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The Jewish Floridian ( December 29, 1944 )

UFJUD

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— m ^^1 7-NUMBER 52 E IS ID STIIGE NEXT EVENT ^l!l!!^5i^ FRIDXTTSECEMBER 29, 1944 The next 1 vent in the Int< *Y r..unral scries, sponsored by the C i Beach YM & WHA and JTlimnu YM & YWHA. will £ a lecture on January 7 1945. rtfctt) i) m.. at the Miami Beach tSr High School, 1420 Drexcl ET Miami Beach The speaker %  ill be General Victor A. Yakhontoff. who will discuss "United Sutcs-KussKi-Japan." The General eminently qualified to discuss this timely and vital question became a general ,t 35 Hi .-< rved for more than W o yeai with the Russian annies in World War I. During that war h • rved as a Personal Emissary from the Czar to the | General Staff. Subsequently. General Yakhontoff served as Assistant Secretary ol War following th throw of the Czar and a Actini; Sei retary in the Cabinet Following this term of office, he was stationed in Tokyo as military attache at the Rus| sun Eml He hns lived in this country! for manj and has been a MANY JEWS CAN STILL BE SAVED IN EUROPE New York (JTA)— Betwc. n 100.000 and 120,000 Jews tan still be saved from Nazi ten tory in Europe, if effective ma urea are taken within the next I three months, Dr. Abraham Sil; berschein, a former Jewish member of the Polish parliament who arrived here from Switzerland last week, told a press conference. Dr. Bilberschein, while PRICE TEN CENTS En SILVER RESIGNS New York (JTA)—Details of the strife within the American Zionist Emergency Council which MAP CAMPAIGN PLANS FOR REHABILITATION New York (JTA)—The executive committee of the World Jewish Congress, at a meeting here, mapped out plans for campaigns in various countries in order to raise the $10,000,000 fund for rehabilitation and reconstruction work in Europe, voted at the War Emergency Conference held recently by the Congress at Atlantic City. A statement issued by the exFEDERATION SETS BUDGET FOR IMS A budget of $305,182.59 was set as the 1945 goal of the annual ewisn Federawas deterof the board organization evening, at budget comm.itberofJews Vnv u f !" 1 5 !" "* counc 1 In wn,ch re >H tee presented its recommendaand in Austffi. He enSES I 0 fejT ion 8 *** the re8ult ?** !" ?& 0 JS&** ** I' tons for allocations. huge amounts ol money that regard t ington of opinion with communities affiliated with the Some 2 i percent has been alto Zioni tta. ties in Wash: congress will participate The I localcd to local agencies, with winch have arisen among statement also announced the ovcrscas re li e f and rehabilitation will be necessary to continue the rescue work. The press t' (VrJ'Ini/'r election of Dr. Nahum Goldmann {•;"';',' %  arranged by the tion „, America and Dr. Wise, as chairman of the executive and Dr. Abba Hillel committee of the Congress. LEADERS WED sIDWFITEDFTRE T JEWS I JTA)—Jew Silver, on the other. These dif-1 %  '.1 in connection with the recent request by the | Stati Department that the Pal Ri ition be shelved l)y i ; rigres Dr. Stephen S. Wise, who last week offered his resignation as co-chairman of the American Zionist Emergency Council, issued a statement explaining the reasons for his action. The statement follows: "One week ago I resigned the office of Chairman of the JEWS PERISH RI MARCH OF DEATH i platfnrt: "" Russia and era hen i ovei the American Zionist Emergency the Fai East This year he is fate of the J< Council. 1 did so because, as I conductaii; i course at the New a result "1 a I hing Sch'Xil for Social Research. here this w ... pro General Yakhontoff is one of I Nazi Premier Fei 5za isj iseries ol four events which has thi all the Inter-V Cultural Committee the Jew I %  to its %  bringing to Miami during the occupation bj the Russiai winter and pring of 1945. SubIt is km more .sequent • include Mollv than 75,000 Jews Picon, outstanding comedienne. Budapest at the beginnini who iinternationally known.! month alter a pogrom during Wlowing her appearance, Harold I which many thousands ol Jews Bauer: American pianist, I were killed, and following the will Rivi i joint recital with' "death march' of UKUiOO BudaDeanor Fine, one of the finer pest Jews to the Austrian I pianists ol the vounger crop. The ier. No report has reached Jewseries will conclude with Harry: i s h organizations in Switzerland xi/ap TQ FOLLOW TRY Gendcl. former member of the | as to what has happen* .1 PTITr *iinr\r Arti'f playei who is a celeremaining 75,000 Budapest J brated interpreter of humorous since the early part of Decemstated in my letter of resignation. 'I felt that it was impossible for me to remain Chairman of a body one of the leaders of which—the Chairman of the Executive Committee—had deliberately and persistently contravened the decisions of the Council in a matter of supreme importance to the lasting hurt of our sacred cause.' At Wednesday's nearly all-night session of the (CONTINUED ON PAGE 4) IF ARAB STATE MADE %  onologue> sketches. and character Ni ... York (JTA)—Any attempt bar. However, the mes Premier Szalasy as stating; "1 (( convert Palestine into an Arab Subscriptions for the full aerie* ask no mercy from anybody, but state or Jewish state will result *t available at the Miami Beach i I shall also show no mercy to j n warfare withm the country, TM & WHA one Lincoln Road, tinJews." Dr J L Magnes warns mtne and the Miami Yi\ It is assum ,. d in well infonnc, j at ^ion oMne PalStine receiving 47 percent plus. Sixty-three organizations wili participate in the fund-raisinft campaign to be held in April of this year. Campaign dates were set after taking into consideration the War Chest and Red Cross appeals. Local agencies to participate in the allocation include: the ArmyNavy Committee of Greater Miami (includes the Miami Service eague, Miami Beach Service League. Miami Beach Jewish Center. Freda Markowitz Post No. 174. and Auxiliary of Jewish War Veterans); the Council of Bern fJTA)—How tens of Social Agencies; the Greater Mithousands of Hungarian Jews' ami Jewish Federation (yearperished last month in an epic round activities); the Bureau of "march of death.'" driven from Jewish Education; the University Budapest to the Austrian frontier, of Miami Hillel Foundation; the was told here by one of the YM & YWHA of Miami; and the '"marchers" who succeeded in esj YM & WHA of Miami Beach, leaping to Switzerland. His eye-| Max Orovitz was chairman of story, as published in the budget committee, whose I the Swiss press reads. 'recommendations were unani"In the early days of Novem-! mously accepted by the directors. ,,,. thou .uids of Jews—men. I Other members of this cornwomen and children—were j.mittee were: Harry Boyell. Norhearded together in Budapest and man Rnssman, Edward Lovitz, driven afoot toward the Austrian Benjamin Meyers, Mrs. Stanley border. For seven or eight days C. Myers, Dr. Albert Rosentha.. we marched an average of thirty Morton Russack, Rabbi Irving kilometers daily, sometime under Lehrman, Ben Silver, Willian: heavy cold rain Before we set Singer and Mrs. Milton Sirkin. out, Hungarian Nazis thoroughly Ex officio members includesearched us so as to prevent us j Stanley C. Myers, honorary presfrom taking along any valu-1 ident; Monte Selig, president: and allies. At the same time, our Joseph Rose, secretary. YWHA, Miami 1667 S. W. 5th St.. FUNERAL SERVICES IN NEW YORK FOR ROSEN New York (JTA)—Funeral Wvicewas held this week for | •nRiiscn. executive director the American Association for **isn Education, who died %  a his home of a heart Jnent. aged r,n. He became ill !" l on a Western tour for %  association Jrom 1921 until he took the J* he held at death. Mr. Rosen "Js director of the Associated 2 !" ud Torahs of Philadelphia. m central agency for Jewish Ration in that city. Earlier ILZ? servi d for two years as jw^'isor of instruction for the I %  Bureau of Jewish Edg !" Bom in Baltimore. Mr. | g attended Teachers Col?*• Columbia University, and university, receiving %  *7Y .? f ed ucation degree from i* latter in 1921. He comT^ 1 his Jewish educational B at the Jewish Theological i*nary in 1913. Jewish circles here that not a .-%  • •;;'••',; %  R s 'suggests the carrying .out his threat Spec.a rtj^ can be obtained^ v. indicat ed. PaVeSne, "SyrST Lebanon and PRESIDENT OF"POLISH *g*Sgi of the immfation Z.O.A. DIES IN TEL AVIV of j* ***£*% the identity documents were taken away from us. The road leading from Budapest via Komaron to the Hungarian border town of HegyShalom is more than 120 kilometers long. On our way we FEW IEWISH CHILDREN ALIVE IN FREED CITY Moscow (JTA)—Only 35 of the several thousand Jewish children meters onj -, "-*.— who resided in the Galician town were img Jy members Drohob h in Polandi wcrc ^jE$?^fi^%l!SU ahve_ when the Red Army .'breakdown was immediately I liberated the city, it is reported dothes torn U pacts. to. tprtd (heir hQmcs ^ 0 spend nights sleep ng along ^ Jcwish woman wh& ,In n.adside Every two day^ remaining hidden each one of us received a piaie t 4U __ tu u ^^ ^„,,„K_ of watery soup and this was all the food we were given. OLD DISPUTE BREAKS AGAIN IN PALESTINE wuuiu "> —i—. .u pnun l Tel Aviv (JTA)-Leo Levite. absorptive capacity oj we Jerusak m (JTA)-The rmer president .if the Zionist try, ^. %  f2S" has been pu te about whether or Organization in Poland, died here the initial par t> ^ at the age of 67. He was the reached there couw head of the Palestine office in ?tead>, thougn e up Warsaw till the outbreak of the .'mnngr-t^n ore we Arab war and also the founder and the dtl h „ sue old disr not German should be spoken by Jews in Palestine has flared up anew with disclosure that the annual Czernichovsky Bell Art Prize of the Tel Aviv municipality will ident of >* Po Ish-Klestine and Jewish Mrgg t h h e at SU h S e n n 0 C t be' awarded "this year benfTn Warsaw. He Cjme to fts. He emphas-^ ^ ^ of *e judges_bajked %  York (JTA)-The \k \w n J cd F undation IS w h and HebreW W t r£HL. pr, s 'nted this week i man pre Bank in Warsaw, ne •. %  ••5' J "' ";" n( a k in the name ui SSstme in 1939 and settled In does no^ speak, m^. Qf wmch Tel A**. g f ^reaident FELLOWSHIP SET UPJW T nVSAND^ENTILES IN JERUSALEM UNIVERSITY gjjg^OBSERVANCE feiSlr^-'^^ a ofte Sv&S the !!i.^ S hL been established at pageant of the h taking together with her young daughter in a house where members of the Elite Guards were quartered told a Russian correspondent how for several months she forbade her child to speak for fear she would be overheard and murdered. U. N. R. R. A. PLANS FOR TWO REFUGEE CAMPS Washington (JTA)—The United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration plans to set up> vu<~ two types of refugee camps in at awarding it to a translation Europe transient and semi-perof Goethe. manen t centers, it was learned The two argued that not a here BBS* uaffB-5 KaMffUS week, man uf the Board Ol J settlement, nV se .."Ai,on. single German protested against the "book burnings" of Jewish literature. The controversy has Col. Roger G. Powell, who leaves within the next two weeks?•— '1—'iMifcin t0 *•*• U P nis duties in London been picked up BaMNeHBBBOT director of the refugee camps the press, whl denounce w ^ of UNRRA S Europearj refugees here who sun _„_ jona offic d ic C losed that "herish" M and"' use German both in public and privately. NOBEITPRIZE WINNER kn attended by ISSftZS S'SS-StfwS^S'C ^^^b^^SS^ NAMED "HIGH OFFICER *gjiit &5& A into a perm ical matheni lame of Prof "~_ Twenty, fS!Li !" ta" 1he~P*i itVk^5i"' sts Present to rej^t the $250 awards were five ** Sin write while the %  W i sent to H Ayalty •S^ v de0, u "g"ay. Tiioae ajL^i prizes were presented ST {,Dh Opatashu. Aron !•* JT a ^ ry s *cklr. A. Kpr^[ J. Fe4gin. : 1Is SUm ps andBonda. n which ing the name ot trow*—i — led the Jewr, children Gentile and ^ w sn oarty at Sseri6S£IB5Siag the first ever. i*g*J he A "'. brew songs were suM oy gBtfggSattg^ ^rrth C e h8 &Sn, Pre. commencement exercises for .2 worje^ ^ ^ students. Paris (JTA)-Prof. Paul Langevin Nobel prize winner in physics who was jailed by the Germans has been elected Resident of the League for the Rights of Man. breeding Victor Basch. who ^Tmunfered in the woods near Lyon together with his wife, in December, 1943. regional office, disclosed that transient centers will house displaced persons on their way home for from five to seven days, while administrative detransportation is arranged. Semi-permanent camps are planned for devastated areas, towns in Poland, for instance, where it will be necessary to provide shelter and food for those who still remain and for those who are returning, Powell said. Keep on buying War Bonds.



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PAGE TWO +Jew is* tkrMtam FRIDAY. DECEMBER 29, 1J BIRTHS Mr. and Mrs. David Berkoritz, 1568 Drexel Ave., Miami ieach, announce the birth of a aughter December 20 at St. rancis hospital. Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Weinkle, of S. W. 11th Ter., have with them for over the holidays Mrs. Weinkle's mother, Mrs. Sam Schwartz, and sister, Barbara, of Charlotte, N. C. Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Adelman, 5050 Alton Rd., Miami Beach, sire the parents of a daughter born December 22 at St. Francis hospital. A daughter was born to Dr. and Mrs. Leonard Jacobson, 4523 Royal Palm Ave., December 21 at St. Francis hospital. Mr. and Mrs. Max Weiss. 1207 Meridian Ave., Miami Beach, an. nounce the birth of a daughter December 22. Sgt. Bernard Greenstein, who was wounded in action in France last spring, arrived in New York Tuesday by plane from a hospital in England. He telephoned his wife, Bernice, who resides with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. Miller, 1636 S. W. 19th St., that he expects to be home on furlough for New Year's. WEDDINGS The wedding of Miss Esther Hirsch and Martin Laibson will be solemnized Sunday at the home of the groom-to-be's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Laibson, 733 Michigan Ave., Miami Beach. Guests from New York will be among those attending. A reception will take place Monday, January 1, at 2 p. m. in the Workman's Circle Lyceum. Miss Hirsch recently dame here from Los Angeles. The Laibsons 1 are originally from New York. Mrs. Max Rosenstein, 505 12th St., Miami Beach, is leaving for New York Saturday morning to receive further medical treatment. While away she will attend the Bar Mitzvah celebration of her nephew, Gerry Meyerson and plans to return the end of January. Dr. and Mrs. Mally, of Atlantic City, have returned home after visiting here with their uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. William Malmut, owners of the Versailles Hotel. While on the Beach they were also guests of Miss Ruth Brotman and her mother, of 1502 Jefferson Ave. Mr. and Mrs. Al Stone of the Blackstone hotel observed their 17th wedding anniversary this month. They have resided in Miami Beach for the last 14 years. The Stones have four sons. Richard, a lieutenant in the I cadet corps at Georgia Military I college; Nathaniel, a private in I the same corps; Robert and Joseph. Miss Charlyne Ruskin. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dan B. Ruskin. 140 N. Hibiscus Island. Miami Beach, and bride-elect of Lt. Sam Coolik. USNR. was tendered a shower by Mrs. Gus Feuer, 50 N. Hibiscus Island. Other parties honoring Miss Ruskin are being planned by Mrs. Max Orovitz, Mrs. Aaron Kanner and Mrs. Lewis Gorfine. Mr. and Mrs. P. Sokoloff. 1898 S. W. 4th Ave., were hosts to more than 200 guests recently at a benefit entertainment for the Russian children now settled in Biro Bidjan. The marriage of Miss Elaine Schindel, daughter of Mrs. Abraham Schindel of East Orange, N. J., and Lt. (jg) Edward S. Rubin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Rubin, of Miami Beach, took place Dec. 3, in New York City. Miss Susan H. Hannoch of South Orange. N. J.. was maid of honor and William Rubin brother of the bridegroom was best man. Mrs. Rubin was graduated from Bradford junior college and attended the Philadelphia Occupational Therapy school. Lieutenant Rubin was graduated from John Hopkins university and the Midshipman's school at Northwestern university. He recently returned to the United States after serving in the Pacific theater of war. Rev. and Mrs. Joseph Malek are spending several weeks here before returning to Detroit, where they now make their home. Mrs. Benjamin LcVine and daughters, formerly of Coral Gables, are now residing in Miami, at 1890 S. W. 16th Ter. Stuart Charles, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Apte, 435 S. W. 31st Rd., is spending the holidays with his parents before returning Sunday to Barnesville, Ga., where he is enrolled as a student at j Gordon Military College. Also here from Gordon Military College is Merton, son of I Mr. and Mrs. Sylvan Wetstein, '919 S. W. 13th Ct. Pvt. Frederick G. Klein spent a weekend pass with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. Klein. 811 Meridian Ave., Miami Beach, before returning to Camp Blanding, Fla. where he is stationed. Pvt. Klein was an active A. Z. A. and "Y" member prior to his entering the armed forces. LOST Three weeks ago. Light tan bag containing family pictures, also son's picture killed in action; and also Rhode Island driver's license No. 920. Please return against reward to Mrs. R. S. Shoket. c o Princess Ann Hotel. 920 Collins Avenue. Phone 5-2196. MOTHER The marriage of Miss Enid Ramber, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Irving Ramber, 1918 Liberty Ave.. Miami Beach, and Cpl. Harold Boxer, son of Mr. and Mrs. Philip Boxer of Brooklyn took place Dec. 6 in Miami Beach. ENGAGEMENT Home to spend the holidays with her family is Miss Sara Rose Schwartz, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Schwartz, 1847 N. W. 8th St. Miss Schwartz, a freshman at Duke University, is a member of Alpha Epsilon Phi sorority. LIQUID ROACH TRAP Keeps the home free J from every size nd I variety of Ruach. } Guaranteed No poison—No Muss At YOUR DRUG STORE i or two postpaid tl 00. I Roach Trap Co., Ft. Smith, Ark. for REST CONVALESCEMCI -~t CHRONIC CASES RIVERSIDE MEMORIAL CHAPEL FUNERAL DIRECTORS !2S6 WjjMnaton Art.. Mum' letch In Hew : ork Qth St & Amsterdam Ave. 5-7777 RIVERSIDE AMBULANCE SERVICE 1944 CAiJULAC AMBULANCE 1944 OXYGEN FQUIPMENT "WSun-RtiyPark / Health Resort Betrothal of Miss Shirley Patrick and Midshipman Jerry Goldlagen, USNR, is being announced >y her mother, Mrs. Pauline Patirk. 3330 Flamingo Dr., Miami leach. Mr. Goldhagen is a son f Mr. and Mrs. M. D. Goldhagen, 670 Lenox Ave., Miami Beach. Vo date has been set for the vedding. -Ruv War Bonds TodayTry it NOWJ IMPROVED ROKEAChV ir mm UNEXCfTfiff „FOB GOOKft.3! BAKING/, and FRYING ALL MEAT Miss Adele Stone, a freshman at Louisiana State University, is spending her holiday vacation i with her parents Mr. and Mrs. jJack Stone. 1884 S. W. 10th SL i Miss Stone is a member of Alpha I Epsilon Phi sorority and also of Landa, their intersorority. MI AH: W n ACK %  -• io-cour rLOBio* GENERAL PAINTING BV BEST MECHANICS Free Estrmatee Given I. D. Gilbreoth Paint Co. PHONE 0070 If Ne Aniwir Call 2-5105 MUSA ISLE INDIAN VILLAGE 1700 N. W. 25th ATWIU Alligator Wrestling Alligator Farm Wishing Well Bead Bracelets and Bags Silver Work Indian Dolls Baskets Tom Toms Pottery Blankets Bows and Arrows Take Bus 15 or 19 Mount Sinai Memorial Park "Owned and Operated by Greater Miami Jawith Cemetery Ass'n A COMMUNTTY CEMETERY dated Congregations: Beth David. Beth Jacob, Miami fwish Orthodox. Schaaiwi Zedek and Sisterhood Cheeed Shel MIAMI FURRIERS Incorporated Storage Repairing Remodeling AMERICAN BANK BLDG. 139 N. E. 1ST ST. ROOM 715-18 PHONE 2-5720 JicttU §totlux* Your Compute Department Store With Quality Merchandise Washington Ave. at lth Be Miami Beach And for your convenience Morris Brother's New Apparel and A cce ssory Stare 79 E. FlegUr St.. Miami Home from Florida State College for Women is Miss Miriam Scheinberg who is spending her holiday recess with her father. P. Scheinberg. 1553 S. W. 7th St. BRISM Rabbi S. M. Machtei nffiTilTa this week at the Brim of £3 sons of Mr. and MnTiVu&l golin; Mr. and Mrs"irvintlw 1 "! and M r. and Mrs. S S afe'"! Mr. and Mrs. Henry Mdlcr arJ S OW E in i4th e s. n ew h omp a b. fc. 14th St.. where they nM entertaining their son-in-law and! daughter Mr. and Mrs. JaX| Land and grandson, Allan n fl Baltimore, Md. Mrs.' Land an dl her son are well-known here for their work in entertain.ng serv icemen in the various hospifis of the area last winter. Thev are looking forward to doine the same again this year. ftC. 1EWBH WOMPJ OFFERS SCHOOL LOAN Realizing the need for trained social workers, the Miami Sec-I tipn. National Council of Jewish Womtn, is offering a scholarship loan m graduate work at an accredited school of social work for the year 1945-1946, beginning with either the March or Ju"? semester. y Applications giving full particulars regarding degree obtained and graduate school the applicant would desire to attend should be sent to the Council office addressed to Mrs. Benjamin LeVine, social welfare chairman. BIALIK BRANCH WILL HAVE NEW YEAR PARTY A New Year's dinner sponsored by Bialik Branch, J. tf W A No. 290 will be held Sunday at 9:30 p. m. in the Royal Tea Room of the Harrison Hotel. 411 Washington Ave., Miami Beach. LAUDERDALE SERVICES Rabbi Samuel H. Baron will discuss the book "Blackmail" at regular Friday evening servicej at Temple Emanu-El, Fort Laudcrdale. Keep on buying War Bonds. Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Gurss, 561 N. E. 68th St., tendered aj family dinner this week in honor of their granddaughter, Barbara I Lewis, who is home from Rollins I College for the holidays. A guest at the affair was Sgt. George Bernon, of Cleveland, Ohio, who | is at a redistribution station in the area after having completed 28 months of overseas duty. INCOME TAX BOOKKEEPING SERVICE ATTRACTIVI RATSS WRITE OR PHONE N. A. SERVICES P. O. Pox 122, Miami 11, Flerlta Phona 2-2MS Season's Greetings Darole Cosmetics Patent Medicines—Sundries Full Line of Cosmetics 927 Washington Avenue Phona 5-4124 HIGH CLASS RESTAURANT FOR SALE 125 seats Long lease — with beautiful duplex bungalow — wall located on Miami Beech. Price $15,000 Mr. Jones, c/o Jewish FlorIdian P. O. Box 2S73. Miami END Of If 1 JLL 1 iL Shop during Burdine's clearance of broken stocks left from a busy holiday season. Clearance values on every floor of our Miami Stare. MOUNT NEBO THE CEMETERY OF DMTINCnON FOR DISCRIMINATING FAMILB8 Rabbi S. M. Machtei. Director Oiympia Building 34720 SID PALMER'S FUNERAL HOME m, !"!" r 5 £ HVING THE JEWISH COMMUNITY* PHONE 9-2884 "A nump IM WEED2008 W. FLAGLER



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f^iV. DECEMBER 29, 1944 BEACH VOTERS fggl TOJE-REGISTER -.haDProximately 14 000 MiW £ a chvo..r S facing the pros^ rc -n gistering before the ^nun:. ;oal election City •^ r W Toinlinson. who also RJrviw'> f registrations, intffida campaign to urge all KTto re-reg&tar a 8 soon as •hi KJ the new system, voters •u be permanently registered t M municipal elections. A ^residence in Florida and ^months m Miami Beach are SSSw for qualification to register. TOUNGVIOLINIST WILL APPEAR IN CONCERT Carroll Glenn, young American noiinist who will be guest artist X thrd of the series of University of Miami Symphony orffi concerts, wi 1 be heard &P m. Sunday Jan 14 Jlliami Senior High school judilorium. MIAMICHAPTER N.H.I.C. TO HOLD OPEN MEET An open meeting of the Miami chapter. National Home for Jewoh Children at Denver, will be held Tuesday, January 2. at 1:30 p. m. at the YM & WHA. 1 Lincoin Rd.. Miami Beach. Candlelight servues in memory of the Utc Midge (John, active worker of the organization who passed iway last year, are planned for that time. A hoard meeting will proceed the affair. TRI BETAS TO INDUCT 6 NEW MEMBERS FRIDAY Six new members of Tn Beta sorority will be Introduced Friday evening at the group's annual holiday rimnei dance at the Latin Quarter They aiv Miss Harriet Hand daughter of Mi and Mrs Rand; Miss Carol Jane Wolpert daughter of Mr and Mrs George Wolpert; Miss Sheila Lewis daughter of Mr. and MrJ Gerald Lewis; Miss Paye Zwick daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Zwick; Miss Carol Steuer, daughter of Mrs. Max Steuer. and Miss Sybil Cowen. daughter of Mr and Mrs. Morns 1. Cowen. Mrs. George Chertkof, sponsor and Mr. Chertkof will attend. The young women were installed at formal candlelight ceremonies Dec. 17 at the home of Miss Rosalie Kotkin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Kotkin, 1344 S. W. 17th Ter. A chow mein supper at Miss Kotkin's was followed by an informal party at the home of the president. Miss Judith Wolpert, 1776 S. W. 16th Ave. Miss Wolpert is vice president of the fraternity sorority council of which Tn Beta is an active member. The group is planning to donate proceeds of its annual winter carnival, held in the early part of the month, to the hero's phone fund of the Biltmonhospital Another welfare project uf the group is work at the Fleetwood canteen. Miami Beach. ^^tfkrkUan PAGE THREE GREEN LANTERN RESTAURANT Po d For the Best PRIVATE DINING ROOMS Visit Our Winery Lounge 345 ALCAZAR AVE. PHONE 4-6225 CORAL GABLES Keep on buying War Bonds. Face Facts B r Alexander F. Miller Florida Regional Director A "' Defamation League eago is at present the headquarters of most of the more! raoid anti-democratic organizations and The Constitutional Americans are one of the most uninhibited of Chicago's nationalists, administration-hating. Jewbaiting clusters. Their titular head and preceptor is George T foster, a thin, brown-haired, tervid man of 50 who operates a knit goods and art sh>,p with his wife on the northwest side. roster calls himself "a profound student of politics, government and international affairs and a lecturer on American history." He is "dedicated to the recapture of constitutional government." His group has been in existence for three years. It numbers "several thousands," Foster claims. According to report received here concerning a recent meeting of this group. Foster who was called as a defense witness for 1 William Dudley Pelley during the Silver Shirt fuehrer's trial for | criminal sedition in 1942 and I who was a delegate to Gerald | L. K. Smith's America First party | convention in Detroit, last Aug' USt, read to his audience long excerpts from a cheaply printed pamphlet, "The Cross of War." i Tinpamphlet he termed "the most significant thing I ever have seen." $25 to SI00 WAR BOND FREE For information leading to the purchase of a 1935 to 1941 CAR Phone 9-1085 Day or Night JOSEPH EPSTEIN For Real Estate Investment* 665 Washington Avenue PHONE 5-7084 f tfa/katutfyfc inlrc ^uced a Thorn declared c,ll f e ".... nu d to. They Bonds because tht> %  naa hemi took 60 days to, pas^ he said, and then !" y ^ cash them to beCJUK {Q buy I have my con attempt u( frC e %  Wf^JLlroni me I to take this a a undcr ground. ss &HS s&—- test*s* r£s h,micl control. sugar because o> y re "* ^ at hv edict causing the strieted by !" ,c £ c sai d it "was • cigaret ****£**& have to getting so a man his fe •{g Sfc^hS a pretty nice kisser." i were their dwelling places and the dwelling places of their fathers. It is a year shrouded in memories of absent ones, in the I sound of voices that will not be heard again. To them we can pay only silent tribute for the greatest thing they have done in their lives. They have now. as we know, the tragedy of being taken I long before their time. For us Jews it is not a new 1 experience, for throughout our history we have been tested, and thai long history is testimony of the power of our great and unshattei able faith which is exi pressed in our conception of religion. This present conflict is not i merely a militaristic struggle for : national power. We arc not only I engaged in a war for the physical safety of our country, our dear ones, and our possessions, but we are also fighting for the vindication of every noble principle of our religious faith and our Amer' ican traditions. We see m the world-wide sweep of this conflict the clash of two forces: the one leading to certain enslavement of mankind, the other to a hope of freedom for all humanity. We must forge into actuality our dreams of a new world, whose foundation of justice and peace we must plan immediately, that will arise from this terrible catastrophe. Every believer in a living G-d can and will denote all his resources of body and mind to such a cause. In this struggle we hear again the ancient call, "Who is unto the Lord let him come to me." It can be taken for grantee that we are giving unstinted aic to the military and naval forces of our country and shall continue to do so; it is obvious that we are more than lending a helping hand to the support of our government, but more than this is necessary, for this is a battle not simply for the strong in arms but for the staunch in heart, and the pure of soul. This demands strengthening of our inner spiritual resources, through the uninterrupted functioning of the religious and cultural institutions of our land. It is interesting to recall th when the Temple was destroy nearly nineteen hundred ves I ago, Rabbi Jochanan ben Zak. a far sighted leader of his peop: obtained from the Roman commander, Vespasian, the permission to establish a school at Jamnia. The Rabbi knew that only the literature of Israel might preserve the landless people. He acted upon the Rabbinic maxim. "Upon the breath of children in the schoolhouse rests the future of the world." May G-d deem us worthy of seeing this battle through to a triumphant conclusion this coming year, nineteen hundred and forty-five. May He fill our hearts with greater hopes for the better world to be born of our sorrow and sacrifice, that all we endure will be accounted as nought in the light of ultimate ;victory—a victory that shall bring glory not merely to us but to Him. the establishment of whose Kingdom among men is our chief prayer and purpose. .-tft £3GUST BROS Ry £ ANHEUSER-BUSCH Budweisei TRAD! MAHK WO. U. • %  *AT. OTF. EVERYWHERE Distributed by NATIONAL BRANDS TIDES HOTEL 1220 Ocean Drive MIAMI BEACH Dining Room Open to Public Strict Dietary Cuisine I WANT MY MILK And B Sura "• FLORIDA DAIRIES HOMOGENIZED Vitamin "IT Milk "Milk Product*" Daero Protected TEL. 2-2621 Greater Miami Delivery VUlt Our Farm at 1200 N. W. ttad Stxt "A Gift of Good Taste" THE HOLIDAYS For Packed. Priced and Shipped Right ORDER NOW! ££icidul FLORIDA FRUITS IN Boxes and Basket* Send Them T* Your Relatives and Friends In the North Holiday Special Fancy Oift Baskets Mixed Florida Fruit M Bu. 1.95 Express Extra 1 Bu. 3.75 RIZZO GROVES REG. PACKING HOUSE Bonded Shippers 2114 N. W. First Awe. Ph. 3-14M PLACE YOUR ORDER NOWl UM Buitt 7, • and 13



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I PAGE FOUR +Jewisii fhrkUan FRIDAY, DECEMBER 29. 194 The Jewish Floridian Plant and Main Offices, 21 S. W. Second Avenue, Miami. Fla. P. O. Box 2973 Phone 2-1141 Entered as Second Class Matter July 4, 1930 at the Post Office of Miami, Florida, under the Act of March 3, 1879 FRED K. S HOCHET, Managing Editor Subscription—1 Year, $2.00 Six Months, $1.00 MIAMI 18, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 29, 194 TEBET 13, 5705 VOLUME 17 NUMBER 52 A NEW CHALLENGE In the midst of new revelations of the mass slaughter of lews in Nazi death camps, an announcement issued by the United Jewish Appeal for Refugees, Overseas Needs and Palestine provided concrete evidence that the Jews of the United States are fully conscious of their responsibility in helping those who have survived the ordeal of persecution and extermination. The United Jewish Appeal reported that it had passed the $100,000,000 mark in its campaigns since 1939 as the unified fund-raising instrument for the Joint Distribution Committee, the United Palestine Appeal and the National Refugee Service. This is perhaps the best reflection of the importance which American Jews attach to the programs of overseas relief and rehabilitation, the upbuilding of the Jewish National Home and refugee adjustment in the United States. In the period of the gravest crisis in Jewish life throughout the world, they have responded generously to the campaigns of the United Jewish Appeal to sustain hope in the midst of despair, to maintain life in the midst of destruction, to provide homes and havens in the midst of mass wandering. That American Jews have contributed the impressive total of 510,000,000 in less than six years to the major rescue and reconstruction agencies represented in the United Jewish Appeal is an achievement in which all of them may take great pride. At the same time, however, we must recognize that we are now entering a period which will involve far greater obligations in meeting vastly increased tasks directly linked to relief, rehabilitation, reconstruction and settlement in Palestine of surviving Jews in Europe freed from the death grip of Nazi oppression. All of us are justified in rejoicing in the encouraging results of the nationwide United Jewish Appeal. We see that the approach of victory which has brought far greater opportunities for saving and restoring JewisMWife has also brought a new challenge to American Jewish generosity and service. 6. E. S. TO INSTALL NEW TESTIMONIAL DINNER OFFICERS ON TUESDAY TENDERED DR. KAPLAN ZIONISM SPLITS OKI ACTS: SILVER itS I ENS (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1) Emergency Council, the resignation was not acted upon, but a motion was passed inviting all the officers of the Executive Committee to resign, in order that it might be free to act upon all resignations at the same time. I believe a meeting is to be held in the near future. I could not return to the serv-TTDBrrS FROM EVEH1 fMidtbj, eorifidetUiai -By PHINEAS J. BIRONLISTEN HERE .. No. 1 Eat 65th Street New York City, is one of the popular recreational centers for soldiers and sailors on 1^ It gives them a club atmosphere plus dormitory accomSTj tions But the most important thing that 1 East 65th I compiishing is this: It is helping to destroy anti-Semitisrn 1 The place is run by volunteer director Mrs. Ely Jacques Kais I and 3,000 junior hostesses in the basement of TempleFmr,! nl with the help of the Jewish Welfare Board Its non^ct character, plus the wonderful spirit of the girls who are act" 311 1 as hostesses there, does a lot to puncture the anti-Jewish I judices that some of the boys bring there Now thau,o i couia nox reiuto w un { *— _i r I m mey re say-l ice of the Zionist Emergency mg that the Shakespearean play Paul Muni is plannina tJ Council unless the reconstitutappear xn on Broadway this season is "The Merchant ing of the Council gave assurj Venice" ... If true, this would be unfortunate indeed u SS, ^permitt*"' eoSS *2 "T* 2&JSETt£ t ^^ l *£ vene its considered and final a time when anti-Semtism is being fostered for service after decisions." | the war The opponents of Dr Silver yOU SHOULD KNOW Claim that lie exceeded his au_, thority in his efforts to secure The rumors that Governor Thomas E. Dewey is to replace passage of the Palestine Resolu-. the Rev. Everett Clinchy, who is a paid official as Dresidpn* tion by the Senate Foreign Rela-, 0 f ^ National Conference of Christians and Jews mZlzn£59iS& fiw! =si b u w e ftv v$ =P5-WEment. Dr. Silver claimed that' than rumors The Rev. Mr. Clinchy would, it is said, remain the majority of the members of | on as the executive chairman, and Dewey would become th* both houses of Congress were head of ^ Conference—without pay, of course The srhnrl l&* i fS 2P^ under which Jewish cHen residing in C^Vemon! the State Department was the ( ( Montreal) are being educated in Protestant schools may be result of the work of only a terminated on June 30, 1945 This would confront the Hurra. Washington Sficiab'whfsTk to | "* J ^J* !" ** *h thppble M of establishing Jew£n small, but luence President Roosevelt and j 8ch ?^ n ce i t ho Province of Quebec all public education the administration against the | is divided into Catholic and Protestant panels, and the Jews Zionist demand for a Jewish j have so for been a part of the Protestant division WAR ECHOES Watch out for a new book, "Axis Rule in Occupied Europe,' by Raphael Lemkin Published by the Carnegie Endowment Mrs. Max lialpern will be mstalled as Worthv Matron of Emunah Chapter No. 175 O.E.S. ;it a formal installation Tuesday night at 8 p. m. at the Scottish Rite Temple. Mrs. John Ramey, Grand Matron of the State of Florida will be the installing officer. Assisting her are the following: Mrs. Jennie Gore, installing grand chaplain, Mrs. Lillian Johnson, installing grand marshall. Mrs. Fred E. Hank, assistant grand marshal and Mrs. G. C. Thompson, intaalung grand organist. Officers for 1945 to be installed include Albert Bacher, worthy patron, Mrs. Philip Levi, associate matron, William Friedman, A testimonial dinner in honor of Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan's seventieth birthday was attended by 250 Palestine. At a meeting of the American Zionist Emergency Council this Wednesday, which lasted until u-nX^ i !" *a > %  PS**" **z**** activities in Washington. His re[ f ocument to roach the public at this tune with authentic inport was followed by a motion, formation on what the "new order" has done to Europe Introduced by one of the ZOA; If you speak German with a correct accent, better skip this-^ EoK' 'ST "refeSd^/SoSS l** !" Broadway they're now saying that Hitler's da'ys are motion recommending that all getting fuehrer and fuehrer officers of the Council resign' JEWISH NFWS and that new elections be held ,,, ,, „ .. was then introduced. The Zion-1 We want to call your attention to the excellent work being st Laborites urged that the mo-' done by the Union of Russian Jews, Inc., with headquarters in I 1 "! 1 M !I.. 1 ;' 1 !. 1 !.''. 1, ,)U l .. l l H .' 1 "' SK"! New York, toward bringing American Jews in contact with their relatives in Russia, so many of whom have been beyond the reach of ordinary communications channels since the outbreak of the war ... In the two years that the organizations has been active some 5,000 families in this country have reestablished contact with their relatives in Russia The Contemporary Jewish Record, published by the American Jewish Committee, is looking for an editor to replace the late tion was not accepted. Whereupon Dr. Silver submitted his resignation before the motion was taken to a vote. Dr. Wise, it is reported, prepared his resignation two weeks ago, as an expression of disagreement with Dr. Silver's tactics. The meeting of the Council persons last Tuesday evening. Temple Israel, of which Dr. Kap-1 was held in camera, but it has Adolph S. Oko Ian Is rabbi emeritus, presented 1 the guest-of-honor with a thous| and dollar war bond in honor of the occasion. The Sisterhood likewise presented a gift. Herbert ; U. Felbelman was chairman of | the committee in charge of arrangements and served as toast| master. Assisting him were Frank A. Perlman, Joseph R. 1 Stein, Mrs. Maxwell Hyman, Harry Boyell, Mrs. Louis Zeientz and Mrs. J. Gerald Lewis. associate patron, Mrs. Saul Bolen\ Outstanding city officials, menv ky, secretary, Mrs. Morris Frank, bers of the press and clergy Were treasurer, Mrs. Jack Rosen, con1 present to pay tribute to Dr ductresS) Mrs. Harry Hacker, asKaplan. sociate conductress, Mrs. Edward J. Cooper, chaplain, Mrs. Harry CFTFRRflTPT* Moms, marshall. Miss Florence ^-LfclSKAl Cooper, organist, Mrs. Dave Roscnblum, Adah, Mrs. Sam Auslander, Ruth, Miss Elyse Bacher,' John Roy Carlson, celebrated Esther, Mrs. Joe Schwartz, Marauthor of the best siller "Under tha, Mrs. Charles Bears, Electa. Cover" will speak at the Miami resignations of Dr. Wise and Dr. Silver will be accepted. A meeting of the Council is scheduled for Wednesday. AUTHOR TO SPEAK HERE JAN. 18 Mrs. Jack Bernstein, wardor, and Mrs. Sidney Palmer sentinel. AGUDATH HAMORIM IN FIRST MEETING JAN. 2 The first meeting of the newlyorganized Agudath Hamorim of Greater Miami will be held Tuesday, January 2, at 1030 Washington Ave., Miami Beach. Hebrew teachers are urged to attend the event, which will begin at 8:15. M. C. !. W. TO HOLD FIRST MEET OF YEAR Tne first meeting of the New Year for the Miami Section, National Council of Jewish Women will be held Wednesday, January 3, at 2 p. m. at the YM & WHA, 1 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach. Program is under the direction Senior High School on January i 18, under the auspices of tile i Miami Community Forum. Carlson, who has continued his investigative work since the completion of his sensational book I will reveal additional facts which i he has unearthed concerning ori ganizations and individuals who | are still endeavoring to create I disunity and to sabotage our war I efforts. Reverend Joseph Barth. Director of the Community Forum announces that tickets are available at the Forum office, 1616 Bnckell Ave. been learned that the represent-; wtnar* BT HrtTrc Stives of the ZOA and most of MUSICAL NU1ES> the representatives of Hadassah It is very fitting that the Victor people chose piano virtusoso P P u Se< i Dr S u lver J Th ? .l ele atcs Artur Rubinstein to make the record album "Piano Music of SL3J!6SI^ for was Rubu^in who over a quarter of a as did Louis Lipsky. The Council j century ago, discovered and sponsored the young and unis yet to decide whether the, known Villa-Lobos in Paris, where thin Latin-American composer, now called the Beethoven of Brazil, was then struggling to make a name for himself ... A brilliant musical deubt took place at New York's Town Hall recently, when Mildred Waldman, who hails from Cleveland and Chicago, showed the big town how she can play the piano We predict that ere long Mildred will be one of Americas favorite recitalists Metropolitan Opera tenor Jan Peerce is so nearsighted that he can't see a thing without his glasses ... So what does he do when singing those romantic tenor roles, when spectacles would clash horribly with the picturesque Metropolitan costumes, and falling over the scenery would spoil the mood of the production? Answer: He wears contact lenses—you know, those plastic lenses that are worn directly over the eyeball ABOUT PEOPLE Washington rumors that Secretary of the Treasury Morgenthau may resign after the Sixth War Loan drive has been successfully concluded But that's just the old anti-Morgenthau campaign, which won't succeed Life marches on item: French playwright Henri Bernstein, out of touch with his family gince the fall of France, has learned that not only are his wife and daughter safe, but his daughter is now married and has made him a grandfather 1945 will welcome to the ether waves none other than Dorothy Parker, that queen of wit, who will have a regular radio program. KEY WEST SERVICEMEN IN SPIRITUAL MEETING A large number of servicemen attended the services held at the Jewish Synagogue, corner of of Mrs. Harry Marcus, consumer^ Simonton and Southard Sts elfare chairman. Speakers for with Rev. L. Lehrer offfciating' Mr. and Mrs. G. Kirchik and the afternoon will be Mrs. George P. Dane of the War Chest and an OPA representaMr. and Mrs. J. G. Kantor presented the synagogue with Chanuve. Members and friends are uka candleabras in an impresInvited. sive ceremony, and Joe Pearlman The National Council of Jewj and Lt. Harold Shapiro addressed an Women will hold its board the gathering. Appropriate remeeting Wednesday morning. Friday, Dec. 22: Vmerl in lew h C ngj i is, Worn BYldi !<• view, l SO p in Sunday. Dec. 24: Miami lieach Bervlc* LMSIM, u< i h v. iupp*r and dance. Monday. Dec. 25: American Jewiah CongTeaa, Women a Dlvlalon, regular tneetinc, af'•' Bualneaa a Profeaalonal Dlvlalon nf II id. IMS, ih. I'HKular '•'••">;" % • %  Beaoh v, | 15 P m ; Beaca \ Dance, Hoach "Y." 8 |> m. Tuesday, Dec. 26: Blallfe Singing Society nponnored by the Bureau of j-wi.h BduoaUoo with the }• and affiliated coniregaUona, iteach "Y." 8 p. m. Wedoeaday, Dec. 27: Bath Ja.ob Adult Iiiatltute, 8-10 v„ "Ui. Workn ;*n'a t''r-le Branca ; >o. 69Z. executive committee meet!""•. P iJ"Si Mu ""l Beach Jewish -"tor Adult 0.uraea In conju.ioBduoatlon and aponaorlng organlaall'mH, 8 JI. nv Thuraday. Dec. 2g: American Jewiah ConKrean, Wornjnj Ml vlilon. Terrace Ileataurant, ii--u.li. d eaart luncheon, l p. m • gaVM ffjm* larae,; Beth AUXILIARY HELD FIRST BOARD MEET DEC. 27 ,. Bnai B'rith Auxiliary held its first officers and board meeting of the season on Wednesday, December 27. .with Mrs. Dorothy Borenstein. newly-elected presiLondon Arms Hotel 727 Collins Avenue MIAMI BEACH Finest Kosher Culain* Open to the Public Phone 5-1264 A good bur Is • War **&£& now and yo win be paid later —*4.00 tor every 00. January tTSrVTUTSTBi SSSTtte? headed 5T3t ^h" SfiJS ^^T^^HST* 8rm ^ SL^Z tH Beach Y. rer. y ^h( the Seven Seas. Restaurant pre* !" cei the he,p "' ceded the meeting. NOW and give our men Bonrb in th. Opera —II Trovatorc by Verdi with four famoui artuu, big chorus and orchestra DR. MODESTE ALLOO Conductor DR. ARTURO DI FILIPPI Artistic Director January 4th JanuarT ,tB January Ith Miami Senior High School Auditorium on West FlaglerSt At t:15 P. M. Tickets on sale at Burdmas



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Ki DECEMBER 29^1944 ^J^stfhridliairi "Between You and Me" By BORIS SMOLAR Copyright, 1944, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc. CflONIST SCENE: The ^..ion of Dr. Stephen S. 5 d on Dr Abba HUM Silver •^airmen of the American ^Emergency Committee the committee without hio temporarily until new Jans of officers are held KC to say, these resignaKll provoke a good many 1 "is amon Zionist throughti country All that can ^Sealed at present is that Ek resignations were not motiI by the same reasons %  Tthat it would be a mistake ?*ume that both co-chairmen >d to express solidarity Ech other ... The contrary tL rase • The meeting at t Dr Wi>, and Dr. Silver mtted their resignations was • of the stormiest the Zionist 'merit in America ever had [Sufficient to say that it lasted 1 i early morning ... If the Is of this meeting are ever public, Zionist rank-andi will find out many interI things Especially, with to the work affecting activities in Washington, ,' Zionist leaders compete B each other in running to wnment offices ... It is safe redict that Dr. Wise will prob„/ be re-elected ... As to Dr. Hver, it looks as if he has reii for good despite the fact t a resolution censuring him, ^red by Dr. James Heller, was ETpassed at the session ... As %  goal, the Mizrachi and the Efcontes backed Dr. Silver while lie ZOA and Hadassah repreattuves opposed him. • • • THE AMERICAN SCENE: rything points to the fact the tendency to "snipe" at .1 which was displayed during past Kssion of Congress will I be present in the 79th Conss. This is a result of the X that some outstanding issolanists, bchir.i! whom many antijmtes operated, were defeated I the November elections never, Clare Hoffman of Jchigan, ami J.hn Rankin of feoun—the two leading "snipT at Jews—won re-election to [House of Representatives 00 the other hand, a number of new liberals will enter the Senfi^ i'-u Th SX includ <" at least three liberal Democrats and two liberal Republicans And speaking of the elections, it has now been established that in neither volume, nor variety, did scurrilous literature play as great a part in the election campaign as it did four years ago The annonymous outpourings of vituperative, un-American, for the most part anti-Jewish, material at that time flooded the records of the special committee set up by the Senate to investigate campaign expenditures Approximately 250 different examples came to its attention The most scurrilous and libeious propaganda conducted during the elections this year was earned under the slogan: "Clear Everything With Sidney" Pennsylvania's Republican chairman M. Harvey Taylor admitted before a Senate committee that this group financed to the tune of nearly $15,000 the printing of 3,000,000 copies of a pamphlet "Clear Everything With Sidney" This pamphlet was barred from the mails by the Post Office Department About 200,000 copies, however, were actually distributed The results of the elections have also shown that the political prestige of John L. Lewis, United Mine Workers' chief, ebbed to a new low despite his veiled anti-Semitic editorials in the United Mine Workers Journal. RESERVATIONS HEAVY I FORHADASsJHDmS fflSULttl ft *KffiSoS success because of the reception already g.ven the Latin Quarter E?3fe !" d are exertinj success th? I lnSUrt financia tendance thr Ugh C3pacit *' ma*n rS ;f H o Ty Rubin is c -chairman of the event, assisted by mi tee members stress the fact that no reservations will be taken by the Latin Quarter that evening thus making advance' reservations mandatory In line with their policy of all-out effort to assist service• men recreation, Mr. and Mrs. Aiex Van Strattan are soliciting purchasers of tickets to sponsor me attendance of servicemen. u i' J 0C ,V' ds wiH K0 t0 tnc Rothschild Memorial hospital in Palestine, which was built in 1939. Ri %  rvationa may be secured by contacting Mrs. Harold Spaet (6-2012). Mrs. Harry Platafi '5-01631, or Mrs. George Chertkof 13-7223). PAGE FIVE LEGAL NOTICES ui K 222L 12 '"-:BHY GIVEN that the underslKned. desiring to ensure W n hini^ NIK r Applicanta U-ti | 5 LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of MAGIC CITY BOTTLE AND SUPPLY at 222 Northwest 27th Street. Miami, Florida, intend to register the said name with the clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. ISAAC EMMER ISIDOR BERKOWITZ .MYERS & HEIMAN Attorneys for Applicants 12/29 1/5-12-19-26 BEACH WOMEN SELL $3,310,182.75 IN BONDS The Miami Beach women's division of bond selling groups pf Dade County have totaled S3,310,182.75, it was announced this week by Mrs. Louis Glasser, COchairman of the division and head of the Jewish organization groups. The women sponsored the purchase of a hospital Mrs. William McBeth i chairman, together with Glasser. HOME FOR AGED WILL HAVE ELECTION IAN. 3 The Home for the Aged will hold its election of officers at a public meeting of the organization January 3 at the Miami Beach Y. The chairman of the nominating committee. Alfred B. •.stein, will make his report. Following the election, plans for a community-wide mass meeting will be arranged. The selection of property to house the organization will also be discussed. Members of the community interested in this project are invited to be present. B'NAI B'RITH LED WITH BLOOD FOR 3 MONTHS NOTICE is HEREBY OIVEN that ine undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name %  if ROXY GRILLE at |07 8. W. 8th Street, Miami, Florida, intends to register the said name with the clerk "f the Circuit Court of IXide County, Florida. JACK KAUFMAN AUK ROSENTHAL MYERS & HEIMAN. Attorney! for Applicants. 12/8-15.JJ-JJ 1/8 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to enuage in business under the fictitious name of THEMARHOK APARTMENTS. 121 N. W. 3rd Avenue. Miami, Fla.. Intend to register the said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida. DAN I ED ZAI1ARSKY AIIRAM WASSERMAN Owners, DIANA COPPERSMITH Attorney for Applicanta. 12'S-ir.-22-2! 1/5 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Chapter 17457—Acts of 1936 File A 8667 NOTICE IS" HEREBY GIVEN that Joseph Stern holder of State and County Tax Certificate No. 6218 Issued the f.th day of June, A.D. IMt, has filed same in my office, and ha -i made application for a tax deed to be issued thereon. Said Certificate embraces the following described property In the County of Dade, Slate of Florida, to-wlt: I*ot 13, Block 28, City of Miami South, Plat Book B, Page 41. In the County of Dade, State of Florida. The assessment of said property under the said certificate was in the name of Lout* llffer. (Tnleea eald certificate shall be redei med according to law, the property described therein win be sold to the highest bidder at the Court House door on the first Monday la the month of February, 1945. which is the f.th day of February. 1945. dated this 27th day of December, 1944. K l! LEATHERMAN. Clerk of Circuit Court, Dade County, Florida. (Circuit Court Seal) By L. M. JOHNSON, D. C. 12/29 1/5-12-19 Buy U. S. Stamps and Bonds. f l 0 1 0 A S FIN:.: i'.tC;CAN|lWISH DINNER r 114 II V\ 446 COLLINS AVt IY.RIECIIIS DR. AARON J. COHEN OPTOMETRIST ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF HIS OFFICE AT 542 41st STREET, MIAMI BEACH FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE EYE "COMPLETE EYE SERVICE" PHONE 5-2763 B'nai B'rith has led with blond donati i I the D ide County Bank for the past three months. The organization has a' total of 74,675 cc to its credit. Pan Amen.;.!! with 6(1.000 cc, Tycoon Tackle with 41,750 cc, and Embry Riddle with 36.700 cc. For the first time this year the mobile Miami Beach blood bank was held Wednesday at the 41st St. elementary school. "The war casualties are high and the boys at the front must have blood plasma," said Chairman Rudy Adler. "We cannot get too much. Let us close the year with a fine response, and resolve now to make 1945 a record one.*' Buy War Stamps and Bond* NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOT1CK IS IIEHKIIY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of •'THE SEA SIDE." 7118 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida. Intends to register the said name with the Clerk nf the Circuit Court of Dade Countv, Klnridn. GOLDIE P. BLACK TIIS ciiins Avenue Miami Beach, Florida I MORRIS BERICK Attorney for Qoldle F. Black 803 Lincoln Ro id i Beach, Florida, li • 13-32-28 l :. NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED FIDE 38750 Notice is hereby given that John II Mann holder of City of Miami Tax Certificate Numbered 914. dated the 1st day of June. A.D. 1942 has filed said Certificate In my offloe. and has made application for tax deed to Issue thereon In accordance with law. Said Certificate embraces the following described property, situated In Dade County. Florida, to-wlt: Dot 6, Block 11. Buena Vista Gardens, Plat Book 5. Page 45, In the City of Miami, County of Dade. State of Florida. The assessment of said property under the said Certificate Issued w in the name of Unknown. Unless said Certificate shall be redeemed according to law. tax deed will Issue thereon on the 17th day of January, A.D. Dated this 12th day of December. AD 1944 R. B. LEATHERMAN. Clerk of Circuit Court, Dade County, Florida. (Circuit Court Seal) By L. M. JOHNSON, D. C. 12/15-22-29 1/5-12 Buy Bonds now. You are lending—not giving. fP/WW""" „'i*t""'" 0H*tf r/l t 1A P t RIVERMONT PARK SANITARIUM 1389 N. W. 7th St. Ph. B-7S01 Brit care for chronic tick, convalescent and elderly people SA.LI. diL n u-. Director Q-i.--ini Prices ^a. Large Beautiful Orounda— New Year's Features! POST 8 P.M. TT RACES Be sure to — the New Years Ere card S


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PAGE SIX vJtWMsSi ikjritdiii&n FRIDAY, DECEMBER 29. u ANNUAL ELECTION OF Y OFFIC ERS O N IAN. 3 The Annual Election of officers and directors of the Miami "Y" will be held next Wednesday evening, January 3, at 8:30 o'clock, at the Miami "Y" Auditorium. Twenty-seven members of the Board for 1 year and 3 members for 3 years are to be elected. The President, Vice-President, Secretary and Treasurer were unanimously chosen at the Nomination Meeting in December. Professional talent will furnish the entertainment for the evening and a buffet supper will be served. GULFSTREAM PARK TO BE MORE BEAUTIFUL Gulfstream Park will undergo an extensive beautification program during the period between meetings, according to James Donn, president of the racing association. Folowing Saturday's finale, and pending the reopening of the 20-day Spring session on next March 28 through April 19, the grounds are to receive a rejuvenating "facial" as Donn puts his landscaping genius to work to make the Hallandale track one of the most beautiful in the land. SCHLECHTER SPEAKER AT FORUM SATURDAY AUXILIARY TO I. W. V. IN REGULAR MEETING The next regular meeting of the Jewish War Veterans Auxiliary is scheduled for Monday afternoon, January 8, at Beth David auditorium, at 8 p. m. The Auxiliary is now active in several projects for servicemen and sends gifts and checks to veterans' hospitals and institutions. Recent acknowledgments include a message from M. Bryson, of the Bay Pines veteran's administration, thanking them for their thoughtfulness in forwarding monthly checks, which will be used to sponsor parties for the veterans. Another from the Rehabilation Division addressed to Mrs. Minnie Kline, president, thanked the organization for its lovely gifts sent to the Joy Shop. Lawrence E. Schlechter will discuss "A Panorama of American History" at a meeting of the Spinoza Forum to be held Saturday afternoon at 3 o'clock. The gathering will convene under a canopy on the lawn of the home of Dr. Abraham Wo If son. 1059 Collins Ave., Miami Beach. PIONEER WOMEN WILL SPONSOR EVENT FRI. The Pioneer Women of Palestine, MiamP Beach chapter, are; sponsoring an Oneg Shabbat this Friday evening at the Royal Tea i Room of the Harrison Hotel, 411 Washington Ave., Miami Reach. Mrs. Lena Wolk is chairman if the event, which will begin at 8:30. A. M. Dorff will serve as toaatmaster. NOW OPEN GARTENBERG IXSCHECHTETS GEORGE WASHINGTON HOTEL 516 Washinqton Ave. Phone 5-6617 • • • Catering For All Occasions Strictly Kosher Cuisine Reservations in advance for Sabbath Meals STELLAR 11-RACE CARD AT FLAGLER NIGHTLY The annual history-making weekend of greyhound racing which celebrates New Year's and salutes the Orange Bowl football classic, gets under way tonight at the downtown West Flagler Kennel club. With tonight's stellar 11-race program, all eyes will be on Saturday night's major New Year's Eve card to be followed on Monday night by the always thrilling Orange Bowl-New Year's Night program. In cooperation with the recent and unexpected wartime order closing all racing in this country by Jan. 3, the final race card under this ruling is scheduled Tuesday night. In view of this sudden closing. West Flagler officials and the Florida State Racing Commission arrange/1 for an 11-race program nightly for the balance of the meeting. This added eleventh race will be run for the exclusive benefit of greyhound owners at West Flagler. all proceeds going to a relief fund to be administered by a special committee. Moving intfi this holiday weekend of stellar racing and the midseason mark of West Flagler s meeting which opened Nov. 15, all of the racers are going in true top midseason form. Recent programs have produced breathtaking time marks as well as thrilling photo-finishes repeatedly with three to a half dozen dogs on the finish line together. The major races of the remaining cards promise to see even tins tempo of high speed and thrilling competition advanced. The nightly programs start at 8 p. m. with the daily double on tinfirst and third races. NOW OPEN VICTOR HOTEL AND DINING ROOM Ocean Drive at 12th Street Managed and Operated By D. ROSNER PHONE 5-0041 Miami Beach Dietary Laws Strictly Observed b&t YCU, COL'-MS *r"UlfoTi6TH Delightful Cuisine In An Atmosphere of Distinction Charcoal Broiled Steaks, Prime Ribs of Beef and Chicken in the Pot Our Daily Special DINNER SERVED FROM 5 TO 10 P. M. Open 7 A. M. to 2 A. M. Air Conditioned Embassy Restaurant 1357 Collins Avenue noo HUNGARIAN-JEWISH CUISINE All Pastry Baked on Premises Dinner From 5 P. M. Tel.. 5-6114 No Tricky Food At HAMMOND'S If You Like— —The Finest Food —Honest Quality —Generous Servings as fresh and pure aa the market affords and without camouflage— Then You'll Like HAMMOND'S OTHER DEATHS LOUIS GERSON I.I'UIH (irrmn, 72, Miami Peach real* dent for th'imal 1!' w-iirs. who resided al 2W2 Alton Road, died Tuesday Dec. li' in a loi'iii his|iii.-ii after an Illness of several months. Me came here from Philadelphia. i<> where the body was mnt for services and burial He was a member <>f Temple Israel Hi\s survived by his wife. Mrs Dora Gcrson, oi Miami Beach; four MUMS. Dr. aeorgw .1 Miami Beach; William A, Philadelphia; Samuel I... Bridgeton, N J and Leon A U s army, and n daughter, Mi?Roaeman Kaplan, Penn'a Grove, N. •' BARNEY SOHN The body •>< Barne) Bohn, %  >'.<, arocei .it ill Collins Ave., wh died Monday, has been sent t-i Hartford. '' %  inn. by Riverside Memorial chapel for services and burial He came bars from Hartford four years ago He IN survived by his Wife, a ~>n and it daughter NATHAN MESIROW Nathan Mealrow, IS, 7i nth St., died Monday In a local hospital and the body has been sent to f'hicuRo by Riverside Memorial chapel for services and burial, He i. survived •>> bis Wife, Mrs A i ha Mealrow; two ••'HIM, i.t i HI Sidney Mealrow, army, and Norman, Chicago, and a (laughter, Mrs Miriam Marks, Washington MAX SINGER Kum*rai services for Max Singer, %  .i. 1511 Pennsylvania Ave., who died Sunday In a local hospital, were conducted at Riverside Memorial chapel with lLiiiM Moses M.s. h. luff officiating, Hurial wan in Miami .1. wish Woodlawn cemetery A former printer. ho i-ame here from New York eight years ago He iw survived by his wife, Mrs. i.nil.m Blnger, and his mother. Mrs Itov,. Singer, t.oih ..f Miami !:•-.!. h MONROE S. FELDMAN Monroe s Peldman, 21. a Miami Beach resident for six years died this week lie came to the Beach from Wi\ V.rk City, and lived at 642 Michigan Ave Surviving are hi mo. thei one brother Norman of Miami !:• %  oh and another brother, Marvin of \"- York Services were held nt the Riverside Memorial chapel and the sent to New York for burial. MRS. DOROTHY ROSENTHAL Mrs Dorothy Roaenthal. IS, of 11 N W 17th f'ourt. died Friday night at a Miami hospital after a brief IIIIH BS Horn In Omaha. Neb Mrs Ithal had lived In Miami U feara She is survived hy her husband, Kdward; a son, Hersehel, and five Slaters, Mrs Henry Q Marx of Balboa Heights. Panama Canal Zone Mrs Hade Ntlne. Hollywood Mrs Nat Kort, of Omaha; Mlna Itella Singer of lxs Angeles, and Mrs. Abe %  roiildchniix, of Hunkle. La, Funeral services were held Sunday at the Palmer funeral chapel, with Rabbi Max Shapiro of peth David congregation officiating Interment followed In Woodlawn Park ce-mctery M. L. Friedman and Lawrence B. Sheffey. Miami Beach business men, have accepted the cochairmanship for Miami Beach of the special finance division of the county Community War Chest. The two men are responsible for advance solicitation of larger Kifts for the war chest, which opens formally Jan. 8. The Greater Miami Pioneer Women's Organization Club No. 1, will sponsor a card party on January 29. Al! proceeds will RO for the Jewish National Fund. The chairman of the affair. Mrs. Pearl Raidman, will be assisted by Mrs. Sarah AuRustine. The reRular meetinR of the -organization will be held Wednesday, January 3, at 8 p. m. at the Beth David Talmud Torah. Members are urged to attend. I DESMOND HAYS DIES SUDDENLY AT BEACH Desmond B. Hays, 53. died suddenly at his home, 900 16th St.. Miami Beach, Tuesday night A partner in the firm of Roth and Hays, clothinR manufacturers' aRent. Mr. Hays became a vice president of the Fashion Mart three years aRO. He came to Miami seven years aRO from Louisville. Ky., where he had been enRaRed in the clothinR business. He was president of Southeastern Salesmen's Caravan and a member of B'nai B'rith. South : ern Travelers' association, Miami Beach Civic league and Temple Israel. Miami. Surviving are his wife, Miriam, a son, Lt. Robert, in the army; his father. Adolph, and sister. Miss Marguerite, both of Louisville. Services will be Friday 2 p. m. at the Riverside Memorial Chapel with Rabbi Saul B. Appelbaum of the Temple officiatinR. ServinR as active pallbearers are Martin Strelitz. GeorRe M. Cohen, Edward Schless. Haynor Bloom. Sidney Lefcourt and Joseph Joseph. Honorary pallbearers named are Nat Roth, Ben H. Hartley. Jack Jayson, Leonard Glenn, Stanley Glenn, Perry Radin and Morton Lauderbach. Ray Pels, Mannie Sheldon, Bert Fames. Jack Green, Is Abrams, Max Silver, Mai Marshall, Fred Shochet, Harold Slimer, Joseph Schwadron, Harry Raab and Larry Fay. Interment will follow in Graceland Park. REVLIN HOTEL A S% LIH8 *vTI OUR DINING ROOM IS NOW 13TH ST M. B.| OPEN TO THE PUBLIC DELUXE FULL COURSE DINNER SERVED FROM t, DIETARY LAWS OBSERVED 8 P **•! RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED—PH. 58-3668 Kriegel's Strictly Kosher Dining Room AT ADMIRAL HOTEL 1020 MERIDIAN AVE.. MIAMI BEACrT^TEL ISMS Under personal supervision of the Krleaels and Jackson of i and Hockaway for 25 years. -atason of Lakewood Brtakfsst up to 11:00 A. M.Dinner from 5 00 P u Saturday from 6:00 P. M. only NOW IN OUR NEW LOCATION 101-102 Mercantile Bank Bldq. Lobby Entrance 420 Lincoln Road — Miami Beach Servicemen: Why not main our office your headquartan? DR. ROBERT R. BRADFORD Optometrist Optician Phont j^a OLD SARATOGA INN Biscayne Boulevard at 77th Street Phone 7-772SI Week Day Dinners 5 to 10 P. M S undays From Noon Cocktail Lounge F ine Liquors and Wines WE ARE CLOSED ON WEDNESDAYS TAKE BUS 11 PROM DOWNTOWN MIAMI. OR BUS M 71 FROM MIAMI BEACH RESTAURAN MIAMI'S NEWEST AND FINEST Featuring Unusual Foods. Delicious Pastries N. E, SECOND AVE. at FOURTH STJ Air Conditioned Phone 2-076 ^-sw CLARAVMAY DOWNEY'S OLNEY INN RESTAURANT I Block from Bus Bayside on the Beach. Bus M From Miami— Venetian Jitneys 1045 DADE AND BAR From Six P. M. Week Days: Five P. M. Sundays) (Closed Mondsy) BOULEVARD OLD PLANTATION RECIPES \M Upton House Cooler Corp COOLING AND VENTILATING SYSTEMS FOR HOMES AND COMMERCIAL USES Export Engineering Service Without Obligation Ask Our Many Friends Who Have One 242 S. W. 5th St Phone 2-6433 THE ROYAL TEAIROOM "THE INTIMATE CORNER" AT THE HARRISON HOTEL 411 WASHINGTON AVENUE. MIAMI BEACH Dairy and Fish Dishes—Home Cooking—All Baking clone on Premises Oneg Shabbat will be our attraction every Friday night ADOLPH ABRAMSON. Mgr. ASK FOR KOSHER ZION PRODUCTS AT YOUR LOCAL DELICATESSEN This label insures your health. U. S. Gov't inspected Demand it! Kosher Zion Sausage Co* CHICAGO IF YOU ARE IN NEED OF KOSHER ZION PRODUCTS Call Florida Provision Co., Inc. OPERATED BY PEARL BROS. Distributors 1725 N. W. 7th AVENUE PHONE 2-6H



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HH ^1KSBI ^y DECEMBER 29, 1944 UTER 01 ^JwisMlwidlteri ===== IMMII | i, l, f>JJ MIAMI ARMY-HAVY COMMITTEE Supported b7G^^r ========= ==== T,. J^rUh W.M-. Board ^^^XTR^ SERVICE PARADE! PAGE SEVEN THREE SONS I. W. B. SERVICEMEN'S HOME AT ONCE the first time in three the three sons of Mr. and 2&S Marks. 3624 N. W. L all of whom are in servwere home together. Their lS tendered them a recep. it their home last Sunday line when friends of the boys Jthe family joined the happy j]y reunion. ifirt Herman Marks, the oldest, Iftht engineer in the air corps. • here just for the holiday, and Monday for his post at Drew Jw Tampa. Cpl. Paul Marks. Uarine. will leave for JackMile the seond of January r having spent 30 days here. youngest, Cpl. Eugene D. b, is here for a 15 day furh/and will leave for Camp Texas, the first of Jan|Cpl Paul Marks will wait for Wngnment to the west coast %  ID instructor. He is the holder (the Silver Star and the Purple art and shares the Presidentunit citatum. He has seen in Peleliu. Guadalcanal. Cape Gloucester and islands of the Pacific. CALENDAR I. RICHARD TOUBY IN T O PARENTS [ U. Richard Touby, plane com_ of a B-17 bomber in his letter from Ireland wrote tn his parents, Mr. and Mrs.Louis Touby, 69 N. W. 8th St., telling them that he has named his bomber "Becky" in honor of his mother. The plane and its name give hun a full realizati ii of his respun s i b i 1 i t y, Touby wrote, because of the nine other American i whose lives are entrusted in lore. Jtl Touby, who is now stain Iceland, attended FlorUniversity, Gainesville. Fla. left school in his sophomore to enlist in the Army Air %  Miajri Discussion Group. 8 p. m Miami gg YM YHA. Clfoata Car? i Trml y : Choir rehearsal. 8 p. m.. Miami R-aht lnemse lves of both over52?J Ur !u h \ hlch W1 be prod .v n ,h r m l c nn "'e Saturday. December 30. Plans were HEW.* 1; m eclin h w £ S triday afternoon by the reore wl'T ,,f ,. the Cn a *r Miami Army-Navy Committee, the Miam. Boach YM & WHA. and hholom Lodge, B"nai B'rith. A nominal charge of 50c will give entree to a soldier to sleep overnight and a brunch the following Sunday morning. Both the members of Sholom Lodge of B nai B'rith and the Ladies' Auxiliary of this fraternal order will provide the foodstuffs and erve the breakfast. The Miami Beach YM & WHA ha made available 24 cots and its facilities, while the Greater Miami Army-Navy Committee of the National Jewish Welfare Board is providing linens, blanket*, and pillows for the servicemen who will be served on Saturday night and Sunday morning. A. I. C. WOMEN READY FOR VICTORY AFFAIR INSIDE WT HD GENERAL reservations for the annual Victory Donor's luncheon sponsored by the Women's Division oi American Jewish Congress are now being accepted. Mrs. Joseph Rose, chairman, announces The affair will be held Sunday, February 25. at the Latin Quarter. Mrs. Rose is being assisted by two co-chairman. Mrs. Louis Glasser, and Mrs. A. E. woolfe, and a committee. Further informat.-on may be obtained by calling 5-2012 or 5-4460. The Women's Division of AJU jointly with Miss Ruth Brotman. is sponsoring the Alex Templeton concert to be held at B:J0 January 23 at the White Temple, 320 N. E. 2nd Ave. Due to the limited seating capacity, reservations must be made in j an £ c T,cke ts, priced at $1.50 and $3.50 plus tax, will be on sale the second week in January at leading Miami and Miami beach stores, or reservations may be made now by calling Miss Kuth Brotman (5-3042), Mrs. KI^SM!; Baskind, co-chairman Kat^'v* or Dr Hampton (9-2358). Patron tickets will also be sold. The executive board will hold its regular meeting on January 4th. Pfc. Irwin J. Kane. USMC. 21 wounded Sept. 28 at Peleliu, has arrived in Miami Beach to visit his parents, Mr. and Mrs. David Kane. 721 Alton Rd. On leave from the naval hospital, San Diego, Pfc. Kane is recuperating from back and arm shrapnel wounds, and from an attack of malaria contracted on AuRuar Island. The Miami Edison graduate spent 20 months in combat, taking part in the Cape Gloucester and Peleliu invasions. He has received the Purple Heart. Lt. Col. Joshua A. Finkol arrived here Tuesday from "somewhere in England" for a visit with his father, Walter Finkel. of Meridian Ave., Miami Beach. An ordnance officer of the 82nd airborne division and the holder of the Legion of Merit, Finkle was wounded on D-Day in France. He will remain here two weeks before reporting to Washington for assignment. WOUNDED IN ACTION Lt. Charles Kleinberg, 35, of Brooklyn, In Italy. Lt. Solomon Kozol, 35, of Roxbury, Mass. At Tarawa. Lt. Kozol, who has been wounded times, is the holder of a Presidential Unit Citation. Prt. Samuel Krohn, 22, of ( \ eland, O. In France. Aviation Cadet Samuel Rothschild will spend the weekend in Miami visiting with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Philip Rothschild, of 1801 S. W. 14th St. Out This Coupon aid Mai To "WAR RECORDS." ArmyNavy Committee, tVe P. O. B*x 2973. Miami 18, Florida hme .. | Borne Address 8' I Birth Date Serial No. City State BirtbpWce Chilian Occupati 5te Entry %  Service ^onch of Serv ion City State Marital Status ice Full Date .Discharged Rank or Rating name of nearest Ida ^'ionship Address formation Transmitted by Ifckphone number Pfc. Alvin A. Levy, 23, of Los Angeles, CaL At Salerno, after participating in the African and Sicilian campaigns. Pfc. Marvin J. Liberman. 21. of the Bronx. In Italy, where he has been wounded in combat three times. He landed with the invasion forces at Anzio. Pvt. M. S. KeUman21. of New York City. Wounded in the D day attack on Normandy, he j recovered and went back into 1 action, but had to return for re: moval of shrapnel overlooked the first time. Sgt. Sydney S. Jaslow. 26. I'SMC, of Philadelphia. Pa. On Saipan. by Jap mortar fire. He is a veteran of the fighting in the Marshall!, Saipan, and other Pacific engagements. His father served In the Army Medical ; Corps during World War I. Pfc. Ben Glosser. 32, of Johnstown, Pa. In France. Sat. Isadora Goldstein. 32. of Cleveland, O. In France. Mad* Possible Through fctotina ThU Page to the Efforts of the Army-Nary Committee. the Co-Operation of ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN & RESTAURANT COWEN'S SHOE STORES 1M E F1 Hlr K — m Lincoln RL JACK C. IAYSON PUBLIC GAS CO. 7200 N. W. 7th ATOSMO MIAMI HUG CO. 100 s. MUnd Avotwo SYBIL'S WOMEN'S APPAREL 76 S. E. lrt Stx~t UUBI N SONR-Orkilnal Rubin. N. Miemi Aroauo k* nJtc ROTH & HAYS "ncttm*. Aveats Laafford Bldg. MONTE SELIG MiajBi. Florida 179 N. W. Fifth Street RICHTER'S 1EWHHTOO. INC 160 E. Flagler Street LEO ROBINSON Miami Beach RUBINSTEIN'S WOMEN'S APPAREL m Li-coin RdMiami Beach NANKIN'S SHOE STORE ,58 E. Flagler Str^t. Mi-mi ANN'S SORTERS 714 Lincoln tloaa CANCER INSTITUTE TO BE HELD HERE ON JAN. 4 A Cancer Institute, sponsored by the Field Army of the American Cancer Society will be held on Thursday, January 4. at the Miami Women's Club, 1737 N Bayshore Dr. During the morning session, beginning at 10 a. m„ Mrs. Malcolm Smith, Florida State Commander will speak, and physicians of the executive board of the Field Army will discuss various phases of cancer and its treatment. Plans for the coming year will be discussed by Mrs. Clyde A. Epperson, Dade County Commander. Following the morning session, a luncheon will be served, and Mrs. Horace Ritchie, Southeastern Regional Director, will talk on "Cancer Calls for Courage."' Those wishing to attend the luncheon are asked to call Mrs. Epperson at 3-3005 not later than Tuesday, January 2. Additional speakers at the luncheon will be Don Graham, president of the Miami Exchange Club and C. W. Peters, state representative, on proposed cancer legislation. There will be an evening meeting on the same day at the Miami YWCA, 108 S. E. 1st Ave.. at 8 p. m. BETH DAVID WOMEN HAS ANNUAL ELECTION At a meeting of Beth David Sisterhood held last Wednesday, ladies chosen to serve as officers for the ensuing year were: President, Mrs. Jack August; first vice president, Mrs. Norman D. Jacobs; second vice president. Mrs. Stanley C. Myers; third vice president, Mrs. Max Hal6 ern; financial secretary, Mrs. yman Sootin; recording secretary, Mrs. Alex Stiebel; corresponding secretary, Mrs. Elix Hinkes; treasurer, Mrs. Sam Dickson; auditor, Mrs. Ida Goldberg; sergeant-at-arms, Mrs. Ben Kandel. Members of the board for three years include Mrs. Harry Markowitz, Mrs. Herman Slepian and Mrs. Celia Seg&l. For two years, Mrs. Harry Hacker, Mrs. L. J. Hartz and Mrs. Samuel Traurig. Held over are Mrs. Charles Abbott, Mrs. Iaadore Langner and Mrs. Harry Shragaa. The organization is planning an installation luncheon to b* held Wednesday, January 17 in the Beth David auditorium. Cairo (JTA)— A farewell party to delegates attending the Arab Women's Conference was turned into an anti-Zionist demonstration when delegates from Syria, Iraq, Lebanon, Egypt and Palestine delivered addresses calling for an independent Arab state in Palestine. One speaker pointed out that the most effective means of supporting the Arabs of Palestine was generous subscriptions to the bank which has boen set up to redeem land sold to Jews. LEGAL NOTICES KOTICE IK HEREBY OIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to encag* in bualnf*w under the fictitious name of TAM1AMI REFRIGERATOR SUPI'l.Y at 1890 8. W. 8th St.. Miami. Florida, Intends to rn.-lnt.-r the saM oiime with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Ihide Countv, Florida. MARK Q. KAl'LAN MAX R. SILVER Attorney for Applicant. 12/8-15-22-29 1/3 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersUmed, desiring to encage in bualnes.u under the fictitious name Of BUSINESS SALES CO. at 74 W. Flapler St.. Miami. Florida, Intends to register the said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dada County, Florida. FRED A. TRACY Sole Owner LEON KAPLAN Attorney for Applicant 12/S-I6-22-29 1/5 NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that the undersigned is engaged in business under the fictitious name of STANDARD MERCANTILE CO.. .02 W Flagler Street, Miami, Florida, and intend to register the said fictltioua name in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. HARRY GRKENBERJ! HENRY GREENBLRO 12/29 1/5-12-19-26 Belvedere Hotel Dining Room Euclid Avenue at 9th Street Miami Beach DINING ROOM OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Kosher Meals Dinner $2J0 PHONE 5-1103 PUBLICATIONS BY MERKOS L'lNYONQ CHINUCH. Inc. COMPLETE STORY OF CHANUKAH (with ill.) 3S* CHANUKAH WU SEFER HASHANA— Hebrew, Bound M ALEPH BETH— Jewish Alphabet .. ... • THE SOLDIER •• LO SISHTACHAVU ............ 8* MANUAL OF BLESSINGS AND PRAYERS 2 # SIFREINU Vol. 1—Reading A Elementary Heb • •• SIFREINU Vol. II •• SIFREINU Vol. IV f1Ja SIFREINU Vol V •*• CURRICULUM FOR HEBREW SCHOOLS .... %  FROM DAY TO DAY—Young Scholar's Pocket Encyclopedia (Vols. I, II, III) each REPORT A SOUVENIR ALBUM --Purim 5703 • .. •*• COMPLETE STORY OF PURIM (with illui.) ..•.-•• %  • • • g SHMUSSEN FAR KINDER UND YUGEND -Yiddish Monthly.... 8* TALKS AND TALES—English Monthly ....... ; %  • • ,-..•••• Annual subscription to tn above Yiddish a English publicatlons together "^'JT THE SEDER g SHOVUOS Z THREE WEEKS • • • • J* TISHREI (with Illui.) ... %  KIDDUSH AND PRAYERS J TEFFILLIN .. J ~ 40 CENTURIES .. % % % % %  £ LAWS OF TEFILLIN • .< % %  THE RUNAWAY (Story) • SIFREINU I—. Vocabulary (In press) (Special discounts for those ordering large quantities) Send your orders to: Mexkos L'Inyonel Chlnuch. loc 770 Eastern Parkway Brooklyn 13, N. Y. rot *£&** DRINK PLENTY OF ^ Waiter DELIVERED TO YOUR HOME >-G*LL0M BOTTLE MILFS NERVINE CASE OF SIX N TABLE 80TTLES ... Plus 8ortl{ Deposit PHONE 2-4128 W. m£ Gt w* ** a '.S! n 'l!? rttusdMAud.DurfB. Haada Cmpkft by kaUng cal.ODnrenl.nt.Ai for the Us dree •*"•— Msloafces. ONE-U'DAY VITA M IN



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' 1 I FAGLUGiii' • JenistittortdUaw FRIDAY, DECEMBER 29. 1944 B'NAI B'RITH NOTES -byMARX FEINBERG In The Synagogues Of Greater Miami I hope by now that most of the war bond sales are woefully vou have recovered fromyour : dragging behind; and yet strange Christmas vacations and are pre1 to you, maybe, the wounds of paring to usher in a new year our boys are just as painful and with hopeful prayers for a quick serious as before. Let us then end of the war. The present outlook is not pleasant, but I am sure that we all realize that along with victories, we must have same setbacks. The present countbegin the new year with the earnest purpose of doing more than more. Let us resolve ourselves that we will contribute to the effort as much as Joe on ways, have thanked us for our efforts on behalf of the rummage store and have reported er-offensive of the Nazi has j the line. Not in the same way seemed to re-awaken the American people as to the strength of our enemies and the analogy is drawn with our people in that it always takes a severe blow of small nature to awaken us as to our duties and responsibilities | that the appeal has brought as Americans and Jews. Every gome success. However, the lack war service channel which was 0 f rummage is still serious and so enthusiastically pursued during the bitter days of Alemein and Tunisia is still in existence and we must admit that the waters in these channels have been strangely calm. The blood bank is soulfully calling for blood; 1 r** W. I2tk AV. MIAMI LlH. 3 3431— "YOUR JEWISH FUNERAL HOME WE OFFICIALLY KPKSENT TMC MAJORITY OF NORTHERN JEWISH FUNERAL HOMES Injormation Clodly fwmihed on Rtqunt SERVING MIAMI BEACN I MIAMI C Exclusively Jewish 2+ #OUR • ^ threatens at this time to possi, bly force a discontinuance of { the store. With so much rummage available, it would be ; criminal to allow this to happen. Please, therefore, make just a little extra effort to gather your rummage and call 5-1974 or the B'nai B'rith office, or any member of the Ladies' Auxiliary and they will collect the same without any inconvenience to vou. Since this is the last column for 1944, I would like to close it with an expression of appreciation to the officers and committee nun of this administration for a splendid job well done and foi Ml of the assistance rendered me in reporting to the membership the news of the organization through the medium of The Floridian. I know thai without such assistance. I would not have been able to handle tinjob. Also, we would like to extend our best wishes to the new administration for a successful and serviceable year and offer to them our sincere cooperation to the end that B'nai B'rith shall remain the outstanding service organization in the country. And to the membership at large, including their lovely ladies, 1 express a heartfelt wish that you enjoy a successful, prosperous and peaceful newsear. J • CHECK THESE ADVANTAGES OF THE CHASE FEDERAL MORTGAGE PLAN LOW interest rate. • SMALL monthly payments. We also make loans ior periods not exceeding five years without monthly payments. NO LOAN FEES actual cost only. • NO PENALTY ior prepayment. COURTEOUS, efficient service by local people who, like you, are interested in the permanent betterment of our community. IN TEN YEARS we have served over 1600 families (over $11,000,000 in mortgage loans) with only one foreclosure. FT IS OBVIOUS that our loan plan has proven sound for your neighbors why not let it work for you. Services announced through Cirenter Miami Babblnleal Association are: MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CON CRECATION, 590 S. W. 17th Ave. Friday evening services ;it 6 p. •" %  Iflncha, Bchaloi Beudoe, and Maarlv at 5:1.'.. Late PYlday evening services %  tartlni al 8:16 p. IB Rabbi Simon April will preach <>M "Reflections "f tinPast Tear." Refreshments will be served by the Ladles' Auxiliary. Schaarel /.id. k Talmud Tm.ih, 1 .' %  % %  s w. Ird st Friday evening services at 6 p. m. Late Friday evening sen ices at the Miami Jewish Orthodox Synagogue, Saturday morning nrvioea at I 10 a. m Junior services al i" M a. m. conducted entirely by th Juniors. Kabbi April will speak, "ii the Portion of the Week SchaloH Baudot at i:30 p, m. Hebrew School dally at 4 p. m. perhaps, but with the same purDOSC in view TEMPLE ISRAEL. Rsform. 137 N. _,, ... ,. .... E. mh st. Friday evening services The ladies, thoughtful as alat 1:16 P m. Rabbi Saul a. Appeibaum will speak, on "Retrospect: IM4." Saturday morning services al 11 a. m. Kablil Appelbaum will speak On the \Veekl> Portion of the Law. BETH DAVID CONGREGATION. Conservative. 135 N. W. 3rd Ave.— l-ute Friday evening services at 1:16 conducted by Rsbbi Max Shapiro. Cantor Abraham Friedman and choli will officiate. Kabbi Shapiro will speak -.ii •The Record of 1M4." Reception iu the auditorium will follow after the services Baturda) morning services al y .!•• Junior services at lu:3'l BETH SHOLOM CENTER. Conlervative. 781 41it St.. Miami Beach. Friday evening service at 6:16 p. m. Rabbi Leon Kronish will speak Oil "Betrayal." An Oneg Bhabbat will follow the s>: \ !.'••. with Mrs. IAII Btelnberg and Mrs. Jacob Pish man as hostesses Cantor Louis Hayman iii officiate and lead the Congregational elnglns Saturday morning Ktrvli el it 10 a 111 at n Inch time Ronald I. Albert will l" bai I mitstvah. Rabbi Kronlah will respond. MIAMI BEACH JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER. Conservative. 1415 Euclid Ave., Miami Beach.— Kabbalas Bhabbas .11 I IS p m. followed by late Prldas evening services at 8 16 i' m Annual home-coming service In hoflor of college youths Miss Caryl Elaine Rote 01 Byracu I'ntveraltj and Pfc. Stanley Weinkle, now Interning al Qrady hospital, Atlanta, will discuss the theme, "Pacing the Future." Rabbi Irving Lehrman will respond. Cantor Emanuel Barkan and 1 in Center choli will chant Baturda) morning services at '. %  a in ii which time Melvln Mlsbkln, son of Mi and Mi Abe Mlshkln. and 'hlswlck, son of .Mi and M1 lr\*lng Chiswlck, win become bar mitsvah Rabbi Lehrman will preach on the Weekly Portion of the Law Cantor llarkan m officiate Mlncha services al 5 (5 followed by Bcnaloa .111,1 Maarlv Bunda) school at 10 .1 m Registration Ii still open BETH JACOB CONGREGATION. Orthodox. 311 Washington Ave.. Miami Beach Friday evening services .ii 6 p in Lati Pridaj night services ,1 • 10 Rabbi Moses Mescheloff will JIM ,1, on the theme 'Lost An < ld I • 1 Cantor Maurice Mamchet will lead m ih. communal singing Saturday morning services al 1 and 9 Rabbi Mew hetofrs sermon topic will be "Be vBlessed." A Mlnnionalre Pathei and Bon religious service will be held al 6:JO .1 m In the C munity building Junior Congregation services will inheld at 10 %  m with I %  • %  HHICI MM ill 11 and Hurvey Jacobs serving as cantors and Judy Hayes reading the Portion of the Week Robert Case win dellvet the sermonstte, and Leon Cutlet and Marvin Bbnenaheln will serve as Qabboylm A Young Jud.-.i Jamboree will be held at nun p 111 iindei tinleadership of Miss Rachel Boldow Bohalos Beudos ai •". p in Dally School from 4 to 7 sund.i> School from 10 R m. to ii* noon BEACH "V" RIPPLES A Column oi Acrivitiea of the Beach "Y" iH'i I&it MJGUST BROS fty: £ %  f* .1,, HI W *• IS the BEST 1111 Lincoln Road— M Block East oi Alton CHASE FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION Resources Over $8,000.000.00 C. L. CLEMENTS. President A city-wide meeting for educational purposes has been set for January 23 with Dr. James G. McDonald, former League of Nations high commissioner for refugees and chairman of President Roosevelt's advisory committee for political refugees as guest speaker. Under the sponsorship of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, the meeting will be held in the Miami Beach Jewish Center The Bialik Singing Society of the Bureau of Jewish Education, under the direction of Cantor Emanuel Barkan, will entertain. Yakhontoff Lecture Stira Interest The coming lecture of General Victor A. Yakhontoff, on January 7. 1945, at the Miami Beach Senior High School, is creating widespread comment in the community. The Inter-Y Cultural Committee has been given high praise for their alertness in securing a speaker on the most timely subject of the year. Another New One At the request of many, many members we are starting a folk and square dance group. Do you remember the Virginia Reel, Hill Billy square and the other group dances which are so much fun? Wednesday evening, January 3. at 8:30 p. m., is the first session. Join us and bring your friends. There'll be plenty of fun for all. Spotlite Resumes Publication The "Y" Spotlite is all set to resume publication. Do you know anything of interest which should be included? Have you any suggestions for the improvement of the paper? Would you like to help us publish it? The Journalism Club meets Thursdays, at 8 o'clock, and will welcome new members and suggestions. Special Winter Holiday Program The winter holiday program for Juniors is in full swing. As a matter of fact, it is really a miniature home camp. Bright and early every morning finds a steady trek of youngsters coming to the "Y" with little packages under their arms. After depositing their packages, they engage in a morning of games in the playground, swinging to their hearts content on the new swings erected in the sunken garden, and then a swim. Following this, they undo their little packages, which prove to be their lunches. They fall to with gusto and in a few minutes the sandwiches and fruit are consumed. In the afternoon they work on their Victory* Garden and participate in crafts, dancing and dramatics. This program was organized by OUT Activities Director, Miriam Levine, with the help of June Kessel Audrey Floyd and Ina Marash Dramatic, Dancing and Crafts teachers," respectively. Symphony Hour The first meeting of the Symphony Hour Group was a complete delight. With a gentle breeze blowing, the warm ravs of the sun shining, Ceasar Francs "D Minor" playing,—who could ask for more? Prior to Franc "D Minor" which was the major work Played, the group listened to the Donna Diana Overture by Reznick, and Roumanian Rhapsody No. 1 by Enesso. This group meets each Sunday afternoon, at 4 o'clock, under the trellis in the sunken garden There is room for many more listeners. Join us next Sunday. Future programs will consist of your requests. What would you like to hear? Basketball Team Enters City League Executive Director Jack P. Marash, has announced that the "Y" Basketball Team will play in a City League, composed of teams from Washington Park. Flamingo Park, Polo Park and the "Y." The first game will be played Friday afternoon, January 12. Coach Jacobson is ready to pick his final squad for the season. However, there is still time] to play on the team if you come| and try out this Sunday morning, at 10:30. A winning team is a team with spirit. Let's give our team spirit. by coming out and cheering for] them at every game. Watch this column for game dates and let's play every game with a big.| rooting section. Palm Beach'Notes MRS. MA1T 8CHBEBNKX Mr. and Mis. Charles F. McKissick, 414 8th St., are announcing the marriage of their daughter, Jackie, to Rudolph F. Master. Rev. and Mrs. Ezekiel Panitz were in Miami visiting with friends. Sgt. Julius (Skippy) Shepard has been wounded in action and is now in a hospital in England, according to word received here. Children of the Beth Israel Sunday School presented a program in honor of the Festival at the Temple Sunday morning. Parents and friends attended, and refreshments served. B'nai B'rith lodge held a supper and card party at Sher Memorial hall. Harry Halpern was chairman in charge. Proceed? went to the Hillel Foundation. When Vou Think of Reel Estst* Think Of LEO EISENSTEIN REALTOR 309 Lincoln Rosd Rhone S-M7S Dependable, Conscientious Service AMBULANCE SERVICE MIZZELL SIMON MORTUARY 413 Hibiscus Street Phone 8121 West Palm Beach, Fla. UFA FOR THE BEST IN DAIRY PRODUCTS WEST PALM BEACH MILK—CREAM—ICE CREAM HEAL BEACH MIAMI BEACH HOMES AND INVESTMENT PROPERTIES B. E. BRONSTON. Realtor A Trustworthy Resl Estate Service •OS Lincoln Rd. Ph.: S SOUTHERN DAIRIES featuring the Dalriee Pro Mac Serving Palm Beach County. Nationally Famous Southern ducts and Ice Cr AS NEAR TO YOU AS YOUR PHONE FERGUSON FUNERAL HOME, Inc. 1201 South Olive Avenue WEST PALM BEACH PHONE 5172 RENTALS • LEASES • SALES Lots, Homes. Hotels Apartment Houses M. GILLER REAL TOR 1448 Washington Avenue PHONE 5 5*75 LAINHART & POTTER ESTABLISH ER 1893 "BUILDING MATERIAL FOR PARTICULAR BUILDERS" Phone 5191 Weal Palm Beach, Fkx.


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MICROFILMED 1998
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GEORGE A. SMATHERS LIBRARIES
PRESERVATION DEPARTMENT
AS PART OF THE
UNITED STATES NEWSPAPER PROGRAM
FUNDED BY THE
NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES
FROM THE ORIGINAL OWNED BY
GEORGE A. SMATHERS LIBRARIES
GAINESVILLE, FL 32611-7007 USA
REPRODUCTION MAY NOT BE MADE WITHOUT PERMISSION



PAGE 1

MICROFILMED 1998 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GEORGE A. SMATHERS LIBRARIES PRESERVATION DEPARTMENT AS PART OF THE UNITED STATES NEWSPAPER PROGRAM FUNDED BY THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES FROM THE ORIGINAL OWNED BY GEORGE A. SMATHERS LIBRARIES GAINESVILLE, FL 32611-7007 USA REPRODUCTION MAY NOT BE MADE WITHOUT PERMISSION


MASTER
NEGATIVE
STORAGE
NUMBER
FUG UN 00172



PAGE 1

MASTER NEGATIVE STORAGE NUMBER FUG UN 00172


COPYRIGHT STATEMENT
The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the
making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted materials including
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that the photocopy or reproduction is not to be "used for any purpose other than
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liable for copyright infringement.
This institution reserves the right to refuse to accept a copying order if, in its
judgment, fulfillment of the order would involve violation of copyright law.



PAGE 1

COPYRIGHT STATEMENT The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted materials including foreign works under certain conditions. In addition, the United States extends protection to foreign works by means of various international conventions, bilateral agreements, and proclamations. Under certain conditions specified in the law, libraries and archives are authorized to furnish a photocopy or other reproduction. One of these specified conditions is that the photocopy or reproduction is not to be "used for any purpose other than private study, scholarship, or research." If a user makes a request for, or later uses, a photocopy or reproduction for purposes in excess of "fair use," that user may be liable for copyright infringement. This institution reserves the right to refuse to accept a copying order if, in its judgment, fulfillment of the order would involve violation of copyright law.


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MIAMI, FL
JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
1928 OCT 19
THROUGH
1932 DEC 30



PAGE 1

MIAMI, FL JEWISH FLORIDIAN 1928 OCT 19 THROUGH 1932 DEC 30


BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD TARGET
MASTER NEGATIVE STORAGE NUMBER FUG UN 0O|72.
ABX5329 NOTIS CATALOGING II DM
UF FMT S RT a BL s T/C DT 05/22/96 R/DT 07/24/98 STAT fc E/L DCF a D/S D
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260:
300/1
310:
362/1
362/2
500/1
500/2
530/3
599/1
la Miami, Fla. : |b Jewish Floridian Pub. Co., |c -1990.
: |a 63 v.
a Weekly
: |a Began in 1927?
0 : |a -v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
|a Editor. Fred K. Shochei, <1959>.
|a Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).
|a Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida
|a lj 6/5/96
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(DLC)sn 8001656 |w (OCoLC)6600918
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780/2:05: jt Jewish weekly
785/1:00: |t Jewish Flondian/the Floridian newspaper Iw (DLC)sn 96027406 Iw
(OCoLC)34771561
MICROFILMED BY
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES PRESERVATION DEPARTMENT
GAINESVILLE, FL 32611-7007 USA
Film Size:
Image Placement:
Reduction Ratio:
Date Filming Began:
Camera Operator: jl
35mm microfilm
ii a
17 :1
1998 OCT 18



PAGE 1

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NEWSPAPER CHECK-IN RECORD.
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ISSUE(S)
MISSING
OR
NOT AVAILABLE
1928 NOV 09-16,
DEC 07-14, 28;
1929 JAN 04, 25-
MAR 08, 22-29,
MAY 17-24,
AUG15,
DEC 12



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ISSUE(S) MISSING OR NOT AVAILABLE 1928 NOV 09-16, DEC 07-14, 28; 1929 JAN 04, 25MAR 08, 22-29, MAY 17-24, AUG15, DEC 12


BEST
COPY
AVAILABLE



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BEST COPY AVAILABLE


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V / / J


1
wjewislti IFIIariidliiai in
I. No. 1.
MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 19,1928
Price 5c
JUST A WORD
s Jewish Floridian which
i its bow to the Jewry of
la with this issue, bids all
ews and Jewesses "Shalom."
" that the purposes of this
!y may be thoroughly under-
i, permit "Ye Editors" at the
outset to make it plain that
%, s primarily a business vent-
NX c have no world evils to
. nor have we a panacea for
I i ot'bles. We propose to make
>uper a live, energetic, vigor-
r"gan that will make itself felt
Councils of Florida Jewry.
>. opening its columns to every
i/ation or individual that has
th while message to deliver;
, :niin:' articles from some of
, oremost Jewish writers and
$rs from time to time; keep-
,it* columns full of vital, up to
iiuile news, that will interest
. one of the readers; in short,
making this paper something
everyone of you will want to
and will look forward to
h Friday morning, thus in-
i-Mij: its circulation and adver-
and yielding a fair return
jtMc investment to the pub-
do not now, nor do we in
.iture, propose to represent or
[i.s the official or unofficial
Esman for any body, be it
igogue, Temple, Club, Council
Ihat not. The Editorials print-
Jill be our official opinion. All
articles published may or
not meet with our approval,
till never the less be present-
fitli the idea that every news-
I should hold its columns
to the public.
.' h this brief statement we ask
r our co-operation. If you like
and succeeding issues, tell
friends about it; if you don't,
us and we shall try to remedy
[faults.
)i c again, we bid you all
lorn."
'i.
und Breaking
Is Postponed
officers of Beth David have
iced that the ground break-
ir the new Talmud Torah
ng to be erected adjoining
.nagogue which has been
iled for this coming Sunday
>en postponed to Sunday,
^\. iiber 11, at 2:30 p. m. The
ks> n for the postponement, we
lei stand, is because of the ab-
^c< from the city of a number
tl officers and some of the
iri t visitors who have express-
a desire to attend the cere-
s' s.
d ilt Bible
Class .Organizes
|Th Beth David Bible Class for
I met at the Synagogue last
i\> y under the leadership of
bl.i Israel H. Weisfeld and pro-
*d to organize by electing of*
* for the class. -John Wolfe
chosen president; Miss Wein-
-jcietary, and Nathan Adel-
^. treasurer. The official roll
"i a membership of more than
't) it the present time.
A TENSE MOMENT
The above photograph was tajten by the staff artist of the Jewish Floridian immediately after the
ring had been placed on the bride's finger by the groom. One of the dramatic episodes is shown in the
lower left-hand corner when Miss Dora Rosenhouse, one of the bridesmaids, collapsed due to the intense
excitement, into the arms of two of the ushers. (Photographic copies of the above may be obtained at our
office).
The Cohen -
Weintraub Nuptials
The marriage of Miss Claire
Cohen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Isidore Cohen, to Sydney L. Wein-
traub, was solemnized at Beth
David Synagogue last Tuesday
evening, Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld
officiating. The rites were partic-
ularly impressive and were con-
ducted along the strict Jewish tra-
ditional ritual. Mr. Isidor Cohen
was given the honor of lifting the
cup of wine to the lips of the
groom and bride. At the opening
of the ceremony Rabbi Weisfeld
paid a glowing tribute to both Mr.
and Mrs.. Isidor Cohen and ex-
pressed the hope that the bridal
couple in their future life would
carry on the traditional heritage
handed down to them of "service
to the community." That a good
Jew must perforce be a good
American and loyal to his country
if he is loyal to his faith was a
further message conveyed by the
rabbi to the assembled audience.
The Synagogue was filled to ca
pacity, it being estimated that
more than fifteen hundred wit-
nessed the ceremony. Extremely
beautiful and inspiring was the
entry into the Synagogue and the
marching to the pulpit of the
bridesmaids- and bridal party,
climaxed by the entry of the bride
upon the arm of her father. The
ring bearer dressed in Colonial
fashion and the costumes of the
bridal party could not help but
add to the impression which be-
came indelibly impressed upon,
those present.
The musical program included
a solo group by Ruby Showers
Baker, "I Love You Truly"
(Bond) and "At Dawning" (Cad-
man), accompanied by I v a
Sproule Baker. Bridal chorus
from the "Rose Maiden" was
sung by a group from the Mana-
Zucca Music Club, of which the
bride is a member, directed by
Adelaide Sterling Clark and ac-
companied by Miss Eleanor Clark.
Dorothy Stearns Mayer sang "Oh
Perfect Love," accompanied by
Miss Clark, who was at the piano
for the processional, the "Wed-
ding March" from Lohengrin,
played by four violins and one
viola. Those playing were Mrs.
A. F. French, Mrs. Daniel Cro-
mer, Miss Charlene Stearns, Miss
Donna Watson and Ceorge Low-
inger.
The bridal party besides the pa-
rents of the bride and gu>- n wh<
were upon the pulpit, const-led "'
Mrs. Irwiii M. Cacell (Ma-ia Zu
ca) matron of honor, Mit- Flor-
ence Conklin, maid of honor and
the following:
Bridesmatrons were Mrs. Na-
than I. Heller, Havana, and Mrs.
Julius Pearlman. Bridesmaids in-
cluded Miss Ethel Burstiner, East
Orange, N. J.; Miss Nita Bell,
Miss Cecelia Wahnish, Tallahas-
see; Miss Minnie Kehoe, Miss Lil-
lian Cohen, New York; Miss Dora
Rosenhouse and Miss Marion
Daniel.
The train bearer, Lillian Rel-
man, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
William Relman, and the ring
bearer, Marshall Feurer, son of
Mrs. Jacob Feurer, wore white
satin suits in colonial design. The
two flower girls, Dorothy Finkel-
stein, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Louis Finkelstein, and Lillian
Rueben, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Morris Rubin, wore ruffled taf-
feta frocks fashioned with tight
bodices and long, full skirts.
George Weintraub, brother of
the bridegroom, was best man.
Groomsmen and ushers were Viv-
ian Moore, Irwin M. Cassel, Mose
GETTING out a paper is no picnic. If we print jokes folks say we are silly.
If we don't they say we are too serious. If we publish original stuff they
say we lack variety. If we clip from other papers they say we are too lazy
to write. If we stay in the office we ought to be out hunting up news. If We hunt up
news, we are not tending to business in the office. If we wear old clothes, we're
stingy If we wear new ones, they're not paid for. Like as not, some one will say
we swiped this article from another newspaper. WE DID.
**-
mm*
V
mmm+im
ANNOUNCEMENTS
BethTDavid.,
f~ Friday evening, late services
'will begin at 8 p. m. Rabbi Is-
rael H. Weisfeld will preach a
sermon on "Our Reversed Order."
A series of readings on "T sti
monies of Great Nations" will be
begun this Friday evening, Stan-
ley C. Myers giving the first read-
ing. Congregational singing *'iH
be led by Cantor M. Shoulson.
The Sunday School will be h.ss^
as usual in the Miami Ilign
School luiildiri". followed by As-
sembly in the Synagogue.
The \o%lt Bible Class will be
conducted by the Rabbi at 10 a.
m. in the Synagogue auditorium.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
The usual Friday night services
will be conducted by Rabbi Dr.
Jacob H. Kaplan at Temple Is-
rael. The subject of his sermon
will be, "Religion and Politics."
The choir will sing as usual.
A reception will be tendered
those attending the service, by the
officers and members of the Sis-
terhood.
A meeting of the Junior C> o-
gregation will be held Sunday h
Kaplan Hall at 10 a. m.
Religious School will be con-
ducted Sunday morning.
Rosenhouse, H. H. Hyman, I
Coleman. Martin Whalen,
Piarlma:' Dr. Benjamin
Ha, M Hm 'lwH>;
brother of the bride.
Immrdiiituly after th^
mony the bridal party and all
guests went to the Biscayne Yacht
Club.
The ballroom of the Yacht
Club, where guests were received,
was festooned with garlands ol
flowers and greenery, hung fmn
the pecky cypress ceiling and
trailing from the tall chandeliers.
A central table held the five-tiired
wedding cake which was dice-
rated with nosegays of flower* in
pastel shades and topped wi||i a
miniature bride and liridegn(wc <4
under a wedding bell. An am-
tique lace banquet cloth covured ,
the board and brass candelabra. -
holding lighted tapers, stood at *
either end. Smaller tables at '
either end of the room corita Bed
the tiny individual boxes of ifed-,
ding cake, decorated with on age
blossoms, which were presented to
guests.
A program given at the recep-
tion included songs by Beatrice
Hunt, Sonya Snow and I
Long.
Sunday School
Issues Challenge
At the services held at Beth
David last Friday night, it was
announced that on behalf o the
children of the Sunday Scho 1 of
Beth David, Rabbi Israel H. Weis-
feld forwarded a challenge to eVs
bate to the Sunday School of
Temple Israel. The time, place
and subject will be determined by
both Rabbis if the challenge is
accepted.
HAVE YOU
SUBSCRIBED FOR
THE JEWISH FLORIDI
Me



PAGE 1

1 wjewislti IFIIariidliiai in I. No. 1. MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 19,1928 Price 5c JUST A WORD s Jewish Floridian which i its bow to the Jewry of la with this issue, bids all ews and Jewesses "Shalom." %  that the purposes of this !y may be thoroughly underi, permit "Ye Editors" at the outset to make it plain that %, s primarily a business ventNX c have no world evils to nor have we a panacea for I i ot'bles. We propose to make >uper a live, energetic, vigorr"gan that will make itself felt • Councils of Florida Jewry. >. opening its columns to every i/ation or individual that has th while message to deliver; :niin:' articles from some of oremost Jewish writers and $rs from time to time; keep,it* columns full of vital, up to iiuile news, that will interest one of the readers; in short, making this paper something everyone of you will want to and will look forward to h Friday morning, thus ini-Mij: its circulation and adverand yielding a fair return jtMc investment to the pub• do not now, nor do we in .iture, propose to represent or [i.s the official or unofficial Esman for any body, be it igogue, Temple, Club, Council Ihat not. The Editorials printJill be our official opinion. All articles published may or not meet with our approval, till never the less be presentfitli the idea that every newsI should hold its columns to the public. .' h this brief statement we ask r our co-operation. If you like and succeeding issues, tell friends about it; if you don't, us and we shall try to remedy [faults. )i c again, we bid you all lorn." 'i. und Breaking Is Postponed officers of Beth David have iced that the ground breakir the new Talmud Torah ng to be erected adjoining • .nagogue which has been iled for this coming Sunday >en postponed to Sunday, ^\. iiber 11, at 2:30 p. m. The ks> n for the postponement, we lei stand, is because of the ab^c< from the city of a number tl • officers and some of the iri t visitors who have expressa desire to attend the ceres' s. d ilt Bible Class .Organizes |Th Beth David Bible Class for %  I met at the Synagogue last i\> y under the leadership of bl.i Israel H. Weisfeld and pro*d to organize by electing of* for the class. -John Wolfe chosen president; Miss Wein-jcietary, and Nathan Adel^. treasurer. The official roll "i a membership of more than 't) it the present time. A TENSE MOMENT The above photograph was tajten by the staff artist of the Jewish Floridian immediately after the ring had been placed on the bride's finger by the groom. One of the dramatic episodes is shown in the lower left-hand corner when Miss Dora Rosenhouse, one of the bridesmaids, collapsed due to the intense excitement, into the arms of two of the ushers. (Photographic copies of the above may be obtained at our office). The Cohen Weintraub Nuptials The marriage of Miss Claire Cohen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Isidore Cohen, to Sydney L. Weintraub, was solemnized at Beth David Synagogue last Tuesday evening, Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld officiating. The rites were particularly impressive and were conducted along the strict Jewish traditional ritual. Mr. Isidor Cohen was given the honor of lifting the cup of wine to the lips of the groom and bride. At the opening of the ceremony Rabbi Weisfeld paid a glowing tribute to both Mr. and Mrs.. Isidor Cohen and expressed the hope that the bridal couple in their future life would carry on the traditional heritage handed down to them of "service to the community." That a good Jew must perforce be a good American and loyal to his country if he is loyal to his faith was a further message conveyed by the rabbi to the assembled audience. The Synagogue was filled to ca pacity, it being estimated that more than fifteen hundred witnessed the ceremony. Extremely beautiful and inspiring was the entry into the Synagogue and the marching to the pulpit of the bridesmaidsand bridal party, climaxed by the entry of the bride upon the arm of her father. The ring bearer dressed in Colonial fashion and the costumes of the bridal party could not help but add to the impression which became indelibly impressed upon, those present. The musical program included a solo group by Ruby Showers Baker, "I Love You Truly" (Bond) and "At Dawning" (Cadman), accompanied by I v a Sproule Baker. Bridal chorus from the "Rose Maiden" was sung by a group from the ManaZucca Music Club, of which the bride is a member, directed by Adelaide Sterling Clark and accompanied by Miss Eleanor Clark. Dorothy Stearns Mayer sang "Oh Perfect Love," accompanied by Miss Clark, who was at the piano for the processional, the "Wedding March" from Lohengrin, played by four violins and one viola. Those playing were Mrs. A. F. French, Mrs. Daniel Cromer, Miss Charlene Stearns, Miss Donna Watson and Ceorge Lowinger. The bridal party besides the parents of the bride and gu>n wh< were upon the pulpit, const-led "' Mrs. Irwiii M. Cacell (Ma-ia Zu ca) matron of honor, MitFlorence Conklin, maid of honor and the following: Bridesmatrons were Mrs. Nathan I. Heller, Havana, and Mrs. Julius Pearlman. Bridesmaids included Miss Ethel Burstiner, East Orange, N. J.; Miss Nita Bell, Miss Cecelia Wahnish, Tallahassee; Miss Minnie Kehoe, Miss Lillian Cohen, New York; Miss Dora Rosenhouse and Miss Marion Daniel. The train bearer, Lillian Relman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Relman, and the ring bearer, Marshall Feurer, son of Mrs. Jacob Feurer, wore white satin suits in colonial design. The two flower girls, Dorothy Finkelstein, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Finkelstein, and Lillian Rueben, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Morris Rubin, wore ruffled taffeta frocks fashioned with tight bodices and long, full skirts. George Weintraub, brother of the bridegroom, was best man. Groomsmen and ushers were Vivian Moore, Irwin M. Cassel, Mose G ETTING out a paper is no picnic. If we print jokes folks say we are silly. If we don't they say we are too serious. If we publish original stuff they say we lack variety. If we clip from other papers they say we are too lazy to write. If we stay in the office we ought to be out hunting up news. If We hunt up news, we are not tending to business in the office. If we wear old clothes, we're stingy If we wear new ones, they're not paid for. Like as not, some one will say we swiped this article from another newspaper. WE DID. **mm* V£ mmm+im ANNOUNCEMENTS BethTDavid., f~ Friday evening, late services 'will begin at 8 p. m. Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld will preach a sermon on "Our Reversed Order." A series of readings on "T sti monies of Great Nations" will be begun this Friday evening, Stanley C. Myers giving the first reading. Congregational singing *'iH be led by Cantor M. Shoulson. The Sunday School will be h.ss^ as usual in the Miami Ilign School luiildiri". followed by Assembly in the Synagogue. The \o%lt Bible Class will be conducted by the Rabbi at 10 a. m. in the Synagogue auditorium. TEMPLE ISRAEL The usual Friday night services will be conducted by Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan at Temple Israel. The subject of his sermon will be, "Religion and Politics." The choir will sing as usual. A reception will be tendered those attending the service, by the officers and members of the Sisterhood. A meeting of the Junior C> ogregation will be held Sunday h Kaplan Hall at 10 a. m. Religious School will be conducted Sunday morning. Rosenhouse, H. H. Hyman, I Coleman. Martin Whalen, Piarlma:' Dr. Benjamin Ha, M Hm 'lwH>; brother of the bride. Immrdiiituly after th^ mony the bridal party and all guests went to the Biscayne Yacht Club. The ballroom of the Yacht Club, where guests were received, was festooned with garlands ol flowers and greenery, hung fmn the pecky cypress ceiling and trailing from the tall chandeliers. A central table held the five-tiired wedding cake which was dicerated with nosegays of flower* in pastel shades and topped wi||i a miniature bride and liridegn(wc <4 under a wedding bell. An amtique lace banquet cloth covured the board and brass candelabra. holding lighted tapers, stood at either end. Smaller tables at either end of the room corita Bed the tiny individual boxes of ifed-, ding cake, decorated with on age blossoms, which were presented to guests. A program given at the reception included songs by Beatrice Hunt, Sonya Snow and I Long. Sunday School Issues Challenge At the services held at • Beth David last Friday night, it was announced that on behalf o the children of the Sunday Scho 1 of Beth David, Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld forwarded a challenge to eVs bate to the Sunday School of Temple Israel. The time, place and subject will be determined by both Rabbis if the challenge is accepted. HAVE YOU SUBSCRIBED FOR THE JEWISH FLORIDI •Me


The Jewish Floridian some printer
X wi'kiy mwapaper published al
.Mi.'iini. Florida
b]
The .Ii\vl-li Floridian Publishing Co.
253 I l;ik yon Arcade
Phone 36840
" Hay I print a kiss on your lips?"
1 said.
And she nodded her sued permis-
sion.
So ire went lo press and. I rather
guess,
H printed a full edition.
"One edition is hardly enough,"
Said she. With a charming pout.
So again on the press the form
was placed.
And tie got some extras out.
}
EDITORIAL
I N these dav- ..I
"Lest We Forget"
economic stress
a moment of "best We forget"
ijflll not lie appropriate.
Most human beings 'ake all
get l(ii granted: l| i- coming
to them; mil ours to fight and
-in. {glc for evei \ thing, nor to
cultivate the virgin soil and wrest
a living out of stones and rocks.
\ow.nlavs. most of u- gel things
asilv. I'm standard of re-
sponsibilil) his heen lowered in
I he ratio our -iandnid of de-ires
has gone up. We want the earth
in! the lidlm- thereof for OUT-
sl\es. mil nl course we imagine
that we create everything our-
-I'"-.. We have become bloated
our own conceit \ rn I
rjded to this is our cynicism, our
rtter disregard of the liner things
't life. VIodei ii life being mech-
.ini/eil. hum,in I.- i11_-- have be-
i.'l. come m re mechanical in their re-
*': \ lati(iii.-h:|i to the world at large.
I Everything is a machine; so are
IV* Then whv declare 'hat they
Ifowi ainthing lo anybody else?
ie__J- a id -late of affairs
and plai. human beings in a
teiv unhappy frame of mind. It
I- the -jiirii of selfishness. It
makes for callousness and gene-
i indifference, thus deslro)-
he vei > sanclit) of life.
Of course, it's not true that hu-
ma beings do everything them-
's and that human beings are
I lutely independent. No hu-
man Itcing, lie he rich or poor,
ir di go through life with-
out having had rendered for him
sun ic e by some one el-e.
Life is a co-partnership to
which each one of us has to con-
tribute his bIi ire.
Mi. Miamian, how about you?
Have \on contributed your share?
"Lesi We Forget," do you know
that the Jewish Welfare Bureau
i- in soic dislress and must have
funds to continue its work to
help your co-partners in life?
"I i-l We Forget," how man*, of
Mm have paid your dues to the
suit Ji wi-h Welfare Bureau and
are going to attend its meetings
for election of officers this com-
ing Mondav night at the Elk's
Club?
"Lest We Forget," how many
ol you remember how 'he IJnai
Brith came to the rescue of strick-
en Miamian Jewry during the
1920 hurricane with five thousand
dollars to help you and yours?
"Lest We Forget," how many
ol miii know of the wank that the
Bnai Brith hue accomplished in
Mexico and other countries and
b n\ man) pogroms it has avert-
ed? \cd. "I.'-' We Forget,"how
man) ol you know of tie Anti-
Defamation League and the I lib
lel Foundation, sponsored and
supported In the same Bnai
Brith? And, how many of \ou
will join the forces of the local
Lodge of Bnai Brith and help to
fan the spark of vitality still re-
maining, to that of vigorous life?
\n.l thus. "Lest We forget,"
earn the right to live, to labor and
to enjoy the opportunities af-
lorded us to do our bii io make
Miamian Jewry -that which
should rightfully be.
it
Loose Loafs From My Note-Book
Without Comment or Conclusion from my Russian Trip.
Of Interest to Jewish people.
By JACOB 11. KAPLAN, Ph.D.
Rabbi. Temple Israel

bare is no anti-semitism in
Ussia todav I mm an official
p"o nt of view. The government
ignizes no one religion or na-
alit) a- above an) other. Re-
n, in lad. i- prohibited by
1 e ;overnment. I"he i Inn dies, or
goguc- and Mosques have
nationalized, and the Greek
"lie-, the Jew.- and Moham-
' in- must nut their lions, of
I",, from the government
1 h buildings ma) be used lor
mi purpose die leS8ce may
re; club, business or picture
<' place of worship. A
' man) svnagoguea, some in
1 ever) city, have been rent
for clubs. A Karaite syna-
JUe in Kiev, the most beautiful
'.....hire of the kind I have eve.
e. n. i- used for a picture show.
'he man in charge was kind
igb to take us through and
-b iw ii- the
t.
various items of in-
only nian of interest to the
i nenl is tlie manual laborer
and the peasant. The peasant, of
whom there are quite a number
newl) made of the Jewish people,
is seconder) in importance, al-
though outnumbering the others
probabl) eight lo one. He must
be reckoned wilh, as the popula-
tion needs food. A watchful eye
is kept over ihe peasants, as it is
a tremendous problem to let them
sell the produce of the earth, and
Ml keep them in ordinal \ pov-
erty. No independent or wealthy
men are wanted, nor would the
system permit it.
J'lhc condition of the few pri-
>' business men and of all oth-
er- who were business men, is in-
describably miserable, viz.: In
Kharkov a woman on the street
corner Belling cigarettes after be-
ing assured by my fn>nd) RaW)j
laxay, and myself (hat we were
Americana, said that her husband
|s sick at home but attends to the
"We stand half the day whi/
attends the other half of the
(
treat thai it is tragic even lo
IC
Their income is about two (2) ru-
bles a day. When all her dear
ones were killed in the pogrom,
she wept bitter tears, but now she
weep- because l!ie\ did nol also
kill her husband and herself.
In one of the synagogues which
we visited, a few old men attend-
ed the evening services, Mincha
and Maariv. The Rabbi lived in
one room in the cellar, in which
his wife and three other persons
were domiciled. Two men lived
in the ante-room to the cellar.
Wilh tear- in their eyes they
begged me to collect something
for the rabbis of the town. At the
services there was one communist
who came to sav Kaddish (which
strictly speaking is against the
law l, and the entire tone ol the
conversation I had with tne presi-
dent and members of the congre-
gation changed as soon a- the
communist joined the party. The
fear of the population everywhere
i- so
speak to them.
In a restaurant, owned pi ivate-
1). to which ihe government navel
bureau took our part), probably
because the government-owned
restaurants were unfit to -it in,
the following conversation look
place. Silling alone at the table
on a Sunday evening, first time I
got away from ihe part), one of
the men came up to me and -aid:
*'It does me good to hear you
laugh."
"S ou're allowed to laugh, aren't
)OU?"
"Why, no: how can we laugh?
Our heart- are lull of bar.'
"You have a beautiful restau-
rant," was my answer,
"This was a beautiful restau-
rant before the revolution." i In
the place were -till visible Bigna
that it might have been a beauti-
ful restaurant once).-
" There is so much miser) in
this country thai you ought lo be
happy that von have enough lo
eat"
""We have enough lo eat. but we
cannot digest what we have to
swallow."
'W hv not?"
Pointing to an old man silling
al a distant table, he -aid. 'That
is my father over there, la line.
dignified-looking gentleman). Ib-
is blind. Thev put him into jail
liu sixtj -I ive days because he and
his three sons are running a re-
tain ant and asked u- to pay eleven
thousand ruble-, lb- became blind
in those sixty-five davs. Then
the) literal!) threw him out of
prison anil a-ked n- for lift) ru-
llow can we eat? Mow can
neerm gifting the trains, who told
me IMiJm-i) flay a Lrain load ol
|ici-^g,iare sent to Siberia be-
caii-iwV\ talk.
One of the rabbis in the nearest
cii) to the colonies told us he had
never visited the colonies out of
feai that be might be arrested for
making religious propaganda. I,
too, had lo sign a paper al Hel-
singfors, Finland, Russian office,
thai I Would not -peak or teach
wbile in Russia.
The Value of Athldfics
By
Max iMiiiiHicin
THE PSALMS
By Bebtha I'o-i i ii
Publishers Note- Mist Bertha Foster
is head of '/" Department Music of
tin- I niversity of Miami and is a well-
known authority in the world of music.
This is the hist oj n series >' articles
on things musical.
I hum-, which
large pail of ail
i,i
we digest? We don't know from
one da\ lo aiiolhei what i- going
lo happen to u- or lo our dear
ones."
The fear of ihe country literal-
ly presented it-elf to me one eve-
ning when, alter having told the
guide who asked me when oiii rev-
olution will lake place in the
United Stales that. "^ on have not
shown anything vet that recom-
mends itself io my admiration and
half of what you have done is
done with money sent von by rela-
tives from the I uiled Male-.'
When, alter this conversation, the
guide,came into my room at 1
o'clock in the morning to ask foi
ill) passport and in) partner. l{ah-
bi Taxay, had not returned from
a visit to some friends in a neigh-
boring village because he niis-ed
the train, the thought came to nie
that surelv he must be arrested
and the) are going |() -end me to
Siberia. I ceuld nol sleep all
night, for even tv Vmerfcan pass-
port could not protect me. ;1- we
have no diplomat! relations with
IJu-ia. The week ,.!,,. | ||;| .,
COnVCTSlion With 1 ,, ,.,;
ted, dignified and/needed by the
government, as I ,m ^
form such a
religious serv-
ices oi todav. are ol Hebrew ori-
gin. The hymns ol the Old Tes-
tament were the spontaneous out-
flow of the religious nature. Ml
gnat occasions were celebrated in
song, improvised in the ecstacy ol
the moment. Such a song was
Mil iam's celebration of ihe safe
passage over the Red Sea. In the
Book of Judges ihe Son" of De-
borah is cast in a distinctly met-
i real loi m.
\- the religious life "I the na-
tion grew deeper this kind of im-
l>io\ iscd song led the way to a
school for the cultivation <>l mu-
sic and sacred utterance. Tbi- was
the chief function ol the schools
ol tlie prophets which came into
prominence in the lime of Samuel.
From the School under Samuel
the prophet David, sweet singer
ol Israel, probably caught the in-
spiration which afterwards found
expression in the Psalms, Through
David the service of song was
added to the ordinary worship of
the sanctuary, and made a fixed
part of the daily offering to Je-
hovah.
Ihe great beauty of the Psalms
is the antiphonal arrangement in
the temple were two choir.-, one
of which would chani the pro-
nouncement to which (he other
would respond in like sentiment
but somewhat different words.
< tin failure to notice this arrange-
ment has led to the conviction that
the Psalms repeal unnecessarily
'heir teaching and sentiment If
choirs were arranged todav to ren-
der these hymns as they were in
the ancient Tempje Bervice ihe
beauty of these compositions
would be manifest and their hold
upon the congregation multiplied.
By special direction in the Book
of Psalms many of them are dedi-
cated to the chief musician with
instructions for their rendition,
I iie-e instructions we wholly mis-
understand, or if we understand,
we omit them, thereby losing
much of the majesty and dignity.
I hus the Psalms became the 1 it-
urgical hymn-book of the Jewish
service. Says the distinguished
rabbinical scholar, Paul Isaac
lb rshon, "The same psalms thai
we sung in the Temple are now
merely repealed b\ ever) orth
do* bw in his dail

lio-
i\ morning
I" '' Having no Temple, the
priest doe- not sacrifice, and the
Lev ite does not sing."
These songs of the Psalms have
proved adequate to the needs of
the Christians as well as the Jew-
ish heart. There is no lyric book
111 the \ew lc-iameni correspond-
|:|" '" them. They have exercised
.. mighty spell over the Christian
cburch, anil rightly so. fm t|,ey
ihe heart utterance of the no-
ble men whose mission it was to
give ihe world religion. And as
_"/' "'"' "ol outgrown the art of
breeee nor the laws t Home, so
neithoi hue v e outgrown the wor-
ship-song of Israel.
Publisher's NoteThis defemirent
ii ill tie conducted l>y E. Mux Goldstein,
who is a i // known as "Goldie, fmmoui
it,i his achievements in the a\ hletie
world and especially on tne ft mball
team of the University of Florida, there
his work was so outstanding that he
was chosen h) the late Walter Cat ifi on
the mythical "All American Football
Team." Being one of our own boys, ue
take especial pride in this editorial ac-
quisition and trust that this column will
be a source of pleasure to all our read-
en,
So much has been said and
written about the position of the
Jew in the athletic life of
both preparatory and University
schools, and especially about the
individual prowess of such men
as Captain Benny Friedman of the
I niversit) of Michigan, one of the
greatest, perhaps, that I feel more
would be accomplished by dis-
cussing the value oi athletic com-
petition to all voungsters, espe-
cially Jewish boys.
None can gainsaj the value of
exercise or athletics as a builder
of young bodies. These may he
divided into, first, pure gymnas-
tic work which i- devoid of even
the slightest tinge of play; and.
second, athletic competition either
on team- or individually. Pure
gymnastic work is valuable only
to the participant but is necessar-
il\ pure out and out drudgery
lacking the element of competi-
tion that neeessarilv brings forth
the best that is in one. Athletic
competition on learns furnish both
the participant and the onlooker
alike the pleasure and benefit of
mental as well as physical exhili-
ratioii. It is surprising how much
effort one puls forth to become a
member of a team, so that he
might plav against other teams of
the same kind. I *ii( it's only nat-
ural. One necessaril) wants to
excel when on teams or even when
in individual competition with
athletes of opposing colleges, be-
cause of the inborn desire to be
heller than the next one. The
good thai results is manifold. The
group exercise must necessarily
develop the bod) to the very acme
ol perfection, because by the ex-
ercise and activ ities brought into
plav the co-ordination of both
mind and bod) comes close to per-
lection. Ihe mind must bring in-
to action the very muscles which
ue depended upon for the win-
ning of the game.
Though most coaches naturally
prefer the born athlete, one whose
body and soul are basically
adapted to athletics, I venture the
opinion that history will show
thousands of athletes who 'have
reai bed the very pinnacle of fame
o; stardom who became the ath-
lete- thev wen- because of con-
stant training and application. A
verv shining example is the pres-
ent champion pugilist, Gene
1 unnej. Ever) man knows the
fact that Tunne) was not even ol
ordinal \ ability in the verv be-
very
ginning. However, constant train-
ing and application made him
what he is today. So that we
must arrive al the conclusion thai
ever) child, be he of great or
small physique, possessing little
" no predilection for athletics.
an be made into a real athlete
b) eon-tant training and applica-
tion.
Were this application or (rain-
ing to be merely an individual
one, I respectfully submit that it
would bo soon become obnoxious
thai one could nol stand the strain.
therefore, my preference for
group and contested athletic train-
'"ft- Ihe desire to
other fellow, to c
in his own
rnd, and the super



PAGE 1

The Jewish Floridian SOME PRINTER X wi'kiy mwapaper published al .Mi.'iini. Florida b] The .Ii\vl-li Floridian Publishing Co. 253 I l;ik yon Arcade Phone 36840 Hay I print a kiss on your lips?" 1 said. And she nodded her sued permission. So ire went lo press and. I rather guess, H • %  printed a full edition. "One edition is hardly enough," Said she. With a charming pout. So again on the press the form was placed. And tie got some extras out. } EDITORIAL I N these dav..I "Lest We Forget" economic stress a moment of "best We forget" ijflll not lie appropriate. Most human beings 'ake all %  get l(ii granted: l| icoming to them; mil ours to fight and •-in. {glc for evei \ thing, nor to cultivate the virgin soil and wrest a living out of stones and rocks. \ow.nlavs. most of ugel things • asilv. I'm standard of responsibilil) his heen lowered in I he ratio our -iandnid of de-ires has gone up. We want the earth in! the lidlmthereof for OUTsl\es. mil nl course we imagine that we create everything our-•I'"-.. We have become bloated our own conceit \ rn I rjded to this is our cynicism, our rtter disregard of the liner things '•t life. VIodei II life being mech.ini/eil. hum,in I.i11 %  _-have bei.'l. come m re mechanical in their re*': \ lati(iii.-h : |i to the world at large. I Everything is a machine; so are IV* Then whv declare 'hat they Ifowi ainthing lo anybody else? ie__Ja id -late of affairs and plai. human beings in a teiv unhappy frame of mind. It Ithe -jiirii of selfishness. It makes for callousness and genei indifference, thus deslro)he vei > sanclit) of life. Of course, it's not true that huma beings do everything them's and that human beings are I lutely independent. No human Itcing, lie he rich or poor, ir di go through life without having had rendered for him • sun ic e by some one el-e. Life is a co-partnership to which each one of us has to contribute his BII ire. Mi. Miamian, how about you? Have \on contributed your share? "Lesi We Forget," do you know that the Jewish Welfare Bureau iin soic dislress and must have funds to continue its work to help your co-partners in life? "I i-l We Forget," how man*, of Mm have paid your dues to the SUIT Ji wi-h Welfare Bureau and are going to attend its meetings for election of officers this coming Mondav night at the Elk's Club? "Lest We Forget," how many ol you remember how 'he IJnai Brith came to the rescue of stricken Miamian Jewry during the 1920 hurricane with five thousand dollars to help you and yours? "Lest We Forget," how many ol MIII know of the wank that the Bnai Brith hue accomplished in Mexico and other countries and b n\ man) pogroms it has averted? \cd. "I.'-' We Forget,"how man) ol you know of tie AntiDefamation League and the I lib lel Foundation, sponsored and supported In the same Bnai Brith? And, how many of \ou will join the forces of the local Lodge of Bnai Brith and help to fan the spark of vitality still remaining, to that of vigorous life? \n.l thus. "Lest We forget," earn the right to live, to labor and to enjoy the opportunities aflorded us to do our bii io make Miamian Jewry -that which should rightfully be. it Loose Loafs From My Note-Book Without Comment or Conclusion from my Russian Trip. Of Interest to Jewish people. By JACOB 11. KAPLAN, Ph.D. Rabbi. Temple Israel bare is no anti-semitism in Ussia todav I mm an official p"o nt of view. The government ignizes no one religion or naalit) aabove an) other. Re•n, in lad. iprohibited by 1 e ;overnment. I"he i Inn dies, or gogucand Mosques have nationalized, and the Greek "lie-, the Jew.and Moham' • inmust nut their lions, of I",, from the government 1 h %  buildings ma) be used lor MI purpose die le S8 ce may re; club, business or picture <' place of worship. A man) svnagoguea, some in 1 ever) city, have been rent • %  •• for clubs. A Karaite syna• JUe in Kiev, the most beautiful hire of the kind I have eve. e. n. iused for a picture show. 'he man in charge was kind igb to take us through and -b iw IIthe %  t. various items of inonly nian of interest to the i nenl is tlie manual laborer and the peasant. The peasant, of whom there are quite a number newl) made of the Jewish people, is seconder) in importance, although outnumbering the others probabl) eight lo one. He must be reckoned wilh, as the population needs food. A watchful eye is kept over ihe peasants, as it is a tremendous problem to let them sell the produce of the earth, and Ml keep them in ordinal \ poverty. No independent or wealthy men are wanted, nor would the system permit it. J 'lhc condition of the few pri>'• %  business men and of all otherwho were business men, is indescribably miserable, viz.: In Kharkov a woman on the street corner Belling cigarettes after being assured by my f n > nd) RaW) j laxay, and myself (hat we were Americana, said that her husband |s sick at home but attends to the "We stand half the day whi/ attends the other half of the ( treat thai it is tragic even lo IC Their income is about two (2) rubles a day. When all her dear ones were killed in the pogrom, she wept bitter tears, but now she weepbecause l!ie\ did nol also kill her husband and herself. In one of the synagogues which we visited, a few old men attended the evening services, Mincha and Maariv. The Rabbi lived in one room in the cellar, in which his wife and three other persons were domiciled. Two men lived in the ante-room to the cellar. Wilh tearin their eyes they begged me to collect something for the rabbis of the town. At the services there was one communist who came to sav Kaddish (which strictly speaking is against the law l, and the entire tone ol the conversation I had with tne president and members of the congregation changed as soon athe communist joined the party. The fear of the population everywhere iso speak to them. In a restaurant, owned pi ivate1). to which ihe government navel bureau took our part), probably because the government-owned restaurants were unfit to -it in, the following conversation look place. Silling alone at the table on a Sunday evening, first time I got away from ihe part), one of the men came up to me and -aid: *'It does me good to hear you laugh." "S ou're allowed to laugh, aren't )OU?" "Why, no: how can we laugh? Our heartare lull of bar.' "You have a beautiful restaurant," was my answer, "This was a beautiful restaurant before the revolution." i In the place were -till visible Bigna that it might have been a beautiful restaurant once). There is so much miser) in this country thai you ought lo be happy that von have enough lo eat" ""We have enough lo eat. but we cannot digest what we have to swallow." 'W hv not?" Pointing to an old man silling al a distant table, he -aid. %  That is my father over there, la line. dignified-looking gentleman). Ibis blind. Thev put him into jail liu sixtj -I ive days because he and his three sons are running a retain ant and asked uto pay eleven thousand ruble-, lbbecame blind in those sixty-five davs. Then the) literal!) threw him out of prison anil a-ked nfor lift) rullow can we eat? Mow can neerm gifting the trains, who told me IMIJM-I) flay a Lrain load ol |ici-^g,iare sent to Siberia becaii-iwV\ talk. One of the rabbis in the nearest cii) to the colonies told us he had never visited the colonies out of feai that be might be arrested for making religious propaganda. I, too, had lo sign a paper al Helsingfors, Finland, Russian office, thai I Would not -peak or teach wbile in Russia. The Value of Athldfics By Max iMiiiiHicin THE PSALMS By BEBTHA I'oI I II Publishers NoteMist Bertha Foster is head of '/"• Department Music of tinI niversity of Miami and is a wellknown authority in the world of music. This is the hist oj n series %  >' articles on things musical. I hum-, which large pail of ail i,i we digest? We don't know from one da\ lo aiiolhei what igoing lo happen to uor lo our dear ones." The fear of ihe country literally presented it-elf to me one evening when, alter having told the guide who asked me when OIII revolution will lake place in the United Stales that. "^ on have not shown anything vet that recommends itself io my admiration and half of what you have done is done with money sent von by relatives from the I uiled Male-.' When, alter this conversation, the guide,came into my room at 1 o'clock in the morning to ask foi ill) passport and in) partner. l{ a hbi Taxay, had not returned from a visit to some friends in a neighboring village because he niis-ed the train, the thought came to nie that surelv he must be arrested and the) are going | () -end me to Siberia. I ceuld nol sleep all night, for even tv Vmerfcan passport could not protect me. ;1 we have no diplomat! relations with IJu-ia. The week ,„.!,„,. | | |; „| ., COnVCTSlion With 1 ,„„„, ,.,; ted, dignified and/needed by the government, as I m ^ form such a religious services oi todav. are ol Hebrew origin. The hymns ol the Old Testament were the spontaneous outflow of the religious nature. Ml gnat occasions were celebrated in song, improvised in the ecstacy ol the moment. Such a song was Mil iam's celebration of ihe safe passage over the Red Sea. In the Book of Judges ihe Son" of Deborah is cast in a distinctly meti real loi m. \the religious life "I the nation grew deeper this kind of iml>io\ iscd song led the way to a school for the cultivation <>l music and sacred utterance. Tbiwas the chief function ol the schools ol tlie prophets which came into prominence in the lime of Samuel. From the School under Samuel the prophet David, sweet singer ol Israel, probably caught the inspiration which afterwards found expression in the Psalms, Through David the service of song was added to the ordinary worship of the sanctuary, and made a fixed part of the daily offering to Jehovah. Ihe great beauty of the Psalms is the antiphonal arrangement in the temple were two choir.-, one of which would chani the pronouncement to which (he other would respond in like sentiment but somewhat different words. < tin failure to notice this arrangement has led to the conviction that the Psalms repeal unnecessarily 'heir teaching and sentiment If choirs were arranged todav to render these hymns as they were in the ancient Tempje Bervice ihe beauty of these compositions would be manifest and their hold upon the congregation multiplied. By special direction in the Book of Psalms many of them are dedicated to the chief musician with instructions for their rendition, I iie-e instructions we wholly misunderstand, or if we understand, we omit them, thereby losing much of the majesty and dignity. I hus the Psalms became the 1 iturgical hymn-book of the Jewish service. Says the distinguished rabbinical scholar, Paul Isaac lb rshon, "The same psalms thai we %  sung in the Temple are now merely repealed b\ ever) orth do* bw in his dail lioi\ morning I" '•' '• Having no Temple, the priest doenot sacrifice, and the Lev ite does not sing." These songs of the Psalms have proved adequate to the needs of the Christians as well as the Jewish heart. There is no lyric book 111 the \ew lc-iameni correspond|:| '" them. They have exercised .. mighty spell over the Christian cburch, anil rightly so. f m t|, ey ihe heart utterance of the noble men whose mission it was to give ihe world religion. And as _"/' "' "'• "ol outgrown the art of breeee nor the laws „t Home, so neithoi hue v e outgrown the worship-song of Israel. Publisher's Note—This defemirent II ill tie conducted l>y E. Mux Goldstein, who is a i // known as "Goldie, fmmoui it,i his achievements in the a\ hletie world and especially on tne ft mball team of the University of Florida, there his work was so outstanding that he was chosen h) the late Walter Cat ifi on the mythical "All American Football Team." Being one of our own boys, ue take especial pride in this editorial acquisition and trust that this column will be a source of pleasure to all our readen, So much has been said and written about the position of the Jew in the athletic life of both preparatory and University schools, and especially about the individual prowess of such men as Captain Benny Friedman of the I niversit) of Michigan, one of the greatest, perhaps, that I feel more would be accomplished by discussing the value oi athletic competition to all voungsters, especially Jewish boys. None can gainsaj the value of exercise or athletics as a builder of young bodies. These may he divided into, first, pure gymnastic work which idevoid of even the slightest tinge of play; and. second, athletic competition either on teamor individually. Pure gymnastic work is valuable only to the participant but is necessaril\ pure out and out drudgery lacking the element of competition that neeessarilv brings forth the best that is in one. Athletic competition on learns furnish both the participant and the onlooker alike the pleasure and benefit of mental as well as physical exhiliratioii. It is surprising how much effort one puls forth to become a member of a team, so that he might plav against other teams of the same kind. I II( it's only natural. One necessaril) wants to excel when on teams or even when in individual competition with athletes of opposing colleges, because of the inborn desire to be heller than the next one. The good thai results is manifold. The group exercise must necessarily develop the bod) to the very acme ol perfection, because by the exercise and activ ities brought into plav the co-ordination of both mind and bod) comes close to perlection. Ihe mind must bring into action the very muscles which ue depended upon for the winning of the game. Though most coaches naturally prefer the born athlete, one whose body and soul are basically adapted to athletics, I venture the opinion that history will show thousands of athletes who 'have reai bed the very pinnacle of fame o; stardom who became the athletethev wenbecause of constant training and application. A verv shining example is the present champion pugilist, Gene 1 unnej. Ever) man knows the fact that Tunne) was not even ol ordinal \ ability in the verv bevery ginning. However, constant training and application made him what he is today. So that we must arrive al the conclusion thai ever) child, be he of great or small physique, possessing little no predilection for athletics. •an be made into a real athlete b) eon-tant training and application. Were this application or (raining to be merely an individual one, I respectfully submit that it would BO soon become obnoxious thai one could nol stand the strain. therefore, my preference for group and contested athletic train'"ftIhe desire to other fellow, to c in his own rnd, and the super


r

UNCHAINING
MEN'S SOULS
Mi wnic Tradition Has Peen the
oe of Fanatacism and Has
)isseminatcd the Gospel of Hu-
hanism Which Will Eventually
Crystallize the Spirit of Good-
Will Between Jew and Gentile.
By Isidor Cohen
Reprint from American Hebrew by
lvrinW.f-l.iii of the Author)
Freemasonry is reputed to be
the oldest fraternity in the his-
tory of civilization. Its origin,
however, is submerged by an ac-
cumulation of legends the investi-
gation of which has occupied the
aitention of students of Masonic
history from time immemorial.
Innumerable theories have been
advanced by earnest investigators.
Some historians trace its origin to
Moses, to whom, it is -laimed, it
uas revealed h) the Architect of
the Universe upon Mount Sinai.
The erection of the temple at Je-
rusalem coni'ci ts the name of
King Solomon with Freemasonry.
In order to carry out his stupen-
dous! un'lerta'.ing Solomon, as the
Bible relates, appealed for help
to the Tyrians. who were noted
for their architectural skill. Hi-
lam, King of Tyre, sent Solomon
a vast army of hi.- most skilful
craftsmen unaer the leadership of
Hiram the widow's son. King
Solomon, in o der to accelerate
the work of cc -lsti -notion and to
preserve order and harmony
among his mul'itude of workers,
organized them into lodges, each
lodge lia\ iiiir its master and subor-
dinate officers. Solemn .a-remon-
iea of initiation were performed
and vows of inviolate secrecy
were imposed upon the initiates.
Signs were adopted as a mode oi
recognition ameng craftsmen that
differ- d in language.
In Masonic lodges where Jews
participate in llie exemplification
of the various degrees they enter
into the exercise with avidity and
characteristic .tal, which enhan-
ces the dramatic setting prepared
for the reception of candidates
and the instruction of the Craft.
Through Masonry the Jew is
brought into close fellowship with
his Christian brother to their mu-
tual benefit. In the Lodge they
learn to condone one mother's
faults and to -.ppreciate ca"h oth-
er's merits. They cultivate mu-
tual sympathy which influences
their relationships ou'side the
lodge Mutual confidence is sub-
stituted for unfounded suspicion,
and loyal friendships are formed
which dissolve tenacious enmities.
There is r.o discrimination
against Jews 'in Masonic lodges,
especially in the South. The more
intellectual ai:,ong than become
outstanding members of the Order
and not a few attain Masonic emi-
nence The State of F!->r"da has
honored one of the race with the
Grand Master-hip, pnd local
lodges have l-eslqw*d Masonic-
honors upon.'- deserving Jewish
brethren. As a moral ^i idc, Ma-
sonry is of inestimable 1 eiefit to
the Jew as well as to the, Chris-
tian; it strengthens th influence
of the Church and 'vi PgOgue.
Unless one is a des*eacr ite, he
must become h better man, good
neighbor and an ideal American
citizen.
To '.rue Masons us to ull lib-
eral men, the lenaeitv with which
anti-Semitism persists is as pro-
found a mystery as the survival
of the Jewish peop'e in spite of
their relentless persecution. While
it is (rue that religio is fanatics
delight in sowing sectar*an dis-
sension it is unbelievable that
this is the sole ba.r >! 'iniversal
antipathy toward to 1< -. Mal-
ice toward them lor i! ei- ances-
tors' implication in the crucifix-
ion of. Jesus of Nazar-ib is sus-
ceptible to the intetpretalion that
it is used bv ani-S'lii'ies as a
mask for vicious er.vv and latent
savagery which cling 'o perverted
human nature in defiance of all
moral teachings. Such evils as
these, Masonry endeavor.- to erad-
icate.
In the Book of Morals and
Dogma we are told hai "Masonry
has already heiped oa? down
some idols from their pedestals,
and grind t impalpable dust
some of the links of tl.e cl ain that
held men's souls in bondage. That
there has been pi ogress n^eds no
other lemonstration than ihc* vou
may i'ow reason wi*1- men, and
urge ipon th-.n, w;ihoul danger
of the rack or stake, that no doc-
trine (an be appiel'ended as truth
if they contradict each other, or
contradict other truths given us
by God."
The Christian Scriptures bear
testimony to the close relationship
that exists between the two great
religions, and the acceptance and
reverence of the Jewish Bible by
Christendom renders this relation-
ship indestructible. Christianity
and Judism are indisolubly linked
to common traditions. Their cleav-
age, which is accentuated by the
diversity of worship of the same
God, is chiefly due to difference
of interpretation of Prophetic doc-
trines. This variance is in con-
lormity with human naturethere
can be neither uniformity of per-
ception nor of faith. Sincere
Christians are cognizant of these
verities and it is due to their in-
fluence that bigotry is held in re-
straint.
As. Masons we are taught that
"every other man has the same
right to his opinion and faith that
we have to ours; and as no human
being can with certainty say, in the
clash and conflict of hostile faiths
and creeds, ,what is truth, or that
he is surely in possession of it, so
every one should feel that it is
quite possible that another equally
honest and sincere with himself,
and \et holding the contrary opin-
THE VALUE OF ATHLETICS
(Continued from Page 1!)
if you please, to WIN, necessarily
rails forth every ounce of phy-
iical as well as mental energy. It
means the development of one's
thinking faculties to act in an
emergency; for is not every ath-
letic game but a continuation of
momentary emergencies? It brings
Forth the determination to over-
come mere physical pain or dif-
ficulties and creates in one the de-
sire to fight on and on until vic-
tory has been achieved. And thus
i- created in the subconscious
Mind that ineradicable feeling of
'lighting on" that is so necessary
in the every-day business life of
the community.
If there does exist that inferior-
it \ complex amongst our own
Jewish boys that Ludwig Lewisohn
talks about, it is my humble opin-
ion that the training of the Jewish
child along healthy athletic lines
would be a very effective means
of wiping out forever that com-
plex and creating instead that feel-
ing of being equal that we as
Jews should always possess.
And while all of you may not
agree with me, it does appear to
me that though there should exist
purely Jewish teams, it may be a
very good thing and extremely
beneficial that our activities
: lid not he limited to such
teams alone; but that as citizens
we take our rightful place in ev-
ery other team that time and op-
portunity may afford us, and thus
d monstrate in a fashion o ef-
.
h COME BACK TO MIAMI +
By Max Boshlriil
I've been gleaning from a letter, you have written to the Fetter;
That you were forced to go muchulla in your town.
That it's hard to make a chajes, when one has a bunch of daijes,
And every wind doth waft a whisper "you are down!"
'Tis a folly then to linger, when no friend will lift a finger!
When not a bit of mazzel seems to come your way;
Where tliere is no Shool nor Chader, not a Sukkah nor a Seder!
While here, at least, the Jew can have a holiday.
We've engaged a Polish Chazzennot alone that he can davven,
But he can darshen like the Rav at Budapest;
And his chants are so apppealing, for he sings with so much feeling!
That it awakens a deep devotion in one's breast.
On last Friday he made kiddush, and the niegen was that Jiddish
That you and I so oft have heard across the sea;
When we had the old shool klepper and your Daddy dealt in tepper;
Athwart the way just where the Mickve used to be.
How I begged my son to hear him! but the Goy would not go near him,
And said that he preferred the idea of reform;
He's cast aside his Tefillennever dreams of saying tillem!
But seldom miss to go to Temple Sunday morn.
At the Shochet he's a pickin', when he comes to kill the chicken.
And vows: "It is a travesty on creed I wot;"
I don't know this hifalutin, that he learnt from saint or suten,
And dares to call the sep'rate dishes "Tommy rot!"
Ich hab maure he's a drifting, from the Torah so uplifting!
And oft I fear he'd take a shiksa for a spouse;
I've an inkling he's a sinner, for he takes at Rector's dinner
And well we know that Goyim keep no kosher house.
1 have lavished all my earning, to give Gershon a good learning,
And well he knows each Sedrah in the sacred scroll;
Yet he jeers at din and Dajen and prefers his "Omar Khayyam,"
And well thou wist such maassses will ne'er save the soul.
And I know of nary ointment, that will sooth the disappointment,
To lift the weight of care from off my troubled breast!
In the meantime let's be tryingsuccess comes not with the sighing,
Nor with the lout that lags in pleasing nooks to rest.
Every venture has ils hustle, naught is gained without a tussle,
All men must watch their chances naught the fates can bribe!
Come to Miami "ti; the Goshen, where thry speak tlu mai ima loshen.
Where heart and home is open to you Cousin Leib.
ion, may himself be in possession
of the truth, and that whatever one
firmly and conscientiously be-
lieves, is truth to him- these are
the mortal enemies of that fanatic-
ism which persecutes for opinion's
sake, and initiates crusades against
whatever it, in its imaginary holi-
ness, deems to be contrary to the
law of God or verity of dogma."
These sublime sentiments and
ideals are in accord with the true
spirit of Americanism. It is in
this wonderful land of freedom
above any other spot undo* the
sun where the votaries of Freemas-
onary can disseminate the gospel
of tolerance and hunman kinship.
Among divers favorable react-
ions American Jews respond to
this spirit of tolerance by resist-
ing the efforts of some of their de-
luded ,i>rethern to segregate them
from the rest of the community as
a political or civic unit. The Jew
that docs not commercialize his
franchise of citizenship prefers to
vote as a citizennot as a Jew.
This is born out by the uniqueness
of exclusively Jewish civic or poli-
tical organizations. American
Jews, as a rule, apply this princi-
ple to those who are seeking pub-.
lie office. They judge candidates
by their personal merits rather
than b> party or church aflilia-
lions.
The departure from this prin-
ciple attracts wide attention by its
rarity. Public-spirited Jews con-
fine their group activities to relig-
ious, educational, philantropic and
recreational pursuits, hut they es-
chew grup identification with civic
movements that are unrelated to
their peculiar requirements. The
only occasion on which they feel
warranted to arouse Jewish con-
sciousness is when the community
is menaced by demagogues or big-
ots seeking public office. Those de-
parting from this rules are repudi-
ated by their co-religionists who,
in groat majority, arer opposed to
sectarian division in politics.
Other favorable reactions are
manifested by American Jews in
their spontaneous and generous
contributuions to non-Jewish re-
ligious and educational institu-
tions; and by the increasing tend-
ency of liberal Jews to regard
Christianity; as preached by Jesus,
as a revised form of Judaism. It
should be remarked in passing
that these conciliary gestures will
eventually crystallize the spirit
of good will' between Jews and
Christians that is devoutly wished
by the leading thinkers of this
country.
A Pleasant Surprise
Awaits you at the opening of
our now place designed to
please your eve y desire for
I cool, comfortable restaurant
serving clean, home cooked
and wholesome
KOSHER FOOD
At Reasonable Prices
Palatial
Kosher Restaurant
We're Not in the
Beer Business
but we must dispose of a
limited supply of
Pilsener German
Lager Beer
at the unbelievable price of
only .$3.00 per case of
twenty-four bottles.
Place your orders with
HOSEDALE DELICATESSEN
i'hone :>4II
FOR REAL QUALITY
KOSHER MEAT
TENNESSEE
CANNOT BE BEAT
TENNESSEE
KOSHER MARKET
166 N. W. 5th STREET
Phone 21514
Miami Showcase
&
Fixture Co.
General Contractors and
Manufacturers of
STOKE KKO.NTS
anil
STORK FIXTl'REH
228 S. Miami A*enm
Phone 22168
I
.
A!TO GLASS
Installed by Experts while
you wait at reasonable prices
East Coast Glass Co.
131.3 N. Bayshore Drive
Phone 33371
USED
Reinforcing Steel and Building
Materials
BOUGHT and SOLD
MIAMI JUNK
TRADERS CORP.
407 N. W. North River Drive
Phone 7516
Sanitary Mattress
Works
The only sterilizer in Miami. We
renovate maUn-anew. oumuIoiih and
upholstery, Low prices and high
i-Iush workmanship.
For Your Health's Sake
PHONE 21218
2015 North Miami Avenue
PROTECT YOUR INCOME
Against
ACCIDENT or ILLNESS
with a good Health and
Accident Policy
D. Kahn and I. Fine
1307 Realty Board Bldg.
Yours for a Real Live
Jewish Weekly
ROSOStO
W. L. WILLIAMS
252 HALCYON ARCADE
MI-HI FOUNT
"Your Rendzevous"
opposite Miami Senior High,
"GOODIES" of All Kinds
nv ami avll nw n llln'i School Book*
l ,^r



PAGE 1

r —— UNCHAINING MEN'S SOULS Mi wnic Tradition Has Peen the oe of Fanatacism and Has )isseminatcd the Gospel of Huhanism Which Will Eventually Crystallize the Spirit of GoodWill Between Jew and Gentile. By ISIDOR COHEN Reprint from American Hebrew by lvrinW.f-l.iii of the Author) Freemasonry is reputed to be the oldest fraternity in the history of civilization. Its origin, however, is submerged by an accumulation of legends the investigation of which has occupied the aitention of students of Masonic history from time immemorial. Innumerable theories have been advanced by earnest investigators. Some historians trace its origin to Moses, to whom, it is -laimed, it uas revealed h) the Architect of the Universe upon Mount Sinai. The erection of the temple at Jerusalem coni'ci ts the name of King Solomon with Freemasonry. In order to carry out his stupendous! un'lerta'.ing Solomon, as the Bible relates, appealed for help to the Tyrians. who were noted for their architectural skill. Hilam, King of Tyre, sent Solomon a vast army of hi.most skilful craftsmen unaer the leadership of Hiram the widow's son. King Solomon, in o der to accelerate the work of cc -lsti -notion and to preserve order and harmony among his mul'itude of workers, organized them into lodges, each lodge lia\ iiiir its master and subordinate officers. Solemn .a-remoniea of initiation were performed and vows of inviolate secrecy were imposed upon the initiates. Signs were adopted as a mode oi recognition ameng craftsmen that differd in language. In Masonic lodges where Jews participate in llie exemplification of the various degrees they enter into the exercise with avidity and characteristic .tal, which enhances the dramatic setting prepared for the reception of candidates and the instruction of the Craft. Through Masonry the Jew is brought into close fellowship with his Christian brother to their mutual benefit. In the Lodge they learn to condone one mother's faults and to -.ppreciate ca"h other's merits. They cultivate mutual sympathy which influences their relationships ou'side the lodge Mutual confidence is substituted for unfounded suspicion, and loyal friendships are formed which dissolve tenacious enmities. There is r.o discrimination against Jews 'in Masonic lodges, especially in the South. The more intellectual ai:,ong than become outstanding members of the Order and not a few attain Masonic eminence The State of F!->r"da has honored one of the race with the Grand Master-hip, pnd local lodges have l-eslqw*d Masonichonors upon.'deserving Jewish brethren. As a moral ^i idc, Masonry is of inestimable 1 eiefit to the Jew as well as to the, Christian; it strengthens th influence of the Church and 'vi PgOgue. Unless one is a des*eacr ite, he must become H better man, good neighbor and an ideal American citizen. To '.rue Masons us to ull liberal men, the lenaeitv with which anti-Semitism persists is as profound a mystery as the survival of the Jewish peop'e in spite of their relentless persecution. While it is (rue that religio is fanatics delight in sowing sectar*an dissension it is unbelievable that this is the sole ba.r >! 'iniversal antipathy toward to 1< -. Malice toward them lor i! eiancestors' implication in the crucifixion of. Jesus of Nazar-ib is susceptible to the intetpretalion that it is used bv ani-S'lii'ies as a mask for vicious er.vv and latent savagery which cling 'o perverted human nature in defiance of all moral teachings. Such evils as these, Masonry endeavor.to eradicate. In the Book of Morals and Dogma we are told •hai "Masonry has already heiped oa? down some idols from their pedestals, and grind t impalpable dust some of the links of tl.e cl ain that held men's souls in bondage. That there has been pi ogress n^eds no other lemonstration than ihc* vou may i'ow reason wi* 1 men, and urge ipon th-.n, w ; ihoul danger of the rack or stake, that no doctrine (an be appiel'ended as truth if they contradict each other, or contradict other truths given us by God." The Christian Scriptures bear testimony to the close relationship that exists between the two great religions, and the acceptance and reverence of the Jewish Bible by Christendom renders this relationship indestructible. Christianity and Judism are indisolubly linked to common traditions. Their cleavage, which is accentuated by the diversity of worship of the same God, is chiefly due to difference of interpretation of Prophetic doctrines. This variance is in conlormity with human nature—there can be neither uniformity of perception nor of faith. Sincere Christians are cognizant of these verities and it is due to their influence that bigotry is held in restraint. As. Masons we are taught that "every other man has the same right to his opinion and faith that we have to ours; and as no human being can with certainty say, in the clash and conflict of hostile faiths and creeds, ,what is truth, or that he is surely in possession of it, so every one should feel that it is quite possible that another equally honest and sincere with himself, and \et holding the contrary opinTHE VALUE OF ATHLETICS (Continued from Page 1!) if you please, to WIN, necessarily rails forth every ounce of phyiical as well as mental energy. It means the development of one's thinking faculties to act in an emergency; for is not every athletic game but a continuation of momentary emergencies? It brings Forth the determination to overcome mere physical pain or difficulties and creates in one the desire to fight on and on until victory has been achieved. And thus icreated in the subconscious Mind that ineradicable feeling of 'lighting on" that is so necessary in the every-day business life of the community. If there does exist that inferiorit \ complex amongst our own Jewish boys that Ludwig Lewisohn talks about, it is my humble opinion that the training of the Jewish child along healthy athletic lines would be a very effective means of wiping out forever that complex and creating instead that feeling of being equal that we as Jews should always possess. And while all of you may not agree with me, it does appear to me that though there should exist purely Jewish teams, it may be a very good thing and extremely beneficial that our activities : %  lid not he limited to such teams alone; but that as citizens we take our rightful place in every other team that time and opportunity may afford us, and thus d monstrate in a fashion o ef. •h COME BACK TO MIAMI + By Max Boshlriil I've been gleaning from a letter, you have written to the Fetter; That you were forced to go muchulla in your town. That it's hard to make a chajes, when one has a bunch of daijes, And every wind doth waft a whisper "you are down!" 'Tis a folly then to linger, when no friend will lift a finger! When not a bit of mazzel seems to come your way; Where tliere is no Shool nor Chader, not a Sukkah nor a Seder! While here, at least, the Jew can have a holiday. We've engaged a Polish Chazzen—not alone that he can davven, But he can darshen like the Rav at Budapest; And his chants are so apppealing, for he sings with so much feeling! That it awakens a deep devotion in one's breast. On last Friday he made kiddush, and the niegen was that Jiddish That you and I so oft have heard across the sea; When we had the old shool klepper and your Daddy dealt in tepper; Athwart the way just where the Mickve used to be. How I begged my son to hear him! but the Goy would not go near him, And said that he preferred the idea of reform; He's cast aside his Tefillen—never dreams of saying tillem! But seldom miss to go to Temple Sunday morn. At the Shochet he's a pickin', when he comes to kill the chicken. And vows: "It is a travesty on creed I wot;" I don't know this hifalutin, that he learnt from saint or suten, And dares to call the sep'rate dishes "Tommy rot!" Ich hab maure he's a drifting, from the Torah so uplifting! And oft I fear he'd take a shiksa for a spouse; I've an inkling he's a sinner, for he takes at Rector's dinner— And well we know that Goyim keep no kosher house. 1 have lavished all my earning, to give Gershon a good learning, And well he knows each Sedrah in the sacred scroll; Yet he jeers at din and Dajen and prefers his "Omar Khayyam," And well thou wist such maassses will ne'er save the soul. And I know of nary ointment, that will sooth the disappointment, To lift the weight of care from off my troubled breast! In the meantime let's be trying—success comes not with the sighing, Nor with the lout that lags in pleasing nooks to rest. Every venture has ils hustle, naught is gained without a tussle, All men must watch their chances naught the fates can bribe! Come to Miami "ti; the Goshen, where thry speak tlu mai ima loshen. Where heart and home is open to you Cousin Leib. ion, may himself be in possession of the truth, and that whatever one firmly and conscientiously believes, is truth to himthese are the mortal enemies of that fanaticism which persecutes for opinion's sake, and initiates crusades against whatever it, in its imaginary holiness, deems to be contrary to the law of God or verity of dogma." These sublime sentiments and ideals are in accord with the true spirit of Americanism. It is in this wonderful land of freedom above any other spot undo* the sun where the votaries of Freemasonary can disseminate the gospel of tolerance and hunman kinship. Among divers favorable reactions American Jews respond to this spirit of tolerance by resisting the efforts of some of their deluded ,i>rethern to segregate them from the rest of the community as a political or civic unit. The Jew that docs not commercialize his franchise of citizenship prefers to vote as a citizen— not as a Jew. This is born out by the uniqueness of exclusively Jewish civic or political organizations. American Jews, as a rule, apply this principle to those who are seeking pub-. lie office. They judge candidates by their personal merits rather than b> party or church aflilialions. The departure from this principle attracts wide attention by its rarity. Public-spirited Jews confine their group activities to religious, educational, philantropic and recreational pursuits, hut they eschew grup identification with civic movements that are unrelated to their peculiar requirements. The only occasion on which they feel warranted to arouse Jewish consciousness is when the community is menaced by demagogues or bigots seeking public office. Those departing from this rules are repudiated by their co-religionists who, in groat majority, arer opposed to sectarian division in politics. Other favorable reactions are manifested by American Jews in their spontaneous and generous contributuions to non-Jewish religious and educational institutions; and by the increasing tendency of liberal Jews to regard Christianity; as preached by Jesus, as a revised form of Judaism. It should be remarked in passing that these conciliary gestures will eventually crystallize the spirit of good will' between Jews and Christians that is devoutly wished by the leading thinkers of this country. A Pleasant Surprise Awaits you at the opening of our now place designed to please your eve y desire for I cool, comfortable restaurant serving clean, home cooked and wholesome KOSHER FOOD At Reasonable Prices Palatial Kosher Restaurant We're Not in the Beer Business but we must dispose of a limited supply of Pilsener German Lager Beer at the unbelievable price of only .$3.00 per case of twenty-four bottles. Place your orders with HOSEDALE DELICATESSEN i'hone :>4II FOR REAL QUALITY KOSHER MEAT TENNESSEE CANNOT BE BEAT TENNESSEE KOSHER MARKET 166 N. W. 5th STREET Phone 21514 Miami Showcase & Fixture Co. General Contractors and Manufacturers of STOKE KKO.NTS anil STORK FIXTl'REH 228 S. Miami A*enm Phone 22168 I A!TO GLASS Installed by Experts while you wait at reasonable prices East Coast Glass Co. 131.3 N. Bayshore Drive Phone 33371 USED Reinforcing Steel and Building Materials BOUGHT and SOLD MIAMI JUNK TRADERS CORP. 407 N. W. North River Drive Phone 7516 Sanitary Mattress Works The only sterilizer in Miami. We renovate maUn-anew. OUMUIOIIH and upholstery, Low prices and high I-IUSH workmanship. For Your Health's Sake PHONE 21218 2015 North Miami Avenue PROTECT YOUR INCOME Against ACCIDENT or ILLNESS with a good Health and Accident Policy D. Kahn and I. Fine 1307 Realty Board Bldg. Yours for a Real Live Jewish Weekly ROSOStO W. L. WILLIAMS 252 HALCYON ARCADE MI-HI FOUNT "Your Rendzevous" opposite Miami Senior High, "GOODIES" of All Kinds %  nv ami avll nw n

I
Beth David
Nominates Officers
At the first general meeting of
the Congregation Beth David held
last Stinda) night at the vestry
rooms the financial reports of the
Congregation were read by the
treasurer. Mr. Lewis Brown, and
showed that during the ten months
of the present administration
mure than thirty-eight hundred
- dollars of debts and improve-
ment" were paid for, and that at
the present time the Congregation
is no jonger in debt. Mr. Isidor
Cohen, aided by Mr. Lewis Brown,
made a very eloquent appeal for
the ruvival of the local Lodge of
Bnai Brith. Mr. P. Scheinberg re-
quested help for the Jewish Wel-
fare Bureau and a more active
v-participation in its affairs by
those present. Plans for the Tal-
mud Torah were discussed at
length and marked enthusiasm was
^hown wHIn it was announced
that the ground breaking would
take place this coming Sunday.
On the call for nominations the
following were nominated:
President, J. Louis Shochet,
inanimously; first vice president,
Jos. M. Fine and John Wolf; sec-
ond vice president, W. L. Wil-
liams and J. B. Berner; treasurer,
Lewis Brown, unanimously: re-
cording secretary. Jake Brown,
limously: financial secretary,
Stanley C. Myers, unanimously;
sergeant at arms, Nathan Adel-
pian. unanimously.
For four vacancies on the
>oard of trustees: Mendel Rippa,
.orris Kubin, Herbert Scherr,
Idward Wolfe, W. L. Williams
tad J Rosengarden.
^Junior Council News
fhe Junior Council of Jewish
will hold then hrst meet-
ing I ;sda\ evening, October 30,
\1. at the Alcazar Hotel. All
Jcwvh girls seventeen years of age
or ever are invited to attend.
Plans are being made for Dram-
atic, Music and Athletic Circles to
act as subsidiaries of the Junior
Council.
The officers of the organiza-
tion are as follows: President,
Florence Alpert; Vice-President,
Marcella Seiden; Rec. Secretary,
Elsie Weinberger; Corres. Secre-
tary, Lilian Dock; Treasurer, Nor-
ma Wolfe.
Acting as sponsors for the
Council are Mrs. Wm. Shayne and
Mrs. Harry C. Markle.
Flo Alpert.
Friendship League
The Friendship League of Mi-
ami held its regular weekly meet-
ing Wednesday night at the Col-
mbus Hotel. Plans were discus-
and arranged for the forma-
tion of a Dramatic Club composed
of members of the League. A
Friendship League basketball team
n as organized and a girl's basket-
1 all team is being formed, which
will compete with various teams
-pile much adverse criticism
by those individuals who are whol-
uorant of the actual affairs of
the J-eague, the Friendship League
'ands out today as the only suc-
id Jewish organization com-
posed of Jewish young men and
iromen whose religious affiliations
art not confined to any particular
legation or temple. The Lea-
gue is an entity in and of itself.
activities of the League have
been carried on in a quiet and
modest way, but at the same time,
effectively. Young men and wo-
is well as their parents and
ds are invited to the-weekly
a t< igs held every Wednesday
ig at 9 P. M., at the Colum-
ns Hotel.
David Weintraub.
Emunah Chapter
O. E. S.
The first birthday was cele-
brated by Emunah Chapter No.
175 O. E. S. on Thursday October
11, 1928. The presence of our Jr.
Past Grand Matron Angie J. Monk,
Past Grand Matron Claudia Chris-
tian, Grand instructress Dora
Reynolds, and their husbands was
enjoyed by the chapter. The pres-
entation of an Altar Cover made
by the Loyalty Club was beautiful-
ly conducted. After the meeting
a reception was held at the recep-
tion hall of the Scottish Rite Tem-
ple where an enjoyable time was
had by all.
The next meeting of the chapter
will be held October 25th. All
members of the 0. E. S. are invit-
ed, to meet us.
Ed, Wolfe.
Council of
Jewish Women
Hebrew Free
Loan Association
Beth David Sisterho*
Men's Club of Miami
Recognition
a n d popularity
comes only through service. The
standing of the Men's Club of Mi-
ami among the Civic organiza-
tions of Miami is silent but suffi-
cient proof of the truth of this
adage.
Beliefs and statements to the
contrary, this organization, cre-
ated by a group of American
Jews, intent on interesting the
Jews of Miami in civic affairs,
has prospered during the past
year until its achievements are
now heralded by the very ones
who condemned its purpose at its
inception.
Serving the Magic City sincere-
ly, with no desire for publicity or
reward, the club through its offi-
cers and members has accom-
plished great 'liings. Called upon
to outfit poor children who were
without -hi" id clothing with
which to atte I school, this or-
ganization of Jews was the first
to answer the appeal, and regard-
less of religion or creed, we
clothed from head to feet, bovs
with shoes and clothing purchased
out of Club funds. The suf-
ferers in the recent hurricane
called out to the world for help,
and this organization of Jews in
twenty-four hours, their Jewish
hearts filled with sympathy,
raised the large sum of 8570
the largest sum donated bv any
one civic organizationand that
statement from the daily newspa-
persthe same newspapers which
arbitrarily refused, or rather neg-
lected, to give us any publicity
whatsoever.
By virtue of its achievements
the Men's Club of Miami has won
its place among the recognized
civic institutions of Miami. Its
representatives are called upon to
be present at club councils, at or-
ganization meetings, its officers
are given a hearing, their sugges-
tions are listened to and some-
times even adopted.
It is by serving, by giving of
our time, our energy, unselfishly,
that we will win the plume of ser-
vice.
The most wonderful achieve-
ment of all, however, is that while
devoting itself to civic affairs
while striving for the recognition
of its members as useful and wor-
thy citizens of the community
the club has never forgotten that
it is primarily and fundamentally
an organization of Jewsholding
aloft the high ideals and tradi-
tions of our people.
The Men's Club of Miami,
though it cease to exist this very
minute, accomplished its purpose.
It has created "The Miamian Jew"
a useful and worthy addition to
the ever-growing population of
our Magic City.
----------
The Miami Section of the Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women
held its first regular meeting of
the 1928-29 season, at the Alcazar
Hotel. Wednesday afternoon, Octo-
ber 10th. A representative and en-
thusiastic group were in attend-
ance.
The opening prayer was im-
pressively given by Mrs. M. Fed-
der, Jr.. Mrs. Benjamin Axleroad,
President, called for reports of
Chairman of Committees, which
had functioned during the summer
months.
Mrs. Morris Dubler, Chairman
of the Immigrant.Aid Committee,
reported the handling of an emer-
gency case, which involved twelve
Jewish persons. Frequent visits
were made by Mrs. Dubler's Com-
mittee: food, clothing and Jewish
papers' were provided.
Report of the Finance Chairman
'Mrs. Meyer Schwartz, stated that
more than S500 has been expend-
ed during the 1927-28 season, for
various philanthropic endeavors,
sponsored by the Council.
Mrs. Benjamin Hirshfield,
Chairman of the Current Events
(!la. gave an interesting reading
of excerpts of timely interest
Mrs. Brenton Simmons. Chair-
man of the Dade County Federa-
tion of Women's Clubs, gave a
short talk.
Miss Rose Marks and Miss
Evelyn Marks kindly offered to
furnish the musical feature of the
afternoon. Punch was served dur-
ing the social period following
the business meeting. Mrs. Charles
Greenfield. Chairman of Hospital-
ity, assisted by Mrs. Lewis Brown,
served.
Mrs. Benjamin Axelroud.
Those of you who lived in
Miami for the past seven years
know that from time to time move-
ments have been started to organ-
ize a Free Loan Association but
that until last winter it failed.
The Free Loan Association was
designed from time immemorial
to afford the opportunity to a
man to help himself. Small loans
not exceeding one hundred dollars
to any one individual are granted
without bonus, without interest or
charge of any kind whatsoever.
The only requisite is that the ap-
plicant be a man of good moral
standing, either in business or
some other occupation where the
loan will enable him to replenish
stock, or buy merchandise to en-
able him to earn a livelihood for
his family. He must provide two
good endorsers, and agree to re-
pay the loan at the rate of three
per cent per week, thus retiring
the loan within thirty-five weeks.
Experience has shown that the av-
erage is repaid in one year.
Last winter at the instance of
the Men's Club of Miami, an or-
ganization meeting was called at
the Odd Fellows Hall and the idea
met with instantaneous enthusias-
tic response. Mr. Samuel Kanlor
was elected president, and various
ol the active communal workers
of the city were enlisted actively
in its behalf.
Until now more than forty
loans of varying amounts have
been made, and the revolving
fund now on hand is more than
two thousand dollars. This fund
was raised by donations, but most-
ly from individual membership
subscription of ten dollars each.
John Wolfe.
Joseph M. Lipnitz
Fire, Automobile
Bonds, Life
BBRVICI
that DUkca frl.....I- ami keeps tl.....i
510 Lawyers Iildg.
1204 Exchange Bldg.
Phones 21522- 20317
Special Agents
AETNA LIFE INSURANCE
ESTABLISHED SINCE 1890
We handle only the best and
freshest of fish.
Sea foods of all kinds
always on hand.
Baker Fish Co.
Curb Mkt. at S. W. 2nd Ave.
and Bridge
IF YOU DO
lake advantage of B lucky purchase that enables us to sell you
1%-ineh galvanized pipe at only 9c a foot
You Will Be the Gainer
For your pipe needs in galvanized or black, in any quantity
new or reconditioned call on
A & B. Pipe and Metal Go. Inc.
53 N. E. 25th STREET
PHONE 37761
FOR STORE FIXTURES
See
BERNER STORE
EQUIPMENT CO.
824 N. E. 1st Avenue
Phone 32261
J. SIMPSON
CEMENT, LIME, PLASTER
ROOFING and ASPHALT
423 N. W. North River Drive
"The Best Way to reach a man's heart is through his stomach"
is an age Old saying, but true never the less and we're on the job
to help you do u. For real Jewish delicatessen that man, wo-
man or child may desire, or a real meal, your only destination is
ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN
AND RESTAURANT
170 N. W. FIFTH STREET
Stanley C Myera.
The Sisterhood has undertakl
this >ear to take complete charl
of the upkeep of the Talmud Te
ah after its erection.
During the summer months tl
Sisterhood sponsored card parti/
each member acting as hosted
The proceeds which were derivj
from these card parties were tm
ed over to the Talmud Torah funji
During the winter months caf~
parties will be held monthly ai
the annual Sisterhood's Purim bi
and bazaar will be held this yeJ]
The next card party which the
Sisterhood will sponsor will
held on Wednesday. October 24tk,
at 2:30 P. M. at the home of Mil
Samuel Aronovitz, 1820 S. W1
With St. Mrs. Aronovitz will be
a -isted by Mrs. Max Chertler. I
Mrs. Meyer Schwartz.
HADASSAH
On Friday, Oct. 5th the first
board meeting of the officers and
chairmen of standing committee*
held an enjoyable luncheon at the
Roundtahle. Mrs. Louis
Zeientz was elected to (ill the vac- '
am v left by the resignation o.
Mrs. H. H. Fisher,
The first regular monthly meei
in;.' was held on Monday, Octob(
7 at the Robert Clay Hotel
The organization announced th*
there would be a large publi-
bridge at the Columbus Hotel o
Tuesday evening October 23 at th-
Columbus Hotel.
On Thanksgiving night, Noi
29th the Hadassah will entertait
at a dinner dance for its member>
and their friends. The place will
be announced later.
On Monday Ortobt r 22 thcrr
will be an all day sewing held a'
the home of Mrs. Louis Zeient7.
337 N. E. 28th St.
After the business meeting, th
Hadassah enjoyed a very beaut
ful and instructive talk on Pale
tine by Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan.
The next regular meeting wi
take place on the 2nd Monday i
November.
Mrs. I join |1,,lirin.
L. (Pop) GERSON
Buyer of all kinds of
Scrap Metal
2145 N. W. 2nd AVENUE
Phone 7909
Res. Phone 7276
Etta Beauty Shoppe
We -|M.|,,lallre In Kurene permanent
watliiic ami Helena Rubinstein fc
mi treatment! and preparations.
2207 N. E. Second Avenue
Phone 20245
E. M. Wolfe Ample Parking- Span-
THE BEST
PUMPERNICKLE, RYE
BREAD, ROLLS and
"CHALAS" are made by
August Bros.
Magic Bakery
Ask for them at your
Grocery or Delicatessen
also at your Bakery
361 S. W. 8th STREET



PAGE 1

I Beth David Nominates Officers At the first general meeting of the Congregation Beth David held last Stinda) night at the vestry rooms the financial reports of the Congregation were read by the treasurer. Mr. Lewis Brown, and showed that during the ten months of the present administration mure than thirty-eight hundred dollars of debts and improvement" were paid for, and that at the present time the Congregation is no jonger in debt. Mr. Isidor Cohen, aided by Mr. Lewis Brown, • made a very eloquent appeal for the ruvival of the local Lodge of Bnai Brith. Mr. P. Scheinberg requested help for the Jewish Welfare Bureau and a more active v -participation in its affairs by those present. Plans for the Talmud Torah were discussed at length and marked enthusiasm was ^hown wHIn it was announced that the ground breaking would take place this coming Sunday. On the call for nominations the following were nominated: President, J. Louis Shochet, inanimously; first vice president, Jos. M. Fine and John Wolf; second vice president, W. L. Williams and J. B. Berner; treasurer, Lewis Brown, unanimously: recording secretary. Jake Brown, limously: financial secretary, Stanley C. Myers, unanimously; sergeant at arms, Nathan Adelpian. unanimously. For four vacancies on the >oard of trustees: Mendel Rippa, .orris Kubin, Herbert Scherr, Idward Wolfe, W. L. Williams tad J Rosengarden. ^Junior Council News fhe Junior Council of Jewish will hold then hrst meeting I ;sda\ evening, October 30, \1. at the Alcazar Hotel. All Jcwvh girls seventeen years of age or ever are invited to attend. Plans are being made for Dramatic, Music and Athletic Circles to act as subsidiaries of the Junior Council. The officers of the organization are as follows: President, Florence Alpert; Vice-President, Marcella Seiden; Rec. Secretary, Elsie Weinberger; Corres. Secretary, Lilian Dock; Treasurer, Norma Wolfe. Acting as sponsors for the Council are Mrs. Wm. Shayne and Mrs. Harry C. Markle. Flo Alpert. Friendship League The Friendship League of Miami held its regular weekly meeting Wednesday night at the Colmbus Hotel. Plans were discusand arranged for the formation of a Dramatic Club composed of members of the League. A Friendship League basketball team n as organized and a girl's basket1 all team is being formed, which will compete with various teams -pile much adverse criticism by those individuals who are wholuorant of the actual affairs of the J-eague, the Friendship League 'ands out today as the only sucid Jewish organization composed of Jewish young men and iromen whose religious affiliations art not confined to any particular legation or temple. The League is an entity in and of itself. activities of the League have been carried on in a quiet and modest way, but at the same time, effectively. Young men and wois well as their parents and ds are invited to the-weekly %  a t< igs held every Wednesday ig at 9 P. M., at the Columns Hotel. David Weintraub. Emunah Chapter O. E. S. The first birthday was celebrated by Emunah Chapter No. 175 O. E. S. on Thursday October 11, 1928. The presence of our Jr. Past Grand Matron Angie J. Monk, Past Grand Matron Claudia Christian, Grand instructress Dora Reynolds, and their husbands was enjoyed by the chapter. The presentation of an Altar Cover made by the Loyalty Club was beautifully conducted. After the meeting a reception was held at the reception hall of the Scottish Rite Temple where an enjoyable time was had by all. The next meeting of the chapter will be held October 25th. All members of the 0. E. S. are invited, to meet us. Ed, Wolfe. Council of Jewish Women Hebrew Free Loan Association Beth David Sisterho* Men's Club of Miami Recognition a n d popularity comes only through service. The standing of the Men's Club of Miami among the Civic organizations of Miami is silent but sufficient proof of the truth of this adage. Beliefs and statements to the contrary, this organization, created by a group of American Jews, intent on interesting the Jews of Miami in civic affairs, has prospered during the past year until its achievements are now heralded by the very ones who condemned its purpose at its inception. Serving the Magic City sincerely, with no desire for publicity or reward, the club through its officers and members has accomplished great 'liings. Called upon to outfit poor children who were without -hi" id clothing with which to atte I school, this organization of Jews was the first to answer the appeal, and regardless of religion or creed, we clothed from head to feet, bovs with shoes and clothing purchased out of Club funds. The sufferers in the recent hurricane called out to the world for help, and this organization of Jews in twenty-four hours, their Jewish hearts filled with sympathy, raised the large sum of 8570— the largest sum donated bv any one civic organization—and that statement from the daily newspapers—the same newspapers which arbitrarily refused, or rather neglected, to give us any publicity whatsoever. By virtue of its achievements the Men's Club of Miami has won its place among the recognized civic institutions of Miami. Its representatives are called upon to be present at club councils, at organization meetings, its officers are given a hearing, their suggestions are listened to and sometimes even adopted. It is by serving, by giving of our time, our energy, unselfishly, that we will win the plume of service. The most wonderful achievement of all, however, is that while devoting itself to civic affairs— while striving for the recognition of its members as useful and worthy citizens of the community— the club has never forgotten that it is primarily and fundamentally an organization of Jews—holding aloft the high ideals and traditions of our people. The Men's Club of Miami, though it cease to exist this very minute, accomplished its purpose. It has created "The Miamian Jew" —a useful and worthy addition to the ever-growing population of our Magic City. The Miami Section of the National Council of Jewish Women held its first regular meeting of the 1928-29 season, at the Alcazar Hotel. Wednesday afternoon, October 10th. A representative and enthusiastic group were in attendance. The opening prayer was impressively given by Mrs. M. Fedder, Jr.. Mrs. Benjamin Axleroad, President, called for reports of Chairman of Committees, which had functioned during the summer months. Mrs. Morris Dubler, Chairman of the Immigrant.Aid Committee, reported the handling of an emergency case, which involved twelve Jewish persons. Frequent visits were made by Mrs. Dubler's Committee: food, clothing and Jewish papers' were provided. Report of the Finance Chairman 'Mrs. Meyer Schwartz, stated that more than S500 has been expended during the 1927-28 season, for various philanthropic endeavors, sponsored by the Council. Mrs. Benjamin Hirshfield, Chairman of the Current Events (!la. gave an interesting reading of excerpts of timely interest Mrs. Brenton Simmons. Chairman of the Dade County Federation of Women's Clubs, gave a short talk. Miss Rose Marks and Miss Evelyn Marks kindly offered to furnish the musical feature of the afternoon. Punch was served during the social period following the business meeting. Mrs. Charles Greenfield. Chairman of Hospitality, assisted by Mrs. Lewis Brown, served. Mrs. Benjamin Axelroud. Those of you who lived in Miami for the past seven years know that from time to time movements have been started to organize a Free Loan Association but that until last winter it failed. The Free Loan Association was designed from time immemorial to afford the opportunity to a man to help himself. Small loans not exceeding one hundred dollars to any one individual are granted without bonus, without interest or charge of any kind whatsoever. The only requisite is that the applicant be a man of good moral standing, either in business or some other occupation where the loan will enable him to replenish stock, or buy merchandise to enable him to earn a livelihood for his family. He must provide two good endorsers, and agree to repay the loan at the rate of three per cent per week, thus retiring the loan within thirty-five weeks. Experience has shown that the average is repaid in one year. Last winter at the instance of the Men's Club of Miami, an organization meeting was called at the Odd Fellows Hall and the idea met with instantaneous enthusiastic response. Mr. Samuel Kanlor was elected president, and various ol the active communal workers of the city were enlisted actively in its behalf. Until now more than forty loans of varying amounts have been made, and the revolving fund now on hand is more than two thousand dollars. This fund was raised by donations, but mostly from individual membership subscription of ten dollars each. John Wolfe. Joseph M. Lipnitz Fire, Automobile Bonds, Life BBRVICI that DUkca frl Iami keeps tl i 510 Lawyers Iildg. 1204 Exchange Bldg. Phones 2152220317 Special Agents AETNA LIFE INSURANCE ESTABLISHED SINCE 1890 We handle only the best and freshest of fish. Sea foods of all kinds always on hand. Baker Fish Co. Curb Mkt. at S. W. 2nd Ave. and Bridge IF YOU DO lake advantage of B lucky purchase that enables us to sell you 1%-ineh galvanized pipe at only 9c a foot You Will Be the Gainer For your pipe needs in galvanized or black, in any quantity new or reconditioned call on A & B. Pipe and Metal Go. Inc. 53 N. E. 25th STREET PHONE 37761 FOR STORE FIXTURES See BERNER STORE EQUIPMENT CO. 824 N. E. 1st Avenue Phone 32261 J. SIMPSON CEMENT, LIME, PLASTER ROOFING and ASPHALT 423 N. W. North River Drive "The Best Way to reach a man's heart is through his stomach" is an age Old saying, but true never the less and we're on the job to help you do u. For real Jewish delicatessen that man, woman or child may desire, or a real meal, your only destination is ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN AND RESTAURANT 170 N. W. FIFTH STREET Stanley C Myera. The Sisterhood has undertakl this >ear to take complete charl of the upkeep of the Talmud Te ah after its erection. During the summer months tl Sisterhood sponsored card parti/ each member acting as hosted The proceeds which were derivj from these card parties were tm ed over to the Talmud Torah funji During the winter months caf~ parties will be held monthly ai the annual Sisterhood's Purim bi and bazaar will be held this yeJ] The next card party which the Sisterhood will sponsor will %  held on Wednesday. October 24tk, at 2:30 P. M. at the home of Mil Samuel Aronovitz, 1820 S. W1 With St. Mrs. Aronovitz will be a -isted by Mrs. Max Chertler. I Mrs. Meyer Schwartz. HADASSAH On Friday, Oct. 5th the first board meeting of the officers and chairmen of standing committee* held an enjoyable luncheon at the Roundtahle. Mrs. Louis Zeientz was elected to (ill the vac' am v left by the resignation o. Mrs. H. H. Fisher, The first regular monthly meei in;.' was held on Monday, Octob( 7 at the Robert Clay Hotel The organization announced th* there would be a large publibridge at the Columbus Hotel o Tuesday evening October 23 at thColumbus Hotel. On Thanksgiving night, Noi 29th the Hadassah will entertait at a dinner dance for its member %  > and their friends. The place will be announced later. On Monday Ortobt r 22 thcrr will be an all day sewing held a' the home of Mrs. Louis Zeient7. 337 N. E. 28th St. After the business meeting, th Hadassah enjoyed a very beaut ful and instructive talk on Pale tine by Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan. The next regular meeting wi take place on the 2nd Monday i November. Mrs. I join |1,,lirin. L. (Pop) GERSON Buyer of all kinds of Scrap Metal 2145 N. W. 2nd AVENUE Phone 7909 Res. Phone 7276 Etta Beauty Shoppe We -|M.|,,lallre In Kurene permanent watliiic ami Helena Rubinstein fc mi treatment! and preparations. 2207 N. E. Second Avenue Phone 20245 E. M. Wolfe Ample ParkingSpanTHE BEST PUMPERNICKLE, RYE BREAD, ROLLS and "CHALAS" are made by August Bros. Magic Bakery Ask for them at your Grocery or Delicatessen also at your Bakery 361 S. W. 8th STREET


LI. No. 2.
wJewisti flhondlim
i
MIAMI, FLORI3 A, OCTOBER 26,1928
Price oc
fen Editors
Are Human
Strange As that May Seem.
[We are grateful to the people of
lami who have expressed their
kproval of our last issue of "The
Iwish Floridian." And we are
|ore than grateful that a good
feal of this appreciation was ex-
ressed not in mere words alone
it by subscriptions and adver-
Bements which we have obtained
Srough their help.
Even Editors are human, and
leing human, are far from being
[he infallible beings they are pop-
ularly supposed to be. Ye Editors
have tried, are trying and will
Continue to try, to make "The
Jewish Floridian" as attractive
ind interesting as is-within their
limited power to accomplish. We
re bound, however, to make mis-
akes from time to time.
And that's just where "You
JJood Readers" can be of help to
js. When you se something in our
[paper that you believe might be
improved upon; if you think of
< some feature that would appeal
! to you and your friends, that
should appear in a weekly -news-
paper, don't be bashful. Just sit
down and write us a little note
and frankly and fully tell us what
; you think. And if it's only pos-
sible and reasonable, rest assured,
[Good Reader, your request will be
[complied with.
We desire to call your especial
[attention to this issue. It contains
[several article of undoubted merit.
The article "On Wings of Song"
should undoubtedly appeal to the
! 'over of things musical. Our De-
partment on "Athletics" invites
your questions and promises im-
mediate replies in the next issue.
In short: We want "The Jewish
Floridian to be your paper in
every sense of the word. We are
here to PLEASE YOU.
Thanks!
Men's Club Is Now
Preparing Surprise
The Entertainment Committee
of the Men's Club of Miami is de-
bating the time and place of a
Ladies Night to begin the winter
season. While no official an-
nouncement has yet been made of
the exact time and place, it is ex-
pected to be replete with novel
features and will more than make
up for the lack of summer enter-
tainment
Nomination and election of of-
ficers will shortly take place.
Jewish Boys On
Stump for Party
While Stanley C. Myers, Harry
Gordon and others of the Jewish
attorneys have been campaigning
for the democratic ticket in the
Greater Miami area, Abe Arono-
vitz has been sent to Key West
where he will deliver several ad-
dresses on Saturday night.
TIRED BUT HAPPY
Jewish Physicians
Are Honored
Jackson Memorial Hospital
Announces New Staff.

The above photograph was taken by the Staff Artist of the Jewish Floridian immediately after
Mr. P. Scheinberg, the retiring President of the Jewish Welfare Bureau, had been presented with a
silver pitcher and tray. Reading from left to right: Mrs. Lois Dobrin, Social Secretary of the
Rureau; Mrs. P. Scheinberg, Mr. P. Scheinberg, and Day J. Apte, the new President of the Bureau.
The Board of Trustees of the
Jackson Memorial Hospital of
which one of the pioneers of Mi-
ami, Isidor Cohen is a member,
last Tuesday announced the names
of those physicians who will com-
prise the new medical staff of the
hospital.
Amongst the consulting physic-
, ians named are Dr. Max Dobrin,
who has acted as one of the con-
sultants of the Jewish Welfare
Bureau for the past several years;
Dr. I. H. Agos active physician in
neurology; Dr. M. D. Kirsch, who
is also well known in musical cir-
cles in Miami, being a member of
the Symphony Orchestra of the
University of Miami, as consulting
physician and specialist in eye
ear, nose and throat cases.
With the standing that the^e
gentlemen have in medical circles
we feel certain the Jackson Memor-
ial Hospital will be the gainer be-
cause of their services and local
Jewish residents will continue to
be proud of their records.
Jewish Welfare
Bureau Meets
Officers and Board Elected.
A well attended meeting marked
the annual gathering of the mem-
bers of the Jewish Welfare Bureau
at the Elk"s Club last Mondav
night.
The meeting was called to order
by Mr. P. Scheinberg, its president
for the past seven years In a few
well chosen words he outlined the
work of the Welfare Bureau and
stressed the fact that while great
importance is paid to the actual
financial and material relief of
those in heed, yet a great deal of
time and effort is placed to help
people get hold of their normal
selves and in social work to te-
unite families. He showed how
the Social worker of the Bureau
makes innumerable visits to the
various Hospitals and homes and
follows up cases of desertions;
helps locate positions for families
and returns strangers to their
home cities.
After the report of the President
and before the nomination of off
cers, Mr. John Wolf was recogniz-
ed and spoke at length on the
work of Mr. P. Scheinberg in the
past several years as President
and concluded with introducing
Mr. J. L. Shochet. In a brief
speech Mr. Shochet told of the
sacrifices Mr. Scheinberg had
made both financially and physic-
all) in order to devote himself t >
the work of the Bureau and on be-
half of the members, officers and
directors of the Jewish Welfare
Bureau presented Mr. Scheinberg
with a beautiful silver pitcher and
tray as a token of the appreciation
of all connected with the Bureau
for his unselfish work. Mr. Day
J. Apte concluded the presentation
with a few well chosen remarks of
his knowledge of Mr. Scheinberg's
work and remarked that he hoped
that the good work done would al
ways remain as a lasting tribute to
Mr. Scheinberg's devotion.
The following officers were un-
animously chosen: Day J. Apte,
President; John Wolf, 1st Vice
Pres.; Sam Kanter, 2nd Vice-Pre*.
Mrs. Anna Benjamin, Treasurer;
Gerald Lewis AssL Treasurer;
Stanley C. Myers, Secretary.
Rabbis Jacob H. Kaplan, and
Israel H. Weisfeld, and Messrs.
Harry I. Magid, Harry I. Lipnitz,
Norman Mirsky, Sam C. Levenson,
Dan Cromer, Lewis Brown, A.
Tauber, and Mesdames D. J. Apte,
P. Scheinberg and Isidor Cohen
were elected as Directors after due
balloting. Drs. Samuel Aronowitz
and Max Dobrin were unanimous-
ly elected on the Board of Direct-
ors, without being balloted upon,
as a tribute to their work for the
sick of the Welfare Bureau.
A rising vote of thanks was giv-
en the retiring Secretary, Jake
Brown and to the Social Secretary
Mrs. Lois Dobrin for their ser-
vices to the Bureau.
An amendment to the Constitu-
tion was adopted creating the of-
fice of Honorary President, and
Mr. P. Scheinberg was unani-
mously elected to the office for
life.
A vote of thanks was extended
the local Elks Club for the use ->f
the Club for the meeting.
Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan in-
stalled Mr. Apte as President with
a few words, and Rabbi Israel H.
Weisfeld then installed the remain-
ing officers and expressed the hope
that the records of these newly
chosen officers would be as good
in the future as they had been in
the past
THE BIG IDEA
4
The big idea is to put a page in a paragrapha par-
agraph in a sentencea sentence in a phrasea phrase
in a word. We can't do this often, butit's the BIG
IDEA!
Tampa Y. M. EL A.
Is Wide Awake
Issue* Challenge for Debate.
Mr. Manning A. Bernstein, Exe-
cutive Secretary of the Young
Men's Hebrew Association of
Tampa, Florida, in a very interest-
ing letter addressed to the Men's
Club of Miami issued a challenge
to the local organization for a
series of debates between the two
organizations. He requests that
the first debate be held in Tampa
and subsequently in Miami. The
choice of subject is left to the
Men's Club of Miami. In this let-
ter, the Executnre Secretary of the
Tampa organization expresses the
hope that the Jews of both cities
might be brought closer together
as a result of the proposed debates
to the mutual advantage and ad-
vancement of Tampa and Miami
Jewry.
The Board of Directors of the
Men's Club of Miami will meet
early next week to decide upon tha
challenge.
This Is Not News
BUT
We feel it is of interest to tha
Jewish Community of Miami to let
Ye Editors know of ail the items
which may interest our readers.
So if you want to be goodJoat
drop us a line, or better still
Call 36840
B
..
mmtmmmtk



PAGE 1

LI. No. 2. wJewisti flhondlim i MIAMI, FLORI3 A, OCTOBER 26,1928 Price oc fen Editors Are Human Strange As that May Seem. [We are grateful to the people of lami who have expressed their kproval of our last issue of "The Iwish Floridian." And we are |ore than grateful that a good feal of this appreciation was exressed not in mere words alone— it by subscriptions and adverBements which we have obtained Srough their help. Even Editors are human, and leing human, are far from being [he infallible beings they are popularly supposed to be. Ye Editors have tried, are trying and will Continue to try, to make "The Jewish Floridian" as attractive ind interesting as is-within their limited power to accomplish. We re bound, however, to make misakes from time to time. And that's just where "You JJood Readers" can be of help to JS. When you se something in our [paper that you believe might be improved upon; if you think of < some feature that would appeal to you and your friends, that should appear in a weekly -newspaper, don't be bashful. Just sit down and write us a little note and frankly and fully tell us what ; you think. And if it's only possible and reasonable, rest assured, [Good Reader, your request will be [complied with. We desire to call your especial [attention to this issue. It contains [several article of undoubted merit. The article "On Wings of Song" should undoubtedly appeal to the 'over of things musical. Our Department on "Athletics" invites your questions and promises immediate replies in the next issue. In short: We want "The Jewish Floridian to be your paper in every sense of the word. We are here to PLEASE YOU. Thanks! Men's Club Is Now Preparing Surprise The Entertainment Committee of the Men's Club of Miami is debating the time and place of a Ladies Night to begin the winter season. While no official announcement has yet been made of the exact time and place, it is expected to be replete with novel features and will more than make up for the lack of summer entertainment Nomination and election of officers will shortly take place. Jewish Boys On Stump for Party While Stanley C. Myers, Harry Gordon and others of the Jewish attorneys have been campaigning for the democratic ticket in the Greater Miami area, Abe Aronovitz has been sent to Key West where he will deliver several addresses on Saturday night. TIRED BUT HAPPY Jewish Physicians Are Honored Jackson Memorial Hospital Announces New Staff. The above photograph was taken by the Staff Artist of the Jewish Floridian immediately after Mr. P. Scheinberg, the retiring President of the Jewish Welfare Bureau, had been presented with a silver pitcher and tray. Reading from left to right: Mrs. Lois Dobrin, Social Secretary of the Rureau; Mrs. P. Scheinberg, Mr. P. Scheinberg, and Day J. Apte, the new President of the Bureau. The Board of Trustees of the Jackson Memorial Hospital of which one of the pioneers of Miami, Isidor Cohen is a member, last Tuesday announced the names of those physicians who will comprise the new medical staff of the hospital. Amongst the consulting physic, ians named are Dr. Max Dobrin, who has acted as one of the consultants of the Jewish Welfare Bureau for the past several years; Dr. I. H. Agos active physician in neurology; Dr. M. D. Kirsch, who is also well known in musical circles in Miami, being a member of the Symphony Orchestra of the University of Miami, as consulting physician and specialist in eye ear, nose and throat cases. With the standing that the^e gentlemen have in medical circles we feel certain the Jackson Memorial Hospital will be the gainer because of their services and local Jewish residents will continue to be proud of their records. Jewish Welfare Bureau Meets Officers and Board Elected. A well attended meeting marked the annual gathering of the members of the Jewish Welfare Bureau at the Elk"s Club last Mondav night. The meeting was called to order by Mr. P. Scheinberg, its president for the past seven years In a few well chosen words he outlined the work of the Welfare Bureau and stressed the fact that while great importance is paid to the actual financial and material relief of those in heed, yet a great deal of time and effort is placed to help people get hold of their normal selves and in social work to teunite families. He showed how the Social worker of the Bureau makes innumerable visits to the various Hospitals and homes and follows up cases of desertions; helps locate positions for families and returns strangers to their home cities. After the report of the President and before the nomination of off cers, Mr. John Wolf was recognized and spoke at length on the work of Mr. P. Scheinberg in the past several years as President and concluded with introducing Mr. J. L. Shochet. In a brief speech Mr. Shochet told of the sacrifices Mr. Scheinberg had made both financially and physicall) in order to devote himself t > the work of the Bureau and on behalf of the members, officers and directors of the Jewish Welfare Bureau presented Mr. Scheinberg with a beautiful silver pitcher and tray as a token of the appreciation of all connected with the Bureau for his unselfish work. Mr. Day J. Apte concluded the presentation with a few well chosen remarks of his knowledge of Mr. Scheinberg's work and remarked that he hoped that the good work done would al ways remain as a lasting tribute to Mr. Scheinberg's devotion. The following officers were unanimously chosen: Day J. Apte, President; John Wolf, 1st Vice Pres.; Sam Kanter, 2nd Vice-Pre*. Mrs. Anna Benjamin, Treasurer; Gerald Lewis AssL Treasurer; Stanley C. Myers, Secretary. Rabbis Jacob H. Kaplan, and Israel H. Weisfeld, and Messrs. Harry I. Magid, Harry I. Lipnitz, Norman Mirsky, Sam C. Levenson, Dan Cromer, Lewis Brown, A. Tauber, and Mesdames D. J. Apte, P. Scheinberg and Isidor Cohen were elected as Directors after due balloting. Drs. Samuel Aronowitz and Max Dobrin were unanimously elected on the Board of Directors, without being balloted upon, as a tribute to their work for the sick of the Welfare Bureau. A rising vote of thanks was given the retiring Secretary, Jake Brown and to the Social Secretary Mrs. Lois Dobrin for their services to the Bureau. An amendment to the Constitution was adopted creating the office of Honorary President, and Mr. P. Scheinberg was unanimously elected to the office for life. A vote of thanks was extended the local Elks Club for the use ->f the Club for the meeting. Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan installed Mr. Apte as President with a few words, and Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld then installed the remaining officers and expressed the hope that the records of these newly chosen officers would be as good in the future as they had been in the past THE BIG IDEA 4 The big idea is to put a page in a paragraph—a paragraph in a sentence—a sentence in a phrase—a phrase in a word. We can't do this often, but—it's the BIG IDEA! Tampa Y. M. EL A. Is Wide Awake Issue* Challenge for Debate. Mr. Manning A. Bernstein, Executive Secretary of the Young Men's Hebrew Association of Tampa, Florida, in a very interesting letter addressed to the Men's Club of Miami issued a challenge to the local organization for a series of debates between the two organizations. He requests that the first debate be held in Tampa and subsequently in Miami. The choice of subject is left to the Men's Club of Miami. In this letter, the Executnre Secretary of the Tampa organization expresses the hope that the Jews of both cities might be brought closer together as a result of the proposed debates to the mutual advantage and advancement of Tampa and Miami Jewry. The Board of Directors of the Men's Club of Miami will meet early next week to decide upon tha challenge. This Is Not News— BUT We feel it is of interest to tha Jewish Community of Miami to let Ye Editors know of ail the items which may interest our readers. So if you want to be good—Joat drop us a line, or better still— Call 36840 B %  mmtmmmtk


The Jewish Floridian
A weekly newspaper published at
Miami. Florida
by
The JewiR i Kl.r1.lian PaMlal lag Co.
253 Halcyon Arcade
Phone 36840
Editorial Staff
J. Luiis Shochet
I. Lasky
Be.n Durum
A. Chochom
A. If. ASHEB
THE RABBI
By EJiza'jttk C. Stern
Is not he
Like a friendly elm
With branches making shelter
For every pa ar-b\
That on the highway seeketh peace
Thick and leafy is its secret heart.
But above a silver sheen
Glanceth like laughter
Upon the upper, sunlit, boughs.
Like a highroad is the path to him
Wherever he chooseth to be.
Our friends and leader and teacher
We are maay who have hid
Our sorrows in his secret heart.
-. --king the peace
That shineth from his quiet eyes.
But when we come we joy.
We see the little smile in humor-
ous lines
Curving his gravely-speaking lips.
He is a friend in sunshine and de-
spair.
EDITORIAL
Fortunate is that man in life
who possesses as many friends as
he has fingers. The same thing's
true of communities.
We pass over the checker board
of life and in the passing meet
many people. Some we admirie
for their courage: some we re-
spect for their integrity; some we
cherish for their kindness. These
people we call friends. Then we
go into another room of life and
meet new faces. The former be-
come but a memory.
During our contact with these
people we think that they are our
friends, not realizing that the
world is large and that we are con-
stantly meeting new people. After
til. they are merely acquaintances.
True friends are few. They un-
derstand us and will sacrifice and
suffer for us. They like us for
what we are and not for what we
possess or what we can do for
them.
Giving is their first considera-
tion.
Unfortunately, there are today
two wings in Miamian Jewry. Both
wings, each entitled to live and to
prosper, are merely acquaint-
ances with each other. Wh\ not
lets all be FRIENDS.' Let us all
unite on the common grounds of
welfare work in the Jewish Wel-
fare Bureau, fraternal work in the
Bnai Brith. and civic work in the
Men's Club of Miami.
Once againlet's all be friends.
Modern Trends of American Literature
By ISRAEL H.
(Rabbi Cong. Beth
Is literature responsible for the
times or is it merely a mirror of
a certain period in history? In
other words, is it the writer who
moulds public thought and opin-
ion to any appreciably lasting ex-
tent, or are his words merely an
echo of existing thoughts and ten-
dencies? Taken at face value this
question must appear moot and
eminently qualified to take its
place in the vicious circle, side
Dl side with that old reliable
which preceded which-the egg or
the hen? Possibly so. And yet
the question remains as interesting
as ever.
Think of an age that* has devel-
oped so quick a tempo of life as
ours has, that is so eagerly con-
tent to live according to the teach-
ings of Omar Khayyam I with
modern American variations. The
"jug of wine" has been magicallv
transformed into a "hip-flask,"
and 'underneath the bough" has
been changed to read "the rumble
-eat of a roadster" I that hugs
LIFE so violently that it threat-
ens to "choke the life out of life"
to cap the climax, picture a gen-
eration intellectually inclined, but
which is so fearful it will "miss
the show" that it takes its educa-
tion standing, in fitful doses of
>utlines: The Outline of Philoso-
phy; The Outline of History;
the Story of Literature; the A.B.C.
of Chemistry, etc., etc. (For one
blessed witih more leisure time
than myself, I suggest the writing
of a book called "The Outline of
Outlines." This should prove
'The Great American Book" that
Minors and critics have been vain-
ly'seeking for a number of years),
picture that much-adjectived gene-
WEISFELD
David, Miami I
ration displaying a decided flair
for biographies of all Mid-Victor-
ian-.
Conclusive proof of the master v
of mind over matter? That the
zealous guardians have sucr eeded
in -laving the many-headed hydra
and have restored the garden of
literature to it* former grandeur
and pristine innocence? Hardly
. Rather would one hazard the
opinion that the present genera-
tion is vainly seeking to find in
tru? literature of that era. that,
which its own life fails to offer
placidity, contentment, peace.
Incidentally it might here be men-
tioned that probably no other pe-
riod in literature has witnessed
such an avalanche of biographies
and autobiographies as has come
since the World War. But there
is a fallacy in this assumption.
For these biographies are not
mere biographies like Ibsen's
"problem plays." These biog-
raphies are "purpose biograph-
ies." And their purpose is ex-
tremely praiseworthy. First, show
that a certain man was great.
When the reader has become con-
vinced of his greatness, sling as
much mud as possible at the great
man but do not cover him com-
pletely. Permit a few spots of
greatness to be noticed through
the blotches of mud. The recipe
is childishly simple. Select any
great man whose name and
achievements have inspired men
for many years; insinuate or state
bluntly (his descendants possess
too much good taste to drag the
matter into court), that he was
vulgar, dishonest and immoral
and, behold, you have a "best sel-
ler." (The reader will recall
"The Life of Washing on." by
Rupert Hughes: "This Side Idol-
atry, purporting to be ai account
of the life of Dickens; aid the re-
cent "Life of Gladstone'). Our
generation pauses for a moment
as each hero is dragged from his
pedestal into the mire, grins dia-
bolically, nods its head it approv-
al, and hastily passes to the next
pedestal to "have more fun."
What is the cause of tkis? Can
it be that we are so brutilly hon-
est that we can stand n< shame,
even in the highly wnerated
dead." Our daily life haidly sub-
stantiates this theory. Or, is it
that our generation knowing it is
wicked, in self-justifica ion, at-
tempts to show that the past, as
exemplified by its great nen, was
also wicked?
So much for biography There
is another and much moje laud-
able trend in modern literature.
Time was when James Bairie was
preferred to Leo Tolstoy in this
country, not so much beciuse of
the former's whimsicality, but be-
cause all his stories were so Peter
Panny. with happy endings, while
those of the latter were too *tark
and realistic. Nowadays, while
Barrie and his like still enjoy
great favor in this Country it is
alongside such names as Ibsen,
Tolstoy. Dostoyevsky and >thers.
And quite naturally so.
A country, for years taunted by
the subtle irony of Cabel!, the
sneering contempt of Mencken,
the regularly appearing jibes of
Sinclair Lewis, .and the passion-
ate denunciations of Upton Sin-
clair must eventually come to the
realization that episodes in every-
day life do not always end 'with
"And they lived happily ever af-
ter." Thus the birth of realism
in American literature. The
school of the realists is compara-
tively young. Of the few realists
who come to mind. Sherwood An-
derson is probably the greatest. In
fact, he might almost be termed
the Father of American Realists.
Worthy lieutenants in the strug-
gle to introduce realism into
American literature are Theodore
Dreiser and Ernest Hemingway.
Although a late arrival. Jim Tull'y
also might be included. As yet
Russian and American realism are
not identical. The Russian real-
ist concerns himself more with the
inner man. with the details of emo-
tion, with the paradoxical work-
ings of the human mind, than
does his American contemporary.
And yet. prrhap*. unknowingly,
we are witnessing the creation of
a new branch in realism. The ab-
ruptness of remarks, the staccato
like sentences and the constant
repetition of stark scenes, remin-
iscent of the steady patter of rain
on the roof of n lonely shack, all
may be symptoms of a new st\le
in realism tha bids fair to be-
come a permanent integral part of
American literature.
Things Theatrical
Bub Burton, leading man of the
Burton-Garrett Players, in the
principal role of "the Whole
Town's Talking." which has been
Ploying all week at the Scotti-h
Kile Temple Theatre this week
so ma to have appealed to the Mi- /
amians. Many pleasant things aie
being said about him. and mcst
pleasant of all is the fact that
those who have attended the per-
formances have signified their at-
tention of returning. Miami needs
a good stock company and we feel
that a good company playing n
varied repertoire wilj receive the
support of local theatre goers.
Beginning Sunday the company
will present "Pigs," what is prom-
ised to be an out of the ordinary
comedy containing many laughs,
for the audience.
SAY*
Editor1! Note: Our readers, ue feared,
uould not understand Tony's DialecUc
English, so ice have tramlated it for
your benefit.
When I came to this Country,
I looked around for a job; didn't
want to shine shoes, and didn t
know how to be a barber. I asked
my friends for advice and after
long consultations. 1 bought a
monkey and a hand organ. "Offi-
cial Organ" they called it. It play
an) tune and any song you want
It play funerals, and it play
church music. Everything, any-
thing. The monkey he do any-
thing you want. He is a 'ell of a
fine monkey, and he dance to any
tune that the "Official Organ"
play. Now, I write and tell you
of some of the tunes the "Official
0. can" grinds out.
At the meeting of the Jewish
Welfare Bureau friend "PINKY"
opened the meeting with "The
Constitution and by-laws of this
Bureau provides that the Annual
meeting must be held annually
once a year.
Ain't that clever?
At the Friendship League the
other night one of the young lad-
ie- was talking of the modern style
of women's dress. "Do you know,"
she cried to her audience, the
majority of whom were of her own
- \. "that our present style of
sensible clothing has reduced ac-
i idents on trains and busses by at
least SO per cent?" She paused to
let this sink in. It gave one of
our bright young friends his op-
portunity. "You'll excuse me," our
gentleman friend said, politely,
"but why not do away with ac:i-
dents altogether?*1
A prominent Editor coming
home with his golf clubs from a
match with a Rabbi, was over
taken by a friend.
"Well," asked the friend, "how
did you make out today?"
"Not so badly," replied the
Editor, "I took only 72."
"W by," exclaimed the friend,
"that's wonderful."
"I thought so. too. I'm going to
try the second hole tomorrow."
My idea of a mistaken identity
i- when a man finds his wife sew-
ing a teeny weeny garment and
then learns that she is making a
new dress for herself.
Something often heard about
town these days. "You can alwayj
tell a bad egg when he's broke."
You can't always build a news-
paper with a pair of shears, a po'.
of glue and contemporary dailies.
My idea of a bad impression is
one made by a lip-sticked kiss.
When an egg gets bad. it's
thrown out.
When a maid gets old, she be-
comes a wall flower.
But when a news item gets old,
it suddenly reappears in a weekly
disguised as fresh news.
Respectfully referred to our eg.
teemed Rabbis as a splendid sub-
ject for a sermon. "The fate of the
world depends on small things."
As a hintsuppose, just suppou
that instead of a fig leaf, Eve
had picked a leaf of poison ivy.
II you think ignorance ISN'T
bliss, observe the happy express-
ion of the man who has just
bought a used car.
High Life
l p at seven
\\ ash and dress;
Eat some breakfast
More or less;
Crowd on street car,
Go to work
Hate to do it,
Liross like Turk.
Work all morning.
Out to lunch
Ham and hen fruit,
Sadly munch
Back to labor,
Work till five;
Home for dinner
Still alive.
Go to movies,
Home at ten;
Sleep and start
All over again.
If you praise the world, you are
a Poly anna: if you mention its
faults, you are a swell headed ep-
ic if you merely use discretion,
>ou are dumb.
Matrimony carries off more
single girls than any other epidem-
ic.
Institutions of learning are
pawnshops where little men and
little women borrow for a short
span of years the thoughts of the
_'ieat.
W hen a man meets
downtown he always
what it will cost him.
his wife
wonders
Necks cause a lot ef trouble
DO) 's necks must be washedgirl's
necks must be praised and; wo-
men's necks must be adorned;
and necks are what they HANG
you by.
// you like any of our stuff,
take it and give US credit. If
you don't want to give US cred-
it, take it and "The De'il take
you."



PAGE 1

The Jewish Floridian A weekly newspaper published at Miami. Florida by The JewiR i Kl.r1.lian PaMlal lag Co. 253 Halcyon Arcade Phone 36840 EDITORIAL STAFF J. Luiis SHOCHET I. LASKY BE.N DURUM A. CHOCHOM A. If. ASHEB THE RABBI By EJiza'jttk C. Stern Is not he Like a friendly elm With branches making shelter For every pa— ar-b\ That on the highway seeketh peace Thick and leafy is its secret heart. But above a silver sheen Glanceth like laughter Upon the upper, sunlit, boughs. Like a highroad is the path to him Wherever he chooseth to be. Our friends and leader and teacher We are maay who have hid Our sorrows in his secret heart. -. --king the peace That shineth from his quiet eyes. But when we come we joy. We see the little smile in humorous lines Curving his gravely-speaking lips. He is a friend in sunshine and despair. EDITORIAL Fortunate is that man in life who possesses as many friends as he has fingers. The same thing's true of communities. We pass over the checker board of life and in the passing meet many people. Some we admirie for their courage: some we respect for their integrity; some we cherish for their kindness. These people we call friends. Then we go into another room of life and meet new faces. The former become but a memory. During our contact with these people we think that they are our friends, not realizing that the world is large and that we are constantly meeting new people. After til. they are merely acquaintances. True friends are few. They understand us and will sacrifice and suffer for us. They like us for what we are and not for what we possess or what we can do for them. Giving is their first consideration. Unfortunately, there are today two wings in Miamian Jewry. Both wings, each entitled to live and to prosper, are merely acquaintances with each other. Wh\ not lets all be FRIENDS.' Let us all unite on the common grounds of welfare work in the Jewish Welfare Bureau, fraternal work in the Bnai Brith. and civic work in the Men's Club of Miami. Once again—let's all be friends. Modern Trends of American Literature By ISRAEL H. (Rabbi Cong. Beth Is literature responsible for the times or is it merely a mirror of a certain period in history? In other words, is it the writer who moulds public thought and opinion to any appreciably lasting extent, or are his words merely an echo of existing thoughts and tendencies? Taken at face value this question must appear moot and eminently qualified to take its place in the vicious circle, side Dl side with that old reliable— which preceded which-—the egg or the hen? Possibly so. And yet the question remains as interesting as ever. Think of an age that* has developed so quick a tempo of life as ours has, that is so eagerly content to live according to the teachings of Omar Khayyam I with modern American variations. The "jug of wine" has been magicallv transformed into a "hip-flask," and 'underneath the bough" has been changed to read "the rumble -eat of a roadster" I that hugs LIFE so violently that it threatens to "choke the life out of life" —to cap the climax, picture a generation intellectually inclined, but which is so fearful it will "miss the show" that it takes its education standing, in fitful doses of >utlines: The Outline of Philosophy; The Outline of History; the Story of Literature; the A.B.C. of Chemistry, etc., etc. (For one blessed witih more leisure time than myself, I suggest the writing of a book called "The Outline of Outlines." This should prove 'The Great American Book" that •Minors and critics have been vainly'seeking for a number of years), picture that much-adjectived geneWEISFELD David, Miami I ration displaying a decided flair for biographies of all Mid-Victorian-. Conclusive proof of the master v of mind over matter? That the zealous guardians have sucr eeded in -laving the many-headed hydra and have restored the garden of literature to it* former grandeur and pristine innocence? Hardly Rather would one hazard the opinion that the present generation is vainly seeking to find in tru? literature of that era. that, which its own life fails to offer —placidity, contentment, peace. Incidentally it might here be mentioned that probably no other period in literature has witnessed such an avalanche of biographies and autobiographies as has come since the World War. But there is a fallacy in this assumption. For these biographies are not mere biographies like Ibsen's "problem plays." These biographies are "purpose biographies." And their purpose is extremely praiseworthy. First, show that a certain man was great. When the reader has become convinced of his greatness, sling as much mud as possible at the great man but do not cover him completely. Permit a few spots of greatness to be noticed through the blotches of mud. The recipe is childishly simple. Select any great man whose name and achievements have inspired men for many years; insinuate or state bluntly (his descendants possess too much good taste to drag the matter into court), that he was vulgar, dishonest and immoral— and, behold, you have a "best seller." (The reader will recall "The Life of Washing on." by Rupert Hughes: "This Side Idolatry, purporting to be ai account of the life of Dickens; aid the recent "Life of Gladstone'). Our generation pauses for a moment as each hero is dragged from his pedestal into the mire, grins diabolically, nods its head it approval, and hastily passes to the next pedestal to "have more fun." What is the cause of tkis? Can it be that we are so brutilly honest that we can stand n< shame, even in the highly wnerated dead." Our daily life haidly substantiates this theory. Or, is it that our generation knowing it is wicked, in self-justifica ion, attempts to show that the past, as exemplified by its great nen, was also wicked? So much for biography There is another and much moje laudable trend in modern literature. Time was when James Bairie was preferred to Leo Tolstoy in this country, not so much beciuse of the former's whimsicality, but because all his stories were so Peter Panny. with happy endings, while those of the latter were too *tark and realistic. Nowadays, while Barrie and his like still enjoy great favor in this Country it is alongside such names as Ibsen, Tolstoy. Dostoyevsky and >thers. And quite naturally so. A country, for years taunted by the subtle irony of Cabel!, the sneering contempt of Mencken, the regularly appearing jibes of Sinclair Lewis, .and the passionate denunciations of Upton Sinclair must eventually come to the realization that episodes in everyday life do not always end 'with "And they lived happily ever after." Thus the birth of realism in American literature. The school of the realists is comparatively young. Of the few realists who come to mind. Sherwood Anderson is probably the greatest. In fact, he might almost be termed the Father of American Realists. Worthy lieutenants in the struggle to introduce realism into American literature are Theodore Dreiser and Ernest Hemingway. Although a late arrival. Jim Tull'y also might be included. As yet Russian and American realism are not identical. The Russian realist concerns himself more with the inner man. with the details of emotion, with the paradoxical workings of the human mind, than does his American contemporary. And yet. prrhap*. unknowingly, we are witnessing the creation of a new branch in realism. The abruptness of remarks, the staccato like sentences and the constant repetition of stark scenes, reminiscent of the steady patter of rain on the roof of n lonely shack, all may be symptoms of a new st\le in realism tha bids fair to become a permanent integral part of American literature. Things Theatrical Bub Burton, leading man of the Burton-Garrett Players, in the principal role of "the Whole Town's Talking." which has been Ploying all week at the Scotti-h Kile Temple Theatre this week so ma to have appealed to the Mi/ a mi ans. Many pleasant things aie being said about him. and mcst pleasant of all is the fact that those who have attended the performances have signified their attention of returning. Miami needs a good stock company and we feel that a good company playing n varied repertoire wilj receive the support of local theatre goers. Beginning Sunday the company will present "Pigs," what is promised to be an out of the ordinary comedy containing many laughs, for the audience. SAY* Editor 1 Note: Our readers, ue feared, uould not understand Tony's DialecUc English, so ice have tramlated it for your benefit. When I came to this Country, I looked around for a job; didn't want to shine shoes, and didn t know how to be a barber. I asked my friends for advice and after long consultations. 1 bought a monkey and a hand organ. "Official Organ" they called it. It play an) tune and any song you want It play funerals, and it play church music. Everything, anything. The monkey he do anything you want. He is a 'ell of a fine monkey, and he dance to any tune that the "Official Organ" play. Now, I write and tell you of some of the tunes the "Official 0. can" grinds out. At the meeting of the Jewish Welfare Bureau friend "PINKY" opened the meeting with "The Constitution and by-laws of this Bureau provides that the Annual meeting must be held annually once a year. Ain't that clever? At the Friendship League the other night one of the young ladiewas talking of the modern style of women's dress. "Do you know," she cried to her audience, the majority of whom were of her own -• \. "that our present style of sensible clothing has reduced aci idents on trains and busses by at least SO per cent?" She paused to let this sink in. It gave one of our bright young friends his opportunity. "You'll excuse me," our gentleman friend said, politely, "but why not do away with ac:idents altogether?* 1 A prominent Editor coming home with his golf clubs from a match with a Rabbi, was over taken by a friend. "Well," asked the friend, "how did you make out today?" "Not so badly," replied the Editor, "I took only 72." "W by," exclaimed the friend, "that's wonderful." "I thought so. too. I'm going to try the second hole tomorrow." My idea of a mistaken identity iwhen a man finds his wife sewing a teeny weeny garment and then learns that she is making a new dress for herself. Something often heard about town these days. "You can alwayj tell a bad egg when he's broke." You can't always build a newspaper with a pair of shears, a po'. of glue and contemporary dailies. My idea of a bad impression is one made by a lip-sticked kiss. When an egg gets bad. it's thrown out. When a maid gets old, she becomes a wall flower. But when a news item gets old, it suddenly reappears in a weekly disguised as fresh news. Respectfully referred to our eg. teemed Rabbis as a splendid subject for a sermon. "The fate of the world depends on small things." As a hint— suppose, just suppou —that instead of a fig leaf, Eve had picked a leaf of poison ivy. II you think ignorance ISN'T bliss, observe the happy expression of the man who has just bought a used car. High Life l p at seven \\ ash and dress; Eat some breakfast More or less; Crowd on street car, Go to work Hate to do it, Liross like Turk. Work all morning. Out to lunch— Ham and hen fruit, Sadly munch Back to labor, Work till five; Home for dinner— Still alive. Go to movies, Home at ten; Sleep and start All over again. If you praise the world, you are a Poly anna: if you mention its faults, you are a swell headed epic if you merely use discretion, >ou are dumb. Matrimony carries off more single girls than any other epidemic. Institutions of learning are pawnshops where little men and little women borrow for a short span of years the thoughts of the _'ieat. W hen a man meets downtown he always what it will cost him. his wife wonders Necks cause a lot ef trouble— DO) 's necks must be washed—girl's necks must be praised and—; women's necks must be adorned; and necks are what they HANG you by. // you like any of our stuff, take it and gi ve US credit. If you don't want to give US credit, take it and "The De'il take you."


On Wings of Song
By David Ewen
One music season follows an-
other in an inevitable sequence,
like so many waves, carrying up-
on their crests flotsam and jetsam
but occasional shells which con-
tain latent gems. A season has
just passed, another one is about
to arrive,and between the going
and coming it may be wise to re-
flect on what the past has wrought.
And while the coming season is
yet in somnolence and the new
music which it will bring yet un-
heard, we might summon up re-
membrance of things past so that,
with our feet firmly planted in
yesterday we can look more criti-
cally and more penetratingly upon
today.
Felix Mendelssohn it was who
gave birth to a long line of great
Jewish composers. He was the first
of the great composers of his race.
Himself a delicate and sensitive
soul which quivered under the
touch of any exotic influence, his
music is as delicate as he was. Like
Mozart, Mendelssohn seemed to
have an innate genius for express-
ing his messages in silken deli-
cacy. His orchestration is as frag-
ile and as tender as precious china-
ware. Instinctively he chose the
proper balance: he could attain
sonority without becoming pomp-
ons or raucous. And he could
depict sensitive delicacy without
becoming as tenuous and inexpres-
sive as Debussy. Intensely emo-
tional, he was. however, too much
of an artist to permit his music to
froth with vapid passions. He is
restrained ami careful and hi*
emotional outpourings are the re-
actions of a highly sensitive artist.
All the virtues of the Romantic
period--of which he is the epitome
find their embodiment and per-
fection in Mendelssohn's music.
The tender poetry of Schumann,
the effeminate charm of Chopin,
the melodic robustness of Anton
Rubinstein, and the exaggerated
emotions of a Meyerbeer,all
have grown out of Mendelssohn's
music just as Minerva grew out
of the head of Jove. His fellow-
JewsMeyerbeer and his creation
of the Romantic opera, Rubinstein
and his founding of a nationalistic
Russian idiom, Joachim and his
sweeping Hungarian musicimi-
tated Mendelssohn with blindness
and with groping. But they are
lesser personalities, filling in the
period between two giantsFelix
Mendelssohn and Gustav Mahler.
To the great music-audience,
Gustav Mahler is an incompre-
hensible pedant of musical com-
position. But to the scattered few
of learned musiciansas typified
by Arnold Schonberg, Richard
Strauss, Tschaikowsky, Brahms,
Nickisch, etc.he was and is one
of the greatest Titans of the sym-
phony; the first to lead the way
to the moderns. Mahler did not
content himself with tinkling, per-
fumed melodies which deliciously
tickle the ear and the senses but
which are shallow and stagnant.
Mahler did not, like Wagner, revel
but in massive orchestral fabrics;
or even, like Brahms, did he de-
light in the sumptuous, sensuous
ecstasy of human emotions.
Mahler is a metaphysician and
music is his metaphysics. In the
Second Symphony he voices the
tongue of destiny, wherein the
I death of a Hero in his gallant
Promethean struggle to learn what
I life and death really are, is depict-
[ed. The Third Symphony is to
Nature, not overbubbling with a
Beethovian exuberance in the de-
llicious presence of countrysides,
[but rather the outcry of a bewild-
jered Spinozistic Pantheist who
I seeks out the inherent meaning of
I Nature. The Fifth Symphony is
one of the greatest threnodies in
all music, a grim, tragic disserta-
tion on Death. The Eighth is a
Faustian pursuit for the vain hap-
piness and joy of life; the Ninth,
as a gigantic culmination of Mah-
ler's superhuman struggles with
the philosophic problems of life,
is, aptly enough, a docile resigna-
tion to it.
William Mengelherg has called
Mahler's Nine Symphonies greater
than Beethoven's. But the greatest
appreciation of all has come from
the pen of Arnold Schonberg, fore-
most of modern composers, who
dedicated his valuable book on
harmony to the memory of his im-
mortal teacher:
"This book is dedicated to Gus-
tav Mahler. It is hoped that this
dedication might give him some
small joy while he still lived.
"But Gustav Mahler had to fore-
go far greater joys than that which
the book might have brought him.
This martyr, this saint, had to
leave this earth before he had so
far advanced his work as to be
able to hand it over to his friends
in all tranquility.
"I should have contented myself
with offering him this satisfaction.
Hut now that he is dead it is my
wish that my book may bring me
this esteem, that none may gainsay
me when 1 say. Truly he was a
great man!"
Then came the revolt. Music,
it was feared, had become too
mug and complacent: it was too
artificial in the orgiastic orchestra-
tion and SUmptUOUS development
that Wagner had given it, and in
the elaborate emotions of the Ro-
mantics and Brahms. But more
grievous than all this, music was
becoming too stereotyped. Due to
the limited number of scales in
existence, musicit was feared
waa beginning to repeat itself. A
revolt was needed, a revolt against
th' stiff rules of the past. Of this
revolt, Arnold Schonberg was the
prophet.
Arnold Schonberg's idiom is in-
dubitably his own. The "Gurre-
Lieder" has its roots in no other
music; it is a new weird twist in
the language of music. Before the
Gurre-Lieder" Schonberg had com-
posed Verklaerte Nacht lucid.
fluent contrapuntal writing in
which the exquisite mood of a
sensuous night is entrapped in
gossamer, delicate tone-colors. It
remains Schonberg's most beauti-
ful music and one of the high-
peaks of twentieth century music.
Schonberg has always hated
superfluities. One of his earliest
theories was that music, to be sub-
lime, must be denuded of all sup-
erficiality, of all extraneous mater-
ial, of all unnecessary appendages
and must present its terse message
succinctly. Brevity, therefore, is
the soul of Schonberg's wit. One
of his Five Compositions for Or-
chestra is merely six bars! Schon-
berg's orchestration, moreover, is
threadbare and transparent; it
consists only of those instruments
which are absolutely essential to
the message. Schonberg will, there-
fore, seldom use the tympani and
never the triangle, glockenspiel,
snares, etc.all of which color
music but are not essential to it.
He must pierce into the very heart
of music; he must be absolutely
to the point without any subter-
fuge or circumventions; he must
reveal his message in its baldest
altitudes. Of modern composers,
therefore, he is the expressionist.
But somewhere in France, a
group of young talented musicians
felt that Schonberg's brutal aton-
ality and gruesome nudity were
making music too dryland color-
less, too stiff and expressionless.
It feared that music, becoming so
pedantically intellectual, was now
beginning to consist merely of a
bundle of tricks and theories.
It was then that this group the
now famous "French-six" headed
by two Jews, Darius Milhaud and
Arthur Honegger-realized that
music, if it was to achieve sublim-
ity, must blend its gushing emo-
tions of the Romantics with the
stern intellectualism of the mod-
erns. And so, the French six de-
termined to free music from pris-
on of pedagogy and theory. It
hoped, by injecting a light touch
in composing, to make music more
pliantly plastic to various differ-
ent expressions of emotions than
it was under the fingers of other
moderns. The French-six, there-
fore, restored to wit, satire and
irony as means to procure their
deft and sportive style.
They are two musical rascals
Milhaud and Honegger. "Les
Mariees" of Honegger is a master-
piece of satire and the heavy, over-
colored style of Wagner is ridi-
culed deliciouslyespecially the
grandiose funeral march conduct-
ing the dead Siegfried to his grave.
"Pacific 231" is a futuristic tribute
to the machine age. The engine
grates and shrieks and roars. And
one gets a powerful kinacsthetic
sensation in hearing it. Milhaud,
too, uses humor. In one of his
compositions the shimmy is em-
ployedin all its rascally impu-
dence. In another, the mellow
wailings of a Negro appear. He
has borrowed his effects wherever
he could find them, and his music
is completely effective.
In America, in the meanwhile,
the Jazz idiom was fully develop-
ed, and two JewsGeorge Gersh-
win and Aaron Copland-develop-
ed it. They developed polyrythm
and made it a powerful organ of
kinacsthetic expression. Gershwin's
"Rhapsody in Blue" is capricious,
whimsical, humorous but through-
out thoroughly American. In it,
jazz is thoroughly emancipated
and freed from the sterile prison
of Tin-Pan Alley. A miracle of
rhythmic ingenuitywhere changes
of time are achieved by subtle ties
and rubatos and convenient rests
a monument of coherent form
and a ponderous vessel of the wine
of melodic- lyricism, it remains the
outstanding music that America
has brought to the altar of art.
The Jazz Piano-Concerto is an ad-
vance merely in form. In content.
it is equal to the Rhapsody. This
season will tell uswith an
"American in Paris" whether
Gershwin is advancing in his art.
Aaron Copland is not the inspir-
ed musician that Gershwin is but
he is the complete technician. The
"Music for the Theatre" is not
wholly jazz. In this suite of
dances there are unmistakable mo-
ments of it. But, by far, the lovli-
est portions are serious, classical
themes and harmonies. It is the
Jazz Piano Concerto which is Cop-
land's most important work, and
a development of the jazz techni-
que. Jazz, here, adds a warmer
and more lustrous color to the
harmonies; it helps Copland at-
tain the sweeping, dynamic effect
for which he was striving. In the
Concerto, the rhythms interweave
with one another like threads of a
carefully knit scarf. One cannot
tell where they begin or where
they end. They are the rhythms
of debauchery. They rush through
the music like a gust of mighty
wind. All the lyrical themes bend
and sway before them. They fill
the music with a thunderous in-
tensity that locks the work into a
coherent unity.
One other preeminent composer
lives in America, but he composes
his music irrespective of trends
and eras. Ernest Bloch is not a
modernist although he utilizes
modernism. Nor does the vigorous
tongue of jazz interest him. Only
the purely classical music of Beet-
hoven and Brahms has seduced
him and it is in their idiom that
be tries to phrase his message. His
message? At first it was the Jew
the wrinkled, haggard, stooped
Jew on whose face are engraved
the thousand fingerprints of mis-
fortune and hardships but here
his message is cramped. The "Is-
rael Symphony" is not inspired
from beginning to end. It was
when he renounced his Hebrew
idiom that Bloch found himself.
The Quinete is a prophecy. It is
a music whichlike Beethoven's
last quartetsseems to link the
mundane world with the celestial
one. It seems to be a religion of
its own, uniting all of mankind
into an inseparable and undo -
standing brotherhood.
A new season is now yawning
before us. New music by Ernest
Bloch, George Gershwin, Aaron
Copland, Darius Milhaud will re-
ceive performance. Arthur Honeg-
ger is coming here to perform his
latest works. What story will this
Season tell us and what part will
the Jew play in it r* We wait for
an aswer impatienlK.
SOCIETY--Continued
Immediately after the election
of officers at the Welfare Bureau
last Monday night a reception was
held at Staley's in honor of Mr.
P. Schemberg. An ice course was
served and a very pleasant time
was had by all. Among those
present were Mr. and Mrs. P.
Scheinberg, Mrs. M. Schemberg,
Mr. and Mrs. Harry I. Magid, Har-
ry. LipnitZ, Mr. and Mrs. J. Louis
Shochet, Mr. Nathan Adelman and
Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld.
SANDWICH ami BAR
in Heart
OF BUSINESS
DOWNTOWN
SECTION
Very Little Cath
W. L. WILLIAMS
252 HALCYON ARCADE
Phone 368 to
Announcing the Removal of
AHERN FUNERAL
HOME
to 1224 S. W. First St.
Ranking Second to None
FRANCIS AHERN. Pret.
AMBULANCE SERVICE ------ Phone 2332t
-
-H
TEMPL1
THEATR _
N. W. River Drive and 3rd St.
Today and Tomorrow
A. J. Kleist, Jr., Presents
The Burton-Garrett
Players
In
"THE WHOLE
TOWN'S
TALKING"
2:30 Saturday Matinee
8:15 at Night
Nifhl Price,. 23c. SOc. 7Sc and II 00
I.WHi:* HAHUAIN MATI.VKK
Every Wed. Afternoon 25c
For Seal Reaervaliona, Phone 4700
or at Burdine'a
Next Week, Opening Sunday
"PIGS"
A Pleasant Surprise
Awaits you at the opening of
our new place designed to
please your every desire for
b cool, co.nfortable restaurant
serving clean, home cooked
and wholesome
KOSHER FOOD
Al Reasonable Prices
Palatial
Kosher Restaurant
Uf V E. ltd STREET
Miami Showcase
&
Fixture Co.
(jeneral Contractors and
Manufacturers of
STORK FRONTS
MM
STORE FIXTLRKS
228 S. Miami Avenue
Phone 22168
FOR REAL QUALITY
KOSHER MEAT
TENNESSEE
CANNOT BE BEAT
TENNESSEE
KOSHER MARKET
166 N. W. 5th STREET
Phone 21514
I
HAVE YOU
SUBSCRIBED FOR
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN ?
"The Best Way to reach a man's heart is through his stomach"
is an age old saying, but true never the less and we're on the job
to help you do it. For real Jewish delicatessen that man, wo-
man or child may desire, or a real meal, your only destination is
ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN
AND RESTAURANT
170 N. W. FIFTH STREET
"Perpetual Care"
WOODLAWN BURIAL PARK
When on the Tamiami Trail, we shall be pleased to have you in-
spect our new Jewish section, operated according to the Jewish
ritual.
t
.-.
mm



PAGE 1

On Wings of Song By David Ewen One music season follows another in an inevitable sequence, like so many waves, carrying upon their crests flotsam and jetsam but occasional shells which contain latent gems. A season has just passed, another one is about to arrive,—and between the going and coming it may be wise to reflect on what the past has wrought. And while the coming season is yet in somnolence and the new music which it will bring yet unheard, we might summon up remembrance of things past so that, with our feet firmly planted in yesterday we can look more critically and more penetratingly upon today. Felix Mendelssohn it was who gave birth to a long line of great Jewish composers. He was the first of the great composers of his race. Himself a delicate and sensitive soul which quivered under the touch of any exotic influence, his music is as delicate as he was. Like Mozart, Mendelssohn seemed to have an innate genius for expressing his messages in silken delicacy. His orchestration is as fragile and as tender as precious chinaware. Instinctively he chose the proper balance: he could attain sonority without becoming pompons or raucous. And he could depict sensitive delicacy without becoming as tenuous and inexpressive as Debussy. Intensely emotional, he was. however, too much of an artist to permit his music to froth with vapid passions. He is restrained ami careful and hi* emotional outpourings are the reactions of a highly sensitive artist. All the virtues of the Romantic period--of which he is the epitome —find their embodiment and perfection in Mendelssohn's music. The tender poetry of Schumann, the effeminate charm of Chopin, the melodic robustness of Anton Rubinstein, and the exaggerated emotions of a Meyerbeer,—all have grown out of Mendelssohn's music just as Minerva grew out of the head of Jove. His fellowJews—Meyerbeer and his creation of the Romantic opera, Rubinstein and his founding of a nationalistic Russian idiom, Joachim and his sweeping Hungarian music—imitated Mendelssohn with blindness and with groping. But they are lesser personalities, filling in the period between two giants—Felix Mendelssohn and Gustav Mahler. To the great music-audience, Gustav Mahler is an incomprehensible pedant of musical composition. But to the scattered few of learned musicians—as typified by Arnold Schonberg, Richard Strauss, Tschaikowsky, Brahms, Nickisch, etc.—he was and is one of the greatest Titans of the symphony; the first to lead the way to the moderns. Mahler did not content himself with tinkling, perfumed melodies which deliciously tickle the ear and the senses but which are shallow and stagnant. Mahler did not, like Wagner, revel but in massive orchestral fabrics; or even, like Brahms, did he delight in the sumptuous, sensuous ecstasy of human emotions. Mahler is a metaphysician and music is his metaphysics. In the Second Symphony he voices the tongue of destiny, wherein the I death of a Hero in his gallant Promethean struggle to learn what I life and death really are, is depict[ed. The Third Symphony is to Nature, not overbubbling with a Beethovian exuberance in the dellicious presence of countrysides, [but rather the outcry of a bewildjered Spinozistic Pantheist who I seeks out the inherent meaning of I Nature. The Fifth Symphony is one of the greatest threnodies in all music, a grim, tragic dissertation on Death. The Eighth is a Faustian pursuit for the vain happiness and joy of life; the Ninth, as a gigantic culmination of Mahler's superhuman struggles with the philosophic problems of life, is, aptly enough, a docile resignation to it. William Mengelherg has called Mahler's Nine Symphonies greater than Beethoven's. But the greatest appreciation of all has come from the pen of Arnold Schonberg, foremost of modern composers, who dedicated his valuable book on harmony to the memory of his immortal teacher: "This book is dedicated to Gustav Mahler. It is hoped that this dedication might give him some small joy while he still lived. "But Gustav Mahler had to forego far greater joys than that which the book might have brought him. This martyr, this saint, had to leave this earth before he had so far advanced his work as to be able to hand it over to his friends in all tranquility. "I should have contented myself with offering him this satisfaction. Hut now that he is dead it is my wish that my book may bring me this esteem, that none may gainsay me when 1 say. Truly he was a great man!" Then came the revolt. Music, it was feared, had become too %  mug and complacent: it was too artificial in the orgiastic orchestration and SUmptUOUS development that Wagner had given it, and in the elaborate emotions of the Romantics and Brahms. But more grievous than all this, music was becoming too stereotyped. Due to the limited number of scales in existence, music—it was feared— waa beginning to repeat itself. A revolt was needed, a revolt against th' stiff rules of the past. Of this revolt, Arnold Schonberg was the prophet. Arnold Schonberg's idiom is indubitably his own. The "GurreLieder" has its roots in no other music; it is a new weird twist in the language of music. Before the Gurre-Lieder" Schonberg had composed Verklaerte Nacht — lucid. fluent contrapuntal writing in which the exquisite mood of a sensuous night is entrapped in gossamer, delicate tone-colors. It remains Schonberg's most beautiful music and one of the highpeaks of twentieth century music. Schonberg has always hated superfluities. One of his earliest theories was that music, to be sublime, must be denuded of all superficiality, of all extraneous material, of all unnecessary appendages and must present its terse message succinctly. Brevity, therefore, is the soul of Schonberg's wit. One of his Five Compositions for Orchestra is merely six bars! Schonberg's orchestration, moreover, is threadbare and transparent; it consists only of those instruments which are absolutely essential to the message. Schonberg will, therefore, seldom use the tympani and never the triangle, glockenspiel, snares, etc.—all of which color music but are not essential to it. He must pierce into the very heart of music; he must be absolutely to the point without any subterfuge or circumventions; he must reveal his message in its baldest altitudes. Of modern composers, therefore, he is the expressionist. But somewhere in France, a group of young talented musicians felt that Schonberg's brutal atonality and gruesome nudity were making music too dryland colorless, too stiff and expressionless. It feared that music, becoming so pedantically intellectual, was now beginning to consist merely of a bundle of tricks and theories. It was then that this group —the now famous "French-six" headed by two Jews, Darius Milhaud and Arthur Honegger—-realized that music, if it was to achieve sublimity, must blend its gushing emotions of the Romantics with the stern intellectualism of the moderns. And so, the French six determined to free music from prison of pedagogy and theory. It hoped, by injecting a light touch in composing, to make music more pliantly plastic to various different expressions of emotions than it was under the fingers of other moderns. The French-six, therefore, restored to wit, satire and irony as means to procure their deft and sportive style. They are two musical rascals— Milhaud and Honegger. "Les Mariees" of Honegger is a masterpiece of satire and the heavy, overcolored style of Wagner is ridiculed deliciously—especially the grandiose funeral march conducting the dead Siegfried to his grave. "Pacific 231" is a futuristic tribute to the machine age. The engine grates and shrieks and roars. And one gets a powerful kinacsthetic sensation in hearing it. Milhaud, too, uses humor. In one of his compositions the shimmy is employed—in all its rascally impudence. In another, the mellow wailings of a Negro appear. He has borrowed his effects wherever he could find them, and his music is completely effective. In America, in the meanwhile, the Jazz idiom was fully developed, and two Jews—George Gershwin and Aaron Copland-—developed it. They developed polyrythm and made it a powerful organ of kinacsthetic expression. Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue" is capricious, whimsical, humorous but throughout thoroughly American. In it, jazz is thoroughly emancipated and freed from the sterile prison of Tin-Pan Alley. A miracle of rhythmic ingenuity—where changes of time are achieved by subtle ties and rubatos and convenient rests —a monument of coherent form and a ponderous vessel of the wine of melodiclyricism, it remains the outstanding music that America has brought to the altar of art. The Jazz Piano-Concerto is an advance merely in form. In content. it is equal to the Rhapsody. This season will tell us—with an "American in Paris" — whether Gershwin is advancing in his art. Aaron Copland is not the inspired musician that Gershwin is but he is the complete technician. The "Music for the Theatre" is not wholly jazz. In this suite of dances there are unmistakable moments of it. But, by far, the lovliest portions are serious, classical themes and harmonies. It is the Jazz Piano Concerto which is Copland's most important work, and a development of the jazz technique. Jazz, here, adds a warmer and more lustrous color to the harmonies; it helps Copland attain the sweeping, dynamic effect for which he was striving. In the Concerto, the rhythms interweave with one another like threads of a carefully knit scarf. One cannot tell where they begin or where they end. They are the rhythms of debauchery. They rush through the music like a gust of mighty wind. All the lyrical themes bend and sway before them. They fill the music with a thunderous intensity that locks the work into a coherent unity. One other preeminent composer lives in America, but he composes his music irrespective of trends and eras. Ernest Bloch is not a modernist — although he utilizes modernism. Nor does the vigorous tongue of jazz interest him. Only the purely classical music of Beethoven and Brahms has seduced him and it is in their idiom that be tries to phrase his message. His message? At first it was the Jew the wrinkled, haggard, stooped Jew on whose face are engraved the thousand fingerprints of misfortune and hardships but here his message is cramped. The "Israel Symphony" is not inspired from beginning to end. It was when he renounced his Hebrew idiom that Bloch found himself. The Quinete is a prophecy. It is a music which—like Beethoven's last quartets—seems to link the mundane world with the celestial one. It seems to be a religion of its own, uniting all of mankind into an inseparable and undo standing brotherhood. A new season is now yawning before us. New music by Ernest Bloch, George Gershwin, Aaron Copland, Darius Milhaud will receive performance. Arthur Honegger is coming here to perform his latest works. What story will this Season tell us and what part will the Jew play in it r* We wait for an aswer impatienlK. SOCIETY--Continued Immediately after the election of officers at the Welfare Bureau last Monday night a reception was held at Staley's in honor of Mr. P. Schemberg. An ice course was served and a very pleasant time was had by all. Among those present were Mr. and Mrs. P. Scheinberg, Mrs. M. Schemberg, Mr. and Mrs. Harry I. Magid, Harry. LipnitZ, Mr. and Mrs. J. Louis Shochet, Mr. Nathan Adelman and Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld. SANDWICH ami BAR in Heart OF BUSINESS DOWNTOWN SECTION Very Little Cath W. L. WILLIAMS 252 HALCYON ARCADE Phone 368 to Announcing the Removal of AHERN FUNERAL HOME to 1224 S. W. First St. Ranking Second to None FRANCIS AHERN. Pret. AMBULANCE SERVICE Phone 2332t -H TEMPL1 THEATR N. W. River Drive and 3rd St. Today and Tomorrow A. J. Kleist, Jr., Presents The Burton-Garrett Players —In— "THE WHOLE TOWN'S TALKING" 2:30 Saturday Matinee 8:15 at Night Nifhl Price,. 23c. SOc. 7Sc and II 00 I.WHi:* HAHUAIN MATI.VKK Every Wed. Afternoon — 25c For Seal Reaervaliona, Phone 4700 or at Burdine'a Next Week, Opening Sunday— "PIGS" A Pleasant Surprise Awaits you at the opening of our new place designed to please your every desire for B cool, co.nfortable restaurant serving clean, home cooked and wholesome KOSHER FOOD Al Reasonable Prices Palatial Kosher Restaurant Uf V E. ltd STREET Miami Showcase & Fixture Co. (jeneral Contractors and Manufacturers of STORK FRONTS MM STORE FIXTLRKS 228 S. Miami Avenue Phone 22168 FOR REAL QUALITY KOSHER MEAT TENNESSEE CANNOT BE BEAT TENNESSEE KOSHER MARKET 166 N. W. 5th STREET Phone 21514 I HAVE YOU SUBSCRIBED FOR THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN ? "The Best Way to reach a man's heart is through his stomach" is an age old saying, but true never the less and we're on the job to help you do it. For real Jewish delicatessen that man, woman or child may desire, or a real meal, your only destination is ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN AND RESTAURANT 170 N. W. FIFTH STREET "Perpetual Care" WOODLAWN BURIAL PARK When on the Tamiami Trail, we shall be pleased to have you inspect our new Jewish section, operated according to the Jewish ritual. t .-. mm





SOCIETY
A verv enjovable afternoon va-
.-eminent in i
Je*.- M"
P. Sdwiul 5h" nandoah at a
Brids:'- partv given in booo)
Mr-, Hellei Havana. Prize*
_*arded to the I orer
at each table an i i H -t prize to
booor. After the
game a buffet lunch was served in
the dining room. The table **
ited *:th cut flowers
and fern-, and the centerpiece
-: : an antique lace
ri- hl> arrangi
\rr;or:j tb Mrs,
.. I \r Bowitx, Mrs. Max
Ghertler. Mrs. I-idore Cohen. Mrs,
Harrj I Magid, Mr-. M. Sehein-
berg. Mrs. J. L Sbochet, Mrs. Abe
Aronov.it/. Mr-. E Cohen of New
York Cit\. Mr?. Richter. Mrs. Set
den, Mr-. K. J. Wolpert. Mr?. Jack
Bern-t'' :.. Mr?. Bernard Gordon.
Mrs. Seiden. and the guest of hot.-
or Mr?. HelW.
Mr-. \:.:..i Benjamin
loved Tr- Wei-
Bureau, honored and estemed

with I

-t.v- y- j- in ('
mania her native countn
.-lit risit bei relatives. Mr-.
smin ha- promu
of her ez| while in Eu
:...- the
"The Jewi-h Floridian" and her
lea trill shortly appear.
I -ngratulation? are being ex-
Mr. and Mr-. L > SI
iro upon the arrival of a son ^ ed-
it the J Mem-
I' M ther and ton
are d thank you.
Rudkh i- a- happy as
-.me of the bird? he s*-ll-.
Mr. and Mr-. I. .:- Illoomfield
rtained last I lesdav nisht at
-
who has
New *1 rk <.itv.
eautiiully
- i v ith
Mrs. .1 Berg. Mi nd Mrs W.
I \\ Mr. and Mr-. !
'.iifield. Mr. and Mrs. frank
Mr. and Mr-. Harry
Smith and daughter >: Piti-.- ^r^'h.
Th' 'A Lillian
Drench to Peter Jacob? of Chi-
i 1^0. 111. ha- ju-t r*-n annoir
Drei the daughter of
Mr. and Mr-. H. M. Drevi h who
I .' been residenui ( Miami for
a numl its.
Mi?- !'- it h wl is now %i-it-
latives in Chi if pei t-
ed to return to Miami shortly,
^hi' ;:ient v. ill be
madi z date.
Mr. Arnold Volpe one of the
popolar and beloved i<-ader-
- al in the versil
Miami has ju^t returned wi'h
Mrs. \ '.!pe from a tour thr
Europe, and n to
enlarge musical work at the Uni-
ty. He will resume da i
at the University this week.
FOR STORE FIXTURES
BERNER STORE
EQUIPMENT CO.
824 N. E, 1st Avenue
PHONE 31361
One of the Social events of the
rriase of Beatrice
H.-: : Mr. Je>?^ Saltzberg la*t
night at the Alcazar
The ballroom of the hotel
va- beaatrfnlh decorated and af-
forded a .-ndid setting for
the beautiful gowns of the bridal
party.
The maid of honor was Mini
. Harri-. a -ister of the bride.
Matri of Honor were: Mrs. Svd-
ney Avner and Mr?. E. B. Saltz-
Bridesmaids were Miss Ad-
- and Harriet Saltzberg.
Mr. E. B. Saltzberg acted as
best mat I mien v.'-re: Syd-
\vner. Leo Ackerman. Larry
Taul*r and Baron de Hirsch Mey-
er.
Aaron Farr head of the Glee
Club of the University of Miami
and one of the prominent music-
ian? of this city played the wed-
ding march. Mr-. H. U. Feibel-
mar. "0. Promise Me."
Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan of
Tempi- I-ra*-! :r. iated at the
remony.
Immi liateh after the ceremony
utiful n j served to
the larj-- numl"-: -
was I bv all.
["he I ridal couple left for a trip
* ith 1 tl if f. nermoon.
1 ngratul ihow-
ipon Mr. and Mr-. David
G pon the arrival of a
- week. Both
mother and daughter are in splen-
did health and enjoying their itaj
at th* Jackson Memorial HospitaL
Mr. and Mr-. Morris Small en-
tertained at Bridge la-t Sundav
night at their horn*- in R
in honor of Mr. and Mr?. Harry
I-. -. Among present were
Mr. tnd Mrs. Moe kurman. Mr.
Mrs. U>e Kurman. Mr. an^
\\ rlarrj Isaa> -. Mr. and Mr-.
\i. Banks and Mr. and Mrs.
J. I. bet Beautiful pri/^
L \t a late hour re-
!
Mr. and Mr-. J dler will
the Bar Mitzva of their
Irvine, it Beth Dav id I
oi 5 turdaj mon ing. I > t-
27th at 9:30 a. m. Immedi-
ately after the services refresh-
ment- will he served to all the
lesti and *r.r?hipperi in the
- of the i .-._- station
bj the parent- of the Bar Mitzva.
The numerous friend- of I>-v* i-
Brown were shocked to hear of
illness due to an infection of
the foot which k*-pt him at home.
We join with hi? host of friends
u wishing him a peedy re over]
I "Rafua Shtaymo, and glad
11 lrf> out in a few d,:
We ar>- happ) to learn of the
rn to Miami of R -
ton Berney and her
an extended trip
. While in Phil-
adelphia Mr-. Bernej was taken
ill but i? now in her u?uaul good
health.
FLAGLER DRV CLEANERS
Cleaning. Pressing, Dyeing: and
Repairing:
472 W. Hazier St.
Phoo. 11260
} :' Prrvmiioi of Yof Clott-"
Bnai Brith News
At a recent meeting of the exec-
utive board of the Sholem Lodge
of Bnai Brith. it *a- reported that
the Elks Club had been secured
as a regular meeting hall for the
Lodge. Tho-e h<- bai e v. -
the Elks Club lodge room know
that it i? an ideal location for
Bnai Brilh meetu..-. afJ ding the
necesrorv setting for the -plendid
meeting? the Bnai Brith proposal
fj )
B- -:r:r.:r._- witih the first Thars-
d3> in November, regular meet-
_ will be held on the first and
third Thursday of each and ever]
month. Social affair? v.ill alter-
nate with bu?iness meeting-. All
local member?, their friends and
all members of Bnai Brith vho are
in Miami are urgently requested
to attend the meeting? and help
infuse new life into the local
Lodge.
Forbidden Fruit
By B- -. I1 m
T''ie art the wit Wf
on* max end by one r-.an. I' rot folks
*an: to /:< -
on k -
A respectabk Turkish woman,
t thought
below tl her
. than would our *o
men have th E her
leg

f r a Turkish woman, bow
pretty she might havi u, to
show below the ridge of
hf-r nose. the depth ol irnmor-
alitv-an immoralit] a- de-p down
a- that in one of our women vho
been so brazen as to
leg, however shapely
it might have been, to show above
the ankle-bone. So that while the
moral? of the Turki-: were
mea*urt-d bv \\\<- ar>-a ;' face thev
showed 1-elov* th*- bridge of the
nose, those of the Amerit an wo
men were measured bj the an
leg that showed above the ankle
both ?ubject to the emphatic
qualification, "before tht [>
All of whi set I i
thinking. '-\-n t>. wondering, whet-
irkisl >uth in tl
>f Kemal.
in th>- reign re less
moral in th'-. \ ation bj
: i eir you
nine fa-"- and femil
legs, than were their sires and
grand-ir--- t-> whom such si
were forbidden fruit.
After all. i? there not a lot of
hvpocris] in the clamor we h-ar.
that we are living in a decadent
agethat our youth is unmoral
in their melt away and deprive
depravity of it- -u-tenance. Re-
move the mv?terv that begets curb
"-it\ and the muddled and mud-
died mind of the youth will come
forth clear and clean.
Although I have no ?tati-ti' tn
i>ear me out. I believe, as I look
back to the turbulent day? of Com-
BtO> k. that th- i in ulation of ob-
-riitv in literature at that time
v%a- a- large, in proportion t<
uation, or even larger than it
i- today. There were not nearh
SO many printing? to tho?e books
of other dav- as there are to the
11 daj 1.....k-. but the) were
del; circulated from hand t >
hand, that the] continued to be
read and pas-ed. long after their
covers uere literally worn awav
from the handling. I blame the
Comstock clamor for .hi? condi
tion. the clamor that aroused an
intense curiosity in the moronic
mind. ju?t as the clamor against a
certain story in a certain magazine
some months ago swept the new--
stands clear of the magazine ar.d
brought the story to the attention
of thousands who Other* buj would
never have heard of it.
- iiiation ^ another naned) 'or
cenhj and its l!
i- not
divides

difi. bettei n
in qns k-r time than wili c\
and supp U is nol i!
lirv that attractfl the public to
d book or a playit i- thai in-
:il to want that vvhi'h is
forbiddenthe irrestible tempi i-
tion t'. taste of thoforbidden fi iil
- destroys de-ire. Eyi n
. thai books bordering
upon obscenity are disappointing
the coffers of their publishers and
that nast) plays are being taken
off the boards, not because their
producer? had become virtuous,
but becawsf they no longer attract
a public who have become so sati-
ated that na?tine?- has no further
intere-t for them.
For the obscene books thai I; ve
flooded the country in the last f JW
vear? I have an utter disgust for
the obscenista who pose as literary
lights but who are onb potboiling
perverts, I have the same contempt
a- for anv other pervert. Yet I
."t approve "l the policv of
iression. It i- lik'- smothei ing
and letting the fire smold-
minably.
Xoi do I believe thai the i Id
i- v Bui I do |p"li.-\.-
that : ho have a de ade
or two al us in this \ ale ol
sunshine, ill live to the pi
lem that i? here discussed, much
loser to solution than it i- today.
And having thought over the in li-
ter, and wondered over it. I now
believe that the Turki-h youth of
the reign of Kemal, and the Ameri-
can youth of the reign of Coolidge,
:.ir more moral in their genera-
tion than w- their Bires and
dsires said with all dm- i
spect to our elder-.
Dr.- G. J. Gerson
th. nii.-.val of hi*
Mesannins Floor of
Cromer-Canaeirs
Yours For a Paper
That Is
l.iv. Awake and Fp-to-Date
MORRIS .SMALL
For the Best of Workmanship
On Your Car, See
THE DONERIGHT
GARAGE
All work ,nd Prtt GoanalMd. Stor,(.
IS S W if nmmr Jo7
OLDSMOBILE
"The fine car of low price"
AUBREY E.
GREEN, INC.
\ I h ..n. Boalr>ir I
PI :%M
AITO (.LASS
Installed bv Experts while
you wait al reasonable prices
East Coast Glass Co.
1313 N. Bavshore Drive
I'hone 33371
The Bank of Personal Service
THE THIRD NATIONAL BANK
OF MIAMI33 N. E. First Ave.
Total Resources, Close of Business, Oct. 3. 1928$1,356,538.43
RECORD OF (.ROW III
- -.
- - -"
' .
- (71 "- "
- 68J '
uim ERS
. 12 ;
I" I VMM Wl -
wm ( inn
w vi.viv
K I) ll-IIHl .
II J -11111\
I I li .
.....CWireu-
P..
Vke-Prwidrt:
.Vka Pr*drp:
Cukur
AMilUat Cjh. :
P. J. Davis Corporation
Contractors and Builders
202 CALUMET BUILDING
THAT WOXDERFUT, \KW di;i\K Burmn IOI cold
T A K A B 0 0 S T 5c
Trr tki. {.n. TkAboo,t" -h mOk .un.hmg .nd IrffMhin, a-a ^k-
!' "" W dnnk -"* *"h FU" 'lk ^1 "" t. k^.
19 N. E. SECOND AVENUE
HIPPODROME BlILDINC
SOITHERV TAK ABOOST CO s. ,_ E,CHTH Amm



PAGE 1

SOCIETY A verv enjovable afternoon va%  .-eminent in i Je*.• • %  M" P. Sdwiul 5h" nandoah at a Brids:'partv given in booo) Mr-, Hellei Havana. Prize* _*arded to the I orer at each table an i i H -t prize to booor. After the game a buffet lunch was served in the dining room. The table ** %  ited *:th cut flowers and fern-, and the centerpiece -:• : an antique lace rihl> arrangi \rr;or:j tb • %  % % %  • Mrs, .. I \r Bowitx, Mrs. Max Ghertler. Mrs. I-idore Cohen. Mrs, Harrj I Magid, Mr-. M. Seheinberg. Mrs. J. L Sbochet, Mrs. Abe Aronov.it/. Mr-. E Cohen of New York Cit\. Mr?. Richter. Mrs. Set den, Mr-. K. J. Wolpert. Mr?. Jack Bern-t'' :.. Mr?. Bernard Gordon. Mrs. Seiden. and the guest of hot.or Mr?. HelW. Mr-. \:.:..i Benjamin loved TrWeiBureau, honored and estemed • with I • -t.vyJin (' mania her native countn • .-lit % %  risit bei relatives. Mr-. smin hapromu of her ez| while in Eu :...the "The Jewi-h Floridian" and her lea trill shortly appear. I -ngratulation? are being exMr. and Mr-. L > SI iro upon the arrival of a son ^ edit the J %  MemI' M ther and ton are d %  %  thank you. Rudkh iahappy as -•.me of the bird? he s*-ll-. Mr. and Mr-. I. .:Illoomfield rtained last I lesdav nisht at • who has New *1 %  rk <.itv eautiiully .• i v ith Mrs. .1 Berg. Mi nd Mrs W. I \\ Mr. and Mr-. '. %  iifield. Mr. and Mrs. frank Mr. and Mr-. Harry Smith and daughter •>: Piti-.^r^'h. Th' 'A Lillian Drench to Peter Jacob? of Chii 1^0. 111. haju-t r*-n annoir Drei the daughter of Mr. and Mr-. H. M. Drevi h who I %  % %  %  been residenui %  •( Miami for a numl • ITS. Mi?!'-• % %  it h wl is now % i -it% %  latives in Chi if %  pei ted to return to Miami shortly, ^hi' ;:ient v. ill be madi z date. Mr. Arnold Volpe one of the popolar and beloved i<-aderal in the versil • Miami has ju^t returned wi'h Mrs. \ '.!pe from a tour thr Europe, and n to enlarge musical work at the Unity. He will re sum e da i at the University this week. FOR STORE FIXTURES BERNER STORE EQUIPMENT CO. 824 N. E, 1st Avenue PHONE 31361 One of the Social events of the rriase of Beatrice H.-: : Mr. Je>?^ Saltzberg la*t night at the Alcazar The ballroom of the hotel vabeaatrfnlh decorated and afforded a .-ndid setting for the beautiful gowns of the bridal party. The maid of honor was Mini Harri-. a -ister of the bride. Matri •of Honor were: Mrs. Svdney Avner and Mr?. E. B. SaltzBridesmaids were Miss Adand Harriet Saltzberg. Mr. E. B. Saltzberg acted as best mat I mien v.'-re: Syd\vner. Leo Ackerman. Larry Taul*r and Baron de Hirsch Meyer. Aaron Farr head of the Glee Club of the University of Miami and one of the prominent musician? of this city played the wedding march. Mr-. H. U. Feibelmar. "0. Promise Me." Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan of TempiI-ra*-! :r. iated at the remony. Immi liateh after the ceremony %  utiful n j served to the larj-numl"-: was I bv all. ["he I ridal couple left for a trip ith 1 tl • if f. nermoon. 1 ngratul ihowipon Mr. and Mr-. David G pon the arrival of a week. Both mother and daughter are in splendid health and enjoying their itaj at th* Jackson Memorial HospitaL Mr. and Mr-. Morris Small entertained at Bridge la-t Sundav night at their horn*in R in honor of Mr. and Mr?. Harry I-. -. Among %  ••• present were Mr. tnd Mrs. Moe kurman. Mr. Mrs. U>e Kurman. Mr. an^ \\ rlarrj Isaa> -. Mr. and Mr-. \i. Banks and Mr. and Mrs. J. I. bet Beautiful pri/^ L \t a late hour re%  %  Mr. and Mr-. J dler will the Bar Mitzva of their Irvine, it Beth Dav id I oi 5 turdaj mon ing. I > t27th at 9:30 a. m. Immediately after the services refreshmentwill he served to all the lesti and *r.r?hipperi in the of the i .-._•-• station bj the parentof the Bar Mitzva. The numerous friendof I>-v* iBrown were shocked to hear of %  illness due to an infection of the foot which k*-pt him at home. We join with hi? host of friends u wishing him a peedy re over] I "Rafua Shtaymo, and glad 11 lrf> out in a few d,: We ar>happ) to learn of the rn to Miami of R -• ton Berney and her an extended trip While in Philadelphia Mr-. Bernej was taken ill but i? now in her u?uaul good health. FLAGLER DRV CLEANERS Cleaning. Pressing, Dyeing: and Repairing: 472 W. Hazier St. Phoo. 11260 } %  :'— Prrvmiioi of Yof Clott-" Bnai Brith News At a recent meeting of the executive board of the Sholem Lodge of Bnai Brith. it *areported that the Elks Club had been secured as a regular meeting hall for the Lodge. Tho-e h in November, regular meet_ will be held on the first and third Thursday of each and ever] month. Social affair? v.ill alternate with bu?iness meeting-. All local member?, their friends and all members of Bnai Brith vho are in Miami are urgently requested to attend the meeting? and help infuse new life into the local Lodge. Forbidden Fruit By B-. I 1 m T''ie art the wit %  Wf on* max end by one r-.an. I' rot folks *an: to /:<• on K A respectabk Turkish woman, t-a %  •;' face thev showed 1-elov* th*bridge of the nose, those of the Amerit an wo men were measured bj the an leg that showed above the ankle —both ?ubject to the emphatic qualification, "before tht [> % %  All of whi set I i thinking. '-\-n t>. wondering, whetirkisl >uth in tl %  >f Kemal. in th>reign re less moral in th'-. \ ation bj : %  %  • i eir you nine fa-"and femil legs, than were their sires and grand-ir--t-> whom such si were forbidden fruit. After all. i? there not a lot of hvpocris] in the clamor we h-ar. that we are living in a decadent age—that our youth is unmoral in their melt away and deprive depravity of it-u-tenance. Remove the mv?terv that begets curb "-it\ and the muddled and muddied mind of the youth will come forth clear and clean. Although I have no ?tati-ti' tn i>ear me out. I believe, as I look back to the turbulent day? of ComBtO> k. that thi in ulation of ob-••riitv in literature at that time v%aalarge, in proportion t< uation, or even larger than it itoday. There were not nearh SO many printing? to tho?e books of other davas there are to the 11 daj 1 k-. but the) were del; circulated from hand t > hand, that the] continued to be read and pas-ed. long after their covers uere literally worn awav from the handling. I blame the Comstock clamor for .hi? condi tion. the clamor that aroused an intense curiosity in the moronic mind. ju?t as the clamor against a certain story in a certain magazine some months ago swept the new-stands clear of the magazine ar.d brought the story to the attention of thousands who Other* buj would never have heard of it. iiiation ^ another naned) 'or cenhj and its l! inot • divides %  %  difi. bettei n in qns k-r time than wili c\ and supp U is nol i! lirv that attractfl the public to d book or a play—it ithai in:il to want that vvhi'h is forbidden—the irrestible tempi ition t'. taste of thoforbidden fi iil %  • destroys de-ire. Eyi n thai books bordering upon obscenity are disappointing the coffers of their publishers and that nast) plays are being taken off the boards, not because their producer? had become virtuous, but becawsf they no longer attract a public who have become so satiated that na?tine?has no further intere-t for them. For the obscene books thai I; ve flooded the country in the last f JW vear? I have an utter disgust for the obscenista who pose as literary lights but who are onb potboiling perverts, I have the same contempt afor anv other pervert. Yet I ."t approve "l the policv of iression. It ilik'smothei ing and letting the fire smoldminably. Xoi do I believe thai the %  i Id iv Bui I do |p"li.-\.that : %  ho have a de ade or two al us in this \ ale ol sunshine, ill live to -••• %  the pi lem that i? here discussed, much %  loser to solution than it itoday. And having thought over the in liter, and wondered over it. I now believe that the Turki-h youth of the reign of Kemal, and the American youth of the reign of Coolidge, :.ir more moral in their generation than wtheir Bires and dsires said with all dmi • spect to our elder-. Dr.G. J. Gerson th. nii.-.val of hi* Mesannins Floor of Cromer-Canaeirs Yours For a Paper That Is l.iv. Awake and Fp-to-Date MORRIS .SMALL For the Best of Workmanship On Your Car, See THE DONERIGHT GARAGE All work ,nd Prtt GoanalMd. Stor, ( IS S W if %  nmmr Jo7 OLDSMOBILE "The fine car of low price" AUBREY E. GREEN, INC. \ I %  h • ..n. Boalr>ir I PI :%M AITO (.LASS Installed bv Experts while you wait al reasonable prices East Coast Glass Co. 1313 N. Bavshore Drive I'hone 33371 The Bank of Personal Service THE THIRD NATIONAL BANK OF MIAMI—33 N. E. First Ave. Total Resources, Close of Business, Oct. 3. 1928—$1,356,538.43 RECORD OF (.ROW III • -. -" %  (71 "" • %  •68J uim ERS %  12 ; I" I VMM Wl WM ( inn w vi.viv K I) ll-IIHl II J -11111\ I I li CWireuP.. • Vke-Prwidrt: .Vka Pr*drp: Cukur AMilUat Cjh. : P. J. Davis Corporation Contractors and Builders 202 CALUMET BUILDING THAT WOXDERFUT, \KW DI;I\K Burmn IOI COLD T A K A B 0 0 S T — 5c Trr tki. {.n. TkAboo,t" -„h mOk .un.hmg .nd IrffMhin, a-a ^k!'£ "" W dnnk -"* *" h FU lk ^1 "" t. k^. 19 N. E. SECOND AVENUE HIPPODROME BlILDINC SOITHERV TAK ABOOST CO „, s ,_ E CHTH Amm


'he Value of Athletics
[knowledge of football
Essential to Enjoy the Game
As the season of football looms
nto the horizon and its followers
re confronted with the realization
Jiat football games are in the off-
ing, artists the world over show a
tendency to draw upon fans of
Football in a stadium as illustra-
tions for their periodicals and
magazines. The usual inference is
that the female fans attend games
if or the purpose of displaying their
hew raiment and that the male fan
[goes to the game for the purpose
[of drinking himself into glorious
[oblivion. Unquestionably the por-
[trayals or sketches are gross exag-
gerations in themselves but to my
I mind there is a tinge of truth in
their conception meaning that few
I fans or spectators understand foot-
ball well.
In the early days of football
history, science was a thing un-
heard of, but with the approach
of the open game and the time,
money and interest spent for the
development of individuals and
teams, we find that football has
become the most scientific of
sports, and its science as a general
rule is within the knowledge of the
players, the coach, and a few
close observers of football. Gen-
erally it sems the spectators do not
begin to understand or realize the
significant features of each play,
their execution and result, but are
only cognizant of a forward pass
being made, a long run perform-
ed or a touchdown or place kick
scored.
To enjoy football in the manner
it should be enjoyed, one should
know the fine points of tackling,
blocking, running the team and to
understand their importance. The
purpose of this article centers in
that statement. It is my wish to
inform you and apprise you of the
fact that football games can be a
great deal more enjoyable to you
were you to read football articles
wherein football is discussed, pay
more attention to the individual
players of the team other than the
one who is carrying the ball, and
realize that without the aid of the
other ten men, the ball carrier can
never advance. Learn the football
rules so that a penalty during the
game can be easily understood by
you. Upon following these
thoughts out you will find your-
self, not a mere spectator at a foot-
ball game, but one who knows
football, and you will find that
your ability to perceive the intric-
acies of the game will enhance
your enjoyment of if.
If any of the readers care to
ask questions about football, I
shall be glad for you to do so,
and a line in this newspaper will
reach me, and I in turn shall en-
deavor to make an appropriate
answer through the medium of
this newspaper.
Moses Mendelssohn, the great
Jewish philosopher, was once
walking on a busy thoroughfare in
Berlin deeply engrossed in
thoughts and uninentionally he
bumped into a heavy set Prussion
army officer. Mendelsohn hasten-
to apologize, but the officer be-
came furious.
"Pig!" he shouted.
Whereupon the philosopher
made a courteous bow, as if res-
ponding to a self-introduction, and
said:
"Mendelsohn."
A DISSATISFIED
RACE
By Oliver Munning
Light is the great, vivfier, and
though it rarely reveals much
more than what we knew existed
all along, it still has the power of
exciting and awakening in us.
Thus I have long been seriously
and painfully oppressed in a rath-
er subconscious way by the patent
discrimination practised upon the
Jew in the several fields of social
and industrial endeavor, as against
the province of politics where
quality is guaranteed him by law.
But it took a ray of light in the
formalas, we can't give the
whole article in one sentence. .
My very good friend, my boss,
and a Gentile, feeling quite liber-
al and magnanimous that he had
at least one Jew in his employ,
waxed expensive and pseudo-seri-
ous.
"What is the matter with you
Jews?" he demanded, "never satis-
fied! Never have enough! Al-
ways excited, grabbing after every-
thing! You don't know what it is
to sit down and be happy and let
well-enough alone."
"Perhaps," I nodded, but said
nothing because I have learned
that when my boss has a burden
on his chest the better part of val-
or consists in letting him unbosom
himself with the least possible
hindrance.
"Now, for instance, I had a
salesman. He started like you, and
I taught him the business from the
bottom up. I lost money on him
at the beginning but I saw he had
good possibilities, so I kept him.
Then, what do you think happen-
ed? Just as soon as he began to
be worth his salt, the fellow slips
off and starts in business on his
own. He's 'Jake Lipsin & Co.' now,
one of our most energetic and suc-
cessful competitors. I guess you'll
end up the same way,' he barked
at me with an air of superior resig-
nationa way bosses have with
employees in whom they confide
after five P. M.
"No-no, I won't," I said weakly
because I am unused to contradict-
ing my boss.
"Yes, you will. You're all the
same," he grew reminiscent. "I
remember in school. There was
one anemic kid wno went after
every prize, and got them, too, by
God, every one of them. That's
what I don't like about you people.
Have no sense of proportion. Road
hogs, that's what you are, crowd
everybody else off. Damn capable,
I'll grant, but it's mostly for your-
selves. You won't co-operate, you
won't accept your position and
wait decently for your chance to
rise. As soon as you can you're
out for yourselves.
"That is why railroads fight shy
of Jews, and other big organiza-
tions. It costs money to train men,
and the Jew, as soon as he has a
little money or a little experience,
wants to set up shop for himself.
Be independent, he calls it. It's
a good attitude," he conceded,
"but it doesn't pay the firm, and
it's no good for business.
"Look at the clothing industry,
one of the biggest in the country
and nobody making any money
out of it. It's bad for labor and
for capital. Why? Because the
Jews got hold of it and every Jew
wants to be his ovyn boss. He'll
lose every cent he's got just to see
his name on a shingle. He'll starve
fourteen hours a day for himself
rather than earn a decent salary
working eight hours for somebody
else.
"Look what has happened to
Zimm," he named one of the big-
gest makers of men's clothing in
the country which recently liqui-
dated, "Zimm was a big man. He
had the makings of a Captain of
Industry.
"He could have bought up all
these little fellows and made a
real industry out of men's cloth-
ing. That's what was done in Steel,
even in the Baking and Grocery
Stores. But no, as soon as he
bought up one little fellow, two
sprang up in his place, some of
the very men he himself trained,"
he gave several instances. "They
lowered prices, cut each others'
throats, lowered wages, had strikes
and nine-tenths of them failed. It
doesn't pay, so big men like Zimm
who's got brains and deserves to
be a boss, is gojng out of the busi-
ness and will put his money into
something else."
I told him politely and gently
how this sad state of affairs de-
veloped historically, how the Jews
were excluded from big business
first and thereby forced into de-
veloping independently, that the
fault was with prejudice and not
with Jewish nature, that any self-
respecting individual who was arti-
ficially relegated to the lower
positions of industry would natur-
ally and inevitably develop his
own opportunities independently.
"That may be, that may be," my
boss admitted, "no doubt you're
right. We're no angels ourselves,
far from it. But I'm just stating
the facts, and facts are facts,
arent they?"
One does not dispute such a
truism, so I went home with the
distressing knowledge that I had
been a poor advocate for my breth-
ren.
Perhaps the only thing I gained
from a four-year course in one of
our great universities is the friend-
ship of one of the professors who
taught psychology there and serv-
ed as vocational adviser to the
students. He was sincerely inter-
ested in Jews,most likely be-
cause the Jewish student body was
comparatively large,as the rec-
ord of a fate that made them
"nature's most significant social
and human experiment."
I brought this scientist my heavy
conscience.
"Your boss is not a Babbitt," he
said after my story, "he's ninety
per cent right. The Jews are the
most chronic rebels in history and
what I term the most persistently
dissatisfied race. That is how to
explain the facts th?t are perplex-
ing your boss, and also, if we want
to become profound, that is the
explanation of a good bit of pre-
judice that makes conservative em-
ployers fight shy of Jews and al-
lows them to employ Jews only
when Jewish ability is indispens-
able.
"You can't predict a Jew. You
forsee what he'll do next The
Jew always wants the millenium
and that makes him an uncomfort-
able person to have around. He
has a mania for seeing the seamy
side of everything and a mission-
ary zeal for correcting faults. Now
correcting faults means change,
and change spells trouble, especi-
ally to the man who is satisfied
with himself and his position in
the world. His one fear is that
when the cards are dealt next time
he won't get such a good hand
The "Jew expects a better deal."
"That's good for progress."
"For progress, yes, but not for
pleasant social intercourse, which
is the binder or cement of big
business. Your boss doesn't care
to have his faults emphasized or
corrected. Habit is less profitable,
perhaps, but it makes life easier
and more pleasant. The Iconoclast
is never popular. Even in the most
- progressive firm his presence is
soon sensed by the complacent
boss and he is eliminated. Your
boss couldn't tell this because he
doesn't understand the scientific
jargon. He based his conscious
opinion on the more evident and
rational facts that have developed
from this peculiarity of the Jewish
mental attitude."
"But in the long run this dis-
satisfaction works for the general
good of industry and humanity at
large."
"I'm not so sure. Rebellion and
independence, like all virtues in
excess, approach vice. You see
what happened to the Jews as a
nationality. They know not the
value of a little stupidity that will
follow a plan of action blindly
and ignore the little defects or
even the big ones. To make a mis-
take isn't a crime. Better do some-
thing wrong than do nothing at all
because you can't choose between
eight or ten panaceas. I have seen
Jews continue the same leader in
office year after year, not because
they were pleased with himthey
vociferously opposed him and tied
his hands, and refused to co-oper-
ate with him so that he could do
nothing either bad or goodthey
kept him in office because they
could not agree on a successor.
One can scarcely call that progress
or even intelligence."
"The fact that we survived
where others failed shows that we
were right."
"It shows nothing of the sort.
It shows only that you survived,
that is, as a race, and others as a
race died, the benefit of which to
you is disputable. Better to have
lived your life and died as the
Greeks and Romans did, and as
we Americans eventually will do,
than to groan through 2,000 years
like a tortured ghost What good
has your survival done?"
"Our culture."
"Your culture, what is beautiful
and good in it, would have surviv-
ed your death as a race even as
happened with the Greek and Ro-
man cultures. You're going to tell
me you've given great leaders to
humanity, Einstein, Spinoza, the
whole list, I know them. That's
all very noble for Einstein, Spin-
oza and Co., but what good do
they do the Jew? It's beautiful
philanthropy to be martyrs for
humanity but charity should begin
at home. Let's get back to the in-
dividual Jew, who is very individ-
ualistic and self-conscious. How
does he benefit from this Jewish
trait of emphasized dissatisfaction
and concomitant rebellion? Is he
happier, is he better? Does hu-
manity at least appreciate bis
sacrifice?some satisfaction in
that No, the only recognition he
is given is 'Jews need not apply.''
"The Jew is happy in his role of
the dissatisfied Spirit After all he
does a great deal of good for the
world at large including industry
and as for himself, he is fulfilling
his nature," I suggested.
"That is hard to say. This spirit
of rebellion, of dissatisfaction
with the yoke of mass co-opera-
tion,, of desire for individual in-
dependence may be in the Jewish
blood, inherited from a long line
of ancestors similarly disposed, or
it may be trained in the Jewish
child generation after generation.
You know that certain prejudices,
psychological attitudes and biases,
ways of looking at things, have a
way of persisting generation after
generation, through thousands of
years, by the simple process of
passing from mother to child, al-
most breathed in from the atmos-
phere that is shared by his im-
mediate family. This latter ex-
planation is the one I incline to
as the explanation of the Jewish
complex. But, whatever the rea-
son, this, like any other alien com-
plex, is suspected by the indigen-
ous population and in this case
doubly suspected because it takes
the universally dreaded form of
rebellion and desire for change."
"So that's how science explains
my boss's prejudice?"
"Yes, but don't let it keep you
awake nights. Live your Jewish
instincts, traditions and prejudices.
That's the only way to be happy,
for if your prejudice is to sec
faults, to be dissatisfied, then to be
dissatisfied is to be happy. After
all, prejudices are mental habits
and are goodof course with the
exception of a few pernicious pre-
judices which enlightened men
have been trying to eradicate since
Abraham went out of Hauran, and
before."
The above article will natural-
ly evoke thought on the par' ol
our readers. In view of the lUm-
erous signs hung out in from <>*.
many apartment huoses "GE2U
TILES ONLY" at the present time
here in Miami and in Mi mii
Beach, we fel that the above arti-
cle is well worth studying.
We invite the opinion ol our '
readers on this subject and its at-
tendant circumstances; especially
their reaction to the signs referred
to and how the opinions expressed
by the Gentile boss in this article
have impressed them.
Letters should not be more than
three hundred words long and
should be written in ink, prefer-
ably typewritten, on one side of
the page only.
Ye Editors.
The Test of a Man
The test of a man is the fight he
makes,
The grit that he daily show
The way he stands on his feet and
takes
Fate's numerous bump^ and
blows.
A coward can smile when theitfl*
naught to fear,
When nothing his progress
bars,
But it takes a man to stand up and
cheer
While some other fellow
stars.
It isn't victory, after all,
But the fight that a brother
makes;"
The man, who, driven against the
wall,
Still stands erect and takes
The blows of fate with head held
high,
Bleeding and bruised and
pale,
Is the man who'll win in the by
and by,
For he isn't afraid to fail.
Jt's the bumps you get and the
jolts you get,
And the shocks that your
courage stands.
The hours of sorrow and vain re-
gret,
The prize that escapes your
hands,
That test your mettle and prove
your worth;
It isn't the blows you deal.
But the blows you take on this
good old earth
That show if your stuff is
real.
Oregon Teachers Monthly.
OffiP*ln,in*
ka^ignf prices .^KEgst
IV>ihtQuality 35*38,
wt ..

**



PAGE 1

'he Value of Athletics [KNOWLEDGE OF FOOTBALL Essential to Enjoy the Game As the season of football looms nto the horizon and its followers re confronted with the realization Jiat football games are in the offing, artists the world over show a tendency to draw upon fans of Football in a stadium as illustrations for their periodicals and magazines. The usual inference is that the female fans attend games if or the purpose of displaying their hew raiment and that the male fan [goes to the game for the purpose [of drinking himself into glorious [oblivion. Unquestionably the por[trayals or sketches are gross exaggerations in themselves but to my I mind there is a tinge of truth in their conception meaning that few I fans or spectators understand football well. In the early days of football history, science was a thing unheard of, but with the approach of the open game and the time, money and interest spent for the development of individuals and teams, we find that football has become the most scientific of sports, and its science as a general rule is within the knowledge of the players, the coach, and a few close observers of football. Generally it sems the spectators do not begin to understand or realize the significant features of each play, their execution and result, but are only cognizant of a forward pass being made, a long run performed or a touchdown or place kick scored. To enjoy football in the manner it should be enjoyed, one should know the fine points of tackling, blocking, running the team and to understand their importance. The purpose of this article centers in that statement. It is my wish to inform you and apprise you of the fact that football games can be a great deal more enjoyable to you were you to read football articles wherein football is discussed, pay more attention to the individual players of the team other than the one who is carrying the ball, and realize that without the aid of the other ten men, the ball carrier can never advance. Learn the football rules so that a penalty during the game can be easily understood by you. Upon following these thoughts out you will find yourself, not a mere spectator at a football game, but one who knows football, and you will find that your ability to perceive the intricacies of the game will enhance your enjoyment of if. If any of the readers care to ask questions about football, I shall be glad for you to do so, and a line in this newspaper will reach me, and I in turn shall endeavor to make an appropriate answer through the medium of this newspaper. Moses Mendelssohn, the great Jewish philosopher, was once walking on a busy thoroughfare in Berlin deeply engrossed in thoughts and uninentionally he bumped into a heavy set Prussion army officer. Mendelsohn hastento apologize, but the officer became furious. "Pig!" he shouted. Whereupon the philosopher made a courteous bow, as if responding to a self-introduction, and said: "Mendelsohn." A DISSATISFIED RACE By Oliver Munning Light is the great, vivfier, and though it rarely reveals much more than what we knew existed all along, it still has the power of exciting and awakening in us. Thus I have long been seriously and painfully oppressed in a rather subconscious way by the patent discrimination practised upon the Jew in the several fields of social and industrial endeavor, as against the province of politics where quality is guaranteed him by law. But it took a ray of light in the form—alas, we can't give the whole article in one sentence. My very good friend, my boss, and a Gentile, feeling quite liberal and magnanimous that he had at least one Jew in his employ, waxed expensive and pseudo-serious. "What is the matter with you Jews?" he demanded, "never satisfied! Never have enough! Always excited, grabbing after everything! You don't know what it is to sit down and be happy and let well-enough alone." "Perhaps," I nodded, but said nothing because I have learned that when my boss has a burden on his chest the better part of valor consists in letting him unbosom himself with the least possible hindrance. "Now, for instance, I had a salesman. He started like you, and I taught him the business from the bottom up. I lost money on him at the beginning but I saw he had good possibilities, so I kept him. Then, what do you think happened? Just as soon as he began to be worth his salt, the fellow slips off and starts in business on his own. He's 'Jake Lipsin & Co.' now, one of our most energetic and successful competitors. I guess you'll end up the same way,' he barked at me with an air of superior resignation—a way bosses have with employees in whom they confide after five P. M. "No-no, I won't," I said weakly because I am unused to contradicting my boss. "Yes, you will. You're all the same," he grew reminiscent. "I remember in school. There was one anemic kid wno went after every prize, and got them, too, by God, every one of them. That's what I don't like about you people. Have no sense of proportion. Road hogs, that's what you are, crowd everybody else off. Damn capable, I'll grant, but it's mostly for yourselves. You won't co-operate, you won't accept your position and wait decently for your chance to rise. As soon as you can you're out for yourselves. "That is why railroads fight shy of Jews, and other big organizations. It costs money to train men, and the Jew, as soon as he has a little money or a little experience, wants to set up shop for himself. Be independent, he calls it. It's a good attitude," he conceded, "but it doesn't pay the firm, and it's no good for business. "Look at the clothing industry, one of the biggest in the country and nobody making any money out of it. It's bad for labor and for capital. Why? Because the Jews got hold of it and every Jew wants to be his ovyn boss. He'll lose every cent he's got just to see his name on a shingle. He'll starve fourteen hours a day for himself rather than earn a decent salary working eight hours for somebody else. "Look what has happened to Zimm," he named one of the biggest makers of men's clothing in the country which recently liquidated, "Zimm was a big man. He had the makings of a Captain of Industry. "He could have bought up all these little fellows and made a real industry out of men's clothing. That's what was done in Steel, even in the Baking and Grocery Stores. But no, as soon as he bought up one little fellow, two sprang up in his place, some of the very men he himself trained," he gave several instances. "They lowered prices, cut each others' throats, lowered wages, had strikes and nine-tenths of them failed. It doesn't pay, so big men like Zimm who's got brains and deserves to be a boss, is gojng out of the business and will put his money into something else." I told him politely and gently how this sad state of affairs developed historically, how the Jews were excluded from big business first and thereby forced into developing independently, that the fault was with prejudice and not with Jewish nature, that any selfrespecting individual who was artificially relegated to the lower positions of industry would naturally and inevitably develop his own opportunities independently. "That may be, that may be," my boss admitted, "no doubt you're right. We're no angels ourselves, far from it. But I'm just stating the facts, and facts are facts, arent they?" One does not dispute such a truism, so I went home with the distressing knowledge that I had been a poor advocate for my brethren. Perhaps the only thing I gained from a four-year course in one of our great universities is the friendship of one of the professors who taught psychology there and served as vocational adviser to the students. He was sincerely interested in Jews,—most likely because the Jewish student body was comparatively large,—as the record of a fate that made them "nature's most significant social and human experiment." I brought this scientist my heavy conscience. "Your boss is not a Babbitt," he said after my story, "he's ninety per cent right. The Jews are the most chronic rebels in history and what I term the most persistently dissatisfied race. That is how to explain the facts th?t are perplexing your boss, and also, if we want to become profound, that is the explanation of a good bit of prejudice that makes conservative employers fight shy of Jews and allows them to employ Jews only when Jewish ability is indispensable. "You can't predict a Jew. You forsee what he'll do next The Jew always wants the millenium and that makes him an uncomfortable person to have around. He has a mania for seeing the seamy side of everything and a missionary zeal for correcting faults. Now correcting faults means change, and change spells trouble, especially to the man who is satisfied with himself and his position in the world. His one fear is that when the cards are dealt next time he won't get such a good hand The "Jew expects a better deal." "That's good for progress." "For progress, yes, but not for pleasant social intercourse, which is the binder or cement of big business. Your boss doesn't care to have his faults emphasized or corrected. Habit is less profitable, perhaps, but it makes life easier and more pleasant. The Iconoclast is never popular. Even in the most progressive firm his presence is soon sensed by the complacent boss and he is eliminated. Your boss couldn't tell this because he doesn't understand the scientific jargon. He based his conscious opinion on the more evident and rational facts that have developed from this peculiarity of the Jewish mental attitude." "But in the long run this dissatisfaction works for the general good of industry and humanity at large." "I'm not so sure. Rebellion and independence, like all virtues in excess, approach vice. You see what happened to the Jews as a nationality. They know not the value of a little stupidity that will follow a plan of action blindly and ignore the little defects or even the big ones. To make a mistake isn't a crime. Better do something wrong than do nothing at all because you can't choose between eight or ten panaceas. I have seen Jews continue the same leader in office year after year, not because they were pleased with him—they vociferously opposed him and tied his hands, and refused to co-operate with him so that he could do nothing either bad or good—they kept him in office because they could not agree on a successor. One can scarcely call that progress or even intelligence." "The fact that we survived where others failed shows that we were right." "It shows nothing of the sort. It shows only that you survived, that is, as a race, and others as a race died, the benefit of which to you is disputable. Better to have lived your life and died as the Greeks and Romans did, and as we Americans eventually will do, than to groan through 2,000 years like a tortured ghost What good has your survival done?" "Our culture." "Your culture, what is beautiful and good in it, would have survived your death as a race even as happened with the Greek and Roman cultures. You're going to tell me you've given great leaders to humanity, Einstein, Spinoza, the whole list, I know them. That's all very noble for Einstein, Spinoza and Co., but what good do they do the Jew? It's beautiful philanthropy to be martyrs for humanity but charity should begin at home. Let's get back to the individual Jew, who is very individualistic and self-conscious. How does he benefit from this Jewish trait of emphasized dissatisfaction and concomitant rebellion? Is he happier, is he better? Does humanity at least appreciate bis sacrifice?—some satisfaction in that No, the only recognition he is given is 'Jews need not apply.'' "The Jew is happy in his role of the dissatisfied Spirit After all he does a great deal of good for the world at large including industry and as for himself, he is fulfilling his nature," I suggested. "That is hard to say. This spirit of rebellion, of dissatisfaction with the yoke of mass co-operation,, of desire for individual independence may be in the Jewish blood, inherited from a long line of ancestors similarly disposed, or it may be trained in the Jewish child generation after generation. You know that certain prejudices, psychological attitudes and biases, ways of looking at things, have a way of persisting generation after generation, through thousands of years, by the simple process of passing from mother to child, almost breathed in from the atmosphere that is shared by his immediate family. This latter explanation is the one I incline to as the explanation of the Jewish complex. But, whatever the reason, this, like any other alien complex, is suspected by the indigenous population and in this case doubly suspected because it takes the universally dreaded form of rebellion and desire for change." "So that's how science explains my boss's prejudice?" "Yes, but don't let it keep you awake nights. Live your Jewish instincts, traditions and prejudices. That's the only way to be happy, for if your prejudice is to sec faults, to be dissatisfied, then to be dissatisfied is to be happy. After all, prejudices are mental habits and are good—of course with the exception of a few pernicious prejudices which enlightened men have been trying to eradicate since Abraham went out of Hauran, and before." The above article will naturally evoke thought on the par' ol our readers. In view of the lUmerous signs hung out in from <>*. many apartment huoses "GE2U TILES ONLY" at the present time here in Miami and in Mi mii Beach, we fel that the above article is well worth studying. We invite the opinion ol our readers on this subject and its attendant circumstances; especially their reaction to the signs referred to and how the opinions expressed by the Gentile boss in this article have impressed them. Letters should not be more than three hundred words long and should be written in ink, preferably typewritten, on one side of the page only. Ye Editors. The Test of a Man The test of a man is the fight he makes, The grit that he daily show The way he stands on his feet and takes Fate's numerous bump^ and blows. A coward can smile when theitfl* naught to fear, When nothing his progress bars, But it takes a man to stand up and cheer While some other fellow stars. It isn't victory, after all, But the fight that a brother makes;" The man, who, driven against the wall, Still stands erect and takes The blows of fate with head held high, Bleeding and bruised and pale, Is the man who'll win in the by and by, For he isn't afraid to fail. Jt's the bumps you get and the jolts you get, And the shocks that your courage stands. The hours of sorrow and vain regret, The prize that escapes your hands, That test your mettle and prove your worth; It isn't the blows you deal. But the blows you take on this good old earth That show if your stuff is real. —Oregon Teachers Monthly. OffiP* ln,in ka^ignf prices .^KEgst IV>i§htQuality £35*38, wt .. % 



ANNOUNCEMENTS
r
II
Beth David
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Friday night services will be
conducted by Rabbi Dr. Jacob H.
Kaplan who will preach on "The
best way to destroy Religion." The
augumented choir will sing as us-
ual.
The Junior Congregation of
which Leonard Epstein is Presi-
dent will meet Sunday morning at
10 A. M. in the Temple proper
Mr. David Goodman who has had
considerable experience in this
line of endeavor has consented to
direct the meetings which will
feature an "Open Forum" and dis-
cussions on current topics of
Jewish interest.
The attendance at the Religious
School which meets in Kaplan
Hall every Sunday morning at 10
a. m. has greatly increased and
the staff of capable teachers are
earnestly at work teaching the
young. The religious school is
presided over by Dr. Kaplan as
Superintendent, Mr. Leonard Ep-
stein, Asst. Supt. and Mrs. Gordon
Davis in active charge.
Emunah Chapter
O. E. S.
A regular meeting of the Chap-
ter was held Thursday night and
was well attended.
A meeting of the Loyalty Club
will be held at the home of Mrs.
Dan Ruskin, 1772 S. W. 9th St.
on Thursday, November 1st at 8
p. m. o'clock. All members of the
Eastern Star and their friends are
cordially invited to attend.
Local Zionist
District
Chesed Shel Ernes
Two services are conducted at
Beth David regularly every Fri-
day niht. The early service or
"Minyan" begins with "Mincha"
at 5:30. Late services begin at
8 p. in. o'clock and will include
several new features. Rabbi Is-
rael H. Weisfeld will preach the
sermon on the subject "Shall bro-
ther rise against brother?" Can-
tor Morris Shoulson will render
several solos. A feature of the
services will be a continuation of
"Testimonies of Great Nations" to
be led by one of the members of
the Congregation. In line with the
innovation begun several weeks
ago, a member of the congregation
will offer a prayer. The first
prayer was offered two weeks ago
by Mr. Isidor Cohen and last
week by Daniel Cromer.
The attendance at the Sunday
School classes increased more than
thirty per cent since its beginning.
Registration for the Talmud
Torah which is held daily will
continue for two weeks more and
will then close for the season.
The local District of Zionists
which has been very dormant for
the past several months has once
again begun activities under the
leadership of Harry I. Lipnitz.
At the convention of the South
em Region No. 10 of the Zionist
Organization of America which
takes in the State of Florida Mr.
Lipnitz was designated Chairmen
for the State of Florida. In view
of the fact that Miami is not the
strongest in point of Zionistic
achievement this appointment was
a personal tribute to Mr. Lip-
nitz.
The work for which an appeal
will shortly be made comprises all
the activities of Zionist Organiza-
tion of America, Keren Hayesod,
Jewish National Fund, Hadassah,
Junior Hadassah, Hebrew Univer
sity and all Mizrachi Institutions.
Committees have been appoint-
ed, one of the most important be-
ing the Nomination Committee
which is to recommend names for
the officers and Directors of the
District for the ensuing term.
The first mass meeting at which
prominent speakers will address
the audience will be held Thurs-
day night November 8th at Beth
David Synagogue.
Among the active workers of
the local District are Baron de
Hirsch Meyer Secretary and John
Wolf, Treasurer.
Beth David Sisterhood
One of the series of card par-
ties that the Sisterhood of Beth
David has been conducting for
the benefit of the Talmud Torah
of Beth David was held at the
home of Mrs. Samuel Aronovitz
1820 Southwest 11th street, last
Wednesday afternoon. Mrs. Max
Ghertler assisted Mrs. Aronovitz
in entertaining the large number
of guests present. There were
twenty tables of bridge and beau-
tiful prizes were awarded to the
highest scorer at each table.
A beautiful lamp shade, do-
nated by Mrs. P. Scheinberg, was
raffled and Mrs. M. Silver was
the lucky recipient of the prize.
Refreshments were served and
a good time was had by all.
Among those present were: Mes-
dames I. Harris, S. I. Besvinick,
M. Pepper, A. Pepper, Chas. Gold-
stein, Silver, Leibovitz, R. J. Wol-
pert, J. Kaplan, A. Seiden, Rosen-
stock, I. Tannenbaum, I. Buck-
stein, J. Katz, H. Oliphant, H. I.
Homa, H. Greenfield, S. Richter,
Mrs. Cohen, of New York; Isidor
Cohen, M. D. Kirsch, S. Simon-
hoof,' A. Saul. M. Kandel, Silver-
stein, H. H. Farr, Lewis Brown, S.
Zirm.
-raped.
ground
In the Spring of 1927, spurred
on by the fact that in a number of
instances when poor Jews had
died there arose quite some diffi-
cult) about the place and cost of
liiiM.il. and bearing in mind the
age-old injunction to all Jews of
giving a decent hurial to everyone,
irrespective of wealth or station
in life, a number of Jewish citi-
zen- ol Miami formed the Broth-
erhood and Sisterhood of Chesed
Slid rallies. Quite an unexpected
response was received and there-
upon under the leadership and by
the help of Mrs. M. Rippa and
Mrs. I. Kisenstein, a plot of
ground was purchased in the
Woodlawn Cemetery consisting of
210 lots. Each lot contains five
graves. The plot of ground is
fenced in as required by Jewish
law and ha* been beautifully land-
PerpetUtl care of the
and graves has been pro-
vided for in the contract for the
purchase of the land. A beautiful
gateway commemorating the work
of the founders will shortly be
dedicated and due announcement
will be made in the local papers.
It goes without saying that the
strict ritual of the Jewish Ortho-
dox faith is observed in all the
preparation and ceremonies at fu-
nerals.
Twelve funerals have been held
since the organization, eight of
which were paid for by the or-
ganization out of its own funds.
The Tachrichim or funeral shroud
is prepared by a committee of the
Sisterhood. An urgent request is
made to all to call Mr. M. Rippa
at any time they have old clothes
to spare, as these clothes are re-
paired and sold and the proceeds
used to defray funeral costs for
the poor.
John Wolfe.
Council of
Jewish Women
Friendship League
The meeting <>( the League last
Wcdnesdav night teemed with in-
teresl from the moment the gavel
of the presiding officer fell to the
last strain of the dance music.
The chairman of the dramatic
committee asked for more male
volunteers as they were necessary
to round the work into proper
shape.
The dance to be held at the
Floridian Hotel on November 11,
Armistice night, was discussed and
tickets are being widelv distrib-
uted for sale at $1.50
pie.
Because
per cou-
Mahi Temple,
A. A. O. N. M. S.
A gala Mahi Shrine Halloween
Party and dance for all Shriners,
their ladies and friends will be
held on Wednesday October 31st.
at the Coliseum, Coral Gables. The
only requisite is the Shrine mem-
bership card which should be pre-
sented for admission.
A regular meeting of the
Shrine will be held Friday even-
ing November 2nd at 8 p. m. at
the Banquet Hall of the Scottish
Rite Temple N. W. River Dr. and
3rd St. An evening of entertain-
ment and refreshments is prom-
ised.
Mana-Zucca
Music Club
A large number of guests and
members attended a meeting of the
Mana-Zucca Music Club on last
Monday afternoon at Mazica Hall,
the home of the President. A
varied program which was greatly
enjoyed by those present was pre-
sented by the following:
Frances Tarboux, Myrtle Ash-
worth, Amy Rice Davis, Eleanor
Clark, Dorothy Mayer, Elizabeth
Dorsey, Frances Druckerman, Ber-
tha Merrill, O. C. Turner and
Louise MacCallman.
Great interest is being shown in
these weekly meetings and ar-
rangements are being made for a
number of concerts at which guet
artists from all over the Country
will be soloists.
of Hallowe'en, there
will be no meeting of the League
next Wednesday night.
To raise funds for the basket
ball team of the League, adver-
tisements will be solicited for a
souvenir program for the benefit
dance.
A very interesting address on
life in Jerusalem was given by
Cantor Shoulson of Congregation
Beth David.
Dancing concluded
gram of the even
ment.
nng s
the pro-
entertain-
L. (Pop) GERSON
Buyer of all kinds of
Scrap Metal
2145 N. W. 2nd AVENUE
Phone 7909
Res. Phone 7276
A very important meeting of the
Executive Board of tin' Council of
Jewish Women was held at the
home of Mrs. P. Scheinberg, Wed-
nesday afternoon. A rev iew of the
business affairs of the Council was
given by the President and plans
were made for a very active sea-
son of winter affairs.
Invitations were received from
Congregation Beth David and
Temple Israel extending the Use
of their facilities for meeting
quarters and it was then decided
that the meetings of the Executive
Board aa well as the general meet-
ings of tin' membership would be
held alternately at both Syna-
gogue and Temple.
A very elaborate program is
being prepared for Armistice Day
November 11th. the exact details
of which will be announced in the
next week's issue of "The Jewish
Floridian."
.
Anybody
Can Vote
For
Hugh G. Williams
For
Tax Assessor.
Most
Everybody
Is Going
To Vote
For
Hugh G. Williams
For
TAX ASSESSOR
on
NOVEMBER Sixth
Because
Hugh G. Williams
Pledges an
old-fashioned
HONEST
Administration
This ad paid for by
a friend.
Etta Beauty Shoppe
vv- .pepclallse in Bugene Dermaneni
waring and Helen, feoblnrteln f
im treatment, and preparation^
2207 N. E. Second Avenue
I'hone 20245
B. If. Wolfe A,|.|,. Parkin* BpaoB
Hadassah Gives
Party Tuesday
On Tuesday, October 30th nerj
the Hadassah will give a card par.
ty at the Columbus Hotel begin
ning at 8 P. M. O'clock. \ert"]
active work is being done by the
Committee in charge of Mrs. Mor.!
ris Dubler, Chairman to insure i j
large attendance and a very en. I
joyable evening. The public is in.')
vited.
On last Monday an all da. I
sewing circle was held at the
home of Mrs. Louis Zeientz 337
N. E. 28th St. More than 'forty!
ladies attended and completed'
twenty-eight Hospital garment!
The work consisted from the cut-
ting to the complete finishing of I
the garment They wilr be ship,
ped to the Medical organization at
Palestine for use by the Hospitals
being operated by Haddasah.
Arrangements are being made
for a large benefit Dinner Dance |
for Thanksgiving night. Detail, j
will he announced at an early
date.
our Specialty
small Order.
Right Now Service
MIDGET
PRESS
Particular Printers
16 N. R. 1h1 ST. Hionc in;;
PHONE 6602
Florida Iron and
Equipment Co.
519 N. W. 3rd Avenue
Wholesale dealer. In maclilii-ry .nil
contractor*, equipment.
M In mi. Florida
AWNINGS
Phone 20830
Miami Awning Co. 1721 S. W. 8th STREET
Miami Abstract and
Title Company
66 N. E. 1st STREET
Phone 20417
Rapid ami Reliable Service
I IT lllmlrai'lH, jlliltHMl'Mt
earchea, etc.
Rev.
Morris Shoulson
Cantor Cong. Beth David
Graduate aloha]
Appmv-d hy
I -iin. Still- Hoard of Kxamlncra
Phone 6901
ESTABLISHED SINCE 1890
We handle only the best and
freshest of fish.
Sea foods of all kinds
always on hand.
Baker Fish Co.
Curb Mkt. at S. W. 2nd Ave.
and Bridge
IVES CERTIFIED MILK
IS
SAFE MILK
For Adult and Baby
"QUALITY MILK"
For the PARTICULAR and DISCRIMINATING
If yU *ut not J c*'omer^ajjk your
Neighbor about our product*'
IVES CERTIFIED DAIRY
"Florida's First Certified Dairy
Miami Telephone 8831 qj,^ p,^



PAGE 1

ANNOUNCEMENTS r II Beth David TEMPLE ISRAEL Friday night services will be conducted by Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan who will preach on "The best way to destroy Religion." The augumented choir will sing as usual. The Junior Congregation of which Leonard Epstein is President will meet Sunday morning at 10 A. M. in the Temple proper Mr. David Goodman who has had considerable experience in this line of endeavor has consented to direct the meetings which will feature an "Open Forum" and discussions on current topics of Jewish interest. The attendance at the Religious School which meets in Kaplan Hall every Sunday morning at 10 a. m. has greatly increased and the staff of capable teachers are earnestly at work teaching the young. The religious school is presided over by Dr. Kaplan as Superintendent, Mr. Leonard Epstein, Asst. Supt. and Mrs. Gordon Davis in active charge. Emunah Chapter O. E. S. A regular meeting of the Chapter was held Thursday night and was well attended. A meeting of the Loyalty Club will be held at the home of Mrs. Dan Ruskin, 1772 S. W. 9th St. on Thursday, November 1st at 8 p. m. o'clock. All members of the Eastern Star and their friends are cordially invited to attend. Local Zionist District Chesed Shel Ernes Two services are conducted at Beth David regularly every Friday niht. The early service or "Minyan" begins with "Mincha" at 5:30. Late services begin at 8 p. in. o'clock and will include several new features. Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld will preach the sermon on the subject "Shall brother rise against brother?" Cantor Morris Shoulson will render several solos. A feature of the services will be a continuation of "Testimonies of Great Nations" to be led by one of the members of the Congregation. In line with the innovation begun several weeks ago, a member of the congregation will offer a prayer. The first prayer was offered two weeks ago by Mr. Isidor Cohen and last week by Daniel Cromer. The attendance at the Sunday School classes increased more than thirty per cent since its beginning. Registration for the Talmud Torah which is held daily will continue for two weeks more and will then close for the season. The local District of Zionists which has been very dormant for the past several months has once again begun activities under the leadership of Harry I. Lipnitz. At the convention of the South em Region No. 10 of the Zionist Organization of America which takes in the State of Florida Mr. Lipnitz was designated Chairmen for the State of Florida. In view of the fact that Miami is not the strongest in point of Zionistic achievement this appointment was a personal tribute to Mr. Lipnitz. The work for which an appeal will shortly be made comprises all the activities of Zionist Organization of America, Keren Hayesod, Jewish National Fund, Hadassah, Junior Hadassah, Hebrew Univer sity and all Mizrachi Institutions. Committees have been appointed, one of the most important being the Nomination Committee which is to recommend names for the officers and Directors of the District for the ensuing term. The first mass meeting at which prominent speakers will address the audience will be held Thursday night November 8th at Beth David Synagogue. Among the active workers of the local District are Baron de Hirsch Meyer Secretary and John Wolf, Treasurer. Beth David Sisterhood One of the series of card parties that the Sisterhood of Beth David has been conducting for the benefit of the Talmud Torah of Beth David was held at the home of Mrs. Samuel Aronovitz 1820 Southwest 11th street, last Wednesday afternoon. Mrs. Max Ghertler assisted Mrs. Aronovitz in entertaining the large number of guests present. There were twenty tables of bridge and beautiful prizes were awarded to the highest scorer at each table. A beautiful lamp shade, donated by Mrs. P. Scheinberg, was raffled and Mrs. M. Silver was the lucky recipient of the prize. Refreshments were served and a good time was had by all. Among those present were: Mesdames I. Harris, S. I. Besvinick, M. Pepper, A. Pepper, Chas. Goldstein, Silver, Leibovitz, R. J. Wolpert, J. Kaplan, A. Seiden, Rosenstock, I. Tannenbaum, I. Buckstein, J. Katz, H. Oliphant, H. I. Homa, H. Greenfield, S. Richter, Mrs. Cohen, of New York; Isidor Cohen, M. D. Kirsch, S. Simonhoof,' A. Saul. M. Kandel, Silverstein, H. H. Farr, Lewis Brown, S. Zirm. -raped. ground In the Spring of 1927, spurred on by the fact that in a number of instances when poor Jews had died there arose quite some difficult) about the place and cost of liiiM.il. and bearing in mind the age-old injunction to all Jews of giving a decent hurial to everyone, irrespective of wealth or station in life, a number of Jewish citizenol Miami formed the Brotherhood and Sisterhood of Chesed Slid rallies. Quite an unexpected response was received and thereupon under the leadership and by the help of Mrs. M. Rippa and Mrs. I. Kisenstein, a plot of ground was purchased in the Woodlawn Cemetery consisting of 210 lots. Each lot contains five graves. The plot of ground is fenced in as required by Jewish law and ha* been beautifully landPerpetUtl care of the and graves has been provided for in the contract for the purchase of the land. A beautiful gateway commemorating the work of the founders will shortly be dedicated and due announcement will be made in the local papers. It goes without saying that the strict ritual of the Jewish Orthodox faith is observed in all the preparation and ceremonies at funerals. Twelve funerals have been held since the organization, eight of which were paid for by the organization out of its own funds. The Tachrichim or funeral shroud is prepared by a committee of the Sisterhood. An urgent request is made to all to call Mr. M. Rippa at any time they have old clothes to spare, as these clothes are repaired and sold and the proceeds used to defray funeral costs for the poor. John Wolfe. Council of Jewish Women Friendship League The meeting <>( the League last Wcdnesdav night teemed with interesl from the moment the gavel of the presiding officer fell to the last strain of the dance music. The chairman of the dramatic committee asked for more male volunteers as they were necessary to round the work into proper shape. The dance to be held at the Floridian Hotel on November 11, Armistice night, was discussed and tickets are being widelv distributed for sale at $1.50 pie. Because per couMahi Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. A gala Mahi Shrine Halloween Party and dance for all Shriners, their ladies and friends will be held on Wednesday October 31st. at the Coliseum, Coral Gables. The only requisite is the Shrine membership card which should be presented for admission. A regular meeting of the Shrine will be held Friday evening November 2nd at 8 p. m. at the Banquet Hall of the Scottish Rite Temple N. W. River Dr. and 3rd St. An evening of entertainment and refreshments is promised. Mana-Zucca Music Club A large number of guests and members attended a meeting of the Mana-Zucca Music Club on last Monday afternoon at Mazica Hall, the home of the President. A varied program which was greatly enjoyed by those present was presented by the following: Frances Tarboux, Myrtle Ashworth, Amy Rice Davis, Eleanor Clark, Dorothy Mayer, Elizabeth Dorsey, Frances Druckerman, Bertha Merrill, O. C. Turner and Louise MacCallman. Great interest is being shown in these weekly meetings and arrangements are being made for a number of concerts at which guet artists from all over the Country will be soloists. of Hallowe'en, there will be no meeting of the League next Wednesday night. To raise funds for the basket ball team of the League, advertisements will be solicited for a souvenir program for the benefit dance. A very interesting address on life in Jerusalem was given by Cantor Shoulson of Congregation Beth David. Dancing concluded gram of the even ment. nng s the proentertainL. (Pop) GERSON Buyer of all kinds of Scrap Metal 2145 N. W. 2nd AVENUE Phone 7909 Res. Phone 7276 A very important meeting of the Executive Board of tin' Council of Jewish Women was held at the home of Mrs. P. Scheinberg, Wednesday afternoon. A rev iew of the business affairs of the Council was given by the President and plans were made for a very active season of winter affairs. Invitations were received from Congregation Beth David and Temple Israel extending the Use of their facilities for meeting quarters and it was then decided that the meetings of the Executive Board aa well as the general meetings of tin' membership would be held alternately at both Synagogue and Temple. A very elaborate program is being prepared for Armistice Day November 11th. the exact details of which will be announced in the next week's issue of "The Jewish Floridian." Anybody Can Vote For Hugh G. Williams For Tax Assessor. Most Everybody Is Going To Vote For Hugh G. Williams For TAX ASSESSOR on NOVEMBER Sixth Because Hugh G. Williams Pledges an old-fashioned HONEST Administration This ad paid for by a friend. Etta Beauty Shoppe vv.pepclallse in Bugene Dermaneni waring and Helen, feoblnrteln f !" im treatment, and preparation^ 2207 N. E. Second Avenue I'hone 20245 B. If. Wolfe A„,|.|,. Parkin* BpaoB Hadassah Gives Party Tuesday On Tuesday, October 30th nerj the Hadassah will give a card par. ty at the Columbus Hotel begin ning at 8 P. M. O'clock. \ert"] active work is being done by the Committee in charge of Mrs. Mor.! ris Dubler, Chairman to insure i j large attendance and a very en. I joyable evening. The public is in.') vited. On last Monday an all da. I sewing circle was held at the home of Mrs. Louis Zeientz 337 N. E. 28th St. More than 'forty! ladies attended and completed' twenty-eight Hospital garment! The work consisted from the cutting to the complete finishing of I the garment They wilr be ship, ped to the Medical organization at Palestine for use by the Hospitals being operated by Haddasah. Arrangements are being made for a large benefit Dinner Dance | for Thanksgiving night. Detail, j will he announced at an early date. our Specialty small Order. Right Now Service MIDGET PRESS Particular Printers 16 N. R. 1H1 ST. Hionc in;; PHONE 6602 Florida Iron and Equipment Co. 519 N. W. 3rd Avenue Wholesale dealer. In maclilii-ry .nil contractor*, equipment. M In mi. Florida AWNINGS Phone 20830 Miami Awning Co. 1721 S. W. 8th STREET Miami Abstract and Title Company 66 N. E. 1st STREET Phone 20417 Rapid ami Reliable Service I IT lllmlrai'lH, jlliltHMl'Mt %  earchea, etc. Rev. Morris Shoulson Cantor Cong. Beth David Graduate aloha] Appmv-d hy I -iin. StillHoard of Kxamlncra Phone 6901 ESTABLISHED SINCE 1890 We handle only the best and freshest of fish. Sea foods of all kinds always on hand. Baker Fish Co. Curb Mkt. at S. W. 2nd Ave. and Bridge IVES CERTIFIED MILK IS SAFE MILK For Adult and Baby "QUALITY MILK" For the PARTICULAR and DISCRIMINATING If y £ U *ut not J c *'omer^ajjk your Neighbor about our product*' IVES CERTIFIED DAIRY "Florida's First Certified Dairy Miami Telephone 8831 QJ,^ p ,^


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*7..
ftJemsti Filariidlii& in
No. 3.
iception
a Newspaper
riendly Chat
[with you, Mr. Reader,
should not appear
page, because it's not
its. But unlike folks
sir neighbors into the
Jiere talk with them,
Bryday folks who like
! front porch and like
"forget formality. And
Jjpens to be our front
[.well, we know you'll
[we're doing our level
you a real weekly that
be ashamed to let ev-
le family read. News
it page that isn't re-
bn old newspapers; a
ture each week to keep
[acquainted with the
town; an editorial to
Ir views about things
and not a lot of bal-
le or two feature ar-
)riginal. A column or
trams and nonsense; a
Bp about the people,
pf you please; and last
It, the activities of the
inizations here in Mi-
ch all are vitally inter-
we could be better!
roing to improve as
ler, with your help.
ite to call us up and
|t you woi^ilike to see
km % II-. if \<>ii
|ust so lo^^is you're
tip us, and we'll thank
thrc
do
ut to make money
is paper and we can't
appealing merely to
athy. Wed rather do
you more than you're
|r and getting you to
Jewish Floridian as
own. And we don't
sell "the proverbial
for a mess of pottage."
ike us and want to help
The Jewish Floridian
of which you're going
d of, boost us with your
Tell your merchants
nd patronize our adver-
you want what they've
KS!
The Editors.
Mian Jewess
[Receives Honor
id
Convention of the Flor-
Ite Dental Hygienists As-
i, held in conjunction
Florida State Dental As-
|n, Mrs. Albert E. Rosen-
this city was honored by
Elected Vice President of
[Association of Hygienists.
tosenthal is a graduate of
ia University School of
lygiene.
>1 Son?
Eagerly Awaited
Is Written;
Sunday next the Beth David
y School will begin singing
Bw school song written and
Dsed specially for Beth
by Aaron Farr, well known
musician. Copies of the
will be distributed at the
ably and will be sung for the
(time under the direction of
[Farr.
MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 2,1928
Price 5c
A "PRETTY" START
Prominent Jews Die;
Loss Will Be Felt
The above photograph was taken by the Staff Artist of The Jewish Floridian at the Alcazar
Hotel, when the first meeting of the Junior Council was held, inaugurating the season's activities,
and shows the officers, sponsors and members.
Junior Council Meets
Committee Chairmen Announced
The first meeting for the win-
ter season of 1928 of the Junior
Counci! of Jewish Women-
held at the Alcazar Hotel last
Tuesday night A very enthusi-
astic meeting was held, at which
the business of the organization
was transacted and was followed
by a social program.
The following committee ap-
pointments were announced: Af-
fairs, Marcella Seiden; entertain-
ment, Martha Scheinberg; hospi-
lajjty, Adalyn Ross; membership,
ftrude Huilisch; publicity,
Ruth Frankenstein; music circle,
Mrs. Wm. Shayne; athletic circle,
Harriet Salt/berg; dramatic cir-
cle, Faye Weintraub.
Miss Florence Alpert is presi-
dent, and Mrs. Harry C. Markle
and Mrs. Wm. Shayne are the
sponsors for the organization.
Those taking part in the elabor-
ate entertainment program were
Aaron Farr in several singing and
playing number*; Miss i... "'
Wallerstein in a reading, and
Miss Ethel Tauber at the piano.
Bring-a-Friend Night (female),
will begin the membership cam-
paign and will be held at Temple
Israel on the evening of Novem-
ber 13, where an elaborate pro-
gram of entertainment and re-
freshments has been prepared.
Formation of Boys'
Work Incorporated;
Banquet Celebration
A step forward in welfare work
of Greater Miami was taken on}
Thursday night at the Alcazar Ho-
tel, when Incorporation night of
Boys' Work Incorporated was cel-
ebrated.
For months the crying need for
some organization to undertake
Big Brother Work in Miami has
become more and more notice-
able and has been the subject of
numerous conferences between
those interested in the develop-
ment of the underprivileged boy
of Greater Miami. As a result,
the Miami Civic Clubs Council
and others interested in local wel-
fare work proposed to found a
new organization whose object it
would be to "further physical,
mental and moral development of
the under privileged boy in Grea-
ter Miami district; to establish an
agency to co-operate with the Ju-
venile Court and such other agen-
cies as the Board of Governors
may designate; to establish a per-
manent home to further its work,
if found advisable." The new
organization will be known as
"Boys' Work, Inc," and will con-
sist of three members from each
organization interested in such
work, whose participation shall
have been approved by the Board
of Governors. The Men's Club of
Miami is represented by Stanley
C. Myers, who drew the charter;
E. Max Goldstein, and J. Louis
ShocheL
Gee. R. Hilty of the Florida
Power & Light Company, who is
acting chairman of Boys' Work,
Inc., presided.
Judge Edith Atkinson of the Ju-
venile Court and Judge Stoneman
of the Municipal Court were the
guests of honor and gave very
interesting talks on the problems
of the underprivileged boy and
stressed the need for such a co-
operative organization.
Tin- past week has marked the
f i-- each known throughout the world
for the good accomplished for
humanity, and whose loss will be
keenly felt throughout the world.
Adolf Kraus, for many years
the (.i.iikI Master of Bnai Brith,
had been a prominent figure in
the political life of Chicago fof
many years having served on the
Board of Education and as Cor-
poration Counsel. For twenty
vears he served as the Interna-
tional head of the Bnai Brith and
traveled throughout the world in
I he interests of Jewry and to help
ameliorate conditions in Eastern
Europe and other places where
the Jew had been persecuted.
Oreat cultural and welfare work
was undertaken during his admin-
istration. He was a frequent visi-
tor to Miami.
Leon Kamaiky, one of the foun-
ders of the Jewish Daily News of
I\ew York, which was subsequent-
ly merged with the Jewish Morn-
ing Journal, has been a promi-
nent figure in American lewry
for many years. Whe nthe Amer-
ican Jewish Committee was or-
ganized Mr. Kamaiky was one of
the fifteen original members cho-
sen by Mr. Louis Marshall as rep-
resentative of American Jewry. In
1914 he organized the Central Re-
lief Committee which gathered
and distributed more than ten
million dollars to the war suffer-
ers. He was Vice President of
the HI AS and spent nearly a year
in Europe straightening out im-
migration problems so that Jew-
ish refugees could come to Amer-
ica. At the time of his death he
was a very active figure in numer-
ous Charity and Educational in-
stitutions.
Jewry of the world and espe-
cially America, will greatly mourn
the loss of these two men.
Local Boys in Crash
Are Exonerated
Nat Williams; the son of W. L.
Williams, prominent local realtor
and active in Jewish Communal
circles, was a passenger in an au-
tomobile driven by Charles O.
Sims, Jr., last Tuesday when the
car collided with Mrs. Beulah
Brown's auto and caused serious
injuries to the occupants of the
Brown car. Others in the car
with Nat Williams were Paul
Mark and Sam Silverman, all stu-
dents in the Law Department of
the University of Florida, who
had been in Miami for a week-
end visit and were returning to
school. None of the boys were
hurt and upon an investigation by
the county authorities were exon-
erated from all blame.
BOOK CONTEST
ABOUT CLOSED
INTEREST SHOWN
N-E-W-S
There is only one definition of news. It is GOSSIP
of the neighborhood known as EARTH. And upon sec-
ond thought we're all inhabitants of the earth.
The book contest started several
weeks ago by the Flagler Memor-
ial Library to arouse interest in
books has caused great interest to
be shown by the children attend-
ing the public schools. Prizes are
being offered for grades one, two
and three for the designing of
book marks, which may be either
plain black and white or colored.
Prizes for classes, four, five and
six, and for classes from seven to
nine, are for posters showing or
suggesting the advantages of books
and must be in color.
All designs and drawings must
be submitted to the Flagler Mem-
orial Library not later than noon
on November 8th and will be ex-
hibited in the windows of the
Library, Central Book Shop, and
Burdines.
We suggest that all children
who have not yet entered the con-
test do so immediately.
We are advised that the teach-
ers in the schools will be more
than glad to assist the children in
getting up of their designs and
ideas.



-,-r.
*M*ft*MMM
P



PAGE 1

*7.. ftJemsti Filariidlii& in No. 3. iception a Newspaper riendly Chat [with you, Mr. Reader, should not appear page, because it's not ITS. But unlike folks sir neighbors into the Jiere talk with them, Bryday folks who like front porch and like "forget formality. And Jjpens to be our front [.well, we know you'll [we're doing our level %  you a real weekly that be ashamed to let evle family read. News it page that isn't rebn old newspapers; a ture each week to keep [acquainted with the town; an editorial to Ir views about things and not a lot of balle or two feature ar)riginal. A column or trams and nonsense; a Bp about the people, pf you please; and last It, the activities of the inizations here in Mich all are vitally interwe could be better! roing to improve as ler, with your help. ite to call us up and |t you woi^ilike to see km % II-. if \<>II |ust so lo^^is you're tip us, and we'll thank thrc do ut to make money is paper and we can't appealing merely to athy. Wed rather do you more than you're |r and getting you to Jewish Floridian as own. And we don't sell "the proverbial for a mess of pottage." ike us and want to help The Jewish Floridian of which you're going d of, boost us with your Tell your merchants nd patronize our adveryou want what they've KS! — The Editors. Mian Jewess [Receives Honor id Convention of the FlorIte Dental Hygienists Asi, held in conjunction Florida State Dental As|n, Mrs. Albert E. Rosenthis city was honored by Elected Vice President of [Association of Hygienists. tosenthal is a graduate of ia University School of lygiene. >1 Son? Eagerly Awaited Is Written; Sunday next the Beth David y School will begin singing Bw school song written and Dsed specially for Beth by Aaron Farr, well known musician. Copies of the will be distributed at the ably and will be sung for the (time under the direction of [Farr. MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 2,1928 Price 5c A "PRETTY" START Prominent Jews Die; Loss Will Be Felt The above photograph was taken by the Staff Artist of The Jewish Floridian at the Alcazar Hotel, when the first meeting of the Junior Council was held, inaugurating the season's activities, and shows the officers, sponsors and members. Junior Council Meets Committee Chairmen Announced The first meeting for the winter season of 1928 of the Junior Counci! of Jewish Womenheld at the Alcazar Hotel last Tuesday night A very enthusiastic meeting was held, at which the business of the organization was transacted and was followed by a social program. The following committee appointments were announced: Affairs, Marcella Seiden; entertainment, Martha Scheinberg; hospilajj ty, Adalyn Ross; membership, ftrude Huilisch; publicity, Ruth Frankenstein; music circle, Mrs. Wm. Shayne; athletic circle, Harriet Salt/berg; dramatic circle, Faye Weintraub. Miss Florence Alpert is president, and Mrs. Harry C. Markle and Mrs. Wm. Shayne are the sponsors for the organization. Those taking part in the elaborate entertainment program were Aaron Farr in several singing and playing number*; Miss i... %  •"•' Wallerstein in a reading, and Miss Ethel Tauber at the piano. Bring-a-Friend Night (female), will begin the membership campaign and will be held at Temple Israel on the evening of November 13, where an elaborate program of entertainment and refreshments has been prepared. Formation of Boys' Work Incorporated; Banquet Celebration A step forward in welfare work of Greater Miami was taken on} Thursday night at the Alcazar Hotel, when Incorporation night of Boys' Work Incorporated was celebrated. For months the crying need for some organization to undertake Big Brother Work in Miami has become more and more noticeable and has been the subject of numerous conferences between those interested in the development of the underprivileged boy of Greater Miami. As a result, the Miami Civic Clubs Council and others interested in local welfare work proposed to found a new organization whose object it would be to "further physical, mental and moral development of the under privileged boy in Greater Miami district; to establish an agency to co-operate with the Juvenile Court and such other agencies as the Board of Governors may designate; to establish a permanent home to further its work, if found advisable." The new organization will be known as "Boys' Work, Inc," and will consist of three members from each organization interested in such work, whose participation shall have been approved by the Board of Governors. The Men's Club of Miami is represented by Stanley C. Myers, who drew the charter; E. Max Goldstein, and J. Louis ShocheL Gee. R. Hilty of the Florida Power & Light Company, who is acting chairman of Boys' Work, Inc., presided. Judge Edith Atkinson of the Juvenile Court and Judge Stoneman of the Municipal Court were the guests of honor and gave very interesting talks on the problems of the underprivileged boy and stressed the need for such a cooperative organization. Tinpast week has marked the f i--

THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
'!
SOCIETY
A very enjoyable evening was
spent at the home of Miss Reba
Engler on South Miami avenue
when she entertained at a bridge
supper in honor of Miss Etta
Burholtz. of Jacksonville, last Fri-
day night. There were three ta-
bles of bridge, and high score
prize was awarded to Miss Reg-
gie Goldstein.
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Gordon
are being congratulated by their
numerous friends upon the arriv-
al of a baby boy. Grandmother
Cohen is mighty, mighty happy
and proud of the boy.
The Misses Pauline and Betty
I-a-kv were hostesses last Satur-
da> night at their home in River-
side at a delightful party, where
a large number of games were
plaved and a good time was had
by all. At a late hour refresh-
ment? were served. Prizes were
awarded to Muriel McDonald and
Frances Marx. Among those
present were Gertrude Dietz, Lou-
ise Dietz. Dorothy Roth. Pauline
Dampier. Muriel McDonald. Ros-
l\n Daum, Francis Marx, Teira
Carnevale. Julia Carnevale and
Mortv Laskv.
Mr. and Mrs. Leo Rosen are be-
ing congratulated on the arrival
of a babv daughter last week.
Grandpan-nt- Rosen and Rauzin
are mighty proud.
Mr-. S. Bergson. of New York,
has arrived to open their winter
home at 21+4 S. W. 11th St.. for
the season. Mr. Bergson is ex-
pected here shortly and will re-
main the entire season.
One of the social events of this
ireek will be a bridge and linen
shower at the Alcazar Hotel on
Saturday afternoon in honor of
Miss Claire Apetowsky. whose en-
gagement was a recent affair. Mrs.
Thomas Apetowsky, an aunt, will
be the ho>tess.
On last Tuesday night Mist
Edythe Katz entertained at a
bridge party in honor of Miss
Hortmse Katz. The home was
decorated in Hallowe'en effect.
Prize- were awarded to Mrs. Mor-
ris Gusky, Mrs. Sydney Rosen-
Mock. Min Clara Apetowsky and
Mrs. Herman Wepman.
THE THREE BROTHERS
By Hen
I shall try to describe three
brothers, the fir-t two diametrical-
I) opposite. Suspicio and Gullibio
and the third brother. Sceptico.
Suspicio i- always found in il e
company of Greed. Distrust and
Ui-i uiitent. traveling a trail
"through a jungle of bitter herbs."
Gullibio always ha- as his com-
panions, Faith and Charity and
lived in ParadixFool's Para-
dise. t
Suspicio trusted no one. There-
fore, he could not be duped. By
brute strength of his avarice, re-
inforced by a native cunning
peculiar to his ilk. he achieved
wealth and power. And as his
fortune grew, his circle of friends
diminished. And his soul became
barren.
Gullibio. he without a shadow,
continued to swallow everything
he was toldhook. line, sinker
and remained a laboring slave to
the end of his days. He achieved
the reputation of being a mark for
ever) trickster, fraud and bunk
dispenser in the land. His name
embellished all the "sucker lists'"
and was handed around freely
among the birds of prey who man-
aged to keep him poor. He per-
sisted, however, in his dogged re-
fusal to ever question the other
fellow's good faith, notwithstand-
ing frequent unmistakable evi-
dence of underhandedness. Once
in a crowd, he detected a "dip" in
the act of "lifting" his watch.
"\\ hat are you doing, kind sir,"
said Gully naively. "I just wanted
to know what time it is." said the
other. "Oh." said poor Gully
sweetly, and that closed the inci-
dent.
Now enters the third and young-
est brotherSceptico. He was
Dorom
neither oversuspicious nor unduly
t redulous, but was always being
mistaken for one or the other of
his brothers. He had traveled long
with Suspicio and Gullibio an r
after observing their respective
mode> of living, he had concluded
that both were wrong. He had no-
lii id that Suspy could find muck
even when- there was none, while
<7iill\ couldn't detect it even
though it were right beneath his
precious nose.
Si eptico came to regard the one
as a mean-spirited crab.
Th>- other he classified as a pur-
blind a.
I li>- cue he disliked.
Tin- other he held in contempt.
He watched the one distrust vir-
tuous people.
He -aw the others nurse vipers
to his promiscuous bosom.
Sceptico said: "As I see it. Sus-
pj thinks the world's all black.
Gully, on the other hand, thinks
it's all snow-white. Each is color
blind. Anyone with discernment
can see that it is neither all black
nor all white, but a mixture of the
two with frequent overlapping?.
There is no reason why an intelli-
gent person cannot learn to dis-
tinguish the one from the other,
by steering a middle course be-
tween the attitudes of Gullibio and
Suspicio. For instance, why can't
I stroll through the valley of Rea-
sonable Doubt, where the light of-
day penerates the clouds, without
being mistaken for my brother
Suspicio. And why can't I visit
the shrine of faith and embrace
the Loyalties without being con-
fused with Gullibio. Isn't there a
Happy Medium between the two
extremes?"
Union Thanksgiving
Services, Creeds Unite
Lnion Thanksgiving services
will once again be celebrated at
the Bav front Park this year, in ac-
cordance with the precedent set
several years ago. The services
will be in charge of Mr. Isidor
Cohen and a committee represent-
ing (he Protestant, Catholic and
Jewish faiths. The complete pro-
gram has not yet been arranged
but will shortly be announced.
Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld will
speak on behalf of the Jewish
faith.
West Palm Beach
Temple to Rebuild
The building committee of Tem-
ple Israel, consisting of Joseph
\bndil. Juliu- J. Lax and Max
Sirkin. have prepared plans for
the rebuilding and repairing of
Temple Beth Israel, which was
damaged during the last hurri-
cane.
Immediately upon the repairs
luing completed, which is expect-
ed to be within the next two
weeks, services will once again be
resumed.
I
Congratulations:
We're more than pleased to see
"Mom" Fagan of the Palatial at
last realize a fond wi-li. that of
opening a real restaurant serving
splendidly cooked kosher meals in
a large and pleasant place. We
congratulate him because we
know that "Mortv" has at all
times been more than willing to
go out of his way to help the
boys. Those of us who have been
gathered around his festive board
at meetings of the Men's Club
know how hard he's tried to please
us at all times. A friendly word,
an extra dainty, has always mark-
ed the pleasant meetings we've
had. "Willingness to serve" is
his motto.
So. congratulations. "Mortv,"
to you and your good wife, and
may success attend you in all
vour endeavors!
FRANK E. HUNT
Candidate for
TAX
ASSESSOR
20 Years
Specializing
in Dade County
Taxes
For Tax Reduction
A Properly Owner
Best Experienced for
Tax Assessor
Arrived in Dade County in
1898 as Spanish-American
War Soldier
My All is in This Section
Your Vote and Support
Appreciated
(Paid Political Adv.)
AUTO GLASS
Installed by Experts while
you wait at reasonable prices
East Coast Glass Co.
1313 N. Bayshore Drive
Phone .13371
Why take a Chance?
For Only $7.50 the First Year
and Five Dollars Annually
Thereafter. We Pay S2.1 Week-
ly Accidental Benefit.
Nil K.il Tii|- \,i 11,1,,!,
\\>- i\i> aii ( laiau Locally
D. KAHN
1307 Realty Board Bldg.
BIGGER and BETTER
So That You May Enjoy a
REAL KOSHER. APPETIZING AND PLEASING MEAL
AMIDST PLEASANT SURROUNDINGS
is the NEW
PALATIAL KOSHER RESTAURANT
2(55 N. E. Second St.
Grand Opening, Sunday, Nov. 4, 6:30 P. M.
FOR RESERVATIONS
PHONE 9883
Free Parking Space To All Our Guests
CONGRATULATIONS
to I he
PALATIAL RESTAURANT
W. A. PENNELL
The Plumbing Shop
on Wheels
Service At Your
Door
744 N. W. 23rd Curt
Phone 2270!
Announcing Opening
of
Utermoehlen
Studio
Piano, Harmony, String Instru-
ments, arranging. Pupil Carl
Utermoehlen, Berlin; End]
Liebling, Chicago; 20 year's ex-
perience. Formerly librarian
Olympia Orchestra.
Phone 9210
1129 N. W. 3rd STREET
BELL BAKERY
60 West Plagler St.
Bake-Rite Breadery
332 N. Miami Ave.
Home-Made
BREAD. PIES and CAKES
We Provide the Goodies for
Your Affairs
Catering Our
Specialty
Remember, Everything
is
"The Tanenbaum Standard"
Northern Interests
Have Cash to Invest
in Business
er Real Estate
WHAT HAVE YOU?
W. L. WILLIAMS
2r2 HALCYON ARCADE
Phone 36840
FOR LUMBER
and ALL BUILDING Materials
FISHER LUMBER CO.
I'hnii.- :o.'..i
1100 S. W. rim Avrnnr
FLAGLER DRY CLEANERS
Cleaning, Pressing, Dyeing and
Repairing
472 W. Flagler St.
Phone 33260
"For thr Prrarrvation of Your Clothe*"
FOR STORE FIXTURES
See
BERNER STORE
EQUIPMENT CO.
824 N. E. 1st Avenue
PHONE 31261
The Bank of Personal Service
THE THIRD NATIONAL BANK
OF MIAMI33 N. E. First Ave.
Total Resources, Close of Business. Oct. 3. 1928 $1,356,538.43
RECORD OF GROWTH
Drpo.il.. March 23. 1927 I233.9U.S3
!> ; t-. Jun.- 30. 1927 ....... 362.048.67
IVpo.it.. Drrrmbrr 31. 1927 ........ 587,109.56
Urpo.it.. r'.-bruary 28th. 1928 678,072.78
Drpo.il.. Junr 30. 1928 682.519.14
l>li-"-ll>. OCTOBER 3rd, I9H, 7.T6.J28"w
OFFICERS
t I MONTANUS .................._..Chainuti
*\' <: hill......r*i"r
IAMES ALMY Vlre.Prraide:
"SHER.....V.cr Prr.idm.
', ",ll\ _. Ca.hi.r
tP. MERCER Ai..., Cahi.r
Etta Beauty Shoppe
u. bpepcttUIsp in i; I.,.,,,- pt-nfenetV i\
aravlag ami Helena liuirV^irKtai-- \|
lal matin.hi- an.I |iri'pfll|liV1'. '', -V
2207 N. E. Second Avenue
Phone 20245
K. M. V'olf.- Amil.. lurking Spac
'
THAT mmMERFl I. NEW I.K.NK Sk..vk ,ck cold
TAK-ABOOST 5c
bTnftrd .Tu, ..., ., .. ''"k *" *"~ palate .d rm.or.tr.. No car
^NOJ^ "ttm """ 'Crd """ Tr, i, tod., and ,ou ..II T.k
,_J ffy Hiii Cimnyf Trfk-AliOiHl" .ill. ,.,.11. I.
; Aaltra. lu^Sroa. \ ETfcjft*?^ "!?......"" "'">. <
for IM. ^r a'mm """'! with purr milk that cannot be boatrn
19 N. E. SECOND AVENUE
HIPPODROME Bl. 11.1)1 \i.
SOUTHERN TAK-ABOOST CO.
4J6 S. W. EIGHTH AVENUE



PAGE 1

THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN SOCIETY A very enjoyable evening was spent at the home of Miss Reba Engler on South Miami avenue when she entertained at a bridge supper in honor of Miss Etta Burholtz. of Jacksonville, last Friday night. There were three tables of bridge, and high score prize was awarded to Miss Reggie Goldstein. Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Gordon are being congratulated by their numerous friends upon the arrival of a baby boy. Grandmother Cohen is mighty, mighty happy and proud of the boy. The Misses Pauline and Betty I-a-kv were hostesses last Saturda> night at their home in Riverside at a delightful party, where a large number of games were plaved and a good time was had by all. At a late hour refreshment? were served. Prizes were awarded to Muriel McDonald and Frances Marx. Among those present were Gertrude Dietz, Louise Dietz. Dorothy Roth. Pauline Dampier. Muriel McDonald. Rosl\n Daum, Francis Marx, Teira Carnevale. Julia Carnevale and Mortv Laskv. Mr. and Mrs. Leo Rosen are being congratulated on the arrival of a babv daughter last week. Grandpan-ntRosen and Rauzin are mighty proud. Mr-. S. Bergson. of New York, has arrived to open their winter home at 21+4 S. W. 11th St.. for the season. Mr. Bergson is expected here shortly and will remain the entire season. One of the social events of this ireek will be a bridge and linen shower at the Alcazar Hotel on Saturday afternoon in honor of Miss Claire Apetowsky. whose engagement was a recent affair. Mrs. Thomas Apetowsky, an aunt, will be the ho>tess. On last Tuesday night Mist Edythe Katz entertained at a bridge party in honor of Miss Hortmse Katz. The home was decorated in Hallowe'en effect. Prizewere awarded to Mrs. Morris Gusky, Mrs. Sydney RosenMock. Min Clara Apetowsky and Mrs. Herman Wepman. THE THREE BROTHERS By Hen I shall try to describe three brothers, the fir-t two diametricalI) opposite. Suspicio and Gullibio and the third brother. Sceptico. Suspicio ialways found in il e company of Greed. Distrust and Ui-i uiitent. traveling a trail "through a jungle of bitter herbs." Gullibio always haas his companions, Faith and Charity and lived in Paradix—Fool's Paradise. t Suspicio trusted no one. Therefore, he could not be duped. By brute strength of his avarice, reinforced by a native cunning peculiar to his ilk. he achieved wealth and power. And as his fortune grew, his circle of friends diminished. And his soul became barren. Gullibio. he without a shadow, continued to swallow everything he was told—hook. line, sinker— and remained a laboring slave to the end of his days. He achieved the reputation of being a mark for ever) trickster, fraud and bunk dispenser in the land. His name embellished all the "sucker lists'" and was handed around freely among the birds of prey who managed to keep him poor. He persisted, however, in his dogged refusal to ever question the other fellow's good faith, notwithstanding frequent unmistakable evidence of underhandedness. Once in a crowd, he detected a "dip" in the act of "lifting" his watch. "\\ hat are you doing, kind sir," said Gully naively. "I just wanted to know what time it is." said the other. "Oh." said poor Gully sweetly, and that closed the incident. Now enters the third and youngest brother—Sceptico. He was Dorom neither oversuspicious nor unduly t redulous, but was always being mistaken for one or the other of his brothers. He had traveled long with Suspicio and Gullibio an r after observing their respective mode> of living, he had concluded that both were wrong. He had nolii id that Suspy could find muck even whenthere was none, while <7iill\ couldn't detect it even though it were right beneath his precious nose. Si eptico came to regard the one as a mean-spirited crab. Th>other he classified as a purblind a—. I li>cue he disliked. Tinother he held in contempt. He watched the one distrust virtuous people. He -aw the others nurse vipers to his promiscuous bosom. Sceptico said: "As I see it. Suspj thinks the world's all black. Gully, on the other hand, thinks it's all snow-white. Each is color blind. Anyone with discernment can see that it is neither all black nor all white, but a mixture of the two with frequent overlapping?. There is no reason why an intelligent person cannot learn to distinguish the one from the other, by steering a middle course between the attitudes of Gullibio and Suspicio. For instance, why can't I stroll through the valley of Reasonable Doubt, where the light ofday penerates the clouds, without being mistaken for my brother Suspicio. And why can't I visit the shrine of faith and embrace the Loyalties without being confused with Gullibio. Isn't there a Happy Medium between the two extremes?" Union Thanksgiving Services, Creeds Unite Lnion Thanksgiving services will once again be celebrated at the Bav front Park this year, in accordance with the precedent set several years ago. The services will be in charge of Mr. Isidor Cohen and a committee representing (he Protestant, Catholic and Jewish faiths. The complete program has not yet been arranged but will shortly be announced. Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld will speak on behalf of the Jewish faith. West Palm Beach Temple to Rebuild The building committee of Temple Israel, consisting of Joseph \bndil. JuliuJ. Lax and Max Sirkin. have prepared plans for the rebuilding and repairing of Temple Beth Israel, which was damaged during the last hurricane. Immediately upon the repairs luing completed, which is expected to be within the next two weeks, services will once again be resumed. I Congratulations: We're more than pleased to see "Mom" Fagan of the Palatial at last realize a fond wi-li. that of opening a real restaurant serving splendidly cooked kosher meals in a large and pleasant place. We congratulate him because we know that "Mortv" has at all times been more than willing to go out of his way to help the boys. Those of us who have been gathered around his festive board at meetings of the Men's Club know how hard he's tried to please us at all times. A friendly word, an extra dainty, has always marked the pleasant meetings we've had. "Willingness to serve" is his motto. So. congratulations. "Mortv," to you and your good wife, and may success attend you in all vour endeavors! FRANK E. HUNT Candidate for TAX ASSESSOR 20 Years Specializing in Dade County Taxes For Tax Reduction A Properly Owner Best Experienced for Tax Assessor Arrived in Dade County in 1898 as Spanish-American War Soldier My All is in This Section Your Vote and Support Appreciated (Paid Political Adv.) AUTO GLASS Installed by Experts while you wait at reasonable prices East Coast Glass Co. 1313 N. Bayshore Drive Phone .13371 Why take a Chance? For Only $7.50 the First Year and Five Dollars Annually Thereafter. We Pay S2.1 Weekly Accidental Benefit. Nil K.il Tii|\,i 11,1,,!, \\>I\I> AII ( laiau Locally D. KAHN 1307 Realty Board Bldg. BIGGER and BETTER So That You May Enjoy a REAL KOSHER. APPETIZING AND PLEASING MEAL AMIDST PLEASANT SURROUNDINGS is the NEW PALATIAL KOSHER RESTAURANT 2(55 N. E. Second St. Grand Opening, Sunday, Nov. 4, 6:30 P. M. FOR RESERVATIONS PHONE 9883 Free Parking Space To All Our Guests CONGRATULATIONS to I he PALATIAL RESTAURANT W. A. PENNELL The Plumbing Shop on Wheels Service At Your Door 744 N. W. 23rd Curt Phone 2270! Announcing Opening of Utermoehlen Studio Piano, Harmony, String Instruments, arranging. Pupil Carl Utermoehlen, Berlin; End] Liebling, Chicago; 20 year's experience. Formerly librarian Olympia Orchestra. Phone 9210 1129 N. W. 3rd STREET BELL BAKERY 60 West Plagler St. Bake-Rite Breadery 332 N. Miami Ave. Home-Made BREAD. PIES and CAKES We Provide the Goodies for Your Affairs Catering Our Specialty Remember, Everything —is— "The Tanenbaum Standard" Northern Interests Have Cash to Invest in Business er Real Estate WHAT HAVE YOU? W. L. WILLIAMS 2r2 HALCYON ARCADE Phone 36840 FOR LUMBER and ALL BUILDING Materials FISHER LUMBER CO. I'hnii.:o.'..i 1100 S. W. rim Avrnnr FLAGLER DRY CLEANERS Cleaning, Pressing, Dyeing and Repairing 472 W. Flagler St. Phone 33260 "For thr Prrarrvation of Your Clothe*" FOR STORE FIXTURES See BERNER STORE EQUIPMENT CO. 824 N. E. 1st Avenue PHONE 31261 The Bank of Personal Service THE THIRD NATIONAL BANK OF MIAMI—33 N. E. First Ave. Total Resources, Close of Business. Oct. 3. 1928— $1,356,538.43 RECORD OF GROWTH Drpo.il.. March 23. 1927 I233.9U.S3 !> %  ; % %  — t-. Jun.30. 1927 362.048.67 IVpo.it.. Drrrmbrr 31. 1927 587,109.56 Urpo.it.. r'.-bruary 28th. 1928 678,072.78 Drpo.il.. Junr 30. 1928 682.519.14 l>li-"-ll>. OCTOBER 3rd, I9H, 7.T6.J28"w OFFICERS t I MONTANUS _..Chainuti *\' < : HILL r *i"r IAMES ALMY V lr e.Prraide: • "SHER V.cr Prr.idm. ', ",ll\ _. Ca.hi.r tP. MERCER Ai...„, Cahi.r Etta Beauty Shoppe u. bpepcttUIsp in i; I.,.,,,pt-nfenetV i\ aravlag ami Helena liuirV^irKtai-\| lal matin. HIan.I |iri'p f l l| liV 1 '. -V 2207 N. E. Second Avenue Phone 20245 K. M. V'olf.Amil.. lurking Spac THAT mmMERFl I. NEW I.K.NK S K..VK„ ,CK COLD TAK-ABOOST — 5c bTnftrd .Tu, „..., ., ..„ ''" k *" *"~ *• palate .„d %  rm.or.tr.. No car ^NOJ^ "ttm """ Crd """• Tr, i, tod., and ,ou ..II T.k ,_J ffy Hiii Cimnyf Trfk-AliOiHl" .ill. ,.,.11. I. • ; Aaltra. lu^Sroa. \ ETfcjft*?^ "•!? "" "'•">. <• %  for IM. ^r a mm •"•""'! with purr milk that cannot be boatrn 19 N. E. SECOND AVENUE HIPPODROME Bl. 11.1)1 \i. SOUTHERN TAK-ABOOST CO. 4J6 S. W. EIGHTH AVENUE


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
THE OPERATION
(Continued from I*bk' 3)
the earth, this bitter enemy of
e Jews, in a better way than I?
jw well I could avenge the mis-
y he caused not only for me,
at the suffering and anguish he
[ought on others! But can I do
Can I control myself? It is
to you, rabbi, in the common
fterest of humanity, to help me
pt rid of him in a manner be-
Itting his cursed dignity.'
'By whom were you asked to
aerate?" the rabbi asked in an
Imost inaudible tone. Then he
Ided, "Were there not others
as competent as you?"
"Curses, no! This vile dog went
the hospital, and the doctors,
I of whom are seniors, made a
itudy of him. It is one case in a
housand. Other big, noted med-
ial men, some of whom are pro-
lessors, have been consulted, and
They believe that an operation
irould not only be fatal, but im-
possible. This case has interested
Foremost doctors of America, and
let none are willing to attempt an
Operation. At the hospital recent-
ly, they had a consultation, and
kg'reed, knowing my reputation
End the success 1 had achieved in
atricate cases where an operation
n the brain had to be performed,
tiat the one to operate should be
,. They expressed their confi-
dence in my ability and skill."
Another long interval went by
|before Finkel spoke again, and
(this time hotly and passionately.
'I haven't got the courage to
-operate in such a manner that he
[will go through, or at least feel,
[the tortures, the pains that he in-
Iflicted upon others, upon his cow-
lering victims. It is no more than
[justice that they should be aveng-
|ed a thousand-fold. And how 1
[could do it, could I but control
[myself. I would make him squirm
[until he felt the cold hand of
[death, and then I would prolong
[his life. Alternately, I would tor-
[ture him as long as I pleased. For
[every victim he burned alive or
I buried alive, I would plunge him
[so deep into the bitter depths of
[agony that he would wish he was
dead. Yes, I would sear his soul
in the same manner that he seared
I others'!"
The rabbi shuddered percept-
ibly, and a cold sweat gathered on
his forehead. Then Finkel contin-
ued, wetting his parched lips with
| his tongue.
"But the question is: Should I
let him die a death fit for a dog
or have him die humanely, under
the knife of some unskilled doc-
tor?"
"If it was someone else upon
whom you are supposed to oper-
ate, could you cure the person?
"Yes, I feel confident I could.
In Europe I have operated on sim-
ilar cases successfully. And for
that matter, I have cut deeper in-
to the skull in more intricate op-
erations than this would require."
"Then you could, if so desired,
save this person?"
"Certainly."
"Then by all means do so." The
rabbi spoke slowly, and enunci-
ated each word emphatically.
Finkel jumped up as if he was
sitting on a hot iron. His eyes
Were distended in horror.
"Such talk as this from you!
Do you know what you're say-
ing?'*
"Must I remind you," began the
rabbi wearily, "that I, as a Jew,
can give you advice only as a Jew.
You want me to encourage you to
do what you think is your duty.
That I cannot. To pass judgment
upon anyone is something which
no mortal can take upon himself;
that belongs to the Almighty. God
metes out justice in his own way;
we can only bow our heads and
place our fate in His hands. What-
ever injustice the Jews have suf-
fered, they must overlook. They
must forgive and forget."
"But it is like giving new life
to a deadly, venomous reptile to
continue its devasting work!"
"God created reptiles for some
purpose."
"Be sensible! Act human! You
know as well as I, that it is rank
folly to let this man live," ve-
hemently protested Finkel, forget-
ting to whom he was speaking.
"My dear Finkel, despite the
fact that you called the Jew an
animal, if he is, let us say, of a
higher mentality, must he show the
same atrributes and virtues of
those mentally, morally, and
spiritually inferior than he? Re-
venge, you know, is something for-
eign to the Jew. He who indulges,
or even entertains that idea, is in-
finitely inferior to his persecutors.
In America, in the olden times,
Indians scalped people and crush-
ed babies' heads against tree
trunks; the European savages,
with whom you, unfortunately,
were so well acquainted, were per-
haps more cruel; must you there-
fore follow their example and be
still more inhuman? Because a
dog lull-- you, must you bite him
in revenge?"
"Good heavens, how you talk!"
impetuously cried Finkel, getting
redder every moment. He started
to gesture wildly and excitedly.
"You with your disgusting senti-
mentalism! It's impossible for
any intelligent person to swallow
it; it deprives him of his last bit
of manhood and self-respect! As
for myself, I know that if I should
operate, I could not help plung-
ing the operating knife deep into
the scoundrel's black soul. Seeing
his brutish face, what decent man
could control himself? Should I
fawn about this low, base, despic-
able person as you would have
me? Should I inject life in him
so that he can spit at my face?
Shall I let him go back and tor-
ture those victims of his with a
cruder lash, a hotter iron, a sharp-
er knife? Aye, and youa rabbi,
a person inbued with the spirit of
Judaism, would actually let this
happen again! You would turn
loose this bloodthirsty hound, this
insatiable beast! You would see
those degrading atrocities take
place again, and have the ruthless
programs a national sport with the
anti-Semites! Have you no feel-
ing, no sympathy? Youyou"
Here the doctor truly seemed on
the verge of apoplexy. He was
trembling and his face was livid
with rage; and with each word he
rose to his full length on his toes,
as if striving to overtower the rab-
bi. With a tightly clenched fist,
he pounded and hammered away
into the open palm of his other
hand to give emphasis to his
words.
The rabbi, frightened by the
scene this enraged man was mak-
ing, shrank deeper in his chair in
a state of alarm and fear.
"Here, here! Calm yourself!"
he cried apprehensively.
"Youyou!" the doctor fum-
ed infuriatedly, his anger so
wrought-up that it took away his
power of speech. Menacingly, he
towered with uplifted fists above
the frightened rabbi, and then,
finding his tongue, he bellowed,
"Your heart is blacker thanthan
that vile dog's!" And then with a
sudden movement that almost put
the rabbi into a frantic terror, he
swung swiftly on his heel, and
like one gasping for a breath of
fresh air, he rushed headlong out
of the house, loudly slamming the
door after him.
All that night Finkel acted like
a man in a nightmare. Back and
forth he paced in his bedroom,
his mind in a raging turmoil; and
the more he deliberated upon the
situation, the more intense his
hatred for this anti-Semite became,
until it knew no bounds.
But the rabbi's words pounded
unceasingly on his brains. It
served to cool his flaming emo-
tions; and then later to re-alight
them with a hotter flame. He
had thought the rabbi a sane
and logical person, devoid of such
sickly sentimentalism; a person of
clear reasoning; one who could
feel the injuries of his race and
wish to avenge them. He thought
the rabbi, too, would believe in
"an eye for an eye," that he would
rejoice in disposing of this veno-
mous, deadly reptile?the rabbi
actually suggested operating so
as to save the worthless life of this
Jew-hater, this cruel Jew-baiter,
this flaming anti-Semite! Are the
Jews so utterly devoid of sense of
honor that they seek not to return
blow for blow? The European
Jews, he contemplated, were nar-
row-minded anyhow, but an in-
telligent type such as this Ameri-
can Jew, well versed in the ideals
and principles of America's demo-
cracy and justice, would stoop,
deign, nay, condescend to utter
such nonsensical, revolting words!
Indeed the Jewish mind goes in a
circle! What the world consider-
ed bravery was cowardice in the
eyes of the Jews, and what the
former considered cowardice was,
in the eyes of the latter, heroism.
It is true, bitterly reflected Finkel,
that the Jewish mind has not pro-
gressed much during the thousands
of years of wandering through-
out the earth. Yes, indeed, it was
sickening, discouraging, and more
sodisgusting!
He began to feel a hatred for
this most unusual affair in which
he was so inadvertently mixed up.
And yet, try as he would, he could
not make up his mind one way or
the other. To killwhy not? It
would be no more than justice.
Had not this brute extinguished
many purposeful lives; numerous
lives that were striving to main-
lain some beautiful ideal accord-
ing to the concepts of their re-
ligion? These people enjoying
and appreciating all that life had
to give them, were brutally wiped
off the earth, as if they had never
existed. Their death caused no
more commotion in this cold
world than the quiet ripples of a
still, peaceful water started by a
pebble. Their lives were snuffed
out like a candle by a cold, icy
draft. And this beast, having
drained the cup of life to the very
last drop, was now on his back
helpless, and yet no animosity was
being borne him; in fact, they
would have a fellow Jew cure this
pitiless enemy of theirs. Strange,
Finkel reflected, how by isolating
himself from them the many years
that he had lived in America, he
had failed entirely to understand
or sympathize with their point of
view, their method of reasoning.
Was it because Christian thought,
Christian contact, had alienated
him from his race, so that he was
like an utter stranger?
The next morning brought him
no solution, nor relief. But,
strangely, the words of the rabbi
persisted in his mind, and he was,
try as he would, unable to dispel
them. They were breaking down
his barrier of intense hatred, in-
vading, trampling over the griev-
ances and sentiments which he
had nursed. "A Jew must forgive
and forget!" rang through his
mind continuously, and it would
ruthlessly upset his chain of
thoughts. It was his Jewish con-
science, he reflected bitterly, that
was manifesting itself. He could
feel himself wavering. To be born
a Jew, he caustically meditated,
is a curse, for one cannot shake
himself entirely free from its in-
fluence.
That afternoon, while attending
some of his patients in the hospi-
tal, he met a warm friend of his,
Henri Chambeau, a noted French
doctor. The latter, gushing with
compliments and good wishes, joy-
ously seized Finkel's hand.
"Congratulations, mon ami. I
was so very very much glad to
hear of your appointment. When
I first heard of the caseIvan
Yankovitch is the nameyes!I
think at once of you. 'Finkel is just
the man.' I said to myself; 'all
the rest of the big doctors talk
too much, and look too serious.
My friend Finkel is the very
man!" And sure enough he gets
the appointment. All the luck
in the world I wish you."
"I haven't yet decided to ac-
cept," explained Finkel.
"What! No confidence in your-
self? Bah! You're worse than
some of my patients," snapped
Chambeau.
Finkel said nothing, but he
thoughtfully studied his watch
fob.
"When is the operation schedul-
ed for?" inquired his friend.
"Tomorrow, at ten o'clock."
"Have you yet refused?"
"No."
"Then don't be a fool!" Cham-
beau dryly remarked. "All the
seniors have declined because they
lack confidence in themselves.
And if you succeed, just see what
a name you'll make for yourself!"
Finkel wearily shook his head,
discouragingly.
"Is he in such bad shape?"
Chambeau asked.
"I haven't examined him yet,"
he explained. "I know only what
others tell me about him. Of
course, I'm familiar with such
cases." Finkel's voice was low,
in fact so low, that the alert little
Frenchman s e n s e d something
wrong.
"What! Even before examining
you talk about refusing? Big men
honor you, and you triflle with it
as if it were nothing." He shook
his head disparagingly.
The long, tedious day slid by
and Finkel agitatedly strode his
room like a caged lion. He had
given no decisive answer to
the officials, and he knew
that by his silence they
would expect him to go through
with the operation. Numberless
cigars, chewed to shreds, lay
strewn about, and in his stridings,
he would occasionally mutter un-
der his breath. Later in the even-
ing, tired and exhausted, he sat by
the window in his soft armchair,
breathing deeply of the cool night
air. Thus, in that position, tired
from battling with the raging tur-
moil within him, he fell asleep.
He slept fitfully until late in the
morning. Upon awakening, real-
izing the late hour, he sprang up.
After a quick cold shower, he
scrambled into his clothes, re-
freshed himself with hot, black
coffee, and springing into a taxi,
made for the hospital.
ii ..nth,ii..i Next Week)
I'm Thankful
I'm thankful that the sun and
moon
Are both hung up so high
That no pretentious hand can
stretch
And pull them from the sky.
If they were not, I have no doubt,
That some reforming ass
Would recommend to take them
down
And light the world with gas.
Judaism?
"Judaism is not a mere nega-
tion of the dominant belief. It is
a positive religion. It is an act-
ive, living faith; a faith that is
shown not by our words, but by
our daily life; not by the public
edifices we build, but by the in-
fluences silently, ceaselessly at
work at our family hearthstones
... If there is one lesson that the
Jewish home, the true Jewish
home, teaches above all things, it
is the lesson of rest; not slothful-
ness, not passive acquiescence in
the mean or the sordid, not igno-
rant acceptance of the false or the
bad, but that loftiest optimism,
that restful contentedness, which
is born of an unshaken trust in
God."
Dr. Solomon Solis Cohen.
Myself and Me
I have to live with myself and so
I want to be fit for myself to
know.
I want to be able, as days go by,
Always to look myself straight in
the eye.
I don't want to stand with the set-
ting sun,
And hate myself for the things
I've done.
I never can hide myself from me;
I see what others may never see.
I know what others may never
know;
I never can fool myself, and so,
Whatever happens, I want to be
Self respecting and conscience-
free.
// you like any of our stuff,
take it and give US credit. If
you don't want to give US cred-
it, take it and "The De'il take
you."
L. (Pop) GERSON
Buyer of all kinds of
Scrap Metal
2145 N. W. 2nd AVENUE
Phone 7909
Res. Phone 7276
MI HI FOUNT
opposite .Miami Senior High
"Your Rendzevous"
Electric Hot Dog Machine
Strictly Fresh
HAMBURGERS DAILY
Candies, Cigars, etc.
PHONE 6602
Florida Iron and
Equipment Co.
519 N. W. 3rd Avenue
WIioIi-nbIi- ili'iil.Ts lii machinery and
contractors equipment.
Miami. Florida
AWNINGS
Phone 20830
Miami Awning Co.
1724 S. W. 8th STREET
i
mm
m



PAGE 1

THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN THE OPERATION (Continued from I*BK' 3) the earth, this bitter enemy of E Jews, in a better way than I? jw well I could avenge the misy he caused not only for me, at the suffering and anguish he [ %  ought on others! But can I do Can I control myself? It is to you, rabbi, in the common fterest of humanity, to help me pt rid of him in a manner beItting his cursed dignity.' •'By whom were you asked to aerate?" the rabbi asked in an Imost inaudible tone. Then he Ided, "Were there not others as competent as you?" "Curses, no! This vile dog went the hospital, and the doctors, I of whom are seniors, made a itudy of him. It is one case in a housand. Other big, noted medial men, some of whom are prolessors, have been consulted, and They believe that an operation irould not only be fatal, but impossible. This case has interested Foremost doctors of America, and let none are willing to attempt an Operation. At the hospital recently, they had a consultation, and kg'reed, knowing my reputation End the success 1 had achieved in atricate cases where an operation n the brain had to be performed, tiat the one to operate should be ,. They expressed their confidence in my ability and skill." Another long interval went by |before Finkel spoke again, and (this time hotly and passionately. 'I haven't got the courage to -operate in such a manner that he [will go through, or at least feel, [the tortures, the pains that he inIflicted upon others, upon his cowlering victims. It is no more than [justice that they should be aveng|ed a thousand-fold. And how 1 [could do it, could I but control [myself. I would make him squirm [until he felt the cold hand of [death, and then I would prolong [his life. Alternately, I would tor[ture him as long as I pleased. For [every victim he burned alive or I buried alive, I would plunge him [so deep into the bitter depths of [agony that he would wish he was dead. Yes, I would sear his soul in the same manner that he seared I others'!" The rabbi shuddered perceptibly, and a cold sweat gathered on his forehead. Then Finkel continued, wetting his parched lips with | his tongue. "But the question is: Should I let him die a death fit for a dog— or have him die humanely, under the knife of some unskilled doctor?" "If it was someone else upon whom you are supposed to operate, could you cure the person? "Yes, I feel confident I could. In Europe I have operated on similar cases successfully. And for that matter, I have cut deeper into the skull in more intricate operations than this would require." "Then you could, if so desired, save this person?" "Certainly." "Then by all means do so." The rabbi spoke slowly, and enunciated each word emphatically. Finkel jumped up as if he was sitting on a hot iron. His eyes Were distended in horror. "Such talk as this from you! Do you know what you're saying?'* "Must I remind you," began the rabbi wearily, "that I, as a Jew, can give you advice only as a Jew. You want me to encourage you to do what you think is your duty. That I cannot. To pass judgment upon anyone is something which no mortal can take upon himself; that belongs to the Almighty. God metes out justice in his own way; we can only bow our heads and place our fate in His hands. Whatever injustice the Jews have suffered, they must overlook. They must forgive and forget." "But it is like giving new life to a deadly, venomous reptile to continue its devasting work!" "God created reptiles for some purpose." "Be sensible! Act human! You know as well as I, that it is rank folly to let this man live," vehemently protested Finkel, forgetting to whom he was speaking. "My dear Finkel, despite the fact that you called the Jew an animal, if he is, let us say, of a higher mentality, must he show the same atrributes and virtues of those mentally, morally, and spiritually inferior than he? Revenge, you know, is something foreign to the Jew. He who indulges, or even entertains that idea, is infinitely inferior to his persecutors. In America, in the olden times, Indians scalped people and crushed babies' heads against tree trunks; the European savages, with whom you, unfortunately, were so well acquainted, were perhaps more cruel; must you therefore follow their example and be still more inhuman? Because a dog lull-you, must you bite him in revenge?" "Good heavens, how you talk!" impetuously cried Finkel, getting redder every moment. He started to gesture wildly and excitedly. "You with your disgusting sentimentalism! It's impossible for any intelligent person to swallow it; it deprives him of his last bit of manhood and self-respect! As for myself, I know that if I should operate, I could not help plunging the operating knife deep into the scoundrel's black soul. Seeing his brutish face, what decent man could control himself? Should I fawn about this low, base, despicable person as you would have me? Should I inject life in him so that he can spit at my face? Shall I let him go back and torture those victims of his with a cruder lash, a hotter iron, a sharper knife? Aye, and you—a rabbi, a person inbued with the spirit of Judaism, would actually let this happen again! You would turn loose this bloodthirsty hound, this insatiable beast! You would see those degrading atrocities take place again, and have the ruthless programs a national sport with the anti-Semites! Have you no feeling, no sympathy? You—you—" Here the doctor truly seemed on the verge of apoplexy. He was trembling and his face was livid with rage; and with each word he rose to his full length on his toes, as if striving to overtower the rabbi. With a tightly clenched fist, he pounded and hammered away into the open palm of his other hand to give emphasis to his words. The rabbi, frightened by the scene this enraged man was making, shrank deeper in his chair in a state of alarm and fear. "Here, here! Calm yourself!" he cried apprehensively. "You—you—!" the doctor fumed infuriatedly, his anger so wrought-up that it took away his power of speech. Menacingly, he towered with uplifted fists above the frightened rabbi, and then, finding his tongue, he bellowed, "Your heart is blacker than—than that vile dog's!" And then with a sudden movement that almost put the rabbi into a frantic terror, he swung swiftly on his heel, and like one gasping for a breath of fresh air, he rushed headlong out of the house, loudly slamming the door after him. All that night Finkel acted like a man in a nightmare. Back and forth he paced in his bedroom, his mind in a raging turmoil; and the more he deliberated upon the situation, the more intense his hatred for this anti-Semite became, until it knew no bounds. But the rabbi's words pounded unceasingly on his brains. It served to cool his flaming emotions; and then later to re-alight them with a hotter flame. He had thought the rabbi a sane and logical person, devoid of such sickly sentimentalism; a person of clear reasoning; one who could feel the injuries of his race and wish to avenge them. He thought the rabbi, too, would believe in "an eye for an eye," that he would rejoice in disposing of this venomous, deadly reptile?—the rabbi actually suggested operating so as to save the worthless life of this Jew-hater, this cruel Jew-baiter, this flaming anti-Semite! Are the Jews so utterly devoid of sense of honor that they seek not to return blow for blow? The European Jews, he contemplated, were narrow-minded anyhow, but an intelligent type such as this American Jew, well versed in the ideals and principles of America's democracy and justice, would stoop, deign, nay, condescend to utter such nonsensical, revolting words! Indeed the Jewish mind goes in a circle! What the world considered bravery was cowardice in the eyes of the Jews, and what the former considered cowardice was, in the eyes of the latter, heroism. It is true, bitterly reflected Finkel, that the Jewish mind has not progressed much during the thousands of years of wandering throughout the earth. Yes, indeed, it was sickening, discouraging, and more so—disgusting! He began to feel a hatred for this most unusual affair in which he was so inadvertently mixed up. And yet, try as he would, he could not make up his mind one way or the other. To kill—why not? It would be no more than justice. Had not this brute extinguished many purposeful lives; numerous lives that were striving to mainlain some beautiful ideal according to the concepts of their religion? These people enjoying and appreciating all that life had to give them, were brutally wiped off the earth, as if they had never existed. Their death caused no more commotion in this cold world than the quiet ripples of a still, peaceful water started by a pebble. Their lives were snuffed out like a candle by a cold, icy draft. And this beast, having drained the cup of life to the very last drop, was now on his back helpless, and yet no animosity was being borne him; in fact, they would have a fellow Jew cure this pitiless enemy of theirs. Strange, Finkel reflected, how by isolating himself from them the many years that he had lived in America, he had failed entirely to understand or sympathize with their point of view, their method of reasoning. Was it because Christian thought, Christian contact, had alienated him from his race, so that he was like an utter stranger? The next morning brought him no solution, nor relief. But, strangely, the words of the rabbi persisted in his mind, and he was, try as he would, unable to dispel them. They were breaking down his barrier of intense hatred, invading, trampling over the grievances and sentiments which he had nursed. "A Jew must forgive and forget!" rang through his mind continuously, and it would ruthlessly upset his chain of thoughts. It was his Jewish conscience, he reflected bitterly, that was manifesting itself. He could feel himself wavering. To be born a Jew, he caustically meditated, is a curse, for one cannot shake himself entirely free from its influence. That afternoon, while attending some of his patients in the hospital, he met a warm friend of his, Henri Chambeau, a noted French doctor. The latter, gushing with compliments and good wishes, joyously seized Finkel's hand. "Congratulations, mon ami. I was so very — very much glad to hear of your appointment. When I first heard of the case—Ivan Yankovitch is the name—yes!—I think at once of you. 'Finkel is just the man.' I said to myself; 'all the rest of the big doctors talk too much, and look too serious. My friend Finkel is the very man!" And sure enough he gets the appointment. All the luck in the world I wish you." "I haven't yet decided to accept," explained Finkel. "What! No confidence in yourself? Bah! You're worse than some of my patients," snapped Chambeau. Finkel said nothing, but he thoughtfully studied his watch fob. "When is the operation scheduled for?" inquired his friend. "Tomorrow, at ten o'clock." "Have you yet refused?" "No." "Then don't be a fool!" Chambeau dryly remarked. "All the seniors have declined because they lack confidence in themselves. And if you succeed, just see what a name you'll make for yourself!" Finkel wearily shook his head, discouragingly. "Is he in such bad shape?" Chambeau asked. "I haven't examined him yet," he explained. "I know only what others tell me about him. Of course, I'm familiar with such cases." Finkel's voice was low, in fact so low, that the alert little Frenchman s e n s e d something wrong. "What! Even before examining you talk about refusing? Big men honor you, and you triflle with it as if it were nothing." He shook his head disparagingly. The long, tedious day slid by and Finkel agitatedly strode his room like a caged lion. He had given no decisive answer to the officials, and he knew that by his silence they would expect him to go through with the operation. Numberless cigars, chewed to shreds, lay strewn about, and in his stridings, he would occasionally mutter under his breath. Later in the evening, tired and exhausted, he sat by the window in his soft armchair, breathing deeply of the cool night air. Thus, in that position, tired from battling with the raging turmoil within him, he fell asleep. He slept fitfully until late in the morning. Upon awakening, realizing the late hour, he sprang up. After a quick cold shower, he scrambled into his clothes, refreshed himself with hot, black coffee, and springing into a taxi, made for the hospital. ii ..nth,ii. %  .i Next Week) I'm Thankful I'm thankful that the sun and moon Are both hung up so high That no pretentious hand can stretch And pull them from the sky. If they were not, I have no doubt, That some reforming ass Would recommend to take them down And light the world with gas. Judaism? "Judaism is not a mere negation of the dominant belief. It is a positive religion. It is an active, living faith; a faith that is shown not by our words, but by our daily life; not by the public edifices we build, but by the influences silently, ceaselessly at work at our family hearthstones ... If there is one lesson that the Jewish home, the true Jewish home, teaches above all things, it is the lesson of rest; not slothfulness, not passive acquiescence in the mean or the sordid, not ignorant acceptance of the false or the bad, but that loftiest optimism, that restful contentedness, which is born of an unshaken trust in God." Dr. Solomon Solis Cohen. Myself and Me I have to live with myself and so I want to be fit for myself to know. I want to be able, as days go by, Always to look myself straight in the eye. I don't want to stand with the setting sun, And hate myself for the things I've done. I never can hide myself from me; I see what others may never see. I know what others may never know; I never can fool myself, and so, Whatever happens, I want to be Self respecting and consciencefree. // you like any of our stuff, take it and give US credit. If you don't want to give US credit, take it and "The De'il take you." L. (Pop) GERSON Buyer of all kinds of Scrap Metal 2145 N. W. 2nd AVENUE Phone 7909 Res. Phone 7276 MI HI FOUNT opposite .Miami Senior High "Your Rendzevous" Electric Hot Dog Machine Strictly Fresh HAMBURGERS DAILY Candies, Cigars, etc. PHONE 6602 Florida Iron and Equipment Co. 519 N. W. 3rd Avenue WIIOII-NBIIili'iil.Ts lii machinery and %  contractors equipment. Miami. Florida AWNINGS Phone 20830 Miami Awning Co. 1724 S. W. 8th STREET —i mm m


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
i.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
BETH DAVID
TEMPLE ISRAEL
HADASSAH
Last Tuesday evening the Ha-
dassah showed its mettle when one
of the largest card parties of the
season was held at the Alcazar
Hotel Quite a large number of
both members and non-members
attended and an enjoyable even-
ing was had by all. Beautiful
prizes were awarded to the win-
ners. Refreshments were served.
The committee in charge, con-
sisting of Mrs. Morris Dubler,
chairlady. assisted by Mrs. Sam-
uel Simonhoff. Mrs. David Bo-
gen. Mrs. Mendel Cromer and oth-
ers, deserve much commendation
for the very efficient manner in
which the affair was conducted.
A very important meeting of
the Board of Directors of Hadas-
sah wai held at the home of Mrs.
Louis Zeientz on last Monday
night. Much regret was expressed
at the resignation of Mr*. Morris
Plant who will not return to Mi-
ami any more, having taken up
her permanent residence in New
York City.
A nominating committee was
appointed to propose names for
the vacancy.
A joint meeting with the local
Zionist District will be held in the
near future to discuss ways and
means for co-ordinating local
Zionist work.
Plans are being whipped into
shape for the Thanksgiving din-
ner dance to be held next Thanks-
giving for funds for the Hadas-
sah work.
HAVE YOU
SUBSCRIBED FOR
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN ?
Jewish Welfare
Bureau
Mana Zucca
Music
Club
Late services beginning at 8
p. m. will be held as usual. Rabbi
Israel H. Weisfeld will preach a
sermon on "Fifty Righteous Men."
A feature of the services will be
a continuation of "Testimonies of
Great Nations." to be led this
week by Abe Aronovitz. As usual,
one of the members of the congre-
gation will offer a prayer.
A special class for teaching of
Yiddish reading and writing has
been begun for young girls of 16
and the enrollment is steadily in-
creasing.
Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan
will preach at the Friday evening
services on "Whom Are ^ ou En-
tertaining?"
A feature of the services will
be a special '"Schlessinger Musi-
cal Program." Mrs. H. U. Fei-
belman and Miss Kahn will sing
a duet "The Lord is Mv Shep-
herd."
The usual religious classes and
open forum will be conducted
Sunday morning.
At a meeting of the Board of
Directors of the Jewish Welfare
Bureau it was decided to hold a
Charity Ball and Bazaar to raise
funds for the Jewish Welfare Bu-
reau in the early part of Febru-
ary. Mrs. P. Scheinberg is to be
Chairman, assisted by Messrs.
Norman Mirsky. D. J. Apte, Stan-
ley C. Myers and H. I. Homa.
A gala card party for the bene-
fit of the bureau funds will be
held on Tuesday. November 13, at
the Alcazar Hotel, and will be in
charge of a committee consisting
of Mrs. P. Scheinberg. Mrs. Anna
Benjamin and Mrs. D. J. Apte,
The proposal of the Community
Chest that the Jewish Welfare Bu-
reau join the Central Council of
Social Agencies which is to consist
of all local welfare associations,
was approved. Each organiza-
tion will send two representatives
to the Council in addition to the
Social Secretary. The Council
will eek to eliminate duplication
of activities and will encourage
interchange of ideas in Welfare
Bureau work.
The regular weekly meeting of
the Mana-Zucca Music Club was
held at Mazica Hall. A large
membership was present, and a
\ aiied program, including solos
on the piano and violin and a
number of vocal solos, was ren-
dered. Those taking part in the
musical program were Miss Elea-
nor Clark. George Lowinger, Ir-
win M. Cassell. Mrs. L B. Staf-
ford. Edythe Dann. Ruth Phelps,
Faye Rogers and Frances Tar-
boux.
Felicia Rybier
Music Club
Council Of
Jewish Women
At the meeting of the Board of
Directors of the Council of Jew-
ish Women, the President, Mrs.
Benj. Axelroad announced that a
check for the sum of fifty dollars
had been received from the Bos-
ton Chapter, towards Charity-
work. A vote of thanks was given
the Boston Chapter and it was de-
cided to accept the gift and send
it to the Jewish Rehabilitation
Committee at Palm Beach for the
relief of the Jewish families who
suffered because of the last hur-
ricane.
Announcement was made for a
elaborate program for November
14. at 3 p. m., to celebrate the
National Peace Program of the
Council. The full details of the
program will be announced in the
next issue of the Jewish Floridian.
This general meeting to which all
are invited, will be held at Tem-
ple Israel.
Because of the fact that the
Council feels that all organiza-
tions in the city have their defi-
nite field for work and not to ov-
erburden the people, it was defi-
nitely agreed that the Council will
sponsor only one benefit affair
this year, to be in the form of an
elaborate entertainment to be held
January 22. next. No other af-
fairs of any kind will be held for
the Council.
An enthusiastic and well-attend-
ed meeting of the newly organized
Felicia Rybier Music Club was
held at the home of Mrs. E. Blum
at Coral Gables, last Tuesday
night. A vocal solo was rendered
by Eugenia Holmsdale. who was
accompanied by Miss Florence
Besvinick. Two Mana-Zucca com-
positions were played by Gertrude
Dietz. A very interesting paper
on the "Life of Schubert" was
read by Mrs. E. Blum.
After the program refreshments
were served.
Among those present were Mrs.
E. Blum. Felicia Rybier. Babette
and Laurette Simons. Gertrude
and Louise Dietz. Eleanor Blum,
Pauline and Betty Lasky. Theresa
and Shirley Harris, Sema Lomask
and Mrs. D. Lomask.
Emunah Chapter
O. E. S.
The Hallowe'en party sponsor-
r-d by the Loyalty Club of the
Emunah Chapter was held at the
home of Mrs. Dan Ruskin on
Thursday night, and was marked
by the large number of guests
present Wry interesting and
quaint costumes were worn by
some of those present. During
the evening a decorated card table
was raffled.
IVES CERTIFIED MILK
SAFE MILK
For Adult and Baby
"QUALITY MILK"
For the PARTICULAR and DISCRLMLNATING
If you are not a customerask your
Neighbor about our products.
IVES CERTIFIED DAIRY
"Florida's First Certified Dairy
Miami Telephone 8841 OJua, Fla.
Friendship League
All preparations have been
made for the Friendship League
Armistice Dance to be held at the
Floridian Hotel on Armistice
Night. November 11th. beginning
at 9 P. M. Extensive plans have
been arranged to make this dance
the outstanding affair of the sea-
son. Tickets are being rapidly
sold and from all indications a
record-breaking attendance is
anticipated. Admission is only
$1.50 a couple. The League has
alwa>s been known to provide
the best entertainment possible at
the lowest admiion. The dance
is the fore-runner of a number of
social affairs which will be given
by the League djring the Winter
Season. Ticket- may be had at
the Central Boo*. Shop at N. E.
Second Avenue and First Street as
well as from all members of the
League.
The Dramati Club of the
Friendship League met Monday
night at the home of Miss Lena
W inkle. A one-act play entitled
"Spot Cash" will be put'on at the
regular meeting of the League next
W -dn.->dj\ night A Treat is in
store for those present. Professor
Covlitt of the Lia\ersit> of Miami
Law School will also give a talk
on "My Idea of a Jew." A very-
interesting meeting is promised.
The meeting will begin at 9 P. M.
promptly.
The Friend-hip League Dram-
atic Club will meet hereafter on
Tuesday nights at 8 P.M. at Beth
David Sxnagogue. All members
of the Club are urged to be pres-
ent as many activities are being
planned.
ADVERTISE
l\
THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
SEE
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MORGAN
427 N. y> 20:h St.
For
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For the Best of Workmanship
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Presentations
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TO VOTE FOR
HERBERT HOOVER FOR PRESIDENT
You must make your ci >ss before the names of the Hepublicnn
Electors ;is follows:
ABBOTT, HI)win w.
ACKER, BERT LEIGH.
ALDRICH, ROBERT D.
AMES, PH. GEORGE S.
ANDERSON, HERBERT L.
AUSHERMAN, KATHARINE F.
For Member of Congress, 4th Cong. Dist WILLIAM C. LAWS' \
For (lovcrror W. J. HOWEY
For Secretary of State DR. GLEN C. HENLE 'i
For State Treasurer F. A. STOOL?
Dade County's Republican Candidates
For Tax Assessor HUGH C. WILLIAMS
For Clerk of Criminal Court of Record GEO. R. SHORT
For Justice of the Peace. Third District WALTER L SMITH
HOOVER
the '!.
the M.tmnn with a I,..it:
true atlwH-nte of unitrrftui pea .
who i.r.u irfil religion* liberty .ill III- life, mil
who helped the |h*oi>I< t rcant l'* .if pu r r re.il
-.tini therefore rnlor-*- *r.-at .lew-. >r.ili ;. l.oiii* Marshall, Juli -
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PAGE 1

THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN i. ANNOUNCEMENTS BETH DAVID TEMPLE ISRAEL HADASSAH Last Tuesday evening the Hadassah showed its mettle when one of the largest card parties of the season was held at the Alcazar Hotel Quite a large number of both members and non-members attended and an enjoyable evening was had by all. Beautiful prizes were awarded to the winners. Refreshments were served. The committee in charge, consisting of Mrs. Morris Dubler, chairlady. assisted by Mrs. Samuel Simonhoff. Mrs. David Bogen. Mrs. Mendel Cromer and others, deserve much commendation for the very efficient manner in which the affair was conducted. A very important meeting of the Board of Directors of Hadassah wai held at the home of Mrs. Louis Zeientz on last Monday night. Much regret was expressed at the resignation of Mr*. Morris Plant who will not return to Miami any more, having taken up her permanent residence in New York City. A nominating committee was appointed to propose names for the vacancy. A joint meeting with the local Zionist District will be held in the near future to discuss ways and means for co-ordinating local Zionist work. Plans are being whipped into shape for the Thanksgiving dinner dance to be held next Thanksgiving for funds for the Hadassah work. HAVE YOU SUBSCRIBED FOR THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN ? Jewish Welfare Bureau Mana Zucca Music Club Late services beginning at 8 p. m. will be held as usual. Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld will preach a sermon on "Fifty Righteous Men." A feature of the services will be a continuation of "Testimonies of Great Nations." to be led this week by Abe Aronovitz. As usual, one of the members of the congregation will offer a prayer. A special class for teaching of Yiddish reading and writing has been begun for young girls of 16 and the enrollment is steadily increasing. Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan will preach at the Friday evening services on "Whom Are ^ ou Entertaining?" A feature of the services will be a special '"Schlessinger Musical Program." Mrs. H. U. Feibelman and Miss Kahn will sing a duet "The Lord is Mv Shepherd." The usual religious classes and open forum will be conducted Sunday morning. At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Jewish Welfare Bureau it was decided to hold a Charity Ball and Bazaar to raise funds for the Jewish Welfare Bureau in the early part of February. Mrs. P. Scheinberg is to be Chairman, assisted by Messrs. Norman Mirsky. D. J. Apte, Stanley C. Myers and H. I. Homa. A gala card party for the benefit of the bureau funds will be held on Tuesday. November 13, at the Alcazar Hotel, and will be in charge of a committee consisting of Mrs. P. Scheinberg. Mrs. Anna Benjamin and Mrs. D. J. Apte, The proposal of the Community Chest that the Jewish Welfare Bureau join the Central Council of Social Agencies which is to consist of all local welfare associations, was approved. Each organization will send two representatives to the Council in addition to the Social Secretary. The Council will eek to eliminate duplication of activities and will encourage interchange of ideas in Welfare Bureau work. The regular weekly meeting of the Mana-Zucca Music Club was held at Mazica Hall. A large membership was present, and a \ aiied program, including solos on the piano and violin and a number of vocal solos, was rendered. Those taking part in the musical program were Miss Eleanor Clark. George Lowinger, Irwin M. Cassell. Mrs. L B. Stafford. Edythe Dann. Ruth Phelps, Faye Rogers and Frances Tarboux. Felicia Rybier Music Club Council Of Jewish Women At the meeting of the Board of Directors of the Council of Jewish Women, the President, Mrs. Benj. Axelroad announced that a check for the sum of fifty dollars had been received from the Boston Chapter, towards Charitywork. A vote of thanks was given the Boston Chapter and it was decided to accept the gift and send it to the Jewish Rehabilitation Committee at Palm Beach for the relief of the Jewish families who suffered because of the last hurricane. Announcement was made for a elaborate program for November 14. at 3 p. m., to celebrate the National Peace Program of the Council. The full details of the program will be announced in the next issue of the Jewish Floridian. This general meeting to which all are invited, will be held at Temple Israel. Because of the fact that the Council feels that all organizations in the city have their definite field for work and not to overburden the people, it was definitely agreed that the Council will sponsor only one benefit affair this year, to be in the form of an elaborate entertainment to be held January 22. next. No other affairs of any kind will be held for the Council. An enthusiastic and well-attended meeting of the newly organized Felicia Rybier Music Club was held at the home of Mrs. E. Blum at Coral Gables, last Tuesday night. A vocal solo was rendered by Eugenia Holmsdale. who was accompanied by Miss Florence Besvinick. Two Mana-Zucca compositions were played by Gertrude Dietz. A very interesting paper on the "Life of Schubert" was read by Mrs. E. Blum. After the program refreshments were served. Among those present were Mrs. E. Blum. Felicia Rybier. Babette and Laurette Simons. Gertrude and Louise Dietz. Eleanor Blum, Pauline and Betty Lasky. Theresa and Shirley Harris, Sema Lomask and Mrs. D. Lomask. Emunah Chapter O. E. S. The Hallowe'en party sponsorr-d by the Loyalty Club of the Emunah Chapter was held at the home of Mrs. Dan Ruskin on Thursday night, and was marked by the large number of guests present Wry interesting and quaint costumes were worn by some of those present. During the evening a decorated card table was raffled. IVES CERTIFIED MILK SAFE MILK For Adult and Baby "QUALITY MILK" For the PARTICULAR and DISCRLMLNATING If you are not a customer—ask your Neighbor about our products. IVES CERTIFIED DAIRY "Florida's First Certified Dairy Miami Telephone 8841 OJua, Fla. Friendship League All preparations have been made for the Friendship League Armistice Dance to be held at the Floridian Hotel on Armistice Night. November 11th. beginning at 9 P. M. Extensive plans have been arranged to make this dance the outstanding affair of the season. Tickets are being rapidly sold and from all indications a record-breaking attendance is anticipated. Admission is only $1.50 a couple. The League has alwa>s been known to provide the best entertainment possible at the lowest admi—ion. The dance is the fore-runner of a number of social affairs which will be given by the League djring the Winter Season. Ticketmay be had at the Central Boo*. Shop at N. E. Second Avenue and First Street as well as from all members of the League. The Dramati Club of the Friendship League met Monday night at the home of Miss Lena W inkle. A one-act play entitled "Spot Cash" will be put'on at the regular meeting of the League next W -dn.->dj\ night A Treat is in store for those present. Professor Covlitt of the Lia\ersit> of Miami Law School will also give a talk on "My Idea of a Jew." A veryinteresting meeting is promised. The meeting will begin at 9 P. M. promptly. The Friend-hip League Dramatic Club will meet hereafter on Tuesday nights at 8 P.M. at Beth David Sxnagogue. All members of the Club are urged to be present as many activities are being planned. ADVERTISE l\ THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN SEE SILVERMAN & MORGAN 427 N. y> 20:h St. —For— PAINTING End DECORATING Of AH Kinds For the Best of Workmanship On Your Car, See THE DONERIGHT GARAGE IS N. W. Srd Atf. I'li.mr .;•.; All Work and Prt OmMmtaN STORAGE HTODflOMf COMING COMING! See Him Hear Him THE WORLD'S GREATEST ENTERTADtEB Al Jolson IN THE SINGING FOOL l ita phone Presentations Fox Movietone \eus TO VOTE FOR HERBERT HOOVER FOR PRESIDENT You must make your ci >ss before the names of the Hepublicnn Electors ;is follows: ABBOTT, HI) WIN w. ACKER, BERT LEIGH. ALDRICH, ROBERT D. AMES, PH. GEORGE S. ANDERSON, HERBERT L. AUSHERMAN, KATHARINE F. For Member of Congress, 4th Cong. Dist WILLIAM C. LAWS' \ For (lovcrror W. J. HOWEY For Secretary of State DR. GLEN C. HENLE 'i For State Treasurer F. A. STOOL? Dade County's Republican Candidates For Tax Assessor HUGH C. WILLIAMS For Clerk of Criminal Court of Record GEO. R. SHORT For Justice of the Peace. Third District WALTER L SMITH HOOVER —the •• %  '•!•. the M.t—mnn with a I,. it: —true atlwH-nte of unitrrftui pea •. who i.r.u irfil religion* liberty .ill IIIlife, mil who helped the |H*OI>I< t rcant l'* .if pu r r re.il — -.tin i therefore rnlor-*- *r.-at .lew-. >r.ili ; l.oiii* Marshall, Juli Ko-.nuulil. Kel|\ Warluir*, Herman IWrn-i.in anil other-.: Paid Po| ;1 1 Advi r-;-. :i.. nt • Complete Facilities Are offered to you by the CITY NATIONAL BANK IN MIAMI eight distinct departments complete and ready to render a thoroughly efficient SERVICE: 11) — COMMERCIAL <2 — SAVINGS <3i — BONDS and INVESTMENTS •4i — EXCHANGE lot — COLLECTION 6— CREDIT <7i — SAFE DEPOSIT I8 — TRUST We would appreciate the opportunity to serve you. City National Bank in Miami Capital $1,000,000.00 Surplus Sl.000.000.0* 116 EAST FLAGLER STREET


wJewish Flaridliai m
To\. I.No. 6
MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 23, 1928
Price, 5 Cents
lOINT MEETING HAS
ELECTION OF
OFFICERS
These Will Entertain You At Our Party
Last Sunday night the joint
leeting of the local Zionist dis-
|rict and the local chapter of
ladassah was held at the Scot-
[ish Rite Temple banquet hall.
Ir. Harry I. Lipnitz presided and
presented a brief report of the
[ctivities of the district during
le past year. He was followed
py a report of the treasurer, Mr.
John Wolf, who showed that
lore than a thousand doflars had
i>een collected and sent to the
irious funds, such as the Na-
ional Fund, Zionist Organization,
Palestine Crafts Workers and
)ther Zionist funds. Mr. Baron
3c Hirsch Meyer, the secretary,
khen presented his report, after
i-hich Mrs. Max Dobrin, presi-
Jcnt of the local chapter of Ha-
iassah, in one of the most in-
^eresting addresses of the evening,
spoke of the work of Hadassah
lere and in Palestine and bespoke
fhe co-operation of all members
)f Hadassah in attending Zionist
leetings and otherwise co-operat-
ing with the Zionists.
Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld of
cth David spoke on Greater
Lionism and Rabbi Dr. Jacob H.
Kaplan of Temple Israel spoke on
Colonization, in Russia as compar-
with the""colonies irTPalestiilt.
Ir. Isidor Cohen spoke on the
york of the Zionists in the early
lays and at present and pledged
lis co-operation towards more
Successful accomplishments this'
coming year. He presented a plea
For Bnai Brith, saying that by
tiding Bnai Brith, the Ben Briths
would undoubtedly come to the
relp'of local Zionism and that
together they could accomplish a
treat deal.
Mr. John Wolf presented the
report of the nominations com-
littee and after several motions
were presented the report was
adopted. (No questions were ask-
|ed of those present as to whether
ir not they were members.) Mr.
larry I. Lipnitz, well known Jew-
ish attorney, was re-elected pres-
ident; John Wolf, first vice pres-
ident; Rabbi Israel Weisfeld and
fabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan, hon-
lorary vice presidents; Lewis
[Brown, active in local Jewish cir-
cles, was chosen treasurer; Mr.
lax Glass was returned to the
peal fold by being chosen secre-
tary. The following were elected
to the executive board: A. I.
loma, Day J. Apte, Isidor Co-
len, Louis Gerson, Dr. Max Dob-
rin, Dr. N. Halpern, Stanley C.
lyers, Henry Seitlin, Sam Si-
lonhoff, Harold Kassewitz, Her-
ert Scheer, Louis Zeientz, Baron
)e H. Meyer for the United
'alestine Appeal, Herman Wep-
lan, H. I. Magid, Jos. M. Fine,
r. L. Williams, Lawrence Sa-
cro. Hadassah representatives
ire: Mrs. Max Dobrin, Mrs. Isi-
lor Cohen, Mrs. Nat Sharaf,
Irs. Sam Simonhoff and Mrs.
lenry Settlin.
Miss Mildred (Sr'eenberg at the
iiano accompanied Cantor M.
ihoulson of Beth David in a
number of Yiddish folk songs
lich were very beautifully ren-
Jered.
-.*-...-.**-?,*
The entire company of the Burton-Garrett Players, who will entertain the guests of The Jewish
Floridian at the Temple Theatre, Tuesday night, November 27, at 8 o'clock.
PROMINENT JEWISH
MERCHANT DIES
AT ORLANDO
Harry Stolberg, a prominent
Jewish merchant of Orlando, died
from gas asphyxiation, self-admin-
istreed, last Friday at his Orlando
home.
Harry Stolberg came to Miami
many years ago and for a short
period was associated in business
with the late Louis Fine, one of
Miami's leading Jews of the past
decade. Shortly after his arrival
he left for Orlando, where he
subsequently made his home. He
was interested in various Miami
enterprises in the past several
years.
Mr. Stolberg was for a num-
ber of years president of the Or-
lando Jewish Community and
took a very active part in the
civic and communal life of Orlan-
do, in addition to his interest
and efforts among his fellow-
Jews.
Mr. Stolberg was about *>0
years of age and was a veteran
of the Spanish-American war.
He was buried in Beth David
cemetery after the rites had been
conducted by a delegation from
the local Bnai Brith lodge and
the Veterans of Foreign Wars.
He leaves surviving him his
wife.
MIAMI U. STUDENTS
ARE GUESTS OF
BETH DAVID
The Jewish boys and girls at-
tending the University of Miami
will be guests of Congregation
Beth David at the services on
Friday night,November 23, at
which time a special program will
be presented. Clarence Ross, one
of the students in the senior law
class, on behalf of the young
men, and Miss Reba Engfer, well
known public speaker and mem-
ber of the university debating
team, will speak on behalf of the
young ladies. Rabbi Weisfeld will
preach.
LET'S GET ACQUAINTED
As we said last week, too many of our Jewish men and women do not even
know each other; haven't had the opportunity to meet each other. That's only
one of the reasons for the Theatre Party at the TEMPLE THEATRE, TUES-
DAY, NOVEMBER 27, 8 P. M., where we want all the Jewish men and women
of Miami to be the guests of the Jewish Floridian.
Due to a change in the bill caused by a desire on our part and that of the
Burton-Garrett Players to give you something that has not yet been presented to'
Miamians, "THE OLD SOAK" will be presented for your entertainment.
If you have not yet reserved your tickets, make sure to call the president of
your organization and have her call the Jewish Floridian. The time is close.
You want to be there with all your friends. We want you to be there to have a
good time.
If you don't belong to any of the local organizations, call 36840 and we will
take care of your needs.
YOUR "U" AND YOU
A Plea
Aside from his contribution of
the "Koran" to the world litera'
ture, Mahomet will probably be
best remembered by his appella-
tion of the Jews. He called them
"the People of the Book." And
that the Jews justified the impli-
cation of this compliment is best
attested by the fact that at a time
when England was just beginning
to put John Milton's ideas of
public education into effect; while
Germany was experimenting with
its "Realschule" and America
with its Latin schools and acade-
mies, practically every Jewish
town in Europe boasted a com-
munal elementary school and an
advanced school or seminary
would be found in a radius of
every few hundred miles. So im-
portant was the education of the
community's future citizenry that
children o f indigent parents
would receive not only their tu-
ition free but would also receive
they- meals and lodging at th$
homes of the public-spirited and
generous-minded Jews. This tra-
dition has passed down to our
own days. Even those people
who have no children of their
own consider it their duty"\?.* *y
privilege to enable boys and girls, e''
y^TanTmerr*and women to receive
that training that will prepare
them to take their place in so-
ciety as worthwhil elcaders of
their immediate spheres, with this
exception. Whereas in former
days support was given to only
those students who engaged in
religious studies, nowadays the
pursuit of secular study, or for
that matter, any study that will
broaden the student mentally,
cultivate in him qualities that will
prove beneficial to him and the
community, is considered suffi-
ciently important to warrant sup-
port and co-operation.
Here in Miami we are for-
tunate in having a university
that is far superior to the tradi-
tional southern university or col-
lege. It ranks equally with north-
ern universities, by whom it is
duly recognized. A goodly share
of its student body is Jewish. It
is but a matter of a few years
when these students, then grad-
uates, will take their place in Mi-
ami Jewry as tone-givers in the
circles in which they will move.
Does not, therefore, Miami Jew-
ry owe it to itself to take a far
greater interest in the progress
and welfare of these students
than it has heretofore? While the
Lions Club, the Women's Club
and various other organizations
are annually granting scholar-
ships to needy and meritorious
students, not one Jewish organi-
zation has as yet come forward
with an offer to grant a scholar-
ship to some Jewish student at
the university who is deserving
and would appreciate it. Cannot
all factions in Miami Jewry unite
in this extremely worthy under- .
taking to provide at least two or
three scholarships each year to
needy Jewish students who may
otherwise be denied the benefits
of a higher education? There are
(Continued on Pag* Fivt)
; -

--.
mam
#*=



PAGE 1

wJewish Flaridliai m T o\. I.— No. 6 MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 23, 1928 Price, 5 Cents lOINT MEETING HAS ELECTION OF OFFICERS These Will Entertain You At Our Party Last Sunday night the joint leeting of the local Zionist dis|rict and the local chapter of ladassah was held at the Scot[ish Rite Temple banquet hall. Ir. Harry I. Lipnitz presided and presented a brief report of the [ctivities of the district during le past year. He was followed py a report of the treasurer, Mr. John Wolf, who showed that lore than a thousand doflars had i>een collected and sent to the irious funds, such as the Naional Fund, Zionist Organization, Palestine Crafts Workers and )ther Zionist funds. Mr. Baron 3c Hirsch Meyer, the secretary, khen presented his report, after i-hich Mrs. Max Dobrin, presiJcnt of the local chapter of Haiassah, in one of the most in^eresting addresses of the evening, spoke of the work of Hadassah lere and in Palestine and bespoke fhe co-operation of all members )f Hadassah in attending Zionist leetings and otherwise co-operating with the Zionists. Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld of cth David spoke on Greater Lionism and Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan of Temple Israel spoke on Colonizatio n, in Ru ssia as comparwith the""colonies irTPalestiilt. Ir. Isidor Cohen spoke on the york of the Zionists in the early lays and at present and pledged lis co-operation towards more Successful accomplishments this' coming year. He presented a plea For Bnai Brith, saying that by tiding Bnai Brith, the Ben Briths would undoubtedly come to the relp'of local Zionism and that together they could accomplish a treat deal. Mr. John Wolf presented the report of the nominations comlittee and after several motions were presented the report was adopted. (No questions were ask|ed of those present as to whether ir not they were members.) Mr. larry I. Lipnitz, well known Jewish attorney, was re-elected president; John Wolf, first vice president; Rabbi Israel Weisfeld and fabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan, honlorary vice presidents; Lewis [Brown, active in local Jewish circles, was chosen treasurer; Mr. lax Glass was returned to the peal fold by being chosen secretary. The following were elected to the executive board: A. I. loma, Day J. Apte, Isidor Colen, Louis Gerson, Dr. Max Dobrin, Dr. N. Halpern, Stanley C. lyers, Henry Seitlin, Sam Silonhoff, Harold Kassewitz, Herert Scheer, Louis Zeientz, Baron )e H. Meyer for the United 'alestine Appeal, Herman Weplan, H. I. Magid, Jos. M. Fine, r L. Williams, Lawrence Sacro. Hadassah representatives ire: Mrs. Max Dobrin, Mrs. Isilor Cohen, Mrs. Nat Sharaf, Irs. Sam Simonhoff and Mrs. lenry Settlin. Miss Mildred (Sr'eenberg at the iiano accompanied Cantor M. ihoulson of Beth David in a number of Yiddish folk songs lich were very beautifully renJered. -.*-...-.**•-?,* The entire company of the Burton-Garrett Players, who will entertain the guests of The Jewish Floridian at the Temple Theatre, Tuesday night, November 27, at 8 o'clock. PROMINENT JEWISH MERCHANT DIES AT ORLANDO Harry Stolberg, a prominent Jewish merchant of Orlando, died from gas asphyxiation, self-administreed, last Friday at his Orlando home. Harry Stolberg came to Miami many years ago and for a short period was associated in business with the late Louis Fine, one of Miami's leading Jews of the past decade. Shortly after his arrival he left for Orlando, where he subsequently made his home. He was interested in various Miami enterprises in the past several years. Mr. Stolberg was for a number of years president of the Orlando Jewish Community and took a very active part in the civic and communal life of Orlando, in addition to his interest and efforts among his fellowJews. Mr. Stolberg was about *>0 years of age and was a veteran of the Spanish-American war. He was buried in Beth David cemetery after the rites had been conducted by a delegation from the local Bnai Brith lodge and the Veterans of Foreign Wars. He leaves surviving him his wife. MIAMI U. STUDENTS ARE GUESTS OF BETH DAVID The Jewish boys and girls attending the University of Miami will be guests of Congregation Beth David at the services on Friday night,••November 23, at which time a special program will be presented. Clarence Ross, one of the students in the senior law class, on behalf of the young men, and Miss Reba Engfer, well known public speaker and member of the university debating team, will speak on behalf of the young ladies. Rabbi Weisfeld will preach. LET'S GET ACQUAINTED As we said last week, too many of our Jewish men and women do not even know each other; haven't had the opportunity to meet each other. That's only one of the reasons for the Theatre Party at the TEMPLE THEATRE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 8 P. M., where we want all the Jewish men and women of Miami to be the guests of the Jewish Floridian. Due to a change in the bill caused by a desire on our part and that of the Burton-Garrett Players to give you something that has not yet been presented to' Miamians, "THE OLD SOAK" will be presented for your entertainment. If you have not yet reserved your tickets, make sure to call the president of your organization and have her call the Jewish Floridian. The time is close. You want to be there with all your friends. We want you to be there to have a good time. If you don't belong to any of the local organizations, call 36840 and we will take care of your needs. YOUR "U" AND YOU A Plea Aside from his contribution of the "Koran" to the world litera' ture, Mahomet will probably be best remembered by his appellation of the Jews. He called them "the People of the Book." And that the Jews justified the implication of this compliment is best attested by the fact that at a time when England was just beginning to put John Milton's ideas of public education into effect; while Germany was experimenting with its "Realschule" and America with its Latin schools and academies, practically every Jewish town in Europe boasted a communal elementary school and an advanced school or seminary would be found in a radius of every few hundred miles. So important was the education of the community's future citizenry that children o f indigent parents would receive not only their tuition free but would also receive theymeals and lodging at th$ homes of the public-spirited and generous-minded Jews. This tradition has passed down to our own days. Even those people who have no children of their own consider it their duty"\?.* !" *y privilege to enable boys and girls, e '' %  y^Tan£Tmerr*and women to receive that training that will prepare them to take their place in society as worthwhil elcaders of their immediate spheres, with this exception. Whereas in former days support was given to only those students who engaged in religious studies, nowadays the pursuit of secular study, or for that matter, any study that will broaden the student mentally, cultivate in him qualities that will prove beneficial to him and the community, is considered sufficiently important to warrant support and co-operation. Here in Miami we are fortunate in having a university that is far superior to the traditional southern university or college. It ranks equally with northern universities, by whom it is duly recognized. A goodly share of its student body is Jewish. It is but a matter of a few years when these students, then graduates, will take their place in Miami Jewry as tone-givers in the circles in which they will move. Does not, therefore, Miami Jewry owe it to itself to take a far greater interest in the progress and welfare of these students than it has heretofore? While the Lions Club, the Women's Club and various other organizations are annually granting scholarships to needy and meritorious students, not one Jewish organization has as yet come forward with an offer to grant a scholarship to some Jewish student at the university who is deserving and would appreciate it. Cannot all factions in Miami Jewry unite in this extremely worthy under. taking to provide at least two or three scholarships each year to needy Jewish students who may otherwise be denied the benefits of a higher education? There are (Continued on Pag* Fivt) ; --. mam %  #*=



Page 2
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
November 23, 1928
N
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
A Weekly Newspaper Published At Miami, Florida
By The Jewish Floridian Publishing Company
252- Halcyon Arcade
Phone ?684!
EDITORIAL STAFF
J LOUIS SHOCHET I. LA-KY BEN" DOROM
A CHOCHOM
A. S'. ASHER
EDITORIAL
JUST SO LONG SHALL MAN BE ^RESPECTED
AS HE RETAINS HIS SELF-RESPECT
So much has been said about
the incident of the "Wailing
Wall*" on last Yom Kippur that
we had hoped that the matter
so clarified that even those
that did not care to see would
have seen the incident in its true
light. However ... At the
meeting of the Zionist district
held last Sunday night one of the
speaker? deplored the incident of
the "Wailing Wall'" and proper-
ly, we suhr.::. condemned the
failure of Chaim Weitzman and
other leader? in Zionism to take
prompt and courageous action to
condemn the attitude of the Brit-
ish government in tolerating such
happening- But no sooner had
this speaker concluded than there
followed him upon the rostrum
a gentlemen whom we highly re-
spect. And this gentleman of the
cloth delivered himself of state-
ments so far trom the actual
facts, so foolishly quibbled, that
we cannot sit idly by and permit
that statement to go unchalleng-
ed First Historically and sci-
entifically, this very gentleman^
knows that the wailing wall has
never been proven other than
one of the original walls of the
Temple proper. That all other
statements to the contrary arc
mere creations of fantasy on the
part of some archaeologists, un-
proven as yet. As to the remain
der The "wailing wall" epi-
side is so exaggerated, etc., etc.
Let us for a moment forg. t
the leaders of the so-called op-
position to the present adminis-
tration of the Zionist Organiza
tion of America and turn to
those who would have been
promnent in the councils of the
Zionist movement of the world
We all recall the furore created
by the arrival in this country not
so many months ago of the noted
scientist and Zionist. Prof Selig
Brodetsky. And we recall the ac-
claim and triumphant parades
that the Zionist Organization of
America created for him during
his tour of the various American
cif.es At a meeting held in the
city of London within the past
several weeks, at which Prof.
Brodetsky. Chief Rabbi Dr Hen:
and Dr Eder, among others,
spoke. Prof. Brodetsky said: "Wc
hold no controver-y with the
Mohammedans Our controversy
is with the English administration
in Palestine, because she has not
yet realized that the religious
feelings o fthe Jews must also be
treated with respect. We are in
Palestine not by favor but by
right and we demand this right."
Chief Rabbi Dr. Hertz, always
model for the expression of loy-
alt yand patriotism, in a speech
characterized by unusual bitter-
ness of feeling for one in his of-
ficial position, said: "We crave
no mercy from King George. We
request but a slight use of com-
mon sense." Dr. Eder, the chair-
man of the meeting, one of the
-t ever held in London, said:
"The deepest feelings of our peo-
ple have been trodden upon and
ted, and violated by none
t than the British mandate
er in Palestine It is with
>t regret that I must em-
:ze that this is not the first
time that we have had to com-
plain of similar conduct of vio-
lence towards w< r-hippers at the
"Wailing Wall"' under the Bnt-
l-h iJministration. Accepting the
late the English government
assumed the responsibility of con-
tinuing all of our existent rights
t' ly places This is not a po-
ln: '. question It is not even ex-
clusively a religious question. We
cr demand our rights This is a
matter that ranks higher than the
mandate and our demands are
not based upon the mandate
all ne Had no recognition been
-Jed the Iewj*h nattcnal
home we Jews would not have
quietly submitted to such out-
- But the mandate docs ex
:-t Does it perhaps mean
that the religious rights of all in-
habitants of Palestine must be
protected, save that of the Jew-1
Must we be the only exception''
The religious convictions of the
Jewish nation and its traditions
are dear to millions of our people
and we must demand the proper
respect for them"
Now let us for a moment ex-
amine the facts and see whether
< not the "Wailing Wall" cpi-
8 Jc was exaggerated, etc.. etc.,
.- our very eminent Rabbi sug-
l -ted, and whether or not the
protest so ably voiced by his pre-
c cessor on the rostrum was not
well founded Among the charges
p referred against the English, or
British, government are: I. The
gates to Palestine are practically
closed to our own people, and
compared to the Palestinian re-
strictions, the American quota
regulations are but playthings.
Even the sacrificing "Chalutzim."
ready to shed their very life
blood for the upbiuldmg of Pal-
estine, is at an end, excluded.
Even now when the economic
crisis in Palestine is at an end,
and new endeavors and cntcr-
prises require the help of work
men, Chalutzim are not admitted
According to the statement of H.
Dobkin, the leader of the Chal-
utzim of Palestine, the Jews of
Palestine will shortly be compell-
ed to import Arab laborers from
the Sudan because the adminis-
tration will not permit the entry
of Chalutzim, even at a time
when thousands are waiting for
the signal to enter. 2. The gov-
ernment has not shown the slight-
est tendency to help develop
Jewish colonization and the tre-
mendous burden has been thrown
entirely upon the Jews. 3. Jews
must pay for every bit of earth
thai they need, even though the
government itself is the owner of
muchJand which could be turn
ed over to the Jews for develop
ment. 4. New Jewish Industrie -
are forced to compete with well
established and long existent for-
eign firms, and in addition pay
heavy import duties i n raw ma-
terials. The government having it
within its powers by means of
the regulation of the tariff to aid
and protect these industries, re-
fuses to help and does nothing
J All products oSMhc^- new in
dustnes are heavily taxed. 6. The
major portion of ever, purely gov-
ernmental works. Act as sanitary
improvements and education costs
are forced upon the Jews and
they made to pay for the ereater
pan of it. although all inhabi-
tants profit. 7. Jews are treated
as if they were people of an in-
ferior race who mu-t be held
tightly under control and taught
to keep their place, practically as
the negroes in Africa. < r similar
wild tnhes. These are but a few
of the charges made gainst the
British government, not even
bearing in mind 'insults such as
the refusal to admit that great
Zionist, Jabotinsky, the recent re-
fusal to permit Schwartzbord to
enter, and others of the same
kind too numerous to mention.
All these are but the causes
leading up and culminating in the
outburst of the real Jewish heart
nst the British gi vernment
and the Zionist organization for
sitting idly by and overlooking
at the time of the disturbance at
the "Wailing Wall." Tis not
merely against the incident of the
"Wailing Wall" that the Jew
protest^ but against that spirit
which makes such incidents pos-
sible
And may we most respectfully
direct the attention of .this very
same gentleman to the resolution
protest adopted by the Syna-
gogue Council of America only
this week in New York City For
the information of those of our
readers who do not know the
Synagogue Council, we may add
that the Council consists of rep-
resentative- of the Reform. Con-
servative and Orthodox Judaism,
and includes the Central Confer-
ence of American Rabbis, the
Rabbinical Assembly of the L'nit-
ed Synagogue, the Rabbinical
Council of the L'nion of Ortho-
dox Jewish Congregations of
America, the L'nion of American
Hebrew Congregations, the Un-
ion of Orthodox Jewish Congre-
gations of America and the L'nit-
ed Synagogue of America. The
resolution read.
"'The Synagogue Council of
America, a n organization i n
which arc represented officially
all religious elements in Jewry,
voicing the religious conscience
of the millions of Jews of the
United States of America, pro-
foundly deplores the interference
with Jewish worship which took
place at the Kothel Maaravi (The
Western Wall), popularly known
as the Wailing Wall, in Jerusa-
lem, on the Day of Atonement.
"'Relying on the spirit of broth-
erhood and reverence for sacred
things, common to all religions,
the Synagogue Council herewith
expresses its firm hope that Jew-
ish worship at the Wall, a "tra-
dition of centuries, be respected
in the future, and that there shall
never be a recurrence of such a
painful offense to the religious
feelings of the Jews in Palestine
and of the whole world."
So that with all due respect
and courtesy to the honored gen-
tleman of the cloth, we feel that
we prefer to remember the inci-
dent and not to minimize it, as
he has attempted to do: we
It's a wise fish that can read
between the lines
1 1 1
Old N .: was a great success
as.a speculator He cornered all
the stock in the world.
1 *
In days of old knights were
bold They had to be. becauCM
the ladies of that day wouldn t
st.,rt anything.
1 1 1
Intelligent people judge a writ-
er by what he says: cranks judge
him by what they red between
the lines.
* t 1
If a man fails to get what he
he ought to be
thankful
r <
A sweetheart expected you I
appear with a white horse: a
swee::e expects white mule.
* 1 1
Perfection in courtesy is reach-
ed when a drug clerk sells a
Lge -tamp and offers to wrap
it for the customer
* 1 *
California is merely following
the example of Moses When he
found the land was dry. he plant-
ed grapes
* < 1
Friends .-.re those who gossip
about you for pleasure instead of
vengeance
* 1 1
Don't feel cheated because
your wife is dumb. The fact that
you selected her proves she has
no monopoly of dumbness
1 1 1
Don't be a human bass drum
a lot of noise and nothing in-
side.
i 1 1
The dying sinner might con-
sole himself with the thought
that he isn't likely to be left out
in the cold.
111
The clock points out the hours
for a man. but a charming wo-
man makes him forget them.
111
Cupid is the manager of a
two-ring circusthe engagement
and wedding rings.
111
Why shouldn"t the specialist
charge more? He gets only one
choose to take our view of facts
and conditions from such organi-
zations as the Synagogue Council
of America, comprised of men
who know and think, and from
such noted leaders in the Zionist
movement as Chief Rabbi Dr.
Henz of England. Prof. Selig
Brodetsky and Dr. Eder.
And to take our brand of
Zionism from men in whose
prayer books and recitations there
still remains the mention of Je-
rusalem and Palestine, and with
whom that age-old and never-to-
be-forgotten cry of "Im Eshko-
chaych Yerusholayim, Tishkach
Yemini" (If I forget thee, O Je-
rusalem, may I forget my right
hand" is ever borne in mind.
crack at you, while the family
doctor regards you as an annuity.
111
Religion is like education.
Those who need it most are by
their very need made incapable
of realizing it.
111
Neves judge a woman's smile
by her teethboth may be arti-
ficial.
111
Rules for a Rabbi to Become
Popular
1 Let your supreme motive
be popularity rather than relig-
ion.
2. Study to please everyone of
your congregation and make a
reputation rather than to please
God
3. Take up popular, passing f|
and sensational themes to draw
the crowd, ana avoid essential
doctnnes of religion.
4 Denounce sin in the ab-
-tract, but pass lightly over siai
that prevail in your own congre-
gation.
5. If asked, "Is it wrong to
mix dishes, keep a treifah house,
play cards and go to movie* on
Friday night instead of going to
services?" answer very pleasantly,
"Oh. that is a matter for private
judgment. It is not for me to say
what you shall or shall not do."
6 Reprove the sins of the ab-
sent, but make those who are
p -ent pleased with themselves,
so that they will enjoy the ser-
mon and not go away with their
feelings hurt.
7. Preach on the loveline-- of
virtue and the glory of Heaven:
but teach them also that no mat-
ter what they do, God is too
good to send any of your own
congregation to the other place.
8. Provide easy chairs, fashion
magazines and refreshments for
those who are too tired to listen
to your preaching on things re-
ligious.
9. Avoid seriousness in your
daily rounds with the members
of the congregation as to mat-
ters religious.
10. Care not whether the chil-
dren go to Talmud Torah or
Sunday school but provide c.rd
parties for the women, and things
"risque" for the men.
We are sincerely proud to join
the ranks of such men as Rabbi
Hertz, Brodetsky, Eder and oth-
ers who are courageous enough
to say what they think, and not
follow the wishy-washy policy of
the present Zionist administra-
tion. For, just so long as man re-
tains his self-respect, just that
long and longer shall he be re-
spected.
And so the "Wailing Wall" to
us will ever be a reminder of
that glorious tradition of ours,
that spirit of self-respect which
characterized the "Maccabees"
and for which all true Zionists
nope, pray and work to once
again return to that real land of
all real Jews Palestine.



PAGE 1

Page 2 THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN November 23, 1928 N THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN A Weekly Newspaper Published At Miami, Florida By The Jewish Floridian Publishing Company 252Halcyon Arcade Phone ?684 EDITORIAL STAFF J LOUIS SHOCHET I. LA-KY BEN" DOROM A CHOCHOM A. S'. ASHER EDITORIAL JUST SO LONG SHALL MAN BE ^RESPECTED AS HE RETAINS HIS SELF-RESPECT So much has been said about the incident of the "Wailing Wall*" on last Yom Kippur that we had hoped that the matter so clarified that even those that did not care to see would have seen the incident in its true light. However ... At the meeting of the Zionist district held last Sunday night one of the speaker? deplored the incident of the "Wailing Wall'" and properly, we suhr.::. condemned the failure of Chaim Weitzman and other leader? in Zionism to take prompt and courageous action to condemn the attitude of the British government in tolerating such happeningBut no sooner had this speaker concluded than there followed him upon the rostrum a gentlemen whom we highly respect. And this gentleman of the cloth delivered himself of statements so far trom the actual facts, so foolishly quibbled, that we cannot sit idly by and permit that statement to go unchallenged First Historically and scientifically, this very gentleman^ knows that the wailing wall has never been proven other than one of the original walls of the Temple proper. That all other statements to the contrary arc mere creations of fantasy on the part of some archaeologists, unproven as yet. As to the remain der The "wailing wall" episide is so exaggerated, etc., etc. Let us for a moment forg. t the leaders of the so-called opposition to the present administration of the Zionist Organiza tion of America and turn to those who would have been promnent in the councils of the Zionist movement of the world We all recall the furore created by the arrival in this country not so many months ago of the noted scientist and Zionist. Prof Selig Brodetsky. And we recall the acclaim and triumphant parades that the Zionist Organization of America created for him during his tour of the various American cif.es At a meeting held in the city of London within the past several weeks, at which Prof. Brodetsky. Chief Rabbi Dr Hen: and Dr Eder, among others, spoke. Prof. Brodetsky said: "Wc hold no controver-y with the Mohammedans Our controversy is with the English administration in Palestine, because she has not yet realized that the religious feelings o fthe Jews must also be treated with respect. We are in Palestine not by favor but by right and we demand this right." Chief Rabbi Dr. Hertz, always model for the expression of loyalt yand patriotism, in a speech characterized by unusual bitterness of feeling for one in his official position, said: "We crave no mercy from King George. We request but a slight use of common sense." Dr. Eder, the chairman of the meeting, one of the -t ever held in London, said: "The deepest feelings of our people have been trodden upon and ted, and violated by none t than the British mandate er in Palestine It is with >t regret that I must em:ze that this is not the first time that we have had to complain of similar conduct of violence towards w< r-hippers at the "Wailing Wall"' under the Bntl-h iJministration. Accepting the late the English government assumed the responsibility of continuing all of our existent rights t' ly places This is not a poln: %  question It is not even exclusively a religious question. We cr

November 23", 1928
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Page 3
Would the World Benefit
By the Assimilation
of the Jew?
By David Goldblatt
The Jewish Contribution
To Music
"The cultivation nf music was so wiuVly
ipicad and mi completely naturalised In I--
uJ, that it was even pushed t>> excels."
II BwsM.
Music, the only language that
all human hearts understand and
feel, the tamer and charmer of
beasts and brutes, the teacher of
harmony, of love and peace
among the whole human race,
came to the Aryans from no oth-
er source than the Jewish Peal'
ter. There is not one great Aryan
composer in the whole history of
music that has not been first
charmed by the chants of our
l'salms in his Church. Only in
these, and presumably nowhere
else, could he discover the wings
of his youthful soul, with which
to fly among the cherubim that
sing to the tunes of the Harp of
David. Without this influence
and inspiration, these great Ar-
yan composers most probably
might have become great men of
muscle, like their progenitors, the
Greeks, who had very little time
for music. Even Schopenhauer
admitted this by saying: "Church
music is the best foundation for
B musical education." But what is
church music if not Jewish?*'
In spite of the fact that its
beginning is as old as the first
man on earth, music is generally
regarded as the youngest of all
arts. Its advent as an art has a
remarkably close coincidence with
the advent of the emancipation of
the Jews from their Aryan rul-
ers. Thei rmarch, in time as well
h&- in space, was parallel, as
though the progress of one was
the consequence of the other. We
find Jewish participation in the
progress of music, first in France,
by Halevy, Bizet, Offenbach and
Her;; next, among the Germans
by Bruch, Meyerbeer, Mendels-
sohn, Brull, Hiller and Gern-
shcim; among the Italians by
Franchetti and Rossi; among the
Hungarians by Joachim, Remen-
yi, Naehez, Singer and Goldmark:
among the Austrians by Hauser,
EUppoldi and Fischhoff; in Po-
land by Wieniawski, Lotto, Fried-
heim, Rosenthal, Josefy and
Moschkowsky; in England by
Barnett, Benedict, Cowan, Mos-
cheles, Alvars and Costa. Many
of those in Czarist Russia, where
the Jews were forced to embrace
Christianity before they could
unfold the wings of their ideals,
changed their religion and there'
fore are counted to the credit of
the Aryans. Yet in spite of this,
the Rubinsteins, Brodsky, Auer,
Grcgorowitz, Davidson and Gab-
rilowitz have outshone all con-
tcmopararies in their own coun-
try.
During the entire period of
persecution of the Jews by the
Aryans, there was very little
progress among the latter in the
musical world. However, music
was not dead during that time.
It was fostered and encouraged
among the Jews by their cantors
(chanters; Heb.hazanim) and
cherished by all Jewish commu-
nities in their synagogues, as well
as. in their homes at their Sab-
bath meals. Almost every new
persecution suffered at the hands
of the Aryans, brought among
the Jews a new prayer and a new
musical composition chant. With
bleeding hearts and heads our
persecuted people ran into their
houses of worship to be consoled
and healed by the strains of the
new compositions of their haza-
nim. The Jewish tailor, the cob-
bler, the carpenter, and even the
blacksmith hummed these COmpo
sitions over their work all week.
They had no mind for sports, in
which the. Aryan worker is al-
ways absorbed in preference to
purely intellectual recreation.
Many times the whole workshop
gave the appearance of a well re-
hearsed opera, with the master
himself joining in the chorus.
These hazanim were not mere-
ly singers, nor was the major part
of the Jewish prayers wedded to
one particular musical setting. A
hasan that could not compose his
own repertoire had a very low
standing in his class. To keep up
a >_;ood reput.it ion a hazan could
not repeat the same composition
at the same synagogue many
times without depreciating his
own value in the eyes of his con-
gregation. For every New Year's
(Rosh Hashanah) service, every
hazan was expected to create, or
borrow from his brother hazan.
new compositions. Compositions
have thus been made by thous-
ands ot our hazanim, year by
year, while our Aryan '"masters"'
neglected every art except the
one of persecution, an art which
many of their greatgrandchildren-
cannot forget even to this day.
Of course, not many of these
compositions have seen the color
of printer's ink- 'that was not
necessary, because ot the craze
lor new compositions; old ones,
even the best, were discarded.
No orthodoz hazan dared to com-
mercialize his genius, which is
considered by all of them as the
gift of God, for which reason it
belongs to the synagogue alone.
From time to time, however,
some of them broke the rule and
sold some of their compositions
lor the profane stage, alter they
had been performed in the syna-
gogue; and some of them were
persuaded to leave the role of
hacan for one in the opera, im-
mediately to gain worldly lame.
Within the writer's memory, sev-
eral such compositions have been
purchased by the Warsaw State
Theatre from the Solitzer hazan,
who was then officiating at the
Synagogue in the Nalewka Street,
where the director of the State
Theatre, a Christian, used to
Come to listen. The performance
of these compositions in the the-
atre always secured a beautiful
reception by the public and the
press. Schnitzler, the choirmaster
of the so-called German Syna-
gogue in the Tlomatzka Street,
joined the opera of the State
Theatre, where he was soon after
crowned with the title of King
of the Lyric Tenors; and Zeide-
man, an assistant to the Prager
hazan J. Michalowsky, followed
Schnitzler, and he too was crown-
ed as the King of the Basso.
The relation between hazanuth
and the opera can further be il-
lustrated by Halevy, the com-
poser of thirty operas and two
balettes, the son of a Hebrew
poet and the brother of another
Hebrew poet, who wrote three
compositions of hazanuth in five
parts, published in Naumbourg's
'"Zemiroth Israel." Furthermore,
his opera, "La Juive," is all haza-
nuth. Some believe that Halevy
served as choir-leader for three
years in a Paris synagogue. Of-
fenbach, the creator of musK;il
humor, was the son of a Jewish
hazan. Braham, the greatest mu-
sical genius England ever had,
was a chorister in the Duke's
Place Synagogue. Meyerbeer,
who has been characterized by
his critics as "a combination of
Oriental gorgeousness, German
massiveness, French vivacity and
Italian brilliancy," also composed
some beautiful Psalmodic compo
sitions. After the first appearance
of Anton Rubinstein's opera,
"Die Makkabeer," in the Royal
Theatre of Berlin, one of its crit-
ics remarked: "The Royal The-
atre has been turned into a syn-
agogue." The same could be said
of almost 60 per cent of Rubin-
stein's other compositions, in
spite of his father's baptism.
Mendelssohn's compositions
sound (>0 per cent Jewish, and
-his valume of Duettes, like all
hazanuth.
It is not our object to go
through all the Jewish geniuses
m the musical world who have
gained universal recognition. Had
this been the case, we could ex-
perience no difficulty in tracing
the relation ot almost every one
ot them, in some way, to the in
Quence oi our liturgical music,
which plays a very important
part in the religious lite of our
people. Aryan persecution has
t orced many of them to change
their religion, but could not very
well change their origin. Even
such as Anton Rubinstein, who
was born ot baptized Jewish par-
ents, could not Aryanize his soul
altogether. The reason is obvious;
music is wedded to religion, and
the source of all religions must
naturally be the source of all
music too.
It is only a short time since
the Jews entered the world's mu-
sical arena, and their achieve-
ments are tremendous. Not only
can they now match their own
against all the musical geniuses
of all nations combined, but they
have even managed to reach the
mastery of the piano and the vio-
lin. Leopold Auer alone produced
at least twenty Jewish masters ot
the violin that no Aryan nation
can matcik. The Jewish Maestro
is not a mere performer like a
Paderewski or a ('arusoin ad-
dition he is a teacher, and pro-
duces a dynasty to follow him,
and in many cases he is a com-
poser of note, too. He will help
others often at his own expense,
while the Aryan will melt in his
own glory. As a case in point,
we have in mind Carl Tausiu. i
Polish Jew, who was not only a
match for Paderewski at the pi-
ano, but also saved Wagner to
lame by helping him obtain the
money to build his theatre in
Bayreuth. Wagner, an Aryan,
was a man full of difficulties. But
he always found a Jewish purse
to help him out of most of them.
How grateful he was, however,
is well known.
Since the Jews are admittedly
called "The People of the Book"
they may justly claim the credit
for all the Aryan successes that
won tame upon Biblical sources.
Handel, for instance, must have
had his good reasons for spend-
ing the greater part of his life
on the Bible, and particularly on
the Old Testament. The greater
part of his work consists of thir-
teen Biblical operas, of which
only one belongs to the New
Testament. In going over the list
of his subjects (Esther, Deborah,
Athalia, Saui, Samson, Israel in
Egypt, Joseph and His Brethren,
Belshazzar, Joshua, Judas Macca-
beus, Jephthah, and Messiah)
one can clearly see the opinion
of a great Aryan composer as to
the best source for the best mu-
sic. Mozart's 20 Masses, 9 Offer
tones, and 8 Litanies and Hymns
belong to the same source. Bee-
thoven's Mass in D is the only
composition that survived all his
other productions. Verdi suffered
reverses one after another, until
he established his reputation by
hi~ Biblical opera "Nabucodono-
sor." Haydn, who was brought
up upon religious compositions,
lias himself composed fourteen
Masses, one Stabat Mater, ten
Church pieces; and one of his
two best compositions was "Cre-
ation." That same composer could
not obtain recognition in his own
country, and he might have died
in obscurity, had not the Jew,
Solomon, brought him over to
London, where he made a j^reat
impression with the twelve sym-
phonies that he composed for
Solomon's concerts. Bach is con-
sidered primarily a church musi-
cian, and he acted as cantor in
the Thomas Schule of Leipzig.
Schumann admitted the wonder-
ful influence of Mendelssohn
over his career and works, and
expressed his admiration by his
Psalmodic compositions. That
Jew baiter Wagner could not find
among the Aryans a better con-
ductor for his 'Pirzifal" than
Herman Levi, the son of a rabbi,
and for the opening night of his
Bayreuth Theatre another Jewish
conductor, Julius Stern.
As already stilted above, the
Jewish people as a rule docs not
commercialize vocal music, but
keeps it sacred for the Syna-
gogue. For that reason the world
at large will never know the ex-
act position of the Jews in the
musical world. When a Caruso,
i lean D'Rcszke, or a d*Negre,
is produced by any of the Aryan
nations, he is immediately placed
in the limelight before the whole
world: whilst among the lews,
such prodigies remain within the
Jewish fold. If such an Aryan
disappear from the stage, hi- na-
tion can very rarely replace him,
whilst among the Jews there arc
always many to replace the one.
In fact, hundreds of them are
living from hand to mouth. For
example, we point to but a few
Jewish candors in New York--
Quartin, Hershman, Rosenblatt,
and Schliskywho have manag-
ed to escape the ingratitude of
the Aryan masters of the home
of their birth The last one,
whose voice reaches high "E," is
soon to appear with the San Car
lo Company to sing the leading
roles in "La Juive," ""La Boheme"
and "Tosca" for ten nights, at a
price of $1,50') for each appear-
ancethe highest price ever paid
to any singer on the stage.
In the whole of the United
States, with a population of over
one hundred and twenty million
people, there are only two opera
companies, one in New York and
the other in Chicago. Both of
them have between themselves
no more than 10,000 regular at-
tendants. Both depend for their
existence upon rich patrons,
whilst one prize fight between
Dempsey .and Tunney exceeds
them both in profit, as well as
in honors. We are informed by
piano manufacturers and music
dealers that the percentage of
their customers may safely be
taken at 75 per cent Jewish, and
that even a poor Jewish family
will buy a piano or victrola.
Oscar Hammerstein tried to de-
velop a musical taste among the
sport-crazy Aryans, and he lost a
fortune. Adolph Lewisohn, a
Jew, presented a beautiful and
very expensive stadium to the
people of New York; Guggen-
heim, another Jew, is still paying
for the music; Goldman, still an-
other Jew, is conducting; the
greatest musical talent obtainable
is performing, and if the music-
loving Jews were not filling the
-cats, the stadium would have to
be closed. It may be safely stated
as a fact that an Aryan entering
a concert hall becomes a better
man, and the Jew entering a
prize-fight leaves the better man
behind.
Individual nations, inclined to
relegate some of the statements
above made into the scrap-heap
of exaggerations, by judging the
Jewish musicians in their country-
only, may not see the full light
of our statements until they com-
bine all the great Jewish musi-
cians from every nation into one
group, and compare them with a
group of any single nation.
Our contention in this article
will then prove to be more than
lustified.
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1400 S. W. First Avenue
GAUTIER FUNERAL HOME
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514 W. Flagler St. R. A. Gautier, Mgr. Phones 8421-8422



PAGE 1

November 23", 1928 THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Page 3 Would the World Benefit By the Assimilation of the Jew? By David Goldblatt The Jewish Contribution To Music "The cultivation nf music was so wiuVly ipicad and MI completely naturalised In I-uJ, that it was even pushed t>> excels."— II BwsM. Music, the only language that all human hearts understand and feel, the tamer and charmer of beasts and brutes, the teacher of harmony, of love and peace among the whole human race, came to the Aryans from no other source than the Jewish Peal' ter. There is not one great Aryan composer in the whole history of music that has not been first charmed by the chants of our l'salms in his Church. Only in these, and presumably nowhere else, could he discover the wings of his youthful soul, with which to fly among the cherubim that sing to the tunes of the Harp of David. Without this influence and inspiration, these great Aryan composers most probably might have become great men of muscle, like their progenitors, the Greeks, who had very little time for music. Even Schopenhauer admitted this by saying: "Church music is the best foundation for B musical education." But what is church music if not Jewish?*' In spite of the fact that its beginning is as old as the first man on earth, music is generally regarded as the youngest of all arts. Its advent as an art has a remarkably close coincidence with the advent of the emancipation of the Jews from their Aryan rulers. Thei rmarch, in time as well H&in space, was parallel, as though the progress of one was the consequence of the other. We find Jewish participation in the progress of music, first in France, by Halevy, Bizet, Offenbach and Her;; next, among the Germans by Bruch, Meyerbeer, Mendelssohn, Brull, Hiller and Gernshcim; among the Italians by Franchetti and Rossi; among the Hungarians by Joachim, Remenyi, Naehez, Singer and Goldmark: among the Austrians by Hauser, EUppoldi and Fischhoff; in Poland by Wieniawski, Lotto, Friedheim, Rosenthal, Josefy and Moschkowsky; in England by Barnett, Benedict, Cowan, Moscheles, Alvars and Costa. Many of those in Czarist Russia, where the Jews were forced to embrace Christianity before they could unfold the wings of their ideals, changed their religion and there' fore are counted to the credit of the Aryans. Yet in spite of this, the Rubinsteins, Brodsky, Auer, Grcgorowitz, Davidson and Gabrilowitz have outshone all contcmopararies in their own country. During the entire period of persecution of the Jews by the Aryans, there was very little progress among the latter in the musical world. However, music was not dead during that time. It was fostered and encouraged among the Jews by their cantors (chanters; Heb.—hazanim) and cherished by all Jewish communities in their synagogues, as well as. in their homes at their Sabbath meals. Almost every new persecution suffered at the hands of the Aryans, brought among the Jews a new prayer and a new musical composition chant. With bleeding hearts and heads our persecuted people ran into their houses of worship to be consoled and healed by the strains of the new compositions of their hazanim. The Jewish tailor, the cobbler, the carpenter, and even the blacksmith hummed these COmpo sitions over their work all week. They had no mind for sports, in which the. Aryan worker is always absorbed in preference to purely intellectual recreation. Many times the whole workshop gave the appearance of a well rehearsed opera, with the master himself joining in the chorus. These hazanim were not merely singers, nor was the major part of the Jewish prayers wedded to one particular musical setting. A hasan that could not compose his own repertoire had a very low standing in his class. To keep up a >_;ood reput.it ion a hazan could not repeat the same composition at the same synagogue many times without depreciating his own value in the eyes of his congregation. For every New Year's (Rosh Hashanah) service, every hazan was expected to create, or borrow from his brother hazan. new compositions. Compositions have thus been made by thousands ot our hazanim, year by year, while our Aryan '"masters"' neglected every art except the one of persecution, an art which many of their greatgrandchildrencannot forget even to this day. Of course, not many of these compositions have seen the color of printer's ink'that was not necessary, because ot the craze lor new compositions; old ones, even the best, were discarded. No orthodoz hazan dared to commercialize his genius, which is considered by all of them as the gift of God, for which reason it belongs to the synagogue alone. From time to time, however, some of them broke the rule and sold some of their compositions lor the profane stage, alter they had been performed in the synagogue; and some of them were persuaded to leave the role of hacan for one in the opera, immediately to gain worldly lame. Within the writer's memory, several such compositions have been purchased by the Warsaw State Theatre from the Solitzer hazan, who was then officiating at the Synagogue in the Nalewka Street, where the director of the State Theatre, a Christian, used to Come to listen. The performance of these compositions in the theatre always secured a beautiful reception by the public and the press. Schnitzler, the choirmaster of the so-called German Synagogue in the Tlomatzka Street, joined the opera of the State Theatre, where he was soon after crowned with the title of King of the Lyric Tenors; and Zeideman, an assistant to the Prager hazan J. Michalowsky, followed Schnitzler, and he too was crowned as the King of the Basso. The relation between hazanuth and the opera can further be illustrated by Halevy, the composer of thirty operas and two balettes, the son of a Hebrew poet and the brother of another Hebrew poet, who wrote three compositions of hazanuth in five parts, published in Naumbourg's '"Zemiroth Israel." Furthermore, his opera, "La Juive," is all hazanuth. Some believe that Halevy served as choir-leader for three years in a Paris synagogue. Offenbach, the creator of musK;il humor, was the son of a Jewish hazan. Braham, the greatest musical genius England ever had, was a chorister in the Duke's Place Synagogue. Meyerbeer, who has been characterized by his critics as "a combination of Oriental gorgeousness, German massiveness, French vivacity and Italian brilliancy," also composed some beautiful Psalmodic compo sitions. After the first appearance of Anton Rubinstein's opera, "Die Makkabeer," in the Royal Theatre of Berlin, one of its critics remarked: "The Royal Theatre has been turned into a synagogue." The same could be said of almost 60 per cent of Rubinstein's other compositions, in spite of his father's baptism. Mendelssohn's compositions sound ( >0 per cent Jewish, and -his valume of Duettes, like all hazanuth. It is not our object to go through all the Jewish geniuses m the musical world who have gained universal recognition. Had this been the case, we could experience no difficulty in tracing the relation ot almost every one ot them, in some way, to the in Quence oi our liturgical music, which plays a very important part in the religious lite of our people. Aryan persecution has t orced many of them to change their religion, but could not very well change their origin. Even such as Anton Rubinstein, who was born ot baptized Jewish parents, could not Aryanize his soul altogether. The reason is obvious; music is wedded to religion, and the source of all religions must naturally be the source of all music too. It is only a short time since the Jews entered the world's musical arena, and their achievements are tremendous. Not only can they now match their own against all the musical geniuses of all nations combined, but they have even managed to reach the mastery of the piano and the violin. Leopold Auer alone produced at least twenty Jewish masters ot the violin that no Aryan nation can matcik. The Jewish Maestro is not a mere performer like a Paderewski or a ('aruso—in addition he is a teacher, and produces a dynasty to follow him, and in many cases he is a composer of note, too. He will help others often at his own expense, while the Aryan will melt in his own glory. As a case in point, we have in mind Carl Tausiu. i Polish Jew, who was not only a match for Paderewski at the piano, but also saved Wagner to lame by helping him obtain the money to build his theatre in Bayreuth. Wagner, an Aryan, was a man full of difficulties. But he always found a Jewish purse to help him out of most of them. How grateful he was, however, is well known. Since the Jews are admittedly called "The People of the Book" they may justly claim the credit for all the Aryan successes that won tame upon Biblical sources. Handel, for instance, must have had his good reasons for spending the greater part of his life on the Bible, and particularly on the Old Testament. The greater part of his work consists of thirteen Biblical operas, of which only one belongs to the New Testament. In going over the list of his subjects (Esther, Deborah, Athalia, Saui, Samson, Israel in Egypt, Joseph and His Brethren, Belshazzar, Joshua, Judas Maccabeus, Jephthah, and Messiah) one can clearly see the opinion of a great Aryan composer as to the best source for the best music. Mozart's 20 Masses, 9 Offer tones, and 8 Litanies and Hymns belong to the same source. Beethoven's Mass in D is the only composition that survived all his other productions. Verdi suffered reverses one after another, until he established his reputation by hi~ Biblical opera "Nabucodonosor." Haydn, who was brought up upon religious compositions, lias himself composed fourteen Masses, one Stabat Mater, ten Church pieces; and one of his two best compositions was "Creation." That same composer could not obtain recognition in his own country, and he might have died in obscurity, had not the Jew, Solomon, brought him over to London, where he made a j^reat impression with the twelve symphonies that he composed for Solomon's concerts. Bach is considered primarily a church musician, and he acted as cantor in the Thomas Schule of Leipzig. Schumann admitted the wonderful influence of Mendelssohn over his career and works, and expressed his admiration by his Psalmodic compositions. That Jew baiter Wagner could not find among the Aryans a better conductor for his %  'Pirzifal" than Herman Levi, the son of a rabbi, and for the opening night of his Bayreuth Theatre another Jewish conductor, Julius Stern. As already stilted above, the Jewish people as a rule docs not commercialize vocal music, but keeps it sacred for the Synagogue. For that reason the world at large will never know the exact position of the Jews in the musical world. When a Caruso, i lean D'Rcszke, or a d*Negre, is produced by any of the Aryan nations, he is immediately placed in the limelight before the whole world: whilst among the lews, such prodigies remain within the Jewish fold. If such an Aryan disappear from the stage, hination can very rarely replace him, whilst among the Jews there arc always many to replace the one. In fact, hundreds of them are living from hand to mouth. For example, we point to but a few Jewish candors in New York-Quartin, Hershman, Rosenblatt, and Schlisky—who have managed to escape the ingratitude of the Aryan masters of the home of their birth The last one, whose voice reaches high "E," is soon to appear with the San Car lo Company to sing the leading roles in "La Juive," ""La Boheme" and "Tosca" for ten nights, at a price of $1,50') for each appearance—the highest price ever paid to any singer on the stage. In the whole of the United States, with a population of over one hundred and twenty million people, there are only two opera companies, one in New York and the other in Chicago. Both of them have between themselves no more than 10,000 regular attendants. Both depend for their existence upon rich patrons, whilst one prize fight between Dempsey .and Tunney exceeds them both in profit, as well as in honors. We are informed by piano manufacturers and music dealers that the percentage of their customers may safely be taken at 75 per cent Jewish, and that even a poor Jewish family will buy a piano or victrola. Oscar Hammerstein tried to develop a musical taste among the sport-crazy Aryans, and he lost a fortune. Adolph Lewisohn, a Jew, presented a beautiful and very expensive stadium to the people of New York; Guggenheim, another Jew, is still paying for the music; Goldman, still another Jew, is conducting; the greatest musical talent obtainable is performing, and if the musicloving Jews were not filling the -cats, the stadium would have to be closed. It may be safely stated as a fact that an Aryan entering a concert hall becomes a better man, and the Jew entering a prize-fight leaves the better man behind. Individual nations, inclined to relegate some of the statements above made into the scrap-heap of exaggerations, by judging the Jewish musicians in their countryonly, may not see the full light of our statements until they combine all the great Jewish musicians from every nation into one group, and compare them with a group of any single nation. Our contention in this article will then prove to be more than lustified. Etta Beauty Shoppe \\ .ip ctalta in EugtiM perouncnt waving Bfid H.!. na Rubin-tun facial treat* %  went* and preparations 2207 N. E. Second Avenue Phone 20245 B M Wolfe Ample Parking Space APPETIZING KOSHER DELIGHTFUL ARE THE DELICATESSEN OF ALL KINDS That Man, Woman or Child May Desire At the Rosedale Delicatessen and Restaurant 1 -0 N. W. FIFTH STREET ESTABLISHED SINCE 1890 We Handle Only the Best and Freshest of Fish. Sea Pood of All Kind* Always on Hand. Baker Fish Co. Curb M.t-i.. t at S. W. Second Avenue and Bridie? AUTO GLASS Installed By Experts While You Wait, At Reasonable Prices East Coast Glass Co. 1313 N. Bayshore Drive Phone 33371 Lockwood Service Station GOODYEAR TIRE SERVICE TEXACO GAS N. W. 7th Ave. and 20th St. Phone 9464 FOR STORE FIXTURES See BERNER STORE EQUIPMENT CO. 824 N. E. First Avenue PHONE M26I AWNINGS PHONE 20830 Miami Awning Co. 1714 S. W. EIGHTH STREET FOR LUMBER ind All BUILDING MATERIALS See FISHER LUMBER CO. Phone 20261 1400 S. W. First Avenue GAUTIER FUNERAL HOME LINCOLN AMBULANCE 514 W. Flagler St. R. A. Gautier, Mgr. Phones 8421-8422


Page 4
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
November 23, 1928
II

: SOCIETY :
On last Sunday night Miss
Frances Druckerman, well known
pianist, entertained at her home
in honor of Mrs. Fred Berney,
who recently returned from the
north, where she had visited ex-
tensively Bridge was played and
a buffet supper was served
Among those present were Mr
and Mrs Fred Berney, Dr. G. J.
Gerson, Miss Helen Freed, Rcba
Engler, Sam Koerner, Jack Druc-
kerman and Mr and Mrs Louis
Druckerman.
Miss Sonia Segal was the guest
of honor at a surprise party ten-
dered by her mother, Mrs. Ab
ner Segal, and Mrs. H Goldberg.
Bridge was played and prizes
were awarded to Jack Daly and
Miss Frances Gross. Among those
present were Florence Besvinick,
Ruth Kaplan, Irene Farr, Helen
Wolpert, Luella Wallerstein, Jack
Daly Aaron Farr, Jerry Cohn,
Gene Kohn, Clyde Ross, Edward
Cohen, M o e Albert, Irving
Greenfield and C Cohen
sin, Claire Cohen. A large num-
ber of guests were present from
various parts of Greater Miami.
Prizes were awarded and among
those who received the coveted
honors were Mrs Harry I Magid
and Mrs Sam Silverstcin. When
the gueaU first arrived they were
lerved with luncheon. Bridge was
then played and several vocal and
instrumental selections were then
given. Later in the afternoon re
fresmmentl including ice cream,
coffee and cake were served. A
very pleasant afternoon was spent
by all and the guest of honor,
M>> Cohen, was bidden a reluc-
tant "ant wiedersehen."
Were going to let you in on
a secret The people involved do
not even know that this is to be
printed ?<~> here goes. Mr and
Mrs I Lasky are celebrating the
sixteenth anniversary of their
wedSing on November 26, and
we all join in congratulations to
them with wishes that they may
live to celebrate many more an-
niversary- of the happy event.
Mrs. M. Scheinberg entertain-
ed last Monday night in honor
of the bridge committee for Beth
David at her home in Riverside.
Refreshments were served and a
good time was had by all. Among
those present were Mrs. M
Schonfield, Mrs J L. Schochet,
Mrs Kandel, Mrs. Katz, Mrs
Majid and Mrs. M Goldenblank
Mr and Mrs. David L. Slann
are beini: congratulated on the
arrival of a baby daughter last
week at Victoria Hospital Moth-
er is resting nicely and "Daddy"
ii Knitting about very happily.
Mrs. Walder entertained a
number of frends at a bridge
luncheon last Friday afternoon at
the Columbus hotel. The tables
were beautifully decorated with
silver vases full of gladiolii
Prizes for high score were award-
ed to Mrs. L. Richtcr, Mrs.
Greenfield and Mrs Wallerstein.
Those present were Mrs. Seiden,
Mrs H. Greenfield, Mrs C
Greenfield, Mrs L. Richter, Mrs
P. Scheinberg, Mrs. Chas Davis,
Mrs. J. Bernstein, Mrs. S. Aron-
owitz, Mrs. Wallerstein, Mrs
Walder, Mrs Weinbcrg and Mrs
Kaufman.
Dr. Rose Rubin and Miss Ma-
ne Miser, who are spending sev-
eral days here, were guests of
Mr. and Mrs Louis Gerson of
this city A dinner party was ten-
dered by the hosts on Sunday
night to a number of friends
honoring the visitors. Quite a
number of the younger set were
present and Miss Frances Druck-
erman and Mrs. Rose May Ger-
son Berney presented several vo-
cal and instrumental selections for
the entertainment of the guests.
Mrs Isidor Cohen entertained
last Friday at her home in Shen-
andpah in honor of her niece,
Miss Cohen, of New York City
Miss Cohen spent the past six
weeks in Miami, having come
here to act as one of the brides-
maids at the wedding of her cou-
Things Theatrical
Al Jolson, the world's most
famous entertainer, is still ap-
pearing at the Hippodrome The-
atre all week in his latest and
test talking picture, "The
Singing Fool."
In this great drama of stage
life Jolson is revealed as an actor
of unquestionable sincerity and
amazing power of emotional cx-
pr, -ion. In many of his scenes
his SOITOW8 are tragic in their in-
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tensity and exercise an unusual
effect on the feeling of the audi-
nce. This is the more remarkable
when one considers that Jolson
has always been looked upon as
a comedian, though to the more
discerning there has invariably
been the touch of pathos which
made it evident that he would
be able at some time to interpret
the tragedies of life as well as the
lighter moods.
"The Singing Fool" tells the
story of a man who work- in a
New York night club in the dual
capacity of waiter and singer of
popular songs. He is madly in-
fatuated with the featured en-
tertainer of the club and even
tually makes her his wife, but
stark tragedy comes into his
household .and the distracted
husband, who has by this time
become part owner of a preten-
tious cabaret, is almost broken by
the weight of his distress
Betty Bronson and Josephine
Dunn give excellent support in
the feminine roles.
The Burton -Garret! Players,
now entering into their sixth
week at the Temple The.itre,
have justly earned the title that
has been bestowed upon them
"Miami's Favorites."
For the past five weeks this
capable company has been pre-
senting a series of carefully se-
lected Broadway plays at a scale
of prices within reach of every-
one, and the continued increase
in crowds at the Temple is con-
clusive proof that their efforts
have met with the approval of
Miami theatregoers.
For their sixth week, which be-
gins Sunday, the Burton-Garrett
Players have selected a play that
has been termed one of the clas-
sics of the American theatre
Don Marquis' beloved play, "The
Old Soak," a story with a human
touch, a world o{ comedy and
perhaps a tear or two.
Mr Gavin Harris, popular
character actor of the company,
will be seen as Clem Hawley, the
Old Soak, a role which he had
the distinction of playing with
one of the original road produc
tions, a part in which he excels.
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PAGE 1

Page 4 THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN November 23, 1928 II : SOCIETY : On last Sunday night Miss Frances Druckerman, well known pianist, entertained at her home in honor of Mrs. Fred Berney, who recently returned from the north, where she had visited extensively Bridge was played and a buffet supper was served Among those present were Mr and Mrs Fred Berney, Dr. G. J. Gerson, Miss Helen Freed, Rcba Engler, Sam Koerner, Jack Druckerman and Mr and Mrs Louis Druckerman. Miss Sonia Segal was the guest of honor at a surprise party tendered by her mother, Mrs. Ab ner Segal, and Mrs. H Goldberg. Bridge was played and prizes were awarded to Jack Daly and Miss Frances Gross. Among those present were Florence Besvinick, Ruth Kaplan, Irene Farr, Helen Wolpert, Luella Wallerstein, Jack Daly Aaron Farr, Jerry Cohn, Gene Kohn, Clyde Ross, Edward Cohen, M o e Albert, Irving Greenfield and C Cohen sin, Claire Cohen. A large number of guests were present from various parts of Greater Miami. Prizes were awarded and among those who received the coveted honors were Mrs Harry I Magid and Mrs Sam Silverstcin. When the gueaU first arrived they were lerved with luncheon. Bridge was then played and several vocal and instrumental selections were then given. Later in the afternoon re fresmmentl including ice cream, coffee and cake were served. A very pleasant afternoon was spent by all and the guest of honor, M>> Cohen, was bidden a reluctant "ant wiedersehen." Were going to let you in on a secret The people involved do not even know that this is to be printed ?<~> here goes. Mr and Mrs I Lasky are celebrating the sixteenth anniversary of their wedSing on November 26, and we all join in congratulations to them with wishes that they may live to celebrate many more anniversaryof the happy event. Mrs. M. Scheinberg entertained last Monday night in honor of the bridge committee for Beth David at her home in Riverside. Refreshments were served and a good time was had by all. Among those present were Mrs. M Schonfield, Mrs J L. Schochet, Mrs Kandel, Mrs. Katz, Mrs Majid and Mrs. M Goldenblank Mr and Mrs. David L. Slann are beini: congratulated on the arrival of a baby daughter last week at Victoria Hospital Mother is resting nicely and "Daddy" ii Knitting about very happily. Mrs. Walder entertained a number of frends at a bridge luncheon last Friday afternoon at the Columbus hotel. The tables were beautifully decorated with silver vases full of gladiolii Prizes for high score were awarded to Mrs. L. Richtcr, Mrs. Greenfield and Mrs Wallerstein. Those present were Mrs. Seiden, Mrs H. Greenfield, Mrs C Greenfield, Mrs L. Richter, Mrs P. Scheinberg, Mrs. Chas Davis, Mrs. J. Bernstein, Mrs. S. Aronowitz, Mrs. Wallerstein, Mrs Walder, Mrs Weinbcrg and Mrs Kaufman. Dr. Rose Rubin and Miss Mane Miser, who are spending several days here, were guests of Mr. and Mrs Louis Gerson of this city A dinner party was tendered by the hosts on Sunday night to a number of friends honoring the visitors. Quite a number of the younger set were present and Miss Frances Druckerman and Mrs. Rose May Gerson Berney presented several vocal and instrumental selections for the entertainment of the guests. Mrs Isidor Cohen entertained last Friday at her home in Shenandpah in honor of her niece, Miss Cohen, of New York City Miss Cohen spent the past six weeks in Miami, having come here to act as one of the bridesmaids at the wedding of her couThings Theatrical Al Jolson, the world's most famous entertainer, is still appearing at the Hippodrome Theatre all week in his latest and test talking picture, "The Singing Fool." In this great drama of stage life Jolson is revealed as an actor of unquestionable sincerity and amazing power of emotional cxpr, -ion. In many of his scenes his SOITOW8 are tragic in their inFOR A REAL THANKSGIVING TREAT DINE AT THE G SCR KOSHER RESTAURANT 403 N. E. SECOND. AVENUE A Dinner Full of Choice Kosher Food and Plenty of Dainties TURKEY—OF COURSE Phone 9702 For Reservations IVES CERTIFIED MILK is SAFE MILK For Adult and Baby "QUALITY MILK" For the PARTICULAR and DISCRIMINATING If you arc not a customer—ask your Neighbor about our products IVES CERTIFIED DAIRY "Florida's First Certified Dairy" Miami, Telephone 8831 Ojus, Florida tensity and exercise an unusual effect on the feeling of the audince. This is the more remarkable when one considers that Jolson has always been looked upon as a comedian, though to the more discerning there has invariably been the touch of pathos which made it evident that he would be able at some time to interpret the tragedies of life as well as the lighter moods. "The Singing Fool" tells the story of a man who workin a New York night club in the dual capacity of waiter and singer of popular songs. He is madly infatuated with the featured entertainer of the club and even tually makes her his wife, but stark tragedy comes into his household .and the distracted husband, who has by this time become part owner of a pretentious cabaret, is almost broken by the weight of his distress Betty Bronson and Josephine Dunn give excellent support in the feminine roles. The Burton -Garret! Players, now entering into their sixth week at the Temple The.itre, have justly earned the title that has been bestowed upon them— "Miami's Favorites." For the past five weeks this capable company has been presenting a series of carefully selected Broadway plays at a scale of prices within reach of everyone, and the continued increase in crowds at the Temple is conclusive proof that their efforts have met with the approval of Miami theatregoers. For their sixth week, which begins Sunday, the Burton-Garrett Players have selected a play that has been termed one of the classics of the American theatre— Don Marquis' beloved play, "The Old Soak," a story with a human touch, a world o{ comedy and perhaps a tear or two. Mr Gavin Harris, popular character actor of the company, will be seen as Clem Hawley, the Old Soak, a role which he had the distinction of playing with one of the original road produc tions, a part in which he excels. Flagler Dry Cleaners Cleaning. Pressing. Dyeing and Repairing 472 W. Flagler Street Phone U260 "ft* the IV • I Y'.ur Clothes" PHONE 6602 Florida Iron and Equipment Co. 519 N. W. Third Avenue '. Deskn it. Machinery IK ( mtraetnri Equipment MIAMI, FLORIDA L. (Pop) GERSON Buyer of All Kinds of SCRAP METAL 2145 N. W. Second Avenue Phone 7909 Residence Phone 7276 Announcing the Removal of AHERN FUNERAL HOME To 1224 S. W. FIRST STREET Ranking Second to None FRANCIS AHERN. Pre.. 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Gas 25c Gal. Heavy Oil, Qt. 15c Kirby's Service Station N. W. 3rd Ave. and 20th St. Tire Work Our Specialty "Sec L's for Your Own Benefit" Messages Parcels Dime Messenger Service 334 N. E. 2nd Ave. Phone 4747 "We Deliver I verylhinit But Your Baby" DANDRUFF AND FALLING HAIR Require immediate attention. Int-effig-iir our SPICIAL OFFER on sc.ilp treatments. Bring this ad* v.-rti iiH-nt with you. It is worth National Beauty Shoppe 100" S. W. Sixth St. Phone 7925 Invest igatr *1. TAK-ABOOST 5c HAS SET THEM ALL TALKING AND BOOSTING — Because It's unlike anything you've ever tasted. Try it with plain ice cold water or with milk. Try it NOW and you will take "TAK-ABOOST" often. It's pleasant, nourishing, refreshing. No equal or comparison anywhere. Try It at Our Miami Beach Station—HARDIE'S CASINO, South Beach. SOUTHERN TAK-ABOOST COMPANY or at 19 N. E. SECOND AVENUE, Hippodrome Building 436 S. W. EIGHTH AVENUE BELL BAKERY 60 West Flagler Street Bake-Rite Breadery 332 N. Miami Avenue Home-Made BREAD, PIES and CAKES CATERING OUR SPECIALTY "The Tanenbautn Standard" Miami Showcase and Fixture Company General Contractors and Manufacturers of STORE FRONTS and STORE FIXTURES 228 S. MIAMI AVENUE Phone 22168 "PERPETUAL CARE" WOODLAWN BURIAL PARK When on the Tamiami Trail, we shall be pleased to have you inspect our new Jewish section, operated according to the Jewish ritual.


November 23, 1928
IMPORTANT
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Page 5
The Social Service Commit-
tee of the Council of Jewish
Women headed by its chair-
man, Mrs. P. Scheinberg, re-
quests that she be notified of
any families in need where a
Thanksgiving basket would be
appropriate and needed. It is
the committee's desire that
none who should receive these
baskets be overlooked, and
therefore urgently requests the
co-operation of Miami Jewry.
If you know of any such fam-
ilies please phone 20207 or
21373.
Junior Council of Jewish
Women
The Dramatic Circle of the
Junior Council has, after long
consideration, adopted "Stage
Strutters" as the official name of
the circle. They have been re-
hearsing for some time past and
will shortly present their first ef-
fort at one of the meetings of
the Junior Council. The next
meeting of "Stage Strutters" will
be held on Tuesday evening, No-
vember 27, at 7 o'clock sharp at
the Scottish Rite Temple. The
meeting will last onh/ one hour,
after which time the meeting will
be adjourned and the entire Jun-
ior Council will march upstairs to
the Temple Theatre to be the
guests of the Jewish Floridian at
its Theatre Party.
For ICEUse
Peninsular Ice Company
ICE
IM,i.t Locat! t 645 N. W. 13th Street
Phone 21298 or 22262 for
FREE DELIVERY
COAL : WOOD : COKE
CHARCOAL
Miami Coal Co., Inc.
1100 N. W. 21st Terrace
Phone 7896
For Choice
Meats and Poultry
THAT'S KOSHER
Beyond a Doubt
TENNESSEE
KOSHER MARKET
166 N. W. Fifth Street
Phone 21514
YOUR "U" AND YOU
A Plea
(Continued from Page One)
other ways in' which we might
show our interest in these young
men and women. Organizations
who strive to make their meet-
ings as interesting as possible
could, and should, invite some
student from the university to
address them and to acquaint
them with the progress of the
Jewish student at the university.
We owe it to the students, we
owe it to ourselves. A communi-
ty is judged by the interest it
displays in its educational insti-
tutions. Let not Miami Jewry be
found wanting. Let us all unite.
Ours will be the benefit.
Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld
Program For Jewish
Floridian Theatre Party
Following is the cast of char-
acters to be presented by the
Burton-Garrett Players at the
Temple Theatre on November 27,
when the ^kwish Floridian will
stage its theatre party: The play
is "The Old Soak," an old favor-
ite that has enjoyed several big
runs in northern cities.
The Cast
Webster Parson....Walter Kniffin
Mathilda Hawley........Grace Leith
Lucy Hawley......Marjorie Garrett
Tom Ogden..............Milo Boulton
Clemmie ............Harry Blackiston
Clem Hawley............Gavin Harris
Nellie ............................Alis Frost
"Al" ......................Robert Burton
Ina Heath......Margaret Wetherell
The Scenes
Act 1. The living room in
the Hawley home.
Act 2. The same, two weeks
later.
Act 3. Scene 1, The office in
the bank; scene 2, The living
room.
HARRINGTON
ELECTRIC COMPANY
Electric Construction and Repairs
150 N. E. Third St. Phone 7116
REAL ESTATE
and Business Opportunities
W. L. WILLIAMS
252 Halcyon Arcade
Phone 36840
The Samaritans and Their
Pentateuch
By Henry S. Morais
Much has been written, even
in recent times, respecting that
peculiar sect known as the "The
Samaritans," who wrongfully
claim to be descendants of the
Ten Tribes, originally composing
the Kingdom of Israel. Their na-
tionality was broken up, when
successive kings of Assyria, Shal-
maneseh, Sennacherib, and Sar-
gon, took them into captivity,
and peopled Samaria, their cap-
ital, with Assyrian subjects. This
fact, of itself, proves the falsity
of any claim modern Samaritans
may put forth. Their text of the
Pentateuch shows plainly that the
Written Word has been garbled
by them, especially when they
substitute for the Temple, Mount
Gerizim, instead of Mount Mor-
iah, or Mount Zion.
It is a wellknown fact that
Gerizim was the mountain chosen
in Deuteronomy XXVIII, 13)
for the pronouncement of the
Blessings by the Levites; while on
the opposite side, Mount 'Ebal
was selected for the Maledictions.
Below these two eminences lies
the ancient city of Shechem,
the modern Nablus or Naplouse.
Among the writings on this
subject, nothing is more distinc-
tive than that found in the "Lit-
erary Remains" of Dr. Emanuel
Oscar Menahem Deutsch, en-
titled: "The Samaritan Penta-
teuch". He was a scholar acute
and profound, associated with the
British Museum. His researches
on the subject were conducted
under its auspices. A later work,
bearing the title, "The Samari-
tans", has emanated from the pen
of that distinguished scholar, the
chief Rabbi- of the English Se-
phardim, Moses Gaster, Ph.D., of
London, (published by the Brit-
ish Academy, 1925). Another
writer on this subject is Profes-
sor James A. Montgomery of the
University of Pennsylvania. But,
strange as it may seem, we
scarcely note any reference in
these latter works to the labori-
ous efforts of Dr. Deutsch, nor
what he unfolded from his dis-
coveries years before.
The Samaritans, variously called
by Jews Shomronim, from Sho-
meronSamariaare also known
by the term Cuthim. As has
been observed, their version of
the Pentateuch is in parts gar-
bled, and they have likewise a
Book of Joshua, so different from
the original book included in
Holy Writ (which, with their
other five Books, makes a Hexa-
teuch) that it has long since been
BE OUR GUESTS
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN believes in doing everything within its power to
make Miami Jews a force for good both locally and nationally. Why all the
petty bickerings, the conflicting of dates and such other pettiness which could
and should be eliminated?
TOO MANY of the Jewish residents of Miami don't even know one. another;
haven't had the opportunity of meeting each other in that unrestrained happy
manner that is conducive of good fellowship.
WE WANT to afford you that opportunity.
WE WANT every Jewish woman of Miami to be our guest at a COMMUNITY
THEATRE PARTY at the TEMPLE THEATRE on TUESDAY EVENING,
NOVEMBER 27, 1928, AT 8 O'CLOCK, when an exceptionally good, live, clean
enjoyable play will be presented, called "OLD SOAK," calculated to give you an
exceptionally pleasant evening.
THERE ARE no strings of any kind attached. NO CHARGES AT ALL. NO
APPEALS. The Jewish Floridian pays for everything, and you are our guests.
Between the acts the presidents of the different Jewish organizations will be per-
mitted to speak briefly to outline the work of their particular society.
HAVE the president or secretary of your organization call The Jewish Floridian,
36840, and arrange for tickets for your party.
proven by scholars, to be spuri-
ous. These Samaritans, who still
maintain their religious rites on
Mount Gerizim, have been writ-
ten of by various travelers, in-
cluding Benjamin of Tudela, in
Bartinoro, in the fifteenth cen-
tury; Sir John Mandeville (a
traveler whose statements are not
altogether reliable) and others,
including Scaliger, in the six-
teenth century; and Pietro Del
Valle, in the seventeenth cen-
turyJewish and Gentile trav
elers
The number of'the Samaritan >
has been steadily decimated, until
at present they count in all
male and femalebut a hundred
and fifty souls. Still they practice
the customs in vogue in the an-
cient Holy Templetheir "High-
Priest" claiming actual descent
from the line of Kehath, of the
Levitical stock, directly descended
from Aaron
These Samaritans, few as they
are, acknowledge only the Mosaic
Codethe Written Lawnot ac-
cepting the Prophetical Books,
nor the Feasts or Fasts of the
House of Israel, designated in
later books of the Bible. Of
course, with no acceptance what-
soever of any rabbinical author-
ities, they have nothing in com-
mon with real Jews, while they
still observe the Passover accord-
ing to Temple rites, sacrificinu'
the lamb on the fourteenth of
Nissan, and from their misinter-
pretation of the Divine Law,
practicing the ceremony on
Mount Gerizim, as was done by
the High-Priest and priests of
old in the Temple on Mount
Zion
In a single respect,that of
non-acceptance of the Oral Law
they are to be likened to the
Karaites of Russia, who, while
accepting the "Written Testi-
mony," reject entirely the Rab-
binical Traditions, having no sym-
pathy in common with world-
Jewry, and have even been set
apart by the Romanoffs and other
rulers of modern Russia as ex-
empt from the persecutions and
pogroms, of which all Jews but
these have been, and still are,
the victims
As for the Samaritans their
number is bound to dwindle still
further, and eventually to result
in their total extinctionproving
that schismatics cannot endure
among Jews; a fact sustained by
the centuries, and by the exist-
ence of Judaism and Jewry, true
to the past, and by the accept-
ance of sacred traditions as hand-
ed down by the sages of our
own people.
Buy your Used Car from
RELIABLE MOTOR CORP.
5th and Lennox Miami Beach
Phone Miami Beach 838
"Reliable In Every Respect"
King
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v
29 N. W. THIRD AVENUE
Phones 23535-31624
Life Fire Casualty Bonds
Rauzin Insurancy Agency, Inc.
Phones 2256539563
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Miami, Florida
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8 McAllister Arcade
Cantilevers in a Variety of Colors
and Patterns
Harry J. Mullady, Pres.
Julius Damenstein, Inc.
JEWELER
The Store With a Reputation
10 W. Flagler St. Phone 4701
MIAMI, FLORIDA
CHOP SUEY
A Good 60c Luncheon
CHICKEN, CHOW MEIN,
CHOP SUEY
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Clubs and Lodge Parties Catered To
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Phone 3-5687
COMPLETE FACILITIES
111
ARE OFFERED TO YOU BY THE
City National Bank in Miami
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a Thoroughly Efficient
SERVICE
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(3)BONDS AND INVESTMENTS
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sa



PAGE 1

November 23, 1928 IMPORTANT THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Page 5 The Social Service Committee of the Council of Jewish Women headed by its chairman, Mrs. P. Scheinberg, requests that she be notified of any families in need where a Thanksgiving basket would be appropriate and needed. It is the committee's desire that none who should receive these baskets be overlooked, and therefore urgently requests the co-operation of Miami Jewry. If you know of any such families please phone 20207 or 21373. Junior Council of Jewish Women The Dramatic Circle of the Junior Council has, after long consideration, adopted "Stage Strutters" as the official name of the circle. They have been rehearsing for some time past and will shortly present their first effort at one of the meetings of the Junior Council. The next meeting of "Stage Strutters" will be held on Tuesday evening, November 27, at 7 o'clock sharp at the Scottish Rite Temple. The meeting will last onh/ one hour, after which time the meeting will be adjourned and the entire Junior Council will march upstairs to the Temple Theatre to be the guests of the Jewish Floridian at its Theatre Party. For ICE—Use Peninsular Ice Company ICE IM,i.t Locat! t 645 N. W. 13th Street Phone 21298 or 22262 for FREE DELIVERY COAL : WOOD : COKE CHARCOAL Miami Coal Co., Inc. 1100 N. W. 21st Terrace Phone 7896 For Choice Meats and Poultry THAT'S KOSHER Beyond a Doubt TENNESSEE KOSHER MARKET 166 N. W. Fifth Street Phone 21514 YOUR "U" AND YOU A Plea (Continued from Page One) other ways in' which we might show our interest in these young men and women. Organizations who strive to make their meetings as interesting as possible could, and should, invite some student from the university to address them and to acquaint them with the progress of the Jewish student at the university. We owe it to the students, we owe it to ourselves. A community is judged by the interest it displays in its educational institutions. Let not Miami Jewry be found wanting. Let us all unite. Ours will be the benefit. Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld Program For Jewish Floridian Theatre Party Following is the cast of characters to be presented by the Burton-Garrett Players at the Temple Theatre on November 27, when the ^kwish Floridian will stage its theatre party: The play is "The Old Soak," an old favorite that has enjoyed several big runs in northern cities. The Cast Webster Parson....Walter Kniffin Mathilda Hawley Grace Leith Lucy Hawley Marjorie Garrett Tom Ogden Milo Boulton Clemmie Harry Blackiston Clem Hawley Gavin Harris Nellie Alis Frost "Al" Robert Burton Ina Heath Margaret Wetherell The Scenes Act 1. The living room in the Hawley home. Act 2. The same, two weeks later. Act 3. Scene 1, The office in the bank; scene 2, The living room. HARRINGTON ELECTRIC COMPANY Electric Construction and Repairs 150 N. E. Third St. Phone 7116 REAL ESTATE and Business Opportunities W. L. WILLIAMS 252 Halcyon Arcade Phone 36840 The Samaritans and Their Pentateuch By Henry S. Morais Much has been written, even in recent times, respecting that peculiar sect known as the "The Samaritans," who wrongfully claim to be descendants of the Ten Tribes, originally composing the Kingdom of Israel. Their nationality was broken up, when successive kings of Assyria, Shalmaneseh, Sennacherib, and Sargon, took them into captivity, and peopled Samaria, their capital, with Assyrian subjects. This fact, of itself, proves the falsity of any claim modern Samaritans may put forth. Their text of the Pentateuch shows plainly that the Written Word has been garbled by them, especially when they substitute for the Temple, Mount Gerizim, instead of Mount Moriah, or Mount Zion. It is a wellknown fact that Gerizim was the mountain chosen in Deuteronomy XXVIII, 13) for the pronouncement of the Blessings by the Levites; while on the opposite side, Mount 'Ebal was selected for the Maledictions. Below these two eminences lies the ancient city of Shechem, the modern Nablus or Naplouse. Among the writings on this subject, nothing is more distinctive than that found in the "Literary Remains" of Dr. Emanuel Oscar Menahem Deutsch, entitled: "The Samaritan Pentateuch". He was a scholar acute and profound, associated with the British Museum. His researches on the subject were conducted under its auspices. A later work, bearing the title, "The Samaritans", has emanated from the pen of that distinguished scholar, the chief Rabbiof the English Sephardim, Moses Gaster, Ph.D., of London, (published by the British Academy, 1925). Another writer on this subject is Professor James A. Montgomery of the University of Pennsylvania. But, strange as it may seem, we scarcely note any reference in these latter works to the laborious efforts of Dr. Deutsch, nor what he unfolded from his discoveries years before. The Samaritans, variously called by Jews Shomronim, from Shomeron—Samaria—are also known by the term Cuthim. As has been observed, their version of the Pentateuch is in parts garbled, and they have likewise a Book of Joshua, so different from the original book included in Holy Writ (which, with their other five Books, makes a Hexateuch) that it has long since been BE OUR GUESTS T HE JEWISH FLORIDIAN believes in doing everything within its power to make Miami Jews a force for good both locally and nationally. Why all the petty bickerings, the conflicting of dates and such other pettiness which could and should be eliminated? TOO MANY of the Jewish residents of Miami don't even know one. another; haven't had the opportunity of meeting each other in that unrestrained happy manner that is conducive of good fellowship. WE WANT to afford you that opportunity. WE WANT every Jewish woman of Miami to be our guest at a COMMUNITY THEATRE PARTY at the TEMPLE THEATRE on TUESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 27, 1928, AT 8 O'CLOCK, when an exceptionally good, live, clean enjoyable play will be presented, called "OLD SOAK," calculated to give you an exceptionally pleasant evening. THERE ARE no strings of any kind attached. NO CHARGES AT ALL. NO APPEALS. The Jewish Floridian pays for everything, and you are our guests. Between the acts the presidents of the different Jewish organizations will be permitted to speak briefly to outline the work of their particular society. HAVE the president or secretary of your organization call The Jewish Floridian, 36840, and arrange for tickets for your party. proven by scholars, to be spurious. These Samaritans, who still maintain their religious rites on Mount Gerizim, have been written of by various travelers, including Benjamin of Tudela, in Bartinoro, in the fifteenth century; Sir John Mandeville (a traveler whose statements are not altogether reliable) and others, including Scaliger, in the sixteenth century; and Pietro Del Valle, in the seventeenth century—Jewish and Gentile trav elers The number of'the Samaritan > has been steadily decimated, until at present they count in all— male and female—but a hundred and fifty souls. Still they practice the customs in vogue in the ancient Holy Temple—their "HighPriest" claiming actual descent from the line of Kehath, of the Levitical stock, directly descended from Aaron These Samaritans, few as they are, acknowledge only the Mosaic Code—the Written Law—not accepting the Prophetical Books, nor the Feasts or Fasts of the House of Israel, designated in later books of the Bible. Of course, with no acceptance whatsoever of any rabbinical authorities, they have nothing in common with real Jews, while they still observe the Passover according to Temple rites, sacrificinu' the lamb on the fourteenth of Nissan, and from their misinterpretation of the Divine Law, practicing the ceremony on Mount Gerizim, as was done by the High-Priest and priests of old in the Temple on Mount Zion In a single respect,—that of non-acceptance of the Oral Law —they are to be likened to the Karaites of Russia, who, while accepting the "Written Testimony," reject entirely the Rabbinical Traditions, having no sympathy in common with worldJewry, and have even been set apart by the Romanoffs and other rulers of modern Russia as exempt from the persecutions and pogroms, of which all Jews but these have been, and still are, the victims As for the Samaritans their number is bound to dwindle still further, and eventually to result in their total extinction—proving that schismatics cannot endure among Jews; a fact sustained by the centuries, and by the existence of Judaism and Jewry, true to the past, and by the acceptance of sacred traditions as handed down by the sages of our own people. Buy your Used Car from— RELIABLE MOTOR CORP. 5th and Lennox Miami Beach Phone Miami Beach 838 "Reliable In Every Respect" King Undertaking Co. •v 29 N. W. THIRD AVENUE Phones 23535-31624 Life Fire • Casualty Bonds Rauzin Insurancy Agency, Inc. Phones 22565—39563 402-404 Meyer-Kiser Building Miami, Florida "Shoes Mark the Man" fantilever ^-Shoe For Men, Women and Children 8 McAllister Arcade Cantilevers in a Variety of Colors and Patterns Harry J. Mullady, Pres. Julius Damenstein, Inc. JEWELER The Store With a Reputation 10 W. Flagler St. Phone 4701 MIAMI, FLORIDA CHOP SUEY A Good 60c Luncheon CHICKEN, CHOW MEIN, CHOP SUEY Dinner, $1.00 Clubs and Lodge Parties Catered To Tokio Roof Garden 272 West Flagler Street Phone 3-5687 COMPLETE FACILITIES 111 ARE OFFERED TO YOU BY THE City National Bank in Miami Eight Distinct Departments Complete and Ready to Render a Thoroughly Efficient SERVICE (l)—COMMERCIAL (2)—SAVINGS (3)—BONDS AND INVESTMENTS (4)—EXCHANGE (5)—COLLECTION (6)—CREDIT (7)—SAFE DEPOSIT (8)—TRUST We Would Appreciate the Opportunity to Serve You City National Bank in Miami Capital S 1,000,000.00 Surplus V S 1,000.000 fio 116 EAST FLAGLER STREET •*sa


Page 6
THE TEWISH FLORIDIAN
'

B I
u
I
Announcements
Hadassah
Beth David
The usual Friday night late
services will be held at Beth
David at 8 o'clock, when Rabbi
Israel H. Weisfeld will preach a
sermon on "The New Attitude."
The students of the University
of Miami will be guests of the
congregation. Cantor Shoulson
will sing several solos and the
usual congregational singing will
be had.
On Thursday morning, No-
vember 29, special Thanksgiving
services will be conducted by the
Rabbi at 11 o'clock. A musical
program will be a feature of this
service.
The subject of the Rabbi's ser-
mon will be, "How Old Is
Thanksgiving?"
Temple Israel
Rabbi Jacob H. Kaplan will
preach a sermon on "When
Dreamers Begin to Dream" at
the regular Friday night services
at Temple Israel. The choir will
sing as usual.
On Sunday morning the sec-
ond meeting of the open forum
will be held. The forum is at-
tracting considerable attention
and favorable comment. Rabbi
Kaplan will speak on the second
of a series of "My Impressions
of Russia."
A Thanksgiving service will be
held at the temple on Thursday
morning, November 29, at 11
o'clock, when Rabbi Kaplan will
deliver a sermon on "Apprecia-
tion of American Ideals as the
True Thanksgivine "
As previously announced in
these columns, the reception
planned for the young women of
Miami by the Hadassah, was held
at the Beverly Terrace Hotel and
resulted in the formation of a
Junior Hadassah. Sylvia Katz and
Harriet Salzberg were appointed
temporary officers to help form
the organization. The aims of the
Junior Chapter will be to help
toward the support of the chil-
dren's orphanage and the nurses'
training school in Palestine.
Mrs. Max Dobrin, Mrs. Nat
Sharaf, Mrs. I. Cohen and Mrs.
Louis Zeicntz acted as hostesses
and made the young ladies wel-
come They were assisted by Mrs.
Frank Solomon, Mrs. Herman
Wcpman and Mrs. Eliot Gold-
stein. The first meeting of the
Junior Hadassah will be held on
November 2^ at 8 p. m. at the
home of Miss Sylvia Katz.
An error was made in the col-
umn* of the local dailies and
weeklies in announcing that the
sewing circle at the home of Mrs.
SeliL'man would he held on Tues-
day afternoon. For the benefit of
all interested, Hadassah sewing
circles arc held the second and
fourth Mondays in each month.
The next sewing circle will be
held on Monday, November 26,
at the home of Mrs. Seligman,
at which time the tickets for the
Jewish Floridian theatre party
will he distributed to the mem-
bers by Mrs. Nat Sharaf, who is
in charge of the Hadassah party.
sion it was thought advisable not
to join the Co-operative Council
until such time when the league
will have more time tor discus-
sion at their next meeting.
The league will hold its regu-
lar meeting and dancing next
Wednesday night.
After November 28, the league
will not meet at the Columbus.
Various hotels are being consid-
ered and announcement of the
first meeting in December will be
made in local papers.
Mr. H. H. Farr spoke a few
words to the body at large in
which he told the league of the
many favorable reports he had
heard of its work. Parents of the
league members and other visitors
are invited to these meetings.
There will be a nomination of
officers next week and only paid
up members will be eligible to
nominate and be nominated.
Talmuh Torah building fund. Do-
nations are being received daily
from tourists and merchants ot
Miami. The committee in charge
is headed by Mrs. J. Englcr and
Mrs. Isidor Cohen. A fuller an-
nouncement and full details re-
garding the bazaar will be made
in these columns in the next is*
sue.
November* 23, 1928
North driven here by the cold
the funds of the bureau are be-
ing heavily taxed. The member-
ship committee thus far has not
met with the response it deserves
and must have for the self-pro-
tection of Miami Jewry.
Beth David Sisterhood
Jewish Welfare Bureau
A meeting of the hoard of di-
rectors of the Jewish Welfare
Bureau was held at the offices of
the bureau last Wednesday night
at which several important mat
ters were discussed. Plans of the
committee for the ball to be run
for the benefit of the bureau
were discussed.
Following the meeting of the
board of directors, the welfare
committee met and discussed sev-
eral of the problems of those de-
pendent upon it. Because of the
influx of needy cases from the
Emunah Chapter, O. E. S.
The Loyalty Club, an auxiliary
of the Emunah Chapter, celebrat-
ed at a card party given at the
home of Mrs. Charles Goldstein
last Thursday evening. Among
those present were Mr. and Mrs.
Ed Wolfe, Mr. and Mrs. Dave
Kahn, Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Spec-
tor, Mr. and Mrs. L. Kaiser, Mr.
and Mrs. A. Aronowitz, Mrs.
Francis Bcrner, Mrs. R. Scluaf
and numerous others.
The usual ceremonial and ini-
tiation was held last night at the
meeting of the chapter and a
very instructive and interesting
evening was had.
Friendship League
The Friendship League met at
the Columbus Hotel on Wednes-
day evening. After much discus-
The Beth David Sisterhood
sponsored a very large card
party at the Columbus hotel last
Wednesday night. Over thirty
tables of bridge were played and
six prizes were awarded to those
making highest scores The com-
mittee in charge consisted of Mrs.
J. Louis Shochct, Mrs. M. Sehcin-
berg, as hostesses, and Mrs. M.
Schonficld, Mrs. Katz, Mrs. Kan-
del, Mrs. M. Goldcnblank and
Mrs. Majid. Quite a tidy sum
was realized from the affair. This
sum will go towards the upkeep
of the Talmud Torah now being
carried on daily by Beth David
at the old Miami High School
building.
Preparations are being made
for the bazaar to be held during
December for the benefit of the
HWOOROm
THEATRE
Phone 6040
NOW
SHOWING
The World's Greatest Entertainer
AL JOLSON
in
"THE SINGING FOOL"
A Puhlix Theatre- Home of Paramount Pictures

An Appeal to the Jewish Public for Fair Play
I have been in business in Miami for a number of years,
when there were no other Jewish butchers here. I have
tried to play fair with my customers and have at all times
served them with STRICTLY KOSHER MEATS and
POULTRY.
Because of the fact that business has been slow some of
my local competitors have by insinuation and otherwise
raised the cry that we have been selling our customers
meat that has been non'kosher. They know that state'
ment is ABSOLUTELY FALSE.
Rev. S. Guttman, who is in charge of the killing of my
cattle and poultry and constantly in the store, is too well
known to need any recommendations as to his honesty.
He has "kabbolo" from prominent Rabbis of Roumania
and this country. When our new Rabbi of Beth David
arrived in Miami he was invited to call at our store and
closely examined Mr. Guttman and watched him slaugh'
ter both cattle and poultry.
We believe in not only preaching but PRACTICING
"KASHRUTH." We want all of you to KNOW EV-
ERYTHING YOU BUY IS KOSHER BEYOND A
DOUBT.
There is ONLY ONE WAY TO ASSURE IT. All
butchers should immediately place themselves under the
supervision of Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld. A MASH-
GIACH should be employed who will be constantly on
the move and on the watch. We are willing to do our
share by paying our fair share of the cost of a Mashgiach
and are ready to post a bond to secure this payment.
Can you ask any more of us? Are the rest of Miami's
kosher butchers ready to do as much?
We have notified Rabbi Weisfeld that we are anxious
to have our two stores placed under his supervision, and
we now repeat the offer.
JEWS OF MIAMI, PLAY FAIR!
TENNESSEE KOSHER MARKET MIAMI BEACH KOSHER MARKET
170 N. W. Fifth Street, Miami 329-331 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach
DAVID GOTTFRIED, Proprietor
"FOR CHOICE KOSHER MEATS AND POULTRY SEE GOTTFRIED"



PAGE 1

Page 6 THE TEWISH FLORIDIAN •' B I u I Announcements Hadassah Beth David The usual Friday night late services will be held at Beth David at 8 o'clock, when Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld will preach a sermon on "The New Attitude." The students of the University of Miami will be guests of the congregation. Cantor Shoulson will sing several solos and the usual congregational singing will be had. On Thursday morning, November 29, special Thanksgiving services will be conducted by the Rabbi at 11 o'clock. A musical program will be a feature of this service. The subject of the Rabbi's sermon will be, "How Old Is Thanksgiving?" Temple Israel Rabbi Jacob H. Kaplan will preach a sermon on "When Dreamers Begin to Dream" at the regular Friday night services at Temple Israel. The choir will sing as usual. On Sunday morning the second meeting of the open forum will be held. The forum is attracting considerable attention and favorable comment. Rabbi Kaplan will speak on the second of a series of "My Impressions of Russia." A Thanksgiving service will be held at the temple on Thursday morning, November 29, at 11 o'clock, when Rabbi Kaplan will deliver a sermon on "Appreciation of American Ideals as the True Thanksgivine As previously announced in these columns, the reception planned for the young women of Miami by the Hadassah, was held at the Beverly Terrace Hotel and resulted in the formation of a Junior Hadassah. Sylvia Katz and Harriet Salzberg were appointed temporary officers to help form the organization. The aims of the Junior Chapter will be to help toward the support of the children's orphanage and the nurses' training school in Palestine. Mrs. Max Dobrin, Mrs. Nat Sharaf, Mrs. I. Cohen and Mrs. Louis Zeicntz acted as hostesses and made the young ladies welcome They were assisted by Mrs. Frank Solomon, Mrs. Herman Wcpman and Mrs. Eliot Goldstein. The first meeting of the Junior Hadassah will be held on November 2^ at 8 p. m. at the home of Miss Sylvia Katz. An error was made in the column* of the local dailies and weeklies in announcing that the sewing circle at the home of Mrs. SeliL'man would he held on Tuesday afternoon. For the benefit of all interested, Hadassah sewing circles arc held the second and fourth Mondays in each month. The next sewing circle will be held on Monday, November 26, at the home of Mrs. Seligman, at which time the tickets for the Jewish Floridian theatre party will he distributed to the members by Mrs. Nat Sharaf, who is in charge of the Hadassah party. sion it was thought advisable not to join the Co-operative Council until such time when the league will have more time tor discussion at their next meeting. The league will hold its regular meeting and dancing next Wednesday night. After November 28, the league will not meet at the Columbus. Various hotels are being considered and announcement of the first meeting in December will be made in local papers. Mr. H. H. Farr spoke a few words to the body at large in which he told the league of the many favorable reports he had heard of its work. Parents of the league members and other visitors are invited to these meetings. There will be a nomination of officers next week and only paid up members will be eligible to nominate and be nominated. Talmuh Torah building fund. Donations are being received daily from tourists and merchants ot Miami. The committee in charge is headed by Mrs. J. Englcr and Mrs. Isidor Cohen. A fuller announcement and full details regarding the bazaar will be made in these columns in the next is* sue. November* 23, 1928 North driven here by the cold the funds of the bureau are being heavily taxed. The membership committee thus far has not met with the response it deserves and must have for the self-protection of Miami Jewry. Beth David Sisterhood Jewish Welfare Bureau A meeting of the hoard of directors of the Jewish Welfare Bureau was held at the offices of the bureau last Wednesday night at which several important mat ters were discussed. Plans of the committee for the ball to be run for the benefit of the bureau were discussed. Following the meeting of the board of directors, the welfare committee met and discussed several of the problems of those dependent upon it. Because of the influx of needy cases from the Emunah Chapter, O. E. S. The Loyalty Club, an auxiliary of the Emunah Chapter, celebrated at a card party given at the home of Mrs. Charles Goldstein last Thursday evening. Among those present were Mr. and Mrs. Ed Wolfe, Mr. and Mrs. Dave Kahn, Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Spector, Mr. and Mrs. L. Kaiser, Mr. and Mrs. A. Aronowitz, Mrs. Francis Bcrner, Mrs. R. Scluaf and numerous others. The usual ceremonial and initiation was held last night at the meeting of the chapter and a very instructive and interesting evening was had. Friendship League The Friendship League met at the Columbus Hotel on Wednesday evening. After much discusThe Beth David Sisterhood sponsored a very large card party at the Columbus hotel last Wednesday night. Over thirty tables of bridge were played and six prizes were awarded to those making highest scores The committee in charge consisted of Mrs. J. Louis Shochct, Mrs. M. Sehcinberg, as hostesses, and Mrs. M. Schonficld, Mrs. Katz, Mrs. Kandel, Mrs. M. Goldcnblank and Mrs. Majid. Quite a tidy sum was realized from the affair. This sum will go towards the upkeep of the Talmud Torah now being carried on daily by Beth David at the old Miami High School building. Preparations are being made for the bazaar to be held during December for the benefit of the HWOOROm THEATRE Phone 6040 NOW SHOWING The World's Greatest Entertainer AL JOLSON in "THE SINGING FOOL" A Puhlix TheatreHome of Paramount Pictures An Appeal to the Jewish Public for Fair Play I have been in business in Miami for a number of years, when there were no other Jewish butchers here. I have tried to play fair with my customers and have at all times served them with STRICTLY KOSHER MEATS and POULTRY. Because of the fact that business has been slow some of my local competitors have by insinuation and otherwise raised the cry that we have been selling our customers meat that has been non'kosher. They know that state' ment is ABSOLUTELY FALSE. Rev. S. Guttman, who is in charge of the killing of my cattle and poultry and constantly in the store, is too well known to need any recommendations as to his honesty. He has "kabbolo" from prominent Rabbis of Roumania and this country. When our new Rabbi of Beth David arrived in Miami he was invited to call at our store and closely examined Mr. Guttman and watched him slaugh' ter both cattle and poultry. We believe in not only preaching but PRACTICING "KASHRUTH." We want all of you to KNOW EVERYTHING YOU BUY IS KOSHER BEYOND A DOUBT. There is ONLY ONE WAY TO ASSURE IT. All butchers should immediately place themselves under the supervision of Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld. A MASHGIACH should be employed who will be constantly on the move and on the watch. We are willing to do our share by paying our fair share of the cost of a Mashgiach and are ready to post a bond to secure this payment. Can you ask any more of us? Are the rest of Miami's kosher butchers ready to do as much? We have notified Rabbi Weisfeld that we are anxious to have our two stores placed under his supervision, and we now repeat the offer. JEWS OF MIAMI, PLAY FAIR! TENNESSEE KOSHER MARKET MIAMI BEACH KOSHER MARKET 170 N. W. Fifth Street, Miami 329-331 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach DAVID GOTTFRIED, Proprietor "FOR CHOICE KOSHER MEATS AND POULTRY SEE GOTTFRIED"


---------------
Vol. I.No. 7
MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 30, 1928
Price, 5 Cents
:**=
A THANKSGIVING
MESSAGE
_
Thanksgiving! What shall we
be thankful for? Let us be thank-
ful for the privilege of living on
a soil saturated with the blood
of those who lived and died for
freedom of life, thought and be-
lief. Who, undismayed by the
apparently insurmountable vicis-
situdes, because of their su-
Creme and implicit faith in God
lazed the path for posterity.
Let us be thankful that we have
been granted the privilege of liv-
ing in an age that it replete with
scientific wonders, with epoch-
making events and the initiation
of movements that will leave
their indelible imprint upon the
pages of time. On this Thanks-
giving Day let us be thankful
and hopeful thankful for
the initial steps that have already
been taken toward the goal of a
better understanding between na-
tion and nation, religion and re-
ligion; and hopeful that ours
may be the day in which the
goal of perfect harmony, love
and understanding and the readi-
ness to forgive the next man's
weaknesses may be realized, and
a sincere heartfelt resolution to
propagate those ideals which per-
meated the lives and actions* of
theee who are responsible for'
Thanksgiving Day, be ours on
this day.
Hodu ladoshem ki tov, ki lco-
lom chasdo. Give thanks unto
the Lord, for He is good, for His
loving kindness endureth forever.
Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld.
KIWANIS CLUB HAS
JEWISH GIRL ON
PROGRAM
At the regular weekly lun-
cheon of the Kiwanis Club, held
at Burdine's last Friday, one of
the quartet representing the
Highland Park School was a lit-
tle Jewish girl, Ethel Lazar. The
quartet has been trained by the
musical instructress of the High-
land Park School and has pleased
all those who have been fortun-
ate enough to hear them.
Thanksgiving Cheer
The Social Welfare Committee
of the Council of Jewish Women
headed by Mrs. P. Scheinberg
distributed fifty-odd baskets of
food and considerable clothing to
the needy families of Miami on
Wednesday. As this paper is go-
ing to press we are unable to
give a detailed account of the
work but suffice it to say that
many families will tomorrow en-
joy Thanksgiving where food
would probably otherwise not
have been.
Miami Y. M. H. A. Seeks
Amalgamation
We are advised that a propos-
al has been made by the Miami
Y. M. H. A. that it be amalga'
mated with the Men's Club of
Miami. Definite announcement
will be made next week.
lF~








tt
A Thanksgiving Prayer
tit
V-JH, LORD! when on that dreary win-
ter's morn
The Mayflower anchored safe from ice
and storm,
The Pilgrims knelt, their voices rose in
prayer,
To seek thy guidance and protecting care.
For thou dost always hear the sincere
plea
That's raised in supplication unto Thee.
By thy omnipotent and- gracious aid
Thus was the bulwark of our nation laid.
Those nations are no more that forget
Thee.
Preserve us, Author of Our Liberty,
Let songs of thanks and praise the wel-
kin ring!
We magnify thy name, C; God, our king.
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
THEATRE PARTY
DRAWS CROWD
Miami Jewry was well repre-
sented last Tuesday night at the
Temple Theatre to see a per-
formance of "The Old Soak"
played by the Burton-Garrett
Players as the guests of the Jew-
ish Floridian.
Tickets for the performance
had been distributed to the heads
of the different Jewish organiza-
tions of the city for delivery to
their respective members. The
Beth David Sisterhood, Hadas-
sah, Council of Jewish Women,
the Zionist District, Friendship
League and other Jewish organi-
zations were there en masse.
Temple Israel, Beth David, B'nai
Brith and the Men's Club were
out in full regalia, and between
the acts all wings of Miami Jew-
ry fraternized with one another.
The Burton Garrett Players
outdid themselves in presenting
their performance. The story was
put over in masterful fashion,
the entire company evidently en-
tering into the spirit of good will
that pervaded the entire theatre.
The audience was quick to grasp
every witticism and every joke
and to applaud immediately when
the situation deserved it, which
was quite often during the eve-
ning.
Young and old were repre-
sented in the audience which
contained a number of non-Jews.
Quite a number were turned
away at the box office of the
theatre because the entire house
had been sold out and no more
room was available.
The Jewish Floridian takes this
means of expressing its sincere
thanks to the heads of the vari-
ous organizations and to all their
respective members for their
splendid support shown at the
theatre inhelping to make this
evening one of the banner eve-
nings of Miami Jewry; it wants
to assure the Jewry of Miami
that it will at all times do its
utmost to help make Miami Jew-
ry one great big loving family
irrespective of what wing of Mi-
ami Jewry they may be mem-
bers of.
Old acquaintances were once
again renewed and pledges made
to each other that they would
remain strangers to each other
no longer.
The Jewish Floridian hopes
shortly to be able to announce
to its readers another gala night
of entertainment where folks may
once again get together.
U. OF M. GLEE CLUB
IS BEING LED BY
JEWISH BOY
The University of Miami Glee
and Instrumental Club, led by
Aaron Farr, popular local Jew-
ish boy, announced its itinerary
for the initial trip of the club
this season. It will make its first
appearance in Homestead, De-
cember 7; Arcadia, December
11; Lakeland, December 12; Plant
City, December 13, and Sara-
sota, December 14. A much long-
er tour will be taken in March.
Aaron Farr, who is the son of
Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Farr, hails
originally from McKeesport, Pa.,
and early in life showed remark-
able musical talents. He is the
composer of the Miami High
School song, quite a number of
songs for Mercer College, a num-
ber of popular songs highly
lauded by Irving Berlin, Gene
Austen and others. He recently
composed the school song for
Beth David.
Accompanying him on the trip
as part of the Glee Club will be
Moe Albert, Gene Cohen, Irving
Lauton, Louis Cohen, all Jewish
boys, who will help make things
hum with the show which will
be billed as "A Cloudburst of
Melody."
A THANKSGIVING
MESSAGE
"I will wash my hands in innocency.
So will 1 compass Thine altar. O
God;
That 1 will make the voice of
Thanksgiving to be heard.
And tell of all Thy wondrous works.'
Psalm 26: 6-7.
If we study the history of the
United States in its nobler mo-
ments we shall find beneath and
behind all the experiences and
the wars, and the struggles, this
great unconscious life motif: "I
will wash my hands in inno-
cency."
The environment, the evolving
social consciousness, all show this
desire for clean hands to be the
inspiration for national Thanks-
giving.
America is not, as many think,
the land of opportunity for phys-
ical and material success; it is
above all else the opportunity
for Thanksgiving because of the
reflection that life is worth while,
is enchantingly beautiful with
clean hands as the offering on
the altar of God.
Young folks with a mistaken
idea of freedom, intoxicated with
youth but not always with wis-
dom, do not yet know that the
Thanksgiving is the highest of-
fering on the altar of the nation
vif \>ui- by the hands bf hnw
cency.
The Jew should be as he was,
an example of the meaning of
the holiness of life. What did
not the Jew suffer to compass
the altar of God. The Jew is as
sensitive as any other to the
pleasures of life, yet would he
pluck out pleasure from his
breast though his heart were at
the root, if that pleasure inter?
fered with clean-handed and
clean-hearted worship at the altar
of his God.
Trained in Jewish ideals and
American life, let us lay on the
altar of our country the true
Thanksgiving offering and appre-
ciation for the ethical ideals of
our glorious land. In this spirit
let us enjoy this day and all days
to come.
Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan.
COSMETOLOGISTS OF
GREATER MIAMI
ORGANIZE
Last Tuesday evening a meet-
ing of local cosmetologists and
hairdressers was formed and offi-
cers were chosen. Mr. William
Gravatt was elected president;
Mrs. Nora Davis, vice president;
Mr. Ed Wolfe of the Etta Beau-
ty Shop and well known in lo-
cal fraternal circles, was chosen
secretary; Mr. William Knot! was
elected treasurer.
The corporate name chosen
was "The Hairdressers' and Cos-
metologists' Association of Mi-
ami and Vicinity." The purpose
of the association, as stated by
its officers, was to assure the Mi-
ami public fair and competent
treatment and to prevent any un-
due advantage being taken of
residents or tourists, and to also
insure that only competent and
capable operators were employed
in the beauty parlors of the city.



PAGE 1

Vol. I.—No. 7 MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 30, 1928 Price, 5 Cents : %  **= A THANKSGIVING MESSAGE •Thanksgiving! What shall we be thankful for? Let us be thankful for the privilege of living on a soil saturated with the blood of those who lived and died for freedom of life, thought and belief. Who, undismayed by the apparently insurmountable vicissitudes, because of their suCreme and implicit faith in God lazed the path for posterity. Let us be thankful that we have •been granted the privilege of living in an age that it replete with scientific wonders, with epochmaking events and the initiation of movements that will leave their indelible imprint upon the pages of time. On this Thanksgiving Day let us be thankful and hopeful thankful for the initial steps that have already been taken toward the goal of a better understanding between nation and nation, religion and religion; and hopeful that ours may be the day in which the goal of perfect harmony, love and understanding and the readiness to forgive the next man's weaknesses may be realized, and a sincere heartfelt resolution to propagate those ideals which permeated the lives and actions* of theee who are responsible for' Thanksgiving Day, be ours on this day. Hodu ladoshem ki tov, ki lcolom chasdo. Give thanks unto the Lord, for He is good, for His loving kindness endureth forever. Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld. KIWANIS CLUB HAS JEWISH GIRL ON PROGRAM At the regular weekly luncheon of the Kiwanis Club, held at Burdine's last Friday, one of the quartet representing the Highland Park School was a little Jewish girl, Ethel Lazar. The quartet has been trained by the musical instructress of the Highland Park School and has pleased all those who have been fortunate enough to hear them. Thanksgiving Cheer The Social Welfare Committee of the Council of Jewish Women headed by Mrs. P. Scheinberg distributed fifty-odd baskets of food and considerable clothing to the needy families of Miami on Wednesday. As this paper is going to press we are unable to give a detailed account of the work but suffice it to say that many families will tomorrow enjoy Thanksgiving where food would probably otherwise not have been. Miami Y. M. H. A. Seeks Amalgamation We are advised that a proposal has been made by the Miami Y. M. H. A. that it be amalga' mated with the Men's Club of Miami. Definite announcement will be made next week. lF~ tt A Thanksgiving Prayer %  tit V-JH, LORD! when on that dreary winter's morn The Mayflower anchored safe from ice and storm, The Pilgrims knelt, their voices rose in prayer, To seek thy guidance and protecting care. For thou dost always hear the sincere plea That's raised in supplication unto Thee. By thy omnipotent andgracious aid Thus was the bulwark of our nation laid. Those nations are no more that forget Thee. Preserve us, Author of Our Liberty, Let songs of thanks and praise the welkin ring! We magnify thy name, C ; God, our king. JEWISH FLORIDIAN THEATRE PARTY DRAWS CROWD Miami Jewry was well represented last Tuesday night at the Temple Theatre to see a performance of "The Old Soak" played by the Burton-Garrett Players as the guests of the Jewish Floridian. Tickets for the performance had been distributed to the heads of the different Jewish organizations of the city for delivery to their respective members. The Beth David Sisterhood, Hadassah, Council of Jewish Women, the Zionist District, Friendship League and other Jewish organizations were there en masse. Temple Israel, Beth David, B'nai Brith and the Men's Club were out in full regalia, and between the acts all wings of Miami Jewry fraternized with one another. The Burton Garrett Players outdid themselves in presenting their performance. The story was put over in masterful fashion, the entire company evidently entering into the spirit of good will that pervaded the entire theatre. The audience was quick to grasp every witticism and every joke and to applaud immediately when the situation deserved it, which was quite often during the evening. Young and old were represented in the audience which contained a number of non-Jews. Quite a number were turned away at the box office of the theatre because the entire house had been sold out and no more room was available. The Jewish Floridian takes this means of expressing its sincere thanks to the heads of the various organizations and to all their respective members for their splendid support shown at the theatre inhelping to make this evening one of the banner evenings of Miami Jewry; it wants to assure the Jewry of Miami that it will at all times do its utmost to help make Miami Jewry one great big loving family irrespective of what wing of Miami Jewry they may be members of. Old acquaintances were once again renewed and pledges made to each other that they would remain strangers to each other no longer. The Jewish Floridian hopes shortly to be able to announce to its readers another gala night of entertainment where folks may once again get together. U. OF M. GLEE CLUB IS BEING LED BY JEWISH BOY The University of Miami Glee and Instrumental Club, led by Aaron Farr, popular local Jewish boy, announced its itinerary for the initial trip of the club this season. It will make its first appearance in Homestead, December 7; Arcadia, December 11; Lakeland, December 12; Plant City, December 13, and Sarasota, December 14. A much longer tour will be taken in March. Aaron Farr, who is the son of Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Farr, hails originally from McKeesport, Pa., and early in life showed remarkable musical talents. He is the composer of the Miami High School song, quite a number of songs for Mercer College, a number of popular songs highly lauded by Irving Berlin, Gene Austen and others. He recently composed the school song for Beth David. Accompanying him on the trip as part of the Glee Club will be Moe Albert, Gene Cohen, Irving Lauton, Louis Cohen, all Jewish boys, who will help make things hum with the show which will be billed as "A Cloudburst of Melody." A THANKSGIVING MESSAGE "I will wash my hands in innocency. So will 1 compass Thine altar. O God; That 1 will make the voice of Thanksgiving to be heard. And tell of all Thy wondrous works.' —Psalm 26: 6-7. If we study the history of the United States in its nobler moments we shall find beneath and behind all the experiences and the wars, and the struggles, this great unconscious life motif: "I will wash my hands in innocency." The environment, the evolving social consciousness, all show this desire for clean hands to be the inspiration for national Thanksgiving. America is not, as many think, the land of opportunity for physical and material success; it is above all else the opportunity for Thanksgiving because of the reflection that life is worth while, is enchantingly beautiful with clean hands as the offering on the altar of God. Young folks with a mistaken idea of freedom, intoxicated with youth but not always with wisdom, do not yet know that the Thanksgiving is the highest offering on the altar of the nation v if \>uiby the hands bf hnw cency. The Jew should be as he was, an example of the meaning of the holiness of life. What did not the Jew suffer to compass the altar of God. The Jew is as sensitive as any other to the pleasures of life, yet would he pluck out pleasure from his breast though his heart were at the root, if that pleasure inter? fered with clean-handed and clean-hearted worship at the altar of his God. Trained in Jewish ideals and American life, let us lay on the altar of our country the true Thanksgiving offering and appreciation for the ethical ideals of our glorious land. In this spirit let us enjoy this day and all days to come. —Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan. COSMETOLOGISTS OF GREATER MIAMI ORGANIZE Last Tuesday evening a meeting of local cosmetologists and hairdressers was formed and officers were chosen. Mr. William Gravatt was elected president; Mrs. Nora Davis, vice president; Mr. Ed Wolfe of the Etta Beauty Shop and well known in local fraternal circles, was chosen secretary; Mr. William Knot! was elected treasurer. The corporate name chosen was "The Hairdressers' and Cosmetologists' Association of Miami and Vicinity." The purpose of the association, as stated by its officers, was to assure the Miami public fair and competent treatment and to prevent any undue advantage being taken of residents or tourists, and to also insure that only competent and capable operators were employed in the beauty parlors of the city.








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PAGE 1

%  I torn 1 nz. *. *"Er! r\ HAN -* im THE JEVTISH FLORIDIAN =-l v I VI^J: .* "U-a:*BBBBBBI runi^r.ra A: Msac r -.-_-_. ^ iH g i S~. '. -W TlHflf" s it -in-; —: Tit: --a—— v—" : ~T1 TTT".' ~ *" **' aair.*;. EDITORIAL ynnc' nn /t~v =:. — z~" naeL sen aa: s 9=i HCB gsmsu -asz. natsrw&K < OBEX SB HOC ~ n lira*, nt axa :rrK -: .: _rt-~_ _: : nn^liufm. rw^ son nsaa ns*i -igpsr an; r-rrsr Zmcr^ i_v; ^: aasaj cnw : Hut w: si %  OTeno:-:J: BBBBI rr.ir w; as r at fmin 5 B ii*l Tr L %  an -. — '.-=1 i_ :^.:_ :_-.-.._' w E*BB> T—; i: km v( : : d. EBe: Bj | in ^WKJJnitiir" • • iS i IH.Uilasm^sr: ;" : 1 -c : r>ii ] I L.ZZL ~ ENV* A SLA JO* COST? lr '.T T ? :.AN~SE>C73M A USE n B3] v*-r • : e : v— L rrac ... ~ %  • %  -~ I .-.--. i aB fjknjp— %  ~^-. -I -%  : I _-"""-. iraoB BB r* Tr* Hand of a Friend %  Bang snssaaBOiEK. le te-_ T%  — C ~* r r j : :_c: praaBC %  iqi ^S.*'%  ^S Vi m -. z. _~ .-%  : .sr. "ii* :. %  -an : %  r r:if•' ~ r .^.^r inn fc IT' v—m: I smaBt zvtr ^ 1^.1 :-. : --" -r. —J. tz x Ba zcir Wll ICC BST"1 T iC! TTTT :; 3Z5. ,r* tz-^z.'. --" : %  --"'Jt i %  ar. :-.....• u. Tirr in '_nr.-^r v _-._ :_ xxu ~r — ^xi'.rxr £ %  aa SQ'JB — in mm*-T**T -ITI- nan, arse ... -: r-izi : %  tJH z, s r _.. fmm: — WeL at rxasr09 nimarr SOB B -j£ ~nr->r=naBL km s-_^nc BBB m:r*. % % %  .rs?i %  i ~ %  '•' K. al assrjK. %  : -.:%  • • ; : : i _" I %  %  TI_ z.L .%  : -.. r-< Iqwr : j-cr a.">rf k.r i ?m%  V 3c %  sxr %  t. ---:• ix : %  : %  _' e At Opck-x poae cc is .*=i"49BCK r TEaCfclfcf ~B~^— BB : "W m -.. 3 BBC m: UB -iHiac wz^ri — — a : "i sap Li BBJ s.-K~rifcSZT ^c sac pas r ar-sT nai %  BBBOB r i in.iHM BBf a: r ii SBBBSt TK aal fcacaeri arvsj i i %  % %  __ : .— ._ —. T %  BBI WBBBI i B Duscrirscte sr an incS ,, ,niBr imc a: ,W -. %  irar iCCT I&UB--A -irrr t rrvy ^s tcii a.' E m nnac '" i pd. irxancic ~T>* zrsc VBTBWT A .-nwr BBI T-Tijboa ee BBBBcr nae vaoc o.u^ rr -;-rt '-"< nr ;KT BBS) %  a: amr rilaaxiaaB •s"^t -" a; ~-a : —z.w~ '.'.: : %  -• !" '%  mmi x: ~ r itr-Tr am N %  _* I I-HE-* OBBBi. TBC fBBBr e aVe BMSKT QB wet m tier ZJ a -~ rra aBcr.-ri ^J: : BBBB a tie If rt IBBIJ ; L-.fr dL X > *2Bt POB -i "-"'-r ,-*a fcrpne %  B V_xarx *aam nai BB : Bt IIIBJI aBC BC \ .—nrv "* Az the revr at tker cC aW taaVGod. %  > HiBiint "5 Bfkc. la m KTtf tie frc rjfic. akp sai Peacr. t be a-amari aasaa a* x sai HBErri aT


lovember 30, 1928
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Page 3
The Belly-Puncher
By Erwin Muscovich
The Belly-puncher, the why
lid wherefore of whom shall
hereinafter set forth, is to
irrow a phrase recently coined
r the biologists, a specimen of
jiergent evolution. Just as new
ivironmental conditions bring
bout changes in the organisms
ependent upon them, so has the
American environment evolved a
lew type of Jew.
Like many others of that grow-
v,i band of students to whom a
Ihange of environment is neces-
lary if they are not to be stulti-
led in academic halls of learning
sought to exchange, for a sum-
mer, the freshness of a Western
allege for my habitual haunts in
In Eastern university. Summer
then found me in the Western
netropolis which is graced by
ic University of Chicago, devot-
,_ig my mornings to the study
f)f books and my afternoons to
their sale. My knowledge of Ju-
jaica led me to specialize in that
5eld. I used to take the inter-
iirban buses running out of Chi-
cago to such Indiana communi-
. as Gary, Hammond and
,. siting and other outlying vil-
,ages. Walking down the main
business street, I used to pick
Dut some undoubtedly Jewish
firm. I usually managed to pick
jp sufficient information about
;he merchants of the vicinity to
prevent my approaching some
Italian in the hopes of selling him
Jraetz' History of the Jews, in
.ix volumes, at a wonderful bar-
gain. I must confess that this,
too, happened often enough;
[though I can recall no Italian dis-
courteous enough to laugh be-
cause he was offered some Ju-
laica.
In this fashion I met the belly-
Ipuncher at his best; stalked him
lin his lair, as it were, by trying
Ito sell him some Jewish cultural
{matter in his place of business.
[Be it recorded that my rather
[ingenious plan of financing my-
[self succeeded, so that I was able
[to observe him with amusement
I rather than with bitterness.
He may be seen any afternoon
[around three o'clock, during the
lull of the business day, stand-
ing, or rather, leaning, against
the entrance to his store. In the
(corner of his mouth a cigar, or
what was one, pitched at an in-
[clination of some sixty degrees
toward the heavens. His eyes
follow the passers-by, paying
particular attention to the ankles
of the fair ones. His hair is thin-
ning, and his forehead is en-
croaching on regions once lux-
uriant. One of his arms, stretch-
ed above his head, is the stay
wherewith his body is supported
against the impressive glass of
his modern 'front windows. The
other is quite unconsciously, but
conspicuously, placed against his
already protruding belly, slightly
to one side. The fingers, radiating
out from the palm, seem to em-
brace severally and collectively
that portion of his anatomy. A
thumb, inserted in a conveniently
placed vest pocket, offers the
support for that customary po-
sition with a minimum expendi-
ture of energy.
The hand rises in a casual
wave. An acquaintance has pass-
ed. It resumes its place. The fin-
gers play a varying and spas-
modic tattoo against the belly.
The bahoviorist must turn intro-
spectionist. It is after dinner,
business is fair, there is the
home, the car, and of course, the
wife and baby. That little in-
vestment made last year has ev-
ery prospect of yielding a tre-
mendous return. Weren't there
rumors to the effect that a car
line would be built right past his
,lot? Up shoots his handbut
this time with energy, with pre-
cision. His stomach is momen-
tarily drawn in. One's visual fo-
cus is shifted from the vest to
the smile which wreathes his
face. The eyes are casting benev-
olent good will in the direction
of a passing figure whose sure
stride befits the neat blue uni-
form which clothes it. Police
Captain Connor. Fine chap.
Friendly. Very useful acquaint-
ance in a pinch. As the object of
the salute passes, back goes the
hand to its perch, but now with
a rapid tattoo, as though to
awaken about his equatorial re-
gions some sympathetic response
to a weighty stimulus. It is no
little honor, surely, to be singled
out of the Jewish community,
with a few other choice souls, as
a- prospect for membership in the
local Masonic lodge. And he
would be admitted. He would
not be embarrassingly blackballed
as Sid Bernstein had been six
years before. The Jews had been
undesirable then. Their growing
economic importance in the city
had rendered them much less so
now. At thoughts of this tri-
umphthe fingers make a posi-
tive caress of the stomach as in
loving satisfaction.
He is Jewish. Babbitt does not
mean him, for while Babbitt's
stupidities are his stupidities, he
has a few of his own which Bab-
bitt does not share. These arise
out of the fact that his very
Jewishness presents problems
which he neither perceives, com-
prehends, nor solves. As we pic-
ture him, he is from the prov-
inces. There he is confronted, as
a result of contacts with Gen-
tiles, with particular problems
which the cloak-and-suitcr or
shoe merchant of New York
does not have occasion to face.
Nor may we underestimate the
extent of these problems in the
individual and communal life of
American Jewry, where blind ef-
fort takes the place of intelligent
dealing. The belly-puncher is in
the peculiar position of many of
his kind who are assimilating
American life with all its objec-
tionable superficialities. He is a
member of a race temporarily
and geographically transcendent,
in the sense that he has time and .
space attachments which, if
heeded, should effectively broad-
en his interests and his sphere
of activities. The neglect of the
mental and historical factors of
his origin, development, and so-
cial status leads him to over-em-
phasize ineffective and unimpor-
tant aspects of life in a new en-
vironment. In his desire to get
away from one set of group lim-
itations, he is placing himself di-
rectly under the sway of another
set of group limitations. If they
are not those of the narrow vi-
sion of the Ghetto, they are
those of the narrower vision of
Main Street. To the intellectual
such a change, which loses the
spiritual qualities of racial tradi-
tions, is abhorrent. Only the Bel-
ly-puncher could be satisfied
and he is. The ineffectiveness of
his adjustments is apparent to ev-
eryone, including, one suspects,
the Gentile for whose approval
they are being made. They are
not apparent to himself.
I entered the store of such a
one during the course of a visit
to some small town. The propri-
etor was at the moment being
solicited by representatives of the
United Palestine Appeal. While
I waited unobtrusively, he de-
livered a harangue on the sub-
ject of Judaism, Nationalism, Zi-
onism et al. I %'J
"Now, listen," he was saying,
"what is the use of all this fuss
about Zionism? We are contented
here. Do you expect me to move
my store to Palestine to sell
pants to a bunch of old-fash-
ioned fogies with long curls? If
I've got to give money, there's
the hospital we're building here.
We can use all our money right
here in our own town. There's
no use talking old-fashioned no-
tions about Judaism, Zionism,
and that stuff to me. That's good
enough for Europe where they
don't know any better. I have my
own notions about them. Do you
want to see my flag? Here it is!"
And taking a dollar bill out of
his pocket, he waved it under
the nose of his hearers. "That,"
he continued, "is what counts
here, and not a lot of crazy
dreams and ideas that are a hun-
dred years behind the times."
Expostulations on the part of
the solicitors were cut short by
a pronouncement which ended
their hopes even as it did mine.
"There's no use talking, gen-
tlemen," he said impatiently, with
a sort of rude finality: "You're
only wasting your breath. It's
getting late, and I've just re-
minded myself that I have to go
to Shul. I've got Yahrzeit."
A Conservative View of
Jewish Radicalism
By Peter Wiernik
We have invited Mr. Wiernik, the
outstanding Jewish journalist, author
and thinker, whose critical attitude
towards radicalism is pronounced, to
give our readers a clear definition of
his views. The following outline,
though brief and in humorous vein,
states the case squarely and does full
justice to the writer.Editor.
The propounder of the query:
What would happen if an irre-
sistible force should meet an im-
movable body, ought to have
made a study of Jewish radical-
ism. The answer which, accord-
ing to tradition, he received, that
the result would be a heterogen-
eous conglomeration of incom-
prehensible incongruities, could
not satisfy anybody, not even
those vaguely emotional radicals
whose sfate of mind those four
"jaw-breakers" come near describ-
ing, if such feat is at all possi-
ble.
That irresistible force which
resists everything seems to be a
part of the Jewish mind, espe-
cially typical of the East-Euro-
pean or Russian Jew, whose re-
bellious spirit received a peculiar
twist from contact with the Slav-
ic mind. One would have to go
back seven centuries, to the Mon-
gol conquest and the resulting
social and economic backward-
ness, to the presistence of autoc-
racy and semi-socialistic land-
tenure down to our own times,
to understand why intellectual
Russia was always more radical,
more susceptible to absorbing so-
cialist doctrine than the "intelli-
gentzia" of Western countries.
Russia needed a revolution, need-
ed it very badly, and the emi-
grant who is ever loath to ad-
mit that he comes from inferior
surroundings, is naturally insist-
ent that a revolution would be
equally as good everywhere else.
And so we have that radical-
ism in the form of socialism in
its various ramifications, spread
out over a large part of our
world of activity, shading off
from red communism on the ex-
treme left, through left and right
socialism, turning the nationalis-
tic corner with the socialists-ter-
ritorialists, descending, or ascend-
ing, through the left and the
right wings of Poale Zionism in-
to the camp of general Zionism,
almost touching the edge of the
Mizrachi movement. Even in mid-
dle class life the radical bent is
clearly apparent.
Those general confessions of
belief or of adherence to idealis-
tic concepts of what the world
ought to be, must however not
be taken very seriously. By a
strange coincidence, which to my
mind has a profound significance,
this world, which seems to be-
come all socialistic, is also, and
has been for many centuries, al-
most all Christian. Only in our
swiftly moving times decades
will bring changes which in slow-
moving generations it took al-
most milleniums to accomplish.
As Christianity was spreading, it
gradually shed its purely Jewish
principles with the aid of which
it conquered the world, and be-
came almost pagan. In the pres-
ent time socialism relinquishes
more and more its true Marxian
severity and thoroughness the
nearer it gets to power or the
longer it holds on to it. It is
becoming capitalistic even in
Moscow, and in countries which
stand higher, the election of an
Ebert as President of Germany
or the elevation of a MacDonald
to the premiership of Great Brit-
ain affected the economic struc-
ture of those countries much less
than our country would be af-
fected by the election to the
presidency of a Bryan or a La
Follette.
The analogy is even more
strange, or more significant, when
we turn our attention to the ori-
gin, or originators, of the two
movements. The bearer of the
Marxian message for the last two
generations is astonishingly simi-
lar to the propangandist of Chris-
tianity for the first two or three
centuries A. D. They were both
detached, if we do not want to
use the harsher word, renegades,
from the Jewish camp. Each of
them apparently conquered the
world as an irresistible force
spreading outward, and each of
them left behind an immovable
body, of apparently small dimen-
sions, which remained adamant
to all the blandishments of a new
interpretation of its hoary prin-
ciples.
When the spread of Christian-
ity began to assume large pro-
portions, the time soon came
when "The Greeks began to
murmur against the Hebrews."
We have no exact data about
Etta Beauty Shoppe
SVe and Helena Rubinitein facial treat'
merits and preparations
2207 N. E. Second Avenue
Phone 20245
E. M. Wolfe Ample Parking Space
Lockwood Service
Station
GOODYEAR TIRE SERVICE
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N. W. 7th Ave. and 20th St.
Phone 9464
AWNINGS
PHONE 20830
Miami Awning Co.
1724 S. W. EIGHTH STREET
the number of Hebrews who
turned aside, or back, on a road
which could not have led in any
other direction than to that of
the parental immovable body.
One must be deaf not to hear
that same "murmur" in the radi-
cal camps of today, and blind
not to see in its results the turn-
ing, in increasing numbers, of
Jewish radicals in the direction
of our nationalism.
When we last hear of the
"Ebionites," the ultra-Jewish sect
in early Christendom, they were
not popular among either Chris-
tians or Jews. The ultra-Jewish
socialist has, and deserves, more
luck, for his turning to nation-
alism is a bolder defiance of his
new faith, despite the obstinacy
with which he clings to its shad-
ow. Therein lies the merit of
radical nationalism among the
Jews. It is a form of repentance,
a search for redemption; its ef-
fort to continue the struggle in
the Jewish camp may be sincere,
but it has taken itself definitely
out of that outward stream of
c o s m o p o li tan destructiveness,
which changes while it seeming-
ly engulfs the world and may yet
turn to plague its ancestors, as
Christianity did when it became
full grown andun-Christian.
And now the riddle at the be-
ginning of the article can be
solved much clearer than it could
be done with the quoted sesqui-
pedalian verbiage. The irresisti-
ble force is a sham, to start with,
and at any rate it is centrifugal,
running away from the immova-
ble body from which it origi-
nated. When it turns back no-
body is so foolish as to consider
it irresistible. Continuous change
has yielded to the eternal veri-
ties, supreme faith has triumph-
ed over revolution, marvelous
endurance has demonstrated that
salvation lies in obedience to law,
not in suspension, repeal or de-
fiance of law. The immovable
body may seem as small, or
smaller than ever, but if we con-
sider what it has sent out, what
it has resisted and whom it had
survived, the only force which is
truly irresistible is latent with-
in it.
AUTO GLASS
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Phone 33371
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GAUTIER FUNERAL HOME
LINCOLN AMBULANCE
514 W. Flagler St. R. A. Gautier, Mgr. Phones 8421-S422



PAGE 1

lovember 30, 1928 THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Page 3 The Belly-Puncher By Erwin Muscovich The Belly-puncher, the why lid wherefore of whom shall hereinafter set forth, is to irrow a phrase recently coined r the biologists, a specimen of jiergent evolution. Just as new ivironmental conditions bring bout changes in the organisms ependent upon them, so has the American environment evolved a lew type of Jew. Like many others of that growv,i band of students to whom a Ihange of environment is neceslary if they are not to be stultiled in academic halls of learning sought to exchange, for a summer, the freshness of a Western allege for my habitual haunts in In Eastern university. Summer then found me in the Western netropolis which is graced by ic University of Chicago, devot,_ig my mornings to the study f)f books and my afternoons to their sale. My knowledge of Jujaica led me to specialize in that 5eld. I used to take the interiirban buses running out of Chicago to such Indiana communi. as Gary, Hammond and ,. siting and other outlying vil,ages. Walking down the main business street, I used to pick Dut some undoubtedly Jewish firm. I usually managed to pick jp sufficient information about ;he merchants of the vicinity to prevent my approaching some Italian in the hopes of selling him Jraetz' History of the Jews, in .ix volumes, at a wonderful bargain. I must confess that this, too, happened often enough; [though I can recall no Italian discourteous enough to laugh because he was offered some Julaica. In this fashion I met the bellyIpuncher at his best; stalked him lin his lair, as it were, by trying Ito sell him some Jewish cultural {matter in his place of business. [Be it recorded that my rather [ingenious plan of financing my[self succeeded, so that I was able [to observe him with amusement I rather than with bitterness. He may be seen any afternoon [around three o'clock, during the lull of the business day, standing, or rather, leaning, against the entrance to his store. In the (corner of his mouth a cigar, or what was one, pitched at an in[clination of some sixty degrees toward the heavens. His eyes follow the passers-by, paying particular attention to the ankles of the fair ones. His hair is thinning, and his forehead is encroaching on regions once luxuriant. One of his arms, stretched above his head, is the stay wherewith his body is supported against the impressive glass of his modern 'front windows. The other is quite unconsciously, but conspicuously, placed against his already protruding belly, slightly to one side. The fingers, radiating out from the palm, seem to embrace severally and collectively that portion of his anatomy. A thumb, inserted in a conveniently placed vest pocket, offers the support for that customary position with a minimum expenditure of energy. The hand rises in a casual wave. An acquaintance has passed. It resumes its place. The fingers play a varying and spasmodic tattoo against the belly. The bahoviorist must turn introspectionist. It is after dinner, business is fair, there is the home, the car, and of course, the wife and baby. That little investment made last year has every prospect of yielding a tremendous return. Weren't there rumors to the effect that a car line would be built right past his ,lot? Up shoots his hand—but this time with energy, with precision. His stomach is momentarily drawn in. One's visual focus is shifted from the vest to the smile which wreathes his face. The eyes are casting benevolent good will in the direction of a passing figure whose sure stride befits the neat blue uniform which clothes it. Police Captain Connor. Fine chap. Friendly. Very useful acquaintance in a pinch. As the object of the salute passes, back goes the hand to its perch, but now with a rapid tattoo, as though to awaken about his equatorial regions some sympathetic response to a weighty stimulus. It is no little honor, surely, to be singled out of the Jewish community, with a few other choice souls, as aprospect for membership in the local Masonic lodge. And he would be admitted. He would not be embarrassingly blackballed as Sid Bernstein had been six years before. The Jews had been undesirable then. Their growing economic importance in the city had rendered them much less so now. At thoughts of this triumph—the fingers make a positive caress of the stomach as in loving satisfaction. He is Jewish. Babbitt does not mean him, for while Babbitt's stupidities are his stupidities, he has a few of his own which Babbitt does not share. These arise out of the fact that his very Jewishness presents problems which he neither perceives, comprehends, nor solves. As we picture him, he is from the provinces. There he is confronted, as a result of contacts with Gentiles, with particular problems which the cloak-and-suitcr or shoe merchant of New York does not have occasion to face. Nor may we underestimate the extent of these problems in the individual and communal life of American Jewry, where blind effort takes the place of intelligent dealing. The belly-puncher is in the peculiar position of many of his kind who are assimilating American life with all its objectionable superficialities. He is a member of a race temporarily and geographically transcendent, in the sense that he has time and space attachments which, if heeded, should effectively broaden his interests and his sphere of activities. The neglect of the mental and historical factors of his origin, development, and social status leads him to over-emphasize ineffective and unimportant aspects of life in a new environment. In his desire to get away from one set of group limitations, he is placing himself directly under the sway of another set of group limitations. If they are not those of the narrow vision of the Ghetto, they are those of the narrower vision of Main Street. To the intellectual such a change, which loses the spiritual qualities of racial traditions, is abhorrent. Only the Belly-puncher could be satisfied— and he is. The ineffectiveness of his adjustments is apparent to everyone, including, one suspects, the Gentile for whose approval they are being made. They are not apparent to himself. I entered the store of such a one during the course of a visit to some small town. The proprietor was at the moment being solicited by representatives of the United Palestine Appeal. While I waited unobtrusively, he delivered a harangue on the subject of Judaism, Nationalism, Zionism et al. I %'J "Now, listen," he was saying, "what is the use of all this fuss about Zionism? We are contented here. Do you expect me to move my store to Palestine to sell pants to a bunch of old-fashioned fogies with long curls? If I've got to give money, there's the hospital we're building here. We can use all our money right here in our own town. There's no use talking old-fashioned notions about Judaism, Zionism, and that stuff to me. That's good enough for Europe where they don't know any better. I have my own notions about them. Do you want to see my flag? Here it is!" And taking a dollar bill out of his pocket, he waved it under the nose of his hearers. "That," he continued, "is what counts here, and not a lot of crazy dreams and ideas that are a hundred years behind the times." Expostulations on the part of the solicitors were cut short by a pronouncement which ended their hopes even as it did mine. "There's no use talking, gentlemen," he said impatiently, with a sort of rude finality: "You're only wasting your breath. It's getting late, and I've just reminded myself that I have to go to Shul. I've got Yahrzeit." A Conservative View of Jewish Radicalism By Peter Wiernik We have invited Mr. Wiernik, the outstanding Jewish journalist, author and thinker, whose critical attitude towards radicalism is pronounced, to give our readers a clear definition of his views. The following outline, though brief and in humorous vein, states the case squarely and does full justice to the writer.—Editor. The propounder of the query: What would happen if an irresistible force should meet an immovable body, ought to have made a study of Jewish radicalism. The answer which, according to tradition, he received, that the result would be a heterogeneous conglomeration of incomprehensible incongruities, could not satisfy anybody, not even those vaguely emotional radicals whose sfate of mind those four "jaw-breakers" come near describing, if such feat is at all possible. That irresistible force which resists everything seems to be a part of the Jewish mind, especially typical of the East-European or Russian Jew, whose rebellious spirit received a peculiar twist from contact with the Slavic mind. One would have to go back seven centuries, to the Mongol conquest and the resulting social and economic backwardness, to the presistence of autocracy and semi-socialistic landtenure down to our own times, to understand why intellectual Russia was always more radical, more susceptible to absorbing socialist doctrine than the "intelligentzia" of Western countries. Russia needed a revolution, needed it very badly, and the emigrant who is ever loath to admit that he comes from inferior surroundings, is naturally insistent that a revolution would be equally as good everywhere else. And so we have that radicalism in the form of socialism in its various ramifications, spread out over a large part of our world of activity, shading off from red communism on the extreme left, through left and right socialism, turning the nationalistic corner with the socialists-territorialists, descending, or ascending, through the left and the right wings of Poale Zionism into the camp of general Zionism, almost touching the edge of the Mizrachi movement. Even in middle class life the radical bent is clearly apparent. Those general confessions of belief or of adherence to idealistic concepts of what the world ought to be, must however not be taken very seriously. By a strange coincidence, which to my mind has a profound significance, this world, which seems to become all socialistic, is also, and has been for many centuries, almost all Christian. Only in our swiftly moving times decades will bring changes which in slowmoving generations it took almost milleniums to accomplish. As Christianity was spreading, it gradually shed its purely Jewish principles with the aid of which it conquered the world, and became almost pagan. In the present time socialism relinquishes more and more its true Marxian severity and thoroughness the nearer it gets to power or the longer it holds on to it. It is becoming capitalistic even in Moscow, and in countries which stand higher, the election of an Ebert as President of Germany or the elevation of a MacDonald to the premiership of Great Britain affected the economic structure of those countries much less than our country would be affected by the election to the presidency of a Bryan or a La Follette. The analogy is even more strange, or more significant, when we turn our attention to the origin, or originators, of the two movements. The bearer of the Marxian message for the last two generations is astonishingly similar to the propangandist of Christianity for the first two or three centuries A. D. They were both detached, if we do not want to use the harsher word, renegades, from the Jewish camp. Each of them apparently conquered the world as an irresistible force spreading outward, and each of them left behind an immovable body, of apparently small dimensions, which remained adamant to all the blandishments of a new interpretation of its hoary principles. When the spread of Christianity began to assume large proportions, the time soon came when "The Greeks began to murmur against the Hebrews." We have no exact data about Etta Beauty Shoppe SVe



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V
/ember 30, 1928
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Page 5
Down-Stream
By Mendel G. Glenn
iking I began, lower and
er did I sink; I wanted to
to run away from myself
[from the worldand then I
d her again.
was night. A night when
['s soul is torn by its own ag-
when one's heart is about
Durst with anger, grief, hu-
ition, and ... a night when
entire being is turned into
gigantic curse to be hurled
the whole world. Upon
a night I found her.
["hus it happened:
fe, a friend of mine and I,
streaming along with the
Ititudes that crowded from
theatres before midnight.
Hi of usmen who, somehow,
their hold on life, and from
leath whose feet the earth has
melted away, and who stand
a gaping chasm, an infinite,
abyss. The piece just
at the theatre stirred up hid-
emotions in our hearts and
ikened stifled, pent-up pas-
is.
JJut we were alone, compan-
(lesswe had no families, no
lies. Lonely and forsaken,
bpingly we felt in the dark-
8. Yet life called to life-
were still young!
Streaming down, down, I drag-
everything behind me. .
/e were sitting in a restau-
[it. All about us happiness and
I of life. Through the smoke-
fuds of the cigarettes we could
icern distinctly the faces of the
iers. Sparks of impassionate
ve from the eyes of one flash-
into the eyes of the other.
[But we were talking about
|And then: _
They were sitting in frtont of
drank and smoked. One look-
so familiar to me. Where
aid I have 'seen her?I did
bt care. What difference did it
ake? There she was sitting near
and drinking. .
| We were soon in the street
ain. Night swallowed us up,
ought love enwrapped us. .
In the morning, sober and
earheaded, I beheld her near
and I recognized her. It was
he.
I uttered a cry of amazement
id anguish: "Youhere!"
And she: "Me, what of it?
uch is life. You looked for me,
panted me, so you had me!"
I thought it was but a dream,
hallucination, but in a flash all
became clear to me.
"How long is it since?"
She did not let me finish, in-
errupting me:
"What's the difference?It's
11 the same now. But you want
know all, don't you? Well,
viv it is:
'How long is it since that
[ime? Let's seenten years! AH
. so simple. I married the rich
lan. My fault. Perhaps yours,
do. You ought not to have left
le city. But I never loved him.
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The world around me was so
strange, so cold, terrible. ... I
was alone: no real friend. .
Then came hehe was my hus-
band's friendhandsome, flatter-
ing and sympathetic. ... I fell.
(Of course, I know now that it
was all plotted by my husband
who wanted to get rid of me.)
Then I returned to the all-swal-
lowing-up city. Having become
used to rich life, I had to go on.
. So, there you are! Instead
of having one to pay me for not
loving him, I have many yho
pay me for not loving them. .
"And you, too, fell, and of all
womenyou picked on me!"
I left. I ran away and cursed
the world and myself.
A Shriner Talks To
His Boy
(Reprinted from "Mahi Dust")
(This touching reverie of a dad,
as he stands over the bed of his
son', ies so sincere and revealing, that
it is given space in our columns. It
is so universal in its application that
surely it is worthy of being followed
hy fathers elsewhere.)
Listen, son: I am saying this
to you as you lie asleep, one lit-
tle paw crumpled under your
check and the blond curls stick-
ily wet on your damp forehead.
I ha,ve stolen into your room
alone. Just a few minutes ago,
as I sat reading my paper in the
library, a hot, stifling wave of
remorse swept over me. I could
not resist it. Guiltily I came to
your bedside.
"These are the things I was
thinking, son: I had been cross
to you. I scolded you as you
were dressing for school because
you gave your face merely a dab
with a towel. I took you to task
for not cleaning your shoes. I
called out angrily when I found
you had thrown some of your
things on the floor.
"At breakfast I found fault,
too. You spilled things. You
gulped down your food. You
put your elbows on the table.
You" spread butter too thick on
your bread. And as you started
off to play and I made for my
train, you turned and waved a
little hand and called, 'Good-bye,
Daddy!' and I frowned, and said
in reply, 'Hold your shoulders
back.'
"Then it began all over again
in the late afternoon. As I came
up the hill road I spied you,
down on your knees, playing
marbles. There were holes in
youi stockings. I humiliated you
before your boy friends by mak-
ing ycu march ahead of me back
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mem you would be more care-
ful! Imagine that, son, from a
father! It was such stupid and
silly logic!
"Do you remember, later, when
I was reading in the library, how
you came in, softly, timidly, with
a sort of hurt, hunted look in
your eyes? When I glanced up
over my paper, impatient at the
interruption, you hesitated at the
door. "What is it you want?' I
snapped.
"You said nothing, but ran
across in one tempestuous plunge
and threw your arms around my
neck and kissed me, again and
again, and your small arms tight-
ened with an affection that God
had set blooming in your heart
and which even neglect could
not wither. And then you were
gone, pattering up the stairs.
"Well, son, it was shortly af-
terwards that my paper slipped
from my hands and a terrible
sickening fear came over me.
Suddenly I saw myself as I real-
ly was, in all my horrible sel-
fishness, and I felt sick at heart.
"What has habit been doing
to me? The habit of complain-
ing, of finding fault, or repri-
mandingall of these were my
rewards to you for being a boy.
It was not that I did not love
you; it was that I expected so
much of youth. It was measuring
you by the yardstick of my own
years.
"And there was so much that
was good, and fine and true in
your character. You did not de-
serve my treatment of you, so.
The little heart of you was as
big as the dawn itself over the
wide hills. All this was shown
by your spontaneous impulse to
rush in and kiss me good night.
Nothing else matters tonight,
son. I have come to your bed-
side in the darkness, and I have
knelt there, choking with emo-
tions, and so ashamed!
"It is a feeble atonement, 1
know you would not understand
these things if I told them to
you during your waking hours,
yet I must say what I am say-
ing. I must burn sacrificial fires,
alone, here in your bedroom,
and make free confession. And
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I have prayed God to strength-
en me in my new resolve. To-
morrow I will be a real dady!
I will chum with you, and suf-
fer when you suffer, and laugh
when you laugh. I will bite my
tongue when impatient words
come. I will keep saying as if it
were a ritual: 'He is nothing but
a boya little boy!'
"I am afraid I have visualized
you as a man. Yet as I see you
now, son, crumpled and weary
in your cot, I see that you are
still a baby. Yesterday you were
in your mother's arms, your head
on her shoulder. I have asked too
much, too much.
"Dear Boy! Dear little son!
A penitent kneels at your infant
shrine, here in the moonlight. I
kiss the little fingers and the
damp forehead."
? ? ?

If you don't feel just right.
If you can't sleep at night,
If you moan and you sigh,
If your throat feels so dry.
If you don't care to smoke,
If your food makes you choke,
If your heart doesn't beat,
If you're getting cold feet.
If your head's in a whirl,
WHY NOT MARRY THE
GIRL?
The Fish
By B. A. BOTKIN
Man, like a fish, with lungs for
gills.
Glides through space for a while
and wills
To live, but somehow fears to die
As he stares at the top of his
pool, the sky.
His fellows vanish in a bubble of
air,
And he wonders if life goes on
up there.
Yet what are fish to us on high,
Who savor their sizzling as they
fry?
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PAGE 1

V /ember 30, 1928 THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Page 5 Down-Stream By Mendel G. Glenn iking I began, lower and er did I sink; I wanted to to run away from myself [from the world—and then I d her again. was night. A night when ['s soul is torn by its own agwhen one's heart is about Durst with anger, grief, huition, and ... a night when entire being is turned into gigantic curse to be hurled the whole world. Upon a night I found her. ["hus it happened: fe, a friend of mine and I, streaming along with the Ititudes that crowded from theatres before midnight. Hi of us—men who, somehow, their hold on life, and from leath whose feet the earth has melted away, and who stand a gaping chasm, an infinite, abyss. The piece just at the theatre stirred up hidemotions in our hearts and ikened stifled, pent-up pasis. JJut we were alone, compan(less—we had no families, no lies. Lonely and forsaken, bpingly we felt in the dark8. Yet life called to lifewere still young! Streaming down, down, I drageverything behind me. /e were sitting in a restau[it. All about us happiness and I of life. Through the smokefuds of the cigarettes we could icern distinctly the faces of the iers. Sparks of impassionate ve from the eyes of one flashinto the eyes of the other. [But we were talking about |And then: They were sitting in frtont of drank and smoked. One lookso familiar to me. Where aid I have 'seen her?—I did bt care. What difference did it ake? There she was sitting near and drinking. | We were soon in the street ain. Night swallowed us up, ought love enwrapped us. In the morning, sober and earheaded, I beheld her near and I recognized her. It was he. I uttered a cry of amazement id anguish: "You—here!" And she: "Me, what of it? uch is life. You looked for me, panted me, so you had me!" I thought it was but a dream, hallucination, but in a flash all became clear to me. "How long is it since—?" She did not let me finish, inerrupting me: "What's the difference?—It's 11 the same now. But you want know all, don't you? Well, viv it is: 'How long is it since that [ime? Let's seen—ten years! AH so simple. I married the rich lan. My fault. Perhaps yours, DO. You ought not to have left le city. But I never loved him. Buy your Used Car from— RELIABLE MOTOR CORP. 5th and Lennox Miami Beach Phone Miami Beach 838 "Reliable In Every Respect" For ICE—Ue Peninsular Ice Company ICE PUnt Loraiad at 645 N. W. Uth Strart Phone 21298 or 22197 lor FREE DELIVERY The world around me was so strange, so cold, terrible. ... I was alone: no real friend. Then came he—he was my husband's friend—handsome, flattering and sympathetic. ... I fell. (Of course, I know now that it was all plotted by my husband who wanted to get rid of me.) Then I returned to the all-swallowing-up city. Having become used to rich life, I had to go on. So, there you are! Instead of having one to pay me for not loving him, I have many yho pay me for not loving them. "And you, too, fell, and of all women—you picked on me!" I left. I ran away and cursed the world and myself. A Shriner Talks To His Boy (Reprinted from "Mahi Dust") (This touching reverie of a dad, as he stands over the bed of his son', ies so sincere and revealing, that it is given space in our columns. It is so universal in its application that surely it is worthy of being followed hy fathers elsewhere.) Listen, son: I am saying this to you as you lie asleep, one little paw crumpled under your check and the blond curls stickily wet on your damp forehead. I ha,ve stolen into your room alone. Just a few minutes ago, as I sat reading my paper in the library, a hot, stifling wave of remorse swept over me. I could not resist it. Guiltily I came to your bedside. "These are the things I was thinking, son: I had been cross to you. I scolded you as you were dressing for school because you gave your face merely a dab with a towel. I took you to task for not cleaning your shoes. I called out angrily when I found you had thrown some of your things on the floor. "At breakfast I found fault, too. You spilled things. You gulped down your food. You put your elbows on the table. You" spread butter too thick on your bread. And as you started off to play and I made for my train, you turned and waved a little hand and called, 'Good-bye, Daddy!' and I frowned, and said in reply, 'Hold your shoulders back.' "Then it began all over again in the late afternoon. As I came up the hill road I spied you, down on your knees, playing marbles. There were holes in youi stockings. I humiliated you before your boy friends by making ycu march ahead of me back Life • Fire Casualty Bonds Rauzin Insurancy Agency, Inc. Phones 22565—39563 402-404 Meyer-Kiser Building Miami, Florida to the house. Stockings were expensive—and if you had to buy mem you would be more careful! Imagine that, son, from a father! It was such stupid and silly logic! "Do you remember, later, when I was reading in the library, how you came in, softly, timidly, with a sort of hurt, hunted look in your eyes? When I glanced up over my paper, impatient at the interruption, you hesitated at the door. "What is it you want?' I snapped. "You said nothing, but ran across in one tempestuous plunge and threw your arms around my neck and kissed me, again and again, and your small arms tightened with an affection that God had set blooming in your heart and which even neglect could not wither. And then you were gone, pattering up the stairs. "Well, son, it was shortly afterwards that my paper slipped from my hands and a terrible sickening fear came over me. Suddenly I saw myself as I really was, in all my horrible selfishness, and I felt sick at heart. "What has habit been doing to me? The habit of complaining, of finding fault, or reprimanding—all of these were my rewards to you for being a boy. It was not that I did not love you; it was that I expected so much of youth. It was measuring you by the yardstick of my own years. "And there was so much that was good, and fine and true in your character. You did not deserve my treatment of you, so. The little heart of you was as big as the dawn itself over the wide hills. All this was shown by your spontaneous impulse to rush in and kiss me good night. Nothing else matters tonight, son. I have come to your bedside in the darkness, and I have knelt there, choking with emotions, and so ashamed! "It is a feeble atonement, 1 know you would not understand these things if I told them to you during your waking hours, yet I must say what I am saying. I must burn sacrificial fires, alone, here in your bedroom, and make free confession. And Julius Damenstein, Inc. JEWELER The Store With a Reputation 10 W. Flagler St. Phone 4701 MIAMI, FLORIDA COAL : WOOD : COKE CHARCOAL Miami Coal Co., Inc. 1100 N. W. 21st Terrace Phone 7896 An Unusual Opportunity Is Afforded To all those who need adequate meeting quarters, or facilities for dancing, dining, etc., by the splendid meeting hall, dance and banquet hall and unsually excellent kitchen facilities of the Bay Biscayne Lodge, F. QC A. M. N. .W. Fifteenth Avenue and First Street At prices far below that obtainable for equal or even poorer facilities in Miami. For Information—Call PAUL MARTENS, Secretary Phone 3-1696 I have prayed God to strengthen me in my new resolve. Tomorrow I will be a real dady! I will chum with you, and suffer when you suffer, and laugh when you laugh. I will bite my tongue when impatient words come. I will keep saying as if it were a ritual: 'He is nothing but a boy—a little boy!' "I am afraid I have visualized you as a man. Yet as I see you now, son, crumpled and weary in your cot, I see that you are still a baby. Yesterday you were in your mother's arms, your head on her shoulder. I have asked too much, too much. "Dear Boy! Dear little son! A penitent kneels at your infant shrine, here in the moonlight. I kiss the little fingers and the damp forehead." ? ? ? • • • If you don't feel just right. If you can't sleep at night, If you moan and you sigh, If your throat feels so dry. If you don't care to smoke, If your food makes you choke, If your heart doesn't beat, If you're getting cold feet. If your head's in a whirl, WHY NOT MARRY THE GIRL? The Fish By B. A. BOTKIN Man, like a fish, with lungs for gills. Glides through space for a while and wills To live, but somehow fears to die As he stares at the top of his pool, the sky. His fellows vanish in a bubble of air, And he wonders if life goes on up there. Yet what are fish to us on high, Who savor their sizzling as they fry? "Shoes Mark the Man" fantilever For Men, Women and Children 8 McAllister Arcade Cantilevers in a Variety of Colors and Patterns Harry J. Mullady, Pres. REAL ESTATE and Business Opportunities W. L. WILLIAMS 252 Halcyon Arcade Phone 36840 In almost every organization there is an enthusiast whose mouth portrays a rosy future while somebody else does the work. HARRINGTON ELECTRIC COMPANY Electric Construction and Repairs 150 N. E. Third St. Phone 7116 jaaaiS *l8e|j isa A ZCZ uapaur) joo>f opjox i P*"'^ •!" PGHFHKSS w


Pa*_e e
THE TEWBH IlJORIDIAN
November SO.M
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Brtfc Davad
tie usual _"-__-? __g_e
__ al t* :ia: a: Ben 1 _vi_
ic f : -<:.- ':- ----
mt n be n-___aac
laa_ H ""_-___>_ -" ---
[ -ra]
___a
.,._ Aiak Biac Caw iiBar-i
-_-.--.-
__P___-}t cpctt
jack a___ a acv Teaxar-
. _js are __s-
be V. a: dc f__naaa Hit'
Bbi bb_b_ o__ :x --_-__- I
_a_ r>__: I ___Bfl__-l __ aa
ca_ vac aw _>-_: _:n._--..
____. _____ tar _hr heat nnf
d_a_e _f the twit
A haaj paaaaai r
_____ bit beta aaaaaai and
Coimc-l erf Jr_-__fc
* aaajgaj
mem
tw -sac faeaa
_
Tae F^fT1-1 _f -he
_ ;, _ _. t- .. .. ,_ : .
- t --::;-
I
Temple Israel
?.,:: .'._- : r. '-.:._- : ?
:nE ::r ~i3 ; _t
- : -- rae
_ __*_-__!-- -" i.o: _-_
~" -:r.v.--: -\- bt :.- __."_-
B r_*_n_b_r? r -t,-. _
tech-ad and amor* aaa
K-maneria wit be preache- rv
:
--., .-.- _~ laaaaj
-_- .-----, -.- i.
-
.tewiBT T
Beth David Has Cbanucca
Piav At Fairfax Theatre
______err :- _e_r
. -
; -_ -
_-i.ii _- :..
i-__ _-.-- :
The Tali:*_.iar are in il-MO-
-r.t rK__cb_ Can-"* -*rt
- '- BO-BO Si-''- W^J H
WCS-HB k f'1*! M^i
!':.- -_5__binc_c_. V_rf
- L_aaa_ _- : __c
Merer s_n: >_:___
_r._ Mr? j
yak. M-: _.'.'_. --" p-"
Mrs ta~ fcu-n."^- Mr?
aaaraf. Mn II aal Mrt
jr:: __tri Ma c I Bepv_r.
Mn i :-:
... -
i_.-."-.-: .-. _rcr">iO-c l.." :
a acaaj aansa::
-r.-r- as__5__r.: __r_ffi
ila aVaar _r"r.
- -.- -_.--.' _-nae_ _s
wen aaaaaaal a hi *c"
"_.---. ..-. H.t^..r
s_r Mi-:
tae aca_c al Vt- I ." >_nr___.-
'.-i aaaaf aW d i a any
_.-_ FT>rr
_acr or not a _aae oaffc* *
,nlii. of the aaa alone wa.
kat a tae oucreaaa ^-Baano- aac ekctaon at of
tjjc _)ob a "f" aya-c *'. be
....... i ;
aaa -
- .
net--- r_ecutr.T -x^rd

e_i_r
-
- .
-
a. ax m
----- Of
; M__nu je-^
"
- --
-
- -. ill?* taaa I
.- iMigia-rifi
Emunab Chapter, O. E.
Last laaraday raght, ProJ
Ofico* Nifk a celebrity]
Emunab Chaaaer at the f
Rite Te__ple The reft_Ur
>iekJed their chairs for the
niro? to pro tea o_Fcer5 who,
aded an a very craatable
Baa Dora Reynolds, mij]
tru-trew tor the 2tjth EhstrJ
the O E S-, aas presrrtcd7(
i beajnful gift as a toko of]
Don and apprejuauor. for I
efforu m moructaof the
then- work, reaarkable
Boency bexog aown u .
- tins instruction-
One of the surprises of
e-.en_ng wa. the announce
- -- aaoBBaj aaaaj
of the worthy aacron, Mrs.
Wolfe, who was presented wj
beautiful diamrmd encrusted
dine band by her hiab-nd.
fresh nenu were served a a
hour
Men's Oob Meets
nr a aaaaaer ^t" aoavjewt. wal
. ti'. execurr. i
_t ;_.-.

__i_ >:_-i
_r_ t:
v; r"
.-.. to
Hadassab
. C.
Cr

-.- -.: rx _--
i
- _-_k a tcerajr i -- \.
._-.: aaaaai _-: : :_1 "
be best
- -
er a
rweaa_. as -has pa-
r": r i-r.tr
HEAR and SEE
AUDREY FERRIS
CoUer. jr. and Oyde Cook
m
are of _3achelo^s',
\LSO
YITAPHONE PRESENTATIONS
AND
FOX MOVIETONE NEWS
PUT UP OR SHUT UP!
1
1
5 e~.r. :: r__i: bout the other fellow and charge
"-in -a-ih _r^'^; : r ir_r.r 5.: :j^ B_ir;." :r_r__ tbal
cojr_fjE is "ACTION I bebe\^ it. ser-.-_.-__; ny z.-~\-
er, *-r_h 5TRICTLY K05HER MEATS'and POLT
THY and have dco. =c arid __! _:r.:mue to do so as -onz
m I remam m the KOSHDl BLTCHER BUSINESS -
-_-_r_er *'bat my zr.--z.zc:: '.- ~_y sav
In my last ___Yer__5er: I said that I
^ billing to INSURE KASHRLTH by pa-.ir-z n
:^ the" zoet. :: MA5HGLACH The other kosher
butcher. have not yet seer. ::: to accept the propoatxxL
One says he _ar : _5--rd : i the others say it", some-
thmg the;.' ___.: _r:rc :r _r._: tne Jeus tr Mar- inftv:
ually should pay fat You and I well know that
Jewish people of Miami knew that a competent MA5H
GLACH under the a_per\-_aon of Rabbi Israel H Wexs-
feld was m charge of the kosher butchers that our busi-
ness would mcreaie Why pass the buck and try :. zt:
:_t :: :t tnat wav Tbere are no tuo wavs about it!
:. HAT ARI ~r-E C ~HrR BUTCHERS OF MIAMI
GOING TO DO ABOUT IT?
I cannot afford to continue paying for half-page ad-
rtisener-ts Tms mv bst calf TO INSURE
KA5HRUTH I AM WILLING TO HELP PAY FOR
A MASHGIACH. TO DO EVERYTHING NECES-
SARY ACCORDING TO JEWISH LAW THAT
RAB5I WTISFELD MAY PRESCRIBE
I CHALLENGE MY COMPETITORS TO DO
THE SA_\_E"
.'EWS OF MIAMI, WAKE UP' DEMAND
THAT YOLH BLTCHER PL\CE HI\4SELF UN-
DER THE PROPER SUPERVISION IMMEDIATE-
LY" DONT LET HIM EVADE THE ISSUE!
JEWS OF MIAMI, BE FAIR WITH YOUR-
SELVES' IVA_.IV
TENNESSEE KOSHER MAWGET MIAMI BEACH KOSHER MARKET
170 N. W. Fifth Street, Miami 329-331 Collins Avenue. Miami Beach
DA\1D GOTTFRIED. Propnetor
-FOR CHOICE KOSHER MEATS AND POULTRY SEE GOTTFRIED"
I.



PAGE 1

Pa*_e e THE TEWBH IlJORIDIAN November SO.M ANNOUNCEMENTS Brtfc Davad tie usual "-__? __g_e %  __ al t* :ia: a: Ben 1 _vi_ ic f : -<:.-• ':% %  -%  %  %  mt n be n-___aac laa_ H "•"•_-___>_ -" --•[ -ra] ___a —.,._ Aiak Biac C aw iiBar-i -_-.--.__P___-}T CPCTT jack a___ a acv Teaxar. _JS are __sbe V. a: dc f__naaa HIT' BBI BB_B_ o__ :x --_-__I _a_ r>__: —I ___Bfl__-l __ aa ca_ vac aw _>-_: _:n._--.. ____. _____ tar _hr heat nnf d_a_e _f the twit A haaj paaaaai r %  _____ bit beta aaaaaai and Coimc-l erf Jr_-__fc aaajgaj mem tw -sac faeaa %  Tae F^fT 1 1 %  _f -he ;, _:___ _r._ Mr? j yak. M-: _.'.'_. —--" p-" Mrs ta~ fcu-n."^Mr? aaaraf. Mn II aal Mrt • jr:: __tri Ma c I Bepv_r. Mn i :-: ... i_—.%  %  "-.-: .-. _rcr">iO-c L.." : a acaaj aansa:: -r. -ras__5__r.: __r_ffi ila aVaar _r"r. ••-.%  -_.--.' _-nae_ _s •wen aaaaaaal a hi *c" "_ %  •.---•. %  ..-. • %  H. t ^ ..r s_r Mi-: tae aca_c al VtI ." >_nr___.'.-i aaaaf aW d i a any %  _.-£_ FT>rr •_acr or not a _aae oaffc* ,nlii. of the aaa alone wa. kat a tae oucreaaa iekJed their chairs for the niro? to pro tea o_Fcer5 who, aded an a very craatable Baa Dora Reynolds, mij] •tru-trew tor the 2tjth EhstrJ the O E S-, aas presrrtcd7( i beajnful gift as a toko of] Don and apprejuauor. for I efforu m moructaof the thenwork, reaarkable Boency bexog aown u tins instructionOne of the surprises of e-.en_ng wa. the announce -•aaoBBaj aaaaj of the worthy aacron, Mrs. %  Wolfe, who was presented wj beautiful diamrmd encrusted dine band by her hiab-nd. fresh nenu were served a a hour Men's Oob Meets nr a aaaaaer ^t" aoavjewt. wal ti'. execurr. i _t ;•_.-•. __i_ >:_-i _r_ t: v; r" .-.. to Hadassab C. Cr -.-.: rx _-i _-_k a t c erajr i -\. ._-.: aaaaai _-: %  : :_1 be best er a rweaa_£. as -has pa% %  r": r i-r.tr HEAR and SEE AUDREY FERRIS CoUer. jr. and Oyde Cook m are of _3achelo^s' \LSO YITAPHONE PRESENTATIONS AND FOX MOVIETONE NEWS PUT UP OR SHUT UP! 1 1 5 e~.r. :: r__i: bout the other fellow and charge "-in -a-ih _r^'^; : r ir_r.r 5.: :j^€ B_ir;." :r_r__ tbal cojr_fjE is "ACTION I bebe\^ IT. ser-.-_.-__; ny z.-~\er, *-r_h 5TRICTLY K05HER MEATS'and POLT THY and have dco. =c arid •__! _:r.:mue to do so as -onz M I remam m the KOSHDl BLTCHER BUSINESS -_-_r_er *'bat my zr.--z.zc:: '.-• ~_y sav In my last ___Yer__5er: I said that I ^ billing to INSURE KASHRLTH by pa-.ir-z n :^ the" ZOET. :: MA5HGLACH The other kosher butcher. have not yet seer. ::: to accept the propoatxxL One says he _ar : _5--rd : i the others say it", somethmg the;.' ___.: _r:rc :r _r._: tne Jeus tr Mar inftv: ually should pay fat You and I well know that Jewish people of Miami knew that a competent MA5H GLACH under the a_per\-_aon of Rabbi Israel H Wexsfeld was m charge of the kosher butchers that our business would mcreaie Why pass the buck and try :. zt: :_t :: :t tnat wav Tbere are no tuo wavs about it! :•. HAT ARI ~r-E C ~HrR BUTCHERS OF MIAMI GOING TO DO ABOUT IT? I cannot afford to continue paying for half-page adrtisener-ts Tms %  mv bst calf TO INSURE KA5HRUTH I AM WILLING TO HELP PAY FOR A MASHGIACH. TO DO EVERYTHING NECESSARY ACCORDING TO JEWISH LAW THAT RAB5I WTISFELD MAY PRESCRIBE I CHALLENGE MY COMPETITORS TO DO THE SA_\_E" .'EWS OF MIAMI, WAKE UP' DEMAND THAT YOLH BLTCHER PL\CE HI\4SELF UNDER THE PROPER SUPERVISION IMMEDIATELY" DONT LET HIM EVADE THE ISSUE! JEWS OF MIAMI, BE FAIR WITH YOURSELVES' IVA_.IV TENNESSEE KOSHER MAWGET MIAMI BEACH KOSHER MARKET 170 N. W. Fifth Street, Miami 329-331 Collins Avenue. Miami Beach DA\1D GOTTFRIED. Propnetor -FOR CHOICE KOSHER MEATS AND POULTRY SEE GOTTFRIED" I.


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1928
DEC



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1928 DEC


ISSUE(S)
MISSING
OR
NOT AVAILABLE
1928
DEC 07-14, 28;



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ISSUE(S) MISSING OR NOT AVAILABLE 1928 DEC 07-14, 28;



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wJewish Fiaridliiai in
-No. 10
MIAMI, FLORIDA, DECEMBER 21, 1928
Price 5 Cents
BETH DAVID CHOOSES RABBI.
Unanimous Call Extended
JEWISH BOY
COMMENDED
Performances Praised
4
t Thursday night
8 an unusual scene in
y rooms of Beth Da-
jgregation when at a
eeting of the general
hip of the entire con-
Bi, a unanimous call
tended to Rabbi I.
Wi to the Rabbinate of
Beth Bvid. Because of con-
st it '.;: Aal requirements a se-
Hlot was taken and
Hdlot cast was in favor
ding the call to Rabbi
vV'''<: who has occupied
the Bit of Beth David for
the Kgt fourteen weeks.
bi PVeisfeld was sent for
r being advised that
regation desired him
bbi and that he had
nimously chosen for
of three years from
1st 1929, agreed-to
d pledged his efforts
make a "Bigger and
eth David."
a number of lauda-
arks were made by
hen, John Wolf, P.
k, Lewis Brown, Har-
s, and others present
the progress made
e Rabbi's arrival in
nd the remarkable
pients in the Talmud
[Varan.
Weisfeld was born in
r m, where he attended
Knd high schools, sub-
By moving to Brook-
Here his father is en-
~Hn the wholesale hat
Mb. He is a graduate
pRabbi Isaac Elchanan
fical Seminary which
dedicated the first of
of college buildings
five million dollar
be erected within the
years. While attend-
Yeshiva and the Uni-
of the City of New
ibbi Weisfeld was
i v WISH FRAT
To Hold Dance
Pi Kappa Mu, Jewish
jity at the University
pii is lending every ef-
make the "Big" Dance,
is to take the limelight
per 25, at the City
Big Success.
;hing is being done to
pleasure and comfort
e who will be present,
ly the ballroom but the
City Club building will
ed over to the guests
e occasion, which in-
the card rooms for
and other games.
e" Farr's Freshmen will
ih dance music and no-
Other attractions will
University Melody
[well known radio artists
le Glee Club, which has
fcly returned from their
[trip extended along the
coast of Florida,
purpose of the dance is
President of the Student body
for three years during which
time while Editor of the stu-
dent publication "Hadenu,"
he was the English Editor of
the "For Our Country," the
offical Mizrachi Zionist publi-
cation. He was also the chair-
man and an active member of
the debating team which went
to Chicago to debate with the
Chicago Theological Semin-
ary. The team led by Rabbi
Weisfeld was victorious receiv-
ing the unanimous decision of
the judges .presided over by
Judge Harry Fisher.
The Rabbi is at the present
time on the staff of the Day,
one of the largest Jewish pub-
lication in the world, contrib-
uting articles in English from
time to time, and is book re-
viewer for the Vanguard, a
leading literary magazine in
New York.
While in Miami he organ-
ized the Talmud Torah which
now has five classes in daily
session, including a class de-
voted to Yiddish; an adult
Bible class; a Sunday School
Teachers Training class, a
Sunday School Teachers
course in Biblical and post-
Biblical history, a Saturday
afternoon class where por-
tions of the Talmud are being
taught in the original; a Bar
Mitzva Boy's Breakfast Club
meeting every Sunday morn-
ing, and a large number of
'other activities.
Because of his duties and
activities the Rabbi has been
unable to find time for his
favorite diversions, tennis and
golf.
Rabbi Weisfeld is engaged
to Miss Lillian Rosen of To-
ronto, a playmate of child-
hood days and is expected to
be married in the early
spring.
BNAI BRITH
TO CELEBRATE
TO ELECT
Meeting To Be Held
The local chapter of Bnai
Brith will hold what is ex-
pected to be one of the most
important meetings of the
year on Thursday evening,
December 27 at the Elks Club
on East Flagler street when
the annual nomination and
election of officers for the
coming year will be held. Be-
cause of the fact that the na-
tional headquarters of Bnai
Brith have been counting on
real work being shown by the
local chapter during .the win-
ter season when Ben Briths
from all over the country will
be visiting Miami, the active
members of the local Sholom
Lodge are more than anxious
to elect those members to of-
fice who may be depended on
to raise funds to provide for
the payment of furnishings
for the new fraternity house,
which has just been occupied.
V'Aad HaKashruth
Is Being Formed
Last Wednesday night the
initial meeting of an organi-
zation to be known as the
"V'Aad HaKashruth" was
held and the following were
appointed a committee to de-
vise way and means of con-
ducting the organization. Mr.
A. L. Homa, Nathan Adelman.
John Wolf, Henry Seitlin, M.
Abrams. The purpose of the
organization will be to insure
that kosher meats or other
kosher food products being
sold will be absolutely kosher
MEN'S CLUB TO HOLD
NEW YEAR'S AFFAIR
Once again a Jewish boy
has come to the fore at the
University of Miami, this
time by "putting over" the
show at the Miami High
School building on Wednes-
day night. The University
Glee Club and band showed its
wares for the first time and
received the commendation of
the musical critics of the city
for the manner in which it
was put over, the Herald say-
ing it was "was clicking alone;
with professional precision."
A program was presented
featuring the Melody Boys, in
which Aaron Farr was at the
piano playing a number of his
own compositions, and the
three boys stopped the show
time and again.
One of the numbers that
went over with a bang was
the chorus finale of the first
part "Goin' Home." Individ-
ual stars led by Aaron Farr,
were, Bob Stanton, Walt
Svehla, being the three who
.compose the Melody Trio, and
Greeny Greenfield, one of the
Minstrel end men. Irving Lau-
ton was time and again the re-
cipient of continued applause
for his vocal presentations.
The Farr's Freshman, a
band of ten pieces gave just
the touch to the entire pro-
gram that was needed to
round out an evening of well
thought out enjoyment, the
original burlesque on Uncle
Tom's Cabin being especially
amusing.
Aaron is not new in the
field of music being the au-
thor of a large number of col-
lege and school songs, and a
number of highly praised jazz
compositions and ballads. He
is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Harry H. Farr, for a number
of years residents of Miami.
for active and effective work.
A very active season of both
constructive and entertaining
work has been planned and
earnest and sincere workers
are needed.
All members are urged to
attend this meeting and help
shape the destinies of the lo-
cal Bnai Brith Lodge for the
future.
Dr. Samuel Aronowitz is
the present President of the
Lodge.
Big Events Planned
The Mens Club of Miami
will begin the 1929 season
with a real affair outrivalig
the splendid New Years Eve
banquet held last year.
Those that attened the af-
fair last year know and re-
member the good time had by
all. The Committee this year
plans if possible to make a
bigger and better affair.
There will be a twelve course
banquet, and plenty to drink.
No extra charges of any kind
will be made for crushed ice,
ginger ale, white rock or for
anything else. A complete
musical comedy show has
been engaged for the event
and will be supplemented by
individual vaudville acts dur-
ing the evening. The banquet
will begin at 8:30 p. m. and
will last until 2:30 in the
morning. Noisemakers and
everything necessary for a
real good time will be provid-
ed. .
The affair will be held at
the Biscayne-Collins hotel at
Miami Beach and will be a
strictly kosher catered meal
provided by the Jacobs Fam-
ily.
During the meal dancing
will go on, a band of the finest
having been provided for the
evening.
Because of the lack of space
only a limited number of re-
servations can be made, and
all are asked to make their re-
servations within the next few
days to insure themselves be-
ing at the event of the year.
FLAGLER STREET
MERCHANT DIES
NOVEL EVENT FIRST
TIME IN MIAMI
Commits Suicide
Louis Louis 45 years of age,
a member of the firm of A.
Louis & Son, prominent cloth-
iers of Miami, shot and killed
himself on Monday last at the
home of his uncle, Simon Cre-
ole, on S. W. 11th Avenue.
Mr. Louis was a member of
Temple Israel, James Carnell
Lodge of Masons, a former
commander of Battery B of
the National Guard Unit in
Key West in 1913 and 1914,
the Elks, Scottish Rite and
Mahi Temple of the Shriners,
was a graduate of the Ossin-
ing on the Hudson Military
Academy, had been in splen-
did health, and according to
friends in good financial shape
and no reason or motive can
be found for the act.
The funeral took place from
the W. H. Combs Funeral
Home where a large number
of friends who gathered to
pay pay their last respects
listened to the funeral serv-
ices as read by Rabbi Dr. Ja-
cob H. Kaplan of Temple Is-
rael. At the grave in Wood-
lawn Park cemetery, the de-
parted was accorded a Mason-
ic funeral. He leaves surviving
him his widow, Mrs. Rose
Louis, two daughters, Barbara
and Lois, and a son, Paul, his
parents Mr. and Mrs. A. Louis
of Miami, and three sisters.
An event rarely seen in Mi-
ami was witnessed at the ves-
try rooms of Beth David Sy-
nagogue last Fridgv night
and Saturday morning whtm
the Sheva Brochos of Mr. and
Mrs. Stillman of Borough
Park, New York, was cele-
ebrated. The couple are
spending their honeymoon in
Miami and being religious re-
quested that they be per-
mitted to celebrate the "Sheva
Brochos" in accordance with
tradition at the Synagogue
which was done. Rabbi Is-
rael H. Weisfeld conducted the
ceremony which was witness-
ed by a number of prominent
Miamians. Refreshments were
served and a number of ad-
dresses were made by Rabbi
Israel H. Weisfeld. Isador Co-
hen, Lewis Brown, Jake
Brown, Jos. M. Fine, Mrs. J,
Louis Schocket, Mrs. Jos. M#
Fine, Mrs. Lewis Brown,
Mrs. Isidor Cohen and Mrs,
Louis Heiman who congratul-
ated the couple and entended
them a welcome to Florida.
After the addresses Mr. Still-
man who possesses a fine ten-
or voice sang several appro-
priate selections. The cere-
mony was then conductad by
.Rabbi Weisfeld and at a late
hour the assemblage depart-
ed. In the words of Jake
Brown "I never had seen any-
thing like this before, and I
really enjoyed it."
in accordance with dietary
laws. The local butchers,
ritual slaughterers, delicates-
sen stores and restaurants in
Greater Miami will be placed
under the supervision of the
Organization who have asked
Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld of
Beth David to act as their
guide in all matters relating
to inspection of meats and
general supervision relating to
the observance of the dietary
laws. It will be the object of
the organization to introduce
and have passed laws in the
next Legislature of the State
of Florida similar to the laws
passed in New York, Mary-
land, Virginia, California,
Ohio, Michigan and other
States, known as "The Kosher
Laws." The next meeting
will be held next Wednesday
night at which time all butch-
ers and "shochtim" have been
invited to be present.



PAGE 1

• • wJewish Fiaridliiai in -No. 10 MIAMI, FLORIDA, DECEMBER 21, 1928 Price 5 Cents BETH DAVID CHOOSES RABBI. Unanimous Call Extended JEWISH BOY COMMENDED Performances Praised 4 t Thursday night 8 an unusual scene in y rooms of Beth Dajgregation when at a eeting of the general hip of the entire conBi, a unanimous call %  tended to Rabbi I. Wi %  to the Rabbinate of Beth Bvid. Because of const it '.;: %  Aal requirements a seHlot was taken and Hdlot cast was in favor %  ding the call to Rabbi vV % %  '<: %  who has occupied the Bit of Beth David for the Kgt fourteen weeks. bi PVeisfeld was sent for r being advised that regation desired him bbi and that he had nimously chosen for of three years from 1st 1929, agreed-to d pledged his efforts make a "Bigger and eth David." a number of laudaarks were made by hen, John Wolf, P. k, Lewis Brown, Hars, and others present the progress made e Rabbi's arrival in nd the remarkable %  pients in the Talmud [Varan. %  Weisfeld was born in r m, where he attended Knd high schools, subBy moving to BrookHere his father is en~Hn the wholesale hat MB. He is a graduate pRabbi Isaac Elchanan fical Seminary which dedicated the first of of college buildings five million dollar be erected within the years. While attendYeshiva and the Uniof the City of New ibbi Weisfeld was i v WISH FRAT To Hold Dance Pi Kappa Mu, Jewish jity at the University pii is lending every efmake the "Big" Dance, is to take the limelight per 25, at the City Big Success. ;hing is being done to pleasure and comfort e who will be present, ly the ballroom but the City Club building will ed over to the guests e occasion, which inthe card rooms for and other games. e" Farr's Freshmen will ih dance music and noOther attractions will University Melody [well known radio artists le Glee Club, which has fcly returned from their [trip extended along the coast of Florida, purpose of the dance is President of the Student body for three years during which time while Editor of the student publication "Hadenu," he was the English Editor of the "For Our Country," the offical Mizrachi Zionist publication. He was also the chairman and an active member of the debating team which went to Chicago to debate with the Chicago Theological Seminary. The team led by Rabbi Weisfeld was victorious receiving the unanimous decision of the judges .presided over by Judge Harry Fisher. The Rabbi is at the present time on the staff of the Day, one of the largest Jewish publication in the world, contributing articles in English from time to time, and is book reviewer for the Vanguard, a leading literary magazine in New York. While in Miami he organized the Talmud Torah which now has five classes in daily session, including a class devoted to Yiddish; an adult Bible class; a Sunday School Teachers Training class, a Sunday School Teachers course in Biblical and postBiblical history, a Saturday afternoon class where portions of the Talmud are being taught in the original; a Bar Mitzva Boy's Breakfast Club meeting every Sunday morning, and a large number of 'other activities. Because of his duties and activities the Rabbi has been unable to find time for his favorite diversions, tennis and golf. Rabbi Weisfeld is engaged to Miss Lillian Rosen of Toronto, a playmate of childhood days and is expected to be married in the early spring. BNAI BRITH TO CELEBRATE TO ELECT Meeting To Be Held The local chapter of Bnai Brith will hold what is expected to be one of the most important meetings of the year on Thursday evening, December 27 at the Elks Club on East Flagler street when the annual nomination and election of officers for the coming year will be held. Because of the fact that the national headquarters of Bnai Brith have been counting on real work being shown by the local chapter during .the winter season when Ben Briths from all over the country will be visiting Miami, the active members of the local Sholom Lodge are more than anxious to elect those members to office who may be depended on to raise funds to provide for the payment of furnishings for the new fraternity house, which has just been occupied. V'Aad HaKashruth Is Being Formed Last Wednesday night the initial meeting of an organization to be known as the "V'Aad HaKashruth" was held and the following were appointed a committee to devise way and means of conducting the organization. Mr. A. L. Homa, Nathan Adelman. John Wolf, Henry Seitlin, M. Abrams. The purpose of the organization will be to insure that kosher meats or other kosher food products being sold will be absolutely kosher MEN'S CLUB TO HOLD NEW YEAR'S AFFAIR Once again a Jewish boy has come to the fore at the University of Miami, this time by "putting over" the show at the Miami High School building on Wednesday night. The University Glee Club and band showed its wares for the first time and received the commendation of the musical critics of the city for the manner in which it was put over, the Herald saying it was "was clicking alone; with professional precision." A program was presented featuring the Melody Boys, in which Aaron Farr was at the piano playing a number of his own compositions, and the three boys stopped the show time and again. One of the numbers that went over with a bang was the chorus finale of the first part "Goin' Home." Individual stars led by Aaron Farr, were, Bob Stanton, Walt Svehla, being the three who .compose the Melody Trio, and Greeny Greenfield, one of the Minstrel end men. Irving Lauton was time and again the recipient of continued applause for his vocal presentations. The Farr's Freshman, a band of ten pieces gave just the touch to the entire program that was needed to round out an evening of well thought out enjoyment, the original burlesque on Uncle Tom's Cabin being especially amusing. Aaron is not new in the field of music being the author of a large number of college and school songs, and a number of highly praised jazz compositions and ballads. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry H. Farr, for a number of years residents of Miami. for active and effective work. A very active season of both constructive and entertaining work has been planned and earnest and sincere workers are needed. All members are urged to attend this meeting and help shape the destinies of the local Bnai Brith Lodge for the future. Dr. Samuel Aronowitz is the present President of the Lodge. Big Events Planned The Mens Club of Miami will begin the 1929 season with a real affair outrivalig the splendid New Years Eve banquet held last year. Those that attened the affair last year know and remember the good time had by all. The Committee this year plans if possible to make a bigger and better affair. There will be a twelve course banquet, and plenty to drink. No extra charges of any kind will be made for crushed ice, ginger ale, white rock or for anything else. A complete musical comedy show has been engaged for the event and will be supplemented by individual vaudville acts during the evening. The banquet will begin at 8:30 p. m. and will last until 2:30 in the morning. Noisemakers and everything necessary for a real good time will be provided. The affair will be held at the Biscayne-Collins hotel at Miami Beach and will be a strictly kosher catered meal provided by the Jacobs Family. During the meal dancing will go on, a band of the finest having been provided for the evening. Because of the lack of space only a limited number of reservations can be made, and all are asked to make their reservations within the next few days to insure themselves being at the event of the year. FLAGLER STREET MERCHANT DIES NOVEL EVENT FIRST TIME IN MIAMI Commits Suicide Louis Louis 45 years of age, a member of the firm of A. Louis & Son, prominent clothiers of Miami, shot and killed himself on Monday last at the home of his uncle, Simon Creole, on S. W. 11th Avenue. Mr. Louis was a member of Temple Israel, James Carnell Lodge of Masons, a former commander of Battery B of the National Guard Unit in Key West in 1913 and 1914, the Elks, Scottish Rite and Mahi Temple of the Shriners, was a graduate of the Ossining on the Hudson Military Academy, had been in splendid health, and according to friends in good financial shape and no reason or motive can be found for the act. The funeral took place from the W. H. Combs Funeral Home where a large number of friends who gathered to pay pay their last respects listened to the funeral services as read by Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan of Temple Israel. At the grave in Woodlawn Park cemetery, the departed was accorded a Masonic funeral. He leaves surviving him his widow, Mrs. Rose Louis, two daughters, Barbara and Lois, and a son, Paul, his parents Mr. and Mrs. A. Louis of Miami, and three sisters. An event rarely seen in Miami was witnessed at the vestry rooms of Beth David Synagogue last Fridgv night and Saturday morning whtm the Sheva Brochos of Mr. and Mrs. Stillman of Borough Park, New York, was celeebrated. The couple are spending their honeymoon in Miami and being religious requested that they be permitted to celebrate the "Sheva Brochos" in accordance with tradition at the Synagogue which was done. Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld conducted the ceremony which was witnessed by a number of prominent Miamians. Refreshments were served and a number of addresses were made by Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld. Isador Cohen, Lewis Brown, Jake Brown, Jos. M. Fine, Mrs. J, Louis Schocket, Mrs. Jos. M# Fine, Mrs. Lewis Brown, Mrs. Isidor Cohen and Mrs, Louis Heiman who congratulated the couple and entended them a welcome to Florida. After the addresses Mr. Stillman who possesses a fine tenor voice sang several appropriate selections. The ceremony was then conductad by .Rabbi Weisfeld and at a late hour the assemblage departed. In the words of Jake Brown "I never had seen anything like this before, and I really enjoyed it." in accordance with dietary laws. The local butchers, ritual slaughterers, delicatessen stores and restaurants in Greater Miami will be placed under the supervision of the Organization who have asked Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld of Beth David to act as their guide in all matters relating to inspection of meats and general supervision relating to the observance of the dietary laws. It will be the object of the organization to introduce and have passed laws in the next Legislature of the State of Florida similar to the laws passed in New York, Maryland, Virginia, California, Ohio, Michigan and other States, known as "The Kosher Laws." The next meeting will be held next Wednesday night at which time all butchers and "shochtim" have been invited to be present.


Page 2
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
December 21, 1928
!!
i
I


j

THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
A Weekly Newspaper Published At Miami, Florida
By The Jewish Flondun Publishing Company
253 Halcyon Arcade
6
Phone 684'
EDITORIAL STAFF
. J LOUIS SHOCHET I LASI BEN DOROM
A CHOCHOM
A N A^HE?
EDITORIAL
Less though has been given
by Jewish educators to the re-
ligious training of the young
girl than to 'any other pha*e
of Jewish life. It ha? been
taken for granted since time
immemorial that the girl will
do as her parents tell her and
will absorb whatever she may
need from her environment.
No doubt, such supposi:
wer.- on the whole justifiable
in Jewish communities up tiii
the period of the emancipation
and enlightenment. Life has
changed completely in this
century, particularly for wo-
men. In the first place,
all civilized countries, girls
must attend the secular
schools u well as the boys.
They therefore come into
tact with children of other
faiths: they study subjects
that require explanation be-
fore a reconciliation with tra-
ditional religion can be
brought about Being alert
and intelligent, they ask ques-
tions, they want to know the
reason for observances, they
demand explanations of truths
btt -d on faith. There is no
harm in this attitude. There
i harm rather in foolish par-
ent- and educators trying to
suppress the inquiring mind.
Th<- intellectual emancipation
of the girl merely means an
added responsibility for the
religious teacher and the par-
ents. Just ai the age of self-
made men is passing away, so
is the age of untrained par-
ent- who relied wholly on in-
stinct and tradition. Too con-
temptible for words is the
man who can still say that it
were better for girls not to
come into contact with the
world, and not to receive a
thorough secular training. No
doubt a girl without mind or
will makes a pliant instrument
for the domineering parent or
egocentric husband; but we
who are devoted to the cause
of our faith, who want to see
our noble women working side
by side with noble men, con-
sider brainless and spineless
individuals a handicap, if not
an actual menace to the wel-
fare of mankind. Eugenists
shout from the housetops the
necessity of having intelligent
men and women as the par-
ent* of the future generation.
Bertrand Russell* declares:
"One generation of fearless
Women could transform the
World by bringing into it a
generation of fearless chil-
dren, not contorted into un-
natural shapes, but straight
and candid, generous, affec-
tionate, and free." Bernard
Shaw in Back to Methuslah
describes his conception of
the millennium as a time when
the world will be inhabited
only by superior men and wo-
men of intelligence and wis-
dom. Can inferior women
bear superior sons and
daughters? The wry idea is
preposterous. We should re-
joice when we find a girl with
an active and an inquiring
mind. It is our duty a* pai-
- and educators to develop
through reason her imagina-
tion and faith, and to streng-
then her will in the cause of
her people. When we fail, we
should seek the fault in our-
selves. Have we been consist-
ent ir. belief and observance?
Have we reconsidered our cul-
ture in the light of modem
science? Ha* our knowledge
kept pace with the expansion
: the times 1 Y nth is keen
at detecting inconsistencies,
incongruities, and hypocrisies.
Life ha* also been changed
economically for women. For-
merly she wa* supported by
her father and then by her
husband. Wretched indeed
was the lot of the daughter
or wife of a poverty-stricken
man. She did not even dare
*o seek for work for fear of
losing caste in the marriage
market or in the social world.
Nowadays conditions are en-
tirely different. The girl who
not work is the excep-
tion. Even wealthy girls seek
some means of occupation un-
til they marry, so that they
may not be wholly dependent
upon their fathers, and also
that they may avoid the stig-
ma of idleness. Besides, a
little experience in the busi-
ness or professional world is
always valuable, particularly
to the prospective wife and
mother. A woman who has
successfully held down a job
of any kind, cannot be an
utter fool and simpleton. She
realizes that every situation
has its problems which must
be met intelligently. She ap-
plies her experience to the
problems that confront her in
married life. Everyone must
admit that the problems that
she must face are far more
complex than those her grand-
mother had to contend with.
The vast majority of girls,
however, must work because
they must contribute to the
family income besides sup-
porting themselves. Such girls
cannot even consider a career.
They cannot seek self-expres-
sion. They must turn to what-
ever work will give them an
immediate and secure income.
Then again, an ever-increas-
ing number of married wo-
men must work if they, their
husbands, and their families
are to live in decency, not to
speak of comfort. Young men
who have just entered upon a
business or professional ca-
reer do not earn a living. The
girl, rather than wait five or
ten years, prefers to marry
while she is young, even tho
she must keep on working. Of
course, we are not talking
about well dowered girls. Even
they, when their own hard-
earned money or that of their
fathers has been lost by the
husband inexperienced in busi-
ness or investment, find it
necessary to seek work.
This world is no place for
the inefficient, the shiftless,
the lazy, and the maladjusted.
The girl who finds herself
united for life to one of these
unfortunate types, must put
her shoulder to the wheel, or
else be content to live on a
houseboat in the East River.
Since nine woman out of ten
will find it necessary to work
during part of their lives and
sometimes all of their lives,
thev must be prepared to earn
a livelihood. Naturally, girls
who are independent finan-
cially, who contribute to the
maintenance of the home, can-
not be treated like girls who
are so much like household
furniture. They cannot be ex-
pected to be so docile in belief
and action as the girl who has
never had to make her way in
the world.
It is of no use to deplore
woman's intellectual and eco-
nomic independence. It is the
it of conditions. It must
be taken into consideration
when educators are formulat-
ing ideals and planning pro-
grams of work and study. Wo-
man needs religion more than
ever before. Without the faith
and comfort of renewed spirit-
ual energy that true religion
offers the weary and the
heavy-hearted, woman must
cope with a task that at pres-
ent in an age of shifting
standards and conflicting
ideals, is well night insup-
erable. Can we blame the mo-
dern woman for rejecting the
dry husks that have been cast
before her? What have most
Jewish girls been taught ? the
reading of a few prayers? a
few Biblical stories? some su-
perstitions of an East Europ-
ean ghetto? Are these the
well-springs that will furnish
waters of health for the body
of refreshment for the mind.
of consolation and stimulation
for the spirit? Will these un-
related bits of information
teach them to solve the prob-
lems of the modern working
girl both when she is single
and when she is married?
The implication of the situa-
tion is clear. Our girls must
receive a careful religious
training. The spiritual values
of religion must be empha-
sized. A Bible hour class or
a Sunday school class is not
sufficient. We must not rely
on that little that the girls
can absorb from the atmos-
phere of the home. Few homes
anyhow are true sanctuaries
of pity and peace, and the out-
side distractions are too nu-
merous and powerful.
When is the necessity for
religious training most ur-
gent ? In the adolescent period.
The girl in her teens is either
studying or working. Her in-
tellect has grown more active;
her emotional nature has un-
dergone profund changes. At
an understanding age she be-
gins the study of world his-
tory and literature and comes
into conscious contact with
people of widely varying
views. The conceptions she
Our veins are subways in
which the spectres of human
passion walk Btealthily on
curled toes and with masked
faces.

All people may be equal be-
fore the law but not before the
mother-in-law.
Owe ten dollars and you're
a dead-beat: owe ten thous-
and and you're a financier.
It's a surpise party if every-
body has a good time.
A girl in love is often un-
able to express her thoughts,
but it's different after mar-
riage.
*
You can find all kinds o*
I eople in the world except the
girl who ever really walker
home from a ride.
*
No man can go completely
to the dogs without a great
deal of determination.
*
Most wives hopes their
daughters will marry more
wisely than their "mothers
did.
*
Next to making a sale the
most pleasant experience i*
collecting the money.
*
No idea is worth much un-
less a first class man is back
of it.
*
Most of us fear our friends
more than our enemies.
*
No expression of the human
spirit is quite so fine as the
commendation of good work
while success is still in the dis-
tance.
*
If experience is a good
teacher some of us ought to be
a lot brighter by this time
than we appear to be.
*
God bless bridge! When
people get tired of chatting
about this and that, someone
suggests the game and those
of us who do not plav are re-
leased to our reading. Manv
a book have I read when
standing by at such times
Every night I get down on my
knees and pray for the repose
of the soul of the man who in-
vented bridge. (Dreier)
has gained in childhood and
has absorbed from the home
environment are now put to
the test. These childish ideas
are obviously inadequate
They must be reformulated to
Every wife seems to think
her husband should be able to
combine the qualities of an ad-
venturer and a saint, i

Nothing ever pleases a mar-
ried man as much a* teiiing
him he doesn't look like a
married man.

I don"t understand these
people who put up an intoler-
ant fight for tolerance.

It's a long time since we've
seen a robust doctor.
,
Money won't buy even-
thing but it flavors even-
thing.

In expecting too much from
life we often miss some of the
sweetest joys.
*
Often it would be better if
the speaker was reprimanded
for dullness instead of rebuk-
ing the audience for inatten-
tion.

"Mary," said the mistress
of the house, "I am going to
lie down on the sette for half
an hour. Call me at 5 o'clock
if I happen to drop off. will
you ?'*
Some time later she woke
up suddenly as the clock was
striking. It was 6.
"Mary!*' she cried, "why
didn't you call me?"
Mary was very indignant.
"But, ma'am," she began,
"you distinctly asked me to
call you if you dropped off,
and when I looked in at 5 you
hadn't droped off at all. You
were lying in the same place,
fast asleep.
The Sabbath School teach-
er, after taking her cla*s of
little ones through the Syna-
gogue and telling them of all
the holy things and places, re-
turned .to the class room and
asked. "What is the Ark?" A
bright little fellow raised his
hand. "Well?" "Please teach-
er, the ark is the place where
they keep all the animals."

It was Meyer Lefkovitch's
first morning as a farm hand.
As he walked out to the barn
with the owner of the farm,
the latter said to him:
"Now, Meyer, I'll show you
how to milk a cow. And after
you've learned it will be one
of your duties every day."
"But," asked the boy, had-
n't I better learn to milk a
calf first?"__________________
meet the demands of the ac-
tive and growing adolescent
mind.
I have spoken to more than
a hundred Jewish girls on the
(continued on page 5)



PAGE 1

Page 2 THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN December 21, 1928 !! i I j %  THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN A Weekly Newspaper Published At Miami, Florida By The Jewish Flondun Publishing Company 253 Halcyon Arcade 6 Phone •684' EDITORIAL STAFF J LOUIS SHOCHET I LASI BEN DOROM A CHOCHOM A N A^HE? EDITORIAL Less though has been given by Jewish educators to the religious training of the young girl than to 'any other pha*e of Jewish life. It ha? been taken for granted since time immemorial that the girl will do as her parents tell her and will absorb whatever she may need from her environment. No doubt, such supposi: wer.on the whole justifiable in Jewish communities up tiii the period of the emancipation and enlightenment. Life has changed completely in this century, particularly for women. In the first place, all civilized countries, girls must attend the secular schools u well as the boys. They therefore come into tact with children of other faiths: they study subjects that require explanation before a reconciliation with traditional religion can be brought about Being alert and intelligent, they ask questions, they want to know the reason for observances, they demand explanations of truths btt -d on faith. There is no harm in this attitude. There i harm rather in foolish parentand educators trying to suppress the inquiring mind. Th

lecember 21, 1928
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
PgS3
The London Ghetto
By BESSIE GENN
With Gabriel Costa, the
riter, who is known th rough -
it London as the "Ghetto
lild,"" and designated by the
|te Zangwill as his successor
portraying the spirit of
e Ghetto, I made my first
tsit to the famous "East
|nd" of London. It seemed a
rpical Jewish expedition, for
irough his charming Ghetto
Kgnettes that appear in the
jnglo-Jewish press, is known
id beloved in America.
A penny bus marked "Ald-
ite" took us past the staid,
mservativee Bank of Eng-
knd, past St. Paul's, past the
^oyal Exchange, where the
imous Petticoat Lane begins,
was of this lane that Zang-
rill, while still an obscure
ihool teacher in the Free
:hool, wrote: "When the
lessiah comes to take the
Children of Israel to the
promised Land, they will go
lere to the strains of 'The
me I Left Behind Me"."
As we walked through the
Jroad Lane, lined with push-
irts and eager gesticulating
lerchants, with their wives
id daughters also in attend-
ance, Costa told me some of
le tricks of these suave ven-
dors tha tmake the unwary
Ihoppers there rue the bar-
rain they so eagerly carry
lome.
The glove stunt is the most
immon, according to my ci-
jrone. Because of their vast
luantities of unmatched
floves, the East End mer--
lants tried to bring back the
ishion of wearing different
)lored gloves. This failing,
ley advertised odd pairs at a
Jery low rate, or special prices
lor those who matched them
}ut of heaps on the push-cart,
is a result, in the grey of
winter mornings, eager cus-
imers flocked around with
Searchlights matching loves.
Trousers are always cheap
.ere, and it is not unusual to
find that the neatly folded
lir the merchant wrapped up
for you, Jias one leg missing.
)r if you wear them in the
bain/it is not unlikely you will
fome running back with sev-
eral inches of legs and arms
Exposed, due to the shrinking
if your suit.
Not alone are these vendors
rlib of tongue, they are also
[left of hand. They sell you
lurses for seven shillings
/hich contain a lucky half-
ferown. This makes the purse
bargain, and its cost actually
tour and a half shillings (de-
leting the good-luck coin.)
'ith a smile, the merchant
jlaces th eshiny half-crown
[nto your purse. When you
fet it home and show it to
four friends, you find only a
irge copper penny there to
iring you luck.
The second-hand boots look
|ike a real bargain. Ask the
lan who owns someand you
nil hear a tale of woe.
They are actually brand
lew boots, wth paper soles.
len are hired to wear them
jmtil they look a bit worn and
|he soles covered with grime.
Then on Sunday, when the
bargain hunters flock to the
stalls, they are put on sale.
Suits and coats are not sold
here very much, because the
firms who advertise that if
you send your measurements,
you can have your suit by re-
turn mail. Just then we passed
the geat clothing emporium.
A large sign: "Valentine, the
Clothing King." Beside it
was his trade marka head-
less man, carrying his head
under his arm. Although
hardly a pleasant trade-mark,
nevertheless, it lingered in the
memory.
It seemed surprising, as we
elbowed through the crowds,
that not a word of Yiddish
was heard. Always the cock-
ney accents of the stall-hold-
ers and their women folks,
sometimes the clipped, precise
Oxford accents of the pur-
chasers. Petticiat Lane, as
far as its language, might be
any corner of London cater-
ing to bargain hunters and
cut-rate merchants.
When you see the barrels
of herrings, adjoining a dis-
play of silk underwear, you
suspect there are people of
Jewish persuasion about. You
thread your way through the
stalls of glass-ware, pastry,
spices, furs. Counters where
men and women sip coffee, eat
prunes and cream, or ice-
creamlarger portions on
cold days to encourage the
sales. A sign offers a bar-
gain in stuffed monkeys.
(Costa explained stuffed mon-
key as a confection of which
English pastry-cooks are
proud. It is a biscuit made up
of almonds, raisins, candied
orange-peel, spices and cur-
rants) A man wearing a cap
and gown reads your charac-
ter and tells your fortune for
a shilling.
But this section is no re-
lation to what we New York-
ers familiarly and fondly con-
jure up as our "East Side."
The hustle and bustle of the
pushcart and crowds, the wo-
men with children in their
arms and one or two hanging
to their skirts, the gesticula-
ting in jargon, the bargaining,
the luscious fruits, the savory
pickles, bearded patriarchs
munching a sweet-corn, the
rag-tag children crowding
about the ice-cream and wa-
termelon stands, the shrill
cries of the women leaning
out of the windows, the eager
crowding, the homely Jewish
phrases, the bargaining, give
off an over-tone of Jewish liv-
ing that makes Riverside
Drive and Park Avenue come
in their limousines for a sniff
of the atmosphere they once
breathed.
All this seems lost in Lon-
don-town. Th East-End does
not seem typically Jewish in
any way. It reminds you more
of Leblang's cut-rate theater
ticket counters on Saturday
nights. Crowds and crowds of
eager bargain hunters nothing
more.
You are struck with the
orderliness and politeness of
that crowd. They are all well
dressed, too, and the Lane is
pecularily clean. No papers
strewn about, no heavy odors,
no disorder anywhere, no
noises. Just a current of peo-
ple endlessly streaming thru-
ough the Lane the jentire Sun-
day, which is the main shop-
ping day there.
We are in Whitechapel
Road now, the widest in Lon-
don. It is well paved and
lined with the limousines of
shoppers from the West End.
"Yes, there is still the be-
nighted ghetto," said Costa
with a smile.
The upbuilding of streets
and public buildings swept
away most of the courts and
alleys of that section explain-
ed my guide. "With that,
much of the communal life
departed," he remarked. "For-
merely it was so congested in
this neighborhood that ten or
twelve people lived in two
rooms, and most social life
overflowed into the courts and
streets."
A touch of Jewishness as
we passed Barnett's an attrac-
tive, three-story kosher butch-
er-shop. From this shop, the
Prince of Wales received his
first kosher joint when Mr.
Barnett bought Snowdrop,
the Prince's prize bullock.
Here Queen Victoria, so runs
the story, came one day for a
taste of kosher meat. Even
then, as I stood in the cool,
well ventilated building, I ob-
served many non-Jews pur-
chasing joints and roasts.
The proprietor was amazed
and amused when I remarked
that the hot-dogs looked appe-
tizing.
"What does that mean?" he
asked.
As I pointed to the rows of
juicyrlooking frankfurters, he
laughed and said, "Oh, Vien-
nas." He asked me to repeat
that funny namtf"hot
what was it?" for his clerks
to hear. They all laughed at
the jolly name Americans
have for Viennas.
I was glad when Costa halt-
ed before a restaurant bearing
the Kosher sign. The tramp
through the Lane and the ap-
petizing zdisplay in Barnett's
were working against my ci-
cerone's bankrool.
It was a typical kosher meal,
from chopped liver to roast
chicken. Stuffed monkey, ac-
companying the tea-with-le-
mon, reminded me of the
sliced almond bread mothers
always had "for company
only," at "yuntef" time. But
the surroundingsgleaming
white table cloths, clusters of
flowers, soft footed waiters,
music. It might have been the
Astor Roof for delicacy of at-
mosphere and service.
More tramping after lunch-
eon. This time through the
forbidding thoroughfare of
Black Lion Yard, standing in
the shadow of Whitechapel
Church. A veritable cave of
Aladdin this display of dia-
monds behind the barred win-
dows that lined this court
could be equalled only by Tif-
fany. It seemed queer, this
juxtaposition of wealth and
poverty.
Dusk, when we left that re-
gion East of Aldgate Pump.
Such a queer Ghetto, so clean,
so orderly. But not reminis-
cent of Jewish living, not with
the tangand spice, yea, the
crowds and the noise and dis-
order that make Rivington
and Delancey and Hester
streets the fascinating bedlam
that they are. A ghetto
rather of assimilation with
cockney unadorned the order
of the day.
That penny bus took us
back through another route.
Past Chancery Lane, where
Tellson's and Temple Bar once
stood, past the Lord Mayor's
House, with echoes of "Turn
again, Whittington, Lord Ma-
yor of London!" ringing
thru the twilight that was
covering London-town with a
mantle of mellowness and me-
mories.
The Various Gods of The
Jews
"The Gods of the Jews. .. ".
my friend began.
"Is there not only one God
of the Jews?" I interrupted.
"Sh'ma Yisroel Adonoi Elo-
heinu Adonoi Echod!"
"The Gods of the Jews," he
went on, "are sometimes sev-
eral. Let me tell you about
the Gods of Mr. Shabbosdeck-
el. Do you know him?"
"Do I know him? I knew
him when he didn't have any-
thing but the pack on his
back. Do I know him? I knew
him when he lived on a third
floor in the tenement house
around the corner from the
Partick Street Schule."
"Well," my friend contin-
ued, "then you know about
Mr. Shabbosdeckel's remark-
able rise in the world of com-
merce and finance in our city,
about his elevation from the
tenement house to the Engish
manor in the beautiful suburb
of Ganeden, where he has a
Japanese butler and a hot-
house in which he grows ba-
nanas for his table in the win-
ter time. He is, as you may
know, rapidly advancing to-
ward the rulership of the
doorknob industry of Amer-
ica, manufacturing, as he doe*
already, one million doorknobs
a week."
"I well know all of that," I
observed.
* *
"Until Mr. Shabbosdeckel be-
gan to be a figure in the door-
knob industry he was a mem-
ber of the Patrick Street
Schule. To it he was bound
by fond sentiments dating
back to his beginnings in
America. There he had sat
in the last seat on his first
Sabbath in the land. Indeed,
long afterward he liked at
times to sit in that same seat,
reveling in mellow memories.
"In time he had become one
of the pillars of the congre-
gation who could always be
depended to purchase one of
the honors of the Torah. Mr.
Shabbosdeckel always said
that he would be content to
Etta Beauty Shoppe
Vt >pt-cialiie in Eugene permanent waving
and Helena Rubinstein facial treat'
ni. Hi- and preparations
2207 N. E. Second Avenue
Phone 20245
E. M. Wolfe Ample Parking Space
AWNINGS
PHONE 20830
Miami Awning Co.
1724 S. W. EIGHTH STREET
die a member of the Patrick
Street Schule. And so he
could but for his daughters.
"As soon as they were old
enough to know the fashions,
they began to admonish him
about the Patrick Street
Schule. It was quite no place,
they said, for people their sta-
tion of life to be seen-in.
Didn't M r. Shabbosdeckel
have any sense of dignity to
be seen mingling with these
people.
" "Where there is God there
is dignity'," Mr. Shabbosdeck-
el answered solemnly.
* *
" 'It is so old-fashioned',"
they told him.
"Mr. Shabbosdeckel's indig-
nation rose at this.
"God is old-fashioned for
them already,"he said.
"Your God is not like our
God," the precocious children
replied. "Our God is modern.
He ... "
'There is only one God,"
Mr. Shabbosdeckel thundered.
He was the God Mr. Shabbos-
deckel had known from his
childhood in Russia whose
commandments he literally
obeyed even to that day, put-
ting the law as a frontlet be-
tween his eyes and upon his
arm at prayer every morn-
ing.
"But the upshot was that
in the end Mr. Shabbosdeckel
became a member of fche Sons
of Abraham Temple. What is
a man to do against the per-
suasions of three daughters?
Besides, Mr. Shabbosdeckel
himself had begun to feel that
his ascending position in the
doorknob industry called for
a separation from the Patrick
Street association.
*
"He joined the temple with
many misgivings, his spirit
drooping like leaves of a
(Continued on Page 4)
Hungarian
Restaurant
29 N. W. First Street
Near the Court House
PLATE LUNCH 35c
Chicken soup with home-
made noodles every day
Formerly on N. W. 5th St.
AUTO GLASS
Installed By Expert* While You
Wait, At Reasonable Price*
East Coast Glass Co.
1313 N. Bayshore Drive
Phone 33371
Malcolm McAllister
Florist
"Funeral Flowers a Specialty**
"The Gold Fish Man"
Phone 2-3773 431 W. Flagler St.
FOR LUMBER
and All BUILDING MATERIALS
See
FISHER LUMBER CO.
Phone 20261
1400 S. W. Fir* Avenue
GAUTIER FUNERAL HOME
LINCOLN AMBULANCE
514 W. Flagler St. R. A. Gamier, Mgr. Phones 8421-8422
_.
7=7



PAGE 1

lecember 21, 1928 THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN PgS3 The London Ghetto By BESSIE GENN With Gabriel Costa, the riter, who is known th rough it London as the "Ghetto lild,"" and designated by the |te Zangwill as his successor portraying the spirit of e Ghetto, I made my first tsit to the famous "East |nd" of London. It seemed a rpical Jewish expedition, for irough his charming Ghetto Kgnettes that appear in the jnglo-Jewish press, is known id beloved in America. A penny bus marked "Aldite" took us past the staid, mservativee Bank of Engknd, past St. Paul's, past the ^oyal Exchange, where the imous Petticoat Lane begins, was of this lane that Zangrill, while still an obscure ihool teacher in the Free :hool, wrote: "When the lessiah comes to take the Children of Israel to the promised Land, they will go lere to the strains of 'The me I Left Behind Me"." As we walked through the Jroad Lane, lined with pushirts and eager gesticulating lerchants, with their wives id daughters also in attendance, Costa told me some of le tricks of these suave vendors tha tmake the unwary Ihoppers there rue the barrain they so eagerly carry lome. The glove stunt is the most immon, according to my cijrone. Because of their vast luantities of unmatched floves, the East End mer-lants tried to bring back the ishion of wearing different )lored gloves. This failing, ley advertised odd pairs at a Jery low rate, or special prices lor those who matched them }ut of heaps on the push-cart, is a result, in the grey of winter mornings, eager cusimers flocked around with Searchlights matching loves. Trousers are always cheap .ere, and it is not unusual to find that the neatly folded lir the merchant wrapped up for you, Jias one leg missing. )r if you wear them in the bain/it is not unlikely you will fome running back with several inches of legs and arms Exposed, due to the shrinking if your suit. Not alone are these vendors rlib of tongue, they are also [left of hand. They sell you lurses for seven shillings /hich contain a lucky halfferown. This makes the purse bargain, and its cost actually tour and a half shillings (deleting the good-luck coin.) 'ith a smile, the merchant jlaces th eshiny half-crown [nto your purse. When you fet it home and show it to four friends, you find only a irge copper penny there to iring you luck. The second-hand boots look |ike a real bargain. Ask the lan who owns some—and you nil hear a tale of woe. They are actually brand lew boots, wth paper soles. len are hired to wear them jmtil they look a bit worn and |he soles covered with grime. Then on Sunday, when the bargain hunters flock to the stalls, they are put on sale. Suits and coats are not sold here very much, because the firms who advertise that if you send your measurements, you can have your suit by return mail. Just then we passed the geat clothing emporium. A large sign: "Valentine, the Clothing King." Beside it was his trade mark—a headless man, carrying his head under his arm. Although hardly a pleasant trade-mark, nevertheless, it lingered in the memory. It seemed surprising, as we elbowed through the crowds, that not a word of Yiddish was heard. Always the cockney accents of the stall-holders and their women folks, sometimes the clipped, precise Oxford accents of the purchasers. Petticiat Lane, as far as its language, might be any corner of London catering to bargain hunters and cut-rate merchants. When you see the barrels of herrings, adjoining a display of silk underwear, you suspect there are people of Jewish persuasion about. You thread your way through the stalls of glass-ware, pastry, spices, furs. Counters where men and women sip coffee, eat prunes and cream, or icecream—larger portions on cold days to encourage the sales. A sign offers a bargain in stuffed monkeys. (Costa explained stuffed monkey as a confection of which English pastry-cooks are proud. It is a biscuit made up of almonds, raisins, candied orange-peel, spices and currants) A man wearing a cap and gown reads your character and tells your fortune for a shilling. But this section is no relation to what we New Yorkers familiarly and fondly conjure up as our "East Side." The hustle and bustle of the pushcart and crowds, the women with children in their arms and one or two hanging to their skirts, the gesticulating in jargon, the bargaining, the luscious fruits, the savory pickles, bearded patriarchs munching a sweet-corn, the rag-tag children crowding about the ice-cream and watermelon stands, the shrill cries of the women leaning out of the windows, the eager crowding, the homely Jewish phrases, the bargaining, give off an over-tone of Jewish living that makes Riverside Drive and Park Avenue come in their limousines for a sniff of the atmosphere they once breathed. All this seems lost in London-town. Th East-End does not seem typically Jewish in any way. It reminds you more of Leblang's cut-rate theater ticket counters on Saturday nights. Crowds and crowds of eager bargain hunters nothing more. You are struck with the orderliness and politeness of that crowd. They are all well dressed, too, and the Lane is pecularily clean. No papers strewn about, no heavy odors, no disorder anywhere, no noises. Just a current of people endlessly streaming thruough the Lane the jentire Sunday, which is the main shopping day there. We are in Whitechapel Road now, the widest in London. It is well paved and lined with the limousines of shoppers from the West End. "Yes, there is still the benighted ghetto," said Costa with a smile. The upbuilding of streets and public buildings swept away most of the courts and alleys of that section explained my guide. "With that, much of the communal life departed," he remarked. "Formerely it was so congested in this neighborhood that ten or twelve people lived in two rooms, and most social life overflowed into the courts and streets." A touch of Jewishness as we passed Barnett's an attractive, three-story kosher butcher-shop. From this shop, the Prince of Wales received his first kosher joint when Mr. Barnett bought Snowdrop, the Prince's prize bullock. Here Queen Victoria, so runs the story, came one day for a taste of kosher meat. Even then, as I stood in the cool, well ventilated building, I observed many non-Jews purchasing joints and roasts. The proprietor was amazed and amused when I remarked that the hot-dogs looked appetizing. "What does that mean?" he asked. As I pointed to the rows of juicyrlooking frankfurters, he laughed and said, "Oh, Viennas." He asked me to repeat that funny namtf—"hot— what was it?" for his clerks to hear. They all laughed at the jolly name Americans have for Viennas. I was glad when Costa halted before a restaurant bearing the Kosher sign. The tramp through the Lane and the appetizing zdisplay in Barnett's were working against my cicerone's bankrool. It was a typical kosher meal, from chopped liver to roast chicken. Stuffed monkey, accompanying the tea-with-lemon, reminded me of the sliced almond bread mothers always had "for company only," at "yuntef" time. But the surroundings—gleaming white table cloths, clusters of flowers, soft footed waiters, music. It might have been the Astor Roof for delicacy of atmosphere and service. More tramping after luncheon. This time through the forbidding thoroughfare of Black Lion Yard, standing in the shadow of Whitechapel Church. A veritable cave of Aladdin this display of diamonds behind the barred windows that lined this court could be equalled only by Tiffany. It seemed queer, this juxtaposition of wealth and poverty. Dusk, when we left that region East of Aldgate Pump. Such a queer Ghetto, so clean, so orderly. But not reminiscent of Jewish living, not with the tangand spice, yea, the crowds and the noise and disorder that make Rivington and Delancey and Hester streets the fascinating bedlam that they are. A ghetto rather of assimilation with cockney unadorned the order of the day. That penny bus took us back through another route. Past Chancery Lane, where Tellson's and Temple Bar once stood, past the Lord Mayor's House, with echoes of "Turn again, Whittington, Lord Mayor of London!" ringing thru the twilight that was covering London-town with a mantle of mellowness and memories. The Various Gods of The Jews "The Gods of the Jews. .. ". my friend began. "Is there not only one God of the Jews?" I interrupted. "Sh'ma Yisroel Adonoi Eloheinu Adonoi Echod!" "The Gods of the Jews," he went on, "are sometimes several. Let me tell you about the Gods of Mr. Shabbosdeckel. Do you know him?" "Do I know him? I knew him when he didn't have anything but the pack on his back. Do I know him? I knew him when he lived on a third floor in the tenement house around the corner from the Partick Street Schule." "Well," my friend continued, "then you know about Mr. Shabbosdeckel's remarkable rise in the world of commerce and finance in our city, about his elevation from the tenement house to the Engish manor in the beautiful suburb of Ganeden, where he has a Japanese butler and a hothouse in which he grows bananas for his table in the winter time. He is, as you may know, rapidly advancing toward the rulership of the doorknob industry of America, manufacturing, as he doe* already, one million doorknobs a week." "I well know all of that," I observed. "Until Mr. Shabbosdeckel began to be a figure in the doorknob industry he was a member of the Patrick Street Schule. To it he was bound by fond sentiments dating back to his beginnings in America. There he had sat in the last seat on his first Sabbath in the land. Indeed, long afterward he liked at times to sit in that same seat, reveling in mellow memories. "In time he had become one of the pillars of the congregation who could always be depended to purchase one of the honors of the Torah. Mr. Shabbosdeckel always said that he would be content to Etta Beauty Shoppe Vt >pt-cialiie in Eugene permanent waving and Helena Rubinstein facial treat' ni. Hiand preparations 2207 N. E. Second Avenue Phone 20245 E. M. Wolfe Ample Parking Space AWNINGS PHONE 20830 Miami Awning Co. 1724 S. W. EIGHTH STREET die a member of the Patrick Street Schule. And so he could but for his daughters. "As soon as they were old enough to know the fashions, they began to admonish him about the Patrick Street Schule. It was quite no place, they said, for people their station of life to be seen-in. Didn't M r. Shabbosdeckel have any sense of dignity to be seen mingling with these people. "Where there is God there is dignity'," Mr. Shabbosdeckel answered solemnly. 'It is so old-fashioned'," they told him. "Mr. Shabbosdeckel's indignation rose at this. "God is old-fashioned for them already,"he said. "Your God is not like our God," the precocious children replied. "Our God is modern. He ... 'There is only one God," Mr. Shabbosdeckel thundered. He was the God Mr. Shabbosdeckel had known from his childhood in Russia whose commandments he literally obeyed even to that day, putting the law as a frontlet between his eyes and upon his arm at prayer every morning. "But the upshot was that in the end Mr. Shabbosdeckel became a member of fche Sons of Abraham Temple. What is a man to do against the persuasions of three daughters? Besides, Mr. Shabbosdeckel himself had begun to feel that his ascending position in the doorknob industry called for a separation from the Patrick Street association. "He joined the temple with many misgivings, his spirit drooping like leaves of a (Continued on Page 4) Hungarian Restaurant 29 N. W. First Street Near the Court House PLATE LUNCH 35c Chicken soup with homemade noodles every day Formerly on N. W. 5th St. AUTO GLASS Installed By Expert* While You Wait, At Reasonable Price* East Coast Glass Co. 1313 N. Bayshore Drive Phone 33371 Malcolm McAllister Florist "Funeral Flowers a Specialty** "The Gold Fish Man" Phone 2-3773 431 W. Flagler St. FOR LUMBER and All BUILDING MATERIALS See FISHER LUMBER CO. Phone 20261 1400 S. W. Fir* Avenue GAUTIER FUNERAL HOME LINCOLN AMBULANCE 514 W. Flagler St. R. A. Gamier, Mgr. Phones 8421-8422 _. 7=7


Page 4"
THE JEWISH FLORIDrAN
December 21,1928



!

I
: SOCIETY :
Mr. and Mrs. S. Goldstein
celebrated the Bar Mitzva of
their son Martin at the Beth
David Synagogue last Satur-
day. The boy was called to
the Torah where he recited
the usual blessings and then
read the "Haftoro." After
the services all were conduct-
ed to the vestry rooms where
lunch was served to all the at-
tendants at the service.
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Rubin
entertained at a children's
party last Sunday afternoon
in honor of the birthday of
their daughter. Anna Leah at
their spacious home in Shen-
andoah.
The dining room was decor-
ated with roses and other
flowers and with a beautiful
birthday cake which was later
cut and divided among the
little guests.
Games were played on the
lawn and afterwards in the
living room. First prize was
awarded to Master Frank
Markowitz and second prize to
Dorothy Finkelstein.
After the game refresh-
ments were served. Among
those present were Sydney
Besvinick, Janice Magid. Mal-
colm Magid, Lillian Mirsky.
Ray U. Schochet. Esther V.
Shocket, Mary Weinfeld. Rol-
and Weinfeld, Seymour Feuer,
Natalie Simon, Arlene Aron-
owitz, Nathan Aronowitz,
Bobby Gershon and Peterz
Scheinberg.
Anna Leah Rubin was the
recipient of a number of beau-
tiful gifts from her admiring
friends.
The many friends of Mr.
and Mrs. Harry H. Farr will
be more than pleased to learn
that on December 27 next,
they will celebrate their silver
wedding anniversary. The
Farrs will be at home to their
manv friends at their home
1315 S. W. Third street from
8 to 11 p. m. to receive con-
gratulations on December 27,
when a reception will be held
by them.
Mr. Farr has been active in
communal work both in Erie
where he hails from and in
Miami where they have res-
sided for the past several
yars. In Erie both Mr. and
Mrs. Farr were active workers
in the Erie Hebrew Institute
which they helped found. In
Miami Mr. Farr has been ac-
tive in the Mens Club of Mi-
ami, which he helped found,
and the Beth David Syna-
gogue which he served as
Financial Secretary, Vice
President and is now Trustee.
He is also one of the Vice
Presidents of the Mens Club.
Mrs. Farr has been very ac-
tive in the Sisterhood of Beth
David and Chairman of its
House Committee and in
charge of Congregational Din-
ners for a considerable period.
They have two sons, Bill
Farr, who is engaged in busi-
ness in Coral Gables, and Aar-
on Farr, who is leader of the
Freshman Band and the Glee
and Instrumental Club of the
University of Miami, and two
daughters, Irene who is well
known in Miami musical cir-
cles, a member of the Sunday
Sunday School Teacher's
Staff of Beth David, and Syl-
via, who is one of the active
students at Miami High.
We join with their many
friends in hoping the the Su-
preme Ruler may vouschafe
them many and many a year
of happiness.
.Miss Sara Spector the
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S.
J. Spector of Coral Gables and
Miami is to be married to Mr.
Louis Baron on Thursday, De-
cember 27, at their home in
Coral Gables, at a strictly pri-
vate wedding, where the mem-
bers of the immediate family
only will be present. Imme-
diately after the ceremony at
which Rabbi Israel H. Weis-
feld of Beth David will offi-
ciate the couple will leave for
their honeymoon to be spent
in Cuba. Upon their return
the parents of the bride will
tender a reception in their
honor.
Dr. and Mrs. Aronowitz en-
tertained at their home in
Shenandoah last Sunday night
in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Hen-
ry Seiden of Chicago, at a
bridge party. Mrs. H. I Homa
received the first prize, Mrs.
L. Seiden the second prize,
Mrs. A. Aronowitz the third
prize, while the guest prize
was awarded to Mr. and Mrs.
Henry Seiden. After the
games were played and a buf-
fet luncheon was served at
midnight. Among those pres-
ent were Mr. and Mrs. Harry
Greenfield, Mr. and Mrs. Jack
Bernstein, Mr. and Mrs. J.
Richter, Mr. and Mrs. Henry
Seiden, Mr. and "Mrs. Louis
Seiden. Mrs. H. I. Homa, Mr.
and Mrs. P. Scheinberg, Mr.
and Mrs. A. Aronowitz, and
Miss Irma Avrack.
Congratulations are being
showered upon Mr. and Mrs.
Sydney Rauzin on the arrival
of a baby son last week.
Mother and baby are resting
nicely at the Jackson Memor-
ial Hospital.
Stanley C. Myers, well
known local attorney leaves
tonight for New York City
for a combined pleasure and
business trip. On his return
he will bring his parents
with him for a stay of sev-
eral weeks.
Things Theatrical
"West of Zanzibar," Lon
Chaney's newest starring ve-
hicle which opened at the
Olympia Wednesday, is a
vivid story of revenge, into
which is woven one of the
most dramatic of love stories,
and its settings, weird gro-
tesque and terrifying accen-
tuate the sensational narra-
tive. Chaney is seen as "Dead
Legs Flint," former stage ma-
gician paralyzed by the man
who stole the love of his wife,
and trailing that man through
the perilous wilds of the Bel-
gian Congo in Africa. Chaney
is supported by a notable cast
including Lionel Barrymore,
Mary Nolan and Richard Bax-
ter.
Vitaphone offers Mary
Haynes in a skit "The Beauty
Shop" a broad comedy of
songs and humor and "Fash-
ion Plates of Harmony," a
wonderful quartette singing
original compositions.
Commencing Sunday the
feature picture will be "Sub-
marine," in which Jack Holt
stars, supported by Dorothy
Revier and Ralph Graves. A
mighty drama of the sea in
which petty officers of the
United States Navy seek ad-
ventures in an Oriental port.
They find them in a free for
all fight with natives from
which they emerge with the
prettiest girl in the village.
Soon after this episode they
are transferred back to the
United States for duty and it
is from this point that the
drama of love, self sacrifice
and thrilling adventures in
undersea life of our sailormen
is so vividly portrayed. "Sub-
marine" is accorded a fine
musical accompaniment and
realistic sound effect that en-
hance the dramatic action of
the picture. "Submarine" was
adopted from the story by
Norman Springer.
Olympia inaugurates it's
stage band policy of beautiful
presentations and acts com-
mencing Sunday. This addi-
tion to Miami's premier thea-
ter program will satisfy a Ion,*
felt need for real high class
entertainment in our fair city,
as the Olympia twelve piece
orchestra will be supported by
a Ballet and high class units
as used by the Publix Thea-
ters throughout the country.
Manager McKoy returns to-
day from a trip having ar-
ranged for some of these units
which ordinarily terminate
their season at Atlanta.
George M. Cohan's comedy-
drama "The Home Towners,"
replete with sound effects
and an all "tlakie" dialogue,
will be the feature of the en-
tertainment menu to be serv-
ed at the gala re-opening of
the Fairfax Theater Saturday.
SIP and BITE
Open all Night'
115 E. FLAGLERST.
NISSENBAUM
921 N. W. Third Ave
"Shoe repairing of
quality"
I will give 10% of all work
brought in by Jewish trade
to the Talmud Torah. This
does not include Friday or
Saturday business.
For Reliable and Efficient Aulo
RepairsSee
G. R. BARBRE
2210 N. W. Sixth Avenue
Buick expert fur more than seven
years; 19 years' general auto re-
pair experience.
I Ii.nest and Fair Charges
E. L. McRAE
BUILDER
4040 Ensenada Avenue
Coconut (trove Florida
Phone Coconut Grove 65
No job too large or too small
George M. Cohan, in en-
tainment circles, means clean
American comedy, and that
comes closest to giving ad-
vance information on "The
Home Towners." a new type
of picture offering more near-
lv the ideal entertainment for
the vast majority than is us-
ually the case with photoplay
offerings.
In addition to the clean
comedv offered in "The Home
Towners." it is also the spoken
word that makes the picture
BO effective. A splendid casl
of actors, headed by Richard
Bennett, dramatic stage Btar,
and Doris Kenyon. who ha<
starred in numerous produc-
tions of the screen, make the
acting all that could be de-
sired. Robert McWade in the
chief scomedy role. Glady
Brock well and Stanley Tay-
lor round out an accomplished
cast.
With the feature picture,
the opening program at the
Fairfax will include two Vita-
phone vaudeville numbers:
"The Lemon." with Hugh Her-
bert and Harry Foy, a comedy
talking skit, and an unusual
negro spiritual presentation
entitled "Dixie Days." featur-
ing some real Southern mel-
ody.
(Continued from Page 3)
plant when it is transferred
from one soil to another. For-
getfully, he walked in with
his hat on; he felt naked
without his talith; he moved
uneasily in his pew.
"Mr. Shabbosdeckel, how. \
ever, remained rigid in his ad.
herence to one tradition. He
must walk to the temple on,
the Sabbath tho the daugh.
ters insisted that the way t0
go to the temple was in the
limousine. But so stern was
his refusal that they yielded
to this whim of his.
"I should ride on the Shah-
lias yet,' he sighed.
"But time is the healer of
all pains, and it came to pass
that Mr. Shabbosdeckel no
longer felt the agony of up.
rooting from the Patrick
Street Schule. Indeed, he be
Kan to enjoy his new assort*
tion in the temple of the Sons
of Abraham. Shortly he be-
came one of its pillars, and
he was elected a director.
"Mr. Shabbosdeckel felt the
modern God of his daughters
had done well for him.
*
"So you see," my friend
concluded, "in the transition
the Gods of a Jew are several
One for vanity and One for
sorrow."
YOU CANT AFFORD TO MISS
THESE WONDERFUL VALUES!
Creations in the latest styles of Georgettes, Crepe de
Chines. Foulards. Prints, etc.. priced at only
MILLERS DRESS SHOP, INC
74 EAST FLAGLER STREET
"Shoes Mark the Man"
Cantilever
^Shoe
For Men, Women and Children
8 McAllister Arcade
Cantilevers in a Variety of Colors
and Patterns
Harry J Mullady, Prcs.
Get Your 1929
AUTO LICENSE TAGS
12.15 West Flagler St.
1140 N. E. 2nd Ave.
(oral (iahles (iarage
M.S. TUCKER, Bonded Agent
For Choice
Meats and Poultry
THAT'S KOSHER
Heyond a Doubt
TENNESEE
KOSHER MARKET
1(16 N. W. Fifth St.
Phone 21514
MIAMI BEACH
KOSHER MARKET
IM.SS1 Collins Ave..
Miami Beach
PHONE 6602
Florida Iron and
Equipment Co.
519 N. W. Third Avenue
Wl 1...I, Da|,ra Mdhin
I ilpncnt
MIAMI. FLORIDA
DANDRUFF
Is unsightly as well as un-
healthy. Our treatments are
10 thorough and so reuson-
able you cannot afford not to
avail yourself of them.
National Beauty Shoppe
1007 S. W. 6th St. Phone 7925
Plenty of free parking spuce.
Open evenings.
APPETIZING KOSHER ARE THE DBLIGHTFl X
DELICATESSEN OF ALL KINDS
That Man, Woman or Child May Desire At the
Rosedale Del catessen and Restaurant
170 N. W. FIFTH STREET
BELL BAKERY
50 West Flagler St.
BAKE-RITE BREADERY
332 N. Miami Ave.
Home-made Bread, Pies and
Cakes
'The Tannenbaum Standard"
B &M
Cleaners and Tailors
6 S. W. 2nd Ave.
We do satisfactory work



PAGE 1

Page 4" THE JEWISH FLORIDrAN December 21, 1 928 • I : SOCIETY : Mr. and Mrs. S. Goldstein celebrated the Bar Mitzva of their son Martin at the Beth David Synagogue last Saturday. The boy was called to the Torah where he recited the usual blessings and then read the "Haftoro." After the services all were conducted to the vestry rooms where lunch was served to all the attendants at the service. Mr. and Mrs. Morris Rubin entertained at a children's party last Sunday afternoon in honor of the birthday of their daughter. Anna Leah at their spacious home in Shenandoah. The dining room was decorated with roses and other flowers and with a beautiful birthday cake which was later cut and divided among the little guests. Games were played on the lawn and afterwards in the living room. First prize was awarded to Master Frank Markowitz and second prize to Dorothy Finkelstein. After the game refreshments were served. Among those present were Sydney Besvinick, Janice Magid. Malcolm Magid, Lillian Mirsky. Ray U. Schochet. Esther V. Shocket, Mary Weinfeld. Roland Weinfeld, Seymour Feuer, Natalie Simon, Arlene Aronowitz, Nathan Aronowitz, Bobby Gershon and Peterz Scheinberg. Anna Leah Rubin was the recipient of a number of beautiful gifts from her admiring friends. The many friends of Mr. and Mrs. Harry H. Farr will be more than pleased to learn that on December 27 next, they will celebrate their silver wedding anniversary. The Farrs will be at home to their manv friends at their home 1315 S. W. Third street from 8 to 11 p. m. to receive congratulations on December 27, when a reception will be held by them. Mr. Farr has been active in communal work both in Erie where he hails from and in Miami where they have ressided for the past several yars. In Erie both Mr. and Mrs. Farr were active workers in the Erie Hebrew Institute which they helped found. In Miami Mr. Farr has been active in the Mens Club of Miami, which he helped found, and the Beth David Synagogue which he served as Financial Secretary, Vice President and is now Trustee. He is also one of the Vice Presidents of the Mens Club. Mrs. Farr has been very active in the Sisterhood of Beth David and Chairman of its House Committee and in charge of Congregational Dinners for a considerable period. They have two sons, Bill Farr, who is engaged in business in Coral Gables, and Aaron Farr, who is leader of the Freshman Band and the Glee and Instrumental Club of the University of Miami, and two daughters, Irene who is well known in Miami musical circles, a member of the Sunday Sunday School Teacher's Staff of Beth David, and Sylvia, who is one of the active students at Miami High. We join with their many friends in hoping the the Supreme Ruler may vouschafe them many and many a year of happiness. .Miss Sara Spector the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Spector of Coral Gables and Miami is to be married to Mr. Louis Baron on Thursday, December 27, at their home in Coral Gables, at a strictly private wedding, where the members of the immediate family only will be present. Immediately after the ceremony at which Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld of Beth David will officiate the couple will leave for their honeymoon to be spent in Cuba. Upon their return the parents of the bride will tender a reception in their honor. Dr. and Mrs. Aronowitz entertained at their home in Shenandoah last Sunday night in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Seiden of Chicago, at a bridge party. Mrs. H. I Homa received the first prize, Mrs. L. Seiden the second prize, Mrs. A. Aronowitz the third prize, while the guest prize was awarded to Mr. and Mrs. Henry Seiden. After the games were played and a buffet luncheon was served at midnight. Among those present were Mr. and Mrs. Harry Greenfield, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Bernstein, Mr. and Mrs. J. Richter, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Seiden, Mr. and "Mrs. Louis Seiden. Mrs. H. I. Homa, Mr. and Mrs. P. Scheinberg, Mr. and Mrs. A. Aronowitz, and Miss Irma Avrack. Congratulations are being showered upon Mr. and Mrs. Sydney Rauzin on the arrival of a baby son last week. Mother and baby are resting nicely at the Jackson Memorial Hospital. Stanley C. Myers, well known local attorney leaves tonight for New York City for a combined pleasure and business trip. On his return he will bring his parents with him for a stay of several weeks. Things Theatrical "West of Zanzibar," Lon Chaney's newest starring vehicle which opened at the Olympia Wednesday, is a vivid story of revenge, into which is woven one of the most dramatic of love stories, and its settings, weird grotesque and terrifying accentuate the sensational narrative. Chaney is seen as "Dead Legs Flint," former stage magician paralyzed by the man who stole the love of his wife, and trailing that man through the perilous wilds of the Belgian Congo in Africa. Chaney is supported by a notable cast including Lionel Barrymore, Mary Nolan and Richard Baxter. Vitaphone offers Mary Haynes in a skit "The Beauty Shop" a broad comedy of songs and humor and "Fashion Plates of Harmony," a wonderful quartette singing original compositions. Commencing Sunday the feature picture will be "Submarine," in which Jack Holt stars, supported by Dorothy Revier and Ralph Graves. A mighty drama of the sea in which petty officers of the United States Navy seek adventures in an Oriental port. They find them in a free for all fight with natives from which they emerge with the prettiest girl in the village. Soon after this episode they are transferred back to the United States for duty and it is from this point that the drama of love, self sacrifice and thrilling adventures in undersea life of our sailormen is so vividly portrayed. "Submarine" is accorded a fine musical accompaniment and realistic sound effect that enhance the dramatic action of the picture. "Submarine" was adopted from the story by Norman Springer. Olympia inaugurates it's stage band policy of beautiful presentations and acts commencing Sunday. This addition to Miami's premier theater program will satisfy a Ion,* felt need for real high class entertainment in our fair city, as the Olympia twelve piece orchestra will be supported by a Ballet and high class units as used by the Publix Theaters throughout the country. Manager McKoy returns today from a trip having arranged for some of these units which ordinarily terminate their season at Atlanta. George M. Cohan's comedydrama "The Home Towners," replete with sound effects and an all "tlakie" dialogue, will be the feature of the entertainment menu to be served at the gala re-opening of the Fairfax Theater Saturday. SIP and BITE •Open all Night' 115 E. FLAGLERST. NISSENBAUM 921 N. W. Third Ave "Shoe repairing of quality" I will give 10% of all work brought in by Jewish trade to the Talmud Torah. This does not include Friday or Saturday business. For Reliable and Efficient Aulo Repairs—See G. R. BARBRE 2210 N. W. Sixth Avenue Buick expert fur more than seven years; 19 years' general auto repair experience. I Ii.nest and Fair Charges E. L. McRAE BUILDER 4040 Ensenada Avenue Coconut (trove Florida Phone Coconut Grove 65 No job too large or too small George M. Cohan, in entainment circles, means clean American comedy, and that comes closest to giving advance information on "The Home Towners." a new type of picture offering more nearlv the ideal entertainment for the vast majority than is usually the case with photoplay offerings. In addition to the clean comedv offered in "The Home Towners." it is also the spoken word that makes the picture BO effective. A splendid casl of actors, headed by Richard Bennett, dramatic stage Btar, and Doris Kenyon. who ha< starred in numerous productions of the screen, make the acting all that could be desired. Robert McWade in the chief scomedy role. Glady Brock well and Stanley Taylor round out an accomplished cast. With the feature picture, the opening program at the Fairfax will include two Vitaphone vaudeville numbers: "The Lemon." with Hugh Herbert and Harry Foy, a comedy talking skit, and an unusual negro spiritual presentation entitled "Dixie Days." featuring some real Southern melody. (Continued from Page 3) plant when it is transferred from one soil to another. Forgetfully, he walked in with his hat on; he felt naked without his talith; he moved uneasily in his pew. "Mr. Shabbosdeckel, how. \ ever, remained rigid in his ad. herence to one tradition. He must walk to the temple on, the Sabbath tho the daugh. ters insisted that the way t 0 go to the temple was in the limousine. But so stern was his refusal that they yielded to this whim of his. "I should ride on the Shahlias yet,' he sighed. "But time is the healer of all pains, and it came to pass that Mr. Shabbosdeckel no longer felt the agony of up. rooting from the Patrick Street Schule. Indeed, he be Kan to enjoy his new assort* tion in the temple of the Sons of Abraham. Shortly he became one of its pillars, and he was elected a director. "Mr. Shabbosdeckel felt the modern God of his daughters had done well for him. • "So you see," my friend concluded, "in the transition the Gods of a Jew are several —One for vanity and One for sorrow." YOU CANT AFFORD TO MISS THESE WONDERFUL VALUES! Creations in the latest styles of Georgettes, Crepe de Chines. Foulards. Prints, etc.. priced at only MILLERS DRESS SHOP, INC 74 EAST FLAGLER STREET "Shoes Mark the Man" Cantilever ^Shoe For Men, Women and Children 8 McAllister Arcade Cantilevers in a Variety of Colors and Patterns Harry J Mullady, Prcs. Get Your 1929 AUTO LICENSE TAGS 12.15 West Flagler St. 1140 N. E. 2nd Ave. (oral (iahles (iarage M.S. TUCKER, Bonded Agent For Choice Meats and Poultry THAT'S KOSHER Heyond a Doubt TENNESEE KOSHER MARKET 1(16 N. W. Fifth St. Phone 21514 MIAMI BEACH KOSHER MARKET IM.SS1 Collins Ave.. Miami Beach PHONE 6602 Florida Iron and Equipment Co. 519 N. W. Third Avenue Wl„ 1...I, Da|, ra ,„ Mdhin I ilpncnt MIAMI. FLORIDA DANDRUFF Is unsightly as well as unhealthy. Our treatments are 10 thorough and so reusonable you cannot afford not to avail yourself of them. National Beauty Shoppe 1007 S. W. 6th St. Phone 7925 Plenty of free parking spuce. Open evenings. APPETIZING KOSHER ARE THE DBLIGHTFl X DELICATESSEN OF ALL KINDS That Man, Woman or Child May Desire At the Rosedale Del catessen and Restaurant 170 N. W. FIFTH STREET BELL BAKERY 50 West Flagler St. BAKE-RITE BREADERY 332 N. Miami Ave. Home-made Bread, Pies and Cakes 'The Tannenbaum Standard" B &M Cleaners and Tailors 6 S. W. 2nd Ave. We do satisfactory work


>mber 21, 1928
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Page 5
Editorial
continued from page 2)
krent phases and problems
lligion. I found in every
^f these girls a great hun-
for a truly spiritual sup-
a live desire for things
$h, a secret unconfessed
Jest in problems, such as
prayer, and ritual ob-
mce. I found the long-
[even in the hearts of girls
[had parents without any
lite religion affiliations.
girl in particular whose
its were atheists and who
lever received a reliigious
^ing, went to a Catholic
ler to discuss her prob-
Fortunately, this wo-
I refused to advise her and
fcted her to a Jewish
ler. A very healthy sign
le fact that an overwhelm-
majority of the girls
^ed to believe in God,
id to be taught to pray,
ited to be convinced that
happiness lay in leading
Ish lives. They wanted
>ns that would appeal to
intellect. They wanted
Jrm faith that would satis-
leir emotions. They want-
le entire problem of Juda-
intelligently presented,
wanted openly' and
pcly discussed problems
as, Why should we be
to our inherited faith,
is intermarriage harm-
Of 92 girls that I ques-
Bd, 38 either had had ab-
tely no training at all, and
of these girls came from
Jrvant homes. Five girls
they had received a little
(uction from their par-
Fifty girls said they did
some training. But when
^top to consider that six
ths in a Sunday school at
[age of seven, and a pri-
teacher for a summer or
were considered "train-
I we must be appalled by
large number of girls who
preparing for college or
msiness world without a
Jewish background of
/ledge and faith. Can we
ier that these girls will
to Ethical Culture, the
^munity Church, or join
ranks of the indifferent
the spiritually poverty-
bken? What do they know
Judaism that they should
ect it and make sacrifices
lit? Why are observant
^nts so negligible? I urged
isiness man to send his in-
dent fifteen year old
fhter to a Hebrew school,
had been to a Jewish
^p the preceding summer,
learned to read Hebrew,
become interested in
^gs Jewish, and was anx-
to continue her religious
lies. Her father refused
iy the $12.00 registration
rhich included tuition for
Bar and all text-books. Of
fse, the girl was taking ex-
^ive piano lessons. Music
worth while paying for,
Ireligion evidently was not.
I gave a very unhappy lit-
jirl my prayer-book. Let
luote the note that she left
ly desk the next day: "Re-
in is one of the hardest
|gs to acquire, and one of
lardest things to lose; but
|n a person has had great
and then lost it, it makes
killions of times harder to
once again be able to believe.
The mental battle that goes on
the arguments against and for
faith, the desire for some-
thing to rely upon, yet the
fear of being 'fooled' .
Can't you understand what I
went through when I opened
your prayerbook? That was
just the beginning. It went
on, that terrible strife, thro-
ugh the day through the
night, never for a moment
ceasing. I want to believe,
but I am afraid to."
Such are the thoughts of
our girls of fourteen, fifteen
and sixteen. Who will give
them nourishment for the
souls? These girls are the fu-
ture citizens of Jewry. These
girls are our future mothers.
Is it right that we should let
them suffer in silence? It is
our duty to invite confidence,
to let them express freely the
doubts and fears that con-
sume their hearts, to show
them the way to spiritual
peace and understanding. Par-
ents should insist upon the re-
ligious training of girls of
high-school age. Religious
schools should make every ef-
fort to attract the high-
school girl. It is not to our
credit if even a single girl
should go astray seeking the
way of life.
Throughout American Jew-
ry, let a Sabbath be devoted
to the problem of the young
girl. Let rabbi point out to
the members of their congre-
gations the necessity that the
girl receive a religious train-
ing that will help her to ad-
just herself to life. Let us en-
courage the girls to attend
services and classes. Instead
of courses on Jewish philoso-
phy and mediaeval Jewish li-
terature (excellent at the
right time and in the right
place), let groups be formed
purely for the discussiony of
problems of life in the light
of religion. In these classes
let the atmosphere be warm
and conciliating, let the teach-
er be so sympathetic and un-
derstanding, that the girls
may indeed feel that the
Law "is a tree of Hie to them
that grasp it."
Goliath of the Bronx
The Bronx Park Express
was running at top speed
carrying the weary toilers
home. Above the deafening
clatter of the wheels rose the
stentorian voic of a stalwart,
redheaded, ferocious-looking
individual, who appeared at
the rear entrance of the car.
"Any Jews in this car?"
bellowed the strapping man.
The question was ridiculous.
It would have been more sen-
sible to ask: "Any Gentiles in
this car?" Yet it was asked.
And what is even stranger,
no response came. The gi-
gantic proportions of the in-
quiring person, his stern face
and belligerent manner, made
every Israelite in the car
think thrice before acknowl-
edging his nationality. It was
more than evident that this
Brobdingnagian belicose per-
sonage was just hankering for
a chance to kill a couple of
Jews.
"Any Jews here?" boomed
the voice, louder and more ter-
rifying than before.
A sepulchral silence was
the reply.
"Don't be cowards," roared
the Titan. "If there is any
Jew here, let him stand up
like a man and admit it."
One young Jewish fellow
was particularly stung by this
insolent challenge. To be sure,
he was no match for the tow-
ering monster; but his racial
pride got the best of him, and
he decided to risk his life for
the honor of his people. Be-
sides, his best girl was sitting
next, to him, and he wanted to
show her that he was a brave
man and a proud Jew.
"I am a Jew!" blurted out
the brave co-religionist of Da-
vid, as he rose from his seat
pale as a ghost, glaring de-
fiantly at the blaspheming
Goliath, "I am a Jew; what of
it?"
"Well, if you are a Jew,"
finally said the colossus,
"step into the next car.
You see, today is the anni-
versary of my father's
death, and I want to say
'Kaddish.' But there are
only nine Jews in the other
car, and I need one more Jew
to make a 'minyan.' I am
afraid before I get to the
Bronx all the synagogues will
be closed."
Over the Teacups
By ZMIRA CARMEL
In Flynn life was a pleas-
ant monotony that is like the
lulling motion of a canoe flow-
ing along with the stream. A
pleasant, dreamy mood en-
chants one into a lassitude
that is not without its note
of poignancy as an advertant
movement brings to mind the
possibilities of a spill. It is
like that therein this tiny
metropolis nestled in the
mountains of the Alleghanies.
One moment you sit before
the open fire and sip a cup
of deep contentment, the next
you are in the whirlpools of
human movement and grave
concern Today as usual.
The rest of the women had
literally scurried home after
the bridge game. Only Mollie
Sonders, our rich and persist-
ent bachelor girl; Bertha
Hayms, the Mrs. Hayms, and
our voluble and voluminous
Mrs. Rosenbergnever will I
speak of her in flippancy
againremained for tea and
chat.
Mollie, as usual, was advo-
cating the need,of something
or other for the common weal,
(today, another fulltime pub-
lic health nurse), when Edith,
my eighteen year old niece,
clever, spoiled and difficult
but altogether lovable because
of her kittenish way of worm-
ing herself into one's good
graces, burst in upon us most
unceremoniously
'Edie, I think you'd better
run apstairs and make your-
self presentable first" I
tartly remarked by way of
welcome.
Instead she plumped her-
self down by the hearth atop
a pile of cushions, and flip-
ping out a cigarette from the
ubiquitous cigarette case,
proceeded to adjust herself
into a rather pleasant picture
of youthful misery. The cig-
arette, however, held one in
doubt as to whether one might
laugh with discretion or let
one's sympathies flow on un-
restrained
"No joking, people, I'm mis-
erable, and I don't know what
to do about it either'
"Some tea for Miss Edith,
Euphrosia,"
"Good old auntie anodyne,
the fountain of youth boiled
nto a cup of tea"
I permitted myself a little
laugh at my own expense.
There was no gainsaying my
5o'clock tea
'You don't complain of be-
ing miserable anymore,
now"
"But I am, I'm alright here
among my own kind, but I'll
never be the same out there,
(to be continued next week)
The Friendship League
The regular meeting of the
Friendship League was held
at its temporary headquarters
at Temple Israel on last Wed-
nesday night and a large num-
ber of members attended.
This marked the beginning of
the administration under Har-
ry Goldstein, its new presi-
dent. After the brief busi-
ness session, the usual danc-
ing and entertaining followed.
We will buy what you
don't need and
sell you what you need
International Trade
and Exchange
142-146 N. Miami Ave.
Cor. 2nd St. Phone 20311
Julius Damenstein, Inc.
JEWELER
The Store With a Reputation
10 W. Fiagler St. Phone 4701
MIAMI, FLORIDA
HARRINGTON
ELECTRIC COMPANY
Electric Construction and Repairs
150 N. E. Third St. Phone 7116
REAL ESTATE
and Business Opportunities
W. L. WILLIAMS
252 Halcyon Arcade
Phone 36840
King
Undertaking Co.
29 N. W. THIRD AVENUE
Phones 23535-31624
L. (Pop) GERSON
Buyer of AH Kinds of
SCRAP METAL
2145 N. W. Second Avenue
Phone 7909
Residence Phone 7276
WHY BUY NEW PARTS FOR AN OLD CAR?
MIAMI
AUTO WRECKING COMPANY
INC.
HAS PARTS FOR YOUR CAR
Phone 5050 (fifty-fifty) 606-608 N. W. 5th St.
"PERPETUAL CARE"
WOODLAWN BURIAL PARK
When on the Tamiami Trail, we shall be pleased to have you inspect
our new Jewish section, operated according to the Jewish ritual.
For ICEUse
Peninsular Ice Company
ICE
PL.ni Located at 645 N. W. nth Street
Phone 21298 or 22197 (or
FREE DELIVERY
Buy your Used Car from
RELIABLE MOTOR CORP.
5th and Lennox Miami Beach
Phone Miami Beach 838
"Reliable In Every Respect"
IVES CERTIFIED MILK
is
SAFE MILK
For Adult and Baby
"QUALITY MILK'i
For the PARTICULAR and DISCRIMINATING
If you are not a customerask your Neighbor
about our products
IVES CERTIFIED DAIRY
"Florida's First Certified Dairy"
Miami, Telephone 8831 Ojus, Florida

=s=?
^



PAGE 1

>mber 21, 1928 THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Page 5 Editorial continued from page 2) krent phases and problems lligion. I found in every ^f these girls a great hunfor a truly spiritual supa live desire for things $h, a secret unconfessed Jest in problems, such as prayer, and ritual obmce. I found the long[even in the hearts of girls [had parents without any lite religion affiliations. girl in particular whose its were atheists and who lever received a reliigious ^ing, went to a Catholic ler to discuss her probFortunately, this woI refused to advise her and fcted her to a Jewish ler. A very healthy sign le fact that an overwhelmmajority of the girls ^ed to believe in God, id to be taught to pray, ited to be convinced that happiness lay in leading Ish lives. They wanted >ns that would appeal to intellect. They wanted Jrm faith that would satisleir emotions. They wantle entire problem of Judaintelligently presented, wanted openly' and pcly discussed problems as, Why should we be to our inherited faith, is intermarriage harmOf 92 girls that I quesBd, 38 either had had abtely no training at all, and of these girls came from Jrvant homes. Five girls they had received a little (•uction from their parFifty girls said they did some training. But when ^top to consider that six ths in a Sunday school at [age of seven, and a priteacher for a summer or were considered "trainI we must be appalled by large number of girls who preparing for college or msiness world without a Jewish background of /ledge and faith. Can we ier that these girls will to Ethical Culture, the ^munity Church, or join ranks of the indifferent the spiritually povertybken? What do they know Judaism that they should ect it and make sacrifices lit? Why are observant ^nts so negligible? I urged isiness man to send his indent fifteen year old fhter to a Hebrew school, had been to a Jewish ^p the preceding summer, learned to read Hebrew, become interested in ^gs Jewish, and was anxto continue her religious lies. Her father refused iy the $12.00 registration rhich included tuition for Bar and all text-books. Of fse, the girl was taking ex^ive piano lessons. Music worth while paying for, Ireligion evidently was not. I gave a very unhappy litjirl my prayer-book. Let luote the note that she left ly desk the next day: "Rein is one of the hardest |gs to acquire, and one of lardest things to lose; but |n a person has had great and then lost it, it makes killions of times harder to once again be able to believe. The mental battle that goes on the arguments against and for faith, the desire for something to rely upon, yet the fear of being 'fooled' Can't you understand what I went through when I opened your prayerbook? That was just the beginning. It went on, that terrible strife, through the day through the night, never for a moment ceasing. I want to believe, but I am afraid to." Such are the thoughts of our girls of fourteen, fifteen and sixteen. Who will give them nourishment for the souls? These girls are the future citizens of Jewry. These girls are our future mothers. Is it right that we should let them suffer in silence? It is our duty to invite confidence, to let them express freely the doubts and fears that consume their hearts, to show them the way to spiritual peace and understanding. Parents should insist upon the religious training of girls of high-school age. Religious schools should make every effort to attract the highschool girl. It is not to our credit if even a single girl should go astray seeking the way of life. Throughout American Jewry, let a Sabbath be devoted to the problem of the young girl. Let rabbi point out to the members of their congregations the necessity that the girl receive a religious training that will help her to adjust herself to life. Let us encourage the girls to attend services and classes. Instead of courses on Jewish philosophy and mediaeval Jewish literature (excellent at the right time and in the right place), let groups be formed purely for the discussiony of problems of life in the light of religion. In these classes let the atmosphere be warm and conciliating, let the teacher be so sympathetic and understanding, that the girls may indeed feel that the Law "is a tree of Hie to them that grasp it." Goliath of the Bronx The Bronx Park Express was running at top speed carrying the weary toilers home. Above the deafening clatter of the wheels rose the stentorian voic of a stalwart, redheaded, ferocious-looking individual, who appeared at the rear entrance of the car. "Any Jews in this car?" bellowed the strapping man. The question was ridiculous. It would have been more sensible to ask: "Any Gentiles in this car?" Yet it was asked. And what is even stranger, no response came. The gigantic proportions of the inquiring person, his stern face and belligerent manner, made every Israelite in the car think thrice before acknowledging his nationality. It was more than evident that this Brobdingnagian belicose personage was just hankering for a chance to kill a couple of Jews. "Any Jews here?" boomed the voice, louder and more terrifying than before. A sepulchral silence was the reply. "Don't be cowards," roared the Titan. "If there is any Jew here, let him stand up like a man and admit it." One young Jewish fellow was particularly stung by this insolent challenge. To be sure, he was no match for the towering monster; but his racial pride got the best of him, and he decided to risk his life for the honor of his people. Besides, his best girl was sitting next, to him, and he wanted to show her that he was a brave man and a proud Jew. "I am a Jew!" blurted out the brave co-religionist of David, as he rose from his seat pale as a ghost, glaring defiantly at the blaspheming Goliath, "I am a Jew; what of it?" "Well, if you are a Jew," finally said the colossus, "step into the next car. You see, today is the anniversary of my father's death, and I want to say 'Kaddish.' But there are only nine Jews in the other car, and I need one more Jew to make a 'minyan.' I am afraid before I get to the Bronx all the synagogues will be closed." Over the Teacups By ZMIRA CARMEL In Flynn life was a pleasant monotony that is like the lulling motion of a canoe flowing along with the stream. A pleasant, dreamy mood enchants one into a lassitude that is not without its note of poignancy as an advertant movement brings to mind the possibilities of a spill. It is like that there—in this tiny metropolis nestled in the mountains of the Alleghanies. One moment you sit before the open fire and sip a cup of deep contentment, the next you are in the whirlpools of human movement and grave concern Today as usual. The rest of the women had literally scurried home after the bridge game. Only Mollie Sonders, our rich and persistent bachelor girl; Bertha Hayms, the Mrs. Hayms, and our voluble and voluminous Mrs. Rosenberg—never will I speak of her in flippancy again—remained for tea and chat. Mollie, as usual, was advocating the need,of something or other for the common weal, (today, another fulltime public health nurse), when Edith, my eighteen year old niece, clever, spoiled and difficult but altogether lovable because of her kittenish way of worming herself into one's good graces, burst in upon us most unceremoniously— 'Edie, I think you'd better run apstairs and make yourself presentable first—" I tartly remarked by way of welcome. Instead she plumped herself down by the hearth atop a pile of cushions, and flipping out a cigarette from the ubiquitous cigarette case, proceeded to adjust herself into a rather pleasant picture of youthful misery. The cigarette, however, held one in doubt as to whether one might laugh with discretion or let one's sympathies flow on unrestrained— "No joking, people, I'm miserable, and I don't know what to do about it either—' "Some tea for Miss Edith, Euphrosia," "Good old auntie anodyne, the fountain of youth boiled nto a cup of tea—" I permitted myself a little laugh at my own expense. There was no gainsaying my 5o'clock tea— 'You don't complain of being miserable anymore, now—" "But I am, I'm alright here among my own kind, but I'll never be the same out there, (to be continued next week) The Friendship League The regular meeting of the Friendship League was held at its temporary headquarters at Temple Israel on last Wednesday night and a large number of members attended. This marked the beginning of the administration under Harry Goldstein, its new president. After the brief business session, the usual dancing and entertaining followed. We will buy what you don't need and sell you what you need International Trade and Exchange 142-146 N. Miami Ave. Cor. 2nd St. Phone 20311 Julius Damenstein, Inc. JEWELER The Store With a Reputation 10 W. Fiagler St. Phone 4701 MIAMI, FLORIDA HARRINGTON ELECTRIC COMPANY Electric Construction and Repairs 150 N. E. Third St. Phone 7116 REAL ESTATE and Business Opportunities W. L. WILLIAMS 252 Halcyon Arcade Phone 36840 King Undertaking Co. 29 N. W. THIRD AVENUE Phones 23535-31624 L. (Pop) GERSON Buyer of AH Kinds of SCRAP METAL 2145 N. W. Second Avenue Phone 7909 Residence Phone 7276 WHY BUY NEW PARTS FOR AN OLD CAR? MIAMI AUTO WRECKING COMPANY INC. HAS PARTS FOR YOUR CAR Phone 5050 (fifty-fifty) 606-608 N. W. 5th St. "PERPETUAL CARE" WOODLAWN BURIAL PARK When on the Tamiami Trail, we shall be pleased to have you inspect our new Jewish section, operated according to the Jewish ritual. For ICE—Use Peninsular Ice Company ICE PL.ni Located at 645 N. W. nth Street Phone 21298 or 22197 (or FREE DELIVERY Buy your Used Car from— RELIABLE MOTOR CORP. 5th and Lennox Miami Beach Phone Miami Beach 838 "Reliable In Every Respect" IVES CERTIFIED MILK is SAFE MILK For Adult and Baby "QUALITY MILK'i For the PARTICULAR and DISCRIMINATING If you are not a customer—ask your Neighbor about our products IVES CERTIFIED DAIRY "Florida's First Certified Dairy" Miami, Telephone 8831 Ojus, Florida —• =s=? ^




I



Page 6
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Beth David
The usual Friday night ser-
vices will be held at the Beth
David Synagogue, Rabbi Is-
rael H. Weisfeld preaching a
sermon on "The Test of
Faith." The usual congrega-
tional'singing will be had, and
Cantor Morris Shoulson will
sing several solos.
The Junior Council of Jew-
ish Women will be the guests
of the Congregation on Friday
night and a speech indicating
the work of the Junior Coun-
cil will be made by one of its
representatives.
The Adult Bible Class and
the Bar Mitzva Boys Break-
fast Club will meet as usual
on Sunday mornings.
Temple Israel
Friday night services will be
held as usual at Temple Is-
rael, Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kap-
lan delivering a sermon on
"The Place of Sorrow in Hu-
man Life." The choir will
sing as usual.
The Open Forum will be
temporarily discontinued un-
til Sunday, January 6, 1929,
because of the absence of
Rabbi Kaplan from the city.
The definite program for the
Open Forum will be announc-
ed later.
Rabbi Kaplan is leaving to
hgious School in Macon, Ga.
attend a conference of Re-
as previously reported in the
Jewish Floridian.
Council of Jewish Women
The Council of Jewish Wo-
men held a well attended
meeting in the auditorium of
Beth David Synagogue last
Wednesday when it celebrated
Immigrant Day. A splendid
musical program was present-
ed due to the efforts of Mrs.
Daniel Cromer who was in
charge of the musical num-
bers. Mrs. James K. Bisset
sang two beautiful Scotch
songs and was accompanied
at the piano by Mrs. Clair
Cohen Weintraub. Several
other musical numbers were
rendered after which there
was a reading by Luella Wal-
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
lerstein. Mrs. S. H. Wood de-
livered a very interesting and
educational talk on "Immi-
grant Education."
The meeting was presided
over by Mrs. Benjamin Axel-
road, the President, who in-
troduced Rabbi, Israel H.
Weisfeld of Beth David to de-
liver the invocation. Rabbi
Weisfeld was followed by the
President of Beth David, Mr.
J. Louis Shocket who wel-
comed the Council to Beth
David.
During the business portion
of the meeting several import
ant reports of cimmittees was
presented including the re-
port of the Committee who
distributed Thanksgiving bas-
kets to the needy. A rising
vote of thanks was given by
the Council to all who had
contributed to the worthy en-
terprise (a list of those con-
tributing having been read,
and thelocal press was asked
to convey the thanks through
its mediums.
A^ter the business and edu-
cational program had been
concluded all adjourned to the
ante room where refresh-
ments were served.
Beth David Sisterhood
24 North
Miami Ave.
FAYMUS
Off Flagler
Off Prices
FAY'S
LINGERIE SALE
FRENCH VOILE And Silkette
GOWNS and PAJAMAS
Trimmed with imported lace medallions and
fine tucks ,'
Value
$3.95
We Carry A Full Line of Pleated
SKIRTS and SWEATER**
Also in Children's Sizes ...................
SEE FAYMUS FAY'S USEFUL GIFTS
Haddassah
Under the auspices of Mrs.
Henry Seitlin, Chairman of
the National Fund Committee
of the local chapter of Had-
dassah and her committee, the
members of the local Junior
Haddassah conducted Nation-
al Tag Day last Friday to cel-
ebrate Maccabean Flag Day.
Because of the vast amount of
territory necessary to be cov-
ered the drive was continued
on last Monday. The returns
show that real work can be
accomplished if only one tries
and the members of the Jun-
ior Haddassah deserve com-
mendation for the splendid
spirit in which Tag Day was
successfully carried out.
An- intensive membership
campaign will be launched by
the Haddassah on National
Haddassah Day January 26,
1929. Jt will be the object of
the membership committee to
enroll every Jewish woman in
Greater Miami as a member.
Definite plans and the per-
sonnel of the teams conduct-
ing the drive wil be announc-
ed in these columns with the
next few weeks.
The weekly card party
given by the Beth David Sis-
terhood was held at the home
of Mrs. Harry Shapiro, 2281
S. W. 23rd street, last Monday
night. Assisting her as host-
esses were Mrs. Louis Hay-
man, Mrs. B. Kraft, and Mrs.
Milton Weiner. There was
quite a large gathering and
the prizes, were won by Mrs.
Isidor Ccfien, Mrs. I. Tanen-
baum, Mrs. Lewis Brown, and
Mrs. J. Katz.
On Wednesday morning the
sewing circle met at the home
of Mrs. Jake Engler to sew
for the Bazaar to be held for
the benefit of the Talmud To-
rah Fund sometime before
Purim. A large number of
the members fo the Sister-
hood attended.
Due to the illness of Mrs.
Harry I. Magid, W. L. Wil-
liams was persuaded to under-
take th*fe Chairmanship of the
dance to be given on January
15 for the benefit of the Tal-
mud Torah. He will be as-
sisted by Nathan Adelman
and E. Max Goldstein. Defin-
ite plan* will be announced in
these columns shortly.
Home of Prmount Picture
~OlIM||A
NOW
LON CHANEY
' WIST .f ZANZIBAR"
Vitaphone Presentations
Paramount NeVs
STAN
MALOTTE
Organist
NEXT ATTRACTION
"SUBMARINE"
OPENING
SUNDAY
STAGE BAND
ACTS
GALA RE-OPENING
SAT. DEC. 22ND
A PLBLIX THEATRE
FAIRFAX
Hunt if Piriatiot ft&ttti
-HEARSEE-
George M. Cohan's
ALL TALKING
PICTURE
"The
Home Towners"
WITH
RICHARD BENNETT
DORIS KENYON
ALSO
Vitaphone Presentations
Children's Matinee
SAT. 10 A. M.
10*Admission10c
December 21, M
NEW YEAR'S EVE
Monday December 31, 1928
AT THE
BISCAYNE- COLLINS
MIAMI BEACH
Men's Club of Miami
BANQUET
Dance and Entertainment
$4.50 Per Plate
SEND RESERVATIONS AND CHECK TO MEN'S CLU1
OF MIAMI
Biscayne and Collins Avenue, Miami Beach
Phone Miami Beach 6603
BIGGER AM) BETTER THAN LAST NEW YEAR'S EVE
------------------------------------------------ '
HUMAN FOLKS HERE
NOTHING "HIGH HAT" ABOUT
THE FAMILY JACOBS'
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Plain Sincere Personal ServiceHungarian Cuisine
Adhering To Jewish Dietary Laws
It Took Hard Work But We're Here at Last!
MARKOWITZ & RESNICK
The Plumbing Department Store
Now in our new home
839 WEST FLAGLER STREET
(Next door to Sears, Roebuck & Co.)
When in need of anything in plumbing just call 23153
FOR BEAUTIFUL
SHOES
Always $6.00
_^ See
(Butlers
60 East Flagler Street
JUNE DAIRY
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CHEESE
EGGS
'For folks who want]
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COMPLETE FACILITIES
111
ARE OFFERED TO YOU BY THE
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We Would Appreciate the Opportunity to Serve You
City National Bank in Miami
Capital ^1,000,000.00 Surplu. Jl,000,000.0
116 EAST FLAGLER STREET



PAGE 1

I %  Page 6 ANNOUNCEMENTS Beth David The usual Friday night services will be held at the Beth David Synagogue, Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld preaching a sermon on "The Test of Faith." The usual congregational'singing will be had, and Cantor Morris Shoulson will sing several solos. The Junior Council of Jewish Women will be the guests of the Congregation on Friday night and a speech indicating the work of the Junior Council will be made by one of its representatives. The Adult Bible Class and the Bar Mitzva Boys Breakfast Club will meet as usual on Sunday mornings. Temple Israel Friday night services will be held as usual at Temple Israel, Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan delivering a sermon on "The Place of Sorrow in Human Life." The choir will sing as usual. The Open Forum will be temporarily discontinued until Sunday, January 6, 1929, because of the absence of Rabbi Kaplan from the city. The definite program for the Open Forum will be announced later. Rabbi Kaplan is leaving to hgious School in Macon, Ga. attend a conference of Reas previously reported in the Jewish Floridian. Council of Jewish Women The Council of Jewish Women held a well attended meeting in the auditorium of Beth David Synagogue last Wednesday when it celebrated Immigrant Day. A splendid musical program was presented due to the efforts of Mrs. Daniel Cromer who was in charge of the musical numbers. Mrs. James K. Bisset sang two beautiful Scotch songs and was accompanied at the piano by Mrs. Clair Cohen Weintraub. Several other musical numbers were rendered after which there was a reading by Luella WalTHE JEWISH FLORIDIAN lerstein. Mrs. S. H. Wood delivered a very interesting and educational talk on "Immigrant Education." The meeting was presided over by Mrs. Benjamin Axelroad, the President, who in•troduced Rabbi, Israel H. Weisfeld of Beth David to deliver the invocation. Rabbi Weisfeld was followed by the President of Beth David, Mr. J. Louis Shocket who welcomed the Council to Beth David. During the business portion of the meeting several import ant reports of cimmittees was presented including the report of the Committee who distributed Thanksgiving baskets to the needy. A rising •vote of thanks was given by the Council to all who had contributed to the worthy enterprise (a list of those contributing having been read, and thelocal press was asked to convey the thanks through its mediums. A^ter the business and educational program had been concluded all adjourned to the ante room where refreshments were served. Beth David Sisterhood 24 North Miami Ave. FAYMUS Off Flagler Off Prices FAY'S LINGERIE SALE FRENCH VOILE And Silkette GOWNS and PAJAMAS Trimmed with imported lace medallions and fine tucks ,' Value $3.95 We Carry A Full Line of Pleated SKIRTS and SWEATER** Also in Children's Sizes SEE FAYMUS FAY'S USEFUL GIFTS Haddassah Under the auspices of Mrs. Henry Seitlin, Chairman of the National Fund Committee of the local chapter of Haddassah and her committee, the members of the local Junior Haddassah conducted National Tag Day last Friday to celebrate Maccabean Flag Day. Because of the vast amount of territory necessary to be covered the drive was continued on last Monday. The returns show that real work can be accomplished if only one tries and the members of the Junior Haddassah deserve commendation for the splendid spirit in which Tag Day was successfully carried out. Anintensive membership campaign will be launched by the Haddassah on National Haddassah Day January 26, 1929. Jt will be the object of the membership committee to enroll every Jewish woman in Greater Miami as a member. Definite plans and the personnel of the teams conducting the drive wil be announced in these columns with the next few weeks. The weekly card party given by the Beth David Sisterhood was held at the home of Mrs. Harry Shapiro, 2281 S. W. 23rd street, last Monday night. Assisting her as hostesses were Mrs. Louis Hayman, Mrs. B. Kraft, and Mrs. Milton Weiner. There was quite a large gathering and the prizes, were won by Mrs. Isidor Ccfien, Mrs. I. Tanenbaum, Mrs. Lewis Brown, and Mrs. J. Katz. On Wednesday morning the sewing circle met at the home of Mrs. Jake Engler to sew for the Bazaar to be held for the benefit of the Talmud Torah Fund sometime before Purim. A large number of the members fo the Sisterhood attended. Due to the illness of Mrs. Harry I. Magid, W. L. Williams was persuaded to undertake th*fe Chairmanship of the dance to be given on January 15 for the benefit of the Talmud Torah. He will be assisted by Nathan Adelman and E. Max Goldstein. Definite plan* will be announced in these columns shortly. Home of Prmount Picture ~OlIM||A NOW LON CHANEY WIST .f ZANZIBAR" Vitaphone Presentations Paramount NeVs STAN MALOTTE Organist NEXT ATTRACTION "SUBMARINE" OPENING SUNDAY STAGE BAND ACTS GALA RE-OPENING SAT. DEC. 22ND A PLBLIX THEATRE FAIRFAX Hunt if Piriatiot ft&ttti -HEAR—SEEGeorge M. Cohan's ALL TALKING PICTURE "The Home Towners" WITH RICHARD BENNETT DORIS KENYON ALSO Vitaphone Presentations Children's Matinee SAT. 10 A. M. 10*—Admission—10c December 21, M NEW YEAR'S EVE Monday December 31, 1928 AT THE BISCAYNECOLLINS MIAMI BEACH Men's Club of Miami BANQUET Dance and Entertainment $4.50 Per Plate SEND RESERVATIONS AND CHECK TO MEN'S CLU1 OF MIAMI Biscayne and Collins Avenue, Miami Beach Phone Miami Beach 6603 BIGGER AM) BETTER THAN LAST NEW YEAR'S EVE — %  ———— HUMAN FOLKS HERE NOTHING "HIGH HAT" ABOUT THE FAMILY JACOBS' BISCAYNECOLLINS On the Ocean at Miami Beach Plain Sincere Personal Service—Hungarian Cuisine Adhering To Jewish Dietary Laws It Took Hard Work But We're Here at Last! MARKOWITZ & RESNICK The Plumbing Department Store Now in our new home 839 WEST FLAGLER STREET (Next door to Sears, Roebuck & Co.) When in need of anything in plumbing just call 23153 FOR BEAUTIFUL SHOES Always $6.00 _^ See (Butlers 60 East Flagler Street JUNE DAIRY BUTTER CHEESE EGGS 'For folks who want] the Best" COMPLETE FACILITIES 111 ARE OFFERED TO YOU BY THE City National Bank in Miami Eight Distinct Departments Complete and Ready to Render a Thoroughly Efficient SERVICE (0—COMMERCIAL (2)—SAVINGS (3)-BONDS AND INVESTMENTS (4)-EXCHANGE (5)—COLLECTION (6)—CREDIT (7)—SAFE DEPOSIT (8)-TRUST We Would Appreciate the Opportunity to Serve You City National Bank in Miami Capital ^1,000,000.00 Surplu. Jl,000,000.0 116 EAST FLAGLER STREET


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END
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YEAR



PAGE 1

END OF YEAR


1929
JAN



PAGE 1

1929 JAN


ISSUE(S)
MISSING
OR
NOT AVAILABLE
1929
JAN 04, 25-



PAGE 1

ISSUE(S) MISSING OR NOT AVAILABLE 1929 JAN 04, 25


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wJewisF Florid tin
VOL. I to
NO. II.
MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 11, 1929
Price 5 Cents
Exchange Club
Elects Rabbi As
fcard Member
[plan Honored I'nani-
MMlsly I'o Office
Rabl tjDr. .Jacob II. Kaplan
ol r< mple Israel, was unani-
mou jly elected as one of the
)ireetors of the loc-
Kge Club the past
week.
.. i.Kaplan since his stay
i i Bias addressed prac-
af the Civic Clubs
ACOB H. KAPLAN
ty and nearby Flori-
Hb and has been active
Exchange Club, of
; m has been a member
itanding. The Ex-
llub directorate has
loubtly strengthened
lection of the Rabbi
bard.
iDavid Calls
lecial Meeting
Erne;
y Matters To Be
Discussed
I Sunday night, Jan-
tr: Kth. at 7:30 P. M. a
meeting of Congrega-
, Beth David will take
place [At this meeting a
numlm of problems facing
th < Segregation at the pre-
en! fee will be submitted to
the Btire membership for
pscussion among them
the question of the
Iry housing of the
atending the Talmud
As is well known,
High School was
Irred to the old Miami
Highjrtrich the Talmud To-
ld been previously oc-
% and the Talmud To-
isses have been forced
:e use of make-shift
T which have been pro-
or the past week. The
jons thus forced upon
lalmud Torah must be
mediately This and
problems will be pre-
, and all the members
ged to attend promptly.
Officers Chosen
At Meeting
Vaad Hakashruth Elects
That public opinion has
been aroused in Miami and
that simple honesty is to be
enforced in the sale of Kosher
food products and meats was
amply demonstrated at the
meeting in the Beth David
Synagogue held last Wednes-
day night, when officers were
chosen for the newly formed
Vaad Hakashruth. After a
brief outline of conditions as
respects the sale of kosher
meats and food products in
Miami, by John Wolf who pre-
sided, Rabbi Israel H. Weis-
feld in a brief but pointedly
forceful address and without
mincing words depicted con-
ditions in Miami which were
astounding and called upon
the butchers and Shochtim to
realize that they must immed-
iately enlist in the cause or
face the inevitable conse-
quences.
The committee on nomina-
tions presented its report and
it was unanimously adopted.
The following were choseK:
Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld,
Rabbi in charge of Kashruth,
and Honorary Chairman, John
Wolfe, Chairman, M. Abrams
of Miami Beach, Vice-chair-
man, P. G. Blank, Treasurer,
E. Gordon, Recording Secre-
tary, Louis Weinkel, Finan-
cial Secretary, and Messrs.
Isidor Cohen, Nathan Adel-
man, Harry Isaacs, Abe Aron-
owitz and Louis Heiman as
the Executive Board.
Various resolutions were
then adopted the most impor-
tant being one designed to re-
move the shochtim from the
control of the butchers and
placing them directly under
the supervision of the Rabbi
and the Vaad Hakashruth.
A matter which vitally af-
fected Miami Beach was
then reported and the action
of the Rabbi and committee
in taking drastic action was
unanimously approved. It was
reported that the Sea Breeze
Hotel, Biscayne-Collins Hotel
and Nemo Hotel had cooperat-
ed with the Rabbi and Com-
mittee in all matters and their
action was commended. After
a hearing afforded the parties
involved was granted at the
Rabbi's request, the decisions
reached by the Rabbi and
Committee were unanimously
agreed to by the parties in-
volved and a pledge of future
cooperation voluntarily given,
and the matter was then clos-
ed
All the butchers engaged
in the sale of kosher meats
were present and pledged
their unstinted support and
cooperation in all matters and
Seminary Repre-
sentative Arrives
On Mission Here
Rabbi Stops In Miami On
Southern Tour
Rabbi D. Ordentlich arrived
in Miami this week on his
tour of the Southern States
for a two fold purpose. His
first and main purpose is to
conduct an educational cam-
paign throughout the South-
ern States to acquaint the
Jewish residents of the impor
tance to the United Staes and
the world at large of the Ye-
shivas Rabbi Isaac Elchanan,
now popularly known as the
Theological Seminary and Col-
lege of America. He is stres-
sing the fact that Traditional
Judaism can best be served by
such institutions as the Ye-
shiva which combines the cler-
ical knowledge of the Talmud,
the Code of Jurisprudence and
other Rabbinical lore and
study so vitally necessary for
a -Rabbi,- with--the secular
knowledge of a man of the
world. More than that, it
puts forth every effort to pro-
duce Rabbis with a knowledge
and understanding of the pre-
sent day problems of Jewry
who by their innate sense of
the fitness of things and
knowledge of everyday Amer-
ican life, combined with their
zeal for traditional Judaism
can best cope with the lack
of knowledge of true tradi-
tional Judaism. The type of
man produced by the Yeshiva
can meet the old time Rabbi
on his own grounds in mat-
ters of Jewish law and learn-
ing yet be on an equal if not
superior footing with those
American leaders in Jewry,
clerical or lay, to whom the
knowledge of the Talmud was
inconsequential.
Rabbi Ordentlich is at the
same time trying to raise
funds for the magnificent
Five Million dollar group of
buildings now being erected
for the Yeshiva, the first
building being recently dedi-
cated in New York City.
Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld of
Beth David, who is a graduate
of the Yeshiva is to accom-
pany Rabbi Ordentlich on a
tour of a number of Florida
cities, having been urged to
do so by the faculty of the
Yeshiva.
to aid in establishing Kash-
ruth in Miami and surround-
ing territory.
A series of conferences will
be held between a sub-com-
mittee and the butchers and
shochtim to put into immed-
iate operation the resolutions
adopted at the Wednesday
night meeting.
Talmud Torah
Ground Breaking
Epoch Making Event To Take
Place
The Building Committe of
the Talmud Torah consisting
of Lewis Brown, Chairman,
Isidor Cohen, Secretary, and
J. Louis Shochet, Jos. M.
Fine, W. L. Williams, Harry
Isaacs, I. Lasky, Stanley C.
Myers and Herbert E. Scherr,
met at the office of the Chair-
man on last Monday and plans
were adopted for the breaking
of ground for the new edifice
being erected to provide an
auditorium in addition to am-
ple class rooms for a Talmud
Torah for Miami's Jewish
children. A sub committee
consisting of Isidor Coheu,
Stanley C. Myers and J. Louis
Shochet were authorized to
proceed with the program for
the ground greaking ceremon-
ies, and all matters incident
to the starting of the build-
ing. A sub-committee con-
sisting of'"Rabbi 'Israel H.
Weisfeld, W. L. Williams and
Lewis Brown was appointed
to approve all final building
plans and make the necessary
changes if they deemed such
changes proper. The plans
call for a foundation capable
of carrying four stories, only
one story containing six class
rooms, suitable lavatories, of-
fice, kitchen fully equipped,
and large auditorium for so-
cial events to be erected at
the present time. It is to be
of Spanish architecture and
designed to give the maxi-
mum amount of comfort and
aid occording to the latest
pedagogical methods. An
auxiliary committees of ladies
of the Beth David Sisterhood
headed by Mrs. Isidor Cohen
and Mrs. Lewis Brown is aid-
ing greatly in the raising of
funds and other matters aris-
ing.
The committee in charge
propose that this event which
marks a new epoch in the his-
tory of Miami Jews shall be
one long to be remembered
by all present. Seating ar-
rangements are being prepar-
ed to take care of the large
audience of residents and
tourists who will be present.
Bnai Brith To
Elect Officers
Important Meeting Called
As we go to press, Sholom
Lodge, the local chater of
Bnai Birth will be nominating
and electing officers for the
ensuing term. Much depends
upon the choice of officials
but judging from the interest
Rabbi To Leave
On Speaking Tour
Through Florida
To Deliver Address For Ye-
shiva Building Campaign
At the request of the Pres-
ident and Faculty of the Ye-
shiva, Rabbi Isaac Elchanan,
known as the Rabbinical Sem-
inary and College of America,
Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld, of
Beth David will deliver a ser-
ies of addresses in various
RABBI I. H. WEISFELD
cities of Florida, the first to
be delivered in Jacksonville,
Fla., before its Community
center and then before the
Congregation in Tampa. Oth-
er stops have not yet been de-
termined upon. Rabbi Weis-
feld plans to leave early next
Thursday and to return to Mi-
ami the middle of the follow-
ing week: In the course of
his addresses he will tell of
the work of the Yeshiva and
will describe conditions of
Jewry in Miami and the work
of the local Talmud Torah.
awakened recently and the de-
termination of the members
and officers to make things
hum from now on, it is felt
that good men will assume the
leadership and carry on the
good work started by the pre-
sent officials who have not re-
ceived that cooperation from
the general public that Bnai
Brith deserves.
The Lodge will meet at Elks
Hall, on Thursday night, Jan-
uary 10th. and all members
are urged to attend without
fail.

**4EgJF



PAGE 1

wJewisF Florid tin VOL. I to NO. II. MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 11, 1929 Price 5 Cents Exchange Club Elects Rabbi As fcard Member [plan Honored I'naniMMlsly I'o Office Rabl tjDr. .Jacob II. Kaplan ol r< mple Israel, was unanimou jly elected as one of the %  )ireetors of the locKge Club the past week. .. i.Kaplan since his stay i i Bias addressed prac%  af the Civic Clubs %  ACOB H. KAPLAN %  ty and nearby FloriHB and has been active %  Exchange Club, of ; m has been a member itanding. The Exllub directorate has loubtly strengthened lection of the Rabbi bard. iDavid Calls lecial Meeting Erne; y Matters To Be Discussed I Sunday night, Jantr: Kth. at 7:30 P. M. a %  meeting of Congrega, Beth David will take place [At this meeting a numl m of problems facing th < Segregation at the preen! fee will be submitted to the Btire membership for pscussion among them the question of the Iry housing of the atending the Talmud As is well known, High School was Irred to the old Miami Highjrtrich the Talmud Told been previously oc% and the Talmud Toisses have been forced :e use of make-shift T which have been pro%  or the past week. The jons thus forced upon lalmud Torah must be mediately This and problems will be pre, and all the members ged to attend promptly. Officers Chosen At Meeting Vaad Hakashruth Elects That public opinion has been aroused in Miami and that simple honesty is to be enforced in the sale of Kosher food products and meats was amply demonstrated at the meeting in the Beth David Synagogue held last Wednesday night, when officers were chosen for the newly formed Vaad Hakashruth. After a brief outline of conditions as respects the sale of kosher meats and food products in Miami, by John Wolf who presided, Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld in a brief but pointedly forceful address and without mincing words depicted conditions in Miami which were astounding and called upon the butchers and Shochtim to realize that they must immediately enlist in the cause or face the inevitable consequences. The committee on nominations presented its report and it was unanimously adopted. The following were choseK: Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld, Rabbi in charge of Kashruth, and Honorary Chairman, John Wolfe, Chairman, M. Abrams of Miami Beach, Vice-chairman, P. G. Blank, Treasurer, E. Gordon, Recording Secretary, Louis Weinkel, Financial Secretary, and Messrs. Isidor Cohen, Nathan Adelman, Harry Isaacs, Abe Aronowitz and Louis Heiman as the Executive Board. Various resolutions were then adopted the most important being one designed to remove the shochtim from the control of the butchers and placing them directly under the supervision of the Rabbi and the Vaad Hakashruth. A matter which vitally affected Miami Beach was then reported and the action of the Rabbi and committee in taking drastic action was unanimously approved. It was reported that the Sea Breeze Hotel, Biscayne-Collins Hotel and Nemo Hotel had cooperated with the Rabbi and Committee in all matters and their action was commended. After a hearing afforded the parties involved was granted at the Rabbi's request, the decisions reached by the Rabbi and Committee were unanimously agreed to by the parties involved and a pledge of future cooperation voluntarily given, and the matter was then closed All the butchers engaged in the sale of kosher meats were present and pledged their unstinted support and cooperation in all matters and Seminary Representative Arrives • On Mission Here Rabbi Stops In Miami On Southern Tour Rabbi D. Ordentlich arrived in Miami this week on his tour of the Southern States for a two fold purpose. His first and main purpose is to conduct an educational campaign throughout the Southern States to acquaint the Jewish residents of the impor tance to the United Staes and the world at large of the Yeshivas Rabbi Isaac Elchanan, now popularly known as the Theological Seminary and College of America. He is stressing the fact that Traditional Judaism can best be served by such institutions as the Yeshiva which combines the clerical knowledge of the Talmud, the Code of Jurisprudence and other Rabbinical lore and study so vitally necessary for a -Rabbi,with--the secular knowledge of a man of the world. More than that, it puts forth every effort to produce Rabbis with a knowledge and understanding of the present day problems of Jewry who by their innate sense of the fitness of things and knowledge of everyday American life, combined with their zeal for traditional Judaism can best cope with the lack of knowledge of true traditional Judaism. The type of man produced by the Yeshiva can meet the old time Rabbi on his own grounds in matters of Jewish law and learning yet be on an equal if not superior footing with those American leaders in Jewry, clerical or lay, to whom the knowledge of the Talmud was inconsequential. Rabbi Ordentlich is at the same time trying to raise funds for the magnificent Five Million dollar group of buildings now being erected for the Yeshiva, the first building being recently dedicated in New York City. Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld of Beth David, who is a graduate of the Yeshiva is to accompany Rabbi Ordentlich on a tour of a number of Florida cities, having been urged to do so by the faculty of the Yeshiva. to aid in establishing Kashruth in Miami and surrounding territory. A series of conferences will be held between a sub-committee and the butchers and shochtim to put into immediate operation the resolutions adopted at the Wednesday night meeting. Talmud Torah Ground Breaking Epoch Making Event To Take Place The Building Committe of the Talmud Torah consisting of Lewis Brown, Chairman, Isidor Cohen, Secretary, and J. Louis Shochet, Jos. M. Fine, W. L. Williams, Harry Isaacs, I. Lasky, Stanley C. Myers and Herbert E. Scherr, met at the office of the Chairman on last Monday and plans were adopted for the breaking of ground for the new edifice being erected to provide an auditorium in addition to ample class rooms for a Talmud Torah for Miami's Jewish children. A sub committee consisting of Isidor Coheu, Stanley C. Myers and J. Louis Shochet were authorized to proceed with the program for the ground greaking ceremonies, and all matters incident to the starting of the building. A sub-committee consisting of'"Rabbi 'Israel H. Weisfeld, W. L. Williams and Lewis Brown was appointed to approve all final building plans and make the necessary changes if they deemed such changes proper. The plans call for a foundation capable of carrying four stories, only one story containing six class rooms, suitable lavatories, office, kitchen fully equipped, and large auditorium for social events to be erected at the present time. It is to be of Spanish architecture and designed to give the maximum amount of comfort and aid occording to the latest pedagogical methods. An auxiliary committees of ladies of the Beth David Sisterhood headed by Mrs. Isidor Cohen and Mrs. Lewis Brown is aiding greatly in the raising of funds and other matters arising. The committee in charge propose that this event which marks a new epoch in the history of Miami Jews shall be one long to be remembered by all present. Seating arrangements are being prepared to take care of the large audience of residents and tourists who will be present. Bnai Brith To Elect Officers Important Meeting Called As we go to press, Sholom Lodge, the local chater of Bnai Birth will be nominating and electing officers for the ensuing term. Much depends upon the choice of officials but judging from the interest Rabbi To Leave On Speaking Tour Through Florida To Deliver Address For Yeshiva Building Campaign At the request of the President and Faculty of the Yeshiva, Rabbi Isaac Elchanan, known as the Rabbinical Seminary and College of America, Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld, of Beth David will deliver a series of addresses in various RABBI I. H. WEISFELD cities of Florida, the first to be delivered in Jacksonville, Fla., before its Community center and then before the Congregation in Tampa. Other stops have not yet been determined upon. Rabbi Weisfeld plans to leave early next Thursday and to return to Miami the middle of the following week: In the course of his addresses he will tell of the work of the Yeshiva and will describe conditions of Jewry in Miami and the work of the local Talmud Torah. awakened recently and the determination of the members and officers to make things hum from now on, it is felt that good men will assume the leadership and carry on the good work started by the present officials who have not received that cooperation from the general public that Bnai Brith deserves. The Lodge will meet at Elks Hall, on Thursday night, January 10th. and all members are urged to attend without fail. **4EgJ F






i* ;!
,i
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
January 11, 19J
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
A Weekly Newspaper Published At Miami, Florida
By The Jewish Floridian Publishing Company
253 Halcyon Arcade
Phone 36840
EDITORIAL STAFF
J. LOUIS SHOCHET BEN DOROM
A CHOCHOM
A N ASHER
EDITORIAL
Spare the Rod and Spoil the Child
When* wise King Solomon
enunciated the oft repeated
and now famous saying
"spare the rod and spoil the
child" we wonder if he had
present day Miami in mind.
Much discussion has been
evoked among the younger
feminine element of our fair
City by the Editorial appear-
ing in last week's issue. "Jus
Words'* in which several glar-
ing indiscretions on the part
of Miami Jewish organiza-
tions were pointed out. "Of
course it was wrong, but why
stir the matter up? was the
universal comment. And our
reply: "Spare the rod and
spoil the child." Of course,
we want every Jewish organi-
zation in Miami to prosper and
grow! But that growth must
be in the proper direction. And
above all in its growth there
must not be forgotten plain
and simple honesty, when one
holds itself out to the world
as a Jewish organization it
must in simple honesty ad-
here to Jewish practices, at
least do nothing un-Jewish.
And that brings us to some-
thing at this time of great
interest to the Jewish Com-
munity of Miami. As appears
in the news columns of this
paper public opinion has been
aroused in Miami and the best
elements of our Jewish Com-
munity have taken action to
insure that simple honesty
must be practiced in the hand-
ling and sale of kosher meats.
And again the cry is raised
"Why stir the matter up?"
And again our answer "Spare
the rod and spoil the Child."
When one learns that the peo-
ple of Miami have been sold
and charged for what is sup-
posed to be lamb prices and
then by universal admission
of all that this supposed lamb
was 'GOAT." how in simple
honesty can anyone say "Why
stir the matter up." When we
find that we have been paying
a tariff for the privilege of
getting suppose-dlv "KOSH-
ER" products and ??????.
can anyone in simple honesty
sit idly by and say nothing?
The Jewish Floridian does
not believe that the purpose
of a newspaper is to simply
sit idly by, overlook matters
of even simple honesty and
just smile and pat people on
the back in hopes that the cir-
culation may be thus increas-
ed. Our conception of a news-
paper is that it must present
all the facts to the people, be
they pleasant or even unpleas-
ant. That it must not shirk
plain duty when that duty is
a matter of public interest
and it proposes to carry that
policy into effect at all times.
We should like to see all but-
chers and all shochtim get a-
long and prosper, but not at
the expense of simple honesty.
"Spare the Rod and Spoil
the Child." we hope will be the
policy of the Jewish Commun-
ity and people of Miami no
matter who may be involved,
especially where simple hon-
esty is involved.
BROTHERHOOD
In every patch of timber you
Will always find a tree or two
That would have fallen long
ago,
Borne down by wind or age
or snow.
Had not another neighbor
tree
Held out its arms in sympathy
And caught the tree the
storm had hurled
To earth. So, brothers, is the
earth.
In every patch of timber
stand
Samaritans of forest land,
The birch, the maple, oak or
pine.
The fir. the cedar, all the line;
In every wood, unseen, un-
known,
They bear the burdens of
their own
And bear as well another
form.
Some brothers stricken by the
storm.
Shall trees be nobler to their
kind
Than men. who boast the
noble mind?
Shall there exist within the
wood
This great eternal In-other-
hood
Of oak and pine, of hill and
fen
And not within the hearts of
men?
God grant that men are like
to these.
And brothers brotherly as
trees.
Making Paper.
GREETINGS
Do you remember 'way back
wh _ Say thirty or forty years.
You never saw your sweet-
heart's limbs.
But iudged her by her
ears?
The kids were washed each
Saturday night.
Their daddy cut their hair,
Their suits were made from
Uncle's pants.
And they wore no under-
wear.
The women padded, but did
^ not paint,
Nor smoke nor drink nor
vote,
The men wore boots and
derby hats,
And whiskers like a goat.
Not a soul had appendicitis,
Nor thought of buying
glands,
The butcher sold you liver,
But charged you for his
hands.
You did not need a bank ac-
count,
Your beer gave 4 per cent,
The hired girl got three a
week,
And twelve bucks paid the
rent.
You could stand each night
when work was o'er
With one foot on the rail,
Your hip supporting not a
thing
Except your own shirtail.
You had real friends, and
trusted them,
Yow knew they were sin-
cere;
The same we are, with our
wish to you,
On the eve "of A GOOD
NEW YEAR.
SAY'
A good man likes a hard
boss. I mean a boss who in-
sists upon things being done
right, a boss who is watching
things closely enough so that
he knows a good job from a
poor one.
Rhodes Colossus
* *
NOISES IN DE NIGHT
Noisi slak you caint tell
what 'tis makes 'em
Allus comes in de middle ob
de night.
An' it's what-you-don't know-
"tIs goin' to grab yo'
Dat makes yo' haul de kiv-
vers up an' hoi' 'em tight.
Da-'s a tip tap tappin' by de
chimbly,
An' a rip rap rappin' 'hind
de do';
Da's a flip flap flappin' at d;;
winda.
And a slip slop slappin'
'cross de flo'.
An' you lays dar col'-sweatin'
'till ele mawnm',
Fo' eberyting gits quiet
when it's light:
Laws! da's nuthin' much ah's
skeered ob in de daytime,
But it's what-you-don't-
know-what-'tis in de
night.
? *
A doctor left a thermomet-
er with the wife of a patient,
and told her to take her hus-
band's temperature ever y
hour and to call him if he got
any worse. When he returned
to the house in the morning,
the patient was missing ami
the doctor asked what had
happened.
"I broke the thermomet-
er," said the woman, "so I
used the barometer. It regis-
tered 'very dry,' so I gave him
about a pint of corn liquor and
I swear he got up and went
out and went to plowing in
the back field."
*
"The stenographer we re-
quire," ran the ad, "must be
fast, absolutely accurate, and
must have human intelli-
gence. If you are not a crack-
er jack, don't bother us."
One of the answerers wrote
that she noted their require-
ments and went on: "Your ad-
vertisement appeals to me
stronglystronger than pre-
pared mustard as I have
searched Europe, Airope,
Irope and Hoboken in quest of
someone who could use my
talents to advantage. When
it comes to this chin music
proposition, I have never
found man, woman or dicta-
phone who could get first
base on me, either fancy or
catch-as-catch-can. I wrjte
shorthand so fast that I have
to use a specially prepared
pencil with a platinum point
and water cooled attachment,!
a note pad made of asbestos!
ruled with sulphuric acid and
stitched with catgut. I run
my cutout open at all speeds,
and am in fact a guaranteed,
double hydraulic welded, drop,
forged and oil-tempered spec-
imen of human lightning on a |
perfect thirty-six frame, and!
ground to one-thousandth of|
an inch.
"If you would avail your-1
self of the opportunity of a
lifetime, wire me, but unless!
you are fully prepared to pay
the tariff for such service!
don't bother me, as I am sol
nervous I can't stand still1
long enough to have mv dress-
es fitted."
She got the job.
Boston Transcript

The Einstein Theory, and
how it came to the assistance!
of a belated pupil, is the sub-!
ject of the following story:
Avrumke came late to che-
der. His rebbe said to him,
'Avrumke, what's the mat-|
ter? Why are you so late?"
"Well, you see, rebbe, it is
so slippery that every time I
took a step forward, I slipped
back two." replied the pupil.
"But. Avrumke, if that is
soif that is so how did you
get here at all?" retorted the
teacher.
"Oh, you see, rebbe, I turn-
ed back and started home."
was the pupil's final reply.-
*
Listen to dat harmony:
I.awdy, how I loves it,
L'sten to dat melody
Lawdy, how I craves it!
Don't know when I evah
heard
Syncopationquite the word.
Listen to dat violin,
Purrin' sweet and low!
Banjo plunkin' tenderly- -
Piano just tickles so.
A jungle tune from de drum
Like a beat from a tom-tom.
A weird fantastic creeping
Spell taunts my weary brain
when de synchronizing, ah
Melodious refrain.
Now de cymbals madly
dash
into jazz dey wildly crash!
Snap my fingerscan't keep
still,
Eorgits my cares and woes
Jazz, oh Jazzuncon-
sciously
Creeping down my toes.
*
Customer : "My, what
smells so?"
Merchant: "Do you smell
it, too?"
Customer: "Yes, what is
it?"
Merchant: "Business. If
rotten."



PAGE 1

i* ;! ,i THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN January 11, 19J THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN A Weekly Newspaper Published At Miami, Florida By The Jewish Floridian Publishing Company 253 Halcyon Arcade Phone 36840 EDITORIAL STAFF J. LOUIS SHOCHET BEN DOROM A CHOCHOM A N ASHER EDITORIAL Spare the Rod and Spoil the Child When* wise King Solomon enunciated the oft repeated and now famous saying "spare the rod and spoil the child" we wonder if he had present day Miami in mind. Much discussion has been evoked among the younger feminine element of our fair City by the Editorial appearing in last week's issue. "Jus Words'* in which several glaring indiscretions on the part of Miami Jewish organizations were pointed out. "Of course it was wrong, but why stir the matter up? was the universal comment. And our reply: "Spare the rod and spoil the child." Of course, we want every Jewish organization in Miami to prosper and grow! But that growth must be in the proper direction. And above all in its growth there must not be forgotten plain and simple honesty, when one holds itself out to the world as a Jewish organization it must in simple honesty adhere to Jewish practices, at least do nothing un-Jewish. And that brings us to something at this time of great interest to the Jewish Community of Miami. As appears in the news columns of this paper public opinion has been aroused in Miami and the best elements of our Jewish Community have taken action to insure that simple honesty must be practiced in the handling and sale of kosher meats. And again the cry is raised "Why stir the matter up?" And again our answer "Spare the rod and spoil the Child." When one learns that the people of Miami have been sold and charged for what is supposed to be lamb prices and then by universal admission of all that this supposed lamb was '•GOAT." how in simple honesty can anyone say "Why stir the matter up." When we find that we have been paying a tariff for the privilege of getting suppose-dlv "KOSHER" products and ??????. can anyone in simple honesty sit idly by and say nothing? The Jewish Floridian does not believe that the purpose of a newspaper is to simply sit idly by, overlook matters of even simple honesty and just smile and pat people on the back in hopes that the circulation may be thus increased. Our conception of a newspaper is that it must present all the facts to the people, be they pleasant or even unpleasant. That it must not shirk plain duty when that duty is a matter of public interest and it proposes to carry that policy into effect at all times. We should like to see all butchers and all shochtim get along and prosper, but not at the expense of simple honesty. "Spare the Rod and Spoil the Child." we hope will be the policy of the Jewish Community and people of Miami no matter who may be involved, especially where simple honesty is involved. BROTHERHOOD In every patch of timber you Will always find a tree or two That would have fallen long ago, Borne down by wind or age or snow. Had not another neighbor tree Held out its arms in sympathy And caught the tree the storm had hurled To earth. So, brothers, is the earth. In every patch of timber stand Samaritans of forest land, The birch, the maple, oak or pine. The fir. the cedar, all the line; In every wood, unseen, unknown, They bear the burdens of their own And bear as well another form. Some brothers stricken by the storm. Shall trees be nobler to their kind Than men. who boast the noble mind? Shall there exist within the wood This great eternal In-other• hood Of oak and pine, of hill and fen And not within the hearts of men? God grant that men are like to these. And brothers brotherly as trees. —Making Paper. GREETINGS Do you remember 'way back wh

inuary U, 1929
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Page 3
: SOCIETY :
[Mr. and Mrs. Scheinberg
Itertained at their home
st Monday night, in honor of
Jr. and Mrs. C. Myers, of
jw York City, at a bridge
id card party. During the
rening refreshments were
Srved and the guests Joined
telling stories and offering
iusical numbers.
The first prize for high
bore in bridge was won by
jrs. M. Aronovitz, 2nd prize
Mrs. S. Aronovitz, booby
rize by Mrs. Hawkins.. A
eautiful guest prize was inv-
ented to Mrs. Myers, the
iest of honor. The prizes in
le non-bridge games were
)t announced. Among those
resent were: Dr. and Mrs. S.
Aronovitz, Mr. I. Aronovitz,
Ir. and Mrs. M. Aronovitz,
tr. and Mrs. Morris M. Dub-
kr, Mr. and Mrs. C. Myers, of
Jew York, Mrs. Cohen, of
few York, Stanley C. Myers,
Audrey Myers, Mr. and Mrs.
[awkins, Mr. and Mrs. P.
sheinberg, Mr. and Mrs. J.
tichter, Mrs. Isidor Cohen.
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Wucher,
re being congratulated upon
le arrival of a baby boy at
le Riverside Hospital. The
ris will take place Friday
lorning. Mother is resting
jry nicely.
Lewis Brown, Treasurer of
.eth David, Chairman of the
luilding Committee of the
ew Talmud Torah, Treasurer
1 Bnai Bri'th Local Lodge,
jid a member of the Board of
directors of the Hebrew Free
oan Society and the Jewish
,/elfare Bureau, celebrated
[is fifty-fifth birthday last
lunday. As a fitting eclebra-
lon he will act as host to the
iar Mitzva Boys Breakfast
Plub at Beth David this com-
ng Sunday. We join his host
.f friends in wishing him hap-
piness and joy in the years to
ome.
Prof. Lionel S. Mathews,
elebrated his birthday last
r4ew Years eve, by a party at
is home, 272 S. W. th St. A
lumber of friends appeared
extend their congratula-
tions and the house was beau-
tifully decorated for the
event. Games were played
ind at midnight a buffet
luncheon was served. May
rifts were received by the cel-
ebrant from his many friends.
Lmong those present were:
j*. and Mrs. Philip Schill, Mr.
md Mrs. B. Chase, Mr. and
Irs. Dan Keith, Mrs. Appuzo.
Irs. Kerrigan, Otto North,
William Englander, both of
Jermany, and the Misses
tauline and Mary Watson.
Miss Norma Wolfe, enter-
lined the Knights of the
lath, at her home, 1104 N. W.
1st St., last Saturday night at
Bridge. Quite a number of
the younger set were present
and enjoyed the evening.
Cake and tea as well as hot
dogs and sauerkraut were
served to the Knights and
Ladies during the evening.
Mrs. J. Louis Shochet left
for Baltimore last Sunday
night to visit her mother who
is critically ill in Baltimore.
Cantor Aaron Edgar is
spending the week in Miami
to enjoy a much needed rest
from his very ardous duties
with the Community Centre,
of Jacksonville, Fla. While
here, he is observing the var-
ious communal activities and
is especially interested in the
progress of the local Talmud
Torah and the pedagogical
methods in practice.
Invitations have been issu-
ed by Miss Francis Drucker-
man to a pupils' recital to be
given at 3:30 p. m. Saturday
at Mazica hall, 410 N. E. 17th
St. The program follows: (a)
The Merry Peasant, (Schu-
mann) ; (b) La Cinquantine,
(Gabriel Marie), Maurice
Cromer; The Rippling Water
(Mann-Zucca), Belle Tannen-
baum; Buttercup, (Mae Ei-
leen Erb), Rose Marion Gold-
en; (a) La Candeur, (Burg-
muller), (b) Broken Toys
(Mana-Zucca), (c) Innocence
(Burgmuller), Esther Winer;
Pierrot and Pierrette (Mana-
Zucca), Sylvia Leibovit; (a)
Prelude B Minor (Chopin),
(b) Valse A Minor (Choppin),
Doris Cromer; Faust (Gou-
nod), (a) Flower Song (b)
Soldiers' March Lucy Snowe;
Scene De Ballet, (Mana-Zuc-
ca), Jeanette Slann; Tann-
hauser (Wagner), (a) Pil-
grim's Chorus, (b) Song to an
Evening Star), Maurice Crom-
er; (a) Arabesque (Burgmul-
ler), (b) Inquietude (Burg-
muller), (c) Happy Birthday
(Mana-Zucca), Frank E. Sol-
omon; (a) Melodie (Mapse-<

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
December 29, 1944

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00828

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
December 29, 1944

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00828

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text

m

^^17-NUMBER 52
E
IS ID STIIGE NEXT
EVENT
^l!l!!^5i^ fridXTTSecember 29, 1944
The next 1 vent in the Int<*-Y
r..unral scries, sponsored by the
C i Beach YM & WHA and
JTlimnu YM & YWHA. will
a lecture on January 7 1945.
rtfctt) i) m.. at the Miami Beach
tSr High School, 1420 Drexcl
ET Miami Beach The speaker
ill be General Victor A. Yak-
hontoff. who will discuss "United
Sutcs-KussKi-Japan."
The General eminently quali-
fied to discuss this timely and
vital question became a general
,t 35 Hi .-< rved for more than
.Wo yeai with the Russian
annies in World War I. During
that war h rved as a Personal
Emissary from the Czar to the |
General Staff.
Subsequently. General Yak-
hontoff served as Assistant Sec-
retary ol War following th
throw of the Czar and a
Actini; Sei retary in the
Cabinet Following this term of
office, he was stationed in Tokyo
as military attache at the Rus- |
sun Eml
He hns lived in this country!
for manj and has been a
MANY JEWS CAN STILL
BE SAVED IN EUROPE
New York (JTA) Betwc. n
100.000 and 120,000 Jews tan
still be saved from Nazi ten -
tory in Europe, if effective m- a .
urea are taken within the next I
three months, Dr. Abraham Sil-;
berschein, a former Jewish mem-
ber of the Polish parliament who
arrived here from Switzerland
last week, told a press confer-
ence.
Dr. Bilberschein, while
PRICE TEN CENTS
En
SILVER RESIGNS
New York (JTA)Details of
the strife within the American
Zionist Emergency Council which
MAP CAMPAIGN PLANS
FOR REHABILITATION
New York (JTA)The execu-
tive committee of the World
Jewish Congress, at a meeting
here, mapped out plans for cam-
paigns in various countries in
order to raise the $10,000,000 fund
for rehabilitation and reconstruc-
tion work in Europe, voted at
the War Emergency Conference
held recently by the Congress
at Atlantic City.
A statement issued by the ex-
FEDERATION SETS
BUDGET FOR IMS
A budget of $305,182.59 was set
as the 1945 goal of the annual
ewisn Federa-
was deter-
of the board
organization
evening, at
. budget comm.it-
berofJews Vnv u' f1 5"* counc'1 In wn,ch .re>H tee presented its recommenda-
and in Austffi. He enSES I 0, fejT ion-8 *** the re8ult ?**?& 0' JS&** ** I' tons for allocations.
huge amounts ol money
that
regard t
ington
of opinion with communities affiliated with the Some 2i percent has been al-
to Zioni tta. ties in Wash- : congress will participate The I localcd to local agencies, with
winch have arisen among statement also announced the ovcrscas relief and rehabilitation
will be necessary to continue
the rescue work. The press t' (VrJ'Ini/'r election of Dr. Nahum Goldmann
{;"';',', arranged by the tion America and Dr. Wise, as chairman of the executive
and Dr. Abba Hillel committee of the Congress.
LEADERS WED
sIDWFITEDFTRE
T JEWS
I JTA)Jew
Silver, on the other. These dif-1
''.1 in connection
with the recent request by the |
Stati Department that the Pal
Ri ition be shelved l)y i
; rigres
Dr. Stephen S. Wise, who
last week offered his resigna-
tion as co-chairman of the
American Zionist Emergency
Council, issued a statement ex-
plaining the reasons for his
action. The statement follows:
"One week ago I resigned the
office of Chairman of the
JEWS PERISH RI
MARCH OF DEATH i
platfnrt: "" Russia and era hen i ovei the American Zionist Emergency
the Fai East This year he is fate of the J< Council. 1 did so because, as I
conductaii; i course at the New a result "1 a I hing
Sch'Xil for Social Research. here this w ... pro.
General Yakhontoff is one of I Nazi Premier Fei 5za isj
iseries ol four events which has thi all
the Inter-V Cultural Committee the Jew I to its
bringing to Miami during the occupation bj the Russiai
winter and pring of 1945. Sub- It is km more
.sequent include Mollv than 75,000 Jews
Picon, outstanding comedienne. Budapest at the beginnini
who i- internationally known.! month alter a pogrom during
Wlowing her appearance, Harold I which many thousands ol Jews
Bauer: American pianist, I were killed, and following the
will Rivi i joint recital with' "death march' of UKUiOO Buda-
Deanor Fine, one of the finer pest Jews to the Austrian I
pianists ol the vounger crop. The ier. No report has reached Jew-
series will conclude with Harry: ish organizations in Switzerland xi/ap tq FOLLOW TRY
Gendcl. former member of the | as to what has happen* .1 PTITr *iinr\r
Arti'f playei who is a cele- remaining 75,000 Budapest J
brated interpreter of humorous since the early part of Decem-
stated in my letter of resigna-
tion. 'I felt that it was im-
possible for me to remain
Chairman of a body one of
the leaders of whichthe
Chairman of the Executive
Committeehad deliberately
and persistently contravened
the decisions of the Council in
a matter of supreme import-
ance to the lasting hurt of our
sacred cause.' At Wednesday's
nearly all-night session of the
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 4)
IF ARAB STATE MADE
onologue>
sketches.
and character
Ni ... York (JTA)Any attempt
bar. However, the mes
Premier Szalasy as stating; "1 ((, convert Palestine into an Arab
Subscriptions for the full aerie* ask no mercy from anybody, but state or Jewish state will result
*t available at the Miami Beach i I shall also show no mercy to jn warfare withm the country,
TM & WHA one Lincoln Road, tin- Jews." Dr J L Magnes warns mtne
. and the Miami Yi\ It is assum,.d in well infonnc, j at ^ion oMne PalStine
receiving 47 percent plus.
Sixty-three organizations wili
participate in the fund-raisinft
campaign to be held in April of
this year. Campaign dates were
set after taking into considera-
tion the War Chest and Red
Cross appeals.
Local agencies to participate in
the allocation include: the Army-
Navy Committee of Greater Mi-
ami (includes the Miami Service
eague, Miami Beach Service
League. Miami Beach Jewish
Center. Freda Markowitz Post
No. 174. and Auxiliary of Jewish
War Veterans); the Council of
Bern fJTA)How tens of Social Agencies; the Greater Mi-
thousands of Hungarian Jews' ami Jewish Federation (year-
perished last month in an epic round activities); the Bureau of
"march of death.'" driven from Jewish Education; the University
Budapest to the Austrian frontier, of Miami Hillel Foundation; the
was told here by one of the YM & YWHA of Miami; and the
'"marchers" who succeeded in es- j YM & WHA of Miami Beach,
leaping to Switzerland. His eye-| Max Orovitz was chairman of
story, as published in the budget committee, whose
I the Swiss press reads. 'recommendations were unani-
"In the early days of Novem-! mously accepted by the directors.
,,,. thou .uids of Jewsmen. I Other members of this corn-
women and childrenwere j.mittee were: Harry Boyell. Nor-
hearded together in Budapest and man Rnssman, Edward Lovitz,
driven afoot toward the Austrian Benjamin Meyers, Mrs. Stanley
border. For seven or eight days C. Myers, Dr. Albert Rosentha..
we marched an average of thirty Morton Russack, Rabbi Irving
kilometers daily, sometime under Lehrman, Ben Silver, Willian:
heavy cold rain Before we set Singer and Mrs. Milton Sirkin.
out, Hungarian Nazis thoroughly Ex officio members include-
searched us so as to prevent us j Stanley C. Myers, honorary pres-
from taking along any valu-1 ident; Monte Selig, president: and
allies. At the same time, our Joseph Rose, secretary.
YWHA,
Miami
1667 S. W. 5th St..
FUNERAL SERVICES IN
NEW YORK FOR ROSEN
New York (JTA)Funeral
Wvice- was held this week for
| nRiiscn. executive director
' the American Association for
**isn Education, who died
** a* his home of a heart
Jnent. aged r,n. He became ill
l on a Western tour for
* association
Jrom 1921 until he took the
J* he held at death. Mr. Rosen
"Js director of the Associated
2ud Torahs of Philadelphia.
m central agency for Jewish
Ration in that city. Earlier
ILZ? servi'd for two years as
jw^'isor of instruction for the
I Bureau of Jewish Ed-
g- Bom in Baltimore. Mr.
| g attended Teachers Col-
?* Columbia University, and
university, receiving
*7y .?f education degree from
i* latter in 1921. He com-
T^1 his Jewish educational
B at the Jewish Theological
i*nary in 1913.
Jewish circles here that not a .-- ;;'',; R.s'suggests the
carrying .out his threat Spec.a rtj^ can be obtained^ v.
indicated. PaVeSne, "SyrST Lebanon and
PRESIDENT OF"POLISH *g*Sgi of the immfation
Z.O.A. DIES IN TEL AVIV ofj* ****%
the
identity documents were taken
away from us.
' The road leading from Buda-
pest via Komaron to the Hun-
garian border town of Hegy-
Shalom is more than 120 kilo-
meters long. On our way we
FEW IEWISH CHILDREN
ALIVE IN FREED CITY
Moscow (JTA)Only 35 of the
several thousand Jewish children
meters onj -, "-*. who resided in the Galician town
were img Jy members Drohob h in Polandi wcrc
^jE$?^fi^%l!SU ahve_ when the Red Army
.'breakdown was immediately I liberated the city, it is reported
dothes torn U pacts. to. tprtd (heir hQmcs ^
0 spend nights sleep ng along ^ Jcwish woman wh&
,In n.adside Every two day^ remaining hidden
each one of us received a piaie t___4U__ tu u -----^^ ^,,k_
of watery soup and this was all
the food we were given.
OLD DISPUTE BREAKS
AGAIN IN PALESTINE
_______ wuuiu "> i. .u pnun l _______
Tel Aviv (JTA)-Leo Levite. absorptive capacity oj we Jerusak.m (JTA)-The
rmer president .if the Zionist try, ^.f2S" has been pute about whether or
Organization in Poland, died here the initial par t> ^
at the age of 67. He was the reached there couw
head of the Palestine office in ?tead>, thougn e up
Warsaw till the outbreak of the .'mnngr-t^n ore we Arab
war and also the founder and the dtl h sue-
old dis-
r not Ger-
man should be spoken by Jews
in Palestine has flared up anew
with disclosure that the annual
Czernichovsky Bell Art Prize of
the Tel Aviv municipality will
ident of>* Po Ish-Klestine and Jewish Mrgg thheatSUhSe nn0Ct be' awarded "this year be-
nfTn Warsaw. He Cjme to fts. He emphas-^ ^ ^ of *e judges_bajked
* York (JTA)-The
\k \wnJcd Fundation
IS w h and HebreW
W t rHL. .pr,'s'nted this week i man
pre
Bank in Warsaw, ne .- 5'J"' ";" n(.ak in the name ui
SSstme in 1939 and settled In does no^ speak, m^. Qf wmch
Tel A**.__________ g f^reaident
FELLOWSHIP SET UPJW TnVSAND^ENTILES IN
JERUSALEM UNIVERSITY gjjg^OBSERVANCE
feiSlr^-'^^ a ofte Sv&S the
!!i.^S hL been established at pageant of the h taking
together with her young daugh-
ter in a house where members
of the Elite Guards were quar-
tered told a Russian correspond-
ent how for several months she
forbade her child to speak for
fear she would be overheard and
murdered.
U. N. R. R. A. PLANS FOR
TWO REFUGEE CAMPS
Washington (JTA)The United
Nations Relief and Rehabilitation
Administration plans to set up>
vu<~ two types of refugee camps in
at awarding it to a translation Europe transient and semi-per-
of Goethe. manent centers, it was learned
The two argued that not a here_
BBS* uaffB-5 KaMffUS
week, man uf the Board Ol J settlement, nVse.."Ai,on.
single German protested against
the "book burnings" of Jewish
literature. The controversy has
Col. Roger G. Powell, who
leaves within the next two weeks-
? '1'iMifcin t0 ** UP nis duties in London
been picked up BaMNeHBBBOT director of the refugee camps
the press, whl* denounce w ^ of UNRRA.S Europearj
refugees here who sun __jona, offic. dicClosed that
"herish"Mand"' use German both
in public and privately.
nobeiTprize winner
kn
attended by
ISSftZS S'SS-StfwS^S'C ^^^b^^SS^ NAMED "HIGH OFFICER *gjiit,&5&
A into a perm
ical matheni
lame of Prof
"~_ Twenty, fS!Lita" 1he~P*i
itVk^5i"'sts- Present to re-
j^t the $250 awards were five
** Sin .write. while the
W i sent to H Ayalty
S^v'de0, u"g"ay. Tiioae
ajL^i prizes were presented
ST {,Dh Opatashu. Aron
!* JTa^ry s*cklr. A. Kp-
r^[J. Fe4gin.
: 1Is- SUm ps andBonda.
,n which
ing the name ot trow*- i led the Jew- r, children
Gentile and ^w'snoarty, at
Sseri6SIB5Siag
the first ever. i*g*J *heA"'. brew songs were suM oy
gBtfggSattg^ ^rrthCeh8&Sn, Pre.
commencement exercises for .2 worje^ ^ ^
students.
Paris (JTA)-Prof. Paul Lange-
vin Nobel prize winner in physics
who was jailed by the Germans
has been elected Resident of the
League for the Rights of Man.
breeding Victor Basch. who
^Tmunfered in the woods near
Lyon together with his wife, in
December, 1943.
regional office, disclosed that
transient centers will house dis-
placed persons on their way
home for from five to seven
days, while administrative de-
trans-
portation is arranged. Semi-per-
manent camps are planned for
devastated areas, towns in Po-
land, for instance, where it will
be necessary to provide shelter
and food for those who still re-
main and for those who are re-
turning, Powell said.
Keep on buying War Bonds.


PAGE TWO
+Jew is* tkrMtam
FRIDAY. DECEMBER
29, 1J
BIRTHS
Mr. and Mrs. David Berko-
ritz, 1568 Drexel Ave., Miami
ieach, announce the birth of a
aughter December 20 at St.
rancis hospital.
Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Weinkle,
of S. W. 11th Ter., have with
them for over the holidays Mrs.
Weinkle's mother, Mrs. Sam
Schwartz, and sister, Barbara,
of Charlotte, N. C.
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Adel-
man, 5050 Alton Rd., Miami
Beach, sire the parents of a
daughter born December 22 at
St. Francis hospital.
A daughter was born to Dr.
and Mrs. Leonard Jacobson, 4523
Royal Palm Ave., December 21
at St. Francis hospital.
Mr. and Mrs. Max Weiss. 1207
Meridian Ave., Miami Beach, an.
nounce the birth of a daughter
December 22.
Sgt. Bernard Greenstein, who
was wounded in action in
France last spring, arrived in
New York Tuesday by plane
from a hospital in England. He
telephoned his wife, Bernice,
who resides with her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. M. Miller, 1636
S. W. 19th St., that he expects
to be home on furlough for
New Year's.
WEDDINGS
The wedding of Miss Esther
Hirsch and Martin Laibson will
be solemnized Sunday at the
home of the groom-to-be's par-
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Laib-
son, 733 Michigan Ave., Miami
Beach. Guests from New York
will be among those attending.
A reception will take place Mon-
day, January 1, at 2 p. m. in
the Workman's Circle Lyceum.
Miss Hirsch recently dame here
from Los Angeles. The Laibsons
1 are originally from New York.
Mrs. Max Rosenstein, 505 12th
St., Miami Beach, is leaving for
New York Saturday morning to
receive further medical treat-
ment. While away she will attend
the Bar Mitzvah celebration of
her nephew, Gerry Meyerson and
plans to return the end of Jan-
uary.
Dr. and Mrs. Mally, of Atlantic
City, have returned home after
visiting here with their uncle
and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. William
Malmut, owners of the Versailles
Hotel. While on the Beach they
were also guests of Miss Ruth
Brotman and her mother, of 1502
Jefferson Ave.
Mr. and Mrs. Al Stone of the
Blackstone hotel observed their
17th wedding anniversary this
month. They have resided in
Miami Beach for the last 14
years.
The Stones have four sons.
Richard, a lieutenant in the
I cadet corps at Georgia Military
I college; Nathaniel, a private in
I the same corps; Robert and
Joseph.
Miss Charlyne Ruskin. daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Dan B. Rus-
kin. 140 N. Hibiscus Island. Mi-
ami Beach, and bride-elect of
Lt. Sam Coolik. USNR. was
tendered a shower by Mrs. Gus
Feuer, 50 N. Hibiscus Island.
Other parties honoring Miss Rus-
kin are being planned by Mrs.
Max Orovitz, Mrs. Aaron Kanner
and Mrs. Lewis Gorfine.
Mr. and Mrs. P. Sokoloff. 1898
S. W. 4th Ave., were hosts to
more than 200 guests recently
at a benefit entertainment for
the Russian children now settled
in Biro Bidjan.
The marriage of Miss Elaine
Schindel, daughter of Mrs.
Abraham Schindel of East Or-
ange, N. J., and Lt. (jg) Edward
S. Rubin, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Rubin, of Miami Beach,
took place Dec. 3, in New York
City.
Miss Susan H. Hannoch of
South Orange. N. J.. was maid
of honor and William Rubin
brother of the bridegroom was
best man.
Mrs. Rubin was graduated from
Bradford junior college and at-
tended the Philadelphia Occupa-
tional Therapy school.
Lieutenant Rubin was gradu-
ated from John Hopkins uni-
versity and the Midshipman's
school at Northwestern universi-
ty. He recently returned to the
United States after serving in
the Pacific theater of war.
Rev. and Mrs. Joseph Malek
are spending several weeks here
before returning to Detroit,
where they now make their
home.
Mrs. Benjamin LcVine and
daughters, formerly of Coral
Gables, are now residing in Mi-
ami, at 1890 S. W. 16th Ter.
Stuart Charles, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Jack Apte, 435 S. W. 31st
Rd., is spending the holidays with
his parents before returning Sun-
day to Barnesville, Ga., where
he is enrolled as a student at
j Gordon Military College.
Also here from Gordon Mili-
tary College is Merton, son of
I Mr. and Mrs. Sylvan Wetstein,
'919 S. W. 13th Ct.
Pvt. Frederick G. Klein spent
a weekend pass with his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. A. Klein. 811
Meridian Ave., Miami Beach, be-
fore returning to Camp Blanding,
Fla. where he is stationed. Pvt.
Klein was an active A. Z. A.
and "Y" member prior to his
entering the armed forces.
LOST
Three weeks ago. Light tan
bag containing family pictures,
also son's picture killed in
action; and also Rhode Island
driver's license No. 920. Please
return against reward to Mrs.
R. S. Shoket. c o Princess Ann
Hotel. 920 Collins Avenue.
Phone 5-2196.
MOTHER
The marriage of Miss Enid
Ramber, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Irving Ramber, 1918 Liberty
Ave.. Miami Beach, and Cpl.
Harold Boxer, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Philip Boxer of Brooklyn
took place Dec. 6 in Miami
Beach.
ENGAGEMENT
Home to spend the holidays
with her family is Miss Sara
Rose Schwartz, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Meyer Schwartz, 1847
N. W. 8th St.
Miss Schwartz, a freshman at
Duke University, is a member of
Alpha Epsilon Phi sorority.
LIQUID ROACH TRAP
Keeps the home free J
from every size nd I
variety of Ruach. }
Guaranteed
No poisonNo Muss
At YOUR DRUG STORE i
or two postpaid tl 00. I
Roach Trap Co., Ft. Smith, Ark. '
for Rest
CONVALESCEMCI
-~tChronic Cases
RIVERSIDE
MEMORIAL CHAPEL
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
!2S6 WjjMnaton Art.. Mum' letch
In Hew : ork Qth St & Amsterdam Ave.
5-7777
RIVERSIDE
AMBULANCE
SERVICE
1944 CAiJULAC AMBULANCE
1944 OXYGEN FQUIPMENT
"WSun-RtiyPark
/ Health Resort
Betrothal of Miss Shirley Pat-
rick and Midshipman Jerry Gold-
lagen, USNR, is being announced
>y her mother, Mrs. Pauline Pat-
irk. 3330 Flamingo Dr., Miami
leach. Mr. Goldhagen is a son
f Mr. and Mrs. M. D. Goldhagen,
670 Lenox Ave., Miami Beach.
Vo date has been set for the
vedding.
-Ruv War Bonds Today-
Try it NOWJ
IMPROVED
ROKEAChV
irmm
UNEXCfTfiff
FOB
GOOKft.3!
baking/,
and FRYING
ALL MEAT
Miss Adele Stone, a freshman
at Louisiana State University, is
spending her holiday vacation
i with her parents Mr. and Mrs.
jJack Stone. 1884 S. W. 10th SL
i Miss Stone is a member of Alpha
I Epsilon Phi sorority and also of
Landa, their intersorority.
mi ah: w n ack io-cour rLOBio*
GENERAL PAINTING
BV BEST MECHANICS
Free Estrmatee Given
I. D. Gilbreoth Paint Co.
PHONE 0070
If Ne Aniwir Call 2-5105
MUSA ISLE
INDIAN VILLAGE
1700 N. W. 25th Atwiu
Alligator Wrestling
Alligator Farm
Wishing Well
Bead Bracelets and Bags
Silver Work Indian Dolls
Baskets Tom Toms
Pottery Blankets
Bows and Arrows
Take Bus 15 or 19
Mount Sinai Memorial Park
"Owned and Operated by
Greater Miami Jawith Cemetery Ass'n
A COMMUNTTY CEMETERY
dated Congregations: Beth David. Beth Jacob, Miami
fwish Orthodox. Schaaiwi Zedek and Sisterhood
Cheeed Shel
MIAMI
FURRIERS
Incorporated
Storage Repairing
Remodeling
AMERICAN BANK BLDG.
139 N. E. 1ST ST.
ROOM
715-18
PHONE
2-5720
JicttU totlux*
Your Compute Department
Store With Quality
Merchandise
Washington Ave. at lth Be
Miami Beach
And for your convenience
Morris Brother's New Ap-
parel and Accessory Stare
79 E. FlegUr St.. Miami
Home from Florida State Col-
lege for Women is Miss Miriam
Scheinberg who is spending her
holiday recess with her father.
P. Scheinberg. 1553 S. W. 7th St.
BRISM
Rabbi S. M. Machtei nffiTilTa
this week at the Brim of 3
sons of Mr. and MnTiVu&l
golin; Mr. and Mrs"irvintlw1"!
and Mr. and Mrs. S Safe'"!
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Mdlcr arJ
sowe ini4thes.new.homp a
b. fc. 14th St.. where they nM
entertaining their son-in-law and!
daughter Mr. and Mrs. JaX|
Land and grandson, Allan nfl
Baltimore, Md. Mrs.' Land andl
her son are well-known here for
their work in entertain.ng serv
icemen in the various hospifis
of the area last winter. Thev
are looking forward to doine the
same again this year.
ftC. 1EWBH WOMpJ
OFFERS SCHOOL LOAN
Realizing the need for trained
social workers, the Miami Sec-I
tipn. National Council of Jewish
Womtn, is offering a scholarship
loan m graduate work at an ac-
credited school of social work for
the year 1945-1946, beginning
with either the March or Ju"?
semester. y
Applications giving full parti-
culars regarding degree obtained
and graduate school the applicant
would desire to attend should be
sent to the Council office ad-
dressed to Mrs. Benjamin Le-
Vine, social welfare chairman.
BIALIK BRANCH WILL
HAVE NEW YEAR PARTY
A New Year's dinner sponsored
by Bialik Branch, J. tf W A
No. 290 will be held Sunday at
9:30 p. m. in the Royal Tea
Room of the Harrison Hotel. 411
Washington Ave., Miami Beach.
LAUDERDALE SERVICES
Rabbi Samuel H. Baron will
discuss the book "Blackmail" at
regular Friday evening servicej
at Temple Emanu-El, Fort Laud-
crdale.
Keep on buying War Bonds.
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Gurss,
561 N. E. 68th St., tendered aj
family dinner this week in honor
of their granddaughter, Barbara I
Lewis, who is home from Rollins I
College for the holidays. A guest
at the affair was Sgt. George
Bernon, of Cleveland, Ohio, who |
is at a redistribution station in
the area after having completed
28 months of overseas duty.
INCOME TAX
BOOKKEEPING SERVICE
ATTRACTIVI RATSS
WRITE OR PHONE
N. A. SERVICES
P. O. Pox 122, Miami 11, Flerlta
Phona 2-2MS
Season's Greetings
Darole Cosmetics
Patent MedicinesSundries
Full Line of Cosmetics
927 Washington Avenue
Phona 5-4124
HIGH CLASS RESTAURANT
FOR SALE
125 seats
Long lease with beautiful
duplex bungalow wall lo-
cated on Miami Beech.
Price $15,000
Mr. Jones, c/o Jewish FlorIdian
P. O. Box 2S73. Miami
END Of If
1
JLL
1
iL
Shop during Burdine's
clearance of broken stocks
left from a busy holiday
season. Clearance values
on every floor of our Mi-
ami Stare.
MOUNT NEBO
THE CEMETERY OF DMTINCnON
FOR DISCRIMINATING FAMILB8
Rabbi S. M. Machtei. Director
Oiympia Building
34720
SID PALMER'S FUNERAL HOME
m,r5HVING THE JEWISH COMMUNITY- *
PHONE 9-2884 "A nump im weed- 2008 W. FLAGLER


f^iV. DECEMBER 29, 1944
BEACH VOTERS
fggl TOJE-REGISTER
-.haDProximately 14 000 Mi-
Wachvo..rS facing the pros-
^ rc-n gistering before the
^nun:. ;oal election City
^ r W Toinlinson. who also
RJrviw'> "f registrations, in-
tffida campaign to urge all
KTto re-reg&tar a8 soon as
hi
KJ the new system, voters
u be permanently registered
t M municipal elections. A
^residence in Florida and
^months m Miami Beach are
SSSw for qualification to
register.____________
TOUNGVIOLINIST WILL
APPEAR IN CONCERT
Carroll Glenn, young American
noiinist who will be guest artist
X thrd of the series of Uni-
versity of Miami Symphony or-
ffi concerts, wi 1 be heard
&p m. Sunday Jan 14
Jlliami Senior High school
judilorium.
MIAMICHAPTER N.H.I.C.
TO HOLD OPEN MEET
An open meeting of the Miami
chapter. National Home for Jew-
oh Children at Denver, will be
held Tuesday, January 2. at 1:30
p. m. at the YM & WHA. 1 Lin-
coin Rd.. Miami Beach. Candle-
light servues in memory of the
Utc Midge (John, active worker
of the organization who passed
iway last year, are planned for
that time. A hoard meeting will
proceed the affair.
TRI BETAS TO INDUCT 6
NEW MEMBERS FRIDAY
Six new members of Tn Beta
sorority will be Introduced Fri-
day evening at the group's an-
nual holiday rimnei dance at
the Latin Quarter
They aiv Miss Harriet Hand
daughter of Mi and Mrs
Rand; Miss Carol Jane Wolpert
daughter of Mr and Mrs George
Wolpert; Miss Sheila Lewis
daughter of Mr. and Mr- J
Gerald Lewis; Miss Paye Zwick
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jack
Zwick; Miss Carol Steuer, daugh-
ter of Mrs. Max Steuer. and Miss
Sybil Cowen. daughter of Mr
and Mrs. Morns 1. Cowen.
Mrs. George Chertkof, sponsor
and Mr. Chertkof will attend.
The young women were in-
stalled at formal candlelight cere-
monies Dec. 17 at the home of
Miss Rosalie Kotkin, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Kotkin, 1344
S. W. 17th Ter.
A chow mein supper at Miss
Kotkin's was followed by an in-
formal party at the home of the
president. Miss Judith Wolpert,
1776 S. W. 16th Ave.
Miss Wolpert is vice president
of the fraternity sorority council
of which Tn Beta is an active
member.
The group is planning to do-
nate proceeds of its annual win-
ter carnival, held in the early
part of the month, to the hero's
phone fund of the Biltmon- hos-
pital
Another welfare project uf the
group is work at the Fleetwood
canteen. Miami Beach.
^^tfkrkUan
PAGE THREE
GREEN LANTERN
RESTAURANT
Po d For the Best
PRIVATE
DINING ROOMS
Visit Our Winery Lounge
345 ALCAZAR AVE.
PHONE 4-6225
CORAL GABLES
Keep on buying War Bonds.
Face Facts
Br Alexander F. Miller
Florida Regional Director
A"' Defamation League
eago is at present the head-
quarters of most of the more!
raoid anti-democratic organiza-
tions and The Constitutional
Americans are one of the most
uninhibited of Chicago's nation-
alists, administration-hating. Jew-
baiting clusters. Their titular
head and preceptor is George T
foster, a thin, brown-haired,
tervid man of 50 who operates
a knit goods and art sh>,p with
his wife on the northwest side.
roster calls himself "a profound
student of politics, government
and international affairs and a
lecturer on American history."
He is "dedicated to the recapture
of constitutional government."
His group has been in existence
for three years. It numbers "sev-
eral thousands," Foster claims.
According to report received
here concerning a recent meeting
of this group. Foster who was
called as a defense witness for
1 William Dudley Pelley during the
! Silver Shirt fuehrer's trial for
| criminal sedition in 1942 and
I who was a delegate to Gerald
| L. K. Smith's America First party
| convention in Detroit, last Aug-
' USt, read to his audience long ex-
cerpts from a cheaply printed
pamphlet, "The Cross of War."
i Tin- pamphlet he termed "the
most significant thing I ever
. have seen."
$25 to SI00
WAR BOND FREE
For information leading to the
purchase of a
1935 to 1941 CAR
Phone 9-1085 Day or Night
JOSEPH EPSTEIN
For Real Estate Investment*
665 Washington Avenue
PHONE 5-7084
ftfa/katutfyfc "There are some things worse
than defeat," he finished, "and
one of them is to prostitute our
flag and our democratic way of
n behall ol a foreign ty-
ranny."
Almost as good at casting a
William J- Grace, Chi-
cago's No. l rabble-rouser whose
wi rk was detailed in an earlier
article in this series. Foster reads
words slowly, lei them sink
in.
He got the response he wanted.
On tins night American boys
were going over the top all
ng the western front. But in
jammed, stuffy little hall in
the Atlantic Hotel, no prote l
Foster's inouthu
Maledictions there were against
Prebj j, ni Roi evelt, the British
and the Jews. For Foster there
v. is approval.
I "That's light." clucked an anci-
ent crone at the reporters side
Gustave Homer Maertz. contact
man of native Fascism, turned
around and winked at the re-
. rte, Mary Parker vendor of
1 Court Ashers ant.-Seni.t.c sheet
the X-Ray. jumped up in glee.
Mary Leach, secretary to Eliza-
beth Dilling, the Roman ca dk
uf -the movement, beg .pass
By Rabbi Simon April
With the approach of midnight
Sunday the year 1944 will depart
into the great sea of the past,
and the New Year, with new
hopes for a better world, will be
ushered in. This New Year finds
us in the midst of a great struggle
for national survival. It is there-
fore befitting that we devote a
few moments to examine the im-
plications of this new milestone
in our national life.
A mountain is in space what a
New Year is in time; it is an
elevation and those who stand
on its summit may survey the
area below. New Year is an
elevation in time, and those that
place themselves upon it. may
look backward and forward, to
the right and to the left, to sur-
vey the past and cast a glance
upon the future. But as we shift
our glance from this elevation
of the New Year into the im-
mediate past, we are bewildered
by the horrors of war and what
it entails. The events of the past
year have paraded before us
with such feverish intensity that
1 we have paid the calendar small
j heed. Thus we have not realized
that another year is about to
take its place on the musty shelf
of memory.
Will anyone miss the year now-
ending? Yes, those whose dear
ones were taken never to return
to them, but few others will re-
gret its passing. For it is a year
packed with death from the air,
the land, and sea; with further
destruction of homes, fields, and
landmarks; with the flight of
thousands from shambles, which
1:45 p.m.
DON'T MISS THE
HISTORY-MAKING
NEW YEAR'S
MORNING
MACE PROGRAM DAILY DOUBLE
Special Pj$1, 10 a. m. 1st and 2nd Races
Ueated m Bird RoadUFst of Kllwre Twer
USS THAN MINE MILES FROM DOWNTOWN MIAMI
tie movemi ',"-" -. .
, out copies of "The Cross of
War" at a nickel a piece, but
would not sell one to the re-
PCharies J Anderson. Jr. the
8*5*" r% Negro* uUer'-
Semitic and n,,l\ri, fun
ances, laughed to see hm,uf^.t,
s ft sr&s s
LVSB MS'- ,h,s
great victory? reporter,
he did not turn anaw. burst
Anderson s MtWggS a short.
Earlier in the mectmg. ^
heavy-set white n Thornton>
inlrc^uced a Thorn
declared c,llfe".... nud to. They
Bonds because tht> naa hemi
took 60 days to, pas^
he said, and then y ^
cash them to beCJUK {q buy
I have my con attempt
u( frCe Wf^JLlroni me I
to take this a*a* undcrground.
ss &HS s&-
test*s* rs
' h,micl control.
sugar because o> y re_
"* ^athv edict causing the
strieted by ,cc said it "was
cigaret ******& have to
. getting so a man his fe
{g Sfc^hS a pretty nice
! kisser."
i were their dwelling places and
the dwelling places of their fa-
thers. It is a year shrouded in
memories of absent ones, in the
I sound of voices that will not be
heard again. To them we can pay
! only silent tribute for the great-
est thing they have done in their
lives. They have now. as we
know, the tragedy of being taken I
long before their time.
For us Jews it is not a new
1 experience, for throughout our
history we have been tested, and
thai long history is testimony of
! the power of our great and un-
shattei able faith which is ex-
i pressed in our conception of re-
ligion. .
This present conflict is not
i merely a militaristic struggle for
: national power. We arc not only
I engaged in a war for the physical
! safety of our country, our dear
' ones, and our possessions, but we
' are also fighting for the vindica-
tion of every noble principle of
' our religious faith and our Amer-
' ican traditions. We see m the
world-wide sweep of this con-
flict the clash of two forces: the
one leading to certain enslave-
ment of mankind, the other to a
hope of freedom for all human-
ity. We must forge into actuality
our dreams of a new world,
whose foundation of justice and
peace we must plan immediate-
ly, that will arise from this terri-
ble catastrophe. Every believer
in a living G-d can and will de-
note all his resources of body
and mind to such a cause. In this
struggle we hear again the anci-
ent call, "Who is unto the Lord
let him come to me."
It can be taken for grantee
that we are giving unstinted aic
to the military and naval forces
of our country and shall continue
to do so; it is obvious that we
are more than lending a helping
hand to the support of our gov-
ernment, but more than this is
necessary, for this is a battle not
simply for the strong in arms but
for the staunch in heart, and the
pure of soul. This demands
strengthening of our inner spirit-
ual resources, through the unin-
terrupted functioning of the re-
ligious and cultural institutions
of our land.
It is interesting to recall th
when the Temple was destroy
nearly nineteen hundred ves I
ago, Rabbi Jochanan ben Zak. ,
a far sighted leader of his peop:
obtained from the Roman com-
mander, Vespasian, the permis-
sion to establish a school at
Jamnia. The Rabbi knew that
only the literature of Israel might
preserve the landless people. He
acted upon the Rabbinic maxim.
"Upon the breath of children in
the schoolhouse rests the future
of the world."
May G-d deem us worthy of
seeing this battle through to a
triumphant conclusion this com-
ing year, nineteen hundred and
forty-five. May He fill our hearts
with greater hopes for the better
world to be born of our sorrow
and sacrifice, that all we endure
will be accounted as nought in
the light of ultimate ;victorya
victory that shall bring glory not
merely to us but to Him. the
establishment of whose Kingdom
among men is our chief prayer
and purpose.
.-tft
3GUST BROS Ry
ANHEUSER-BUSCH
Budweisei
TRAD! MAHK WO. U. *AT. OTF.
EVERYWHERE
Distributed by
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1220 Ocean Drive
MIAMI BEACH
Dining Room Open to Public
Strict Dietary Cuisine
I WANT MY MILK
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Vitamin "IT Milk
"Milk Product*"
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THE HOLIDAYS
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Packed. Priced and Shipped
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icidul
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Holiday Special
Fancy Oift Baskets
Mixed Florida Fruit
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Express
Extra
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3.75
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REG. PACKING HOUSE
Bonded Shippers
2114 N. W. First Awe. Ph. 3-14M
PLACE YOUR ORDER NOWl
Um Buitt 7, and 13


I
PAGE FOUR
+Jewisii fhrkUan
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 29. 194
The Jewish Floridian
Plant and Main Offices, 21 S. W. Second Avenue, Miami. Fla.
P. O. Box 2973____________________ Phone 2-1141
Entered as Second Class Matter July 4, 1930 at the Post Office
of Miami, Florida, under the Act of March 3, 1879
__________FRED K. SHOCHET, Managing Editor
Subscription1 Year, $2.00 Six Months, $1.00
MIAMI 18, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 29, 194
TEBET 13, 5705
VOLUME 17 NUMBER 52
A NEW CHALLENGE
In the midst of new revelations of the mass slaughter of
lews in Nazi death camps, an announcement issued by the
United Jewish Appeal for Refugees, Overseas Needs and
Palestine provided concrete evidence that the Jews of the
United States are fully conscious of their responsibility in
helping those who have survived the ordeal of persecution
and extermination. The United Jewish Appeal reported that
it had passed the $100,000,000 mark in its campaigns since
1939 as the unified fund-raising instrument for the Joint Dis-
tribution Committee, the United Palestine Appeal and the
National Refugee Service. This is perhaps the best reflection
of the importance which American Jews attach to the pro-
grams of overseas relief and rehabilitation, the upbuilding of
the Jewish National Home and refugee adjustment in the
United States. In the period of the gravest crisis in Jewish
life throughout the world, they have responded generously to
the campaigns of the United Jewish Appeal to sustain hope in
the midst of despair, to maintain life in the midst of destruc-
tion, to provide homes and havens in the midst of mass
wandering.
That American Jews have contributed the impressive total
of 510,000,000 in less than six years to the major rescue and
reconstruction agencies represented in the United Jewish Ap-
peal is an achievement in which all of them may take great
pride. At the same time, however, we must recognize that we
are now entering a period which will involve far greater obliga-
tions in meeting vastly increased tasks directly linked to relief,
rehabilitation, reconstruction and settlement in Palestine of
surviving Jews in Europe freed from the death grip of Nazi
oppression. All of us are justified in rejoicing in the encourag-
ing results of the nationwide United Jewish Appeal.
We see that the approach of victory which has brought
far greater opportunities for saving and restoring JewisMWife
has also brought a new challenge to American Jewish generosi-
ty and service.
6. E. S. TO INSTALL NEW TESTIMONIAL- DINNER
OFFICERS ON TUESDAY TENDERED DR. KAPLAN
ZIONISM
SPLITS OKI ACTS:
SILVER itS I ENS
(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1)
Emergency Council, the resign-
ation was not acted upon, but
a motion was passed inviting all
the officers of the Executive
Committee to resign, in order
that it might be free to act
upon all resignations at the
same time. I believe a meeting
is to be held in the near future.
I could not return to the serv-
-TTDBrrS FROM EVEH1
fMidtbj, eorifidetUiai
-By phineas j. biron-
LISTEN HERE .. .
No. 1 Eat 65th Street New York City, is one of the
popular recreational centers for soldiers and sailors on 1^
. It gives them a club atmosphere plus dormitory accomSTj
tions But the most important thing that 1 East 65th I
compiishing is this: It is helping to destroy anti-Semitisrn 1
The place is run by volunteer director Mrs. Ely Jacques Kais I
and 3,000 junior hostesses in the basement of TempleFmr,! nl
with the help of the Jewish Welfare Board Its non^ct *
character, plus the wonderful spirit of the girls who are act"3111
as hostesses there, does a lot to puncture the anti-Jewish I
judices that some of the boys bring there Now thau,o -
i couia nox reiuto w un { _i r i m mey re say-l
ice of the Zionist Emergency mg that the Shakespearean play Paul Muni is plannina tJ
Council unless the reconstitut- appear xn on Broadway this season is "The Merchant
ing of the Council gave assur- j Venice" ... If true, this would be unfortunate indeed u
SS, ^permitt*"' eoSS *2 "T* 2&JSETt t ^^ l *
vene its considered and final a time when anti-Semtism is being fostered for service after
decisions." | the war .
The opponents of Dr Silver yOU SHOULD KNOW .
Claim that lie exceeded his au- _, _
thority in his efforts to secure The rumors that Governor Thomas E. Dewey is to replace
passage of the Palestine Resolu-. the Rev. Everett Clinchy, who is a paid official as Dresidpn*
tion by the Senate Foreign Rela-, 0f ^ National Conference of Christians and Jews mZl-
zn59iS& fiw! =sibu'we ftv v$ =P5-WE-
ment. Dr. Silver claimed that' than rumors The Rev. Mr. Clinchy would, it is said, remain
the majority of the members of | on as the executive chairman, and Dewey would become th*
both houses of Congress were head of ^ Conferencewithout pay, of course The srhnrl
l&*-ifS 2P^ under which Jewish cHen residing in C^Vemon!
the State Department was the ((Montreal) are being educated in Protestant schools may be
result of the work of only a terminated on June 30, 1945 This would confront the Hurra.
Washington Sficiab'whfsTk to | "*J^J*** *h thppbleM of establishing Jewn
small, but
luence President Roosevelt and j 8ch?^ n.ce i"tho Province of Quebec all public education
the administration against the | is divided into Catholic and Protestant panels, and the Jews
Zionist demand for a Jewish j have so for been a part of the Protestant division
WAR ECHOES .
Watch out for a new book, "Axis Rule in Occupied Europe,'
by Raphael Lemkin Published by the Carnegie Endowment
Mrs. Max lialpern will be m-
stalled as Worthv Matron of
Emunah Chapter No. 175 O.E.S.
;it a formal installation Tuesday
night at 8 p. m. at the Scottish
Rite Temple.
Mrs. John Ramey, Grand Mat-
ron of the State of Florida will
be the installing officer. Assist-
ing her are the following: Mrs.
Jennie Gore, installing grand
chaplain, Mrs. Lillian Johnson,
installing grand marshall. Mrs.
Fred E. Hank, assistant grand
marshal and Mrs. G. C. Thomp-
son, intaalung grand organist.
Officers for 1945 to be installed
include Albert Bacher, worthy
patron, Mrs. Philip Levi, associ-
ate matron, William Friedman,
A testimonial dinner in honor of
Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan's seventieth
birthday was attended by 250
Palestine.
At a meeting of the American
Zionist Emergency Council this
Wednesday, which lasted until
u-nX^ i*- a > PS**" **z****
activities in Washington. His re- [ f ocument to roach the public at this tune with authentic in-
port was followed by a motion, formation on what the "new order" has done to Europe
Introduced by one of the ZOA; If you speak German with a correct accent, better skip this-^
EoK' 'ST "refeSd^/SoSS l** Broadway they're now saying that Hitler's da'ys are
motion recommending that all getting fuehrer and fuehrer .
officers of the Council resign' JEWISH NFWS
and that new elections be held ,,, ,, ..
was then introduced. The Zion-1 We want to call your attention to the excellent work being
st Laborites urged that the mo-' done by the Union of Russian Jews, Inc., with headquarters in
I1"!1 ,.M!I..1;'1!.1!.''.1, .,)U.l..l.l.H.'1"' SK"! New York, toward bringing American Jews in contact with
their relatives in Russia, so many of whom have been beyond
the reach of ordinary communications channels since the out-
break of the war ... In the two years that the organizations
has been active some 5,000 families in this country have re-
established contact with their relatives in Russia The
Contemporary Jewish Record, published by the American Jew-
ish Committee, is looking for an editor to replace the late
tion was not accepted. Where-
upon Dr. Silver submitted his
resignation before the motion was
taken to a vote. Dr. Wise, it is
reported, prepared his resigna-
tion two weeks ago, as an ex-
pression of disagreement with
Dr. Silver's tactics.
The meeting of the Council
persons last Tuesday evening.
Temple Israel, of which Dr. Kap-1 was held in camera, but it has Adolph S. Oko .
Ian Is rabbi emeritus, presented
1 the guest-of-honor with a thous-
| and dollar war bond in honor of
the occasion. The Sisterhood like-
wise presented a gift. Herbert
; U. Felbelman was chairman of
| the committee in charge of ar-
rangements and served as toast-
| master. Assisting him were
Frank A. Perlman, Joseph R.
1 Stein, Mrs. Maxwell Hyman,
Harry Boyell, Mrs. Louis Zeientz
and Mrs. J. Gerald Lewis.
associate patron, Mrs. Saul Bolen- \ Outstanding city officials, menv
ky, secretary, Mrs. Morris Frank, bers of the press and clergy Were
treasurer, Mrs. Jack Rosen, con-1 present to pay tribute to Dr
ductresS) Mrs. Harry Hacker, as- Kaplan.
sociate conductress, Mrs. Edward .____________
J. Cooper, chaplain, Mrs. Harry CFTFRRflTPT*
Moms, marshall. Miss Florence ^-LfclSKAl
Cooper, organist, Mrs. Dave
Roscnblum, Adah, Mrs. Sam Aus-
lander, Ruth, Miss Elyse Bacher,' John Roy Carlson, celebrated
Esther, Mrs. Joe Schwartz, Mar- author of the best siller "Under
tha, Mrs. Charles Bears, Electa. Cover" will speak at the Miami
resignations of Dr. Wise and Dr.
Silver will be accepted. A meet-
ing of the Council is scheduled
for Wednesday.
AUTHOR
TO SPEAK HERE JAN. 18
Mrs. Jack Bernstein, wardor, and
Mrs. Sidney Palmer sentinel.
AGUDATH HAMORIM IN
FIRST MEETING JAN. 2
The first meeting of the newly-
organized Agudath Hamorim of
Greater Miami will be held Tues-
day, January 2, at 1030 Washing-
ton Ave., Miami Beach. Hebrew
teachers are urged to attend the
event, which will begin at 8:15.
M. C. !. W. TO HOLD
FIRST MEET OF YEAR
Tne first meeting of the New
Year for the Miami Section, Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women
will be held Wednesday, January
3, at 2 p. m. at the YM & WHA,
1 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach.
Program is under the direction
Senior High School on January
i 18, under the auspices of tile
i Miami Community Forum. Carl-
son, who has continued his in-
vestigative work since the com-
pletion of his sensational book
I will reveal additional facts which
i he has unearthed concerning or-
i ganizations and individuals who
| are still endeavoring to create
I disunity and to sabotage our war
I efforts.
Reverend Joseph Barth. Di-
rector of the Community Forum
announces that tickets are avail-
able at the Forum office, 1616
Bnckell Ave.
been learned that the represent-; wtnar* BT HrtTrc
Stives of the ZOA and most of MUSICAL NU1ES> .
the representatives of Hadassah It is very fitting that the Victor people chose piano virtusoso
PPuSe Sl3J!6SI^ for was Rubu^in who over a quarter of a
as did Louis Lipsky. The Council j century ago, discovered and sponsored the young and un-
is yet to decide whether the, known Villa-Lobos in Paris, where thin Latin-American com-
poser, now called the Beethoven of Brazil, was then struggling
to make a name for himself ... A brilliant musical deubt took
place at New York's Town Hall recently, when Mildred
Waldman, who hails from Cleveland and Chicago, showed
the big town how she can play the piano We predict that
ere long Mildred will be one of Americas favorite recitalists
. Metropolitan Opera tenor Jan Peerce is so nearsighted that
he can't see a thing without his glasses ... So what does he
do when singing those romantic tenor roles, when spectacles
would clash horribly with the picturesque Metropolitan cos-
tumes, and falling over the scenery would spoil the mood of
the production? Answer: He wears contact lensesyou
know, those plastic lenses that are worn directly over the
eyeball .
ABOUT PEOPLE .
Washington rumors that Secretary of the Treasury Mor-
genthau may resign after the Sixth War Loan drive has been
successfully concluded But that's just the old anti-Morgen-
thau campaign, which won't succeed Life marches on
item: French playwright Henri Bernstein, out of touch with his
family gince the fall of France, has learned that not only are his
wife and daughter safe, but his daughter is now married and
has made him a grandfather 1945 will welcome to the
ether waves none other than Dorothy Parker, that queen of
wit, who will have a regular radio program. _____
KEY WEST SERVICEMEN
IN SPIRITUAL MEETING
A large number of servicemen
attended the services held at the
Jewish Synagogue, corner of
of Mrs. Harry Marcus, consumer^ Simonton and Southard Sts
elfare chairman. Speakers for with Rev. L. Lehrer offfciating'
Mr. and Mrs. G. Kirchik and
the afternoon will be Mrs.
George P. Dane of the War
Chest and an OPA representa-
Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Kantor pre-
sented the synagogue with Chan-
uve. Members and friends are uka candleabras in an impres-
Invited. sive ceremony, and Joe Pearlman
The National Council of Jew- j and Lt. Harold Shapiro addressed
an Women will hold its board the gathering. Appropriate re-
meeting Wednesday morning.
Friday, Dec. 22:
Vmerl in lew h C ngj i is, Worn -
BYldi !< view, l SO
p in
Sunday. Dec. 24:
Miami lieach Bervlc* Lmsim,
u< i h v. iupp*r and dance.
Monday. Dec. 25:
American Jewiah CongTeaa, Wom-
en a Dlvlalon, regular tneetinc, af-
''......... Bualneaa a Profeaalonal
Dlvlalon nf II id.ims,ih. I'HKular
''">;"?. Beaoh v, | 15 P. m ;
Beaca \ Dance, Hoach "Y." 8
|> m.
Tuesday, Dec. 26:
Blallfe Singing Society nponnored by
the Bureau of j-wi.h BduoaUoo
with the } and affiliated con-
iregaUona, iteach "Y." 8 p. m.
Wedoeaday, Dec. 27:
Bath Ja.ob Adult Iiiatltute, 8-10
v "Ui. Workn;*n'a t''r-le Branca
;>o. 69Z. executive committee meet-
!"". PiJ"Si Mu""l Beach Jewish
-"tor Adult 0.uraea In conju.io-
Bduoatlon and aponaorlng organlaa-
ll'mH, 8 ji. nv
Thuraday. Dec. 2g:
American Jewiah ConKrean, Worn-
jnj Ml vlilon. Terrace Ileataurant,
ii--u.li. deaart luncheon, l p. m
gaVM ffjm* larae,; Beth
AUXILIARY HELD FIRST
BOARD MEET DEC. 27
,. Bnai B'rith Auxiliary held its
first officers and board meeting
of the season on Wednesday, De-
cember 27. .with Mrs. Dorothy
Borenstein. newly-elected presi-
London Arms
Hotel
727 Collins Avenue
MIAMI BEACH
Finest Kosher Culain*
Open to the Public
Phone 5-1264
A good bur Is War **&&
now and yo win be paid later
*4.00 tor every 00.
January tTSrVTUTSTBi SSSTtte? headed 5T3t ^h" SfiJS ^^T^^hST* 8rm^ SL^Z tH
Beach Y. rer. y ^h-( the Seven Seas. Restaurant pre- -cei the he,p "'
ceded the meeting. NOW and give our men
Bonrb
in th.
Opera II Trovatorc
by Verdi
with four famoui artuu,
big chorus and orchestra
DR. MODESTE ALLOO
Conductor
DR. ARTURO DI FILIPPI
Artistic Director
January 4th JanuarT ,tB
January Ith
Miami Senior High School
Auditorium on West FlaglerSt
At t:15 P. M.
Tickets on sale at Burdmas


Ki
DECEMBER 29^1944
^J^stfhridliairi
"Between You and Me"
By BORIS SMOLAR
Copyright, 1944, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.
CflONIST SCENE: The
^..ion of Dr. Stephen S.
5 'donDr. Abba HUM Silver
^airmen of the American
^Emergency Committee
the committee without
hio temporarily until new
Jans of officers are held .
kC to say, these resigna-
Kll provoke a good many
1 "is amon Zionist through-
ti country All that can
^Sealed at present is that
Ek resignations were not moti-
I by the same reasons .
Tthat it would be a mistake
?*ume that both co-chairmen
>d to express solidarity
Ech other ... The contrary
tL rase The meeting at
t Dr Wi>, and Dr. Silver
mtted their resignations was
of the stormiest the Zionist
'merit in America ever had
[Sufficient to say that it lasted
1 i early morning ... If the
Is of this meeting are ever
. public, Zionist rank-and-
i will find out many inter-
I things Especially, with
to the work affecting
, activities in Washington,
,' Zionist leaders compete
B each other in running to
wnment offices ... It is safe
redict that Dr. Wise will prob-
/ be re-elected ... As to Dr.
Hver, it looks as if he has re-
ii for good despite the fact
t a resolution censuring him,
^red by Dr. James Heller, was
ETpassed at the session ... As
goal, the Mizrachi and the
Efcontes backed Dr. Silver while
lie ZOA and Hadassah repre-
attuves opposed him.

THE AMERICAN SCENE:
rything points to the fact
the tendency to "snipe" at
.1 which was displayed during
! past Kssion of Congress will
I be present in the 79th Con-
ss. This is a result of the
X that some outstanding issola-
nists, bchir.i! whom many anti-
jmtes operated, were defeated
I the November elections .
never, Clare Hoffman of
Jchigan, ami J.hn Rankin of
feounthe two leading "snip-
T at Jewswon re-election to
[House of Representatives .
00 the other hand, a number of
new liberals will enter the Sen-
fi^ i'-u ThSX includ<" at least
three liberal Democrats and two
liberal Republicans And
speaking of the elections, it has
now been established that in
neither volume, nor variety, did
scurrilous literature play as great
a part in the election campaign
as it did four years ago The
annonymous outpourings of vitu-
perative, un-American, for the
most part anti-Jewish, material
at that time flooded the records
of the special committee set up
by the Senate to investigate cam-
paign expenditures Approxi-
mately 250 different examples
came to its attention The
most scurrilous and libeious prop-
aganda conducted during the
elections this year was earned
under the slogan: "Clear Every-
thing With Sidney" Pennsyl-
vania's Republican chairman M.
Harvey Taylor admitted before a
Senate committee that this group
financed to the tune of nearly
$15,000 the printing of 3,000,000
copies of a pamphlet "Clear
Everything With Sidney" .
This pamphlet was barred from
the mails by the Post Office De-
partment About 200,000
copies, however, were actually
distributed The results of
the elections have also shown
that the political prestige of John
L. Lewis, United Mine Workers'
chief, ebbed to a new low despite
his veiled anti-Semitic editorials
in the United Mine Workers
Journal.
RESERVATIONS HEAVY I
FORHADASsJHDmS
fflSULttl ft
*KffiSoS
success because of the reception
already g.ven the Latin Quarter
E?3fe d are exertinj
success th? I lnSUrt" financia'
tendancethrUgh C3pacit* *'
ma*nrS;fHoTy Rubin is c-chair-
man of the event, assisted by
mi tee members stress the fact
that no reservations will be tak-
en by the Latin Quarter that
evening thus making advance'
reservations mandatory
In line with their policy of
all-out effort to assist service-
men recreation, Mr. and Mrs.
Aiex Van Strattan are soliciting
purchasers of tickets to sponsor
me attendance of servicemen.
' u i'J0C,V'ds wiH K0 t0 tnc Roths-
child Memorial hospital in Pales-
tine, which was built in 1939.
Ri rvationa may be secured by
contacting Mrs. Harold Spaet
(6-2012). Mrs. Harry Platafi
'5-01631, or Mrs. George Chertkof
13-7223).
PAGE FIVE
LEGAL NOTICES
uiK222L 12 '"-:bhy GIVEN that
the underslKned. desiring to ensure
Wnhini^NIK. ffiJWS Avenue. Miami Beach,
SSSft-te^!*1 }? reslHt" the Bald
r?4 *," he,.Clerk of lhe Circuit
court of Dade County. Florida
12/1-8-15-22-29 BHKA HKRMAN-
t.,.NTl,CB,IH "KTIEBV GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
lit kC wA vMK pwi!L T. Ni R,ver Urlve- "'ami,
Morion, Intend to reglnter the said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Morlda
ANN NADl.ER
JIAIUtY TIH.HIJ5R
SEYMOIU I'ROTZEL
... ,___ 1IKKI1 II. COHEN
SILVER. KAPLAN I.1ETZ.
ufsssss-sr Ap""ran,!'
NfiTICK IS UEFlEltY GIVEN that
the undersigned Ik engaged In busl-
SSJf. ,'J"'l"r the fictitious name of
"l VIS SANDWICH SHOP at 422
V Miami Ave., Miami, Florida, and
intendto register the said ficititious
name In the office of the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida
MORR1TZ YOUNG
a, ,... 1IAKUY KATKOVSKY
BILVER, KAPLAN & MKTZ
Attorneys f.>r Applicanta
U-ti | 5
LEGAL NOTICES
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of MAGIC CITY BOTTLE AND SUP-
PLY at 222 Northwest 27th Street.
Miami, Florida, intend to register the
said name with the clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
ISAAC EMMER
ISIDOR BERKOWITZ
.MYERS & HEIMAN
Attorneys for Applicants
12/29 1/5-12-19-26
BEACH WOMEN SELL
$3,310,182.75 IN BONDS
The Miami Beach women's di-
vision of bond selling groups pf
Dade County have totaled S3,-
310,182.75, it was announced this
week by Mrs. Louis Glasser, CO-
chairman of the division and
head of the Jewish organization
groups. The women sponsored
the purchase of a hospital
Mrs. William McBeth i
chairman, together with
Glasser.
HOME FOR AGED WILL
HAVE ELECTION IAN. 3
The Home for the Aged will
hold its election of officers at a
public meeting of the organiza-
tion January 3 at the Miami
Beach Y. The chairman of the
nominating committee. Alfred B.
.stein, will make his report.
Following the election, plans
for a community-wide mass
meeting will be arranged. The
selection of property to house
the organization will also be dis-
cussed.
Members of the community in-
terested in this project are in-
vited to be present.
B'NAI B'RITH LED WITH
BLOOD FOR 3 MONTHS
NOTICE is HEREBY OIVEN that
ine undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
if ROXY GRILLE at |07 8. W. 8th
Street, Miami, Florida, intends to
register the said name with the clerk
"f the Circuit Court of IXide County,
Florida.
jack KAUFMAN
AUK ROSENTHAL
MYERS & HEIMAN.
Attorney! for Applicants.
12/8-15.JJ-JJ 1/8
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to enuage
in business under the fictitious name
of THEMARHOK APARTMENTS. 121
N. W. 3rd Avenue. Miami, Fla.. In-
tend to register the said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
DAN I ED ZAI1ARSKY
AIIRAM WASSERMAN
Owners,
DIANA COPPERSMITH
Attorney for Applicanta.
12'S-ir.-22-2! 1/5
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Chapter 17457Acts of 1936
File A 8667
NOTICE IS" HEREBY GIVEN that
Joseph Stern holder of State and
County Tax Certificate No. 6218 Is-
sued the f.th day of June, A.D. IMt,
has filed same in my office, and ha -i
made application for a tax deed to
be issued thereon. Said Certificate
embraces the following described
property In the County of Dade, Slate
of Florida, to-wlt:
I*ot 13, Block 28, City of Miami
South, Plat Book B, Page 41. In
the County of Dade, State of Florida.
The assessment of said property
under the said certificate was in the
name of Lout* llffer.
(Tnleea eald certificate shall be re-
dei med according to law, the prop-
erty described therein win be sold
to the highest bidder at the Court
House door on the first Monday la
the month of February, 1945. which
is the f.th day of February. 1945.
dated this 27th day of December, 1944.
K l! LEATHERMAN.
Clerk of Circuit Court,
Dade County, Florida.
(Circuit Court Seal)
By L. M. JOHNSON, D. C.
12/29 1/5-12-19
Buy U. S. Stamps and Bonds.
f l 0 1 0 A S FIN:.: i'.tC;CAN|lWISH DINNER
r 114 II V\ 446 COLLINS AVt
IY.RIECiIIS
DR. AARON J. COHEN
OPTOMETRIST
ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF HIS OFFICE AT
542 41st STREET, MIAMI BEACH
FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE EYE
"COMPLETE EYE SERVICE" PHONE 5-2763
B'nai B'rith has led with blond
donati i I the D ide County
Bank for the past three
months. The organization has a'
total of 74,675 cc to its credit.
Pan Amen.;.!!
with 6(1.000 cc, Tycoon Tackle
with 41,750 cc, and Embry Riddle
with 36.700 cc.
For the first time this year
the mobile Miami Beach blood
bank was held Wednesday at the
41st St. elementary school.
"The war casualties are high
and the boys at the front must
have blood plasma," said Chair-
man Rudy Adler. "We cannot
get too much. Let us close the
year with a fine response, and
resolve now to make 1945 a
record one.*'
Buy War Stamps and Bond*
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOT1CK IS IIEHKIIY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of 'THE SEA SIDE." 7118 Collins
Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida. Intends
to register the said name with the
Clerk nf the Circuit Court of Dade
Countv, Klnridn.
GOLDIE P. BLACK
tiis ciiins Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida
I MORRIS BERICK
Attorney for Qoldle F. Black
803 Lincoln Ro id
i Beach, Florida,
li 13-32-28 l :.
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
FIDE 38750
Notice is hereby given that John
II Mann holder of City of Miami
Tax Certificate Numbered 914. dated
the 1st day of June. A.D. 1942 has
filed said Certificate In my offloe. and
has made application for tax deed
to Issue thereon In accordance with
law. Said Certificate embraces the
following described property, situated
In Dade County. Florida, to-wlt:
Dot 6, Block 11. Buena Vista Gar-
dens, Plat Book 5. Page 45, In the
City of Miami, County of Dade. State
of Florida.
The assessment of said property
under the said Certificate Issued w
in the name of Unknown. Unless said
Certificate shall be redeemed accord-
ing to law. tax deed will Issue thereon
on the 17th day of January, A.D.
Dated this 12th day of December.
AD' 1944' R. B. LEATHERMAN.
Clerk of Circuit Court,
Dade County, Florida.
(Circuit Court Seal) ____
By L. M. JOHNSON, D. C.
12/15-22-29 1/5-12
Buy Bonds now. You are lend-
ingnot giving.
fP/WW""".....'
'i*t""'"
0H*tfr/lt
1a
P t
RIVERMONT PARK
SANITARIUM
1389 N. W. 7th St. Ph. B-7S01
Brit care for chronic tick, conva-
lescent and elderly people
SA.li. diL n u-. Director
Q-i.--ini Prices
^a. Large Beautiful Orounda
New Year's Features!
POST
8 P.M.
TT
RACES
Be sure to the New Years
Ere card S Orange Bowl program on Mon-
day night
(He Minori Admitted)
DAILY DOUBLE. 1st AND 3rd
%fTJ.AGLER
KENNEL CLUB
WEST FLAGLEB AT 37TH AVE.
HrlP"r?n* deeirlnt te uee bus treneportatlon. convenient
piC\U offered ov tti. Red Adema Bua from.the
J^fe.slonal Bldfl. atatlen. *18 N. E. 2nd Ave.. via Ita
" w. 7th St. route te the Army Air Baee.
Home Cooked Kosher Meals
K O P3E L S
29 N. E. 11th Street, Miami
Reasonable Rates for Room and
Board. Special attention to
private parties.
Unwanted Hair Removed
In the Newest and
Soeediest Method Known
th* face, arma and lega.
"" R.ault. Guaranteed
IRENE GOODMAN
M0 LinVoln Road Phon. -2
Your Blood
Deposit...
Like Money in the Bank-
Draw on it in case ol need

GIVE NOW-CALL
RUDY ADLER
5_5319 For Appointment
Wantages
IIAIIC FEWtAL
MORTGAGE
V
. tOW RATE.
. BA8V PAYMENTS
. lONQ TIME TO PAT
. PROMPT SERVICE
. A HOME INSTITUTION
Deal With Vou*
tOCAL. FRIENDLY
INSTITUTION
^okcesovehsio^ooo
IIAIIG FEIHiUAL
m*

!
*0*m
iljM/JM"m""'


PAGE SIX
vJtWMsSi ikjritdiii&n
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 29. u


ANNUAL ELECTION OF
Y OFFICERS ON IAN. 3
The Annual Election of officers
and directors of the Miami "Y"
will be held next Wednesday
evening, January 3, at 8:30
o'clock, at the Miami "Y" Audi-
torium.
Twenty-seven members of the
Board for 1 year and 3 mem-
bers for 3 years are to be elect-
ed. The President, Vice-President,
Secretary and Treasurer were
unanimously chosen at the Nom-
ination Meeting in December.
Professional talent will furnish
the entertainment for the eve-
ning and a buffet supper will be
served.
GULFSTREAM PARK TO
BE MORE BEAUTIFUL
Gulfstream Park will undergo
an extensive beautification pro-
gram during the period between
meetings, according to James
Donn, president of the racing as-
sociation. Folowing Saturday's
finale, and pending the reopen-
ing of the 20-day Spring session
on next March 28 through April
19, the grounds are to receive a
rejuvenating "facial" as Donn
puts his landscaping genius to
work to make the Hallandale
track one of the most beautiful
in the land.
SCHLECHTER SPEAKER
AT FORUM SATURDAY
AUXILIARY TO I. W. V.
IN REGULAR MEETING
The next regular meeting of
the Jewish War Veterans Auxil-
iary is scheduled for Monday
afternoon, January 8, at Beth
David auditorium, at 8 p. m.
The Auxiliary is now active in
several projects for servicemen
and sends gifts and checks to
veterans' hospitals and institu-
tions. Recent acknowledgments
include a message from M. Bry-
son, of the Bay Pines veteran's
administration, thanking them
for their thoughtfulness in for-
warding monthly checks, which
will be used to sponsor parties
for the veterans. Another from
the Rehabilation Division ad-
dressed to Mrs. Minnie Kline,
president, thanked the organiza-
tion for its lovely gifts sent to
the Joy Shop.
Lawrence E. Schlechter will
discuss "A Panorama of Ameri-
can History" at a meeting of the
Spinoza Forum to be held Sat-
urday afternoon at 3 o'clock. The
gathering will convene under a
canopy on the lawn of the home
of Dr. Abraham Wo If son. 1059
Collins Ave., Miami Beach.
PIONEER WOMEN WILL
SPONSOR EVENT FRI.
The Pioneer Women of Pales-
tine, MiamP Beach chapter, are;
sponsoring an Oneg Shabbat this
Friday evening at the Royal Tea i
Room of the Harrison Hotel, 411 ,
Washington Ave., Miami Reach.
Mrs. Lena Wolk is chairman if
the event, which will begin at
8:30. A. M. Dorff will serve as
toaatmaster.
NOW OPEN
GARTENBERG IXSCHECHTETS
GEORGE
WASHINGTON
HOTEL
516 Washinqton Ave.
Phone 5-6617

Catering For All Occasions
Strictly Kosher Cuisine
Reservations in advance for
Sabbath Meals
STELLAR 11-RACE CARD
AT FLAGLER NIGHTLY
The annual history-making
weekend of greyhound racing
which celebrates New Year's and
salutes the Orange Bowl football
classic, gets under way tonight
at the downtown West Flagler
Kennel club.
With tonight's stellar 11-race
program, all eyes will be on Sat-
urday night's major New Year's
Eve card to be followed on Mon-
day night by the always thrilling
Orange Bowl-New Year's Night
program.
In cooperation with the recent
and unexpected wartime order
closing all racing in this country
by Jan. 3, the final race card
under this ruling is scheduled
Tuesday night. In view of this
sudden closing. West Flagler of-
ficials and the Florida State Rac-
ing Commission arrange/1 for an
11-race program nightly for the
balance of the meeting. This
added eleventh race will be run
for the exclusive benefit of
greyhound owners at West Flag-
ler. all proceeds going to a relief
fund to be administered by a
special committee.
Moving intfi this holiday week-
end of stellar racing and the
midseason mark of West Flagler s
meeting which opened Nov. 15,
all of the racers are going in
true top midseason form. Recent
programs have produced breath-
taking time marks as well as
thrilling photo-finishes repeated-
ly with three to a half dozen
dogs on the finish line together.
The major races of the remain-
ing cards promise to see even
tins tempo of high speed and
thrilling competition advanced.
The nightly programs start at
8 p. m. with the daily double on
tin- first and third races.
NOW OPEN
VICTOR HOTEL
AND DINING ROOM
Ocean Drive at 12th Street
Managed and Operated By
D. ROSNER
PHONE 5-0041
Miami Beach
Dietary Laws Strictly Observed
b&t YCU,
col'-ms
*r"UlfoTi6TH
Delightful Cuisine In An
Atmosphere of Distinction
Charcoal Broiled Steaks, Prime Ribs of Beef
and Chicken in the Pot
Our Daily Special
DINNER SERVED FROM 5 TO 10 P. M.
Open 7 A. M. to 2 A. M. Air Conditioned
Embassy Restaurant
1357 Collins Avenue
noo HUNGARIAN-JEWISH CUISINE
All Pastry Baked on Premises
Dinner From 5 P. M. Tel.. 5-6114
No Tricky Food At
HAMMOND'S
If You Like
The Finest Food
Honest Quality
Generous Servings
as fresh and pure aa the
market affords and without
camouflage
Then You'll Like
HAMMOND'S
OTHER DEATHS
LOUIS GERSON
I.i'Uih (irrmn, 72, Miami Peach real*
dent for th'- imal 1!' w-iirs. who resided
al 2W2 Alton Road, died Tuesday
Dec. li' in a loi'iii his|iii.-ii after an
Illness of several months. Me came
here from Philadelphia. i<> where the
body was mnt for services and burial
He was a member <>f Temple Israel
Hi- \s survived by his wife. Mrs Dora
Gcrson, oi Miami Beach; four mums.
Dr. aeorgw .1 Miami Beach; William
a, Philadelphia; Samuel I... Bridge-
ton, N J and Leon A U s army,
and n daughter, Mi?- Roaeman Kap-
lan, Penn'a Grove, N. '
BARNEY SOHN
The body >< Barne) Bohn, >'.<,
arocei .it ill Collins Ave., wh died
Monday, has been sent t-i Hartford.
''inn. by Riverside Memorial chapel
for services and burial He came bars
from Hartford four years ago He
In survived by his Wife, a ~>n and it
daughter
NATHAN MESIROW
Nathan Mealrow, IS, 7i nth St.,
died Monday In a local hospital and
the body has been sent to f'hicuRo
by Riverside Memorial chapel for
services and burial, He i. survived >>
bis Wife, Mrs A i ha Mealrow; two
'him, i.t i hi Sidney Mealrow, army,
and Norman, Chicago, and a (laughter,
Mrs Miriam Marks, Washington
MAX SINGER
Kum*rai services for Max Singer,
.i. 1511 Pennsylvania Ave., who died
Sunday In a local hospital, were con-
ducted at Riverside Memorial chapel
with lLiiiM Moses M.s. h. luff officiat-
ing, Hurial wan in Miami .1. wish
Woodlawn cemetery A former printer.
ho i-ame here from New York eight
years ago He iw survived by his wife,
Mrs. i.nil.m Blnger, and his mother.
Mrs Itov,. Singer, t.oih ..f Miami
!:-.!. h
MONROE S. FELDMAN
Monroe s Peldman, 21. a Miami
Beach resident for six years died this
week lie came to the Beach from
Wi\ V.rk City, and lived at 642
Michigan Ave Surviving are hi mo.
thei one brother Norman of Miami
!: oh and another brother, Marvin of
\"- York Services were held nt the
Riverside Memorial chapel and the
sent to New York for burial.
MRS. DOROTHY ROSENTHAL
Mrs Dorothy Roaenthal. IS, of 11
N W 17th f'ourt. died Friday night
at a Miami hospital after a brief III-
IH BS Horn In Omaha. Neb Mrs
Ithal had lived In Miami U
feara She is survived hy her hus-
band, Kdward; a son, Hersehel, and
five Slaters, Mrs Henry Q Marx of
Balboa Heights. Panama Canal Zone
Mrs Hade Ntlne. Hollywood Mrs
Nat Kort, of Omaha; Mlna Itella
Singer of lxs Angeles, and Mrs. Abe
roiildchniix, of Hunkle. La, Funeral
services were held Sunday at the
Palmer funeral chapel, with Rabbi
Max Shapiro of peth David congrega-
tion officiating Interment followed
In Woodlawn Park ce-mctery
M. L. Friedman and Lawrence
B. Sheffey. Miami Beach busi-
ness men, have accepted the co-
chairmanship for Miami Beach
of the special finance division of
the county Community War
Chest.
The two men are responsible
for advance solicitation of larger
Kifts for the war chest, which
opens formally Jan. 8.
The Greater Miami Pioneer
Women's Organization Club No.
1, will sponsor a card party on
January 29. Al! proceeds will ro
for the Jewish National Fund.
The chairman of the affair. Mrs.
Pearl Raidman, will be assisted
by Mrs. Sarah AuRustine.
The reRular meetinR of the
-organization will be held Wed-
nesday, January 3, at 8 p. m. at
the Beth David Talmud Torah.
Members are urged to attend.
I DESMOND HAYS DIES
SUDDENLY AT BEACH
Desmond B. Hays, 53. died
suddenly at his home, 900 16th
St.. Miami Beach, Tuesday night
A partner in the firm of Roth
and Hays, clothinR manufactur-
ers' aRent. Mr. Hays became a
vice president of the Fashion
Mart three years aRO. He came
to Miami seven years aRO from
Louisville. Ky., where he had
been enRaRed in the clothinR
business.
He was president of South-
eastern Salesmen's Caravan and
a member of B'nai B'rith. South:
ern Travelers' association, Miami
Beach Civic league and Temple
Israel. Miami.
Surviving are his wife, Miriam,
a son, Lt. Robert, in the army;
his father. Adolph, and sister.
Miss Marguerite, both of Louis-
ville.
Services will be Friday 2 p. m.
at the Riverside Memorial Chapel
with Rabbi Saul B. Appelbaum
of the Temple officiatinR. Serv-
inR as active pallbearers are Mar-
tin Strelitz. GeorRe M. Cohen,
Edward Schless. Haynor Bloom.
Sidney Lefcourt and Joseph
Joseph.
Honorary pallbearers named
are Nat Roth, Ben H. Hartley.
Jack Jayson, Leonard Glenn,
Stanley Glenn, Perry Radin and
Morton Lauderbach. Ray Pels,
Mannie Sheldon, Bert Fames.
Jack Green, Is Abrams, Max
Silver, Mai Marshall, Fred
Shochet, Harold Slimer, Joseph
Schwadron, Harry Raab and
Larry Fay.
Interment will follow in Grace-
land Park.
REVLIN HOTEL AS%LIH8 *vTI
OUR DINING ROOM IS NOW 13TH ST- M. B.|
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
DELUXE FULL COURSE DINNER SERVED FROM t, .
DIETARY LAWS OBSERVED 8 P' **!
RESERVATIONS SUGGESTEDPH. 58-3668
Kriegel's Strictly Kosher Dining Room
AT ADMIRAL HOTEL
1020 MERIDIAN AVE.. MIAMI BEACrT^TEL ISMS
Under personal supervision of the Krleaels and Jackson of i .
and Hockaway for 25 years. -atason of Lakewood
Brtakfsst up to 11:00 A. M.- Dinner from 5 00 P u
Saturday from 6:00 P. M. only
NOW IN OUR NEW LOCATION
101-102 Mercantile Bank Bldq. Lobby Entrance
420 Lincoln Road Miami Beach
Servicemen: Why not main our office your headquartan?
DR. ROBERT R. BRADFORD
Optometrist Optician Phont j^a
OLD SARATOGA INN
Biscayne Boulevard at 77th Street Phone 7-772SI
Week Day Dinners 5 to 10 P. M--------Sundays From Noon
Cocktail Lounge.....Fine Liquors and Wines
WE ARE CLOSED ON WEDNESDAYS
TAKE BUS 11 PROM DOWNTOWN MIAMI. OR
BUS M 71 FROM MIAMI BEACH
RESTAURAN
MIAMI'S NEWEST AND FINEST
Featuring
Unusual Foods. Delicious Pastries
N. E, SECOND AVE. at FOURTH StJ
Air Conditioned Phone 2-076
^-sw CLARAVMAY DOWNEY'S
Olney inn
RESTAURANT
I Block from Bus
Bayside on the Beach.
Bus M From Miami
Venetian Jitneys
1045
DADE
AND BAR
From Six P. M. Week
Days: Five P. M.
Sundays)
(Closed Mondsy)
BOULEVARD
OLD
PLANTATION
RECIPES
\M
Upton House Cooler Corp
COOLING AND VENTILATING SYSTEMS
FOR
HOMES AND COMMERCIAL USES
Export Engineering Service
Without Obligation
Ask Our Many Friends Who Have One
242 S. W. 5th St Phone 2-6433
THE ROYAL TEAIROOM
"THE INTIMATE CORNER"
AT THE
HARRISON HOTEL
411 WASHINGTON AVENUE. MIAMI BEACH
Dairy and Fish DishesHome CookingAll Baking clone on
Premises
Oneg Shabbat will be our attraction every Friday night
ADOLPH ABRAMSON. Mgr.
ASK FOR KOSHER ZION PRODUCTS AT YOUR
LOCAL DELICATESSEN
This label in-
sures your
health.
U. S. Gov't
inspected
Demand it!
Kosher Zion Sausage Co*
CHICAGO
IF YOU ARE IN NEED OF KOSHER ZION PRODUCTS
Call
Florida Provision Co., Inc.
OPERATED BY
PEARL BROS.
Distributors
1725 N. W. 7th AVENUE PHONE 2-6H


HH^1KSBI
^y DECEMBER 29,
1944
UTER
01
^JwisMlwidlteri
=====------------------------------------------------------_______ IMMII | i, l, f>JJ ,
MIAMI ARMY-HAVY COMMITTEE Supported b7G^^r=============
T,. J^rUh W.M-. Board ^^^XTr^
SERVICE
PARADE!
PAGE SEVEN
THREE SONS I. W. B. SERVICEMEN'S
HOME AT ONCE
the first time in three
. the three sons of Mr. and
2&S Marks. 3624 N. W.
l all of whom are in serv-
were home together. Their
lS tendered them a recep-
. it their home last Sunday
line when friends of the boys
Jthe family joined the happy
j]y reunion.
ifirt Herman Marks, the oldest,
Iftht engineer in the air corps.
here just for the holiday, and
, Monday for his post at Drew
Jw Tampa. Cpl. Paul Marks.
Uarine. will leave for Jack-
Mile the seond of January
r having spent 30 days here.
youngest, Cpl. Eugene D.
b, is here for a 15 day fur-
h/and will leave for Camp
Texas, the first of Jan-
|Cpl Paul Marks will wait for
Wngnment to the west coast
id instructor. He is the holder
(the Silver Star and the Purple
art and shares the President-
unit citatum. He has seen
in Peleliu. Guadalcanal.
Cape Gloucester and
islands of the Pacific.
CALENDAR
I. RICHARD TOUBY IN
T O PARENTS
[ U. Richard Touby, plane com-
_ of a B-17 bomber in his
letter from Ireland wrote
tn his parents,
Mr. and Mrs.Louis
Touby, 69 N. W.
8th St., telling
them that he has
named his bomb-
er "Becky" in
honor of his mo-
ther. The plane
and its name give
hun a full realiza-
ti ii of his re-
spun s i b i 1 i t y,
Touby wrote, be-
cause of the nine
other American
i whose lives are entrusted in
lore.
Jtl Touby, who is now sta-
in Iceland, attended Flor-
University, Gainesville. Fla.
left school in his sophomore
to enlist in the Army Air
Miajri
Discussion Group. 8 p. m Miami
gg YM YHA. Clfoata Car? i
Trml y :
Choir rehearsal. 8 p. m.. Miami R-a Jewish Community Center, MIS Ku-
clld Ave.. Cantor Emanu.l n.irkan.
Wednesday:
Elementary Hebrew, 7 30 p. m Hi.
tSBL B<,Srh YHA; s""ly Group ,
The Reconstruction!*! Ifovemanl "
9 p. m.. Miami Beacb YM & WI1A 1
Chaplain Saul Kraft.
Friday:
Sabbath Servlres. 8 p. m.. ChapUm
Saul Kraft, Miami B.a. h YM &
"HA; Chaplain Carl I. MilLr
Polnclana Motel. IB55 Collins Ave
Miami Beach; JWB OneB Shabbat! !
refreshments served by hostesses,
from the Miami Beach Mrrlce Lea
sue; Chaplain M.yer Meremlnaky,
Chapel No. 3. Bora Raton Field
JWB Ones Shabbat. refresnMiiui
nerved by hostesses from the Minim
Service League.
Stmrday:
Servlcemen'a Dance. 8 p. ni.. yiami
Beech YM & WHA, refreshmenti
served by Miami Ilearh Service Lea-
rue: Servlcrmcn'8 dance. 8 p. m., Mi-
ami YM YWHA. 1567 9 W. 5th
St.. refreahrnenta served by Miami
Service League.
Saaday:
Servicemen'* Dance. 8 p. m.. Miami
Beach Jewish Community Center, re-
freahmenta served by senior
hoeteeaee.
Gil TO HAVE SLEEPING
ACCOMMODATIONS
to^vSnWil! liav, an opportunity
nL>ht ,lnemselves of both over-
52?J Ur!uh' \hlch W1" be pro-
d .v n ,hrm l'c'nn"'e Satur-
day. December 30. Plans were
HEW.*1;'meclin h'wS
triday afternoon by the reore
wl'T ,,f,.the Cn'a*r Miami
Army-Navy Committee, the Mi-
am. Boach YM & WHA. and
hholom Lodge, B"nai B'rith.
A nominal charge of 50c will
give entree to a soldier to sleep
overnight and a brunch the fol-
lowing Sunday morning. Both the
members of Sholom Lodge of
B nai B'rith and the Ladies'
Auxiliary of this fraternal order
will provide the foodstuffs and
erve the breakfast.
The Miami Beach YM & WHA
ha made available 24 cots and
its facilities, while the Greater
Miami Army-Navy Committee of
the National Jewish Welfare
Board is providing linens, blank-
et*, and pillows for the service-
men who will be served on Sat-
urday night and Sunday morn-
ing.
A. I. C. WOMEN READY
FOR VICTORY AFFAIR
INSIDE WT HD GENERAL
reservations for the annual
Victory Donor's luncheon spon-
sored by the Women's Division
oi American Jewish Congress
are now being accepted. Mrs.
Joseph Rose, chairman, an-
nounces The affair will be held
Sunday, February 25. at the Latin
Quarter. Mrs. Rose is being as-
sisted by two co-chairman. Mrs.
Louis Glasser, and Mrs. A. E.
woolfe, and a committee. Further
informat.-on may be obtained by
calling 5-2012 or 5-4460.
The Women's Division of
AJU jointly with Miss Ruth Brot-
man. is sponsoring the Alex
Templeton concert to be held at
b:J0 January 23 at the White
Temple, 320 N. E. 2nd Ave. Due
to the limited seating capacity,
reservations must be made in
janc- T,ckets, priced at $1.50
and $3.50 plus tax, will be on
sale the second week in January
at leading Miami and Miami
beach stores, or reservations may
be made now by calling Miss
Kuth Brotman (5-3042), Mrs.
KI^SM!; Baskind, co-chairman
Kat^'v* or Dr Hampton
(9-2358). Patron tickets will also
be sold.
The executive board will hold
its regular meeting on January
4th.
Pfc. Irwin J. Kane. USMC. 21
wounded Sept. 28 at Peleliu, has
arrived in Miami Beach to visit
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. David
Kane. 721 Alton Rd.
On leave from the naval hos-
pital, San Diego, Pfc. Kane is
recuperating from back and arm
shrapnel wounds, and from an
attack of malaria contracted on
AuRuar Island.
The Miami Edison graduate
spent 20 months in combat, taking
part in the Cape Gloucester and
Peleliu invasions. He has re-
ceived the Purple Heart.
Lt. Col. Joshua A. Finkol ar-
rived here Tuesday from "some-
where in England" for a visit
with his father, Walter Finkel.
of Meridian Ave., Miami Beach.
An ordnance officer of the 82nd
airborne division and the holder
of the Legion of Merit, Finkle
was wounded on D-Day in France.
He will remain here two weeks
before reporting to Washington
for assignment.
WOUNDED IN ACTION
Lt. Charles Kleinberg, 35, of
Brooklyn, In Italy.
Lt. Solomon Kozol, 35, of Rox-
bury, Mass. At Tarawa. Lt.
Kozol, who has been wounded
times, is the holder of a
Presidential Unit Citation.
Prt. Samuel Krohn, 22, of
( \ eland, O. In France.
Aviation Cadet Samuel Roths-
child will spend the weekend in
Miami visiting with his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Philip Rothschild,
of 1801 S. W. 14th St.
Out This Coupon aid Mai To "WAR RECORDS." Army-
Navy Committee, tVe P. O. B*x 2973. Miami 18, Florida
hme..____________
| Borne Address
8'
I Birth Date________
Serial No.
City
State
BirtbpWce
Chilian Occupati
5te Entry
Service
^onch of Serv
ion
City State
Marital Status---------
ice
Full
Date
.Discharged---------
_ Rank or Rating
name of nearest Ida
^'ionship ______ Address
formation Transmitted by___
Ifckphone number____________
Pfc. Alvin A. Levy, 23, of Los
Angeles, CaL At Salerno, after
participating in the African and
Sicilian campaigns.
Pfc. Marvin J. Liberman. 21. of
the Bronx. In Italy, where he
has been wounded in combat
three times. He landed with the
invasion forces at Anzio.
Pvt. M. S. KeUman- 21. of
New York City. Wounded in the
D day attack on Normandy, he
j recovered and went back into
1 action, but had to return for re-
: moval of shrapnel overlooked the
first time.
Sgt. Sydney S. Jaslow. 26.
I'SMC, of Philadelphia. Pa. On
Saipan. by Jap mortar fire. He is
a veteran of the fighting in the
Marshall!, Saipan, and other
Pacific engagements. His father
served In the Army Medical
; Corps during World War I.
Pfc. Ben Glosser. 32, of Johns-
town, Pa. In France.
Sat. Isadora Goldstein. 32. of
Cleveland, O. In France.
, Mad* Possible Through
fctotina ThU Page to the Efforts of the Army-Nary Committee.
the Co-Operation of
ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN &
RESTAURANT
COWEN'S SHOE STORES
1M E F1Hlr K m Lincoln RL
JACK C. IAYSON
PUBLIC GAS CO.
7200 N. W. 7th Atosmo
MIAMI HUG CO.
100 s. MUnd Avotwo
SYBIL'S WOMEN'S APPAREL
76 S. E. lrt Stx~t
UUBIN SONR-Orkilnal Rubin.
N. Miemi Aroauo
k*nJtc. ROTH & HAYS
"ncttm*. Aveats Laafford Bldg.
MONTE SELIG
MiajBi. Florida
179 N. W. Fifth Street
RICHTER'S 1EWHHTOO. INC
160 E. Flagler Street
LEO ROBINSON
Miami Beach
RUBINSTEIN'S
WOMEN'S APPAREL
m Li-coin Rd- Miami Beach
NANKIN'S SHOE STORE
,58 E. Flagler Str^t. Mi-mi
ANN'S SORTERS
714 Lincoln tloaa
CANCER INSTITUTE TO
BE HELD HERE ON JAN. 4
A Cancer Institute, sponsored
by the Field Army of the Ameri-
can Cancer Society will be held
on Thursday, January 4. at the
Miami Women's Club, 1737 N
Bayshore Dr. During the morn-
ing session, beginning at 10 a. m
Mrs. Malcolm Smith, Florida
State Commander will speak, and
physicians of the executive board
of the Field Army will discuss
various phases of cancer and its
treatment. Plans for the coming
year will be discussed by Mrs.
Clyde A. Epperson, Dade County
Commander. Following the morn-
ing session, a luncheon will be
served, and Mrs. Horace Ritchie,
Southeastern Regional Director,
will talk on "Cancer Calls for
Courage."' Those wishing to at-
tend the luncheon are asked to
call Mrs. Epperson at 3-3005 not
later than Tuesday, January 2.
Additional speakers at the
luncheon will be Don Graham,
president of the Miami Exchange
Club and C. W. Peters, state
representative, on proposed canc-
er legislation.
There will be an evening meet-
ing on the same day at the Mi-
ami YWCA, 108 S. E. 1st Ave..
at 8 p. m.
BETH DAVID WOMEN
HAS ANNUAL ELECTION
At a meeting of Beth David
Sisterhood held last Wednesday,
ladies chosen to serve as officers
for the ensuing year were: Presi-
dent, Mrs. Jack August; first vice
president, Mrs. Norman D.
Jacobs; second vice president.
Mrs. Stanley C. Myers; third
vice president, Mrs. Max Hal-
6ern; financial secretary, Mrs.
yman Sootin; recording secre-
tary, Mrs. Alex Stiebel; corre-
sponding secretary, Mrs. Elix
Hinkes; treasurer, Mrs. Sam
Dickson; auditor, Mrs. Ida Gold-
berg; sergeant-at-arms, Mrs. Ben
Kandel. Members of the board
for three years include Mrs.
Harry Markowitz, Mrs. Herman
Slepian and Mrs. Celia Seg&l.
For two years, Mrs. Harry Hack-
er, Mrs. L. J. Hartz and Mrs.
Samuel Traurig. Held over are
Mrs. Charles Abbott, Mrs. Iaa-
dore Langner and Mrs. Harry
Shragaa.
The organization is planning
an installation luncheon to b*
held Wednesday, January 17 in
the Beth David auditorium.
Cairo (JTA) A farewell party
to delegates attending the Arab
Women's Conference was turned
into an anti-Zionist demonstra-
tion when delegates from Syria,
Iraq, Lebanon, Egypt and Pales-
tine delivered addresses calling
for an independent Arab state
in Palestine. One speaker pointed
out that the most effective means
of supporting the Arabs of
Palestine was generous subscrip-
tions to the bank which has boen
set up to redeem land sold to
Jews.
LEGAL NOTICES
KOTICE IK HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to encag*
in bualnf*w under the fictitious name
of TAM1AMI REFRIGERATOR SUP-
I'l.Y at 1890 8. W. 8th St.. Miami.
Florida, Intends to rn.-lnt.-r the saM
oiime with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Ihide Countv, Florida.
MARK Q. KAl'LAN
MAX R. SILVER
Attorney for Applicant.
12/8-15-22-29 1/3
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersUmed, desiring to encage
in bualnes.u under the fictitious name
Of BUSINESS SALES CO. at 74 W.
Flapler St.. Miami. Florida, Intends
to register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dada
County, Florida.
FRED A. TRACY
Sole Owner
LEON KAPLAN
Attorney for Applicant
12/S-I6-22-29 1/5
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned is engaged in busi-
ness under the fictitious name of
STANDARD MERCANTILE CO.. .02
W Flagler Street, Miami, Florida, and
intend to register the said fictltioua
name in the office of the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
HARRY GRKENBERJ!
HENRY GREENBLRO
12/29 1/5-12-19-26
Belvedere Hotel
Dining Room
Euclid Avenue at 9th Street
Miami Beach
DINING ROOM OPEN TO
THE PUBLIC
Kosher Meals Dinner $2J0
PHONE 5-1103
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'
1 I
FAG- LUGiii'
JenistittortdUaw
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 29. 1944
B'NAI B'RITH
NOTES
-by-
MARX FEINBERG
In The Synagogues
Of Greater Miami
I hope by now that most of the war bond sales are woefully
vou have recovered from- your : dragging behind; and yet strange
Christmas vacations and are pre- 1 to you, maybe, the wounds of
paring to usher in a new year our boys are just as painful and
with hopeful prayers for a quick serious as before. Let us then
end of the war. The present out-
look is not pleasant, but I am
sure that we all realize that along
with victories, we must have
same setbacks. The present count-
begin the new year with the
earnest purpose of doing more
than more. Let us resolve our-
selves that we will contribute to
the effort as much as Joe on
ways, have thanked us for our
efforts on behalf of the rum-
mage store and have reported
er-offensive of the Nazi has j the line. Not in the same way
seemed to re-awaken the Amer-
ican people as to the strength
of our enemies and the analogy
is drawn with our people in that
it always takes a severe blow
of small nature to awaken us as
to our duties and responsibilities | that the appeal has brought
as Americans and Jews. Every gome success. However, the lack
war service channel which was 0f rummage is still serious and
so enthusiastically pursued dur-
ing the bitter days of Alemein
and Tunisia is still in existence
and we must admit that the wat-
ers in these channels have been
strangely calm. The blood bank
is soulfully calling for blood;
1
r** W. I2tk AV. MIAMI
LlH. 3 3431
"YOUR JEWISH
FUNERAL HOME
WE OFFICIALLY KPKSENT
TMC MAJORITY OF NORTHERN
JEWISH FUNERAL HOMES
Injormation Clodly fwmihed on Rtqunt
SERVING MIAMI BEACN I MIAMI
C Exclusively Jewish
2+ #OUR ^
threatens at this time to possi-
, bly force a discontinuance of
{ the store. With so much rum-
mage available, it would be
; criminal to allow this to happen.
Please, therefore, make just a
little extra effort to gather your
rummage and call 5-1974 or the
B'nai B'rith office, or any mem-
ber of the Ladies' Auxiliary and
they will collect the same with-
out any inconvenience to vou.
Since this is the last column
for 1944, I would like to close
it with an expression of appre-
ciation to the officers and com-
mittee nun of this administration
for a splendid job well done and
foi Ml of the assistance rendered
me in reporting to the member-
ship the news of the organiza-
tion through the medium of The
Floridian. I know thai without
such assistance. I would not have
been able to handle tin- job.
Also, we would like to extend
our best wishes to the new ad-
ministration for a successful and
serviceable year and offer to
them our sincere cooperation to
the end that B'nai B'rith shall
remain the outstanding service
organization in the country.
And to the membership at
large, including their lovely
ladies, 1 express a heartfelt wish
that you enjoy a successful,
prosperous and peaceful new-
sear.
J
CHECK THESE ADVANTAGES OF THE
CHASE FEDERAL MORTGAGE PLAN
LOW interest rate.

SMALL monthly payments. We also make loans ior periods
not exceeding five years without monthly payments.
*
NO LOAN FEES actual cost only.

NO PENALTY ior prepayment.
*
COURTEOUS, efficient service by local people who, like
you, are interested in the permanent betterment of our
community.
*
IN TEN YEARS we have served over 1600 families (over
$11,000,000 in mortgage loans) with only one foreclosure.
*
FT IS OBVIOUS that our loan plan has proven sound for
your neighbors why not let it work for you.
Services announced through Cirenter
Miami Babblnleal Association are:
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CON
CRECATION, 590 S. W. 17th Ave.
Friday evening services ;it 6 p. "
Iflncha, Bchaloi Beudoe, and Maarlv
at 5:1.'.. Late PYlday evening services
tartlni al 8:16 p. IB Rabbi Simon
April will preach <>m "Reflections "f
tin- Past Tear." Refreshments will
be served by the Ladles' Auxiliary.
Schaarel /.id. k Talmud Tm.ih, 1 .'!
s w. Ird st Friday evening services
at 6 p. m. Late Friday evening sen
ices at the Miami Jewish Orthodox
Synagogue, Saturday morning nrvioea
at I 10 a. m Junior services al i" M
a. m. conducted entirely by th
Juniors. Kabbi April will speak, "ii
the Portion of the Week SchaloH
Baudot at i:30 p, m. Hebrew School
dally at 4 p. m.
perhaps, but with the same pur-
dosc in view temple israel. Rsform. 137 n.
_,, ... ,. .... E. mh st. Friday evening services
The ladies, thoughtful as al- at 1:16 p m. Rabbi Saul a. Appei-
baum will speak, on "Retrospect:
IM4." Saturday morning services al
11 a. m. Kablil Appelbaum will speak
On the \Veekl> Portion of the Law.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION.
Conservative. 135 N. W. 3rd Ave.
l-ute Friday evening services at 1:16
conducted by Rsbbi Max Shapiro.
Cantor Abraham Friedman and choli
will officiate. Kabbi Shapiro will
speak -.ii The Record of 1M4." Re-
ception iu the auditorium will follow
after the services Baturda) morning
services al y .! Junior services at
lu:3'l
BETH SHOLOM CENTER. Con-
lervative. 781 41it St.. Miami Beach.
- Friday evening service at 6:16 p. m.
Rabbi Leon Kronish will speak Oil
"Betrayal." An Oneg Bhabbat will
follow the s>: \ !.'. with Mrs. Iaii
Btelnberg and Mrs. Jacob Pish man
as hostesses Cantor Louis Hayman
iii officiate and lead the Congrega-
tional elnglns Saturday morning
Ktrvli el it 10 a 111 at n Inch time
Ronald I. Albert will l"........ bai
I mitstvah. Rabbi Kronlah will respond.
MIAMI BEACH JEWISH COM-
MUNITY CENTER. Conservative.
1415 Euclid Ave., Miami Beach.
Kabbalas Bhabbas .11 I IS p m. fol-
lowed by late Prldas evening services
at 8 16 i' m Annual home-coming
service In hoflor of college youths
Miss Caryl Elaine Rote 01 Byracu
I'ntveraltj and Pfc. Stanley Weinkle,
now Interning al Qrady hospital, At-
lanta, will discuss the theme, "Pacing
the Future." Rabbi Irving Lehrman
will respond. Cantor Emanuel Barkan
and 1 in Center choli will chant Bat-
urda) morning services at '. a in
ii which time Melvln Mlsbkln, son of
Mi and Mi Abe Mlshkln. and
' 'hlswlck, son of .Mi and M1
lr\*lng Chiswlck, win become bar
mitsvah Rabbi Lehrman will preach
on the Weekly Portion of the Law
Cantor llarkan m officiate Mlncha
services al 5 (5 followed by Bcnaloa
.111,1 Maarlv Bunda) school
at 10 .1 m Registration Ii still open
BETH JACOB CONGREGATION.
Orthodox. 311 Washington Ave.. Mi-
ami Beach Friday evening services
.ii 6 p in Lati Pridaj night services
,1 10 Rabbi Moses Mescheloff will
jim ,1, on the theme 'Lost An < ld
I 1 Cantor Maurice Mamchet will
lead m ih. communal singing Satur-
day morning services al 1 and 9
Rabbi Mew hetofrs sermon topic will
be "Be v- Blessed." A Mlnnionalre
Pathei and Bon religious service will
be held al 6:JO .1 m In the C.....
munity building Junior Congregation
services will in- held at 10 m with
I hhIcI Mm ill 11 and Hurvey Jacobs
serving as cantors and Judy Hayes
reading the Portion of the Week
Robert Case win dellvet the sermon-
stte, and Leon Cutlet and Marvin
Bbnenaheln will serve as Qabboylm
A Young Jud.-.i Jamboree will be held
at nun p 111 iindei tin- leadership of
Miss Rachel Boldow Bohalos Beudos
ai ". p in Dally School from 4 to
7 sund.i> School from 10 r m. to
ii* noon
BEACH "V" RIPPLES
A Column oi Acrivitiea of the Beach "Y"
iH'i
I&it
MJGUST BROS fty:
** f* .1,, HI W *
IS the BEST
1111 Lincoln Road M Block East oi Alton
CHASE FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
Resources Over $8,000.000.00 C. L. CLEMENTS. President
A city-wide meeting for edu-
cational purposes has been set
for January 23 with Dr. James
G. McDonald, former League of
Nations high commissioner for
refugees and chairman of Presi-
dent Roosevelt's advisory com-
mittee for political refugees as
guest speaker. Under the spon-
sorship of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, the meeting
will be held in the Miami Beach
Jewish Center The Bialik Sing-
ing Society of the Bureau of
Jewish Education, under the di-
rection of Cantor Emanuel Bar-
kan, will entertain.
Yakhontoff Lecture Stira
Interest
The coming lecture of General
Victor A. Yakhontoff, on January
7. 1945, at the Miami Beach
Senior High School, is creating
widespread comment in the com-
munity. The Inter-Y Cultural
Committee has been given high
praise for their alertness in se-
curing a speaker on the most
timely subject of the year.
Another New One
At the request of many, many
members we are starting a folk
and square dance group. Do you
remember the Virginia Reel,
Hill Billy square and the other
group dances which are so much
fun? Wednesday evening, Jan-
uary 3. at 8:30 p. m., is the first
session. Join us and bring your
friends. There'll be plenty of fun
for all.
Spotlite Resumes Publication
The "Y" Spotlite is all set to
resume publication. Do you know
anything of interest which should
be included? Have you any sug-
gestions for the improvement of
the paper? Would you like to
help us publish it? The Journal-
ism Club meets Thursdays, at
8 o'clock, and will welcome new
members and suggestions.
Special Winter Holiday Program
The winter holiday program for
Juniors is in full swing. As a
matter of fact, it is really a min-
iature home camp. Bright and
early every morning finds a
steady trek of youngsters coming
to the "Y" with little packages
under their arms. After deposit-
ing their packages, they engage
in a morning of games in the
playground, swinging to their
hearts content on the new swings
erected in the sunken garden, and
then a swim.
Following this, they undo
their little packages, which prove
to be their lunches. They fall to
with gusto and in a few minutes
the sandwiches and fruit are
consumed.
In the afternoon they work on
their Victory* Garden and partici-
pate in crafts, dancing and
dramatics.
This program was organized by
OUT Activities Director, Miriam
Levine, with the help of June
Kessel Audrey Floyd and Ina
Marash Dramatic, Dancing and
Crafts teachers," respectively.
Symphony Hour
The first meeting of the Sym-
phony Hour Group was a com-
plete delight. With a gentle
breeze blowing, the warm ravs
of the sun shining, Ceasar Francs
"D Minor" playing,who could
ask for more?
Prior to Franc "D Minor"
which was the major work
Played, the group listened to
the Donna Diana Overture by
Reznick, and Roumanian Rhap-
sody No. 1 by Enesso.
This group meets each Sun-
day afternoon, at 4 o'clock, under
the trellis in the sunken garden
There is room for many more
listeners. Join us next Sunday.
Future programs will consist
of your requests. What would
you like to hear?
Basketball Team Enters
City League
Executive Director Jack P.
Marash, has announced that the
"Y" Basketball Team will play
in a City League, composed of
teams from Washington Park.
Flamingo Park, Polo Park and
the "Y." The first game will be
played Friday afternoon, January
12.
Coach Jacobson is ready to
pick his final squad for the sea-
son. However, there is still time]
to play on the team if you come|
and try out this Sunday morn-
ing, at 10:30.
A winning team is a team with
spirit. Let's give our team spirit.
by coming out and cheering for]
them at every game. Watch this
column for game dates and let's
play every game with a big.|
rooting section.
Palm Beach'Notes
MRS. MA1T 8CHBEBNKX
Mr. and Mis. Charles F. Mc-
Kissick, 414 8th St., are an-
nouncing the marriage of their
daughter, Jackie, to Rudolph F.
Master. ----------
Rev. and Mrs. Ezekiel Panitz
were in Miami visiting with
friends.
Sgt. Julius (Skippy) Shepard
has been wounded in action and
is now in a hospital in England,
according to word received here.
Children of the Beth Israel
Sunday School presented a pro-
gram in honor of the Festival at
the Temple Sunday morning.
Parents and friends attended, and
refreshments served.
B'nai B'rith lodge held a sup-
per and card party at Sher Me-
morial hall. Harry Halpern was
chairman in charge. Proceed?
went to the Hillel Foundation.
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