The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01015

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text
lie\wiisltUEIIiDipidliigun
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
VOLUME 20NUMBER 29
MIAMI 18, FLORIDA. FRIDAY. JULY 18, 1947
PRICE: TEN CENTS
British Declare Martial Law In Palestine
As Dragnet Is Spread For Irgun Kidnappers
'DEMOCRATIC ARAB-JEWISH STATE'
IS GOAL OF PALESTINE
JERUSALEM (JTA)Immedi-t
bte evacuation of British troops
[from Palestine and the establish-
linent of a "democratic Jewish-
lArab state" following a transition
I period under the supervision of
[a special United Nations commit-
Itee was urged this week by the
[all-Jewish Palestine Communist
[party during testimony before the
[United Nations Special Commit-
|tn' on Palestine.
Meir Vilner and Dr. W. S. Ehr-
llirh. speaking for the control
committee of the Communist
[party, charged that British rule
Ihad been responsible for the
[animosity between Jews and
|Arabs and had prevented Arab-
Ii wish rapprochement. They
ited a long list of "crimes, mur-
U P, rape and pillage," committed
Dy the mandatory during the 30
pears it has ruled this country,
particularly in the years 1936-39
und 1946-47. The Communist
Baden also listed examples of
uab-Jewish cooperation, partic-
larly in the field of labor.
The Communist spokesman
asserted that Britain was build-
ing a military stronghold in
Palestine as part of a "cordon
sanitaire" against the Soviet
Union, and not for the benefit
of the country. They appealed
to the United Nations to re-
move British "reactionary
forces" in order to achieve
peace in the Middle Cast and
the whole world.
Questioned concerning their at-
itude to Jewish immigration,
Vilner and Dr. Ehrlich stated
that the problem of immigration
ivas never a major problem with
Arabs, who considered the
removal of foreign rule more im-
portant. They expressed the be-
i'f that a future Palestine state
i'<>uld participate with other
luntries in solving the problem
A rescuing the surviving Jews
if Europe who wish to leave that
Continent.
Several committee members,
(leaded by Chairman Emil Sand-
troem, wanted to know on what
(Continued on Page 4)
Soviets To Open
lirobidjan Land
To 550 Families
NEW YORK (JTA)The
I Council of Ministers of the
Soviet Union has instructed the
lUkranrian government to make
[provisions to facilitate the send-
ing of S50 Jewish families to
IBirobidjan, Jewish autonomous
[region, the American Birobid-
Ijan committee reported this
|week.
Temporary housing has al-
ready been established to re-
ceive the new families until
permanent homes can be found
by the industries in which they
"ill be employed, the report
aid. It added that some 500
families, mostly evacuees from
Vreas overrun by the Nasis.
Save arrived in Birobidjan dur-
^g recent weeks.
Jews In Poland
See Conditions
Much Improved
WARSAW (JTA)The atti-
tude of the Jews in Poland to-
ward the government was defined
by Dr. Michael Shuldenfrei, a
member of the Polish National
council and leader of the Jewish
Socialist Bund party, in an ad-
dress to the council, which is
the new Polish parliament.
Emphasizing that the Jewish
population fully supports the
present policies of the govern-
ment and appreciates its attempts
to uproot anti-Semitism, Dr.
Shuldenfrei said:
1. The Jews in Poland want to
participate in the development of
the country as equal citizens.
2. The Jews consider the sec-
tions of Germany acquired by
Poland after the war to be an
integral part of the Polish Re-
public, which has become a new
place for Jewish settlement. Any
attempt to question Polish rights
to this territory threatens the
general peace and must be com-
batted.
3. The efforts of the govern-
ment to combat anti-Semitic ac-
tivities must be developed into
a permanent campaign against
racism.
4. Jewish leadership believes in
the sincerity of the government's
appeal to the Jews of Poland, to
(Continued on Page 4)
Cooperation Here
Works To Improve
Palestine Housing
NEW YORK (JTA)Plans are
under way to organize an Ameri-
can company to build thousands
of housing units in Palestine,
where the shortage is extremely
acute, as a result of conferences
between Aaron Wright, president
of the Jewish National Fund and
the United Palestine Appeal for
Great Britain and Ireland, and
American Jewish leaders headed
by Judge Morris Rothenberg,
president of the American JNF.
Wright, who is returning to
(Continued on Page 4)
LEAVES FOR PARIS
The National Council of Jew-
ish Women was officially rep-
resented at the formal opening
of its Home for Unattached
Jewish Women, in Paris, on
July 2, by Mrs. Moise Cahn
(above) of New Orleans. Mrs.
Cahn, a national vice president
of the organisation, is shown
prior to her departure for
France, at LaGuardia Field.
New York.
NEWS BRIEFS FROM EUROPE
FRANKFURT (JTA)In an
apparent attempt to halt the in-
discriminate arrests of DP's by
American troops searching for
stolen goods, American head-
quarters here has advised all
field units that the DP's are en-
titled to possess various items in-
cluding specific American sup-
plies and American money.
The announcement inferentially
took cognizance of the complaints
of a number of relief authorities
that the soldiers arrested DP's
even when the goods in question
were legally acquired. The or-
ders forbade arrests unless illegal
possessions could be proved or
unless the amount possessed was
far more than was needed for one
DP or his family. In cases of
doubt the troops are advised to
consult the camp director and if
they seize any goods they are to
give an official receipt for it.
killed during the fascist regime
and that several thousand deport-
ees probably returned to the
country, further reducing the
toll.
Hungary
BUDAPEST (JTA)Both Jew-
ish and democratic circles here
are up in arms over the interview
given to the Vienna newspaper
Die Welt am Abend by Josef
Cardinal Mindszenty, Catholic
primate of Hungary.
The cardinal told the Austrian
paper that not 600,000 but "only"
500,000 Hungarian Jews were
England
LONDON (JTA)An interna-
tional conference of experts to
discuss the resurgence of anti-
Semitism in Europe will be held
in Switzerland between July 30
and Aug. 5, under the auspices
of the International Conference
of Christians and Jews.
The parley, the first of its kind
called by the conference, will be
attended by Jewish and non-
Jewish members of affiliated or-
ganizations in the United States,
Britain and continental Europe.
Haganah Abandons {Search
For Two Missing Sergeants
JERUSALEM (JTA)Military control was proclaimed in
Nathanya and outlying settlements this week as the deadline
set by the government for the return of two British sergeants
kidnapped there last Saturday passed with no word of the men.
House curfew was immediately proclaimed in the district
pending further notice, and troops began moving in and estab-
lishing barbed wire entanglements and enclosures for screen-
ing people. Military headquar-
ters were established in the build-
ing of the municipal council.
Persons entering or leaving the
Nathanya area earlier were
searched and questioned.
Martial rule was clamped down
despite an eleventh hour plea by
Mayor Oved Ben Ami. The proc-
lamation had been delayed twice
before to give the Haganah more
time to trace the abducted men.
As soon as it went into effect the
resistance force withdrew from
the search.
Earlier, a Jewish Agency
spokesman told correspondents
that the agency felt that the im-
position of controls would be a
grave blunder since the entire
population is aiding the hunt for
the abducted men and military
control would only hamper them.
In addition, he pointed out that
declaring Nathanya a controlled
area and disrupting its economic
life virtually means collective
punishment of people who are
not responsible for the kidnap-
pings.
The Irgun issued a statement
that it would not deliver up the
soldiers until the sentences of the
three condemned Irgunists were
commuted. It declared that the
men were unharmed and_ "in a
place where they can be kept a
month or more."
The controlled area will be
commanded by Brig. Gen. Sir
Humphrey Gale, who was in
charge of Tel Aviv when it was
under martial law. The area
in which 15,000 to 20,000 persons
livecomprises, in addition to
Nathanya, Avichail, Ramath,
Tiomkin, Neve Ittamar, Ein
Hatcheleth, Neve Oved, Neve
Shalom and a number of smaller
communities. The official com-
munique announcing control list-
ed a number of reasonsall ter-
rorist attacksfor the action.
British Cantor
Will Sing Here
On High Holidays
Cantor Abraham Behrman, of
the Willesden synagogue, London,
England, has accepted an invita-
tion to chant the services at the
Miami Jewish Orthodox Congre-
gation for Slichos and the High
Holy Days, according to an an-
nouncement by Rabbi Murray
Grauer. The Willesden congrega-
tion is reportedly the largest or-
thodox synagogue in London.
Rev. Behrman is one of the
outstanding cantors in Europe.
He was educated in Continental
yeshivas and received his mu-
sical training in Amsterdam.
Upon the completion of his stud-
ies, Rev. Behrman was appointed
cantor of the orthodox syna-
gogue in Edinburgh, Scotland.
After serving there for six years,
he sang for the Birmingham,
England, congregation, and trans-
ferred to the Willesden synagogue
in 1939.
Cantor Behrman has booked
passage for Aug. 7 and is expected
to arrive here Aug. 15. He came
to the attention of the Miami
Orthodox Congregation, Rabbi
Grauer said, through his friend-
ship with a Miami ex-G.I.
nine are slated to be sent to the
Lipari penal islands, off Naples.
Italy
ROME (JTA) Italian police
have arrested nine Jewish refu-
gees at the port of Ancona, north-
east of here on the Adriatic coast,
it was reported this week.
The Jews, inmates of the Torino
DP camp, are suspected of plan-
ning to emigrate illegally to Pal-
estine. They were arrested while
talking to Italian sailors. Al-
though no specific charges have
been lodged against them, the
Sweden
STOCKHOLM. (JTA) The
chief prosecutor has ordered the
confiscation of five anti-Jewish
pamphlets published and circu-
lated by Einar Aaborg, interna-
tionally known Swedish anti-
Semite. Distribution of any cop-
ies which have not been seized
has been prohibited.
The action was taken in con-
nection with the indictment
brought this week against Aaborg
by the prosecutor. Aaborg is
president of the so-called Swed-
ish Anji-Jewish league.
Rumania
BUCHAREST (JTA)A group
of 126 Jews this week sailed for
Palestine and the western hemi-
sphere aboard the liner Transyl-
vania.
The majority of the immigrants
are bound for South American
countries, while 39 are going to
Palestine and a small number to
the United States.
Europe's Doctors
Get 60,000 Books
Donated In N. Y.
NEW YORK (JTA)More
than 60.000 medical textbooks,
journals, charts and reports
have been donated by New
York medical schools, libraries
and individual doctors to the
Joint Distribution Committee's
SOS collection campaign, for
the use of doctors and students
in Europe, it was announced
here.
Among the gifts was a dona-
tion of 38.500 books and jour-
nals from the library division
of the New York Academy of
Medicine. Columbia university's
college of physicians and surg-
eons contributed approximately
12.000 items of medical data;
the Medical college of Cornell
university. 3.600; New York
university's college of medicine.
1.000.

4 .


, i


;


I


PAGE TWO
>MniitnrriiiJt
FRIDAY. JULY 18.
1941
Mitttt i irip Apppl MIppoiuph Hridp
Ot Earl I'n inoif In Until RUph
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M B Z -
M H
HA IN
Mrs. H
P. Gersl
P Raizer Mi Jack
:i
''.
I
The f the
.
I n H ty ir.
Miss Li
1
A

urdines
Classical
Favorites
$f25
each
DEBUSSY. Afternoon of a
Faun, Stokowski and
Philadelphia Orch.
RACHMANINOFF, Prel-
ude in C sharp minor.
PADEREWSKI. Minuet in
G.
EIGAR, Pomp and Circum-
stance, March No. 1.
HANDEL, Xerxes' Largo.
PROKOIEFF, Classical
Symphony, Koussevitzky
and Boston Symphony
LIAPOUNOFF. Caucasian
Dances, Alexander
Brailowsky.
STRAUSS, Roses from the
South Waltz, Fiedler and
Boston "Pops" Orch.
FIFTH FLOOR
Eleanor Rosow Engaged
To Howard Schwartz
'. 1577 I
01
-
'
M :;
Memo.-i
:' nursing. S
-..-. the U. S
t Tali
''. Senior Hi(
-
the G 1
'
I
ty. Hi
in-
the Pacil

the I- u
Tepper-Mayerson Rites
Scheduled for Aug. 10
151 '. w : I

Manuel Ma n n I Mr. and
Mi .'. :.:.
'' a gradu. I
Cinciri
ttiliated a^ a case
with the Travelei
ty Hei fian e, a graduate
D ton, and
ho saw
e at Anzio, Sicily,
in busini
n, where the coup!,
tht-ir home.
Colman Zwitman will
uled for Aug. 10 at the Robert
Rich'.'
Miss Jeanne Rosenthol |<1*M>III 11 V S|M*nlii|| Becomes Briae .r. r.c:e. .,- ~ HameB. their cousin. Irving Kaplan anj
Candlelighl Ceremony ,,: left by car last week for a three-week'stay
-
1372 1 -erT ion Lawrence.
3

.
:

Predinger, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred H.
1425 S ''.'Fifth st., is attending summer busses a
:: Alabama at Tuscaloosa.
. :.. s:r.s of Rabbi and Mrs. Joseph Rackovsky
-_: s '.V Fifth s- an spending their summer vacation from
..-- Nr-v York, with their parents.
from
Mi md Mrs Hennan Binder have just returned from atrip
- : At mta Z a where they attended a family reunion in honot
. er Mrs. Mathieu Block, Atlanta who ho
at i :----~. a four-month tour of Europe with her husband.
a held od the home of Mrs. E. Lichtenstein, Ma
z.r.z-.-. s mother.
Di okla 4123 Pine Tree dr., Miami Beach, it
in 3c.:.ore and New York. He will next go
; Boston M a where he will do research study for the
tier.
(Sue Moss of the Miami Beach "Y" is currently vaca-
fornia and write* glowing, and perhaps treason-
reports from the West Coast state.

Mr md Mrs, L C 31oorrJ:eld are vacationing in Ho! Springs,
where they recently visited the Leo N. Levi Memorial
i: Ir.z. I :.-'-.
Mrs. I. L. Mintxei have left for an extended trip of I
-. monl -us European countries.

:e Sunshine, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Martin
Rodan-Brookstone 3. W. 11th ter.. left last week for a month's stay
Is Announced By Parents m New :-;':' ,
Mi :. i Mrs. I. Mannheimer. of 1054 Pennsylvania a
. Beach ::es^g the summer at wn Lake I
Hous &ist Straudsburg, Pa.
Mrs. Max Rosenstein are spending the summer in I
Brooklyn, N. Y., and will return here the end of next month.

Dr. and Mrs. Alexander E. Rosenberg have returned to their |
wne here from a month'e vacation, during which Dr. Rosen-
led sessions of the American Prodological society at I
invention in Atlantic City.

he) Rosen. 1523 Meridian aye., was suddenly called|
Pm= Repr [ac ----ide oi her s:r::ken mother in Brooklyn last week.
Miarr.: E l
P-- ;i under
an Bil of Mr. and Mrs. Pearl Bittel. 3010 Alton rd,
ingtcn ave. Executive, of the MeXiC0 Mexico CitY-
agency, who retain their for-
mer
pres
vi
er, secrelary-ireasurer.
agency who retain their for- w m
ner posiiior.s, are: Don Frank. ** Klugrnan of Savannah, Ga., is currently c quest at
preside.-.:- Erwin D. Harris, :w ar.d daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Charles
rice president: Harold D. Mey. 421 N. W. First st.
W.
"aTboth theatres.
iTLlftmi LffiCOin
Mr. i Mrs. Marcus and their daughter, of 1528 S.
*e left for a two-month trip to New York.

Mi A ma R. Berow, 245 Jefferson ave., leaves this weetl
wl with her children in Chicago and New York

md Mrs. Max Schwartz. 1250 Collins ave.. Miami Beach, |
' ntinued on Page 3)
Death leaves its call,
ing card!
VICTOR MATURE I J
Peggy CUMMIN'GS
Ethel BARRYMORE | ft
V
Vincent PRICE
OCIALLY, candy has long been accepted as a
part of our daily lives .
From early childhood on, CANDY is considered an
priate accompaniment of the festive spirit of
Birthdays, Holidays, Anniversaries and other joyous
occasions .
ou can have your pick of the finest assortment of
"gh grade candies to fit any celebration.
f^fW
AUGUST BROS ftv
/* the HE STf y


HDAY. JULY 18. 1947
+Jewlsti /forIdiom
PAGE THREE
1 CAPITAL SPOTLIGHT
By BEATRICE HEIMAN
(Copyright, 1947, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.)

WASHINGTON.
If it is any comfort to the displaced persons of Europe, activity
their behalf is proceeding on three fronts in Washington.
In Congress, the Senate and the House have under consideration
his to admit a number of DP's to the United States. From the
rhite House, President Truman sent a special message to Con-
fess, urging swift passage of legislation to admit "a substantial,"
it unspecified, number of refugees.
In a parallel, but unpublicized step, it is understood that the
resident has assigned a special study on refugees and possibilities
their resettlement to Myron C. Taylor, his personal representa-
ire to the Vatican. Mr. Taylor, who has been in New York since
krly this year, is believed to be well into his complex survey.
|is experience in the subject dates back to 1938 when, as special
ibassador of President Roosevelt, he was made chairman of the
nan Conference on Political Refugees, and later became vice-
aairman of the Intergovernmental Committee on Refugees.
A tremendous archive of materials already gathered, under the
litiative of Roosevelt, lies ready to hand. Foreseeing the upheaval
people which would result from the war, Roosevelt in 1942 called
a group of geographers, economists, and population experts, and
at them to work on the so-called M-project (M for migration).
The scope of the inquiry was vast. The question of Jewish
sfugees was a part of the whole. In pursuit of potential resettle-
ment areas, Palestine was given a careful once-over. According to
lose familiar with the inquiry, the examiners concluded that the
fcKov desert areawhich comprises 45 per cent of Palestine, and
antains 4 to 5 per cent of the total populationcould be developcQ
accommodate a considerably larger number of inhabitants. And
international settlement authority was proposed, with an ap-
[roximately one billion-dollar yearly budget, to carry out a unified
bheme.
To what extent the findings of the migration project are being
ctively considered for eventual use is not, at this time, clear.
pficials in the State department who were connected with it in
io way or another will say nothing, for reasons of "policy forma-
|on." A logical deduction is, therefore, that despite the layers of
ust which have accumulated on the "M" files, they are not com-
Bctely forgotten; that, in the current search for homes for those
ktking them, the three-year labors and hundreds of documents
|ay be imbued with life.
Dr. Isaiah Bowman, president of Johns Hopkins University and
e of the most eminent living geographers, was a guiding spirit
the project. It has been suggested that the United Nations could
|ut the materials to good use, and that Dr. Bowman would be the
ppropriate person to funnel them to the International Refugee
frganization, the obvious agency to deal with the problem.
Miss Quartin Plans
December Wedding
Palm Beach
MRS. MARY SCHREBNICK. Representative
FOR THE BEST IN
DAIRY PRODUCTS
[MILKCREAMICE CREAM
LFA
WEST PALM BEACH
M IZELL-S I MO N
MORTUARY
N. w. Mlxell, C. K. Simon, Lawrence S. Favllle, Funeral Director!
413 Hibiscus Street Phone 8121 W. Palm Beach. Fla.
LAINHART & POTTER
ESTABLISHER 1893
"BUILDING MATERIAL FOR PARTICULAR BUTLDERS"
Phone 5191 West Palm Beach. Flo.
SOUTHERN DAIRIES
Barring Palm Beach County, featuring uv
NatlonallT Famous Southern Deiriea fro
ducts and lea Cream.
AS NEAR TO YOU AS YOUR PHONE
Ml CMAarf
^rVe^VWWAMMWMti
IVMi
m***^^^^^*^^^*^*^*
C. W. SMITH
PLUMBING CONTRACTOR
529 Independence Road, West Palm Beach
No job too large or too small. Over 50 years in busiraeen-
The betrothal of Miss Eleanor
Quartin and Louis Sager has been
announced by the mother of the
bride-elect, Mrs. Joseph Quartin,
1809 S. W. 23rd ter. Mr. Sager
is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Rubin
Sager, 2410 S. W. 22nd ter., for-
merly of New Haven, Conn.
Miss Quartin served two years
in the Marine Corps Women's
Reserve and is now a senior at
the University of Miami, where
she is a charter member of The
Quill, honorary journalism so-
ciety She is District No. 5 re-
porter and historian of B'nai
B'rith Young Women, and second
vice president of Debbs chapter,
BBYW.
Sager, a veteran of three years
of Navy service, attended the
University of Connecticut college
of pharmacy.
The wedding has been sched-
uled for December.
High Grade
TAILORED
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Thomas Venetian blinds are
specially designed for Florida
usedurable and long lasting.
All blinds installed and guar-
anteed prompt shipment on
out-of-town orders.
Phone for Estimates
9-7555
from Iftt HttNl HOMC INSTITUTE
An Easy "Fleischig" Recipe
Almost every housewife has her
own coiled ion of recipes that call
for chicken. And yet every house-
wife scans the recipe columns for
Something new a hit of a surprise
in chicken cookery for the family.
Well, here's that somethinR in w
easy and tasty, too! Here we use
paieve and Kosher condensed
vegetable soup and combine it with
chicken in a novel way. We
suggest :
Chicken 'n Rice
This recipe requires:
2',i lbs. stewing chicken, cut in
pieces for serving
1 tablespoon salt
'j teaspoon pepper
2 quarts of boiling water
1 cup rice
111-oz. can 'Condensed Vege-
table Soup Without Meat, un-
diluted.
Add chicken, salt and pepper to
water. Cover and simmer until
chicken is very tender. Remove
from broth. Bring broth to boil.
Wash rice thoroughly. Add to
broth. Meanwhile, remove skin
and bones from chicken: cube.
When rice is tender (about 20
minutes), add chicken and soap.
Heat thoroughly. (Serves 8.)
P*MUi h K,ihi.nd'.iJ bs.lki U-'ot /
Personally Speaking
(Continued from Page 2)
have just returned from a two-month vacation in Chicago where
Ihey attended the Bar Mitzvah of their grandson, Eddie, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Mitzen.
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Apte,, 435 S. W. 31st rd., returned last
week from a six-week trip which included two weeks at Johns
Hopkins clinic. They visited Hendersonville and Jacksonville,
returning by car with Mr. and Mrs. Abe S. Goldman.
Miss Evelyn Koppelman left eaily this week for a month's
vacation in Louisville, Ky., and Chicago. Her parents are Mr.
and Mrs. Myer Koppelman of 2420 Flamingo dr.
A party held recently in honor of the birthday of Mrs. Abe
Safra, 202 Washington ave., was combined with a farewell to
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Hagen and their children, Ruth and Max,
who left for a trip to North Carolina. Friends present included
Mr. and Mrs. Leibisch Hagen and their sons, Manfred and Jack;
Mr. Abe Safra and Jack, Melvin and Lorraine Safra.

Barbara Hutner, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hutner,
547 13th st., and Lucille Yuran, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Saul
B. Yuran, 345 W. 46th st., will leave for a vacation in Columbia,
S. C, New York and Connecticut upon the completion of their
work at the first summer session at the University of Miami.
Both girls will attend Florida State university upon their return.

Among Miamians vacationing at Duncraggan Inn, Hender-
sonville, N. C, are Mr. and Mrs. Jack Zwicker, Mr. and Mrs.
Max Samuels, Mr and Mrs. Lee Beck, Mr. and Mrs. Julian Kur-
lander and son, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Rayvis, Mr. and Mrs. Jack
Rausch, Mr. and Mrs. Abe Humel, Mr. Abe Pepper, Mr. and
Mrs. David Granat, and their sons, Robert and Richard Granat.

First family reunion in 10 years for the Teitler family was
held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Teitler, 2828 S. W. 12th st.
Those members of the family present were Mr. and Mrs. Isidore
Teitler, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Teitler, Mr. and Mrs. Mannie Teitler
and children, Marilyn and Barry; Mr. Al Teitler and daughter,
Rita Ann, all of New York, and Herman Teitler, Miami.
(III III hill
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GENERAL INSULATING CO.
PHONE 9-4842
2119 N. W. 22nd STREET
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FRIDAY, JULY 18, 1947
vJenisti fhyridficnn
Judaism Council
Asks Passage Of
Stratton Measure
A board meeting of the South
Florida chapter of the American
Council for Judaism on July 15,
enthusiastically adopted a reso-
lution calling on the U. S. Senate
to pass Bill S-1563, which would
authorize, for a limited period of
time, the admission of certain dis-
placed persons into the United
States for permanent residence.
The resolution, a copy of which
was telegraphed to members of
the Senate immigration commit-
tee, read: "We unanimously en-
dorse emergency displaced per-
sons admission act and urge in-
clusion in its final draft of Strat-
ton Bill's provision relative to
quota on number of persons ad-
mitted. We also urge presenta-
tion of this act prior to adjourn-
ment of Congress." The wire was
signed by Benjamin E. Bronston
and Samuel J. Kanner, president
and secretary of the group.
Bronston announced the recent
election of Herbert U. Feibelman
as vice president and Albert J.
Hirsch and Edward Walterman
as members of the board. Harry
Boyell, former secretary, recently
resigned to accept the director- j
ship of the Southeastern regional
office of the American Council
I'm Judaism on Miami Beach.
IDA COMMITTEE OF SIX NAMED
Newly named to serve on the Joint Defense Appeal's Com-
mittee of Six, central governing body of the IDA, are (top row,
left to right) Gustave M. Berne, Arnold S. Askin. Albert H.
Lieberman, for the AIC; (bottom row, left to right) Jacob Alson,
Edmund Waterman, Max I. Schneider, for the ADL. The an-
nouncement was made by loseph M. Proskauer, president of
the American Jewish Committee, and New York State Supreme
Court Justice Meier Steinbrink, national chairman of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai B'rith.
Emanon Club Plans
Many New Events
A spelling bee will follow the
regular meeting of the Emanon
club, Wednesday, July 23, 8:15
p.m., at the Young Men's He-
brew Association, 1567 S. W. Fifth
.st., Miami. Six male members j
will compete against six females
of the club. Valuable prizes will
be awarded to the winners.
A parents' night will be held
by club members and their par-
ents. Sunday, July 27, at Temple
Israel of Miami. Professional en-
tertainers will perform and re-
freshments will be served.
The club is also planning a
swim-dance for Saturday eve-
ning, Aug. 2, at the Venetian pool.
Coral Gables. Admissio nis $1.50
per person. The proceeds will
go to the Buy-A-Brick campaign
of the Miami YMHA.
The Emanon club is a social
organization for young men and
women over 21 years of age.
Meetings are held the second and
fourth Wednesdays of the month
at the Miami YMHA. 1567 S. W.
Fifth st. Veterans are given six
months' free membership.
Mrs. Kirstein,
Returning Here,
Hails NHJC Work
Imbued with the pioneering
work of the National Home for
Jewish Children at Denver in the
relief of child asthma sufferers,
Mrs. Samuel Kirstein. president
of the Greater Miami chapter of
NHJC, has returned home from
the 40th annual convention of the
nationally known organization.
Mrs. Kirstein said the local
auxiliary would intensify its ac-
tivities in support of the Denver
institution, which has gained
praise from such authorities ;is
Dr. M. Murray Peshkin. chief
consultant physician from New-
York's Mt. Sinai hospital and Dr.
Bela Schick, originator of the
famed Schick test, national pedi-
atric consultant.
Other officers of the local aux-
iliary are Mrs. Irving R. Becker,
tirst vice president; Mrs. George
Feller, second vice president.
Mrs. Isadore Vogel. third vice
president; Mrs. Albert Dublcr.
recording secretary; Mrs. Sanford
Levine. corresponding secretary:
Mrs. Samuel Leschel, financial
secretary; Mrs. Harry Siegel,
treasurer, and Mrs. Benjamin
Bloom, auditor.
Pioneer Women Form
Coordinating Council
A council to coordinate the ac-
tivities of the three chapters of
Pioneer Women of Greater Miami
was formed at a special meeting
held recently. Three representa-
tives from each group partici-
pated in the organization of the
new body, with Mrs. Isaac Push-
kin presiding.
The following women repre-
sented their respective groups:
Club No. 1. Mesdames Isaac Push-
kin, Sam Sorin-Bild, Isaac Shap-
off; Club No. 2, Mesdames Lena
Mintzes, M. Shubow; Kadimah,
Mesdames Albert Berson, David
Washer and Max Shapiro.
The council elected the follow-
ing officers: President, Mrs. Sam
Sorin-Bild; vice president, Mrs.
M. Shubow; secretary, Mrs. Max
Shapiro, and treasurer, Mrs. Al-
bert Berson.
Included in the business of the
first meeting was the adoption of
the by-laws transmitted by the
national office of Pioneer Wom-
en, and the discussion of joint
plans for a donor dinner.
Colleagues' Party
Honors Dr. Berman
Mr. Louis Fleischer, president
of the Mercury Medical Supply
Co., was host recently at the
semi-annual company party held
in the Nepsune room of the
Robert Richter hotel, Miami
Beach.
The dinner was served in the
enclosed patio and was preceded
by a cocktail party at which Dr.
Theodore M. Berman, Beach
radiologist, was guest of honor.
Other guests included Benja-
min Grossman, Mr. and Mrs. Louis
Grossman, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Kane, Mr. and Mrs. Philip Pett,
Miss Perry Luft and Mr. and Mrs.
James Bulova.
Professional Hadassah
Will Meet Monday Night
A cultural meeting of the Busi-
ness and Professional Women's
division, Miami chapter of Ha-
dassah, will be held Monday eve-
ning, July 21, at 8:30, at the home
of Miss Alice Cohen, 629 S. W.
Fifth st, Miami.
The meeting will feature a con-
tinuation of the officers' training
course, the first session of which
was held at the last cultural meet-
ing of the organization.
Plans arc being made by the
career women's group, it was
learned, for a membership tea
on Columbus day, Oct. 12.
\X)GUST BROS RV/
' Is the Bt.SI '
Gables B'nai BVith
Plans Splash Party
The Coral Gables lodge, B'nai
B'rith, has planned a splash party
and water carnival for Saturday,
July 26, at 8 p.m. at the Albion
hotel pool and patio, Dr. Leonard
Glickstein, president, announced
recently.
Heading the variety bill of
nautical entertainment will be an
exhibition of diving by Miss
Helen Miller. Maurice Shorr is
chairman of the carnival com-
mittee and will be assisted by
Leonard Spiegel, Maurice Hor-
witz and Irving Gerstenfeld.
Cabanas will be provided for
the convenience of guests, and
refreshments will be served.
Tickets at one dollar per person
may be obtained at the door.
The Pittsburgh Club of
Greater Miami will hold a
membership rally Monday eve-
ning, July 21, at 8:15, at the
Miami Beach Y, One Lincoln
rd. All former Pittsburghers
and their families are invited
to this first meeting since the
organisation was chartered.
GORDON ROOFING AND
SHEET METAL WORKS
Have your roof repaired now; you
will nvt on a new roof later
"8atlafactory Work by
Experienced Men"
414 W. 22nd Avenua
I'HONE 4-6880
NURSERY
PLANTS
SHRUBS
POTTED FERNS
FLOWERS
Joseph Melnick
1252 N. W. 33rd Street
Phone 3-9801
We Sell, Rent and Tune Pianos
SOLE DISTRIBUTORS
WEAVER PIANOS
MARKLEY'S
2900 S. W. 8th Street
Phone 4-5951
NOTiCE! KOTiCE!
YUw. acatian
ROHAN'S
Hardware and Paint Company
515 41st Street Phone 5-2026
lOftl
ALPER &
GREENBURG
CONTRACTORS. Inc.
"Clearing Lots Our Specialty"
Bulldozer and Drag Lines for
RentGrade A Pulverized
and Processed Muck and
MarlAny Mixture Bitter
Blue Sod
Soil and Fill of Any Kind
CaU 4-0335 or 78-3878
For FREE Estimates
1813 S. W. 21st Terrace
Formerly the
MIAMI TOP SOIL CO.
All Work Guaranteed
WOLPEKT f URMJTUI** ^
1200 CORAL WAY AT "5 POINTS'
Make Dreams Come True
See Us If You Plan To Buy, Build Or
Refinance Your Home
HOME LOANS TAILOR-MADE TO FIT YOUR NEEDS
RESOURCES MORE THAN $17,500,000.00
l>AI>E FEUEItAl
&mtt#4 artd/outt Awoctafion, c^Mami
FORTY-FIVE NORTHEAST FIRST AVENUE IOSEPH M. LIPTON. President
INSURED,
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FRIDAY, JULY 18, 1947
+Jewist ftcrldfatn
PAGE SEVEN
Disaster Study
Scheduled Here
By Red Cross
Four outstanding leaders in
disaster relief work from south-
eastern area and national Red
Cross headquarters are scheduled
to lead discussions at Dade
county's disaster preparedness in-
stitute to be held in Miami July
23, 24, 25, E. G. "Don" Graham,
Dade Red Cross disaster chair-
man, said Wednesday. They are
Maurice R. Reddy, Washington;
Karl Reiser, Dr. Burton F. Aus-
tin and Miss Helen M. Flanagan,
Atlanta.
Reddy, assistant administrator,
disaster relief, American Nation-
al Red Cross, will come to Miami
direct from Texas City, Texas,
where he has been directing re-
lief operations following the ex-
plosions there April 16.
Reiser, assistant director, dis-
aster service, southeastern area,
saw more than four years of Red
Cross duty with the armed forces
during the war and entered upon
his present duties in April, 1946.
Administrator of medical and
health service in southeastern
area, Dr. Austin joined the or-
ganization in January of this
year. His experience includes
more than 20 years of public
health work, and service in the
medical corps in World War I.
Miss Flanagan became a mem-
ber of the Red Cross nursing
staff in 1942, left to serve 33
months in the Army, and return-
ed to Red Cross as a consultant
in disaster nursing in the Atlanta
office.
"Purpose of the disaster insti-
tute is to mobilize and organize
all community resources in Dade
county to plan for hurricane or
any other type of disaster which
may strike this area," Disaster
Chairman Don Graham said.
Phi Sigma Sigma
Alumnae Convene
The first summer meeting of
the Phi Sigma Sigma Alumnae
group was held at Mammy's res-
taurant, Miami Beach, on July
12, inaugurating the series of
summer luncheon meetings which
have been planned by Mrs. Je-
rome Adelman, chairman.
Plans for a cabana party were
discussed and methods of aiding
the active chapter at trje Univers-
ity of Miami in their 1947-48 sem-
ester activities were also on the
agenda. At a recent meeting
Mrs. Robert Rosen was appointed
chairman of the building fund for
the Beta Theta chapter house on
on the new university campus.
Fund raising methods are under
discussion and will soon be sub-
mitted to the committee for con-
sideration.
Louis Kraft, left, executive director of the National Jewish Wel-
fare Board (JWB), is retiring effective Oct. 1, from post he has
held for past eight years to take over duties of newly created
office of general secretary. National Council of JWB. He will
be succeeded as JWB executive director by Samuel D. Gersho-
vitz, right, former associate director of the JWB Jewish Center
division and most recently general director of the Jewish
Community Centers of Chicago.
Hebrew College
To Offer Course
To Lay Students
A new series of courses, de-
signed for undergraduates inter-
ested in Jewish studies but not
intending to prepare for rabbi-
nical careers, will be offered by
the Hebrew Union college, Cin-
cinnati, Ohio, according to an
announcement by Rabbi Alvin I.
Fine, director of field activities.
The program, to be instituted
for the first time during the fall
semester, will combine regular
undergraduate studies at the Uni-
versity of Cincinnati with courses
in Hebrew, Jewish history, litera-
ture and religion, at the college.
A maximum of 12 credits will be
allowed by the university for
these courses.
In addition to the program of-
fered to lay students, the college
will continue its courses in pre-
rabbinica] studies, for candidates
to the rabbinate. These courses,
offered at the university under
the supervision of the college,
prepare undergraduates for post-
graduate rabbinical work at the
college.
Further information may be
obtained by writing the Hebrew
Union college, Cincinnati 20, O.
4th 'Pop' Concert
Tomorrow Night
The University of Miami con-
cert orchestra will present the
fourth in its series of summer
"pop" concerts tomorrow, July 19,
at 8:30 p.m., at Flamingo Park,
Miami Beach, under the baton
of Robert M. Crawford.
Featured soloist will be Mar-
jorie Mayer, pianist, who will
interpret the famed Rachmaninoff
concerto No. 2 in C minor.
The program follows:
Overture to "II Ouarsiny". .....Gomez
(Vmri-rto No. -1 in C minor,
for piano ............._......Rachmaninoff
a. Mouerato
b. Adagio soHtenuto
<- Allegro ma.herznmlo
Marjorle Mayer
Tamliourln Chin..Is Krelsler
"I..h EStollea," Hulte for orchestra
Crawford
a. Ue uolr"Cello solo
Walter UroHsmnn
b. I,a Rrande OurHe
C. I^i petite OurHe
lit-..iK,. (irnihwln Favorites Gershwin
Holy Day Services
May Be Performed
By Hebrew Academy
The newly organized Greater
Miami Hebrew academy may hold
services for the High Holy Days
if plans to complete alterations
on its new building are success-
ful, it was reliably learned this
week.
Work is being rushed on the
decoration and rebuilding of the
school's edifice, located at 918
Sixth St., Miami Beach, in order
to have the yeshiva ready for
enrollment of students for the
fall semester.
If the work is completed by
Sept. 1, there are good chances
that the board of directors of the
academy may decide to hold ser-
vices in the building for Slichos.
Rosh Hashonah and Yom Kippur.
Jews In Sports
In case you are wondering
what became of Seymour Cohen,
the Jewish thrower from Phila-
delphia, we hasten to inform you
that he is the Steve Seymour who
created a new American javelin
record at the recent National
A.A.U. games at Lincoln, Nebr.
Seymour hurled the stick 246 feet
10 inches, more than 10 feet
farther than the previous record,
and within a few yards of the
world's mark. Seymour jumped
into the air and gesticulated
wildly just as soon as the stick
left his hands. He knew instantly
that the rod was going farther
"han any of his previous attempts.
Spectators foresaw the new rec-
. rd when the osteopathic surgeon,
who now resides in Los Angeles,
took his warm-up throws. A
year or so ago Seymour swiveled
the javelin over 235 feet in the
G.I. games conducted in Turkey.
Normally the Olympic title in the
javelin goes to a Finn or Swede.
If Seymour's recent triumph is
any indication, the javelin title
will come to the United States
next summer when the Olympics
are contested in London.
*
On the eve of his Garden fight
appearance against Steve Belloise,
Georgie Abrams, middleweight
battler, exhibited his pastel paint-
ings in the lobby of the 20th
Century Sporting club. Such ex-
perts as Mickey Walker and John
Groth insisted that Abram's work
showed much promise.
Lincoln Cafeteria
lias Novel Radio
Interview Show
An entirely new idea in pro-
motional activities was inaugu-
rated on Miami Beach recently,
with the first of Saturday after-
noon broadcasts direct from the
tablesides at the Lincoln cafe-
teria, Lincoln rd.
The programs, a series of inter-
views with lunching patrons of
the lavish new eating spot, are
aired over radio station WKAT
every Saturday afternoon at
12:30. Conducted by "disc jock-
ey" Dick Stern, they provide
amusement and novelty both for
diners and listeners, according to
George Dubrow, owner of the
cafeteria.
Dubrow, who shares ownership
with Simon Botwinik, is also
owner of two famed Dubrow's
cafeterias in Brooklyn, N. Y., as
well as Dubson's steak and chop
house in the same city. He repre-
sents the third generation of his
family which has been involved
in restaurant and cafeteria op-
eration.
Feuer Is Named
To Lead Beach
Center Campaign
With construction under way
for the erection of new quarters
for the Miami Beach Jewish
Community Center at Washing-
ton ave. and 17th st., Joseph M.
Rose, president of the center, has
announced the selection of Wil-
liam I. Feuer, Miami Beach real-
tor, as chairman of a month-long
membership drive which will
commence Aug. 1.
Mr. Feuer reports that the goal
of the drive will be to build the
membership rolls of the center
up to 1,000, which is almost dou-
ble its present membership of
550.
Assisting Mr. Feuer in the drive
are George J. Taiianoff, Jack
Burris, Philip Salmon, Dr. Ben-
jamin Coleman, Ira Walsey, Oscar
Mamber, Morris N e w m a r k ,
George Goldberg and Ed Singer.
It is expected that the new
community center building will
be completed by February, 1948.
The New York offices of the
United Jewish Appeal have
announced the receipt of a
check for $150,000 from the
Miami UJA in payment toward
the local agency's allotment of
$900,000. The sum represented
the June collections of pledges
made for the Appeal during the
recent drive.
Harold Tannen Returns
To Join Law Firm Here
Harold Tannen, former Miami-
an who has spent the past five
years in executive positions with
the federal government, returned
to Miami this week to resume
private law practice.
Tannen, who was an official of
the War Shipping administration
and the U. S. Maritime commis-
sion in Washington, will become
associated'with Harry D. Williams
of the firm of Williams, Salomon
and Katz.
WANT TO BUY OR RKXT
2-Bedroom home, preferably S. W. section. Does not
have to be new. but want clean property. Will take
immediate possession If I rent; can furnish excellent
references that will insure that your property will be
taken care of and protected. Reply: R. MACK, care of
Jewish Floridian. Box 2973. Miami 18. Honda.
A. F. GIVEN
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT
1420 Congress Building
MIAMI, FLORIDA
Phone 3-3658
Tempered Masonite
STORM
SHUTTERS
EASY TO INSTALL
Interchangeable Sizes
Stored in Small Space
FREE ESTIMATES
PHONE 5-1662
H. W. THOMAS CO.
60S LINCOLN RD.
Immediate Deliveries
THE POST-WAR MOTOR CARS WITH
TREMENDOUS ENGINEERING
ADVANCES .
IN BEAUTY SIDE
PERFORMANCE
ROOMINESS
SAFETY
Open 8:30 A.M. to 5:30 P.M.
Friday and Saturday Until 8 P.M.
Everything for the Motorist
Liberal Trade-in
Allowance
For Your Present Tires
on the purchase of
New
SEIBERLING
TIRES
Come in today and see the new
1947 Seiberling (Special Service)
Tires. You'll be surprised at the
liberal trade-in value of your
present tires. Don't wait! Drive
to a Dixie Station todayl
S.W. 1st STREET
45 FIFTH ST. M. B.
19 N. W. 17th AVE. 1840 ALTON RD. M. B.
Electrical Appliances for the Home y
5327 N. MIAMI AVE.
3539 N.W. 17th AVE.

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JULY 18. 194?
+Jewistfk>ri PAGE NINE
ctics Of American Bigots Seen Changing
aid L. K. Smith Meeting
licates New Hate Strategy
erican fascism is applying the "homey touch."
days of the hysterical, rabble-rousing meetings are
passing, and the "new line" of this country's hate-
rs, anti-Semites and potential Belsen cremators is aimed
omespun, just-folks, next-door-neighbor psychology which
n found so appealing by American demagogues in the
4----------------------------------
'
to decades,
are the conclusions to be
from a report recently
fed by The Jewish Floridian
reader who attended a
lg on June 19 in St. Louis
Jald L. K. Smith's viciously
emitic "Christian National-
ly."
correspondent recalled the
liots which characterized
ir meetings of the Ger-
Lmerican Bund, the Chris-
rront, the America First
Ittee and other hate groups
flourished in the days be-
Pearl Harbor. Today, he
the same people are
|ing their poisonous dot-
again, encouraged by the
dismissal of the federal
lment's sedition charges
It 26 American fascists.
approach of our native
fites, however, has changed,
by the tenor of the St.
meeting. The new angle
gck is due in large measure
"silent treatment" now be-
ccorded Smith and his co-
both by the majority of the
hi\.a press and by the pro-
|ve and pro-democratic or-
ations which formerly or-
bd public protests and picket
at every one of Smith's
By common agreement,
militant groups have de-
that lack of publicity is a
|tating weapon against the
i. Thus, where the appear-
)f Smith at a meeting in St.
last year aroused storms of
controversy, a great
bf newspaper space, a battle
fen Smith's hoodlums and
who were picketing the
e-rouser, and above all, an
cedented attendance at the
[itself, this year saw a mere
pnes of publicity in the local
and a consequent attend-
3f only 200 people in a hall
led to hold 400.
r is the "Reverend" Smith
rare of the effect which
'cold shoulder" treatment
had on his following.
bughout the June 19 meet
Smith again and again re
to the lack of publicity
fch the meeting had re-
Id, in a very rueful and
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even nostalgic tone. The nos-
talgia was doubtless prompted
by memories of the "blood and
thunder" days, when blood
flowed freely at hate meetings,
when anyone who looked like a
Jew was attacked by young
storm-troop hoodlums of the
Christian Front, and when
hordes of misguided, otherwise
harmless people allowed them-
selves to be whipped into fren-
sies of hate and intolerance by
Smith's lying, rabble-rousing
speeches.
Today, Smith is a subdued man.
He describes himself as the
"elder statesman of American na-
tionalism" (a favorite term of
the bigots, who feel that the word
"fascist" is still too unpopular in
this country). He makes little
jokes during his speeches, paint-
ing himself as a simple family
man, a lover of peace, and any-
thing but an anti-Semite. He
gauges his talks to his audience,
which in St. Louis consisted
mainly of old and middle-aged
people, with a small sprinkling
of young couples, many of whom,
our correspondent feels, may have
been observers like himself. Vet-
erans were conspicuous by their
absence, and though Smith
threatened, throughout the eve-
ning, to "take care of any spies"
who might be present, his young
storm-troopers of earlier days
were not in evidence.
Smith indeed acted as an elder
statesman. He served as a mas-
ter of ceremonies and beamed as
he introduced the main speakers.
These were his two proteges, Don
Lohbeck and Kenneth Goff.
Lohbeck, editor of Smith's pois-
onous hate magazine "The Cross
and the Flag," is a juvenile-look-
ing young man, who speaks in a
quavering voice and whose argu-
ments mark him as the least in-
tellectual of the American fas-
cists. Both he and Goff, who
claims to have been a member
of the Communist party, and was
therefore welcomed into the
"nationalist" ranks for his knowl-
edge of the "tie-up between the
international Jews and the Reds,"
were named by John Roy Carl-
son, author of the best seller "The
Plotters," as being connected with
the Christian Veterans of Amer-
ica, an anti-Semitic groap whose
leaders were either deserters or
former inmates of Army penal
stockades.
The significant fact is that
though the approach of these
fascists has changed, the content
of their propaganda has not. In-
deed, they now find themselves
conveniently wrapped in a cloak
of immunity, by the current wave
of official and unofficial feeling
against Communists. For, above
all, the "nationalist" line of at-
tack is to link the Communists
with the Jews, the Jews with
some sort of "international bank-
ers' plot," the international bank-
ers with Moscow and Moscow
with a mysterious plan to force
mixed marriages between Negroes
and whites in the U. S., thereby
"mongrelizing" the white race.
This theme of "mongrelization,"
incidentally, is also connected
with the Jews, who, according to
the fascists, want to "defile Chris-
tian blood with Asiatic Jewish
blood" by intermarrying with
Gentiles.
The pet hates of the bigots,
our reporter writes, are still
the same. Aside from the
Jews, Communists and Negroes,
they scream loudly at Walter
Winchell, the late F.D.R., Ber-
nard Baruch, Eleanor Roose-
velt, the late Henry Monsky,
and anyone else who has shown
himself to be prominent in the
fight against intolerance and
for the etexnsion of democ-
racy.
Despite the changed tactics of
the haters, which are largely en-
forced by the "cold shoulder"
strategy, their danger to Ameri-
can life has increased rather than
diminished. It is well demon-
strated that the most prominent
demagogues of the past year have
addressed themselves in home-
spun terms to the simple people,
particularly to the Midwestern
and Southern rural population.
Lack of sophistication was the
trade-mark of Huey Long, of red-
suspendered, tobacco chewing
Eugene Talmadge of Georgia,
Senator "Pappy" O'Daniel of
Texas, Father Coughlin and oth-
ers of their ilk. The scheme is
to play on the supposedly tra-
ditional mistrust of small town
people for the big city "centers
of vice," and therefore, "logical"
Cf nters of insidious plots by Jews,
bankers and Communists.
That this tactic does not always
work was clearly illustrated in
the experience of Gerald L. K.
Smith in Douglas, Ga., last April.
Douglas, a small, sleepy town in
the heart of Georgia's "white
supremacy" belt, was suddenly
aroused to action at the announce-
ment of a Smith meeting there.
Citizens' protests against
Smith's use of the county court-
house and a serious movement
in the town's Lions club to ride
Smith out of town on a rail,
forced the hate-monger to re-
move his meeting to a small Bap-
tist church outside the city limits,
where he spoke before an audi-
ence of 68 people, fully 38 of
whom were later identified as
hostile observers.
A United Press dispatch from
Boston on July 14 reported that
Smith was forced to cancel a
meeting he had scheduled in
historic Old South church in
the Hub city. A capacity crowd
hooted and jeered him from
the platform.
The lessons to be learned by
such events are many. It is ob-
vious that even in KKK terri-
tory, the rural people of the
South are thinking along far
more tolerant lines than before.
Anti-Semitism and hatred of the
Negro has not found as fertile
ground as was expected. And
though Smith and the hundreds
of other American fascists are
concentrating their energies in
the traditionally conservative and
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isolationist Midwest, with their
headquarters in Chicago, the same
pro-democratic groups which de-
cided on the "cold shoulder" tac-
tics are not idle. Groups such
as the National Conference of
Christians and Jews, Anti-Defa-
mation League of B'nai B'rith,
the non-sectarian Anti-Nazi Lea-
gue, and others are battling the
fascists tooth and nail at every
step of the way.
Progressive people and pro-
gressive organizations, Jewish
and otherwise, are not allowing
themselves to be lulled to a sense
of false security. They know
that fascism was not destroyed
on V-E day. They are ever-
watchful and ever-active in the
continued fight against the Amer-
ican Nazis.
(This is the first of two ar-
ticles written exclusively for
The Jewish Floridian on this
subject. Next week's article
will contain an analysis of the
propaganda being disseminated
by Smith's magazine, "The
Cross and the Flag.")
NOW delivering America's molt
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it or not, A RADIO IN A BOTTLE,
110 volt, AC or DC, 4 tubea. Try a
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Miami. Ph. 2-4429. Shipman Stamp
machines also available.
THE
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FRIDAY, JULY 18
Seymour Cohen
Named To Head
National BBYM
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CJlini St. Pal. October 15 to If
I. Xante*
_>ow On Rot
Of Survivors

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SOL A. GOLDSTROM
JOINS FEUER OFFICE
Sol a. BoMbfe promil
i Beach R
past 22 yean, b n issixm
with the W I T'.- rai
*r at 309 Ua
Goldstrom. *:/ pened
Beach's first bade...; p^,'
1923. also organs
- associatior. there. Hewl
president o* that for
years. During -_> he *rvj
as chief obser-.
force*, and m ArmJ
trial of aerit
_r*r_ zz*ii
=-i= cf the
Lr* lMaurac
NAT GANS
u* -. Ct.
S*m W. lawk, f raari H-
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xwr 'jam-ecru. JjmnoiMr S. hi .jramMf-.t-
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M =. LcIiml
JWV I* Planning
Hallowe'en Ball
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nil !! 1 Bad seetias
:- be*'.rs w._ "=* ild ai
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- -: :. :: i: I im A; :i
-- Mrs Baa Wttm.
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<,r_ --:;: -- *: *'-:
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2323 H. BCIAM: AVE.
Pboon 243C8



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ITOUBY
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MIAMI X. FLC*XA
ai.


FRIDAY, JULY 18, 1947
*Jen 1sfi fkricfict/i
PAGE ELEVEN
TIDBITS FROM EVERYWHERE.
(Copyright, 1946. Seven ArU Festurs Syndicate)
By PHINEAS J. BIRON
The Real Difference
Dr. Chaim Weizmann unquestionably is the most realistic
leader in Zionism today It's an open secret that he is pre-
pared to accept an increase in the immigration quota for Pales-
tine even if it should mean "to forego debate for some time
regarding future statehood" The quotes are from a recent
letter from Weizmann to Prof. Chaim E. Chernowitz ... In
other words, Weizmann is primarily concerned about saving
the DP's stagnating in concentration camps.
The Jewish Aspect .
The Garsson brothers and ex-Congressman May were found
guiltyand rightly soon charges of graft in their work for
the government during the war The Garsson case, how-
ever, was a minor matter in comparison with the war-profiteer-
ing scandals in the billion-dollar class Now the Garsson
brothers were Jews, and as such were resented, because Jews
are not supposed to break into the big munitions game .
There is a similarity between the Garsson case and the case
against Bernard J. Marcus of the Bank of the United States some
fifteen years ago Marcus was sentenced to jail and his
bank closed, although the receivers were able to reimburse the
depositors to the extent of well over 90 per cent of their so-
called losses But there too a definite Jewish anqle came
into play Jews are far from welcome in the big banking
game ... It will always remain a mystery why a Jewish
banker and a Jewish munitions maker were selected as the
targets when non-Jewish culprits had much more to answer
for Not that we condone the actions of the Garssons at
all .They deserved their punishment But where are the
other culprits? What about Senator Bilbo's entanglements in
big war contract deals, to mention just one instance? Presi-
dent Roosevelt, while still Governor of New York, admitted to
us in a private interview that there was a Jewish aspect in the
Marcus case Well, there was a big Jewish angle in the
Garsson case, and we still are waiting for the bigger offenders
to be brought to the bar of justice.
Showdown Required ...
Some time ago the American Jewish Committee asked the
House un-Amexican Activities Committee to investigate the
activities of George W. Armstrong of Natchez, Miss., and Ft.
Worth, Texas Armstrong is a very rich oil operator who
has established the Armstrong Foundation, which is spreading
prejudice against Negroes and Jews Armstrong is a great
admirer of Representative John E. Rankin, and apparently has
no fear of any investigation But Jewish and non-Jewish
pro-democratic organizations should back the American Jewish
Committee's request for a showdown on Armstrong.
Misvelianti ...
Joseph Brainin, newly elected chairman of the administrative
board of the Committee of Jewish Writers, Artists and Scientists,
is readying a novel for publication next spring Paul Muni
will appear on Broadway in 1948 in an Ibsen play Marc
Chagall is seriously considering residence in the USSR for at
least one year Rubin Saltzman, general secretary of the
Jewish People's Fraternal Order, is leaving for Palestine in
September, in connection with a new donation to the Hadassah
hospital Albert Einstein has been ordered to take a com-
plete restnot even letter-writing is permitted himduring the
summer Arthur Koestler, author of "Thieves In the Night,"
will be visiting America in the coming winter The Rev.
Richard E. Evans, dynamic fighter against prejudice, has fully
recovered, we understand, after being knocked down by a Fifth
ave. bus a few weeks ago.
Flash!
If the United Nations commission decides against a Jewish
state, look for a dramatic political-military coup by the Irgun in
Palestine Blueprints are ready for taking over the govern-
mentunless, of course, the Jewish Agency succeeds in pre-
venting the coup.
68 Organizations
Get VA Authority
On Veterans' Claims
Sixty-eight organizations arc
authorized to represent veterans
in the presentation and prosecu-
tion of claims against Veterans
Administration, according to the
latest VA list.
They have been recognized by
the Administrator of Veterans
Affairs under section 200, Public-
Law 844, 74th Congress, for the
presentation of veterans' claims
in connection with the statutes
administered by VA.
VA is now authorized, in gen-
eral, to recognize only state or
governmental services, or organi-
zations granted a charter or rec-
ognition by an act of Congress.
Organizations included in the
list which have local representa-
tives in Miami or Florida, are:
American Legion; American
Red Cross; AMVETS (American
Veterans of World War II); AVC
(American Veterans committee);
JWV (Jewish War Veterans);
National Jewish Welfare board
(YMHA), and the Florida State
Veterans commission.
NBC Radio Show
Will Broadcast
Herzl Vignette
In tribute to Theodor Herzl,
founder and guiding spirit of the
modern Zionist movement, the
Eternal Light program will pre-
sent "Herzl and the Minstrel," by
Arnold Perl, on Sunday, July 20,
over Station WIOD at 10:30 a.m.,
to commemorate the 43rd anni-
versary of Herzl's death.
The Eternal Light, a coast-to
coast radio program presented
under the auspices of the Jewish
Theological Seminary of America,
is a public service presentation
of the National Broadcasting Co.
Dr. Moshc Davis is program
editor.
Although Theodor Herzl stud-
ied for a legal career, the world
of letters captured him so com-
pletely that within a year he
withdrew from legal practise. An
appointment as Paris correspond-
ent for the Neue Freie Press, tne
most distinguished newspaper in
the Austro Hungarian empire,
climaxed his journalistic career
in 1892. In Paris, his ideas on
the dilemma of world Jewry de-
veloped and found expression.
"Herzl and the Minstrel" tells
of the impact of Herzl's person-
ality upon the Austrian town of
Alt Austee where he spent some
time.
MIAMI BEACH
Better Class Listings On
Oceanfront Properties. Hotels,
Homes or Investments
B. E. BRONSTON, Bealtor
605 Lincoln Rd. Phone 5.5868
"Trustworthy Service"
Schwartz Is Featured
On WINZ Yiddish Hour
Maurice Schwartz, leading ac-
tor, producer and director of the
Yiddish stage, will be the featured
performer this Sunday at noon
on the "Yiddish Classical Hour,"
weekly broadcast of traditional
Yiddish and Hebrew songs and
recitations over Station WINZ.
M. Nasatir, director of the pro-
gram, has announced that he will
present a recording by Schwartz
of "A Chazn A Shikcr," well-
known humorous monologue. Also
featured will be a recording, made
in Tel Aviv by the Palestinian
j quartet "Hazomer," of a tradi-
! tional Chassidic dance.
Other numbers to be aired will
include renditions by Aaron Leb-
edeff, Seymour Rechtzcit and
Menashe Oppenheim.
Pioneer Women Hail
Musical Evening Success
More than 200 persons were
guests of the Pioneer Women's
club No. 2, of Miami, at a dinner
and musical evening held last
Sunday night, July 13, at the
Workmen's Circle lyceum, 25
Washington ave., according to
Mrs. Lena Mintzcs, chairlady of
the event.
Jacob Schechtcr, director of
the WBAY Jewish Radio Hour,
acted as master of ceremonies for
j a program which included Mrs.
Albert Naness, soprano, and Mrs.
E. Cameron, pianist.
SUNRAYPARK
HEALTH RESORT
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Foe ROT COMVALESCENCI
AND CHUOMIC CJES
wwfl ** ooti.i
II* I W JO COURT
MIAMI FLORIDA-
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38 N. W. 7th Street
PHONE 2-1759
Repairs Contract*
Electrical Installations
INDUSTRIAL
COMMERCIAL
RESIDENTIAL
Same Dependable Service
RUTH GROSS AGENCY
Inc.
GENERAL INSURANCE
BONDS LIFE
Phone 58-9538
350 LINCOLN ROAD
Morris Alpert Is Injured
In Automobile Collision
Morris Alpert, 3930 N. Meridian
ave., Miami Beach, was taken to
Alton Road hospital Tuesday
morning, July 15, with a possible
fracture, as the result of a head-
on collision on Lake Pancoast dr.
Alpert is a building contractor
and a member of the firm of
Kahn and Alpert, 420 Lincoln rd.
DISTRIBUTORS FOR
U. S. TIRES
EMERSON TIRE CO.
600 N.E. 1st Av. 2644 S.W. 8th St.
PH. 3-5308 PH. 48-3442
MIRRORS
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IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
Auto Glass Installed Furniture Tops
Store Front Construction
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Everything in the General Building Line
Phones 9-03989-9985
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PER ANNUM*
ON
INSURED
SAVINGS
ACCOUNTS
Ths Federal Savings and Loss Insurance Cor-
poration insures individual accounts up to $5,000.
Husband and wife may have total of $15,000 fully
insured.
Chase Federal savings accounts are legal in-
vestments for Trust Funds, es well as Funds held by
Guardians, Administrators and Executors.
Funds invested on or before the 10th of tho
month earn as of the 1st of the current month.
Funds invested after the I Oth earn as of ttie first
of the following month.
CURRENT DIVIDEND RATE
. rrcrtA. .'vin;
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lilt ItattH ...if HH tl AH**
e. i. ciiUPJftrJteiAl'ti
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__L-ii
PAGE TWELVE
*Jenistfkridi^r
FRIDAY. JULY 18. 1947
Temple Israel Men
Hear Isenberg Talk
A: inspiring talk on the life of
1 D. Brandeis, late Ju
of the U. S. Supreme Court, was
lure of a meeting,
on Julv 9. of the Temple Israel
Men's Club.
Col -. who ad-
e ^roup. touched upon
: tht noted judicial de-
y Brandeis, 1 n
Ut that since Brandeis
first Jewish supreme
A r. erican hist
:-,e presidi
- added a
tus t< the Zion-
ist .....M
An ther guest speaker was
Nance,
taiven mpa, who
ed by Nat Roth.
'
cultural rel
thai his t ::- :' '''
Jew and w should be
- vocab-
ople have only one
"..:.. i) id r
ndivid-
Ervin to Enter Race
For Attorney General
PALATKA. F:a July 17.R.
W Dick E:
ney I th state road k pai ".-
I ssistant attor-
today
that he plans i lui I i atl rnej
and

after th<

paign
I : ledged nself 1
..: local
. iti ial

l
lions He
:.:.-;. liti-
...:.:
.' nt of 1
i bu-
tations

I to h:rr.
tc ..:...-. -. ,ities

and at-
1 effect

t up in his '.-

nt .:'
t! nt atl pting :
usurp aut .:;.
-
The Miami Beach chapter of
the American Jewiih Congress
will hold its second annual
dance a! the Robert Richter
hciel tomorrow night. July 19.
at 8:30. Members and friends
are cordially invited to attend.
GLASS
FOR EVERY PURPOSE
STORE FRONT
PLATE k WINDOW GLASS
FURNITURE TOPS
BEVELED MIRRORS
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Washington Are. at 13th St.
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And for your convenience
Morris Brother's New Ap-
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UVES OF OUR TIMES
ABRAHAM__REIilN_
r~.~ .. NO*MAN ~4 KX HO0H
____________~ HOO I iiMOW
n *at i*o* tan ui nauuti en
WHUAl UTIMRV COUICTMW. AT I.I *\ :
uci of kbit; urn immom uikwu. thus
H TM M TIM 0U> VOUTM UuaCHID M
YMHA Committee
Studies Programs
For New Bui ding
Spurred on by th prog-
"
- the i
-- : --.:: f the M
V luig M Women s H
. Ass fiati
rtu
es of i prog
to be conducted in 1
A letti r ft m Maui
an, exi itivi tor, t ffi-
eers Y
lisclosed a t<
s and mass
tivitj
norm..! nducted by a
munal cent i fa-
cilities
Included in I
gram B Jew-
ish cen nonies Is Jew-
"...'.- is

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ects. mus '
i
- n
.
Wl
tied to 1 t ac-
tivities
"
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OPf/V VRYOAr
170ML 5ST. t SV4SS.* A2-9814
ANGIE and FRED WELCOME YOU TO
PICCIOLO'S
HE PALMS AT
AMERICAN-ITALIAN
RESTAURANT
Mm ralla< Steaks. Chopi. S
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Diners IM Calllns *., M. .
f 4 P.M. I. I] H<<>i(>l; 111. 4 t.U. It I t.M.i lw.
rallaa Stoats. Chopi. Sea Food
Maine Labsters
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lie\wiisltUEIIiDipidliigun Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY VOLUME 20—NUMBER 29 MIAMI 18, FLORIDA. FRIDAY. JULY 18, 1947 PRICE: TEN CENTS British Declare Martial Law In Palestine As Dragnet Is Spread For Irgun Kidnappers 'DEMOCRATIC ARAB-JEWISH STATE' IS GOAL OF PALESTINE JERUSALEM (JTA)—Immedi-t bte evacuation of British troops [from Palestine and the establishlinent of a "democratic JewishlArab state" following a transition I period under the supervision of [a special United Nations commitItee was urged this week by the [all-Jewish Palestine Communist [party during testimony before the [United Nations Special Commit|tn' on Palestine. Meir Vilner and Dr. W. S. Ehrllirh. speaking for the control %  committee of the Communist [party, charged that British rule Ihad been responsible for the [animosity between Jews and |Arabs and had prevented ArabIi wish rapprochement. They %  ited a long list of "crimes, murU P, rape and pillage," committed Dy the mandatory during the 30 pears it has ruled this country, particularly in the years 1936-39 und 1946-47. The Communist Baden also listed examples of uab-Jewish cooperation, particlarly in the field of labor. The Communist spokesman asserted that Britain was building a military stronghold in Palestine as part of a "cordon sanitaire" against the Soviet Union, and not for the benefit of the country. They appealed to the United Nations to remove British "reactionary forces" in order to achieve peace in the Middle Cast and the whole world. Questioned concerning their atitude to Jewish immigration, Vilner and Dr. Ehrlich stated that the problem of immigration ivas never a major problem with Arabs, who considered the removal of foreign rule more important. They expressed the bei'f that a future Palestine state i'<>uld participate with other luntries in solving the problem A rescuing the surviving Jews if Europe who wish to leave that Continent. Several committee members, (leaded by Chairman Emil Sandtroem, wanted to know on what (Continued on Page 4) Soviets To Open lirobidjan Land To 550 Families NEW YORK (JTA)—The I Council of Ministers of the Soviet Union has instructed the lUkranrian government to make [provisions to facilitate the sending of S50 Jewish families to IBirobidjan, Jewish autonomous [region, the American BirobidIjan committee reported this |week. Temporary housing has already been established to receive the new families until permanent homes can be found by the industries in which they "ill be employed, the report aid. It added that some 500 families, mostly evacuees from Vreas overrun by the Nasis. Save arrived in Birobidjan dur^g recent weeks. Jews In Poland See Conditions Much Improved WARSAW (JTA)—The attitude of the Jews in Poland toward the government was defined by Dr. Michael Shuldenfrei, a member of the Polish National council and leader of the Jewish Socialist Bund party, in an address to the council, which is the new Polish parliament. Emphasizing that the Jewish population fully supports the present policies of the government and appreciates its attempts to uproot anti-Semitism, Dr. Shuldenfrei said: 1. The Jews in Poland want to participate in the development of the country as equal citizens. 2. The Jews consider the sections of Germany acquired by Poland after the war to be an integral part of the Polish Republic, which has become a new place for Jewish settlement. Any attempt to question Polish rights to this territory threatens the general peace and must be combatted. 3. The efforts of the government to combat anti-Semitic activities must be developed into a permanent campaign against racism. 4. Jewish leadership believes in the sincerity of the government's appeal to the Jews of Poland, to (Continued on Page 4) Cooperation Here Works To Improve Palestine Housing NEW YORK (JTA)—Plans are under way to organize an American company to build thousands of housing units in Palestine, where the shortage is extremely acute, as a result of conferences between Aaron Wright, president of the Jewish National Fund and the United Palestine Appeal for Great Britain and Ireland, and American Jewish leaders headed by Judge Morris Rothenberg, president of the American JNF. Wright, who is returning to (Continued on Page 4) LEAVES FOR PARIS The National Council of Jewish Women was officially represented at the formal opening of its Home for Unattached Jewish Women, in Paris, on July 2, by Mrs. Moise Cahn (above) of New Orleans. Mrs. Cahn, a national vice president of the organisation, is shown prior to her departure for France, at LaGuardia Field. New York. NEWS BRIEFS FROM EUROPE FRANKFURT (JTA)—In an apparent attempt to halt the indiscriminate arrests of DP's by American troops searching for stolen goods, American headquarters here has advised all field units that the DP's are entitled to possess various items including specific American supplies and American money. The announcement inferentially took cognizance of the complaints of a number of relief authorities that the soldiers arrested DP's even when the goods in question were legally acquired. The orders forbade arrests unless illegal possessions could be proved or unless the amount possessed was far more than was needed for one DP or his family. In cases of doubt the troops are advised to consult the camp director and if they seize any goods they are to give an official receipt for it. killed during the fascist regime and that several thousand deportees probably returned to the country, further reducing the toll. Hungary BUDAPEST (JTA)—Both Jewish and democratic circles here are up in arms over the interview given to the Vienna newspaper Die Welt am Abend by Josef Cardinal Mindszenty, Catholic primate of Hungary. The cardinal told the Austrian paper that not 600,000 but "only" 500,000 Hungarian Jews were England LONDON (JTA)—An international conference of experts to discuss the resurgence of antiSemitism in Europe will be held in Switzerland between July 30 and Aug. 5, under the auspices of the International Conference of Christians and Jews. The parley, the first of its kind called by the conference, will be attended by Jewish and nonJewish members of affiliated organizations in the United States, Britain and continental Europe. Haganah Abandons {Se arch For Two Missing Sergeants JERUSALEM (JTA)—Military control was proclaimed in Nathanya and outlying settlements this week as the deadline set by the government for the return of two British sergeants kidnapped there last Saturday passed with no word of the men. House curfew was immediately proclaimed in the district pending further notice, and troops began moving in and establishing barbed wire entanglements and enclosures for screening people. Military headquarters were established in the building of the municipal council. Persons entering or leaving the Nathanya area earlier were searched and questioned. Martial rule was clamped down despite an eleventh hour plea by Mayor Oved Ben Ami. The proclamation had been delayed twice before to give the Haganah more time to trace the abducted men. As soon as it went into effect the resistance force withdrew from the search. Earlier, a Jewish Agency spokesman told correspondents that the agency felt that the imposition of controls would be a grave blunder since the entire population is aiding the hunt for the abducted men and military control would only hamper them. In addition, he pointed out that declaring Nathanya a controlled area and disrupting its economic life virtually means collective punishment of people who are not responsible for the kidnappings. The Irgun issued a statement that it would not deliver up the soldiers until the sentences of the three condemned Irgunists were commuted. It declared that the men were unharmed and_ "in a place where they can be kept a month or more." The controlled area will be commanded by Brig. Gen. Sir Humphrey Gale, who was in charge of Tel Aviv when it was under martial law. The area— in which 15,000 to 20,000 persons live—comprises, in addition to Nathanya, Avichail, Ramath, Tiomkin, Neve Ittamar, Ein Hatcheleth, Neve Oved, Neve Shalom and a number of smaller communities. The official communique announcing control listed a number of reasons—all terrorist attacks—for the action. British Cantor Will Sing Here On High Holidays Cantor Abraham Behrman, of the Willesden synagogue, London, England, has accepted an invitation to chant the services at the Miami Jewish Orthodox Congregation for Slichos and the High Holy Days, according to an announcement by Rabbi Murray Grauer. The Willesden congregation is reportedly the largest orthodox synagogue in London. Rev. Behrman is one of the outstanding cantors in Europe. He was educated in Continental yeshivas and received his musical training in Amsterdam. Upon the completion of his studies, Rev. Behrman was appointed cantor of the orthodox synagogue in Edinburgh, Scotland. After serving there for six years, he sang for the Birmingham, England, congregation, and transferred to the Willesden synagogue in 1939. Cantor Behrman has booked passage for Aug. 7 and is expected to arrive here Aug. 15. He came to the attention of the Miami Orthodox Congregation, Rabbi Grauer said, through his friendship with a Miami ex-G.I. nine are slated to be sent to the Lipari penal islands, off Naples. Italy ROME (JTA) — Italian police have arrested nine Jewish refugees at the port of Ancona, northeast of here on the Adriatic coast, it was reported this week. The Jews, inmates of the Torino DP camp, are suspected of planning to emigrate illegally to Palestine. They were arrested while talking to Italian sailors. Although no specific charges have been lodged against them, the Sweden STOCKHOLM. (JTA)— The chief prosecutor has ordered the confiscation of five anti-Jewish pamphlets published and circulated by Einar Aaborg, internationally known Swedish antiSemite. Distribution of any copies which have not been seized has been prohibited. The action was taken in connection with the indictment brought this week against Aaborg by the prosecutor. Aaborg is president of the so-called Swedish Anji-Jewish league. Rumania BUCHAREST (JTA)—A group of 126 Jews this week sailed for Palestine and the western hemisphere aboard the liner Transylvania. The majority of the immigrants are bound for South American countries, while 39 are going to Palestine and a small number to the United States. Europe's Doctors Get 60,000 Books Donated In N. Y. NEW YORK (JTA)—More than 60.000 medical textbooks, journals, charts and reports have been donated by New York medical schools, libraries and individual doctors to the Joint Distribution Committee's SOS collection campaign, for the use of doctors and students in Europe, it was announced here. Among the gifts was a donation of 38.500 books and journals from the library division of the New York Academy of Medicine. Columbia university's college of physicians and surgeons contributed approximately 12.000 items of medical data; the Medical college of Cornell university. 3.600; New York university's college of medicine. 1.000. 4 •• i • %  ;



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HDAY. JULY 18. 1947 +Jewlsti /for Idiom PAGE THREE 1 CAPITAL SPOTLIGHT By BEATRICE HEIMAN (Copyright, 1947, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.) • WASHINGTON. If it is any comfort to the displaced persons of Europe, activity their behalf is proceeding on three fronts in Washington. In Congress, the Senate and the House have under consideration his to admit a number of DP's to the United States. From the rhite House, President Truman sent a special message to Confess, urging swift passage of legislation to admit "a substantial," it unspecified, number of refugees. In a parallel, but unpublicized step, it is understood that the resident has assigned a special study on refugees and possibilities their resettlement to Myron C. Taylor, his personal representaire to the Vatican. Mr. Taylor, who has been in New York since krly this year, is believed to be well into his complex survey. |is experience in the subject dates back to 1938 when, as special ibassador of President Roosevelt, he was made chairman of the nan Conference on Political Refugees, and later became viceaairman of the Intergovernmental Committee on Refugees. A tremendous archive of materials already gathered, under the litiative of Roosevelt, lies ready to hand. Foreseeing the upheaval people which would result from the war, Roosevelt in 1942 called a group of geographers, economists, and population experts, and at them to work on the so-called M-project (M for migration). The scope of the inquiry was vast. The question of Jewish sfugees was a part of the whole. In pursuit of potential resettlement areas, Palestine was given a careful once-over. According to lose familiar with the inquiry, the examiners concluded that the fcKov desert area—which comprises 45 per cent of Palestine, and antains 4 to 5 per cent of the total population—could be developcQ accommodate a considerably larger number of inhabitants. And international settlement authority was proposed, with an ap[roximately one billion-dollar yearly budget, to carry out a unified bheme. To what extent the findings of the migration project are being ctively considered for eventual use is not, at this time, clear. pficials in the State department who were connected with it in IO way or another will say nothing, for reasons of "policy forma|on." A logical deduction is, therefore, that despite the layers of ust which have accumulated on the "M" files, they are not comBctely forgotten; that, in the current search for homes for those ktking them, the three-year labors and hundreds of documents |ay be imbued with life. Dr. Isaiah Bowman, president of Johns Hopkins University and e of the most eminent living geographers, was a guiding spirit the project. It has been suggested that the United Nations could |ut the materials to good use, and that Dr. Bowman would be the ppropriate person to funnel them to the International Refugee frganization, the obvious agency to deal with the problem. Miss Quartin Plans December Wedding Palm Beach MRS. MARY SCHREBNICK. Representative FOR THE BEST IN DAIRY PRODUCTS [MILK—CREAM—ICE CREAM LFA WEST PALM BEACH M IZELL-S I MO N MORTUARY N. w. Mlxell, C. K. Simon, Lawrence S. Favllle, Funeral Director! 413 Hibiscus Street • Phone 8121 • W. Palm Beach. Fla. LAINHART & POTTER ESTABLISHER 1893 "BUILDING MATERIAL FOR PARTICULAR BUTLDERS" Phone 5191 West Palm Beach. Flo. SOUTHERN DAIRIES Barring Palm Beach County, featuring uv NatlonallT Famous Southern Deiriea fro ducts and lea Cream. AS NEAR TO YOU AS YOUR PHONE Ml CMAarf ^rVe^VWWAMMWMti IVMi m***^^^^^*^^^*^*^* C. W. SMITH PLUMBING CONTRACTOR 529 Independence Road, West Palm Beach No job too large or too small. Over 50 years in busiraeenThe betrothal of Miss Eleanor Quartin and Louis Sager has been announced by the mother of the bride-elect, Mrs. Joseph Quartin, 1809 S. W. 23rd ter. Mr. Sager is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Rubin Sager, 2410 S. W. 22nd ter., formerly of New Haven, Conn. Miss Quartin served two years in the Marine Corps Women's Reserve and is now a senior at the University of Miami, where she is a charter member of The Quill, honorary journalism society She is District No. 5 reporter and historian of B'nai B'rith Young Women, and second vice president of Debbs chapter, BBYW. Sager, a veteran of three years of Navy service, attended the University of Connecticut college of pharmacy. The wedding has been scheduled for December. High Grade TAILORED VENETIAN BLINDS Thomas Venetian blinds are specially designed for Florida use—durable and long lasting. All blinds installed and guaranteed — prompt shipment on out-of-town orders. Phone for Estimates 9-7555 from Iftt HttNl HOMC INSTITUTE An Easy "Fleischig" Recipe Almost every housewife has her own coiled ion of recipes that call for chicken. And yet every housewife scans the recipe columns for Something new —a hit of a surprise in chicken cookery for the family. Well, here's that somethinR in w —easy and tasty, too! Here we use paieve and Kosher condensed vegetable soup and combine it with chicken in a novel way. We suggest : — Chicken 'n Rice This recipe requires: — 2',i lbs. stewing chicken, cut in pieces for serving 1 tablespoon salt 'j teaspoon pepper 2 quarts of boiling water 1 cup rice 1—11-oz. can 'Condensed Vegetable Soup Without Meat, undiluted. Add chicken, salt and pepper to water. Cover and simmer until chicken is very tender. Remove from broth. Bring broth to boil. Wash rice thoroughly. Add to broth. Meanwhile, remove skin and bones from chicken: cube. When rice is tender (about 20 minutes), add chicken and soap. Heat thoroughly. (Serves 8.) P*MUi h K,ihi.nd'.iJ bs.lki U-'ot / Personally Speaking (Continued from Page 2) have just returned from a two-month vacation in Chicago where Ihey attended the Bar Mitzvah of their grandson, Eddie, son of Mr. and Mrs. Morris Mitzen. Mr. and Mrs. Jack Apte,, 435 S. W. 31st rd., returned last week from a six-week trip which included two weeks at Johns Hopkins clinic. They visited Hendersonville and Jacksonville, returning by car with Mr. and Mrs. Abe S. Goldman. Miss Evelyn Koppelman left eaily this week for a month's vacation in Louisville, Ky., and Chicago. Her parents are Mr. and Mrs. Myer Koppelman of 2420 Flamingo dr. A party held recently in honor of the birthday of Mrs. Abe Safra, 202 Washington ave., was combined with a farewell to Mr. and Mrs. Bert Hagen and their children, Ruth and Max, who left for a trip to North Carolina. Friends present included Mr. and Mrs. Leibisch Hagen and their sons, Manfred and Jack; Mr. Abe Safra and Jack, Melvin and Lorraine Safra. • • Barbara Hutner, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hutner, 547 13th st., and Lucille Yuran, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Saul B. Yuran, 345 W. 46th st., will leave for a vacation in Columbia, S. C, New York and Connecticut upon the completion of their work at the first summer session at the University of Miami. Both girls will attend Florida State university upon their return. • • Among Miamians vacationing at Duncraggan Inn, Hendersonville, N. C, are Mr. and Mrs. Jack Zwicker, Mr. and Mrs. Max Samuels, Mr and Mrs. Lee Beck, Mr. and Mrs. Julian Kurlander and son, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Rayvis, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Rausch, Mr. and Mrs. Abe Humel, Mr. Abe Pepper, Mr. and Mrs. David Granat, and their sons, Robert and Richard Granat. • • First family reunion in 10 years for the Teitler family was held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Teitler, 2828 S. W. 12th st. Those members of the family present were Mr. and Mrs. Isidore Teitler, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Teitler, Mr. and Mrs. Mannie Teitler and children, Marilyn and Barry; Mr. Al Teitler and daughter, Rita Ann, all of New York, and Herman Teitler, Miami. (III III hill IllMlll.mi.lllimll j|im linn %  •III" ,ll 'I III mil EXPERT REPAIRING MANTEL —ELECTRIC—ALARM SUMMER PRICES PREVAILING PICK-UP and DELIVERY PH. 2-3039 J. H. STAFFORD 35 N. W. 1ST ST. LOCATION GENERAL INSULATING CO. PHONE 9-4842 2119 N. W. 22nd STREET ? DUBROWS LINCOLN CAFETERIA for Food that is different courteously served... reasonably priced. Air-conditioned for comfort. // VISIT US // U rows "A Tradition Three steb Generations" 330 LINCOLN ROAD I i • 1; • I-. i I i I •



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FRIDAY, JULY 18, 1947 vJenisti fhyridficnn Judaism Council Asks Passage Of Stratton Measure A board meeting of the South Florida chapter of the American Council for Judaism on July 15, enthusiastically adopted a resolution calling on the U. S. Senate to pass Bill S-1563, which would authorize, for a limited period of time, the admission of certain displaced persons into the United States for permanent residence. The resolution, a copy of which was telegraphed to members of the Senate immigration committee, read: "We unanimously endorse emergency displaced persons admission act and urge inclusion in its final draft of Stratton Bill's provision relative to quota on number of persons admitted. We also urge presentation of this act prior to adjournment of Congress." The wire was signed by Benjamin E. Bronston and Samuel J. Kanner, president and secretary of the group. Bronston announced the recent election of Herbert U. Feibelman as vice president and Albert J. Hirsch and Edward Walterman as members of the board. Harry Boyell, former secretary, recently resigned to accept the directorj ship of the Southeastern regional office of the American Council I'm Judaism on Miami Beach. IDA COMMITTEE OF SIX NAMED Newly named to serve on the Joint Defense Appeal's Committee of Six, central governing body of the IDA, are (top row, left to right) Gustave M. Berne, Arnold S. Askin. Albert H. Lieberman, for the AIC; (bottom row, left to right) Jacob Alson, Edmund Waterman, Max I. Schneider, for the ADL. The announcement was made by loseph M. Proskauer, president of the American Jewish Committee, and New York State Supreme Court Justice Meier Steinbrink, national chairman of the AntiDefamation League of B'nai B'rith. Emanon Club Plans Many New Events A spelling bee will follow the regular meeting of the Emanon club, Wednesday, July 23, 8:15 p.m., at the Young Men's Hebrew Association, 1567 S. W. Fifth .st., Miami. Six male members j will compete against six females of the club. Valuable prizes will be awarded to the winners. A parents' night will be held by club members and their parents. Sunday, July 27, at Temple Israel of Miami. Professional entertainers will perform and refreshments will be served. The club is also planning a swim-dance for Saturday evening, Aug. 2, at the Venetian pool. Coral Gables. Admissio nis $1.50 per person. The proceeds will go to the Buy-A-Brick campaign of the Miami YMHA. The Emanon club is a social organization for young men and women over 21 years of age. Meetings are held the second and fourth Wednesdays of the month at the Miami YMHA. 1567 S. W. Fifth st. Veterans are given six months' free membership. Mrs. Kirstein, Returning Here, Hails NHJC Work Imbued with the pioneering work of the National Home for Jewish Children at Denver in the relief of child asthma sufferers, Mrs. Samuel Kirstein. president of the Greater Miami chapter of NHJC, has returned home from the 40th annual convention of the nationally known organization. Mrs. Kirstein said the local auxiliary would intensify its activities in support of the Denver institution, which has gained praise from such authorities ;is Dr. M. Murray Peshkin. chief consultant physician from NewYork's Mt. Sinai hospital and Dr. Bela Schick, originator of the famed Schick test, national pediatric consultant. Other officers of the local auxiliary are Mrs. Irving R. Becker, tirst vice president; Mrs. George Feller, second vice president. Mrs. Isadore Vogel. third vice president; Mrs. Albert Dublcr. recording secretary; Mrs. Sanford Levine. corresponding secretary: Mrs. Samuel Leschel, financial secretary; Mrs. Harry Siegel, treasurer, and Mrs. Benjamin Bloom, auditor. Pioneer Women Form Coordinating Council A council to coordinate the activities of the three chapters of Pioneer Women of Greater Miami was formed at a special meeting held recently. Three representatives from each group participated in the organization of the new body, with Mrs. Isaac Pushkin presiding. The following women represented their respective groups: Club No. 1. Mesdames Isaac Pushkin, Sam Sorin-Bild, Isaac Shapoff; Club No. 2, Mesdames Lena Mintzes, M. Shubow; Kadimah, Mesdames Albert Berson, David Washer and Max Shapiro. The council elected the following officers: President, Mrs. Sam Sorin-Bild; vice president, Mrs. M. Shubow; secretary, Mrs. Max Shapiro, and treasurer, Mrs. Albert Berson. Included in the business of the first meeting was the adoption of the by-laws transmitted by the national office of Pioneer Women, and the discussion of joint plans for a donor dinner. Colleagues' Party Honors Dr. Berman Mr. Louis Fleischer, president of the Mercury Medical Supply Co., was host recently at the semi-annual company party held in the Nepsune room of the Robert Richter hotel, Miami Beach. The dinner was served in the enclosed patio and was preceded by a cocktail party at which Dr. Theodore M. Berman, Beach radiologist, was guest of honor. Other guests included Benjamin Grossman, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Grossman, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Kane, Mr. and Mrs. Philip Pett, Miss Perry Luft and Mr. and Mrs. James Bulova. Professional Hadassah Will Meet Monday Night A cultural meeting of the Business and Professional Women's division, Miami chapter of Hadassah, will be held Monday evening, July 21, at 8:30, at the home of Miss Alice Cohen, 629 S. W. Fifth st, Miami. The meeting will feature a continuation of the officers' training course, the first session of which was held at the last cultural meeting of the organization. Plans arc being made by the career women's group, it was learned, for a membership tea on Columbus day, Oct. 12. \X)GUST BROS R V/ Is the Bt.SI Gables B'nai BVith Plans Splash Party The Coral Gables lodge, B'nai B'rith, has planned a splash party and water carnival for Saturday, July 26, at 8 p.m. at the Albion hotel pool and patio, Dr. Leonard Glickstein, president, announced recently. Heading the variety bill of nautical entertainment will be an exhibition of diving by Miss Helen Miller. Maurice Shorr is chairman of the carnival committee and will be assisted by Leonard Spiegel, Maurice Horwitz and Irving Gerstenfeld. Cabanas will be provided for the convenience of guests, and refreshments will be served. Tickets at one dollar per person may be obtained at the door. The Pittsburgh Club of Greater Miami will hold a membership rally Monday evening, July 21, at 8:15, at the Miami Beach Y, One Lincoln rd. All former Pittsburghers and their families are invited to this first meeting since the organisation was chartered. GORDON ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORKS Have your roof repaired now; you will nvt on a new roof later "8atlafactory Work by Experienced Men" 414 W. 22nd Avenua I'HONE 4-6880 NURSERY PLANTS • SHRUBS • POTTED FERNS • FLOWERS Joseph Melnick 1252 N. W. 33rd Street Phone 3-9801 We Sell, Rent and Tune Pianos SOLE DISTRIBUTORS WEAVER PIANOS MARKLEY'S 2900 S. W. 8th Street Phone 4-5951 NOTiCE! KOTiCE! YUw. £acatian ROHAN'S Hardware and Paint Company 515 41st Street Phone 5-2026 lOftl ALPER & GREENBURG CONTRACTORS. Inc. "Clearing Lots Our Specialty" Bulldozer and Drag Lines for Rent—Grade A Pulverized and Processed Muck and Marl— Any Mixture Bitter Blue Sod Soil and Fill of Any Kind CaU 4-0335 or 78-3878 For FREE Estimates 1813 S. 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I L-ii PAGE TWELVE *Jenistfkridi^r FRIDAY. JULY 18. 1947 Temple Israel Men Hear Isenberg Talk A: inspiring talk on the life of 1 D. Brandeis, late Ju of the U. S. Supreme Court, was lure of a meeting, on Julv 9. of the Temple Israel Men's Club. Col -. who ade ^roup. touched upon : tht noted judicial dey Brandeis, 1 n Ut that since Brandeis first Jewish supreme A r. erican hist :-,e presidi added a tus t< the Zionist M An ther guest speaker was Nance, taiven mpa, who ed by Nat Roth. %  cultural rel thai his t • :: : %  %  %  Jew and w should be vocabople have only one "..:..• i) id r ndividErvin to Enter Race For Attorney General PALATKA. F:a July 17.—R. W Dick E: ney I th state road k pai ".I ssistant attortoday that he plans i LUI I i atl rnej and • after th< • %  paign I %  : ledged nself 1 ..: local iti ial %  %  % %  '• l lions He :.:.-;. liti...:.: %  %  .' %  nt of 1 i butations %  %  I to h:rr. tc ..:.•..-. -. ,ities • and at1 effect • t up in his '.%  nt .:'• t! nt atl pting : usurp aut .:;. The Miami Beach chapter of the American Jewiih Congress will hold its second annual dance a! the Robert Richter hciel tomorrow night. July 19. at 8:30. Members and friends are cordially invited to attend. GLASS FOR EVERY PURPOSE STORE FRONT PLATE k WINDOW GLASS FURNITURE TOPS BEVELED MIRRORS OUR SPECIALTY AND RESILVERING L. & G. GLASS AND MIRROR WORKS 136 S. W. 8th St Ph. 3-4834 VORRS ORLIN LOS GERBER Your Complete Department Store With Qual'ty Merchandise Washington Are. at 13th St. Miami Beach And for your convenience Morris Brother's New Apparel and Accessory Store 70 E. Flakier Su Miami UVES OF OUR TIMES ABRAHAM__REIilN_ r~.~ .. NO*MAN ~4 KX HO0H ~ % %  HOO I iiMOW n *at %  i*o* tan ui nauuti en WHUAl UTIMRV COUICTMW. AT I.I *\ : uci of KBIT; urn IMMOM UIKWU. THUS H TM M TIM 0U> VOUTM UuaCHID M YMHA Committee Studies Programs For New Bui ding Spurred on by th prog" %  •%  the i -: --.:: f the M V luig M Women s H %  Ass fiati %  rtu es of i prog to be conducted in 1 A letti r ft m Maui an, exi itivi tor, t ffieers Y lisclosed a t< s and mass tivitj norm..! nducted by a munal cent i facilities Included in I gram B Jewish cen nonies Is Jew"...'.is • ects. mus i n Wl tied to 1 t activities : :: OPf/V £V£RYOAr 170ML 5ST. T SV4SS. A2-9814 ANGIE and FRED WELCOME YOU TO PICCIOLO'S HE PALMS AT AMERICAN-ITALIAN RESTAURANT Mm ralla< Steaks. Chopi. S •*er. WineMaine labitcrt Diners IM Calllns *., M. f 4 P.M. I. I] H<<>i ( >l; 111. 4 t.U. It I t.M.i lw. •rallaa Stoats. Chopi. Sea Food Maine Labsters •Mas kit., M. B. >honr S-MH Rabbi Joseph E. RackoTsky 1520 S. W. 5th St. Phone 2-7439 PHILLIPS PLUMBING and HEATING SUPPLIES Phones 3-1830 — 3-7116 2415 N. Miami Ave. = • %  1445 N. W. 15th Ave. Nc Job Too Small or Too Large WHEN YOU TAKE VITAMINS CAICIUMC NTOTMIHATI OBo-Tbar (brand) lloWpJ. Viub> 1—Potent Eacti aapaaU lamau 2?* !" "" "* flr HUM— am at (B tw, Tftaaua* hick bar, bata awabbabad at —e^xiu t baman antritMo. I—ConTcniant ... Jan M eapaoU %  • %  ud roa caa CorrM all aboet h acn. tOBOrro*. — Economical ... A ibirU capaaW •Mb 4U.b aO roapayfat .ad afire taiT Guarantee. Take oaa, Ona-4.-DaT Cbraod) fiatepj. r.iaiS cTwal. tZI 4.7 for 60 BII2E+BREZ ar. ao< aabrai. mtlmUi. At aU aaC bus tAseuram. m. BJOAIT BEIN ESSEN Keystone CONSTRUCTION CO. PHONE 3-6924 PAINTING AND Decorating INTERIOR and EXTERIOR LICENSED and INSURED GUARANTEED WORK -J'gf rT| Es: mate* Chee-..n uliy Given Distinctive FLOORS and CEILINGS WOOD ASPHALT TILE LINOLEUM BROADFELT • ACOUSTICS • FORMICA WALTON Flooring Company 3850 N. Miami Avenue PHONE 7-6631-32 A TRULY NOLEN. President ECONOMY EXTERMINATORS TERMITE CONTROL WE SPECIALIZE IN 5YEAR GUARANTEE 5-3444 41st Street and Prairie Ave. Miami Beach Miami Phone 2-2555 FREE INSPECTION



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FRIDAY, JULY 18, 1947 +Jewist ftcrldfatn PAGE SEVEN Disaster Study Scheduled Here By Red Cross Four outstanding leaders in disaster relief work from southeastern area and national Red Cross headquarters are scheduled to lead discussions at Dade county's disaster preparedness institute to be held in Miami July 23, 24, 25, E. G. "Don" Graham, Dade Red Cross disaster chairman, said Wednesday. They are Maurice R. Reddy, Washington; Karl Reiser, Dr. Burton F. Austin and Miss Helen M. Flanagan, Atlanta. Reddy, assistant administrator, disaster relief, American National Red Cross, will come to Miami direct from Texas City, Texas, where he has been directing relief operations following the explosions there April 16. Reiser, assistant director, disaster service, southeastern area, saw more than four years of Red Cross duty with the armed forces during the war and entered upon his present duties in April, 1946. Administrator of medical and health service in southeastern area, Dr. Austin joined the organization in January of this year. His experience includes more than 20 years of public health work, and service in the medical corps in World War I. Miss Flanagan became a member of the Red Cross nursing staff in 1942, left to serve 33 months in the Army, and returned to Red Cross as a consultant in disaster nursing in the Atlanta office. "Purpose of the disaster institute is to mobilize and organize all community resources in Dade county to plan for hurricane or any other type of disaster which may strike this area," Disaster Chairman Don Graham said. Phi Sigma Sigma Alumnae Convene The first summer meeting of the Phi Sigma Sigma Alumnae group was held at Mammy's restaurant, Miami Beach, on July 12, inaugurating the series of summer luncheon meetings which have been planned by Mrs. Jerome Adelman, chairman. Plans for a cabana party were discussed and methods of aiding the active chapter at trje University of Miami in their 1947-48 semester activities were also on the agenda. At a recent meeting Mrs. Robert Rosen was appointed chairman of the building fund for the Beta Theta chapter house on on the new university campus. Fund raising methods are under discussion and will soon be submitted to the committee for consideration. Louis Kraft, left, executive director of the National Jewish Welfare Board (JWB), is retiring effective Oct. 1, from post he has held for past eight years to take over duties of newly created office of general secretary. National Council of JWB. He will be succeeded as JWB executive director by Samuel D. Gershovitz, right, former associate director of the JWB Jewish Center division and most recently general director of the Jewish Community Centers of Chicago. Hebrew College To Offer Course To Lay Students A new series of courses, designed for undergraduates interested in Jewish studies but not intending to prepare for rabbinical careers, will be offered by the Hebrew Union college, Cincinnati, Ohio, according to an announcement by Rabbi Alvin I. Fine, director of field activities. The program, to be instituted for the first time during the fall semester, will combine regular undergraduate studies at the University of Cincinnati with courses in Hebrew, Jewish history, literature and religion, at the college. A maximum of 12 credits will be allowed by the university for these courses. In addition to the program offered to lay students, the college will continue its courses in prerabbinica] studies, for candidates to the rabbinate. These courses, offered at the university under the supervision of the college, prepare undergraduates for postgraduate rabbinical work at the college. Further information may be obtained by writing the Hebrew Union college, Cincinnati 20, O. 4th 'Pop' Concert Tomorrow Night The University of Miami concert orchestra will present the fourth in its series of summer "pop" concerts tomorrow, July 19, at 8:30 p.m., at Flamingo Park, Miami Beach, under the baton of Robert M. Crawford. Featured soloist will be Marjorie Mayer, pianist, who will interpret the famed Rachmaninoff concerto No. 2 in C minor. The program follows: Overture to "II Ouarsiny". Gomez (Vmri-rto No. -1 in C minor, for piano Rachmaninoff a. Mouerato b. Adagio soHtenuto <•Allegro m a .herznmlo Marjorle Mayer Tamliourln Chin..Is Krelsler "I..H EStollea," Hulte for orchestra Crawford a. Ue uolr—"Cello solo Walter UroHsmnn b. I,a Rrande OurHe C. I^i petite OurHe


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I PAGE TWO >MniitnrriiiJt FRIDAY. JULY 18. 1941 Mitttt i irip Apppl MIPPOIUPH Hridp Ot Earl I'n inoif In Until RUPH M A --: H %  .• -%  I: 44:'. I A % %  L .. B. Pen Mi H Ml %  %  %  Otr I '••' %  • • g Mr. and M • %  : %  Ben A f New .' I ...-.-• Miss I .' %  ;#' M B Z M H HA IN Mrs. H P. Gersl P Raizer Mi Jack :i %  '. I The f the I n H ty ir. Miss Li 1 A %  urdines Classical Favorites $f25 each DEBUSSY. Afternoon of a Faun, Stokowski and Philadelphia Orch. RACHMANINOFF, Prelude in C sharp minor. PADEREWSKI. Minuet in G. EIGAR, Pomp and Circumstance, March No. 1. HANDEL, Xerxes' Largo. PROKOIEFF, Classical Symphony, Koussevitzky and Boston Symphony LIAPOUNOFF. Caucasian Dances, Alexander Brailowsky. STRAUSS, Roses from the South Waltz, Fiedler and Boston "Pops" Orch. FIFTH FLOOR Eleanor Rosow Engaged To Howard Schwartz '. 1577 I 01 %  %  %  M : ; Memo.-i :' nursing. S -..-.• the U. S t Tali • %  '. Senior Hi( the G 1 '• I ty. Hi • inthe Pacil %  the Iu Tepper-Mayerson Rites Scheduled for Aug. 10 151 '. w : I %  Manuel Ma n n I Mr. and Mi .'. :.:. % %  %  a gradu. I • Cinciri ttiliated a^ a case with the Travelei ty Hei fian e, a graduate D ton, and ho saw e at Anzio, Sicily, % % % %  in busini n, where the coup!, tht-ir home. Colman Zwitman will uled for Aug. 10 at the Robert Rich'.' Miss Jeanne Rosenthol |<1*M>III 11 V S|M*nlii||


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I I I %  I I %  A3 TEN Jem is* FkrriHr FRIDAY, JULY 18 Seymour Cohen Named To Head National BBYM 57 '_.."". B — Si• %  •%  3 -A. 5 -• V:<-c< 3 •-; :c i£Z-i%  •-• %  : %  %  ; "• ; • %  Asra •-.-.-•-. star) A %  T. Baak sfrrf-I-rBBTM %  %  er Be '. %  • %  %  '• aras i H aaa ." %  ?.i^j t~~^ I E "" 5 :rptr z ?.sss~: i reso CTS *.; %  % %  r* • 5 ] MOS _-.%  %  s a %  % %  ..-a %  %  %  Mok.Pla-s for 52d Jewish War Vteron C—Jlini %  St. Pal. October 15 to If I—.— Xante* _>ow On ROT Of Survivors • i • 21 I 5. W. %  ~s of F r SOL A. GOLDSTROM JOINS FEUER OFFICE Sol A. BoMbfe promil i Beach R past 22 yean, b n ISSIXM with the W I T'.r ai *r at 309 Ua Goldstrom. *:/ pened Beach's first bade..•.; p^,' 1923. also organs •-• associatior. there. Hewl president o* that for years. During -_ %  > he *rvj as chief obser-. force*, and m %  -„ ArmJ %  trial of aerit _r*r_ zz*ii =-i= cf the Lr* lMaurac NAT GANS %  u* -. Ct. S*M W. lawk, f r — aari H%  •• %  a. KTX V '• a m wa i -gt l ** •' -•" • r '. "'• r m -' m~*' xwr 'jam-ecru. • %  JjmnoiMr S. hi .jramMf-.t. ^jt-.-Ma ."jini&aaier K-i ;e :v M =. LCIIML JWV I* Planning Hallowe'en Ball •.. -. .. _.nil % %  !! 1 Bad seetias :%  £ be*'.rs w._ "=* ild ai y : V;=daT tre-: :. :: i : I im A; :i --• Mrs Baa W tt m. Y -;-; s scwliac <,r_ --:;: -*: *'-: %  ; aaoai vdrt ta* :r*> MS uad sortnaDy .= ---^:^ ; w:: *T* ofHAULING PROWPT S£ = ; E W. A. DICKINSON TRANSIT?. CO. 2323 H. BCIAM: AVE. Pboon 243C8 DIAM OND 1 CAB PBONE M627 ipea iece DB -' -. Z I %  Sacc T a: %  %  : | ColKns Transport & Trading, Inc. Li r.iz-T :: Oiitr Yea Unhmftad Space ::: A *::c-ji=g tad Staraoc ?_. i.~--s% — Poci Car Disxribolicn T rarr% %  ST3K r Sana "^" j f -" > r I. % % %  3 i 7 • —. : : : :-* : fiar m • %  eaa! a Zx-.": S E. 4Ct= 5. •beam ''::; mil r ^JI PLf%rr zf S^Trijmrr i~z.-z.rn *: %  £ Kosher Zion %  JOBBCS K fOCal Local Delicatessen ITOUBY i PAINTING CORP. Florida Provision Co.. LncPEARL BROS. S*2 3L W. "^ ATSSrv racsE s-j.c MIAMI X. FLC*XA • ai.



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JULY 18. 194? +Jewistfk>ri


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FWDAT. IDLY Editorial INKI. VtOMMI*MO* ,.. ... N v i %  Ik : %  • • I M i •' %  %  %  > %  -• %  i I : MC -. 5 S* POLISH JEWS' LOT %  %  'Between You and Me BY BCRJS SMOLAH *}. ;*aa Te^*rpejc Agency, fct >• %  M-PBOfECT': %  : %  %  s .%  iixlT'* -eunflMoc . :* ~~.e i-.rr.-~ :he !lg gv *-nts. —...: large aumcer_sn ma :ests :o *e -xhtr .land r.rmran 3epu %  %  — — ._ 33B D JO B. • %  -grient 7 %  MS 1J UJBWUll.^ac r -. CTHIIUSW] .arporcnon toraa -_er r -.Palestine rfousmq IronBwoa ; — e *~ ~. V -*, MM -%  %  .., OB ~ • %  % %  ? %  I I Ml|1 •*c vziis an ?G53orar- 3id 'miijMu t -am *pr— • r -suscilars 10 ~3jm* V i -ar~. %  -n-i' .e HEM -a a mp i T ecr. THHTTWT %  I —V ll'Ud. : "•••pawn*. j.;i41—Mtq •i .-career. -|nw I oa 3ar %  ears ^ Ta Many TMP*:^ -' 7-" % 



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FRIDAY, JULY 18, 1947 *Jen 1sfi fkricfict/i PAGE ELEVEN TIDBITS FROM EVERYWHERE. (Copyright, 1946. Seven ArU Festurs Syndicate) By PHINEAS J. BIRON The Real Difference • Dr. Chaim Weizmann unquestionably is the most realistic leader in Zionism today It's an open secret that he is prepared to accept an increase in the immigration quota for Palestine even if it should mean "to forego debate for some time regarding future statehood" The quotes are from a recent letter from Weizmann to Prof. Chaim E. Chernowitz ... In other words, Weizmann is primarily concerned about saving the DP's stagnating in concentration camps. The Jewish Aspect • The Garsson brothers and ex-Congressman May were found guilty—and rightly so—on charges of graft in their work for the government during the war The Garsson case, however, was a minor matter in comparison with the war-profiteering scandals in the billion-dollar class Now the Garsson brothers were Jews, and as such were resented, because Jews are not supposed to break into the big munitions game There is a similarity between the Garsson case and the case against Bernard J. Marcus of the Bank of the United States some fifteen years ago Marcus was sentenced to jail and his bank closed, although the receivers were able to reimburse the depositors to the extent of well over 90 per cent of their socalled losses But there too a definite Jewish anqle came into play Jews are far from welcome in the big banking game ... It will always remain a mystery why a Jewish banker and a Jewish munitions maker were selected as the targets when non-Jewish culprits had much more to answer for Not that we condone the actions of the Garssons at all .They deserved their punishment But where are the other culprits? What about Senator Bilbo's entanglements in big war contract deals, to mention just one instance? President Roosevelt, while still Governor of New York, admitted to us in a private interview that there was a Jewish aspect in the Marcus case Well, there was a big Jewish angle in the Garsson case, and we still are waiting for the bigger offenders to be brought to the bar of justice. Showdown Required ... Some time ago the American Jewish Committee asked the House un-Amexican Activities Committee to investigate the activities of George W. Armstrong of Natchez, Miss., and Ft. Worth, Texas Armstrong is a very rich oil operator who has established the Armstrong Foundation, which is spreading prejudice against Negroes and Jews Armstrong is a great admirer of Representative John E. Rankin, and apparently has no fear of any investigation But Jewish and non-Jewish pro-democratic organizations should back the American Jewish Committee's request for a showdown on Armstrong. Misvelianti ... Joseph Brainin, newly elected chairman of the administrative board of the Committee of Jewish Writers, Artists and Scientists, is readying a novel for publication next spring Paul Muni will appear on Broadway in 1948 in an Ibsen play Marc Chagall is seriously considering residence in the USSR for at least one year Rubin Saltzman, general secretary of the Jewish People's Fraternal Order, is leaving for Palestine in September, in connection with a new donation to the Hadassah hospital Albert Einstein has been ordered to take a complete rest—not even letter-writing is permitted him—during the summer Arthur Koestler, author of "Thieves In the Night," will be visiting America in the coming winter The Rev. Richard E. Evans, dynamic fighter against prejudice, has fully recovered, we understand, after being knocked down by a Fifth ave. bus a few weeks ago. Flash! If the United Nations commission decides against a Jewish state, look for a dramatic political-military coup by the Irgun in Palestine Blueprints are ready for taking over the government—unless, of course, the Jewish Agency succeeds in preventing the coup. 68 Organizations Get VA Authority On Veterans' Claims Sixty-eight organizations arc authorized to represent veterans in the presentation and prosecution of claims against Veterans Administration, according to the latest VA list. They have been recognized by the Administrator of Veterans Affairs under section 200, PublicLaw 844, 74th Congress, for the presentation of veterans' claims in connection with the statutes administered by VA. VA is now authorized, in general, to recognize only state or governmental services, or organizations granted a charter or recognition by an act of Congress. Organizations included in the list which have local representatives in Miami or Florida, are: American Legion; American Red Cross; AMVETS (American Veterans of World War II); AVC (American Veterans committee); JWV (Jewish War Veterans); National Jewish Welfare board (YMHA), and the Florida State Veterans commission. NBC Radio Show Will Broadcast Herzl Vignette In tribute to Theodor Herzl, founder and guiding spirit of the modern Zionist movement, the Eternal Light program will present "Herzl and the Minstrel," by Arnold Perl, on Sunday, July 20, over Station WIOD at 10:30 a.m., to commemorate the 43rd anniversary of Herzl's death. The Eternal Light, a coast-to coast radio program presented under the auspices of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, is a public service presentation of the National Broadcasting Co. Dr. Moshc Davis is program editor. Although Theodor Herzl studied for a legal career, the world of letters captured him so completely that within a year he withdrew from legal practise. An appointment as Paris correspondent for the Neue Freie Press, tne most distinguished newspaper in the Austro Hungarian empire, climaxed his journalistic career in 1892. In Paris, his ideas on the dilemma of world Jewry developed and found expression. "Herzl and the Minstrel" tells of the impact of Herzl's personality upon the Austrian town of Alt Austee where he spent some time. MIAMI BEACH Better Class Listings On Oceanfront Properties. Hotels, Homes or Investments B. E. BRONSTON, Bealtor 605 Lincoln Rd. Phone 5.5868 "Trustworthy Service" Schwartz Is Featured On WINZ Yiddish Hour Maurice Schwartz, leading actor, producer and director of the Yiddish stage, will be the featured performer this Sunday at noon on the "Yiddish Classical Hour," weekly broadcast of traditional Yiddish and Hebrew songs and recitations over Station WINZ. M. Nasatir, director of the program, has announced that he will present a recording by Schwartz of "A Chazn A Shikcr," wellknown humorous monologue. Also featured will be a recording, made in Tel Aviv by the Palestinian j quartet "Hazomer," of a tradi! tional Chassidic dance. Other numbers to be aired will include renditions by Aaron Lebedeff, Seymour Rechtzcit and Menashe Oppenheim. Pioneer Women Hail Musical Evening Success More than 200 persons were guests of the Pioneer Women's club No. 2, of Miami, at a dinner and musical evening held last Sunday night, July 13, at the Workmen's Circle lyceum, 25 Washington ave., according to Mrs. Lena Mintzcs, chairlady of the event. Jacob Schechtcr, director of the WBAY Jewish Radio Hour, acted as master of ceremonies for j a program which included Mrs. Albert Naness, soprano, and Mrs. E. Cameron, pianist. SUNRAYPARK HEALTH RESORT HOTEL SANITARIUM Foe ROT COMVALESCENCI AND CHUOMIC CJES wwfl ** •ooti.i II* I W JO— COURT MIAMI FLORIDALaVigne Electric Co. 38 N. W. 7th Street PHONE 2-1759 Repairs — Contract* Electrical Installations INDUSTRIAL COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL Same Dependable Service RUTH GROSS AGENCY Inc. GENERAL INSURANCE BONDS LIFE Phone 58-9538 350 LINCOLN ROAD Morris Alpert Is Injured In Automobile Collision Morris Alpert, 3930 N. Meridian ave., Miami Beach, was taken to Alton Road hospital Tuesday morning, July 15, with a possible fracture, as the result of a headon collision on Lake Pancoast dr. Alpert is a building contractor and a member of the firm of Kahn and Alpert, 420 Lincoln rd. DISTRIBUTORS FOR U. S. TIRES EMERSON TIRE CO. 600 N.E. 1st Av. 2644 S.W. 8th St. PH. 3-5308 PH. 48-3442 MIRRORS FINEST QUALITY — MADE TO ORDER IMMEDIATE DELIVERY Auto Glass Installed — Furniture Tops Store Front Construction ADAMS GLASS SERVICE "If It's Glass We Have It' 1805 PURDY AVE.. M. B. PR 58-3756 ADAM, ABE and IRVING RABINOWITZ AVERY INC. BUILDING SUPPLIES CEMENT — ROCK LATH — CEMENT BLOCKS MORTAR MDC Everything in the General Building Line Phones 9-0398—9-9985 3800 X. W. S. River Drive PER ANNUM* ON INSURED SAVINGS ACCOUNTS Ths Federal Savings and Loss Insurance Corporation insures individual accounts up to $5,000. Husband and wife may have total of $15,000 fully insured. Chase Federal savings accounts are legal investments for Trust Funds, es well as Funds held by Guardians, Administrators and Executors. Funds invested on or before the 10th of tho month earn as of the 1st of the current month. Funds invested after the I Oth earn as of ttie first of the following month. •CURRENT DIVIDEND RATE rrcrtA. .'VIN; EC CHASE FEDERAL SAYINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION lilt ItattH •••...• %  ••••if *•• %  HH tl AH** e. i. ciiUPJftrJteiAl'ti I i, i %  %  1 1 \ i 1 i. a 1 J • • %  ;