The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00808

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Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
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Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
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Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
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Jewish Floridian of South County
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Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
^
jiJ^wiislh-IEIliOipidliiaun
^.THE MWISH UNITY \
asr,& THE JEWI SH WE
MIAMI 18, FLORIDA. FRIDAY. AUGUST 11, 1944
PRICE 10 CENTS
{First Population Survey in
[Greater Miami to Be Made
I Preliminary details are now
Line arranged for the lirst
Hation survey ever to be held
SC community. The popu-
IE cnrvev is a project of the
'BtfTSU JewiA Federa-
S and will be undertaken ,n
lose cooperation with the Bu-
au of War Records of the Na-
Xl Jewish Welfare Board.
The survey will be as complete
Wd detailed as possible the
Federation stated, with a house-
to-house canvass made by the
corps of volunteer workers to
obtain information and data.
When completed, information
I will be available as to the Jew-
ish population here, and will
serve as the background for
community planning in the need-
ed fields of endeavor.
M. J. Kopelowitz has been se-
lected as chairman of the popu-
lation survey planning commit-
tee by Monte Selig. Serving on
this committee with Mr. Kopel-
owitz are representatives of the
Miami Beach YM & WHA. the
Greater Miami Army and Navy
Committee of the Jewish Wel-
fare Board, Bureau of Jewish Ed-
ucation and Miami YM & YWHA.
Dr. Samuel Kohs, national di-
rector of the JWB Bureau of
War Records, will arrive in Mi-
ami in September to assist in
completing plans.
Organizations of the Greater
Miami area are being asked to
cooperate in this community-
vide project, and to assist in the
preparations in addition to the
actual canvassing.
Among questions to be asked
are the number of members in
the family, religious and organi-
Btion affiliation, members in the
armed forces and their service
activities.
OF SHIP
111 STOP EMIGRE
Ankara (JTA)The sinking of
the 200-ton Turkish motor ship
"tlcure in which more than 250
wish refugees perished in the
*ers of the Black Sea on their
ayfrom the Rumanian port of
iwnstanza to Turkey, may mean
end of further transportation
refugees aboard Turkish ships
*ustated here.
JheLbreak uf diplomatic rela-
ys between Turkey and Ger-
My'was foil,,wed by an order
tooting all Turkish ships home
m foreign ports. There is no
S0n that ,hls order will be
SXV'spi'ciallv after the loss
w the Mefcure.
Iihm!anwhlU' two ther Turkish
>mps carrying 815 Jewish refu-
trnm Dnvt(1 Mfely this week
lttbVn i:i, at tne iKneada
IBuZi 0ne 1,f lhese ships is the
Iff1 carrying 500 Jews and
Jewilh J--S lhc' Morina' With 315
- Wssengers,
th# Jt'?S asct rtiiined here that
" y 0f the refugees who
RJeir lives this week on.the
Jge were Piish and Ru.
*Cs anT nly llV0 f th
trew SIX m,,rnbers of the
5MW- ,&** lhey are
^ibl, to m,,,tary zone, in-
lails ,u correspondents. de-
* >"ckin{1' *ttaCk "f the ship
I AST'' ';if;"mat'on avail-
hy shell rthl" M'fcure was sunk
TurkoR,,"0 sevcn mh* off the
l* th. RDr'a border- (In Lon'
^W renni'1!811. n'WS aKency
l**ton5 Hd that the Mefcure
l*Wm td bv an unidentified
l*l55V-n2 ,hat 277 Jewish
I^Uow^15 when the 8hip
** on buying War Bonds.
OFFICE III ROME;
TEACHERS HIRED;
Rome (JTA)A decree order-'
ing the reinstatement of Jewish |
teachers and other employes of j
the educational system in Italy
who were dismissed from their
posts under Mussolini's anti-
Jewish laws was issued here this
week by the Italian minister of
public instruction. The order is
effective as of the date of lib-
eration of the territory in which
the dismissed personnel reside.
Earlier in the week the Italian
minister of the interior issued an
order liquidating the racial of-
anti-Jewish laws in Italy. The
Rome headquarters of the office
have been converted into an of-
fice for Count Carlo Sforza. high
commissioner for Sanctions
Against Fascism.
Plans for a comprehensive pro-
gram of relief and rehabilitation
of Jews in Italy are presently
being worked out by Arthur D.
Greenleigh, representative of the
Joint Distribution Committee, it
was announced here. Mr. Green-
leigh has left for Bari, in south-
ern Italy, where many Jewish
refugees are concentrated, after
consultations with high Allied
military officials, Red Cross of-
ficials and with the representa-
tive of the International Com-
mittee for Refugees in Italy.
BLOCKADE EASED FOR
NEUTRALS ADMITTING
HUNGARIAN CHILDREN
London (JTA) Dingle Foot.
Parliamentary Secretary for the
Ministry of Economic Warfare,
told the House of Commons this
week that both the British and
American governments had as-
sured neutral countries that ad-
ditional supplies would be
passed through the blockade if
they allowed Hungarian Jewish
children to enter Both govern-
ments, he added, have offered to
see that the supplies are form-
coming.
No word has been received yet
from neutral countries on their
willingness to receive Jcwisn
children under ten years of age
acceding to the P^n advanced
by Regent Nicholas Horthy of
Hungary, the British official re-
ported. He added, however that
certain countries notably Switz
erland and Sweden, had always
been cooperative in the past.
io.ooo1ews1jrdered
in kaunas prior to
retreat of_germans
London (JTA>-Ten thousand
Jews were murdered in KaunM;
capital of Lithuania, just prim
toV German evacuation o the
city it is reported by the Stock
holm corespondent of the Lon-
don Times. Inform* n reach
ing the Swedish capital, he says-
says that the Jews fiercely re-
Sited Nazi extermination squads,
us'ng arms which had been smug-
gled into the ghetto.
The same dispatch confirm*
earlier reports that several thou-
sand Jews were killed in vuna
a few days before the Gei mans
fledThat city Thes<-Jews, who
were conf ned m a ghetto. "
The remnants of the *JftJ
50.000 Jews who had resided in
Vilna and the many thousands
who were brought there fiom
western Europe._______
You can't quit now! You
mS continue to" buy Bonds, and
More Bonds!
FUGITIVES DWELL
III SECRET FOREST
REED BY GERMANS
1,000 Refugees Arrive Here;
Names Available to Public
BULGARIA STOPS
Moscow (JTA)The story of
how 1,000 fugitive Jews dwelt
for two years in a well-estab-
lished forest community in the
Baranovici district of Byelorus-
sia in the heart of German-held
territory, was told this week by
Henach Levin, a 13-year-old
Jewish partisan who frequently
visited the camp.
The residents of the settlement
fled from ghettos, labor camps,
and concentration camps in the
cities of Mir, Rakov, Slonin,
Baranovici and the surrounding
hamlets. Among them were 90
Jews who had escaped from a
camp at Koldychev by an under-
ground tunnel which they had
dug secretly over a period of
three months.
The forest community, which
was under the protection of
neighboring partisan bands, pro-
vided the guerrillas with shoes,
caps, clothes and other articles
which were manufactured in the
shops established by the refu-
gees. Articles not required by
the partisans were given to lo-
cal farmers in return for food.
LABOR PARTY WINS IN
PALESTINE ELECTIONS
Jerusalem (JTA)Preliminary
results of the elections to the As-
sefath Hanivcharim, the Jewish
National Assembly of Palestine,
made public this week show that
nearly 200,000 persons voted.
This is about 72 per cent of the
total entitled to vote. Only 56
percent voted in the last elections
to the Assembly which were held
thirteen years ago.
IACKSONVILLE JEWS IN
SERVICE NINE PERCENT
Jacksonville (JTA)Approxi-
mately nine per cent of the local
Jewish population is now in the
aimed forces, according to a pre-
liminary survey by the Jackson-
ville Jewish Community Council.
This percentage coincides with
the overall statistics just re-
leased by the National Jewish
Welfare Board Bureau for wai
Records, in which the general
average for the American Jewish
Community is given as 9%.
Ill PEACE TALKS
Ankara (JTA)All anti-Jew-
ish measures were suspended this
week by the Bulgarian govern-
ment in Varna, Burgas, and oth-
er cities along the Black Sea as
a result of negotiations between
the Allies and Bulgaria for the
latter's surrender, it was reliably
learned here.
The restoration of full rights
to Jews was one of the conditions
in the preliminary terms for sur-
render which British-American
military authorities presented to
the Bulgarian government thru
neutral channels. The terms were
backed by the Soviet govern-
ment through its diplomats in
Sofia and were reported to have
been accepted by Bulgaria.
The acceptance by Bulgaria of
the Allied terms will also effect
the Jews in Hungary and Ru-
mania, it was predicted here.
Rumania, facing encirclement, is
reported to be modifying its an-
ti-Jewish policy to pave the
way for surrender, while the
pro-Nazi Hungarian government
thoroughly frightened, is at-
tempting to dodge the blame for
the ruthless deportations of Jews
and is ready to place moderate
elements in the cabinet.
New York (JTA)After sever-
al years of living under Nazi and
Fascist terror, approximately
1000 European refugees, 918 of
whom are Jews, landed this
week in the United States and
were transported to the Emer-
gency Refugee Shelter at Fort
Ontario, near Oswego, N. Y.,
which was established as a 'free
port" on orders of President
Roosevelt. They will remain
there for the duration of the war.
The arrivals include citizens of
fourteen countries and many
stateless persons. The largest
group is made up of more than
300 Jews from Yugoslavia who
A complete list of the names
of the 987 refugees from Italy
thatt are now located at Fort
Ontario, Oswego, N. Y., has
been received in Miami. This
list is available to the public
at the office of the Jewish So-
cial Service Bureau, 127 N.
W. 2nd St., or at The Jewish
Floridian. Refugee agencies
are seeking to ascertain the
whereabouts of relatives and
friends of these refugees so
that they may contact them
with full information concern-
ing the new arrivals. Inquir-
ies may be addressed care this
paper, and will be forwarded.
Attention
Advertisers
The Jewish Floridian de-
sires to call attention to its
readers and advertising
patrons that they are 1not
publishing any year book. A
despicable attempt through
phone solicitation by a
group of professional pro-
moters u besmirching the
name of the Jewish people.
Deceitful and misleading
methods are used, includ-
ing that of informing the
prospective advertiser that
partTf the funds derived
will be given to one of the
local Rabbis, and a portion
of the money to be "ted for
refugee work. Consider-
able pressure u used in
these contacts-threatened
boycott and the like, unless
fund, are given. Merchant,
of this community are
ked to watch out for
these individuals who are
seeking Holiday greetings
tradin! on the Jewish
25.. and whose actualjk
creating a wave of Ul-feel-
5Tr US in this comrnun-
ity. Additional fa*"M-
tion may be obtained by
calling 2-1141.
JEWISH SURVIVORS OF
VILNA DISTRICT BEGIN
COMING FROM HIDING
Moscow (JTA)Although vir-
tually no Jews were found in
Vilna and the surrounding town-
ships when the Red Army first
entered the region, hundreds of
Jews who formerly dwelt there
are beginning to return from the
forests in which they hid to es-
cape destruction by the Ger-
mans. These are mainly young*
able-bodied persons who fled to
the woods and poined partisan
bands. .
More than 1,000 persons have
already returned to the town of
Glubokovce in the Vilna district .
and reports reaching here ex- ;
press the hope that there may be i
others still in the forests. Most
of the Jews of Glubokoye were
massacred in 1941 and the others
were crowded into a ghetto
which was burned down by Elite
Guard troops.
RED CROSS PERMITTED
TO AID HUNGARY JEWS
TO SPEED EMIGRATION
Zurich (JTA)The Swiss radio
this week announced that repre-
sentatives of the International
Red Cross in Hungary have been
permitted to extend relief to
Jews there and to facilitate their
emigration from the country.
The Red Cross representatives
have been allowed to visit Jew-
ish homes and hospitals allocat-
ed to Jews, the announcement
said. They have also visited the
Jewish internment camps and ar-
ranged relief for the internees
there. __
MEXICO PLANS TO USE
"FREE PORT" FOR JEWS
Mexico City (JTA)The: Mex-
can government has officially
announced its intention to estab-
lish a 'free port" for Jewish ref-
ugees along the same lines as the
United States, provided that the
refugees will maintain them-
selves or will be maintained by
relief organizatitons.
Buy U. S. Stamps and Bonds.
had been in Axis concentration
camps in Italy. Others crossed
from France into Italy to escape
deportation by the Germans to
extermination camps in occupied
Poland.
The refugees arrived on an
army transport which they
boarded after medical inspection
at a camp near Naples, in the
liberated part of Italy. Six
nurses and ten enlisted men of
the Medical Corps accompanied
them.
Representatives of Jewish ref-
ugee relief organizations met the
arrivals together with represen-
tatives of the War Relocation
Authority which will administer
the Fort Ontario Camp. The
Jewish Welfare Board, it is un-
derstood, has arranged for the
establishment of a synagogue in
the camp and for the delivery
there of a Sefer Torah and Jew-
ish ritual articles.
The youngest resident of Fort
Ontario will be an infnt who
was born just before his mother
embarked in Italy. The age of
the oldest is 82, but the majority
of the refugees are above mili-
tary age. Included in the trans-
port were 435 men, 367 women,
152 children under fourteen
years of age, and 12 infants less
than one year old.
The War Relocation Authority
announced that no persons will
be permitted to visit Fort On-
tario for a period of three weeks,
except representatives of the
press and cooperating agencies.
Relatives in the United States
will be permitted to write letters
as frequently as they wish. Mail
will no be censored.
At the request of the U. S.
Department of Interior, B'nai
B'rith has undertaken to equip
and furnish a number of hospit-
ality houses, nursery and arts
and crafts facilities at the Emer-
gency Shelter. This Shelter, bet-
ter is better known as the first
"free port." The refugees who
have arrived at Oswego, found
that the National War Service
Fund of B'nai B'rith had made
available to them the equipment
of a large community house (120
ft. by 60 ft.), four hospitality
houses, comprising 12 rooms of
substantial dimensions, a nur-
sery for children and two arts
and crafts rooms for vocational
and therapeutic purposes.
Lisbon (JTA)A group of 202
Jews who have been interned in
German concentration camps, ar-
rived here this week to be ex-
changed for Germans held by
Briitan. The arrivals were held
by the Germans in the Vittel
camp in France.
!
I
11 .





PAGE TWO
+Jewist Flcridian
FRIDAY, AUGUST
BIRTHS
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Lavine.
435 S. W. 30th Rd., announce the
birth of a daughter on August 4.
BRISM
Rabbi S. M. Machtei officiated
this week at the brisim of the
sons of Mr. and Mrs. Edward
Cantor, Sgt. and Mrs. Bernard
(8, Mr. and Mrs. Isadore
Sehicnhoft, Sgt. and Mrs. Hairy
Gelensky, and Mr. and Mrs. Al-
ien Fagen.
Word has been received here
el the bilth of a seven-pound
boy on August 2nd to Mrs. Ruth
Schindler, in New York. Mrs.
Schindler is the widow of the
late Lt. Roland Schindler, who
was killed in the explosion of
July 17th, at Port Chicago, Cal.
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Schindler,
1425 Meridian Avenue, accom-
panied by their son, Irvin. are in
New York with their daughter-
in-law.
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Schemer
have just returned from a two
week's vacation in New York
and Washington. While in Wash-
ington they visited with Mr.
Schemer's brother-in-law and
sister, Mr. and Mrs. Irvin L.
Siegal.
UNVEILING
The unveiling of a memorial
to the memory of the late Sidney
Rauzin will take place Sunday.
August 20th.
U. 1944
BARNEY ROSS JOINS JEWISH WARVETs"
WEDDINGS
Mrs. Lottie Gershon announces
the marriage <>f her (laughter.
Janie, to Kalman Rosen, u. S.
Navy, son of Mr. and Mrs. Sol
Rosen, Bronx, New York. The
cen tnony took place Tue
August 1st at the home oi the
bride's sister, Mrs. George J-
Rachlin, 1517 S. W. 17th Street.
Rabbi Max Shapiro officiated at
!ihe double rmg ceremony. A
reception followed attended by
relatives and friends. The cou-
ple arc now making their home
Ul Miami Beach.
*? W
Miss Roslyn Rabin has as her I
house guest her cousin. Miss!
Phyllis Rokuson oK New York |
City. She will remain through
this month.
Mrs. Milton Wolf has left for
New York where she will be with
Mr. Wolf at the Waldorf-Astoria.
Returning, they will be at the
Versailles hotel.
HARRIET CHIEL
Mr. and Mrs. Abe Chiel, 345
Meridian Ave.. this week an-
nounced the engagement of their
daughter Harriet to S 2'c Bern-
ard Kaplan, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Max Kaplan of Brooklyn, N. Y.
Miss Chiel attended local schools
and is at present a member of
the staff of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. The groom-
to-be is attached to the Seabees
and is stationed in Rhode Island.
Seaman Kaplan is a former stu-
dent of Brooklyn College. No
date has been set for the wed-
ding.
Mr. and Mrs. Leo Chaikin re-
turned to the city after a two
week's trip in Wisconsin and Il-
linois.
Dr. Theodore M. Bcrman of
Miami Beach returned this week |
from a month's trip to Califor-
nia, where he visited in San j
Francisco and Sacramento.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Zuckcr-
nick and son Michael returned
to the city Monday from a trip
to New York.
Dr. and Mrs. Z. I. Sabshin have
returned to their Miami Beach
home, 3760 Royal Palm Ave..
from a trip to New York.
Dr. H. A. Leavitt is on vaca-
tion and i> visiting relatives in
Lancaster, Ohm. From there he
will go to Hammond, 111., be-
fore returning to Miami about
September 1.
LINCOLN
Open
Daily 1:45
Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach
Ml A U Open Daily
I A In I 11:15 A. M.
Downtown Miami
capitol ass-a
Downtown. N. Miami at 3rd
NOW SHOWING!
Fit Thru Mon., Aug. 11-14
Damsels and Dances .
Music and Mirth .
In One Gay Packaqe
of Romantic Fun!
"SENSATIONS
OF 1945"
WITH
ELEANOR
POWELL
Dennis O'Keefe
W. C. FIELDS
SOPHIE TUCKER
DAVID LICHINE
WITH
Woody Herman
Cab Calloway
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Hertzman.
730 10th St.. Miami Beach, have
announced the engagement of
their daughter, Miss Phyllis
Hertzman, to Lieut. Howard
Learner, USAAF, son of Mrs.
Elizabeth W. Lerner, Los An-
geles.
The bride, a graduate of Mi-
ami Senior High school, will be
attended by her sister, Miss
Ruth Hertzman.
Lieut. Learner was graduat-
ed from officers' candidate
school, Miami Beach, two years
ago and has been stationed in
Panama.
After their marriage the cou-
ple will make their home in San
Bernardino. Calif.
Mrs. Theodore D. Firestone has
left to visit her daughter. Mrs.
Donald Smith and grandson at
Akron, Ohio. Mrs. Firestone
will also visit in Cleveland.
Mrs. Sam B. Miller, 918 S. W.
4th St., left Thursday for a six
week's trip to New York and
Connecticut. She will visit rel-
atives and friends and return
I with her daughter, who is now
! in New York. Mrs. Miller is
president of the Bnai B'rith La-
dies Auxiliary-
Mrs. Robert Miller and family
; left this week by plane for Texas
to join her husband who is sta-
tioned there.
A. P. Gannes, director of the
Bureau of Jewish Education, re-
turned here this week following
a trip to New York.
Dr. B. H. Sadowsky, 3445 Roy-
al Palm Ave., Miami Beach, is
visiting in New York.
Miss Sue Moss, secretary of the
Miami Beach YM & WHA, is
spending two weeks m New York
visiting relatives and friends.
Mr. and Mrs. N. Adelman had
as their guest* for the week-end
their niece and nephew, Sgt. and
Mrs. Harry Rimsky. Sgt. Rim-
sky is stationed in Orlando. Fla.
Rabbi and Mrs. Irving Lehr-
man and family will return to
the city after a two month's stay
in New York. Rabbi Lehrman
i- spiritual leader of the Miami
Beach Jewish Center.
And Their Bands
FLORIDA
CONGREGATION
HAS NEED OF
CANTOR
for High Holidays
Write or Wire
MR. J. LEONIDOFF
c o Jewish Floridian
21 S. W. 2nd Avenue
Miami
HEADACHE 1
IS SUCH A
BIG
UTTISTHMO I
TUami
for Rest
CONVALESCENC!
o^ChronicCases
*WSun-RqyPark
/HealthResort
Mount Sinai Memorial Park
"Owned and Operated by
Greater Miami Jewish Cemetery Ass'n
A COMMUNITY CEMETERY
Affiliated Congregations: Beth David, Beth Jacob, Miami
Jewish Orthodox, Schaarei Zedek and Sisterhood
Chesed Shel Ernes
ALL SET for a good full day'a
work when a nagging head-
ache sneaks up on you. You suffer
and so does your work.
* Beady for an evening of relax-
ation and enjoymenta peaky
headache interfere* with your fun,
feat, enjoyment or relaxation.
DR. MILES
Anti-Pain Pills
usually relieve not only Hea4-
eke. but Simple Neuralgia. Mut
L9Ll&.^L?& You can
*t Dr. Mile* Anti-Pain Pilla at
your drug .tore in the regular
Ps*ksge for only a penny apiece
and In the economy package even
cheaper. Why not get a paekage
Bead directions and use only aa
SID PALMER'S FUNERAL HOME
"SERVING THE JEWISH COMMUNITY"
PHONE 9-2664 "A friend in need- ^^ w HAGLER
SCT. BARNEY ROSS, FORMER WORLD'S CHAMPION PRIZF
FIGHTER WHO WAS ONE OF THE HEROES OF GUADALCANAL
JOINS JEWISH WAR VETERANS OF.U. S. FOLLOWINC HBDI&
CHARGE FROM MARINES:Rom (center), who it credited *iih
netting Iwentj-two Jape while defending three wounded comrade*, it
fthown with Murrey Pre** (left), NalionalRecruiting Officer, nd Archil
H. Grccnberf (right), National Commander of the J. W. V. .
Mrs. Maurice Grossman wifll
leave August 15th to spend sev-l
eral weeks in New York.
Mr. and Mrs. Max Mintzer re-
turned to the city this week af-
ter a northern trip that took
them to New York and Canada.
Their daughter Ethel spent part
of the time with them.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Belan-
off and Mr. and Mrs. Dave Cash-
van are now residing at their
new home, 845 S. W. 13th Court.
Joe Gottesman, a member of
the staff of Warner Bros, motion
picture producers, is spending
two weeks here with his father,
Alfred Gottesman. He is a guest
at the Breakers Hotel, Miami
Beach.
Dr. and Mrs. Bernard S. Klein-
man, 441 Washington Ave., are
leaving Miami Beach on August
10 for Alexandria, Louisiana, to
visit their children, Captain and
Mrs. Samuel B. Kleinman. and
their granddaugiiter, Sara Louise.
They expect to return on Labor
Day.
Louis Heiman and son Eugene
are now at home after a short
stay in New York. Mrs. Heiman
and daughter Mickey are spend-
ing some time in Fleischman's,
New York.
Mrs. Max Halpern is spending
some time in Hendersonville.
Herman Wall is spending al
week in this city and will returnl
to Carolina to join his family.
Abe Chiel has been confined!
to his home, where he is recup-l
erating from a recent illness.
A. Glazeroff, 340 S. W. 6thI
Ave., left this week for the north.!
He will be gone about two|
months.
United States War Bonds
still the best investment.
Mr. and Mrs. Al Zalka have
just returned to this city after a
lour weeks vacation in Wayncs-
villc and Brevard, N. C. At
Brevard they visited with their
daughter, Sheila, who is at
Eagle's Nest Camp for the sum- '
mer.
Bruce, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Philip Steii, 531 15th St.. left
this week for Georgia Military
Academy, where he enrolled as
'i student.
Mom* *>tUt
Your Complete Department
Store With Quality
Merchandise
Washington Aye. at 13th St.
Miami Beach
And for your convenience
Morris Brother's New Ap-
parel and Accessory Store
70 E. Flagler St.. Miami
TAVERN DRY
CLEANER re-
moves spots; easy
to use. Two-gallon
can $1.29
"NOX-ODOR" ab-
sorbs objection-
a b 1 e refrigerator
odors. Helps food
retain flavor. 50c
MIAMI BTORB
HOUSE KI'KMSIIINGS
KII-'TII I LOOR
MOUNT NEBO
THE CEMETERY OF DISTINCTION
FOR DISCRIMINATING FAMILIES
Rabbi S. M. Machtei. Director
Olympic: Building Phone 3-3720
OLD SARATOGA INN
Biscayno Boulevard at 77th Street Phon# \V\
Week Day Dinners 5 to 10 P. M_____Sunday. From Noon
Cocktail Lounge.....Fine Liquors and Wine
WE ARE CLOSED ON WEDNESDAYS
TAKE BUS 11 FROM DOWHTOWM MIAMI. OR
BUS M-71 FROM MIAMI BEACH


FRIDAY.
AUGUST 11. 1944
vJenisirkridfor)
PAGE THREE
Th,, -fcblishment of the Cen-
?^a.-.n Index, Inc.. as a
tral U*a ,, w|,ich seven
Si,"known organization!
na Sk to locate Persons dis-
W,'ld by war a,ul whose where-
K are unknown, was an-
,b,n^d her- today by Moses
FSSittTpmideni of the new-
created agency. The seven
JS.tion.< which have com-
bined to establish this cooper-
ative service an
The American Committali for
ChnshanRofu^sJnc ^Cen-
tre St.. New \<>ik 13, N. Y..
American Friends Service Com-
gS 20 South 12th St., Phil-
Slphia 7. Pa,: The American
Jewish Joint Distribution Com-
;,,,' inc. 270 Madison Ave.,
fiYork 16: Hebrew Shelter-
mgand Immigrant Aid Society,
425 Latoyette St., New York 3.
u Y International Migration
Service 122 East 22nd St.. New
York 10 N Y : National Council
of Jewish Women, 181 Broad-
way, New York 23. N. Y.; Na-
tional Refugee Service, Inc., 1W
Centre St.. New Wk 13. N. Y.
Mr. Leavitt stated that the
Central Location Index, which
will be housed in New York City
will serve as a channel for clear- '
ante of the names of hundreds ,
of thousands of persons who are
DOW being sought by relatives
and friends in this country. The
Index, Mr. Leavittt emphasized
will not deal directly with indi-
vidual applicants. Persons de-
siring to apply for location ser-
vice can do so through member
agencies or their affiliated and
cooperating organizations thru-
out the united States if they
have not previously done
The member agencies in turn
will register the names with
the Central Location Index for
clearance, after which the exten-
sive overseas facilities of the
member agencies, of the Interna-
tional Red Cross and of public
and semi-public bodies, will be
enlisted in the location of dis-
placed people as rapidly as
changing conditions permit.
TO REMOVE RESTRICTIONS
ON INDUCTION ON SEPT. 1
Brigadier General Vivian Col-
lins, Florida State Director of
Selective Service, has announced
that, effective September 1, 1944,
the restriction against induction
of registrants in the age group
twenty-six through thirty-seven
will be removed and that all
registrants classified to 1-A will
thereafter be called for induction
in sequence of order number.
Keep on buying War Bonds.
Excellent and growing Florida
Community has position and
good future for Schoched who
who can operate Butcher Shop
and Delicatessen.
Reply, M. GREEN, BOX 2973, MIAM118, FLORIDA
SERVE II HOSPITAL
COMMITTEE PUN
INCLUDES PARTY
Serve A Hospital committee \
announces ;i community wide
card parly with Mrs! Elsie
Siiackman, general chairman, to
be held at the Beach Y Monday.
August 14th at 2 p. m. Pro-
ceeds will help buy materials
needed by the Serve-a-Hospital
committee of Greater Miami.
This committee is sponsored by
the Greater Miami Army and
Navy Committee of the National
Jewish Welfare Board, and is a
voluntary one, supported by
Jewish women's groups in this
area
All articles made by the Serve-
a-hospital committee are sent as
Kiits to government general hos-
pitals. The women are now sew-
ing "solitaire" pillow cases,
which by an ingenious use of
tape enable bed-ridden patients
to play solitaire, and kits espe-
cially constructed to hold toilet
articles, cigarettes, etc., within
the patient's reach.
Assisting Mrs. Shackman will
be Mrs. Sidney Stepkin. Mrs.
Jack August, Mrs. N. B. Jacobs,
Mrs. H. A. Kauflman, Mrs. Hen-
ry Seitlin, Mrs. Joseph Arkin,
and Mrs. Gertrude Lachs.
A very pleasant afternoon has
been planned. Tickets are 75c
and include refreshments and
door prizes. Tickets may be
obtained from Mrs. Sidney Step-
kin, 4-4126. or Mrs. Jack August,
5-0947 for tickets.
Cairo (JTA)Jews in the Do-
decanese Islands off the coast of
Turkey, have been placed in
camps and many have been de-
ported, the underground Greek
radio reported this week. Jews
on Rhodes, the largest of the isl-
ands, which are populated by
Greeks, have been confined in
concentration camps.
IBHZSSW.V.W
9
ON SEPTEMBER 15,1944
YOUR FRIENDS WILL
BE LOOKING
FOR YOUR NAME
in the
ThdlexwiklbJEIIiDiRidliiquR
Gyn&n^* .HE )[W I S^^^jG
\ c*r,l THE JEWISH WEEKLY
JUST SAY
HAPPY NEW YEAR
A New Year Greeting in The
Rosh Hashonah Issue of The
Jewish Floridian is the Popular
and Accepted Way of Person-
ally Greeting Your Relatives
and Friends on the Occasion
of New Year
LEAST TROUBLE MAXIMUM COVERAGE
MINIMUM EXPENSE
mLCOMD TO U. 5. WITH BOND AND BOUQUET
Happy smile, gay bouquet, and United States War Bondthat'* the
way Mote* Scherzer, a refugee here since 1939, greeted his wife,
Sablna, on her arrival recently in Philadelphia. Scherzer, who haa been
aided by the National Refugee Service, had no idea that hie wife was
on her way to this country until a friendly FBI agent brought him the
Joyful news. They are pictured outside their Brooklyn, N. Y., home.
PALESTINE WILL NOT
GIVE VISAS TO BODY
OF JEWISH DELEGATES
rectly connected with the war
effort, and, therefore, would not
issue visas to its members, but
would attempt to supply them
wih necessary reportts.
Jerusalem (JTA)The Pahs-
tine government admitted this
week that it has refused to grant ,
visas to an American Jewish eco- j
nomic commission which desires
to visit Palestine to make an eco-
nomic survey of the country in
connection with post-war immi-
gration and settlement possibili-
ties.
Chief Secretary G. V. Shaw
told a press conference that the
government had decided that the
commission's work was not di-
IT PAYS TO BUY AT
WvStmi
LUGGAGE SHOP
PHQNE 3-2603
Ask Your Local
Delicatessen
For the Beet
e
It Costs No More
OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE IN FLORIDA
KOSHER ZION
SAUSAGE CO. PRODUCTS
Delicioui Corned Beer
Pickled, Cookad and Smoked Meats
37th and Normal Ave. Chloaae
PALM BEACH NOTES
MBS. MARY 8CHREBNICX BapreeepWrtvo
Beth Israel Sisterhood spon-, Mr. and Mrs. L. Goldstein left
sored a card party Wednesday Sunday on a business trip, and
night at Schwartzberg Hall. will visit relatives and friends
______ in New York.
Members and friends of Beth
El Congregation attended ser-
vices Friday night together with
Spars and men in service. A
social hour followed with Mrs.
Ann Moss as hostess. She was
assisted by her daughters. Rosa-
lyn and Doris.
The names of Irving Kappner
and Mr. Tisnauer who assisted
the chairman, Harry Halpern,
for the Hillel fund were omitted
from the.news items last week.
A Word of Thanks
I want to express my heart-
felt appreciation to the presi-
dent of Beth El Congregation.
Mr. Glasser, and to the various
men who took part at the memo-
rial Yahrzeit service for my fath-
er. I also wish to thank our
loyal friend. Mr. A. Levin, for
conducting the service and recit-
ing the Kaddish, which I was un-
[ able to attend, being in service
! in Italy.
Pfc. Joseph Schrebnick.
Drink
COCA
COLA
Coca Cola Bottling
Company
of
West Palm Beach
Florida
SOUTHERN DAIRIES
Dairies
County.
leathern
lea
MM NSA1 TO TOO AS TOU1 PHOHZ
FERGUSON FUNERAL HOME, Inc.
1201 South Olive Avenue
WEST PALM BEACH
PHONE 5172










PAGE FOUR
rjewlsli nprMtofJ
The Jewish Floridi
lan
it and Main Offices, 21 S. W. Second Avenue, Miami, Fla.
). Box 2973_____________________________Phone 2-1141
ered as Second Class Matter July 4, 1930 at the Post Office
of Miami, Florida, under the Act of March 3, 1879
FRED K. SHOCHET, Managing Editor
Subscription1 Year, $2.00 Six Months, $1.00
MIAMI 18, FLORIDA. FRIDAY, AUGUST 11, 1944
Ab 19, 5704
VOLUME 17 NUMBER 32
FRIDAY, AUGUST H
THANK AND BE THANKFUL
The Fort Ontario "free port" or, more correctly speaking,
the Emergency Shelter Camp, is an established fact now.
The thousand refugees selected from various concentration
camps are now ensconced in America on a site of some eighty
acres in the town of Oswego, New York.
That the United States Government should provide refuge
for this number of refugees is not a thing about which we can
justly make any great fuss about. The governments of such
small countries as Sweden and Switzerland are taking care of
many times this number of refugees. To be sure, many thou-
sands of other refugees have come to the United States, but
they have had to make their own way. They have not been
wards of our government.
But let us be thankful for small things.
These new coming residents to America are very thankful.
Newspaper reports tell us that their hearts almost broke with
joy upon their arrival. We can understand their feeling. Ev-
ery one of them in the last half dozen years has lived through
a life time, had experienced more agony than is the portion of
people's life times. Every one of them could fill a book with
their stories.
We have done something for them for which they are thank-
ful, but in another sense, we must be thankful to them. We
must be thankful for the fact that to us was given, in at least a
small measure, a chance to bring a little happiness to a thou-
sand people who suffered for no sin of their own.
To us, they are further a symbol of what this war is all
about. When we see them, when we contemplate their fate,
we can understand better what the war is being fought for
and so we can dedicate ourselves more completely to fur-
nishing the task of beating the enemy, which we are now en-
gaged in.
SAPERSTEIN IS NAMED
CIVIL SERVICE OFFICER
Albert H. Sapcrstcin, acting
personnel administrator and sec-
retary of the Civil Service board
for the city of Miami Beach, has
been elected third vice presi-
dent of the Florida Association
of Civil Service and Personnel
Agencies.
A native of Detroit, Sapcr-
stcin 'is a graduate of the Uni-
versity of Michigan, with A. B.
and LI. B. degrees. He also has
taken courses in the University
of Florida and the University of
Miami. He practiced law in De-
troit before coming to Miami
Beach in 1939.
He will serve as chairman on
arrangements and host for the
Miami Beach convention of the
organization.
NAME CHAIRMAN FOR
JEWISH BOOK MONTH
The appointment of Abraham
H. Cohen as chairman of the
Jewish Book Month Committee
has been announced by Dr. Mor-
decai Soltes, president of the
Jewish Book Council of Ameri-
ca, of which the National Jew-
ish Welfare Board is sponsor-co-
ordinator. Jewish Book Month
will take place from November
10 to December 10, 1944 with the
concluding seven days to be ob-
served as Jewish Book Week.
Dr. Soltes said.
The Jewish Book Month Com-
mittee of the Council will ini-
tiate a program of special activi-
ties and projects for the nation-
wide observance of Jewish Book
Month.
-TIDBITS FROM EVER
Mudfy Confidential
-By PHINEAS I. BIRON-
NAMES OF JEWS FROM
ITALY ARE RELEASED
"The American people do not glorify war. We do not em-
brace it as a way of life. But if our freedom is threatened we
will fight hard and gloriously and with all our resources for
its preservation.
"In this hour of war it is highly fitting that we look ahead to
the days of peace and to ways and means of insuring against
the outbreak of another world catastrophe."Secretary of State
Cordell Hull.
A guarantee against future wars is a better understanding
among nations. The unhindered interchange of independent
news can beget such understanding.
"Therefore, we declare for peace treaty provisions proclaim-
ing the world-wide right of all men to get, send and publish the
news for the information of the public, without interference by
governments and at uniform communications rates In our
country we insist that censorship shall end when the war ends."
Kent Cooper, Executive Director of the Associated Press.
LETS LOCK THE BARN DOOR NOW!!
Names of 573 Jewish men, wo-
men and children, members of
300 families, who have reached
Palestine from Southern Italy,
were announced today by the
Joint Districution Committee.
The list was forwarded from Je-
rusalem and is on file at The
Jewish Floridian office. Includ-
ed are the names of members of
many families who fled to Italy
before 1940 when the Nazi
hordes overran Europe. Their
refuge became untenable when
Italy entered the war and the
Germans took over the penin-
sula. Thereafter most of them
were incarcerated in the intern-
ment camps at Bari and Ferra-
monti in Southern Italy.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
TAKE ON NEW PROJECT
The women's group of Sholem
Lodge B'nai B'nth have enlarged
their war activities to include
the making of solitaire pillows
and bedside kits for the men on
hospital ships.
They have also established a
cookie jar project through Spe-
cial Services, furnishing cookies
for the men of Redistribution
Center No. 2. Mrs. Benjamin
Landau is in charge.
A study gtoup recently formed
under the auspices of the Anti-
Defamation League has been
well attended, with Alex Miller
and George Talianoff conducting
the interesting classes. Members
are urged to join by contacting
Mrs Dorothy Beienstein or the
ADL office.
B. B. GIRLS OF BEACH
HAVE ELECTION AUG. 3
n B'laiu ?lrith. Girls of Miami
Beach held their election of of-
ficers for the following season
on August 3rd. Chosen were:
President. Fuzzy Port; vice-pres-
ident, Vivian Schaeffer; second
vice-president, Doris Weitzman;
delegates Toby Fishman and
Mickey Dubrin; recording secre-
tary, Toby Fishman; correspond-
ing secretary, Barbara Frumkes-
treasurer Mickey Dubrin; de-
fense chairman, Harriet Feif
religious chairman, Beverly
Oreen; publicity chairman, Rita
vlluL Go,ldftfln: editor, Lillian
nth^i-ahetlc chairman. Dor-
othy Michelson; historian, Glo-
ria Mantell; and sergeant-at-
arms, Adele Lifter.
*** From Freeh Oranges
YOU SHOULD KNOW____
The Fascist elements among Hungarian-Americans
thoroughly exposed within the next six weeks as
quiet investigations The finds will also show other?* !
language groups involved in an astoundng anti-Sem' b*
.... Helen Gahagan, wife of screen star Capt. Melvyn Da Sl!
and in her own right an actress, singer and Califo
gressional candidate, became active in political aff
a concert tour through Central Europe in which she
bidden to sing songs by Jewish composers and witnessed ft!
social ostracism to which her Jewish accompanist wa
jected .... After this experience she canceled her outstartd^
European contracts and determined to do all in her no .
prevent similar conditions from arising in this country *'to
Father Ford, of the Corpus Christi Catholic Church, will bop" hi
the recipient of a great and well-deserved honor from an
expected quarter Ford is a Roman Catholic priest who hw
given much time to a study of the Jewish question
FROM THE FIGHTING FRONTS.... j
Privates Michael De Luise and Anthony Aquilana, with
our fighting forces in Italy, are most popular with the Jewish
boys of their division because of the drastic lesson they taught
to one of the boys who in his relations with his Jewish fellow
soldiers proved that he didn't know what we are fighting lor
. .From a lettter written by Private Michael J. Higgins, Jr.,
shortly before his death in action, to columnist Ed Sullivan:
"Once at a field mass I saw a Jewish friend of mine kneeling
in the mud .... Afterward I remarked casually to him of my I
astonishment .... His answer was: 'Mike, what kind oi re-
ligious services you go to over here don't count___What does
count is, if I get it next, the Boss will know that I tried "*...,
READER'S GUIDE....
We do hope that the Warsaw Ghetto Diary now running
serially in the Yiddish daily The Jewish Morning Journal will
be published in English some time soon .... The author is a
nineteen-year-old American Jewish girl who lived in Warsaw
from the first day of the war through the beginning of 1944....
Finally she reached these shores on the Gripsholm, in exchange
for five important Nazi prisoners .... Her diary reveals some
amazing facts about the underground heroes of the ghetto...
Bertram Bloch, story editor of Twentieth Century-Fox, has pre-
pared a plan which will give twenty-five fellowships, each with
a 51,500 grant, to would-be writers in our armed forces, to help
them tell their stories for possible publication and filming ...
Frederick Wakeman's successful "Shore Leave" is the result of
such a fellowship .... Some of the book reviewers have point-
ed out, in Dimitri Marianoff's book on Einstein, an unfortunate |
passage containing an anti-Semitic implication .... Marianoit
Einstein's son-in-law, is a lovable fellow .... A Jew himself
and a man of honor, he is incapable of anti-Jewish thinking
.... The wording of the passage must be due to Marianoff's
faulty English .... What promises to be a most interesting bio-
graphy of an artistic institution has been written by Harold
Clurman on the Group Theatre .... Clurman, who was one of
the founders of the Group, calls his book "The Fervent Years"
.... Prof. Lowdermilk's "Palestine, Land of Promise'' is now inI
its fifth printing It's British, Hebrew and Yiddish editions |
are doing equally well ....
STRAWS IN THE WIND____
At a recent auction sale held at Stockholm a portrait of
Hitler was sold, frame and all, for the sum of one krona-two
bits to you .... On Broadway they're saying that housepainter
Hitler will soon be back on the scaffoldwith a rope around his
neck .... In England they've found an answer to the question
of where the Luftwaffe is: It's standing by to take Hitler out of
Germany------Then there's the story of the English prison camp j
where the Nazi prisoners used to watch the robot bombs streak |
across the sky and shout "Heil Hitler" after each one ,
Until one of the robots landed a few hundred yards away fc* I
the prison------Then the Nazis suddenly became very polij-
as they approached the camp commandant to ask for u
to another location ....
ABOUT PEOPLE....
Dr. Stephen S. Wise, who, we must remind you, is a sP
agenarian, jumped into the ice-cold waters of Lake Champ
the other day to rescue his grandson, who was having trouo
in an uncharted whirlpool .... Sam Behrman, one of ourw
Ixant playwrights, wUl be leaving soon for overseas on a sp |
mission .... Back in this country is songwriter Irving **
who was overseas with his show, "This Is the Jta>7 JJfJS
months, and got the thrills of his life watching our cornbaror
in Italy enjoy his catchy tunes_____The late Max W^JE,
holdings in Germany and Austria are evaluated at two"
dolors, yet his estate here is having difficulties JJJJ
Schwartz, dean of the Yiddsh theatre, vehemently oeja
report that ill health may force him to retire, and 825
that he'll be back on Second Avenue after giving ***.**:br
on the Coast-------Just announced is a new book mgfJJ
Martin Panzer, with the tentative title "How to Get a &
of Life"____


FRIDAY.
AUGUST 11. 1944
"Between You and Me"
By BORIS SMOLAR
Copyright, 1344, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.
Jewish fkrihui
PAGE FIVE
CAPITAL SPOTLIGHT
By MURIEL LEVIN
Copyrirtt, 1944. Jewish
telegraphic Agency. Inc.
THE ARAB-JEWISH FRONT: We don't know who's behind
the Council on Jewish-Arab Cooperation which was formed this
month in New York .... The name of the chairman, Seymour
Melman, means nothing to Jews in this country, nor do the
names of the other members of the Council .... But we see
that the group is a sort of branch of the League for Jewish-Rap-
pochement which the well-meaning H. M. Kavarisky of Pales-
tine organized years ago in Jerusalem .... We remember that
about four years ago certain leading Arabs in America met with
lews in New York in an attempt to form a body for Arab-Jewish
cooperation Nothing came of this attempt ... We do not
see the names of any Arabs on the list of members of the coun-
il which leads us to believe that for the time being the Council
is nothing but a one-sided meager affair------The Council holds
that it is possible to devlop in Palestine such economic and
political conditions as will permit cooperation between Jews and
Arabs there .... It leans heavily upon the program of Mr. Kal-
varisky's League for Jewish-Arab Rapprochment which advo-
cates the establishment of a bi-national order in Palestine on
the basis of non-domination of one nation by the other ....
Congressional circles believe that Congress may soon appeal
to Premier Churchil to disregard the White Paper and open
Palestine for Jewish immigration .... Such* an appeal may be
expected daily now that Congress has resumed its session ....
The American League for a Free Palestine, which is opposed
by all Zionist groups in this country, is going out of its way to
claim credit for the adoption by the Democratic convention of a
plank favoring a Jewish Commonwealth in Palestine .... This
claim amuses the Zionist leaders in New York as well as others
who know what actually transpired behind the scenes at the
Democratic convention ....

OVER THERE: Now that a good part of Poland has been
liberated by the Russian Army, the problem of reaching Jews
remaining there is attracting the attention of interested Jewish
groups in America .... Jewish organizations are also studying
the problem of restitution of Nazi-confiscated property to Jews
in Poland .... One of the most serious problems is the question
of Jewish communal property in the liberated part of Poland
___This property, which includes synagogue buildings, ceme-
tery plots, Jewish hospitals and other institutions, amounts to no
small sum .... A queston that arises is: who is to inherit the
Jewish communal wealth in towns where the Nazis have left no
Jews alive and where no Jewish communities will probably be
estabished for many years to come .... This is aside from the
property which the Germans looted and confiscated from in-
dividual Jews in Europe and which is estimated to amount to
more than fifteen billion dollars .... Many consignments of
Jewish religious supplies have reached overseas military bases
ior distribution among American Jewish servicemen during the
forthcoming High Holidays .... They include a million Rosh-
Hashanah greeting cards forwarded by the Jewish Welfare
Board to men in all branches of the armed forces .... Also
50,000 leaflets explaining the significance of Rosh-Hashanah
and Yom Kippur .... Also tens of thousands of prayer books,
200 Shofars made in Palestine, and ample stocks of prayer
shawls and skull caps ....
*
POST WAR PROJECTS: As the hour of Nazi defeat ap-
proaches, more and more important books appear in this coun-
try dealing with the problem of how to secure a world of per-
manent peace One of these books is Sumner Welles' "Time
ior Decision." published by Harper's, in which the former Assis-
tant Secretary of State deals also with the post-war status of
Palestine and urges the acceptance of a plan similar to the one
suggested by Dr. J. L. Magnes Another very important book
of the same type is Prof. James T. Shotwell's "The Great De-
cision," published by Macmillan .... Among other things, Prof.
Shotwell warns against Nationalism .... He discusses at great
leng.h the suggestion that a universal Bill of Rights be intro-
duced which would defend the rights of national minorities
He believes that the mere insertion of a formula in a con-
stitution is not enough, because the enforcement of the provision
the all-important thing ..... It is a sobering fact, he points
out, that some of the countries in which human rights have been
most violated have the best provisions in their constitutions
against such violations .... Freedom of the press and public
utterance are the best safeguards against such injustice, he
f erts .... At the same time, he urges the establsnment of a
World Institute of Jurisprudence composed of the most highly
qualified experts in law and government------His views are of
special interest to Jewish readers in view of the discussion now
going on among Jewish organizations in this country as to
whether the national minorty rights secured for Jews in European
countries through the League of Nations proved to be a failure,
ood whether these rights should not be covered by a universal
JJof Rights Prof. Shotwell also devotes much P"! "*
"X* to post-war relief activities in connection with the UNrlrm,
*a urges the establishment of a European council as a center
w all long-term economic reconstructon in war-torn countries.

r TURKISH MOTIFS: Turkey's breaking off relations with
Jnany will have an effect on Palestine .We hear from
*m e sources that Turkey may be given a chance to wieia
considerable influence in affairs of the Middle East as a result
* brek with Hitler ... In short, this should mean that the
*M of Palestine after the war may be determined by Britain,
2 HS States, Russia and Turkey .... It must not be forgot
^[Palestine and Syria were part of Turkey pnor to World
FZ bef0re il to* a great section d its territory to Bntain and
oXV '''l! dubtful whether Turkey will make <**"
b?J?y f territories now. though portly before Ae out
J* Of this war the Tttkish Government claimed and re-
** a port in Syria_____
Our Film Folk
By HELEN ZIGMOND


Two recent events, one of na-
tional, the other of international
significance, reinforce the old
lesson that religion is one of the
most dangerous elements to mix
with politics.
In New York, Representative
Hamilton Fish, campaigning for
releetion, won repudiation for
himself from the previous and
the president candidates for
president of his own party, when
he singled out the Jews for pol-
itical attack. What Fish tried
to do was create the impression
that Jews voted as a block and
for one political party mainly.
His endeavor was to channel all
the resentment against the ad-
ministration into hatred of the
Jews who, he implied, for rea-
sons of their own were its chief
supporters.
This is the old pre-Nazi trick
in new dress. Find an issue or
a party against which there is
resentment. Then identify the
Jews with it. Fortunately the
reply to this shocking maneuver
was to elicit a prompt counter-
blast from the head of Fish's own
party, calling it "disgraceful and
un-American." The national as-
pect of such campaigning was
emphasized in editorial comment
like that of the Washington Post
which said that "Mr. Fish has
ceased to be merely irrespon-
sible. He is a national disgrace."
The Fish episode constitutes
large handwriting, in fiery let-
ters, on the political wall which
everyone in America must look
at, that there are elements ready
to create political anti-Semitism,
of the Hitler variety, in the Un-
ited States. It reinforces the fact,
long known to students of inter-
national forces of our time, that
fascism and reaction on the one
hand, and anti-Semitism on the
other, are inseparable. It sug-
gests forcibly, once again, that
the fate of the Jews is inescap-
ably tied to the forces of progress
and of liberalism.
The same conclusion is to be
derived from another episode in-
volving a different religion. This
second episode is reported from
Argentina, where the Farrell
governing clique, having created
a Sduth American version of
Nazism, has succeeded in draw-
ing on their administration an
unprecedentedly sharp rebuke
from Secretary of State Cordell
Hull. Isolated as Argentina now
is in this hemisphere, it is per-
sistently seeking to rally behind
its totalitarian scheme various or-
ganized groups. A recent dis-
patch to the New York Herald-
Tribune tells how a number of
Catholic organizations have ral-
lied to the support of the Farrell
regime and are trying to bring
the Argentine Church into line
soldily backing that administra-
tion. .
Here religion is being used
overtly for purely political pur-
poses. In fact, in the dispatch
referred to, the dean of a Buenos
Aires Catholic seminary is quo-
ted as having said:
"We do not want elections. We
want government."
Only one kind of government
gets into power and stays in
power without elections. That
kind of government is totalitar-
ian. It is the kind of government
Argentina now enjoys, with its
concomitants of state religion,
suppression of free speech and
press, concentration camps for
political opponents, police-toler-
ated violence against critics and
dissentersin short, government
on the streamlined Hitler-Mus-
solini model. ..
Both the Fish episode in the
United States, and the attempt
to rally the Catholic Church as
an organized body behindI the
Farrell regime in Argentina,
carry obvious warnings on their
face Religion and politics are
a highly dangerous and explosive
compound, when mixed._______
Copyright, 1944, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc.
Human interest story: When
Paul Tarshish, 75, passed away
this week, Mary Pickford lost her
'Vathdr." Miss Pickford is a
Trustee of the Jewish Home for
the Aged, where Tarshish, a
great Talmudic scholar, was a
resident. Mary lost her own
father when she was four .
was attracted to this old man .
"adopted" him always called
him "Papa." Her last affection-
ate gesture was delivering the
speech of eulogy at his funeral.
Did you hear that break in a
Winchellian newscast recently?
He was talking about "Goyes-
cas," explaining that the Spanish
film was made with Nazi money
for Nazi profits, and was about
to reveal the name of the Hol-
lywood distributing agent (RKO)
when the sound transmitter blur-
red him right off the air.

As the Allies move into the in-
terior of Europe many of the
one-time famous stars will sud-
denly find themselves declasse.
Public opinion, completely muz-
zled during Nazi control, is be-
ginning to throw off its restraints.
In Rome recently public demon-
strations forced the cancellation
of Gigli's concert. The people
will have none of these artistic
Quislings. It won't be long be-
fore Chevalier, Sascha Guitry
and other Goebbel goyerboys
will be relegated to the has-
beens. Case of the death sen-
tence pronounced on Danielle
Darrieux by the French under-
ground is a sample of the seeth-
ing anti-Nazi torrent surging be-
neath the surface.

Twenty-year-old Leonard Sues,
who has played both stage and
screen roles, returns to his other
professionmusic. He's a trump-
eter has just signed as the
orchestra leader for Eddie Can-
tor's air show.

Since the irrepressible G. B.
Shaw is figuring in the prints
again, permitting his 'Ceasar and
Cleopatra" to go before the
kliegs, our own local Caesar
(Arthur, the scribe) is reminded
of the time when Shaw invited
him to his home. Arthur arrived
a bit flustered. Shaw gave him
one long look, then said, "Please
walk around for a few minutes
and then come back. I want to
get used to your face!"
In Portugal Nazi officals are
holding up shipments of Ameri-
can films en route to Switzerland
be refusing transit permits
through occupied France. Ger-
mans are particularly anxious to
prevent the Swiss from seeing
American and British newsreels.
Invasion films do not flatter
the "wehrmacht." In retaliation
some Swiss houses are boycot-
ting German-made films.

Danny Kaye sustained such
severe injuries in a fall while
shooting scenes for 'The Wonder
Man" that he will have to walk
on crutches for several weeks,
necessitating cessation of the pic-
ture. Insider's info on the Kaye
succession to "Blue Ribbon
Town" replacing Groucho is that
the sponsor has an eye to tele-
visionand blonde hair is more
photogenic than a black cigar.

Though there have been pre-
monitory warnings, the Mervyn
LeRoys have finally split. She
was Doris Warner, daughter of
Harry. The LeRoys have been
married ten years have two
children.

Fanny Brice held an exhibit in
New York of her "Baby Snooks
Collection of Children's Art." It
is an assortment of water colors
and drawings of youngsters from
9 to 16 years of age.

Castings: George Cukor looks
like the favored candidate to di-
rect the forthcoming feature,
"Sarah Bernhardt." Paul Muni,
who not long ago had quit pic-
tures "forevah," has just finish-
ed a role in "A Song to Remem-
ber" and was signed for
"Counterattack" as his next.

Major David F. Silverstein,
former scenarist and more lately
attached to the Army Signal
Corps, died at the Halloran Gen-
eral Hospital. He has been award-
ed the Purple Heart.

Whoops! Scoops! George Jean
Nathan, from his lofty dramatic
pedestal, is condescending to
TALK about a writing contract
for flickers.

Arthur Kober's books, "Thun-
der Over the Bronx" and "My
Dear Bella" are set for a British
edition. Churchill should be get-
ting an accent, yet? *
BONDS and BOMBS
BRING
VICTORY
RELEASED BY THE ARMY
Now Open Year Around
RurieAa Hotel
GEM OF FLORIDA'S EAST COAST
Announces
NEW CABANA CLUB Open Nightly at
Swimming Pool and Tennis Court
Music Entertainment Recreation
Transportation Service for Guests
Station Wagon will meet your train and make trips
to the world's famous beach
Boat and Motor for Fishing and Pleasure
Write for Descriptive Literature and Summer Rates
Box 747, Daytoaa Beach. Fla.
HENRY H. HARDESTY. Mgr.
Notice Several Ftotel Positions Open Writel



<
' i



PAGE SIX
*Jenisli thrkHeun
FRIDAY, MJGUST n
AFTER 8 MOUTHS
Moscow (JTA)Ei>>ht Jewish
boys in.in Minsk, ranging in age
from eleven to fifteen, returned
' to that city this week after
spending nine months with a
partisan band in the neighboring
Forests. A report of their ex-
i ploits appeared in the Moscow
press.
The boys fled the ghetto about
I a year ago after they had seen
their parents and friends massa-
cred. Slipping past sentinels and
barbed wire, they reached the
i center of tin' city where they met
a friendly Byelorussian who di-
rected th< m to the woods where
: the guerrillas had their head-
quarters. After travelling for
three days, they finally met up
with a partisan sentry.
The boys perfi.nner various
t.isks (luring their slay with the
guerrillas. The younger ones
helped around the kitchen; the
older youths tended horses, act-
ed as stouts, and even participat-
ed in some forays against the
Germans.
OBITUARIES
SAFFER
Rev. Samuel David Saffer,
father of Harry Saffer of this
city, died August 6th in New
York. A learned scholar. Rev.
Saffer was a former Miami vis-
itor, and conducted a religious
articles business in New York.
He was considered an authority
on Torahs. Burial took place at
Mount Zion cemetery Monday.
Surviving are five sons in ad-
dition to Harry of Miami; Louis.
Charles, Jack and Al of New
York, and Murray of Los An-
geles, and three daughters, Syl-
via and Ida, of New York, and
Etta of Los Angeles. In addi-
tion, he left 19 grandchildren
and two great grandchildren.
Ill
in
LOEB
Mrs Barah Loeb, TO. 624 s. \V. uth
\v.-. "lied in ii local hospital Mrly
Saturday followlni a long lllnaaa,
She bad been a realdent for 2."> yearn,
coming here from itirmliiKhnm. Ala
She i~ .urvlved by her husband, Har-
ry; Ihii sons, Loull and Qaorg*., of
Miami Beach; two daughter., .Mis
William Kchneldman of Miami, ami
Mis Bern Ice Markowlta <>f New
v i s> .ami nine grandchildren. Ser-
vices in the chapel of the Oordon
Funeral home were held Monday un-
doi the direction of Rabbi Man Sha-
piro
Notice |g
undersigned,
hiislneu uml
KI.KAN'Olis
iraby ,
Dade County. fiort" -i ,- .
Bart u
I.EOX KAPLAN ftSSL
NOTICE is
JOSEPH |3 rb<*v'~.V!v*!N a
to the office of ti '.,."k" '}"
cult Court of Dad, ."} the Clr.
JOSEPH i: I ,,', .... I i:
BERTHA l.ll i v'wT,HA1-
I8IDOR SWEET
la.
In response to a plea from his son, Seaman Louis J. Gross,
serving "somewhere In the Southwest Pacific," for a Torah to be
used in religious services, William Gross, of 227 East 203rd
Street, the Bronx, (right above) presents a Torah to Rabbi
Nathan Witkin of the National Jewish Welfare Board. The
Torah is on its way, through regular Army channels, to Chaplain
Martin M. Weitz, whose jungle synagogue Is attended regularly
by Seaman Gross.
B'NAI B'RITH CANCELS services for father of
EVENTS FOR TRAINING george chertkof Friday
Champaign, 111.The first na-
tional Bnai Biiih Hillel Leader-
ship Training Institute, which
was to have been held al Camp
Onibar on Lake Como, Wayne
County, Ua., from September 1-
10, has been cancelled in com-
pliance with the request of the
Office of Defense Transportation
to make available all possible
transportation facilities for war
purposes, it was announced by
Dr. A. L. Sachar. national direc-
tor of the B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundation.
LOCAL PROMOTERS TO
PRESENT SPORTS CARD
The Weinberg twins. Phil and
Jerry, known throughout this
area for their sports activities,
have announced another popular
wrestling card for Monday night
at the Miami Field arena.
Featuring women wrestlers as
part of the attraction, the Wein-
bergs' sports presentations have
been will attended in previous
shows.
Services will be held Friday at
three o'clock al the Gordon Fun-
eral Chapel for Bernard Chert-
kof, 65. who passed away sud-
denly Thursday morning. Orig-
inally of Baltimore. Maryland,
he had been a resident here for
the past 19 years. He was a iv-
grocer.
Surviving him are his widow,
Ida, a son, George, Miami at-
torney, and a daughter. Mrs.
Frieda Levin of Miami Beach
Rabbi Max Shapiro will offici-
ate. Interment will ( in Wood-
lawn Park.
Cairo The pan-Arab
unity conference, which has been
scheduled and re-scheduled, and
delayed for more than a year, is
now slated to open in Alexan-
dria on September 25. it was of-
ficially announced here. Iraq,
which had been reported as un-
willing t,i attend, will be repre-
sented by its foreign minister.
ESSMAN
k Easnian, 4!'. of lit s \v ith
Ave., 'li.'.l ai hli home Saturday
following I In Iff Illness A Miami
i.s.i,mi for the naal two years*, he
came here from New York city. He
waa i member "f the Harvey Seeds
port, American Jeglon. In addition
I his widow, Tic is aurvlvad by
Karl,, and four brothera, laador,
Herman, Norman and Moe, all of
New Vork City. Funeral arrange-
II.nis were under the direction of
Coition I'nni-ial home.
ARBEITER RING HOLDS
SPECIAL MEET AUG. 2
QBOROB CHERTKOF
THAI.
IN THK COUNTY
IN AND FOR
Jl'DGE-fl
Florida. -,x' i'^VVrr"^^
taRE^o^|XnS ">* '
Having flai,s .),[ **
Saul Batati
Vou, ami
notified and
clalma ami
ach of
A BEST investmentA United
States War Bond. Buy often.
ARABS CONCERNED OVER
U. S. POLITICAL PARTIES
Cairo (JTAlLeading Arab
circles in Egypt are concerned
at the fact that both the Repub-
lican and the Democratic parties
in the United States have em-
pirically expressed themselves
In favor of the Zionist demands
for Palestine. The actions of the
American pahtical parties have
brutally blasted" Arab hopes,
-ays an article in the leading
Cairo newspaper.
RIVERSIDE
MEMORIAL CHAPEL
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
1236 Washington Iff* Mima Beach
In New York. 76th SL* Am*, it: mm A
5-7777
RIVERSIDE
AMBULANCE
SERVICE

1944 CA'tilLLAC AMBULANCE
1944 OXTGEN EQUIPMENT
On August 2nd a special meet-
ing was held at which four del-
egates were elected to attend the
25th Southeastern District Con-
ference. The conference will be
held in Birmingham, Ala. dur-
ing Labor Day week. Elected
are David Gross, Simon Kahn.
Joseph Pollock and Morris Ja-
cobs.
The meeting will be a jubilee
conference in celebration of the
Southeastern District organized I {*
twenty-five years ago. The Dis-
trict was organized to unify the
individual branches in the South
and also to help the branches
have a wider cultural field than
would be possible otherwise.!
Through the efforts of this or-
ganization many widely known
lecturers and singers have been
brought to the branches. In
many cities Jewish schools,
choirs and other cultural activi-
ties have been formed through
their help.
The Ladies Club, recently or-
ganized, at their last meeting,
Jacob H. Siegel as
attend the confer-
either of'you^mai
aaUU of yjOH.vaF UeT.NOLdS
' '"" Sea \,, rJr
!.;........"cut. to the II w l
Blanton. County Jud of ba
county, and file ,,
lie,- in ih,' i ..line. c. unk .... !
Dad. County, F!.,i, \7i,
calendar'months from hedausfib,
fifSt pul.....itlon hereof. Sd J*.
or demand! to contain u,.- ,
dreaa of the claim i .., '
worn to and........-. ..
"> aame will be baited <.. .. :"
IfOof u. IM3 !,.,. .
Date Aujrual i, a. i I'm
MAX Ft SILVER
Aa Ancillary Admin >r c
of tin- EaUte of John P R*yi
I CH| >l
MAX It SILVER
Attorney for Am
Admlnist
R/4 11-18-2.1


NOTICE
FOR
elected Mrs.
delegate to
ence.
Keep on buying War Bonds.
LEGAL NOTICES
l.J.A. FINDS BROUGHT THEM INTO THE HARBOR OF HOPE
Notice is hereby given that the
iiii'i,,-imi. a. dealrlna to engage In
buMtieiM undei the fictitious name "f
HTDALL FAINT DISTRIBUTING
CO at 103 Ml, st Miami Beach,
i-1' mi, la. intends to reglater .aid name
in the offfce of the clerk of the Clr-
ull Court of Dade County, Floi Ida
MORTON Rl'BENSTEIN,
LEON KAPLAN ** WMr
I .MUtS? I'.'l Appllc.nl
OF APPLICATION
TAX DEED
Chapter 20722 Acts of 194-
Pile A 8096
NOTICE IS HEREin (JIVEN that
Rae Socolof, holdei State u I
( ounty Tax Certlfii ti No m.
sued th<- 1st .1 ij ol June, A. I> INI
has fllad aame in mj office, and ha.
made application foi i tai deed to
issued thereon s\. tl Cartlflcau
embracei the folloulnR di
property In the Count) of Dade >-
of Vlorida. to-wit
B. :.n ft of N 7|
Block :. Para Villa
Sul,.. Fiat Booh
the County of Dad)
Florida
Tin aaaeaamenl <: >;,i.i proaenj
under the raid certlflcati was in the
name of: Rana Rhett
Unleaa aaid certlflcati ihall is) t-
deemed according t>. laa", tl-
erty therein deacrlbed ill be * the hlahaal bldd< i the '',,u:t
House BOor On the fii'! Mondai i
the month of September, 1944. which
is the 4th dav of Repti mber, I'll
I late.I this 26th t\n\ of July, 1*11.
K. I: LEATHERMAN
Clel k Of i I IJi I
I >.i le 'nunt>. Flo
By N (' stc rretl D C
'Cli.ult Court Seal)
~/n K/4-I1-U
I ft. '.f N|
Heigh!
'age !
Stat- of
NOITCE
FOR
Noti.e I- hereby nlven that the
underaigned, dealrlna .....ngage in
bualneaa under the fi,titi.,us name of
OI>OZNACER COMPANY, at
B. 1st Avenue, Miami. Florida,
t'i reglater said name ill the
or the Clark of the Circuit
of Dade Countv, Florida.
LEE OWEN
II J OWEN
KAPI.AN OWmn
Attorney for Applicant!
l-ll-ll-Zja/l
R21 N
intend
office
Court
LEON
NOTICE IH HEREBY lie uii.lersljtned arc i-nRaced In bus-
HJ"J uii.ler the fl.tltloiiM name of
01N* i/'r vl.'v-,' l:N"'KK '!" U'KHY
V ''AHIMKM. at MM Waahlnaton
Avenua. Miami Beach, Florida, and
i nteii.i t,, reglatar the said n.-titioua
.'""' .'" 'he office of the Clerk of
Florida <""U" "' n"'"' <',,un>'-
SAM BHRLICH
MURRAY OROBSMAN
GEORGE c.lKHTK..FS"" W,"'r"
T/^,.Wiy.,,!5,AwHc"1-
With the help of the agencies of the United
Jet.i.h Appeal for Refugees, Overaeai Needs and
Palestine, these refugees from war-torn Europe have
been brought to safety and freedom in Palestine.
i lirough the combined efforts of the Joint Distribu-
tion Commiitee and the United Palestine Appeal,
more than 8,500 reached the Jewish homeland \TSU
first half of 1944. Hundreds of others have been
brought to Canada and the United Slates. Those ar-
SerV"cehere "?*" *" *""" U,e **** "'*
i- i1!?** 1944. "onwid campaign of the United
Jewish Appeal for Refugees. Oversea. NeedVand RS
est.ne represents the Urgest combined tmmT^i.
.on. ever undertaken by American Jewt! To m
l,e.'!JI"i,e1 une*4d$ of.,u wnatituen' .Ancle.,h2
IOHKPhV PSSSB? (ilVKN ,h"1
H v J,:.,.J-,.K,!KNTnAI- BER-
KrVKNT"AL :""' I8IDOR
iI r ,i ''" 'K<"l in businetw un-
i-'o,;1::"1""1" norm*
;,1 m, '^ ,:" '--'7 M-rldlan Ave-
niia. Miami Beach, Florida, and in-
L m"1"";' -'"' """<'> name
n tl,- off ,.. of the Clark of the cir-
'OMBPH 1! LIKI-.KNTI IAL
BERTHA LIRRBNTHAL
IBIDOR SWEET
OBOBOE CHERTKOF wn"''
yV\3GUST BROS KV/
__ is thi at si i
OF APPLICATION
TAX DEED
Chapter 20722 Acts of !'
File A8207
NOTICE IS HERKBV GIVEN ttsl
Hen F and Mar> I> Ragsdllt SOB"
era of state and Count Ta* Cerufl-
i ate No tltS laaueil the l-i d.iy
June, A. I>. IM2, havi filed
my office, and ha\>-
tion for tax deed to b >u
on. Said certificate
following deacrlbed p operty in th*
County of Dade, Btate "f I
to-wit:
Lota I and I". Hloi '* '.. P
dena Pat k. a Sub 1*1.1
I'a.e 58, in the 1'ount) of Ds*
State of Mori.la.
The aaaessment of ".'.'i I
under the said certificate was n me
name of: TH( >M AS W M'NP
l,"nles said certlfii ate shall l"" "
deemed accord In. t<- law, ine prop*
arty described therein il bs
the highest blddei al th
Houaa door on the flrt M "
the month of September, 1MI. 1"""
is the 4th dav of September, IW4-
Dated tin- !-t "lav ..f AUfTOSt '"
B I! LEATHERMAN,
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hade County. Florida.
By N. C STERBETT. P '
(Circuit Court Seal)
g/4-ii-is--;.____________________
in the coi:nty jri-;k*s ''.[J,!:,T
IN AND FOB DADE <'">''
... .^n >> .t., l- a 1 '
FLORIDA
PROBATE
HTEPHBN K
P
IN
No 162
In Re: B8TATE OF
IIHKINIMi. Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and Ail
Having Claims or iniiunds
sani Batate: k.r*bv
You. and each of >"'. SJfS
notified and required to presW
claims and demands whan lW
either of >.., ma> have ;f1,"\-'|N,;,
estate of STEPHEN K |IK,, Mo:
deceased, late of Dadj '""'UVJ,^.
Ida. tn the Hon. W. f. "'"JS
County Judae of Bade '<""">:, .h,
file the aame in.hla ofrii* '* n,
Countv Courthouse in 111"e *- ^in
Florida, within (right ll,"ll,,r,,!r.jtion
from the date of the fn>t I'"''; ,
hereof. Said claims or dn*
contain t
nnt and
prt-
iU p-
.tHIII l-IHllll" -"-- ,
he lettal address of tnei
, !,.. -i ; a ,.
aented aa aforesaid, or same ;,
barred See Section 120 of tne
1*41
I'rohate Act.
Date August 4. A. I*- -:;.
MARIAN BREININOi^M 0,
As Administratrix of ,
STEPHEN K BREININO. '
MAX It. S1I.VEK ,rlv
Attorney for Admlnlstratns
8/11-18-25 9/1 ____________,------'
Buy War Bonftd and Sump* "
help preserve Democracy.


AUGUST 11, 1944
vJwistfhridilar)
HUDAY,
* fk py ,%-------^
PARADE!
\
PAGE SEVEN
SERVICE
WOUNDED IN ACTION KILLED IN ACTION
Pvt. Abraham Aronson. 26, of T/S Alfred S. Koslan. 26. of
Dorchester, Mass., wounded in Richmond Hill, N. Y. At Cassino.
combat at Guadalcanal, is the was a veteran of a dozen battjes
recipient of the Purple Heart. In in North Africa, Sicily and Italy,
service three years, Pvt. Aron-
son received a medical discharge
this February.
M. g. Furman. a mem- S/Sgt. Samuel Hollander, hus- WnTTMntT* tm koti^m L mvas
'the U S. Army attached band of Mrs. Oretel A. Holland- WUUNL>ED IN ACTION hn to
Intelligence Division is er of Miami, is back in the States Pvl w.r...~^T.j:., ing with
Capt
br of
Steave here on the 17th
ASSa and will then
turn to his post-____
Milton R- Singer, son of Mr.
; after two year's service'overseas.' Yo^ngsWn^O ^^
He will spend a 21-dav furlouch SHEWlX2 *?:
Pvt. Seymour R. Levoff, 20. of
Brooklyn. In Marshall Islands.
(Eniwetok).
Pvt. Arthur Becht, of Mas- ---------
pith. L. I., received the Purple Pvt. Ernest Lilenstein, 22, of
Heart for wounds incurred in New York City. In Italy. A
the invasion of Sicily. He has refugee from Germany, he came
service two years, serv- to U. S. in 1938 with mother,
the infantry. father and sister.
29. of
He
for
re-
spc
in this city.
Pfc. Daniel Broder, 22, of New S/Sgt. Harold B. Maxkowitz,
j .i-r, ui4iissiuwii, w., serving with the
aay iunough infantry in Italy, sustained shrap- York City, holder of the Purple 20, of New York City. Southwest
nel wounds in the arm. Pvt. Ru- Heart, was twice wounded when Pacific. A radio operator aboard
Ma'tin William Urey. 611 Es-
panola Way, Miami Beach, has
entered the naval reserve mid-
dMrs A. K Singer, 947 Wash- shipman's school at Notre Dame.
melon Ave. Miami Beach, re- ---------
Lntlv was commissioned a sec- Sgt. A. J. "Stumpy" Kaplan is ,
ond lieutenant in the AAF after spending a furlough here visit- purnl
complpf'S bombardier training ing friends and relatives.
at Carlsbad. N. M.
dies was a contractor in civil life. ne 'uRht with the Marines at
prior to his induction nine months Gudalcanal and at Cape Glou-
ago. cester, New Britain. Pvt. Bro-
der is now on combat duty in
a bomber, Sgt. Markowitz
been in service two years.
had
Lieut. Barnerd W. Nayowitz.
26, of Brooklyn. Regensburg,
Germany. Was pilot of a Flying
Pfc. Bernard Saperstein. 24, of New Guinea-
ical detachment?* received ""the ,S{?fft- ranku C. Cohen, 21. Fortress" based in England which
c Heart for wounds sus- ew York Clty- aerial Kun" snot down eight Nazi fighters on
ner attached to the Eighth Air return trip of a bombing mission.
tained in the Sicilian fighting er attacncd t0 tne Eighth Air return trip of a bombing mission.
, A graduate of City College Pvt For?e, and holdcr of, th Air Liuet Nayowitz held the Air
* Saperstein was erxiDloved at the edal, was awarded the Purple Medal and two Oakleaf Clusters.
Sgt. Robert Gold, 26, of Jack
Sgt. Isaac Gordon, son of Mr. sonville. Fla., was wounded in eoverSnt^ureau^f^nnmiit Heart'a"d a commendation for
Snd Mrs- E Gordon of this city, action while behind enemy lines in WaXngton Economics wounds sustained in a bombing
will leave Saturday, after spend- blowing up radio towers at An- J_____ mission over France. Although
a furlough with his family, zio Beachhead. He has been p_. M k* e.;t. _c injured by a burst of anti- air-
vt. Herber itleman. 25 of craft fire which penetrated his
He has been posthumously
awarded the Purple Heart.
grades in group tests at Jackson-
ville.
Ariation Cadet C. N. Goldman.
formerly Rationed at Corpus
Christi. Texas, has been trans-
ferred to Jacksonville, Fla.
When Lt. General L. J. McNair
was wounded in North Africa last
year, one Lt. Jules L. Seidel, of
the Dental Corps, was on hand
to give him a transfusion. Seidel
thought no more of the matter.
He took part in the remainder of
the North African campaign and,
later, in the warfare on Sicily.
Prt. Murray Miller left after
spending a ten day furlough here
with his parents. Mr. and Mrs.
Sam B. Miller. He will return
to his camp at Atterbury, Indi- Recently, to his surprise, he re-
ana- ceived a letter from General Mc-
former student at Brooklyn
College, Pvt. Seitelman has been Pfc. Arthur K. Dorfman. 19.
in service nearly three years. of Bayonnc, N. J.. who left Bay-
onne High School to join the
Pvt. Albert Solomon. 27. of Marines in October. 1942. was
Cleveland, is the wearer of the wounded in action on the Roi
Purple Heart, awarded him for Islands.
wounds received in action at Sal- ---------
erno. Pfc. Julius Ruderman. 27. of
------- Bridgeport, Conn., infantryman,
Sgt. Max Jagoda. 29, of Brook- was wounded in action in the
lyn. infantryman in service four Solomons. Pvt. Ruderman has
years, was wounded in the fight- received an honorable discharge,
ing at Arawe, New Britain.
Pfc. Arthur G. Popkin. 21. of
ape Gloucester, New
ing with the Mar-
Arthur gave his life
to eliminate two
gun positions hold-
ing up the Marines' advance.
Pvt. Irving F. Pokrass. 26. of
the Bronx. Munda, Southwest
Pacific.
Pvt. Samuel Richman. 22, of
New York City. In Italy. An
infantryman, Pvt. Richman was
sent ahead to repair forward
communications. He was killed
by an enemy shell.
Pvt. Joel Ehrenreich.
S Sgt BUI Butterman. nephew Nair who wrote In part. "You N. Y., was injured in the
of Mr. and Mrs. Jack August, were very kind to feel an inter- combat'
and brother of Mrs. Al Levine, is est in my case. I remember very theatre
now in the States from Italy. He distinctly your administering he MarcuSi served the j t war
has been in the service three blood plasma. It surely did the______
years, and i^ at present visiting trick. e_;j^ u ^ .._i~..~u .., p*c Elias Schcultz, 33, of New member
his parents at Pawtucket.
Lieut. Albert L. Rolnick. 22. of
Pvt. Harold Lister. 21, of Mil- Baltimore. Md. Europe. Bom-
24. of waukee, Wis., was decorated with bardier of a Flying Fortress.
Purple Heart for wounds ---------
the Mediterranean received in Italy when enemy Lieut. Jack Rosenblatt, 24. of
His stepfather, George shells exploded Allied munitions Brooklyn. In Italy. An infantry
near the observation post at
which Lister was stationed. A
of AZA, Lister joined
Ltp^!i?eluifii?n Ur vUBh,..n.2W; York' City, infantr'yman. was the army a year and a half ago.
Corporal William A. Schlesin-
gtr, with the Ninth AAF in Eng-
land, was wounded in action on
July 10, according to informa-
tion received by his parents, Mr.
and Mrs Arthur Schlesinger,
323 N. E. 19th St. Corporal
Schlesinger, 21, has been in ser-
vice two years and overseas one
year. H- was formerly a stu-
dent at Miami Edison high
school.
in Forest Hills, N.
quiet after El Guitar.
rather
Helen Adelle Hirsch. WAVE.
aaughtei ol Mr. and Mrs. Henry
Hirsch, 2300 S. W. 20th St.. left
Iowa State Teach-
m College Cedar Falls, for a
12-week course of specialized in-
struction a veoman.
The Greater Miami Army-
Navy Committee wants in-
teresting letters received
from those in service. These
will be used for publication
on the Service Parade Page
of The Jewish Floridian, the
daily press** and national
publications. Send original
or copies of these letters to
the Army-Navy Committee.
Box 2973. Miami 18, Fla.
These will be returned if
requested. Make it possible
for everyone to know where
our servicefolk are, what
they are seeing and doing.
wounded in action in the Aleu-
tians. Pvt- Schultz has been in
service two years.
officer, he died of wounds sus-
tained in combat. Lieut. Rosen-
blatt was one of four brothers in
service.
Pfc. Ira Pike, 21, of Rockaway
Beach, N. Y., who took part in
the initial landing on Bougain-
ville Island in the South Pacific,
was wounded three weeks later
during a Japanese artillery bar-
Pvt. David Lasker, 27. of
Hackensack, N. J., infantryman
stationed in the Aleutians and
who came through two bombings, rage on American installations, in the battles of Salerno and
Sgt. Howard Rosenstein. 24,
of Brooklyn. At Anzio Beach.
Served with the famed 45th Di-
vision all through Sicilian cam-
paign and capture of Messina.
St. Rosenstein also took part
was wounded during the invas- Two of Pvt. Pike's brothers are
ion of Attu. A salesman in civil serving in the navy.
life, Private Lasker is a gradu- ---------
ate of Hackensack High. pvt. Isidore J. Pitt, 24, of New
York City, was wounded in Sal-
Cassino before being transfer-
red to the Anzio sector.
Pvt. Irving B. Salsberg. 24. of erno while serving as a runner
Kennett Square, Pa., stationed
with the Engineers in the Pa-
cific, was wounded in the Battle
of New Guinea.
between the front line and head-
quarters. Pvt. Pitt, now back
in active service, was awarded
the Purple Heart.
S Sgt. Solomon Schuster, 20.
of New York City. Eastern Ger-
many. Tail gunner on an Eng-
land-based bomber. Sgt. Schus-
ter had been in service a year
and a half.
Fill Out This Coupon and Mail To "WAR RECORDS," Army-
Navy Committee, c/o P. O. Box 2973, Miami 18, Florida
Torpedoman's Mate 3/c Leon-
ard Wolfson, 20, of Baltimore,
Md.. has been awarded the Pur-
ple Heart for wounds ssutained
in naval action.
Pvt. Joseph Rosenstein. 34. of
Roxbury, Mass.. lntfantryman,
was wounded in combat in Beja,
Tunisia, during the Allied attack
on a strong hill emplacement.
Pfc. Harry M. Seiff, 25, of Ven-
ice, Cal. Bataan. Died of illness
in a Japanese prison camp. Pri-
vate Seiff joined the army Air
Corps in September of 1940.
Name .;_____
Home Address -
Serial No...
Street
City
State
Birth Date .,________Birthplace____
Civilian Occupation.
Date Entry
In Service ......____
City State
Marital Status----------
Branch of Service_____________
Full name of nearest kin_____
Relationship .........__ Address.
Information Transmitted by___
Telephone number____________
Date
.Discharged--------
_ Rank or Rating
WAR RECORDS COMMITTEE
NAT ROTH. Chairman
FRED SHOCHET
MRS. CEOROE M- COHEN
MAURlOE GROSSMAN
JENNIE H. ROTFORT
NATHAN ROTHBERQ
J. W. B. Director
OFFICERS
sam blank, chairman
MONTE SEUiO. Vice-chairmen
JOSEPH A- BERMAN, See.
Executive Committee
Mn. Max Dobrin, Ben B. Qoljiman,
Maunice croiaman. Louia Heiman,
Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan. Mra. Murry
Koven, Harry Markowltx. AJex-
ander F. M4dr, at Roth. Fred
Shochet. Milton Sirkin. Joaeph
SUin, Mr. Herman Wallach. Carl
WeHMe, Georfle Wolpart, Harry
Zukernlck.
Pvt. Benjamin Weissler. 22,
of the Bronx, infantryman, who
participated in four major bat-
tles, was wounded in action in
Sicily. Pvt. Weissler enlisted in
the army a year and a half ago.
Cpl. Benjamin Millstone. 22. of
Chicago, a member of the Mar-
ine Corps, was killed in action
on the Solomon Islands. His
father served in the United
States armed forces in World
War I.
U.S.MAXMiS
Noting This P.g. to the Effort, of the Army-Kary Committee. Made Possibl. Through
the Co-Operation of
ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN &
COWEN'S SHOE STORES
1" E. Flagler St 812 Lincoln Rd.
JACK C. IAYSON
PUBLIC GAS CO.
7200 N. W. 7th Avenue
MIAMI RUG CO.
100 S. Miami Avenue
SYBIL'S WOMEN'S APPAREL
76 S. E. 1st Street
I RUBIN SONSOriginal Rubins
145 N. Miami Avenue
^ufacturHPIS-t ^llnUrd Bid..
TOOLEY MYRON STUDIOS
Du Pont Building
RESTAURANT
170 N. W. Fifth Street
RICHTER'S JEWELRY CO.. INC.
160 E. Flagler Street
SEA ISLE HOTEL
3001 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach
RUBINSTEIN'S
WOMEN'S APPAREL
1026 Lincoln Rd- Miami Beach
N/\NKIN'S SHOE STORE
1S8 E. Flegler Street. Miami
ANN'S IMPORTERS
714 Lincoln Roe*
PVT. y-.A. DARNELL, USMC, ASHORE
WITH THE rTRST ASSAULT WWE Y
TARAWA, WAS STRUCK IN THE BACK
pY A SPENT BULLET WHICH LODGED
AN INCH FROM HIS HEART... N
DARNELL FOUGHT FOR 3 DAYS
AND 3 NIGHTS BEFORE RECEIVING
MEDICAL ATTENTION/





I
aft .1


PAGE EIGHT
+Jewist tlcrkJiari
FRIDAY, AUGUST n
'NAI B'RITH
NOTES
MARX
-by-
FEINBERG
In The Synagogues
Of Greater Miami
Services ror lh week and nn-
nounced bj the Qreatei Miami area
art -i follows:
Last Tuesday evening at the
Miami Beach Y, Brother Harold
Turk admirably filled the shoes
of absent president Friedman and
conducted one of the most or-
derly and interesting meetings of
the year. Usually a vice-presi-
dent, although very capable, be-
comes very panicky when called
upon to substitute, but in this
instance we had a magnificent
preview of what we can expect
from Harold next year. He is to
be commended very highly for
his orderly procedure and presi-
dential demeanor.
The entertainment program
was sponsored by Royal Palm
Chapter of A. Z. A. Brothers
George Bertman and Joe Rudd
The business of the meeting
consisted of a final bond report
by Brother Lou Heiman together
with a request for an allocation
of $150, which is to be supple-
mented by other agencies, the
purpose of which is to sponsor
a personal launching of the two
sub-chasers purchased through
our war bond effort. The may-
ors of Miami and Miami Beach
together with the proper officers
of the Lodge, are to attend this
launching and the attendant pub-
licity of newsreel and newspaper
should prove to be the largest
good will undertaking of the
present administration.
Brother Ike Levin, always on
the alert for opportunities of do
have proven themselves worthy | mg good in the community, asked
of the job undertaken as evi-
denced by the work that this
chapter of A. Z. A. is doing. As-
sisted by the B. B. G. girls at the
Beach, the program consisted ol
monologues, a magician act and
vocal selections, and was con-
cluded culturally in the presen-
tation of a symposium by the
boys on the post-war European
Jew. It seems thai the Lodge
has always shud away from any
cultural programs and the 'do
or die" method is to inject ;i lit-
tie culuture into our regular]
meetings. Surprising as it seems
everyone present enjoyed the en-
tire meeting.
-GORDON-
FUNERAL HOME
710 S. W. 12th AV. MIAMI
TEL. 3-3431
Moderate Costs Always
Within the Means of
Individual Circumstances
"YOUR JEWISH
FUNERAL HOME"

Worthy and Deserves
Your Full Support and
Recommendation

SERVING MIAMI BEACH
AND MIAMI

EXCLUSIVELY JEWISH
24-HOUR
Ambulance Service
I WANT MY MILK
And Be Sure It's
FLORIDA
DAIRIES
HOMOGENIZED
Vitamin "D" Milk
"Milk Products"
Dacro Protected
TEL. 2-2621
Greater Miami Delivery
Visit Our Farm at
200 N. W. 3aad Street
for an allocation of $50 for the
purchase of subscriptions to cur-
rent magazines for the Nautilus
Hospital on the Beach. The mer-
its ol this project are self-evi-
I dent and it should suffice to say
' that the only complaint from the
membership was to the inade-
| quacy of the appropriation.
We are beginning to have a
1 trickling back of members from
summer vacations and many old
faces were seen present at the
Tin re were some young
too. It set ms that the
hers are loath to announce
thai they have taken vacations
and are resorting to the Bubter-
(ug< ol summer business trips.
One ol these days the wives will
learn.
Tins week we dedicate our
Closing panel to Brother l.ouis
Heiman. 1 believe that Lou be-
came a member of our Lodge in
1938 and it was my pleasure to be
the financial secretary at the
time ot his admission. From the
day of his initiation I believe
that Lou has been one of our
most active members. He came
to Miami in 1926 from Jackson-
ville and was associated in the,
practice of law with Brother Joe I
Morris. Since that time Lou has
made tremendous progress not
only in his profession, but in his
social relations in the commun-
ity. Although Brother Heiman
has held some of the highest of-
fices in the Lodge, including the
presidency in 1943, yet his activ-
j it less and announced purpose
I have been recognized in his elec-
tion to the third vice-presidency
of the entire district. Tin's
means that in three years Broth- |
er Heiman will become the pres-
ident ol the fifth district. We
look forward to that day so that;
we may enjoy with Lou the hon-
or and prestige- to which he is I
so notably entitled. His zeal in '
all war service efforts are known1
not only m this community but
throughout the district. Lou is
one ot our younger leaders and
is destined to go far in the work
Of the Lodge. His, of all mem-
ber-, is more likely to become a
prominent name m the history ol
District 5. I know that I expn
the sentiments ot everyone when
I say that we appreciate- the
weak that Lou has done and will
do, and we'll lend him our every
cooperation.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION.
Conservative. 135 N. W. 3rd Ave..
Miami. Friday evening services ;it
7:15, Saturday morning .it 1:30
Evening services at 7:16 o'clock.
BETH JACOB CONGREGATION.
Orthodox. 311 Washington Ave.. Mi-
ami BeachFriday evening services
at 7:15 o'clock; Saturday morning ; 8:30. Cantor Maurice Mamches will
chant the service Religious School
Monday iiimuKh Friday, I a. m. to
noon.
MIAMI BEACH JEWISH COM-
MUNITY CENTER, Conservative,
1415 Euclid Ave.Kabalaa Bhabboa
Friday evening al 16 Baturdaj
morning services al 9. Shaloab Beu-
iIiih lervlcei s m. to be fol-
lowed by evening prayers.
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI. Re-
form. 137 N. E. 1th St.. Miami
Il'-Kulai services Friday evening at
.- I
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CON-
GREGATION. Orthodox, 694 S. W.
17th Ave.. MiamiServices wheil-
ult-el for Frielay at 7.15 p. m. and
Salurday .tt I a m and 7:18 i>. in.
Shalosh Reudoa will be followed by
M-i.e iv Dallj services al s ^u a, m.
and -o p. in
SCHAAREI ZEDEK CONGREGA-
TION, Orthodox. 1545 S. W. 3rd St..
Miami. Frill.i> evening services be-
gin at 7:in Saturday morning at :>
Mlncha and Maai i\ al 30 a m
Dally service! .e: i", a. m. and 7:30
p. in.
Notes Of
Y. M. H. A.
-by-
SAM SILVER
BETH SHOLOM CENTER. Con.
lervative. 761 41it St., Miami Beach.
Se vices ..... scheduled f"i Frldaj
evening ..t : IS Saturda) morning
set \ Ices \\ i.'l be liM t
London (JTA)Spurred by the
possibility of saving Jews from
Hungary the International Com-
mittee for Refugees, which was
reorganized following the Ber-
muda Conference last year, will
hold a plenary session in London
on August 15, it is learned here
i rbla column is conducted by the
Ureater Miami Jewish Federation in
eooperutlon with The Jewliih Florld-
lau as a community service. To Inform
the community of your organization's
activities and ( avoid conHicts In
dates, phone 3-3411 and ask for
' t ommunlty Calendar." Notification
must reach Federation no later than
Tuesday for publication that week.)
Sunday. August 13th
Meeting ..f Servicemen's Sub-Com-
mittee librarj of I teach Y
a. m.
Monday. August 14th
Meeting of \., ,,: Hakaahruth Sub-
' "inmitt.. i--. del itlon offi.. so
i; m Mian I l:-.,. d Jewish
Sisterhood, Centei. <-> ,, ,
Tuesday, August 15th
Kxee utivi i ommlttei meeting, f.-I-
i at inn office, .'! 'Hi |, m
Wednesday. August 16th
Beth ti.ee id siaterh.....i meeting al
- i' "' Workmen's Circle
''"''' s- '- retmlar member-
ship meeting, v 30 n m
Monday. August 20th
r.nai Hi hi, Bholem Lodge, card
""' olngo party, Wofford 11..1.1
evening
Buy War Stamps and Bonds
NOW and give our men in the
armed forces the help they need
BALLANTINE'S
ALE C
Amirltm'i Fintst Since 1840
DISTRIBUTED BT
NATIONAL BRANDS. INC.
When You Think of Real Estate
Think Of
LEO EISENSTEIN
REALTOR
309 Lincoln Road Phone 5-6479
Dependable. Conscientious Service
REAL ESTATEMIAMI BEACH
MIAMI BEACH
HOMES AND INVESTMENT
PROPERTIES
B. E. BRONSTON. Realtor
605 Lincoln Rd. ph.: 5.M6e
RENTALS LEASES SALES
Lpt. Hornet. Hotels
Apartment Houses
M. GILLER
, REALTOR
1448 Washington Avenue
PHONE 5-5875
'^ST
DRINK PLENTY OF
" ntcr
"UVIRlo TO YOUR HOME
8-04LL0K BOTT.r $0c
CASE OF Six S
TBLE BOTTLtS ... ,5,
p,u Bom. Deposit >'
PHONE 2-4128
BEFORE YOU BUY
EON ELIIH
with
METROPOLITAN
UFEINS.CO.
S Bigg-,
"?-Blggsjrt B6jeuge Beat
Clocing Exercises
The Y Home Camp closed its
summer program last Thursday
evening, August 10th, in a blaze
of glory. The closing evercises
consisted of a program, the un-
derlying theme of which was the
cooperation and coordination, be-
tween the United Nations. Songs
and plays of the various coun-
tries, which make up the Unit-
ed Nations, were sung and pre-
sented and the grand finale of
the evening was the presentation
of a musical called "The Clock
Shop."
This program required quite a
bit of preparation and much
credit is due the Home Camp
faculty stall, as well as the chil-
dren who participated in the ac-
tivities.
The Y Home Camp is one of
the outstanding projects for
younger children held in the
AUGUST BROS Rv?
IS the BEST.' *
ONE
VITAMIN
DAY 1
-TABLST*
XHDdrfiii Tewsasa-
W A TL D THaTssJ"U'5
the Basse ONB-A-DAT
(Waari) THaaste TteMets.
-"-NERVINE
no rmtnn >*m. i.
**Tm* WrtrfsL Crfcr.
Miami area each summer rv,
dren of all creeds S" A
camp and have a wel? rolfc
summer schedule ^SSt
I am sure most nf .
the publicity ^rfen^tjV*
Camp in the Miami Herald ?*
past week-end. Mr. GroSmt
our executive director n?n'
formed me that the pubHcitv J
unsolicited He said that a H
aid reported called at the Y 11
H?m.VrWed th(\actlvities of the
Home Camp and sent a photo?
rapher out the following Jay
As a result of this publicity^
Y has received long distance" calk
from all over the State. From
people who desired to have chrt-
dren from their communities en-
rolled in the Home Camp. How-
fh^m '.Vn,88, necessarv o inform
them that the camps program
was concluded for this summer
It is believed that the program
will expand annually, and that
many children from throughout
tne State will participate in
summers to come.
The thanks of the Y are ex-
tended to all members of the
faculty and all counsellors of the
Home Camp for the splendid
job performed by them at the
camp this summer.
J. W. B. Conference
The Southeastern Region of
the Jewish Welfare Board will
hold its conference in Atlanta,
Ga. on September 23rd and 24th.
All Y members are welcome to
attend this conference, and anv
who can make it are urged to
communicate with Mr. Gross-
man immediately. Phone 3-4012
RIVERMONT ?ABl
SANITARIUM
ISM N. W. 7th St. Ph. 1-7301
et ear* for chronic sick, eonvi-
'scent sad elderly ptopis
8ANEL BEER. M. D Direcur
Reasonable Prices
****##*"*
Advantages
of a
IIMIE FEItERaVL
. MORTGAGE
LOW RATES
BASY PAYMENTS
LONG TIME TO PAY
. PROMPT SERVICE
. A HOME INSTITUTION
Deal With Youn
LOCAL. FRIENDLY
INSTITUTION
'resources over $10,000,000
, HAHEFEIMmAl
mmm


Full Text

PAGE 1

^ jiJ^wiislh-IEIliOipidliiaun ^.THE MWISH UNITY \ asr,& THE JEWI SH WE MIAMI 18, FLORIDA. FRIDAY. AUGUST 11, 1944 PRICE 10 CENTS {First Population Survey in [Greater Mia mi to Be Made I Preliminary details are now Line arranged for the lirst Hation survey ever to be held SC community. The popuIE• „ cnrvev is a project of the 'BtfTSU JewiA FederaS and will be undertaken ,n lose cooperation with the Buau of War Records of the NaXl Jewish Welfare Board. The survey will be as complete W d detailed as possible the Federation stated, with a houseto-house canvass made by the corps of volunteer workers to obtain information and data. When completed, information I will be available as to the Jewish population here, and will serve as the background for community planning in the needed fields of endeavor. M. J. Kopelowitz has been selected as chairman of the population survey planning committee by Monte Selig. Serving on this committee with Mr. Kopelowitz are representatives of the Miami Beach YM & WHA. the Greater Miami Army and Navy Committee of the Jewish Welfare Board, Bureau of Jewish Education and Miami YM & YWHA. Dr. Samuel Kohs, national director of the JWB Bureau of War Records, will arrive in Miami in September to assist in completing plans. Organizations of the Greater Miami area are being asked to cooperate in this communityvide project, and to assist in the preparations in addition to the actual canvassing. Among questions to be asked are the number of members in the family, religious and organiBtion affiliation, members in the armed forces and their service activities. OF SHIP 111 STOP EMIGRE Ankara (JTA)—The sinking of the 200-ton Turkish motor ship "tlcure in which more than 250 wish refugees perished in the *ers of the Black Sea on their ayfrom the Rumanian port of iwnstanza to Turkey, may mean !" end of further transportation refugees aboard Turkish ships %  *ustated here. J he L break uf diplomatic relays between Turkey and Ger%  My 'was foil,, wed by an order tooting all Turkish ships home m foreign ports. There is no S 0n that ,hls order will be SXV'spi'ciallv after the loss w the Mefcure. Iihm! anwhlU two ther Turkish >mps carrying 815 Jewish refutrnm D nvt(1 Mfel y this week lttbVn i:i at tne iKneada IBUZI 0ne 1,f l hese ships is the Iff1 carrying 500 Jews and Jewilh J-S lhc Morina With 315 Wssengers, th# Jt'? S asct rtiiined here that y 0 f the refugees who RJeir lives this week on.the Jge were P„i ish and Ru *Cs anT nly ll V0 f th trew SIX m,,r nbers of the 5MW,&**• lhe y are ^ibl, to m,,, tary zone, inlails !" ,u corr espondents. de*• >"ckin{ 1 ttaCk f the ship I AST'' '; if ;" mat 'on availhy shell r t hl M 'fcure was sunk TurkoR,," 0 sevcn m h* off the l* th. R D r a border (In Lon ^W renni' 1 811 n WS a K enc y l**ton5 H d that the Mefcure l*Wm td bv an unidentified l*l55Vn 2 ,hat 277 Jewish I^Uow^ 15 when the 8hip ** on buying War Bonds. OFFICE III ROME; TEACHERS HIRED; Rome (JTA)—A decree order-' ing the reinstatement of Jewish | teachers and other employes of j the educational system in Italy who were dismissed from their posts under Mussolini's antiJewish laws was issued here this week by the Italian minister of public instruction. The order is effective as of the date of liberation of the territory in which the dismissed personnel reside. Earlier in the week the Italian minister of the interior issued an order liquidating the racial ofanti-Jewish laws in Italy. The Rome headquarters of the office have been converted into an office for Count Carlo Sforza. high commissioner for Sanctions Against Fascism. Plans for a comprehensive program of relief and rehabilitation of Jews in Italy are presently being worked out by Arthur D. Greenleigh, representative of the Joint Distribution Committee, it was announced here. Mr. Greenleigh has left for Bari, in southern Italy, where many Jewish refugees are concentrated, after consultations with high Allied military officials, Red Cross officials and with the representative of the International Committee for Refugees in Italy. BLOCKADE EASED FOR NEUTRALS ADMITTING HUNGARIAN CHILDREN London (JTA) —Dingle Foot. Parliamentary Secretary for the Ministry of Economic Warfare, told the House of Commons this week that both the British and American governments had assured neutral countries that additional supplies would be passed through the blockade if they allowed Hungarian Jewish children to enter Both governments, he added, have offered to see that the supplies are formcoming. No word has been received yet from neutral countries on their willingness to receive Jcwisn children under ten years of age acceding to the P^n advanced by Regent Nicholas Horthy of Hungary, the British official reported. He added, however that certain countries notably Switz erland and Sweden, had always been cooperative in t he p ast. IO.OOO1EWS1JRDERED IN KAUNAS PRIOR TO RETREAT OF_GERMANS London (JTA>-Ten thousand Jews were murdered in KaunM; capital of Lithuania, just prim toV German evacuation o the city it is reported by the Stock holm corespondent of the London Times. Inform* n reach ing the Swedish capital, he sayssays that the Jews fiercely re%  Sited Nazi extermination squads, us'ng arms which had been smuggled into the ghetto. The same dispatch confirm* earlier reports that several thousand Jews were killed in vuna a few days before the Gei mans fledThat city Thes<-Jews, who were conf ned m a ghetto. The remnants of the *JftJ 50.000 Jews who had resided in Vilna and the many thousands who were brought there fiom western Europe. You can't quit now! You mS continue to" buy Bonds, and More Bonds! FUGITIVES DWELL III SECRET FOREST REED BY GERMANS 1,000 Refugees Arrive Here; Names Available to Public BULGARIA STOPS Moscow (JTA)—The story of how 1,000 fugitive Jews dwelt for two years in a well-established forest community in the Baranovici district of Byelorussia in the heart of German-held territory, was told this week by Henach Levin, a 13-year-old Jewish partisan who frequently visited the camp. The residents of the settlement fled from ghettos, labor camps, and concentration camps in the cities of Mir, Rakov, Slonin, Baranovici and the surrounding hamlets. Among them were 90 Jews who had escaped from a camp at Koldychev by an underground tunnel which they had dug secretly over a period of three months. The forest community, which was under the protection of neighboring partisan bands, provided the guerrillas with shoes, caps, clothes and other articles which were manufactured in the shops established by the refugees. Articles not required by the partisans were given to local farmers in return for food. LABOR PARTY WINS IN PALESTINE ELECTIONS Jerusalem (JTA)—Preliminary results of the elections to the Assefath Hanivcharim, the Jewish National Assembly of Palestine, made public this week show that nearly 200,000 persons voted. This is about 72 per cent of the total entitled to vote. Only 56 percent voted in the last elections to the Assembly which were held thirteen years ago. IACKSONVILLE JEWS IN SERVICE NINE PERCENT Jacksonville (JTA)—Approximately nine per cent of the local Jewish population is now in the aimed forces, according to a preliminary survey by the Jacksonville Jewish Community Council. This percentage coincides with the overall statistics just released by the National Jewish Welfare Board Bureau for wai Records, in which the general average for the American Jewish Community is given as 9%. Ill PEACE TALKS Ankara (JTA)—All anti-Jewish measures were suspended this week by the Bulgarian government in Varna, Burgas, and other cities along the Black Sea as a result of negotiations between the Allies and Bulgaria for the latter's surrender, it was reliably learned here. The restoration of full rights to Jews was one of the conditions in the preliminary terms for surrender which British-American military authorities presented to the Bulgarian government thru neutral channels. The terms were backed by the Soviet government through its diplomats in Sofia and were reported to have been accepted by Bulgaria. The acceptance by Bulgaria of the Allied terms will also effect the Jews in Hungary and Rumania, it was predicted here. Rumania, facing encirclement, is reported to be modifying its anti-Jewish policy to pave the way for surrender, while the pro-Nazi Hungarian government thoroughly frightened, is attempting to dodge the blame for the ruthless deportations of Jews and is ready to place moderate elements in the cabinet. New York (JTA)—After several years of living under Nazi and Fascist terror, approximately 1000 European refugees, 918 of whom are Jews, landed this week in the United States and were transported to the Emergency Refugee Shelter at Fort Ontario, near Oswego, N. Y., which was established as a 'free port" on orders of President Roosevelt. They will remain there for the duration of the war. The arrivals include citizens of fourteen countries and many stateless persons. The largest group is made up of more than 300 Jews from Yugoslavia who A complete list of the names of the 987 refugees from Italy thatt are now located at Fort Ontario, Oswego, N. Y., has been received in Miami. This list is available to the public at the office of the Jewish Social Service Bureau, 127 N. W. 2nd St., or at The Jewish Floridian. Refugee agencies are seeking to ascertain the whereabouts of relatives and friends of these refugees so that they may contact them with full information concerning the new arrivals. Inquiries may be addressed care this paper, and will be forwarded. Attention Advertisers The Jewish Floridian desires to call attention to its readers and advertising patrons that they are 1not publishing any year book. A despicable attempt through phone solicitation by a group of professional promoters u besmirching the name of the Jewish people. Deceitful and misleading methods are used, including that of informing the prospective advertiser that partTf the funds derived will be given to one of the local Rabbis, and a portion of the money to be "ted for refugee work. Considerable pressure u used in these contacts-threatened boycott and the like, unless fund, are given. Merchant, of this community are „ked to watch out for these individuals who are seeking Holiday greetings tradin! on the Jewish 25.. and whose actualjk creating a wave of Ul-feel5T£r US in this comrnunit y. Additional £fa*"Mtion may be obtained by calling 2-1141. JEWISH SURVIVORS OF VILNA DISTRICT BEGIN COMING FROM HIDING Moscow (JTA)—Although virtually no Jews were found in Vilna and the surrounding townships when the Red Army first entered the region, hundreds of Jews who formerly dwelt there are beginning to return from the forests in which they hid to escape destruction by the Germans. These are mainly young* able-bodied persons who fled to the woods and poined partisan bands. „ More than 1,000 persons have already returned to the town of Glubokovce in the Vilna district and reports reaching here ex; press the hope that there may be i others still in the forests. Most of the Jews of Glubokoye were massacred in 1941 and the others were crowded into a ghetto which was burned down by Elite Guard troops. RED CROSS PERMITTED TO AID HUNGARY JEWS TO SPEED EMIGRATION Zurich (JTA)—The Swiss radio this week announced that representatives of the International Red Cross in Hungary have been permitted to extend relief to Jews there and to facilitate their emigration from the country. The Red Cross representatives have been allowed to visit Jewish homes and hospitals allocated to Jews, the announcement said. They have also visited the Jewish internment camps and arranged relief for the internees there. MEXICO PLANS TO USE "FREE PORT" FOR JEWS Mexico City (JTA)—The: Mexcan government has officially announced its intention to establish a 'free port" for Jewish refugees along the same lines as the United States, provided that the refugees will maintain themselves or will be maintained by relief organizatitons. Buy U. S. Stamps and Bonds. had been in Axis concentration camps in Italy. Others crossed from France into Italy to escape deportation by the Germans to extermination camps in occupied Poland. The refugees arrived on an army transport which they boarded after medical inspection at a camp near Naples, in the liberated part of Italy. Six nurses and ten enlisted men of the Medical Corps accompanied them. Representatives of Jewish refugee relief organizations met the arrivals together with representatives of the War Relocation Authority which will administer the Fort Ontario Camp. The Jewish Welfare Board, it is understood, has arranged for the establishment of a synagogue in the camp and for the delivery there of a Sefer Torah and Jewish ritual articles. The youngest resident of Fort Ontario will be an infnt who was born just before his mother embarked in Italy. The age of the oldest is 82, but the majority of the refugees are above military age. Included in the transport were 435 men, 367 women, 152 children under fourteen years of age, and 12 infants less than one year old. The War Relocation Authority announced that no persons will be permitted to visit Fort Ontario for a period of three weeks, except representatives of the press and cooperating agencies. Relatives in the United States will be permitted to write letters as frequently as they wish. Mail will no be censored. At the request of the U. S. Department of Interior, B'nai B'rith has undertaken to equip and furnish a number of hospitality houses, nursery and arts and crafts facilities at the Emergency Shelter. This Shelter, better is better known as the first "free port." The refugees who have arrived at Oswego, found that the National War Service Fund of B'nai B'rith had made available to them the equipment of a large community house (120 ft. by 60 ft.), four hospitality houses, comprising 12 rooms of substantial dimensions, a nursery for children and two arts and crafts rooms for vocational and therapeutic purposes. Lisbon (JTA)—A group of 202 Jews who have been interned in German concentration camps, arrived here this week to be exchanged for Germans held by Briitan. The arrivals were held by the Germans in the Vittel camp in France. • I 11



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AUGUST 11, 1944 vJwistfhridilar) HUDAY, FK py ,% ^ PARADE! \ PAGE SEVEN SERVICE WOUNDED IN ACTION KILLED IN ACTION Pvt. Abraham Aronson. 26, of T/S Alfred S. Koslan. 26. of Dorchester, Mass., wounded in Richmond Hill, N. Y. At Cassino. combat at Guadalcanal, is the was a veteran of a dozen battjes recipient of the Purple Heart. In in North Africa, Sicily and Italy, service three years, Pvt. Aronson received a medical discharge this February. M G. Furman. a memS/Sgt. Samuel Hollander, husWnTTMntT* TM KOTI^M L mvas 'the U S. Army attached band of Mrs. Oretel A. HollandWU UNL>ED IN ACTION h !" n to %  Intelligence Division is er of Miami, is back in the States Pvl w.r...~^T. j: ., !" ing with Capt br of Steave here on the 17th ASSA and will then turn to his postMilton RSinger, son of Mr. ; after two year's service'overseas.' Yo^ngsWn^O ^^ He will spend a 21-dav furlouch SHEWl X2 *?: Pvt. Seymour R. Levoff, 20. of Brooklyn. In Marshall Islands. (Eniwetok). Pvt. Arthur Becht, of Maspith. L. I., received the Purple Pvt. Ernest Lilenstein, 22, of Heart for wounds incurred in New York City. In Italy. A the invasion of Sicily. He has refugee from Germany, he came service two years, servto U. S. in 1938 with mother, the infantry. father and sister. 29. of He for respc in this city. Pfc. Daniel Broder, 22, of New S/Sgt. Harold B. Maxkowitz, J„„ „.i-r, ui4iissiuwii, w., serving with the aay iunough infantry in Italy, sustained shrapYork City, holder of the Purple 20, of New York City. Southwest nel wounds in the arm. Pvt. RuHeart, was twice wounded when Pacific. A radio operator aboard Ma'tin William Urey. 611 Espanola Way, Miami Beach, has entered the naval reserve middMrs A. K Singer, 947 Washshipman's school at Notre Dame. melon Ave. Miami Beach, reLntlv was commissioned a secSgt. A. J. "Stumpy" Kaplan is ond lieutenant in the AAF after spending a furlough here visitp urnl complpf'S bombardier training ing friends and relatives. at Carlsbad. N. M. dies was a contractor in civil life. ne 'uRht with the Marines at prior to his induction nine months Gudalcanal and at Cape Glouago. cester, New Britain. Pvt. Broder is now on combat duty in a bomber, Sgt. Markowitz been in service two years. had Lieut. Barnerd W. Nayowitz. 26, of Brooklyn. Regensburg, Germany. Was pilot of a Flying Pfc. Bernard Saperstein. 24, of New Guinea ical detachment?* received ""the S {? fft £ ranku C. Cohen, 21. Fortress" based in England which c Heart for wounds sus ew York Clty aerial K un snot down eight Nazi fighters on ner attached to the Eighth Air return trip of a bombing mission. tained in the Sicilian fighting £ er attacncd t0 tne Eighth Air return trip of a bombing mission. A graduate of City College Pvt F or ? e and holdc r of th £ Air Liuet Nayowitz held the Air %  Saperstein was erxiDloved at the !" edal, was awarded the Purple Medal and two Oakleaf Clusters. Sgt. Robert Gold, 26, of Jack Sgt. Isaac Gordon, son of Mr. sonville. Fla., was wounded in eoverSnt^ureau^f^nnmiit Hear t' a d a commendation for S nd MrsE Gordon of this city, action while behind enemy lines in WaXngton Economics wounds sustai ned in a bombing will leave Saturday, after spendblowing up radio towers at AnJ mission over France. Although a furlough with his family, zio Beachhead. He has been p_. M „K— e ;t c injured by a burst of antiairvt. Herber itleman. 25 of cra ft fire which penetrated his He has been posthumously awarded the Purple Heart. grades in group tests at Jacksonville. Ariation Cadet C. N. Goldman. formerly Rationed at Corpus Christi. Texas, has been transferred to Jacksonville, Fla. When Lt. General L. J. McNair was wounded in North Africa last year, one Lt. Jules L. Seidel, of the Dental Corps, was on hand to give him a transfusion. Seidel thought no more of the matter. He took part in the remainder of the North African campaign and, later, in the warfare on Sicily. Prt. Murray Miller left after spending a ten day furlough here with his parents. Mr. and Mrs. Sam B. Miller. He will return to his camp at Atterbury, IndiRecently, to his surprise, he reana ceived a letter from General Mcformer student at Brooklyn College, Pvt. Seitelman has been Pf c Arthur K. Dorfman. 19. in service n early t hree years. of Bayonnc, N. J.. who left Bayonne High School to join the Pvt. Albert Solomon. 27. of Marines in October. 1942. was Cleveland, is the wearer of the wounded in action on the Roi Purple Heart, awarded him for Islands. wounds received in action at Salerno. Pfc. Julius Ruderman. 27. of — Bridgeport, Conn., infantryman, Sgt. Max Jagoda. 29, of Brookwas wounded in action in the lyn. infantryman in service four Solomons. Pvt. Ruderman has years, was wounded in the fightreceived an honorable discharge, ing at Arawe, New Britain. Pfc. Arthur G. Popkin. 21. of ape Gloucester, New ing with the MarArthur gave his life to eliminate two gun positions holding up the Marines' advance. Pvt. Irving F. Pokrass. 26. of the Bronx. Munda, Southwest Pacific. Pvt. Samuel Richman. 22, of New York City. In Italy. An infantryman, Pvt. Richman was sent ahead to repair forward communications. He was killed by an enemy shell. Pvt. Joel Ehrenreich. S Sgt BUI Butterman. nephew Nair who wrote In part. "You !" N. Y., was injured in the of Mr. and Mrs. Jack August, were very kind to feel an intercombat' and brother of Mrs. Al Levine, is est in my case. I remember very theatre now in the States from Italy. He distinctly your administering he MarcuSi served £ the j t war has been in the service three blood plasma. It surely did the years, and i^ at present visiting trick. e ;j ^ u ^ .._i~..~u „„.., p *c Elias Schcultz, 33, of New member his parents at Pawtucket. Lieut. Albert L. Rolnick. 22. of Pvt. Harold Lister. 21, of MilBaltimore. Md. Europe. Bom24. of waukee, Wis., was decorated with bardier of a Flying Fortress. Purple Heart for wounds the Mediterranean received in Italy when enemy Lieut. Jack Rosenblatt, 24. of His stepfather, George shells exploded Allied munitions Brooklyn. In Italy. An infantry near the observation post at which Lister was stationed. A of AZA, Lister joined Lt p^!i? el u i fii? n £ Ur v UBh ,.. n .2 W ; York City, infantr'yman. was the army a year and a half ago. Corporal William A. Schlesingtr, with the Ninth AAF in England, was wounded in action on July 10, according to information received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs Arthur Schlesinger, 323 N. E. 19th St. Corporal Schlesinger, 21, has been in service two years and overseas one year. Hwas formerly a student at Miami Edison high school. in Forest Hills, N. quiet after El Guitar. rather Helen Adelle Hirsch. WAVE. aaughtei ol Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hirsch, 2300 S. W. 20th St.. left Iowa State Teachm College Cedar Falls, for a 12-week course of specialized instruction a veoman. The Greater Miami ArmyNavy Committee wants interesting letters received from those in service. These will be used for publication on the Service Parade Page of The Jewish Floridian, the daily press** and national publications. Send original or copies of these letters to the Army-Navy Committee. Box 2973. Miami 18, Fla. These will be returned if requested. Make it possible for everyone to know where our servicefolk are, what they are seeing and doing. wounded in action in the Aleutians. PvtSchultz has been in service two years. officer, he died of wounds sustained in combat. Lieut. Rosenblatt was one of four brothers in service. Pfc. Ira Pike, 21, of Rockaway Beach, N. Y., who took part in the initial landing on Bougainville Island in the South Pacific, was wounded three weeks later during a Japanese artillery barPvt. David Lasker, 27. of Hackensack, N. J., infantryman stationed in the Aleutians and who came through two bombings, rage on American installations, in the battles of Salerno and Sgt. Howard Rosenstein. 24, of Brooklyn. At Anzio Beach. Served with the famed 45th Division all through Sicilian campaign and capture of Messina. St. Rosenstein also took part was wounded during the invasTwo of Pvt. Pike's brothers are ion of Attu. A salesman in civil serving in the navy. life, Private Lasker is a gradu. ate of Hackensack High. p vt. Isidore J. Pitt, 24, of New York City, was wounded in SalCassino before being transferred to the Anzio sector. Pvt. Irving B. Salsberg. 24. of erno while serving as a runner Kennett Square, Pa., stationed with the Engineers in the Pacific, was wounded in the Battle of New Guinea. between the front line and headquarters. Pvt. Pitt, now back in active service, was awarded the Purple Heart. S Sgt. Solomon Schuster, 20. of New York City. Eastern Germany. Tail gunner on an England-based bomber. Sgt. Schuster had been in service a year and a half. Fill Out This Coupon and Mail To "WAR RECORDS," ArmyNavy Committee, c/o P. O. Box 2973, Miami 18, Florida Torpedoman's Mate 3/c Leonard Wolfson, 20, of Baltimore, Md.. has been awarded the Purple Heart for wounds ssutained in naval action. Pvt. Joseph Rosenstein. 34. of Roxbury, Mass.. lntfantryman, was wounded in combat in Beja, Tunisia, during the Allied attack on a strong hill emplacement. Pfc. Harry M. Seiff, 25, of Venice, Cal. Bataan. Died of illness in a Japanese prison camp. Private Seiff joined the army Air Corps in September of 1940. Name .; Home Address Serial No... Street City State Birth Date ., B irthplace Civilian Occupation. Date Entry In Service City State Marital Status Branch of Service Full name of nearest kin Relationship __ Address. Information Transmitted by Telephone number Date .Discharged Rank or Rating WAR RECORDS COMMITTEE NAT ROTH. Chairman FRED SHOCHET MRS. CEOROE MCOHEN MAURlOE GROSSMAN JENNIE H. ROTFORT NATHAN ROTHBERQ J. W. B. Director OFFICERS SAM BLANK, CHAIRMAN MONTE SEUiO. Vice-chairmen JOSEPH ABERMAN, See. Executive Committee Mn. Max Dobrin, Ben B. Qoljiman, Maunice croiaman. Louia Heiman, Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan. Mra. Murry Koven, Harry Markowltx. AJexander F. M4dr, at Roth. Fred Shochet. Milton Sirkin. Joaeph SUin, Mr. Herman Wallach. Carl WeHMe, Georfle Wolpart, Harry Zukernlck. Pvt. Benjamin Weissler. 22, of the Bronx, infantryman, who participated in four major battles, was wounded in action in Sicily. Pvt. Weissler enlisted in the army a year and a half ago. Cpl. Benjamin Millstone. 22. of Chicago, a member of the Marine Corps, was killed in action on the Solomon Islands. His father served in the United States armed forces in World War I. U.S.MAXMiS Noting This P.g. to the Effort, of the Army-Kary Committee. Made Possibl. Through the Co-Operation of ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN & COWEN'S SHOE STORES 1" E. Flagler St — 812 Lincoln Rd. JACK C. IAYSON PUBLIC GAS CO. 7200 N. W. 7th Avenue MIAMI RUG CO. 100 S. Miami Avenue SYBIL'S WOMEN'S APPAREL 76 S. E. 1st Street I RUBIN SONS—Original Rubins 145 N. Miami Avenue ^ufacturHPIS-t ^llnUrd Bid.. TOOLEY MYRON STUDIOS Du Pont Building RESTAURANT 170 N. W. Fifth Street RICHTER'S JEWELRY CO.. INC. 160 E. Flagler Street SEA ISLE HOTEL 3001 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach RUBINSTEIN'S WOMEN'S APPAREL 1026 Lincoln RdMiami Beach N/\NKIN'S SHOE STORE 1S8 E. Flegler Street. Miami ANN'S IMPORTERS 714 Lincoln Roe* PVT. y-.A. DARNELL, USMC, ASHORE WITH THE rTRST ASSAULT WWE Y TARAWA, WAS STRUCK IN THE BACK pY A SPENT BULLET WHICH LODGED AN INCH FROM HIS HEART... N DARNELL FOUGHT FOR 3 DAYS AND 3 NIGHTS BEFORE RECEIVING MEDICAL ATTENTION/ • • %  I aft .1


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FRIDAY. AUGUST 11. 1944 "Between You and Me" By BORIS SMOLAR Copyright, 1344, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc. • •Jewish fkrihui PAGE FIVE CAPITAL SPOTLIGHT By MURIEL LEVIN Copyrirtt, 1944. Jewish telegraphic Agency. Inc. THE ARAB-JEWISH FRONT: We don't know who's behind the Council on Jewish-Arab Cooperation which was formed this month in New York .... The name of the chairman, Seymour Melman, means nothing to Jews in this country, nor do the names of the other members of the Council .... But we see that the group is a sort of branch of the League for Jewish-Rappochement which the well-meaning H. M. Kavarisky of Palestine organized years ago in Jerusalem .... We remember that about four years ago certain leading Arabs in America met with lews in New York in an attempt to form a body for Arab-Jewish cooperation Nothing came of this attempt ... We do not see the names of any Arabs on the list of members of the counil which leads us to believe that for the time being the Council is nothing but a one-sided meager affair T he Council holds that it is possible to devlop in Palestine such economic and political conditions as will permit cooperation between Jews and Arabs there .... It leans heavily upon the program of Mr. Kalvarisky's League for Jewish-Arab Rapprochment which advocates the establishment of a bi-national order in Palestine on the basis of non-domination of one nation by the other .... Congressional circles believe that Congress may soon appeal to Premier Churchil to disregard the White Paper and open Palestine for Jewish immigration .... Such* an appeal may be expected daily now that Congress has resumed its session .... The American League for a Free Palestine, which is opposed by all Zionist groups in this country, is going out of its way to claim credit for the adoption by the Democratic convention of a plank favoring a Jewish Commonwealth in Palestine .... This claim amuses the Zionist leaders in New York as well as others who know what actually transpired behind the scenes at the Democratic convention .... • %  • OVER THERE: Now that a good part of Poland has been liberated by the Russian Army, the problem of reaching Jews remaining there is attracting the attention of interested Jewish groups in America .... Jewish organizations are also studying the problem of restitution of Nazi-confiscated property to Jews in Poland .... One of the most serious problems is the question of Jewish communal property in the liberated part of Poland This property, which includes synagogue buildings, cemetery plots, Jewish hospitals and other institutions, amounts to no small sum .... A queston that arises is: who is to inherit the Jewish communal wealth in towns where the Nazis have left no Jews alive and where no Jewish communities will probably be estabished for many years to come .... This is aside from the property which the Germans looted and confiscated from individual Jews in Europe and which is estimated to amount to more than fifteen billion dollars .... Many consignments of Jewish religious supplies have reached overseas military bases ior distribution among American Jewish servicemen during the forthcoming High Holidays .... They include a million RoshHashanah greeting cards forwarded by the Jewish Welfare Board to men in all branches of the armed forces .... Also 50,000 leaflets explaining the significance of Rosh-Hashanah and Yom Kippur .... Also tens of thousands of prayer books, 200 Shofars made in Palestine, and ample stocks of prayer shawls and skull caps .... • • POST WAR PROJECTS: As the hour of Nazi defeat approaches, more and more important books appear in this country dealing with the problem of how to secure a world of permanent peace One of these books is Sumner Welles' "Time ior Decision." published by Harper's, in which the former Assistant Secretary of State deals also with the post-war status of Palestine and urges the acceptance of a plan similar to the one suggested by Dr. J. L. Magnes Another very important book of the same type is Prof. James T. Shotwell's "The Great Decision," published by Macmillan .... Among other things, Prof. Shotwell warns against Nationalism .... He discusses at great leng.h the suggestion that a universal Bill of Rights be introduced which would defend the rights of national minorities • • • • He believes that the mere insertion of a formula in a constitution is not enough, because the enforcement of the provision the all-important thing ..... It is a sobering fact, he points out, that some of the countries in which human rights have been most violated have the best provisions in their constitutions against such violations .... Freedom of the press and public utterance are the best safeguards against such injustice, he f erts .... At the same time, he urges the establsnment of a World Institute of Jurisprudence composed of the most highly qualified experts in law and government H is views are of special interest to Jewish readers in view of the discussion now going on among Jewish organizations in this country as to whether the national minorty rights secured for Jews in European countries through the League of Nations proved to be a failure, ood whether these rights should not be covered by a universal JJof Rights Prof. Shotwell also devotes much P"! "* "X* to post-war relief activities in connection with the UNrlrm, *a urges the establishment of a European council as a center w all long-term economic reconstructon in war-torn countries. • • • r TURKISH MOTIFS: Turkey's breaking off relations with Jnany will have an effect on Palestine .We hear from *m e sources that Turkey may be given a chance to wieia considerable influence in affairs of the Middle East as a result %  bre k with Hitler ... In short, this should mean that the *M of Palestine after the war may be determined by Britain, 2 HS States, Russia and Turkey .... It must not be forgot ^[Palestine and Syria were part of Turkey pnor to World FZ bef0re il to* a great section d its territory to Bntain and oXV ''' l d ubtful whether Turkey will make <**" %  b?J? y f *• %  • territories now. though portly before Ae out J* Of this war the Tttkish Government claimed and re** a port in Syria Our Film Folk By HELEN ZIGMOND Two recent events, one of national, the other of international significance, reinforce the old lesson that religion is one of the most dangerous elements to mix with politics. In New York, Representative Hamilton Fish, campaigning for releetion, won repudiation for himself from the previous and the president candidates for president of his own party, when he singled out the Jews for political attack. What Fish tried to do was create the impression that Jews voted as a block and for one political party mainly. His endeavor was to channel all the resentment against the administration into hatred of the Jews who, he implied, for reasons of their own were its chief supporters. This is the old pre-Nazi trick in new dress. Find an issue or a party against which there is resentment. Then identify the Jews with it. Fortunately the reply to this shocking maneuver was to elicit a prompt counterblast from the head of Fish's own party, calling it "disgraceful and un-American." The national aspect of such campaigning was emphasized in editorial comment like that of the Washington Post which said that "Mr. Fish has ceased to be merely irresponsible. He is a national disgrace." The Fish episode constitutes large handwriting, in fiery letters, on the political wall which everyone in America must look at, that there are elements ready to create political anti-Semitism, of the Hitler variety, in the United States. It reinforces the fact, long known to students of international forces of our time, that fascism and reaction on the one hand, and anti-Semitism on the other, are inseparable. It suggests forcibly, once again, that the fate of the Jews is inescapably tied to the forces of progress and of liberalism. The same conclusion is to be derived from another episode involving a different religion. This second episode is reported from Argentina, where the Farrell governing clique, having created a Sduth American version of Nazism, has succeeded in drawing on their administration an unprecedentedly sharp rebuke from Secretary of State Cordell Hull. Isolated as Argentina now is in this hemisphere, it is persistently seeking to rally behind its totalitarian scheme various organized groups. A recent dispatch to the New York HeraldTribune tells how a number of Catholic organizations have rallied to the support of the Farrell regime and are trying to bring the Argentine Church into line soldily backing that administration. Here religion is being used overtly for purely political purposes. In fact, in the dispatch referred to, the dean of a Buenos Aires Catholic seminary is quoted as having said: "We do not want elections. We want government." Only one kind of government gets into power and stays in power without elections. That kind of government is totalitarian. It is the kind of government Argentina now enjoys, with its concomitants of state religion, suppression of free speech and press, concentration camps for political opponents, police-tolerated violence against critics and dissenters—in short, government on the streamlined Hitler-Mussolini model. .. Both the Fish episode in the United States, and the attempt to rally the Catholic Church as an organized body behindI the Farrell regime in Argentina, carry obvious warnings on their face Religion and politics are a highly dangerous and explosive compound, when mixed. __ Copyright, 1944, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc. Human interest story: When Paul Tarshish, 75, passed away this week, Mary Pickford lost her 'Vathdr." Miss Pickford is a Trustee of the Jewish Home for the Aged, where Tarshish, a great Talmudic scholar, was a resident. Mary lost her own father when she was four was attracted to this old man "adopted" him always called him "Papa." Her last affectionate gesture was delivering the speech of eulogy at his funeral. Did you hear that break in a Winchellian newscast recently? He was talking about "Goyescas," explaining that the Spanish film was made with Nazi money for Nazi profits, and was about to reveal the name of the Hollywood distributing agent (RKO) when the sound transmitter blurred him right off the air. • • • As the Allies move into the interior of Europe many of the one-time famous stars will suddenly find themselves declasse. Public opinion, completely muzzled during Nazi control, is beginning to throw off its restraints. In Rome recently public demonstrations forced the cancellation of Gigli's concert. The people will have none of these artistic Quislings. It won't be long before Chevalier, Sascha Guitry and other Goebbel goy—er—boys will be relegated to the hasbeens. Case of the death sentence pronounced on Danielle Darrieux by the French underground is a sample of the seething anti-Nazi torrent surging beneath the surface. • • • Twenty-year-old Leonard Sues, who has played both stage and screen roles, returns to his other profession—music. He's a trumpeter has just signed as the orchestra leader for Eddie Cantor's air show. • • • Since the irrepressible G. B. Shaw is figuring in the prints again, permitting his 'Ceasar and Cleopatra" to go before the kliegs, our own local Caesar (Arthur, the scribe) is reminded of the time when Shaw invited him to his home. Arthur arrived a bit flustered. Shaw gave him one long look, then said, "Please walk around for a few minutes and then come back. I want to get used to your face!" In Portugal Nazi officals are holding up shipments of American films en route to Switzerland be refusing transit permits through occupied France. Germans are particularly anxious to prevent the Swiss from seeing American and British newsreels. Invasion films do not flatter the "wehrmacht." In retaliation some Swiss houses are boycotting German-made films. • • • Danny Kaye sustained such severe injuries in a fall while shooting scenes for 'The Wonder Man" that he will have to walk on crutches for several weeks, necessitating cessation of the picture. Insider's info on the Kaye succession to "Blue Ribbon Town" replacing Groucho is that the sponsor has an eye to television—and blonde hair is more photogenic than a black cigar. • • • Though there have been premonitory warnings, the Mervyn LeRoys have finally split. She was Doris Warner, daughter of Harry. The LeRoys have been married ten years have two children. • • Fanny Brice held an exhibit in New York of her "Baby Snooks Collection of Children's Art." It is an assortment of water colors and drawings of youngsters from 9 to 16 years of age. • • • Castings: George Cukor looks like the favored candidate to direct the forthcoming feature, "Sarah Bernhardt." Paul Muni, who not long ago had quit pictures "forevah," has just finished a role in "A Song to Remember" and was signed for "Counterattack" as his next. • • • Major David F. Silverstein, former scenarist and more lately attached to the Army Signal Corps, died at the Halloran General Hospital. He has been awarded the Purple Heart. • • Whoops! Scoops! George Jean Nathan, from his lofty dramatic pedestal, is condescending to TALK about a writing contract for flickers. • • • Arthur Kober's books, "Thunder Over the Bronx" and "My Dear Bella" are set for a British edition. Churchill should be getting an accent, yet? BONDS and BOMBS BRING VICTORY RELEASED BY THE ARMY Now Open Year Around RurieAa Hotel GEM OF FLORIDA'S EAST COAST — Announces — NEW CABANA CLUB Open Nightly at Swimming Pool and Tennis Court Music Entertainment Recreation Transportation Service for Guests — Station Wagon will meet your train and make trips to the world's famous beach Boat and Motor for Fishing and Pleasure Write for Descriptive Literature and Summer Rates Box 747, Daytoaa Beach. Fla. HENRY H. HARDESTY. Mgr. Notice — Several Ftotel Positions Open — Writel < i



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PAGE SIX *Jenisli thrkHeun FRIDAY, M JG UST n AFTER 8 MOUTHS Moscow (JTA)—Ei>>ht Jewish boys in.in Minsk, ranging in age from eleven to fifteen, returned to that city this week after spending nine months with a partisan band in the neighboring Forests. A report of their exi ploits appeared in the Moscow press. The boys fled the ghetto about I a year ago after they had seen their parents and friends massacred. Slipping past sentinels and barbed wire, they reached the i center of tin' city where they met a friendly Byelorussian who directed th< m to the woods where : the guerrillas had their headquarters. After travelling for three days, they finally met up with a partisan sentry. The boys perfi.nner various t.isks (luring their slay with the guerrillas. The younger ones helped around the kitchen; the older youths tended horses, acted as stouts, and even participated in some forays against the Germans. OBITUARIES SAFFER Rev. Samuel David Saffer, father of Harry Saffer of this city, died August 6th in New York. A learned scholar. Rev. Saffer was a former Miami visitor, and conducted a religious articles business in New York. He was considered an authority on Torahs. Burial took place at Mount Zion cemetery Monday. Surviving are five sons in addition to Harry of Miami; Louis. Charles, Jack and Al of New York, and Murray of Los Angeles, and three daughters, Sylvia and Ida, of New York, and Etta of Los Angeles. In addition, he left 19 grandchildren and two great grandchildren. Ill in LOEB Mrs Barah Loeb, TO. 624 s. \V. uth \v.-. "lied in ii local hospital Mrly Saturday followlni a long lllnaaa, She bad been a realdent for 2."> yearn, coming here from itirmliiKhnm. Ala She i~ .urvlved by her husband, Harry; IHII sons, Loull and Qaorg*., of Miami Beach; two daughter., .Mis William Kchneldman of Miami, ami Mis Bern Ice Markowlta <>f New v i s> .ami nine grandchildren. Services in the chapel of the Oordon Funeral home were held Monday undoi the direction of Rabbi Man Shapiro Notice |g undersigned, hiislneu uml KI.KAN'Olis iraby Dade County. fiort£" -i ,. Bart u I.EOX KAPLAN ftSSL NOTICE is JOSEPH |3 RB<*V'~.V! V *!N a to the office of ti„ '., % %  ." k '}" %  cult Court of Dad, ." %  } the Clr. JOSEPH i: I ,,', .... I %  i: BERTHA l.ll i v'wT, HA1 I8IDOR SWEET la. In response to a plea from his son, Seaman Louis J. Gross, serving "somewhere In the Southwest Pacific," for a Torah to be used in religious services, William Gross, of 227 East 203rd Street, the Bronx, (right above) presents a Torah to Rabbi Nathan Witkin of the National Jewish Welfare Board. The Torah is on its way, through regular Army channels, to Chaplain Martin M. Weitz, whose jungle synagogue Is attended regularly by Seaman Gross. B'NAI B'RITH CANCELS SERVICES FOR FATHER OF EVENTS FOR TRAINING GEORGE CHERTKOF FRIDAY Champaign, 111.—The first national Bnai Biiih Hillel Leadership Training Institute, which was to have been held al Camp Onibar on Lake Como, Wayne County, Ua., from September 110, has been cancelled in compliance with the request of the Office of Defense Transportation to make available all possible transportation facilities for war purposes, it was announced by Dr. A. L. Sachar. national director of the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation. LOCAL PROMOTERS TO PRESENT SPORTS CARD The Weinberg twins. Phil and Jerry, known throughout this area for their sports activities, have announced another popular wrestling card for Monday night at the Miami Field arena. Featuring women wrestlers as part of the attraction, the Weinbergs' sports presentations have been will attended in previous shows. Services will be held Friday at three o'clock al the Gordon Funeral Chapel for Bernard Chertkof, 65. who passed away suddenly Thursday morning. Originally of Baltimore. Maryland, he had been a resident here for the past 19 years. He was a ivgrocer. Surviving him are his widow, Ida, a son, George, Miami attorney, and a daughter. Mrs. Frieda Levin of Miami Beach Rabbi Max Shapiro will officiate. Interment will ( %  in Woodlawn Park. Cairo —The pan-Arab unity conference, which has been scheduled and re-scheduled, and delayed for more than a year, is now slated to open in Alexandria on September 25. it was officially announced here. Iraq, which had been reported as unwilling t,i attend, will be represented by its foreign minister. ESSMAN k Easnian, 4!'. of lit s \v ith Ave., 'li.'.l ai hli home Saturday following I In Iff Illness A Miami i.s.i, M I for the naal two years*, he came here from New York city. He waa i member "f the Harvey Seeds port, American Jeglon. In addition I • his widow, Tic is aurvlvad by %  Karl,, and four brothera, laador, Herman, Norman and Moe, all of New Vork City. Funeral arrangeII.nis were under the direction of Coition I'nni-ial home. ARBEITER RING HOLDS SPECIAL MEET AUG. 2 QBOROB CHERTKOF THAI. IN THK COUNTY IN AND FOR Jl'DGE-fl FLORIDA. -,x' i'^VVrr"^^ ta RE^o^| X nS ">* %  Having flai,„ s .),[ *£* Saul Batati Vou, ami notified and clalma ami ach of A BEST investment—A United States War Bond. Buy often. ARABS CONCERNED OVER U. S. POLITICAL PARTIES Cairo (JTAl—Leading Arab circles in Egypt are concerned at the fact that both the Republican and the Democratic parties in the United States have empirically expressed themselves In favor of the Zionist demands for Palestine. The actions of the American pahtical parties have •brutally blasted" Arab hopes, -ays an article in the leading Cairo newspaper. RIVERSIDE MEMORIAL CHAPEL FUNERAL DIRECTORS 1236 Washington Iff* Mima Beach In New York. 76th SL* Am*, it: mm A 5-7777 RIVERSIDE AMBULANCE SERVICE • 1944 CA'tilLLAC AMBULANCE 1944 OXTGEN EQUIPMENT On August 2nd a special meeting was held at which four delegates were elected to attend the 25th Southeastern District Conference. The conference will be held in Birmingham, Ala. during Labor Day week. Elected are David Gross, Simon Kahn. Joseph Pollock and Morris Jacobs. The meeting will be a jubilee conference in celebration of the Southeastern District organized I {* twenty-five years ago. The District was organized to unify the individual branches in the South and also to help the branches have a wider cultural field than would be possible otherwise.! Through the efforts of this organization many widely known lecturers and singers have been brought to the branches. In many cities Jewish schools, choirs and other cultural activities have been formed through their help. The Ladies Club, recently organized, at their last meeting, Jacob H. Siegel as attend the confereither of'you^mai aaUU of y jOH.v a F UET.NOLDS £ '•"" • %  Sea \,, rJr !.; cut. to the II w l Blanton. County Jud of ba£ county, and file ,„, lie,in ih,' i ..line. c. unk .... Dad. County, F!.,i„, \7i, calendar'months from hedausfib, fifSt pul itlon hereof. Sd J*. or demand! to contain u,., dreaa of the claim i .., %  worn to and .-.„ .. "> %  aame will be baited <.. .. :" IfOof u„. IM3 !••,.,. Date Aujrual i, A. i I'm MAX Ft SILVER Aa Ancillary Admin • >r c of tinEaUte of John P R*yi I '• % %  CH| >l •MAX It SILVER Attorney for Am Admlnist • R/4 11-18-2.1 • NOTICE FOR elected Mrs. delegate to ence. Keep on buying War Bonds. LEGAL NOTICES l.J.A. FINDS BROUGHT THEM INTO THE HARBOR OF HOPE Notice is hereby given that the iiii'i,, imi. a. dealrlna to engage In buMtieiM undei the fictitious name "f HTDALL FAINT DISTRIBUTING CO at 103 Ml, st Miami Beach, i-1' MI, la. intends to reglater .aid name in the offfce of the clerk of the Clr%  ull Court of Dade County, Floi Ida MORTON Rl'BENSTEIN, LEON KAPLAN ** WMr I .MUtS? I'.'l Appllc.nl OF APPLICATION TAX DEED Chapter 20722 Acts of 194Pile A 8096 NOTICE IS HEREin (JIVEN that Rae Socolof, holdei State u I ( ounty Tax Certlfii ti No •. M. sued th<1st .1 ij ol June, A. I> INI has fllad aame in mj office, and ha. made application foi i tai deed to issued thereon s\. tl Cartlflcau embracei the folloulnR di property In the Count) of Dade > %  • %  of Vlorida. to-wit B. :.n ft of N 7| Block :•. Para Villa Sul,.. Fiat Booh the County of Dad) Florida Tin aaaeaamenl <•: >; ,I.I proaenj under the raid certlflcati was in the name of: Rana Rhett Unleaa aaid certlflcati ihall is) tdeemed according t>. laa", tlerty therein deacrlbed ill be *.i le 'nunt>. Flo By N (' stc rretl D C 'Cli.ult Court Seal) ~/n K/4-I1-U I ft. '.f N| Heigh! 'age %  Statof NOITCE FOR Noti.e Ihereby nlven that the underaigned, dealrlna ngage in bualneaa under the fi,titi.,us name of OI>OZNACER COMPANY, at B. 1st Avenue, Miami. Florida, t'i reglater said name ill the or the Clark of the Circuit of Dade Countv, Florida. LEE OWEN II J OWEN KAPI.AN OWmn Attorney for Applicant! l-ll-ll-Zja/l R21 N intend office Court LEON NOTICE IH HEREBY 'SAM BHRLICH MURRAY OROBSMAN GEORGE c.lKHTK..F S "" W, "' r T/^ .Wi y .,,!5, AwHc 1 With the help of the agencies of the United Jet.i.h Appeal for Refugees, Overaeai Needs and Palestine, these refugees from war-torn Europe have been brought to safety and freedom in Palestine. i lirough the combined efforts of the Joint Distribution Commiitee and the United Palestine Appeal, more than 8,500 reached the Jewish homeland \TSU first half of 1944. Hundreds of others have been brought to Canada and the United Slates. Those arSerV"ce here "?*" *" *""" U,e **** "'*• ii 1 !?** 1944 "•onwid campaign of the United Jewish Appeal for Refugees. Oversea. NeedVand RS est.ne represents the Urgest combined tmmT^i. .on. ever undertaken by American Jewt! To m l e '!J I "i ,e 1 u ne 4 d$ of ,u wnatituen' .Ancle. !" ,h2 IOHKPHV PSSSB? (ilVKN ,h 1 %  H v %  J, : .,.J, K,!KNTnAI BERKrV K NT AL : ""' I8IDOR iI r ,i ''"• •• %  'K<"l in businetw uni-'o,; 1 ::" 1 "" 1 •• ••' NORM* ;,1 M, '^ : '--' 7 M-rldlan Aveniia. Miami Beach, Florida, and in%  L m" 1 "";' -'"' "• %  ""<'> %  name n tl,off ,.. of the Clark of the cir I> Ragsdllt SOB" era of state and Count Ta* Cerufli ate No tltS laaueil the l-i d.iy June, A. I>. IM2, havi filed my office, and ha\>tion for tax deed to b >u on. Said certificate • following deacrlbed p operty in th* County of Dade, Btate "f I to-wit: Lota I and I". Hloi '* '.. P dena Pat k. a Sub 1*1.1 I'a.e 58, in the 1'ount) of Ds* State of Mori. la. The aaaessment of ".'.'i I under the said certificate was n me name of: TH( >M AS W M'NP l,"nles said certlfii ate shall l"" deemed accord In. t'' ... .^ n %  >> .t., la %  1 FLORIDA PROBATE HTEPHBN K P IN No 162 In Re: B8TATE OF IIHKINIMi. Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and Ail Having Claims or iniiunds sani Batate: k.r*bv You. and each of >"'. SJfS notified and required to presW claims and demands whan lW either of >..„, ma> have ;f 1, "\-'| N ,;, estate of STEPHEN K |IK ,, Mo: deceased, late of Dadj '""'UVJ,^. Ida. tn the Hon. W. f. "'"JS County Judae of Bade '<""">:, h file the aame in.hla ofrii* '* n „, Countv Courthouse in 111"e *%  ^in Florida, within (right %  • ll, ll,,r ,,!r.jtion from the date of the fn>t I'"'' %  ; hereof. Said claims or dn* contain t nnt and prtiU P.tHIII l-IHllll" •" "%  he lettal address of tnei ,„ !,.. -i • • •; a ,. aented aa aforesaid, or same ; barred See Section 120 of tne 1*41 I'rohate Act. Date August 4. A. I*•-•:;. MARIAN BREININO i ^ M 0 As Administratrix of •' STEPHEN K BREININO. MAX It. S1I.VEK rlv Attorney for Admlnlstratns 8/11-18-25 9/1 Buy War Bonftd and Sump* help preserve Democracy.



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FRIDAY. AUGUS T 11. 1944 vJenisirkridfor) PAGE THREE Th,, -fcblishment of the Cen?^a.-.n Index, Inc.. as a tral U* a ,, w |,ich seven Si,"known organization! na Sk to lo cate Persons disW ,'ld by war a,ul whose whereK are unknown, was an,b ,n^d hertoday by Moses FSSittTpmideni of the new£ created agency. The seven JS.tion.< which have combined to establish this cooperative service an The American Committali for ChnshanRofu^sJnc ^Centre St.. New \<>ik 13, N. Y.. American Friends Service ComgS 20 South 12th St., PhilSlphia 7. Pa,: The American Jewish Joint Distribution Com;,,,' inc. 270 Madison Ave., fiYork 16: Hebrew Sheltermgand Immigrant Aid Society, 425 Latoyette St., New York 3. u Y International Migration Service 122 East 22nd St.. New York 10 N Y : National Council of Jewish Women, 181 Broadway, New York 23. N. Y.; National Refugee Service, Inc., 1W Centre St.. New Wk 13. N. Y. Mr. Leavitt stated that the Central Location Index, which will be housed in New York City will serve as a channel for clear' ante of the names of hundreds of thousands of persons who are DOW being sought by relatives and friends in this country. The Index, Mr. Leavittt emphasized will not deal directly with individual applicants. Persons desiring to apply for location service can do so through member agencies or their affiliated and cooperating organizations thruout the united States if they have not previously done The member agencies in turn will register the names with the Central Location Index for clearance, after which the extensive overseas facilities of the member agencies, of the International Red Cross and of public and semi-public bodies, will be enlisted in the location of displaced people as rapidly as changing conditions permit. TO REMOVE RESTRICTIONS ON INDUCTION ON SEPT. 1 Brigadier General Vivian Collins, Florida State Director of Selective Service, has announced that, effective September 1, 1944, the restriction against induction of registrants in the age group twenty-six through thirty-seven will be removed and that all registrants classified to 1-A will thereafter be called for induction in sequence of order number. Keep on buying War Bonds. Excellent and growing Florida Community has position and good future for Schoched who who can operate Butcher Shop and Delicatessen. Reply, M. GREEN, BOX 2973, MIAM118, FLORIDA SERVE II HOSPITAL COMMITTEE PUN INCLUDES PARTY Serve A Hospital committee \ announces ;i community wide card parly with Mrs! Elsie Siiackman, general chairman, to be held at the Beach Y Monday. August 14th at 2 p. m. Proceeds will help buy materials needed by the Serve-a-Hospital committee of Greater Miami. This committee is sponsored by the Greater Miami Army and Navy Committee of the National Jewish Welfare Board, and is a voluntary one, supported by Jewish women's groups in this area All articles made by the Servea-hospital committee are sent as Kiits to government general hospitals. The women are now sewing "solitaire" pillow cases, which by an ingenious use of tape enable bed-ridden patients to play solitaire, and kits especially constructed to hold toilet articles, cigarettes, etc., within the patient's reach. Assisting Mrs. Shackman will be Mrs. Sidney Stepkin. Mrs. Jack August, Mrs. N. B. Jacobs, Mrs. H. A. Kauflman, Mrs. Henry Seitlin, Mrs. Joseph Arkin, and Mrs. Gertrude Lachs. A very pleasant afternoon has been planned. Tickets are 75c and include refreshments and door prizes. Tickets may be obtained from Mrs. Sidney Stepkin, 4-4126. or Mrs. Jack August, 5-0947 for tickets. Cairo (JTA)—Jews in the Dodecanese Islands off the coast of Turkey, have been placed in camps and many have been deported, the underground Greek radio reported this week. Jews on Rhodes, the largest of the islands, which are populated by Greeks, have been confined in concentration camps. IBHZSSW.V.W 9 ON SEPTEMBER 15,1944 YOUR FRIENDS WILL BE LOOKING FOR YOUR NAME in the ThdlexwiklbJEIIiDiRidliiquR Gyn&n^* .HE )[W I S^^^jG \ c*r,l THE JEWIS H WEEKLY JUST SAY HAPPY NEW YEAR A New Year Greeting in The Rosh Hashonah Issue of The Jewish Floridian is the Popular and Accepted Way of Personally Greeting Your Relatives and Friends on the Occasion of New Year LEAST TROUBLE MAXIMUM COVERAGE MINIMUM EXPENSE mLCOMD TO U. 5. WITH BOND AND BOUQUET Happy smile, gay bouquet, and United States War Bond—that'* the way Mote* Scherzer, a refugee here since 1939, greeted his wife, Sablna, on her arrival recently in Philadelphia. Scherzer, who haa been aided by the National Refugee Service, had no idea that hie wife was on her way to this country until a friendly FBI agent brought him the Joyful news. They are pictured outside their Brooklyn, N. Y., home. PALESTINE WILL NOT GIVE VISAS TO BODY OF JEWISH DELEGATES rectly connected with the war effort, and, therefore, would not issue visas to its members, but would attempt to supply them wih necessary reportts. Jerusalem (JTA)—The Pahstine government admitted this week that it has refused to grant visas to an American Jewish ecoj nomic commission which desires to visit Palestine to make an economic survey of the country in connection with post-war immigration and settlement possibilities. Chief Secretary G. V. Shaw told a press conference that the government had decided that the commission's work was not diIT PAYS TO BUY AT WvStmi LUGGAGE SHOP PHQNE 3-2603 Ask Your Local Delicatessen For the Beet e It Costs No More OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE IN FLORIDA KOSHER ZION SAUSAGE CO. PRODUCTS Delicioui Corned Beer Pickled, Cookad and Smoked Meats 37th and Normal Ave. Chloaae PALM BEACH NOTES MBS. MARY 8CHREBNICX Ba p reeep Wrt vo Beth Israel Sisterhood spon-, Mr. and Mrs. L. Goldstein left sored a card party Wednesday Sunday on a business trip, and night at Schwartzberg Hall. will visit relatives and friends in New York. Members and friends of Beth El Congregation attended services Friday night together with Spars and men in service. A social hour followed with Mrs. Ann Moss as hostess. She was assisted by her daughters. Rosalyn and Doris. The names of Irving Kappner and Mr. Tisnauer who assisted the chairman, Harry Halpern, for the Hillel fund were omitted from the.news items last week. A Word of Thanks I want to express my heartfelt appreciation to the president of Beth El Congregation. Mr. Glasser, and to the various men who took part at the memorial Yahrzeit service for my father. I also wish to thank our loyal friend. Mr. A. Levin, for conducting the service and reciting the Kaddish, which I was un[ able to attend, being in service in Italy. Pfc. Joseph Schrebnick. Drink COCA COLA Coca Cola Bottling Company of West Palm Beach Florida SOUTHERN DAIRIES D airi es County. leathern lea MM NSA1 TO TOO AS TOU1 PHOHZ FERGUSON FUNERAL HOME, Inc. 1201 South Olive Avenue WEST PALM BEACH PHONE 5172 %  % 



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PAGE TWO +Jewist Flcridian FRIDAY, AUGUST BIRTHS Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Lavine. 435 S. W. 30th Rd., announce the birth of a daughter on August 4. BRISM Rabbi S. M. Machtei officiated this week at the brisim of the sons of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Cantor, Sgt. and Mrs. Bernard (8, Mr. and Mrs. Isadore Sehicnhoft, Sgt. and Mrs. Hairy Gelensky, and Mr. and Mrs. Alien Fagen. Word has been received here el the bilth of a seven-pound boy on August 2nd to Mrs. Ruth Schindler, in New York. Mrs. Schindler is the widow of the late Lt. Roland Schindler, who was killed in the explosion of July 17th, at Port Chicago, Cal. Mr. and Mrs. Sam Schindler, 1425 Meridian Avenue, accompanied by their son, Irvin. are in New York with their daughterin-law. Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Schemer have just returned from a two week's vacation in New York and Washington. While in Washington they visited with Mr. Schemer's brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Irvin L. Siegal. UNVEILING The unveiling of a memorial to the memory of the late Sidney Rauzin will take place Sunday. August 20th. U. 1944 BARNEY ROSS JOINS JEWISH WARVETs" WEDDINGS Mrs. Lottie Gershon announces the marriage <>f her (laughter. Janie, to Kalman Rosen, u. S. Navy, son of Mr. and Mrs. Sol Rosen, Bronx, New York. The cen tnony took place Tue August 1st at the home oi the bride's sister, Mrs. George JRachlin, 1517 S. W. 17th Street. Rabbi Max Shapiro officiated at !ihe double rmg ceremony. A reception followed attended by relatives and friends. The couple arc now making their home Ul Miami Beach. *? W Miss Roslyn Rabin has as her I house guest her cousin. Miss! Phyllis Rokuson oK New York | City. She will remain through this month. Mrs. Milton Wolf has left for New York where she will be with Mr. Wolf at the Waldorf-Astoria. Returning, they will be at the Versailles hotel. HARRIET CHIEL Mr. and Mrs. Abe Chiel, 345 Meridian Ave.. this week announced the engagement of their daughter Harriet to S 2'c Bernard Kaplan, son of Mr. and Mrs. Max Kaplan of Brooklyn, N. Y. Miss Chiel attended local schools and is at present a member of the staff of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. The groomto-be is attached to the Seabees and is stationed in Rhode Island. Seaman Kaplan is a former student of Brooklyn College. No date has been set for the wedding. Mr. and Mrs. Leo Chaikin returned to the city after a two week's trip in Wisconsin and Illinois. Dr. Theodore M. Bcrman of Miami Beach returned this week | from a month's trip to California, where he visited in San j Francisco and Sacramento. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Zuckcrnick and son Michael returned to the city Monday from a trip to New York. Dr. and Mrs. Z. I. Sabshin have returned to their Miami Beach home, 3760 Royal Palm Ave.. from a trip to New York. Dr. H. A. Leavitt is on vacation and i> visiting relatives in Lancaster, Ohm. From there he will go to Hammond, 111., before returning to Miami about September 1. LINCOLN Open Daily 1:45 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach M l A U Open Daily I A In I 11:15 A. M. Downtown Miami CAPITOL ass-a Downtown. N. Miami at 3rd NOW SHOWING! Fit Thru Mon., Aug. 11-14 Damsels and Dances Music and Mirth In One Gay Packaqe of Romantic Fun! "SENSATIONS OF 1945" WITH ELEANOR POWELL Dennis O'Keefe W. C. FIELDS SOPHIE TUCKER DAVID LICHINE WITH Woody Herman Cab Calloway Mr. and Mrs. Jack Hertzman. 730 10th St.. Miami Beach, have announced the engagement of their daughter, Miss Phyllis Hertzman, to Lieut. Howard Learner, USAAF, son of Mrs. Elizabeth W. Lerner, Los Angeles. The bride, a graduate of Miami Senior High school, will be attended by her sister, Miss Ruth Hertzman. Lieut. Learner was graduated from officers' candidate school, Miami Beach, two years ago and has been stationed in Panama. After their marriage the couple will make their home in San Bernardino. Calif. Mrs. Theodore D. Firestone has left to visit her daughter. Mrs. Donald Smith and grandson at Akron, Ohio. Mrs. Firestone will also visit in Cleveland. Mrs. Sam B. Miller, 918 S. W. 4th St., left Thursday for a six week's trip to New York and Connecticut. She will visit relatives and friends and return I with her daughter, who is now in New York. Mrs. Miller is president of the Bnai B'rith Ladies AuxiliaryMrs. Robert Miller and family ; left this week by plane for Texas to join her husband who is stationed there. A. P. Gannes, director of the Bureau of Jewish Education, returned here this week following a trip to New York. Dr. B. H. Sadowsky, 3445 Royal Palm Ave., Miami Beach, is visiting in New York. Miss Sue Moss, secretary of the Miami Beach YM & WHA, is spending two weeks m New York visiting relatives and friends. Mr. and Mrs. N. Adelman had as their guest* for the week-end their niece and nephew, Sgt. and Mrs. Harry Rimsky. Sgt. Rimsky is stationed in Orlando. Fla. Rabbi and Mrs. Irving Lehrman and family will return to the city after a two month's stay in New York. Rabbi Lehrman ispiritual leader of the Miami Beach Jewish Center. And Their Bands FLORIDA CONGREGATION HAS NEED OF CANTOR for High Holidays Write or Wire MR. J. LEONIDOFF c o Jewish Floridian 21 S. W. 2nd Avenue Miami HEADACHE 1 IS SUCH A BIG UTTISTHMO I TUami for REST CONVALESCENC! O^CHRONICCASES *WSun-RqyPark /HealthResort Mount Sinai Memorial Park "Owned and Operated by Greater Miami Jewish Cemetery Ass'n A COMMUNITY CEMETERY Affiliated Congregations: Beth David, Beth Jacob, Miami Jewish Orthodox, Schaarei Zedek and Sisterhood Chesed Shel Ernes A LL SET for a good full day'a work when a nagging headache sneaks up on you. You suffer and so does your work. Beady for an evening of relaxation and enjoyment—a peaky headache interfere* with your fun, feat, enjoyment or relaxation. DR. MILES Anti-Pain Pills usually relieve not only Hea4%  eke. but Simple Neuralgia. Mut L9Ll&.^L?& You can *t Dr. Mile* Anti-Pain Pilla at your drug .tore in the regular Ps*ksge for only a penny apiece and In the economy package even cheaper. Why not get a paekage Bead directions and use only aa SID PALMER'S FUNERAL HOME "SERVING THE JEWISH COMMUNITY" PHONE 9-2664 "A FRIEND IN NEED^^ w HAGLER SCT. BARNEY ROSS, FORMER WORLD'S CHAMPION PRIZF FIGHTER WHO WAS ONE OF THE HEROES OF GUADALCANAL JOINS JEWISH WAR VETERANS OF.U. S. FOLLOWINC HBDI& CHARGE FROM MARINES:— ROM (center), who it credited *iih netting Iwentj-two Jape while defending three wounded comrade*, it fthown with Murrey Pre** (left), NalionalRecruiting Officer, nd Archil H. Grccnberf (right), National Commander of the J. W. V. Mrs. Maurice Grossman wifll leave August 15th to spend sev-l eral weeks in New York. Mr. and Mrs. Max Mintzer returned to the city this week after a northern trip that took them to New York and Canada. Their daughter Ethel spent part of the time with them. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Belanoff and Mr. and Mrs. Dave Cashvan are now residing at their new home, 845 S. W. 13th Court. Joe Gottesman, a member of the staff of Warner Bros, motion picture producers, is spending two weeks here with his father, Alfred Gottesman. He is a guest at the Breakers Hotel, Miami Beach. Dr. and Mrs. Bernard S. Kleinman, 441 Washington Ave., are leaving Miami Beach on August 10 for Alexandria, Louisiana, to visit their children, Captain and Mrs. Samuel B. Kleinman. and their granddaugiiter, Sara Louise. They expect to return on Labor Day. Louis Heiman and son Eugene are now at home after a short stay in New York. Mrs. Heiman and daughter Mickey are spending some time in Fleischman's, New York. Mrs. Max Halpern is spending some time in Hendersonville. Herman Wall is spending al week in this city and will returnl to Carolina to join his family. Abe Chiel has been confined! to his home, where he is recup-l erating from a recent illness. A. Glazeroff, 340 S. W. 6thI Ave., left this week for the north.! He will be gone about two| months. United States War Bonds still the best investment. Mr. and Mrs. Al Zalka have just returned to this city after a lour weeks vacation in Wayncsvillc and Brevard, N. C. At Brevard they visited with their daughter, Sheila, who is at Eagle's Nest Camp for the sum' mer. Bruce, son of Mr. and Mrs. Philip Steii, 531 15th St.. left this week for Georgia Military Academy, where he enrolled as '•i student. Mom* §*>tUt Your Complete Department Store With Quality Merchandise Washington Aye. at 13th St. Miami Beach And for your convenience Morris Brother's New Apparel and Accessory Store 70 E. Flagler St.. Miami TAVERN DRY CLEANER removes spots; easy to use. Two-gallon can $1.29 "NOX-ODOR" absorbs objectiona b 1 e refrigerator odors. Helps food retain flavor. 50c MIAMI BTORB HOUSE KI'KMSIIINGS KII-'TII I LOOR MOUNT NEBO THE CEMETERY OF DISTINCTION FOR DISCRIMINATING FAMILIES Rabbi S. M. Machtei. Director Olympic: Building Phone 3-3720 OLD SARATOGA INN Biscayno Boulevard at 77th Street P hon# \V\ Week Day Dinners 5 to 10 P. M S unday. From Noon Cocktail Lounge F ine Liquors and Wine WE ARE CLOSED ON WEDNESDAYS TAKE BUS 11 FROM DOWHTOWM MIAMI. OR BUS M-71 FROM MIAMI BEACH



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PAGE EIGHT +Jewist tlcrkJiari FRIDAY, AUGUST n 'NAI B'RITH NOTES MARX -byFEINBERG In The Synagogues Of Greater Miami Services ror lh€ week •and nnnounced bj the Qreatei Miami area art -i follows: Last Tuesday evening at the Miami Beach Y, Brother Harold Turk admirably filled the shoes of absent president Friedman and conducted one of the most orderly and interesting meetings of the year. Usually a vice-president, although very capable, becomes very panicky when called upon to substitute, but in this instance we had a magnificent preview of what we can expect from Harold next year. He is to be commended very highly for his orderly procedure and presidential demeanor. The entertainment program was sponsored by Royal Palm Chapter of A. Z. A. Brothers George Bertman and Joe Rudd The business of the meeting consisted of a final bond report by Brother Lou Heiman together with a request for an allocation of $150, which is to be supplemented by other agencies, the purpose of which is to sponsor a personal launching of the two sub-chasers purchased through our war bond effort. The mayors of Miami and Miami Beach together with the proper officers of the Lodge, are to attend this launching and the attendant publicity of newsreel and newspaper should prove to be the largest good will undertaking of the present administration. Brother Ike Levin, always on the alert for opportunities of do have proven themselves worthy | mg good in the community, asked of the job undertaken as evidenced by the work that this chapter of A. Z. A. is doing. Assisted by the B. B. G. girls at the Beach, the program consisted ol monologues, a magician act and vocal selections, and was concluded culturally in the presentation of a symposium by the boys on the post-war European Jew. It seems thai the Lodge has always shud away from any cultural programs and the 'do or die" method is to inject ;i lit%  tie culuture into our regular] meetings. Surprising as it seems everyone present enjoyed the entire meeting. -GORDONFUNERAL HOME 710 S. W. 12th AV. MIAMI TEL. 3-3431 Moderate Costs Always Within the Means of Individual Circumstances "YOUR JEWISH FUNERAL HOME" • Worthy and Deserves Your Full Support and Recommendation • SERVING MIAMI BEACH AND MIAMI • EXCLUSIVELY JEWISH 24-HOUR Ambulance Service I WANT MY MILK And Be Sure It's FLORIDA DAIRIES HOMOGENIZED Vitamin "D" Milk "Milk Products" Dacro Pro t ected TEL. 2-2621 Greater Miami Delivery Visit Our Farm at •200 N. W. 3aad Street for an allocation of $50 for the purchase of subscriptions to current magazines for the Nautilus Hospital on the Beach. The merits ol this project are self-eviI dent and it should suffice to say that the only complaint from the membership was to the inade| quacy of the appropriation. We are beginning to have a 1 trickling back of members from summer vacations and many old faces were seen present at the Tin re were some young too. It set ms that the hers are loath to announce thai they have taken vacations and are resorting to the Bubter(ug< ol summer business trips. One ol these days the wives will learn. Tins week we dedicate our Closing panel to Brother l.ouis Heiman. 1 believe that Lou became a member of our Lodge in 1938 and it was my pleasure to be the financial secretary at the time ot his admission. From the day of his initiation I believe that Lou has been one of our most active members. He came to Miami in 1926 from Jacksonville and was associated in the, practice of law with Brother Joe I Morris. Since that time Lou has made tremendous progress not only in his profession, but in his social relations in the community. Although Brother Heiman has held some of the highest offices in the Lodge, including the presidency in 1943, yet his activj it less and announced purpose I have been recognized in his election to the third vice-presidency of the entire district. Tin's means that in three years Broth| er Heiman will become the president ol the fifth district. We look forward to that day so that; we may enjoy with Lou the honor and prestigeto which he is I so notably entitled. His zeal in all war service efforts are known 1 not only m this community but throughout the district. Lou is one ot our younger leaders and is destined to go far in the work Of the Lodge. His, of all member-, is more likely to become a prominent name m the history ol District 5. I know that I expn the sentiments ot everyone when I say that we appreciatethe weak that Lou has done and will do, and we'll lend him our every cooperation. BETH DAVID CONGREGATION. Conservative. 135 N. W. 3rd Ave.. Miami.— Friday evening services ;it 7:15, Saturday morning .it 1:30 Evening services at 7:16 o'clock. BETH JACOB CONGREGATION. Orthodox. 311 Washington Ave.. Miami Beach—Friday evening services at 7:15 o'clock; Saturday morning ; m. to be followed by evening prayers. TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI. Reform. 137 N. E. 1th St.. Miami— Il'-Kulai services Friday evening at .I MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CONGREGATION. Orthodox, 694 S. W. 17th Ave.. Miami—Services wheilult-el for Frielay at 7.15 p. m. and Salurday .tt I a m and 7:18 i>. in. Shalosh Reudoa will be followed by M-i.e iv Dallj services al s ^u a, m. and -o p. in SCHAAREI ZEDEK CONGREGATION, Orthodox. 1545 S. W. 3rd St.. Miami. Frill.i> evening services begin at 7:in Saturday morning at :> Mlncha and Maai i\ al 30 a m Dally service! .e: i", a. m. and 7:30 p. in. Notes Of Y. M. H. A. -bySAM SILVER BETH SHOLOM CENTER. Con. lervative. 761 41it St., Miami Beach. Se vices scheduled f"i Frldaj evening ..t : IS Saturda) morning set \ Ices \\ i.'l be liM %  t %  • London (JTA)—Spurred by the possibility of saving Jews from Hungary the International Committee for Refugees, which was reorganized following the Bermuda Conference last year, will hold a plenary session in London on August 15, it is learned here i rbla column is conducted by the Ureater Miami Jewish Federation in eooperutlon with The Jewliih Florldlau as a community service. To Inform the community of your organization's activities and (•• avoid conHicts In dates, phone 3-3411 and ask for t ommunlty Calendar." Notification must reach Federation no later than Tuesday for publication that week.) Sunday. August 13th Meeting ..f Servicemen's Sub-Committee librarj of I teach Y a. m. Monday. August 14th Meeting of \., ,,: Hakaahruth Sub' "inmitt. i--. del itlon offi.. so i; m Mian I l:-.,. d Jewish • • %  Sisterhood, Centei. %  %  <-> ,, ,„ Tuesday, August 15th Kxee utivi i ommlttei meeting, F.-I• I at inn office, .'! 'Hi |, m Wednesday. August 16th Beth ti.ee id siaterh i meeting al •" i' "' • Workmen's Circle %  '•"•''' s ••'•retmlar membership meeting, v 30 n m Monday. August 20th r.nai Hi HI, Bholem Lodge, card %  ""' olngo party, Wofford 11..1.1 evening Buy War Stamps and Bonds NOW and give our men in the armed forces the help they need BALLANTINE'S ALE C Amirltm'i Fintst Since 1840 DISTRIBUTED BT NATIONAL BRANDS. INC. When You Think of Real Estate Think Of LEO EISENSTEIN REALTOR 309 Lincoln Road Phone 5-6479 Dependable. Conscientious Service REAL ESTATE—MIAMI BEACH MIAMI BEACH HOMES AND INVESTMENT PROPERTIES B. E. BRONSTON. Realtor 605 Lincoln Rd. p h : 5 M6e RENTALS LEASES SALES Lpt. Hornet. Hotels Apartment Houses M. GILLER REALTOR 1448 Washington Avenue PHONE 5-5875 '^ST DRINK PLENTY OF ntcr "UVIRlo TO YOUR HOME 8-04LL0K BOTT.r $0c CASE OF Six S T BLE BOTTLtS ... ,5, p,u Bom. Deposit >' PHONE 2-4128 BEFORE YOU BUY • %  E O N ELIIH with METROPOLITAN „ UFEINS.CO. S %  — % %  Bigg-, %  &f -Blggsjrt B6jeuge Beat Clocing Exercises The Y Home Camp closed its summer program last Thursday evening, August 10th, in a blaze of glory. The closing evercises consisted of a program, the underlying theme of which was the cooperation and coordination, between the United Nations. Songs and plays of the various countries, which make up the United Nations, were sung and presented and the grand finale of the evening was the presentation of a musical called "The Clock Shop." This program required quite a bit of preparation and much credit is due the Home Camp faculty stall, as well as the children who participated in the activities. The Y Home Camp is one of the outstanding projects for younger children held in the AUGUST BROS Rv? IS the BEST.' %  ONE VITAMIN DAY 1 -TABLST* XHDdrfiii TewsasaW A TL D THaTssJ"U'5 the Basse ONB-A-DAT (Waari) THaaste TteMets. -"-NERVINE no rmtnn >*m. i. **Tm* WrtrfsL Cr—fcr. Miami area each summer rv, dren of all creeds S" A camp and have a wel? rolfc summer schedule ^SSt I am sure most nf „„. the publicity ^rfen^tjV* Camp in the Miami Herald ?* past week-end. Mr. GroSmt our executive director n? n formed me that the pubHcitv J unsolicited He said that a H aid reported called at the Y 11 H?m. V r Wed th( \ actlvitie s of the Home Camp and sent a photo? rapher out the following Jay As a result of this publicity^ Y has received long distance" calk from all over the State. From people who desired to have chrtdren from their communities enrolled in the Home Camp. Howfh^m '.Vn, 88 necessarv o inform them that the camps program was concluded for this summer It is believed that the program will expand annually, and that many children from throughout tne State will participate in summers to come. The thanks of the Y are extended to all members of the faculty and all counsellors of the Home Camp for the splendid job performed by them at the camp this summer. J. W. B. Conference The Southeastern Region of the Jewish Welfare Board will hold its conference in Atlanta, Ga. on September 23rd and 24th. All Y members are welcome to attend this conference, and anv who can make it are urged to communicate with Mr. Grossman immediately. Phone 3-4012 RIVERMONT ?ABl SANITARIUM ISM N. W. 7th St. Ph. 1-7301 •et ear* for chronic sick, eonvi'•scent sad elderly ptopis 8ANEL BEER. M. D Direcur Reasonable Prices ****##*"* ADVANTAGES of a IIMIE FEItERaVL MORTGAGE • LOW RATES • BASY PAYMENTS • LONG TIME TO PAY PROMPT SERVICE A HOME INSTITUTION Deal With Youn LOCAL. FRIENDLY INSTITUTION 'RESOURCES OVER $10,000,000 HAHEFEIMmAl mmm



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PAGE FOUR rjewlsli nprMtofJ The Jewish Floridi lan it and Main Offices, 21 S. W. Second Avenue, Miami, Fla. ). Box 2973 Phone 2-1141 ered as Second Class Matter July 4, 1930 at the Post Office of Miami, Florida, under the Act of March 3, 1879 FRED K. SHOCHET, Managing Editor Subscription—1 Year, $2.00 Six Months, $1.00 MIAMI 18, FLORIDA. FRIDAY, AUGUST 11, 1944 Ab 19, 5704 VOLUME 17 NUMBER 32 FRIDAY, A UGUST H THANK AND BE THANKFUL The Fort Ontario "free port" or, more correctly speaking, the Emergency Shelter Camp, is an established fact now. The thousand refugees selected from various concentration camps are now ensconced in America on a site of some eighty acres in the town of Oswego, New York. That the United States Government should provide refuge for this number of refugees is not a thing about which we can justly make any great fuss about. The governments of such small countries as Sweden and Switzerland are taking care of many times this number of refugees. To be sure, many thousands of other refugees have come to the United States, but they have had to make their own way. They have not been wards of our government. But let us be thankful for small things. These new coming residents to America are very thankful. Newspaper reports tell us that their hearts almost broke with joy upon their arrival. We can understand their feeling. Every one of them in the last half dozen years has lived through a life time, had experienced more agony than is the portion of people's life times. Every one of them could fill a book with their stories. We have done something for them for which they are thankful, but in another sense, we must be thankful to them. We must be thankful for the fact that to us was given, in at least a small measure, a chance to bring a little happiness to a thousand people who suffered for no sin of their own. To us, they are further a symbol of what this war is all about. When we see them, when we contemplate their fate, we can understand better what the war is being fought for and so we can dedicate ourselves more completely to furnishing the task of beating the enemy, which we are now engaged in. SAPERSTEIN IS NAMED CIVIL SERVICE OFFICER Albert H. Sapcrstcin, acting personnel administrator and secretary of the Civil Service board for the city of Miami Beach, has been elected third vice president of the Florida Association of Civil Service and Personnel Agencies. A native of Detroit, Sapcrstcin 'is a graduate of the University of Michigan, with A. B. and LI. B. degrees. He also has taken courses in the University of Florida and the University of Miami. He practiced law in Detroit before coming to Miami Beach in 1939. He will serve as chairman on arrangements and host for the Miami Beach convention of the organization. NAME CHAIRMAN FOR JEWISH BOOK MONTH The appointment of Abraham H. Cohen as chairman of the Jewish Book Month Committee has been announced by Dr. Mordecai Soltes, president of the Jewish Book Council of America, of which the National Jewish Welfare Board is sponsor-coordinator. Jewish Book Month will take place from November 10 to December 10, 1944 with the concluding seven days to be observed as Jewish Book Week. Dr. Soltes said. The Jewish Book Month Committee of the Council will initiate a program of special activities and projects for the nationwide observance of Jewish Book Month. -TIDBITS FROM EVER Mudfy Confidential -By PHINEAS I. BIRONNAMES OF JEWS FROM ITALY ARE RELEASED "The American people do not glorify war. We do not embrace it as a way of life. But if our freedom is threatened we will fight hard and gloriously and with all our resources for its preservation. "In this hour of war it is highly fitting that we look ahead to the days of peace and to ways and means of insuring against the outbreak of another world catastrophe."—Secretary of State Cordell Hull. A guarantee against future wars is a better understanding among nations. The unhindered interchange of independent news can beget such understanding. "Therefore, we declare for peace treaty provisions proclaiming the world-wide right of all men to get, send and publish the news for the information of the public, without interference by governments and at uniform communications rates In our country we insist that censorship shall end when the war ends." —Kent Cooper, Executive Director of the Associated Press. LETS LOCK THE BARN DOOR NOW!! Names of 573 Jewish men, women and children, members of 300 families, who have reached Palestine from Southern Italy, were announced today by the Joint Districution Committee. The list was forwarded from Jerusalem and is on file at The Jewish Floridian office. Included are the names of members of many families who fled to Italy before 1940 when the Nazi hordes overran Europe. Their refuge became untenable when Italy entered the war and the Germans took over the peninsula. Thereafter most of them were incarcerated in the internment camps at Bari and Ferramonti in Southern Italy. B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN TAKE ON NEW PROJECT The women's group of Sholem Lodge B'nai B'nth have enlarged their war activities to include the making of solitaire pillows and bedside kits for the men on hospital ships. They have also established a cookie jar project through Special Services, furnishing cookies for the men of Redistribution Center No. 2. Mrs. Benjamin Landau is in charge. A study gtoup recently formed under the auspices of the AntiDefamation League has been well attended, with Alex Miller and George Talianoff conducting the interesting classes. Members are urged to join by contacting Mrs Dorothy Beienstein or the ADL office. B. B. GIRLS OF BEACH HAVE ELECTION AUG. 3 n B 'l ai u ?l rith Girls of Miami Beach held their election of officers for the following season on August 3rd. Chosen were: President. Fuzzy Port; vice-president, Vivian Schaeffer; second vice-president, Doris Weitzman; delegates Toby Fishman and Mickey Dubrin; recording secretary, Toby Fishman; corresponding secretary, Barbara Frumkestreasurer Mickey Dubrin; defense chairman, Harriet Feif religious chairman, Beverly Oreen; publicity chairman, Rita 7 JJfJS months, and got the thrills of his life watching our cornbaror in Italy enjoy his catchy tunes T he late Max W^JE, holdings in Germany and Austria are evaluated at two" dolors, yet his estate here is having difficulties • • • JJJJ Schwartz, dean of the Yiddsh theatre, vehemently oeja report that ill health may force him to retire, and 825 that he'll be back on Second Avenue after giving ***•.**: b r on the Coast J ust announced is a new book mgfJJ Martin Panzer, with the tentative title "How to Get a & of Life"