The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00806

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
r
ifcJteyislbJEIliDipidliiaun
^.THE JEWISH UNITY
a& THE JEWIS H WE E
MIAMI 18, FLORIDA. FRIDAY, JULY 28, 1944
PRICE 10 CENTS
and American
it can be revealed
Rome (JTA)A brazen
,emp by the Gestapo to barter
Res of 400.000 Jew* n Hun-
an for relaxation of the Allied
Stockade of occupied Europe was
S at Istanbul last month and
received extensive consideration
by the British
governments
noW- _, T
The offer was carried to Istan-
bul from Budapest by two men.
one of whom was a reputable
Jew whose family had been tak-
en as hostages to ensure his re-'
turn when the mission was com-
pleted. He is now being held on
British territory. The two men
arrived at Istanbul early in June
to establish contact with refu-
gee rescue organizations, to
which they disclosed the Ges-
tapo proposals.
All that can be revealed of
these at this time is that the
Nazis offend to cease deporting
Jews from Hungary to Poland
for extermination and agree to
permit them to remain in Hun-
gary providing the Allies modi-
fied the blockade, permitting
the Germans to import a speci-
fied quantity of rolling stock and
other needed supplies.
The proposal contained the
warning that if it was not ac-
cepted the deportations and ex-
termination of Jews would be ac-
celerated. It was communicated
to the Allied authorities and
was the subject of a series of
conferences in Cairo in the mid-
dle of June, when detailed re-
ports went to the British For-
eign Office and the State Depart-
ment. Representative! of the
United States War Refugee
Board. American Jewish relief
organizations and the Jewish
Agency for Palestine participat-
ed in the Cairo discussions with
Lord Moyne. British Resident
Minister of State in the Middle
East, and other British officials.
The strictest secrecy was ob-
served at the time in fear that
the Nazis might use publication
as an excuse to intensify meas-
ures against the helpless Jews.
It was never considered, either
in Cairo or Istanbul, that there
was anv possibility that the Nazi
otter would be accepted since
me Allies could never agree to
weaken the blockade and since
there was no assurance that the
wrmans would keep their end
of the bargain. The opinion was
expressed that to make one con-
fession of this nature would only
"duce the Nazis to make furth-
er blackmail demands.
IT CHICAGO MEET
MILS OF OFFER Consolidation of Prominent Congregations b PJ};rfJ
10 RELEIISE JEWS Consummated By Announcement of Merger;
Organizational Life in Miami Benefits by Action
Creating history in the annals oi the organizational life oi the Greater Miami community,
was the official announcement this week by the presidents of the respective synagogues of
the merger and consolidation of the Miami Jewish Orthodox and Schaarei Zedek congregations.
Leon Kaplan and Abe Pepper, heads of the two congregations, reported that the nego-
tiations were approved individually by each body with an unanimous endorsement This
merger brings together the two synagogues, one of which, Schaarei Zedek, was the result of
political differences among the officers and members, resulting in the off-shoot in October, 1941.
The merged congregations will charge of the education and Tal- committee for Schaarei Zedek.
be known as the Miami Jewish
Orthodox. The Talmud Torah
will be known as the Schaarei
Zedek Talmud Torah of the con-
gregation. Consolidation of the
groups will give the organiza-
tion two pieces of paid-up prop-
ertyone on S. W. 3rd St.. in-
tended as the center of youth
educational activities, and the
synagogue proper, on S. W. 17th
avenue. Additional property is
owned adjacent to the 17th Ave-
nue building.
Rabbi Simon April will con-
tinue his affiliation with the
merged institutions, and have
mud Torah activities.
Details of the merger made
public provide the combining of
the membership rolls, which will
give the synagogue a member-
ship of approximately 250. The
women's groups of both congre-
gations will likewise combine
membership and activities.
The present officers of the Mi-
ami Jewish Orthodox Congrega-
tion will remain until the next
election in November, and a
number of seats on the board of
directors are being filled by
Schaarei Zedek irepresentation.
Fred K. Shochet headed the
and was assisted in the negota-
tions by other members, includ-
ing Phillip Berkowitz, Leon Lie-
berman, Nat Blumberg, Herman
Pearl, H. M. Drewich, Milton
Weiner, A. Pepper, Max R. Sil-
ver, and Mrs. Ida Buckstein and
Mrs. Morris Ofsowitz.
Leon Kaplan headed the com-
mittee representing the Miami
Jewish Orthodox Congregation,
and other members of his group
included Sidney A. Palmer. Jo-
seph Zalis, Max Rifas, D. Singer,
A. M. Bear, Mrs. Joseph Zalis,
and Mrs. A. I. Orlansky.
INTERNED AMERICANS
KILLED DURING RAIDS
ON BUDAPEST IS CLAIM
Zurich (JTA) Eighty nine
American Jews who had been in-
terned in Hungary since the out-
break of the war were killed dur-
ing recent Allied bombings of
Budapest, according to the Buda-
pest newspaper Fueggetlenseg,
official organ of the pro-Nazi
Sztojay government.
The paper claims that the
Jews were recently moved from
an internment camp near a rail-
road station at the request of
the central Jewish council which
was charged with securing food
and other supplies for the Amer-
icans. It has been the ex-
pressed policy of the Hungarian
government, however, to move
Jews from places of comparative
safety to areas close to military
targets and to deny them access
to air-raid shelters.
REFUGEES FROM ITALY
EXPECTED IN AUGUST
SWEDEN WILLING TO AID
HUNGARIAN JEWS, REPORT
Stockholm (JTA)The Swed-
ish radio and press commenting
this week on the reported Hun-
garian offer to the Red Cross to
release certain categories of
Jews states that Sweden is ready
to do everything possible to as-
sist the endangered Jews. The
Swedish radio declared that "if
Sweden can contribute to the
humane solution of the problem,
we will certainly not hesitate."
ABOUT 80,000 CHILDREN
WILL BE AFFECTED BY
HUNGARY'S PROPOSAL
Geneva (JTA)About 80.000
children would be affected by
* offer of Hungarian Regent
Admiral Hurt by to permit the
fmJ?ral!on of Jewish children
*?.." supervision of the In-
ernational Red Cross, it is
'earned here.
The International Peace office
thl Wepk addressed a letter to
Rwit,enVrt' diplomatic corps in
Z lr'i,nd urK'nR action bv all
Hit;,... "'R"'K otuuil ut an
hons to save the Jews of Hun-
*arv from total annihilation.
j*GuN ADMITS IT BOMBED
"EA&QUARTERS OF POLICE
Zvlf iAviv. (JTA)The Irgun
terror; "" outlawed Jewish
tank tlrrRarization' posied Dla"
Wth. uiRhuul lhe city dur-
biiitv V n'K '' turning responsi-
E af ,'hc bmbing of Jeru-
iVt Vnct. Police headOar-
PoliJi. Fnday. m which one
* SK^iu1^ 8ever-
Ke*P on buying War Bond*.
GUERRILLA OPERATING
BAND IS_IN^ POLAND
Moscow (JTA)Deep in the
forests of the Lublin region of
Poland a well-armed Jewish par-
tisan detachment composed of
1,000 men is harrassing the rear
of the Nazi army, in coordina-
tion with the frontal assaults by
the rapidly advancing Red Army
troops, according to information
received here by the Jewish An-
ti-Fascist Committee.
The guerrillas possess a secret
from which they
. radio station,
Washington (JTA)The 950 call upon the Jews of Poland to
war refugees coming from Italy ( escape and join hem -while
for temporary haven in this there is still time." and a con-
countryatFort Ontario. Oswego. I siderable number of trucks and
N. Y., will probably not arrive horses.
until after August 1. according
to information available to the
War Relocation Authority.
When they arrive the army
will be responsible
for their
In the past year and a
half they have carried out thirty
large-scale operations aaginst the
Germans in addition to constant
"nuisance raids'* on Nazi garri-
sons and installations. The par-
tisans are also sheltering more
transport. TrobabTy by special, .sans are a. o --* "^
train.'from the port of debarka-, Jan LWOjj ^ ^
In? tfffin TAhutrho!ityr:ing from the occupation forces.
will assume authority.
GORT HIGH COMMISSIONER
WAR BOARD UNINFORMED FOR PALESTINE AND EAST
ON REMOVAL OF CHILDREN, ^^ (J^TThe c lonial
--------- ^ or.. I Office announced this week that
Washington (JTA)-The W" Field Marshal Viscount Gort had
Refugee Board, informed that appointed high commission-
Pinckncy Tuck. U. S. minister in tf foj. Pak.stjne and Transiordar,.
Cairo, had announced thatm3 I succeeding Sir Harold MacMich-
Jewish children n beremoved jLjg^JjJgffgjf com-
Viscount Gort. who becomes
the sixth high commissioner
since Britain assumed the man-
date over Palestine, was
chief
from"'France shortly, stated that
it had no knowledge of the pro
jected evacuation. __
Je^to^^yIv^e 2EB9es! ss?tf
Washington^-The Nag' R -sanded Brit^h troops m
^systematically exhuming the rran f of Gibraltar be-
remafns of 70.00(5 Yugoslavs and n g ^ Malta As
30.000 Jews executed .since 1 q{ {h general staff he vis-
to "erase all. marksL 'ted Palestine in 1939.
murders, a Swiss newspaper says.
ANTI SEMITISM BODY
FINISHES PRELIMINARY
PROBE OF POLISH ARMY
London (JTA)The commis-
sion appointed by the Polish Na-
tional Council to investigate the
reasons for Jewish soldiers leav-
ing the Polish Army has com-
pleted preliminary inquiries in
Scotland, where most of the Pol-
ish troops are quartered, it was
learned here this week.
Dr. Ignacy Schwartzbart. one
of the members of the commis-
sion, revealed that the group
heard testimony of Jewish and
non-Jewish soldiers from July 4
to 13. The members of the com-
mission also were enabled to
speak with the army command-
ers Schwartzbart said that he
could not divulge the results of
the preliminary investigations at
present.
POPE~USES HEBREW TO
BLESS IEWISH SOLDIER
Chicago (JTA)Free and ua-
restricted Jewish immigration to
Palestine and the ultimate es-
tablishment there of a Jewish
Commonwealth were endorsed
last week at the national conven-
tion of the Democratic party.
The platform adopted by the
delegates states: 'We favor the
opening of Palestine to unre-
stricted Jewish immigration and
colonization, and such a policy
as to result in the establishment
there of a free and democratic
Jewish commonwealth."
At the same time, the conven-
tion went on record supporting
Congressional action to secure
full rights for racial and relig-
ious minorities in the United
States. The plank covering the
minority question said: "We be-
lieve that racial and religious
minorities have the right to live,
develop and vote equally with
all citizens and share the rights
that are guaranteed by our Con-
stitution. Congress should exert
its full constitutional powers to
protect those rights."
Following adoption of the Pal-
estine plank, Dr. Stephen S.
Wise, co-chairman of the Ameri-
can Zionist Emergency Council,
issued a statement here hailing
the Democrats' action and ex-
pressing confidence that the
plank "will speedily be trans-
lated by definite action into the
fulfillment of the age-old aspir-
ations of the Jewish people."
"My associates and I welcome
the adoption of the Palestine
plank in the platform of the
Democratic National Conven-
tion," Dr. Wise said. "We are
grateful to the leaders of the
Democratic party, including the
co-chairman of the committee on
resolutions, the Honorable John
W. McCormick, and the Honor-
able Mary T. Norton, and the
distinguished leaders of both
Houses of Congress who served
on the committee, in addition to
the veteran Liberal, the Honor-
able Josephus Daniels. The con-
vention delegates, representing
the conviction of the American
people, adopted the resolution
with unanimity. By this act. the
Democratic party once again re-
affirms the historic policy of
Woodrow Wilson and Franklin
Delano Roosevelt."
Tel Aviv (JTA)The story of
how the Pope blessed a Jewish
soldier in Hebrew was told in a
letter which arrived here from
the front in Italy.
Visiting troops, the Pope asked
the soldier where he was from.
When the soldier replied that his
home was in Palestine, the Pope
raised his hand and greeted him
with the words: "Yevorechacha
adonai vosmerecha"the tradi-
tional Hebrew blessing from the
Old Testament (Numerals VI
24-6) meaning: "May God bless
you and keep you."
CAMP ADMINISTRATOR
ON TRIAL FOR MURDER
Algiers (JTA)The mistreat-
ment of interned Jews in the
concentration camps established
by the Vichy government in
North Africa was described here
at the trial of the administrat-
ors of Camp Djenian at Bou?
Rezg.
The chief accusation against
the comp director and guards is
that they caused the death of a
51-year-old Jewish physician, a
former president of the League
for Human Rights in
GERMANS CAPTURE 100
WARSAW JEWS HIDING
WITH FRIENDLY POLES
London (JTA)German police
in Warsaw recently rounded up
100 Jews who were being shel-
tered in the homes of Poles, ac-
cording to information reaching
Polish circles here. The fate of
the Jews, who were probably
survivors of the liquidation of
the Warsaw ghetto, is unknown.
The Jews were captured dur-
ing mass arrests by the Nazis of
Poles whom they are using for
forced labor to construct fortifi-
cations. It is also reported that
the prison located within the
ruins of the Warsaw ghetto was
raided recently by Polish patriots
who liberated 15 political prison-
ers, including leaders of the re-
sistance movement.
5.000 JEWISH CHILDREN MAY
BE EVACUATED IN FRANCE
Although he was ill when he ar-
rived at the camp, he was com-
pelled to work on the camp
farm. Witnesses said that he
contracted pneumonia and lat-
er typhus and died June 12, 1942.
Cairo (JTA)Five thousand
Jewish orphans will soon be al-
lowed to leave France, it was
reported here by United States
Minister Pinckney Tuck, who
was formerly American charge
Algeria.! d'affaires at Vichy.
At one time "the U. S. had
agreed to admit several thousand
of the young refugees, and Amer-
ican relief organizations had even
sent representatives to Europe to
arrange transportation for them.'




I 4


PAGE TWO
+Jmistifk>rkJiati

T
OBITUARIES
KLEIN
David Klein. 51. of 2334 Alton
Rd., Miami Beach, who came
here 10 years ago from New
York, died Wednesday in a hos-
pital. Surviving are his wife.
Mrs. Rose Klein; two brothers.
Adolph and Ignatz. and three
.sisters, Misses Fanny, Irene and
Virginia Klein, all of Miami
Beach. Services were held on
Thursday in the Riverside chapel
with burial following in Miami
Jewish cemetery.
BIRTHS
S/Sgt and Mrs. Bernard Gross
announce the birth of a son
Monday at the Biltmore hos-
pital. Mrs. Gross is the daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Adolf Adler
of this city.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Zucker-
nick and son Chick, 3134 Sheri-
dan Ave., Miami Beach, are va-
cationing in New York. Mr.
Zuckernick is president of the
Miami Beach "Y."
Mr. and Mrs. Albert A. Ber-
man announce the birth of a
daughter, Rosalyn. July 10th.
Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Slote are
visiting at Blowing Rock. N. C.
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Margulies
are leaving for a two week's
stay at Gatlinsburg, Tenn.
Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Schindler
spent a week here visiting with
their in-laws, Mr. and Mrs. Sam
Schindler, 1425 Meridian Aye..
Miami Beach. Irwin is a pilot
with American Export Lines,
Naval Transport Services, with
headquarters in New York. Both
families left Thursday for New
York to visit the widow of their
late son and brother. Roland,
who was killed in the recent ex-
plosion at Port Chicago, Calif.
ENGAGED
s >#
Stanley C. Myers will leave
August 3rd for New York to join
his wife and family. They will
Sam Miller. 1919 S. W. 17th St.
will leave Sunday to join his
wife in New York. He will be
gone about three weeks.
Rabbi Simon April of Cong.
Schaarei Zedek, is spending a
CAPITAL SPOTLIGHT
By MURIEL LEVIN
Copyright, tan. Jewish
Ti-U'Kniphii' AKfiioy, Inc.
return to the city the early part month visiting in Pennsylvania
of September.
and New York.
Mrs. Abe Mazor and family
have returned to the city after
Miss Mary Berstein, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Jules Berstein.
1132 Euclid Ave., Miami Beach. vlsiting in the North.
left this week to spend some time
as a guest of Mr. and Mrs. Mur-
ray Kaufman in New York.
Mrs. Moses Mescheloff is leav-
ing Monday to join Rabbi Mes-
cheloff in New York. They will
spend several weeks there.
MISS RACHEL OKA
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Oka. 1562
Meridian Ave., Miami Beach, an-
nounce the engagement of their
daughter. Rachel, to Pvt. Samuel
Kann, U. S. A., son of Mr. and
Mrs. Daniel Kann of Milwaukee.
With both political parties
angling for their votes, Zionists
lure are beginning to hope that
the new Congressional action to
open Palestine to Jewish immi-
grants will be initiated even be-
fore the elections in November.
The more cautious counsel
waiting until the United Nations
victory is in the bag. But Is-
rael Goldstein, president of the
Zionist Organization of Amer-
ica, has said that as .soon as the
military tide were changed, the
Zionists would again press for
action. They do not want to let
another March 31 pass without
wiping out the MacDonald White
Paper of 1939.
Proponents in Congress say
they would be willing to start
the fight again in the fallif the
military situation continues to
look good. If Turkey should
commit herself to the Allies as is
hoped in diplomatic quarters, it
is thought there would be little
in the Middle Eastern set-up to
disturb the war department.
When Prince Emir Feisal. see-
Both are students of the Univer- 1 nd son of King Ibn-Saud. and
sity of Wisconsin. I foreign minister of Saudi-Ara-
i bia. swept into Washington last
Dave Bear, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Morris Bear, is a patient at Jack-
son Memorial hospital.
Mr. and Mrs. D. Rosner and
family are spending some time
in Atlantic City at the Ostend
Mrs. Lillian Fisher and daugh-
ter, of Monticello, New York, are
the guests of her brother-in-law
and sister. Mr. and Mrs. Pete
Silver. Mrs. Fisher is the daugh-
ter of H. M. Drewich.
Mr
left
northern
Charlotte, who is at present at
camp in Pennsylvania, will join
them prior to their returning
for the Holidays.
Miss Bernyce Badanes has re-
turned to the city after a month's
j i------Tr t,. Hotel as thp guests of Rahhi and i turnea to tne city alter a montn s
and Mrs. Nat Blumberg MlV?_.ATr H K vaaclion in Philadelphia. New
Tuesday for an extended ^-.J.nfn reen,\vald/ Mr ,Rof York and New Jersey,
lern trip. Their daughter. "er; hotclman, will return short- xorK ana "cw *""**
ly to Miami Beach where he will M ___, .. .-, .,_____
make plans for the opening f ,,R Wftii ^ Goldmann.
the Victor Hotel, which he will .5 5.' 2!thJCr uha.Vu aS t!?eir
Benjamin Fmkel is in Miami
Beach for a short stay from his
northern 'home, to visit with
his son. who is spending a fur-
lough here.
Lifelong Treasures!
6-Piece Sterling
PLACE SETTINGS
In 1810 Pattern
By International!
$
17
82<
Treasured possession for a
lifetime. You'll adore the
masterly design and mel-
low finish of International
Sterling! Set includes one
each: knife, fork, tea-
spoon, cream soup, salad
fork, and butter spreader.
Plus Tax
MIAMI STORE. SILVERWARE
FIFTH FLOOR
operate this season.
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Mills, of
Lyons, Ga., are spending two
weeks at the Milburn Hotel. Mi-
ami Beach. While here they are
being entertained by their cous-
ins, Mr. and Mrs. Leon Kaplan.
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Berman.
and daughter Carol, are leaving
August 3rd for a month's stay
in the North.
Mr. and Mrs. Sol Goldstrom o
Miami Beach have as their guests
from San Francisco, their daugh-
ter. Mrs. Bert Walter, and grand-
child. Flora Rose.
Dr. and Mrs. Max Dobrin. Mi-
ami Beach, left for New York to
visit their daughter, Celia.
Mr. and Mrs. R. JacobsUm
left this week to visit in Louis-
ville and Hendersonville.
Miss Evelyn Rifas. daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Max Rifas. has re-
turned to Miami, on June 17th.
from Puerto Rico, where she has
been in government service for
over a year. Miss Rifas will be
leaving Miami on July 31st for
Chicago, where she will visit her
sister, Mrs. Atz.
Leon Lieberman is spending a
vacation in New Jersey and will
return to the city next week.
Sherwin Drewich, of Waynes-
ville, Mo., is visiting with Mr.
and Mrs. H. M. Drewich.
TUomi
for Rest
CONVALESCENCl
j Chronic Cases
fSun-RayPark
Health Resort
Mount Sinai Memorial Park
"Owned and Operated by
Greater Miami Jewish Cemetery An'n
A COMMUNITY CEMETERY
Affiliated Congregations: Beth David, Beth Jacob. Miami
Jewish Orthodox, Schaarei Zedek and Sisterhood
Chesed Shel Ernes
October, Zionists feared that
their aspirations in Palestine
would be submerged in oil.
But just a few months later,
the Compton-Wright and Wag-
ner-Taft resolutions to open Pal-
estine to Jewish immigration and
to ultimately establish a Jewish
Commonwealth were introduced
in the House and the Senate.
The majority and minority lead-
ers announced their support.
Hearings before the House For-
eign Affairs Committee were
immediately scheduled.
In addition to the expected op-
position from Arabs here and
abroad, protests from Jewish
groups were entered. Lessing J.
Rosenwald of the American
Council for Judaism led those
who denounced attempts to "go
back to a theocratic state."
Then the War and State De-
partments turned thumbs down.
The military situation was too
uncertain; the merits of the case
were not under consideration.
The resolutions were shelved
With the approach of the fate-
ful March 31. 1944 promised in
the MacDonald White Paper
Dr. Abba Hillel Silver and Dr
Stephen Wise of the American
Zionist Emergency Council ap-
proached President Roosevelt. In
somewhat ambiguous terms, he
The bar mitzvah of Morton, expressed his support for the
son of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Golden- ~lon.lst cause. Finally, the Pres-
blank, will take place at ser-1 ,nt was asked Just what the
vices at Beth David a week from f._"up_,w?s- "e said he saw no
Saturday. August 5th.
house guests her brother-in-law
and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Harry
Kaufman, former Miami resi-
dents who now live at Starke.
Mr. Goldmann returned this
week from New York where he
was joined by his daughter,
WAVE Petty Officer 2/c Gladys
Goldmann, stationed in Washing-
ton.
Miss Florella Sternbcrg. 147
N. E. Third St., returned home
Friday from Chicago where she
has been visiting relatives and
friends for the past seven weeks.
Miss Renee Greenfield. 1354 S.
W. 12th St., is spending a two
weeks' vacation at Henderson-
ville. N. C.
BAR MITZVAH
international parlevTT*55*
follow the war y that will
Dissension among th* i
groups on the issue of ui.JeWlsh
establishing a Jewish &ately
wea th, however. prcSenc mmon'
or less formidable &mor*
Zionists to surmount T for
hungry Congress mav vte-
antagonizing any section \risk
Jewish ballot casters f "*
ON U.S. PARTY ?SrS
Cairo (JTA)Thp p
government intends to JSS?lan
Pro-Z.onist Palestine ft thc
both the Democratic and S*S in
bean platforms, it J? ,RcDub-
here. The Arab press has IW
voiced its objections and'S
week, a well-known pjLffi
nationalist sent a letter to no
Minister Pinckney Tuck h
nouncing the DemocraUc Dlank
as an injustice to the Arabs.
BRITAIN WILL~NOT~ACT ON
PALESTINE FOR THE HUHR
London (JTA)Britain will
not adopt a clear-cut final S
icy in regard to Palestine until
the Indian question is soivJ
Emanuel Shinwell. Labor Part,
leader in Commons, said this
hrtLS anA in,e.rvicw spearing
in the London Jewish Chronicle
i'J?a *!?? meanJirne." Shinwell
stated. I strongly urge Zionists
to concentrate on economic and
purely materialistic Jewish de-
velopments in Palestine. That
is the thing that counts with the
British government and people
The more valuable they make
themselves economically and
materialistically, the more con-
sideration and respect they will
receive from Britain which has
absolutely no interest in Jews as
Jews or in the future of Jewry."
Buy U. S. Stamps and Bonds.
BRIS
The brism of the sons of Mr.
and Mrs. Irving Cohen, Welling-
ton Hotel, Miami Beach, and Mr
and Mrs. Nathan Dubler. 92 N.
E. 56th St., took place this week
with Rabbi S. M. Machtei offi-
ciating.
RIVERSIDE
MEMORIAL CHAPEL
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
1256 Washington .vi, Miami Scach
In Mew York 76th St l Amsterdam Avt
5-7777
RIVERSIDE
HI AMBULANCE
SERVICE
A
1944 CAiilLUC AMBULANCE
1944 OXYGEN EQUIPMENT
contradiction between the inac-
tivity required by military de-
mands and termed the claims of
the Jews in Palestine a civil
problem. The issue of Palestine
was closed for the moment.
Now that the Allied armies
appear to be surrounding the
Aryans from all sides. Zionists
think that military objections
to our taking a stand will soon be
t'j1In"na4ted- Trey want the Unit-
id States on record before the
Your Complete Department
Store With Quality
Merchandise
Washington At*, at 13th St.
Miami Beach
And for your convenience
Morris Brother's New Ap-
parel and Accessory Store
70 E. Flagler St.. Miami
LINCOLN *g"M
Lincoln Rd., Miami Btach
Ml | U I Open Daily
I n m I 11:15 AM
Downtown Miami
CAPITOL 5ft?
Downtown. N. Miami at 3rd
NOW SHOWING
Thru Monday, July 31
From Somerset Maugham's
Sensational Novel!
DEANNA
DURBIN
As Abigail who became
"Jackie" Because she
couldn't stop loving!
GENE
KELLY
As Robert who enslaved
her heart!
"CHRISTMAS
HOLIDAY"
WITH
Gale Sondergaard
Richard Whorf
SID PALMER'S FUNERAL HOME
SERVING
PHONE 9-2664
THEJEWISH COMMUNITY"
i friend in need- 20ft W FLAGLER
MOUNT NEBO
THE CEMETERY OF DISTINCTION
FOR DISCRIMINATING FAMILIES
Rabbi S. M. Machtei, Director
Olympic Building Phone 3-3720
OLD SARATOGA INN
Biacayne Boulevard at 77th Street Phone 7-7725
Week Day Dinners 5 to 10 P. M_____Sundays From Noon
Cocktail Lounge.....Fine Liquors and Wines
WE ARE CLOSED ON WEDNESDAYS
TAKE BUS 11 FROM DOWNTOWN MIAML OH
BUS M 71 PROM MIAMI BEACH


^^^28^944
Stockholm
(JTA)A Latvian
t. woman, who arrived in
^TcenUy af^r hiding
?WmtheG.-stapofora.yearand
""".l gave an eye-witness ac-
f0f thl. massacres of Lat-
Jews by the Germans and
a m of the massacres of Lat
count ,01 yu? thm oenTians an<
vian
also l
sons
%e woman. Selma Anderson
Jose fmllv nameL ^ef?.
,miee was Shebshelovitz. was
S from the Riga ghetto in
Somber 1941, on the eve of
JS siread massacre by Al-
wnder Anderson, whom she
jRuently married. They
S3 in Latvia for more than a
year, under the noses of the Ges-
At the outbreak of the war.
Mrs Anderson was a student at
e'EnRhsh College in Riga. Af-
ter the German occupation she
was forced to work in the rains
f the bombed sections of Riga,
and later as a kitchen maid in S.
S headquarters. In October. 1941,
she was placed in a ghetto to-
cher with her parents. Josif
and Emma. Here, seven persons
had to live in a room nine yards
^the reveals that in the first
weeks of the occupation, 26.000
Jews were murdered in the
provinces, and the rest fled to
Riga, where further thousands
were kilKd Latvian guards
fired into the ghetto houses at
random, killing hundreds. Many
were beaten to death. Women
were raped. Some Latvian po-
licemen, .students, hoodlums and
dregs from the Riga underworld
participated In the atrocities.
Keep on buying War Bonds.
vJewlstrhridiar)
PAGE THREE
JEWISH FOLK CHORUS OF GREATER MIAMI EXPANDS ITS ACTIVITIES
Much interest has been aroused
by the Jewish Folk Chorus of
Greater Miami, consisting of a
complete vocal scale, an organi-
zation that dedicates itself to
the service of the Jewish com-
munity of the Greater Miami
area with Jewish vocal music of
a nature designed to stimulate
a higher degree of morale, wher-
ever Jewish people gather for
social functions.
Although of comparatively re-
cent origin, it has already par-
ticipated in many social affairs,
invited by Jewish organizations
and assisting in making the af-
fairs successful with the presen-
tation of Jewish folk songs.
The Jewish Folk Chorus of
Greater Miami rehearsed and
publicly delivered a repertoire
of a great number of Jewish folk
songs, now available to anv
Jewish organization.
They are now preparing a rep-
ertoire of many additional songs,
including Jewish Folk, Palestin-
ian, historical, and workers'
songs of social character, select-
ed from material submitted by
the Jewish Music Alliance of
which the local folk chorus is a
member.
The officers and membership
of the Jewish Folk Chorus fool
that there is room in the Jew-,
ish social life of Greater Miami
for its existence only if it can
render service to all Jewish or-
ganizations in this area.
Jewish organizations that
would like to have the Jewish
Folk Chorus appear at their af-
fairs are asked for three weeks
advance notice for immediate
programs and will be ready to i
make public appearances with j
their enlarged repertoire De-
cember 1, of this year.
The Jewish Folk Chorus con- |
tinues to rehearse during the
entire summer and is preparing i
itself to serve the Jewish com- ;
munity of Greater Miami with a :
diversified repertoire of ever j
growing quality and choral per- ,
fection.
Jewish organizations wishing
information of any nature in ref- :
erence to the Jewish Folk Cho-
rus or its services, are asked to,
address all inquiries to Mrs. Ce-
lia Pomerantz, secretary, 1429 S.:
W. 3rd St., Miami, phone 3-7465.
A good buy is a War Bond. Buy
now and you will be paid later
$4.00 for every $3.00.
NATIONAL
BEVERAGE
DISTRIBUTORS
224-228 South Miami Avenue
announces
the Opening of Their
Exclusive Distributorship of
NATIONAL DISTILLERS PRODUCTS CORP.
NATIONALLY KNOWN LIQUORS
for the Florida East Coast Area serving the ter-
ritory between Vero Beach and Key West
SPECIAL NOTICE
on .f the**- flrit- liWh if now In prorreaa, bul It will
laki Mveral daya io compile distribution throughout thla antlra
"'' We MiKKi'.-t that thone who prefer OM Of more of thaaa
''"" branda pUoa their orders Immediately With tholr faVor-
package atore (or delivery on arrival <>f moraohandtaa. We
k, however, that you pieaaa he ooaaMarata i" your raqueet,
Inasmuch as tupplle* are not sufficient t<. permit mora than >
limited amount for each customer. In the event you me ot
able la Mcure your wants during the Initial distribution, try
again, at your dealer will receive an additional supply of mar-
OhandlM in approximately II day*. It Is our Intention to make
dletrnmtlon In limited quantttlaa at regular IB daya inteivais
Thui must of these fine labels should be available in practically
nil "tore.; in limited quantities most of the time
0- P. A. CONSUMER PRICES
rang Proof
g< Grand.d ....................100
2? J1*""- ......................100
" Vrnon .... 100
Bourbn De l_ue................ 86
wco ...... h j
HJS'a, Oln .................... 0
ft*!" Brandy ................... M
""nto Brandy ..... M
22 M*Irt um .................. 0
*".Scotch..................... K(
Buihmdl Irith ................... 84
R, J-IP PORTS:
uby port 20r<
fe WO Tawny.V..............'.'.'.. 20%
MERITO SHfeRRY:...............
* '20 KKf-
C^* : '' >*
r*rmn ....... Mfi
fwontnudo .................... 2(K?
" crau.:.;:;::::;;;;:;:;::; m
FOR THIS AREA
"ifth Pint
42 3.10
4.M 3.10
4.08 25a
4.0* 2.5a
3.50 2.20
3.50 2.20
3.S2 2.42
3.42 2.15
4M
4.0*
&.M
4.17 ....
5.M
b.ao
5.4
175
i46
2 40 ....
a.22 ....
iK
3*7 ....
S.4
4.30
5:77
Tenth
2.25
THE FIRST JEWISH
CARDIAC HOME PRESIDENT
ANNOUNCES GAMES NIGHT
Receiving the distinction of
becoming the first Jewish indi-
vidual in the state of Florida to
hold an embalmer's license. Ed-
ward T. Newman received word
this week that he had passed
the examination taken on July
11 th at Bartow, Fla.
Newman, a resident of Miami
Beach for the past 11 years, spent
a part of the practical portion
of his 4-year course here as an
apprentice embalmer. The last
Mrs. Clementine Kemp, presi-
dent of the Dade Chapter. Na-
tional Children's Cardiac Home,
announces a Night of Games on
Monday evening, July 31st. at 8
o'clock, at the Y. M. & Y. W. H.
A.. 1 Lincoln Road.
Mrs. Charles Raab. chairman,
and Mrs. Oscar Adler, co-chair-
man,, together with their commit-
tee, have planned an interesting
evening.
United States War Bonds are
still the best investment.
63. PASSES AWAY
OF HEART ATTACK
Daniel Cromer, 63, resident of
Miami for the past 33 years,
died Friday night as a heart at-
tack while on a
visit to Asheville,
N. C. He was a
life member of
Biscayne Lodge of
Elks, a member of
the Masonic order
in Miami, B'nai
B'rith and Jhe Y.
M. H. A. and was
past president and
one of the organ-
izers of Beth Da-
v i d congregation.
He is survived by
the wife, Mrs. Estelle Cromer, of
432 N. E. 26th Terrace; one son.
Maurice; two daughters, Mrs.
Doris Pallot and Miss Florence
Cromer; and one grandchild,
Roxanne Pallot, all of Miami;
two sisters, Mrs. Fannie Cowen
of Miami, and Mrs. A. Swidler,
of Chicago.
Cromer was well known in
mercantile marts in New York
and Chicago. He established the
Cromer Wholesale Co., leaving
the business in the hands of his
son. In 1926, he built the Crom-
er-Cassel department store at N.
Miami Ave. and First St.. the
building now occupied by Rich-
ards.
Services for the pioneer Mi-
ami merchant were held Tues-
day morning in Beth David syn-
agogue, with Rabbi Max Sha-
piro officiating. Interment fol-
lowed in the family plot in
Mount Nebo cemetery, with Gor-
don Funeral home in charge of
arrangements. Active pallbear-
ers were P. J. Davis, Isador Co-
hen. Samuel Spector, Edward
Friedman. Lionel Cassell. Joseph
Regal, Harry Magid, J. N. Morris
and Carl Diamond.
KOVALSKY
Samuel D. Kovalsky, 68. who
came here five years ago from
New York City, died Saturday
afternoon in his home, 38 N. W.
35th St. Surviving are his wife,
Mrs. Minnie Kovalsky, Miami;
two brothers, Wolfe and Dr. Jo-
seph Kovalsky; two sisters, Mrs.
Ida Saul and Mrs. Anna Singer,
all of Cleveland, O. The body
was sent to New York by the
Riverside Funeral home.
PALM BEACH NOTES
MRS. MART SCHREBNICX RapTaaankrtiva
B'nai B'rith sponsored a card
party at Scher Memorial hall
Sunday night for the benefit of
the Hillel fund. Harry Halpern
was in charge of arrangements.
Chaplain Charles H. Iley,
Coast Guard Training Station,
was speaker at a meeting of
B'nai B'rith Lodge at Scher Me-
morial hall Tuesday night. A
social hour followed.
Beth El congregation he'd
their regular Friday night ser-
vices at 8:15. Mrs. I. Rottman
was hostess, assisted by her
daughter Evelyn.
Mrs. E. Wacksnian, Pennsyl-
vania St. is visiting her son-in-
law and daughter. Mr. and Mrs.
Persoff in Delray Beach.
Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Lesser and
son Sheppard returned from a
month's vacation spent in Rome.
Ga., visiting relatives and friends.
Jack Barash. connected with
the post exchange at Morrison
Field, has returned from New
York.
EDWARD T. NEWMAN
year was spent in a New York
school where he studied embalm-
ing, funeral directing, and asso-
ciated subjects. He ffaduatcd
with honors, receiving the high-
est scholastic average of the
class, and served as class chair-
man.
Mr. Newman, now on vaca-
tion, resides with his mother.
Mrs Frieda Newman, active
communal worker and President
of the Miami Beach Jewish Cen-
ter Sisterhood. Mr. Newman is
a member of the Center, the Mi-
ami Beach Jr. Chamber of Com-
merce. and the B nai B nth.
A BEST investmentA United
States War Bond. Buy often.
ALFAR-
CRLMLRY CO.
rt
WOT PALM
Drink
COCA
COLA
Coca Cola Bottling
Company
of
West Palm Beach
Florida
SOUTHERN DAIRIES
atattaaaaOlr Tmmmm Ut
akacta mmt law
MM WEAR TO TOU AaVYOUl
FERGUSON FUNERAL HOME, Inc.
1201 South Olive Avenue
WEST PALM BEACH
PHONE 5172

*




<




1
<

i
'



I I

I I



PAGE FOUR

rJewlsli fhrMkM)
ewish Florid id n
nt and Main Offices, 21 S. W. Second Avenue, Miami, Fla.
1 \ Bok 2973 Phone 2-1141
. _____________________________________________________________ ______________
;ered as Second Class Matter July 4, 1930 at the Post Office
of Miami, Florida, under the Act of March 3, 1879
FRED K. SHOCHET, Managing Editor
""DAY. JULY 28,
Subscription1 Year, $2.00 Six Months, $1.00
Face Facts
By Alexander F. Miller
Florida R Anti Defimation League
-TIDBITS FROM EVERYWI
MAictfy eongidentiai
-By PHINEAS J. BIRON-
MIAMI 18, FLORIDA. FRIDAY, JULY 28, 1944
- Ab 8. 5704
VLUME 17 NUMBER 30
MERGED
This week's issue of the paper carries the announcement
of the merger of the two southwest congregations. This news
will be pleasing and satisfying to the community, who will
note this action as another move of unification. Solidification
of factions, cooperation of groups, joint efforts of individuals
all intensify the goal of a strong united front through which the
program of the Jewish community can be carried out to the
fullest.
This welcome announcement brings the commendation of
our community to the leaders of these institutions who with
their organizations have both served well and served a pur-
pose. These Houses of Worship serve even further by their
present action exemplifying in a concrete fashion their teach-
ings and preachings.
I have been vastly annoyed for
some time now by the snide
cracks Phineas J. Biron, syndi-
cated columnist, featured in this
and other anglo-Jewish papers,
has been taking at the Anti-
Defamation League and its ex-
ecutives.
Of course, any criticism non-
syndicated Miller might make
of this columnist, who apparent-
ly doesn't have the courage to
use his own name, might be con-
sidered presumptuous some-
thing like a fly treading on an
elephant's corn. Nevertheless,
your director must give vent to
some resentment less there be
an unhealthy explosion in Room
330 Seybold Building.
What annoys me most about
Biron is his habit of making flat
statements without bothering to
give verification or reason there-
for. For example, in last week's
column_ he derides Sigmund Liv-
ingston's popular book. "Men
Must Hate." Biron described
Livingston as 'President' of the
Anti Defamation League. Mr.
Livingston happens to be chair-
man of the National Executive
Committee just as Isaac Levin is
chairman of our local commit-
tee. A small matter says vou.
Perhaps! But a careful reporter
makes sure of all his facts be-
fore rushing into print because
he knows that errors of this
type cast reflections on his cred-
ibility.
As for his criticism of the book
which he declares is unintelli-
gent, let me quote to you a cou-
ple of paragraphs from a review
by Dorothy Raymcr which ap-
peared in the Miami Daily News
on Sunday, July 16, 1944.
'Mr. Livingston, I presume,
is a crusader of anti-Semitism
and a very able one. He has
written various brochures on
the racial question of preju-
dice. This one seems to be the
hardest-hitting and the most
logical.
"As Raymond Gram Swing
says in a comment on Living-
stons book. The cure for anti-
Semitism is chiefly the respon-
sibility of non-Jews.' Hence
Livingston is correct in begin-
ning his treatise bv explaining
the beginning* u| hatred, then
surging forward in direct
mowing down statements to
prove the wrongne&s of these
ideas. He also gives exam-
ples of what such harmful
thinking can do, with the n-
A SYMBOL
"On Tisha B'Av, the day when the Temple was destroyed.
Messiah was born," is an ancient dictum which gives expres-
sion to the positive content of the Synagogue observance on
the 9th day of Av. For in our tradition, Tisha B'Av is not only
a day of lamentation over the glory that has departed, but more
poignantly a symbol of our ceaseless struggle for the preser-
vation of Jewish spiritual and cultural values and the restora-
tion of Eretz4srarel as a Homeland of the Jewish People.
Soon the day of Rescue and Liberation for the surviving
remnants of European Jewry will be at hand. What is the
message that we can bring to those of our surviving brothers
and sisters in the liberated lands who seek rest from persecu-
tion and hatred? A permanent home in Eretz Israel, a Home-
land where they may have the opportunity to -rebuild their
lives and forge a new future for themselves, is the answer to
the problem. Palestine, which has absorbed more than 300.000 sfo^n's" book.Th^cur^foV^nU:
Jewish refugees since the beginning of the Hitler misrule, must
be prepared to admit and to absorb the great influx of men and
women who will come to its shores from the zones of devas
tation and slaughter. Among the primary tasks which we are
facing in the era of liberation is the work of the Jewish National
Fundthe acquisition of new extensive land tracts upon which
more agricultural settlements and urban developments may be
established to take care of the urgent needs of today and to! SulS^^!^;:;
strengthen the foundations of the Homeland which, we are than a world wa'"!'*
confident, will become the Jewish Commonwealth of Palestine H,',"!ulv vu'" director for-
" v\ aided copies of this book to a
| number of prominent clergymen
in this area. The other day we
received a reply from a clergy-
man whose church is on. of the
largest and most prominent in
Miami. Here is the first para-
graph of that letter
u"1 a"\very grateful for vour
thoughtfulness in sending me
Mr. Livingston's book. It is a
great help to have so briefly
condensed all the essential fac-
tors that enter into the prob-
ems of intolerance. I find that
the author has done a splendid
job and I am sure the spread-
ing of these principles will
have much to do with creating
the proper public opinion
which is always necessary to
bring about, a betterment of
social conditions."
of th,yc,U, need aLny morp P^of
of the status of the book? Here
it is. A brilliant young Cat
ohc who ,s studying for the
priesthood, expressed to a local
attorney certain misconcep "ons
regarding the Jews. This at tor
ney arranged to have Living
ton's book forwarded tohSS
He received in reply a lengthv
letter from the young man ind.
ing nhRadhth/rnatCfu,lncss B hat
in! this t&TOUn,ty f *-
The letter pledged its wriinr
tiJEPJS S^***
W^Dalfte^do^
g? ?f, m* Priesthood-w ,h
~/ i
against j^S1^.,!1* e c t e d
I.
IB FOR BOYS
Two dances this week were
among the first events in a pro-
gram of hospitality for servicc-
ment at Miami Beach sponsored
by merchants of the community.
Arrangements for the two par-
ties were announced to mer-
chants attending a luncheon on
Tuesday. The group heard re-
ports of progress in other phases
of the plan, and announcement
of pledges to assist financially
in the project.
The committee was informed
that several organizations and
the Coast Guard, had donated
boats to be used by servicemen
for fishing trips.
Night clubs announce special
discounts to servicemen, and sev-
eral night clubs will entertain a
fixed number of servicemen
without charge nightly.
Sol Goldstrom, presiding, said
City Manager Claude A. Renshaw
had given the committee $100 on
behalf of the city.
Summarizing for newcomers
what already has been done,
George P. Talianoff said:
"We as merchants of Miami
Beach learned about two months
ago that thousands of returned
servicemen would come through
Miami Beach each month within
the next. year. It is very impor-
tant that they get a true picture
Of Miami Beach hospitality. The
Miami Beach servicemen's hos-
piality committee was formed
Dr. Morris Goodman, chairman
of the retail merchants group
stated:
"It is a challenge and an op-
portunity to be called upon to
do this work. We will cenent
friendships and good will that
will remain in our favor for-
ever.
Capt. C. C. Chaffee explained
men returning from battlefronts
spend three weeks at home, then
come to redistribution centers at
Miami Beach for two weeks be-
fore being sent on to new assign-
ments.
He distributed a "Hospitality
Pledge to be signed by mer-
chants, who will display a spe-
cial emblem as long as thev live
up to the contents of the pledge,
a calls for 'fair and courteous
treatment of men and women in
uniform, plainly marked prices
and compliance with wartime
regulations.
Dr Goodman said each mer-
chant also would be asked to
provide special benefits for sej-
v|cemen in accordance with his
WEINBERG TWINS LAUNCH
PROMOTIONS MONDAY EVE
Monday night the Weinberg
twins, Phil and Jerry, will launch
the., wrestling promotions at
Miami Field. Patsy Miller of
Texas will battle Doris; Dean of
Atlanta, featuring once again
women wrestlers as part of the
program. ""
The weekly shows will be of-
fered under the auspices of the
Harvey Seeds Post of the Ameri?
can Legion.
RESCUE EFFORTS
If the remaining 400,000 Jews of Hungary will ^
and that is still a big question markChaim W 8aVed-
have had a hand in it, we're told ... The ZionUi "?ann will
heart to heart talk with Anthony Eden and Winstnrv had a
and finally succeeded in getting things movinq v9h,Ulcllill.
ably informed that Stalin exercised tremendous m*.. w reli-
Hungarian government ... The International Red r on *
negotiated with Admiral Nicholas Horthy Reaen. i?f' whicl>
had the backing of London. Washington and MoSr 9ar?'
his talk with Weizmann Eden is reported to have said*"? ?
word goes furthest in Budapestbecause his militn 8
is so close to the scene" ... P. S.: Stalin said the word PW*
BEHIND THE SCENE ....
The Democratic National Convention is in session at rv
cago as we write this column It will belonq to v 7
when you will read these lines ... But we're telli doy
that if the Democratic platform will include a shoU? T
tion on Palestine this will be due to the untirinq Tt
Stephen S. Wise, Dr. Israel Goldstein, Judge Louis Kv, ?!
and Herman Schulman These four leaders a(.enLa??
dressed a meeting of the Resolution Committee of the rw
cratic Convention It's too bad. though, that these Wh
did not use the opportunity to include in their pleadinas aT
mand for action against the mounting wave of anti-sLiti..
in this country Leaders of the World Jewish CoagSS
off the record as a confab m Boston about two weeks aao
Matters concerning the salvation of Jews escapinq from N*
persecution were discussed From Boston, too comes S
ports of a new sport devised by the anti-Semitic hoodlum.*
that area Whenever they spot a Jewish-looking patron eat
ing in a restaurant they go up to his or her table and throw
lighted cigars or cigarettes into the diner s food They find
special delight in grinding out cigarettes in dishes of ice cream
ZIONEWS ....
The annual convention of the Zionist Organization of Amer-
ica, scheduled for October, may be held at Atlantic City in-
tead of New York, which has been announced as the meetinq-
place Peter Bergson, head of the "Hebrew Committeed
National Liberation." delivered his "first major address" in Town
Hall, New York, last week Admission prices were charged,
and the place was crowded with an audience that applauded
Bergson's criticism of Dr. Weizmann. Dr. Wise and Jewish
leadership in America Bergson's speech was broadcast
over a local radio station, and it created a deep impression ...
We're telling you this not because we like the Bergson group,
but because it must be admitted that the Palestinian boys car-
ried it off once more both organizationaly and technically.
THIS AND THAT ....
Don't miss Howard Fast's message lo American youth, in
the current issue of Harper's Bazaar We don't think it would
be such a great idea to re-issue Cecil B. DeMille's "The Sign
of the Cross" at this time ... Yet that is what Paramount is
preparing to do ... A new prologue will show American troops
entering Rome ... It strikes us as tactless to connect America's
fight against Fascism with a crucifixion movie ... At Flushing,
Long Island, in St. Andrew's Roman Catholic Church, a mass
was recently celebrated for Pvt. Alfred Dorfman, a Jewish boy
from Flushing killed outside Rome That's good will action.
ABOUT PEOPLE ....
During General Charles de Gaulle's visit to New York, Jo
Davidson made a bust of the French leaderin a single day.
and without asking him to pose Davidson just followed
the general around town, looked at him from all angles, made
notes, and then did the sculpture When violin virtuoso
Yehudi Menuhin visited the armed forces in the Aleutians he
shed his formal manner and became one of the boys, playing
by preference before small groups An eye-witness reports:
"It was thirty below zero His hands were blue from cold,
yet he played for us When his fingers became stiff he
wrapped them in a muffler, told us stories until they got warm,
then asked what melodies we'd like to hear."
New York (JTA) The United
Nations were appealed to this
*hXJ rec*n the so-ca led
Hebrew nation" as a "sovereign
SfiL2&4> m riKht of8a
pusmy urnui iikc ^-r* ",".. wlul me xun right of a
about six weeks ago by a nucleus co-belligerent by the Cornrnutee
of leading businessmen." 'of National Liberation
happened in Boston and in New
York was happening here.
This office investigated care-
fully and could find no trace of
any such incidents. Requests
were made of Biron to furnish
us with specific cases but with-
out result. You and I both know
the situation in this city and are
aware that despite certain fric-
tions during the past two years.
Jaw and order has prevailed.
This type of reporting is not
only irresponsible but danger-
ous. In these times when the
Jewish people are highly strung
and nervous because of the
?, ye?r barra*e of hate
which has battered against them,
there is no need for any writer to
make capital of their fears and
create situations where none
ex ist.
to believe lff?g& $g&
SEATS NOW ON SALE FOR
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
Seats for the High Holy Days
o? thM n 5? at the "e
m,.t oami Beach Jewish Com-
BEr22&'*&U Euc,id Ave..
Miami Beach Members and res-
resenrtvataioensaSked to make '
k-?UJr War Bondl ""I Stamps to
help preserve DemocrscyT^
AUXILIARY GIVES TO
NEEDS OF SERVICEMEN
The Ladies' Auxiliary of the
Freda Markowitz Post No. 17*
Jewish War Veterans of the
United States, at its meeting
Monday evening at the YM *
YWHA on the Beach, made Ado-
nation towards the Sefer Toran
for the McGuire General hos-
pital of Richmond. Va. if""
also allocated funds for the pur-
chase of ash trays for the Ever-
glades Navy sick bay. Pa"""*
Verdon and Lillian Soskins are
in charge. .
In conjunction with members
of the Post, the Auxiliary con-
tributed 34 bingo prizes for >e
military hospitals. Ida l-.Lr'
Vine and Evelyn Clein are chair-
man and co-chairman of nospu
alization work for the organi-
zation. Mrs. Minnie Kline, pres-
ident, assembled the *5*2K
Auxiliary is planning a boat noe
in the near future, with W*
Pearl Raidman as chairman ana
Mrs. Rose Borkin assisting.
Berne (WNS)-Thc ~bitft
Jewish industrialist" in Hunfary
Baron Andreas Hatvany.
been deported to a concentration
camp for allegedly failing
register his property under "*
Aryan laws, it was said here.


^AyjULY_28.
1944
*JeHtrk>rkJton
PAGE FIVE
1HE JEWISH WAR VETERANS: 48 YEAR OLD SYMBOL OF JEWISH PATRIOTISM
BY GEORGE J. FREDMAN, EDITOR, THE JEWISH VETERAN
Oil.
H DO
Hiilloil as a patrl-
by
i-elt
on
. Note- Hailed as a pat
*?lE5jon of RXeat worth
:io fSgEEat pnnklln D. Roosov
>ve!T of Its Mi annlveriwry
~C*n m, hVedman, a Pa8t
*, "K" Coinm '"'"' tra.'.-H the hla-
We, thecitUcnsoi the United
ates'of America., of the Jewish
,hwho served in the wars of
ftntdStates_olArnenca.m
Etato our country and to one
Sher associate ourselves to-
anotner, a nwine Dur
jether for the .following j
:
ICC
sri
'whatever'"tends' toL impair
To maintain true _alle-
nce
at/true Americanism
. to the United States of
ffrca; to foster .and perpetu-
fmu. Americanism; to_ com-
d efficiency and permanency
3 nur free institutions; to up-
ld the fair name of the Jew
iff fight his battles wherever
iled; to encourage the doc-
S of universal liberty equal
Shis and full justice to all men;
combat the powers of bigotry
11 darkness wherever ongin-
Zg and whatever their target;
tn oreserve the spirit of com-
radeship by mutual helpfulness
"comrades and their families;
to instill love of country and
fiaB- to promote sound minds and
bodies in our members and our
youth' to preserve the memo-
ries and records of patriotic ser-
vice performed by the men of
our faith; to honor their memory
and shield from neglect the
paves of our heroic dead.
The above statement of prin-
ciples is the preamble to the
constitution of the Jewish War
Veterans of the United States,
the history of which bears re-
telling on the 48th anniversary
of the organization, at a time
when some 500,000 American
Jews are once again in the ser-
vice of Uncle Sam.
Although the J.W.V., as it is
popularly called, is today made
up largely of the quarter of a
million men who wore the uni-
form of the United States during
the First World War, its genesis
does back to the Civil War.
Many of the thousands of Jews
who served in both the Union
and the Confederate armies
during the War between the
States later joined the Grand
Army of the Republic and the
Confederate War Veterans. But
shortly before the close of the
19th century, disturbing echoes
of anti-Semitism, both in veter-
an and other American circles.
prompted some of the Jewish
Union veterans to do something
that would silence the calumnies
against American Jewry, partic-
ularly since the anti-Semites
were alleging that no Jews had
served in the Civil War and
otherwise impugning their pat-
riotism.
The answer of the Jewish vet-
erans of 1861-1865 was a meet-
ing in the Lexington Avenue
Opera House in New York City
on the night of March 15. 1896.
Sixty-seven men attended this
gathering, at which it was de-
cided to organize the Hebrew
Union Veterans. This new or-
ganization was duly incorporated
in February, 1897, and Joseph H.
Stiner was chosen its first chair-
man. Although modeled after
the existing veterans' societies,
the Hebrew Union Veterans took
for its major responsibility the
task of giving wide currency to
the patriotic record of American
Jewry. The first activity in this
regard was an annual memorial
service for those Jews who had
fallen in line of duty, a service
which is still held annually by
the J.W.V. on the Sunday near-
est to Memorial Day. in 1896
the Hebrew Union Veterans held
its first memorial service on
May 20th at Temple Emanu-El,
and the principal speaker was
the late Simon Wolf.
The choice of Simon Wolf as
speaker on that occasion was a
happy one, for he was the author
of the then recently published
study "The American Jew as
Soldier and Citizen," which he
had written as an answer to the
very slurs which had brought
the Hebrew Union Veterans into
being. It was Wolfs monumen-
tal research which disclosed that
at least 10,000 Jews had seen
active service in the Civil War
and which gave striking point to
the existence of the new organ-
ization.
When the Hebrew Union Vet-
erans was barely a year old. the
Spanish-American War brought
into being a new scrop of Jewish
veterans from among the several
thousand Jews who participated
in that combat. These men soon
launched their own organization
for purposes similar to those that
had inspired the Civil War ex-
servicemen, and adopted as their
name Junior Hebrew Veterans;
but in March, 1900, they changed
it to Hebrew Veterans of the
War with Spain. Theodore
Roosevelt, who, like all presi-
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GEM OF FLORIDA'S EAST COAST
Announces
NEW CABANA CLUB Open Nightly at
Swimming Pool and Tennis Court
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Transportation Service for Guests
Station Wagon will meet your train and make trips
to the world's famous beach
Boat and Motor for Fishing and Pleasure
Write for Descriptive Literature and Summer Rates
Box 747. Daytona Beach, Flo.
HENRY H. HARDESTY, Mar.
Notice Several Hotel Positions Open Writel
dem,? of the United States since,
publicly recognized the patriotic
services of American Jewry in
messages to the Jewish War Vet-
erans, was an honorary mem-
ber of the Hebrew Veterans of
the War with Spain, some of
whose members served under
him in the Rough Riders.
On the ove of the entry of the
United States into the World
War, the Hebrew Union Veter-
ans, whose membership was
largely confined to New York
City, was about ready to dis-
band because of the steady de-
cline in its members due to
death. The Hebrew Veterans of
the War with Spain then took
over the senior organization by
making its* remaining members
honorary members of the young-
er group.
When the tens of thousands of
Jews who had served in the
American Expeditionary Forces
were demobilized at the close
of the World War, they too
took steps to organize. For a
time there were again two sep-
arate organizations of Jewish
veterans. Anticipating an ulti-
mate merger, the Hebrew Veter-
ans of the War with Spain
changed its name in 1918 to the
Hebrew Veterans of the Wars
of the Republic. Since all of the
members lived in New York they
combined in Manhattan Post No.
1, which is still in existence as
the original post of the preselt
J. W. V.
In 1919, when the Jewish vet-
erans of the World War took the
initiative in sponsoring the his-
toric parade and mass meeting
in the old Madison Square Gar-
den to protest against the pog-
roms in Poland, officials of the
two organizations decided the
time was ripe to amalgamate.
The union was achieved in Feb-
ruary, 1920, when Maurice Sim-
mons, a former national com-
mander-in-chief of the United
Spanish War Veterans, was
elected commander in chief of
the Hebrew Veterans of the
Wars of the Republic.
Three years later, at the sug-
gestion of the late Nathan Straus,
an honorary member, the name
of the organization was changed
to the Jewish Veterans of the
Wars of the Republic, and David
Solomon, of Brooklyn, was chos-
en commander-in-chief. In that
same year Brooklyn Post No. 2
and Harry Cutler Post No. 3
were instituted. Solomon was
succeeded by Morri s Mendel-
sohn, a veteran of the Spanish-
American War, who founded ten
posts when he camevinto office
six in New York City and one
each in Jersey City, Boston.
^tft.
Act
XvJGUST BROS Ryc
**" /* the BEST.'
rt
WHEN NERVOUS HEADACHES
PESTER ME
I FIND THAT MILES NERVINE
HELPS NERVOUS TENSION
TO RELAX AND LEAVES ME S*&
CA.M,SERENE <
WHEN Functional Nc
Disturbances such m Slssp-
lir------. Crankiness, ExeiUkiMty.
lltteSSi M-------n~d~L
intssf ere with your work or ape*
ytor rood tiro**, take
Dr. Miles NsnriM
(LsauU r WarTBaeaa* Tablets)
Narvoos Tansion can make JM
Wakeful, Jtttsry. I"**^*^*^
Tw Tanaion ean caoM Narreas
Stasis and Narrow Indiges-
tion. In timaa lika those, ws arc
Mr* llkaljr than usual to bieoaaa
or at wrought and narroua ana U
ShT ood aadatJra.. Ps.
Ifll*. Nsrrins U a rood sodntr*s
__ntUd but offectire.
If you do not use Dr. MflaS
NarvfaM you eaat too"*at
wfll do far you. It comas m
Staid ana Efferre~snt Tnblst
form, both squally fg*1***
ton** and a as> a IjsjBjpt nsrrss.
WHY DONT YOU TBT lT.t
Got it
Cleveland and Providence. When
he turned over the commander's
title to the late Julius S. Berg
of the Bronx in 1928, there were
twice that number. The conven-
tion that elected Berg command-
er-in-chief (he was the first
World War Veteran to head the
J. W. V.) adopted the present
name, Jewish War Veterans of
the United States. Since 1930,
the following have served as
commander-in-chief: Harold Sei-
denberg, of Boston, 1930-32; J.
George Fredman, of Jersey City,
1932-33; William Berman. of
Boston, 1933-35; Abraham Krad-
itor, of Brooklyn, 1935-36; Harry
Schaffer, of Pittsburgh, 1936-38;
Isador S. Worth, of Camden. N.
J., 1938-39; Edgar H. Burman. of
New York, 1939-40; Fred H. Har-
ris, of Meriden, Conn., 1940-41;
Benjamin Kaufman, of Trenton,
N. J., 1941-43; and Archie H.
Greenberg, of New York, the
present commander.
From 1932 there has been a
decided growth of our organiza-
tion both in membership and
achievement. Our 300 posts lo-
cated in all important cities are
taking an active part in promot-
ing American ideals, combatting
subversive movements, and are
building inter-faith good-will and
understanding. J. W. V. is offi-
cially credited with starting the
boycott of Nazi goods and ser-
vices on March 20th, )33. Under
the leadership of J George Fred-
men, P. N. C, the. boycott de-
veloped not only into a world-
wide movement, but became the
most effective non-military wea-
pon against Nazi tyranny.
J. W. V. also took the lead in
combatting un-American groups
and individuals. The German-
American Bund, Silver Shirts,
Brown Shirts, and similar sub-
versive groups of the 1934-1940
era could not stand J. W. V.'s
attacks and expose and either
folded up or went under ground.
Christian Front and Christian
Mobilizer groups in New York.
Brooklyn and other large cities
could not compete with pro-
American meetings held every-
where under J. W. V. sponsor-
ship. Some of their leaders were
jailed, and Joe McWilliams found
it desirable to emigrate to the
mid-west. Our disclosures were
valuable for the Congressional
Committees investigating un-
American activities and the
Federal Bureau of Investigation.
In the last decade the J. W. V.
has been represented on all gov-
ernmental committees and agen-
cies dealing with veterans' af-
fairs. Six years ago, when Gen-
eral John J. Pershing. who on
several occasions acknowledged
the heroism of American Jews
in the World War, went to France
to dedicate the American war
memorials and chapels, he in-
vited the J. W. V. to send an of-
ficial representative. General
Frank T. Hines, head of the
United States Veterans' Admin-
istration, has been a frequent
guest and speaker at J. W. V.
encampments and has repeated-
ly paid tribute to its work, as
have the heads of virtually all
of the other veterans' organiza-
tions. In recent years the top
ranking officers of the J. W. V.
have been invited guests at the
conventions of the other veter-
ans' societies. A large propor-
tion of the J. W. V. membership
belongs to other veterans' organ-
izations to which they are eligi-
ble. ,
Tracing its history back to
those Jewish Civil War veterans
of 1896, the J. W. V. is today the
second oldest veterans' society in
the country, being antedated on-
ly by the Grand Army of the
Republic. When this organiza-
tion of Civil War Veterans dis-
bands, as it must before long
because the last bugle call is
fast decimating its aging ranks,
the J. W. V. will become the
senior among all veterans'
groups. ..
The most potent evidence
against the baseless slander of
Jewish lack of patriotism is to
be found in the war records of
every country in the world, in-
cluding those in which the Jew
for centuries was not permitted
to bear arms. In the United
States, the only nation in the
world that has never discrimin-
ated against Jews in its armed
forces, there is an organized sym-
bol to refute the monumental lie
that the Jew doesn't fight for his
country. That symbol is the
Jewish War Veterans of the
United States which in the 48
years since it was created has
held fast to the ideals of the
founders.
With some 500,000 Jewish men
now in service, the Jewish War
Veterans of the U. S. enters into
a new and even more vital phase
of its life. Along with the
American Legion, the Veterans
of Foreign Wars and other vet-
eran organizations it supported
the "G. I. Bill of Rights." the
recently enacted legislation that
provides post war rights for the
ten million Americans now in
service.
Besides its regular membership
in over three hundred posts
throughout the country, the
Jewish War Veterans now has a
service membership classifica-
tion of over 70,000 men now in
service. Already, three new
posts composed entirely of vet-
erans of the second World War
have been formed and others are
in process of organization-
With some of its membership
including two past National
Commanders: Lt. Colonel Wil-
liam Berman and Lt. Command-
er Abraham Kraditor once
again in service, the rest of the
membership of the J. W. V. is
playing its part on the home
frontselling war bonds (for
which the organization and its
Ladies Auxiliary has been com-
mended by the Treasury Depart-
ment), giving blood to the Red
Cross, holding various Civilian
Defense posts, and cooperating
with the Jewish Welfare Board
and USO in serving the recrea-
tion needs of the men in service.
Planning for the post war. the
J. W. V. has entered into two co-
operative ventures of great im-
portance. It has joined with the
Jewish Welfare Board in the
joint sponsorship of a program
of relief and rehabilitation for
the returned veterans. And it
has joined hands with the four
other leading national Jewish
civic protective agenciesthe
American Jewish Committee, the
American Jewish Congress, the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith and the Jewish La-
bor Committeein the National
Community Relations Advisory
Council, a central unifying agen-
cy in the field of civic protection.
The J. W. V. is, of course, also
an active member of the Ameri-
can Jewish Conference.
BZB CHAPTER ELECTS
FOR THE COMING YEAR
It at your drus; saars.
Mt UbleU Sf* sad If*.
| W and $IM. KasdsW-
Election of officers of the BZB
Chapter of the B'nai B'rith Girls
held recently saw Miss Beverly
August elected president for the
coming year. Other officers chos-
en were Miss Esther April, vice-
president; Miss Hope Tannen-
baum, recording secretary; Miss
Rita Quartin, corresponding sec-
retary; and Miss Rita Weiss,
treasurer. Minor officers includ-
ed Miss Anita Malmud, public-
ity chairman and historian; Miss
Gladys Novack, editor of the pa-
per, the Comet; Miss Tobie Jac-
obskind. program and social
chairman; Miss Joy Alpert. A. Z.
A. cooperative chairman: Miss
Jackie Nadel, sergeant-at-arms;
and Miss Cynthia Schwartz, par-
liamentarian.
Keep on buying War Bonds.
Made From Freeh Orange*
AUTO ELECTRIC SERVICE
Starter and Generator Repairs
A Specialty
Special Service to Fleet Ownera
llr>l/'C AUTOMOTIVE
JAlfV 0 ELECTRIC SERVICE
1M N. W. MTH 8TREET
PHONE 2-9304
OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE IN FLORIDA
KOSHER ZION
SAUSAGE CO. PRODUCT!
DeUstOUa Corned Beef
Pl+eltod, CotXJ
and ImanoS Meata
art* and Normal Ave. Cilia Be





t



I



IT
PAGE SIX
* Jewish fhrktlan
Our Film Folk .
By HELEN ZIGMOND
Copyright, 1944, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc.
Henry Ginsberg this week
took over the reins of general
manager in charge of all produc-
a rehearsal of the Fred Allen
program. Allen made with the
jokes Mrs. Mussbaum made

tion at Paramount. He is the I with the accent other comics
same producer who has been I including Monty Woolley. tied
very active on all bond drives | knots in the mike but nary a
flicker, not a laugh, not a smile
from Reed, jr., the side-line
spectator. Then papa rounded
the corner of Allen's Alley. The
first Falstaffian line brought a
scream of laughter from sonny
. then shrieks, howls, guffaws.
"M-m-m," muttered Fred lacon-
ically, "Milton Berle has his
mother, so you have your son!"
in fact, he is the originator of the
ten per cent payroll deduction
plan in use at all the studios.

Since the time he played op-
posite Pola Negri in 1928 until
the winning of his Oscar. Paul
Lukas says he has been "found"
and lost by Hollywood exactly
seven times. So it isn't likely
that his new fame accruing from
the statuette will expand his
head. "It's like the title of my
last picture'Uncertain Glory'."

Turnabout: Jimmy Sauter of
the Air Features Dynamo, was
presented by Prexy Eddie Can-
tor with a Gold Life Member-
"Have you heard my pome?" sh'P Card in the Jewish Thcat-
Alan Reed is $1000 richer for re-
cording a one-minute, ten-line
verse for a paint company which
they will use in radio spot an-
nouncements.
Radie Harris tells this one
about Reed: Ho brought his
eight-year-old hopeful to watch
rical Guild. Sauter is the first
non-Jew to be so honored .
said it gave him "the thrill of
his life."

Did you know that "Up In
Arms" is not Danny Daye's cin-
ema debut? He played in a num-
bar of Vitaphone Shorts years
ago in Brooklynbut why bring
that up now?

Did you know that Dewey
Robinson, who always plays a
"tough guy" in gangster films,
weighs 260 pounds measures
twenty-three inches around the
neck? A gangster picture with-
1 out Man Mountain Dewey, a
hulking racketeer, wouldn't seem
aomplete.

And if you'll believe the puff-
licity boys. Irving Pichel likes
to perch on ladders while direct-
ing his actors. He used six of
I them ladders, not actors .
while piloting "And Now Tomor-
row." Presumably different ones
I for various camera angles.

News item in a local paper
read: "Jack L. Warner, vice-
president in charge of popula-
tion ." For that brave New
World now aborning

Nat Carr, veteran actor of the
stage and screen, took his last
curtain call this week. He played
in the "Cohens and the Kellys"
pictures, 'The Jazz Singer. "Kosh-
er Kitty Kelly." and many oth-
ers. He was the brother of Al-
exxander Carr of "Potash and
Perlmutter" fame.

So fearful are the Nazis of the
Allied radio programs that they
punished a whole French town
as an example. For "paying at-
tention to foreign broadcasts."
the Nazis seized all radio sets in
Capestang and deported to Ger-
many all men between 18 and 40.
So reports OWI by way of "La
Suisse," Swiss newspaper.
! !
Dots and Dashes: The profits
from Sol Lasser's "Stage Door
Canteen" was the financial up-
lift which gave the New York
Stage Door Canteen its new fa-
cial Al Jolson attended the
Democratic National Convention
merely as an observer"The
Mad Russian," Bert Gordon, re-
turns to Eddie Cantor's program
next season Secretary Henry
Morgenthau pronounced its Fifth
War Loan Drive as "Holly-
wood's best performance." So
rapid and efficient is the work-
ing of the film branch (Robert
Riskin's department) of the OWI
that the boys in Normandy were
enjoying new American films ten
days after the invasion began
Edward Robinson is currently
in London to play in a British
film with an R. A. F. back-
ground.
6/30 7/7.H.21.28"tV'N'0 pWKHAJ|
&&. atfa-j*
.J"11 'a herebi
undendnned,
buxInpHa utidt-r
SUSSMAN'S| "njVKSStt n** 5
gOMPAN Y. NOT 1 \V-MA:V S'-'MS
Miami Av... IBuft^g
" <-ourt of
Dade County. World*,
&5IM NII.HKltST
JOSKl'M
Or*
I&CM
MJGUST BROS ftw
*^ ll r I, /, V I '
is the at si
Keep on buying War Bonds.
-
f*-%
ll/'i hot, but baby sleeps with ease.,.
He's cooled by air like a mountain breeze!
ft
WON'T IT BE WONDEirUL
to live in a house that's
cool in July j.-: balmy in
January? Where at the flif
of a finger your new Gas
air-conditioning system
gives you the txact
temperature you want.
all year 'round!
Winner time... Mom reads or knits!
Precision-cooked. T. her meals are hit (Qjn tap for washing duds or dishes
As much hot water as one wishes!
*^^r a '*
I*
ft
TOUi kitchen will be cool and
clean..-. with a new Certifiec
Performance Gas rangethat
would make any cook a good
cook.;: that's fast and efficient
t.-: saves food values, and
hours of work. And a silent
Gas refrigerator that keeps
all kinds of food fresh longer.: i
saves you hours of marketing.
UPSTAIRS AND DOWNSTAIRS
your silent servant Gas
brings you gallons of hot
water whenever you want
itwherever you want
it...making all your
housework easier!

/,
... This is the house that Gas
tomomow. yours can be one of the millions of American families who will live haooilv
ever after in a house that runs by Gas who will be benefited by the unceasing
research carried on in the great laboratories of the Gas industry.
todat Gas speeds war production. Useit wisely. But tomorrow.. .thanks to the miraculous
flame thatcools as utll as hats -there'll bt amazing things in store for you Speed
the day-by putting every cent you can into War Bonds! American Gas Association
runs!
r
PEOPLES
Hollywood &
COJMPAjW
ft
YOUR FUTUME
Ft. Lauderdal*
JBR8TBK
mutox-X:^uV:^a^
s/^7/7^ 2? V''111';''<"
Horida,
"AS! B .M.HRIDE
l.Eox KAPLAN ''"
Attorney for Aiiiill.-int.
7/21-28 S/1-1I-18 ""'
IN THE COUNT?
.J" v:,r,->'TY J^E-scotS
No. 15171
In Re: BSTATB'op'HENRY r
To a7iT C^.T0 CRED'T0RS
io All ( rodltors nod All iv- -.
BOTLS?......"""*'
noSVoVanV,'.'
calms and demand. .,,.',
'"."'.'* "'. >."" ."'"> have again,! ,Z
eatate nf
HENRY cTqffiftfi
IMOIIdH, to tin. Hun. \v y I.),....'
County Jud.e ol ,,.,,. rSjg^
file the nam.- In hi. ,.m,. in ,JJ
." ""J""" "' niK orrice in the
SgHg SKIff'.......; ""' com.
?..,..'. L wl,.hl" "l" calendar nwofi
from
...............rnthi
the date of the first uubl.ca-
lion hereof. Bald ,,.,. r rt n(|
to contain the leaal addreai of 5
claimant an.l to l.. sworn to and on-
Mnted aai aforesaid. ..r same will be
Imrre.l. s...- Section I20 of the I'M
I'robate Act.
Data July 12, 1944
If A RIB (IALLAOHER
Ah AilmlnlHtiati'ix of the Kst.ite ot
HK.MtV C OALUAQHra
Ip, ,..,., ,1
MAX K. BILVER
Attorney f. Admli Istratrti
7/M-21-2S 8/4
NOTICE is HBRKUY GIVE.N that
JOHKI'H H. LIEI4KNTHAU ItF.K-
THA LIEBENTHAI., and ISIDOB
SWEET are engaxeil in Inisineu mi-
'lei the flctitlo |l mi "f MARY
LOU Al'TS al IJIS Meridtan Ave-
nue. Miami Beach, Florida, and in-
tend tu ii-Klsti-i- laid flctitlonj name
in the office of Hi. rierh of
cult Courl < Dad) .iint\. i
J08EPN [I I.IKFIBNTHAL
IIERTIIA MERENTHAL
ISIDOR SWEET
I P.l 5
OBC/ROE CHERTKOK
Attornev for Applii-antl
7/21-28 8/4-11 -1 v
NOTICE IS HERBRV tilVEN tint
JOSEPH 1: MEBBXTHAL, BBB-
THA MERENTHAL. and ISII"*
BWBBT are encased In busini
'let- tin- flctltlotui name "f NOWU
l.or Al'TS., al 1227 Meridian Ave-
nue, .Miami Beach, Florida, and In-
it ml to register wild fi-titieu> name
in the office ol thi 'li k o( I
cult Court ..f Dade County, I
JOSEPH 1: MEBBXTHAL
IIERTIIA MEBBXTHAL
ISIDOR SWEET
OEOROE CHERTKOF
Attornev for Appllc
7/21-28 8/4-11-IS
NOTICE IS HERBBT OIVES
the umlei siKiifi are enaafed
Ineaa under the flctltloui 'u"i'v,
ZION I-t>i>l> CENTER OBOCrai
DEPARTMENT, at 1429 WaaWnfMJ
Avenue. Miami Beach, Florida., a
intend to raffltter the sai'l Iirtitio""
name In the office of the CTerl;
the Circuit Courl ol Dade Como*
Florida.
sam BHRMCH
MURRAY OROSWIA>
Sole (li r.'
OBOROE CHERTKOF
Attorney for Applil ant
7/28 8/4-11-18-2.'.
NOTICE Or* APPLICATION FO"
TAX DEED
Chapter 20722 Acta of w
notice raliTOSToivw''
Rae Socolof, holder "'.su'' T
County Tax Certificate No. 5i '
aued the lat day of June. A ''d'hw
filed name In my office, and
e application for aJiajg*,.
11
made _
be iemued
.nil,i a.
mbracb the <"""'"* ,JZ state
propertf In the County of I>a'.
of Florida, to-wit: M .. ui
E. M ft. Of N TS j* "
Block 2. Para Villa Hel*.%.8, ,
Sub l'lat B.-k I. IW 5
the County -t Dad*. Mate
Florida. M nroperf
The aanefament of na" Jr^ |h,
under the sail certificate w ln
name of: llena Rhett. ^ re.
Unloaa Maid certlflcte shall: .
deemed a erty therein described will M "(.(,urt
the hiehe.vt bidder at '"'^v >
llouae door on the flt '".|
iiouxe rtoor on inr it ,,..
the month of Keptemlier. !>
Ih the 4th day of BWt*n>"f" ,l-
Dnted thi. 26th day<>', la< '
E It LE^THBWdAW^
Clerk of < n-<-ul '
Clicult Cofjrt Heall
7/28 8/4-11-18
Buy War Bonds Today-


Lav, n*tf
1944
+JewistincriJar7
PAGE SEVEN
l-^-SKJSKKff^r--^^
WOUNDED IN ACTION KILLED IN ACTION
Pc. Eric Rich. 22, of New York
City. In Italy. An infantryman,
Roth was injured in the drive on
Cassino.
Pvt. Joseph Stain. 36, infantry,
f Denver, Colo. On a Sicilian
ill during a shell explosion that
illed six out of 16.
Pvt. Sidney Tane. 22, of New
York City. In North Africa. He
is survived by his mother. Mrs.
Jennie Tane. At the time of his
death he had been in the army
five months, serving overseas as
an infantryman.
E Max Goldstein, form-
rtioncd at Homest-
ransferred to C
where be awaits orders.
erly
been
transferred to Cleveland.
has
WOUNDED IN ACTION baron de hirsch meyer
Pvt. Irving~Se7ig.r. 27. of AWARDED THE AIR MEDAL
Miami Beach. Fla.. was wound-
ed in Italy while in action. He
was awarded the Purple Heart.
crt Leonard J. Oxenberg
JJhis last furlough with his
Snts. who arc now in New
Vnrk before going overseas. He
Iwi'th the 4th Emergency Res-
cue Squadron, and is now some-
Xere in the Pacific.
LmII* August. aach^ l tn.* at Nashville, Tenn., has arrived the AAF, has been stationed in
Signal Corps at Palm Beacn. is for a brief visit with his parents, the Central Pacific with the 7th
Word was received that 1st
Lt. Jerome R. Gold of Pa-
hokee was wounded in action.
Sgt. Lyman W. Finkel of the
TSA ferry command, stationed
Captain Baron de Hirsch Mey-
er, former Miami Beach city
councilman, has been awarded
the Air Medal for meritorious
service with a 7th AAF medium
bombardment squadron in the
Gilbert Islands.
Captain Meyer, who resigned
from the city council in May,
1942, to accept a commission in
Sgt. Philip Feld. 22, Air Force,
of Bridgeport, Conn. While on
a bombing mission, when his
plane encountered bad weather
and was forced down on a river
in China. The navigator was
killed, the others in the crew
wounded. Chinese rescued them
an dgave them medical care.
Cpl. Harry Silberbrush, 23. of
the Bronx. At Cassino. He took
part in the North African cam-
paign and served later in the
front lines in Italy. He worked
in New York as shipping clerk
before his enlistment two years
ago.
Pfc. Arthur Hoffe. 24, infantry,
of New Haven, Conn. By shrap-
nel in the chest and back, some-
whore in Italy.
Ending a 10 day furlough with Mr. and Mrs Benjamin Finkel,
his mother and relatives on Mi- 125 East San Marino Dr.. San
ami Beach.
Marino Island.
u Col Elry Stone and Mrs.
Stone are spending a short leave
m New York City.
Prt. Alfred Lev is now sta-
tioned in New Guinea. He has
taken part in the two campaigns
recently, Hollandia and Biak.
Word has been received that
Sidney Zuckerman, son of Mr.
Raphael K. Yunes, former Mi-
ami Beach attorney, was promot-
ed to lieutenant (jg) in the naval
reserve; serving in the Pacific
since November, 1943. Lt. Yunes'
wife, the former Trudy Bandel.
Miami Beach, is living with her
parents at 835 Michigan Ave
during her husband's absence.
AAF since October, 1943. He
now is serving as squadron in-
terrogation officer for a Mitchell
squadron.
Lawyer and banker, Capt.
Meyer was president of Miami
Beach Federal Savings & Loan
association. His mother. Mrs.
John Meyer, resides at 1530 Me-
ridian Ave.
Pvt. Fred Bublits. 32, of the
Bronx. In the battle of Salerno.
Pfc. Phillip Rothstein. 27. of
of carrying out a special military
of carying out a special military
mission at the front for which he
had volunteered. He served in
a field artillery outfit, had been
in the army two and one half
years.
Pfc. Sam Zoslofsky, 20 USMC.
of Brooklyn. On Cape Glouces-
Warrant Officer Irving Cohen, ter. Took part in the invasion of
25, Air Force, of Brooklyn. In
a raid on Hamburg. He was
wounded several times before
during raids on Europe.
FORMER MIAMIAN IN
HFE AND DEATH SHOW
HarreJ !Cato.wit^,so" f. Mver Five minutes after
your son
Ms Nathan Zuckerman. 920 Morris Katowitz, 125 S. W 27th fa,is injured on a foreign battle.
I st'h St., has been promot- f>d- is.a recent graduate of avia- front, the chances are he is he-
rd toi major. Major Zuckerman tion storekeeper s school. Jack- inK given the medical aid that
fnow stat.oned in the Hawai- |onviUe' w'th the rating of avi- may save. his. life. .
lan Islands.
S Sgt Leon Lebaw, acting
first sergeant, 413 N. W. Third
St, is a member of the staff of a
hospital train in England, bring-
ing wounded men back from
combat areas.
ation storekeeper 3/c.
Charles Rubin, 5901 N. Bay-
shore Dr., has been assigned to
the Navy's V-12 program at the
University of North Carolina.
Lt. Charles Schumann, 29, Sig-
nal Corps, of the Bronx. On
Munda.
Sgt. Lester Wolf, infantry, of
Cleveland, O. On Munda. He
also saw action in the Russell
Islands and at New Georgia.
Guadalcanal and in American as-
saults on Bougainville. He had
two and a half years of service
with the Marines. Some months
before his death, Zoslofsky re-
ceived a letter of commendation
from his commanding officer for
heroism in the Pacific war the-
atre.
Pfc. Max Wein, 26, infantry,
of Brooklyn. During the incas-
ion of Italy.
Cpl. Harold Uerball, 23.
USMC, of Brooklyn. In the Mar-
shall Islands. He has received
SSgt. S. H. Berenatein, 1132
Euclid Ave., Miami Beach, a
former airplane mechanic for the
Embry-Riddle School of Avia-
tion, has completed courses in
England for duty in a combat
zone.
Benjamin B. Cassell. son of
Benjamin B. Sassell, sr., Miami,
was promoted to sergeant with
the Fifth Army in Italy.
T/Sgt. Morris Plotkin, son of
Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Plotkin, is
spending his fifteen day fur-
lough at the Astor Hotel on Mi- are "responsible," the guide says.
Nothing has been overlooked
How this vital aid, comprising
trained men and thousands of
dollars worth of equipment, is
taken along within 200 yards of the pu'rDie Heart
the front lines was demonstrated
at a three-day show beginning
on the grounds east of Municip-
al auditorium, June 8, in Texas.
"Nine out of ten men who died
in the last war would have been
saved in this," a placard .near
one of the outdoor tents says.
"It's the blood plasma, sulfa
drugs and the medical depart-
ment on the front lines which
Lieut. Nathan Ungar, 25. of
New York City. Army Air Forces
navigator, was stopped by flames
that broke out aboard his bomb-
er somewhere in England. He
had participated in numerous
missions over occupied Europe.
He had been in the Air Forces
more than three years.
Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Spitz. 4615
Prairie Ave., have received word
that their son, S/Sgt. Jack G.
Spits, jr.. has been awarded the
Air Medal for combat missions
and two oak leaf clusters. Sgt.
Spitz is a graduate of Miami
Beach Senior High school. He
has been overseas since January,
serving first in the Italian area
and at present in England. He is
a radio gunner on a B-24 Liber-
ator.
ami Beach. He is stationed at
the 2516th AAF Base Unit. AAF
Pilot School (Adv-SE) EPAAF,
Eagle Pass, Texas.
Cpl. Paul A. Rosenblum, 24. of
Cleveland, in service two years,
lost his life in the North African
area.
Pfc. Harold Friedman. 27. of
Brooklyn. In Italy. He had
served with an anti-aircraft unit
in the attempt to bring an in-
jured man eventually home alive
and all in one piece.
There are plaster of paris casts
for busted limbs. Hair-thin brass
wires for bracing fractured jaw-
bones together while they heal.
Row after row of artificial teeth
to be skillfully matched and
placed in gaping holes made by
shrapnel and bullets.
'It isn't enough to keep a man
Name___________
Home Addres3...__
Birth Date
Serial No-
Street
City
State
Birthplace------
Civilian Occupation...
Date Entry
in Service__________
City
Marital Status
State
Btanch of Service________
full name of nearest kin-
Relationship_____
Date
Discharged---------
_Rank or Rating
Address-
Information Transmitted by_
Telephone number____________
of the coast artillery. He was alive," Capt. Benjamin Coleman,
a steel worker when he enlisted Dne of the several doctors here
two and a half years ago. with the exhibit says. "We try
Sgt. David B. Gottlieb. 5122 N. --------- to piece him together again so
W Fifth Ave. is an assistant Lieut, (jg) Lawrence Cohen, he won't dread facing his fam-
crew chief of a P-51 Mustang 25. of Norfolk, Va. In the South jiy and friends."
based in England. Atlantic. ______Capt. Coleman is a Miamian
i^TI-------------------------------------------------------__________ITST"S and practiced here prior to his
Fill Out This Coupon and Mail To "WAR RECORDS, Army- enterinK the army.
Navy Committee, c/o P. O. Box 2973, Miami 18. Florida
WAR RECORDS COMMITTEE
NAT ROTH, Chairman
FRED SHOCHET
MRS. GEORGE M. COHEN
MAURICE GROSSMAN
JENNIE H. ROTFORT
NATHAN ROTHBERO
J. W. B. Director
OFFICERS
SAM BLANK, CHAIRMAN
MONTE SELIG, Vice Chairman
JOSEPH A. BERMAN, Sao.
Executive Committee
Mra. Max Dobrln, Ben B. O*1^."?;"-
Maunjce Groaaman. Leula M.iman,
Sr Jacob H. Kaplan Mr.. Miirry
Koven. Harry Markovfct*. Alex-
inrti-r F Miller, at Rotb. Fred
snooh.r SX Slrkln, Jee.pl.
Stein. Mra. H" ^elfach. Ceri
W.lnWe, Oeong. W.lpert, Harry
Zukernlck.
Lieut Harris A. Tucker. 19. of
Memphis, Tenn. During a raid
on Brunswick, Germany. He was
Lt. Arthur RosenthaL 28, Air co-pilot on a B-17 during 11 mis-
Force bombardier, of the Bronx, sions against occupied territory
In a raid on Germany.
Pvt. Phillip Rosenberg, 24,
Medical Corps, of Cheyenne,
Wyo. Aboard a torpedo boat in
the Aleutians campaign.
on the continent. He joined the
Air Forces in August, 1942.
Major John Groopman, 37,
Medical Corps, of Garden City,
N. Y. Somewhere in China,
where he is stationed as a flight
surgeon.
Pvt. Samuel T. Simon. 21.
USMC, of Chicago. On Cape
Gloucester, New Britain, after 28
months in service. He has re-
ceived the Purple Heart. He was
a spot welder before he enlisted
in the Marines.
Cpl. Elmer Frank Greenberg.
26, infantry, of Cleveland, O. In
Italy, when he was hurled out
of a tank in the midst of battle.
Once before he had been wound-
ed in the leg, during the North
African campaign.
Cpl. Julian Kadis. 25, of Brook-
line, Mass., wounded in the Tun-
isian campaign, wears the Purple
Heart. In civil life Cpl. Kadis
was employed by the 20the Cen-
tury Fox films.
Lieut. Seymour B. Schneck. 22.
of Brooklyn, a navigator. On.
a bombing mission over France.
He had been awarded the Air
Medal in February. He joined
the Air Forces two years ago,
having worked before that as an
accountant in New York. He was
a member of the Jewish Center
of Hyde Park, Brooklyn, was a
Red Cross swimming instructor
and, before going overseas, was
assigned as special flying in-
structor in Florida.
^voting This Pag. to the Efforts of the Aimy-Wavy Committee. Made Possible Through
the Co Operation of
ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN &
COWEN'S SHOE STORES
US E. Flaler St SSI Lincoln Rd.
FIXZIT SYSTEM
II14 K. E. feed Avenue
JACK C. JAYSON
PUBLIC GAS CO.
7200 N. W. 7th Avenue
DONALD LAVIGNEUNIFORMS
114 If. E. Second Avenue
MIAMI RUG CO.
100 S. Miami Avenue
SYBIL'S WOMEN'S APPAREL
71 S. E. let Street
RESTAURANT
170 N. W. Fifth Street
RICHTER'S JEWELRY CO.. INC.
160 E. Flefller Street
SEA ISLE HOTEL
3001 Collins Avenue. Miami Beech
RUBINSTEIN'S
WOMEN'S APPAREL
1024 Lincoln B NANKIN'S SHOE STORE
158 E. Flakier Street Miami
ANN'S IMPORTERS
714 Lincoln Road
Pfc. Norman S. Fromberg. 23,
of Brooklyn. He was "trouble
snooting" a communication line
in Italy only 20 yards from his
own trench when two enemy
shells exploded in front of him. ton, O. On Bougainville. A mem-
Lieut Franklin Leve, 26. of
Bayonne, N. J. In a raid over
the continent. Was bombardier
and pilot of Flying Fortresses in
the European theatre.
Pfc. Eugene Glaser. 27, of Can-
wounding him in the shoulder.
Pfc. Joseph Friedman.
fantry, of Tenafly, N. J.
the advance on Cassino.
27, in-
During
ber of the division which cap-
tured Munda airfield and Vella
LaVella Island in the Solomons,
he had seen four years of serv-
ice in the infantry.
US. Atari ties
*&*A
CORP. R.T. DAVIS. USMC. RECEIVED
SIXTY INDIVIDUAL WOUNDS- DURING
THE NOW FAMOUS MARINE LANDING
AT TARAWA-DAVIS LAY UNATTENDED
FOR 36 HOURS AWAITING EVACUATION
*-, ...HE IS FULLY RECOVERING.-AND
W1L SHORTLY RESUME ACTIVE DUTY.
-<^yr.
ltj





I
4 !
i
...j



PAGE EIGHT
+ knisl tkrHktn
raiDAY. JULY 28
'NAI B'RITH
NOTES
-by-
MARX FEINBERG
The Lodge, as well as the com-
munity, has suffered a grievous
loss in the passing of Daniel
Cromer. Mr. Cromer was one
of the most outstanding Jews
and citizens of Miami and was
considered a pioneer in the mer-
cantile field before the rise of
Miami to the largest city in the
state. He had contributed much
to the progress of the commun-
ity and created much good-will
among our non-Jewish friends.
I know I express the sentiments
of every member of Sholem
Lodge when I say that we will
miss Daniel Cromer and we ex-
tend to his family and loved
ones our sincere sympathy.
At the last meeting of the ex-
ecutive committee it was decid-
ed that all service men in our
community desiring to join our
organization would be required
to pay initiation fees in the sum
of $5.00 and all dues would be
waived for the duration and six
months thereafter. To some of
you brothers who have friends
in the service and who would
care to become one of us. this
inducement will be interesting.
On the night of August 20th
a card party will bo tendered at
the Wofford Hotel on Miami
Beach. More details later.
The next meeting of the Lodge
will be held on the night of
August 8th at the Miami Beach
"Y." The program will be
GORDON
FUNERAL HOME
710 S. W. 12th AV. MIAMI
TEL. 3-3431
Moderate Costs Always
Within the Means of
Individual Circumstances
"YOUR JEWISH
FUNERAL HOME"

Worthy and Deserves
Your Full Support and
Recommendation

SERVING MIAMI BEACH
AND MIAMI

EXCLUSIVELY JEWISH
24-HOUR
Ambulance Service
sponsored by Royal Palm Chap-
ter of A. Z. A. and promises to
provide some fine music and en-
tertainment. Please make plans
now to attend.
I would like, at this time, to
institute a series of thumbnail
sketches of personalities within
Sholem Lodge who have labored
hard and to whom a great deal
of credit is due for the growth
and progress of the Lodge. It
might be well to begin with
Brother Ike Levin. Brother Ike
is a native of Virginia and was
president of his home-town
lodge in Roanoke for a number
of years. His interest in B'nai
B'rith work has extended over
a period of approximately 30
years and during his residence
in Miami has attained the presi-
dency of Sholem Lodge, a mem-
ber of the general committee for
District No. 5. vice president of
District No. 5 and culminating
his activities in this district in
1941 was elected president of
District Grand Lodge No. 5.
Brother Ike has always served
faithfully when called upon and
has been constantly active in the
Lodge activities all through the
years and particularly in the A.
D. L. field. I can recall in the
days of the late Brother Louis
Shochet when Ike. Harry Simon-
hot f. Mr. Shochet and a host of
other members were instrumen-
tal in the dissolution of the white
front organization in Miami and
directly contributed to the dis-
solution of a franchise to the
Hamburg American line, the
German firm, for a boat line be-
tween Miami and Cuba. Mr.
Levin is president of the Tri-
Pure Water Co.. and his favorite
expression was and is: "I am not
a lawyer. I only make water
for a living." We salute Broth-
er Ike Levin and hope that he
will remain with us for a long
time to come.
In The Synagogues
Of Greater Miami
Services lor the wcek-aiifl an-
nounced by the Greatei Miami area
are an follow*:
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION.
Conservative, 135 N. W. 3rd Ave..
Miami. Friday evening services at
: IS, Saturday inurninK "l s '"
BETH JACOB CONGREGATION,
Orthodox, 311 Washington Ave.. Mi-
ami BeachFriday evening services
at 7:l.'i o'clock; Saturday mornlnf at
x:30. Cantor Maurice Mamchee will
chant the service. KoIIk'ouh School
Monday throuKh Friday, 9 a. m. tu
noon.
Notes Of
Y. M. H. A.
-by-
SAM SILVER
MIAMI BEACH JEWISH COM-
MUNITY CENTER, Conservative,
1415 Euclid Ave.Kabalau Shabbox
Friday evening at 7:15. Saturday
morning MrviOM at I, Shaliwh Si-u-
doH services at 7:15 p. m. to be fol-
lowed by evening prayers.
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI. Re-
form. 137 N. E. 1lth St.. Miami
Iti-Kiilai services Friday evening at
s.i:..
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CON-
GREGATION, Orthodox, 690 S. W.
17th Ave.. MiamiServices sched-
uled for Friday at 7:15 p. m. and
Saturday at a. m. and 7:15 p. m.
Nhalosn Scudoa will be follow**d by
afaarlv. Dally services at 8:30 a. in.
and 7:18 p. in.
SCHAAREI ZEDEK CONGREGA-
TION, Orthodox, 1545 S. W. 3rd St.,
Miami. Friday evening servlcea be-
gin at 7:10. Saturday morning at 9
Iflncba and Maaiiv at 7:30 p. m.
Dally services at 8:15 a. m. and 7:30
p. m.
BETH SHOLOM CENTER. Con-
servative. 761 41st St., Miami Beach.
Services are scheduled for Prlda)
evening, at 7:15; Saturday moming
Mrvlcaa win be held m 9:30.
HAT
HEN
HERE
I WANT MY MILK
And Ba Sum Its
FLORIDA
DAIRIES
HOMOGENIZED
Vitamin "D" Milk
"MUk Products"
Dacro Protected
TEL. 2-2621
Greater Miami Delivery
Visit Our Farm at
200 N. W. 32nd Strait
DR. SANEL BEER NOW
CITIZEN OF THE U. S.
Sanel Beer, M. D., founder and
owner of Rivermont Park Sani-
tarium. 1389 N. W. 7th Street,
received his United States cit-
izenship on July 8th. Dr. Beer
has been in Miami exactly five
years, and during this time has
built up the well-known insti-
tution.
Mr. Beer was a leader of the
Jewish community in Vienna,
and an active personality in the
Zionist cause. He was also the
f "under of the Hakoah sport
club in Vienna and an officer of
the Vienna Medical Association.
WORKMEN'S CIRCLE IN
SUNDAY EVE SERVICES
.u0nSunday t'veninR. July 23.
Nn Moru^ns Circl<" Branc>
No. 692 held memorial services
in honor of Philip Rabinowitz
a national figure of the organi-
zation, who passed away the 15th
of this month after a prolonged
illness. Commendation and a de-
scription of his life's activities
were depicted during the eve-
ning.
On Sunday evening. July 30th.
Branch 692 will entertain with
a boat ride, leaving from Pier 7
City Yacht Basin at 8 p. m.
You can't quit now! You
must continue to buy Bonds, and
More Bonds!
(Thin column Is conducted by the
Jreater Miami Jewish Federation In
cooperation with The Jewish Florid-
Ian as a community eervlce. To Inform
the community of your organisation's
activities and to avoid conflicts In
dates, phone 3-5411 and aak for
Community Calendar." Notification
must reach Federation no later than
Tuesday for publication that week.)
Mondsy, July 31
Federation budget committee meet-
Ins;, Federation office. 8 p. m.
Tuesday. August 1
National Home for Jewish Child-
ren at Denver, regular meeting,
p. m.
Wednesday, August 2
National Council of .lewiah Wo-
men, afternoon: Worfcmen'a circle
Branca No. 69L'. regular member-
ship meeting. 8:30 p. m.
Monday, August 7
Temple Isiael Sisterhood, U':30 p.m.
BALLANTINE'S
ALE <>
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Think Of
LEO EISENSTEIN
REALTOR
309 Lincoln Road Phone 5-6479
Dependable, Conscientious Service
WZAL ESTATEMIAMI BEACH
MIAMI BEACH
HOMES AND INVESTMENT
PROPERTIES
B. E. BRONSTON. Realtor
iT!":&* "e Estate Service
Lincoln Rd. pn-. s.sgjj
RENTALS LEASES SALES
Lot!. Homei, Hotels
Apartment Houses
M. GILLER
REALTOR
1448 Washington Avenue
PHONE 5-5875
Horn. **
MINK PLENTY Of
pure
Water
oaivmo to tour home
= G.U0 BOTfc E0{
CASC OF SIX *
T*BLE BOTTLES_____ ,5,
Piui Bofll* Depoi.i
PHONE
BEFORE YOU BUY
aee
LEON ELIIN
with
METROPOLITAN
K tLIFE INS. CO.
Hot Beat Becatu. Blgg^
ButBiggest Because Best
Dues Collection Campaign
Bcrnie Sterling, chairman of
the membership committee of
the Y, has reported that his com-
mittee has commenced a dues
collection campaign, and re-
quests that all members who are
in arrears in the payment of
their dues please get paid up as
soon as possible. In our Federa-
tion budget it is provided that a
certain amount of the Y's operat-
ing expenses must come from
dues collected, so in order to op-
erate the organization efficient-
ly the money must be made
available.
Condolences to Crosiers
The officers and board mem-
bers of the Y extend heartfelt
sympathy to Maurice Cromer, a
Y board member, and the other
members of the Cromer family,
over the loss of Mr. Daniel Crom-
er, a long time Miami resident.
Mr. Cromer was the father-in-law
of Lt. E. Albert Pallot, former
president of the Y.
Home Camp
The Y Home Camp is progress-
ing according to plans and all
of the registrants
preparing for the pageantT
given at a later date The ?
^"t.'s.a Part of the Ttm
of distilling Jewish back"
and tradition Into its aS
Community Center '
I was happy to notein
weeks issue of The JewishV
ldian that Federation haa^S
nated a Community TlaS*
Committee, of which
Myers and George Chertkof L
co-chairman. Here's hoping 5S
committee aets active SPeS
and that plans for the erecUcT
a community center here will
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Full Text

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^^^28^944 Stockholm (JTA)—A Latvian t. woman, who arrived in ^TcenUy af^r hiding ? W mtheG.-stapofora.yearand """.l gave an eye-witness acf 0 f thl massacres of LatJews by the Germans and a M of the massacres of Lat count ,01 y u? thm o enTians an < vian also l sons %e woman. Selma Anderson Jose f mllv name L ^ ef? ,miee was Shebshelovitz. was S from the Riga ghetto in Somber 1941, on the eve of JS siread massacre by Alwnder Anderson, whom she jRuently married. They S3 in Latvia for more than a year, under the noses of the GesAt the outbreak of the war. Mrs Anderson was a student at e'EnRhsh College in Riga. After the German occupation she was forced to work in the rains „f the bombed sections of Riga, and later as a kitchen maid in S. S headquarters. In October. 1941, she was placed in a ghetto tocher with her parents. Josif and Emma. Here, seven persons had to live in a room nine yards ^the reveals that in the first weeks of the occupation, 26.000 Jews were murdered in the provinces, and the rest fled to Riga, where further thousands were kilKd Latvian guards fired into the ghetto houses at random, killing hundreds. Many were beaten to death. Women were raped. Some Latvian policemen, .students, hoodlums and dregs from the Riga underworld participated In the atrocities. Keep on buying War Bonds. vJewlstrhridiar) PAGE THREE JEWISH FOLK CHORUS OF GREATER MIAMI EXPANDS ITS ACTIVITIES Much interest has been aroused by the Jewish Folk Chorus of Greater Miami, consisting of a complete vocal scale, an organization that dedicates itself to the service of the Jewish community of the Greater Miami area with Jewish vocal music of a nature designed to stimulate a higher degree of morale, wherever Jewish people gather for social functions. Although of comparatively recent origin, it has already participated in many social affairs, invited by Jewish organizations and assisting in making the affairs successful with the presentation of Jewish folk songs. The Jewish Folk Chorus of Greater Miami rehearsed and publicly delivered a repertoire of a great number of Jewish folk songs, now available to anv Jewish organization. They are now preparing a repertoire of many additional songs, including Jewish Folk, Palestinian, historical, and workers' songs of social character, selected from material submitted by the Jewish Music Alliance of which the local folk chorus is a member. The officers and membership of the Jewish Folk Chorus fool that there is room in the Jew-, ish social life of Greater Miami for its existence only if it can render service to all Jewish organizations in this area. Jewish organizations that would like to have the Jewish Folk Chorus appear at their affairs are asked for three weeks advance notice for immediate programs and will be ready to i make public appearances with j their enlarged repertoire December 1, of this year. The Jewish Folk Chorus con| tinues to rehearse during the entire summer and is preparing i itself to serve the Jewish com; munity of Greater Miami with a : diversified repertoire of ever j growing quality and choral per, fection. Jewish organizations wishing information of any nature in ref: erence to the Jewish Folk Chorus or its services, are asked to, address all inquiries to Mrs. Celia Pomerantz, secretary, 1429 S. : W. 3rd St., Miami, phone 3-7465. A good buy is a War Bond. Buy now and you will be paid later —$4.00 for every $3.00. NATIONAL BEVERAGE DISTRIBUTORS 224-228 South Miami Avenue announces the Opening of Their Exclusive Distributorship of NATIONAL DISTILLERS PRODUCTS CORP. NATIONALLY KNOWN LIQUORS for the Florida East Coast Area serving the territory between Vero Beach and Key West SPECIAL NOTICE on .f the**flritliWh if now In prorreaa, bul It will laki Mveral daya io compile distribution throughout thla antlra %  "'•' We MiKKi'.-t that thone who prefer OM Of more of thaaa ''"" branda pUoa their orders Immediately With tholr faVor• %  package atore (or delivery on arrival <>f moraohandtaa. We k, however, that you pieaaa he ooaaMarata i" your raqueet, Inasmuch as tupplle* are not sufficient t<. permit mora than %  > limited amount for each customer. In the event you me ot able la Mcure your wants during the Initial distribution, try again, at your dealer will receive an additional supply of marOhandlM in approximately II day*. It Is our Intention to make dletrnmtlon In limited quantttlaa at regular IB daya inteivais Thui must of these fine labels should be available in practically nil "tore.; in limited quantities most of the time 0P. A. CONSUMER PRICES %  rang Proof g< Grand.d 100 2? J 1 *""100 "• Vrnon .... 100 Bourb„n De l_ue 86 wco H j HJS'a, Oln 0 ft*!" Brandy M ""•nto Brandy M 22 M *I rt um 0 *"•.Scotch K( Buihmdl Irith 84 R, J-IP PORTS: uby p ort 20 r < fe WO Tawny. V... .'.'.. 20% MERITO SHfeRRY: '20 KKfC^* %  : • %  '' • ••• %  • • %  >* r* rm n Mfi fwontnudo 2(K? %  "• %  crau.:.;:;::::;;;;:;:;::; m FOR THIS AREA "ifth Pint 42 3.10 4.M 3.10 4.08 25a 4.0* 2.5a 3.50 2.20 3.50 2.20 3.S2 2.42 3.42 2.15 4M 4.0* &.M 4.17 .... 5.M b.ao 5.4 175 i46 2 40 .... a.22 .... iK 3*7 .... S.4§ 4.30 5:77 Tenth 2.25 THE FIRST JEWISH CARDIAC HOME PRESIDENT ANNOUNCES GAMES NIGHT Receiving the distinction of becoming the first Jewish individual in the state of Florida to hold an embalmer's license. Edward T. Newman received word this week that he had passed the examination taken on July 11 th at Bartow, Fla. Newman, a resident of Miami Beach for the past 11 years, spent a part of the practical portion of his 4-year course here as an apprentice embalmer. The last Mrs. Clementine Kemp, president of the Dade Chapter. National Children's Cardiac Home, announces a Night of Games on Monday evening, July 31st. at 8 o'clock, at the Y. M. & Y. W. H. A.. 1 Lincoln Road. Mrs. Charles Raab. chairman, and Mrs. Oscar Adler, co-chairman,, together with their committee, have planned an interesting evening. United States War Bonds are still the best investment. 63. PASSES AWAY OF HEART ATTACK Daniel Cromer, 63, resident of Miami for the past 33 years, died Friday night as a heart attack while on a visit to Asheville, N. C. He was a life member of Biscayne Lodge of Elks, a member of the Masonic order in Miami, B'nai B'rith and Jhe Y. M. H. A. and was past president and one of the organizers of Beth Dav i d congregation. He is survived by the wife, Mrs. Estelle Cromer, of 432 N. E. 26th Terrace; one son. Maurice; two daughters, Mrs. Doris Pallot and Miss Florence Cromer; and one grandchild, Roxanne Pallot, all of Miami; two sisters, Mrs. Fannie Cowen of Miami, and Mrs. A. Swidler, of Chicago. Cromer was well known in mercantile marts in New York and Chicago. He established the Cromer Wholesale Co., leaving the business in the hands of his son. In 1926, he built the Cromer-Cassel department store at N. Miami Ave. and First St.. the building now occupied by Richards. Services for the pioneer Miami merchant were held Tuesday morning in Beth David synagogue, with Rabbi Max Shapiro officiating. Interment followed in the family plot in Mount Nebo cemetery, with Gordon Funeral home in charge of arrangements. Active pallbearers were P. J. Davis, Isador Cohen. Samuel Spector, Edward Friedman. Lionel Cassell. Joseph Regal, Harry Magid, J. N. Morris and Carl Diamond. KOVALSKY Samuel D. Kovalsky, 68. who came here five years ago from New York City, died Saturday afternoon in his home, 38 N. W. 35th St. Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Minnie Kovalsky, Miami; two brothers, Wolfe and Dr. Joseph Kovalsky; two sisters, Mrs. Ida Saul and Mrs. Anna Singer, all of Cleveland, O. The body was sent to New York by the Riverside Funeral home. PALM BEACH NOTES MRS. MART SCHREBNICX RapTaaankrtiva B'nai B'rith sponsored a card party at Scher Memorial hall Sunday night for the benefit of the Hillel fund. Harry Halpern was in charge of arrangements. Chaplain Charles H. Iley, Coast Guard Training Station, was speaker at a meeting of B'nai B'rith Lodge at Scher Memorial hall Tuesday night. A social hour followed. Beth El congregation he'd their regular Friday night services at 8:15. Mrs. I. Rottman was hostess, assisted by her daughter Evelyn. Mrs. E. Wacksnian, Pennsylvania St. is visiting her son-inlaw and daughter. Mr. and Mrs. Persoff in Delray Beach. Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Lesser and son Sheppard returned from a month's vacation spent in Rome. Ga., visiting relatives and friends. Jack Barash. connected with the post exchange %  at Morrison Field, has returned from New York. EDWARD T. NEWMAN year was spent in a New York school where he studied embalming, funeral directing, and associated subjects. He ffaduatcd with honors, receiving the highest scholastic average of the class, and served as class chairman. Mr. Newman, now on vacation, resides with his mother. Mrs Frieda Newman, active communal worker and President of the Miami Beach Jewish Center Sisterhood. Mr. Newman is a member of the Center, the Miami Beach Jr. Chamber of Commerc e. and the B nai B nth. A BEST investment—A United States War Bond. Buy often. ALFARCRLMLRY CO. rt WOT PALM Drink COCA COLA Coca Cola Bottling Company of West Palm Beach Florida SOUTHERN DAIRIES atattaaaaOlr Tmmmm Ut akacta mmt law MM WEAR TO TOU AaVYOUl FERGUSON FUNERAL HOME, Inc. 1201 South Olive Avenue WEST PALM BEACH PHONE 5172 < • 1 %  < i • I I %  I I



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PAGE FOUR rJewlsli fhrMkM) ewish Florid id n nt and Main Offices, 21 S. W. Second Avenue, Miami, Fla. 1 \ BOK 2973 Phone 2-1141 •. — %  ;ered as Second Class Matter July 4, 1930 at the Post Office of M iami, Florida, under the Act of March 3, 1879 FRED K. SHOCHET, Managing Editor ""DAY. JULY 28, Subscription—1 Year, $2.00 Six Months, $1.00 Face Facts By Alexander F. Miller Florida R had the backing of London. Washington and Mo S r 9ar ?' his talk with Weizmann Eden is reported to have said*"? ? word goes furthest in Budapest—because his militn 8 is so close to the scene" ... P. S.: Stalin said the word PW BEHIND THE SCENE .... The Democratic National Convention is i n session at rv cago as we write this column It will belonq to v 7 when you will read these lines ... But we're telli !" doy that if the Democratic platform will include a shoU? T tion on Palestine this will be due to the untirinq £ Tt Stephen S. Wise, Dr. Israel Goldstein, Judge Louis Kv, ?! and Herman Schulman These four leaders a(.enL a ?? dressed a meeting of the Resolution Committee of the rw cratic Convention It's too bad. though, that these WH did not use the opportunity to include in their pleadinas a T mand for action against the mounting wave of anti-sLiti.. in this country Leaders of the World Jewish CoagSS off the record as a confab m Boston about two weeks aao Matters concerning the salvation of Jews escapinq from N* persecution were discussed From Boston, too comes S ports of a new sport devised by the anti-Semitic hoodlum.* that area Whenever they spot a Jewish-looking patron eat ing in a restaurant they go up to his or her table and throw lighted cigars or cigarettes into the diner s food They find special delight in grinding out cigarettes in dishes of ice cream ZIONEWS .... The annual convention of the Zionist Organization of America, scheduled for October, may be held at Atlantic City intead of New York, which has been announced as the meetinqplace Peter Bergson, head of the "Hebrew Committeed National Liberation." delivered his "first major address" in Town Hall, New York, last week Admission prices were charged, and the place was crowded with an audience that applauded Bergson's criticism of Dr. Weizmann. Dr. Wise and Jewish leadership in America Bergson's speech was broadcast over a local radio station, and it created a deep impression ... We're telling you this not because we like the Bergson group, but because it must be admitted that the Palestinian boys carried it off once more both organizationaly and technically. THIS AND THAT .... Don't miss Howard Fast's message lo American youth, in the current issue of Harper's Bazaar We don't think it would be such a great idea to re-issue Cecil B. DeMille's "The Sign of the Cross" at this time ... Yet that is what Paramount is preparing to do ... A new prologue will show American troops entering Rome ... It strikes us as tactless to connect America's fight against Fascism with a crucifixion movie ... At Flushing, Long Island, in St. Andrew's Roman Catholic Church, a mass was recently celebrated for Pvt. Alfred Dorfman, a Jewish boy from Flushing killed outside Rome That's good will action. ABOUT PEOPLE .... During General Charles de Gaulle's visit to New York, Jo Davidson made a bust of the French leader—in a single day. and without asking him to pose Davidson just followed the general around town, looked at him from all angles, made notes, and then did the sculpture When violin virtuoso Yehudi Menuhin visited the armed forces in the Aleutians he shed his formal manner and became one of the boys, playing by preference before small groups An eye-witness reports: "It was thirty below zero His hands were blue from cold, yet he played for us When his fingers became stiff he wrapped them in a muffler, told us stories until they got warm, then asked what melodies we'd like to hear." New York (JTA)— The United Nations were appealed to this *HXJ rec n !" the so-ca led Hebrew nation" as a "sovereign SfiL2&4> m riKht of 8 a pusmy urnui IIKC "— ^-r*— ","•.. wlul me xun right of a about six weeks ago by a nucleus co-belligerent by the Cornrnutee of leading businessmen." 'of National Liberation happened in Boston and in New York was happening here. This office investigated carefully and could find no trace of any such incidents. Requests were made of Biron to furnish us with specific cases but without result. You and I both know the situation in this city and are aware that despite certain frictions during the past two years. Jaw and order has prevailed. This type of reporting is not only irresponsible but dangerous. In these times when the Jewish people are highly strung and nervous because of the £££? %  ye ? r barra e of hate which has battered against them, there is no need for any writer to make capital of their fears and create situations where none ex ist. to believe lff?g& $g& SEATS NOW ON SALE FOR HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES Seats for the High Holy Days o? thM n 5? at the "e m,.t o ami Beach Jewish ComBE£r£22&'*& U Euc,id Ave.. Miami Beach Members and resrese n r t vat a io e ns aSked to make k-?„ UJr War Bondl ""I Stamps to help preserve DemocrscyT^ AUXILIARY GIVES TO NEEDS OF SERVICEMEN The Ladies' Auxiliary of the Freda Markowitz Post No. 17* Jewish War Veterans of the United States, at its meeting Monday evening at the YM YWHA on the Beach, made Adonation towards the Sefer Toran for the McGuire General hospital of Richmond. Va. if"" also allocated funds for the purchase of ash trays for the Everglades Navy sick bay. Pa"""* Verdon and Lillian Soskins are in charge. In conjunction with members of the Post, the Auxiliary contributed 34 bingo prizes for >e military hospitals. Ida l -. L r' Vine and Evelyn Clein are chairman and co-chairman of nospu alization work for the organization. Mrs. Minnie Kline, president, assembled the *5*2K Auxiliary is planning a boat noe in the near future, with W* Pearl Raidman as chairman ana Mrs. Rose Borkin assisting. Berne (WNS)-Thc ~bitft Jewish industrialist" in Hunfary Baron Andreas Hatvany. % %  been deported to a concentration camp for allegedly failing register his property under "* Aryan laws, it was said here.



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^ A yjULY_28. 1944 *JeHtrk>rkJton PAGE FIVE 1HE JEWISH WAR VETERANS: 48 YEAR OLD SYMBOL OF JEWISH PATRIOTISM BY GEORGE J. FREDMAN, EDITOR, THE JEWISH VETERAN Oil. %  H DO Hiilloil as a patrlby i-elt on NoteHailed as a pat *£?lE5jon of RXeat worth :io fSgEEat pnnklln D. Roosov > ve !T of Its Mi annlveriwry ~ C *n M, hVedman, a Pa 8 t *, "K" Coinm '"'"'• tra.'.-H the hla%  We, thecitUcnsoi the United at es'of America., of the Jewish ,hwho served in the wars of ftntdStates_o l Arnenca.m Etato our country and to one Sher associate ourselves toanotner, a nwine Dur jether for the .following j£ : ICC sri „ 'whatever'"tends' to L impair To maintain true _allence at/true Americanism to the United States of ffrca; to foster .and perpetufmu. Americanism; to_ comd efficiency and permanency 3 nur free institutions; to upld the fair name of the Jew iff fight his battles wherever iled; to encourage the docS of universal liberty equal Shis and full justice to all men; £ combat the powers of bigotry 1 1 darkness wherever onginZg and whatever their target; tn oreserve the spirit of comradeship by mutual helpfulness "comrades and their families; to instill love of country and fi aB to promote sound minds and bodies in our members and our youth' to preserve the memories and records of patriotic service performed by the men of our faith; to honor their memory and shield from neglect the paves of our heroic dead. The above statement of principles is the preamble to the constitution of the Jewish War Veterans of the United States, the history of which bears retelling on the 48th anniversary of the organization, at a time when some 500,000 American Jews are once again in the service of Uncle Sam. Although the J.W.V., as it is popularly called, is today made up largely of the quarter of a million men who wore the uniform of the United States during the First World War, its genesis does back to the Civil War. Many of the thousands of Jews who served in both the Union and the Confederate armies during the War between the States later joined the Grand Army of the Republic and the Confederate War Veterans. But shortly before the close of the 19th century, disturbing echoes of anti-Semitism, both in veteran and other American circles. prompted some of the Jewish Union veterans to do something that would silence the calumnies against American Jewry, particularly since the anti-Semites were alleging that no Jews had served in the Civil War and otherwise impugning their patriotism. The answer of the Jewish veterans of 1861-1865 was a meeting in the Lexington Avenue Opera House in New York City on the night of March 15. 1896. Sixty-seven men attended this gathering, at which it was decided to organize the Hebrew Union Veterans. This new organization was duly incorporated in February, 1897, and Joseph H. Stiner was chosen its first chairman. Although modeled after the existing veterans' societies, the Hebrew Union Veterans took for its major responsibility the task of giving wide currency to the patriotic record of American Jewry. The first activity in this regard was an annual memorial service for those Jews who had fallen in line of duty, a service which is still held annually by the J.W.V. on the Sunday nearest to Memorial Day. in 1896 the Hebrew Union Veterans held its first memorial service on May 20th at Temple Emanu-El, and the principal speaker was the late Simon Wolf. The choice of Simon Wolf as speaker on that occasion was a happy one, for he was the author of the then recently published study "The American Jew as Soldier and Citizen," which he had written as an answer to the very slurs which had brought the Hebrew Union Veterans into being. It was Wolfs monumental research which disclosed that at least 10,000 Jews had seen active service in the Civil War and which gave striking point to the existence of the new organization. When the Hebrew Union Veterans was barely a year old. the Spanish-American War brought into being a new scrop of Jewish veterans from among the several thousand Jews who participated in that combat. These men soon launched their own organization for purposes similar to those that had inspired the Civil War exservicemen, and adopted as their name Junior Hebrew Veterans; but in March, 1900, they changed it to Hebrew Veterans of the War with Spain. Theodore Roosevelt, who, like all presiRELEASED BY THE ARMY Now Open Year Around Rurieto Hotel GEM OF FLORIDA'S EAST COAST — Announces — NEW CABANA CLUB Open Nightly at Swimming Pool and Tennis Court Music Entertainment Recreation Transportation Service for Guests — Station Wagon will meet your train and make trips to the world's famous beach Boat and Motor for Fishing and Pleasure Write for Descriptive Literature and Summer Rates Box 747. Daytona Beach, Flo. HENRY H. HARDESTY, Mar. Notice Several Hotel Positions Open — Writel dem ,? of the United States since, publicly recognized the patriotic services of American Jewry in messages to the Jewish War Veterans, was an honorary member of the Hebrew Veterans of the War with Spain, some of whose members served under him in the Rough Riders. On the ove of the entry of the United States into the World War, the Hebrew Union Veterans, whose membership was largely confined to New York City, was about ready to disband because of the steady decline in its members due to death. The Hebrew Veterans of the War with Spain then took over the senior organization by making its* remaining members honorary members of the younger group. When the tens of thousands of Jews who had served in the American Expeditionary Forces were demobilized at the close of the World War, they too took steps to organize. For a time there were again two separate organizations of Jewish veterans. Anticipating an ultimate merger, the Hebrew Veterans of the War with Spain changed its name in 1918 to the Hebrew Veterans of the Wars of the Republic. Since all of the members lived in New York they combined in Manhattan Post No. 1, which is still in existence as the original post of the preselt J. W. V. In 1919, when the Jewish veterans of the World War took the initiative in sponsoring the historic parade and mass meeting in the old Madison Square Garden to protest against the pogroms in Poland, officials of the two organizations decided the time was ripe to amalgamate. The union was achieved in February, 1920, when Maurice Simmons, a former national commander-in-chief of the United Spanish War Veterans, was elected commander in chief of the Hebrew Veterans of the Wars of the Republic. Three years later, at the suggestion of the late Nathan Straus, an honorary member, the name of the organization was changed to the Jewish Veterans of the Wars of the Republic, and David Solomon, of Brooklyn, was chosen commander-in-chief. In that same year Brooklyn Post No. 2 and Harry Cutler Post No. 3 were instituted. Solomon was succeeded by Morri s Mendelsohn, a veteran of the SpanishAmerican War, who founded ten posts when he came v into office —six in New York City and one each in Jersey City, Boston. ^tft. Act XvJGUST BROS Ryc£ **" /* the BEST.' rt WHEN NERVOUS HEADACHES PESTER ME I FIND THAT MILES NERVINE HELPS NERVOUS TENSION TO RELAX a IjsjBj pt nsrrss. WHY DONT YOU TBT lT.t •Got it Cleveland and Providence. When he turned over the commander's title to the late Julius S. Berg of the Bronx in 1928, there were twice that number. The convention that elected Berg commander-in-chief (he was the first World War Veteran to head the J. W. V.) adopted the present name, Jewish War Veterans of the United States. Since 1930, the following have served as commander-in-chief: Harold Seidenberg, of Boston, 1930-32; J. George Fredman, of Jersey City, 1932-33; William Berman. of Boston, 1933-35; Abraham Kraditor, of Brooklyn, 1935-36; Harry Schaffer, of Pittsburgh, 1936-38; Isador S. Worth, of Camden. N. J., 1938-39; Edgar H. Burman. of New York, 1939-40; Fred H. Harris, of Meriden, Conn., 1940-41; Benjamin Kaufman, of Trenton, N. J., 1941-43; and Archie H. Greenberg, of New York, the present commander. From 1932 there has been a decided growth of our organization both in membership and achievement. Our 300 posts located in all important cities are taking an active part in promoting American ideals, combatting subversive movements, and are building inter-faith good-will and understanding. J. W. V. is officially credited with starting the boycott of Nazi goods and services on March 20th, )£33. Under the leadership of J George Fredmen, P. N. C, the. boycott developed not only into a worldwide movement, but became the most effective non-military weapon against Nazi tyranny. J. W. V. also took the lead in combatting un-American groups and individuals. The GermanAmerican Bund, Silver Shirts, Brown Shirts, and similar subversive groups of the 1934-1940 era could not stand J. W. V.'s attacks and expose and either folded up or went under ground. Christian Front and Christian Mobilizer groups in New York. Brooklyn and other large cities could not compete with proAmerican meetings held everywhere under J. W. V. sponsorship. Some of their leaders were jailed, and Joe McWilliams found it desirable to emigrate to the mid-west. Our disclosures were valuable for the Congressional Committees investigating unAmerican activities and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. In the last decade the J. W. V. has been represented on all governmental committees and agencies dealing with veterans' affairs. Six years ago, when General John J. Pershing. who on several occasions acknowledged the heroism of American Jews in the World War, went to France to dedicate the American war memorials and chapels, he invited the J. W. V. to send an official representative. General Frank T. Hines, head of the United States Veterans' Administration, has been a frequent guest and speaker at J. W. V. encampments and has repeatedly paid tribute to its work, as have the heads of virtually all of the other veterans' organizations. In recent years the top ranking officers of the J. W. V. have been invited guests at the conventions of the other veterans' societies. A large proportion of the J. W. V. membership belongs to other veterans' organizations to which they are eligible. Tracing its history back to those Jewish Civil War veterans of 1896, the J. W. V. is today the second oldest veterans' society in the country, being antedated only by the Grand Army of the Republic. When this organization of Civil War Veterans disbands, as it must before long because the last bugle call is fast decimating its aging ranks, the J. W. V. will become the senior among all veterans' groups. .. The most potent evidence against the baseless slander of Jewish lack of patriotism is to be found in the war records of every country in the world, including those in which the Jew for centuries was not permitted to bear arms. In the United States, the only nation in the world that has never discriminated against Jews in its armed forces, there is an organized symbol to refute the monumental lie that the Jew doesn't fight for his country. That symbol is the Jewish War Veterans of the United States which in the 48 years since it was created has held fast to the ideals of the founders. With some 500,000 Jewish men now in service, the Jewish War Veterans of the U. S. enters into a new and even more vital phase of its life. Along with the American Legion, the Veterans of Foreign Wars and other veteran organizations it supported the "G. I. Bill of Rights." the recently enacted legislation that provides post war rights for the ten million Americans now in service. Besides its regular membership in over three hundred posts throughout the country, the Jewish War Veterans now has a service membership classification of over 70,000 men now in service. Already, three new posts composed entirely of veterans of the second World War have been formed and others are in process of organizationWith some of its membership —including two past National Commanders: Lt. Colonel William Berman and Lt. Commander Abraham Kraditor — once again in service, the rest of the membership of the J. W. V. is playing its part on the home front—selling war bonds (for which the organization and its Ladies Auxiliary has been commended by the Treasury Department), giving blood to the Red Cross, holding various Civilian Defense posts, and cooperating with the Jewish Welfare Board and USO in serving the recreation needs of the men in service. Planning for the post war. the J. W. V. has entered into two cooperative ventures of great importance. It has joined with the Jewish Welfare Board in the joint sponsorship of a program of relief and rehabilitation for the returned veterans. And it has joined hands with the four other leading national Jewish civic protective agencies—the American Jewish Committee, the American Jewish Congress, the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith and the Jewish Labor Committee—in the National Community Relations Advisory Council, a central unifying agency in the field of civic protection. The J. W. V. is, of course, also an active member of the American Jewish Conference. BZB CHAPTER ELECTS FOR THE COMING YEAR It at your drus; saars. Mt UbleU Sf* sad If*. | W and $IM. KasdsWElection of officers of the BZB Chapter of the B'nai B'rith Girls held recently saw Miss Beverly August elected president for the coming year. Other officers chosen were Miss Esther April, vicepresident; Miss Hope Tannenbaum, recording secretary; Miss Rita Quartin, corresponding secretary; and Miss Rita Weiss, treasurer. Minor officers included Miss Anita Malmud, publicity chairman and historian; Miss Gladys Novack, editor of the paper, the Comet; Miss Tobie Jacobskind. program and social chairman; Miss Joy Alpert. A. Z. A. cooperative chairman: Miss Jackie Nadel, sergeant-at-arms; and Miss Cynthia Schwartz, parliamentarian. Keep on buying War Bonds. Made From Freeh Orange* AUTO ELECTRIC SERVICE Starter and Generator Repairs A Specialty Special Service to Fleet Ownera llr>l/'C — AUTOMOTIVE — JAlfV 0 ELECTRIC SERVICE 1M N. W. MTH 8TREET PHONE 2-9304 OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE IN FLORIDA KOSHER ZION SAUSAGE CO. PRODUCT! DeUstOUa Corned Beef Pl+eltod, CotXJ and Im ano S Meata art* and Normal Ave. Cilia %  Be • t I



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PAGE EIGHT + knisl tkrHktn rai DAY. JULY 28 'NAI B'RITH NOTES -byMARX FEINBERG The Lodge, as well as the community, has suffered a grievous loss in the passing of Daniel Cromer. Mr. Cromer was one of the most outstanding Jews and citizens of Miami and was considered a pioneer in the mercantile field before the rise of Miami to the largest city in the state. He had contributed much to the progress of the community and created much good-will among our non-Jewish friends. I know I express the sentiments of every member of Sholem Lodge when I say that we will miss Daniel Cromer and we extend to his family and loved ones our sincere sympathy. At the last meeting of the executive committee it was decided that all service men in our community desiring to join our organization would be required to pay initiation fees in the sum of $5.00 and all dues would be waived for the duration and six months thereafter. To some of you brothers who have friends in the service and who would care to become one of us. this inducement will be interesting. On the night of August 20th a card party will bo tendered at the Wofford Hotel on Miami Beach. More details later. The next meeting of the Lodge will be held on the night of August 8th at the Miami Beach "Y." The program will be GORDON FUNERAL HOME 710 S. W. 12th AV. MIAMI TEL. 3-3431 Moderate Costs Always Within the Means of Individual Circumstances "YOUR JEWISH FUNERAL HOME" • Worthy and Deserves Your Full Support and Recommendation • SERVING MIAMI BEACH AND MIAMI • EXCLUSIVELY JEWISH 24-HOUR Ambulance Service sponsored by Royal Palm Chapter of A. Z. A. and promises to provide some fine music and entertainment. Please make plans now to attend. I would like, at this time, to institute a series of thumbnail sketches of personalities within Sholem Lodge who have labored hard and to whom a great deal of credit is due for the growth and progress of the Lodge. It might be well to begin with Brother Ike Levin. Brother Ike is a native of Virginia and was president of his home-town lodge in Roanoke for a number of years. His interest in B'nai B'rith work has extended over a period of approximately 30 years and during his residence in Miami has attained the presidency of Sholem Lodge, a member of the general committee for District No. 5. vice president of District No. 5 and culminating his activities in this district in 1941 was elected president of District Grand Lodge No. 5. Brother Ike has always served faithfully when called upon and has been constantly active in the Lodge activities all through the years and particularly in the A. D. L. field. I can recall in the days of the late Brother Louis Shochet when Ike. Harry Simonhot f. Mr. Shochet and a host of other members were instrumental in the dissolution of the white front organization in Miami and directly contributed to the dissolution of a franchise to the Hamburg American line, the German firm, for a boat line between Miami and Cuba. Mr. Levin is president of the TriPure Water Co.. and his favorite expression was and is: "I am not a lawyer. I only make water for a living." We salute Brother Ike Levin and hope that he will remain with us for a long time to come. In The Synagogues Of Greater Miami Services lor the wcek-aiifl announced by the Greatei Miami area are an follow*: BETH DAVID CONGREGATION. Conservative, 135 N. W. 3rd Ave.. Miami.— Friday evening services at : IS, Saturday inurninK l s %  %  '" %  BETH JACOB CONGREGATION, Orthodox, 311 Washington Ave.. Miami Beach—Friday evening services at 7:l.'i o'clock; Saturday mornlnf at x:30. Cantor Maurice Mamchee will chant the service. KOIIK'OUH School Monday throuKh Friday, 9 a. m. tu noon. Notes Of Y. M. H. A. -bySAM SILVER MIAMI BEACH JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER, Conservative, 1415 Euclid Ave.—Kabalau Shabbox Friday evening at 7:15. Saturday morning MrviOM at I, Shaliwh Si-udoH services at 7:15 p. m. to be followed by evening prayers. TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI. Reform. 137 N. E. 1lth St.. Miami— Iti-Kiilai services Friday evening at s.i:.. MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CONGREGATION, Orthodox, 690 S. W. 17th Ave.. Miami—Services scheduled for Friday at 7:15 p. m. and Saturday at a. m. and 7:15 p. m. Nhalosn Scudoa will be follow**d by afaarlv. Dally services at 8:30 a. in. and 7:18 p. in. SCHAAREI ZEDEK CONGREGATION, Orthodox, 1545 S. W. 3rd St., Miami. Friday evening servlcea begin at 7:10. Saturday morning at 9 Iflncba and Maaiiv at 7:30 p. m. Dally services at 8:15 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. BETH SHOLOM CENTER. Conservative. 761 41st St., Miami Beach. Services are scheduled for Prlda) evening, at 7:15; Saturday moming Mrvlcaa win be held m 9:30. HAT HEN HERE I WANT MY MILK And Ba SUM Its FLORIDA DAIRIES HOMOGENIZED Vitamin "D" Milk "MUk Products" Dacro Protected TEL. 2-2621 Greater Miami Delivery Visit Our Farm at •200 N. W. 32nd Strait DR. SANEL BEER NOW CITIZEN OF THE U. S. Sanel Beer, M. D., founder and owner of Rivermont Park Sanitarium. 1389 N. W. 7th Street, received his United States citizenship on July 8th. Dr. Beer has been in Miami exactly five years, and during this time has built up the well-known institution. Mr. Beer was a leader of the Jewish community in Vienna, and an active personality in the Zionist cause. He was also the f "under of the Hakoah sport club in Vienna and an officer of the Vienna Medical Association. WORKMEN'S CIRCLE IN SUNDAY EVE SERVICES .u 0n „ Sunday t'veninR. July 23. Nn Mo r u^ ns Circl< Branc > No. 692 held memorial services in honor of Philip Rabinowitz a national figure of the organization, who passed away the 15th of this month after a prolonged illness. Commendation and a description of his life's activities were depicted during the evening. On Sunday evening. July 30th. Branch 692 will entertain with a boat ride, leaving from Pier 7 City Yacht Basin a t 8 p. m. You can't quit now! You must continue to buy Bonds, and More Bonds! (Thin column Is conducted by the •Jreater Miami Jewish Federation In cooperation with The Jewish FloridIan as a community eervlce. To Inform the community of your organisation's activities and to avoid conflicts In dates, phone 3-5411 and aak for Community Calendar." Notification must reach Federation no later than Tuesday for publication that week.) Mondsy, July 31 Federation budget committee meetIns;, Federation office. 8 p. m. Tuesday. August 1 National Home for Jewish Children at Denver, regular meeting, £ p. m. Wednesday, August 2 National Council of .lewiah Women, afternoon: Worfcmen'a circle Branca No. 69L'. regular membership meeting. 8:30 p. m. Monday, August 7 Temple Isiael Sisterhood, U':30 p.m. BALLANTINE'S ALE <§> America 't Finest Since 1840 mvntiBtjrro HY NATIONAL BRANDS. INC. NEW ROOF or REPAIR OLD ROOF No Down Payment Small Monthly Payment All Work Guaranteed LANG ROOFING CO. 416 N. W. 79th St. 78-1009 When You Think of Real Estate Think Of LEO EISENSTEIN REALTOR 309 Lincoln Road Phone 5-6479 Dependable, Conscientious Service WZAL ESTATE—MIAM I BEACH MIAMI BEACH HOMES AND INVESTMENT PROPERTIES B. E. BRONSTON. Realtor i T !" !": &* "e Estate Service Lincoln Rd. p n. s.sgjj RENTALS LEASES SALES Lot!. Homei, Hotels Apartment Houses M. GILLER REALTOR 1448 Washington Avenue PHONE 5-5875 Horn. ** MINK PLENTY Of pure Water oaivmo TO TOUR HOME = G.U0 BOTfc E0{ CASC OF SIX T *BLE BOTTLES 5 Piui Bofll* Depoi.i PHONE BEFORE YOU BUY aee LEON ELIIN with METROPOLITAN K t LIFE INS. CO. Hot Beat Becatu. Blgg^ But—Biggest Because Best Dues Collection Campaign Bcrnie Sterling, chairman of the membership committee of the Y, has reported that his committee has commenced a dues collection campaign, and requests that all members who are in arrears in the payment of their dues please get paid up as soon as possible. In our Federation budget it is provided that a certain amount of the Y's operating expenses must come from dues collected, so in order to operate the organization efficiently the money must be made available. Condolences to Crosiers The officers and board members of the Y extend heartfelt sympathy to Maurice Cromer, a Y board member, and the other members of the Cromer family, over the loss of Mr. Daniel Cromer, a long time Miami resident. Mr. Cromer was the father-in-law of Lt. E. Albert Pallot, former president of the Y. Home Camp The Y Home Camp is progressing according to plans and all of the registrants preparing for the pageantT given at a later date The ? ^"t.'s.a Part of the Ttm of distilling Jewish back" and tradition Into its aS Community Center I was happy to notein weeks issue of The JewishV ldian that Federation haa^S nated a Community TlaS* Committee, of which £ Myers and George Chertkof L co-chairman. Here's hoping 5S committee aets active SPeS and that plans for the erecUcT a community center here will under way before long Youth Groups kX Uth K 4 roups of the M 'ami are hold meetings at the Y seve evenings a week, and the Y continually making efforts to ordinate the activities of th groups and to bring about great er harmony among the differen age groups. Among the organi zations who meet here are th A. Z. A. Chapters, B'nai Brit Girls Chapters and the Bo Scouts. Keep tru^>n on t/owi MEDICINE CABINET (VGkSSSf: leJarcaUeau ONEQDAY I T A M I N -~ A tt L r X& Vlu-t.pt. !" at Uw •*•ONK-A DAT Tltaaslsi TillrtL. A ssal Buy Direct-No. 8 Century Lant.l Belle Isle, two bed rooms and I'wp.j ing porch, in perfect condition, low.| est price $14,850, unfurnished. If you wish to own a met n tw | home riflht on the Bay. phone own.| er, 58-2328. UJERYIIIsL •*— *• pstiss j easy aa ai nn is. (a QRNERAL PAINTING CLHAN WORK DONE BT BEST MECHANICS KHWH ESTIMATES NO JOB TOO LARGE OR TOO SMALL J. D. OILRRKATH 1'AINTCONTRACTOR PH. 3-0070; If no answer, 2-5105 RIVERMONT PARK SANITARIUM use N. w. 7th St. Ph. 1-7301 ._ eara for chronic sick, convt. 'secant and elderly people SANEL BEER. M. D., Director Reasenabls Prices BBB*Lare Beautiful Qroundiaaa, yff}/s/r/"'""^"'~ .„„„"/""'""'' >//4 .ADVANTAGES of* IIAWE PEIIERAL MORTGAGE ^ v LOW RATES • BA8Y PAYMENTS • LONG TIME TO PAY • PROMPT SERVICE • A HOME INSTITUTION Deal With Your LOCAL. FRIENDLY INSTITUTION RESOURCES OVER $10,000,000 IIAIME FEWtAL •-OHM IAI1 Mlt AVI WMMtummv* JO. mm u. UrIM mvovrt ^


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r ifcJteyislbJEIliDipidliiaun ^.THE JEWISH UNITY a !" & THE JEWIS H WE E MIAMI 18, FLORIDA. FRIDAY, JULY 28, 1944 PRICE 10 CENTS and American it can be revealed Rome (JTA)—A brazen ,emp by the Gestapo to barter Res of 400.000 Jew* n Hunan for relaxation of the Allied Stockade of occupied Europe was S at Istanbul last month and received extensive consideration by the British governments noW _, T The offer was carried to Istanbul from Budapest by two men. one of whom was a reputable Jew whose family had been taken as hostages to ensure his re-' turn when the mission was completed. He is now being held on British territory. The two men arrived at Istanbul early in June to establish contact with refugee rescue organizations, to which they disclosed the Gestapo proposals. All that can be revealed of these at this time is that the Nazis offend to cease deporting Jews from Hungary to Poland for extermination and agree to permit them to remain in Hungary providing the Allies modified the blockade, permitting the Germans to import a specified quantity of rolling stock and other needed supplies. The proposal contained the warning that if it was not accepted the deportations and extermination of Jews would be accelerated. It was communicated to the Allied authorities and was the subject of a series of conferences in Cairo in the middle of June, when detailed reports went to the British Foreign Office and the State Department. Representative! of the United States War Refugee Board. American Jewish relief organizations and the Jewish Agency for Palestine participated in the Cairo discussions with Lord Moyne. British Resident Minister of State in the Middle East, and other British officials. The strictest secrecy was observed at the time in fear that the Nazis might use publication as an excuse to intensify measures against the helpless Jews. It was never considered, either in Cairo or Istanbul, that there was anv possibility that the Nazi otter would be accepted since me Allies could never agree to weaken the blockade and since there was no assurance that the wrmans would keep their end of the bargain. The opinion was expressed that to make one confession of this nature would only "duce the Nazis to make further blackmail demands. IT CHICAGO MEET MILS OF OFFER Consolidation of Prominent Congregations b PJ}; r fJ !" 10 RELEIISE JEWS Consummated By Announcement of Merger; Organizational Li fe in Mi ami Benefits by Action Creating history in the annals oi the organizational life oi the Greater Miami community, was the official announcement this week by the presidents of the respective synagogues of the merger and consolidation of the Miami Jewish Orthodox and Schaarei Zedek congregations. Leon Kaplan and Abe Pepper, heads of the two congregations, reported that the negotiations were approved individually by each body with an unanimous endorsement This merger brings together the two synagogues, one of which, Schaarei Zedek, was the result of political differences among the officers and members, resulting in the off-shoot in October, 1941. The merged congregations will charge of the education and Talcommittee for Schaarei Zedek. be known as the Miami Jewish Orthodox. The Talmud Torah will be known as the Schaarei Zedek Talmud Torah of the congregation. Consolidation of the groups will give the organization two pieces of paid-up property—one on S. W. 3rd St.. intended as the center of youth educational activities, and the synagogue proper, on S. W. 17th avenue. Additional property is owned adjacent to the 17th Avenue building. Rabbi Simon April will continue his affiliation with the merged institutions, and have mud Torah activities. Details of the merger made public provide the combining of the membership rolls, which will give the synagogue a membership of approximately 250. The women's groups of both congregations will likewise combine membership and activities. The present officers of the Miami Jewish Orthodox Congregation will remain until the next election in November, and a number of seats on the board of directors are being filled by Schaarei Zedek irepresentation. Fred K. Shochet headed the and was assisted in the negotations by other members, including Phillip Berkowitz, Leon Lieberman, Nat Blumberg, Herman Pearl, H. M. Drewich, Milton Weiner, A. Pepper, Max R. Silver, and Mrs. Ida Buckstein and Mrs. Morris Ofsowitz. Leon Kaplan headed the committee representing the Miami Jewish Orthodox Congregation, and other members of his group included Sidney A. Palmer. Joseph Zalis, Max Rifas, D. Singer, A. M. Bear, Mrs. Joseph Zalis, and Mrs. A. I. Orlansky. INTERNED AMERICANS KILLED DURING RAIDS ON BUDAPEST IS CLAIM Zurich (JTA) — Eighty nine American Jews who had been interned in Hungary since the outbreak of the war were killed during recent Allied bombings of Budapest, according to the Budapest newspaper Fueggetlenseg, official organ of the pro-Nazi Sztojay government. The paper claims that the Jews were recently moved from an internment camp near a railroad station at the request of the central Jewish council which was charged with securing food and other supplies for the Americans. It has been the expressed policy of the Hungarian government, however, to move Jews from places of comparative safety to areas close to military targets and to deny them access to air-raid shelters. REFUGEES FROM ITALY EXPECTED IN AUGUST SWEDEN WILLING TO AID HUNGARIAN JEWS, REPORT Stockholm (JTA)—The Swedish radio and press commenting this week on the reported Hungarian offer to the Red Cross to release certain categories of Jews states that Sweden is ready to do everything possible to assist the endangered Jews. The Swedish radio declared that "if Sweden can contribute to the humane solution of the problem, we will certainly not hesitate." ABOUT 80,000 CHILDREN WILL BE AFFECTED BY HUNGARY'S PROPOSAL Geneva (JTA)—About 80.000 children would be affected by offer of Hungarian Regent Admiral Hurt by to permit the fmJ ?ral on of Jewish children £*?.." supervision of the Inernational Red Cross, it is 'earned here. The International Peace office thl Wepk ad dressed a letter to Rwit, en V rt diplomatic corps in Z l r i,nd ur K' n R action bv all Hit;,... "'R"'K otuuil UT an hons to save the Jews of Hun* ar v from total annihilation. j* Gu N ADMITS IT BOMBED "EA&QUARTERS OF POLICE Zvlf i Aviv (JTA)—The Irgun terror; ""• outlawed Jewish tank tlr rRa r ization posied Dla Wth. u i Rhuul lhe city dur biiitv V n K '' turning responsiE a f ,' hc b mbing of JeruiVt V nct Police head O ar PoliJi. Fnda y. m which one %  SK ^iu 1 ^ %  8ever Ke *P on buying War Bond*. GUERRILLA OPERATING BAND IS_IN^ POLAND Moscow (JTA)—Deep in the forests of the Lublin region of Poland a well-armed Jewish partisan detachment composed of 1,000 men is harrassing the rear of the Nazi army, in coordination with the frontal assaults by the rapidly advancing Red Army troops, according to information received here by the Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee. The guerrillas possess a secret from which they radio station, Washington (JTA)—The 950 call upon the Jews of Poland to war refugees coming from Italy ( escape and join hem -while for temporary haven in this there is still time." and a concountryatFort Ontario. Oswego. I siderable number of trucks and N. Y., will probably not arrive horses. until after August 1. according to information available to the War Relocation Authority. When they arrive the army will be responsible for their In the past year and a half they have carried out thirty large-scale operations aaginst the Germans in addition to constant "nuisance raids'* on Nazi garrisons and installations. The partisans are also sheltering more transport. TrobabTy by special, .sans are a. o --* "^ train.'from the port of debarka-, Jan LWOjj ^ ^ In? tfffin T A h ut r ho!ity r : i ng from the occupation forces. will assume authority. GORT HIGH COMMISSIONER WAR BOARD UNINFORMED FOR PALESTINE AND EAST ON REMOVAL OF CHILDREN, ^^ (J ^T The c lonial ^ or.. I Office announced this week that Washington (JTA)-The W" Field Marshal Viscount Gort had Refugee Board, informed that appointed high commissionPinckncy Tuck. U. S. minister in tf foj Pak s tjne and Transiordar,. Cairo, had announced that m 3 I succeeding Sir Harold MacMichJewish children n beremoved jLjg^JjJgffgjf comViscount Gort. who becomes the sixth high commissioner since Britain assumed the mandate over Palestine, was chief from"'France shortly, stated that it had no knowledge of the pro jected evacuation. JE^TO^^YIV^E 2£EB9es! ss?tf Washington^-The Nag' R -sanded Brit^h troops m ^systematically exhuming the rran f of Gibraltar beremafns of 70.00(5 Yugoslavs and n g ^ Malta As 30.000 Jews executed .since 1 Q{ {h general staff he visto "erase all. mark sL 'ted Palestine in 1939. murders, a Swiss newspaper says. ANTI SEMITISM BODY FINISHES PRELIMINARY PROBE OF POLISH ARMY London (JTA)—The commission appointed by the Polish National Council to investigate the reasons for Jewish soldiers leaving the Polish Army has completed preliminary inquiries in Scotland, where most of the Polish troops are quartered, it was learned here this week. Dr. Ignacy Schwartzbart. one of the members of the commission, revealed that the group heard testimony of Jewish and non-Jewish soldiers from July 4 to 13. The members of the commission also were enabled to speak with the army commanders Schwartzbart said that he could not divulge the results of the preliminary investigations at present. POPE~USES HEBREW TO BLESS IEWISH SOLDIER Chicago (JTA)—Free and uarestricted Jewish immigration to Palestine and the ultimate establishment there of a Jewish Commonwealth were endorsed last week at the national convention of the Democratic party. The platform adopted by the delegates states: 'We favor the opening of Palestine to unrestricted Jewish immigration and colonization, and such a policy as to result in the establishment there of a free and democratic Jewish commonwealth." At the same time, the convention went on record supporting Congressional action to secure full rights for racial and religious minorities in the United States. The plank covering the minority question said: "We believe that racial and religious minorities have the right to live, develop and vote equally with all citizens and share the rights that are guaranteed by our Constitution. Congress should exert its full constitutional powers to protect those rights." Following adoption of the Palestine plank, Dr. Stephen S. Wise, co-chairman of the American Zionist Emergency Council, issued a statement here hailing the Democrats' action and expressing confidence that the plank "will speedily be translated by definite action into the fulfillment of the age-old aspirations of the Jewish people." "My associates and I welcome the adoption of the Palestine plank in the platform of the Democratic National Convention," Dr. Wise said. "We are grateful to the leaders of the Democratic party, including the co-chairman of the committee on resolutions, the Honorable John W. McCormick, and the Honorable Mary T. Norton, and the distinguished leaders of both Houses of Congress who served on the committee, in addition to the veteran Liberal, the Honorable Josephus Daniels. The convention delegates, representing the conviction of the American people, adopted the resolution with unanimity. By this act. the Democratic party once again reaffirms the historic policy of Woodrow Wilson and Franklin Delano Roosevelt." Tel Aviv (JTA)—The story of how the Pope blessed a Jewish soldier in Hebrew was told in a letter which arrived here from the front in Italy. Visiting troops, the Pope asked the soldier where he was from. When the soldier replied that his home was in Palestine, the Pope raised his hand and greeted him with the words: "Yevorechacha adonai vosmerecha"—the traditional Hebrew blessing from the Old Testament (Numerals VI 24-6) meaning: "May God bless you and keep you." CAMP ADMINISTRATOR ON TRIAL FOR MURDER Algiers (JTA)—The mistreatment of interned Jews in the concentration camps established by the Vichy government in North Africa was described here at the trial of the administrators of Camp Djenian at Bou? Rezg. The chief accusation against the comp director and guards is that they caused the death of a 51-year-old Jewish physician, a former president of the League for Human Rights in GERMANS CAPTURE 100 WARSAW JEWS HIDING WITH FRIENDLY POLES London (JTA)—German police in Warsaw recently rounded up 100 Jews who were being sheltered in the homes of Poles, according to information reaching Polish circles here. The fate of the Jews, who were probably survivors of the liquidation of the Warsaw ghetto, is unknown. The Jews were captured during mass arrests by the Nazis of Poles whom they are using for forced labor to construct fortifications. It is also reported that the prison located within the ruins of the Warsaw ghetto was raided recently by Polish patriots who liberated 15 political prisoners, including leaders of the resistance movement. 5.000 JEWISH CHILDREN MAY BE EVACUATED IN FRANCE Although he was ill when he arrived at the camp, he was compelled to work on the camp farm. Witnesses said that he contracted pneumonia and later typhus and died June 12, 1942. Cairo (JTA)—Five thousand Jewish orphans will soon be allowed to leave France, it was reported here by United States Minister Pinckney Tuck, who was formerly American charge Algeria.! d'affaires at Vichy. At one time "the U. S. had agreed to admit several thousand of the young refugees, and American relief organizations had even sent representatives to Europe to arrange transportation for them.' • I 4



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IT PAGE SIX Jewish fhrktlan Our Film Folk By HELEN ZIGMOND Copyright, 1944, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc. Henry Ginsberg this week took over the reins of general manager in charge of all produca rehearsal of the Fred Allen program. Allen made with the jokes Mrs. Mussbaum made tion at Paramount. He is the I with the accent other comics same producer who has been I including Monty Woolley. tied very active on all bond drives— | knots in the mike but nary a flicker, not a laugh, not a smile from Reed, jr., the side-line spectator. Then papa rounded the corner of Allen's Alley. The first Falstaffian line brought a scream of laughter from sonny then shrieks, howls, guffaws. "M-m-m," muttered Fred laconically, "Milton Berle has his mother, so you have your son!" in fact, he is the originator of the ten per cent payroll deduction plan in use at all the studios. • • • Since the time he played opposite Pola Negri in 1928 until the winning of his Oscar. Paul Lukas says he has been "found" and lost by Hollywood exactly seven times. So it isn't likely that his new fame accruing from the statuette will expand his head. "It's like the title of my last picture—'Uncertain Glory'." • Turnabout: Jimmy Sauter of the Air Features Dynamo, was presented by Prexy Eddie Cantor with a Gold Life Member"Have you heard my pome?" sh 'P Card in the Jewish ThcatAlan Reed is $1000 richer for recording a one-minute, ten-line verse for a paint company which they will use in radio spot announcements. Radie Harris tells this one about Reed: Ho brought his eight-year-old hopeful to watch rical Guild. Sauter is the first non-Jew to be so honored said it gave him "the thrill of his life." • • • Did you know that "Up In Arms" is not Danny Daye's cinema debut? He played in a numbar of Vitaphone Shorts years ago in Brooklyn—but why bring that up now? • • • • Did you know that Dewey Robinson, who always plays a "tough guy" in gangster films, weighs 260 pounds measures twenty-three inches around the neck? A gangster picture with1 out Man Mountain Dewey, a hulking racketeer, wouldn't seem aomplete. • • • And if you'll believe the pufflicity boys. Irving Pichel likes to perch on ladders while directing his actors. He used six of I them ladders, not actors while piloting "And Now Tomorrow." Presumably different ones I for various camera angles. • • • News item in a local paper read: "Jack L. Warner, vicepresident in charge of population ." For that brave New World now aborning • • • Nat Carr, veteran actor of the stage and screen, took his last curtain call this week. He played in the "Cohens and the Kellys" pictures, 'The Jazz Singer. "Kosher Kitty Kelly." and many others. He was the brother of Alexxander Carr of "Potash and Perlmutter" fame. • • • So fearful are the Nazis of the Allied radio programs that they punished a whole French town as an example. For "paying attention to foreign broadcasts." the Nazis seized all radio sets in Capestang and deported to Germany all men between 18 and 40. So reports OWI by way of "La Suisse," Swiss newspaper. Dots and Dashes: The profits from Sol Lasser's "Stage Door Canteen" was the financial uplift which gave the New York Stage Door Canteen its new facial Al Jolson attended the Democratic National Convention merely as an observer—"The Mad Russian," Bert Gordon, returns to Eddie Cantor's program next season Secretary Henry Morgenthau pronounced its Fifth War Loan Drive as "Hollywood's best performance." So rapid and efficient is the working of the film branch (Robert Riskin's department) of the OWI that the boys in Normandy were enjoying new American films ten days after the invasion began— Edward Robinson is currently in London to play in a British film with an R. A. F. background. 6/30 7/7.H.21.2 8 tV N 0 p WKHAJ| &£&£. atfa-j* .J" 11 !" 'a herebi undendnned, buxInpHa utidt-r SUSSMAN'S| "njVKSStt n ** 5 gOMPAN Y. NOT 1 \VMA : V S'-'MS Miami Av... IBuft^g <-ourt of Dade County. World*, &5IM NII.HKltST JOSKl'M Or* I&CM MJGUST BROS ftw *^ ll r I, /, V I is the at si Keep on buying War Bonds. f*-% ll /'i hot, but baby sleeps with ease ., He's cooled by air like a mountain breeze! ft WON'T IT BE WONDEirUL to live in a house that's cool in July j.-: balmy in January? Where at the flif of a finger your new Gas air-conditioning system gives you the txact temperature you want—. all year 'round! Winner time Mom reads or knits! Precision-cooked. T her meals are hit'T Y J^E-scotS No. 15171 In Re: BSTATB'op'HENRY r To A7IT C ^. T0 CRE D'T0RS io All ( rodltors nod All iv-. BOTLS? •""* %  noSVoVanV,'.' calms and demand. %  .,,.',„ '"."'.'* "'. >.""• ."'"> have again,! ,Z eatate nf HENRY cTqffiftfi IMOIIdH, to tin. Hun. \v y I.),....' County Jud.e ol ,,.„,,. rSjg^ file the nam.In hi. ,. m ,.„ in ,JJ ." ""J""" "' niK orrice in the SgHg SKIff' ; %  ""'• %  com. ?..,..'. %  L wl, hl ••"• l calendar nwofi from rnthi the date of the first uubl.calion hereof. Bald ,,.,„„. „ r rt n(| to contain the leaal addreai of 5 claimant an.l to l.. sworn to and onMnted aai aforesaid. ..r same will be Imrre.l. s...Section I20 of the I'M I'robate Act. Data July 12, 1944 If A RIB (IALLAOHER AH AilmlnlHtiati'ix of the Kst.ite ot HK.MtV C OALUAQHra IP, ,..,., ,1 MAX K. BILVER Attorney f.„ Admli Istratrti 7/M-21-2S 8/4 NOTICE is HBRKUY GIVE.N that JOHKI'H H. LIEI4KNTHAU ItF.KTHA LIEBENTHAI., and ISIDOB SWEET are engaxeil in Inisineu mi'lei the flctitlo |l mi "f MARY LOU Al'TS al IJIS Meridtan Avenue. Miami Beach, Florida, and intend tu ii-Klsti-ilaid flctitlonj name in the office of Hi. rierh of %  cult Courl %  •< Dad) • "• .iint\. i J08EPN [I I.IKFIBNTHAL IIERTIIA MERENTHAL ISIDOR SWEET I P.l %  • 5 OBC/ROE CHERTKOK Attornev for Applii-antl 7/21-28 8/4-11 -1 v NOTICE IS HERBRV tilVEN tint JOSEPH 1: MEBBXTHAL, BBBTHA MERENTHAL. and ISII"* BWBBT are encased In busini 'lettinflctltlotui name "f NOWU l.or Al'TS., al 1227 Meridian Avenue, .Miami Beach, Florida, and Init ml to register wild fi-titieu> name in the office ol thi 'li %  k o( I cult Court ..f Dade County, I JOSEPH 1: MEBBXTHAL IIERTIIA MEBBXTHAL ISIDOR SWEET OEOROE CHERTKOF Attornev for Appllc 7/21-28 8/4-11-IS NOTICE IS HERBBT OIVES the umlei siKiifi are enaafed Ineaa under the flctltloui u "i' v ZION I-t>i>l> CENTER —OBOCrai DEPARTMENT, at 1429 WaaWnfMJ Avenue. Miami Beach, Florida., a !" intend to raffltter the sai'l Iirtitio"" name In the office of the CTerl; %  the Circuit Courl ol Dade COMO* Florida. SAM BHRMCH MURRAY OROSWIA> Sole (li r.' • OBOROE CHERTKOF Attorney for Applil ant 7/28 8/4-11-18-2.'. NOTICE Or* APPLICATION FO" TAX DEED Chapter 20722 Acta of w NOTICE raliTOSToivw'' Rae Socolof, holder "'.• su ''„ T County Tax Certificate No. 5i aued the lat day of June. A '' d hw filed name In my office, and e application for aJiajg*,. 11 • made be iemued .nil,i a. •mbracb the <••"""'"* ,JZ state propertf In the County of I>a'. of Florida, to-wit: M .. ui E. M ft. Of N TS j* "• Block 2. Para Villa Hel *.%. 8, ,„ Sub l'lat B.-k I. IW '• 5 the County -t Dad*. Mate Florida. M nroperf The aanefament of na" J r ^ |h under the sail certificate w ln name of: llena Rhett. ^ re Unloaa Maid certlflcte shall: deemed a llouae door on the flt '"„.| iiouxe rtoor on inr it ,,.. the month of Keptemlier. !>•„ IH the 4th day of BWt*n>"f" ,lDnted thi. 26th day„<>', la < E It LE^THBWdAW^ Clerk of < •n-<-ul • Clicult Cofjrt Heall 7/28 8/4-11-18 —Buy War Bonds Today



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LAV, n*tf 1944 +JewistincriJ£ar7 PAGE SEVEN l-^-SKJSKKff^r--^^ WOUNDED IN ACTION KILLED IN ACTION P£c. Eric Rich. 22, of New York City. In Italy. An infantryman, Roth was injured in the drive on Cassino. Pvt. Joseph Stain. 36, infantry, f Denver, Colo. On a Sicilian ill during a shell explosion that illed six out of 16. Pvt. Sidney Tane. 22, of New York City. In North Africa. He is survived by his mother. Mrs. Jennie Tane. At the time of his death he had been in the army five months, serving overseas as an infantryman. E Max Goldstein, formrtioncd at Homestransferred to C wh ere be awaits orders. erly been transferred to Cleveland. has WOUNDED IN ACTION BARON de HIRSCH MEYER Pvt. Irving~Se7i„g. r 27. of AWARDED T HE AIR MEDAL Miami Beach. Fla.. was wounded in Italy while in action. He was awarded the Purple Heart. crt Leonard J. Oxenberg JJhis last furlough with his Snts. who arc now in New Vnrk before going overseas. He Iwi'th the 4th Emergency Rescue Squadron, and is now someXere in th e Pacif ic. LMII* August. aa ch ^ l tn .* at Nashville, Tenn., has arrived the AAF, has been stationed in Signal Corps at Palm Beacn. is f or a brief visit with his parents, the Central Pacific with the 7th Word was received that 1st Lt. Jerome R. Gold of Pahokee was wounded in action. Sgt. Lyman W. Finkel of the TSA ferry command, stationed Captain Baron de Hirsch Meyer, former Miami Beach city councilman, has been awarded the Air Medal for meritorious service with a 7th AAF medium bombardment squadron in the Gilbert Islands. Captain Meyer, who resigned from the city council in May, 1942, to accept a commission in Sgt. Philip Feld. 22, Air Force, of Bridgeport, Conn. While on a bombing mission, when his plane encountered bad weather and was forced down on a river in China. The navigator was killed, the others in the crew wounded. Chinese rescued them an dgave them medical care. Cpl. Harry Silberbrush, 23. of the Bronx. At Cassino. He took part in the North African campaign and served later in the front lines in Italy. He worked in New York as shipping clerk before his enlistment two years ago. Pfc. Arthur Hoffe. 24, infantry, of New Haven, Conn. By shrapnel in the chest and back, somewhore in Italy. Ending a 10 day furlough with Mr and Mrs Benjamin Finkel, his mother and relatives on Mi125 East S an Marino Dr.. San ami Beach. Marino Island. u Col Elry Stone and Mrs. Stone are spending a short leave m New York City. Prt. Alfred Lev is now stationed in New Guinea. He has taken part in the two campaigns recently, Hollandia and Biak. Word has been received that Sidney Zuckerman, son of Mr. Raphael K. Yunes, former Miami Beach attorney, was promoted to lieutenant (jg) in the naval reserve; serving in the Pacific since November, 1943. Lt. Yunes' wife, the former Trudy Bandel. Miami Beach, is living with her parents at 835 Michigan Ave„ during her husband's absence. AAF since October, 1943. He now is serving as squadron interrogation officer for a Mitchell squadron. Lawyer and banker, Capt. Meyer was president of Miami Beach Federal Savings & Loan association. His mother. Mrs. John Meyer, resides at 1530 Meridian Ave. Pvt. Fred Bublits. 32, of the Bronx. In the battle of Salerno. Pfc. Phillip Rothstein. 27. of of carrying out a special military of carying out a special military mission at the front for which he had volunteered. He served in a field artillery outfit, had been in the army two and one half years. Pfc. Sam Zoslofsky, 20 USMC. of Brooklyn. On Cape GloucesWarrant Officer Irving Cohen, ter. Took part in the invasion of 25, Air Force, of Brooklyn. In a raid on Hamburg. He was wounded several times before during raids on Europe. FORMER MIAMIAN IN HFE AND DEATH SHOW Harre J Cato wit ^, so f Mver Five m i nut es after your son Ms Nathan Zuckerman. 920 Morris Katowitz, 125 S. W 27th fa ,i s injured on a foreign battle I st'h St., has been promotf> d is a recent graduate of aviaf ron t, the chances are he is herd toi major. Major Zuckerman tion storekeeper s school. JackinK given the me dical aid that fnow stat.oned in the Hawai| onviUe w th the rating of avimay save. his. life. lan Islands. S Sgt Leon Lebaw, acting first sergeant, 413 N. W. Third St, is a member of the staff of a hospital train in England, bringing wounded men back from combat areas. ation storekeeper 3/c. Charles Rubin, 5901 N. Bayshore Dr., has been assigned to the Navy's V-12 program at the University of North Carolina. Lt. Charles Schumann, 29, Signal Corps, of the Bronx. On Munda. Sgt. Lester Wolf, infantry, of Cleveland, O. On Munda. He also saw action in the Russell Islands and at New Georgia. Guadalcanal and in American assaults on Bougainville. He had two and a half years of service with the Marines. Some months before his death, Zoslofsky received a letter of commendation from his commanding officer for heroism in the Pacific war theatre. Pfc. Max Wein, 26, infantry, of Brooklyn. During the incasion of Italy. Cpl. Harold Uerball, 23. USMC, of Brooklyn. In the Marshall Islands. He has received SSgt. S. H. Berenatein, 1132 Euclid Ave., Miami Beach, a former airplane mechanic for the Embry-Riddle School of Aviation, has completed courses in England for duty in a combat zone. Benjamin B. Cassell. son of Benjamin B. Sassell, sr., Miami, was promoted to sergeant with the Fifth Army in Italy. T/Sgt. Morris Plotkin, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Plotkin, is spending his fifteen day furlough at the Astor Hotel on Miare "responsible," the guide says. Nothing has been overlooked How this vital aid, comprising trained men and thousands of dollars worth of equipment, is taken along within 200 yards of the p u rD i e Heart the front lines was demonstrated at a three-day show beginning on the grounds east of Municipal auditorium, June 8, in Texas. "Nine out of ten men who died in the last war would have been saved in this," a placard .near one of the outdoor tents says. "It's the blood plasma, sulfa drugs and the medical department on the front lines which Lieut. Nathan Ungar, 25. of New York City. Army Air Forces navigator, was stopped by flames that broke out aboard his bomber somewhere in England. He had participated in numerous missions over occupied Europe. He had been in the Air Forces more than three years. Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Spitz. 4615 Prairie Ave., have received word that their son, S/Sgt. Jack G. Spits, jr.. has been awarded the Air Medal for combat missions and two oak leaf clusters. Sgt. Spitz is a graduate of Miami Beach Senior High school. He has been overseas since January, serving first in the Italian area and at present in England. He is a radio gunner on a B-24 Liberator. ami Beach. He is stationed at the 2516th AAF Base Unit. AAF Pilot School (Adv-SE) EPAAF, Eagle Pass, Texas. Cpl. Paul A. Rosenblum, 24. of Cleveland, in service two years, lost his life in the North African area. Pfc. Harold Friedman. 27. of Brooklyn. In Italy. He had served with an anti-aircraft unit in the attempt to bring an injured man eventually home alive and all in one piece. There are plaster of paris casts for busted limbs. Hair-thin brass wires for bracing fractured jawbones together while they heal. Row after row of artificial teeth to be skillfully matched and placed in gaping holes made by shrapnel and bullets. 'It isn't enough to keep a man Name Home Addres3...__ Birth Date Serial NoStreet City State Birthplace Civilian Occupation... Date Entry in Service City Marital Status State Btanch of Service full name of nearest kinRelationship Date Discharged _Rank or Rating AddressInformation Transmitted by_ Telephone number of the coast artillery. He was a live," Capt. Benjamin Coleman, a steel worker when he enlisted D ne of the several doctors here two and a half years ago. with the exhibit says. "We try Sgt. David B. Gottlieb. 5122 N. to piece him together again so W Fifth Ave. is an assistant Lieut, (jg) Lawrence Cohen, he won't dread facing his famcrew chief of a P-51 Mustang 25. of Norfolk, Va. In the South jiy an d friends." based in England. Atlantic. C apt. Coleman is a Miamian i^TI ITST"S and practiced here prior to his Fill Out This Coupon and Mail To "WAR RECORDS, ArmyenterinK the army. Navy Committee, c/o P. O. Box 2973, Miami 18. Florida WAR RECORDS COMMITTEE NAT ROTH, Chairman FRED SHOCHET MRS. GEORGE M. COHEN MAURICE GROSSMAN JENNIE H. ROTFORT NATHAN ROTHBERO J. W. B. Director OFFICERS SAM BLANK, CHAIRMAN MONTE SELIG, Vice Chairman JOSEPH A BER MAN, Sao. Executive Committee Mra. Max Dobrln, Ben B. O* 1 ^."?;"Maunjce Groaaman. Leula M.iman, Sr Jacob H. Kaplan Mr.. Miirry Koven. Harry Markovfct*. Alexinrti-r F Miller, at Rotb. Fred snooh.r SX Slrkln, Jee.pl. Stein. Mra. H !" ^elfach. Ceri W.lnWe, Oeong. W.lpert, Harry Zukernlck. Lieut Harris A. Tucker. 19. of Memphis, Tenn. During a raid on Brunswick, Germany. He was Lt. Arthur RosenthaL 28, Air co-pilot on a B-17 during 11 misForce bombardier, of the Bronx, sions against occupied territory In a raid on Germany. Pvt. Phillip Rosenberg, 24, Medical Corps, of Cheyenne, Wyo. Aboard a torpedo boat in the Aleutians campaign. on the continent. He joined the Air Forces in August, 1942. Major John Groopman, 37, Medical Corps, of Garden City, N. Y. Somewhere in China, where he is stationed as a flight surgeon. Pvt. Samuel T. Simon. 21. USMC, of Chicago. On Cape Gloucester, New Britain, after 28 months in service. He has received the Purple Heart. He was a spot welder before he enlisted in the Marines. Cpl. Elmer Frank Greenberg. 26, infantry, of Cleveland, O. In Italy, when he was hurled out of a tank in the midst of battle. Once before he had been wounded in the leg, during the North African campaign. Cpl. Julian Kadis. 25, of Brookline, Mass., wounded in the Tunisian campaign, wears the Purple Heart. In civil life Cpl. Kadis was employed by the 20the Century Fox films. Lieut. Seymour B. Schneck. 22. of Brooklyn, a navigator. On. a bombing mission over France. He had been awarded the Air Medal in February. He joined the Air Forces two years ago, having worked before that as an accountant in New York. He was a member of the Jewish Center of Hyde Park, Brooklyn, was a Red Cross swimming instructor and, before going overseas, was assigned as special flying instructor in Florida. ^voting This Pag. to the Efforts of the Aimy-Wavy Committee. Made Possible Through the Co Operation of ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN & COWEN'S SHOE STORES US E. Flaler St — SSI Lincoln Rd. FIXZIT SYSTEM II14 K. E. feed Avenue JACK C. JAYSON PUBLIC GAS CO. 7200 N. W. 7th Avenue DONALD LAVIGNE—UNIFORMS 114 If. E. Second Avenue MIAMI RUG CO. 100 S. Miami Avenue SYBIL'S WOMEN'S APPAREL 71 S. E. let Street RESTAURANT 170 N. W. Fifth Street RICHTER'S JEWELRY CO.. INC. 160 E. Flefller Street SEA ISLE HOTEL 3001 Collins Avenue. Miami Beech RUBINSTEIN'S WOMEN'S APPAREL 1024 Lincoln B

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PAGE TWO +Jmistifk>rkJiati T OBITUARIES KLEIN David Klein. 51. of 2334 Alton Rd., Miami Beach, who came here 10 years ago from New York, died Wednesday in a hospital. Surviving are his wife. Mrs. Rose Klein; two brothers. Adolph and Ignatz. and three .sisters, Misses Fanny, Irene and Virginia Klein, all of Miami Beach. Services were held on Thursday in the Riverside chapel with burial following in Miami Jewish cemetery. BIRTHS S/Sgt and Mrs. Bernard Gross announce the birth of a son Monday at the Biltmore hospital. Mrs. Gross is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Adolf Adler of this city. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Zuckernick and son Chick, 3134 Sheridan Ave., Miami Beach, are vacationing in New York. Mr. Zuckernick is president of the Miami Beach "Y." Mr. and Mrs. Albert A. Berman announce the birth of a daughter, Rosalyn. July 10th. Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Slote are visiting at Blowing Rock. N. C. Mr. and Mrs. Morris Margulies are leaving for a two week's stay at Gatlinsburg, Tenn. Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Schindler spent a week here visiting with their in-laws, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Schindler, 1425 Meridian Aye.. Miami Beach. Irwin is a pilot with American Export Lines, Naval Transport Services, with headquarters in New York. Both families left Thursday for New York to visit the widow of their late son and brother. Roland, who was killed in the recent explosion at Port Chicago, Calif. ENGAGED s % % %  ># Stanley C. Myers will leave August 3rd for New York to join his wife and family. They will Sam Miller. 1919 S. W. 17th St. will leave Sunday to join his wife in New York. He will be gone about three weeks. Rabbi Simon April of Cong. Schaarei Zedek, is spending a CAPITAL SPOTLIGHT By MURIEL LEVIN Copyright, tan. Jewish Ti-U'Kniphii' AKfiioy, Inc. return to the city the early part month visiting in Pennsylvania of September. and New York. Mrs. Abe Mazor and family have returned to the city after Miss Mary Berstein, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jules Berstein. 1132 Euclid Ave., Miami Beach. vls iting in the North. left this week to spend some time as a guest of Mr. and Mrs. Murray Kaufman in New York. Mrs. Moses Mescheloff is leaving Monday to join Rabbi Mescheloff in New York. They will spend several weeks there. MISS RACHEL OKA Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Oka. 1562 Meridian Ave., Miami Beach, announce the engagement of their daughter. Rachel, to Pvt. Samuel Kann, U. S. A., son of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Kann of Milwaukee. With both political parties angling for their votes, Zionists lure are beginning to hope that the new Congressional action to open Palestine to Jewish immigrants will be initiated even before the elections in November. The more cautious counsel waiting until the United Nations victory is in the bag. But Israel Goldstein, president of the Zionist Organization of America, has said that as .soon as the military tide were changed, the Zionists would again press for action. They do not want to let another March 31 pass without wiping out the MacDonald White Paper of 1939. Proponents in Congress say they would be willing to start the fight again in the fall—if the military situation continues to look good. If Turkey should commit herself to the Allies as is hoped in diplomatic quarters, it is thought there would be little in the Middle Eastern set-up to disturb the war department. When Prince Emir Feisal. seeBoth are students of the Univer1 nd son of King Ibn-Saud. and sity of Wisconsin. I foreign minister of Saudi-Arai bia. swept into Washington last Dave Bear, son of Mr. and Mrs. Morris Bear, is a patient at Jackson Memorial hospital. Mr. and Mrs. D. Rosner and family are spending some time in Atlantic City at the Ostend Mrs. Lillian Fisher and daughter, of Monticello, New York, are the guests of her brother-in-law and sister. Mr. and Mrs. Pete Silver. Mrs. Fisher is the daughter of H. M. Drewich. Mr left northern Charlotte, who is at present at camp in Pennsylvania, will join them prior to their returning for the Holidays. Miss Bernyce Badanes has returned to the city after a month's j i Tr T,. Hotel as thp guests of Rahhi and i turnea to tne city alter a montn s and Mrs. Nat Blumberg M !" l V?_.ATr£ !" • H K vaaclion in Philadelphia. New Tuesday for an extended ^-. J n f n reen ,\ vald / Mr Ro f York and New Jersey, lern trip. Their daughter. er ; hotclman, will return short, xorK ana cw *""** ly to Miami Beach where he will M „ ..„ „ .-, ., make plans for the opening f ,,R Wftii ^ Goldmann. the Victor Hotel, which he will .5 5.' 2 „! th J Cr u ha V u aS t! ? eir Benjamin Fmkel is in Miami Beach for a short stay from his northern 'home, to visit with his son. who is spending a furlough here. Lifelong Treasures! 6-Piece Sterling PLACE SETTINGS In 1810 Pattern By International! $ 17 82< Treasured possession for a lifetime. You'll adore the masterly design and mellow finish of International Sterling! Set includes one each: knife, fork, teaspoon, cream soup, salad fork, and butter spreader. •Plus Tax MIAMI STORE. SILVERWARE FIFTH FLOOR operate this season. Mr. and Mrs. Henry Mills, of Lyons, Ga., are spending two weeks at the Milburn Hotel. Miami Beach. While here they are being entertained by their cousins, Mr. and Mrs. Leon Kaplan. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Berman. and daughter Carol, are leaving August 3rd for a month's stay in the North. Mr. and Mrs. Sol Goldstrom o£ Miami Beach have as their guests from San Francisco, their daughter. Mrs. Bert Walter, and grandchild. Flora Rose. Dr. and Mrs. Max Dobrin. Miami Beach, left for New York to visit their daughter, Celia. Mr. and Mrs. R. JacobsUm left this week to visit in Louisville and Hendersonville. Miss Evelyn Rifas. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Max Rifas. has returned to Miami, on June 17th. from Puerto Rico, where she has been in government service for over a year. Miss Rifas will be leaving Miami on July 31st for Chicago, where she will visit her sister, Mrs. Atz. Leon Lieberman is spending a vacation in New Jersey and will return to the city next week. Sherwin Drewich, of Waynesville, Mo., is visiting with Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Drewich. TUomi for REST CONVALESCENCl •J CHRONIC CASES f Sun-RayPark Health Resort Mount Sinai Memorial Park "Owned and Operated by Greater Miami Jewish Cemetery An'n A COMMUNITY CEMETERY Affiliated Congregations: Beth David, Beth Jacob. Miami Jewish Orthodox, Schaarei Zedek and Sisterhood Chesed Shel Ernes October, Zionists feared that their aspirations in Palestine would be submerged in oil. But just a few months later, the Compton-Wright and Wagner-Taft resolutions to open Palestine to Jewish immigration and to ultimately establish a Jewish Commonwealth were introduced in the House and the Senate. The majority and minority leaders announced their support. Hearings before the House Foreign Affairs Committee were immediately scheduled. In addition to the expected opposition from Arabs here and abroad, protests from Jewish groups were entered. Lessing J. Rosenwald of the American Council for Judaism led those who denounced attempts to "go back to a theocratic state." Then the War and State Departments turned thumbs down. The military situation was too uncertain; the merits of the case were not under consideration. The resolutions were shelved With the approach of the fateful March 31. 1944 promised in the MacDonald White Paper Dr. Abba Hillel Silver and Dr Stephen Wise of the American Zionist Emergency Council approached President Roosevelt. In somewhat ambiguous terms, he The bar mitzvah of Morton, expressed his support for the son of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Golden~ lon lst cause. Finally, the Presblank, will take place at ser-1 nt was asked Just what the vices at Beth David a week from f.„_" up _, w ? s e said he saw no Saturday. August 5th. house guests her brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Kaufman, former Miami residents who now live at Starke. Mr. Goldmann returned this week from New York where he was joined by his daughter, WAVE Petty Officer 2/c Gladys Goldmann, stationed in Washington. Miss Florella Sternbcrg. 147 N. E. Third St., returned home Friday from Chicago where she has been visiting relatives and friends for the past seven weeks. Miss Renee Greenfield. 1354 S. W. 12th St., is spending a two weeks' vacation at Hendersonville. N. C. BAR MITZVAH international parlevTT* 55 follow the war y that will Dissension among th* i groups on the issue of ui. JeWlsh establishing a Jewish & ately wea th, however. prc Sen c mmon or less formidable & m or Zionists to surmount T for hungry Congress mav v teantagonizing any section \ risk Jewish ballot casters f "* ON U.S. PARTY ?SrS Cairo (JTA)—Thp p government intends to JSS? lan Pro-Z.onist Palestine ft thc both the Democratic and S* S i n bean platforms, it J£? RcDub here. The Arab press has IW voiced its objections and'S week, a well-known pjLffi nationalist sent a letter to no Minister Pinckney Tuck H nouncing the DemocraUc D l a n k as an injustice to the Arabs. BRITAIN WILL~NOT~ACT ON PALESTINE FOR THE HUHR London (JTA)—Britain will not adopt a clear-cut final S icy in regard to Palestine until the Indian question is so i v J Emanuel Shinwell. Labor Part, leader in Commons, said this hrtLS an A in,e rvicw spearing in the London Jewish Chronicle I'J?A *!?? mean J ir ne." Shinwell stated. I strongly urge Zionists to concentrate on economic and purely materialistic Jewish developments in Palestine. That is the thing that counts with the British government and people The more valuable they make themselves economically and materialistically, the more consideration and respect they will receive from Britain which has absolutely no interest in Jews as Jews or in the future of Jewry." Buy U. S. Stamps and Bonds. BRIS The brism of the sons of Mr. and Mrs. Irving Cohen, Wellington Hotel, Miami Beach, and Mr and Mrs. Nathan Dubler. 92 N. E. 56th St., took place this week with Rabbi S. M. Machtei officiating. RIVERSIDE MEMORIAL CHAPEL FUNERAL DIRECTORS 1256 Washington .vi, Miami Scach In Mew York 76th St l Amsterdam Avt 5-7777 RIVERSIDE HI AMBULANCE SERVICE A 1944 CAiilLUC AMBULANCE 1944 OXYGEN EQUIPMENT contradiction between the inactivity required by military demands and termed the claims of the Jews in Palestine a civil problem. The issue of Palestine was closed for the moment. Now that the Allied armies appear to be surrounding the Aryans from all sides. Zionists think that military objections to our taking a stand will soon be t 'j 1 In na 4 ted Tr ey want the Unitid States on record before the Your Complete Department Store With Quality Merchandise Washington AT*, at 13th St. Miami Beach And for your convenience Morris Brother's New Apparel and Accessory Store 70 E. Flagler St.. Miami LINCOLN *g" M Lincoln Rd., Miami Btach M l | U I Open Daily I n m I 11:15 AM Downtown Miami CAPITOL 5ft? Downtown. N. Miami at 3rd NOW SHOWING Thru Monday, July 31 From Somerset Maugham's Sensational Novel! DEANNA DURBIN As Abigail who became "Jackie" — Because she couldn't stop loving! GENE KELLY As Robert who enslaved her heart! "CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY" WITH Gale Sondergaard Richard Whorf SID PALMER'S FUNERAL HOME SERVING PHONE 9-2664 TH E J E W I S H COMMUNITY" i FRIEND IN NEED20ft W FLAGLER MOUNT NEBO THE CEMETERY OF DISTINCTION FOR DISCRIMINATING FAMILIES Rabbi S. M. Machtei, Director Olympic Building Phone 3-3720 OLD SARATOGA INN Biacayne Boulevard at 77th Street Phone 7-7725 Week Day Dinners 5 to 10 P. M S undays From Noon Cocktail Lounge F ine Liquors and Wines WE ARE CLOSED ON WEDNESDAYS TAKE BUS 11 FROM DOWNTOWN MIAML OH BUS M 71 PROM MIAMI BEACH