The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00910

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
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tewjytUEIIiOJpidliiaup
G?(^^^Y\ E JEWISH UNITY f
Curn
THE JEWISH WE EKLY
VOLUME 18NUMBER 28
MIAMI 18, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JULY 13. 1945
WITHDRAW PARTS
PALESTINE QUESTION
IS OBSTACLE TO ARAB-
BRITISH COOPERATION
London (JTA) Britain will
forfeit the friendship of 32,000-
000 Arabs if it creates a Jewish
state in Palestine, Edward Ati-
yah, of the London Arab office
says in the Spectator.
The Palestine question, he
continued, is the only obstacle to
Arab cooperation with Britain
and this can be removed by
strict application of the White
Paper.
PRICE TEN CENTS
AtlantaComplete elimination
of the use of anti-Semitic ex-
cerpts from Andre Siegfried's
book, "America Comes of Age,"
in correspondence courses offer-
ed t" civilian extension students
at tli" University of Alabama
and army and navy personnel
was announced by Alexander F.
Miller, director of the South-
eastern Kogional Office of the
Anti-Drlamation League of B'nai
B'nth.
Following recent revelations
thai the United States Army
Forci s Institutp had purchased
this correspondence course from i
the University of Alabama, Israel j
H. Moss, of the league's south- Wnshinetnn (ITAi T,.,r..
office, immediately l*\*SEttff$^?3g&
PRESIDENT ASKED
TOTflKESTEPSFQR
I JEWISH STATE
IS STATE'S FIRST
JEWISH DIRECTOR
Edward T. Newman this week
became Florida's first Jewish
funeral director after success-
fully passing the state board
July 10 at Bartow.
Last year Mr. Newman had
the distinction of becoming
Florida's first Jewish licensed
mWHnsnri
Princton, N. J. (JTA)After
discussing problems of the Near
East and their impact on the
lives of every American, the na-
tional seminar on Palestine, con-
ducted by the American Chris-
tian Committee, which met here
last week, set up an educational
program of Christian action in
behalf of Jewish aims in Pales-
tine to be put in force during
the coming year. Participants
heard many distinguished au-
thorities in the field from both
the secular and religious world.
TO THE NEAR EAST
for Tus aloosa, Alabama.
members of the House of Repre-
Blo
de
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 6)
PEiNir
I RED CROSS TO
ARRIVE IN MIAM
A impanied by Mr. William j sntativs, and 125 mayors of large
loum oi Tuscaioosa, past presi- i cities this week presented a
ir District 7 of B'nai B'rith, | joint petition to President Tru-
Mr. Moss conferred with univer-| man urging he government to
Hty officiate. | take "the necessary steps that
As a result of this interview I Palestine in its historic boun-
daries shall be proclaimed as a
Jewish State."
The petition, submitted
through the New Zionist Organi-
zation of America, also urged
that the Jewish pcoplp "through
a delegation of Palestine Jewry"
be invited to participate in the
councils of the United Nations.
Stating that "unless the Jew-
ish problem is solved, it will con-
stitute a permanent obstacle to
the effectiveness of any post-war
settlement and to the peace of
the world," the declaration voices
A personnel recruitment team ?arp Tticisfm,,ofTJhe, W}FS of
from tlii- southeastern area e leaders of the United Nations cmbalmer, and after completing
headquarters of the American It0 invlte a Jewish delegation to the necessary additional year of
Red Cross will be in Miami July San Francisco. declaring that service, he became eligible to
26 through 31 to interview appli- ithis was a 8ross injustice and take the funeral director's ex-
cants for paid positions. Ian error-" amination.
Newman has resided on Miami
Beach for the past twelve years,
j and completed three years of
apprenticeship as an embalmer
in this area. He completed his
course by taking a year's train-
ing a New York school where
EDWARD T. NEWMAN
EPARTMENT
EXPERT AIDS ARAB
PART! AT FRISCO
New York (JTA) The dis-
closure that an expert of the
War Department assisted the
Arab delegates during their stay
at San Francisco is revealed in
the Al-Hoda, an Arab daily
newspaper published here.
Reporting that the Iraq dele-
gation maintained a special pro-
paganda office at San Francisco,
the paper says that this office
was headed by Prof. Darwish
Al-Heidari, general secretary of
the Iraq delegation. "Also in
the office were Professor Faris
Maloof, head of the Institute for
Arab-Ameriean -Affairs, assisted-
by Prof. George Barakat, on
special leave from the U. S. War
Department," the paper says. It
credits the Iraq Minister in
Washington with making this
arrangement.
Mackinac Island, Mich. (JTA)
President Truman was asked
this week by the governors of
thirty-seven states to take im-
mediate steps to open Palestine
"to Jewish mass immigration
and colonization, and to bring
about the earliest transforma-
tion of that country into a free
and democratic Jewish Common-
wealth."
A petition bearing the signa-
tures of thirty-seven state execu-
tives was sent to President Tru-
man, accompanied by a cover-
ing letter from Governor Her-
bert B. Maw of Utah expressing"
hope that the President will dis-
j cuss ways and means to achieve
this with Prime Minister
Churchill and Marshal Stalin at
the forthcoming Big Three con-
ference in Berlin. Gov. Millard
Caldwell of Florida was among
the signers.
Governor Maw, who initiated
the petition with Governor
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 8)
appli
or paid positions.
Needs are for women hospital
workers to staff military hospi-
tals, for staff assistants to serve
i and for men to fill po-
sitions as assistant field direc-
tor.
Trained social workers for
supervisory administrative and
stafl positions; recreation work-
ers t,i plan, direct and conduct
tion programs; and hospi-
11 workersto serve under pro-
visional guidance in social case
work.
Wj applying for positions
stall assistants must be' be-
tween the ages of 23 and 35,
a are needed for overseas duty
"operate clubmobiles and to
rlr,(' ,'" Rl'd Cross clubs and
',' ""' centers.
Men applying for positions as
assistant field directors must be
necHnri0? yt'Uls of aS. and are
cam,'0 '"'" assignment, either to
raTnti"' "lls country, or to re-
eas TiU"lts, be,n* sent ver-
K.JhM? dutles are to coun-
J.D.C.
DIRECTOR LEAVES
HERE FORL
he studied embalming, funeral
direction, and associated sub-
jects. He graduated with honors
receiving the highest scholastic
average of the class and served
as class chairman.
Newman, son of Mrs. Freda
Newman, prominent Beachite,
resides with his mother. His ci-
vic activities include affiliation
with Miami Beach Jewish Cen-
ter, historian of the Beach Jey-
OF
IS
PRESIDENT LAUDS
EFFORTS OF HENRY
iworgea, Jl.
Havana (WNS) An anti-
Semitic campaign, spearheaded
by a group of Germans recent-
ly released from internment, is
now under way in Cuba.
se' and assist
sonni
servicemen on per-
aeps?sem"and hf*
lofffi? 1intc,rcste call \,C Ip','s'tlns are asked to
so m ,Jhn C' Schroeter. per-
Sunw ntSv,e,wer for the Dade
Cnd *, ?"* 277a N. W.
sohi loePhone 3-1477. In-
WllVv possl,bl<->. Mrs. Schroeter
'o all p'"- lmina,'-V interviews
11 applicants prior to the I
Washington (JTA) The de-
parture of Dr. Joseph J. Sch-
wartz, European director of the
Joint Distribution Committee,
for London on a special refugee
mission was announced this
week by the State Department.
Dr. Schwartz has been given
a temporary leave by the Joint
Distribution Commission to ac-
company Earl G. Harrison,
United States representative on i PrTTMn MFHP MTTMnFlM I organizing a new post-war Nazi
the Inter-Governmental Com-!rUUNL> NfcAtt HUNtMCTI movement
Washington (JTA)Hight tri-
bute was paid this week by
President Truman to Secretary
j of the Treasury Henry Morgen-
thau, Jr., following his announce-
ment that Mr. Morgenthau had
resigned from the office which
he has held since 1934.
The President lauded Mr. Mor-
genlhau's efforts for the nation
both during the years of peace
and war. No successor to Mr.
Morgenthau will be appointed
until the President returns from
his conference with Prime Min-
ister Churchill and Premier
Stalin, it was announced.
A fervent plea for religious
tolerance and differing beliefs
was made this I eek by James
F. Byrnes, new Secretary of
State, at his swearing-in cere-
the terrace of the
mittee on Refugees, as an asso-
ciate on a mission of inquiry to
Europe concerning the needs of
stateless and non-repatriable
refugees, including many Jews,
in Western Europe and the Al-
lied zones of occupation in Ger-
many.
The State Department an-
nounced that the mission has
been directed to ascertain the
extent to which the needs of non-
repatriables, who include "many j der the direction of Alfred Ro-
Jewish survivors of Nazi per- senberg, chief Nazi race theo-
ritician, who was _captured by
Sf'ol theReddroS officiate tcution..'' are nod being met
Tom Atlanta ^Ioi!> oniciais k fV> ,;,;
Brfe"'"?. 'n Ausi'vi ls now stationed
tain Dormi 's attl;mpting to ob-
palesuni h to transfer to
Horzl Th '' rL'ma'ns of Theodor
n* h now rcst in a Vien-
here mttory' ll was learned
edJVienn-f0!dicrs who have visit-
es<*pedI dnaPort that tne rave
t^ handsamoafRethor desecration at
"wmberiT of ihe ^azis- May
vited th he ^iaade have
^ths Z tnfSvi t0 PlaCC
The leader of the revived anti-
Semite drive is Hans Biederlack, I mony on
a close associate of Arnulfo j White House. The Secretary told
Arias, pro-Nazi former president j the audience of high Washing-
cees, secretary of the Civic 10f Panama, who is said to have ton officials, including the cabi-
League, and a member of B nai j the backing of many Falangist!net- senators and congressmen,
B'rith. HP is now associated j elements in Havana and through- i that "centuries ago devout men
with the King Funeral Home. | out the country. It is known thought that they had to fight
------. ,^,-__ ^^>^CT|that even during his internment with one another to preserve
MANY LOOTED BOOKS : Biederlack was instrumental in their different beliefs, but we
have learned through long and
bitter experience that the only
way to protect our religious be-
liefs is to respect and recognize
the right of others to their re-
ligious beliefs."
Secretary of State James F.
Byrnes this week announced the
appointment of Benjamin V. Co-
hen as one of his three special
assistants. Mr. Cohen previously
served as general counsel of the
Office of War Mobilization and
Reconversion when Mr. Byrnes
was its director, and held many
other government posts.
Frankfurt (JTA) Three-
quarters of a million volumes
looted from Jewish rabbinical
libraries in Vilna, Paris and
Amsterdam have been discover-
ed, so far, in the small town of
Hungen, north of here, and 100,-
000 have been found in the "In-
stitute for Research Into the
Jewish Question" in Frankfurt.
The institute was operated un-
by the military authorities, gov
ernments of residence, interna-
tional relief bodies and private
refugee agencies.
Melbourne, Australia (JTA)
The attempt by anti-Semitic
groups to block the purchase by
the Australian Zionist organiza-
tion of a building in .the business
section of this city has been con-
demned by several radio com-
mentators. One broadcaster
pointed out that the failure to
stop the sale is an indication
that the majority of Australians
are true to the British tradition
of tolerance and fair play.
British troops in Flensburg in
May. After examining the loot
at the institute, Rosenberg would
send the books to Hungen to be
stored. Among the nearly 1,-
000,000 volumes are priceless
treasures, including illuminated
manuscripts and examples of the
earliest printing in Europe.
Lieut. Julius Buchman, of New
York City, discovered the cache,
and suspecting its value sent out
a hurry call for someone who
could read Hebrew. SHAEF
produced Cpl. Abraham Aaroni,
also of New York, a Semitic
scholar. Aaroni quickly identi-
fied the volumes.
In Haban Vieja, the Jewish
section of this city, the anti-
Semites distributed anti-Jewish
posters and hand-bills, provok-
ing street brawls with Jews. One
of the weekly newspapers. La
Tribuna, in its issue of June 25,
carried a headline "The Cuban
worker and commerce demand
that the Jews get out of Cuba."
New York (JTA)Disclosure
of what transpired at a "national
anti-Semitic conference" held in
Los Angeles last month under
the auspices of the "United
Israelites," or, as they sometimes
call themselves, the "Anglo-
Israelites," is made in the news-
paper PM.
The paper reveals that 1.000 to
1,500 delegates attended the con-
ference which was featured by
numerous anti-Semitic speeches,
is which Jews were described
variously as "liars," "murderers"
and "skunks." It was announced
that "a funeral service" would
soon bP held for the Jews, and
those present were urged to "get
their guns" and prepare to fight
the Jews.
Marseilles, (JTA)Over 2,000
French Jews liberated from
concentration camps in Poland
by the Red Army have arrived
here from Odessa to where they
were taken by Soviet authori-
ties.
They told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency that en route
from Oswiecim to Odessa they
stopped in Bucharest where they
were warmly welcomed by the
Jewish community and given
clothes. Among thP arrivals is
Pierre Karsenti, 32, from Paris,
who is one of the few Jews in
Europe to have survived two
years in Oswiecim.
V
' I
i:
1


PAGE TWO
fJemsii fkricficTrjn
FRIDAY, JULY 13,
PERSONALS
Paul Weitzman leaves Friday
for New York where he will
vacation for two weeks.
Celebrate 50th Anniversary
WEDDINGS
Rabbi and Mrs. Saul P. Appel-
baum will return Monday, July
16, after a six weeks trip
through Ohio, Chicago, and New
York. Rabbi Appelbaum is spi-
ritual leader of Temple Israel.
Mr. and Mis. Max D. Rifas
are visiting with their children
in Chicago. They will return
for the holidays.
Mr. J. Schiff, Miami Beach,
returned home after spending
foul weeks in New York and
vicinity.
Miss Natalie Goodman, daugh-
ter of Dr. and Mrs. Morris
Goodman, 3619 Flamingo Drive,
is home from Winston Salem
academy, Winston Salem, N. C.
Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky
left Monday to spend several
weeks in New York.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Gordon
will leave Sunday for a two-
week stay in Cuba.
Jare Margolis Feiman will be-
come the bride of Irving Na-
thanson at a ceremony Sunday
at 12:35 held at th,. home of
Jftdgi- and Mrs. Harold B. Spaet,
5435 La Gorce Drive, Rabbi Ja-
cob H. Kaplan will officiate. Fol-
lowing the ceremony, a luncheon
will be held at the Versailles
Hotel.
The (laughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Samuel Margolis of Akron, Ohio,
Miss Feiman attended Akron
University and is a member of
Deta Pi Iota Sorority.
Mr. Nathanson, of the law firm
Nathanson, Oka and Spaet, at-
tended City College of New
York and St. Johns University
in Brooklyn. He is the son of
the late Mr. and Mrs. Dese Na-
thanson.
After a month's honeymoon in
Mexico, the couple will reside
at 3915 N. Meridian Ave., Mi-
ami Beach.
"personals
Completing their vacation, Mr.
and Mrs. Leon Kaplan will leave
the Berkshire Pines, West Co-
pake, New York, on the 13th for
home.
Mrs. Louis Kotkin, 333 S. W.
30th Road, left for an extended
visit with relatives and friends
in Detroit.
Dr. and Mrs. Jack Seitlin of
Corpus Christi, Texas, are visit-
ing their parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Henry Seitlin, 347 S. W. 6th St.
Mr. and Mrs. David H. Reiser
celebrated their 50th wedding
anniversary last month. Form-
erly of Cleveland, O., the couple
came here for a visit with their
son and daughter-in-law and
their family, Mr. and Mrs. Jessie
Reiser of Coconut Grove. Once
here, thP couple decided to join
their son, Jessie, member of the
Amrican Legion Drum and Bu-
gle Corps for the past 12 years,
and make this their permanent
residence.
Mr. Reiser, prior to his coming
here, traveled extensively and
was a sea captain in the sailing
days. His family settled in this
country in 1836 and he is a Ma-
son of many years.
The couple have two sons.
Raymond, first lieutenant in
France, and Charles, associated
with the government in Cleve-
land. They have a grandson,
Billy, son of the Reisers of this
city, at present with the army in
Ft. Louis. Washington, and a
great grandson, Daniel.
Cantor and Mrs. A. Friedman,
i 336 N. W. Second Street, left
yesterday for a month's stay
in Mount Vernon and Asbury
Park, N. J.
Mrs. Bernard Mayerson, Mi-
ami Beach, left for Chicago
where she will spend a month
visiting friends and relatives.
Mrs. Emanuel Gluck, 2475 S.
W. 17th street, has returned
from an extended visit to north-
ern cities. Mr. and Mrs. Gluck
have as their house guest, Mrs.
Vilma Heltay of Charleston, S. C.
Mr. and Mrs. Sol Goldstrom
leave today to spend several
weeks in Hendersonville, N. C.
Mr. and Mrs. Abe Bcrger left
for New York to spend two
weeks.
PERSONALS
Miss Phyllis Lazar of Jamaica.
L. I., niece of Mr. and Mrs. Jack
Wucher, Miami Beach, and Mr.
and Mrs. Henry S. Greenbaum.
Miami, is spending the summer,
here.
Nat H. Hankoff, vice-president
of the Miami Beach Hotel Own-
ers' Association, accompanied by
his wife, left for the North where
he will make a survey of hotel
conditions. They will also visit
with their family in Pittsburgh.
BAR MITZVAH
Mrs. Ethel Shochet left Wed-
nesday morning to spend several
weks in Baltimore, Md.
Listen to our radio program
"Fashion Time" over WIOD
each weekday, 8:30 to 8:45
A. M.
Write Him Often
on colorful
air mail paper
$
1
.50
BOX

Bring "color" into your
air mail letters with
"Wings of Tomorow" sta-
tionery. White with blue,
green with peach, and
pink with grey borders.
72 single sheets and 30
envelopes.
MIAMI STORE
STATIONERY
SECOND KI,OOR
Louis Silverman has returned
to the city after spending several
weeks in New York and New
Hampshire. While away he vis-
ited his daughter, Edith, who
now resides with her husband,
Captain Albert Blich, in Man-
duster. N. H. Mrs. Silverman
leaves tomorrow to visit with
her family in the North. She
will return here prior to the hol-
idays.
Mrs. Dave Emmer is visiting
in New York where she will
spend several months. Mr. Em-
mer will leave tomorrow to join
his wife.
Dr. Albert E. Rosenthal is re-
cuperating at his home from an
attack of the flu.
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Rose re-
turned after spending a month
in the north. They visited in
Cleveland, Pennsylvania, and
New York. Mr. Rose is executive
director of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
BRISM
The brism of the past week
included the sons of Mr. and
Mrs. Heinz Wellisch, Mr. and
Mrs. Sam Greenspan, Mr. and
Mrs. Ray Redman. Rabbi S. M.
Machtei officiated.
Dr. and Mrs. Albert E. Ros-
enthal announce the bar mitzvah
of their son. Eugene, to take
place at services in Temple Israel
Friday evening, July 20. at 8:15
p. m. Friends are asked to join
the family on the happy occas-
ion. A reception in Kaplan Hall
will follow the ceremony. No
formal invitations will be issued.
Mr. and Mrs. David Adler-
blum, 1820 S. W. 6th Street, left
Sunday for a visit with their
children in Chicago. They ex-
pect to be away until after the
holidays.
Mrs. H. Y. Waldorf announces
the bar mitzvah of her son,
Melvin, Saturday, July 21, in
New York. The family make
their home at 3002 N. W. 7th
Avenue, Miami, and spend the
summer in New York.
Miss Doris Feldman, 2119 S.
W. 16 Terrace, well known lo-
cal harpist with the University
i of Miami symphony orchestra, is
' continuing her harp studies this
summer under the personal tu-
| telage of Mr. Carlos Salzedo.
world's foremost authority, on
the harp at his summer harp
colony in Camden, Maine. She
will return late in the fall to
resume her studies at the Uni-
versity of Miami where she is a
junior, majoring in music educa-
tion.
Miss Hadassah Ril alow mi
appointed first executive secre-
tary of the Rabbinical Assembly
at the conference recently con-
cluded in New York. Mist Riba-
low holds the degree oi Bache-
lor of Hebrew Literature from
the Seminary College of Jew-
ish Studies and Bachelor of Arts
from Hunter College.
Quito, Ecuador (JTA)-A de-
mand by the Quito chamber of
commerce that all Jewish shops
be closed and a collective fine
of $150,000 levelled upon the
Jewish population of Ecuador to
make good the losses suffered
by the creditors of a Jewish
businessman, Natan Lewin, has
been rejected by Minister of the
Government Dr. Carols Guevara
Moreno.
Dr. Moreno told a delegation
of the chamber that what they
asked would require imposition
of Nazi or Fascist- methods,
which the Ecuadorean govern-
ment repudiates. He assured
them that Lewin would be
punished, if criminal intent is
proven, but stressed that the
Jewish community and the Jew-
ish refugees here were not in-
volved in any manner.
Prague (JTA) Expressing
sympathy with the Zionist
movement, President Benes of
Czechoslovakia told a Jewish
delegation that he will do every
thing possible to facilitate emi-
gration of Jews from Czechoslo-
vakia to Palestine. At the same
time, he indicated that Jews who
intend to remain in Czechoslova-
kia will not bP treated as a na-
tional minority, but will be con-
sidered full-fledged Czechoslo-
vak citizens.
BIRTHS
Dr. and Mrs. Harry Kraff an-
nounce the birth of a son Wed-
nesday at Jackson Memorial hos-
pital.
Mr. and Mrs. Marty Milstein
announce the birth of a daugh-
ter, Ellen Leslie, born July 2 at
St. Francis hospital.
Mrs. Phillip Neuwirth and
daughter, Harriet, left Saturday
to visit in New York. Mr. Neu-
wirth, now on a business trip in
Chicago, will join his family
shortly at the Barbizon Plaza
Hotel.
Mr. and Mrs. Al Berkowitz,
926 S. W. 4th Street, announces
the birth of a son Monday at
Jackson Memorial Hospital.
Donald Berkowitz, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Philip Berkowitz, is
visiting his sister, Mrs. Walter
Mackauf in New Orleans.
Mr. and Mrs. William Warshaw
announce the birth of a daugh-
ter. Andrea. June 20 in New
York. Mrs. Warshaw is the
daughter of Max Rappaport. of
Miami.
ROSE CHAPTER HAS
MAH IONG PARTY
Keep on Buying War Bonds
and Stamps.
POSITION WANTED
Cantor, Lecturer, Shoched,
Teacher, wants position in
Florida community. Holidays
or year round. References, c/o
Rabbi Leher, Key West.
To Share
Young woman share modern
efficiency. Call mornings.
Millard Apt. 2-551 Michigan
Ave., Miami Beach.
Rose Chapter, B'nai B'rith
Women held a Mah Jong and
card party at the Triton Hotel
Tuesday. Prizes were won by
Mrs. L. Schaffel. Mrs. A. Hoff-
man, Mrs. I. Stalotz and Mr.
Col legman.
Proceeds of thP event were
given to the General Maurice
Rose Memorial Hospital and for
local use in providing Sunday
breakfasts for servicemen and
women.
>^ww^w^^w^^^w^^^w^ww^w^w^^^^www>yy
MOUNT NEBO
THE CEMETERY OF DISTINCTION
FOR DISCRIMINATING FAMILIES
Rabbi S. M. Machtei, Director
Olympia Building Phone 3-3720
_nj1_rLn-*Li*u*ij*n*ii*i* *^****-'----- ni-i_i-i_n_n_rui_i.
Johannesburg, South Africa
(JTA)The Palestine censor has
banned th(. South African Jew-
ish Times from the country, ac-
cording to word received here.
It is understood that a protest
will be lodged with British au-
thorities.
Buy War Bonds and Stamps to
help preserve Democracy.
Jacksonville, July 12"Flori-
da's 'Courtesy Week', starting
Sunday, July 15, will be observ-
ed in practically every section
of the state," Harold Colee, ex-
ecutive vice-president of the
Florida State Chamber of Com-
merce said today.
"Chambers of Commerce,
newspapers, radio stations and
individual business enterprises
have assured us of full coopera-
tion in making this week an out-
standing event," he said. The
need for a forceful reminder of
the value of courtesy seems to
be generally recognized, and the
only objection we have received
so far is that a week is not long
enough considering the import-
ance courtesy plays in our daily
business and social lives.
Sickness
Accident
Hospitalization
Insurance
for Everyone
PAUL L. GREENE
605 Lincoln Rd.
Phone 5-4133
a^tf^iftmtff'^m^^r^'
PALMER FUNERAL CHAPEL
"SERVIN
PHONE 9-2664
G THE JEWISH COMMUNITY" ,__
"A FRIEND IN NEED" 2008 W. FLA<


FRIDAY. JULY 13, 1945
*JewistinoridUan
PAGE THREE
SISTERHOOD HAS
PLANS FOB PARTY
iriLIHSTHE
Temple Beth Sholom Sister-
hood lias completed its arrange-
ments for a card and social par-
ty to be held on the evening of
July 24th at 8:00 P. M in the
Pan-American Room, Blackstone
Hotel, Miami Beach. The pro-
wl 11 go towards the new
Temple and Community House
that is to be built in the near
future on Chase Avenue at 41st
Street. Miami Beach.
This card and social party is
open to the public. The com-
mittee announces that arrange-
ments have been completed for
the distribution of very fine
door prizes and gifts. It will be
one of the outstanding Sisterhood
affairs this year.
Mrs. Charles S. Tobin, presi-
dent ol the Sisterhood, announc-
ed the appointment of the fol-
lowing committees in charge of
the arrangements for the card
and social party; Mesdames
Rhoda Morris and E m a n u e 1
trich, co-chairman of the
ticket committee; Mesdames Leo
Steinberg. Herman Rosenbaum
and Jack Shaeffer, co-chairmen
of the refreshment committee;
mes Simon Wolf and Irv-
ing Rothman, co-chairmen of the
door prizes and gifts; Mesdames
Louis J. Krensky and Irving
Becker, co-chairmen of the game
committee; Mesdames Morris
Berich and Louis Goldman, co-
chairmen of the publicity com-
mittee and Mesdames I. C.
Greenberg and Camelia Baum,
co-chairmen of the usherettes
committee. In addition to these
committees, the following are i
also members of the various !
committees in charge: Mesdames ;
Charles S. Tobin, Leo Solomon, j
Charlotte Haas, Abraham Blatt,
Norman Maran, A. Solasko and i
Leo Robinson.
Temple Beth Sholom Sister- '
hood is embarking on one of'
the most ambitious social pro- j
f>ram- of the coming year. In i
this program provisions will be
made for educational and com-
munal activities. In September
the Sisterhood is planning to
Dave a tea in honor of the new
members, of which committee
Mrs. Louis J. Krensky, vice-
president, has been appointed as
chairman, and as soon as plans
are completed, notice will be
given to all the members of the
Sisterii i i.
NOTICE!
We call attention to our subscribers that effective July
15, 1945, subscription rates to The Jewish Floridian will be
increased to $3.00 per year, $2.00 for six months, two
years, $5.00. Renewals of all subscribers will be accepted
at the old rate until October 15. New subscribers will pay
increased rates.
CHIEF RABBI SURVIVOR
OF PRE-WAR LEADERS
London (JTA) Chief Rabbi
Leo Baeck, of Berlin, who has
just arrived here from Theresien-
stadt after a short stay in Paris,
revealed that he is the only sur-
vivor of the pre-war Jewish
leaders of Germany and Austria.
Dr. Otto Hirsch, executive di-
rector of the "Reichsvertretung"
of German Jews, died in the
Mauthausen camp, Dr. Baeck
said, while other officials of the
central body, including Dr. Ar-
thur Lilienthal, a one-time Ber-
lin judge, Dr. Cora Berliner and
Hanna Karminsky were deport-
ed to Poland. Dr. Paul Epstein,
another leader of the organiza-
tion, died in Oswiecim. The Aus-
trian Jewish leaders who died or
were murdered included Robert
Strieker, prominent Zionist
(whose son is now in the U. S.
Army), and Dr. Desider Fried-
man, president of the Vienna
Jewish community at the time
of thr> Anschluss.
Jerusalem (JTA)ThP extent
of Palestine Jewish industry's
contribution to the war effort is
disclosed in the current issue
of the monthly publication of
the Jewish Industrialists Asso-
ciation. It reveals that war ma-
terials valued at over $1,000,000,-
000 were manufactured here.
The manufactures included 3,-
000.000 anti-tank mines, 5.000,- j
000 benzine and water tanks, j
parts for ships, tremendous i
amounts of foodstuffs includ- i
ing 20,000 tons of jams and mar-
malades, 7.000.000 bottles of
fruit juices, over 750,000 quarts
of wines and over 5,000.000
quarts of beer, 7,000,000 pounds
of textiles, and 1,000,000 pairs of
shoes.
Ne\ York (JTA)The Amer-
ican Jewish Trade Union Com-
mittee for Palestine, which in-
workers both AFL and CIO
ciudi millions of American
wis week issued a memorandum
calling upon the leaders of the
uniated Nations to act immedi-
ately on the Palestine question.
Bucharest (JTA) Approxi-
mately 8,000 Jews in the Car-
patho-Ukraine will become So-
viet citizens as a result of that
part of Czechoslovakia joining
the USSR as a section of the
Ukraine, it was reported here.
Of the 90,000 Jews who were
deported by the Germans from
the Carpatho-Ukraine to vari-
ous extermination camps in Po-
land and Germany, only 8,000
have returned, the report said.
They include 1,000 Jews of Mun-
kacevo, where the Jewish popu-
lation totalled 177,000 prior to
the deportations.
FEW JEWS LEFT
III BERLIN SHOWN
BY RECENT CHECK
Berlin (JTA)Only 4,000 to
5.000 Jews are left in this capi-
tal today, according to prelimi-
nary estimates, out of a pre-war
Jewish population here of al-
most 100,000. Most of them, as
Jews of mixed marriages, had
been granted certain Drivileges
by the Nazis and were allowed
to remain here.
A new Jewish community
council, representing the com-
bined interests of these Jews
and those who recently returned
from concentration camps, has
been selected and will cooperate
with the Russian military gov-
ernment, Dr. Alfred Warner.
German Lord Mayor, and the
municipality.
Unity between the two groups
was achieved after difficulties
arose between the existing Jew-
ish organization, "Reichvereini-
gurg der Juden," which was
formed during the Hitler regime
to account for Jewish affairs to
the Gestapo, and a new group
consisting mostly of the Jews
who had returned from Nazi
prison camps. The newly-libera-
ted Jews expressed a lack of
confidence in the old organiza-
tion, accusing it of not having
adequately performed its work.
As yet, no representative has
been appointed to represent Jew-
ish religious affairs on the Lord
Mayor's board. At present.
Father Buchholz, a Catholic
priest, aided by a Protestant
minister named Gruber, is hand-
ling religious affairs for the en-
tire city. Pastor Gruber was
confined for three years in a
concentration camp.
Among public properties suf-
fering least damage is a hos-
pital which remained in Jewish
hands throughout the Nazi rule
and which did extremely useful
work. In addition to being used
as a hospital it served also as a
home for the aged who were
saved from deportation. All doc-
tors employed there were Jew-
ish.
ELECTED TO LEAD NATIONAL U. J. A. CAMPAIGN
_J
Vllii-----*"> O. Heller, rUbbi Jonah B. Wie ana
k.''""Y *MesnmM (lop row, left lo right), have
Unhfd ,0 *"*' ** N",ional Chairmen of the
VlU^I" i'me* C; Heller, Rabbi Jonah B. Wiae and
been
Ijflil J ~~ --. aaw i aiviieaa *..! **
nd P.I ." Appeal for *rtfW. Perea. Need
tanifiJl r j** whicB reconstituted recently at the;
Com^,U ,r*i,in "fener for the Joint DUtribution
"*, the U|,ed Palestine Appeal and the Na-
OurL i'"V* Service. I. Edwin* Coldw.wer and
-""a J. Rotenbloom were named National Co-
Treamrer*. and l.idor Coon and Henry Montor were
elected Executive Vice-Chairmen (bottom row, left
to right). A record number of 4.600 Jewi.h com-
munities in every .eclion of the country will par-
ticipate in the 1945 V. J. A. campaign, which miiM
provide Jarger resource, than ever before Tor emer-
gency relief and rehabilitation oveWa. for the up-
building of the Jewish National Home in Palestine
and for refugee aid in the United Slates.
Economic Development of Palestine
Increases Market for American Exports
Julius 8lmon, president of the Palestine Economic Corporation, being
Interviewed by newspaper reporters in New York on his arrival for a
brief visit in the United States. Mr. Simon's headquarters are In Jerusalem.
New York CityPalestine will
be a very profitable market in the
Middle East for American exports
when conditions return to normal,
declared Julius Simon, president
of the Palestine Economic Corpo-
ration, largest American business
enterprise in that country, on his
recent arrival from his headquar-
ters in Jerusalem. Many orders
have already been placed in this
country for the purchase of in-
dustrial and agricultural machin-
ery for Palestinian factories and
farms, Mr. Simon said.
"One of the most important
projects in the long-range plans
of the Palestine Economic Corpo-
ration is an extensive irrigation
system which has been worked
out with the aid of American ex-
perts," he announced. "This proj-
ect will provide for the irrigation
0- approximately 750,000 acres
and make possible the establish-
ment of about 100,000 additional
farms with a total farming popu-
lation of half a million persons.
The first step calls for the irriga-
tion of 125,000 acres for Jewish
settlers and it will take from one
to three years to carry out this
preliminary work at a cost of ap-
proximately $26,000,000."
The Palestine Economic Corpo-
ration, 570 Lexington Avenue.
New York City, was formed in
1926 "to afford an instrument
through which American Jews
and others who may be interested
may give material aid on a strictly
business basis to productive Pal-
estinian enterprises and thereby
further the economic development
of the Holy Land and the reset-
tlement there of an increasing
number of Jews." The Corpora-
tion owns and operates a number
of subsidiary companies in Pales-
tine and is a large shareholder in
certain basic industries.
Specializing ....
IN
SOUTHWEST
PROPERTIES
The I. S. SHAPOFF
Organization has sold over a
quarter million dollars of
residential property the
past three months
If you are interested in
Selling your Home
Buying a Home
Real Estate Investments
SEE OR CALL
I. S. SHAPOFF, Realtor
2755 S. W. 27th Avenue
PHONE 4-7027

War Bonds Are Still a Best Buy


PAGE FOUR
*Jenisti Fkridiain
FRIDAY, JULY 13,
The Jewish Floridian
Plant and Main Offices, 21 S. W. Second Avenue. Miami, Fla.
P. O. Box 2973______________________________Phone 2-1141
Entered as Second Class Matter July 4, 1930 at the Post Office
of Miami, Florida, under the Act of March 3, 1879
FRED K. SHOCHET, Managing Editor
1 Year, $3.00
Six Months, $2.00
2 Years. $5.00
MIAMI 18, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JULY 13, 1945
AB 3, 5705
VOLUME 18 NUMBER 28
A TIMELY WARNING
In well spoken words, addressing an Independence Day
gathering in Hollywood, Supmere Court Justice Murphy warn-
ed against "the Nazi disease" here.
In Germany, "the Nazi disease" is under control. In none
of the zones occupied by the Allied armies in Germany will
we for a long time see any of the Nazi poison spread but
there are carriers of the Nazi disease elsewhere. Even as Jus-
tice Murphy spoke there was a report from Havana to the
effect that a group of Germans, recently released from intern-
ment in Cuba, have launched a good imitation of Goebbels'
propaganda program in the Cuban capital. We may expect
that disgruntled Germans in other paits of the world will not
fail to attempt to infect the new communities in which they
may be, or to which they may immigrate, and in which they
are not subject to Allied control.
These Nazis, who are free to spread their poison, will un-
questionably make the most of their opportunity. The famous
Norwegian woman writer, Miss Undsett, some time ago re-
marked that the German atrocities against the Jews had been
so ghastly, that to justify themselves in their own souls, they
would, after the war, even intensify the propaganda against
the Jews. We are unguestionably faced by a grave danger, in
which simple liberal tolerance will not do. We must take very
positive steps whenever we see the first signs of Nazi infection.
Justice Murphy's warning is timely.
BOX
2 9 7 3
Miami 18
BORN OF UNITY
They had never heard of San Francisco. Not in 1776.
The people of the original 13 Colonies lived in a rustic
world bounded by the Appalachian Mountains and the Atlan-
tic ocean. To travel from one colony to another was hazardous.
As for the people, they spoke different languages, attended
different churches and each were suspicious of the other.
To unite these people and fill them with enough spirit to
fight for their ideals was a gigantic task. Yet these people of
wide interests and alien thoughts drew up the "Declaration of
Independence."
The men who went to San Francisco were handicapped
in much the same manner as were our founding fathers. Lan-
guage, religion, political ideology, all, in the begining, seemed
to be insurmountable barriers. However, the desire of man-
kind to achieve continued peace was strong enough to bring
these men together and to keep them together until out of their
misunderstandings, disagreements, debates, and compromises
came the World Peace Charter.
The Declaration of Independence was the beginning, out
of which has grown the United States.
Let us hope that out of the World Peace Charter will be
born the United Nations. (Orlando Transit Co. Bulletin)
(Editor'! Note: Boa Ht'S is the
post office addresa of iiic Jewien
Floridian, in Which is pla.vd moun-
tainous amounts .if nrs nl.a.-os
from onranlxatlona and individuals
all over the country. Under this title
will appear dl me of this
.i- rial.)
Some 3500 Jewish refugees are
expected to arrive in Palestine
during the month of July with
half of them due in the next
few days The American Jew-
ish Trade Union Committee for
Palestine, speaking tor millions
nf American workers, both A. F.
of L. and C.I.O.. has adopted
resolutions calling for leaders of
the United Nations to act im-
mediately on the Palestine ques-
tion ... A goal of -200.000.00 has
been sent to the Working Wom-
en's Council in Palestine since
October 1 against a quota of
$250.00.00 this year by the Pio-
neer Women's Organization.
A nation-wide campaign to
raise S500.000 to build and
equip a national arthritis re-
search institute as part of the
Leo N. Levi Memorial Hospi-
* tal of B'nai B'rith at Hot
Springs, Arkansas, was launch-
ed. Jews constitute an
amazingly small percentage of
juvenile delinquents and adult
criminals, it is revealed in a
statistical article by Nathan
Goldberg in The National
Jewish Monthly.
Dr. Israel Goldstein, president
of Z.O.A., left July 4 for France
and England to study problems
of post-war rehabilitation and to
attend the World Zionist Con-
ference in London this month.
. Thirty-seven out of forty-
eight governors petitioned Presi-
dent Truman to take immediate
steps to open Palestine to Jew-
ish mass immigration and colo-
nization, and to bring about the
earliest transformation of that
country into a free and Jewish
democratic commonwealth.
The American Council for
Judaism warns against "con-
tradictory claims for Jews on
the international bill of rights
and the trusteeship system."
._. American Christian Pales-
tine Committee sets up educa-
tional program of Christian-
action on behalf of Jewish
aims in Palestine.
Dr. Israel M. Goldman, di-
rector of the National Academy
of Adult Jewish Studies, sum-
marizes Jewish life as it must
be lived in America with three
L's: labor, in the service of the
Jewish people, leadership, learn-
ing.....Rabbinical Assembly
in convention recommends re-
vising and publishing Code of
Ethics for Rabbis and Lay of-
ficials.
Dr. Eric Warner revives He-
brew songs from 13th century,
transcribing them for record-
ings. Eleanor Roosevelt
advises immigrantes to Ameri-
canize their names terming
foreign names as a barrier to
"successful ammalgamation of
the American peoole." .
Rabbi Samuel Rosenblatt of
Johns Hopkins has been as-
signed by Yale University to
translate the works of Saadia
Gaon. Jewish 10th Century-
Philosopher, into English .
A.D.L. scores progress in the
positive education field with
its successful action in secur-
ing University of Alabama
elimination of anti material
from courses.
ERETZ ISRAEL IS IN DANGER
The Second of the Articles by
PIERRE VAN PAASSEN
(In the absence abroad of Phineas J. Biron)
B'NAI B'RITH HOLDS
2ND BOND AUCTION
At the regular monthly meet-
ing of B'nai B'rith held Tuesday
night at the Miami Beach YMHA
a second War Bond auction was
held, which netted approximate-
ly $30,000.00 of bonds. Some 80
items of merchandise, ranging
from a baby carriage to valuable
jewelry wei> auctioned by Marx
Feinberg. to the highest War
Bond bidders. With the $107,-
200.50 of Bonds purchased at the
mammoth Blackstone War Bond
auction rally held July 3rd,
$136,200.50 were reaped as a re-
sult of the two auctions.
The total sales of War Bonds
which were credited to B'nai
B'rith during the Seventh War
Loan drive were double the orig-
inal quota of $1,000,000, Milton
A. Friedman, War Bond chair-
man, announced.
The situation in Palestine is rapidly nearing the point of
explosion. If the White Paper is not abrogated, or, at least, \
the government of Great Britain does not in the very near hi.
ture make the gesture of sensibly attenuating the harsher im-
plications of that infamous instrument of policy, the Land of
Israel will be plunged into a seething cauldron of unrest, riots
destruction of property and bloodshed before the year is over
The Yishuv is near the end of its patience" The foreign Arab
princes are encouraged to become more presumptuous and
arrogant every day on the subject of Palestine. The British
government, with the passive connivance and the pusillanimity
of the Zionist leadership, is allowing things to come to a pass
where a settlement of the Palestine question will occur auto-
maticallythat is to say, by the force of artificially created cir-
cumstances. That settlement, conceived in tenor and upheaval
will be so detrimental to the Jewish people as to blast their
hopes for a generation to come.
What Britain's intentions are with and in Palestine may be
gauged with sorrowful accuracy by what occurred recently in
! Syria and Lebanon. There, in those two Levantine States, a
great European power, France, was ignominously booted out
i by Arabs mobs armed, equipped and brought to a point of
| anti-French frenzy by British agents. Behind the Syrian mobs
' was the new Arab League, which is a British-sponsored and
British-controlled organization. That Arab League is next turn-
, ing its attention to Palestine. For that purpose, and no other,
it was set up and created by the Colonial Office: to eliminate
| the French rival from the Near East and to settle the Jewish
question in such a manner that Britain can afterwards stand
before the world and shrug off responsibility.
If Mr. Churchill is still the friend of the Jewish people that
he is said to be and if he is sincere in his condemnation of the
White Paper, the time has come to show it by deeds. His ante-
diluvian rhetorical pronouncements on the subject, to which the
Zionist leadership still clings with pathetic insistence, are abso-
lutely worthless in the present circumstances. They are void
of substance. Churchill's deeds of commission and omission for
five years have to all intents and purposes repudiated his con-
demnation of the White Paper. It is not tomorrow or next year
that danger to Jewish Palestine may arise. Jewish Palestine is
being destroyed now by the policy of the White Paper which
has been in force for five yearsChurchill being Prime Minis-
ter for most of that timeand which is now being implemented
by a carefully managed and systematic transfer of authority
i to the foreign potentates of the Arab League, which is Mr.
J Churchill's own creation
Only the policy of havlaga, of national self-control and
' self-discipline as practised by the Yishuv, is today holding off
j an outbreak of terrorism on an unprecedented scale in the
Holy Land. The tension is acute and the acts of provocation
| on the part of the government and its official and secret agents
are steadily becoming more cynically overt and flagrant. How
long the Palestinian Jews will be able to resist the pressure de-
pends entirely on whether their American brethren will at long
last take the matter seriously enough to intervene energetically,
unafraid, conscious of their rights as American citizens, with
the authorities in London and Washington.
There lies the only hope now. The prattle about the Yishuv
being able to mobilize sixty thousand fighting men to resist,
once the signal is given for Arab hooliganism to break loose,
is self-delusion of the worst sort. Pompous declarations by
Zionist leaders in this country that whereas Hitler might have
been able to kill Jews with impunity the British government
cannot do so because a world public opinion will oppose its
moral non licetsuch declarations are childishly naive. British
imperialism is not any more merciful or amenable to feeble
democratic protestations than any other imperialism. It shoots
when its designs are contravened, whether in India, Kenya,
Syria or Palestine.
Moreover, its apologists are busy even now, for all com-
ing eventualities, with placing the Jews in an unfavorable
light. When hell breaks loose not Britain but the Yishuv will
bear the blame, as De Gaulle is made to bear the blame before
world public opinion for what happened in Syria not long ago.
The task of rescuing Palestine from the deadly web of
Levantine intrigue and imperialist chicanery is now up to in
American Zionist leaders. They have behind them a unani-
mous American Jewish community and a political 0I9anJ*\
tion of vast potential influence and strength. They alone ca
tear that web to pieces by speaking the truth at last in nig
places. They have never yet, so far, had the courage to can
a spade by its namei.e., let the American people know
it is Britain's imperialist policy which is diametrically oppos
to and the mortal enemy of a Jewish Palestine.
As long as the war in Europe lasted this attitude on the
part of official Zionism may have been commendab e \ r
though not from a Jewish national point of view in tnai
sought to spare the allied British government any sort o e
barrassment in the conduct of the war wiih Germany, ow
considerateness is no longer valid as an excuse for inacu iy.
the more since British gratitude for that Zionist policy "-V" s
embarrassment now reveals itself in favoring the Arab para
of Adolf Hitler.
Remember, soldier, the only
secret is the one never toldl
uou timer. ,1^.
The American people will come to look upon the esta
t of a Jewish State in Palestine as an essentially sti y
ment u jovvisu oiuie in raiesuutt un mi *
forward, genuinely democratic, realistic, just and nece
solution of the Jewish problem when and if they are tola
is at stake in the Holy Land. v-en
At present they are not Being told. They have never
told. They hear lies from the Arab side and garbled profwy j
da from British sources. They never hear the Zionist po"*
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 11)


FRIDAY, JULY 13, 1945
*'JewislirkrirJiir
PAGE FIVE
Holy Scroll for Jewish Community
Presented at Impressive Ceremony
At a very impressive ceremony
amid the chanting of Liturgical
Sies ..nd Psalms, a Sacred
c'r(ln (Sefer Torah) was pre-
sented '" the Religious Rellef
ond R,h.il>ilitation Department
rf the Union of Orthodox Rabbis
,f Ann rica in its drive for the
restoration and rehabilitation of
Jewish religious communities
and traditional Jewish life in the
European countries devastated
by tin Hitlerite hordes. The Se-
fer Torah was consecrated by
the Rabbinate in the memory of
the late Rabbi Hirsch Manis-
chewitz.
The ceremony took place Tues-
day night, July 10th, at the Ohav
Zodek Synagogue, West 95th
Street, New York, where hun-
dreds of people, among them
prominent Rabbis, scholars, com-
munal and religious leaders.
SCROLL CONSECRATED
IN HIS MEMORY
THE LATE ZVI
HIRSCH MANISCHEWITZ
came to express their conviction
of the impregnability of the
Jewish spirit, of the Jewish To-
rah and of Jewish life.
In a throbbing voice Rabbi
Dr. Hoffman, spiritual leader of
the Ohav Zedek Synagogue, de-
livered the invocation which
brought the audience into a
mood of sac-redness and dedica-
tion.
Rabbi Bernard Bergman spoke
for the Union of Orthodox Rab-
bis of America. In words which
came from the very depth of his
being, he urged American Jew-
ry to follow the example set by
the Manischewitz Family, in
helping to rebuild Jewish reli-
gious li: on thP European con-
tinent. -The uisk is tremendous,"
Kabbi B< rgman said, "and we
must mobilize all our efforts and
Fergus to meet it." He ex-
pressed the hope that American
wrv Ull] mcasure up t0 the
13SK.
Rabbi Meyer Rosenbaum, of
Avenue U Educational Center of
Brooklyn, spoke for the Rehabi-
litation Department of the Union
.Orthnds Rabbis. He pointed
out that the presentation of the
aeter Torah consecrated to the
mlTl ol Hi,sch Manischewitz.
marked he beginning of a na-
jiona campaign to rehabilitate
main; dlUonal life of t"- re-
ug ,brethe in Europe and
fS^sswl the conviction that
MEMORIAL CHAPEL
THOS. M. BURNS. JR.
Funeral Director
57777
.RIVERSIDE
AMBULANCE
SERVICE
1J36 Wa,hlgto Ave.
Miami Beach
* Amsterdam Are.
out of the ruins a new and firm-
er Jewry will emerge.
The presentation of the Sefer
Torah at the Synagogue was
made by the two sons of the
late Rabbi Manischewitz, Joshua
and Beryl.
Prior to the ceremony at the
Synagogue, a Sium H a s e f e r
(consecration) took place at the
home of Mrs. Hirsch Manische-
witz. A large gathering of
prominent Rabbis, scholars and
Jewish religious and communal
leaders, friends of Mrs. Manis-
chewitz, and the late Rabbi
Hirsch Manischewitz assembled
at this quiet, but very impres-
sive home ceremony. A feeling
of tragedy, but also a feeling of
hope, prevaded this quiet gath-
ering at which the first Sefer
Torah in the rehabilitation drive
was consecrated. After the con-
secration at the home the Torah
was led in parade to the Syna-
gogue.
It is fitting to remember that
almost two years ago in .this
very Synagogue, where the Se-
fer Torah was presented to the
devastated Jewish communities
of Europe, Rabbi Hirsch Manis-
chewitz died in most dramatic
circumstances. It happened on
Yom Kippur. Rabbi Manische-
witz was a very sick man. His
physician advised him to stay
at home. Rabbi Manischewitz
however, his physician's advice
notwithstanding, felt that he
must join his people in collec-
tive prayers on this most sacred
of days. While reciting the tra-
ditional prayers Unesane To-
kef in which Israel declares
that on that day Providence
judges who shall live and who
shall die, Rabbi Manischewitz
suddenly collapsed and died im-
mediately. Thus this saintly man
passed away in prayer with and
for his people.
In recognition of this tragic
fact the Religious Relief and
Rehabilitation Department of
the Union of Orthodox Rabbis,
which is in charge of the pro-
gram to aid in the resurrection
of Jewish spiritual life in Eu-
rope, deemed it proper to honor
the memory of this saintly man
by holding the dedication cere-
monies of the Sefer Torah at
the Ohav Zedek Synagogue
with which the late Rabbi Man-
ischewitz was associated for
many years.
With this first dedication, the
Union of Orthodox Rabbis calls
upon American Jewry to fulfill
its duty toward our sorely tried
European brethern, so that tra-
ditional Judaism will outlive all
its enemies till the days of the
Messiah.
The Sefer Torah will be for-
warded to the Jews of Belgium,
who formerly numbered 150,000
souls, and of whom approximate-
ly 25,000 are left, and who re-
mained with only one Holy
Scroll. Three other scrolls will
be sent to the communities of
Belgium and Holland. It is
worthy to note that the Belgian
ambassador to America, hearing
of this noble deed, offered im-
mediate transportation of the
Sacred Scrolls at the expense of
his government.
The late Hirsch Manischewitz,
in whose memory the Sefer To-
rah (Holy Scroll) for the Bel-
gian Jewish community was
consecrated, was a member of
the family which has for many
years been prominent in Jewish
religious and communal life. He
was especially known as one of
the brothers *eading the world
famous matzo firm, the B. Man-
ischewitz Company. In spite of
the demands made of him by his
business, he gave of himself un-
tiringly to scores of Jewish phil-
anthropic, social, fraternal, civic
and religious enterprises.
PIONEER WOMEN TO
HAVE MOONLIGHT TRIP
A moonlight cruise aboard the
Seven Seas, leaving Pier 5^,
will be held Tuesday evening,
July 24th, 1945, at 8:15 o'clock,
for the benefit of the Child's
Rescue Fund. Sponsored by the
Pioneer Women's Organization
for Palstine of Greater Miami,
for Palestine of Greater Miami,
ing Mrs. Henry Seitlin, 2-3947, or
Mrs. I. Shapoff, 4-4034.
Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Kan-
del, formerly of 169 N. W. 24th
Street, are now residing at the
Mildred Apartments, 1629 S. W.
13th Street. Mr. Kandel recent-
ly acquired the apartment house.
Photo by Newman
Jerome Grecnwald. newly-
elected president of Miami
Beach Junior Chamber of
Commerce was installed at a
dinner at the Strand restau-
rant.
ror y&Sf
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CASE OF SIX s
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You must not trust this enchanting age to memory.
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for you each new stage of development in your
child's life and now is the time to start.
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Lobby Floor, du Pont Bldq.. Miami 205 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach
LEGAL NOTICES
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of ALTON SPORTSWEAR at 1668 A.
Alton Road, Miami Beach, Florida,
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
MAX SHEREMETA.
__ Sole Owner
ISAAC JOFFE
Attorney for Applicant
6/22-29 7/6-13-20
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of McMullln Apartments at 36 N. E.
6.'.th Street, Miami. Florida. Intends
to register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
LENA ROSEN,
Sole Owner.
LEON KAPLAN.
Attorney for Applicant.
6/15-22-29 7/6-13
LEGAL NOTICES
NOTICE IS HEREBY. GIVEN that
the undersigned are engaged in busi-
ness under the fictitious name of
LORRAINi: MANUFACTURING CO.
(not Inc.) at 64 South Miami Avenue,
Miami, Florida, and intend to regis-
ter the said fictitious name In the
office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
HERMAN SALUK
ABRAHAM SAI.I'K
Owners
GEORGE CHERTKOF,
Attorney for Applicants
6/29 7/6-13-20-27
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of Gurtner's Cleaners, at 1390 S. W.
Sth Street. Miami. Florida, intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court at Dade County,
Florid*.
HARRY BOLOTIN.
MYERS & HEIMAN,
Attorneys for Applicant.
6/15-22-29 7/6-13
PROFESSOR ALBERT EINSTEIN Nobel Priie winner HrfRdiU
,.rj,.n ; Wise oreeident of the American Jewish Congreaa and
AeWorWJewiihCongreM honorary co-chairmen of the Jewish CouncU
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Chapter 20722 Acts of 1941
FILE A9209
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
James and Julia Shugrue holders of
County Tax Certificate No 2168 is-
sued the 7th day of June. A. D. 1943,
have filed same In my office, and
have made application for a tax deed
to be issued thereon. Said Certifi-
cate embraces the following described
property in the County of Dade, State
of Florida, to-wit:
Lot 23, Block 6. Semlnole
i.nins. a Sub., Plat Book 16,
Page 4, In the County of Dade,
State of Florida.
The assessment of said property
under the said certificate was in the
name of: Comm. Bk. & Tr. Co.
Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law. the prop-
erty described therein will be sold
to the highest bidder at the Court
House door on the first Monday In
the month of August, 1945. which is
the 6th day of August, 1945.
Dated this 27th day of June, 1945.
E. B. LEATHERMAN,
Clerk of Circuit Court, Dade
County, Florida.
(Circuit Court Seal)
By N. C. STERRETT, D. C.
6/29 7/6-13-20.
Buy War Bonds and Stampa.
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
FILE NO. 39748
Notice Is hereby given that LIs-
beth G. Scarborough holder as as-
signee of City of Miami Tax Certifi-
cate Numbered 4962, dated the 1st
day of June, A. D 1942, has filed
said Certificate In my office, and has
made application for tax deed to
issue thereon in accordance with law.
Said Certificate embraces the follow-
ing described property, situated In
Dade County, Florida, to-wit:
Ix>t 3. Block 22, Riverside
Farms Amended, Plat Book 2.
Page 88, In the City of Miami,
County of Dade, State of Florida.
The assessment of said property
under the said Certificate Issued was
in the name of Unknown.
Unless said Certificate shall be
redeemed according to law, tax deed
will issue thereon on the 1st day of
August. A. D. 1943.
Dated this 27th day of June, A. D.
1945.
E. B. LEATHERMAN,
Clerk of Circuit Court. Dade
County, Florida.
(Circuit Court Seal)
By N. C. STERRETT. D. C.
6/29 7/6-13-20-27
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engago
In business under the fictitious name
of UEE-REEN CANDY COMPANY
at 55 N. E. 24th Street, Intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
I. W. GREEN
LEON GREEN
ALBERT A. GREEN
JOSEPH ARAGO
MYERS & HEIMAN
Attorneys for Applicants
7/13-20-27 8/3-10
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of CHARLEY AND ANDY'S GRO-
CERY Intends to register the said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
ANDY MARCHINSKY
MYERS & HEIMAN
Attorneys for Applicant
7/13-20-27 8/S-10
iiV. Jk


PAGE SIX
vjewistflcrktiari
FRIDAY, JULY 13.
1945
SURVIVING JEWS
CONFISCATION
Prague (JTA) Surviving
Jews in the Sudeten area of
Czechoslovakia who are Ger-
man-speaking and who always
registered as of German nation-
ally are somewhat apprehen-
sive about whether they will be
exempted from the confiscation
of property, expulsion from the
country and other reprisals that
almost certainly will be visited
upon the Sudeten Germans by
the Czechoslovak government.
Jewish leaders, however, told
this correspondent that they are
confident that fair treatment
will be given the Sudeten Jews
and that they will be allowed to
become full citizens of Czecho-
slovakia.
Another ticklish problem,
thesp leaders said, is securing
the return of confiscated Jewish
property. This will be compara-
tively simple in Bohemia and
Moravia where the property was
taken over by Germans, who are
going to be expelled, but in Slo-
vakia, the property is now in the
hands of Slovaks, who. from all
indications, will not give it up
without a struggle. Government
experts are now at work seek-
ing a solution of the problem.
The majority of the 2.000 Jews
now in Praguesurvivors of the
pre-war Jewish communitv of
45.000and another 7.000 else-
where in Boehmia and Moravia
have been stripped of most of
their assets and are dependent
on relief. A small amount has
already arrived from the Joint
Distribution Committee, via
Stockholm, including milk, jam
and other foodstuffs, but much
more is urgently needed.particu-
larly fats. Money is apparently
not as important at present as
supplies.
JEWS FARE WORSE
THAN GERMANS
ENEMY WEARS BADGES
THE SAME AS JEWS
Frankfurt (JTA)The ragged
remnants of Frankfurt's once
flourishing, prosperous Jewish
community have, up to now,
fared worse under the Ameri-
can occupation than many Ger-
mans who discarded their Nazi
party badges the day the city
was taken.
Those who have struggled
horrw from concentration camps
inthe past two months returned
ill and penniless, and, sometimes.
on the verge of starvation. But
theye wei> bolstered by the hope
that they would soon regain their
homes, their possessions and
their positions in the com-
munity. Their hopes have not
. been realized.
The Jews have discovered that
no machinery has been set up
, for restitution of their property,
and many are living in squalor
while Germans occupy then-
former homes.
Frankfurt's pre-Hitler Jew-
ish population exceeded 30.000,
and was the second largest in
Germany. Only 600 are in the
city today. Of these, 140 escap-
ed deportation to concentration
camps and managed to remain
here. The others are survivors
from concentration camps who
returned home in recent weeks
on foot, or in pitiful truck cara-
vans. More than 7.000 Frank-
furt Jews were sent to There-
sienstadt, and 326 who have re-
turned from there report that
the others were murdered.
Paris (JTA) The works of
Jewish composers, whose com-
positions could not be played in
Germany during the Nazi re-
gime, were in the record collec-
tion of Hitler at his Berchtcsga-
den retreat, according to Allied
correspondents.
Radio Luxembourg quotes the
correspondents as stating that
they found albums of music by
Felix Mendelssohn, Jacques Of-
fenbach and Karl Goldmark in
Hitler's music room.
J.D.C. Sends Three Relief Workers Abroad
These three new members of the J.D.C. overseas staff have
just sailed for Europe where they will help to administer the
J.D.C's widespread program of relief and rehabilitation of the
1,250,000 Jews who look to American Jewry for aid. They are (left
to right) Benjamin N. Brook, Maurice Eigen and James P. Rice.
London (JTA)Germans and
collaborationist Hungarians in
at least one Prague district are
being compelled to observe the
same regulations that the Nazis
imposed upon the Jews, even to
wearing identifying badges, a
correspondent of the Manchester
Guardian reports.
An official poster issued by
the local national committee
which is the authoritative ad-
ministrative body in Prague s
12th district lists the following
regulations:
1. Persons falling into the
category of German or Hungar-
ian traitors, and who are over
the age of 14. must wear a four-
inch-square swastika on a white
background.
2. Persons marked with such
swastikas are not to receive nor-
mal ration cards, arc barred from ;
using street cars, except when !
going to work, and then may i
only enter the read car and not
occupy any seats. They must i
not walk on sidewalks, but must
use the roadways and will be
refused admittance to all pub-
lic parks, woods, barber shops,
restaurants, places of entertain-
ment and lectures.
3. Such persons are forbidden
to use laundries and cleaning
shops and are restricted to shop-
ping between the hours of 11
A. M. to 1 P. M. and 3 P. M. to
4 P. M. Violation of these regu-
lations will result in punishment
for both buyers and sellers. Af-
ter 8 P. M. they are forbidden
to appear on the streets.
4. Persons over 14 who have
the letter "D" for "Deutsch"
stamped on their identity papers
must apply for the swastika
badges and, at the same time,
submit a list of the property held
by them and surrender all radios
in their possession. They are
forbidden to engage in any fi-
nancial transactions.
5. Germans are not entitled to
tobacco rations and are not al-
lowed to smoke in public or at
work. ,
As a final blow, the regula-
tions provide that the words Ger-
man and Hungarian are hence-
forth to be written with a small
"g" and "h", respectively.
The Guardian correspondent,
commenting on these restrictions,
calls them "unjust and ruthless"
and says that they are merely
following totalitarian methods,
and applying them to Sudeten
Germans and Hungarians, who
were formerly Czech subjects.
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and Eve set up light housekeeping! Cabinets and appliances
will fit together from stem to stern. No cracks
or crannies to catch dust and dirt. Nothing
to stick out in unstreamiined, higgledy-
piggledy fashion.
ANOTHER NIW FHKCOOM Q|
TCMIN DIllGN
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good-by f to time-consuming cookino methods Your new Gas range -
whatever its "make"will bring you faster, easier, better cooking than
you ever dreamed possible. You'll know it's the last word in cooking
perfection by the CP seal it carries! oooo-bye to extra marketing trips
... Your new silent Gas refrigerator will be roomier than ever
designed to keep all kinds of food fresh longer. QOOD-bye to hot
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MIAMI BEACH
FORT LA
UDERPAtf


FRIDAY, JULY 13, 1945
vJenisti FhridHann
PAGE SEVEN
KILLED IN ACTION
Official JWB Release
Pvt. Meyer Epitein. 32, In-
fantry, of Miami. Fla. Hol-
land.
pfc Arthur Solomon. 24,
Combat Engineer Corps, of
Miami Beach, Fla. In Ger-
many.
Sam (Sonny) Schaffer. petty
officer first class, is spending a
thirty-day furlough with his
parents. Mr. and Mrs J. Schaffer,
1637 S. W. Sixth Street, and his
wife and son. He arrived in this
country after twenty months of
foreign duty, making his trip
abroad ;>nd return on the Queen
Mary. He was with the armed
forces in the invasion of France
and served as a diver with the
salvage division in thP navy.
He relates that his most in-
teresting event in the service was
a reunion with his brother in
England whom he had not seen
for three years. The brother,
Melvin, has been released and is
attending school at Northwest-
ern in Chicago.
Sonny has taken his wife and
infant son to the Netherland
Hotel for several weeks.
Darid S. Goldflne, who has
made six trips across thP Atlan-
tic to bring back the wounded,
is home on a 15-day furlough
visiting his mother, Mrs. J. Dol-
gin, 900 Pennsylvania Ave., Mil
ami Beach. He expects an as-
signment to the Pacific area.
Major Maurice Orovitx, son of
Mr. and Mrs. A. Orovitz, 1350
Collins Ave., is home on ter-
minal leave awaiting discharge
orders. Major Orovitz, who spent
three years overseas with the
Army Air Forces, wears seven
battle stars on his campaign
ribbons. He will make his home
on Miami Beach with his par-
ents, and will be connected with
the Alfred Destin Company.
U. spending a twenty-five day leave
with his wife and daughter. Rox-
ane. Lt Pallot has been in the
naval reserve for two and one-
half years in command of a gun
crew on a merchant ship. He
has seen service in Italy and An-
zio.
Pfc. Donald Jack Kirschner,
18. a graduate of Miami Beach
High School, has been awarded
the Certificate of Merit for out-
standing service in Germany.
Attached to a field artillery
unit, the young soldier remained
in a German town from which
a task force had moved forward
under heavy enemy barrage,
rvt Kirschner and six other men
checked the streets and build-
ups for wounded, and finding
six casualties they administered
urst aid. moved them to shelter
and the following day evacuated
them to an aid station.
He wrote his mother, Mrs.
Sarah S. Kirschner, 929 Michi-
gan Ave.. Miami Beach, from
'ranee that he was on his way
home He has been overseas
about five months.
Louis I. Kolber. Miami Beach,
who recently had a battlefield
Promotion to first lieutenant,
*L .l'n. aw^rded the Bronze
war Medal for heroic achieve-
ment.m action against the ene-
MarcTa2'STnt> GermanV l3St
no"'s,cila,ion said, "During that
S Ll Kolber displayed out-
let!? 'iual'ties of courage and
tank oHP Whi'^in charEe of a
"iKpldtoon which was attach-
the ,in ,'.nfantry battalion. In
r?La?fault through the Sieg-
emnlnv"?' ,Lt Kolber skillfully
theW, his tanks- a"d from
'ire at t^nk-,Puersonally directed
*'rHnRePlbXeS frm Pint-
occunSanfilrlefs action caused the
S'X5 fKthe P^oxes to
'"wine il embrasures, thus al-
vance n G foot trooPs to ad-
*utw-T?vand attack them, re-
ou* wiionenCaptUre f numer"
Kolber'8 l&i brther of Edward
Beach Jn l5th st- Miami
home Wlth whom he made his
as^ Rj^lU>w.y. serving
"> Franp ,S-.hospital stai{ aide
Mrs. m\1' r,',tes t0 her mother.
purtrrsttJ^ loway. 1351 S. W.
yate to taft' thai every boy
Whine S at lenth about
80 ^cA2n&*' Just
80 Amerimn ^K. the sound of
and .again *aV* voice aa>n
^kfijS-S employed
""or to inia" of censorship here
10 Wining the Red Cross.
GREATER MIAMI ARMY-NAVY COMMITTEE Supported by Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Ut The Jewish Welfare Board Help Us Keep a Record of Our Men in Service
* *
SERVICE
i t$ ^ m ^ ^
/PARADE!
First Lt. Bernard E. Gerstner,
26, Miami Beach, was killed on a
mission Mav 29 over Yokohoma,
Japan, relatives have been noti-
fied by the War Department.
A navigator on a B-29, Lt.
Gerstner was graduated from
New York University, enlisting
in the AAF in 1942. His wife, the
former Edith Held, is thP daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. M. Held, 216
Espanola way, Miami Beach.
Lt. Gerstner had been award-
ed thP Distinguished Flying
Cross with two Oak Leaf Clus-
ters and the Air Medal.
T/Sgt. King S. Dansky, 27, of
233 First Ct., Miami Beach, has
been awarded the distinguished
flying cross in recognition of his
work as an enlisted pilot flying
hospital ships from behind ene-
my lines in the China-Burma-
India theater.
Sgt. Dansky also holds the
Legion of Merit for his work in
supervising the construction of
airstrips in enemy-occupied ter-
ritory, and the air medal.
FLIGHT OFFICER
TELLS EXPERIENCES
"Monday was by far the most
interesting day I've had over-
seas," Flight Officer Eugene L.
Weiner, 20, of Brooklyn, wrote his
father recently. "I took off from
my field in the morning and
landed at a field in Burma. While
there, the Colonel wanted a plane
to fly to China and he chose mine
because it was in good condition.
He told a major to see that my
stay was a pleasant one while he
was gone with my plane.
"Well, the major gave me a
jeep and I drove out to see the
ruins of a recent battle with the
Japs. There was practically noth-
ing left of the city.
"Then the major and I had
lunch. Later, after a swim, I had
drinks with a crowd of majors
and colonels. Then the colonel
who had my plane returned and
took me to supper, after which
we went to the general's house
to see a movie. The colonel in-
troduced me to the general and
we spent about 15 minutes to-
gether, discussing the news of the
day.
"What a memorable day for
mean obscure Brooklyn flight
officer: major, colonel, general .
in one day!
WOUNDED IN ACTION
Lt. Eugene J. Lerner. 26. In-
fantry, of New York City. Palau
Island.
Pvt. Mervin Pollokoff. 25 In-
fantry, of Baltimore, Md. In
Belgium.
SERGEANT MADE
MAJOR BY RUSSIANS
The Russians made a major of
Sgt. Bernard Bernhardt, of Bos-
ton, after he bailed out a B-24
over Hungary when the plane
burst into flames. And Stalin
personally decorated him.
At present, Bernhardt is un-
dergoing plastic surgery at Cush-
ing General Hospital, Framing-
ham,Mass. to cover the scars on
his face and head, resulting from
the burns he suffered when his
plane was set afire.
It all started during the ser-
geant's 44th mission. German
fighters shot up his plane over
Lake Balaton, Germany.
He had swapped places with
the waist gunner, but the gun-
ner was killed. Bernhardt, bad-
ly burned, bailed out.
"German fighters," he related,
"tried twice to cut the shrouds
of my parachute with their
wings while diving at 400 miles
an hour. But they missed. I got
a 22-millimeter bullet in the leg.
Hungarian peasants were waiting
for me with pitchforks when I
landed. They marched me a
mile in spite of my wound. I
collapsed and later found my-
self in a German garrison. Later
I was transferred to the Royal
Hungarian hospital at Budapest.
"For five days they left me
unattended on a stretcher, think-
ing I was going to die. Then they
gave me medical treatment. Be-
fore the Russians came to Buda-
pest the American prisoners were
evacuated. But a Hungarian doc-
tor who was a member of the
underground permitted me td
stay.
"When the Russian Army en-
tered I joined with them and
took part in fighting two blocks
from the hospital. I was quickly
back in the hospital with a
wound. But I was out before the
siege was finished and rejoined
my Russian companions.
"This time they made me a
major and when Stalin appeared
he personally pinned a decora-
tion on me. It looked as if every-
thing that was happening was in
my favor. The Germans had set
up gun positions on the hospital
and the Russians shelled it and
hit it 1456 times in a month and
a half, killing 1200 patients. ,1
might have been among them had
I remained.
"As a Russian officer, I oc-
cupied a villa with servants and
lived on the fat of the land. But
when an American Liberator
bomber was forced down in Bu-
dapest I got a longing for Amer-
ica and flew away with the crew,
after they had completed repairs.
TELLS HOW FT. DRUM-
WAS RECAPTURED
How Fort Drum, guardian
island fortress of Manila's har-
bor, was recaptured by Amer-
ican troops was related recently
by Sgt. Louis Gross, of Wash-
ington, D. C. Gross was a mem-
ber of the picked platoon which
took Fort Drum. Fort Drum is
not really a fort, by the way; it's
a concrete-and-steel replica of a
battleship.
"The ramp of a landing craft."
Gross said, "could not span the
height of the "deck', but the
Navy built a heavy wooden ramp
to let down from the tower of a
special structure.
"Meanwhile, using aerial pho-
tos as a guide, officers laid out
the design of the deck on the
old parade ground on Corregidor,
with air vents, gun emplace-
ments and other openings mark-
ed off. Each man had an open-
ing to cover.
"We pulled alongside the island
fortress and the ramp dropped.
In 30 seconds every opening was
covered by a tommy-gun, auto-
matic rifle or a Garand.
"Ten men followed us, each
carrying 60 pounds of TNT. A
mixture of oil and gasoline was
pumped down an air shaft from
the ship; the explosive, with
time-fuse set, was lowered down
the vent.
"We raced back to the land-
ing ship and pulled away. There
were several blasts as powder
magazines went off, and smoke
and flames flared high* in the
air.
"Twenty-four hours later we
returned. Deep down we found
the charred remains of the Jap
garrison. Only two of our men
suffered slight wounds."
CAPT. RADIN HAS
29 DECORATIONS
A parachute was put to a
unique use recently at a base in
New Guinea. It served as a
canopy for a marriage. Under it,
T/5 Annette Winona Trebitsch of
Brooklyn became the wife of
Pfc. Robert Joseph Greenberg of
New York.
There was a little trouble for
Joe and Annette at first because
there was no Jewish chaplain
around to perform the ceremony.
For five weeks the Catholic base
chaplain, John A. Righino, kept
the official wires buzzing until
he contacted Chaplain Hugo
Mantel of Boston, Jewish chap-
lain who had just arrived in New
Guinea from the Philippines.
Chaplain Mantel served on tem-
porary duty in Base Ejust long
enough to officiate at the wed-
ding.
Monsky Presents A JCMemorandum on International
Trusteeships to American Spokesmen at Conference
As the consultant to the American delegation at the San Francisco Conference of the
United Nations, representing the American Jewfeh Conference, of whose Interim Committee
he, iTcc-chairrnan. Henry Monsky, president o B'nen Bnth (standing with back to camera) is
shown at a meeting of tie consultants presenting the memorandum o the American Jewish
ConTerence which suggested specific amendments to the American delegation s proposals on
yoniBiBiK.B u ,^Qui0 a number of the proposals advanced in this memo have now
r^rJccepeTaclorrg to r^ from San Francisco. Presiding at me meeting of the
cc^uST ^Commander Harold Stassen. member of the Amencan delegation .Against
the^lXteated to the right of Commander Stassen, is Assistant Secretary of State Archi-
bald MacLeish.
New York (JTA)Capt. Edwin
F. Radin, 25, of Brooklyn, N. Y.,
has received twenty-ninP deco-
rations: The Distinguished Fly-
ing Cross, Air Medal, twenty-
four Oakleaf Clusters, two Presi-
dential Unit Citations and Croix
do Guerra ovec Palme for aerial
heroism in the European thea-
ter, the Jewish Welfare Board
reports.
As navigator of a B-26 bomb-
er, he has taken part in fifty-six
combat missions. At Cassino,
Radin served as group lead navi-
gator in a formation- of forty-
eight bombers which attacked
an important road bridge. Weath-
er conditions seriously limited
visibility, but Radin led his
group over a pin-point target
in the face of heavy and accuiate
anti-aircraft fire. His expert
navigation enabled the bombar-
diers following him to drop a
devastating pattern of bombs on
the bridge and entirely block
the highway. He later led the
formation safely back to base
without any loss of personnel
or ships.
During nine months of aerial
combat service, Radin flew on
every type of bombing mission,
including attacks against enemy
airfields, lines of communica-
tions, ammunition dumps and
harbor areas. He has been call-
ed one of the outstanding navi-
gators in the history of his
squadron.
PVT. TELLS ABOUT
PACIFIC FRONT
Pfc. Harold Malis of the Bronx,
N. Y., knows what we're up
against on the Pacific front. He's
lought the Japs. Harold went
overseas in January, 1944, to New
Caledonia. He trained in Guadal-
canal, later took part In the in-
vasion of Guam, arriving there
on D-Day. Last July, on Guam,
he was wounded by bullets which
ore off his left foot and serious-
ly injured his right wrist. He has
lought in dense jungles with the
Pa nfurther away than 50
Iffr. / .?neT most 6r"esome thing
fJ oWaps- ,s?ys Harold. who
is at St. Owens Hospital now. re-
cuperating, is the way they be-
have during a Banzai attack,
borne fool Jap officer," he said,
will throw thousands of men into
an attack that hasn't a chance of
coming off. Sometimes we can
just mow them down with ma-
chine guns, but on a Banzai at-
tack they keep on going until
hey hit the dust. That's how
their minds work. It's an honor,
a privilege to them to be killed
whether it serves a sound mili-
tary service or not. That's where
they differ from us and that's
where we win out every time
Because every one of the GI's
uses his common sense at all
times."
Japanese rifles, Mails said, are
clumsier than American ones
and difficult to handle. The Japs
designed them to make up for
the shortness of their arms.
SGT. WANTS PRAYER
BOOK FIRST THING
When he got out or a German
prison camp liberated by our
troops, the first thing Sgt. Mor-
ns J. Katz wanted was a prayer
book and a Bible. "During the
time I was a prisoner of war,"
he wrote home, "I had two great
comforts. One was my prayer
book and the other was the
Jewish Holy Scriptures. Without
those two books I would have
gone nuts. They kept my faith
up and many times gave me
strength when I most needed it.
I have learned quite a lot
about the Old Testament and
how much prayer can do for a
person in need. My prayers were
answerednow I am free again.
"Here is what I want you to
get for me. I want a prayer book
that is put out for the GI's by
the Jewish Welfare Board, but I
want a copy with a good leather
binding. Also, I want a leather-
bound copy of the Jewish Holy
Scriptures.
SOLDIER FREES SELF
FROM ROCK AND DIRT
An American battalion aid
station, located in a cave on Oki-
nawa, was in bad straits when
the cave entrance was sealed by
a Japanese morar shell. Among
the 41 men trapped inside was
Pfc. Eugene Freedman of Phil-
adelphia. Twenty of the trapped
men were killed or wounded
when the shell went off. but
rreedman was buried under
rock and dirt, from which he
managed to free himself.

. '
j : i


PAGE EIGHT
*JenisiiflcridHaf7






1
c'!
I
^^^^^^
In the Greater Miami! WITHDRAW PARTS
OF COURSE
Houses of Worship
TEMPLE ISRAEL, Reform, 137 N
E. 19th St.Kvtiiiliir services FrldaJ
evening at S:15 p. m Dr. Jacob H.
Kaplan is delivering course ol lec-
ture! "n the "Ethic* ami Ideall Ol
l'raver Book" This week's lecture
la entitled "The Kaddleh".
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CON-
GREGATION. 590 S. W. 17th Ave.
Friday evening service* at r:80 p. m.
and Saturday morning services at 9
a. m. Sohaarel Zedek Talmud Torah,
1545 8. W. Srd Street. Friday eve-
ning services at 7:80 p. ni. Saturday
morning services at n. m. Dally
services DO a. m. and 7:16 p, m.
Schaarel Zedek Talmud Torah, 1545
S. w. Srd street, Friday evening ser-
\ es at 7 JO p. m. Saturday morn-
. : \ lce .it 9 o'clock.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION,
Conservative. 139 N. W 3rd Ave.
Regular services Friday evening at
7.;0 p. m. Saturday morning services
at 8:30 a. ra, Pally Mlnyan. Cantor
Abraham Friedman will officiate. He-
brew School daily from Monday
through Thursday, 9 a. m. until 12.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM. Lib-
eral. 761 41st Street, Miami Beach.
Friday evening services at 5:45.
BETH JACOB CONGREGATION,
Orthodox. 311 Washington Ave.. Mi- ;
ami Beach.Krld.iy evening service i
at 7:30 p. m, Saturday morning MTV-
Ices at SO a m, Scnaloa Seudoa at
p. m. Rabbi Moses Mescheloff !
will speak on the portion of the law. I
Cantor Maurice Mamches will chant. ,
Summer sessions of the
school .Monday through Friday, from
: IS.
MIAMI BEACH JEWISH COM-
MUNITY CENTER. Conservative,
1415 Euclid Avenue. Miami Beach. -
as at 7:15 p. i
Saturday morning ser-
vices Mincha a" :''
p. n x p. ni.
(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1)
the university officials agreed
to withdraw Siegfried's excerpt
from the model composition
course. Dean R. E. Tidwell. of
the Extension Division of the
University of Alabama, wrote
in part:
"I have talked this matter
over with the instructor and
she is greatly disturbed that
the inclusion of this particu-
lar selection has caused this
misunderstanding. The only
purpose the author of the
course had in mind was to
give the student an oppoc1-
tunity to write a brief or a
summary of a good article.
Prior to this, we have not had
any question raised with ref-
erence to this selection.
"The course has been re-
vised from time to time, but
this particular selection has
been. included since the ori-
ginal preparation of the course
some ten years ago. I am glad
to inform you that this selec-
OBITUARIES
FRANKEL
En II F I v :
Avi Ml Bei h
.;.i\ He can i lo M
;,, > .- from Havana, Cuba.
... etal S
rife, Mrs A ''
: \ P nke!
M -- >-' Frai ki 1. all of
Bead Ser es were 1
Riverside Mi With
v \ emetery.
KRAMER
s K er. 64, dl< d T
:: Ave.,
....
here fri aeven
-
Hi vea n I -
Ehter, Mra
. '
I Mill Kramei all of
Sew York, when the body Is
seni ': KI i" il H
ROSE
la -aj. y. ... adaj
sidence earl
He VI .
t \. n i rk CH
Ifi Mr*
: ly was sent I
N i '" N.
ASKPRESIDENTTQ
AID IMMIGRATION
TO THE BEAST
(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1)
Dewey of New York, Tobin of
Massachusetts, Baldwin of Con-
necticut, and McGrath of Rhode
Island, released its text this
week at the close of the gover-
nors' conference here at which
he prsided.
"Concerned as it is with the
position of the Jewish people in
Europe the future of the Jewish
National Home in Palestine, we
believe that this petition raises
matters of immediate and far-
reaching humanitarian and po-
litical importance." the accom-
panying letter declares. "The
considerations which prevented
action in regard to these press-
ing issues while war still raged
in Europe, no longer applies.
Thp urgency of the Jewish prob-
lem and its solution in Palestine
has become such that I venture
the earnest hope that it may be
thought opportune to give at-
tention to his question in the
course of your forthcoming con-
versations with the Prime Min-
ister of Great Britain and Mar-
shal Stalin."
MONDAY. July 16
Campaign Committee of Federation
meeting;'at B P. M. In the Sunshine
Room: Meeting of the Miami Berv-
Ice League Town Y. 7:15.
Buy More War Bonds!
need is greater than ever.
The
tion has been deleted and will
not be used any further.
"I believe that I am right
in saying that here at our own
institution there is absolutely
no manifestation of religious
intolerance or bias. This would
apply with more than ordi-
nary force to the author of the
English Composition Course IB
question.
On July 5. 1945, the Jewish .
Welfare Board representative in I
Washington, D. C, conferred
with army officials and received
verified confirmation that the I
U S. Army had directed the I
withdrawal of this material
from the US API.
Radioa Phonographa
P. A. Syatema Auto Radioa
Electrical Contracting
Electrical Appliancea
Refrigeration Motora Fana
LYONS
Radio Electrical Service
Telephone 2-7618
440 S. W. 8th Street
Rabbi Joseph E. RackovgW
1520 S. W. 5th St
Phone 2-7439
London (JTA)The Stockholm
correspondent of the Daily Her-
ald reports that a group of Ger-
man Jews are planning to pre-
sent to the United Nations a
plan for the creation of a Jew-
ish state within the borders of
Germany.
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OIL ON TROUBLED WATERS
A spreading oil slick brief marker for the death of a
gallant American tanker and for immortal merchant
seamen who defied the wolf-packs to get the precious oil
through to our fighters and their allies .
Gone are the days when our merchant ships burned helplessly
in sight of the South Florida coast ... the wolf-packs no
longer roam the Atlantic.
We lost millions of tons of gasoline and oil to enemy
submarines, but millions more got through in time to speed
the day of Victory in Europe.
The men of the tankers still have a big job to do. They must
carry twice as much gasoline and oil twice as far to our
troops in the Pacific.
And when I ictory Everywhere has been achieved, fuel oil
will have much to do with shaping; the world of tomorrow
. for fuel oil i a builder, too.
The Belcher <-'!! Company proudly continues to supply fuel
oil to our Navy and Merchant Marine while planning
for the new world a-coming ... in which fuel oil
will share in building jobs and security for all!
Belcher's busy on the home front, too!
Supplying prompt metercd delivery
service to all users of fuel oil, from the
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hotels and industrial plants.
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its Belcher! Phone 2-7425.
\-L.iten V->>uf,cMeW.Ue..n Miam. Melod, T.w !hu.>dY, 6 a0
-- iuuonyi 4 3C p




FRIDAY, JULY 13, 1945
*Jenisfifh)ridUar7
PAGE NINE
"Between You and Me"
By BORIS SMOLAR
Copyright, 1944, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.
Political Note*
Unwarranted attacks by some
American Zionist laborites on
David Dubinsky, president of the
International Ladies Garment
Workers' Union, may cost Pal-
estine half-a-million dollars .
it is known the union planned
to spend $500,000 in building
houses for returning Jewish
soldiers in Palestine on land be-
longing to the Jewish National
Fund This project was to
have been a part of a larger pro-
ject by U. S. organized labor
aimed at alleviating the acute
housing shortage in Palestine .
The iittacks on Dubinsky may
affect not only this effort, but
the pro-Zionist sympathies in the
higher ranks of the American
Federation of Labor Presi-
dent Truman, prior to leaving for
his conference with Churchill
and Stalin, is expected to receive
two separate delegations The
Zionists hope that he will see a
Zionist delegation, and the
American Jewish Committee is
certain that the President will
receive its leaders in the White
House very shortly The peti-
tion on Palestine submitted to
President Truman by the gov-
ernors of thirty-seven states is
the result of long and hard
work by the American Zionist
Emergency Council during Ha-
yim Gri'enberg's administration
as chairman of the Council's
executive committee ... It was
no easy task to persuade the
governors to sign the petition .
Many of them were hesitant and
wanted to know why American
Zionist leaders withdrew the
Palestine Resolutions from Con-
gress at a time when the ma-
jority of the Senate was ready
to vote for this resolution which
is practically embodied in the
governors' petition to Truman.
International Notes
Now that the Charter of the
new League of Nations is defi-
nitely going to be approved by
the Senate, by the British Gov-
ernment and by Moscow, the
question of establishing a United
Nations Commission on Human
Rights is no longer merely theo-
retical. ... In this connection a
very important book has just
been published by Columbia Uni-
versity Press. ... It is Prof.
H. Lauterpacht's "An Interna-
tional Bill of the Rights of Man"
. This study, written by an
eminent professor of interna-
tional law, will no doubt serve
as a basis for the work which
the contemplated Commission on
human rights is to start. ... It
is the kind of a book that no
person interested in the problem
of human rights can afford to
miss. ... It formulates extreme-
ly well, and from every angle,
the International Bill of Rights
of Man in which Jews through-
out the world are so interested,
and makes definite proposals as
JEWISH CALENDAR
All Holidays and Fast Days
begin at sunset of the day pre-
ceding the dates given below:
1945
TISHA B'AB
Thursday, July 19
ROSH HASHONAH
Saturday, Sept. 8.
Sunday, Sept. 9
YOM KIPPUR
Monday, Sept. 17
SUCCOTH
Saturday, Sept. 22
to Sunday, Sept. 30
CHANUKAH
First Candle,
Friday, Nov. 30
YIZKOR
or Memorial Services for the de-
parted are conducted on the fol-
lowing Holidays:
YOM KIPPUR
Monday, Sept. 17
Ml E. Flakier St.
Organised 1902
ntieFiFSlNnlioEaliaiik
of Miami
MIAMI, FLORIDA
EDWARD C. ROMPH, President
LAURENCE ROMPH,
Assistant to the President
STATEMENT OF CONDITION
Comptroller's Call, June 30, 1945
RESOURCES
Cash on Hand and Due from
Other Banks ......................$19,649,826.44
U. S. Government Securities,
Direct or Guaranteed 71,877,687.46
State and Municipal Securities 441,176.36
Stock in Federal Reserve Bank
Other Securities........................
Loans and Discounts............_
Bank Premises and Furniture
and Fixtures ............._.......
Other Real Estate......................
Accrued Income Receivable...
Prepaid Expense ......................
Other Assets _________
$91,968,690.26
90,000.00
138,340.19
4,650,530.99
708,148.79
8.626.00
242,981.33
54,199.18
3,199.66
$97,864,716.40
LIABILITIES
Deposits:
Demand ................____..........$51,877,065.68
Savings .................................. 8.066,241.86
United States Government 15,550,254.38
State and Municipal............. 9,302,894.28
Deposits of Banks..............__ 8,137,674.47
Other Deposits ______........... 716,897.74 $93,651,028.41
Capital Account:
Common Stock..............._.... 1,500,000.00
fIurPlu8 .................--......-...... 1,500,000.00
Undivided Profits .................. 969,222.63
Reserve for Dividend............ 60,000.00 4,029,222.63
income Collected, Not Earned 4,208.46
Heserve for Taxes and Other
n,k pe,nses ..............................- 170,151.90
uiner Liabilities ...................___ 10,105.00
$97,864,716.40
United States Government Securities carried at
S30.639.000.00 in the foregoing statement are
pledged to secure public and trust deposits and
'or other purposes required by law.
MpMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM AND
'UJERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION
BUY MORE WAR BONDS
to how this Bill of Rights can
be enforced both nationally and
internationally. Prof. Lau-
terpacht believes that every na-
tion must, by appropriate con-
stitutional means, adopt certain
sections of the International Bill
of Rights of Man as part of its
domestic law and constitution.
The effect of such legislation
would be abrogation of any
existing regulations inconsistent
with equal treatment of all by
the state. It would also au-
tomatically eliminate any pos-
! sible discrimination on account
of religion, race, language or po-
litical creed. ... As to interna-
tional enforcement, the author
believes that this can be achiev-
ed through the establishment by
the United Nations of a High
Commission for the supervision
of the observance of the Bill of
Rights of Man. This High
Commission would receive pe-
titions from individuals and or-
ganizations and would act. also,
as an agency for removing any
violations of the Bill of Rights.
. Prof. Lauterpacht pays tri-
bute to the American Jewish
Committee which assisted in the
publication of the volume.
Vacation Notes
No less than twenty American
Zionist leaders, the majority of
them laborites, will spend their
vacation in Europe this summr.
. This is the first time since
the war that Zionist leaders are
leaving the United States en
masse for Europe. Most of
them will go to London to par-
ticipate in the Zionist confer-
ence which will take place there
the end of this month But
some of them will also proceed
to France, Belgium, Switzerland
and other countries to study the
general Jewish situation. Dr.
Abba Hillel Silver, who is to
represent the ZOA at .he con-
ference in London, may also go
Palesine for a brief visit. ...
The mass-exodus of the princi-
pal leaders of the American
Zionist movement leaves the
Zionist activities in the United
States "frozen" for the summer.
. But one can expect lively
doings as soon as the delegates
begin to return home. By
that time a little more will be
known of what the future status
of Palestine may be in the near
future, since the new British
cabinet will have been formed,
and the Truman-Churchill-Stalin
conference will be over. ... At
this conference, the Palestine
question may be touched upon
as part of the situation concern-
ing the entire Middle East and
the Dardanelles. And speak-
ing of vacation, yours truly is
going to be away for the next
three weeks "somewhere
abroad" on his own vacation
trying to forget, for the first
time in a number of years, news
and newspapers. This "some-
where abroad" is not a military
secret, but simply the Chateau
Frontenac in Quebec ... So lor
three weeks there will be no
"Between You and Me column,
unless something startling hap-
pens in the Jewish world and
the writer of these lines is com-
pelled to interrupt his fishing
in Canadian waters to return to
his desk in New York.
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Palm Beach Notes
MRS. MARY SCHREBNICK, Representative
Mrs. Libby Metz and her
daughter, Lillian, left on a com-
bined business and pleasure
trip which will take them to
New York, Philadelphia and
Washington.
The semi-monthly meeting of
B'nai B'rith was held at Scher
Memorial Hall, Tuesday nite.
Dave Katz, president, presided.
Mr. Burns, of Miami, is spend-
ing a week in Palm Beach.
Local residents leaving for
New York were Mr. Abe James.
Mrs. Henry Aaron and her son,
David, will visit with relatives
and friends. David will stay
to attend school. Mr. I. Oken
will join his family and spend
the summer in New York with
them.
Mr. and Mrs. David Nash and
infant daughter left for the
north.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Dave of Dur-
ham, N. C, will make their
home here. Their daughter, Mrs.
Mae Schupler, will also reside
in Palm Beach.
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The enemy's ears
. Are opened wide
So military secrets
We must hide!
Buy War Bonds and Stamps to
help preserve Democracy.
Enemy ears
Are ever near
If we don't talk
They can't hear.
United States War Bonds are
still the best investment.

I
H


PAGE TEN
9-Jenisiifhricnan
FRIDAY. JULY 13.
Face Facts
George J. Tatianoff
Executive Director A.D.L.
The Tragedy of the Jewish
People: With a heavy heart, we
read that only 150,000 Jewish
children remain in Europe out
of a total of 1.350.000. Eight out
of every nine Jewish children in
Europe the innocent victims of
th,-, Nazi hordes!
Recently Lee Hills, managing
editor of the Miami Herald, now
on tour of war-torn Europe, add-
ed graphic emphasis to the
plight of the European Jews.
Wrote Hills, "In terms of hu-
man misery the Jewish popula-
tion of Europe was scourged by
the Nazi-Fascist plague as was
:.. r group of victims."
He described their sufferings
and demoralizationthe estimat-
ed 5.000.000 slaughtered in Nazi
murder factories, the pitiful at-
tempts of survivors to tie togeth-
er tile shattered threads of life
the whole, horrible, almost un-
believable tragedy of the Jewish
people of Europe. Their plight Is
truly one of the tragic horrors
of our civilization.
The misery suffered by our
people, we would suppose, would
serve as a cohesive force to bind
us together against those fac-
tions who, for political gain,
would destroy US. We would
imagine that every Jew would
m r..-i i for harmony and
unity in preserving and I
tag traditional human liberties.
Yet. despite th( changing scene
with peril
for our people. .. complete and
harm, inifii d spirit of ac-
tion does not exisl A small mi-
nority apparently fails to t.
nize th rs. This small
minority, prompted by motives
that ard to understand
would I ist disheartening dis-
unity and a type of sniping
which. invalidate the ef-
forts those who sincerely [
work in behalf of the common
good.
When we look back upon the
plight of our people in Europe,
the lack of unity is the real
tragedy of our American-Jewish
people.
Fortunately, the great majority
of our people have an increas-
ing awareness of the need for
harmonious teamwork. The great
majority possess the basically
humane qualities of patriotism.
loyalty and fair play. Their true
Jewish spirit will eventually
bring about the happiness which
we seek for i ;|nii oux
children. Their st Ifless efforts
will ultimately inspire the unity
that must prevail in order t.
ter with maximum effecth
the cause I I lerance and un-
d< rstanding.
THE
JEWISH
QUIZ
BOX
By Rabbi Samuel J. Fox
(Copyright. 1945. J. T. A.)
MIAMI BEACH C. OFF C.
TO ADD NEW MEMBERS
A campaign to add 300 new
m< ml ers t Miami B
Chamber Commi rce was
started I s week with l<
to Miami Bi;wn ar.d M;;
.-.- and professional peo-
i
Charles L. C I I its, chair-'
man of tl bership com-
mitt plans ti a li n its services
through increased postwar plan-:
ning at fa recent-
nized mer h ints' division.
F. Lowry Wall, president of
the Miami Beach Fust National
I ank, is co-chairman with Cle-
ments in the membership cam-
Others on the commit-
te< ..re John B. Reid, Bruno
W John T. Larkm. Allan T.
Al ess, Joseph M. Rose. Dr. Mor- :
ris Goodman. Dr. John Puffer. '
Bertram Scheuer, Sam Becker,
Hugh Larrick. Sam Blank, A.
Allenberg. Al R. Smith. Shepard
;. Albert Kahn and Harry
Sirkin.
GENERAL PAINTING
BY BEST MECHANICS
Free Estimates Given
I. D. Gilbrecrth Pcrinl Co.
PHONE 3-0070
If No Answer Call 2-5105
ROYAL PALM A.Z.A.
DOUBLES BOND SALES
RIVERMONT PARK
SANITARIUM
1389 S. W 7th St. Ph. 3-7301
Best carefer chronic sick, conva-
lescent and elderly people
SANEL BEER, M. Oi, Director
Reasonable Prices
a_Large Beautiful Grouno;^^
Royal Palm chapter of the ;
Aleph Zadik Aleph. Junior, B'nai
B'rith. doubled its bond sales
quota in the seventh War Loan
drive. At the beginning of the
nation-wide campaign the mem-
I (I of Royal Palm announced
their goal as S14.400.00, to be
used ft r the purchase of a caval-
f 12 ieeps. It is now an- :
nounced that the group has sold
S28.955.50 in bonds, enough to
buy twice as many such vehicles.
QUESTION: Why is it cus-
ry to visit the cemetery on
"Tishah B'av" (occurring on
July 18th?)
ANSWER: The custom seems
to date back at least from Tal-
mudic times. It is mentioned in
the Tractate of Taamt and the
. I itseli gives two reasons
for this tradition. Tishah B'av
: i Lng our day ol national mourn-
ing in commemoration of the
destruction of the temple we are
aforementioned source) to con-
sider ourselves virtually dead; as
a nation having lost its land and
spiritual center. Being likened
unto the dead in this respect our
presence on the cemetery would
certainly lead the proper atmos-
phere. Another version on the
matter explains the custom as
having a direct bearing upon
those buried in the cemetery- It
has long been a custom to ap-
peal to the souls of the departed
to pray for us in the Kingdom
of Heaven. What more appro-
priate time could there be for
this than Tishah B'av. From the
Talmudic version it seems that
n was originally a custom to
visit the cemetery on every fast
day of the year. The Tesofot
commentary thereof relates the
fact that later standardization
relegated the custom especially
to Tishah B'av. A m o n g the
many other reasons offered by
later writers for this custom is
the emotional tendency of as-
sociating any misfortune with
the things and persons gone by.
QUESTION: Why is the Sab-
bath after Tishah B'av called
"Shabbos Nachmu" (Sabbath of
Consolation?)
ANSWER: The name is simply
taken from the opening word of
the prophetic portion assigned
for the Scripture reading of that
Sabbath in which the prophet
attempts to console his people
after having reawakened them
to their bitter misfortunes.
QUESTION: What significance
is attached to the 15th day of
Jewish month "AV"?
ANSWER: In the days of the
Second temple the 15th day of
Av was one of exceptional re-
joicing of which the Talmud re-
lates that no day of the year
was so celebrated. Various rea-
sons are afforded for the gaiety
of this day which fell at the
end of the Summer season in
Palestine. Besides the fact that
the season and its harvesting
was one of gay time and is said
that the punished Jews of the
rebellious desert days were re-
lieved from the plague of death
that had befallen them as pay-
ment for their unappreciative
attitudes. The happy moment of
the tribe of Benjamin with the
daughters of Shiloh (mentioned
in the last chapter of Judges)
occurred on that day. along with
many other anniversaries of
happy note.
THIS SUMMER..
figrfcy M* <&acJaUnu
COMPUTE WINTER LUXURIES
AT LOW SUMMER RATES.
PRIVATE P0W.-UUHAS-MARINE DECK
TROPICAL GARDENS PATIO
250 ROOMS* BATHS
Phone SB-
LADIES AUXILIARY
TO HOLD OPEN HOUSE
Ladies' Auxiliary of the Jew-
ish Home for the Aged will hold
open house at the Home, 335
S. W. 12th Avenue, Sunday. July
15 from 3 to 6 P. M. Hostesses
for the afternoon will be Mrs.
Joe Zalis, Mrs. Paul Raff, and
Mrs. Ida Orlansky.
ROHANS
Paint and hardware store
Dealers in Pratt & Lambert's Paints Full Line of HARDWARE ... Mechanical Tools
Garden and Electrical Supplies
MORRIS ROHINSKY, Owner
4106 ROYAL PALM AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
5-2026
Protect freedom of speech!
don"t be free with military in- ,
formation!
EDWARD T. NEWMAN
R. E. WIXSON
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
KING FUNERAL HOME
PHONE 3-2111
INCOME TAX
BCOKKEEPING SERVICE
ATTRACTIVE RATES
WRITE OR PHONE
N. A. SERVICES
P. O. Box 1922. Miami tl, Florida
Phone 9-2*03
Your Complete Department
Store With Quality
Merchandise
Washington Are. at 13th St.
Miami Beach
And for your convenience
Morris Brother's New Ap-
parel and Accessory Store
70 E. Flagler St. Miami
Mount Sinai Memorial Park
MIAMI'S "COMMUNITY CEMETERY"
ONE OF MIAMI'S UP-TO-DATE DIGNIFIED
MEMORIAL PARKS
SINGLE GRAVES. FAMILY PLOTS AND GROUP
ESTATES NOW AVAILABLE
Affiliate Congregations: Beth David, Beth Jacob, Miami
Jewish Orthodox and Sisterhood Chesed Shel Ernes
For Further Information Phone 9-2664, 4-5922 or 9-1434
RESTAURANT
MIAMI'S NEWEST AND FINEST
Featuring
Unusual Foods, Delicious Pastries
N. E. SECOND AVE. at FOURTH ST.
Air Conditioned Phone 2-0760
For a Real Tasty Hungarian Kosher Dinner Go to the
Ocean View Hotel
-\ _?_) Restaurant
158 Ocean Drive Miami Beach
Serving From 5 to 8 P. M. Open All Summer
For Reservations Phone 5-9462
AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK
OF MIAMI
139 NORTHEAST FIRST STREET. MIAMI. FLORIDA
STATEMENT OF CONDITION
JUNE 30. 1945
RESOURCES
Cash and Due from Banks S 6.448.197.87
U. S. Government Securities 22.550.964.62
All Direct Government Obligations.
State and Municipal Bonds 550.778.01
Marketable Corporation Bonds 79,970.00
All Listed on the N. Y. Stock Exchange.
Total Cash and Securities $29,629,910.50
Commercial Loans to Individuals. Firms and
Corporations 4.738.043.05
F.H.A. Title II First Mortgages on Improved
Real Estate _____..........________ 78.100.89
Total Loans and Mortgages ......_________ 4.816.143.94
Furniture and Fixtures 50.204.lt
Federal Reserve Bank Stock 30.000.00
Accrued Interest Receivable 39.545.29
Prepaid Expenses and Other Resources 29.922.74
Customers' LiabilityLetters ol Credit 179.084.66
Total Resources ......______ $34,774,811.23
Capital (Common Stock)
Surplus
Undivided Profits and Reserves
LIABILITIES
DEPOSITS
500.000.00
500.000.00
438.149.39
$29,751,393.66
3.406,183.52
$1,438,149.39
33.157.577.18
179.084.66
Demand....._________
Time
We pay 1': % per annum on Time and Savings Deposit*
under $5,000 and ', of 1* over $5,000. Interest payable
June 30 and December 31.
Total Deposits_________________________
Letters of Credit """ ..."
Total Liabilities ________________________________ $34,774.811.23
FACILITIES AVAILABLE TO BANKS. CORPORATIONS AND INDIVIDUALS
COMMERCIAL BANKING PERSONAL LOAN DEPARTMENT
SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS SAVINGS ACCOUNTS
?55KS_- CHECK SERVICE ESCROW DEPARTMENT
COLLECTION DEPARTMENT TRUST DEPARTMENT
Member Federal Reserve SystemMember Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation


FRIDAY, JULY 13, 1945
*Jewist Meridian
PAGE ELEVEN
DF GREAT WORTH
The attention of the readiR
nnhlic is directed to Volume 1,
$5 of Harofe Haivri (The He-
hrow Medical Journal), which
has been published for the last
oiehtein years under the editor-
ship of Moses Einhorn, M.D.. of
New York City. Its contents are
not confined to technical medi-
cal topics, but are divided into
several sections covering a va-
riety of related subjects.
The current issue is dedicated
to the late Henrietta Szold, dis-
tinguished humanist and Zion-
jjti who harnessed American
Jewish womanhood in a great
organization. Hadassah, which is
responsible for the vast network
0f medical and sanitary installa-
tions in Palestine, making it the
outstanding health center of the
whole of the Middle East.
Mrs. Hose G. Jacobs, an inti-
mate friend and co-worker, who
was president of Hadassah for
five years, presents a very in-
teresting article entitled "Hen-
rieta Szold's Contribution to the
Health of the Body and Soul of
Palestine:' Mrs. Tamar De Sola
Pool, also former president of
Hadassah lor four years gives
a detailed account of the life
and work of Miss Szold.
Dr. S. R. Kagan contributes
an article of particular interest
nn the contribution of the
ing a special section on the sub-
ject. In this issue Dr. A. Freed
writes on forms of medical nom-
enclature in the Bible, and Dr.
M. H. Leon on terminological
controversies. Dr. Leon Golden,
eminent Hebrew philologist, pre-
sents a dictionary of 600 new
medical terms.
The Harofe Haivri has no
counterpart. With the passing
of the years, this journal with its
extensive material and promi-
nent contributors has maintain-
ed its high standard of service
to the medical profession, and
has won the esteem of doctors
and laymen throughout the
world. Its contents, moreover,
are available to every reader,
for there is an English section
containing complete translations
of all the Hebrew articles.
Those who desire information
of any sort, or who wish to sub-
scribe, should communicate with
The Hebrew Medical Journal,
983 Park Avenue, New York 28,
N. Y.
pioneer physicians to the growth
and development of the Zionist
movement throughout the world.
Since the Middle Ages the Jew-
ish physician has exerted great
influence on tlie communal life
of Israel. They were not only
the healers of the body and
mind, but also leaders, states-
men and diplomats who fought
for tht. rights and freedom of
their brethren.
The development of a living
Hebraic culture has made neces-
sary the creation of a new medi-
cal terminology in Hebrew, and
lot Harofe Haivri has had a part
in this creative effort by devot-
DEBBS TO ENTERTAIN
PROSPECTIVE MEMBERS
Prospective members of the
Debb's Chapter, B'nai B'rith
Young Women are to be enter-
tainled at a dessert luncheon
on Sunday, July 15 at 2:00 P. M.
Invitations have been sent to
the guests who will come to-
gether at the home of Miss Jo-
anne Saltzman, 108 Eighth Ter-
race, Di Lido Isle.
MIKE SCHEMER TO~
BE HONORED
Mike Schemer, of Miami, son
of the late Rabbi Philip Schemer,
an Orthodox Rabbi, will be hon-
ored with a "Mike Schemer" day
to be held at the Roosevelt sta-
dium in the near future. One of
the most popular men on the
Jersey City, N. J., Giants base-
ball team, he joined the team
following his discharge from the
army last year. Playing first
base, he is one of the top hit-
ters, batting around .333.
The Sisterhood of Temple
Beth Sholom, Miami Beach, is
sponsoring a Social Evening in
the Pan American Room at the
Blackstone Hotel on July 24 at
8 P. M. Door prizes will be
awarded and refreshments
served.
MERCANTILE NATIONAL BANK
MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA
Condensed Statement of Condition
COMPTROLLER'S CALL
At Close of Business June 30. 1945
RESOURCES
Cash on Hand and Due from Banks $ 4,411,146.62
United States Government
Securities ......._ 17,340,248.28
Municipal Bonds ......._..........._____ 118,000.00 $21,869,394.90
21,000.00
3,345,608.16
Stock of Federal Reserve Bank-
Loans ;,ik1 Discounts....................... 3,340,609.02
F.H.A. Insured Mortgages_______ 4,999.14
Furniture and Fixtures
Other Assets ...........___
Overdrafts ____
37,984.47
37,107.16
54.94
Customer's Liability-Letters of
Credit.........................................
75,146.57
27,820.16
$25,338,969.79
LIABILITIES
Capital Stock ___ 100,000.00
Surplus 600,000.00
Undivided Profits and Reserves 404,706.47 1,104,706.47
Letters of Credit....'..._......
Deposits ......
75,320.16
24,158,943.16
$25,338,969.79
DIRECTORS
p SAMUEL BLANK
mnaent, National Brands. Inc.
_ GUY W. ELLIS
Executive Vice President
Lin...in Koad Association
GEORGE GOLDBERG
BENJAMIN N. KANE
\ ice President of Bank
1 resident, Interstate Home
K'luipment Co.
HAROLD KASSEWITZ
Attorney
MARCIE LIBERMAN
Vice President of Bank
ALEXANDER ORR. JR-
President, Alexander Orr, Jr.. inc.
JUDSON L. OWEN
President of Bank
Director, First National Bank
In Palm Beach
OFFICERS
JUDSON L. OWEN
President
EDW. MERCER
\ Ice President
BENJAMIN N. KANE
vice President
HENRY 8. LAWLEY
Assistant Vice President
MARCIE LIBERMAN
Vice President
D. B. HUDSON
Cashier
R. W. POLLARD
Asst. Cashier
STANLEY N. BOOKBINDER
Asst. Cashier
MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM
MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION
KEEP BUYING AND SAVING WAR BONDS
DADE JR. RED CROSS
NEEDS COMIC BOOKS
The Dade County Junior Red
Cross needs comic books.
Through Red Cross Camp and
Hospital service, books collect-
ed by the juniors will be distri-
buted to military hospitals. Very
popular with servicemen, the de-
mand for comic books far ex-
ceeds the supply now on hand at
camp and hospital.
The public is urged to con-
tribute books, either at the
Junior Red Cross office, 275 N.
W. Second St., or camp and hos-
pital headquarters, 336 E. Flag-
ler St.
ERETZ ISRAEL IS IN DANGER
(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4)
view explained. In the matter of public relations the Zionist
organization's many bureaus and worse than children, for
children at least cry sometimes when they don't get what
they want. Meeting one another is taken for important political
work by the Zionist leaders. They live as effectively in a
ghetto as if there were a wall around them.
It is time for them to come out of their ghetto and forget
about the guestion of personal prestige, for the Jewish people's
holiest possession, Eretz Israel, is in danger of being stolen.
Let them lead the fight against the foul curs* of imperialism, in
the open, in the light of day, and millions of unseen brethren
in America, Africa and Asia will acclaim them and the Yishuv
of Palestine will bless their names.
Corporal Irving Yablonsky,
former Bronx druggist of 3510
Bainbridge Avenue, New York
City, shows Cadet Nurse Thel-
ma King, Poughkeepsie, N. Y.,
the penknife with which he op-
erated to save a soldier's life un-
der fire. Yablonsky, a medic, is
recovering from machine gun
wounds at Thomas England Gen-
eral Hospital, Atlantic City.
This unique operation took
place in the Belgian Ardennes
Mountains when the 4th Armor-
ed Division, to which Cpl. Ya-
blonsky was attached, was
trapped and cut off from its rear
echelons by the Nazi 11th Pan-
zer Division. Unable to retreat
the 4th drove ahead.
At the height of the furious
conflict Cpl. Yablonsky aban-
doned his first aid jeep and on
foot began searching for wound-
ed men, zigzagging from fox-
hole to foxhole. In one foxhole
LAUDERDALE SERVICES
Sabbath evening services will
be conducted by Temple Emanu-
El in Ft. Lauderdale at 8 P. M.
during June, July and August.
The subject will deal with the
Chapter on Ethics of the Fath-
ers of the Talmud.
he found a man near death from
a deep shrapnel wound in his
chest. Yablonsky examined the
man and saw there was no time
to summon a doctor. With a
penknife sterilized in alcohol, he
enlarged the wound and check-
ed the flow of blood, using a
pair of forceps in place of the
usual hemostat as a compres-
sion clamp. Constant bombard-
ment made suturing the lung at
that time impossible, so he
packed the hole with cotton,
saturated the wound with sul-
pha powder and evacuated the
patient. The wounded soldier
recovered.
Ttlomi
for Rest
CONVALESCENCI
mt Chronic Casej
un-Ray Park
eaIth Resort
I WANT MY MILK
Estab.
1924
And Be Sure Ifi
FLORIDA
DAIRIES
HOMOGENIZED
Vitamin "D" Milk
"Milk Producto"
Dacro Protected
TEL. 2-2621
Greater Miami Delivery
Visit Our Farm at
6200 N. W. 32nd Street
TOP SOIL
3-0561
GRADE A PULVERIZED and
PROCESSED MUCK and
MARL. Any Mixture
No Shells or Weeds
BITTER BLUE SOD
Soil and Fill of Any Kind
Landscaping Estimates
All Work Guaranteed
MIAMI TOP SOIL CO.
Ed. Alper
iiiiMimmu
iiiimiiiLwiii
ITOUBY
I PAINTING
ICO.
IfYouHadMYJOB
KEEPING HOUSE, helping
take care of the familyyou
Would realize that business girls
are not the only ones who some-
times get Headache and Tired
Aching; Muscles. We home girl*
often work just as hard and have
Just as many Headaches, just as
many Stomach Upsets and get
just as Tired.
About a year ago, I first used
ALKA-SELTZER
I find that it eases my Aching
Head, takes the kinks out of Tired,
Aching Muscles and brings relief
when I have Acid Indigestion.
The family says I am a lofi
easier to live with since I have
known about Alka-Seltzer.
"Have you tried ALKA-SELT-
ZEK7 If not, why don't you get
a package today? Large package
60*, Small package SO*, also by
the glass at Soda Fountain*, t
3 5OC0 S
LitEHSEb ahpInsured Cqhtractohs |
669 N.W.6& JtVeefc.
MIAMI 36. FLORIDA
||||lBIIIIHIHILll!IILlllllWII||||Hinwi||i


\!
I:
MK^HMM


PAGE TWELVE
* Jen is* fhrMiam
FRIDAY. JULY i3i
BNAI B'RITH NOTES
By DAVE ISEN
COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN
NAMED BY RED CROSS
Major Gen. Henry W. Baird,
Chairman of disaster relief for
the Dado county chapter, Amer-
ican Red Cross, announced Mon-
ins so that everyone will look : humor and a drive that brought
forward to the Biiai B'rith meet- the maximum figure lor each
ing as the best and only place item.
to' go the second Tuesday of i Shirley Rosen and her Victory
Harrison and J. E. Lind. Lt.
Comdr Charles A. Mills. USNR,
(ret), win serve as chapter mili-
tary liaison. w Red Cross field directors on
f
GORDON
^|-710 S. W. 12th AV. MIAMH
YOUR JEWISH
FUNERAL HOME
cordial with spirit and Joy un- fact anything he couldnt sell Other appom menu ar a
confined. As a result, the.r feel- he bought himself, including a follows: E. O. JDon Graham.
inS .s contageoua and the black lace nightgown mat he purvey; E. \\ Dee. nK. rescue
crowd really had a swell time mistook tor an evening cress- .Dr. J. Raymond Graces medical
listening to such popular num- 1 wonder what Mrs Miller said aid. H. S. Branrfen. shelter. Hen-
bers as -Tea for Two'". "Tito when he got hometell us the ry E. Mangels, food and pur-
Chico" and "Tiger Rag"three truth. Sam! chasms: R. B. Grant, clothing:
encores were necessary to sat- Harold Turk succeeded in buy- R. D. -Buck Freeman, trans-
isfy the audience ing a baby carriage, although he portation; \\. E. MacArthur.
The continuation of the War had to bid high foi itinasmuch communications; Stanley C. My-
Bond Auction to add to the vol- as Irving Frankel, who is also ers, registration and mforma-
ume of $107,200.50 worth of the father oi a row : \ : tion: Mrs. H. O. \ ance. public
bonds sold at the Blackstone Ho- cave Harold a real tussle for the information: H. H. Hyrnan. fi-
carriage however, Irving had nance: John Mahony. audit: and
to be content with bringing Mrs. H. O. Shaw, volunteer spec- ;
home soj irmalade, a ial services coordinator.
black bag and -i case of coconuts A preliminary meeting of
at least h light home I committee chairmen was called
o.:a:-:;-.\ Monday afternoon at Red Cross
Harrj M at the headquarters by General Baird
Blood Bai k i rsfa- to make plans for a three-day
. donors disaster institute to be held here
every! I Mor- Aug. 1 thru 3. for the purpose
ris Bi there E ent Store 0f training those who will assist
- "< k's RTOU| iii ease of disaster.
will be led I y Lt. Lloyd Bert- ---------------------------
BEACH ZIONIST CLUB
IN REGULAR MEETING
yd was at 1 eeting Tues- ---------
mteered to Miami Beach Zionist Luncheon
give his alth ugh the Club met Wednesday noon at
already has the Strand Restaurant. 1225
receiv great Washington Ave. Mr. Harry
him. Witi -..... exampU be- Sin ... ff, guest speaker, gave
I us we do less than historic account of the develop-
I >d is ; ing? Let us jam Mor- :;ient of the Jewish Common-
r-.s Bi there Blood Bank next wealth ideal.
ursdaj and si thai we still ---------------------------
that there is a war yet to
t a on.
Three noted Jewish cantors
recently participated in a pro-
ject by which rare liturgical He-
brew songs from the Birnbaum
collection at the Hebrew Union
College were put on records. The
songs will be heard again for
I thP first time in centuries. Hen
| are the cantors giving voice to
; these songs long unheard Left
I to right: Emil Rosen, Cincinnati-
j Abraham Shapiro, Newark. N J-'
Frederick Lechner of New York
and Harpist, Vojm!r Attl.
WE OFFICIALLY REPttSfJT
TO HAJ0K1TT Of H08TKKK
JEWISH FUNERAL I0KS
SERVING MIAMI BEACH & MIAMI
fxca-s.ve.v Je+ish

J24 HOUR
Buy Mere War Bonds.
RECEPTION TENDERED
TO LT. SHAPIRO
IOS. L. PLUMMER
FUNERAL -""'.RECTOR
7
Lift insu-ance Estates
Authoritatively Programmed
NAT GANS
Metrccc 'tan Life Int. Co.
107 B'sca>re Bldfl.
P. I-MH cr 4-9M1
A CHASE
FEDERAL
HOME LOAN
OFFERS YOU
Low Interest Rates
Small Monthly
Payments
No Loan Fees
(Actual Cost Only^
No Charge for
Prepayment
'We also make loans for periods not exceeding
five years without monthly payments
A reception was tendered to
Lt Harold Shapiro. U S. Navy.
at Key West last Friday. After
spending more than a year there
with the Navy Intelligence De-
i artment, Lt. Shapiro will leave
for a furlough at his home in
Milwaukee and then overseas.
During his stay in Key West,
he acted as assistant to Rabbi
Lazarus Lehrer addressing Fri-
day nieht services and arrang-
ing affairs
At the reception Friday eve-
attended by high navy of-
-. he was 11 ntt i a gift
by the community for his serv-
NOTICE
WOFFORD CRUISES
iS-c;tss:-$ t; S : C-_ sea
- ~ -.>..-
FVL
-
. -
*' <* 2.-Hs.r Trip $>.00
3"... "IOC A.V.-- -.304:00 P.M.
Sc_ti Baj. Trip3 Heart
to t*e Fae_ c Dee-'-a Estate
'00Daily. 2 00 P.M.|\00
\:. -
-" 4
Alka-Seltzer
XI A :. a :r. AJJ i
" r for Cm m Si.wt.
Sr Sunxk. "Mtrainc
Aft.r" a=j C*U Duum:
11 **. ar tx>:' P-oxsar.-..
IB a*lon. tatad.. r.
cau ana Sty
1111 Lincoln Road
ls Block East ol Alton
CHASE FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
Resource* Otk St.000.000.00
C L. CLEMENTS. President
OR
MIL!
I NERVINE
FOR rr!>ef fro FsBrtkr*.'. Me*.
* J l'J-.-rt*r..- _: ,. -Cc-
"""a. Crantiawaa. Klcnafcilitr.
Xtri^m, Brua * Ti ::<. lit a^4 Tie.
Lx;>4 lit and II M. !U>J i :.
ucaa and a< c^j at drnctrd.
nofii
VVlGUST BROS RVf
When You Think of Real Eitata
ThinK Of
LEO EISENSTEIN
REALTOR
309 Lincoln Road Phone 5-M79
Dependable, Conacientioua Service
GORDON ROOFING AND
SHEET METAL WORKS
Have your roof repaired now; yN
will aave on a new roof later
"Satisfactory Work by
Experienced Men"
414 S. W. 22nd Avenue
PHONE 4.5860
ntui BISCRVHE HREnn
S. W. 4th SI AT MIAMI AVE.
BOXING WRESTLING
MONDAY NTTE FRIDAY NTTE
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL SAM'S NEWS START)
3- 1236
NOW IN OUR NEW LOCATION
101-102 Mercantile Bank Bldg. Lobby Entrance
420 Lincoln Road Miami Beach
Serricemen: Why not make our office your headquarters?
DR. ROBERT R. BRADFORD
Optometrist-Optician Phone 5-234J
Dade Federal's principle of "Careful and Con-
servative Lending" has meant safety and se-
curity for home owners and investors.
For over a decade Dade Federal has been a
leading financial institution of Greater Miami.
It has placed millions of dollars in first mort-
gages and enjoys the confidence of home
owners and investors because of its sound
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\ tewjytUEIIiOJpidliiaup G? !" ( ^^^Y\ E JEWISH UNITY f Curn THE JEWISH WE EKLY VOLUME 18—NUMBER 28 MIAMI 18, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JULY 13. 1945 WITHDRAW PARTS PALESTINE QUESTION IS OBSTACLE TO ARABBRITISH COOPERATION London (JTA) — Britain will forfeit the friendship of 32,000000 Arabs if it creates a Jewish state in Palestine, Edward Atiyah, of the London Arab office says in the Spectator. The Palestine question, he continued, is the only obstacle to Arab cooperation with Britain and this can be removed by strict application of th e White Paper. PRICE TEN CENTS Atlanta—Complete elimination of the use of anti-Semitic excerpts from Andre Siegfried's book, "America Comes of Age," in correspondence courses offered t" civilian extension students at tli" University of Alabama and army and navy personnel was announced by Alexander F. Miller, director of the Southeastern Kogional Office of the Anti-Drlamation League of B'nai B'nth. Following recent revelations thai the United States Army Forci s Institutp had purchased this correspondence course from i the University of Alabama, Israel j H. Moss, of the league's southWnshinetnn (ITAi T,.,r.. office, immediately l*\*SEttff$^?3g& PRESIDENT ASKED TOTflKESTEPSFQR I JEWISH STATE IS STATE'S FIRST JEWISH DIRECTOR Edward T. Newman this week became Florida's first Jewish funeral director after successfully passing the state board July 10 at Bartow. Last year Mr. Newman had the distinction of becoming Florida's first Jewish licensed mWHnsnri Princton, N. J. (JTA)—After discussing problems of the Near East and their impact on the lives of every American, the national seminar on Palestine, conducted by the American Christian Committee, which met here last week, set up an educational program of Christian action in behalf of Jewish aims in Palestine to be put in force during the coming year. Participants heard many distinguished authorities in the field from both the secular and religious world. TO THE NEAR EAST for Tus aloosa, Alabama. members of the House of RepreBlo de (CONTINUED ON PAGE 6) PEiNir !" I RED CROSS TO ARRIVE IN MIAM A impanied by Mr. William j sntativs, and 125 mayors of large loum oi Tuscaioosa, past presii cities this week presented a %  ir District 7 of B'nai B'rith, | joint petition to President TruMr. Moss conferred with univer-| man urging he government to Hty officiate. | take "the necessary steps that As a result of this interview I Palestine in its historic boundaries shall be proclaimed as a Jewish State." The petition, submitted through the New Zionist Organization of America, also urged that the Jewish pcoplp "through a delegation of Palestine Jewry" be invited to participate in the councils of the United Nations. Stating that "unless the Jewish problem is solved, it will constitute a permanent obstacle to the effectiveness of any post-war settlement and to the peace of the world," the declaration voices A personnel recruitment team ?£ arp T ticis f m ,, of T J he W}FS of from tliisoutheastern area e leaders of the United Nations cmbalmer, and after completing headquarters of the American I t 0 invlte a Jewish delegation to the necessary additional year of Red Cross will be in Miami July San Fra ncisco. declaring that service, he became eligible to 26 through 31 to interview applii t his was a 8 ross injustice and take the funeral director's excants for paid positions. I a n error -" amination. Newman has resided on Miami Beach for the past twelve years, j and completed three years of apprenticeship as an embalmer in this area. He completed his course by taking a year's training a New York school where EDWARD T. NEWMAN EPARTMENT EXPERT AIDS ARAB PART! AT FRISCO New York (JTA) — The disclosure that an expert of the War Department assisted the Arab delegates during their stay at San Francisco is revealed in the Al-Hoda, an Arab daily newspaper published here. Reporting that the Iraq delegation maintained a special propaganda office at San Francisco, the paper says that this office was headed by Prof. Darwish Al-Heidari, general secretary of the Iraq delegation. "Also in the office were Professor Faris Maloof, head of the Institute for Arab-Ameriean -Affairs, assistedby Prof. George Barakat, on special leave from the U. S. War Department," the paper says. It credits the Iraq Minister in Washington with making this arrangement. Mackinac Island, Mich. (JTA) President Truman was asked this week by the governors of thirty-seven states to take immediate steps to open Palestine "to Jewish mass immigration and colonization, and to bring about the earliest transformation of that country into a free and democratic Jewish Commonwealth." A petition bearing the signatures of thirty-seven state executives was sent to President Truman, accompanied by a covering letter from Governor Herbert B. Maw of Utah expressing" hope that the President will disj cuss ways and means to achieve this with Prime Minister Churchill and Marshal Stalin at the forthcoming Big Three conference in Berlin. Gov. Millard Caldwell of Florida was among the signers. Governor Maw, who initiated the petition with Governor (CONTINUED ON PAGE 8) appli or paid positions. Needs are for women hospital workers to staff military hospitals, for staff assistants to serve i and for men to fill positions as assistant field director. Trained social workers — for supervisory administrative and stafl positions; recreation workers— t,i plan, direct and conduct tion programs; and hospi11 workers—to serv e under provisional guidance in social case work. Wj applying for positions !" stall assistants must be' between the ages of 23 and 35, a are needed for overseas duty "operate clubmobiles and to rl r ( ,'" Rl 'd Cross clubs and ',' ""'• centers. Men applying for positions as assistant field directors must be necHnri 0 ? yt Uls of a S. and are cam,' 0 %  '"'" assignment, either to raTnti"' lls cou ntry, or to ree as Ti U lts be,n sent verK.J hM ? dutles are to counJ.D.C. DIRECTOR LEAVES HERE FORL he studied embalming, funeral direction, and associated subjects. He graduated with honors receiving the highest scholastic average of the class and served as class chairman. Newman, son of Mrs. Freda Newman, prominent Beachite, resides with his mother. His civic activities include affiliation with Miami Beach Jewish Center, historian of the Beach JeyOF IS PRESIDENT LAUDS EFFORTS OF HENRY IWORGEA !" Jl. Havana (WNS) — An antiSemitic campaign, spearheaded by a group of Germans recently released from internment, is now under way in Cuba. se and assist sonni servicemen on pera e p s?s em a nd HF* lofffi? 1 intc rcste Mrs. Schroeter 'o all p '"lmina, '-V interviews 11 applicants prior to the I Washington (JTA) — The departure of Dr. Joseph J. Schwartz, European director of the Joint Distribution Committee, for London on a special refugee mission was announced this week by the State Department. Dr. Schwartz has been given a temporary leave by the Joint Distribution Commission to accompany Earl G. Harrison, United States representative on i Pr TTMn MFHP MTTMnFlM I organizing a new post-war Nazi the Inter-Governmental Com-!rUUNL> NfcAtt HUNtMCTI movement Washington (JTA)—Hight tribute was paid this week by President Truman to Secretary j of the Treasury Henry Morgenthau, Jr., following his announcement that Mr. Morgenthau had resigned from the office which he has held since 1934. The President lauded Mr. Morgenlhau's efforts for the nation both during the years of peace and war. No successor to Mr. Morgenthau will be appointed until the President returns from his conference with Prime Minister Churchill and Premier Stalin, it was announced. A fervent plea for religious tolerance and differing beliefs was made this I eek by James F. Byrnes, new Secretary of State, at his swearing-in cerethe terrace of the mittee on Refugees, as an associate on a mission of inquiry to Europe concerning the needs of stateless and non-repatriable refugees, including many Jews, in Western Europe and the Allied zones of occupation in Germany. The State Department announced that the mission has been directed to ascertain the extent to which the needs of nonrepatriables, who include "many j der the direction of Alfred RoJewish survivors of Nazi persenberg, chief Nazi race theoritician, who was _captured by Sf'ol theReddroS officiate •tcution..'' are nod being met Tom Atlanta ^ Ioi! > oniciais k „ fV> „ „,;,; Brfe"'"?. ^CT|that even during his internment with one another to preserve MANY LOOTED BOOKS : Biederlack was instrumental in their different beliefs, but we have learned through long and bitter experience that the only way to protect our religious beliefs is to respect and recognize the right of others to their religious beliefs." Secretary of State James F. Byrnes this week announced the appointment of Benjamin V. Cohen as one of his three special assistants. Mr. Cohen previously served as general counsel of the Office of War Mobilization and Reconversion when Mr. Byrnes was its director, and held many other government posts. Frankfurt (JTA) — Threequarters of a million volumes looted from Jewish rabbinical libraries in Vilna, Paris and Amsterdam have been discovered, so far, in the small town of Hungen, north of here, and 100,000 have been found in the "Institute for Research Into the Jewish Question" in Frankfurt. The institute was operated unby the military authorities, gov ernments of residence, international relief bodies and private refugee agencies. Melbourne, Australia (JTA)— The attempt by anti-Semitic groups to block the purchase by the Australian Zionist organization of a building in .the business section of this city has been condemned by several radio commentators. One broadcaster pointed out that the failure to stop the sale is an indication that the majority of Australians are true to the British tradition of tolerance and fair play. British troops in Flensburg in May. After examining the loot at the institute, Rosenberg would send the books to Hungen to be stored. Among the nearly 1,000,000 volumes ar e priceless treasures, including illuminated manuscripts and examples of the earliest printing in Europe. Lieut. Julius Buchman, of New York City, discovered the cache, and suspecting its value sent out a hurry call for someone who could read Hebrew. SHAEF produced Cpl. Abraham Aaroni, also of New York, a Semitic scholar. Aaroni quickly identified the volumes. In Haban Vieja, the Jewish section of this city, the antiSemites distributed anti-Jewish posters and hand-bills, provoking street brawls with Jews. One of the weekly newspapers. La Tribuna, in its issue of June 25, carried a headline "The Cuban worker and commerce demand that the Jews get out of Cuba." New York (JTA)—Disclosure of what transpired at a "national anti-Semitic conference" held in Los Angeles last month under the auspices of the "United Israelites," or, as they sometimes call themselves, the "AngloIsraelites," is made in the newspaper PM. The paper reveals that 1.000 to 1,500 delegates attended the conference which was featured by numerous anti-Semitic speeches, is which Jews were described variously as "liars," "murderers" and "skunks." It was announced that "a funeral service" would soon b P held for the Jews, and those present were urged to "get their guns" and prepare to fight the Jews. Marseilles, (JTA)—Over 2,000 French Jews liberated from concentration camps in Poland by the Red Army have arrived here from Odessa to where they were taken by Soviet authorities. They told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency that en route from Oswiecim to Odessa they stopped in Bucharest where they were warmly welcomed by the Jewish community and given clothes. Among th P arrivals is Pierre Karsenti, 32, from Paris, who is one of the few Jews in Europe to have survived two years in Oswiecim. •V I i: 1



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FRIDAY. JULY 13, 1945 *JewistinoridUan PAGE THREE SISTERHOOD HAS PLANS FOB PARTY iriLIHSTHE Temple Beth Sholom Sisterhood lias completed its arrangements for a card and social party to be held on the evening of July 24th at 8:00 P. M„ in the Pan-American Room, Blackstone Hotel, Miami Beach. The prowl 11 go towards the new Temple and Community House that is to be built in the near future on Chase Avenue at 41st Street. Miami Beach. This card and social party is open to the public. The committee announces that arrangements have been completed for the distribution of very fine door prizes and gifts. It will be one of the outstanding Sisterhood affairs this year. Mrs. Charles S. Tobin, president ol the Sisterhood, announced the appointment of the following committees in charge of the arrangements for the card and social party; Mesdames Rhoda Morris and E m a n u e 1 trich, co-chairman of the ticket committee; Mesdames Leo Steinberg. Herman Rosenbaum and Jack Shaeffer, co-chairmen of the refreshment committee; mes Simon Wolf and Irving Rothman, co-chairmen of the door prizes and gifts; Mesdames Louis J. Krensky and Irving Becker, co-chairmen of the game committee; Mesdames Morris Berich and Louis Goldman, cochairmen of the publicity committee and Mesdames I. C. Greenberg and Camelia Baum, co-chairmen of the usherettes committee. In addition to these committees, the following are i also members of the various committees in charge: Mesdames ; Charles S. Tobin, Leo Solomon, j Charlotte Haas, Abraham Blatt, Norman Maran, A. Solasko and i Leo Robinson. Temple Beth Sholom Sister' hood is embarking on one of the most ambitious social proj f>ramof the coming year. In i this program provisions will be made for educational and communal activities. In September the Sisterhood is planning to Dave a tea in honor of the new members, of which committee Mrs. Louis J. Krensky, vicepresident, has been appointed as chairman, and as soon as plans are completed, notice will be given to all the members of the Sisterii i i. NOTICE! We call attention to our subscribers that effective July 15, 1945, subscription rates to The Jewish Floridian will be increased to $3.00 per year, $2.00 for six months, two years, $5.00. Renewals of all subscribers will be accepted at the old rate until October 15. New subscribers will pay increased rates. CHIEF RABBI SURVIVOR OF PREWAR LEADERS London (JTA) — Chief Rabbi Leo Baeck, of Berlin, who has just arrived here from Theresienstadt after a short stay in Paris, revealed that h e is the only survivor of the pre-war Jewish leaders of Germany and Austria. Dr. Otto Hirsch, executive director of the "Reichsvertretung" of German Jews, died in the Mauthausen camp, Dr. Baeck said, while other officials of the central body, including Dr. Arthur Lilienthal, a one-time Berlin judge, Dr. Cora Berliner and Hanna Karminsky were deported to Poland. Dr. Paul Epstein, another leader of the organization, died in Oswiecim. The Austrian Jewish leaders who died or were murdered included Robert Strieker, prominent Zionist (whose son is now in the U. S. Army), and Dr. Desider Friedman, president of the Vienna Jewish community at the time of thr> Anschluss. Jerusalem (JTA)—Th P extent of Palestine Jewish industry's contribution to the war effort is disclosed in the current issue of the monthly publication of the Jewish Industrialists Association. It reveals that war materials valued at over $1,000,000,000 were manufactured here. The manufactures included 3,000.000 anti-tank mines, 5.000,j 000 benzine and water tanks, j parts for ships, tremendous i amounts of foodstuffs — includi ing 20,000 tons of jams and marmalades, 7.000.000 bottles of fruit juices, over 750,000 quarts of wines and over 5,000.000 quarts of beer, 7,000,000 pounds of textiles, and 1,000,000 pairs of shoes. Ne\ York (JTA)—The American Jewish Trade Union Committee for Palestine, which inworkers both AFL and CIO— ciudi %  millions of American wis week issued a memorandum calling upon the leaders of the uniated Nations to act immediately on the Palestine question. Bucharest (JTA) — Approximately 8,000 Jews in the Carpatho-Ukraine will become Soviet citizens as a result of that part of Czechoslovakia joining the USSR as a section of the Ukraine, it was reported here. Of the 90,000 Jews who were deported by the Germans from the Carpatho-Ukraine to various extermination camps in Poland and Germany, only 8,000 have returned, the report said. They include 1,000 Jews of Munkacevo, where the Jewish population totalled 177,000 prior to the deportations. FEW JEWS LEFT III BERLIN SHOWN BY RECENT CHECK Berlin (JTA)—Only 4,000 to 5.000 Jews are left in this capital today, according to preliminary estimates, out of a pre-war Jewish population here of almost 100,000. Most of them, as Jews of mixed marriages, had been granted certain Drivileges by the Nazis and were allowed to remain here. A new Jewish community council, representing the combined interests of these Jews and those who recently returned from concentration camps, has been selected and will cooperate with the Russian military government, Dr. Alfred Warner. German Lord Mayor, and the municipality. Unity between the two groups was achieved after difficulties arose between the existing Jewish organization, "Reichvereinigurg der Juden," which was formed during the Hitler regime to account for Jewish affairs to the Gestapo, and a new group consisting mostly of the Jews who had returned from Nazi prison camps. The newly-liberated Jews expressed a lack of confidence in the old organization, accusing it of not having adequately performed its work. As yet, no representative has been appointed to represent Jewish religious affairs on the Lord Mayor's board. At present. Father Buchholz, a Catholic priest, aided by a Protestant minister named Gruber, is handling religious affairs for the entire city. Pastor Gruber was confined for three years in a concentration camp. Among public properties suffering least damage is a hospital which remained in Jewish hands throughout the Nazi rule and which did extremely useful work. In addition to being used as a hospital it served also as a home for the aged who were saved from deportation. All doctors employed there were Jewish. ELECTED TO LEAD NATIONAL U. J. A. CAMPAIGN _J Vllii ">• O. Heller, rUbbi Jonah B. Wie ana k.''""Y *MesnmM (lop row, left lo right), have Unhfd %  ,0 *"*' ** N ,ional Chairmen of the VlU^I" i' me C ; Heller, Rabbi Jonah B. Wiae and been Ijflil — J ~~ —--••. aaw i • %  aiviieaa *..! %  • %  % % % % %  % %  *• • *•* •nd P.I ." Appeal for *rtfW. Perea. Need tanifiJl r J** whicB %  • reconstituted recently at the; Com^, U r i,in "fener for the Joint DUtribution ££"*, the U„|,ed Palestine Appeal and the NaOurL i '"V* Service. I. Edwin* Coldw.wer and -""•a J. Rotenbloom were named National CoTreamrer*. and l.idor Coon and Henry Montor were elected Executive Vice-Chairmen (bottom row, left to right). A record number of 4.600 Jewi.h communities in every .eclion of the country will participate in the 1945 V. J. A. campaign, which miiM provide Jarger resource, than ever before Tor emergency relief and rehabilitation ove W a. for the upbuilding of the Jewish National Home in Palestine and for refugee aid in the United Slates. Economic Development of Palestine Increases Market for American Exports Julius 8lmon, president of the Palestine Economic Corporation, being Interviewed by newspaper reporters in New York on his arrival for a brief visit in the United States. Mr. Simon's headquarters are In Jerusalem. New York City—Palestine will be a very profitable market in the Middle East for American exports when conditions return to normal, declared Julius Simon, president of the Palestine Economic Corporation, largest American business enterprise in that country, on his recent arrival from his headquarters in Jerusalem. Many orders have already been placed in this country for the purchase of industrial and agricultural machinery for Palestinian factories and farms, Mr. Simon said. "One of the most important projects in the long-range plans of the Palestine Economic Corporation is an extensive irrigation system which has been worked out with the aid of American experts," he announced. "This project will provide for the irrigation 0approximately 750,000 acres and make possible the establishment of about 100,000 additional farms with a total farming population of half a million persons. The first step calls for the irrigation of 125,000 acres for Jewish settlers and it will take from one to three years to carry out this p r eliminary work at a cost of approximately $26,000,000." The Palestine Economic Corporation, 570 Lexington Avenue. New York City, was formed in 1926 "to afford an instrument through which American Jews and others who may be interested may give material aid on a strictly business basis to productive Palestinian enterprises and thereby further the economic development of the Holy Land and the resettlement there of an increasing number of Jews." The Corporation owns and operates a number of subsidiary companies in Palestine and is a large shareholder in certain basic industries. Specializing .... IN SOUTHWEST PROPERTIES The I. S. SHAPOFF Organization has sold over a quarter million dollars of residential property the past three months If you are interested in Selling your Home Buying a Home Real Estate Investments SEE OR CALL I. S. SHAPOFF, Realtor 2755 S. W. 27th Avenue PHONE 4-7027 War Bonds Are Still a Best Buy



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PAGE EIGHT *JenisiiflcridHaf7 %  1 c'! I •^^^^^^ In the Greater Miami! WITHDRAW PARTS OF COURSE Houses of Worship TEMPLE ISRAEL, Reform, 137 N E. 19th St.—Kvtiiiliir services FrldaJ evening at S:15 p. m Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan is delivering course ol lecture! "n the "Ethic* ami Ideall Ol l'raver Book" This week's lecture la entitled "The Kaddleh". MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CONGREGATION. 590 S. W. 17th Ave.— Friday evening service* at r:80 p. m. and Saturday morning services at 9 a. m. Sohaarel Zedek Talmud Torah, 1545 8. W. Srd Street. Friday evening services at 7:80 p. ni. Saturday morning services at n. m. Dally services • DO a. m. and 7:16 p, m. Schaarel Zedek Talmud Torah, 1545 S. w. Srd street, Friday evening ser\ es at 7 JO p. m. Saturday morn. : \ lce .it 9 o'clock. BETH DAVID CONGREGATION, Conservative. 139 N. W 3rd Ave.— Regular services Friday evening at 7.;0 p. m. Saturday morning services at 8:30 a. ra, Pally Mlnyan. Cantor Abraham Friedman will officiate. Hebrew School daily from Monday through Thursday, 9 a. m. until 12. TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM. Liberal. 761 41st Street, Miami Beach.— Friday evening services at 5:45. BETH JACOB CONGREGATION, Orthodox. 311 Washington Ave.. Mi; ami Beach.—Krld.iy evening service i at 7:30 p. m, Saturday morning MTVIces at SO a m, Scnaloa Seudoa at p. m. Rabbi Moses Mescheloff will speak on the portion of the law. I Cantor Maurice Mamches will chant. Summer sessions of the school .Monday through Friday, from : %  % %  IS. MIAMI BEACH JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER. Conservative, 1415 Euclid Avenue. Miami Beach. AS at 7:15 p. i Saturday morning services Mincha a" %  %  :'' p. n x p. ni. (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1) the university officials agreed to withdraw Siegfried's excerpt from the model composition course. Dean R. E. Tidwell. of the Extension Division of the University of Alabama, wrote in part: "I have talked this matter over with the instructor and she is greatly disturbed that the inclusion of this particular selection has caused this misunderstanding. The only purpose the author of the course had in mind was to give the student an oppoc 1 tunity to write a brief or a summary of a good article. Prior to this, we have not had any question raised with reference to this selection. "The course has been revised from time to time, but this particular selection has been. included since the original preparation of the course some ten years ago. I am glad to inform you that this selecOBITUARIES FRANKEL En II F • I % %  v : Avi Ml % %  Bei h .;.i\ He can i lo M ;,, > %  %  from Havana, Cuba. ... etal S rife, Mrs A • %  %  : \ P nke! M ->-'• Frai ki 1. all of Bead Ser es were 1 Riverside Mi • With v %  • \ emetery. KRAMER s • %  K er. 64, dl< d T : : Ave., .... here fri aeven Hi vea n I Ehter, Mra I Mill Kramei all of Sew York, when the body Is seni ': KI i" %  il H ROSE la -aj. y. ... adaj sidence earl He • VI %  • t \. n i rk CH Ifi Mr* : %  ly was sent I N i %  •'" N ASKPRESIDENTTQ AID IMMIGRATION TO THE BEAST (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1) Dewey of New York, Tobin of Massachusetts, Baldwin of Connecticut, and McGrath of Rhode Island, released its text this week at the close of the governors' conference here at which he prsided. "Concerned as it is with the position of the Jewish people in Europe the future of the Jewish National Home in Palestine, we believe that this petition raises matters of immediate and farreaching humanitarian and political importance." the accompanying letter declares. "The considerations which prevented action in regard to these pressing issues while war still raged in Europe, no longer applies. Thp urgency of the Jewish problem and its solution in Palestine has become such that I venture the earnest hope that it may be thought opportune to give attention to his question in the course of your forthcoming conversations with the Prime Minister of Great Britain and Marshal Stalin." MONDAY. July 16 Campaign Committee of Federation meeting;'at B P. M. In the Sunshine Room: Meeting of the Miami BervIce League Town Y. 7:15. Buy More War Bonds! need is greater than ever. The tion has been deleted and will not be used any further. "I believe that I am right in saying that here at our own institution there is absolutely no manifestation of religious intolerance or bias. This would apply with more than ordinary force to the author of the English Composition Course IB question. On July 5. 1945, the Jewish Welfare Board representative in I Washington, D. C, conferred with army officials and received verified confirmation that the I U S. Army had directed the I withdrawal of this material %  from the US API. Radioa — Phonographa P. A. Syatema — Auto Radioa Electrical Contracting Electrical Appliancea Refrigeration — Motora — Fana LYONS Radio Electrical Service Telephone 2-7618 440 S. W. 8th Street Rabbi Joseph E. RackovgW 1520 S. W. 5th St Phone 2-7439 London (JTA)—The Stockholm correspondent of the Daily Herald reports that a group of German Jews are planning to present to the United Nations a plan for the creation of a Jewish state within the borders of Germany. You can't quit now! You must continue to buy Bonds, and More Bonds! MONAHAN'S ONE-STOP AUTO SERVICE 2160 S W. 8th Street Hours 8 A.M. to 9 P.M. Sundays 9 to 3 PHONE 3-8266 IT PAYS TO BUY AT WGGAGCSHOP PHONE 3-2603 DO YOU NEED A GIRL FOR HOUSEWORK? If you want a girl for Day Work—at a moment's notice—one who is reliable and competent—call PHONE 2-2648 ALLEN EMPLOYMENT AGENCY 420 N. E. 2nd Avenue Custom-Made Seat Covers Convertible Tops One-Day Service TRAIL TOP SHOP 1699 S. W. 8th St. Ph. 9-3541 DINE IN COMFORT AT THE STRAND RESTAURANT Wi.!u • ton Ave. at 12th St.. Miami Beach OPEN ALL YEAR AIR CONDITIONED il n.|. i ni •|niMBI*ttmM f the •••'''l l**i -r* .t Huffman'*,! Telephone 58-2979 ^^^^ MM ___-__________________i OIL ON TROUBLED WATERS A spreading oil slick brief marker for the death of a gallant American tanker and for immortal merchant seamen who defied the wolf-packs to get the precious oil through to our fighters and their allies Gone are the days when our merchant ships burned helplessly in sight of the South Florida coast ... the wolf-packs no longer roam the Atlantic. We lost millions of tons of gasoline and oil to enemy submarines, but millions more got through in time to speed the day of Victory in Europe. The men of the tankers still have a big job to do. They must carry twice as much gasoline and oil twice as far to our troops in the Pacific. And when I ictory Everywhere has been achieved, fuel oil will have much to do with shaping; the world of tomorrow for fuel oil i a builder, too. The Belcher <-'!! Company proudly continues to supply fuel oil to our Navy and Merchant Marine while planning for the new world a-coming ... in which fuel oil will share in building jobs and security for all! Belcher's busy on the home front, too! Supplying prompt metercd delivery service to all users of fuel oil, from the smallest homes to South Florida's largest hotels and industrial plants. If it's fuel oil or oil-burning equipment, its Belcher! Phone 2-7425. \-L.iten V->>uf,cMeW.Ue..n Miam. Melod, T.„w !hu.>d Y 6 A0 -iuuonyi 4 3C p



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FRIDAY, J ULY 13, 1945 *Jewist Meridian PAGE ELEVEN DF GREAT WORTH The attention of the readiR£ nnhlic is directed to Volume 1, $5 of Harofe Haivri (The Hehrow Medical Journal), which has been published for the last oiehtein years under the editorship of Moses Einhorn, M.D.. of New York City. Its contents are not confined to technical medical topics, but are divided into several sections covering a variety of related subjects. The current issue is dedicated to the late Henrietta Szold, distinguished humanist and Zionjj ti who harnessed American Jewish womanhood in a great organization. Hadassah, which is responsible for the vast network 0 f medical and sanitary installations in Palestine, making it the outstanding health center of the whole of the Middle East. Mrs. Hose G. Jacobs, an intimate friend and co-worker, who was president of Hadassah for five years, presents a very interesting article entitled "Henrieta Szold's Contribution to the Health of the Body and Soul of Palestine:' Mrs. Tamar De Sola Pool, also former president of Hadassah lor four years gives a detailed account of the life and work of Miss Szold. Dr. S. R. Kagan contributes an article of particular interest nn the contribution of the ing a special section on the subject. In this issue Dr. A. Freed writes on forms of medical nomenclature in the Bible, and Dr. M. H. Leon on terminological controversies. Dr. Leon Golden, eminent Hebrew philologist, presents a dictionary of 600 new medical terms. The Harofe Haivri has no counterpart. With the passing of the years, this journal with its extensive material and prominent contributors has maintained its high standard of service to the medical profession, and has won the esteem of doctors and laymen throughout the world. Its contents, moreover, are available to every reader, for there is an English section containing complete translations of all the Hebrew articles. Those who desire information of any sort, or who wish to subscribe, should communicate with The Hebrew Medical Journal, 983 Park Avenue, New York 28, N. Y. pioneer physicians to the growth and development of the Zionist movement throughout the world. Since the Middle Ages the Jewish physician has exerted great influence on tlie communal life of Israel. They wer e not only the healers of the body and mind, but also leaders, statesmen and diplomats who fought for th t rights and freedom of their brethren. The development of a living Hebraic culture has made necessary the creation of a new medical terminology in Hebrew, and lot Harofe Haivri has had a part in this creative effort by devotDEBBS TO ENTERTAIN PROSPECTIVE MEMBERS Prospective members of the Debb's Chapter, B'nai B'rith Young Women are to be entertainled at a dessert luncheon on Sunday, July 15 at 2:00 P. M. Invitations have been sent to the guests who will come together at the home of Miss Joanne Saltzman, 108 Eighth Terrace, Di Lido Isle. MIKE SCHEMER TO~ BE HONORED Mike Schemer, of Miami, son of the late Rabbi Philip Schemer, an Orthodox Rabbi, will be honored with a "Mike Schemer" day to be held at the Roosevelt stadium in the near future. One of the most popular men on the Jersey City, N. J., Giants baseball team, he joined the team following his discharge from the army last year. Playing first base, he is one of the top hitters, batting around .333. The Sisterhood of Temple Beth Sholom, Miami Beach, is sponsoring a Social Evening in the Pan American Room at the Blackstone Hotel on July 24 at 8 P. M. Door prizes will be awarded and refreshments served. MERCANTILE NATIONAL BANK MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA Condensed Statement of Condition COMPTROLLER'S CALL At Close of Business June 30. 1945 RESOURCES Cash on Hand and Due from Banks $ 4,411,146.62 United States Government Securities 17,340,248.28 Municipal Bonds 118,000.00 $21,869,394.90 21,000.00 3,345,608.16 Stock of Federal Reserve BankLoans ;,IK1 Discounts 3,340,609.02 F.H.A. Insured Mortgages 4,999.14 Furniture and Fixtures Other Assets Overdrafts 37,984.47 37,107.16 54.94 Customer's Liability-Letters of Credit 75,146.57 27,820.16 $25,338,969.79 LIABILITIES Capital Stock 100,000.00 Surplus 600,000.00 Undivided Profits and Reserves 404,706.47 1,104,706.47 Letters of Credit....'..._ Deposits ...... 75,320.16 24,158,943.16 $25,338,969.79 DIRECTORS p SAMUEL BLANK mnaent, National Brands. Inc. GUY W. ELLIS Executive Vice President Lin. .in Koad Association GEORGE GOLDBERG BENJAMIN N. KANE \ ice President of Bank 1 resident, Interstate Home K'luipment Co. HAROLD KASSEWITZ Attorney MARCIE LIBERMAN Vice President of Bank ALEXANDER ORR. JRPresident, Alexander Orr, Jr.. inc. JUDSON L. OWEN President of Bank Director, First National Bank In Palm Beach OFFICERS JUDSON L. OWEN President EDW. MERCER \ Ice President BENJAMIN N. KANE vice President HENRY 8. LAWLEY Assistant Vice President MARCIE LIBERMAN Vice President D. B. HUDSON Cashier R. W. POLLARD Asst. Cashier STANLEY N. BOOKBINDER Asst. Cashier MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION KEEP BUYING AND SAVING WAR BONDS DADE JR. RED CROSS NEEDS COMIC BOOKS The Dade County Junior Red Cross needs comic books. Through Red Cross Camp and Hospital service, books collected by the juniors will be distributed to military hospitals. Very popular with servicemen, the demand for comic books far exceeds the supply now on hand at camp and hospital. The public is urged to contribute books, either at the Junior Red Cross office, 275 N. W. Second St., or camp and hospital headquarters, 336 E. Flagler St. ERETZ ISRAEL IS IN DANGER (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4) view explained. In the matter of public relations the Zionist organization's many bureaus and worse than children, for children at least cry sometimes when they don't get what they want. Meeting one another is taken for important political work by the Zionist leaders. They live as effectively in a ghetto as if there were a wall around them. It is time for them to come out of their ghetto and forget about the guestion of personal prestige, for the Jewish people's holiest possession, Eretz Israel, is in danger of being stolen. Let them lead the fight against the foul curs* of imperialism, in the open, in the light of day, and millions of unseen brethren in America, Africa and Asia will acclaim them and the Yishuv of Palestine will bless their names. Corporal Irving Yablonsky, former Bronx druggist of 3510 Bainbridge Avenue, New York City, shows Cadet Nurse Thelma King, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., the penknife with which he operated to save a soldier's life under fire. Yablonsky, a medic, is recovering from machine gun wounds at Thomas England General Hospital, Atlantic City. This unique operation took place in the Belgian Ardennes Mountains when the 4th Armored Division, to which Cpl. Yablonsky was attached, was trapped and cut off from its rear echelons by the Nazi 11th Panzer Division. Unable to retreat the 4th drove ahead. At the height of the furious conflict Cpl. Yablonsky abandoned his first aid jeep and on foot began searching for wounded men, zigzagging from foxhole to foxhole. In one foxhole LAUDERDALE SERVICES Sabbath evening services will be conducted by Temple EmanuEl in Ft. Lauderdale at 8 P. M. during June, July and August. The subject will deal with the Chapter on Ethics of the Fathers of the Talmud. he found a man near death from a deep shrapnel wound in his chest. Yablonsky examined the man and saw there was no time to summon a doctor. With a penknife sterilized in alcohol, he enlarged the wound and checked the flow of blood, using a pair of forceps in place of the usual hemostat as a compression clamp. Constant bombardment made suturing the lung at that time impossible, so he packed the hole with cotton, saturated the wound with sulpha powder and evacuated the patient. The wounded soldier recovered. Ttlomi for REST CONVALESCENCI mt CHRONIC CASEJ un-Ray Park e aIth Resort I WANT MY MILK Estab. 1924 And Be Sure Ifi FLORIDA DAIRIES HOMOGENIZED Vitamin "D" Milk "Milk Producto" Dacro Protected TEL. 2-2621 Greater Miami Delivery Visit Our Farm at 6200 N. 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PAGE SIX vjewistflcrktiari FRIDAY, JULY 13. 1945 SURVIVING JEWS CONFISCATION Prague (JTA) — Surviving Jews in the Sudeten area of Czechoslovakia — who are German-speaking and who always registered as of German nationally — are somewhat apprehensive about whether they will be exempted from the confiscation of property, expulsion from the country and other reprisals that almost certainly will be visited upon the Sudeten Germans by the Czechoslovak government. Jewish leaders, however, told this correspondent that they are confident that fair treatment will be given the Sudeten Jews and that they will be allowed to become full citizens of Czechoslovakia. Another ticklish problem, thesp leaders said, is securing the return of confiscated Jewish property. This will be comparatively simple in Bohemia and Moravia where the property was taken over by Germans, who are going to be expelled, but in Slovakia, the property is now in the hands of Slovaks, who. from all indications, will not give it up without a struggle. Government experts are now at work seeking a solution of the problem. The majority of the 2.000 Jews now in Prague—survivors of the pre-war Jewish communitv of 45.000—and another 7.000 elsewhere in Boehmia and Moravia have been stripped of most of their assets and are dependent on relief. A small amount has already arrived from the Joint Distribution Committee, via Stockholm, including milk, jam and other foodstuffs, but much more is urgently needed.particularly fats. Money is apparently not as important at present as supplies. JEWS FARE WORSE THAN GERMANS ENEMY WEARS BADGES THE SAME AS JEWS Frankfurt (JTA)—The ragged remnants of Frankfurt's once flourishing, prosperous Jewish community have, up to now, fared worse under the American occupation than many Germans who discarded their Nazi party badges the day the city was taken. Those who have struggled horrw from concentration camps inthe past two months returned ill and penniless, and, sometimes. • on the verge of starvation. But theye wei> bolstered by the hope that they would soon regain their homes, their possessions and their positions in the community. Their hopes have not been realized. The Jews have discovered that no machinery has been set up for restitution of their property, and many are living in squalor while Germans occupy thenformer homes. Frankfurt's pre-Hitler Jewish population exceeded 30.000, and was the second largest in Germany. Only 600 are in the city today. Of these, 140 escaped deportation to concentration camps and managed to remain here. The others are survivors from concentration camps who returned home in recent weeks on foot, or in pitiful truck caravans. More than 7.000 Frankfurt Jews were sent to Theresienstadt, and 326 who have returned from there report that the others were murdered. Paris (JTA) — The works of Jewish composers, whose compositions could not be played in Germany during the Nazi regime, were in the record collection of Hitler at his Berchtcsgaden retreat, according to Allied correspondents. Radio Luxembourg quotes the correspondents as stating that they found albums of music by Felix Mendelssohn, Jacques Offenbach and Karl Goldmark in Hitler's music room. J.D.C. Sends Three Relief Workers Abroad These three new members of the J.D.C. overseas staff have %  just sailed for Europe where they will help to administer the J.D.C's widespread program of relief and rehabilitation of the 1,250,000 Jews who look to American Jewry for aid. They are (left to right) Benjamin N. Brook, Maurice Eigen and James P. Rice. London (JTA)—Germans and collaborationist Hungarians in at least one Prague district are being compelled to observe the same regulations that the Nazis imposed upon the Jews, even to wearing identifying badges, a correspondent of the Manchester Guardian reports. An official poster issued by the local national committee — which is the authoritative administrative body — in Prague s 12th district lists the following regulations: 1. Persons falling into the category of German or Hungarian traitors, and who are over the age of 14. must wear a fourinch-square swastika on a white background. 2. Persons marked with such swastikas are not to receive normal ration cards, arc barred from ; using street cars, except when going to work, and then may i only enter the read car and not occupy any seats. They must i not walk on sidewalks, but must use the roadways and will be refused admittance to all public parks, woods, barber shops, restaurants, places of entertainment and lectures. 3. Such persons are forbidden to use laundries and cleaning shops and are restricted to shopping between the hours of 11 A. M. to 1 P. M. and 3 P. M. to 4 P. M. Violation of these regulations will result in punishment for both buyers and sellers. After 8 P. M. they are forbidden to appear on the streets. 4. Persons over 14 who have the letter "D" for "Deutsch" stamped on their identity papers must apply for the swastika badges and, at the same time, submit a list of the property held by them and surrender all radios in their possession. They are forbidden to engage in any financial transactions. 5. Germans are not entitled to tobacco rations and are not allowed to smoke in public or at work. As a final blow, the regulations provide that the words German and Hungarian are henceforth to be written with a small "g" and "h", respectively. The Guardian correspondent, commenting on these restrictions, calls them "unjust and ruthless" and says that they are merely following totalitarian methods, and applying them to Sudeten Germans and Hungarians, who were formerly Czech subjects. You've got a new-kitchen bee buzzing in your bonnet. You want a better kitchen cooler, cleaner .. without a single lingering odor. lined for easier working ... a beautiful, livable place! Everything streamIt's a plan the whole Gas industry is working on —and it's wonderful. It's going to brirg you the most thoroughly coordinated kitchens since Adam and Eve set up light housekeeping! Cabinets and appliances will fit together from stem to stern. No cracks or crannies to catch dust and dirt. 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PAGE FOUR *Jenisti Fkridiain FRIDAY, JULY 13, The Jewish Floridian Plant and Main Offices, 21 S. W. Second Avenue. Miami, Fla. P. O. Bo x 2973 P hone 2-1141 Entered as Second Class Matter July 4, 1930 at the Post Office of Miami, Florida, under the Act of March 3, 1879 FRED K. SHOCHET, Managing Editor 1 Year, $3.00 Six Months, $2.00 2 Years. $5.00 MIAMI 18, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JULY 13, 1945 AB 3, 5705 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 28 A TIMELY WARNING In well spoken words, addressing an Independence Day gathering in Hollywood, Supmere Court Justice Murphy warned against "the Nazi disease" here. In Germany, "the Nazi disease" is under control. In none of the zones occupied by the Allied armies in Germany will we for a long time see any of the Nazi poison spread — but there are carriers of the Nazi disease elsewhere. Even as Justice Murphy spoke there was a report from Havana to the effect that a group of Germans, recently released from internment in Cuba, have launched a good imitation of Goebbels' propaganda program in the Cuban capital. We may expect that disgruntled Germans in other paits of the world will not fail to attempt to infect the new communities in which they may be, or to which they may immigrate, and in which they are not subject to Allied control. These Nazis, who are free to spread their poison, will unquestionably make the most of their opportunity. The famous Norwegian woman writer, Miss Undsett, some time ago remarked that the German atrocities against the Jews had been so ghastly, that to justify themselves in their own souls, they would, after the war, even intensify the propaganda against the Jews. We are unguestionably faced by a grave danger, in which simple liberal tolerance will not do. We must take very positive steps whenever we see the first signs of Nazi infection. Justice Murphy's warning is timely. BOX 2 9 7 3 Miami 18 BORN OF UNITY They had never heard of San Francisco. Not in 1776. The people of the original 13 Colonies lived in a rustic world bounded by the Appalachian Mountains and the Atlantic ocean. To travel from one colony to another was hazardous. As for the people, they spoke different languages, attended different churches and each were suspicious of the other. To unite these people and fill them with enough spirit to fight for their ideals was a gigantic task. Yet these people of wide interests and alien thoughts drew up the "Declaration of Independence." The men who went to San Francisco were handicapped in much the same manner as were our founding fathers. Language, religion, political ideology, all, in the begining, seemed to be insurmountable barriers. However, the desire of mankind to achieve continued peace was strong enough to bring these men together and to keep them together until out of their misunderstandings, disagreements, debates, and compromises came the World Peace Charter. The Declaration of Independence was the beginning, out of which has grown the United States. Let us hope that out of the World Peace Charter will be born the United Nations. (Orlando Transit Co. Bulletin) (Editor'! Note: Boa Ht'S is the post office addresa of iiic Jewien Floridian, in Which is pla.vd mountainous amounts .if nrs nl.a.-os from onranlxatlona and individuals all over the country. Under this title will appear • dl me of this .irial.) Some 3500 Jewish refugees are expected to arrive in Palestine during the month of July with half of them due in the next few days The American Jewish Trade Union Committee for Palestine, speaking tor millions nf American workers, both A. F. of L. and C.I.O.. has adopted resolutions calling for leaders of the United Nations to act immediately on the Palestine question ... A goal of -200.000.00 has been sent to the Working Women's Council in Palestine since October 1 against a quota of $250.00.00 this year by the Pioneer Women's Organization. A nation-wide campaign to raise S500.000 to build and equip a national arthritis research institute as part of the Leo N. Levi Memorial Hospi* tal of B'nai B'rith at Hot Springs, Arkansas, was launched. Jews constitute an amazingly small percentage of juvenile delinquents and adult criminals, it is revealed in a statistical article by Nathan Goldberg in The National Jewish Monthly. Dr. Israel Goldstein, president of Z.O.A., left July 4 for France and England to study problems of post-war rehabilitation and to attend the World Zionist Conference in London this month. Thirty-seven out of fortyeight governors petitioned President Truman to take immediate steps to open Palestine to Jewish mass immigration and colonization, and to bring about the earliest transformation of that country into a free and Jewish democratic commonwealth. The American Council for Judaism warns against "contradictory claims for Jews on the international bill of rights and the trusteeship system." ._. American Christian Palestine Committee sets up educational program of Christianaction on behalf of Jewish aims in Palestine. Dr. Israel M. Goldman, director of the National Academy of Adult Jewish Studies, summarizes Jewish life as it must be lived in America with three L's: labor, in the service of the Jewish people, leadership, learning R abbinical Assembly in convention recommends revising and publishing Code of Ethics for Rabbis and Lay officials. Dr. Eric Warner revives Hebrew songs from 13th century, transcribing them for recordings. Eleanor Roosevelt advises immigrantes to Americanize their names terming foreign names as a barrier to "successful ammalgamation of the American peoole." Rabbi Samuel Rosenblatt of Johns Hopkins has been assigned by Yale University to translate the works of Saadia Gaon. Jewish 10th CenturyPhilosopher, into English A.D.L. scores progress in the positive education field with its successful action in securing University of Alabama elimination of anti material from courses. ERETZ ISRAEL IS IN DANGER The Second of the Articles by PIERRE VAN PAASSEN (In the absence abroad of Phineas J. Biron) B'NAI B'RITH HOLDS 2ND BOND AUCTION At the regular monthly meeting of B'nai B'rith held Tuesday night at the Miami Beach YMHA a second War Bond auction was held, which netted approximately $30,000.00 of bonds. Some 80 items of merchandise, ranging from a baby carriage to valuable jewelry wei> auctioned by Marx Feinberg. to the highest War Bond bidders. With the $107,200.50 of Bonds purchased at the mammoth Blackstone War Bond auction rally held July 3rd, $136,200.50 were reaped as a result of the two auctions. The total sales of War Bonds which were credited to B'nai B'rith during the Seventh War Loan drive were double the original quota of $1,000,000, Milton A. Friedman, War Bond chairman, announced. The situation in Palestine is rapidly nearing the point of explosion. If the White Paper is not abrogated, or, at least, \ the government of Great Britain does not in the very near hi. ture make the gesture of sensibly attenuating the harsher implications of that infamous instrument of policy, the Land of Israel will be plunged into a seething cauldron of unrest, riots destruction of property and bloodshed before the year is over The Yishuv is near the end of its patience" The foreign Arab princes are encouraged to become more presumptuous and arrogant every day on the subject of Palestine. The British government, with the passive connivance and the pusillanimity of the Zionist leadership, is allowing things to come to a pass where a settlement of the Palestine question will occur automatically—that is to say, by the force of artificially created circumstances. That settlement, conceived in tenor and upheaval will be so detrimental to the Jewish people as to blast their hopes for a generation to come. What Britain's intentions are with and in Palestine may be gauged with sorrowful accuracy by what occurred recently in Syria and Lebanon. There, in those two Levantine States, a great European power, France, was ignominously booted out i by Arabs mobs armed, equipped and brought to a point of | anti-French frenzy by British agents. Behind the Syrian mobs was the new Arab League, which is a British-sponsored and British-controlled organization. That Arab League is next turn, ing its attention to Palestine. For that purpose, and no other, it was set up and created by the Colonial Office: to eliminate | the French rival from the Near East and to settle the Jewish question in such a manner that Britain can afterwards stand before the world and shrug off responsibility. If Mr. Churchill is still the friend of the Jewish people that he is said to be and if he is sincere in his condemnation of the White Paper, the time has come to show it by deeds. His antediluvian rhetorical pronouncements on the subject, to which the Zionist leadership still clings with pathetic insistence, are absolutely worthless in the present circumstances. They are void of substance. Churchill's deeds of commission and omission for five years have to all intents and purposes repudiated his condemnation of the White Paper. It is not tomorrow or next year that danger to Jewish Palestine may arise. Jewish Palestine is being destroyed now by the policy of the White Paper which has been in force for five years—Churchill being Prime Minister for most of that time—and which is now being implemented by a carefully managed and systematic transfer of authority i to the foreign potentates of the Arab League, which is Mr. J Churchill's own creation Only the policy of havlaga, of national self-control and self-discipline as practised by the Yishuv, is today holding off j an outbreak of terrorism on an unprecedented scale in the Holy Land. The tension is acute and the acts of provocation | on the part of the government and its official and secret agents are steadily becoming more cynically overt and flagrant. How long the Palestinian Jews will be able to resist the pressure depends entirely on whether their American brethren will at long last take the matter seriously enough to intervene energetically, unafraid, conscious of their rights as American citizens, with the authorities in London and Washington. There lies the only hope now. The prattle about the Yishuv being able to mobilize sixty thousand fighting men to resist, once the signal is given for Arab hooliganism to break loose, is self-delusion of the worst sort. Pompous declarations by Zionist leaders in this country that whereas Hitler might have been able to kill Jews with impunity the British government cannot do so because a world public opinion will oppose its moral non licet—such declarations are childishly naive. British imperialism is not any more merciful or amenable to feeble democratic protestations than any other imperialism. It shoots when its designs are contravened, whether in India, Kenya, Syria or Palestine. Moreover, its apologists are busy even now, for all coming eventualities, with placing the Jews in an unfavorable light. When hell breaks loose not Britain but the Yishuv will bear the blame, as De Gaulle is made to bear the blame before world public opinion for what happened in Syria not long ago. The task of rescuing Palestine from the deadly web of Levantine intrigue and imperialist chicanery is now up to in American Zionist leaders. They have behind them a unanimous American Jewish community and a political 0I 9 anJ *\ tion of vast potential influence and strength. They alone ca tear that web to pieces by speaking the truth at last in nig places. They have never yet, so far, had the courage to can a spade by its name—i.e., let the American people know it is Britain's imperialist policy which is diametrically oppos to and the mortal enemy of a Jewish Palestine. As long as the war in Europe lasted this attitude on the part of official Zionism may have been commendab e \ r though not from a Jewish national point of view in tnai sought to spare the allied British government any sort o e barrassment in the conduct of the war wiih Germany, ow considerateness is no longer valid as an excuse for inacu iy. the more since British gratitude for that Zionist policy "-V" s embarrassment now reveals itself in favoring the Arab para of Adolf Hitler. Remember, soldier, the only secret is the one never toldl uou timer. ,1^. The American people will come to look upon the esta t of a Jewish State in Palestine as an essentially sti y ment u jovvisu oiuie in raiesuutt un mi % % % %  forward, genuinely democratic, realistic, just and nece solution of the Jewish problem when and if they are tola is at stake in the Holy Land. v-en At present they are not Being told. They have never told. They hear lies from the Arab side and garbled profwy j da from British sources. They never hear the Zionist po"* (CONTINUED ON PAGE 11)



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FRIDAY, J ULY 13, 1945 vJenisti FhridHann PAGE SEVEN KILLED IN ACTION Official JWB Release Pvt. Meyer Epitein. 32, Infantry, of Miami. Fla. Holland. pfc Arthur Solomon. 24, Combat Engineer Corps, of Miami Beach, Fla. In Germany. Sam (Sonny) Schaffer. petty officer first class, is spending a thirty-day furlough with his parents. Mr. and Mrs J. Schaffer, 1637 S. W. Sixth Street, and his wife and son. He arrived in this country after twenty months of foreign duty, making his trip abroad ;>nd return on the Queen Mary. He was with the armed forces in the invasion of France and served as a diver with the salvage division in th P navy. He relates that his most interesting event in the service was a reunion with his brother in England whom he had not seen for three years. The brother, Melvin, has been released and is attending school at Northwestern in Chicago. Sonny has taken his wife and infant son to the Netherland Hotel for several weeks. Darid S. Goldflne, who has made six trips across th P Atlantic to bring back the wounded, is home on a 15-day furlough visiting his mother, Mrs. J. Dolgin, 900 Pennsylvania Ave., Mil ami Beach. He expects an assignment to the Pacific area. Major Maurice Orovitx, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Orovitz, 1350 Collins Ave., is home on terminal leave awaiting discharge orders. Major Orovitz, who spent three years overseas with the Army Air Forces, wears seven battle stars on his campaign ribbons. He will make his home on Miami Beach with his parents, and will be connected with the Alfred Destin Company. U. GermanV l3St no "' s c i la, ion said, "During that S Ll Kolber displayed outlet!? 'i ual 'ties of courage and tank oH P Whi '^ i n charEe of a "iKpldtoon which was attachthe ,in ,'. nfantry battalion. In r?L a ?f ault through the Siegemnlnv"?' Lt Kolber skillfully theW, h i s tanks a "d from 'ire at t^ nk -,Pu ersonally directed %  'rHn R e Plb XeS fr m P int occun S a nf ilrle f s action caused the S'X 5 f K the P^oxes to '"wine il embrasur es, thus alvance „n G foot troo P s to ad*utw-T?v and att ack them, reou wiionen CaptUre f numer Kolber' 8 l &i br ther of Edward Beach Jn l 5th st Miami home Wlth whom h e made his as^ Rj^lU>w.y. serving "> Fran p S -. hospital stai{ aide Mrs. M\1' r ,', tes t0 her mother. p urtrrsttJ^ lowa y. 1351 S. W. y a te to taft' tha i every boy Whine S at len th about 80 ^cA2 n & !" *' Just 80 Amerimn ^K. the sound of and .again aV voice a a > n ^kfijS-S employed ""or to ini a of censorship here 10 Wining the Red Cross. GREATER MIAMI ARMY-NAVY COMMITTEE Supported by Greater Miami Jewish Federation Ut The Jewish Welfare Board Help Us Keep a Record of Our Men in Service SERVICE i t$ ^ M ^ ^ /PARADE! First Lt. Bernard E. Gerstner, 26, Miami Beach, was killed on a mission Mav 29 over Yokohoma, Japan, relatives have been notified by the War Department. A navigator on a B-29, Lt. Gerstner was graduated from New York University, enlisting in the AAF in 1942. His wife, the former Edith Held, is th P daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. Held, 216 Espanola way, Miami Beach. Lt. Gerstner had been awarded th P Distinguished Flying Cross with two Oak Leaf Clusters and the Air Medal. T/Sgt. King S. Dansky, 27, of 233 First Ct., Miami Beach, has been awarded th e distinguished flying cross in recognition of his work as an enlisted pilot flying hospital ships from behind enemy lines in the China-BurmaIndia theater. Sgt. Dansky also holds the Legion of Merit for his work in supervising the construction of airstrips in enemy-occupied territory, and the air medal. FLIGHT OFFICER TELLS EXPERIENCES "Monday was by far the most interesting day I've had overseas," Flight Officer Eugene L. Weiner, 20, of Brooklyn, wrote his father recently. "I took off from my field in the morning and landed at a field in Burma. While there, the Colonel wanted a plane to fly to China and he chose mine because it was in good condition. He told a major to see that my stay was a pleasant one while he was gone with my plane. "Well, the major gave me a jeep and I drove out to see the ruins of a recent battle with the Japs. There was practically nothing left of the city. "Then the major and I had lunch. Later, after a swim, I had drinks with a crowd of majors and colonels. Then the colonel who had my plane returned and took me to supper, after which we went to the general's house to see a movie. The colonel introduced me to the general and we spent about 15 minutes together, discussing the news of the day. "What a memorable day for me—an obscure Brooklyn flight officer: major, colonel, general in one day! WOUNDED IN ACTION Lt. Eugene J. Lerner. 26. Infantry, of New York City. Palau Island. Pvt. Mervin Pollokoff. 25 Infantry, of Baltimore, Md. In Belgium. SERGEANT MADE MAJOR BY RUSSIANS The Russians made a major of Sgt. Bernard Bernhardt, of Boston, after he bailed out a B-24 over Hungary when the plane burst into flames. And Stalin personally decorated him. At present, Bernhardt is undergoing plastic surgery at Cushing General Hospital, Framingham,Mass. to cover the scars on his face and head, resulting from the burns he suffered when his plane was set afire. It all started during the sergeant's 44th mission. German fighters shot up his plane over Lake Balaton, Germany. He had swapped places with the waist gunner, but the gunner was killed. Bernhardt, badly burned, bailed out. "German fighters," he related, "tried twice to cut the shrouds of my parachute with their wings while diving at 400 miles an hour. But they missed. I got a 22-millimeter bullet in the leg. Hungarian peasants were waiting for me with pitchforks when I landed. They marched me a mile in spite of my wound. I collapsed and later found myself in a German garrison. Later I was transferred to the Royal Hungarian hospital at Budapest. "For five days they left me unattended on a stretcher, thinking I was going to die. Then they gave me medical treatment. Before the Russians came to Budapest the American prisoners were evacuated. But a Hungarian doctor who was a member of the underground permitted me td stay. "When the Russian Army entered I joined with them and took part in fighting two blocks from the hospital. I was quickly back in the hospital with a wound. But I was out before the siege was finished and rejoined my Russian companions. "This time they made me a major and when Stalin appeared he personally pinned a decoration on me. It looked as if everything that was happening was in my favor. The Germans had set up gun positions on the hospital and the Russians shelled it and hit it 1456 times in a month and a half, killing 1200 patients. ,1 might have been among them had I remained. "As a Russian officer, I occupied a villa with servants and lived on the fat of the land. But when an American Liberator bomber was forced down in Budapest I got a longing for America and flew away with the crew, after they had completed repairs. TELLS HOW FT. DRUMWAS RECAPTURED How Fort Drum, guardian island fortress of Manila's harbor, was recaptured by American troops was related recently by Sgt. Louis Gross, of Washington, D. C. Gross was a member of the picked platoon which took Fort Drum. Fort Drum is not really a fort, by the way; it's a concrete-and-steel replica of a battleship. "The ramp of a landing craft." Gross said, "could not span the height of the "deck', but the Navy built a heavy wooden ramp to let down from the tower of a special structure. "Meanwhile, using aerial photos as a guide, officers laid out the design of the deck on the old parade ground on Corregidor, with air vents, gun emplacements and other openings marked off. Each man had an opening to cover. "We pulled alongside the island fortress and the ramp dropped. In 30 seconds every opening was covered by a tommy-gun, automatic rifle or a Garand. "Ten men followed us, each carrying 60 pounds of TNT. A mixture of oil and gasoline was pumped down an air shaft from the ship; the explosive, with time-fuse set, was lowered down the vent. "We raced back to the landing ship and pulled away. There were several blasts as powder magazines went off, and smoke and flames flared high* in the air. "Twenty-four hours later we returned. Deep down we found the charred remains of the Jap garrison. Only two of our men suffered slight wounds." CAPT. RADIN HAS 29 DECORATIONS A parachute was put to a unique use recently at a base in New Guinea. It served as a canopy for a marriage. Under it, T/5 Annette Winona Trebitsch of Brooklyn became the wife of Pfc. Robert Joseph Greenberg of New York. There was a little trouble for Joe and Annette at first because there was no Jewish chaplain around to perform the ceremony. For five weeks the Catholic base chaplain, John A. Righino, kept the official wires buzzing until he contacted Chaplain Hugo Mantel of Boston, Jewish chaplain who had just arrived in New Guinea from the Philippines. Chaplain Mantel served on temporary duty in Base E—just long enough to officiate at the wedding. Monsky Presents A JCMemorandum on International Trusteeships to American Spokesmen at Conference As the consultant to the American delegation at the San Francisco Conference of the United Nations, representing the American Jewfeh Conference, of whose Interim Committee he, iTcc-chairrnan. Henry Monsky, president o B'nen Bnth (standing with back to camera) is shown at a meeting of tie consultants presenting the memorandum o the American Jewish ConTerence which suggested specific amendments to the American delegation s proposals on yoniBiBiK.B u ,^ Q „ui„ 0 A number of the proposals advanced in this memo have now r^rJccepeTaclorrg to r^ from San Francisco. Presiding at me meeting of the cc^uST ^Commander Harold Stassen. member of the Amencan delegation .Against the^lXteated to the right of Commander Stassen, is Assistant Secretary of State Archibald MacLeish. New York (JTA)—Capt. Edwin F. Radin, 25, of Brooklyn, N. Y., has received twenty-nin P decorations: The Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal, twentyfour Oakleaf Clusters, two Presidential Unit Citations and Croix do Guerra ovec Palme for aerial heroism in the European theater, the Jewish Welfare Board reports. As navigator of a B-26 bomber, he has taken part in fifty-six combat missions. At Cassino, Radin served as group lead navigator in a formationof fortyeight bombers which attacked an important road bridge. Weather conditions seriously limited visibility, but Radin led his group over a pin-point target in the face of heavy and accuiate anti-aircraft fire. His expert navigation enabled the bombardiers following him to drop a devastating pattern of bombs on the bridge and entirely block the highway. He later led the formation safely back to base without any loss of personnel or ships. During nine months of aerial combat service, Radin flew on every type of bombing mission, including attacks against enemy airfields, lines of communications, ammunition dumps and harbor areas. He has been called one of the outstanding navigators in the history of his squadron. PVT. TELLS ABOUT PACIFIC FRONT Pfc. Harold Malis of the Bronx, N. Y., knows what we're up against on the Pacific front. He's lought the Japs. Harold went overseas in January, 1944, to New Caledonia. He trained in Guadalcanal, later took part In the invasion of Guam, arriving there on D-Day. Last July, on Guam, he was wounded by bullets which ore off his left foot and seriously injured his right wrist. He has lought in dense jungles with the P A n f urt her away than 50 Iffr. / .? ne T most 6 r e some thing f J oW aps s ?y s Harol d. who is at St. Owens Hospital now. recuperating, is the way they behave during a Banzai attack, borne fool Jap officer," he said, will throw thousands of men into an attack that hasn't a chance of coming off. Sometimes we can just mow them down with machine guns, but on a Banzai attack they keep on going until hey hit the dust. That's how their minds work. It's an honor, a privilege to them to be killed —whether it serves a sound military service or not. That's where they differ from us and that's where we win out every time Because every one of the GI's uses his common sense at all times." Japanese rifles, Mails said, are clumsier than American ones and difficult to handle. The Japs designed them to make up for the shortness of their arms. SGT. WANTS PRAYER BOOK FIRST THING When he got out or a German prison camp liberated by our troops, the first thing Sgt. Morns J. Katz wanted was a prayer book and a Bible. "During the time I was a prisoner of war," he wrote home, "I had two great comforts. One was my prayer book and the other was the Jewish Holy Scriptures. Without those two books I would have gone nuts. They kept my faith up and many times gave me strength when I most needed it. I have learned quite a lot about the Old Testament and how much prayer can do for a person in need. My prayers were answered—now I am free again. "Here is what I want you to get for me. I want a prayer book that is put out for the GI's by the Jewish Welfare Board, but I want a copy with a good leather binding. Also, I want a leatherbound copy of the Jewish Holy Scriptures. SOLDIER FREES SELF FROM ROCK AND DIRT An American battalion aid station, located in a cave on Okinawa, was in bad straits when the cave entrance was sealed by a Japanese morar shell. Among the 41 men trapped inside was Pfc. Eugene Freedman of Philadelphia. Twenty of the trapped men were killed or wounded when the shell went off. but rreedman was buried under rock and dirt, from which he managed to free himself. • %  j : i



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FRIDAY, JU LY 13, 1945 *'JewislirkrirJiir PAGE FIVE Holy Scroll for Jewish Community Presented at Impressive Ceremony At a very impressive ceremony a mid the chanting of Liturgical Sies ..nd Psalms, a Sacred c' r(l n (Sefer Torah) was presented '" the Religious Rellef ond R,h.il>ilitation Department rf the Union of Orthodox Rabbis ,f Ann rica in its drive for the restoration and rehabilitation of Jewish religious communities and traditional Jewish life in the European countries devastated by tin Hitlerite hordes. The Sefer Torah was consecrated by the Rabbinate in the memory of the late Rabbi Hirsch Manischewitz. The ceremony took place Tuesday night, July 10th, at the Ohav Zodek Synagogue, West 95th Street, New York, where hundreds of people, among them prominent Rabbis, scholars, communal and religious leaders. SCROLL CONSECRATED IN HIS MEMORY THE LATE ZVI HIRSCH MANISCHEWITZ came to express their conviction of the impregnability of the Jewish spirit, of the Jewish Torah and of Jewish life. In a throbbing voice Rabbi Dr. Hoffman, spiritual leader of the Ohav Zedek Synagogue, delivered the invocation which brought the audience into a mood of sac-redness and dedication. Rabbi Bernard Bergman spoke for the Union of Orthodox Rabbis of America. In words which came from the very depth of his being, he urged American Jewry to follow the example set by the Manischewitz Family, in helping to rebuild Jewish religious li: on th P European continent. -The uisk is tremendous," Kabbi B< rgman said, "and we must mobilize all our efforts and Fergus to meet it." He expressed the hope that American wrv Ull] mcasure up t0 the 13SK. Rabbi Meyer Rosenbaum, of Avenue U Educational Center of Brooklyn, spoke for the Rehabilitation Department of the Union .Orthnd„s Rabbis. He pointed out that the presentation of the aeter Torah consecrated to the mlTl ol Hi,sch Manischewitz. marked he beginning of a najiona campaign to rehabilitate main; d l Uonal life of t"reu g brethe !" in Europe and fS^sswl the conviction that MEMORIAL CHAPEL THOS. M. BURNS. JR. Funeral Director 57777 .RIVERSIDE AMBULANCE SERVICE 1J 36 Wa,hl„ g to„ Ave. Miami Beach Amsterdam Are. out of the ruins a new and firmer Jewry will emerge. The presentation of the Sefer Torah at the Synagogue was made by the two sons of the late Rabbi Manischewitz, Joshua and Beryl. Prior to the ceremony at the Synagogue, a Sium H a s e f e r (consecration) took place at the home of Mrs. Hirsch Manischewitz. A large gathering of prominent Rabbis, scholars and Jewish religious and communal leaders, friends of Mrs. Manischewitz, and the late Rabbi Hirsch Manischewitz assembled at this quiet, but very impressive home ceremony. A feeling of tragedy, but also a feeling of hope, prevaded this quiet gathering at which the first Sefer Torah in the rehabilitation drive was consecrated. After the consecration at the home the Torah was led in parade to the Synagogue. It is fitting to remember that almost two years ago in .this very Synagogue, where the Sefer Torah was presented to the devastated Jewish communities of Europe, Rabbi Hirsch Manischewitz died in most dramatic circumstances. It happened on Yom Kippur. Rabbi Manischewitz was a very sick man. His physician advised him to stay at home. Rabbi Manischewitz however, his physician's advice notwithstanding, felt that he must join his people in collective prayers on this most sacred of days. While reciting the traditional prayers — Unesane Tokef — in which Israel declares that on that day Providence judges who shall live and who shall die, Rabbi Manischewitz suddenly collapsed and died immediately. Thus this saintly man passed away in prayer with and for his people. In recognition of this tragic fact the Religious Relief and Rehabilitation Department of the Union of Orthodox Rabbis, which is in charge of the program to aid in the resurrection of Jewish spiritual life in Europe, deemed it proper to honor the memory of this saintly man by holding the dedication ceremonies of the Sefer Torah at the Ohav Zedek Synagogue with which the late Rabbi Manischewitz was associated for many years. With this first dedication, the Union of Orthodox Rabbis calls upon American Jewry to fulfill its duty toward our sorely tried European brethern, so that traditional Judaism will outlive all its enemies till the days of the Messiah. The Sefer Torah will be forwarded to the Jews of Belgium, who formerly numbered 150,000 souls, and of whom approximately 25,000 are left, and who remained with only one Holy Scroll. Three other scrolls will be sent to the communities of Belgium and Holland. It is worthy to note that the Belgian ambassador to America, hearing of this noble deed, offered immediate transportation of the Sacred Scrolls at the expense of his government. The late Hirsch Manischewitz, in whose memory the Sefer Torah (Holy Scroll) for the Belgian Jewish community was consecrated, was a member of the family which has for many years been prominent in Jewish religious and communal life. He was especially known as one of the brothers *eading the world famous matzo firm, the B. Manischewitz Company. In spite of the demands made of him by his business, he gave of himself untiringly to scores of Jewish philanthropic, social, fraternal, civic and religious enterprises. PIONEER WOMEN TO HAVE MOONLIGHT TRIP A moonlight cruise aboard the Seven Seas, leaving Pier 5^, will be held Tuesday evening, July 24th, 1945, at 8:15 o'clock, for the benefit of the Child's Rescue Fund. Sponsored by the Pioneer Women's Organization for Palstine of Greater Miami, for Palestine of Greater Miami, ing Mrs. Henry Seitlin, 2-3947, or Mrs. I. Shapoff, 4-4034. Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Kandel, formerly of 169 N. W. 24th Street, are now residing at the Mildred Apartments, 1629 S. W. 13th Street. Mr. Kandel recently acquired the apartment house. —Photo by Newman Jerome Grecnwald. newlyelected president of Miami Beach Junior Chamber of Commerce was installed at a dinner at the Strand restaurant. ror y&Sf DRINK PLENTY OF CTTripure KJ Water 0ELIVERE0 TO TOUR HOME (•GALLON BOTTLE ..... 60e CASE OF SIX s "I ABLE BOTTLES 7 5e Plus Bone Deposit> PHONE 2-4128 Tooley-Myron captures the wide-eyed wonderment of a child to whom all the world's a fairyland. You must not trust this enchanting age to memory. Let Tooley-Myron's master photographers record for you each new stage of development in your child's life and now is the time to start. 'Foremost Photographers in the South" No appointment necessary Lobby Floor, du Pont Bldq.. Miami 205 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of ALTON SPORTSWEAR at 1668 A. Alton Road, Miami Beach, Florida, intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida. MAX SHEREMETA. Sole Owner ISAAC JOFFE Attorney for Applicant 6/22-29 7/6-13-20 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of McMullln Apartments at 36 N. E. 6.'.th Street, Miami. Florida. Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. LENA ROSEN, Sole Owner. LEON KAPLAN. Attorney for Applicant. 6/15-22-29 7/6-13 LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE IS HEREBY. GIVEN that the undersigned are engaged in business under the fictitious name of LORRAINi: MANUFACTURING CO. (not Inc.) at 64 South Miami Avenue, Miami, Florida, and intend to register the said fictitious name In the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida. HERMAN SALUK ABRAHAM SAI.I'K Owners GEORGE CHERTKOF, Attorney for Applicants 6/29 7/6-13-20-27 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of Gurtner's Cleaners, at 1390 S. W. Sth Street. Miami. Florida, intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court at Dade County, Florid*. HARRY BOLOTIN. MYERS & HEIMAN, Attorneys for Applicant. 6/15-22-29 7/6-13 P ROFESSOR ALBERT EINSTEIN Nobel Priie winner HrfRdiU ,.rj,.n ; Wise oreeident of the American Jewish Congreaa and AeWorWJewiihCongreM honorary co-chairmen of the Jewish CouncU NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Chapter 20722 — Acts of 1941 FILE A9209 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that James and Julia Shugrue holders of County Tax Certificate No 2168 issued the 7th day of June. A. D. 1943, have filed same In my office, and have made application for a tax deed to be issued thereon. Said Certificate embraces the following described property in the County of Dade, State of Florida, to-wit: Lot 23, Block 6. Semlnole i.nins. a Sub., Plat Book 16, Page 4, In the County of Dade, State of Florida. The assessment of said property under the said certificate was in the name of: Comm. Bk. & Tr. Co. Unless said certificate shall be redeemed according to law. the property described therein will be sold to the highest bidder at the Court House door on the first Monday In the month of August, 1945. which is the 6th day of August, 1945. Dated this 27th day of June, 1945. E. B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk of Circuit Court, Dade County, Florida. (Circuit Court Seal) By N. C. STERRETT, D. C. 6/29 7/6-13-20. Buy War Bonds and Stampa. NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED FILE NO. 39748 Notice Is hereby given that LIsbeth G. Scarborough holder as assignee of City of Miami Tax Certificate Numbered 4962, dated the 1st day of June, A. D 1942, has filed said Certificate In my office, and has made application for tax deed to issue thereon in accordance with law. Said Certificate embraces the following described property, situated In Dade County, Florida, to-wit: Ix>t 3. Block 22, Riverside Farms Amended, Plat Book 2. Page 88, In the City of Miami, County of Dade, State of Florida. The assessment of said property under the said Certificate Issued was in the name of Unknown. Unless said Certificate shall be redeemed according to law, tax deed will issue thereon on the 1st day of August. A. D. 1943. Dated this 27th day of June, A. D. 1945. E. B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk of Circuit Court. Dade County, Florida. (Circuit Court Seal) By N. C. STERRETT. D. C. 6/29 7/6-13-20-27 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engago In business under the fictitious name of UEE-REEN CANDY COMPANY at 55 N. E. 24th Street, Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. I. W. GREEN LEON GREEN ALBERT A. GREEN JOSEPH ARAGO MYERS & HEIMAN Attorneys for Applicants 7/13-20-27 8/3-10 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of CHARLEY AND ANDY'S GROCERY Intends to register the said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. ANDY MARCHINSKY MYERS & HEIMAN Attorneys for Applicant 7/13-20-27 8/S-10 iiV. Jk


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PAGE TWELVE Jen is* fhrMiam FRIDAY. JULY i 3i BNAI B'RITH NOTES By DAVE ISEN COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN NAMED BY RED CROSS Major Gen. Henry W. Baird, Chairman of disaster relief for the Dado county chapter, American Red Cross, announced Monins so that everyone will look : humor and a drive that brought forward to the Biiai B'rith meetthe maximum figure lor each ing as the best and only place item. to' go the second Tuesday of i Shirley Rosen and her Victory Harrison and J. E. Lind. Lt. Comdr Charles A. Mills. USNR, (ret), win serve as chapter military liaison. wd is ; ing? Let us jam Mor:;i ent of the Jewish Commonr-.s Bi there Blood Bank next wealth ideal. ursdaj and si thai we still that there is a war yet to t A on. Three noted Jewish cantors recently participated in a project by which rare liturgical Hebrew songs from the Birnbaum collection at the Hebrew Union College were put on records. The songs will be heard again for I th P first time in centuries. Hen | are the cantors giving voice to ; these songs long unheard Left I to right: Emil Rosen, Cincinnatij Abraham Shapiro, Newark. N J-' Frederick Lechner of New York and Harpist, Vojm!r Attl. WE OFFICIALLY REPttSfJT TO HAJ0K1TT Of H08TKKK JEWISH FUNERAL I0KS SERVING MIAMI BEACH & MIAMI fxca-s.ve.v Je+ish J24 HOUR Buy Mere War Bonds. RECEPTION TENDERED TO LT. SHAPIRO IOS. L. PLUMMER FUNERAL %  -""'.RECTOR 7 Lift insu-ance Estates Authoritatively Programmed NAT G A N S Metrccc 'tan Life Int. Co. 107 B'sca>re Bldfl. P. I-MH cr 4-9M1 A CHASE FEDERAL HOME LOAN OFFERS YOU • Low Interest Rates • Small Monthly Payments • No Loan Fees (Actual Cost Only^ • No Charge for Prepayment 'We also make loans for periods not exceeding five years without monthly payments A reception was tendered to Lt Harold Shapiro. U S. Navy. at Key West last Friday. After spending more than a year there with the Navy Intelligence Dei artment, Lt. Shapiro will leave for a furlough at his home in Milwaukee and then overseas. During his stay in Key West, he acted as assistant to Rabbi Lazarus Lehrer addressing Friday nieht services and arranging affairs At the reception Friday eveattended by high navy of-. he was 11 ntt i a gift by the community for his servNOTICE WOFFORD CRUISES iS-c;tss:-$ t; S : C-_ sea -• %  ~ -.>..FVL *' <* 2.-Hs.r Trip — $>.00 3"... "IOC A.V.--.30—4:00 P.M. Sc_ti Baj. Trip—3 Heart TO t*e Fae_ c Dee-'-a Estate '00—Daily. 2 00 P.M.—|\00 • \:. -" -• 4 Alka-Seltzer XI A • :. a :r. AJJ i r for CM M Si.wt. Sr Sunxk. "Mtrainc Aft.r" a=j C*U Duum: 11 •**. ar tx>:' P-oxsar.-.. IB a*lon. tatad.. r. cau ana Sty 1111 Lincoln Road l s Block East ol Alton CHASE FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION Resource* OTK St.000.000.00 C L. CLEMENTS. President OR MIL! I NERVINE FOR rr!>ef fro !" FsBrtkr*.'. Me*. %  J l'J-.-rt*r..- •_: ,. -Cc•"""•a. Crantiawaa. Klcnafcilitr. Xtri^m, Brua4 lit and II M. !U>J i :. ucaa and a< c^j at drnctrd. nofii VVlGUST BROS R Vf When You Think of Real Eitata ThinK Of LEO EISENSTEIN REALTOR 309 Lincoln Road Phone 5-M79 Dependable, Conacientioua Service GORDON ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORKS Have your roof repaired now; y N will aave on a new roof later "Satisfactory Work by Experienced Men" 414 S. W. 22nd Avenue PHONE 4.5860 ntui BISCRVHE HREnn S. W. 4th SI %  AT MIAMI AVE. BOXING WRESTLING MONDAY NTTE FRIDAY NTTE FOR RESERVATIONS CALL SAM'S NEWS START) 31236 NOW IN OUR NEW LOCATION 101-102 Mercantile Bank Bldg. — Lobby Entrance 420 Lincoln Road — Miami Beach Serricemen: Why not make our office your headquarters? DR. ROBERT R. BRADFORD Optometrist-Optician Phone 5-234J Dade Federal's principle of "Careful and Conservative Lending" has meant safety and security for home owners and investors. For over a decade Dade Federal has been a leading financial institution of Greater Miami. It has placed millions of dollars in first mortgages and enjoys the confidence of home owners and investors because of its sound judgment easy monthly payment plan, prompt service and low interest rates. Dade Federal invites you to consult with them concerning your financial and home mortgage problems. RESOURCES OVER $11,000,000 DADE FEDERAL OF MIAMI 45 WORTH EAST FIRST AVI JOSEPH M. UPTOX... PRESIDENT



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PAGE TEN 9-Jenisiifhricnan FRIDAY. JULY 13. Face Facts George J. Tatianoff Executive Director A.D.L. The Tragedy of the Jewish People: With a heavy heart, we read that only 150,000 Jewish children remain in Europe out of a total of 1.350.000. Eight out of every nine Jewish children in Europe the innocent victims of th,-, Nazi hordes! Recently Lee Hills, managing editor of the Miami Herald, now on tour of war-torn Europe, added graphic emphasis to the plight of the European Jews. Wrote Hills, "In terms of human misery the Jewish population of Europe was scourged by the Nazi-Fascist plague as was :.. r group of victims." He described their sufferings and demoralization—the estimated 5.000.000 slaughtered in Nazi murder factories, the pitiful attempts of survivors to tie together tile shattered threads of life— the whole, horrible, almost unbelievable tragedy of the Jewish people of Europe. Their plight Is truly one of the tragic horrors of our civilization. The misery suffered by our people, we would suppose, would serve as a cohesive force to bind us together against those factions who, for political gain, would destroy US. We would imagine that every Jew would M r..-i i for harmony and unity in preserving and I tag traditional human liberties. Yet. despite th( changing scene with peril for our people. .. complete and harm, inifii d spirit of action does not exisl A small minority apparently fails to t. nize th rs. This small minority, prompted by motives that ard to understand would I ist disheartening disunity and a type of sniping which. invalidate the efforts those who sincerely [ work in behalf of the common good. When we look back upon the plight of our people in Europe, the lack of unity is the real tragedy of our American-Jewish people. Fortunately, the great majority of our people have an increasing awareness of the need for harmonious teamwork. The great majority possess the basically humane qualities of patriotism. loyalty and fair play. Their true Jewish spirit will eventually bring about the happiness which we seek for i ; |nii oux children. Their st Ifless efforts will ultimately inspire the unity that must prevail in order t. ter with maximum effecth the cause I I lerance and und< rstanding. THE JEWISH QUIZ BOX By Rabbi Samuel J. Fox (Copyright. 1945. J. T. A.) MIAMI BEACH C. OFF C. TO ADD NEW MEMBERS A campaign to add 300 new m< ml ers t Miami B Chamber Commi rce was started I s week with l< to Miami Bi;wn ar.d M;; .-.and professional peo• i Charles L. C I I its, chair-' man of tl bership committ


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PAGE TWO fJemsii fkricficTrjn FRIDAY, JULY 13, PERSONALS Paul Weitzman leaves Friday for New York where he will vacation for two weeks. Celebrate 50th Anniversary WEDDINGS Rabbi and Mrs. Saul P. Appelbaum will return Monday, July 16, after a six weeks trip through Ohio, Chicago, and New York. Rabbi Appelbaum is spiritual leader of Temple Israel. Mr. and Mis. Max D. Rifas are visiting with their children in Chicago. They will return for the holidays. Mr. J. Schiff, Miami Beach, returned home after spending foul weeks in New York and vicinity. Miss Natalie Goodman, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Morris Goodman, 3619 Flamingo Drive, is home from Winston Salem academy, Winston Salem, N. C. Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky left Monday to spend several weeks in New York. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Gordon will leave Sunday for a twoweek stay in Cuba. Jare Margolis Feiman will become the bride of Irving Nathanson at a ceremony Sunday at 12:35 held at th,. home of Jftdgiand Mrs. Harold B. Spaet, 5435 La Gorce Drive, Rabbi Jacob H. Kaplan will officiate. Following the ceremony, a luncheon will be held at the Versailles Hotel. The (laughter of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Margolis of Akron, Ohio, Miss Feiman attended Akron University and is a member of Deta Pi Iota Sorority. Mr. Nathanson, of the law firm Nathanson, Oka and Spaet, attended City College of New York and St. Johns University in Brooklyn. He is the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Dese Nathanson. After a month's honeymoon in Mexico, the couple will reside at 3915 N. Meridian Ave., Miami Beach. "PERSONALS Completing their vacation, Mr. and Mrs. Leon Kaplan will leave the Berkshire Pines, West Copake, New York, on the 13th for home. Mrs. Louis Kotkin, 333 S. W. 30th Road, left for an extended visit with relatives and friends in Detroit. Dr. and Mrs. Jack Seitlin of Corpus Christi, Texas, are visiting their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Seitlin, 347 S. W. 6th St. Mr. and Mrs. David H. Reiser celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary last month. Formerly of Cleveland, O., the couple came here for a visit with their son and daughter-in-law and their family, Mr. and Mrs. Jessie Reiser of Coconut Grove. Once here, th P couple decided to join their son, Jessie, member of the Amrican Legion Drum and Bugle Corps for the past 12 years, and make this their permanent residence. Mr. Reiser, prior to his coming here, traveled extensively and was a sea captain in the sailing days. His family settled in this country in 1836 and he is a Mason of many years. The couple have two sons. Raymond, first lieutenant in France, and Charles, associated with the government in Cleveland. They have a grandson, Billy, son of the Reisers of this city, at present with the army in Ft. Louis. Washington, and a great grandson, Daniel. Cantor and Mrs. A. Friedman, i 336 N. W. Second Street, left %  yesterday for a month's stay in Mount Vernon and Asbury Park, N. J. Mrs. Bernard Mayerson, Miami Beach, left for Chicago where she will spend a month visiting friends and relatives. Mrs. Emanuel Gluck, 2475 S. W. 17th street, has returned from an extended visit to northern cities. Mr. and Mrs. Gluck have as their house guest, Mrs. Vilma Heltay of Charleston, S. C. Mr. and Mrs. Sol Goldstrom leave today to spend several weeks in Hendersonville, N. C. Mr. and Mrs. Abe Bcrger left for New York to spend two weeks. PERSONALS Miss Phyllis Lazar of Jamaica. L. I., niece of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Wucher, Miami Beach, and Mr. and Mrs. Henry S. Greenbaum. Miami, is spending the summer, here. Nat H. Hankoff, vice-president of the Miami Beach Hotel Owners' Association, accompanied by his wife, left for the North where he will make a survey of hotel conditions. They will also visit with their family in Pittsburgh. BAR MITZVAH Mrs. Ethel Shochet left Wednesday morning to spend several weks in Baltimore, Md. Listen to our radio program "Fashion Time" over WIOD each weekday, 8:30 to 8:45 A. M. Write Him Often on colorful air mail paper $ 1 .50 BOX Bring "color" into your air mail letters with "Wings of Tomorow" stationery. White with blue, green with peach, and pink with grey borders. 72 single sheets and 30 envelopes. MIAMI STORE STATIONERY SECOND KI,OOR Louis Silverman has returned to the city after spending several weeks in New York and New Hampshire. While away he visited his daughter, Edith, who now resides with her husband, Captain Albert Blich, in Manduster. N. H. Mrs. Silverman leaves tomorrow to visit with her family in the North. She will return here prior to the holidays. Mrs. Dave Emmer is visiting in New York where she will spend several months. Mr. Emmer will leave tomorrow to join his wife. Dr. Albert E. Rosenthal is recuperating at his home from an attack of the flu. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Rose returned after spending a month in the north. They visited in Cleveland, Pennsylvania, and New York. Mr. Rose is executive director of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. BRISM The brism of the past week included the sons of Mr. and Mrs. Heinz Wellisch, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Greenspan, Mr. and Mrs. Ray Redman. Rabbi S. M. Machtei officiated. Dr. and Mrs. Albert E. Rosenthal announce the bar mitzvah of their son. Eugene, to take place at services in Temple Israel Friday evening, July 20. at 8:15 p. m. Friends are asked to join the family on the happy occasion. A reception in Kaplan Hall will follow the ceremony. No formal invitations will be issued. Mr. and Mrs. David Adlerblum, 1820 S. W. 6th Street, left Sunday for a visit with their children in Chicago. They expect to be away until after the holidays. Mrs. H. Y. Waldorf announces the bar mitzvah of her son, Melvin, Saturday, July 21, in New York. The family make their home at 3002 N. W. 7th Avenue, Miami, and spend the summer in New York. Miss Doris Feldman, 2119 S. W. 16 Terrace, well known local harpist with the University i of Miami symphony orchestra, is continuing her harp studies this summer under the personal tu| telage of Mr. Carlos Salzedo. world's foremost authority, on the harp at his summer harp colony in Camden, Maine. She will return late in the fall to resume her studies at the University of Miami where she is a junior, majoring in music education. Miss Hadassah Ril alow mi appointed first executive secretary of the Rabbinical Assembly at the conference recently concluded in New York. Mist Ribalow holds the degree oi Bachelor of Hebrew Literature from the Seminary College of Jewish Studies and Bachelor of Arts from Hunter College. Quito, Ecuador (JTA)-A demand by the Quito chamber of commerce that all Jewish shops be closed and a collective fine of $150,000 levelled upon the Jewish population of Ecuador to make good the losses suffered by the creditors of a Jewish businessman, Natan Lewin, has been rejected by Minister of the Government Dr. Carols Guevara Moreno. Dr. Moreno told a delegation of the chamber that what they asked would require imposition of Nazi or Fascistmethods, which the Ecuadorean government repudiates. He assured them that Lewin would be punished, if criminal intent is proven, but stressed that the Jewish community and the Jewish refugees here were not involved in any manner. Prague (JTA) — Expressing sympathy with the Zionist movement, President Benes of Czechoslovakia told a Jewish delegation that he will do every thing possible to facilitate emigration of Jews from Czechoslovakia to Palestine. At the same time, he indicated that Jews who intend to remain in Czechoslovakia will not b P treated as a national minority, but will be considered full-fledged Czechoslovak citizens. BIRTHS Dr. and Mrs. Harry Kraff announce the birth of a son Wednesday at Jackson Memorial hospital. Mr. and Mrs. Marty Milstein announce the birth of a daughter, Ellen Leslie, born July 2 at St. Francis hospital. Mrs. Phillip Neuwirth and daughter, Harriet, left Saturday to visit in New York. Mr. Neuwirth, now on a business trip in Chicago, will join his family shortly at the Barbizon Plaza Hotel. Mr. and Mrs. Al Berkowitz, 926 S. W. 4th Street, announces the birth of a son Monday at Jackson Memorial Hospital. Donald Berkowitz, son of Mr. and Mrs. Philip Berkowitz, is visiting his sister, Mrs. Walter Mackauf in New Orleans. Mr. and Mrs. William Warshaw announce the birth of a daughter. Andrea. June 20 in New York. Mrs. Warshaw is the daughter of Max Rappaport. of Miami. ROSE CHAPTER HAS MAH IONG PARTY Keep on Buying War Bonds and Stamps. POSITION WANTED Cantor, Lecturer, Shoched, Teacher, wants position in Florida community. Holidays or year round. References, c/o Rabbi Leher, Key West. To Share Young woman share modern efficiency. Call mornings. Millard Apt. 2-551 Michigan Ave., Miami Beach. Rose Chapter, B'nai B'rith Women held a Mah Jong and card party at the Triton Hotel Tuesday. Prizes were won by Mrs. L. Schaffel. Mrs. A. Hoffman, Mrs. I. Stalotz and Mr. Col legman. Proceeds of th P event were given to the General Maurice Rose Memorial Hospital and for local use in providing Sunday breakfasts for servicemen and women. >^ww^w^^w^^^w^^^w^ww^w^w^^^^www>yy MOUNT NEBO THE CEMETERY OF DISTINCTION FOR DISCRIMINATING FAMILIES Rabbi S. M. Machtei, Director Olympia Building Phone 3-3720 _nj1_rLn-*Li*u* i j*n* ii i *^****-'----n i i i i _n_n_rui_ i Johannesburg, South Africa (JTA)—The Palestine censor has banned th ( South African Jewish Times from the country, according to word received here. It is understood that a protest will be lodged with British authorities. Buy War Bonds and Stamps to help preserve Democracy. Jacksonville, July 12—"Florida's 'Courtesy Week', starting Sunday, July 15, will be observed in practically every section of the state," Harold Colee, executive vice-president of the Florida State Chamber of Commerce said today. "Chambers of Commerce, newspapers, radio stations and individual business enterprises have assured us of full cooperation in making this week an outstanding event," he said. The need for a forceful reminder of the value of courtesy seems to be generally recognized, and the only objection we have received so far is that a week is not long enough considering the importance courtesy plays in our daily business and social lives. Sickness Accident Hospitalization Insurance for Everyone PAUL L. GREENE 605 Lincoln Rd. Phone 5-4133 a^tf^iftmtf f'^ m^^r^' PALMER FUNERAL CHAPEL "SERVIN PHONE 9-2664 G THE JEWISH COMMUNITY" „,__ "A FRIEND IN NEED" 2008 W. FLA< % % 



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FRIDAY, J ULY 13, 1945 *Jenisfifh)ridUar7 PAGE NINE "Between You and Me" By BORIS SMOLAR Copyright, 1944, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc. Political Note* Unwarranted attacks by some American Zionist laborites on David Dubinsky, president of the International Ladies Garment Workers' Union, may cost Palestine half-a-million dollars it is known the union planned to spend $500,000 in building houses for returning Jewish soldiers in Palestine on land belonging to the Jewish National Fund • This project was to have been a part of a larger project by U. S. organized labor aimed at alleviating the acute housing shortage in Palestine The iittacks on Dubinsky may affect not only this effort, but the pro-Zionist sympathies in the higher ranks of the American Federation of Labor President Truman, prior to leaving for his conference with Churchill and Stalin, is expected to receive two separate delegations The Zionists hope that he will see a Zionist delegation, and the American Jewish Committee is certain that the President will receive its leaders in the White House very shortly The petition on Palestine submitted to President Truman by the governors of thirty-seven states is the result of long and hard work by the American Zionist Emergency Council during Hayim Gri'enberg's administration as chairman of the Council's executive committee ... It was no easy task to persuade the governors to sign the petition Many of them were hesitant and wanted to know why American Zionist leaders withdrew the Palestine Resolutions from Congress at a time when the majority of the Senate was ready to vote for this resolution which is practically embodied in the governors' petition to Truman. International Notes Now that the Charter of the new League of Nations is definitely going to be approved by the Senate, by the British Government and by Moscow, the question of establishing a United Nations Commission on Human Rights is no longer merely theoretical. ... In this connection a very important book has just been published by Columbia University Press. ... It is Prof. H. Lauterpacht's "An International Bill of the Rights of Man" This study, written by an eminent professor of international law, will no doubt serve as a basis for the work which the contemplated Commission on human rights is to start. ... It is the kind of a book that no person interested in the problem of human rights can afford to miss. ... It formulates extremely well, and from every angle, the International Bill of Rights of Man in which Jews throughout the world are so interested, and makes definite proposals as JEWISH CALENDAR All Holidays and Fast Days begin at sunset of the day preceding the dates given below: 1945 TISHA B'AB Thursday, July 19 ROSH HASHONAH Saturday, Sept. 8. Sunday, Sept. 9 YOM KIPPUR Monday, Sept. 17 SUCCOTH Saturday, Sept. 22 to Sunday, Sept. 30 CHANUKAH First Candle, Friday, Nov. 30 YIZKOR or Memorial Services for the departed are conducted on the following Holidays: YOM KIPPUR Monday, Sept. 17 Ml E. Flakier St. Organised 1902 ntieFiFSlNnlioEaliaiik of Miami MIAMI, FLORIDA EDWARD C. ROMPH, President LAURENCE ROMPH, Assistant to the President STATEMENT OF CONDITION Comptroller's Call, June 30, 1945 RESOURCES Cash on Hand and Due from Other Banks ...$19,649,826.44 U. S. Government Securities, Direct or Guaranteed 71,877,687.46 State and Municipal Securities 441,176.36 Stock in Federal Reserve Bank Other Securities Loans and Discounts Bank Premises and Furniture and Fixtures Other Real Estate Accrued Income Receivable... Prepaid Expense Other Assets $91,968,690.26 90,000.00 138,340.19 4,650,530.99 708,148.79 8.626.00 242,981.33 54,199.18 3,199.66 $97,864,716.40 LIABILITIES Deposits: Demand $51,877,065.68 Savings 8.066,241.86 United States Government 15,550,254.38 State and Municipal 9,302,894.28 Deposits of Banks. __ 8,137,674.47 Other Deposits 716,897.74 $93,651,028.41 Capital Account: Common Stock _.... 1,500,000.00 f I ur P lu8 -1,500,000.00 Undivided Profits 969,222.63 Reserve for Dividend 60,000.00 4,029,222.63 income Collected, Not Earned 4,208.46 Heserve for Taxes and Other n,k pe nses 170,151.90 uiner Liabilities 10,105.00 $97,864,716.40 United States Government Securities carried at S30.639.000.00 in the foregoing statement are pledged to secure public and trust deposits and 'or other purposes required by law. Mp MBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM AND 'UJERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION BUY MORE WAR BONDS to how this Bill of Rights can be enforced both nationally and internationally. Prof. Lauterpacht believes that every nation must, by appropriate constitutional means, adopt certain sections of the International Bill of Rights of Man as part of its domestic law and constitution. The effect of such legislation would be abrogation of any existing regulations inconsistent with equal treatment of all by the state. It would also automatically eliminate any pos! sible discrimination on account of religion, race, language or political creed. ... As to international enforcement, the author believes that this can be achieved through the establishment by the United Nations of a High Commission for the supervision of the observance of the Bill of Rights of Man. This High Commission would receive petitions from individuals and organizations and would act. also, as an agency for removing any violations of the Bill of Rights. Prof. Lauterpacht pays tribute to the American Jewish Committee which assisted in the publication of the volume. Vacation Notes No less than twenty American Zionist leaders, the majority of them laborites, will spend their vacation in Europe this summr. This is the first time since the war that Zionist leaders are leaving the United States en masse for Europe. Most of them will go to London to participate in the Zionist conference which will take place there the end of this month But some of them will also proceed to France, Belgium, Switzerland and other countries to study the general Jewish situation. Dr. Abba Hillel Silver, who is to represent the ZOA at .he conference in London, may also go Palesine for a brief visit. ... The mass-exodus of the principal leaders of the American Zionist movement leaves the Zionist activities in the United States "frozen" for the summer. But one can expect lively doings as soon as the delegates begin to return home. By that time a little more will be known of what the future status of Palestine may be in the near future, since the new British cabinet will have been formed, and the Truman-Churchill-Stalin conference will be over. ... At this conference, the Palestine question may be touched upon as part of the situation concerning the entire Middle East and the Dardanelles. And speaking of vacation, yours truly is going to be away for the next three weeks "somewhere abroad" on his own vacation trying to forget, for the first time in a number of years, news and newspapers. This "somewhere abroad" is not a military secret, but simply the Chateau Frontenac in Quebec ... So lor three weeks there will be no "Between You and Me column, unless something startling happens in the Jewish world and the writer of these lines is compelled to interrupt his fishing in Canadian waters to return to his desk in New York. ASK FOR A product of Distributed by FLORIDA PROVISION CO. 1725 N. W. 7th Ave. Phone 26141 ASK FOR KOSHER ZION PRODUCTS AT YOUR LOCAL DELICATESSEN This label insures your health. U. S. Gov't inspected Demand it I Kosher Zion Sausage Co. CHICAGO IF YOU ARE IN NEED OF KOSHER ZION PRODUCTS Call Florida Provision Co., Inc. OPERATED BY PEARL BROS. Distributors 1725 N. W. 7th AVENUE PHONE 2-6141 Palm Beach Notes MRS. MARY SCHREBNICK, Representative Mrs. Libby Metz and her daughter, Lillian, left on a combined business and pleasure trip which will take them to New York, Philadelphia and Washington. The semi-monthly meeting of B'nai B'rith was held at Scher Memorial Hall, Tuesday nite. Dave Katz, president, presided. Mr. Burns, of Miami, is spending a week in Palm Beach. Local residents leaving for New York were Mr. Abe James. Mrs. Henry Aaron and her son, David, will visit with relatives and friends. David will stay to attend school. Mr. I. Oken will join his family and spend the summer in New York with them. Mr. and Mrs. David Nash and infant daughter left for the north. Mr. and Mrs. J. Dave of Durham, N. C, will make their home here. Their daughter, Mrs. Mae Schupler, will also reside in Palm Beach. *w C. W. SMITH PLUMBING CONTRACTOR 529 Independence Road, West Palm Beach No job too large or too small. Over 50 years in business. L j l _l*U*U*U* w *w*a* i *^*^^*^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^* SOUTHERN DAIRIES Serving Palm Beach County, featuring the Nationally Famous Southern Dairies Products and Ice Cream. AS NEAR TO YOU AS YOUR PHONE MB CIIU4 FERGUSON FUNERAL HOME, Inc. 1201 South Olive Avenue WEST PALM BEACH PHONE 5172 REAL ESTATE—MIAM I BEACH RENTALS LEASES SALES Lots, Homes. Hotels Apt. & Commercial Bldgs. M. GILLER, Realtor 1448 Wlh. Ave., Ph. 5-5875 418-16 Seybold Bldg—Ph. 25151 MIAMI BEACH HOMES AND INVESTMENT PROPERTIES B. E. BRONSTON. Realtor A Tru.two.thv Reel Bstyto Service 06 Lincoln RdLAINHART & POTTER ESTABLISHER 1893 "BUILDING MATERIAL FOR PARTICULAR BUILDERS" Phone 5191 West Palm Beach, Fla. Ik LFA FOR THE BEST IN DAIRY PRODUCTS WEST PALM BEACH MILK—CREAM—ICE CREAM AMBULANCE SERVICE MIZZELL %  SIMON MORTUARY 413 Hibiscus Street Phone 8121 West Palm Beach, Fla The enemy's ears Are opened wide So military secrets We must hide! Buy War Bonds and Stamps to help preserve Democracy. Enemy ears Are ever near If we don't talk They can't hear. United States War Bonds are still the best investment. %  % %  %  %  I % %  H