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The Jewish Floridian ( October 15, 1948 )

UFJUD

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ihdlie\wiislh-IEIIiDipidliiaun Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY I^Jj^T-NUMBER 41 MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1948 PRICE TEN CENTS Palestine Question Expected at U.N. this Week PARIS, (JTA)—The belief that general debate of the Palestine nuestion may begin this week in \he United Nations was voiced here in informed circles. These Quarters said that the arrival here gently of acting Palestine mediator Dr. Ralph Bunche was linked |o this possibility. Israeli Foreign Minister Moshe Shertok conferred this week with John Foster Dulles, foreign affairs advisor to Presidential candidate Governor Thomas E. flewey. who is expected to be appointed Secretary of State in the fcvent of a Republican victory in November. The meeting between fchertok and Dulles, which followed an earlier conference beween the Israeli Foreign Minister tnd Dr. Bunche, aroused lively [peculation here since it came after Dulles' return from consultations with Dewey in the U.S. and us earlier statement that he had kot been consulted by Secretary larshall before the latter issued kis endorsement of the Bernadotte plan. Meanwhile, the Israeli delegation to the U.N. reported this veek that it was "making process" in informal discussions vith various delegations here, the Israeli delegates said that vhen they are shown a map of srael most representatives to the J.N. express surprise at the exent of territory which the Jew$h state would lose under terms |>f the Bernadotte proposals. Aubrey S. Eban, head of the sraeli mission to the U.N., in a etter to the President of the Seurity Council, charged the U.N. vith failure to remedy six "grave Holations of the truce on the Lrab side" which jeopardized the ositions and interests of Israel. Emphasizing that his statement lid not attempt to list all Arab polations, Eban declared that the aajor violations cited had a "lastng detrimental effect on the position of Israel. In all these cases, ne U.N. representatives have not en able to give effect to their ulings which the Arabs systematically disregarded," he charged. Following are the six major violations: 1. The Jerusalem water supply, which is still not in operation, the blasted Latrun pumping station, unrepaired, and the population existing on the most meager water allowance. 2. The road to the Negev, the statement complained of the failure of the Egyptians to observe Gen. Aage Lundstroem's ruling of Aug. 18 providing for the unmolested use of the crossroads at Karatiyah by both side for sixhour periods, alternatively. 3. Bir Asluj in the Negev was occupied by the Egyptians Aug. 5 under the eyes of U.N. observers, who persuaded the Israelis not to counter-attack, undertaking to obtain an evacuation which has not occurred to date. 4. At Mishmar Hayarden the Syrians occupied a vital height, violating the line-fixing agreement signed by the Israeli and Arab commanders. The height has still not yet been evacuated and "here again the U.N. representatives were unable to enforcetheir decisions." 5. The Arab Legion commanders, after signing an undertaking to evacuate positions in no-man's land at Deir Abu Tor and Mt. Zion, did not comply. 6. Mt. Scopus, where, despite a mid-July agreement demilitarizing the Hebrew University and Hadassah Hospital area, only one convoy actually passed through. Arab Shelling Of Jerusalem Continues 500 Shells Fall In Jewish Areas JERUSALEM, Oct. 11. (JTA)— Jerusalem's war continued today with more Arab artillery and small arms fire on the southern outskirts of the city. It is estimated that some 500 shells fell in the Jewish areas during the last 24 hours, one hitting and damaging the Turkish consulate. No one was injured in the consulate. A spokesman for the Israeli military governor of Jerusalem today announced special precautions to guard foreign consular staffs in the city. He stressed that the measures are not being taken because of yesterday's mass prison break by Sternists in Jaffa. He said arrangements were begun after the assassination of Count Bernadotte. but could not be completed until now; following receipt of the consent of the consular corps and U.N. staff. It was learned today that the consular truce commission's protest to the Arabs over their refusal to permit Christians to enter the Old City to visit the Holy Places may be extended to cover the refusal to admit Jews to pray at the Wailing Wall and elsewhere. Although the Jewish authorities do not expect much improvement in the situation, it is believed that if the situation in respect to the Christians improves, the Jews will also benefit. ^Write Today" "Write Today—Make SomeHappy," will be the slogan of National Letter Writing Week from October 17 to the 23. Hugh P. Emerson, postmaster, states: "As a result of the observance of Letter Writing Week, many home times are renewed, old friendships recaptured, and new ones discovered .... we sincerely hope the celebration of Letter Writing Week will bring pleasure and happiness to millions throughout the country." Cabinet Committee Recommends Israeli Hold Election December 15 TEL AVIV, Oct. 11. (JTA)—A Cabinet committee dealing with preparations for the first parliamentary elections to be held in Israel has submitted a recommendation to the Cabinet to set Dec. 15 as the date of the elections. The proposal must be approved by the State Council. A committee of experts submitted a recommendation to the Cabinet suggesting that the Israeli flag have a white background with two blue stripes on both the right and the left sides and with the Shield of David in the center. The same committee recommended that the Israeli crest be a Chanuka lamp with seven branches against a blue background. In addition it would contain seven Shields of David signifying the seven-hour working day proposed by Theodor Herzl. The crest would also bear at the lower right-hand corner ; Shofar while at the lower left would be a Lulav and Esrog, used by Jews during the Succoth holidays. 170 Sternists Sent To Acre JAFFA, (JTA) — About 170 Stern Group prisoners who staged a demonstration, this week, overpowering the guards and taking over control of the prison, surrendered to the military police. They were loaded into lorries and transferred to Acre prison when the authorities grimly prorrised that treatment "won't be so lax." About 30 detainees who walked out of the prison were still at large and were objects of an intensive man-hunt. The authorities predicted a speedy return or recapture of all fugitives. Meanwhile, the military authorities opened a searching inquiry into the administration of the Jaffa prison to determine responsibility for the conditions enabling the Sternists to stage their demonstration, which the Hebrew press denounced as a serious blow to the Israeli government's prestige. A senior military police official denied that the Sternists had been in virtual control within the prison for the last fortnight, explaning that they were confined to cells but were permitted free use of the large exercise yard. Asked why the prison guards had not used arms to prevent the break, he replied that the prisoners, after making their escape by leaping over the wall, had mixed with the crowd of women and children outside the prison who had come to visit the Sternists. irabs Get Air Superiority Over Israel Tom British, Claims 'Flying' Magazine Ii Great Britain withdrew its direct aid today, the Arab air prces would collapse, it is disclosed in a feature article on the Vi war in Palestine, appearing in the October issue of "Flying," rational aviation magazine published by Ziff-Davis and now pi the newsstands. Official British air missions are rtlve in training and equipping mlitary forces in Iraq and Saudi yabia, and the Transjordan Air force is completely operated and Inanced by the British Crown. ptes John C. Ross in the aviapon magazine. Israel's air power is much less nan that 0 f the Arabs—whose tola] might is largely concenrated in Egypt's British-spon ored air force—but if both sides 'ere left to fend for themselves, tore i. s no q Ues ti on 0 f the outome, the article declares. The Arabs would be left helpKs the author asserts, but Is%  el, freed of paralyzing restricts, would bring into full play •s technical brains and resource wness. The arms embargos imosed on both sides in the Holy and warfare has hurt Israel ftuch more than it has the Arabs --although the Jews have exerted considerable ingenuity in Manufacturing their own small r rns and field-pieces. But both side have tasted air far and are determined to build iieir air forces as soon as cir?umstances permit—regardless of whether the present anxious oeace becomes enduring, or the war is resumed. An effctive air force, the writer says, will be "a colossal luxury" for these small nations, but all are eager to have such a fighting arm. "The Arab League nations are so backward by Western standards," the article states, "that they seemed almost sub-human to American soldiers who saw them during the war. In addition to a .shortage of industrial resources is the problem of training recruits to operate anything as complex as an air force. Here, the disciplined Israelis have a great advantage over the illiterate and individualistic Arabs. The Israelis learned cooperation and "teamwork in European armies and in the task of reclaiming the arid Palestine deserts. "Israel, unlike the Arabs, has no shortage of trained men. The Israelis, trained in all the armies of Europe, include high quality (Continued on Page 16) Give Supplies to Save Lives Local SOS Chairman Urges Israeli Government Reaches Agreement On Supply Of Oil TEL AVIV, (JTA)—An agreement with Shell-Socony-Vacuum to supply refined oil products sufficient to meet the nation's domestic requirements was announced this week by the Israeli government. Shipments are expected to begin immediately but the government as a "precautionary measure" will not relax the current restrictions on fuel consumption. The continuance of the rationing is also based on the need of Israeli to conserve foreign exchange. The three companies consented to continue to supply refined products as long as there are no hostilities. The agreement reserves the right of the Israeli government to obtain additional supplies from other sources. To help Europe's Jews turn a new and happier page in 1948, the SOS (Suppl-es for Overseas Survivors) Collection of the Joint Distribution Committee of Greater Miami will launch its 1948 spring campaign for high priority canned foods and layette items on Sunday, Nov. 14, it was announced by Mrs. Matilda Ratner, SOS chairman. Mrs. Ratner stated that the Greater Miami SOS committee seeks to collect 75,000 pounds of relief supplies. The following supplies were listed by Mrs. Ratner as those most urgently needed by Europe's Jews: infants' layettes, and canned foods, such as meats, fish, milk, milk products, Please Note: Due to observance of the Holidays copy for Insertion in Friday's edition of the JEWISH FLORIDIAN must be in our office not later than WEDNESDAY. 10 A.M. ^ %  nmtuun Lloyd D. LeMan Photo Mrs. Matilda Ratner fruits and fruit juices. Mrs. Ratner said, "1948 is a year of hope and a year of opportunity for Europe's Jews. This year, we in comfortable, secure America must give more than we have ever given before to help Europe's Jews realize that hope and opportunity. Many survivors overseas, after untold hardships, have now begun to restablish themselves again on European soil. Mrs. Ratner was hostess at a luncheon at Huyler's for the initial meeting of area chairman. Assisting Mrs. Ratner were: Mrs. Emanual Baskin for West Miami Shores; Mrs. Maurice Whitman, Miami Springs and Miami Shores; Mrs. Albert Green, upper Biscayne Boulevard; Mrs. Harry Kaufman and Mrs. William Loeb, Miami Beach; Mrs. Ben Essen and Mrs. Harry Brenner, Coral Gables; Mrs. Samuel Danels, Hialeah; Mrs. Harry Gordon, Miami; Mrs. Harold Spaet, publicity chairman; Mrs. Isidore Newman, layette sewing chairman, and Miss Shirley Rosenberg will assist the committee as chairman of the volunteer clerical staff. Headquarters for the local campaign will be at the YMHA, located at 1536 Ray Road, Miami Beach. National SOS has assigned Stan Murray, southeastern field representative to assist in the Greater Miami campaign.



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FRIDAY. OCTOBER 15, 1948 I'll Say... By HARRY SIMONHOFF Luiz de Torres: 1492 +Jenisti Ftcrid/an PAGE THREE PalOS) a small seaport in Spain, W as bustling with the preparations of three ships about to embark on the strangest voyage anyone ever heard of. In a few days thev would sail over the western S ea" in search of the East Indies. The villagers tapped their foreheads mockingly as the top commander, one Christobal Colon, passed by mumbling to himself. "These Pinzon brothers have such vile taste. Imagine such a voyage in a ship they call Pinta. the painted harlot, or Nina, the wench. But I won't stand for Maria Galante. The Admiral's flagship must bear a more dignified name than Footloose Mary. Why not Santa Maria ." "Captain Chris Colon!" broke in a voice upon his reverie. The tall seaman drew himself up to his full height and exclaimed haughtily "Captain, indeed! Grand Admiral of the Ocean, if you please." "Come now, Colon. Don't put on the dog with an old comrade, the only one who would listen to your crazy dreams and your wretched Latin. By the way, do you still sign your name Columbus with that big flourish?" "Luiz de Torres, as I live," exclaimed Colon. "But you look so down hearted. Let's see, I believe our last voyage was to Iceland. What are you doing here? Oh, I know, signed up with my fleet, I'll bet." "No," he answered and remained silent for awhile. "But can"t you guess? I have to obey the royal decree. That rotten hulk must fill up with Jewish exiles before it lifts anchor." "Oh, I forgot," said the Grand Admiral and reflected for several moments. "But you don't have to be an exile. Surely there is some way out." "Not at the price of my faith. I won't change religion as I would a doublet and hose." The future discoverer looked about furtively, and whispered: "You don't have to change on the inside. Why not do like Santangel, Sanchez and the other Marannos Say, I have an idea. You still have that gift for languages?" "Yes, I added Persian, Turkish, and a little Chaldean since we last met." "I knew I forgot something. 1 need an interpreter. Come along with me to Fra Diego Morales. Now, don't contradict me. As soon as you are baptised, I will sign you up for the greatest voyage ever taken. There is no safer place on earth than on my flagship. You shall eat at the Grand Admiral's table." October 12, 1492 The Santa Maria fairly heaved with jubilation. After 69 days of discouragement and despair, they now stood at anchor before land. What a bright sun! Far more dazzling than Andalusia. Columbus was dressed in a magnificent scarlet robe. Those sailors, who wanted to throw him overboard, were now kissing his hand and begging his forgiveness. Luiz de Torres also came up to congratulate the great discoverer. He had no need to fall on his knees. He was loyal all through. "Senor Interpreter," boomed Columbus in his most pompous manner. "You will be the first to land. Take Sebastion and Ruiz along as bodyguards. Pay my respects to the local ruler. I will follow shortly. Be sure to present me in proper form." Luiz de Torres leaped out of the row-boat. He scooped up some white sand in both hands and murmured a prayer ending with a word that sounded like Adama. A sword hanging at his side, and flanked by two stalwart sailors each carrying a tall halberd, hr walked two hundred feet to a group of people, some naked others partly clad, all of coppei reddish tint. A tall man in the center, wearing a crown of brilliant colored feathers, carried himself with an air of authority. "Shalom Alechem," greeted Luiz with assumed boldness. The chief did not answer. "Pax Vobiscum!" No response. The polyglot Jewish interpreter flung out words in a dozen languages or dialects, but with no success. The head man maintained a grave and baffling sil[ ence. What next? puzzled de Torres. A young girl stepped up to Sebastian, looked him over, and touched his clothes, his hands and his face. Sebastian smiled his pleasure at the young shapely naked form. Luiz looked at her only article of wear: a necklace of small, evenly matched shells. De Torres suddenly got an inspiration. Drawing out of his doublet a string of blue glass beads, he placed it around his own neck. He pointed to the sky, then to the beads of the same skyblue color. He took off the beads held it circular like in both hands and advanced to the chief. The red man evidently understood. He removed his plumed egrets a n/ lowered his head. Luiz slipped thn beads around the chief's neck. The leader took a long reed fror a retainer standing near, and stuck it in his mouth. The reed began to smoke, but a cloud o' smoke also came out of his mouth. The chief offered the smokinp eed to the white visitor. Dc Torres, an experienced traveler, felt it always wise to follow the custom of the land. He placcthe reed between his lips and began to draw in his breath. The ta"ste was bitter. He wanted to cough, but restrained himself, and with heroic effort let the smoke out of his mouth. The red leader LilienthafTo Address JDC\ Annual Meeting in Chicago B'nai B'rith Receives Call For Executive Meet Milton Friedman, president of the State Federation of B'nai B'rith Lodges has called a meeting of the executive committee of the State Federation for October 16 and 17 at St. Petersburg, Fla. Representatives from nineteen lodges are expected to participate. George Talianoff, Anti-Defamation League's executive secretary, Irving Cypen, state secretary, William Pallot, president of the B'nai B'rith Council, and Harold Turk, state membership chairman, will accompany Mr. Friedman to the west coast. Headquarters will be in the Suwanee Hotel. Following the week-end conference Mr. Friedman and Mr. Talianoff will proceed to Lakeland where they will address the B'nai B'rith Lodge on the 19th. David E. Lilienthal, chairman of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission, will be the featured speaker at the 34th Annual Meeting of the Joint Distribution Committee on October 31 in the Palmer House, Chicago. He will share the speakers' platform with Dr. William Haber, Adviser on Jewish Affairs in Germany to Gen. Lucius D. Clay. Five hundred delegates are expected to attend the meeting, which will be open to the public, and which will be presided over by Edward M. M. Warburg, JDC chairman. Your Complete Department Store With Quality Merchandise Washington Are. at 13tb St Miami Beach And for your convenience Morris Brother's New Apparel and Accessory Store 70 E. Flakier St.. Miami AUTO LOCK & HARDWARE 1304 N. E. 2nd Avenue Phone 9-3144 Specializing Installing oi AUTO LOCKS SPEEDOMETERS WINDSHIELD WIPERS AUTO GLASS & PARTS SUN VISORS SPOT LIGHTS Owners J. A. NILON J. P. NILON gravely placed his right arm on the newcomer's shoulder. He must be pleased with me, mused de Torres. A company of Spaniards drew near, dressed in velvets satins of sober as well as bright colors. Banners and pinions waved as the tallest standard was firmly planted in the ground. "Any success, de Torres?" questioned the commander. "Senor Admiral, I can't make myself understood. But the chief over there seems friendly." A monk began reciting a prayer in Latin. The group remained on their knees when they heard a booming voice solemnly entoning, "I, Christopher Columbus, by virtue of the power vested in me as Admiral of the Ocean and viceroy of the Indies, now declare these lands and people the property of their Catholic Majesties. Ferdinand of Aragon and Isabella of Castile." ^KKiaKT: ^fupldi am/ bependaMe cfiffe Setorke M IAMI TITL€ & abstract Co. •r Tim mfKiB ABSTRACTS TITLE Title Insurance Policies of Kansas City Title Insurance Co. Assets Over $2,000,000.00 <1 N. E. FIRST AVE. TELEPHONE 3-6661 7! 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PAGE FOUR +Je*lst ncrkJIan raw, OCTQBBP it 1348 EDITORIAL Agrieulturat Sabbath Two years ago the Jewish Agricultural Society conceived the happy thought of inaugurating a Jewish Agricultural Sabbath. The idea has struck roots and now it bids fair to remain a permanent institution in Jewish life in America. As on the previous two occasions, the Agricultural Sabbath this year will be observed on the first Sabbath of Succoth. Today we Jews are predominantly an urban people. But that was not always so. In the days before the Diaspora we were primarily an agricultural folk. Our profound attachment to the soil is perhaps best reflected in the fact that great portions of the Talmud are devoted to agricultural laws and to the agricultural mode of life of our forefathers. There is, therefore, deep spiritual meaning in the observance of a day that reminds the Jew of his pastoral origin. There are many in our midst who are still unaware of the importance agriculture is assuming in the life of our people. Although the Jewish farm movement in America is barely half a century old, quite a large segment of the Jewish population* derives its living from the land. Flourishing Jewish farm communities have been built up in various parts of the country, mostly near the large centers of Jewish life, and our farmers, although newcomers, have left a profound imprint on American agriculture. There is a growing awareness among our people of the importance of agricultural occupations and of the need of having more tillers of the soil. Officially designated as such by the Synagogue Council of America, the Agricultural Sabbath not only recalls the traditional meaning and implications of the Succoth festival but also serves to call attention to the importance of agriculture to American Jewry in our own day. Sueeoth After the more serious Holy Days of Rosh Hashonah and Yom Kippur, Judaism, as it were, rewards its adherents with the more joyful holiday of Succoth. Originally Succoth was an agricultural festival and we observe it today very 7i i m What Further Evidence Is Needed?" much as a reminiscence of the times when the Jew was a tiller of the soil. The Jew even brought his farm symbolically into the synagogue with his esrog and lulav, with which he used to chant his thankfulness to God. Today, the festival takes on more of its ancient significance as Israel again takes its place as a nation among the nations. Once more Israel is a t.ller of its soil, living the normal life of a people. In the new Israel, Succoth thus undergoes a revivifying experience. It is possible that the newer forms, or at least the new spirit, with which Succoth will be observed in the new Israel will in time also influence our own observance of the holiday. In any event, Succoth is a very welcome holiday. It is a zman simchasenu, a time of joy and the world has need of joy. Ilravtdeis Inivvrsity The inauguration of Branded University A first Jewish-sponsored, non-sectarian institJ' higher learning in America, has both an ate and historical significance for theT^'" people. Jewi "h Viewed in terms of our contemporary from work, and taking place in the same W^ which the State of Israel has been estaffij? it serves notice upon the world that Jewry deo brutal persecutions, has lost none of itsi aZ vitality. The launching of Brandeis, another I! strumentality for the strengthening of democrat processes, also attests to the continuing faithof Jewry in the ideals of democracy. Finally as university tolerating restrictions neither in h student body nor in its faculty, Brandeis serves a symbol of the insistence of Jewish people uoon the rights of all minorities. m From an historical perspective, there are deeper implications. For more than 30 years, leadina Jewish figures had urged the establishment of a Jewish-sponsored university of a non-sectarian nature. Protestant and Catholic religious groupinqs had contributed generously to the founding of universities in Amerca. The Jews, the people of the Book, now take their proper role in providinq higher educational facilities for the youth of the nation. Equally as momentous is the simple reassurance implicit in the creation of Brandeis University that the traditional Jewish solicitude for the care of youth, their proper rearing and education, is still alive. The solemn dignity of the inauguration of the Univers ty; the warm reception accorded the institution by the academic fraternity; the carefullyphrased pledges of the President of the Board, George Alpert, and of the first President, Dr. Abram Leon Sachar; and the national attention focussed upon the fledgling school, all give assuiance that Brandeis University will add to the rich lustre of Jewry's contributions to world culture and knowledge. THE JEWISH ANSWERMAN As part of its program of service to Jewish Community Centers and YM-YWHAs and other community agencies, the National Jewish Welfare Board has published a 102-page book entitled "The Jewish Holidays—A Guide to Their Origin, Significance and Observance," by Dr. Mordecai Soltes. From this volume and a supplementary series of JWB manuals on the observance of the major Jewish festivals and holidays including Sukkot. there has been developed a series of Jewish holiday quizzes of which this one, on Sukkot, is the second. Questions Memorial Services for the dead conducted? 1. What does the name Sukkot mean and how long does the festival last? 2. By what special name is the eighth day of the Sukkot festival called? 3. Why is the concluding day of the Festival of Tabernacles called Simhat Torah (Rejoicing in the Law)? 4. How are the intervening days of Sukkot (third to seventh called)? 5. What is the agricultural significance of Sukkot? 6. What historical experience of the Jewish people does the Feast of Booths recall? 20. How do children generally observe Simhat Torah? Answers 1. Booths or Tabernacles; nine days. 2. Shemini Azeret (Feast of the Eighth Day, or the Eighth Day of Solemn Assembly). 3. Because on that day the one year cycle of the reading of the Pentateuch is completed and resumed. 4. Hoi Hamoed, or week days of the Feast. 5. The festival occurred originally during the fruit harvest in Palestine and was observed as 7. By what three names is the thanksgiving at the completion festival of Tabernacles referred to in the Bible? of the entire harvest. 6. It commemorates the wan8. What are the two main cere-1 derings of the Israelites in the monies included in the celebration of Sukkot? 9. How is the Sukkah usually utilized by the members of the family? 10. Why are Jews required to erect and dwell in Sukkahs during the Festival of Booths? 11. What is a contemporary practice regarding the Sukkah which is becoming widespread? 12. What does the Sukkah symbolize? 13. What is the Lulav and ofj what elements does it consist? 14. When does the Reader wave the Lulav in the Synagogue? 15. In what other ceremony is the Lulav used in the Synagogue on the first two days of Sukkot? 16. What do the processional circuits with the Lulav made in the Synagogue on Sukkot commemorate? 17. What is the Hoshannah? When is the Hoshanna used? 18. Describe the special ceremony which takes place in the Synagogue on Hoshannah Rabbah. 19. On what day of Sukkot are which they were uprooted by persecution. 13. A festive palm branch which is waved by observant Jews during the Sukkot festival; a palm branch, three myrtle twigs (Haddasim), two willow branches (Avarot), and a citron (Etrog). "Lulav" is the word applied for short to all elements, which are arranged in a booklet. 14. During the chanting of the Hallel prayers the Hazan waves the festive branch in all directions—north, south, east and west, as an acknowledgement of God's sovereignty over nature. 15. At the end of the service, processional circuits led by the Reader, are made around the reading desk or Bimah. The Lulav is carried and special hymns, beginning with the word "hoshanna" are chanted. 16. The procession around the altar in the Temple Court. 17. An osier or willow branch made up of five small twigs, tied together with strips of willow bark or palm leaf. It is used in the Synagogue in the morning of the seventh day of Sukkot. 18. Processional circuits are made around the reading desk seven times. At last, wth a petition for forgiveness of his sins, each worshipper strikes his branch a few times on the desk or bench before him, and throws it away. Poetical prayers are recited, among them one full of Messianic hopes—"Kol M'vaser, M'vaser V'omer" — "A Voice brings news, brings news and says.'' 19. On Shemini Azeret, the eighth day of the Sukkot Festival. 20. They carry Jewish flags during the "hakafot" (processional circuits) with the Holy Scrolls, and are called up to recite the blessing over the Torah. CANTOR GETS U.J.A. AWARD FROM GOLDWYN Desert of Sinai, following their exodus from Egypt. 7. Hag HaSukkot—(Festival of Booths), Hag HeAsif—Festival of Ingathering), Z'man Simhatenu— (The Season of our Rejoicing), These names suggest various phases of the significance and observance of this festival. 8. Dwelling in Sukkahs or huts, and the waving of the Lulav and Etrog. 9. The mother blesses the candles and the father and children recite the Kiddush and sometimes partake of their meals in the Sukkah. 10. To recall the temporary huts which our forefathers built as | dwellings during their wander-1 ings in the Wilderness of Sinai. Hebrew Calendar 11. The erection of larger ComS709 1948 munity Sukkahs by SynagoguesSuccoth, lit day Oct u and Jewish Community Centers •V "." ,h -.'"-'< ''• %  > %  „Oot It which are utilized by the Jewish SSSSSI^ASSSS. : ~get |? Eddie Cantor, star of stage, screen and radio, is shown receiving the United Jewish Appeal's 1948 Citation for Humanitarianism trom Samuel Goldwyn, noted motion picture producer. who is president of the United Jewish Welfare Fund in Mj Angeles. Mr. Cantor recently completed a tour of major U.S. cm in which he gave great impetus to their campaign for the S250-000,000 United Jewish Appeal. Prior to his lour he visited JBJ-maintained homes and workshops for refugees in Europe. j UJA supports the world-wide relief, reconstruction and r f"!"' ment activities of the United Palestine Appeal, the Joint Distriw tion Committee and the Unied Service for New Americans. community at large. 12. It is an emblem of the Galut (Exile), and suggests the temporary abodes which the Jews have found in various lands from Slmchath Torah" "" Oct' 2 Rosh ( hodesh. Klslev ... i > PC 3 < hanukah, lnt dav 1 i,.,.' -.Chanukah, 2nd day Dec' 28 •AIHO observed previous day. News Briefs Emil Cohen has been elected president of the newly formed Citrus Fruit Division of the Miami Beach Chamber of Commerce. The new unit campaign will include promotion of advertising, publicity and complete cooperation among the industry. Other officers are Max Goodman, vice president; William Knowles. treasurer; Seymour Weiss and Leon Michelson, directors, and George H. Mitchell, secretary. Marvin Kimmel, president of the Miami Beach Jaycees, announced that the organization will again sponsor the Damon Runyon Cancer Fund for the third consecutive year. Previous cancer fund drives netted £50,000. Chairman of the committee is Buddv Allen. %  ^JewistFkridiar Published every Friday **fl „y The Jewish Floridian at iw Sixth Street. Miami 18, F 0 %  ^ lered as second-class mauer l30. at the WMtoifl Fla.. under the Act of Marc n*^ Act of Marcn *-j F.ondi.nM.••"5JS tne jewisn Unity and in. T|M Weekly. Member of the J. tuN graphic Agency. Seven Aru Syndicate. Worldwide News aj ,, National Editorial Assooaton. *£-, can Association of Enfl ,' c j,tu. Newspapers. Florida Press Assocu SUBSCRIPTION RATE ?j 0 One Year M Two Years FRED K. SHOCrfET Edltc and p..oii r Telephones UMI-** 1 OFFICE and PLANT 120 N. E. Sixth Street Volume 21 .JTlSi FRIDAY. OCTOBER 15. TISHRI 12, 5-09 41



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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1948 +Jewist fhrldian PAGE FIVE Actress Has Leading Radio Role In Council Program Jano Cowl, noted actress of Stage, screen and radio, will play the leading role in the annual Council Day broadcast of the National Council of Jewish Women to be carried over the coastto-coast network of the National Broadcasting Company on Saturday. October 16, and heard locally O vor WIOU at 6:45 p.m. The broadcast a dramatic docuAcademy Gives M u s i < ;i 1 1 i ni in The opening event on the Hebrew Academy's calendar this year will be a forum and musicale to be held Wednesday evening at 8 p m. at the academy auditorium, 918 6th St., Miami Beach. Dr. David Andron, president, will act as chairman of the evening. Speakers will be Rabbi Irving Lehrmai) and Sol Sugarman, principal of the school. Cantor Jacob Y. Goldring will sing seven] numbers. Special refreshments will be served in the Succah which has been decorated by the children of the academy for the occasioThere will be no solicitation of funds. National B'nai B'rith Leaders In Miami To Attend American Legion Convention Jane Cowl mcnlaiy entitled, "A Time to Sp.;ik.' ; will launch Council Day celebrations by sections throughout the nation. A special message will be presented by Mrs. Joseph M. Welt, of Detroit, Council's nation;.! president.. Both the national and local events planned for Council Day 1048. ir.aking the 55th anniversary of the founding of the National Council of Jewish Women, are being keyed to the theme. "The Vil 1 Contribution of the Council Volunteer." The significant role of the volunteer women worker —locally, nationally and internationally—will be highlighted. Beach Y Program Has Added Projects Mrs, Evelyn Walterman. program chairman of the Beach Y. %  nnouneffs the following forth coming activities: On Thursday at 8:30 the second clnss in conversation-it Spanish will b^ein, with Vt-rnon Dyer, of the University of Miami, in charge. The women's modern dance group will open for the second year on Monday. November 1 at 8:30. Bernard Qstfeld. dancing instructor, also teaches a class in children's modern dancing on Monday and Wednesday afternoons. Lillian Fox, director of the Little Theatre Group, began coaching the group for this year's production last night. B'nai B'rith Women To Organize New Group In Normandy Isle Area First organizational meeting of a new B"nai B'rith Young Women's group in the Normandy Isle area of Miami Beach was held last night at the home of Miss Harriet Feinberg, 1738 Marseilles Drive. The young ladies heard a talk by Howard Liebman, Florida state director of B'nai B'rith Youth activities. The chaiter group consists o f fourteen girls between the ages of 18 and 25 who attend college and are employed. Misses Carol Potasnick and Harriet Feinberg are assisting Mr. Liebman with organizational plans. Temporary officers will be elected at the next meeting. Gables Zionists Call Luncheon Meeting The next luncheon meeting of the Coral Gables Zionist District will be held at Erving's Restaurant, 3500 Coral Way, on Thursday at 12 noon. Zionists and friends of Israel are invited to attend. Reservations are unnecessary and no collections will be made. Sports To Be Discussed At Men Club Meeting "Jews in Sports," will be the subject of a talk next Wednesday when the Men's Club of Temple Israel meet at 8 p.m.. E. Max Goldstein, all southern football olayer and local attorney will be the sneaker. Several sport figures • % %  ill be the guests of the Men's Club at the meeting. Two national B'nai B'rith leaders will be in Miami to represent their respective state delegations at the American Legion Convention October 16 through 22. Lt. Col. Elliott A. Niles of Brookline, Mass., chairman of the B'nai B'rith National Committee on Veterans' Affairs and A. B. Kapplin, director of the National Commission on Americanism and Civic Affairs and the National Committee on Veterans Affairs of B'nai B'rith will attend convention sessions here. Lt. Col. Niles has recently been appointed liaison officer of the Secretary of Defense to the U. S. Veterans' Administration. He renresents Secretary of Defense Forrestal at all national conventions of the major veterans' organizations of the United States. Since his promotion to Lt. Col. ; n May, 1945, Lt. Col. Niles has been serving as chief of the management branch of the Adjutant General's office, with headquar'ers in the Pentagon Bldg. He was active'in the B'nai B'rith service nrogram before his transfer to Washington and was the origina*or of the "Serve-A-Ship" project which won the Navy award for B'nai B'rith shortly after V-J day. Lt. Col. Niles will fly to Miami in an army plane on October 16 and will be at the Raleigh Hotel during convention week. A. B. Kapplin, the second B'nai B'rith luminary to attend the convention is a former newspaper man and editor of Minnesota where he was prominently identified with the American Legion for many years. He served with the national headquarters of th Anti-Defamation League for three years before coming to the Supreme Lodge headquarters of B'nai B'rith late in 1945. Prior to that time he had lived in Duluth, Minn, for more than 25 years where he was associated with local newspapers and served as managing editor of the Duluth News-Tribune. He attended the University of Minnesota and is a veteran of World War I and served as commander of the Minnesota Department of the Legion in 1931. Mr. Kapplin served as director of Civilian Defense for Northern Minnesota. While a resident of Duluth, he was for 15 years a TROPICAL LODGE B'NAI B'RITH Presents Its 2nd Annual Halloween Whirl SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24th—9 'TIL 1 At the AIR-CONDITIONED FROLIC CLUB TICKETS $1.25 MUSIC BY SAM LANE 1306 N. E. BAYSHORE DRIVE (Just off MacArthur Causeway) SET UPS FREE B. Y. O. L. ADDS NEW TO YOUR MEALS Breakstone's Sour Cream is not really sour. It's a specially cultured sweet cream with o fresh, lively flavor all Its own. Use it as o main dish—os an ingredient in soupt, sauces, salads, vegetables and pastries—and a a topping for fruits and berries. Your grocer has it in glass or paper containers. SOUR CREAM fASTlURIZlD • HOMOGENIZED A. B. Kapplin member of the executive board of the Boy Scout Council and served on the board of directors of the Duluth Lighthouse for the Blind for 20 years. Mr. Kapplin will attend the annual Post Department Commander's Club Dinner Sunday evening, October 17, at the Colony Restaurant. It is expected that both A. B. Kapplin ana i_,t. Col. Niles will appear at B'nai B'rith membership luncheons and smokers currently in progress as part of the B'nai B'rith October membership drive. During his stay, Mr. Kapplin will confer with Charles R. Jacobson, executive director of the Greater Miami B'nai B'rith Council regarding public relations methods and means of promoting the Americanism rally sponsored by the Council on Sunday, October 31 in Flamingo Park where Harold Russell will appear as speaker. Local Legionnaires To Attend Convention An expected 50,000 Legionnaires from over the nation will start pouring tnrough Florida in the next few days enroute to the American Legion convention at Miami, October 18-21. Some of the advance guard will be members of the Legion's fun group, the 40 et 8, which opens its preconvention promenade on October 16. American Legion Posts throughout the state are sprucing up for "open house" on the days preceding and following the convention. Gateway booths at the northern end of the state will offer orange juice and information to the Legionnaires as they enter Florida and there will be hospitality available for them at all of their stopping places enroute. The serious side of the convention program will be participated in officially by fifty-one delegates chosen from all over Florida, or their alternates, but they will be informally assisted by several thousand Florida Legionnaires, many of whom have already registered. Delegates from this area include: Coral Gables, A. B. Lambert; Miami, H. Frost Bailey, Joe Frank, Henry Melloy Sr., W. Fisher; Miami Springs, Art Calvert; Miami Beach, Hyman Kout. Miami Y Initiates Weight Lifting Group A weight lifting group has been formed at the Miami YMHA to meet each Sunday morning at 10 a.m. and Tuesday and Thursday evenings at 8 p.m. Beginners are invited to attend the first meeting this Sunday morning. AT YOUR SERVICE SHERRY'S BAKERY Finest Danish Pastry 5c Apple Turn Over 10c Egg Bread Daily 24c Rich Chocolate Eclairs 10c MANY OTHER ITEMS THAT YOU WILL LIKE We will appreciate a trial LOU LEVIN. Mar. 2151 S.W. 8th Street Next to A & P PHONE 9-9756 FOR WOMEN 5 FT. 4 IN. AND UNDER Spectacular Sale 100% Wool SUITS GABARDINES — SOFT WOOLS AND FLANNELS 19 9 5 29 9 5 Formerly 49.95 59.95 69.95 79.95 Skirts are Shorter than currently shown—hence the reason for these drastic reductions. Buy one suit and have two suits by contrasting skirts. COLORS AND SIZES FOR WOMEN. MISSES. JUNIORS ALL SALES FINAL NO REFUNDS — NO EXCHANGE duPONT BLDG., MIAMI



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PAGE SIX Jewlsti fhrkttan FRIDAY, OCTQBER l ^ SUCCOTH By DAVID SCHWARTZ There is an appeal about Suej coth that transcends that of most of the Jewish holidays. Succoth winds up in the very gala hilarity of Simchat Torah. Well, there are other joyous holidays. Purim is also a day of carnival joy. but its joy is not the wholesome kind of Succoth. Purim makes the triumph over an enemy. That is a joy, but it is a joy that at the same time suggests pain. Succoth is joy at merely being, the joy that comes from the harvesting of the fruits of the field, the j living, of laboring and loving. It is a more natural festiv J and more human festival. It is the kind of holiday—the thanksgiving days—that every pe pie r.-v Jewish legend ass with the founding of Succoth. At first sight, this appears a not very happy thing. Of the Hebrew patrriarchs, Jacob is th least glamorous. Abraham s so much more lofty, -much more saintly We ses spots in '..-.err. ar.: them. They seem tc have born for distinction But noi Jacob. He is full .:' the ills ::' humar. flesh. Let us take a 1 k at his ret rd But let's look mon lose] God is supposed t -' %  ~ weighs man in the s Let _.look as the psychologist i es Th psychologists asks •• %  •.-.; haved as he iid What does the record sh The Biblical ace ant tells is that while Jac >b "sat in i tenl Esau was a man ::' action, :•• loved of his father, I home the venison. E success, the extrovert the man of action He had a house in the country, two autorr. es a. .a sea: on thstock on tl % %  ther hand glasses, use-a I : rr: w I I books from the library and sit and read the'in the tents His father used to say tc him don't you go out ar.d make of money like Ei-The one to star.d up for him was his ther She would take Jac side, but her love was prob more compassion than anything else. We all love the succones. She had pity or. Jac >b She knew that Jacob wasn't much more than reading books and that if he went out with his gur. to shoot a deer, the gun would accidentally go off and he would shoot himself. And yet to say that Jacob is inferior is to miss the truth. He has, it .; true, an inferiority complex, but an inferiority complex is sometimes lr. itself proof of a kind of superiority. The doubts, the hesitancies of man. while from one aspect are a sign of weakness, at the same time show a thoughtfulness, a sensitivity that the mar. of action sometimes lacks. But one cannot live in a steady climate of failure. Jacob learns that he car. sometimes hold hack the forces of this cruel world and bring about a crude sort of justice. Encouraged by his mother Rebecca, he falls in with her plan •.j Receive Isaac and win the paternal blessing. As a matter of fact, Rebecca is the sponsor of this idea. Rebecca is a very fine woman. Whv does she concoct such a plan? It is very simple. She reasons: -What the devil does Esau need any more blessing? He's got all he wants. If anybody needs a blessing, it is Jacob." The incident teaches Jacob a lesson. He leaves his mother's apron strings and finds the outside world more cruel. He gel job with Uncle Laban and what does Uncle Laban do* H ises to give Jacob his %  years y The idinj 1 when th ted. J V i has i L -" -• %  %  Ifact a to surH '" %  : Ra%  .-% %  %  --%  rattle— %  ; %  Bernadotte Report Written In D. C London, ZOA Publication Revea's :-• --• .z --.--~ '-''' [and ronter. -_ -.-. "J ligels Sever rief is the finer struggling in sti rid I ing t on a high plane, but : this imp ss.r'.e and failing — rays dreaming, coning : ang Is striving things. 5 it .that examine lj the very seem to hin %  attractive We ise he is like us. JUT pains and struggles and weak resolutions. So the Jews even took his name ar.d not that >f the >ther Patriarchs. We are called Israel, the name given to Jacob when he contended with the angels. NEW YORK—'The New Palestine," official publication of the Zionist Organization of America, printing a dispatch from its Washington correspondent. Murray Frank, asserted that the Bernadotte report did not originate with the late U.N. mediator. Instead. Mr. Frank writes, it was "the handiwork of State Department officials in Washington who, in collaboration with the British, Foreign Office, prepared the letails of the report more than a mor.th ago." Mr Frank, in his dispatch, to the close jeer; governed the J.S. collaboration in writing : major sections of the reand then declared that this, underlying reason for J of State Marshall's! al of the report and \ (or Brit • endorsement, which .. s ;-. followed the move om Mi Marshall" The New Palestine" dispatch c ted out that State Deind the British quietly worked _the Is of the report durmonth >f August." By end :' the month, the disaddc i th major points of %  ;lawere completed and ap-; Foreign Afin Washington ar.d %  —. ""he i spatch continued: The I • ve was to approach a certain influential Western Euro1 pean country. The plan was disd '..: its representatives, de-' ".a.Is were fully explained, and --upport at the appropriate! time was asked. This cleared the way for the' rep. Representatives of the State Department presented the main points of the Anglo-US., j Palestine Solution," whi h was t i be the he in ( '. Bern idottel Report, to representatives of the [s eli g %  r.: 7."'.hint was p litely dropped tn^t the US.. GORDON ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORKS Hava >5JP -:.* repaired now; you will aav* on a nrw roof latar • %  Sat rfaetory Work by Expananead Man" 414 I W. 22nd Avent PHONE 4-1 Britain and a certain Western European country will suport the plan, and the request was made that Israel, too. seriously consider the plan and give its assent to it. But the Anglo-U.S. planners hit their first snag. The Israeli government refused to accept the •Bernadotte Plan," and instead proceeded to raise a series of objections which would make it unacceptable \p Israel and doom the entire report, such as loss of the Negev. internationalization of Jerusalem, the status of Haifa, etc. Despite the objections by the Israeli government, Mr. Frank asserted, "the State Department was determined that nothing would stop its efforts this time and the anti-Israel clique now proceeded to push the matter to its full fruition." "Officials of the department dispatched to Bernadotte's island headquarters on Rhodes the complete text of the agreement reached between the Americans and the British, accompanied byclear instructions that this agree ment was to be made an integral part of the mediator's report." Israeli representatives, Mr. Frank asserted, were "under the impression that the State Department would support the Bernadotte report in its general lines, but that the U.S. delegation at the United Nations session in Parish would not reach hasty judgment of the report and would be open to suggestions to amend certain details and all J* remain free in its actions.The assassination of R Prn ,j Mr. Frank said, af oS ^ opportunity for' ££ £* "to prevail upon Secretary y? shell's statement of appiJLft the Bernadotte pIan ? a £j f drastic revisions of the P a w! partition plan. alestlne Revealing that President Tv„ man was not awar e of "th. machinations," Mr. Frank T eluded: "All of this leads one ft reach two definite and clear CO n elusions, First, that the State jZ partment has now assumed th. responsibility of putting into e feet the Bevin program for a so" IT 'n e Palestln Problem' while Mr Bevin and the British Foreign Office has assumed the role of disinterested onlookers and "reluctant" supporters of the U.S. The psychological effect on the smaller nations of this division of roles by the two great Western Powers, particularly the quick and determined action of the U.S., will unquestionably bring forth the desired response Second—and this has been suspected in Washington for some time—the State Department has deliberately sought to postpone all favorable action on the part of the U.S. in regard to Israel, including extension of de jure recognition, economic aid in the form of a loan, and Israel's admission to membership in the UN. until after publication of the Bernadotte report. 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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1948 knisl fkricftctr) PAGE SEVEN It. Col. Niles Speaks At Beach Smoker Lt. Col. Elliott K. Niles, chairman of the B'nai B'rith National Committee on Veterans affairs and Secretary ot Detense Forrestal's representative at veteran's conventions will be the major speaker at a mammoth smoker sponsored by the Miami Beach Lodfic B'nai B'rith on Tuesday, 8 30 p.m., October 19, at the Beach YMHA, 15th St. and Bay Road. Lt. Col. Niles is in Miami attending the national convention of the American Legion as a special representative of Secretary of Defense Forrestal. President Harry Zukernick and membership chairman Barnet Beckerman will report on the the progress of the October membership drive and outline plans for the remainder of October in order to reach the goal of 125 new members set by the B'nai B'rith Council in this area. Refreshments and smokes will be provided and several surprise entertainment features have been planned. Harold Turk, state membership chairman, will address the members and prospects on the service work accomplished by B'nai B'rith in the past 105 years. Turk, past president of the B'nai B'rith Council will describe the awards to be given to the top membership workers in the current drive. All residents of Miami Beach South of 41st St. who are interested in joining B'nai B'rith should call the lodge secretary at 5-2435. Mrs. Charles Gordon Host At Festival Mrs. Charles Gordon, chairman of Temple Isaiah's Religious School, will sponsor a Sukos party in honor of her daughter's birthday. The Religious School children have built the sukoh and decorated it with the traditional fruits and vegetables. The young people and their parents are invited to attend the affair which will be held on Sunday at 10 a.m. at the Temple. Swedish Tenor Will Start Series For Miami Symphony Featured by the University of Miami Symphony orchestra, Modeste Alloo conducting, in a pair of concerts Oct. 31 and Nov. 1. will be Set Svanholm, outstanding Swedish tenor. Svanholm has contributed materially to the postal revenue in this country with offers for contraits and fan mail pouring into hi) manager's office. Popularity olten is achieved overnight here, so it was nothing new to find Sv.-.nholm a national hero with music lovers so soon after his triumphs on the west coast and at the Metropolitan. Mag n a vox Authorized Sales and Service MIAMI BEACH RADIO I COMPANY 1219 LINCOLN ROAD PHONE 58-7S75 SOH.T AUGUST BPOS. ay-** £ I* the BE SI*/ jL SOUTHERN FOOD DISTRIBUTORS, inc. NOW EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTORS FOR THE NATIONALLY FAMOUS WILNO KOSHER PRODUCTS CHICAGO READY AS ALWAYS TO SERVE YOU! Herman Pearl Harry Pearl THE PEARL BROTHERS Associated with MORT TJSCHLER In the Same Location for Eight Years 1725 N. W. Seventh Avenue Phone 3-0021 Distributors of the Finest and WellKnown National Food Products Call Harry and Herman Pearl or M ort Tischler at Son I hern Food Distributors, Inf.. and receive the usual cordial, cheery excellent service and quality merchandise that made the PEARL. BROTHERS so popular these many years.



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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1948 -Jewisti ftorMian PAGE NINE Beach Center Sisterhood Holds Luncheon And Installation At Shelborn On Nov. 1st car of strenuous activity for nffk ( r s and members has been fined by the Sisterhood of the guni Beach Community Center Jhc "pason will be inaugurated f 0r the organization withi thei installation luncheon on Monday. November 1 at 12:30 at the Shelborne Hotel. and board members to be f r; are" "IK Arthur Klein. j: I ;Mrs. Bertram Thorpe, ,r :.sLl.nt. Mrs. Jos. Herman, president; Mrs. pre Vic vice seroiitl Harry Rofjers. Mrs. Jos. I.lpton. "' i '' 1 ;::;. fiSlfcm Upton, recording >-Sam r.lnsberK, eorMrs. eo. CloldIiiin. OkB, n. %  Othei boiird Irvine. Lehrman, try; Mrs. ^.^iiniwiini; secretary. Eg! ""rresponfllnf %  ecretary: Mrs_ K..hn auditor; Mrs. Samuel social secretary; Mrs. S am financial secretary. members include: Mrs Mrs. Morris Rubin, eymour Uubln, Mrs. Raymond nubia Mrs Sam Joaepher, Mrs. Sam„' Krledland. Mrs. Julius Selectman, S' E-ther Si.llzer, Mrs. Joseph M. H„L.. Mra. BenJ. B. Wolff Mrs. Morri. Wolfe Mrs. Alexander Richardson, M,s Maurice Levlne, Mrs Harry Koretsky Mrs. W. 1. Feuer. Mrs. Jack S.)k, MIMI Lillian Danstger. Mrs ,\1;,.'d stone Mrs. Al Oshcroff. Mrs. n .,,,;,,. Cohen, Mrs. Nat Hankoff. Mr. Theo. Hankoff, Mrs. Ira Walsey u r Milton Slrkln, Mrs. Paul hmpol. \\.'< Bernard Btern, Mrs. Abraham Goodman, Mrs. Isidore Goldberg. Wm. I -i. Mrs. Fay Tupler and [ N. in.in. Mrs. Benj. B. Wolff is chairman of the installation luncheon, assisted by co-chairmen Mrs. Sam Wiesen and Mrs. Bertram Thorpe. Mrs. Mrs. Ha pool H izrachi Starts Chapter The founding of the Hapoel Mizrachi of Greater Miami took place at the organizational meeting last week at which time officers were elected. These include Moishe Gruenberg, president: Marvin Zalis, vice president in charge of programs; Morton Rosenberg, vice president in charge of meetings; and Ruth Saul, secretary-treasurer. The next meeting of the group will be held Thursday at 8:30 at the Hebrew Academy. Speakers will be Rabbi Moses Mescheloff and Sol Sugarman, principal of the academy. Legion Chairman Speak At Sholem Luncheon Joe H. Adams, president of the American Legion Convention Corporation and local hotel man will be the guest of honor at today's Sholem Lodge B'nai B'rith luncheon 12:15 p.m., in the Downtowner Restaurant. Mr. Adams will speak on the 1948 national American Legion Convention in Miami. HViicli Chapter of B'nai B'rith Women Invite Groups To Meeting the Colony Miss Leslie Goldberg Engaged Mrs. Ida Goldberg, 319 W. 28th St., Miami Beach, announces the engagement of her daughter, Leslie, to Arthur J. Lyons, son of Mrs. Beatrice Levy, Bellmore, Long Island, New York. Miss Goldberg is a graduate of Miami High school, where she was a member of Tri Beta Sorority. She attended the University of Miami, at which she pledged Phi Sigma Sigma Sorority. She also attended the Ann-Reno Institute of Teaching in New York City. Mr. Lyons attended New York University. He is a veteran of three years service in the Coast Artillery, having served in the European, Asiatic and Pacific theatres of operations. No date has been set for the wedding. On Tuesday, at Restaurant, the Miami Beach Chapter of B'nai B'rith Women will lie hostess to leaders of some of the outstanding Jewish Women's service organizations in the area. Each guest has been invited to briefly address the membership. outlining the purposes and activities of tiuir organization. "Thereby we hope to acquaint our B'nai B'rith women with the work of all service organizations in our community and to show the unification of our purposes" says Mrs. Harold Turk, president. Guests include: Mrs Milton Slrkln, president of Tep Fraternity Creates Field Secretary Post Ted Sakowitz, grand vice chancellor and director of the Undergraduate and Alumni Association for the State of Florida of the national fraternity Tau Epsilon Phi, announced locally the appointment of Irving Block, of Massachusetts, as national secretary. The post was created after 38 years to fill a need created by the recent expansion program. The duties of Mr. Block will be (Water Miami Chapter of Hadaasah;' to visit chapter and alumni asMrs. I...-IIS Ulasser. president of rlor. cnHntinrw Miltnn T? Wasman is Ida V\\ of American Jewish Con-' sotiauons. Miuon K. wasman is M i. Benjamin Meyers, preaipresent of the Greater Miami dent, Conference of Jewish Women's Alumni Accncintinn Organliatlons; Mrs. Jean Raab, presi-i Alumni Association. dent, Beach Chapter National Chll( %  'Inns Cardiac Home; Mrs. Sol H. %  |f| aB a L| T.*—. f,„,,„ Brown, president, Jewish Consumptive: JVllZracni 1 amara V*rOUp Relief So lety; Mrs. Leonard Clickman, Miami Beach Division, president, American Jewish Congress; Mrs. l^eon MI.. ;,i,i,t, Deborah Chapter I A Succoth party at the home rladassah; Mrs. Benjamin B. Ooid-I 0 f Mrs. T. Landesman, 2924 Kteln, president, Miami Beach Chapter _;_„ Hadassah; Mrs. Louis Krenaky, presiPrairie Ave., Tuesday evening at dent, sisterhood of Temple Beth 18:30 will constitute the October ^''•^'iho^^^S'.iS; meeting of Tamara Chapter Mizinlty Center; Mrs. Benjamin rachi Women. "Tenth Man" On WIOD Saturday In conjunction with the Mental Health Society of Southeastern Florida, the Miami Section, National Council of Jewish Women will conduct the third in their series of thirteen broadcasts entitled the "Tenth Man," on WIOD Saturday from 12:15 to 12:30 p.m. A professional dramatized sketch concerning mental illness and how it not only affects those who are afflicted but others who necessarily must be affected by contact and family ties. Burdlne'a Photo Reflel Miss Leslie Goldberg U. S. Saving Bonds—the safest crop that grows. MARTHA ZAIX MODISTE Formerly with Lily Ruben Located at 407 15th ST., MIAMI BEACH Specializing in afternoon and evening wear Sizes: 10-44; 14H-24H. If You Desire JEWISH Cuisine Try These LUNCHEON SPECIALS SANDWICHES SMOKED SALMON CHOPPED LIVER TOMATO HERRING SOUR CREAM SPECIALS SOUR CREAM WITH COTTAGE CHEESE SOUR CREAM WITH VEGETABLES Air-Conditioned Mezzanine Floor 'm Plan Succoth Party Sherry, president. Beach Auxiliary of the Jewish Home for the Aged; Mrs. Stan!. > p Phillips, president, North Shon Chapter B'nai It'rlth Women; Mrs Nathan ISIoom, president, Coral liable* Chapter B"nat B'rith Women; served. and Mrs Louis Makovsky. president. | Beth Jacob Sisterhood. Mrs. Irving Becker, first vice president of District Grand Lodge, will represent B'nai B'rith women and outline the work of the organization. A short musical program will follow. Entertainment has neen planned for members and their friends. Refreshments will be JCRS Membership Tea At Atlantis Wednesday The Jewish Consumptive Relief Society will hold its 4th annual M-.emhership tea in the ballroom of the Atlantis Hotel on Wednesday at 12:30. Mrs. Maurie Poncher, chairman, and Mrs. M. Goluskin, co-chairman, announce that a gala show has been arranged for the occasion. The Family of the late CHARLES GREENFIELD Desires to thank many friends for their their kindness, words of sympathy and floral offerings during their recent bereavement. HOME MILK WASH ROOM SANITATION SERVICE ODORITE OF FLORIDA CO. j Patented Lavador Deoderizer [ for {Filling Stations, Restaurants, Nlte Clubs 31 N.W. 8th Ave. Ph. 2-1338 We Carry a Full Line of Strictly Fresh NORTHERN LAKE FISH YELLOW PIKE WHITE FISH BUFFALO AND CARP Also All Southern Fish WE GRIND YOUR FISH FREE 147 N. W. 5th STREET Jes, the "golden rule" for health is plenty of daily fresh Home Milk. There is no food so necessary... nor, is there a finer food! Home Milk supplies the essentials you need proteins, calcium, phosphorus, energy, vitamins -plus good taste. Home Milk is rich, creamy, and delicious. And, every quart of daily fresh Home Milk carries our "Pledge of Purity'...supported by every member of our association. Home Milk is produced on our own Dade and Broward County MIAMI farms, by our fine, regularly tested herds. At our modern Home Milk Plant it is scientifically pasteurized, bottled and cooled under strict laboratory control. So, we know it is rich and wholesome and good. Buy Pasteurized Grade A, or Vitamin D Homogenized Home Milk ...today!. ..daily fresh at your grocer's... or phone 2-7696 and the friendly Home Milk Man will deliver it to your doorstep in the morning. Remember, it's daily fresh ...you can taste the differencel r I rl i u i • Wm 0 U C I A S S 0 CIATION Plant and Sales Office: Northwest 7^fa



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PAGE TEN +Je*ist ncridian Jews In Sports Mishmash: Marshall Gold: has decided to keep going the Chicago Cardinals, football i leaders in the National Lt last year. He stars on defens< and is considered just as valuable to the club as Charley Tripp Elmer Angsman, offensive wigs. Sid Luckman is in the I pitching shape of his career and as a result the Chicago Bea: now favorites to displace Cardinals as National League champions. Ir. their first encounter last week the Bears romped over the Cards. Earlier Sid led his mates to a runaway triumph over the Green Bay Packer.-. Al Sherman is serving as player-coach for the Paterson Panthers, farm team of the Philly Eagles. Al formerly was quarter-' back for the Eagle eleven ana given the opportunity to make the grade as a mentor when the opening developed at Pate: Art Weiner. rugged end on the North Carolina eleven, looms as an All-American terminal. The Snavely-coached crew appears to be the best in the South, which means that many All-American selectors will have an opportunity to watch the Jewish boy in action. Grant and Rice, prominent All-American selector, has already qualified Weiner as the best in the Southeastern area. • • Al Rosen of Miami was recalled in time by the Cleveland Indians to qualify for the World Series. It looks as though Rosey may be tried as a first sacker next year. Keltner appears to be a fixture at the hot corner while Eddie Robinson at first can be moved out for a hitter of Al'sJ stature. Hank Greenberg. the rumor j along the World Series press rows insisted, will be the next owner of the Indians. The story goes that Bill Veeck wants to take over the punch drunk Chicago White Sox franchise and leave the lucrative Tribe to Greenberg. Hank made quite a few trips for the Indians during the closing weeks of the season taking over many of Veeck's chores. Hank doesn*t have the dough to swing the purchase of the club but his friends the Marx Bros., toy manufacturers, are willing to back him. Veeck has denied the move but a lot of baseball people say the deal is in the making. Hank wants to make baseball his life's work and is giving his job with Cleveland his undivided atl tion. • After a sustained holdout Max Zaslofsky of the Chicago Stags in the Basketball Association of Americag League was on his way to the Windy City to report for practice as we prepared this column. The writer was instrumental in getting Max to sign with YESHIVA UNIVERSITY GRADUATE DEVELOPS "MIDGET SAMSON"—FOR ATOM SMASHING IIr. Ed. Meadow lt\i s Suddenly Dr. Edward Meadow, 39, director of Biscayne Hospital, passed away Sunday of a heart attack. Coming here from Canton, Ohio, the physician was one of the founders and owners of' the hospital in addition to acting as ,! ief of the surgical staff. Survivors include his wife, his mother Mrs. Jennie King, and two sisins. Mrs. Ruth Ricco and Miss Elizabeth Meadow, of Miami: and his father. Meyer Meadown, Canton, Ohio. Services were held Sunday night at Lithgow's Funeral Home. Interment was in Canton. Dr. Meadow was widely known for his medical prowess in the cardiac field. g*">AV. OCTOBER K Dr. Jacob E. Goldman, a graduate of Yeshiva University's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and a physicist with Westinghouse Laboratories, measure strength of the mighty electromagnet he has developed for use in magnetic research. Capable of exerting in a space the size of a saucer, a magnetic pull of 4,000 pounds—enough to lift an automobile—the powerful "midget Samson" can be used in designing atom-smashing equipment and in producing permanent magnets. Many Yeshiva University graduates are today active leaders in science, medicine, law, and business, in addition to the rabbinate, education and communal service. the Stai:.after the Brooklyn gster refused to heed the ad-! monitions of the Chicago owners. I Sid Tanenbaurr. is a determined j holdout with the New York 1 Knicks while it appears that Ralph Kuplowitz will desert the Philly Warriors to work full time at his insurance position. Irv Tore, : not report to Baltimore, preferring to get started in a business venture he is considering. Both Ralph and Irv will play part time ball in and around New York if they go through with their plans to go into business. Life Insurance Estatea Authoritativaly Programmed NAT GAN S Metropolitan Life Ina. Co. 907 Blecayne Bldo. Ph. 3.461* or 4-9981 See or phone me for your LIFE INSURANCE NEED8 I ni 7 SPt AUGUST ftROs.Ryf W la th< BEST? 1 CARR APPLIANCES, INC. OWEN L. CARR, President I FRIGID Aim: PRODUCTS PHONE 82-5295 1405 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD AUTO GLASS Installed While You Wait Full Line of Auto Accessories and Paris ADAMS GLASS SERVICE 1805 Purdy Avenue Call 58-3758 or 5-4316 WINZ (940 on Your Dial) EVERY SUNDAY 12:00 Noon to 1:00 P. M. EVERY TUESDAY 6:00 to 7:00 P. M. Yiddish Classical Hour EVERY SUNDAY A Variety of Stars in the Latest Recordings Available CLASSICAL—LITURGICAL AND FOLK MUSIC MAXIMUM HEALTH ... COMFORT 5... ECOMOMY OIL HOUSE HEATING SEE YOUR DEALER -OR CALL US! HUM m Minn SHEET METAL WORK Anything in Sheet Metal Galvanized — Stainless Steel Aluminum PALM SHEET METAL CO, Inc. 1840 N W. Miami Ct. Ph. 82-3341 Beth David Directors To Meet Wednesday Congregation Beth David Wlll hold a meeting on Wed ** evening at 8 o'clock at the Z gogue. Harry Markowitz J, dent, will chair the %  &** Ask Your Grocer For SO ALITY FOOD PRODUCTS Distributed by VARIETY FOODS DIST.. k Phone 3-3761 1029 N.W. 31st Street Collins Transport & Terminal Corp. Is Happy to Offer You Unlimited Space For Wareousing and Storage Rail Sidings — Pool Car Distribution Phone 3-0789. Pier 1, Bldq. 8, Municipal Docks GLASS FOR EVERY PURPOSE STORE FRONT — PLATE and WINDOW GLASS Furniture Tops, Beveled Mirrors and Resilvering Our Specialty L. & G. Glass and Mirror Works 136 S.W. 8th St. PHONE 3-4834 MORRIS ORLIN LOUIS GERBER JULIUS JAY PERLMUTTER Licensed Mortgage and Investment Broker :t:tr, MJneoln lloud. Miami lteaeh Phone 5-0858 Confidental Co-operation with ATTORNEYS. ACCOUNTANTS AND BROKERS DO YOU NEED A PAINT JOB? A Phone Call Will Bring Our Representative to Estimate Your Painting We Are Ready and Equipped To Do It • PAINTING • P APEHIIAXGIXG • WATERPROOFING We Have Experienced Painters We Do Good Clean Work We Are Licensed — Insured Moro Painting Co* Office Room 302 Congress Bldg. Phone 9-2831 Home Address 3134 S. W. 21st Street Phone 4-7472 No Job Too Small. Or Too Big



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FRID AY. OCTOBER 15, 1948 +Jen>isii fk>rid£an PAGE ELEVEN Off the Record HOT AND COLD Governor Dewey was expected to issue a strong statement in favor of Israel's aspirations ,f is rumored that Dulles and Vandenberg dissuaded Dewey from making the anticipated declaration • Despite the secrecy surrounding the Dewey-Dulles talks, this writer learned that the Republican candidate and the man who is slated to be the next Secretary of State if Dewey wins exhibited sharp differences of opinion over the Palestine question at one of their meetings Dulles was irked when Secretary of State Marshall announced U.S backing of the Bernadotte plan But his irritation was due primarily ta the fact that he felt he had been ignored on a political issue on which he should have been consulted as matter of courtesy Before leaving Paris Dulles stated that the Republicans had not announced approval of Bernadotte's recommendation That of course could not be construed as meaning that the Republicans were necessarily against the plan Dewey's Rosh Hashonah message was radiant with warmth for Israel and its aspirant to the Presidency should clarify his stand on the posthumous Bernadotte report ... To leave the issue in abeyance until after the election would be an unpardonable act of political timidity The General Assembly at Paris is due to consider the report late this month Knowledge that the possible new President of the United States is against mutilating the historic November 29 decision could well be the deciding factor in influencing UN action on the Bernadotte plan Truman too is continuing his vacillating attitude Washington sources believe he was about to issue a statement to the effect that the Marshall declaration at Paris did not imply a deviation either from the Administration's Palestine policy or from the Democratic plank on Israel The statement was withheld when it became known that Marshall was returning to the US. for a consultation with the President According to Washington rumors Mr. Truman intended saying that Marshall's statement merely meant that the U.S. would support the principle of the Bernadotte report as a basis for a possible Jewish-Arab territorial agreement High Democratic leaders closo to the White House intimated that Mr. Truman will shortly announce opposition to the proposed severance of the Negev from Israel and to reconsideration of the original UN decision There is a possibility he may rescind the arms embargo if the Arabs remain truculent and continue challenging UN authority .. ON THE HOME FRONT Henry Montor has tendered his resignation as executive director of the U.J.A. ... He will live in the history of fund-raising as the man who ran the first Jewish orives for 100 million dollars and more There have been reports for months that Montor was opposed to control of the United Palestine Appeal by the Zionist Organization Years ago he most vehemently opposed National Budgeting ... He fought for the "sovereignty" of the Zionist world organization ... In his present fight against control by the Zionist Organization he has reversed his position Henry Morgenthau will shortly visit Israel DEMOCRACY IN ACTION The Palcor Agency as of October 1st has ceased giving services to the press The government of Israel deserves praise for this decision ... It recognized that a government-controlled news service is incompatible with democratic tenets HERE AND THERE Israel has a secret war weapon almost as effective as the atom bomb This is what Drew Pearson told his radio audience in a broadcast las week The Jewish merchant of Baghdad who was publicly hanged last week after conviction by an Iraqi military court on charges of aiding the Jews in Palestine and spearheading a Zionist movement in Iraq was not a Zionist The authorities accused him of being a Zionist as a pretext for confiscating his property after execution ... At Alexandria government officials confiscated over 400 telephones in Jewish homes Restaurants and cafe houses in Cairo carry signs "Jews and dogs not allowed" Jewish businessmen in Egypt employing help must engage at least 75 percent Arabs. Principals in U. P. A. National Parley Strictly Kosher Catering For All Occasions By MAX FIRESTONE At Our Hotel or Your Home GEORGE WASHINGTON HOTEL S1 Washington Ave. Ph. 5-6617 ABC EXTERMINATING COMPANY TERMITE CONTROL SPECIALISTS Free inspection and estimates 5 year guarantee PHONE: 78-6815 7664 N.W. 17th PL Miami Fla. MIAMI TOP SOIL CO. Wholesale and Retail Grade A Pulverized and Processed Muck and Marl Any Mixture Bitter Blue Sod Soil and Fill o{ Any Kind Phone 4-0335 1813 S. W. 21st Terrace EDDIE ALPER Of. H. Silver Cm. J. H. Hi'.ldcirig Of. Iicoil OoldiUls Eliahu tpiltin lobtit A National Conference for Israel "to map American Jewry's participation in the prospective liquidation of the Jewish D. P. camps and the resettlement in Israel of the Homeless Jews of Europe and other lands" has been called by Dr. Israel Goldstein, newly elected treasurer of the World Zionist Executive and United Palestine Appeal national chairman. Under the sponsorship of the UP A, the conference will be held at the Palmer House in Chicago. November 6 and 7 and will feature as principal participants: Major General John H. Hilldring. former Assistant Secretary of State and member of the U. S. delegation to the United Nations; Dr. Abba Hillel Silver, chairman, American Section Jewish Agency for Palestine; Eliahu Epstein. Israeli Representative to the U. S.; Dr. Israel Goldstein, who will preside; Dr. Emanuel Neumann, president, Zionist Organization of America and member of the World Zionist Executive; Robert R. Nathan, economist and formerly Deputy Director of the Office of War Mobilization and Reconversion; Judge Morris Rothenberg, president, Jewish National Fund; Charles Ress, president, Palestine Foundation Fund; Chaim Greenberg, member. World Zionist Executive; Rabbi Max Kirshblum, vice chairman, Mizrachi Organization of America. 52 Veterans Association Enlists 150 Members "The Wounded Shall Never Be Forgotten" is the slogan of the recently organized 52 Association of Greater Miami which met last night at the Hyde Park Hotel. The organization which was formed for the purpose of bringing entertainment and comfort to the men in the veterans hospitals now comprises a local membership of 150 members. $52 are the annual membership dues while auxiliary dues are $10. Other branches of the association function in Chicago and New York. Mount Pleasant Convalescent Home OF MIAMI, INC. 1414 N.E. BAYSHORE PLACE Bright—Cheerful—Homelike INSPECTION INVITED Strictly Kosher Meals— 24 hour nursing care Under the Supervision of Greater Miami Vaad Hakashruth Special Diets Reasonable rates Special care for Cardiac cases House physician always on call I. GERTMAN, Director For information write or phone 82-5395 the ^p7IO S. W. 12th AV. MIAMI-. L/iZ. 3-343 LJ 'YOUR JEWISH FUNERAL HOME WE OFFIOAiLT REPRESENT THE MAJORITY OF NORTHERN JEWISH FUNERAL RIMES /n/wmalion Gladly fuiniihtd on Request SERVING MIAMI BEACH t MIAMI Exclusively Jewish Lister-Bernstein Mr. and Mrs. Jack Bernstein, 1676 S.W. 14th St., announce the marriage of their daughter Irma to Dr. George Lister on October 2. *}5onpo *S*^ov arm Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky 1520 S. W. 5th St Phone 2-7439 llll I K I M BLIND CO. (Not Incorporated) Specialist in RECONDITIONING Manufacturers VENETIAN BUNDS CORNICES Call 4-6921 21 Almeria Avenue Coral Gables MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY THE CEMETERY OF DISTINCTION FOR DISCRIMINATING FAMILIES Rabbi S. M. MachteL Director Olympic Building Phone 3-3720 For Better Service to the Public In Greater Miami... TOS. L. PLUMMER Funeral Director Builders ot Immortal Memorials tor the Jewish Trade • Large stock of monuments on display for immediate delivery in all Jewish cemeteries. • Serving the leading Jewish families in this area since 1925. Look For the 2-Story White Building THURMOND MONUMENT CO. MARKERS $35.00 PLUS CEMETERY CHARGES OPEN SUNDAYS PHONE 4-3249 11 You may obtain your copy of SPARKS FROM A MENTAL ANVIL Written by DR. JACOB II. KAPLAN By calling at or writing to TEMPLE ISRAEL. 137 N.E. 19th ST.. MIAMI or by writing DR. JACOB H. KAPLAN. BOX 4087. MIAMI. FLA. Price $2..*0 a • Up-to-the-minute hi fti e.wH>ment, beautifully fumlihed en 4 decorated throughout, *mt new MIAMI branch lignallse. sui policy of providing funeral — rrl— ef the finest character. 24-HOUR AMBULANCE SERVICE IVERSIDE MEMORIAL CHAPEL 1236 WASHINGTON AVENUI, MIAMI IIACN Phone: 5-3355 — 5-7777 EDWARD T. NIWMAN, Puntrnl Dire**** ABI IISENBERG, Treasurer IN NIW YORKi T6tw TRIfT AND AMSTERDAM AV1NU1



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PAGE TWELVE +JenlstncrMk*n FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15 m Chest Campaign Announces Selection of Regional Women's Chairmen For 1949 The appointment of additional regional women's chairmen for the 1949 Dade County Community Chest campaign, sched-! uled for November 5 to 23, was announced by Oscar E. Dooly, Jr., campaign co-chairman. Mrs. Stanley Milledae. 107 N.E. 93rd St., a nd Mrs. H. D. Freeman. 590 N.W. 43ri St. will, J serve as women's co-chairmen in 60 c r 0 f t h e $1,013,173 goal, and the Central Miami refion, with p \ ans t0 complete its job before! responsibility for recruiting women tc serve as bl -. U< itora in the : %  .' i stnets in the region. In the same manner, Mrs. Charles E Enterline, T420 N.E. Ave and Mrs W. G. Seekins. 737 N.E 53rd St will be regional men's -< rmen in the N rth M egion, which also includes five solicitation districts. Women workers in the Miami Beach region are meeting at luncheon Saturdav at the Hotel the general campaign opens on November 5. Youth Commission Announces Course In Leadership .tl.'iziar To Head Food For Israel Z.O.A. Campaign Jack Mazier, prominent Atlanta businessman, has been appointed general chairman in charge of the regional Southeastern Z.O.A. Food for Israel campaign, according to an announcement by S. P. Benamy. president of the region. The drive, which will extend over a period of 90 days, is part of a nation-wide campaign conducted by the Z.O.A. William B. Sylk, of Philadelphia is national chairman. Mr. Maziar's operations will cover the states of Alabama. Florida, Georgia. Mississippi. South Carolina, Tennessee and the city of New Orleans. Dr. E. J. Edelman. chairman of the Zionist Youth Commission of Shelborne to ciscuss tr.e problems ^^ ^ ^ announced of block solicitation with Mrs., h leadership Training course Sydney L.Wemtraub, o28 W 49th f y St.. Miami Beach women s chairP be ^ rr.an. Among those to De present are Mrs. Charles King. Mrs. Rusauc ea sell Wvkoff. Mrs. Phil Gallagher. I Young Judaea is a national Mrs E. G. Burns. Mrs. Israel movement that has served the Teitch. Mrs. William B. Delahunt. i Jewish youth of America for forty Mrs. Linda Satin. Mrs. Joseph, v ears guiding its members to Thery and Mrs. Jack Rosenberg. t ?k e their P lace as active partiThe recruiting of women voluncipants in the American Jewish teeri in the Coral Gables region is in progress led by Mrs. William community. Membership in Young Judaea is open to all Jewish Cox. 5737 Riviera Drive, regional >' un 8 people of ten to eighteen women's chairman. years of age. Young Juaaea is Solicitation of special gifts of| d lvlded int0 the Jun,or Club 10 $2 I or more is already under j 1 4 and the Senior Chapter, 15-18. way in advance of the general Enrollment in the clubs is now campaign for SI.013.173 in behalf ; being taken by the Zionist Youth of 28 Red Feather services in the Commission, 235 Lincoln Rd.. Mifields of health, welfare and recreation. ami Beach. Those interested arc requested to write stating, name. James L. Knight, special gifts age and address. chairman has scheduled a reportj Further information concerning luncheon for his committee at Betty's restaurant, 1440 Biscayne Blvd. or. October 15. This group has the responsibility of raising the Leadership Training course can be obtained by writing to the Zionist Youth Commission at 235 Lincoln Rd. or calling 58-6464 Sholom Sisterhood Opens Season With Dessert Luncheon Mrs. Louis J. Krcnsky. president of the Sisterhood of Temple Beth Sholom of Miami Beach, has announced the first open meeting of the 1948-49 season, to be held on Wednesday. October 20. at 12:30 p.m. in the air-conditional banquet hall of the Temple. A dessert luncheon will be served and an unusual and stimulating program will be presented by Mrs. William Fan program chairman. Mrs. Edward Cowen will present "A symphony of Broadway' and Ben Browne, talented vocalist, will render Latin tunes. The membership chairman, Mrs. Abe Blatt, will honor all new members. Mrs. Krensky Host To Members Of Sholom Board The first board meeting of the 1948-49 season of the Sisterhood of Temple Beth Sholom of Miami Beach will be held today at 10 a.m., at the home of the president. Mrs. Louis J. Krensky, 4955 Delaware Ave. Luncheon will be served at the conclusion of the mooting. Following Is a list f thf offirors nnd members of the board: Mrse Louis J. Krensky, president; Mrs. Alexander Kojtan, honorary president: Mrs. ieon J. i:il, honorary president; Mrs. Charles Tobln, honorary president; Mis Abo Blatt, Mr William Fair and' Mrs. Bessie Nelson, vice presidents: Mrs Arthur England, recording etary; Mrs. Uenjamln Beldler, corresponding secretary; Mrs. Bert Whitman, financial secretary: Mrs. I. C. (ireenberg, treasurer, and Mrs. Leon Kronlsh, chaplain. Hoard members are: Mrs Joseph Arkln, Mrs, Leonard Barr, Mrs. CamlUe Baum, Mrs. E. A. Meeker. Mrs. Irving Becker, Mrs. William Bernstein, Mrs. Emanual Goldstrich, Mrs Stem Lachman, Mrs. Alfred Mamlet, Mrs. Irving Mareiis. Mrs. Murray Maurer, Mrs. Edward Mencher, Mrs. r Rnthman. Mrs. Simon Wolff, Mrs. •.'..• Zlnnamon, Mrs. K. J. Baskind. Mrs J, C. ChUtkOW, Mrs. Joseph pvnias. Mrs. s. A. Goodman, Mrs. Samuel Kelemer, Mrs. Harry Kohn. Mrs. David I-evinson, Mrs. Joseph Mr/.,. Mrs. David Phillips, Mrs. Lvon Plstrich, Mrs. Alex Bobbins, Mrs. If. Snmmersteln, Mrs. L. Btoff, Mrs. Alex S'trailS and Mrs. Jack Udell. _^^^^ SOLAR WATER SERVICE REPAIRS AND CALL 4-7485 BOOSTERS DON S. COLEMAN Workmen's Circle Schule Present Children On Air Children from the Workjr Circle Schule will appear on'* tion WBAY on Sunday between ten and eleven. Friends and p ar ents are asked to tune in to hear the program presented bv H. Schule which is located at Iftu S.W. 3rd St. 1545 Registration for children from Classes are held Monday Tu' day, Wednesday and ThursdTv between 4 and 6 and on Sunday morning between io and o'clock. a Top Price Paid for MEN'S USED CLOTHING AL'S 432 N. MIAMI AVE. Phone 2-3213 LIQUOR BAR Be8t downtown location. Percentage lease for 8 yrs. Buy Vi interest for $20,000 or all for $40,000. Netted $20,000 past yr. Call or see Millari with Ralph Realty Co., Inc. 2611 W.FLAGLER STREET' Ph. 47-8748 Res. Ph. 88-2794 NEW LOCATION Mil 11 METAL SPECIALTY CO. ROOFING AND SHEET METAL CONTRACTORS 573 N.W. 71st St. Phone 7-6288 Miami 38. Florida B. C. TILLER R. M. BOTTOM Tropical Lodge Dance At Frolic Club r The first annual Halloween dance of Tropical Lodge B'nai B'rith is being planned for 8:30 p.m.. Sunday, October 24. at the Frolic Club. Bay Shore Place and McArthur Causeway. Free favors will be distributed to those attending .and there will be a rumba contest and other entertainment. Tickets at SI.25 may be obtained from lodge members. Mike Sussman is chairman of the affair, assisted by Saul Genet and Leonard Wolfe. Iloaeh V Seeks 1000 Members Carl Weinkle, president of the Beach Y, has announced the inauguration of a membership campaign on November 7. A minimum of an additional thousand members is the aim of the drive which will end on November 17. According to Mr. Weinkle the organization needs this increased membership if the present program is to be continued and extended. More than 4,000 persons each week use the new building which opened in January of this year. The membership campaign will he directed by Mrs. Milton Sirkin and Paul Weitzman. Volunteer workers are urgently needed. STEWART EMPLOYMENT 127 N.E. 1st Ave. Hm. 218 3-1254 — 9-9472 WHITE HELP For Fine Homes MEDICAL ASSISTANTS PRACT ICAL NUR SES HIGH TYPE DOMESTICS Beach Zionists Send Shipment To Aid Orphans Two thousand pounds of pressed pure beef is being sent by the Miami Beach Zionist District to an orphanage in Haifa, Israel, that cares for two hundred nnd fifty children of Haganah parents who were killed in the recent fighting. The organization has also sent twelve cases of new shoes to Israel. Alfred Stone, organization president, announced that the special fund committee, headed by Leon J. Ell and assisted by S. Ashkenazy, Jacob Fishman and Sam Lachman, is now endeavoring to raise $4,000 to purchase two ambulances. Temporary office of the local district is 4144 Chase Ave. The mailing address is P.O. box 2494. Miami Beach. ARE VOI LONESOME? Join the CIRCLE CLUB Chamber of Commerce Building 141 N. E. 3rd Street Room 501 PHONE 2-6242 Open 2 pjn. to 10 p.m. WRITE P.O. BOX 3468 n J: J. n j CHICAGO, ILL. SEASON'S GREETINGS WENDELL'S COMPLETE AUTO SERVICE 535 N.W. 54th St. Miami k, Announces the appointment of SOUTHERN FOOD DISTRIBUTORS Inc. 1725 N.W. Seventh Avenue IMIOM: .-i-eezi AS EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTORS FOR ITS COMPLETE LINE OF MEAT PRODUCTS SOUTHERN FOOD DISTRIBUTORS Is Operated By HAIIRY PEARL AXD HERMAN PEARL THE PEARL BROTHERS Associated With MORT TISCHLER IN THE SAME LOCATION FOR 8 YEARS %  BW M M^M W— %  ** % 



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FRIDAY. OCTOBER 15, 1948 +Jtni stilt rid/an PAGE THIRTEEN B'nai B'rith Lodges And Women's Groups Start Activities To Add Membership \ortli Shore The North Shore Lodge B'nai B'rith has launched its membership drive under the direction of Chairmen Lou Sherman and Mark Silverstein, it was announced by President A. J. Kaplan "Car Cavalcade Contacts" will be utilized by the membership committee each Sunday between the hours of 1 and 4 for the purpose of reaching prospects in the North Shore area. Leonard Tobin, originator of the car cavalcade idea, is the lodge publicity chairman. Weekly meetings to report on progress of the drive will be held at the home of Jack Lawson and plans are now under way for a mammoth stag smoker to be held during the last week in October. Sholem Lodge A "Lox-and-Bagel" breakfast for key workers and membership workers will be sponsored by Sholem Lodge B'nai B'rith at Rosedale Restaurant on Sunday morning at 10 a.m. Membership Chairman John Kronenfeld announces that all B'nai B'rith members are invited to attend and hear an outline of plans for the October drive. The lodge will award an RCA Victor radio to the top membership worker in the current drive and gold menorah lapel pins will be awarded to workers securing five or more members, it is announced by C. R. Jacobson, executive secretary of the B'nai B'rith Council. bership affair to be held shortly as part of the current October B'nai B'rith membership drive. A report will also be heard from Mrs. Morris Horwitz, membership chairman, on plans for a series of informal teas to be held throughout the Coral Gables area as part of the membership campaign. Sholem Women Sholem Lodge Women of B'nai B'rith will launch their fall activities at a gala membership tea at tlie Monte Carlo Restaurant, 700 S.W. 8th St. on Tuesday at 1 p.m. Headlining me program of entertainment will be magical feats performed by Roscoe the Magician and vocal selections by Miss Roberta Weiner. Bob Lynn 'of station WIOD, known as "the Man with a Thousand Voices" will offer comedy sketches. Final number on the varied program will be a rhumba exhibition by Ralph Martino. Mrs. Lenore Curtice, membership chairman and in charge of the program and arrangements, will be assisted by Mrs. John Kronenfeld, Mrs. Sam Silver and Mrs. C. R. Jacobson. Mrs. Harry Gordon will preside. Coral Gables A kick-off membership breakfast will be sponsored by the Coral Gables Lodge B'nai B'rith on Sunday, 10 a.m., at Howard Johnson's Restaurant, 3727 S.W. 8th St. President Leonard Spiegel, Sidney Lewis and Past President Dr. Leonard Glickstein will tell of plans to canvas the West Miami and Flagler Granada area for membership in B'nai B'rith. A report will be given by Bill Hechler, membership co-chairman on plans for the second annual stag smoker. Charles R. Jacobson, executive director of the council will address the group and describe the awards to be given by the B'nai B'rith Council for top membership activities in the current drive. Prizes of men's haberdashery and other merchandise will be awarded to top workers in the drive, chairman Hechler stated. tables Women A "Truth or Consequences" program featuring audience participation with prizes for winners Will be the highlight of the Coral ( %  ables women's chapter meeting on Tuesday at 8:15 p.m. at Hillel House, 3306 Ponce de Leon Blvd. The program is under the direction of Mrs. Lawrence Simpkins and Mrs. William Hechler. Mrs. Ruth Bloom, president, Will report on plans for a memJewish Quiz Box Q.: Why is the Scroll of Koheleth (Ecclesiastes) read in the synagogue on the Sabbath of the intermediate days of Succoth Festival? A.: Tradition has it that King Solomon authored most of the verses of this scroll on the Succoth Festival (see Kings 8:1, 2). As a matter of fact the word "Koheleth" stems from the verb meaning "to assemble." Since it was King Solomon who assembled the Israelites on the holiday to hear words of wisdom and ethics he is referred to in the Scroll as "Koheleth" instead of his real name, "Solomon." It is thus a historical recognition of the authorship and antiquity of the Scroll of Koheleth to read it on the Sabbath of the intermediate days. Furthermore, the Succoth holiday was Biblically considered a period for mass assembly to hear words of ethics and wisdom. (Deut. 31:10, 11). Other reasons offered for the reading of the Scroll of Koheleth on the Sabbath of the intermediate days of the Succoth Festival have to do with the contents of the Scroll, as related to the Succoth holiday. Hebrew literature and history tell us that Succoth was the merriest festival of the entire year. The Talmud goes into great length to describe the merriment that surrounded the festival in the temple of old, particularly in the intermediate days when the "pouring of the water" was observed. At the peak of merriment and sheer folly, the former being aligned with altruism and the latter being embedded in fool's play. It was therefore that the book of Koheleth, with its stark realism, is read. It asks "of rejoicing—what doeth it?" (Ecclesiastes 2:2) as a constant reminder that the ideal in Jewish life was to show that there can even be a purpose in the act of rejoicing, in this case—a way ol serving the Almighty. A brilliant comparison is offered in this respect by Rabbi Amiel of Palestine who sees in the total ity of the Succoth holiday the image of the life of man on this earth. As the Succoth Festival commences in a holy day of strict observance, so does man begin his life with a solemn purpose. The ensuing days of man's life are comparable to the intermediate days of the festival which constitute a mixture of both sanctity and materialism—being part holiday and part week-day at the same time. As pictured in the Scroll of Ecclesiastes, man's life constitutes a contradiction as well as a synthesis of altruism and egotism. In the end of life man realizes the folly of personal motives and understands the perpetual values. At the end of Hue Book of Ecclesiastes, Solomon concludes that the fear of God and the keeping of the Command ments is man's solemn holiday of Shemini Atzeres giving the people the serious touch after a week's merriment. The final note is ::ounded by the reading of the Torah to show that man's real joy is to be found in following God's precept as found in the Commandments. Q.: Why is it customary in many -1


PAGE 1

PAGE FOURTEEN +Jenisli nor Mian FRIDAY, OCTOBER l948 15VES OF OUR TIMES MAURICE -SCHWARTZ >~*^ NORMAN Sot NOM A JEWISH SOT OF 12 LANDED AT £1115 ISIAUD IN 1900 TODAY HI IS THE WEUKNOWN ACTOR, DIRECTOR S PRODUCER OF MANT CREAT flAYS IN YIDDISH AS A ROY, HE ATTENDED AW dRTHOPOX JEWISH SCHOOL. HE WON A REPUTATION ASA SOLOIST IN THE SYNAGOGUE CHOIR IN NEW YORK, AFTER PU6LIC SCHOOL HOURS, HE HELPED HIS FATHER IN HIS BUSINESS, BUT HIS HEART WAS IN THE THEATRE. HE SPENT ALL HIS FREE EVENINGS SITTING IN THE BAtCONlES OF YIDDISH PLAYHOUSES, OBSERVING, ABSORBING THE SKIUSOF JK DRAMA. | AT IT; HE JOINED A DRAMATIC CLUB, AND HIS FIRST ASSIGNED ROIE WAS TO PlAY THE PART OF A 60 YEAR OLD MAN. HIS CAREER LAUNCHED, HE BECAME A PROFESSIONAL ACTOR FOR $800 A WEEK. HIS ABILITY DEVELOPED. HE PLAYED WITH OTHER COMPANIES UNTIL 1915.THEN.IN 1918, Hi ACHIEVED HIS DREAM.HE ORGANIZED HIS 0"N DMMATIC COMPANY £ NAMED ITTHl YODlSHART THEATRE. IN 1924 HE TOURED EUROPE WITH HIS COMPANY AND ALSO APPEARED IN PALESTINE i LATIN AMERICANS AN ACTOR HE EXCELLED IN CHARACTER PARTS,REVEALING RARE VERSATILITY. IN 19ft HE ACTED S PRODUCED "YOSHE KAIB" WITH MUCH SUCCESS.IATER.IT WAS H tt%lg ON BROADWAY. HE ACTED.DIRECTED.PRODUCED A VARIED REPERTOIRE WITH NO LESS THAN 150 PLAYSTHEY INCLUDED DRAMAS tCOMEPIES BY SHAKESPEARE.MOUERE.GMOl.SHAW, GORKI, i OTHER FAMOUS WRITERS, AS WELL AS MOST OF JEWISH PLAYWRIGHTS. IN 1947, HE TOURED THE DP CAMPS IN GERMANY FOR THE JOINT DISTRIBUTION COMMITTEE,BRINGING JEWISH HUMOR,* HOPE, TO THE WAR'S SURVIVORS. AT THE AGE OF 60,HE STILL IS THE MOST DOMINANT FI6UR'. IN THE YIDDISH THEATRE JSS *i*f %*4 .JIWW* i mmi £• Florida Oil Industry Information Group Reveals Largest Volume Of Crude Oil Modern exploratory and production methods have lifted the knowr volume of crude oil underground in the United States to the highest in history, more than nine hundred billion gallons, despite unprecedented demands for oil products. Walter T. Etzel, state chairman of the Florida Oil Industry Information Committee, announced today. Besides crude oil, the known reserves of condensates, natural gasoline and other liqucfield petroleum gases, which form part of the supply, total more than 130 billion gallons. This fact, Mr. Etzel said, should dispel fears that "we are running out of oil." Modern technological developments have increased the percentage of oil that may be recovered from a well from about 20 percent a few decades ago to several times that percentage today. Careful control of the flow from wells, development of equipment for use at the well head that prevents the wasteful "gusher" and repressuring of wells by gas and water, all have contributed to increasing the yield of oil. The airborne magnetometer, the waterborne seismograph and the garvimetcr have taken a lot of the guess-work out of searching for oil, thus contributing to the increased reserves. In addition, research is making possible the utilization of natural gas, coal, oil shale and tar sands as supplementary sources of liquid fuel if that should become necessary. The consumer of liquid fuels in the United States can be assured of adequate supplies for many years in the future, Mr Etzel declared. Additions to proved crude oil reserves underground have been made in 40 of the past 47 years. he continued. Despite record production since 1900 to meet almost steadily rising demands for products, the oil industry has been able to increase these reserves steadily over the years. These reserves represent only oil that has been discovered, and they must not be confused with potential oil resources still to be developed by the industry. Geologists estimate that there are over two trillion more gallons of oil yet to be discovered in the United States. In comment on the presently "proved" reserve, Mr. Etzel said, they include only the amount of oil known to exist through test drilling, and do not include oil in the unproved portions of partially-developed fields, or in untested areas. Also excepted. Mr. Etzel added, is oil that may yet -ecome available by methods developed in recent years to recover oil from well formerly considered exhausted; oil that may be produced synthetically from coal, shale or other materials; oil • that may be present in regions believed to be unfavorable; or liquid fuels that may become available through chemical processing of natural gas. In announcing that today's proved crude oil underground is the highest in history. Mr. Etzel pointed out that it is not immediately available for production. Oil is taken from the ground at the most efficient rate necessary to make possible the extraction of the greatest amount of oil. ho said, or under "conversation" rules which avoid wasteful production. When the rate of production is too fast, more crude oil underground is lost to extraction than under scientific controlled production. Meanwhile, he said, the oil industry is moving rapidly with its continuing expansion program, calling for an expenditure of four billion dollars in 1847-48. to increase facilities in all divisions to meet the ever-increasing demand for oil products. This year along, he added. 40,000 wells, a new record, are expected to be drilled, of which more than 7.000 will he exoloratory or "wildcat" wells, in the search for new oil sources. AI Rosens To Spend Honeymoon Here Al Rosen, son of Mrs. Rose Rosen, of Miami, will be married to Miss Evelyn Silverstein, of Kansas City, on October 30. Al, the American Association's "prize rookie of the year," made an appearance in the world series and is scheduled to play first base for the Cleveland Indians. Together with his bride he will reside in Kansas City following a month's honeymoon in Miami. Mrs. Goldman Is Hoslew Mrs. Louis Goldman, 3925 Meridian Ave., was hostess to the Women's League of Phi Epsilon Pi Fraternity, Alpha Iota Chapter, at a meeting yesterday. Need Help in a Hurry?—Call A-l EMPLOYMENT SERVICE White and Colored Help Phonee 9-5317 — 9-6727 51 N. E. 6th Street AL MEIDENBERO, Owner STEEL ERECTING HAULING None Too Large or Too Small PROMPT SERVICE W. A. DICKINSON TRANSFER CO. 2319 N. MIAMI AVE. Phones 2-4308 — 3-1658 GILBERT MALONEY DORIS MALONEY RED FEWER myr a arvm/x. "OUR LATCH STRING'S OUT AGAIN" DINE FAMILY STYLE! Where the Food and Atmosphere Is Really Different FOR HEARTY APPETITES! Our regular man-size 7-course, sumptuous home-cooked dinners served family style in our main dining room. LIGHT EATERS will find a pleasant INNOVATION in our NEW COFFEE SHOP, serving choice portions of our delicious HOME-COOKED foods. TASTE-EXCITING SUPPERS will be served daily after 9.00 P.M. SPECIALIZING IN SEA FOODS Dining Room opens at 4:00 P. M.. Monday through Saturday 12:30 P. M. on Sunday and holidays 14036 N. E. SIXTH AVENUE • NORTH MIAMI. FLA. How to Get Thera Telephone 89-3612 Biscayne Boulevard to double traffic lights at 88th Street intersection—Drive straight off of Boulevard onto N. E. Sixth Avenue, left of Gas Station; continue through Miami Shores Biscayne Park and North Miami to 140th Street. 1*1. IPs*. AUGUST BROS fcvf 13 the BRgTf *V Relatives Are Seeking Horesnik, Local Resident Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Louis Horesnik or his wife Bessie, are asked to communicate with the Union of Russian Jews, 55 West 42nd St., New York City. The last known address of the Horesniks was: Louis Furniture Store, 235 N.E. 79th St.. Miami. Looking for them is Rive Horeshnik, wife of Louis's brother, Joseph. Essen Construction Co. 2236 N.W. Miami Court Commercial and Residential Construction LICENSED AND INSURED Guaranteed Work Phone 3-6924 Estimates Cheerfully Given LISTEN TO THE Jewish Musical Hour WBAY—1490 on Your Dial Every Friday from 11 KM to 12 Noon Every Sunday from 10 A.M. to 11 A.M. A PROGRAM OF POPULAR, CLASSICAL AND LITURGICAL MUSIC JACOB SCHACHTER Director WHEN YOU TAKE VITAMINS Twenty Y*e a r s With Lcadinc Clubs and Hotels his violin — his orchestra Limited engagements now accepted. Phones 89-1805, 2-4366 L ^ u i u i m NIACIN AMI! r eAieiM* ANTOTMIKMI \* 7 Q*m*d) M*U+1*+ T—Poult. 11 f**rt 312 SEE •bSi a. !" wtt 1" taxU-r m mjm • %  %  m I—EoonomiMl • • 7"T1_ |^



PAGE 1

PRjDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1948 +Jewisii ink* id/fan PAGE FIFTEEN RELIGIOUS DIRECTORY ORTHODOX Congregation Beth Jacob. 301311 Washington Ave., Miami Beach. Rabbi Moaea Meicheloff: Cantor Louia D. Feder. ." i„ evening services at 5:30. PUK. morn "K at 8:30. Mlncha a* ?*•• fSSSmSbv Snalos Seudos. Rabbi ;, i ff will" %  peak on the Portion 5*rt Week Services at 0:30 p.m. of is iii during the Succos period. ?,"',,, %  i sehel-Vf? will preach Monday 1 ,', 'Fruits of Rxlle" and Tuesday on I .Mm i of Israel." Cantor Louis Keder "in,ant during all services. Klddush Euclid Are.. Miami Beach. Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky. .... i..evenlnc services at 5:30: \\morning at 8:30. Habl.i SlCfaky w?r P reaeh on the Portion 'V'tnWeek. Mlncha at 4:30 followed SvShaloa Seudoa and Mfjarlv. Sunday 5 "-. M Mlncha followed by Maariv f.?i,i he .'..nductcd by the Rabbi. Mon3,1! morning services at 8:30. The RBbb will speak on "The I.ulov %  "1m ha at 3 p.m. followed by Maariv a 6 Tiie.-d.iy morning services at t'111 The Rabbi will conduct the Jervlcce and sneak on "Our Temporary '''Miami Jewish Orthodox Congregation. 590 S.W. 17th Ave. Rabbi Murray Grauer. Cantor Milton Friedman. Pridav • veiling services at 5:4;.; BaWrday at 9 a.m. Junior services ,T in. Rabbi Grauer will speak on .the pVtton of the Week. Mlncha at 5:80 f„ll„e.| by ShalOB Seudos. Sunday School at I"Suceoth services Sunday kt VIS p.m.; Monday morning at 9. Uabhi Qrauer will speak on %  Festival of our .lov.*' Mlncha at 5:30. Jr. service* Monday and Tuesday at 10 Tuesday morning services at 9. Rabbi will speak on "The Succah as a Meet"Miami Hebrew School and Congregation. 1101 S.W. 12th Are. Rabbi Simon April. Pridav evening services at 5:30; Saturday morning at 9. Rabbi April will speak on "The Song of the Torah" Mlncha at ." p.m. followed bv Bhaloa Beudoa and Maariv. Suceoth services Sunday at ..::in p.m.. Monday at 9 a.m. The Rabbi will apeak on "How to Rejoice. Mlncha at :> followed by Maariv. Tueada) morning services at 9. The Rabbi's topic will be "The Profession or the Palms." Mlncha at 5 followed b> Maariv. LIBERAL Temple Beth Sholom. 4144 Chase Are.. Miami Beach. Rabbi Leon Kronish: Cantor Samuel Kelemer. Pridav evening services at 8:13. Rabbi Kronish will speak on The High llolv Days Are Over— %  Doea thf Memory Linger On?" Oneg hhabbat sponsored by the PTA and dealrated t" the theme "Let's . Sukkos services Sunday evening, Oct. IT. at 8:15: Monday morning at 11 'Temple Isaiah. 4925 Collins Aye.. Miami Beach. Rabbi David Raab. Friday evening services at : '[' ; Italibl Raab will preach on HOW Wine Can You Be." Religious School Uunda) at id a.m. Temple Emanu-El. 1801 S. Andrews Ave.. Fort Lauderdale. Friday evening services at 8. Speaker t" be announced. CONSERVATIVE Congregation Beth David. 135 N.W. Third Ave. Rabbi Max Shapiro: Rev. Maurice Mamches. Friday evening services at 7 p.m. Saturdav morning services at 8:.". Rabbi Shapiro and Rev. Mamches Will officiate. Suceoth services Sunday evening at 7. A reception will follow in the large booth at 7:30. Monday and Tuesday morning services at 8::l 0 "he central theme for discussion will be Tbe Perennial Problem." Students services will be combined with the adull services at" 10 a.m. Monday and Tuesday morning. Miami Beach Jewish Community Center. 1701 Washington Ave.. Miami Beach. Rabbi Irving Lehrman. Cantor Jacob Y. Goldring. Friday evening service at 6; Saturday morning service at 9. Rabbi Lehrman will preach on the Portion of the law. Succos services Sunday at 6 p.m.: Monday and Tuesday mornings at 9. Rabbi Lehrman will speak to the worshippers Monday and Tuesday mornings. Cantor Goldring will chant at all services assisted by f'tnter Choir under the direction of Joseph Schreibman. Jr. Congregation services In chapel Monday and Tuesday mornings. Jewish Community Center, 2020 Polk St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Max Kaufman. Friday evening services at 8:15. 'Jbbi Kaufman will Bpeak. Saturday morning services at 10. Religious school on Sept. 12 at 10:30. Registration from > a.m. to 6 p.m. dally. Brandeis Opens With Pomp Brandeis University became a reality this week-end in an academic celebration marked by colorful pageantry of 600 years of educational heraldry. With presidents and delegates from more than 200 of the world's greatest educational and learned bodies looking on, Dr. Abram Leon Sachar was installed as the new university's first president at the inaugural ceremonies Thursday evening, October 7, which highlighted the three-day program of festivities. Pledging a three-fold goal that Brandeis University, the first Jewish sponsored, nonsectarian institution of* higher education in America, will be an "institution of quality," "a school of the spirit" and an institution of equal opportunity for all, Dr. Sachar accepted the office conferred upon him by George Alpert, president of the board of trustees. Eliahu Epstein, head of the Special Mission of Israel to the United States, extended the greetings of the State of Israel to Brandeis University. Other participants included Dr. Arthur H. Compton, chancellor of Washington University and recent Nobel prize winner for his work in atomic energy, who welcomed Brandeis in behalf of the assembled academic delegates as an especially welcome asset to our nation." President of the Brandeis University board of trustees, George Alpert, in opening the ceremonies, stated, "It is for the age-old search for truth i-nd through truth for the crowning glory of peace on earth that Brandeis University has been nurtured from a dream into a living institution—whose creation we here recognize." The three-day program of Inaugural Festivities included the official reception Thursday morning, October 7, given by the president of the university and the board of trustees to the delegates from schools as widely distributed geographically as Yenching University, China; the Royal Academy of England; Harvard University—and as varied in educational orientation as the University of Chicago; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and the Academie des Beaux Arts de l'institute de France. Dr. Abram Leon Sachar was photographed as he made his acceptance speech after his installation as Brandeis' first president. In the semi-circle behind him from 1. to r. are Dr. Nelson Glueck. president of Hebrew Union College, who delivered the invocation: Dr. Arthur H. Compton. chancellor of Washington University and main speaker of the evening; Eliahu Epstein, head of the special mission of the State of Israel to the United Stales, who brought official greetings from Israel. Photographed before the academic procession which opened Thursday evening's inaugural ceremonies were Carl S. Ell. president of Northeastern; Paul Herman Buck, provost of Harvard University; and Professor Jeremiah D. M. Ford o Harvard-who represented the Academie des Inscriptions et Belles Lettres de l'Institut de France. George Alpert. president of Brandeis' board of trustees, addressed the more than 200 delegates of American and foreign educational institutions at a luncheon following Thursday morning's official reception. Sealed at the left of the rostrum for 1. to r. are Meyer Jaffe. member of Ihe board of trustees; Moms Shapiro, president of Brandeis Foundation. Inc., and Dr. Abram Leon Sachar. Hidden behind the speakers' rostrum are other board members: Abraham Shapiro. Joseph F. Ford. -Norman S. Rabb. and James J. Axelrod. Before the inaugural ceremonies the ever present photographer snapped three of the principal participants: Dr. Arthur H. Compton, chancellor of Washington University; Eliahu Epstein, head ot the special mission of the State of Israel to the United States; and Dr. Nelson Glueck. president of the Hebrew Union College. Chatting during the tea serve:? at Brasdaif' campus. Thursday afternoon were Eliahu Fsiein, head ol the special mission of the State of Tsr?el tc ft ,niied State.-,, Dr. Abram Leon Sachar, and Mrs. Ssehar.



PAGE 1

PAGE SIXTEEN >Jenist fkridian Arabs Get Air Superiority Over Israel From British. Claim spying' Magazine Survivor $ of Gush Ettion iBtoc Find Haven in Beth Zeiroth Mizrachl 'C-n::nue:i tx m Pi %  -. (r w get officer mat, portion of technical prol > .. \ f*r capita than is to be found ir • • ; %  States, and a any other country in the Canada a They have no rfficer casl tern. Messes are together -icd th men work :n close con bal teams The Palestine air war start exactly 5 hours and '.-. mir after the State of Isra as -:'finally proclaimed on May IS It came in the f ran f tw and two fighting. droppil op. Tel Aviv from a %  I altitude. No one • %  %  •. %  .'".-.The same day, the Jews roughl an Egyptian plar.e. a Britishbuilt Spitfire, and capture; the Three flying schools have been A '. ally • ; : part >f f its I I p non-Jewish • percent is Jew:M Si the ung %  '• who i during the war as r.AF firmer. :r flew for other pilot. Israeli plar.es ret;'.: :• :' ur days later with an attack >n military objectives in N rthern Palestine—and issue was ; Ined! Estimates of the number of planes involved in the Holy Land war vary widely. The United Nations set the figure at 400 total which U. S. Intelligence believe* is too high. However, other informed sources believe the Arabs ha% e "many more" than 400 planes, and Israel has a small part of that number. The Arabs seerr. to have a many American AT-6 typ training planes, which pthem to carry 50-pound b slung under the wings; they als have some light bombers. Spitfires and tra I Isi I's aitmight, however, is more but more effectively • Probably most useful are said t be late model wartime M< schmitts. with increased fin power, flown dismantled fr Czechoslovakia in U.S. C-47s bought from surplus stock?. In Palestine, they were reassi m in a matter of hours ar.d were taken into combat b war veterans volunteers. A number of wartime B-17s have also been seen in action, flying Israel's colors. In the matter of engaging foreign pilot-:, the Arabs have been having difficulty but have -hired a few Frenchmen. Israel, having % in Israel since it be• v list May. M v --. the new nation's fliers • %  start with the establishut ten years ago of two \s in Palestine. They were subsidized by the Jewish Agency, but because of the restrictions of the British mandate. called "sporting" organiza• s About five years ago, the Agency founded an air service rved incidentally as an training school for ts A number of them were • to England for further training. 1! est-known fliers in Isrticli : ts. are two 27-yi -old : rmer RAF fighter pilots They are Dan Tolkowsky, • itions for its Air F M ^.echai Alon, curl's leading air ace by mei t in having shot • roe Egyptian planes. inBritish Dakotas. -.• m : British partisan• • thi Holy Land war is inncident recoui ted le. After an Arab air raid on Tel Aviv, the writer reIsraelis countered with an attack on Amman, capital of Ian. The British there • notified Israel that Air.was a British military ghold, and any further raids by t:• %  Jews would bring prompt retaliation by the RAF. %M w FOR SURE PLEASURE This summer, the Gush Etzion block, a string of four Mixrachi settlements located between Jerusalem and Hebron, came under heavy Arab pressure. Subjected to almost continuous shelling and attack, women and children were evacuated under cover of night at the first opportunity. Fifty women, 12 babies and an additional number of young boys and girls found refuge, first aid assistance and a warm welcome at the Beth Zeiroth Misrachi in Tel Aviv, one of the 47 projects sponsored by the Misrachi Women's Organization of America. For many of the young women, being received at the Beth Zeiroth was in the nature of a reunion, for a goodly number graduated from the Mizrachi Women's vocational school. KadimahCh^~T^ SOS Benefit Party The Kadimah Chapter Pjft Women, will give a %*** Saturday at 8 p.m. f or t ^ f SOS at the home of? Lillian Becker, i 538 S W ^ Ter., co-chairman of vj, '* SOS committee, of W ^T Abraham Kasow l s chapman ^ mission to the affair, which open to both men and women,,; be ether 51.00 or a cantrip of high protein canned good,? an article for the lavetuX." tion. Sheeting and ^ "J* especially desired g 8 Beth David Barn Dance Sponsored By PTA Music by Nathan Greenberg and his seven piece band will be the background at the barn dance to be held by the Beth David Sisterhood and PTA on November 3 in Bayfror.t Recreation Hall. Mrs. Harry August, general chairman, will be assisted by Mrs. Harry Laufer, country store; Mrs. Max Seigel, refreshments: Mrs. Harry Gilbert and Mrs. O. Dworkin, tickets. LADY—MIDDLE AGED To do light housekeeping for 2 adults in exchange for lovely room and board. Call after 4 p.m. 3570 S. W. 23rd Street AUGUST STUDIO Just Arrived from New York with a Large variety of Fabrics 1230 ALTON ROAD PHONE 5-1024 Attention is called to those who ordered the record albumn A Nation Is Horn" Through error these albumns were sent express-collect. THE KEILSON COMPANY 117 W. 46th St. New York 19, N. Y. will refund all charges above the advertised purchase price of $3.00. Future orders for "A Nation Is Born," (3 full-size records—6 sides—commemorating the historic United Nations vote for a Jewish State and other events leading to its establishment after centuries of exile) will be accepted at $3.00 Post-paid. Obituaries BORIS PREO Private funeral services were held Monday at the Riverside Memorial Chapel. Miami Beach, for Boris Tied. Tv of 4800 N. Meridian Ave.. who passed away Sunday following a long Illness, Mr. I'red was a resident of this area for the past 25 years, coming henfrom Omaha. Nebraska. Surviving are three daughters, Mrs M. A. Wally, Mrs. D. p. W'olfson and Mrs. Mayer Spencer, all of Miami Bench. Interment was In Woodlawn Park Cemetery. To Old M_ DRINK-PLENTY OF DRlJVlKfTI tom'Mm CASE OF SIX TABLE BOTTLES 5-GALLON BOTTLE %  • 8 5c ..TSc *V ~<

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
October 15, 1948

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01080

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
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Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
October 15, 1948

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
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Full Text
ihdlie\wiislh-IEIIiDipidliiaun
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
I^Jj^T-NUMBER 41

MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1948
PRICE TEN CENTS
Palestine Question Expected at U.N. this Week
PARIS, (JTA)The belief that
general debate of the Palestine
nuestion may begin this week in
\he United Nations was voiced
here in informed circles. These
Quarters said that the arrival here
gently of acting Palestine medi-
ator Dr. Ralph Bunche was linked
|o this possibility.
Israeli Foreign Minister Moshe
Shertok conferred this week with
John Foster Dulles, foreign af-
fairs advisor to Presidential can-
didate Governor Thomas E.
flewey. who is expected to be ap-
pointed Secretary of State in the
fcvent of a Republican victory in
November. The meeting between
fchertok and Dulles, which fol-
lowed an earlier conference be-
ween the Israeli Foreign Minister
tnd Dr. Bunche, aroused lively
[peculation here since it came
after Dulles' return from consulta-
tions with Dewey in the U.S. and
us earlier statement that he had
kot been consulted by Secretary
larshall before the latter issued
kis endorsement of the Bernadotte
plan.
Meanwhile, the Israeli delega-
tion to the U.N. reported this
veek that it was "making pro-
cess" in informal discussions
vith various delegations here,
the Israeli delegates said that
vhen they are shown a map of
srael most representatives to the
J.N. express surprise at the ex-
ent of territory which the Jew-
$h state would lose under terms
|>f the Bernadotte proposals.
Aubrey S. Eban, head of the
sraeli mission to the U.N., in a
etter to the President of the Se-
urity Council, charged the U.N.
vith failure to remedy six "grave
Holations of the truce on the
Lrab side" which jeopardized the
ositions and interests of Israel.
Emphasizing that his statement
lid not attempt to list all Arab
polations, Eban declared that the
aajor violations cited had a "last-
ng detrimental effect on the posi-
tion of Israel. In all these cases,
ne U.N. representatives have not
en able to give effect to their
ulings which the Arabs system-
atically disregarded," he charged.
Following are the six major
violations:
1. The Jerusalem water supply,
which is still not in operation, the
blasted Latrun pumping station,
unrepaired, and the population
existing on the most meager
water allowance.
2. The road to the Negev, the
statement complained of the fail-
ure of the Egyptians to observe
Gen. Aage Lundstroem's ruling
of Aug. 18 providing for the un-
molested use of the crossroads at
Karatiyah by both side for six-
hour periods, alternatively.
3. Bir Asluj in the Negev was
occupied by the Egyptians Aug.
5 under the eyes of U.N. observ-
ers, who persuaded the Israelis
not to counter-attack, undertak-
ing to obtain an evacuation which
has not occurred to date.
4. At Mishmar Hayarden the
Syrians occupied a vital height,
violating the line-fixing agree-
ment signed by the Israeli and
Arab commanders. The height has
still not yet been evacuated and
"here again the U.N. representa-
tives were unable to enforcetheir
decisions."
5. The Arab Legion command-
ers, after signing an undertaking
to evacuate positions in no-man's
land at Deir Abu Tor and Mt.
Zion, did not comply.
6. Mt. Scopus, where, despite a
mid-July agreement demilitariz-
ing the Hebrew University and
Hadassah Hospital area, only one
convoy actually passed through.
Arab Shelling Of Jerusalem Continues
500 Shells Fall In Jewish Areas
JERUSALEM, Oct. 11. (JTA)
Jerusalem's war continued today
with more Arab artillery and
small arms fire on the southern
outskirts of the city. It is esti-
mated that some 500 shells fell
in the Jewish areas during the
last 24 hours, one hitting and
damaging the Turkish consulate.
No one was injured in the con-
sulate.
A spokesman for the Israeli
military governor of Jerusalem
today announced special precau-
tions to guard foreign consular
staffs in the city. He stressed that
the measures are not being taken
because of yesterday's mass prison
break by Sternists in Jaffa. He
said arrangements were begun
after the assassination of Count
Bernadotte. but could not be com-
pleted until now; following re-
ceipt of the consent of the con-
sular corps and U.N. staff.
It was learned today that the
consular truce commission's pro-
test to the Arabs over their re-
fusal to permit Christians to enter
the Old City to visit the Holy
Places may be extended to cover
the refusal to admit Jews to pray
at the Wailing Wall and else-
where. Although the Jewish au-
thorities do not expect much im-
provement in the situation, it is
believed that if the situation in
respect to the Christians im-
proves, the Jews will also benefit.
^Write Today"
"Write TodayMake Some-
Happy," will be the slogan of
National Letter Writing Week
from October 17 to the 23.
Hugh P. Emerson, postmaster,
states: "As a result of the ob-
servance of Letter Writing
Week, many home times are re-
newed, old friendships recap-
tured, and new ones discovered
.... we sincerely hope the
celebration of Letter Writing
Week will bring pleasure and
happiness to millions through-
out the country."
Cabinet Committee Recommends
Israeli Hold Election December 15
TEL AVIV, Oct. 11. (JTA)A Cabinet committee dealing with
preparations for the first parliamentary elections to be held in Israel
has submitted a recommendation to the Cabinet to set Dec. 15 as the
date of the elections. The proposal must be approved by the State
Council.
A committee of experts submitted a recommendation to the
Cabinet suggesting that the Israeli flag have a white background
with two blue stripes on both the right and the left sides and with
the Shield of David in the center. The same committee recommended
that the Israeli crest be a Chanuka lamp with seven branches against
a blue background. In addition it would contain seven Shields of
David signifying the seven-hour working day proposed by Theodor
Herzl. The crest would also bear at the lower right-hand corner ;
Shofar while at the lower left would be a Lulav and Esrog, used by
Jews during the Succoth holidays.
170 Sternists
Sent To Acre
JAFFA, (JTA) About 170
Stern Group prisoners who staged
a demonstration, this week, over-
powering the guards and taking
over control of the prison, sur-
rendered to the military police.
They were loaded into lorries and
transferred to Acre prison when
the authorities grimly prorrised
that treatment "won't be so lax."
About 30 detainees who walked
out of the prison were still at
large and were objects of an in-
tensive man-hunt. The authori-
ties predicted a speedy return or
recapture of all fugitives.
Meanwhile, the military author-
ities opened a searching inquiry
into the administration of the
Jaffa prison to determine re-
sponsibility for the conditions en-
abling the Sternists to stage their
demonstration, which the Hebrew
press denounced as a serious blow
to the Israeli government's
prestige.
A senior military police official
denied that the Sternists had been
in virtual control within the pri-
son for the last fortnight, ex-
planing that they were confined
to cells but were permitted free
use of the large exercise yard.
Asked why the prison guards had
not used arms to prevent the
break, he replied that the prison-
ers, after making their escape by
leaping over the wall, had mixed
with the crowd of women and
children outside the prison who
had come to visit the Sternists.
irabs Get Air Superiority Over Israel
Tom British, Claims 'Flying' Magazine
Ii Great Britain withdrew its direct aid today, the Arab air
prces would collapse, it is disclosed in a feature article on the
Vi war in Palestine, appearing in the October issue of "Flying,"
rational aviation magazine published by Ziff-Davis and now
pi the newsstands.
Official British air missions are
rtlve in training and equipping
mlitary forces in Iraq and Saudi
yabia, and the Transjordan Air
force is completely operated and
Inanced by the British Crown.
ptes John C. Ross in the avia-
pon magazine.
Israel's air power is much less
nan that 0f the Arabswhose
tola] might is largely concen-
rated in Egypt's British-spon
ored air forcebut if both sides
'ere left to fend for themselves,
tore i.s no qUestion 0f the out-
ome, the article declares.
The Arabs would be left help-
Ks. the author asserts, but Is-
el, freed of paralyzing restric-
ts, would bring into full play
s technical brains and resource
wness. The arms embargos im-
osed on both sides in the Holy
and warfare has hurt Israel
ftuch more than it has the Arabs
--although the Jews have exer-
ted considerable ingenuity in
Manufacturing their own small
rrns and field-pieces.
But both side have tasted air
far and are determined to build
iieir air forces as soon as cir-
?umstances permitregardless of
whether the present anxious
oeace becomes enduring, or the
war is resumed. An effctive air
force, the writer says, will be "a
colossal luxury" for these small
nations, but all are eager to have
such a fighting arm.
"The Arab League nations are
so backward by Western stand-
ards," the article states, "that they
seemed almost sub-human to
American soldiers who saw them
during the war. In addition to a
.shortage of industrial resources
is the problem of training re-
cruits to operate anything as com-
plex as an air force. Here, the
disciplined Israelis have a great
advantage over the illiterate and
individualistic Arabs. The Israelis
learned cooperation and "team-
work in European armies and in
the task of reclaiming the arid
Palestine deserts.
"Israel, unlike the Arabs, has
no shortage of trained men. The
Israelis, trained in all the armies
of Europe, include high quality
(Continued on Page 16)
Give Supplies to Save Lives
Local SOS Chairman Urges
Israeli Government
Reaches Agreement
On Supply Of Oil
TEL AVIV, (JTA)An agree-
ment with Shell-Socony-Vacuum
to supply refined oil products suf-
ficient to meet the nation's
domestic requirements was an-
nounced this week by the Israeli
government.
Shipments are expected to be-
gin immediately but the govern-
ment as a "precautionary meas-
ure" will not relax the current
restrictions on fuel consumption.
The continuance of the rationing
is also based on the need of Is-
raeli to conserve foreign ex-
change.
The three companies consented
to continue to supply refined pro-
ducts as long as there are no hos-
tilities. The agreement reserves
the right of the Israeli govern-
ment to obtain additional supplies
from other sources.
To help Europe's Jews turn a new and happier page in
1948, the SOS (Suppl-es for Overseas Survivors) Collection of
the Joint Distribution Committee of Greater Miami will launch
its 1948 spring campaign for high priority canned foods and
layette items on Sunday, Nov. 14, it was announced by Mrs.
Matilda Ratner, SOS chairman.
Mrs. Ratner stated that the
Greater Miami SOS committee
seeks to collect 75,000 pounds of
relief supplies. The following
supplies were listed by Mrs. Rat-
ner as those most urgently need-
ed by Europe's Jews: infants'
layettes, and canned foods, such
as meats, fish, milk, milk products,
Please Note:
Due to observance of the Holi-
days copy for Insertion in Fri-
day's edition of the
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
must be in our office not
later than WEDNESDAY. 10
A.M.
^nmtuun
Lloyd D. LeMan Photo
Mrs. Matilda Ratner
fruits and fruit juices.
Mrs. Ratner said, "1948 is a
year of hope and a year of op-
portunity for Europe's Jews. This
year, we in comfortable, secure
America must give more than we
have ever given before to help
Europe's Jews realize that hope
and opportunity. Many survivors
overseas, after untold hardships,
have now begun to restablish
themselves again on European
soil.
Mrs. Ratner was hostess at a
luncheon at Huyler's for the initial
meeting of area chairman. Assist-
ing Mrs. Ratner were: Mrs.
Emanual Baskin for West Miami
Shores; Mrs. Maurice Whitman,
Miami Springs and Miami Shores;
Mrs. Albert Green, upper Bis-
cayne Boulevard; Mrs. Harry
Kaufman and Mrs. William Loeb,
Miami Beach; Mrs. Ben Essen
and Mrs. Harry Brenner, Coral
Gables; Mrs. Samuel Danels, Hia-
leah; Mrs. Harry Gordon, Miami;
Mrs. Harold Spaet, publicity
chairman; Mrs. Isidore Newman,
layette sewing chairman, and
Miss Shirley Rosenberg will as-
sist the committee as chairman
of the volunteer clerical staff.
Headquarters for the local cam-
paign will be at the YMHA, lo-
cated at 1536 Ray Road, Miami
Beach.
National SOS has assigned Stan
Murray, southeastern field repre-
sentative to assist in the Greater
Miami campaign.


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FRIDAY. OCTOBER 15, 1948
I'll Say...
By HARRY SIMONHOFF
Luiz de Torres: 1492
+Jenisti Ftcrid/an
PAGE THREE
PalOS) a small seaport in Spain,
Was bustling with the prepara-
tions of three ships about to em-
bark on the strangest voyage any-
one ever heard of. In a few days
thev would sail over the western
Sea" in search of the East Indies.
The villagers tapped their fore-
heads mockingly as the top com-
mander, one Christobal Colon,
passed by mumbling to himself.
"These Pinzon brothers have such
vile taste. Imagine such a voy-
age in a ship they call Pinta. the
painted harlot, or Nina, the
wench. But I won't stand for
Maria Galante. The Admiral's
flagship must bear a more digni-
fied name than Footloose Mary.
Why not Santa Maria ."
"Captain Chris Colon!" broke
in a voice upon his reverie.
The tall seaman drew himself
up to his full height and ex-
claimed haughtily "Captain,
indeed! Grand Admiral of the
Ocean, if you please."
"Come now, Colon. Don't put
on the dog with an old comrade,
the only one who would listen to
your crazy dreams and your
wretched Latin. By the way, do
you still sign your name Colum-
bus with that big flourish?"
"Luiz de Torres, as I live," ex-
claimed Colon. "But you look so
down hearted. Let's see, I believe
our last voyage was to Iceland.
What are you doing here? Oh, I
know, signed up with my fleet,
I'll bet."
"No," he answered and re-
mained silent for awhile. "But
can"t you guess? I have to obey
the royal decree. That rotten hulk
must fill up with Jewish exiles
before it lifts anchor."
"Oh, I forgot," said the Grand
Admiral and reflected for several
moments. "But you don't have
to be an exile. Surely there is
some way out."
"Not at the price of my faith.
I won't change religion as I
would a doublet and hose."
The future discoverer looked
about furtively, and whispered:
"You don't have to change on the
inside. Why not do like Santangel,
Sanchez and the other Marannos
. Say, I have an idea. You
still have that gift for languages?"
"Yes, I added Persian, Turkish,
and a little Chaldean since we
last met."
"I knew I forgot something. 1
need an interpreter. Come along
with me to Fra Diego Morales.
Now, don't contradict me. As soon
as you are baptised, I will sign
you up for the greatest voyage
ever taken. There is no safer
place on earth than on my flag-
ship. You shall eat at the Grand
Admiral's table."
October 12, 1492
The Santa Maria fairly heaved
with jubilation. After 69 days of
discouragement and despair, they
now stood at anchor before land.
What a bright sun! Far more
dazzling than Andalusia. Colum-
bus was dressed in a magnificent
scarlet robe. Those sailors, who
wanted to throw him overboard,
were now kissing his hand and
begging his forgiveness. Luiz de
Torres also came up to congratu-
late the great discoverer. He had
no need to fall on his knees. He
was loyal all through.
"Senor Interpreter," boomed
Columbus in his most pompous
manner. "You will be the first to
land. Take Sebastion and Ruiz
along as bodyguards. Pay my re-
spects to the local ruler. I will
follow shortly. Be sure to present
me in proper form."
Luiz de Torres leaped out of
the row-boat. He scooped up some
white sand in both hands and
murmured a prayer ending with
a word that sounded like Adama.
A sword hanging at his side, and
flanked by two stalwart sailors
each carrying a tall halberd, hr
walked two hundred feet to a
group of people, some naked
others partly clad, all of coppei
reddish tint. A tall man in the
center, wearing a crown of bril-
liant colored feathers, carried him-
self with an air of authority.
"Shalom Alechem," greeted
Luiz with assumed boldness. The
chief did not answer.
"Pax Vobiscum!" No response.
The polyglot Jewish interpreter
flung out words in a dozen lan-
guages or dialects, but with no
success. The head man main-
tained a grave and baffling sil-
[ ence.
What next? puzzled de Torres.
A young girl stepped up to Se-
bastian, looked him over, and
touched his clothes, his hands and
his face. Sebastian smiled his
pleasure at the young shapely
naked form. Luiz looked at her
only article of wear: a necklace
of small, evenly matched shells.
De Torres suddenly got an in-
spiration. Drawing out of his
doublet a string of blue glass
beads, he placed it around his
own neck. He pointed to the sky,
then to the beads of the same sky-
blue color. He took off the beads
held it circular like in both hands
and advanced to the chief. The
red man evidently understood. He
removed his plumed egrets an/
lowered his head. Luiz slipped thn
beads around the chief's neck.
The leader took a long reed fror
a retainer standing near, and
stuck it in his mouth. The reed
began to smoke, but a cloud o'
smoke also came out of his mouth.
The chief offered the smokinp
eed to the white visitor. Dc
Torres, an experienced traveler,
felt it always wise to follow the
custom of the land. He placc-
the reed between his lips and be-
gan to draw in his breath. The
ta"ste was bitter. He wanted to
cough, but restrained himself, and
with heroic effort let the smoke
out of his mouth. The red leader
LilienthafTo Address JDC\
Annual Meeting in Chicago
B'nai B'rith
Receives Call For
Executive Meet
Milton Friedman, president of
the State Federation of B'nai
B'rith Lodges has called a meet-
ing of the executive committee of
the State Federation for October
16 and 17 at St. Petersburg, Fla.
Representatives from nineteen
lodges are expected to participate.
George Talianoff, Anti-Defama-
tion League's executive secretary,
Irving Cypen, state secretary,
William Pallot, president of the
B'nai B'rith Council, and Harold
Turk, state membership chair-
man, will accompany Mr. Fried-
man to the west coast. Head-
quarters will be in the Suwanee
Hotel. Following the week-end
conference Mr. Friedman and Mr.
Talianoff will proceed to Lake-
land where they will address the
B'nai B'rith Lodge on the 19th.
David E. Lilienthal, chairman of the U. S. Atomic Energy
Commission, will be the featured speaker at the 34th Annual
Meeting of the Joint Distribution Committee on October 31 in the
Palmer House, Chicago. He will share the speakers' platform with
Dr. William Haber, Adviser on Jewish Affairs in Germany to
Gen. Lucius D. Clay.
Five hundred delegates are expected to attend the meeting,
which will be open to the public, and which will be presided over
by Edward M. M. Warburg, JDC chairman.
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J. A. NILON J. P. NILON
gravely placed his right arm on
the newcomer's shoulder. He must
be pleased with me, mused de
Torres.
A company of Spaniards drew
near, dressed in velvets satins of
sober as well as bright colors.
Banners and pinions waved as the
tallest standard was firmly plant-
ed in the ground.
"Any success, de Torres?"
questioned the commander.
"Senor Admiral, I can't make
myself understood. But the chief
over there seems friendly."
A monk began reciting a prayer
in Latin. The group remained on
their knees when they heard a
booming voice solemnly enton-
ing, "I, Christopher Columbus, by
virtue of the power vested in me
as Admiral of the Ocean and vice-
roy of the Indies, now declare
these lands and people the prop-
erty of their Catholic Majesties.
Ferdinand of Aragon and Isabella
of Castile."
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PAGE FOUR
+Je*lst ncrkJIan
raw, octqbbp it
1348
EDITORIAL
Agrieulturat Sabbath
Two years ago the Jewish Agricultural Society
conceived the happy thought of inaugurating a
Jewish Agricultural Sabbath. The idea has struck
roots and now it bids fair to remain a permanent
institution in Jewish life in America. As on the
previous two occasions, the Agricultural Sabbath
this year will be observed on the first Sabbath
of Succoth.
Today we Jews are predominantly an urban
people. But that was not always so. In the days
before the Diaspora we were primarily an agri-
cultural folk. Our profound attachment to the soil
is perhaps best reflected in the fact that great
portions of the Talmud are devoted to agricultural
laws and to the agricultural mode of life of our
forefathers. There is, therefore, deep spiritual
meaning in the observance of a day that reminds
the Jew of his pastoral origin.
There are many in our midst who are still un-
aware of the importance agriculture is assuming
in the life of our people. Although the Jewish farm
movement in America is barely half a century
old, quite a large segment of the Jewish popula-
tion* derives its living from the land. Flourishing
Jewish farm communities have been built up in
various parts of the country, mostly near the
large centers of Jewish life, and our farmers, al-
though newcomers, have left a profound imprint
on American agriculture. There is a growing
awareness among our people of the importance
of agricultural occupations and of the need of
having more tillers of the soil.
Officially designated as such by the Synagogue
Council of America, the Agricultural Sabbath
not only recalls the traditional meaning and im-
plications of the Succoth festival but also serves
to call attention to the importance of agriculture
to American Jewry in our own day.
Sueeoth
After the more serious Holy Days of Rosh
Hashonah and Yom Kippur, Judaism, as it were,
rewards its adherents with the more joyful holi-
day of Succoth. Originally Succoth was an ag-
ricultural festival and we observe it today very

7i i m
' What Further Evidence Is Needed?"
much as a reminiscence of the times when the
Jew was a tiller of the soil. The Jew even brought
his farm symbolically into the synagogue with
his esrog and lulav, with which he used to chant
his thankfulness to God.
Today, the festival takes on more of its ancient
significance as Israel again takes its place as a
nation among the nations. Once more Israel is
a t.ller of its soil, living the normal life of a people.
In the new Israel, Succoth thus undergoes a
revivifying experience.
It is possible that the newer forms, or at least
the new spirit, with which Succoth will be ob-
served in the new Israel will in time also in-
fluence our own observance of the holiday. In
any event, Succoth is a very welcome holiday.
It is a zman simchasenu, a time of joy and the
world has need of joy.
Ilravtdeis Inivvrsity
The inauguration of Branded University A
first Jewish-sponsored, non-sectarian institJ'
higher learning in America, has both an '
ate and historical significance for theT^'"
people. Jewi"h
Viewed in terms of our contemporary from
work, and taking place in the same W^
which the State of Israel has been estaffij?
it serves notice upon the world that Jewry deo
brutal persecutions, has lost none of itsi aZ
vitality. The launching of Brandeis, another I!
strumentality for the strengthening of democrat
processes, also attests to the continuing faithof
Jewry in the ideals of democracy. Finally as
university tolerating restrictions neither in h
student body nor in its faculty, Brandeis serves
a symbol of the insistence of Jewish people uoon
the rights of all minorities. m
From an historical perspective, there are deep-
er implications. For more than 30 years, leadina
Jewish figures had urged the establishment of a
Jewish-sponsored university of a non-sectarian
nature. Protestant and Catholic religious groupinqs
had contributed generously to the founding of
universities in Amerca. The Jews, the people of
the Book, now take their proper role in providinq
higher educational facilities for the youth of the
nation.
Equally as momentous is the simple reassur-
ance implicit in the creation of Brandeis University
that the traditional Jewish solicitude for the care
of youth, their proper rearing and education, is
still alive.
The solemn dignity of the inauguration of the
Univers ty; the warm reception accorded the in-
stitution by the academic fraternity; the carefully-
phrased pledges of the President of the Board,
George Alpert, and of the first President, Dr.
Abram Leon Sachar; and the national attention
focussed upon the fledgling school, all give as-
suiance that Brandeis University will add to the
rich lustre of Jewry's contributions to world culture
and knowledge.
THE JEWISH ANSWERMAN
As part of its program of service to Jewish Community Centers
and YM-YWHAs and other community agencies, the National Jewish
Welfare Board has published a 102-page book entitled "The Jewish
HolidaysA Guide to Their Origin, Significance and Observance,"
by Dr. Mordecai Soltes. From this volume and a supplementary series
of JWB manuals on the observance of the major Jewish festivals
and holidays including Sukkot. there has been developed a series of
Jewish holiday quizzes of which this one, on Sukkot, is the second.
Questions Memorial Services for the dead
conducted?
1. What does the name Sukkot
mean and how long does the festi-
val last?
2. By what special name is the
eighth day of the Sukkot festival
called?
3. Why is the concluding day
of the Festival of Tabernacles
called Simhat Torah (Rejoicing
in the Law)?
4. How are the intervening days
of Sukkot (third to seventh
called)?
5. What is the agricultural
significance of Sukkot?
6. What historical experience of
the Jewish people does the Feast
of Booths recall?
20. How do children generally
observe Simhat Torah?
Answers
1. Booths or Tabernacles; nine
days.
2. Shemini Azeret (Feast of the
Eighth Day, or the Eighth Day of
Solemn Assembly).
3. Because on that day the one
year cycle of the reading of the
Pentateuch is completed and re-
sumed.
4. Hoi Hamoed, or week days
of the Feast.
5. The festival occurred origin-
ally during the fruit harvest in
Palestine and was observed as
7. By what three names is the thanksgiving at the completion
festival of Tabernacles referred
to in the Bible?
of the entire harvest.
6. It commemorates the wan-
8. What are the two main cere-1 derings of the Israelites in the
monies included in the celebra-
tion of Sukkot?
9. How is the Sukkah usually
utilized by the members of the
family?
10. Why are Jews required to
erect and dwell in Sukkahs dur-
ing the Festival of Booths?
11. What is a contemporary
practice regarding the Sukkah
which is becoming widespread?
12. What does the Sukkah sym-
bolize?
13. What is the Lulav and ofj
what elements does it consist?
14. When does the Reader wave
the Lulav in the Synagogue?
15. In what other ceremony is
the Lulav used in the Synagogue
on the first two days of Sukkot?
16. What do the processional
circuits with the Lulav made in
the Synagogue on Sukkot com-
memorate?
17. What is the Hoshannah?
When is the Hoshanna used?
18. Describe the special cere-
mony which takes place in the
Synagogue on Hoshannah Rabbah.
19. On what day of Sukkot are
which they were uprooted by per-
secution.
13. A festive palm branch which
is waved by observant Jews dur-
ing the Sukkot festival; a palm
branch, three myrtle twigs (Had-
dasim), two willow branches
(Avarot), and a citron (Etrog).
"Lulav" is the word applied for
short to all elements, which are
arranged in a booklet.
14. During the chanting of the
Hallel prayers the Hazan waves
the festive branch in all direc-
tionsnorth, south, east and west,
as an acknowledgement of God's
sovereignty over nature.
15. At the end of the service,
processional circuits led by the
Reader, are made around the
reading desk or Bimah. The
Lulav is carried and special
hymns, beginning with the word
"hoshanna" are chanted.
16. The procession around the
altar in the Temple Court.
17. An osier or willow branch
made up of five small twigs, tied
together with strips of willow
bark or palm leaf. It is used in
the Synagogue in the morning
of the seventh day of Sukkot.
18. Processional circuits are
made around the reading desk
seven times. At last, wth a peti-
tion for forgiveness of his sins,
each worshipper strikes his
branch a few times on the desk
or bench before him, and throws
it away. Poetical prayers are re-
cited, among them one full of
Messianic hopes"Kol M'vaser,
M'vaser V'omer" "A Voice
brings news, brings news and
says.''
19. On Shemini Azeret, the
eighth day of the Sukkot Festival.
20. They carry Jewish flags
during the "hakafot" (procession-
al circuits) with the Holy Scrolls,
and are called up to recite the
blessing over the Torah.
CANTOR GETS U.J.A. AWARD FROM GOLDWYN
Desert of Sinai, following their
exodus from Egypt.
7. Hag HaSukkot(Festival of
Booths), Hag HeAsifFestival of
Ingathering), Z'man Simhatenu
(The Season of our Rejoicing),
These names suggest various
phases of the significance and ob-
servance of this festival.
8. Dwelling in Sukkahs or huts,
and the waving of the Lulav and
Etrog.
9. The mother blesses the can-
dles and the father and children
recite the Kiddush and sometimes
partake of their meals in the
Sukkah.
10. To recall the temporary huts
which our forefathers built as |
dwellings during their wander-1 '
ings in the Wilderness of Sinai. Hebrew Calendar
11. The erection of larger Com- S709 1948
munity Sukkahs by SynagoguesSuccoth, lit day Oct u
and Jewish Community Centers V,".",h-.'"-'< ''> Oot It
which are utilized by the Jewish SSSSSi^aSSSS. : ~get |?
Eddie Cantor, star of stage, screen and radio, is shown re-
ceiving the United Jewish Appeal's 1948 Citation for Humani-
tarianism trom Samuel Goldwyn, noted motion picture producer.
who is president of the United Jewish Welfare Fund in Mj
Angeles. Mr. Cantor recently completed a tour of major U.S. cm
in which he gave great impetus to their campaign for the S250--
000,000 United Jewish Appeal. Prior to his lour he visited JBJ--
maintained homes and workshops for refugees in Europe. j
UJA supports the world-wide relief, reconstruction and rf"!"'-
ment activities of the United Palestine Appeal, the Joint Distriw
tion Committee and the Unied Service for New Americans.
community at large.
12. It is an emblem of the Galut
(Exile), and suggests the tem-
porary abodes which the Jews
have found in various lands from
Slmchath Torah" "" Oct' 2
Rosh ( hodesh. Klslev ... i >PC 3
< hanukah, lnt dav 1 i,.,.' -.-
Chanukah, 2nd day Dec' 28
AIho observed previous day.
News Briefs
Emil Cohen has been elected
president of the newly formed
Citrus Fruit Division of the Mi-
ami Beach Chamber of Commerce.
The new unit campaign will in-
clude promotion of advertising,
publicity and complete coopera-
tion among the industry. Other
officers are Max Goodman, vice
president; William Knowles.
treasurer; Seymour Weiss and
Leon Michelson, directors, and
George H. Mitchell, secretary.
Marvin Kimmel, president of
the Miami Beach Jaycees, an-
nounced that the organization will
again sponsor the Damon Runyon
Cancer Fund for the third con-
secutive year. Previous cancer
fund drives netted 50,000. Chair-
man of the committee is Buddv
Allen.
^JewistFkridiar
Published every Friday **fl
y The Jewish Floridian at iw
Sixth Street. Miami 18, F 0^
lered as second-class mauer
l30. at the WMtoifl
Fla.. under the Act of Marc n*^
. Act of Marcn *-j
F.ondi.nM."5JS
tne jewisn Unity and in. T|M.
Weekly. Member of the J. tuN
graphic Agency. Seven Aru
Syndicate. Worldwide News aj ,,
National Editorial Assooaton. *-,
can Association of Enfl',' cj,tu.
Newspapers. Florida Press Assocu
SUBSCRIPTION RATE?j0,
One Year.............. 'M
Two Years
FRED K. SHOCrfET
Edltc and p..oiir
Telephones UMI-**1
OFFICE and PLANT
120 N. E. Sixth Street _
Volume 21 .JTlSi
FRIDAY. OCTOBER 15.
TISHRI 12, 5-09
41


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1948
+Jewist fhrldian
PAGE FIVE
Actress Has
Leading Radio Role
In Council Program
Jano Cowl, noted actress of
Stage, screen and radio, will play
the leading role in the annual
Council Day broadcast of the
National Council of Jewish Wom-
en to be carried over the coast-
to-coast network of the National
Broadcasting Company on Satur-
day. October 16, and heard locally
Ovor WIOU at 6:45 p.m.
The broadcast a dramatic docu-
Academy Gives
M u s i< ;i 1-1 i ni in
The opening event on the He-
brew Academy's calendar this
year will be a forum and musicale
to be held Wednesday evening at
8 p m. at the academy auditorium,
918 6th St., Miami Beach. Dr.
David Andron, president, will act
as chairman of the evening.
Speakers will be Rabbi Irving
Lehrmai) and Sol Sugarman,
principal of the school. Cantor
Jacob Y. Goldring will sing sev-
en] numbers.
Special refreshments will be
served in the Succah which has
been decorated by the children
of the academy for the occasio-
There will be no solicitation of
funds.
National B'nai B'rith Leaders In Miami
To Attend American Legion Convention
Jane Cowl
mcnlaiy entitled, "A Time to
Sp.;ik.'; will launch Council Day
celebrations by sections through-
out the nation. A special message
will be presented by Mrs. Joseph
M. Welt, of Detroit, Council's na-
tion;.! president..
Both the national and local
events planned for Council Day
1048. ir.aking the 55th anniversary
of the founding of the National
Council of Jewish Women, are
being keyed to the theme. "The
Vil 1 Contribution of the Council
Volunteer." The significant role
of the volunteer women worker
locally, nationally and interna-
tionallywill be highlighted.
Beach Y Program
Has Added Projects
Mrs, Evelyn Walterman. pro-
gram chairman of the Beach Y.
nnouneffs the following forth
coming activities: On Thursday at
8:30 the second clnss in conversa-
tion-it Spanish will b^ein, with
Vt-rnon Dyer, of the University
of Miami, in charge. The women's
modern dance group will open
for the second year on Monday.
November 1 at 8:30. Bernard Qst-
feld. dancing instructor, also
teaches a class in children's mod-
ern dancing on Monday and Wed-
nesday afternoons. Lillian Fox,
director of the Little Theatre
Group, began coaching the group
for this year's production last
night.
B'nai B'rith Women
To Organize New Group
In Normandy Isle Area
First organizational meeting of
a new B"nai B'rith Young Wom-
en's group in the Normandy Isle
area of Miami Beach was held
last night at the home of Miss
Harriet Feinberg, 1738 Marseilles
Drive. The young ladies heard a
talk by Howard Liebman, Florida
state director of B'nai B'rith
Youth activities.
The chaiter group consists of
fourteen girls between the ages
of 18 and 25 who attend college
and are employed.
Misses Carol Potasnick and
Harriet Feinberg are assisting
Mr. Liebman with organizational
plans. Temporary officers will be
elected at the next meeting.
Gables Zionists Call
Luncheon Meeting
The next luncheon meeting of
the Coral Gables Zionist District
will be held at Erving's Restaur-
ant, 3500 Coral Way, on Thurs-
day at 12 noon. Zionists and
friends of Israel are invited to
attend. Reservations are unnec-
essary and no collections will be
made.
Sports To Be Discussed
At Men Club Meeting
"Jews in Sports," will be the
subject of a talk next Wednesday
when the Men's Club of Temple
Israel meet at 8 p.m.. E. Max
Goldstein, all southern football
olayer and local attorney will be
the sneaker. Several sport figures
ill be the guests of the Men's
Club at the meeting.
Two national B'nai B'rith lead-
ers will be in Miami to represent
their respective state delegations
at the American Legion Conven-
tion October 16 through 22.
Lt. Col. Elliott A. Niles of
Brookline, Mass., chairman of the
B'nai B'rith National Committee
on Veterans' Affairs and A. B.
Kapplin, director of the National
Commission on Americanism and
Civic Affairs and the National
Committee on Veterans Affairs
of B'nai B'rith will attend con-
vention sessions here.
Lt. Col. Niles has recently been
appointed liaison officer of the
Secretary of Defense to the U. S.
Veterans' Administration. He re-
nresents Secretary of Defense
Forrestal at all national conven-
tions of the major veterans' or-
ganizations of the United States.
Since his promotion to Lt. Col.
;n May, 1945, Lt. Col. Niles has
been serving as chief of the man-
agement branch of the Adjutant
General's office, with headquar-
'ers in the Pentagon Bldg. He was
active'in the B'nai B'rith service
nrogram before his transfer to
Washington and was the origina-
*or of the "Serve-A-Ship" project
which won the Navy award for
B'nai B'rith shortly after V-J day.
Lt. Col. Niles will fly to Miami
in an army plane on October 16
and will be at the Raleigh Hotel
during convention week.
A. B. Kapplin, the second B'nai
B'rith luminary to attend the con-
vention is a former newspaper
man and editor of Minnesota
where he was prominently ident-
ified with the American Legion
for many years. He served with
the national headquarters of th
Anti-Defamation League for three
years before coming to the Su-
preme Lodge headquarters of
B'nai B'rith late in 1945. Prior to
that time he had lived in Duluth,
Minn, for more than 25 years
where he was associated with
local newspapers and served as
managing editor of the Duluth
News-Tribune. He attended the
University of Minnesota and is a
veteran of World War I and
served as commander of the Min-
nesota Department of the Legion
in 1931.
Mr. Kapplin served as director
of Civilian Defense for Northern
Minnesota. While a resident of
Duluth, he was for 15 years a
TROPICAL LODGE B'NAI B'RITH
Presents Its 2nd Annual
Halloween Whirl
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24th9 'TIL 1
At the AIR-CONDITIONED
FROLIC CLUB
TICKETS $1.25
MUSIC BY SAM LANE
1306 N. E. BAYSHORE DRIVE
(Just off MacArthur Causeway)
SET UPS FREE
B. Y. O. L.
ADDS NEW
TO YOUR MEALS
Breakstone's Sour Cream is not really sour. It's a specially
cultured sweet cream with o fresh, lively flavor all Its
own. Use it as o main dishos an ingredient in soupt,
sauces, salads, vegetables and pastriesand a a
topping for fruits and berries. Your grocer has it in glass
or paper containers.
SOUR CREAM
fASTlURIZlD HOMOGENIZED
A. B. Kapplin
member of the executive board
of the Boy Scout Council and
served on the board of directors
of the Duluth Lighthouse for the
Blind for 20 years.
Mr. Kapplin will attend the an-
nual Post Department Command-
er's Club Dinner Sunday eve-
ning, October 17, at the Colony
Restaurant.
It is expected that both A. B.
Kapplin ana i_,t. Col. Niles will
appear at B'nai B'rith member-
ship luncheons and smokers cur-
rently in progress as part of the
B'nai B'rith October membership
drive.
During his stay, Mr. Kapplin
will confer with Charles R. Jacob-
son, executive director of the
Greater Miami B'nai B'rith Coun-
cil regarding public relations
methods and means of promoting
the Americanism rally sponsored
by the Council on Sunday, Octo-
ber 31 in Flamingo Park where
Harold Russell will appear as
speaker.
Local Legionnaires
To Attend Convention
An expected 50,000 Legion-
naires from over the nation will
start pouring tnrough Florida in
the next few days enroute to the
American Legion convention at
Miami, October 18-21. Some of
the advance guard will be mem-
bers of the Legion's fun group,
the 40 et 8, which opens its pre-
convention promenade on Octo-
ber 16.
American Legion Posts through-
out the state are sprucing up for
"open house" on the days pre-
ceding and following the con-
vention. Gateway booths at the
northern end of the state will
offer orange juice and informa-
tion to the Legionnaires as they
enter Florida and there will be
hospitality available for them at
all of their stopping places en-
route.
The serious side of the conven-
tion program will be participated
in officially by fifty-one dele-
gates chosen from all over Flor-
ida, or their alternates, but they
will be informally assisted by sev-
eral thousand Florida Legion-
naires, many of whom have al-
ready registered.
Delegates from this area in-
clude: Coral Gables, A. B. Lam-
bert; Miami, H. Frost Bailey, Joe
Frank, Henry Melloy Sr., W.
Fisher; Miami Springs, Art Cal-
vert; Miami Beach, Hyman Kout.
Miami Y Initiates
Weight Lifting Group
A weight lifting group has been
formed at the Miami YMHA to
meet each Sunday morning at 10
a.m. and Tuesday and Thursday
evenings at 8 p.m. Beginners are
invited to attend the first meet-
ing this Sunday morning.
AT YOUR SERVICE
SHERRY'S BAKERY
Finest Danish Pastry.......... 5c
Apple Turn Over..............10c
Egg Bread Daily................24c
Rich Chocolate Eclairs......10c
MANY OTHER ITEMS THAT
YOU WILL LIKE
We will appreciate a trial
LOU LEVIN. Mar.
2151 S.W. 8th Street
Next to A & P
PHONE 9-9756
FOR WOMEN 5 FT. 4 IN. AND UNDER
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Skirts are Shorter
than currently shownhence the reason for these drastic
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COLORS AND SIZES FOR WOMEN. MISSES. JUNIORS
ALL SALES FINAL
NO REFUNDS NO EXCHANGE
duPONT BLDG., MIAMI


PAGE SIX
* Jewlsti fhrkttan
FRIDAY, OCTQBERl. ^
SUCCOTH
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
There is an appeal about Sue- j
coth that transcends that of most
of the Jewish holidays. Succoth
winds up in the very gala hilarity
of Simchat Torah. Well, there are
other joyous holidays. Purim is
also a day of carnival joy. but its
joy is not the wholesome kind of
Succoth. Purim makes the
triumph over an enemy. That is
a joy, but it is a joy that at the
same time suggests pain. Succoth
is joy at merely being, the joy
that comes from the harvesting
of the fruits of the field, the j
living, of laboring and loving. It
is a more natural festiv J and
more human festival. It is the
kind of holidaythe thanksgiving
daysthat every pe pie r.-v
Jewish legend ass
with the founding of Succoth. At
first sight, this appears a not
very happy thing. Of the
Hebrew patrriarchs, Jacob is th
least glamorous. Abraham s
so much more lofty, --
much more saintly We ses
spots in '..-.err. ar.:

them. They seem tc have
born for distinction But noi
Jacob. He is full .:' the ills ::'
humar. flesh.
Let us take a 1 k at his ret rd
But let's look mon lose]
God is supposed t -' ~
weighs man in the s Let _.-
look as the psychologist i es Th
psychologists asks .-.; -
haved as he iid
What does the record sh
The Biblical ace ant tells is that
while Jac >b "sat in i tenl
Esau was a man ::' action, :
loved of his father, I
home the venison. E -
success, the extrovert the man
of action He had a house in the
country, two autorr......es a.-.- a
sea: on th- stock
on tl ther hand
glasses, use-a I : rr: w I I
books from the library and sit and
read the- 'in the tents His
father used to say tc him
don't you go out ar.d make
of money like Ei-- The
one to star.d up for him was his
ther She would take Jac
side, but her love was prob
more compassion than anything
else. We all love the succ-
ones. She had pity or. Jac >b She
knew that Jacob wasn't -
much more than reading books
and that if he went out with his
gur. to shoot a deer, the gun would
accidentally go off and he would
shoot himself. And yet to say
that Jacob is inferior is to miss
the truth. He has, it .; true, an
inferiority complex, but an in-
feriority complex is sometimes lr.
itself proof of a kind of superior-
ity. The doubts, the hesitancies
of man. while from one aspect
are a sign of weakness, at the same
time show a thoughtfulness, a
sensitivity that the mar. of action
sometimes lacks.
But one cannot live in a steady
climate of failure. Jacob learns
that he car. sometimes hold hack
the forces of this cruel world and
bring about a crude sort of jus-
tice. Encouraged by his mother
Rebecca, he falls in with her plan
.j Receive Isaac and win the pa-
ternal blessing. As a matter of
fact, Rebecca is the sponsor of
this idea. Rebecca is a very fine
woman. Whv does she concoct
such a plan? It is very simple.
She reasons: -What the devil does
Esau need any more blessing?
He's got all he wants. If anybody
needs a blessing, it is Jacob."
The incident teaches Jacob a
lesson. He leaves his mother's
apron strings and finds the out-
side world more cruel. He gel
job with Uncle Laban and what
does Uncle Laban do* H
ises to give Jacob his
years
y The idinj
1 when th ted. J
. V i has
i L -" ''
I- fact
a to sur-
H '- "
- : Ra-
.-- ---
-
rattle
- '
- ; '

Bernadotte Report Written In D. C
London, ZOA Publication Revea's

..... :- --
_ -
.z --.--- ~ '-''- [and
ronter. -_ -.-. "J ligels Sever

- rief is the finer
struggling in sti rid I
ing t on a high plane, but
: this imp ss.r'.e and
failing rays dreaming, con-
ing : ang Is striving
. things.
5 it .- that examine
lj the very
seem to
hin attractive We
ise he is like us.
jut pains and struggles and
weak resolutions. So the Jews
even took his name ar.d not that
>f the >ther Patriarchs. We are
called Israel, the name given to
Jacob when he contended with
the angels.
NEW YORK'The New Pal-
estine," official publication of the
Zionist Organization of America,
printing a dispatch from its Wash-
ington correspondent. Murray
Frank, asserted that the Berna-
dotte report did not originate
with the late U.N. mediator. In-
stead. Mr. Frank writes, it was
"the handiwork of State Depart-
ment officials in Washington who,
in collaboration with the British,
Foreign Office, prepared the
letails of the report more
than a mor.th ago."
Mr Frank, in his dispatch,
to the close
jeer; governed the
J.S. collaboration in writ-
ing : major sections of the re-
- and then declared that this,
underlying reason for J
of State Marshall's!
al of the report and \
(or Brit endorsement, which
.. s ;-. followed the move om
Mi Marshall"
The New Palestine" dispatch
- c ted out that State De-
ind the British
quietly worked
_- the Is of the report dur-
month >f August." By
end :' the month, the dis-
addc i th major points of
-- ;la- were completed and ap-;
. Foreign Af-
- in Washington ar.d
'
""he i spatch continued: The
I ve was to approach a cer-
tain influential Western Euro-1
pean country. The plan was dis-
d '..: its representatives, de-'
".a.Is were fully explained, and
-- -upport at the appropriate!
time was asked.
This cleared the way for the'
rep. Representatives of the
State Department presented the
main points of the Anglo-US., j
Palestine Solution," whi h was
t i be the he in ( '. Bern idottel
Report, to representatives of the
[s eli g r.: 7."'.- hint was
p litely dropped tn^t the US..
GORDON ROOFING AND '
SHEET METAL WORKS
Hava >5jp -:.* repaired now; you
will aav* on a nrw roof latar
Sat rfaetory Work by
Expananead Man"
414 I W. 22nd Avent
PHONE 4-1
Britain and a certain Western
European country will suport the
plan, and the request was made
that Israel, too. seriously consid-
er the plan and give its assent
to it.
But the Anglo-U.S. planners hit
their first snag. The Israeli gov-
ernment refused to accept the
Bernadotte Plan," and instead
proceeded to raise a series of ob-
jections which would make it
unacceptable \p Israel and doom
the entire report, such as loss of
the Negev. internationalization of
Jerusalem, the status of Haifa,
etc.
Despite the objections by the
Israeli government, Mr. Frank as-
serted, "the State Department was
determined that nothing would
stop its efforts this time and the
anti-Israel clique now proceeded
to push the matter to its full
fruition."
"Officials of the department
dispatched to Bernadotte's island
headquarters on Rhodes the com-
plete text of the agreement
reached between the Americans
and the British, accompanied by-
clear instructions that this agree
ment was to be made an integral
part of the mediator's report."
Israeli representatives, Mr.
Frank asserted, were "under the
impression that the State Depart-
ment would support the Berna-
dotte report in its general lines,
but that the U.S. delegation at
the United Nations session in
Parish would not reach hasty
judgment of the report and would
be open to suggestions to amend
certain details and all J*
remain free in its actions.-
The assassination of RPrn,j .
Mr. Frank said, af oS ^
opportunity for' *
"to prevail upon Secretary y?
shell's statement of appiJLft
the Bernadotte pIan ?aj f
drastic revisions of the Paw!
partition plan. alestlne
Revealing that President Tv
man was not aware of "th.
machinations," Mr. Frank T
eluded: "All of this leads one ft
reach two definite and clear COn
elusions, First, that the State jZ
partment has now assumed th.
, responsibility of putting into e
feet the Bevin program for a so"
IT 'ne Palestln* Problem'
while Mr Bevin and the British
Foreign Office has assumed the
role of disinterested onlookers
and "reluctant" supporters of the
U.S. The psychological effect on
the smaller nations of this divi-
sion of roles by the two great
Western Powers, particularly the
quick and determined action of
the U.S., will unquestionably
bring forth the desired response
Secondand this has been
suspected in Washington for some
timethe State Department has
deliberately sought to postpone
all favorable action on the part
of the U.S. in regard to Israel,
including extension of de jure
recognition, economic aid in the
form of a loan, and Israel's ad-
mission to membership in the
UN. until after publication of the
Bernadotte report.
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ttttW


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1948
* knisl fkricftctr)
PAGE SEVEN
It. Col. Niles Speaks
At Beach Smoker
Lt. Col. Elliott K. Niles, chair-
man of the B'nai B'rith National
Committee on Veterans affairs
and Secretary ot Detense Forres-
tal's representative at veteran's
conventions will be the major
speaker at a mammoth smoker
sponsored by the Miami Beach
Lodfic B'nai B'rith on Tuesday,
8 30 p.m., October 19, at the
Beach YMHA, 15th St. and Bay
Road.
Lt. Col. Niles is in Miami at-
tending the national convention
of the American Legion as a
special representative of Secre-
tary of Defense Forrestal.
President Harry Zukernick and
membership chairman Barnet
Beckerman will report on the
the progress of the October mem-
bership drive and outline plans
for the remainder of October in
order to reach the goal of 125 new
members set by the B'nai B'rith
Council in this area.
Refreshments and smokes will
be provided and several surprise
entertainment features have been
planned.
Harold Turk, state membership
chairman, will address the mem-
bers and prospects on the service
work accomplished by B'nai B'rith
in the past 105 years. Turk, past
president of the B'nai B'rith
Council will describe the awards
to be given to the top member-
ship workers in the current drive.
All residents of Miami Beach
South of 41st St. who are inter-
ested in joining B'nai B'rith
should call the lodge secretary
at 5-2435.
Mrs. Charles Gordon
Host At Festival
Mrs. Charles Gordon, chairman
of Temple Isaiah's Religious
School, will sponsor a Sukos
party in honor of her daughter's
birthday. The Religious School
children have built the sukoh and
decorated it with the traditional
fruits and vegetables. The young
people and their parents are in-
vited to attend the affair which
will be held on Sunday at 10
a.m. at the Temple.
Swedish Tenor
Will Start Series For
Miami Symphony
Featured by the University of
Miami Symphony orchestra,
Modeste Alloo conducting, in a
pair of concerts Oct. 31 and Nov.
1. will be Set Svanholm, out-
standing Swedish tenor.
Svanholm has contributed ma-
terially to the postal revenue in
this country with offers for con-
traits and fan mail pouring into
hi) manager's office. Popularity
olten is achieved overnight here,
so it was nothing new to find
Sv.-.nholm a national hero with
music lovers so soon after his
triumphs on the west coast and
at the Metropolitan.
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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1948
-Jewisti ftorMian
PAGE NINE
Beach Center Sisterhood Holds Luncheon
And Installation At Shelborn On Nov. 1st
car of strenuous activity for
nffk.(,rs and members has been
fined by the Sisterhood of the
guni Beach Community Center
Jhc "pason will be inaugurated
f0r the organization withi thei in-
stallation luncheon on Monday.
November 1 at 12:30 at the Shel-
borne Hotel.
and board members to be
, f r; are" "IK Arthur Klein.
j: I ;Mrs. Bertram Thorpe,
,r:.sLl.nt. Mrs. Jos. Herman,
president; Mrs.
pre
Vic
vice
seroiitl
Harry Rofjers.
Mrs. Jos. I.lpton.
"'i''1;::;. fiSlfcm Upton, recording
>-- Sam r.lnsberK, eor-
Mrs. eo. Clold-
Iiiin.
OkB,
n.
Othei boiird
Irvine. Lehrman,
try; Mrs. .
^.^iiniwiini; secretary.
Eg! ""rresponfllnf ecretary: Mrs_
K..hn auditor; Mrs. Samuel
social secretary; Mrs. S am
financial secretary.
members include: Mrs
, Mrs. Morris Rubin,
eymour Uubln, Mrs. Raymond
nubia Mrs Sam Joaepher, Mrs. Sam-
' Krledland. Mrs. Julius Selectman,
S' E-ther Si.llzer, Mrs. Joseph M.
HL.. Mra. BenJ. B. Wolff Mrs. Mor-
ri. Wolfe Mrs. Alexander Richardson,
M,s Maurice Levlne, Mrs Harry
Koretsky Mrs. W. 1. Feuer. Mrs. Jack
S.)k, MImi Lillian Danstger. Mrs ,\1-
;,.'d stone Mrs. Al Oshcroff. Mrs.
n.,,,;,,. Cohen, Mrs. Nat Hankoff.
Mr. Theo. Hankoff, Mrs. Ira Walsey
ur Milton Slrkln, Mrs. Paul hmpol.
\\.'< Bernard Btern, Mrs. Abraham
Goodman, Mrs. Isidore Goldberg.
Wm. I -i. Mrs. Fay Tupler and
[ N. in.in.
Mrs. Benj. B. Wolff is chairman
of the installation luncheon, as-
sisted by co-chairmen Mrs. Sam
Wiesen and Mrs. Bertram Thorpe.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Ha pool H izrachi
Starts Chapter
The founding of the Hapoel
Mizrachi of Greater Miami took
place at the organizational meet-
ing last week at which time of-
ficers were elected. These include
Moishe Gruenberg, president:
Marvin Zalis, vice president in
charge of programs; Morton Ros-
enberg, vice president in charge
of meetings; and Ruth Saul, sec-
retary-treasurer.
The next meeting of the group
will be held Thursday at 8:30 at
the Hebrew Academy. Speakers
will be Rabbi Moses Mescheloff
and Sol Sugarman, principal of
the academy.
Legion Chairman Speak
At Sholem Luncheon
Joe H. Adams, president of the
American Legion Convention
Corporation and local hotel man
will be the guest of honor at to-
day's Sholem Lodge B'nai B'rith
luncheon 12:15 p.m., in the Down-
towner Restaurant. Mr. Adams
will speak on the 1948 national
American Legion Convention in
Miami.
HViicli Chapter of B'nai B'rith
Women Invite Groups To Meeting
the Colony
Miss Leslie Goldberg Engaged
Mrs. Ida Goldberg, 319 W. 28th
St., Miami Beach, announces the
engagement of her daughter,
Leslie, to Arthur J. Lyons, son of
Mrs. Beatrice Levy, Bellmore,
Long Island, New York.
Miss Goldberg is a graduate of
Miami High school, where she
was a member of Tri Beta Sorori-
ty. She attended the University
of Miami, at which she pledged
Phi Sigma Sigma Sorority. She
also attended the Ann-Reno In-
stitute of Teaching in New York
City.
Mr. Lyons attended New York
University. He is a veteran of
three years service in the Coast
Artillery, having served in the
European, Asiatic and Pacific
theatres of operations. No date
has been set for the wedding.
On Tuesday, at
Restaurant, the Miami Beach
Chapter of B'nai B'rith Women
will lie hostess to leaders of some
of the outstanding Jewish Wom-
en's service organizations in the
area.
Each guest has been invited to
briefly address the membership.
outlining the purposes and activi-
ties of tiuir organization. "There-
by we hope to acquaint our B'nai
B'rith women with the work of
all service organizations in our
community and to show the uni-
fication of our purposes" says
Mrs. Harold Turk, president.
Guests include:
Mrs Milton Slrkln, president of
Tep Fraternity Creates
Field Secretary Post
Ted Sakowitz, grand vice chan-
cellor and director of the Under-
graduate and Alumni Association
for the State of Florida of the
national fraternity Tau Epsilon
Phi, announced locally the ap-
pointment of Irving Block, of
Massachusetts, as national secre-
tary.
The post was created after 38
years to fill a need created by
the recent expansion program.
The duties of Mr. Block will be
(Water Miami Chapter of Hadaasah;' to visit chapter and alumni as-
Mrs. I...-IIS Ulasser. president of rlor- cnHntinrw Miltnn T? Wasman is
Ida V\\ of American Jewish Con-' sotiauons. Miuon k. wasman is
M i. Benjamin Meyers, preai- present of the Greater Miami
dent, Conference of Jewish Women's Alumni Accncintinn
Organliatlons; Mrs. Jean Raab, presi-i Alumni Association.
dent, Beach Chapter National Chll- (---------------------------------
'Inns Cardiac Home; Mrs. Sol H. |f|aB_aL| T.*. f,,,
Brown, president, Jewish Consumptive: JVllZracni 1 amara V*rOUp
Relief So lety; Mrs. Leonard Click-
man, Miami Beach Division, president,
American Jewish Congress; Mrs. l^eon .
mi.. ;,i,i,t, Deborah Chapter I A Succoth party at the home
rladassah; Mrs. Benjamin B. Ooid-I0f Mrs. T. Landesman, 2924
Kteln, president, Miami Beach Chapter _;_ .
Hadassah; Mrs. Louis Krenaky, presi- Prairie Ave., Tuesday evening at
dent, sisterhood of Temple Beth 18:30 will constitute the October
^''^'iho^^^S'.iS; meeting of Tamara Chapter Miz-
inlty Center; Mrs. Benjamin rachi Women.
"Tenth Man" On
WIOD Saturday
In conjunction with the Mental
Health Society of Southeastern
Florida, the Miami Section, Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women
will conduct the third in their
series of thirteen broadcasts en-
titled the "Tenth Man," on WIOD
Saturday from 12:15 to 12:30 p.m.
A professional dramatized sketch
concerning mental illness and
how it not only affects those who
are afflicted but others who ne-
cessarily must be affected by con-
tact and family ties.
Burdlne'a Photo Reflel
Miss Leslie Goldberg
U. S. Saving Bondsthe safest
crop that grows.
MARTHA ZAIX
MODISTE
Formerly with Lily Ruben
Located at
407 15th ST., MIAMI BEACH
Specializing in afternoon and
evening wear
Sizes: 10-44; 14H-24H.
If You Desire
JEWISH
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Plan Succoth Party
Sherry, president. Beach Auxiliary of
the Jewish Home for the Aged; Mrs.
Stan!. > p Phillips, president, North
Shon Chapter B'nai It'rlth Women;
Mrs Nathan ISIoom, president, Coral
liable* Chapter B"nat B'rith Women; served.
and Mrs Louis Makovsky. president. |-----------
Beth Jacob Sisterhood.
Mrs. Irving Becker, first vice
president of District Grand Lodge,
will represent B'nai B'rith women
and outline the work of the or-
ganization. A short musical pro-
gram will follow.
Entertainment has neen plan-
ned for members and their
friends. Refreshments will be
JCRS Membership Tea
At Atlantis Wednesday
The Jewish Consumptive Re-
lief Society will hold its 4th an-
nual M-.emhership tea in the ball-
room of the Atlantis Hotel on
Wednesday at 12:30. Mrs. Maurie
Poncher, chairman, and Mrs. M.
Goluskin, co-chairman, announce
that a gala show has been ar-
ranged for the occasion.
The Family of the late
CHARLES GREENFIELD
Desires to thank
many friends for
their
their
kindness, words of sym-
pathy and floral offerings
during their recent be-
reavement.

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PAGE TEN
+Je*ist ncridian
Jews In Sports
Mishmash: Marshall Gold:
has decided to keep going
the Chicago Cardinals, football i
leaders in the National Lt
last year. He stars on defens<
and is considered just as valuable
to the club as Charley Tripp
Elmer Angsman, offensive
wigs.
Sid Luckman is in the I "
pitching shape of his career and
as a result the Chicago Bea: -
now favorites to displace
Cardinals as National League
champions. Ir. their first encount-
er last week the Bears romped
over the Cards. Earlier Sid led
his mates to a runaway triumph
over the Green Bay Packer.-.
Al Sherman is serving as play-
er-coach for the Paterson Pan-
thers, farm team of the Philly
Eagles. Al formerly was quarter-'
back for the Eagle eleven ana
given the opportunity to make
the grade as a mentor when the
opening developed at Pate:
Art Weiner. rugged end on the
North Carolina eleven, looms as
an All-American terminal. The
Snavely-coached crew appears to
be the best in the South, which
means that many All-American
selectors will have an opportunity
to watch the Jewish boy in ac-
tion. Grant and Rice, prominent
All-American selector, has al-
ready qualified Weiner as the
best in the Southeastern area.

Al Rosen of Miami was re-
called in time by the Cleveland
Indians to qualify for the World
Series. It looks as though Rosey
may be tried as a first sacker
next year. Keltner appears to be
a fixture at the hot corner while
Eddie Robinson at first can be
moved out for a hitter of Al'sJ
stature.
Hank Greenberg. the rumor j
along the World Series press rows
insisted, will be the next owner
of the Indians. The story goes that
Bill Veeck wants to take over
the punch drunk Chicago White
Sox franchise and leave the
lucrative Tribe to Greenberg.
Hank made quite a few trips for
the Indians during the closing
weeks of the season taking over
many of Veeck's chores. Hank
doesn*t have the dough to swing
the purchase of the club but his
friends the Marx Bros., toy man-
ufacturers, are willing to back
him. Veeck has denied the move
but a lot of baseball people say
the deal is in the making. Hank
wants to make baseball his life's
work and is giving his job with
Cleveland his undivided atl
tion.
* *
After a sustained holdout Max
Zaslofsky of the Chicago Stags in
the Basketball Association of
Americag League was on his way
to the Windy City to report for
practice as we prepared this col-
umn. The writer was instrument-
al in getting Max to sign with
YESHIVA UNIVERSITY GRADUATE DEVELOPS
"MIDGET SAMSON"FOR ATOM SMASHING
IIr. Ed. Meadow
lt\i s Suddenly
Dr. Edward Meadow, 39, di-
rector of Biscayne Hospital,
passed away Sunday of a heart
attack. Coming here from Can-
ton, Ohio, the physician was one
of the founders and owners of'
the hospital in addition to acting
as ,! ief of the surgical staff. Sur-
vivors include his wife, his mother
Mrs. Jennie King, and two sis-
ins. Mrs. Ruth Ricco and Miss
Elizabeth Meadow, of Miami: and
his father. Meyer Meadown, Can-
ton, Ohio. Services were held
Sunday night at Lithgow's Funer-
al Home. Interment was in Can-
ton. Dr. Meadow was widely
known for his medical prowess in
the cardiac field.
g*">AV. OCTOBER K ,
Dr. Jacob E. Goldman, a graduate of Yeshiva University's Col-
lege of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and a physicist with Westing-
house Laboratories, measure strength of the mighty electro-
magnet he has developed for use in magnetic research. Capable of
exerting in a space the size of a saucer, a magnetic pull of 4,000
poundsenough to lift an automobilethe powerful "midget
Samson" can be used in designing atom-smashing equipment and
in producing permanent magnets. Many Yeshiva University gradu-
ates are today active leaders in science, medicine, law, and busi-
ness, in addition to the rabbinate, education and communal service.
the Stai:.- after the Brooklyn
gster refused to heed the ad-!
monitions of the Chicago owners. I
Sid Tanenbaurr. is a determined j
holdout with the New York1
Knicks while it appears that
Ralph Kuplowitz will desert the
Philly Warriors to work full time
at his insurance position. Irv
Tore, : not report to Balti-
more, preferring to get started in
a business venture he is consid-
ering. Both Ralph and Irv will
play part time ball in and around
New York if they go through with
their plans to go into business.
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Beth David Directors
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Congregation Beth David Wlll
hold a meeting on Wed **
evening at 8 o'clock at the Z
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dent, will chair the &**
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FRIDAY. OCTOBER 15, 1948
+Jen>isii fk>ridan
PAGE ELEVEN
Off the Record
HOT AND COLD .
Governor Dewey was expected
to issue a strong statement in
favor of Israel's aspirations .
,f is rumored that Dulles and
Vandenberg dissuaded Dewey
from making the anticipated de-
claration Despite the secrecy
surrounding the Dewey-Dulles
talks, this writer learned that the
Republican candidate and the man
who is slated to be the next Sec-
retary of State if Dewey wins ex-
hibited sharp differences of opin-
ion over the Palestine question at
one of their meetings Dulles
was irked when Secretary of
State Marshall announced U.S
backing of the Bernadotte plan
But his irritation was due pri-
marily ta the fact that he felt he
had been ignored on a political
issue on which he should have
been consulted as matter of
courtesy Before leaving Paris
Dulles stated that the Republi-
cans had not announced approval
of Bernadotte's recommendation
That of course could not be
construed as meaning that the
Republicans were necessarily
against the plan Dewey's Rosh
Hashonah message was radiant
with warmth for Israel and its
aspirant to the Presidency should
clarify his stand on the post-
humous Bernadotte report ... To
leave the issue in abeyance until
after the election would be an
unpardonable act of political
timidity The General Assem-
bly at Paris is due to consider the
report late this month Knowl-
edge that the possible new Presi-
dent of the United States is
against mutilating the historic
November 29 decision could well
be the deciding factor in influ-
encing UN action on the Berna-
dotte plan Truman too is con-
tinuing his vacillating attitude .
Washington sources believe he
was about to issue a statement to
the effect that the Marshall de-
claration at Paris did not imply
a deviation either from the Ad-
ministration's Palestine policy or
from the Democratic plank on
Israel The statement was
withheld when it became known
that Marshall was returning to
the US. for a consultation with
the President According to
Washington rumors Mr. Truman
intended saying that Marshall's
statement merely meant that the
U.S. would support the principle
of the Bernadotte report as a basis
for a possible Jewish-Arab terri-
torial agreement High Demo-
cratic leaders closo to the White
House intimated that Mr. Truman
will shortly announce opposition
to the proposed severance of the
Negev from Israel and to recon-
sideration of the original UN de-
cision There is a possibility
he may rescind the arms embargo
if the Arabs remain truculent and
continue challenging UN author-
ity .. .
ON THE HOME FRONT .
Henry Montor has tendered his
resignation as executive director
of the U.J.A. ... He will live in
the history of fund-raising as the
man who ran the first Jewish
orives for 100 million dollars and
more There have been re-
ports for months that Montor was
opposed to control of the United
Palestine Appeal by the Zionist
Organization Years ago he
most vehemently opposed Nation-
al Budgeting ... He fought for
the "sovereignty" of the Zionist
world organization ... In his
present fight against control by
the Zionist Organization he has
reversed his position Henry
Morgenthau will shortly visit Is-
rael .
DEMOCRACY IN ACTION .
The Palcor Agency as of Octo-
ber 1st has ceased giving services
to the press The government
of Israel deserves praise for this
decision ... It recognized that a
government-controlled news serv-
ice is incompatible with demo-
cratic tenets .
HERE AND THERE .
Israel has a secret war weapon
almost as effective as the atom
bomb This is what Drew
Pearson told his radio audience
in a broadcast las week The
Jewish merchant of Baghdad who
was publicly hanged last week
after conviction by an Iraqi mili-
tary court on charges of aiding
the Jews in Palestine and spear-
heading a Zionist movement in
Iraq was not a Zionist The
authorities accused him of being
a Zionist as a pretext for con-
fiscating his property after ex-
ecution ... At Alexandria gov-
ernment officials confiscated over
400 telephones in Jewish homes
. Restaurants and cafe houses
in Cairo carry signs "Jews and
dogs not allowed" Jewish
businessmen in Egypt employing
help must engage at least 75
percent Arabs.
Principals in U. P. A. National Parley
Strictly Kosher
Catering
For All Occasions
By MAX FIRESTONE
At Our Hotel or Your Home
GEORGE WASHINGTON HOTEL
S1 Washington Ave. Ph. 5-6617
ABC
EXTERMINATING
COMPANY
TERMITE CONTROL
SPECIALISTS
Free inspection and estimates
5 year guarantee
PHONE: 78-6815
7664 N.W. 17th PL
Miami Fla.
MIAMI TOP
SOIL CO.
Wholesale and
Retail
Grade A Pulverized and
Processed Muck and Marl
Any Mixture Bitter
Blue Sod
Soil and Fill o{ Any Kind
, Phone 4-0335
1813 S. W. 21st Terrace
EDDIE ALPER
Of. H. Silver
Cm. J. H. Hi'.ldcirig Of. Iicoil OoldiUls
Eliahu tpiltin
lobtit
A National Conference for Israel "to map
American Jewry's participation in the prospective
liquidation of the Jewish D. P. camps and the re-
settlement in Israel of the Homeless Jews of
Europe and other lands" has been called by Dr.
Israel Goldstein, newly elected treasurer of the
World Zionist Executive and United Palestine Ap-
peal national chairman.
Under the sponsorship of the UP A, the confer-
ence will be held at the Palmer House in Chicago.
November 6 and 7 and will feature as principal
participants: Major General John H. Hilldring.
former Assistant Secretary of State and member of
the U. S. delegation to the United Nations; Dr.
Abba Hillel Silver, chairman, American Section
Jewish Agency for Palestine; Eliahu Epstein. Is-
raeli Representative to the U. S.; Dr. Israel Gold-
stein, who will preside; Dr. Emanuel Neumann,
president, Zionist Organization of America and
member of the World Zionist Executive; Robert
R. Nathan, economist and formerly Deputy Di-
rector of the Office of War Mobilization and Re-
conversion; Judge Morris Rothenberg, president,
Jewish National Fund; Charles Ress, president,
Palestine Foundation Fund; Chaim Greenberg,
member. World Zionist Executive; Rabbi Max
Kirshblum, vice chairman, Mizrachi Organization
of America.
52 Veterans Association
Enlists 150 Members
"The Wounded Shall Never Be
Forgotten" is the slogan of the
recently organized 52 Association
of Greater Miami which met last
night at the Hyde Park Hotel.
The organization which was
formed for the purpose of bring-
ing entertainment and comfort
to the men in the veterans hos-
pitals now comprises a local mem-
bership of 150 members.
$52 are the annual membership
dues while auxiliary dues are $10.
Other branches of the association
function in Chicago and New
York.
Mount Pleasant
Convalescent Home
OF MIAMI, INC.
1414 N.E. BAYSHORE PLACE
BrightCheerfulHomelike
INSPECTION INVITED
Strictly Kosher Meals
24 hour nursing care
Under the Supervision of
Greater Miami Vaad
Hakashruth
Special Diets
Reasonable rates
Special care for Cardiac
cases
House physician always on
call
I. GERTMAN, Director
For information write or
phone 82-5395
the
^p7IO S. W. 12th AV. MIAMI-.
L/iZ. 3-343 LJ
'YOUR JEWISH
FUNERAL HOME
WE OFFIOAiLT REPRESENT
THE MAJORITY OF NORTHERN
JEWISH FUNERAL RIMES
/n/wmalion Gladly fuiniihtd on Request
SERVING MIAMI BEACH t MIAMI
Exclusively Jewish
Lister-Bernstein
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Bernstein,
1676 S.W. 14th St., announce the
marriage of their daughter Irma
to Dr. George Lister on October 2.
*}5onpo *S*^ov arm
Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky
1520 S. W. 5th St
Phone 2-7439
llll I-KIM
BLIND CO.
(Not Incorporated)
Specialist in
RECONDITIONING
Manufacturers
VENETIAN BUNDS
CORNICES
Call 4-6921
21 Almeria Avenue
Coral Gables
MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY
THE CEMETERY OF DISTINCTION
FOR DISCRIMINATING FAMILIES
Rabbi S. M. MachteL Director
Olympic Building Phone 3-3720
For Better Service to the Public
In Greater Miami...
TOS. L. PLUMMER
Funeral Director
Builders ot Immortal
Memorials tor the
Jewish Trade
Large stock of monu-
ments on display for
immediate delivery in
all Jewish cemeteries.
Serving the leading
Jewish families in this
area since 1925.

Look For the 2-Story White Building
THURMOND MONUMENT CO.
MARKERS $35.00 PLUS CEMETERY CHARGES
OPEN SUNDAYS PHONE 4-3249
11
You may obtain your copy of
SPARKS FROM A MENTAL ANVIL
Written by
DR. JACOB II. KAPLAN
By calling at or writing to
TEMPLE ISRAEL. 137 N.E. 19th ST.. MIAMI
or by writing
DR. JACOB H. KAPLAN. BOX 4087. MIAMI. FLA.
Price $2..*0
a
Up-to-the-minute hi fti e.wH>-
ment, beautifully fumlihed en 4
decorated throughout, *mt new
MIAMI branch lignallse. sui pol-
icy of providing funeral rrl ef
the finest character.
24-HOUR AMBULANCE SERVICE
IVERSIDE
MEMORIAL CHAPEL
1236 WASHINGTON AVENUI, MIAMI IIACN
Phone: 5-3355 5-7777
EDWARD T. NIWMAN, Puntrnl Dire****
ABI IISENBERG, Treasurer
IN NIW YORKi T6tw TRIfT AND AMSTERDAM AV1NU1


PAGE TWELVE
+JenlstncrMk*n
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15. m
Chest Campaign Announces Selection of
Regional Women's Chairmen For 1949
The appointment of additional regional women's chairmen
for the 1949 Dade County Community Chest campaign, sched-!
uled for November 5 to 23, was announced by Oscar E. Dooly,
Jr., campaign co-chairman.
Mrs. Stanley Milledae. 107 N.E. 93rd St., and Mrs. H. D.
Freeman. 590 N.W. 43ri St. will,------------------------------------------------J
serve as women's co-chairmen in 60cr 0f the $1,013,173 goal, and
the Central Miami refion, with p\ans t0 complete its job before!
responsibility for recruiting wom-
en tc serve as bl -. U< itora in
the :.' i stnets in the region.
In the same manner, Mrs.
Charles E Enterline, T420 N.E.
Ave and Mrs W. G. Seekins.
737 N.E 53rd St will be regional
men's -<.....rmen in the
N rth M egion, which also
includes five solicitation districts.
Women workers in the Miami
Beach region are meeting at
luncheon Saturdav at the Hotel
the general campaign opens on
November 5.
Youth Commission
Announces Course
In Leadership
.tl.'iziar To Head
Food For Israel
Z.O.A. Campaign
Jack Mazier, prominent Atlanta
businessman, has been appointed
general chairman in charge of the
regional Southeastern Z.O.A.
Food for Israel campaign, accord-
ing to an announcement by S. P.
Benamy. president of the region.
The drive, which will extend
over a period of 90 days, is part
of a nation-wide campaign con-
ducted by the Z.O.A. William B.
Sylk, of Philadelphia is national
chairman. Mr. Maziar's operations
will cover the states of Alabama.
Florida, Georgia. Mississippi.
South Carolina, Tennessee and
the city of New Orleans.
Dr. E. J. Edelman. chairman of
. the Zionist Youth Commission of
Shelborne to ciscuss tr.e problems ^^ ^ ^ announced
of block solicitation with Mrs., h leadership Training course
Sydney L.Wemtraub, o28 W 49th f y
St.. Miami Beach women s chair- P be ^
rr.an. Among those to De present ,
are Mrs. Charles King. Mrs. Rus- auc'ea-
sell Wvkoff. Mrs. Phil Gallagher. I Young Judaea is a national
Mrs E. G. Burns. Mrs. Israel movement that has served the
Teitch. Mrs. William B. Delahunt. i Jewish youth of America for forty
Mrs. Linda Satin. Mrs. Joseph,vears- guiding its members to
Thery and Mrs. Jack Rosenberg. t?ke their Place as active parti-
The recruiting of women volun- cipants in the American Jewish
teeri in the Coral Gables region
is in progress led by Mrs. William
community. Membership in Young
Judaea is open to all Jewish
Cox. 5737 Riviera Drive, regional >'un8 people of ten to eighteen
women's chairman. years of age. Young Juaaea is
Solicitation of special gifts of|dlvlded int0 the Jun,or Club' 10"
$2 I or more is already under j14 and the Senior Chapter, 15-18.
way in advance of the general Enrollment in the clubs is now
campaign for SI.013.173 in behalf; being taken by the Zionist Youth
of 28 Red Feather services in the Commission, 235 Lincoln Rd.. Mi-
fields of health, welfare and re-
creation.
ami Beach. Those interested arc
requested to write stating, name.
James L. Knight, special gifts age and address.
chairman has scheduled a reportj Further information concerning
luncheon for his committee at
Betty's restaurant, 1440 Biscayne
Blvd. or. October 15. This group
has the responsibility of raising
the Leadership Training course
can be obtained by writing to
the Zionist Youth Commission at
235 Lincoln Rd. or calling 58-6464
Sholom Sisterhood
Opens Season With
Dessert Luncheon
Mrs. Louis J. Krcnsky. presi-
dent of the Sisterhood of Temple
Beth Sholom of Miami Beach,
has announced the first open
meeting of the 1948-49 season, to
be held on Wednesday. October
20. at 12:30 p.m. in the air-con-
ditional banquet hall of the Tem-
ple. A dessert luncheon will be
served and an unusual and stim-
ulating program will be present-
ed by Mrs. William Fan-, program
chairman.
Mrs. Edward Cowen will pre-
sent "A symphony of Broadway'
and Ben Browne, talented vocal-
ist, will render Latin tunes.
The membership chairman,
Mrs. Abe Blatt, will honor all
new members.
Mrs. Krensky
Host To Members
Of Sholom Board
The first board meeting of the
1948-49 season of the Sisterhood
of Temple Beth Sholom of Mi-
ami Beach will be held today at
10 a.m., at the home of the presi-
dent. Mrs. Louis J. Krensky, 4955
Delaware Ave. Luncheon will be
served at the conclusion of the
mooting.
Following Is a list f thf offirors
nnd members of the board: Mrse Louis
J. Krensky, president; Mrs. Alexander
Kojtan, honorary president: Mrs. ieon
J. i:il, honorary president; Mrs.
Charles Tobln, honorary president;
Mis Abo Blatt, Mr William Fair
and' Mrs. Bessie Nelson, vice presi-
dents: Mrs Arthur England, recording
etary; Mrs. Uenjamln Beldler, cor-
responding secretary; Mrs. Bert Whit-
man, financial secretary: Mrs. I. C.
(ireenberg, treasurer, and Mrs. Leon
Kronlsh, chaplain. Hoard members are:
Mrs Joseph Arkln, Mrs, Leonard Barr,
Mrs. CamlUe Baum, Mrs. E. A. Meeker.
Mrs. Irving Becker, Mrs. William
Bernstein, Mrs. Emanual Goldstrich,
Mrs Stem Lachman, Mrs. Alfred Mam-
let, Mrs. Irving Mareiis. Mrs. Murray
Maurer, Mrs. Edward Mencher, Mrs.
r Rnthman. Mrs. Simon Wolff, Mrs.
.'.. Zlnnamon, Mrs. K. J. Baskind.
Mrs J, C. ChUtkOW, Mrs. Joseph
pvnias. Mrs. s. A. Goodman, Mrs.
Samuel Kelemer, Mrs. Harry Kohn.
Mrs. David I-evinson, Mrs. Joseph
Mr/.,. Mrs. David Phillips, Mrs. Lvon
Plstrich, Mrs. Alex Bobbins, Mrs. If.
Snmmersteln, Mrs. L. Btoff, Mrs. Alex
S'trailS and Mrs. Jack Udell. _^^^^
SOLAR WATER SERVICE
REPAIRS AND
CALL 4-7485
BOOSTERS
DON S. COLEMAN
Workmen's Circle Schule
Present Children On Air
Children from the Workjr '
Circle Schule will appear on'*
tion WBAY on Sunday between
ten and eleven. Friends and par
ents are asked to tune in to hear
the program presented bv H.
Schule which is located at Iftu
S.W. 3rd St. 1545
Registration for children from
Classes are held Monday Tu'
day, Wednesday and ThursdTv
between 4 and 6 and on Sunday
morning between io and
o'clock. a
Top Price Paid for
MEN'S USED CLOTHING
AL'S
432 N. MIAMI AVE.
Phone 2-3213
LIQUOR BAR
Be8t downtown location. Per-
centage lease for 8 yrs. Buy
Vi interest for $20,000 or all
for $40,000. Netted $20,000
past yr. Call or see Millari
with Ralph Realty Co., Inc.
2611 W.FLAGLER STREET'
Ph. 47-8748 Res. Ph. 88-2794
NEW LOCATION
Mil 11 METAL SPECIALTY CO.
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL
CONTRACTORS
573 N.W. 71st St. Phone 7-6288 Miami 38. Florida
B. C. TILLER R. M. BOTTOM
Tropical Lodge Dance At Frolic Club
r
The first annual Halloween
dance of Tropical Lodge B'nai
B'rith is being planned for 8:30
p.m.. Sunday, October 24. at the
Frolic Club. Bay Shore Place and
McArthur Causeway. Free favors
will be distributed to those at-
tending .and there will be a
rumba contest and other enter-
tainment.
Tickets at SI.25 may be ob-
tained from lodge members. Mike
Sussman is chairman of the af-
fair, assisted by Saul Genet and
Leonard Wolfe.
Iloaeh V Seeks
1000 Members
Carl Weinkle, president of the
Beach Y, has announced the in-
auguration of a membership cam-
paign on November 7. A minimum
of an additional thousand mem-
bers is the aim of the drive which
will end on November 17.
According to Mr. Weinkle the
organization needs this increased
membership if the present pro-
gram is to be continued and ex-
tended. More than 4,000 persons
each week use the new building
which opened in January of this
year.
The membership campaign will
he directed by Mrs. Milton Sirkin
and Paul Weitzman. Volunteer
workers are urgently needed.
STEWART EMPLOYMENT
127 N.E. 1st Ave. Hm. 218
3-1254 9-9472
WHITE HELP
For Fine Homes
MEDICAL ASSISTANTS
PRACTICAL NURSES
HIGH TYPE DOMESTICS
Beach Zionists
Send Shipment
To Aid Orphans
Two thousand pounds of
pressed pure beef is being sent
by the Miami Beach Zionist Dis-
trict to an orphanage in Haifa,
Israel, that cares for two hundred
nnd fifty children of Haganah
parents who were killed in the
recent fighting. The organization
has also sent twelve cases of new
shoes to Israel.
Alfred Stone, organization pres-
ident, announced that the special
fund committee, headed by Leon
J. Ell and assisted by S. Ash-
kenazy, Jacob Fishman and Sam
Lachman, is now endeavoring to
raise $4,000 to purchase two am-
bulances.
Temporary office of the local
district is 4144 Chase Ave. The
mailing address is P.O. box 2494.
Miami Beach.
ARE VOI
LONESOME?
Join the
CIRCLE CLUB
Chamber of Commerce
Building
141 N. E. 3rd Street
Room 501
PHONE 2-6242
Open 2 pjn. to 10 p.m.
WRITE P.O. BOX 3468


n
j:
j.
n
j
CHICAGO, ILL.
SEASON'S GREETINGS
WENDELL'S
COMPLETE AUTO SERVICE
535 N.W. 54th St.
Miami
k,
Announces the appointment of
SOUTHERN FOOD
DISTRIBUTORS Inc.
1725 N.W. Seventh Avenue
imiom: .-i-eezi
AS EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTORS FOR ITS
COMPLETE LINE OF MEAT PRODUCTS
SOUTHERN FOOD DISTRIBUTORS
Is Operated By
HAIIRY PEARL AXD HERMAN PEARL
THE PEARL BROTHERS
Associated With
MORT TISCHLER
IN THE SAME LOCATION FOR 8 YEARS
bwmm^mw***


FRIDAY. OCTOBER 15, 1948
+Jtni stilt rid/an
PAGE THIRTEEN
B'nai B'rith Lodges And Women's Groups
Start Activities To Add Membership
\ortli Shore
The North Shore Lodge B'nai
B'rith has launched its member-
ship drive under the direction of
Chairmen Lou Sherman and
Mark Silverstein, it was an-
nounced by President A. J. Kap-
lan "Car Cavalcade Contacts"
will be utilized by the member-
ship committee each Sunday be-
tween the hours of 1 and 4 for
the purpose of reaching prospects
in the North Shore area.
Leonard Tobin, originator of
the car cavalcade idea, is the lodge
publicity chairman.
Weekly meetings to report on
progress of the drive will be held
at the home of Jack Lawson and
plans are now under way for a
mammoth stag smoker to be held
during the last week in October.
Sholem Lodge
A "Lox-and-Bagel" breakfast
for key workers and membership
workers will be sponsored by
Sholem Lodge B'nai B'rith at
Rosedale Restaurant on Sunday
morning at 10 a.m. Membership
Chairman John Kronenfeld an-
nounces that all B'nai B'rith
members are invited to attend and
hear an outline of plans for the
October drive.
The lodge will award an RCA
Victor radio to the top member-
ship worker in the current drive
and gold menorah lapel pins will
be awarded to workers securing
five or more members, it is an-
nounced by C. R. Jacobson, ex-
ecutive secretary of the B'nai
B'rith Council.
bership affair to be held shortly
as part of the current October
B'nai B'rith membership drive.
A report will also be heard from
Mrs. Morris Horwitz, membership
chairman, on plans for a series
of informal teas to be held
throughout the Coral Gables area
as part of the membership cam-
paign.
Sholem Women
Sholem Lodge Women of B'nai
B'rith will launch their fall activi-
ties at a gala membership tea at
tlie Monte Carlo Restaurant, 700
S.W. 8th St. on Tuesday at 1 p.m.
Headlining me program of en-
tertainment will be magical feats
performed by Roscoe the Magician
and vocal selections by Miss
Roberta Weiner. Bob Lynn 'of
station WIOD, known as "the
Man with a Thousand Voices"
will offer comedy sketches. Final
number on the varied program
will be a rhumba exhibition by
Ralph Martino.
Mrs. Lenore Curtice, member-
ship chairman and in charge of
the program and arrangements,
will be assisted by Mrs. John
Kronenfeld, Mrs. Sam Silver and
Mrs. C. R. Jacobson. Mrs. Harry
Gordon will preside.
Coral Gables
A kick-off membership break-
fast will be sponsored by the
Coral Gables Lodge B'nai B'rith
on Sunday, 10 a.m., at Howard
Johnson's Restaurant, 3727 S.W.
8th St.
President Leonard Spiegel, Sid-
ney Lewis and Past President Dr.
Leonard Glickstein will tell of
plans to canvas the West Miami
and Flagler Granada area for
membership in B'nai B'rith. A
report will be given by Bill Hech-
ler, membership co-chairman on
plans for the second annual stag
smoker. Charles R. Jacobson, ex-
ecutive director of the council
will address the group and de-
scribe the awards to be given by
the B'nai B'rith Council for top
membership activities in the cur-
rent drive.
Prizes of men's haberdashery
and other merchandise will be
awarded to top workers in the
drive, chairman Hechler stated.
tables Women
A "Truth or Consequences" pro-
gram featuring audience partici-
pation with prizes for winners
Will be the highlight of the Coral
(ables women's chapter meeting
on Tuesday at 8:15 p.m. at Hillel
House, 3306 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
The program is under the direc-
tion of Mrs. Lawrence Simpkins
and Mrs. William Hechler.
Mrs. Ruth Bloom, president,
Will report on plans for a mem-
Jewish Quiz Box
Q.: Why is the Scroll of Koheleth
(Ecclesiastes) read in the syna-
gogue on the Sabbath of the in-
termediate days of Succoth Fes-
tival?
A.: Tradition has it that King
Solomon authored most of the
verses of this scroll on the Suc-
coth Festival (see Kings 8:1, 2).
As a matter of fact the word
"Koheleth" stems from the verb
meaning "to assemble." Since it
was King Solomon who assem-
bled the Israelites on the holiday
to hear words of wisdom and
ethics he is referred to in the
Scroll as "Koheleth" instead of
his real name, "Solomon." It is
thus a historical recognition of
the authorship and antiquity of
the Scroll of Koheleth to read it
on the Sabbath of the intermedi-
ate days. Furthermore, the Suc-
coth holiday was Biblically con-
sidered a period for mass as-
sembly to hear words of ethics
and wisdom. (Deut. 31:10, 11).
Other reasons offered for the
reading of the Scroll of Koheleth
on the Sabbath of the intermedi-
ate days of the Succoth Festival
have to do with the contents of
the Scroll, as related to the Suc-
coth holiday. Hebrew literature
and history tell us that Succoth
was the merriest festival of the
entire year. The Talmud goes into
great length to describe the mer-
riment that surrounded the fes-
tival in the temple of old, par-
ticularly in the intermediate days
when the "pouring of the water"
was observed. At the peak of mer-
riment and sheer folly, the former
being aligned with altruism and
the latter being embedded in
fool's play. It was therefore that
the book of Koheleth, with its
stark realism, is read. It asks "of
rejoicingwhat doeth it?" (Ec-
clesiastes 2:2) as a constant re-
minder that the ideal in Jewish
life was to show that there can
even be a purpose in the act of
rejoicing, in this casea way ol
serving the Almighty.
A brilliant comparison is offered
in this respect by Rabbi Amiel
of Palestine who sees in the total
ity of the Succoth holiday the
image of the life of man on this
earth. As the Succoth Festival
commences in a holy day of strict
observance, so does man begin
his life with a solemn purpose.
The ensuing days of man's life
are comparable to the intermed-
iate days of the festival which
constitute a mixture of both
sanctity and materialismbeing
part holiday and part week-day
at the same time. As pictured in
the Scroll of Ecclesiastes, man's
life constitutes a contradiction as
well as a synthesis of altruism
and egotism. In the end of life
man realizes the folly of personal
motives and understands the per-
petual values. At the end of Hue
Book of Ecclesiastes, Solomon
concludes that the fear of God
and the keeping of the Command
ments is man's solemn holiday of
Shemini Atzeres giving the people
the serious touch after a week's
merriment. The final note is
::ounded by the reading of the
Torah to show that man's real
joy is to be found in following
God's precept as found in the
Commandments.
Q.: Why is it customary in many
-1 off the stump (pitum) of the cit-
ron (Esron) on the last day of the
Festival (Hoshonoh Rabbah)?
A.: Early sources indicate the
gravity of the origin of this cus-
tom. According to the Talmud,
the forbidden fruit by which men
was tempted into sin and eventual
ADL Veteran's Head
Here For Legion
In Miami to attend the Ameri-
can Legion National Convention
is Frederick M. Kraut, national
director of the veterans' relations
department, Anti Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith.
From his headquarters in the
League's national offices in New
York Kraut directs the League's
program for building harmonious
group relations among the na-
tion's veterans. His work as di-
rector of the Anti-Defamation
veteran's program is dedicated to
helping secure and safeguard
basic human rights of freedom,
equality and liberty for which
veterans fought and died together
regardless of race, creed, color
or nationality.
Kraut recently returned from
a visit to Germany where he sur-
veyed remaining evidences of
anti-Semitism and activated a
group educational program among
American GI's there.
While in the Miami area Kraut
is receiving the cooperation of
George J. Talianoff, director, and
Gilbert J. Balkin, associate di-
rector of the Anti-Defamation
League's Florida Regional office.
LEGAL NOTICE
Flagler-Granada Party
Precedes Barn Dance
A games party will follow
Thursday night's meeting of the
Flagler-Granada Jewish Com-
munity Center at the Coral
Gables Women's Club. The public
is invited to attend the affair
which is being arranged by Joe
Cohen.
Joe Masters, chairman of the
Flagler-Granada Jewish Com-
munity Center's entertainment
committee, has announced plans
for a Halloween barn dance to
be held at the Coral Gables Wom-
en's Club on October 30. Games
and prizes will be featured and a
Mill-Billy band will furnish music
for dancing.
NOTICE OF MASTER'S SALE
IX THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL. CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY. No.
11T.462.
LOUIS M. JEPEWAY, Plaintiff, vs.
EDWARD FALK. LENA FAIJC
DUBLER and MORRIS DUBLER.
her husband, et al., Defendants.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, as Special Master,
under and by virtue of the Final De-
cree heretofore entered In that cer-
tain cause pending: In the Circuit
Court of the Eleventh Judicial Circuit
of Florhla, in and for Dade County, In
Chancery, being Chancery Case No.
115462. In which Louis M. Jepeway is
plaintiff, and Edward Ealk, Lena Falk
Dubler and Morris Dubler, her hus-
band, Rae Falk Frank and Morris
B. Frank, her husband, Yetta Falk
Wetstone and Mack Wetstone, her
husband, Mildred Falk Bolltzer and
Abraham Ilolitzer. her husband, Louis
Kalk and Betty Falk, his wife. Harry
Fallc, and Mrs. Harry Ealk, If mar-
ried, Anna Falk Cohen and Charles
Cohen, her husband, the Estate of
Rose Falk, a widow, and all persons
claiming by, through, and under her,
are defendants, I, as Special Master
In Chancery, appointed by the Court
in said decree, under and by virtue of
the terms thereof, will offer for sale
and sell at public outcry to the high-
est and best bidder for cash at the
South Front Door of the Court House
of Dade County, in the City of Miami,
Florida, on the 1st day of November.
1948, between the hours of eleven
o'clock a.m. and two o'clock p.m., the
same being a legal sales day and the
hours the legal hours of sale, the
following described property, situated
In Dade County. Florida, to-wit:
Lot Seven of Block One of Marl-
borough, according to the Pint
thereof, recorded In Plat Book
15 at Page 38 of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida.
The said property as aforesaid, to-
gether with all the tenements, heredi-
taments and appurtenances thereunto
belonging or in anywise appertaining,
being sold to satisfy said decree.
DATED this 8th day of October,
1948.
SUSAN KIRTLEY.
Special Master in Chancery.
BURNETT ROTH
112 Congress Building
Miami, Florida
Attorney for Plaintiff
10/15-22-29
death as well as finiteness was a
citron. As a result of the Biblical
narrative the guilt is laid to Eve
forbearer of all womanhood. To
he sure, the luscious taste and
the fragrant aroma of the citron
-ould very well have been the
source of temptation. To show
?hat the woman of today, especial-
ly those who are pregnant, do not
intend to bring children upon this
earth for death, they customarily
bite off the stump of the citron
as a display of anger and regret
for their historic temptation
thus wishing life and good health
upon the children who are soon
to be expected.
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY CIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
lusiness under the fictitious name of
O I. Joe Army Navy Surplus at 14:10
N. W. 62nd Street, .Miami, Florida.
intends to register said n:ime with the
clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida. JOE ZAUS
10/15-22-29 11/6-12 _________
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
DON'S* SUNDRY & LUNCHEONETTE
at 41 N. E. 14th Street, Miami, Florida,
intends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
Count v. Florida.
ABRAHAM COTTLIEB
I.EO SHEINER
Attorney for Applicant
1204-05 Pacific Building
Miami 32. Florida
IO/1.-.-22-29 11/5-12
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY CIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
LIBBER'S LUGGAGE at 501 West
Racier Street, Miami. Florida, In-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
Countv. Florida.
MAX LIEBER. Owner
HARRY ZUKERNICK
Attorney for Applicant
10/15-22-29 11/5________________________
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
The Betty Lou Shop at 8016 N.E.
Second Avenue, Miami, Florida. In-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
EDWARD SCHLESS
Applicant
MYERS, HE1MAN & KAPLAN
Aturneys for Applicant
9/17-24 10/1-8-15
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
North Cleaners at 1630 N.W. 7th Ave-
nue, Miami, Florida, intends to regis-
ter said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
Imperial Enterprises, Inc.
a Florida Corporation
By Edward Harellk, President
CORPORATE SEAL
Attest
Florence K. Helfand, Secretary
HARRy DIETZ, Attorney
10/1-8-15-22-29
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
FILM-ART MURALS at 214 North
Miami Avenue, Miami, Florida, In-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
TELEVISION FILM-ART
SERVICE, INC.
WASMAN, SILVER & SAKOWITZ
Attorneys for Applicant
10/1-8-13-22-29
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name
THE STYLE SHOP
at number 1730 Northwest 36th Street.
In the City of Miami. Florhla, intend
to register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
IRVING GOLDMAN
BEATRICE R. GOLDMAN
JACK A. ABBOTT
Attorney for applicants
10/1-8-15-22
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA.
IN CHANCERY, No. 119521.
MARY WORTHINGTON, Plaintiff, vs.
HERMAN WORTHINGTON. JR..
Defendant
THE STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO: HERMAN WORTHINGTON, JR.,
c/o Barnesboro Hotel
Burnesboro, New Jersey
You are hereby notified and ordered
to appear to the Bill iA Complaint for
Divorce filed against you In the above
styled cause on or before the 25th day
of October, 1948; otherwise the al-
legations of said BUI will be taken
as confessed against you.
DATED this 23 day of September,
1948
E. B. LEATHERMAN,
Clerk of Circuit Court.
(Circuit Court Seal)
By WM. W. STOCKING.
Deputy Clerk.
HARRY DIETZ
Solicitor for Plaintiff
1703 Congress Building
Miami 32, Florida
9/24 10/1-8-15
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
Harraan Villa Hotel at 354 Washing-
ton Avenue, Miami Beach, Intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
NATHAN LIPKIND
Sole Owner
HARRY DIETZ
Attorney for Applicant
10/1-8-15-22-29
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
The Betty Lou Shop at 2348 Ponce de
Leon Boulevard. Coral Gables, Flor-
ida, Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
MARTIN GOLDSTEIN
Applicant
MYERS, HEIMAN & KAPLAN
Attorneys for Applicant
9/17-24 10/1-8-15
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
KAY DISTRIBUTORS at 310 78th
Street, Miami Beach, Florida, Intends
to register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
HERBERT KAHN
WALTER C. KOVNER
Attorney for Kay Distributors
9/24 10/1-8-15
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
Dee-Llcious Products at 5905 N. W.
17tn Avenue, Miami, Florida, intends
to register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
SAMUEL ZOLTROW
SSole Owner
HARRY DIETZ
Attorney for Applicant
10/1-8-15-22-29
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
Golden Gate Grocery at 350 South
Dixie Highway, Coral Gables, Florida,
Intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
SAMUEL HOLTZMAN
DAVID SIMON
MILTON A. FRIEDMAN
Attorney for Applicants
9/17-24 10/1-8-15
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
62nd Street Bakery at 1486 N. W.
62nd Street, Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
FRED KAUFMANN
WASMAN, SILVER & SAKOWITZ
Attorneys for Applicant.
10/1-8-15-22-29
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
SUN REALTY at 1220 BISCAYNE
BOrLEVARD. MIAMI. FLA., Intends
to register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida,
SAMUEL T. SAPIRO
Sole Owner
MYERS. HEIMAN AND KAPLAN
Attorneys for Applicant
9/24 10/1-8-15-22
NOTICE TO APPEAR OR
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COITRT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCCIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUXTY,
FLORIDA. INCTJHANCERY. No.
119628.
JACOB ZACK. Plaintiff, vs. CELIA
ZACK. Defendant.
IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA:
TO THE DEFENDANT
Cella Zack
611 E. 137th Street
Bronx, New York
You are hereby notified that you
are required to file an appearance In
this proceeding for divorce filed
against you hy Jacob Zack on or be-
fore November 1, 1948, otherwise the
allegations of said bill will be taken
as confessed by you.
This order to be published In the
Jewish Florldlan.
This 30th day of September, 1948.
E. B. LEATHERMAN,
Clerk of the Circuit Court.
(Circuit Court Bealj
By M. C. FEIGE.
Deputy Clerk.
ALFRED KREISI.ER
Attorney for Plaintiff
1009 Pan American Bank Bldg.
Miami 32, Florida
10/1-8-15-22
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TII JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FI-ORIDA. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No.
119350.
JOAN B. FORST. Plaintiff, vs.
RICHARD E. FORST, Defendant.
YOU, RICHARD E. FORST, 28
Columbus Avenue, NEW ROCHELLE.
NEW YORK, are notified to file your
appearance in the above cause for
divorce, on or before October 12,
1948, or a decree pro confesso will be
entered against you.
DATED: September 13, 1948.
E. B. LEATHERMAN. Clerk.
(Circuit Court Seal}
By WM. W. STOCKING.
Deputy Clerk.
WASMAN. SILVER & SAKoWITZ
Attorneys for Plaintiff
Suite 918 Seybold Building
Miami, Florida
9/17-24 10/1-8-15
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COCHT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FIXUMDA, IN_A.NI) Foil DADE
COUNTY. INTHAXCKBY, No.
119747.
GERALD CLAYTON OAKES. Plain-
tiff, vs. VIRGINIA OAKES, De-
fendant
TO: VIRGINIA OAKES. Terra Alta,
West Virginia.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED to
file your appearance In the above
styled cause for divorce, on or before
the 6th day of November. 1948, other-
wise Decree Pro Confesso will be
entered against you.
Dated this 7th day of October. 1948.
E. B. LEATHERMAN.
Clerk of Circuit Court.
(Circuit Court Seal)
By M. C. FEIGE,
Deputy Clerk.
SAMUEL J. RAND, Attorney
617 Seybold Building
Miami, Florida
10/8-15-22-28 ,


PAGE FOURTEEN
+Jenisli nor Mian
FRIDAY, OCTOBER!* l948
15VES OF OUR TIMES
MAURICE -SCHWARTZ
>~*^ NORMAN Sot NOM
A JEWISH SOT OF 12 LANDED AT 1115 ISIAUD IN
1900 TODAY HI IS THE WEUKNOWN ACTOR,
DIRECTOR S PRODUCER OF MANT CREAT flAYS
IN YIDDISH.....

AS A ROY, HE ATTENDED AW dRTHOPOX JEWISH
SCHOOL. HE WON A REPUTATION ASA SOLO-
IST IN THE SYNAGOGUE CHOIR
IN NEW YORK, AFTER PU6LIC SCHOOL HOURS,
HE HELPED HIS FATHER IN HIS BUSINESS,
BUT HIS HEART WAS IN THE THEATRE. HE
SPENT ALL HIS FREE EVENINGS SITTING IN
THE BAtCONlES OF YIDDISH PLAYHOUSES,
OBSERVING, ABSORBING THE SKIUSOF JK
DRAMA. |
AT IT; HE JOINED A DRAMATIC CLUB, AND HIS FIRST
ASSIGNED ROIE WAS TO PlAY THE PART OF A 60
YEAR OLD MAN. HIS CAREER LAUNCHED, HE BECAME
A PROFESSIONAL ACTOR FOR $800 A WEEK.
HIS ABILITY DEVELOPED. HE PLAYED WITH
OTHER COMPANIES UNTIL 1915.THEN.IN 1918,
Hi ACHIEVED HIS DREAM.HE ORGANIZED
HIS 0"N DMMATIC COMPANY NAMED
ITTHl YODlSHART THEATRE.
IN 1924 HE TOURED EUROPE WITH HIS COMPANY
AND ALSO APPEARED IN PALESTINE i LATIN
AMERICANS AN ACTOR HE EXCELLED IN
CHARACTER PARTS,REVEALING RARE VERSATILITY.
IN 19ft HE ACTED S PRODUCED "YOSHE KAIB"
WITH MUCH SUCCESS.IATER.IT WAS Htt%lg
ON BROADWAY.
HE ACTED.DIRECTED.PRODUCED A VARIED
REPERTOIRE WITH NO LESS THAN 150
PLAYSTHEY INCLUDED DRAMAS tCOMEPIES
BY SHAKESPEARE.MOUERE.GMOl.SHAW,
GORKI,i OTHER FAMOUS WRITERS, AS WELL
AS MOST OF JEWISH PLAYWRIGHTS.
IN 1947, HE TOURED THE DP CAMPS IN GERMANY FOR
THE JOINT DISTRIBUTION COMMITTEE,BRINGING JEW-
ISH HUMOR,* HOPE, TO THE WAR'S SURVIVORS. AT THE
AGE OF 60,HE STILL IS THE MOST DOMINANT FI6UR'.
IN THE YIDDISH THEATRE.....
JSS
*i*f %*4 .jiww* immi

Florida Oil Industry Information Group
Reveals Largest Volume Of Crude Oil
Modern exploratory and pro-
duction methods have lifted the
knowr volume of crude oil under-
ground in the United States to
the highest in history, more than
nine hundred billion gallons, de-
spite unprecedented demands for
oil products. Walter T. Etzel, state
chairman of the Florida Oil In-
dustry Information Committee,
announced today.
Besides crude oil, the known
reserves of condensates, natural
gasoline and other liqucfield pe-
troleum gases, which form part
of the supply, total more than
130 billion gallons.
This fact, Mr. Etzel said, should
dispel fears that "we are running
out of oil." Modern technological
developments have increased the
percentage of oil that may be re-
covered from a well from about
20 percent a few decades ago to
several times that percentage to-
day. Careful control of the flow
from wells, development of
equipment for use at the well
head that prevents the wasteful
"gusher" and repressuring of wells
by gas and water, all have con-
tributed to increasing the yield
of oil. The airborne magneto-
meter, the waterborne seismo-
graph and the garvimetcr have
taken a lot of the guess-work out
of searching for oil, thus con-
tributing to the increased re-
serves.
In addition, research is making
possible the utilization of natural
gas, coal, oil shale and tar sands
as supplementary sources of li-
quid fuel if that should become
necessary. The consumer of liquid
fuels in the United States can be
assured of adequate supplies for
many years in the future, Mr
Etzel declared.
Additions to proved crude oil
reserves underground have been
made in 40 of the past 47 years.
he continued. Despite record pro-
duction since 1900 to meet almost
steadily rising demands for pro-
ducts, the oil industry has been
able to increase these reserves
steadily over the years. These re-
serves represent only oil that has
been discovered, and they must
not be confused with potential oil
resources still to be developed by
the industry. Geologists estimate
that there are over two trillion
more gallons of oil yet to be dis-
covered in the United States.
In comment on the presently
"proved" reserve, Mr. Etzel said,
they include only the amount of
oil known to exist through test
drilling, and do not include oil
in the unproved portions of par-
tially-developed fields, or in un-
tested areas. Also excepted. Mr.
Etzel added, is oil that may yet
-ecome available by methods de-
veloped in recent years to re-
cover oil from well formerly con-
sidered exhausted; oil that may
be produced synthetically from
coal, shale or other materials; oil

that may be present in regions
believed to be unfavorable; or
liquid fuels that may become
available through chemical pro-
cessing of natural gas.
In announcing that today's
proved crude oil underground is
the highest in history. Mr. Etzel
pointed out that it is not immed-
iately available for production. Oil
is taken from the ground at the
most efficient rate necessary to
make possible the extraction of
the greatest amount of oil. ho
said, or under "conversation"
rules which avoid wasteful pro-
duction. When the rate of produc-
tion is too fast, more crude oil
underground is lost to extraction
than under scientific controlled
production.
Meanwhile, he said, the oil in-
dustry is moving rapidly with
its continuing expansion program,
calling for an expenditure of four
billion dollars in 1847-48. to in-
crease facilities in all divisions to
meet the ever-increasing demand
for oil products.
This year along, he added.
40,000 wells, a new record, are
expected to be drilled, of which
more than 7.000 will he exolora-
tory or "wildcat" wells, in the
search for new oil sources.
AI Rosens To Spend
Honeymoon Here
Al Rosen, son of Mrs. Rose
Rosen, of Miami, will be married
to Miss Evelyn Silverstein, of
Kansas City, on October 30. Al,
the American Association's "prize
rookie of the year," made an ap-
pearance in the world series and
is scheduled to play first base for
the Cleveland Indians. Together
with his bride he will reside in
Kansas City following a month's
honeymoon in Miami.
Mrs. Goldman Is Hoslew
Mrs. Louis Goldman, 3925 Meri-
dian Ave., was hostess to the
Women's League of Phi Epsilon
Pi Fraternity, Alpha Iota Chap-
ter, at a meeting yesterday.
Need Help in a Hurry?Call
A-l EMPLOYMENT SERVICE
White and Colored Help
Phonee 9-5317 9-6727
51 N. E. 6th Street
AL MEIDENBERO, Owner
STEEL ERECTING
HAULING
None Too Large or Too Small
PROMPT SERVICE
W. A. DICKINSON
TRANSFER CO.
2319 N. MIAMI AVE.
Phones 2-4308 3-1658
GILBERT MALONEY
DORIS MALONEY
RED FEWER
myra
arvm/x.
"OUR LATCH STRING'S OUT AGAIN"
DINE FAMILY STYLE!
Where the Food and Atmosphere Is Really Different
FOR HEARTY APPETITES! Our regular man-size 7-course,
sumptuous home-cooked dinners served family style in our
main dining room.
LIGHT EATERS will find a pleasant INNOVATION in our
NEW COFFEE SHOP, serving choice portions of our delicious
HOME-COOKED foods. TASTE-EXCITING SUPPERS will be
served daily after 9.00 P.M.
SPECIALIZING IN SEA FOODS
Dining Room opens at 4:00 P. M.. Monday through Saturday
12:30 P. M. on Sunday and holidays
14036 N. E. SIXTH AVENUE NORTH MIAMI. FLA.
How to Get Thera Telephone 89-3612
Biscayne Boulevard to double traffic lights at 88th Street inter-
sectionDrive straight off of Boulevard onto N. E. Sixth Ave-
nue, left of Gas Station; continue through Miami Shores
Biscayne Park and North Miami to 140th Street.
1*1.
IPs*.
AUGUST BROS fcvf
13 the BRgTf *V
Relatives Are Seeking
Horesnik, Local Resident
Anyone knowing the where-
abouts of Louis Horesnik or his
wife Bessie, are asked to com-
municate with the Union of Rus-
sian Jews, 55 West 42nd St., New
York City. The last known ad-
dress of the Horesniks was: Louis
Furniture Store, 235 N.E. 79th St..
Miami. Looking for them is Rive
Horeshnik, wife of Louis's bro-
ther, Joseph.
Essen
Construction Co.
2236 N.W. Miami Court
Commercial
and Residential
Construction
LICENSED AND
INSURED
Guaranteed Work

Phone 3-6924
Estimates Cheerfully Given
LISTEN TO THE
Jewish
Musical Hour
WBAY1490 on Your
Dial
Every Friday from 11 KM
to 12 Noon
Every Sunday from 10 A.M.
to 11 A.M.
A PROGRAM OF POPULAR,
CLASSICAL AND
LITURGICAL MUSIC
JACOB SCHACHTER
Director
WHEN YOU TAKE VITAMINS
Twenty Y*e a r s With
Lcadinc Clubs and Hotels
his violin his orchestra
Limited engagements now accepted. Phones 89-1805, 2-4366
L^uiuim..............
NIACIN
AMI!
r eAieiM*
ANTOTMIKMI
\*7 Q*m*d) M*U+1*+
TPoult. 11 f**rt 312
SEE bSi a. w- -tt*1-"
taxU-r mmjm *" m
IEoonomiMl 7"T1_ |^


PRjDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1948
+Jewisii ink* id/fan
PAGE FIFTEEN
RELIGIOUS
DIRECTORY
ORTHODOX
Congregation Beth Jacob. 301-
311 Washington Ave., Miami
Beach. Rabbi Moaea Meicheloff:
Cantor Louia D. Feder.
." i evening services at 5:30.
PUK. morn "k at 8:30. Mlncha a*
?* fSSSmSbv Snalos Seudos. Rabbi
;, i ff will" peak on the Portion
5*rt Week Services at 0:30 p.m.
of is iii during the Succos period.
?,"',,, i sehel-Vf? will preach Monday
1,', 'Fruits of Rxlle" and Tuesday on
I .Mmi of Israel." Cantor Louis Keder
"in,ant during all services. Klddush
Euclid Are.. Miami Beach. Rabbi
Joseph E. Rackovsky.
.... i..- evenlnc services at 5:30:
* \\- morning at 8:30. Habl.i
SlCfaky w?rPreaeh on the Portion
'V'tnWeek. Mlncha at 4:30 followed
SvShaloa Seudoa and Mfjarlv. Sunday
5 "-. m Mlncha followed by Maariv
f.?i,i he .'..nductcd by the Rabbi. Mon-
3,1! morning services at 8:30. The
RBbb will speak on "The I.ulov
"1m ha at 3 p.m. followed by Maariv
a 6 Tiie.-d.iy morning services at
t'111 The Rabbi will conduct the
Jervlcce and sneak on "Our Temporary
'''Miami Jewish Orthodox Con-
gregation. 590 S.W. 17th Ave.
Rabbi Murray Grauer. Cantor
Milton Friedman.
Pridav veiling services at 5:4;.;
BaWrday at 9 a.m. Junior services
,T in. Rabbi Grauer will speak on .the
pVtton of the Week. Mlncha at 5:80
flle.| by ShalOB Seudos. Sunday
School at I"- Suceoth services Sunday
kt VIS p.m.; Monday morning at 9.
Uabhi Qrauer will speak on 'Festival
of our .lov.*' Mlncha at 5:30. Jr.
service* Monday and Tuesday at 10
Tuesday morning services at 9. Rabbi
will speak on "The Succah as a Meet-
"Miami Hebrew School and
Congregation. 1101 S.W. 12th
Are. Rabbi Simon April.
Pridav evening services at 5:30;
Saturday morning at 9. Rabbi April
will speak on "The Song of the
Torah" Mlncha at ." p.m. followed
bv Bhaloa Beudoa and Maariv. Suc-
eoth services Sunday at ..::in p.m..
Monday at 9 a.m. The Rabbi will
apeak on "How to Rejoice. Mlncha
at :> followed by Maariv. Tueada)
morning services at 9. The Rabbi's
topic will be "The Profession or the
Palms." Mlncha at 5 followed b>
Maariv.
LIBERAL
Temple Beth Sholom. 4144
Chase Are.. Miami Beach. Rabbi
Leon Kronish: Cantor Samuel
Kelemer.
Pridav evening services at 8:13.
Rabbi Kronish will speak on The
High llolv Days Are OverDoea
thf Memory Linger On?" Oneg hhab-
bat sponsored by the PTA and deal-
rated t" the theme "Let's quainted with our Religious School, '
will follow the services. Saturday
morning service at 10:45. Sukkos serv-
ices Sunday ovxnlng at 8:18. Ituabi
Kronish will speak on 'Huts, Motels
and HousingWhat Can We Learn
in the Sukkah?" Monday morning
services at 10:30. Parents are invited
lo attend the Children's Harvest Fes-
tival with their children.
REFORM
Temple Israel, 137 N.E. 19th St.
Rabbi Colman A. Zwitman; Dr.
Jacob H. Kaplan, rabbi emeritus.
Friday evening services at 8:1>.
Sukkos services Sunday evening, Oct.
IT. at 8:15: Monday morning at 11
'Temple Isaiah. 4925 Collins
Aye.. Miami Beach. Rabbi David
Raab.
Friday evening services at *:'[';
Italibl Raab will preach on how
Wine Can You Be." Religious School
Uunda) at id a.m.
Temple Emanu-El. 1801 S. An-
drews Ave.. Fort Lauderdale.
Friday evening services at 8. Speak-
er t" be announced.
CONSERVATIVE
Congregation Beth David. 135
N.W. Third Ave. Rabbi Max
Shapiro: Rev. Maurice Mamches.
Friday evening services at 7 p.m.
Saturdav morning services at 8:.".
Rabbi Shapiro and Rev. Mamches Will
officiate. Suceoth services Sunday eve-
ning at 7. A reception will follow in
the large booth at 7:30. Monday and
Tuesday morning services at 8::l0 "he
central theme for discussion will be
Tbe Perennial Problem." Students
services will be combined with the
adull services at" 10 a.m. Monday and
Tuesday morning.
Miami Beach Jewish Commun-
ity Center. 1701 Washington Ave..
Miami Beach. Rabbi Irving Lehr-
man. Cantor Jacob Y. Goldring.
Friday evening service at 6; Satur-
day morning service at 9. Rabbi Lehr-
man will preach on the Portion of
the law. Succos services Sunday at
6 p.m.: Monday and Tuesday morn-
ings at 9. Rabbi Lehrman will speak
to the worshippers Monday and Tues-
day mornings. Cantor Goldring will
chant at all services assisted by
f'tnter Choir under the direction of
Joseph Schreibman. Jr. Congregation
services In chapel Monday and Tues-
day mornings.
Jewish Community Center,
2020 Polk St.. Hollywood. Rabbi
Max Kaufman.
Friday evening services at 8:15.
'Jbbi Kaufman will Bpeak. Saturday
morning services at 10. Religious
school on Sept. 12 at 10:30. Registra-
tion from > a.m. to 6 p.m. dally.
Brandeis Opens With Pomp
Brandeis University became a reality this week-end in an
academic celebration marked by colorful pageantry of 600 years of
educational heraldry.
With presidents and delegates from more than 200 of the world's
greatest educational and learned bodies looking on, Dr. Abram Leon
Sachar was installed as the new university's first president at the
inaugural ceremonies Thursday evening, October 7, which high-
lighted the three-day program of festivities.
Pledging a three-fold goal that Brandeis University, the first
Jewish sponsored, nonsectarian institution of* higher education in
America, will be an "institution of quality," "a school of the spirit"
and an institution of equal opportunity for all, Dr. Sachar accepted
the office conferred upon him by George Alpert, president of the
board of trustees.
Eliahu Epstein, head of the Special Mission of Israel to the
United States, extended the greetings of the State of Israel to
Brandeis University. Other participants included Dr. Arthur H.
Compton, chancellor of Washington University and recent Nobel
prize winner for his work in atomic energy, who welcomed Brandeis
in behalf of the assembled academic delegates as an especially wel-
come asset to our nation."
President of the Brandeis University board of trustees, George
Alpert, in opening the ceremonies, stated, "It is for the age-old
search for truth i-nd through truth for the crowning glory of peace
on earth that Brandeis University has been nurtured from a dream
into a living institutionwhose creation we here recognize."
The three-day program of Inaugural Festivities included the
official reception Thursday morning, October 7, given by the presi-
dent of the university and the board of trustees to the delegates from
schools as widely distributed geographically as Yenching University,
China; the Royal Academy of England; Harvard Universityand
as varied in educational orientation as the University of Chicago;
Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and the Academie des Beaux
Arts de l'institute de France.
Dr. Abram Leon Sachar was photographed as he made his
acceptance speech after his installation as Brandeis' first president.
In the semi-circle behind him from 1. to r. are Dr. Nelson Glueck.
president of Hebrew Union College, who delivered the invocation:
Dr. Arthur H. Compton. chancellor of Washington University and
main speaker of the evening; Eliahu Epstein, head of the special
mission of the State of Israel to the United Stales, who brought
official greetings from Israel.
Photographed before the academic procession which opened
Thursday evening's inaugural ceremonies were Carl S. Ell. presi-
dent of Northeastern; Paul Herman Buck, provost of Harvard
University; and Professor Jeremiah D. M. Ford o Harvard-who
represented the Academie des Inscriptions et Belles Lettres de
l'Institut de France.
George Alpert. president of Brandeis' board of trustees, ad-
dressed the more than 200 delegates of American and foreign
educational institutions at a luncheon following Thursday morn-
ing's official reception. Sealed at the left of the rostrum for 1. to
r. are Meyer Jaffe. member of Ihe board of trustees; Moms
Shapiro, president of Brandeis Foundation. Inc., and Dr. Abram
Leon Sachar. Hidden behind the speakers' rostrum are other board
members: Abraham Shapiro. Joseph F. Ford. -Norman S. Rabb.
and James J. Axelrod.
Before the inaugural ceremonies the ever present photographer
snapped three of the principal participants: Dr. Arthur H. Compton,
chancellor of Washington University; Eliahu Epstein, head ot the
special mission of the State of Israel to the United States; and Dr.
Nelson Glueck. president of the Hebrew Union College.

Chatting during the tea serve:? at Brasdaif' campus. Thursday
afternoon were Eliahu Fsiein, head ol the special mission of the
State of Tsr?el tc ft ,niied State.-,, Dr. Abram Leon Sachar, and
Mrs. Ssehar.


PAGE SIXTEEN
>Jenist fkridian
Arabs Get Air Superiority Over Israel
From British. Claim spying' Magazine
Survivor $ of Gush Ettion iBtoc
Find Haven in Beth Zeiroth Mizrachl
'C-n::nue:i tx m Pi

- -. (r w
get
officer mat,
portion of technical prol > .. \
f*r capita than is to be found ir ; States, and a
any other country in the Canada- a
They have no rfficer casl
tern. Messes are together -icd th
men work :n close con bal teams
The Palestine air war start
exactly 5 hours and '.-. mir
after the State of Isra as -:'-
finally proclaimed on May IS It
came in the f ran f tw
and two fighting. droppil
op. Tel Aviv from a I alti-
tude. No one ..'".-.- The
same day, the Jews roughl
an Egyptian plar.e. a British-
built Spitfire, and capture; the Three flying schools have been
A '. ally ;: part >f
f its
I
I p non-Jewish
percent is Jew-
:- M Si the
ung who
i during the war as
r.AF firmer. :r flew for other
pilot.
Israeli plar.es ret;'.: : :' ur
days later with an attack >n mili-
tary objectives in N rthern Pal-
estineand issue was ; Ined!
Estimates of the number of
planes involved in the Holy Land
war vary widely. The United Na-
tions set the figure at 400 total
which U. S. Intelligence believe*
is too high. However, other in-
formed sources believe the Arabs
ha%-e "many more" than 400
planes, and Israel has a small part
of that number.
The Arabs seerr. to have a -
many American AT-6 typ
training planes, which p-
them to carry 50-pound b
slung under the wings; they als
have some light bombers. Spit-
fires and tra I Isi I's ait-
might, however, is more
but more effectively
Probably most useful are said t
be late model wartime M<
schmitts. with increased fin
power, flown dismantled fr
Czechoslovakia in U.S. C-47s
bought from surplus stock?. In
Palestine, they were reassi m
in a matter of hours ar.d were
taken into combat b
war veterans volunteers. A num-
ber of wartime B-17s have also
been seen in action, flying Is-
rael's colors.
In the matter of engaging for-
eign pilot-:, the Arabs have been
having difficulty but have -hired
a few Frenchmen. Israel, having
- % in Israel since it be-
v list May.
M v --. the new nation's fliers
start with the establish-
ut ten years ago of two
\s in Palestine. They
were subsidized by the Jewish
Agency, but because of the re-
strictions of the British mandate.
. called "sporting" organiza-
s About five years ago, the
Agency founded an air service
- rved incidentally as an
training school for
ts A number of them were
to England for further train-
ing.
1! est-known fliers in Is-
rticli : ts. are two
27-yi -old : rmer RAF fighter
pilots They are Dan Tolkowsky,
itions for its Air
F M ^.echai Alon, cur-
l's leading air ace by
mei t in having shot
roe Egyptian planes. in-
British Dakotas.
-. m : British partisan-
thi Holy Land war is in-
ncident recoui ted
le. After an Arab air
raid on Tel Aviv, the writer re-
Israelis countered with
an attack on Amman, capital of
Ian. The British there
notified Israel that Air.-
was a British military
ghold, and any further raids
by t: Jews would bring prompt
retaliation by the RAF.
%M
w

FOR
SURE PLEASURE
This summer, the Gush Etzion
block, a string of four Mixrachi
settlements located between
Jerusalem and Hebron, came
under heavy Arab pressure.
Subjected to almost continuous
shelling and attack, women and
children were evacuated under
cover of night at the first op-
portunity. Fifty women, 12
babies and an additional num-
ber of young boys and girls
found refuge, first aid assistance
and a warm welcome at the
Beth Zeiroth Misrachi in Tel
Aviv, one of the 47 projects
sponsored by the Misrachi Wo-
men's Organization of America.
For many of the young wo-
men, being received at the Beth
Zeiroth was in the nature of a
reunion, for a goodly number
graduated from the Mizrachi
Women's vocational school.
KadimahCh^~T^
SOS Benefit Party "
The Kadimah Chapter Pjft_
Women, will give a %***
Saturday at 8 p.m. for t ^
f SOS at the home of?
Lillian Becker, i538 SW ^
Ter., co-chairman of vj, '*
SOS committee, of W^T
Abraham Kasowls chapman ^
mission to the affair, which
open to both men and women,,;
be ether 51.00 or a cantrip
of high protein canned good,?
an article for the lavetuX."
tion. Sheeting and ^ "J*
especially desired "g 8
Beth David Barn Dance
Sponsored By PTA
Music by Nathan Greenberg
and his seven piece band will
be the background at the barn
dance to be held by the Beth
David Sisterhood and PTA on
November 3 in Bayfror.t Recrea-
tion Hall.
Mrs. Harry August, general
chairman, will be assisted by
Mrs. Harry Laufer, country store;
Mrs. Max Seigel, refreshments:
Mrs. Harry Gilbert and Mrs. O.
Dworkin, tickets.
LADYMIDDLE AGED
To do light housekeeping for 2
adults in exchange for lovely
room and board.
Call after 4 p.m.
3570 S. W. 23rd Street
AUGUST STUDIO
Just Arrived from New York
with a Large variety of
Fabrics
1230 ALTON ROAD
PHONE 5-1024
Attention is called to those who
ordered the record albumn
"A Nation Is
Horn"
Through error these albumns were
sent express-collect.
THE KEILSON COMPANY
117 W. 46th St.
New York 19, N. Y.
will refund all charges above the
advertised purchase price of $3.00.
Future orders for "A Nation Is
Born," (3 full-size records6
sidescommemorating the his-
toric United Nations vote for a
Jewish State and other events
leading to its establishment after
centuries of exile) will be accepted
at $3.00 Post-paid.
Obituaries
BORIS PREO
Private funeral services were held
Monday at the Riverside Memorial
Chapel. Miami Beach, for Boris Tied.
Tv of 4800 N. Meridian Ave.. who
passed away Sunday following a long
Illness, Mr. I'red was a resident of
this area for the past 25 years, com-
ing hen- from Omaha. Nebraska. Sur-
viving are three daughters, Mrs M. A.
Wally, Mrs. D. p. W'olfson and Mrs.
Mayer Spencer, all of Miami Bench.
Interment was In Woodlawn Park
Cemetery.
To Old M_
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