The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00765

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
wJewish IFIIaridliiai in
CTORY
BUY
UNITED
TATII
Cggga YUne Ji r*
VOLUME 16No. 42
MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1943
PRICE 10 CENTS
GREATER Ml AM
THIS WEEK END
Services announced by spir-
itual leaders of Greater Miami
for the observance of Succos,
which began Wednesday eve-
ning October 13 and lasting
through Friday October 22, are
as follows:
Temple Israel, Succos morn-
ing, Thursday, Oct. 14. at 12:00
a. m. Sermon: "Pleasure or Hap-
piness." Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan of-
ficiating at all services.
Beth David Congregation,
Thursday morning, 8:30. Rabbi
Max Shapiro and Cantor Louis
Hayman officiating. Subject:
"The Messianic Truth." Eve-
ning, 7:30, a brief service. Friday
morning, 8:30, Dr. Jacob H. Kap-
lan of Temple Israel will be
guest speaker. His sermon title
will be "Succos, a Symbol of the
Faith in God." Junior services
Thursday and Friday in syna-
Sogue at 10:30 a. m. Bernard
lickson, Meyer Greenberg, Fred-
die Heineman and David Jacobs
officiating.
Schaarei Zedek Congregation,
Rabbi Simon April officiating.
Thursday and Friday evenings
at 6:45 p. m. Thursday morning,
Oct. 14, at 9:00 o'clock, sermon:
Fature's Sermon." Friday morn-
;, Oct. 15, sermon: "Connecting
,k." Afternoon services at
- p. m.
Miami Beach Jewish Com-
munity Center, Rabbi Irving
X.ehrman officiating. Services
will be held in the Center on
both days, the 14th and 15th of
October, at 9:00 a. m., in the eve-
nings at 7:00 p. m. Thursday
morning Rabbi Lehrman will
preach on "The Grand Finale."
Friday morning, the sermon topic
will be "The Joy that Endures."
Cantor Abraham D. Wolf will of-
ficiate at all the Festival services.
Kiddush will be served by the
Sisterhood in the Center's new
(CONTINUED ON PAOE 3)
DIMOUT REGULATIONS
ARE STILL IN EFFECT
Dimout regulations will be in
effect from 7:45 p. m. to 6:30 a. m.
during October and November,
and violators will be fined ac-
cording to the extent of the vio-
lations, says an announcement by
C. H. Blanding, Fourth Corps area
co-ordinator.
Warnings to conform with the
dimout order have been issued
by E. G. (Don) Graham, charged
with enforcement in D a d e
county, to all citizens of the area.
Graham pointed out that contin-
ued imposition of the regulations
is by order of the army, and re-
laxation will not come until of-
ficials feel there is no longer a
necessity for them.
TRIAE VERDICT AT
SPECIALSESS10N
Jerusalem (WNS).The con-
viction of Leib Sirkin and Abra-
ham Rachlin by a British mili-
tary court here last week on a
charge of illegally possessing
arms which had been stolen by
two convicted British soldiers
from government arsenals in
Egypt, will be discussed here this
week at a special session of the
Jewish National Assembly .Asse-
fath Hanivcharim. It is expected
that the Assembly will then issue
a pronouncement setting forth
the formal attitude of the Yishuv
towards the proceedings.
A statement issued last week
by the Jewish National Council,
executive body of the Jewish Na-
tional Assembly, urged the Jews
of Palestine to desist from mak-
ing their feelings in the matter
articulate at this time and to
"take the verdict quietly in or-
der to make it possible to take
lawful and authorized action.
Declaring that while the "prose-
cution tried to impugn the Yish-
uv, its institutions and contribu-
tions to the war effort," the Jews
of Palestine "and their institu-
tions" refrained from interfering
with the court's procedure, the
statement added that the Jews of
Palestine would "express their
opinion" at the forthcoming spe-
cial session of the Assemby.
RESOLUTIONS ARE
ADOPTEBJTA.J.C.
REPORT MEETING
At a meeting held last Monday
evening at Temple Israel attend-
ed by a representative gathering
who came to hear reports from
delegates to the American Jew-
ish Conference, resolutions to the
governments of Sweden and
Switzerland were introduced.
Passed unanimously, the resolu-
tion concerning Sweden was
adopted by the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, Miami Beach
Zionist District, Miami Zionist
District and B'nai B'rith Sho-
lem Lodge. The appreciative
message stated:
WHEREAS, we, the representa-
tives of the Jewish Community
of Greater Miami, in the State of
Florida, assembled- in Temple
Israel Monday evening, October
11th, 1943, are cognizant of the
sympathy and consideration as
shown by the Government and
people of Sweden towards our
brethren in Denmark, and
WHEREAS, we have learned of
Sweden's humane offer of refuge
for the Jewish citizens of Den-
mark, and
WHEREAS, we have knowledge
of the factual acceptance by Swe-
den and the Swiss people of
thousands of these unfortunate
Danish Jews in its fair land, and
WHEREAS, we consider this
friendly action by the Govern-
ment of Sweden is a worthy ex-
ample of a neutral government's
therefore.
BE IT RESOLVED, that we,
the Jewish Community of
Greater Miami do express to the
Government of Sweden and to
the people of Sweden our heart-
felt gratitude and the deep sense
of obligation felt by all of us for
its helpful hand in our time of
great emergency and unnatural
hardship, and
FURTHER, we strongly believe
that we express the sentiment
and feeling of all American Jew-
ish communities and their sym-
pathizers, wherever they may be,
that this evidence of humanity
by the Government of Sweden
will hearten and sustain all those
who are now oppressed and who
look to a new world order based
on principles which are rooted in
a liberality of view and a sense
of justice such as is expressed by
the Swedish nation in the hour
of travail for our people; and.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED,
that this resolution be sent to
His Excellency, the Ambassador
of Sweden to be transmitted to
his Government.
Signed this eleventh day of Oc-
tober, 1943, at Miami, Florida.
An identical resolution was
adopted to be forwarded to the
Ambassador of Switzerland for
the magnanimous offer to the
Jews of Italy.
MHZ. 52
DIES SUDDENLY OF
A HEART ATTACK
New York (JTA).-F u n e r a 1
services were held this week for
Rabbi Hirsch Manishewitz. 52,
vice-president of the famous bak-
ing firm founded by his parents,
who died of a heart attack dur-
ing Yom Kippur services at the
Congregation Ohab Zedeb here.
Born in Concinnati, wither his
parents, Rabbi Dov Ver and Nat-
alie Rose Manischewitz, had mi-
grated from Meme, Lithuania, a
few years earlier, Rabbi Ma-
Kabbi Hirsch Manischewitz
nischcwitz was educated in Pal-
estine at Yeshivoth Etz Chaim,
1901-07; Torath Chaim, 1908-10.
and Meah Shearim, 1910-14. In
August, 1914. he returned to Cin-
cinnati, where he remained until
1931, when he moved to New
York.
A representative of more than
thirty institutions or organiza-
tions of higher Jewish learning
in Europe and Palestine, Rabbi
Manischewitz was president of
the Federation of Palestine Jews,
Israel Orphans Home for Girls
in Jerusalem, Beth Yeshomin
Eishel of Warsaw, vice-president
of the Mizrachi Organization of
America, executive member of
Yeshiva College, Orthodox Jew-
ish Congregation of America and
Canada, and treasurer of the
United Charities Institutions of
Jerusalem.
Buy War Savings Bonds
JEWS IN HUNGARY
ORDERED TO SEEE
THEIR FARM LAND
Ankara .WNS).A recent de-
cree issued by the Hungarian
Ministry of Agriculture forbids
Jews in Hungary to hold and
own faim land exceeding five
acres, it was disclosed here this
week by authoritative sources.
The decree provides that Jews
owning more than five acres of
land used for agricultural pur-
poses must offer their holdings,
together with the live stock and
other farm appurtenances, for
sale to any bidder offering a rea-
sonable price. It provides fur-
ther that where the Jewish
owner and the prospective pur-
chaser are unable to agree either
on the price or on the terms of
payment the price and other
terms of the sale are to be fixed
by an agent for the Ministry of
Agriculture.
FLORIDA WAR FUND TO
HELP RAISE $125,000,000
Jacksonville, Fla."A share in
the National War Fund is a share
in winning the war," President
Roosevelt has said in an endorse-
ment of the nation-wide cam-
paign that has been inaugurated
this month to raise $125,000,000
for 17 war-related agencies giv-
ing assistance to the service men
of Uncle Sam's fighting forces
and aid to the stricken people of
European countries that have
fallen to aggressor nations.
In this state the Florida War
Fund is the agency which will
handle the National War Fund
appeal for $1,417,500 as Florida's
share of the national goal. Gov-
ernor Holland is president of the
Florida War Fund and Dr. John
J. Tigert. president of the Univer-
sity of Florida, is campaign
chairman.
VICTORY RALLY TD
AT THE Y. SUNDAY
A Victory Rally honoring the
new members of the "Y" will
take place Sunday night, October
17, at 8:30 o'clock, at the "Y"
Auditorium, 1567 S. W. 5th
Street, Miami.
Highlight of the evening will
be S/Sgt. Hal Fisher, who will
act as Master of Ceremonies Sgt.
Fisher is well known on the
stage, radio and screen for many
years and is Master of Ceremo-
nies of the "Pine Tree Bandshell
Air Corps Caperers."
Appearing with Sgt. Fisher is
S/Sgt. Harold Woodall. also of
stage and radio, well-known pi-
anist and accompanist; Cpl. Zach-
ary Solov. who is a dancer of
note, having completed a tour of
South America as a ballet dancer
before joining the Armed Forces;
Sgt. William Froelich. Cpl. Clif-
ton Hughes, Sgt. John Peterson.
Miss Margaret Tunisohn, vocal-
ist, and others.
The entertainment will include
a variety of songs, skits, dances
and other comedy acts.
The Army entertainment was
procured through the efforts of
Miss Ida Engler, Chairman of the
Board of the Y. M. H. A.
As a special attraction. Eddie
Pastroff, winner of a $100 Bond
from Station WIOD for piano
playing, will render the winning
selection.
A silver loving cup donated by
George Wolpert will be awarded
to the person who obtained the
largest number of new members.
Refreshments will be served by
hostesses from the Y. M. H. A.
The public is invited. Admission
is free.
JEWS TO MOBILIZE
IN FIGHT AGAINST
WHITE PAPER ACT
American Jews will be mobil-
ized in a battle to smash the
Chamberlain White Paper, which
"erects an illegal wall about
Palestine" and closes its doors to
Jews forever in April, 1944.
The fight was opened by Dr.
Abba Hillel Silver of Cleveland,
new chairman of the executive
committee of the American Zion-
ist Emergency Council, who de-
nounced the White Paper as "the
greatest miscarriage of justice in
our day and the most brazen re-
pudiation of the sanctity of cove-
nants."
The Council is spokesman for
all major Zionist organizations
in the United Statesthe Zionist
Organization of America. Hadas-
sah, Mizrachi and Poale Zion.
Dr. Silver, spiritual leader of The
Temple, in Cleveland, recently
assumed political leadership of
the Zionist movement and his
call for a war on the Palestine
White Paper is his first declara-
tion of policy.
Proposing an incessant and un-
compromising drive to set aside
the "manifestly unjust and il-
legal" Chamberlain policy during
the seven months which remain
before it becomes completely ef-
fective. Dr. Silver declared that
American Jews will appeal to
the United States Government to
seek its suspension.
NAZIS INTENSIFY
SEARCH FOR JEWS
MIAMI BEACH ZIONISTS TO
CHANGE DATE OF MEETING
The regular weekly session of
the Zionist Cultural Forum will
change its meeting day to Sun-
day, and its place of gathering to
the YM&WHA, No. 1 Lincoln Rd.
The Forum will be held at its us-
ual time. 3:30 P. M.. and Dr. Lip-
kind will speak on The Achieve-
ment of Jewish-Arab Harmony"
Sunday. October 17th.
Geneva (JTA). German au-
thorities are combing farm
houses, forests and remote vil-
i laees throughout Holland in an
effort to discover fugitive Jews.
it was reported here this week.
The report expresses the fear
| that "large numbers of these
Jews may be caught by the Ges-
Itapo's manhunt, which is the
most brutal since the Nazi in-
J vasion." The raids are being car-
i ried out in the provinces of Gron-
ingen, Friesland. Drente, Overys-
sel and Geleraland. Captured
"Jews are treated "in the most
| horrible way imaginable." the
report says.
j Another report states that a
, German court-martial in Ghent.
Belgium, has sentenced a num-
ber of Belgians to long terms of
imprisonment for aiding Jews to
j cross the frontier into France.
One of the Belgians was charged
with providing false identity
documents to Jews who allegedly
reached Switzerland via Paris.
The Vichy radio this week re-
! ported that four Jews have been
executed by the German authori-
ties in Paris "for guerrilla war-
fare activities."
JEWISH WELFARE BOARD TO
HOLD MEETING OCTOBER 19
The Jewish Welfare Bureau
will hold a regular monthly meet-
ing of its board Tuesday, October
19th at its offices, 127 N. W. 2nd
St. This meeting will take the
place of that scheduled for last
week and postponed because of
the Holidays.
Buy War Bonds and Stamps to
help preserve Democracy.
UAHC DEFERS ACTION
ON COMMONWEALTH
Cincinnati (WNS).A motion
approving all resolutions adopted
by the American Jewish Confer-
ence, except the one demanding
the establishment of a Jewish
Commonwealth in Palestine, was
unanimously pased here this
week at a meeting of the execu-
tive board of the Union of Ameri-
can Hebrew Congregations. The
board decided that the Palestine
resolution be submitted for con-
sideration to the Council, the su-
preme governing body of the
Union.


PAGE TWO
vjewisti fhrkttati
*


J




SOCIAL ITEMS AND
PERSONALS
Mrs. Irving Rosenfeld has just
returned from a stay of several
months in California and Louisi-
ana, and is now the guest of her
brother-in-law and sister. Mr.
and Mrs. Charles Altschul, Jr.,
2027 N. W. 24th Avenue. Her
husband, Pvt. Rosenfeld. USA,
formerly a resident of Miami,
was stationed in Indio. Cal., for
several months with the Signal
Corps, and recently was trans-
ferred to Camp Polk in Louisi-
ana.
Mrs, Rosenfeld. who is the for-
mer Edith Adler. was accom-
panied on her trip by her mother.
Mrs. Edith Adler. who also is a
guest of the Altschuls.
Mrs. Joseph Rambam is ex-
pected back at her home. 1330
Michigan Avenue, this week.
She has been visiting her daugh-
ter. Mrs. Stanley Bornstein in
Oregon and in New Jersey.
ENGAGEMENT
Betrothal of Miss Anyce Get-
zug and Walter A. Lavigne.
USMC. is being announced by
the parents of the bride-to-be,
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Getzug,
1580 S. W. 19th Avenue. He is
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Donald
L. Lavigne, 570 N. E. 5th Street.
No date has been set for the wed-
ding.
Miss Getzug was graduated
from Miami Edison High School,
where she was a member of Tri
Beta society; also attended
schools in Cincinnati. Ohio.
Mr. Lavigne attended Gordon
Military Academy and the Cita-
del, Charleston. S. C.
IN THE MAIL BOX
Linda Ray Rose, daughter of
Lt. James Rose of the U. S.
Army, will celebrate her seventh
birthday Friday at the Lear
School with her classmates as
fiuests. Alfred B. Nemirow. who
las been a student at the school
for several years, will celebrate
his twelfth birthday on Friday
with a luncheon given in his
honor. The faculty, friends and
soldiers will attend the first so-
cial of the season at the Lear
School Friday evening. Enter-
tainment, dancing and refresh-
ments have been arranged.
WEDDINGS
During the past High Holy
Days the Jewish Community of
Greater Miami has exceeded all
its past records of providing
home hospitality tor Jewish men
and women in service stationed
here.
The Jewish Welfare Board re-
ports that 945 service men and
women were the guests of 425
families in Greater Miami. The
community's welcome reached
out to the members of the Armed
Forces stationed in Miami and
the Beach proper, as well as sur-
rounding areas. Service men
guests arrived from Belle Haven.
36th Street Airport. Homestead
Air Base. Boca Raton Field, and
from parts as distant as Fort
Myers and Camp Murphy.
What such hospitality means to
the service men can well be
imagined when it is remembered
that at no time does he feel his
separation from home and fa-
miliar things as during the re-
ligious holidays Our hospitality
is a further reminder to the men
that all Israel is one family, and
wherever a Jew might be he can
well feel at home among other
Jews. We may at this time pride-
fully give thought to these
things, as we hear a soldier say,
"Oh boy, home cooking! Just
like my mother's:"
The Jewish Welfare Board con-
i^E^CTOBER 15,
Sol Sackheim. veteran of World
war I. has relumed to U. S. Vet-
erans Hospital at Bay Pines. Fla. i
He had been given a short leave '
of absence from the hospital in
order to bid farewell to his
daughter Alice, who recently left
to enter the University of Mich-
igan.
The marriage of Miss Bella
Mintzer to Cpl. Irving Shlansky
took place Monday afternoon.
September 27. at 844 Jefferson
Avenue, the home of Mr. and
Mrs. Jacob Lurie.
Martin Shlansky. of New York,
acted as his brother's best man
and Miss Lucille Shlansky was veys its thanks and appreciation
the bride's attendant. Rabbi Ito all individuals and organiza-
Moses Meschloff performed the j tipns wno co-operated so splen-
ceremony assisted by Rev. Mau- didly in this most worthy cause.
rice Mamches and Sexton Max
Feit.
After the wedding a reception
was held and supper served.
Others attending were the bride's
parents. Mr. and Mrs. Mintzer. of
New Orleans; the grooms par-
ents. Mr. and Mrs. Philip Shlan-
sky. of New York, and aunt and
uncle of the groom, Mr. and Mrs
Rynas of Brooklvn. N. Y.
Pvt. Leo Machtei arrived on
Wednesday \o spend a short fur-
lough with his parents. Rabbi
and Mrs. S. M. Machtei. Pvt. |
Machtei is stationed at Fort Jay j
Governors Island. N. Y.
BRITH
The Bnth Millah of the son of
Lt and Mrs. Godfrey K. New-
man. 4580 Post Avenue. Miami
Beach, took place at the St
trances Hospital on Tuesday
with Rabbi S. M. Machtei offici-
ating.
Miss Renee Miller, daughter of
Mrs. Alfred Thorner. 350 Euclid
Avenue, Miami Beach, was mar-
ried Sept. 28 to 1st Lt. Julius A
Stern. USAAC. son of Mr. and
Mrs. I. K. Stern of Astoria. N Y
A native of New York City,
she is a graduate of the Ida
Fisher High School. Miami
Beach, and a member of the
Amity Club.
Lieutenant Stern, who came
here from Lake Charles. La., on
leave, began his training at the
Officer Candidate School on Mi-
ami Beach and received his com-
mission at Harvard.
NATHAN ROTHBERG.
PAUL W. ARON.
Jewish Welfare Board
Representatives.
Washington (WNS)Eighty-odd
American Red Cross service clubs
in the British Isles were hosts to
Jewish members of the U. S.
armed forces during Rosh Hash-
onah and on Yom Kippur eve. it
was announced here this week by
Norman H. Davis.
ORLANDO NOTES
Over eight hundred Jewish
service men and women packed
the High Holy Days Services at
Congregation Ohev Shalom in
Orlando. Cantor Julius Rosen-
stein of Miami Beach chanted the
impressive service in the syna-
gogue with Meyer Shader. Or-
lando baritone officiating in the
Assembly Hall.
The Orlando Jewish community
enjoyed the numerous traditional
renditions offered by Cantor Ro-
senstem and joined in the sing-
ing of most of the Yom Kippur
service.
Following the Yom Kippur
Fast, the Jewish Welfare Board
served a Break-Fast Supper for
all persons in uniform and Mrs.
Max Blattner acted as hostess to
the entire congregation for
Break-Fast Kiddush.
The attendance at both adult
services and the special children's
service was the largest in the his-
tory of the Orlando Jewish com-
munity.
Over $50,000 in War Bonds
were purchased at the opening
service hour by members of the
congregation.
Rabbi Morris A. Skop preached
at all services.
CAMPAIGN AGAIN?^58
Berne (WNS)-The M S
northern Italy hav* ** ,
terror campaign againT? '
>sh population, murSn^
reds of Jewish men 2**
children in Rome. Gen^ ^
Venice, and other citiesu "*
revealed here this week k. **
peachable sources by ""*
order following the ou.fe *
revolt and sabotage $&*
hni's ouster. Thev ar Lj ?*
Italian followers of Mussff b?
fascism. "^solim an
wid
CHARRON-WILLIAMS
Commercial College
Special Night School Classes
Monday. Wednesday fn7Z
6:30 to 9:00 P M. y
Sixth Floor Postal Bide
PHONE 3-4859
Mary Williams. B.C.S. Diwctw
12TH UIH DK
Sponsored by Miami Y. M. H. I.
Tuesday Eve., Oct. 26,9 o'clock
at the
Coral Gables Country Club
Music By
CY WASHBURN AND HIS
COUNTRY CLUB ORCHESTRA
ADMISSION. INCLUDING TAX........$j 10
CALL THE "Y" FOR TABLE RESERVATIONS
New York (WNS)Seventy-two
Jewish refugees arrived in New
^ urk ports during the Rosh Hash-
onah week-end, it was announced
here this week.
Mod* Fran Fresh Oranges
*s
Takt Your Watch
to Danzig's!

V.' A T Z -
PERfECTtY
RE a ;e:
DUcat: Email, intricaf
BOTMMBts art haadltd
bj u wtih undirstaad-
mq can and tkUL
JtWOAY REPAIRING
\v
DANZIG'S
jEWElFCS
236 nalCYOs AKC-.DE
US I Flia|f Si
TIER THEATRE
S.W. Sth St. at 15th Aye.
OPEN AT 1:45 P. M.
Fri., Oct. 15Last Day
Good Morning
Judge
DENNIS O'KEEFE
MARY BETH HUGHES
LOUISE ALLBRITTON
* tir -tr
Starts Saturday at 4:30 P.M.
and Sunday Through Wed-
nesday, Oct. 16-20
"PHANTOM
OF THE
OPERA
n
IN TECHNICOLOR
WITH
NELSON EDDY
SUSANNA FOSTER
CLAUDE RAINS
And a Cast of Thousands
in the Year's Greatest
Musical Spectacle!

//
INSURE
IN SURE
ASSURANCE
THE SENSIBLE FARSIGHTED INDIVIDUAL provides
today the assurance for tomorrow and the years
ahead.
ASSURANCE IS INVESTING WISELY and soundly to
provide for all the needs of the years ahead .
NEEDS that include Home Education Com-
munal Endeavor Emergencies Illness
Retirement, and the InevitableDeath.
B* P^!Srow*thwith hCI? W*? co"1" y" are t bothered in your
onW Murt SJ iS thaA.make the tragedy gruesome, and the
hlfvn,rM t0 keep the enlire farni'y together forever, is by
M~ Sf X?"5-n private family plot. And having your plot in
round nf 5 *?"* ^ f thu Prtection ,n the finest sur-
rounaings at a reasonable cost.
NW BeW^H^Th.t'L3 f?T'!y plot in Mount Nebo Cemetery-
to SoVoTthe Jewish"' Cemete,y dedlCated 35WS
For further information with no obligation, phone
3-5132
Florida's Most Beautiful Burial Estates
MOUNT NEBO
ONLY TEN MINUTES FROM THE HEART OF MIAMI
West Flagler Street at 54th Avenue
BUSINESS OFFICE 1014 OLYMPIA BUILDING
A VISIT WILL CONVINCE YOU


1IDAY, OCTOBER 15. 1943
*Jeniskh florid ten
PAGE THREE
ORGANIZATION
ACTIVITIES
SCHAAREI ZEDEK
The Ladies Auxiliary of Cong.
Schaarei Zedek announce a card
party at the synagogue for Sun-
day evening, October 24, and not
as previously announced by er-
ror as October 4. Mrs. Max
Mintzer and Mrs. Gershon Au-
gust will serve as hostesses for
the occasion. Proceeds will be
used for the Talmud Torah.
BETH SHOLOM CENTER
Sunday school and Talmud To-
rah registration for Beth Sholonf
Center will take place on Sun-
day, Oct. 17. Children's Succos
Party, under the auspices of the
Beth Sholom Sisterhood, will
start at 11 a. m. Sunday Oct. 17.
First session of Sunday school
will be on Oct. 24. and the Tal-
mud Torah opening on Monday,
Oct. 25, at 3:30 p. m.
BETH DAVID
On account of Succos holidays,
Mrs. Harry Oliphant, president
of Beth David Sisterhood, an-
nounces that the regular meeting
scheduled for Wednesday, Oct.
20, has been postponed until
Wednesday, Oct. 27, at 2:30 p. m.
A fine program has been ar-
ranged and a large nUmber of
members and friends are ex-
pected.
At the last regular meeting of
the Sisterhood, Mrs. Harry Oli-
phant appointed Mrs. Isador Co-
hen as Hospitality Chairman of
the Annual Pre-Purim Ball. Mrs.
Hyman Sootin was elected finan-
cial secretary to replace Mrs.
Samuel Auslander, who left Mi-
ami for the North. Mrs. Jake
Engler was appointed chairman
of all Card Parties, with Mrs.
Louis Hartz as co-chairman.
Sunday school registration and
Children's Succo Party will take
place Sunday morning at 10 a. m.
Parents are urged to register
their children.
,
The United States Govern-
ment Having Taken Over His
Present Offices
DR. JOSEPH B. MARGOLIS
announces the
REMOVAL OF HIS OFFICE
to
311 Lincoln Road
Albion Bldg.. Suite 301
MIAMI BEACH
For the Practice of
General Dentistry
BETH JACOB
There will be a membership
meeting of the Congregation Beth
Jacob on Monday night, Oct. 18.
at the synagogue. New members
will be inducted and a Cultural
program presented.
The Beth Jacob Sisterhood will
meet Tuesday, Oct. 19, at 2 p. m.
in the Succa of Beth Jacob Con-
gregation. Mrs. Moses Krieger,
first vice-president, will be the
guest speaker. Her subject will
be "Impressions of the American
Jewish Conference." The meet-
ing is open to the public.
The Board of Education of
Beth Jacob Congregation will
meet at the synagogue Tuesday
night, Oct. 19.
JEWISH CONGRESS
At the executive board meet-
ing of the Women's Division of
the American- Jewish Congress
elected to serve on the executive
board as vice-presidents, was Mrs.
Rose Weiss, chairman of the bond
and stamp selling for Congress,
and Mrs. Philip Salmon, chair-
man of the United Jewish War
Effort, and chairman of the cul-
tural project, the "Friday Re-
view."
These women will be installed
on Oct. 25th at the installation
luncheon at the Versailles hotel.
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As assurance of a strong, pro-
gressive leadership for the Miami
Beach Zionist District in its new
year is voiced by the nomination
committee composed of Max Mei-
sel, Alex Van Stratton, Harry
Platoff. Dr. M. A. Lipkind. and
Jake Felt. The program com-
mittee, headed by Philip Salmon,
has made necessary arrangements
to assure a successful annual elec-
tion meeting for the evening of
Wednesday, October 27th.
Miami Beach Zionists partici-
pated in the submission of a
resolution of gratitude and ap-
preciation to the Swedish gov-
ernment for the haven provided
for refugee Jews of Denmark.
ARAB DELEGATES HERE
FAVOR U. S. OF ARABIA
Washington (WNS).The es-
tablishment of a United States of
Arabia including Palestine,
Egypt. Iraq. Syria and other Arab
states was urged as the best so-
lution of the Arab problem by
Emir Feisal, second son and For-
eign Minister of King Ibn Saud
of Saudi Arabia, at a press con-
ference here this week. Con-
firming the report that he would
proceed to London after com-
pleting his stay in the United
States, the Foreign Minister add-
ed that there was no reason why
the matter of a union of Arab
states should not be negotiated
before the end of the war.
He also revealed that shortly
before he left for his trip to the
United States he learned that an
emissary of the Egyptian Prime
Minister Nahas Pasha was on his
way to discuss Arab federation
problems with Ibn Saud. He
also intimated that he, too, would
participate in later discussions.
SflS^ld
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OBITUARIES
Mrs. Clara Thalheimer, 75, of
1229 18th Street, Miami Beach,
died Sunday in a local hospital.
She has been a Beach resident
four months, coming from Brook-
lyn, and is survived by her hus-
band, Edward Thalheimer, Mi-
ami Beach, and a son, Albert
Thalheimer, of Philadelphia.
Services were conducted Mon-
day in Riverside Memorial
Chapel with Rabbi S. M. Mach-
tei officiating.
NON-JEWS CONTRIBUTORS
IN AIDING JEWS ABROAD
Non-Jews have contributed
on numerous occasions to local
campaigns for the rescue of
Jews abroad, for Palestine re-
construction and for refugee
aid in the United States, but
this week it was reported that
for the first time in the five-
year history of the United Jew-
ish Appeal for Refugees. Over-
seas Needs and Palestine, a
Christian has assumed the
leadership of a Jewish com-
munity's drive. In Hammond.
Ind.. James Post, a non-Jew,
heads the campaign "High
Command'' for the unified
drive in behalf of the Joint
Distribution Committee.
United Palestine Appeal and
National Refugee Service.
Putting his business obliga-
tions aside, Mr. Post is these
days spending all his time in
organizing the Jewish com-
munal forces, conferring with
Jewish leaders, studying pros-
pect cards and going over the
general campaign strategy.
It is reported that the entire
Jewish community of Ham-
mond has been stimulated to a
high pitch of enthusiasm by
Mr. Post's devotion to the cause
of Jewish survival and rehabil-
itation.
jJJgust bros. r>^
GREATER MIAM
THIS WEEK END
(CONTINUED FROM PAC 1)
Succo after each of the holiday
services.
Beth Sholem Center, Rabbi S.
M. Machtei will conduct the serv-
ices. Cantor Abraham Fried-
man will chant the musical por-
tions of the service. Thursday at
9:00 a .m., sermon subject: "Only
a Hut." Thursday at 6:30 p. m.
Friday at 9:00 a. m., sermon sub-
ject: "Harvest Festival." Chil-
dren's Succo Party at 11:00 a. m.
on Sunday, Oct. 17, with the Sis-
terhood acting as hosts.
Miami Jewish Orthodox Con-
gregation, Rabbi Joseph E, Ra-
kovsky will preach and chant the
services beginning Thursday and
Friday morning at 9:00 a. m.. and
in the evening at 6:00 p. m. Rabbi
Rakovsky's topic Thursday morn-
ing will be "Tabernacles," and on
Friday "Lulov." .
The closing days of the festival
will start Wednesday evening at
6:00 p. m. with Yizkor Memorial
Service at the houses of worship
on Thursday morning. Holiday
services continue through Friday.
(Note: Because of the holiday,
this edition is published on
Wednesday for delivery Thurs-
day, carrying regular Friday
dateline. This issue will reach
readers in time for the above in-
formation to be of value.)
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PAGE FOUR
fJewlsti ncrkHan
Z^^^i^CTOBER lSi
I

The Jewish Floridian
Plant and Main Offices, 21 S. W. Second Avenue, Miami, Fla.
P. O. Box 2973 Phone 2-1141
Entered as Second Class Matter July 4, 1930 at the Post Office
of Miami, Florida, under the Act of March 3, 1879
FRED K. SHOCHET, Managing Editor
Subscription1 Year, $2.00 Six Months, $1.00
MAIMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1943
TISHRI 16. 5704
VOLUME 16 NUMBER 42
The A-J Conference
by LOUIS HEIMAN
Press Representative of
The Jewish Floridian
"ON READING EDITORIALS"
Many comments have been received by your editor from
time to time about editorials and the views expressed therein.
But recently we were flooded with calls following a reply to one
of our editorials. Different interpretations were given. Various
ideas were expressed. Local editorials commenting about our
own community and its problems, without fail arouse comment.
The exception to this is the mutual admiration type, highly com-
plimentary, and then there's some who feel the credit was mis-
placed and undeserved.
In the AMERICAN JEWISH OUTLOOK of Pittsburgh an edi-
torial titled "On Reading Editorials" appeared expressing our
sentiments. We reprint it herewith:
Editorials are definitely and undeniably the language, ideas
and interpretations of an individual. As such, they are open to
the criticisms of any and every other individual. But at the
same time, if there be any art in writing editorials, there is like-
wise an art in reading them.
An editor has a responsibility in obtaining all the facts re-
garding a given situation. He should never write until he feels
sure that the facts are clear. With the facts at his disposal, he
must write about them with courage and clarity, having in
mind the rendering of a public service, and without fear of
what some readers might say or do as a result. The editor's
motto must be "ii the shoe fits, wear it."
An editor tries in his interpretation to bring such background
to his writing as he can, in fact, unless he has a knowledge
of history and of the world around him, he should not serve as
an editor. This is especially true of an editor serving a Jewish
paper. To him, an isolated event is not at all isolated. Rather
it appears as a further step in some directionand if that direc-
tion looks to be undesirable, he must attack the isolated inci-
dent.
The purpose of an editorial is to make the readers react.
It makes little difference if the reaction is favorable or unfavor-
abole provided the reader has read the editorial carefully, has
absorbed its contents, and then decided that his view coincides
or differs from that of the editor. The editor knows that people
differ. They differ in their religious beliefs, in their political
beliefs, in their tastes and buying habits, in their standards.
For the same reason, they differ in their attitudes on editorials.
One editorial might pass unnoticed by a thousand persons,
might wm the favorable comment of another thousand, might
arouse the most bitter opposition of a handful, and not be read
at all by thousands of others. It is also to be noted that people
who like the views expressed in an editorial do not express
themselves very frequently, while those who dislike them qive
vent to bitter expression.
While it is true that each editorial must stand by itself it is
frue. nevertheless, that an editorial is best judged by the repu-
tation of a paper over a period of time: "Is the paper qiven
over to wild or unjustified statements? Is the editorial policy
inconsistent? Is the paper's policy one that shows an iqno-
xance of things that pertain to Judaism' Is the paper com-
munity-minded? These and other questions are best answered
over a period of time, and they should bring to each editorial
that appears, a meaning over and above the individual edi-
torial. Critics of editorials usually show, too, that they have
not read the editorial carefully, that they have read into it
remarks and meanings not written into it by the editor, that
they are are so convinced of their own belief that they are
incapable of understanding that another view is possible
Some Jewish papers have been so plagued by the editorial
situation that they no longer run editoriaU-o decision unfair
u lommunal betterment. Some confine themselves to one
short and non-controversial editorial each week. Some clio
one safe editorial each week from another paper and run none
of their own. Some subscribe to national services which send
four or five editorials each week from which a choice can be
Vfu ^B Ch(?iCe is frecIuently made on the basis of the
size of the editorial and the space available on the editorial
page.
The readers of the The Outlook are given editorials based
on fact and intended for the betterment of things American and
Jewish. We are careful of our facts and proud of our service
to American and Jewish ideals. When it comes to a difference
of opinion or interpretation, we want it known that we respect
the views of others in the same spirit that we want our views
T GSpCCtQ.
ABOUT PEOPLE .
On October 15th Henry Montor will assume the Execu-
*T kfcSrtfcj^Jft*, 2-,ni8t EmeraencY Committee, of
which Rabbi Abba Hillel Silver is now the co-chairman
New literary critic for Esquire is publisher Bennett Cerf, who
sure knows a good book when he see,s it Look who's a
labor leader now ... Its none other than subway builder
Sam Rosoff, who was chosen as their union head by the
workers employed on his Mexican construction job
The statement has oftentimes
been made that "the greatest
enemy of the Jew is the Jew him-
self." The fifth session of the
American Jewish Conference
held on August 31st, at the Wal-
dorf Astoria Hotel, New York,
gave proponents of that state-
ment an opportunity to add an-
other example to the long list
which they say proves its truth.
The delegates were shocked to
read in the New York Times a
statement of 'The American
Council for Judaism" opposing a
Jewish Commonwealth in Pales-
tine. This Council, a body of
100 men, issued the statement in
the name, so they said, of "Amer-
icans of Jewish Faith." Natural-
ly, the program of the Confer-
ence had not planned a discus-
sion of that group. However,
the publication of its statement
caused the Chairman, Henry
Monsky, to recognize the resent-
ment and indignation of the dele-
gates and their desire to express
themselves about it. He per-
mitted four speakers to take the
floor for the discussion, namely,
Rabbi James G. Heller, for the
Central Conference of American
Rabbis; Rabbi Robert Gordis. for
the Conservative Rabbis; Rabbi
Joseph H. Lookstein. for the Or-
thodox Rabbis, and Dr. Stephen
S. Wise, a member of the Con-
ference Presidium.
Rabbi Heller called attention
to the fact that the Central Con-
ference of American Rabbis had
declared that the "American
Council for Judaism" is a disrup-
tive force, represented a com-
paratively minority of the Re-
form Rabbinate, and an infini-
tesimal minority of the Jewish
laity. He stated: "Any group in
American Jewish life had the
right to come to this meeting to
state its point of view and agi-
tate for it. The American Coun-
cil for Judaism has a number of
men on the floor of this Confer-
ence. To issue this statement at
this time, totally aside from its
merit or demerit, in and of itself
is a disservice to this representa-
tive body, is a denial in Jewish
life of that very democracy
which this statement declares it
loves and serves."
Rabbi Gordis said: "It seems
difficult to believe that in this
day and age when our people
are beset by enemies on all sides
a group of men who denominate
themselves as Jewish leaders,
would feel called upon to fulfill
the prophetic words. Thine ene-
mies and thy destroyers arise
from thine own midst." I have
no hesitation in saying that the
so-called American Council for
Judaism is neither American, nor
a Council, nor Judaism."
Rabbi Lookstein said: "Those
who dare speak in this hour of
crisis, those who dare speak at
this moment of universal Jewish
sorrow, those who dare to stand
at the grave of 3.000.000 Jews and
mutter about 'theoretical' home-
lessness of the Jew. who dare to
fiddle on their distorted theologi-
cal fiddle while the Jewish world
,i,Urnu w not t0 punch us belw
the belt, not to stab us in the
heC t Venly to stab us m thc
Dr. Stephen Wise said: "We
are not going to accept a new
lorah from a group of men who
come to us with the readiness to
destroy the democratic character
Israe We speak here for Kol
5fi J cy speak. for K"'alth
t c curse of which they
seek to bring upon Israel as we
t?Jw Umfy 'V. ,0 umte and
to make it one."
Henry Monsky then expressed
the sentiments of the delegates
b.v saying, ,n part: The Ameri-
can Council for Judaism, a Tody
2*1*2? mn sPt,akl"K for themV
selyes. have seen fit to issue a
statement in the name of Ameri-
cans of Jewish faith at a time
when the American Jewish X
ference. a democratically elected
tt;hrCprCSentinK ^ ma jo?
Jewish organization and com-
munity ,n the United Stalest
seeking to unite American Jewrv
l,utionCOr!rim10n,Pro^ram for the s"
rnnt? the ,t.,rafIc Prblems con-
fronting world Jewry. The tim-
ing of this action rmYst be cha
renrehnn Si unsPorfmanlike and
reprehensibly impertinent. It is
calculated to confuse American
public opinion and to disrupt the
American Jewish Community"
Upon motion of Fred Butzel of
-TIDBrrS FROM EVER
Mtidtly eonfubudhi
-By PHTNEAS J. BIRON-
LOOKING TO ZION .
An American League
for
'"U1|H I I L-
launched by the Committee for a Jewish Army .. Th I
will seek to enlist one million members, Jewish 'v0**
Jewish, for the cause of a Free Palestine And th i ^
will launch a nation-wide campaign, with all the ^
nalia of modern propaganda ... We wonder what vSu^'
official Zionist attitude toward this league The ZOA
not very well fight a non-sectarian organization dadt^
to a cause it stands for ... At a public meeting L ftSS
Theatre at Wellington, New Zealand, Prime MmSte P^"
spoke in unequivocal terms about "four-square justice S
ancient home and the new hope of the Jewish people''
New Zealand is the only country whose Premier ha." j
dressed a public Zionist meeting Bravo, Mr Frase
In April. 1944, all Jewish immigration to Palestine rnustLu
to an end according to the terms of the British I9iq wv
Paper ... And April 12, 1944, is the date Dr. Stephen SuF
has picked for Hitler's final defeat. w*
HERE AND THERE ...
The American Jewish Conference is finding it difficult m
organize its activities While some of its leaders think ft* I
it is the duty of the Conference to get busy and take the lead
in the implementing of its resolutions, others are hopina E
the Conference, now that it has held its assembly will dk
a peaceful death There will be fireworks when the Cot
ference's Interim Committee of 52 meets this month Aside
to Chaplain Abraham Dubin of the U. S. Army: Those 15 (KB
Jews you found in India are not quite the "forgotten colony
you believe them to be Indeed, a comprehensive article
on their history and life appears in the Universal Jewish En
cyclopedia, under the heading "Beni Israel" ... A school
principal in Amsterdam, in his farewell speech to his clou
said: "I am speaking with mixed feelings, because I an
thinking of the Jewish children who formerly shared the
benches with you boys and girls ... I hope that you will
never forget your Jewish fellow pupils" Whereupon the
courageous teacher was made to feel the barbarous rage erf
the Nazis ... But his sacrifice is another proof that Holland
has not submitted to her oppressors.
WAR ECHOES .
One of the new Liberty Ships is named after our old friend
Haym Salomon, the financier of Revolutionary Days..
Whenever a member of Cleveland's The Temple, Dr. Abbe
H. Silver's congregation, goes off to the wars, he is present
with a silver mezuza Succinct review of the milta
events of 5703, as current on Broadway: The only thing h
Nazis have captured in the past year isMussolini..
Harry Hershfield suggests that pretty soon Hitler may be rt-
duced to telling Musso the Mussed story of his past exploit!
in the manner of the hunter who was narrating: ". and
then, when I ran out of ammunition, I suddenly found mysel
surrounded by a lion, a bear and an eagle" "And what
happened then?" the stooge now asks "What happened?
Why, I was killed."
BOOKS AND AUTHORS .
Hats off to newsman Cecil Brown for giving up a $58,000-
-a-year radio job in protest against Columbia Broadcasting
System's new policy of forbidding its commentators to ex-
press an opinion Brown has been swamped with thou-
sands of fan letters commending his resignation and hi*
refusal to submit to such censorship Stefan Heym, author
of "Hostages," is with the Army in more ways than one..
Not only is Heym himself a Private, but Army authorities are
said to be distributing 50,000 copies of his book among sol-
diers overseas Private Robert L. Nathan, former chief of
the War Production Board's Planning Board, has been ill, and
may receive a medical discharge from the Army During
the enforced leisure of his hospital stay Nathan wrote the
outline for a book he is planning on post-war economic prob-
lems Abraham Goldberg's posthumous book, "Pioneers
and Builders," is out ... It looks good and reads well, and
Pierre van Paassen's short foreword is a masterpiece
And Pete Gross, the editor, did a swell job with rather uneven
material ... It deserves a place in every Jewish home.
THIS AND THAT .
Wonder what the shade of old Mayer Amschel Roths-
child, founder of the famous banking family, thought the
other day when his descendent, Bettina de Rothschild, for-
merly of Vienna, and on her mother's side a member of the
famous Montefiore family of England, was married in New
York by the rector of St. Thomas Church Justice Francis
E Rivers of the New York City Court, recently appointed to
the highest judicial office ever held by a Negro in the Empir
State, had a hard time, because of his color, in finding a job
after graduating from Columbia Law School a couple
decides ago But finally he got one, in the law firm ot
Jonah J. Goldstein, now himself a General Sessions Judge
Detroit, the statement of Monsky
was unanimously adopted as ex-
pressing the action of the Con-
ference.
Quislings were found in Nor-
way; saboteurs were apprehend-
ed in America. We have the
American Council for Judaism"
to obstruct the efforts of the
American Jewish people to
press their will and reach tneu
goal, the establishement oi
Jewish Commonwealth in raic
tine.
A good buy is a War Bond. BJ
now and you will be paid m
.00 for every $300.


|AY. OCTOBER 15, 1943 *Jewisti rhrii^r PAGE FIVE
BETWEEN YOU AND WIE OUR JEWISH FILM FOLK IT HAPPENED LIST WEEK
BY BORIS SMOLAR Copyright, 1943, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc. ------------- BY HELEN ZIGMOND Copyright, 1943, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc. BY MILTON BROWN Copyright, 1943, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc.
Washington Notes: People in Washington ore
much interested in knowing who is behind the
Fly-formed "American Resettlement Committee
fUprooted Jews" which recently inserted a full-
advertisement in the New York press .
fe may even be an attack on it from the floor
Congress because of its slogan: "Jews to Pales-
I Arabs to Iraq!" ... It is suspected that this is
ler branch of the same group which organized
iCommittee for a Jewish Army, the pageant "We
Never Die," and the Emergency Committee to
the Jewish People of Europe The program
le new organization seems to be based on the
"The Middle East" by Elihau Ben-Horin urg-
the transfer of all Palestinian Arabs to Iraz in
sr to make room for European Jews in Palestine
L Incidentally, Mr. Ben-Horin is the executive di-
Hor of the new organization Washington corre-
Kndents are beginning to get annoyed with the
d of publicity releases which they have been
fcving from busy bodies in the capital in behalf
Jewish organizations or delegations One of
Bn asks me to advise Jewish publicity men that
Hould be better for them to place a few copies of
r releases in the press room of the State Depart-
Bit, or the White House, and at the National Press
Hb, and refrain from tagging along after delega-
tm* Copies may also be placed in the press
nUeries of the House and the Senate The tag-
Big along isn't customary and makes a bad im-
ression The name of the press agent and the
telephone number should be on the handout, and a
representative should remain at the telephone all
the time to answer questions ... "I think they would
find that their stories would get better play if they
did this," this Washington correspondent asks me
to tip off the interested Jewish organizations .
Needless to say that the correspondents of the Jew-
ish Telegraphic Agency in Washington is not
among the Washington reporters who are annoyed
with the flood of publicity by Jewish organizations
and delegations ... He can always be reached at
the JTA Washington office in the National Press
Building.
Arabian Themes: Arabs in the United States
are now discussing the question of launching an
Arab newspaper in the English language Such
newspaper, if published, would concentrate
chiefly on combatting Zionism, Arab leaders in
New York admit While ihe nature of the conver-
ts between President Roosevelt and Emih Fei-
in Washington remains a state secret, it is
m that the son of King Ibn Saud made a rather
^pointing impression on some of the Congress-
I "All he wants is money," one of the mem-
of the Foreign Affairs Committee said after the
guest was presented to the Committee by Con-
sman Soil Bloom Some members of the
imittee wanted to know his attitude on the Arab-
question They made no complimentary
larks later about his reply ... In case you are
terested in the program of Emir Feisal's visit to
United States, here it is ... He landed at Miami
1 was met there by a representative of the State
ipartment The next day he had dinner at the
nite House ... A day later he was honored with
dinner by the Acting Secretary of State at the
rlton Hotel in Washington Assistant Secretary
tendered him a luncheon at his residence .
reptions were held in his honor at the Iraquian
Egyptian legations and at the Turkish Embassy
In New York he was met at the station by an
:ort of sixty policemen, some with motorcycles,
took him to City Hall in Mayor LaGuardia's
icial car The first luncheon he had in New
was arranged at the National City Bank, the
cond at the Banker's Club Emir Feisal's visit
this country ends on October 23 ... It is unlikely
lat he will meet any Zionist leaders here, since he
i not expected to return to Washington or to New
fork during the last two weeks of his stay here.
American "Crusaders": A breezy novel, "See
fhat I Mean," dealing fictionally with the anti-
jmitic movement in the United States was pub-
shed this week by Random House ... Its author
the well-known Lewis Browne Written very
mch in the style of "What Makes Sammy Run,"
le book gives quite an intimate picture of rack-
Meers who discovered that it pays to be anti-Jewish
. The spiritual head of these anti-Jewish "cru-
Jders" is a half-wit who finally lands in an insane
xsylum ... He is being "managed" by a couple of
iwindlers who exploit his hatred of Jews to fleece
xir and ignorant women of nickels and dimes...
ie trio is financed by an owner of a chain of drug
Mores who is, for commercial reasons, interested
lot so much in the "movement" as in the anti-
Jewish boycott propaganda which it carries on
igainst his Jewish business competitor Added
Sid Grauman, super showman of these or any
other times, wil leave more tracks on the sands of
the amusement world than are imprinted in the
forecourt of his Chinese Theatre. His latest unique
creation is to be a waxworks museum of Holly-
wood. It will occupy a three-story building will
house realistic paraffin figures of past and present
movie greats will tell tallow tales in tableaus
from outstanding films contain a cinema theatre
where old flickers will unreel and boast a staff
of lecturers just to put that high-brow touch to the
waxen assemblage.
Certain that it won't belong before France will
be liberated, the studio has already prepared Franz
Werfel's "Song of Bernadette" with a French dialog
sound track. A bit premature perhaps but .
even a German version is being considered.
Eddie Cantor's eyes almost popped out of his
head when Morton May, scion of the department
store family, hand him a check in the amount oi
$1,000,000 for the purchase of War Bonds
And Berle's latest axiom is: "If we 'Back the At-
tack,' we'll never again be attacked in the back!"
Nostalgiana: The Old Timers, bond sellers of
1917 campaigns, pitted their skill against the Bonda-
deers of 1943- Among the oldsters were Willie How-
ard and Harry Hershfield. Captain of the Young-
sters was Phil Baker. Which team won remains
an unrecorded military secret.
Al Shean is cooking up a plan to revive his old
vaude act"Oh, Mr. Gallagher; Oh, Mr. Shean."
He'll choose a new partner for the late Mr. Galla-
gher, and tour the Army camps-
Research revealed that George Gershwin was
extremely fond of clothes, so his filmbiog calls for
forty costume changes.
A letter received from Jack Benny in the mid-
East looks like the original black-out. Censor tracks
obliterated all but five legible lines. Benny's return
to the film village is expected in November when he
is to start "The Horn Blows at Midnight."
Turnabout fair film: Georgie Jessel has prom-
ised Eddie Cantor to impersonate himself in Can-
tor's epic, "Show Business" and Cantor is com-
mitted to characterize himself in Jessel's flicker,
"The Dolly Sisters."
finances from a mysterious source believed to be
the German Consulate These "crusaders" and
their fifth-column activities are presented by the
author in a manner which makes for amusing and
interesting reading not only for Jews but for every
American Based on actual testimony presented
before a grand jury, which resulted in the indict-
ment of about thirty men and women, the book "See
What I Mean" has all the qualities of becoming a
best seller because of the humorous style in which
it is written ... At the same time the volume is no
less a contribution to the literature on combatting
subversive movements than any of the serious
books written on this subject.
March of Events: The Zionist Organization of
America is finding difficulty in securing a manag-
ing editor for its official organ, "The New Pales-
tine" Carl Alpert, the able editor of the publi-
cation, is going into the Army in a few weeks, and
the ZOA is confronted witih a real problem in ob-
taining a successor for him The ZOA is also
losing to the Army its comptroller, Zvi Levavay,
who at one time served with the Department of
Immigration of the Palestine Government and was
formerly secretary of the Danish Consulate at Tel
Aviv The Jewish Historical Society of Chicago
is now making preparations for the celebration of
the 100th anniversary of Chicago's first "Minyan"
. When Chicago was incorporated as a city in
1837, there were only five Jews there out of a popu-
lation of 4,170 Later, in 1843, more Jews had
arrived and the nucleus of a Jewish community was
born The first religious service was held by this
little band of Chicago Jews on Yom Kippur in a
small room above a store on Wells Street The
Jewish Centennial Week which the historical so-
ciety is planning will be carried out on a large scale
with the participation of all major Jewish organiza-
tions in the city Speaking of anniversaries, it
is well to remember that this year marks the com-
pletion of fifty years of service by the Jewish Chau-
tauqua Society which is now under the sponsorship
of the National Federation of Temple Brotherhoods
. The Society disseminates facts on Jews among
students in universities and colleges, carrying on
its educational program on a non-propagandistic
basis with speakers from every wing of Jewry .
In 1943 approximately 100 different represenatives
of the Society visited 210 campuses in 46 states of
the United States and two provinces oi Canada.
In Washington and Jerusalem, there were two
important visitors this week. Emir Feisal, son of
Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia, was in Washington, the
guest of our State Department, invited there, accord-
ing to reports, at the special instance of Assistant
Secretary of State Berle.
In Jerusalem, the important visitor was Ivan
Maisky, Soviet Vice-Commissar of Foreign Affairs.
On the fact of it, it would seem there was no
connection between the visits by these different
leaders in different parts of the world, and yet it
may be there was a very important connection.
One merely has to recall the charge made by the
columnist, Drew Pearson, that Mr. Berle is interested
in building up a series of buffer states against Rus-
suia to "catch on." It will be recalled that this
accusation was levelled against our State Depart-
ment in connection with the reported invitation to
Ibn Saud to visit this country.
It stands to reason that Russia would be inter-
ested in defeating such machinations. If our gov-
ernment is seeking to build up an Arab bulwark
against the Soviet, it might well be the Soviet's pol-
icy to attempt to throw a monkey wrench in this by
building up a counterweight. The very strange
thing might come to pass that Mr. Berle would
throw Russia on the side of Jewish Palestine. If he
did this, the Zionists would doubtless be eternally
grateful to him, for no one has any doubt but that
Russia is going to play a very important part in
deciding the fate of the Near East after the war.
This is all pure conjecture, of course. At any
rate, the very visit of so leading a Soviet figure as
Ivan Maisky to Jerusalem is an event of extraordi-
nary importance. According to the report, Mr.
Maisky asked some significant questions. He
wasn't there merely for his health or pleasure. He
asked Mr. Ben-Gurion about Palestine's absorptive
capacity and listened with great interest to the story
of what has been done in Palestine.
The city of Washington was the scene of a pic-
turesque spectacle this week when a pilgrimage
of orthodox rabbis met with Vice-President Wal-
lace on the steps of the Capitol and recited the
psalms and prayed for the rescue of the Jews under
the Nazi heel.
At the same time there came reports from Den-
mark which show that the Nazis have learned as
yet nothing about civilization and the standards of
decency, although it would seem that they have
suffered enough hard blows to absorb a few les-
sons. The action of Sweden in publicly offering to
receive the Jews of Denmark is, as the man in the
street would say, "Swell!" Such action as this by
the larger countries is what has been asked for all
the time. It may be that the Nazis would reject
any such plea by the mightier nations as they do
that of Swedenand then again it may be that
they would not. The Nazis do respect power, for
that means the possibility of vengeance and they
know that Sweden won't do much avenging, but
the larger countries can.
The Scandinavian countries have been one of
the few bright spots in this world tragedy. Almost
every Swedish newspaper voiced its approval of
the Swedish government's offer to receive the Jews.
The Swedes took definite steps, while the Anglo-
American countries merely call conferences which
are empty of any real meaning. It is painful to say
such things about one's own country, but lets quit
bluffing.
The religious leaders of all faiths, Protestants,
Catholics and Jews, have united on a seven-point
declaration of a world order based on moral law.
The declaration of principles and ideals which
these men of religion believe should guide the
making of a post-war world, represent much pa-
tient study. They have come forward with a very
fine statement of principles. Perhaps the most im-
portant thing isthat they have come forward
togethernot so much the statements. They could
have found an equally good statement, for example,
in the prophet Isaiah or Amos. But it is important
that Protestant and Catholic and Jewish religious
leaders should get together and exert the weight
of their influence to lead the people to these fine
ideals.
There was a report this week that Britain is con-
sidering the creation of a Jewish army of possibly
one or more divisions to help drive the Japanese
from Burma. "The idea," says the report, "has
found favor in certain responsible miUtary quar-
ters."
We can's speak authoritatively for those favor-
ing a Jewish army, but nevertheless, if we may
drop a hint to the British government, it would be:
drop the idea. The place to have started a Jewish
army, if at all, was around Palestine.


1
PAGE SIX
vjewisti tkridiair
FRIDAY,

i
OCTOBES
-
THE Y. M. H. A.
NOTES
BT HARRY SCHWARTZ
SHE
TO III SEVENTEEN
SERVICE AGENCIES
Fall Activities Begin
The first in the series of aduh
programs sponsored by the "Y"
for this Fall will take place on
Sunday evening, October 17. in
the nature of a Rally for new
members. Elsewhere in this is-
sue more details will be found.
Other activities for the month
of October are as follows:
October 18. 7:30 P. M.Boy
Scout Review Court.
October 25. 3:30 P. M.Danc-
ing classes for children begin.
October 25, 7:30 P. MCourse
in Conversational Spanish be-1
gins
October 26. 8:30 P. M.Annual
Dance ..t Coral Gables Country
Club.
October 28. 8:30 P. M.Lecture
on Jewish Historyfirst in se-
ries sponsored by the Y. M. H. A.
in co-operation with the Rabbini-
cal Association. Dr. Jacob Kap-
lan, lecturer.
In addition to the above, the
reguli ly activities of the
"Y" for youths will take place,
such as meetings and projet I
Boy Scouts, Cub Troop, A. Z. A..
B. Z B, and other youth groups.
Persons interested in any of
the above projects are urged to
at the V office imme-
miately.
Diamondball
Our D rn, with-
out any fanfare, has been doing
a splendid job for the past sev-
eral weeks It has played the
various service teams in the sur-
rounding areas. This is greatly
appreciated by the officers and
men as it gives them an outlet
for their energy. Last Sunday
they played the Coast Guards and
won. Several such games are
planned for the succeeding Sun-
days. Games are held at the
Riverside Playground.
Boy Scouts
The "Y" once more has been
chosen by the Dade County Boy-
Scout Association to hold its Re-
view Court at the "Y"' on Mon-
day evening. October 18. This is
ngular hi nor b< cause, under
ordinary circumstances, our turn
would nJt come for another six
or eightanonths, but the mem-
bers ot r>e Association feel that
our facilities an so good that
hav< asked us to hold this
Review once more before our
regular scheduled tune. Scouts
from all over the county will at-
tend and will be examini
their officers for merit.
12th Annual Dance Oct. 26th
Larry Grossberg, Chairman of
the 12th Annual Dance Commit-
tee, reports B brisk sale oi tick-
ets for this event Reservations
are now being taken
GEORGE T. COSTELLO NEW
RED CROSS REPRESENTATIVE
The appointment ol George T.
Cost) llo 40f. I.-.ke Elbert Drive,
Winter Haven, Fli as General
rield Representative for the
American Ked CK ss v. ith terri-
tory in the southern half ot the
ida Peninsula hi been an-
nounci d by the South* asti i n
Area Headquarters, ten pol
at Alexandria V*a
He will act as the liaison be-
tween Red Cros C .,; : an I
Area Headquarters, and
travel the' i poi ti. n ol his
visiting chapters in bis
rritory and helping then- af.
ficials develop Red C activi-
Mr. Costello, en a
Aid and Lift Saving in-
structor with Hed Cro.-.- for n
years, both as a volunteer and a
member ol the national staff,
traveled through the Orient and
in Hawaii and the Philippines in
!!)4l on special assignment with
the Insular and Foreign Service
of Red Cross. He taught First
Aid and Life Saving to men and
women in the islands and spent
some time in China.
Cairo (WNS)A broup of Ar-
abs attacked a n d seriously
I' woun l< manj J< ws in Morocco
on V'liii KippUT eve, it was re-
ported here this week. The Ai-
ved to hi i 'i in-
cited by pro-Nazi elements to
pogromize the Jewish population.
' thi Jews a.-saulted re-
lion
Jacksonville. Fla..State head
quarters of the Florida War
Fund, Inc.. affiliated with the
National War Fund, today point-
ed to a list of some of the causes
served by the National War Fund
through the 17 great organiza-
tions which are member agen-
cies.
"In this gnat humanitarian
undertaking." Dr. John J. Tigert.
state campaign chairman._ said.
we want the people of Florida
to know what is the National
War Fund and what it is doing in
the way of service to our men in
the various branches of the
armed forces, and what assis-
tance it is giving to the people of
suffering nations. which are
sympathetic to the Allied cause."'
More than S.ooo.OOO men and
women of the U. S. fighting
forces look to the USO each
I month fot off-duty recreation,
comforts and spiritual well
Tigert said. In addition, nearly
1.000 professional enti rtainers
are givmg nightly performances
under the auspices of USO Camp
Shows. Inc.. tor our service men
at home and abroad tq keep them
laughing,
"Thousand of merchant sea-
men, who bring the convoys
through mine infested lanes to
their final destination, find need-
-t and relaxation in homes
and centers operated by the
United Seami ns' Service in co-
operation with the War Shipping
Administration in ports m two
hemispheres.' Tigert said.
The state chairman pointed
out. too. that more than 6.000.-
000 men are in the "barbed wire
; legion." prisoners of.war. who
need more than the established
n regime if their spirit is to
be maintained lor peacetime use-
fulness.
Another important service. Dr.
Tigert said, is that rendered to
some 30.000.000 refugees from
Axis terrors Scattered through-
out the world, these people need
friendly help in their efforts to
re-establish themselves, he
added.
In that connection, he pointed
further to some startling stafis-
Between 5.000.000 and 7.-
m
In the interests of wartime conser-
vation, Uncle Sam asks us to MAKE
THE THINGS WE HAVE. DO. If you
can't use it, let someone else have it.
MALL ELECTRIC
!\ .
'a
PLIANCE YOU WANT TO

Cooperation Uamwork lhat'i (he
key to victory. Your shelved appliance
may be badly Hooded by someone elie.
U beyond repair, you can soil it lor sal-
vage of parts. Our Trading Post was
established
uie it
to help you. Como in and
nosuD* po
court**
HM
000.000 Chinese people are facing
starvation. Of the Greek chil-
dren born since 1940, less than
one in twenty is alive today due
to starving conditions. Approxi-
mately 40.000.000 Russians have
I had to evacuate their homes.
I More than 2.000 child victims of
tin war have been evacuated to
this country for care and protec-
tion, and hundreds of others
await the miracle of rescue.
Tigert said mat one out of
every five homes in Britain have
i been ruined or damaged by
1 raids, and that in China 2.000
children have been orphaned
left homeless.
"Thousands of women war vic-
tims, internees, evacuees and
refugees need assistance," he
added.
"These and other needs on the
Military Front, the United Na-
tions Front and the Home Front
are served by the agencies par-
ticipating in the National War
Fund and local united war
chests." Tigert'said.
LEGAL
notice"
NOTICI is
NOTICES
uNDER~rTr-~-
*aminlism
LAW T|lfl
the undei : '''^"ffllVpy
the Clerk .., ,' *'" "i.,?
ti-UB name tr'^VK *.*,
Miami Bench, |.-|,i,u '"'TICal
*" '"<'' in ta8nV*5*
9/17-24 10,1.,.,- '"< E J
Zurich (JTA). Traveling by
Jews in Rumania has been fur-
ther restricted as a result of the
restlessness prevailing in the
country since the present success-
ful offensive of the Russian army
began,
The Bucharest radio this wi'ek
1 ported that Jews holding travel
permits will have to submit them
to the authorities for revision in
connection with the new travel
regulations for the Jewish popu-
lation. At the same time the
broadcast warned that severe
punishment will be imposed upon
Rumania business firms which
do not comply with the labor reg-
ulations concerning the employ-
ment ol Jews.
fictitious name
Clerk or the
County, Florida
In u,,.
' ircult
Conn
SAMIKI,
DA VII
DAVID BLAN^
MARION hS#
'P
: iUv%r%*
LOUIH HEIMA^?"CMU
Attorney f.i .\pi.ii,..ni.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT J
11th JUDICIAL, euLiW
FLORIDA. |N AND ?oL'T.!
COUNTY. iN CHANCWrl
No. 80950
CECIL HARRISON cTrvn
Pla INhV
LfJEABBTM REBECCA nirJ
Defendan) *
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
rou. i:i.ix a 1:1:111 rprS
1 "' 10 raj
the nbova
illna, are
appeal knci
I Hvorc*
Buy War Savings Bonds.
HELP WANTED
BODY AND FENDER
MAN
TOP PRICES PAID
Apply or Call
WALTERSON
BODY WORKS. INC.
1135 N. Miami Avenue
PHONE 2-8816
* ............ move nm
Divorce 01 ,, ubt _
'"' il, ''''':"' '-- win"nl
tered against M
I ATEI Sept. .' lu
. i: B LEATHERN
IBM I I! K .1 ,;,,;
I It 1-8-15-22, u
NOTICE UNDER FICTll
NAME LAW W
Notice is henb) g|v<
undersigned. HAKKY STEM a
bualneaa under ti><
NEW VORK BAKERY
Court, Miami Uearh, KlondiTta
t.. rearlatei said 'i. iitiou nui
Office "f the Clerk ol
Court, Dade County, y
HARR1
LOUIS HBIMAN
Attoroe) for Apprl
10/1-15-ZI-SI 11 i
REAL ESTATEMIAMI BEACH
B. E. BRONSTON, Realtor 605 Lincoln Road Ph. 5-5868
A Trustworthy Real Estate Service
1> I-! Free ISM! Descriptive. Map ..r Miami Be u a
NOTICE UNDER FICTIT'OLS
NAME LAW
No) i' .- in reb r 1 .
undersigned, MONTE SELK M
NIE SKI.Hi ;inil IDA RAI
partners doing buidnen isAy t
fictitious name ol .-
Spirit a at 17 N W ith BtraLlj
da, Intend l<> regitti
turns nami
f the Circuit Court, ItdtCMK
Florida,
Mi'NTK '
F\\N11
ll>.\ ;
X !
LOl'Ifl HEIMAN
Atto...... (ppl .ii u
10 I- I5-S2-S9 II
RENTALS LEASES SALES
Lots. Homes. Hotels
Apartment Houses
M. GILLER
Reg. Real Estate Broker
Ph. 58-1188 523 Mich. Art.
I WANT MY MILK
Bur* It'a
FLORIDA
DAIRIES
HOMOGENIZED
Vitamin "D" Milk
"Milk Product"
Dbcto Protected
TEL. 2-2621
Greater Miami Delivery
Visit Our Farm at
200 H. W. 32nd Street
NOTICE OF APPLICATION <%
TAX DEED
File 37106
Notli e is hen
P CHRISTOPHER, I I* u ]
f City >' Hlaleal Ti i I
Numb< dated I I
>f .liilv. .\ I i
Mflcate In n offii and hw J
application for tax In a '
Certificate en the '*{J
:. .i
County, Florid i _.
i>.i ;:. Bio h ". Amenoel f*
of MelroHe Qardi
if III..I. all
Htate nf Floi ni i
The aaseaameni t>t -aid w*
under the Ceri
thi i im of CNKNOWN J
Certificate shall i-- r.-.i.em*d J
ini; to law, tax deed will
<-ii on the '.'iii da> id Novesias-.'
1 ii
Dated this 5th da
I I' i :
!:. li. NEATHERMAN
Clerk "' ciri-uliCoJi
Dade County, rw;"
(Circuit Court Heal)
By N C Sterrett '' l
10 s-i:, ::-::< n _____ J
IN THE CIRCI IT COfRl'* 1
li Til Jl'DICIAL CIRWTJ
FI/ORJDA, IN AND Pf
COl'NTY L\ '"HANI KK>
No.
CARL RIPLET
Plaintiff
ELIZABETH RIPLET,
I (efi
ORDE
V..U. i:i...
I'nioii Street, Wharton, >
are notified to file >"'
in the above ca i '
Defendant ,,_.nN
,ER OF PUBLICATION
elizabbtii iur_>y
.. ... II I, Ml, HI >' J 3
oafesao will l"' M
Octobei !*!
pr<
you
DATED
i : 11
(ski.11 B) wm
l" 1-lS-SI-tl 11 '
tered *
\. i^dft i
Tiiomi
for RST
COHVALtSCfW
^Ch-ohkC**
IthReson
tit


llY. dCTOBER 15. 1943
*JewisliHcrM/an
PAGE SEVEN
ARMED SERVICE
rd has been received of the
otion of Ely Katz to the rank
ijor.
t. Herbert B. Wilensky, son
and Mrs. Wolf Wilensky,
, W. Fourth Ave., has been
a cadet in the Army spe-
training unit, and is now
>ned at Muskingum College,
Concord, O. He is a gradu-
>f Miami Senior High school
[spent two years at the Uni-
Ity of Florida.
GREATER MIAMI ARMY-NAVY COMMITTEE
Of The Jewish Welfare Board
A COMMUNITY PROJECT
Help Ui Keep a Record of Our Men in Service
' IK' II'
SERVICE [ 1W PARADE!
/c E. Howard Lavine, son of
I. H. Lavine, 2117 S. W. 5th
fct, flew into the city for the
Kippur Holiday. A recent
late of the Jacksonville Na-
Station's Ordnance
)1, Seaman Lavine is at-
to a fighter squadron sta-
at Lee Field, Green Coves
igs, Fla.
Aaron Goldenblank. sta-
at Camp Gordon Johnson,
is spending a 10-day fur-
with his parents, Mr. and
M. Goldenblank, 1923 S. W.
Terrace. He is a former stu-
the University of Florida,
lating in 1938.
t Murray Dackt is now en-
at the University of Cali-
jbm under the Army Special-
Training Program. He was
'lerly stationed at the Santa
kna, Cal., Army Air Base.
News has been received that
William H. Bermtein has been
promoted to the rank of captain
rCamp Patrick Henry in Vir-
S^nia. Mrs. Bernstein and three
BUghters have just returned to
their homo. 4565 N. Bay Road,
after a visit with her sister, Mrs.
M. M. Silberstein in Johnstown,
Pa.
Capt. Bernstein now is serving
overseas.
Jerome J. Berger, Miami Beach
business man. who ha sbeen serv-
ing in the navy at the Miami
Naval Air Station for the past 11
months, has been commissioned a
lieutenant (j. g.) it was learned
today.
Lieutenant Berger lives at 4141
Nautilus Drive, and was manager
of the Outlet Shop, a women's
el business, at 1150 Lincoln
^Lieutenant Berger is a gradu-
||e of Lehigh University at Beth-
em, Pa., and came to Miami
ich eight years ago from
Skill, N. Y.
le has been assigned to the
Transport Command, Squad-
7, at the Miami Naval Air
Ition and will report next week
his new assignment at the
Ulywood, Fla., Naval Training
ition.
[Sgt. Samuel H. Glasser, son of
s. Ida Glasser and graduate of
ami Beach Senior High School,
now receiving a radio-opera-
r-gunner training at Alexan-
ia, La., Army Air Base. He is
member of a Flying Fortress
tew nearly ready for overseas
bmbat duty.
Sgt. Aaron Meyers, 27, of St.
Louis, Mo., engaged in the New
Guinea fighting for many
months, has been awarded the
Silver Star for gallantry in com-
bat. One of the first of the air-
borne infantry men to go into
action in that theatre of war.
Sergeant Meyers is credited with
substantially contributing to the
progress of the Allied campaign
in New Guinea.
Prt. James Poris, 21, of Elm-
irst, L. I., volunteering for a
pecial communications mission
the epochal battle of Hill 609,
?as killed by enemy shell fire.
lis mother is a lieutenant in the
|ed Cross Prisoner of War Pack-
?ing Service; she is also a Gray
ady serving in the Emergency
fard at Queens General Hos-
pital.
^ Seaman Robert Biglow, 22. of
it. Paul, Minn., was reported
lissing in action after his ship,
He U. S. Destroyer DeHaven,
vas sunk by Jap dive bombers
iff Guadalcanal. A graduate of
Mechanic Art High School. Big-
low operated a "meat market in
Civilian life, when he enlisted in
M Navy a little over a year ago.
Lt. Leonard M Feldman, 23. of
Springfield, 111., Flying Fortress
ombardier, lost his life when his
lip's twin motors went dead on
fie return journey from a suc-
.essful bombing mission and
plunged into the ocean, just two
Jiours from land. The lieutenant
pad taken part in the Battle of
Midway and in numerous other
pacific engagements. Leonard
Bias been posthumously awarded
Ithe Purple Heart.
S/Sgt. George Joseph Smith.
24, of Lynbrook, N. Y., an airman
serving in the South Pacific area,
has been killed in action. Join-
ing the Air Corps almost two
years before Pearl Harbor, Ser-
geant Smith was on duty at Hick-
am Field when the Japs launched
their war. In the next few
months he earned the Air Medal
and an Oak Leaf Cluster, getting
into action in Australia and New
Guinea.
Corp. Milton Melman, 24, of
Middletown, Pa., tail gunner
aboard a Flying Fortress oper-
ating in the South Pacific, sank
a Japanese vessel at Finschhaven.
For his effective work against
the foe, Corporal Melman has
been awarded the Distinguished
Flying Cross and the Air Medal.
Prt. Abraham A. Marder. 26. of
Philadelphia, died of wounds
sustained in the Hill 609 drive.
Private Marder had been en-
gaged in scouting and reconnai-
sance duty. A member of the
Philadelphia YMHA, he was an
all-around athlete. He had been
in service close to two years.
CHAPLAIN H. L. FREUND IS
AT MIAMI BEACH B. T. C 4
Chaplain Hirsch L. Freund has
been appointed as Post Chaplain
of the B. T. C. 4, Miami Beach.
He is a former resident of Cin-
cinnati, Ohio, and was previously
stationed at Fort Knox, Ky., be-
fore coming to Miami Beach
three months ago.
Pfc. Meyer Brener. 37, of New
Orleans, La., lost his life in the
Southwest Pacific area. A mem-
ber of the YMHA and the B'nai
B'rith, he was a furniture sales-
man in civilian life. He has been
posthumously awarded the Pur-
ple Heart.
Petty Officer Marvin C. Huff-
man. 24, of Cincinnati, lost his
life in the Mediterranean. A me-
chanic in civilian life,
Lt. Julian S. Adleman. 32. of
Medford, Mass., a member of the
Medical Corps, was killed in ac-
tion in the Mediterranean zone.
A physician in civilian life, he
was graduated from Medford
High School and Middlesex Col-
legt.
Lt. Milton Greene. 27, of Den-
ver, Colo., a Flying Fortress pi-
lot participating in the relentless
air hammering of Hitler's Fort-
ress Europa, holds six decora-
tions: the Distinguished Service
Cross, the Distinguished Flying
Cross, the Air Medal, and three
Oak Leaf Clusters. Completing
25 successful bombing missions
over vital Nazi targets. Lieuten-
ant Green was shipped back to
the States and is now on duty
at the Pocatella Air Base in
Idaho as pilot instructor follow-
ing a fifteen-day leave at home.
Lt. Julius Dorfman, 23, of Phil-
adelphia, Pa., co-pilot on a Fly-
ing Fortress, has been reported
missing in action after a bomb-
ing raid over Germany. Lieu-
tenant Dorfman was previously
wounded during a raid on Lori-
ent in which his ship, fighting
against heavy odds, destroyed
several Nazi planes. Lieutenant
Dorfman enlisted in the Air
Force two years ago, after at-
tending Temple University. His
father is assistant to the Super-
visor of the Food Distribution
Administration of the U. S. De-
partment of Agriculture.
Lt. Sidney Casden. 22. of
Brooklyn, missing in action when
his plane was forced down over
France, had written his parents
the day before his plane fell that
"the chances are I'll be all right
even if they do list me as miss-
ing."
Sgt. Irving R. Newman. 23, of
Los Angeles, Cal., member of a
bomber squadron, was killed in
the Middle East fighting. The
son of an Army musician, he had
been in service a year and a half.
His plane went down under ene-
my shells, but every one of the
crew survived the crash except
Irving.
Pvt Sidney Rothenberg,, 28. of
the Bronx, lost his life when his
vessel was sunk in the North At-
lantic by a Nazi submarine early
this year. A member of the
Coast Artillery Corps, Private
Rothenberg had been in service
five months. A graduate of Sew-
ard Park, he was a salesman in
civilian life.
Lt. Raymond T. Siegel. 22. of
Baton Rouge, La., was killed in
action in North Africa, leading
his platoon in an attack on the
foe. He was a student at L. S. U.
when he enlisted a year ago.
Lt. Gilbert H. Wolf. 42, of New
York City, a Medical Corps of-
ficer, lost his life when his ship
went down off the African coast.
A member of the Army Reserve
Corps for five years, Lieutenant
Wolf had been on active duty
five months. He has been pos-
thumously awarded the Purple
Heart.
Lt. Jay J. G. Schats. 25, of Chi-
cago, cited for his "superior per-
formance of duty and calmness
in making decisions in the face
of heavy fighter opposition," has
been decorated with the Dis-
tinguished Flying Cross. Hit by
a bullet that went right through
his left leg, Lieutenant Schatz
also holds the Purple Heart.
Sgt Hyman Phillip*. 24. of
Fairmount, N. D., bombardier, is
missing in action in the European
area. A graduate of North High
School in Minneapolis, Phillips
was an outstanding swimmer and
skier. In service a year and a
half. Sergeant Phillips enlisted
shortly after Pearl Harbor.
Sgt. Simon E. Goldstein, 22. of
Bayside, N. Y., a member of the
Marine Air Corps, was killed in
action in the South Pacific area.
Before joining the Marine Air
Corps a year and a half ago. Ser-
geant Goldstein was a printer in
civilian life.
WAR" RECORDS COMMITTEE
NAT ROTH. Chairman
FRED SHOCHET
MRS. GEORGE M. COHEN
MAURICE GROSSMAN
JENNIE H. ROTFORT
NATHAN ROTHBERO
J. W. B. Director
OFFICERS
SAM BLANK, CHAIRMAN
MONTE SELIQ, Vice-Chairman
JOSEPH A. BERMAN, See.
Executive Committee
Mrs. Waiter Bronaton, Mrs. Max
Dobrin, Maurice Gronmin, Louis
Helman, Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan,
Mrs. Murry Koven, Harry Marko-
wltz, Nat Roth, Fred Shochet.
Milton Sirkin, Joseph Stein. Mrs.
Hermn Wallach, Carl Wainkls.
Georae Wolpert.
Able Bodied Seaman Nathan
Dembofsky. 38, of New York
City, a member of the Merchant
Marine, has been missing in ac-
tion since his ship was torpedoed
sometime ago in the North At-
lantic. Dembofsky, who has
made a career of the Merchant
Marine, has been in its service
twenty-two years.
Soundman 3/c Nathaniel
Brody, 20, of Kerhonkson, N. Y.,
is missing in action. On convoy
duty in the Solomon Islands area,
his vessel was the target of a
concentrated attack by one hun-
dred Japanese planes. In the
Navy fourteen months, Brody
was an apprentice carpenter in
civilian life and was a student at
the University of Baltimore.
Lt. Jack Miller. 23, of Dallas.
Texas, who lost his life on Gua-
dalcanal, has been posthumously
awarded the Navy Cross for ex-
traordinray heroism and the
Purple Heart for "military
merit."
At Southern Methodist Univer-
sity, of which he was an alum-
nus, Miller captained the univer-
sity swimming team in 1939.
Cpl. Sidney S. Damb. 24, of
Springfield, Mass., has been
awarded the Silver Star for
"initiative, coolness, and gallan-
try in action" in Tunisia. When
his squad leader was wounded
and put out of action, Corporal
Damb jumped into command and
at once deployed his men so that
maximum damage could be in-
flicted on the enemy.
In service close to three years,
he was a Springfield Armory
worker in civilian life.
QNALLTHEFRDNTS
Pfc. Carl C. Goshman. 23. of
Brooklyn, member of the Medical
Corps, was killed in action
"somewhere in the Aleutians."
In service a year and a half. Pri-
vate Goshman managed a whole-
sale bakery in civilian life. He
was graduated from Tilden High
School and attended New York
University. Private Goshman
was posthumously awarded the
Purple Heart.
Pfc. Alfred L. Kat*. Jr.. 19, of
Memphis Tenn., serving on one
of the first Flying Fortresses to
attack,Henderson Field, Guadal-
canal, in Oct., 1942, died of
wounds sustained on the third
day of action. His father, Alfred
Katz, Sr., of Memphis, Term.,
was in the Navy in the World
War I.
T/Sgt. Arnold E. Hyman. 21. of
Los Angeles, Cal., Flying Fort-
ress gunner,, killed in action in
the European Area, has been
posthumously awarded the Pur-
ple Heart. A graduate of Thomas
Jefferson High School of San An-
tonio, Sergeant Hyman held the
rank of major in the R. O. T. C.
Following his graduation, the
family moved to California
where the sergeant starred in
football at U. C. L. A.
Lt. Arthur M. Zuckerman. 25.
of Los Angeles, has been killed
in action in the Southwest Pa-
cific Area. He was a student at
Rhodes' Prep. School in New
York and a graduate of the Uni-
versity of Southern California.
He had been a member of the Air
Force two years.
Pfc. Louis SasloTsky. 23, of
Brooklyn, was wounded in ac-
tion during the Sicilian cam-
paign. In service twenty months.
Private Saslovsky was a pleater
in civilian life. He is a gradu-
ate of Franklin Lane High
School.
Pvt Russell L. Cohen, 22. of
Pittsburgh, Pa., a Marine, was
wounded on Guadalcanal. In one
battle he killed ten Japanese
with a hand grenade before he
was wounded. Private Cohen is
a member of the B'nai Israel
synagogue and a graduate of
Peabody High School.
Pvt. Samuel Newman. 26. of
Cleveland, Ohio, was wounded in
action in the North African Area.
A recipient of the Purple Heart,
Private Newman took part in five
major battles in the Tunisian
campaign. A salesman in civilian
life, he is a graduate of Glen-
ville High.
Pvt. William Roth man. 21, of
Brooklyn, tail gunner on a B-24
Liberator operating in the Pacific
Area, lost his life when his plane
went down near Henderson Field
on Guadalcanal.
Devoting This Entire Page to the Efforts of Army-Navy Committee. Made Possible Through
the Co^Operation of
ABESS & COSTAR
First National Bank Building
COWEN'S SHOE STORE
155 E. Flagler St. 822 Lincoln Rd.
FIXZIT SYSTEMS. Plumbers
1114 N. E. 2nd Avenue
FLORIDA LINEN SERVICE
100 N. W. 20th Street
LAND-O-SUN DAIRIES, Inc-
101 Alton Road
LUBY CHEVROLET CO.
1055 West Flagler Street
MIAMI MILL WORK &
LUMBER CO.
535 N. W. 11th Street
NATIONAL BRANDS, Inc.
690 N. W. 13th Street
NANKIN'S SHOE STORE
158 East Flagler Street
SAM MEYERS
111 South Miami Avenue
SOUTHEASTERN SALESMEN'S
CARAVAN
Langford Building
STANDARD WHOLESALE
GROCERY CO.
149 N. E. 10th Street
TOOLEY-MYRON STUDIOS
DuPont Building
WILLIAM D. SINGER
SUNGAS CO.
1100 West Flagler Street
WEST FLAGLER KENNEL CLUB
West Flagler St. at 37th Avenue
WOLPERT FURNITURE CO.
155 West Flagler Street
WOMETCO THEATRES
Mitchell Wolf son Sydney Meyer
Lt. Milton Lunenfeld. 25. of
the Bronx, has been decorated
with the Distinguished Flying
Cross, the Air Medal, and two
Oak Leaf Clusters.
S Sgt. Fred Harris Goldstein.
21, of Cleveland, a flight chief
and radio operator aboard a
Southwest Pacific air transport,
is the recipient of the Distin-
guished Flying Cross and the Air
Medal for the valorous role he
played in helping to save Gua-
dalcanal during the "dark days
of last October.
Sergeant Goldstein, who has
been in service a year and a half,
was attending a science school
at the time of his enlistment. His
father served in the last war and
his brother, Ted, is an air cadet.
Lt. Harold L. Fuchsmann. 25.
of Chicago, leading navigator of
a squadron of six Flying Forts,
is an eleven-medal flier, holding
the Distinguished Flying Cross,
the Air Medal and nine Oak Leaf
Clusters. Lieutenant Fuchs-
mann's DFC citation stresses the
fact that his was the only bomber
ever to make "a record of 50 con-
secutive, completed sorties, each
directly to the target and return,
without deviation from course."
Operating in the African the-
atre, Fuchsmann's Fortress, the
"Wahoo," went through 440 hours
of flying time with its original
four engines and its initial crew
of ten intact, every man making
every mission without a single
replacement.


PAGE EIGHT
*Jtisi> ihrMian

ESJLocici
=B E N SIO N......fpaUstine
The name of the American
Jewish community is blessed in
and out of Zion. Throughout
Palestine and most likely every-
where else America is mentioned
with affection and reverence. It
is a great privilege to be an
American, but at the same time
also a grave responsibility. No-
blesse Oblige! The whole world
looks to America not only for
material sustenance but also
spiritual leadership to prevent a
relapse into the catastrophic old
world politics which nurtured
the best of Germany on Jewish
flesh and blood until it became
monstrous enough to swallow
those that fed it, but fortunately
is strangling to death in its greed
and avarice. May all the enemies
of Israel and humanity speedily
reach the same end.
However. God helps those who
help themselves. This is a prin-
ciple repeated numerous times in
diverse forms both in Bible and
Talmud and is well established
in modern social science and
philanthropy. American Jewry
has spent millions on charity and
most likely will be called on to
continue to do so No wards
need be wasted in pointing out
how laudable and noble such
sympathy and self-sacrifice truly
is Nevertheless, standing on the
threshold of a new Jewish Year.
at a time of unprecedented crisis
in Jewish history, it may be well
to pause and take stock of our
charities and well intended re-
lief end.mv
The facts arc appalling. The
millions of dollars American
Jewry spent during and since
the last World War served main-
ly to preserve our helpless breth-
ren in Eastern Europe in a hu-
miliating miserable condition,
ultimately to become the vic-
tims of Nazi brutality in the
present war. It is only too true
that practically all of them have
been destroyed root and branch.
The greater tragedy, however, is tunity to save many of
that these sacrifices seem to have
been in vain, for the remnant of
Israel still has not learned the
lesson these facts teach so clearly
that even he who runs may read.
No one in his right mind, and
least one endowed with a Jew-
ish heart, will deprecate extend-
ing a helping hand at any time
to any one in need. "Bread tor
the living and shrouds for the
dead'" was and is an urgent nec-
essity which may not be ignored;
but as a people fighting for our
survival, we cannot stop at that,
but can and must do more.
The rebuilding of Palestine is
not only a religious duty hal-
lowed by centuries Of Jewish
tradition and devotion, but also
the soli solution to the problem
of Jewish relict in a constructive
sense and Jewish self-preserva-
tion on a basis of dignity and
honor Let me illustrate by prac-
tical I I from my own ex-
perience. In Palestine I met
J e w i s h refugees from many
lands. The very wealthy owner
of one of the largest textile fac-
tories in Lodz who always lived
in dread of being murdered by
any one of his numerous em-
ployees was induced by his
"crazy" Zionist brother to buy
land in Palestine where he
himself had settled. At the out-
break ol the war this Polish mag- symbol of wicked
nate barely escaped with his life, and taunted
and after a long and hazardous
^^twwjw""
...,iiii"""'
;i"/ DVANTAGES
of a
IIAIIE FEIHikUL
MORTGAGE
journey finally reached Pales-
tine. His former insignificant
investment here now enables
him to maintain an independent
existence and he would be truly-
happy were it not for the re-
morse of having lost the oppor-
his rela-
tives as he had saved himself.
There are numerous cases just
like this and some of a more
fortunate nature. There are men
who have become extremely
wealthy through their Palestine
investments. Unfortunately, there
are ever so many more who
were great financiers and lead-
ing merchants in Europe who
now peddle shoelaces or are al-
together dependent on charity.
In contrast to the lack of vision
on the part of so many of our
formei ly wealthy Europe a n
brethren and American Jews
even now are individual Arabs
who peddled Oriental goods in
the States and invested their sav-
ings in Palestine One now is
fabulously rich and owns the
most valuable property in Haifa.
Another has become the mayor
of an historic Palestine town.
There are even recent eases on
record where Arabs have bought
Jewish office buildings and
apartment houses. How did our
prophet Isaiah put it? "The ox
knoweth his owner, and the ass
his master's crib; but Israel does
not know. My people does not
consider."
I live on Mount Carmel so in-
timately associated with the mir-
acle working prophet Elijah.
Here he challenged Jezebel, the
government,
our own vacillating
people. "How long will you halt
between two opinions, if the
Lord be God. follow Him; and if
Baal, follow him. I look up into
, azure clear sides and look down
upon the crystal blue waters of
the Mediterranean. From afar I
behold the snow-peaked moun-i
, tains Hermon and Lebanon, and
more closely the valley of Jez-
reel dotted with numerous Jew-
ish flourishing agricultural set-
tlements and the humming in-
dustrial enterprises along Haifa
l Bay. It is all real. It is not a
dream or a mirage. Then I think
r Europe, the awful nightmare
brutality, ruin and destruc-
B'NAI B-riTh
Notes
111 AID
W)
Bv PAUL WEITZMAN
/.i-^iir*^!!*^ A A -*"A AA *!!* ^M^fSaS^^Wwy^,*,
of
V
LOW
RATES
tion, and I wonder why my
American brethren still hesitate
between two opinions as to what
must be done to save the Jewish
l ople. Let me act the "crazy"
brother who calls on you to in-
vest n: Palestine. I ask not
chanty but "Zedake." justice to
yourselves and the Jewish future.
EASY PAYMENTS
LONG TIME TO PAY
. PROMPT SERVICE
. A HOME INSTITUTION
Deal With Your-
LOCAL. FRIENDLY
INSTITUTION
RESdURCES OVER <7.000.000
IIAIIG FEWiRAL
^W^WWWWWWWHWWW)
Ws
A
E
E
T
N
R
>*.
Tl
the
In
(ThN column is condih tad b
' atei Miami JewiNh Pedal ill
;.....l>rtlon with Tha Jewlah Florid -
f community aeri i, T., Inform
th immunity '' your organisation'^
mi-* and t.. avoid riifii,-tn in
Phone 1.5411 ;,,, ask f|ir
Calendar" Notification
u-t reach Mmta no laterthin
"ia> for publication that v.., u >
d ttei
"Community
mm
I i<
r *TT.. .r.rtffn i
HOItH
JOSEPH M. UPTON. PRESIDENT
Sun.. Oct. 17. Beth David Chil-
dren s Succoth Party. Beth Da-
vid Synagogue; also Sunday
School registration. 10:00 a m
Tue... Oct. 19. Jewish Welfare
2nd St.. 8:00 p. m.
Wed Oct. 20. Beth David Sis-
n !i>dA "'Ku,ar meeting. Beth
David Auditorium. 2 30 ,,,
Mon.. Oct. 25. Women's' Di-
vision American Jewish Con-
1 annual installation lunch-
eon at Versailles Hotel. Mian,
Retenti ? 'r P' m Bm" B*Sh
Intention Committee, dinner
meeting, Royal Center, HadaV
1 """ ""'tme., i vi rung
Embarking upon a vigorous
campaign to set its house in or-
der, following hectic campaigns
in aid of the war effort, Sholem
Lodge has come to the inevitable
conclusion that dues must be col-
lected and its roster consist of a
large paid-up membership.
Louis Heiman set a mark of
1,000 members in good standing
by the end of 1943, as the goal
with which he will end "his year"
as president of Sholem Lodge.
This he announced at a Dutch
treat dinner meeting which was
held at the Royal Center on
Thursday. October 7th. At this
meeting there were present Nat
Blumberg. Isador Goldstein. Leon
Stolli r. Ernest Sussman, Louis
Gordon. Morris Gerstein, Harry
(li rstein, Maurice Cromer. Mil-
ton Friedman. Garry Glatt. Jo-
seph Socolof. Sam B. Miller. Dr.
I Feirstein, Louis Heiman. Sam
Reinhardt and Max Goldman.
In good standing means that a
member has paid his dues to and
including the current year, or,
that a member is in the Armed
Forces or Services, in which
event dues are waived, and such
member is in good standing for
the duration.
Which puts an extra burden on
the lodge and membership.
Grand Lodge, District and State
per capita dues are based upon
the number of members in good
standing, and if the Lodge is to
carry members in Service, the
other members must make a spe-
cial effort to see that their dues
are paid. Bringing attention to
members that they are delin-
quent in the payment of dues
entails work and expense, which
could be devoted to projects to
produce other resultsbut unless
each member sees that his dues
are paid, others must do the
work.
To date Sholem Lodge has 643
members in good standing, as
herein above defined. The total
must be raised to 1.000 before the
end of this year. Some members
have set an example for the
others by paying 1944 dues, and
in this pre-paying group is Nat
Blumberg. Isidore Brown. Sam
W Alpert and Jay Alpert.
Dinner Planned for Oct. 25th
Another Dutch treat dinner
meeting is planned for October
125th. to be held at the Clover
Club. A private room, and din-
ner from $1.50and after the
i business ,,f reporting on the prog-
ress of the "Retention Commit-
tei work, see the show. Com-
bining business and pleasure.
Dues Dunning a Bora
It must be as boring to read a
column of this nature, assuming
the reader has come as far as this
admission, as it is to write it. if
not more so. But we pay the
butcher, the baker and the can-
dlestick maker. We pay our way
as we go along, but when it
comes to pay dues, we like to
postpone it. There h
It, but that is ,hterfa J*J
solution fr
the
ra
pay the dues now 2Mft*
with. Once ,t is nie,_tt"
Once
better. But
the rank and file of the T
ship-or about 40 Der "*
that it will move thSS\ **
is something wo can't s^ft
It is common kn^.-i-.j.
Paid, *. i
h0w t0 impan: "
common knowtafeJ
a new blood bank at theft2l
been established at
Power and Light
downtown Miami. Thif_|
for bloa-il
make it convenient
BuildaiJ
nors who can stop ,n W,C
pointments.
depart with
ing contribute.I
do their
hat feeling "on |
in a constriM
manner to the health ofthf,'
munity and the war effort
B'nai B'rith volunteer*'J
have not yet fulfilled J
pledges to heroin, blood \
are urged to attend at th*
station at their earln fl I
ience. The only instru
to abstain from eating fors*]
or of four hours before eh|
the blood donatii
And when so reporting
state that you are a repr
tive of B'nai B'rith. that the
ganization may be credited.
RADIO HOUR
Rabbi S. M. Machtei of Bnl
Sholem Center will be the nsI
speaker on the Rabbinical A|
ciation Hour at 10 a. m. Si
over Station WQAM.
BEFORE YOU BUT
see
LEON ELIII
with
metropolis!
life ins. co.
Not Bast BacauM Big
ButBiggest BacauM M
sah.
7/////////////M//M""'
.... ..... --*"
M/dM//M
RIVERMONT PARS
SANITARIUM
18tt N. W. 7th St.
BMI
Ph. 8-7301
for chronic sick, conva-
nd elderly paopl,
$25 WEEKLY
locent ar
DRINK PLENTY OF
Cferipure
Water
DELIVERED TO YOUR HOME
I0ALL0N BOTTlE Me
CASE OF SIX
TABLE BOTTLES.......75c
Plus Bottle Oepojit
PHONE 2-4128
MODERATE COSTS
ALWAYS WITHIN THE MEANS
OF INDIVIDUAL
CIRCUMSTANCES
I Accoftiii)"totl*M
authoritie*, the n
mum daily AD*"*1
Complex Vitamin
quirementsof then*
aee person are: .
A urn VST v+*\
440 ISP EM*"3
USP Unru, K1*\
Mlcnxrrami. **"
proxlmately 1S.0M MIUSglSSM mm
tinamlde. The required SSBSBSfJ
other B Complex Vitamins hivtwi
yet been established. j|
Many people do not ft-fStl
theae essent.al Vitamins. DO I""1 J
Why not play safe by t"*"1'
ONE-A-DAYVItam.S*?H
Each ONE-A-DAY Viunun A |
D Tablet conUins Z\'n0Z.*Z
ood liver oil vitamins than tbjwj;
mum daily recommonded 9^\
Each MB;A-WW
Complex Tablet contains J"U
mum daily requiremenU ol *-(
Bl and B2 and 10,000 m**fTm>
NicoUnamide together with
aUntial amount of other O ""Z^
When you buy Vitn{*gg,
potencies and prices. Noten" ^
A-DAY TableU orm ^
average human requiremen*
how reasonable the cost
Get them at your drug ^
GORDON
YOUR JEWISH
710 S. W. 12th AVENUE
FUNERAL
HOME
PHONE 3-3431
WORTHY AND
DESERVES YOUR FULL
SUPPORT AND
RECOMMENDATION


Full Text

PAGE 1

PAGE FOUR fJewlsti ncrkHan Z^^^i^CTOBER lSi I The Jewish Floridian Plant and Main Offices, 21 S. W. Second Avenue, Miami, Fla. P. O. Box 2973 Phone 2-1141 Entered as Second Class Matter July 4, 1930 at the Post Office of Miami, Florida, under the Act of March 3, 1879 FRED K. SHOCHET, Managing Editor Subscription—1 Year, $2.00 Six Months, $1.00 MAIMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1943 TISHRI 16. 5704 VOLUME 16 NUMBER 42 The A-J Conference by LOUIS HEIMAN Press Representative of The Jewish Floridian "ON READING EDITORIALS" Many comments have been received by your editor from time to time about editorials and the views expressed therein. But recently we were flooded with calls following a reply to one of our editorials. Different interpretations were given. Various ideas were expressed. Local editorials commenting about our own community and its problems, without fail arouse comment. The exception to this is the mutual admiration type, highly complimentary, and then there's some who feel the credit was misplaced and undeserved. In the AMERICAN JEWISH OUTLOOK of Pittsburgh an editorial titled "On Reading Editorials" appeared expressing our sentiments. We reprint it herewith: Editorials are definitely and undeniably the language, ideas and interpretations of an individual. As such, they are open to the criticisms of any and every other individual. But at the same time, if there be any art in writing editorials, there is likewise an art in reading them. An editor has a responsibility in obtaining all the facts regarding a given situation. He should never write until he feels sure that the facts are clear. With the facts at his disposal, he must write about them with courage and clarity, having in mind the rendering of a public service, and without fear of what some readers might say or do as a result. The editor's motto must be "ii the shoe fits, wear it." An editor tries in his interpretation to bring such background to his writing as he can, in fact, unless he has a knowledge of history and of the world around him, he should not serve as an editor. This is especially true of an editor serving a Jewish paper. To him, an isolated event is not at all isolated. Rather it appears as a further step in some direction—and if that direction looks to be undesirable, he must attack the isolated incident. The purpose of an editorial is to make the readers react. It makes little difference if the reaction is favorable or unfavorabole provided the reader has read the editorial carefully, has absorbed its contents, and then decided that his view coincides or differs from that of the editor. The editor knows that people differ. They differ in their religious beliefs, in their political beliefs, in their tastes and buying habits, in their standards. For the same reason, they differ in their attitudes on editorials. One editorial might pass unnoticed by a thousand persons, might wm the favorable comment of another thousand, might arouse the most bitter opposition of a handful, and not be read at all by thousands of others. It is also to be noted that people who like the views expressed in an editorial do not express themselves very frequently, while those who dislike them qive vent to bitter expression. While it is true that each editorial must stand by itself it is frue. nevertheless, that an editorial is best judged by the reputation of a paper over a period of time: "Is the paper qiven over to wild or unjustified statements? Is the editorial policy inconsistent? Is the paper's policy one that shows an iqnoxance of things that pertain to Judaism' Is the paper community-minded? These and other questions are best answered over a period of time, and they should bring to each editorial that appears, a meaning over and above the individual editorial. Critics of editorials usually show, too, that they have not read the editorial carefully, that they have read into it remarks and meanings not written into it by the editor, that they are are so convinced of their own belief that they are incapable of understanding that another view is possible Some Jewish papers have been so plagued by the editorial situation that they no longer run editoriaU-o decision unfair u l ommunal betterment. Some confine themselves to one short and non-controversial editorial each week. Some clio one safe editorial each week from another paper and run none of their own. Some subscribe to national services which send four or five editorials each week from which a choice can be Vfu ^ B Ch( ? iCe is frec I ue ntly made on the basis of the size of the editorial and the space available on the editorial page. The readers of the The Outlook are given editorials based on fact and intended for the betterment of things American and Jewish. We are careful of our facts and proud of our service to American and Jewish ideals. When it comes to a difference of opinion or interpretation, we want it known that we respect the views of others in the same spirit that we want our views T GSpCCtQ. ABOUT PEOPLE On October 15th Henry Montor will assume the Execu*T kfcSrtfcj^Jft*, 2-, ni8t Emeraenc Y Committee, of which Rabbi Abba Hillel Silver is now the co-chairman New literary critic for Esquire is publisher Bennett Cerf, who sure knows a good book when he see,s it Look who's a labor leader now ... Its none other than subway builder Sam Rosoff, who was chosen as their union head by the workers employed on his Mexican construction job The statement has oftentimes been made that "the greatest enemy of the Jew is the Jew himself." The fifth session of the American Jewish Conference held on August 31st, at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel, New York, gave proponents of that statement an opportunity to add another example to the long list which they say proves its truth. The delegates were shocked to read in the New York Times a statement of 'The American Council for Judaism" opposing a Jewish Commonwealth in Palestine. This Council, a body of 100 men, issued the statement in the name, so they said, of "Americans of Jewish Faith." Naturally, the program of the Conference had not planned a discussion of that group. However, the publication of its statement caused the Chairman, Henry Monsky, to recognize the resentment and indignation of the delegates and their desire to express themselves about it. He permitted four speakers to take the floor for the discussion, namely, Rabbi James G. Heller, for the Central Conference of American Rabbis; Rabbi Robert Gordis. for the Conservative Rabbis; Rabbi Joseph H. Lookstein. for the Orthodox Rabbis, and Dr. Stephen S. Wise, a member of the Conference Presidium. Rabbi Heller called attention to the fact that the Central Conference of American Rabbis had declared that the "American Council for Judaism" is a disruptive force, represented a comparatively minority of the Reform Rabbinate, and an infinitesimal minority of the Jewish laity. He stated: "Any group in American Jewish life had the right to come to this meeting to state its point of view and agitate for it. The American Council for Judaism has a number of men on the floor of this Conference. To issue this statement at this time, totally aside from its merit or demerit, in and of itself is a disservice to this representative body, is a denial in Jewish life of that very democracy which this statement declares it loves and serves." Rabbi Gordis said: "It seems difficult to believe that in this day and age— when our people are beset by enemies on all sides a group of men who denominate themselves as Jewish leaders, would feel called upon to fulfill the prophetic words. Thine enemies and thy destroyers arise from thine own midst." I have no hesitation in saying that the so-called American Council for Judaism is neither American, nor a Council, nor Judaism." Rabbi Lookstein said: "Those who dare speak in this hour of crisis, those who dare speak at this moment of universal Jewish sorrow, those who dare to stand at the grave of 3.000.000 Jews and mutter about 'theoretical' homelessness of the Jew. who dare to fiddle on their distorted theological fiddle while the Jewish world ,i, Urn u w • not t0 punch us bel w the belt, not to stab us in the he C t •• Venly to stab us m thc Dr. Stephen Wise said: "We are not going to accept a new lorah from a group of men who come to us with the readiness to destroy the democratic character Israe We speak here for Kol 5£fi J cy speak for K "'alth t £ c curse of which they seek to bring upon Israel as we t?£Jw Umfy 'V. ,0 umte '• and to make it one." Henry Monsky then expressed the sentiments of the delegates b.v saying, n part: The American Council for Judaism, a Tody 2*1*2? m n s P t,akl "K for them V selyes. have seen fit to issue a statement in the name of Americans of Jewish faith at a time when the American Jewish X ference. a democratically elected tt;h rCprCSentin K ^ ma jo? Jewish organization and community ,n the United Stalest seeking to unite American Jewrv l ution CO r!r im 1 0n Pro ^ ram for the s rnnt? !" the t ., ra f Ic P r blems confronting world Jewry. The timing of this action rmYst be cha !" renrehnn Si uns P or fmanlike and reprehensibly impertinent. It is calculated to confuse American public opinion and to disrupt the American Jewish Community" Upon motion of Fred Butzel of -TIDBrrS FROM EVER Mtidtly eonfubudhi -By PHTNEAS J. BIRONLOOKING TO ZION An American League for '"U1|H I I Llaunched by the Committee for a Jewish Army .. Th I will seek to enlist one million members, Jewish 'v 0 ** Jewish, for the cause of a Free Palestine And th i ^ will launch a nation-wide campaign, with all the ^ nalia of modern propaganda ... We wonder what vSu^' official Zionist attitude toward this league The ZOA not very well fight a non-sectarian organization dadt^ to a cause it stands for ... At a public meeting L ftSS Theatre at Wellington, New Zealand, Prime MmSte P^" spoke in unequivocal terms about "four-square justice £S ancient home and the new hope of the Jewish people'' New Zealand is the only country whose Premier ha." J dressed a public Zionist meeting Bravo, Mr Frase In April. 1944, all Jewish immigration to Palestine rnustLu to an end according to the terms of the British I9iq wv Paper ... And April 12, 1944, is the date Dr. Stephen SuF has picked for Hitler's final defeat. w HERE AND THERE ... The American Jewish Conference is finding it difficult m organize its activities While some of its leaders think ft* I it is the duty of the Conference to get busy and take the lead in the implementing of its resolutions, others are hopina E the Conference, now that it has held its assembly will dk a peaceful death There will be fireworks when the Cot ference's Interim Committee of 52 meets this month Aside to Chaplain Abraham Dubin of the U. S. Army: Those 15 (KB Jews you found in India are not quite the "forgotten colony you believe them to be Indeed, a comprehensive article on their history and life appears in the Universal Jewish En cyclopedia, under the heading "Beni Israel" ... A school principal in Amsterdam, in his farewell speech to his clou said: "I am speaking with mixed feelings, because I an thinking of the Jewish children who formerly shared the benches with you boys and girls ... I hope that you will never forget your Jewish fellow pupils" Whereupon the courageous teacher was made to feel the barbarous rage erf the Nazis ... But his sacrifice is another proof that Holland has not submitted to her oppressors. WAR ECHOES One of the new Liberty Ships is named after our old friend Haym Salomon, the financier of Revolutionary Days.. Whenever a member of Cleveland's The Temple, Dr. Abbe H. Silver's congregation, goes off to the wars, he is present with a silver mezuza Succinct review of the milta events of 5703, as current on Broadway: The only thing h Nazis have captured in the past year is—Mussolini.. Harry Hershfield suggests that pretty soon Hitler may be rtduced to telling Musso the Mussed story of his past exploit! in the manner of the hunter who was narrating: ". and then, when I ran out of ammunition, I suddenly found mysel surrounded by a lion, a bear and an eagle" "And what happened then?" the stooge now asks "What happened? Why, I was killed." BOOKS AND AUTHORS Hats off to newsman Cecil Brown for giving up a $58,000-a-year radio job in protest against Columbia Broadcasting System's new policy of forbidding its commentators to express an opinion Brown has been swamped with thousands of fan letters commending his resignation and hi* refusal to submit to such censorship Stefan Heym, author of "Hostages," is with the Army in more ways than one.. %  Not only is Heym himself a Private, but Army authorities are said to be distributing 50,000 copies of his book among soldiers overseas Private Robert L. Nathan, former chief of the War Production Board's Planning Board, has been ill, and may receive a medical discharge from the Army During the enforced leisure of his hospital stay Nathan wrote the outline for a book he is planning on post-war economic problems Abraham Goldberg's posthumous book, "Pioneers and Builders," is out ... It looks good and reads well, and Pierre van Paassen's short foreword is a masterpiece • And Pete Gross, the editor, did a swell job with rather uneven material ... It deserves a place in every Jewish home. THIS AND THAT Wonder what the shade of old Mayer Amschel Rothschild, founder of the famous banking family, thought the other day when his descendent, Bettina de Rothschild, formerly of Vienna, and on her mother's side a member of the famous Montefiore family of England, was married in New York by the rector of St. Thomas Church Justice Francis E Rivers of the New York City Court, recently appointed to the highest judicial office ever held by a Negro in the Empir State, had a hard time, because of his color, in finding a job after graduating from Columbia Law School a couple decides ago But finally he got one, in the law firm ot Jonah J. Goldstein, now himself a General Sessions Judge Detroit, the statement of Monsky was unanimously adopted as expressing the action of the Conference. Quislings were found in Norway; saboteurs were apprehended in America. We have the American Council for Judaism" to obstruct the efforts of the American Jewish people to %  press their will and reach tneu goal, the establishement oi Jewish Commonwealth in rai c tine. A good buy is a War Bond. BJ now and you will be paid m .00 for every $300.



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PAGE TWO vjewisti fhrkttati %  J %  SOCIAL ITEMS AND PERSONALS Mrs. Irving Rosenfeld has just returned from a stay of several months in California and Louisiana, and is now the guest of her brother-in-law and sister. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Altschul, Jr., 2027 N. W. 24th Avenue. Her husband, Pvt. Rosenfeld. USA, formerly a resident of Miami, was stationed in Indio. Cal., for several months with the Signal Corps, and recently was transferred to Camp Polk in Louisiana. Mrs, Rosenfeld. who is the former Edith Adler. was accompanied on her trip by her mother. Mrs. Edith Adler. who also is a guest of the Altschuls. Mrs. Joseph Rambam is expected back at her home. 1330 Michigan Avenue, this week. She has been visiting her daughter. Mrs. Stanley Bornstein in Oregon and in New Jersey. ENGAGEMENT Betrothal of Miss Anyce Getzug and Walter A. Lavigne. USMC. is being announced by the parents of the bride-to-be, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Getzug, 1580 S. W. 19th Avenue. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Donald L. Lavigne, 570 N. E. 5th Street. No date has been set for the wedding. Miss Getzug was graduated from Miami Edison High School, where she was a member of Tri Beta society; also attended schools in Cincinnati. Ohio. Mr. Lavigne attended Gordon Military Academy and the Citadel, Charleston. S. C. IN THE MAIL BOX Linda Ray Rose, daughter of Lt. James Rose of the U. S. Army, will celebrate her seventh birthday Friday at the Lear School with her classmates as f iuests. Alfred B. Nemirow. who las been a student at the school for several years, will celebrate his twelfth birthday on Friday with a luncheon given in his honor. The faculty, friends and soldiers will attend the first social of the season at the Lear School Friday evening. Entertainment, dancing and refreshments have been arranged. WEDDINGS During the past High Holy Days the Jewish Community of Greater Miami has exceeded all its past records of providing home hospitality tor Jewish men and women in service stationed here. The Jewish Welfare Board reports that 945 service men and women were the guests of 425 families in Greater Miami. The community's welcome reached out to the members of the Armed Forces stationed in Miami and the Beach proper, as well as surrounding areas. Service men guests arrived from Belle Haven. 36th Street Airport. Homestead Air Base. Boca Raton Field, and from parts as distant as Fort Myers and Camp Murphy. What such hospitality means to the service men can well be imagined when it is remembered that at no time does he feel his separation from home and familiar things as during the religious holidays Our hospitality is a further reminder to the men that all Israel is one family, and wherever a Jew might be he can well feel at home among other Jews. We may at this time pridefully give thought to these things, as we hear a soldier say, "Oh boy, home cooking! Just like my mother's:" The Jewish Welfare Board coni^E^CTOBER 15, Sol Sackheim. veteran of World war I. has relumed to U. S. Veterans Hospital at Bay Pines. Fla. i He had been given a short leave of absence from the hospital in order to bid farewell to his daughter Alice, who recently left to enter the University of Michigan. The marriage of Miss Bella Mintzer to Cpl. Irving Shlansky took place Monday afternoon. September 27. at 844 Jefferson Avenue, the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Lurie. Martin Shlansky. of New York, acted as his brother's best man and Miss Lucille Shlansky was veys its thanks and appreciation the bride's attendant. Rabbi I t o all individuals and organizaMoses Meschloff performed the j tipns wno co-operated so splenceremony assisted by Rev. Maudidly i n this most worthy cause. rice Mamches and Sexton Max Feit. After the wedding a reception was held and supper served. Others attending were the bride's parents. Mr. and Mrs. Mintzer. of New Orleans; the grooms parents. Mr. and Mrs. Philip Shlansky. of New York, and aunt and uncle of the groom, Mr. and Mrs Rynas of Brooklvn. N. Y. Pvt. Leo Machtei arrived on Wednesday \o spend a short furlough with his parents. Rabbi and Mrs. S. M. Machtei. Pvt. | Machtei is stationed at Fort Jay j Governors Island. N. Y. BRITH The Bnth Millah of the son of Lt and Mrs. Godfrey K. Newman. 4580 Post Avenue. Miami Beach, took place at the St trances Hospital on Tuesday with Rabbi S. M. Machtei officiating. Miss Renee Miller, daughter of Mrs. Alfred Thorner. 350 Euclid Avenue, Miami Beach, was married Sept. 28 to 1st Lt. Julius A Stern. USAAC. son of Mr. and Mrs. I. K. Stern of Astoria. N Y A native of New York City, she is a graduate of the Ida Fisher High School. Miami Beach, and a member of the Amity Club. Lieutenant Stern, who came here from Lake Charles. La., on leave, began his training at the Officer Candidate School on Miami Beach and received his commission at Harvard. NATHAN ROTHBERG. PAUL W. ARON. Jewish Welfare Board Representatives. Washington (WNS)—Eighty-odd American Red Cross service clubs in the British Isles were hosts to Jewish members of the U. S. armed forces during Rosh Hashonah and on Yom Kippur eve. it was announced here this week by Norman H. Davis. ORLANDO NOTES Over eight hundred Jewish service men and women packed the High Holy Days Services at Congregation Ohev Shalom in Orlando. Cantor Julius Rosenstein of Miami Beach chanted the impressive service in the synagogue with Meyer Shader. Orlando baritone officiating in the Assembly Hall. The Orlando Jewish community enjoyed the numerous traditional renditions offered by Cantor Rosenstem and joined in the singing of most of the Yom Kippur service. Following the Yom Kippur Fast, the Jewish Welfare Board served a Break-Fast Supper for all persons in uniform and Mrs. Max Blattner acted as hostess to the entire congregation for Break-Fast Kiddush. The attendance at both adult services and the special children's service was the largest in the history of the Orlando Jewish community. Over $50,000 in War Bonds were purchased at the opening service hour by members of the congregation. Rabbi Morris A. Skop preached at all services. CAMPAIGN AGAIN?^ 58 Berne (WN S )The M S northern Italy hav ** terror campaign againT? >sh population, murSn^ reds of Jewish m en 2** children in Rome. Gen^ ^ Venice, and other citiesu "* revealed here this week K. ** peachable sources by ""*• order following the ou.fe revolt and sabotage $£&* hni's ouster. Thev ar LJ ?* Italian followers of Mussff b? fascism. "^solim an wid CHARRON-WILLIAMS Commercial College Special Night School Classes Monday. Wednesday f n 7Z 6:30 to 9:00 P M. y Sixth Floor Postal Bide PHONE 3-4859 Mary Williams. B.C.S. Diwctw 12TH UIH DK Sponsored by Miami Y. M. H. I. Tuesday Eve., Oct. 26,9 o'clock at the Coral Gables Country Club Music By CY WASHBURN AND HIS COUNTRY CLUB ORCHESTRA ADMISSION. INCLUDING TAX $ j 10 CALL THE "Y" FOR TABLE RESERVATIONS New York (WNS)—Seventy-two Jewish refugees arrived in New ^ urk ports during the Rosh Hashonah week-end, it was announced here this week. Mod* Fran Fresh Oranges *s Takt Your Watch to Danzig's! V.' A T Z PERfECTtY RE A ;E: DUcat: Email, intricaf BOTMMBts art haadltd bj u wtih undirstaadmq can and tkUL JtWOAY REPAIRING \v DANZIG'S JEWELFCS 236 NALCYOS AKC-.DE US I Flia|f Si TIER THEATRE S.W. Sth St. at 15th Aye. OPEN AT 1:45 P. M. Fri., Oct. 15—Last Day Good Morning Judge DENNIS O'KEEFE MARY BETH HUGHES LOUISE ALLBRITTON tir -tr Starts Saturday at 4:30 P.M. and Sunday Through Wednesday, Oct. 16-20 "PHANTOM OF THE OPERA n IN TECHNICOLOR WITH NELSON EDDY SUSANNA FOSTER CLAUDE RAINS And a Cast of Thousands in the Year's Greatest Musical Spectacle! // INSURE IN SURE ASSURANCE THE SENSIBLE FARSIGHTED INDIVIDUAL provides today the assurance for tomorrow and the years ahead. ASSURANCE IS INVESTING WISELY and soundly to provide for all the needs of the years ahead NEEDS that include Home — Education — Communal Endeavor — Emergencies — Illness — Retirement, and the Inevitable—Death. B P ^!Srow* th with H CI ? W*£? co" 1 y" are !" t bothered in your onW Murt SJ i S tha A. m ake the tr agedy gruesome, and the hlfv n r M t0 keep the enlire farni 'y together forever, is by M~ Sf X?"5-n private family plot. And having your plot in round n£f 5 *?"* ^ f thu P r tection ,n the finest surrounaings at a reasonable cost. N W BeW^H^Th.t'L 3 f ?T'! y plot in Mount Nebo Cemeteryto SoVoTthe Jewish"' Cemete,y dedlCated 35WS For further information with no obligation, phone 3-5132 Florida's Most Beautiful Burial Estates MOUNT NEBO ONLY TEN MINUTES FROM THE HEART OF MIAMI West Flagler Street at 54th Avenue BUSINESS OFFICE 1014 OLYMPIA BUILDING A VISIT WILL CONVINCE YOU


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|AY. OCTOBER 15, 1943 *Jewisti rhrii^r PAGE FIVE BETWEEN YOU AND WIE OUR JEWISH FILM FOLK IT HAPPENED LIST WEEK BY BORIS SMOLAR Copyright, 1943, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc. BY HELEN ZIGMOND Copyright, 1943, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc. BY MILTON BROWN Copyright, 1943, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc. Washington Notes: People in Washington ore much interested in knowing who is behind the Fly-formed "American Resettlement Committee fUprooted Jews" which recently inserted a fulladvertisement in the New York press fe may even be an attack on it from the floor Congress because of its slogan: "Jews to PalesI Arabs to Iraq!" ... It is suspected that this is ler branch of the same group which organized iCommittee for a Jewish Army, the pageant "We Never Die," and the Emergency Committee to the Jewish People of Europe The program le new organization seems to be based on the "The Middle East" by Elihau Ben-Horin urgthe transfer of all Palestinian Arabs to Iraz in sr to make room for European Jews in Palestine L Incidentally, Mr. Ben-Horin is the executive diHor of the new organization Washington correK ndents are beginning to get annoyed with the d of publicity releases which they have been fcving from busy bodies in the capital in behalf Jewish organizations or delegations One of Bn asks me to advise Jewish publicity men that Hould be better for them to place a few copies of %  r releases in the press room of the State DepartBit, or the White House, and at the National Press Hb, and refrain from tagging along after delegatm* Copies may also be placed in the press nUeries of the House and the Senate The tagBig along isn't customary and makes a bad imression The name of the press agent and the telephone number should be on the handout, and a representative should remain at the telephone all the time to answer questions ... "I think they would find that their stories would get better play if they did this," this Washington correspondent asks me to tip off the interested Jewish organizations Needless to say that the correspondents of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency in Washington is not among the Washington reporters who are annoyed with the flood of publicity by Jewish organizations and delegations ... He can always be reached at the JTA Washington office in the National Press Building. Arabian Themes: Arabs in the United States are now discussing the question of launching an Arab newspaper in the English language Such newspaper, if published, would concentrate chiefly on combatting Zionism, Arab leaders in New York admit While ihe nature of the converts between President Roosevelt and Emih Feiin Washington remains a state secret, it is m that the son of King Ibn Saud made a rather ^pointing impression on some of the CongressI "All he wants is money," one of the memof the Foreign Affairs Committee said after the guest was presented to the Committee by Consman Soil Bloom Some members of the imittee wanted to know his attitude on the Arabquestion They made no complimentary larks later about his reply ... In case you are terested in the program of Emir Feisal's visit to United States, here it is ... He landed at Miami 1 was met there by a representative of the State ipartment The next day he had dinner at the nite House ... A day later he was honored with dinner by the Acting Secretary of State at the rlton Hotel in Washington Assistant Secretary tendered him a luncheon at his residence reptions were held in his honor at the Iraquian Egyptian legations and at the Turkish Embassy In New York he was met at the station by an :ort of sixty policemen, some with motorcycles, took him to City Hall in Mayor LaGuardia's icial car The first luncheon he had in New was arranged at the National City Bank, the cond at the Banker's Club Emir Feisal's visit this country ends on October 23 ... It is unlikely lat he will meet any Zionist leaders here, since he i not expected to return to Washington or to New fork during the last two weeks of his stay here. American "Crusaders": A breezy novel, "See fhat I Mean," dealing fictionally with the antijmitic movement in the United States was pubshed this week by Random House ... Its author the well-known Lewis Browne Written very mch in the style of "What Makes Sammy Run," le book gives quite an intimate picture of rackMeers who discovered that it pays to be anti-Jewish The spiritual head of these anti-Jewish "cruJders" is a half-wit who finally lands in an insane xsylum ... He is being "managed" by a couple of iwindlers who exploit his hatred of Jews to fleece xir and ignorant women of nickels and dimes... ie trio is financed by an owner of a chain of drug Mores who is, for commercial reasons, interested lot so much in the "movement" as in the antiJewish boycott propaganda which it carries on igainst his Jewish business competitor • Added Sid Grauman, super showman of these or any other times, wil leave more tracks on the sands of the amusement world than are imprinted in the forecourt of his Chinese Theatre. His latest unique creation is to be a waxworks museum of Hollywood. It will occupy a three-story building will house realistic paraffin figures of past and present movie greats • will tell tallow tales in tableaus from outstanding films contain a cinema theatre where old flickers will unreel %  and boast a staff of lecturers just to put that high-brow touch to the waxen assemblage. Certain that it won't belong before France will be liberated, the studio has already prepared Franz Werfel's "Song of Bernadette" with a French dialog sound track. A bit premature perhaps but even a German version is being considered. Eddie Cantor's eyes almost popped out of his head when Morton May, scion of the department store family, hand him a check in the amount oi $1,000,000 for the purchase of War Bonds And Berle's latest axiom is: "If we 'Back the Attack,' we'll never again be attacked in the back!" Nostalgiana: The Old Timers, bond sellers of 1917 campaigns, pitted their skill against the Bondadeers of 1943Among the oldsters were Willie Howard and Harry Hershfield. Captain of the Youngsters was Phil Baker. Which team won remains an unrecorded military secret. Al Shean is cooking up a plan to revive his old vaude act—"Oh, Mr. Gallagher; Oh, Mr. Shean." He'll choose a new partner for the late Mr. Gallagher, and tour the Army campsResearch revealed that George Gershwin was extremely fond of clothes, so his filmbiog calls for forty costume changes. A letter received from Jack Benny in the midEast looks like the original black-out. Censor tracks obliterated all but five legible lines. Benny's return to the film village is expected in November when he is to start "The Horn Blows at Midnight." Turnabout fair film: Georgie Jessel has promised Eddie Cantor to impersonate himself in Cantor's epic, "Show Business" and Cantor is committed to characterize himself in Jessel's flicker, "The Dolly Sisters." finances from a mysterious source believed to be the German Consulate These "crusaders" and their fifth-column activities are presented by the author in a manner which makes for amusing and interesting reading not only for Jews but for every American Based on actual testimony presented before a grand jury, which resulted in the indictment of about thirty men and women, the book "See What I Mean" has all the qualities of becoming a best seller because of the humorous style in which it is written ... At the same time the volume is no less a contribution to the literature on combatting subversive movements than any of the serious books written on this subject. March of Events: The Zionist Organization of America is finding difficulty in securing a managing editor for its official organ, "The New Palestine" Carl Alpert, the able editor of the publication, is going into the Army in a few weeks, and the ZOA is confronted witih a real problem in obtaining a successor for him The ZOA is also losing to the Army its comptroller, Zvi Levavay, who at one time served with the Department of Immigration of the Palestine Government and was formerly secretary of the Danish Consulate at Tel Aviv The Jewish Historical Society of Chicago is now making preparations for the celebration of the 100th anniversary of Chicago's first "Minyan" When Chicago was incorporated as a city in 1837, there were only five Jews there out of a population of 4,170 Later, in 1843, more Jews had arrived and the nucleus of a Jewish community was born • The first religious service was held by this little band of Chicago Jews on Yom Kippur in a small room above a store on Wells Street The Jewish Centennial Week which the historical society is planning will be carried out on a large scale with the participation of all major Jewish organizations in the city Speaking of anniversaries, it is well to remember that this year marks the completion of fifty years of service by the Jewish Chautauqua Society which is now under the sponsorship of the National Federation of Temple Brotherhoods The Society disseminates facts on Jews among students in universities and colleges, carrying on its educational program on a non-propagandistic basis with speakers from every wing of Jewry In 1943 approximately 100 different represenatives of the Society visited 210 campuses in 46 states of the United States and two provinces oi Canada. In Washington and Jerusalem, there were two important visitors this week. Emir Feisal, son of Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia, was in Washington, the guest of our State Department, invited there, according to reports, at the special instance of Assistant Secretary of State Berle. In Jerusalem, the important visitor was Ivan Maisky, Soviet Vice-Commissar of Foreign Affairs. On the fact of it, it would seem there was no connection between the visits by these different leaders in different parts of the world, and yet it may be there was a very important connection. One merely has to recall the charge made by the columnist, Drew Pearson, that Mr. Berle is interested in building up a series of buffer states against Russuia to "catch on." It will be recalled that this accusation was levelled against our State Department in connection with the reported invitation to Ibn Saud to visit this country. It stands to reason that Russia would be interested in defeating such machinations. If our government is seeking to build up an Arab bulwark against the Soviet, it might well be the Soviet's policy to attempt to throw a monkey wrench in this by building up a counterweight. The very strange thing might come to pass that Mr. Berle would throw Russia on the side of Jewish Palestine. If he did this, the Zionists would doubtless be eternally grateful to him, for no one has any doubt but that Russia is going to play a very important part in deciding the fate of the Near East after the war. This is all pure conjecture, of course. At any rate, the very visit of so leading a Soviet figure as Ivan Maisky to Jerusalem is an event of extraordinary importance. According to the report, Mr. Maisky asked some significant questions. He wasn't there merely for his health or pleasure. He asked Mr. Ben-Gurion about Palestine's absorptive capacity and listened with great interest to the story of what has been done in Palestine. The city of Washington was the scene of a picturesque spectacle this week when a pilgrimage of orthodox rabbis met with Vice-President Wallace on the steps of the Capitol and recited the psalms and prayed for the rescue of the Jews under the Nazi heel. At the same time there came reports from Denmark which show that the Nazis have learned as yet nothing about civilization and the standards of decency, although it would seem that they have suffered enough hard blows to absorb a few lessons. The action of Sweden in publicly offering to receive the Jews of Denmark is, as the man in the street would say, "Swell!" Such action as this by the larger countries is what has been asked for all the time. It may be that the Nazis would reject any such plea by the mightier nations as they do that of Sweden—and then again it may be that they would not. The Nazis do respect power, for that means the possibility of vengeance and they know that Sweden won't do much avenging, but the larger countries can. The Scandinavian countries have been one of the few bright spots in this world tragedy. Almost every Swedish newspaper voiced its approval of the Swedish government's offer to receive the Jews. The Swedes took definite steps, while the AngloAmerican countries merely call conferences which are empty of any real meaning. It is painful to say such things about one's own country, but lets quit bluffing. The religious leaders of all faiths, Protestants, Catholics and Jews, have united on a seven-point declaration of a world order based on moral law. The declaration of principles and ideals which these men of religion believe should guide the making of a post-war world, represent much patient study. They have come forward with a very fine statement of principles. Perhaps the most important thing is—that they have come forward— together—not so much the statements. They could have found an equally good statement, for example, in the prophet Isaiah or Amos. But it is important that Protestant and Catholic and Jewish religious leaders should get together and exert the weight of their influence to lead the people to these fine ideals. There was a report this week that Britain is considering the creation of a Jewish army of possibly one or more divisions to help drive the Japanese from Burma. "The idea," says the report, "has found favor in certain responsible miUtary quarters." We can's speak authoritatively for those favoring a Jewish army, but nevertheless, if we may drop a hint to the British government, it would be: drop the idea. The place to have started a Jewish army, if at all, was around Palestine.



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PAGE EIGHT *Jtisi> ihrMian ESJLocici = B E N SIO N f !" p aUstine The name of the American Jewish community is blessed in and out of Zion. Throughout Palestine and most likely everywhere else America is mentioned with affection and reverence. It is a great privilege to be an American, but at the same time also a grave responsibility. Noblesse Oblige! The whole world looks to America not only for material sustenance but also spiritual leadership to prevent a relapse into the catastrophic old world politics which nurtured the best of Germany on Jewish flesh and blood until it became monstrous enough to swallow those that fed it, but fortunately is strangling to death in its greed and avarice. May all the enemies of Israel and humanity speedily reach the same end. However. God helps those who help themselves. This is a principle repeated numerous times in diverse forms both in Bible and Talmud and is well established in modern social science and philanthropy. American Jewry has spent millions on charity and most likely will be called on to continue to do so No wards need be wasted in pointing out how laudable and noble such sympathy and self-sacrifice truly is Nevertheless, standing on the threshold of a new Jewish Year. at a time of unprecedented crisis in Jewish history, it may be well to pause and take stock of our charities and well intended relief end. MV The facts arc appalling. The millions of dollars American Jewry spent during and since the last World War served mainly to preserve our helpless brethren in Eastern Europe in a humiliating miserable condition, ultimately to become the victims of Nazi brutality in the present war. It is only too true that practically all of them have been destroyed root and branch. The greater tragedy, however, is tunity to save many of that these sacrifices seem to have been in vain, for the remnant of Israel still has not learned the lesson these facts teach so clearly that even he who runs may read. No one in his right mind, and least one endowed with a Jewish heart, will deprecate extending a helping hand at any time to any one in need. "Bread tor the living and shrouds for the dead'" was and is an urgent necessity which may not be ignored; but as a people fighting for our survival, we cannot stop at that, but can and must do more. The rebuilding of Palestine is not only a religious duty hallowed by centuries Of Jewish tradition and devotion, but also the soli solution to the problem of Jewish relict in a constructive sense and Jewish self-preservation on a basis of dignity and honor Let me illustrate by practical I I from my own experience. In Palestine I met J e w i s h refugees from many lands. The very wealthy owner of one of the largest textile factories in Lodz who always lived in dread of being murdered by any one of his numerous employees was induced by his "crazy" Zionist brother to buy land in Palestine where he himself had settled. At the outbreak ol the war this Polish magsymbol of wicked nate barely escaped with his life, and taunted and after a long and hazardous ^^twwjw"" • ...„,iiii"""' ;i"/•*. •Tl the In (ThN column is condih tad b '• %  • atei Miami JewiNh Pedal ill ; l>rtlon with Tha Jewlah Florid f %  community aeri I, T ., Inform th immunity '•' your organisation'^ mi-* and t.. avoid riifii,-tn in Phone 1.5411 ;,„,, ask f|ir Calendar" Notification •u-t reach Mmta no laterthin "•ia> for publication that v.., u > d ttei "Community mm I i< r *TT.. .r.rtffn *••• %  %  i HOItH JOSEPH M. UPTON. PRESIDENT Sun.. Oct. 17. Beth David Children s Succoth Party. Beth David Synagogue; also Sunday School registration. 10:00 a m Tue... Oct. 19. Jewish Welfare 2nd St.. 8:00 p. m. Wed Oct. 20. Beth David Sisn !i >d A "'K u,ar meeting. Beth David Auditorium. 2 30 ,,„, Mon.. Oct. 25. Women's' Division American Jewish Con1 %  annual installation luncheon at Versailles Hotel. Mian, Retenti ? 'r P m Bm B*Sh Intention Committee, dinner meeting, Royal Center, HadaV 1 "•"" ""••'tme., i vi rung Embarking upon a vigorous campaign to set its house in order, following hectic campaigns in aid of the war effort, Sholem Lodge has come to the inevitable conclusion that dues must be collected and its roster consist of a large paid-up membership. Louis Heiman set a mark of 1,000 members in good standing by the end of 1943, as the goal with which he will end "his year" as president of Sholem Lodge. This he announced at a Dutch treat dinner meeting which was held at the Royal Center on Thursday. October 7th. At this meeting there were present Nat Blumberg. Isador Goldstein. Leon Stolli r. Ernest Sussman, Louis Gordon. Morris Gerstein, Harry (li rstein, Maurice Cromer. Milton Friedman. Garry Glatt. Joseph Socolof. Sam B. Miller. Dr. I Feirstein, Louis Heiman. Sam Reinhardt and Max Goldman. In good standing means that a member has paid his dues to and including the current year, or, that a member is in the Armed Forces or Services, in which event dues are waived, and such member is in good standing for the duration. Which puts an extra burden on the lodge and membership. Grand Lodge, District and State per capita dues are based upon the number of members in good standing, and if the Lodge is to carry members in Service, the other members must make a special effort to see that their dues are paid. Bringing attention to members that they are delinquent in the payment of dues entails work and expense, which could be devoted to projects to produce other results—but unless each member sees that his dues are paid, others must do the work. To date Sholem Lodge has 643 members in good standing, as herein above defined. The total must be raised to 1.000 before the end of this year. Some members have set an example for the others by paying 1944 dues, and in this pre-paying group is Nat Blumberg. Isidore Brown. Sam W Alpert and Jay Alpert. Dinner Planned for Oct. 25th Another Dutch treat dinner meeting is planned for October 125th. to be held at the Clover Club. A private room, and dinner from $1.50—and after the i business ,,f reporting on the progress of the "Retention Committei work, see the show. Combining business and pleasure. Dues Dunning a Bora It must be as boring to read a column of this nature, assuming the reader has come as far as this admission, as it is to write it. if not more so. But we pay the butcher, the baker and the candlestick maker. We pay our way as we go along, but when it comes to pay dues, we like to postpone it. There H It, but that is ,h t er fa J*J solution f„r the ra pay the dues now 2Mft* with. Once ,t is ni e, tt Once better. But the rank and file of the T ship-or about 40 D er "* that it will move t hSS \ £** is something wo can't s^ft It is common kn^.-i-.j. Paid, *. i h0w t0 impan: common knowtafeJ a new blood bank at theft2l been established at Power and Light downtown Miami. Thif_| for bloa-il make it convenient BuildaiJ nors who can stop n W ,C pointments. depart with ing contribute.I do their hat feeling "on | in a constriM manner to the health ofthf,' munity and the war effort B'nai B'rith volunteer*'J have not yet fulfilled J pledges to heroin,• blood £\ are urged to attend at th* station at their earln fl I ience. The only instru to abstain from eating fors*] or of four hours before EH| the blood donatii And when so reporting state that you are a repr tive of B'nai B'rith. that the ganization may be credited. RADIO HOUR Rabbi S. M. Machtei of Bnl Sholem Center will be the nsI speaker on the Rabbinical A| ciation Hour at 10 a. m. Si over Station WQAM. BEFORE YOU BUT see LEON ELIII with METROPOLIS! LIFE INS. CO. Not Bast BacauM Big But—Biggest BacauM M sah. 7/////////////M//M""' .... % % % %  --*" M/dM//M RIVERMONT PARS SANITARIUM 18tt N. W. 7th St. BMI Ph. 8-7301 for chronic sick, convand elderly paopl, $25 WEEKLY locent ar DRINK PLENTY OF Cferipure Water DELIVERED TO YOUR HOME I0ALL0N BOTTLE Me CASE OF SIX TABLE BOTTLES 7 5c Plus Bottle Oepojit PHONE 2-4128 MODERATE COSTS ALWAYS WITHIN THE MEANS OF INDIVIDUAL CIRCUMSTANCES I Accoftiii)"totl*M authoritie*, the n mum daily AD*"* 1 Complex Vitamin • quirementsof then* aee person are: A urn VST v+*\ 440 ISP EM*"3 USP Unru, K1*\ Mlcnxrrami. %  **" proxlmately 1S.0M MIUSglSSM mm tinamlde. The required SSBSBSfJ other B Complex Vitamins hivtwi yet been established. J| Many people do not ft-fStl theae essent.al Vitamins. DO I"" 1 J Why not play safe by t"*" 1 ONE-A-DAY VI TAM.S*?H Each ONE-A-DAY Viunun A | D Tablet conUins Z\' n0 Z.*Z ood liver oil vitamins than tbjwj; mum daily recommonded 9^\ Each MB ; A-WW Complex Tablet contains J"U !" £ mum daily requiremenU ol *-( Bl and B2 and 10,000 m**fTm> NicoUnamide together with • aUntial amount of other O ""Z^ When you buy Vitn{*gg, potencies and prices. Noten" ^ A-DAY TableU orm ^ average human requiremen* how reasonable the cost •Get them at your drug • ^ GORDON YOUR JEWISH 710 S. W. 12th AVENUE FUNERAL HOME PHONE 3-3431 WORTHY AND DESERVES YOUR FULL SUPPORT AND RECOMMENDATION



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1 PAGE SIX vjewisti tkridiair FRIDAY, i OCTOBES THE Y. M. H. A. NOTES B T HARRY SCHWARTZ SHE TO III SEVENTEEN SERVICE AGENCIES Fall Activities Begin The first in the series of aduh programs sponsored by the "Y" for this Fall will take place on Sunday evening, October 17. in the nature of a Rally for new members. Elsewhere in this issue more details will be found. Other activities for the month of October are as follows: October 18. 7:30 P. M.—Boy Scout Review Court. October 25. 3:30 P. M.—Dancing classes for children begin. October 25, 7:30 P. M—Course in Conversational Spanish be-1 gins October 26. 8:30 P. M.—Annual Dance ..t Coral Gables Country Club. October 28. 8:30 P. M.—Lecture on Jewish History—first in series sponsored by the Y. M. H. A. in co-operation with the Rabbinical Association. Dr. Jacob Kaplan, lecturer. In addition to the above, the reguli ly activities of the "Y" for youths will take place, such as meetings and projet I Boy Scouts, Cub Troop, A. Z. A.. B. Z B, and other youth groups. Persons interested in any of the above projects are urged to at the V office immemiately. Diamondball Our D rn, without any fanfare, has been doing a splendid job for the past several weeks It has played the various service teams in the surrounding areas. This is greatly appreciated by the officers and men as it gives them an outlet for their energy. Last Sunday they played the Coast Guards and won. Several such games are planned for the succeeding Sundays. Games are held at the Riverside Playground. Boy Scouts The "Y" once more has been chosen by the Dade County BoyScout Association to hold its Review Court at the "Y"' on Monday evening. October 18. This is ngular hi nor b< cause, under ordinary circumstances, our turn would nJt come for another six or eightanonths, but the members ot r>e Association feel that our facilities an so good that hav< asked us to hold this Review once more before our regular scheduled tune. Scouts from all over the county will attend and will be examini their officers for merit. 12th Annual Dance Oct. 26th Larry Grossberg, Chairman of the 12th Annual Dance Committee, reports B brisk sale oi tickets for this event Reservations are now being taken GEORGE T. COSTELLO NEW RED CROSS REPRESENTATIVE The appointment ol George T. Cost) llo 40f. I.-.ke Elbert Drive, Winter Haven, Fli as General rield Representative for the American Ked CK ss v. ith territory in the southern half ot the ida Peninsula hi been announci d by the South* asti i n Area Headquarters, ten pol at Alexandria V*a He will act as the liaison between Red Cros C .,; %  %  : %  an I Area Headquarters, and travel the' i %  poi ti. n ol his visiting chapters in bis • rritory and helping thenaf. ficials develop Red C activiMr. Costello, en a %  Aid and Lift Saving instructor with Hed Cro.-.for n years, both as a volunteer and a member ol the national staff, traveled through the Orient and in Hawaii and the Philippines in !!)4l on special assignment with the Insular and Foreign Service of Red Cross. He taught First Aid and Life Saving to men and women in the islands and spent some time in China. Cairo (WNS)—A broup of Arabs attacked a n d seriously I' woun l< manj J< ws in Morocco on V'liii KippUT eve, it was reported here this week. The Aived to hi i 'i incited by pro-Nazi elements to pogromize the Jewish population. thi Jews a.-saulted re%  lion Jacksonville. Fla..—State head quarters of the Florida War Fund, Inc.. affiliated with the National War Fund, today pointed to a list of some of the causes served by the National War Fund through the 17 great organizations which are member agencies. "In this gnat humanitarian undertaking." Dr. John J. Tigert. state campaign chairman._ said. we want the people of Florida to know what is the National War Fund and what it is doing in the way of service to our men in the various branches of the armed forces, and what assistance it is giving to the people of suffering nations. which are sympathetic to the Allied cause."' More than S.ooo.OOO men and women of the U. S. fighting forces look to the USO each I month fot off-duty recreation, comforts and spiritual well Tigert said. In addition, nearly 1.000 professional enti rtainers are givmg nightly performances under the auspices of USO Camp Shows. Inc.. tor our service men at home and abroad tq keep them laughing, "Thousand of merchant seamen, who bring the convoys through mine infested lanes to their final destination, find need-t and relaxation in homes and centers operated by the United Seami ns' Service in cooperation with the War Shipping Administration in ports m two hemispheres.' Tigert said. The state chairman pointed out. too. that more than 6.000.000 men are in the "barbed wire ; legion." prisoners of.war. who need more than the established n regime if their spirit is to be maintained lor peacetime usefulness. Another important service. Dr. Tigert said, is that rendered to some 30.000.000 refugees from Axis terrors Scattered throughout the world, these people need friendly help in their efforts to re-establish themselves, he added. In that connection, he pointed further to some startling stafisBetween 5.000.000 and 7.m In the interests of wartime conservation, Uncle Sam asks us to MAKE THE THINGS WE HAVE. DO. If you can't use it, let someone else have it. MALL ELECTRIC !\ • 'A PLIANCE YOU WANT TO Cooperation Uamwork lhat'i (he key to victory. Your shelved appliance may be badly Hooded by someone elie. U beyond repair, you can soil it lor salvage of parts. Our Trading Post was established uie it to help you. Como in and nosuD* PO %  court** HM 000.000 Chinese people are facing starvation. Of the Greek children born since 1940, less than one in twenty is alive today due to starving conditions. Approximately 40.000.000 Russians have I had to evacuate their homes. I More than 2.000 child victims of tin war have been evacuated to this country for care and protection, and hundreds of others await the miracle of rescue. Tigert said mat one out of every five homes in Britain have i been ruined or damaged by 1 raids, and that in China 2.000 children have been orphaned left homeless. "Thousands of women war victims, internees, evacuees and refugees need assistance," he added. "These and other needs on the Military Front, the United Nations Front and the Home Front are served by the agencies participating in the National War Fund and local united war chests." Tigert'said. LEGAL NOTICE" NOTICI is NOTICES u NDER~rTr-~*AMI nlism LAW T| lfl the undei : '''^"ffllVpy the Clerk .., ,' *'" "i.,? ti-UB name tr'^VK *.*, Miami Bench, |.-|„,i,u "'TICAL *•" '"•<•'••' in ta8nV*5* 9/17-24 10,1.,.,'"< %  E J Zurich (JTA). — Traveling by Jews in Rumania has been further restricted as a result of the restlessness prevailing in the country since the present successful offensive of the Russian army began, The Bucharest radio this wi'ek 1 ported that Jews holding travel permits will have to submit them to the authorities for revision in connection with the new travel regulations for the Jewish population. At the same time the broadcast warned that severe punishment will be imposed upon Rumania business firms which do not comply with the labor regulations concerning the employment ol Jews. fictitious name Clerk or the County, Florida In u,,. ircult Conn SAMIKI, DA VII DAVID BLAN^ MARION hS#£ 'P : iUv%r%* LOUIH HEIM A ^?" CMU Attorney f.i .\pi.ii,.. ni IN THE CIRCUIT COURT J 11th JUDICIAL, euLiW FLORIDA. | N AND ?o L „' T COUNTY. i N CHANCWrl No. 80950 CECIL HARRISON cTrvn Pla INhV %  LfJEABBTM REBECCA nirJ Defendan) % %  ORDER OF PUBLICATION rou. I:I.IX A 1:1:111 RPRS 1 "' 10 raj the nbova %  %  illna, are appeal knci I Hvorc* Buy War Savings Bonds. HELP WANTED BODY AND FENDER MAN TOP PRICES PAID Apply or Call WALTERSON BODY WORKS. INC. 1135 N. Miami Avenue PHONE 2-8816 %  "• •move nm Divorce 01 ,, ubt %  '"' il ''''' : "' • % % %  --• win"nl tered against %  M I ATEI %  Sept. .' lu i: B LEATHERN IBM I I! K .1 ,;,,; I It 1-8-15-22, u NOTICE UNDER FICTll NAME LAW W Notice is henb) g|v< undersigned. HAKKY STEM a bualneaa under ti>< NEW VORK BAKERY Court, Miami Uearh, KlondiTta t.. rearlatei said 'i. iitiou nui Office "f the Clerk ol Court, Dade County, y HARR1 LOUIS HBIMAN Attoroe) for Apprl 10/1-15-ZI-SI 11 i REAL ESTATE—MIAMI BEACH B. E. BRONSTON, Realtor 605 Lincoln Road Ph. 5-5868 A Trustworthy Real Estate Service 1 > I-! Free ISM! Descriptive. Map ..r Miami Be u a NOTICE UNDER FICTIT'OLS NAME LAW No) i' •• .in reb r 1 • undersigned, MONTE SELK M NIE SKI.Hi ;inil IDA RAI partners doing buidnen isAy t fictitious name ol .Spirit a at 17 N W ith BtraLlj da, Intend l<> regitti turns nami %  •f the Circuit Court, ItdtCMK Florida, Mi'NTK F\ \N11 ll>.\ ; X LOl'Ifl HEIMAN Atto (ppl .ii u 10 II5-S2-S9 II %  RENTALS LEASES SALES Lots. Homes. Hotels Apartment Houses M. GILLER Reg. Real Estate Broker Ph. 58-1188 523 Mich. Art. I WANT MY MILK Bur* It'a FLORIDA DAIRIES HOMOGENIZED Vitamin "D" Milk "Milk Product" DBCTO Protected TEL. 2-2621 Greater Miami Delivery Visit Our Farm at •200 H. W. 32nd Street NOTICE OF APPLICATION <% TAX DEED File 37106 Notli e is hen P CHRISTOPHER, I I* u %  ] • %  f City %  >' Hlaleal Ti i • I Numb< dated I I %  >f .liilv. .\ I i Mflcate In n offii •. and hw J application for tax .i ;:. Bio h ". Amenoel f* of MelroHe Qardi %  if III..I. all Htate nf Floi ni i The aaseaameni t>t -aid w* under the Ceri thi i im of CNKNOWN J Certificate shall i-r.-.i.em*d J ini; to law, tax deed will <-ii on the '.'iii da> id Novesias .' 1 „ ii Dated this 5th da I I' %  i : !•:. li. NEATHERMAN Clerk "' ciri-uliCoJi Dade County, rw;" (Circuit Court Heal) By N C Sterrett '' l 10 s-i:, %  : %  :%  ::< n _____ J IN THE CIRCI IT COfRl'* 1 li Til Jl'DICIAL CIRWTJ FI/ORJDA, IN AND Pf COl'NTY L\ '"HANI KK> No. • CARL RIPLET Plaintiff ELIZABETH RIPLET, I (efi ORDE V..U. i:i... I'nioii Street, Wharton, > are notified to file > %  "' in the above ca i '• %  Defendant ,,_. nN ,ER OF PUBLICATION ELIZABBTII iur_>y .. ... II I, Ml, HI >' J 3 oafesao will l "' M Octobei %  !•*! pr< you DATED i •: 11 (SKI. 11 B) WM l" 1-lS-SI-tl 11 tered %  %  \ i^dft i Tiiomi for R£ST COHVALtSCfW ^CH-OHKC** IthReson tit



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1IDAY, OCTOBER 15. 1943 *Jeniskh florid ten PAGE THREE ORGANIZATION ACTIVITIES SCHAAREI ZEDEK The Ladies Auxiliary of Cong. Schaarei Zedek announce a card party at the synagogue for Sunday evening, October 24, and not as previously announced by error as October 4. Mrs. Max Mintzer and Mrs. Gershon August will serve as hostesses for the occasion. Proceeds will be used for the Talmud Torah. BET H SHOLOM CENT ER Sunday school and Talmud Torah registration for Beth Sholonf Center will take place on Sunday, Oct. 17. Children's Succos Party, under the auspices of the Beth Sholom Sisterhood, will start at 11 a. m. Sunday Oct. 17. First session of Sunday school will be on Oct. 24. and the Talmud Torah opening on Monday, Oct. 25, at 3:30 p. m. BETH DAVID On account of Succos holidays, Mrs. Harry Oliphant, president of Beth David Sisterhood, announces that the regular meeting scheduled for Wednesday, Oct. 20, has been postponed until Wednesday, Oct. 27, at 2:30 p. m. A fine program has been arranged and a large nUmber of members and friends are expected. At the last regular meeting of the Sisterhood, Mrs. Harry Oliphant appointed Mrs. Isador Cohen as Hospitality Chairman of the Annual Pre-Purim Ball. Mrs. Hyman Sootin was elected financial secretary to replace Mrs. Samuel Auslander, who left Miami for the North. Mrs. Jake Engler was appointed chairman of all Card Parties, with Mrs. Louis Hartz as co-chairman. Sunday school registration and Children's Succo Party will take place Sunday morning at 10 a. m. Parents are urged to register their children. The United States Government Having Taken Over His Present Offices — DR. JOSEPH B. MARGOLIS announces the REMOVAL OF HIS OFFICE to 311 Lincoln Road Albion Bldg.. Suite 301 MIAMI BEACH For the Practice of General Dentistry BETH JACOB There will be a membership meeting of the Congregation Beth Jacob on Monday night, Oct. 18. at the synagogue. New members will be inducted and a Cultural program presented. The Beth Jacob Sisterhood will meet Tuesday, Oct. 19, at 2 p. m. in the Succa of Beth Jacob Congregation. Mrs. Moses Krieger, first vice-president, will be the guest speaker. Her subject will be "Impressions of the American Jewish Conference." The meeting is open to the public. The Board of Education of Beth Jacob Congregation will meet at the synagogue Tuesday night, Oct. 19. JEWISH CONGRESS At the executive board meeting of the Women's Division of the AmericanJewish Congress elected to serve on the executive board as vice-presidents, was Mrs. Rose Weiss, chairman of the bond and stamp selling for Congress, and Mrs. Philip Salmon, chairman of the United Jewish War Effort, and chairman of the cultural project, the "Friday Review." These women will be installed on Oct. 25th at the installation luncheon at the Versailles hotel. Have you Dought your Defense Bonds yet? Ask Your Local Delicatessen For the Beat e It Costs No More OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE IN FLORIDA KOSHER ZION SAUSAGE CO. PRODUCTS Delicious Corned Beer Pickled, Cooked and Smoked Moate 37th and Normal Ave. Chicago MR. AND MRS. DAVID ROSNER AND FAMILY Operators of the Ostend Hotel, Atlantic City, and formerly Astor Hotel, Miami Beach WISH FOR ALL JEWRY A GMAR CHSIMA TOVA Now operating the London Arms Hotel, Miami Beach Strictly Kosher—Watch for Opening Announcement HOLLEMAN'S RESTAURANT 14th Street at Washington Avenue, Miami Beach Open from 11 A. M. to 8:30 P. M. (Closed All Day Friday) Serving the Same Fine Quality Food at Moderate Prices Luncheons from 50c Dinners from 65c BEACH ZIONIST LAMAR HOTEL 411 WEST CENTRAL ORLANDO. FLORIDA FREE PARKING COFFEE SHOPPE ELEVATOR SERVICE As assurance of a strong, progressive leadership for the Miami Beach Zionist District in its new year is voiced by the nomination committee composed of Max Meisel, Alex Van Stratton, Harry Platoff. Dr. M. A. Lipkind. and Jake Felt. The program committee, headed by Philip Salmon, has made necessary arrangements to assure a successful annual election meeting for the evening of Wednesday, October 27th. Miami Beach Zionists participated in the submission of a resolution of gratitude and appreciation to the Swedish government for the haven provided for refugee Jews of Denmark. ARAB DELEGATES HERE FAVOR U. S. OF ARABIA Washington (WNS).—The establishment of a United States of Arabia including Palestine, Egypt. Iraq. Syria and other Arab states was urged as the best solution of the Arab problem by Emir Feisal, second son and Foreign Minister of King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia, at a press conference here this week. Confirming the report that he would proceed to London after completing his stay in the United States, the Foreign Minister added that there was no reason why the matter of a union of Arab states should not be negotiated before the end of the war. He also revealed that shortly before he left for his trip to the United States he learned that an emissary of the Egyptian Prime Minister Nahas Pasha was on his way to discuss Arab federation problems with Ibn Saud. He also intimated that he, too, would participate in later discussions. SflS^ld AI.KA SO.TZER An feat relief for HIIMIIII, 81 ~U Neemlgla. "alen. InjAfUr". CeMD I et r — i Maacalar Pelna and ladlfeetlaa. roar DrumrUt — and M Ceats \Ika-Seltzer )YotT Dr. MUea Nerrioe for, Blu p I %  %  Nf row IrrttaMKr., BxattaMIttr u Ne r ro— Headaahe. Bead diree-' taaaa and DM only aa directed. NERVINE Get TOOT daftr Vitamin* A and D aad BComples by takin* OKBA-DAT (brand) THaarta %  DP 0 Takfeta. lewou•"IT_\C7 eeJ.oooritoot.A* ONE-7D.-DA VITAMIN T ,-\ >i i r OBITUARIES Mrs. Clara Thalheimer, 75, of 1229 18th Street, Miami Beach, died Sunday in a local hospital. She has been a Beach resident four months, coming from Brooklyn, and is survived by her husband, Edward Thalheimer, Miami Beach, and a son, Albert Thalheimer, of Philadelphia. Services were conducted Monday in Riverside Memorial Chapel with Rabbi S. M. Machtei officiating. NON-JEWS CONTRIBUTORS IN AIDING JEWS ABROAD Non-Jews have contributed on numerous occasions to local campaigns for the rescue of Jews abroad, for Palestine reconstruction and for refugee aid in the United States, but this week it was reported that for the first time in the fiveyear history of the United Jewish Appeal for Refugees. Overseas Needs and Palestine, a Christian has assumed the leadership of a Jewish community's drive. In Hammond. Ind.. James Post, a non-Jew, heads the campaign "High Command'' for the unified drive in behalf of the Joint Distribution Committee. United Palestine Appeal and National Refugee Service. Putting his business obligations aside, Mr. Post is these days spending all his time in organizing the Jewish communal forces, conferring with Jewish leaders, studying prospect cards and going over the general campaign strategy. It is reported that the entire Jewish community of Hammond has been stimulated to a high pitch of enthusiasm by Mr. Post's devotion to the cause of Jewish survival and rehabilitation. JJJGUST BROS. R>^ GREATER MIAM THIS WEEK END (CONTINUED FROM PAC£ 1) Succo after each of the holiday services. Beth Sholem Center, Rabbi S. M. Machtei will conduct the services. Cantor Abraham Friedman will chant the musical portions of the service. Thursday at 9:00 a .m., sermon subject: "Only a Hut." Thursday at 6:30 p. m. Friday at 9:00 a. m., sermon subject: "Harvest Festival." Children's Succo Party at 11:00 a. m. on Sunday, Oct. 17, with the Sisterhood acting as hosts. Miami Jewish Orthodox Congregation, Rabbi Joseph E, Rakovsky will preach and chant the services beginning Thursday and Friday morning at 9:00 a. m.. and in the evening at 6:00 p. m. Rabbi Rakovsky's topic Thursday morning will be "Tabernacles," and on Friday "Lulov." The closing days of the festival will start Wednesday evening at 6:00 p. m. with Yizkor Memorial Service at the houses of worship on Thursday morning. Holiday services continue through Friday. (Note: Because of the holiday, this edition is published on Wednesday for delivery Thursday, carrying regular Friday dateline. This issue will reach readers in time for the above information to be of value.) Is the BEST —Buy War Bonds Today— The Best Chop Suey in Town! CHICKEN CHOW MEIN 0 R I E N T A L GARDEN 272 West Flagler Street OPEN ALL SUMMER OLD SARATOGA INN Bisc'.iync Boulevard at 77th Street Phone 7-7725 Dinners From 5 o'Clock Sundays From Noon Cocktai! Lounge Fine Liquors and Wines TAKE BUS II FROM DOWNTOWN MIAMI OR BUS Mil FROM MIAMI REACH OPEN EVERY DAY EXCEPT TUESDAY PALM BEACH NOTES JEWISH FLORIDIAN OFFICE. 226 S. OLIVE STREET IN THE FOX BUILDING MBS. MARY SCKREBNICX Representative LFAR £* fc.A MERY CO. Tm the Beel In Dairy Pro du cts WEST PALM BEACH MM—CREAM—ICE CREAM • %  C SOUTHERN DAIRIES Wen tug Palm Beec h County, featuring the Nationally Famous leathern TTllrtee P*e~ duct and Ice 0— AS NEA1 TO YOU AS YOUR PHOKF FERGUSON FUNERAL HOME, Inc. 1201 South Olive Avenue WEST PALM BEACH PHONE 5172 PALM BEACH BOTTLING WORKS INCORPORATED WEST PALM BEACH. FLORIDA Beverages of Quality Since 1920 LAINHART & POTTER ESTABLISHED 1893 BUILDING MATERIAL FOR PARTICULAR BUILDERS' Phone 5191 West Palm Beach, Fla.



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llY. dCTOBER 15. 1943 J ewisliHcrM/an PAGE SEVEN ARMED SERVICE rd has been received of the otion of Ely Katz to the rank ijor. t. Herbert B. Wilensky, son and Mrs. Wolf Wilensky, W. Fourth Ave., has been a cadet in the Army spetraining unit, and is now >ned at Muskingum College, Concord, O. He is a gradu>f Miami Senior High school [spent two years at the UniIty of Florida. GREATER MIAMI ARMY-NAVY COMMITTEE Of The Jewish Welfare Board A COMMUNITY PROJECT Help Ui Keep a Record of Our Men in Service IK' II' SERVICE [ 1 W PARADE! /c E. Howard Lavine, son of I. H. Lavine, 2117 S. W. 5th fct, flew into the city for the Kippur Holiday. A recent late of the Jacksonville NaStation's Ordnance )1, Seaman Lavine is atto a fighter squadron staat Lee Field, Green Coves igs, Fla. Aaron Goldenblank. staat Camp Gordon Johnson, is spending a 10-day furwith his parents, Mr. and M. Goldenblank, 1923 S. W. Terrace. He is a former stuthe University of Florida, lating in 1938. t Murray Dackt is now enat the University of Calijbm under the Army Special%  Training Program. He was %  lerly stationed at the Santa kna, Cal., Army Air Base. News has been received that William H. Bermtein has been promoted to the rank of captain rCamp Patrick Henry in VirS ^nia. Mrs. Bernstein and three BUghters have just returned to their homo. 4565 N. Bay Road, after a visit with her sister, Mrs. M. M. Silberstein in Johnstown, Pa. Capt. Bernstein now is serving overseas. Jerome J. Berger, Miami Beach business man. who ha sbeen serving in the navy at the Miami Naval Air Station for the past 11 months, has been commissioned a lieutenant (j. g.) it was learned today. Lieutenant Berger lives at 4141 Nautilus Drive, and was manager of the Outlet Shop, a women's el business, at 1150 Lincoln ^Lieutenant Berger is a gradu||e of Lehigh University at Bethem, Pa., and came to Miami ich eight years ago from %  Skill, N. Y. le has been assigned to the Transport Command, Squad7, at the Miami Naval Air Ition and will report next week his new assignment at the Ulywood, Fla., Naval Training ition. [Sgt. Samuel H. Glasser, son of s. Ida Glasser and graduate of ami Beach Senior High School, now receiving a radio-operar-gunner training at Alexania, La., Army Air Base. He is member of a Flying Fortress tew nearly ready for overseas bmbat duty. Sgt. Aaron Meyers, 27, of St. Louis, Mo., engaged in the New Guinea fighting for many months, has been awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in combat. One of the first of the airborne infantry men to go into action in that theatre of war. Sergeant Meyers is credited with substantially contributing to the progress of the Allied campaign in New Guinea. Prt. James Poris, 21, of Elmirst, L. I., volunteering for a pecial communications mission the epochal battle of Hill 609, % as killed by enemy shell fire. lis mother is a lieutenant in the |ed Cross Prisoner of War Pack?ing Service; she is also a Gray ady serving in the Emergency fard at Queens General Hospital. ^ Seaman Robert Biglow, 22. of it. Paul, Minn., was reported lissing in action after his ship, He U. S. Destroyer DeHaven, vas sunk by Jap dive bombers iff Guadalcanal. A graduate of Mechanic Art High School. Biglow operated a "meat market in Civilian life, when he enlisted in M Navy a little over a year ago. Lt. Leonard M Feldman, 23. of Springfield, 111., Flying Fortress ombardier, lost his life when his lip's twin motors went dead on fie return journey from a suc.essful bombing mission and plunged into the ocean, just two Jiours from land. The lieutenant pad taken part in the Battle of Midway and in numerous other pacific engagements. Leonard Bias been posthumously awarded Ithe Purple Heart. S/Sgt. George Joseph Smith. 24, of Lynbrook, N. Y., an airman serving in the South Pacific area, has been killed in action. Joining the Air Corps almost two years before Pearl Harbor, Sergeant Smith was on duty at Hickam Field when the Japs launched their war. In the next few months he earned the Air Medal and an Oak Leaf Cluster, getting into action in Australia and New Guinea. Corp. Milton Melman, 24, of Middletown, Pa., tail gunner aboard a Flying Fortress operating in the South Pacific, sank a Japanese vessel at Finschhaven. For his effective work against the foe, Corporal Melman has been awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal. Prt. Abraham A. Marder. 26. of Philadelphia, died of wounds sustained in the Hill 609 drive. Private Marder had been engaged in scouting and reconnaisance duty. A member of the Philadelphia YMHA, he was an all-around athlete. He had been in service close to two years. CHAPLAIN H. L. FREUND IS AT MIAMI BEACH B. T. C 4 Chaplain Hirsch L. Freund has been appointed as Post Chaplain of the B. T. C. 4, Miami Beach. He is a former resident of Cincinnati, Ohio, and was previously stationed at Fort Knox, Ky., before coming to Miami Beach three months ago. Pfc. Meyer Brener. 37, of New Orleans, La., lost his life in the Southwest Pacific area. A member of the YMHA and the B'nai B'rith, he was a furniture salesman in civilian life. He has been posthumously awarded the Purple Heart. Petty Officer Marvin C. Huffman. 24, of Cincinnati, lost his life in the Mediterranean. A mechanic in civilian life, Lt. Julian S. Adleman. 32. of Medford, Mass., a member of the Medical Corps, was killed in action in the Mediterranean zone. A physician in civilian life, he was graduated from Medford High School and Middlesex Collegt. Lt. Milton Greene. 27, of Denver, Colo., a Flying Fortress pilot participating in the relentless air hammering of Hitler's Fortress Europa, holds six decorations: the Distinguished Service Cross, the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Air Medal, and three Oak Leaf Clusters. Completing 25 successful bombing missions over vital Nazi targets. Lieutenant Green was shipped back to the States and is now on duty at the Pocatella Air Base in Idaho as pilot instructor following a fifteen-day leave at home. Lt. Julius Dorfman, 23, of Philadelphia, Pa., co-pilot on a Flying Fortress, has been reported missing in action after a bombing raid over Germany. Lieutenant Dorfman was previously wounded during a raid on Lorient in which his ship, fighting against heavy odds, destroyed several Nazi planes. Lieutenant Dorfman enlisted in the Air Force two years ago, after attending Temple University. His father is assistant to the Supervisor of the Food Distribution Administration of the U. S. Department of Agriculture. Lt. Sidney Casden. 22. of Brooklyn, missing in action when his plane was forced down over France, had written his parents the day before his plane fell that "the chances are I'll be all right even if they do list me as missing." Sgt. Irving R. Newman. 23, of Los Angeles, Cal., member of a bomber squadron, was killed in the Middle East fighting. The son of an Army musician, he had been in service a year and a half. His plane went down under enemy shells, but every one of the crew survived the crash except Irving. Pvt Sidney Rothenberg,, 28. of the Bronx, lost his life when his vessel was sunk in the North Atlantic by a Nazi submarine early this year. A member of the Coast Artillery Corps, Private Rothenberg had been in service five months. A graduate of Seward Park, he was a salesman in civilian life. Lt. Raymond T. Siegel. 22. of Baton Rouge, La., was killed in action in North Africa, leading his platoon in an attack on the foe. He was a student at L. S. U. when he enlisted a year ago. Lt. Gilbert H. Wolf. 42, of New York City, a Medical Corps officer, lost his life when his ship went down off the African coast. A member of the Army Reserve Corps for five years, Lieutenant Wolf had been on active duty five months. He has been posthumously awarded the Purple Heart. Lt. Jay J. G. Schats. 25, of Chicago, cited for his "superior performance of duty and calmness in making decisions in the face of heavy fighter opposition," has been decorated with the Distinguished Flying Cross. Hit by a bullet that went right through his left leg, Lieutenant Schatz also holds the Purple Heart. Sgt Hyman Phillip*. 24. of Fairmount, N. D., bombardier, is missing in action in the European area. A graduate of North High School in Minneapolis, Phillips was an outstanding swimmer and skier. In service a year and a half. Sergeant Phillips enlisted shortly after Pearl Harbor. Sgt. Simon E. Goldstein, 22. of Bayside, N. Y., a member of the Marine Air Corps, was killed in action in the South Pacific area. Before joining the Marine Air Corps a year and a half ago. Sergeant Goldstein was a printer in civilian life. WAR" RECORDS COMMITTEE NAT ROTH. Chairman FRED SHOCHET MRS. GEORGE M. COHEN MAURICE GROSSMAN JENNIE H. ROTFORT NATHAN ROTHBERO J. W. B. Director OFFICERS SAM BLANK, CHAIRMAN MONTE SELIQ, Vice-Chairman JOSEPH A. BERMAN, See. Executive Committee Mrs. Waiter Bronaton, Mrs. Max Dobrin, Maurice Gronmin, Louis Helman, Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan, Mrs. Murry Koven, Harry Markowltz, Nat Roth, Fred Shochet. Milton Sirkin, Joseph Stein. Mrs. Hermn Wallach, Carl Wainkls. Georae Wolpert. Able Bodied Seaman Nathan Dembofsky. 38, of New York City, a member of the Merchant Marine, has been missing in action since his ship was torpedoed sometime ago in the North Atlantic. Dembofsky, who has made a career of the Merchant Marine, has been in its service twenty-two years. Soundman 3/c Nathaniel Brody, 20, of Kerhonkson, N. Y., is missing in action. On convoy duty in the Solomon Islands area, his vessel was the target of a concentrated attack by one hundred Japanese planes. In the Navy fourteen months, Brody was an apprentice carpenter in civilian life and was a student at the University of Baltimore. Lt. Jack Miller. 23, of Dallas. Texas, who lost his life on Guadalcanal, has been posthumously awarded the Navy Cross for extraordinray heroism and the Purple Heart for "military merit." At Southern Methodist University, of which he was an alumnus, Miller captained the university swimming team in 1939. Cpl. Sidney S. Damb. 24, of Springfield, Mass., has been awarded the Silver Star for "initiative, coolness, and gallantry in action" in Tunisia. When his squad leader was wounded and put out of action, Corporal Damb jumped into command and at once deployed his men so that maximum damage could be inflicted on the enemy. In service close to three years, he was a Springfield Armory worker in civilian life. QNALLTHEFRDNTS Pfc. Carl C. Goshman. 23. of Brooklyn, member of the Medical Corps, was killed in action "somewhere in the Aleutians." In service a year and a half. Private Goshman managed a wholesale bakery in civilian life. He was graduated from Tilden High School and attended New York University. Private Goshman was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart. Pfc. Alfred L. Kat*. Jr.. 19, of Memphis Tenn., serving on one of the first Flying Fortresses to attack,Henderson Field, Guadalcanal, in Oct., 1942, died of wounds sustained on the third day of action. His father, Alfred Katz, Sr., of Memphis, Term., was in the Navy in the World War I. T/Sgt. Arnold E. Hyman. 21. of Los Angeles, Cal., Flying Fortress gunner,, killed in action in the European Area, has been posthumously awarded the Purple Heart. A graduate of Thomas Jefferson High School of San Antonio, Sergeant Hyman held the rank of major in the R. O. T. C. Following his graduation, the family moved to California where the sergeant starred in football at U. C. L. A. Lt. Arthur M. Zuckerman. 25. of Los Angeles, has been killed in action in the Southwest Pacific Area. He was a student at Rhodes' Prep. School in New York and a graduate of the University of Southern California. He had been a member of the Air Force two years. Pfc. Louis SasloTsky. 23, of Brooklyn, was wounded in action during the Sicilian campaign. In service twenty months. Private Saslovsky was a pleater in civilian life. He is a graduate of Franklin Lane High School. Pvt Russell L. Cohen, 22. of Pittsburgh, Pa., a Marine, was wounded on Guadalcanal. In one battle he killed ten Japanese with a hand grenade before he was wounded. Private Cohen is a member of the B'nai Israel synagogue and a graduate of Peabody High School. Pvt. Samuel Newman. 26. of Cleveland, Ohio, was wounded in action in the North African Area. A recipient of the Purple Heart, Private Newman took part in five major battles in the Tunisian campaign. A salesman in civilian life, he is a graduate of Glenville High. Pvt. William Roth man. 21, of Brooklyn, tail gunner on a B-24 Liberator operating in the Pacific Area, lost his life when his plane went down near Henderson Field on Guadalcanal. Devoting This Entire Page to the Efforts of Army-Navy Committee. Made Possible Through the Co^Operation of ABESS & COSTAR First National Bank Building COWEN'S SHOE STORE 155 E. Flagler St. — 822 Lincoln Rd. FIXZIT SYSTEMS. Plumbers 1114 N. E. 2nd Avenue FLORIDA LINEN SERVICE 100 N. W. 20th Street LAND-O-SUN DAIRIES, Inc101 Alton Road LUBY CHEVROLET CO. 1055 West Flagler Street MIAMI MILL WORK & LUMBER CO. 535 N. W. 11th Street NATIONAL BRANDS, Inc. 690 N. W. 13th Street NANKIN'S SHOE STORE 158 East Flagler Street SAM MEYERS 111 South Miami Avenue SOUTHEASTERN SALESMEN'S CARAVAN Langford Building STANDARD WHOLESALE GROCERY CO. 149 N. E. 10th Street TOOLEY-MYRON STUDIOS DuPont Building WILLIAM D. SINGER SUNGAS CO. 1100 West Flagler Street WEST FLAGLER KENNEL CLUB West Flagler St. at 37th Avenue WOLPERT FURNITURE CO. 155 West Flagler Street WOMETCO THEATRES Mitchell Wolf son Sydney Meyer Lt. Milton Lunenfeld. 25. of the Bronx, has been decorated with the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Air Medal, and two Oak Leaf Clusters. S Sgt. Fred Harris Goldstein. 21, of Cleveland, a flight chief and radio operator aboard a Southwest Pacific air transport, is the recipient of the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal for the valorous role he played in helping to save Guadalcanal during the "dark days of last October. Sergeant Goldstein, who has been in service a year and a half, was attending a science school at the time of his enlistment. His father served in the last war and his brother, Ted, is an air cadet. Lt. Harold L. Fuchsmann. 25. of Chicago, leading navigator of a squadron of six Flying Forts, is an eleven-medal flier, holding the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Air Medal and nine Oak Leaf Clusters. Lieutenant Fuchsmann's DFC citation stresses the fact that his was the only bomber ever to make "a record of 50 consecutive, completed sorties, each directly to the target and return, without deviation from course." Operating in the African theatre, Fuchsmann's Fortress, the "Wahoo," went through 440 hours of flying time with its original four engines and its initial crew of ten intact, every man making every mission without a single replacement.