiah, Rabbi Raab served for two
years as spiritual leader of the
Reform Jewish Temple in Fort
Lauderdale. During this time he
was instrumental in organizing
the Hollywood-Fort Lauderdale
Chapter of Hadassah and the
Zionist District of Broward
County.
The young rabbi has also held
pulpits in Louisville, Ky, Dan-
ville, 111., and Newark, N. J. For
three years he served as auxiliary
Jewish chaplain at Fort Knox,
Ky., and Boca Raton Air Base.
A native of Tel Aviv, he came
to America in 1930 after receiv-
ing his early education there. He
(Continued on Page 12)



'
It
PAGE TWO
+Je*istncrMj2_
FRIDAY, AUGUST 12,
I'll Say...
The sudden emergence of the Republic Israel has
left us in a daze. After a thing is accomplished, it no
longer looks so difficult. Students of history are at-
tributing this miracle to the peculiar brand of Nazi
anti-Semitism, with its dogma of genocide, which
ultimately resulted in the cremation of 6.000.000
souls. Jews, whether faithful to tradition or con-
verts to Christianity, were caught in a trap that
spelled their doom. A Jewish state appeared as the
only solution for survival.
The Spanish Catastrophe
Yet in the long range of Jewish history there oc-
curred tragic events which, allowing for the differ-
ential in population, were proportionately as catas-
trophic as the Nazi extermination. And after such
ghastly experiences, the student asks why a concen-
trated effort was not made towards the creation of a
Jewish state. For example, the expulsion from Spain
in 1492 has always been considered a calamity on a
par with the destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans.
Church and State have consistently kept up the
pretense that the Spanish edict was merely a measure
to force baptism. Actually, the New Christian, as a
convert was then called, was in a worse position
than the observing Jew. The Inquisition, like a
rattlesnake coiled up in dark secrecy, was ever ready
to strike with its poisonous fangs any Mariano whose
sincerity to Christian doctrine was under suspicion.
And any well-to-do converso was automatically a
suspect. Thus in the 16th century, Jews, faithful or
converted, were in most Catholic lands in the same
trap as their descendents, who found themselves in
Nazi Europe four centuries later.
At no time was there a more desperate need for a
Jewish state. For, as in our own day, the wholesale
expulsion caught the refugees without a destination.
The Christian world was closed almost air tight. The
Moslem lands, with the exception of Turkey, had
sunk into fanaticism, ignorance and bigotry. Boats
loaded with Spanish exiles sailed from port to port
The Messiah vs. The Jewish State
By HARRY SIMONHOFF
rascally sea captains sold them as slaves
until the
or threw them into -
Don Isaac Abravenel
How did J,ws meet the Spanish catastrophe on
the ideological plane? Among thorn were men ol
minent abilities' The outstanding leader was h
celebrated Don Isaac A Here w, nomere
bookworm. Don U who ft**"
his descent from David's royal lme was a financier
and statesman who served Portugal. Spain the King-
dom of Naples width, Rep ^Trd^md
his capable management of th. treasury, H'.d.n.md
and Isabella won the M.....>sh war and entered
Granada in triumpl Yet si> nths lat. Abravenel
took up the wand. tf and joined his fellow
exiles.
Don Isaac Abravenel, a scholar deeply versed in
Hebrew learning, was widelj e Humamsno
k)re of tn, ,nc( At homo in Hebrew, Latin
Greek. Spanish and Portugese, was a voluminous
wrher K the royal palace ol th, Catholic: kings he
was in a position to know real pohtik Intimately
for Spain was tin lending power of the day. Sage,
philosopher, statesman and influential loader. Don
Isaac was in a peculiar position to render signal
service to his shattered brethren. He could have
sounded a clarion call for the exiles to wind their
tortuous way to the Holy Land. Un r his leadership
a golden opportunity was waiting to lay the founda-
tions for a Jewish state, H< had the jump uf four
centuries on Theodore H
The Missed Opportunity
But the glorious opportunity was muffed,. Pales-
tine, greatly underpopulated, was under the rule of
the Egvptian Marmelukes. In 1")17 '.hose redoubtable
slave soldiers lost their empire to the conquering
Turks. The Jews could simply have moved in. Then-
nucleus would have been aug y the constant
addition of new immigrants, fleeing from the waves
of persecutions that wen the order of the day.
Material assistance could have come from Po|an(i
which in those days, strange to- say, was the p^
pcrous center of a populous Jewish community, en
joying a measure of self-government (Council 0f
three lands). The communities in Italy, then the
center of European art and culture, would have been
quite helpful Turkey, a newcomer in the West and
a great power, had opened its gates to the Spanish
refugees. The growing communities in Constant!,
nople and Salonica, an almost all Jewish city, Were
the New York and London of those days.
Messianism
But Don Isaac Abravenel turned mystic. He be.
came obsessed with the idea that the Messiah was
on the way and about to turn the corner. The real-
istic statesman delved into the sources of Messianic
speculation; he wrote three books to prove from
Holy Writ that the long awaited Redeemer was
about to appear. Under such circumstances, it was
superfluous, nay even a sacrilege, to hasten the End
(Ketz). to attempt God's own task through concerted
human action. Restored faith in the speedy advent
of a Savior may have brought solace to the bereaved
footsore refugees. It sustained them in their intoler-
able misery. But it also paralyzed all effort to at-
tempt a solution to the thousand year old Galut, ar.
enigma of unspeakable suffering.
A rigid, inflexible Orthodoxy accepted Abravenel's
dictum as to the early advent of the Messiah. All
human effort to end the unendurable misery of the
Galut was branded a sin and crime against Rebono
Shel Olam. Woe to any rebel daring enough to defy
Rabbinic rule. The ban hurled against DeCosta ar.il
Spinoza was enough to intimidate the bravest. Ghetto
walls had to suffocate Jewry for centuries; Bogdan
Chmielnicki had to all but destroy the thriving com-
munity in Poland; the fantastic antiques of the Sab-
batai Zevis had to cause Judaism to blush with
shame: the Nazis had to exterminate by the million
In lore Medinas Israel could arise without Messianic
intervention.
NOW THERE'S MORE
BUDWEISER
...and there will
be still more as
our vast expansion
program continues
Budweiser
fO U T 0*F
ANHEUSER-BUSCH
SAINT LOUIS
Distributed by
NATIONAL BRANDS, Inc.
SAM BLANK. Pres.
Phone 2-7401 Miami, Fla.
Vet Patients Entertained
B'nai B'rith Lodges and Wom-
en's Chapters entertained patients
at Pratt General Hospital, Cora!
Gables, last night with a small
vaudeville revue presented by
Betty Ward's Youth Roundup.
Miss Arlene Shapiro of the
Roundup staff made arrangements
for the program, which included.
in addition to Rounduppers. Jack
Murphy, pantomimist.
Mrs. Sidney Boeninger. B'nai
B'rith Women's hospital repre-
sentative; Leo Steinman. men's
hospital representative; and Marx
Faber were in charge of the af-
fair.
Greenwalds, Perrins To
Entertain In Honor Of
Children's Birthdays
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Green-
wald, 1576 S.W. 2nd St., and Mr.
and Mrs. N. Perrin will be joint
hosts at a party in honor of their
children's birthdays on Sundav
afternoon at 2:30 at Fairyland
Park, 3647 N.W. 36th St.
A clown will spark the cele-
bration which mark.' the second
birthday of the Greenwalds"
daughter, Libby, and the fourth
of the Perrins' son, Evan.
No personal invitations have
been issued and friends are in-
vited to attend.
I .Hill \hm i i Ml
> la <<' hi a I'ruguay MaH-il
MONTEVIDEO, (JTA) The
firs) Latin American Maccabiad
will be held here from Aug. 20-30
with more than 200 contestants
from Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay,
> Colombia and Bolivia in
attei dan< i. Pai I icipai ts will com-1
pete in football, basketball, swim-
ming, tennis and oth< I sports. The
Israeli Ambassador to Uruguay,
Dr.yaacov Tsur, will servi as
chairman of tl e Ma
Formation of a Uruguayan com-
mittee to aid the Weizmann In-
stitute of Science at Rehovot was
announced her, this week. Dr.
Jacob Chazan was name I chair-
man of the now group, which
represents all sections of the
Jewish community in this coun-
try.
THEY'RE SALT FREE!
A tempting treat lor every-
one at all times, HOROWITZ-
MARGARETEN Oven Crisp
MATZOHS are particularly
welcome to people on special
diets, because
THEY CONTAIN NO SALT!
IPLE-PACKED TO PROTECT FRESHNESS!
Distributed by
PALM DISTRIBUTORS, EfC
14 N.E. 24th St., Miami 37, Fla. Phone 3-6866
Lyons To Speak On Herzl
A biographical sketch of Theo-
dore Herzl, founder of political
Zionism, will be given y Norman i
R. Lyons Sundav at 10 a.m. on
Jacob Schachters J< wis Hour.
The program may be
station WTTT on Monday, Wed-
nesday and Friday at 1 p m |
on Sundav at 10 i
> : > M
Zsme Cmwa/gwm
km >,*'&
HERE'S BUTTER YOU'LL REALLY
Attention to every detail of Jewish relioious]
requirements in an atmosphere of beauty
and peace distinguishes our service to the I
Jewish family. [
Our two complete funeral chapels are up-to-\
the-minute in every detail of their equip-
ment beautifully furnished and decoratedl
throughout.
ftC I
H'i Breakitone'i Whipped Butter.[. freihly churned
and whipped until it hat a flovor and creamlne
such at you've never tasted In butler before, h'i
economical, too, became It ipreadi eailer and goei
further. Ask for H at your nel8hborhood store.
mm
TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS
\m
WHIPPED BUTTER
WMT Ol UOHTLY MtriO
twm
Miami Of f.....1713 N.W. 7th Ave^ Phone 82-17:1!
West Flagier & 20th Ave.
Phone:
1236 Washington Ave.
COWARD I NfWMAN FUI
IN NEW | K
Minn \inin:
[ISI NBIRI
......t MNUI


{Y, AUGUST 12, 1949
>Jeist>norIdlar
PAGE THREE
mi Y To Meet Thursday For Purpose
mending Sections Of Constitution
of the most important
ngs to be held by the Mi-
Cm & YWHA will take place
fcdav evening at 8 o'clock at
iami Y, 450 S.W. 16th Ave.,
ding to Leon Kaplan, presi-
Inai
h>ose of the meeting, he an-
tes, is to amend certain sec-
of the constitution, most im-
nt of which is the changing
name from the YM &
|A of Miami to the Miami
fh Community Center.
ial objectives of the Y are
amended in the following
J*r: m
|To develop a program of m-
|al education, recreation and
|h education, which should
Ite primary attention to the
Ttual-cultural factors which
litute the Jewish way of life.
To serve as an agency of
sh identification and integra-
This function requires that
1 membership in the Jewish
ler be open to the entire Jew-
Icommunity and no one be
uded from membership be-
of doctrinal or ritualistic
fcrences.
[To serve as an agency of per-
Jlity development and to de-
|p play-groups, clubs and in-
nal programs to that end.
To further the democratic
of life, by developing the
ntials for citizenship in young
pie. to develop respect for
fan personality and the sanc-
of differences.
To develop a comprehensive
gram responsive to the inter-
k)f people of all ages. Nothing
human concern is alien to the
ler and programs of the great-
diversity of interest may have
Ir proper place within the
per.
&thor amendments to be taken
will be the reduction of mem-
of the board to 35 members,
abolition of the executive
imittce and the creation of an
forary board of directors.
Jr. Kaplan stated that "several
ago the Jewish Welfare
bid undertook a self-study
bwn as the Janowski Survey.
purpose of this studywhich
i conducted by Professor Oscar
Janowski and Dr. Salo Baron
jras to ascertain a critical eval-
linn of the Jewish Community
Biter movement in the United
fates. As a result of this study
ftain principles were adopted
the Chicago convention in 1948.
proposed amendments to our
Jistitution conform to the
inciples of the survey, above-
fentioned.
f'The name Young Men's and
lung Women's Hebrew Associa-
In is a misnomer. Not only do
\ cater to young men and young
Emen but we cater to boys and
ils of pre-school age, of school
i< teen-agers, young adults and
Ir Golden Age Club for people
ler fifty. The Jewish Commun-
m Center is all-inclusive and em-
bees all the groups above-men-
pned. For many years we have
en a Community Center so why
iii call it that?"
fin addition to the general meet-
at which the amendments
will be considered, a musical pro-
igram featuring Bernie Bennett,
who directs his own music school,
I will take place. Also, "Carmen,"
an operetta in miniature, will be
performed by one of the youth
groups of the camp. Admission is
free.
Dade Stations Will
Air Storm Warnings
The Dade County Red Cross
disaster radio communications
system which gained national
recognition last year will again
be inaugurated in the event a
hurricane or similar disaster
strikes this section this year.
At a meeting of representatives
of all radio stations in Dade Coun-
ty and Red Cross disaster officials
as well as officials from the U.S.
Weather Bureau, plans were dis-
cussed for giving complete cover-
age to weather advisory an-
nouncements and official Red
Cross bulletins.
When a storm approaches this
section, two Red Cross volunteer
announcers will be assigned to
the U.S. Weather Bureau. After
the weather advisory has been
read by Grady Norton, meteoro-
ligist in charge, an official Red
Cross bulletin will be read. All
radio stations in this vicinity will
carry the messages and keep the
public informed of emergency
measures in this area.
At the meeting Mr. Norton ex-
pressed alarm at the continuing
complacent attitude of Dade
Countians toward hurricanes and
emphasized that we have not had
a really serious storm since 1926.
"Unless our people obtain a deep-
er sense of appreciation for the
possible danger which might be
wrought by a tropical storm, a
serious situation might develop
in Miami. As far as my office is
concerned," said Mr. Norton, "we
will give the plain facts about
the severity of the storm and
urge all listeners to take proper
precautions."
Women's Newcomball
As a result of last week's con-
test in the Miami women's new-
comball leagues in which the
Roosevelt Girls, led bv Bobby
Bezine defeated the K.V.'s 15 to
10, the standing of the clubs is
first place, Roosevelt Girls;
second place, Dare Devils; third
place, K.V.'s.
The league is a perpetual, lad-
der type in which games are
clayed on the basis of challenge,
with a team able to move up
only one place at a time In the
standings._____________
Jayeees Assail
Ku Klux Klnn
At their annual summer con-
ference held in Key West the
Florida Junior Chamber of Com-
merce last weekend unanimously
adopted two resolutions deplor-
ing the Ku Klux Klan and charg-
ing it with "hiding back of hoods
and masks to do many cowardly
and disgraceful deeds that are
un-American."
In the first resolution the Jay-
cees urged state newspapers to
deny advertising to the Klan,
particularly its solicitation for
membership," "in the interest of
public welfare and to assist in
the elimination of such activities."
The other resolution "deplores
and condemns the un-American
and extra-legal activities of the
Original Southern Klans, Inc., and
urges passage of legislation by
the legislature of Florida to out-
law these practices."
IFIagler-Granada Center Completes
Plans For High Holy Day Services
The Flagler-Granada Jewish, Hurwitz, who is known in Miami
Community Center has completed for his work in the field of He-
plans for High Holy Day services, I brew education, is a graduate of
Herman Fe.dman, president, has ^A%SSUS
announced.
Services will be held at the
Coral Gables Woman's Club and
Joseph J. Hurwitz will officiate.
'Beauty Contest'
Will Highlight
BB Swim llanee
Danee Slated By
I .iiii.ii.i Chapter
Final arrangements for the
games party and dance to be
sponsored by the Tamara Chapter
of Mizrachi Women at the Sor-
rento Hotel. 4384 Collins Ave.,
Miami Beach, tomorrow night at
8 o'clock were made at an execu-
tive meeting this week.
Mrs. Seymour Polin, chairman
of the event, has named the fol-
lowing hostesses for the evening:
Mesdames Theodore Landesman,
A. Mechlowitz, Ben Kazar. Henry
Chill, J. Rosen, Israel Yulish and
Miss Clara Goldenburg.
Mai Malkin and his orchestra
will furnish music for dancing.
Tickets can be procured by phon-
ing Mrs. Polin at 3-0269.
at Boston University and Hebrew
Teachers College of Boston and
is now writing his doctoral dis-
sertation on the subject, "Jewish
Influences on the Koran." He
conducted High Holy Day services
for a number of years in Boston.
Scheduled to serve as cantor
for the services will be Joseph
Krissel, formerly of Denver, Colo.,
who is chaplain of the Norman
Bruce Brown Post No. 174 of the
Jewish War Veterans. Krissel has
conducted services for the armed
forces at Augsburg, Germany, at
Sun Lake in the Catskills.
Reservations for the services
may be made by calling any
member of the High Holy Day
committee, which is composed of
Berry Clein, chairman, 330 N.W.
44th Ave., 48-1780; Joe Masters.
200 S.W. 51st PI., 83-6477; Sam
Kirschner, 430 N.W. 32nd Ave.;
"Mr. and Mrs. 1849" and "Mr.
and Mrs. 1949" will be selected
by members and guests of the
North Shore Women's Chapter,
B'nai B'rith, at their second an-
nual swim dance Wednesday,
August 24, at the Sorrento Hotel,
4399 Collins Ave., Miami Beach.
In addition to the "beauty con-
test" prizes will be awarded to
the winners of a rumba contest
and to the guest appearing in the
oldest style swimijJJ*JJ I ftves for the Loon Lake Hotel and
mittee in charge of arrangements | Franklin County,
is headed by President Mrs. Mark l
Farr Tours Appointed
Miami Representative
For Loon Lake Hotel
Farr Tours have been appointed
and to the guest appearing in tne Miamj senta.
oldest style^swim suit. The^com-|t.ves for ^ LoQn Lflke Rotel and
County,
Silverstein" and she will be
James Segal, 4925 S.W. 5th Terr.,
4-0425; Ben Clein, 4360 S.W. 1st
St., 4-6571. _________
as-
sisted by Mrs. Selma Leban and
Mrs. Leon Rapee who will handle
reservations. Tickets are SI ner
person including tax and may be
secured from any member of the
North Shore Chapter. Price of
admission includes cabanas and
towels. Mai Malkin and his rumba
band will play for dancing. For
reservations call Mrs. Rapee at
86-4413.
New York.
The 3000-acre resort, which is
under the ownership-management
of David S. Andron, is located in
the heart of the Adirondacks. On
the grounds are a three-mile pri-
vate lake for swimming and
water sports, an 18-hole golf
course, tennis courts and riding
paths.
Anyone wishing information
about the vacation spot may call
Farr at 5-5327.
FOR AUTO INSURANCE
SEE
HAROLD GRAHAM
(With Terry In*. Aflcy, Inc.)
1105 Blscayne Bldg. 19 W. Flagler
PHONE 3-4071
serve
BORJtHT
... buy
R0K14CH
A HOME AWAY FROM HOME
24 Hr. Expert Nursing Care
Beautiful Grounds, Well Located
Dietary Lawi Strictly Observed.
$50.00 per week
DR. SHOULSON'S (D.D.)
1681 MERIDIAN AVE.
MIAMI BEACH, FLA.
58-0112
Moving to Bigger and Better
Facilities on the Beach in October
Stone's
Bookkeeping
and
Tax Service
Specialiiing in Small Buiinew
Expert Accountant and Tax
Consultant. Low Rate*.
PHONE 5-5392
1602 Lenox Ave- Miami Beach

Isaiah Women To
Sponsor Party
The Sisterhood of Temple
Isaiah will sponsor a card and
mah jong party Tuesday evening
at 8 o'clock at the Sorrento Hotel,
Miami Beach, according to Mrs.
Clara Mae Van Ness, president.
Subscription will be one dollar,
she announces, and prizes will be
awarded and refreshments served.
Members are asked to bring
friends, cards and mah jong sets.
In charge of the affair are Mrs.
Van Ness, Mrs. Jack Brodsky,
Mrs. J. J. Perlmutter and Mrs.
Arthur Kaplan.
Following this affair, members
of the sisterhood will resume
their weekly Tuesday night sew-
ing sessions. At these meetings
which begin at 8 p.m. the women
are preparing items for a forth-
coming bazaar. Mrs. Louis Litt-
man is chairman of the sessions.
Sorority Alumnae To
Hold Luncheon Party
Alpha Epsilon Phi Alumnae
will hold a summer luncheon and
games party tomorrow at 12:30
p.m. at the Variety Club on the
Alcazar roof. ... -,
All alumnae and their friends
are invited to attend and reserva-
tions may be made by calling
Mrs. Sidney Lewis, chairman, at
4-0568. ...
The next regular meeting of the
association will be held Thursday
at Mrs. Lewis' home, 1801 Cortez,
Coral Gables.
... Make
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NOW the very best is available!
A. beautiful SOOO-aore wonderland retort .. ****
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sorlal. entertainment and athletic program .
CELEBRITIES noted Andron CUISINE .
diet" law*. lake front luncheon buKet. .
eveiy conceivable comfort *
RESERVE NOW for choice cottages,
luxurious suites and hotel rooms.
"Buif a case of
Cool Omfat
BAUANTINE
aleQDbeer
YOUR AFTERNOON WILL BE
FILLED WITH MUSIC IF
YOU LISTEN TO
"MUSIC ROOM"
2:35 5:00 P.M.
DISC JOCKEY JOEL CRAEGER SPINS THE LATEST
POPULAR RECORDS FOR YOUR LISTENING ENJOYMENT
"YOUR FAVORITE STATION FOR MUSIC AND NEWS'
vU *D'0 D'**
PHONE 5-5327
FARRYour Travel Agent
EXCLUSIVELY DISTRIBUTED IN MIAMI BY
on
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1725 N. W. 7TH AVENUE
PHONES 3-0021 and 2-6141-2
Distributed by
STATE BEVERAGE DISTRIBUTORS OF MIAMI, INC.
SAM BLANK, Pres. Phone 88-3431
DELICIOUSLY FAMOUS
KOSHER DELICATESSEN
Under Strict Rabbinical
Supervision
Approved by
The Beth Jacob Vaad Hakashruth,
Rabbi Moses Mescheloff, Executive
Director.
The Greater Miami Vaad Hakash-
ruth, Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky,
Director


t\
PAGE FOOB
*Jehhtfk*Mtor
FRIDAY, AUGUST
*.
EDITORIAL
Mux \ordau
Max Nordau, the centennial of whose birth is
being celebrated this month in Israel and through-
out world Jewry, was next to Herzl the greatest
figure produced by the modern Zionist movement.
First a physician, then a writer by profession, he
dedicated the best years of his life to the task
of healing, or regenerating, a sick Jewry by means
of his pen and voice.
Nordau shared Herzl's great vision, that of
making the Jewish people healthy again by re-
establishing it as an independent nation on its
ancestral soil. He had already won his spurs as
a writer of social criticism, as a novelist and
dramatist in Europe when Herzl's idea of a Jewish
state captured his imagination. He unreservedly
identified himself with Herzl's plan and assumed
his share of the work. It was Nordau who formu-
lated the Basel Program at the First Zionist Con-
gress in 1897 and it was his speeches, eloquent
surveys of the situation of Jews throughout Europe,
animated by his passion for justice, that were the
highlights of many subsequent Congresses.
It was Nordau, the healer of his people, wh-
first coined the term "muscle Jews," who called
uporf the Jewish youth of Europe to train their
bodies and at whose suggestion Jewish sports
clubs and gymnasiums sprang up everywhere.
He. too, possessed of the gift of prophecy, fore-
seeing trouble ahead in Palestine after the Bal-
four Declaration and the Mandate, begged the
World Zionist Executive to transfer immediately
to Palestine 600,000 Jews from Eastern Europe, a
request which some Zionist leaders then regarded
as "impractical" but which, had it been heeded,
would have proved the most practical of all steps.
The contribution of Max Nordau to the rise of
the Jewish state can hardly be over-estimated.
Like Herzl, born and reared in Budapest, Hun-
gary, in an assimilationist environment, he em-
braced the movement for Jewish national re-
naissance, devoted his entire life to it and is
today gratefully remembered for his contribution
in the newborn Jewish state that he helped plan.
Thrillinq
The story of the linking of Jerusalem and Tel
Aviv by train for the first time since Israel's
existence could not have failed to thrill those who
have been following the rapidly moving events
gion
tore
!ash
Dollar-Spending Cut
A Fourth by Britain

*
u

K
'-*
Yw*i
u&
- *
v,
v.
]
Wfe
-..,'
f?f v~ x V^ kudu**-
'Don't You Dare Give That Stranger the
Bread Out of Our Mouths"
Senate Group
Blocks Passage
Of New DP Law
WASHINGTON, (JTA) The
Senate Democratic Policy Com-
mittee decided this week to in-
vite Chairman Pat McCarran of
the Senate Judiciary Committee
before it next week to explain his
blocking of the House-approved
displaced persons bill.
Senators said that if Sen. Mc-
Carran continues his refusal to
act, Republicans may join with
Democrats in an effort to force
the measure out of the commititj
and before the Senate. Sen. Mc-
Carran opposes the bill and has
stated that he can see no basis
for Jewish complaints or. the
United States displaced persons
program.
Herzl Remains Transfer
Postponed For One Week
VIENNA, (JTA)The transfer
of the remains of Dr. Theodor
Herzl from Austria for reburial
in Israel, which was scheduled to
take place next week has been
postponed for one week, it was
announced here this week. The
remains will be flown from here
on August 15, according to the
vJewisti fkrrjian
Published every Friday oinco 1M7
oy The Jewnh Floridian at 120 N c
Ixth Street, Miami IB, Florida. En-
!d "cond-claaa matter July 4,
1W0, at the Po.t Office of Miami,
Fla.. under the Act of March i, 187
Tna Jewnh Floridian haa abaorbio
IE* J,wl,.h Un,t* nd MW Jwlih
Weakly. Member of the Jewish Tale.
graphic Aoancy, Seven Arta Feature
Kn.b.lS;!,t^r.ld.wJd' ?ew Service.
National Editorial Aseoclatten, Ameri-
can Aeioci.lt :n of
in that part of the world.
Th story of the besieged city, the trials and
tribulations its inhabitants went through from the
moment the first Arab gun was aimed at Israel's
heart and the heroism of the beleaguered men,
women and children who stood the test with cour-
age and faiththese are now still-to-be written
pages for history and material for legend and
folklore. The construction of the rails and the
roads linking Israel with its heartJerusalemis
the culmination of an effort that cannot be ex-
plained by physical courage alone. Nor can there
be any mistake about the symbolic and political
significance of the event.
Yet, to us it seems there was even greater
drama when the first train arrived. That it brought
Spiritual Therapy For Jewish Veterans
A Jewish Chaplain in Mental Hospital Appraises His Task
By RABBI LEE J. LEVINGER
worker wr^l2?m.nhiS?fenitj r,vU.tlon "' ,hf '* -
artttffS -
ILS ?uPa^!ir?eJeWish, chaP'ain serving Jewish veterans
doin^hl h0P,v- ^Wrk' Hke ,ha' ,he manV *er rabbis
doing ,he same kind of specialized job, is carried out under
Z^Xrn l ReUgi0US *- < 'he NatSS
SiriL^^'li!!!!!!8!^.^. San Francisco. Th
I tutsanrn- Conferonve
The protracted negotiations at Lausanne I I
zerland, are seemingly drawing to a succ**!
conclusion. What started out as a futile eftlrl
beginning to bear fruit only because of Lin]
determination to establish friendly relation! I
its neighboring states and the growing reauM
tion in the Arab countries that the outsidb^l
fluences which have been working agaiM*|
peace settlement are not grounded in welfaakl
in political and military considerations from til*!
the people in the Middle East have nothinqJ
gain. I
The basic obstacle to the attainment of a r*J
settlement at Lausanne has been the Arab reh
problem and the insistence of the Arab
tions that solution of the repatriation issue
made a condition precedent to a settlement Tkl
Israeli government, on the other hand, has i
tained that there could be no settlement c
larger refugee issue except as an integral pan"l
the general peace agreement. Since the Lsraail
government has justly and logically held Hn(
the mass exodus of Arabs from the country m|
inspired by Arab propaganda, responsibility 1
the fate of the refugees rested on those wsJ
created the problem. However, when the cor, I
ference reached an impasse over those differences I
the Israeli government, again displaying a sph
of conciliation, made a gesture which, had I
been rejected, would have sent the conferew
spinning to failure.
By consenting to take back 100.000 Arab reb
gees at a time when it is struggling with the I
problem of absorbing tens of thousands of lewisi
immigrants already in the country and those sal I
to come, the Israeli government has demonstrated
a degree of generosity whose wisdom is qua
tioned even by its best friends. Should the Laus-l
anne conference end in failure the finger of gifl
will point to precincts other than the Middle East
flour to the Holy City was a welcome omen of
course. But the greater omen lay in the fact that
it brought fo the site of God's sanctuary sods
seventy thousand books that escaped the fires d
Hitlerdom. Book and prayer shawl and phyladary
have been our share and consolation throughout
our wanderings in the ages. The survival of oar
books has been the story of our survival.
Judaism, whether in a congrega-
tion, in an Army or Navy post,
or in a hospital. The chief differ-
ence is that he serves a different
group of people in a different
background.
In a congregation the rabbi's
activities are centered primarily
around his synagogue, from which
he branches out into the com-
munity. Hi= first call is to con-
duct religious services and to
supervise a religious school. His
last is to advance the personal
welfare of the individual mem-
bers. But in the chaplaincy the
chief Jewish organizations in this
area have joined together in the
Peninsula Coordinating Commit-
tee, one of whose activities is to
rfcrivfho* h0Spital Th,OU8h this
body the mar.-power and especial-
ij the woman-power of the com-
r? i^T0^"2^*0 take a full
pait in the hospital program in
foTihi' rnd L P~videg parties
r r te ,Je%vlf:n Patients on all
Jewish festivals and ,imi,ar .
The hospital itself is quite -
Urge institution, with two full
lme^ny^bu?y chaplains for
situation is reversed, for personal the Protest nt TV .lP '"'" f"r
welfare is the immediate dailv ente As C f Cath,,1,c Pati-
need and formal religious services I the Datiertf^nH,'' !Hr cent of
come second. Only the deep ap-'tho ncrln i tw? piT cen of
Pfal of the High Holy Day? and ableto servp thu &*h l am
the Seder make these public r*. halfoftnt hl\ bodv ,n about
nan ot the normal working week
but with very intensive demands
n my Ume while on duty
nit l f aplaln in ,hu' mental hos-
E^JSSLM?* yWch makes
the Seder make these public oc-
casions outstanding.
The chaplain in a Veterans'
Hospital is, of course, a civil serv-
ice employee. However, he must
be endorsed by his own national
!.w.h! of rabbis means the Division of .{ionTile is
YMr*............18.00
FRED K. SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
Telephones 2-11412-8212
OFFICE and PLANT
120 N. E. Sixth Street
Vo!HS5!?3 Number 32
FRIDAY, AUGUST 12. 1949
W. AV 17, 5709
hrJTu P2r hosP"als. Everv
exist* ff the n,e"tal hoipS
exists for one purpose, therapy
There are recreational then
P^Pational therapy. "Sfffi
i u! ie c ut,r:ost. "f satisfac-
Newepaoer.. Florid. Pr... Ae.oei.tion i Religious Activities of the Na-ltMm in Parl of tht' medical
OrJUYMrR'PT,ON RATEJ,:n tional Jewish Welfare Board. The1 n ZZ ^re sPecific than
?wo v.'. ........... {Jg fEg^JWn 5 SanTof0^! SfiW. Every
pnes, a minimum of funds for ex-
penses, as well as annual chap-
plains conferences and much ad-
vice and support.
The active volunteers in the re-
ligious as well as social program
of the
nearby
the Vetera
pital i.<
and th
comprise
area called the Peninsula, running tyP.S of ihe v!a"U'' hospilal *
v/v system in th**
high regard it gives to the work
of the chaplains. Not only do we
often consult the psychiatrists in
regard to individual patients, but
the medical men often request us
to talk to certain patients with
moral or religious problems and
to aid in their solution. These
problems of doubt, guilt or un-
certainty are often central in the
mind of a person with mental dis-
order, and so the chaplain may
..ecome an important ally of the
psychiatrist. Recently our hospi-
tal arranged office hours for the
chaplains to render this type of
service. }y
h J|h'"S aC,.'Ve .Part'C'Pation in the
healing situation dominates both
aspects of the chaplains's daily
11 win^ 2* reli8iou-s servi*
M well as the ward visiting, con-
erences with patients and their
wEfc and allJthose varie which come under the heading of
doef nn ,Welfare- The chapfafn
frv but hryut0 Practjce P^chia-
romf he knows that religious
X f^ g0od-f2r PePle' "Pe"
h Va worried, nervous and
hX Ke peop1?- He knows eJao
both by experience and by his
menfalCn aCU W'ih the theVry of
mental illness, that one of the
important wavs of helping theH
problem fnSrVices are a sPecial
problem in a mental hosnital
Siy ffsa re^nd snt
to \L tuXSK and ritual than
blessed % W^dh Not >e|ng
sum Slth great "ntors. I try
succ, f 1 C^ert2in measur of
in sfnking ?he,he conK"tion
hvmns g hC more familiar
ErssErvl HS people
Preparations For|
Horzl Reburial
Almost Complete
TEL AVIV, (JTAiPrepars-
tions for the reburia! of the re-
mains of Theodor Herzl, father
of modern Zionism, are r.eanrn i
completion in Jerusalem. A spe-
cial grave, 13 feet deep, has al-
ready been carved nut on ta
summit of the topmost height
overlooking Jerusalem. The h:l
which is located on the cihJ
northern outskirts, faces the Med-
iterranean, on one .-ide, and the
Dead Sea and the Judean Desert
on the other. f
The coffin containing Dr.Hens
remains will be brought fro*
Vienna to the Lydda airport W
plane and thence will be escorts
to Tel Aviv where a special ses-
sion of the Knesset will be con-
vened to take custody of the re-
mains. The coffin will reffl"
under guard in the Knesset cham-
bers all night and, in the morn-
ing, will be transferred to Jeru-
salem. .J
There, members of the Cabinet
deputies of the parliament, men
bers of the Jewish Agency
representatives of municp
councils throughout the counW
as well as delegates from
the
.-t'ional in-
stitutions'will escort the bodv
political parties and na
stitutions will escort thi
the grave in a procession ij-a
an Israeli Army unit-,Tne.T(7ni|
site will be circled by ntig
flags and the green *",
lowered to its final rest, WWT
speeches and to the accomp^
ment of traditional PW*^
the dead, as asked in Dr. W
will.__________________
Gold was forbidden in Scofo
in 1491 because people were
glecting their archery W
for it.
The chemical designation J
the element Plutonium.
gredient of the atom tx>mu'
PU.
Christian patient who de1""1,^
a complete description oi'" ^
ernacle in the wilderness^ ^
cir own ernacle in the wuaern= -
sv tZP"al.Jslme "nexp7ctedoi.5ra "iay ask Jewish bov who ob^
V-tem m the'even weeks \H?" llTJLt** r using the word,--JudaisTn
i-ier. i remember one i (Continued next weew


JAY, AUGUST 12, 1949
+ k-nlsHh-rldflnr
PAOE FIVE
iple Israel To Conduct Two Complete
irvices On High Holiday Evenings
Fin compliance with the recommendations of the Union of
lerican Hebrew Congregations, parent organization of Re-
Judaism in America, Temple Israel, Florida's largest Re-
Jewish congregation, has announced two complete services
3e held consecutively in the Temple's main auditorium on
evening! of the New Year,*
tcmber 23, and Yom Kippur,
obor 2.
jles Pearlman, president of
[congregation, announced that
procedure which will extend
all Temple Israel's members
Importunity to attend services
he main auditorium on the
lino of the Holy Days was
Mr-d at a recent board meeting,
erviccs will be held at 7:30
and at 9 p.m. on the New
lr ;ind Atonement Eves.
the past when only one eve-
service was held it was
essary to have an overflow
,jcc in Kaplan Hall be-
se of the large Temple mem-
ship. Pearlman explained.
tis year, however, as an added
fcice to Temple members, and
anticipation of the increased
fcribership rolls due to the cur-
ft drive for new members re-
fctlv undertaken by the Temple,
two evening services will be
lugurated," he said.
Hefoi-m congregations in Phil-
fclphia. Los Angeles, San
Cjcisco, Chicago and New York
also instituting this system
year in answer to the in-
lased needs and to the growing
Dibers in Reform congregations,
irlman continued.
president also announced
Bt the Temple is presently en-
Bcd in a renovation and im-
Bvement project which will en-
jice and expand the facilities
[the present building which was
cted in 1928. The building
mmittee is under the chairman-
of Leo Ackerman and In-
kles Ellard G. Kohn, Emil J.
fuld. Herman Wronker, M. M.
|son, Leonard A. Wien and Nor-
n M. Ciller. The membership
tmittee is headed by A. A.
reen. .
Services at the temple during
he High Holy Days will in-
iude. in addition to the eve-
ning services, a New Year's Day
crvice on September 24 at 10
Lm., an all day service on the
Day of Atonement. October 3,
(ginning at 10 a.m.with a
Dildren's service at 1 p.m. and
memorial service at 4 p.m.
|The services will be conducted
Rabbi Colman A. Zwitman,
ritual leader, and Dr. Jacob H.
apian, rabbi emeritus. The musi-(
1 sections will be provided by
double choir under the direction
of Frances Tarboux, organist.
Information about Temple mem-
bership and arrangements for at-
tendance at High Holy Day serv-
ices may be obtained by contact-
ing the Temple office at 9-1757.
CANTOR WANTED
| For High Holiday Services
in Miami Beach
Write C. W., Box 2973
Miami 18, FTa.
RUTH GROSS AGENCY
Inc.
GENERAL INSURANCE
BONDS LIFE
Phone 58-9538
350 LINCOLN ROAD
INVESTMENT ADVISER
living adviceHandling Dtsi-re-
tloiiiiry accounts
lr<>r advice, mall your Investment
problem with minimum fee of 15.00
payable In advance, to:
NATHAN ABRAHAM
|PO. Box 1922 Miami 11, Fla.
Foor Enters Race
For City Council
Sam Foor, resident of Florida
for the past 41 years, has an-
nounced his resignation as in-
spector and investigator for the
Workmen's Compensation Divi-
sion of the Florida Industrial
Commission in order to run for
the office of city commissioner
in the November elections.
In announcing his candidacy,
Foor, who lives at 102 N.E. 20th
Terr., pledged that he would "be
subject to neither influence nor
commands from any clique or
faction." He stated that he will
keep in touch with matters poli-
tical and support whatever he be-
lieves to be sound progressive
public policy.
"We should have laws as
friendly as our people and of-
ficials to administer those laws
who will not seek to impair the
lawful rights of our citizens,"
Foor said.
He asserted that he has always
supported organized labor and the
veterans and will continue to do
so. He advocates the bringing of
payrolls here and the legalization
of gambling.
Camp Converted
NEW YORK. (JTA)A former
German concentration camp in
Norway has been converted into
a "children's city" lor Jewisn
children threatened by tuber-
culosis, the Norwegian Informa-
tion Service revealed here.
The children will be accommo-
dated at the camp at Holmestrand
for about eight months, after
which they will proceed to Israel
if their health permits. The "city
will accommodate 200 children at
a time and it is expected that a
total of 600 will be treated there.
Obituaries
MRS. BARBARA HOFFMAN
An 11, < 2:tl Bast Flagler St She had On two
occasions lived in Miami for-atow
of 32 years. She leaves her husband,
Henry. _____
JACOB EOERT
An 89, retired real estate man of
1215 Meridian Ave., Miami n tills week. Bgert came to Miami from
Pateison, N. J., nine years ago. He
Is survived by a wife, Pauline, and a
son. Leonard. Services were held in
Riverside Chapel, New York City.
MORRIS SCHWARTZ
One of the general managers of UK-
Delano Hotel, passed away August 1
In a New York hospital. He owned
extensive properties here. Including
the Delano, the Hiawatha Apart-
ments and the Charles Hotel. Sur-
vivors are his wife, Rose; two sons.
Nathan of Miami Beach and Hyman
of New York; and a daughter, Clara
Slegel of Miami Reach. Interment was
In Elmont. Long Island.
HARRY FRIEDMAN
Of 1231 N.W. 58th St.. passed away
last week. He came to Miami In 194,,
from Detroit, Mich., where he was a
member of the Grand Ixjdge or the
F and A. M. He Is survived by his
wife. Ruth; two sisters. Florence Ros-
ooe of Miami and Anne Gorman. 0-
coe L. I.: two brothers. Leo, Pitts-
burgh and William. Los Angeles, t.al.
Services were in the Riverside
Memorial Chapel of Miami.
| Israel Wants U.S.
; Jewish Settlers
j TEL AVIV, (JTA)Asserting
that the Israeli government would
like to see American investors in
the Jewish state make a profit.
Premier David Ben Gurion this
week told Dr. Bernard Bergman,
editor of the Jewish Journal of
New York and president of the
American Labor Mizrachi Organ-
ization, that Israel wants Ameri-
can Jews to settle here.
"We want not only American
money but also U.S. Jews," he
said. "We want their skill and
brains." Asked by Dr. Bergman
whether Israel is being built along
the line of American democracy,
the Premier replied: "We are
building Israeli democracy and
socialism as developed on Mount
Sinai." He also expressed himself
as opposed to any form of dicta-
torship, either by an individual
or a party. Dr. Bergman appealed
to the Israeli government for sup-
port for yeshivoth and Mr. Ben
Gurion replied sympathetically.
Council Approves
Refugee Protection
GENEVA, (JTA)The princi- I Miami Beach, tomorrow morning
- ~s uTLL.1 ~~4~ f' at 8:30. Cantor David Cooper will
Rabbi Ever to Give
Knesseth Israel Sermon
Rabbi Isaac H. Ever will de-
liver the sermon at Congregation
Knesseth Israel, 1415 Euclid Ave.,
First Of 16-Volume
Hebrew Encyclopedia
Published This Week
TEL AVIV, (JTA)The first of
a 16-volume Hebrew General En-
cyclopedia appeared here this
week. The first copy was present-
ed by he publishers to President
Dr. Chaim Weizmann and the
second went to Premier David
Ben Gurion.
The printing of the 16 volumes
will cost more than $3,000,000. it
was revealed at a press confer-
ence. Subscribers will be sought
not only in Israel but all over the
world, including the United
States. The publication of all 16
volumes will be completed within
five years.
The first volume contains 1,024
large-sized pages. More than 200
researchers and authors, among
them Nobel Prize winners, par-
ticipated in its publication.
pie of international protection of
refugees by the United Nations
was approved here this week by
the United Nations Economic and
Social Council. The council also
approved an American proposal
that Secretary-General Trygve
Lie should submit a plan for
United Nations protection of refu-
gees to the forthcoming General
Assembly, which opens in Flush-
ing Meadows next month.
It was suggested that the plan
should consider two alternatives:
the setting up of a "High Com-
missioner's Office for Refugees"
under UN. control, or formation
of a special service within the
U.N. Secretariat to handle such
affairs. The United States op-
posed the first alternative in
favor of the second. The council
approved a resolution the effect
of which was to call for the pre-
paration of an alternative plan
to deal with the problems of
stateless persons when the refu-
gees cease to exist as a group.
chant the service. Services will
also be held this evening at 6:30.
ADOPTION
WANTED COUPLE
Expectant Mother Seeks
Couple to Adopt Unborn
Child
WRITE J. F.
BOX 2973, MIAMI 18
Proposal To Aid Jewish
Refugees Is Rejected
LONDON, (JTA)The Surrey
County Council rejected this
week a proposal by the Health
Ministry that it take over the
national government's share of
responsibility for the care of in-
valid Jewish refugees from Ger-
many and Austria, living on two
hostels at Epsom and Richmond.
The shelters are conducted by the
Jewish Refugees Committee.
For the last ten years, grants of
maintenance have been made oy
the Home Office, supplemented
by funds from the refugees com-
mittee. The plan would have cost
the Surrey taxpayers $22,000 a
year.___________________
DR. LONG'S CLINIC
Non-Surgical Treatment of
HERNIA (Rupture)
HEMORRHOIDS
CHRONIC DISEASES
21 S. W. 13th Avenue
PHONE 3-2748
abbl Joseph E. Rackovmky
818 Michigan Avenue
Miami Beach
Phone 5-3595
lOtf
2
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137 N.E. 1st Street
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J. SKLOW, Owner
es
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Phone 48-0346 For Free Delivery Anywhere
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"YOUR FAVORITE STATION FOR MUSIC AND NEWS"
The Hebrew Academy
918 Sixth Street
Miami Beach, Florida
announces to its many friends that
REGISTRATION FOR PUPILS
will take place
Beginning August 15th, 1949
GIVE YOUR SON OR DAUGHTER THE ADVANTAGE OF:
Dramatics
Progressive English Education
Maximum Hebrew Instruction
Careful Transportation to and
from the Academy
Hot scientifically prepared
lunch
Afternoon Refreshments
Physical Training and Athletic
Programs
Arts and Crafts
Public Speaking
Medical Care under
the expert supervision
of a well trained and
professional faculty.
CLASSES FROM THE KINDERGARTEN
THROUGH TO THE SEVENTH GRADE
Phone 58-4641 for an appointment


I
I

1 '
PAGE sn
Israeli Newsletter
By ADA OREN
(Copyright. 19*9, Jewlrt Telegraphic Agency,
BDITOR'S NOTE: This the rirsl of a '"":''';
problems ol the emerging Israeli Army While the "e
establishment is experimenting with personnel anc aa
uatlons in the developing of a new. /egujar a w. t m
time struggle with the problems ol in- i ''"',,'
mobilised to defend Its borders in the mldsl of a Blmu
on all land frontiers.)
In. )
. .. i
-i.ii
ministi
ust at
ilch w
luneou
- mil

the
is ha
ii va
II
am.-
I
TEL AVIVThe reorganization of the armed services of
Israel is making good progress under a partial veil of secrecy.
The system of separate pay for soldiers and allowances for
their families is being discontinued with the raising of the level
of service personnel's pay to the normal qrades of pay for
government employees in parallel ^_______________,-------------
positions of responsibility. Sol-
diers' pay will now be subject
also to normal taxation, educa-
cal training under army auspices
with the regular activities of
vouth movements and with young
tion and health care charges. It yuu"1 v....... on at
is not yet clear what wartime peoples working hours in an M-
privileges members of the armed tcnipt to.makc* uchtiain iM com-
forces will continue to enjoy in
the future.
As far as possible, soldiers of
non-combat units are being re-
placed by civilians for reasons of
efficiency, with many ex-service-
men and women continuing to
serve in their former capacities
but according to civilian standards
of office routine, working hours,
etc. Specialists entitled to release
in accordance with the general
regulations are generally offered
good pay and rank in order to
induce them to remain in the
Army and help form its per-
manent core.
No bill for the establishment of
a standing peace-time army has
yet been introduced into* the
Knesset, but the principles guid-
ing the government in this matter
are known to the public in their
general outlines after having been
discussed in a closed session of
the coalition parties.
So far the draft foresees two
years' compulsory service for men
a few months of intensive mili-
tary training, about seven months
of agricultural or other technical
experience, and one year of stand-
ing army duty. Girls will prob-
ably be expected to spend one
year in mixed agricultural and
military training in settlements
only, as was the custom for vol-
unteers in the Palmach days, as
a concession to the Orthodox
parties within the coalition, which
refuse to sanction regular mili-
tary service for women on a
large scale in peacetime.
They could not prevent the
conscription of women during the
war, but even then they effected
a regulation exempting all reli-
gious girls from duties requiring
their living away from their
homes. Now such girls will ap-
parently be unable to receive
their mixed training in settle-
ments of the religious move-
ments. Only medical, clerical and
communications women person-
nel will serve in the regular army
on a semi-voluntary basis and for
longer periods.
Similar arrangements are fore-
seen for young men in the navy,
air force and other specialized
services requiring several vears'
pulsorv from the age of foul
or fifteen. This part of the gov-
ernment's program also raised
Orthodox opposition within the
coalition, expressly on the grounds
that the mixing of religious youth
with others in holidav camps at
this early age might endanger
the exclusive influence of Ortho-
dox homes and schools. Since
there is fear of misuse of such a
formation for the indoctrination
of children in other quart, r
from the extreme left to ;h- ex-
treme rightthe whole matter is
still in a state of flux. Meanwhile
boys and girls, recruited on a
semi-voluntary basis, are already
making themselves useful in va
rious pioneering ventures in the
old tradition, such as clearing
roads in areas where professional
labor is not available.
Along with releasing non-es-
sential personnelmainly nun
with family responsibilitiesand
students who interrupted their
studies, the army is also return-
ing to civilian use requisitioned
cars and buildingschiefly hotels
and camps taken over from the
British. The latter are being con-
verted into immigrants' transit
centers, civilian hospitals, etc.
Carelessness and even large-scale
pilfering on the part of troops
quartered on requisitioned pre-
mises or using commandeered cars
is now involving the military au-
thorities in considerable claims
for reparations on the part of
property owners, especially in the
case of localities or suburbs from
which the Jewish civilian popula-
tion, had to evacuate during the
fighting, leaving its belongings
behind.
Because of the housing short-
age, veterans' resettlement of-
ficers are hard pressed to find
even temporary accommodations
for their charges, and are open-
ing hostels in abandoned houses
Immigrant soldiers are entitled
to go to Jewish transit camps on
release, but in view of the over-
crowding in these camps they
prefer any alternative arrange-
ment in the homes of relatives, il
possible. The government is doing
its utmost for veterans although
it is in no position to assume re-
i inhabited dwelling It
haa however, secured Immigrant
v,; rity on "Amida.
public housing.
As for employment, there is a
law requii nployers to take
Kk men and women who left
their '- to oin up. but thai
ew immigrant
even local men who had i.-i neny
been employed bj the British
"" Moi
unen ployment and lack oi
.'. quarters affect not mor.
han*15 percent of those dis-
charged until now. A few hun-
dred have started training as
building laborers under the aus-
pices etttenenl officer.
Ul Ol 1,000 applicants
havi aln :; inted all''w"
ances to help them complete
higher stu rated by the
war \ 'sand veterans
havt registi red foi settlement on
the land are awaiting facilities
for training and settling, which
are insufficient tor lack oi Jewish
Agency funds.
KraiMlciK I. tivta
S2.~i.000 l-i.'l
A gift ol $25,000 to Brandeis
University, the country's first
Jewish-sponsored, non-sectarian
college, has been made by Alpha
Omega, national dental fraternity.
for the establishment ol a bio-
logical laboratory, according to
Abraham L. Sachar. president of
the university.
The laboratory, to be named
the Alpha Omega Biological Lab-
or,.torv. is scheduled to be com-
pleted in time for the 1949-50
academic year.
The laboratory will consist of a
research laboratory, an advanced
e arch laboratory, private facul-
ty lal oratory and two demonstra-
tion classrooms.
FRIDAY, August
12, II.
country between the ages of 20
and 25. Young men joining
frontier settlements after their
first year will also be considered
to have served their trick in the
army. Such personnel already
make up a separate formation and
appear at parades with tools in-
stead of weapons. Compulsory
service will start at 18, and all
male citizens up to the age of
fifty will then continue to be
called up for yearly refresher ex-
ercises on the Swiss model.
This combination of a profes-
sional core and a conscript "work-
ing army" is expected to make
possible the building up of an
efficient, cheap military estab-
lishment suited to both the long
frontiers and the small purse of
the state of Israel. It will be so
organized as to make possible a
general mobilization at very short
notice.
Apart from all this, plans are
already being worked out for the
dovetailing of pre-military physi-
S. .1. Freedman
HEBREW BOOK STORE
417 Washington Are.
a Miami Beach
Between Fourth and Fifth Ste.
Hebrew Religious Supplies
For Synagogues end Private-
Use. Also for Hebrew School*.
LPTO "U1D
Telephone 5-9017
MIAMI'S OLDEST
FURNITURE MOVERS
WANTED LOAD OR
PART LOAD TO AND
FROM
NEW YORK OR
VICINITY .. ALSO
THE MIDDLE WEST
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LONG DISTANCE
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Transit Insurance Available
On All Shipments
WITHERS
VAN LINES
1000 N.E. 1st Ave. Ph. 3-2667
Builders of Immortal
Memorials for the
Jewish Trade
Look For the 2-Story White
Building
THURMOND
MONUMENT Co.
MARKERS $35.00 PLUS
CEMETERY CHARGES
Open Sundays Phone 4-3249
When Your Tablets
Get Down to 4
That's the Time d
To Buy Some
$o>RlS
JfV* f
3888"
Alka-Seltzer
AT ALl DRUG STORES
MiM Went* Will
Sluclv l>rmif
Mlsj *Jack Wentz. of 4135
Douglas Road. Coconut Grove,
left Monday for the Poland
School of Crafts. Penland. N. C.,
where she will take courses in
ceramics and sterling silver
jewelry making, as well as brush-
up courses in the making of wood,
metal and leather articles. |
Miss Wentz, who has been crafts,
instructor for the Dade County
Society for Crippled Children, has
be.n awarded a scholarship to
the school by the society.
Under the homebound program, |
M Wentz teaches craft work
to 25 homebound children who
are unable to attend school be-
cause of physical handicaps. Chil-
dren are taught to make model
airplanes, metal trays, basket
weaving, key cases, bird houses,
ruga and plastic braiding.
The Dade County society's
policv is to serve all handicapped
children not being served by any
other agency. The homebound
program serves children afflicted
with rheumatic fever, cerebral
palsy, epilepsy, perthes disease,
rheumatoid artitis, post-polio and
others.
Sisterhood To Meet
The Sisterhood of the First
Jewish Congregation of Coral'
Gables will hold a meeting Wed-
nesday at the home of Mrs. Paul
Reece, 3555 S.W. 7th St. at 8 p.m.
BERNIE "SAFFERI
About Your
FOOD
Entertainment and the otJ|
thousand details for M|
Weddings. Bar Mifcvaht, J
gagements. Lawn Part.!
Cocktail Parties, ChildJ
Parties, Meetings, Buifit. |
A Complete Catering SerrJ
PHONE 9-0573
JACK & JILL
2 N.W. 7th St. Off Miami An I
WAKE UP EVERY
MORNING
TO
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7:30 10:00 A.M.
Hear Morning Personalist "Jock the Clock," "Clancy tin
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Auto Glass Installed --- Furniture Tops
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ADAMS GLASS SERVICE
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1805 PURDY AVE., M. B. PH. 58-3756 OR 54311
Ask for ABE or IRVING RABINOWITZ
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10 S.E. 5th Street
Miami, Florida
Available to Give You
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PHONE
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FRIDAY, AUGUST 12, 1&49
+ l PAGE SEVEN
Israeli Blueprint For Settlement Of
Arab Problem Goes To Conciliation Unit!
LAUSANNE, (JTA)The Is-
raeli delegation this week pro-
vided the United Nations Con-
ciliation Commission on Palestine
with its eagerly awaited plan for
the repatriation of Palestine Arab
last possible word of the Tel Aviv
government and not subject to
any bargaining. The commission
is now considering a proposal for
the formation of a joint Arab-
Israeli body.
Rabbi Shapiro To Speak
At VFW Memorial Rites
Rabbi Max Shapiro has been
invited to deliver the eulogy to
World War I dead at the memorial
services to be conducted Sunday
night, August 21, at the band-
shell in Bayfront Park by the
Veterans of Foreign Wars during
their national convention here
August 21-26.
Gables Sunday School
Registration Is Set
Registration for Sunday school
at the Coral Gables Jewish Center
will be held September 11 at the
new temple, 320 Palermo Ave.,
Coral Gables, Herbert Gelernter,
president, nas annuonced. Hebrew
classes will also be held at the
I Gables synagogue. _______
Classes will be conducted in
classrooms in the new structure.
Rabbi Morris Skop, spiritual
leader of the congregation, will
supervise the synagogue's reli-
gious schools. He will be assisted
by a staff of experienced teachers.
Anyone wishing further in-
formation is asked to call Maurice
Finkelhor, 4-3276; Nat Winokur,
48-8947; or Mrs. Sydney Richman,
48-4343.
refugees.
Reuven Shiloah, special assist-
ant to Israeli Foreign Minister
Moshe Sharett. told the commis-
sion members that Israel was pre-
pared to accept 100,000 Arab ref-
ugees, provided the Arab states
accepted that as part of the gen-
eral settlement of the refugee
question within the framework of
the ultimate settlement of all out-
standing questions between the
Arab states and Israel.
The Arab states have already
given their agreement to this, al-
though they have not hidden
their disappointment over the
total number of refugees Israel
has offered to take back. The Is-
raeli delegation, however, pro-
posed that discussion of details
should begin at once, and it seems
likely now that the first joint
meeting of the two parties to the
controversy will take place soon.
The most significant develop-
ment at the meeting was the as-
surances received by the Arabs
from the United States that as
soon as they agree to the Israeli
proposals over the number of
refugees to be accepted, Wash-
ington will begin immediate im-
plementation of the McGhee Plan
without waiting for a full peace
settlement at Lausanne.
(The so-called McGhee Plan,
advanced by George C. McGhee,
new Assistant Secretary of State
for Near Eastern and African Af-
fairs, would provide for the de-
velopment of the entire Near
East area.)
The Arab states have already
replied, and informed the United
States representatives on the
commission here of the number
of refugees which they are will-
ing to settle in their countries,
subject to receiving the financial
and technical assistance outlined
in the McGhee Plan.
Transjordan proposes to take
100,000 refugees, Syria and Le-
banon each 100,000, while about
30.000, it is estimated, will be
resettled in central Arab Pales-
tine: for its part.^Egypt is pre-
pared to accept 150,000 refugees
for settlement in the Gaza area
and such additional territories of
Southern Palestine to which it
lays claim.
The United Nations Concilia-
tion Commission is considering
how to approach the Arab delega-
tions with the Israeli blueprint
for settlement of the Arab refugee
problem. Certain security regula-
tions similar to those now exist-
ing in Turkey would apply to
those Arab refugees returning to
Israel. The Arabs would not be
allowed to settle in any frontier
district out of military considera-
tions and also to prevent any ot
the large-scale smuggling for
which the Palestine frontier has
always been notorious.
The Arabs are not objecting, it
is learned, to either of these con-
ditions, but their first counter-
demand, according to Mulki
Pasha, the Transjordan Defense
Minister, will be to ask a certain
deadline from Israel by which
the repatriation of the Arab refu-
gees to Israel will have been con-
cluded. ,.
The second Arab demand will
be to obtain consent to the re-
turn of 100,000 refugees without
any of the deductions included in
the Israeli figures. But the Is-
raeli delegation informed the Con-
ciliation Commission that its pres-
ent offer of 100,000 Arabs refu-
geeswhich includes the 25.00U
already in the countrywas the
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PAGE DGHT
+J(lstFkiJteti==z
FRIDAY, AUGUST 12,
1943
/;

Personally Speaking
Figur-Moscovitz Nuptials Dolores Joy Shapiro, Oscar Dobrow
Performed By Rabbi Skop Exchange Vows At Sherry Frontenac
Rabbi M rris Sk
the '
cf Miami Bea ''* H
V 111 : B X N V Sunday
. ..... -i\: V
Mr. and Mis. Harry Stitsky and dauqhter. Flora, of Bronx,
N. Y., are guests at the South Seas Hotel, Miami Beach. The
Stitskys are the parents of Morton Stitsky, son-in-law of Rabbi
and Mrs. S. M. Machtei.
* n h
Prior to departing for Israel on August 27, Mrs. Rebecca ,
Hudes of Brooklyn, N. Y., is spending ten days with her son, Nat ^
Pollack, and his family, 3884 N.W. 6th St. Mrs. Hudes, who is Mrs of West
president of the Ladies' Auxiliary of the Yeshiva Rabbi Chaim ,,a;.. nd Mrs, P I
Berlin in Brooklyn, will be honored by the members of that ,,... nd Ai
organization at a farewell party on August 21. The affair will r ; F;gur.
be a tribute to Mrs. Hudes' 25 years of service to the group.
* *
Under a canopy of white roses
and gladioli, Miss Dolores Joy
Shapiro, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
I S Shapiro of August, Ga., be-
Philip B. Padawer To
Become Bar Mitzvah
Mrs. Ar.ne S. Padawer, 2270
S.W. 23rd Terr., announces the
Bar Mitzvah of her son. Philip
Barnett. to be held at the Miami
Hebrew School ar.d Congregation
Saturday. August 20 at 9 a.m.
The Bar Mitzvah attends Shen-
andoah Junior High School ana
is a member of the Boy Scouts.
He arrived here in March from
Greenville. Mis?., and has been
studying under Rabbi Sirr.on
April since his arrival.
A reception will follow the
services. Relative? and friends are
invited to attend.
Mr. and Mrs. George Goldberg left this week for New York
'and other Northern points for a stay of several weeks. En route
they will stop in Silver Springs cr.d Tampa. Mr. Goldberg is
sexton of Beth David Synagogue.
* *
Joseph Julius and family of West Palm Beech are vacation-
ing in New York. They will return the latter part of August.
* *
Moe Sternberg of West Palm Beach is in New York for a
brief sojourn.
* *
Arnold Kurland and Melvin Richman of Baltimore, Md.. are
spending a ten-day vacation at the Ritz Plaza Hotel in Miami
Beach.
* *
Mrs. Dasha Rattner, 542 Jefferson Ave., Miami Beach, has
returned from a six-week vacation in New York with her
daughter.
* *
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Rood, 3710 N.W. 2nd Terr., announce
the birth of a daughter on Friday, August 5, at Doctor's Hospital.
Mrs. Rood is the former Frances Kimmel of Miami Beach and
Buffalo.
m
Frontenac Hotel, J
who
m
came the bride of Oscar Dob
son of Mr. and Mrs. Sam DobT
of Daytona Beach. Sunday at it,
Sherry Fror*-
Beach.
The bride \
marriage by her father \1
gown of imported Chantilly ,'
and pearls. Her full length vd
of matching lace fell f,0m a m2
coronet of seed pearl., in mam 11"
effect. She carried a fan of J
fled Chantilly lace adorned X
a spray of white orchids
valley lilies.
Gloria Shapiro served
of honor for her sister
of mauve rose satin
and
I p Baruett Padnuer
Clips! Education
Chairman Listpd
Progress in the organization of
the new educational division of
the Community Chest of Dade
County was reported Saturday bv
Mrs. L. J. McCaffrey, chairman
of the division.
Established as a year-round vol-
unteer unit of the Chest at the
July meeting of the board of di-
rectors, the mission of the educa-
tional division is to conduct a
twelve month program to inter-
pret the work of Red Feather
services to the community, Mrs.
McCaffrey explained.
IKfe Appointments to key commit-
I tees which will carry on the pro-
|gram were Mrs. Frank Malone
ar.d Hugh Matheson, Jr.. speakers
bureau committee; Mrs. W. L.
iMussett, schools committee; Mrs.
'Stanley Milledge and George
^Chertkof. solicitor training com-
mittee; Mrs. Stanley Biedron and
Mrs. Minnie Miller,
Beach Leader, Dies
Mrs. Minnie Wilier. 70. of 6380Geor8e Nicholas, recruiting corn-
Mrs. Miller
mittee.
Mrs. William Cox and Mrs.
Mussett are co-chairmen of the
educational division with Mrs.
McCaffrey.
BB Luncheon To
Honor Goldman
Final arrangements have been
made for the Americanism lunch-
eon honoring Abe S. Goldman of
862 S.W. 6th St., commander of
the United Veterans' Council of
Dade County, to be held Friday
August 19, at 12:15 p.m. in the
Downtowner Restaurant, Seybold
Building, Miami.
Convention officials of the Vet-
erans of Foreign Wars will also
be present to take part in the
ceremonies which will be high-
lighted by the presentation of a
bronze plaque to Goldman in
recognition of his 22 -ears of
service in promoting veteran's
Americanism programs in Dade
County and in combating pre-
judice and bigotry as a part of
this program.
A native of Jacksonville, he
has been active in veterans' af-
fairs since his arrival in Miami
m 1924. He has been a member
of the American Legion for 31
years and has held membership
in the Elks Lodge for a similar
period. He was honored by Post
No. 174 of the Jewish War Vet-
v erans by election as commandei
: Hebrew Academy. a"d. granted life membership in
trvices were helc tnat organization. Among his
many other community activities
Goldman is a Scottish Rite 32nd
degree Mason and a past mem-
ber of the board of directors of
the Miami YMHA.
City Commissioner Charles
City Manager O. P. Hart and
Tom Kclley, commander Harvey
Seeds Post. American Legion, are
among the prominent city of-
ficials who have been invited to
attend the affair, it has been an-
nounced by President John K.
Indian Creek Dr.. leader in Mi-
ami Beach Jewish women's or-
ganizations, died Saturday in
Rochester. Minn.,
after a year's :11-
ne-s.
The wife of
Louis Miller. Mi-
ami Beach build-
er contrai toi I i
25 years. Mis.
Miller was flown
to Mayo Clinic
Friday. At her
bedside at I e
time of her death
were her hus-
band and three
daughters, Mrs.
Ernie Woolfe, Mrs Sol Leslie and
Miss Jeanne Miller, all of Miami
Beach.
Also surviving are a son, Harrv
A.: 14 grandchildren and two
great grandchildren, all of Miami
Beach.
The Millers, who celebrated
their golden wedding anniversary
in March of this year, came here
from Akron, Ohio. Mr. Miller
heads the construction company
which has constructed about 40
Beach hotels and which has the
contract for the new Beach city
auditorium.
Mrs. Miller was one of the or-
ganizers of the Jewish Children s
Shelter Home in Akron. She alsc
served as a board member here
of the American Jewish Congress,
the Hebrew Immigrant Aid So-
ciety, the Mt. Sinai Ho-pital
Auxiliary, Hadassah. the Cardiac
Home and the
Funeral serv
Tuesday at Riverside Memorial
Chapel of Miami Beach. Inter-
ment was in the Greater Miami
Jewish Cemetery (Woodlawn).
* + *
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Simon, 1927 N.W. 3rd St., left Tuesday
for California, where they will visit relatives and friends. On
their return they plan to stop in Chicago to spend some time
with their son, Jesse, a senior at the Northern Illinois College
of Optemetry, and in Washington, D. C, with their daughter,
Mrs. Murray Ressler, and her family.
*
Mr. and Mrs. David Mandell of Lake Worth announce the
recent birth of a son, Stephen. Mrs. Mandell is the former Esther
Ann Margolis.
* *
Catherine and Jeanette Friedheim have returned to their
home in Belle Glade after attending a recent 4-H camp at Lake
Osborne, near Lake Worth. The girls are the daughters of Mr.
and Mrs. Joe Friedheim.
* *
Mrs. M. S. Rubin, Claremont Hotel, Miami Beach, left
Wednesday for an extended Northern trip. She will visit her
children, Mr. and Mrs. Milton Rubin in Scardale N Y her
sister, Mrs. H. Goodman in Springfield, Mass.; and may spend
several weeks in September in Atlantic City. She plans to
return here in October.
as maid
ln a gown
wit1, boat
neckline and peplum skirt! She
carried a fan of matchine material
with orchids and stephanotis
Mrs. Fred Miller Harpster
matron of honor, was attired in j
gown of similar design in violet
safin and carried a matching fa-
bouquet.
The Misses Sara Dressauer
Ruth Davis, Miriam Siskin served
as bridesmaids in gowns of ice
blue marquisette with satin trim
Their bouquets were attached to
matching marquisette and satin
fans.
Leah Joyce Shapiro was flower
girl and Joseph Lee Shapiro was
ring bearer.
Sam Dobrow was best man for
his son. Ushering were Leonard
Dobrow, Melvin Dobrow. Oscar
Dobrow, Robert Bernstein, Paul
Whitsett, Butter Goodson. Clyde
Morgan, Dorsey Cork and Fred
Harpster.
Following a reception at the
.'hotel, the couple left by car for
a wedding trip to New York and
Bar Harbor, Maine. Upon their
return they will make their home
in Daytona Beach.
Chaikin New Head
Of Business Council
Leo Chaikin was elected presi-
dent of the Businessmen's Coun-
cil of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation at the annual meeting
of the organization Wednesday
aboard the Probus Club barge in
Biscayne Bay.
Others elected were Aaron Kan-
ner, vice president, and Seymour
Rubin, treasurer. Samuel A Riv-
kind, retiring president, was pre-
sented with an award of apprecia-
tion by Herbert E. Scher, vice
president of Federation.
Dr. Reinhold P. Wolf of the
University of Miami, guest speak-
er, discussed the business outlook
for Miami. He said that even if a
Joan Ahlin Pledged
To Marvin P. Schero
Announcement of the engage-
ment of Miss Joan Arden Ablin
to Marvin Paul Schero has been
made by her parents, Mr. and
Mrs, Jack A. Ablin, Miami Beach
and Chicago. The prospective
bridegroom's parents are Mr. and
Mrs. Harry Schero. Chicago.
The wedding is planned for
early fall.
* *
Mrs. Al Morris and son, Stephen, left recently for a brief
stay in Los Angeles, Cal. En route they spent a week in New
Orleans.
Cantor Kelemer Will
Oiiiciaie At Services
Cantor Samuel Kelemer will of-
ficiate at services at Temple Beth
Sholom tonight at 8:15, in the
absence of Rabbi Leon Kronish,
who is away on vacation.
* *
After visiting relatives in Pittsburgh. Pa., Mr. and Mrs. Ted
Kaufman and children will vacation in the mountains of North
Carolina.
* *
Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Forrest, 1565 Jefferson Ave., Miami
Beach, announce the birth of a daughter, Felice Myma, bom
Friday morning, August 5, at St. Francis Hospital, Miami Beach.
The Forrests are also parents of a dauqhter, Joyce, and a son,
Bruce.
... *
Nathan Alexander has been confined to his home for the
past two weeks by illness and is now recuperatinq.
* .ft -K
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Koqos have left for Philadelphia, where
Mrs. Kogos will undergo an operation.
Rabbi and Mrs. Simon April have returned from an ex-
S? .?? ?hi0h ,00k ,hem to Savannah, Ga., where they
^visited^heudaughter and son-in-law, and Montreal, Canada.
Polish District Judge
Killed By Policeman
WARSAW. (JTA)-M. Fried-
man-Loubovitzki. a judge of the
Glivitze district
and killed by
loca"
Ablin
a
court, was shot
a member of the
Kronenfeld of Sholem Lodge Mi
am. Beach Councilman Burnett
Roth will present the plaque to
Goldman. Raymond Nathan, vet-
erans' chairman of Sholem Lodge
is in charge
Serving with
of
arrangements.
Nathan will be
SUrS SaVn' Gilbert J- Blk.n.
Coin b8n and n:,v"!
15 Torahs Transferred
From Britain To Israel
LONDON, (JTA)P-rmission
had to be obtained from the Dank
of England this week for the
, transfer of 15 Torahs from Britain
this week JLWM vPOrted here to Israel. The Torahs were trans-
it the judje inPa 3." Prted by three *** ** '
in Glivitee ,, under arrest
whn?Ua',d Lonkovskv. a Fol(
ng theS fr the Ges,4 < specialized
and who
delegates who left here to attend
a World Mizrachi conference
Jerusalem next week.
Another shipment of Scro
fr/WrSfttATS wni'be"uke7to IsVae. by ^
trouv following a denial of chS: ther Mizrachi delegates who*
scheduled to leave this week, tw
eney by the President
Pol'sh Republic
writers and
clem
of the
Three Polish
years
Scrollstwelve of which *<"
donated by Liverpool yngR3
twelve by London synagogues
several of which were donate
private individualsare W"J
brought to Israel at thereque*
of the Ministry of Religion-


IaY. AUGUST 12, 1949
* Jewish norHlar
PAGE NINE
Gey Notovitz, Samuel Steen Speak
rs Before Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan
marriage of Miss Shirley
|itz. daughter of Mr. and
Ben Notovitz, 2498 S.W. 21st
Samuel Steen, son of Mr.
rs. Philip Steen, 5172 S.W.
|t. was solemnized by Dr.
H Kaplan Sunday at 12:30
|at the home of the bride's
her wedding the bride
a gown of blue eyelet or-
with capelet. She wore a
net veil and carried white
Bernard Goldberg served
Itnm of honor for her sister.
Fogelman was best man.
deception followed the cere-
former Miss Notovitz is a
at the University of Miami
ia member of B'nai B'rith
Women. The bridegroom,
tmv veteran with two years
be "overseas, is a law student
. University of Miami, where
affiliated with Pi Lambda
fraternity.
Jer a wedding trip through-
Ithe state, the couple will
in Miami.
:utive Breakfast
executive breakfast will be
bv the Tropical Lodge of
B'rith Sunday at 10:15 a.m
kyler's Restaurant, 141 East
er St. President Budd Cutler
preside.
group's service program
lie fall will be outlined.
Richmans Celebrate
Golden Wedding
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Richman
celebrated their golden wedding
at the home of their daughter,
Mrs. Theodore Goodman, 304
Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral
Gables, on Sunday afternoon.
Rabbi Morris A. Skop, the
Coral Gables Jewish cantor, of-
ficiated.
The affair was attended by 125
friends and relatives of the couple.
Personally Speaking...
Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Katz, cousins of Mrs. S. M. Machlei,
are here from Brooklyn, N. Y. The Katzes are guests at the
National Hotel, Miami Beach.
* *
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Kaufman, S651 N.E. Miami Ct., announce
the birth of a son, Howard Norman, born on August 1 at Jackson
Memorial Hospital. The mother is the former Fanny Friedman of
Baltimore. Mr. Kaufman formerly lived in Pennsylvania.
* *
Mr. and Mrs. Gus Jacobson are vacationing in New York
for the month of August. Mr. Jacobson is executive director of
the Miami Beach Y.
O
* *
Mrs. Samue
Steen
Pllkintuu
~
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Aronovitz of Key West left last week
for a combined business and pleasure trip in New York. They
plan to return the early part of September.
* *
Mrs. Anna Frank, 1462 S.W. 17th St., is leaving tomorrow
for Baltimore to spend a month with her children. While there
her son, Donald, and his wife will come in from Chicago.

Bart Giordano, 1630 S.W. 10th St., and Mr. and Mrs. Yale
Leavy, 6530 Tamiami Canal Road, and their two children, are
leavinq Sunday for a month's stay in New York.
* *
Vacationing at the Saxony Hotel, Miami Beach, are Mrs.
Joseph Alperin and dauqhter, Sonya, of Memphis, Tenn. The
visitors left for a brief sojourn in Havana yesterday. Mrs.
Alperin is a prominent attorney and club woman in Memphis.
* *
Dr. and Mrs. Sidney H. Moss announce the birth of their
second son, Edwin Marc, on Tuesday, August 2, at Jackson
Memorial Hospital. The mother is the former Elaine Weinberg
of Baltimore, Md.
+ M
Patricia Becker To
Wed Marvin Mandell
The betrothal of Patricia Beck-
er to Marvin Mandell, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Gustav Mandell, 2210
S.W. 19th Terr., has been an-
nounced by her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Benjamin Becker, 2603 S.W.
3rd St.
The bride-elect is a graduate
of Central High School in Tren-
ton, N. J., and the Paine Hall
School of Medical Technology,
New York.
Her fiance, an Army veteran,
graduated from Port Richmond
High in Staten Island, N. Y., and
received his degree from the Uni-
versity of Miami, where he was
affiliated with Alpha Epsilon Pi
fraternity.
No date has been set for the
wedding.
bine R. Kantor
trothal Revealed
_. engagement of Miss Jeanne
lantor of Miami Beach, form-
at Newark, to Bernard
movich of Irvington, N. J-,
been announced by her sister,
I Joseph W. Kane of Newark.
Kantor is the daughter of
ate Mr. and Mrs. Julius Kan-
bf Newark.
\c bride-elect, who has re-
. in Miami Beach for the
[two years, is chief auditor for
Sorrento Hotel. She attended
York University and grad-
lrom New Jersey Normal
ol and the Government
ol of Aeronautics in Newark.
Chaimovich, a graduate of
ark College of Engineering,
civil engineer in Irvington.
erved four years in the Paci-
a chief petty officer with
Seabees.
. tail wedding is planned in
lark and the couple will live
irvington.
Miamians vacationing at Duncraggan Inn, Hendersonville,
N. C. include, Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Laiten, Mrs. Morris Obeler,
Mrs Alfred Obeler and dauqhter Ilene, Mrs. I. D. Bernstein,
Mrs. A. Siegel, Mrs. Ernest Maas and Mr. and Mrs. Milton Baer.
* *
Cantor and Mrs. Samuel Kelemer have returned here after
a vacation in New York.
-K *
Slated to arrive from North Hollywood, Cal., Sunday is
Michael Horwitz, who will attend the Bar Mitzvah of his great
nephew, Philip Barnett Padawer.
Mr and Mrs. Sam Taubenblatt of Memphis, Tenn., are
staying at the Saxony Hotel, Miami Beach. Mr. Taubenblatt
is a Memphis attorney.
* *
Mr. and Mrs. I. Langner, 2283 S.W. 17th St., returned from
a three-month stay in New York and New Jersey in time to
attend the bris of their great qrandson, Lee Mitchell, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Harold Rothlein, which took place Sunday. Godparents
were Mr. and Mrs. Murray Silberman. Mr. Langner was sandek
for his great grandchild. Rabbi S. M. Machtei officiated.
+ *

Bridge Classes
Are Offered
Milton Vernoff, managing di-
rector of the Boulevard Bridge
Club, 1428 N. E. Bayshore Place,
announces that he is now ar-
ranging classes in contract bridge
instruction for groups of four.
Time for classes, he states, will
be arranged to suit players.
Vernoff, who is ex-president of
the Florida Unit of the American
Contract Bridge League, is Flor-
ida state champion and is con-
sidered one of the country's fore-
most bridge players. He is now
chairman of the executive com-
mittee of the American Contract
Bridge League.
The Boulevard Bridge Club,
which was organized nine years
ago, is a bridge membership club
now composed of over 200 mem-
bers. Recommended by the Cham-
ber of Commerce, the club holds
regular bride tournaments during
the winter season. Ruth Gassen-
heimer is chairman of the club's
board of directors. ______
$----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Miss Naomi Schwartz and her brother Marshall of Cleve-
L Ohio, have been entertained by their aunt and uncle, Mr.
Mrs. Samuel Saal, and cousins, Mr. and Mrs. Saul Brett.
ng their vacation at the Sorrento Hotel.
* *
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Friedland will return Monday from a
opean trip.
* *
. Mr. and Mrs. Leon J. Ell are staying at the Park Lane Hotel,
kver, Colo., until August 21, when they will leave for Colorado
ngs, where they will stop at the Broadmoor for several days.
i there they will drive to Hot Springs for a short stay. They
then proceed to New Orleans and plan to arrive in Miami
Ich on or about September 2.
* + *
Selma and Lee Katzman, 2266 S.W. 23rd St., are leaving
weekend for a sojourn in Texas.
* -* *
Mr. and Mrs. Marion Ross, accompanied by their daughter,
I this week for New York, where they will be joined by their
who has been attending camp in the North.
+ *
Mrs. Sylvia Chertkof left Tuesday foi New York, where she
visit her sister. Miss Paula Gaines, New York model.
raeli Women's Groap Urges
obilixation For Immigrant Aid
' AVIV, (JTA)The Worn- demanded that in the event of a
family the mother
lEL
Workers Conference of Israel
week issued a call for the
biuzation of women teachers,
es and others trained in the
Weal field to volunteer for
k with the immigrants.
[he call was incorporated in a
plution adopted by the body at
J conclusion of its seven-day
Ivention. It also urged mothers
lp were nurses or medical tech-
lans to devote at least a few
frs each day to the vital work
icromiriodatina the immigrants.
another resolution demands
equality under the civil and
Igious law for Israeli women
. equalitv for a son and
Enter in matters pertaining to
entance. A third resolution
divorce in a
be given the right of raising the
children.
Among the guests attending the
conference were about 100 Amer-
ican women who brought with
them a resolution from the Pio-
neer Women pledging to raise
$2,000,000 in the next two years
to assist the various projects
sponsored by the Women Workers.
Ruth L. Margaretten Becomes Mrs. Levick
In Garden Ceremony At Parents' Home
Miss Ruth Lenore Margaretten,
daughter of the Sam Margaret-
tens, 2276 S.W. 18th St., became
the bride of Lewis Morley Levick,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Le-
vick, 637 Malaga Ave., Coral
Gables, on Sunday, July 10, at
high noon, in the garden of the
home of the bride's parents. Rabbi
Moses Mescheloff read the
service.
The bride wore a ballerina
length gown of white organdy
over dusty rose taffeta with a
wide dusty rose sash. The dress
was trimmed with embroidered
scalloping and butterlies. She
complemented this with a white
nylon straw hat with illusion veil-
ing and mits of nylon net. She
carried a bouquet of purple
throated white orchids and tube
roses.
Mrs. Stanley Greene, matron of
honor for her sister, wore a
flowered cotton print and carried
<3>a nosegay of gardenias and pink
babies breath. Best man was Je-
rome Balbot of Pittsburgh.
At the reception which fol-
lowed the ceremony the bride s
mother greeted guests in beige
silk, while the bridegrooms
mother wore a green silk print.
Both wore corsages of yellow or-
chids. _
For the wedding trip to Day-
tona Beach the bride donned a
silver blue silk print two-piece
suit dress. She wore a corsage of
white orchids. Following the
honeymoon, the couple is residing
at 123 Zamora Ave., Coral Gables.
The former Miss Margaretten
attended the University of Miami,
where she was a mpmbpr of Kap-
honorary art
Patricid Becker

Mrs. Lewis M. Levick
the University of Miami. He is a
member of Pi Lambda Phi frat-
ernity.
pa Pi. natio :;;'
fraternity, and Delta Phi Lpsilon
Go''"1 '' po olentif**'in some sorority. She is a member of
locality ""t thev arc ussd forjSharet Chapter, B'nai B nth
fooa according to the Encyclo- Young Women. Mr. Levick at-
Ihirr resolution paedia Britamuca. I tended schools in P,ttsbrgh and
Blood Bank Drive
To Begin Sept. 12
A campaign to build up blood
bank reserves at the Dade County
bank, as well as private organiza-
tions, will be conducted during a
"Walking Memorial Blood Bank
Week," scheduled for September
12-18. ,
The drive.will be launched with
a parade of participating civic
groups east along Flagler St. to
Bayfront Park on the evening of
September 12, followed by
speeches, music and the solicita-
tion of blood donor pledges.
In charge of arrangements for
the drive is E. C. Allen, chair-
man of the blood banks of the
Miami Junior Chamber of Com-
merce and of the Harvey Seeds
American Legion Post.
Allen stated that Pratt Veterans
Hospital's need for 300 pints of
blood per month creates a drain
on the county blood bank's sup-
plies. To help build up the gen-
eral reserve, he said, each organ-
ization now maintaining an in-
dividual account at the bank will
be asked to donate 10 per cent of
the blood given for it to Pratt.
At the same time each group wul
be asked to build up its own ac-
count through donations from
more members and friends.
During the parade and at the
ark blood donor cards will be
istributed, Allen said. Signers
will be requested to list then-
names, addresses, phone numbers
and organizations to whose ac-
counts their blood is to be
credited.
Since blood for transfusions can
be kept only three weeks, Allen
underscored the need for donors
Persons who have suffered from
sunstroke have an abnormal sus-
ceptibility to the action OK who will give blood at regular
stimulants. I intervals.



/,
j



PAGE TEN
+ ltl&lkMidtor
FRIDAY, AUGUST
12.;
JEWS IN SPORTS
Bv HASKELL COHEN
Max Patkin, baseball comedian
formerly with the Cleveland In-
dians, reports that he already
has made as many appearances
this year as he had during all of
last season, and that he has been
greeted by good crowds wherever
he has been.
About a month ago. Max was
driving through Gastonia, N. C.
on his way to Lumberton. N. C,
when his new automobile was
damaged in a collision. Patkin
discovered that the other driver
worked for a friend of his. Buddy
Lews of the Washington Sena-
tors, who operates a Ford Agency
in Gastonia.
Patkir. is booked for his base-
ball tour by Eddie Gottlieb, the
Philadelphia promoter. Ed sent
Max out with The Philadelphia
Sphas basketball team last win-
ter when they toured the country
with the Harlem Globetrotters.
Patkin had a funny skit or two
which he put on during the play.
He appeared on the court dressed
in a 1910 woman's bathing suit
and went into his body gyrations,
which are second to none. Max
is quite a dancer and in certain
parts of his act put on hilarious
jitterbug exhibitions.
*
Speaking of Eddie Gottlieb we
are reminded that his former star
Negro baseball player. Harry
Simpson, is the talk of Eastern
League baseball circles. The
young slugger has blasted 25 home
runs and bids fair to break the
loop record set in 1930 by Ken
Strong when the former N.Y.U.
athlete clubbed 41 four-base hits.
Former major league players in
the loop are amazed at Simpson's
tremendous hitting power and
claim that he will astonish the
fans in the big time when he
comes up with Cleveland.
The Indians purchased Simpson
from Gottlieb's Philly Stars, last
winter. We were in Getty's hotel
room when a representative of
the Indians spoke to him via long
distance telephone and tried to
hurry the mogul into selling the
boy for a pittance. Gotty was so
sure the boy had the makings of
a star that he insisted on a fi-
nancial arrangement that will net
him a tidy sum from the Indians,
something like seven times what
the major league representative
originally offered.
Gottlieb is one of the few per-
son; connected with Negro base-
ball who has not suffered in deal-
ings with the major league
moguls. Few people realize that
Branch Rickey acquired Robin-
son, Campanella and Newcombe
without laying out a penny of
Brooklyn's money. When Rickey
wanted a hurler from Gottlieb's
Philly Stars, however, he ap-
proached Eddie in a business-like
manner and purchased the play-
er. Gottlieb, certain that the
pitcher involved would not make
good, insisted that Brooklyn re-
turn the player in the event he
failed to make the grade. Rickey
sent the hurler back when they
discovered he wasn't the plaver
they thought he was. Thus Gott-
lieb received money and the play-
er back, making him one of the
very few to outsmart Branch
Rickey.

Goody Rosen, former Dodger
and Giant outfielder, is playing
in the Inter-county League in
Ontario, Canada. Goody has
turned down several lucrative of-
fers to return to organized base-
ball. His restaurant in Canada is
doing so well he finds it hard to
leave the premises for extended
periods of time.
Murray Franklin, one of the
former Mexican League players
recentlv reinstated by Commis-
sioner Happy Chandler, has been
released by Detroit and caught
on with Hollywood in the Pacific
Coast League. Franklin played
for Los Angeles in the same cir-
cuit for three years prior to join-
ing the Tigers in 1942. He is an
in fielder.
*
Hal Saltzman copped his fif-
teenth win last week for Port-
land in the Pacific Coast circuit
to give him one of the best records
in the wheel. He pitched a shut-
out to gain his fourteenth triumph
and just missed another in win-
ning his latest game
L. Adlor Will
tttend Chicago
Medical ehal
Lawrence Ale, 4326 Post
Ave.. Mian iA^tfftoS
the students enrolled in the t..
class at the Chicago
M^Ce8ofShhe"ve fully accredited
medical schools h Chicago, the
bsKmsms
countries. hised
Admission policies *"?
solely on character and scholar
ship merit and only 1
LEGAL NOTICE
TcTrTcE UNDER FICTITIOUS
N,,,, $m&**m .-.
,h. undenilgned, dealt Iiir to engage in
!; V I .';,' Miami M* Worlda,
'"""U' ""haRRY MARGOLIN
MAT MAW'.OIJN
l,|.;n IIIMMKI-
MILLER PODBLL, ESQS.
Attorney! tor Applicants
35 Lincoln Road
19 l/S-U
accepted
applications
yeLester N. Selig is chairman of
the board of trustees of the school
and Dr. John J. She.nin is dean.
LEGAL NOTICE
FICTITIOUS
NOTICE IS HKHKI
NOTICE UNDER
NAME LAy\;iVKN that
:";;,;:: : '
. ,. Wnnoo1n"c '
Suh in. i
of Dad. Com ty,
BERTRAM II
DANIEL F. PARISER
AttOI iii v for APP
811 Bl '8.
K. 12-19-26 9/2
'
\n:\ i.i:
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
I hi. undersigned, desiring; to engage in
'blwlne.. unite, the fictitious name of
Kenny's French Cleaners at 616 S
Miami Avenue, Miami. Fla Intend to
I name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County,
'' KENNETH C. P.RAIDMAN
MAY BRAIDMAN
PALLOT & TATHAM
attorneys for Applicants
- 22-29 5-12
IX
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
TI1K CIRCUIT ClIl'HT OK Til
ITU JUDICIAL CIRCriT 1
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER FICTiti^
NAME LAW IT|*
NOTICE IS HEREBY rav*
the undersigned, attlrlne i* L
bu",ne8S ssuft Sgfq
at the numhe
Miami Avenue
tend to register
,ft'! ndiiujj,
Miami tvi'
lhem\ F1'
the Clerk of the C^rouu"1r!,fl,,"'
County, Florida. l Ul
IVAIt OLSEN
ETHEL OL8BN
Owners
OSCAR RAPPAI'ORT
Attorney
516 Seybold Iluilding
7/29 8/5-12-19-26
IN
NOTICE TO CREDITOR
THE COUNTY JIIhiS*'
K> .,..
Commander Joshua L. Gold-
berg, who has been named by
the Department of the Navy as
District Chaplain of the Third
Naval District, the highest ad-
ministrative post ever occupied
by a Jewish chaplain in the
armed forces in time of war or
peace. Chaplain Goldberg is
the Navy's official liaison of-
ficer with the Division of Re-
ligious Activities of the Na-
tional Jewish Welfare Board.
fvablos Ontor
If old* M<. iii$>
The Coral Gables Jewish Cen-
ter held its monthly meeting
Sunday at the Hillel House in
Coral Gables. Herbert Gelernter
presided.
The new temple building at
320 Palermo Ave., Coral Gables,
now under construction, was the
primary concern of the group.
Sam Silver was named chairman
of the fund raising committee
for the project. Stanley Wayne
was appointed chairman of the
committee in charge of forming a
men's club affiliated with the
congregation. Elected to serve on
the board were Maurice Coren-
blum, Theodore Wayne. Sam
Schulefend, Dr. Leo Wool and
Joseph Koven.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COIR1
IN AXn FUR DAME '.'..'. N'.
FLORIDA. IX PROBATE. N"
22N34.
In Re: ESTATE OF
MORRIS J liERSTEIN,
I leei
To All Creditor* a il VII Pi
Ing Claim* oi Demi ds x'
Said Gsl
I .. and eai h of you,
notified and required to i' nl any
claims an.! ii you, '
either of vc.ii. may haw- against ih.
.Mute of MORRIS J. UERSTEIX de-
ceased late of Dade Count> Fl
In the Hon W F BLAXTOX O I '
i idgi : 1 lade i -o intj. and file the
Kami hit offli-i IIn I'ounl
Courthouse in Dade Counts I
within eight i alendar ninths from
.in- .Ian- ei tli. first publication here-
of Said claims in demands to contain
the legal addrest ol the claimant and
to he swoi i : nted afot e-
said, oi same uill be barred. See 8<
tlon 120 of ih. 19 li Aii
Dati \ .-. isi -. A 11. 1949
UERALD "L" GLEASON and
i: DAVID ROSEN
A- Co-exi :' f the Last Will
and Test unenl of Ml iRRJS .1.
nERSTEIN, I.......-il
E DAVID ROSEN
-,! Seybold Hide
Miami. I'
Attorney for Exei utoi a
12-19-21
IE
F
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR DADE
, -,,| vrv IN CHANCERY, No.
EVELYN BECK NELL, Plaintiff, vs.
fiEOROE LESTER HECKNELL,
YOU? ""eOROB l.KSTER HF.CK-
NELL Residence I'nknown, are notl-
ii,.,i to file vein appearance In the
, ,Bi foi divorce, on or before
s..|.t..iiil.i-i '.. I!!!. or decree pro
so will I.....iit.i.d against you.
DATED August 1. I4.
K B LEATHERMAN, Clerk
' ""''''" **, ...
By M. C. FEU'.K.
Deputy Clerk.
MAX It SILVER.
Attnrnev for Plaintiff
Seybold Building
Miami. Florida
. :,.12-19-26 9 2
in and Edit dadr"
FLORIDA. IN pRoB
In Re:'ESTATE OF
CI^ARA K. I'Ai'KTTI, fwj
To All Creditors snd AU tuA
ing Claims or Demand,
Said Estate:
You, and each of you, v> |_
notified and required tu'pmslT
l.iiins ahd demand.- whkh jl
either of you, may have uiiul
estate of CLAka I'ACtriTjU'
late of DADE County, FlorWiki
HON. W. F. BLANTON '
Judge of Dade County, and til
same In his office In th(
Courthouse In Dad* County |
within eight calendar moaiaj
the date of the flist publication
of. Said claims or demand! to.
the legal addrens ef the clalntag
to be sworn to and presentedua
said, or same will he barred I
Section 120 of the 1S33 Probiui
Date July 12, A D. lms
VIOI.A M. do\mj.h|
As Executrix of the Emf
Clara E. Pacettl, DecMM
MARION BROOKS
Attorney for Executrix
7/22-29 8/3-12
bV
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
The Jewish Floridian so-
licits your legal notices.
We appreciate your
patronage and guaran-
tee accurate service at
legal rates. Phone 2-1141
for messenger service.
Tel Aviv-Jerusalem Train
Greeted Enthusiastically
JERUSALEM, (JTAj The
population of Jerusalem enthusi-
astically celebrated the arrival
this week of the first train to
make the Tel Aviv-Jerusalem run
since the declaration of Israel's
independence on May 4, 1948.
The train pulled into the crowd-
ed Jerusalem station at exactly
noon. In the flag-bedecked sta-
tion were hundreds of prominent
guests, including members of the
cabinet, led by Premier David
Ben Gurion, members of the Jew-
ish Agency executive, as well as
local officials. Minister of Com-
munications David Rcmez rode
with the train from Tel Aviv.
Steel-helmeted Army escort con-
trasted strangely with the flowers
and banners which were scattered
over the entire train.
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
Alterman Transport Lines at 1091
K W. 22nd Street, Miami, Fla., in-
tends t" register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
.. Florida.
SIDNEY ALT Kit MAN
Sole Owner
GEORGE CHERTKI P
Attorney for Applicant
oiympla Bldg
8/5-12-W-M
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN thai
the undersigned, desiring to i ng igi
- inder the fictitlnu nnmei :
Luxurla Clenners; l,\.- n ., Laundry
ii"! I. ah i.i Cleani and Laundi y at
1022 \. w r,th Ave Miami, Florida,
intends to register said nnme Ith the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida
I.OCIS 01TTLEMAN
Sole Owner
S 12-19-24 9/S
Gables Women To Stage
Spaghetti Supper, Dance
Coral Gables Jewish Center
Sisterhood will sponsor a spag-
hetti supper and barn dance on
Saturday. August 20, at 7 p.m. at
the Chamber of Commerce Build-
ing, 300 Sunset Drive, South
Miami.
Admission is S1.50.
Anyone wishing information
and reservations is requested to
SaeaaS1 ^dneY Richman,
48-4343; Mrs. Sam Silver, 48-2582'
or Mrs. Ted Wayne. 48-5507.
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
nes; under the ti. titlous name o:
Miami Beach Laundrj & Laundromat
at 1305 2oth Street Miami Beach,
Honda, ml,.iids i registi : .-., d I ame
with the ci.-ik of the Circuit Court ol
l iade County, Florida
BAR). M C( dl.i i\"
Sole i iwner
FREDERICK S (iROSKBERU
Attorney for applicant
.a) Biscayne Bide
8 12-19-26 9 :-:
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S i'uI'RT
IN ANI> Foil DADE COUNTY,
FI.OIIIDA.IN I !'.( il'.ATE.
No ._-_
In Re: ESTATE OP
MATH K W !: M A TONICAN,
I '-leased.
To All Creditors ami All Persona Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against
Said Estate:
You, aid each of you, are hereby
notified and required to present any
and demands which you. or
either of you, may have attalnst the
estate of Mathew E. Matonloan de-
ceaseiI late of Dade County, Florida.
to tin- Hon W !'. Blanton, County
hide,- of Oade County, and file the
same In his office In the County
Courthouse In Dade County, Florida,
within eight calendar months from
the date of tli- first publication here-
of. Bald claims or demands to con-
tain the legal addreaa of the claimant
and to be sworn to and presented as
aforesaid, said or -ame iii be barred.
See Section 120 of the 1933 Probate
Act,
Date August :. A.D. 1949.
FRIEDA I.KININGER,
As Executrix of the Last will and
Testament of Mathew E. Matoni-
in, Deceased.
MARX FABER
U2 Congress Hldg.,
Miami. Florid I
Atto ney I Exi itrlg
8/5-12-19-24
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO L
APPLICATION FOR FINUp
DISCHARGE
IN COCNTY JUDGE'S
DADE COUNTY, KI^iRIDa -j
19554.
RE: ESTATE OP
MURRAY MILLER,
Deceased
NOTICE is hereby given
have filed my final u-i-irt and p
for Final Dischaige as Ailmlmit
of the estate of Murray Millr.l
ceased; and that on the Hit <
August, 1949, will apply to the I
aide W. F. Blanton, County
of Dade County, Florida, for I
Of said final report and for I
charge as Administratrix of the I
Of Murray Miller, decease!.
This 25 day of July, 1919.
s/ PAULINE MILLBl
AdminiMtnl
NATHAN JAFFUl
sT
HARRY ZUKERNICK, ES<3
Attorney for Administratrix
8/5-12-19-26
IV T?mEM.,F PUBLICATION
.I!!1'- ll:' IT COURT OP THE
'T ,'''"" ''" CIRCUIT OV
f-ot v iv' IX, AND POR "A"":
mm CHANCERY, No.
''K'Ur:^'wi,,''';A,ZV Pla,ntll va
Yot- u-l--VU."';.L"AIZA- Defendant.
Ml olllim Mi,, i. i.. v. ,
fornia, are notified to in,
pearance in the al
your ap-
;;r'ron I,r '^"5'.
l9DATED! This irt day of Aug,,,
,, K WEATHERMAN, Cleric
(Circuit c,t Seal) -iera.
By W.M. \v.
MAX R BILVER
Attorney for Plaintiff
j-12-19-26 I 2
STOCKING,
Deputy Clerk
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
AS LOW AS]
AH
INTKIST
MORTGAGE LOANS
HENRY E.WOLFF CO.
aiK la.Mi"i
9-3435
-junty, Florida.
mw-nSSS" STI:1'K,N
NOTICE UNDER Ficrmou,
NOTICE TO APPEAR
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE cul.mi.
FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY, No.
126170.
IRVING WAI.Ii.MAN. Plaintiff, vs.
SADIE uai.hman, Defendant
>ii. SADIE WALDMAN, 1981
"ospecl Avi 11 ,. Bronx, New York,
are notified to file imir appearance
in Uii above cause for divorce on the
:Id day ol August, A.D, 1949, other-
' de : e pro confesso will be
ntered against you.
Dated
I 149
!:
ill
tins 21 day of July. A.D.
B. LEATHERMAN, Cleik.
C tut Seal)
liy C. B HOI.AM).
mm T. m t ,. Deputy Clerk.
MIL! \ A PRlfcJUMAN, Attorney
Seybold Ruining
-2 i-12
MM, P. PAR1SER
Attorney for Applicants
611 Biscayne ){]dK
DA
Att
IN TIU^?T!CE. T0 APPEAR
Ki v\-v.'.V,IT COURT OF THK
ficL-, ," JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
!Hi vtv1:",A',1N A-N" EUlt DADE
.;;!.^Tl. in CHANCERY. No.
,,. R8E E- MCHULSON. Defend-
",' 'V-'.81,- !': NICHOLBON,
1 J. Robaru,
On West n.-.th street,
Cleveland, ohio
rile an AUK ,,Kltl:"V RBQUTRBD to
4 otW- "X --'"' ''"> <' August,
ii I of c ""' ""egatlons of said
Jjant wu be um. M ,,.
,TW noUja to b< published in The
I iir I.? 71""' "'"'' week Tor
This h <".n1*<'ve weeks.
'"Is, the .1 d.,> of July, 1949
Ci .u B.' '-KATHBRMAN.
,,i ?' ""' clrUtt Court.
,.-i uade County Florida
" '""'It Court Seal, *' f",r,ua-
By WM W. STOCKING.
TO1 ivW"*
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT'
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CU
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FURl
COUNTY. IN CHASCERM
126157.
ELIZABETH KREI'P, PUIntll
OSCAR KREPP, I'efemUnl
TO: OSCAR KREPP, C/0 K
Ripp. 5.".o Mosel Avenue,
Island, New York. _,i
YOU ARK HEREBY .NUTIFIE]
file your appearance In tlw
styled cause for divorce, on or I
the 19th day of August, IMI.
wise a decree pro cunitno |
entered against you. J
Dated, his >'h/'ftTJa&jj|
Ckrk of Circuit OC
-Circuit Cou *l.wsT0CBL
Depatl m
SAMUEL J. RAND. Attornej
617 Seybold liullding
Miami, Florida
7/22-29 8/5-12
ORDER OF PUBUCATO^
in the circuit corajSr
nth judicial ciac\mluy-
FOR DADE COJ STY. l^.,'
IN CHANCERY, No !-';'
MAY JBiiMl I.KJV. Wga.1
FRANK H. LEW. Defe
TO: FRANK II. J-BW .
224 West Yoseinile Avenut
Manteca, California
You are hereby r.-.tifled. a*<
to file your appeaiaiice m '
Hill of Complaint lor D'10.c'n,-,
you in the above-named>** M
before the 22 day of A"^,al
otherwise the alligations 5T
talned will be taken as cum"]
'"ORDERED at Miami. W*!
21 day of July, l9 EuHEW
EClerk of OR*
(Circuit Court Seal)
liy r
J.
DepulJ
SAM SILVER. ,
Solicitor for Plaintiff.
1703 Congress Bldg..
Miami, Florida
7/22-298/5-12
NOTICE TO.Ufijbm
in the aviL.cowTw^p
AND FOR DADE
FLORIDA.No. 396'J-.
PEELE,
^IRALAM^'-R^pgEj
ELISABETH JINNIE R0SK' ^
his wife. Defendants.
TO: GIRALAMO JBgHMr M
ELISABETH JINMB
LIOSI, Defendants. ,
23J4 West 2h ftree 8u :
Number Three. M ami Ben
You and each of >?" *"#
to file with the Otn^JSk
named Court at Mian". J g
or before the I2,h .^araae1,
1949. your written app |
suit brought against .f~#0
of which a decree pro"
be entered against >ouj,p ,t
IX>NE AND .OMJffgfJ*
Florida, this 16th day
Clerk. Civil Court *
" ByCHAR.^1
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida
7/21-W /6-U
pfl-y'.Wrf^f^^-j*SS^r i^S^ia


FRIDAY, AUGUST 12, 1949
+Jewislifhrldiar
PAGE ELEVEN
"Between You and Me"
By BORIS SMOLAR
(Copyright, 1948, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.)
Cantor Julius Rosenstein To Officiate
At Gables Congregation Holiday Services
| ZIONIST TALKS:
There is renewed talk in New York of the advisability of merg-
ing all existing Zionist groups in Use United States into one co-
ordinated body This has long been advocated by David Ben
Curion, even prior to the establishment of the Jewish State Now
one can hear even more drastic suggestions in circles close to the
Israeli government These circles advance the idea that the
American Zionist groups should merge into an organization to be
called American Friends for Israel Such an organization, they
believe, would enjoy the advantage of also having non-Zionists as
members While it is not likely that an organization of this kind
will be formed prior to the next Zionist Congress, the unification of
I all American Zionist groups in a central Zionist body may become a
matter of serious discussion within a few months Tourist traffic
from the United States to Israel is steadily increasing The num-
ber of visas issued in this country totalled 5,437 during the first six
months of this year ... In recent months tourists have been ex-
changing foreign currency into Israeli currency at the rate of
$1 500,000 a month ... It is estimated that approximately 100,000
Christian pilgrims will visit Israel in 1950 That year is designated
bv the Vatican as a Holy Year Since 1475 one year in every
twenty-five is celebrated by the Catholic Church as a Holy Year .
In fact, the Vatican has already appointed a high official of the
Italian Foreign Ministry to make arrangements for the pilgrimage
to Israel Churches, monasteries and parochial schools in Israel
will meet the housing needs of the pilgrims The Israeli Ministry
of Religion has promised to provide the necessary facilities for the
pilgrims. # ( (
THE DOMESTIC FRONT:
The changes that are occurring, and are likely to occur, in the
United States point in the direction of a gradual reduction in dis-
crimination and prejudice This is the conclusion to which Arnold
and Caroline 'Rose, authorities on race relations, come in their
"America Divided" just published by Alfred Knopf The book is
one of the finest surveys on racial, religious and ethnic antagonisms
in the United States The authors discuss frankly the various
aspects of racial hatred in this country and discrimination in its
economic and social life Naturally, the position of the Jews in
the United States is dealt with lengthily in the book The authors
establish that while American Jews were originally quite divided
about Zionism, with probably the great majority opposed, this is
not the case any longer And to them the future of anti-Semitism
in America depends^very much on whether the Jewish state leans
toward the United STates or Russia "If the Jews come to appear
as party of a threat to the safety of the United States, hatred against
them might suddenly rise to fever pitch," the authors warn .
Thev point to the fact that because of the Palestine issue hatred of
Jew's suddenly rose in Britain between 1945 and 1947 However,
they state that propaganda against Jews in the United States has
been on the decline since World War II The book emphasizes
that there is always a danger of increased racial discrimination and
intcrgroup hatred in case of economic disaster ... At the same time,
the authors feel that extreme forms of intergroup hatred are to be
feared only if political fascism comes to this country._____________
Julius Rosenstein, Miami Beach
cantor, will officiate at the High
Holy Day services for the First
Jewish Congregation at the
Coliseum, Douglas Road at S.W.
16th St., Coral Gables. Cantor
Rosenstein will be accompanied
by a mixed choir composed of
members of the congregation.
Choir rehearsals are now being
held, Lee Viau, congregation
president, announces. Next re-
hearsal will be held at the home
of Cantor Rosenstein, 1401 Alton
Road, Miami Beach, on Sunday
afternoon. Anyone interested in
joining the choir. Platt states, may
call Prof. Pierre Mande at 48-7247.
Last rehearsal was held at the
home of Mrs. Ruth Borok. Par-
ticipating were Mr. and Mrs. Leon
Honig, Dr. and Mrs. Seymour
Blumenthal, Mrs. Mandron and
Prof. Mande. Following the prac-
tice. Prof. Mande presented a
violin recital. He was accom-
panied by Mrs. Blumenthal.
To help those who close busi-
ness for the High Holy Days ana
those who travel for services,
Platt announces, services will be-
gin at 8 pun. on Rosh Hashono
Eve and at 6 p.m. on Yom Kippur
Eve- A
The congregation has invited
as its guests for the services
the Jewish students at the Uni-
versity of Miami, veterans at
Pratt Hospital and patients at the
Hebrew School
Opens l!H!)-.~0
leriii On Monday
Leo Sheiner, chairman of the
board of education of the Miami
Hebrew School and Congregation,
announces that the 1949-50 term
of Hebrew School will get under-
way Monday.
Parents may register their chil-
dren from 10 a.m. to 12 noon on
Monday, Tuesday and Wednes-
day and from 7:30 to 9 p.m. on
Tuesday. For the convenience of
children who will be away until
after Labor Day, late .registra-
tion will be held from 3:30 to 5:30
p.m. on September 6, 7 and 8.
Parents may simultaneously
register children for Sunday
School which is slated to com-
mence shortly after Labor Day.
Cantor Julius Rosenstein
Cardiac
National Children's
Home.
Jacobson Will Speak
On Jazz Monday Night
A recorded musical demonstra-
tion and talk on the subject "Jazz
and Modern Society" will be given
by Charles R. Jacobson at the
AVC Freedom House, 4323 Collins
Ave., Monday at 8:30 p.m.
Jacobson will trace the origin
and development of jazz music
and illustrate his lecture with
unusual jazz recordings by top
modern artists. Program is under
the direction of Miss Helen Bar-
clay.
Intermediate Basketball
A three-man summer basketball
league for intermediates (boys up
to, but not including, 15 years of
age) has been formed at the Mi-
ami Y. Games will be played
each Tuesday and Thursday after-
noon at 4 o'clock at the Y build-
ing, 450 S.W. 16th Ave.
A double round-robin tourna-
ment has been organized for four
participating teams, which in-
clude: Haganahs captained by
Gordon "Boopsy" Miller; Macca-
bees, by Bob Fisher; Bialiks, by
Leonard Booth; Hobohnims, by
"Gremlin" Mendel.
News Brief
Mrs. "T," formerly of the Flor-
idian Beauty Salon, Baltimore, is
now located at Harold's Beauty
Salon, 1039 Lincoln Road.
Iluty On Parcels
To Israel Is Set
As of last week, duty on all
standard food parcels sent to Is-
rael must be prepaid in the U.S.,
and such parcels can be mailed
only through authorized agencies,
according to an announcement by
the Consulate General of Israel,
11 East 70th St., New York City.
The duty on these parcles
amounts to 30 mils per kilogram,
that is, about four cents per
pound, and will be collected by
authorized agencies, a list of
which may be obtained at the
consulate. No more than one par-
cel may be sent to any one person
within one month.
Self-packed food parcels, which
do not conform to the regulations
for standard parcels, will be
limited to 2 kilograms (4.4
pounds). The duty on such parcels
amounts to 40 mils per kilogram,
that is about 5> cents per pound
and must be paid in Israel by the
recipient. No more than two par-
cels may be sent to any one family
in one month. ^^^^
Breakfast Will
Honor Gannes
A community-wide breakfast in
honor of the departing executive
director of the Bureau of Jewish
Education, A. P. Gannes, who
will leave to assume the post of
executive director of the Phila-
delphia Council on Jewish Educa-
tion September 1, is slated for
Sunday, August 21, at 9:45 a.m.
at the Hyde Park Hotel, Miami
Beach. ,
Eli Hurwitz heads the commit-
tee in charge. Assisting him arc-
Mrs. Matilda Ratner, Mrs. Jack
Rosenberg, Mrs. Milton Sachs and
Max Meisel. ,
Reservations may be made oy
calling 3-5858.
GORDON ROOFING AND
SHEET METAL WORKS
Hava your roof rapalrad now; you
will aava on a now roof latar
"Satiofaotory Work by
Exparlanead Man"
414 a. w. 82nd Avanua
PHONE 4-6M0
OCULIST'S
PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED
LENSES AND FRAMES
DUPLICATED
LARGE SELECTION IN
LATEST STYLES
Beach Optical
Service
350 Lincoln Road
Suit* 502 Phone 5-5419
AUTO GLASS
Installed While You Wait
Full Line of
Auto Accessories and Paris
ADAMS GLASS
SERVICE
1805 Purdy Avenue
Call 58-3756 or 5-4316
Complete ml beptndaUe 5We <&***
MIAMI TITLC
* Gkttact Co.
24 YEARS OF TITLE SERVICE IN DADE COUNTY
ESCROWS ABSTRACTS TITLE INSURANCE!
Title Iniuranc* Policies of
Kansas CUT Till* Insurance Co.
Assets Over $2,000,000.00
104 N.E. FIRST STREET
TELEPHONE 3-6661
Llfa Inaurance Eatataa
Authoritatively Programmed
NAT GANS
Metropolitan Llfa Ina. Co.
907 Blacayne BldQ.
Ph. 3 4616 or 4-0981
Baa or phona ma for your
LIFE INSURANCE NEEDS
Yiddish Classical Hour
WINZ
(940 on Your Dial)
EVERY SUNDAY
12:00 Noon to 1:30 P. M.
EVERY TUESDAY
8:00 to 7:00 P. M.
A Variety oi Stars in the
Latest Recording* Available
CLASSICALLITURGICAL
AND FOLK MUSIC
Listen to our New Feature
"JEWISH HUMOR"
M. Naaetir. Program Director
Spend Your
SUMMER VACATION
at the
De Soto Hotel and Health Resort
SAFETY HARBOR, FLORIDA
Rest and relax at one of the West Coast's finest
hotels. Spring Vacation rates of $8 per day. American
Plan, effective now.
TELEPHONE: CLEARWATEH. FLA- 2587_____


I*
'


'
PAGE TWELVE
Vatican Paper Charges U. S. Supports
Jerusalem Solution Opposed To Church
ROME. (JTA)Charges that-
the United States supports a point
of view exactlv the opposite of
the Vatican's at current Lausaur.e
discussions on the fate of Jeru-
salem appeared this week in a
front page editorial in "11 Quoti-
diano." a newspaper which often
serves as a medium for semi-
official Vatican statements.
The editorial charged that
American representatives at
Lausanne were opposing Vatican
proposals for the Internationaliza-
tion of Jerusalem on the ground
that an autonomous Jerusalem
would not be economically viable
The paper dismissed, along with
this contention, the idea reported
as prevalent in Lausanne, that
United States opposition was
motivated by fear of Russian in
tervention. It stated that de
the United States stand the forth-
coming session of the General As-
sembly would not be without
echoes of Christian aspirations
Fraternity To Meet
Nu Beta Epsilon. honorary legal
fraternity, will hold a ioint meet-
ing of University of Miami under-
graduates and alumni as well as
members from other schools Wed-
nesday night at 8:15 at the Hyde
Park "Hotel. Miami Beach, accord-
ing to ar. announcement by Harry
Smith, president.
Plans for the national conven-
tion to be held here in December
will be discussed.______________
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICK is HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersiKi leslrln* to ena
oils name Of
] >ad- IVa ; -N ,u -;
River I" -. M ''' Intends
in register said name with tin i
of the Circuit C I Dade County.
Fli : ;0a.
DAVID POTTA8H
KLRY STONE
Congri t Bldg Miami
Attorney for Applicant
> 12-19-2S : --'
Scrolls To Israel
WARSAW. iJTAi-The Jewish
Religious Congregation o: Poland
has received government pi i
sion to ship 34 crates of torn an..
damaged Scrolls to Israel
they will be repaired and do
to new communities and > I
ments. The organization has
readv shipped 60 crates of similar
mate'rial to Israel.
Towns In Turkey
Art? Without Jews
ISTANBUL. (JTA>The two
southeastern Turkish towns
Marash and Diarbakir were re-
ported this week as being com-
pletely without Jews foil
the departure of 3u0 Jews :
there for Israel. Almost all
small Jewish communities of I
Law To Aid >""
Victims Appraved
WASHINGTON. JTA

FRIDAY. AUGUST 12,
Rabbi Raab Resigns From Temple Isaiah
Pulpit, Will Work For Ph. D. Degree
(Continued fro mPage 1)
B, A. at Brooklyn
College and was ordained at He-
brew Union College in Cincinnati
ne worked for a Master
0f Hebrew Letters degree.
Rabbi Raab is a ^"^ffiJE!
"' directors of the MiarrU
V Miami Beach Zionist
.. southeastern region ol
known for having
tation of
- nferei | '
to the
State Deparl
V. N
tmneligil

-
smau jewsr. commu.n^,
area are reported as having been
completely liquidated.
These Jewish cor. mil
which were considered the most .
uccessful Youth
. Leadership Training
iKmi Beach. The rabbi
hairman of the committee for
I brotherhood ol the Miami Beach
^CTreate"!
W
ancient in Turkey, were
pletely isolated from the
and from Turkish Jewry. ".
had no link with Judaism other
than religion and Hebrew tr
tions. which differ from th<
the Sephardic Jews living ::.
country. ____
Commitl
ish orgai
: | ki : '
la and the Greater
R inical Associations.
.\. lecturer for the Jewish
Ch itauqua Society, an organiza-
hich sends rabbis to college
throughout the country,
Raab spoke at Bethune-
man College in Daytona
and the West Palm Beach
Junior College. A member of the
Central Conference of American
, has broadcast weekly
. Saturdays at 9:15 a.m. over
,n WINZ on "The Living
program for the pa^t
Perlmutter praised "the efforts,
Arabs Bar Jews
From Wailing Wall
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN Tin: COVSTY JUDGE'S COI I
UN Urges All Governments To Study
Pact On Missing Nazi Victims
GENEVA. (JTA)A resolution"'
IN AND FOR I'ADE tui'NTi. requesting the L.N. Seen.'.
FLORIDA. in PROBATE. ^*-1 General to transmit immediateb
1: ': !:s ":v'','-';PP ito all governments the drafi oi
K. Ian international convention ui
To All Credit is and Hav- which missir.g Nazi and war vie-
....; A" n8t tims would be declare
Y u. and dead was adopted here I
esent any bv a special committee of the U N.
nave^a&M Social and Economic C. u:
.f in.iis ki.kin d<.....ed which began consideration o
1" l, !
laic : Ili '
Hi n W F BLA.N VI '.V -
, f 11 I file thi same
In hi- ".- el i Cou thouse
,n Pade i Florida Ithin tight
... m the date of the
first i 8 .i'i clalmi
or den mils to ntaln the legal a>i-
ili.*.- ol and to be sworn
.... | presented tforesal
win be be red Bet Section 120 of
te Act
Date August 11. AD. I49
RAYMOND EI.KlN,
As it f the 1 .-'ate of
JULIO ELKIN, Deceased
DE COS* ER .v FD >YI
607-8 Blscayni
Mian I -
Att" Ili
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE TO APOFAR
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THI
JERUSALEM, (JTA) Despite
isi s by Ui ited Nations per-
lh( Arabs in control
,f thi Old Citv of Jerusalem
would make arrangements for
.1, v be admitted to the Holy
Places there nut a single Jew
itted to visit the Wailing
Wall t: is week, on the eve of
B iv In pre-war years
i : Jews from all over
the com.try flocked to the Wail-
the Lamenta-
destruction of
. jmple.
n thai Meanwhile, the Arab authori-
Rabbi David Raab
the interest and the sincerity ol
Rabbi Raab during the trying
times of the founding of the
temple."
The congregation moved the
site of their services from 4925
Collins Ave.. Miami Beach, last
winter after legal difficulties ini-
tiated by a neighbor.
Perlmutter announced that the
resignation was accepted bv the
directors Sunday "with deepest
regrets." He said that the c,
operation of the Hebrew Union
College will be sought in securinj
a rabbi to serve during the H:g-
Holy Days and in engaging i
permanent rabbi for the congrega-
tion.
the country flocke
, ing Wall to recite
Th< introduced ng marking the
he ancient Tt mpl
n thai Meanwhile, the .
nsidera- ties of the Old City have changed
lion t of the pact \. it! the name of the Jewish quarter
that I there to the MouidinFighters
I quarter. Jews in this city, barred
fron the Wailing Wall, have as-
F i inbled in dimly-lit synagogues
len tional to recite the Lamentations. Many
part. I i I only en American visitors attended the
v
ALEXANDER KOGAN
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THE COUNTY JITXJES Ci lURT
IN AND FOR HADE COUNTY,
Fl.oRII'A. IN PROBATE, No.
22742.
In Re i.-i ATE i >F
JACOB MINOWITZ,
I > .
To All i 'redlti an I All P( rsons Hav.
Ing (".., .:-. ..;!'. ,:..'.- A-.u.. |
Estate:
V. I, u, a:-e hereby
I .'!..' ... ilred t, present any
i laims and
elthi have acain-t the
estate of JACOB MINOWITZ de-
i sed lati I d< Counts
the H W F BLANTON, rou
.'? Ol Dadi County, and file the
fire In the ''
.- .. Da : County, Fl
within eisV calendar months from
the date of thi tion here-
nf. Said li ;- on*
tain 11 .;,!... of the claimant
and to be sworn t" an>i presented as
same will he barred. Her
Bectlon 120 of the 1933 Probate Act.
iMte A :c:is- 11. A.D. 1949
BERTHA MINOWITZ.
A- Exe trlx I thi Laal Will and
Testament of JACOB MINOWITZ,
Deceased
THEODORE I RAKOWITZ
Attorney for Exi it ix
f 12-19-26 : .
W^f^hII^LV li,-' rtaim eryl
per-1 All employees of the Israeli
legal government who are observing
the Tish;i B'av by fasting have of-
U.N ficially beer, excused from work
T Knesset began meeting earl-
tivi Dr. M. K with the Speaker reciting
" ed verses from the Prophet Za-
' rias Throughout the major
Citi. of the land public places
:, hereby required file have been closed down and the
svnas igues are crowded.
ore September 12th, 1949 ----------------------
OF FleORIDA IN AND Fi
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY. No
12*371,
MARY TIP 'Ml si >N i'i.a i l"Y. I
tiff, vs EDWARD BLA'
fendant,
EDWARD BI.ATTY
No "-' I' int Street N E .
Washington '. C
YOU ARE HEREBY SOT
that a bill of oi ; lali t for ai
hat
pea
fore .
the allegations of si
.<< c< :.:' -> '
I ted at Miami. Fli I Id I
day of An^-
E B LEATHKR.MAN.
i '! 'k of Cll CUlt I '
ill i". : Seal)
By WM W. BTOCKIN'i,
De] it;
MARX KABER
Solicitor for riaintiff
412 Congress Building
Miami, Florida
J'12-19-26 9/2
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE !.-' HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desirlnc to engage in
business under th- fictitious nami ol
BEACH TOTQERY SHOP at number
Avenue In the C'ltv ol
Beach, 1 k Ida, nt< nds t ev
Isti th< said nami i -.: oi
the Circuit Court of Dade Countv,
Florida,
ISIDORE ARmNOVITZ
ARONOVITZ, WEINKUE &
ARi 'NOVITZ
"I- Seybold Building
Miami. Fia
8/12-19-26 ;'-;i
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT "F I'm:
11th JUDICIAL '"IRiTIT IN AMI
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
IN CHANCERY, No :.' :
RENETTE ISRAEL DAVIH, I.
tiff, vs. DAVID : DAVID, Ui
fendant.
THE STATE OF KI.'!'. I PA:
TO: DAVID G. L-AV1U
1ST E. 2'th Street
New York. New Yoah
You are hereby rei| your
api.earan. e to Plainti" I
plaint for Divorce filed against
In the above-styled cause <>n
fore the nth day of September, i
otherwise tl i alii -. ns of
will be taken as confi
DATED at Mian I, F
day '( August. 1949
E R LEATHERMAN.
Cli rk of Circuit I
(Circuit i "our! Beal i
By C. E BOLAND,
I ll put! '
SAM S-ILVER
1703 Congress Building
Miami. Florida
Notice .
undersigned.
hereby given that the
.......-Ifc.:.--.,. desiring to '-ngage in
business under the fictitious name of
THE Rl'.-HBROOK CO. at N. W
22nd Street and l"th Avenue, Miami
Dade County. Florida, intends to reg-
im. r said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Floi Ida
NAT ROTTENBERO
J. H. LESSER
Attorney at Law
West Talm Beach. Fia
v 12-19-26 9/2-9
I "he
poir.l
ested cor.i lusion of
un internal entioi
' surviving
.... .
Isi Dr. Ju ;: S
preser.tativi f Polai
' tions
tted by t.
tee on tl ...
ntii .
nomii S I C ncil.
Truman Distressed By
Senate's Failure To Act
On Liberal DP Law
WASHINGTON, \ ; .,-'
dent Truman is
at Senate I el t on the
pproved d r
>"ns bill Rep I
New v rk said this week fllow-
Wl it. II .
Celler
Kosher Killed
Chlekens
TENNESSEE
POULTRY <& EGG CO.
WEDS. A.M. THURS. A.M.
Phones 9-2585 9-7981
1340 S.W. 8th St.
Prominently identified with M
furs here and in the East, says-
FARR and I are kindred spins
-the finest in furs- the fin travel. That's why I've adopted
FARR as my travel specialist.
I A IIII -your TroWl Agent-
- -. .., ii
' i Presidei I
mm that he was rininj; "every-
thinc possible" to get tl
non out of the Sennte Judi
Committee where Sen. Pal
has it bottled tip
Seymour Satin
Certified Public Accountant
will continue to practice with offices at
420 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, Florida
and announces the dissolution of
Seymour Satin and Company
R-?aZ3^&?^
^m ^^^h -!**.


Friday, august 12, 1949
+Jenisl IkridHar
PAGE THIRTEEN
lerusalem Building
'rogram Planned
JERUSALEM, (JTA)Plans for
khe construction of a government
building in Jerusalem's northern
buburb of Sheikh Bader were
jiade known this week by a group
M building experts who will sup-
ervise the project. The Jewish
National Fund has reserved a site
i>f several hundred dunams of
land in the area for the erection
bf Israel's government seat, which
/ill include the most modern
jrchitectural and building de-
yelopmnets. Construction is ex-
pected to begin as soon as the
late of Jerusalem is decided by
|he United Nations.
The site of the projected build-
ings will be adjacent -to the
memorial park where the remains
jf Theodor Herzl will be reburied
xt week. The proposed edifice
lo be set up for the use of future
ft'orld Zionist Congress sessions
Is also expected to be located in
\\w same area.
A cornerstone of a school build-
ing and vocational center spon-
sored by the Mizrachi Women's
Organization of America was laid
|n Kfur Batia, the organization's
fchildren's village at Raanana. The
School will be named for the late
fc-orld Mizrachi leader, Rabbi
Jeir Bar-Ilan. Approximately 400
Jewish children from northern
Israel will attend the school. Mrs.
Jeborah Rabinowitz, president of
he Mizrachi Women who at-
ended the ceremonies, said that
tier organization now maintain.-
lint' institutions in the Jewish
Bate, caring for more than 1,000
Children, The Mizrachi Woman's
annual budget exceeds $1,500,000
khe added.
Construction of a Yeshivat
Dublin in the settlement of Zich-
on Meir to accomodate 200 stu-
jrr.ts was announced by Rabbi
lordecai Hershberg, president of
|he Organization of Yeshivot of
Jhachamei Lublin of the U.S.
ir.d Canada. Fifty Lublin stu-
dents will proceed to Israel soon
pom the U.S. to take up residence j
at the new yeshivah, he added. -\
Israel Will I\'ot
Publish Whit<
look on ic'iFmfeefl
TEL AVIV, (JTA)-The Israeli
government has reversed its de-
cision to publish an official White
Book on the Arab refugee ques-
tion, it was learned here this
week. The decision was reversed
because the White Book would
have explained in detail why the
government opposed the large-
scale readmission of Arab refu-
gees, a policy to which the gov-
er2.ment is no ,onger committed.
The document, largely based on
the former Mandatory Govern-
ment's statements, would have
attempted to outline Israel's con-
tribution to the economic and
political stabilization of the status
of the Palestine Arabsa con-
tribution greater than that of any
of the Arab states. The document
would also have pointed out that
Israel has already allowed to
enter, or would accept under the
plan for reuniting disrupted Arab
families, a good-sized proportion
of the Arabs who originally lived
in what is now Israeli territory.
Youth Group
Launches Drive
For MeiiilMi*s
The Young People's League of
Temple Isaiah, a social, cultural
and religious organization found-
ed by Rabbi David Raab, has em-
barked on a membership cam-
paign, according to an announce-
ment by Evelyn Ell, acting presi-
dent. A tentative goal of 500
members by the end of this year
has been set.
All members of the group are
urged to invite friends to the next
general meeting which is slated
for Sunday, August 21, at 8 p.m.
in the organization's club room
at Temple Isaiah, 1065 Dade Blvd.,
Miami Beach.
Additional information about
the group may be secured from
Sy Lippman, 1349 S.W. 7th St.,
9-7934, or Miss Ell, 334 N.E. 55th
Terr., 7-1480.
Suspects Arrested In Bombing Of
Syrian Synagogue; 7 Killed, 27 Hurt
B'nai B'rith Women of West Palm Beach present a check for S300 to support Refugee Scholar-
ship Fund at the University of Florida Hillel Foundation in Gainesville. In photo are (1. to r.) Mrs.
M. Kalmulz, co-chairman of Hillel committee; Mrs. Jack Wilson, president West Palm Beach chapter;
Mrs. Albert Moss, deputy. District Grand Lodge No. 5; and Mrs. Irving Kapner. Hillel chairman. Mrs.
Moss received the check from Mrs. Wilson on behalf of the District Hillel Fund.
LONDON, (JTA)A number of
fcuspeota have been arrested in an
all-out hunt order by the Syrian
Iguvi-i nment for perpetrators of
he bombing of a synagogue in
Damascus this week which took
Ithe lives of seven Jews and in-
jured twenty-seven others, Reut-
ri'ported here. Syrian Presi-
|d Ipatch added, has ordered an in-
[tensive police search. Hospitals
Ito which the injured were rushed
Kvere commanded to give the vic-
2 FAMOUS NAMES
FEATURED BY
WOLPERT'S

Living Room Furniture
and
GENERAL % ELECTRIC
Appliances
UlolfxeAt
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1200 Corel Way
tims the best attention and diet
available.
Premier Mohsen el Barazi, who
visited the scene of the explosion,
which took place in the courtyard
of the synagogue, visited the hos-
pitalized victims to see that they
were properly cared for. He stated
to a representative of the United
States Legation at Damascus that
the bombing was an attack on
the authority of the government
and an affront to its prestige. He
asserted that every means was
being employed to discover the
criminals responsible and bring
them to trial.
The explosion occurred when a
bomb, apparently homemade, was
thrown into the entrance of the
synagogue just as preparations
were being made for the Sabbath
services. Eye-witnesses to the ex-
plosion said that the bombing had
been the work of three men who
were seen fleeing immediately
after the bomb went off. The wit-
nesses asserted that they would
be able to recognize one or more
of the men.
In the explosion the building
was considerably damaged and
windows of other buildings in the
vicinity were shattered. After the
explosion, bereaved women
searched the debris for members
of their families, while police and
ambulances blocked the streets
around the scene.
Anti-Semitism Flares
Up In Argentinian City
BUENOS AIRES, (JTA)A re-
port of renewed anti-Semitic ag-
itation in Rosario, second largest
city in Argentina, was published
'this week in "Di Yiddishe Zei-
jtung," a daily Jewish newspare.
The paper said that anti-Jewish
inscriptions appeared on buildings
of the city's principal thorough-
fares.
The Zeitung urged the DAIA,
central representative body of
Argentine Jewry, to intervene
with authorities in Rosario to put
an end to the anti-Semitic agita-
tion. The newspaper also appealed
to the Rosario police chief, Dr.
L. Pesenti, to halt the anti-Jew-
ish outbursts, and noted that Dr.
Pesenti "is known as a good demo-
crat who certainly cannot wish
that anti-Jewish insults should be
written'on the streets of his city."
UN Conciliation Commission Deadlocked
Over Recommendations For Jerusalem
Rabbi Jacobs To Be
Speaker At Isaiah
Rabbi Pizer Jacobs of the He-
brew Union College of Cincinnati
will conduct services and be guest
speaker at Temple Isaiah tonight
at 8:15.
Rabbi Jacobs, who has been in
the ministry for the past 30 years,
graduated from Hebrew Union
College with top honors in ora-
tory.
Israeli Official
To Visit Moscow
LONDON, (JTA)Reuters re-
ported from Tel Aviv this week
that an Israeli Foreign Ministry
spokesman had announced that
Dr. Shirouel Elyashiv, head of
the Eastern European Section of
the Ministry, is leaving this week
for Moscow and other Eastern
European capitals to inspect lega-
tions there and "tighten the
friendlv relations between Israel
and the countries of Eastern
Europe."
But usually well-informed
sources said that the object of
Dr. Elyashiv's mission is princi-
Dally to assure Russia that there
is no change in Israel's strict neu-
trality in the struggle between
East and West. It was also be-
lieved that he would attempt to
obtain the lifting of the virtual
ban imposed in Rumania and
Hungary on the emigration of
Jews to Israel, Reuters added.
It was once believed that the
king's touch could cure certain
forms of tuberculosis, according
to the Encyclopaedia Britannica.
BUGGER'S FOOD MARKET
1430 WASHINGTON AVE., MIAMI BEACH
A Complete Line of
KOSHER MEATS & POULTRY
PHONE 58-3118
FOR FREE DELIVERY
LAUSANNE, (JTA) The
United Nations Conciliation Com-
mission is finding itself increas-
ingly deadlocked over recom-
mending the future status of
Jerusalem to the General Assem-
bly, which opens its meetings in
New York next month.
It has been hoped that this
would be the least difficult prob-
lem of all, and members of the
commission had expected to be
able to present the General As-
sembly with a workable solution.
But experts here this week, pri-
marily concerned with the Jeru-
salem problem, consider that it
may be the last of the Palestine
issues to be solved.
The trouble that has arisen over
the issue is simple enough: the
commission members have found
that there exists complete incom-
patibility between the demands
of Israel and Transjordan, on one
side, and on the other those of
the major powers and the remain-
ing Arab states. Two alternative
positions have been advanced by
these groups. One, partition of
Jerusalem between Israel and
Transjordan, which is supported
by those two states; and, second,
the long-standing proposal to in-
ternationalize the entire city of
Jerusalem, which was proposed
by the great powers and all the
Arab states except Transjordan
and, additionally, the Vatican.
For some time, it has been
known that the experts drafting
the Jerusalem statute considered
partition the only practical solu-
tion, but they now find them-
selves faced by almost insur-
mountable difficulties. They have
been given to understand that so
much opposition will be met in
the United Nations and the neigh-
boring Arab states that it would
stand no chance of acceptance by
the General Assembly this stage.
Meanwhile, another problem
arose. Members of the commis-
sion had to consider the future
prospect of the Kingdom of
Transjordan and of Arab Pales-
tine, and of either becoming a de
facto guardian of the Old Citv of
Jerusalem.
The commission has ruled out
the prospect of a really inde-
pendent Arab Palestine. It is as-
sumed for the time being the
Arab Palestine will become part
of the Hashemite Kingdom of
Transjordan. But commission
members are not certain over its
future.
The position of Transjordan. in
the view of the commission, is
based almost entirely on the per-
son of King Abdullah. No one
here is willing to forecast what
will happen when the question of
his succession arises. Almost all
observers, however, are agreed
that there will not be mainten-
ance of the status quo.
Communities Raise
Less Than In 1948
(Continued from Page 1)
effective last year, was missing in
the current effort. "The emotional
appeal was considerably weaker,"
many communities reported.
3. Some campaigns were hit
hard by poor collection records
of the previous year's pledges;
givers who had outstanding bal-
ances on 1948 pledges were less
favorable prospective givers.
4. Independent capital funds
campaigns, in some instances,
were harmful to the welfare fund
campaign since the timing was
badlarge fund-raising came di-
rectly before or after the central
campign.
5. The internal conflicts in na-
tional agencies, preceding the
setting of the national U.J.A. cam-
paign, affected the local efforts to
some extent.
RABBI PIZER W. JACOBS
of the Hebrew Union College oi Cincinnati
Will conduct the services and deliver the sermon at
TEMPLE ISAIAH
The Reform Jewish Congregation oi Miami Beach
1065 DADE BOULEVARD
FRIDAY (TONIGHT) AT 8:15 P. M.
Public Invited

'



'
1


v

PAGE FOURTEEN
*jistfkrtf.
kMU(l( y
f,VES CF OUR TjMES
Chi OfTM WOHD'5 fOMMOST tltUCU
: ...\L0i0n.STj AND OOTSTAM0IN6 AU-
THORITIES ON ANCIENT PALESTINE
FRIDAY, AUGUST 12,
CtO BV NORMAN SOU NODtt.
Tt'T EV LAUS.A G SHAftflx
CfiVEO HIS AM
EPUCATtO IN VARlOijrTESHIVQTH IN
loUNOJWH!HtWASMRNlNW,Hl
MOVED TO PALESTINE PUWN6THt!A-ir
PIONEERING DATS OF 1912.
FOR A TIME HE ENGAGED IH EDUCATIONAL
WORK IN ((HALF Of THE ZIONIST ORGANIZATION
IN PALESTINE.LATER HE BECAME FIELD ARCHAE-
OLOGIST FOR HEBREW UNIVERSITY.
HE HAS CONDUCTED EXCAVATIONS ON THE
"THIRD WALL'OF JERUSALEM,AND IN THE
ANCIENT SYNAGOGUE ON THE CREEK ISLAND
OF ALGINA.HL HAS DISCOVERED MANY AMTIQUI
fR0fSUKENm--WH0 IS THE FATHER
OF ISRAELI ARMY OPERATIONS CHIEF COL
^ALYADIN-WAS RECENTLY RKEI ED
RY POPE PIUS WHO EXPRESSED DEEP
NTEREST IN THE ISAIAH MANUSCRIPT.
/^yf7 (v^J
HE RECENTLY CAME ACROSS AN ANCIENT
MANUSCRIPT WHICH IS ATTRIBUTED TO THE
PROfHET ISAIAH.TNIS DISCOVERY i5 CONSiDER-
ED A 5RET tiNDMAU IN lUCAl 5OI01WSH
AN ARCHAEOLOGIST WHOSE FINDINGS ARE
BOUND TO LEAD TO THE SHEDDING OF MORE
LIGHT ON ANCIENT JEWISH HISTORY.......
sssft
,i,.n-. im.jii TCLioAfMie AeiNcr
Melvyn Douglas To
Star In Radio Play
Melvyn Dougla?. noted stage
and screen actor, stars in the
radio drama. "Mv Little Boy."
latest episode in the new series.
"Lest We ForgetStories To Re-
member." to be broadcast to-
morrow at 6 D.m. over station
WVCG. Coral Gables.
Participants in the fifteen-min-
ute live par.el discussion to follow
the broadcast will include: Pro-
fessor Ross Beiler. department of
government. University if Miami,
who will serve as moderator: Dr.
Granville Fisher, department of
psychology, University of Miami:
and Mr. a: d Mrs. Ben Essen, Coral
Gables
"My Little Boy" is produced
bv the Institute for Democratic
Education, and describes how a
father .inoculates hl= sor. against
prejudices so that he and others
can embark on a decent, happy
life. The original story of "My
Little Boy" was written by Carl
Ewald and appeared in the Woll-
cott Reader.
"Stones To Ren the
12th "Let We Forget" series of
transcribed dramatic programs, is
devoted to problems of intergroup
tensions in the United States as
viewed by outstanding writers.
Sharet Chapter To Hold
Meeting, Kiddie Party
Next meeting of the Sharet
Chapter. B"nai B'rith Young
Women, will be held at the home
of Mrs. Ruth Levick, 123 Zamora
Ave.. Coral Gables, on Tuesday
evening at 8:30.
The meeting will be followed
by a kiddie party at which all
members will come dressed in
children's clothes.
Local Firm Makes
Jewelry Cleaner
A new fast-acting liquid
ry cleaner has been placed on
the market by the "' '
Chemical Company, a Gi
Miami firm.
The clear liquid cli
as Dip. is as safe to use
, hold cleanser, act Jrding I
'announcement by .".-
! urers.
The product is simple and
i to use. You take your je
' dip it for a second in the solu-
tion, place it under tap wati I
wipe off with a tov I
; The jewelry is as bright
clean as new!
The solution is a I to eyi
i glass-wearers, too. : nol
cleans the lens, but is
;safe for all cellulbid parts
dissolves corrosion that gel
; the hinges in this clin
At the present tin
facturers are bottling the cleaner
I in one size onlyfor ji
cleaning. Since it cleans si
ware with speed and i
ever, the company plan.- to put
it out in a dip bottle la. -
to dip flat silver.
One of the remarkable quali-
ties of the product, the manu-
facturers report, is that it does not
lose its potency and maj
over and over again indefinitely.
Inasmuch as the cleaner dissolve-
all oxidation and tarnisl without
taking off any of the platinc :
the silver or gold, there is no
need for rubbing.
Nursery Playground Will
Be Carnival Feature
A : nival
I to b( -; nsored tl Bet.-.
I at tl I
) .. Synagogue,
s W Ird 26th and
271 : I be 1
parent! may
fry, Mrs. H
presidi nt, announced.
Sun-
t 2 p m.
enterl ni

fa com-
y Mrs Bernard
S
Si that I
I ,
ted.
Beth El Games Party
Mrs. Adoipr. Gieenberg wi
hostess at a games party to
held Wednesday at 1 p.m. ..'
Beth El Center, 500 S.W. 17th
Ave. Assisting Mrs. Green
will be Mrs. Samuel Wil
Refreshments will be served.
Proceeds will go to Beth El
Talmud Torah.
Beach A JC To
S in mi sod- I'artv
rhe Mi i apter of
A Congri -- will
er di
card partj I Atlantis Rool
V Miami
Bi "'" p.m.
Ml .! Janofl chairman
:' tl with Mrs. Manu< l
m s-
ing on the committee are the
Giazi Mae
Dolly Hersh, M
: Sil-
n. Matthew Silverstein,
and Morris
Young Adults To
Hear Dr. Finer
Dr. Herman Finer, eminent
political scientist of the Universi-
ty of Chicago, will speak on the
subject "The Next Ten Years:
Peace or War?" before the Miami
Beach YM & WHA Young Adult
Planning Committee at Temple
Beth Sholom. Sunday at 8:30 p.m.
Dr. Finer, who recently gave
the commencement address at the
University of Miami's graduation
ceremonies, has been a faculty
member of the London School of
Economics and Political Science
and has served in high adminis-
trative and advisory positions
with the United Nations, the Brit-
ish and the United States govern-
: ei i- He is also a prolific writer.
Among his better known works
aii The Road to Reaction,"
"America's Destiny." and "The
Theory and Practice of Modern
Government "
A social period will follow the
discussion. The meeting is open
to all young adults of the com-
munity.
Top Price Paid for
MEN'S USED CLOTHING
AL'S
432 N. MIAMI AVE.
Phone 2-3213
JEWISH
CUISINE
LUNCHEON
SPECIALS
S A N D W ICHES
SOUR CREAM WITH
COTTAGE CHEESE
SOUR CREAM WITH
VEGETABLES
Air-Conditioned
Mezzanine Floor
Tin: SHOW PLACE OF THE CAROLINAS
LAKESIDE IM N
On Lak Osceola In The Blue Ridge Mountains
COOL COOL
You'll use blankets every night
EVERY ROOM PRIVATE BATH EXCELLENT FOOD
Swimming, Boating. Fishing, Golf, Riding Scenic Tours. Social Director
Write or wire for Reservations
Dick Sachsel, Mgr. Hendersonville, N. C.
Beth David Sisterhood
Board Meeting Slated
:. d ul the
I is slated
for Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. at
Beth David Talmud rorah,
- to an announcement by
Mrs. Harry Gordon, president.
Plans for the carnival to be
sponsored by the croup on August
28 will :' discussed. All board
members are urged tu be presi nt.
The Showcase of Good Food
The GOVERNOR
CAFETERIA
1225 WASHINGTON AVE. MIAMI BEACH
The GREATER MIAMI VAAD HAKASHRUTH
The Only Community-Wide Kashruth Association
Participating agency of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation,
announces that any chickens without the ring which bears the
insignia (1*183 are not endorsed by the Vaad- Other
information in the field of Kashruth in this araa may be ob-
tained by callinq our Director. Rabbi Joseph E, Rackovsky,
818 Michigan Avenue, Miami Beach, Phone 5-3595.
Miami Beach, Phone 5-3595.
HARRY SIRKIN. Pres. H. SOOTIN, Secv
A. M. BEAR. Vice Pre.. S. LOBELVw
LISTEN TO THE
Jewish
Musical Hour
WTTT1490 on Your
Dial
JACOB SCHACHTER
Director
NORMAN R. LYONS
Newscaster and Historical
Narrator
NOW FOUR TIMES A WEEK
SUNDAY FROM 10 A.M.
TO 11 AM.
MONDAY, WEDNESDAY
AND FRIDAY FROM
1 P.M. TO 1:30 P.M.
MOUNT NEB0 CEMETERY
Offers to
DISCRIMINATING FAMILIES
A 5-POINT PURCHASE PLAN
Wise Counseling Beautiful Landscaping
Perpetual Care Pr-Need Budget Pi*0
Special Protective Features
Ideally Located Near West Flagler at 53rd AvenJ*
General OfficeOlympia Bldfl. For Information Phone 3-3
RABBI S. M. MACHTEI. Exec Vice-President
ROBERT YAFFEY. Sates Director


lY, AUGUST 12. 1949
-Jewish ncrkilan
PAGE FIFTEEN
Warns U.N. Security Council
iinst Encouraging Armaments Race
IKE SUCCESS, (JTA)Israel's representative to the U.N.
eek warned the Security Council against makinq a de-
which would expose the entire Middle East to an un-
armaments race.
saking before the council on the recommendation by
Irnediator Dr. Ralph
RELIGIOUS DIRECTORY
.7.
that the functions of the
jr be terminated, Mr. Eban
je council that an arma-
Irace would not benefit the
Vatic institutions nor the
hv of that region. However,
a race takes place, he
that "Israel will not allow
be overtaken." He agreed
fe acting mediator that the
[regime in Palestine has
Replaced by the armistice
lents. He suggested, how-
fhat the council would do
issue "a clear moral di-
against a Middle East
em competition. Mr. Eban
Id the council that the time
me for lifting all other
al restrictions imposed
heKitimate commerce and
Eg. I have in mind the
of seizing cargoes of
commodities passing
Suez on their way to Is-
korts," he added.
Israeli representative called
Jention of the council to at
tie provision in the armis-
jreement with Transjordan
[has not been implemented.
ecifically referred to the
|at up to this date there is
free traffic on the vital
Jerusalem road, and the
at no progress has been
Ed in the resumption of
operations of the Hebrew
|sity and the Hadassah
_ Center on Mount Scopus.
jned the Transjordanian in-
leance for this condition.
Security Council session
with a statement by
representative Jean Chau-
jo said the council faces a
of terminating the truce.
rench position, he said, is
Ihc armistice agreements
cpluced it, and that the
nentation of the agreements
I be left to the parties them-
and the mixed armistice
Ksions with a minimum of
'-
news from Lausanne is encour-
aging him to believe that all of
the outstanding obstacles to per-
manent peace, including the refu-
gee problem, "can and will be
overcome."
Mr. Eban devoted much of his
speech to arguing that direct
negotiations between Jews and
Arabs at Lausanne would greatly
speed up the peace. But if the
lengthier procedure followed at
Lausanne prevails, then Israel
can wait "as long as necessary."
he said. He paid tribute to Dr.
Bunche who, he stated, brought
about an end of the military
phase of the Palestine problem
"with tact, skill and tenacious
idealism."
Later, the representatives of the
U.S. and Britain told the Security
Council that they endorsed the
lifting of the arms embargo for
Israel and the Arab countries,
but morally pledged their gov-
ernments not to aid a so-called
armaments race in the Middle
East.
British delegate Sir Terrence
Shone declared that with the
fighting over and a new phase
established for a peaceful Pales-
tine by the armistice agreements
all restrictions posed by the truce
should be lifted. He indicated that
the British government was ready
to resume a supply of arms to
the Arabs in accordance with
standing agreements, but added
that this does not mean that ship-
ment should be made in excess
of requirements for internal se-
curity and national defense. His
government, he said, does not
favor the acquisition of arms ir.
the Middle East in excess of these
legitimate requirements.
U.S. delegate Warren Austin
supported the British stand and
Congregation Beth David (Con-
servative), 13S N.W. Third Are.
Rabbi Max Shapiro; Rev. Maurice
Mamches.
Friday evening gervlcei at 6:10. Sab-
bath morning services at 8:30. Rabbi
Shapiro and Cantor Mamches will of-
rlcate.
Religious Congregation. 4064
N.W. 4th St.
Services Saturday morning at 9:00
o'clock.
Congregation Beth El (Ortho-
dox), 590 S.W. 17th Ave. Rabbi
Murray Grauer, Cantor Milton
Friedman.
Friday evening services 6:30. Sab-
hath morning service at 8:30 a.m.
Har Mllzvah of George Slegel. son
of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Slrgel.
Junior congregation at 10 a.m. Mincha
at 6:30 followed by Shalos Seudos.
Dally services 8 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Temple Emanu-El (Reform),
1801 S. Andrews Ave.. Fort Laud-
erdale. Dr. Marius Ranson, Rabbi.
Friday evening services at 8:00.
Hal.1.1 Ranson will officiate.
Miami Hebrew School and Con-
gregation (Orthodox). 1101 S.W.
12th Ave. Rabbi Simon April.
Cantor Berele Kelemer.
Services Friday evening at 1:10.
Saturday morning at 9 a.m. Rabbi
Samuel Zakutu of rittsburgh will he
guest speaker. Mincha at 6 p.m. fol-
lowed by Shalos Seudos. Rabbi Simon
April will speak on the Portion of the
week. Mlroa at 7:30 p.m. Hebrew
school daily it a.m. to 12 noon. Dally
services at 7:30 p.m. and 645 p.m.
Congregation Beth Jacob (Or-
thodox). 301-311 Washington Are.,
Miami Beach. Rabbi Moses Mes-
cheloff.
Friday evening service at 6:45 p.m.
Sabbath service at 8:30 a.m. Mincha
at 6:45 followed by Shalos Seudos.
Jewish Community Center
(Conservative). 2020 Polk St.,
Hollywood. Rabbi Max Kaufman.
Fridav evening service at 6:30 p.m.
Saturday services at 9:0" a.m. during
summer Anyone wishing a Minyan
for Yahrzelt is asked to call Hyman
Tellman.
Israelite Center (General). 3340
S.W. 24th St.
Dally services at 7 a.m. Friday night
umtvisory machinery. Mr. urged all governments to exercise
restraint in the shipments of arms
in the Middle East in such quanti-
ties as would weaken the newly
established armistice agreements.
An arms race would jeopardize
the armistice and settlement," he
said. "The United States, insofar
as we are concerned, does not
intend to allow the exports of
arms which would permit a com-
petitive arms race in the area."
Commenting on the embargo
aspect of the problem. Dr. Bunche
said he would not like to see an
interruption of the peace in the
Middle East by an armaments
race. But in practice, he said, the
enforcement of the embargo
would entail a topheavy U.N.
observation apparatus. He asked,
however, that arfhs export-
ing countries pledge themselves
not to support a competitive arms
situation. In any event, he said,
if such a race ensued, it would
not proceed without being
brought to the attention of the
council. _
Dr. Bunche accepted a Cana-
dian amendment to his draft
resolution terminating the truce
in which the function of imple-
menting the armistices would re-
vert to the truce supervising or-
ganization instead of the Con-
ciliation Commission.
Canada, the U.S., Britain, Cuba,
China and Egypt joined France
in support of Dr. Bunche s recom-
mendations. The council then ad-
journed until next week.
H disagreed with Dr.
that difficulties arising
| ti.e agreement should be
before the Conciliation
ssion. The hands of the
fcsion. he said, should be left
the pursuit of peace. He
ed. however, that the coun-
juld continue to maintain
jgilance" by retaining the
|ri( ease on its agenda.
brief statement before the
Dr. Bunche said there
doubt that the armistice
lients had rendered "obso-
truce resolution with iti
heritage of restrictions.'
nediator called for the
gtion of restrictions on im-
land immigration. He ad-
free movement for legiti-
|hipping and the removal of
Stiges of the wartime block-
lever, he warned that the
could not at this time
Rely divest itself of its re-
ality in Palestine and sug-
j that it reaffirm the cease-
pneiple by which it would
[its authority in the Middle
H would consider it highly
>le that it should not prc-
ly detach itself completely
Hie situation," he stated.
Junehe suggested that no
lhan 30 to 40 observers be
\d to help the parties under
mistice agreement. These,
, are proving "very ef-
He added that the recent
LISTEN TO THE CULTURAL
JEWISH FORUM RADIO HOUR
EVERY SATURDAY NIGHT
FROM 8 TO 9 P.M.
OVER STATION WWPB
1450 on the Dial
Directed and Announced by
services at 8 p.m. Refreshments will
be served Immediately following the
services. Saturday morning services
at 9 a.m.
Congregation Keneseth Israel
(Orthodox). 1415 Euclid Ave..
Miami Beach.
Friday evening services at 6:30 p.m.
Saturday morning services at > a.m.
Mincha at 6 p.m. followed by Shalos
Seudos.
Temple Beth Sholom (Liberal).
4144 Chase Ave.. Miami Beach.
Rabbi Leon Kronish; Cantor
Samuel Kelemer.
Friday evening summer service at
8:15 p.m.
Coral Gables Jewish Center
(Liberal).
Services discontinued until the tall.
United Jewish Schools, North
Campus, University of Miami.
Discontinued until fall.
Congregation beth Tfilah (Or-
thodox). 935 Euclid Ave.. Miami
Beach. Rabbi Joseph E. Rack-
ovsky.
Friday evening service at 6:45 p.m.
Saturday morning at 8:30 Rabbi
Rackovsky will speak. Saturday at
5:30 p.m. Rabbi Rackovsky will speak
followed by Mincha, Shalos Seudos and
program of Palestinian songs. Maariv
wilr follow. Daily services at 7:30 a.m.
Class In Mlshna will be addressed
by the Rabbi. Services at 7:00 p.m.
followed by a class In Jewish laws
and customs.
Miami Beach Jewish Commun-
ity Center (Conservative). 1701
Washington Ave., Miami Beach.
Rabbi Irving Lehrman, Cantor
Jacob Y. Goldring.
Friday evening service at 6:45. Sat-
urday morning service at 9. Daily
services at 8 a.m. and 6:45 p.m.
Temple Isaiah (Reform), 1065
Dade Blvd.. Miami Beach. Rabbi
David Raab.
Friday evening services at Sir..
Rabbi Raab will conduct the service
and give a book review on "East
River" by Sholem Asch. Mrs. Louis
I.ittman will kindle the Sabbath
lights and recite the blessings. Milton
Tupler will recite the blessings for
Klddush. A reception will follow.
Temple Israel (Reform). 137
N.E. 19th St. Rabbi Colman A
Zwitman; Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan,
Rabbi Emeritus.
Sabbath evening service at 8:15.
Dr. Kaplan will conduct the services.
MIAMI TOP
SOIL CO.
Wholesale and
Retail
Grade A Pulverized and
Processed Muck and Marl
Any Mixture Bitter
Blue Sod
SoU and Fill of Any Kind
Phone 4-0335
1813 S. W. 21st Terrace
EDDIE ALPER
Approved by
GREATER MIAMI VAAD
HAKASHRUS
Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky,
Director
Demand
SINAI
orris
Drotn
ers
Hadassah Unit To
Hold Boat Ride
The Miami Group of Hadassah
will sponsor a boat trip aboard
the Showboat on Sunday evening,
August 28, at 8 p.m. The boat will
leave from the City Yacht Basin,
Pier 7. Music for dancing will be
furnished by the boat's orchestra.
Mrs. Abraham Gold is chair-
man of the affair and reserva-
tions may be made by calling her
at 48-4322.
KOSHER
and
PURE
Distributed by
HI-GRADE
FOOD CO.
1733 N.W. 7th AVE.
PHONE 2-7570. 9-2652
SIMON SEIDEN
ONLY DEPARTMENT STORE ON THE BEACH
1261 Washington Avenue
VISIT OUR BRAND NEW FASHION STORE
68-72 East Flagler Street
n i cc FOR EVERY
aLAii purpose
STORE FRONT PLATE end WINDOW GLASS
Bitur. Tops. Beveled Mirror, end ReeUvering Our Specialty
& G. Glass and Mirror 'vYorks
B6 S.W. 8th SL PHONE 3-4334
lORRJS ORLIN L.OUIS GERBER
I WANT MY MILK
Estab.
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And Be Sure It's
FLORIDA
DAIRIES
HOMOGENIZED
Vitamin "D" Milk
"Milk Product."
Dacro Protected
TEW.. 2-2621
Greater Miami Delivery
VUit Our Farm at
End of Bird Rd. A Snapper Creek
Mendelsohn's
Restaurant
STRICTLY
KOSHER
1301 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach
WHERE THE FINEST MEET TO DINE DAILY FROM 4-9
TELEPHONE 5-9065
COOLED BEER AND WINES SERVED
Free Parking in Rear
AIR
DRINK PLENTY OF
Water
CASE OF SIX
TABLE BOTTLES..........85c
5-GALLON BOTTLE......75c
DELIVERED TO YOUR HOME
"FOR BETTER HEALTH
FROM INFANCY TO
OLD AGE"
PHONE 2-4128

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2235 S. W. 8th STREET PHONE 4-3155
FAMOUS FOR GOOD FOOD
Recommended by DUNCAN HINES
VISIT OUR NEW PATIO
Open From 12 Neon MRS. MARIA FREYER, Owner
IDEAL FOR LUNCHEONS AND PRIVATE PARTIES
ALPINE LOUNGE MAGIC RUDY From VIENNA




j
I



!
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PAGE SIXTEEN
fJenliiiikfl^L
FRIDAY, AUGUST 131
kraeiiTeadcrs Defend Stand On
Arab Refugees In Heated Session
TEL AVIV, OTA)In a dramatic session punctuated with
interruptions and shouts from the deputies during the cowseo
a speech by Premier David Ben Gurion the Israeli parliament
this week wound up its foreign policy debate without takinq a
vote of confidence in the government.__________________________
Facing its severest fight since*"
the establishment of the coalition,
the government mustered its most
prominent figures to defend the
offer to the Arab states at Lau.>-
anne to accept a specific number
of Arab refugees if the question
were settled within the frame-
work of a general peace. Before
the session ended, the Knesset
members heard the Premier and
Foreign Minister Moshe Snarctt
admit that its Arab refugee pro-
posal was made under pressure
from the United States.
Mr. Ben Gurion insisted '.hat
the government's latest proposal
was not a radical departure from
its policy, but was, in fact, merely
a continuation of a policy which
the responsible leaders of the
Jewish community had drafted
and followed for many years
beginning in the period of the
British Mandate. This policy he
outlined as follows: firstly, the
sponsored peace parley.
A motion bv the Herut that the
question of the repatriation of
the Arab refugees be put to a
nation-wide referendum was de-
feated twice, the last time by a
recorded vote of 41-10. In the
course of the debate, only one
speaker. Zalaman Aharonovitch.
Mapai chairman of the Foreign
Relations Committee, mer.tionec.
__in a roundabout mannerthai
the government's proposal in-
volved the acceptance of 100.000
Arab refugees, including those
who have already made their way
back to Israel and those who will
be reunited with their families.
Earlier attacks from the left,
center and right greeted Foreign
Minister Sharett's statement that
the government was prepared to
discuss plans to readmit an un-
specified number of Arab refu-
solution of that
Fight Against Religious, Racial Bi;
In New York Is Making Headway
_____> * NF.W YORK. .JTA)~The fight*
outlined as follows: firstly, the j provided a solution of
achievement of security with the probiem was achieved withi
organization of the Haganah: f,.amowork of a general pei
organization of the Hagan
secondly, the founding of the
state: and, thirdly, the achieve-
ment of an Arab-Israeli allianc?.
The last stage of this program
has now been reached, the Pre-
mier insisted, and the govern-
ment's policv has been set accord-
lin the
framework of a general peace.
Herut representative Arieh Bon
Eliezer attacked the suggestion,
quoting Mr. Sharett's speech of
five weeks ago in the same cham-
ber. At that time Sharett said
the readmission of a substantial
ment's policy has been set accora-r-u-m^erof Arabs wouid Con.-ti
ingly. No other course cou.d naveltute a grave security threat and
Viaon frvllrvwed. he asserted. He j-~~ *v,n ^A,
been followed, he asserted. He
stressed that the signing of the
armistice pacts by the Arab states
constitutes a historical event
which must be properly assessed.
particularly since the struggle
with the Arabs has not yet ended.
When the Premier charged that
all the opposition parties had
jailed to warn the nation and pre-
pare it for the struggle against
the Arab invaders, he was inter-
rupted by angry members of the
Herut and Mapam who cried that
he was "distorting the truth." Is-
ra< 1 Galili. former Assistant De-
fense Minister and Mapam de-
puty, shouted that Premier Ben
Gurion's remarks constituted "a
denial of and treason against" the
troops who stood side-by-side in
the formations of the Haganah
and the Palmach.
Fureign Minister Sharett de-
d that the government was
justified in its offer on the refu-
gees in order to lessen the pres-
sure from the United States and
to restore friendly relations with
the U.S. Further-initiative for
peace in the Middle East rests
with the countries which have
exerted pressure or. Israel
a danger of the country's eco-
nomic structure. The Herut lead-
er attributed the government's
"weakness" in this situation to
the fact that it had neglected its
international obligations to "med-
dle" in the "intrigues of Ameri-
can Jews."
General Zionist deputy Joseph
Saphir said that he suspected that
the Foreign Minister's statement
foreshadowed further concessions.
He also called it a mistake to
make concessions on the reft
in advance of obtaining counter-
balancing concession; from the
Arab states. Rabbi
N'urok, of the Mizrachi, said that
his party favored the readmission
onlv of' those Arabs whom the
war had separated from their
families.
Samuel Mikunis, Communist
leader, stated that his party
favored the return of peace-loving
Arabs. This, he said, was not only
a matter of justice but one of self
interest since Israel must con-
sider its future situation among
the Arab nations of the Middle
East. He insisted that the initia-
tive in this matter should have
Red Cross Accepts
War Orphan Proviso
GENEVA. iJTA'-An Israeli-
sponsored amendment to the
modernized draft convention for
the protection of civilians in war-
time providing thai "as f
possible education of deserted or-
phaned children should b.
trusted to persons of the same
cultural tradition" was ad<
this week by the conference of
Red Cro> cpnsid; ring
proposals I the revision of the
Geneva Convention.
The confi i i 'so adopti a an
other Is: sored amend-
ment providing that |
taining citizenship in formei
ei emj natii ns without receiving
protection from that state should
not be automatically subjected to
ures applying I > n-'"
tionals. German and Austrian
j. ., j n enemy na-
tionals bv some Allied bodies at
the end of the late war.
The Red Mogen Dovid will be
ned as the emblem I
and civilian stitutions,
Emile Najar. a spok tor the
told the plen-
ary session of the conference. The
emblem will be retained, he
stated, despite the refusal of the
conference to recognize it on a
par with the Red Cross. Red
Crescent and Red I.ion of Iran.
affainst religious and racial pre-
judice in New York City has
been making good progress, Col.
Harold Riegelman. chairman of
[he New York chapter of the
. ican jewis!! Committee, de-
clared this week in his annual
" \ew York Citv has become a
letter, healthier community for
all its many peoples since they
have become increasingly aware
of the need to foster healthy
croup relations among Americans
l\ every race and creed and are
working actively to challenge pre-
judice wherever they meet it, Col.
Selman added. The report
summarizes the work that the
American Jewish Committees
Seal branch has done in New
York Citv during the past year.
-The anti-Semitic rabble-rouser
is gone from the streets of New
vrk said Col. Riegelman. More
and more New Yorkerspre-
viously barred from employment
because of race, color or creed
S lnding jobs in banks, utility
companies and insurance firms
Gentleman's Agreements which
prevent certain of our citizens
from living where they choose
can no longer be enforced]
courts.
"On balance. New York
has become a better, h|
community for all its
peoples. Not a perfect coma
by far, but one increasing
pared to meet its responsM
to all its citizens," Col p
man said.
Remnants Of AncienlL
Synagogue UncoverJ
JERUSALEM, (JTA)
mints of an ancient
bearing Samaritan ins
have been uncovered by >
logists digging in the villa]
Salvith, which overloo'
Ayalon Valley.
Dr. Eliezer Sukenik,
leading archaeologist, who ak
recting the excavations, ihmijl
has discovered the site of ah
whose name is not kr.owsi,
which dates back to the ml
King Solomon. The excaYjJ
are financed by a special ij
donated by Louis M. Ratal
of New York.
Waterfront Apartment llous*
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LEO EISENSTEllI
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"PERSONALIZED SERVICE'
Broken Cooperate
22 Vichy Officials
Sentenced To Prison
PARIS. (JTA) Twenty-two
ers of the Vichy Commis-
sariat for Jewish Affairs were
this week sentenced to various
ins and six others lost
civil rights following I i
conviction by a Seine Depart-
n ent court on charges of having
fraudulently arrested French
Jews and deported them to Ger-
man death camps in Poland.
Paul Besson and Jean Mon-
zams received 20 years at hard
labor; Robert Douillet, Roland
Founnier and Hubert Lazare, 15
years at hard labor; Andre Revel,
"ten years; Robert Donnauhe,
eight years; Alexandre Truille,
six: and An.and Renoudot, five
years. Lesser sentences were
handed down against Bi other 13
defendants, while another seven
were acquitted.
exerted pressure or. Israel and i f th Israeli government
whose duty now is to divert this h h result f sub.
pressure to the Arab states. Mr. Son to American imperialism."
Sharett told ti.e Knesset. _______________
He said the government's ac-
tion was prompted by the fact
that this was a "timely oppor-
tunity" for a peace solution "even
at a price." He rejected the suspi-
cions of the opposition parties
that the government's move was
an indication that it would give
way on other issues at the U.N.-
Gannes To Speak
A. P. Gannes. executive director
of the Bureau of Jewish Educa-
tion, will speak tomorrow night
over Simon Seiden's Jewish
Forum, which is broadcast every
Saturday from 8 to 9 p.m. over
station WWPB.
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PAGE 1

I* PAGE TWELVE Vatican Paper Charges U. S. Supports Jerusalem Solution Opposed To Church ROME. (JTA)—Charges thatthe United States supports a point of view exactlv the opposite of the Vatican's at current Lausaur.e discussions on the fate of Jerusalem appeared this week in a front page editorial in "11 Quotidiano." a newspaper which often serves as a medium for semiofficial Vatican statements. The editorial charged that American representatives at Lausanne were opposing Vatican proposals for the Internationalization of Jerusalem on the ground that an autonomous Jerusalem would not be economically viable The paper dismissed, along with this contention, the idea reported as prevalent in Lausanne, that United States opposition was motivated by fear of Russian in tervention. It stated that de the United States stand the forthcoming session of the General Assembly would not be without echoes of Christian aspirations Fraternity To Meet Nu Beta Epsilon. honorary legal fraternity, will hold a ioint meeting of University of Miami undergraduates and alumni as well as members from other schools Wednesday night at 8:15 at the Hyde Park "Hotel. Miami Beach, according to ar. announcement by Harry Smith, president. Plans for the national convention to be held here in December will be discussed. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICK is HEREBY GIVEN that the undersiKi leslrln* to ena %  •-•• %  % %  oils name Of ] >adIVa • ; N u • -;• River I" -. • M '' %  '• Intends in register said name with tin i of the Circuit C I • %  • Dade County. Fli : ;0a. DAVID POTTA8H KLRY STONE Congri t Bldg Miami Attorney for Applicant > 12-19-2S :• -%  Scrolls To Israel WARSAW. iJTAi-The Jewish Religious Congregation o: Poland has received government pi i sion to ship 34 crates of torn an.. damaged Scrolls to Israel they will be repaired and do to new communities and > %  I ments. The organization has readv shipped 60 crates of similar mate'rial to Israel. Towns In Turkey Art? Without Jews ISTANBUL. (JTA>—The two southeastern Turkish towns Marash and Diarbakir were reported this week as being completely without Jews foil the departure of 3u0 Jews : there for Israel. Almost all small Jewish communities of I Law To Aid >"" Victims Appraved WASHINGTON. JTA %  FRIDAY. AUGUST 12, Rabbi Raab Resigns From Temple Isaiah Pulpit, Will Work For Ph. D. Degree (Continued fro mPage 1) B A at Brooklyn College and was ordained at Hebrew Union College in Cincinnati ne worked for a Master 0 f Hebrew Letters degree. Ra bbi Raab is a ^"^ffiJE! "' directors of the MiarrU V Miami Beach Zionist .. southeastern region ol known for having tation of nferei | to the State Deparl V. • • N tmneligil • smau jewsr. commu.n^, • area are reported as having been completely liquidated. These Jewish cor. mil which were considered the most %  • uccessful Youth • Leadership Training iKmi Beach. The rabbi hairman of the committee for I brot herhood ol the Miami Beach ^CTreate"! W • ancient in Turkey, were pletely isolated from the and from Turkish Jewry. ". had no link with Judaism other than religion and Hebrew tr tions. which differ from th< the Sephardic Jews living ::. country. Commitl ish orgai : | ki : la and the Greater R inical Associations. .\. lecturer for the Jewish Ch itauqua Society, an organizahich sends rabbis to college throughout the country, Raab spoke at Bethuneman College in Daytona and the West Palm Beach Junior College. A member of the Central Conference of American has broadcast weekly Saturdays at 9:15 a.m. over • n WINZ on "The Living program for the pa^t Perlmutter praised "the efforts, Arabs Bar Jews From Wailing Wall NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN Tin: COVSTY JUDGE'S COI I UN Urges All Governments To Study Pact On Missing Nazi Victims GENEVA. (JTA)—A resolution"' IN AND FOR I'ADE tui'NTi. requesting the L.N. Seen.'. FLORIDA. IN PROBATE. ^*-1 General to transmit immediateb 1: ':• :s ": v '','-';P P ito all governments the drafi oi K. Ian international convention ui To All Credit is and Havw hich missir.g Nazi and war vie....; A n8t tims would be declare Y u. and %  dead was adopted here I esent any bv a special committee of the U N. nave^a&M Social and Economic C. u: .f in.iis KI.KIN d< ed which began consid eration o 1" l, %  • laic : Ili %  !• Hi n W F BLA.N VI '.V %  • f 11 I file thi same In hi%  %  ". % %  el i Cou thouse ,n Pade i Florida Ithin tight ... • m the date of the first i 8 .i'i clalmi or den mils to ntaln the legal a>iili.*.ol • • and to be sworn .... | presented tforesal win be be red Bet Section 120 of te Act Date August 11. AD. I49 RAYMOND EI.KlN, As it %  f the 1 .-'ate of JULIO ELKIN, Deceased DE COS* • ER .v FD >YI 607-8 Blscayni Mian I Att" Ili LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO APOFAR IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THI JERUSALEM, (JTA) —Despite isi s by Ui ited Nations per• lh( Arabs in control ,f thi Old Citv of Jerusalem would make arrangements for .1, v • be admitted to the Holy Places there nut a single Jew itted to visit the Wailing Wall t: is week, on the eve of B iv In pre-war years i : Jews from all over the com.try flocked to the Wailthe Lamentadestruction of jmple. n thai Meanwhile, the Arab authoriRabbi David Raab the interest and the sincerity ol Rabbi Raab during the trying times of the founding of the temple." The congregation moved the site of their services from 4925 Collins Ave.. Miami Beach, last winter after legal difficulties initiated by a neighbor. Perlmutter announced that the resignation was accepted bv the directors Sunday "with deepest regrets." He said that the c, operation of the Hebrew Union College will be sought in securinj a rabbi to serve during the H:gHoly Days and in engaging i permanent rabbi for the congregation. the country flocke ing Wall to recite Th< introduced ng marking the •he ancient Tt mpl n thai Meanwhile, the nsideraties of the Old City have changed lion t of the pact \. it! the name of the Jewish quarter that I • '• there to the Mouidin—Fighters— I quarter. Jews in this city, barred fron the Wailing Wall, have as• F i inbled in dimly-lit synagogues len tional to recite the Lamentations. Many part. %  I i I only en American visitors attended the v ALEXANDER KOGAN NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE COUNTY JITXJES Ci lURT IN AND FOR HADE COUNTY, Fl.oRII'A. — IN PROBATE, No. 22742. In Re i.-i ATE i >F JACOB MINOWITZ, I >• To All i 'redlti %  an I All P( rsons Hav. Ing (".., %  .:•-. ..;!'. ,:..'.A-.u.. %  %  | Estate: V. I, u, a: e hereby %  • I .'!..' ... ilred t, present any i laims and elthi • have acain-t the estate of JACOB MINOWITZ dei %  •• sed lati •" I %  d< Counts %  %  the H W F BLANTON, rou • .' % % • Ol Dadi County, and file the fire In the '' %  %  • .-• .. Da :•• County, Fl within eisV calendar months from the date of thi tion herenf. Said %  li ;on* tain 11 • • .;,! %  ... of the claimant and to be sworn t" an>i presented as same will he barred. Her Bectlon 120 of the 1933 Probate Act. iMte A :c:is11. A.D. 1949 BERTHA MINOWITZ. AExe trlx I thi Laal Will and Testament of JACOB MINOWITZ, Deceased THEODORE I RAKOWITZ Attorney for Exi it ix f 12-19-26 :• W^F^HII^LV li,-' • • rtaim eryl • • %  per-1 All employees of the Israeli %  legal government who are observing the Tish;i B'av by fasting have ofU.N % %  ficially beer, excused from work • T Knesset began meeting earltivi Dr. M. K with the Speaker reciting ed verses from the Prophet Za' %  %  rias Throughout the major Citi. of the land public places :, hereby required file have been closed down and the svnas igues are crowded. ore September 12th, 1949 OF FleORIDA IN AND Fi COUNTY. — IN CHANCERY. No 12*371, MARY TIP 'Ml si >N I'I.A i l"Y. I tiff, vs EDWARD BLA' fendant, EDWARD BI.ATTY No "-' I'• % % %  int Street N E Washington '. %  C YOU ARE HEREBY SOT that a bill of %  oi ; lali t for ai hat pea fore the allegations of si .<< c< :.:'• ->• I ted at Miami. Fli I Id I day of An^E B LEATHKR.MAN. i '! %  'k of Cll CUlt I ill i". %  :•• Seal) By WM W. BTOCKIN'i, De] it; MARX KABER Solicitor for riaintiff 412 Congress Building Miami, Florida J'12-19-26 9/2 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE !.-' HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desirlnc to engage in business under thfictitious nami ol BEACH TOTQERY SHOP at number Avenue In the C'ltv ol Beach, 1 k Ida, nt< nds t ev Isti • %  th< said nami %  • • %  • i -. : oi the Circuit Court of Dade Countv, Florida, ISIDORE ARMNOVITZ ARONOVITZ, WEINKUE & ARi 'NOVITZ "ISeybold Building Miami. Fia 8/12-19-26 !• ;'-;i ORDER OF PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT "F I'm: 11th JUDICIAL '"IRiTIT IN AMI FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA IN CHANCERY, No :.'• : RENETTE ISRAEL DAVIH, I. tiff, vs. DAVID •: DAVID, Ui fendant. THE STATE OF KI.'•!'. I PA: TO: DAVID G. L-AV1U 1ST E. 2'th Street New York. New Yoah You are hereby rei| your api.earan. e to Plainti" I plaint for Divorce filed against In the above-styled cause <>n fore the nth day of September, i otherwise tl i alii -•. • ns of will be taken as confi DATED at Mian I, F day %  ( August. 1949 E R LEATHERMAN. Cli rk of Circuit • I (Circuit i "our! Beal i By C. E BOLAND, I ll put! SAM S-ILVER 1703 Congress Building Miami. Florida Notice undersigned. hereby given that the .......Ifc .:.--.,. desiring to '-ngage in business under the fictitious name of THE Rl'.-HBROOK CO. at N. W 22nd Street and l"th Avenue, Miami Dade County. Florida, intends to regIM. r said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Floi Ida NAT ROTTENBERO J. H. LESSER Attorney at Law West Talm Beach. Fia v 12-19-26 9/2-9 I •• "he poir.l ested cor.i lusion of un internal entioi surviving .... Isi Dr. Ju ; : • S preser.tativi f Polai tions tted by t. tee on tl ... ntii • nomii S I C ncil. Truman Distressed By Senate's Failure To Act On Liberal DP Law WASHINGTON, \ ; .,-' dent Truman is at Senate I el t on the pproved d ,„ r >"ns bill Rep I New v rk said this week fllow• • • Wl it. II Celler Kosher Killed Chlekens TENNESSEE POULTRY <& EGG CO. WEDS. A.M. THURS. A.M. Phones 9-2585 — 9-7981 1340 S.W. 8th St. Prominently identified with M furs here and in the East, saysFARR and I are kindred spins -the finest in fursthe fin


PAGE 1

fewiisltJEIliDipidliiaun Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY 5LUME22—NUMBER 32 MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, AUGUST 12. 1949 PRICE TEN CENTS EWS FLASHES lines Explode JERUSALEM, (JTA)—An ac(entally started fire this week nlodcd several mines in the no fn'. land area of Mt. Zion. There were no casualties as a tuK of the unexpected blasts. Lumber of tourists visiting the Ltoi icul height were thrown into | temporary panic as the exosivcs were s et off. ligratc To Israel ATHENS, (JTA)—The Israeli Insul lure has received assurIces from the Greek War MinisLr that Greek Jews whose age hups have recently been called for service with the armed rces will be permitted to mirate to Israel if they choose, it ks learned here this week. [Meanwhile, it was also revealed Lathe director of the Greek Air Enistry will visit Tel Aviv next lonth to negotiate and sign an |r convention with the Jewish ate. A trade pact between the so nations is expected to follow fce signing of the air convention. i.-i/i Sentenced WARSAW, (JTA)—A Warsaw (strict court this week sentenced ranch LKM1 Seized FRANKFURT, (JTA) — U. S. Lrmy authorities at the port of iremerhaven this week seized an iraeli vessel, the Drommit, be|ause it was allegedly being loadwith an illegal consignment of nachinery, including construction nachines, tractors and automobiles. The Army announcement repealing the seizure said that the nachinery was labelled as houseSold goods of Jewish immigrants beaded for Israel. The Army officials said that the shipment, vhieh came from Bergen-Belsen, the largest of its kind ever overed. Award Made WARSAW, (JTA) — Dr. M. Golenbievsky, director of the Jewish Health Society OSE in Poland has been awarded the Polish gold "Medal of Merit." The award was made by the Police Vice Minister for Health at a ceremony opening a new 250-bed OSE sanatorium for tuberculosis patients at Otvock. 67 Communities Will Raise $12,000,000 Less This Year Than In 1948, Survey Shows NEW YORK, (JTA)—A total of i Funds says: "The current cam$54,191,000 has been raised to date|paigns show that American Jews Israeli Income Exceeds Outgo TEL AVIV, (JTA)—In its first published statement of the finances of the state of Israel from its establishment, on May 14, 1948, to March 31, 1949, the Finance Ministry revealed that for its first ten and one-half months the Israeli Government had a revenue which was 1,355,000 ($4,065,000) above its expenditures. For the first quarter of 1949, the statement revealed, imports into Israel amounted to 15,500,000 pounds, while exports came to 5,050,000 pounds. The United States led the list of nations selling its products to Israel, accounting for 23 percent of the imports. The British Commonwealth, exclusive of Canada, sold the Jewish state 12 percent of its imports; Italy, seven percent; and the Eastern European bloc, eleven percent. Israel's chief customer was Britain. Test Houses NEW YORK, (JTA) — Three types of small-pre-fabricated houses are being sent .to Israel for testing by the Palestine Economic Corporation, it was announced this week. The houses will be set up by the end of August in various locations to ascertain their suitability for Israel's climate as well as to determine the cost for a large-scale assembly program. Jews Remain LONDON, (JTA)—The Jewish Committee for Relief Abroad this week reported that large numbers of Jews in Berlin have changed their minds about immigrating to Israel "where constill in the pioneer toward local campaign goals by 67 Jewish communities throughout the country, according to a report released this week by the Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds. Some of these communities completed their campaigns in July, while others are continuing their drives. The reporting cities anticipate a final total return of $58,990,500 for 1949, the report said. The same communities raised $71,005,256 last year. These communities include: Baltimore, which has so far raised more than $3,000,000^ and will close its campaign in September; Buffalo, which completed its campaign by raising its quota of $1,200,000; Cincinnati, which reached its goal of $1,600,000;' Cleveland, which completed its drive after raising its goal of $4,900,000; Detroit, which raised $5,240,000 and is concluding its campaign this month; Kansas City, which reached its goal of $1,210,000; Los Angeles, which raised six million dollars toward its $8,000,000 goal, but which is continuing its campaign through September. The reporting cities also included Miami, which concluded its campaign last month after raising $1,090,000; Newark, which completed its drive after raising its quota of about $2,800,000; Philadelphia, which raised $5,700,000 but is still trying to reach a total of $6,000,000; St. Louis, which raised $2,650,000; San Francisco, which secured about $1,500,000; and Toronto, which completed its drive after raising $1,322,000. The report only gives the results of spring campaigns. Emphasizing that campaign results will this year equal or surpass all previous years, with the exception of the banner year of 1948, the report of the Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare take their responsibilities seriously. When presented with the challenge for supporting vital and urgent needs, the American Jewish communities can contipue ..o raise tremendous sums of money despite less favorable economic conditions." As compared with 1948, the council's report makes the following generalizations on the experiences of this year as reported by the communities: 1. Even though the experts aie still undecided as to whether the country is now in a "recession," "depression," or "mere levellingoff process," there exists a fear of the economic future which cut sharply into big giving for campaigns. Decreased contributions this year from some big givers foreshadows the problems to be faced in-the 1950 campaign. 2. There were "manpower" difficulties—lack of workers and less intense coverage of prospects. The climate of lessened interest in the campaign applied to workers as well as givers, indicating that the impetus of startling headlines, so (Continued on Page 13) %  "R i SAW e ( JT A?-A l tribute to gg are fg^JBJfiB mrieh &f oohr.ioi-ine in T.nwer sla 6 e ; *". __.:n :_ Iwish technicians in Lower llesia and particularly the Jewish miners of the town of Valbfchich was published in Dziennik IZachedni, leading newspaper of pCatowide. The newspaper reports that %  there are 500 miners and several %  thousand other Jewish techniIcians. The newspaper reported Ithat many Jewish miners had inIcrcased their output to double Ithe standards set by the mine [management and that a group of %  Jewish farmers in the same vicinlity had exceeded normal production by 225 percent. The Jews I were also praised for their [brotherly attitude toward the I Poles and for their cooperation. Deadline Set BUENOS AIRES, (JTA) — Immigrants who entered Argentina illegally up to July 8 of this year when President Juan Peron granted them a pardon must legalize their status by October 1, 1949, the Director of Migration I announced this week. The announcement warned that any person failing to register with the Migration Department and obtain the necessary documents is liable to deportation to his country of origin or any other nation which will agree to take him. Thousand of Jewish DP's who arrived in this country since the end of the war are affected by the ruling. Soldier Honored LONDON, (JTA)—A former Jewish paratrooper, Solomon Weintraub, was awarded the King George medal this week for rescuing five women trapped in *. fire in a Glasgow building. about 5,000 Jews will remain in Berlin permanently. The report also reveals that many Jewish applicants for U.S. v i sas _whose applications have been pending for three yearswere recently informed that they would be transported to the United States soon Greek Jews May Leave For Israel ATHENS, (JTA)—Greek Jews of military age may immigrate to Israel on condition that they renounce their nationality, declare that they will never return to Greece and "take with them all members of their family," a GreeK government order concerning the emigration of Jews from this country said this week. The last part of the order—pertaining to the movement of families — is 9 onsldered 0/4 t0 th „! vague and it is expected that elucidation of the clause will be requested. The government order covers Jews now serving in the Greek Army. German Priority WASHINGTON, -Whle opposing liberalization of the US DP immigration law-to admit more Jewish and Catholic DPs Sen. Pat McCarran, chapman of the Senate Immigration Subcommittee this week said at hearings Si DP legislation that he is exceedingly sympathetic to Germans who would like= priority enter this country. Sen. McCarran has bottled up in cornmaee the House-approved Celler BUI to -a S?t ovfr 300,000 DP's within three years. UN To Withdraw Truce Machinery From Palestine LAKE SUCCESS, (JTA)—Arab and Jewish representatives agreed this week at the U.N. Security Council on the earliest possible withdrawal of the United Nations truce supervisory machinery from Palestine. The Israeli, Egyptian and Syrian deleqations expressed this sentiment after being invited 1 — to comment on formal Soviet proposals calling for the immediate withdrawal of all United Nations personnel from Palestine including the Conciliation Commission itself. The Russian proposals were put forth in the form of amendments to a joint Canadian-French draft resolution drawn up in consultation with Palestine mediator Dr. Ralph Bunche during the weekend. Under this resolution, the Arab-Israeli armistice agreements supersede the truce, but leave the U.N. Security Council in full charge of the cease-fire through the United Nations chief of truce staff. The acting mediator is relieved of his responsibility and Anti-Semitism Down Canada Survey Shows MONTREAL, (JTA)—Anti-Semitism does not present an immediate menace to the Jewish community of Canada today, according to a survey made public here by Saul Hayes, executive director of the Canadian Jewish Congress. Mr. Hayes points out that overt acts of prejudice are rarer now than at any time since Hitler^ 1 in the United States. There Is no discrimination against Jews in civic organizations and public facilities. In a foreword to the survey, Mr. Hayes mentions that in the years before the war, under the stimulus and with the assistance of foreign anti-democratic groups, there was waged an extensive and successful campaign to separate Canadian Jewry from the rest of the Canadian community by arousing hatred for the Jews. The effects the U.N. Conciliation Commission Heprived of anv responsibility for implementing the armistice agreements. The effects of the CanadianFrench resolution, if adopted, would be to lift the arms embargo on the Middle East and, at the same time, remove all military responsibility from the Conciliation Commission. The resolution makes no reference to the freeing of Mt. Scopus or the lifting of the Egyptian blockade, two points raised by Israeli represent ative Aubrey Eban. The question of the armaments race raised by Mr. Eban in previous meetings appeared to vanish as an issue when the two Soviet delegates at the council failed to make mention of the question. Soviet delegate Semyon Tsarapkin and the Ukrainian delegate, Dmitri ManuiLsky, were chiefly concerned with allowing the f mrties to work out their probems in direct negotiations without "pressure" from the outside. "The parties proved they are mature enough to reach their own agreements," Mr. Tsarapkin said. He added that "there is no need for any commission or any observers." Dr. Bunche generally held that complete elimination of the U.N. personnel would injure the structure of armistice commissions and expose to danger a number of demilitarized zones, such as Mt. Scopus which is entirely under U.N. control. Mr. Eban suggested that the council might eliminate all truce supervisory personnel at once, excepting the minin-um numbers called for by armistice agreements. Norway's representative again expressed the concern of his government over the unsolved assassination of Count Folke Bernadotte. At the request of Mr. Tsarapkin the council decided not to vote early on the resolution. came to power, and, although there is no immediate cause for undue concern, the resources of the Canadian Jewish Community are mobilized currently in the defense of the Jewish position. Among the highlights of the survey are the following: 1. The assumption that antiSemitism is more prevalent among French Canadians than among the English-speaking population is not valid; perhaps French-Canadians are more frank I of this campaign were wideand inclined to admit prejudice spread and lasted well into the than the Protestant Anglo-Saxon ^war period. element. &f gnS&ris&MSiMH Raab Resigns From Temple Isaiah they align themselves with the French Canadians linguistically, culturally and politically. 3. Jews do occasionally encounter difficulty in buying and renting homes, although this cannot be considered a typical occurence in Canada. 4. There is no discrimination in hotels in Canada except in vacation resorts. Discriminatory practices in Canadian resorts are roughly equal to the situation in the United States. Such practices appear to be increasing in frequency both in Ontario and Quebec. 5. Discrimination against Jews in social and business club again would be best described as running parallel to similar practices Pulpit, Will Work For Ph. D. Degree The resignation of Rabbi David Raab, spiritual leader of Temple Isaiah, was announced this week by Julius Jay Perlmutter, president of the congregation. The young rabbi founded the organization 16 months ago. Rabbi Raab's resignation is effective September 1, after which he will leave for Cincinnati where he will begin study for a Ph. D. at Hebrew Union College. The degree is being offered for the first time by the school. Prior to organizing Temple Isaiah, Rabbi Raab served for two years as spiritual leader of the Reform Jewish Temple in Fort Lauderdale. During this time he was instrumental in organizing the Hollywood-Fort Lauderdale Chapter of Hadassah and the Zionist District of Broward County. The young rabbi has also held pulpits in Louisville, Ky, Danville, 111., and Newark, N. J. For three years he served as auxiliary Jewish chaplain at Fort Knox, Ky., and Boca Raton Air Base. A native of Tel Aviv, he came to America in 1930 after receiving his early education there. He (Continued on Page 12)



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PAGE DGHT +J(lstFk£iJteti = =z FRIDAY, AUGUST 12, 1943 /; Personally Speaking Figur-Moscovitz Nuptials Dolores Joy Shapiro, Oscar Dobrow Performed By Rabbi Skop Exchange Vows At Sherry Frontenac Rabbi M rris Sk the %  cf Miami Bea %  %  % % %  H V 111 : B X N V %  • Sunday %  -i\: V • Mr. and Mis. Harry Stitsky and dauqhter. Flora, of Bronx, N. Y., are guests at the South Seas Hotel, Miami Beach. The Stitskys are the parents of Morton Stitsky, son-in-law of Rabbi and Mrs. S. M. Machtei. n h Prior to departing for Israel on August 27, Mrs. Rebecca Hudes of Brooklyn, N. Y., is spending ten days with her son, Nat ^ Pollack, and his family, 3884 N.W. 6th St. Mrs. Hudes, who is Mrs •. of West president of the Ladies' Auxiliary of the Yeshiva Rabbi Chaim ,, a; .. nd Mrs, P I Berlin in Brooklyn, will be honored by the members of that ,,... nd Ai organization at a farewell party on August 21. The affair will r ; F;gur. be a tribute to Mrs. Hudes' 25 years of service to the group. Under a canopy of white roses and gladioli, Miss Dolores Joy Shapiro, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. I S Shapiro of August, Ga., bePhilip B. Padawer To Become Bar Mitzvah Mrs. Ar.ne S. Padawer, 2270 S.W. 23rd Terr., announces the Bar Mitzvah of her son. Philip Barnett. to be held at the Miami Hebrew School ar.d Congregation Saturday. August 20 at 9 a.m. The Bar Mitzvah attends Shenandoah Junior High School ana is a member of the Boy Scouts. He arrived here in March from Greenville. Mis?., and has been studying under Rabbi Sirr.on April since his arrival. A reception will follow the services. Relative? and friends are invited to attend. Mr. and Mrs. George Goldberg left this week for New York 'and other Northern points for a stay of several weeks. En route they will stop in Silver Springs cr.d Tampa. Mr. Goldberg is sexton of Beth David Synagogue. Joseph Julius and family of West Palm Beech are vacationing in New York. They will return the latter part of August. Moe Sternberg of West Palm Beach is in New York for a brief sojourn. Arnold Kurland and Melvin Richman of Baltimore, Md.. are spending a ten-day vacation at the Ritz Plaza Hotel in Miami Beach. Mrs. Dasha Rattner, 542 Jefferson Ave., Miami Beach, has returned from a six-week vacation in New York with her daughter. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Rood, 3710 N.W. 2nd Terr., announce the birth of a daughter on Friday, August 5, at Doctor's Hospital. Mrs. Rood is the former Frances Kimmel of Miami Beach and Buffalo. m Frontenac Hotel, J who m came the bride of Oscar Dob son of Mr. and Mrs. Sam DobT of Daytona Beach. Sunday at it, Sherry Fror*Beach. The bride \ marriage by her father \1 gown of imported Chantilly ,' and pearls. Her full length vd of matching lace fell f, 0 m a M2 coronet of seed pearl., in mam 11" effect. She carried a fan of J fled Chantilly lace adorned X a spray of white orchids valley lilies. Gloria Shapiro served of honor for her sister of mauve rose satin and I p Baruett Padnuer Clips! Education Chairman Listpd Progress in the organization of the new educational division of the Community Chest of Dade County was reported Saturday bv Mrs. L. J. McCaffrey, chairman of the division. Established as a year-round volunteer unit of the Chest at the July meeting of the board of directors, the mission of the educational division is to conduct a twelve month program to interpret the work of Red Feather services to the community, Mrs. McCaffrey explained. IKfe Appointments to key commit— I tees which will carry on the pro|gram were Mrs. Frank Malone ar.d Hugh Matheson, Jr.. speakers bureau committee; Mrs. W. L. iMussett, schools committee; Mrs. 'Stanley Milledge and George ^Chertkof. solicitor training committee; Mrs. Stanley Biedron and Mrs. Minnie Miller, Beach Leader, Dies Mrs. Minnie Wilier. 70. of 6380 G eor 8 e Nicholas, recruiting cornMrs. Miller mittee. Mrs. William Cox and Mrs. Mussett are co-chairmen of the educational division with Mrs. McCaffrey. BB Luncheon To Honor Goldman Final arrangements have been made for the Americanism luncheon honoring Abe S. Goldman of 862 S.W. 6th St., commander of the United Veterans' Council of Dade County, to be held Friday August 19, at 12:15 p.m. in the Downtowner Restaurant, Seybold Building, Miami. Convention officials of the Veterans of Foreign Wars will also be present to take part in the ceremonies which will be highlighted by the presentation of a bronze plaque to Goldman in recognition of his 22 -ears of service in promoting veteran's Americanism programs in Dade County and in combating prejudice and bigotry as a part of this program. A native of Jacksonville, he has been active in veterans' affairs since his arrival in Miami m 1924. He has been a member of the American Legion for 31 years and has held membership in the Elks Lodge for a similar period. He was honored by Post No. 174 of the Jewish War Vetv erans by election as commandei : Hebrew Academy. a d granted life membership in trvices were helc tnat organization. Among his many other community activities Goldman is a Scottish Rite 32nd degree Mason and a past member of the board of directors of the Miami YMHA. City Commissioner Charles City Manager O. P. Hart and Tom Kclley, commander Harvey Seeds Post. American Legion, are among the prominent city officials who have been invited to attend the affair, it has been announced by President John K. Indian Creek Dr.. leader in Miami Beach Jewish women's organizations, died Saturday in Rochester. Minn., after a year's :11ne-s. The wife of Louis Miller. Miami Beach builder contrai toi I i 25 years. Mis. Miller was flown to Mayo Clinic Friday. At her bedside at I e time of her death were her husband and three daughters, Mrs. Ernie Woolfe, Mrs Sol Leslie and Miss Jeanne Miller, all of Miami Beach. Also surviving are a son, Harrv A.: 14 grandchildren and two great grandchildren, all of Miami Beach. The Millers, who celebrated their golden wedding anniversary in March of this year, came here from Akron, Ohio. Mr. Miller heads the construction company which has constructed about 40 Beach hotels and which has the contract for the new Beach city auditorium. Mrs. Miller was one of the organizers of the Jewish Children s Shelter Home in Akron. She alsc served as a board member here of the American Jewish Congress, the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, the Mt. Sinai Ho-pital Auxiliary, Hadassah. the Cardiac Home and the Funeral serv Tuesday at Riverside Memorial Chapel of Miami Beach. Interment was in the Greater Miami Jewish Cemetery (Woodlawn). + Mr. and Mrs. Morris Simon, 1927 N.W. 3rd St., left Tuesday for California, where they will visit relatives and friends. On their return they plan to stop in Chicago to spend some time with their son, Jesse, a senior at the Northern Illinois College of Optemetry, and in Washington, D. C, with their daughter, Mrs. Murray Ressler, and her family. %  Mr. and Mrs. David Mandell of Lake Worth announce the recent birth of a son, Stephen. Mrs. Mandell is the former Esther Ann Margolis. Catherine and Jeanette Friedheim have returned to their home in Belle Glade after attending a recent 4-H camp at Lake Osborne, near Lake Worth. The girls are the daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Friedheim. Mrs. M. S. Rubin, Claremont Hotel, Miami Beach, left Wednesday for an extended Northern trip. She will visit her children, Mr. and Mrs. Milton Rubin in Scardale N Y • her sister, Mrs. H. Goodman in Springfield, Mass.; and may spend several weeks in September in Atlantic City. She plans to return here in October. as maid ln a gown wit 1, boat neckline and peplum skirt! She carried a fan of matchine material with orchids and stephanotis Mrs. Fred Miller Harpster matron of honor, was attired in j gown of similar design in violet safin and carried a matching fabouquet. The Misses Sara Dressauer Ruth Davis, Miriam Siskin served as bridesmaids in gowns of ice blue marquisette with satin trim Their bouquets were attached to matching marquisette and satin fans. Leah Joyce Shapiro was flower girl and Joseph Lee Shapiro was ring bearer. Sam Dobrow was best man for his son. Ushering were Leonard Dobrow, Melvin Dobrow. Oscar Dobrow, Robert Bernstein, Paul Whitsett, Butter Goodson. Clyde Morgan, Dorsey Cork and Fred Harpster. Following a reception at the .'hotel, the couple left by car for a wedding trip to New York and Bar Harbor, Maine. Upon their return they will make their home in Daytona Beach. Chaikin New Head Of Business Council Leo Chaikin was elected president of the Businessmen's Council of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation at the annual meeting of the organization Wednesday aboard the Probus Club barge in Biscayne Bay. Others elected were Aaron Kanner, vice president, and Seymour Rubin, treasurer. Samuel A Rivkind, retiring president, was presented with an award of appreciation by Herbert E. Scher, vice president of Federation. Dr. Reinhold P. Wolf of the University of Miami, guest speaker, discussed the business outlook for Miami. He said that even if a Joan Ahlin Pledged To Marvin P. Schero Announcement of the engagement of Miss Joan Arden Ablin to Marvin Paul Schero has been made by her parents, Mr. and Mrs, Jack A. Ablin, Miami Beach and Chicago. The prospective bridegroom's parents are Mr. and Mrs. Harry Schero. Chicago. The wedding is planned for early fall. Mrs. Al Morris and son, Stephen, left recently for a brief stay in Los Angeles, Cal. En route they spent a week in New Orleans. Cantor Kelemer Will Oiiiciaie At Services Cantor Samuel Kelemer will officiate at services at Temple Beth Sholom tonight at 8:15, in the absence of Rabbi Leon Kronish, who is away on vacation. After visiting relatives in Pittsburgh. Pa., Mr. and Mrs. Ted Kaufman and children will vacation in the mountains of North Carolina. Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Forrest, 1565 Jefferson Ave., Miami Beach, announce the birth of a daughter, Felice Myma, bom Friday morning, August 5, at St. Francis Hospital, Miami Beach. The Forrests are also parents of a dauqhter, Joyce, and a son, Bruce. ... Nathan Alexander has been confined to his home for the past two weeks by illness and is now recuperatinq. .ft -K Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Koqos have left for Philadelphia, where Mrs. Kogos will undergo an operation. Rabbi and Mrs. Simon April have returned from an exS? .?? ? hi0h ,00k ,hem to Savannah, Ga., where they ^visited^heuda ughter and son-in-law, and Montreal, Canada. Polish District Judge Killed By Policeman WARSAW. (JTA)-M. Friedman-Loubovitzki. a judge of the Glivitze district and killed by loca" Ablin a court, was shot a member of the Kronenfeld of Sholem Lodge Mi am. Beach Councilman Burnett Roth will present the plaque to Goldman. Raymond Nathan, veterans' chairman of Sholem Lodge is in charge Serving with of arrangements. Nathan will be SUrS Sa V n Gilbert J Blk.n. Coin b8 n and n:,v 15 Torahs Transferred From Britain To Israel LONDON, (JTA)— P-rmission had to be obtained from the Dank of England this week for the transfer of 15 Torahs from Britain this week JL WM v POrted here to Israel. The Torahs were transit the judje in P a 3." — P rted by three *** ** in Glivitee ,, under arrest whn? Ua ', d Lonkovskv. a Fol( ng theS f r the Ges, 4 <


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%  j I %  PAGE SIXTEEN fJenliiiikfl^L FRIDAY, AUGUS T 131 kraeiiTeadcrs Defend Stand On Arab Refugees In Heated Session TEL AVIV, OTA)—In a dramatic session punctuated with interruptions and shouts from the deputies during the cowseo a speech by Premier David Ben Gurion the Israeli parliament this week wound up its foreign policy debate without takinq a vote of confidence in the gover nment. Facing its severest fight since*" the establishment of the coalition, the government mustered its most prominent figures to defend the offer to the Arab states at Lau.>anne to accept a specific number of Arab refugees if the question were settled within the framework of a general peace. Before the session ended, the Knesset members heard the Premier and Foreign Minister Moshe Snarctt admit that its Arab refugee proposal was made under pressure from the United States. Mr. Ben Gurion insisted '.hat the government's latest proposal was not a radical departure from its policy, but was, in fact, merely a continuation of a policy which the responsible leaders of the Jewish community had drafted and followed for many years— beginning in the period of the British Mandate. This policy he outlined as follows: firstly, the sponsored peace parley. A motion bv the Herut that the question of the repatriation of the Arab refugees be put to a nation-wide referendum was defeated twice, the last time by a recorded vote of 41-10. In the course of the debate, only one speaker. Zalaman Aharonovitch. Mapai chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee, mer.tionec. in a roundabout manner—thai the government's proposal involved the acceptance of 100.000 Arab refugees, including those who have already made their way back to Israel and those who will be reunited with their families. Earlier attacks from the left, center and right greeted Foreign Minister Sharett's statement that the government was prepared to discuss plans to readmit an unspecified number of Arab refusolution of that Fight Against Religious, Racial Bi; In New York Is Making Headway > * cpnsid; ring proposals I the revision of the Geneva Convention. The confi i i 'so adopti a an other Is: sored amendment providing that | taining citizenship in formei ei emj natii ns without receiving protection from that state should not be automatically subjected to ures applying I > n -'" tionals. German and Austrian j. ., j n enemy nationals bv some Allied bodies at the end of the late war. The Red Mogen Dovid will be ned as the emblem I and civilian stitutions, Emile Najar. a spok tor the • told the plenary session of the conference. The emblem will be retained, he stated, despite the refusal of the conference to recognize it on a par with the Red Cross. Red Crescent and Red I.ion of Iran. affainst religious and racial prejudice in New York City has been making good progress, Col. Harold Riegelman. chairman of [he New York chapter of the ican jewis!! Committee, declared this week in his annual \ew York Citv has become a letter, healthier community for all its many peoples since they have become increasingly aware of the need to foster healthy croup relations among Americans l\ every race and creed and are working actively to challenge prejudice wherever they meet it, Col. Selman added. The report summarizes the work that the American Jewish Committees Seal branch has done in New York Citv during the past year. -The anti-Semitic rabble-rouser is gone from the streets of New v„rk said Col. Riegelman. More and more New Yorkers—previously barred from employment beca use of race, color or creed— S £lndi n g jobs in banks, utility companies and insurance firms •Gentleman's Agreements —which prevent certain of our citizens from living where they choose— can no longer be enforced] courts. "On balance. New York has become a better, h| community for a ll its peoples. Not a perfect coma by far, but one increasing pared to meet its responsM to all its citizens," Col p man said. Remnants Of AncienlL Synagogue UncoverJ JERUSALEM, (JTA) mints of an ancient bearing Samaritan ins have been uncovered by %  > logists digging in the villa] Salvith, which overloo' Ayalon Valley. Dr. Eliezer Sukenik, „ leading archaeologist, who ak recting the excavations, ihmijl has discovered the site of ah whose name is not kr.owsi, which dates back to the ml King Solomon. The excaYjJ are financed by a special ij donated by Louis M. Ratal of New York. Waterfront Apartment llous* lfi units—one and two bedroom apartments with 2 bttkl Luxuriously furnished. Has 2 docks for fishing and tab, boats Income S41.000. Will sell less than 5 times Us incoa It is an excellent buy. FEUER & EISENSTEIN. Realtors LEO EISENSTEllI Telephone U-l W. I. FEUER 235 Lincoln Rood "PERSONALIZED SERVICE' Broken Cooperate 22 Vichy Officials Sentenced To Prison PARIS. (JTA) — Twenty-two ers of the Vichy Commissariat for Jewish Affairs were this week sentenced to various ins and six others lost civil rights following I i conviction by a Seine Departn ent court on charges of having fraudulently arrested French Jews and deported them to German death camps in Poland. Paul Besson and Jean Monzams received 20 years at hard labor; Robert Douillet, Roland Founnier and Hubert Lazare, 15 years at hard labor; Andre Revel, "ten years; Robert Donnauhe, eight years; Alexandre Truille, six: and An.and Renoudot, five years. Lesser sentences were handed down against Bi other 13 defendants, while another seven were acquitted. exerted pressure or. Israel and i f th Israeli government whose duty now is to divert this h h „ result f sub pressure to the Arab states. Mr. Son to American imperialism." Sharett told ti.e Knesset. He said the government's action was prompted by the fact that this was a "timely opportunity" for a peace solution "even at a price." He rejected the suspicions of the opposition parties that the government's move was an indication that it would give way on other issues at the U.N.Gannes To Speak A. P. Gannes. executive director of the Bureau of Jewish Education, will speak tomorrow night over Simon Seiden's Jewish Forum, which is broadcast every Saturday from 8 to 9 p.m. over station WWPB. 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t\ PAGE FOOB *Jehhtfk*Mtor FRIDAY, AUGUST *. EDITORIAL Mux \ordau Max Nordau, the centennial of whose birth is being celebrated this month in Israel and throughout world Jewry, was next to Herzl the greatest figure produced by the modern Zionist movement. First a physician, then a writer by profession, he dedicated the best years of his life to the task of healing, or regenerating, a sick Jewry by means of his pen and voice. Nordau shared Herzl's great vision, that of making the Jewish people healthy again by reestablishing it as an independent nation on its ancestral soil. He had already won his spurs as a writer of social criticism, as a novelist and dramatist in Europe when Herzl's idea of a Jewish state captured his imagination. He unreservedly identified himself with Herzl's plan and assumed his share of the work. It was Nordau who formulated the Basel Program at the First Zionist Congress in 1897 and it was his speeches, eloquent surveys of the situation of Jews throughout Europe, animated by his passion for justice, that were the highlights of many subsequent Congresses. It was Nordau, the healer of his people, whfirst coined the term "muscle Jews," who called uporf the Jewish youth of Europe to train their bodies and at whose suggestion Jewish sports clubs and gymnasiums sprang up everywhere. He. too, possessed of the gift of prophecy, foreseeing trouble ahead in Palestine after the Balfour Declaration and the Mandate, begged the World Zionist Executive to transfer immediately to Palestine 600,000 Jews from Eastern Europe, a request which some Zionist leaders then regarded as "impractical" but which, had it been heeded, would have proved the most practical of all steps. The contribution of Max Nordau to the rise of the Jewish state can hardly be over-estimated. Like Herzl, born and reared in Budapest, Hungary, in an assimilationist environment, he embraced the movement for Jewish national renaissance, devoted his entire life to it and is today gratefully remembered for his contribution in the newborn Jewish state that he helped plan. Thrillinq The story of the linking of Jerusalem and Tel Aviv by train for the first time since Israel's existence could not have failed to thrill those who have been following the rapidly moving events %  gion tore !ash Dollar-Spending Cut A Fourth by Britain •* u K '-* Yw*i u& v, v. % %  ] Wfe -..,' f?£f v~ x V^ kudu**'Don't You Dare Give That Stranger the Bread Out of Our Mouths"— Senate Group Blocks Passage Of New DP Law WASHINGTON, (JTA) — The Senate Democratic Policy Committee decided this week to invite Chairman Pat McCarran of the Senate Judiciary Committee before it next week to explain his blocking of the House-approved displaced persons bill. Senators said that if Sen. McCarran continues his refusal to act, Republicans may join with Democrats in an effort to force the measure out of the commititj and before the Senate. Sen. McCarran opposes the bill and has stated that he can see no basis for Jewish complaints or. the United States displaced persons program. Herzl Remains Transfer Postponed For One Week VIENNA, (JTA)—The transfer of the remains of Dr. Theodor Herzl from Austria for reburial in Israel, which was scheduled to take place next week has been postponed for one week, it was announced here this week. The remains will be flown from here on August 15, acc ording to the vJewisti fkrrjian Published every Friday oinco 1M7 oy The Jewnh Floridian at 120 N c •Ixth Street, Miami IB, Florida. En! !" d "cond-claaa matter July 4, 1W0, at the Po.t Office of Miami, Fla.. under the Act of March i, 187 Tna Jewnh Floridian haa abaorbio IE* J ,wl, h Un,t • nd MW Jwlih Weakly. Member of the Jewish Tale. graphic Aoancy, Seven Arta Feature K n .b. l S;! t^ r ld w J d ? ew Service. National Editorial Aseoclatten, American Aeioci.lt :n of in that part of the world. Th story of the besieged city, the trials and tribulations its inhabitants went through from the moment the first Arab gun was aimed at Israel's heart and the heroism of the beleaguered men, women and children who stood the test with courage and faith—these are now still-to-be written pages for history and material for legend and folklore. The construction of the rails and the roads linking Israel with its heart—Jerusalem—is the culmination of an effort that cannot be explained by physical courage alone. Nor can there be any mistake about the symbolic and political significance of the event. Yet, to us it seems there was even greater drama when the first train arrived. That it brought Spiritual Therapy For Jewish Veterans A Jewish Chaplain in Mental Hospital Appraises His Task By RABBI LEE J. LEVINGER worker wr^l2?m.n h iS?f e ni t j £££ r, v U tlon "' ,h f '•*• •artttffS ILS ?u Pa ^! ir ? e J eWish cha P' ain serving Jewish veterans doin^hl h0§P, v^ W rk Hke ,ha ,he man V *er rabbis doing ,he same kind of specialized job, is carried out under Z£^Xr n l ReUgi0US *-— < he NatSS SiriL^^'li!!!!!! 8 ^.^. San Francisco. Th I tutsanrnConferonve The protracted negotiations at Lausanne I I zerland, are seemingly drawing to a succ**! conclusion. What started out as a futile eftlrl beginning to bear fruit only because of Lin] determination to establish friendly relation! I its neighboring states and the growing rea uM tion in the Arab countries that the outsidb^l fluences which have been working agaiM*| peace settlement are not grounded in welfaakl in political and military considerations from til*! the people in the Middle East have nothinqJ gain. I The basic obstacle to the attainment of a r*J settlement at Lausanne has been the Arab reh problem and the insistence of the Arab tions that solution of the repatriation issue made a condition precedent to a settlement Tkl Israeli government, on the other hand, has i tained that there could be no settlement c larger refugee issue except as an integral pan"l the general peace agreement. Since the Lsraail government has justly and logically held Hn( the mass exodus of Arabs from the country M| inspired by Arab propaganda, responsibility 1 the fate of the refugees rested on those wsJ created the problem. However, when the cor, I ference reached an impasse over those differences I the Israeli government, again displaying a sph of conciliation, made a gesture which, had I been rejected, would have sent the conferew spinning to failure. By consenting to take back 100.000 Arab reb gees at a time when it is struggling with the I problem of absorbing tens of thousands of lewisi immigrants already in the country and those sal I to come, the Israeli government has demonstrated a degree of generosity whose wisdom is qua tioned even by its best friends. Should the Laus-l anne conference end in failure the finger of gifl will point to precincts other than the Middle East flour to the Holy City was a welcome omen of course. But the greater omen lay in the fact that it brought fo the site of God's sanctuary SODS seventy thousand books that escaped the fires d Hitlerdom. Book and prayer shawl and phyladary have been our share and consolation throughout our wanderings in the ages. The survival of oar books has been the story of our survival. Judaism, whether in a congregation, in an Army or Navy post, or in a hospital. The chief difference is that he serves a different group of people in a different background. In a congregation the rabbi's activities are centered primarily around his synagogue, from which he branches out into the community. Hi= first call is to conduct religious services and to supervise a religious school. His last is to advance the personal welfare of the individual members. But in the chaplaincy the chief Jewish organizations in this area have joined together in the Peninsula Coordinating Committee, one of whose activities is to rfcrivfho* h0Spital Th,OU8h this body the mar.-power and especialij the woman-power of the com£r? i^T 0 ^" 2 ^* 0 take a full pait in the hospital program in foTihi' r nd L P~vide g parties r r • t e Je%vlf:n Patients on all Jewish festivals and ,i mi ar £. The hospital itself is quite Urge institution, with two full l me ^ n £y^b u ?y chaplains for situation is reversed, for personal the Protest nt TV .l P '"'" f r welfare is the immediate dailv ente As C f£ Cath,,1,c Patineed and formal religious services I the Datiertf^nH,'' !Hr cent of come second. Only the deep ap-'tho ncrln i tw ? piT cen of Pfal of the High Holy Day? and ableto servp thu &*h l am the Seder make these public r*. halfoftnt !" hl \ bodv ,n about nan ot the normal working week but with very intensive demands n my Ume while on duty nit l f aplaln in ,hu mental hosE^JSSLM?* yWch makes the Seder make these public occasions outstanding. The chaplain in a Veterans' Hospital is, of course, a civil service employee. However, he must be endorsed by his own national !.w.h! of rabbis means the Division of .{ionTile is YMr 1 8.00 FRED K. SHOCHET Editor and Publisher Telephones 2-1141—2-8212 OFFICE and PLANT 120 N. E. Sixth Street VO !HS5!?3 Number 32 FRIDAY, AUGUST 12. 1949 W. AV 17, 5709 hrJ Tu P !" 2 r hos P"als. Everv exist* f f the n,e tal hoipS exists for one purpose, therapy There are recreational then !" P^Pational therapy. "Sfffi i u! ie c „ ut,r : ost f satisfacNewepaoer.. Florid. Pr... Ae.oei.tion i Religious Activities of the Na-ltMm in Parl of tht medical OrJ U YMr R PT,ON RATE J, : n „ tional Jewish Welfare Board. The 1 n ZZ ^ re s P ecific • than ?wo v.'. • !" {Jg fEg^JWn 5 SanTof 0 ^! SfiW. Every pnes, a minimum of funds for expenses, as well as annual chapplains conferences and much advice and support. The active volunteers in the religious as well as social program of the nearby the Vetera pital i.< and th comprise area called the Peninsula, running ty P .S of ihe V A" U '' hospilal v/v system in th** high regard it gives to the work of the chaplains. Not only do we often consult the psychiatrists in regard to individual patients, but the medical men often request us to talk to certain patients with moral or religious problems and to aid in their solution. These problems of doubt, guilt or uncertainty are often central in the mind of a person with mental disorder, and so the chaplain may .. %  ecome an important ally of the psychiatrist. Recently our hospital arranged office hours for the chaplains to render this type of service. }y h J| h '" S aC, .' Ve .P art 'C'Pation in the healing situation dominates both aspects of the chaplains's daily 11 win^ 2* reli8iou s servi M well as the ward visiting, conerences with patients and their wEfc and all J those varie e|ng SUM Slth great "ntors. I try succ, f„ 1 C ^ ert 2 in measur of in sfnking ?he ,he con K"tion hvmns g hC more famil iar ErssErvl HS people Preparations For| Horzl Reburial Almost Complete TEL AVIV, (JTAi—Preparstions for the reburia! of the remains of Theodor Herzl, father of modern Zionism, are r.eanrn i completion in Jerusalem. A special grave, 13 feet deep, has already been carved nut on ta summit of the topmost height overlooking Jerusalem. The h:l which is located on the cihJ northern outskirts, faces the Mediterranean, on one .-ide, and the Dead Sea and the Judean Desert on the other. f The coffin containing Dr.Hens remains will be brought fro* Vienna to the Lydda airport W plane and thence will be escorts to Tel Aviv where a special session of the Knesset will be convened to take custody of the remains. The coffin will reffl" under guard in the Knesset chambers all night and, in the morning, will be transferred to Jerusalem. .J There, members of the Cabinet deputies of the parliament, men bers of the Jewish Agency representatives of municp councils throughout the counW as well as delegates from the .-t'ional institutions'will escort the bodv political parties and na stitutions will escort thi the grave in a procession ij-a an Israeli Army u nit -, Tne .T(7ni| site will be circled by ntig flags and the green *", lowered to its final rest, WWT speeches and to the accomp^ ment of traditional PW*^ the dead, as asked in Dr. W will. Gold was forbidden in Scofo in 1491 because people were • glecting their archery W for it. The chemical designation J the element Plutonium. „ gredient of the atom tx> mu PU. Christian patient who de 1 "" 1 ,^ a complete description oi'" ^ ernacle in the wilderness^ ^ cir own ernacle in the wuaern= sv tZ P al .J s l me "nexp7ctedoi.5r£ a "i ay ask Jewish bov who ob ^ V-tem m the'even weeks \H? llTJLt** r using the word,--JudaisTn i-ier. I remember one i (Continued next weew



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' 1 • v PAGE FOURTEEN *j€istfkrtf££. kMU(l( y f,VES CF OUR TjMES Chi OfTM WOHD'5 fOMMOST tltUCU : ...\L0i0n.STj AND OOTSTAM0IN6 AUTHORITIES ON ANCIENT PALESTINE FRIDAY, AUGUST 12, CtO BV NORMAN SOU NODtt. Tt'T EV LAUS.A G SHAftflx CfiVEO HIS AM EPUCATtO IN VARlOijrTESHIVQTH IN loUNO J WH!HtWASMRNlNW,Hl MOVED TO PALESTINE PUWN6TH t A-ir PIONEERING DATS OF 1912. FOR A TIME HE ENGAGED IH EDUCATIONAL WORK IN ((HALF Of THE ZIONIST ORGANIZATION IN PALESTINE.LATER HE BECAME FIELD ARCHAEOLOGIST FOR HEBREW UNIVERSITY. HE HAS CONDUCTED EXCAVATIONS ON THE "THIRD WALL'OF JERUSALEM,AND IN THE ANCIENT SYNAGOGUE ON THE CREEK ISLAND OF ALGINA.HL HAS DISCOVERED MANY AMTIQUI fR0fSUKENm--WH0 IS THE FATHER OF ISRAELI ARMY OPERATIONS CHIEF COL ^ALYADIN-WAS RECENTLY RKEI ED RY POPE PIUS WHO EXPRESSED DEEP NTEREST IN THE ISAIAH MANUSCRIPT. /^ y f7 (v^J HE RECENTLY CAME ACROSS AN ANCIENT MANUSCRIPT WHICH IS ATTRIBUTED TO THE PROfHET ISAIAH.TNIS DISCOVERY i5 CONSiDERED A 5RET tiNDMAU IN lUCAl 5OI01WSH AN ARCHAEOLOGIST WHOSE FINDINGS ARE BOUND TO LEAD TO THE SHEDDING OF MORE LIGHT ON ANCIENT JEWISH HISTORY sssft ,i,„.n-. im.jii TCLioAfMie AeiNcr Melvyn Douglas To Star In Radio Play Melvyn Dougla?. noted stage and screen actor, stars in the radio drama. "Mv Little Boy." latest episode in the new series. "Lest We Forget—Stories To Remember." to be broadcast tomorrow at 6 D.m. over station WVCG. Coral Gables. Participants in the fifteen-minute live par.el discussion to follow the broadcast will include: Professor Ross Beiler. department of government. University if Miami, who will serve as moderator: Dr. Granville Fisher, department of psychology, University of Miami: and Mr. a: d Mrs. Ben Essen, Coral Gables • "My Little Boy" is produced bv the Institute for Democratic Education, and describes how a father .inoculates hl= sor. against prejudices so that he and others can embark on a decent, happy life. The original story of "My Little Boy" was written by Carl Ewald and appeared in the Wollcott Reader. "Stones To Ren the 12th "Let We Forget" series of transcribed dramatic programs, is devoted to problems of intergroup tensions in the United States as viewed by outstanding writers. Sharet Chapter To Hold Meeting, Kiddie Party Next meeting of the Sharet Chapter. B"nai B'rith Young Women, will be held at the home of Mrs. Ruth Levick, 123 Zamora Ave.. Coral Gables, on Tuesday evening at 8:30. The meeting will be followed by a kiddie party at which all members will come dressed in children's clothes. Local Firm Makes Jewelry Cleaner A new fast-acting liquid ry cleaner has been placed on the market by the "•' Chemical Company, a Gi Miami firm. The clear liquid cli as Dip. is as safe to use hold cleanser, act Jrding I 'announcement by .".! urers. The product is simple and i to use. You take your je %  dip it for a second in the solution, place it under tap wati I %  wipe off with a tov • I ; The jewelry is as bright clean as new! The solution is a I to eyi i glass-wearers, too. : nol cleans the lens, but is ;safe for all cellulbid parts dissolves corrosion that gel ; the hinges in this clin At the present tin facturers are bottling the cleaner I in one size only—for ji cleaning. Since it cleans si ware with speed and i ever, the company plan.to put it out in a dip bottle la. to dip flat silver. One of the remarkable qualities of the product, the manufacturers report, is that it does not lose its potency and maj over and over again indefinitely. Inasmuch as the cleaner dissolveall oxidation and tarnisl without taking off any of the platinc : the silver or gold, there is no need for rubbing. Nursery Playground Will Be Carnival Feature A : %  nival I to b( -; nsored tl • Bet.-. I at tl • I • %  ) %  .. Synagogue, s W Ird 26th and 271 : I be 1 parent! may fry, Mrs. H presidi nt, announced. Sunt 2 p m. enterl ni • fa comy Mrs Bernard S Si that I I ted. Beth El Games Party Mrs. Adoipr. Gieenberg wi hostess at a games party to held Wednesday at 1 p.m. ..' Beth El Center, 500 S.W. 17th Ave. Assisting Mrs. Green will be Mrs. Samuel Wil Refreshments will be served. Proceeds will go to Beth El Talmud Torah. Beach A JC To S in MI SODI'artv rhe Mi i apter of A %  Congri -will er di card partj I • • Atlantis Rool • V %  Miami Bi %  '" p.m. Ml • %  .! Janofl chairman :' tl %  with Mrs. Manu< l %  m sing on the committee are the Giazi Mae Dolly Hersh, M : • • Siln. Matthew Silverstein, and Morris Young Adults To Hear Dr. Finer Dr. Herman Finer, eminent political scientist of the University of Chicago, will speak on the subject "The Next Ten Years: Peace or War?" before the Miami Beach YM & WHA Young Adult Planning Committee at Temple Beth Sholom. Sunday at 8:30 p.m. Dr. Finer, who recently gave the commencement address at the University of Miami's graduation ceremonies, has been a faculty member of the London School of Economics and Political Science and has served in high administrative and advisory positions with the United Nations, the British and the United States govern: ei iHe is also a prolific writer. Among his better known works aii The Road to Reaction," "America's Destiny." and "The Theory and Practice of Modern Government A social period will follow the discussion. The meeting is open to all young adults of the community. Top Price Paid for MEN'S USED CLOTHING AL'S 432 N. MIAMI AVE. Phone 2-3213 JEWISH CUISINE LUNCHEON SPECIALS S A N D W ICHES SOUR CREAM WITH COTTAGE CHEESE SOUR CREAM WITH VEGETABLES Air-Conditioned Mezzanine Floor Tin: SHOW PLACE OF THE CAROLINAS LAKESIDE IM N On Lak Osceola In The Blue Ridge Mountains COOL — COOL You'll use blankets every night EVERY ROOM PRIVATE BATH EXCELLENT FOOD Swimming, Boating. Fishing, Golf, Riding Scenic Tours. Social Director Write or wire for Reservations Dick Sachsel, Mgr. Hendersonville, N. C. Beth David Sisterhood Board Meeting Slated :. d ul the I is slated for Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. at Beth David Talmud rorah, to an announcement by Mrs. Harry Gordon, president. Plans for the carnival to be sponsored by the croup on August 28 will :' discussed. All board members are urged tu be presi nt. The Showcase of Good Food The GOVERNOR CAFETERIA 1225 WASHINGTON AVE. MIAMI BEACH The GREATER MIAMI VAAD HAKASHRUTH The Only Community-Wide Kashruth Association Participating agency of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, announces that any chickens without the ring which bears the insignia (1*183 are not endorsed by the VaadOther information in the field of Kashruth in this araa may be obtained by callinq our Director. Rabbi Joseph E, Rackovsky, 818 Michigan Avenue, Miami Beach, Phone 5-3595. Miami Beach, Phone 5-3595. HARRY SIRKIN. Pres. H. SOOTIN, Secv A. M. BEAR. Vice Pre.. S LOBELVW LISTEN TO THE Jewish Musical Hour WTTT—1490 on Your Dial JACOB SCHACHTER Director NORMAN R. LYONS Newscaster and Historical Narrator NOW FOUR TIMES A WEEK SUNDAY FROM 10 A.M. TO 11 AM. MONDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY FROM 1 P.M. TO 1:30 P.M. MOUNT NEB0 CEMETERY Offers to DISCRIMINATING FAMILIES A 5-POINT PURCHASE PLAN • Wise Counseling • Beautiful Landscaping • Perpetual Care • Pr-Need Budget Pi* 0 • Special Protective Features Ideally Located Near West Flagler at 53rd Aven J* „ General Office—Olympia Bldfl. For Information Phone 3-3 RABBI S. M. MACHTEI. Exec Vice-President ROBERT YAFFEY. Sates Director



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' It PAGE TWO +Je*istncrMj2£_ FRIDAY, AUGUST 12, I'll Say... The sudden emergence of the Republic Israel has left us in a daze. After a thing is accomplished, it no longer looks so difficult. Students of history are attributing this miracle to the peculiar brand of Nazi anti-Semitism, with its dogma of genocide, which ultimately resulted in the cremation of 6.000.000 souls. Jews, whether faithful to tradition or converts to Christianity, were caught in a trap that spelled their doom. A Jewish state appeared as the only solution for survival. The Spanish Catastrophe Yet in the long range of Jewish history there occurred tragic events which, allowing for the differential in population, were proportionately as catastrophic as the Nazi extermination. And after such ghastly experiences, the student asks why a concentrated effort was not made towards the creation of a Jewish state. For example, the expulsion from Spain in 1492 has always been considered a calamity on a par with the destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans. Church and State have consistently kept up the pretense that the Spanish edict was merely a measure to force baptism. Actually, the New Christian, as a convert was then called, was in a worse position than the observing Jew. The Inquisition, like a rattlesnake coiled up in dark secrecy, was ever ready to strike with its poisonous fangs any Mariano whose sincerity to Christian doctrine was under suspicion. And any well-to-do converso was automatically a suspect. Thus in the 16th century, Jews, faithful or converted, were in most Catholic lands in the same trap as their descendents, who found themselves in Nazi Europe four centuries later. At no time was there a more desperate need for a Jewish state. For, as in our own day, the wholesale expulsion caught the refugees without a destination. The Christian world was closed almost air tight. The Moslem lands, with the exception of Turkey, had sunk into fanaticism, ignorance and bigotry. Boats loaded with Spanish exiles sailed from port to port The Messiah vs. The Jewish State By HARRY SIMONHOFF rasca lly sea captains sold them as slaves until the or threw them into • Don Isaac Abravenel How did J,ws meet the Spanish catastrophe on the ideological plane? Among thorn were men ol minent abilities' The outstanding leader was h celebrated Don Isaac A Here w, nomere bookworm. Don U who ft**" his descent from David's royal lme was a financier and statesman who served Portugal. Spain the Kingdom of Naples width, Rep ^Trd^md his capable management of th. treasury, H'.d.n.md and Isabella won the M > sh war and entered Granada in triumpl Yet si> nths lat. Abravenel took up the wand. tf and joined his fellow exiles. Don Isaac Abravenel, a scholar deeply versed in Hebrew learning, was widelj £e Humamsno k)re of tn ,nc( At homo in Hebrew, Latin Greek. Spanish and Portugese, • was a voluminous wrher K the royal palace ol th, Catholic: kings he was in a position to know real pohtik Intimately— for Spain was tin lending power of the day. Sage, philosopher, statesman and influential loader. Don Isaac was in a peculiar position to render signal service to his shattered brethren. He could have sounded a clarion call for the exiles to wind their tortuous way to the Holy Land. Un %  r his leadership a golden opportunity was waiting to lay the foundations for a Jewish state, H< had the jump uf four centuries on Theodore H The Missed Opportunity But the glorious opportunity was muffed,. Palestine, greatly underpopulated, was under the rule of the Egvptian Marmelukes. In 1")17 '.hose redoubtable slave soldiers lost their empire to the conquering Turks. The Jews could simply have moved in. Thennucleus would have been aug y the constant addition of new immigrants, fleeing from the waves of persecutions that wen the order of the day. Material assistance could have come from Po| an( i which in those days, strange tosay, was the p^ pcrous center of a populous Jewish community, en joying a measure of self-government (Council 0 f three lands). The communities in Italy, then the center of European art and culture, would have been quite helpful Turkey, a newcomer in the West and a great power, had opened its gates to the Spanish refugees. The growing communities in Constant!, nople and Salonica, an almost all Jewish city, Were the New York and London of those days. Messianism But Don Isaac Abravenel turned mystic. He be. came obsessed with the idea that the Messiah was on the way and about to turn the corner. The realistic statesman delved into the sources of Messianic speculation; he wrote three books to prove from Holy Writ that the long awaited Redeemer was about to appear. Under such circumstances, it was superfluous, nay even a sacrilege, to hasten the End (Ketz). to attempt God's own task through concerted human action. Restored faith in the speedy advent of a Savior may have brought solace to the bereaved footsore refugees. It sustained them in their intolerable misery. But it also paralyzed all effort to attempt a solution to the thousand year old Galut, ar. enigma of unspeakable suffering. A rigid, inflexible Orthodoxy accepted Abravenel's dictum as to the early advent of the Messiah. All human effort to end the unendurable misery of the Galut was branded a sin and crime against Rebono Shel Olam. Woe to any rebel daring enough to defy Rabbinic rule. The ban hurled against DeCosta ar.il Spinoza was enough to intimidate the bravest. Ghetto walls had to suffocate Jewry for centuries; Bogdan Chmielnicki had to all but destroy the thriving community in Poland; the fantastic antiques of the Sabbatai Zevis had to cause Judaism to blush with shame: the Nazis had to exterminate by the million In lore Medinas Israel could arise without Messianic intervention. NOW THERE'S MORE BUDWEISER ...and there will be still more as our vast expansion program continues Budweiser fO U • T 0*F ANHEUSER-BUSCH SAINT LOUIS Distributed by NATIONAL BRANDS, Inc. SAM BLANK. Pres. Phone 2-7401 Miami, Fla. Vet Patients Entertained B'nai B'rith Lodges and Women's Chapters entertained patients at Pratt General Hospital, Cora! Gables, last night with a small vaudeville revue presented by Betty Ward's Youth Roundup. Miss Arlene Shapiro of the Roundup staff made arrangements for the program, which included. in addition to Rounduppers. Jack Murphy, pantomimist. Mrs. Sidney Boeninger. B'nai B'rith Women's hospital representative; Leo Steinman. men's hospital representative; and Marx Faber were in charge of the affair. Greenwalds, Perrins To Entertain In Honor Of Children's Birthdays Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Greenwald, 1576 S.W. 2nd St., and Mr. and Mrs. N. Perrin will be joint hosts at a party in honor of their children's birthdays on Sundav afternoon at 2:30 at Fairyland Park, 3647 N.W. 36th St. A clown will spark the celebration which mark.' the second birthday of the Greenwalds" daughter, Libby, and the fourth of the Perrins' son, Evan. No personal invitations have been issued and friends are invited to attend. I .Hill \HM i i Ml > la <•<•' %  hi a Colombia and Bolivia in attei dan< i. Pai I icipai ts will com-1 pete in football, basketball, swimming, tennis and oth< I sports. The Israeli Ambassador to Uruguay, Dr.yaacov Tsur, will servi as chairman of tl e Ma Formation of a Uruguayan committee to aid the Weizmann Institute of Science at Rehovot was announced her, this week. Dr. Jacob Chazan was name I chairman of the now group, which represents all sections of the Jewish community in this country. THEY'RE SALT FREE! A tempting treat lor everyone at all times, HOROWITZMARGARETEN Oven Crisp MATZOHS are particularly welcome to people on special diets, because THEY CONTAIN NO SALT! IPLE-PACKED TO PROTECT FRESHNESS! Distributed by PALM DISTRIBUTORS, EfC 14 N.E. 24th St., Miami 37, Fla. Phone 3-6866 Lyons To Speak On Herzl A biographical sketch of Theodore Herzl, founder of political Zionism, will be given y Norman i R. Lyons Sundav at 10 a.m. on Jacob Schachters J< wis Hour. The program may be station WTTT on Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 1 p m | on Sundav at 10 i •> % %  : > % %  M Zsme Cmwa/gwm km >,*'& %  § HERE'S BUTTER YOU'LL REALLY Attention to every detail of Jewish relioious] requirements in an atmosphere of beauty and peace distinguishes our service to the I Jewish family. [ Our two complete funeral chapels are up-to-\ the-minute in every detail of their equipment— beautifully furnished and decoratedl throughout. ftC I H'i Breakitone'i Whipped Butter .[. freihly churned and whipped until it hat a flovor and creamlne such at you've never tasted In butler before, h'i economical, too, became It ipreadi eailer and goei further. Ask for H at your nel 8 hborhood store. mm TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS \m WHIPPED BUTTER WMT Ol UOHTLY MtriO twm Miami Of f 1 713 N.W. 7th Ave^ Phone 82-17:1! West Flagier & 20th Ave. Phone: 1236 Washington Ave. COWARD I NfWMAN F UI IN NEW | K Minn \inin: • [ISI NBIRI t MNUI



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FRIDAY, AUGUST 12, 1949 +Jewislifhrldiar PAGE ELEVEN "Between You and Me" By BORIS SMOLAR (Copyright, 1948, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.) Cantor Julius Rosenstein To Officiate At Gables Congregation Holiday Services | ZIONIST TALKS: There is renewed talk in New York of the advisability of merging all existing Zionist groups in Use United States into one coordinated body This has long been advocated by David Ben Curion, even prior to the establishment of the Jewish State Now one can hear even more drastic suggestions in circles close to the Israeli government These circles advance the idea that the American Zionist groups should merge into an organization to be called American Friends for Israel Such an organization, they believe, would enjoy the advantage of also having non-Zionists as members While it is not likely that an organization of this kind will be formed prior to the next Zionist Congress, the unification of I all American Zionist groups in a central Zionist body may become a matter of serious discussion within a few months Tourist traffic from the United States to Israel is steadily increasing The number of visas issued in this country totalled 5,437 during the first six months of this year ... In recent months tourists have been exchanging foreign currency into Israeli currency at the rate of $1 500,000 a month ... It is estimated that approximately 100,000 Christian pilgrims will visit Israel in 1950 That year is designated bv the Vatican as a Holy Year Since 1475 one year in every twenty-five is celebrated by the Catholic Church as a Holy Year In fact, the Vatican has already appointed a high official of the Italian Foreign Ministry to make arrangements for the pilgrimage to Israel Churches, monasteries and parochial schools in Israel will meet the housing needs of the pilgrims The Israeli Ministry of Religion has promised to provide the necessary facilities for the pilgrims. # ( ( THE DOMESTIC FRONT: The changes that are occurring, and are likely to occur, in the United States point in the direction of a gradual reduction in discrimination and prejudice This is the conclusion to which Arnold and Caroline 'Rose, authorities on race relations, come in their "America Divided" just published by Alfred Knopf The book is one of the finest surveys on racial, religious and ethnic antagonisms in the United States The authors discuss frankly the various aspects of racial hatred in this country and discrimination in its economic and social life Naturally, the position of the Jews in the United States is dealt with lengthily in the book The authors establish that while American Jews were originally quite divided about Zionism, with probably the great majority opposed, this is not the case any longer And to them the future of anti-Semitism in America depends^very much on whether the Jewish state leans toward the United STates or Russia "If the Jews come to appear as party of a threat to the safety of the United States, hatred against them might suddenly rise to fever pitch," the authors warn Thev point to the fact that because of the Palestine issue hatred of Jew's suddenly rose in Britain between 1945 and 1947 However, they state that propaganda against Jews in the United States has been on the decline since World War II The book emphasizes that there is always a danger of increased racial discrimination and intcrgroup hatred in case of economic disaster ... At the same time, the authors feel that extreme forms of intergroup hatred are to be feared only if political fascism comes to this country. Julius Rosenstein, Miami Beach cantor, will officiate at the High Holy Day services for the First Jewish Congregation at the Coliseum, Douglas Road at S.W. 16th St., Coral Gables. Cantor Rosenstein will be accompanied by a mixed choir composed of members of the congregation. Choir rehearsals are now being held, Lee Viau, congregation president, announces. Next rehearsal will be held at the home of Cantor Rosenstein, 1401 Alton Road, Miami Beach, on Sunday afternoon. Anyone interested in joining the choir. Platt states, may call Prof. Pierre Mande at 48-7247. Last rehearsal was held at the home of Mrs. Ruth Borok. Participating were Mr. and Mrs. Leon Honig, Dr. and Mrs. Seymour Blumenthal, Mrs. Mandron and Prof. Mande. Following the practice. Prof. Mande presented a violin recital. He was accompanied by Mrs. Blumenthal. To help those who close business for the High Holy Days ana those who travel for services, Platt announces, services will begin at 8 pun. on Rosh Hashono Eve and at 6 p.m. on Yom Kippur Eve %  •. A The congregation has invited as its guests for the services the Jewish students at the University of Miami, veterans at Pratt Hospital and patients at the Hebrew School Opens l!H!)-.~0 leriii On Monday Leo Sheiner, chairman of the board of education of the Miami Hebrew School and Congregation, announces that the 1949-50 term of Hebrew School will get underway Monday. Parents may register their children from 10 a.m. to 12 noon on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday and from 7:30 to 9 p.m. on Tuesday. For the convenience of children who will be away until after Labor Day, late .registration will be held from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. on September 6, 7 and 8. Parents may simultaneously register children for Sunday School which is slated to commence shortly after Labor Day. Cantor Julius Rosenstein Cardiac National Children's Home. Jacobson Will Speak On Jazz Monday Night A recorded musical demonstration and talk on the subject "Jazz and Modern Society" will be given by Charles R. Jacobson at the AVC Freedom House, 4323 Collins Ave., Monday at 8:30 p.m. Jacobson will trace the origin and development of jazz music and illustrate his lecture with unusual jazz recordings by top modern artists. Program is under the direction of Miss Helen Barclay. Intermediate Basketball A three-man summer basketball league for intermediates (boys up to, but not including, 15 years of age) has been formed at the Miami Y. Games will be played each Tuesday and Thursday afternoon at 4 o'clock at the Y building, 450 S.W. 16th Ave. A double round-robin tournament has been organized for four participating teams, which include: Haganahs captained by Gordon "Boopsy" Miller; Maccabees, by Bob Fisher; Bialiks, by Leonard Booth; Hobohnims, by "Gremlin" Mendel. News Brief Mrs. "T," formerly of the Floridian Beauty Salon, Baltimore, is now located at Harold's Beauty Salon, 1039 Lincoln Road. Iluty On Parcels To Israel Is Set As of last week, duty on all standard food parcels sent to Israel must be prepaid in the U.S., and such parcels can be mailed only through authorized agencies, according to an announcement by the Consulate General of Israel, 11 East 70th St., New York City. The duty on these parcles amounts to 30 mils per kilogram, that is, about four cents per pound, and will be collected by authorized agencies, a list of which may be obtained at the consulate. No more than one parcel may be sent to any one person within one month. Self-packed food parcels, which do not conform to the regulations for standard parcels, will be limited to 2 kilograms (4.4 pounds). The duty on such parcels amounts to 40 mils per kilogram, that is about 5>£ cents per pound and must be paid in Israel by the recipient. No more than two parcels may be sent to any one family in one month. ^^^^ Breakfast Will Honor Gannes A community-wide breakfast in honor of the departing executive director of the Bureau of Jewish Education, A. P. Gannes, who will leave to assume the post of executive director of the Philadelphia Council on Jewish Education September 1, is slated for Sunday, August 21, at 9:45 a.m. at the Hyde Park Hotel, Miami Beach. Eli Hurwitz heads the committee in charge. Assisting him arcMrs. Matilda Ratner, Mrs. Jack Rosenberg, Mrs. Milton Sachs and Max Meisel. Reservations may be made oy calling 3-5858. GORDON ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORKS Hava your roof rapalrad now; you will aava on a now roof latar "Satiofaotory Work by Exparlanead Man" 414 a. w. 82nd Avanua PHONE 4-6M0 OCULIST'S PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED LENSES AND FRAMES DUPLICATED LARGE SELECTION IN LATEST STYLES Beach Optical Service 350 Lincoln Road Suit* 502 — Phone 5-5419 AUTO GLASS Installed While You Wait Full Line of Auto Accessories and Paris ADAMS GLASS SERVICE 1805 Purdy Avenue Call 58-3756 or 5-4316 Complete ml beptndaUe 5We <&*** M IAMI TITLC Gkttact Co. 24 YEARS OF TITLE SERVICE IN DADE COUNTY ESCROWS ABSTRACTS TITLE INSURANCE! Title Iniuranc* Policies of Kansas CUT Till* Insurance Co. Assets Over $2,000,000.00 104 N.E. FIRST STREET TELEPHONE 3-6661 Llfa Inaurance Eatataa Authoritatively Programmed NAT GANS Metropolitan Llfa Ina. Co. 907 Blacayne BldQ. Ph. 3 4616 or 4-0981 Baa or phona ma for your LIFE INSURANCE NEEDS Yiddish Classical Hour WINZ (940 on Your Dial) EVERY SUNDAY 12:00 Noon to 1:30 P. M. EVERY TUESDAY 8:00 to 7:00 P. M. A Variety oi Stars in the Latest Recording* Available CLASSICAL—LITURGICAL AND FOLK MUSIC Listen to our New Feature "JEWISH HUMOR" M. Naaetir. Program Director Spend Your SUMMER VACATION at the De Soto Hotel and Health Resort SAFETY HARBOR, FLORIDA Rest and relax at one of the West Coast's finest hotels. Spring Vacation rates of $8 per day. American Plan, effective now. TELEPHONE: CLEARWATEH. FLA2587



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JAY, AUGUST 12, 1949 + k-nlsHh-rldflnr PAOE FIVE iple Israel To Conduct Two Complete irvices On High Holiday Evenings Fin compliance with the recommendations of the Union of lerican Hebrew Congregations, parent organization of ReJudaism in America, Temple Israel, Florida's largest ReJewish congregation, has announced two complete services 3 e held consecutively in the Temple's main auditorium on evening! of the New Year,*— tcmber 23, and Yom Kippur, obor 2. jles Pearlman, president of [congregation, announced that procedure which will extend %  all Temple Israel's members Importunity to attend services %  he main auditorium on the lino of the Holy Days was Mr-d at a recent board meeting, erviccs will be held at 7:30 and at 9 p.m. on the New lr ;ind Atonement Eves. the past when only one eveservice was held it was essary to have an overflow ,j cc in Kaplan Hall bese of the large Temple memship. Pearlman explained. tis year, however, as an added fcice to Temple members, and anticipation of the increased fcribership rolls due to the curft drive for new members refctlv undertaken by the Temple, two evening services will be lugurated," he said. Hefoi-m congregations in Philfclphia. Los Angeles, San Cjcisco, Chicago and New York also instituting this system year in answer to the inlased needs and to the growing Dibers in Reform congregations, irlman continued. president also announced Bt the Temple is presently enB cd in a renovation and imBvement project which will enjice and expand the facilities [the present building which was cted in 1928. The building mmittee is under the chairman„ of Leo Ackerman and Inkles Ellard G. Kohn, Emil J. fuld. Herman Wronker, M. M. |son, Leonard A. Wien and Norn M. Ciller. The membership tmittee is headed by A. A. reen. Services at the temple during he High Holy Days will iniude. in addition to the evening services, a New Year's Day crvice on September 24 at 10 Lm., an all day service on the Day of Atonement. October 3, (ginning at 10 a.m.—with a Dildren's service at 1 p.m. and memorial service at 4 p.m. |The services will be conducted Rabbi Colman A. Zwitman, %  ritual leader, and Dr. Jacob H. apian, rabbi emeritus. The musi( 1 sections will be provided by double choir under the direction of Frances Tarboux, organist. Information about Temple membership and arrangements for attendance at High Holy Day services may be obtained by contacting the Temple office at 9-1757. CANTOR WANTED | For High Holiday Services in Miami Beach Write C. W., Box 2973 Miami 18, FTa. RUTH GROSS AGENCY Inc. GENERAL INSURANCE BONDS LIFE Phone 58-9538 350 LINCOLN ROAD INVESTMENT ADVISER %  living advice—Handling Dtsi-re%  tloiiiiry accounts lr<>r advice, mall your Investment %  problem with minimum fee of 15.00 payable In advance, to: NATHAN ABRAHAM |PO. Box 1922 Miami 11, Fla. Foor Enters Race For City Council Sam Foor, resident of Florida for the past 41 years, has announced his resignation as inspector and investigator for the Workmen's Compensation Division of the Florida Industrial Commission in order to run for the office of city commissioner in the November elections. In announcing his candidacy, Foor, who lives at 102 N.E. 20th Terr., pledged that he would "be subject to neither influence nor commands from any clique or faction." He stated that he will keep in touch with matters political and support whatever he believes to be sound progressive public policy. "We should have laws as friendly as our people and officials to administer those laws who will not seek to impair the lawful rights of our citizens," Foor said. He asserted that he has always supported organized labor and the veterans and will continue to do so. He advocates the bringing of payrolls here and the legalization of gambling. Camp Converted NEW YORK. (JTA)—A former German concentration camp in Norway has been converted into a "children's city" lor Jewisn children threatened by tuberculosis, the Norwegian Information Service revealed here. The children will be accommodated at the camp at Holmestrand for about eight months, after which they will proceed to Israel if their health permits. The "city will accommodate 200 children at a time and it is expected that a total of 600 will be treated there. Obituaries MRS. BARBARA HOFFMAN An 11, •< %  • %  % %  • • .li.tenure • No Icrlloiine Seom • Saorl Styl'f Haa'l $is.s D'Scholl FOOT COMFORT* SHOP 137 N.E. 1st Street Bet. let and 2nd A vet., Miami J. SKLOW, Owner es THIRSTY KERCHIEF Dries Hair in Half the Time! *4-95 Lilly Dache designed new tie-on you arrange to suit yourself and wear wherever you're going! It draws the water from your hair; often dries pin-curls right lor combing in an hour! Yet never affects hair's natural oils! Burdine't, Miami, Toiletries, Street Floor ^tfOPfO* (JUNE, BEST^=^HEALTH BUTTER EGGS niiii i iniuiMU i run O ew MIDNIGHT TO 3 AYEM Versatile Roger Krupp brings you music flavored with the Krupp personality to produce an extremely enjoyable three hours. "YOUR FAVORITE STATION FOR MUSIC AND NEWS" The Hebrew Academy 918 Sixth Street Miami Beach, Florida announces to its many friends that REGISTRATION FOR PUPILS will take place Beginning August 15th, 1949 GIVE YOUR SON OR DAUGHTER THE ADVANTAGE OF: • Dramatics • Progressive English Education • Maximum Hebrew Instruction • Careful Transportation to and from the Academy • Hot scientifically prepared lunch • Afternoon Refreshments • Physical Training and Athletic Programs • Arts and Crafts • Public Speaking • Medical Care — under the expert supervision of a well trained and professional faculty. CLASSES FROM THE KINDERGARTEN THROUGH TO THE SEVENTH GRADE Phone 58-4641 for an appointment



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/, j • PAGE TEN + ltl&lkMidtor FRIDAY, AUGUST 12.; JEWS IN SPORTS Bv HASKELL COHEN Max Patkin, baseball comedian formerly with the Cleveland Indians, reports that he already has made as many appearances this year as he had during all of last season, and that he has been greeted by good crowds wherever he has been. About a month ago. Max was driving through Gastonia, N. C. on his way to Lumberton. N. C, when his new automobile was damaged in a collision. Patkin discovered that the other driver worked for a friend of his. Buddy Lews of the Washington Senators, who operates a Ford Agency in Gastonia. Patkir. is booked for his baseball tour by Eddie Gottlieb, the Philadelphia promoter. Ed sent Max out with The Philadelphia Sphas basketball team last winter when they toured the country with the Harlem Globetrotters. Patkin had a funny skit or two which he put on during the play. He appeared on the court dressed in a 1910 woman's bathing suit and went into his body gyrations, which are second to none. Max is quite a dancer and in certain parts of his act put on hilarious jitterbug exhibitions. • • Speaking of Eddie Gottlieb we are reminded that his former star Negro baseball player. Harry Simpson, is the talk of Eastern League baseball circles. The young slugger has blasted 25 home runs and bids fair to break the loop record set in 1930 by Ken Strong when the former N.Y.U. athlete clubbed 41 four-base hits. Former major league players in the loop are amazed at Simpson's tremendous hitting power and claim that he will astonish the fans in the big time when he comes up with Cleveland. The Indians purchased Simpson from Gottlieb's Philly Stars, last winter. We were in Getty's hotel room when a representative of the Indians spoke to him via long distance telephone and tried to hurry the mogul into selling the boy for a pittance. Gotty was so sure the boy had the makings of a star that he insisted on a financial arrangement that will net him a tidy sum from the Indians, something like seven times what the major league representative originally offered. Gottlieb is one of the few person; connected with Negro baseball who has not suffered in dealings with the major league moguls. Few people realize that Branch Rickey acquired Robinson, Campanella and Newcombe without laying out a penny of Brooklyn's money. When Rickey wanted a hurler from Gottlieb's Philly Stars, however, he approached Eddie in a business-like manner and purchased the player. Gottlieb, certain that the pitcher involved would not make good, insisted that Brooklyn return the player in the event he failed to make the grade. Rickey sent the hurler back when they discovered he wasn't the plaver they thought he was. Thus Gottlieb received money and the player back, making him one of the very few to outsmart Branch Rickey. • • • Goody Rosen, former Dodger and Giant outfielder, is playing in the Inter-county League in Ontario, Canada. Goody has turned down several lucrative offers to return to organized baseball. His restaurant in Canada is doing so well he finds it hard to leave the premises for extended periods of time. Murray Franklin, one of the former Mexican League players recentlv reinstated by Commissioner Happy Chandler, has been released by Detroit and caught on with Hollywood in the Pacific Coast League. Franklin played for Los Angeles in the same circuit for three years prior to joining the Tigers in 1942. He is an in fielder. Hal Saltzman copped his fifteenth win last week for Portland in the Pacific Coast circuit to give him one of the best records in the wheel. He pitched a shutout to gain his fourteenth triumph and just missed another in winning his latest game L. Adlor Will tttend Chicago Medical §ehal Lawrence Ale, 4326 Post Ave.. Mian iA^tfftoS the students enrolled in the t.. class at the Chicago M ^ C e 8 of S h h e"ve fully accredited medical schools h Chicago, the BSKMSMS countries. hised Admission policies *"? solely on character and scholar ship merit and only 1 LEGAL NOTICE TcTrTcE UNDER FICTITIOUS N „,,,, $m&**m .-. ,h. undenilgned, dealt IIIR to engage in !; V I .';,' Miami M* Worlda, '""" U ""HARRY MARGOLIN MAT MAW'.OIJN l,|.;n IIIMMKIMILLER PODBLL, ESQS. Attorney! tor Applicants 35 Lincoln Road 19 l/S-U accepted applications ye Lester N. Selig is chairman of the board of trustees of the school and Dr. John J. She.nin is dean. LEGAL NOTICE FICTITIOUS NOTICE IS HKHKI NOTICE UNDER NAME LA y\ ; iVKN that :";;,;:: : ,. .,.. Commander Joshua L. Goldberg, who has been named by the Department of the Navy as District Chaplain of the Third Naval District, the highest administrative post ever occupied by a Jewish chaplain in the armed forces in time of war or peace. Chaplain Goldberg is the Navy's official liaison officer with the Division of Religious Activities of the National Jewish Welfare Board. fvablos Ontor If old* M<. iii$> The Coral Gables Jewish Center held its monthly meeting Sunday at the Hillel House in Coral Gables. Herbert Gelernter presided. The new temple building at 320 Palermo Ave., Coral Gables, now under construction, was the primary concern of the group. Sam Silver was named chairman of the fund raising committee for the project. Stanley Wayne was appointed chairman of the committee in charge of forming a men's club affiliated with the congregation. Elected to serve on the board were Maurice Corenblum, Theodore Wayne. Sam Schulefend, Dr. Leo Wool and Joseph Koven. NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COIR1 IN AXn FUR DAME '.'..'. N FLORIDA. IX PROBATE. N" 22N34. In Re: ESTATE OF MORRIS J liERSTEIN, I leei To All Creditor* a il VII Pi Ing Claim* oi Demi ds x Said Gsl • I .. and eai h of you, notified and required to i %  '• %  nl any claims an.! ii you, % %  either of vc.ii. may hawagainst ih. .Mute of MORRIS J. UERSTEIX deceased late of Dade Count> Fl In the Hon W F BLAXTOX O I i idgi % %  : 1 lade i o intj. and file the Kami hit offli-i IIn I'ounl Courthouse in Dade Counts I within eight i alendar ninths from .in.Ianei tli. first publication hereof Said claims in demands to contain the legal addrest ol the claimant and to he swoi %  i : • nted afot esaid, oi same uill be barred. See 8< tlon 120 of ih. 19 li Aii Dati \ .-. ISI -. A 11. 1949 UERALD "L" GLEASON and i: DAVID ROSEN ACo-exi %  :'• f the Last Will and Test unenl of Ml iRRJS .1. nERSTEIN, I -il E DAVID ROSEN -,! % %  Seybold Hide Miami. I' Attorney for Exei utoi a %  12-19-21 IE F FLORIDA, IN AND FOR DADE -,,| vrv — IN CHANCERY, No. EVELYN BECK NELL, Plaintiff, vs. fiEOROE LESTER HECKNELL, YOU? ""EOROB l.KSTER HF.CKNELL Residence I'nknown, are notlii,.,i to file vein appearance In the ,Bi foi divorce, on or before s. .|.t..iiil.i-i '.. I!•!!•. or • decree pro so will I iit.i.d against you. DATED August 1. I4. K B LEATHERMAN, Clerk ""''•''" „**, ... By M. C. FEU'.K. Deputy Clerk. MAX It SILVER. Attnrnev for Plaintiff Seybold Building Miami. Florida :,.12-19-26 9 2 IN AND Edit DADR" FLORIDA. IN pRo B In Re:'ESTATE OF CI^ARA K. I'Ai'KTTI, fwj To All Creditors snd AU tu£A ing Claims or Demand, Said Estate: You, and each of you, v> |_ notified and required tu'pmslT • l.iiins ahd demand.whkh jl either of you, may have uiiul estate of CLAKA I'ACtriTjU' late of DADE County, FlorWiki HON. W. F. BLANTON Judge of Dade County, and til same In his office In th( Courthouse In Dad* County | within eight calendar moaiaj the date of the flist publication of. Said claims or demand! to. the legal addrens ef the clalntag to be sworn to and presentedu A said, or same will he barred I Section 120 of the 1S33 Probiui Date July 12, A D. lms VIOI.A M. DO\MJ.H| As Executrix of the Emf Clara E. Pacettl, DecMM MARION BROOKS Attorney for Executrix 7/22-29 8/3-12 BV ATTENTION ATTORNEYS! The Jewish Floridian solicits your legal notices. We appreciate your patronage and guarantee accurate service at legal rates. Phone 2-1141 for messenger service. Tel Aviv-Jerusalem Train Greeted Enthusiastically JERUSALEM, (JTAj — The population of Jerusalem enthusiastically celebrated the arrival this week of the first train to make the Tel Aviv-Jerusalem run since the declaration of Israel's independence on May 4, 1948. The train pulled into the crowded Jerusalem station at exactly noon. In the flag-bedecked station were hundreds of prominent guests, including members of the cabinet, led by Premier David Ben Gurion, members of the Jewish Agency executive, as well as local officials. Minister of Communications David Rcmez rode with the train from Tel Aviv. Steel-helmeted Army escort contrasted strangely with the flowers and banners which were scattered over the entire train. NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of Alterman Transport Lines at 1091 K W. 22nd Street, Miami, Fla., intends t" register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade .. Florida. SIDNEY ALT Kit MAN Sole Owner GEORGE CHERTKI P Attorney for Applicant oiympla Bldg 8/5-12-W-M NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN thai the undersigned, desiring to i ng igi inder the fictitlnu nnmei : Luxurla Clenners; l,\.n ., Laundry ii"! I. AH i.i Cleani and Laundi y at 1022 \. w r,th Ave Miami, Florida, intends to register said nnme Ith the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida I.OCIS 01TTLEMAN Sole Owner S 12-19-24 9/S Gables Women To Stage Spaghetti Supper, Dance Coral Gables Jewish Center Sisterhood will sponsor a spaghetti supper and barn dance on Saturday. August 20, at 7 p.m. at the Chamber of Commerce Building, 300 Sunset Drive, South Miami. Admission is S1.50. Anyone wishing information and reservations is requested to SaeaaS 1 ^ dne Y Richman, 48-4343; Mrs. Sam Silver, 48-2582' or Mrs. Ted Wayne. 48-5507. NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai the undersigned, desiring to engage In nes; under the ti. titlous name o: Miami Beach Laundrj & Laundromat at 1305 2oth Street Miami Beach, Honda, ml,.iids i registi : .-., d I ame with the ci.-ik of the Circuit Court ol l iade County, Florida BAR). M C( dl.i i\" Sole i iwner FREDERICK S (iROSKBERU Attorney for applicant .a) Biscayne Bide 8 12-19-26 9 :-: %  NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S I'UI'RT IN ANI> Foil DADE COUNTY, FI.OIIIDA.—IN I %  !'.( il'.ATE. No ._-_ % %  In Re: ESTATE OP MATH K W %  : M A TONICAN, I '-leased. To All Creditors ami All Persona Having Claims or Demands Against Said Estate: You, aid each of you, are hereby notified and required to present any and demands which you. or either of you, may have attalnst the estate of Mathew E. Matonloan deceaseiI late of Dade County, Florida. to tinHon W !•'. Blanton, County hide,of Oade County, and file the same In his office In the County Courthouse In Dade County, Florida, within eight calendar months from the date of tlifirst publication hereof. Bald claims or demands to contain the legal addreaa of the claimant and to be sworn to and presented as aforesaid, said or -ame iii be barred. See Section 120 of the 1933 Probate Act, Date August :. A.D. 1949. FRIEDA I.KININGER, As Executrix of the Last will and Testament of Mathew E. Matoni• in, Deceased. MARX FABER U2 Congress Hldg., Miami. Florid I Atto ney I Exi itrlg 8/5-12-19-24 NOTICE OF INTENTION TO L APPLICATION FOR FINUp DISCHARGE IN COCNTY JUDGE'S DADE COUNTY, KI^IRIDA -j 19554. RE: ESTATE OP MURRAY MILLER, Deceased NOTICE is hereby given have filed my final u-i-irt and p for Final Dischaige as Ailmlmit of the estate of Murray Millr.l ceased; and that on the Hit < August, 1949, will apply to the I aide W. F. Blanton, County of Dade County, Florida, for I Of said final report and for I charge as Administratrix of the I Of Murray Miller, decease!. This 25 day of July, 1919. s/ PAULINE MILLBl AdminiMtnl NATHAN JAFFUl sT HARRY ZUKERNICK, ES<3 Attorney for Administratrix 8/5-12-19-26 IV T?m E M., F PUBLICATION %  .I!! 1 '' ll: IT COURT OP THE %  T ,„•'''"" ''•"• CIRCUIT OV f-ot v iv' IX AND POR A "" : mm CHANCERY, No. ''K'Ur : ^'wi,,'''; A,ZV Pla,ntl l va Yotu-l--V U ."';. L AIZA Defendant. Ml olllim Mi,, i. i.. v fornia, are notified to in, pearance in the al your ap;;r' r on I r %  '^"5'. l9 DATED! This i rt day of Aug,,„, ,„, K WEATHERMAN, Cleric (Circuit c,„„t Seal) -iera. By W.M. \v. MAX R BILVER Attorney for Plaintiff j-12-19-26 I 2 STOCKING, Deputy Clerk NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW AS LOW AS] AH INTKIST MORTGAGE LOANS HENRY E.WOLFF CO. •aiK la.Mi"i 9-3435 -junty, Florida. mw-nSSS" STI:1 K,N NOTICE UNDER Ficrmou, NOTICE TO APPEAR IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE CUL.MI. FLORIDA. — IN CHANCERY, No. 126170. IRVING WAI.Ii.MAN. Plaintiff, vs. SADIE UAI.HMAN, Defendant >ii. SADIE WALDMAN, 1981 %  ospecl Avi 11 ,. Bronx, New York, are notified to file imir appearance in Uii above cause for divorce on the —:Id day ol August, A.D, 1949, other%  de : %  e pro confesso will be ntered against you. Dated I 149 %  : ill tins 21 day of July. A.D. B. LEATHERMAN, Cleik. C tut Seal) liy C. B HOI.AM). MM T. M t ,. Deputy Clerk. MIL! \ A PRlfcJUMAN, Attorney Seybold Ruining • -2 • i-12 MM, P. PAR1SER Attorney for Applicants 611 Biscayne ){]d K DA Att IN TIU^?T! CE T0 APPEAR Ki •v\-v.'.V ,IT COURT OF THK ficL-, ," JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Hi VTV 1 : ,A ', 1N A N EUlt DADE .;;!.^Tl. IN CHANCERY. No. ,„,. R 8E E MCHULSON. Defend",' 'V-'. 81 ,!' : NICHOLBON, 1 J. Robaru, On West n.-.th street, Cleveland, ohio rile an AUK ,,Kltl: "V RBQUTRBD to 4 otW-£ "X --'"' ''">• < %  August, ii I of c ""' ""egatlons of said Jjant wu be um. M „,,. ,TW noUja to b< published in The I iir I.? 71""' "'"'' •" week Tor This h < ". n 1 *<'ve weeks. '"Is, the .1 d.,> of July, 1949 Ci .u B .' '-KATHBRMAN. ,,i ? %  ""' clr Utt Court. ,.-i uade County Florida '""'It Court Seal, *' f ,r,ua By WM W. STOCKING. TO 1 ivW"* ORDER OF PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT' ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CU OF FLORIDA, IN AND FURl COUNTY. — IN CHASCERM 126157. ELIZABETH KREI'P, PUIntll OSCAR KREPP, I'efemUnl TO: OSCAR KREPP, C/0 K Ripp. 5.".o Mosel Avenue, Island, New York. _, !" i YOU ARK HEREBY .NUTIFIE] file your appearance In tlw styled cause for divorce, on or I the 19th day of August, IMI. wise a decree pro cunitno !" | entered against you. J Dated, his >'h/'ft T J a &jj| Ckrk of Circuit OC -Circuit Cou *l. wsT0CB L Depatl m SAMUEL J. RAND. Attornej 617 Seybold liullding Miami, Florida 7/22-29 8/5-12 ORDER OF PUBUCATO^ IN THE CIRCUIT corajSr nth JUDICIAL ciac\m luyFOR DADE COJ STY. l^.,' IN CHANCERY, No !-•';'• MAY JBiiMl I.KJV. Wga. 1 FRANK H. LEW. Defe TO: FRANK II. J-BW 224 West Yoseinile Avenut Manteca, California You are hereby r.-.tifled. a*< to file your appeaiaiice M Hill of Complaint lor D' 10 c n ,-, you in the above-named>** M before the 22 day of A"^,al otherwise the alligations 5T talned will be taken as cum"—] '"ORDERED at Miami. W*! 21 day of July, l9 E uHEW E Clerk of OR* (Circuit Court Seal) liy r J. DepulJ SAM SILVER. „, Solicitor for Plaintiff. 1703 Congress Bldg.. Miami, Florida 7/22-298/5-12 NOTICE TO .Ufijbm IN THE aviL.cowTw^p AND FOR DADE FLORIDA.—No. 396'J-. PEELE, ^IRALAM^'-R^pgEj ELISABETH JINNIE R 0SK ^ his wife. Defendants. TO: GIRALAMO JBgHMr M ELISABETH JINM B LIOSI, Defendants. 23J4 West 2h ftree %  8u : Number Three. M ami Be n You and each of >?" *"# to file with the Otn^JSk named Court at Mian". J g or before the I2,h .^araae 1 1949. your written app ,„ | suit brought against f~#0 of which a decree pro" be entered against > ou j, p ,t %  IX>NE AND .OMJffgfJ* Florida, this 16th day Clerk. Civil Court ByCHAR.^1 420 Lincoln Road Miami Beach. Florida 7/21-W /6-U pfl-y£'.Wrf^f^^-j*SS^r i^S^ia



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{Y, AUGUST 12, 1949 • >Jeist>norIdlar PAGE THREE mi Y To Meet Thursday For Purpose mending Sections Of Constitution of the most important ngs to be held by the MiCM & YWHA will take place fcdav evening at 8 o'clock at iami Y, 450 S.W. 16th Ave., ding to Leon Kaplan, presiInai h>ose of the meeting, he antes, is to amend certain secof the constitution, most imnt of which is the changing name from the YM & |A of Miami to the Miami fh Community Center. ial objectives of the Y are amended in the following J* r: m %  |To develop a program of m|al education, recreation and |h education, which should Ite primary attention to the Ttual-cultural factors which litute the Jewish way of life. To serve as an agency of sh identification and integraThis function requires that 1 membership in the Jewish ler be open to the entire JewIcommunity and no one be uded from membership beof doctrinal or ritualistic fcrences. [To serve as an agency of perJlity development and to de|p play-groups, clubs and innal programs to that end. To further the democratic of life, by developing the ntials for citizenship in young pie. to develop respect for fan personality and the sancof differences. To develop a comprehensive gram responsive to the interk)f people of all ages. Nothing human concern is alien to the ler and programs of the greatdiversity of interest may have Ir proper place within the per. &thor amendments to be taken will be the reduction of memof the board to 35 members, abolition of the executive imittce and the creation of an forary board of directors. Jr. Kaplan stated that "several ago the Jewish Welfare bid undertook a self-study bwn as the Janowski Survey. purpose of this study—which i conducted by Professor Oscar Janowski and Dr. Salo Baron jras to ascertain a critical evallinn of the Jewish Community Biter movement in the United fates. As a result of this study ftain principles were adopted the Chicago convention in 1948. proposed amendments to our Jistitution conform to the inciples of the survey, abovefentioned. f'The name Young Men's and lung Women's Hebrew AssociaIn is a misnomer. Not only do \ cater to young men and young Emen but we cater to boys and ils of pre-school age, of school i< teen-agers, young adults and Ir Golden Age Club for people ler fifty. The Jewish Communm Center is all-inclusive and embees all the groups above-menpned. For many years we have en a Community Center so why iii call it that?" fin addition to the general meetat which the amendments will be considered, a musical proigram featuring Bernie Bennett, who directs his own music school, I will take place. Also, "Carmen," an operetta in miniature, will be performed by one of the youth groups of the camp. Admission is free. Dade Stations Will Air Storm Warnings The Dade County Red Cross disaster radio communications system which gained national recognition last year will again be inaugurated in the event a hurricane or similar disaster strikes this section this year. At a meeting of representatives of all radio stations in Dade County and Red Cross disaster officials as well as officials from the U.S. Weather Bureau, plans were discussed for giving complete coverage to weather advisory announcements and official Red Cross bulletins. When a storm approaches this section, two Red Cross volunteer announcers will be assigned to the U.S. Weather Bureau. After the weather advisory has been read by Grady Norton, meteoroligist in charge, an official Red Cross bulletin will be read. All radio stations in this vicinity will carry the messages and keep the public informed of emergency measures in this area. At the meeting Mr. Norton expressed alarm at the continuing complacent attitude of Dade Countians toward hurricanes and emphasized that we have not had a really serious storm since 1926. "Unless our people obtain a deeper sense of appreciation for the possible danger which might be wrought by a tropical storm, a serious situation might develop in Miami. As far as my office is concerned," said Mr. Norton, "we will give the plain facts about the severity of the storm and urge all listeners to take proper precautions." Women's Newcomball As a result of last week's contest in the Miami women's newcomball leagues in which the Roosevelt Girls, led bv Bobby Bezine defeated the K.V.'s 15 to 10, the standing of the clubs is first place, Roosevelt Girls; second place, Dare Devils; third place, K.V.'s. The league is a perpetual, ladder type in which games are clayed on the basis of challenge, with a team able to move up only one place at a time In the standings. •Jayeees Assail Ku Klux Klnn At their annual summer conference held in Key West the Florida Junior Chamber of Commerce last weekend unanimously adopted two resolutions deploring the Ku Klux Klan and charging it with "hiding back of hoods and masks to do many cowardly and disgraceful deeds that are un-American." In the first resolution the Jaycees urged state newspapers to deny advertising to the Klan, particularly its solicitation for membership," "in the interest of public welfare and to assist in the elimination of such activities." The other resolution "deplores and condemns the un-American and extra-legal activities of the Original Southern Klans, Inc., and urges passage of legislation by the legislature of Florida to outlaw these practices." IFIagler-Granada Center Completes Plans For High Holy Day Services The Flagler-Granada Jewish, Hurwitz, who is known in Miami Community Center has completed for his work in the field of Heplans for High Holy Day services, I brew education, is a graduate of Herman Fe.dman, president, has ^A%S££SUS announced. Services will be held at the Coral Gables Woman's Club and Joseph J. Hurwitz will officiate. 'Beauty Contest' Will Highlight BB Swim llanee Danee Slated By I .iiii.i I I Chapter Final arrangements for the games party and dance to be sponsored by the Tamara Chapter of Mizrachi Women at the Sorrento Hotel. 4384 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, tomorrow night at 8 o'clock were made at an executive meeting this week. Mrs. Seymour Polin, chairman of the event, has named the following hostesses for the evening: Mesdames Theodore Landesman, A. Mechlowitz, Ben Kazar. Henry Chill, J. Rosen, Israel Yulish and Miss Clara Goldenburg. Mai Malkin and his orchestra will furnish music for dancing. Tickets can be procured by phoning Mrs. Polin at 3-0269. at Boston University and Hebrew Teachers College of Boston and is now writing his doctoral dissertation on the subject, "Jewish Influences on the Koran." He conducted High Holy Day services for a number of years in Boston. Scheduled to serve as cantor for the services will be Joseph Krissel, formerly of Denver, Colo., who is chaplain of the Norman Bruce Brown Post No. 174 of the Jewish War Veterans. Krissel has conducted services for the armed forces at Augsburg, Germany, at Sun Lake in the Catskills. Reservations for the services may be made by calling any member of the High Holy Day committee, which is composed of Berry Clein, chairman, 330 N.W. 44th Ave., 48-1780; Joe Masters. 200 S.W. 51st PI., 83-6477; Sam Kirschner, 430 N.W. 32nd Ave.; "Mr. and Mrs. 1849" and "Mr. and Mrs. 1949" will be selected by members and guests of the North Shore Women's Chapter, B'nai B'rith, at their second annual swim dance Wednesday, August 24, at the Sorrento Hotel, 4399 Collins Ave., Miami Beach. In addition to the "beauty contest" prizes will be awarded to the winners of a rumba contest and to the guest appearing in the oldest style swimijJJ*JJ I ftves for the Loon Lake Hotel and mittee in charge of arrangements | Franklin County, is headed by President Mrs. Mark l Farr Tours Appointed Miami Representative For Loon Lake Hotel Farr Tours have been appointed and to the guest appearing in tne Miamj senta oldest style^swim suit. The^com-| t ves for ^ LoQn Lflke Rotel and County, Silverstein" and she will be James Segal, 4925 S.W. 5th Terr., 4-0425; Ben Clein, 4360 S.W. 1st St., 4-6571. assisted by Mrs. Selma Leban and Mrs. Leon Rapee who will handle reservations. Tickets are SI ner person including tax and may be secured from any member of the North Shore Chapter. Price of admission includes cabanas and towels. Mai Malkin and his rumba band will play for dancing. For reservations call Mrs. Rapee at 86-4413. New York. The 3000-acre resort, which is under the ownership-management of David S. Andron, is located in the heart of the Adirondacks. On the grounds are a three-mile private lake for swimming and water sports, an 18-hole golf course, tennis courts and riding paths. Anyone wishing information about the vacation spot may call Farr at 5-5327. FOR AUTO INSURANCE SEE HAROLD GRAHAM (With Terry In*. Aflcy, Inc.) 1105 Blscayne Bldg. 19 W. Flagler PHONE 3-4071 serve BORJtHT ... buy R0K14CH A HOME AWAY FROM HOME 24 Hr. Expert Nursing Care Beautiful Grounds, Well Located Dietary Lawi Strictly Observed. $50.00 per week DR. SHOULSON'S (D.D.) 1681 MERIDIAN AVE. MIAMI BEACH, FLA. 58-0112 Moving to Bigger and Better Facilities on the Beach in October Stone's Bookkeeping and Tax Service Specialiiing in Small Buiinew Expert Accountant and Tax Consultant. Low Rate*. PHONE 5-5392 1602 Lenox AveMiami Beach Isaiah Women To Sponsor Party The Sisterhood of Temple Isaiah will sponsor a card and mah jong party Tuesday evening at 8 o'clock at the Sorrento Hotel, Miami Beach, according to Mrs. Clara Mae Van Ness, president. Subscription will be one dollar, she announces, and prizes will be awarded and refreshments served. Members are asked to bring friends, cards and mah jong sets. In charge of the affair are Mrs. Van Ness, Mrs. Jack Brodsky, Mrs. J. J. Perlmutter and Mrs. Arthur Kaplan. Following this affair, members of the sisterhood will resume their weekly Tuesday night sewing sessions. At these meetings which begin at 8 p.m. the women are preparing items for a forthcoming bazaar. Mrs. Louis Littman is chairman of the sessions. Sorority Alumnae To Hold Luncheon Party Alpha Epsilon Phi Alumnae will hold a summer luncheon and games party tomorrow at 12:30 p.m. at the Variety Club on the Alcazar roof. ... -, All alumnae and their friends are invited to attend and reservations may be made by calling Mrs. Sidney Lewis, chairman, at 4-0568. ... The next regular meeting of the association will be held Thursday at Mrs. Lewis' home, 1801 Cortez, Coral Gables. ... Make AND COTTAGES • tOON UM <*-*• M Hfw VOW 1B0O feet hi*h in the cool, picturesque Adirondiclci DAVIDS.ANDRON tummiUf mmtgmmt NOW the very best is available! A. beautiful SOOO-aore wonderland retort .. *£*•** GOLF OOUTM TENNIS ._;g^ gggi LAKE all water SPORTS saddle HORSta sorlal. entertainment and athletic program CELEBRITIES noted Andron CUISINE diet" law* • lake front luncheon buKet. eveiy conceivable comfort • • RESERVE NOW for choice cottages, luxurious suites and hotel rooms. "Buif a case of Cool Omfat BAUANTINE ALEQDBEER YOUR AFTERNOON WILL BE FILLED WITH MUSIC IF YOU LISTEN TO— "MUSIC ROOM" 2:35 5:00 P.M. DISC JOCKEY JOEL CRAEGER SPINS THE LATEST POPULAR RECORDS FOR YOUR LISTENING ENJOYMENT "YOUR FAVORITE STATION FOR MUSIC AND NEWS' vU *D'0 D'** PHONE 5-5327 FARR—Your Travel Agent EXCLUSIVELY DISTRIBUTED IN MIAMI BY on MIAMI. FLORIDA Southern Food Distributors, Inc. 1725 N. W. 7TH AVENUE PHONES 3-0021 and 2-6141-2 Distributed by STATE BEVERAGE DISTRIBUTORS OF MIAMI, INC. SAM BLANK, Pres. Phone 88-3431 DELICIOUSLY FAMOUS KOSHER DELICATESSEN Under Strict Rabbinical Supervision Approved by The Beth Jacob Vaad Hakashruth, Rabbi Moses Mescheloff, Executive Director. The Greater Miami Vaad Hakashruth, Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky, Director



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I I 1 PAGE sn Israeli Newsletter By ADA OREN (Copyright. 19*9, Jewlrt Telegraphic Agency, BDITOR'S NOTE: This %  the rirsl of a '"" : '''; problems ol the emerging Israeli Army While the "e establishment is experimenting with personnel anc aa uatlons in the developing of a new. /egujar a w. t m time struggle with the problems ol ini '•'"',,„' mobilised to defend Its borders in the mldsl of a Blmu on all land frontiers.) In. ) .. i -i.ii ministi ust at ilch w luneou mil %  the is ha ii va II am.I TEL AVIV—The reorganization of the armed services of Israel is making good progress under a partial veil of secrecy. The system of separate pay for soldiers and allowances for their families is being discontinued with the raising of the level of service personnel's pay to the normal qrades of pay for government employees in parallel ^ positions of responsibility. Soldiers' pay will now be subject also to normal taxation, educacal training under army auspices with the regular activities of vouth movements and with young tion and health care charges. It yuu 1 '• v „ on at is not yet clear what wartime peoples working hours in an Mprivileges members of the armed tcnipt to makc uchtiain iM comforces will continue to enjoy in the future. As far as possible, soldiers of non-combat units are being replaced by civilians for reasons of efficiency, with many ex-servicemen and women continuing to serve in their former capacities but according to civilian standards of office routine, working hours, etc. Specialists entitled to release in accordance with the general regulations are generally offered good pay and rank in order to induce them to remain in the Army and help form its permanent core. No bill for the establishment of a standing peace-time army has yet been introduced into* the Knesset, but the principles guiding the government in this matter are known to the public in their general outlines after having been discussed in a closed session of the coalition parties. So far the draft foresees two years' compulsory service for men —a few months of intensive military training, about seven months of agricultural or other technical experience, and one year of standing army duty. Girls will probably be expected to spend one year in mixed agricultural and military training in settlements only, as was the custom for volunteers in the Palmach days, as a concession to the Orthodox parties within the coalition, which refuse to sanction regular military service for women on a large scale in peacetime. They could not prevent the conscription of women during the war, but even then they effected a regulation exempting all religious girls from duties requiring their living away from their homes. Now such girls will apparently be unable to receive their mixed training in settlements of the religious movements. Only medical, clerical and communications women personnel will serve in the regular army on a semi-voluntary basis and for longer periods. Similar arrangements are foreseen for young men in the navy, air force and other specialized services requiring several vears' pulsorv from the age of foul or fifteen. This part of the government's program also raised Orthodox opposition within the coalition, expressly on the grounds that the mixing of religious youth with others in holidav camps at this early age might endanger the exclusive influence of Orthodox homes and schools. Since there is fear of misuse of such a formation for the indoctrination of children in other quart, r from the extreme left to ;hextreme right—the whole matter is still in a state of flux. Meanwhile boys and girls, recruited on a semi-voluntary basis, are already making themselves useful in va rious pioneering ventures in the old tradition, such as clearing roads in areas where professional labor is not available. Along with releasing non-essential personnel—mainly nun with family responsibilities—and students who interrupted their studies, the army is also returning to civilian use requisitioned cars and buildings—chiefly hotels and camps taken over from the British. The latter are being converted into immigrants' transit centers, civilian hospitals, etc. Carelessness and even large-scale pilfering on the part of troops quartered on requisitioned premises or using commandeered cars is now involving the military authorities in considerable claims for reparations on the part of property owners, especially in the case of localities or suburbs from which the Jewish civilian population, had to evacuate during the fighting, leaving its belongings behind. Because of the housing shortage, veterans' resettlement officers are hard pressed to find even temporary accommodations for their charges, and are opening hostels in abandoned houses Immigrant soldiers are entitled to go to Jewish transit camps on release, but in view of the overcrowding in these camps they prefer any alternative arrangement in the homes of relatives, il possible. The government is doing its utmost for veterans although it is in no position to assume rei inhabited dwelling It haa however, secured Immigrant v ,„ ; rity on "Amida. public housing. As for employment, there is a law requii nployers to take Kk men and women who left their 'to oin up. but thai ew immigrant even local men who had i.-i neny been employed bj the British "" Moi unen ployment and lack oi .'. quarters affect not mor. han*15 percent of those discharged until now. A few hundred have started training as building laborers under the auspices etttenenl officer. •Ul Ol 1,000 applicants havi aln :; inted all '' w ances to help them complete higher stu rated by the war \ • 'sand veterans havt registi red foi settlement on the land are awaiting facilities for training and settling, which are insufficient tor lack oi Jewish Agency funds. KraiMlciK I. tivta S2.~i.000 l-i.'l A gift ol $25,000 to Brandeis University, the country's first Jewish-sponsored, non-sectarian college, has been made by Alpha Omega, national dental fraternity. for the establishment ol a biological laboratory, according to Abraham L. Sachar. president of the university. The laboratory, to be named the Alpha Omega Biological Labor,.torv. is scheduled to be completed in time for the 1949-50 academic year. The laboratory will consist of a research laboratory, an advanced e arch laboratory, private faculty lal oratory and two demonstration classrooms. FRIDAY, AUGUST 12, II. country between the ages of 20 and 25. Young men joining frontier settlements after their first year will also be considered to have served their trick in the army. Such personnel already make up a separate formation and appear at parades with tools instead of weapons. Compulsory service will start at 18, and all male citizens up to the age of fifty will then continue to be called up for yearly refresher exercises on the Swiss model. This combination of a professional core and a conscript "working army" is expected to make possible the building up of an efficient, cheap military establishment suited to both the long frontiers and the small purse of the state of Israel. It will be so organized as to make possible a general mobilization at very short notice. Apart from all this, plans are already being worked out for the dovetailing of pre-military physiS. .1. Freedman HEBREW BOOK STORE 417 Washington Are. a Miami Beach Between Fourth and Fifth Ste. Hebrew Religious Supplies For Synagogues end PrivateUse. Also for Hebrew School*. LPTO "U1D Telephone 5-9017 MIAMI'S OLDEST FURNITURE MOVERS WANTED LOAD OR PART LOAD TO AND FROM NEW YORK OR VICINITY .. ALSO THE MIDDLE WEST AND CALIFORNIA LONG DISTANCE DOOR-TO-DOOR Transit Insurance Available On All Shipments WITHERS VAN LINES 1000 N.E. 1st Ave. Ph. 3-2667 Builders of Immortal Memorials for the Jewish Trade Look For the 2-Story White Building THURMOND MONUMENT Co. MARKERS $35.00 PLUS CEMETERY CHARGES Open Sundays Phone 4-3249 When Your Tablets Get Down to 4 That's the Time d To Buy Some $o> RlS JfV* f 3888" Alka-Seltzer AT ALl DRUG STORES MiM Went* Will Sluclv l>rmif Mlsj *Jack Wentz. of 4135 Douglas Road. Coconut Grove, left Monday for the Poland School of Crafts. Penland. N. C., where she will take courses in ceramics and sterling silver jewelry making, as well as brushup courses in the making of wood, metal and leather articles. | Miss Wentz, who has been crafts, instructor for the Dade County Society for Crippled Children, has be.n awarded a scholarship to the school by the society. Under the homebound program, | M Wentz teaches craft work to 25 homebound children who are unable to attend school because of physical handicaps. Children are taught to make model airplanes, metal trays, basket weaving, key cases, bird houses, ruga and plastic braiding. The Dade County society's policv is to serve all handicapped children not being served by any other agency. The homebound program serves children afflicted with rheumatic fever, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, perthes disease, rheumatoid artitis, post-polio and others. Sisterhood To Meet The Sisterhood of the First Jewish Congregation of Coral' Gables will hold a meeting Wednesday at the home of Mrs. Paul Reece, 3555 S.W. 7th St. at 8 p.m. BERNIE "SAFFERI About Your FOOD Entertainment and the otJ| thousand details for M | Weddings. Bar Mifcvaht, J gagements. Lawn Part.! Cocktail Parties, ChildJ Parties, Meetings, Buifit. | A Complete Catering SerrJ PHONE 9-0573 JACK & JILL 2 N.W. 7th St. Off Miami An I WAKE UP EVERY MORNING TO !" "Wake Up and Live" 7:30 10:00 A.M. Hear Morning Personalist "Jock the Clock," "Clancy tin Weatherman," "Grapevine Gus" and STAN BURNS "YUUR FAVORITE STATION FOR MUSIC ASD NEWS MIRRORS FINEST QUALITY — MADE TO ORDER IMMEDIATE DELIVERY Auto Glass Installed --Furniture Tops Store Front Construction ADAMS GLASS SERVICE "If It's Glass We Have It" 1805 PURDY AVE., M. B. PH. 58-3756 OR 54311 Ask for ABE or IRVING RABINOWITZ LINDA BRANDS, INC. 10 S.E. 5th Street Miami, Florida Available to Give You Personal Service and information PHONE 82-2731 82-2732 rmw &&****" ••*; fJr* For your htalth, for your $aO*l^^ mand "KOSHER ZION" FB**S the rupervision of Rabbi Sholem OfKolpas. DAVID MANASTER AND BROjHj KOSHER ZION SAUSAGE W* 37th St. and Normal, Chicago, IU Under U. S. Government Supe^ ESTABLISHMENT! ATTENTION STOREKEEPERS — JOBBERS If you dsslrs Koihsr Zlon Products for your custom dirsct to our Chicsgo offlca and thssa ordsrs will hsw r 1st* sttsntion, and b shlppsd from our Chicsgo plsnt.



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lY, AUGUST 12. 1949 -Jewish ncrkilan PAGE FIFTEEN Warns U.N. Security Council iinst Encouraging Armaments Race IKE SUCCESS, (JTA)—Israel's representative to the U.N. eek warned the Security Council against makinq a dewhich would expose the entire Middle East to an unarmaments race. saking before the council on the recommendation by Irnediator Dr. Ralph RELIGIOUS DIRECTORY .7. that the functions of the jr be terminated, Mr. Eban je council that an armaIrace would not benefit the Vatic institutions nor the hv of that region. However, a race takes place, he that "Israel will not allow be overtaken." He agreed fe acting mediator that the [regime in Palestine has Replaced by the armistice lents. He suggested, howfhat the council would do issue "a clear moral diagainst a Middle East em competition. Mr. Eban Id the council that the time me for lifting all other al restrictions imposed heKitimate commerce and Eg. I have in mind the of seizing cargoes of commodities passing Suez on their way to Iskorts," he added. Israeli representative called Jention of the council to at tie provision in the armisjreement with Transjordan [has not been implemented. ecifically referred to the |at up to this date there is free traffic on the vital Jerusalem road, and the at no progress has been Ed in the resumption of operations of the Hebrew |sity and the Hadassah Center on Mount Scopus. jned the Transjordanian inleance for this condition. Security Council session with a statement by representative Jean Chaujo said the council faces a of terminating the truce. rench position, he said, is Ihc armistice agreements cpluced it, and that the nentation of the agreements I be left to the parties themand the mixed armistice Ksions with a minimum of %  'news from Lausanne is encouraging him to believe that all of the outstanding obstacles to permanent peace, including the refugee problem, "can and will be overcome." Mr. Eban devoted much of his speech to arguing that direct negotiations between Jews and Arabs at Lausanne would greatly speed up the peace. But if the lengthier procedure followed at Lausanne prevails, then Israel can wait "as long as necessary." he said. He paid tribute to Dr. Bunche who, he stated, brought about an end of the military phase of the Palestine problem "with tact, skill and tenacious idealism." Later, the representatives of the U.S. and Britain told the Security Council that they endorsed the lifting of the arms embargo for Israel and the Arab countries, but morally pledged their governments not to aid a so-called armaments race in the Middle East. British delegate Sir Terrence Shone declared that with the fighting over and a new phase established for a peaceful Palestine by the armistice agreements all restrictions posed by the truce should be lifted. He indicated that the British government was ready to resume a supply of arms to the Arabs in accordance with standing agreements, but added that this does not mean that shipment should be made in excess of requirements for internal security and national defense. His government, he said, does not favor the acquisition of arms ir. the Middle East in excess of these legitimate requirements. U.S. delegate Warren Austin supported the British stand and Congregation Beth David (Conservative), 13S N.W. Third Are. Rabbi Max Shapiro; Rev. Maurice Mamches. Friday evening gervlcei at 6:10. Sabbath morning services at 8:30. Rabbi Shapiro and Cantor Mamches will ofrlcate. Religious Congregation. 4064 N.W. 4th St. Services Saturday morning at 9:00 o'clock. Congregation Beth El (Orthodox), 590 S.W. 17th Ave. Rabbi Murray Grauer, Cantor Milton Friedman. Friday evening services 6:30. Sabhath morning service at 8:30 a.m. Har Mllzvah of George Slegel. son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Slrgel. Junior congregation at 10 a.m. Mincha at 6:30 followed by Shalos Seudos. Dally services 8 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Temple Emanu-El (Reform), 1801 S. Andrews Ave.. Fort Lauderdale. Dr. Marius Ranson, Rabbi. Friday evening services at 8:00. Hal.1.1 Ranson will officiate. Miami Hebrew School and Congregation (Orthodox). 1101 S.W. 12th Ave. Rabbi Simon April. Cantor Berele Kelemer. Services Friday evening at 1:10. Saturday morning at 9 a.m. Rabbi Samuel Zakutu of rittsburgh will he guest speaker. Mincha at 6 p.m. followed by Shalos Seudos. Rabbi Simon April will speak on the Portion of the week. Mlroa at 7:30 p.m. Hebrew school daily it a.m. to 12 noon. Dally services at 7:30 p.m. and 645 p.m. Congregation Beth Jacob (Orthodox). 301-311 Washington Are., Miami Beach. Rabbi Moses Mescheloff. Friday evening service at 6:45 p.m. Sabbath service at 8:30 a.m. Mincha at 6:45 followed by Shalos Seudos. Jewish Community Center (Conservative). 2020 Polk St., Hollywood. Rabbi Max Kaufman. Fridav evening service at 6:30 p.m. Saturday services at 9:0" a.m. during summer Anyone wishing a Minyan for Yahrzelt is asked to call Hyman Tellman. Israelite Center (General). 3340 S.W. 24th St. Dally services at 7 a.m. Friday night %  umtvisory machinery. Mr. urged all governments to exercise restraint in the shipments of arms in the Middle East in such quantities as would weaken the newly established armistice agreements. An arms race would jeopardize the armistice and settlement," he said. "The United States, insofar as we are concerned, does not intend to allow the exports of arms which would permit a competitive arms race in the area." Commenting on the embargo aspect of the problem. Dr. Bunche said he would not like to see an interruption of the peace in the Middle East by an armaments race. But in practice, he said, the enforcement of the embargo would entail a topheavy U.N. observation apparatus. He asked, however, that arfhs exporting countries pledge themselves not to support a competitive arms situation. In any event, he said, if such a race ensued, it would not proceed without being brought to the attention of the council. Dr. Bunche accepted a Canadian amendment to his draft resolution terminating the truce in which the function of implementing the armistices would revert to the truce supervising organization instead of the Conciliation Commission. Canada, the U.S., Britain, Cuba, China and Egypt joined France in support of Dr. Bunche s recommendations. The council then adjourned until next week. H disagreed with Dr. that difficulties arising | ti.e agreement should be before the Conciliation %  ssion. The hands of the fcsion. he said, should be left the pursuit of peace. He ed. however, that the counjuld continue to maintain jgilance" by retaining the |ri( ease on its agenda. brief statement before the Dr. Bunche said there doubt that the armistice lients had rendered "obsotruce resolution with iti heritage of restrictions.' nediator called for the gtion of restrictions on imland immigration. He adfree movement for legiti|hipping and the removal of Stiges of the wartime blocklever, he warned that the could not at this time Rely divest itself of its reality in Palestine and sugj that it reaffirm the ceasepneiple by which it would [its authority in the Middle H would consider it highly >le that it should not prcly detach itself completely Hie situation," he stated. Junehe suggested that no lhan 30 to 40 observers be \d to help the parties under mistice agreement. These, are proving "very efHe added that the recent LISTEN TO THE CULTURAL JEWISH FORUM RADIO HOUR EVERY SATURDAY NIGHT FROM 8 TO 9 P.M. OVER STATION WWPB 1450 on the Dial Directed and Announced by services at 8 p.m. Refreshments will be served Immediately following the services. Saturday morning services at 9 a.m. Congregation Keneseth Israel (Orthodox). 1415 Euclid Ave.. Miami Beach. Friday evening services at 6:30 p.m. Saturday morning services at > a.m. Mincha at 6 p.m. followed by Shalos Seudos. Temple Beth Sholom (Liberal). 4144 Chase Ave.. Miami Beach. Rabbi Leon Kronish; Cantor Samuel Kelemer. Friday evening summer service at 8:15 p.m. Coral Gables Jewish Center (Liberal). Services discontinued until the tall. United Jewish Schools, North Campus, University of Miami. Discontinued until fall. Congregation beth Tfilah (Orthodox). 935 Euclid Ave.. Miami Beach. Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky. Friday evening service at 6:45 p.m. Saturday morning at 8:30 Rabbi Rackovsky will speak. Saturday at 5:30 p.m. Rabbi Rackovsky will speak followed by Mincha, Shalos Seudos and program of Palestinian songs. Maariv wilr follow. Daily services at 7:30 a.m. Class In Mlshna will be addressed by the Rabbi. Services at 7:00 p.m. followed by a class In Jewish laws and customs. Miami Beach Jewish Community Center (Conservative). 1701 Washington Ave., Miami Beach. Rabbi Irving Lehrman, Cantor Jacob Y. Goldring. Friday evening service at 6:45. Saturday morning service at 9. Daily services at 8 a.m. and 6:45 p.m. Temple Isaiah (Reform), 1065 Dade Blvd.. Miami Beach. Rabbi David Raab. Friday evening services at Sir.. Rabbi Raab will conduct the service and give a book review on "East River" by Sholem Asch. Mrs. Louis I.ittman will kindle the Sabbath lights and recite the blessings. Milton Tupler will recite the blessings for Klddush. A reception will follow. Temple Israel (Reform). 137 N.E. 19th St. Rabbi Colman A Zwitman; Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan, Rabbi Emeritus. Sabbath evening service at 8:15. Dr. Kaplan will conduct the services. MIAMI TOP SOIL CO. Wholesale and Retail Grade A Pulverized and Processed Muck and Marl Any Mixture Bitter Blue Sod SoU and Fill of Any Kind Phone 4-0335 1813 S. W. 21st Terrace EDDIE ALPER Approved by GREATER MIAMI VAAD HAKASHRUS Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky, Director Demand SINAI orris Drotn ers Hadassah Unit To Hold Boat Ride The Miami Group of Hadassah will sponsor a boat trip aboard the Showboat on Sunday evening, August 28, at 8 p.m. The boat will leave from the City Yacht Basin, Pier 7. Music for dancing will be furnished by the boat's orchestra. Mrs. Abraham Gold is chairman of the affair and reservations may be made by calling her at 48-4322. KOSHER and PURE Distributed by HI-GRADE FOOD CO. 1733 N.W. 7th AVE. PHONE 2-7570. 9-2652 SIMON SEIDEN ONLY DEPARTMENT STORE ON THE BEACH 1261 Washington Avenue VISIT OUR BRAND NEW FASHION STORE 68-72 East Flagler Street n i cc FOR EVERY aLAii PURPOSE STORE FRONT PLATE end WINDOW GLASS Bitur. Tops. Beveled Mirror, end ReeUvering Our Specialty & G. 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IAY. AUGUST 12, 1949 *• Jewish norHlar PAGE NINE Gey Notovitz, Samuel Steen Speak rs Before Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan marriage of Miss Shirley |itz. daughter of Mr. and Ben Notovitz, 2498 S.W. 21st Samuel Steen, son of Mr. rs. Philip Steen, 5172 S.W. |t. was solemnized by Dr. H Kaplan Sunday at 12:30 |at the home of the bride's her wedding the bride a gown of blue eyelet orwith capelet. She wore a net veil and carried white Bernard Goldberg served Itnm of honor for her sister. Fogelman was best man. deception followed the cereformer Miss Notovitz is a at the University of Miami i a member of B'nai B'rith Women. The bridegroom, tmv veteran with two years be "overseas, is a law student University of Miami, where affiliated with Pi Lambda fraternity. Jer a wedding trip throughIthe state, the couple will in Miami. :utive Breakfast executive breakfast will be bv the Tropical Lodge of B'rith Sunday at 10:15 a.m kyler's Restaurant, 141 East er St. President Budd Cutler %  preside. group's service program lie fall will be outlined. Richmans Celebrate Golden Wedding Mr. and Mrs. Harry Richman celebrated their golden wedding at the home of their daughter, Mrs. Theodore Goodman, 304 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables, on Sunday afternoon. Rabbi Morris A. Skop, the Coral Gables Jewish cantor, officiated. The affair was attended by 125 friends and relatives of the couple. Personally Speaking... Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Katz, cousins of Mrs. S. M. Machlei, are here from Brooklyn, N. Y. The Katzes are guests at the National Hotel, Miami Beach. Mr. and Mrs. Fred Kaufman, S651 N.E. Miami Ct., announce the birth of a son, Howard Norman, born on August 1 at Jackson Memorial Hospital. The mother is the former Fanny Friedman of Baltimore. Mr. Kaufman formerly lived in Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Gus Jacobson are vacationing in New York for the month of August. Mr. Jacobson is executive director of the Miami Beach Y. O Mrs. Samue Steen —Pllkintuu ~ Mr. and Mrs. Charles Aronovitz of Key West left last week for a combined business and pleasure trip in New York. They plan to return the early part of September. Mrs. Anna Frank, 1462 S.W. 17th St., is leaving tomorrow for Baltimore to spend a month with her children. While there her son, Donald, and his wife will come in from Chicago. %  % %  %  Bart Giordano, 1630 S.W. 10th St., and Mr. and Mrs. Yale Leavy, 6530 Tamiami Canal Road, and their two children, are leavinq Sunday for a month's stay in New York. Vacationing at the Saxony Hotel, Miami Beach, are Mrs. Joseph Alperin and dauqhter, Sonya, of Memphis, Tenn. The visitors left for a brief sojourn in Havana yesterday. Mrs. Alperin is a prominent attorney and club woman in Memphis. Dr. and Mrs. Sidney H. Moss announce the birth of their second son, Edwin Marc, on Tuesday, August 2, at Jackson Memorial Hospital. The mother is the former Elaine Weinberg of Baltimore, Md. + M Patricia Becker To Wed Marvin Mandell The betrothal of Patricia Becker to Marvin Mandell, son of Mr. and Mrs. Gustav Mandell, 2210 S.W. 19th Terr., has been announced by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Becker, 2603 S.W. 3rd St. The bride-elect is a graduate of Central High School in Trenton, N. J., and the Paine Hall School of Medical Technology, New York. Her fiance, an Army veteran, graduated from Port Richmond High in Staten Island, N. Y., and received his degree from the University of Miami, where he was affiliated with Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity. No date has been set for the wedding. bine R. Kantor trothal Revealed _. engagement of Miss Jeanne lantor of Miami Beach, format Newark, to Bernard movich of Irvington, N. J-, been announced by her sister, I Joseph W. Kane of Newark. Kantor is the daughter of %  ate Mr. and Mrs. Julius Kanbf Newark. \c bride-elect, who has re. in Miami Beach for the [two years, is chief auditor for Sorrento Hotel. She attended York University and gradlrom New Jersey Normal ol and the Government ol of Aeronautics in Newark. Chaimovich, a graduate of ark College of Engineering, civil engineer in Irvington. erved four years in the Pacia chief petty officer with Seabees. tail wedding is planned in lark and the couple will live irvington. Miamians vacationing at Duncraggan Inn, Hendersonville, N. C. include, Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Laiten, Mrs. Morris Obeler, Mrs Alfred Obeler and dauqhter Ilene, Mrs. I. D. Bernstein, Mrs. A. Siegel, Mrs. Ernest Maas and Mr. and Mrs. Milton Baer. Cantor and Mrs. Samuel Kelemer have returned here after a vacation in New York. -K Slated to arrive from North Hollywood, Cal., Sunday is Michael Horwitz, who will attend the Bar Mitzvah of his great nephew, Philip Barnett Padawer. Mr and Mrs. Sam Taubenblatt of Memphis, Tenn., are staying at the Saxony Hotel, Miami Beach. Mr. Taubenblatt is a Memphis attorney. Mr. and Mrs. I. Langner, 2283 S.W. 17th St., returned from a three-month stay in New York and New Jersey in time to attend the bris of their great qrandson, Lee Mitchell, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Rothlein, which took place Sunday. Godparents were Mr. and Mrs. Murray Silberman. Mr. Langner was sandek for his great grandchild. Rabbi S. M. Machtei officiated. + •• Bridge Classes Are Offered Milton Vernoff, managing director of the Boulevard Bridge Club, 1428 N. E. Bayshore Place, announces that he is now arranging classes in contract bridge instruction for groups of four. Time for classes, he states, will be arranged to suit players. Vernoff, who is ex-president of the Florida Unit of the American Contract Bridge League, is Florida state champion and is considered one of the country's foremost bridge players. He is now chairman of the executive committee of the American Contract Bridge League. The Boulevard Bridge Club, which was organized nine years ago, is a bridge membership club now composed of over 200 members. Recommended by the Chamber of Commerce, the club holds regular bride tournaments during the winter season. Ruth Gassenheimer is chairman of the club's board of directors. $ %  Miss Naomi Schwartz and her brother Marshall of CleveL Ohio, have been entertained by their aunt and uncle, Mr. Mrs. Samuel Saal, and cousins, Mr. and Mrs. Saul Brett. ng their vacation at the Sorrento Hotel. Mr. and Mrs. Sam Friedland will return Monday from a opean trip. Mr. and Mrs. Leon J. Ell are staying at the Park Lane Hotel, kver, Colo., until August 21, when they will leave for Colorado ngs, where they will stop at the Broadmoor for several days. i there they will drive to Hot Springs for a short stay. They then proceed to New Orleans and plan to arrive in Miami Ich on or about September 2. + Selma and Lee Katzman, 2266 S.W. 23rd St., are leaving weekend for a sojourn in Texas. -* Mr. and Mrs. Marion Ross, accompanied by their daughter, I this week for New York, where they will be joined by their who has been attending camp in the North. + Mrs. Sylvia Chertkof left Tuesday foi New York, where she visit her sister. Miss Paula Gaines, New York model. raeli Women's Groap Urges obilixation For Immigrant Aid AVIV, (JTA)—The Worndemanded that in the event of a family the mother lEL %  Workers Conference of Israel week issued a call for the biuzation of women teachers, %  es and others trained in the Weal field to volunteer for £k with the immigrants. [he call was incorporated in a plution adopted by the body at J conclusion of its seven-day Ivention. It also urged mothers lp were nurses or medical techlans to devote at least a few frs each day to the vital work icromiriodatina the immigrants. another resolution demands equality under the civil and Igious law for Israeli women equalitv for a son and %  Enter in matters pertaining to entance. A third resolution divorce in a be given the right of raising the children. Among the guests attending the conference were about 100 American women who brought with them a resolution from the Pioneer Women pledging to raise $2,000,000 in the next two years to assist the various projects sponsored by the Women Workers. Ruth L. Margaretten Becomes Mrs. Levick In Garden Ceremony At Parents' Home Miss Ruth Lenore Margaretten, daughter of the Sam Margarettens, 2276 S.W. 18th St., became the bride of Lewis Morley Levick, son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Levick, 637 Malaga Ave., Coral Gables, on Sunday, July 10, at high noon, in the garden of the home of the bride's parents. Rabbi Moses Mescheloff read the service. The bride wore a ballerina length gown of white organdy over dusty rose taffeta with a wide dusty rose sash. The dress was trimmed with embroidered scalloping and butterlies. She complemented this with a white nylon straw hat with illusion veiling and mits of nylon net. She carried a bouquet of purple throated white orchids and tube roses. Mrs. Stanley Greene, matron of honor for her sister, wore a flowered cotton print and carried <3>a nosegay of gardenias and pink babies breath. Best man was Jerome Balbot of Pittsburgh. At the reception which followed the ceremony the bride s mother greeted guests in beige silk, while the bridegrooms mother wore a green silk print. Both wore corsages of yellow orchids. For the wedding trip to Daytona Beach the bride donned a silver blue silk print two-piece suit dress. She wore a corsage of white orchids. Following the honeymoon, the couple is residing at 123 Zamora Ave., Coral Gables. The former Miss Margaretten attended the University of Miami, where she was a mpmbpr of Kaphonorary art Patricid Becker %  Mrs. Lewis M. Levick the University of Miami. He is a member of Pi Lambda Phi fraternity. pa Pi. natio :;;' fraternity, and Delta Phi Lpsilon Go''" 1 '' • • PO olentif**'in some sorority. She is a member of locality ""t thev arc ussd forjSharet Chapter, B'nai B nth fooa according to the EncycloYoung Women. Mr. Levick atIhirr resolution paedia Britamuca. I tended schools in P,ttsbrgh and Blood Bank Drive To Begin Sept. 12 A campaign to build up blood bank reserves at the Dade County bank, as well as private organizations, will be conducted during a "Walking Memorial Blood Bank Week," scheduled for September 12-18. The drive.will be launched with a parade of participating civic groups east along Flagler St. to Bayfront Park on the evening of September 12, followed by speeches, music and the solicitation of blood donor pledges. In charge of arrangements for the drive is E. C. Allen, chairman of the blood banks of the Miami Junior Chamber of Commerce and of the Harvey Seeds American Legion Post. Allen stated that Pratt Veterans Hospital's need for 300 pints of blood per month creates a drain on the county blood bank's supplies. To help build up the general reserve, he said, each organization now maintaining an individual account at the bank will be asked to donate 10 per cent of the blood given for it to Pratt. At the same time each group wul be asked to build up its own account through donations from more members and friends. During the parade and at the § ark blood donor cards will be istributed, Allen said. Signers will be requested to list thennames, addresses, phone numbers and organizations to whose accounts their blood is to be credited. Since blood for transfusions can be kept only three weeks, Allen underscored the need for donors Persons who have suffered from sunstroke have an abnormal susceptibility to the action OK who will give blood at regular stimulants. I intervals.



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FRIDAY, AUGUST 12, 1&49 + l