The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00767

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
i*Jewish FllaridlHa in
Cowa/^/v n
rOLUME 16No. 44
MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1943
PRICE 10 CENTS
BEACH Y IS
II ACTIVE SEASON
The YM&WHA of Miami
beach is setting the machinery
in motion for a concerted and
[vigorous campaign to obtain a
full complement of members to
[support and carry out the com-
Iprehensive facilities scheduled
for the coming season, in addition
Ro the facilities afforded at its
building, 1 Lincoln Road, at Col-
Dins Avenue and the Beach. Mi-
lami Beach.
The first step in this campaign
is the enlistment of volunteer
linen and women who will devote
a Sunday to procure members as
[a task force, whose objective will
[be attained by a combined con-
centrated effort on "Y" day.
[Present members are solicited to
rvolunteer for this service.
The projected membership
[campaign is the first major effort
undertaken by the Beach "Y."
Up to this point, men and women
have joined to create the Beach
"Y" because of the need and
benefits of the entire community.
Many other civic minded men
and women have recognized the
opportunity of serving the Jew-
ish Community, Youth Organiza-
Jons, Servicemen, the City of
iiami Beach and the Greater
Hami Community, and joined
TlADflSSlTOTES
ZIONISTS IN AMERICA
HAVE "BALFOUR WEEK"
Washington (WNS)A procla-
mation issued here this week by
Dr. Israel Goldstein, president
of the Zionist Organization of
America, designated Oct. 31 to
I Nov. 6 Balfour Week in observ-
ance of the twenty-sixth anni-
versary of the issuance of the
Balfour Declaration by which
Great Britain pledged to "facili-
tate the establishment of a Jew-
ish national homeland in Pales-
tine."
The observances will be com-
bined with nation-wide protest
rallies by American Jews against
the policy of the Chamberlain
White Paper of 1939, which would
stop Jewish immigration into
Palestine on April 1, 1944.
CONFERENCE ASKS
FOR
L
London (JTA)An indispen-
sable condition to the future
peace and security of the Jewish
people is legal recognition of its
unrestricted access to settlement
in Palestine, it was asserted this
week in a resolution adopted by
the national conference of the
British section of the World Jew-
ish Congress. At the same time,
the conference went on record
supporting the Jewish Agency's
demand for the establishment of
[a Jewish Commonwealth in Pal-
estine and endorsed a policy of
(friendship and cooperation with
the Arabs "to foster peace and
| prosperity in Palestine and the
j Middle East."
A resolution was adopted de-
manding sanctuaries for refugees
in allied and neutral nations and
the lowering of immigration laws
in the American republics and ad-
mission of refugees to the British
Commonwealth.
F
POET TRANSLATOR
DIES IN PALESTINE
Tel Aviv (WNS).Dr. Saul
Tchernichovsky, famous Hebrew
poet who translated Shake-
speare's Macbeth and Homer's
Odyssey into Hebrew, died on
Oct. 14 of a heart attack while
spending the Succoth holidays at
Katamon, a suburb of Jerusalem.
He was 68 years old.
The funeral took place on Oct.
15 at Tel Aviv where, in accord-
ance with his last will, he was
buried on the "Old Cemetery"
alongside the late Hebrew poet
Chaim Nachman Bialik. The
funeral, arranged by the Jewish
National Council of Palestine,
was attended by thousands of
people, including all the out-
standing leaders of Palestine
Jewry. The body was escorted
to Tel Aviv by delegations rep-
resenting all the national Jewish
organizations in Palestine.
NAMES OF JEWS WHO FLED
TO SWITZERLAND RELEASED
FROMTHEA.J.C.
New York (WNS)The first
official act of the twenty-ninth
annual Hadassah convention,
which opened here at the Henry
Hudson Hotel Monday evening,
October 25. was the unanimous
adoption of a resolution with-
drawing from membership in the
American Jewish Committee
with which the Women's Zion-
ist Organization of America had
been affiliated for ten years.
The action was the result of a
decision made on October 24 by
the executive committee of the from the American Jewish t_.on-
American Jewish Committee to ference. The meeting, which was
The Joint Distribution Com-
mittee today made public the
names of more than 100 Aus-
trian Jews who have escaped
into Switzerland from France.
Holland, Belgium and other
countries. The list was com-
piled by the Association of
Austrian Immigrants in Pales-
tine and forwarded from Jeru-
salem to J. D. C.'s New York
headquarters. Jewish refugees
reaching Switzerland, the J. D.
C. pointed out, are provided
with food, housing, clothing
and other necessities by local
welfare organizations through
substantial funds allocated by
the J. D. C.
This list is available for pe-
rusal at the Jewish Floridian,
21 S. W. Second Ave.
NAZIS KILL ALL JEWS
IN RUSSIAN RETREAT
Moscow (WNS)All Jews in
Poltova and Zaporozhye were
killed by the Nazis before they
abandoned those cities to the
Russians, it is revealed here.
The correspondents disclosed
that they had discovered in the
midst of the debris and ruins of
the cities hundreds of mutilated
bodies of Jewish men, women
and children shot at close range.
They quoted a Jewish Red Army
officer, Sterlin, as having stated
that when he entered Zaporozhye
he stopped Russian peasants and
women to inquire after relatives
and friends who had been living
there and that he had been told
that the retreating Germans had
shot every Jewish resident.
RUMANIAN JEWS
FORCED TO BUIED
FORTIFICATIONS
Stockholm (JTA)The Swed-
ish press reports that thousands
of Rumanian Jews have been
sent to Bessarabia to build forti-
fications on the banks of the
Dniester and Prut rivers in pre-
paration for a possible Russian
offensive if the Rumanian forces
are compelled to retreat from
Odessa, which is now under Ru-
manian administration.
MEET IN CHICAGO
Mrs. Monte Selig, president of
the Miami Section of the National
Council of Jewish Women, has
been elected delegate from Miami
to attend the 17th triennial con-
vention of the National Council
of Jewish Women, to be held at
the Drake Hotel in Chicago from
Nov. 7 to 12.
Other delegates are Mrs. Her-
man Wepman, 1833 S. W. 21st
Terrace, and Mrs. David Phillips,
5748 Pine Tree Drive. Alternates
are Mrs. Nat L. Williams, 325
N. E. 93rd Street, and Mrs. Benja-
imin Bronston. 3301 Flamingo
Drive. Miami Beach.
This convention has been called
by Mrs. Maurice L. Goldman of
San Francisco, national president
of the council, and is primarily a
business meeting to formulate the
national program of the organi-
zation for the next three years?
Special emphasis will be placed
on war activities and post-war
planning. Mrs. J. J. Jacobs, pres-
ident of the Canadian division of
the National Council of Jewish
Women, will attend, and the ros-
ter of speakers includes distin-
guished national figures who will
discuss the current problems be-
ing considered by members of'
the council in planning their
three-year program.
in thP Rnltir rmintries caused bv IlnR wltn tne Natlonal Council of
\u r,A,,r.r!,l fT R^fipn trmv Jewish Juniors who, for the first
LhaeniaGeh?ven fiSSST. "vkfi | L'SK^S'Bfc t2
cai press arouna int cuiik<"""i ; Thic rnn,.0an maT\,e the snth
that Jews are taking revenge on
This convention marks the 50th
the" local" population as soon as I anniversary of ttie National
'^."^ K ,.o^ni.H hv ihn ; Council ot Jewish Women, which
American Jewish Committe Votes 25-13
To Leave American Jewish Conference
New York (WNS).The execu-
tive board of the American Jew-
ish Committee decided, by a vote
of 52 to 13, at an all-day session
held here on Oct. 25 to withdraw
withdraw from the American
Jewish Conference.
The resolution, which had been
adopted earlier by the full na-
tional board of the Hadassah.
charged that the American Jew-
ish Committee had broken the
unity of the American Jews at a
time when it was most vital and
declared that the committee, de-
spite ideological differences,
could have remained in the con-
ference by continuing its suport
of those views of the conference
with which it was in full accord.
MANN WILL ADDRESS
N. C. J. W. AT CHICAGO
New York (JTA)Mrs. Mau-
-jce L. Goldman, president of thi
National Council of Jewish Wo
held behind closed doors, was at-
tended by 75 representatives of
Jewish communities throughout
the United States.
The committee's action was
predicated upon the contention
that the American Jewish Con-
ference's demand for the eventual
establishment of a Jewish Com-
monwealth in Palestine and its
subordination of other Jewish is-
sues to "the problem of the po-
litical structure of Palestine'
were wholly in disagreement
with the fundamental views on
Jewish life and problems held
by the American Jewish Com-
mittee. The committee declared,
however, that it was ready and
willing to "cooperate with the
ments in this countryreligious,
cultural and philanthropic
which help to nourish and en-
rich Jewish life in America."
The resolution to withdraw
men, this week announced the
program for their Seventeenth
Triennial Convention at the
Drake Hotel, Chicago, Novem-
ber 7-11. Among the highlights
of the program will be Dr. Thom-
as Mann's address to the opening
meeting, Sunday night, on The
Order of the Day." After a dis-
cussion of Canadian relations and
affairs Monday afternoon. Dr.
Caroline F. Ware, chairman of
Social Studies committee, A. A.
U. W.. will present "The Place of
the Volunteer Organization in So-
cial Welfare and Rehabilitation.
from further participation in the
American Jewish Conference was
drafted by a special committee
consisting of Chief Judge Irving
Lehman of the Court of Appeals
of the State of New York, Horace
Stone, justice of the Pennsylvania
Supreme Court; Alan M. Stroock,
prominent New York attorney
and chairman of the administra-
tive committee of the American
Jewish Committee; Fred Lazarus
Jr. of Ohio, and Jesse Steinhart
of San Francisco.
Immediately after the adoption
of the resolution the executive
committee issued a press release
to the effect that the American
Jewish Committee would "apply
its most diligent efforts to bring
about the abrogation of the White
Paper which closes the doors of
Palestine to further Jewish im-
migration and restricts Jewish
land purchase" and that it would
continue to demand free immi-
gration into Palestine and res-
toration of equal rights every-
where. The press release stated
further that the committee was
firmly convinced that the world
problems of Jews "cannot be
solved by a single political pana-
cea and that the salvation and
rehabilitation of the stricken
Jews of Europe cannot be
achieved through Palestine alone
and certainly not through over-
emphasis on the political consti-
tution of Palestine." That the
solution of the Jewish problem
can be achieved "only by con-
sidering Palestine a part of the
larger program which looks to
the rehabilitation and resettle-
ment of Jews throughout the
world and the restoration of their
equal rights" and that "the ma-
jority of the delegates" at the
five-day session of the American
Jewish Conference which was
held in New York "took such a
stand that there was no room
left for adequate presentation of
the views of the American Jew-
ish Committee and considerable
din hrnHmc the Jowl "Italv*s I Greenebaum Solomon, one of the
WSBtoS urging! organizers of the World's Parlia-
has pioneered in educational, leg-
; islative and social service work,
jand today numbers 65,000 mem-
|bers in 215 sections throughout
I the United States and Canada,
I with corresponding councils in
Australia and South Africa. Its
five-point program comprises
service to the foreign-born, social
segments of the Jewish commu-
nity of America."
Outlining the American Jew- welfare and war activities, social
ish Committee's position toward legislation, international relations
the major Jewish problems of the and peace., and contemporary
day. the statement said: "Con- Jewish affairs,
cerning Palestine, it approves for
the present an inter-national
trusteeship responsible to the
de Kauffmann said that-
Denmark, with a population of
6.000 Jews, had taken in an ad-
ditional 2,000 Jewish refugees
DANISH MINISTER SAYS
Un"teTNat,ons.-for the following 5.000 JEWISHESCAPEES
purposes: To safeguard the few-, Ncw YorR (JTA)_Henrik w
ish settlement in, and >mnl|ra- d Kauffmann. Danish minister
tion into. Palestine and to guar thc Unjted g to,d a con_.
antee adequate scope for future, ference of the Jewish National i
growth and development to the Workors Ailiance in the Hotel
full extent of the econom c: ab-, Penn lvania this week that 5,000
sorptive capacity of the country i Jews havp es ^ from Dcn.
to safeguard and protect the ,mark jn the lhree wecRs sincp
fundamental rights of all inhabi- th Nazi therc decreed dcporta-
tants and to prepare the coun-1 tion
try to become, within a reason- j Mr
able peiiod of years, a self-gov-
erning commonwealth.
"Much more than Palestine
must occupy the attention of any
responsible body which is vitally
concerned with the total welfare
of Jewry. Through the marshal-
ing of public opinion, through
representations to our govern-
ment and through proper diplo-
matic channels, we shall continue
to seek to achieve the quickest
possible rescue of the Jews per-
secuted in Europe today and to
attain for the millions who will
be there tomorrow a normal life
on a basis of equality with their
fellow citizens. We reject any
thesis which surrenders the right
of Jews to live as equal citizens
in Europe or anywhere.
"The combating of anti-Semit-
(CONTINUKO ON PAGE 7)
DECREE RESTORATION
PRAISED BY DEPUTIES
London (JTA)The board of
deputies of British Jews this
week cabled to the French Com-
mittee of National Liberation at
Algiers expressing the thanks of
British Jewry for the commit-
tee's restoration of the Cremieux
Decree. "Not only British Jews
but Jews the world over will hail
this action as a decisive step in
the restoration of the principles
of liberty, equality and frater-
nity for which the gallant soldiers
of the Fighting French are batt-
ling in the ranks of the United
Nations," the cable stated.


I 1 i i IIII
1 nil 11*1

: i

PAGE TWO
fJtnist: tkrkHan
" .


'^WWWW*^WW^^WWWW^IWW>W>
SOCIAL ITEMS AND
PERSONALS

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Cromer,
432 N. E. 26th Terrace, have re-
turned after spending two months
in Hendersonvilie, N. C., and two
weeks at the Battery Park Hotel
in Asheville. Their daughter.
Miss Florence Cromer, attended
summer classes at Chapel Hill,
N. C. and will enter her sopho-
more year at the University of
Miami in November. At the con-
clusion of her summer course at
Chapel Hill, she traveled to New
York, Canada and Montreal, then
visited her sister and brother-in-
law. Lieut, (j. g.) and Mrs. E.
Albert Pallot in Gulfport, Miss.
Mrs. Pallot and her daughter.
Roxane, accompanied Miss Cro-
mer home. Mrs. Pallot has re-
turned to Gulfport.
rabbi, 711 Lenox Avenue, Miami
Beach.
BIRTHS
A daughter. Judith Lvnnc. was
born to Mr. and Mrs. Melvin L.
Gipson, 2396 S. W. 20th Street,
on Sunday. Oct. 17, at Victoria
Hospital. Mrs. Gipson is the for-
mer Fay Engel.
BRITH
""PAY. QCTOr^ j
Prof. OTtmtei^JVRS Board (Itir^
Is Honored ffir'50tear? PobbVSerJiee
WEDDINGS
Mrs. Edward Oxenberg is leav-
ing Thursday. Nov. 4, for St.
Louis, Mo., for a visit with her
ion. Pvt. 1/c Leonard Oxenberg,
who is a member of the Medical
Detachment at Jefferson Bar-
racks. Mrs. Oxenberg will be
away for about 10 days.
Elected to Duke Chapter. Phi
Beta Kappa, national honorary
scholarship fraiernity. Miss Shir-
ley Bloom, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. J. C. Bloom. Miami Beach,
is one of 18 Duke University
undergraduates to achieve this
honor this fall.
The wedding of Miss Mollie
Weinstein and Felix Shevinsky,
Birmingham merchant, took place
last week in the home of the
bride. 2425 N. Meridian Avenue.
Miami Beach. Miss Weinstein,
who has lived here for several
years, is a daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Jacob Weinstein. Birming-
ham.
After Nov. 10 the couple will
live at the Bankhead Hotel. Bir-
mingham.
Mrs. Muriel Hirsch. 3470 Me-
ridian Avenue. Miami Beach, who
has been on an extended trip to
New York and Washington for
several months, during which she
spent considerable time with
Mme. Maxim Litvinoff. wife of
the former ambassador from
Russia, has returned home.
Mr. and Mrs. Michael August,
447 S. W. 28th Rd Miami, an-
nounce the marriage of their
daughter, Jessica, to Cpl. Harry
Kelman, U.S.A. Air Corps, on
October 12, in New York City.
The bride attended Burdett Col-
lege. Boston, and the University
of Miami. Cpl. Kelman. son of
David Kelman. New York City
and the late Mrs. Kelman. at-
tended New York University.
The couple have left for Ephrata.
Washington, where Cpl. Kelman
is stationed.
The Bris of the son of Pvt. and
Mrs. Jack Zwitt. 1330 Pennsyl-
vania Avenue, took place Tues-
day at St. Francis Hospital with
Rabbi S. M. Machtei officiating.
SEWING AND KNITTING
GROUP TO HOLD PARTY
An exhibition of clothing gar-
ments for world wide distribu-
tion among needy men. women
and children, and knitted gar-
ments for the Army. Navy, Coast
Guard and Marines, all made by
volunteer workers, will take
place Wednesday afternoon. Nov.
3. at 2 p. m., at the Trail Ameri-
can Red Cross Sewing and Knit-
ting Center, 1890 S. W. Eighth
Street. Card games and mah
jongg will follow, with Mrs.
Louis Kotkin as chairman. Re-
freshments will be served.
OBITUARIES
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Man-
heimer, 16 Phoenetia Avenue,
Coral Gables, returned from a
four-month stay in Chicago with
their son. Dr. Stephen Manhei-
mer. director of Mt. Sinai Hos-
pital.
Mr. George Cohen, 4701 Pine
Tree Drive, is recovering at the
Jackson Memorial Hospital from
an attack of penumonia.
Mrs. Abraham Zinnamon. 4326
Sheridan Avenue, is recuperating
from a severe case of bronchitis.
Mr. and Mrs. Leon Elkin. of
1519 Drexel Avenue, Miami
Beach, announce the marriage of
their daughter, Shirley, to Sgt.
Harry Freeman. The ceremony
took place Oct. 4 in New Haven,
Conn. Mrs. Freeman is a gradu-
ate of Miami Senior High and
for years served as office secre-
tary of the Jewish Welfare Bu-
reau. Sgt. Freeman is the son
of Mr. and Mrs. Isidor Freeman
of New Haven, and is now with
the 418th Army Air Force. The
couple are residing at 65 Clark
Street, New Haven.
Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Mesche-
loff of Brooklyn, N. Y.. parents
of Rabbi Moses Mescheloff. ar-
rived for a visit Wednesday. They
are residing at the home of the
TOWER THEME
S.W. 8th St at 15th At*.
OPEN AT 1:45 P. M.
Friday and Matinee Only
Saturday, Oct. 29-30
"FUN WITH HILARIOUS
BUMSTEADS"
"FOOTLIGHT
GLAMOUR"
WITH
BLONDE and DAGWOOD
ARTHUR LAKE
PENNY SINGLETON

Starts Sat. at 4:30 P. M. and
Sun. Thru Wed., Oct.
30-Nov. 1
"MY
KINGDOM
FOR
A COOK"
WITH
CHARLES COBURN
(Funnier Than in "The More
the Merrier")
MARG. CHAPMAN
EDWARD GARGAN
BILL CARTER
ANNOUNCE FRIDAY
T
SERVICES LOCALLY
Services for Friday night and
Saturday at Greater Miami syna-
gogues are announced as follows:
Beth DavidFriday evening
services at 6:30. Saturday morn-
ing at 8:30 the Bar Mitzvah of
David Perle. Junior services at
10 30. Rabbi Max Shapiro and
Cantor Louis Hayman will of-
ficiate. First series of late Friday
evening services will begin Nov
5 at 8:15.
Beth Jacob Friday evening
services at 6:30. Services chanted
chanted by Cantor Maurice Mam-
ches with Rabbi Moses Mesche-
loff preaching. Saturday at 6:30
p. m.. "Sholosh Seudis" services
Rabbi Moses Mescheloff, speaker
Beth SholemFriday evening
services at 6:30. Saturday morn-
ing at 9:30. sermon by Rabbi
Samuel M. Machtei; subject
"Misunderstanding!" Cantor Ab-
raham Friedman, officiating.
Mincha services at 6:30.
Miami Beach Jewish Center-
Friday evening services at 6:30
Saturday morning at 9 o'clock
sermon by Rabbi Irving Lehr-
man; subject. "Educational Sur-
veyOur Reaction!" Junior
services at 10:30 a. m. under the
direction of David Freedman;
d ur,ahm D- Wolf win officiate.
Bible Class Saturday at 5:30. con-
ducted by Mr. Gershon. Mincha
services at 6:30.
Shaarei ZedekFriday evening
services at 8:30; sermon by Rabbi
Simon April; subject. "Destruc-
tion of Our Present World!" Sat-
urday morning at 9 o'clock Rabbi
April will read Portion of Week
Talmud Torah children assisting
with services. Bible class at
5:30 p. m.
Temple IsraelRegular Friday
evening services at 8:15. Dr Ja-
cob H. Kaplan officiating.
Miami Jewish Orthodox Con-
gregationFriday evening serv-
lc.esn at- ?:3- Saturday morning
at 9 o clock with Rabbi Joseph
"ackovsky addressing the wor-
shipers.
NATHAN MORRIS
Nathan Morris. 43. former res-
taurant operator, died last week
in his home, 101 Ocean Drive.
Miami Beach.
A World War veteran, he came
to Miami Beach eight years ago
from Savannah, Ga.
He is survived by his mother,
Mrs. Dina Morris; a brother. Dr.
M. R. Morris, and a sister. Mrs.
Ida Peters, all Miami Beach, and
another sister. Mrs. S. Blair. Sa-
vannah.
The body was sent to Savan-
nah by the Riverside Memorial
Chapel.
Buy Wax Bonds and Stamps to
help preserve Democracy.
Professor Joseph P. Chamberlain of Columbia UBivenilv, ( h.irnua of
ihe Board of Director* of tbe National Refugee Service, accept* frsa
William Ko.cnw.ld. President of the organisation, a testimonial tml
honoring him for half a century of public service to "hit dtr, h
country, and mankind,** particularly to refugee* from political tai
religious persecution who have found haven in America. The scroll *j
, presented to Professor Chamberlain on behalf of officer*, director)
and members of the Executive Committee of the NRS during tbt
bration of his 70th birthday at the Harmonic Club ia Mew York Ckj!
A good buy is a War Bond. Buy
nsSnnn y0U wU* *** Paid later
4.06 for every $3.00.
INSURE
IN SURE
ASSURANCE
THE SENSIBLE FARSIGHTED INDIVIDUAL provides
today the assurance for tomorrow and the years
ahead. *
ASSURANCE IS INVESTING WISELY and soundly to
"Smn^L^ ?? needa of the ?** ahead. .
NEEDS that include Home Education Com-
munal Endeavor Emergencies Illness
Ketirement, and the InevitableDeath.
B# PrSr^sthwithVhdee?aS!e.h^e comes.you "* not bothered in your
o^lyTglre wa to k JJVh^*?' thf tn.gedy ". the
havingKSLJ^Pu*1.* en,Ure P**! together forever, is by
Mount nTnrf. ? P"vat* family plot. And having your plot in
^s^srssus 2protection s sur-
NW Bef^^d^Thu'lf/tT^ plot !" Mount Nebo Cemetery-
to tho^Sth. Jewis^failh11 CCmetery B dedicated -SK5
For further information with no obligation, phone
3-5132
Florida's Most Beautiful Burial Estates
MOUNT NEBO
ONLY TEN MINUTES FROM THE HEART OF MIAMI
West Flagler Street at 54th Avenue
BUSINESS OFFICE 1014 OLYMPIA BUILDING
* VISIT WILL CONVINCE YOU


)AY, OCTOBER 29. 1943
*Jf/nist) ncrkiian
PAGE THREE
ORGANIZATION
ACTIVITIES
^MAAMMMAAAAAAAAAAA ARBEITER RING
I Sunday, Oct. 17, the report of
the Southeastern Conference,
which was held in Atlanta during
the week of Labor Day, was
j given the members of the Ar-
beiter Ring. The delegates, Harry
Rose, Ben Silver and Felix Ro-
senthal, delivered the report and
reported the activities of the dis-
trict for the past year and out-
lined future plans. They an-
nounced that the Southeastern
District bought over $200,000 in
War Bonds and that thousands of
pieces of clothing were collected
and sent to the Jewish refugees
in Russia. A detailed account on
the Arbeiter Ring Shulen
throughout the district was given
and the Miami branch is looking
forward to the opening of a Shule
here in the near future.
A chicken supper was served.
The committee in charge were
Mrs. J. H. Siegal, Mrs. Mendel
Levin and Mrs. Morris Jacobs.
November 1 the local drive for
I clothes to be sent overseas to
Jewish refugees in Russia starts.
The clothing collected will be
shipped and distributed through
the Jewish Labor Committee.
The drive will last 60 days and
will be headed by committees,
and their respective telephones
are listed in order to facilitate
calling them for collecting any
clothes you may wish to give. On
Miami Beach, Mrs. H. Leibson,
5-7696; B. Chertkoff, 5-5919. In
Miami, B. Rifkind, 2-3676; S.
Kahn, 3-8924, and Morris Jacobs.
2-8336. Clothing will be called
for.
The library at Lyceum Hall. 25
Washington Avenue, will be open
every Monday, Wednesday, Fri-
day and Sunday from 8:30 p. m.
tot 10 p. m. The public is invited
.to visit and register to take home
fcewish and English books.
J. W. V. AUXILIARY
The Jewish War Veterans'
^Auxiliary of the Freda Marko-
witz Post held its regular meet-
' ing Monday evening at the Beth
David Synagogue, with Minnie
Kline presiding.
In line with their hospitaliza-
tion program, it was decided to
undertake the project of supply-
ing gifts to the veterans of the
Bay Pines Hospital, from which
they can personally select holi-
day gifts for members of their
family. Mollie Cooper was ap-
pointed chairman with Ann
Brooks as assistant.
Another activity is a Rummage
Sale, the proceeds of which will
go into a holiday fund for con-
valescent servicemen. Mrs. Rose
Zalis is chairman with Mrs. S. R.
Patterson assisting. Some have
already contributed "merchan-
dise," and others who have old
XXMWWWWXIi>^
clothing, shoes, or glass jars,
please contact Betty Alpert,
2-6804, or Minnie Kline, 2-1025,
and the articles will be called for.
The Auxiliary is now launching
a membership drive. Mothers,
sisters, wives, daughters, grand-
daughters, or daughters-in-law
of a member of the armed forces
are eligible to join immediately
upon the serviceman's induction
and doTiot have to wait until he
is discharged, as after World
War I. Any one interested in af-
filiating with the organization
may contact Mrs. Isidor Cohen,
chairman of membership, 2-2193,
or Mrs. Sarah Augustine, co-
chairman, 9-2068.
BEACH ZIONIST
Thursday evening saw the elec-
tion of new officers for the Mi-
ami Beach Zionist District. Shep-
ard Broad was re-elected presi-
dent.
Report of Jewish National
Fund achievements and the pro-
gram activities were heard. A
membership goal of 500 was set
and accepted with total enroll-
ment to date in excess of 375
members.
Golden Book certificates were
presented to Leo Robinson and
Shepard Broad for outstanding
services to the district.
The Cultural Forum will hold
its regular weekly meeting this
Sunday afternoon at 3:30 at the
Beach "Y," 1 Lincoln Road. The
topic for discussion is "The War
Contribution of Palestine to the
United Nations" to which all in-
terested are invited. The usual
question and answer period will
follow.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
SERVICE LEAGUE
The United States Govern-
ment Having Taken Over His
Present Offices
DR. JOSEPH B. MARGOLIS
announces the
REMOVAL OF HIS OFFICE
to
311 Lincoln Road
Albion Bldg.. Suit* 301
MIAMI BEACH
For the Practice of
General Dentistry
The Miami Service League of
the YMHA is planning a gala
Hallowe'en dance to be held on
Saturday evening. Oct. 30, at the
YMHA. Mrs. Harry Rabin, chair-
main, called a meeting Wednes-
day evening at her home. 2018
S. W. 14th Terrace, at which time
plans were completed. Members
who will act as senior hostesses
include: Mesdames Herman
Bloom, Sam Sidele, Henry SMer,
Maurice Sager, Leo Hohauser, Al
Weiss and Max Shapiro; victory
belle committee: Mrs. Ann Pas-
troff and Mrs. Henry Kauffrhan;
refreshment committee: Mrs. Jen-
nie D. Levinsohn and Mrs. Lil
Friedman, and promise an eve-
ning of dancing, games, contests
and refreshments. Service men
are invited to participate in the
fun.
ORTHODOX CONG.
The Miami Jewish Orthodox
Congregation at a meeting last
Tuesday elected officers for the
ensuing year. Chosen were Leon
Kaplan, president; D. Simon, 1st
vice president; D. Singer, 2nd
vice president; Samuel Raskin,
3rd vice president; David Bear,
treasurer; Sid H. Palmer, record-
ing secretary; Sidney Wasserman,
financial secretary.
On the board of directors are
Max Rifas, David Bear, M. H.
Silverman, Aaron Freilich. Mor-
ris Ehrlich, Harry Pearl, Hyman
Talkofsky, George Chertkof. Da-
vid Rabinovich, Joe Zalis, Phil-
lip Wallich, Nat Blumberg and
Joseph Rosenthal.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
A board meeting of the Temple
Israel Sisterhood will be held at
10:30 Wednesday morning, Nov.
3, in Kaplan Hall.
OLD SARATOGA INN
Bisoync Boulcv.ird .it 77h Street Phono 7-77Z3
Dinners From 5 o'Clock Sundays From Noon
Cocktai! Lounge Fine Liquors and Wines
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87th and Normal Ava._____________Chiaaje
The regular monthly meeting
of the National Council of Jewish
Women, Miami Section, will be
held Wednesday, Nov. 3, at 1:30
p. m. at the YM&WHA, 1 Lin-
coln Road, Miami Beach.
Mrs. Monte Selig, president,
will preside at a business meet-
ing which will be followed by an
address by Mr. Benjamin Gold-
man, director of the Greater Mi-
ami Jewish Federation. His topic
will be "Community Service."
Added feature of the meeting
will be a talk by Miss Athene
Foster, executive director of the
Florida Association of Workers
for the Blind. Piano selections
will be given by Miss Alama
Chalker of the Miami Lighthouse.
Miss Chalker is a graduate of the
Florida State College for Women
and the Cincinnati College of
Music.
Aiding the blind is one of the
Council's projects and the Miami
Section recently received a let-
ter of appreciation from the
Florida Association of Workers
for the Blind which acknowl-
edged the gift from the Council
of four Braille writers. The
Braille writers were presented to
the Miami Lighthouse and are
used by volunteer workers in
transcribing books for the blind
and various other ways. The
Braille writers were procured
through the efforts of Mrs. David
Phillips, Council chairman in the
work for the blind.
Beginning Friday, Nov. 5, at 2
p. m., the Council Weekly Forum
will inaugurate a new Forum lec-
ture series. Designed to help
Council members and all inter-
ested to understand current
events and trends, especially in
regard to the position of the Jew
in the post-war world, these
Forums will be conducted the
first and third Fridays of the
month through April 21 at the
YM&WHA at 1 Lincoln Road,
Miami Beach.
The program as planned by
Mrs. Benjamin LeVine, Social
Welfare chairman of the Miami
Section, includes the following
lectures:
Nov. 5, 1943"Why Study
Post-War Problems," Mrs. Stan-
ley C. Myers.
Nov. 19, 1943"Problems of
Transition Period," Rev. Joseph
Barth.
Dec. 3, 1943"Relief, Recon-
struction and Migration," Rabbi
Irving Lehrman.
Dec. 17, 1943"World Federa-
tion of States," Dr. Louis K.
Manley.
Jan. 7, 1944"New League of
Nations," Mr. Eustace L. Adams.
Jan. 21, 1944"Social Aspects
in Post-War Planning," Dr. Har-
old Briggs.
Fob. 4, 1944"Palestine in the
Post-War World," Mr. Harry Si-
monhoff.
Feb. 18. 1944"Religion in the
Post-War World," Miami Round
Table: Father Florence Sullivan,
Dr. Glenn C. James, Rabbi Max
Shapiro.
Mar. 3, 1944"Anti-Semitism
in America," Mr. Alexander F.
Miller.
Mar. 17, 1944"Anti-Semitism
in Europe," Mr. Alexander F.
Miller.
Apr. 7, 1944"Women in the
Post-War World," Mrs. Ramona
Barth.
Apr. 21. 1944"Problem of
Youth in the Post-War World,"
Mr. Wm. C. Kesselman.
Books of tickets, which will in-
clude the entire series, will cost
$4.50 and individual tickets may
be purchased at the meeting place
for 50 cents. Books of tickets
may be obtained from the Coun-
cil office, 513 Congress Building,
or from Mrs. Herbert.
As in the past the Forum will
support the Council Scholarship
Fund which provides tuition for
several worthy students at the
University of Miami.
SCHAAREI ZEDEK
Congregation Shaarei Zedek
will hold its annual election of
officers on Tuesday evening, Nov.
2, at the synagogue. Other- im-
portant business will be tran-
sacted.
Announcement has been made
this week regarding the resump-
tion of Sunday School classes at
Congregation Shaarei Zedek
Synagogue, 1545 S. W. Third
Street, commencing Sunday, Oct.
24, at 10 a. m. Registration is
open to all children.
B'NAI B'RITH GIRLS
BETH SHOLOM CENTER
A regular meeting of Beth Sho-
lem Center has been called for
next Tuesday night by President
Abraham Frankel. Reports of
the High Holy Days will be sub-
mitted. The Board of Directors
will report on the activities dur-
ing the past summer and will out-
line the program for the coming
winter season. Mr. Frankel will
announce his committee appoint-
ments for the program of activi-
ties at the Center.
BETH DAVID
Plans for the Annual Member-
ship Tea to be held Wednesday,
Nov. 17, are now being formu-
lated by the chairman, Mrs. Nor-
man Jacobs and her committee, of
Beth David Sisterhood.
The Fall Rush tea of the Miami
Beach Chapter of B'nai B'rith
Girls was held Sunday, Oct. 17
at the YM&WHA, Miami Beach.
Thirteen members were present
and became acquainted with the
organization and its work.
Newly elected officers of the
B. B. G. are: President, Edith
Schulman; vice president, Lila
Zeffert; secretary, Judy Nelson;
treasurer, Mickey DuBrin: de-
fense chairman, Isadora Margolis.
The Third War Loan Drive is
now on. Will you do your part
by buying Bonds? Your help is
urgently needed NOW!
REAL ESTATEMIAMI BEACH
B. E. BRONSTON, Realtor
605 Lincoln Road Ph. 5-5868
A Trustworthy Real Estate Service
Ask for Free 19*3 Descriptive
Map of Miami Ileach
RENTALS LEASES SALES
Lots, Homes, Hotels
Apartment Houses
M. GILLER
Reg. Real Estate Broker
Ph. 58-1188
523 Mich. A*e.
PALM BEACH NOTES
JEWISH FLORIDIAN OFFICE, 226 S. OLIVE STREET
IN THE FOX BUILDING
MBS. MART SCHHEBNKX RapraaaakrtlTa
Mrs. Marie Blumberg, 412 42nd
Street, has just returned from
Hempstead, N. Y., where she
spent the summer.
ANNOUNCEMENT
Beginning Monday, Nov. 1,
I will be associated with the
SOUTHERN DAIRIES
and will handle all their
dairy products. Due to my
late accident I am unable to
call on all my friends in per-
son, I therefore ask them
to be kind enough to call
Phone 2-1326
I can assure you of prompt
and courteous attention.
THANK YOU.
Mrs. Mary Schrebnick
The Bar Mitzvah of Sammy,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Smith,
took place Saturday, Aug. 3, at
Temple Beth El. Rabbi Green-
stein officiated at the ceremony,
attended by many friends.
S/Sgt. George Greenberg. son
of Mr. and Mrs. Max Greenberg,
85 Barcelona, is now with the
Quartermaster Board Detach-
ment, colonel's staff, Camp Lee,
Va.
A card party was sponsored
last Sunday night at Scher
Memorial Hall by the Beth El
Sisterhood.
Mr. and Mrs. Hyman, 1801 S.
Olive Avenue, returned from
Worcester, Mass., where they
spent the summer. Their daugh-
ter. Miss Phyllis Freeman, is at-
tending the Florida State College
for Women at Tallahassee.
Buy War Savings Bonds
The Sisterhood of Beth Israel
held a Succoth party for the chil-
dren at Schwartzberg Hall. Sun-
day afternoon, and a card party
in the evening for the members
and friends.
ALFAR
CREAMERY CO.
Fot to
Fradi
WEST PALM BEACH
MTT.FCREAMICE CREAM
DENVER CHILD'S HOME
The Greater Miami Chapter of
the National Home for Jewish
Children at Denver will hold
their next regular meeting Tues-
day, Nov. 2, at 1:30 p. m., at the
YM&WHA, 1 Lincoln Road, Mi-
ami Beach. Mrs. Irving Lehr-
man, wife of Rabbi Lehrman of
the Miami Beach Jewish Center,
will be the guest speaker. Mrs.
Lehrman was a well known fig-
ure in Jewish charity circles in
Montclair, N. J., her former
home. A social hour and refresh-
ments will follow and members
and friends are invited to attend.
A meeting of the board of di-
rectors will be held at 10:30 a. m.
of the same day, also at the
Beach "Y."
SOUTHERN DAIRIES
Mac
County, ieatwtaf
bvrthan Daf
U* Crcam.
MM NEAR TO TOO AS YOUR
Pain
lUtionally Fi
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1201 South Olive Avenue
WEST PALM BEACH
PHONE 5172
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INCORPORATED
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Beverages of Quality Since 1920
LAINHART & POTTER
ESTABLISHED 1893
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Phone 5191 West Palm Beach, Fla.


PAGE FOUR
"JcnislHu-kMan
IH-'l


'- 3 -"A


The Jewish Floridian
Plant and Main Offices, 31 S. W. Second Avenue, Miami, Fla.
P. O. Box 2973 Phone 2-1141
Entered as Second Class Matter July 4 1930 at the Post Office
of Miami, Florida, under the Act of March 3, 1879
___________FRED K. SHOCHET, Managing Editor________
Subscription1 Year, $2.00 Six Months, $1.00
MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29. 1943
TISHRI 30, 1943
VOLUME 16 NUMBER 44
PRESENCE. NOT PRESENTS
The question being asked in tens of thousands of Jewish and
non-Jewish homes in America is"What shall I send my son
and daughter in the Service'"
Nothing we feel is too good for these young people in uni-
form, and feeling this way, it is natural that Father and Mother
and Sister and Friend think of sending something of the highest
valueand since value in the common market conception is
estimated in terms of dollars, the natural tendency is to send
some tangible gift which will represent a monetary sacrifice.
Yet this is the kind of gift that is least desired, warns the
Jewish Welfare Board, speaking for the hundreds of thousands
of Jewish soldiers.
"Food with a few exceptions," says the Jewish Welfare
Board is a waste of space and deep disappointment. The sol-
diers do not want cigarettes, shaving kits and the ordinary gifts
that are so welcomed in normal times. The Jewish Welfare
Board makes this statement on the basis of polls of soldiers.
What do the soldiers want, then? Here is the answer, accord-
ing to the J. W. B.
"More than most elaborate gifts, soldiers will welcome
newsy, cheerful letters from home and recent photographs or
snapshots of family and friends. Many would like a new pic-
ture of wife, sweetheart or parent not larger than pocket size
and encased in a waterproof folder, as pictures the men took
with them are the worse for wear."
The soldier wants mainly a letter from youthat is the para-
dox of the story. He wants not the things that cost money. He
judges not by the market. He wants youyour presenceand
not being in a position to have youhe wants the next best
thinga letter that will make you vivid to him.
Remember this, when you think of your soldier boy. He
wants your presence, not your presents!
THE ARGENTINA JEWISH PRESS
The Yiddish press of Argentina loomed as an international
issue this past week when President Roosevelt took occasion
to publicly rebuke the Argentina government for its ban on the
Yiddish press. The ban was shortly lifted. Whether this relent-
ing by the Argentine government was due to the President's
censure or not, there can be little question but that President
Roosevelt's frank statement will have a salutary effect on the
status of the Jews in Argentina.
The alibi offered by the Argentine government for its tem-
porary suspension of the Jewish press was the lame one that
the Yiddish language was a very difficult language to censor.
Walter Winchell has remarked apropos of this, that the Argen-
tine government had not found the Japanese language press
difficult to censor. No hand was raised against the Japanese
press in Argentina.
President Roosevelt doubtlessly had two aims in view when
he made the statement. He was desirous not only of rebuking
the special discrimination against the Jews, but also availing
himself of the opportunity to "take a sock" at the pro-Axis gov-
ernment of Argentina, the one government of South America
which still clings to Hitler.
Argentina presents the one axis-infected spot in the Ameri-
cas, and the restoration to the Jewish press of its right to publish
can be construed only as the first of a series of steps which
must be taken until the collapse of the present Argentine regime
is effected. That regime exists today not by the will of the
Argentine people, but by the usurpation of the government
and by the use of terror and force. If we have a duty to clear
out cesspools of tyranny across the Atlantic and Pacific, we
have an even stronger obligation to clean up such nests of
foulness in the closer environs of our own Western Hemisphere.
AFTER SUCCAS
By RABBI MOSES MESCHELOFF
Beth Jacob Congregation
Editor's Note: This is the
second of a series of articles by
the spiritual leaders of Greater
Miami.
I have just taken down my
Succah. It was a sad task. I
removed the bright paper deco-
rations; took down the fruits and
flowers; took off the .pictures
from the walls. Then down
came the roof of palm branches
and the tessellated slats which
held them up. Lastly, the wall
panels hit earth; all to be carted
away or laid up in the garage for
the next fall.
A happy holiday, Succos! No
weeping and breast-beating. No
fasting. Instead, the pleasant-
ness of our lovely fall weather,
the paying of visits and receiving
of visitors. Dreaming dreams
and making new plans for a new
"season"
Now Succos is over. Not an-
other Biblical holiday until Pas-
sovera half year off. G-d says
(to quote our Rabbis) that He
hates to see us leave Him on
Shemini Atzeress, the closing
day of Succos. I. too, hate to see
the end of the holiday-filled
month with its ceremonies and
special services. I shall miss the
throngs of adults and youth in
the synagogue; the renewal of old
acquaintances and the establish-
ments of new friendships.
My succah is gone, but its
melodies linger. It sang to me of
Jewish exile and suffering. Its
frail walls and flimsy roof sym-
bolized the tragic story of Jewish
"security" in the diaspora. The
hut is the symbol of the wan-
derer. It is the curse of the
"Chosen People," chosen for two
millenia to be wandering always
and everywhere.
This used to be a sentimental
theme in former years. Now the
reality is more somber than the
succah symbol. The House of
Israel is even more insecure than
the frail tabernacle prescribed
for the holiday.
But Succos is a happy holiday,
not a sad one. And to me the
Succah sang, too, a paean of
faith, a tribute to Israel's un-
shakable conviction: G-d is our
Protector. As the nomad looks
into the starry sky and finds
there the peace, strength and se-
curity which earth-bound nature
denies him. so throughout our
history we have enjoyed peace,
spiritual strength and security in
our one-ness with our G-d Al-
most without letup ours was the
"falling Succah of David." It
never fell. G-d sustained us!
Faith sounds good. It is our
staff of life. But when you build
a succahnot simply read about
it, or hear a sermon on it or
idealize about it when you
BUILD a succah you hear other
motifs.
Faith is belief in the completed
thing or the accepted way. Des-
potism may govern without faith.
Liberty requires faith for its
maintenance. But liberty is not
the fruit of faith alone. Faith
accepts and supports that liberty
for which others have fought. It
expects no further attack. Faith
alone is for the majority and the
strong. For the minority and the
weak there must be the addition
of 'good works." Without deeds
the faith of the minority will be
overthrown by the majority
the potential enemy, the tautono-
mous opposition of the few.
My succah taught me this. One
of the first lessons in building a
succah is: "You must MAKE a
succah." A succah that stands
of its own making or is incident-
ally brought into being may not
be used traditionally. A succah
must be built purposefully. We
gather our hammer and nails,
boards and planks, ladder and
saw and set to work. We select
the proper site, make firm the
foundation; erect the walls and
roof. When we are through, we
still have only a succah. A vio-
lent wind will uproot it. A storm
will drench us in it. The sun
will make up swelter in it. But
we have made it! It is our handi-
work! And there is joy in the
work.
Judaism is the religion of the
minority. For a minority to ex-
ist it must work. It must be con-
stantly active in its own sphere.
As American citizens we have a
common faith in democracy, in
decency, in the tenets of citizen-
ship which are universal and
uniformly humanor should be.
Those doctrines come to us as
citizens. In them we have faith.
In our country they succeed be-
cause they arewe trustthe
faith of the majority.
When it comes to our own re-
ligious tenets, passive faith is
totally inadequate. Faith alone
then leads to assimilation. Faith
then seeks a common denomina-
tor and becomes submerged in
and indistinguishable from the
dominant faith. The many "Jew-
ish imitations and emulations of
non-Jewish observances and
practices (Christmas vs. Chanu-
kah) are testimony to this basic
axiom: a minority must create__
it must build its own succahif
it is to exist!
There are all kinds of succos.
jnere are many opinions of how
Jews should "create." I recog-
nize this. There is room for dif-
ference of opinion as there is
room for architectural difference
in the making of a succah. But
certain basic factors must be ad-
hered to.
The walls of the succah can-
not be established in mid-air.
They must begin on the ground
i?IaC S.eKen.ligh t0 il to be identi-
fied with it "Lawvood"). Jewish
communal and organized life
must have ,ts feet on the ground.
It must be practical. It must be
fXJ^i U must Put firs* things
hi t#"nni,t lon endure n
a haze of good-will" and "faith "
We must build "our succah" on
the ground.
I have seen many organizations
with outstanding names and
grandiose credos that have died
early deaths because they were
up m the air." They got no
further than the forensic or ideo-
CCONTINUEO ON PAOI )
TODAY,JXTOBPP ,
-TIDBITS FROM EVER!
Muctey, Qon^ldejnilai
-By PHTNEAS J. BIRON-
LISTEN HERE .
You can't beat the Irish
. A* reported in The Irish r L
Ireland's premier. Eamon de Valera, recently succeed^
making Hitler, no less, pay for the restoration of aj
synagogue which Nazi flyers had destroyed in their h^
ing of the Irish capital some years ago Mavh Tv w'
glad to supply you with some information"Mr'S*
. Paul Scheffer. Goebbels' pet foreign correspond
you mentioned as contributing, under another n 5
man should form a partnership with Mr. de Valera
we're "
chell
whom you mentioned
to a New York Sunday supplement, is persona grata' in a
ernment circles in Washington This man, who once
exposed as being a key agent of the German military int?
gence, was the author of an article called "The Spectr *
1918 Walks in Germany." published in the New York-Tit
of September 19. 1943. lB*
TIDBITS .
London held five receptions of welcome in honor of tin
Jewish delegation from the Soviet Union, but at none of then
receptions were the delegates presentbecause of unavoid-
able delay in getting air transportation from this country |
England ... At one function H. G. Welles was the maa
speaker, and tried to atone for some of his anti-Jewish com
ments of years ago Now that Professor Solomon Michaeli
and Lieut. Col. Itzik Feffer have actually reached England,
we wonder whether they will be given a public recent*,
that they can attend in person after having received so much
public acclaim in absentia Broadway press agent Fi
Lloyd Hoffman is an army sergeant now, so he can't credit
a client with the gags he thinks up That's why it's Hoff-
man himself who is now quoted as cracking that in Rustic
the Nazis are getting Dnieper and Dnieper into trouble.
READER'S GUIDE .
"The Forgotten Ally," Pierre van Paassen's new book,
which made its appearance last week, is enjoying a faster
sale than any of Van Paassen's previous books, which ii
going some ... It has already passed the 100,000 mark...
The indefatigable Bennett Cerf, who as a successful pub-
lisher and writer of two literary columns should be plenty
busy without any additional activities, has found time to edit
the "Pocket Book of Cartoons," which we cheerfully recom-
mend to all who want a good chuckle Lewis Browne'i
"See What I Mean?" is rapidly becoming one of the conn-
try's best sellers This volume, you should know, containi
as much "undercover" material as the widely heralded boor
entitled "Under Cover" Browne used, for his novel U
findings of some of the best undercover men in Caliban
and New York Dr. Saul Padover. who is going to Londcs
as a specialist on broadcasts to Central Europe and Poland.
Jias edited the collected works of Thomas Jefferson .. T
collection is being published in the very near future ... Viet
Baum, whose "Grand Hotel" was so successful as a now!
and play quite some years ago, has written another volume
of the same type, with the action laid in Berlin's Hotel Adlon
in the Nazi era Georgie Price, whose career has already
taken him from Broadway to Wall Street and back to Broad-
way, is now becoming one of the literati It's a book of
reminiscences that he's authoring.
THE ENTERTAINERS .
Chief Petty Officer Artie Shaw, the Navy Bandmaster,
reports that while he and his men were lying in New Guinea
foxholes they heard a nearby radio, tuned to Tokyo, playing
a musical program which closed with the announcement:
"You have just heard the orchestra conducted by Artie Shaw,
playing from the Mark Hopkins Hotel in San Francisco"
A recording, of course Soon to go overseas to entertain
the boys is Benny Goodman, together with his orchestra.
Comedian Danny Kaye has left Hollywood and is back on
Broadway, but only for a spell ... In a month or so hell be
leaving for overseas, where he'll give our boys a few laughs-
ABOUT PEOPLE .
A new addition to the Columbia University faculty of
Creative and Applied Arts is Henry Brant, gifted young com-
poser and orchestrator for the Columbia Broadcasting Sys-
tem ... He is giving a course in Modern Scoring and Arrang-
ing .. Radio Commentator Gabriel Heatter is playing Mo-
hammed in a new version of the mountain story Wanted
for a film part in Hollywood, Heatter declared that he couldnt
possibly go to the screen capital ... So a Hollywood director
is coming East to shoot the scenes involving Gabriel
The once dashing and romantic and always erratic Maxwell
Bodenheim, Greenwich Village poet laureate, celebrated his
60th birthday the other day He's a shriveled-up old man
now and openly confesses his terrible need for a job
His nine books of poetry, which discerning critics consider
among the best verse produced in this country, aren't bring-
ing him sufficient royalties to buy an apple a day
23-year-old Larry Leonard is doing okay for a plain, ordinary
army corporal ... He just married Hazel Guggenheim,
year-old daughter of the late millionaire Benjamin Guggen-
heim.
CALL R. J. WAINWRIQHT. DISTRICT MANAOK"
SHELBY SALESBOOK CO. n
- O. BOX MIAMI IMINDI, FLA, r-MONC -'
T^M"00*" *NO UXNUI FORMS Or ALL *!*>
"COMPARE OUR PRICES AND QUALITY"


)AY, OCTOBER 29, 1943
+Jewish HorkUan
PAGEFTVE
IATI0N/IL COUNCIL OF J
by
MARTIN SILVER
irWEMILISTIEEI
BY MILTON BROWN
Copyright, 1943, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc.
The National Council of Jewish Women, which
hold its 17th triennial convention and observe
50th anniversary at the Drake Hotel, in Chicago,
r. 7 to Nov. 11, is the oldest organized Jewish
ion's group in America, and it includes all
ses of Jewish belief. The Council grew out of
Congress of Jewish Women, which was part of
Parliament of Religions held in connection with
World's Fair in Chicago, in 1893. A Women's
aittee representing every religion and denomi-
tion thereof formed a separate unit in the general
imittee of the Parliament, and each woman on
committee was the chairman for her particular
ligious group.
Mrs. Hannah Greenebaum Solomon, a young
>man already known for her participation in Chi-
go civic affairs, was appointed to this Women's
kmmittee Jan. 1, 1892. The Jewish Women's Re-
pous Congress convened in the Memorial Art
lace in Chicago during the week of Sept. 3, 1893,
took part in the Parliament of Religions, Sept.
to 26. The 95 women at the Congress approved
s. Solomon's plan for a permanent organization,
d the National Council of Jewish Women was
jlished, dedicating itself to "Faith and Human-
\" through religious education and philanthropy.
A significant program was introduced in 1894
Ith the appointment of a junior section committee,
parallel and carry on the work of the senior
juncil members. In 1919 the juniors met and be-
le established as the National Council of Jewish
iors. When the Senior Council convenes in
icago in November, the Jewish Juniors will hold
siennial convention, their thirteenth, at the same
xe and place as the parent organization. Mrs.
rice L. Goldman, president of the National
incil, and Miss Marian Schuman, president of
rish Juniors, will give their messages at the open-
meeting, Sunday evening, Nov. 7.
[Thousands of Jewish women did volunteer work
the early years, with the dual purpose of fur-
Pring the aims of Judaism and of representing
rish women worthily in all causes that affect
rind. By the end of the first decade. 14 Sab-
Schools were doing important work in relig-
education. Pioneer work had been done in
janizing settlement houses, in work with juvenile
id other courts, and in cooperation with state and
ional associations with social programs. Coun-
Sections supported a great variety of philan-
ropic endeavors, such as industrial schools, day
rseries, and Religious Mission Schools among
ie poor.
In 1903 the Government of the United States re-
lested the Council's assistance in solving serious
roblems created by the greatly increasing immi-
ration to America. The Lexow Committee, ap-
iinted by the government to investigate conditions
: the ports of entry, had brought to light tragic
lories of exploitation, white slavery, and sweat-
"lop labor. Organization of Council's Port and
ock Department was its quick response to this
jameful situation. Relatives were located, details
I immigration adjusted, and families and indi-
idual women and children assisted on their way
join their own national groups. Council workers
vent on to investigate labor conditions and to co-
)perate in a campaign for better living and working
onditions. In 1907 a permanent station for immi-
rant aid was established by the Council at Ellis
md.
In 1908 the Council participated in the White
louse Conference on Child Welfare, called by
resident Taft, and the Council's program for social
legislation was formally established in 1911. The
summation of child labor, provision of adequate
lousing, slum clearance, wage and hour laws for
women, enactment of anti-lynching legislation, and
ill legislation for protection of women and children
came the concern of the Council thereafter.
When war broke in 1914 the Council was ac-
ively cooperating with the World Peace Founda-
tion. Between 1914 and 1918 the National Council
if Jewish Women was a member of the Council of
National Defense and cooperated with various other
committees and associations.
When Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catt called a con-
jlerence of eight women's organizations in 1925
Po found a National Committee on the Cause and
'ure of War. the National Council of Je\vish Women
ras among the original groups represented. This
'as following out the stand taken by the Council
early as 1889, before the Spanish American War.
(Continued next week)
The big news of the week was the three power
conference in Moscow. Some observers were pre-
dicting that the Palestine and Middle East situation
would come up before the Conference. These ob-
servers pointed to the recent visit of Ivan Maisky
to Palestine as an indication of Russian interest in
the Middle East.
It was said that Anthony Eden, the British For-
eign Minister, had conferred with a number of
Egyptian and Arab leaders while in Cairo en route
to Moscow. It was also reported that a Russian
legation will shortly be opened in Egypt.
All of this appears to give a new aspect to the
Palestine question. If the question was ever com-
plex, it is more complex now. Obviously, the Brit-
ish White Paper by no means writes the word "finis"
to Palestine. The Jews are pulling one way, the
Arabs another, Britain has its own ends in view
and now Russia seems to have special interests.
All of this leads to the possibility of a new solu-
tionthat of the internationalization of the Palestine
zone. Palestine might be made into an interna-
tional territory.
While the Zionists, of course, are openily con-
tending for a Jewish state, it is quite possible that
they would be entirely satisfied if Palestine were
given an international status as long as the right
of Jewish immigration to Palestine were not re-
stricted. In fact, some Zionist leaders have indi-
cated their desire for such a status for Palestine at
least for the period immediately after the war.
Such a development suggests another curious
angles. If Palestine is made into an international
state, then it would seem that even so unrelenting
an opponent of Zionism as Dr. Julius Morgenstern,
president of the Hebrew Union College, might give
Zionism his blessing. Dr. Morgenstern this week
came out strongly against Zionism. It is the na-
tionalism of Zionism which goes against his grain.
It is the universalism of Judaism which appeals to
him. Well, if Palestine is made into an international
state, it would seem this would be furthering the
international, the universalistic idea which Dr. Mor-
genstern cherishes. This would indeed be trans-
forming the abstract ideal of universalism into con-
crete reality. We should imagine that none could
be so gratified as Dr. Morgenstern. All of the na-
tions of the world would then begin to share in the
universalistic idea. And Palestine would lead, so
to speak, to the actual ushering in of that "one
world" idea, which Wendell WilUrie proclaims, but
which the prophets for whom Dr. Morgenstern
speaks, proclaimed many centuries ago. Zionism
would then open the road for universalism. What
does the head of the Hebrew Union Colege think
of this?
President Roosevelt's reprimand of the Argen-
tine government for its ban on the Yiddish press
seemingly "hit home." The Argentine authorities
were so concerned about it that this week they
called upon Jewish leaders in Buenos Aires to sign
a statement saying that no anti-Jewish discrimina-
tion has been practiced in Argentine. Of course,
the Jewish leaders, with Argentina being a dictator-
ship a la Axis, had no other alternative but to sign.
President Roosevelt has a right to be well
pleased with the reaction to his statement. Unfor-
tunately, in the United States, too, we have our
black spots. According to the New York newspaper
PM, the city of Boston is one of such black spots.
That the reports appearing in PM, even if some-
what sensational, have a substantial core of truth,
was indicated this week when Boston Jewish
leaders called on Police Commissioner Joseph Tim-
ilty to do something about the attacks "on Jewish
children and adults by hoodlums in Dorchester."
That such attacks should occur in Boston is a
double shame. This was the vicinity where the
Pilgrims landed in search of religious freedom. This
was the land hallowed by the Emersons, the Theo-
dore Parkers, the Garrisons, the Thoreaus. These
were the prophets of early America who expressed
American idealism in its highest form. Today, the
early Puritan element has receded in Boston. Bos-
ton today is more of an Irish city than a Puritan
city. And one would expect that under the Irish
the ideals of religious freedom and freedom from
persecution would be even more stringently upheld,
for the Irish have themselves suffered so much at
the hands of the oppressors that they must have a
fellow feeling for other victims. Unfortunately,
however, the incidents reported this week do not
bear out this hope. Of course, it is the "scum" who
are behind these attacks, that scum whose mind
has been inflamed by Father Coughlin and his lieu-
tenants. We wonder what Father Coughlin would
say about the news reported this week that the
Pope contributed about $10,000 to make up the fine
imposed on the Jews of Rome by the Nazis.
BETWEEN YOU AND ME
BY BORIS SMOLAR
Copyright, 1943, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc.
z.
Delegation: With religion again fully recognized
in Soviet Russia, don't be surprised if you read
soon in the press that a religious delegation will
shortly proceed from Moscow to Palestine This
will not exactly be a Jewish delegation, although
representatives of the Moscow Jewish religious com-
munity may also be included in it The delega-
tion will be headed by the Russian Patriarch Ser-
gius The Jewish members of the delegation are
expected to visit the Wailing Wall, Jewish colonies
and Rabbinate The Christian members will
make a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, Nazareth and
Bethlehem ... At the same time that the Palestine
Government was asked to grant visas to the dele-
gation, it was also requested to permit the visit of
five Soviet cameramen and eight press representa-
tives While on the subject of Palestine, it is in-
teresting to know that the Iraquian Military Attache
in Washington has published an article in the
Americcht^ ,ess emphasizing that "whatever hap-
pens inr*aWBtine has the strongest repercussions in
Iraq" ... He insists that "the extreme propaganda
of certain Zionists can only have a detrimental effect
on the good relations that have always existed
among Christian, Moslem and Jewish Arabs" .
Well, we never knew that there was such a thing
as a "Jewish Arab" Needless to say, he con-
siders Palestine a country which belongs to the
Arabs and believes that the Arabs, in any of their
territories, will never accept what he calls "over-
lordship from alien Zionists" in any form.
Question: People are wondering why no mem-
ber of the American Jewish Committee is among
the co-chairman of the Interim Committee of the
American Jewish Conference And questions are
being asked as to why the Jewish Labor Committee
is not on the executive of the Interim Committee...
Have you heard of the new proposal that each
member of each congregation in the Union of He-
brew Congregations be asked to cast a vote on the
ratification of the resolution on Palestine adopted
by the American Jewish Conference? This would
mean that tens of thousands would be asked to
participate in the poll Those persons in the
Union of American Hebrew Congregations who ad-
vocate the polling of individual members argue that
this would be a really democratic method of estab-
lishing the opinion of the majority of the congrega-
tions The results, they say, would serve as a
clear mandate to the UAHC convention which is
to take place 18 months from now Quoting the
judgment of American military leaders concerning
the prospects of a long war, the advocates of an
individual poll also argue that it is doubtful if a
convention of the Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations called in war time would be truly repre-
sentative, many delegates being absent Thus,
they consider it unfair "for a scattering of delegates"
to decide on such an important issue as the Pales-
tine resolution of the American Jewish Conference,
on which there is no unity in the ranks of Reform
Jews And speaking of polls, you may be inter-
ested to learn that Detroiters went to the polls the
other day and gave various anti-Semitic, nationalist
and Ku Klux Klan nominees a combined total of
52,000 votes out of 199,000 cast in the mayoralty and
councilmanic primaries However, the highest
vote secured by any of the anti-Semites was about
18,000, while the winning candidate received 97,000
votes.
Wisdom: American readers now have a chance
to get acquainted with the philosophic thoughts of
Dr. Jacob Klatzkin, the Jewish philosopher of world
renown who is now living in the United States ... A
book by Dr. Klatzkin analyzing life and containing
a number of psychological essays has just been
published by the Fischer Publishing House under
the title "In Praise of Wisdom" The volume
first of Dr. Klatzkin's works to be published in this
countryis a collection of philosophical gems and
has already attracted the attention of many learned
men here who received advance copies ... It was
a great "discovery" for those who had never had
the opportunity of reading Dr. Klatzkin's works in
other languages ... A nationalist Jew and a good
Zionist, Dr. Klatzkin was considered in Europe to be
one of the outstanding philosophers of our times...
He is the author of many works on philosophy pub-
lished in German and other languages, including
Hebrew, and was also editor-in-chief of the Jewish
Encyclopedia which was published in Berlin in pre-
Hitler years ... Dr. Klatzkin is one of America's
gains and Germany's losses as a result of the per-
secution of the Jews in the Reich Readers of his
book "in Praise of Wisdom," will actually acquire
much wisdom ... It is the land of book which stimu-
lates the reader to stop and to ponder over each of
the "simple" truths of life which the author presents
in popular form .


PAGE SK
+Jewlst> fhrkMrtr
FRIDAY,

I
,
r.i
COMMUTE LEAVES
LI
(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1)
ism in this country will continue
to be a major activity of the
American Jewish Committee."
One of the immediate reper-
cussions of the committee's with-
drawal from the American Jew-
ish Conference was the resigna-
tion of three of its members
Mrs. David de Sola Pool, Judge
Louis E. Levinthal and Magis-
trate Morris Rothenberg who
asserted that the committee's ac-
tion was "undemocratic and a
shocking act of isolation from the
overwhelming majority of Amer-
ican Jewry.'' They also criti-
cized the executive committee j
for failing to submit the question
to the general membership, de- j
daring that the committee's ac- '
tion threatened "to disrupt
American Jewry at a time when
unity is vital in our efforts to
save the remnant of Jewry Ln
Europe, to safeguard Jewish
rights everywhere and to assure
the fulfillment of Jewish aspira-
tions in the Jewish National
Home."
When the American Jewish
Conference adopted, at its five-
day session held in New York at
the end of August, a resolution
calling for the establishment of
a Jewish Commonwealth in Pal-
estine, Judge Joseph M. Pros-
kauer announced that, although
[he and his two fellow-delegates
had dissented from the Palestine
resolution "with profound re-
'gret," the representatives of the
American Jewish Committee
would continue to cooperate with
the Conference in its endeavors
to have the White Paper revoked.
Judge Proskauer then voiced the
belief that "the present issuance
of the proposals contained in the
resolution is unwise because it
may carry with it embarrassment
to the governments of the United
States, and is calculated to jeo-
pardize the status of Jews and
even prejudice the fullest devel-
opment of the Jewish settlement
in Palestine itself."
After Succas C^S^B^S
COLEMAN TO BECOME
SENATORIAL ASPIRANT
Sheriff D. C. Coleman. Dade
County's chief law enforcement
officer for a decade and former
Miami City Manager, will become
a candidate for the Florida State
Senate at the conclusion of his
present term of office.
In a formal announcement of
his candidacy Saturday. Sheriff
Coleman said he has determined
not to seek re-election because
friends* couId lhrfrerve ms s,at0- county
and ci na^Ju- upper house of the
Florida legislature.
SCHOOLING ItACES TO
GET UNDER WAY NOV. 4
Made From Fresh Oranges
jfr/f/SS'/'''''''!'''"''''
Nine nights of schooling races
Will get under wav Nov. 4 at the
west Flagler Kennel Club, these
nightly programs open to the
public free, leading to the for-
mal opening Nov. 15. it was an-
nounced Saturday by Jacob Sher,
president, and William L. Hunt-
general manager.
In addition, the West Flagler
owners announced the official
family" for the tracks 86-mght
meeting, a io>t,-r which finds
practically the same experienced
officials of former years at the
west side plant. H. M. Barton
returns as presiding judge, with
Ward McAlister as associate
judge R K. JajOUT, long one of
the sport's leading racing secre-
taries, will return to that post.
mill/""
Wantages
of a
|AIE FEDERAL
MORTGAGE
V
LOW RATES
e EASY PAYMENTS
LONG TIME TO PAY
PROMPT SERVICE
e A HOME INSTITUTION
Deal With You*
LOCAL. FRIENDLY
INSTITUTION
RESOURCES OVER *7.O00.OOO
I l>AI>E I'EMSKAL
\ rTT,. ,?.?*.......
(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4)
logic stage. They did not duel
with facts and set the walls of
their structure on firm ground.
On the other hand, the walls
of the succah must reach to the
roof (or close enough to it to be
identified with it. Again the
principle of "Lawvood"). We
must implement exalted princi-
ples to make them real. We must
fill the void between earth and
sky that our succah be livable.
I have seen organizations with
beautiful goals who have made
excellent first steps toward at-
taining them but have never
planned on filling the gap. Uto-
pian communal projects are fre-
quently left without planning be-
yond the very first stage. The
hiatus between the foundation
and the roof is a no-man's land
where "anything goes'" Every
predatory animal or fly-by-night
can roam through it and make its
nest in the caves. Those who
have been in our community for
a number of years can quote the
record as proof of this succah
refrain.
I have taken down my succah
with regret. If only this holiday
were a bit longer More: if
only more > i ui observed it re-
ligiously. If only more of us
built Israel's Succah and planned
its building soundly.
Somewhere I have been a com-
mentary on the Talmudic correc-
tion to the Biblical sentence:
"And great shall be the peace
of thy children."
The Talmud says:
"Read not, thy children." but
thy builders' in this sentence."
And the commentary' adds pith-
ily. "Count among your children
only those who are thy builders
Thy builders are ol right thy true-
children. "
To Israel's children the succah
extends the tools of activity and
cries, "Come, help build." Join
the group of builders. In our
community they are so few!
Work from within the Succah of
Jewry as a builder, not from
without as a critic. And, if you
all build, each with the tools to
which he is most accustomed;
each where he is most needed,
then we shall not have a Succah
which threatens perennially to
fall, but which will be firm and
strong, the home of a proud peo-
plegreat in faith and in deed
a succah of lasting peace.
OCTOBER
Dr. Jacob Segal, new medical di-
rector, of famed Los Angeles Sana-
torium, says routine use of X-ray
in examination of millions of se-
lectees points the way to be fol-
lowed in the fight against tubercu-
losis. A national, non-sectarian in-
stitution for the care of the indigent
tuberculous, the Sanatorium is lo-
cated at Duarte, Calif., and is oper-
ated by Jewish Consumptive A Ex-
patients Relief Association.
N0T,CE ?^^r^.
**>Uoa I. h^"? ,r,0
r. Christopher' fi2" .
ot City f n ,',".h"l Numb.?* f37'^ >-*
t July. A |) i1.aft** tl*i?
"Heat. In my oihMni*lw<
application iSr'u?1 ffffl
thereon In ac ora,, ir*l> ta i
deaerlbed property .i,."1* 'oh
< OUBty Florida. to. V*"* 51
.Lot 3. Block I ir S
of Melroae- ,.*;,A,*d pJ
<'f Hlaleah. &**.!{
State of Moriio. 'y U* I
The axeeamnem I
under the CwtKajf wj
the name of |-.\Ky .;N JJI
Certificate shall \V "A '"Wj
n* to law. ,ax ,,,r^*y^3\
Dna,ed,hl, ,thdayofo^J
K B. LEATHER**, t
to*** oJtL^i
ZZMP***
POPULAR SINGER WILL
RETURN TO ENTERTAIN
Miss Phyllis Sharon, popular
singer and mistress of ceremo-
nies in local dinner clubs, re-
turned this week after complet-
ing successful engagements at
the Flamingo Night Club. Or-
| lando. Fla.. and the Temple The-
ater. Jacksonville.
Formerly with the Drum. Jim-
mies, Jeff's and other notable
clubs. Miss Sharon will return
to the Pago Pago Room of the
: Vanderbilt Hotel.
A talented singer as well as
mistress of ceremonies. Miss
Sharon is a student at the Uni-
versity of Miami. With Sharon
as her stage name, she is the
I daughter ol Mr. and Mrs. Harry
Schulman.
MAITKR 174,7 Al-TNJr.. '
.BBS fd
"-., Cntv Ta(ffl
. and Jitt. tafid th.a
tua-naj a i. ill3,; hi, f!,7!
TICKETS ON SALE FOR MUSIC
SERIES U. OF M. SYMPHONY
ci...
State anil
oYV"
thereon. Bald CrtlfiJ ... ^ 1
the (.> of Dade state5*'
** eml,.,,| | PineM,Vl
The asaaesmeni ,,f rald, "JlM
?"t^mVVRerth.tfa|
"'" County of Dade, RtateVfifl
rue assessment of said ,.r,,,.-,?l
par tha naid c, m,., ,"
In the name of l:..| Salm.""* *|
I nlei.K wild <-.-tif|,.atM,rt-ihJ
deemed acoprdlni t< law, ih, Jill
daacrlbad therein will ti liFfil
hbrhest bidder ai the -ort IS
Dam-on the drat Monday it2l
;f >-*-/'' which u'i!tJ
day of D.....u..- i i'.|;:
Hated this lSMh dm ', (Vinte |
B B LEATHBRMaS I
Clerh circuit Coat I
(Clrcull Court sXu Com'- M
i/M.Mitc BTIM".ai
Tickets have gone on sale for
University of Miami's symphony
series, to open Nov. 14 with Na-
than Milstein. at the orchestra
office of the university.
In Alsace-Lorraine even the
family names have been taken from
the residents and Germanized
names substituted. Century-old
French streets of Mulhouse, Stras-
bourg, Metz have been given Nazi
na.me,s. In their effort to destroy
all trench culture in these prov-
josara m. uptow. president
WHEN Functional Nervous
Disturbances such aa Sleep-
S55 Crankineaa, Excitability,
i^?MB*M r N"oua Headacha
interfere with your work or spoil
your good times, take
Dr. Miles Nervine
(Liaaid or Efferreaceat Tablets)
Nervous Tension can make you
WakefoL Jittery, Irritable. NaT
?pusi Tension can cause Nerrous
Headsche and Nerroua Indige^
tioo. In times like thew, we ara
more likely than usual to become
Te[Wrught and nervous and to
juh for a good sedative. Dr.
SLii!M ? *ood ^dative
mild but effective.
M.".yu ^ not use Dr. Miles
Nervine you can't know what it
*ZEi*2& Efferv*nt TabUt
Sn?.' it? *qUally ,oothin*
WHY DONT YOU TRY IT T
"Get it at your drug store.
Effervescent tablets Si* and 76?
Uona and uae only airaetad.
inces the Germans are burning
librarieseven the privately owned
french cook books. In Strasbourg
alone nearly 20,000 homes have
been damaged in this wa- but the
residents still pray for allied bomb-
;rs to come over again with their
block busters.
In America our war efforts are
tranquil but nevertheless they
dmiS.te,Md if we are to de-
Buying War Bonds every pay
day ,8 one good way to exhibit our
determination to aid in the war
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO
TAX DEED
CHAPTaTR 174..7 A-TS0F1W
PILE A 6926
NflTICK IS HKHKHr ciTEMktl
ROBICRT B. CORNS, holder f ^|
"f Miami Bprlncs n'miiitn 0;1 fj-l
tnte) Tax IVrtlfiiai.-. No. It a
and HI, Inaued the 1th tiaritJ$,
A I>. i<3!t. haa filed hamaj#
'i. and has mad.- ui i>liasi i
tax deed to he isu.-d ihmw. feH
Certificates embrace in. timui*
wrilied propart) In (he CM d
Pade. State of Plorlda, tort
U.t s. Block UK, Sei lion :.0rj (
Club (Catatea, in th.- Town ot Mha j
Splines, (Country Club KstatnlCia-
t> .if Ihiil.- SUte i.f Florida, u lira.-ed in C.-rtlfl.-ate So TH1
aeaament .f mid pmperty j-der Ml
said I ertlfii .,t, is--.n-d Wti 'I
name of Unknown
Lot s. Block i IK, s. lion !. OM
Club Estates, In thi T"n o( a*
s"ihiiiks (Country Club F>tatesi Or
ly of Had.-. State of Klorldi.au
braced In Cert If l< ate No Tkt|
s.-ssm.iit ( wild pr Mid Certificate issued a '" *l
name >,f I'likn. |
U't 10, HIiK-k IIS, S.--tlMi :. i on* |
Club Bstaten, In iv, rown ol |
SprinKi. iC.iiiiirv Club Ksutl'*l
ty ..f |)ade. state ..l KliirkU. ul
braced in Certificate No M TM|
sensment of said property '""* *
wild Certificate lssii.il "" *l
name of i'nkn"n _
Ix>t 11. Hl..ck MV Section r"
Country Club fc>tntet m the i'-
Miami Sprirura (Country flub u
County- of Dade, State of "1*,tJ
embraced in Certificate No. ?' "Jl
asseaament of said property undff"
said Certificate Issuad *l
name iif Unknown. ..v.*!
fnleaii said Certificates shall |J
deemed according to law, the prewj
described therein will be soid to"
hlKhest bidder at the I o.iri HJ
IXK>r on the first Monday in the""
Of I Um ember. It43, li:< h is toe
day of December. 1ft" w tio
Dated this 19th daj of OeWJ*"
Ptork fjrcu Coort^
pad.- County. '"'
(Clrcull Court 8asJ> __ D
By N C BTEBBBTrT, v
10'22-L1:' 11 B-1S ____
LEGAL NOTICES
= I Buy War Savings Bonds.
w///M/MM/UM"""
m*M***
US/A*"""'-
tM"rfi
RIVERMONT PARK
SANITARIUM
istt n. w. rth at. ph. t.nm
scant and elderly peeple
25 WEEKLY Up
L.ro. #autlful Orounda,
,N'imV: VriViI'lT,''',URT OF TOT
CAW. KPUtg0 y"::
Plaintiff
KI.IZAHKTU RIPUBT
ab_- I'efendant
v ORDER OF PUBLICATION
hafora November^ >43 r^0'a"" r
I'rti confeeao will i- .; r^* decree
you ^ *'" b "tered acainat
(aeal)E V^^ra^S "<*
lO/l-lS-JJ-S?,^^- K,RTLEY, D. C.
NOTICE UNDER FiCTlTlOLi
NAME LAW p
Notice la hereby aiwjn t'
underslsned, MAUHV STKRV*7
bualnaaa under the fi.-tltfiiii^nai-r
NEW FORK BAKKB> at "JJ
Court, Miami Beach, ""'"* iVr*
to reslater aald fictitious name
Office of the Cl.rk of he
'"'^"^"&1=-.
Circa
LOUIS IIKIMAN ,
Attorney for AppHosnt.
10/l-lS-tt-X II
NOTICE UNDER flCTl
NAME LAW
. .. .man
ITIOUS
ulrlts at 47 If. w M vpr
eforlda. Intend to rea-IMer ^
tioua name In the '<*''' Court?'
of the Circuit Court, i*
L0UiVSE< APPl.cn.,
10/l-lt-M-ll/___________-
Buy War Saving* Bond*-


|AY. OCTOBER 29. 1943
+Jmlsti ncrtkUarj
PAGE SEVEN
1 LOCAL BOYS
ARMED SERVICE
Abe Silver, stationed at
Kilmer, N. J., was host re-
ly to Miami friends. Mr. and
Abe Berkowitz and Lt. and
Irving Rotfort comprised
|party.
Zohn, sl/c, Sanford.
[Naval Air Base, visited with
lives and friends during his
day stay here last week.
Berger has been promot-
the rank of Aviation Elec-
ian Mate 2/c at his Melbourne,
base. Along with his elec-
al duties, Petty Officer Berg-
is gunnery instructor, con-
ting classes for newly com-
Bioned Marine and Navy fli-
He is spending an eight day
re in Miami and will leave to-
row to resume his duties.
GREATER MIAMI ARMY-NAVY COMMITTEE
Of The Jewish Weliare Board
^ ^
Jpl. Harold George Shapiro.
of Mr. and Mrs. Morris Sha-
>, 1157 N. W. 1st Street, re-
Itly returned to camp after
Iting with his family during
h Hashonah. Cpl. Shapiro is
aboratory technician with the
ly Air Force, and is stationed
the Base Hospital at Drew
lid. Florida.
iur Stein, 20. aviation radio-
i, 3/c, son of Mr. and Mrs. I.
kin, 545 W. Flagler St., is now
turned in Puerto Rico. Stein
|ered the Navy on Jan. 18 and
;ived training in radio and
lery at the Jacksonville Nav-
[air station. He is a former
lent at the University of Mi-
Iriation Student Harold Rubin,
N. W. Seventh Ave., is now
[West Texas State College tak-
a course of Army air forces
action leading to aviation
let.
infantry base commander
(the Caribbean Area has an-
aced the promotion of First
fMilton G. Abranel. 9410 Ab-
Ave., Miami Beach, to the
of captain.
Scherex, son of Mr. and
s. Harry Scherer, 352 S. W.
jrth St., has been commis-
led a second lieutenant in the
ine Corps after attending the
ensive officer training course
Quantico, Va.
[Promoted to first lieutenant
lounced by the War Depart-
ment in Washington, is Isadora
avers, infantry, of 636 N. W.
fth Ave.
Enrolled in a special course of
struction in the Southern Sig-
il Corps school at Camp Murphy
Pfc Aaron S. Aronorf, son of
lex Aronoff, 1342 S. W. Fourth
Itreet.
Maj. Morris Hecht, 26, of Co-
lmbus, Ga., commanding officer
Jf a pursuit plane squadron, has
been killed in action in the
South Pacific. He enlisted be-
Fore the declaration of war and
'as sent overseas four days after
?earl Harbor. A manufacturing
fcompany executive in civilian
fife. Major Hecht was a graduate
>f the University of North Caro-
fina. His brother is serving in
England as an aviation officer.
Boatswain's Mate Edwin Sper-
, f. of Stephentown, N. Y., is the
recipient of the Navy Cross "for
lextraordinary heroism and dis-
Itinguished service in action."
I Sperry was a member of a party
I ordered to cut a passage through
an obstruction at the mouth of
[the Sebou River; it was the night
of November 9th and the USS
I Cherokee, of which Sperry was a
[crew member, was participating
in the assault on French Morocco.
Subjected to heavy hostile fire,
the demolition party neverthe-
less successfully accomplished its
task with "great skill and cour-
I af?e." Sperry was cited for "com-
[ plete disregard for his own per-
sonal safety" and commended for
the swift efficiency with which
he carried out his part of the
dangerous assignment.
Pfc. Isadora Brookoif. 23, of
Brooklyn, was killed in action
last April in North Africa. A
printer in civilian life, Private
Brookoff had been in service two
and a half years. He was the son
of Mrs. Anna Brookoff of 60 E.
Wth St., Brooklyn.
SERVICE
A COMMUNITY PROJECT
Help Us Keep a Record of Our Men in Service
r\ r\ r\ r\ m
PARADE!
Lt. Irving C. Bloom, 28, of Han-
nibal, Mo., bombardier on a B-24
Liberator which helped hammer
Italy into submission, is a flier
on the imposing roster of Ameri-
can Jewish multiple medal-win-
ners, holding eight decorations:
the Distinguished Flying Cross,
Air Medal, and six Oak Leaf
Clusters. Lieutenant Bloom, in
company with 26 other airmen,
the crews of three bombers
which rendered magnificent ser-
vice in the Mediterranean and
Balkan areas, is now touring the
United States, exhibiting to air-
craft workers the results of their
"handicraft."
Lieutenant Bloom's Liberator,
the Wash Tub, has been cited for
"outstanding service in aerial op-
erations against the enemy over
a period of 15 months, during
which it dropped 219 tons of
bombs on Axis targets, participat-
ed in 73 combat missions, includ-
ing three daring low level at-
tacks, flew 551 hours in combat,
shot down 22 enemy fighters and
flew nearly 100,000 miles." This
is the first time that planes from
the Middle East Theatre of Op-
erations have been returned to
the United States for exhibition;
the citation of the bombers them-
selves is, of course, unique in
combat annals.
Capt. William Louis Sackler. 28.
of the Bronx, lead navigator on
one of the Eighth Air Force's
most succesful daylight precis-
ion bombing attacks on German
targets, has been awarded the
Distinguished Flying Cross and
Air Medal. Captain Sackler has
charted half a dozen wing forma-
tions over Europe.
The specific mission for which
he won the D. F. C. was an Aug-
ust attack on the Nazi submarine
works at Flensburg, Germany.
Navigating the Flying Fortress
Heavy Date. Captain Sackler
kept the formation on its course
through a furious attack and di-
rectly into the target area. To
guarantee accurate navigation,
the Heavy Date refrained from
firing a single burst in its de-
fense, although the enemy planes
were making desperate frontal
assaults. Achieving the destruc-
tion of the submarine plant, the
Fortress group was credited by
Col. John G. Moore, command
pilot, with a "perfect daylight
bombing attack."
Member of the Jersey City
YMHA. Sackler attended New
York University and enlisted in
the Air Corps two years ago.
Pfc. Harold C. Eisenbruch. 21,
of New York City, a paratroop-
er, lost his life in the invasion of
Sicily. His father, member of
the U. S. Army during the First
World War, was decorated for
gallantry at St. Mihiel and in the
Meuse-Argonne. In service one
and a half years, Private Ensen-
bruch was a graduate of the Man-
hattan School of Aviation, and
was an airplane mechanic in civil
life. He was a member of the
Inwood Hebrew Congregation.
CHAPLAIN ZWITMAN IS
WRITER FOR PAPER FOR
NATIONAL BIBLE WEEK
The following is one of a se-
ries of editorials written by Chap-
lain Colman A. Zwitman of Fort
Monmouth, in the army news-
paper, "The Signal Corps Mes-
sage." The particular editorial
quoted below was selected by the
newspaper to appear in the issue
during the celebration of Nation-
al Bible Week:
It was said of Sydney Smith
that he would never read a book
which he was to reviewreading
it might prejudice his judgment.
There are many in our day who
never read the Bible, fearing that
reading of it might upset some of
their irreligious ideas. Seekers
for solutions to the chaotic prob-
lems of our day might do well to
call out with the poet Whittier:
We search the world for truth;
we cull
The good, the pure, the beau-
tiful.
From graven stone and writ-
ten scroll.
From the old flower-field of
the soul;
And weary seekers of the best,
We come back laden from our
quest,
To find that all the sages said
Is in the book our mothers read.
The founders of America used
the Bible and Biblical tradition
as an architect's plan for the es-
tablishment of their dream of
liberty.
Liberty in our day should re-
ceive that eternal vigilance de-
creed by the founders of Amer-
ica. By liberty, we should mean
not license for licentiousness, but
obedience to the principles of
faith and democracy.
The planets wheel in their or-
bits, they march and counter-
march along the camping-grounds
of the heavens in obedience to
the eternal laws set for them.
While thus they obey they are
free. Should they disobey, what
stupendous firmamental cata-
clysm would ensue. Thus, too,
for man are there laws moral and
spiritual, which he must obey if
he would be free to consummate
his highest achievement. Perfect
freedom is not the absence of
law, but thorough voluntary obe-
dience to that law which is the
essential requisite of life, the law
of righteousness.
And service or both God and
country can be enhanced by a
knowledge of and acquaintance
with the great heritagethe
Bible.
WAR] RECORDS COMMITTEE
NAT ROTH, Chairman
FRED 8HOCHET
MRS. QEOROE M. COHEN
MAURICE GROSSMAN
JENNIE H. ROTFORT
NATHAN ROTHBERQ
J. W. B. Director
OFFICERS
8AM BLANK, CHAIRMAN
MONTE SELIQ, Vice-chairman
JOSEPH A. BERMAN. Sac.
Executive Committee
Mrs. Walter Bronsten, Mrs. Max
Dobrln, Maurice Oroaaman. Louie
Helman, Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan,
Mra. Murry Koven, Harry Marko-
witx, Nat Roth, Fred Shochet.
Bilton Sirkln. Joaaph Stain. Mrs.
arman Wallach, Carl Wainkle.
Gsorfls Wolpert.
Captain Herman Lusky, 26. of
Nashville, Tenn., transport plane
pilot operating in the Far East,
has been decorated with the Dis-
tinguished Flying Cross and the
Air Medal. The D. F. C. was pre-
sented to him recently at Love
Field. Dallas.
In service two and a half years,.
Captain Lusky was honored for
his participation, from May 1942
to February 1943. in more than
fifty operational flights "in un-
armed, heavily overloaded trans-
port planes through the combat
zones of Upper Assam (Burma)
and Southwest China." Frequent-
ly Captain Lusky made these haz-
ardous flights on successive days,
combating bitter weather and ic-
ing conditions; forced to alti-
tudes "seldom reached during av-
erage flying," he had to resort to
instrument flying for long pe-
riods over an area lacking navi-
gational aids. Peril was an ever-
present factor in these flights,
lasting three to five hours each,
and made over high rugged
mountainous terrain. In the fif-
teen months he and his group of
pioneer pilots served in that re-
gion, Captain Lusky made 48
round trips "over the hump" and
132 flights over enemy territory.
A laboratory worker for South-
ern Oil Service before he joined
the Air Corps, Lusky attended
Vanderbilt University. He re-
ceived his wings in January of
1942 at Randolph Field, Texas.
Lt. William A. Levitan. 22. of
Roxbury, Mass., a fighter pilot
serving in the New Guinea area,
has been killed in action. In ser-
vice two years, he enlisted while
he was a student at Boston Uni-
versity. Recipient of the Air
Medal early this year, Lieut. Lev-
itan was credited with downing
two Jao planes. His father. John
M. Levitan, of 32 Deckard St.,
was wounded in action and re-
ceived the Purple Heart during
World War I.
Lt. Daniel T. Drubin, 24. of
Brooklyn, N. Y., a bombardier
engaged in anti-submarine patrol
work, lost his life in the Euro-
pean area. A textile salesman in
civilian life, he had been in ser-
vice two years. While serving
with the anti-submarine patrol
at Mitchel Field, L. I., he was
commended for his work by Rear-
Admiral I. C. Sewell.
Flight Officer Joseph Levy, 23,
of Scarsdale, N. Y., a member of
the Air Corps, was killed in ac-
tion in the Aleutian area. In
service two years, he was em-
ployed by the advertising de-
partment of a furniture store in
civilian life. He was a member
of Naphthali Lodge, Free Sons
of Israel.
ON K1L THE FRONTS
Capt Frank Friedman, 24, of
University City, Mo., a pilot at-
tached to a combat squadron op-
erating in the Aleutians, has been
decorated with the Distinguished
Flying Cross, the Air Medal and
an Oak Leaf Cluster.
A recent news dispatch from
Alaska reported that the squadron
of which Captain Friedman is a
member scored an overwhelming
victory against a fleet of Japan-
ese bombers, smashing 12 out of
a total of 16 in the air.
The captain has been in ser-
vice since March 1941.
Lt. Bertram H. Kaplan. 23, of
Great Neck, L. I., has been award-
ed the Distinguished Frying
Cross, the Air Medal, and three
Oak Leaf Clusters. Lieutenant
Kaplan, now home on leave, has
been pilot in an American bomb-
er squadron stationed in England.
Participating in air operations
over France and Germany, de-
scribed as the toughest the Air
Forces are engaged in, Lt. Kap-
lan wrote of the particular glee
he felt when raiding the Reich
and "giving the Nazis a taste of
their own medicine." He noted
that there are many Jewish boys
among the American bombing
crews and that their splendid
work was being recognized.
A graduate of St. John's Col-
lege, he was an accountant before
joining the Air Corps three weeks
after Pearl Harbor. He is a mem-
ber of Temple Beth El of Great
Neck.
Lt. Aaron Liepe. 23 of Du-
buque, Iowa, mentioned in the
Honor Foil for his receipt of an
Air Medal, was recently award-
ed the Distinguished Flying
Cross. The citation accompany-
ing the latter award credits him
with more than 50 combat mis-
sions, "including various phases
of attack and defense in fighter
type of aircraft." Stressing the
fact that he has had to operate
in difficult weather conditions
and over rugged terrain, the ci-
tation says he has "always met
the enemy with courage and de-
termination and has destroyed
two enemy planes in aerial com-
bat."
Lt. Liepe, in service more than
two years, has been a student at
three colleges: the University of
Dubuque, Ames College (La.) and
the University of Alabama. While
on vacation one summer he took
up flying and earned a pilot li-
cense.
Pfc. Philip Feldacker. 27. of
St. Louis, Mo., has been decor-
ated by Gen. Patton with the
Silver Star for gallantry in ac-
tion during the African cam-
paign. Private Feldacker has
been in service three years. He
is a member of the Engineer
Corps.
Devoting This Entire Page to the Efforts of
the Co-
ABESS & COSTAR
First National Bank Building
COWEN'S SHOE STORE
155 E. Flagler St 122 Lincoln Rd.
FLXZIT SYSTEMS. Plumbers
1114 N. E. 2nd Avenue
FLORIDA LINEN SERVICE
100 N. W. 20th Street
LAND-O-SUN DAIRIES. Inc
101 Alton Road
LUBY CHEVROLET CO.
1055 West Flagler Street
MIAMI MILL WORK &
LUMBER CO.
535 N. W. Uth Street
NATIONAL BRANDS. Inc.
690 N. W. 13th 8treet
NANKIN'S SHOE STORE
158 East Flagler Street
Army-Nary Committee. Made Possible Through
Operation of
SAM MEYERS
111 South Miami Avenue
SOUTHEASTERN SALESMEN'S
CARAVAN
Langford Building
STANDARD WHOLESALE
GROCERY CO.
149 N. E. 10th Street
TOOLEY-MYRON STUDIOS
DuPont Building
WILLIAM D. SINGER
SUNGAS CO.
1100 West Flagler Street
WEST FLAGLER KENNEL CLUB
West Flagler St at 37th Avenue
WOLPERT FURNITURE CO.
15S West Flagler Street
WOMETCO THEATRES
Mitchell Wolfaoo Sydney
Lt. Norman Kossis. 26, of Se-
attle, Wash., was killed in action
over Western Europe in the
course of an aerial bombard-
ment of the Nazi submarine base
at Lorient. A holder of the Pur-
ple Heart Lt. Kossis has been
posthumously awarded the Air
Medal. The award was made
last month at a military review
at the Boeing Flying Fortress
School on the west coast with
the late lieutenant's mother re-
ceiving the award from Lt. Col.
Wiley Wright, commander of the
Army Air Force in the Seattle
area. A graduate of the Univer-
sity of Washington, Lieut Kossis
had been in service sixteen
months.
Pfc Theodore P. Gelbsteln. 19.
of the Bronx, lost his life last
March in the North African fight-
ing. A letter received from him
just the day before the War De-
partment's announcement of his
death said: "We went through
hell but so far I am all right.
Sometimes it is as quiet as the
graveyard here, but all of a sud-
den heaven and earth and all the
devils on earth break loose."
Prt. Hyman Fatt. 28, of New-
burgh, N. Y., was killed during
the Tunisian campaign. In ser-
vice a year, Private Fatt was a
salesman in civilian life and at-
tended Newburgh Free Academy.
Prt Jethro L Cohen. 21, of El-
gin, 111., was killed in action in
the Southwest Pacific area.




I
-
II
m
i.



PAGE EIGHT
MnfcA FhrMton
NOTES OF Y. M. //. A.
-by-
SAM SILVER
raiDAY.ocTOBFP
29,
tW
HAT
HEN
HERE
-i-runj-i........ ....."
After seven years of faithful
service as the YMHA columnist
for the Jewish Floridian, Harry
Schwartz, ardent and long time
worker of the "Y," has requested
that he be relieved of the duty of
writing this column on account
of additional community burdens
thrust upon him. It is with re-
gret that the "Y" accepts Harry's
resignation and all of us extend
to him our heartfelt thanks for
his splendid job as columnist.
Yours truly, who was appointed
YMHA columnist by Leo Acekr-
man, president, hopes he will be
able to equal Harry's excellent
record. The matter of writing a
column being something new to
me. I urge all members of the
was congenial and it was good to
see some of the staunch "Y"
workers, both old and new, trip-
ping lightly on the dance floor.
Next Sunday, Oct. 31. the "Y."
in conjunction with the Youth
Council of Greater Miami, will
sponsor an all-day program at
our building for all young men
and women in this community.
The program consists of athletic
events in the morning, a lunch-
eon, a forum in the afternoon,
and a dance in the evening. Ted
Sakowitz, president of the Youth
Council, has promised a well
rounded-out program, wholesome
in all respects, and we urge all
parents to send their children to
the "Y" to participate in this
(This column Is conducted by the
Creator Miami Jewish Federation In
,-,.operation with The Jewish frid-
hiii as a community service, lo Inform
the community of your organisation
activities and to avoid conflicts In
date:s. phone 3-5411 and ask for
'Community Calendar." Notification
must reach Federation no later than
Tuesday for publication that week.)
Fri., Oct. 29. National Council
tw ,i,mm I nwwwwwwwwwwte i I p
I
B'NAI B'RiTH
Notes
w
Bv PAUL WOTZMAN
^yy^^MMWWWwMMMkAAAAAAAAAAAAM^
"Y" and my other readers to send program. Incidentally. Ted is a
me suggestions and news items, candidate for National President
With the coming of somewhat
cooler weather, the New Year is
Jewish Women, bridge and Man just aroUnd the corner, and
Jongg. Beach Y.M.&W.H.A. 1:J0 lnoughts run to winding up the
year with a bang. Hence in-
creased activity is evident every-
where in Sholem Lodge.
Membership Retention
The committee working hard to
bring the total of members in
good standing to 1000 before the
end of the year, has reported
that its efforts have brought the
p. m. .
Tuet.. Nov. 2. Hadassah Board
meeting, 2 p. m.
Tue.. Nov. 2. Temple Israel
Board meeting. 8 p. m.
Wed.. Nov. 2. National Council
cil of Jewish Women, regular
meeting, Beach YM&WHA. 1:30
p. m.
Wed.. Nov. 3. Workmen's Cir-
cle, Branch 692, regular meeting.
We are sponsoring a series of of A- z- A- *nc junior order of! 25 Washington Avenue, Miami
cturcs on Jewish history B'nai B'rith. Being one of four .Beach. 8:30 p. m.
rough the cooperation of the candidates throughout the United [ Mon.. Nov. 8. Hadassah regular
le
through the coope
Rabbinical Association of Miami.
commencing shortly. The meth-
od of presentation will be out of
the ordinary in that the chut
topic of discussion will be the life
dt an individual, whereas the lec-
turer, at the same time, will
weave the history of the era in
which the individual lived into
his remarks. On the evening of
Nov. 3. at our building. Dr. Kap-
lan of Temple Israel will deliver
,i lecture on the life of Rabbi Jo-
ehannan Ben Zakai. A former
philosophy .student of Dr. Kap-
lan at the University of Miami.
I recommend his lectures as a
States for such high position meeting, 2 p. m.
makes us quite proud of Ted. and j -----------------
"if our wishes were horses" he RADIO HOUR
would be elected without any J Rab(jl M<)ses Ml,schl.,off wiu
be guest speaker on the Rabbini-
nl L i ii M Hour over WQAM this Sun- termine how many
Wd (du Pont Bldg.) and the. ,H' Son ot Man. Lodg,^
trouble.
Of interest to the athletically |
it
gj
C,i
Sunday morning at Ada Merritt KIN OF DR.* WOLFSON
Field[. S W. Fourth Street and WITH N.B.C. SYMPHONY
Lighth Avenue. Milt Friedman ______
reports it's more fun than a bar-j William Kapell. celebrated 21-
rel of monkeys to play such year-old pianist, who recently
keenly contested games. The spent several weeks in Miami
Coast Guard lias won three out beach with his uncle. Dr. Abra-
have forgotten our Servi*
-we haven't. But owR
n the service have no L
knowing that we ever flS
them as Ben B'rithi ""*<
Blood Donort
And what happened .
those who volunteered to T
blood to the Blood Bank'
now can go to the
Building at their own
lence and leave a p,t J\
life-saving fluid But it
total to 723 so far. An increase ijk0 they have to he
of about 80, since efforts to col- the hand and led there
led delinquent dues were first twi... /-. .
projected.
Last Monday night at a dutch
Tableau On Mt. Sinai
Shades of Gabriel's
treat dinner meeting before the Brother Harry Kovner, fatl
Pfc. Walter C. Kovner
vice-president of Sholem
committee was distracted by the
entertainment provided at the
Clover Club, the entire delin- remember?) suggested that
quent list was again culled to de- fWS*,te5rM. Promulated by
termine how many more mem-! United Nations, be proc
for Sholem
Nominating Committee
Louis Heiman. president of
Sholem Lodge, announced the ap-
pointment of a nominating com-
mittee to present a list of candi-
dates for the respective offices
Of the Lodge tor 1944. The mem-
bers of the committee are Morris
Gerstein, Isidore Goldstein. Sam
treat to anyone. The remainder "!'' foiE fma )l;,vi'd 1thus bam Wolf son. will play with the r^mTi'iV.V u"-^ iTv'm^Ainv'T
Of the schedule is: Nov. 10. Rab- fj >!ut the games have ,-.ton Symphony Orchestra this ".',hr: |"{c j Aertman and
hi Machtei of Beth Sholem Cen- l',,,n tl1", Su"<*?>' ,,*'f,,n las1 Saturday evening at 8:15 p. m. r*"r*-.. Btrtman and
ter will discuss Saadia tlaon. on V"' K-"11''. Iast'd >' 'nn,"Ks bt'' He will play the colorful Piano
Dec. 1. Rabbi April of Schaam [ore lhf toast GuardI finally won. .Concerto by the Soviet-Armenian
Zedek Congregation will discuss 8-7. Last Sunday the- score was composer, Aran Katchatunan.
Maimonides; on Dec. 15. Rabbi ^^m the eighth inmng. and the Young Kapell played this Con-
Mescheloff of Beth Jacob Con- flrst, three Coast Guard batters
gregation will discuss Rabbi Jo- m lhv "|nth Knocked home runs,
seph Karo; on Dec. 29. Rabbi Riving their team a 6-3 victory
Shapiro of Beth David Congre-! nvt'r the/'Y. These games will
gation will discuss Baal Shem bc continued every Sunday
Tov; and. last but not least, on morning, so run down and watch
Jan. 24. 1944, Rabbi Lehrman of ittum <"' Ket "n the team and
the Miami Beach Jewish Center
will discuss Moses Mendelsohn.
We know these lectures will be
of interest to everyone in the
community and we recommend
them highly.
I know everyone will agree
with me when I state that the
12th Annual Dance held last
certo at the Lewisohn Stadium
with the New York Philharmonic
Garry Glatt.
The next meeting of Sholem
Lodge, to be held on November
9th, will include nomination of
officers on the agenda, so the
nominating committee has its
work cut out. They will select
from Mount Sinai. Ari aru
Harry Kovner in the Los Ai
"Jewish Forum' elicited
some comment.
Lights Going On Agia
As we come to this point t
attention is distracted byai
nouncement over the radiotol
effect that dim-out regulgj.
are to be lifted on Novemberl
and once again the lights
shine on Broadwayand Gn
Miami will once again
brightly.
The day is closer when
lights will "go on all over l
world." Let us hope it will I
enlightenment that brightens!
world, as well.
Orchestra and made a tremen- the men who. in their opinion,
dous hit. Dr. Serge Koussevit- (w,n best fill the chairs for the
sky. the conductor of the famous coming yearand carry on for
Boston Symphony Orchestra, was dear old alma mater.
participate in them.
Registration for Spanish classes
for adults and dancing classes for
children was held at the "Y" last
night Large groups registered
for both of these projects
At your convenience, go to the ''>' tbe Blue Network of NBC
wntown branch of the Florida a,,d Wl11 Dt' earned here by radio
80 impressed with the brilliant
versatility of this unusually gift-
ed artist that he invited him to
play the Concerto with the Bos-
ton Symphony Orchestra.
This concert will be broadcast
dowi
Power & Light Co. and donate
Tuesday at the Coral Gables' v"ur blood. This is a patriotic-
Country Club was a social sue- dut>- Request that your dona-
cess. As usual the Air Corps ll!"> '' Caperers were a riot. I. person- MHA.
ally, enjoy them more and more
each time I see and hear them
The first meeting of the fall
season of the YMHA Cub Pack
perform. The crowd at the dance wil|, take place Monday evening
at (30 p. m. in the clubrooms.
Mr. Louis Zimmon is chairman of
the Cub Pack committee.
I WANT MY MILK
Ettab.
1924
And Be Sure It's
FLORIDA
DAIRIES
HOMOGENIZED
Vitamin "D" Milk
"Milk Product"
Dscto Protected
TEL. 2-2621
Greater Miami Delivery
Visit Our Farm at
6200 N. W. 32nd Street
station WKAT.
While in Miami Beach Kapell
played before the Army and
Navy, for the Parents and Teach
ers Association and for the bene-
fit concert lor the Jewish Na-
tional Fund, given by the .Mi- i woods,
ami Beach Zionist district.
We've heard tell that men are
selected to run for elective office
in governmental divisions by
men in shirt sleeves in smoke
filled rooms. We've heard rum-
ors that there is a lot of horse
trading between cliques and fac-
tions to promote the political ca-
reers of favorite candidates.
Much pork-barrel legislation us-
ually results from such deals,
we've heard it whispered about.
But what would we know about
such thingsbeing babes in the
SEXTETTE TO BE ORGANIZED
Buy War Bonds and Stamps and
Insure Your Tomorrow.
Take Your Watch
to Danzig's!
SMALl:3t
w at : -
MOVE ^-'STS
P E R <=- E : T _Y
R fc. ^A RED
Delicate, smafl. Intricate
morDWDte art haadlmd
by as wild nndinlaod
too car* and ikUZ.
JEWELRY REPAIRING
DANZIG'S
JEWELERS
id HALCYON ARCADE
145 E Hlqlir S<
Oddi and Ends
Speaking of winding up the
year generally includes a gener-
jal cleaningthe kind that calls
FOR MIAMI ROUNn T&Rtr ai Cleaningtne kind tnat calls
rUK MIAMI HOUND TABLE sweeping out from under the
. --------- rug. instead of a lick and a prom-
A special sextette of three men
and three women of Protestant.
Catholic and Jewish faiths will be
organized by the Miami Round
Table for the first World Com-
munity day program, Nov. 11,
under sponsorship of the Miami
branch, Florida Chain of Mis-
sionary- Assemblies.
The Inter-faith meeting will be-
held from 2 to 4 p. m. in observa-
tion of the 25th anniversary of
the Armistice.
BEFORE YOU NT
see
LEON EL III
with
METROPOLITAN
LIFE INS. CO.
Not Beat Because Biggs*
ButBiggeet Becaust M
For l intancY
DRINK plenty of
Cfgripure
. Wa ter
yCLIVMcatO TOUR HOME
i-CALLON BOTTLE .....$0|
C*S OF SIX
TMU tOTTLlS.......,5l
*9gn BiMIt Otpotili
'* PHONE 2-4128
ise. And looking into some
dark corners and closets, we
found a duffle bag which was
supposed to be filled by mem-
bers for the benefit of brothers
in the serviceand replenished,
so that Ben B'riths in the ser- I
vice would receive a gift from'
time to time, just so that they .
would know they were remem-
bered Sad to say, the duffle
bag was empty, and in fact never
held very much.
This does not mean that we
TUomi
for Rest
Convalesces?! I
jChronicCasb|
Hn-Raylm
lealthResort
,smc 'o* toounC
r "
1*11
THREE O'CLOCK >
AND I HAVENT SLEPT A WINK"
WAKEFUL NIGHTS-how the tin* M
Minutes seem like hours, we wony over uw>
done and left undone. 'After such a wi*". *rT
up In the morninc more tired than when we wn
to bed. Nervous Tension causes many s **?"
night and wakeful nirhu are likely tesaS>*S
vous Tension. Next time you feel Nervoui
Keyed Up or begin to toss, tumble and wony "
you get to bed try
DR. MILES NERVINE
(Liquid or Effervescent Tablets)
fWsh!n.^5fS IS** helP to ease Nervous Tension-to pemK
lE M?l~ iT^Whiyou *" K'y* UJ>. Crmky, fidgety. -
JETS NtfriM- T^ ^ Nervous I&dadbTsnd Nervous ta*!****
^.g*'te.'gifcMpt, at your drug store. Effervescent Table* l*J
m"SfS, ^.', T11 ***** ** Li9a. Large Bottle I1.M, S^Jfir
your^o^ffi n' -tt*
your money beck. Read directions and use only as directed.
MODERATE COSTS
ALWAYS WITHIN THE MEANS
OF INDIVIDUAL
CIRCUMSTANCES
GORDON FUNERAL HOME
yiOSW^AV^T^1811 FUNEHAL HME
710 S. W. 1 th AVENl PHONE M431
WORTHY AND
DESERVES YOUR H^1
SUPPORT AND
RECOMMENDATION


Full Text

PAGE 1

I II m i. PAGE EIGHT MnfcA FhrMton NOTES OF Y. M. //. A. -bySAM SILVER raiDAY.o c TOBFP 29, tW HAT HEN HERE % %  -i-runj-i After seven years of faithful service as the YMHA columnist for the Jewish Floridian, Harry Schwartz, ardent and long time worker of the "Y," has requested that he be relieved of the duty of writing this column on account of additional community burdens thrust upon him. It is with regret that the "Y" accepts Harry's resignation and all of us extend to him our heartfelt thanks for his splendid job as columnist. Yours truly, who was appointed YMHA columnist by Leo Acekrman, president, hopes he will be able to equal Harry's excellent record. The matter of writing a column being something new to me. I urge all members of the was congenial and it was good to see some of the staunch "Y" workers, both old and new, tripping lightly on the dance floor. Next Sunday, Oct. 31. the "Y." in conjunction with the Youth Council of Greater Miami, will sponsor an all-day program at our building for all young men and women in this community. The program consists of athletic events in the morning, a luncheon, a forum in the afternoon, and a dance in the evening. Ted Sakowitz, president of the Youth Council, has promised a well rounded-out program, wholesome in all respects, and we urge all parents to send their children to the "Y" to participate in this (This column Is conducted by the Creator Miami Jewish Federation In ,-,.operation with The Jewish fridhiii as a community service, lo Inform the community of your organisation %  activities and to avoid conflicts In date:s. phone 3-5411 and ask for %  Community Calendar." Notification must reach Federation no later than Tuesday for publication that week.) Fri., O c t. 29. National Council t w ,I,MM I nw wwwwww wwwte i I p I B'NAI B'Ri TH NOTES w Bv PAUL WOTZMAN ^yy^^MMWWWwMMMkAAAAAAAAAAAAM^ "Y" and my other readers to send program. Incidentally. Ted is a me suggestions and news items, candidate for National President With the coming of somewhat cooler weather, the New Year is Jewish Women, bridge and Man j ust aroU nd the corner, and Jongg. Beach Y.M.&W.H.A. 1:J0 lnou ght s run to winding up the year with a bang. Hence increased activity is evident everywhere in Sholem Lodge. Membership Retention The committee working hard to bring the total of members in good standing to 1000 before the end of the year, has reported that its efforts have brought the p. m. Tuet.. Nov. 2. Hadassah Board meeting, 2 p. m. Tue.. Nov. 2. Temple Israel Board meeting. 8 p. m. Wed.. Nov. 2. National Council cil of Jewish Women, regular meeting, Beach YM&WHA. 1:30 p. m. Wed.. Nov. 3. Workmen's Circle, Branch 692, regular meeting. We are sponsoring a series of of A z A nc junior order of! 25 Washington Avenue, Miami cturcs on Jewish history B'nai B'rith. Being one of four .Beach. 8:30 p. m. rough the cooperation of the candidates throughout the United [ Mon.. Nov. 8. Hadassah regular le through the coope Rabbinical Association of Miami. commencing shortly. The method of presentation will be out of the ordinary in that the chut topic of discussion will be the life dt an individual, whereas the lecturer, at the same time, will weave the history of the era in which the individual lived into his remarks. On the evening of Nov. 3. at our building. Dr. Kaplan of Temple Israel will deliver ,i lecture on the life of Rabbi Joehannan Ben Zakai. A former philosophy .student of Dr. Kaplan at the University of Miami. I recommend his lectures as a States for such high position meeting, 2 p. m. makes us quite proud of Ted. and j "if our wishes were horses" he RADIO HOUR would be elected without any J Rab(jl M<)ses Ml schl ., off wi u be guest speaker on the Rabbininl L „ i ii M Hour over WQAM this Suntermine how many Wd (du Pont Bldg.) and the. ,H Son ot Man. Lodg,^ trouble. Of interest to the athletically | it gj C,i Sunday morning at Ada Merritt KIN OF DR.* WOLFSON Field[. S W. Fourth Street and WITH N.B.C. SYMPHONY Lighth Avenue. Milt Friedman reports it's more fun than a bar-j William Kapell. celebrated 21rel of monkeys to play such year-old pianist, who recently keenly contested games. The spe nt several weeks in Miami Coast Guard lias won three out beach with his uncle. Dr. Abrahave forgotten our Servi* -we haven't. But owR n the service have no L knowing that we ever flS them as Ben B'rithi "" %  *< Blood Donort And what happened those who volunteered to T blood to the Blood Bank' now can go to the £ %  Building at their own %  lence and leave a p ,„ t J\ life-saving fluid But it total to 723 so far. An increase ijk 0 t hey have to he of about 80, since efforts to colthe hand and led there led delinquent dues were first TWI... /-. projected. Last Monday night at a dutch Tableau On Mt. Sinai Shades of Gabriel's treat dinner meeting before the Brother Harry Kovner, fatl Pfc. Walter C. Kovner vice-president of Sholem committee was distracted by the entertainment provided at the Clover Club, the entire delinremember?) suggested that quent list was again culled to defWS*, te 5 r M P rom ulated by termine how many more mem-! United Nations, be proc for Sholem Nominating Committee Louis Heiman. president of Sholem Lodge, announced the appointment of a nominating committee to present a list of candidates for the respective offices Of the Lodge tor 1944. The members of the committee are Morris Gerstein, Isidore Goldstein. Sam treat to anyone. The remainder "!'' foi E %  f m £ a • )l;,vi d 1 thus bam Wolf son. will play with the R^MTI'IV.V u"-^ iTv'm^Ainv'T Of the schedule is: Nov. 10. Rab£fj >! ut %  the games have ,-„.ton Symphony Orchestra this ". !" ,hr : |"{ c j Aertman and hi Machtei of Beth Sholem Cenl ,,,n tl 1 ", Su "<*?>' ,, *' f,,n las 1 Saturday evening at 8:15 p. m. r*"r*-.. Btrtman and ter will discuss Saadia tlaon. on V"' K-" 11 ''. Iast d >' nn, "K s bt '' He will play the colorful Piano Dec. 1. Rabbi April of Schaam [ore lh f toast GuardI finally won. .Concerto by the Soviet-Armenian Zedek Congregation will discuss 8-7. Last Sunday thescore was composer, Aran Katchatunan. Maimonides; on Dec. 15. Rabbi ^^m the eighth inmng. and the Young Kapell played this ConMescheloff of Beth Jacob Conflrst three Coast Guard batters gregation will discuss Rabbi Jom lhv "| nth Knocked home runs, seph Karo; on Dec. 29. Rabbi Riving their team a 6-3 victory Shapiro of Beth David Congre-! nvt r the/'Y. These games will gation will discuss Baal Shem bc continued every Sunday Tov; and. last but not least, on morning, so run down and watch Jan. 24. 1944, Rabbi Lehrman of i t tum <"' K et n the team and the Miami Beach Jewish Center will discuss Moses Mendelsohn. We know these lectures will be of interest to everyone in the community and we recommend them highly. I know everyone will agree with me when I state that the 12th Annual Dance held last certo at the Lewisohn Stadium with the New York Philharmonic Garry Glatt. The next meeting of Sholem Lodge, to be held on November 9th, will include nomination of officers on the agenda, so the nominating committee has its work cut out. They will select from Mount Sinai. Ari ar u Harry Kovner in the Los Ai "Jewish Forum' elicited some comment. Lights Going On Agia As we come to this point t attention is distracted byai nouncement over the radiotol effect that dim-out regulgj. are to be lifted on Novemberl and once again the lights shine on Broadway—and Gn Miami will once again brightly. The day is closer when lights will "go on all over l world." Let us hope it will I enlightenment that brightens! world, as well. Orchestra and made a trementhe men who. in their opinion, dous hit. Dr. Serge Koussevit(w ,n best fill the chairs for the sky. the conductor of the famous coming year—and carry on for Boston Symphony Orchestra, was dear old alma mater. participate in them. Registration for Spanish classes for adults and dancing classes for children was held at the "Y" last night Large groups registered for both of these projects At your convenience, go to the ''>' tbe Blue Network of NBC %  wntown branch of the Florida a,,d Wl11 Dt earned here by radio 80 impressed with the brilliant versatility of this unusually gifted artist that he invited him to play the Concerto with the Boston Symphony Orchestra. This concert will be broadcast dowi Power & Light Co. and donate Tuesday at the Coral Gables' v ur blood. This is a patrioticCountry Club was a social suedut >Request that your donacess. As usual the Air Corps ll !"> '' < v 'T;, (l i l ""' %  *"* Caperers were a riot. I. person' MHA. ally, enjoy them more and more each time I see and hear them The first meeting of the fall season of the YMHA Cub Pack perform. The crowd at the dance wil |, take place Monday evening at (30 p. m. in the clubrooms. Mr. Louis Zimmon is chairman of the Cub Pack committee. I WANT MY MILK Ettab. 1924 And Be Sure It's FLORIDA DAIRIES HOMOGENIZED Vitamin "D" Milk "Milk Product" DSCTO Protected TEL. 2-2621 Greater Miami Delivery Visit Our Farm at 6200 N. W. 32nd Street station WKAT. While in Miami Beach Kapell played before the Army and Navy, for the Parents and Teach ers Association and for the benefit concert lor the Jewish National Fund, given by the .Mii woods, ami Beach Zionist district. We've heard tell that men are selected to run for elective office in governmental divisions by men in shirt sleeves in smoke filled rooms. We've heard rumors that there is a lot of horse trading between cliques and factions to promote the political careers of favorite candidates. Much pork-barrel legislation usually results from such deals, we've heard it whispered about. But what would we know about such things—being babes in the SEXTETTE TO BE ORGANIZED Buy War Bonds and Stamps and Insure Your Tomorrow. Take Your Watch to Danzig's! SMALL:3 T w AT : MOVE ^-'STS P E R <=E : T _Y R fc. ^A RED Delicate, smafl. Intricate morDWDte art haadlmd by as wild nndinlaod too car* and ikUZ. JEWELRY REPAIRING DANZIG'S JEWELERS id HALCYON ARCADE 145 E Hlqlir S< Oddi and Ends Speaking of winding up the year generally includes a generjal cleaning—the kind that calls FOR MIAMI ROUNn T&Rtr ai Cleaning—tne kind tnat calls rUK MIAMI HOUND TABLE sweeping out from under the rug. instead of a lick and a promA special sextette of three men and three women of Protestant. Catholic and Jewish faiths will be organized by the Miami Round Table for the first World Community day program, Nov. 11, under sponsorship of the Miami branch, Florida Chain of Missionary Assemblies. The Inter-faith meeting will beheld from 2 to 4 p. m. in observation of the 25th anniversary of the Armistice. BEFORE YOU NT see LEON EL III with METROPOLITAN LIFE INS. CO. Not Beat Because Biggs* But—Biggeet Becaust M For l intancY DRINK PLENTY OF Cfgripure Wa ter yCLIVMcatO TOUR HOME i-CALLON BOTTLE $ 0| C*S£ OF SIX %  TMU tOTTLlS 5l *9gn BiMIt Otpotili '* PHONE 2-4128 ise. And looking into some dark corners and closets, we found a duffle bag which was supposed to be filled by members for the benefit of brothers in the service—and replenished, so that Ben B'riths in the serI vice would receive a gift from' time to time, just so that they would know they were remembered Sad to say, the duffle bag was empty, and in fact never held very much. This does not mean that we TUomi for REST CONVALESCES?! I •„JCHRONICCASB| Hn-Raylm lealthResort ,smc 'o* toounC r %  1*11 THREE O'CLOCK •> AND I HAVENT SLEPT A WINK" WAKEFUL NIGHTS-how the tin* M Minutes seem like hours, we wony over uw> done and left undone. 'After such a wi*". *rT up In the morninc more tired than when we wn to bed. Nervous Tension causes many s ** %  ?" night and wakeful nirhu are likely te s aS> *S vous Tension. Next time you feel Nervoui • Keyed Up or begin to toss, tumble and wony •" %  you get to bed —try DR. MILES NERVINE (Liquid or Effervescent Tablets) fW s h!n.^5f S IS* !" hel P to ease Nervous Tension-to pemK£ lE M?l~ iT^ W h £i you *" %  K 'y* UJ>. Crmky, fidgety. £££-£ JETS Nt f riM T^ ^ Nervous I&dadbTsnd Nervous ta*!**** ^.g*' te.'gifcMpt, at your drug store. Effervescent Table* l*J m "SfS, ^.', T 11 ***** ** Li9a. Large Bottle I1.M, S^Jfir your^o^ffi n' -tt* %  your money beck. Read directions and use only as directed. MODERATE COSTS ALWAYS WITHIN THE MEANS OF INDIVIDUAL CIRCUMSTANCES GORDON FUNERAL HOME yiOSW^AV^T^ 1 8 1 1 FUNEHAL H M E 710 S. W. 1 th AVENl PHONE M431 WORTHY AND DESERVES YOUR H^ 1 SUPPORT AND RECOMMENDATION


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PAGE 1

)AY, OCTOBER 29. 1943 *Jf/nist) ncrkiian PAGE THREE ORGANIZATION ACTIVITIES ^MAAMMMAAAAAAAAAAA^ clothing, shoes, or glass jars, please contact Betty Alpert, 2-6804, or Minnie Kline, 2-1025, and the articles will be called for. The Auxiliary is now launching a membership drive. Mothers, sisters, wives, daughters, granddaughters, or daughters-in-law of a member of the armed forces are eligible to join immediately upon the serviceman's induction and doTiot have to wait until he is discharged, as after World War I. Any one interested in affiliating with the organization may contact Mrs. Isidor Cohen, chairman of membership, 2-2193, or Mrs. Sarah Augustine, cochairman, 9-2068. BEACH ZIONIST Thursday evening saw the election of new officers for the Miami Beach Zionist District. Shepard Broad was re-elected president. Report of Jewish National Fund achievements and the program activities were heard. A membership goal of 500 was set and accepted with total enrollment to date in excess of 375 members. Golden Book certificates were presented to Leo Robinson and Shepard Broad for outstanding services to the district. The Cultural Forum will hold its regular weekly meeting this Sunday afternoon at 3:30 at the Beach "Y," 1 Lincoln Road. The topic for discussion is "The War Contribution of Palestine to the United Nations" to which all interested are invited. The usual question and answer period will follow. NATIONAL COUNCIL SERVICE LEAGUE The United States Government Having Taken Over His Present Offices— DR. JOSEPH B. MARGOLIS announces the REMOVAL OF HIS OFFICE to 311 Lincoln Road Albion Bldg.. Suit* 301 MIAMI BEACH For the Practice of General Dentistry The Miami Service League of the YMHA is planning a gala Hallowe'en dance to be held on Saturday evening. Oct. 30, at the YMHA. Mrs. Harry Rabin, chairmain, called a meeting Wednesday evening at her home. 2018 S. W. 14th Terrace, at which time plans were completed. Members who will act as senior hostesses include: Mesdames Herman Bloom, Sam Sidele, Henry SMer, Maurice Sager, Leo Hohauser, Al Weiss and Max Shapiro; victory belle committee: Mrs. Ann Pastroff and Mrs. Henry Kauffrhan; refreshment committee: Mrs. Jennie D. Levinsohn and Mrs. Lil Friedman, and promise an evening of dancing, games, contests and refreshments. Service men are invited to participate in the fun. ORTHODOX CONG. The Miami Jewish Orthodox Congregation at a meeting last Tuesday elected officers for the ensuing year. Chosen were Leon Kaplan, president; D. Simon, 1st vice president; D. Singer, 2nd vice president; Samuel Raskin, 3rd vice president; David Bear, treasurer; Sid H. Palmer, recording secretary; Sidney Wasserman, financial secretary. On the board of directors are Max Rifas, David Bear, M. H. Silverman, Aaron Freilich. Morris Ehrlich, Harry Pearl, Hyman Talkofsky, George Chertkof. David Rabinovich, Joe Zalis, Phillip Wallich, Nat Blumberg and Joseph Rosenthal. TEMPLE ISRAEL A board meeting of the Temple Israel Sisterhood will be held at 10:30 Wednesday morning, Nov. 3, in Kaplan Hall. OLD SARATOGA INN Bisoync Boulcv.ird .it 77h Street Phono 7-77Z3 Dinners From 5 o'Clock Sundays From Noon Cocktai! Lounge Fine Liquors and Wines •M liUS II rROM DOWNTOWN MIAMI OB Bin M 'I MOM MIAMI IUCN OPEN EVERY DAY EXCEPT TUESDAY Aak Your Local DalicatMMn roc tha Baat • It Ceata No Mora OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE IN FLORIDA KOSHER ZION SAUSAGE CO. PRODUCTS Dallolout Corn*d B*r Plcklad, Cookd and 8mok*d Maati 87th and Normal Ava. Chiaaje The regular monthly meeting of the National Council of Jewish Women, Miami Section, will be held Wednesday, Nov. 3, at 1:30 p. m. at the YM&WHA, 1 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach. Mrs. Monte Selig, president, will preside at a business meeting which will be followed by an address by Mr. Benjamin Goldman, director of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. His topic will be "Community Service." Added feature of the meeting will be a talk by Miss Athene Foster, executive director of the Florida Association of Workers for the Blind. Piano selections will be given by Miss Alama Chalker of the Miami Lighthouse. Miss Chalker is a graduate of the Florida State College for Women and the Cincinnati College of Music. Aiding the blind is one of the Council's projects and the Miami Section recently received a letter of appreciation from the Florida Association of Workers for the Blind which acknowledged the gift from the Council of four Braille writers. The Braille writers were presented to the Miami Lighthouse and are used by volunteer workers in transcribing books for the blind and various other ways. The Braille writers were procured through the efforts of Mrs. David Phillips, Council chairman in the work for the blind. Beginning Friday, Nov. 5, at 2 p. m., the Council Weekly Forum will inaugurate a new Forum lecture series. Designed to help Council members and all interested to understand current events and trends, especially in regard to the position of the Jew in the post-war world, these Forums will be conducted the first and third Fridays of the month through April 21 at the YM&WHA at 1 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach. The program as planned by Mrs. Benjamin LeVine, Social Welfare chairman of the Miami Section, includes the following lectures: Nov. 5, 1943—"Why Study Post-War Problems," Mrs. Stanley C. Myers. Nov. 19, 1943—"Problems of Transition Period," Rev. Joseph Barth. Dec. 3, 1943—"Relief, Reconstruction and Migration," Rabbi Irving Lehrman. Dec. 17, 1943—"World Federation of States," Dr. Louis K. Manley. Jan. 7, 1944—"New League of Nations," Mr. Eustace L. Adams. Jan. 21, 1944—"Social Aspects in Post-War Planning," Dr. Harold Briggs. Fob. 4, 1944—"Palestine in the Post-War World," Mr. Harry Simonhoff. Feb. 18. 1944—"Religion in the Post-War World," Miami Round Table: Father Florence Sullivan, Dr. Glenn C. James, Rabbi Max Shapiro. Mar. 3, 1944—"Anti-Semitism in America," Mr. Alexander F. Miller. Mar. 17, 1944—"Anti-Semitism in Europe," Mr. Alexander F. Miller. Apr. 7, 1944—"Women in the Post-War World," Mrs. Ramona Barth. Apr. 21. 1944—"Problem of Youth in the Post-War World," Mr. Wm. C. Kesselman. Books of tickets, which will include the entire series, will cost $4.50 and individual tickets may be purchased at the meeting place for 50 cents. Books of tickets may be obtained from the Council office, 513 Congress Building, or from Mrs. Herbert. As in the past the Forum will support the Council Scholarship Fund which provides tuition for several worthy students at the University of Miami. SCHAAREI ZEDEK Congregation Shaarei Zedek will hold its annual election of officers on Tuesday evening, Nov. 2, at the synagogue. Other important business will be transacted. Announcement has been made this week regarding the resumption of Sunday School classes at Congregation Shaarei Zedek Synagogue, 1545 S. W. Third Street, commencing Sunday, Oct. 24, at 10 a. m. Registration is open to all children. B'NAI B'RITH GIRLS BE TH SHOLOM CENTER A regular meeting of Beth Sholem Center has been called for next Tuesday night by President Abraham Frankel. Reports of the High Holy Days will be submitted. The Board of Directors will report on the activities during the past summer and will outline the program for the coming winter season. Mr. Frankel will announce his committee appointments for the program of activities at the Center. BETH DAVID Plans for the Annual Membership Tea to be held Wednesday, Nov. 17, are now being formulated by the chairman, Mrs. Norman Jacobs and her committee, of Beth David Sisterhood. The Fall Rush tea of the Miami Beach Chapter of B'nai B'rith Girls was held Sunday, Oct. 17 at the YM&WHA, Miami Beach. Thirteen members were present and became acquainted with the organization and its work. Newly elected officers of the B. B. G. are: President, Edith Schulman; vice president, Lila Zeffert; secretary, Judy Nelson; treasurer, Mickey DuBrin: defense chairman, Isadora Margolis. The Third War Loan Drive is now on. Will you do your part by buying Bonds? Your help is urgently needed NOW! REAL ESTATE—MIAMI BEACH B. E. BRONSTON, Realtor 605 Lincoln Road Ph. 5-5868 A Trustworthy Real Estate Service Ask for Free 19*3 Descriptive Map of Miami Ileach RENTALS LEASES SALES Lots, Homes, Hotels Apartment Houses M. GILLER Reg. Real Estate Broker Ph. 58-1188 523 Mich. A*e. PALM BEACH NOTES JEWISH FLORIDIAN OFFICE, 226 S. OLIVE STREET IN THE FOX BUILDING MBS. MART SCHHEBNKX Rap r aaaa k rtlTa Mrs. Marie Blumberg, 412 42nd Street, has just returned from Hempstead, N. Y., where she spent the summer. ANNOUNCEMENT Beginning Monday, Nov. 1, I will be associated with the SOUTHERN DAIRIES and will handle all their dairy products. Due to my late accident I am unable to call on all my friends in person, I therefore ask them to be kind enough to call Phone 2-1326 I can assure you of prompt and courteous attention. THANK YOU. Mrs. Mary Schrebnick The Bar Mitzvah of Sammy, son of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Smith, took place Saturday, Aug. 3, at Temple Beth El. Rabbi Greenstein officiated at the ceremony, attended by many friends. S/Sgt. George Greenberg. son of Mr. and Mrs. Max Greenberg, 85 Barcelona, is now with the Quartermaster Board Detachment, colonel's staff, Camp Lee, Va. A card party was sponsored last Sunday night at Scher Memorial Hall by the Beth El Sisterhood. Mr. and Mrs. Hyman, 1801 S. Olive Avenue, returned from Worcester, Mass., where they spent the summer. Their daughter. Miss Phyllis Freeman, is attending the Florida State College for Women at Tallahassee. —Buy War Savings Bonds— The Sisterhood of Beth Israel held a Succoth party for the children at Schwartzberg Hall. Sunday afternoon, and a card party in the evening for the members and friends. ALFAR CREAMERY CO. FOT to Fradi WEST PALM BEACH MTT.F—CREAM—ICE CREAM DENVER CHILD'S HOME The Greater Miami Chapter of the National Home for Jewish Children at Denver will hold their next regular meeting Tuesday, Nov. 2, at 1:30 p. m., at the YM&WHA, 1 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach. Mrs. Irving Lehrman, wife of Rabbi Lehrman of the Miami Beach Jewish Center, will be the guest speaker. Mrs. Lehrman was a well known figure in Jewish charity circles in Montclair, N. J., her former home. A social hour and refreshments will follow and members and friends are invited to attend. A meeting of the board of directors will be held at 10:30 a. m. of the same day, also at the Beach "Y." 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)AY, OCTOBER 29, 1943 +Jewish HorkUan PAGEFTVE IATI0N/IL COUNCIL OF J by MARTIN SILVER irWEMILISTIEEI BY MILTON BROWN Copyright, 1943, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc. The National Council of Jewish Women, which hold its 17th triennial convention and observe 50th anniversary at the Drake Hotel, in Chicago, r. 7 to Nov. 11, is the oldest organized Jewish ion's group in America, and it includes all ses of Jewish belief. The Council grew out of Congress of Jewish Women, which was part of Parliament of Religions held in connection with World's Fair in Chicago, in 1893. A Women's aittee representing every religion and denomition thereof formed a separate unit in the general imittee of the Parliament, and each woman on committee was the chairman for her particular ligious group. Mrs. Hannah Greenebaum Solomon, a young >man already known for her participation in Chigo civic affairs, was appointed to this Women's kmmittee Jan. 1, 1892. The Jewish Women's Repous Congress convened in the Memorial Art lace in Chicago during the week of Sept. 3, 1893, took part in the Parliament of Religions, Sept. to 26. The 95 women at the Congress approved s. Solomon's plan for a permanent organization, d the National Council of Jewish Women was jlished, dedicating itself to "Faith and Human\" through religious education and philanthropy. A significant program was introduced in 1894 Ith the appointment of a junior section committee, parallel and carry on the work of the senior juncil members. In 1919 the juniors met and bele established as the National Council of Jewish iors. When the Senior Council convenes in icago in November, the Jewish Juniors will hold siennial convention, their thirteenth, at the same xe and place as the parent organization. Mrs. rice L. Goldman, president of the National incil, and Miss Marian Schuman, president of rish Juniors, will give their messages at the openmeeting, Sunday evening, Nov. 7. [Thousands of Jewish women did volunteer work %  the early years, with the dual purpose of furPring the aims of Judaism and of representing rish women worthily in all causes that affect rind. By the end of the first decade. 14 SabSchools were doing important work in religeducation. Pioneer work had been done in janizing settlement houses, in work with juvenile id other courts, and in cooperation with state and ional associations with social programs. CounSections supported a great variety of philanropic endeavors, such as industrial schools, day rseries, and Religious Mission Schools among ie poor. In 1903 the Government of the United States relested the Council's assistance in solving serious roblems created by the greatly increasing immiration to America. The Lexow Committee, apiinted by the government to investigate conditions : the ports of entry, had brought to light tragic lories of exploitation, white slavery, and sweat"lop labor. Organization of Council's Port and ock Department was its quick response to this jameful situation. Relatives were located, details I immigration adjusted, and families and indiidual women and children assisted on their way join their own national groups. Council workers vent on to investigate labor conditions and to co)perate in a campaign for better living and working onditions. In 1907 a permanent station for immirant aid was established by the Council at Ellis md. In 1908 the Council participated in the White louse Conference on Child Welfare, called by resident Taft, and the Council's program for social legislation was formally established in 1911. The summation of child labor, provision of adequate lousing, slum clearance, wage and hour laws for women, enactment of anti-lynching legislation, and ill legislation for protection of women and children came the concern of the Council thereafter. When war broke in 1914 the Council was acively cooperating with the World Peace Foundation. Between 1914 and 1918 the National Council if Jewish Women was a member of the Council of National Defense and cooperated with various other committees and associations. When Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catt called a conjlerence of eight women's organizations in 1925 Po found a National Committee on the Cause and 'ure of War. the National Council of Je\vish Women ras among the original groups represented. This 'as following out the stand taken by the Council early as 1889, before the Spanish American War. (Continued next week) The big news of the week was the three power conference in Moscow. Some observers were predicting that the Palestine and Middle East situation would come up before the Conference. These observers pointed to the recent visit of Ivan Maisky to Palestine as an indication of Russian interest in the Middle East. It was said that Anthony Eden, the British Foreign Minister, had conferred with a number of Egyptian and Arab leaders while in Cairo en route to Moscow. It was also reported that a Russian legation will shortly be opened in Egypt. All of this appears to give a new aspect to the Palestine question. If the question was ever complex, it is more complex now. Obviously, the British White Paper by no means writes the word "finis" to Palestine. The Jews are pulling one way, the Arabs another, Britain has its own ends in view— and now Russia seems to have special interests. All of this leads to the possibility of a new solution—that of the internationalization of the Palestine zone. Palestine might be made into an international territory. While the Zionists, of course, are openily contending for a Jewish state, it is quite possible that they would be entirely satisfied if Palestine were given an international status as long as the right of Jewish immigration to Palestine were not restricted. In fact, some Zionist leaders have indicated their desire for such a status for Palestine at least for the period immediately after the war. Such a development suggests another curious angles. If Palestine is made into an international state, then it would seem that even so unrelenting an opponent of Zionism as Dr. Julius Morgenstern, president of the Hebrew Union College, might give Zionism his blessing. Dr. Morgenstern this week came out strongly against Zionism. It is the nationalism of Zionism which goes against his grain. It is the universalism of Judaism which appeals to him. Well, if Palestine is made into an international state, it would seem this would be furthering the international, the universalistic idea which Dr. Morgenstern cherishes. This would indeed be transforming the abstract ideal of universalism into concrete reality. We should imagine that none could be so gratified as Dr. Morgenstern. All of the nations of the world would then begin to share in the universalistic idea. And Palestine would lead, so to speak, to the actual ushering in of that "one world" idea, which Wendell WilUrie proclaims, but which the prophets for whom Dr. Morgenstern speaks, proclaimed many centuries ago. Zionism would then open the road for universalism. What does the head of the Hebrew Union Colege think of this? President Roosevelt's reprimand of the Argentine government for its ban on the Yiddish press seemingly "hit home." The Argentine authorities were so concerned about it that this week they called upon Jewish leaders in Buenos Aires to sign a statement saying that no anti-Jewish discrimination has been practiced in Argentine. Of course, the Jewish leaders, with Argentina being a dictatorship a la Axis, had no other alternative but to sign. President Roosevelt has a right to be well pleased with the reaction to his statement. Unfortunately, in the United States, too, we have our black spots. According to the New York newspaper PM, the city of Boston is one of such black spots. That the reports appearing in PM, even if somewhat sensational, have a substantial core of truth, was indicated this week when Boston Jewish leaders called on Police Commissioner Joseph Timilty to do something about the attacks "on Jewish children and adults by hoodlums in Dorchester." That such attacks should occur in Boston is a double shame. This was the vicinity where the Pilgrims landed in search of religious freedom. This was the land hallowed by the Emersons, the Theodore Parkers, the Garrisons, the Thoreaus. These were the prophets of early America who expressed American idealism in its highest form. Today, the early Puritan element has receded in Boston. Boston today is more of an Irish city than a Puritan city. And one would expect that under the Irish the ideals of religious freedom and freedom from persecution would be even more stringently upheld, for the Irish have themselves suffered so much at the hands of the oppressors that they must have a fellow feeling for other victims. Unfortunately, however, the incidents reported this week do not bear out this hope. Of course, it is the "scum" who are behind these attacks, that scum whose mind has been inflamed by Father Coughlin and his lieutenants. We wonder what Father Coughlin would say about the news reported this week that the Pope contributed about $10,000 to make up the fine imposed on the Jews of Rome by the Nazis. BETWEEN YOU AND ME BY BORIS SMOLAR Copyright, 1943, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc. z. Delegation: With religion again fully recognized in Soviet Russia, don't be surprised if you read soon in the press that a religious delegation will shortly proceed from Moscow to Palestine This will not exactly be a Jewish delegation, although representatives of the Moscow Jewish religious community may also be included in it The delegation will be headed by the Russian Patriarch Sergius The Jewish members of the delegation are expected to visit the Wailing Wall, Jewish colonies and Rabbinate The Christian members will make a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, Nazareth and Bethlehem ... At the same time that the Palestine Government was asked to grant visas to the delegation, it was also requested to permit the visit of five Soviet cameramen and eight press representatives While on the subject of Palestine, it is interesting to know that the Iraquian Military Attache in Washington has published an article in the Americc ht ^ ,ess emphasizing that "whatever happens inr*aWBtine has the strongest repercussions in Iraq" ... He insists that "the extreme propaganda of certain Zionists can only have a detrimental effect on the good relations that have always existed among Christian, Moslem and Jewish Arabs" Well, we never knew that there was such a thing as a "Jewish Arab" Needless to say, he considers Palestine a country which belongs to the Arabs and believes that the Arabs, in any of their territories, will never accept what he calls "overlordship from alien Zionists" in any form. Question: People are wondering why no member of the American Jewish Committee is among the co-chairman of the Interim Committee of the American Jewish Conference And questions are being asked as to why the Jewish Labor Committee is not on the executive of the Interim Committee... Have you heard of the new proposal that each member of each congregation in the Union of Hebrew Congregations be asked to cast a vote on the ratification of the resolution on Palestine adopted by the American Jewish Conference? This would mean that tens of thousands would be asked to participate in the poll Those persons in the Union of American Hebrew Congregations who advocate the polling of individual members argue that this would be a really democratic method of establishing the opinion of the majority of the congregations The results, they say, would serve as a clear mandate to the UAHC convention which is to take place 18 months from now Quoting the judgment of American military leaders concerning the prospects of a long war, the advocates of an individual poll also argue that it is doubtful if a convention of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations called in war time would be truly representative, many delegates being absent Thus, they consider it unfair "for a scattering of delegates" to decide on such an important issue as the Palestine resolution of the American Jewish Conference, on which there is no unity in the ranks of Reform Jews And speaking of polls, you may be interested to learn that Detroiters went to the polls the other day and gave various anti-Semitic, nationalist and Ku Klux Klan nominees a combined total of 52,000 votes out of 199,000 cast in the mayoralty and councilmanic primaries However, the highest vote secured by any of the anti-Semites was about 18,000, while the winning candidate received 97,000 votes. Wisdom: American readers now have a chance to get acquainted with the philosophic thoughts of Dr. Jacob Klatzkin, the Jewish philosopher of world renown who is now living in the United States ... A book by Dr. Klatzkin analyzing life and containing a number of psychological essays has just been published by the Fischer Publishing House under the title "In Praise of Wisdom" The volume— first of Dr. Klatzkin's works to be published in this country—is a collection of philosophical gems and has already attracted the attention of many learned men here who received advance copies ... It was a great "discovery" for those who had never had the opportunity of reading Dr. Klatzkin's works in other languages ... A nationalist Jew and a good Zionist, Dr. Klatzkin was considered in Europe to be one of the outstanding philosophers of our times... He is the author of many works on philosophy published in German and other languages, including Hebrew, and was also editor-in-chief of the Jewish Encyclopedia which was published in Berlin in preHitler years ... Dr. Klatzkin is one of America's gains and Germany's losses as a result of the persecution of the Jews in the Reich Readers of his book "in Praise of Wisdom," will actually acquire much wisdom ... It is the land of book which stimulates the reader to stop and to ponder over each of the "simple" truths of life which the author presents in popular form



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PAGE FOUR JcnislHu-kMan IH-'l '3 -"A The Jewish Floridian Plant and Main Offices, 31 S. W. Second Avenue, Miami, Fla. P. O. Box 2973 Phone 2-1141 Entered as Second Class Matter July 4 1930 at the Post Office of Miami, Florida, under the Act of March 3, 1879 FRED K. SHOCHET, Managing Editor Subscription—1 Year, $2.00 Six Months, $1.00 MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29. 1943 TISHRI 30, 1943 VOLUME 16 NUMBER 44 PRESENCE. NOT PRESENTS The question being asked in tens of thousands of Jewish and non-Jewish homes in America is—"What shall I send my son and daughter in the Service'" Nothing we feel is too good for these young people in uniform, and feeling this way, it is natural that Father and Mother and Sister and Friend think of sending something of the highest value—and since value in the common market conception is estimated in terms of dollars, the natural tendency is to send some tangible gift which will represent a monetary sacrifice. Yet this is the kind of gift that is least desired, warns the Jewish Welfare Board, speaking for the hundreds of thousands of Jewish soldiers. "Food with a few exceptions," says the Jewish Welfare Board is a waste of space and deep disappointment. The soldiers do not want cigarettes, shaving kits and the ordinary gifts that are so welcomed in normal times. The Jewish Welfare Board makes this statement on the basis of polls of soldiers. What do the soldiers want, then? Here is the answer, according to the J. W. B. "More than most elaborate gifts, soldiers will welcome newsy, cheerful letters from home and recent photographs or snapshots of family and friends. Many would like a new picture of wife, sweetheart or parent not larger than pocket size and encased in a waterproof folder, as pictures the men took with them are the worse for wear." The soldier wants mainly a letter from you—that is the paradox of the story. He wants not the things that cost money. He judges not by the market. He wants you—your presence—and not being in a position to have you—he wants the next best thing—a letter that will make you vivid to him. Remember this, when you think of your soldier boy. He wants your presence, not your presents! THE ARGENTINA JEWISH PRESS The Yiddish press of Argentina loomed as an international issue this past week when President Roosevelt took occasion to publicly rebuke the Argentina government for its ban on the Yiddish press. The ban was shortly lifted. Whether this relenting by the Argentine government was due to the President's censure or not, there can be little question but that President Roosevelt's frank statement will have a salutary effect on the status of the Jews in Argentina. The alibi offered by the Argentine government for its temporary suspension of the Jewish press was the lame one that the Yiddish language was a very difficult language to censor. Walter Winchell has remarked apropos of this, that the Argentine government had not found the Japanese language press difficult to censor. No hand was raised against the Japanese press in Argentina. President Roosevelt doubtlessly had two aims in view when he made the statement. He was desirous not only of rebuking the special discrimination against the Jews, but also availing himself of the opportunity to "take a sock" at the pro-Axis government of Argentina, the one government of South America which still clings to Hitler. Argentina presents the one axis-infected spot in the Americas, and the restoration to the Jewish press of its right to publish can be construed only as the first of a series of steps which must be taken until the collapse of the present Argentine regime is effected. That regime exists today not by the will of the Argentine people, but by the usurpation of the government and by the use of terror and force. If we have a duty to clear out cesspools of tyranny across the Atlantic and Pacific, we have an even stronger obligation to clean up such nests of foulness in the closer environs of our own Western Hemisphere. AFTER SUCCAS By RABBI MOSES MESCHELOFF Beth Jacob Congregation Editor's Note: This is the second of a series of articles by the spiritual leaders of Greater Miami. I have just taken down my Succah. It was a sad task. I removed the bright paper decorations; took down the fruits and flowers; took off the .pictures from the walls. Then down came the roof of palm branches and the tessellated slats which held them up. Lastly, the wall panels hit earth; all to be carted away or laid up in the garage for the next fall. A happy holiday, Succos! No weeping and breast-beating. No fasting. Instead, the pleasantness of our lovely fall weather, the paying of visits and receiving of visitors. Dreaming dreams and making new plans for a new "season" Now Succos is over. Not another Biblical holiday until Passover—a half year off. G-d says (to quote our Rabbis) that He hates to see us leave Him on Shemini Atzeress, the closing day of Succos. I. too, hate to see the end of the holiday-filled month with its ceremonies and special services. I shall miss the throngs of adults and youth in the synagogue; the renewal of old acquaintances and the establishments of new friendships. My succah is gone, but its melodies linger. It sang to me of Jewish exile and suffering. Its frail walls and flimsy roof symbolized the tragic story of Jewish "security" in the diaspora. The hut is the symbol of the wanderer. It is the curse of the "Chosen People," chosen for two millenia to be wandering always and everywhere. This used to be a sentimental theme in former years. Now the reality is more somber than the succah symbol. The House of Israel is even more insecure than the frail tabernacle prescribed for the holiday. But Succos is a happy holiday, not a sad one. And to me the Succah sang, too, a paean of faith, a tribute to Israel's unshakable conviction: G-d is our Protector. As the nomad looks into the starry sky and finds there the peace, strength and security which earth-bound nature denies him. so throughout our history we have enjoyed peace, spiritual strength and security in our one-ness with our G-d Almost without letup ours was the "falling Succah of David." It never fell. G-d sustained us! Faith sounds good. It is our staff of life. But when you build a succah—not simply read about it, or hear a sermon on it or idealize about it — when you BUILD a succah you hear other motifs. Faith is belief in the completed thing or the accepted way. Despotism may govern without faith. Liberty requires faith for its maintenance. But liberty is not the fruit of faith alone. Faith accepts and supports that liberty for which others have fought. It expects no further attack. Faith alone is for the majority and the strong. For the minority and the weak there must be the addition of 'good works." Without deeds the faith of the minority will be overthrown by the majority— the potential enemy, the tautonomous opposition of the few. My succah taught me this. One of the first lessons in building a succah is: "You must MAKE a succah." A succah that stands of its own making or is incidentally brought into being may not be used traditionally. A succah must be built purposefully. We gather our hammer and nails, boards and planks, ladder and saw and set to work. We select the proper site, make firm the foundation; erect the walls and roof. When we are through, we still have only a succah. A violent wind will uproot it. A storm will drench us in it. The sun will make up swelter in it. But we have made it! It is our handiwork! And there is joy in the work. Judaism is the religion of the minority. For a minority to exist it must work. It must be constantly active in its own sphere. As American citizens we have a common faith in democracy, in decency, in the tenets of citizenship which are universal and uniformly human—or should be. Those doctrines come to us as citizens. In them we have faith. In our country they succeed because they are—we trust—the faith of the majority. When it comes to our own religious tenets, passive faith is totally inadequate. Faith alone then leads to assimilation. Faith then seeks a common denominator and becomes submerged in and indistinguishable from the dominant faith. The many "Jewish imitations and emulations of non-Jewish observances and practices (Christmas vs. Chanukah) are testimony to this basic axiom: a minority must create it must build its own succah—if it is to exist! There are all kinds of succos. jnere are many opinions of how Jews should "create." I recognize this. There is room for difference of opinion as there is room for architectural difference in the making of a succah. But certain basic factors must be adhered to. The walls of the succah cannot be established in mid-air. They must begin on the ground I?IA C S e K en .li gh t0 il to be identified with it "Lawvood"). Jewish communal and organized life must have ,ts feet on the ground. It must be practical. It must be fXJ^i U must P ut firs things hi !" t #" nn i ,t lon endure n a haze of good-will" and "faith We must build "our succah" on the ground. I have seen many organizations with outstanding names and grandiose credos that have died early deaths because they were up m the air." They got no further than the forensic or ideoCCONTINUEO ON PAOI ) TODAY,JXTO BPP -TIDBITS FROM EVER! Muctey, Qon^ldejnilai -By PHTNEAS J. BIRONLISTEN HERE You can't beat the Irish A* reported in The Irish r L Ireland's premier. Eamon de Valera, recently succeed^ making Hitler, no less, pay for the restoration of a£j synagogue which Nazi flyers had destroyed in their h^ ing of the Irish capital some years ago Mavh Tv w' glad to supply you with some information"Mr'S* Paul Scheffer. Goebbels' pet foreign correspond you mentioned as contributing, under another n 5 man should form a partnership with Mr. de Valera we're chell whom you mentioned to a New York Sunday supplement, is persona grata' in a ernment circles in Washington This man, who once exposed as being a key agent of the German military int? gence, was the author of an article called "The Spectr 1918 Walks in Germany." published in the New York-Tit of September 19. 1943. lB TIDBITS London held five receptions of welcome in honor of tin Jewish delegation from the Soviet Union, but at none of then receptions were the delegates present—because of unavoidable delay in getting air transportation from this country | England ... At one function H. G. Welles was the maa speaker, and tried to atone for some of his anti-Jewish com ments of years ago Now that Professor Solomon Michaeli and Lieut. Col. Itzik Feffer have actually reached England, we wonder whether they will be given a public recent*, that they can attend in person after having received so much public acclaim in absentia Broadway press agent Fi Lloyd Hoffman is an army sergeant now, so he can't credit a client with the gags he thinks up That's why it's Hoffman himself who is now quoted as cracking that in Rustic the Nazis are getting Dnieper and Dnieper into trouble. READER'S GUIDE "The Forgotten Ally," Pierre van Paassen's new book, which made its appearance last week, is enjoying a faster sale than any of Van Paassen's previous books, which ii going some ... It has already passed the 100,000 mark... The indefatigable Bennett Cerf, who as a successful publisher and writer of two literary columns should be plenty busy without any additional activities, has found time to edit the "Pocket Book of Cartoons," which we cheerfully recommend to all who want a good chuckle Lewis Browne'i "See What I Mean?" is rapidly becoming one of the conntry's best sellers This volume, you should know, containi as much "undercover" material as the widely heralded boor entitled "Under Cover" Browne used, for his novel U findings of some of the best undercover men in Caliban and New York Dr. Saul Padover. who is going to Londcs as a specialist on broadcasts to Central Europe and Poland. Jias edited the collected works of Thomas Jefferson .. T collection is being published in the very near future ... Viet Baum, whose "Grand Hotel" was so successful as a now! and play quite some years ago, has written another volume of the same type, with the action laid in Berlin's Hotel Adlon in the Nazi era Georgie Price, whose career has already taken him from Broadway to Wall Street and back to Broadway, is now becoming one of the literati It's a book of reminiscences that he's authoring. THE ENTERTAINERS Chief Petty Officer Artie Shaw, the Navy Bandmaster, reports that while he and his men were lying in New Guinea foxholes they heard a nearby radio, tuned to Tokyo, playing a musical program which closed with the announcement: "You have just heard the orchestra conducted by Artie Shaw, playing from the Mark Hopkins Hotel in San Francisco" • A recording, of course Soon to go overseas to entertain the boys is Benny Goodman, together with his orchestra. • • Comedian Danny Kaye has left Hollywood and is back on Broadway, but only for a spell ... In a month or so hell be leaving for overseas, where he'll give our boys a few laughsABOUT PEOPLE A new addition to the Columbia University faculty of Creative and Applied Arts is Henry Brant, gifted young composer and orchestrator for the Columbia Broadcasting System ... He is giving a course in Modern Scoring and Arranging .. Radio Commentator Gabriel Heatter is playing Mohammed in a new version of the mountain story • Wanted for a film part in Hollywood, Heatter declared that he couldnt possibly go to the screen capital ... So a Hollywood director is coming East to shoot the scenes involving Gabriel %  • The once dashing and romantic and always erratic Maxwell Bodenheim, Greenwich Village poet laureate, celebrated his 60th birthday the other day He's a shriveled-up old man now and openly confesses his terrible need for a job His nine books of poetry, which discerning critics consider among the best verse produced in this country, aren't bringing him sufficient royalties to buy an apple a day • • 23-year-old Larry Leonard is doing okay for a plain, ordinary army corporal ... He just married Hazel Guggenheim, %  year-old daughter of the late millionaire Benjamin Guggenheim. CALL R. J. WAINWRIQHT. DISTRICT MANAOK" SHELBY SALESBOOK CO. n %  O. BOX •. MIAMI IMINDI, FLA, r-MONC %  -'•• T^M" 00 *" NO %  UXNUI FORMS Or ALL *!*>• "COMPARE OUR PRICES AND QUALITY"


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I 1 i i IIII 1 nil • • 11*1 : i %  PAGE TWO fJtnist: tkrkHan %  %  ^WWWW*^WW^^WWWW^IWW>W> SOCIAL ITEMS AND PERSONALS Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Cromer, 432 N. E. 26th Terrace, have returned after spending two months in Hendersonvilie, N. C., and two weeks at the Battery Park Hotel in Asheville. Their daughter. Miss Florence Cromer, attended summer classes at Chapel Hill, N. C. and will enter her sophomore year at the University of Miami in November. At the conclusion of her summer course at Chapel Hill, she traveled to New York, Canada and Montreal, then visited her sister and brother-inlaw. Lieut, (j. g.) and Mrs. E. Albert Pallot in Gulfport, Miss. Mrs. Pallot and her daughter. Roxane, accompanied Miss Cromer home. Mrs. Pallot has returned to Gulfport. rabbi, 711 Lenox Avenue, Miami Beach. BIRTHS A daughter. Judith Lvnnc. was born to Mr. and Mrs. Melvin L. Gipson, 2396 S. W. 20th Street, on Sunday. Oct. 17, at Victoria Hospital. Mrs. Gipson is the former Fay Engel. BRITH ""PAY. QCTOr^ j Prof. OTtmtei^JVRS Board (Itir^ Is Honored ffir'50tear? PobbVSerJiee WEDDINGS Mrs. Edward Oxenberg is leaving Thursday. Nov. 4, for St. Louis, Mo., for a visit with her ion. Pvt. 1/c Leonard Oxenberg, who is a member of the Medical Detachment at Jefferson Barracks. Mrs. Oxenberg will be away for about 10 days. Elected to Duke Chapter. Phi Beta Kappa, national honorary scholarship fraiernity. Miss Shirley Bloom, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Bloom. Miami Beach, is one of 18 Duke University undergraduates to achieve this honor this fall. The wedding of Miss Mollie Weinstein and Felix Shevinsky, Birmingham merchant, took place last week in the home of the bride. 2425 N. Meridian Avenue. Miami Beach. Miss Weinstein, who has lived here for several years, is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Weinstein. Birmingham. After Nov. 10 the couple will live at the Bankhead Hotel. Birmingham. Mrs. Muriel Hirsch. 3470 Meridian Avenue. Miami Beach, who has been on an extended trip to New York and Washington for several months, during which she spent considerable time with Mme. Maxim Litvinoff. wife of the former ambassador from Russia, has returned home. Mr. and Mrs. Michael August, 447 S. W. 28th Rd„ Miami, announce the marriage of their daughter, Jessica, to Cpl. Harry Kelman, U.S.A. Air Corps, on October 12, in New York City. The bride attended Burdett College. Boston, and the University of Miami. Cpl. Kelman. son of David Kelman. New York City and the late Mrs. Kelman. attended New York University. The couple have left for Ephrata. Washington, where Cpl. Kelman is stationed. The Bris of the son of Pvt. and Mrs. Jack Zwitt. 1330 Pennsylvania Avenue, took place Tuesday at St. Francis Hospital with Rabbi S. M. Machtei officiating. SEWING AND KNITTING GROUP TO HOLD PARTY An exhibition of clothing garments for world wide distribution among needy men. women and children, and knitted garments for the Army. Navy, Coast Guard and Marines, all made by volunteer workers, will take place Wednesday afternoon. Nov. 3. at 2 p. m., at the Trail American Red Cross Sewing and Knitting Center, 1890 S. W. Eighth Street. Card games and mah jongg will follow, with Mrs. Louis Kotkin as chairman. Refreshments will be served. OBITUARIES Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Manheimer, 16 Phoenetia Avenue, Coral Gables, returned from a four-month stay in Chicago with their son. Dr. Stephen Manheimer. director of Mt. Sinai Hospital. Mr. George Cohen, 4701 Pine Tree Drive, is recovering at the Jackson Memorial Hospital from an attack of penumonia. Mrs. Abraham Zinnamon. 4326 Sheridan Avenue, is recuperating from a severe case of bronchitis. Mr. and Mrs. Leon Elkin. of 1519 Drexel Avenue, Miami Beach, announce the marriage of their daughter, Shirley, to Sgt. Harry Freeman. The ceremony took place Oct. 4 in New Haven, Conn. Mrs. Freeman is a graduate of Miami Senior High and for years served as office secretary of the Jewish Welfare Bureau. Sgt. Freeman is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Isidor Freeman of New Haven, and is now with the 418th Army Air Force. The couple are residing at 65 Clark Street, New Haven. Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Mescheloff of Brooklyn, N. Y.. parents of Rabbi Moses Mescheloff. arrived for a visit Wednesday. They are residing at the home of the TOWER THEME S.W. 8th St at 15th AT*. OPEN AT 1:45 P. M. Friday and Matinee Only Saturday, Oct. 29-30 "FUN WITH HILARIOUS BUMSTEADS" "FOOTLIGHT GLAMOUR" WITH BLONDE and DAGWOOD ARTHUR LAKE PENNY SINGLETON • • • Starts Sat. at 4:30 P. M. and Sun. Thru Wed., Oct. 30-Nov. 1 "MY KINGDOM FOR A COOK" WITH CHARLES COBURN (Funnier Than in "The More the Merrier") MARG. CHAPMAN EDWARD GARGAN BILL CARTER ANNOUNCE FRIDAY T SERVICES LOCALLY Services for Friday night and Saturday at Greater Miami synagogues are announced as follows: Beth David—Friday evening services at 6:30. Saturday morning at 8:30 the Bar Mitzvah of David Perle. Junior services at 10 30. Rabbi Max Shapiro and Cantor Louis Hayman will officiate. First series of late Friday evening services will begin Nov 5 at 8:15. Beth Jacob — Friday evening services at 6:30. Services chanted chanted by Cantor Maurice Mamches with Rabbi Moses Mescheloff preaching. Saturday at 6:30 p. m.. "Sholosh Seudis" services Rabbi Moses Mescheloff, speaker Beth Sholem—Friday evening services at 6:30. Saturday morning at 9:30. sermon by Rabbi Samuel M. Machtei; subject "Misunderstanding!" Cantor Abraham Friedman, officiating. Mincha services at 6:30. Miami Beach Jewish CenterFriday evening services at 6:30 Saturday morning at 9 o'clock sermon by Rabbi Irving Lehrman; subject. "Educational Survey—Our Reaction!" Junior services at 10:30 a. m. under the direction of David Freedman; D u r ah £ m D Wolf win officiate. Bible Class Saturday at 5:30. conducted by Mr. Gershon. Mincha services at 6:30. Shaarei Zedek—Friday evening services at 8:30; sermon by Rabbi Simon April; subject. "Destruction of Our Present World!" Saturday morning at 9 o'clock Rabbi April will read Portion of Week Talmud Torah children assisting with services. Bible class at 5:30 p. m. Temple Israel—Regular Friday evening services at 8:15. Dr Jacob H. Kaplan officiating. Miami Jewish Orthodox Congregation—Friday evening servlc es n at ? :3 Sat urday morning at 9 o clock with Rabbi Joseph %  • "ackovsky addressing the worshipers. NATHAN MORRIS Nathan Morris. 43. former restaurant operator, died last week in his home, 101 Ocean Drive. Miami Beach. A World War veteran, he came to Miami Beach eight years ago from Savannah, Ga. He is survived by his mother, Mrs. Dina Morris; a brother. Dr. M. R. Morris, and a sister. Mrs. Ida Peters, all Miami Beach, and another sister. Mrs. S. Blair. Savannah. The body was sent to Savannah by the Riverside Memorial Chapel. Buy Wax Bonds and Stamps to help preserve Democracy. Professor Joseph P. Chamberlain of Columbia UBivenilv, ( h.irnua of ihe Board of Director* of tbe National Refugee Service, accept* frsa William Ko.cnw.ld. President of the organisation, a testimonial tml honoring him for half a century of public service to "hit dtr, h country, and mankind,** particularly to refugee* from political tai religious persecution who have found haven in America. The scroll *j presented to Professor Chamberlain on behalf of officer*, director) and members of the Executive Committee of the NRS during tbt bration of his 70th birthday at the Harmonic Club ia Mew York Ckj! A good buy is a War Bond. Buy n sSnn n y0U wU *** Paid later —•4.06 for every $3.00. INSURE IN SURE ASSURANCE THE SENSIBLE FARSIGHTED INDIVIDUAL provides today the assurance for tomorrow and the years ahead. ASSURANCE IS INVESTING WISELY and soundly to "Smn^L^ ?? needa of the ?** ahead. NEEDS that include Home — Education — Communal Endeavor — Emergencies — Illness — Ketirement, and the Inevitable—Death. B# Pr Sr^s th with Vh d e e? a S e .h^ e comes you "* not bothered in your o^lyTglre wa to k JJVh^* &f th f tn gedy "••. !" the havingKSLJ^Pu* 1 .* en Ure P**! together forever, is by Mount nTnrf. £? P"vat* family plot. And having your plot in ^s^srssus 2 !" p rotection s %  %  sur N W Bef^^d^Thu'lf/tT^ plot !" Mount Nebo Cemeteryto tho^Sth. Jewis^failh 11 CCmetery B dedicated -SK5 For further information with no obligation, phone 3-5132 Florida's Most Beautiful Burial Estates MOUNT NEBO ONLY TEN MINUTES FROM THE HEART OF MIAMI West Flagler Street at 54th Avenue BUSINESS OFFICE 1014 OLYMPIA BUILDING VISIT WILL CONVINCE YOU



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|AY. OCTOBER 29. 1943 +Jmlsti ncrtkUarj PAGE SEVEN 1 LOCAL BOYS ARMED SERVICE Abe Silver, stationed at Kilmer, N. J., was host rely to Miami friends. Mr. and Abe Berkowitz and Lt. and Irving Rotfort comprised |party. Zohn, sl/c, Sanford. [Naval Air Base, visited with lives and friends during his day stay here last week. Berger has been promotthe rank of Aviation Elecian Mate 2/c at his Melbourne, base. Along with his elecal duties, Petty Officer Bergis gunnery instructor, conting classes for newly comBioned Marine and Navy fliHe is spending an eight day re in Miami and will leave torow to resume his duties. GREATER MIAMI ARMY-NAVY COMMITTEE Of The Jewish Weliare Board ^ ^ Jpl. Harold George Shapiro. of Mr. and Mrs. Morris Sha>, 1157 N. W. 1st Street, reItly returned to camp after Iting with his family during h Hashonah. Cpl. Shapiro is aboratory technician with the ly Air Force, and is stationed the Base Hospital at Drew lid. Florida. iur Stein, 20. aviation radioI, 3/c, son of Mr. and Mrs. I. kin, 545 W. Flagler St., is now turned in Puerto Rico. Stein |ered the Navy on Jan. 18 and ;ived training in radio and lery at the Jacksonville Nav[air station. He is a former lent at the University of MiIriation Student Harold Rubin, N. W. Seventh Ave., is now [West Texas State College taka course of Army air forces action leading to aviation let. infantry base commander (the Caribbean Area has anaced the promotion of First fMilton G. Abranel. 9410 AbAve., Miami Beach, to the of captain. Scherex, son of Mr. and s. Harry Scherer, 352 S. W. jrth St., has been commisled a second lieutenant in the ine Corps after attending the ensive officer training course Quantico, Va. [Promoted to first lieutenant lounced by the War Department in Washington, is Isadora avers, infantry, of 636 N. W. fth Ave. Enrolled in a special course of struction in the Southern Sigil Corps school at Camp Murphy Pfc Aaron S. Aronorf, son of lex Aronoff, 1342 S. W. Fourth Itreet. Maj. Morris Hecht, 26, of Colmbus, Ga., commanding officer Jf a pursuit plane squadron, has been killed in action in the South Pacific. He enlisted beFore the declaration of war and 'as sent overseas four days after ?earl Harbor. A manufacturing fcompany executive in civilian fife. Major Hecht was a graduate >f the University of North Carofina. His brother is serving in England as an aviation officer. Boatswain's Mate Edwin Sper, f. of Stephentown, N. Y., is the %  recipient of the Navy Cross "for lextraordinary heroism and disItinguished service in action." I Sperry was a member of a party I ordered to cut a passage through an obstruction at the mouth of [the Sebou River; it was the night of November 9th and the USS I Cherokee, of which Sperry was a [crew member, was participating in the assault on French Morocco. Subjected to heavy hostile fire, the demolition party nevertheless successfully accomplished its task with "great skill and courI af?e." Sperry was cited for "com[ plete disregard for his own personal safety" and commended for the swift efficiency with which he carried out his part of the dangerous assignment. Pfc. Isadora Brookoif. 23, of Brooklyn, was killed in action last April in North Africa. A printer in civilian life, Private Brookoff had been in service two and a half years. He was the son of Mrs. Anna Brookoff of 60 E. Wth St., Brooklyn. SERVICE A COMMUNITY PROJECT Help Us Keep a Record of Our Men in Service r\ r\ r\ r\ M PARADE! Lt. Irving C. Bloom, 28, of Hannibal, Mo., bombardier on a B-24 Liberator which helped hammer Italy into submission, is a flier on the imposing roster of American Jewish multiple medal-winners, holding eight decorations: the Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal, and six Oak Leaf Clusters. Lieutenant Bloom, in company with 26 other airmen, the crews of three bombers which rendered magnificent service in the Mediterranean and Balkan areas, is now touring the United States, exhibiting to aircraft workers the results of their "handicraft." Lieutenant Bloom's Liberator, the Wash Tub, has been cited for "outstanding service in aerial operations against the enemy over a period of 15 months, during which it dropped 219 tons of bombs on Axis targets, participated in 73 combat missions, including three daring low level attacks, flew 551 hours in combat, shot down 22 enemy fighters and flew nearly 100,000 miles." This is the first time that planes from the Middle East Theatre of Operations have been returned to the United States for exhibition; the citation of the bombers themselves is, of course, unique in combat annals. Capt. William Louis Sackler. 28. of the Bronx, lead navigator on one of the Eighth Air Force's most succesful daylight precision bombing attacks on German targets, has been awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and Air Medal. Captain Sackler has charted half a dozen wing formations over Europe. The specific mission for which he won the D. F. C. was an August attack on the Nazi submarine works at Flensburg, Germany. Navigating the Flying Fortress Heavy Date. Captain Sackler kept the formation on its course through a furious attack and directly into the target area. To guarantee accurate navigation, the Heavy Date refrained from firing a single burst in its defense, although the enemy planes were making desperate frontal assaults. Achieving the destruction of the submarine plant, the Fortress group was credited by Col. John G. Moore, command pilot, with a "perfect daylight bombing attack." Member of the Jersey City YMHA. Sackler attended New York University and enlisted in the Air Corps two years ago. Pfc. Harold C. Eisenbruch. 21, of New York City, a paratrooper, lost his life in the invasion of Sicily. His father, member of the U. S. Army during the First World War, was decorated for gallantry at St. Mihiel and in the Meuse-Argonne. In service one and a half years, Private Ensenbruch was a graduate of the Manhattan School of Aviation, and was an airplane mechanic in civil life. He was a member of the Inwood Hebrew Congregation. CHAPLAIN ZWITMAN IS WRITER FOR PAPER FOR NATIONAL BIBLE WEEK The following is one of a series of editorials written by Chaplain Colman A. Zwitman of Fort Monmouth, in the army newspaper, "The Signal Corps Message." The particular editorial quoted below was selected by the newspaper to appear in the issue during the celebration of National Bible Week: It was said of Sydney Smith that he would never read a book which he was to review—reading it might prejudice his judgment. There are many in our day who never read the Bible, fearing that reading of it might upset some of their irreligious ideas. Seekers for solutions to the chaotic problems of our day might do well to call out with the poet Whittier: We search the world for truth; we cull The good, the pure, the beautiful. From graven stone and written scroll. From the old flower-field of the soul; And weary seekers of the best, We come back laden from our quest, To find that all the sages said Is in the book our mothers read. The founders of America used the Bible and Biblical tradition as an architect's plan for the establishment of their dream of liberty. Liberty in our day should receive that eternal vigilance decreed by the founders of America. By liberty, we should mean not license for licentiousness, but obedience to the principles of faith and democracy. The planets wheel in their orbits, they march and countermarch along the camping-grounds of the heavens in obedience to the eternal laws set for them. While thus they obey they are free. Should they disobey, what stupendous firmamental cataclysm would ensue. Thus, too, for man are there laws moral and spiritual, which he must obey if he would be free to consummate his highest achievement. Perfect freedom is not the absence of law, but thorough voluntary obedience to that law which is the essential requisite of life, the law of righteousness. And service or both God and country can be enhanced by a knowledge of and acquaintance with the great heritage—the Bible. WAR] RECORDS COMMITTEE NAT ROTH, Chairman FRED 8HOCHET MRS. QEOROE M. COHEN MAURICE GROSSMAN JENNIE H. ROTFORT NATHAN ROTHBERQ J. W. B. Director OFFICERS 8AM BLANK, CHAIRMAN MONTE SELIQ, Vice-chairman JOSEPH A BER MAN. Sac. Executive Committee Mrs. Walter Bronsten, Mrs. Max Dobrln, Maurice Oroaaman. Louie Helman, Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan, Mra. Murry Koven, Harry Markowitx, Nat Roth, Fred Shochet. B ilton Sirkln. Joaaph Stain. Mrs. arman Wallach, Carl Wainkle. Gsorfls Wolpert. Captain Herman Lusky, 26. of Nashville, Tenn., transport plane pilot operating in the Far East, has been decorated with the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal. The D. F. C. was presented to him recently at Love Field. Dallas. In service two and a half years,. Captain Lusky was honored for his participation, from May 1942 to February 1943. in more than fifty operational flights "in unarmed, heavily overloaded transport planes through the combat zones of Upper Assam (Burma) and Southwest China." Frequently Captain Lusky made these hazardous flights on successive days, combating bitter weather and icing conditions; forced to altitudes "seldom reached during average flying," he had to resort to instrument flying for long periods over an area lacking navigational aids. Peril was an everpresent factor in these flights, lasting three to five hours each, and made over high rugged mountainous terrain. In the fifteen months he and his group of pioneer pilots served in that region, Captain Lusky made 48 round trips "over the hump" and 132 flights over enemy territory. A laboratory worker for Southern Oil Service before he joined the Air Corps, Lusky attended Vanderbilt University. He received his wings in January of 1942 at Randolph Field, Texas. Lt. William A. Levitan. 22. of Roxbury, Mass., a fighter pilot serving in the New Guinea area, has been killed in action. In service two years, he enlisted while he was a student at Boston University. Recipient of the Air Medal early this year, Lieut. Levitan was credited with downing two Jao planes. His father. John M. Levitan, of 32 Deckard St., was wounded in action and received the Purple Heart during World War I. Lt. Daniel T. Drubin, 24. of Brooklyn, N. Y., a bombardier engaged in anti-submarine patrol work, lost his life in the European area. A textile salesman in civilian life, he had been in service two years. While serving with the anti-submarine patrol at Mitchel Field, L. I., he was commended for his work by RearAdmiral I. C. Sewell. Flight Offi c er Joseph Levy, 23, of Scarsdale, N. Y., a member of the Air Corps, was killed in action in the Aleutian area. In service two years, he was employed by the advertising department of a furniture store in civilian life. He was a member of Naphthali Lodge, Free Sons of Israel. ON K1L THE FRONTS Capt Frank Friedman, 24, of University City, Mo., a pilot attached to a combat squadron operating in the Aleutians, has been decorated with the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Air Medal and an Oak Leaf Cluster. A recent news dispatch from Alaska reported that the squadron of which Captain Friedman is a member scored an overwhelming victory against a fleet of Japanese bombers, smashing 12 out of a total of 16 in the air. The captain has been in service since March 1941. Lt. Bertram H. Kaplan. 23, of Great Neck, L. I., has been awarded the Distinguished Frying Cross, the Air Medal, and three Oak Leaf Clusters. Lieutenant Kaplan, now home on leave, has been pilot in an American bomber squadron stationed in England. Participating in air operations over France and Germany, described as the toughest the Air Forces are engaged in, Lt. Kaplan wrote of the particular glee he felt when raiding the Reich and "giving the Nazis a taste of their own medicine." He noted that there are many Jewish boys among the American bombing crews and that their splendid work was being recognized. A graduate of St. John's College, he was an accountant before joining the Air Corps three weeks after Pearl Harbor. He is a member of Temple Beth El of Great Neck. Lt. Aaron Liepe. 23 of Dubuque, Iowa, mentioned in the Honor Foil for his receipt of an Air Medal, was recently awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. The citation accompanying the latter award credits him with more than 50 combat missions, "including various phases of attack and defense in fighter type of aircraft." Stressing the fact that he has had to operate in difficult weather conditions and over rugged terrain, the citation says he has "always met the enemy with courage and determination and has destroyed two enemy planes in aerial combat." Lt. Liepe, in service more than two years, has been a student at three colleges: the University of Dubuque, Ames College (La.) and the University of Alabama. While on vacation one summer he took up flying and earned a pilot license. Pfc. Philip Feldacker. 27. of St. Louis, Mo., has been decorated by Gen. Patton with the Silver Star for gallantry in action during the African campaign. Private Feldacker has been in service three years. He is a member of the Engineer Corps. Devoting This Entire Page to the Efforts of the CoABESS & COSTAR First National Bank Building COWEN'S SHOE STORE 155 E. Flagler St — 122 Lincoln Rd. FLXZIT SYSTEMS. Plumbers 1114 N. E. 2nd Avenue FLORIDA LINEN SERVICE 100 N. W. 20th Street LAND-O-SUN DAIRIES. Inc 101 Alton Road LUBY CHEVROLET CO. 1055 West Flagler Street MIAMI MILL WORK & LUMBER CO. 535 N. W. Uth Street NATIONAL BRANDS. Inc. 690 N. W. 13th 8treet NANKIN'S SHOE STORE 158 East Flagler Street Army-Nary Committee. Made Possible Through Operation of SAM MEYERS 111 South Miami Avenue SOUTHEASTERN SALESMEN'S CARAVAN Langford Building STANDARD WHOLESALE GROCERY CO. 149 N. E. 10th Street TOOLEY-MYRON STUDIOS DuPont Building WILLIAM D. SINGER SUNGAS CO. 1100 West Flagler Street WEST FLAGLER KENNEL CLUB West Flagler St at 37th Avenue WOLPERT FURNITURE CO. 15S West Flagler Street WOMETCO THEATRES Mitchell Wolfaoo Sydney Lt. Norman Kossis. 26, of Seattle, Wash., was killed in action over Western Europe in the course of an aerial bombardment of the Nazi submarine base at Lorient. A holder of the Purple Heart Lt. Kossis has been posthumously awarded the Air Medal. The award was made last month at a military review at the Boeing Flying Fortress School on the west coast with the late lieutenant's mother receiving the award from Lt. Col. Wiley Wright, commander of the Army Air Force in the Seattle area. A graduate of the University of Washington, Lieut Kossis had been in service sixteen months. Pfc Theodore P. Gelbsteln. 19. of the Bronx, lost his life last March in the North African fighting. A letter received from him just the day before the War Department's announcement of his death said: "We went through hell but so far I am all right. Sometimes it is as quiet as the graveyard here, but all of a sudden heaven and earth and all the devils on earth break loose." Prt. Hyman Fatt. 28, of Newburgh, N. Y., was killed during the Tunisian campaign. In service a year, Private Fatt was a salesman in civilian life and attended Newburgh Free Academy. Prt Jethro L Cohen. 21, of Elgin, 111., was killed in action in the Southwest Pacific area.



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PAGE SK +Jewlst> fhrkMrtr FRIDAY, I r.i COMMUTE LEAVES LI (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1) ism in this country will continue to be a major activity of the American Jewish Committee." One of the immediate repercussions of the committee's withdrawal from the American Jewish Conference was the resignation of three of its members— Mrs. David de Sola Pool, Judge Louis E. Levinthal and Magistrate Morris Rothenberg — who asserted that the committee's action was "undemocratic and a shocking act of isolation from the overwhelming majority of American Jewry.'' They also criticized the executive committee j for failing to submit the question to the general membership, dej daring that the committee's ac' tion threatened "to disrupt American Jewry at a time when unity is vital in our efforts to save the remnant of Jewry Ln Europe, to safeguard Jewish rights everywhere and to assure the fulfillment of Jewish aspirations in the Jewish National Home." When the American Jewish Conference adopted, at its fiveday session held in New York at the end of August, a resolution calling for the establishment of a Jewish Commonwealth in Palestine, Judge Joseph M. Proskauer announced that, although [he and his two fellow-delegates had dissented from the Palestine resolution "with profound re'gret," the representatives of the American Jewish Committee would continue to cooperate with the Conference in its endeavors to have the White Paper revoked. Judge Proskauer then voiced the belief that "the present issuance of the proposals contained in the resolution is unwise because it may carry with it embarrassment to the governments of the United States, and is calculated to jeopardize the status of Jews and even prejudice the fullest development of the Jewish settlement in Palestine itself." After Succas C^S^B^S COLEMAN TO BECOME SENATORIAL ASPIRANT Sheriff D. C. Coleman. Dade County's chief law enforcement officer for a decade and former Miami City Manager, will become a candidate for the Florida State Senate at the conclusion of his present term of office. In a formal announcement of his candidacy Saturday. Sheriff Coleman said he has determined not to seek re-election because friends*t,-r which finds practically the same experienced officials of former years at the west side plant. H. M. Barton returns as presiding judge, with Ward McAlister as associate judge R K. JajOUT, long one of the sport's leading racing secretaries, will return to that post. mill/"" WANTAGES of a |AIE FEDERAL MORTGAGE V • LOW RATES e EASY PAYMENTS • LONG TIME TO PAY • PROMPT SERVICE e A HOME INSTITUTION Deal With You* LOCAL. FRIENDLY INSTITUTION RESOURCES OVER *7.O00.OOO I l>AI>E I'EMSKAL \ rTT,. ,?.?•*.. • (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4) logic stage. They did not duel with facts and set the walls of their structure on firm ground. On the other hand, the walls of the succah must reach to the roof (or close enough to it to be identified with it. Again the principle of "Lawvood"). We must implement exalted principles to make them real. We must fill the void between earth and sky that our succah be livable. I have seen organizations with beautiful goals who have made excellent first steps toward attaining them but have never planned on filling the gap. Utopian communal projects are frequently left without planning beyond the very first stage. The hiatus between the foundation and the roof is a no-man's land where "anything goes'" Every predatory animal or fly-by-night can roam through it and make its nest in the caves. Those who have been in our community for a number of years can quote the record as proof of this succah refrain. I have taken down my succah with regret. If only this holiday were a bit longer More: if only more > i ui observed it religiously. If only more of us built Israel's Succah and planned its building soundly. Somewhere I have been a commentary on the Talmudic correction to the Biblical sentence: "And great shall be the peace of thy children." The Talmud says: "Read not, thy children." but thy builders' in this sentence." And the commentary' adds pithily. "Count among your children only those who are thy builders Thy builders are ol right thy truechildren. To Israel's children the succah extends the tools of activity and cries, "Come, help build." Join the group of builders. In our community they are so few! Work from within the Succah of Jewry as a builder, not from without as a critic. And, if you all build, each with the tools to which he is most accustomed; each where he is most needed, then we shall not have a Succah which threatens perennially to fall, but which will be firm and strong, the home of a proud people—great in faith and in deed— a succah of lasting peace. OCTOBER Dr. Jacob Segal, new medical director, of famed Los Angeles Sanatorium, says routine use of X-ray in examination of millions of selectees points the way to be followed in the fight against tuberculosis. A national, non-sectarian institution for the care of the indigent tuberculous, the Sanatorium is located at Duarte, Calif., and is operated by Jewish Consumptive A Expatients Relief Association. N0T,CE ?^^r^. **>Uoa I. h^"? ,r,0 r. CHRISTOPHER' fi2" ot City „f n ,'," %  h "l-* t July. A |) i 1 a f t ** tl*i? "Heat. In my oi hMni *lw< application iSr'u? 1 ffffl thereon In ac o r a,,„„ ir l > ta i deaerlbed property .i,." 1 'oh < OUBty Florida. to. V*"* 51 .Lot 3. Block I i r S of Melroae,„.„*;„, A, *d pJ <'f Hlaleah. &**.!{ State of Moriio. y U* I The axeeamnem I under the CwtKajf •£* wj the name of |-.\ K y .;N JJI Certificate shall \V "A '"Wj n* to law. ax „£,,, r ^*y^3\ D n a,ed,hl, thdayofo ^J K B. LEATHER**, t to*** oJtL^i ZZMP*** POPULAR SINGER WILL RETURN TO ENTERTAIN Miss Phyllis Sharon, popular singer and mistress of ceremonies in local dinner clubs, returned this week after completing successful engagements at the Flamingo Night Club. Or| lando. Fla.. and the Temple Theater. Jacksonville. Formerly with the Drum. Jimmies, Jeff's and other notable clubs. Miss Sharon will return to the Pago Pago Room of the : Vanderbilt Hotel. A talented singer as well as mistress of ceremonies. Miss Sharon is a student at the University of Miami. With Sharon as her stage name, she is the I daughter ol Mr. and Mrs. Harry Schulman. MAITKR 174,7 Al-TNJr.. .BBS fd %  •-., % %  C„„ntv Ta£(£ffl and Jitt. tafid th.a tua-naj A i. i ll3 ,; hi, f!,7! TICKETS ON SALE FOR MUSIC SERIES U. OF M. SYMPHONY ci... State anil oYV" thereon. Bald CrtlfiJ ... ^ 1 the (•.„„„> of Dade state5*' ** eml„,.,,| |„ PineM,Vl The a sa a esm eni ,,f rald "JlM ?"t^mVVRe rt h.tfa| "'"• County of Dade, RtateVfifl rue assessment of said ,.r,,,.-,?l par tha naid c, m,., ," In the name of l:..|„ Salm.""* *| I nlei.K wild <-.-tif|,.at M ,rt i h J deemed acoprdlni t< law, ih, Jill daacrlbad therein will ti liFfil hbrhest bidder ai the -ort IS Dam-on the drat Monday i„t£2l •; f %  >%  *-/' which u'i!tJ day of D u..i i'.|;: Hated this lSMh dm „', (Vinte | B B LEATHBRMAS I Clerh circuit Coat I (Clrcull Court sXu Com 'M i/M.Mit c BTI M ".ai Tickets have gone on sale for University of Miami's symphony series, to open Nov. 14 with Nathan Milstein. at the orchestra office of the university. In Alsace-Lorraine even the family names have been taken from the residents and Germanized names substituted. Century-old French streets of Mulhouse, Strasbourg, Metz have been given Nazi na me ,s. In their effort to destroy all trench culture in these provjosara M. UPTOW. PRESIDENT W HEN Functional Nervous Disturbances such aa SleepS55 Crankineaa, Excitability, i^? MB M r N "oua Headacha interfere with your work or spoil your good times, take Dr. Miles Nervine (Liaaid or Efferreaceat Tablets) Nervous Tension can make you WakefoL Jittery, Irritable. NaT % pusi Tension can cause Nerrous Headsche and Nerroua Indige^ tioo. In times like thew, we ara more likely than usual to become T e [ Wr ught and nervous and to juh for a good sedative. Dr. SL II!M ? ood •^dative —mild but effective. M .".y u ^ not use Dr. Miles Nervine you can't know what it *ZE i *2& Efferv *nt TabUt Sn?.' it? qUally ,oothin • WHY DONT YOU TRY IT T "Get it at your drug store. Effervescent tablets Si* and 76? Uona and uae only „ airaetad. inces the Germans are burning libraries—even the privately owned french cook books. In Strasbourg alone nearly 20,000 homes have been damaged in this wabut the residents still pray for allied bomb;rs to come over again with their block busters. In America our war efforts are tranquil but nevertheless they dmiS. te !" ,Md if we are to de Buying War Bonds every pay day 8 one good way to exhibit our determination to aid in the war NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO TAX DEED CHAPTaTR 174..7 A-TS0F1W PILE A 6926 NflTICK IS HKHKHr ciTEMktl ROBICRT B. CORNS, holder „f ^| "f Miami Bprlncs n'miiitn 0;1 fj-l tnte) Tax IVrtlfiiai.-. No. It a and HI, Inaued the 1th tiar itJ$, A I>. i<3!t. haa filed hamaj# 'i. and has mad.ui i>liasi i tax deed to he isu.-d ihmw. feH Certificates embrace in. timui* wrilied propart) In (he CM d Pade. State of Plorlda, tort U.t s. Block UK, Sei lion :.0rj ( Club (Catatea, in th.Town ot Mha j Splines, (Country Club KstatnlCiat> .if Ihiil.SUte i.f Florida, u tatesi Or ly of Had.-. State of Klorldi.au braced In Cert If l< ate No •• Tkt| s.-ssm.iit •( wild pr,f I'likn. • | U't 10, HIiK-k IIS, S.--tlMi :. i on* | Club Bstaten, In iv, rown ol | SprinKi. iC.iiiiirv Club Ksutl'*l ty ..f |)ade. state ..l KliirkU. ul braced in Certificate No M TM| sensment of said property %  ""* wild Certificate lssii.il "" *l name of i'nkn"n Ix>t 11. Hl..ck MV Section r" Country Club fc>tntet m the i'- Miami Sprirura (Country flub u Countyof Dade, State of %  1 t J embraced in Certificate No. ?' "Jl asseaament of said property undff" said Certificate Issuad *• *l name iif Unknown. ..v.*! fnleaii said Certificates shall |J deemed according to law, the prewj described therein will be soid to" hlKhest bidder at the I o.iri HJ IXK>r on the first Monday in the"" Of I UM ember. It43, li:< h is toe — day of December. 1ft" w tio Dated this 19th daj of OeWJ*" Ptork fjrcu Coort^ pad.County. '"' (Clrcull Court 8asJ> __ D By N C BTEBBBTrT, v 10'22-L 1 :' 11 B-1S LEGAL NOTICES = I Buy War Savings Bonds. w///M/MM/UM""" m*M*** US/A*"""'tM"rfi RIVERMONT PARK SANITARIUM istt N. w. rth at. p h t.nm ••scant and elderly peeple •25 WEEKLY Up — L.ro. #au tlful Orounda——, ,N 'imV : VriViI'lT,''' URT OF TOT CAW. KPUtg 0 y :: Plaintiff KI.IZAHKTU RIPUBT AB_I'efendant v ORDER OF PUBLICATION hafora November^ >43 r^ 0 'a"" r I'rti confeeao will i.„; r ^* decree you ^ *'" b "tered acainat (aeal) E V^^ra^S "<* lO/l-lS-JJ-S?,^^K,RT LEY, D. C. NOTICE UNDER FiCTlTlOLi NAME LAW p Notice la hereby aiwjn t' underslsned, MAUHV STKRV*7 bualnaaa under the fi.-tltfiiii^nai-r NEW FORK BAKKB> at "JJ Court, Miami Beach, ""'"* iVr* to reslater aald fictitious name Office of the Cl.rk of he %  '"'^"^"&1=-. Circa LOUIS IIKIMAN Attorney for AppHosnt. 10/l-lS-tt-X II NOTICE UNDER flCTl NAME LAW %  .. .man ITIOUS ulrlts at 47 If. w •" •-• %  M vpr eforlda. Intend to rea-IMer ^ tioua name In the '<*''' Court?' of the Circuit Court, i* L0U iVSE < § APPl.cn., 10/l-lt-M-ll/ -— Buy War Saving* Bond*



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i*Jewish FllaridlHa in Cowa/^/vmnl|rad Kauffmann. Danish minister tion into. Palestine and to guar thc Unjted g to d a con _. antee adequate scope for future, ference of the Jewish Natio nal i growth and development to the Workors A i liance in the Hotel full extent of the econom c: ab-, Penn lvania this week that 5 000 sorptive capacity of the country i Jews havp es ^ from Dcn to safeguard and protect the m ark jn the lhree wecRs sincp fundamental rights of all inhabith Nazi therc decreed dcpo rtatants and to prepare the coun-1 tion try to become, within a reasonj Mr able peiiod of years, a self-governing commonwealth. "Much more than Palestine must occupy the attention of any responsible body which is vitally concerned with the total welfare of Jewry. Through the marshaling of public opinion, through representations to our government and through proper diplomatic channels, we shall continue to seek to achieve the quickest possible rescue of the Jews persecuted in Europe today and to attain for the millions who will be there tomorrow a normal life on a basis of equality with their fellow citizens. We reject any thesis which surrenders the right of Jews to live as equal citizens in Europe or anywhere. "The combating of anti-Semit(CONTINUKO ON PAGE 7) DECREE RESTORATION PRAISED BY DEPUTIES London (JTA)—The board of deputies of British Jews this week cabled to the French Committee of National Liberation at Algiers expressing the thanks of British Jewry for the committee's restoration of the Cremieux Decree. "Not only British Jews but Jews the world over will hail this action as a decisive step in the restoration of the principles of liberty, equality and fraternity for which the gallant soldiers of the Fighting French are battling in the ranks of the United Nations," the cable stated.