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The Jewish Floridian ( August 4, 1944 )

UFJUD

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%  > jjJeMviislbJEIIiDipidliiaun 5SME17^ NUMBER 31 MIAMI 18. FLORIDA, FRIDAY. AUGUST 4. 1944 PRICE 10 CENTS ntCEIIHG 111 E Merchants of M.am. Beach coJL in the servicemen s Kffifty dnve are receiving 37ms for their participation the movement Hospitality 'ledges are now ready for disSft'on to the stores the merchants' committee said. According to the sub-committee of the Miami Beach servicemen's hospitality committee the results of thedrive have been very satisfactory. Reports of all committees were heard and discussed at a meeting of the executive committee' held Wednesday in the Wofford hotel. Miami Bcac h Servicemen's Hospitality committee "Welcome Day" dance, the first in a series given for the entertainment of servicemen in this area, held last Saturday at the Recreation Pier was received with great enthusiasm. Present at the affair included C. L. Clements, treasurer of the merchants committee; Sol Goldstrom, co-chairman, hospitality committee; Mrs. Charles O. King. Mrs. M. E. Harwood. and Mrs. Edna Woody Gentry, members of the pier association. WAR RECORD OF JEWS OF CANADA PUBLISHED BY JEWISH CONGRESS Montreal (JTA)—A complete record of the participation of Jews in the Canadian war effort has been issued here by the Canadian Jewish Congress. It includes a list of 14,000 Jewish enlistees now in service. The national executive council of the Congress announced that it has established a rehabilitation committee to deal with the problem of demobilized Jewish servicemen and to insure full support by the Jewish community of the goernment's rehabilitation program. 1 NOT OFFER 10 BOARD PLANS 10 RESCUE CHILDREN AFTER HEARS Zurich (JTA)—Faced by world wide revulsion as a result of disclosure of the German-Hungarian offer to spare the estimated 400,000 Jews remaining in Hungary in exchange for non-military supplies from the Allies. the semi-official Hungarian Telegraph Agency this week denied that such a proposal had been made. Although the report of the negotiations nave been corroborated by reliable Allied sources, the Hungarian press agency denounces it as a "malicious rumor." Meanwhile, it was learned here 'hat 800 Budapest Jews who Possess exit visas face the prospect of sharing the fate of the bulk of Hungarian Jewry unless {hey can get out of the country by August 1. The Nazi Transwntment Press reports that the "sas issued to these Jews will invalidated at the end of this month. The possessors of the I lsas allr "ough compelled to wear a yellow star, have not oeen otherwise molested. fWlSH CHAPLAIN HAS ARK. SCROLL SERVICES San Juan, Puerto Rico (JTA)— !" a JSidney E. Unger. Jewish r* p ain of the Antilles Depart!" n t. this week dedicated the IPnt, e ^ lsh ark and scro11 in K,r? Rlc<> at lnc Ateneo. a culI "r.,1 center of the island. About •w Jewish servicemen attended. Services have been conducted il Atcn, -'o every Friday night out Vr ar and a half bul withUntJr R10 us equipment. Maj. Petual in pli,nmn e to light a per%  *J1 flame this week. Also prcsem at the ceremony Ho HCl Noah Sheppard, lish „„ (Rel) hoa d of the JewIWill.umv Un lty nere and Ca P t lolic PK Kirkpatrick, army Cathlbv thl aplain The ark was built lteiL. army Ma JUn er was ISffi bW of the Congregallfi ***,* Shalom of Phil and TempuT .Previously rabbi of "P'e Judea of the same city. Washington (JTA)—The War Refugee Board is in receipt of Regent Nicholas Horthy's offer to the' Red Cross to release all Jewish children under ten who can obtain foreign visas, as well as adults with Palestine visas, it was learned here this week. The Horthy proposal, which was first made public last week by the International Red Cross in Geneva, was transmitted to its delegation here and forwarded to George L. Warren of the State Department, who acts as liasion officer between the Department and the War Refugee Board. John W. Pehle, executive director of the WRB confirmed that he had received the Red Cross communication and told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency that the WRB is presently formulating plans for implementing the Horthy offer by securing havens for the children. It is understood that the Horthy note has also been transmitted to the British Foreign Office, but this could not lje confirmed in British official circles here. The cablegram from the Red Cross in Geneva also reveals that it has ben given permission to furnish relief to Jews who are interned in Hungary or those residing in the g hettos. IEWISH BRIGADE STILL POSSIBLE JBY BRITAIN London (JTA)—Britain is still giving serious consideration to the possibility of establishing a Jewish brigade within the British forces, it was stated in Commons this week by Sir James Grigg, war minister. Denying a member's chargethat there has been undue delay in acting on the question of a separate Jewish fighting force. Sir James said that although he was not in a position to make a definite statement at present, ne hoped to do so in the near future. RUSSIANS~TN~ LUBLIN CAPTURE DEATH CAMP London (JTA)-The British press reports that Russian troops who occupied Lublin captured a concentration camp which the Germans had converted into, one of the largest "death camps for %  "Hundreds of thousands of Jews are reported to haw died there from starvation, epidemics and e in gaT chamber. Jhe camp is believed to have been the sue of a revolt by Jewish prisoners last year during which they at tempted to burn down the gas chambers. Jerusalem (JTA)-FivJ hundred and seventy-six Yenum f Jews arr ved here this weeK. The? are the last Jewish immigrants who will be allowed to enter Palestine from non-bellig erent countries. Moscow (JTA)—After three years of sufferings under the German and Rumanian armies, hundreds of Jewish families liberated when the Russian army captured the Rumanian city of Botosani were enabled this week to "resume contact with their friends and relatives in the United States through the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. A list of Botosani Jews who have relatives in the United States, compiled by this correspondent, has been cabled to New York with the permission of the Soviet authorities. The list includes families many members of which have been massacred. It also includes fathers and mothers who have not seen or heard from their children in America since the outbreak of the war. Also women whose husbands emigrated from Botosani to the United States many years ago and who lost contact with them after Rumania entered the war on Germany's side. There are also brothers, sisters and other close relatives, many of whom were believed to have been killed or massacred during the pogroms which the GermanRumanian armies carried out in Rumanian cities. To bring these people in contact with their relatives in the United States, this correspandent made a special trip to Botosani where he spent several days interviewing Jewish leaders and talking to the men. women and children who remained alive after three years of constant terror. Botosani is typical of the many small Rumanian cities which have predominantly Jewish populations. The Jewish community maintains a primary school commanding 1.200 pupils, two high schools, a Talmud Torah, a free communal kitchen, an orphanage — which today houses 163 children whose parents died in Transnistria, — a dispensary, a hospital and three homes for the aged. These institutions had been closed by the Rumanian authorities. From Juno. 1942, the Jews were stripped of all rights. They were deprived of their property, of the right to work and many were sent to slave labor. Heavy taxes were levied on them, their land was confiscated, and professionals, including doctors, were barred from practicing. Although these anti-Jewish measures still remain on the books officially, since the Soviet government has pledged not to interfere in the internal administration of non-Russian territory occupied by its troops, they are no longer observed. Thousands of Rumanian Jews were killed by the Germans and other thousands were deported to Transnistria, the section of the Ukraine which was occupied by Rumanian troops. Although the situation of the Jews improved slightly after the Nazi defeat at Stalingrad and the bombing of the Ploesti oil fields in Kumania by the Allied •*!<*. their position remained hazardous until last June 23, when the German and Rumanian forces evacuated the city. With them went the entire civil administration. BOARD OF GUARDIANS EXTENDS SERVICE FEE FOR CHILD GUIDANCE New York (JTA)—The extension of child guidance work to wider sections of the population through adoption of a non-profit fee program was announced by the Jewish Board of Guardians, the child guidance and delinquency prevention agency of the Jewish Federation. The agency will continue its professional case work and psychiatric help to children and parents, on a moderate fee basis or without payment, depending upon each family's income, the announcement added. GERMAN LEADERS MURDER OF JEWS DELEGATION SEES EDEN ON HUNGARIAN JEW PROBLEM London (JTA)-A delegation of Christian and Jewish leaders, led by the Archbishop of Canterbury, this week conferred with Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden on the situation of the Hungarian Jews. Zurich (JTA) — Nazi leaders, shaken by unrest at home and defeat on all fronts, are beginning to lay the groundwork for their defense before war criminal tribunals, it is indicated in a dispatch by the Nazi Transocean news service received here. The dispatch quotes an address by Sundermann, deputy press chief of the reich, to representatives of the foreign press in Berlin in which he discussed German treatment of the Jews. Alleging that up until 1940 Jews were allowed to emigrate freely, he said that in 1941 Jews were "incorporated into the European production system" and placed at the disposal of the Todt Organization — which constructs German fortifications — farms, factories and other groups. Once assigned to labor, Sundermann said, Jews were no longer under the control of the Gestapo. This last is apparently an attempt to place the blame for the mistreatment and execution of Jews sent to forced labor on the individuals or organizations for whom they were working rather than on the German government. SWISS REFUGEES" WILL BE FORCED TO LABOR Bern (JTA)—The Swiss radio announced this week that the 80,000 refugees and internees in Switzerland, many of whom are Jewish, will be required to perform compulsory labor, under an order issued by the Swiss government. The decree also provides that in the future, arrangements for feeding the refugees and internees will be made by the Swiss military authorities "in accordance with the general food supply conditions in the country. MANY JEWS~MURDERED IN YUGOSLAVIA, CLAIM London (JTA)—Few Jews remain in German-occupied Yugoslavia, it is reported by a high official of Marshal Tito's liberation movement who has just arrived here. Of the Jews who escaped being massacred, many are fighting with Tito's forces, while others who were deported to Italy by the Italian occupation forces, either as prisoners of war or internees, are being returned in substantial numbers to territory new held by the liberation forces. The partisan official also revealed that there is only one Jew UNITY STRESSED BK POSTER TO BE DEDICATED HERE A billboard poster emphasizing American unity in the war effort will be unveiled on the corner of N. E. First St. and First Ave. during the noon hour next Saturday, following the regular war bond parade. Ceremonies arranged bv the Miami Round Table of Christians and Jews, in conjunction with the Institute for American Democracy, of New York, will feature an address by Mayor Leonard Thompson, prayer by ministers of the three faiths, and the reciting of a pledge of religious tolerance. The ceremonies will begin at 12:25 and will be broadcast by Station WIOD between 12:30 and 12:45, and a large gathering is anticipated to witness the ceremony. The poster, which will go on the familiar billboard in front of the First Federal Savings and Loan Association, depicts three American soldiers charging with fixed bayonets. Across the top runs the legend: "Fighting Side by Side." To the right of the soldiers appear the words: •Protestant; Catholic; Jew." Across the bottom of the poster is the legend: "So That Everyone May Worship As He Pleases." The poster has previously been unveiled in New York City, Atlantic City, and Boston. Posting of the billboat-d is done through the courtesy of Packer Displays and use of the board by the First Federal Savings. E IN EIGHT JOIST ITS. PARTY PLANKS Cairo (JTA)—The Arab press is continuing to wage a vigorous anti-Zionist campaign on the basis of the Palestine planks incorporated into the platforms of the Democratic and Republican parties. Al Ahram, largest Arab newspaper in the world, writes that a union of Arab states "can throttle any plans" to make Palestine a Jewish state. The projected meeting of Arab states should make clear, the paper adds, that the Arab governments would consider the formation of a Jewish state in Palestine an inimical gesture and are ready to back the Palestine Arabs in their desire to hold onto their land." ASK PALESTINE HAVEN FOR HUNGARIAN JEWS New York (JTA)—The "Hebrew Committee of National Liberation" announced this week that it has cabled Prime Minister Churchill asking establishment of emergency refugee shelters in Palestine to receive all Jews who can be rescued from Hungary. "The opportunity to save the Hebrews of Hungary is at hand," the cable said. "Countless thousands of men, women and childalive in the Yugoslav capital of ren can save their lives if only -* ,_-_J. u ;<. IM_\7r*ar.r*lH thev are nermittpH tr pnlpr PalBelgrade. He is 80-year-old Dr. Vukie Piade. noted gynecologist, who was president of the they are permitted to enter Palestine. We therefore suggest that His Majesty's government OglSI, wno was M '".uc..i *" • %  %  — TJ ', A. L Belgrade Jewish community I start without delay the estabcouncil Although his family j hshment of emergency refugee was murdered, the aged doctor shelters in Palestine." was allowed to continue practiclg. A popular Jewish officer fighting with the partisans, he said, is Major Moscoar Danaon. You can't quit now! You must continue to buy Bonds, and More Bonds! I



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PAGE TWO BIRTHS Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Imberman, 811 Espanola. announce the birth of a daughter, Gail Sayde, on June 18. Sgt. and Mrs. Harry Galinsky announce the birth of a son at Saint Francis Hospital on July 31. Sgt. Galinsky is stationed at li. Raton with tin Army Air Corps. Mrs. Galinsky was the former Jackie Shopiro, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Shopiro. 200 Ocean Drive. S-Sgt. and Mrs. Hedrick announce the birth of a daughter. Michele Bess, on July 13th at the Miami Biltmore. Mrs. Hedrick is the former Dorothy Schoenbaum. of 1228 Collins Ave., Miami Beach. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Cantor. 3143 S. W. 21st St. announce the birth of a son July 28th. Mr. and Mrs. Max Fcit and family of Miami Beach are now residing at 835 Collins Ave. Miss Beatrice Kellncr of Washington. D. C. is a house guest "f MiSS Bernardino Roth of this city. ENGAGED Mrs. Harry Blumin and family are visiting in New York. Mr. Blumin returned after spending a month with them. Mr. and Mrs. Max L. Shapiro. 1861 S. W. 21st Terrace, will leave Monday for a month's stay nt Scaroon Lake. New York. Mrs. Jennie Applerouth and children of Key West arc spending several weeks ;


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r mAY. AUGUST 4. 1944 ... > I %  -JewlstFhrldian PAGE THREE SERVE-A-HOSPITAL IS COORDINATING WORK OF WOMEN OE AREA The Serve-A-Hospital comJtee of Greater Miami which ffilMtea all Jewish Women s VlS ons in this area, whose or S purpose is to supply SfflTat government hospitals gr^for their comfort and nvrniencc are planning a sg&M m : 7 This committee has already distributed over 100 solitaire JSow cases to be ma de UP T^ y the different organizations. The nillow cases are used for playfng solitaire by bedridden patients. The women are also making bedside kits. These kits are slipped between mattress and bed frame within easy reach of the patient for his toilet articles. wri'ine material and cigarettes. Just as soon as yarn arrives from New York the women will crochet bed room slippers for the returnees hospitalized at general hospitals. Tickets to the game party can be obtained through Mrs. Sidney Stepkin, chairman 4-4126 or Mrs. Jack August, co-chairman 5-0947. Army Will Not Police Refugee Shelter Camp Washington (JTA)—The army will not police the emergency refugee shelter at Fort Ontario. according to Dillon S. Myer. director of the War Relocation Authority which takes over custody of the grounds at the fort tomorrow. The 986 refugees who will be housed there are expected to arrive this week. Although President Roosevelt placed the administration of the camp in the hands of the WRA. he ordered the army to help transport the refugees, provide the equipment needed to convert the army camp, and take the necessary security precautions. The War Department will still be responsible for carrying out all security measures. No military police, therefore, will surround Fort Ontario as they do the Japanese Relocation Benjamin B. Goldman, former director of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation and wellknown social work executive, has assumed the post of Director of Community Information and Service of the Joint Distribution Committee, major American agency for aid to distressed Jews overseas, it was formally announced. In welcoming Mr. Goldman to the J.D.C, Joseph C. Hyman, Executive ViceChairman of the Committee, explained that Mr. Goldman's primary duty will be to maintain and intensify the delation between the J.D.C. and the Jews throughout the country in whose name it operates. LIST OF LIBERATED JEWS FROM BOTOSANI IS NOW AVAILABLE The partial list of Botosani Jews—in the newly liberated part of Rumania—having relatives in the United States, Canada, Latin America and elsewhere, has been called to the Jewish Telegraphic Agency by its Moscow correspondent. To bring these people in contact with their relatives in the United States, the correspondent of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency made a special trip to Botosani where he spent several days interviewing Jewish leaders and talking to the men, woand children who remained aliveafter three years of constant terror. Among names listed is Blumtee Rapaport, who named among his relatives a Mr. Joe Rappaport, of Miami Beach. A complete list is on file at the Jewish Floridian office. The Joint Distribution Committee made public this week the names of 285 German and Holland Jews who were recently exchanged for 111 German nationals interned in the Middle East and who have now arrived in Palestine. The list was forwarded by Reuben Resnik, J.D.C. representative in the Middle East, and is on file at The Jewish Floridian office. A FAMILY OF FIGHTING CONTRIBUTORS TO THE U. J. A. Moscow (JTA)—Jewish partisans from the cities of Pingk, Bialystok, Baranovichi, Slonim and other liberated Byelorussian cities and towns are returning from the forests to begin rebuilding their homes and factories which were destroyed by the Germans, according to dispatches reaching here. Camps, to guard against escapes. The refugee settlement has been placed under the directorship of Joseph H. Smart, formerly field assistant director of the WRA in Denver and more recently stationed in Peru with the Office of the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs. A staff of approximately 40 WRA employees are now stationed at Oswego making final arrangements for the refugees arrival. Of the nearly 1,000 refugees, most are Jewish with small contingents of Roman Catholics, Greek Orthodox, and Protestants. They Ihclude persons of 14 nationalities. Jerusalem (JTA)—An estimated 30,000 Jews assembled at the Wailing Wall this week to mark the observance of Tisha b'Av, which commemorates the destruction of the Temple of which the Wailing Wal is the ony remaining section. The Plotkin family of Athol, Mass., is fighting this war on the European front and on the Pacific front. In addition to meeting the common enemy on the battlefield, they have also done iheir share to help the victims of his program of annihilation. "A foxhole does funny things to you. It makes you think right and drives away selfishness", Sgls. Melvin and Jacob Plotkin wrote from the Solomon Islands to their brother in Massachusetts. In the same letter they announced that they were contributing the sum of $200 to the campaign of the United Jewish Appeal for Refugees, Overseas Needs and Palestine. IJI-I year these boys contributed $90. AH of the six members of the Plotkin family in the armed forces are contributors to the U.J.A. Their motto is that while victory is certain, "we cannot wait for that glad time to aid thoof our people who are suffering because of our common enemy." (Top row, left to right) Sgls. Jacob and Melvin Plotkin, stationed in the Solomon Islands; and Corp. Charles Plotkin, a cousin, now in England. (Bottom row, left to right) Sgt. Robert and Corp. Norman, brotherof the Plotkins in the Pacific area; and Corporal Morris Gould, another cousin. The fighting Plotkins are manning their battle stations on the humanitarian front, too.' Aik Your Local Dslicataasan For the Boat • It Coiti No Mora OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE IN FLORIDA KOSHER ZION SAUSAGE CO. PRODUCTS Delicious Corntd BT Plckisd, Cooked and Smoksd Meats 87th and Normal Ava. Chlaaao New York (JTA)—The unanimous election of David Sher of New York as chairman of the National Community Relations Advisory Council to succeed Edgar J. Kaufmann of Pittsburgh and the announcement of a program of clearance for national and local civic protective agencies high-lighted the meeting this week of the Council's executive committee, it was announced here. London (JTA)—A delegation of Christian and Jewish leaders, led by the Archbishop of Canterbury this week conferred with Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden on the situation of the Hungarian Jews. In disclosing the visit to a meeting of the Board of Deputies of British Jews, Prof. Selig Brodetsky, president, said that there was reason to believe that British government will aid the Hungarian Jews. Rome (JTA)—Pope Pius this week received Chief Rabbi Anton Zolli of Rome, with whom he spoke for a half-hour, it was disclosed this week. It is understood that Rabbi Zolli expressed his thanks and those of the Jewish community for the moral and material assistance given the Jews of Rome during the German occupation of the capital. Aside from sheltering many Jews, the Vatican contributed funds to meet a ransom demand of me Germans. A BEST investment—A United States War Bond. Buy often. IT PAYS TO BUY AT LUGGAGE SHOP 16 A E /"AVS. ..-•""<"<<* PHONE 3 2603 FREEDOM RETURNS TO THE JEWS OF ROME PALM BEACH NOTES MRS. MART SCHREBNICX Max Greenberg has returned from New York where he has been on an extensive buying trip. Mrs. Greenberg accompanied Mr. Greenberg and visited with relatives and friends in New York City and Long Island. Mrs. Hyman Kapner. 831 Ridgeland Drive, left for the north Sunday. She will spend the remainder of the summer there. Pfc. Arthur B. Leibovit has returned to Camp Chaffee. Arkafter spending his furlough with his parents. Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Leibovitt, Winter Rose Apartments. Pfc. Leibovitt, who is in the field artillery expects to be sent to the field artillery mechanic's school at Fort Sill. Okla. At its meeting Tuesday night at Scher Memorial Hall, final plans were made by the Beth El Congregation for the high holidays. Mrs. May Cohen and son Jerry of Tampa are visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Al Persoff of Delray Beach. Mrs. Cohen will also visit at the home of her mother in Miami. Saturday night at 8:30. Sunday morning and evening, impressive services were held at Beth El Congregation, Fern St.. in memory of Carl Schrebnick, who passed away Julv 31st, 1925. He was one of the first members of Beth El Congregation, and was active in its work for about 30 years. A. Levin, a close friend of the family, gave the service and recited the kaddish in the absence of the son. Pfc. Joseph, who is on active duty with the air force at Rome. LFAR MERY CO. For *• lo1 %  D**T Product WIST PALM BEACH 1CLK—CBEAM--ICE CBKAM Drink COCA COLA Coca Cola Bottling Company of West Palm Baach Florida There was great rejoicing in Rome when the 'opening of the avuaKome marked the return — f5-*-* IVIVIVUIK *s-a m\srMm\, *r— —— fpentng of the synagogue marked the return aiJ om lo **• Jewish community in the AinT c ,,y Liber tion f Je* o f I|alv b %  *——'VIMNVU Wl J\~TfB Wft **ay —'/ SS *, rmiw has increased the needs of the Neid j WUh A PPI tor Refugees, Overseas funT p *le*tine, which must provide the rcTt required t0 further the rehabilitation and oration of Jewish communities freed from ^*" oppression. The Joint Distribution Committee, which is afiliated with the Unite* Pal estine Appeal and National Refugee Service in the $32,0()0,000 nationwide UJ.A. drive, is now expanding its program to minister to the Me* of Sew. in liberated territory. Photo *""£"j Unt Jews gathered in front of the Synagogue o Rome on E occasion of the reopening of this famous house of worship from which the Jewish community h.d been barred by the Nasu for nine months. SOUTHERN DAIRIES IT, BsaflaM 9wim Baach County. *33 <3-A*L. nationally F—iou Southern DaMoa *retlleTaUaaBl %  %  aad XoB Cm AS NEAB TO YOU AS TOU1 FERGUSON FUNERAL HOME. Inc. 1201 South Olive Avenue WEST PALM BEACH PHONE 5172 1 i



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PAGE FOUR The Jewish Floridi lan nt and Main Offices, 21 S. W. Second Avenue, Miami. Fla. X Box 2973 Phone 2-1141 :ered as Second Class Matter July 4, 1930 at the Post Office of Miami, Florida, under the Act of March 3, 1879 Jen 1st fkrkgari Face Facts By Alexander F. Miller Florida Regional Director Anti Defamation League -TIDBITS FROM EVER iPMcJtfy Confidential -By PHINEAS I. BIRONFRED K. SHOCHET, Managing Editor Subscription—1 Year, $2.00 Six Months, $1.00 MIAMI 18, FLORIDA. FRIDAY. AUGUST 4, 1944 Ab 12. 5704 VOLUME 17 NUMBER 31 A PICTURE LESSON Saturday, during the noon hour, the unveiling of a billboard poster will take place on the corner of N. E. First Street and First Avenue. Sponsored by the National Conference of Christians and Jews, the poster ably presents the American theme of Religious tolerance and understanding. Depicting in striking form three American soldiers "Fighting Side by Side," this display will serve as a vivid reminder of one of the chief causes for which this war is being fought. Too many have become callous and too matter-of-fact in accepting this conflict without thought of its implications and the benefits to accrue from victory. The Four Freedoms, of which Worship is one will be brought to the fore as we pass by this scene teaching a lesson by its graphic portrayal. A CHANGE Rumors from London say that the British Government has finally determined its policy with respect to Palestine. No hints are given as to what this policy will be, nor is it likely that any such revelations will be made until after the war, but the recent removal of High Commissioner Sir Harold MacMichael and the naming in his stead of Viscount Gort is linked with the new policy. On first thought, it would seem that the fact that MacMichael has been removed could imply that the British intend to adopt a more pro-Jewish policy in Palestine, for MacMichael has been anything but a favorite of Palestine Jewry. On the other hand, no one can say with assurance that Gort will be any friendlier. Gort's atitude to Jewish aspirations are unknown, but the very fact that one man who was displeasing to the Jews has been removed might offer some hope for the thought that his successor will be an improvement. Meanwhile, the various Zionist bodies, notably the Jewish Agency, are adopting a watchful attitude, promising to cooperate with the new High Commissioner as far as the war is concerned, but waiting otherwise to see how he will act. Another indication, beside that of the removal of Gort, that the new British policy may be favorable can be guaged from the action of both of the American political parties which have gone all out for the removal of immigration restrictions against Jews going to Palestine and the establishment of a Jewish Commonwealth. It is scarcely likely that the British right now would want to completely ignore the American policy. It would seem likely that >he British will change their policy at least as far as easinq otf on the White Paper and the restriction of Jewish immigration, cut politics and diplomacy are strange and complex crafts ana all we can do now is guess. the FOOD FACTS In our third year of war, there is a deeper appreciation of ; vital role of food in wartime. There is also a qrowina recognition of the fact that the production, distribution and proper use of our food is so vast a problem, that all of us regardless of our wartime duties can contribute materially to' the task of making food fight for freedom. And this isn't all just talk. During September, 1944 Floridians are participating in the nation-wide Nutrition Month. This is the month when nutrition is receiving primary emphasis throughout the United States in the Food Fights For Freedom Program. The National Nutrition Program has as its goals for all individuals in the United States: To choose a better diet by learning about food selection and food values. To have three well-planned meals each day, with special emphasis on a good breakfast and lunch for school children and war workers. To grow and use more green and yellow vegetables and tomatoes to increase the vitamin and mineral content which is necessary in a wartme diet To store, prepare, and cook food in such a way that the most good can be received from it and to prevent any physical waste of food. Being well fed means more than filling the stomach with foods that satisfy hunger. It is more than getting the food that barely protects the body from disease due to poor diet. It is having each day the kind of food that will promote abounding health and vitality. Nutrition, in every-day language, is eating three good meals a day are appetizingly served and well cooked to preserve all food values. Total war demands total strength. Strong and alert nations are built by strong and alert people. Strong and alert people are built hy abundant and well-balanced diets. Let's all conserve food, share it, play square with it, and EAT WISELY! Each month I look forward to receiving the bulletin issued by Temple Emanucl, Fort Lauderdale. Each issue of this bulletin consists almost entirely of a vibrant and inspiring message written by Dr. Albert A. Shapira, retired physician who. makes his home in that community. For sheer literary merit I think that Dr. Shapira's articles rank with the best writing of today. That I am not alone in my opinion is evidenced by the frequency with which his articles have been picked up by other newspapers and carried in their feature columns. Latest to pay Dr. Shapira the signal honor of quoting him is Arthur Griffith. Sunday columnist on the Miami Herald. Mr. Griffith quotes the first two paragraphs of Dr. Shapira's message in the July issue of the bulletin. I would like to quote for you the last two paragraphs. I wish I had the room to include the entire article. "A Jew in the United States Army or Navy is encouraged to be proud of his heritage. He can worship God in his own way, freely and without prejudice or intolerance. As a result, the soldier or sailor feels uplifted in spirit and is happy that he belongs to one great democratic organization. Yet, here in Fort Lauderdale, we have a large group of people who refuse to rent rooms, apartments. or houses to officers and men in American military or naval uniform if they admit, or are suspected of being Jewish. The leaders of our city know what is going on. The Christian ministers are cognizant of the situation. But they do nothing to eradicate or remedy this bigotry and narrow-mindedness, which is so un-American and unchristian. It seems inconceivable that any American, who must hate the Nazi ideology, could uphold the anti-Semitic (and anti-Christian) keystone upon which the Swastika-idolaters have built their temporary but — thank God! — tottering might. Yes, here in our own city there are those who unblushingly disgrace themselves and commit the unpardonable sin. the treasonable crime, of slamming their doors in the faces of Jewish men and women in uniform, whether holders of commissions or citations or medals or not. The bravery of some of these very men might have saved the lives of relatives of these same door-slammers. From a most reliable source we know that many 'restricted clientele" property owners here have no religious bias. But they are forced into a regimented acquiescence and inaction by a Bund of realtors who have resolved by hook or crook to practice a mercenary discrimination against Jews — and all Jews. Thus Jesus, Joseph, and Mary as well as all the early Christians, would by this yardsticks have to be refused admittance in Fort Lauderdale, with not even a manger in a stable under whose roof to lay their weary heads. So, ever mindful of the early pilgrims (Jews included) who settled on the rocks and rills of our country to escape trom religious persecution, eternally grateful to our fighting men and our liberal leaders for their sacrifices in the cause of liberty and justice and more than mere tolerance, modestly proud of our own congregational blue f w an .u RO J d Patiently hopeful for the dawn of the dav of peace and brotherhood and good neighborliness. we Americans of Jewish faith must be as vigilant against these enemies in our midst as against our foreign foes *....?£ returni nR sons and daughters are to find us ready to assist them in every possible Way u n ? d J ustir K themselves— unobstructed, unhandic a p D e d and unmolested—as useful, dutiful, and law-abiding citizens." CANADIAN CLOUDS Flying to Montreal in perfect weather ... As we look d from the plane window the earth seems well ordered a d ^ tematically arranged Well kept farms nea 8ys white houses lazy cattle, and calm and peace over'all ^ A soldier transported overnight from the battlefield might th \ these green and brown hills and valleys between New Y \, and Montreal were a new planet, the Kingdom of God once in Montreal, one is rudely reminded that the world h"' not changed much—and if at all, for the worse. 8 THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW .... The Canadian Province of Quebec is one of the most bea tiful and most backward regions on the globe Q • "I Fascism flourishes there undisturbed Cardinal Villone" 0 the recognized spiritual head of the French Canadians, drelms of a corporate state and openly approves a French Canadian boycott of Jewish merchants ... The Quebec provincial elec tions will be held on August 8th, and the campaign is in hill swing now Three parties are in the contest for political control of this province, the population of which is overwhelmngly French Canadian ... The three parties are the Bloc Populaire the Union Nationale and the Liberals, who are now in power The Bloc Populaire and the Union Nationale are unquestionably Fascistic in their political orientation. THE NORTH AMERICAN ARGENTINE The press of these two Fascistically inclined (to put it mildly) parties is frankly pro-Franco and pro-Sinarquist If y OU read the Action Nationale of the Bloc Populaire you are propelled back into the Middle Ages Andre Laurendeau, their leader, advocates a French and a Catholic Canada ... He urges French Canadian women to super fecundity as a means of capturing Canada for the French Canadians Laurendeau maintains cordial relations with the Polish Fascist groups in Western Canada and in Latin America, and is very friendly with the Falange. CANADIAN NAZIS .... The Union Nationale is seeking power so aggressively that it stoops to open anti-Semitism to make political hay ... Its leader, Maurice Duplessis, is by far the shewdest of the French Canadian politicians ... It was he who some months ago projected the hoax that the Liberal Government of Quebec was planning to settle 100,000 Jewish refugees in the Province of Quebec L'Union Nationale directs its appeal to the younger generation, and is skilfuly manipulating the anti-Semitic issue as a vote gathering fishing net Ihiplessis' election campaign is by far the most effective and most active ... He uses all the paraphernalia of modern propaganda over the radio, and employs many women as campaign workers. FASCISM ON THE MARCH .... The Liberals, under the leadership of Premier Godbout, are a rather anemic, colorless party trying to follow the middle of the road policy They enjoy the support of the English section of the Province of Quebec, and that of those French Canadians who believe in and want the status quo We do not believe that Godbout will succeed in maintaining a majority over the Bloc Populaire and the Union Nationale ... He has been supporting the Canadian war effort, within certain limits, notwithstanding the anti-war attitude of a majority of the French Canadians and their church There is a strong possibility that he not only will be beaten but will go down in a disastrous defeat. GENERAL IMPRESSIONS .... As you travel about the small towns and villages of Quebec Province you get the feeling that the people are not yet infected, but merely swayed by a consistent anti-British and antiJewish propaganda ... In other words, they are simple, naive people who are being manipulated by ruthless political intriguers backed and, more often, prodded on by a clerical Fascist church The Quebec Hierarchy could, if it wanted to, change the atmosphere overnight ... If the Quebec clergy were to translate the Popes pronouncements against anti-Semitism into concrete action, the Province of Quebec could be paradise on earth The propaganda that is peddling antiSemitism, anti-war ideas and anti-British feeling is mild in the press, but strong and well-organized as conducted by pan 311 workers by the mouth-to-mouth method Sinister whispering campaigns about Jewish conspiracies to control the economic life of Quebec Province are rampant The attitude of the Jewish community reminds us of the Jewish position i Mad* Fran Freeh Orange. jcwioii uummuniiy reminas us ot the jewisn posiuuu — many in 1929 and 1930 .. There is appeasement on every front, and a blatant lack of unity ... For instance: In this election the Jews will, for the first time in 20 years, lose their one representative in the Provincial Parliament of Quebec • •" the St. Louis district, where the Jews could elect a represents w tive, four Jewish candidates are fighting one another • • in result will be that the Bloc Populaire candidate will be presented with the election on a silver platter, because of a disrupted, confused and split Jewish vote Jewish leadersmn failed in this emergency ... The Canadian Jewish ^gres looks on with folded arms ... In this crisis the Jews need [Wg very best spokesman in Quebec—but they will have n 0 ^ 0 :/ We predict that after the elections the Bloc Populaire and w Union Nationale will form a coalition government .. • That a emment will drive aggressively toward a corporate fOc regime ... And the Jews of the Province of Quebec are in ** very tragic chapter in the history of the Jews of the wefw Hemisphere.



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nUDAY^A^Iil 1944 "Between You and Me" By BORIS SMOLAR Copyright, 1344, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc. POLITICAL NOTES: Now that the Democratic Party has matched the Republicans in espousing Jewish rights in Palesfoe. Zionist leaders no longer see any need for pressing for tarty passage of the Palestine Resolution pending in Congess • B is obvious that this resolution could now pass in both houses when Congressional sessions are resumed ... But to jously the military authorities, the Palestine Resolution will remain pending for the time being Leaders of the Democratic Party originally contemplated having Rabbi Stephene S. Wise address their Chicago convention on the Jewish plight in Europe aud on the importance of Palestine as a home for European Jews • • This was later changed to a suggestion that an important non-Jewish personality address the convention on the tragic fate of European Jewry, in order to pave the way for a proper statement on Palestine ... In the end, however, it was thought best that the statement be included in the general party -latform as part of the party's foreign policy, without any special orators Many will be interested to learn that Dr. Abba Hillel Silver, who took a hand in the Republican statement on Palestine, was in Chicago during the Democratic convention and had something to do with the declaration of the Democratic Party • • • And speaking of Palestine, we hear that Eliouh Dobkin, head of the immigration department of the Jewish Agency in Jerusalem, is due soon in the United States ... He is now in Lisbon en route here This will be his first visit to this country ... A Jewish commercial delegation from Palestine will also visit this country soon to place orders for various commodities with United States firms, and to study Palestine-American export and import possibilities INTELLIGENCE NOTES: Approximately nine percent of all Jews in the United States were under arms in the Army, Navy, Coast Guard and Marines, on July 1, 1944 This figure excludes men already discharged from the service ... A study ol those from Pittsburgh has established that one out of every jour of these Jewish men was with the Air Force, probably regarded as the most dangerous of all services About ten percent of the remainder were in the Medical Corps Similar is the percentage of Pittsbubrgh Jews in the Infantry, and somewhat less—about seven percent—are in the Field Artillery and in the Quartermaster Corps, each Five percent are in the Engineers The remainder are with the paratroopers, chemical warfare, and other branches of service ... It is assumed that the same figures hold good for Jewish servicemen bom other cities Many will be interested to learn that a survey of physicians of two boroughs of New York City established the fact that 32 percent of all the Jewish doctors were in the armed forces These two boroughs represent approximately one-fourth of all American physicians of the Jewish faith ... At present Jewish war record committees are functioning in over ninety percent of the cities in the United States having alewish population of 1,000 or over They are all working under the direction of the National Bureau of War Records established by the Jewish Welfare Board We also hear that I the Jewish Welfare Board is flirting with the idea of sending a highly trained Jewish journalist to various battle fronts in Europe to report from there individual heroic acts of Jewish men and women in the armed services. LITERARY NOTES: Jewish students of world literature, and those who are especially interested in the Bible, will not want to miss Thomas Mann's "Joseph the Provider" just published ty Knopf. This is the fourth and last volume of Mann's great tetralogy ... In 600 pages the great writer and Nobel-prize "inner tells the story of Joseph beginning with the time when he was banished for not submitting to the whim of Petepre and concluding with the migration of Israel down to Egypt ... All the incidents in Joseph's life, as related in the Bible, are elaborated upon by Mann as a result of his great erudition in bible ^dy and his special interest in Joseph's personality ... A Picture of Joseph emerges which makes him more shrewd, more calculating, more sophisticated than does the original text in J Bible Religious Jews will definitely disagree with some the characteristics which Mann gives Joseph They will jj*> object to incrimnating incidents which Mann weaves into !" narrative and which are not mentioned in the Bible Jtt. for instance, is the tale which Mann tells of old Jacob j*ag seduced by the wife of his grandson, the native girl Tamar ... This particular episode, inasmuch as it puts the f^narch in a light which is far from the spirit of the Bible and %  Wry to family traditions preached by the Bible, wUl del*% be resented even by non-Jewish students of the Bible • On the whole Mann's book, however, will be widely read %  Wl* homes, though severely criticized by those Jews who Wjr to read the Bible without any trimmings and elabora%  iW on so-called "Bible criticism." PERSONAL NOTES: Maurice Samuel's book on Palestine J 61 1 the Desert" which has been published by the •*h Publication Society by arrangement with Knopf, is turn-out to be quite a good seller Many are wondering, hown!\ Wh ? some co P ies f h bo k 0 P* n with an U WE K?JZ the Iewi8h Publication Society explaining that it does li W ? ys endor8 Ae views of its authors ... This note is %  WW from other copies apparently ordered by Zionist groups LJft Feuc btwanger, who is attaining his 60th birthday this h !L h ? let il e known in a letter to Louis Rittenberg. editor ZZS* hdaism, that he pays no attention to birthdays I2*%to my own birthday^' In an exchange of letters rEkSSS* he develops interesting view, on the role of the X^P' 6 as a spiritual force In the world These views ftjyB** ^ the forthcoming issue of Liberal Judaism /David Mekler, editor-in-chief of the Jewish Morning Journal, jw proud of the fact that he finally secured the news service '•"ish Telegraphic Agency for his pope* • Jew 1st rhriUii -. PAGE FIVE CAPITAL SPOTLIGHT By MURIEL LEVIN Copyright 1944. jtwi.sh lelt-Kiuphlc Agency, Inc. With the realization that the establishment of "free ports" as temporary havens for refugees is limited to small numbers, interested circles here and abroad are plugging a new plan to help the surviving Jews of Europe. nrS lde3, as P ut forth by a Washington columnist with national readership, is for the United Nations to issue "visas for somewhere" for ALL those in danger. According to the plan, the visa would guarantee that the United Nations would see to it, by agreement among themselves, that the individual refugee would reach some safe haven. Presumably this would answer the fears of small neutrals such as Portugal and Switzerland who have in the past been overwhelmed by the stream of refugees pouring in—with no assurance that they would be moved out. This "visa for somewheie" would assure the admitting country that the refugees would be transferred within a reasonable time. Funds, according to the plan, could come directly from the individual Allied and neutral countries, from the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, from the Intergovernmental Committee on Refugees, or from private charity organizations. Some sort of precedent was set by the Nansen passports after the last war. Fridtjof Nansen, who died in the early '30s, was the Norweigian arctic explorer who became internationally known in the years after the last war for his humanitarian work in famine-stricken Russia. He was made High Commissioner of Refugees by the League of Nations, and his office issued the so-called Nansen passports to facilitate the repatriation of those who did not hold any papers. With the league backing the passports, "stateless" persons were enabled to travel from one country to another. Sweden is reported already to have offered some form of protective citizenship to some of the Jews of Hungary, much to the chagrin of the puppet government. The diplomatic representative in Budapest is said to have issued passports to a limited number of Jews, thus accepting them as citizens and offering them protection, i No official group Here has as yet taken the idea of "visas to somewhere" under its wing. The War Refugee Board, for the present, says that it is a State Department matter; the State Deparmens as usual is not talking. However, the "free ports" plan was initiated with similar disavowal of interested. After expression of sufficient support from the press and the public, the plan suddenly found Congressional as well as Administrative backing—and in very short order Fort Ontario was established. Our Film Folk By HELEN ZIGMOND Copyright, 1944, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc. Since 1940 Harry M. Warner has received no less than thirteen awards, medals, citations, ranging from the D.A.R. to a plaque from the President Avila Comacho of Mexico. In between are honors from P.T.A. groups, Boy Scouts, Legion posts, etc. for Warner's patriotic services. One interesting distinction was the title of Honorary Lieutenant Colonel from Governor Rivers of Georgia for aid in the Anti-Fifth Column Campaign. And if we delved into the honors bestowed on David O. Selznick for his continuous stream of high quality pictures, the list would almost fill this pillar. An unusual one is his medal from the League of Nations for motion picture achievement. • • • Many in the cast of "The Hitler Gang" are themselves victims and refugees from that gang. To mention a few—Fritz Kortner, probably the mosthunted of Goebbels' prescribed list; Alexander Granach. Erno Verebes, Felix Basch, Lionel Royce. • • • Producer Hal Wallis. this year's Academy Award winner of the Irving Thalberg memorial, crashes the sacred '' Bes of "Who's Who." A less* a £ consequence is the fact thafSae was in the top brackets of A\e recent Treasury income tax report. • • • When the door of a Jap Zero was -being auctioned off for War Bonds, bidding became hot and lively between Al Jolson and Theatre-Owner Harry Popkin. Al finally won it with a $220,000 purchase—then he redonated the prize to Popkin for further bond-selling bids. • As to Phil Baker's newest sell-uloid, you will either "Take It or Leave It." It's different and if you like memory quizzies and are a fan you'll enjoy identifying scenes from old movies. • • • Pertinent is Eddie Cantor's story of the woman visiting an Army hospital. She lingered at the wheel-chair of a wounded G. I. Joe asked how he had lost his leg. "I didn't lose it. ma'am," he answered. "I traded it for a clear conscience!" In view of the fact that Papa Winchell has had some theatrical experience (he was a Gus Edwards Kiddie in the days of yore), he is west-coasting to aid daughter Walda in launching her career ship. The rest of his menage accompanied him. including eight-year-old sonny and the newly adopted Chinese baby. • • • Cinema Chatter: Junior Laemmle, with a medical release from the Army, is contemplating a renewal of pic production. He owns the film rights to several stories. Max Factor received the "E" for manufacture of plastic eye-shell frames used in gas masks. The legal cleaving of Joan Blondell's matrimonial bark took place this week. She won custody of her two children. Leon Schlesinger celebrated his fifteenth anniversary as a cartoon producer. Did you know that Major William Wyler, former director, was a nephew of the late Carl Laemmle?' Parkyakarkus returns to the silver screen in "Out of This World." Parky doesn't worry about pictures since he owns a juicy slice of the Palladium, Hollywood's busiest dance palace. Joseph Schildkraut's new plan of life is kliegs every summer, footlights the rest of the year. Having completed his warm-weather chore, he's hop-skipping back to 'The Cherry Orchard" located on Broadway. In "Mr. Winkle Goes to War" Edward Robinson delivers one of his finest character portrayals he's a middle-aged office drudge to whom the war brings the fulfillment of his life-long dream. • • • When Joel Kupperman made a guest appearance on Fred Allen's program, he was considerably worried over a loose "toof," fearful lest it fall out during the broadcast. It didn't however, and it wasn't until he was on the train homeward bound that it dropped from his jaw. A few days later Allen received a letter which he insists "tried to bite him." • • • When Phil Baker mentioned a two-inch steak he had just got from the butcher's, he hurriedly added that was the length not the thickness. Buy U. S. Stamps and Bonds. Refined, educated, unencumbered lady seeking position as Apt. House Manager, or Hotel Housekeeper. Mrs. B.. co Box 2973, Miami 18, Fla. RIVERSIDE MEMORIAL CHAPEL FUNERAL DIRECTORS 1256 Washington *ve, Mian.i Besch in New York 76th St 1 Arasteidam Av* 5-7777 RIVERSIDE AMBULANCE SERVICE 1944 CAiilLLAC AMBULANCE 1944 OXYGEN EQUIPMENT RELEASED BY THE ARMY Now Open Year Around RudeAxi UcUe£ GEM OF FLORIDA'S EAST COAST — Announces — NEW CABANA CLUB Open Nightly at Swimming Pool and Tennis Court Music Entertainment Recreation Transportation Service for Guests — Station Wagon will meet your train and make trips to the world's famous beach Boat and Motor for Fishing and Pleasure Write for Descriptive Literature and Summer Rates Box 747, Daytona Beach, Fla. HENRY H. HARDESTY, Mar. Notice — Several Hotel Positions Open — Writel ) i i



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PAGE SIX *AHM/ Flerid/ian The Post-War World By A. NISSENSON The author of this article Is one of the leading Yiddish poets of the day. He is also an outstanding journalist. We deliberately refrained from publishing this article earlier lest it be Interpreted as an indication of a political committment, The views expressed herein ;ni' entirely those of the author, ami do not necessarily reflect our own position. Now, that the onslaught on the European fortress is in full swing; now that the armies of liberation are storming the slave-citadel of Europe from all sides, it is high time to give some thought to what kind of a world will emerge out of the greatest battle the human species ever staged in the history of its existence. Much has been written about the post-war world in the last few years. Articles, books, treatises in the hundreds have been published replete with plans, suggestions, advice and well-wishing about the reconstruction of the world after the war. The thing to be noticed, however, is that none of the authors has treated the subject from the objective point of view; none of the authors, or practically none, has given the merest thought to the possibility of all plans being upset by natural hisi toric causes produced by a war of biologic extermination as the one we are experiencing now. This merely proves that the eminent authors either did not grasp the full meaning of the present conflict, or that thev are afraid to face reality of life and war. The only one who has truly grasped the march of time, who has appraised the evolution of history in the proper light, who so prophetically perceived the; dream and the desire of a world in conflict, is Henry A. Wallace. America's Vice President. Stemming from the heart of the people, endowed with a profoundlyi religious nature with a concep! tion of social justice flowing I from the teachings of the Hebrew prophets he dared to look history in the face and discover I in the present struggle the emerI gence of 'the century of the common man." A greater and truer discovI cry could not have been made. The very outbreak of the war spelled the doom of all movei ments with programs for human | deliverance, leaving the field free and clear for the emergence of the common man on the anna of world history, whose ideology I IS freedom from want, freedom from faar. freedom of religion and freedom of conscience: whose ideology is not to kill and the full be killed but life in meaning of the word. The historian, writing the history of our century, will be forced to note that the disintegration of all social, socialeconomic and socio-political parties and movements of every shade and color began with the very outbreak of the First World War in the year nineteen-hundred-and-fourteen, the very moment these parties lined up behind the banners of their respective governments in support of the war. The Second World War merely brought completedissolution. In his desire to explain the dissolution the historian will have to resort to the science of psychology. By applying this science he will discover for one that the very elements of which the various social movements 1 were compounded consisted of romantic and never of practical fiber. The moment they had to face reality, confront life in all its brutality, the romantic structure snapped like cobweb. The continuance of existence of these movements between two wars was merely a feeble parodv on their former romantic glorv. The end of the first world war left thsjeommon man complete' y d'fHusioned. Having lost faithVMall political movements he nfjtvinger could orient himself i., ,cl the vast labyrinth of problems created by four years of warfare. The peace treaty, instead of settling matters has complicated them and has planted, wittingly or unwittingly, the stcils of a new world war. Socially, politically and economically everything, outside of Russia, remained as is. On the other hand a number of small nations, whose nationalistic aspirations have been subdued for many years, were brought back to life and they took to aping the major nations in their display of extreme nationalism. The romanticism of the defunct social movements was taken over by nationalistic demagogues giving it a blood transfusion of racial mythology and presenting it to the common man as the new and only deliverer. How was the common man to know that the dance-macabre of the various nationalisms was preparing for him a new holocaust of blood, death, sweat and tears? How was he to know that a new trap was being set for him out of which he could escape only through the sacrifical blood of his child? For notwithstanding his practicality in dailylife, his nature is as credulous as that of a child; the various philosophies and dogmas he could never comprehend. His belief is and always has been in God which, as the prophets taught, is truth and justice and goodness and the way to it is— the nation. And he does not understand how people who patriotically speak in the name of the nation are in reality enemies of that very nation. He is gullible, the common man. He does not realize that the god each particular nationalistic leader shapes for his nation is not the universal God of all mankind, but one devised to fit the racial mythology of the particular nation and, like in ancient Greece, a clash between the gods was inevitable. In the blood of the common man there lives a vision of eventual justice and equality, although in his zig-zag toward that vision he often sidetracks the realization of it due to his gullibility and essential purity of heart. Will his vision be realized in this war? Perhaps. Many signs point to that realization, notwithstanding the remark of Prime Minister Churchill that the present war is no longer a war of ideologies. The saviour of England in her most tragic hour dees not stem from the very roots of the English common man and is therefore not the expression of his soul which is the same as that of the universal common man. What are the signs which point to the ascendence on the arena of the common man? The foremost is the disappearance of practically all ideologies and dogmas, leaving the field to the four freedoms which are what the common man expects as the outcome of this war. And it is no coincidence that it fell to the lot of Henry A. Wallace to devise the simple yet equally profound philosophy of the century Of the common man. In formulating his philosophy he gave vent to the subconscious dream of the common man all over the world. For all the books, brochures, articles and treatises about the post-war world are after all products of ivory-tower intellectuals — economists, sociologists and professors of history whose multiplicity of plans were guided by facts and figures and not y J. he soul of tne c mmon man. The common man has suffered a great deal having to fight two wars in one generation. Suffering purifies the soul like a tonic. It stands to reason that he will not allow himself to again be misled into the stray paths of this or that party, this or that demagogue, but will insist on building the post-war world according to the formula of the century of the comman man. OBITUARIES SPEYER Miss Rita Speyer, 50, Miami for the past in a hospital last sided at 118 N. a Red Cross ors %  "' %  her Spi ycr. of mil' hel< I ••Mill 'lit Of four years, died Thursday, She >• %  K. lu.'lrd St.. and wan worker, Among eurvlvbrother, ('apt. Jens II Miami. Funeral servlcee undei the direction of the Gordon Funeral Home KLEIN David Klein, 51, a resident of Miami foi the past 1" years, died last Wednesday, lie came here from New York and resided at ;:i:H Alton Itoad, Miami Beach, He la survived by his wife, Mrs. ROM Klein; three HiHteis, the Misses Fanny. Irene ami Virginia Klein, and two brothers. Adolph and IgjiatS Klein, all of Miami Beach, Rabbi Max Shapiro conducted service! I" Riverside Chapel. Burial followed iii Miami Jewish Cemetery. PARSON Mori is Parson. 7c. a retired retail store operator a died Saturday morning at ins home in t'oiai Qables, aftei s brief illness He came lien, a year ago from New York. Surviving are his widow. Mrs Anna I'ar.son of Coral Qables; two sons. Dr. Rudolph Parson of Roosevelt, New fork, and in. William Parson of Coral Qables, 1 one daughter, Mrs. Alice i.i-tzlei Z5E^_^GUST 4i 1944 J^LNOTICa buxlnesw under the fl.-M.V !" I*t(u BLBABOR-S I'l ( %  • """'iS 2JJ St., Miami, n,;,,;. 310 N' g register said name I,h ln, !" to he Clerk of u,.. rj," M cffle, J Dade County, Florida < our of WrUgJL LEON KAPLAN ''artnert T/iV.itvVuiV pp,,0,Bt FLORIDA, IN PROBATS 01 ^ In Re: MTArg V'HENM „ A NOrVf! E KI Tr,''-'"'" srisg?-Wia lots unit tot hereby and of |.\ Arlington, Va Arrangements were tinGordon Funeral Home. HER6KOWITZ Mis Rachel Herskowlts, jx. of 822 Lenox Ave., Miami Beaob, died lasit Friday after %  brief Illness. She • inn here from l.os AiiKelen eight months ago. Among survivors are a sun, Qeorge, a daughter, Bather, and | a brother, Harry Qreenberg, all of tins city. Funeral .services were undei the direction of the Gordon Funeral Home, with Rabbi Max Shapiro officiating, Burial "as in Mt. Blnal cellletei > CAPLAN Rubin i'apian. 80, a retired wholesale lew.lei ..f no? Collins Ave.. Miami lie.oh. dud last Wednesday In a local hospital, He came here three monthaa*o from I'ittMliurKh. Surviving are ins wife, Mrs, Sophie ('apian. and t"" daughters. Palmer Funeral Home -iii the remains to Pittsburgh, COMMANDER Samuel I. i '..mmander. ill, a resident ol Miami for the past six years. died last Friday at his home, mi S W. Ninth St. He came here from .\.w York City, Surviving are his wife. Mrs, Ida Commander; two daughters, Carolyn ami Bonla Commander "f Miami, and two brothers, Nat ami Sam Commander, both of New York. The Cordon Funeral iioiiie had charge oi arrangements for shipping the body to Richmond. \a., for hui ifll. Havl Maid Estate: notified and required to nr. <• alms ami demands whfth'T "' either of you, may have i.i ,ou "' estate of HENpJ? C^AjfiSSUfc dec-eased late of Miami till jRl Florida, t„ ,„,. li;. !" VTtr nUn,r (punty Judge or Dade cbejff" 1 file the same "• <-' %  .'.V un County Floilc from the i" his off| C j Ul "• the !**&. SsrstSgffiS SS to contain thT 1^1 addr^!3r* St .?; %  ; %  :* "W"fe l>ate July II, if, 4 | MARIE QALLAGHn Administratrix of the KMI. HENRY C. QALLAOHEI MAX R. SILVER*"" As .' PRAYERS FOR VICTORY ON TISHA BAB J**>* a** ***• • ^, First Hand Account of Persecution is Given London (JTA)—Many Jews in the German concentration camp of Vittel in France attempted to commit suicide when they learned that they were to be deported to Poland instead of being exchanged for Germans in Allied countries, it is revealed by British internees from Germany who arrived in Lisbon to be exchanged for Germans. NOTICE IS HEREBY OrVBN iku JOSEPH B UEBENTHAL BBfc m,;, a ,r.;;" K "*'"' i n *SM? .. e fieiitioits name of VUPV LOU ARTS, at 2 |, Mfrh| !" nue. Miami Beach, nSSTm lE tend to register said fictitious name in the office ,.f the i-Uik of the Clr. cult Court of Dade County, Rortk JOSEPH 1! UKItEXTHU BERTHA LIEBENTHAL I8IDOR SWEET GEORGE CHERTKOF Attorney for Applicants 7/J1-M I 4-u-is Geneva (JTA) — Hungarian papers reaching here are silent concerning the offer of Regent Horthy to permit the emigration of Jewish children under tin and also adults who possess Palestine visas. The papers continue to press for even stronger measures against the Jews. Jewish soldiers serving in the United Nations armies assemble at the Wailing Wsll on Tisha B'sb to prsy for victory, ss Jews throughout the world commemorate Ihe destruction of the ancient Temple in Jerusalem. In the United States Tishs B'ab will be observed not merely as s memorial for the dead, but as the occasion for the quickening of the organized effort to rescue the living through the instrumentality of the United Jewish Appeal for Refugees. Overseas Needs and Palestine. Bern (JTA)—A first-hand account of the persecution and de! poitation of Hungarian Jews was given this week by a Hungarian woman who left Budapest a few days ago, in an interview appearing in the Basler 1 Arbeiter Zeitung. I She reports thai thousands of Jews from the Budapest suburbs l oi ujpest and Kispest, where ghettos have been established, were recently loaded into sealed cattle trains and sent to Poland %  Many persons witnessed the deportations, which were accompanied by scenes of horror and tenor since the Jews knew the rate in stoic f,, r them. Jews from the city of Gyoer .h, Hi • Wtu s,nt lo Lublin! which has just been liberated by •,rf„ R S" rt Arm V. Some postcards armed from j,. ws deported to other parts of Poland, but thev were postmarked With the names of towns whose locations were npt known since the Nazis have I changed the Polish names ,„ German ones. Jews are not permitted to accompany their dead to the cemeI tery. she disclosed. Jewish 1 corpses are taken to the grave yards and buried by Jewish labor gangs without any relatives present. Jews In interment camps are not allowed to seek £vcr during air raids, and no shelters are provided for them The woman, who was enabled to reach Switzerland because she is married to a Swiss nationa said that the fate of Hungarian' Jews is in the hands of a Na/, dominated Hungarian triumvirate consisting of Minister of Interior Andor Jaross and two officials under him-Laszlo Bakv. Secretary of State in the minis Sure" 01 Under -Secretary K 0 London (JTA)—Deportations of Jews from Hungary have ceased as a result of joint protests by Catholic and Protestant churches there and the worldwide indignation aroused bv the reports of the execution of tens Of thousands oi Hungarian Jews in Polish death camps, the Swiss Telegraphic Agency reports in a dispatch received here from Berne. IN T11K COUNTY JUDGE'S COOT I IN AND POR DADE COCNTT, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE No. ISM7 In Ro: ESTATE i.P JOHN F REYNOLDS. Decesaed. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persoasl llavina Claims 1MIMAX R SR.VEB As AnciUar) Administrator, C. T A.I of the Estate •< John 9. Re] I in %  ... • 11 .MAX It SILVER Attorney for Am lllarjr Admlnlatratoi 1/1 11-18-25 LEGAL NOTICES Nolle, i • undersianed, linsiii.-s IIIHI. I.MK ^:-i \ Intend offln ''••in t hen i — i V.ii thai thi deKlilns I., engage In tinfictitious name of ornZNAUEIt COMI'ANY at E 1st Avenue, Miami, Elorlda, to realKtei said name In the of HiClera of the Circuit of I lade Count) El la LEE I'WKN II J OWEN KAPLAN """ i Alton,.-* for Applicants 4 -11 -18-25 9 I NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Chapter 20722 Acts of W' File A 809* _. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN -.!>l It...Rocolof, holde of 8U County Tax Certlfli te N" I -ue.I the lsi ii iv of lune, A I haa riled same In m) ofl I mad.application fa t*> be Issued thereon Said <'• I Anbiaces the follow i* I property In the ("out I I W 'I of Florida, to-wlt ... !•: MI n ... N 75 II Blocs :. 1-u.i Villa Hi I Rub.. Plal BOOH Paw ,f rMde, Stai i.ij.x T he 'ount) Florida The assessmi nl ol saw I undei the said name of !:••• Rhel I ,„.,.,. I'nless aid ml • deemed rdlna Ja !•'• '_. thai I< i •'* ,vl11 l.ldder • ;. rirsl Me'du ia at ty tinhlahesl House door tlie month of in .-• %  |t I NOTit E is HEREBY Q1VKN thai the undersigned are enaaced In buayi'i'v V-" 1 ", ,h "' IHIOIM name of l • %  \|. I TU! v '' KXTl:l; OROCERY \ ,,u V. IA • /" "-" %  rVa*hlnston •Ueii. Mia,,,, Beach, h'forlda. and 1 ,'" '•"I-"' the said flctlt %  i..,...• i„ he office of the rierk. of !'!:,,„,: '" "1 County. swt BHRUCH MURRAY OROSSMAN aEtlRGE %  H KI t TK..|S "" 1 "' y AM.,,,,^,,,^^.,,,,,,,,,,, in.iniiMiii .•: .-• I'll'" ...II Is the ith day or September, ', Dated this Mth .•'. %  '\-,'.M'i\ r.lll IN^ "' :, .BATHERMAN i-: i I i Clerk Ol • III ""., Dade County, f Bv X c Sti (Circuit Court Seal) 5 .'v B 4-11.IS rvfDITCE OF ~. ^ TAX OEED APPLICATION "icti of •' Tin uK l s..:N-ni x l :: N, 1 I I l r-,s ,;',;V,i d.t %  tV. n I'""-""' 1 '" bualneaa t.nm ^.i" i--:: Meridian Ave' -. 1 MI -"" 1 "••"'I'. Elorlda. and Intend t • retlatet said fictitious name '"the office of the Clerk of the ci,'" ';"'• %  l "-le County, Kl la '"Sl-.l-ll I I .IK III-NTH \t RERTHA I.IBBENTHAL is i: SWEET aEOROB CHBRTKOr "*'"'"' ii %  iniio. A 11 INS. have my office, and b*v< i for a tax deed to < %  • %  Said rertlfl. l •"'.. filed Issued '" —Buy War Bonds Today— on. Said certtnc in %  -• ln t following described uFopen rount) of Dade, BtM "' to-wit: pis Lou I .-'"I !," %  B'K*. dens Park, s %  >i> • ''',i i,; ,.;,„,. -,.. ;,, ,i„ Count) "' State of H •' vlld prop The isai ,;." w ss m "" under the said • • t' :i ; •"' %  N -1 %  name „f TIH MAS W ''^ b-" *' Unlass Maid ''"" %  '"„ %  "he pf* deemed aceordlni < % %  %  ,i! i* sow 2 described therein w |,l ,he CWfl u pas fClrcull c.niit Beal) 8/4-II-1N--"'



PAGE 1

AUGUST 4. 1944 ^t **} fh *s^^. PAGE SEVEN ^ SERVICE PARADE! lark Suberman. son of Lt. (jg) David G. Swartz. 17iq e.,_, r, ;J T ,_ C8P H Mrs Al Suberman. 514 S. W. 15th St.. was a member of PlS^h, "" Lehman. 19. of Ig^^.xw^fc.b. iBMuaasSLXx. eaga^^ Marine Corps Veterans Attack Saipan Sgt. Ernest Gunzburg of Miami, and formerly director of the Florida State Refugee Resettlement Committee, made the headlines this week. On dutv as an interpreter with the U. S. Army now in Normandy, Sgt. Gunzburg took charge of a group of German parachutists that surrendered last Wednesday after American bombing. He was given much credit for his handling of the situation. Marines spearheaded the attack on heavily fortified Salpaa and %  offered the major ahare of casualties. Typical scenes, recorded by Marine combat photographers darinr the first few days of landing-, •how the beachhead; Leathernecks washing at a captured reeervolr; a rutted American tank; dlfrinr In for stands on the beaehi and farther Inland a mortar crew In actio n a n d last, a final farewell to fallen oomrados. Saipan, like Tarawa, exacted a heavy tefl on the Marine assault force*, whe after the initial landau took a backward ate*. DtTotia >g This Pga to the Efforts of tha Army-Navy Committea, Made Possible Through the Co-Operation of BOSEDALE DELICATESSEN & RESTAURANT 170 N. W. Fifth Street RICHTER'S JEWELRY CO.. INC. 160 E. Flagler Street SEA ISLE HOTEL 3001 Collins Avenue. Miami Beach RUBINSTEIN'S WOMEN'S APPAREL 1026 Lincoln Rd~ Miami Beach NANKIN'S SHOt STORE 1SS E. Flagler Street Miami ANN'S IMPORTERS 714 Lincoln Road COWEN'S SHOE STORES •55 E. Flagler St. — W2 Lincoln Rd. JACK C. JAYSON Miami PUBLIC GAS CO. 7200 N. W. 7th Avenue MIAMI RUG CO. 100 S. Miami Avenue SYBIL'S WOMEN'S APPAREL 76 s. E. 1st Street RUfi W SONS-Oriqinol Rubins US N. Miami Avenue a^. ROTH 4 HAYS "^lecturer, Aganti Langford Bldg. T OLEY MYRON STUDIOS Du Pont Building Gerald Schwartz. 17, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Schwartz, 1230 Lincoln Road, reported to North Carolina State College of Agriculture and Engineering, Raleigh, N. C, on August 2nd to study under the A12 Army Specialized Training Program. Gerald had completed three full terms at the University of Miami, where he was sports editor of the Hurricane. On November 10th North Carolina plays Miami at the Orange Bowl, and Gerald is wondering whom he will root for! WAR RECORDS COMMITTEE NAT ROTH, Chairman FRED SHOCHET MRS. GEORGE M. COHEN MAURICE OROSSMAN JENNIE H. ROTFORT NATHAN ROTHBERQ J. W. B. Director OFFICERS SAM BLANK, CHAIRMAN MONTE SELIG, Vice-chairman JOSEPH A. BERMAN, Sec. Executive Committee Mrs. Max Dobrin, Ben B. Goldman, Maunice Grossman. Louis Human, Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan, Mrs. Murry Koven, Harry Markowitz. Alexander F. MUer, at Roth, Fred Shochet, Milton Slrkin, Joseph Stein, Mrs. Herman Wallach, Carl Weinkle, George Wolpert, Harry Zukernick. KILLED IN ACTION Sgt. Arthur D. Gold, son of Mrs. Ethel Gold. 1500 S. W. 13th Ave., has reported to the Army Air Forces Redistribution station, Miami Beach, for processing and reassignment after serving two years in the Aleutian Islands as a stockroom clerk. Pfc. Sidney Cohen. 29. of Kansas City, Mo. On Kwajalien atoll in the Marshalls. After two days and nights on the atoll, he was given orders to relieve the regular gunner he was helping. While doing so he was hit by enemy rifle fire in the right temple. He died instantly. Cohen has been awarded the Purple Heart. Second Lt. William A. Wallendorf, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Wallendorf. 6780 Collins ave., Miami Beach, arrived at Randolph Field, Tex., for a fourweeks' course at the Central Instructors school of the AAFTC. Pfc. Harry Chersonsky. 29. of Duluth, Minn. On Anzio beachhead. He was a Medical Corpsman, in service since February, 1941. Pvt. Joseph Seligman. 221 N. W. Third St., has been awarded the combat infantryman badge for service on the Cherbourg peninsula. Pvt. Matthew K. Burger. 27. of the Bronx. On the Italian front. He has been awarded the Purple Heart. Howard B. Rosen. Miami Beach, has been commissioned a second lieutenant in field artillery at Fort Sill, Okla. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Rosen. 1579 Meridian Ave., he has been assigned to the 71st infantry division at Fort Benning, Ga. Lieut. Gerald L. Barmack. 24, of Chicago. Flying Fortress navigator. In a bombing raid over Germany. Had taken part in six missions over Europe. Sgt. Charles Brown, 22. of Washington, D. C. Over Bremen. He was radio operator and gunner aboard a B-17. Aviation Cadet Albert A. Sutton, son of Mrs. Gussie D. Sutton of 1056 Euclid ave.. Miami Beach, a recent graduate of the armv air forces bombardier school at Kirtland Field, Albuquerque. N. M„ has been commissioned a second lieutenant and awarded the silver "wings" of the aerial bombardier, supplementing previously won aerial gunner's insignia. Lieut. Sutton is a graduate of Ida M. Fisher Senior High school class of 1935, where as an undergraduate he was a member of the football, basketball and track teams and dramatic society. He later attended the University of Miami. WOUNDED IN ACTION Cpl. Leonard Auslander, 24. of Camden, N. J. In Italy. He was a veteran of the North African campaign. Pvt. Arthur Cohen. 30. of Brideport. Conn. In Italy. Enlisted in 1938, he received his discharge in 1941. Returning to duty in 1942. he took part in the North African campaign, was wounded, and received the Purple Heart. Capt. Norman Epstein, 32. of Brooklyn. In New Guinea. Died of wounds. A Medical Corps officer, he has been posthumously awarded the Purple Heart. Lieut. Leonard Friedman. 22. of Brooklyn. At Cassino. Was executive officer of his company. Purple Heart. Cpl. Morton H. Marcus. 25. of Cleveland, infantryman, was wounded in the Southwest Pacific area Cpl. Marcus has been in service more than three years. Pharmacist's Mate 2 c Harold Yale Rodansky. 24, of Stamford. Conn., injured in the landing operations at Tarawa beach, was declared dead. But Rodansky regained consciousness after a time and (very much alive) assisted in rendering first aid to two other unconsciouss Marines. Rodansky originally enlisted in the navy, but was later transferred to the Marine Corps. He holds the Purple Heart. Lieut. Donald Gusar. 24. of Brooklyn. In England. Navigator on Flying Fortress. Liuet. Martin Heller. 2$. of Brooklyn. In Italy. Field Artillery officer in service three and a half years. Pfc. Leonard Klain. 19. of Newara, N. J. On Bougainville. A Marine. Private Klein enlisted at 18 and in a recent letter home wrote: "Don't worry about me. This is the thing that has to be done. We have to make an end to fascism for a better world." Sgt. Eugene M Bernat, 21, of Youngstown, O., bombardier, was wounded during an aerial mission in the Pacific area last year. Pvt George Karp. 25. of Brooklyn, was wounded i n Africa. Private Karp joined the armed forces three years ago. Pfc. Sidney S. Cohen. 28, of Kansas City, Mo., an infantryman serving in the Pacific area, lost his life in action" on Kwajalein Island. Lt. Stanley Jacobton, 28. of Chicago, a United States Army Air Corps officer in service three years, lost his life in action over England while serving as a Flying Fortress bombardier. Fill Out This Coupon and Mafl To "WAR RECORDS," AnnyNavy Committee, c/o P. O. Bx 2973, Miami 18. Florida Name Home Addres3 Birth Date Serial No. Street City BirthplaceState Civilian OccupationDate Entry In ServieeCity State Marital Status Bianoh of Service % %  Pull name of nearest kin Relationship Addresa. Information Transmitted by— Telephone number — Date .Discharged ...Rank or Rating. .. I



PAGE 1

PAGE EIGHT MmM nuiM am FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, B'NAI B'RITH NOTES -byMARX FEINBERG Last Tuesday evening approximately 250 members and their wives and guests enjoyed a typical Miami evening aboard the Seminole Queen and the Seven Seas for about three hours on the cool waters of Biscayne Bay. The night was clear and the breeze was brisk. The captain provided music and entertainment for the passengers and I believe I express the thoughts of all present when I say that it was a most enjoyable and peaceful evening. To those who were not fortunate enough to attend, I express my regrets and exhort you to be more punctual in the future. The next regular meeting will be held at the Miami Beach "Y" Tuesday evening, August 8th, with the program in the able hands of the Royal Palm Chapter of A. Z. A. who promise that they will furnish us an unforgettable evening. These boys have gone to a lot of trouble and have spent a lot of time preparing this entertainment for you and we should honor their efforts with at least a good attendance. Also some important matters of business will be brought to the attention of the Lodge and we hope that you will make arrangements to attend. From competent authority we business and social trip and will be absent for about a month. During his absence we will have an opportunity to observe our next year"s president in action. Brother Harold Turk will no doubt take over the office during Milton's absence and it should be interesting to watch the preview of how Brother Turk intends to hold the membership in rein. To Milton and his charming wife, Sylvia, we hope that you have a pleasant and enjoyable trip and when you return we hope that you will be enthusiastic in your renewed activities and leadership. This week we would like to pay tribute to Brother Harry Simonoff who has long maintained himself, in a quiet way. as one of the outstanding leaders of our community. I speak advisedly when I say that Brother Harry is a true erudite. To those who have had the opportunity to come in close contact with Harry, he has displayed an inexhaustible store of knowledge and wisdom and invariably In The Synagogues Of Greater Miami Bei \ Ices for nounced by the AI >• as follows Hi.' week-and nnCrcali-i .Ml.iinl un'ii BETH DAVID CONGREGATION. Coniervative. 135 N. W. 3rd Ave.. Miami.—Friday evening services al 7:16, Haturdaj morning :n 1:80. Bai Mltsvah of Morton, son <>f Mr. .mil Mi.Bam Qoldenblank, will teJcs place Evening lervlcei :it 7:18 ocwcK. BETH JACOB CONGREGATION. Orthodox. 311 Washington Ave., Miami Beach—Friday evening services at 7:15 o'clock; Saturday moraine ; morning services at 9. shaiosh Beu* IIIIH Kt-rvii'es al 7 IT. p. in. to be follow til by evening prayers. TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI. Reform, 137 N. E. 1th St., Miami— H.-Kiilji service! Friday evening at J:15, Notes Of Y. M. H. A. -bySAM SILVER MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CONGREGATION. Orthodox. 89* S. W. 17th Ave., Miami—Service* HtheduU'.l fi Fndav .it 7:15 p. ni. and Saturday at s a. m, and 7:16 p. m. HhaJoan Heudoa will lie foli.iw.-d by Maarlv. Dally ssrvices at 1:80 %  m, and 7:88 p. ill. earn that Brother Friedman is Charleston. South Carolina. SCHAAREI ZEDEK CONGREGATION, Orthodox. 1545 S. W. 3rd St.. | Miami. Friday evening, services bei um at T so Saturday morning at %  > when any problems of the com-1 Mlncha and Maarlv al 7:80 p m. munity arise it is usually Harry I Iall> servlcei ai IS a. m. and %  :M Whose wise sage and counsel is sought. Brother Simoncff has been a resident of Miami for about 20 years coming here during the pre-boom days irom Forum Group The Y adult Forum Group, under the able chairmanship of Mr. Harry Gerstein, will hold its next meeting at the Y next Wednesday evening, August 9. The topic for discussion will be "The Jews and the Post-War World." I have been informed that the Forums held in the past have been well attended and greatly enjoyed by those who were there. Mr. Gerstein extends an invitation to all adults to join this group. Beach Y Entertain* The Miami Beach YM & WHA entertained the enrollees of the Y Home Camp last Wednesday. Mr. Henry Shier, of Henry's Auto and Truck Parts, was kind enough to donate the use of two trucks to transport all of the young people from the Mi*•& AUGUST BROS ftw. *T la the lESTf leaving the city on a combined InORDONFUNRIU HOME 710 S. W. 12th AV. MIAMI TEL. 3-3431 Moderate Costs Always Within the Means oi Individual Circumstances "YOUR JEWISH FUNERAL HOME" • Worthy and Deserves Your Full Support and Recommendation • SERVING MIAMI BEACH AND MIAMI • EXCLUSIVELY JEWISH 24-HOUR /dulance Service He was raised in an atmosphere of southern aristocracy and in his early days was imbued with the love and respect oi all of the traditions of the deep south. We respect him as an authority on all historical matters and he has made a deep study of the outstanding Jews in the south as well as in the country. He has been an invaluable asset to the community at large. His unassuming and conservative manner has shied him away from high office but the results of his untiring work and efforts have been felt by all. We hope that Harry will remain with us for many years and will continue the work that he has been doing. Good luck to you. Harry Simonoff! p. m. BETH SHOLOM CENTER. Conservative, 761 41st St., Miami Beach. Services are scheduled foi Friday evening al 7 IS; Saturdaj morning sen \\ ill be held ".t '• SO ONI VITAMIN T MDtK atf Ml Tees issBSB eaafes %  *i4DVK i Oiaiglia VHa. %  I IMIBI Saslat, tta BUM ONaVA-MAT (Waste*) ntasBBB TaMets. -'-NERVINE Tl. OMKMi I WANT MY MILK And Be Sura Its FLORIDA DAIRIES HOMOGENIZED Vitamin "D" Milk "Milk Product." Dacro Protected TEL. 2-2621 Greater Miami Delivery Visit Our Farm at 6200 N. W. 32nd Street CANCER CONTROL BODY HOLDS MEETING The Women's Field Army For Cancer Control, at a meeting held recently, heard Mr. Don G. Graham, member of the Advisory Board and an officer of the Exchange Club, tell of that organization's 100 percent enlistment in the cancer educational activity. Mr. Graham discussed the legislative work of the Exchange Club in behalf of the Women's Field Armv. A movie depicting the work of the organization was shown to those present. Mrs. Clyde A. Epperson, local Dado County Commander, spoke of the Tumor Institute of South Florida, a project the organization is endeavoring to erect in this area. Headquarters for the group are at 1843 Ingiaham rJIdg. (Tliui coluiun Is conducted by the '•renter Miami Jewish Federation In cooperation with The Jewish Kloridlan as a community aervlce. To Inform the community of your organisation's activities and to avoid conflicts In dates, phone 3-5411 and aak for •Community Calendar." Notification must reach Federation no later than Tuesday for publication that week.) Monday, August 7 Temple Israel fci*trrhood. 12:30 p. m. Tuesday. August 8th it'n.-ii li'rlth Shoiini ixidgp. Men, Beach V. S:30 p m.; Miami Beach Service usavne, Beach v, : p, m. Wednesday, August 9th Workman's Circle Branch No. 692. executive committee meeting, x:3o i>. in ANHIUSH-IUSCH Budweiser TOADS MAHK RBO. U S. PAT. OFF. EVERYWHERE DlaTTRJBUTBD BI NATIONAL BRANDS. INC. Alka-Selfaer ye*f rate, at Cb Home Campers biVflS, V is another example of foe operative spirit existing £ tween the two organization^ Latkyi Return Mr. and Mrs. Le ster La k cently returned from tK honeymoon which was nss! the hills of North Caroffia JS in Savannah. Ga. Lester k !i* tor of the Y Bulletin and t been an ardent worker at £ Y for the past few years K wish him and "Ginger" alli the luck in the world. Congratulation! Mr. and Mrs. Jules Wilson celebrated their 18th weddi anniversary on July 25th. The Y extends congratulations and best wishes to them WORKMEN'S cmcLFoRBn WILL SPONSOR A LECTURE Arbeiter Ring, Brunch 692 will sponsor a lecture featuring Morns Bluskstein at the Workman's Circle Lyceum on August 6th. at 8 p. m. Teacher of the Arbeiter Ring schools, Mr. Bluskstein will have as his topic "Jewish UpBringing." The lecturer is the author of several books on child welfare. QHNERAI. TAINTING CLEAN WORK IKINE BY BKST MECHANICS KK.EH ESTIMATES NO JOB TOO I.AKUE OP. TOO S.MAI.I. J. D. QII.BRKATH I'AIXT CONTRACTOR PH. 3-0070: If no answer. Mill RIVERMONT PARK SANITARIUM ISM N. W. 7th St. Ph. 1-7301 ear* for chronic sick, eonvi. laaoi n t aad elderly psopK SANEL BEER. M. D., Dirtcttr Reasonabls Pricts % %  Large Beautiful Orsundiasi yfrrt/w" !" ""—'' When You Think of Real Estate Think Of LEO EISENSTEIN REALTOR 309 Lincoln Road Phone 5-6479 Dependable, Conscientious Service NEW ROOF or REPAIR OLD ROOF No Down Payment Small Monthly Payment All Work Guaranteed LANG ROOFING CO. 416 N. W. 79th St. 78-1009 ADVANTAGES of a IIAVIIE FEIIERM > MORTGAGE • LOW RATES *EAI. ESTATE—MIAMI BEACH MIAMI BEACH HOMES AND INVESTMENT PROPERTIES B. E. BRONSTON. Realtor aiJfl glgfl te R "' Estate Service 605 Lincoln Rd. ph.: 5.5866 RENTALS LEASES SALES Lots. Hornet. Hotels Apartment Houses M. GILLER R E A L T OR 1448 Washington Avenue PHONE 5-5875 AUTO ELECTRIC SERVICE Repairs Stsrtsr snd Generator >. • A s Pcialty Special Service to Fleet Owners IIP. K'? — AUTOMOTIVE IHUI\ 0 ELECTRIC SERVI 199 N, .SKl 20TH STREET PHONE 2-9804 CE DRINK PLENM Jf Water DELIVERED TO YOUR HOME • 0ALL0I 80TTU S Oe C*SE OF six TABLE BOTTLES ... j, Plui Bsnif Dtpoiii PHONE 2-4128 BEFORE YOU BUY LMai LEON ELIIH with METROPOLITAN LIFE INS. CO. Not Best Because Biggeet But—Bi B0M t Because Beat • BASY PAYMENTS • LONG TIME TO PAY PROMPT SERVICE A HOME INSTITUTION Deal With You* LOCAL. FRIENDLY INSTITUTION x. ""^RESOURCES OVER $10,000,000 ?^^tt**Ui ,. MO 8 1 N 8 All "•• T %&l. JOCBM M.UFT08* rwtaptwr *0& ** 1//////W'Jk


MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
August 4, 1944

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00807

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
August 4, 1944

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00807

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text
>
jjJeMviislbJEIIiDipidliiaun
5SME17^ NUMBER 31
MIAMI 18. FLORIDA, FRIDAY. AUGUST 4. 1944
PRICE 10 CENTS
ntCEIIHG
111 E
Merchants of M.am. Beach co-
JL in the servicemen s
Kffifty dnve are receiving
37ms for their participation
, the movement Hospitality
'ledges are now ready for dis-
Sft'on to the stores the mer-
chants' committee said.
According to the sub-commit-
tee of the Miami Beach service-
men's hospitality committee the
results of the- drive have been
very satisfactory. Reports of all
committees were heard and dis-
cussed at a meeting of the ex-
ecutive committee' held Wednes-
day in the Wofford hotel.
Miami Bcac h Servicemen's
Hospitality committee "Welcome
Day" dance, the first in a series
given for the entertainment of
servicemen in this area, held last
Saturday at the Recreation Pier
was received with great enthu-
siasm.
Present at the affair included
C. L. Clements, treasurer of the
merchants committee; Sol Gold-
strom, co-chairman, hospitality
committee; Mrs. Charles O.
King. Mrs. M. E. Harwood. and
Mrs. Edna Woody Gentry, mem-
bers of the pier association.
WAR RECORD OF JEWS
OF CANADA PUBLISHED
BY JEWISH CONGRESS
Montreal (JTA)A complete
record of the participation of
Jews in the Canadian war effort
has been issued here by the Ca-
nadian Jewish Congress. It in-
cludes a list of 14,000 Jewish en-
listees now in service.
The national executive council
of the Congress announced that
it has established a rehabilita-
tion committee to deal with the
problem of demobilized Jewish
servicemen and to insure full
support by the Jewish commun-
ity of the goernment's rehabili-
tation program.
1 NOT OFFER 10
BOARD PLANS 10
RESCUE CHILDREN
AFTER HEARS
Zurich (JTA)Faced by world
wide revulsion as a result of dis-
closure of the German-Hungar-
ian offer to spare the estimated
400,000 Jews remaining in Hun-
gary in exchange for non-mili-
tary supplies from the Allies.
the semi-official Hungarian Tel-
egraph Agency this week denied
that such a proposal had been
made. Although the report of
the negotiations nave been cor-
roborated by reliable Allied
sources, the Hungarian press
agency denounces it as a "ma-
licious rumor."
Meanwhile, it was learned here
'hat 800 Budapest Jews who
Possess exit visas face the pros-
pect of sharing the fate of the
bulk of Hungarian Jewry unless
{hey can get out of the country
by August 1. The Nazi Trans-
wntment Press reports that the
"sas issued to these Jews will
invalidated at the end of this
month. The possessors of the
Ilsas' allr"ough compelled to
wear a yellow star, have not
oeen otherwise molested.
fWlSH CHAPLAIN HAS
ARK. SCROLL SERVICES
San Juan, Puerto Rico (JTA)
!"aJ- Sidney E. Unger. Jewish
r*p'ain of the Antilles Depart-
!"nt. this week dedicated the
IPnt, e^lsh ark and scro11 in
K,r? Rlc<> at lnc Ateneo. a cul-
I "r.,1 center of the island. About
w Jewish servicemen attended.
Services have been conducted
il Atcn,-'o every Friday night
out Vrar and a half. bul with-
UntJr R10,us equipment. Maj.
Petual in pli,nmne to light a per-
*J1 flame this week.
Also prcsem at the ceremony
Ho H- Cl Noah Sheppard,
lish (Rel)- hoad of the Jew-
IWill.umvUn.lty nere- and CaPt-
lolic pk Kirkpatrick, army Cath-
lbv thlaplain- The ark was built
lteiL.army- MaJ- Un*er was
ISffi bW of the Congrega-
llfi ***,* Shalom of Phil
and
TempuT .Previously rabbi of
"P'e Judea of the same city.
Washington (JTA)The War
Refugee Board is in receipt of
Regent Nicholas Horthy's offer
to the' Red Cross to release all
Jewish children under ten who
can obtain foreign visas, as well
as adults with Palestine visas, it
was learned here this week.
The Horthy proposal, which
was first made public last week
by the International Red Cross
in Geneva, was transmitted to its
delegation here and forwarded
to George L. Warren of the State
Department, who acts as liasion
officer between the Department
and the War Refugee Board.
John W. Pehle, executive di-
rector of the WRB confirmed
that he had received the Red
Cross communication and told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
that the WRB is presently for-
mulating plans for implementing
the Horthy offer by securing
havens for the children.
It is understood that the Hor-
thy note has also been transmit-
ted to the British Foreign Office,
but this could not lje confirmed
in British official circles here.
The cablegram from the Red
Cross in Geneva also reveals
that it has ben given permission
to furnish relief to Jews who are
interned in Hungary or those re-
siding in the ghettos.
IEWISH BRIGADE STILL
POSSIBLE JBY BRITAIN
London (JTA)Britain is still
giving serious consideration to
the possibility of establishing a
Jewish brigade within the Brit-
ish forces, it was stated in Com-
mons this week by Sir James
Grigg, war minister.
Denying a member's charge-
that there has been undue delay
in acting on the question of a
separate Jewish fighting force.
Sir James said that although he
was not in a position to make a
definite statement at present, ne
hoped to do so in the near future.
RUSSIANS~Tn~LUBLIN
CAPTURE DEATH CAMP
London (JTA)-The British
press reports that Russian troops
who occupied Lublin captured a
concentration camp which the
Germans had converted into, one
of the largest "death camps for
""Hundreds of thousands of
Jews are reported to haw died
there from starvation, epidemics
andein gaT chamber. Jhe camp
is believed to have been the sue
of a revolt by Jewish prisoners
last year during which they at
tempted to burn down the gas
chambers. _
Jerusalem (JTA)-FivJ hund-
red and seventy-six Yenum f
Jews arr ved here this weeK.
The? are the last Jewish immi-
grants who will be allowed to
enter Palestine from non-bellig
erent countries.
Moscow (JTA)After three
years of sufferings under the
German and Rumanian armies,
hundreds of Jewish families lib-
erated when the Russian army
captured the Rumanian city of
Botosani were enabled this week
to "resume contact with their
friends and relatives in the Unit-
ed States through the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency.
A list of Botosani Jews who
have relatives in the United
States, compiled by this corres-
pondent, has been cabled to New
York with the permission of the
Soviet authorities. The list in-
cludes families many members
of which have been massacred.
It also includes fathers and
mothers who have not seen or
heard from their children in
America since the outbreak of
the war. Also women whose
husbands emigrated from Boto-
sani to the United States many
years ago and who lost contact
with them after Rumania entered
the war on Germany's side.
There are also brothers, sisters
and other close relatives, many
of whom were believed to have
been killed or massacred during
the pogroms which the German-
Rumanian armies carried out in
Rumanian cities.
To bring these people in con-
tact with their relatives in the
United States, this correspand-
ent made a special trip to Boto-
sani where he spent several
days interviewing Jewish lead-
ers and talking to the men. wo-
men and children who remained
alive after three years of con-
stant terror.
Botosani is typical of the many
small Rumanian cities which
have predominantly Jewish pop-
ulations. The Jewish commun-
ity maintains a primary school
commanding 1.200 pupils, two
high schools, a Talmud Torah, a
free communal kitchen, an or-
phanage which today houses
163 children whose parents died
in Transnistria, a dispensary,
a hospital and three homes for
the aged. These institutions had
been closed by the Rumanian au-
thorities.
From Juno. 1942, the Jews
were stripped of all rights. They
were deprived of their property,
of the right to work and many
were sent to slave labor. Heavy
taxes were levied on them, their
land was confiscated, and pro-
fessionals, including doctors,
were barred from practicing.
Although these anti-Jewish
measures still remain on the
books officially, since the Soviet
government has pledged not to
interfere in the internal admin-
istration of non-Russian terri-
tory occupied by its troops, they
are no longer observed.
Thousands of Rumanian Jews
were killed by the Germans and
other thousands were deported
to Transnistria, the section of the
Ukraine which was occupied by
Rumanian troops. Although the
situation of the Jews improved
slightly after the Nazi defeat at
Stalingrad and the bombing of
the Ploesti oil fields in Ku-
mania by the Allied *!<*.
their position remained hazard-
ous until last June 23, when the
German and Rumanian forces
evacuated the city. With them
went the entire civil adminis-
tration.
BOARD OF GUARDIANS
EXTENDS SERVICE FEE
FOR CHILD GUIDANCE
New York (JTA)The exten-
sion of child guidance work to
wider sections of the population
through adoption of a non-profit
fee program was announced by
the Jewish Board of Guardians,
the child guidance and delin-
quency prevention agency of the
Jewish Federation. The agency
will continue its professional case
work and psychiatric help to
children and parents, on a mod-
erate fee basis or without pay-
ment, depending upon each
family's income, the announce-
ment added.
GERMAN LEADERS
MURDER OF JEWS
DELEGATION SEES EDEN ON
HUNGARIAN JEW PROBLEM
London (JTA)-A delegation
of Christian and Jewish leaders,
led by the Archbishop of Canter-
bury, this week conferred with
Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden
on the situation of the Hungarian
Jews.
Zurich (JTA) Nazi leaders,
shaken by unrest at home and
defeat on all fronts, are begin-
ning to lay the groundwork for
their defense before war crimin-
al tribunals, it is indicated in a
dispatch by the Nazi Transocean
news service received here.
The dispatch quotes an ad-
dress by Sundermann, deputy
press chief of the reich, to rep-
resentatives of the foreign press
in Berlin in which he discussed
German treatment of the Jews.
Alleging that up until 1940 Jews
were allowed to emigrate freely,
he said that in 1941 Jews were
"incorporated into the European
production system" and placed
at the disposal of the Todt Or-
ganization which constructs
German fortifications farms,
factories and other groups. Once
assigned to labor, Sundermann
said, Jews were no longer under
the control of the Gestapo.
This last is apparently an at-
tempt to place the blame for the
mistreatment and execution of
Jews sent to forced labor on the
individuals or organizations for
whom they were working rather
than on the German govern-
ment.
SWISS refugees" will
BE FORCED TO LABOR
Bern (JTA)The Swiss radio
announced this week that the
80,000 refugees and internees in
Switzerland, many of whom are
Jewish, will be required to per-
form compulsory labor, under
an order issued by the Swiss
government.
The decree also provides that
in the future, arrangements for
feeding the refugees and inter-
nees will be made by the Swiss
military authorities "in accord-
ance with the general food sup-
ply conditions in the country.
MANY JEWS~MURDERED
IN YUGOSLAVIA, CLAIM
London (JTA)Few Jews re-
main in German-occupied Yugo-
slavia, it is reported by a high
official of Marshal Tito's libera-
tion movement who has just ar-
rived here. Of the Jews who es-
caped being massacred, many are
fighting with Tito's forces, while
others who were deported to
Italy by the Italian occupation
forces, either as prisoners of
war or internees, are being re-
turned in substantial numbers
to territory new held by the lib-
eration forces.
The partisan official also re-
vealed that there is only one Jew
UNITY STRESSED
BK POSTER TO BE
DEDICATED HERE
A billboard poster emphasiz-
ing American unity in the war
effort will be unveiled on the
corner of N. E. First St. and
First Ave. during the noon hour
next Saturday, following the
regular war bond parade.
Ceremonies arranged bv the
Miami Round Table of Chris-
tians and Jews, in conjunction
with the Institute for American
Democracy, of New York, will
feature an address by Mayor
Leonard Thompson, prayer by
ministers of the three faiths, and
the reciting of a pledge of relig-
ious tolerance.
The ceremonies will begin at
12:25 and will be broadcast by
Station WIOD between 12:30
and 12:45, and a large gathering
is anticipated to witness the cer-
emony.
The poster, which will go on
the familiar billboard in front
of the First Federal Savings
and Loan Association, depicts
three American soldiers charg-
ing with fixed bayonets. Across
the top runs the legend: "Fight-
ing Side by Side." To the right
of the soldiers appear the words:
Protestant; Catholic; Jew."
Across the bottom of the poster
is the legend: "So That Every-
one May Worship As He
Pleases."
The poster has previously
been unveiled in New York City,
Atlantic City, and Boston.
Posting of the billboat-d is
done through the courtesy of
Packer Displays and use of the
board by the First Federal Sav-
ings.
E
IN EIGHT JOIST
ITS. PARTY PLANKS
Cairo (JTA)The Arab press
is continuing to wage a vigorous
anti-Zionist campaign on the
basis of the Palestine planks in-
corporated into the platforms of
the Democratic and Republican
parties.
Al Ahram, largest Arab news-
paper in the world, writes that
a union of Arab states "can
throttle any plans" to make Pal-
estine a Jewish state. The pro-
jected meeting of Arab states
should make clear, the paper
adds, that the Arab governments
would consider the formation of
a Jewish state in Palestine an
inimical gesture and are ready
to back the Palestine Arabs in
their desire to hold onto their
land."
ASK PALESTINE HAVEN
FOR HUNGARIAN JEWS
New York (JTA)The "He-
brew Committee of National
Liberation" announced this week
that it has cabled Prime Minister
Churchill asking establishment
of emergency refugee shelters
in Palestine to receive all Jews
who can be rescued from Hun-
gary.
"The opportunity to save the
Hebrews of Hungary is at hand,"
the cable said. "Countless thou-
sands of men, women and child-
alive in the Yugoslav capital of ren can save their lives if only
-* ,_-_j. u ;<. IM_\7r*ar.r*lH thev are nermittpH tr pnlpr Pal-
Belgrade. He is 80-year-old
Dr. Vukie Piade. noted gynecol-
ogist, who was president of the
they are permitted to enter Pal-
estine. We therefore suggest
that His Majesty's government
OglSI, wno was M'".uc..i *" Tj ', A....... L
Belgrade Jewish community I start without delay the estab-
council Although his family j hshment of emergency refugee
was murdered, the aged doctor shelters in Palestine."
was allowed to continue practic-
lg. A popular Jewish officer
fighting with the partisans, he
said, is Major Moscoar Danaon.
You can't quit now! You
must continue to buy Bonds, and
More Bonds!
'
I




PAGE TWO
BIRTHS
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Imberman,
811 Espanola. announce the birth
of a daughter, Gail Sayde, on
June 18.
Sgt. and Mrs. Harry Galinsky
announce the birth of a son at
Saint Francis Hospital on July
31. Sgt. Galinsky is stationed at
li. Raton with tin Army Air
Corps. Mrs. Galinsky was the
former Jackie Shopiro, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Shopiro.
200 Ocean Drive.
S-Sgt. and Mrs. Hedrick an-
nounce the birth of a daughter.
Michele Bess, on July 13th at
the Miami Biltmore. Mrs. Hed-
rick is the former Dorothy
Schoenbaum. of 1228 Collins
Ave., Miami Beach.
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Cantor.
3143 S. W. 21st St. announce the
birth of a son July 28th.
Mr. and Mrs. Max Fcit and
family of Miami Beach are now
residing at 835 Collins Ave.
Miss Beatrice Kellncr of Wash-
ington. D. C. is a house guest "f
MiSS Bernardino Roth of this
city.
ENGAGED
Mrs. Harry Blumin and fam-
ily are visiting in New York.
Mr. Blumin returned after
spending a month with them.
Mr. and Mrs. Max L. Shapiro.
1861 S. W. 21st Terrace, will
leave Monday for a month's stay
nt Scaroon Lake. New York.
Mrs. Jennie Applerouth and
children of Key West arc spend-
ing several weeks ; Apartments. Miami Beach.
CHARLYNE P. RUSKIN
Mr. and Mrs. Dan B. Ruskin.
140 N. Hibiscus Isle, Miami
Beach, are announcing the en-
gagement of their daughter,
Charlyne P. to Lt. Sam Coolik.
a member of the United States
Naval Reserve.
Miss Ruskin attended Miami
Senior High School and the Uni-
versity of Miami.
Lt. Coolik is a son of Mr. and
Mrs David Coolik, of Reynolds.
Ga., and attended school there.
He graduated rrom Vanderbilt
University, and is a member of
Alpha Epsilon Pi.
No date for the marriage has
been set, since Lt. Coolik is now
on duty in the South Pacific.
Mr. and Mrs. M. Shapiro arc
the guests of their son-in-law
and daughter. Mr. and Mrs. Mor-
ris Pepper. Formerly of Jackson-
ville, the Shapiros will make
there home here.
Mrs Milton Friedman will
leave for Columbia, S. C. and
York for a three weeks
vacation.
LINCOLN
Open
Daily 1:45
Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach
MIAMI P*n Daily
I H ITl I 11:15 A. M.
Downtown Miami
capiiol as!!
Downtown, N. Miami at 3rd
NOW SHOWING!
Friday Through Monday
August 4-7
WHAT EVIL FORCES GAVE
THEM THEIR ORDERS?
PAT O'BRIEN
Nobody Knew Who He Was!
Carole LANDIS
She Lived Under An
Assumed Name!
Chester MORRIS
He Didn't Trust His
Own Brother!
Ruth WARRICK
She Betrayed the Man
She Loved!
IN
"SECRET
COMMAND
The engagement of Miss Gloria
Jean Kotler and Mortimer Feld-
man is being announced by her
nts, Mr. and Mrs. S. Fred-
erick Kotler, former Miami
Beach winter residents, now liv-
ing in Glassboro, N. J. Mr. Feld-
man. a son of Mr. and Mrs. Irv-
ing Feldman, Belle Isle. Miami
Beach, attended Massachusetts
Institute of Technology.
Miss Kotler attended Miami
Beach high school and Shenan-
doah College in Virginia. No
date has been set for the wed-
ding.
Mrs. Hyman Traeger and
daughter Sarah will return here
after a two week's stay visiting
relatives and friends in New
York and Washington. While in
New York. Mrs. Traeger spent
some time with her two sons,
Dave ami Milton, who have iust
returned to this country from
duty in Europe and Africa. Both
of thi m an attached to the Mod
ical Corps with the U. S. Navy.
Dr. and Mr.-. Herman Mochlo-
wit/, and family are spending
two weeks in the north.
Saul I. Kenholz will leave
Sunday lor New York to join .
his wife. Tiny will vacation at'
Saratoga Springs and visit in
Chicago and Tennessee before
returning here the first of Sep-
tember. During their stay in
New York, they will visit with
their daughters, who will jour-
ney there from Utah to be with
them.
11
FROM THE SATURDAY
EVENING POST STORY
Buy War Stamps and Bonds
NOW and give our men in the
armed forces the help they need.
for Rest
CONVALESCEMCf
o~)ChronicCases
TUomi.

Sun Ray Park
ealth Resort
HMD 0 10011.1T
MIAMI W.ri ACICR 10'-C0.B- FLORICA
Mount Sinai Memorial Park
"Owned and Operated by
Greater Miami Jewiih Cemetery Ais'n
A COMMUNITY CEMETERY
Affiliated Congregations: Beth David, Beth Jacob, Miami
Jewish Orthodox, Schaarei Zedek and Sisterhood
Chesed Shel Ernes
^||g||||g2|^||||2g2g||^2^g|222g||gg^|^
WEDDINGS
FRIDAY, AUGUST 4. loT
Mr. 'and Mrs. Nat Roth an-
nounce the marriage of their
daughter. Millicent, to Corporal
Martin J. Spilka, USA Air Force,
son of Mrs Martin Spilka and
the late Mr. Spilka. of Pittsburg,
Pa Tin ceremony took place 011
April 10. Corporal Spilka is now
serving over.-eas.
Mrs. Barney Weinkle returned
after spending a week 10 At-
lanta.
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Weinkle of
: Lenox Ave. have as their guests
Mrs. Wemkles sister. Mrs. Sam
Coolev and her friend. Mrs. Rose
Blumberg of Atlanta.
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Rubin.
formerly residing at 1923 S. W.
13th St.. are now occupying their
new home at 410 45th St. on the
Beach.
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Jacobs,
1243 S. W. 6th St., are leaving
Mondav for a five week's trip
in the north. Upon their return.
they will stop in Atlanta and
Birmingham where they will at-
tend the Southeastern Confer-
ence of the Workman's Circle.
Lt. (jg) I. B. Burke is spend-
ing a furlough here with his
wife and family. He came from
Boston, and is awaiting further
orders.
Abe S. Goldman, commander
of Jewish War Veterans of the
U. S., is convalescing at his
home, following an operation in
the North.
Sam Newman of Miami is at
present recuperating in a New-
York hospital.
Mrs. A. E. Freilich returns to-
day from a three weeks vaca-
tion in Hendersonville. N. C.
2-c Petty Officer Louis Stein,
now stationed at the Naval Base
at Jacksonville, is expected to
spend the weekend with his par-
ents. Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Stein.
1511 N. W. 8th St.
Mrs. Hyland Ritas is the guest
of her sister Mrs. E. N. Fclson
at Jacksonville Beach.
Mr. and Mrs. Al Quadow left
this week for Minnesota and
New York.
Mr. and Mrs. Al Wise left for
a month's stay in New York and
Pennsylvania.
Mrs. Nat Roth and daughter
left this week to join Mr. Roth
in New York for a three week
stay.
ALL SET for a rood fall day's
work whan a MgrHf band-,
ache sneaks up on yonTxee. suffer
and so does your work.
Beady for an evening of
atkm and enjoyment a
headache interferes -with yw_
rest, enjoyment or relaxation.
DS.MIIX8
Anti-Pain Pills
usually relieve net only HeseV
ache. St* SiapU Neuralgia, Mee-
Sfttuf rSSsj.*** *'"*'
-Dsi you use Dr. Mies lasrWPasa
Mis 7 If not why not 7 Ten eaa
St Dr. ICOes Anti-Pah, Pill, at
yur drug store in the regular
package for only a penny apiece
nd in the economy package even
cheaper. Why not get a packam
S&rLZs ***& **.
Bead directions and uae only as
rseted. Tour money back if you
u ass Battened.
SID PALMER'S FUNERAL HOME
"SERVING THE JEWISH COMMUNITY"
PHONE 9-2664 "Afriewd in weed- 2O0& W. FLAGLER
FOR WHOM THE BELL TOLLS
BAR MITZVAH
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Golden-
blank. 1111 S. W. 20th Ave.. an-
nounce the Bar Mitzvah of their
son Morton at services Saturday
morning. August 5th at nine
o'clock at Beth David Congrega-
tion. Morton wrll recite the
Haftorah and address the gather-
ing. Rabbi Max Shapiro will re-
spond. A reception will follow
the service. Friends are invited.
Mrs. Frieda F. Newman. Mi-
ami Beach, has left for a two
month's vacation that will take
her to New York, Chicago and
Detroit.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Siegal
will leave this week for an ex-
tended northern trip.
Philadelphia (JTA) Zionist
pressure upon the Republican
and Democratic parties which
resulted in the inclusion in their
election platforms of a plank
calling for unrestricted Jewish
immigration into Palestine and
the establishment of a Jewish
Commonwealth there is con-
demned as having done "a
st nous injury" to American Jews
in the current information bulle-
tin of tiie American Council for
Judaism;
Referring to statements that
the vote of many Jews will be
decided by the two parties' stand
on the Palestine issue, the coun-
cil says that "we American citi-
zens of Jewish faith are too
deeply rooted in the realities of
OUT life in this our own coun-
try, in indulge in such fantastic
nonsense.'" The council also
charges that "our very capacity
to help Jews abroad who will
need our help most is being im-
paired to the extent that such
activity continues."
Mrs. Max Shapiro and sons
Sidney and Jackie of 929 Meri-
dian Ave., are visiting Mrs.
Shapiro's parents. Rev. and Mrs.
B. Saltzman at Indiana Harbor.
They will return in six weeks.
Your Complete Department
Store With Quality
Merchandise
Washington Are. at 13th St.
Miami Beach
And for your convenience
Morris Brother's New Ap-
parel and Accessory Store
70 E. Flagler St. Miami
Hearing Aid .
Model 50
BELTONE
$
49
Buy It On Our Club
Plan. $ 1 9 Down
$7.70 Monthly. In-
cluding Carrying
Charge.
A small, compact
hearing aid with
one central control
switch. Reduces
friction to a mini-
m u m Complete
with batteries.
MIAMI STORK. MINOR
EI.J3CTRICAL. APPIJANCES.
FIFTH FIXWR
MOUNT NEBO
THE CEMETERY OF DISTINCTION
FOR DISCRIMINATING FAMILIES
Rabbi S. M. Machtei, Director
Olympia Building Phone 3-3720
OLD SARATOGA INN
Biecayne Boulevard at 77th Street Phone 7-7725
Week Day Dinners 5 to 10 P. M_____Sundays From Noon
Cocktail Lounge.....Fine Liquor* and Wines
WE ARE CLOSED ON WEDNESDAYS
TAKE BUS 11 FROM DOWNTOWN MIAMI. Oil
BUS M 71 FROM MIAMI BEACH


rmAY. AUGUST 4. 1944
... >
I
-JewlstFhrldian
PAGE THREE
SERVE-A-HOSPITAL IS
COORDINATING WORK
OF WOMEN OE AREA
The Serve-A-Hospital com-
Jtee of Greater Miami which
ffilMtea all Jewish Women s
VlS ons in this area, whose
orS purpose is to supply
SfflTat government hospitals
gr^for their comfort and
nvrniencc are planning a
sg&Mm: 7
This committee has already
distributed over 100 solitaire
JSow cases to be ma.de UPT^y
the different organizations. The
nillow cases are used for play-
fng solitaire by bedridden pati-
ents. .
The women are also making
bedside kits. These kits are
slipped between mattress and
bed frame within easy reach of
the patient for his toilet articles.
wri'ine material and cigarettes.
Just as soon as yarn arrives from
New York the women will cro-
chet bed room slippers for the
returnees hospitalized at gener-
al hospitals.
Tickets to the game party can
be obtained through Mrs. Sid-
ney Stepkin, chairman 4-4126 or
Mrs. Jack August, co-chairman
5-0947. _______________
Army Will Not Police
Refugee Shelter Camp
Washington (JTA)The army
will not police the emergency
refugee shelter at Fort Ontario.
according to Dillon S. Myer. di-
rector of the War Relocation Au-
thority which takes over custody
of the grounds at the fort to-
morrow. The 986 refugees who
will be housed there are expect-
ed to arrive this week.
Although President Roosevelt
placed the administration of the
camp in the hands of the WRA.
he ordered the army to help
transport the refugees, provide
the equipment needed to con-
vert the army camp, and take
the necessary security precau-
tions. The War Department will
still be responsible for carrying
out all security measures. No
military police, therefore, will
surround Fort Ontario as they
do the Japanese Relocation
Benjamin B. Goldman, former
director of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and well-
known social work executive,
has assumed the post of Director
of Community Information and
Service of the Joint Distribution
Committee, major American
agency for aid to distressed Jews
overseas, it was formally an-
nounced. In welcoming Mr.
Goldman to the J.D.C, Joseph
C. Hyman, Executive Vice-
Chairman of the Committee,
explained that Mr. Goldman's
primary duty will be to main-
tain and intensify the delation
between the J.D.C. and the Jews
throughout the country in whose
name it operates.
LIST OF LIBERATED
JEWS FROM BOTOSANI
IS NOW AVAILABLE
The partial list of Botosani
Jewsin the newly liberated
part of Rumaniahaving rela-
tives in the United States, Can-
ada, Latin America and else-
where, has been called to the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency by
its Moscow correspondent.
To bring these people in con-
tact with their relatives in the
United States, the correspondent
of the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency made a special trip to
Botosani where he spent several
days interviewing Jewish lead-
ers and talking to the men, wo-
and children who remained alive-
after three years of constant
terror.
Among names listed is Blum-
tee Rapaport, who named among
his relatives a Mr. Joe Rappa-
port, of Miami Beach. A com-
plete list is on file at the Jew-
ish Floridian office.
The Joint Distribution Com-
mittee made public this week
the names of 285 German and
Holland Jews who were recently
exchanged for 111 German na-
tionals interned in the Middle
East and who have now arrived
in Palestine. The list was for-
warded by Reuben Resnik,
J.D.C. representative in the Mid-
dle East, and is on file at The
Jewish Floridian office.
A FAMILY OF FIGHTING CONTRIBUTORS TO THE U. J. A.
Moscow (JTA)Jewish par-
tisans from the cities of Pingk,
Bialystok, Baranovichi, Slonim
and other liberated Byelorussian
cities and towns are returning
from the forests to begin re-
building their homes and fac-
tories which were destroyed by
the Germans, according to dis-
patches reaching here.
Camps, to guard against escapes.
The refugee settlement has
been placed under the director-
ship of Joseph H. Smart, form-
erly field assistant director of
the WRA in Denver and more
recently stationed in Peru with
the Office of the Coordinator of
Inter-American Affairs. A staff
of approximately 40 WRA em-
ployees are now stationed at Os-
wego making final arrange-
ments for the refugees arrival.
Of the nearly 1,000 refugees,
most are Jewish with small con-
tingents of Roman Catholics,
Greek Orthodox, and Protest-
ants. They Ihclude persons of
14 nationalities.
Jerusalem (JTA)An estimat-
ed 30,000 Jews assembled at the
Wailing Wall this week to mark
the observance of Tisha b'Av,
which commemorates the de-
struction of the Temple of
which the Wailing Wal is the
ony remaining section.
The Plotkin family of Athol, Mass., is fighting this war on the
European front and on the Pacific front. In addition to meeting the
common enemy on the battlefield, they have also done iheir share to
help the victims of his program of annihilation. "A foxhole does funny
things to you. It makes you think right and drives away selfishness",
Sgls. Melvin and Jacob Plotkin wrote from the Solomon Islands to their
brother in Massachusetts. In the same letter they announced that they
were contributing the sum of $200 to the campaign of the United Jewish
Appeal for Refugees, Overseas Needs and Palestine. Iji-i year these
boys contributed $90. AH of the six members of the Plotkin family in
the armed forces are contributors to the U.J.A. Their motto is that
while victory is certain, "we cannot wait for that glad time to aid tho-
of our people who are suffering because of our common enemy."
(Top row, left to right) Sgls. Jacob and Melvin Plotkin, stationed in
the Solomon Islands; and Corp. Charles Plotkin, a cousin, now in
England. (Bottom row, left to right) Sgt. Robert and Corp. Norman,
brother- of the Plotkins in the Pacific area; and Corporal Morris Gould,
another cousin. The fighting Plotkins are manning their battle stations
on the humanitarian front, too.'
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New York (JTA)The un-
animous election of David Sher
of New York as chairman of the
National Community Relations
Advisory Council to succeed Ed-
gar J. Kaufmann of Pittsburgh
and the announcement of a pro-
gram of clearance for national
and local civic protective
agencies high-lighted the meet-
ing this week of the Council's
executive committee, it was an-
nounced here.
London (JTA)A delegation
of Christian and Jewish leaders,
led by the Archbishop of Canter-
bury this week conferred with
Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden
on the situation of the Hun-
garian Jews.
In disclosing the visit to a
meeting of the Board of De-
puties of British Jews, Prof. Selig
Brodetsky, president, said that
there was reason to believe that
British government will aid the
Hungarian Jews.
Rome (JTA)Pope Pius this
week received Chief Rabbi An-
ton Zolli of Rome, with whom
he spoke for a half-hour, it was
disclosed this week.
It is understood that Rabbi
Zolli expressed his thanks and
those of the Jewish community
for the moral and material as-
sistance given the Jews of Rome
during the German occupation
of the capital. Aside from shel-
tering many Jews, the Vatican
contributed funds to meet a ran-
som demand of me Germans.
A BEST investmentA United
States War Bond. Buy often.
IT PAYS TO BUY AT
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FREEDOM RETURNS TO THE JEWS OF ROME
PALM BEACH NOTES
MRS. MART SCHREBNICX
Max Greenberg has returned
from New York where he has
been on an extensive buying
trip. Mrs. Greenberg accom-
panied Mr. Greenberg and visit-
ed with relatives and friends in
New York City and Long Is-
land.
Mrs. Hyman Kapner. 831
Ridgeland Drive, left for the
north Sunday. She will spend
the remainder of the summer
there.
Pfc. Arthur B. Leibovit has
returned to Camp Chaffee. Ark-
after spending his furlough with
his parents. Mr. and Mrs. Harry
L. Leibovitt, Winter Rose Apart-
ments. Pfc. Leibovitt, who is in
the field artillery expects to be
sent to the field artillery me-
chanic's school at Fort Sill. Okla.
At its meeting Tuesday night
at Scher Memorial Hall, final
plans were made by the Beth
El Congregation for the high
holidays.
Mrs. May Cohen and son Jerry
of Tampa are visiting at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. Al Persoff
of Delray Beach. Mrs. Cohen will
also visit at the home of her
mother in Miami.
Saturday night at 8:30. Sun-
day morning and evening, im-
pressive services were held at
Beth El Congregation, Fern St..
in memory of Carl Schrebnick,
who passed away Julv 31st,
1925. He was one of the first
members of Beth El Congrega-
tion, and was active in its work
for about 30 years. A. Levin, a
close friend of the family, gave
the service and recited the kad-
dish in the absence of the son.
Pfc. Joseph, who is on active
duty with the air force at Rome.
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There was great rejoicing in Rome when the
'opening of the avuaKome marked the return
f5-*-* ivivivuik *s-a m\srMm\, *r
fpentng of the synagogue marked the return
aiJ om lo ** Jewish community in the
AinTc,,y' Liber*tion f Je*of I|alvb* *
*- 'VIMNVU Wl J\~TfB Wft **ay '/ --------
SS *,rmiw has increased the needs of the
Neid jWUh APPI tor Refugees, Overseas
funT p*le*tine, which must provide the
rcTt required t0 further the rehabilitation and
oration of Jewish communities freed from
^*" oppression. The Joint Distribution Com-
mittee, which is afiliated with the Unite* Pal
estine Appeal and National Refugee Service in
the $32,0()0,000 nationwide UJ.A. drive, is now
expanding its program to minister to the Me*
of Sew. in liberated territory. Photo *"""j
Unt Jews gathered in front of the Synagogue o
Rome on E occasion of the reopening of this
famous house of worship from which the Jewish
community h.d been barred by the Nasu for
nine months.
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1


i


PAGE FOUR
The Jewish Floridi
lan
nt and Main Offices, 21 S. W. Second Avenue, Miami. Fla.
X Box 2973__________________________ Phone 2-1141
:ered as Second Class Matter July 4, 1930 at the Post Office
of Miami, Florida, under the Act of March 3, 1879
* Jen 1st fkrkgari
Face Facts
By Alexander F. Miller
Florida Regional Director
Anti Defamation League
-TIDBITS FROM EVER
iPMcJtfy Confidential
-By PHINEAS I. BIRON-
FRED K. SHOCHET, Managing Editor
Subscription1 Year, $2.00 Six Months, $1.00
MIAMI 18, FLORIDA. FRIDAY. AUGUST 4, 1944
Ab 12. 5704
VOLUME 17 NUMBER 31
A PICTURE LESSON
Saturday, during the noon hour, the unveiling of a billboard
poster will take place on the corner of N. E. First Street and First
Avenue. Sponsored by the National Conference of Christians
and Jews, the poster ably presents the American theme of Re-
ligious tolerance and understanding. Depicting in striking form
three American soldiers "Fighting Side by Side," this display
will serve as a vivid reminder of one of the chief causes for
which this war is being fought. Too many have become callous
and too matter-of-fact in accepting this conflict without thought
of its implications and the benefits to accrue from victory.
The Four Freedoms, of which Worship is one will be brought
to the fore as we pass by this scene teaching a lesson by its
graphic portrayal.
A CHANGE
Rumors from London say that the British Government has
finally determined its policy with respect to Palestine. No hints
are given as to what this policy will be, nor is it likely that any
such revelations will be made until after the war, but the recent
removal of High Commissioner Sir Harold MacMichael and the
naming in his stead of Viscount Gort is linked with the new
policy.
On first thought, it would seem that the fact that MacMichael
has been removed could imply that the British intend to adopt
a more pro-Jewish policy in Palestine, for MacMichael has been
anything but a favorite of Palestine Jewry.
On the other hand, no one can say with assurance that Gort
will be any friendlier. Gort's atitude to Jewish aspirations are
unknown, but the very fact that one man who was displeasing
to the Jews has been removed might offer some hope for the
thought that his successor will be an improvement. Meanwhile,
the various Zionist bodies, notably the Jewish Agency, are
adopting a watchful attitude, promising to cooperate with the
new High Commissioner as far as the war is concerned, but
waiting otherwise to see how he will act.
Another indication, beside that of the removal of Gort, that
the new British policy may be favorable can be guaged from
the action of both of the American political parties which have
gone all out for the removal of immigration restrictions against
Jews going to Palestine and the establishment of a Jewish
Commonwealth.
It is scarcely likely that the British right now would want to
completely ignore the American policy. It would seem likely
that >he British will change their policy at least as far as easinq
otf on the White Paper and the restriction of Jewish immigration,
cut politics and diplomacy are strange and complex crafts
ana all we can do now is guess.
the
FOOD FACTS
In our third year of war, there is a deeper appreciation of
; vital role of food in wartime. There is also a qrowina
recognition of the fact that the production, distribution and
proper use of our food is so vast a problem, that all of us re-
gardless of our wartime duties can contribute materially to' the
task of making food fight for freedom.
And this isn't all just talk.
During September, 1944 Floridians are participating in the
nation-wide Nutrition Month. This is the month when nutrition is
receiving primary emphasis throughout the United States in
the Food Fights For Freedom Program.
The National Nutrition Program has as its goals for all in-
dividuals in the United States:
To choose a better diet by learning about food selection
and food values.
To have three well-planned meals each day, with special
emphasis on a good breakfast and lunch for school children
and war workers.
To grow and use more green and yellow vegetables and
tomatoes to increase the vitamin and mineral content which
is necessary in a wartme diet
To store, prepare, and cook food in such a way that the
most good can be received from it and to prevent any physi-
cal waste of food.
Being well fed means more than filling the stomach with
foods that satisfy hunger. It is more than getting the food that
barely protects the body from disease due to poor diet. It is
having each day the kind of food that will promote abounding
health and vitality.
Nutrition, in every-day language, is eating three good meals
a day are appetizingly served and well cooked to preserve
all food values.
Total war demands total strength. Strong and alert nations
are built by strong and alert people. Strong and alert people
are built hy abundant and well-balanced diets. Let's all con-
serve food, share it, play square with it, and EAT WISELY!
Each month I look forward to
receiving the bulletin issued by
Temple Emanucl, Fort Lauder-
dale. Each issue of this bulletin
consists almost entirely of a
vibrant and inspiring message
written by Dr. Albert A. Shapira,
retired physician who. makes his
home in that community. For
sheer literary merit I think that
Dr. Shapira's articles rank with
the best writing of today. That
I am not alone in my opinion is
evidenced by the frequency with
which his articles have been
picked up by other newspapers
and carried in their feature col-
umns. Latest to pay Dr. Shapira
the signal honor of quoting him
is Arthur Griffith. Sunday col-
umnist on the Miami Herald.
Mr. Griffith quotes the first two
paragraphs of Dr. Shapira's mes-
sage in the July issue of the
bulletin. I would like to quote
for you the last two paragraphs.
I wish I had the room to in-
clude the entire article.
"A Jew in the United States
Army or Navy is encouraged to
be proud of his heritage. He can
worship God in his own way,
freely and without prejudice or
intolerance. As a result, the
soldier or sailor feels uplifted
in spirit and is happy that he
belongs to one great democratic
organization. Yet, here in Fort
Lauderdale, we have a large
group of people who refuse to
rent rooms, apartments. or
houses to officers and men in
American military or naval uni-
form if they admit, or are sus-
pected of being Jewish. The lead-
ers of our city know what is
going on. The Christian minis-
ters are cognizant of the situa-
tion. But they do nothing to
eradicate or remedy this bigotry
and narrow-mindedness, which
is so un-American and un-
christian. It seems inconceiv-
able that any American, who
must hate the Nazi ideology,
could uphold the anti-Semitic
(and anti-Christian) keystone
upon which the Swastika-idolat-
ers have built their temporary
but thank God! tottering
might. Yes, here in our own city
there are those who unblushing-
ly disgrace themselves and com-
mit the unpardonable sin. the
treasonable crime, of slamming
their doors in the faces of Jewish
men and women in uniform,
whether holders of commissions
or citations or medals or not.
The bravery of some of these
very men might have saved the
lives of relatives of these same
door-slammers.
From a most reliable source
we know that many 'restricted
clientele" property owners here
have no religious bias. But they
are forced into a regimented ac-
quiescence and inaction by a
Bund of realtors who have re-
solved by hook or crook to prac-
tice a mercenary discrimination
against Jews and all Jews.
Thus Jesus, Joseph, and Mary
as well as all the early Chris-
tians, would by this yardsticks
have to be refused admittance
in Fort Lauderdale, with not
even a manger in a stable under
whose roof to lay their weary
heads. So, ever mindful of the
early pilgrims (Jews included)
who settled on the rocks and
rills of our country to escape
trom religious persecution, eter-
nally grateful to our fighting
men and our liberal leaders for
their sacrifices in the cause of
liberty and justice and more than
mere tolerance, modestly proud
of our own congregational blue
f w an.u ROJd- Patiently hope-
ful for the dawn of the dav of
peace and brotherhood and good
neighborliness. we Americans of
Jewish faith must be as vigilant
against these enemies in our
midst as against our foreign foes
*....? returninR sons and
daughters are to find us ready
to assist them in every possible
Wayu !n ?dJustirK themselves
unobstructed, unhandic a p d e d
and unmolestedas useful, duti-
ful, and law-abiding citizens."
CANADIAN CLOUDS
Flying to Montreal in perfect weather ... As we look d
from the plane window the earth seems well ordered a d ^
tematically arranged Well kept farms nea, 8ys'
white houses lazy cattle, and calm and peace over'all ^
A soldier transported overnight from the battlefield might th\
these green and brown hills and valleys between New Y \,
and Montreal were a new planet, the Kingdom of God
once in Montreal, one is rudely reminded that the world h"'
not changed muchand if at all, for the worse. 8
THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ....
The Canadian Province of Quebec is one of the most bea
tiful and most backward regions on the globe q "i
Fascism flourishes there undisturbed Cardinal Villone"0"
the recognized spiritual head of the French Canadians, drelms
of a corporate state and openly approves a French Canadian
boycott of Jewish merchants ... The Quebec provincial elec
tions will be held on August 8th, and the campaign is in hill
swing now Three parties are in the contest for political con-
trol of this province, the population of which is overwhelmngly
French Canadian ... The three parties are the Bloc Populaire
the Union Nationale and the Liberals, who are now in power
The Bloc Populaire and the Union Nationale are unquestion-
ably Fascistic in their political orientation.
THE NORTH AMERICAN ARGENTINE .
The press of these two Fascistically inclined (to put it mild-
ly) parties is frankly pro-Franco and pro-Sinarquist If yOU
read the Action Nationale of the Bloc Populaire you are pro-
pelled back into the Middle Ages Andre Laurendeau, their
leader, advocates a French and a Catholic Canada ... He
urges French Canadian women to super fecundity as a means
of capturing Canada for the French Canadians Laurendeau
maintains cordial relations with the Polish Fascist groups in
Western Canada and in Latin America, and is very friendly
with the Falange.
CANADIAN NAZIS ....
The Union Nationale is seeking power so aggressively that
it stoops to open anti-Semitism to make political hay ... Its
leader, Maurice Duplessis, is by far the shewdest of the French
Canadian politicians ... It was he who some months ago pro-
jected the hoax that the Liberal Government of Quebec was
planning to settle 100,000 Jewish refugees in the Province of
Quebec L'Union Nationale directs its appeal to the younger
generation, and is skilfuly manipulating the anti-Semitic issue
as a vote gathering fishing net Ihiplessis' election cam-
paign is by far the most effective and most active ... He uses
all the paraphernalia of modern propaganda over the radio,
and employs many women as campaign workers.
FASCISM ON THE MARCH ....
The Liberals, under the leadership of Premier Godbout, are
a rather anemic, colorless party trying to follow the middle of
the road policy They enjoy the support of the English sec-
tion of the Province of Quebec, and that of those French Ca-
nadians who believe in and want the status quo We do not
believe that Godbout will succeed in maintaining a majority
over the Bloc Populaire and the Union Nationale ... He has
been supporting the Canadian war effort, within certain limits,
notwithstanding the anti-war attitude of a majority of the French
Canadians and their church There is a strong possibility
that he not only will be beaten but will go down in a disastrous
defeat.
GENERAL IMPRESSIONS ....
As you travel about the small towns and villages of Quebec
Province you get the feeling that the people are not yet in-
fected, but merely swayed by a consistent anti-British and anti-
Jewish propaganda ... In other words, they are simple, naive
people who are being manipulated by ruthless political in-
triguers backed and, more often, prodded on by a clerical
Fascist church The Quebec Hierarchy could, if it wanted to,
change the atmosphere overnight ... If the Quebec clergy
were to translate the Popes pronouncements against anti-Semi-
tism into concrete action, the Province of Quebec could be
paradise on earth The propaganda that is peddling anti-
Semitism, anti-war ideas and anti-British feeling is mild in the
press, but strong and well-organized as conducted by pan311
workers by the mouth-to-mouth method Sinister whispering
campaigns about Jewish conspiracies to control the economic
life of Quebec Province are rampant The attitude of the
Jewish community reminds us of the Jewish position i
Mad* Fran Freeh Orange.
jcwioii uummuniiy reminas us ot the jewisn posiuuu
many in 1929 and 1930 .. There is appeasement on every
front, and a blatant lack of unity ... For instance: In this elec-
tion the Jews will, for the first time in 20 years, lose their one
representative in the Provincial Parliament of Quebec "
the St. Louis district, where the Jews could elect a representsw
tive, four Jewish candidates are fighting one another in
result will be that the Bloc Populaire candidate will be pre-
sented with the election on a silver platter, because of a dis-
rupted, confused and split Jewish vote Jewish leadersmn
failed in this emergency ... The Canadian Jewish ^gres
looks on with folded arms ... In this crisis the Jews need[Wg
very best spokesman in Quebecbut they will have n0^0:/
We predict that after the elections the Bloc Populaire and w
Union Nationale will form a coalition government .. That a
emment will drive aggressively toward a corporate fOc
regime ... And the Jews of the Province of Quebec are in **
very tragic chapter in the history of the Jews of the wefw
Hemisphere.


nUDAY^A^Iil
1944
"Between You and Me"
By BORIS SMOLAR
Copyright, 1344, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.
POLITICAL NOTES: Now that the Democratic Party has
matched the Republicans in espousing Jewish rights in Pales-
foe. Zionist leaders no longer see any need for pressing for
tarty passage of the Palestine Resolution pending in Cong-
ess B is obvious that this resolution could now pass in both
houses when Congressional sessions are resumed ... But to
jously the military authorities, the Palestine Resolution will re-
main pending for the time being Leaders of the Democratic
Party originally contemplated having Rabbi Stephene S. Wise
address their Chicago convention on the Jewish plight in Europe
aud on the importance of Palestine as a home for European
Jews This was later changed to a suggestion that an im-
portant non-Jewish personality address the convention on the
tragic fate of European Jewry, in order to pave the way for a
proper statement on Palestine ... In the end, however, it was
thought best that the statement be included in the general party
-latform as part of the party's foreign policy, without any spe-
cial orators Many will be interested to learn that Dr. Abba
Hillel Silver, who took a hand in the Republican statement on
Palestine, was in Chicago during the Democratic convention
and had something to do with the declaration of the Democratic
Party And speaking of Palestine, we hear that Eliouh Dob-
kin, head of the immigration department of the Jewish Agency
in Jerusalem, is due soon in the United States ... He is now in
Lisbon en route here This will be his first visit to this
country ... A Jewish commercial delegation from Palestine
will also visit this country soon to place orders for various com-
modities with United States firms, and to study Palestine-Ameri-
can export and import possibilities
INTELLIGENCE NOTES: Approximately nine percent of all
Jews in the United States were under arms in the Army, Navy,
Coast Guard and Marines, on July 1, 1944 This figure ex-
cludes men already discharged from the service ... A study
ol those from Pittsburgh has established that one out of every
jour of these Jewish men was with the Air Force, probably re-
garded as the most dangerous of all services About ten
percent of the remainder were in the Medical Corps Similar
is the percentage of Pittsbubrgh Jews in the Infantry, and some-
what lessabout seven percentare in the Field Artillery .
and in the Quartermaster Corps, each Five percent are in
the Engineers The remainder are with the paratroopers,
chemical warfare, and other branches of service ... It is as-
sumed that the same figures hold good for Jewish servicemen
bom other cities Many will be interested to learn that a
survey of physicians of two boroughs of New York City estab-
lished the fact that 32 percent of all the Jewish doctors were in
the armed forces These two boroughs represent approxi-
mately one-fourth of all American physicians of the Jewish faith
... At present Jewish war record committees are functioning
in over ninety percent of the cities in the United States having
alewish population of 1,000 or over They are all working
under the direction of the National Bureau of War Records es-
tablished by the Jewish Welfare Board We also hear that
I the Jewish Welfare Board is flirting with the idea of sending a
highly trained Jewish journalist to various battle fronts in Europe
to report from there individual heroic acts of Jewish men and
women in the armed services.
LITERARY NOTES: Jewish students of world literature, and
those who are especially interested in the Bible, will not want
to miss Thomas Mann's "Joseph the Provider" just published
ty Knopf. This is the fourth and last volume of Mann's great
tetralogy ... In 600 pages the great writer and Nobel-prize
"inner tells the story of Joseph beginning with the time when
he was banished for not submitting to the whim of Petepre and
concluding with the migration of Israel down to Egypt ... All
the incidents in Joseph's life, as related in the Bible, are elabor-
ated upon by Mann as a result of his great erudition in bible
^dy and his special interest in Joseph's personality ... A
Picture of Joseph emerges which makes him more shrewd, more
calculating, more sophisticated than does the original text in
J Bible Religious Jews will definitely disagree with some
the characteristics which Mann gives Joseph They will
jj*> object to incrimnating incidents which Mann weaves into
narrative and which are not mentioned in the Bible .
Jtt. for instance, is the tale which Mann tells of old Jacob
j*ag seduced by the wife of his grandson, the native girl
Tamar ... This particular episode, inasmuch as it puts the
f^narch in a light which is far from the spirit of the Bible and
"Wry to family traditions preached by the Bible, wUl del-
*% be resented even by non-Jewish students of the Bible
. On the whole Mann's book, however, will be widely read
Wl* homes, though severely criticized by those Jews who
Wjr to read the Bible without any trimmings and elabora-
iW on so-called "Bible criticism."
PERSONAL NOTES: Maurice Samuel's book on Palestine
J61'1" the Desert" which has been published by the
*h Publication Society by arrangement with Knopf, is turn-
-out to be quite a good seller Many are wondering, how-
n!\Wh? some coPies f h bok 0P*n with an UWE
K?JZ the Iewi8h Publication Society explaining that it does
liW?ys endor8 Ae views of its authors ... This note is
WW from other copies apparently ordered by Zionist groups
LJft Feucbtwanger, who is attaining his 60th birthday this
h !Lh? let il e known in a letter to Louis Rittenberg. editor
ZZS* hdaism, that he pays no attention to birthdays
I2*%to my own birthday^' In an exchange of letters
rEkSSS* he develops interesting view, on the role of the
X^P'6 as a spiritual force In the world These views
. ftjyB** ^ the forthcoming issue of Liberal Judaism
/David Mekler, editor-in-chief of the Jewish Morning Journal,
jw proud of the fact that he finally secured the news service
'"ish Telegraphic Agency for his pope*
* Jew 1st rhriUii
-.
PAGE FIVE
CAPITAL SPOTLIGHT
By MURIEL LEVIN
Copyright 1944. jtwi.sh
lelt-Kiuphlc Agency, Inc.
With the realization that the
establishment of "free ports" as
temporary havens for refugees
is limited to small numbers, in-
terested circles here and abroad
are plugging a new plan to help
the surviving Jews of Europe.
nrS lde3, as Put forth by a
Washington columnist with na-
tional readership, is for the
United Nations to issue "visas
for somewhere" for ALL those
in danger. According to the plan,
the visa would guarantee that
the United Nations would see
to it, by agreement among
themselves, that the individual
refugee would reach some safe
haven.
Presumably this would answ-
er the fears of small neutrals
such as Portugal and Switzer-
land who have in the past been
overwhelmed by the stream of
refugees pouring inwith no as-
surance that they would be
moved out. This "visa for some-
wheie" would assure the ad-
mitting country that the refu-
gees would be transferred with-
in a reasonable time.
Funds, according to the plan,
could come directly from the in-
dividual Allied and neutral
countries, from the United Na-
tions Relief and Rehabilitation
Administration, from the Inter-
governmental Committee on
Refugees, or from private chari-
ty organizations.
Some sort of precedent was
set by the Nansen passports
after the last war. Fridtjof Nan-
sen, who died in the early '30s,
was the Norweigian arctic ex-
plorer who became internation-
ally known in the years after
the last war for his humani-
tarian work in famine-stricken
Russia. He was made High Com-
missioner of Refugees by the
League of Nations, and his of-
fice issued the so-called Nansen
passports to facilitate the re-
patriation of those who did not
hold any papers. With the league
backing the passports, "state-
less" persons were enabled to
travel from one country to an-
other.
Sweden is reported already to
have offered some form of pro-
tective citizenship to some of
the Jews of Hungary, much to
the chagrin of the puppet gov-
ernment. The diplomatic repre-
sentative in Budapest is said to
have issued passports to a limit-
ed number of Jews, thus accept-
ing them as citizens and offer-
ing them protection, i
No official group Here has as
yet taken the idea of "visas to
somewhere" under its wing. The
War Refugee Board, for the pres-
ent, says that it is a State De-
partment matter; the State De-
parmens as usual is not talking.
However, the "free ports" plan
was initiated with similar dis-
avowal of interested. After ex-
pression of sufficient support
from the press and the public,
the plan suddenly found Con-
gressional as well as Adminis-
trative backingand in very
short order Fort Ontario was
established.
Our Film Folk .
By HELEN ZIGMOND
Copyright, 1944, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc.
Since 1940 Harry M. Warner
has received no less than thir-
teen awards, medals, citations,
ranging from the D.A.R. to a
plaque from the President Avila
Comacho of Mexico. In between
are honors from P.T.A. groups,
Boy Scouts, Legion posts, etc.
for Warner's patriotic services.
One interesting distinction was
the title of Honorary Lieutenant
Colonel from Governor Rivers of
Georgia for aid in the Anti-Fifth
Column Campaign.
And if we delved into the
honors bestowed on David O.
Selznick for his continuous
stream of high quality pictures,
the list would almost fill this
pillar. An unusual one is his
medal from the League of Na-
tions for motion picture achieve-
ment.

Many in the cast of "The Hit-
ler Gang" are themselves vic-
tims and refugees from that
gang. To mention a fewFritz
Kortner, probably the most-
hunted of Goebbels' prescribed
list; Alexander Granach. Erno
Verebes, Felix Basch, Lionel
Royce.

Producer Hal Wallis. this
year's Academy Award winner
of the Irving Thalberg memorial,
crashes the sacred '' Bes of
"Who's Who." A less* a conse-
quence is the fact thafSae was
in the top brackets of A\e re-
cent Treasury income tax re-
port.

When the door of a Jap Zero
was -being auctioned off for
War Bonds, bidding became hot
and lively between Al Jolson
and Theatre-Owner Harry Pop-
kin. Al finally won it with a
$220,000 purchasethen he re-
donated the prize to Popkin for
further bond-selling bids.
*
As to Phil Baker's newest
sell-uloid, you will either "Take
It or Leave It." It's different
. and if you like memory
quizzies and are a fan .
you'll enjoy identifying scenes
from old movies.

Pertinent is Eddie Cantor's
story of the woman visiting an
Army hospital. She lingered at
the wheel-chair of a wounded
G. I. Joe asked how he had
lost his leg. "I didn't lose it.
ma'am," he answered. "I traded
it for a clear conscience!"
In view of the fact that Papa
Winchell has had some thea-
trical experience (he was a Gus
Edwards Kiddie in the days of
yore), he is west-coasting to aid
daughter Walda in launching her
career ship. The rest of his
menage accompanied him. in-
cluding eight-year-old sonny and
the newly adopted Chinese
baby.

Cinema Chatter: Junior Laem-
mle, with a medical release from
the Army, is contemplating a
renewal of pic production. He
owns the film rights to several
stories. Max Factor received the
"E" for manufacture of plastic
eye-shell frames used in gas
masks. The legal cleaving of
Joan Blondell's matrimonial
bark took place this week. She
won custody of her two chil-
dren. Leon Schlesinger cele-
brated his fifteenth anniversary
as a cartoon producer. Did you
know that Major William Wyler,
former director, was a nephew
of the late Carl Laemmle?' Park-
yakarkus returns to the silver
screen in "Out of This World."
Parky doesn't worry about pic-
tures since he owns a juicy slice
of the Palladium, Hollywood's
busiest dance palace. Joseph
Schildkraut's new plan of life
is kliegs every summer, foot-
lights the rest of the year. Hav-
ing completed his warm-weath-
er chore, he's hop-skipping back
to 'The Cherry Orchard" locat-
ed on Broadway. In "Mr. Winkle
Goes to War" Edward Robinson
delivers one of his finest char-
acter portrayals he's a mid-
dle-aged office drudge to whom
the war brings the fulfillment
of his life-long dream.

When Joel Kupperman made
a guest appearance on Fred Al-
len's program, he was consid-
erably worried over a loose
"toof," fearful lest it fall out
during the broadcast. It didn't
however, and it wasn't until he
was on the train homeward
bound that it dropped from his
jaw. A few days later Allen re-
ceived a letter which he insists
"tried to bite him."

When Phil Baker mentioned a
two-inch steak he had just got
from the butcher's, he hurriedly
added that was the length not
the thickness.
Buy U. S. Stamps and Bonds.
Refined, educated, unencum-
bered lady seeking position
as Apt. House Manager, or
Hotel Housekeeper. Mrs. B..
co Box 2973, Miami 18, Fla.
RIVERSIDE
MEMORIAL CHAPEL
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
1256 Washington *ve, Mian.i Besch
in New York 76th St 1 Arasteidam Av*
5-7777
RIVERSIDE
AMBULANCE
SERVICE
1944 CAiilLLAC AMBULANCE
1944 OXYGEN EQUIPMENT
RELEASED BY THE ARMY
Now Open Year Around
RudeAxi UcUe
GEM OF FLORIDA'S EAST COAST
Announces
NEW CABANA CLUB Open Nightly at
Swimming Pool and Tennis Court
Music Entertainment Recreation
Transportation Service for Guests
Station Wagon will meet your train and make trips
to the world's famous beach
Boat and Motor for Fishing and Pleasure
Write for Descriptive Literature and Summer Rates
Box 747, Daytona Beach, Fla.
HENRY H. HARDESTY, Mar.
Notice Several Hotel Positions Open Writel


)
i
- i



PAGE SIX
*Ahm/ Flerid/ian
The Post-War World
By A. NISSENSON
The author of this article Is one of
the leading Yiddish poets of the day.
He is also an outstanding journalist.
We deliberately refrained from pub-
lishing this article earlier lest it be
Interpreted as an indication of a
political committment,
The views expressed herein ;ni'
entirely those of the author, ami do
not necessarily reflect our own posi-
tion.
Now, that the onslaught on
the European fortress is in full
swing; now that the armies of
liberation are storming the
slave-citadel of Europe from all
sides, it is high time to give
some thought to what kind of a
world will emerge out of the
greatest battle the human species
ever staged in the history of
its existence.
Much has been written about
the post-war world in the last
few years. Articles, books,
treatises in the hundreds have
been published replete with
plans, suggestions, advice and
well-wishing about the recon-
struction of the world after the
war. The thing to be noticed,
however, is that none of the
authors has treated the subject
from the objective point of view;
none of the authors, or practical-
ly none, has given the merest
thought to the possibility of all
plans being upset by natural his- i
toric causes produced by a war
of biologic extermination as the
one we are experiencing now.
This merely proves that the
eminent authors either did not
grasp the full meaning of the
present conflict, or that thev are
afraid to face reality of life and
war.
The only one who has truly
grasped the march of time, who
has appraised the evolution of
history in the proper light, who
so prophetically perceived the;
dream and the desire of a world
in conflict, is Henry A. Wallace. '
America's Vice President. Stem-
ming from the heart of the peo-
ple, endowed with a profoundly- i
religious nature with a concep- !
tion of social justice flowing I
from the teachings of the Heb-
rew prophets he dared to look
history in the face and discover I
in the present struggle the emer- I
gence of 'the century of the
common man."
A greater and truer discov- I
cry could not have been made.
The very outbreak of the war
spelled the doom of all move- i
ments with programs for human |
deliverance, leaving the field
free and clear for the emergence
of the common man on the anna
of world history, whose ideology I
IS freedom from want, freedom
from faar. freedom of religion
and freedom of conscience:
whose ideology is not to kill and
the full
be killed but life in
meaning of the word.
The historian, writing the his-
tory of our century, will be
forced to note that the disin-
tegration of all social, social-
economic and socio-political
parties and movements of every
shade and color began with the
very outbreak of the First World
War in the year nineteen-hun-
dred-and-fourteen, the very
moment these parties lined up
behind the banners of their re-
spective governments in support
of the war. The Second World
War merely brought complete-
dissolution.
In his desire to explain the
dissolution the historian will
have to resort to the science of
psychology. By applying this
science he will discover for one
that the very elements of which
the various social movements
1 were compounded consisted of
romantic and never of practical
fiber. The moment they had to
face reality, confront life in all
its brutality, the romantic struc-
ture snapped like cobweb. The
continuance of existence of these
, movements between two wars
was merely a feeble parodv on
their former romantic glorv.
The end of the first world war
left thsjeommon man complete-
' 'y. d'fHusioned. Having lost
faithVMall political movements
he nfjtvinger could orient him-
self i.,,clthe vast labyrinth of
problems created by four years
of warfare. The peace treaty,
instead of settling matters has
complicated them and has plant-
ed, wittingly or unwittingly, the
stcils of a new world war. So-
cially, politically and economic-
ally everything, outside of Rus-
sia, remained as is. On the other
hand a number of small nations,
whose nationalistic aspirations
have been subdued for many
years, were brought back to life
and they took to aping the major
nations in their display of ex-
treme nationalism. The romant-
icism of the defunct social move-
ments was taken over by na-
tionalistic demagogues giving it
a blood transfusion of racial
mythology and presenting it to
the common man as the new and
only deliverer.
How was the common man to
know that the dance-macabre of
the various nationalisms was
preparing for him a new holo-
caust of blood, death, sweat and
tears? How was he to know that
a new trap was being set for
him out of which he could es-
cape only through the sacrifical
blood of his child? For notwith-
standing his practicality in daily-
life, his nature is as credulous
as that of a child; the various
philosophies and dogmas he
could never comprehend. His be-
lief is and always has been in
God which, as the prophets
taught, is truth and justice and
goodness and the way to it is
the nation. And he does not
understand how people who
patriotically speak in the name
of the nation are in reality
enemies of that very nation. He
is gullible, the common man. He
does not realize that the god
each particular nationalistic
leader shapes for his nation is
not the universal God of all
mankind, but one devised to fit
the racial mythology of the
particular nation and, like in
ancient Greece, a clash between
the gods was inevitable. In the
blood of the common man there
lives a vision of eventual justice
and equality, although in his
zig-zag toward that vision he
often sidetracks the realization
of it due to his gullibility and
essential purity of heart.
Will his vision be realized in
this war? Perhaps. Many signs
point to that realization, not-
withstanding the remark of
Prime Minister Churchill that
the present war is no longer a
war of ideologies. The saviour
of England in her most tragic
hour dees not stem from the
very roots of the English com-
mon man and is therefore not
the expression of his soul which
is the same as that of the uni-
versal common man.
What are the signs which point
to the ascendence on the arena
of the common man? The fore-
most is the disappearance of
practically all ideologies and
dogmas, leaving the field to the
four freedoms which are what
the common man expects as the
outcome of this war. And it is
no coincidence that it fell to the
lot of Henry A. Wallace to de-
vise the simple yet equally pro-
found philosophy of the century
Of the common man. In form-
ulating his philosophy he gave
vent to the subconscious dream
of the common man all over the
world.
For all the books, brochures,
articles and treatises about the
post-war world are after all pro-
ducts of ivory-tower intellec-
tuals economists, sociologists
and professors of history whose
multiplicity of plans were guid-
ed by facts and figures and not
yJ.he soul of tne cmmon man.
The common man has suf-
fered a great deal having to fight
two wars in one generation. Suf-
fering purifies the soul like a
tonic. It stands to reason that
he will not allow himself to
again be misled into the stray
paths of this or that party, this
or that demagogue, but will in-
sist on building the post-war
world according to the formula
of the century of the comman
man.
OBITUARIES
SPEYER
Miss Rita Speyer, 50,
Miami for the past
in a hospital last
sided at 118 N.
a Red Cross
ors "' her
Spi ycr. of
mil' hel<
I Mill 'lit Of
four years, died
Thursday, She >-
. K. lu.'lrd St.. and wan
worker, Among eurvlv-
brother, ('apt. Jens II
Miami. Funeral servlcee
undei the direction of the
Gordon Funeral Home
KLEIN
David Klein, 51, a resident of Mi-
ami foi the past 1" years, died last
Wednesday, lie came here from New
York and resided at ;:i:H Alton Itoad,
Miami Beach, He la survived by his
wife, Mrs. Rom Klein; three HiHteis,
the Misses Fanny. Irene ami Virginia
Klein, and two brothers. Adolph and
IgjiatS Klein, all of Miami Beach,
Rabbi Max Shapiro conducted ser-
vice! I" Riverside Chapel. Burial
followed iii Miami Jewish Cemetery.
PARSON
Mori is Parson. 7c. a retired retail
store operatora died Saturday morn-
ing at ins home in t'oiai Qables, af-
tei s brief illness He came lien, a
year ago from New York. Surviving
are his widow. Mrs Anna I'ar.son of
Coral Qables; two sons. Dr. Rudolph
Parson of Roosevelt, New fork, and
in. William Parson of Coral Qables,
1 one daughter, Mrs. Alice i.i-tzlei
Z5E^_^gust 4i 1944
J^LNOTICa
buxlnesw under the fl.-M.V I*t(u
blbaBor-s I'l ('"""'iS
2JJ St., Miami, n,;,,;. 310 N' g
register said name I,h ln, to
he Clerk of u,.. rj," M cffle, J
Dade County, Florida <-our' of
WrUgJL
LEON KAPLAN ''artnert
T/iV.itvVuiVpp,,0,Bt
FLORIDA, in PRoBatS01^
In Re: MTArgV'hENM
ANOrVf!EKITr,''-'"'"
srisg?-Wia
lots
unit
tot hereby
and
of
|.\
Arlington, Va Arrangements were
tin- Gordon Funeral Home.
HER6KOWITZ
Mis Rachel Herskowlts, jx. of 822
Lenox Ave., Miami Beaob, died lasit
Friday after brief Illness. She
inn here from l.os AiiKelen eight
months ago. Among survivors are a
sun, Qeorge, a daughter, Bather, and
| a brother, Harry Qreenberg, all of
tins city. Funeral .services were un-
dei the direction of the Gordon Fun-
eral Home, with Rabbi Max Shapiro
officiating, Burial "as in Mt. Blnal
cellletei > .
CAPLAN
Rubin i'apian. 80, a retired whole-
sale lew.lei ..f no? Collins Ave.. Mi-
ami lie.oh. dud last Wednesday In a
local hospital, He came here three
month- aa*o from I'ittMliurKh. Surviv-
ing are ins wife, Mrs, Sophie ('apian.
and t"" daughters. Palmer Funeral
Home -iii the remains to Pittsburgh,
COMMANDER
Samuel I. i '..mmander. ill, a resi-
dent ol Miami for the past six years.
died last Friday at his home, mi
S W. Ninth St. He came here from
.\.w York City, Surviving are his
wife. Mrs, Ida Commander; two
daughters, Carolyn ami Bonla Com-
mander "f Miami, and two brothers,
Nat ami Sam Commander, both of
New York. The Cordon Funeral
iioiiie had charge oi arrangements
for shipping the body to Richmond.
\a., for hui ifll.
Havl
Maid Estate:
notified and required to nr.
< alms ami demands whfth'T "'
either of you, may have i.i,ou- "'
estate of HENpJ? C^AjfiSSUfc
dec-eased late of Miami till .jRl*
Florida, t ,,. li;.VTtrnUn,r-
(punty Judge or Dade cbejff"1*
file the same <-'- .'.Vun
County
Floilc
from the
i" his off|Cj
Ul
" the
!**&. SsrstSgffiS
SS
to contain thT 1^1 addr^!3r*
St .?;;:*........"W"fe
l>ate July II, if,4|
MARIE QALLAGHn
Administratrix of the kmi.
HENRY C. QALLAOHeI
MAX R. SILVER*""
As
.'
PRAYERS FOR VICTORY ON TISHA BAB
J**>* a** *** ^,
First Hand Account of
Persecution is Given
London (JTA)Many Jews in
the German concentration camp
of Vittel in France attempted to
commit suicide when they learn-
ed that they were to be de-
ported to Poland instead of be-
ing exchanged for Germans in
Allied countries, it is revealed
by British internees from Ger-
many who arrived in Lisbon to
be exchanged for Germans.
NOTICE IS HEREBY OrVBN iku
JOSEPH B UEBENTHaL BBfc
m,;, a,r.;;"K"*'"'in *Sm?
. .. e fieiitioits name of vupv
LOU ARTS, at ,2|, Mfrh| "
nue. Miami Beach, nSSTmlE
tend to register said fictitious name
in the office ,.f the i-Uik of the Clr.
cult Court of Dade County, Rortk
JOSEPH 1! UKItEXTHU
BERTHA LIEBENTHAL
I8IDOR SWEET
GEORGE CHERTKOF
Attorney for Applicants
7/J1-M I 4-u-is
Geneva (JTA) Hungarian
papers reaching here are silent
concerning the offer of Regent
Horthy to permit the emigra-
tion of Jewish children under
tin and also adults who possess
Palestine visas. The papers con-
tinue to press for even stronger
measures against the Jews.

Jewish soldiers serving in the United Nations armies assemble at the
Wailing Wsll on Tisha B'sb to prsy for victory, ss Jews throughout the world
commemorate Ihe destruction of the ancient Temple in Jerusalem. In the
United States Tishs B'ab will be observed not merely as s memorial for the
dead, but as the occasion for the quickening of the organized effort to rescue
the living through the instrumentality of the United Jewish Appeal for
Refugees. Overseas Needs and Palestine.
----------
Bern (JTA)A first-hand ac-
count of the persecution and de-
! poitation of Hungarian Jews
was given this week by a Hun-
garian woman who left Buda-
pest a few days ago, in an in-
terview appearing in the Basler
1 Arbeiter Zeitung.
I She reports thai thousands of
Jews from the Budapest suburbs
l oi ujpest and Kispest, where
ghettos have been established,
were recently loaded into sealed
cattle trains and sent to Poland
Many persons witnessed the de-
portations, which were accom-
panied by scenes of horror and
tenor since the Jews knew the
rate in stoic f,,r them.
Jews from the city of Gyoer
.h, Hi Wtu s,nt lo Lublin!
which has just been liberated by
,rfRS"rt.ArmV. Some postcards
armed from j,.ws deported to
other parts of Poland, but thev
were postmarked With the names
of towns whose locations were
npt known since the Nazis have I
changed the Polish names ,
German ones.
Jews are not permitted to ac-
company their dead to the ceme- I
tery. she disclosed. Jewish1
corpses are taken to the grave
yards and buried by Jewish labor
gangs without any relatives pre-
sent. Jews In interment camps
are not allowed to seek vcr
during air raids, and no shelters
are provided for them
The woman, who was enabled
to reach Switzerland because she
is married to a Swiss nationa
said that the fate of Hungarian'
Jews is in the hands of a Na/,
dominated Hungarian triumvir-
ate consisting of Minister of In-
terior Andor Jaross and two of-
ficials under him-Laszlo Bakv.
Secretary of State in the minis
Sure"01 Under-Secretary K0
London (JTA)Deportations
of Jews from Hungary have
ceased as a result of joint pro-
tests by Catholic and Protestant
churches there and the world-
wide indignation aroused bv the
reports of the execution of tens
Of thousands oi Hungarian Jews
in Polish death camps, the Swiss
Telegraphic Agency reports in
a dispatch received here from
Berne.
IN T11K COUNTY JUDGE'S COOT I
IN AND POR DADE COCNTT,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. ISM7
In Ro: ESTATE i.P JOHN F
REYNOLDS. Decesaed.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persoasl
llavina Claims Said EMitte:
You. and .nil of you, are hereby
notified and required to present anr
claims ami demands which you, or
clthei of you. ma) bave Malnt the
estate of JOHN l-\ REYNObM dt-
'<:i.seel late of New Haven County,
'onnertiiiit. t.v the Hon W F.
Blunt..n, Count) Jmlee of Dxdel
County, ami file the same in hi< ol-
flea In the Countv f'nurthotue inI
Made futility. Florida, within ei*bt
calendar months from the date of the 1
first publication hereof, Said claims I
or demands contain the len.il ad-
dress of the claimant and to b<
sworn to and presented a afo-e*ai4
or xanie will be barred. Bee -1
ltd of the IMS P obate Act
Hate Aojrual -. A I> 1MI-
MAX R SR.VEB
As AnciUar) Administrator, C. T A.I
of the Estate < John 9. Re]
I in .... 11
.MAX It SILVER
Attorney for Am lllarjr
Admlnlatratoi
1/1 11-18-25
LEGAL NOTICES
Nolle, i
undersianed,
linsiii.-s iiihI.
I.MK
^:-i \
Intend
offln
''in t
hen i i V.- ii thai thi
deKlilns I., engage In
tin- fictitious name of

ornZNAUEIt COMI'ANY at
E 1st Avenue, Miami, Elorlda,
to realKtei said name In the
of Hi- Clera of the Circuit
of I lade Count) El.....la
LEE I'WKN
II J OWEN
KAPLAN ""","i
Alton,.-* for Applicants
4 -11 -18-25 9 I
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Chapter 20722 Acts of W'
File A 809* _.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN -.!>l
It...- Rocolof, holde of 8U
County Tax Certlfli te N" I
-ue.I the lsi ii iv of lune, A I
haa riled same In m) ofl I
mad.- application fa t*>
be Issued thereon Said <' I
Anbiaces the follow i* I
property In the ("out I I W 'I
of Florida, to-wlt ...
!: mi n ... N 75 II
Blocs :. 1-u.i Villa Hi I
Rub.. Plal Booh Paw '
,f rMde, Stai
i.ij.x
t he 'ount)
Florida
The assessmi nl ol saw I
undei the said .....
name of !: Rhel I ,.,.,.
I'nless aid ml '
deemed ......rdlna Ja !' '_.
thai.....I< i '* ,vl11 '
l.ldder ;.
rirsl Me'du
ia
at ty
tin- hlahesl
House door
tlie month of
in
.- |t
I
NOTit e is HEREBY Q1VKN thai
the undersigned are enaaced In bua-
yi'i'v V-"1", ,h- "' iHIoim name of
l \|.Itu! v ''KXTl:l; OROCERY
\ ,,u V.IA /" "-"' rVa*hlnston
Ueii. Mia,,,, Beach, h'forlda. and
1 ,'" '"I-"' the said flctlt.....
i..,... i he office of the rierk. of
!'!:,,,: '" .........' "-1- County.
swt BHRUCH
MURRAY OROSSMAN
aEtlRGE HKItTK..|-S""1" "'.....'y
. AM.,,,,^,,,^^.,,,,,,,,,,,
in.- iniiMiii .: .- I'll'"........ii
Is the ith day or September, ',
Dated this Mth .'.'\-,'.M'i\ '
r.lll in- ^ "' :,
.BATHERMAN
i-: i I i
Clerk Ol III "".,
Dade County, f
Bv X c Sti
(Circuit Court Seal)
5 .'v B 4-11.IS
rvfDITCE OF ~.
^ TAX OEED
APPLICATION
"icti of '
Tin uKls..:N-ni,x,l::N,1!IIlr-,s,,;',;V,i
d.t tV. n I'""-""'1 '" bualneaa t.n-
m ^.i" i--:: Meridian Ave-
' -. 1MI-""1 ""'I'. Elorlda. and In-
tend t retlatet said fictitious name
'"the office of the Clerk of the ci,-
'" ';"'' l "-le County, Kl.....la
'"Sl-.l-ll I I .IK III-NTH \t
RERTHA I.IBBENTHAL
is.....i: SWEET
aEOROB CHBRTKOr "*'"'"'
ii
iniio. a 11 INS. have
my office, and b*v<
i..... for a tax deed to <
Said rertlfl. l "'..
filed
Issued '"
Buy War Bonds Today
on. Said certtnc in ln t
following described uFopen
rount) of Dade, BtM "'
to-wit: pis
Lou I .-'"I !," B'K*.
dens Park, s >i> ''',i i,;
,.;,,. -,.. ;,, ,i Count) "'
State of H......' vlld prop
The isai ,;."wss m ""
under the said t':i; "' N-1
name f TIH'MAS W ''^ b-" *'
Unlass Maid ''""'" "he pf*
deemed aceordlni < ,i! i* sow 2
described therein w|,l,he CWfl
u pas
fClrcull c.niit Beal)
8/4-II-1N--"'


AUGUST 4. 1944
^t **} fh *s^^.
PAGE SEVEN
^ *
SERVICE
PARADE!
- lark Suberman. son of Lt. (jg) David G. Swartz. 17iq e.,_, r,__;j t ,_
C8Ph Mrs Al Suberman. 514 S. W. 15th St.. was a member of PlS^h, "" Lehman. 19. of
Ig^^.xw^fc.b. iBMuaasSLXx. eaga^^
Marine Corps Veterans Attack Saipan
Sgt. Ernest Gunzburg of Mi-
ami, and formerly director of
the Florida State Refugee Re-
settlement Committee, made the
headlines this week. On dutv as
an interpreter with the U. S.
Army now in Normandy, Sgt.
Gunzburg took charge of a
group of German parachutists
that surrendered last Wednesday
after American bombing. He was
given much credit for his handl-
ing of the situation.
Marines spearheaded the attack on heavily fortified Salpaa and
offered the major ahare of casualties. Typical scenes, recorded by
Marine combat photographers darinr the first few days of landing-,
how the beachhead; Leathernecks washing at a captured reeer-
volr; a rutted American tank; dlfrinr In for stands on the beaehi
and farther Inland a mortar crew In action and last, a final fare-
well to fallen oomrados. Saipan, like Tarawa, exacted a heavy tefl
on the Marine assault force*, whe after the initial landau
took a backward ate*.
DtTotia
>g This Pga to the Efforts of tha Army-Navy Committea, Made Possible Through
the Co-Operation of
BOSEDALE DELICATESSEN &
RESTAURANT
170 N. W. Fifth Street
RICHTER'S JEWELRY CO.. INC.
160 E. Flagler Street
SEA ISLE HOTEL
3001 Collins Avenue. Miami Beach
RUBINSTEIN'S
WOMEN'S APPAREL
1026 Lincoln Rd~ Miami Beach
NANKIN'S SHOt STORE
1SS E. Flagler Street Miami
ANN'S IMPORTERS
714 Lincoln Road
COWEN'S SHOE STORES
55 E. Flagler St. W2 Lincoln Rd.
JACK C. JAYSON
Miami
PUBLIC GAS CO.
7200 N. W. 7th Avenue
MIAMI RUG CO.
100 S. Miami Avenue
SYBIL'S WOMEN'S APPAREL
76 s. E. 1st Street
RUfiW SONS-Oriqinol Rubins
US N. Miami Avenue
a^. ROTH 4 HAYS
"^lecturer, Aganti Langford Bldg.
TOLEY MYRON STUDIOS
Du Pont Building
Gerald Schwartz. 17, son of
Mr. and Mrs. George Schwartz,
1230 Lincoln Road, reported to
North Carolina State College of
Agriculture and Engineering,
Raleigh, N. C, on August 2nd to
study under the A12 Army Spe-
cialized Training Program. Ger-
ald had completed three full
terms at the University of Mi-
ami, where he was sports editor
of the Hurricane. On November
10th North Carolina plays Mi-
ami at the Orange Bowl, and
Gerald is wondering whom he
will root for!
WAR RECORDS COMMITTEE
NAT ROTH, Chairman
FRED SHOCHET
MRS. GEORGE M. COHEN
MAURICE OROSSMAN
JENNIE H. ROTFORT
NATHAN ROTHBERQ
J. W. B. Director
OFFICERS
SAM BLANK, CHAIRMAN
MONTE SELIG, Vice-chairman *
JOSEPH A. BERMAN, Sec.
Executive Committee
Mrs. Max Dobrin, Ben B. Goldman,
Maunice Grossman. Louis Human,
Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan, Mrs. Murry
Koven, Harry Markowitz. Alex-
ander F. MUer, at Roth, Fred
Shochet, Milton Slrkin, Joseph
Stein, Mrs. Herman Wallach, Carl
Weinkle, George Wolpert, Harry
Zukernick.
KILLED IN ACTION
Sgt. Arthur D. Gold, son of
Mrs. Ethel Gold. 1500 S. W. 13th
Ave., has reported to the Army
Air Forces Redistribution sta-
tion, Miami Beach, for process-
ing and reassignment after serv-
ing two years in the Aleutian
Islands as a stockroom clerk.
Pfc. Sidney Cohen. 29. of Kan-
sas City, Mo. On Kwajalien
atoll in the Marshalls. After
two days and nights on the atoll,
he was given orders to relieve
the regular gunner he was help-
ing. While doing so he was hit
by enemy rifle fire in the right
temple. He died instantly. Co-
hen has been awarded the Pur-
ple Heart.
Second Lt. William A. Wallen-
dorf, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. J.
Wallendorf. 6780 Collins ave.,
Miami Beach, arrived at Ran-
dolph Field, Tex., for a four-
weeks' course at the Central In-
structors school of the AAFTC.
Pfc. Harry Chersonsky. 29. of
Duluth, Minn. On Anzio beach-
head. He was a Medical Corps-
man, in service since February,
1941.
Pvt. Joseph Seligman. 221 N.
W. Third St., has been awarded
the combat infantryman badge
for service on the Cherbourg
peninsula.
Pvt. Matthew K. Burger. 27. of
the Bronx. On the Italian front.
He has been awarded the Pur-
ple Heart.
Howard B. Rosen. Miami
Beach, has been commissioned a
second lieutenant in field artil-
lery at Fort Sill, Okla. Son of
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Rosen. 1579
Meridian Ave., he has been as-
signed to the 71st infantry divi-
sion at Fort Benning, Ga.
Lieut. Gerald L. Barmack. 24,
of Chicago. Flying Fortress nav-
igator. In a bombing raid over
Germany. Had taken part in
six missions over Europe.
Sgt. Charles Brown, 22. of
Washington, D. C. Over Brem-
en. He was radio operator and
gunner aboard a B-17.
Aviation Cadet Albert A. Sut-
ton, son of Mrs. Gussie D. Sut-
ton of 1056 Euclid ave.. Miami
Beach, a recent graduate of the
armv air forces bombardier
school at Kirtland Field, Albu-
querque. N. M has been com-
missioned a second lieutenant
and awarded the silver "wings"
of the aerial bombardier, sup-
plementing previously won
aerial gunner's insignia.
Lieut. Sutton is a graduate of
Ida M. Fisher Senior High school
class of 1935, where as an un-
dergraduate he was a member
of the football, basketball and
track teams and dramatic so-
ciety. He later attended the Un-
iversity of Miami.
WOUNDED IN ACTION
Cpl. Leonard Auslander, 24. of
Camden, N. J. In Italy. He was
a veteran of the North African
campaign.
Pvt. Arthur Cohen. 30. of
Brideport. Conn. In Italy. En-
listed in 1938, he received his dis-
charge in 1941. Returning to
duty in 1942. he took part in the
North African campaign, was
wounded, and received the Pur-
ple Heart.
Capt. Norman Epstein, 32. of
Brooklyn. In New Guinea. Died
of wounds. A Medical Corps of-
ficer, he has been posthumous-
ly awarded the Purple Heart.
Lieut. Leonard Friedman. 22. of
Brooklyn. At Cassino. Was
executive officer of his company.
Purple Heart.
Cpl. Morton H. Marcus. 25. of
Cleveland, infantryman, was
wounded in the Southwest Pa-
cific area Cpl. Marcus has been
in service more than three years.
Pharmacist's Mate 2 c Harold
Yale Rodansky. 24, of Stamford.
Conn., injured in the landing
operations at Tarawa beach, was
declared dead. But Rodansky re-
gained consciousness after a
time and (very much alive) as-
sisted in rendering first aid to
two other unconsciouss Marines.
Rodansky originally enlisted in
the navy, but was later trans-
ferred to the Marine Corps. He
holds the Purple Heart.
Lieut. Donald Gusar. 24. of
Brooklyn. In England. Navi-
gator on Flying Fortress.
Liuet. Martin Heller. 2$. of
Brooklyn. In Italy. Field Ar-
tillery officer in service three and
a half years.
Pfc. Leonard Klain. 19. of Ne-
wara, N. J. On Bougainville. A
Marine. Private Klein enlisted
at 18 and in a recent letter home
wrote: "Don't worry about me.
This is the thing that has to be
done. We have to make an end
to fascism for a better world."
Sgt. Eugene M Bernat, 21, of
Youngstown, O., bombardier, was
wounded during an aerial mis-
sion in the Pacific area last year.
Pvt George Karp. 25. of
Brooklyn, was wounded i n
Africa. Private Karp joined the
armed forces three years ago.
Pfc. Sidney S. Cohen. 28, of
Kansas City, Mo., an infantry-
man serving in the Pacific area,
lost his life in action" on Kwaja-
lein Island.
Lt. Stanley Jacobton, 28. of
Chicago, a United States Army
Air Corps officer in service three
years, lost his life in action over
England while serving as a Fly-
ing Fortress bombardier.
Fill Out This Coupon and Mafl To "WAR RECORDS," Anny-
Navy Committee, c/o P. O. Bx 2973, Miami 18. Florida
Name------------
Home Addres3
Birth Date------
Serial No.
Street City
____Birthplace-
State
Civilian Occupation-
Date Entry
In Serviee-
City State
Marital Status----------
Bianoh of Service-------------
Pull name of nearest kin---------
Relationship------------- Addresa.
Information Transmitted by
Telephone number--------------
Date
.Discharged----------
...Rank or Rating.
..




I

'


PAGE EIGHT
MmM nuiMam
FRIDAY, AUGUST 4,
B'NAI B'RITH
NOTES
-by-
MARX FEINBERG
Last Tuesday evening approxi-
mately 250 members and their
wives and guests enjoyed a typi-
cal Miami evening aboard the
Seminole Queen and the Seven
Seas for about three hours on
the cool waters of Biscayne Bay.
The night was clear and the
breeze was brisk. The captain
provided music and entertain-
ment for the passengers and I
believe I express the thoughts
of all present when I say that
it was a most enjoyable and
peaceful evening. To those who
were not fortunate enough to
attend, I express my regrets and
exhort you to be more punctual
in the future.
The next regular meeting will
be held at the Miami Beach "Y"
Tuesday evening, August 8th,
with the program in the able
hands of the Royal Palm Chap-
ter of A. Z. A. who promise
that they will furnish us an un-
forgettable evening. These boys
have gone to a lot of trouble and
have spent a lot of time prepar-
ing this entertainment for you
and we should honor their ef-
forts with at least a good attend-
ance. Also some important mat-
ters of business will be brought
to the attention of the Lodge
and we hope that you will make
arrangements to attend.
From competent authority we
business and social trip and will
be absent for about a month.
During his absence we will have
an opportunity to observe our
next year"s president in action.
Brother Harold Turk will no
doubt take over the office during
Milton's absence and it should
be interesting to watch the pre-
view of how Brother Turk in-
tends to hold the membership
in rein. To Milton and his
charming wife, Sylvia, we hope
that you have a pleasant and
enjoyable trip and when you re-
turn we hope that you will be
enthusiastic in your renewed ac-
tivities and leadership.
This week we would like to
pay tribute to Brother Harry
Simonoff who has long main-
tained himself, in a quiet way.
as one of the outstanding lead-
ers of our community. I speak
advisedly when I say that Bro-
ther Harry is a true erudite. To
those who have had the oppor-
tunity to come in close contact
with Harry, he has displayed an
inexhaustible store of knowledge
and wisdom and invariably
In The Synagogues
Of Greater Miami
Bei \ Ices for
nounced by the
ai > as follows
Hi.' week-and nn-
Crcali-i .Ml.iinl un'ii
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION.
Coniervative. 135 N. W. 3rd Ave..
Miami.Friday evening services al
7:16, Haturdaj morning :n 1:80.
Bai Mltsvah of Morton, son <>f Mr.
.mil Mi.- Bam Qoldenblank, will teJcs
place
Evening lervlcei :it 7:18 ocwcK.
BETH JACOB CONGREGATION.
Orthodox. 311 Washington Ave., Mi-
ami BeachFriday evening services
at 7:15 o'clock; Saturday moraine ; sll". Cantor Maurice Mamchei will
chant tin- aervlce Religious School
Monda) through Friday, a a. m. to
i.....n.
MIAMI BEACH JEWISH COM-
MUNITY CENTER. Conservative.
1415 Euclid Ave.Kabalas Shalibox
Kriilay rvening at 7:1.V Satui
morning services at 9. shaiosh Beu*
iIiih Kt-rvii'es al 7 IT. p. in. to be fol-
low til by evening prayers.
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI. Re-
form, 137 N. E. 1th St., Miami
H.-Kiilji service! Friday evening at
J:15,
Notes Of
Y. M. H. A.
-by-
SAM SILVER
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CON-
GREGATION. Orthodox. 89* S. W.
17th Ave., MiamiService* Hthed-
uU'.l fi Fndav .it 7:15 p. ni. and
Saturday at s a. m, and 7:16 p. m.
HhaJoan Heudoa will lie foli.iw.-d by
Maarlv. Dally ssrvices at 1:80 m,
and 7:88 p. ill.
earn that Brother Friedman is Charleston. South Carolina.
SCHAAREI ZEDEK CONGREGA-
TION, Orthodox. 1545 S. W. 3rd St..
| Miami. Friday evening, services be-
- i um at t so Saturday morning at '>
when any problems of the com-1 Mlncha and Maarlv al 7:80 p m.
munity arise it is usually Harry I Iall> servlcei ai IS a. m. and :M
Whose wise sage and counsel is
sought. Brother Simoncff has
been a resident of Miami for
about 20 years coming here dur-
ing the pre-boom days irom
Forum Group
The Y adult Forum Group,
under the able chairmanship of
Mr. Harry Gerstein, will hold
its next meeting at the Y next
Wednesday evening, August 9.
The topic for discussion will be
"The Jews and the Post-War
World." I have been informed
that the Forums held in the past
have been well attended and
greatly enjoyed by those who
were there. Mr. Gerstein ex-
tends an invitation to all adults
to join this group.
Beach Y Entertain*
The Miami Beach YM & WHA
entertained the enrollees of the
Y Home Camp last Wednesday.
Mr. Henry Shier, of Henry's
Auto and Truck Parts, was kind
enough to donate the use of
two trucks to transport all of
the young people from the Mi-
*&
AUGUST BROS ftw.
*T la the lESTf
leaving the city on a combined
InORDON-
FUNRIU HOME
710 S. W. 12th AV. MIAMI
TEL. 3-3431
Moderate Costs Always
Within the Means oi
Individual Circumstances
"YOUR JEWISH
FUNERAL HOME"

Worthy and Deserves
Your Full Support and
Recommendation

SERVING MIAMI BEACH
AND MIAMI

EXCLUSIVELY JEWISH
24-HOUR
/dulance Service
He
was raised in an atmosphere of
southern aristocracy and in his
early days was imbued with the
love and respect oi all of the
traditions of the deep south. We
respect him as an authority on
all historical matters and he has
made a deep study of the out-
standing Jews in the south as
well as in the country. He has
been an invaluable asset to the
community at large. His unas-
suming and conservative man-
ner has shied him away from
high office but the results of his
untiring work and efforts have
been felt by all. We hope that
Harry will remain with us for
many years and will continue
the work that he has been doing.
Good luck to you. Harry Simon-
off!
p. m.
BETH SHOLOM CENTER. Con-
servative, 761 41st St., Miami Beach.
Services are scheduled foi Friday
evening al 7 IS; Saturdaj morning
sen..... \\ ill be held ".t SO
ONI
VITAMIN
TMDtK atf Ml Tees
issBSB eaafes
*i4DVK
i Oiaiglia VHa.
IimibI Saslat, _
tta bum ONaVA-MAT
(Waste*) ntasBBB TaMets.
-'-NERVINE
Tl. OMKMi
I WANT MY MILK
And Be Sura Its
FLORIDA
DAIRIES
HOMOGENIZED
Vitamin "D" Milk
"Milk Product."
Dacro Protected
TEL. 2-2621
Greater Miami Delivery
Visit Our Farm at
6200 N. W. 32nd Street
CANCER CONTROL
BODY HOLDS MEETING
The Women's Field Army For
Cancer Control, at a meeting
held recently, heard Mr. Don G.
Graham, member of the Advis-
ory Board and an officer of the
Exchange Club, tell of that or-
ganization's 100 percent enlist-
ment in the cancer educational
activity. Mr. Graham discussed
the legislative work of the Ex-
change Club in behalf of the
Women's Field Armv.
A movie depicting the work
of the organization was shown
to those present.
Mrs. Clyde A. Epperson, local
Dado County Commander, spoke
of the Tumor Institute of South
Florida, a project the organiza-
tion is endeavoring to erect in
this area. Headquarters for the
group are at 1843 Ingiaham
rJIdg.
(Tliui coluiun Is conducted by the
'renter Miami Jewish Federation In
cooperation with The Jewish Klorid-
lan as a community aervlce. To Inform
the community of your organisation's
activities and to avoid conflicts In
dates, phone 3-5411 and aak for
Community Calendar." Notification
must reach Federation no later than
Tuesday for publication that week.)
Monday, August 7
Temple Israel fci*trrhood. 12:30
p. m.
Tuesday. August 8th
it'n.-ii li'rlth Shoiini ixidgp. Men,
Beach V. S:30 p m.; Miami Beach
Service usavne, Beach v, : p, m.
Wednesday, August 9th
Workman's Circle Branch No. 692.
executive committee meeting, x:3o
i>. in
ANHIUSH-IUSCH
Budweiser
TOADS MAHK RBO. U S. PAT. OFF.
EVERYWHERE
DlaTTRJBUTBD BI
NATIONAL BRANDS. INC.
Alka-Selfaer
ye*f rate, at Cb
Home Campers biVflS, V
is another example of foe *
operative spirit existing
tween the two organization^
Latkyi Return
Mr. and Mrs. Lester La k
cently returned from tK
honeymoon which was nss!
the hills of North Caroffia JS
in Savannah. Ga. Lester k !i*
tor of the Y Bulletin and t
been an ardent worker at
Y for the past few years K
wish him and "Ginger" alli
the luck in the world. '
Congratulation!
Mr. and Mrs. Jules Wilson
celebrated their 18th weddi
anniversary on July 25th. The
Y extends congratulations and
best wishes to them.
workmen's cmcLFoRBn
WILL SPONSOR A LECTURE
Arbeiter Ring, Brunch 692 will
sponsor a lecture featuring Mor-
ns Bluskstein at the Workman's
Circle Lyceum on August 6th. at
8 p. m. Teacher of the Arbeiter
Ring schools, Mr. Bluskstein will
have as his topic "Jewish Up-
Bringing." The lecturer is the
author of several books on child
welfare.
QHNERAI. TAINTING
CLEAN WORK IKINE BY
BKST MECHANICS
KK.EH ESTIMATES
NO JOB TOO I.AKUE OP.
TOO S.MAI.I.
J. D. QII.BRKATH I'AIXT
CONTRACTOR
PH. 3-0070: If no answer. Mill
RIVERMONT PARK
SANITARIUM
ISM N. W. 7th St. Ph. 1-7301
ear* for chronic sick, eonvi.
laaoint aad elderly psopK
SANEL BEER. M. D., Dirtcttr
Reasonabls Pricts
* Large Beautiful Orsundiasi
yfrrt/w"""''

When You Think of Real Estate
Think Of
LEO EISENSTEIN
REALTOR
309 Lincoln Road Phone 5-6479
Dependable, Conscientious Service
NEW ROOF
or
REPAIR OLD ROOF
No Down Payment
Small Monthly Payment
All Work Guaranteed
LANG ROOFING CO.
416 N. W. 79th St. 78-1009
Advantages
of a
IIaVIIE FEIIERM
> MORTGAGE
LOW
RATES
*EAI. ESTATEMIAMI BEACH
MIAMI BEACH
HOMES AND INVESTMENT
PROPERTIES
B. E. BRONSTON. Realtor
aiJflglgflte R"' Estate Service
605 Lincoln Rd. ph.: 5.5866
RENTALS LEASES SALES
Lots. Hornet. Hotels
Apartment Houses
M. GILLER
R E A L T OR
1448 Washington Avenue
PHONE 5-5875
AUTO ELECTRIC SERVICE
Repairs
Stsrtsr snd Generator
>. A sPcialty
Special Service to Fleet Owners
IIP. K'? AUTOMOTIVE
IHUI\ 0 ELECTRIC SERVI
199 N,.SKl 20TH STREET
PHONE 2-9804
CE
DRINK PLENM Jf
Water
DELIVERED TO YOUR HOME
0ALL0I 80TTU .....SOe
C*SE OF six
TABLE BOTTLES ... j,
Plui Bsnif Dtpoiii
PHONE 2-4128
BEFORE YOU BUY
LMai
LEON ELIIH
with
METROPOLITAN
LIFE INS. CO.
Not Best Because Biggeet
ButBiB0Mt Because Beat
BASY PAYMENTS
LONG TIME TO PAY
. PROMPT SERVICE
. A HOME INSTITUTION
Deal With You*
LOCAL. FRIENDLY
INSTITUTION
x. ""^RESOURCES OVER $10,000,000
* ?^^tt**Ui ......
,. MO 8 1 N 8 All "T
%&l.
JOCBM M.UFT08*
rwtaptwr
*0&
**
1//////W'Jk