The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00814

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Jewish Floridian of South Broward
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Jewish Floridian of North Broward
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Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
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Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
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Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
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Jewish Floridian of South County
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Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
*
ihdtel^ltulElliDipidliiaun
^mTJ^NUMBER 38
MIAMI 18, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1944
PRINE TEN CENTS
Southern Section of Jewish
Centers Now Being Organized
Oreanization of a Southern sec-
iJn of Jewish community cen-
I r" YMHAs and YWHAs. with
ihrce-fold plan for aiding these
Knits n their work, is now in
Kress and will be officially
Ifaunched at a two-day confer-
ee in Atlanta. Ga., Sept 2J
|!nj 94 it was announced Satur-
Idav by Donald Oberdorfer of At-
lanta, vice president of the Na-
tona Jewish Welfare board.
I The Miami YMHA and the YM
Lid WHA of Miami Beach will
It* members of the Southern sec-
|"-fhe newly formed unit will
Ibenefit the organizations in three
hays, it was explained. It will
help provide a medium of ex-
change of ideas and experience
land thus help improve services to
Wembers. It will co-ordinate pro-
grams and help develop inter-
City activities and it will make
Khe South a greater factor in de-
Itermining the policy, the philoso-
phy and the practices of the Na-
tional Jewish Welfare board.
Attending the initial conference
in Atlanta will be Leo Ackerman.
president of the Miami YMHA;
George Chertkof, chairman of the
card, and Maurice Grossman,
fcxecutive director.
From Miami Beach, Harry
Zukernick. president of the YM
kndWHA there and Jack Marash,
fcxecutive director, will attend.
Mr. Zuckenuck is participating
pn the program and will deliver
p paper on the problems of or-
ganizing a Jewish center.
The new group, which covers
Ihe states of North and South
Carolina, Georgia, Florida. Ala-
bama, Mississippi. Tennessee,
ouiiiana and Arkansas, will op-
rate as a regional section of the
Joard. Matthew Penn has been
pamed field secretary to serve
ihe southern section.
J The sessions will be addressed
K Frank L. Weil, president of
Ue National JWB and Samuel D.
lershovitx, associated director of
Ihe Jewish Center Division.
AN JEWS
I ENJOY PEACE
Moscow (JTA)Jews in Ru-
mania, after several years of hor-
w under the pro-Nazi Antonescu
*Bime. will now enjoy a period
fcr^ac and ta-uali,y under the
*rmsot the armistice agreement
W*i*n the Allies and the Ru-
manian government, it was em-
Fasized here following publica-
7?k niRhl of the f"U text
me'agreement, which provides
i atn,c immediate abolition of
L-nti-Jewish laws in Rumania.
numanian Minister Lucertiu
E?canu> who signed the jym-
''pact here on behalf of fiis
w-ernment. today assured the
jmspondent o( the Jewish Tele-
^ Agency that all Jews in
htS? wh. were arrested or
*rni under the anti-Jewish
PLfcffl be ******& He tried
tW Zi' the fact tha* tens
thousands of Jews were mas-
st thr'" Ruinania during the
Eun2 >('"S ;md that manV
H "f them perished in
nulr n-fnis,na- "There were
Witomv kuf BmaU anti-Jewish
\C ,'fbut m,,si> f them took
B,'; '" 1>1." he told the
TA nMDondent.
gjgff AND~GRECIAN
1* ARE IN PALESTINE
koft\X 'WN'S>-A conting
t>MrumT ,arrived hcrc this
P* from r.rkl'V- Twenty-three
Pom n..." Weece and eleven
Zurich (JTA)Large-scale con-
fiscation of Jewish property was
resumed in Hungary this week
and Jewish industries valued at
tens of millions of dollars will
pass into the hands of the gov-
ernment before the month is
over, it is reported in the Hun-
garian press reaching here from
Budapest.
The Fueggetlenseg. official or-
gan of Hungarian government,
states that the authorities have
started taking over Jewish leath-
er firms valued at fifty million
oengos. about ten million dollars.
The registration and valuation of
these enterprises was carried out
with the assistance of 200 experts
and traders, the paper says.
The annual pilgrimage to
Jewish Cemeteries, a cus-
tom observed throughout
the country on the Sunday
intervening between Rosh
Hashonah and Yom Kippur
will take place this coming
Sunday, Sept. 24. Rabbis of
the Greater Miami area will
be at local cemeteries at 3
o'clock. Services will be
held at Woodlawn Park,
Jewish section, S. W. 8th
St. at 32nd Ave. and at
Mount Nebo. W. Flagler at
53rd Ave., Temple Israel
cemeteries are situated in
both Woodlawn Park and
at Graceland Memorial
Park, S. W. 8th St. at 44th
Ave. Services will be held
at the City Cemetery at 4
o'clock.
Jewish Leaders Say Less Of
French Lives May Be 150,000
U. S. MAT HAVE TO
TAKE STAND Oil
PALESTINE ISSUE
New York (JTA)The United,
States may have to take a stand j
on the Palestine issue before
Flection Day, F. Lawrence Bab-
cock, an editor of Fortune maga-
zine, states in the current issue
<>f that publication, after return-
ing from an eight months' in-
vestigation in the Middle Fast.
With the liberation of the
Balkans, there will be many more
than 27,000 Jews qualifying for
asylum in Palestine under the
terms of the White Paper. Mr.
Babcock points out. No British
excuse for denying them en-
trance to Palestine will be valid, j
"Obviously," the Fortune editor
concludes, "Britain cannot act
without us. She cannot safely
adopt a course on her own re-
sponsibility unless she knows;
that the United States will accept,
it and not detonate the whole1
Middle East by reversing it
later."
Emphasizing that if Allied mili-
tary power is withdrawn from .
the Middle East, frustrations will |
break loose to a point where "the (
explosive forces behind them
mav give them the range and de-
structiveness of a robot bomb, ;
Mr. Babcock says that the Allies ,
must make their decision on I
Palestine now. This key decision.'
he says, cannot wait much longer
and must condition all future
choices the United States may
make in the Middle East.
luxemburg~1ews to
come back to homes
London (JTA)Foreign Minis-
ter Joseph Bech of Luxemburg,
which was liberated this week
by the Allied armies, told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency that
Jews, in common with all othei
residents of the country, are we -
com.- to return home as MonM
possible. There has jwr. been
any anti-Semitic feelings In the
Duchy, he said.
Rome"7jTAiT- An optimistic
View concerning theI fUtUM(dis-
appearance of anti-Sem.t.sn
liberated Europe was voiced here
by Sir Clifford Heathcote-Smit .
representative of the totargv-
ernmental Committee for Rtfu
gees.
Jerusalem (JTA)The charge
that leaders of the democracies
have not even attempted to res-
cue Jews trom extermination in
German-held countries was
voiced here by David Ben-Gurion.
chairman of the executive of the
Jewish Agency, addressing the
opening session of the newly-
elected Assefath Hanivcharim,
the Jewish National Assembly of
Palestine.
The session was greeted in He-
brew by District Commissioner
Newton in behalf of the Palestine
Government. Chief Secretary
Shaw of the Palestine Adminis-
tration sent a message to the
session emphasizing the statutory
recognition which the Assembly
enjoys under the Palestine rules
covering the functions of the
Jewish community in the fields
of education, social welfare, pyb-
lic relief, religious needs and
other community services. He
stressed the fact that sixty-Six
per cent of the Voting Jewish
population in Palestine partici-
pated in the elections to the As-
sefath Hanivcharim as compared
with fifty-six per cent of the vot-
ers in the last elections held thir-
teen years ago.
RABBrHERT7TO"SPEAK
FROM LONDON SEPT. 24
New YorkRabbi Joseph Her-
man Hertz, chief rabbi of the
United Hebrew Congregations of
the British Empire, delivers a
special message from London In
observance of the Jewish Day of
Atonement Sunday. Sc-pt. 24
(NBC.1:15-1:30 p. m.. EWT).
Rabbi Herbert Goldstein, new-
Iv-elected president of the Syna-
gogue Council of America, also
will speak.____________
DISPUTE OVER MAYORALTY
CONTINUES IN JERUSALEM
The Aviv (JTA)The dispute
between the Jews and the Arabs
in Jerusalem over the question of
whether a Jew or an Arab should
be mayor the city can be settled
only by the new High Commis-
sioner, Viscount Gort, who is ex-
p^,ed to arrive any day, it was
announced here by J. V. M. Shaw
Cl,ief Secretary of the Palestine
Government, at a present confer-
ence attended by Jewish and
Arab newspapermen. _______
Rome (WNS)Approximately
1.000 Jews were found alive in
a former Nazi concentration camp
at Lucca, Italy, when the area
was liberated on September 1. it
was disclosed hereby Arthur D.
Greenleiyh. the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee
representative in Rome. Most of
the Jews were deportees from
Poland. Austria and Germany.
Mr. Greenleigh also reported
that the Italian Government's re-
lief to hundreds of thousands of
civilian refugees was inadequate.
"There is," he said, "a serious
need for supplementing this in-
adequate assistance- by our refu-
gee committees, of which there
are now five in Italy, one each
in Naples, Bail, Rome, Leghorn
and Florence. The problem is a
large one of assisting our people
who are in need.'
STORY IS TOLD OF
T
Registration Books to
Be Open Until Oct. 14
The County Registration
Books opened Wednesday
and will remain open until
October U. according to
Carl Holmer. Jr.. upervor
of registration, on the 11th
floor of the courthouse.
Lublin (JTA)The whole story
of what happened to the Jews
; of Lwow was unfolded to this
correspondent by Myra Sommer-
stein-Woliz, daughter of Dr. Emil
Sommerstein, prominent Zionist
and a member of the Polish Com-
mittee of National Liberation,
and her husband, Dr. Marek
Woliz.
"Before the Germans cam..'
she began, 'there were well over
100,000 Jews in Lwow. and no
more than 10.000 of them suc-
ceeded in escaping with the Red
Army. It was fortunate that dur-
' ing the year of Soviet rule thous-
ands of Jews went East and thus
then lives were saved.
"The Germans came July 1,
1941. Within two days they forced
all Jews to wear white armbands
bearing Stars of David. July 15
all the Jews were told to register
with the police for work. That
day thousands were taken direct-
ly from the registration points
and were never see again. It is
believed that five to six thousand
were killed then. About 2,000
Jews remain in Lwow today. So
you can see what happened."
The Germans, she continued,
assigned her husband to work in
the Jewish hospital as a physi-
cian, while she was sent to work
in the Jewish Hospital for Infec-
tious Diseases. In the Catholic
and other hospitals, nurses and
other personnel were innoculated
against disease, but this was not
permitted for Jews.
VICHY COMMISSAR IS
ARRESTED IN FRANCE
London (JTA)Xavier Vallat,
first Commissar of Jewish Af-
fairs of the Vichy Government,
and the man who drew up the
first anti-Jewish legislation in
France, has been arrested, it is
reported from Paris.
The report says that Vallat
faces loss of franchise, restric-
tions on his place of residence
and expulsion from any profes-
sional group to which he may be-
long. Similar punishment awaits
other members of the Jewish
commissariat.
Lyon (JTA)Leaders of French
Jewry today told to a J.T.A.
correspondent that they believed
that possibly 120,000 to 150,000
Jews survived the German ex-
termination drive in France. They
placed at 30.000 the number of
Jews, including foreigners, who
resided in the country prior to
the outbreak of the war.
Additional thousands, they said,
escaped ihe Nazis by crossing the
Swiss and Spanish frontiers.
About 12,000 Jewish children
wc re saved by being smuggled
into Switzerland where they
were maintained with funds sup-
plied by American Jewish re-
lief groups.
These officials estimated that
120,000 Jews were deported from
' France to Poland. They held out
little hope that these deportees
have survived. The larger part
\ of the deportees, they said, were
| foreign refugees, who, because of
language- and other difficulties,
were not able to disguise them-
selves and conceal their identity.
Local Lyon Jewish officials say
that in the last few months be-
fore France was liberated then
main enemy was not the Gestapo,
which seemed to be weakened,
but the French fascist formations
such as the Vichy Militia and the
Parti Populaire of Jacques
Doriot. The latter, the officials
revealed, desecrated the Lyon
Synagogue on Quai Tillsit. de-
stroying Torahs, smashing the
furniture, and leaving the build-
ing a shambles.
Most of the synagogues in
France have been destroyed, the
leaders of the Jewish Consistory
said, but services are being re-
sumed in liberated territories as
soon as possible.
French Jewish leaders an-
nounced the formation of a new
organization representing all the
elements of the community, and
empowered to act as the sole
representative of French Jews
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 3)
HONORALL FAITHS
Washington United States
Senator Scott W. Lucas intro-
duced a joint resolution providing
for appointment of a twelve-man
commission to establish a na-
tional memorial commemorating
contributions of members of the
various faiths to American mili-
tary and naval history.
The proposed inter-faith me-
morial, to be located in the Dis-
trict of Columbia, would be the
first national Memorial symbol-
izing the participation of mem-
bers of different religions in the
defense of America.
"Construction of such a monu-
ment will strike a powerful blow
in defense of true Americanism,"
said Senator Lucas. "It will show
the world that alien theories
which would discriminate be-
tween one American and another
because of the way he worships
God and which the enemy has
attempted to introduce in order
to divide and weaken us have
no place in America."
RADIO ALGIERS SAYS
PELLEPOIX ARRESTED
Algiers (JTA)Radio Algiers
this week reported that Darquier
de Pellepoix, former Commission-
er for Jewish Affairs in the Vichy
government, has been caught and
arrested. He fathered manv of
the anti-Jewish laws issued by
the Vichy regime.


PAGE TWO
vJenist flcric/iiari

BIRTHS
M- and Mrs. John Kronenfcld.
ly of Miami, announce the
cL: )f a son in Dallas, Texas,
ca L )tember 9th.
f"1 >oral and Mrs. C. R. Kap-
..... u..nouncc the birth of a son
on September 19 at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital. Mrs. Kaplan is
the former Use Asher, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Siegbert Asher
of this city. Corporal Kaplan is
stationed at Camp Grant in Rock-
ford, 111.
Mrs. N. Siegal, 1307 S. W. 19th
St.. and family returned from a
three month's vacation in the
North.
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Becker and
children, Gretchen and Joanne,
have returned from a summer va-
cation spent at Graystone Inn,
Roaring Gad, N. C.
ENGAGEMENT
Mr. and Mrs. Ira Walsey. 2125
N. Bay Road, Miami Beach, an-
nounce the birth of a son Sep-
tember 15.
Abe Schoenfeld, petty officer,
2/c, will visit his mother. Mrs.
A. Schoenfeld, for the Yom Kip-
pur holiday.
Mrs. N. Segal and children.
49G'2 S. W. 18th Rd./ spent the
Holiday weekend in Norfolk with
her brother and sister-in-law.
Seaman and Mrs. Robert WVm-
stein.
BRISM
Rabbi Lazarus Lehrer, of Key
West, this week officiated at the
Brisim of the sons of Mr. and
Mrs. Louis Baida. 1536 Michigan
Ave, and Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Reisner, 1455 Michigan Ave.
Dr. and Mrs. Jacob H. Kapkm NCJW TO HOLD OPEN
have returned to the city Ji'^ MrrTiMr- r\v crRCOM
spending the summer in the I lttlHNVj KJt DLAOUl)
North. Dr. Kaplan will assume
;m active part in the plans of
Temple Israel for the coming sea-
son.
Irs. Ethel Shochet has re-
turned to her home, 1548 N. W.
1st St, after a several month's
rt_, ..i Atlantic City and the
North.
Engagement of Miss Ruth Al-
Mrs. Ida Bernstein, 1610 N. W.
34th St., and son Samuel, re-
turned to the city following a
three month's vacation spent
visiting in New York State and
Montreal, Canada. Her daughter,
Shirley, who accompanied her
north, will journey to California
The National Council of Jewish
Women will hold its opening
meeting of the season on Wednes- !>" t of '435 West Ave. Miami
dav. October 4th, at the Atlantis I Beach, to 2nd Lt. Robert M. Met-
Hotel. Miami Beach. The affair i sky of 216 Goldsmith Ave.. Ne-
will be held in the form of a wark, N. J has been announced
luncheon, to start at 12:30. Joseph by Miss Alpert s parents Mr. and
Rose. Executive Director of the | Mrs. Morris Alpert. They plan
Federation, will be guest speak- to be married on Sept. 24 at the
er, and a musical program will Sheraton hotel, Newark Miss Al-
be presented. Attendance is by pert graduated from Northwest
reservation only, which may be ern University last June. Lt
made by calling the Council of- Metsky. quartermaster supply of-
fice at 3-6554 | fleer at the Miami Air Depot of
A*board meeting of the Council lhe Alr Technical Service Com-
will be held September 29th at, ,,Tiand- was an advertising execu-
1 p. m. at the home of the presi- tive before entering the army in
dent. Mrs. Nat Williams, 114 W.
Annl of 1941. He is the son of
;.t the St. Moritz in New York,
ty of Miami.
Glass serving trays
go modern in design!
$4.50
13xlOl/2 ins.
You'll enjoy serving re-
freshments to your guests
on these clever trays!
Frosted bamboo or floral
designs on glass with
wooden frames. Handles
of genuine Plexiglas' a
clear crystal-like compo-
sition, 13-19 ins. $5.50
Rohm and Han trademark
U S. Pat Off.
Sues Approximate
miami store.
<;i.ass\vaui:.
fifth floor
pora-
for
Buy U. S. Stamps and Bonds.
f
WEDDINGS
^
rome
710 S. W. 12th AV. MIAMI-.
Til. 3 3431-}
"YOU* JEWISH
FUNERAL HOME
rflQ
Lj
Miss Margaret Horowitz, daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Horo-
witz, became the bride of Corp.
Sidney Shedrow last Sunday at
the Deauville Hotel. Miami Beach,
with Rabbi Max Shapiro officiat- >
ing. Attending the couple were J
the maid-of-honor, Miss Ethel i
Pont; the groom's mother. Mrs.!
Shedrow; and the bride's parents. I
Following the ceremony, a lunch- !
eon was served in the Palm Room !
of the hotel. The couple are tak-
ing a short trip through the state.
WE OfFKULLV KPKSENT
THE MAJORITY Of NORTHERN
JEWISH FIMRAl HOMES
/n/wmolion Clod/, fu-n,thtd on Atquril
SERVING MIAMI BEACH I MIAMI
Exclusively Jewish
Keep on buying War Bonds.
i
<# 2+ HOUR
&
Jictta v>tkeu
Your Complete Department
Store With Quality
Merchandise
Washington Are. at 13th St.
Miami Beach
And for your convenience
Morris Brother's New Ap-
parel and Accessory Store
70 E. Flagler St.. Miami
Mount Sinai Memorial Park H
"Owned and Operated by
Greater Miami Jewish Cemetery Ass'n
A COMMUNITY CEMETERY
AH liated Congregations: Beth David, Beth Jacob, Miami
jwish Orthodox, Schaaiei Zedek and Sisterhood
Chesed Shel Ernes
1 j^o^yi^i^v?VY>w?Y^^
TUami
for Rest
convalescemci
^Chronic Cases
HICEM TO RESUME ITS
OVERSEAS ACTIVITIES
^LS^BQ^
New York. N. Y.Bucarest.
capital of Rumania, only recently
cleared by the Soviet Army from
Nazi domination, is the first Eu-
ropean capital where the HIAS-
R'A Emigration Association
(HICEM), the world Wide emi-
grant aid service for the benefit
ol Jewish refugees, has been per-
mitted to resume its activities in
behalf of its "Rescue Through
Emigration" program.
EXTENDS PROGRAM OF
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH
New York (WNS)The exten-
i sion of its program of scientific
research and experiment in the
extent and nature of anti-Semit-
ism in America, study of the
| measures that are being applied
to combat it and new experiment-
ation with tests for the effective-
ness of these measures was an-
nounced by Judge Joseph M.
Proskauer. president of the Amer-
ican Jewish Committee.
with her aunt, Mrs. Jean Becker. I 2nd Terrace. San Marino Island." ( ^r- and Mrs- Morris Metsky of
where it is anticipated they will j Miami Beach. j Newark.
meet Mr. Becker, scheduled to ---------------------------
return to the States after 18 "CYCLONE GAS" USED Mr and Mrs Harry Cohen,
months of overseas duty with'. rvrroMiM r Tr Triire 18"4 S- w- 12th St.. announce the
the U. S. Navy. Miss Bernstein *w tJL 1 fcrEmlN AIL JfcWa engagement of their daughter.!
will return to Miami about No- J --------- Anita, to Sol Brownstein of j
vember 1st to enter the Universi- London (JTA)"Cyclone Gas." Cleveland, Ohio, son of Mrs. |
ty of Miami. She is now stopping which was used to asphyxiate Ruskm.
Jews m the Majdanek extermina-, Miss Cohl,n fa a graduate of
iron camp in Poland, was origin- Miami Senior High School. Mr.
ally designed as an insecticide. Brownstein is associated with the
McmdmgtoDr. Martin Schauf. Rubber Development Corp
German-Jewish refugee chemist tion. No date has been set
who was associated with the Ger- tnc wedding
man company producing the gas. ______
Dr. Schauf, who heads the re-
search department of the Atom- Mr- ar>d Mrs A. Kronenfcld,;
ised Food Products Co. here, said ,,f 92 N. E. 48th St.. are announc-
that his brother and many friends 'ng the engagement of their
had been killed at Majdanek with daughter. Thelma, to Corn. Mer-
the gas on which he had experi- '"n Simon, U. S. Army, son of i
mented for many years. The Mr. and Mrs. Herbert A. Simon, f
chemist left Frankfurt in 1933 of this city and Washington, D.;
after his dismissal by the German C. Corp. Simon is now serving
chemical company because lie with the armed forces in New
was a Jew. Guinea.
EHTERTAINMEMT
IS PRESENTED BY
ARTIST SATURDAY
Ruth Brotman entertained at a
musical soiree Saturday evening
at Jack Kaplan's home. 1351
Lenox Ave., honoring Emanuel
Barkan the new cantor of the Mi-
ami Beach Center. Present were:
Rabbi and Mrs. Irving Lehrman;
Cantor and Mrs.Barkan; Mr. and
Mrs. A. P. Cannes; Jean Thorbin. |
feature writer for the Miami
Daily News; Mr. and Mrs. Ash-
konazy; Daniel Broad; Dr.
Charles Hadad; Mr. and Mrs. Bert
Silving; Mrs. McLinson and Mrs.
Mink, of Philadelphia; Mr. and
Mrs. Chassey.
Several members of the Wash-
ington Embassy and Russian of-
ficers were guests. Jack Kaplan,
composer-pianist, sang several "of
his latest song hits, including
"Win the War in '44."
Cantor Barkan and Ruth Brot-
man sang several solos, accom-
panied by Bert Silving. Mr. Silv-
ing, who is an accomplished vio-
linist and a new member of the
University of Miami Orchestra,
played violin selections, accom-
naniedby Jack Kaplan, and also
played several piano duets with
Kaplan.
Phone 5-1025
AUGUST STUDIO
OF INTERIOR DECORATING
EXCLUSIVE DRAPERY
WORK & UPHOLSTERY
Tailor-Made Slip Covert
1230 Alton Road
Miami Beach 39. Fla.
The Greater Miami rv
the Women's DivTs 0nhap,ter ^
Women's Division ST 'L*
can Jewish Congress aL men'
its calendar for thevlSSSSS*
season. Events schi-duu? min
November 2Thursdau d
Meeting. nursday-Board
November 10-Formal .
ing of "Friday Review1':?
vi*ovembcr 24 ..Fng^
November 27 Monriav i
nual^anksgivir. S^
Me^tin^ 7-"M*.
December 8-"Friday Review-
December 22 Friday BevW
-Party for Congress 2
IdfiSnT 4-Th^^y-Board
January 12 "Friday Review-
January 2&"Friday Review-
January 29-General meetint
February 1-Thursday-Be^
meeting. "
February "Friday Review"
February 23"Friday Review"
February 25Sunday-Annul
Donor luncheon.
February 26General meetint
March 1Thursday Rani
meeting.
March 9"Friday Review."
March 23"Friday Review."
March 26Party honoring the
birthday of Dr. Stephens S. Wise.
April 5 Thursday Board
meeting.
April 13"Friday Review."
April 22"Friday Review."
April 30General meeting.
May 3ThursdayBoard meet-
ing.
May 11"Friday Review."
May 25Party honoring Mn.
I. M. Weinstein.
May 28Election of officers
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PPjpAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1944
fJenistifhridrj&n
(C0NTINUED FROM PAGE 1)
in dealings with public authori-
ty and Jewish bodies in other
countries.
The group, which will be
known as the Representative
Council of the Jews of France,
will seek recognition by the gov-
ernment and will ask to be con-
sulted "n a" rnatters affecting
Jews in France. It is composed
of six representatives of the Jew-
ish Consistory, five of the gen-
eral defense committee, which
was the supreme underground
organization during the occupa-
tion, and one each from the
French Zionist Organization and
the Committee of Action of
French Jewish Youth.
Other demands include com-
plete and just reparation to Jews
for moral and material damage
done by them. Restitution of con-
fiscated property whoever may
be the present holder; reintegra-
tion of functionaries and agents
discharged or compelled to cease
their functions, as well as Jewish
employeesthe period during
which such functionaries, agents
and employees were not per-
mitted to function shall count as
a period of active service with
full promotion rights or salary
increases to which they would
have been entitled had they been
working; and re-establishment of
institutions and Jewish social,
cultural and economic bodies sus-
pended or forbidden under the
anti-JeAish laws.
The Jews of liberated Lyon,
which now has the largest Jew-
ish population in France after
Paris, this week held their first
open, legal meeting since the
commencement of Nazi persecu-
tions in France, and tonight cele-
brated their new freedom at spe-
cial synagogue services.
New York (JTA)Commemor-
ating 100 years dedicated to cul-
tivating the spiritual, religious
and cultural ideals of their pio-
neer forefathers, Congregation
Emanu-El
PAGE THREE
RED CROSS FIRST
All MM WILL BE
III CITY MOM
i
Miami Beach civilian war services committee was recently appointed by city coun-
cil to cooperate with and supplement the activities of all individual citizens and organ-
izations engaged in the promotion of the welfare of servicemen in Miami Beach. Mem-
bers are: (left to right) Benjamin E. Bronston. realtor; Dr. Morris Goodman, merchant;
Charles L. Clements, saving and loan executive, chairman; Mrs. Russell T. Pancoast,
president of the Recreational Pier association of Miami Beach, which has entertained nearly
3,000.000 servicemen; and John C. Osterberg, former commander of Miami Beach post of
Veterans of Foreign Wars.
LAUDERDALE TEMPLE
ANNOUNCES SERVICES
Temple Emanu-El, 1801 South
Andrews Ave.. Fort Lauderdale,
will continue its Holy Day serv-
ices Tuesday evening, September
26th, at 8 o'clock, with Kol Nidre
services. Rabbi Simon H. Baron
will address the worshipers, and
has chosen as his topic "Amer-
ican Atonement for Anti-Semit-
ism." He will speak Wednesday
morning, Yom Kippur day, on "A
Perpetual Covenant." The sched-
ule for the remainder of the day
is as follows: Afternoon service
at 12:15 p.m.; children's service
at 2:30 p. m. ("A Story Sermon
on Story-Telling"); at 3:30 p. m.
a scripture service; at 4:15 p. m.
a memorial service, "The Pres-
ence of the Absent;" and the con-
cluding service at 5:15 p. m.
Religious school registration
and opening will take place Sun-
this week began the
celebration of the temple's Cen- day morning, September 24th at
tenary by preparing for a series i 10 a. m.
of special programs, religious
services and forums to be con-
tinued until the end of April.
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WE ARE CLOSED ON WEDNESDAYS
TAKE BUS 11 FROM DOWNTOWN MIAMI. OR
BUS M-.71 FROM MIAMI BEACH
V

PAPPY'S
Air Conditioned
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& Charcoal Broiled Steaks
Prime Ribs of Beef
Chicken in the Pot
Prepared by America'* Fineat Chefs
Under the Personal Supervision of
HARRY S. FEINBERG SS1JS1Z
ALL BAKING DONE ON PREMISES
Open
7 A. M.
to
2 A. M
Hippy's
RESTftimflrvr
SPIEGELMAN
Mrs. Qussle Snlefrelman, axed 89,
residing ;it 1420 N. W. 7th L"t in n local hospital Wednesday, fol-
lowing, ii Ioiik illness. A resident of
this city for :;.'i years, tin- deceased
came here from Hartford, Conn,
Shi* is survived by one son, Nate;
three daughters, Mrs. Irene Gond-
man anil Mrs. Martha Cohen of Mi-
ami. Mrs. Allen Melamed of Hart-
ford, ami three grandchildren. Rabbi
Max Shapiro officiated at services
Thursda) from the Gordon Funeral
Chapel, Interment followed in the
family plot in Woodlawn Cemetery
BARON
Mou is Baron, 61. of -27:; s. \v. l'TUi
Terrace, a retired contractor, iiu-il
Sunday in a local hospital, He Is
survived by the widow, Mrs Laura
Huron. Cordon Funeral Horn,' sen!
tin' body to New York City for
burial,
Harry A. Kenning, field repre-
sentative of First Aid, Water-
Safety and Accident Prevention
services of Southeastern area,
American Red Cross will arrive
in Miami Monday (Sept. 25) to
conduct instructor tr;
courses in Accident Prevc
and Water Safety;
Monday at 7:30 p. m. ali t
aid instructors are invitt ->
meet with Mr. Kenning ana me
First Aid committee of the Dade
County Red Cross in Gesu school.
Jack A. Erneman, chairman of
the committee, will preside.
The instructor training coui'se
in water safety will begin Tues-
day, Sept. 26 at Venetian pool.
Coral Gables, and will meet for
four consecutive evenings from
6 to 9 p. m. Approximately 30
candidates, both military and civ-
ilian are enrolled. One d,***'r _
uniting of this class is tc
ranged in addition.
The accident prcvenli
structor course will begii
day, Oct. 2 at Gesu1 schc
will meet for five consecutive
evenings from 7 to 10 p. m. Candi-
dates for this class are either pro-
Trt or uri r\ OM TWf o Sessional teachers or persons with
IKJ DC 11LLU UN UtU. J som,. plcvious experience in ac-
cident prevention work. The ac-
OBITUARIES SECOND SESSION AIC
ica-
*avt
COHEN
Tin- hody of Abraham Cohen, 47,
who died at his home, 1255 Pennsyl-
vania Ave., Kiidaj nlaht following a
heart attack, was sent to New York
hy Riverside Memorial <'hai>-i for
funeral services ami burial.
Cohen wai part owner of tin- Roose-
velt apartment hotel in Miami Beach.
II,' WH a veteran of World War I.
Surviving are a sister. Mrs Rose
Rosenstock of Miami Beach; a broth-
er, Miic Cohen, and a sister. Mis
Dinah Hurwlts, both of New York
City.
New York (WNS)The second
session of the American Jewish
Conference will be held in Pitts-
burgh, Pa. on December 3, it was
announced here by the adminis-
trative committee of the Con-
ference.
Originally it was planned to
hold the second session in Chica-
go over the Labor Day week-end.
but a ninety day postponement
was voted by the Interim Com-
mittee in June, in compliance
with the request of the office of! course.
Defense Transportation.
The Interim Committee met
this week in New York to con-
sider the agenda for the second
session. On the unfinished busi-
ness from the first session is the
selection of a delegation to re-
present American Jewry at the
Peace Conference.
cident prevention committee of
the Dade County chapter, headed
by Capt. J. W. Davis of the Miami
Fire Dept^. is making plans for
an extensive training program in
that field. Arrangements have
been made to teach certificated
junior accident prevention courses
in all Miami parochial schools,
and contacts are now being made
with private and public schools
to offer these institutions the
same opportunity to teach the
Buy U. S. Stamps and Bonds.
New York (JTA)A represent-
ative of the Joint Distribution
Committee will be included in
the delegation which the United
Nations Relief and Rehabilitation
Administration will send to lib-
erated Poland for the purpose of
studying the relief needs of the
local population, it was an-
nounced.
BETH SHOLOM SCHOOL
TO BE OPENED SUNDAY
PALM BEACH NOTE
MRS. MARY SCHRDNKX Re>prsB*arttv
Louis Goldman, chairman of
the Beth Sholom religious school
Mrs.
Ruth
Mrs. Morris Dickson and chil- Good Samaritan Hospital,
dien, Joy and Sandier, have Goodmark is the former
board, announces that the school joined Mr. Dickson at their home, i Glasser, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
will be formally opened on Sun- 424 Hampton Road, after a visit j Jacob Glasser. Mr. Goodmark is
day morning, October 1st. at 10 ] of about two months with Mrs.; the son ot Mr. and Mrs. J. Good-
a. m. Registrations will be taken Dickson's relatives in Massachu- mark.
Sunday morning, September 24th i setts.
from 10 a. m. to 12 noon, and
a. m.
every afternoon of that week
from 4 to 5 at the Center. The
faculty will consist of qualified
and experienced teachers. Provi-
sion is also being made for Bar
Mitzvah instruction as part of the
afternoon weekday Hebrew
classes. ______
jTj_Tj-u*Lni*Lrir*'j*r*-'*~* ** g a
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Goodmark
announce the birth of a son at
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Goldstein
have returned from New York.
the
Jewish Calendar
All lioilda>s and Fast Pays begin
at sunset of the day preceding
dates given below;
19 4 4
YOM KIPPUR
Wednesday. September 27
SUCCOTH (Firt Two Days)
Monday, October 2
Tuesday, October 3
SHEMINI AZERETH
Monday, October 9
SIMCHATH TORAH
Tuesday, October 10
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"




PAGE FOUR
*Ami si ncridliain
The Jewish Floridian
Plant and Main Offices, 21 S. W. Second Avenue, Miami, Fla.
P. O. Box 2973________________________Phone 2-1141
Entered as Second Class Matter July 4, 1930 at the Post Office
of Miami, Florida, under the Act of March 3, 1879
FRED K. SHOCHET, Managing Editor
Subscription1 Year, $2.00 Six Months, $1.00
MIAMI 18, FLORIDA, FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 22, 1944
TISHRI 5, 5705
VOLUME 17 NUMBER 38
CAPITAL SPOTLIGHT
By MURIEL LEVIN
r.ipyriKiit, 1941. Jewish
Telegraphic Agency, Inc.
RACIAL BIGOTRY
Speaking this week at a mass meeting in San Francisco
that was sponsored by the National Committee Against the
Persecution of the Jews, Associate Justice Frank Murphy of
the United States Supreme Court declared that the tides of
race conflict and bigotry were rising higher every day through-
out the country. The liberal jurist pointed out that there was
mounting evidence that the seeds of evil and hate that have
been implanted by the Nazi revolution have not yet been up-
rooted, and that the Nazi doctrine of anti-Semitism was still
being preached with a view to spreading totalitarianism
throughout the world. Justice Murphy further emphasized that
while the paramount issue at this time was to secure a speedy
victory over the foes of humanity, "social and economic and
political justice of durability when the war is done will alone
assure us the real victory."
But Judge Murphy went beyond mere generalities. He
actually outlined a six-point program to combat the Nazi
theories.
We were particularly impressed by that part of his pro-
gram urging "our Governments to provide full and complete
protection of life, liberty, freedom of worship and civil rights
for all our inhabitants, whatever may be their distinctions as
to birth, color, nationality, language, race or religion."
Another point in the program meriting much considera-
tion is the one in which it was suggested that adeguate and
appropriate machinery be established in every community,
no matter how remote, to "secure protection against the cur-
tailment of our fundamental rights." Here, evidently, is en-
visaged a program to combat race hatred and bigotry throuqh
the local communities in which there has been a manifestation
ot overt intolerance.
Judge Murphy has surely hit the nail on the head when
he asserted that man only resorts to acts of intolerance against
minority, or scapegoat groups of people, when he feols his
ability to provide a decent livelihood for his family has been
jeopardized. This truism holds special significance to the Jews
of American at this time. There is a distinct possibility that the
anticipated post-war economic dislocation might be frauqht
with dangers to the Jewish community in this country. That is
why it is all the more encouraging to see such a vast educa-
tional campaign to eradicate the undeniable influence of Nazi
propaganda in this country.
RESCUE IN WAR
s. S i016. Walls f Fortre8S Germany are being besieged in
the final chapter of the European phase of the war, it is well
that we should pause to consider how American Jews helped
their brothers across the sea survive five of the blackest vears
in Jewish history. The United Jewish Appeal for Refugees Over-
seas Needs and Palestine has reported that in the five-year
period since the outbreak of World War II. the Jews in the
United States contributed a total of S82.000.000 for the rescue
reconstruction and resettlement programs of the Joint Distribu-
tion Committee, United Palestine Appeal and National Refuaee
Service. The record of U.J.A. supported aid to our fellow-Jews
is concrete evidence of the generosity and understanding of
the American Jewish community. The progress of our local
federation in its campaign is further evidence of this awaken-
ing. It also indicates that in a period of the gravest threat to
the Jewish survival, the agencies of the United Jewish Appeal
were not deterred by the spread of destruction or by the ob-
stacles of war in snatching from the cauldron of hate larae
numbers of Jews who might otherwise have suffered the ter-
rible fate of the 3,000,000 martyrs who lie buried in the mass
graves of Poland For example, when normal escape routes
were blocked ,n Europe, the J.D.C. opened new channels for
the emigration of refugees, helping directly 79,000 Jewish men
women and children reach Palestine and the Western Hemi-
sphere. Despite the problems of war, the Jewish homeland in
Palestine received and absorbed more than 55,000 homeless
Jews with the help of the U.P.A. since September 1 1939 Here
wi^heTdo?ryN.RhI.neWCmerS ^ SpeedUy in,^aed
What has been accomplished in the face of many hard-
ships of war is most significant. But of even greater importance
at this moment is the fact that the agencies of the United Jewish
Appeal have already undertaken the larger tasks resultina
from liberation, involving not only the rehabilitation of the
victims, but the restoration of the Jewish communities which
have been reduced to ashes by the Nazi oppressor. The notable
rescue achievements in war have prepared bur major aqencies
for the bigger job of reconstruction in peace. We can free the
new responsibilities of the future with the assurance that the
United Jewish Appeal and its agencies offer the instruments
for bringing about an era of revival and hope for the Jews who
have lived for more than a decade on the brink of destruction
and death.
There arc no reliable figures
for the number of Jews surviving
in Europe. At best there are esti-
mates, which give Poland some
few hundred thousand out of the
three million who lived there be-
fore the war. So it is hard even
to phrase the problem for those
who have found temporary hav-
ens elsewherein Italy, in Scan-
dinavia, in Britain, in hideouts
in France, in North Africa and
in pockets of the Balkans.
Some of the fugitive Jews are
stateless. Some will wish to re-
turn to their old places of resi-
dence. For others, for a variety
of reasons, that will be inadvis-
able or Impossible. The destruc-
tion on the continent of Europe,
which has gone for deeper than
most people in America realize,
makes it dubious whether, in
some areas, even a rudimentary
sort of orderly society and social
life can be maintained. As Anne
O'Harc McCormick reported from
Rome, people are apprehensive
not of mere revolution but of
utter social collapse.
At the moment of writing no
overall solution for the problems
of the dispersed Jews has been
found. The function of UNRRA
(United Nations Relief and Re-
habilitation Administration) is a
limited one. It is to tide people
over the first desperate months
which follow armed conflictto
give them a minimum of food
and clothing, to provide shelter,
to set up assembly camps which
constitute the first step on the
journey home if people have a
home to go to.
When the temporary functions
of the UNRRA are ended, it will
be the task of the Intergovern-
mental Committee for Refugees,
whose course in the past shows
no inspiring record of positive
action, to take over. Probably
some modernized form of the old
Nansen passport can be devised
to be furnished the stateless. No
doubt arrangements will have to
lie made to place those who have
no homes to return to.
Some small number of Jews
may perhaps wish to return to
Germany which is now virtually
purged of them entirely. But in
Germany, quite aside from the
poison-fog of anti-Semitism which
u ^or yt'ars been sP'<'ad over
the landscape, and which will
leave after-effects that cannot be
wiped out overnight, there will
be such bitterness and poverty
that few would willingly expose
themselves to it.
As yet there is no indication
that international action has even
begun to open wider the doors of
Palestine to Jewish immigration
In fact, the determined policy of
hushing up discussion of the sub-
ject, is a concession to retrograde,
not progressive, forces.
Eventually, it is expected that
the entire mandate system will
be revised and international trus-
teeship will supplant the present
one-nation control. But that point
has not yet been reached. Mean-
time, the Arabs are continuing
their political pressure on the
British.
Not even the three-man com-
mission which, led by the eco-
nomist Robert Nathan, was to go
to Palestine and impartially ex-
plore the economic possibilities
pi development and absorption of
the land, has been permitted io
go there.
In the conferences which have
thus tar been held looking to
world reconstruction, there has
been no public intimation that
Jews as ;. group were receiving
Bpecial consideration. Of neces-
sity this would be true of such
general subjects as food, inter-
national currency and the bank
for reconstruction, international
labor problems, and the frame-
work within which peace is
sought to be maintained.
The very immensity of the
problems which the peace plan-
K? Ite rna,''S thC danRt,r ,hat
the Jewish minority will fail ,
receive the consideration which
will necessarily be given to na-
tional groups. With masses of
people, estimated as high as thirty
m! tZ afnd CTVmort'- wander-
n g; the face of the continent of
Euiope. hungry, sick, homeless,
with agriculture disrupted, cities
made into shambles, factories
wrecked currencies become "a"
ueless, it would not be strange f
baecrk0grohunded MMfe r 'nt lhe
It is plainly not adequate to
C.foMont "* as did Sir
inii"1 Heathcte-Smith, of the
Intergovernmental Committee!
Mudfy QwifuhUioi
By PHINEAS J. BJBON-
LISTEN HERE ...
Orchids to Philip Lee Bush and Mrs. Lloyd Dinkri. ,
bers of the San Francisco Board of Education ftS*%
to be intimidated and, as good Americans concern^ rehlMd
maintenance of absolute separation of church and Wlth *
with the majority of the non-Jewish members aSfS Vted
tion of release time for religious instruction tZ .Tv, adoP-
children They are right, of course RelSJuf 8cho1
belongs not in the American public school system H.1
churches and synagogues Besides, they know aJ 4a
Semitic hooliganism on the part of minors occurs mZtt m
ly in such spots in the Union as have adopted U* ^m'
Our hat is off to Harry C. Oppenheimer. who hoS !? V'
in the successful fight to end Jim Crow restrictions m ft. j t
Hospital, the first New York voluntary hospital to era8X^
line in the appointment of doctors and nurses r *
Vanderbilt. who gets around among the 400, reports SS*1
tain of the wealthier, old coupon-clippers are vblirX *
Semitic To hear them talk you JSd thing you iefew'
mg to conversations at Berchtestaden" Very interest
OVERSEAS REPORT .. .
We may hope that by the lime you read this all of Hniu.j
will have been liberated from the Nazi yoke But ?
meantime we want to pass on the report that in' the fai
Zwolle the Nazis, after getting rid of all the livinq Jews h>L2
their attention to the Jewish deadand transformed Lu
Jewish cemetery into a recreation ground ... The tombstone?
we may add, were sent to another city, where they were 3
on the open market ... Dr. Sven Hedin, the great Swedish
scientist and explorer, who is a rabid pro-Nazi unto this day !
partly Jewish, and if he had lived in Germany he would have
been one of the four milliop Jewish victims of the Nazis
When Manfred von Killinger, self-confessed expert in pola'cal
murder, was the Nazi Consul General at San Francisco, we pre-
tested against his presence in this country, and never though!
that the day would come when we would approve one of ha
acts ... But now we give him the posthumous award of our op-
proval of his machine-gunning of a number of Nazi representa-
tives just before his recent suicide at Bucharest.
P.O.W.WOW ...
The ne plus ultra in gall was recently exhibited by a Nazi
prisoner of war at present in this country The Nazi, Leonard
Lyons tells us, had been a painter in civilian life, and as such
had know guite a few art dealers When he reached America
the P.O.W. learned that a Jewish dealer, despoiled by the Nazis,
had managed to establish an art gallery in New York ... So
the Nazi wrote to this Jew, recalling their acguaintanceand
asking for paint and canvas, plus the promise of an eventual
one man show in the refugee's gallery From the Coast a cor-
respondent writes us: "Nazi war prisoners are treated with silk
gloves in this country, as you are well aware ... But you'll be
surprised to know that an American naval officer had to wail
for a seat in a railroad dining car because the only free table
was reserved for two German war prisoners en route to a new
camp."
BOOKS AND AUTHORS .
"No Mean City," Simeon Strunsky's new book on New
York, is gathering in the critical plaudits Strunsky, yon
should know, is the author of the fascinating unsigned column
"Topics of The Times" which appears on the editorial page of
the New York Times every day Allan Chase is having o
novel published this week ... Its title is "Five Anows," and il
deals with the Spanish Fascist group he exposed in his best-
seller "Falange" Ben Hecht is planning a lecture tour fa
the coming season The theme on which he will speak is the
message of his book on the Jewish problem, "A Guide lor the
Bedevilled" Note to the many friends of Pierre van Paassen.
Walter Winchell's item about the serious illness of the beloved
author of "The Forgotten Ally" is, to guote Mark Twain, greatly
exaggerated Van Paassen was, after a thorough medical
check-up, declared in the pink of condition.
ABOUT PEOPLE ...
Anna Lord Strauss, president of the National League
Women Voters, attributes her interest in politics to the influence
of her father, the banker Albert Strauss, whom she accom-
panied to Europe after the last war, when he served as a fi-
nancial adviser to the Peace Conference Roger W. Straus,
who is taking an active part in Governor Dewey's campaign
is one of the big shots of the National Conference of Christians
and Jews Briefly revisiting Brooklyn, after nearly *
half years overseas, is Bernard Kessel, the corporal
o:
"u,1,-'u' uaviser to tne Peace (Jonlerence noger "
who is taking an active part in Governor Dewey's campaign.
- big shots of the National Conference of Christy*
Briefly revisiting Brooklyn, after nearly two anfla
irseas, is Bernard Kessel, the corporal whoi jJJ
-J the North African town of Oran single-hanflJJ
Too bad that Leo Birinski's "The Day Will Come," the p
in ,..l....L tf-.l. .....'. tlf___I
.. j^u.o uveiseas, is oernara Kessel, tne corpoiui r- ,
cally captured the North African town of Oran single-hanaw
Too bad that Leo Birinski's "The Day Will Come," the PiaJ
in which Hitler is confronted and told off by the Wandering !*
hasn't not ho et.. n.__i____l:_________i~ < Soon to v
--- -...... .,ii,Ci tuiuroniea ana toia on rjy ujc u-*
hasn't got the stuff Broadway hits are made of Soon -
launched is a liberty ship bearing the name of the late m
Zionist leader Dr. Nachman Syrkin Back in civilian we
Lieut. Sidney Kingsley, the playwrighta medical cB*S
A new swing band is in the making and will soon maM
debut under the baton of Artie Shaw, recently discharged tw
the Navy.
, of mil"01*
that anti-Semitism will quickly
(lie and that Jewish citizens can
look forward to reinstatement as
full citizens in their native lands,
for how many will Poland be a
refuge? It true only in a limit-
ed sense of Czechoslovakia. Italy
is in a desperate situation eco-
nomically. As for the Balkan
countries, there ig little to be
hoped for from them.
The problem is one ot w> 5
and private agencies U" ^
care for tens of thousand*^
international act'". -V^ituation
take to deal "**&
Only a long view n enw (0
the needs of people scai fff
the four winds, ep^nof vision
their lives on the kind +
and humanity without ww
ilization itself cannot sum


PJUDAY. SEPTEMBER 22, 1944
JewistithrXMam
PAGE FIVE
"Between You and Me
By BORIS SMOLAR
Copyright, 1944, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.
99
OVERSEAS FRONT: Jewish or-
ganizations in America are. for
fhe time being, not in a position
m respond to the appeal of the
iews in liberated Poland for a
relief delegation to be sent to
Lublin Nor are Jew>sh or-
ganizations in England This
because the temporary Polish
government in Lublin is not the
only Polish government .
There is also a Polish Govern-
ment in London The first is
recognized by Russia but not by
the United States and England
The second is recognized by
England and America, but not by
Russia ... A situation is thus
created in which neither the State
Department in Washington, nor
the Foreign Office in London can
JMU6 passports to any delegation
desiring to proceed to liberated
Poland until the two separate Po-
lish governments merge into one
recognized by all members of the
Allied Nations ... In the hope
that such a merger will take
place soon, the interested Jewish
relief groups in this country, espe-
cially the Joint Distribution Com-
mittee, are making preparations
for large-scale relief activities
among the surviving Jews in Po-
land Plans are also being
made for relief activities in Ru-
mania .

THE HOME FRONT: Between
now and Election Day a rise in
anti-Jewish propaganda in this
country can be expected .
Jewish organizations interested in
combating such propaganda are
prepared for it Not much
can be revealed of the measures
they have taken to fight the in-
jection of anti-Seraitic issues into
the Presidential election cam-
paign Sufficient to say that
such measures have been taken
. And in this respect complete
unity prevails among all inter-
ested Jewish groups Zionist
circles in Canada are speculating
whether the Palestine problem
will be dealt with at the Roose-
velt Churchill conference now
taking place in Quebec ... It is
believed that the conference will
discuss, among other questions,
the status of national minorities
. In this connection it is as-
sumea that the Palestine issue
may come up for discussion .
The American Jewish Commit-
tee, under the direction of Dr.
John Slawson. its executive vice-
president, is now developing a
more active policy of acquainting
the Jewish communities through-
out the country with its activities
. More than 300 community
organizations are given an in-
tensive service on various Jewish
questions on a day-to-day basis
. And the public relations de-
partment of the Committee is
also doing a good job The
latest step in popularizing the
activities of the American Jew-
ish Committee is the publication
of an eight-page booklet which
summarizes, among other things,
the attitude of the Committee to-
wards Palestine.
*
ETERNAL FRANCE: Many
books will now be written about
the role which the French under-
ground played in fighting for the
liberation of France Much
will also be said about the aid
given by the underground move-
ment to Nazi-persecuted Jews in
France during the four years of
occupation But the best
book so far on this subject is
Joseph Kessel's "Army of Shad-
ows" This work, by a noted
French-Jewish writer, which was
published by Knopf in this coun-
try shortly before the liberation
of Paris, is even of greater in-
terest now that France is free .
Himself active for several years
in the underground movement in
France, Kessel gives a vivid pic-
ture of how French conspirators
conducted their anti-German ac-
tivities under the very nose of
the Gestapo Frenchmen who
joined the underground move-
ment were warned in all fairness
that they would probably be
caught by the Gestapo within
?%/,>/'"'"''""''''"''
ll*tt"l>
wmfrft
y/DVANTAGES J
of"
MORTGAGE
V
.LOW RATS*
. BA8Y PAYMENTS
. LONG TIM* TO PAT
. PROMPT SERVICE
.A HOME INSTITUTION
Deal With You
WCAt. FRIENDLY
INSTITUTION
"Uo^CESOVEBS.0.000.000
^^
three months and be tortured to
death ... Yet the number of
members of the underground
grew from day to day And
no few women were among them
Kessel also describes the
mountain shelters where people
trying to escape deportation hid
They could not wash .
They could not shave Their
hair hung over their cheeks burn-
ed by sun and rain They
slept in holes, in caves, in the
mud Food was a terrible
daily problem Their clothes
fell off in tatters Their shoes
went to pieces on the rocks .
Some of them had sections of old
tire, or even strips of bark tied
to their feet with string .
Others had nothing on but an
old potato sack split in two and
tied round their waist like loin-
cloth ... It is easy to imagine
how these liberated people feel
now And it is also easy to
imagine what the word "Ger-
man" will mean to these people
for the rest of their lives.
*
FRIENDLY CRITICISM: Much
criticism has been voiced recently
against the American Jewish
Confernce by many of its friends
. But none of the critics is as
outspoken as Daniel Frisch, a
member of its Interim Committee
... On the eve of the second
session of the Conference, which
is to take place in Pittsburgh
early in December, Frisch has is-
sued a special pamphlet asking
"What Happened to the Ameri-
can Jewish Conference?" ... He
charges the Conference with in-
activity and especially with fail-
ure to take a firm attitude to-
wards the problem of rescuing
Jews in Europe from extermina-
tion ... He finds that the leader-
ship of the Conference is mono-
polized by a few people and re-
presents chiefly, vested organiza-
tional interests ... He claims
that the leaders of the "body"
turned out to be the heads of
other organizations which would
not yield their prerogatives to
the Conference which they them-
selves consider the supreme body
of American Jewry He also
holds them responsible "for fail-
ing to provide opportunities for
the inclusion of younger men and
women in the management of our
affairs" The American Jew-
ish Conference, he says, demons-
trated that while the people have
grown, the leaders have not kept
pace They have created a
tyranny of speechmaking as a
substitute for true greatness and
inner humility, he asserts .
He calls upon the delegates to
the forthcoming session of the
Conference not to remain mere
onlookers ... As a sovereign body
the delegates will have to exer-
cise their prerogatives and util-
ize to the fullest their freedom
to choose their leadership and
direction, he stresses.
Our Film Folk .
By HELEN ZIGMOND
Copyright, 1944, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc.
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Pallant
and Daughter
Wish All Their Relatives and
Friends A Happy New Year
Soldiers in Civies: Jascha Heif-
itz and Pianist Milton Kaye re-
turned from a two-month over-
seas tour through North Africa
and the southern part of Italy
up to and including the front
lines north of Rome. They found
G.I. Joes are far from averse to
classic music. Out of 45 concerts,
43 were received with tremend-
ous ovations. Locales included
any kind of a place from hangars
and barns to hospitals and even
the top of a truck. Music from
Bach to Mendelssohn was enjoy-
ed. Heifitz, also a pianist of some
degree, several times joined with
Kaye in cooking up some hot
jam sessions for the boys.
An Army public relations of-
ficer showered high praise on five
outstanding personalities who
have done the most for the mo-
rale of the armed forces. Among
the five were Dinah Shore and
Jack Benny. Benny, though not
in the best of health, insisted on
taking his second overseas jaunt,
this time to the South Pacific.
Dinah is yodeling her way across
France. Somewhere on the coast
of Brittany, writes a soldier,
Dinah had just finished an eve-
ing of song and returned to her
tent, when a truck drove up. Two
lads in it, bewailing their ill-luck
they had driven sixty miles to
hear her and has missed the pro-
gram. Dinah overheard struck
her head out said, "If you
wait till I change costumes, I'll
sing for you." And forthwith
she gave an unscheduled concert
to an audience of two lonely
GI's.
*
Turning Back the Clock: In
1916 Chuck (now Director) Reis-
ner wrote, "Goodbye Broadway,
Hello France." It became one of
the most popular ditties of World
War I, and his royalties were
considerable. Today he can as-
certain the progress of the war
by his royalty checks which are
coming in again in increasing
numbers.

Footing the bill personally,
Groucho is publishing his book
called, "Forward Marx." It tells
of his experiences touring Army
camps ... is not for sale to you
or you but will be distributed
gratis to the boys in service.

From the pennats of Paris to
the pavements of Picturetown the
innocence or guilt of Maurice
Chevalier as a Nazi collaborator
is a much-mooted question. And
most bemooted is Sid Grauman.
He has received numerous re-
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Mann
and Sons
Wish All Their Friends and
Relatives
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
quests to obliterate the footprints
of the chanteur-comedian which
lie in solid, if not eternal, cement
in the forecourt of Grauman's
Chinese Theater. But Sid the
Impresario refuse to take action
until the plaintiff has been prov-
en innocent or guilty by more
authentic report than rumor.
*
Not many weeks ago Swiss
Theatre managers could not ob-
tain transportation permits for
U. S. films to pass through Spain
and portgual due to obstruction
of Nazi officials in those coun-
tries. Now, with Allied occupa-
tion of France, Switzerland will
get a full supply, but the Nazi
product, which occupied a prom-
inent place on Spanish screens,
will find all routes from Berlin
to Spain and Portugal closed.

Pro-Post-War Statistics: Of the
300 Warner employees who re-
ceived discharges from Uncle
Sam, two-thirds are back in their
old jobs, or equivalent, on the
lot.

Sam Goldwyn permits not even
the weather to interfere with Art.
Hollywood's unprecedented weeks
of overcast skies caused him to
gather up his chicks and move
indoors for the production of 'The
Wond Man," Danny Kaye's
starrer. This undershelter shoot-
ing will necessitate the construc-
tion of an immense set with hun-
dreds of trees, shrubs, flowers, a
bridle path, etcetera, realistically
depicting New York's Central
Park. All this for but one se-
quence in the picture.

Dane Clark, actor, who looks
and sounds as goyish as McGaf-
ferty, was chatting with one of
the Boulevard Boys. Later, hun-
gry for some kosher food, hesi-
tatingly asked Dane if he liked
herring. "Sure," said Dane. 'T
like all that kind of stuff." "You
aren't you can't be you're
not one of Our People?" gasped
the other. "Surest thing you know
Brother," answered the actor.
"Where can we go to tear a lox
or destroy a strudel?"
To Our Friends and Patrons
Sincere Best Wishes for A
HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS
NEW YEAR
HARRY
BOONSHOFT
718 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach
W/Mtotomw"
RIVERSIDE
MEMORIAL CHAPEL
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
1236 Washington dvi., Miami Baach
In New Tort 76th St. 1 Arastetdam Avt
5-7777
RIVERSIDE
AMBULANCE
SERVICE
1944 CAillLLAC AMBULANCE
1944 OXYGEN EQUIPMENT
Happy New Year Greetings
To Our Many Friends and
Patrons
Battista's Italian &
American Restaurant
142 S. W. 37th Avenue
PHONE 4-9289
$
STAFF SERGEANT AND
MRS. BURNETT ROTH
Extend the best of wishes
for a Joyous and Happy
New Year to All Their
Friends.
BEST WISHES FOR A
HAPPY NEW YEAR
GRAYMAR
SODA SHOP
720 N. W. 29th Street
MIAMI
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
FREEMAN'S
LUNCH AND
RESTAURANT
798 Palm Avenue
HIALEAH
PHONE 8-1922
Now Under Ownership and
Management of
Albert A. and
Ethel M. Kramer
"JUST GOOD FOOD"
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
MORRIS
KRAFCHICK
"Custom Tailoring"
755 Washington Avenue
MIAMI BEACH
To All A Most Happy and
Prosperous New Year
MR. AND MRS.
SAMUEL SAAL
AND FAMILY
1
INC.
79 N. W. 20th St.. Miami

s


T

PAGE SIX
* knisl I hi Mi w
=*^
M | Notes Of f Y. M. H. A. -by-SAM SILVER

Jewish Centers Conference
Of vital interest to our organ-
ization is the conference being
held in Atlanta this week-end for
the purpose of organizing a
Southern Section of Jewish Cen-
ters, YMHA's and YWHA's. This
conference is taking place at the
Biltmore Hotel up there, and all
Southern leaders interested in
Jewish Center work have been
invited to attend. The need has
been long felt lor a regional or-
ganization of Southern Jewish
Centers to exchange ideas and
programs and to provide for CO
ordinated planning This is parti*
cularly important at this time as
we must gear our plans prooerly
for the post-war era.
Our executive director. Mr.
Grossman, is attending this eon-
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Spcier
and Family
Wish All Their Friends
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
fcrence. and it is believed that
much good will inure to the Ys
of Greater Miami as a result at
the exchange of ideas and the
co-ordinated planning of pro-
grams which will take place
there.
Athletics
It has been called to my atten-
tion that I have been negligent
in bringing to you news pertain-
ing to the Y bowlers and diamond
ball players. This was purely un-
intentional on my part, but I did
get some satisfaction out of learn-
ing that I have a reader or two
I'll get some dope on current
athletic events and pass it on to
you shortly I appreciate criticism
Constructive or otherwise so
let's hear from you.
RUSSIAN SHIPS TO AID
IN REFUGEE SUPPLIES
Ottawa (JTA)The Soviet em-
bassy here will make Russian
ships available for the transport-
ation of relief supplies to the
Jews m liberated sections of Po-
land, as soon as such arrange-
ments are approved by MOSCOW,
a delegation of the Canadian
Jewish Congress was assured this
week by Soviet Ambassador
George Zarubin.
The delegation, head by Sam
in I Bronfman, Congress presi-
dent, discussed with Mr Zarubin
the various problems involved in
getting tood. clothing, medicine
and other rebel supplies to the
.lews of Poland. The Jew i.-h lead-
ers said that the Congress was
iead> to supply unlimited quantl-
of assistance providi d trans-
portation and means of distribu-
tion are available.
'S HELP
TO CHILDREN OF
STATE INCHING
Mr. and Mrs. Saul Sherman
and Family
Wish All Their Friends
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
PUBLIC GAS CO.
7200 N. W. 7th Ave.
Phone 7-6638
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Koretsky
and Son
Concourse Plaza Hotel
New York
Wish All Their Relatives and
Friends a Happy New Year
Best Wishes for a Happy and
Peaceful New Year
Atlas Fish Market
1331 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
PHONE 5-2240
Best Wishes for a
HAPPY NEW YEAR
i
Dr. and MRS.
H. R. MECHLOWITZ
AND FAMILY
Mr. and Mrs.
H. H. MILLER
846 Michigan Avenue
Miami Beach
Extend Sincere Wishes
for a
HAPPY NEW YEAR
V
BONDS and BOMBS
BRING
VICTORY
FIVE POINT PLAN
OF
TO FIRST MEETING
The business and professional
women's division ol the Miami
chapter ol Hadassah has extend-
ed an invitation to all WACs,
WAVES and SPARS m this area,
and to all business women, to
attend the fust meeting ot the
season, at 8:15 p. m next Monday
m the YM-YWHA. 1 Lincoln
Road, Miami Beach. Mrs. Milton
Sirkin, senior adviser, will install
the new officers, and Chaplain
Saul Kraft will be e,uest speaker.
Miss Polly Gershon is presi I
The BPW division o! Hadassah
I omposed of career gil Is who
graduate into that group aftei
five years' membership in Junior
Hadassah.
One of the most important
projects of Hadassah is the Roths-
ehild-Hadassah university in
Palestine. The Henrietta Szold
school of Nursing, part of the
Hadassah medical center there,
has trained 359 nurses since it
was opened in 1!M8. Through Had-
assah miles of hospital beds are
supplied with linen. Food for hos-
pitals as well as for school
luncheons are supplied t,, 30,000
children daily.
ALL-JEWISH CITY WILL
HAVE ARAB POLICEMEN
T( 1 Aviv (WNS>For the first
tune in its history the all-Jewish
city ol Tel Aviv will have Arabs
on its police force. This was due
to the resignation this week ol a
number of Jewish policemen who
claimed that the wages they were
HettmK were not sufficient to
meet the rising cost of livmu It
was expected that more Arabs
might be appointed to fill 11,,-
vac ancles caused by the resigna-
tions.
BALLANTINE'S
ALE f~
America's Fintst Since 7840
DISTRIBUTED HY
NATIONAL BRANDS, INC.
New York (WNSIA five-point
program of clerance and coordi-
nation on Jt'wish civic protective
work in the United States was
adopted here at the- close of a
three-day conference ol the- Na
tional Community Relations Ad-
visory Council. The conference.
attended by representatives id
m\ national and eighteen local
community civic protective
agencies, elected David Slier ol
New York as chairman ot the
Council. The program provides:
1. To study, analyze and evalu-
ate the- policies and activities of
the national and local agencies.
2. To ascertain the proble m
areas from time to time.
3. To ascertain the areas of
activities of these organizations
and to conduct a continuous in-
ventory cif their projects.
4. To serve as a coordinating
and clearance agency for projects
and policies, to eliminate duplica-
tion and conflict of activities, and
to recommend further protects to
member agencies.
5 To sc e k agreement on and
formulate policies. Such policies
once formulated and adopted, it
i i xpected that the affiliated or-
ganizations will adhere to such'
policies and will not eme,ane in
any activities in contravention ol
such policies.
Following a report by Sidney
Holland, i ot Baltimore, chairman
oi the- membership committee, a
cnterai foi membership was de-
vised and accepted The execu-
tive commute was authorized to
"'' Pj local communities for
membership if they met the- fol
lowing three requirements:
1. A Jewish population of 12,-
000 or more- (Provision was made
lor smaller communities netting
togi thei in a regional setup with
th.- authorization ot the executive
committee ,
2. That the applicant city have
a community organization sup-
ported by the community that
concerns itself primarily with the
problem of civic protection.
'. I bat the applicant city have
professional directing the civic
protective activities of the com-
munity.
Jacksonville The extent to
which Florida's a'-i to dependent
children program is being ex-
panded was reflected in the an-
nouncement here today by State
Welfare Commissioner Leland
W. Hiatt that 2.15 families (659
childreni were added to the rolls
during August, for a total of
3.47!) families (8.373 children).
The average grant was in-
creased on the state level during
August to $32.55 per family, pay-
ments being limited to $18 per
month for the first child under
Hi years of age, or under 18 years
11 attending school, and to $12
for each additional child. Total
payments aggregated $113,226.50
lor the month, or at the rate of
$1,358,718 per year.
In Dade County, Hiatt said,
S5.563.50 was paid during August
to 156 families (245 children), or
at the rate of $66,762 per year.
Commissioner Hiatt explained
that due to the lack of funds.
investigations for aid to depend-
ent children were suspended in
the spring of 1942, and that as
a result some 8.000 applications,
some of them filed as far back
as 1939. had accumulated when
additional funds made it possi-
ble for the State Welfare Board
to authorize the investigation of
all applications filed on or be-
fore Aoril 1. this year. Many of
those who had originally applied,
he said, are now ineligible either
because of the lapse of time or
the absence of need on account
of improved economic conditions.
El |6 ; 11 ^WMewiU
1,1 business unZr ,7"'l?K <
'"<' the s.,ii ,'" ''"end t"*'
mlc.....**
t-BON KAPLAN
A tlOl Ill-V f, 1 .,
'ii-
'."" i'li M,,. ,-|,,,.k ,, >n I
......"" "-'..;,.>. 'tt''lf'
MORRIS ARON
ESTHER ARON
MYERS ft HEI.M \\ P
ill.
th.
notice uNDER-r^rloir
' t'lerfc th?rS21it,SSfr
uVSMTSfcHs?
SJS RB.",:;::"&'
ngaged in business
EMAN'l'EL sTll.vpuiv
MIRIAM HEIDER*^
l/S-ll-Zt-JI I] ,; Owwi
..NOTICE is HEREBY OIVEN Am
h" underslgi..... ......taicedin a'
PI"ii'lii. and Intend (o :.KiIe- ti
he- l.,k of the Circuit court '
im.t.. County, Florida
PAl'L GER8TIUII
CWDttOB CHERMTAK,0KF.ORMBa"
Cl'hu column la conducted by the
Oreater Miami Jewish Federation In
...operation vrllh The Jewlnh Florid-
inn as a community nervier To inform
the community of your organisation's
latlvltlee and to avoid conflicts In
dates, phone S-Sdll and a.k for
'Community calendar." NotiricaUon
must reach Federation no later than
rueaday for inilillcatlon that week.)
Monday. September 25th
Hoard of director* meeting-
reau of Jewish Education
David, o'clock
Wednesday. September 27th
Workmen's tlr< le liranch No
executh ninmltte. meetlnir, .
p. in Sen A-Hospital card party,
Miami V. r..,; H \\ ., s. .
even Inc.
Saturday, September 30th
'\"al in. 'oils dance, Miami
\\ omen a e "lub, : p. m,
I! I-
I l.-tll
8:30
CORAL GABLES
LEGAL NOTICES
MEDICINE CABINET
/ilka-Seltor
-^:A:M7n.^!rkVflV,"' *-
Bfescfa., Add hu.,..ti.n l
prompt. effacUr^ 1* mm4 U*~.
ONEQDAY
VITAMIN Si TARI r
Plea tahleU lo the r,-r box. ^^^
>XJLERVINt^
wur.,8UsTir-vs.!^5
ARREST ENTIRE JEWISH
POPULATION OF NITRA
Bjrne(WNS)The entire Jew-
tah population In the city of N.tra,
Slovakia, was placed under ar-
res last week by the chief ol
police in reprisal for tl. larfie-
Male participation of Jews ln the
.Slovakia,, underground move
, iwUe'c,"fdinK u' n',or,s wch-
net T r"n Br">av. The
h v. in\ WM "'"'ted to
the N./.i puppet regime.
While the police was roundinu
"PnohrlJew n Nitra. the chief of
ifnarmei issuing a warning that
Jews aught fleeing their home
. .,hr Pftani would be
executed. He also warned that
;' Persons sheltering Jews woukl
be severely punished
'" WM expressed here in
Siarmed1 ^lrC,e fl"- the fate
the surviving Jews m Slovak,
, n oTn t?i,h" Jt'wish BS
circles -^' h v,ewed "' these
rest and ," SSF1"?" to th"' '
st and possible deportation ,,t
the rernaminj 10,000 Jews. Be'
[OW the war Slovakia had a Jew-
ish population of about 90.000.
Keep on buying War Bonds.
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
.._, ... NAME LAW
NM' I-. 8 1IKKKHY QIVBN that
'" "'"''siK....... desrlni t., ensaca In
r1;;;,,^1';,,,^- n?titiou.B uJ"
1 ., rU-','l:l" APARTMENTS,
, '" "1-735-7*1-746 Sixth St
Miami ,: ,.,,la l,,',^-;,;
iv w f ,.'" '' '' "'"" Um
''MM./.r,.'!,,:,,1,l;.",ult ',m f "-"
BIL.VKR 1 -1I\";^IUS 'ANOVgKT
sii.ni.i. K.\i'i..\\ *. DIBTZ
v KtnjtZl ''" A|'""':"u
FOR
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
.. TAX DEED
Chapter 20722 Acts of 1941
V, ,.....,. F,le 8305
MorrlJ Marl" "5BT OIVBW that
&*A ^o'/'SunV b. fi<
.;,,.v.:'v;;';,' r '"-"" "-
mSK o."-i..::"";; ';:* v--' A'1---
Piohr?d.......... "f
uJ| ,M"'' said in......iiv
nalne' I" VuU V'T" "" "'' "' S
' '"-! i Tamlaml rorp
NOTICE OF APPLICATION F0H
TAX DEED
PILE IMM
Notice Is hereby riven that Mn
M. MM, lizzie. hoM.-r c,f KvertUdf.
Dralnase Dlstrlel Taj ortificiu
.Nuniliei.-,| 4:':.. dated th^ im day of
.run.'. A. I> IMS, hat fiiV.1 raid e>-
tirirat^ in my office, and his midc
application for tax dead to usw
thereon In u oordance with law.
Raid Certificate embnuea the follow.
Inif described propertr, >l!utrd In
Dade County, Plorlda, to-wlt:
Lot 6, Blk ]:. r.mifw cla:-
dena Znd Addn In the County of
J'n.l.-. stiit.- ,.f PiorMa.
Th.- iiosessmenl .; said i
under said Certificate was inued la
the iiain,. or Ann.- I haw, Arer.t.
unless said Certificate rhall be rr-
oeemed a......rdlng to law, tax jrti
will Isaue thereon on the 12th day
of October, \ i). 11
Dated Miis 'Mi da) of BepMaksV
A. i> lU
i: B. i.i:.\ I MKKMA.V.
Clerk of Circull Court
Dade 'ounty, Kl< rida.
Bj \ C STERRETT, P C
fCircnlt Court Real)
/l-16-tl-W 1" I
IN THE COUNTY JIT*
IN AM. PH: OAI'E OOUNTTi
PU.UII.A. IN PROBATE
No i
In R. ESTATE OP WIIJJAM U
BoZAK'l II 11. eased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All I
llavint! Claims "i Demsndi .u-<;"'-
Bald Estate .t
You. .iiol i,-|i of v.,ii. ar hrew
notified and required to present W
lalms and demands srhfch vou, w
either ..r vou, nun have innJ3
esUte of W 11,1 JAM I. llt'ZARTH
deceased late of Dade County. '''
Ida. to Hi- Hon. W K. BM"J
County Judxe of Dade fount) "
tile the same In his offk J" '"
County Courthouse In Pade t-"un,
Plorlda, within eight .slen.la.-
from the date o? the first pubiw-
tlon hereof. Said .-lalms or desuw"
to contain the legal a.idrem of J
claimant and to be Mvorn t "J
|.i -.. no .1 a.s aforesaid, or sam
be ban el. S. s..tl,a 1! of lw
II II I'i..I.at.- Act
Date September. A. P-,"*'.-
WIU.IAM K M,Z*^J.%
As A.liniuistrator of the ?"-""_J
WILLIAM I. BOZARTB I'eca-e.
MAX It SILVER
Attornev for Administrator
i/l-IB-tl-SI I" ii ^__________
mm'jmSm
NOTICE IS HEREBY *">
the u...le.!.iK..ed. In business under the ii.-t l"J.'NSj.,
f LIBERTY ,ynXMVjgffiSE!,
Lincoln Road,
Morl.ia. Intends tp "^'J'Yh. c'rci
name with the Clerk of the < <"
Court ..f Dade County.."jSbh.n
MARTIN QENBT
Ait irney for Apph'-a"'-
l/M l i i-..?_
Dade i otinty. Plorida
Notice Is herebi riven tbj
undersigned, derirfng. t"
business undei th. netUWOiJ
ORA.NT1E HOWL -'".:' B "W
Miami, Plorlda, """,'" ,', of <*>
th.- aald name In "" ." pa*
Clerk of the Circull '
Ooonty, Plorlda M| |!N|vN BHTff*
:. l 1-18 .
Plorlda. intenaa '' r's",lhe t
name With the Clerk "'-T^
c.u.t of Dads C i .-*'
MYERS HKIM V-V
for Petitioner
Altol lie
9/1-8-1S
neya
- Ii-1
M


I ^pAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1944
'JewishFkrMhr)
rflEATER MIAMI ARMY-NAVY COMMITTEE Supported hv r,~*., T
"S, i. ^ w.uar. _< ,S^I!LS^l2ff Sa.'ifE-s
PAGE SEVEN
SERVICE
PARADE!
KILLED IN ACTION
Pvt. Ernest Alperstein. 21, of
New York City. In Italy. A medi-
cal corpsman, he had been in serv-
ice a year and a half.
SACRIFICES TOLD
The story of the sacrifice of the
First and Third Ranger bat-
talions of the First Ranger regi-
ment at Cisterna, Italy, last Jan-
uary will be one of the epics of
World War II, and a Miami boy,
ne of the few survivors, will be
able to tell the whole story when
the war is over.
He is Sgt. Raymond L. Cowen,
who has sent a copy of the Presi-
dential Citation, awarded his bat-
talion, to his mother and father,
Mr and Mrs. M. L. Cowen. 2120
S. W. Sixth St.
Only part of the story has been
told. The Germans claim 699
Rangers of the 1,000 participating
were captured and the rest killed
with the exception of a few, Sgt.
Cowen, included, who managed to
escape. The Rangers fought un-
til their water, food, ammunition
was expended and finally surren-
dered after attacking again and
again secretly reinforced German
positions which at first were be-
lieved to have been abandoned.
Approximately eight days after
they had participated in the Anzio
landing, the Rangers were order-
ed to infiltrate into Cisterna and
establish advanced position in the
darkness on the edge of the city.
During the night the Germans re-
inforced the town with para-
troopers, supported by machine
guns, tanks, antitank guns and
self-propeller 88's.
The Ranger attack bogged
down down after the first half
mile advance in the face of with-
ering fire, but held to their line,
attacking time and time again
without success.
Before the Cisterna disaster the
First Battalion was cited in or-
ders for its outstanding per-
formance between Sept. 10 and
18 by securing the left flank of
the Fifth Army in its push into
the plain of Naples.
Sgt. Cowen is now with a re-
organizing outfit in Italy, and his
brother, Lt. Myron J. Cowen. is
with the Marine Corps at Camp
LeJeune, N. C.
WAR RECORDS COMMITTEE
NAJ R0TH- Chairman
.___FRED SHOCHET
MRS. QEORQE M. COHEN
MAURICE GROSSMAN
JENNIE H. ROTFORT
NATHAN ROTHBERO
J. W. B. Director
OFFTCERS
8AM BLANK, CHAIRMAN
M?l3SE..?*F0J Vic.Chairman
JOSEPH A. BERMAN, Sac.
Executive Committee
Mra. Max Dobrin, Ben B. Goldman,
Maumce Groiaman, Louii Heiman,
Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan, Mra. Murry
Koven, Harry Markowltz, Alex-
ander F. Mijer, at Roth. Fred
Shochet MiTtdn Sirkin, Joseph
MM. Mra. Herman Wallach, Carl
WeinWe, Qeonge Welpert, Harry
Zukernlck. *
WOUNDED IN ACTION
Pvt. Mervin Rosen. 19, of Bal-
timore, Md. In Italy. Purple
Heart.
Pvt. Harold Basel. 19, of New
York City. In Italy. Holder of the
Bronze Star for heroism in com-
bat.
Pfc. Joseph Weiss, of the
Bronx, N. Y. Locale unknown.
Pfc. Henry Wolff. 29, of Rich-
mond Hill, N. Y. At Cassino.
Pvt. Hilmore B. Albert. 20, of
Brooklyn. In Italy.
Sgt. Solomon W. Brackman. 26,
of New York City. Over Germany.
He was a gunner aboard a heavy
bomber.
Lieut. Samuel R. Carpman. 23,
of New York City. Over England.
He was co-pilot of a heavy bomb-
er.
Capt Jesse Weiss of Chanute
Field, Illinois, is spending the
weekend visiting his family in
Miami Beach.
Promotion to rank of major is
announced for Capt. Magnus S.
Altrnayer. Jr.. well known here,
as is his father, Lt. Col. Magnus
S. Altrnayer.
Maj Altrnayer is now with a
heavy bombardment squadron in
England and has been overseas
for two years. Lt. Col. Altrnayer
is special assistant to the com-
manding officer of an ATC instal-
lation at LaGuardia field, N. Y.
He recently returned to the U. S.
after serving a year at ATC bases
in Africa and India.
Among Miamians recently
completing orientation courses
designed to bridge the gap be-
tween training in the States and
combat duty against the enemy
in France, Staff Sgt. Joe C. Aron.
son. son of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob
G. Aronson, 1036 N. W. 63rd St.,
and Sgt. Joseph Wendell Wil-
liams, whose wife lives at 2828
S. W. 18th St.
Capt Irving Tapper, 31, of Chi-
cago, holds a Presidential Unit
Citation awarded the 2nd Bat-
talion, 60th Infantry, for "extra-
ordinary heroism in the face of
the enemy" in the vicinity of the
Sedjenane Valley. Capt. Tepper,
a chaplain, has been in service
three years.
Fill Out This Coupon and Mail To "WAR RECORDS." Army-
Navy Committee, c/o P. O. Box 2973, Miami 18. Florida
Name_________
Heme Address.
Birth Date____
Serial No-
City
State
Birthplace
Civilian Occupation.
Date Entry
fa Serviee__,______
City State
Marital Status----------
Branch of Service_________
Full name of nearest kin_____
Relationship_________Address.
Information Transmitted by-
Telephone number____________
Date
.Discharged---------
Rank or Rating-
Lt. Herbert Avedon. 37, of New
York City, In a commando raid
in Italy. Received a Presidential
Unit Citation.
Pvt. David Cohen. 26, of New
York City. At Anzio beachhead.
An ammunition bearer in a ma-
chine gun platoon, Pvt. Cohen
was killed by an exploding land
mine as he was advancing in a
forward area. Purple Heart.
Pvt. Walter Boxer. 28, of Brook-
lyn. Anzio beachhead. Purple
Heart.
Sgt. Stanley Berke. 31, of
Cleveland Heights, Ohio. In
France.
T/Sgt Norman Bolotin, 21, of
Chicago. In a raid over Austria
and again in a raid over Italy.
Pfc. William Finkelstein, 26, of
the Bronx. Mortally wounded, at
Sarmi, New Guinea, while on a
special mission.
WASTE PAPER PICK
Lieut. Irving Garfinkle. 21, of
Brooklyn. An Air Corps naviga-
tor. Lieut. Garfinkle lost his life
in combat over Central Italy. He
returned to active duty after be-
ing missing in action several
weeks.
Pvt Jack Cohen, 20, of New
York City. In Italy.
Pvt. Sam Dreises, 25, of Brook-
lyn. At Eniwetok Island.
Pvt. Harry Feilhardt. of New
York City. European area.
T 'Sgt. Benjamin M. Gale. 29. of
Brooklyn. Over Perugia, Italy.
Gunner on a B-25 bomber. Sgt.
Gale holds the DFC, Air Medal,
and the Purple Heart. His Air
Medal citation reads, in part:
"For meritorious achievement
while participating in aerialflight
. T/Sgt. Gale, displaying out-
standing courage and stamina,
efficiently administered first aid
to his stricken comrades, thereby
preventing the wounds of two of
his comrades from proving
fatal ."
Pfc Harry Greenberg. 28, of
Brooklyn. In Italy.
Pvt. AlexH. Guralnick. 19. of
Astoria, L. I. In Italy.
Flight Officer Leonard Hersch.
22, of Brooklyn. In a raid on Ber-
lin. A bombardier, he had been in
service a year and a half.
Pfc Lawrence N. Kaplan, 0f
Brooklyn. In Italy, while on a
scouting mission. He was a walk-
ie-talkie operator.
Pvt. Philip M. Kiever. 26, of
New York City. In Italy. An in-
i fantryman, he had been in service
i more than two years.
Pvt. Martin Galuskin. 22, of
New York City. At Anzio beach-
head. A paratrooper, Pvt. Galus-
kin was injured while on a mis-
sion to join communication lines
destroyed by the enemy, during
the initial invasion of Anzio.
Lieut. Kere C. Kowalsky. 26, of
the Bronx. In air combat over
Italy. He was a navigator. Purple
Heart.
Pvt. Milton Goodman. 22, of
Brooklyn, In Italy.
Pvt. Monroe Gottschalk, 23. of
Brooklyn. Anzio beachhead. Pur-
ple Heart.
Pvt. Meyer Rosberg, 19, of
Cleveland, O. At Salerno. The
Purple Heart has been posthum-
ously bestowed on him.
Pfc. Maurice Hammer. 20. of
Brooklyn. Nettuno beachhead
(Anzio).
T/Sgt. Milton Holser. 33, of
Passaic, N. J. Anzio beachhead.
Sgt. Norman R. Harelick. 31, of
Brooklyn. Mediterranean area.
Pvt. Sol Hochberg, 31, of New
York City. At Cassino.
Pvt. Sam Javitch. 25, of Cleve-
land Heights, Ohio. In France.
Lt. Milton Schreiberg, 32, of
Forest Hills, N. Y. In Italy.
The Greater Miami Army-
Navy Committee wants in-
teresting letters received
from those in service. These
will be used for publication
on the Service Parade Page
of The Jewish Floridian. the
daily press and national
publications. Send original
or copies of these letters to
the Army-Navy Committee.
Box 2973. Miami 18. Fla.
These will be returned if
requested. Make it possible
for everyone to know where
our servicefolk are, what
they are seeing and doing.
"The monthly waste paper
curb pickup day scheduled for
the last Sunday in each month
will start promptly at eight a. m.
Sunday morning with none but
municipal trucks from the Great-
er Miami area participating in
the pickup," Mrs. C. H. Reeder,
chairman of the Salavage Divi-
sion of the Dade County Defense
Council, said today. The auxiliary
police and firemen will assist in
keeping an eye on pickups to
see that none but authorized peo-
ple tour the cities in the county
drive.
The American Legionnaires and
Boy Scouts will cooperate again
in this drive and the hope is to
collect sufficient waste paper to
bring the per capita to at least
the halfway mark of the ten
pounds per person set by the
War Production Board in July
for Dade County.
The women members of the
Poinciana Post will service cof-
fee, soft drinks, hot dogs and
sandwiches at the loading station
to the workers on the trucks.
Legionnaires will man the City
of Miami trucks as well as the
trucks touring the outlying areas.
Some two hundred and fifty men
are expected to participate in the
drive, plus the members from the
one hundred Boy Scouts posts.
READY 10 SEND A
PARTI TO RUSSIA
Washington (JTA)The United
Nations Relief and Rehabilitation
Administration is now prepar-
ing to send a mission to Russia
in response to a request from the
Moscow government for investi-
gation of relief needs there. The
mission will probably consist of
about eight persons.
The entire matter of relief in
Russia and in countries liberated
by the Russian armies will be
one of the chief topics of dis-
cussion at the Montreal meeting
of the UNRRA which opens on
Friday. Meanwhile, Director Gen-
eral Herbert H. Lehman is en-
deavoring to get together the ap-
propriate personnel for such a
mission.
What is contemplated for Rus-
sian relief in war-devastated
areas is an arrangement with the
Soviet armies similar to that
which now prevails with the
Anglo-American armies.
United States War Bonds are
still the best investment.
Lt. Jerome M. Segal. 28, of New
York City. In Italy.
Devoting This Page to the Efforts of the Army-Navy Committee. Made Possible Through
the Co-Operation of
COWEN'S SHOE STORES
155 E. Flagler St 822 Lincoln Rd.
JACK C. JAYSON
Miami
PUBLIC GAS CO.
7200 N. W. 7th Avenue
MIAMI RUG CO.
100 S. Miami Avenue
SYBIL'S WOMEN'S APPAREL
76 S. E. 1st Street
I. RUBIN SON6Original Rubins
145 N. Miami Avenue
M.n ROTH & HAYS oiJ
Manufacturers Agents Langford Bldg.
TOOLEY MYRON STUDIOS
Du Pont Building
ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN &
RESTAURANT
170 N. W. Fifth Street
RICHTER'S IEWELRY CO.. INC.
160 E. Flagler Street
LEO ROBINSON
Miami Beach
RUBINSTEIN'S
WOMEN'S APPAREL
1026 Lincoln Rd- Miami Beach
NANKIN'S SHOE STORE
158 E. Flagler Street Miami
ANN'S IMPORTERS
714 Lincoln Road
The above is typical of dozens of "home-made" New Year
greetings received by the National Jewish Welfare Board, made
up by Chaplains for mailing by the men in their units.





i'
PAGE EIGHT
+Jewish FhrkMan
B'NAI B'RITH
NOTES
M
-by-
ARX FEINBER
In The Synagogues
Of Greater Miami
Or< .hi i Mia ri i Jew i y
id.- Penitential Period
i i \ Icea this weekend
Atonement services
At the meeting last Tuesday
night although attendance was
reduced to a minimum by the
hurricane threat, yet approxi-
mately 30 members were present
and enjoyed a short business
meeting. A. Gannes, Director of
the Jewish Educational Bureau
here gave a short talk on the
necessity for Jewish education
and distributed vital pamphlets
to the Lodge.
The most important thing oc-
curring at the meeting was a
tentative discussion of the Hillel
situation in Miami. It was brought
to the attention of the Lodge
that approximately four members
of the Hillel Advisory Council ,
in Miami had written to Dr. I
Sachar complaining ol Bill Kei
selman and through this corre-
spondence secured the release of
Mr. Kesselman as director of the
University. It seems that none
of the other members "i the
Council were advised nor was
the Hillel Committee of Sholem
Lodge advised. The question came
up whether this action on behalf
of these members was authorized
or whether or not the Hillel Ad-
visory Council was an independ-
ent organization not answerable
RIVERMONT PARK
SANITARIUM
1S8 N. W. 7th St. Ph. 3-7301
Beet car* for chronic alck, conva-
lescent and elderly peopi
SANEL BEER, M. D., Director
Reasonable Pncel
BSSUtiful Ground
I LSrga
ector

When You Think of Real Estate
Think Of
LEO EISENSTE1N
REALTOR
309 Lincoln Road Phone 5 6479
Dependable, Conscientious Service
REAL ESTATEMIAMI BEACH
MIAMI BEACH
[HOMES AND INVESTMENT,
PROPERTIES
B. E. BRONSTON, Realtor
I A Trustworthy Real
I 60S Lincoln Rd.
Estate S"rvir
Ph.: 5-5868
RENTALS LEASES SALES
Lots, Homes. Hotels
Apartment Houses
M. GILLER
REALTOR
1448 Washington Avenue
PHONE 5-5875
to the Lodge or under the juris-
diction of same. An investigating
committee was to be appointed
by the chair to make a finding
of fact in the matter and recom-
mendations. It will be interest-
ing to note what these findings
will be and what action will he
taken by the organization, if
an v.
The chairman of the investigat-
ing committee is Brother Abe
Aionovitz. Anyone desiring to Im-
part information concerning the
Kesselman dismissal please com-
municate with Abe.
Also the appropriation of $150
for sending city officials to the
launching of the sub-chasers was
reconsidered and repealed. This
was due to the tact that the
launching was to be up in Massa-
chusetts and the amount of
I money allocated would yiit he
sufficient to take care of the ex-
i penses and also that the plaques
would not mention B'Nai B'Rith.
, Instead of this allocation the
Lodge allocated the sum of $70
tn pay lor the plaques and lefl
i the attendance of the officials to
' their own discretion The secre-
tary was instructed to write ;,
letter to the officials conferring
i this honor of the joint munici-
pality and comment was made
that the publicity funds of the
cities would be more than suf-
ficient tii carry any enxpenses
incurred
A notation received in the mail
from Brother Alex Miller of the
A. D. L reports that Representa-
tive .Samuel A. Weiss from Penn-
sylvania praised the work being
by B'Nai B'Rith for the
armed forces and had an article
printed which listed many of the
services being rendered to the
lighting men by this fraternal or-
ganization. This report appeared
in the Congressional Record and
is just one step toward public
recognition that we deserve.
I alsci received a card from
Brother AlfredAugustine v. ho re-
ceived his discharge as a captain
m the army, and has re-opened
his offices for the practice of
dentistry and oral surgery in the
Huntington Building. Brother
Augustine, before being commis-
sioned, was an active member
and many of his friends will be
pleased to learn of his return.
The Lodge welcomes you back.
Al, and wishes you the best of
luck in your practice
u ii (include
with special
ami Obs '!
Tueadaj i ^ enlna
.iTi.l Wednesday in .ill Ml em li
of u.'i ship Spei i.ii .-I vice* fi
Icemen will be held by chaplains In
thin area
Services announced through Oreatei
Mian i Rabbinli al Association are
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION.
Conservative. 135 N. W. 3rd Ave
Services PYldaj evening al 7:15, Satur-
daj morning "The Sabbath ol R<
pentance" at B:S0. Rabbi Max Shapiro
will speak mi "Return <> Man'"
Kni Nnii.'. Tueadaj evening, Bepl
26th al >i 15 Rabbi Shapiro's theme
fin- discussion will be, "The Deluge
..r Man!"
Ymhi Kippur, "Vlscor" Memorial
services Wednesday, Bepl 17 al II
a m I'ieceedlng Ihi m< men lal sei tr-
ices, Rabbi Shapiro "ill spenk on
the subji i i. Whj Is Man Al
\. Hall, in l IS SO
u m Rabbi Shapiro will aiieak In
l Yiddish on "The Passing of Mi. ds
Juniot set \ li es, v\ dnesdaj from
I' 10 to 12 noon In tin- auditoi nun
Cantor Abraham Friedman ami
Choir will officiate ami Rabbi Mas
Khn, 11 w ill ondui t all i li
MIAMI BEACH JEWISH COM-
MUNITY CENTER. 1415 Euclid Ave.
Conservative. Krldaj evi nlng K
balas Shabbns 7 mi n m Saturday
morning ShnlKis Shuvah nl !...... m
Rabbi Lehrman will preach on "Ijel
I lut ...(..-. t shalosh Seudos w I
l- followed bj evening service with
li*) in.in (irossmsii a* ii"-i Tuesda>
>-\ enlng, K ..| N .I" ai I 10 p in a'
i hi li In Italibl lain man w ill Blieak
in.' i 'ha llenge of i in- lloui "
Wednesday morning servlci begin at
S ii m Viskoi .it in sn -i in Rabbi
lahiman will preach on "A i*.ill tn
tin- I.lvlnii N. ltd h sen i es a ill !
rhnnted b) the rabbi Cantor Emanuel
Barkan .....I the 'ent( i hull w ill ..I
f! late at all r\ I. ^
%
MR. and MRS.
SAMUEL MILLER
1919 S. W. 17th Street
wish all their friends
and relatives a
HAPPY NEW YEAR
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
T. E. B
PIANOS
PIANOS BOUGHT
and SOLD
2380 N. W. Seventh Street
PHONE 4-5965
Mr. and Mrs. Sow, c
Miami Beach -_ Pk Vene
New Ytar Ul
^ and Mrs. B. Siaelb^
Extend Then Best Wlshe<
AH Their Fr.ends for 1 '
HAPPY NEW YEAR
BEST WISHES
for a
HAPPY NEW YEAR

LiBERn ia
259 N. E. 4th Street
Opposite Bay Front Perk
CONGREGATION BETH JACOB.
301-311 Washington Ave. Orthodox.
I" Ids veiling '! \ Ice* w ill li.' held
-i' 5 I'" k a ml Sal.I.a 111 hum Hint'
service* .., > :" Rabbi Meschelott
w ill preai li mi Ihe theme Time t"
Repent."' Shalosh Seudos will be held
m s.iiurda> Ri llglo n hmil
III i" held Kundaj. a m to
m.n. mill .|ai!> li.an I I.. 7 Kni \ '! .
till be held Tuesdiij. Hep-
i. ml., r 28th, ,t 7 p iii Cantor Maurice
Mamches will chant, ami Rabbi Ml
ff will s|>enk i.n i Pledgi \l-
legianci Vi.in Kipnui services Wed-
nesclti s. |it. ii.I,. i 27th, al N SO a in
m both Hi.- Synogfigue building ami
the Talmud Torah Pomn......i\ l.nild
1 i- c il.lil Mi heloff will preach be-
' or "! iii.- theme "Dual ..f
M in M, niii> ial s.-i \ Ices w ill be Ill-Id
" I" SO in ih. Talmud Torah building,
and at n ".ii in the Synagogue l-uilil-

I WANT MY MILK
Ettab.
WHEN the stress of modern'
hTiruj geu "on your nerves")
m rood sedative can do a lot to
lessen nerrous tension, to make1
ysm more comfortable, to permit'
reartfoi sleep.
' Next time a day's work sad
worry or a night's '- fnlnss,
makes you Irritable, Restless er
Jam pygi res you Nerreos Head-
sea* or Nervous Indigestion, toy
Dr. Nilas Nervine
JCLiqaid or Effervescent Tablets)
Dr. Miles Nervine is a
tasted sedative that has
bringing; relief from Functions!
Nervous Disturbances for sixty
years yet is as up-to-date as this
Milling's newspaper. Liquid n*
and I1.88, Effervescent tablets IS*
mad 75*. Read directions and nee
esdjr as directed.
FLORIDA
DAIRIES
HOMOGENIZED
Vitamin "D" MHfr
"Milk Producti**
Dacro Protected
TEL. 2-2621
Greater Miami Delivery
Visit Our Farm at
6200 N. W. 32nd Street
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CON.
GREGATION. 590 S. W. 17th Ave.
Orthodox. Pi Ida> evening servlcei .m
_i' Saturdn> m KvenhiK s tturda) a. r, ih.
Shalosh s.ii.i.,- win i. followed by
M.i uiv Hail) sei vices li SO a. m
Kol Nnii,- services al both buildings
' evening at 7 00 p, m sharp
ami w.-.ii.....I,,, .,i > mi ., Memorial
-' 4 al |i. :n .-, ,,' at Miami .1. w
ish irthodox, iVO s W \itft \ \ i
Rabbi Murray Grauer will speak fol-
. I ,L' Kol Nni.....,i "Children ..f the
: '^ lys i n W .i- sdai morning prior
" ^ Iskor hi- tonic w ill he "Kindle the
Uhl Cantor Berele Kallenberg will
v' >' ha in : Zedek Talmud
| M'inh. \:v. s W Third SI Rabbi
i Simon Aorii u-||| conducl service Pr|.
"g ai 7 p in ami saturdaj
"- nl .....' ., in when he >n
"I'ei > in.i I'rr.gr. --
I in -.l..\ ev< nil servli .v ill -i.,,i nl
! ....... '" '""I rtabhl Sim-.n April will
"peak followl o Kol Sldre on "A Deep
i'i.I Solemn Hour Sei \ li es begin
^;l; I s a m and before
' '""; Rabb \;. || w in -|,...,k
...-
BETH SHOLOM CENTER. Conterv.
Stive. 761 41st St.. Mum, Beach.
|-r i ire s< heduled f... Pi Idav eve-
ling at is: Saturdaj morning serv,
Kea-tlS!' '',,,M '' ::" Rabb. Leon
Kromsn will ..mi ,. Siibbath serv-
'' 'I.....vlc< T li
evenng, Sept Mlh. with Kol >
will', ", "' k dW '-......<......->'
iiLii l!' "" W? Sin?" Cantor
Louis Hayman will ehanl Schedule
' VJedneaday, Sepl -;,(,
v'"' "! ...... -i in VUkor (Mr
t;;',;"' s;.,v":c. -.-/"'.,,
,' J'" rapeatry ..f Remem-
"",- Mlneha. 1 10 p ,,, Nellah
i' ", Bermonette v.,, Kippur
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
REHBERG
GROCERY
AND
4844 N. W. 27th Avenue
Prime Meats. Fish and
Vegetables
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I ^pAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1944 • 'JewishFkrMhr) rflEATER MIAMI ARMY-NAVY COMMITTEE Supported hv r,~*., T "S, i„. ^ w.uar. %  _< S^ I !LS^l£2ff Sa.'ifE-s PAGE SEVEN SERVICE PARADE! KILLED IN ACTION Pvt. Ernest Alperstein. 21, of New York City. In Italy. A medical corpsman, he had been in service a year and a half. SACRIFICES TOLD The story of the sacrifice of the First and Third Ranger battalions of the First Ranger regiment at Cisterna, Italy, last January will be one of the epics of World War II, and a Miami boy, „ne of the few survivors, will be able to tell the whole story when the war is over. He is Sgt. Raymond L. Cowen, who has sent a copy of the Presidential Citation, awarded his battalion, to his mother and father, Mr and Mrs. M. L. Cowen. 2120 S. W. Sixth St. Only part of the story has been told. The Germans claim 699 Rangers of the 1,000 participating were captured and the rest killed with the exception of a few, Sgt. Cowen, included, who managed to escape. The Rangers fought until their water, food, ammunition was expended and finally surrendered after attacking again and again secretly reinforced German positions which at first were believed to have been abandoned. Approximately eight days after they had participated in the Anzio landing, the Rangers were ordered to infiltrate into Cisterna and establish advanced position in the darkness on the edge of the city. During the night the Germans reinforced the town with paratroopers, supported by machine guns, tanks, antitank guns and self-propeller 88's. The Ranger attack bogged down down after the first half mile advance in the face of withering fire, but held to their line, attacking time and time again without success. Before the Cisterna disaster the First Battalion was cited in orders for its outstanding performance between Sept. 10 and 18 by securing the left flank of the Fifth Army in its push into the plain of Naples. Sgt. Cowen is now with a reorganizing outfit in Italy, and his brother, Lt. Myron J. Cowen. is with the Marine Corps at Camp LeJeune, N. C. WAR RECORDS COMMITTEE NA J„ R0TH Chairman F RED SHOCHET MRS. QEORQE M. COHEN MAURICE GROSSMAN JENNIE H. R OTFORT NATHAN ROTHBERO J. W. B. Director OFFTCERS 8AM BLANK, CHAIRMAN M ?l3SE..?*F 0 J Vic.Chairman JOSEPH A BER MAN, Sac. Executive Committee Mra. Max Dobrin, Ben B. Goldman, Maumce Groiaman, Louii Heiman, Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan, Mra. Murry Koven, Harry Markowltz, Alexander F. Mijer, at Roth. Fred Shochet MiTtdn Sirkin, Joseph •MM. Mra. Herman Wallach, Carl WeinWe, Qeonge Welpert, Harry Zukernlck. WOUNDED IN ACTION Pvt. Mervin Rosen. 19, of Baltimore, Md. In Italy. Purple Heart. Pvt. Harold Basel. 19, of New York City. In Italy. Holder of the Bronze Star for heroism in combat. Pfc. Joseph Weiss, of the Bronx, N. Y. Locale unknown. Pfc. Henry Wolff. 29, of Richmond Hill, N. Y. At Cassino. Pvt. Hilmore B. Albert. 20, of Brooklyn. In Italy. Sgt. Solomon W. Brackman. 26, of New York City. Over Germany. He was a gunner aboard a heavy bomber. Lieut. Samuel R. Carpman. 23, of New York City. Over England. He was co-pilot of a heavy bomber. Capt Jesse Weiss of Chanute Field, Illinois, is spending the weekend visiting his family in Miami Beach. Promotion to rank of major is announced for Capt. Magnus S. Altrnayer. Jr.. well known here, as is his father, Lt. Col. Magnus S. Altrnayer. Maj Altrnayer is now with a heavy bombardment squadron in England and has been overseas for two years. Lt. Col. Altrnayer is special assistant to the commanding officer of an ATC installation at LaGuardia field, N. Y. He recently returned to the U. S. after serving a year at ATC bases in Africa and India. Among Miamians recently completing orientation courses designed to bridge the gap between training in the States and combat duty against the enemy in France, Staff Sgt. Joe C. Aron. son. son of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob G. Aronson, 1036 N. W. 63rd St., and Sgt. Joseph Wendell Williams, whose wife lives at 2828 S. W. 18th St. Capt Irving Tapper, 31, of Chicago, holds a Presidential Unit Citation awarded the 2nd Battalion, 60th Infantry, for "extraordinary heroism in the face of the enemy" in the vicinity of the Sedjenane Valley. Capt. Tepper, a chaplain, has been in service three years. Fill Out This Coupon and Mail To "WAR RECORDS." ArmyNavy Committee, c/o P. O. Box 2973, Miami 18. Florida Name Heme Address. Birth Date Serial NoCity State Birthplace— Civilian Occupation. Date Entry fa Serviee City State Marital Status Branch of Service Full name of nearest kin Relationship A ddress. Information Transmitted byTelephone number Date .Discharged —Rank or RatingLt. Herbert Avedon. 37, of New York City, In a commando raid in Italy. Received a Presidential Unit Citation. Pvt. David Cohen. 26, of New York City. At Anzio beachhead. An ammunition bearer in a machine gun platoon, Pvt. Cohen was killed by an exploding land mine as he was advancing in a forward area. Purple Heart. Pvt. Walter Boxer. 28, of Brooklyn. Anzio beachhead. Purple Heart. Sgt. Stanley Berke. 31, of Cleveland Heights, Ohio. In France. T/Sgt Norman Bolotin, 21, of Chicago. In a raid over Austria and again in a raid over Italy. Pfc. William Finkelstein, 26, of the Bronx. Mortally wounded, at Sarmi, New Guinea, while on a special mission. WASTE PAPER PICK Lieut. Irving Garfinkle. 21, of Brooklyn. An Air Corps navigator. Lieut. Garfinkle lost his life in combat over Central Italy. He returned to active duty after being missing in action several weeks. Pvt Jack Cohen, 20, of New York City. In Italy. Pvt. Sam Dreises, 25, of Brooklyn. At Eniwetok Island. Pvt. Harry Feilhardt. of New York City. European area. T 'Sgt. Benjamin M. Gale. 29. of Brooklyn. Over Perugia, Italy. Gunner on a B-25 bomber. Sgt. Gale holds the DFC, Air Medal, and the Purple Heart. His Air Medal citation reads, in part: "For meritorious achievement while participating in aerialflight T/Sgt. Gale, displaying outstanding courage and stamina, efficiently administered first aid to his stricken comrades, thereby preventing the wounds of two of his comrades from proving fatal ." Pfc Harry Greenberg. 28, of Brooklyn. In Italy. Pvt. AlexH. Guralnick. 19. of Astoria, L. I. In Italy. Flight Officer Leonard Hersch. 22, of Brooklyn. In a raid on Berlin. A bombardier, he had been in service a year and a half. Pfc Lawrence N. Kaplan, 0 f Brooklyn. In Italy, while on a scouting mission. He was a walkie-talkie operator. Pvt. Philip M. Kiever. 26, of New York City. In Italy. An ini fantryman, he had been in service i more than two years. Pvt. Martin Galuskin. 22, of New York City. At Anzio beachhead. A paratrooper, Pvt. Galuskin was injured while on a mission to join communication lines destroyed by the enemy, during the initial invasion of Anzio. Lieut. Kere C. Kowalsky. 26, of the Bronx. In air combat over Italy. He was a navigator. Purple Heart. Pvt. Milton Goodman. 22, of Brooklyn, In Italy. Pvt. Monroe Gottschalk, 23. of Brooklyn. Anzio beachhead. Purple Heart. Pvt. Meyer Rosberg, 19, of Cleveland, O. At Salerno. The Purple Heart has been posthumously bestowed on him. Pfc. Maurice Hammer. 20. of Brooklyn. Nettuno beachhead (Anzio). T/Sgt. Milton Holser. 33, of Passaic, N. J. Anzio beachhead. Sgt. Norman R. Harelick. 31, of Brooklyn. Mediterranean area. Pvt. Sol Hochberg, 31, of New York City. At Cassino. Pvt. Sam Javitch. 25, of Cleveland Heights, Ohio. In France. Lt. Milton Schreiberg, 32, of Forest Hills, N. Y. In Italy. The Greater Miami ArmyNavy Committee wants interesting letters received from those in service. These will be used for publication on the Service Parade Page of The Jewish Floridian. the daily press and national publications. Send original or copies of these letters to the Army-Navy Committee. Box 2973. Miami 18. Fla. These will be returned if requested. Make it possible for everyone to know where our servicefolk are, what they are seeing and doing. "The monthly waste paper curb pickup day scheduled for the last Sunday in each month will start promptly at eight a. m. Sunday morning with none but municipal trucks from the Greater Miami area participating in the pickup," Mrs. C. H. Reeder, chairman of the Salavage Division of the Dade County Defense Council, said today. The auxiliary police and firemen will assist in keeping an eye on pickups to see that none but authorized people tour the cities in the county drive. The American Legionnaires and Boy Scouts will cooperate again in this drive and the hope is to collect sufficient waste paper to bring the per capita to at least the halfway mark of the ten pounds per person set by the War Production Board in July for Dade County. The women members of the Poinciana Post will service coffee, soft drinks, hot dogs and sandwiches at the loading station to the workers on the trucks. Legionnaires will man the City of Miami trucks as well as the trucks touring the outlying areas. Some two hundred and fifty men are expected to participate in the drive, plus the members from the one hundred Boy Scouts posts. READY 10 SEND A PARTI TO RUSSIA Washington (JTA)—The United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration is now preparing to send a mission to Russia in response to a request from the Moscow government for investigation of relief needs there. The mission will probably consist of about eight persons. The entire matter of relief in Russia and in countries liberated by the Russian armies will be one of the chief topics of discussion at the Montreal meeting of the UNRRA which opens on Friday. Meanwhile, Director General Herbert H. Lehman is endeavoring to get together the appropriate personnel for such a mission. What is contemplated for Russian relief in war-devastated areas is an arrangement with the Soviet armies similar to that which now prevails with the Anglo-American armies. United States War Bonds are still the best investment. Lt. Jerome M. Segal. 28, of New York City. In Italy. Devoting This Page to the Efforts of the Army-Navy Committee. Made Possible Through the Co-Operation of COWEN'S SHOE STORES 155 E. Flagler St — 822 Lincoln Rd. JACK C. JAYSON Miami PUBLIC GAS CO. 7200 N. W. 7th Avenue MIAMI RUG CO. 100 S. Miami Avenue SYBIL'S WOMEN'S APPAREL 76 S. E. 1st Street I. RUBIN SON6—Original Rubins 145 N. Miami Avenue M n ROTH & HAYS oiJ Manufacturers Agents Langford Bldg. TOOLEY MYRON STUDIOS Du Pont Building ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN & RESTAURANT 170 N. W. Fifth Street RICHTER'S IEWELRY CO.. INC. 160 E. Flagler Street LEO ROBINSON Miami Beach RUBINSTEIN'S WOMEN'S APPAREL 1026 Lincoln RdMiami Beach NANKIN'S SHOE STORE 158 E. Flagler Street Miami ANN'S IMPORTERS 714 Lincoln Road The above is typical of dozens of "home-made" New Year greetings received by the National Jewish Welfare Board, made up by Chaplains for mailing by the men in their units.



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PAGE FOUR *A mi si ncridliain The Jewish Floridian Plant and Main Offices, 21 S. W. Second Avenue, Miami, Fla. P. O. Box 2973 Phone 2-1141 Entered as Second Class Matter July 4, 1930 at the Post Office of Miami, Florida, under the Act of March 3, 1879 FRED K. SHOCHET, Managing Editor Subscription—1 Year, $2.00 Six Months, $1.00 MIAMI 18, FLORIDA, FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 22, 1944 TISHRI 5, 5705 VOLUME 17 NUMBER 38 CAPITAL SPOTLIGHT By MURIEL LEVIN r.ipyriKiit, 1941. Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc. RACIAL BIGOTRY Speaking this week at a mass meeting in San Francisco that was sponsored by the National Committee Against the Persecution of the Jews, Associate Justice Frank Murphy of the United States Supreme Court declared that the tides of race conflict and bigotry were rising higher every day throughout the country. The liberal jurist pointed out that there was mounting evidence that the seeds of evil and hate that have been implanted by the Nazi revolution have not yet been uprooted, and that the Nazi doctrine of anti-Semitism was still being preached with a view to spreading totalitarianism throughout the world. Justice Murphy further emphasized that while the paramount issue at this time was to secure a speedy victory over the foes of humanity, "social and economic and political justice of durability when the war is done will alone assure us the real victory." But Judge Murphy went beyond mere generalities. He actually outlined a six-point program to combat the Nazi theories. We were particularly impressed by that part of his program urging "our Governments to provide full and complete protection of life, liberty, freedom of worship and civil rights for all our inhabitants, whatever may be their distinctions as to birth, color, nationality, language, race or religion." Another point in the program meriting much consideration is the one in which it was suggested that adeguate and appropriate machinery be established in every community, no matter how remote, to "secure protection against the curtailment of our fundamental rights." Here, evidently, is envisaged a program to combat race hatred and bigotry throuqh the local communities in which there has been a manifestation ot overt intolerance. Judge Murphy has surely hit the nail on the head when he asserted that man only resorts to acts of intolerance against minority, or scapegoat groups of people, when he feols his ability to provide a decent livelihood for his family has been jeopardized. This truism holds special significance to the Jews of American at this time. There is a distinct possibility that the anticipated post-war economic dislocation might be frauqht with dangers to the Jewish community in this country. That is why it is all the more encouraging to see such a vast educational campaign to eradicate the undeniable influence of Nazi propaganda in this country. RESCUE IN WAR •s. £ S i 016 Walls f Fortre8S Germany are being besieged in the final chapter of the European phase of the war, it is well that we should pause to consider how American Jews helped their brothers across the sea survive five of the blackest vears in Jewish history. The United Jewish Appeal for Refugees Overseas Needs and Palestine has reported that in the five-year period since the outbreak of World War II. the Jews in the United States contributed a total of S82.000.000 for the rescue reconstruction and resettlement programs of the Joint Distribution Committee, United Palestine Appeal and National Refuaee Service. The record of U.J.A. supported aid to our fellow-Jews is concrete evidence of the generosity and understanding of the American Jewish community. The progress of our local federation in its campaign is further evidence of this awakening. It also indicates that in a period of the gravest threat to the Jewish survival, the agencies of the United Jewish Appeal were not deterred by the spread of destruction or by the obstacles of war in snatching from the cauldron of hate larae numbers of Jews who might otherwise have suffered the terrible fate of the 3,000,000 martyrs who lie buried in the mass graves of Poland For example, when normal escape routes were blocked ,n Europe, the J.D.C. opened new channels for the emigration of refugees, helping directly 79,000 Jewish men women and children reach Palestine and the Western Hemisphere. Despite the problems of war, the Jewish homeland in Palestine received and absorbed more than 55,000 homeless Jews with the help of the U.P.A. since September 1 1939 Here wi^heTdo?r y N.R h I. n eWC merS ^ SpeedUy in, ^ a ed What has been accomplished in the face of many hardships of war is most significant. But of even greater importance at this moment is the fact that the agencies of the United Jewish Appeal have already undertaken the larger tasks resultina from liberation, involving not only the rehabilitation of the victims, but the restoration of the Jewish communities which have been reduced to ashes by the Nazi oppressor. The notable rescue achievements in war have prepared bur major aqencies for the bigger job of reconstruction in peace. We can free the new responsibilities of the future with the assurance that the United Jewish Appeal and its agencies offer the instruments for bringing about an era of revival and hope for the Jews who have lived for more than a decade on the brink of destruction and death. There arc no reliable figures for the number of Jews surviving in Europe. At best there are estimates, which give Poland some few hundred thousand out of the three million who lived there before the war. So it is hard even to phrase the problem for those who have found temporary havens elsewhere—in Italy, in Scandinavia, in Britain, in hideouts in France, in North Africa and in pockets of the Balkans. Some of the fugitive Jews are stateless. Some will wish to return to their old places of residence. For others, for a variety of reasons, that will be inadvisable or Impossible. The destruction on the continent of Europe, which has gone for deeper than most people in America realize, makes it dubious whether, in some areas, even a rudimentary sort of orderly society and social life can be maintained. As Anne O'Harc McCormick reported from Rome, people are apprehensive not of mere revolution but of utter social collapse. At the moment of writing no overall solution for the problems of the dispersed Jews has been found. The function of UNRRA (United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration) is a limited one. It is to tide people over the first desperate months which follow armed conflict—to give them a minimum of food and clothing, to provide shelter, to set up assembly camps which constitute the first step on the journey home if people have a home to go to. When the temporary functions of the UNRRA are ended, it will be the task of the Intergovernmental Committee for Refugees, whose course in the past shows no inspiring record of positive action, to take over. Probably some modernized form of the old Nansen passport can be devised to be furnished the stateless. No doubt arrangements will have to lie made to place those who have no homes to return to. Some small number of Jews may perhaps wish to return to Germany which is now virtually purged of them entirely. But in Germany, quite aside from the poison-fog of anti-Semitism which u ^ or yt ars been s P'<'ad over the landscape, and which will leave after-effects that cannot be wiped out overnight, there will be such bitterness and poverty that few would willingly expose themselves to it. As yet there is no indication that international action has even begun to open wider the doors of Palestine to Jewish immigration In fact, the determined policy of hushing up discussion of the subject, is a concession to retrograde, not progressive, forces. Eventually, it is expected that the entire mandate system will be revised and international trusteeship will supplant the present one-nation control. But that point has not yet been reached. Meantime, the Arabs are continuing their political pressure on the British. Not even the three-man commission which, led by the economist Robert Nathan, was to go to Palestine and impartially explore the economic possibilities pi development and absorption of the land, has been permitted io go there. In the conferences which have thus tar been held looking to world reconstruction, there has been no public intimation that Jews as ;. group were receiving Bpecial consideration. Of necessity this would be true of such general subjects as food, international currency and the bank for reconstruction, international labor problems, and the framework within which peace is sought to be maintained. The very immensity of the problems which the peace planK? Ite r na, '' S thC danRt,r ,hat the Jewish minority will fail receive the consideration which will necessarily be given to national groups. With masses of people, estimated as high as thirty m! tZ a f nd C TV mort 'wandern g; the face of the continent of Euiope. hungry, sick, homeless, with agriculture disrupted, cities made into shambles, factories wrecked currencies become "a" ueless, it would not be strange f ba e c r k 0 gro h und ed MMfe r nt lhe It is plainly not adequate to C. fo M on t "*• as did Sir inii !" 1 Heathc te-Smith, of the Intergovernmental Committee! Mudfy QwifuhUioi %  By PHINEAS J. BJBONLISTEN HERE ... Orchids to Philip Lee Bush and Mrs. Lloyd Dinkri. bers of the San Francisco Board of Education ftS* %  % to be intimidated and, as good Americans concern^ rehlMd maintenance of absolute separation of church and Wlth %  with the majority of the non-Jewish members aSfS V ted tion of release time for religious instruction tZ .Tv, ado Pchildren They are right, of course RelSJuf • 8cho 1 belongs not in the American public school system H. 1 churches and synagogues Besides, they know AJ 4a Semitic hooliganism on the part of minors occurs mZtt m ly in such spots in the Union as have adopted U* ^ m Our hat is off to Harry C. Oppenheimer. who hoS !? V' in the successful fight to end Jim Crow restrictions m ft. J t Hospital, the first New York voluntary hospital to era 8 X^ line in the appointment of doctors and nurses r Vanderbilt. who gets around among the 400, reports SS* 1 tain of the wealthier, old coupon-clippers are v£blirX Semitic To hear them talk you JSd thing you iefew' mg to conversations at Berchtestaden" Very interest OVERSEAS REPORT .. We may hope that by the lime you read this all of H n iu.j will have been liberated from the Nazi yoke But ? meantime we want to pass on the report that in' the fai Zwolle the Nazis, after getting rid of all the livinq Jews h>L2 their attention to the Jewish dead—and transformed Lu Jewish cemetery into a recreation ground ... The tombstone? we may add, were sent to another city, where they were 3 on the open market ... Dr. Sven Hedin, the great Swedish scientist and explorer, who is a rabid pro-Nazi unto this day partly Jewish, and if he had lived in Germany he would have been one of the four milliop Jewish victims of the Nazis When Manfred von Killinger, self-confessed expert in pola'cal murder, was the Nazi Consul General at San Francisco, we pretested against his presence in this country, and never though! that the day would come when we would approve one of ha acts ... But now we give him the posthumous award of our opproval of his machine-gunning of a number of Nazi representatives just before his recent suicide at Bucharest. P.O.W.— WOW ... The ne plus ultra in gall was recently exhibited by a Nazi prisoner of war at present in this country The Nazi, Leonard Lyons tells us, had been a painter in civilian life, and as such had know guite a few art dealers When he reached America the P.O.W. learned that a Jewish dealer, despoiled by the Nazis, had managed to establish an art gallery in New York ... So the Nazi wrote to this Jew, recalling their acguaintance—and asking for paint and canvas, plus the promise of an eventual one man show in the refugee's gallery From the Coast a correspondent writes us: "Nazi war prisoners are treated with silk gloves in this country, as you are well aware ... But you'll be surprised to know that an American naval officer had to wail for a seat in a railroad dining car because the only free table was reserved for two German war prisoners en route to a new camp." BOOKS AND AUTHORS "No Mean City," Simeon Strunsky's new book on New York, is gathering in the critical plaudits Strunsky, yon should know, is the author of the fascinating unsigned column "Topics of The Times" which appears on the editorial page of the New York Times every day Allan Chase is having o novel published this week ... Its title is "Five Anows," and il deals with the Spanish Fascist group he exposed in his bestseller "Falange" Ben Hecht is planning a lecture tour fa the coming season The theme on which he will speak is the message of his book on the Jewish problem, "A Guide lor the Bedevilled" Note to the many friends of Pierre van Paassen. Walter Winchell's item about the serious illness of the beloved author of "The Forgotten Ally" is, to guote Mark Twain, greatly exaggerated Van Paassen was, after a thorough medical check-up, declared in the pink of condition. ABOUT PEOPLE ... Anna Lord Strauss, president of the National League Women Voters, attributes her interest in politics to the influence of her father, the banker Albert Strauss, whom she accompanied to Europe after the last war, when he served as a financial adviser to the Peace Conference Roger W. Straus, who is taking an active part in Governor Dewey's campaign is one of the big shots of the National Conference of Christians and Jews Briefly revisiting Brooklyn, after nearly half years overseas, is Bernard Kessel, the corporal o: u,1, -' u uaviser to tne Peace (Jonlerence noger • "— who is taking an active part in Governor Dewey's campaign. big shots of the National Conference of Christy* Briefly revisiting Brooklyn, after nearly two anfla irseas, is Bernard Kessel, the corporal whoi jJJ -J the North African town of Oran single-hanflJJ • • • Too bad that Leo Birinski's "The Day Will Come," the p in ,..l....L tf-.l. '. tlf I —.. j^u.o uveiseas, is oernara Kessel, tne corpoiui —r, cally captured the North African town of Oran single-hanaw • %  Too bad that Leo Birinski's "The Day Will Come," the P ia J in which Hitler is confronted and told off by the Wandering !•* hasn't not ho e t.. n. i L :_ i~ < Soon to v ---...... .,ii, C i tuiuroniea ana toia on rjy UJC u-—* hasn't got the stuff Broadway hits are made of • Soon launched is a liberty ship bearing the name of the late m Zionist leader Dr. Nachman Syrkin Back in civilian we Lieut. Sidney Kingsley, the playwright—a medical cB*S • • A new swing band is in the making and will soon maM debut under the baton of Artie Shaw, recently discharged tw the Navy. of mil" 01 that anti-Semitism will quickly (lie and that Jewish citizens can look forward to reinstatement as full citizens in their native lands, for how many will Poland be a refuge? It true only in a limited sense of Czechoslovakia. Italy is in a desperate situation economically. As for the Balkan countries, there ig little to be hoped for from them. The problem is one ot w> 5 and private agencies U" ^ care for tens of thousand*^ international a ct '". -V^ituation take to deal "£**£& Only a long view n enw (0 the needs of people scai f£ff the four winds, ep ^ n of vision their lives on the kind £ + and humanity without ww ilization itself cannot sum



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* ihdtel^ltulElliDipidliiaun ^MTJ^NU MBER 38 MIAMI 18, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1944 PRINE TEN CENTS Southern Section of Jewish Centers Now Being Organized Oreanization of a Southern seciJn of Jewish community cenI r YMHAs and YWHAs. with % %  i hrce-fold plan for aiding these Knits n their work, is now in Kress and will be officially Ifaunched at a two-day conferee in Atlanta. Ga., Sept 2J |! n j 94 it was announced SaturIdav by Donald Oberdorfer of Atlanta, vice president of the Na%  tona Jewish Welfare board. I The Miami YMHA and the YM Lid WHA of Miami Beach will It* members of the Southern sec|"-fhe newly formed unit will Ibenefit the organizations in three hays, it was explained. It will %  help provide a medium of exchange of ideas and experience land thus help improve services to Wembers. It will co-ordinate programs and help develop interCity activities and it will make Khe South a greater factor in deItermining the policy, the philosophy and the practices of the National Jewish Welfare board. Attending the initial conference in Atlanta will be Leo Ackerman. president of the Miami YMHA; George Chertkof, chairman of the card, and Maurice Grossman, fcxecutive director. From Miami Beach, Harry Zukernick. president of the YM kndWHA there and Jack Marash, fcxecutive director, will attend. Mr. Zuckenuck is participating pn the program and will deliver p paper on the problems of organizing a Jewish center. The new group, which covers Ihe states of North and South Carolina, Georgia, Florida. Alabama, Mississippi. Tennessee, ouiiiana and Arkansas, will oprate as a regional section of the Joard. Matthew Penn has been pamed field secretary to serve ihe southern section. J The sessions will be addressed K Frank L. Weil, president of Ue National JWB and Samuel D. lershovitx, associated director of Ihe Jewish Center Division. AN JEWS I ENJOY PEACE Moscow (JTA)—Jews in Rumania, after several years of horw under the pro-Nazi Antonescu *Bime. will now enjoy a period fcr^ ac and ta uali, y under the *rmsot the armistice agreement W*i*n the Allies and the Rumanian government, it was emFasized here following publica7?K niRhl of the f "U text me'agreement, which provides i a tn c immediate abolition of L-nti-Jewish laws in Rumania. numanian Minister Lucertiu E? canu > who signed the jym''pact here on behalf of fiis w-ernment. today assured the jmspondent o( the Jewish Tele^ Agency that all Jews in htS? wh were arrested or *rni under the anti-Jewish PLfcffl be ******&• He tried tW Z i' the fact tha t ens thousands of Jews were masst thr'" Ruinania during the Eun2 >( S ;md that manV H f them perished in nulr n f nis,na There were Witomv k u f BmaU anti-Jewish \C ,' f but m,,si > f them took B,'; '" 1 >1." he told the T A nMDondent. gjgff AND~GRECIAN 1* ARE IN PALESTINE kof t\ X WN S >-A conting t>MrumT a rrived hcrc this P* from r. rkl 'VTwenty-three Pom n..." Weece and eleven Zurich (JTA)—Large-scale confiscation of Jewish property was resumed in Hungary this week and Jewish industries valued at tens of millions of dollars will pass into the hands of the government before the month is over, it is reported in the Hungarian press reaching here from Budapest. The Fueggetlenseg. official organ of Hungarian government, states that the authorities have started taking over Jewish leather firms valued at fifty million oengos. about ten million dollars. The registration and valuation of these enterprises was carried out with the assistance of 200 experts and traders, the paper says. The annual pilgrimage to Jewish Cemeteries, a custom observed throughout the country on the Sunday intervening between Rosh Hashonah and Yom Kippur will take place this coming Sunday, Sept. 24. Rabbis of the Greater Miami area will be at local cemeteries at 3 o'clock. Services will be held at Woodlawn Park, Jewish section, S. W. 8th St. at 32nd Ave. and at Mount Nebo. W. Flagler at 53rd Ave., Temple Israel cemeteries are situated in both Woodlawn Park and at Graceland Memorial Park, S. W. 8th St. at 44th Ave. Services will be held at the City Cemetery at 4 o'clock. Jewish Leaders Say Less Of French Lives May Be 150,000 U. S. MAT HAVE TO TAKE STAND Oil PALESTINE ISSUE New York (JTA)—The United, States may have to take a stand j on the Palestine issue before Flection Day, F. Lawrence Babcock, an editor of Fortune magazine, states in the current issue <>f that publication, after returning from an eight months' investigation in the Middle Fast. With the liberation of the Balkans, there will be many more than 27,000 Jews qualifying for asylum in Palestine under the terms of the White Paper. Mr. Babcock points out. No British excuse for denying them entrance to Palestine will be valid, j "Obviously," the Fortune editor concludes, "Britain cannot act without us. She cannot safely adopt a course on her own responsibility unless she knows; that the United States will accept, it and not detonate the whole 1 Middle East by reversing it later." Emphasizing that if Allied military power is withdrawn from the Middle East, frustrations will | break loose to a point where "the ( explosive forces behind them mav give them the range and destructiveness of a robot bomb, ; Mr. Babcock says that the Allies must make their decision on I Palestine now. This key decision.' he says, cannot wait much longer and must condition all future choices the United States may make in the Middl e East LUXEMBURG~1EWS TO COME BACK TO HOMES London (JTA)—Foreign Minister Joseph Bech of Luxemburg, which was liberated this week by the Allied armies, told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency that Jews, in common with all othei residents of the country, are we com.to return home as MonM possible. There has jwr. been any anti-Semitic feelings In the Duchy, he said. Rome"7jTAiTAn optimistic View concerning theI fUtUM(disappearance of anti-Sem.t.sn liberated Europe was voiced here by Sir Clifford Heathcote-Smit representative of the totargvernmental Committee for Rtfu gees. Jerusalem (JTA)—The charge that leaders of the democracies have not even attempted to rescue Jews trom extermination in German-held countries was voiced here by David Ben-Gurion. chairman of the executive of the Jewish Agency, addressing the opening session of the newlyelected Assefath Hanivcharim, the Jewish National Assembly of Palestine. The session was greeted in Hebrew by District Commissioner Newton in behalf of the Palestine Government. Chief Secretary Shaw of the Palestine Administration sent a message to the session emphasizing the statutory recognition which the Assembly enjoys under the Palestine rules covering the functions of the Jewish community in the fields of education, social welfare, pyblic relief, religious needs and other community services. He stressed the fact that sixty-Six per cent of the Voting Jewish population in Palestine participated in the elections to the Assefath Hanivcharim as compared with fifty-six per cent of the voters in the last elections held thirteen years ago. RABBrHERT7TO"SPEAK FROM LONDON SEPT. 24 New York—Rabbi Joseph Herman Hertz, chief rabbi of the United Hebrew Congregations of the British Empire, delivers a special message from London In observance of the Jewish Day of Atonement Sunday. Sc-pt. 24 (NBC.1:15-1:30 p. m.. EWT). Rabbi Herbert Goldstein, newIv-elected president of the Synagogue Council of America, also will speak. DISPUTE OVER MAYORALTY CONTINUES IN JERUSALEM The Aviv (JTA)—The dispute between the Jews and the Arabs in Jerusalem over the question of whether a Jew or an Arab should be mayor the city can be settled only by the new High Commissioner, Viscount Gort, who is exp ^,ed to arrive any day, it was announced here by J. V. M. Shaw C l,ief Secretary of the Palestine Government, at a present conference attended by Jewish and Arab newspa permen. Rome (WNS)—Approximately 1.000 Jews were found alive in a former Nazi concentration camp at Lucca, Italy, when the area was liberated on September 1. it was disclosed hereby Arthur D. Greenleiyh. the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee representative in Rome. Most of the Jews were deportees from Poland. Austria and Germany. Mr. Greenleigh also reported that the Italian Government's relief to hundreds of thousands of civilian refugees was inadequate. "There is," he said, "a serious need for supplementing this inadequate assistanceby our refugee committees, of which there are now five in Italy, one each in Naples, Bail, Rome, Leghorn and Florence. The problem is a large one of assisting our people who are in need.' STORY IS TOLD OF T Registration Books to Be Open Until Oct. 14 The County Registration Books opened Wednesday and will remain open until October U. according to Carl Holmer. Jr.. upervor of registration, on the 11th floor of the courthouse. Lublin (JTA)—The whole story of what happened to the Jews ; of Lwow was unfolded to this correspondent by Myra Sommerstein-Woliz, daughter of Dr. Emil Sommerstein, prominent Zionist and a member of the Polish Committee of National Liberation, and her husband, Dr. Marek Woliz. "Before the Germans cam..' she began, 'there were well over 100,000 Jews in Lwow. and no more than 10.000 of them succeeded in escaping with the Red Army. It was fortunate that dur' ing the year of Soviet rule thousands of Jews went East and thus then lives were saved. "The Germans came July 1, 1941. Within two days they forced all Jews to wear white armbands bearing Stars of David. July 15 all the Jews were told to register with the police for work. That day thousands were taken directly from the registration points and were never see again. It is believed that five to six thousand were killed then. About 2,000 Jews remain in Lwow today. So you can see what happened." The Germans, she continued, assigned her husband to work in the Jewish hospital as a physician, while she was sent to work in the Jewish Hospital for Infectious Diseases. In the Catholic and other hospitals, nurses and other personnel were innoculated against disease, but this was not permitted for Jews. VICHY COMMISSAR IS ARRESTE D IN FRANCE London (JTA)—Xavier Vallat, first Commissar of Jewish Affairs of the Vichy Government, and the man who drew up the first anti-Jewish legislation in France, has been arrested, it is reported from Paris. The report says that Vallat faces loss of franchise, restrictions on his place of residence and expulsion from any professional group to which he may belong. Similar punishment awaits other members of the Jewish commissariat. Lyon (JTA)—Leaders of French Jewry today told to a J.T.A. correspondent that they believed that possibly 120,000 to 150,000 Jews survived the German extermination drive in France. They placed at 30.000 the number of Jews, including foreigners, who resided in the country prior to the outbreak of the war. Additional thousands, they said, escaped ihe Nazis by crossing the Swiss and Spanish frontiers. About 12,000 Jewish children wc re saved by being smuggled into Switzerland where they were maintained with funds supplied by American Jewish relief groups. These officials estimated that 120,000 Jews were deported from France to Poland. They held out little hope that these deportees have survived. The larger part \ of the deportees, they said, were | foreign refugees, who, because of languageand other difficulties, were not able to disguise themselves and conceal their identity. Local Lyon Jewish officials say that in the last few months before France was liberated then main enemy was not the Gestapo, which seemed to be weakened, but the French fascist formations such as the Vichy Militia and the Parti Populaire of Jacques Doriot. The latter, the officials revealed, desecrated the Lyon Synagogue on Quai Tillsit. destroying Torahs, smashing the furniture, and leaving the building a shambles. Most of the synagogues in France have been destroyed, the leaders of the Jewish Consistory said, but services are being resumed in liberated territories as soon as possible. French Jewish leaders announced the formation of a new organization representing all the elements of the community, and empowered to act as the sole representative of French Jews (CONTINUED ON PAGE 3) HONORALL FAITHS Washington — United States Senator Scott W. Lucas introduced a joint resolution providing for appointment of a twelve-man commission to establish a national memorial commemorating contributions of members of the various faiths to American military and naval history. The proposed inter-faith memorial, to be located in the District of Columbia, would be the first national Memorial symbolizing the participation of members of different religions in the defense of America. "Construction of such a monument will strike a powerful blow in defense of true Americanism," said Senator Lucas. "It will show the world that alien theories which would discriminate between one American and another because of the way he worships God and which the enemy has attempted to introduce in order to divide and weaken us have no place in America." RADIO ALGIERS SAYS PELLEPOIX ARRESTED Algiers (JTA)—Radio Algiers this week reported that Darquier de Pellepoix, former Commissioner for Jewish Affairs in the Vichy government, has been caught and arrested. He fathered manv of the anti-Jewish laws issued by the Vichy regime.



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T PAGE SIX knisl I hi Mi w =*^ M | Notes Of f Y. M. H. A. -bySAM SILVER Jewish Centers Conference Of vital interest to our organization is the conference being held in Atlanta this week-end for the purpose of organizing a Southern Section of Jewish Centers, YMHA's and YWHA's. This conference is taking place at the Biltmore Hotel up there, and all Southern leaders interested in Jewish Center work have been invited to attend. The need has been long felt lor a regional organization of Southern Jewish Centers to exchange ideas and programs and to provide for CO ordinated planning This is parti* cularly important at this time as we must gear our plans prooerly for the post-war era. Our executive director. Mr. Grossman, is attending this eonMr. and Mrs. Harry Spcier and Family Wish All Their Friends A HAPPY NEW YEAR fcrence. and it is believed that much good will inure to the Ys of Greater Miami as a result at the exchange of ideas and the co-ordinated planning of programs which will take place there. Athletics It has been called to my attention that I have been negligent in bringing to you news pertaining to the Y bowlers and diamond ball players. This was purely unintentional on my part, but I did get some satisfaction out of learning that I have a reader or two I'll get some dope on current athletic events and pass it on to you shortly I appreciate criticism —Constructive or otherwise so let's hear from you. RUSSIAN SHIPS TO AID IN REFUGEE SUPPLIES Ottawa (JTA)—The Soviet embassy here will make Russian ships available for the transportation of relief supplies to the Jews m liberated sections of Poland, as soon as such arrangements are approved by MOSCOW, a delegation of the Canadian Jewish Congress was assured this week by Soviet Ambassador George Zarubin. The delegation, head by Sam in I Bronfman, Congress president, discussed with Mr Zarubin the various problems involved in getting tood. clothing, medicine and other rebel supplies to the .lews of Poland. The Jew i.-h leaders said that the Congress was iead> to supply unlimited quantlof assistance providi d transportation and means of distribution are available. 'S HELP TO CHILDREN OF STATE INCHING Mr. and Mrs. Saul Sherman and Family Wish All Their Friends A HAPPY NEW YEAR NEW YEAR GREETINGS PUBLIC GAS CO. 7200 N. W. 7th Ave. Phone 7-6638 Mr. and Mrs. Henry Koretsky and Son Concourse Plaza Hotel New York Wish All Their Relatives and Friends a Happy New Year Best Wishes for a Happy and Peaceful New Year Atlas Fish Market 1331 Washington Avenue Miami Beach PHONE 5-2240 Best Wishes for a HAPPY NEW YEAR i Dr. and MRS. H. R. MECHLOWITZ AND FAMILY Mr. and Mrs. H. H. MILLER 846 Michigan Avenue Miami Beach Extend Sincere Wishes for a HAPPY NEW YEAR V BONDS and BOMBS BRING VICTORY FIVE POINT PLAN OF TO FIRST MEETING The business and professional women's division ol the Miami chapter ol Hadassah has extended an invitation to all WACs, WAVES and SPARS m this area, and to all business women, to attend the fust meeting ot the season, at 8:15 p. m next Monday m the YM-YWHA. 1 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach. Mrs. Milton Sirkin, senior adviser, will install the new officers, and Chaplain Saul Kraft will be e,uest speaker. Miss Polly Gershon is presi I The BPW division o! Hadassah I omposed of career gil Is who graduate into that group aftei five years' membership in Junior Hadassah. One of the most important projects of Hadassah is the Rothsehild-Hadassah university in Palestine. The Henrietta Szold school of Nursing, part of the Hadassah medical center there, has trained 359 nurses since it was opened in 1!M8. Through Hadassah miles of hospital beds are supplied with linen. Food for hospitals as well as for school luncheons are supplied t,, 30,000 children daily. ALL-JEWISH CITY WILL HAVE ARAB POLICEMEN T( 1 Aviv (WNS>—For the first tune in its history the all-Jewish city ol Tel Aviv will have Arabs on its police force. This was due to the resignation this week ol a number of Jewish policemen who claimed that the wages they were Hettm K were not sufficient to meet the rising cost of livmu It was expected that more Arabs might be appointed to fill 11,,vac ancles caused by the resignations. BALLANTINE'S ALE f~ America's Fintst Since 7840 DISTRIBUTED HY NATIONAL BRANDS, INC. New York (WNSI—A five-point program of clerance and coordination on Jt'wish civic protective work in the United States was adopted here at theclose of a three-day conference ol theNa tional Community Relations Advisory Council. The conference. attended by representatives id M\ national and eighteen local community civic protective agencies, elected David Slier ol New York as chairman ot the Council. The program provides: 1. To study, analyze and evaluate thepolicies and activities of the national and local agencies. 2. To ascertain the proble m areas from time to time. 3. To ascertain the areas of activities of these organizations and to conduct a continuous inventory cif their projects. 4. To serve as a coordinating and clearance agency for projects and policies, to eliminate duplication and conflict of activities, and to recommend further protects to member agencies. 5 To sc e k agreement on and formulate policies. Such policies once formulated and adopted, it i i xpected that the affiliated organizations will adhere to such' policies and will not eme,ane in any activities in contravention ol such policies. Following a report by Sidney Holland, i ot Baltimore, chairman oi themembership committee, a cnterai foi membership was devised and accepted The executive commute was authorized to •"'' Pj local communities for membership if they met thefol lowing three requirements: 1. A Jewish population of 12,000 or more(Provision was made lor smaller communities netting togi thei in a regional setup with th.authorization ot the executive committee 2. That the applicant city have a community organization supported by the community that concerns itself primarily with the problem of civic protection. '. I bat the applicant city have •• professional directing the civic protective activities of the community. Jacksonville — The extent to which Florida's a'-i to dependent children program is being expanded was reflected in the announcement here today by State Welfare Commissioner Leland W. Hiatt that 2.15 families (659 children i were added to the rolls during August, for a total of 3.47!) families (8.373 children). The average grant was increased on the state level during August to $32.55 per family, payments being limited to $18 per month for the first child under Hi years of age, or under 18 years 11 attending school, and to $12 for each additional child. Total payments aggregated $113,226.50 lor the month, or at the rate of $1,358,718 per year. In Dade County, Hiatt said, S5.563.50 was paid during August to 156 families (245 children), or at the rate of $66,762 per year. Commissioner Hiatt explained that due to the lack of funds. investigations for aid to dependent children were suspended in the spring of 1942, and that as a result some 8.000 applications, some of them filed as far back as 1939. had accumulated when additional funds made it possible for the State Welfare Board to authorize the investigation of all applications filed on or before Aoril 1. this year. Many of those who had originally applied, he said, are now ineligible either because of the lapse of time or the absence of need on account of improved economic conditions. El |6 %  ; 11 ^WMewiU 1,1 business unZr ,7"'l? K < '"<••' the s.,ii ,' %  "• ''"end t"*' ML C **•£§ t-BON KAPLAN A tlOl Ill-V f,„ 1 ., •'ii'.""•• i'li M,,. ,-|,,,. k ,, >n I "" "-'• %  • %  % %  ..;,.>. 'tt'' lf MORRIS ARON ESTHER ARON MYERS ft HEI.M \\ P ill. th. NOTICE uNDER-r^rloir %  t'lerfc !" th?rS21it SSf r %  uVSMTSfcHs? SJS RB. %  "„,:;::"&' •ngaged in business EMAN'l'EL sTll.vpuiv MIRIAM HEIDER*^ l/S-ll-Zt-JI I] ,; Owwi ..NOTICE is HEREBY OIVEN AM h underslgi taicedin a£' PI" ii'lii. and Intend (o :. K i Ie ti he. l.,k of the Circuit court im.t.. County, Florida PAl'L GER8TIUII CWDttOB CHER M T A K 0 K F. ORMBa Cl'hu column la conducted by the Oreater Miami Jewish Federation In .•..operation vrllh The Jewlnh Floridinn as a community nervier To inform the community of your organisation's latlvltlee and to avoid conflicts In dates, phone S-Sdll and a.k for 'Community calendar." NotiricaUon must reach Federation no later than rueaday for inilillcatlon that week.) Monday. September 25th Hoard of director* meetingreau of Jewish Education David, o'clock Wednesday. September 27th Workmen's tlr< le liranch No executh • %  ninmltte. meetlnir, p. in Sen A-Hospital card party, Miami V. r..,; H \\ .,„ s. even Inc. Saturday, September 30th '\" al %  in. 'oils dance, Miami \\ omen a e "lub, :• p. m, I! II l.-tll 8:30 CORAL GABLES LEGAL NOTICES MEDICINE CABINET /ilka-Seltor -^: A • : M7n.^! r k VflV• "' *Bfescfa., Add hu.,..ti.n l prompt. effacUr^ 1* mm4 U*~. ONEQDAY VITAMIN Si TARI r Plea tahleU lo the r,r box. ^^^ >X JLERVINt^ wu r ., 8U sTir-vs.!^5 ARREST ENTIRE JEWISH POPULATION OF NITRA Bjrne(WNS)—The entire Jewtah population In the city of N.tra, Slovakia, was placed under arres last week by the chief ol police in reprisal for tl„. larfieMale participation of Jews ln the .Slovakia,, underground move iw U e' c, f dinK u n ,or,s wch•net T r" n Br ">av. The h v. in\ WM "•'"'•ted to the N./.i puppet regime. While the police was roundinu "P no h r l Je w n Nitra. the chief of ifnarmei issuing a warning that Jews %  aught fleeing their home ,hr Pftani would be executed. He also warned that ;' Persons sheltering Jews woukl be severely punished '" WM expressed here i n Si armed 1 ^ lrC,e fl "the fate the surviving Jews m Slovak, n OTN t ?i h Jt wish BS£ circles -^' h v,ewed "' these rest and ," SSF 1 "?" to th "' %  st and possible deportation ,,t the rernaminj 10,000 Jews. Be' [OW the war Slovakia had a Jewish population of about 90.000. Keep on buying War Bonds. NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS „.._, ... NAME LAW NM' I-. 8 1IKKKHY QIVBN that '" "'"'•'siK desrlni t., ensaca In r 1 ;;;,,^ 1 ';,,,^n?titiou. B uJ" 1 ., •r U -',' l:l APARTMENTS, '" "1-735-7*1-746 Sixth St Miami : „ ,.,,„„ la L,,',^-;,; •iv w f ,.'" % %  %  '' "•'""• •* UM %  'MM./. r ,.'!, :, 1 l ;." ,ult ,m f "-"• BIL.VKR 1 1 I \";^ IUS 'ANOVgKT •SII.NI.I. K.\i'i..\\ *. DIBTZ v KtnjtZl '' % %  A| '""' : u FOR NOTICE OF APPLICATION .. TAX DEED Chapter 20722 Acts of 1941 V, ,. F,le 8305 MorrlJ Marl" "5BT OIVBW that &• A ^o'/'SunV £b. fi< .; %  ,,.v.:'v;;';,' r % %  '"•%  "" "mSK o."-i..::"";; ';:* v --' A 1 --Pio h r ?d. f u„J|„ M "'' ••' said in iiv nalne' I" VuU V'T" "" "'' "' S '•"-!• i Tamlaml rorp NOTICE OF APPLICATION F0H TAX DEED PILE IMM Notice Is hereby riven that Mn M. MM, lizzie. hoM.-r c,f KvertUdf. Dralnase Dlstrlel Taj ortificiu .Nuniliei.-,| 4:':.. dated th^ im day of .run.'. A. I> IMS, hat fiiV.1 raid e>tirirat^ in my office, and his midc application for tax dead to usw thereon In u oordance with law. Raid Certificate embnuea the follow. Inif described propertr, >l!utrd In Dade County, Plorlda, to-wlt: Lot 6, Blk ]:. r.mifw cla:dena Znd Addn In the County of J'n.l.-. stiit.,.f PiorMa. Th.iiosessmenl •.; said i under said Certificate was inued la the iiain,. or Ann.I haw, Arer.t. unless said Certificate rhall be rroeemed a. rdlng to law, tax jrti will Isaue thereon on the 12th day of October, \ i). 11 Dated Miis 'Mi da) of BepMaksV A. i> lU i: B. I.I:.\ I MKKMA.V. Clerk of Circull Court Dade 'ounty, Kl< rida. Bj \ C STERRETT, P C fCircnlt Court Real) /l-16tl-W 1" I IN THE COUNTY JIT* IN AM. PH: OAI'E OOUNTTi PU.UII.A. IN PROBATE No i In R. ESTATE OP WIIJJAM U BoZAK'l II 11. eased NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All I llavint! Claims "i Demsndi .u-< ; "'Bald Estate t You. .iiol .• i,-|i of v., II. ar hrew notified and required to present W %  lalms and demands srhfch vou, w either ..r vou, nun have innJ3 esUte of W 11,1 JAM I. llt'ZARTH deceased late of Dade County. ''' Ida. to HiHon. W K. BM"J County Judxe of Dade fount) •" tile the same In his offk J" '" County Courthouse In Pade t -" un ,„ Plorlda, within eight .•slen.la.from the date o? the first pubiwtlon hereof. Said .-lalms or desuw" to contain the legal a.idrem of J claimant and to be Mvorn t "J |.i ••-.. no .1 a.s aforesaid, or sam • be ban el. S. %  • %  s..tl,a 1! of lw II II I'i..I.at.Act Date September. A. P,"*'.„- WIU.IAM K M,Z *^J.% As A.liniuistrator of the ?"-""_J WILLIAM I. BOZARTB I'eca-e. MAX It SILVER Attornev for Administrator i/l-IB-tl-SI I" ii ^ %  mm'jmSm NOTICE IS HEREBY *"•>£ the u...le. .i K ..ed. th.aald name In "" ." „. pa* Clerk of the Circull '• Ooonty, Plorlda M| |!N|vN BHTff* :. l 1-18 Plorlda. intenaa '•' r s ", l h e t name With the Clerk "'-T^ c.u.t of Dads C i .-•* %  MYERS HKIM V-V for Petitioner Altol lie 9/1-8-1S neya Ii-1 M


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PPjpAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1944 fJenistifhridrj&n (C0N TINUED FROM PAGE 1) in dealings with public authority and Jewish bodies in other countries. The group, which will be known as the Representative Council of the Jews of France, will seek recognition by the government and will ask to be consulted n a rn atters affecting Jews in France. It is composed of six representatives of the Jewish Consistory, five of the general defense committee, which was the supreme underground organization during the occupation, and one each from the French Zionist Organization and the Committee of Action of French Jewish Youth. Other demands include complete and just reparation to Jews for moral and material damage done by them. Restitution of confiscated property whoever may be the present holder; reintegration of functionaries and agents discharged or compelled to cease their functions, as well as Jewish employees—the period during which such functionaries, agents and employees were not permitted to function shall count as a period of active service with full promotion rights or salary increases to which they would have been entitled had they been working; and re-establishment of institutions and Jewish social, cultural and economic bodies suspended or forbidden under the anti-JeAish laws. The Jews of liberated Lyon, which now has the largest Jewish population in France after Paris, this week held their first open, legal meeting since the commencement of Nazi persecutions in France, and tonight celebrated their new freedom at special synagogue services. New York (JTA)—Commemorating 100 years dedicated to cultivating the spiritual, religious and cultural ideals of their pioneer forefathers, Congregation Emanu-El PAGE THREE RED CROSS FIRST All MM WILL BE III CITY MOM i Miami Beach civilian war services committee was recently appointed by city council to cooperate with and supplement the activities of all individual citizens and organizations engaged in the promotion of the welfare of servicemen in Miami Beach. Members are: (left to right) Benjamin E. Bronston. realtor; Dr. Morris Goodman, merchant; Charles L. Clements, saving and loan executive, chairman; Mrs. Russell T. Pancoast, president of the Recreational Pier association of Miami Beach, which has entertained nearly 3,000.000 servicemen; and John C. Osterberg, former commander of Miami Beach post of Veterans of Foreign Wars. LAUDERDALE TEMPLE ANNOUNCES SERVICES Temple Emanu-El, 1801 South Andrews Ave.. Fort Lauderdale, will continue its Holy Day services Tuesday evening, September 26th, at 8 o'clock, with Kol Nidre services. Rabbi Simon H. Baron will address the worshipers, and has chosen as his topic "American Atonement for Anti-Semitism." He will speak Wednesday morning, Yom Kippur day, on "A Perpetual Covenant." The schedule for the remainder of the day is as follows: Afternoon service at 12:15 p.m.; children's service at 2:30 p. m. ("A Story Sermon on Story-Telling"); at 3:30 p. m. a scripture service; at 4:15 p. m. a memorial service, "The Presence of the Absent;" and the concluding service at 5:15 p. m. Religious school registration and opening will take place Sunthis week began the celebration of the temple's Cenday morning, September 24th at tenary by preparing for a series i 10 a. m. of special programs, religious services and forums to be continued until the end of April. —Buy War Bonds Today— MCL %  2*c.t, lOGUST BROS Ry £ ** la the BEST' IT IS A PLEASURE TO EXTEND OUR SINCERE BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR HI APGAR Employment Agency SEYBOLD BUILDING OLD SARATOGA INN Biscoyne Boulevard at 77th Street Phone 7-7725 Week Day Dinners 5 to 10 P. M ... Sundays From Noon Cocktail Lounge F ine Liquors and Wines WE ARE CLOSED ON WEDNESDAYS TAKE BUS 11 FROM DOWNTOWN MIAMI. OR BUS M-.71 FROM MIAMI BEACH V • PAPPY'S Air Conditioned Restaurant Is the Talk of the Town & Charcoal Broiled Steaks Prime Ribs of Beef Chicken in the Pot Prepared by America'* Fineat Chefs Under the Personal Supervision of H ARRY S. FEINBERG SS1JS1Z !" ALL BAKING DONE ON PREMISES Open 7 A. M. to 2 A. M Hippy's RESTftimflrvr SPIEGELMAN Mrs. Qussle Snlefrelman, axed 89, residing ;it 1420 N. W. 7th L"t„ meet with Mr. Kenning ana me First Aid committee of the Dade County Red Cross in Gesu school. Jack A. Erneman, chairman of the committee, will preside. The instructor training coui'se in water safety will begin Tuesday, Sept. 26 at Venetian pool. Coral Gables, and will meet for four consecutive evenings from 6 to 9 p. m. Approximately 30 candidates, both military and civilian are enrolled. One d ***'r _• uniting of this class is tc ranged in addition. The accident prcvenli structor course will begii day, Oct. 2 at Gesu 1 schc will meet for five consecutive evenings from 7 to 10 p. m. Candidates for this class are either proTrt or uri r\ OM TWf o Sessional teachers or persons with IKJ DC 11LLU UN UtU. J %  som ,. plcv ious experience in accident prevention work. The acOBITUARIES SECOND SESSION AIC ica*avt COHEN Tinhody of Abraham Cohen, 47, who died at his home, 1255 Pennsylvania Ave., Kiidaj nlaht following a heart attack, was sent to New York hy Riverside Memorial <'hai>-i for funeral services ami burial. Cohen wai part owner of tinRoosevelt apartment hotel in Miami Beach. II,' WH a veteran of World War I. Surviving are a sister. Mrs Rose Rosenstock of Miami Beach; a brother, MIIC Cohen, and a sister. Mis Dinah Hurwlts, both of New York City. New York (WNS)—The second session of the American Jewish Conference will be held in Pittsburgh, Pa. on December 3, it was announced here by the administrative committee of the Conference. Originally it was planned to hold the second session in Chicago over the Labor Day week-end. but a ninety day postponement was voted by the Interim Committee in June, in compliance with the request of the office of! course. Defense Transportation. The Interim Committee met this week in New York to consider the agenda for the second session. On the unfinished business from the first session is the selection of a delegation to represent American Jewry at the Peace Conference. cident prevention committee of the Dade County chapter, headed by Capt. J. W. Davis of the Miami Fire Dept^. is making plans for an extensive training program in that field. Arrangements have been made to teach certificated junior accident prevention courses in all Miami parochial schools, and contacts are now being made with private and public schools to offer these institutions the same opportunity to teach the Buy U. S. Stamps and Bonds. New York (JTA)—A representative of the Joint Distribution Committee will be included in the delegation which the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration will send to liberated Poland for the purpose of studying the relief needs of the local population, it was announced. BETH SHOLOM SCHOOL TO BE OPENED SUNDAY PALM BEACH NOTE MRS. MARY SCHRDNKX Re>prsB*arttv Louis Goldman, chairman of the Beth Sholom religious school Mrs. Ruth Mrs. Morris Dickson and chilGood Samaritan Hospital, dien, Joy and Sandier, have Goodmark is the former board, announces that the school joined Mr. Dickson at their home, i Glasser, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. will be formally opened on Sun424 Hampton Road, after a visit j Jacob Glasser. Mr. Goodmark is day morning, October 1st. at 10 ] of about two months with Mrs.; the son ot Mr. and Mrs. J. Gooda. m. Registrations will be taken Dickson's relatives in Massachumark. Sunday morning, September 24th i se tts. from 10 a. m. to 12 noon, and a. m. every afternoon of that week from 4 to 5 at the Center. The faculty will consist of qualified and experienced teachers. Provision is also being made for Bar Mitzvah instruction as part of the afternoon weekday Hebrew classes. jTj_Tj u*Lni*Lrir*' j r*-'*~* %  ** g a Mr. and Mrs. Harry Goodmark announce the birth of a son at Mr. and Mrs. Louis Goldstein have returned from New York. the Jewish Calendar All lioilda>s and Fast Pays begin at sunset of the day preceding dates given below; 19 4 4 YOM KIPPUR Wednesday. September 27 SUCCOTH (Firt Two Days) Monday, October 2 Tuesday, October 3 SHEMINI AZERETH Monday, October 9 SIMCHATH TORAH Tuesday, October 10 A-"-rLr>f' M n i ******* •fMWWMMI troto 0 ; d M DRINK PLENTY OF CTTripitre ^ Water DELIVERED TO YOUR HOME i-GALLON BOTTLE 6 0e CASE or SIX N TABLE BOTTLES 1 5c Plus Bottle Deposit i PHONE 2-4128 AMBULANCE SERVICE MIZZELL SIMON MORTUARY 413 Hibiscus Street Phone 8121 West Palm Beach, Fla. ALFAR CREAMERY CO. FOR THE BEST IN DAIRY PRODUCTS WEST PALM BEACH MILK—CREAM—ICE CREAM FERGUSONFUNERALHOME,Inc. 1201 South Olive Avenue WEST PALM BEACH PHONE 5172 LAINHART & POTTER ESTABLISHER 1893 "BUILDING MATERIAL FOR PARTICULAR BUILDERS" Phone 5191 West Palm Beach, Fla. SOUTHERN DAIRIES Serving Palm Beach County, featuring the Nationally Famous Southern Dairies Pro* ducts and lea Cream. AS NEAR TO YOU AS YOUR PHONE KE CstBAaJ



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i' PAGE EIGHT +Jewish FhrkMan B'NAI B'RITH NOTES M -byARX FEINBER In The Synagogues Of Greater Miami Or< .HI i Mia ri %  i Jew i y id.Penitential Period • i i \ Icea this weekend Atonement services At the meeting last Tuesday night although attendance was reduced to a minimum by the hurricane threat, yet approximately 30 members were present and enjoyed a short business meeting. A. Gannes, Director of the Jewish Educational Bureau here gave a short talk on the necessity for Jewish education and distributed vital pamphlets to the Lodge. The most important thing occurring at the meeting was a tentative discussion of the Hillel situation in Miami. It was brought to the attention of the Lodge that approximately four members of the Hillel Advisory Council in Miami had written to Dr. I Sachar complaining ol Bill Kei selman and through this correspondence secured the release of Mr. Kesselman as director of the University. It seems that none of the other members "i the Council were advised nor was the Hillel Committee of Sholem Lodge advised. The question came up whether this action on behalf of these members was authorized or whether or not the Hillel Advisory Council was an independent organization not answerable RIVERMONT PARK SANITARIUM 1S8 N. W. 7th St. Ph. 3-7301 Beet car* for chronic alck, convalescent and elderly peopi SANEL BEER, M. D., Director Reasonable Pncel BSSUtiful Ground I LSrga ector When You Think of Real Estate Think Of LEO EISENSTE1N REALTOR 309 Lincoln Road Phone 5 6479 Dependable, Conscientious Service REAL ESTATE—MIAMI BEACH MIAMI BEACH [HOMES AND INVESTMENT, PROPERTIES B. E. BRONSTON, Realtor I A Trustworthy Real I 60S Lincoln Rd. Estate S"rvir Ph.: 5-5868 RENTALS LEASES SALES Lots, Homes. Hotels Apartment Houses M. GILLER REALTOR 1448 Washington Avenue PHONE 5-5875 to the Lodge or under the jurisdiction of same. An investigating committee was to be appointed by the chair to make a finding of fact in the matter and recommendations. It will be interesting to note what these findings will be and what action will he taken by the organization, if an v. The chairman of the investigating committee is Brother Abe Aionovitz. Anyone desiring to Impart information concerning the Kesselman dismissal please communicate with Abe. Also the appropriation of $150 for sending city officials to the launching of the sub-chasers was reconsidered and repealed. This was due to the tact that the launching was to be up in Massachusetts and the amount of I money allocated would yiit he sufficient to take care of the exi penses and also that the plaques would not mention B'Nai B'Rith. Instead of this allocation the Lodge allocated the sum of $70 tn pay lor the plaques and lefl i the attendance of the officials to their own discretion The secretary was instructed to write ;, letter to the officials conferring i this honor of the joint municipality and comment was made that the publicity funds of the cities would be more than sufficient tii carry any enxpenses incurred A notation received in the mail from Brother Alex Miller of the A. D. L reports that Representative .Samuel A. Weiss from Pennsylvania praised the work being by B'Nai B'Rith for the armed forces and had an article printed which listed many of the services being rendered to the lighting men by this fraternal organization. This report appeared in the Congressional Record and is just one step toward public recognition that we deserve. I alsci received a card from Brother AlfredAugustine v. ho received his discharge as a captain m the army, and has re-opened his offices for the practice of dentistry and oral surgery in the Huntington Building. Brother Augustine, before being commissioned, was an active member and many of his friends will be pleased to learn of his return. The Lodge welcomes you back. Al, and wishes you the best of luck in your practice u ii (include with special ami OBS •'! Tueadaj i ^ enlna .iTi.l Wednesday in .ill Ml em li of u.'i ship Spei i.ii %  -• %  I vice* fi Icemen will be held by chaplains In thin area Services announced through Oreatei Mian i Rabbinli al Association are BETH DAVID CONGREGATION. Conservative. 135 N. W. 3rd Ave Services PYldaj evening al 7:15, Saturdaj morning "The Sabbath ol R< pentance" at B:S0. Rabbi Max Shapiro will speak mi "Return <> Man'" Kni Nnii.'. Tueadaj evening, Bepl 26th al >i 15 Rabbi Shapiro's theme findiscussion will be, "The Deluge ..r Man!" YMHI Kippur, "Vlscor" Memorial services Wednesday, Bepl 17 al II a m I'I eceedlng Ihi m< men lal sei trices, Rabbi Shapiro "ill spenk on the subji i i. Whj Is Man Al \. Hall, in l IS SO u m Rabbi Shapiro will aiieak In l Yiddish on "The Passing of Mi. ds Juniot set \ li es, v\ • dnesdaj from I' 10 to 12 noon In tinauditoi nun Cantor Abraham Friedman ami Choir will officiate ami Rabbi Mas Khn %  11 %  %  w ill ondui t all -• i %  li %  MIAMI BEACH JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER. 1415 Euclid Ave. • Conservative. Krldaj evi nlng K balas Shabbns 7 mi n m Saturday morning ShnlKis Shuvah nl m Rabbi Lehrman will preach on "Ijel I lut %  ...(..-. t shalosh Seudos w I lfollowed bj evening service with li*) in.in (irossmsii a* ii"-i Tuesda> >-\ enlng, K ..| N .I" ai I 10 p in a' i hi li In • Italibl lain man w ill Blieak in.' i 'ha llenge of i inlloui Wednesday morning servlci begin at S II m Viskoi .it in sn -i in Rabbi lahiman will preach on "A i*. ill tn tinI.lvlnii N. ltd h sen i es a ill !••• rhnnted b) the rabbi Cantor Emanuel Barkan I the 'ent( i hull w ill ..I f!• late at all *• r\ I. ^ % MR. and MRS. SAMUEL MILLER 1919 S. W. 17th Street wish all their friends and relatives a HAPPY NEW YEAR A HAPPY NEW YEAR T. E. B PIANOS PIANOS BOUGHT and SOLD 2380 N. W. Seventh Street PHONE 4-5965 Mr. and Mrs. Sow, c Miami Beach -_ P K Ven e New Ytar Ul ^ and Mrs. B. Siaelb^ Extend Then Best Wlsh e< %  AH Their Fr.ends for 1 HAPPY NEW YEAR BEST WISHES for a HAPPY NEW YEAR LiBERn ia 259 N. E. 4th Street Opposite Bay Front Perk CONGREGATION BETH JACOB. 301-311 Washington Ave. Orthodox. I" Ids • veiling '• %  \ Ice* w ill li.' held -i' 5 • %  %  I'" k a ml Sal.I.a 111 HUM Hint' service* .., > :" Rabbi Meschelott w ill preai li mi Ihe theme Time t" Repent."' Shalosh Seudos will be held • m S.II u rda> Ri llglo n hmil • • III i" held Kundaj. •• a m to m.n. mill .|ai!> li.an I I.. 7 Kni \ '! till be held Tuesdiij. Hepi. ml., r 28th, ,t 7 p III Cantor Maurice Mamches will chant, ami Rabbi Ml •ff will s|>enk i.n i Pledgi \llegianci Vi.in Kipnui services Wednesclti s. |it. II. I, i 27th, al N SO a in m both Hi.Synogfigue building ami the Talmud Torah Pomn i\ l.nild 1 ic il.lil Mi %  heloff will preach be' • or "!• iii.theme "Dual ..f M in M, niii> ial s.-i \ Ices w ill be Ill-Id •" I" SO in ih. Talmud Torah building, and at n ".II in the Synagogue l-uilil%  I WANT MY MILK Ettab. W HEN the stress of modern' hTiruj geu "on your nerves") m rood sedative can do a lot to lessen nerrous tension, to make 1 ysm more comfortable, to permit' reartfoi sleep. Next time a day's work sad worry or a night's —'fnlnss—, makes you Irritable, Restless er Jam py— gi res you Nerreos Headsea* or Nervous Indigestion, toy Dr. Nilas Nervine JCLiqaid or Effervescent Tablets) Dr. Miles Nervine is a tasted sedative that has bringing; relief from Functions! Nervous Disturbances for sixty years yet is as up-to-date as this Mill ing's newspaper. Liquid n* and I1.88, Effervescent tablets IS* mad 75*. Read directions and nee esdjr as directed. FLORIDA DAIRIES HOMOGENIZED Vitamin "D" MHfr "Milk Producti** Dacro Protected TEL. 2-2621 Greater Miami Delivery Visit Our Farm at 6200 N. W. 32nd Street MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CON. GREGATION. 590 S. W. 17th Ave. Orthodox. Pi Ida > evening servlcei .M %  _i' Saturdn> m mi ., „, Memorial •-' 4 • al |i. :n .-, ,,' at Miami .1. w ish • irthodox, iVO s W \itft \ \ i Rabbi Murray Grauer will speak fol. %  I ,L Kol Nni ,i "Children ..f the : '^ lys i n W • .i. sdai morning prior •" ^ Iskor hitonic w ill he "Kindle the Uhl Cantor Berele Kallenberg will v >' ha in : Zedek Talmud | M'inh. \:v. s W Third SI Rabbi i Simon Aorii u -||| conducl service Pr|. "g ai 7 p in ami saturdaj • %  "%  nl ., in when he >n %  •"• "I'ei >• %  in. i I'rr.gr. -I in -.l..\ ev< nil %  servli %  •.v ill -i.,,i nl '" '""I rtabhl Sim-. n April will "peak followl o Kol Sldre on "A Deep i'i.I Solemn Hour Sei \ li es begin ^•; l; •' I s a m and before '""; %  • Rabb \ ; || w in -|,...,k • % %  .•..„BETH SHOLOM CENTER. Conterv. Stive. 761 41st St.. Mum, Beach. |-r • i ire s< heduled f... Pi Idav eveling at is: Saturdaj morning serv, Kea-tlS!' ''•„ ,,,M '' :: Rabb. Leon Kromsn will ..mi ,. • Siibbath serv' %  'I v lc< T li evenng, Sept Mlh. with Kol > will', ", "' k dW '< ->' iiLii L!' "" W ? Sin?" Cantor Louis Hayman will ehanl Schedule '• %  • VJedneaday, Sepl -;,(, %  v '"' •" %  -i in VUkor (Mr T;;', ; "' S ;., V : C %  -.-/"'.,, ,' • J'" rapeatry ..f Remem"",Mlneha. 1 10 p ,,, Nellah i' ", Bermonette v.,„, Kippur NEW YEAR GREETINGS REHBERG GROCERY AND 4844 N. W. 27th Avenue Prime Meats. Fish and Vegetables NEW YEAR GREETINGS To Our Many Friends and Patrons From Your Friend Jack It's a Pleasure to Extend Our Best Wishes For A HAPPY NEW YEAR un i 69 N. W. 5th Street PHONE 3-4367 WHOLESALE AND RETAIL "CALL JIMMIE" 217 5th Street Miami Beach PHONE 5-2318 It's a Pleasure to Extend Our Sincere Best Wishes for A HAPPY NEW YEAR BLUE 301 Lincoln Road Miami Beach i i'. Ri fli II • I \ |i ,'S M ll V thl| -I I M-l V C., TE B? LE ISR E1 '37 N. E. 19th St.. Reform. *>.-, i„i mrvlcea Friday %  .Vi ,,,! ,iI h S ", M '-'"' %  •< Repentance; Tarahlih wiii'L' ";""" %  Rabb J "b n.. i v h %  ".""•' k "" "'" w H" ine Jew to Reiient?" in .in.-..I "•"Plan will participate in th "peclal Sabhalh IIIOHIIHK 'ln?" Members and M.nda %  y Invited to attend theaT ReaiHtratlon r.„ Temple Israel Bun suirvtvs .,;M,"";., I < I ; I J '-' %  % % %  ''•„.-.,I.M. s ..,„ £:: '•; %  ;:-. „. Chaplain %  nservativi Aak Your Local Delicatessen For the Best e It Costa No Mora OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE IN FLORID* KOSHER ZION SAUSAGE CO. PRODUCTS Delicious Corned Beer Pickled, Cooked and Smoksd Meats 37th and Normal Avs. Ch cil' BROUSSARD'S OF NEW ORLEANS BAKER'S HAULOVER—MIAMI BEACH PHONE 6-1117 SPECIALIZING IN THE BEST NEW ORLEANS COOKING Extends Sincereit Wishes for a Happy and Prosperous New Year to Our Many Jewish Patrons Bepl K iiiln n "ill Made From Fresh Oranaes Sol Kraft wU] ,.„.,,„, 'he YMM\",, I i" K I''; 1 ," ••rvlcea al Una \v.l-''i...ln Road ami Coi '-nCarVr'MM^'^'r '•;''Chap. Polndana <". ,'V V-';11 ,', '' ; '• Ruth i.r.,1,,,,' 'win';:;:,„ ""• Vr • %  '" % %  IN.-I.I.||„K K.I N In, '," %  ,""'";•' Kamern m i... .'I l <}>"> Jennie BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR NEW YORK DELICATESSEN 44 NORTH EAST 1ST STREET 83s!^"-jsa to atBEST WISHES TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS for a HAPPY NEW YEAR NOT INC EMERSON TIRE COMPANY TIRE RECAPPING HEADQUARTERS' 600 N. E. l,t Are. Tel. 3-5308 1185 N. W. 36th St. U. S. Tires Batteries Kendall %  Veedol • Tydol Oil



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PJUDAY. SEPTEMBER 22, 1944 • •Jewisti thrXMam PAGE FIVE "Between You and Me By BORIS SMOLAR Copyright, 1944, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc. 99 OVERSEAS FRONT: Jewish organizations in America are. for fhe time being, not in a position m respond to the appeal of the i ews in liberated Poland for a relief delegation to be sent to Lublin • • Nor are J ew > s h organizations in England This £ because the temporary Polish government in Lublin is not the only Polish government There is also a Polish Government in London The first is recognized by Russia but not by the United States and England The second is recognized by England and America, but not by Russia ... A situation is thus created in which neither the State Department in Washington, nor the Foreign Office in London can JMU6 passports to any delegation desiring to proceed to liberated Poland until the two separate Polish governments merge into one recognized by all members of the Allied Nations ... In the hope that such a merger will take place soon, the interested Jewish relief groups in this country, especially the Joint Distribution Committee, are making preparations for large-scale relief activities among the surviving Jews in Poland • Plans are also being made for relief activities in Rumania • • • THE HOME FRONT: Between now and Election Day a rise in anti-Jewish propaganda in this country can be expected Jewish organizations interested in combating such propaganda are prepared for it Not much can be revealed of the measures they have taken to fight the injection of anti-Seraitic issues into the Presidential election campaign Sufficient to say that such measures have been taken And in this respect complete unity prevails among all interested Jewish groups Zionist circles in Canada are speculating whether the Palestine problem will be dealt with at the Roosevelt Churchill conference now taking place in Quebec ... It is believed that the conference will discuss, among other questions, the status of national minorities In this connection it is assumea that the Palestine issue may come up for discussion The American Jewish Committee, under the direction of Dr. John Slawson. its executive vicepresident, is now developing a more active policy of acquainting the Jewish communities throughout the country with its activities More than 300 community organizations are given an intensive service on various Jewish questions on a day-to-day basis And the public relations department of the Committee is also doing a good job The latest step in popularizing the activities of the American Jewish Committee is the publication of an eight-page booklet which summarizes, among other things, the attitude of the Committee towards Palestine. • ETERNAL FRANCE: Many books will now be written about the role which the French underground played in fighting for the liberation of France Much will also be said about the aid given by the underground movement to Nazi-persecuted Jews in France during the four years of occupation But the best book so far on this subject is Joseph Kessel's "Army of Shadows" This work, by a noted French-Jewish writer, which was published by Knopf in this country shortly before the liberation of Paris, is even of greater interest now that France is free Himself active for several years in the underground movement in France, Kessel gives a vivid picture of how French conspirators conducted their anti-German activities under the very nose of the Gestapo Frenchmen who joined the underground movement were warned in all fairness that they would probably be caught by the Gestapo within ?%/,>/'"'"''""''''"'' ll*tt"l> wmfrft y/DVANTAGES J of" MORTGAGE V L O W RATS* BA8Y PAYMENTS LONG TIM* TO PAT PROMPT SERVICE .A HOME INSTITUTION Deal With You WCAt. FRIENDLY INSTITUTION "Uo^CESOVEBS.0.000.000 ^^ three months and be tortured to death ... Yet the number of members of the underground grew from day to day And no few women were among them • Kessel also describes the mountain shelters where people trying to escape deportation hid • • • They could not wash They could not shave Their hair hung over their cheeks burned by sun and rain They slept in holes, in caves, in the mud Food was a terrible daily problem Their clothes fell off in tatters Their shoes went to pieces on the rocks Some of them had sections of old tire, or even strips of bark tied to their feet with string Others had nothing on but an old potato sack split in two and tied round their waist like loincloth ... It is easy to imagine how these liberated people feel now And it is also easy to imagine what the word "German" will mean to these people for the rest of their lives. • FRIENDLY CRITICISM: Much criticism has been voiced recently against the American Jewish Confernce by many of its friends But none of the critics is as outspoken as Daniel Frisch, a member of its Interim Committee ... On the eve of the second session of the Conference, which is to take place in Pittsburgh early in December, Frisch has issued a special pamphlet asking "What Happened to the American Jewish Conference?" ... He charges the Conference with inactivity and especially with failure to take a firm attitude towards the problem of rescuing Jews in Europe from extermination ... He finds that the leadership of the Conference is monopolized by a few people and represents chiefly, vested organizational interests ... He claims that the leaders of the "body" turned out to be the heads of other organizations which would not yield their prerogatives to the Conference which they themselves consider the supreme body of American Jewry He also holds them responsible "for failing to provide opportunities for the inclusion of younger men and women in the management of our affairs" The American Jewish Conference, he says, demonstrated that while the people have grown, the leaders have not kept pace They have created a tyranny of speechmaking as a substitute for true greatness and inner humility, he asserts He calls upon the delegates to the forthcoming session of the Conference not to remain mere onlookers ... As a sovereign body the delegates will have to exercise their prerogatives and utilize to the fullest their freedom to choose their leadership and direction, he stresses. Our Film Folk By HELEN ZIGMOND Copyright, 1944, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Pallant and Daughter Wish All Their Relatives and Friends A Happy New Year Soldiers in Civies: Jascha Heifitz and Pianist Milton Kaye returned from a two-month overseas tour through North Africa and the southern part of Italy up to and including the front lines north of Rome. They found G.I. Joes are far from averse to classic music. Out of 45 concerts, 43 were received with tremendous ovations. Locales included any kind of a place from hangars and barns to hospitals and even the top of a truck. Music from Bach to Mendelssohn was enjoyed. Heifitz, also a pianist of some degree, several times joined with Kaye in cooking up some hot jam sessions for the boys. An Army public relations officer showered high praise on five outstanding personalities who have done the most for the morale of the armed forces. Among the five were Dinah Shore and Jack Benny. Benny, though not in the best of health, insisted on taking his second overseas jaunt, this time to the South Pacific. Dinah is yodeling her way across France. Somewhere on the coast of Brittany, writes a soldier, Dinah had just finished an eveing of song and returned to her tent, when a truck drove up. Two lads in it, bewailing their ill-luck —they had driven sixty miles to hear her and has missed the program. Dinah overheard struck her head out said, "If you wait till I change costumes, I'll sing for you." And forthwith she gave an unscheduled concert to an audience of two lonely GI's. • • Turning Back the Clock: In 1916 Chuck (now Director) Reisner wrote, "Goodbye Broadway, Hello France." It became one of the most popular ditties of World War I, and his royalties were considerable. Today he can ascertain the progress of the war by his royalty checks which are coming in again in increasing numbers. • • Footing the bill personally, Groucho is publishing his book called, "Forward Marx." It tells of his experiences touring Army camps ... is not for sale to you or you but will be distributed gratis to the boys in service. • • • From the pennats of Paris to the pavements of Picturetown the innocence or guilt of Maurice Chevalier as a Nazi collaborator is a much-mooted question. And most bemooted is Sid Grauman. He has received numerous reMr. and Mrs. Joseph Mann and Sons Wish All Their Friends and Relatives A HAPPY NEW YEAR quests to obliterate the footprints of the chanteur-comedian which lie in solid, if not eternal, cement in the forecourt of Grauman's Chinese Theater. But Sid the Impresario refuse to take action until the plaintiff has been proven innocent or guilty by more authentic report than rumor. • • Not many weeks ago Swiss Theatre managers could not obtain transportation permits for U. S. films to pass through Spain and portgual due to obstruction of Nazi officials in those countries. Now, with Allied occupation of France, Switzerland will get a full supply, but the Nazi product, which occupied a prominent place on Spanish screens, will find all routes from Berlin to Spain and Portugal closed. • • • Pro-Post-War Statistics: Of the 300 Warner employees who received discharges from Uncle Sam, two-thirds are back in their old jobs, or equivalent, on the lot. • • Sam Goldwyn permits not even the weather to interfere with Art. Hollywood's unprecedented weeks of overcast skies caused him to gather up his chicks and move indoors for the production of 'The Wond Man," Danny Kaye's starrer. This undershelter shooting will necessitate the construction of an immense set with hundreds of trees, shrubs, flowers, a bridle path, etcetera, realistically depicting New York's Central Park. All this for but one sequence in the picture. • • • Dane Clark, actor, who looks and sounds as goyish as McGafferty, was chatting with one of the Boulevard Boys. Later, hungry for some kosher food, hesitatingly asked Dane if he liked herring. "Sure," said Dane. 'T like all that kind of stuff." "You aren't you can't be you're not one of Our People?" gasped the other. "Surest thing you know Brother," answered the actor. "Where can we go to tear a lox or destroy a strudel?" To Our Friends and Patrons Sincere Best Wishes for A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR HARRY BOONSHOFT 718 Collins Avenue Miami Beach W/Mtotom w—— —" RIVERSIDE MEMORIAL CHAPEL FUNERAL DIRECTORS 1236 Washington dvi., Miami Baach In New Tort 76th St. 1 Arastetdam Avt 5-7777 RIVERSIDE AMBULANCE SERVICE 1944 CAillLLAC AMBULANCE 1944 OXYGEN EQUIPMENT Happy New Year Greetings To Our Many Friends and Patrons Battista's Italian & American Restaurant 142 S. W. 37th Avenue PHONE 4-9289 $ STAFF SERGEANT AND MRS. BURNETT ROTH Extend the best of wishes for a Joyous and Happy New Year to All Their Friends. BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR GRAYMAR SODA SHOP 720 N. W. 29th Street MIAMI NEW YEAR GREETINGS FREEMAN'S LUNCH AND RESTAURANT 798 Palm Avenue HIALEAH PHONE 8-1922 Now Under Ownership and Management of Albert A. and Ethel M. Kramer "JUST GOOD FOOD" NEW YEAR GREETINGS MORRIS KRAFCHICK "Custom Tailoring" 755 Washington Avenue MIAMI BEACH To All A Most Happy and Prosperous New Year MR. AND MRS. SAMUEL SAAL AND FAMILY 1 INC. 79 N. W. 20th St.. Miami s



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PAGE TWO vJenist flcric/iiari BIRTHS Mand Mrs. John Kronenfcld. ly of Miami, announce the cL: )f a son in Dallas, Texas, ca L )tember 9th. f" 1 >oral and Mrs. C. R. Kap..... u..nouncc the birth of a son on September 19 at Jackson Memorial Hospital. Mrs. Kaplan is the former Use Asher, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Siegbert Asher of this city. Corporal Kaplan is stationed at Camp Grant in Rockford, 111. Mrs. N. Siegal, 1307 S. W. 19th St.. and family returned from a three month's vacation in the North. Mr. and Mrs. Sam Becker and children, Gretchen and Joanne, have returned from a summer vacation spent at Graystone Inn, Roaring Gad, N. C. ENGAGEMENT Mr. and Mrs. Ira Walsey. 2125 N. Bay Road, Miami Beach, announce the birth of a son September 15. Abe Schoenfeld, petty officer, 2/c, will visit his mother. Mrs. A. Schoenfeld, for the Yom Kippur holiday. Mrs. N. Segal and children. 49G' 2 S. W. 18th Rd./ spent the Holiday weekend in Norfolk with her brother and sister-in-law. Seaman and Mrs. Robert WVmstein. BRISM Rabbi Lazarus Lehrer, of Key West, this week officiated at the Brisim of the sons of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Baida. 1536 Michigan Ave, and Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Reisner, 1455 Michigan Ave. Dr. and Mrs. Jacob H. Kapkm NCJW TO HOLD OPEN have returned to the city Ji'^ MrrTiMrr\v crRCOM spending the summer in the I lttlHNVj KJt DLAOUl) North. Dr. Kaplan will assume ;m active part in the plans of Temple Israel for the coming season. ••Irs. Ethel Shochet has returned to her home, 1548 N. W. 1st St, after a several month's rt_, ..i Atlantic City and the North. Engagement of Miss Ruth AlMrs. Ida Bernstein, 1610 N. W. 34th St., and son Samuel, returned to the city following a three month's vacation spent visiting in New York State and Montreal, Canada. Her daughter, Shirley, who accompanied her north, will journey to California The National Council of Jewish Women will hold its opening meeting of the season on Wednes, !>" t of '435 West Ave. Miami dav. October 4th, at the Atlantis I Beach, to 2nd Lt. Robert M. MetHotel. Miami Beach. The affair i sky of 216 Goldsmith Ave.. Newill be held in the form of a wark, N. J has been announced luncheon, to start at 12:30. Joseph by Miss Alpert s parents Mr. and Rose. Executive Director of the | Mrs. Morris Alpert. They plan Federation, will be guest speak, to be married on Sept. 24 at the er, and a musical program will Sheraton hotel, Newark Miss Albe presented. Attendance is by pert graduated from Northwest reservation only, which may be ern University last June. Lt made by calling the Council ofMetsky. quartermaster supply office at 3-6554 | fleer at the Miami Air Depot of A*board meeting of the Council lhe Alr Technical Service Comwill be held September 29th at, ,Tiand was an advertising execu1 p. m. at the home of the presi! tive before entering the army in dent. Mrs. Nat Williams, 114 W. Annl of 1941. He is the son of ;.t the St. Moritz in New York, ty of Miami. Glass serving trays go modern in design! $4.50 13xlO l /2 ins. You'll enjoy serving refreshments to your guests on these clever trays! Frosted bamboo or floral designs on glass with wooden frames. Handles of genuine Plexiglas' a clear crystal-like composition, 13-19 ins. $5.50 •Rohm and Han trademark U S. Pat Off. Sues Approximate MIAMI STORE. <;I.ASS\VAUI:. FIFTH FLOOR porafor Buy U. S. Stamps and Bonds. f WEDDINGS ^ rome %  710 S. W. 12th AV. MIAMI-. Til. 3 3431-} "YOU* JEWISH FUNERAL HOME rflQ LJ MISS Margaret Horowitz, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Horowitz, became the bride of Corp. Sidney Shedrow last Sunday at the Deauville Hotel. Miami Beach, with Rabbi Max Shapiro officiat> ing. Attending the couple were J the maid-of-honor, Miss Ethel i Pont; the groom's mother. Mrs.! Shedrow; and the bride's parents. I Following the ceremony, a lunch! eon was served in the Palm Room of the hotel. The couple are taking a short trip through the state. WE OfFKULLV KPKSENT THE MAJORITY Of NORTHERN JEWISH FIMRAl HOMES /n/wmolion Clod/, f u -n,thtd on Atquril SERVING MIAMI BEACH I MIAMI Exclusively Jewish Keep on buying War Bonds. i <# 2+ HOUR & Jictta §v>tkeu Your Complete Department Store With Quality • Merchandise Washington Are. at 13th St. Miami Beach And for your convenience Morris Brother's New Apparel and Accessory Store 70 E. Flagler St.. Miami Mount Sinai Memorial Park H "Owned and Operated by Greater Miami Jewish Cemetery Ass'n A COMMUNITY CEMETERY AH liated Congregations: Beth David, Beth Jacob, Miami jwish Orthodox, Schaaiei Zedek and Sisterhood Chesed Shel Ernes 1 j^o^yi^i^v?VY > w?Y^^ TUami for REST CONVALESCEMCI •^CHRONIC CASES HICEM TO RESUME ITS OVERSEAS ACTIVITIES ^LS^BQ^ New York. N. Y.—Bucarest. capital of Rumania, only recently cleared by the Soviet Army from Nazi domination, is the first European capital where the HIASR'A Emigration Association (HICEM), the world Wide emigrant aid service for the benefit ol Jewish refugees, has been permitted to resume its activities in behalf of its "Rescue Through Emigration" program. EXTENDS PROGRAM OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH New York (WNS)—The exteni sion of its program of scientific research and experiment in the extent and nature of anti-Semitism in America, study of the | measures that are being applied to combat it and new experimentation with tests for the effectiveness of these measures was announced by Judge Joseph M. Proskauer. president of the American Jewish Committee. with her aunt, Mrs. Jean Becker. I 2nd Terrace. San Marino Island." ( ^ r and Mrs Morris Metsky of where it is anticipated they will j Miami Beach. j Newark. meet Mr. Becker, scheduled to return to the States after 18 "CYCLONE GAS" USED Mr and Mrs Harry Cohen, months of overseas duty with'——. rvrroMiM R Tr Triire 18 4 Sw 12th St.. announce the the U. S. Navy. Miss Bernstein *w tJL 1 fcrEmlN AIL JfcWa engagement of their daughter.! will return to Miami about NoJ Anita, to Sol Brownstein of j vember 1st to enter the UniversiLondon (JTA)—"Cyclone Gas." Cleveland, Ohio, son of Mrs. | ty of Miami. She is now stopping which was used to asphyxiate Ruskm. Jews m the Majdanek extermina-, Miss Cohl n fa a graduate of iron camp in Poland, was originMiami Senior High School. Mr. ally designed as an insecticide. Brownstein is associated with the McmdmgtoDr. Martin Schauf. Rubber Development Corp German-Jewish refugee chemist tion. No date has been set who was associated with the Gertnc wedding man company producing the gas. Dr. Schauf, who heads the research department of the AtomMr ar >d Mrs A. Kronenfcld,; ised Food Products Co. here, said ,,f 9 2 N. E. 48th St.. are announcthat his brother and many friends 'ng the engagement of their had been killed at Majdanek with daughter. Thelma, to Corn. Merthe gas on which he had experi'" n Simon, U. S. Army, son of i mented for many years. The Mr. and Mrs. Herbert A. Simon, f chemist left Frankfurt in 1933 of this city and Washington, D.; after his dismissal by the German C. Corp. Simon is now serving chemical company because lie with the armed forces in New was a Jew. Guinea. EHTERTAINMEMT IS PRESENTED BY ARTIST SATURDAY Ruth Brotman entertained at a musical soiree Saturday evening at Jack Kaplan's home. 1351 Lenox Ave., honoring Emanuel Barkan the new cantor of the Miami Beach Center. Present were: Rabbi and Mrs. Irving Lehrman; Cantor and Mrs.Barkan; Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Cannes; Jean Thorbin. | feature writer for the Miami Daily News; Mr. and Mrs. Ashkonazy; Daniel Broad; Dr. Charles Hadad; Mr. and Mrs. Bert Silving; Mrs. McLinson and Mrs. Mink, of Philadelphia; Mr. and Mrs. Chassey. Several members of the Washington Embassy and Russian officers were guests. Jack Kaplan, composer-pianist, sang several "of his latest song hits, including "Win the War in '44." Cantor Barkan and Ruth Brotman sang several solos, accompanied by Bert Silving. Mr. Silving, who is an accomplished violinist and a new member of the University of Miami Orchestra, played violin selections, accomnaniedby Jack Kaplan, and also played several piano duets with Kaplan. Phone 5-1025 AUGUST STUDIO OF INTERIOR DECORATING EXCLUSIVE DRAPERY WORK & UPHOLSTERY TailorMade Slip Covert 1230 Alton Road Miami Beach 39. Fla. The Greater Miami rv the Women's DivTs 0 n hap ter ^ Women's Division ST 'L* can Jewish Congress aL men its calendar for the vlSSSSS* season. Events schi-duu? min November 2—Thursdau D Meeting. nursda y-Board November 10-Formal ing of "Friday Review 1 ':?• vi *ove mbcr 2 4 .. Fn g^ November 27 — Monriav i nual^anksgivir. S^ Me^tin !" ^ 7 !" !" "M*. December 8-"Friday ReviewDecember 22— Friday BevW -Party for Congress £2£ IdfiSnT 4 Th ^^y-Board January 12— "Friday ReviewJanuary 2&—"Friday ReviewJanuary 29-General meetint February 1-Thursday-Be^ meeting. February —"Friday Review" February 23—"Friday Review" February 25—Sunday-Annul Donor luncheon. February 26—General meetint March 1—Thursday Rani meeting. March 9—"Friday Review." March 23—"Friday Review." March 26—Party honoring the birthday of Dr. Stephens S. Wise. April 5 — Thursday — Board meeting. April 13—"Friday Review." April 22—"Friday Review." April 30—General meeting. May 3—Thursday—Board meeting. May 11—"Friday Review." May 25—Party honoring Mn. I. M. Weinstein. May 28—Election of officers Keep on buying War Bonds. LI N 0,11 L N Daily 1:45 Lincoln Rd.. Miami Beach M i i MI *w IH III I 11:15 A.M. Downtown Miami CArTTor^P^ Downtown, N. Miami at 3rd NOW SHOWING .. THRU MON., SEPT 25 JEAN ARTHUR CHARLES COBURN LEE BOWMAN "THE IMPATIENT YEARS" ... the laugh and love story oi tomorrow! • • • starts TUESDAY at the LINCOLN AND CAPITOL only • • "ARE THESE PARENTS? M f Sun-RayPark ealth Resort tiNOfoi wesuTC" MOUNT NEBO THE CEMETERY OF DISTINCTION FOR DISCRIMINATING FAMILIES Rabbi S. M. Machtei. Director Olympic Building Phone C MIAMIW riAGUHo. lO'-COUDT-rLOR DA HOME "SERVING THE JEWISH COMMUNITY PHONE 9-2664 A FRIEND IN NEED • 2^ W. FLAGLER RESTAURANT MIAMI'S NEWEST AND F** 1 Featuring Unusual Food* ***£* N. E. SECOND AVE. at H** 1 Air Conditioned Ph nC