The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00766

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Jewish Floridian of South Broward
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Jewish Floridian of North Broward
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Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
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Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
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Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
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Jewish Floridian of South County
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Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
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QoM&i^He, YKie Jliewiislh HJmBty
VOLUME 16No. 43
MIAMI. FLORIDA. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1943
PRICE 10 CENTS
N.C.J1 TO
AT CHICAGO MEET
New York (JTA).The 50th
anniversary of the National
Council of Jewish Women, the
oldest Jewish women's organiza-
tion in this country, will be
marked at the 17th triennial con-
vention of the group which will
meet in Chicago from Nov. 7 to
Nov. 11. The Council was found-
ed in Chicago in 1883.
Delegates from 215 senior and
10(1 junior sections of the Coun-
cil, from all parts of the United
States, will plan the organiza-
tions program for the next three
years with emphasis on the func-
tioning of the five departments
of the Council Service to For-
eign Born: social legislation, so-
cial welfare, war activities, con-
temporary Jewish affairs, and
international relations and peace.
Because of the war the conven-
tion has been stripped of all fes-
tivities with the exception of a
"Golden Jubilee" dinner on Nov.
10. A featured speaker at the
convention will be Earl G. Har-
rison, United States Commis-
sioner of Immigration and Nat-
uralization.
AIR CORPS CAPERERS
FEATURED AT Y DANCE
LOSS OF UKRAINE:
JEWS TO REMAIN
Sgt. Hal Fisher and his group
comprising the Air Corps Caper-
ers will be the feature attraction
at the Annual Dance of the Mi-
ami Y. M. H. A. at the Coral
Gables Country Club next Tues-
day night, Oct. 26.
Larry Grossberg, chairman of
the affair, reports large advance
ticket sales for the affair for
which Cy Washburn and his or-
chestra will play.
For table reservation phone the
Y"3-4012.
y
Bern (JTA).Anticipating the
liberation by the Russian armies
of Transnistria. the Rumanian-
held section of the Ukraine
where tens of thousands of exiled
Rumanian Jews are interned, the
Bucharest Government has or-
dered all Rumanian officials
there to send their wives and
children back to Rumania, it was
reliably reported here this week.
A considerable number of of-
ficials in Transnistria. anticipat-
ing the Bucharest order, have
been sending their families from
Odessa and other occupied Ukrai-
nian cities to the interior of Ru-
mania during the last few weeks.
It is taken for granted in Jew-
ish circles here that the Ru-
manian armed forces, when re-
treating from Transnistria. will
leave the interned Jews in the
devastated territory.
The Swiss newspaper Basler
Nachrichten reports that the Ru-
manian authorities in Galati is-
sued an order forbidding Jews
to ourchase bread or any other
bakery goods. At the same time,
the German news agency DNB
reports that that Rumania Min-
ister of War has issued an order
requesting all Jews in Rumania
who were born in 1926 to regis-
ter for compulsory military
service.
The Bucharest newspaper Ar-
gus reaching here this week
from Rumania reports that a new
decree has been promulgated by
the Rumania Government pro-
hibiting Jewish physicians from
treating "Aryan" patients. Non-
Jews are by the same decree for-
bidden to consult Jewish doctors.
JEWS Of GESTAPO
Stockholm (JTA).The possi-
bility of German occupation of
Hungary and the intensified per-
secution of the Jews by the Ges-
tapo along the same lines as in
other German-occupied countries
was predicted in the Swedish
press this week following the re-
turn from Hungary of a number
of Swedish journalists.
The neutral newspapermen
were told in Budapest that
should Germany forcibly occupy
Hungary, which is now trying to
get out of the war, "over a mil-
lion Jews. Poles and democratic
intellectuals will be butchered by
the Gestapo." At present there
are more than 700,000 Jews re-
siding in Hungary.
"Despite the existing anti-
Jewish measures in the country,
the Hungarians realize that the
Jews there arc vitally needed for
Hungary's economic life." the
representative of the Swedish
newspaper Social Demokraten
writes in summarizing his im-
pressions of the trip. He em-
phasizes that there is a genera]
anti-German feeling in Hungary
and that this feeling is openly
expressed. "Everybody in Hun-
nary is war weary, and none of
the Hungarians would like his
country to share the fate which
Northern Italy is now facing
under German occupation." the
writer says.
CLOSING DAYS OF
CANADA RAISES $500,000 FOR
UNITED PALESTINE APPEAL
Montreal (WNS)Rabbi Jesse
Schwartz, national executive di-
rector of the Zionist organization
of Canada, announced here that
more than $500,000 had been
raised in Canada for the current
United Palestine Appeal.
BY LOCAL JEWRY
(Note: Because of the holiday,
this edition is published on
Wednesday for delivery Thurs-
day, carrying regular Friday
dateline. This issue will reach
leaders in time for the following
information to be of value.)
The closing days of Succos
starting last Wednesday evening
and continuing through Thurs-
day and Friday of this week
brings to a close the High Holi-
day period of observance.
Temple Israel will have Dr.
Jacob H. Kaplan officiating at all
services. Succos morning. Thurs-
day. Oct. 21, at 11a. m. Sermon:
"Realists and Idealists." Memo-
rial services.
At Beth Sholom Center Rabbi
S. M. Machtei will officiate. Can-
tor Abraham Friedman will
chant the musical portions of the
services, scheduled as follows:
Thursday at 9 a. m., Yizkor sery:
ice, at 10:30 a. m. with Rabbi
Machtei preaching on "The Liv-
ing-Dead and the Dead-Living
Thursday at 8 p. m., Simchath
Torah services. Friday at 9:30
(CONTINUED ON PAO.E )
ADDRESS CITIZENS
HERE OCTOBER 11
Greater Miami will be honored
this week when Dr. Israel Chip-
kin arrives here Monday for a
seven-day stay. One of the fore-
most authorities on Jewish Edu-
cation in the country, he comes
here .at the invitation of the Jew-
ish Education Association of
Greater Miami.
This community will be privi-
leged to hear Dr. Chipkin when
DR. ISRAEL CHIPKIN
he addresses a community-wide
meeting sponsored by the Edu-
cation Association on Wednes-
day evening, Oct. 27. at 8:15 p.m.
at "the Y. M. & W. H. A. on Mi-
ami Beach, located at 1 Lincoln
Road. His subject will be "Jew-
ish Education." The meeting is
open to the public who are urged
to take advantage of the oppor-
tunity to hear a leading authority
on the subject. There will be no
funds solicited.
Dr. Chipkin is at present di-
rector for Jewish Education of
New York City and is a past
president of the National Con-
ference of Jewish Social Welfare.
His background and activity is
filled with innumerable positions
he has held in the Jewish Com-
munal Field of Social Endeavor.
Terming his visit one of con-
sultation-observation, he will
spend his time here reviewing
the local Talmud Torahs and con-
sult with local community lead-
ers. His visit is a result of a
series of conferences had with
him in New York by various Mi-
amians interested in the educa-
tion problem. He volunteered
his efforts to assist the local com-
munity in establishing a system
and program that would be ade-
quate for its needs, comply with
its communal setup and geo-
graphical difficulties.
The Jewish Education Associ-
ation has been endeavoring to
institute a program in Greater
Miami area with the co-operation
of the existing institutions and
the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration.
Dr. Chipkin will meet with of-
ficers of the Federation at a
gathering on Oct. 28.
RED MOGEN DAVID WOULD
AFFILIATE WITH RED CROSS
Jerusalem (WNS) Motivated
by a desire to be of direct assist-
ance to the Jews in the liberated
areas of Europe, the Palestine
Red Mogen David organization
his entered into negotiations with
the British and International Red
Cross to the end that it be con-
verted from a local into an inter-
national Jewish Red Cross. Such
arrangement would enable the or-
ganization to broaden its scope.
COMMUNITY CENTER IS
DISCUSSED THIS WEEK
Jewish leaders were present at
a gathering this week convened
at the request of Sam Blank,
communal leader active here for
many years. Called together to
discuss the much talked about
Community Center, plans were
evolved for a joint committee of
the two "Y's" of this area to initi-
ate a program to put into action
a planning group that would
evolve ways and means to pres-
ently institute the Community
Center movement.
REPORT CRITICAL
CLOTHES NEED FOR
29THYEARLY MEET
OCTOBER 25 TO 21
New York (WNS).The 29th
annual convention of Hadassah,
the Women's Zionist Organiza-
tion of America will be held at
the Henry Hudson Hotel here,
from Oct 25 through Oct. 28, Mrs.
Herman Shulman, convention
chairman of this city, announced
today.
In accordance with govern-
ment requests to curtail trans-
portation as a war-time measure,
convention attendance is being
reduce from 1,500 to approxi-
mately 500 delegates, represent-
ing a constituency of 100.000
from 47 states.
"Political issues regarding Pal-
estine and the defeat of the Brit-
ish White Paper of 1939, accord-
ing to which not a single Jew will
be permitted to enter Palestine
after March, 1944. without Arab
consent, will be among the cine!
problems discussed by the con-
vention." Mrs. Shulman said.
"The implementation of that
policy would be a cruel denial
of Jewish lights and hopes Re-
membering that the Mandates
Commission of the League of Na-
tions has held the White Paper
to be a violation of the mandate.
Hadassah together with ail Zion-
ist bodies during the coming
months, will concentrate its full-
strength to defeat that policy. A
line of action toward this end
will be laid down at our conven-
tion," she said.
Critical need of clothing for
Russian civilians, especially
warm garments for the approach-
ing winter, is reported by Ed-
ward C. Carter, president of Rus-
sian War Relief, Inc., in a cable-
gram just received from Moscow*
by the national headquarters of
the agency in New York. Mr.
Carter arrived in the Soviet cap-
ital a few days ago to survey re-
lief needs, especially for the vast
devastated areas already recap-
tured from the Nazi invaders in
the Red army's continuing of-
fensive.
Over four million pounds of
clothing were baled in Russian
War Relief warehouses and
shipped free in Russian boats to
the Soviet Union during the first
eight months of the year. Much
of this clothing has already
played an important part in out-;
fitting civilians who were
stripped of all their belongings,
and in many cases driven from
their homes, by the Nazis.
Clothing may be left at local
Russian War Relief headquar-
ters, or at the national headquar-
ters at 11 East 35th Street. New-
York 16. N. Y.
BALEOBR WEEK IS
TO BE OBSERVED
DCT. 31 TD
Washington. D. C The period
beginning Sunday, Oct. 31 and
ending with Sabbath services on
Friday evening. Nov. 5 and Sat-
urday. Nov. 6. has been desig-
nated as Balfour Week in ob-
servance of the 6th anniversary
of the issuance of the Balfour
declaration, in a proclamation is-
sued here this week by Dr. Israel
Goldstein, president of the Zion-
ist Organization of America.
Declaring that the action of
the American Jewish Conference
in placing a United American
Jewry behind the Zionist Pro-
gram for the establishment of a
Jewish Commonwealth in Pales-
tine, gives to the forthcoming an-
niversary celebration a broader
scope and meaning. Dr. Goldstein
calls upon all Zionist Districts
and units throughout the coun-
try to mark the event jointly
with all groups and institutions
in their respective communities
that were represented in the
Conference.
SAFE IN SWEDEN
IS PRESS REPORT
Stockholm (JTA).Approxi-
mately 6.000 of the 8,000 native
and refugee Jews of Denmark
have succeeded in reaching Swe-
den, it is reported in the Swedish
press this week. Large numbers
of Danish Jews 'nave entered the
country during the last two days.
Reinforcement of the Gestapo
in Denmark will make the es-
cape of more Jews practically im-
possible, the Stockholm news-
paper Aftonbladet predicted this
week. The Dagens Nyheter re-
ports that two of the four "prison
ships" on which the Nazis had
confined about 1.400 Jews have
left Copenhagen. It is not known
how many of the 1,400 were
aboard the two ships.
A number of prominent Dan-
ish army officers, the Dagens
Nyheter writes, have declined to
accept release from an intern-
ment camp at Marieslyst in
"protest against an official an-
nouncement connecting the re-
lease of Danish soldiers with the
deportation of the Jews." Major
General Gortz. commander-in-
chief of all the Danish armed
forces, has given the Germans a.
similar answer and has volun-
tarily remained in an internment
camp at Elsinore. the paper adds.
The Swedish radio, in a broad-
cast this week, reported that rep-
resentatives of the coalition of
five Danish parties had handed
Werner Best, the German Minis-
ter in Denmark, a memorandum
"sharply protesting the German
measures against their fellow-
citizens, the Jews.
Buy War Bonds and Stamps to
help preserve Democracy.
PROTEST AGAINST ARMS
TRIAL IS MADE IN CAPITOL
Washington (WNS)A memo-
randum protesting the manner in
which the recent arms trial in
Palestine was conducted, was
presented here to the British
Embassy here last week.


PAGE TWO
*Jenisi fhrkKan
raiDAY^CTOBER ft

WW^WW^WWW^^W^%lw^ww
SOCIAL ITEMS AND
PERSONALS
of their plants in Lawrence. Kan.
The wedding will take place
Nov. 7 at the home of the bride-
elect's parents.
Pvt. Leo Machtei left Tuesday
to return to Ft. Jay after having
.spent a short furlough with his
family.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Adelman.
Savannah, Ga., are spending a
week in the city as the guests of
his parents. Mr. and Mrs. Nathan
Adelman, 1421 N. W. First Street.
After spending a month in Or-
lando with her children, Lieut.
;snd Mrs. Paul Pollock. Mrs. Hei-
man Trackman is now visiting
her brother and sister. Mr. and
Mrs. M. J. Kopelowitz. Lieut.
Pollock is a "Navidier" or "Bom-
bagtaor," wearing the wings of
both bombardier and navigator,
having been trained at Sequoia
Field. Cai.. Santa Ana. Cal., Wil-
liams Field. Ariz., and Monroe.
La. Mrs. Pollock, formerly Shir-
ley Ruth Trackman was a fre-
quent winter visitor in Miami.
William Taradash has returned
from a summer visit with his
son, Daniel Taradash. at Astoria.
Long Island. N. Y. He lives at
5225 Collins Avenue. Miami
Beach.
and attended the University of
Florida. He is a former resident
of Louisville, Ky.
Mr. and Mrs. Donald LaVigne
announce the approaching mar-
riage of their daughter, Miss
Gladys Ruth LaVigne to Lt. My-
ron J. Cowen. USMCR, at Tem-
ple Israel, 137 N. E. 19th Street,
Sunday, Oct. 24, at 4 p. m. Dr.
Jacob H. Kaplan will officiate.
No formal invitations have
been sent out. All relatives and
friends are invited to attend the
ceremony and reception to follow.
Miss Shana Levinsohn, daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Lev-
insohn. 978 N. W. Second Street,
was married Saturday evening,
Oct 16. to Cpl. Jack Ozark at the
home of Rabbi Max Shapiro. The
bride and groom are artists and
were formerly connected with
Fleisher Studios. After a short
honeymoon, the groom will re-
turn to the Arctic where he is
stationed and the bride will make
her home with her parents.
Mr. and Mrs. Myron Miller.
1636 S. W. 19th Street, announce
the approaching marriage of
their daughter, Doris, to Sol
Alexander, son of Nathan Alex-
ander. 1756 N. W. 16th Street,
for this coming Sunday, Oct. 24.
Miss Dorothy Pepper will be
maid of honor, and Mrs. Bernard
BAR MITZVAH
The Bar Mitzvah of Burton
Aronson will take place Saturday
morning at Beth Jacob Congre-
gation, Miami Beach. The con-
firmant will deliver a message
after the reading of the Torah
and Rabbi Moses Mescheloff will
respond.
TO TENDER RECEPTION TO
DR. AND MRS. M. A. LIPKIND
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Rubin
and daughter, Eleanor, of the
Beach Park Hotel. Miami Beach,
returned Friday from an extend-
ed visit in Boston. Mass.
Isaac Gold returned from a
summer vacation spent in New
York City.
Mrs. Harry Glickstein. 317 Men-
cioza Ave. Coral Gables, has re-
K-ntly returned from a lengthy
visit to her daughter and family
and relatives in New Haven. Ct.
She spent some time with her
sons and families in Chicago, 111.,
where she also visited with her
son. Dr. Leonard M. Glickstein,
before he left for Camp McCoy,
Wis.
ENGAGEMENT
The engagement of Miss Su-
zanne Davis, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Melvin Davis, of 750 Jeffer-
son Avenue, Miami Beach, to
Pfc. Isadore Ratthaus. U. S. A.
Air Force, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Aaron Ratthaus. of 605 Meridian
Avenue, was announced at a din-
ner party given by the parents
of the bride-elect at their home
this week.
MISS DORIS MILLER
________BRITH________j
Rabbi S M. Machtei officiated ;
at the Brith Milah of the son of
Mr. and Mrs. Perry Marks. 2328
S. W. Fourth Street, on Thursday
at the University Hospital.
WEDDINGS
Mr. Meyer Kaplan and Mrs.
Anna Ethel Simons were united
in marriage by Rabbi S. M.
Machtei. on Sunday afternoon, at
1020 Euclid Avenue, Miami
Beach.
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bulbin of
1269 S. W. Fifth Street announce
the engagement and forthcom-
ing marriage of their son. Fred,
to Miss Maxine Spigel, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Spigel, of
Roanoke. Va.
Miss Spigel is a graduate of
Jefferson High School of Roa-
noke. Va.. and of Northwestern
University of Chicago, 111. She
attended the Fagin School of
Dramatic Art in New York, and
appeared with the Barter The-
ater Players in several produc-
tions. She has been active in
radio and local theatricals in her
home city of Roanoke. Va.
Mr. Bulbin is a chemical engi-
neer and a graduate of Miami
Senior High School, also of Geor-
gia School of Technology. He is
a member of Phi Epsilon Pi and
Phi Eta Sigman fraternities, and
also a member of Temple Israel.
He is at present connected with
the Hercules Powder Co. at one

The marriage Sept. 22 in San '
Antonio, Tex., of Miss Phvllis
Berman and Aviation Cadet Mur-
rel Kastan. U. S. A., is being an-
nounced by her parents. Mr. and
Mrs. Louis Berman, 112 Ocean i
Drive, Miami Beach.
The former Miss Berman was '
graduated from Miami Beach i
High School. Cadet Kastan. a
son of Mrs. Bertha Kastan. 1126
Ocean Drive, Miami Beach, was
graduated from the same school !
Take Your Watch
to Danzig's!
7^ -v %%
SMALLEST
WAT Z-
fe^-e: -_ >
Delicate, mall. Intricate
W urs are handled
br with understand-
sag car* and iklli.
JIWELXY RIPAIRING
DANZIG'S
JEWELERS
:J6 HALCYON ARCADE
' 15 f FUalcc S
1H THEATRE
S.W. 8th St. at 15th At*.
OPEN AT 1:45 P. M.
Fri., Oct. 22ndLast Day
//
//
GALS, INC.
WITH
leon errol
grace McDonald
EXTRA!!
"EUROPE'S
CROSSROADS'*
in the latest issue of
"MARCH OF TIME"
* & &
Starts Sat. at 4:30 P. M. and
Sun., Thru Tues., Oct. 23-26
//
WE'VE
NEVER
BEEN
LICKED
WITH
RICHARD QUINE
NOAH BERRY. JR.
ANNE GWYNNE
MARTHA OT>RISCOLL
//
Greenstein, sister of the bride-
elect, matron of honor. Rabbi
Max Shapiro will perform the
ceremony.
Miss Miller is a graduate of
Miami High School and a mem-
ber of the B'nai B'rith Girls. Mr.
Alexander, graduate of the same
school, also was graduated from
the University of Florida where
he was a member of Phi Beta
Kappa and Phi Kappa Phi. na-
tional honorary fraternities. He
was chancellor of Tau Epsilon
Phi. social fraternity.
The couple plan to make their
home in Miami.
A group of Miami Beach resi-
dents active in the Miami Beach
Zionist District, have announced
plans for a reception to be ten-
dered to Dr. and Mrs. M. A. Lip-
kind on the occasion of their 40th
wedding anniversary to be ob-
served October 31st.
Dr. Lipkind is a life-long Zion-
ist and his achievements have
been long respected by the Na-
tional office. Since retirement,
he has devoted his time and tal-
ents to Zionist and cultural activ-
ities in this community. A strong
believer in the Jewish National
Fund, he is J.N.F. chairman of
the Miami Beach Zionist District.
This group interested in fittingly
celebrating the occasion, with the
belief that the Lipkinds would
be pleased to know that their
happiness meant a measure of
hope for some poor European ref-
ugee, are suggesting that friends
and well wishers celebrate this
anniversary with the Lipkinds
by gifts of land and trees, bought
in their honor in Eretz Yisroel. A
tree costs $1.50. a quarter acre of
land (dunam) $25.
This committee will receive
gifts of this nature and translate
them into the measure of land or
number of trees and at the recep-
tion present a record of all such
purchases to the Lipkinds.
The treasurer of this special
purpose is Leo Robinson. 420 Lin-
coln Road, Miami Beach.
LOCAL YOOTHu^;
Zadik Aleph j ,Lo!1*Im
Mr. and Mrs. Asrial r i ?n of
1533S.W. Third street ^fk^
named as one ttitamZZ*
for the international'&*
of the Junior B'nai B'S>
throughout the United "SS?
Canada and England Stat*
Active in youth artu.i.-
this area. Mr SakowiS M 0[
dent of the MiaiK 322 S
of A. Z. A., pre.dit apter
state of Florida A Z A 1th*
president of the Greater M*loa
operation with requests hi ,t
ODT. Final result! of the'eft
tions and awards will gL"
nounced some time in November
New York (WNS)B'nai Brith
Lodge No. 1, the parent lodge of
the national Jewish fraternal or-
der, observed the 100th anniver-
sary of the Lodge here this week.
WANTED
Middle Aged Widow dtiim
room and board (breakfut tad
dinner) with refined fanU?
IS pj,r^mbo"t $7S 38
Address Mrs. D.. c/o P. o Bn
2973. Miami 18. Florida.
***L CrTATEMIAMI BtACB
B. E. BRONSTON, Realtor
605 Lincoln Road Ph. 5-5868
A Trustworthy Real Estate Servict
Ask for Free 1943 Descriptive
Map of Mis ml Beach
RENTALS LEASES SALES
Lots, Homes. Hotels
Apartment Houses
M. GILLER
Reg. Real Estate Broker
Ph. 58 1188 523 Mich. An.
INSURE
IN SURE
ASSURANCE
THE SENSIBLE FARSIGHTED INDIVIDUAL provides
today the assurance for tomorrow and the years
ahead.
ASSURANCE IS INVESTING WISELY and soundly to
GUtmJfc a11 !he needs of the Y*"113 ah^d
NEEDS that include Home Education Com-
munal Endeavor Emergencies Illness
Retirement, and the InevitableDeath.
Be Prepared that when the time comes you are not bothered in vour
^Sn^wa^l^A^ 4 *^IS2E? andythe
=,.;.,.? y to kcep the entire farm y together forever is bv
Mount CWn Pnvate fami'y Plot And having yoJr plot in
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For further information with no obligation, phone
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ONLY TEN MINUTES FROM THE HEART OF MIAMI
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BUSINESS OFFICE WM OLYMPIA BUILDING
A VISIT WILL CONVINCE YOU
L
r


FRIDAY. OCTOBER 22. 1943
+Jew 1st) n&ridlton
PAGE THREE

-i~ 1W ^^^^ a -- -|-|-|-|-1-J-|J-iru-u-u-u-u-^r^r|^-^-^r^-
ORGANIZATION
ACTIVITIES
'u*ii* -***** ^,-| -_i-_n_ri_ru-L_n^-i_n_ri.n_n_n_
JEWISH CONGRESS
Women's Division, American
Jewish Congress, Greater Miami
Chapter, will hold its annual in-
stallation luncheon on Monday,
Oct. 25, 12:30 p. m., at the Ver-
sailles Hotel, 3425 Collins Ave-
nue, Miami Beach. Mrs. Moses
Krieger, Honorary President,
will install officers for the com-
ing season as follows:
President, Mrs. S. H. Lutsky;
vice presidents, Mrs. Louis Glas-
ser, Mrs. A. E. Woolfe, and Mrs.
B. Meyers; recording secretary,
Mrs. Lillian Mills; corresponding
secretary, Mrs. Harry Miller; fi-
nancial secretary, Mrs. Theo.
Firestone; treasurer, Mrs. Leo
Meyer; auditor, Mrs. Sam Com-
mander.
Theme of the afternoon's pro-
gram will be "The American
DreamYesterday. Today, To-
morrow." Invocation will be de-
livered by Rabbi Irving Lehr-
man of the Miami Beach Jewish
Center, and benediction by Rab-
bi Moses Mescheloff of Beth Ja-
cob Congregation. Guest speaker
will be Harold B. Matteson. Di-
rector of the Miami Round Table,
National Conference of Chris-
tians and Jews. Mrs. Virginia
Urban, pianist, will play, and
Mrs. I. M. Weinstein will preside
as toastmistress.
The committee in charge of ar-
rangements is headed by Mrs.
Louis Glasser, and reservations
may be made by calling 5-4460,
5-7731, and 5-3796.
The American Jewish Con-
gress, Women's Division, of
which Mrs. Stephen S. Wise is
national president, has a broad
program of activity which in-
cludes among its projects a Com-
mission on Economic Problems
which seeks to eliminate preju-
dice and discrimination in busi-
ness, industry and the profes-
sions; Commission on Legisla-
tion which combats anti-demo-
cratic forces, subversive propa-
ganda, and discrimination be-
cause of race, color or religion;
Commission on Interfaith Af-
fairs which promotes better un-
derstanding of social problems
common to all faiths; United
Jewish War Effort which aims to
unite all Jewry behind the war
effort, maintain allied relief
workrooms, send money, cloth-
ing and medical aid to Britain,
Russia and China, and support
the Congress Defense Houses for
service men in New York City.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
An afternoon of pleasure and
relaxation has been planned for
members and friends of the Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women,
Miami Section, by Mrs Irving
Kobley and Mrs. Stanley C.
Myers, co-chairmen of the Ways
and Means Committee of the
Council.
Plans call for a card party to
be held Friday, Oct. 29, at 1:30,
at the Y. M. and W. H. A.. 1
Lincoln Road, Miami Beach.
Tickets are 75 cents and reser-
vations are being taken by Mrs.
Kobley. 5-7828, of by any of the
following committee members:
Mrs. Herman Wepman. Mrs.
Anna Cohen, Mrs. Max Meisel,
Mrs. Ben Turchin, Mrs. Merle
Kolber, Mrs. Al Barmack and
Mrs. Herman Levitt.
BEACH Y.M.&W.H.A
Pvt. Ben Levinson was chosen
as director of the Y. M. and W.
H. A. Players at at a meeting at
the "Y."
Officers elected for the group
were Mrs. Gertrude' Marx, presi-
dent; Sgt. Larry Levy, vice presi-
dent; Miss Corinne Feuer, secre-
tary-treasurer; Miss Thelma
Schwartz, corresponding secre-
tary.
BETH JACOB
Beth Jacob Sunday School ses-
sion opens with registration this
Sunday, Oct. 24, at 10 a. m. at
the synagogue. The superintend-
ent of the school is Malvina
Weiss.
SGT. HAL FISHER
AND HIS
'Air Corps Caperers'
IN A ONE-HOUR FLOOR SHOW
AT THE
12th ANNUAL DANCE
Sponsored by Miami Y. M. H. A.
Tuesday Eve., Oct. 26,9 o'clock
at the
Coral Gables Country Club
Music By
CY WASHBURN AND HIS
COUNTRY CLUB ORCHESTRA
ADMISSION. INCLUDING TAX........$1-10
CALL THE "Y" FOR TABLE RESERVATIONS
OLD SARATOGA INN
Buc.iync Boulcv.ud *t 77th Street Phone 7-77Z5
Dinners From 5 o'Clock Sundays From Noon
("ocktai! I.ounije Fine Liquors and Wines
4f nils II FROM DOWNTOWN MIAMI OR BUS M II FROM MIAMI BMCH
OPEN EVERY DAY EXCEPT TUESDAY
OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE IN FLORIDA
KOSHER ZION
SAUSAGE CO. PRODUCTS
Delicious Corned Boof
Pleklod, Cooked and Smoked Meats
87th and Normal Ave. ____________Chloaf
SCHAAREI ZEDEK
Mrs. Max Mintzer and Mrs.
Gorshon August will serve as
hostesses for the card party this
Sunday evening at the synagogue
of the Ladies' Auxiliary of Con-
gregation Shaarei Zedek. Pro-
ceeds will be used for the Tal-
mud Torah.
Seventy children attended the
Succoth party given Sunday aft-
ernoon by the Ladies' Auxiliary
of Congregation Shaarei Zedek.
Mrs. Nat Blumberg and Mrs.
Max Jacobskind were co-chair-
men of the affair, held at the
synagogue. Rabbi Simon April
conducted the ceremonies.
The regular meeting of the
Ladies' Auxiliary will take place
Wednesday, Oct. 27, at 2 p. m. in
the synagogue.
BETH DAVID
Beth David Sisterhood will
hold its monthly meeting on
Wednesday, Oct. 27, at 2:30 p.m.
at the Beth David Auditorium.
The Sisterhood program for this
season will be discussed and ap-
proved.
Mr. William Kesselman, Direc-
tor of Hillel activities at the Uni-
versity of Miami, will be guest
speaker. He will discuss the sub-
ject, "University Life at the
Campus." Miss Phyllis Schul-
man and Mrs. Joseph Schaffer
will take part in the musical
program. Refreshments will be
served. A cordial invitation is
extended to all members and
friends by Mrs. Harry Oliphant.
president.
ARBEITER RING
The Arbeiter Ring, Branch 692.
of Greater Miami, inaugurated
the season's program of cultural
activities with Mr. Mandelman's
lecture, held on Sunday, Oct. 10.
His topic was Kidash Hashem,
'Past and Present." Some of the
highlights of his lecture com-
pared the Jews of old with the
Jews of today, how the persecu-
tions of the past 2,000 years are
still going on today.
This coming winter season the
group is planning a series of lec-
tures to be held at Lyceum Hall.
25 Washington Avenue. Miami
Beach. Some of the prominent
lecturers are Malech Epstein,
representative of the Jewish La-
bor Committee; Chaim Wein-
reich, co-worker on the Jewish
Forward; Poet H. Leivick and a
concert by the well known artist.
Masha Benia. soloist. Dates will
be announced.
Every Saturday night at Ly-
ceum Hall, the soldiers of Miami
Beach use the quarters for their
own entertainment, holding
dances, socials and other activi-
ties.
Buy War Savings Bonds.
WHEN NERVOUS HEADACHES
PE5TER ME
I FIND THAT MILES NERVINE
HELPS NERVOUS TENSION
TO RELAX <^?>v
AND LEAVES ME *&
CALM,$ERENE -
WHEN Function*! Nervous
Disturbances such as Sleep-
lessness, Crankiness, Excitability,
Restlessness or Nervous Headache
interfere with your work or spoil
your good times, take
Dr. Miles Nervine
(Liquid or Effervescent Tablet*)
Nervous Tension can make yoa
Wakeful, Jittery, Irritable. Ner-
vous Tension can cause Nervous
Headache and Nervous Indiges-
tion. In times like these, we are
more likely than usual to become
overwrought and nervous and to
wish for a good sedative. Dr.
Miles Nervine is a good sedative
mild but effective.
If you do not use Dr. MO
Nervine you can't know what it
will do for you. It comes in
Liquid and Effervescent Tablet
form, both equally soothing to
tense and over-wrought nerves.
WHY DONT YOU TRY IT t.
'Get it at your drug store.
Effervescent tablets 35* and 7f,
Liquid 25* aad $140. Road direc-
tions and bob only as directed.
M. B. JEWISH CENTER
Members of the Sisterhood of
the Miami Beach Jewish Com-
munity installed officers and wel-
comed 40 new members into the
Sisterhood at a meeting in the
Center Monday evening.
Mrs. Ben Marbach, chairman,
extended greetings and Samuel
Friedland, president of the Cen-
ter, spoke. An address by Rabbi
Irving Lehrman and a musical
program by Evelyn Raff and
Edith Freeman followed the cere-
monies conducted by Mrs. Lehr-
man. wife of the rabbi.
Mrs. Morris Rubin, honorary
president, was on the program
and Mrs. Joseph Rose was in
charge of the membership com-
mittee. Chaplain of the Sister-
hood is Mrs. Samuel Josepher. A
social hour followed the cere-
monies.
BEACH ZIONIST
The regular weekly session of
the Zionist Cultural Forum will
take place Sunday at the Y. M.
and W. H. A., No. 1 Lincoln Road.
The Forum will be held at its
usual time, 3:30 p. m., and the
subject chosen for discussion dur-
ing the afternoon will "The In-
fluence of Palestine on Jewish
Culture."
KENNEL CLUB NEARLY
READY FOR OPENING
Despite war-time conditions
and a general curtailment in the
number of racing greyhounds
throughout the country West
Flagler Kennel Club is rapidly
completing its roster that already
assures its patrons the nation's
leading kennels and racers.
This was announced by Jacob
Sher, president, and William I.
Huntley, vice president and gen-
eral manager of the club that
will have the earliest opening in
the Florida racing season his-
tory, Nov. 15.
U. OF M. FIFTH SEASON
OF NOTED ORCHESTRA
The University of Miami takes
pleasure in announcing the 16th
season of its Symphony Orches-
tra, 1943-44.
The orchestra will be under
the direction of Dr. Modeste Al-
loo, who won the praise and rec-
ognition of the press and audi-
ences last year for his splendid
performances.
The concerts will again be
given on Sunday afternoons at
4:15 at the Miami Senior High
School Auditorium, 2400 West
Flagler Street, Miami.
The dates and noted soloists
are:
Nov. 14Nathan Milstein.
Dec. 12Dusolini Giannini.
Jan. 16Raya Garbousova.
Feb. 13Efrem Zimbalist.
March 12Alexander Borov-
sky.
April 16"Oratorio" with full
Symphony Orchestra chorus of
100 and a distinguished quartet.
Season subscription tickets at
$5.50. $6.60. $8.25, $9.90, includ-
ing federal tax, may be had at
the University of Miami Main
Building, Room 129.
The United States Govern-
ment Having Taken Over His
Present Offices
DR. JOSEPH B. MARGOUS
announces the
REMOVAL OF HIS OFFICE
to
311 Lincoln Road
Albion Bldg.. Suite 30*
MIAMI BEACH
For the Practice of
General Dentistry
PALM BEACH NOTES
JEWISH FLORIDIAN OFFICE, 226 S. OLIVE STREET
IN THE FOX BUILDING
MRS. MARY SCHREBNICX HoproaontoHT*
Scher Memorial Hall was the
scene of a service men's dance
with soldiers and Spars of the
nearby bases attending.
Beth Israel Sisterhood held a
card party at Schwartzburg Hall.
Residents of Belle Glade who
spent the holidays in West Palm
Beach included Mr. and Mrs. Joe
Gold. Mr. and Mrs. J. Leo Rader.
and Mr. and Mrs. Louis Weiman
and son, David.
Pfc. Joseph Schrebnick has
been awarded the good conduct
medal of the AAF Brookley
Field, Mobile, Ala., where he is
attached to the Air Service Com-
mand.
Buy War Savings Bonds
Miss Geraldine Halpern.
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry
Halpern. 522 33rd Street, has
been tapped for Spirogira hono-
i rary organization at the Florida
State College for Women. A
junior in standing, Miss Halpern
is among four women students
to be so honored.
ALFAR
COtAMERY CO,
Far fee Boat fa Dairy
Product*
WEST PALM REACH
KELTCREAM ICE CREAM
SOUTHERN DAIRIES
cm
Palm Beach County, teatarla* fa*
Matlonallv Famous Southern Dairies Fbb-
ducts and lea Cream.
AS NEAR TO TOU AS TOUR PHOTS
FERGUSON FUNERAL HOME, Inc.
1201 South Olive Avenue
WEST PALM BEACH
PHONE 5172
Palm Beach Bottling Works
INCORPORATED
WEST PALM BEACH. FLORIDA
Beverages of Quality Since 1920
LAINHART & POTTER
ESTABLISHED 1893
BUILDING MATERIAL FOR PARTICULAR BUILDERS"
Phone 5191 West Palm Beach. Fla.


PAGE FOUR
* Jen-istnor Minn

The Jewish Floridian
Plant and Main Offices, 21 S. W. Second Avenue, Miami. Fla.
P. O. Box 2973 Phone 2-1141
Entered as Second Class Matter July 4, 1930 at the Post Office
of Miami, Florida, under the Act of March 3, 1879
___________FRED K. SHOCHET, Managing Editor
Subscription1 Year, $2.00 Six Months, $1.00
MIAMI, FLORIDA. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1943
TISHRI 23, 1943
VOLUME 16 NUMBER 43
BARUCH HABO
Dr. Israel Chipkin, one of the foremost authorities on Jewish
Education in the country, pays our community a visit this week.
Volunteering his time and the vast knowledge and benefit his
years of experience with the problem of Jewish Education have
given him. Dr. Chipkin has come here to assist us with our
oft-mentioned Jewish Education program.
What is the plan to be inaugurated here that will best serve
our purposes is the question for which we seek the answer.
Devoting his life to the expansion and improvement of Jewish
Education, Dr. Chipkin will assist us in achieving our purpose
an all-encompassing program of Jewish Education for our
community.
Dr. Chipkin has termed his coming here a consultation-
observation visit. During his brief stay he will observe our
education system, be that as it may. He will consult our Rab-
bis and Leaders and discuss with them this community and its
particular difficulties.
We say "Baruch Habo," Dr. Chipkin. We welcome you and
look forward to your much needed advice. We look forward
to your guidance to set us off to a good start in our endeavor
to promulgate Jewish Education in a satisfying and result-
getting manner.
succos
Succos closes the cycle of Jewish holidays that begins with
Rosh Hashonah. Succos closes it on a happy note or notes.
There is, first of all, the note of the intrinsic nature of the
holiday,__the celebration of the harvest. The agricultural
background of the festival is to be seen in the booths, bedecked
with foliage as wel! as the waving palms and ethrogs used in
the synagogues and in pious Jewish homes to express thanks-
giving. Succos in this respect is almost the equivalent of the
American Thanksgiving Day.
The festival of Succos fittingly closes with the celebration
of Simchat Torahthe giving of the Law. In a day when Jew-
ish suffering has been so poignant and so widespread, it must
be confessed that the Giving of the Law does not anways ap-
pear a boon and yet without that Law, humanity would be
infinitely the worse.
One cannot render judgments on such things quickly. In
the matters of humanity, time and the complexity of things
make the human mind prone to error. That which we some-
times think is our badge of suffering may turn out to be the
occasion for great joy. The suffering to which the Jew has
been subjected perhaps may be taken as evidence of the
greatness of his service to humanity. Succos, after the more
sombre Yom Kippur, seems to say to us, "Cheer up. See the
fruits are ready for harvesting. Behind the clouds, the sun is
still shining."
RABBI AS PROPHET AND PRIEST
by DR. JACOB H. KAPLAN
Rabbi Emeritus of Temple Israel
Editor's Note: This is the
first of a series of articles by
the spiritual leaders of Greater
Miami.
Religious life among the Jews,
as well as among all those others
who inherited the ideals of Israel,
developed and develops in cycles
that may be expressed briefly as
follows: Prophet, the voice of
God; Institution, preserving the
thoughts and ideals of the pro-
phet usually guarded by the
priest, later by the rabbis, the
inheritors of priest and prophet.
This continues for a time until
the institution becomes corrupt
and then again a prophet or re-
former brings a fresh message or
interprets the old message anew,
and then again priest or rabbi,
etc., etc., over and over again.
If Judaism had become so
static that no prophet or teacher
could enter the house of Judaism
and refresh its message and in-
stitution, it would have been
dead long ago. But Judaism is a
living stream carrying refreshing
waters through the centuries.
At the time of Malachi. we see
plainly that the priest was more
than merely a performer of the
sacrificial rites. Malachi de-
scribes him thus:
"The lips of the priest should
keep knowledge.
And they should seek the Law at
his mouth;
For he is a messenger of the Lord
of Hosts."
The rabbi inherits the office of
the prophet and the office of the
priest. He not only preserves the
message of the prophet and per-
forms the duties of the priest, but
he also feels at times called upon
to be the mouthpiece of God in
the original sense in which the
prophet was the mouthpiece of
God.
.B,ut.at the time of the Prophet
Malachi. the priest no doubt had
assumed the functions which
broadly speaking, are the func-
tions of the rabbi today, namely
to preserve the knowledge of
Judaism and teach it to the
people.
But that is not so easy as it
seems or sounds.
"The priest's lips should keep
knowledge,
And they should seek the Law at
his mouth;
For he is the messenger of the
Lord of Hosts."
To keep knowledge in ancient
time was a comparatively easy
matter for one who devoted his
life to study. Up to the pre-
scientific age a man seeking a
Ph.D. degree was examined on
all the knowledge of the day. He
knew everything that was
known. Today such a thing is
preposterous even to talk about.
No man can know today every-
thing; he cannot even know
everything in any one branch of
knowledge. No physician knows
all the branches of medicine; no
chemist knows all the branches
of chemistry; no biologist knows
all the branches of life; nor does
a professor literature, even of
English literature, know all the
branches of literature. How,
then, can a rabbi be expected to
"guard knowledge"?
Some rabbis, in their eagerness
to serve, attempt to know every-
thing. They talk about Shake-
speare; they lecture about the
latest books; they know about
military strategy, about biologic
ills. The pulpit sometimes is a
forum of all knowledge.
Today this is impossible. No
rabbi can know everything.
There are men at the university
who know Shakespeare better
than the rabbi does, and some
who know how to review books
better than the all-knowing rab-
bi, and certainly some who know
biology better than the rabbi, and
so on throughout the whole cate-
gory of knowledge.
It is evident, therefore, that
the rabbi of today cannot "guard
knowledge." No man can do that
today. And yet, the utterances
of Malachi are sound advice: The
priest, the rabbi of today, should
guard knowledge, and they shall
seek the Law from his mouth;
for he is the messenger of the
Lord of Hosts.
What kind of knowledge can
and must the rabbi "guard"?
Evidently the only knowledge
that he can and ought to guard
is the knowledge of Judaism, and
that the people should seek the
Law from his mouth.
Furthermore, the rabbi who
wishes to serve the people of his
day should and must know the
Bible, the Talmud and all the
later literature of the Jewish
people. And in order to know
the Bible he must know Bibli-
cal criticism; in order to know
Jewish history he must know
general history; in order to know
Judaism he must know other re-
ligious faiths. A rabbi should
know not only kosher meat, but
also how to live in a community
as a man of the general com-
munity. A rabbi should know
how to live as a Jew in a non-
Jewish community as a religious
man and be part and parcel of
the community in which he lives.
This knowledge which a rabbi
is expected to know is also too
vast for one man and, therefore,
the people should give the rabbi
time to acquire that knowledge,
which is necessary and impor-
tant and not waste the precious
time of the rabbi with matters
that any self-respecting Jew can
and ought to take care of. The
rabbi should not be expected to
make social calls when that is
the duty and pleasure of every
Jew. Neither is it necessary for a
rabbi to be present when a Jew
breathes his last. It is the duty
of every Jew to recite the Shema
at such a time. The rabbi does
not forgive sins at the death-bed.
t-od does that; and as every Jew
a. child of God. every Jew
stands in the presence of God in
\i n?SA weI!,ln ,death- The rabbi
fv~d J d, the th,n*s that are
expected of every Jew. but he
" 1 evcry,th'ng and attend
do a^raoir "*** U*ht to
Yes the rabbi should guard
Jewish knowledge, and the peo-
ple should seek the Law from his
mouth, for he is a messenger of
the Lord of Hosts.
nUDAY^OCTQBEB j
-TTDBrrS FROM EVER
Mudfy eotvgldentiol
-By PHTNEAS J. BJBON-

BEACH KIWANIS CLUB
ELECTS NEWPRESIDENT
PBtJatHKM'iler' y,ami Beach real
estate broker, has been elected
president of the Miami Beach Ki-
s.teSuub' lt was announced
Other officers selected to take
office with Miller on Jan. 1. 1944
are Leo Adeeb. first vice presi-
dent". ^^ Ue' J'vi<*
LISTEN HERE .
Emirs Feisal and Khalid of Saudi Arabia, sons f
Ibn Saud, who are now in this country, have been h
over by the high-powered public relations depojtment^T
Saudi-American oil combine Representative Sol Bl
however, got the brilliant idea that a conference should^
arranged between the Arabian princes and Zionist R
sentatives The Zionists wisely refused That Pal
spread in Life magazine is a direct result of the genuine d'
sire of Life's editors to play fair on the Arab-Jewish issue
For its publication orchids are due an ex-editor in the An 1
Jewish field, who, however, prefers to remain unnamed9 *
The American Jewish Conference is meeting with storm
weather The leaders don't know whether to bury it I
give it front rank Rabbi Abba H, Silver is preparina
blitz campaign for the Zionist Emergency Committee
Since his induction as co-chairman things have begun to
happen.
YOU SHOULD KNOW .
Attention, Department of Justice: Dr. Enrique Cervantes
whom Alan Chase, author of "Falange." has branded as a
Falangist, is an avowed anti-Semite Right now he's try.
ing to get into the American Army by way of avoiding
deportation Incidentally, despite rave reviews and Wal
ter Winchell's boosting of the book, the publishers have de-
cided not to push "Falange" High pressure from clerical
and Fascist guarters is the reason, we're told Despite
this, many people have been saying that Chase ought to
get a medal for having written his expose ... So now he has
onea decoration bestowed upon him by the Republic oi
Cuba Major Horace E. Dodge, Jr.. the motor magnate
whose wife is suing him for separation on the grounds thai
he is pro-Nazi, is, according to his own boasts, a hnandal
contributor to Gerald K. Smith, the notorious pro-Fascist and
anti-Semite.
TRANS-ATLANTIC .
Few people realize it, but it none the less true that the
French National Committee, now headed by General
de Gaulle, has ignored pleas to reinstate the Cremieux law
in Algiers We wonder why, since De Gaulle attacked
Giraud for abrogating the decree The Nazis, says Harry
Hershheld, will hold Paris to the bitter endso that Hitler
will be able to come there and say to Napoleon: "More
over!" Needless to say, the current anti-Jewish campaiB
going on in Denmark has the opposition of the rest of t
Danish people and their king ... It is reported that short)]
before the institution of the harsh Gestapo measures against
the Jews some Nazi officials told King Christian that the
simplest thing would be for him to put the Nuremberg laws
in effect in his country Whereupon that King Christian
retorted: "That would be entirely unconstitutional My
official title is King of all the Danes!'"
SIDELIGHT .
Sidelight on life in Paris under the Nazis, as recounted by
Etta Kahn Shiber in her "Paris Underground": When a fair
Parisienne finds herself annoyed by one of the innumerable
Nazi officers who annoy all the French people and who are
particularly persistent in forcing their attentions on unwilling
ladies, she usually grows confidential and whispers in the
invader's ear: "I have to admit I'm a Jewess" And then
the Nazi guickly looks around to see whether any one has
observed him speaking to a "non-Aryan," and hastily de-
parts Mrs. Shiber, you remember, is the middle-aged
American Jewish widow whom the Nazis captured in France
after she had helped some hundreds of British soldiers
escape their clutches. An exchange of prisoners enabled
her to return to our free shores.
STAGE AND SCREEN .
A Leslie Howard Memorial that will provide scholarships
lor nurses is being sponsored in London ... Be sure, by the
way, to see "Spitfire," Howard's last picture, if you haven't
got around to it so far Who knows but that Charlie Chap-
lin will soon join the ranks of the autobiographers? ... A
New York publisher is urging him to do so Pola Negri,
making her long-heralded movie comeback, is announcing
that there never was anything to that story of her friendship
with Hitler, and pointing out that she instituted a libel action
against the Parisian paper which originally published the
storyand that she won the case Broadway isn't the
only theatrical street that is feeling the current manpower
shortage Maurice Schwartz has just hired an actor
named Michael O'Shea, it is reported; said Mr. O'Shea's
main gualification for the Yiddish stage being his possession
of a medical discharge from the Army.
ABOUT PEOPLE .
Dr. Chaim Weizmann. fully recovered, will fly to Pales-
tine from England any day now General Smuts, Premier
of South Africa, will visit the United States, and while here
will address at least one Zionist dinner or mass meeting.
I here are rumors that Laurence Steinhardt, American Am-
bassador to Turkey, will resign Arthur Upham Pop*
book on Maxim Litvinoff, out on October 14th. will be a sen-
sauon It shows Litvinoff aa a one-man political tank
against the appeasers of 1936-1938 Pierre van Paaswn
has been selected by the Office of War Information to broad-
cast a short-wave message of hope to the Jews of Europe


JAY. OCTOBER 22. 1943
*Jewlsti rtcrkfian
PAGE FIVE
HE l-JJHFEIEICE
By LOUIS HEIMAN
Press Representative of The Jewish Floridian
["Shall the American Jewish Conference become
srmanent organization?" This was one of the
jlems which confronted it during its delibera-
t. Although the issue of permanency did not
kg forth any fireworks on the floor of the Confer-
i, it was nevertheless the subject of heated dis-
lions in the committees, in the bloc caucuses,
among the delegates generally.
[Some delegates who favored the Conference be-
made a permanent organization argued that it
gained the best brains and the outstanding lead-
ip among American Jewry and, therefore, it
Id be continued, ready at all times to act on
behalf whenever the occasion arose. Some
:ed the opinion that the delegates had been
locratically elected, and were the proper per-
to speak permanently for and on our behalf.
ie argued that the resolutions of the Conference
to be implemented by further action, and this
lired a permanent organization. Some dele-
desired a permanent chairman elected from
br bloc, and there could be none unless the Con-
jnce was made permanent
[On the other hand, most delegates were op-
to creating a permanent organization out of
Conference. Many argued that the communi-
which elected the delegates were not fore-
led that they were choosing permanent dele-
Hes, and it is conceivable that some different dele-
Btes would have been elected had this guestion
pen before the communities when they were bal-
Big. Others claimed that it was not democracy
felect delegates to a conference, and then permit
to constitute themselves a permanent organi-
>n. A very large segment of the delegates felt
we already had enough Jewish organizations
K~ America, so why create another one. Others
claimed that the Conference, if created as a perma-
nent organization, would duplicate the work of
other Jewish organizations, unless the latter ceased
to exist Others feared that the race for a perma-
nent chairman would create disunity. Some wanted
Henry Monsky, others wanted Dr. Stephen S. Wise,
rrnrj there were other candidates for this high honor.
It is a tribute to the spirit of unity existing among
delegates that this issue was settled without
fed discussions on the floor of the Conference,
delegates argued long and loud, pro and con,
fthe committees, where the issue of permanency
debated. But when the problem came to the
w, it was decided calmly and dispassionately,
.Tersely to the contentions of those who desired
^permanent organization. It was decided to con-
le the Conference for one year, with another
jting to be convened within that period, to allow
implementation of the resolutions adopted. No
Srmanent chairman was elected, but rather an
aterim committee" was chosen, to be headed by
praesidium of three. This "interim committee"
toportionately represents all of the blocs formed at
lie Conference.
"United we stand, divided we fall is ,an old
iage. History will record that in the year 1943,
lerican Jewry kept this thought uppermost in their
.uids through their deliberations at the American
wish Conference, and emerged stronger and more
etermined to take their role as the leaders of the
.swish people throughout the world. The mantle
f leadership has been cast upon our shoulders.
le have accepted our responsibility. We shall
lot fail!
"The war is going better for us but this is no
t/romise that we have victory in our grasp. There
femcrins the strength of the Axis and this means
tiat the war will probably be long and hard. Pain-
il tragedy lies ahead for many in this country. But
7e have strong hopes. We have the greatest re-
-ources in the world, and we have brave and valiant
lAlllea. In the words of the soldiers of 1918 and ot
1943, 'Let's Go'."Robert P. Patterson, Under Secre-
tary of War.
"There should be no rule of thumb set up to hide
[behind whenever any group requests time on the air.
I The free radio can become a powerful instrument
for the protection of freedom of opinion. Men must
be guaranteed their right to express their opinions
and ideas____It is also true that no relaxation m the
pursuit of the freedom to listen can be allowed to
take place when the war is over. Eternal vigilance
and undeviating regard for this and comparable
principles must be observed if we are to have a last-
ing peace____Restriction, constriction and exclusion
must give way to a broader and more democratic
approach as to the persons the listening public may
hear."James Lawrence Fly. chairman of the Fed-
eral Communications Commission.
II BIT OF EVERYTHING
SPORTS
MUSIC
FILM
SPORTS
See what you can do with the following sports
questionnaire about Jewish athletes. Count ten for
each one correct and don't look at the answers
printed below until you've really tried to hit the
mark. Ready, here goes:
1He hit the heavyweight champ, Joe Louis, so
hard, he knocked him head over heels right out of
the ring. Who was he?
2Nat Hohnan is tops as a basketball player,
but he was famous in two other sports besides. Re-
member?
3Tops as a high school football player, this
kid released a bomb that blew a Jap battleship
right into the laps of its ancestors.
4Henry Greenberg used to play hookey in
order to play ball. His mom called him a "bum-
mer" because he used to do it What happened
when he grew up?
Now check your answers:
1Buddy Baer knocked Louis through the ropes
with a right smash to the jaw in their fight in Wash-
ington in June, 1941.
2Holman won fame as a soccer player and
was offered a fabulous contract with the Cincy Reds
to pitch for them in 1919.
3Meyer Levin.
4Hank Greenberg (now Captain U. S. Army
Air Corps) grew up to be the highest paid baseball
player when the Detroit Tigers paid him $55,000
for the 1940 season.
FILM
The Hollywood Bondadiers returned to town
travel-begrimed but happy. In their eleven thou-
sand mile trek from coast to coast, they sold over
one billion dollars worth of bonds, more than dou-
bling the guota set for them by Secretary Morgen-
thau. While certain isolationist playboys continue
to take wrathful snaps at Filmdom and other
big industries blazon double-page spreads in na-
tional magazines about the great things they are
doing for Victory Hollywood, like OF Man
River, just keeps goin' along doing its best as it
sees it. And all the McCormick, FicUer, et al, bray-
ing to the contrary, the greatest morale force in the
Armed Service is Hollywood movies. The numer-
ous spontaneous letters of appreciation from the
boys themselves are proof sufficient.
Those world-famous men of letters residing in
Southern California refugees from Hitler's hate
. were invited to a "Premiere-in-Exile" of "Watch
on the Rhine." Among those present were Franz
Werfel, Bruno Frank, Emil Ludwig, Lion Feucht-
wanger, Thomas and Heinrich Mann.
Tradepaper Film Daily reports that one after-
noon its staff was listening to a news broadcast
when the name of Heinrich Himmler issued from
the loudspeaker. Simultaneously a worm crawled
out of the radio's innardsvisible transmutation of
a Nazi soul! It was gingerly transported to the
window and droppedfrom the 24th floor.
Sol Lesser will present a check for one million
dollars to the New York Stage Door Canteen as the
first instalment of its earnings from the film of that
name. Warners will do likewise for the Hollywood
Canteen have already paid $250,000 for the
screen rights to its name and agreed to give
the organization 40 per cent of the profits from the
picture.
MUSIC
Jacgues Abram, one of the most brilliant young
pianists in America, has been transferred to Stewart
Field, N. Y- Because of the nature of his Army
duties during the last year it has not been possible
for Abram to make any public appearances. His
transfer, however, gives hope that he will soon be
heard again. While at Camp Dix, N. J., he played
for wounded soldiers from the Mediterranean area.
Miriam Solovieff, San Francisco-born violinist,
gives her New York recital in Town Hall Oct. 22.
Miss Solovieff has what amounts to an Army career
in addition to her career in music. Her husband,
William Rubin, is an infantry lieutenant, and she
has gone with him through desert maneuvers.
According to word from Columbia Concerts,
Jascha Heifetz has spent a busy Summer at Harbor
Island, Qal- Carrots, beets, onions, lettuce, cabbage
and beans were raised "by the hands of Heifetz
himself" as the awed release puts it. In addition,
he is a Civilian Defense Corps warden, helps the
police, takes his turn as an airplane spotter and is
general handyman around his house since his hired
man left for a job in a war plant
BETWEEN 101 AND ME
BY BORIS SMOLAR
Copyright, 1943, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc.
Watch on Cairo: The discussions which are
now taking place in Cairo on the guestion of the
establishment of a Pan-Arab Federation are being
closely watched by five interested parties These
are Britain, the United States, Soviet Russia, Turkey
and the Jews Each of these five has a different
attitude toward the formation of a Pan-Arab Fed-
eration which is to include Palestine The British
Foreign Office is not only anxious to see such a
Federation formed, but is doing its utmost to see it
established in order to have it function under British
influence The United States is similarly not
adverse to the Pan-Arab Federation idea, because
of the new interests which America is now acquir-
ing in Arabia ... In fact, the talks in Cairo are not
without American approval Soviet Russia is
looking with suspicion toward the possible forma-
tion of the projected Pan-Arab Federation, because
the Arabs have, in this war, proven themselves
pro-Nazi and pro-Fascist until they realized that
Hitler no longer had any chance for victory .
Turkey is definitely opposed to the Pan-Arab Fed-
eration idea, because she does not want merged
Arab forces as her neighbor The attitude of the
Jews is that Palestine must first be proclaimed a
Jewish Commonwealth, then there will be no Jewish
opposition to its entering the projected Pan-Arab
Federation under certain conditions With Pales-
tine being the back door to Soviet Russia in the
present war and in any other war that may come,
it is no wonder that Ivan Maisky, the Soviet vice-
commissar for Foreign Affairs, has gone out of his
way to visit the Jewish settlements there and to
confer with Ben-Gurion and other Jewish leaders ...
Ordinarily, these Jewish leaders were on the black
list in Moscow, and it is questionable whether they
would get a Soviet visa even today What to-
morrow may bring is, however, a different story...
All indications point to the fact that Russia may be
inclined to exercise great influence in favor of a
Jewish Palestine during the forthcoming peace dis-
cussions.
London and Washington: Dr. Chaim Weizmann
is now a very disappointed man He has been
attempting to see Churchill ever since his return
from the United States, and has so far not suc-
ceeded Disappointed also cue the several hun-
dred rabbis who, misguided by certain elements,
proceeded to Washington to petition Roosevelt on
the Jews in Europe, but were completely ignored
by the President, who preferred not to see them...
This will, perhaps, serve as a lesson to others who
think that the Jews of Europe can be saved by mere
publicity tricks Speaking of Dr- Weizmann, we
are asked by Meyer Weisgal to draw the attention
of editors to the fact that Dr. Weizmann will reach
his 69th, not his 70th, birthday in November of this
year Dr- Weizmann will not be 70 before No-
vem 27th of next year ... A mistake concerning his
birthday crept into the press ten years ago when
the Juedische Rundschau, Zionist organ in Ger-
many, published a special edition' in 1933 in honor
of Dr. Weizmann's reaching 60 years of age .. Dr.
Weizmann himself then drew attention to the fact
that he is a year younger Yet editors in Amer-
ica are now asking for data on Weizmann, being
under the erroneous impression that his 70th birth-
day is next month.
Two Tesumoniee: The best novel I have ever
read picturing the plight of refugees is "The Tres-
passers," by Laura Z. Hobson, published by Simon
and Schuster Here is a novel that every legis-
lator in the United States should read in order to
realize what is wrong with the bureaucratic Ameri-
can consular service abroad ... It is full of human
understanding and deep sympathy for the victims
of the Nazi regime who seek to break through the
many barriers of the immigration laws ... It pic-
tures the American consuls in Europe not in the
best light and shows the stupidity of our consular
officials in deciding the fate of European scientists
and others who apply for visas to America .
Though the characters in Miss Hobson's book may
be fictitious, the situations described there are all
based on actual facts Many of them I witnessed
myself Extremely well written, the book makes
fascinating reading despite its gloomy social aspect.
Another recent book on refugee life worth reading is
"Survival" by Phyllis Bottome, published by Little,
Brown. The central figure in this book is a noted
Vienna psychiatrist who, because of his Jewish or-
igin, must flee from Austria after being repudiated
by his "Aryan" wife, who deserts him taking their
child with her. Heartbroken and a ghost of a
man, he reaches England where he starts life anew
after overcoming the formalities which forbid him
to practice The book is written on a psycho-an-
alytical basis with observations which tend to em-
phasize Freud's theory of psycho-analysis.


PAGE SIX
Jfiii fksicfiif
mm vichy to
ARREST ALL JEWS
London (JTA).German au-
thorities in France have notified
the Vichy Government that they
intend to arrest all Jews in the
country in connection with prep-
arations to prevent Allied land-
ings on French soil, it is reported
in the London press this week.
The German note did not indi-
cate whether the Jews will be
interned in France or deported to
other parts of Europe.
At the same time the Paris ra-
dio this week reported a 'plan
of action" against the Jews of
France outlined by Darquier de
Pellepoix, the French Commis-
sioner for Jewish Affairs. The
plan provides for the confiscation
of Jewish property, for formally
depriving Jews of political rights, I
for "racial segregation," and for
the expulsion off all young Jews
irom educational institutions
German radio stations this
week, in reporting the proposals
ol Darquier de Pellepoix. quoted
the Commissioner for Jewish Al-
lan's as announcing that "more
than 15.000 Jewish firms have
been liquidated in Fiance and
sold to Aryans' They a No
quoted him as stating thai "Ar-
yan" purchasers of liquidated
Jewish firms 'must join a special l
organization called -Union of
Proprietors oi Formerly Jewish-
Owned Business Enterprises.'" I
.OBITUARIES
'MRS. CLARA GOLDENBLANK
Mrs. Clara Goldenblank of 1923
S.W. 14th Ter., who died Thurs-
day in a Miami hospital, was
buried Friday in the Jewish sec-
tion of Woodlawn Cemetery.
Services were held at the Gordon
Funeral Home Chapel-with Rab-
bi Max Shapiro of Beth David
Congregation, officiating.
Mrs. Goldenblank. 55. has been
a resident of Miami for the past
27 years and prominent in com-
munal and civic work. Besides
her husband Max. she leaves a
son, Aaron, U. S. Army, and a
daughter. Beatrice. She was a
member of Beth David Sister-
hood.
MUG OH
BY LOCAL JEWRY
ISIDOR ROTH
Isidor Roth. 65, of 209 Ninth
Street. Miami Beach, died Satur-
day in a Miami Beach hospital.
A retired real estate man. Mr.
Roth came to Miami Beach 15
! years ago from New York City.
His wife, Mrs. Sophie Roth;
two tons, Dr. Edward Roth. Mi-
ami Beach, and Eugene F. Roth.
assistant counsel for the United
stales Treasury Department In
Washington and oia daughter,
Mrs Beatrice Kreiaberg, New
York City, survive.
Service* were held Sunday at
the Riverside Memorial Chapel.
with Rabbi Moses Mescnelof!
fii iating.
LOUIS SIPKIN
The body of Louis Sipkin. 65,
who died Wednesday in a Miami
hospital, was sent to New York
Thursday by the Riverside
Memorial Chapel for services and
bin ial,
Made From Fresh Oranges
LOUIS A. SPIEGEL
Louis A. Spiegel. 69. of 4342
Alton Roard, Miami Beach, died
Oct. 13 in a local hospital.
A retired cotton goods mer-
chant, he came here 2u years ago
from Atlanta. Ga. He was a na-
tive of Milwaukee. Wis.
His wife. Mrs. Hattie Spiegel,
survives.
The body was sent to Atlanta
I y Riverside Memorial Chapel.
'/""
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4- NOITH Utl AVIMUI
(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1)
a. m. the Beth Sholom Sisterhood
will be hosts in the Suko on
Thursday evening and Friday
morning.
Beth David Congregation will
have Rabbi Max Shapiro and
Cantor Louis Hayman officiating
Bt all services. Yizkor or Memo-
rial service will take place Thurs-
day morning at 10 a. m. Rabbi
Shapiro will speak on the subject
"Freedom of the Mosaic Law."
Thursday evening at 7:30 the
celebration of the Rejoicing of I
the Torah will take place, at I
which time the dedication of a.
complete Perochas set. covers for I
ntire altar and holy ark. will
be part of the services. Mr. Nat
Roth and his family, who do- |
nated the set. will be guests of
honor Friday morning services
at 9 o'clock.
Schaarei Zedek Congregation
will have Rabbi Simon April and
Cantor M. Tcitelbautn officiating
at all services Thursday morn-
ing, Oct. 21. at 9 a. m.. Yizkor
servio at 10:30. sermon: "Sacred
Memories." Thursday evening at
(i:30. Sinn-has Torah service. Re-
freshments for the adults and
children, and flags will be dis-
tributed. Friday morning serv-
ice- at 9 o'clock.
At Beth Jacob Congregation.
Rabbi Moses Meschelofl will of-
ficiate with Cantor Maurice
Mamches chanting the musical
portion o! the service's, scheduled
as follows Thursday evening,
Oct. 21. 6:30 p. m.; Thursday and
Friday morning at 9 a. m. Yiz-
kor service will be held Thursday
morning at 10:30 with Rabbi
Mescheloff preaching on "Even
There They Live." Simchas To-
rah services will be held Thurs-
day evening. Flags and refresh-
ments will be distributed to all
children.
Miami Beach Jewish Commu-
nity Center will have Rabbi Irv-
ing Lehrman officiating. Thurs-
day morning. Oct. 21. the service
will begin at B o'clock. At 10:30
the Memorial service. Yizkor. will
be held. Rabbi Lehrman will
pleach on the subject "Strengthen
Our Hearts O Father." Cantor
Abraham D. Wolf will chant the
service Thursday evening. Sim-
chas Torah. the service will start ;
at 7 oclock. The main feature j
ct tin evening will be the Torah
-ion. to which all children '
are invited Flags will be dis-
tributed and refreshments will be I
served by the Sisterhood. Fridav '
morning services will start at 8
o clock.
Miami Jewish Orthodox Con-
Bregation will have Rabbi Joseph
E. Rackovsky preaching and
chanting the services that will
start Thursday and Friday mom-
at 9 o'clock, with 'evening
services at 6 o'clock Thursday
morning at 10 Rabbi Rackovsky
will addresi the worshipers prior
u> Yizkor services A Simchas
Torah celebration will take place
Tuesday evening.
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MIAMI Wlltt.ll> ,, lO'-COUOT FLORIDA
lh.Mi-.in In a
rerun,-a,., "n fc ^ i',!
County, Pfcrt&Tto-w^fl
of M.lroe ijjrrtl^^M
"f HlaleaK !'"" taij SI
St:.,, ,,, ,, ...,,'"- ; A
in.- aaaeaament m '
the name 0f r\Kv ,,.t'NKi
Certlflcat. .^^ J J^
lnK <> tow, uu .k-H wml? *i
.,%' tw,5th *oj
* of ircntt f^_M
(Circuit courP*$: (w*"n|
10/8-16-2:'-j'.'mN '" BUn*t.l]
LB?*."* '' mi iSeS
I WANT MY MILK
ih.- f.ii,L. ,i..,,,,;f'
And Bo Suro It's
FLORIDA
DAIRIES
HOMOGENIZED
Vitamin "D" Milk
"Milk Produce."
Dacro Protoctod
TEL. 2-2621
Greater Miami Delivery
VUit Our Farm at
6200 N. W. 32nd Stroot
thereon. Said
the
II
ihp Count) nl |.i.."s.av&T
1 he aaw P
der th.
in ih- name m ."""I
'"' Block oiymri, J|
Ih* oiint) of 1 I
us embraced .,-...,. I
I IK' 11 -M ." ', |-( ,,f a|H nmnT
derth. .. |
In the Mini ol ,. ".
I 111.-.. ..,!.... I
;'".....c< -I '
described then I
hluheM le.1,1, .
Door on the fli illrt,-
7 De-comber.
il;i\ of I i. i
Dnto.l II I
K R. (. XTHFRJUX [
'"lerk Pin y
I
(Olroali Court
., .n, ?? v '' 8TERRSTT.I
LEGAL NOTICES
DADE COUNTY READY
TO ISSUE RATION BOOK
Some 8.000 Dade County De-
fei council block leaders will
begin receiving applications for
war Ration Book Four at schools
m the area Oct. 23, it was an-
nounced Saturday by Mrs Syd-
ney Weintraub. chief block
leader.
N't.,. ia hertbj kIvm that the
iii.i.t.-ili ..-t. Hamuel niank. DavM
Hiank. Michael Blank. Bcatrlca Hiank
n Prehllna and Root Davldoft aa
" -< loti bualneaa un i.us ham.- ,,f 1-ii|..\k HKVKK-
AdES at S7-M B W Ith siret
nctitioua nam in the offloa of the
'."K "'.. "" rn-puit Court, Dado
( inty, Plorlda.
SAM I KI. HI.ANK
DAVID III.ANK
MICHAEL HI.ANK
BKATRICH BLANK
MARION KHKHUNi;
ROSE DAVIDOFF
. ... Apiillrants.
Ait..hi. > f,,r Ajpplicanta.
v -.'i iii I-S-1S-22
NOTICE OF APPLICATION Fqi
TAX DEED
CHAPTER 174" A FILE A 692i
NOTICE IS HEREBY 01VD -a
RoHEKT R CORNS, hoMO IM
"f Miami Split.u-
tatoal Tax i v if ati i
and si. uwued the ith Au A. D. IMS, nan riled aamtiartl
fire, ami has mil. :i;.i.|inaitri
tax de.-,I to be laaued thum M
fettifUat.s >-mlir^.'<- Ilw Mtllk-
fiTllwd |n i ihf '!*i 1 lade, st.it.. i Plorlda, to w
lx>t s. i!i,-k 118, s.......n t
Club h>tat.-.s. in the Ti
S|iiIiiks. it'ountrj ib !
ty of I >.icl. Bute nl K
i |i Certlfl N
aeaamani of aaul |
Mid 'ortifirati m ed a
Ham,' ,.f Unknown
Lot 9. iciiH-k lit. SecUoa :, C
i 'I ib Batatea, li th. T<
Bprinfi (Countrj rinh i>tatm
ty of 1 '.!. Stall i'
braced in Certiflcati S
neaamenl .-f said pi opt rt]
sni.I Cw tlflcati
name ..f I'tikn.-wn
l-ot 1". Block
flub Batati In Ihi Towl
Springs. (Countr) Club El
t> ..f I ia I
. t> of I lade. State i *
braced in Certiflcati Mi ', JJfS
tit of -...I iroperty unr'
aid 'i tift. ate l> I '
name of Unknowi
Utl li. Block II*.
Country Club Bai
.Miami Bpi Inaa ('ountry
Counts of Dade, SI
embrai .i
i ate N
I
the T'-'l
riubtti*]
, >i
I
assi'sstiu-nt ..f .-.i.l 1 .: rt> 'J"'1' A|
' KM 1=
tin- of t'nknown. k. J
I-iiIi-hh sai.l -i'i
emed arc ii i_ i.. .*;i> l.i, ^ ti I '1
I
'i raoni applying for the books
josara M. liptoh. president
are reminded that they must
have i ne number three book with
them tor each book four they
wish to obtam Bonk three
should nave the name and ad-
dress of each famUy member
i out on the front cover to
hasten issuance of the books
Tin- 1 lock leaders will be sta-
tioned at various schools m the
county and a list of those schools
Will be announced. Issuing of
book four will be handled in the
same manner book two was
handled.
"N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR DADP
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
,.,..... No. 80950
' Bl II. HARRISON QAINET
Plaintiff
ELIZABETH REBECCA OAINBT,
i efendant
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
aAYiNU*TBkIZABB REBECCA
OAINBT, Route 4. parllncton. South
"' are o..t in.-a Io fii^ vour
;;:;;- In the above i-auae^of
1 l%""7 "" "r '''" l>, tol.ei j: lev:
1 <" in.i I'liiifeaaii will be en-
"i ajtalnat you. e"
DATED September :'" i9ti
,,, ,,. I: '-EATHERhlAN. Clark
aid Certiflcati laaueu
name of Unknown
I
'll'.*N,,-,I .11 i.iiuiiih III i..". ----
leacrlbed therein tli I"' v', nil
.hlxheat Uldder ai tin ,.0-,,''!S
ix-.ron Hi. In-' M..n.t.i> '"."".JrH
of Dei ember, IS4S, whic* h """
das of December. !! -; ^
Dated tins 19th il:.> 'J'J*' '
I
1/J///M/MWMH**-
.,l~-.
v0/MUMf^Mi
RIVERMONT PARK
SANITARIUM
ISM N. W. 7th St. Ph. 1-7301
Beet care for chronic elck, conva-
lescent and elderly people
tas WEEKLY UP
aaiae Large Beautiful Ground.^__
_ No, M 1 7
CARL RIPUET,
Plaintiff
BUEABBTH hUPUBT
Defeiiilant
,. v.--"K"zA,;.KTj,?L,ftr1TI,o? 24
-,';.^;;;;i-'l,,^'-liN^K]er^
>" the above *u r. ,i '"
before MovaraRrl %&!?? ,"n 2
pro i on few,, -in i' 4:!- "r a DATED; OWpbe, 7. .943.
tins I'.'in aaj o :
lv B I.K.VTHKHMA.N
,-lerk "Iri-ult C%\
(Circuit Co in Seal) __- n g
By N C. BTERRETT, v
10/23'ZS II 5-IJ ____________
NOTICE UNDER FlCTlTlOL'J
NAME LAW y
Not Ire is herel.y k'm;n IMi
underalsnod. HARRV v;|KI!^"
bualneaa under the fletltloui a-J
NEW TORE BAKBRT U. "1
Court. Miami Bi ich, ''';'*
regiater nld flctlt.....J "^at*
I... ,,f the Cleik Of "
-,.,,!,. county pwjR-Bji
HARR1 -''.,
to I
tiffl
Court.
..'
I. I IS HKIM.W ,
Attorne) for Ai-i'iKant.
IO/H-15-21" 1
NOT.CE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW .j,
la herebj ^ \': fO-I
underalrne.1. MONTE 8EU- (,
bualneai ."SSLgK
Notice
jdernliti
NIE si:i.hj un
fiartneiN doitiK |,u",n'',*_i n'W "'
flt'tltloua name of Wnd*,'L, Mi*
Spnlta at 47 N. W 5th !Jb" W\
Florida. Intend to reg'at" tlt j
tioua name in (he ""h'*.-t.ge C^' j
of the
Florida
"cir.-uit Court, I""1
*j3s
LOL'IS HEIMAN
Attorney for Appll"-*""
10/S-15-2J-IS 11 I
Buy War Saving Bondi
I


LY. OCTOBER 22. 1943
vJewlsMcrMian
PAGE SEVEN
1 LOCAL BOYS
iRMED SERVICE
ation Cadet Ira Seleyan. son
and Mrs. A. Selevan. 1672
>n Avenue, Miami Beach,
Completed his pre-flight
in the Army Air Forces
twell Field and now is tak-
lic flights training at Bain-
r, Ga. Cadet Selevan was a
student at the University
imi and entered the service
124, 1942.
Barney Sirota. formerly of
[Pennsylvania Avenue, Mi-
leach, is now at the Ord-
: e Replacement Training
it, Aberdeen Proving
id. Md.
^ry S. Kaplan, son of A. N.
in, 2952 South Miami Ave-
[is now attending the Naval
n Midshipmen's School at
Jniversity of Notre Dame,
taking a month of induc-
tion he will be appointed a
lipman and upon successful
petion of the three-months'
will be commissioned an
in the Naval Reserve.
3/c Irwin Berger. USNR.
bf Mr. and Mrs. Abe Berger,
[S. W. Fourth Street, will ar-
the city Saturday to spend
jfht-day leave. Petty officer
sr is stationed at the Mel-
ii\ Fla., Naval Air Base,
he is a gunnery instructor.
Zohn, son of Mrs. Sophie
922 S. W. Third Street.
lated last week from the
Bkl Aviation Machinist School
Be Jacksonville Air Station.
^p receiving his diploma sl/c
^k was transferred to the San-
Drd, Fla.. base.
Bkmong Miamians given tem-
ry promotions in the army
_iunced by the War Depart-
at in Washington were:
Isadora Jerry Jarin, Dental
Corps, 112 Biscayne Street, Miami
lach, promoted temporarily
m first lieutenant to captain,
Aaron Bank, infantry, of
jfiidian Creek Drive, Miami
Bh, promoted temporarily
[second lieutenant to' first
lieutenant.
jfc-tha Breskin, WAC, of 860
B. 74th Street, was promoted
^orarily from second lieuten-
first lieutenant.
ition Cadet Arthur D.
son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank
1600 Meridian Avenue,
li Beach, is now receiving
basic flight training at the
iy air field at Bainbridge,
He is a former student at
University of Miami where
is a member of the Phi Ep-
Pi fraternity. He became
[aviation cadet Feb. 25, 1943.
ic Isadora Ratthaui, AAF, is
ending a 10-day furlough with
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Aaron
tthaus, 650 Meridian Avenue,
ami Beach. He has been at
fry Field in Denver, where he
Ok training in the Norden bomb
and the Holliwell automatic
5t. Ratthaus wears the in-
rted blue triangle with a gold
on it signifying Norden
lb sight work, and silver
igs designating his flying time.
Cadet Harold S. Bam-
j. son of Norman Bamberg,
Alton Road, Miami Beach,
^s reported for duty at the AAF
Dmbardier School at Carlsbad,
M.. where he will study ad-
Inced high-level bombard iering
3d dead-reckoning navigation.
|e received his pre-flight train-
at Santa Ana, Cal., and will
te an 18-week course. Upon
i'.'iuation. he will be awarded
Is silver wings and a commis-
m as a second lieutenant or an
ppointment as flight officer.
Dr. Leonard M. Glickstein, of
17 Mendoza Ave., Coral Gables,
Dn of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Glick-
Jtem, is now a Private assigned
p the clinic, where he is busy
living aid and relief at Camp
IcCoy, Wis.
Lt Arthur Minsky. 25. of
Brooklyn, is the recipient of the
Distinguished Flying Cross and
he Air Medal. Now home on
Mve, Lieutenant Minsky put in
W hours of operational flight
missions in the Southwest Pacific
[jea. In uniform two years,
Minsky is a graduate of New
Jtrecht High School and the
Jniversity of Alabama.
GREATER MIAMI ARMY-NAVY COMMITTEE
Of The Jewish Welfare Board
A COMMUNITY PROJECT
Help Ui Keep a Record of Our Men in Service
w r\ r\
%T PARADE!
Capt. Everett A. EUenberg. 27,
of Astoria, L. I., flight leader of
a squadron of Liberators, holds
the Distinguished Flying Cross
and the Air Medal. Back in
February, Captain (then lieuten-
ant) Eisenberg, at the controls of
a Liberator, was participating in
the air battle over Jap-held Am-
bon- Island near New Guinea.
Suddenly he found himself the
target of three Zeros.
His gunners set one afire with
a short burst, shot away the con-
trols of the second and sent it
crashing, and drove away the
third. In addition, his squadron
sank a 10,000-ton Jap merchant
ship. Later Eisenberg was cited
by General MacArthur for "meri-
torious achievement."
Captain Eisenberg, in service
two years, has been in the thick
of the New Guinea fighting since
last October. He is a graduate of
Harvard Law School.
Lt. Samuel Jacobson, 23, of
Kiamesha Lake, N Y., a naviga-
tor in the Ferry Command, has
been reported missing in action,
probably in the North African
theatre. A graduate of Eastern
District High School in Brooklyn,
Lieutenant Jacobson was a stu-
dent at Columbia University
prior to his induction into the Air
Corps two years ago.
Cpl. Siegfried. 29, of Los An-
geles, a member of an infantry
medical detachment, lost his life
in battle on Guadalcanal. A na-
tive of Germany, he came to this
country in 1938. He was in the
service one year and was expect-
ing to receive his naturalization
papers at the time of his death.
He has been posthumously
awarded the Purple Heart.
Lt. Arthur D. Karp. 26. of New
York City, who flew a damaged
bomber to the target are and
back to his base, has been deco-
rated with the Distinguished Fly-
ing Cross, the Air Medal and Oak
Leaf Cluster. Piloting a heavy
bombardment plane on a combat
mission in China some months
ago. Lieutenant Karp had an un-
avoidable mishap on taking off.
the plane hitting an obstruction.
A student at New York Uni-
versity and a sales manager in
civilian life, Karp has been in
service two years and has been
seeing active duty in the China-
Burma-India areas.
Lt. Morton Sher. 22, of Green-
ville, S. C, an army airman serv-
ing in the Asiatic area, has been
killed in action. Entering the
service two and a half years ago,
Lieut. Sher became a member of
the now legendary Flying Tigers.
He is mentioned several times in
Col. Scott's widely-read book,
"God is My Co-Pilot." The Chin-
ese among whom he landed had
never seen a white man, but were
friendly to him and were en-
tranced by his singing of the Star
Spangled Banner and Alabama
University songs. He was a char-
ter member of Aleph Zadik
Aleph.
By HARRY SIMONS
Some 3,000 years ago Moses
handed the world a magna
charta in 10 chapters, known as
the decalogue. With the passing
of time and periods of conden-
sation the decalogue also came in
for its share, and in 1942 some-
where on the Atlantic, the philos-
ophy of the Ten Commandments
was transposed into four chap-
ters, known as the "Four Free-
doms." With further passing of
time the four freedoms may be
reduced to one: "Freedom of Re-
ligion." When this freedom is
universally established and prac-
ticed, the other three will be a
matter of course and will be well
taken care of.
The wise planners of the pres-
ent combat against the destruc-
tion of the sinews of civilization
are fortifying themselves with a
weapon that has never been con-
queredthe perpetuity of re-
ligion according to one's own
choosing. The armed forces are
organized as never before to pre-
serve that philosophy. Every
military camp is well manned
with efficient spiritual leaders of
the three prominent religious
groups, and each chaplain re-
ceives utmost co-operation in
carrying out the religious pro-
gram of his faith, equal only to
the combat branches of the forces
on the front line. This was ex-
emplified at Camp Gordon. Ga.,
recently, where the writer had
the privilege of witnessing one
of the oldest covenants made by
Moses and his people, "The Bris
Milah" or "Circumcision," on a
child born in the camp hospital
to a wife of an officer of that
camp. The services were con-
ducted by Lieut. H. Skidelsky,
Jewish chaplain of the camp, a
young man of orthodox faith on
leave of absence for the duration
from his synagogue in New York.
He was assisted by Cpl. Baum, a
Jewish scholar of New York
City. The services, ceremonies
WAR] RECORDS COMMITTEE
NAT ROTH, Chairman
FRED SHOCHET
MRS. GEORGE M. COHEN
MAURICE GROSSMAN
JENNIE H. ROTFORT
NATHAN ROTHBERQ
J. W. B. Director
OFFICERS
SAM BLANK, CHAIRMAN
MONTE SELIQ. Vice-Chairman
JOSEPH A. BERMAN, See.
Executive Committee
Mra. Waltar Bronaton, Mra. Max
Dobrln, Maurice Oroaaman. Leula
Helmin, Or. Jacob H. Kaplan,
Mra. Murry Kovan, Harry Marko-
witz. Nat Roth, Fred Shochat,
Milton Sirkin, Joaaph Stain. Mra.
Herman Wallach, Carl Walnkle.
George Wolpert.
and the surgical operation were
performed in accordance with
the "Bris Milah" laws prescribed
in the "Shulchan Oruch," the of-
ficial code for such ceremony.
The physical part of the cere-
mony was performed by Rev.
Mohel Funk, a middle-aged gen-
tleman, a native of Trieste, Aus-
tria, who came to this country on
the SS. Volkania on its last
peace-time voyage, previous to
Austria entering into the war.
Since then the Volkania joined
its sister ships on the bottom of
the sea. In spirit of co-ope/ation
by the Augusta Jewish com-
munity, the services of a "Mo-
hel" is furnished free to children
of parents in military service.
The most inspiring part of the
occasion is the environment in
the assembly room of the camp
hospital where the ceremonies
took place. In spite of the rush-
ing business in prosecuting the
war and winning of the victory,
it adds a certain atmosphere of
solemnity equal only to a house
of worship, an agency of winning
religious freedom to the new-
comer according to his choosing.
The co-operation from camp
authorities to the personnel in
immediate attendance during re-
ligious services and ceremonies
is not less than an assurance for
an early victory over the com-
mon enemy and new hopes to
the coming generations of enjoy-
ing the first freedom with the
other three, for which we are
fighting and praying.
MIAMI BEACH SERVICE MEN
GLAD FOR FACILITIES GIVEN
Proud of the many favorable
comments received, the Arbeiter
Ring, Branch 692, of Greater Mi-
ami, has made available to serv-
ice men the use of facilities of its
Lyceum, 25 Washington Street,
Miami Beach. One of the many
letters is reprinted below:
U. S. ARMY AIR FORCES
Sept. 25. 1943.
Gentlemen:
On behalf of the 4th Squadron,
411th Training Group, 42nd
Wing, we wish to express our ap-
preciation to the Workmen's Cir-
cle for their co-operation in per-
mitting the free use of their hall.
It is gratifying to realize that
there are organizations giving
more than lip service to the mem-
bers of the armed forces. Such
actions are conductive to main-
taining the morale of our men.
which is so all-important in our
drive toward an early victorious
peace.
1st Sgt. Daniel T. Doherty,
411th Training Group.
Capt. Morris H. Hurwits. 36. of
Hartford, Conn., has been award-
ed the Legion of Merit "for ex-
ceptional meritorious services" in
the North African campaign. The
medal to Captain Hurwitz is ac-
companied by a citation from
General Eisenhower.
S Sgt. Milton Gersfeld. 19. of
New York City, was killed in a
collision between two Fortresses
ner Steelville, Mo.
Devoting This Entire Page to the Efforts of
the Co
ABESS & COSTAR
First National Bank Building
COWEN'S SHOE STORE
155 E. Flagler St. 822 Lincoln Rd.
FDCZIT SYSTEMS. Plumbers
1114 N. E. 2nd Avenue
FLORIDA LINEN SERVICE
100 N. W. 20th Street
LAND-O-SUN DAIRIES, Inc-
101 Alton Road
LUBY CHEVROLET CO.
1055 West Flagler Street
MIAMI MILL WORE &
LUMBER CO.
535 N. W. 11th Street
NATIONAL BRANDS. Inc.
690 N. W. 13th Street
NANKIN'S SHOE STORE
158 East Flagler Street
Army-Navy Committee. Made Postible Through
Operation of
SAM MEYERS
HI South Miami Avenue
SOUTHEASTERN SALESMEN'S
CARAVAN
Langford Building
STANDARD WHOLESALE
GROCERY CO.
149 N. E. 10th Street
TOOLEY-MYRON STUDIOS
DuPont Building
WILLIAM D. SINGER
SUNGAS CO.
1100 Wast Flagler Street
WEST FLAGLER KENNEL CLUB
West Flagler St. at 37th Avenue
WOLPERT FURNITURE CO.
155 Wast Flagler Street
WOMETCO THEATRES
Mitchell Wolfson Sydney Meyer
ONflLLTHEFHOMTS
Charles Spector. 21, of 1614
Meridian Avenue, Miami Beach,
has been promoted from corporal
to sergeant in the Army Air
Forces in England. The former
University of Florida student is
chief clerk in the operations of-
fice of a Flying Fortress squad-
ron.
Capt. Richard G. Laboviti, 26.
of Mattapan, Mass., a member of
the Field Artillery, was killed
in the drive on Tunis. A gradu-
ate of Boston Latin School and of
Harvard University, htf was an
economist in civilian life and had
been in service four years. He
was a member of Cong. Kehillath
Jacob of Mattapan.
Lt. Robert Morris, 25, of Bridge-
port, Conn., an airman in the
South Pacific, has been killed in
action. Manager of a ladies gar-
ment factory in civilian life, he
was in service two and one-half
years.
S/Sgt. Leno Off. 32, El Paso.
Tex., an Air Corps machine gun-
ner, was killed in action over
Europe. A shipping clerk in civ-
ilian life, he was in service three
years, and has been awarded the
Purple Heart posthumously.
Capt. Otis Daneman. 29 of Port
Richmond, Staten Island, a Para-
troop officer, and a member of
the first group to attack Sicily,
is reported killed in action. A
graduate of the College of the
City of New York, he was en-
gaged in the insurance business
in civilian life.
Cadet Solomon Saniord Levy,
21, of Berkeley, Sal if., was killed
in a plane crash over Texas a
week before he was to win his
Navy wings and receive his com-
mission at the Kingsville Naval
Flying School. A graduate of
Berkeley High and a student at
the University of California, Ca-
det Levy was transferred from
Naval R.O.T.C to Naval aviation.
He attended St. Mary's pre-flight
where he set a record in scholar-
ship and athletics, and he did
his preliminary flying at Los Al-
amedas.
Sgt. Manfred Keitsch, Bloom-
field, N. J., died of wounds from
a .22 sub-calibre machine gun
when he was accidentally shot
during target practice at Camp
Hood. Texas. In service less than
half a year, Sergeant Keitsch had
come to this country from Austria
five years ago.
Lt. Horace J. Adelson, 23, of
Mt. Vernon, N. Y., lost his life in
an airplane crash over Wright
Field, Ohio, while engaged in ex-
perimental and test-pilot work
for the Army. A graduate of
Massachusetts Institute of Tech-
nology, Lieut. Adelson was an
aeronautical engineer in civilian
life.
Capt. Harry Kats. 24, of Cor-
sicana, Texas, serving as a scout
in the Philippines, is a prisoner
of Japan. An R.O.T.C. officer
before the war, he had won his
rank through summer work at va-
rious R.O.T.C. camps and army
posts. After reaching the Islands
Captain Katz, then a first lieuten-
ant, was made an infantry in-
structor and promoted to the
rank of captain. He has not been
heard from in almost two years.
Capt. Charles Joseph Kats. 21.
of Oak Park, 111., a doctor in the
Army Medical Corps, is a prisoner
of war. Formerly in the army
reserve, he enlisted in the regular
army three years ago. Captain
Katz was a psyachiatrist at Elgin
State Hospital. He is also a mem-
ber of B'nai B'rith.
Lt. Joseph H. Brooks. 25, Mem-
phis, Tenn., member of the
Eighth Army Air Force, has been
taken prisoner by the Germans.
In service two years, Lieutenant
Brooks was graduated from Cen-
tral High school and attended
Southwestern University.
Lt. Jacob Howard Franz, 25. of
Charleston. W. Va., who has put
in more than 700 combat flying
hours and has been on 88 bomb-
ing missions, holds the Distin-
guished Flying Cross, a bronze
Oak Leaf Cluster to the D. F. C,
the Silver Star, the Air Medal,
and three Oak Leaf Clusters to
the Air Medal.


PAGE EIGHT
vjewlst ncrkMar
'
i
4 ,




I^WWWWV
THE Y. M. H. A.
NOTES
By HARRY SCHWARTZ

"Y" Opens Fall Activities
Program
The first program of the Fall
Activities for Adults took place
last Sunday at the "Y," when a
crowd of over four hundred peo-
ple witnessed the Membership
Rally, followed by an evening of
excellent entertainment fur-
nished by the Special Service De-
partment of the Army Air Corps.
The meeting was opened by
Leo Ackerman. President, and
was followed with a report by
George Chertkof, Chairman of
the Board, who outlined the "Y"
program. D. C. Willner, Chair-
man of the Cultural and Enter-
tainment Committee, spoke on
the activitii s ol thai group. He
stated that the committee had
prepared a program consisting of
forums for Wednesday nights, ;i
irse in Jewish history by the
binical Assocation. and three
. :ial events with out-of-town
artists
The highlight of the evening
was the presentation of a cup do-
nated i.\ George Wolpert, to the
>n procuring the highest
number of individual member- in
the recent campaign. This cov-
honor was w S B Mil-
li i who procured 50 membt i
Alter the meeting refreshments
>. i'\i d es ol the
Y. W. H. A.
Youth Rally Oct. 31
Al a mi of the Youth Ac-
tivities Committee on Sunday
mi rning, it was decided to
a Field Day on Sunday. Oct. 31.
Luncheon
will be served at noon and the
affair will be concluded with a
dance. The fee is only 25 cents
per person, which includes every-
thing. The program is as follows:
10 to 10:30. Registration: 10:30
to 11:30. Basketball (first round):
12 to 1:30. Luncheon, which will
include an interesting program;
1:30 to 2:30. Tournaments: (a)
Ping Pong, (b) Horseshoe Pitch-
ing, (c) Handball: 2:30 to 3:30.
open Forum: George Chertkof.
Chairman of the Board of the
Y. M. H. A., will act as Modera-
tor; 3:30 to 4.30. Delegates' Meet-
ing; 3*0 to 4:30 Girls Volleyball;
4:30 to 5:30. All Finals; 8:30 "til
------. Dancing and F.ntcrtain-
. Orchestra
Children's Classes
Children'.- dancing classes will i
begin Monday, Oct. 25. at 3:30!
p. m. at the "Y All mothers in-
terested are requested to come;
with their children at that I
Miss Audrey Floyd. OUT dancing
teacher, will be present and will
organize classes at that tune.
Spanish Classes
isses in Conversational Span-
ish will take place Mondav night,
I 25, at T 30 o'clock. All per-
sons interested are requested to
be here at that time. Mrs Emma
Moffet will organize the groups.
WV^^^

HAT
HEN
HERE
(Till* column Id OOUdUOUd by the
Greater Miami Jewish F .1.1 atlon In
.....Deration with Thr Jewish Florid-
ian as a i-iimmunlty mrvlce. '!<' inrorrn
the community i.f your ..iKanlsntlon s
activities and to avoid .onfiirts in
dates, phone I-S411 and art 101
"Community Calendai Notification
muil reach Federation no later than
I" ..-ilny fur pulilleallKti tliut week)
Mon.. Oct. 25. Women's Di-
vision American Jewish Con-
j gross, annual installation lunch-
eon at Versailles Hotel. Miami
Beach. 12:30 p. m. B'nai B'rith
Retention Committee, dinner
meeting. Royal Center. Hadas-
sah. board meeting, evening.
Tues.. Oct. 26. 12th Annual
dance. Miami Y.M.H.A at Coral
Gables Country Club.
Wed.. Oct. 27. Beth David Sis-
terhood, regular meeting, Beth
David Auditorium. 2:30 p. in.:
Jewish Education Association.
COmmunity-Wide meeting. Beach
Y.M.&W.H.A. 8:15 p. m.; Work
rnens1 Circle executive meeting,
25 Washington Ave., 8:30 p. m.
Fri.. Oct. 29. National Council
Jewish Women, bl idle and Mah
J.un:.;. Beach Y.M.&W.H.A. 1:30
p, m
--------- -""i-i-e --ii_i v
A
B'NAI B'riTh
Notes
mum
w
Bv PAUL WEITZMAN
^AAAAAAAAAMWMtMMM
The last meeting of Sholem
Lodge No. 1024 B'nai B'rith
brought out a capacity attend-
ance and at the same time the
Ladies 'Auxiliary held one of its
largest meetings in a long time.
needed
equipment to thP i
Services Division. !
'Having learned that th,
of entertainers ai,w*l
HYMAN MORRIS NAMED
LEADER FOR TROOP 6
RADIO HOUR
Rabbi Simon April of Congre-
gation Schaarei Zedek will be- the
guest speaker on the Rabbinii a
iation Hour at Id a m. Sun-
laj ver station WQAM
Hyman Morns has assumed the
duties "i Scoutmaster of Troop 6.
Boy Scouts of America, replac-
ing Alfred Kahn. now residing in
Pennsylvania. The troop, a proj-
ect of the Miami Y. M. H. A., is
now reorganizing its four patrols
tO fit local needs
A good buy is a War Bond. Buy
now and vou will be paid later
S4.00 for every $3.00.
THEY CREATED
The Beach "Y,' where the meet-
ings were held, offered its facili-
ties to B'nai B'rith for the eve-
ning.
A report on A. D. L. activities
was made by Alex F. Miller.
Florida Regional Director, who
introduced Arnold Forster of the
Eastern Regional Office of the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith. Mr. Foster addressed the
audience and stressed the need
for constant vigilance and assist
ance in combating anti-Semitism.
which has not abated, but which
has been driven underground in
company With other subversive
groups
New members admitted to the
B'nai B'rith organization at this
meeting included William Kessel-
man. Hillel Director at the Uni-
versity of Miami, who demittcd
to Sholem Lodge; Albert Frisch-
man, Hyman Enncrfield. Morris
Snyder. Charles Resnick and
Aaron Sussman.
Jack Marash. Executive Direc-
tor ol the Y. M. & W. H. A. of
Miami Beach, was introduced to
the membership Of Sholem Lodge
and invited the members to re-
turn to the "Y" often.
Membership Retention
With an active committee at
.".oik. "members in good stand-
ing'' increased from 643 at the
last writing to 695 by the collec-
tion of delinquent dues. On Mon- ,nc
day evening at 7 o'clock the com- i the
mittee will meet at the Clover
Club for a dinner meeting at
which time further plans will be
discussed to achieve the goal set
by Louis Heiman. President
1.000 members in good standing
by the end of 1943. Members
can co-operate by paying then
dues.
Army Corps Caperers
I i Special Services Division
entertained members and ladies
ol B'nai B'rith and their friends
the Air Corps Capen i
Civilian- are urged to do this.
thai and thi other thing to keep
up the morah ol men m service
Tie "Caperers" not only keep up
the morale of their fellows in
service, but add to commu-
entertainment by their an-
: B'rith and many other
organizations are indebted
to thi Special Services Division.
ed by Major Early, for the
splendid entertainment supplied.
: mindful ol the old prov-
that it is mole blessed to give
than receivealthough not in-
tended in the original sense, the
giving ol charitySholem Lodge'
i- anxious to reciprocate in some
measure for the immeasurable:
entretainment supplied by the i
A i Coi pi Caperers to members
of B'nai B'rith and other organi- j
zations by supplying some much '
-iners are
handicapped by lack
phone and portable
of
ampljj
equipment. Sholem ,
undertaken the pleasaTL'
raising funds to pS**
equipment In ordTf!
enjoy in the future, itiS-
the entertainment so
vided. It's a cycle, yooifl
At some tin,, ln ,he -J
ture an affair will ben.1
that Specific puipose-tnajL
reception the Air Corps CtaJI
receive is any indicatk '
popularity.
Oct. 13100 Years of Bnii]
Although war condition;
eluded elaborate celebrata!
the 100th anniversary dl
founding of B'nai B'rith fei
niversary did not pass |
notice. Editorials were
by local newspapers and
programs commemorated tail
casion. Alex F. Miller, beaiil
the A. D. L. office played att.
portant part in obtaining saj
In a half-hour program. J
for by George Goldbert J
A. Z. A. and B'nai B'rith ial
put on a skit on WFTL dep;-ij
100 years of progress in Bal
B'rith. with an address by M
ton Friedman. W10D featal
an interview on Leslie B. BJ-1
radio time, with Rabbi Sr.a|
explaining the part B'nai Br
played in the unification i; a
Jewish people. WKAT oral
Miami Round Table. j..|
100th anniversary of fa I
B'rith was appropriately k&|
memorated.
Greater Miami Takes Wist:
Place in Third War Lot
Greater Miami took matin
in a tally from all mac
country in the sale of Vfetaa
through B'nai B'rith withttitt.-
725.
the
nity
tics,
local
'driWk PLENTY OF
' "litre
' \Wata
DELIVERED TO rOUR HOME
a-GaLLQK BOTTLE .....*
CASE OF SIX
TABLE BOTTLES.......,5
Plus Bo tin Deposit
PHONE6 2-4128
'\
THREE O'CLOCK
AND I HAVEN'T SLEPT A WINK*
WAKEFUL NIGHTS how the time jggj
Minutes seem like hours, we worry .V* ~~Z
done and left undone. After such a night. ""IJ,
up in the morning more tired than when w* *j"j
to bed. Nervous Tension causes many a w"
night and wakeful nights are likely to cause *
vous Tension. Next time you feel Nervous
Keyed Up or begin to toss, tumble and worry "-
you get to bed try
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Twelve Founding Fathers of B'nai B'rithThese Dhotos of fh. m
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Anspacher; 3. Reuben Rodacher. died in 1886; 4 Valentin. K^'^ 2W ,n 189,: 2- Henry
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tary. died in 1866; 8. Isaac Dittenhoofer. first president d1edPin I860- fU?de' Dnd iint "cre
whose store first plans were laid for B'nai BPrith. died in 1894 1FLS. H~h.Ri'7lbou^h- m
the founders and great-grandfather of Lester Sherrick oresid-ni f n 1 iuf hV la,t *urr of
in 1909; Henry Kling. died in 1885; 12. Hirsch Heinrnan f Nrlk Lod** ta 19. died
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PAGE FOUR Jen-istnor Minn The Jewish Floridian Plant and Main Offices, 21 S. W. Second Avenue, Miami. Fla. P. O. Box 2973 Phone 2-1141 Entered as Second Class Matter July 4, 1930 at the Post Office of Miami, Florida, under the Act of March 3, 1879 FRED K. SHOCHET, Managing Ed itor Subscription—1 Year, $2.00 Six Months, $1.00 MIAMI, FLORIDA. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1943 TISHRI 23, 1943 VOLUME 16 NUMBER 43 BARUCH HABO Dr. Israel Chipkin, one of the foremost authorities on Jewish Education in the country, pays our community a visit this week. Volunteering his time and the vast knowledge and benefit his years of experience with the problem of Jewish Education have given him. Dr. Chipkin has come here to assist us with our oft-mentioned Jewish Education program. What is the plan to be inaugurated here that will best serve our purposes is the question for which we seek the answer. Devoting his life to the expansion and improvement of Jewish Education, Dr. Chipkin will assist us in achieving our purpose— an all-encompassing program of Jewish Education for our community. Dr. Chipkin has termed his coming here a consultationobservation visit. During his brief stay he will observe our education system, be that as it may. He will consult our Rabbis and Leaders and discuss with them this community and its particular difficulties. We say "Baruch Habo," Dr. Chipkin. We welcome you and look forward to your much needed advice. We look forward to your guidance to set us off to a good start in our endeavor to promulgate Jewish Education in a satisfying and resultgetting manner. succos Succos closes the cycle of Jewish holidays that begins with Rosh Hashonah. Succos closes it on a happy note or notes. There is, first of all, the note of the intrinsic nature of the holiday,__the celebration of the harvest. The agricultural background of the festival is to be seen in the booths, bedecked with foliage as wel! as the waving palms and ethrogs used in the synagogues and in pious Jewish homes to express thanksgiving. Succos in this respect is almost the equivalent of the American Thanksgiving Day. The festival of Succos fittingly closes with the celebration of Simchat Torah—the giving of the Law. In a day when Jewish suffering has been so poignant and so widespread, it must be confessed that the Giving of the Law does not anways appear a boon and yet without that Law, humanity would be infinitely the worse. One cannot render judgments on such things quickly. In the matters of humanity, time and the complexity of things make the human mind prone to error. That which we sometimes think is our badge of suffering may turn out to be the occasion for great joy. The suffering to which the Jew has been subjected perhaps may be taken as evidence of the greatness of his service to humanity. Succos, after the more sombre Yom Kippur, seems to say to us, "Cheer up. See the fruits are ready for harvesting. Behind the clouds, the sun is still shining." RABBI AS PROPHET AND PRIEST by DR. JACOB H. KAPLAN Rabbi Emeritus of Temple Israel Editor's Note: This is the first of a series of articles by the spiritual leaders of Greater Miami. Religious life among the Jews, as well as among all those others who inherited the ideals of Israel, developed and develops in cycles that may be expressed briefly as follows: Prophet, the voice of God; Institution, preserving the thoughts and ideals of the prophet usually guarded by the priest, later by the rabbis, the inheritors of priest and prophet. This continues for a time until the institution becomes corrupt and then again a prophet or reformer brings a fresh message or interprets the old message anew, and then again priest or rabbi, etc., etc., over and over again. If Judaism had become so static that no prophet or teacher could enter the house of Judaism and refresh its message and institution, it would have been dead long ago. But Judaism is a living stream carrying refreshing waters through the centuries. At the time of Malachi. we see plainly that the priest was more than merely a performer of the sacrificial rites. Malachi describes him thus: "The lips of the priest should keep knowledge. And they should seek the Law at his mouth; For he is a messenger of the Lord of Hosts." The rabbi inherits the office of the prophet and the office of the priest. He not only preserves the message of the prophet and performs the duties of the priest, but he also feels at times called upon to be the mouthpiece of God in the original sense in which the prophet was the mouthpiece of God. B ut at the time of the Prophet Malachi. the priest no doubt had assumed the functions which broadly speaking, are the functions of the rabbi today, namely to preserve the knowledge of Judaism and teach it to the people. But that is not so easy as it seems or sounds. "The priest's lips should keep knowledge, And they should seek the Law at his mouth; For he is the messenger of the Lord of Hosts." To keep knowledge in ancient time was a comparatively easy matter for one who devoted his life to study. Up to the prescientific age a man seeking a Ph.D. degree was examined on all the knowledge of the day. He knew everything that was known. Today such a thing is preposterous even to talk about. No man can know today everything; he cannot even know everything in any one branch of knowledge. No physician knows all the branches of medicine; no chemist knows all the branches of chemistry; no biologist knows all the branches of life; nor does a professor literature, even of English literature, know all the branches of literature. How, then, can a rabbi be expected to "guard knowledge"? Some rabbis, in their eagerness to serve, attempt to know everything. They talk about Shakespeare; they lecture about the latest books; they know about military strategy, about biologic ills. The pulpit sometimes is a forum of all knowledge. Today this is impossible. No rabbi can know everything. There are men at the university who know Shakespeare better than the rabbi does, and some who know how to review books better than the all-knowing rabbi, and certainly some who know biology better than the rabbi, and so on throughout the whole category of knowledge. It is evident, therefore, that the rabbi of today cannot "guard knowledge." No man can do that today. And yet, the utterances of Malachi are sound advice: The priest, the rabbi of today, should guard knowledge, and they shall seek the Law from his mouth; for he is the messenger of the Lord of Hosts. What kind of knowledge can and must the rabbi "guard"? Evidently the only knowledge that he can and ought to guard is the knowledge of Judaism, and that the people should seek the Law from his mouth. Furthermore, the rabbi who wishes to serve the people of his day should and must know the Bible, the Talmud and all the later literature of the Jewish people. And in order to know the Bible he must know Biblical criticism; in order to know Jewish history he must know general history; in order to know Judaism he must know other religious faiths. A rabbi should know not only kosher meat, but also how to live in a community as a man of the general community. A rabbi should know how to live as a Jew in a nonJewish community as a religious man and be part and parcel of the community in which he lives. This knowledge which a rabbi is expected to know is also too vast for one man and, therefore, the people should give the rabbi time to acquire that knowledge, which is necessary and important and not waste the precious time of the rabbi with matters that any self-respecting Jew can and ought to take care of. The rabbi should not be expected to make social calls when that is the duty and pleasure of every Jew. Neither is it necessary for a rabbi to be present when a Jew breathes his last. It is the duty of every Jew to recite the Shema at such a time. The rabbi does not forgive sins at the death-bed. t-od does that; and as every Jew a child of God. every Jew stands in the presence of God in \i n ? S A weI !, l n death T he rabbi fv !" ~ d J d the th,n s that are expected of every Jew. but he £"£ 1 evcr y, t h'ng and attend do a^raoir "*** U ht to Yes the rabbi should guard Jewish knowledge, and the people should seek the Law from his mouth, for he is a messenger of the Lord of Hosts. nUDAY^O CTQBEB j -TTDBrrS FROM EVER Mudfy eotvgldentiol -By PHTNEAS J. BJBONBEACH KIWANIS CLUB ELECTS NEWPRESIDENT PB t J a t H K M 'i ler y ,ami Beach real estate broker, has been elected president of the Miami Beach Kis.teSu£ ub lt was announced Other officers selected to take office with Miller on Jan. 1. 1944 are Leo Adeeb. first vice president". ^^ Ue —J' v i <* LISTEN HERE Emirs Feisal and Khalid of Saudi Arabia, sons f Ibn Saud, who are now in this country, have been h over by the high-powered public relations depojtment^T Saudi-American oil combine Representative Sol Bl however, got the brilliant idea that a conference should^ arranged between the Arabian princes and Zionist R sentatives The Zionists wisely refused That Pal spread in Life magazine is a direct result of the genuine d' sire of Life's editors to play fair on the Arab-Jewish issue For its publication orchids are due an ex-editor in the An 1 Jewish field, who, however, prefers to remain unnamed 9 The American Jewish Conference is meeting with storm weather The leaders don't know whether to bury it I give it front rank Rabbi Abba H, Silver is preparina blitz campaign for the Zionist Emergency Committee Since his induction as co-chairman things have begun to happen. YOU SHOULD KNOW Attention, Department of Justice: Dr. Enrique Cervantes whom Alan Chase, author of "Falange." has branded as a Falangist, is an avowed anti-Semite Right now he's try. ing to get into the American Army by way of avoiding deportation Incidentally, despite rave reviews and Wal ter Winchell's boosting of the book, the publishers have decided not to push "Falange" High pressure from clerical and Fascist guarters is the reason, we're told Despite this, many people have been saying that Chase ought to get a medal for having written his expose ... So now he has one—a decoration bestowed upon him by the Republic oi Cuba Major Horace E. Dodge, Jr.. the motor magnate whose wife is suing him for separation on the grounds thai he is pro-Nazi, is, according to his own boasts, a hnandal contributor to Gerald K. Smith, the notorious pro-Fascist and anti-Semite. TRANS-ATLANTIC Few people realize it, but it none the less true that the French National Committee, now headed by General de Gaulle, has ignored pleas to reinstate the Cremieux law in Algiers We wonder why, since De Gaulle attacked Giraud for abrogating the decree The Nazis, says Harry Hershheld, will hold Paris to the bitter end—so that Hitler will be able to come there and say to Napoleon: "More over!" Needless to say, the current anti-Jewish campaiB going on in Denmark has the opposition of the rest of t Danish people and their king ... It is reported that short)] before the institution of the harsh Gestapo measures against the Jews some Nazi officials told King Christian that the simplest thing would be for him to put the Nuremberg laws in effect in his country Whereupon that King Christian retorted: "That would be entirely unconstitutional My official title is King of all the Danes!'" SIDELIGHT Sidelight on life in Paris under the Nazis, as recounted by Etta Kahn Shiber in her "Paris Underground": When a fair Parisienne finds herself annoyed by one of the innumerable Nazi officers who annoy all the French people and who are particularly persistent in forcing their attentions on unwilling ladies, she usually grows confidential and whispers in the invader's ear: "I have to admit I'm a Jewess" And then the Nazi guickly looks around to see whether any one has observed him speaking to a "non-Aryan," and hastily departs Mrs. Shiber, you remember, is the middle-aged American Jewish widow whom the Nazis captured in France after she had helped some hundreds of British soldiers escape their clutches. An exchange of prisoners enabled her to return to our free shores. STAGE AND SCREEN A Leslie Howard Memorial that will provide scholarships lor nurses is being sponsored in London ... Be sure, by the way, to see "Spitfire," Howard's last picture, if you haven't got around to it so far Who knows but that Charlie Chaplin will soon join the ranks of the autobiographers? ... A New York publisher is urging him to do so Pola Negri, making her long-heralded movie comeback, is announcing that there never was anything to that story of her friendship with Hitler, and pointing out that she instituted a libel action against the Parisian paper which originally published the story—and that she won the case %  Broadway isn't the only theatrical street that is feeling the current manpower shortage Maurice Schwartz has just hired an actor named Michael O'Shea, it is reported; said Mr. O'Shea's main gualification for the Yiddish stage being his possession of a medical discharge from the Army. ABOUT PEOPLE Dr. Chaim Weizmann. fully recovered, will fly to Palestine from England any day now General Smuts, Premier of South Africa, will visit the United States, and while here will address at least one Zionist dinner or mass meeting.•• I here are rumors that Laurence Steinhardt, American Ambassador to Turkey, will resign Arthur Upham Pop* book on Maxim Litvinoff, out on October 14th. will be a sensauon It shows Litvinoff aa a one-man political tank against the appeasers of 1936-1938 Pierre van Paaswn has been selected by the Office of War Information to broadcast a short-wave message of hope to the Jews of Europe



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PAGE SIX Jfiii fksicfiif mm VICHY TO ARREST ALL JEWS London (JTA).—German authorities in France have notified the Vichy Government that they intend to arrest all Jews in the country in connection with preparations to prevent Allied landings on French soil, it is reported in the London press this week. The German note did not indicate whether the Jews will be interned in France or deported to other parts of Europe. At the same time the Paris radio this week reported a 'plan of action" against the Jews of France outlined by Darquier de Pellepoix, the French Commissioner for Jewish Affairs. The plan provides for the confiscation of Jewish property, for formally depriving Jews of political rights, I for "racial segregation," and for the expulsion off all young Jews irom educational institutions German radio stations this week, in reporting the proposals ol Darquier de Pellepoix. quoted the Commissioner for Jewish Allan's as announcing that "more than 15.000 Jewish firms have been liquidated in Fiance and sold to Aryans' They a No quoted him as stating thai "Aryan" purchasers of liquidated Jewish firms 'must join a special l organization called -Union of Proprietors oi Formerly JewishOwned Business Enterprises.'" I .OBITUARIES 'MRS. CLARA GOLDENBLANK Mrs. Clara Goldenblank of 1923 S.W. 14th Ter., who died Thursday in a Miami hospital, was buried Friday in the Jewish section of Woodlawn Cemetery. Services were held at the Gordon Funeral Home Chapel-with Rabbi Max Shapiro of Beth David Congregation, officiating. Mrs. Goldenblank. 55. has been a resident of Miami for the past 27 years and prominent in communal and civic work. Besides her husband Max. she leaves a son, Aaron, U. S. Army, and a daughter. Beatrice. She was a member of Beth David Sisterhood. MUG OH BY LOCAL JEWRY ISIDOR ROTH Isidor Roth. 65, of 209 Ninth Street. Miami Beach, died Saturday in a Miami Beach hospital. A retired real estate man. Mr. Roth came to Miami Beach 15 years ago from New York City. His wife, Mrs. Sophie Roth; two tons, Dr. Edward Roth. Miami Beach, and Eugene F. Roth. assistant counsel for the United stales Treasury Department In Washington and oia daughter, Mrs Beatrice Kreiaberg, New York City, survive. Service* were held Sunday at the Riverside Memorial Chapel. with Rabbi Moses Mescnelof! fii iating. LOUIS SIPKIN The body of Louis Sipkin. 65, who died Wednesday in a Miami hospital, was sent to New York Thursday by the Riverside Memorial Chapel for services and bin ial, Made From Fresh Oranges LOUIS A. SPIEGEL Louis A. Spiegel. 69. of 4342 Alton Roard, Miami Beach, died Oct. 13 in a local hospital. A retired cotton goods merchant, he came here 2u years ago from Atlanta. Ga. He was a native of Milwaukee. Wis. His wife. Mrs. Hattie Spiegel, survives. The body was sent to Atlanta I y Riverside Memorial Chapel. '•/<•/> %  ""• %  wHumtHfA 'trfi ADVANTAGES of a IIAIIG FEDERAL MORTGAGE •LOW RATES • EASY PAYMENTS • LONG TIME TO PAY • PROMPT SERVICE A HOME INSTITUTION Deal With Your LOCAL. FRIENDLY INSTITUTION RESOURCES OVBH $7,000,000 IIAItE FGIMHtAL •puwiy MIAMI 4 NOITH Utl ••* AVIMUI (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1) a. m. the Beth Sholom Sisterhood will be hosts in the Suko on Thursday evening and Friday morning. Beth David Congregation will have Rabbi Max Shapiro and Cantor Louis Hayman officiating Bt all services. Yizkor or Memorial service will take place Thursday morning at 10 a. m. Rabbi Shapiro will speak on the subject "Freedom of the Mosaic Law." Thursday evening at 7:30 the celebration of the Rejoicing of I the Torah will take place, at I which time the dedication of a. complete Perochas set. covers for I ntire altar and holy ark. will be part of the services. Mr. Nat Roth and his family, who do| nated the set. will be guests of honor Friday morning services at 9 o'clock. Schaarei Zedek Congregation will have Rabbi Simon April and Cantor M. Tcitelbautn officiating at all services Thursday morning, Oct. 21. at 9 a. m.. Yizkor servio at 10:30. sermon: "Sacred Memories." Thursday evening at (i:30. Sinn-has Torah service. Refreshments for the adults and children, and flags will be distributed. Friday morning serviceat 9 o'clock. At Beth Jacob Congregation. Rabbi Moses Meschelofl will officiate with Cantor Maurice Mamches chanting the musical portion o! the service's, scheduled as follows Thursday evening, Oct. 21. 6:30 p. m.; Thursday and Friday morning at 9 a. m. Yizkor service will be held Thursday morning at 10:30 with Rabbi Mescheloff preaching on "Even There They Live." Simchas Torah services will be held Thursday evening. Flags and refreshments will be distributed to all children. Miami Beach Jewish Community Center will have Rabbi Irving Lehrman officiating. Thursday morning. Oct. 21. the service will begin at B o'clock. At 10:30 the Memorial service. Yizkor. will be held. Rabbi Lehrman will pleach on the subject "Strengthen Our Hearts O Father." Cantor Abraham D. Wolf will chant the service Thursday evening. Simchas Torah. the service will start ; at 7 oclock. The main feature j ct tin evening will be the Torah -ion. to which all children '• are invited Flags will be distributed and refreshments will be I served by the Sisterhood. Fridav morning services will start at 8 o clock. Miami Jewish Orthodox Con• Bregation will have Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky preaching and chanting the services that will start Thursday and Friday momat 9 o'clock, with 'evening services at 6 o'clock Thursday morning at 10 Rabbi Rackovsky will addresi the worshipers prior u> Yizkor services A Simchas Torah celebration will take place Tuesday evening. BEFORE YOU BUY see LEON ELIIN with METROPOLITAN LIFE INS. CO. Not Baat Because Bigg —t But—Blggeat BKIUM Baat Hi i?^N0T^ T,c. o, ^ 37,0i Moth rZjQVST BROS. Rtar if^ Is the BEST.' TUoitu for REST CONVALESCENCE •nj CHRONIC CASES 'Sun-Ray Park Health Resort •OOKUT(T~ tfe < fO •OOKUTI LItLJ4£*}fc.MIAMI Wlltt.ll> ,, lO'-COUOT FLORIDA lh.Mi-.in In a rerun,-a,., "n fc ^ i', County, Pfcrt&Tto-w^fl of M.lro„e ijjrrtl^^M "f HlaleaK %  £!'""• taij SI St:.,, ,,, ,, ...,,'"%  ; A in.aaaeaament m the name 0 f r\Kv ,,.t'NKi Certlflcat. .^^ J J^ ln K <•> tow, uu .kH wml? *i .,%' tw,5th %  *oj of ircntt f^_M (Circuit courP*$: ( w *"n§| 10/8-16-2:'-J'.'M N '" BUn *t.l] LB?*."* '' mi iSeS I WANT MY MILK ih.f.ii„„,„ L ,i..,,,,„;f'• And Bo Suro It's FLORIDA DAIRIES HOMOGENIZED Vitamin "D" Milk "Milk Produce." Dacro Protoctod TEL. 2-2621 Greater Miami Delivery VUit Our Farm at 6200 N. W. 32nd Stroot thereon. Said • the II i hp Count) nl |.i.."s.av&T 1 he aaw %  P der th. in ihname m ."""I %  "' % % % %  Block • oiymri, J| Ih* oiint) of 1 I us embraced .,-...,. I I IK' 11 -M %  ." ••', |-( ,,f a|H nmn—T derth. .. | In the Mini ol ,. ". I 111.-.. ..,!.... I %  ;•••'" c< -I described then I hluheM le.1,1, Door on the fli illrt ,7 De-comber. il;i\ of I i. i Dnto.l II I K R. (. %  • XTHFRJUX [ '"lerk Pin y I (Olroali Court • ., n ?? v '' 8TERRSTT.I LEGAL NOTICES DADE COUNTY READY TO ISSUE RATION BOOK Some 8.000 Dade County Defei council block leaders will begin receiving applications for war Ration Book Four at schools m the area Oct. 23, it was announced Saturday by Mrs Sydney Weintraub. chief block leader. N't.,. ia hertbj KIVM that the %  III.I.T.-ILI ..-t. Hamuel niank. DavM Hiank. Michael Blank. Bcatrlca Hiank n Prehllna and Root Davldoft aa -< %  loti %  bualneaa un f,, r Ajpplicanta. v -.'i iii I-S-1S-22 NOTICE OF APPLICATION Fqi TAX DEED CHAPTER 174" A-mlir^.'t s. i!i,„-k 118, s.. n t Club h>tat.-.s. in the Ti S|IIIIIKS. it'ountrj %  ib ty of I >.icl. Bute nl K • i |i Certlfl % %  N aeaamani of aaul | Mid 'ortifirati M ed a Ham,' ,.f Unknown Lot 9. iciiH-k lit. SecUoa :, C i 'I ib Batatea, li th. T< Bprinfi (Countrj rinh i>tatm ty of 1 '. % %  !. Stall i' braced in Certiflcati S neaamenl .-f said pi opt rt] sni.I Cw tlflcati name ..f I'tikn.-wn l-ot 1". Block flub Batati In Ihi Towl Springs. (Countr) Club El t> ..f I ia of I lade. State i %  braced in Certiflcati Mi % %  JJfS • tit of -...I iroperty unr' %  aid '•• %  i tift. ate l> • I •' %  name of Unknowi Utl li. Block II*. Country Club Bai .Miami Bpi Inaa ('ountry Counts of Dade, SI embrai • .i i ate N I the T'-'l riubtti*] >i I assi'sstiu-nt ..f .-.i.l 1 %  .•: %  • rt> 'J"' 1 A | KM 1= %  %  tinof t'nknown. „ k. J I-IIII-HH sai.l %  -I'I %  emed arc l.i, ^ ti I '1 I 'i raoni applying for the books josara M. LIPTOH. PRESIDENT are reminded that they must have i ne number three book with them tor each book four they wish to obtam Bonk three should nave the name and address of each famUy member i out on the front cover to hasten issuance of the books Tin1 lock leaders will be stationed at various schools m the county and a list of those schools Will be announced. Issuing of book four will be handled in the same manner book two was handled. "N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 11th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR DADP COUNTY. IN CHANCERY ,., No. 80950 Bl II. HARRISON QAINET Plaintiff ELIZABETH REBECCA OAINBT, i %  efendant ORDER OF PUBLICATION aA Y iN U *T B k IZABB !" REBECCA OAINBT, Route 4. parllncton. South %  are o..t in.-a Io f ii^ vour •;;:•;;•-• %  In the above i-auae^of 1 l% ""7 "" r ''•'" %  • %  l>, tol.ei j: lev: 1 <" —• in.i I'liiifeaaii will be en"i ajtalnat you. e DATED September :'" i9ti ,,, ,,. I: '-EATHERhlAN. Clark %  aid Certiflcati laaueu name of Unknown I 'll'.*N,,-,I .11 I.IIUIIIH III i..". %  leacrlbed therein tli I"' v ', nil .hlxheat Uldder ai tin 0 ,''!S ix-.ron Hi. In-' M..n.t.i> '"."".JrH of Dei ember, IS4S, whic* h """ das of December. !!•• ; ^ Dated tins 19th il:.> %  •' 'J'J*' I • 1/J///M/MWMH**„„.,l~-. v0/ MUMf^Mi RIVERMONT PARK SANITARIUM ISM N. W. 7th St. Ph. 1-7301 Beet care for chronic elck, convalescent and elderly people tas WEEKLY UP %  aaiae Large Beautiful Ground. ^__ No, M 1 7 %  CARL RIPUET, Plaintiff BUEABBTH hUPUBT Defeiiilant ,. v.--"K"zA ;.KT j ,? L, ftr 1 T I o? 24 ';.^;;;;i-' l ,,^'li N ^ K ]er^ >" the above *u r. ,i '" before MovaraRrl %&!?? ," n 2 pro i on few,, -in i' 4:! r a


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wJewish ffvndii&in QoM&i^He, YKie Jliewiislh HJmBty VOLUME 16—No. 43 MIAMI. FLORIDA. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1943 PRICE 10 CENTS N.C.J1 TO AT CHICAGO MEET New York (JTA).—The 50th anniversary of the National Council of Jewish Women, the oldest Jewish women's organization in this country, will be marked at the 17th triennial convention of the group which will meet in Chicago from Nov. 7 to Nov. 11. The Council was founded in Chicago in 1883. Delegates from 215 senior and 10(1 junior sections of the Council, from all parts of the United States, will plan the organizations program for the next three years with emphasis on the functioning of the five departments of the Council Service to Foreign Born: social legislation, social welfare, war activities, contemporary Jewish affairs, and international relations and peace. Because of the war the convention has been stripped of all festivities with the exception of a "Golden Jubilee" dinner on Nov. 10. A featured speaker at the convention will be Earl G. Harrison, United States Commissioner of Immigration and Naturalization. AIR CORPS CAPERERS FEATURED AT Y DANCE LOSS OF UKRAINE: JEWS TO REMAIN Sgt. Hal Fisher and his group comprising the Air Corps Caperers will be the feature attraction at the Annual Dance of the Miami Y. M. H. A. at the Coral Gables Country Club next Tuesday night, Oct. 26. Larry Grossberg, chairman of the affair, reports large advance ticket sales for the affair for which Cy Washburn and his orchestra will play. For table reservation phone the •Y"—3-4012. y Bern (JTA).—Anticipating the liberation by the Russian armies of Transnistria. the Rumanianheld section of the Ukraine where tens of thousands of exiled Rumanian Jews are interned, the Bucharest Government has ordered all Rumanian officials there to send their wives and children back to Rumania, it was reliably reported here this week. A considerable number of officials in Transnistria. anticipating the Bucharest order, have been sending their families from Odessa and other occupied Ukrainian cities to the interior of Rumania during the last few weeks. It is taken for granted in Jewish circles here that the Rumanian armed forces, when retreating from Transnistria. will leave the interned Jews in the devastated territory. The Swiss newspaper Basler Nachrichten reports that the Rumanian authorities in Galati issued an order forbidding Jews to ourchase bread or any other bakery goods. At the same time, the German news agency DNB reports that that Rumania Minister of War has issued an order requesting all Jews in Rumania who were born in 1926 to register for compulsory military service. The Bucharest newspaper Argus reaching here this week from Rumania reports that a new decree has been promulgated by the Rumania Government prohibiting Jewish physicians from treating "Aryan" patients. NonJews are by the same decree forbidden to consult Jewish doctors. JEWS Of GESTAPO Stockholm (JTA).—The possibility of German occupation of Hungary and the intensified persecution of the Jews by the Gestapo along the same lines as in other German-occupied countries was predicted in the Swedish press this week following the return from Hungary of a number of Swedish journalists. The neutral newspapermen were told in Budapest that should Germany forcibly occupy Hungary, which is now trying to get out of the war, "over a million Jews. Poles and democratic intellectuals will be butchered by the Gestapo." At present there are more than 700,000 Jews residing in Hungary. "Despite the existing antiJewish measures in the country, the Hungarians realize that the Jews there arc vitally needed for Hungary's economic life." the representative of the Swedish newspaper Social Demokraten writes in summarizing his impressions of the trip. He emphasizes that there is a genera] anti-German feeling in Hungary and that this feeling is openly expressed. "Everybody in Hunnary is war weary, and none of the Hungarians would like his country to share the fate which Northern Italy is now facing under German occupation." the writer says. CLOSING DAYS OF CANADA RAISES $500,000 FOR UNITED PALESTINE APPEAL Montreal (WNS)—Rabbi Jesse Schwartz, national executive director of the Zionist organization of Canada, announced here that more than $500,000 had been raised in Canada for the current United Palestine Appeal. BY LOCAL JEWRY (Note: Because of the holiday, this edition is published on Wednesday for delivery Thursday, carrying regular Friday dateline. This issue will reach leaders in time for the following information to be of value.) The closing days of Succos starting last Wednesday evening and continuing through Thursday and Friday of this week brings to a close the High Holiday period of observance. Temple Israel will have Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan officiating at all services. Succos morning. Thursday. Oct. 21, at 11a. m. Sermon: "Realists and Idealists." Memorial services. At Beth Sholom Center Rabbi S. M. Machtei will officiate. Cantor Abraham Friedman will chant the musical portions of the services, scheduled as follows: Thursday at 9 a. m., Yizkor sery : ice, at 10:30 a. m. with Rabbi Machtei preaching on "The Living-Dead and the Dead-Living Thursday at 8 p. m., Simchath Torah services. Friday at 9:30 (CONTINUED ON PAO.E •) ADDRESS CITIZENS HERE OCTOBER 11 Greater Miami will be honored this week when Dr. Israel Chipkin arrives here Monday for a seven-day stay. One of the foremost authorities on Jewish Education in the country, he comes here .at the invitation of the Jewish Education Association of Greater Miami. This community will be privileged to hear Dr. Chipkin when DR. ISRAEL CHIPKIN he addresses a community-wide meeting sponsored by the Education Association on Wednesday evening, Oct. 27. at 8:15 p.m. at "the Y. M. & W. H. A. on Miami Beach, located at 1 Lincoln Road. His subject will be "Jewish Education." The meeting is open to the public who are urged to take advantage of the opportunity to hear a leading authority on the subject. There will be no funds solicited. Dr. Chipkin is at present director for Jewish Education of New York City and is a past president of the National Conference of Jewish Social Welfare. His background and activity is filled with innumerable positions he has held in the Jewish Communal Field of Social Endeavor. Terming his visit one of consultation-observation, he will spend his time here reviewing the local Talmud Torahs and consult with local community leaders. His visit is a result of a series of conferences had with him in New York by various Miamians interested in the education problem. He volunteered his efforts to assist the local community in establishing a system and program that would be adequate for its needs, comply with its communal setup and geographical difficulties. The Jewish Education Association has been endeavoring to institute a program in Greater Miami area with the co-operation of the existing institutions and the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. Dr. Chipkin will meet with officers of the Federation at a gathering on Oct. 28. RED MOGEN DAVID WOULD AFFILIATE WITH RED CROSS Jerusalem (WNS) — Motivated by a desire to be of direct assistance to the Jews in the liberated areas of Europe, the Palestine Red Mogen David organization his entered into negotiations with the British and International Red Cross to the end that it be converted from a local into an international Jewish Red Cross. Such arrangement would enable the organization to broaden its scope. COMMUNITY CENTER IS DISCUSSED THIS WEEK Jewish leaders were present at a gathering this week convened at the request of Sam Blank, communal leader active here for many years. Called together to discuss the much talked about Community Center, plans were evolved for a joint committee of the two "Y's" of this area to initiate a program to put into action a planning group that would evolve ways and means to presently institute the Community Center movement. REPORT CRITICAL CLOTHES NEED FOR 29THYEARLY MEET OCTOBER 25 TO 21 New York (WNS).—The 29th annual convention of Hadassah, the Women's Zionist Organization of America will be held at the Henry Hudson Hotel here, from Oct 25 through Oct. 28, Mrs. Herman Shulman, convention chairman of this city, announced today. In accordance with government requests to curtail transportation as a war-time measure, convention attendance is being reduce from 1,500 to approximately 500 delegates, representing a constituency of 100.000 from 47 states. "Political issues regarding Palestine and the defeat of the British White Paper of 1939, according to which not a single Jew will be permitted to enter Palestine after March, 1944. without Arab consent, will be among the cine! problems discussed by the convention." Mrs. Shulman said. "The implementation of that policy would be a cruel denial of Jewish lights and hopes Remembering that the Mandates Commission of the League of Nations has held the White Paper to be a violation of the mandate. Hadassah together with ail Zionist bodies during the coming months, will concentrate its fullstrength to defeat that policy. A line of action toward this end will be laid down at our convention," she said. Critical need of clothing for Russian civilians, especially warm garments for the approaching winter, is reported by Edward C. Carter, president of Russian War Relief, Inc., in a cablegram just received from Moscow* by the national headquarters of the agency in New York. Mr. Carter arrived in the Soviet capital a few days ago to survey relief needs, especially for the vast devastated areas already recaptured from the Nazi invaders in the Red army's continuing offensive. Over four million pounds of clothing were baled in Russian War Relief warehouses and shipped free in Russian boats to the Soviet Union during the first eight months of the year. Much of this clothing has already played an important part in out-; fitting civilians who were stripped of all their belongings, and in many cases driven from their homes, by the Nazis. Clothing may be left at local Russian War Relief headquarters, or at the national headquarters at 11 East 35th Street. NewYork 16. N. Y. BALEOBR WEEK IS TO BE OBSERVED DCT. 31 TD Washington. D. C— The period beginning Sunday, Oct. 31 and ending with Sabbath services on Friday evening. Nov. 5 and Saturday. Nov. 6. has been designated as Balfour Week in observance of the 6th anniversary of the issuance of the Balfour declaration, in a proclamation issued here this week by Dr. Israel Goldstein, president of the Zionist Organization of America. Declaring that the action of the American Jewish Conference in placing a United American Jewry behind the Zionist Program for the establishment of a Jewish Commonwealth in Palestine, gives to the forthcoming anniversary celebration a broader scope and meaning. Dr. Goldstein calls upon all Zionist Districts and units throughout the country to mark the event jointly with all groups and institutions in their respective communities that were represented in the Conference. SAFE IN SWEDEN IS PRESS REPORT Stockholm (JTA).—Approximately 6.000 of the 8,000 native and refugee Jews of Denmark have succeeded in reaching Sweden, it is reported in the Swedish press this week. Large numbers of Danish Jews 'nave entered the country during the last two days. Reinforcement of the Gestapo in Denmark will make the escape of more Jews practically impossible, the Stockholm newspaper Aftonbladet predicted this week. The Dagens Nyheter reports that two of the four "prison ships" on which the Nazis had confined about 1.400 Jews have left Copenhagen. It is not known how many of the 1,400 were aboard the two ships. A number of prominent Danish army officers, the Dagens Nyheter writes, have declined to accept release from an internment camp at Marieslyst in "protest against an official announcement connecting the release of Danish soldiers with the deportation of the Jews." Major General Gortz. commander-inchief of all the Danish armed forces, has given the Germans a. similar answer and has voluntarily remained in an internment camp at Elsinore. the paper adds. The Swedish radio, in a broadcast this week, reported that representatives of the coalition of five Danish parties had handed Werner Best, the German Minister in Denmark, a memorandum "sharply protesting the German measures against their fellowcitizens, the Jews. Buy War Bonds and Stamps to help preserve Democracy. PROTEST AGAINST ARMS TRIAL IS MADE IN CAPITOL Washington (WNS)—A memorandum protesting the manner in which the recent arms trial in Palestine was conducted, was presented here to the British Embassy here last week.



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FRIDAY. OCTOBER 22. 1943 + Jew 1st) n&ridlton PAGE THREE • i ~ 1W %  ^^^^ a -| | | | 1 J | J iru u u u u -^ r ^ r | ^-^-^ r ^ORGANIZATION ACTIVITIES 'u* ii %  •***** ^ | -_ i -_n_r i _ru-L_n^i _n_ri.n_n_n_ JE WISH CONGRESS Women's Division, American Jewish Congress, Greater Miami Chapter, will hold its annual installation luncheon on Monday, Oct. 25, 12:30 p. m., at the Versailles Hotel, 3425 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach. Mrs. Moses Krieger, Honorary President, will install officers for the coming season as follows: President, Mrs. S. H. Lutsky; vice presidents, Mrs. Louis Glasser, Mrs. A. E. Woolfe, and Mrs. B. Meyers; recording secretary, Mrs. Lillian Mills; corresponding secretary, Mrs. Harry Miller; financial secretary, Mrs. Theo. Firestone; treasurer, Mrs. Leo Meyer; auditor, Mrs. Sam Commander. Theme of the afternoon's program will be "The American Dream—Yesterday. Today, Tomorrow." Invocation will be delivered by Rabbi Irving Lehrman of the Miami Beach Jewish Center, and benediction by Rabbi Moses Mescheloff of Beth Jacob Congregation. Guest speaker will be Harold B. Matteson. Director of the Miami Round Table, National Conference of Christians and Jews. Mrs. Virginia Urban, pianist, will play, and Mrs. I. M. Weinstein will preside as toastmistress. The committee in charge of arrangements is headed by Mrs. Louis Glasser, and reservations may be made by calling 5-4460, 5-7731, and 5-3796. The American Jewish Congress, Women's Division, of which Mrs. Stephen S. Wise is national president, has a broad program of activity which includes among its projects a Commission on Economic Problems which seeks to eliminate prejudice and discrimination in business, industry and the professions; Commission on Legislation which combats anti-democratic forces, subversive propaganda, and discrimination because of race, color or religion; Commission on Interfaith Affairs which promotes better understanding of social problems common to all faiths; United Jewish War Effort which aims to unite all Jewry behind the war effort, maintain allied relief workrooms, send money, clothing and medical aid to Britain, Russia and China, and support the Congress Defense Houses for service men in New York City. NATIONAL COUNCIL An afternoon of pleasure and relaxation has been planned for members and friends of the National Council of Jewish Women, Miami Section, by Mrs Irving Kobley and Mrs. Stanley C. Myers, co-chairmen of the Ways and Means Committee of the Council. Plans call for a card party to be held Friday, Oct. 29, at 1:30, at the Y. M. and W. H. A.. 1 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach. Tickets are 75 cents and reservations are being taken by Mrs. Kobley. 5-7828, of by any of the following committee members: Mrs. Herman Wepman. Mrs. Anna Cohen, Mrs. Max Meisel, Mrs. Ben Turchin, Mrs. Merle Kolber, Mrs. Al Barmack and Mrs. Herman Levitt. BEACH Y.M.&W.H.A Pvt. Ben Levinson was chosen as director of the Y. M. and W. H. A. Players at at a meeting at the "Y." Officers elected for the group were Mrs. Gertrude' Marx, president; Sgt. Larry Levy, vice president; Miss Corinne Feuer, secretary-treasurer; Miss Thelma Schwartz, corresponding secretary. BETH JACOB Beth Jacob Sunday School session opens with registration this Sunday, Oct. 24, at 10 a. m. at the synagogue. The superintendent of the school is Malvina Weiss. SGT. HAL FISHER AND HIS 'Air Corps Caperers' IN A ONE-HOUR FLOOR SHOW AT THE 12th ANNUAL DANCE Sponsored by Miami Y. M. H. A. Tuesday Eve., Oct. 26,9 o'clock at the Coral Gables Country Club Music By CY WASHBURN AND HIS COUNTRY CLUB ORCHESTRA ADMISSION. INCLUDING TAX $ 1-10 CALL THE "Y" FOR TABLE RESERVATIONS OLD SARATOGA INN Buc.iync Boulcv.ud *t 77th Street Phone 7-77Z5 Dinners From 5 o'Clock Sundays From Noon ("ocktai! I.ounije Fine Liquors and Wines •4f nils II FROM DOWNTOWN MIAMI OR BUS M II FROM MIAMI BMCH OPEN EVERY DAY EXCEPT TUESDAY OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE IN FLORIDA KOSHER ZION SAUSAGE CO. PRODUCTS Delicious Corned Boof Pleklod, Cooked and Smoked Meats 87th and Normal Ave. Chloaf SCHAAREI ZEDEK Mrs. Max Mintzer and Mrs. Gorshon August will serve as hostesses for the card party this Sunday evening at the synagogue of the Ladies' Auxiliary of Congregation Shaarei Zedek. Proceeds will be used for the Talmud Torah. Seventy children attended the Succoth party given Sunday afternoon by the Ladies' Auxiliary of Congregation Shaarei Zedek. Mrs. Nat Blumberg and Mrs. Max Jacobskind were co-chairmen of the affair, held at the synagogue. Rabbi Simon April conducted the ceremonies. The regular meeting of the Ladies' Auxiliary will take place Wednesday, Oct. 27, at 2 p. m. in the synagogue. BETH DAVID Beth David Sisterhood will hold its monthly meeting on Wednesday, Oct. 27, at 2:30 p.m. at the Beth David Auditorium. The Sisterhood program for this season will be discussed and approved. Mr. William Kesselman, Director of Hillel activities at the University of Miami, will be guest speaker. He will discuss the subject, "University Life at the Campus." Miss Phyllis Schulman and Mrs. Joseph Schaffer will take part in the musical program. Refreshments will be served. A cordial invitation is extended to all members and friends by Mrs. Harry Oliphant. president. ARBEITER RING The Arbeiter Ring, Branch 692. of Greater Miami, inaugurated the season's program of cultural activities with Mr. Mandelman's lecture, held on Sunday, Oct. 10. His topic was Kidash Hashem, 'Past and Present." Some of the highlights of his lecture compared the Jews of old with the Jews of today, how the persecutions of the past 2,000 years are still going on today. This coming winter season the group is planning a series of lectures to be held at Lyceum Hall. 25 Washington Avenue. Miami Beach. Some of the prominent lecturers are Malech Epstein, representative of the Jewish Labor Committee; Chaim Weinreich, co-worker on the Jewish Forward; Poet H. Leivick and a concert by the well known artist. Masha Benia. soloist. Dates will be announced. Every Saturday night at Lyceum Hall, the soldiers of Miami Beach use the quarters for their own entertainment, holding dances, socials and other activities. Buy War Savings Bonds. WHEN NERVOUS HEADACHES PE5TER ME I FIND THAT MILES NERVINE HELPS NERVOUS TENSION TO RELAX <^?>v AND LEAVES ME *£& CALM,$ERENE W HEN Function*! Nervous Disturbances such as Sleeplessness, Crankiness, Excitability, Restlessness or Nervous H ea da c he interfere with your work or spoil your good times, take Dr. Miles Nervine (Liquid or Effervescent Tablet*) Nervous Tension can make yoa Wakeful, Jittery, Irritable. Nervous Tension can cause Nervous Headache and Nervous Indigestion. In times like these, we are more likely than usual to become overwrought and nervous and to wish for a good sedative. Dr. Miles Nervine is a good sedative —mild but effective. If you do not use Dr. M O— Nervine you can't know what it will do for you. It comes in Liquid and Effervescent Tablet form, both equally soothing to tense and over-wrought nerves. WHY DONT YOU TRY IT t. 'Get it at your drug store. Effervescent tablets 35* and 7f, Liquid 25* aad $140. Road directions and BOB only as directed. M. B. JEWISH CENTER Members of the Sisterhood of the Miami Beach Jewish Community installed officers and welcomed 40 new members into the Sisterhood at a meeting in the Center Monday evening. Mrs. Ben Marbach, chairman, extended greetings and Samuel Friedland, president of the Center, spoke. An address by Rabbi Irving Lehrman and a musical program by Evelyn Raff and Edith Freeman followed the ceremonies conducted by Mrs. Lehrman. wife of the rabbi. Mrs. Morris Rubin, honorary president, was on the program and Mrs. Joseph Rose was in charge of the membership committee. Chaplain of the Sisterhood is Mrs. Samuel Josepher. A social hour followed the ceremonies. BEACH ZIONIST The regular weekly session of the Zionist Cultural Forum will take place Sunday at the Y. M. and W. H. A., No. 1 Lincoln Road. The Forum will be held at its usual time, 3:30 p. m., and the subject chosen for discussion during the afternoon will "The Influence of Palestine on Jewish Culture." KENNEL CLUB NEARLY READY FOR OPENING Despite war-time conditions and a general curtailment in the number of racing greyhounds throughout the country West Flagler Kennel Club is rapidly completing its roster that already assures its patrons the nation's leading kennels and racers. This was announced by Jacob Sher, president, and William I. Huntley, vice president and general manager of the club that will have the earliest opening in the Florida racing season history, Nov. 15. U. OF M. FIFTH SEASON OF NOTED ORCHESTRA The University of Miami takes pleasure in announcing the 16th season of its Symphony Orchestra, 1943-44. The orchestra will be under the direction of Dr. Modeste Alloo, who won the praise and recognition of the press and audiences last year for his splendid performances. The concerts will again be given on Sunday afternoons at 4:15 at the Miami Senior High School Auditorium, 2400 West Flagler Street, Miami. The dates and noted soloists are: Nov. 14—Nathan Milstein. Dec. 12—Dusolini Giannini. Jan. 16—Raya Garbousova. Feb. 13—Efrem Zimbalist. March 12—Alexander Borovsky. April 16—"Oratorio" with full Symphony Orchestra chorus of 100 and a distinguished quartet. Season subscription tickets at $5.50. $6.60. $8.25, $9.90, including federal tax, may be had at the University of Miami Main Building, Room 129. The United States Government Having Taken Over His Present Offices— DR. JOSEPH B. MARGOUS announces the REMOVAL OF HIS OFFICE to 311 Lincoln Road Albion Bldg.. Suite 30* MIAMI BEACH For the Practice of General Dentistry PALM BEACH NOTES JEWISH FLORIDIAN OFFICE, 226 S. OLIVE STREET IN THE FOX BUILDING MRS. MARY SCHREBNICX HoproaontoHT* Scher Memorial Hall was the scene of a service men's dance with soldiers and Spars of the nearby bases attending. Beth Israel Sisterhood held a card party at Schwartzburg Hall. Residents of Belle Glade who spent the holidays in West Palm Beach included Mr. and Mrs. Joe Gold. Mr. and Mrs. J. Leo Rader. and Mr. and Mrs. Louis Weiman and son, David. Pfc. Joseph Schrebnick has been awarded the good conduct medal of the AAF Brookley Field, Mobile, Ala., where he is attached to the Air Service Command. —Buy War Savings Bonds— Miss Geraldine Halpern. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Halpern. 522 33rd Street, has been tapped for Spirogira honoi rary organization at the Florida State College for Women. A junior in standing, Miss Halpern is among four women students to be so honored. ALFAR COtAMERY CO, Far fee Boat fa Dairy Product* WEST PALM REACH KELT—CREAM— ICE CREAM SOUTHERN DAIRIES %  %  cm Palm Beach County, teatarla* fa* Matlonallv Famous Southern Dairies FBBducts and lea Cream. AS NEAR TO TOU AS TOUR PHOTS FERGUSON FUNERAL HOME, Inc. 1201 South Olive Avenue WEST PALM BEACH PHONE 5172 PALM BEACH BOTTLING WORKS INCORPORATED WEST PALM BEACH. FLORIDA Beverages of Quality Since 1920 LAINHART & POTTER ESTABLISHED 1893 BUILDING MATERIAL FOR PARTICULAR BUILDERS" Phone 5191 West Palm Beach. Fla.



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JAY. OCTOBER 22. 1943 Jewlsti rtcrkfian PAGE FIVE HE l-JJHFEIEICE By LOUIS HEIMAN Press Representative of The Jewish Floridian ["Shall the American Jewish Conference become srmanent organization?" This was one of the jlems which confronted it during its deliberat. Although the issue of permanency did not kg forth any fireworks on the floor of the Conferi, it was nevertheless the subject of heated dislions in the committees, in the bloc caucuses, among the delegates generally. [Some delegates who favored the Conference bemade a permanent organization argued that it gained the best brains and the outstanding leadip among American Jewry and, therefore, it Id be continued, ready at all times to act on behalf whenever the occasion arose. Some :ed the opinion that the delegates had been locratically elected, and were the proper perto speak permanently for and on our behalf. ie argued that the resolutions of the Conference to be implemented by further action, and this lired a permanent organization. Some deledesired a permanent chairman elected from br bloc, and there could be none unless the Conjnce was made permanent [On the other hand, most delegates were opto creating a permanent organization out of Conference. Many argued that the communiwhich elected the delegates were not foreled that they were choosing permanent deleHes, and it is conceivable that some different deleBtes would have been elected had this guestion pen before the communities when they were balBig. Others claimed that it was not democracy felect delegates to a conference, and then permit to constitute themselves a permanent organi>n. A very large segment of the delegates felt we already had enough Jewish organizations K~ America, so why create another one. Others claimed that the Conference, if created as a permanent organization, would duplicate the work of other Jewish organizations, unless the latter ceased to exist Others feared that the race for a permanent chairman would create disunity. Some wanted Henry Monsky, others wanted Dr. Stephen S. Wise, rr n rj there were other candidates for this high honor. It is a tribute to the spirit of unity existing among delegates that this issue was settled without fed discussions on the floor of the Conference, delegates argued long and loud, pro and con, fthe committees, where the issue of permanency debated. But when the problem came to the w, it was decided calmly and dispassionately, .Tersely to the contentions of those who desired ^permanent organization. It was decided to conle the Conference for one year, with another jting to be convened within that period, to allow implementation of the resolutions adopted. No Srmanent chairman was elected, but rather an aterim committee" was chosen, to be headed by praesidium of three. This "interim committee" toportionately represents all of the blocs formed at lie Conference. "United we stand, divided we fall is ,an old iage. History will record that in the year 1943, lerican Jewry kept this thought uppermost in their .uids through their deliberations at the American wish Conference, and emerged stronger and more etermined to take their role as the leaders of the .swish people throughout the world. The mantle f leadership has been cast upon our shoulders. le have accepted our responsibility. We shall lot fail! "The war is going better for us but this is no t/romise that we have victory in our grasp. There femcrins the strength of the Axis and this means tiat the war will probably be long and hard. Painil tragedy lies ahead for many in this country. But 7e have strong hopes. We have the greatest re-ources in the world, and we have brave and valiant lAlllea. In the words of the soldiers of 1918 and ot 1943, 'Let's Go'."—Robert P. Patterson, Under Secretary of War. "There should be no rule of thumb set up to hide [behind whenever any group requests time on the air. I The free radio can become a powerful instrument for the protection of freedom of opinion. Men must be guaranteed their right to express their opinions and ideas I t is also true that no relaxation m the pursuit of the freedom to listen can be allowed to take place when the war is over. Eternal vigilance and undeviating regard for this and comparable principles must be observed if we are to have a lasting peace R estriction, constriction and exclusion must give way to a broader and more democratic approach as to the persons the listening public may hear."—James Lawrence Fly. chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. II BIT OF EVERYTHING SPORTS — MUSIC FILM SPORTS See what you can do with the following sports questionnaire about Jewish athletes. Count ten for each one correct and don't look at the answers printed below until you've really tried to hit the mark. Ready, here goes: 1—He hit the heavyweight champ, Joe Louis, so hard, he knocked him head over heels right out of the ring. Who was he? 2—Nat Hohnan is tops as a basketball player, but he was famous in two other sports besides. Remember? 3—Tops as a high school football player, this kid released a bomb that blew a Jap battleship right into the laps of its ancestors. 4—Henry Greenberg used to play hookey in order to play ball. His mom called him a "bummer" because he used to do it What happened when he grew up? Now check your answers: 1—Buddy Baer knocked Louis through the ropes with a right smash to the jaw in their fight in Washington in June, 1941. 2—Holman won fame as a soccer player and was offered a fabulous contract with the Cincy Reds to pitch for them in 1919. 3—Meyer Levin. 4—Hank Greenberg (now Captain U. S. Army Air Corps) grew up to be the highest paid baseball player when the Detroit Tigers paid him $55,000 for the 1940 season. FILM The Hollywood Bondadiers returned to town travel-begrimed but happy. In their eleven thousand mile trek from coast to coast, they sold over one billion dollars worth of bonds, more than doubling the guota set for them by Secretary Morgenthau. While certain isolationist playboys continue to take wrathful snaps at Filmdom and other big industries blazon double-page spreads in national magazines about the great things they are doing for Victory Hollywood, like OF Man River, just keeps goin' along doing its best as it sees it. And all the McCormick, FicUer, et al, braying to the contrary, the greatest morale force in the Armed Service is Hollywood movies. The numerous spontaneous letters of appreciation from the boys themselves are proof sufficient. Those world-famous men of letters residing in Southern California refugees from Hitler's hate were invited to a "Premiere-in-Exile" of "Watch on the Rhine." Among those present were Franz Werfel, Bruno Frank, Emil Ludwig, Lion Feuchtwanger, Thomas and Heinrich Mann. Tradepaper Film Daily reports that one afternoon its staff was listening to a news broadcast when the name of Heinrich Himmler issued from the loudspeaker. Simultaneously a worm crawled out of the radio's innards—visible transmutation of a Nazi soul! It was gingerly transported to the window and dropped—from the 24th floor. Sol Lesser will present a check for one million dollars to the New York Stage Door Canteen as the first instalment of its earnings from the film of that name. Warners will do likewise for the Hollywood Canteen • have already paid $250,000 for the screen rights to its name and agreed to give the organization 40 per cent of the profits from the picture. MUSIC Jacgues Abram, one of the most brilliant young pianists in America, has been transferred to Stewart Field, N. YBecause of the nature of his Army duties during the last year it has not been possible for Abram to make any public appearances. His transfer, however, gives hope that he will soon be heard again. While at Camp Dix, N. J., he played for wounded soldiers from the Mediterranean area. Miriam Solovieff, San Francisco-born violinist, gives her New York recital in Town Hall Oct. 22. Miss Solovieff has what amounts to an Army career in addition to her career in music. Her husband, William Rubin, is an infantry lieutenant, and she has gone with him through desert maneuvers. According to word from Columbia Concerts, Jascha Heifetz has spent a busy Summer at Harbor Island, QalCarrots, beets, onions, lettuce, cabbage and beans were raised "by the hands of Heifetz himself" as the awed release puts it. In addition, he is a Civilian Defense Corps warden, helps the police, takes his turn as an airplane spotter and is general handyman around his house since his hired man left for a job in a war plant BETWEEN 101 AND ME BY BORIS SMOLAR Copyright, 1943, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc. Watch on Cairo: The discussions which are now taking place in Cairo on the guestion of the establishment of a Pan-Arab Federation are being closely watched by five interested parties These are Britain, the United States, Soviet Russia, Turkey and the Jews Each of these five has a different attitude toward the formation of a Pan-Arab Federation which is to include Palestine • The British Foreign Office is not only anxious to see such a Federation formed, but is doing its utmost to see it established in order to have it function under British influence The United States is similarly not adverse to the Pan-Arab Federation idea, because of the new interests which America is now acquiring in Arabia ... In fact, the talks in Cairo are not without American approval Soviet Russia is looking with suspicion toward the possible formation of the projected Pan-Arab Federation, because the Arabs have, in this war, proven themselves pro-Nazi and pro-Fascist until they realized that Hitler no longer had any chance for victory Turkey is definitely opposed to the Pan-Arab Federation idea, because she does not want merged Arab forces as her neighbor The attitude of the Jews is that Palestine must first be proclaimed a Jewish Commonwealth, then there will be no Jewish opposition to its entering the projected Pan-Arab Federation under certain conditions • With Palestine being the back door to Soviet Russia in the present war and in any other war that may come, it is no wonder that Ivan Maisky, the Soviet vicecommissar for Foreign Affairs, has gone out of his way to visit the Jewish settlements there and to confer with Ben-Gurion and other Jewish leaders ... Ordinarily, these Jewish leaders were on the black list in Moscow, and it is questionable whether they would get a Soviet visa even today What tomorrow may bring is, however, a different story... All indications point to the fact that Russia may be inclined to exercise great influence in favor of a Jewish Palestine during the forthcoming peace discussions. London and Washington: Dr. Chaim Weizmann is now a very disappointed man He has been attempting to see Churchill ever since his return from the United States, and has so far not succeeded Disappointed also cue the several hundred rabbis who, misguided by certain elements, proceeded to Washington to petition Roosevelt on the Jews in Europe, but were completely ignored by the President, who preferred not to see them... This will, perhaps, serve as a lesson to others who think that the Jews of Europe can be saved by mere publicity tricks Speaking of DrWeizmann, we are asked by Meyer Weisgal to draw the attention of editors to the fact that Dr. Weizmann will reach his 69th, not his 70th, birthday in November of this year DrWeizmann will not be 70 before Novem 27th of next year ... A mistake concerning his birthday crept into the press ten years ago when the Juedische Rundschau, Zionist organ in Germany, published a special edition' in 1933 in honor of Dr. Weizmann's reaching 60 years of age •.. Dr. Weizmann himself then drew attention to the fact that he is a year younger Yet editors in America are now asking for data on Weizmann, being under the erroneous impression that his 70th birthday is next month. Two Tesumoniee: The best novel I have ever read picturing the plight of refugees is "The Trespassers," by Laura Z. Hobson, published by Simon and Schuster • Here is a novel that every legislator in the United States should read in order to realize what is wrong with the bureaucratic American consular service abroad ... It is full of human understanding and deep sympathy for the victims of the Nazi regime who seek to break through the many barriers of the immigration laws ... It pictures the American consuls in Europe not in the best light and shows the stupidity of our consular officials in deciding the fate of European scientists and others who apply for visas to America Though the characters in Miss Hobson's book may be fictitious, the situations described there are all based on actual facts Many of them I witnessed myself Extremely well written, the book makes fascinating reading despite its gloomy social aspect. Another recent book on refugee life worth reading is "Survival" by Phyllis Bottome, published by Little, Brown. The central figure in this book is a noted Vienna psychiatrist who, because of his Jewish origin, must flee from Austria after being repudiated by his "Aryan" wife, who deserts him taking their child with her. Heartbroken and a ghost of a man, he reaches England where he starts life anew after overcoming the formalities which forbid him to practice The book is written on a psycho-analytical basis with observations which tend to emphasize Freud's theory of psycho-analysis.


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PAGE TWO *Jenisi fhrkKan raiDAY^CTOBER ft W W^WW^WWW^^W^%lw^ww SOCIAL ITEMS AND PERSONALS of their plants in Lawrence. Kan. The wedding will take place Nov. 7 at the home of the brideelect's parents. Pvt. Leo Machtei left Tuesday to return to Ft. Jay after having .spent a short furlough with his family. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Adelman. Savannah, Ga., are spending a week in the city as the guests of his parents. Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Adelman, 1421 N. W. First Street. After spending a month in Orlando with her children, Lieut. ;snd Mrs. Paul Pollock. Mrs. Heiman Trackman is now visiting her brother and sister. Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Kopelowitz. Lieut. Pollock is a "Navidier" or "Bombagtaor," wearing the wings of both bombardier and navigator, having been trained at Sequoia Field. Cai.. Santa Ana. Cal., Williams Field. Ariz., and Monroe. La. Mrs. Pollock, formerly Shirley Ruth Trackman was a frequent winter visitor in Miami. William Taradash has returned from a summer visit with his son, Daniel Taradash. at Astoria. Long Island. N. Y. He lives at 5225 Collins Avenue. Miami Beach. and attended the University of Florida. He is a former resident of Louisville, Ky. Mr. and Mrs. Donald LaVigne announce the approaching marriage of their daughter, Miss Gladys Ruth LaVigne to Lt. Myron J. Cowen. USMCR, at Temple Israel, 137 N. E. 19th Street, Sunday, Oct. 24, at 4 p. m. Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan will officiate. No formal invitations have been sent out. All relatives and friends are invited to attend the ceremony and reception to follow. Miss Shana Levinsohn, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Levinsohn. 978 N. W. Second Street, was married Saturday evening, Oct 16. to Cpl. Jack Ozark at the home of Rabbi Max Shapiro. The bride and groom are artists and were formerly connected with Fleisher Studios. After a short honeymoon, the groom will return to the Arctic where he is stationed and the bride will make her home with her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Myron Miller. 1636 S. W. 19th Street, announce the approaching marriage of their daughter, Doris, to Sol Alexander, son of Nathan Alexander. 1756 N. W. 16th Street, for this coming Sunday, Oct. 24. Miss Dorothy Pepper will be maid of honor, and Mrs. Bernard BAR MITZVAH The Bar Mitzvah of Burton Aronson will take place Saturday morning at Beth Jacob Congregation, Miami Beach. The confirmant will deliver a message after the reading of the Torah and Rabbi Moses Mescheloff will respond. TO TENDER RECEPTION TO DR. AND MRS. M. A. LIPKIND Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Rubin and daughter, Eleanor, of the Beach Park Hotel. Miami Beach, returned Friday from an extended visit in Boston. Mass. Isaac Gold returned from a summer vacation spent in New York City. Mrs. Harry Glickstein. 317 Mencioza Ave. Coral Gables, has reK-ntly returned from a lengthy visit to her daughter and family and relatives in New Haven. Ct. She spent some time with her sons and families in Chicago, 111., where she also visited with her son. Dr. Leonard M. Glickstein, before he left for Camp McCoy, Wis. ENGAGEMENT The engagement of Miss Suzanne Davis, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Davis, of 750 Jefferson Avenue, Miami Beach, to Pfc. Isadore Ratthaus. U. S. A. Air Force, son of Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Ratthaus. of 605 Meridian Avenue, was announced at a dinner party given by the parents of the bride-elect at their home this week. MISS DORIS MILLER BRITH j Rabbi S M. Machtei officiated ; at the Brith Milah of the son of Mr. and Mrs. Perry Marks. 2328 S. W. Fourth Street, on Thursday at the University Hospital. WEDDINGS Mr. Meyer Kaplan and Mrs. Anna Ethel Simons were united in marriage by Rabbi S. M. Machtei. on Sunday afternoon, at 1020 Euclid Avenue, Miami Beach. Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bulbin of 1269 S. W. Fifth Street announce the engagement and forthcoming marriage of their son. Fred, to Miss Maxine Spigel, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Spigel, of Roanoke. Va. Miss Spigel is a graduate of Jefferson High School of Roanoke. Va.. and of Northwestern University of Chicago, 111. She attended the Fagin School of Dramatic Art in New York, and appeared with the Barter Theater Players in several productions. She has been active in radio and local theatricals in her home city of Roanoke. Va. Mr. Bulbin is a chemical engineer and a graduate of Miami Senior High School, also of Georgia School of Technology. He is a member of Phi Epsilon Pi and Phi Eta Sigman fraternities, and also a member of Temple Israel. He is at present connected with the Hercules Powder Co. at one The marriage Sept. 22 in San Antonio, Tex., of Miss Phvllis Berman and Aviation Cadet Murrel Kastan. U. S. A., is being announced by her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Louis Berman, 112 Ocean i Drive, Miami Beach. The former Miss Berman was graduated from Miami Beach i High School. Cadet Kastan. a son of Mrs. Bertha Kastan. 1126 Ocean Drive, Miami Beach, was graduated from the same school Take Your Watch to Danzig's! 7^ -v £%% SMALLEST WAT ZFE^-E: -_ > Delicate, mall. Intricate %  W urs are handled br %  with understandsag car* and iklli. JIWELXY RIPAIRING DANZIG'S JEWELERS :J6 HALCYON ARCADE 15 f FUalcc S 1H THEATRE S.W. 8th St. at 15th AT*. OPEN AT 1:45 P. M. Fri., Oct. 22nd—Last Day // // GALS, INC. WITH LEON ERROL GRACE MCDONALD EXTRA!! "EUROPE'S CROSSROADS'* in the latest issue of "MARCH OF TIME" •& %  & Starts Sat. at 4:30 P. M. and Sun., Thru Tues., Oct. 23-26 // WE'VE NEVER BEEN LICKED WITH RICHARD QUINE NOAH BERRY. JR. ANNE GWYNNE MARTHA OT>RISCOLL // Greenstein, sister of the brideelect, matron of honor. Rabbi Max Shapiro will perform the ceremony. Miss Miller is a graduate of Miami High School and a member of the B'nai B'rith Girls. Mr. Alexander, graduate of the same school, also was graduated from the University of Florida where he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Phi Kappa Phi. national honorary fraternities. He was chancellor of Tau Epsilon Phi. social fraternity. The couple plan to make their home in Miami. A group of Miami Beach residents active in the Miami Beach Zionist District, have announced plans for a reception to be tendered to Dr. and Mrs. M. A. Lipkind on the occasion of their 40th wedding anniversary to be observed October 31st. Dr. Lipkind is a life-long Zionist and his achievements have been long respected by the National office. Since retirement, he has devoted his time and talents to Zionist and cultural activities in this community. A strong believer in the Jewish National Fund, he is J.N.F. chairman of the Miami Beach Zionist District. This group interested in fittingly celebrating the occasion, with the belief that the Lipkinds would be pleased to know that their happiness meant a measure of hope for some poor European refugee, are suggesting that friends and well wishers celebrate this anniversary with the Lipkinds by gifts of land and trees, bought in their honor in Eretz Yisroel. A tree costs $1.50. a quarter acre of land (dunam) $25. This committee will receive gifts of this nature and translate them into the measure of land or number of trees and at the reception present a record of all such purchases to the Lipkinds. The treasurer of this special purpose is Leo Robinson. 420 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach. LOCAL YOOTHu^; Zadik Aleph j ,L O! 1 IM Mr. and Mrs. Asrial R i ? n of 1533S.W. Third street ^f k ^ named as one ttitamZZ* for the international'&* of the Junior B'nai B'S> throughout the United "SS? Canada and England Stat Active in youth artu.i.this area. Mr SakowiS M 0[ dent of the MiaiK 322 S of A. Z. A., pre.dit apter state of Florida A Z A 1 th president of the Greater M* loa operation with requests hi ,t ODT. Final result! of the'eft tions and awards will gL"£ nounced some tim e in November New York (WNS)—B'nai Brith Lodge No. 1, the parent lodge of the national Jewish fraternal order, observed the 100th anniversary of the Lodge here this week. WANTED Middle Aged Widow dtiim room and board (breakfut tad dinner) with refined fanU? IS pj,r ^ mbo t $7S %  38 Address Mrs. D.. c/o P. o Bn 2973. Miami 18. Florida. ***L CrTATE—MIAMI BtACB B. E. BRONSTON, Realtor 605 Lincoln Road Ph. 5-5868 A Trustworthy Real Estate Servict Ask for Free 1943 Descriptive Map of Mis ml Beach RENTALS LEASES • SALES Lots, Homes. Hotels Apartment Houses M. GILLER Reg. Real Estate Broker Ph. 58 1188 523 Mich. An. INSURE IN SURE ASSURANCE THE SENSIBLE FARSIGHTED INDIVIDUAL provides today the assurance for tomorrow and the years ahead. ASSURANCE IS INVESTING WISELY and soundly to GUtmJfc a11 he needs of the Y*" 113 ah ^ d • • • NEEDS that include Home — Education — Communal Endeavor — Emergencies — Illness — Retirement, and the Inevitable—Death. Be Prepared that when the time comes you are not bothered in vour ^Sn^wa^l^A^ 4 *^IS2E? and y the £=,.;.,.? y to kcep the entire farm y together forever is bv Mount C Wn Pnvate fami 'y P lot And having yoJr plot in N W B P £rVr^ t0 !" leC l a family P lot in Mount Nebo Cemeteryetusixaae c emetery u dedicated Sw For further information with no obligation, phone 3-5132 Florida's Most Beautiful Burial Estates MOUNT NEBO ONLY TEN MINUTES FROM THE HEART OF MIAMI West Flagler Street at S4th Avenue BUSINESS OFFICE WM OLYMPIA BUILDING A VISIT WILL CONVINCE YOU L —r



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PAGE EIGHT vjewlst ncrkMar i 4 ,• I^WWWWV THE Y. M. H. A. NOTES By HARRY SCHWARTZ • "Y" Opens Fall Activities Program The first program of the Fall Activities for Adults took place last Sunday at the "Y," when a crowd of over four hundred people witnessed the Membership Rally, followed by an evening of excellent entertainment furnished by the Special Service Department of the Army Air Corps. The meeting was opened by Leo Ackerman. President, and was followed with a report by George Chertkof, Chairman of the Board, who outlined the "Y" program. D. C. Willner, Chairman of the Cultural and Entertainment Committee, spoke on the activitii s ol thai group. He stated that the committee had prepared a program consisting of forums for Wednesday nights, ;i irse in Jewish history by the binical Assocation. and three :ial events with out-of-town artists The highlight of the evening was the presentation of a cup donated i.\ George Wolpert, to the >n procuring the highest number of individual memberin the recent campaign. This covhonor was w S B Milli i who procured 50 membt i Alter the meeting refreshments >. i'\i d es ol the Y. W. H. A. Youth Rally Oct. 31 Al a mi of the Youth Activities Committee on Sunday mi rning, it was decided to • a Field Day on Sunday. Oct. 31. Luncheon will be served at noon and the affair will be concluded with a dance. The fee is only 25 cents per person, which includes everything. The program is as follows: 10 to 10:30. Registration: 10:30 to 11:30. Basketball (first round): 12 to 1:30. Luncheon, which will include an interesting program; 1:30 to 2:30. Tournaments: (a) Ping Pong, (b) Horseshoe Pitching, (c) Handball: 2:30 to 3:30. open Forum: George Chertkof. Chairman of the Board of the Y. M. H. A., will act as Moderator; 3:30 to 4.30. Delegates' Meeting; 3*0 to 4:30 Girls Volleyball; 4:30 to 5:30. All Finals; 8:30 "til Dancing and F.ntcrtain. Orchestra Children's Classes Children'.dancing classes will i begin Monday, Oct. 25. at 3:30! p. m. at the "Y All mothers interested are requested to come; with their children at that I Miss Audrey Floyd. OUT dancing teacher, will be present and will organize classes at that tune. Spanish Classes isses in Conversational Spanish will take place Mondav night, I %  25, at T 30 o'clock. All persons interested are requested to be here at that time. Mrs Emma Moffet will organize the groups. WV^^^ HAT HEN HERE (Till* column Id OOUdUOUd by the Greater Miami Jewish F .1.1 atlon In Deration with Thr Jewish Floridian as a i-iimmunlty mrvlce. '!<' inrorrn the community i.f your ..iKanlsntlon s activities and to avoid .onfiirts in dates, phone I-S411 and art 101 "Community Calendai Notification muil reach Federation no later than I" .. ilny fur pulilleallKti tliut week) Mon.. Oct. 25. Women's Division American Jewish Conj gross, annual installation luncheon at Versailles Hotel. Miami Beach. 12:30 p. m. B'nai B'rith Retention Committee, dinner meeting. Royal Center. Hadassah. board meeting, evening. Tues.. Oct. 26. 12th Annual dance. Miami Y.M.H.A at Coral Gables Country Club. Wed.. Oct. 27. Beth David Sisterhood, regular meeting, Beth David Auditorium. 2:30 p. in.: Jewish Education Association. COmmunity-Wide meeting. Beach Y.M.&W.H.A. 8:15 p. m.; Work rnens 1 Circle executive meeting, 25 Washington Ave., 8:30 p. m. Fri.. O c t. 29. National Council Jewish Women, bl idle and Mah J.un:.;. Beach Y.M.&W.H.A. 1:30 p, m ---—-----———-"" i i -e II I v A B'NAI B'RI TH NOTES mum w Bv PAUL WEITZMAN ^AAAAAAAAAMWMtMMM The last meeting of Sholem Lodge No. 1024 B'nai B'rith brought out a capacity attendance and at the same time the Ladies 'Auxiliary held one of its largest meetings in a long time. needed equipment to th P i Services Division. 'Having learned that th, of entertainers a i ,w *l HYMAN MORRIS NAMED LEADER FOR TROOP 6 RADIO HOUR Rabbi Simon April of Congregation Schaarei Zedek will bethe guest speaker on the Rabbinii a iation Hour at Id a m. Sunlaj ver station WQAM Hyman Morns has assumed the duties "i Scoutmaster of Troop 6. Boy Scouts of America, replacing Alfred Kahn. now residing in Pennsylvania. The troop, a project of the Miami Y. M. H. A., is now reorganizing its four patrols tO fit local needs A good buy is a War Bond. Buy now and vou will be paid later —S4.00 for every $3.00. THEY CREATED The Beach "Y,' where the meetings were held, offered its facilities to B'nai B'rith for the evening. A report on A. D. L. activities was made by Alex F. Miller. Florida Regional Director, who introduced Arnold Forster of the Eastern Regional Office of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith. Mr. Foster addressed the audience and stressed the need for constant vigilance and assist ance in combating anti-Semitism. which has not abated, but which has been driven underground in company With other subversive groups New members admitted to the B'nai B'rith organization at this meeting included William Kesselman. Hillel Director at the University of Miami, who demittcd to Sholem Lodge; Albert Frischman, Hyman Enncrfield. Morris Snyder. Charles Resnick and Aaron Sussman. Jack Marash. Executive Director ol the Y. M. & W. H. A. of Miami Beach, was introduced to the membership Of Sholem Lodge and invited the members to return to the "Y" often. Membership Retention With an active committee at .".oik. "members in good standing'' increased from 643 at the last writing to 695 by the collection of delinquent dues. On Mon,nc day evening at 7 o'clock the comi the mittee will meet at the Clover Club for a dinner meeting at which time further plans will be discussed to achieve the goal set by Louis Heiman. President— 1.000 members in good standing by the end of 1943. Members can co-operate by paying then dues. Army Corps Caperers I i Special Services Division entertained members and ladies ol B'nai B'rith and their friends the Air Corps Capen i Civilianare urged to do this. thai and thi other thing to keep up the morah ol men m service Tie "Caperers" not only keep up the morale of their fellows in service, but add to commuentertainment by their an: B'rith and many other organizations are indebted to thi Special Services Division. ed by Major Early, for the splendid entertainment supplied. : mindful ol the old provthat it is mole blessed to give than receive—although not intended in the original sense, the giving ol charity—Sholem Lodge' ianxious to reciprocate in some measure for the immeasurable: entretainment supplied by the i A i Coi pi Caperers to members of B'nai B'rith and other organij zations by supplying some much -iners are handicapped by lack phone and portable of ampljj equipment. Sholem undertaken the pleasaTL' raising funds to %  pS** equipment In ordTf enjoy in the future, iti S the entertainment so vided. It's a cycle, yooifl At some tin,, ln ,h e -J ture an affair will ben.1 that Specific puipose-tnajL reception the Air Corps CtaJI receive is any indicatk popularity. • Oct. 13—100 Years of Bnii] Although war condition; eluded elaborate celebrata! the 100th anniversary dl founding of B'nai B'rith fei niversary did not pass | notice. Editorials were by local newspapers and programs commemorated tail casion. Alex F. Miller, beaiil the A. D. L. office played att. portant part in obtaining saj In a half-hour program. J for by George Goldbert J A. Z. A. and B'nai B'rith ial put on a skit on WFTL dep;-ij 100 years of progress in Bal B'rith. with an address by M ton Friedman. W10D featal an interview on Leslie B. BJ-1 radio time, with Rabbi Sr.a| explaining the part B'nai Br played in the unification i; a Jewish people. WKAT oral Miami Round Table. J..| 100th anniversary of fa I B'rith was appropriately K&| memorated. Greater Miami Takes Wist: Place in Third War Lot Greater Miami took matin in a tally from all mac country in the sale of Vfetaa through B'nai B'rith withttitt.725. the nity tics, local 'DRIWK PLENTY OF "litre \Wata DELIVERED TO rOUR HOME a-GaLLQK BOTTLE CASE OF SIX TABLE BOTTLES 5 Plus Bo tin Deposit PHONE 6 2-4128 '\ THREE O'CLOCK AND I HAVEN'T SLEPT A WINK* WAKEFUL NIGHTS —how the time jggj Minutes seem like hours, we worry .V* ~~Z done and left undone. After such a night. ""IJ, up in the morning more tired than when w* *j"j to bed. Nervous Tension causes many a w" night and wakeful nights are likely to cause vous Tension. Next time you feel Nervous %  £ Keyed Up or begin to toss, tumble and worry •"you get to bed —try ,nnit %  Twelve Founding Fathers of B'nai B'rith—These Dhotos of fh. m „„ October 13. 1943 have never before been ftibSSi^Twa^^SL^JSS^ Bnai B r,th !" > Anspacher; 3. Reuben Rodacher. died in 1886; 4 Valentin. K^'^ 2W ,n 189,: 2 Henry Schafer; 6. Michael Schwab, died in 1899; 7. Henry S2 DS.I ^ J" ,889; S Samu tary. died in 1866; 8. Isaac Dittenhoofer. first president d1ed P in I860f U ? de D nd iint cre whose store first plans were laid for B'nai B P rith. died in 1894 1FLS. H~h. R i'7 lbou ^ h m the founders and great-grandfather of Lester Sherrick oresid-ni f N 1 iuf h V la,t ur !" r of in 1909; Henry Kling. died in 1885; 12. Hirsch Heinrnan f N r£ lk Lod ** ta 19 died DR. MILES NERVINE (Liquid or Effervescent Tablets) ..elp to ease Nervous Tension — to P'S"^ BTMSEJ terf Wh ^_y, ou • Keri UP, Cranky. Fidgety, W*efuLl£ Ur. Mile, Nervine. Try it for Nervous liMKUdse and Nervous I u ** • ^-Miles Nervine at yoisr drug store. Effervescent TsbleU.£J 75#. SmaH Package 35; UquW. Large BotUe 91.M, Sn^Jf^ eouaUy effective „ JSM**, both gwsntoed to ey back. R#H riir^..„_. i i! .. jir^-ted. Get Dr. Miles Nerv Package *' 25#, both your money back. ——— -. Ma* a mcu n**d directions MODERATE COSTS ALWAYS WITHIN THE MEANS OF INDIVIDUAL CIRCUMSTANCES GOR v?£ N F U N E R A L HOME WORTHY AND DESERVES YOUR FULL SUPPORT AND RECOMMENDATION f. %  *——*



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LY. OCTOBER 22. 1943 vJewlsMcrMian PAGE SEVEN 1 LOCAL BOYS iRMED SERVICE ation Cadet Ira Seleyan. son and Mrs. A. Selevan. 1672 >n Avenue, Miami Beach, Completed his pre-flight in the Army Air Forces twell Field and now is taklic flights training at Bainr, Ga. Cadet Selevan was a student at the University imi and entered the service 124, 1942. Barney Sirota. formerly of [Pennsylvania Avenue, Mileach, is now at the Ord: e Replacement Training IT, Aberdeen Proving id. Md. ^ry S. Kaplan, son of A. N. in, 2952 South Miami Ave[is now attending the Naval n Midshipmen's School at Jniversity of Notre Dame, taking a month of induction he will be appointed a lipman and upon successful petion of the three-months' will be commissioned an in the Naval Reserve. 3/c Irwin Berger. USNR. bf Mr. and Mrs. Abe Berger, [S. W. Fourth Street, will arthe city Saturday to spend jfht-day leave. Petty officer sr is stationed at the Melii\ Fla., Naval Air Base, he is a gunnery instructor. Zohn, son of Mrs. Sophie 922 S. W. Third Street. lated last week from the Bkl Aviation Machinist School Be Jacksonville Air Station. ^p receiving his diploma sl/c ^k was transferred to the SanDrd, Fla.. base. Bkmong Miamians given temry promotions in the army _iunced by the War Departa t in Washington were: Isadora Jerry Jarin, Dental Corps, 112 Biscayne Street, Miami lach, promoted temporarily %  m first lieutenant to captain, Aaron Bank, infantry, of jfiidian Creek Drive, Miami Bh, promoted temporarily [second lieutenant to' first lieutenant. jfc-tha Breskin, WAC, of 860 B. 74th Street, was promoted ^orarily from second lieutenfirst lieutenant. ition Cadet Arthur D. son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank 1600 Meridian Avenue, li Beach, is now receiving basic flight training at the iy air field at Bainbridge, He is a former student at University of Miami where is a member of the Phi EpPi fraternity. He became [aviation cadet Feb. 25, 1943. ic Isadora Ratthaui, AAF, is ending a 10-day furlough with parents, Mr. and Mrs. Aaron tthaus, 650 Meridian Avenue, ami Beach. He has been at fry Field in Denver, where he Ok training in the Norden bomb and the Holliwell automatic 5t. Ratthaus wears the inrted blue triangle with a gold on it signifying Norden lb sight work, and silver igs designating his flying time. Cadet Harold S. Bamj. son of Norman Bamberg, Alton Road, Miami Beach, ^s reported for duty at the AAF Dmbardier School at Carlsbad, M.. where he will study adInced high-level bombard iering 3d dead-reckoning navigation. |e received his pre-flight trainat Santa Ana, Cal., and will te an 18-week course. Upon i %  .'iuation. he will be awarded Is silver wings and a commism as a second lieutenant or an ppointment as flight officer. Dr. Leonard M. Gli c kstein, of 17 Mendoza Ave., Coral Gables, Dn of Mr. and Mrs. Harry GlickJtem, is now a Private assigned p the clinic, where he is busy living aid and relief at Camp IcCoy, Wis. Lt Arthur Minsky. 25. of Brooklyn, is the recipient of the Distinguished Flying Cross and he Air Medal. Now home on Mve, Lieutenant Minsky put in W hours of operational flight missions in the Southwest Pacific [jea. In uniform two years, Minsky is a graduate of New Jtrecht High School and the Jniversity of Alabama. GREATER MIAMI ARMY-NAVY COMMITTEE Of The Jewish Welfare Board A COMMUNITY PROJECT Help Ui Keep a Record of Our Men in Service w r\ r\ % T PARADE! Capt. Everett A. EUenberg. 27, of Astoria, L. I., flight leader of a squadron of Liberators, holds the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal. Back in February, Captain (then lieutenant) Eisenberg, at the controls of a Liberator, was participating in the air battle over Jap-held AmbonIsland near New Guinea. Suddenly he found himself the target of three Zeros. His gunners set one afire with a short burst, shot away the controls of the second and sent it crashing, and drove away the third. In addition, his squadron sank a 10,000-ton Jap merchant ship. Later Eisenberg was cited by General MacArthur for "meritorious achievement." Captain Eisenberg, in service two years, has been in the thick of the New Guinea fighting since last October. He is a graduate of Harvard Law School. Lt. Samuel Jacobson, 23, of Kiamesha Lake, N Y., a navigator in the Ferry Command, has been reported missing in action, probably in the North African theatre. A graduate of Eastern District High School in Brooklyn, Lieutenant Jacobson was a student at Columbia University prior to his induction into the Air Corps two years ago. Cpl. Siegfried. 29, of Los Angeles, a member of an infantry medical detachment, lost his life in battle on Guadalcanal. A native of Germany, he came to this country in 1938. He was in the service one year and was expecting to receive his naturalization papers at the time of his death. He has been posthumously awarded the Purple Heart. Lt. Arthur D. Karp. 26. of New York City, who flew a damaged bomber to the target are and back to his base, has been decorated with the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Air Medal and Oak Leaf Cluster. Piloting a heavy bombardment plane on a combat mission in China some months ago. Lieutenant Karp had an unavoidable mishap on taking off. the plane hitting an obstruction. A student at New York University and a sales manager in civilian life, Karp has been in service two years and has been seeing active duty in the ChinaBurma-India areas. Lt. Morton Sher. 22, of Greenville, S. C, an army airman serving in the Asiatic area, has been killed in action. Entering the service two and a half years ago, Lieut. Sher became a member of the now legendary Flying Tigers. He is mentioned several times in Col. Scott's widely-read book, "God is My Co-Pilot." The Chinese among whom he landed had never seen a white man, but were friendly to him and were entranced by his singing of the Star Spangled Banner and Alabama University songs. He was a charter member of Aleph Zadik Aleph. By HARRY SIMONS Some 3,000 years ago Moses handed the world a magna charta in 10 chapters, known as the decalogue. With the passing of time and periods of condensation the decalogue also came in for its share, and in 1942 somewhere on the Atlantic, the philosophy of the Ten Commandments was transposed into four chapters, known as the "Four Freedoms." With further passing of time the four freedoms may be reduced to one: "Freedom of Religion." When this freedom is universally established and practiced, the other three will be a matter of course and will be well taken care of. The wise planners of the present combat against the destruction of the sinews of civilization are fortifying themselves with a weapon that has never been conquered—the perpetuity of religion according to one's own choosing. The armed forces are organized as never before to preserve that philosophy. Every military camp is well manned with efficient spiritual leaders of the three prominent religious groups, and each chaplain receives utmost co-operation in carrying out the religious program of his faith, equal only to the combat branches of the forces on the front line. This was exemplified at Camp Gordon. Ga., recently, where the writer had the privilege of witnessing one of the oldest covenants made by Moses and his people, "The Bris Milah" or "Circumcision," on a child born in the camp hospital to a wife of an officer of that camp. The services were conducted by Lieut. H. Skidelsky, Jewish chaplain of the camp, a young man of orthodox faith on leave of absence for the duration from his synagogue in New York. He was assisted by Cpl. Baum, a Jewish scholar of New York City. The services, ceremonies WAR] RECORDS COMMITTEE NAT ROTH, Chairman FRED SHOCHET MRS. GEORGE M. COHEN MAURICE GROSSMAN JENNIE H. ROTFORT NATHAN ROTHBERQ J. W. B. Director OFFICERS SAM BLANK, CHAIRMAN MONTE SELIQ. Vice-Chairman JOSEPH A. BERMAN, See. Executive Committee Mra. Waltar Bronaton, Mra. Max Dobrln, Maurice Oroaaman. Leula Helmin, Or. Jacob H. Kaplan, Mra. Murry Kovan, Harry Markowitz. Nat Roth, Fred Shochat, Milton Sirkin, Joaaph Stain. Mra. Herman Wallach, Carl Walnkle. George Wolpert. and the surgical operation were performed in accordance with the "Bris Milah" laws prescribed in the "Shulchan Oruch," the official code for such ceremony. The physical part of the ceremony was performed by Rev. Mohel Funk, a middle-aged gentleman, a native of Trieste, Austria, who came to this country on the SS. Volkania on its last peace-time voyage, previous to Austria entering into the war. Since then the Volkania joined its sister ships on the bottom of the sea. In spirit of co-ope/ation by the Augusta Jewish community, the services of a "Mohel" is furnished free to children of parents in military service. The most inspiring part of the occasion is the environment in the assembly room of the camp hospital where the ceremonies took place. In spite of the rushing business in prosecuting the war and winning of the victory, it adds a certain atmosphere of solemnity equal only to a house of worship, an agency of winning religious freedom to the newcomer according to his choosing. The co-operation from camp authorities to the personnel in immediate attendance during religious services and ceremonies is not less than an assurance for an early victory over the common enemy and new hopes to the coming generations of enjoying the first freedom with the other three, for which we are fighting and praying. MIAMI BEACH SERVICE MEN GLAD FOR FACILITIES GIVEN Proud of the many favorable comments received, the Arbeiter Ring, Branch 692, of Greater Miami, has made available to service men the use of facilities of its Lyceum, 25 Washington Street, Miami Beach. One of the many letters is reprinted below: U. S. ARMY AIR FORCES Sept. 25. 1943. Gentlemen: On behalf of the 4th Squadron, 411th Training Group, 42nd Wing, we wish to express our appreciation to the Workmen's Circle for their co-operation in permitting the free use of their hall. It is gratifying to realize that there are organizations giving more than lip service to the members of the armed forces. Such actions are conductive to maintaining the morale of our men. which is so all-important in our drive toward an early victorious peace. 1st Sgt. Daniel T. Doherty, 411th Training Group. Capt. Morris H. Hurwits. 36. of Hartford, Conn., has been awarded the Legion of Merit "for exceptional meritorious services" in the North African campaign. The medal to Captain Hurwitz is accompanied by a citation from General Eisenhower. S Sgt. Milton Gersfeld. 19. of New York City, was killed in a collision between two Fortresses ner Steelville, Mo. Devoting This Entire Page to the Efforts of the Co ABESS & COSTAR First National Bank Building COWEN'S SHOE STORE 155 E. Flagler St. — 822 Lincoln Rd. FDCZIT SYSTEMS. Plumbers 1114 N. E. 2nd Avenue FLORIDA LINEN SERVICE 100 N. W. 20th Street LAND-O-SUN DAIRIES, Inc101 Alton Road LUBY CHEVROLET CO. 1055 West Flagler Street MIAMI MILL WORE & LUMBER CO. 535 N. W. 11th Street NATIONAL BRANDS. Inc. 690 N. W. 13th Street NANKIN'S SHOE STORE 158 East Flagler Street Army-Navy Committee. Made Postible Through Operation of SAM MEYERS HI South Miami Avenue SOUTHEASTERN SALESMEN'S CARAVAN Langford Building STANDARD WHOLESALE GROCERY CO. 149 N. E. 10th Street TOOLEY-MYRON STUDIOS DuPont Building WILLIAM D. SINGER SUNGAS CO. 1100 Wast Flagler Street WEST FLAGLER KENNEL CLUB West Flagler St. at 37th Avenue WOLPERT FURNITURE CO. 155 Wast Flagler Street WOMETCO THEATRES Mitchell Wolfson Sydney Meyer ONflLLTHEFHOMTS Charles Spector. 21, of 1614 Meridian Avenue, Miami Beach, has been promoted from corporal to sergeant in the Army Air Forces in England. The former University of Florida student is chief clerk in the operations office of a Flying Fortress squadron. Capt. Richard G. Laboviti, 26. of Mattapan, Mass., a member of the Field Artillery, was killed in the drive on Tunis. A graduate of Boston Latin School and of Harvard University, htf was an economist in civilian life and had been in service four years. He was a member of Cong. Kehillath Jacob of Mattapan. Lt. Robert Morris, 25, of Bridgeport, Conn., an airman in the South Pacific, has been killed in action. Manager of a ladies garment factory in civilian life, he was in service two and one-half years. S/Sgt. Leno Off. 32, El Paso. Tex., an Air Corps machine gunner, was killed in action over Europe. A shipping clerk in civilian life, he was in service three years, and has been awarded the Purple Heart posthumously. Capt. Otis Daneman. 29 of Port Richmond, Staten Island, a Paratroop officer, and a member of the first group to attack Sicily, is reported killed in action. A graduate of the College of the City of New York, he was engaged in the insurance business in civilian life. Cadet Solomon Saniord Levy, 21, of Berkeley, Sal if., was killed in a plane crash over Texas a week before he was to win his Navy wings and receive his commission at the Kingsville Naval Flying School. A graduate of Berkeley High and a student at the University of California, Cadet Levy was transferred from Naval R.O.T.C to Naval aviation. He attended St. Mary's pre-flight where he set a record in scholarship and athletics, and he did his preliminary flying at Los Alamedas. Sgt. Manfred Keitsch, Bloomfield, N. J., died of wounds from a .22 sub-calibre machine gun when he was accidentally shot during target practice at Camp Hood. Texas. In service less than half a year, Sergeant Keitsch had come to this country from Austria five years ago. Lt. Horace J. Adelson, 23, of Mt. Vernon, N. Y., lost his life in an airplane crash over Wright Field, Ohio, while engaged in experimental and test-pilot work for the Army. A graduate of Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lieut. Adelson was an aeronautical engineer in civilian life. Capt. Harry Kats. 24, of Corsicana, Texas, serving as a scout in the Philippines, is a prisoner of Japan. An R.O.T.C. officer before the war, he had won his rank through summer work at various R.O.T.C. camps and army posts. After reaching the Islands Captain Katz, then a first lieutenant, was made an infantry instructor and promoted to the rank of captain. He has not been heard from in almost two years. Capt. Charles Joseph Kats. 21. of Oak Park, 111., a doctor in the Army Medical Corps, is a prisoner of war. Formerly in the army reserve, he enlisted in the regular army three years ago. Captain Katz was a psyachiatrist at Elgin State Hospital. He is also a member of B'nai B'rith. Lt. Joseph H. Brooks. 25, Memphis, Tenn., member of the Eighth Army Air Force, has been taken prisoner by the Germans. In service two years, Lieutenant Brooks was graduated from Central High school and attended Southwestern University. Lt. Jacob Howard Franz, 25. of Charleston. W. Va., who has put in more than 700 combat flying hours and has been on 88 bombing missions, holds the Distinguished Flying Cross, a bronze Oak Leaf Cluster to the D. F. C, the Silver Star, the Air Medal, and three Oak Leaf Clusters to the Air Medal.