The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00757

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
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VOLUME 16No. 34
MIAMI. FLORIDA, FRIDAY, AUGUST 20, 1943
PRICE TEN CENTS
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y. HUG. 29
New York (JTA)The head-
quarters of the American Jew-
ish Conference announced that
the conference will open Sunday
afternoon, August 29, and will
conclude on Thursday, September
2. The principal speakers at the
opening session will be Henry
Monsky and Dr. Stephen S. Wise.
At the opening session, a rec-
ommendation will be made for
the election of a general commit-
tee of 50 to 55 members to serve
as a committee on committees,
rules, procedure and co-ordina-
tion throughout the sessions.
Further recommendations will in-
clude election of a praesidium of
14 members, of which 10 are to
be named by the various groups
at the conference on the basis of
one member in the praesidium
for every 50 delegations, and four
members at large.
In order to assure that all the
committees which are to be elect-
ed for the consideration of the
various issues of the conference
shall adequately represent the
membership of the conference, a
system of proportionate represen-
tation will be recommended. Del-
egates will be given an opportun-
ity to designate their affiliations
v*Mb any of the existing groups
or with groups that may be
formed or to state that 'designa-
tion is reserved."
"The tear expressed in some
sections of the press that the
American Jewish Conference will
devote its deliberations and inter-
est entirely to post-war problems
and will disregard the immediate
rescue program is shown to be
completely unjustified, as a re-
sult of the proposed appointment
of a special committee, consisting
of from 35 to 50 members, which
will consider all problems re-
lated to rendering immediate
help and rescue to the European
Jews," the announcement said.
The executive has decided to
extend to the accredited repre-
sentatives of Canadian. Central
and South American Jewry an
invitation to attend the confer-
ence as guests.
INF OF AMERICA SENDS
$500,000 TO PALESTINE
New York (WNS)The sum of
$500,000 was cabled by the Jew-
ish National Fund of America to
Palestine for new land acquisi-
tion, Dr. Israel Goldstein, presi-
dent of the Jewish National
Fund of America, announced to-
day. This represents one of the
largest single remittances made
in recent years. A total of $3,-
451.006.74 has been remitted by
the Fund since October 1, 1942.
In announcing the remittance,
Dr. Goldstein stated that there
has been an increase of over
40% in the income from the tra-
ditional sources. It was also an-
nounced that the Jewish National
Fund has raised over $1,000,000,-
000 from its traditional fund
raising program.
FIKALDETAILSARE
BOND SALES TOTAL
Washington (WNS) B'nai
B'rith topped the $100,000,000
mark in war bond sales on Aug.
1st with a total of $112,500,000.
enough to pay for an armada of
more than 300 Flying Fortresses,
as a result of the successful cul-
mination of a 70-day bond drive
by the Women's Supreme Coun-
cil of B'nai B'rith during which
time the B'nai B'rith women sold
$13,397,000 worth, making their
total since January ist $19,450,000
Henry Monsky, president of B'nai
B'rith and chairman of its Na-
tional War Service Committee,
announced here today.
This special campaign, designed
to sell enough bonds to pay for
500 pieces of fighting equipment.
was directed by Mrs. Benjamin
Samuels of Chicago.
FOR CONVOCATION
Final details are being com-
pleted for the annual convocation
of the Federation of Florida B'nai
B'rith Lodges which will take
place here on Labor Day week-
end with the Versailles Hotel on
Miami Beach as headquarters.
Louis Ossinsky, president of
the State Federation from Day-
tona, and Barney J. Cohen, prom-
inent in the Federation activi-
ties from Orlando spent this past
week-end in Miami conferring
with the local committee on ar-
rangements.
Dr. Abram L. Sachar, national
director of Hillel, will headline
the program of prominent speak-
ers and military figures that will
make their appearance at the
gathering. District officers will
all be present to participate.
Reservations for the two-day
meet, Sunday and Monday, Sept.
5th and 6th, are being received
from the entire state. Local res-
idents are invited to spend the
week-end at the beach hotel and
attend the convention which will
formally open Saturday evening.
The B'nai B'rith office, phone
3-6391. is in charge of reserva-
tion details, which must be made
early because of limited room and
banquet facilities.
NAZIS KILLED MILLIONS
OF IEWS IN EUROPE
Geneva (WNS)Neutral ob-
servers who have made a study
of the Jewish situation in Nazi-
occupied Europe, revealed here
this week that approximately 4,-
000,000 Jews lost their lives
through massacres and executions
in the various countries occupied
by the Nazis. This, next per-
haps to the losses sustained by
Russia, is the largest figure of
dead suffered by any one people
in Europe. The general impres-
sion hitherto has been that the
Nazis and their satellites exter-
minated approximately 2,000.000
Jews.
Simultaneously, it was reported
that representatives of several
Agencies are holding conferences
on post-war Jewish problems.
- ARAB TALKS
ON FEDERATION
APPEAR FRUITLESS
JEWISH COMMUNITY PAPER
IN TUNISIA IS REPUBLISHED
SOLDIERS AT WAILING WALL
CONCERTO FOR HARP AND
ORCHESTRA'S MUSIC HOUR
A performance of international
niusical interest will be the
American premiere of Reinhold
Chore's Concerto for Harp and
Orchestra to be played by the
NBC Symphony, with Edward
Vito as harpist, on the General
Motors Symphony of the Air's
all-Russian program on Sunday,
August 22 (5:00 to 6:00 p. m..
EWT) over the NBC network.
Orchestral transcriptions by
Frank Black, conductor, of two
Preludes by the late, beloved
Rachmaninoff, and the brilliant
I'oJovetzian Dances from Boro-
din's "Prince Igor," orchestrated
by Rimsky-Korsakov, are other
works listed for performance.
Rachmaninoff will be represent-
ed by his famous Prelude in C
Sharp Minor and the G Minor
Prelude.
GOVERNOR NAMES STATE
CHAIRMAN OF WAR FUND
Jerusalem (WNS) Hundreds
of Jewish soldiers serving in the
Allied forces now stationed in
Palestine visited the Wailing Wall
in Jerusalem on Tisha B'ab.
London (JTA)The Revue
Juive, Jewish community paper
in Tunisia, resumed publication
in Sfax this week." The report
added that a number of Arab an-
ti-Jewish papers in Tunisia have
ceased publication.
RADIO HOUR
Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan of Temple
Israel will be the guest speaker
on the Rabbinical Association
Hour at 9:15 a. m. on Sunday, ox-
er Station WQAM.
GETS
OFRAREMTINCS
Jerusalem (JTA)A collection
of 220 Jewish marriage contracts
from Italy, dating from the be-
ginning of the 16th to the middle
of the 19th centuries has been
presented to the Jewish National
and University Library in Jeru-
salem by Dr. Ephraim Chamitzer
of Haifa. All the manuscripts
are written on parchment and
beautifully illuminated.
This is Dr. Chamitzer's second
gift to the library. The first,
made some ten years ago. consist-
ed of a rare collection of Hcbraica
and Orientalia, which included
some very rare works. Both col-
lections came from the library of
the donor's lather, the late Dr.
Mordechai Ben-David Chamit/.c r,
a noted Jewish scholar and Ori-
entalist of Leipzig.
Jerusalem (JTA) Informed
Arab circles here indicated that
the conferences last week in Cairo
between the Egyptian and the
Irakian foreign ministers on the
question of the proposed forma-
tion of a federation of Arab coun-
tries, including Palestine, have
brought disappointing results.
The prospect for the creation
of a political Pan-Arab federa-
tion in the near future are not
bright, these Arab leaders say.
Considerable opposition against
such political unification exists
in the various Arab states, and
there seems to be little possibil-
ity of overcoming this opposition
at present. Arab leaders, how-
ever, emphasized that the outlook
for culturaland in some cases
even economiccooperation be-
tween the Arab countries is
brighter as a result of the Cairo
conference.
At a conference of leaders of
the Jewish Socialist party in Pal-
1 cstine held at Tel Aviv. David
Ben-Gurion. laborite leader, em-
' phasized that the political atti-
tude of the Jews in Palestine may
be summarized in the slogan:
i "Help the war as if there were no
, White Paper, and fight the White
paper as if there were no war."
E. Dobkin. head of the immi-
'gration department of the Jew-
ish Agency, addressing the con-
ference, urged the need of a bu-
reau to devote itself to devising
work opportunities for all the
Jews expected to arrive from
Central and Eastern Europe.
JEWISH PHILOSOPHER DEAD
London (JTA) Dr. Boris
Markhatsh. well-known Russian-
Jewish philosopher and bibliog-
rapher, was killed in action on
the Russian front, it is reported.
AMERICAN NAMED TO
REFUGEE COMMITTEE
V.M.H.A. CONCLUDES FIFTH ANNUAL HOME
CAMP,- MOST SUCCESSFUL SINCE INCEPTION
The Y. M. H. A. Home Camp
closed its fifth and most success-
ful summer session with an elab-
orate revue and closing exercise
Sunday afternoon before an au-
dience exceeding 250. Aside
from increasing its average daily
attendance to 85 children, almost
double the attendance of previous
years, the Home Camp gave the
children a more interesting and
diversified program than ever
before. This was accomplished
despite critical conditions and
many obstacles confronting the
organization.
This year the government in-
augurated a plan to provide nur-
series and kindergartens for chil-
dren of workers and others and
the Y. M. H. A. helped this pro-
ject by offering all of their camp
facilities to the government for
this purpose without any charge.
An average of 30 children attend
daily. This is an all year pro-
ject and will continue to use the
Y. M. H. A. as its home.
The Home Camp was conduct-
ed on a non-sectarian basis, chil-
dren of all faiths having attend-
ed. Scholarships were provided
for those unable to pay.
Many new features were odded
during this past season. Be-
cause of the inability to take the
children to the beach, outdoor
showers were provided on the
grounds. In addition to tin many
projects provided to entertain
and instruct the children, includ-
ing arts and crafts, athletics,
games, tap and ballet dancing,
outstanding projects this year
were thi' making of model air-
planes and the setting up of a
miniatuYe Indian village and a
model airport.
Wholesome and nourishing
luncheons were served the child-
ren each day.
Under the general direction of
Maurice Grossman, executive di-
(CONTINUED ON PACE 3)
Washington (JTA)The ap-
pointment of Patrick Malin. a
former member of the State De-
partment, to the post of vice-di-
rector of the Intergovernmental
Committee on Refugees, was an-
nounced by the State Depart-
ment. The selection of Mr. Ma-
lin, who. as the State Depart-
ment noted in its announcement,
"has had experience in refugee
matters in Europe." was made at
a meeting of the executive com-
mittee oi the Intergovernmental
Committee held in London this
month "to consider the rccom-
[mendations of the Bermuda Con-
I ference."
i Mr. Malin has been one of the
I key men in ex-Gov. Lehman's
Office of Foreign Relief and Re-
habilitation Operations.
Gov. Spessard L. Holland has
appointed Horace F. Cordes. Bur-
dine official, as state quota chair-
man of the Florida War Fund.
Inc.
Florida's quota will be a share
<>f $120,000,000 to be sought as
a national goal of the National
War Fund Appeal, of which Dr.
John J. Tigert is state campaign
Chairman.
GROUP OF Y. M. H. A. HOME CAMPERS AT A LUNCHEON GET-TOGETHER
RUMANIAN IEWS SPUR
PLAN FOR SPECIAL UNIT
London (JTA)The question
of the formation of a Rumanian
unit within the British Army is
now under discussion by the Brit-
ish military authorities, it was
learned here. A plan for such a
contingent is being considered as
as result of the number of Ru-
manian Jewish refugees now
serving in the British armed
forces.
MEETING DENOUNCES
ATROCITIES TO JEWS
Berne (WNS)Catholic circles
here disclosed this week that the
Conference of German-Catholic
Bishops, held at Fulda on August
17, adopted a resolution denounc-
ing Nazi atrocities against Jews.
Fulda is a city in central west-
ern Germany. Some time ago
German-Catholic priests held a
conference there and adopted a
resolution condemning Nazi anti-
Semitism. That resolution, how-
ever, was a mildly worded one.




PAGE TWO


+Jewislincrklian
FRIDAY, AUGUST 20. 1943

y^^^MlMWW^^^^
SOCIAL ITEMS AND
PERSONALS
MaM
MNMM
MMMMMM%AAl
Maurice Grossman will leave
today for New York for a two
week stay. While there he will
confer with national leaders re-
garding future Y. M. H. A. plans
and programs. He is executive
director of the Miami Y. M. H. A.
Miss Molly Weinstcin. 818 Lin-
coln Rd., has returned from a
combined vacation-business trip
to New York.
Mr. and Mrs. Irving B. Stern
of New York City are spending
six weeks at the Versailles. Mrs.
Stern is the daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. A. E. Reinhard, 1089 N. W.
C4th St.
Miss Barbara Newmark. daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. New-
mark. 3707 Royal Palm Ave..
Miami Beach, has left for Nash-
ville. Tenn., where she will visit
friends.
Mrs. Albert Feinbcrg and
daughter, Judy, have returned to
their home at 1945 N. W. First
terrace after a visit in Knox-
ville. Tenn.
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Heiman
will leave for a vacation in New
York. While there, Mr. Heiman
will attend the American Jewish
Conference.
Rabbi and Mrs. Max Shapiro
left this week for New York City
where the rabbi will attend the
American Jewish Conference as
;i delegate from this area.
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Weinkle of
Atlanta are visiting in the city
and are staying at the Arlington
HoteL
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley C. Myers
left today for a vacation in New
York and vicinity.
Mrs. A. J. Tobin will arrive
home this week-end after spend-
ing two months in the North.
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Berick
and their children Joy and Frank
Martin, arrived from Rhode Isl-
and this week to take up resi-
dence in Miami Beach. They have
purchased a home on Royal Palm
Avenue.
Mr. and Mrs. William Shayne
and son are vacationing at Blow-
ing Rock, N. C.
Mrs. Charles Rosengarten has
returned from a stay at Hender-
sonville, N. C.
Mrs. Carl Weinkle left Mon-
day for Savannah, Ga.. where she
will visit her mother. From there
Mrs. Weinkle will journey to Bal-
timore, where her daughter, Er-
nise, at camp, will join her to go
to New York. On her return trip
Mrs. Weinkle will visit her son.
Julian, who is with the navy at
Chapel Hill and will attend the
wedding of her neice at Asheville
on September 5th.
Mrs. R. V. Brandt, Woodmere.
L. I., is visiting her parents. Mr.
and Mrs. Louis Hartz of this city.
Miss Betty Ann Romm of At-
lanta. Ga., left today after spend-
ing two weeks as the house guest
of Miss Sara Rose Schwartz.
Mrs. Irving Lee Kanof. the
former Elsie Rawlson, is spend-
ing several weeks with her par-
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J.
Rawlson. before returning to San
Francisco where her husband. Lt.
Kanof, is stationed.
Dr. and Mrs. Albert E. Ros-
enthal will return tomorrow
from a month's vacation in the
North.
Rabbi Simon April has return-
ed from a trip in the East and is
now at home at 1845 S. W. 9th
Street, phone 2-55667.
Mrs. J. J. Rawlson returned
from a short vacation in New
York City.
Mrs. Sonia Levitt has returned
from a visit to Jacksonville.
While there she attended the
wedding of her son, Ensign Ben
Levitt, to Miss Geraldine Blum-
berg. The marriage was per-
formed in the presence of imme-
diate families and classmates ot
Ensign Levitt, who is a graduate
of Annapolis. The best man was
Ensign Leslie Landau, son of Col.
Landau, of New York, who is
now with the armed forces in
the South Pacific.
Miss Marjorie Fisher, daughter
of Dr. and Mrs. F. H. Fisher. 5925
LaGorce drive, has returned home
after spending the winter at the
University of Michigan, where
she is a student majoring in art.
At the close of school Miss rish-
er visited friends in Utica, N. Y.,
Youngstown, O.. Jamaica Estates,
Long Island and New York City.
She will return to the University
of Michigan for the fall semester.
M. B. APARTMENT BODY
WILL NAME DIRECTORS
Nomination of 22 directors for
the ensuing year will be made at
a general membership meeting of
Miami Beach Apartment Associa-
tion, Inc., to be held at 8 p. m.
on Tuesday. Sept. 7, at Miami
Beach High school auditorium.
Election has been set for Mon-
day. Sept. 20 and installation of
new officers and directors for
Monday, Oct. 4.
Albert Kahn is president of the
organization.
SOCIAL EVENTS
Mr and Mrs. Herman Slepian,
2558 S W 20th St., will be hosts
at open house Sunday evening.
August 22nd, from 7 to 10 o clock
The occasion will be in honor ot
their moving into their new
home.
Assisting in serving will be
Mrs. Slepian's sisters, Mrs. Max
Pepper. Mrs. Joseph Schaffer.
and sister-in-law, Mrs. M. bil-
berstein.
No invitations are being sent
and friends and relatives of Mr.
and Mrs. Slepian are invited.
Mrs. Slepian is immediate
past president of the Y. W. H. A.
and has been active in local or-
ganization work.
A personal shower compliment-
ing Miss Edith Siegel, bride-elect
of Pfc. William Reiser, U.S.A.,
will be given by her sister-in-law,
Mrs. Harold Siegel. at 8 p. m.
Saturday in her home. 2761 S. W.
Seventh St. Pvt. Reiser is ex-
pected to arrive next week from
Camp Cook. Cal., for the wed-
ding which will take place Wed-
nesday evening. August 25, in
the home of the bride-to-be's par-
ents. Mr. and Mrs. Jacob H. Sie-
gel. 2143 S. W. Sixth St.
Graduates of Miami High
school, the couple will be attend-
ed by Miss Clare Shankman. who
will be maid of honor, Mrs. Har-
old Siegel, matron of honor, and
George Siegel, best man.
BIRTHS
Dr. and Mrs. Herman Mechlo-
witz of Miami Beach announce
the birth of a daughter at St
Francis Hospital last Friday.
Dr. Abraham Wolfson has re-
ceived news that his daughter
Miriam, now Mrs. Herbert Sha-
piro of Spartanburg, S. C, gave
birth to twin boys. Mrs. Shapiro
is a graduate of Columbia Uni-
versity and is the secretary of the
Spartanburg Council of Jewish
Women. Mr. Shapiro is a gradu-
ate of the University of South
Carolina and is in business with
his father.
Myron Levitt is spending some
time in Atlanta as the guest of
his brother and sister, Mr. and
Mrs. Irwin Krick.
Buy War Stamps and Bonds
NOW and give our men in the
armed forces the help they need.
:m ^ForaBetterDaij
HV U.S.WAR BONDS
Eleven members of a secret Bel-
gian underground organization re-
sponsible for aiding United Nations
fliers shot down over German occu-
pied territory were executed by
Nazi firing squads recentlv over a
3-day period. They were charged
by their German captors with "aid-
ing the enemy."
Here in America we can aid in
the fight against Hitler without en-
dangering our lives if we do our
work diligently and buy War Bonds
every pay day.
WS3 741Q V. 8. rrmmm D*pt
EVERY MISSION URCENT
Mrs. Max Kupferstein has
joined her husband in Render-
sonville, N. C.
Joseph Rabin left this week
for a three week vacation in Chi-
cago and St. Louis. He will be
joined by Mrs. Rabin in New
York next week and then both
will entrain for Boston to spend
the remaining two weeks.
Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Bandler
and family have returned from
their vacation at Roanoke, Va.,
and vicinity.
Miss Ruth Brotman, coloratura
soprano and music critic, recent-
ly appeared as soloist with the
concert orchestra at the Colonial
Hotel, Mt. demons, Mich. Miss
Brotman will give concerts in
Buffalo, Philadelphia, Atlantic
City and Baltimore, before re-
turning to her home at Miami
Beach.
Captain and Mrs. David Koller
are visiting Mrs. Roller's par-
ents, Mr. and Mrs. A. Rubin,
1352 S. W. 14th Street. Captain
Koller is now stationed at the
Birmingham, Ala., army base.
Harry Simonhoff left for New-
York where he will attend the
American Jewish Conference as
a delegate from this area. ____
I WANT MY MILK
TOWER THEATRE
S.W. 8th St. at 15th At*.
OPEN AT 1:46 P. M.
Friday and Matinee Only
Saturday, Aug. 20-21
JOHNNY
WEISSMULLER
FRANCES GIFFORD
IN
0^\N
fS
And Be Bur* It's
FLORIDA
DAIRIES
HOMOGENIZED
Vitamin "D" Milk
"Milk Product"
Dacro Protected
TEL. 2-2621
Greater Miami Delivery
Visit Our Farm at
8200 N. W. 32nd Straet
"TARZAN
TRIUMPHS
//
EXTRA! WALT DISNEY'S
"EDUCATION
FOR DEATH"
Starts Saturday at 4:30 P.M.
Thru Tuesday, Aug. 24
BRIAN AHERNE
MERLE OBERON
IN
'FIRST COMES
COURAGE'
-MOST overnight the familiar
tank-truck became a vital part of the nation's war machine,
essential to the very life of the nation.
Every railroad tank-car is needed to haul petroleum prod-
ucts to the eastern seaboard. Therefore, the oil industry's
own transportation systemthe tank-truckhas taken over
the short trips which were formerly made by many railroad
tank-cars.
When you see the Standard Oil Company tank-truck on
the road today, you will know that it is running against time
to get needed stocks of petroleum products to military camps
and fields, to war industries, to ether trucks engaged in the
transportation of a thousand war necessities, to farmers for
their tractors used in food production, and to countless other
places where petroleum is indispensable.
'Round the clock faithful drivers operate these hard-
pressed tank-trucks. Without the tank-truck war effort would
lagor stop f Every mission is urgentmany are vital.
STANDARD OIL COMPANY
llfC OBtrOKATKB IN KINTVCKY
ur Mom wat **


FRIDAY. AUGUST 20. 1943
fJewlsl) flcrkiiar}
ORGANIZATION
ACTIVITIES
.........A.... '[M^->rt_*__IL
* *iriiniirii>.i__i_
M. B. JEWISH CENTER
Saturday afternoon, following
Mincha services, a supper recep-
tion was arranged in the social
hall of the Miami Beach Jewish
Center, for Rabbi and Mrs. Irv-
ing Lehrman. The committee in
charge of arrangements were
Daniel M. Broad, executive sec-
retary; Harry Bodenstein, house
chairman; Mrs. Esther Levy, Mrs.
Marie Balaban, Mrs. Minnie
Bloom and Mrs. Helen Josepher.
Herman M. Berk introduced Jake
Felt, recording secretary of the
Center, as toastmaster, who in-
troduced the rabbi. Rabbi Lehr-
man thanked the Congregation
for its gracious welcome and pre-
sented an informal statement of
his views on the place of the
Center and the rabbi in modern
Jewish life. Among those who
offered greetings were Mayer H.
Frankel, honorary life president;
Shepard Broad, director of the
Center, and president of the Zi-
onist Organization of Miami
Beach, and William Weinberger,
Gabai. The musicai program was
rendered by Cantor Abraham D.
Wolf.
Tuesday the Greater Miami
Rabbinical Association welcomed
Rabbi Irving Lehrman as a new
member at a meeting held at
Temple Israel.
An informal at home for mem-
bers and friends of the Center
will be held Sunday afternoon,
August 22, 2 to 5, at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Berman,
4310 Nautilus Drive, Miami
Beach.
PAGE THREE
MIZRACHI
Rabbi Moses Mescheloff and
Rabbi Un Felshin. honorary and
fk & Pre?'dents- respectively, of
wUKMiami Bach Mizrachi." met
with the world president and the
national president of the Miz-
rachi Organization, Rabbi Meir
Berlin and Leon Gellman last
week.
c Pla.ns /or the formation of a
Southeastern Seaboard Region of
the Mizrachi and a convention to
be held this winter were dis-
cussed. Details are being worked
on with the assistance of the
New York office.
I. E. A.
On behalf of the local Jewish
Education Association Rabbi
Moses Mescheloff has had meet-
ings with Dr. N. Gaffni and Dr.
Israel Chipkin. heads of Relig-
ious Educational Associations in
New York. Recommendations for
an educational director for the
local association were discussed.
IM. AND W. H. .
OF MIAMI BEACH
RECEIVE CHARTER
M. B. ZIONISTS
WAR STAMPS
Dr. Z. I. Sabshin will address
the Zionist Cultural forum at
3:30 p. m. Saturday in the patio
of the home of Dr. Abraham
Wolfson, Collins Ave.- at 11th
St., Miami Beach. The program
is open to the public, whose at-
tendance has increased each suc-
reding week of the Zionist
/*urum.
SCHAAREI ZEDEK
Resumption of Talmud Torah
(lasses at Cong. Schaarei Zedek
will take place at 10.00 a. m.
Monday at the synagogue. All
parents, regardless of congrega-
tional affiliations, are welcome
t'> register their children. Tal-
mud Torah classes are open to ail
with free tuition.
Buy War Savings Bonds.
Low-flying airplanes can create a
great deal of damage by strafing
troops with their machine-gun fire,
A vital weapon in defense against
then* is the 50-caliber Anti-aircraft
machine gun which can be either
mounted or on a mobile base. Only
24 cents in War Savings Stamps
will buy one round of ammunition
for one of these guns but since thou-
sands of rounds are needed to keep
one shooting any length of time it
is imperative that every dollar pos-
sible be invested in War Savings
Stamps and Bonds.
HEADACHE
IS SUCH A
BIG
LITTLE THING
The charter for the newly
formed Y. M. and W. H. A. was
formally approved and signed
last Friday morning in the cham-
bers of Judge Marshall C. Wise-
hart when a full committee of
the organization was present to
witness the significant Miami
Beach event.
Temporary officers as named
in the charter are completing
plans for the program of the
group and the budgeting for the
next period has been set up and
approved. They are Harry Zuk-
ernick, president; Mrs. Ben Mey-
ers, secretary, and Carl Weinkle,
treasurer.
Membership groups have been
arranged to take care of the en-
tire family under a group plan
and applications are now being
solicited and accepted. Nat H
Hankoff is chairman of the mem-
bership committee and is in the
process of forming divisions to
contact Miami Beach business
and professional men and wo-
men.
The Miami Beach Y has locat-
ed at No. 1 Lincoln Road and has
made available meeting places
for various activities of character
and recreational needs on the
Beach.
Directors of the organization
are Rudy R. Adler, Morris Al-
pert, Benjamin Appel. George
Bertman. Benjamin E. Bronston. '
akTeT Felt Nathan Glosscr. Nat.
H. Hankoff. Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan
Mrs Moses Krieger, A. Louis
Mechlowitz, Rabbi Moses Mesch-
eloff. Mrs. Benjamin Meyers. Jo-
seph M. Rose. Alfred B. Rosen-
stoin. Harry Sirkin. Mrs. Milton
Sirkin, Harold Turk. Carl Wein-
kle, Mitchell Wolfson, Harry Zuk-
ernick.
y. M. H. A. CONCLUDES HOME CAMP,-
MOST SUCCESSFUL SINCE INCEPTION
The children of America are do-
ing their part to help keep Uncle
Sam's tanks rolling, planes flying
and guns roaring. Their work,
which is being organized and co-
ordinated by the Schools At War
Program will be recorded in scrap-
books and exhibited throughout the
country. Each school participating
in the program will receive a cer-
tificate of service from the Treas-
ury Department, and a historic
Liberty Brick .will be presented to
each state by the Treasury.
''. .S". 7 rcasury Department
ALL SET for a good fall day's
work when a nigging head-
ache aneaka up on you. You suffer
and so does your work.
* Ready for an evening- of relax-
ation and enjoyment a pesky
headache interferes with your fun,
*et enjoyment or relaxation.
DR. BOLES
Anti-Pain Pills
dually relieve not only Head-
che, but Simple Neuralgia, Maa-
?.,Pa,M mBd Factional
Monthly Pains.
,.,ya n Dr. Miles Anti-Pain
. ? JtfmBot wh* notT You *n
et Dr. Miles Anti-Pain Pills at
your drug- store in the regular
WKage for only a penny apiece
""u m the economy package even
cheaper .Why not get a package
R-./TJ!Your druggist has them.
dWti,lr^t,0M and only as
aT2& Your mcm*r back if you
** ** satisfied.
Take Your Watch
to Danzig's!
FORMER MIAMI RABBI
HONORED BY U. OF M.
Rabbi Abraham A. Kellner.
former spiritual leader of the
Miami Jewish Orthodox Congre-
gation, and presently affiliated
with the Beth Abraham Cong, of
Albany, N. Y.. was recipient of
the degree of Master of Arts at
the University of Maine where he
attended the summer session.
While in Maine. Rabbi Kell-
ner officiated as civilian chap-
lain for the Jewish service men
at Dow Field Army Base and al-
so conducted services for the Ar- I
my Specialized Training Units
which are based at the Univer-
sity.
The Columbia Broadcasting
System extended an invitation to
the rabbi to broadcast over their
nation-wide chain, August 22nd,
from 1:00 to 1:30 p. m. Eastern
War Time, and he will be heard
at that time.
SMALLEST....
WATCH........
MOVEMENTS...
PERFECTLY...
REPAIRED.....
DmlUmtb, mall. Intricate
raoremenli or* bandied
by' with understand
lay car* and skill.
CASH FOR YOUR
DIAMONDS AND
OLD GOLD
JEWELRY REPAIRING
DANZIG'S
JEWELERS
236 HALCYON ARCADE
145 E Fliql,-, Si
ABESS AGAIN NAMED
TO EXAMINING BOARD
Reappointment of Leonard L.
Abess, of 3701 Chase Ave.. Miami
Beach, to the State Bfcard of Ac-
countancy, was annotfneed Wed-
nesday.
First appointed to the board by
Gov. Dave Sholtz, Abess has
served two four-year terms.
The State Board of Account-
ancy is the examining board in
Florida for all persons seeking
classification as Certified Public
Accountants.
Senior member in the Miami
accounting firm of Abess and
Costar. the appointee is also a
vice president of the Miami Beach
Federal Savings & Loan Associa-
tion and a trustee of Miami Beach
City hospital.
MIAMI ARTIST IS HELD OVER
AT PROMINENT NIGHT CLUB
Miss Phyliss Sharon, talented
Miamian. who has been singing,
at the Pago-Pago for the pasi
four weeks, has been held over by
popular demand.
-----
REFINED GIRL
will share large spacious efficiency
apartment. Lincoln Road Section,
with business girl. Piano, tele-
fhone, home like atmosphere.
f.50 per week, entire season rate.
References required. Apartment
available September 1st.
MRS. GEEMAN
c/o P. O. Box 2973
Miami 18. Florida
(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1)
rector of the Y, the following
personnel conducted the activi-
ties of the camp this summer:
kssie Shaffer, supervisor; Don
McCloskey, chief counselor: My-
er Greenbcrg, in charge of boys;
Hope Ellen Tannenbaum, in
charge of girls and dramatics;
Bobby Rubenstein, arts and
oraul.s; 5ay Greenberg, dietitian;
Bobby Decker, music; Mrs. Leon
Lichtenstetter, story hour; Janet
Olitf and Harriet Rand, kinder-
garten.
Many civic and community
leaders were luncheon guests at
Home Camp luncheons this past
season. All of them gave their
nearty approval and endorse-
ment of the project. Many of
them wrote letters congratulat-
ing the Y. M. H. A. upon this
splendid achievement. .They stat-
ed that it was Miami's greatest
answer to the problem of juven-
ile delinquency.
Among prominent guests this
summer were Mayor Leonard K.
Thompson, City Commissioner
James A. Dunn, Preston Bird,
chairman of the Dade County
commissioners; County Commis-
sioner N. P. Lowrey, Postmaster
Hugh Emerson, Judge Marshall
Wisehart. Chief of Police Leslie
Quigg, Asst. County Solicitor
Andrew T. Healy, Sam Blank,
Monte Selig, and Stanley C. My-
ers.
rfr/ssss//"""""""'"
.,.,/""''""'
W#l
Hull'
WANTAGES
of a
IIAIIE FEDERAL
MORTGAGE
v
LOW RATES
EASY PAYMENTS
LONG TIME TO PAY
PROMPT SERVICE
, i
A HOME INSTITb HON
Deal With You*
LOCAL. FRIENDLY
INSTITUTION
RESOURCES OVER $7,000,000
. IIAIIE FCItCltAL
,
,, MOIIH I AS T IIS1
JOSEPH M. LIP-TOW. PRESIDENT
A V I M H (

j/J////J//MM/um~""
_aHstMM
IS***
'//////'
mgta
-.


PAGE FOUR
+Jewish ncrktfon
FRIDAY, AUGUST 20. 1943
-TIDBITS FROM EVERYWHERE-
PLANT AND MAIN
21 S. W. SECOND
P. O. BOX 2973
OFFICES
AVENUE
PHONE 2-1141
FRED K. SHOCHET, Managing Editor
SUBSCRIPTION
One Year, $2.00 Six Months, $1.00
Entered as Second Class Matter July 4, 1940, at
the Post Office of Miami, Florida, under
the Act of March 3, 1879
MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY. AUGUST 20, 1943
AB 19, 5703
VOLUME 16 NUMBER 34
GLOBAL CONSCIOUSNESS
The stories of the presence of large num-
bers of Allied soldiers, stationed in Palestine,
at the religious services held at the Wailing
Wall of the Temple in Jerusalem, are of more
than casual significance.
We shall find that at the end of this war.
many American soldiers returning from the
Near East will have acquired a living knowl-
edge of conditions in Palestine and in the Near
East. From the Zionist standpoint, this will be
of no little import.
What is true about Palestine is of course
true of all parts of the world, though the pres-
ence of American soldiers in Palestine un-
doubtedly will be of more significance, as far
as the Jews are concerned.
The fact of the matter is that we have be-
come globally conscious. Isolationism has
been challenged not only by the fact that we
are embroiled in the world struggle itself, but
by the fact that Americans in great numbers
are now seeing all parts of the world. You
can't live all to yourself after you have seen
other parts of the world. In an abstract and
yet at the same time very real sense, to see or
even to hear very often of a country is to be-
come linked with it. To al of us, stay-at-homes
even, the map of the world has become vastly
more familiar. We have become educated in
world geography by the battles taking place
in the worldand this education in its deepest
sense is not merely a matter of names and
wordsit has broadened our horizons and
linked us to the destinies of the world.
SUMNER WELLES
The State Department and the nation can
ill afford to lose the services of Sumner Welles.
Reports, denied by Secretary of State Cor-
dell Hull, have had it that Mr. Welles was
slated for a "roving" ambassadorial post as a
means of removing him from the State De-
partment.
If such a step is actually contemplated and
is executed, it will be a severe blow to the
cause of constructive liberalism which Mr.
Welles has so upheld during his service as
Under Secretary of State.
An aristocrat by birth and training, yet a
realist and fundamentally a liberal through
reasoned conviction, Welles has blazoned an
enlightened path in the field of international
cooperation. His voice, the more impressive
for its calm control and dependence on reason
rather than passion, has been consistently
lifted in support of those great ideals embodied
in President Roosevelt's enunciation of the
Four Freedoms. If not spectacular, he has
been nonetheless effective in his difficult task
a task made more difficult by the gathering
strength of the forces of reaction in Washing-
ton.
For it is no easy thing in these days for a
man in a key position such as Welles occupies
to hew to a strictly democratic line in the realm
of international affairs. Every man of any
prominence who raises his voice in support of
the "Century of the Common Man" ideal be-
comes fair game for the wolves of reaction.
If Mr. Welles, despite all denials, is re-
moved from his post, repercussions of that ac-
tion may be vast; they will reach into every
United Nations capital, where it may be in-
terpreted as one more significant sign that
Washington is being pushed relentlessly back
on the road to isolationism as opposed to in-
ternational collaboration which alone can lead
to true world peace. And it will indeed be one
more tragic indication that the peace is being
lost even as the war is being won.
Mudfy eonpdentlcd
------By PHINEAS I. BIRON-
Visit Any
Cemetery
and you will see pathetic sights. Families
completely torn apart scattered among strangersall because
the head of the family THOUGHT he had provided properly.
The only sure way to keep the entire family
together forever, is by having your own private family plot. And
having your plot in Mount Nebo assures you of this protection in
the finest surroundings at a reasonable cost.
Only a small down payment is required ior
each grave desired. You are then the complete owner of a beau-
tiful plot at the entrance to Mount Nebo.
For further information with no obligation/ phone
3-5132
Florida s Most Beautiful Burial Estates
MOUNT NEBO
ONLY TEN MINUTES FROM THE HEART OF MIAMI
West Flagler Street at 54th Avenue
BUSINESS OFFICE 1014 OLYMPIA BUILDING
A VISIT WILL CONVINCE YOU
YOU SHOULD KNOW .
The August 1st issue of "The Ghetto Speaks." issued by
the American Representation of the General Jewish Workers'
Union of Poland, publishes a report called "Tremblinka Death
Camp in Poland" .. Now we've read all kinds of descriptions
of Nazi atrocities against Jews This report, however, is
the most realistic story ever published anywhere, telling how
Jews who were shifted to Poland from other countries are
asphyxiated wholesale Every American soldier should
read this story before going into battle against Hitler's hordes
... If he does, we promise you that he won't take any Ger-
man prisoners alive Pretty soon the Axis powers will be-
gin to wonder whether they didn't start something they
couldn't finish when they called the present conflict a "Jew-
ish war" Now it's 2nd Lt. Pincus Pesso of Brooklyn who
made the headlines by leading an American patrol to the
end of the Munda airfield, thus ending the Battle of Munda
Among the wartime visitors in New York a couple of
weeks ago were a dozen or so Greek sailors, here for a well-
earned rest after a spell of service with an Allied fleet .
They found Gothem hospitable, with everybody ready to
give them a good time ... But there was one place they liked
best of allso much that they went there daily and could
hardly be pried away for the other entertainment provided
for them And that place was the Army and Navy Club
of the Jewish Welfare Board.
JEWISH NEWS .
Don't take any bets on the presidency of the Zionist Or-
ganization of America being a closed matter It's true that
Rabbis Israel Goldstein and Abba Hillel Silver have come to
an understanding But ii anything is going to interfere
with Silver's taking over the leadership of Zionist political af-
fairs in actual fact, and not merely in name, the Silver dele-
gates will take the bit in their teeth and run away at the con-
ventionand Silver may find himself elected, willy-nilly ..
Reports to the contrary notwithstanding, and although dele-
gates from various parts of the country are already en route
to the American Jewish Conference, that conclave may yet
be postponed at the eleventh hour, or curtailed Which is
the agency that is cashing in big for palming off free pub-
licity about Henry Ford on the Anglo-Jewish press? May-
be it's because Zionist Herman Shulman was the lawyer who
successfully defended the Pepsi-Cola people in the name
suit instituted against them by the Coca-Cola Company some
time agobut, anyway, a recent ad of the Coca-Cola "glo-
bal" series showed American soldiers sharing their cdres
with a tribe of Arabs, and titled the picture "How Amenams
Make Pals in Palestine."
PUTTING NAZIS IN THEIR PLACE .
The story in these parts, supposed to be straight out ol
the mouths of guards in charge of Nazi prisoners, is that the
Germans stare incredulously when they steam into New York
Harbor and see the famed Manhattan skyline intact ,
seems that for the past year all good Nazis have believed
(because Hitler told them so) that the Luftwaffe had razed our
skyscrapers One of the things Nazi prisoners like least is
the search to which they are subjected when they're taken
captive And officers, particularly, are very much an-
noyed when the search is conducted by mere privates of
Uncle Sam's Army ... So, just like that, the American officer
in charge of a certain section of the Tunisian theatre is said to
have piked Jewish privates to do the searching And our
Jewish boys got an additional kick out of the proceedings by
telling the haughty Aryans about their "race," and then
watching their faces grow still longer.
STAGE AND SCREEN ...
A new high in something or other was set in Hollywood
recently when a draftee was inducted into the Army even
though he was wearing an authentic Nazi uniform Yes,
the draftee was an actor who couldn't be bothered changing
his clothes before reporting to the Army Soon to be made
into a motion picture is Marcia Davenport's "Valley of Dec*
ion," best-selling novel of many month's standing "*
Davenport, you remember, is the daughter of the late singer
Alma Gluck Also expected to be filmed is Howard Fasts
"Citizen Tom Paine," while Rose Feld's character "Sophie
Halenczik" will be making her bow on Broadway before long
. Sleeping in the open fields off one of America's main
highways not long ago was none other than Luise Rainer.
stage and screen and Academy Award winner *h .^
casion was Luise's transfer of herself and personal *?'
from California to the East She got the gas for the trip j>y
a special dispensationbut for five of the fifteen nights sn
and her secretary were on the road they could get no sleep-
ing accommodations.
ABOUT PEOPLE
Now we can tell you that Pierre van Paassen's new
book
will be caUed "The Forgotten Ally" ... It will deal with ^
Jewish problem, with special emphasis on Palestine ^
Paassen's new volume is so chockful of dynamite that it
blow some British colonial officials sky-high S. Weuipjj
one of America's most distinguished Yiddish poets, ProU
announces his greatest creation: His wife, Zita, has gi
birth to a daughterwho has been named Nechemle
the Middle East to entertain our boys are Comedian I J
Benny and harmonica virtuoso Larry Adler Edwar
Robinson of the screen, who already can converse m
languages, and broadcast in half a dozen of them *J*j.
BBC when he was in England, is now adding to hi <*<**"
plishments by learning Russian.


FRIDAY. AUGUST 20. 1943
+Jewlsl)Fk)ridUan
PAGE FIVE
The Ford Way
Of Doing Business
In Wartime
Ford Methods Save
Money And Materials
A neir Ford method of quenching tank armor
plati eliminate* later straightening. Dies hold the
plate during the process. Forty hours are saved on
each M-4 medium tank and M -10 tank destroyer hull.
Ford i* producing gliders hy mass production
MltlOd*. Among Ford developments is a proc-
ess o' quick-drying the glue joints that cut* dry-
ing .iiuu from nine hours to one hour on each wing.
.4/ Willow Run the top section of the bombar-
dier enclosure, formerly made in 13 hand-formed
I- ,. ,-. is now made in only i parts saving M
bOUTI in the construction time of each bomber.
The airplane landing gear hinge formerly made
of nine hand-welded parti, is now cast In one
piece, eliminating S* of the tools formerly used.
Thus again Ford methods save rime and materials.
Four hours In manufacturing time and 5 per
cent of steel requirements are saved on each en-
gine by the Ford-developed method of centrifu-
aUy casting the aircraft engine cylinder barrels.
YOU may NOT be buying Ford cars today, but you are still a Ford
customer. Through your government you are spending your tax
dollars and investing in war bonds to buy the bombers, tanks, tank
destroyers, jeeps and other material that Ford is building for Victory.
And the Ford organization is working for you on these war orders with
the same high skill the same eye toward value and economy that
governed production of over 30,000,000 peacetime Ford cars and trucks.
It always was Ford policy to share the benefits of advanced methods
with employees and customers alike. And that policy is still being
pursued. You are still getting an honest deal for your money.
Keeping Costs Down
Ford keeps down costs on war goods in the same way it kept down
costs on cars by using Ford mass-production techniques, advanced
methods, highly skilled workers and high management efficiency.
Output per employee is high even though thousands of inexperienced
new workersmany of them womenhave been placed in jobs which
demand exacting skill. This quick development of proficiency has been
made possible by comprehensive Ford training programs.
Equally important in boosting the output and lowering the costs are
the working conditions in Ford shop*. They are the best that science
and constant care can make them. These factors, coupled with the
company's long-known and practiced policy of high wage rates and
fair dealing, create an ability and aa attitude toward the job that is
reflected in both the quality and quantity of production.
Difficult Jobs Done By Ford
The jobs we have undertaken were brought to Ford because your
government representative* knew we would do our best with them.
? Ford is a vofume producer of kemvy horsepower aircraft engines!
This is the most exacting type of precision work.
? Today Ford is m foremost producer of Liberator bombers!
? Ford, in collaboration with government engineers, developed
the amphibian jeep-builds this and the famous land jeep, in
huge quantities!
r Ford builds M-4 medium tanks, M-10 tank destroyers, the Ford
tank engine and vast quantities of other war materials.
? Today Ford is in full production for Victory. The Ford Motor
Company is operating more plant capacity, employing more people,
turning out more goods than ever before.
What This Means To You
Throughout forty years of service to the people Ford has built upon
the solid foundation of practical ideals and technical "know howl'
Today the Ford way of doing business means more value to you,
our customers, and honestly-built materials for our sons at the front.
FORD MOTOR COMPANY
Ford Mass-Production Lines Deliver Fleets of Weapons
M-4 MBDIUM TANKS M-10 TANK DESTROYERS PRATT ft WHITNEY AIRCRAFT
ENGINES JEBPS AMPHIBIAN JEBPS ARMY TRUCKS CONSOLIDATED
LIBERATOR BOMBERS TRANSPORT GLIDERS UNIVERSAL CARRIERS
TANK ENGINES TRUCK AND JEEP ENGINES ARMOR PLATE GUN MOUNTS
AIRCRAFT GENERATORS TURBO-SUPERCHARGBRS MAGNESIUM CASTINGS
RATE-OP-CLIMB INDICATORS
This list does nor include other important Victory models now
in production that cannot be named due to wartime conditions.
LMUm to '' Wmltk Tkt W,rUC. '" /fcer, nfrnt 1:00p.m.. E. W.T. M TkBlm, N.twrk.
FULL PRODUCTION FOR VICTORY
Ford Methods Get
The Job Done Quickly

Gun mount cradleit for tank*, formerly m*de
of V parts, are made today at the Ford tank plant
of only three castings, reducing production time
by two-thirds and facilitating repairs in th<- f.eld
i
Automotive-production method* mti -imt
in building war weapons. For instance the Ford
method of drying paint on jeeps by Infru-Ked lamps
now does the work in minutes instc-J ot nuur*
' I
A horizontal engine iathe .it Willow Run carry
ing Ford-designed equipment turns a gur-turret
track for a B-24 Liberator. This machine saves
time and holds the work to 1 11,00(1 of an inch.
By the Ford method of using steel dies in
heavy presses, only three dies instead of 1M are re
quired to form the stripping snd interior sections of
bombardier compartments in I otd-buii> Liberators.
A forest of automotive-type presses speeds the
production of Ford-built Liberator bombers at
Willow Run. One huge press alone saves more
than 1M hours building wing-tips for these planes.
1
i

l '


PAGE SIX
+Jewlsti Fkrlcttan
Ymm..........w
MMMMMfMWMMWI
^^^^^^^^^^^^WMVMVWWW
THE Y. M. H. A.
NOTES
By HARRY SCHWARTZ
"-*--^^^*-*-*-*--*......................,.., -, -, -, njyj^
Home Camp
Last Sunday afternoon, the
closing exercises of the 1943
Home Camp took place amidst a
capacity audience. For a de-
tailed account of the activities
of the Summer Home Camp, we
invite you to read the article
elsewhere in this issue. The af-
fair Sunday afternoon was op-
ened by a few remarks from the
executive director and the pro-
gram proceeded, as follows: The
Doll Shop, with the following
cast: Naomi Lederman, Francine
August. Beverly Chester. Rema
Rubenstein. Judy Sterling and
Elinor Weiner as mechanical
dolls; Gale Ackcrman and Linda
Kaplan as colored Mammy Dolls;
Marjory Wetstein as a China
Doll; Nancy Pepper as a Rhumba
Doll; Estelle Greenberg and Joan
Wilck as Mexican Dolls; Maxine
Bender and Jerry Schulinan as
Ballet Dolls: Susan Tvlcr as a
Singing Doll: Gertrude Sugar-
man as the owner of the Doll
Shop; Kenneth Myers. Felice
Bobson. Judith Myers and Muii-
Stahl as the Customers: Re-
marks by Mrs. Lewis Chester; a
S Shoe Dance by Maxine
Bender, Gertrude Sugarman, and
Ellen Beck; remarks by Ben
Goldman, executive director of
the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration; skit, "Excuse Me." with
the following cast: Felice Bobson,
Maxine Bender, Gertrude Sugar-
man, Estelle Greenberg. Dolores
Simons. Pearl Kaplan, Jerry
Schulman. Kenneth Myers and
Stanley Balish: awarding of
prizes, by Mrs. Joseph Schaffer.
camp supervisor: grand finale
with all the Campers in the cast;
the closing of the show was the
singing of Hatikvah and the Star
Spangled Banner by the entire
audience.
Bowling
A meeting of the Y. M. H. A.
Bowling League was held at the
"Y" gymnasium on Mondav eve-
ning, August 16. Prizes were
awarded as follows: First team.
Ted Bramson, captain; Sam Ba-
danes. Sid Kaplan. Robert Bodin.
Ed Van Daiimi, and Eugene
Weiss. Second team: Sol Wein-
kle, captain; AJLReisman, Frank
Rnse. Larry Grossberg. Harrv
Moss and Sam Welder. High in-
dividual game. Martv Milstein
High individual set, Harold Berk-
IMA HELPS REFUGEE WOMEN FIGHT FOR VICTORY
ON HOME AND WAR FRONTS
PALM BEACH NOTES
JEWISH FLORIDIAN OFFICE, 226 S. OLIVE STREET
IN THE FOX BUILDING
MRS. MARY SCHREHNICX R.prkMiitcrtiv4>
Of interest to many local
friends is the marriage of Ens.
Moses Schupler. USNR. and Miss
Lillian Dave. The couple were
united in marriage at the home
Of the bridegroom's parents. Mr.
and Mrs. Joseph Schupler. 3101
Washington Dd. Dr. Carl N.
Herman, rabbi of Temple Beth
Israel, officated.
Guests included a brother of the
bridegroom. Pvt. Cv Schupler. of
Camp Forrest. Tenn.j his sister
and brother-in-law. Mr. and Mrs.
Phil Bulesky; and the bride's
sister and brother-in-law. Mr.
and Mrs. Irving Moss.
Through the fund* raised by ihe United Jewish Appeal
for Refugees, Overseas Needs and Palestine, Jewish
refugee women have been enlisted in the fight for
freedom on the home and war fronts in many parts of
Ihe world. Photos show (upper left) a scene in a child
care institution in Switzerland maintained by the Joint
Distribution Committee. A young orphan of the Nazi
storm of hate is being fed by a refugee woman super-
visor. (Upper right) Home on leave from service on
the Middle Eastern front, this Jewish woman soldier of
Palestine is planting a tree in a new settlement estab-
lished by the United Palestine Appeal. (Right) Here
in the United States the newcomers are being retrained
by the National Refugee Service for the post of nurd's
aide to help man the health stations on the home front.
Sam Goldman of Florida Ave-
nue has returned aftei a stay of
several weeks at Bay Pines Hos-
pital where he was recuperating.
Mrs. M. Schrebnick has com-
pleted her tour of duty as Bond
and Stamp Saleslady at one of
the local Five and Ten Cent
Stores.
Tom Smith and family are
spending their summer vacation
in Philadelphia.
Mr. and Mrs. Leo Rader. Belle
Glade, were visitors in the com-
munity recently.
Far & lt hi Dairy
Products
Miss Rose Goodmark, an in-
structor in the Miami schools, is
spending some time with her par-
ents. Mr. and Mrs. J. Goodmark.
WEST PALM BEACH
MILKCREAMICE CREAM
Mrs. R. s. Wells has been the
guest of Mr. and Mrs. Chris Er-
neston, 217 Almeria Kd.. while
here to attend the marriage of
tier son. Lt. Dail F. Wells, and
Miss Elinore Erneston. She left
for St. Petersburg for a ten day
stay, after which sue will return
to her Ik.me in Kilgore, Texas.
Miss Cathryn Erneston has re-
turned from a ten day visit with
friends at Bartow.
Jocelyn H. Lee. an officer in
the U. S. Merchant Marine, is
.spending a few (lavs with his par-
lents. Mr. and Mrs Harry A. Lee,
1306 Valencia Rd.
own/. First hiKh average, Marty
Milst. in, George Rachlin, J. Le-
Iblang, Sol Wemkle and Sam Ba-
danes. Most improved bowler,
Ruben Lubel. The Bond Tourna-
ment was won by Hv Oren. who
received a War Bond. Second
place went to Ruben Lubel and
third place to Harold Berkowil/.
A committee corrfbosed of
Marty Milstein, Larry Grossberg
and Hy Oren was appointed to
adjust all differences that might
arise among the various mem-
bers of the Bowling League. The
new season will open next Mon-
day night and all members de-
siring to be present are request-
ed to attend at the Palace Bowl-
ing Alleys.
Youth Activities
Parents of children over the
age <>t H years who desire to send
them to the "Y" for various ac-
tivities are requested to register
at the Y. M. H. A. office. Classes
of various kinds and play activi-
ties will commence immediately
after Labor Day. There will be
supervised play and activities of
all kinds for groups of all ages,
but in order for a child to at-
tend, he must be registered first.
11th Annual Dance
Larry Grossberg was appointed
chairman of the 11th Annual
Dance of the Y. M. H. A. to be-
held some time in October.
LEGAL NOTICES
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Chapter 17437
A 6333
I NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN THAT
'' Urlffln holder of Stata and
County Tax Certificate No. 18001 la-
the 7th day of July. a. I >. 1941,
hasi filed Name in my office, and baa
man* application foi a tax dead to
Is* le thereon. Bald Certificate m-
brace* the following described prop-
iii> In the County of Dade, Bute ol
I' loiida, tow it:
Lots 23 and 14, Block !. Sw-
ings Addition, ii sui... iMat Book
'' Page ISC, in the County of
Bade, State of Florida.
The assessment of aald property
under tin- said certificate was In the
name of: Unknown.
Unless N.iid certificate sh.-iii he re-
deemed according to law, the prop-
ertj described therein will be s<>i the highest bidder iit the Court House
dooi tin the first Monday In the month
.f October, 1943, which le the 4th l < k-tober, 1943,
Dated thin 20th das of August 1941
i: D WEATHERMAN,
Clerk of Circuit Coin t, Hade
County, Florida.
i 'iii nit i'...iit Heal)
Bj N. C STERRBTT. D. .C
1 20-27 3-10
LEGAL NOTICES
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN
the undersigned will register with
th.- clerk of the Clrouit Court
lot Dade County, Florida, th.
.ions name, NORFOLK HOTEL Ii
N. w. 5th Street, Miami, Florida, un-
der which era are engaged ii busl-
neee,
DAVID BROWN
l-'AY BROWN
7/M-80 8/8-18-10 "W"er8
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICK IS HKItKKY GIVEN that
the undersigned will reglstct vita
}..* i,C,,k '!' ,he CW.X.ult Court mutf
for Dade County. Florida, the lai-
tlous name. HISCAYNK apt *..
TKI, in x. K 5th SttwSZ-JarX
Florida, under which we are engav*
in business.
I'AVID BROWN
PAY BROWN
: :v:-30S/6-i3-:o
REAL ESTATEMIAMI BEACH
LAINHART & POTTER
ESTABLISHED 1893
BUILDING MATERIAL FOR PARTICULAR BUILDERS'
Phone 5191 West Palm Beach. Fla.
Lincoln Road Properties
Sale* and Leases
B. E. BRONSTON. Realtor
A Trustworthy Real Estate Service
605 Lincoln Road. Ph. 5-5868
Palm Beach Bottling Works
INCORPORATED
WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA
Beverages of Quality Since 1920
RENTALS LEASES SALES
Lots. Homes, Hotels
Apartment Houses
M. GILLER
r,u Rr^?' Real E*tte Broker
Ph. 58-1188 523 Mich. Are.
FERGUSON FUNERAL HOME, Inc.
1201 South Olive Avenue
WESeALM BEACH
PHONE 5172
SOUTHERN DAIRIES
_ Fmlm Beach County, teetorla*
H.tkmeJlT remoua aWth*jrn Dairies
and Ioe
AS NEAI TO TOO At YOUB FHOM
THINK ef |l Yowasle,
* > gA*M D VIUmlM or of
B Complex Vitassios. Id oa
pUsMDt tablet. Rcmetnbrr
U* aaiM ONK-A-DAT
(brmnd, Vitamin Tablets.
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND I'M It DADE COUNT T
I'l.i IRIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 14142
In Re: ESTATE OP MoitltIS
HINDKR, Hi. eaaed.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
i'" All Creditor* and All Peraona Haw-
aii: Claims hi Demands Against
Said Estate:
Tou und each { you, are hereb}
til pd and required to present any
rlaiiriM and demands which you, or
i-lthei of you, ma) have agalnat the
estate ..f MORRIS HINDER deceased
ate ol Dade County, Florida, t.. the
Hon u w Rlanton, County Judge "f
Dade Count \. ami III. the same in his
office in the County Courthouse in
Dade County. Florida, within eight
calendar months rrom t|i. date "f the
in-t publication hereof. Said claims
"i demands to contain the legal ad-
dress <-f the claimant and to be sworn
'",;,"!'' i"....."|| '- aforesaid, or tame
JYJJ..... barred See Section ISO of tin-
1933 Probate Act.
Date August IS, A. I>. ]943
ABRAHAM HINDER
As Exei utor of the Last win and
Testament ..f Morrla Bindei
I 'ceased.
First publication on August 20, 1943
HAROLD KA8SEWITZ
Attorney for Abraham Binder,
Executor,
a SO-27 9 s-10
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HKRKIiY OIVBN that
the undersigned will register with
tin- Clerk "f the Circuit Court in and
for Dade County, Florida, the rt-ti
tlous name, MIAMI HOTEL. IS3 N
\\ 1st Avenue, Miami, Florida, undt-i
which we are engaged in bufifness
DAVID urown
KAY UROWN
T/M-*0 S/6-13-20
NERVINE
tiua
r| O TKNBK _
Tsnaioa. Gt it .1
" if m dlrwtoa.
WHKN ____
J l.r rsis.
Nrli.
IN COUNTY JUDGE'S Court
Dado I'nunty. F'lorida
No- 13302
Re: Estate of
LOUISA DAY JAY
Deceased
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR FINAL
DISCHARGE
flu,!".',','' if ".reD' Kiven that I have
nied my final report ami iietltWu-for
ffl**fl"|i M A-lmhils'tl^o, of
the estate ;.f LOUISA DAY jay de-
ceased; and that on the 24th dav of
orabbi \\ P. BUANTON. County
Judge of Had.- County, Florida, for
approval of said final repbrt ad f r
t\?, i--J ,Hi"hi,i;,!V. 5f, AamlmVratw of
Cea-.iiI A "AY JAY' dr'
This 21st day of Julv. 1943
MAX R S-ILV,-^*'^ '" JAY-
7/2l,-,3o,i';6>:i3%Adm",""r-"r
NOTICE FOR APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
File No. 36722
Notlc- is hereby given that U> 0.
Kinder, a married Woman, holdei
assignee of City of Miami Tax Cer-
tificate Numbered 17088, dated the
Mli pay ol June. A. ]>. 1938 has Mrd
said Certificate In my office, and has
made application for tax deed to issue
thereon In accordance with law Said
< tiflr.it.- embraces the following de-
scribed property, situated in D d<
i .unity, Florida, to-wlt:
l-ot IS, Hlock 11. Orapelatid
Revised. Plat Itook 3. Page 1>6.
In Hie City of Miami, Count! Ol
pade, state ..f Florida.
i he assesament of said propertv
under the Certificate Issued was in
the name of Unknown. Unless said
Certificate shall he redeemed accord-
ing to law, tax deed will issue there-
'"' .'"' the 2".th day of August. A I'
..Dated this 21st day of July. A. D-
liM.l.
F: I! I.KATHERMAN.
Clerk of circuit Court. Dade
County, Florida.
By N. c STERRBTT, D. C.
(i Ircult Court Seal)
./23-30 X-6-i:i-20
..NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersign,,! will register with the
Clerk .,. the circuit Court in ami for
Dade County, Florida the n titi, .?
name, the JEWISH Y -\iti<, u-
under which I am ..n^Tu*:
8/20-27 J./S-S0-1t"RKI* K S,,,KT
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
M NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HERF.BY OIVE.V that
the undersigned will register with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court in and
'"' DadefCounty, F'Ueida.. the flctl-
Uoue name. |:Ro\vN HOTELS,
Miami. F'lorida. under, which we
re engaged in business.
DAVID BROWN
KAY BROWN
7/888/g.lS-M-2T "'''er'
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
M NAME LAW
NolICK is HKHFJltY tJIVEN that
the nuclei signed will register with
ihe Clerk .,f the Circuit Court In and
for Hade County. Florida, the ficti-
tious name. MIAMI KOSHER MEAT
* IM|'|/|'KY MARKFrr, 2011 SI W-
s we are engaged In business.
davf: klichbr
AlKiLPH ADLER
, Owners
LEON KAPI^N
Attorney for Applicants
8/18-S0-87 t/l


FRIDAY. AUGUST 20. 1943
rJewisii Fhrkttan
PAGE SEVEN
LOCAL BOYS
Sgt. Samuel A. Miller, son of
Mr. and Mrs. John C. Miller. 2234
S W. 36th Ave., was graduated
from the armament department
of the AAFTTC at Lowry Field,
Colo.
GREATER MIAMI AxfMY-NAVY COMMITTEE
Of The Jewish Welfare Board
SERVICE
Pic. Norman Weiss, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Samuel Weiss,, 1018 Jef-
ferson Ave., Miami Beach, is
spending a fifteen day furlough
at home. Coming from MacDill
Field, Tampa, he is with a med-
ical detachment.
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Schindler.
5912 N. E. 2nd Ave., received
word this week that their son,
Lt. (jg.) Roland Schindler. USNR.
is on his way to overseas duty
in Iceland. His wife, the former
Miss Ruth Miness of New York
City, was with Lt. Schindler un-
til his time of embarkation at
which time she returned to New
York to stay with her parents
for the duration.
Lt. Charles Werblow, now a
member of the armed forces, sta-
tioned with the medical division
at Avon Park, Florida, is spend-
ing a short furlough here with
his wife.
Mr. and Mrs. S. Spector. 1575
N. W. Second St., have two sons
in the service, Pvt. Bernard Spec-
tor. 19, in the infantry at Camp
Shennago, Greenville, Pa. A grad-
uate of Miami Senior High
school, he entered the service
last march.
Prt. Aaron Spector, 22, also in
the infantry, has been in train-
ing at Camp Wheeler.
A COMMUNITY PROJECT
Help Us Keep Record of Our Men in Sen-ice
PARADE!
Second Lt.' Robert L. Siegel.
son of Mr. and Mrs. Nate Siegel,
4321 N. W. Sixth Ave., has been
promoted to first lieutenant in
the Army Air Forces. He has
been stationed at Ellington Field,
Texas, since graduating from of-
ficer candidate school at Miami
Beach last December.
Lt. Sidney Rabinowitz. 20 son
of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Rabino-
witz. 4350 Alton Rd., is on duty
with an Engineers Boat regiment
in North Africa. A graduate of
Riverside Military Academy, he
attended the University of Miami
before entering the service in
June, 1942.
Pvt. John Jacob Green, whose
wife lives at 1225 Collins Ave.,
has reported to the army air
field at Dodge City, Kans., from
Sheppard Field, Texas.
Lt. Bernard Robbins, 210 First
St., Miami Beach, has reported
for Army duty in New Orleans.
A former Miami Beach business
man, he was commissioned fol-
lowing his graduation from offi-
cer training school. He and Mrs.
Robbins are making their home
temporarily at the Roosevelt ho-
tel, Miami Beach.
Pfc. Melrin Felt, son of Mrs.
Harry Salus, 1945 N. W. 30th St.,
has qualified for the Army Spe-
cialist program and hopes to be
assigned to some college for study
after completing his course in
Chicago. He was high man in
his class for the fourth phase of
the course. He has a brother,
Carl Felt, who has been promot-
rd to motor machinist's mate 1-c
in the Navy, and has seen duty in
the South Pacific.
Richard B. Erdlitz, son of Mr.
and Mrs. R. J. Erdlitz, 192 N. E.
27th St., is commissioned a sec-
ond lieutenant after completing
the course in photography at
Yale university.
Ens. Howard Schwarti spent
a few days with his parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Meyer Schwartz, com-
ing from his station in Philadel-
phia.
WAR RECORDS COMMITTEE
NAT ROTH, Chairman
FRED SHOCHET
MRS. GEORGE M. COHEN
MAURICE QROSSMAN
JENNIE H. ROTFORT
NATHAN ROTHBERQ
J. W. B. Director
OFFICERS
SAM BLANK, CHAIRMAN
MONTE SELIG, Vice-chairman
JOSEPH A. BERMAN, See.
Executive Committee
Mra, Walter Bronaton. Mra. Max
Dobrln, Maurice Qroaaman. Louie
Helman, Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan,
Mra. Murry Koven, Harry Marko-
witz, Nat Roth, Fred Shochet.
MUton Sirkln, Joeeph Stein. Mra.
Herman Wallach, Carl Wainkle.
George Wolpert.
Cpl. Kolman Stumacher. 21, of
Brooklyn, holds the Silver Star
and the Air Medal. Stationed in
Hawaii, Corporal Stumacher has
participated in the successful
bombardment of Japanese island
bases. On one occasion, while
in air combat, his gun jammed
and with Jap Zeroes all about, he
was in a desperate plight. He
stayer at his sights, however, and
pretended to be pumping lead.
Greatly to his surprise and re-
lief, the enemy planes dashed off,
presumably bluffed by his threat-
ening gestures.
Lt (jg.) Mortimer V. Klein-
mann. Jr., 23, of New York City,
has been decorated with the Sil-
ver Star for "conspicuous gal-
lantry and intrepidity as a pilot
of a fighter plane in action
against enemy forces in the
Guadalcanal area" Lieut. Klein-
mann has seen action in most of
the naval engagements in the
South Pacific since Pearl Har-
bor, in the Coral Sea, Marshal and
Gilbert Islands engagements.
Fill Out Thia Coupon and Mail To "WAR RECORDS." Army-
Navy Committee, c/o P. O. Box 2973. Miami 18. Florida
Name-
Address (Home).
Date of Birth-----
.Date of Enlistment-
Name of Nearest Relative.
_Relatknship-
Address-
Branch of Service.
_Rank_
.Outfit-
Service Address____
TeL No____________
Promotions, honors, awards, acts of heroism, casualty or other
events or services:----------------------------------------------------------------
HELP WANTEDI
to build the most all-inclusive list of Jewish men and women
in the armed forces of the United States.
It is essential that every Jew in America make himself a
committee of one to transmit information on those in service
or who have been decorated, missing in action, wounded, or
who have given their lives in service. By doing this you will
be aiding in the authentic recording of Jewish participation m
this warnow being compiled by the
BUREAU OF WAR RECORDS. NAT ROTH. Chairman
GREATER MIAMI ARMY-NAVY COMMITTEE
OF THE JEWISH WELFARE BOARD
c/o P. O. BOX 2973. MIAMI, FLORIDA
WANTS FACILITIES
FOR SERVICE MEN
Nathan Rothberg, director
of the Jewish Welfare Board-
USO organization, is inter-
ested in contacting local res-
idents who are in a position
to accommodate service men
at their homes while these
men are on short leaves from
nearby camps, at reasonable
rates. Mr. Rothberg may be
reached at his office in the
Y. M. H. A., 9-13231
Cpl. Maurice Derfler. 23. of
Philadelphia, a radioman and
auxiliary gunner, is missing in
action in the Southwest Pacific.
He had been serving on a B-24.
Corporal Derfler, in service little
more than a year, is a refugee
from Germany, the only one of
his family to escape from the
Reich. He spent two and a half
years at the National Farm
School, Doylestown, Pa., before
joining the Air Forces.
[
YEARS TIME
A Miami Beach High school
graduate has received his promo-
tions from buck private to major
within one year.
Word has just been received
here that Lewis Berner, 27. son
of Mrs. Frances Berner. now of
1460 S. W. 14th Ave., Miami, was
commissioned a major on July 30.
Having specialized in biology
at University of Florida, young
Berner now is engaged in battling
disease on behalf of the army air
force, medical division.
Berner had been inducted at
Camp Blanding in July, 1941, and
assigned to artillery. After serv-
ing as a private in various camps,
he was honorably discharged in
Atlanta only to receive a com-
mission as lieutenant in the army
air corps on the next day. He
went to Africa in September,
1942. He became a captain last
January, and now is Major Lewis
Berner.
Capt. Lloyd H. Aronson. 24. of
So. Norwalk, Conn., has been
awarded the Distinguished Fly-
ing Cross anr the Air Medal. A
ferry pilot, Captain Aronson last
year figured in an amazing res-
cue of a British missionary's
daughter, when his plane was
forced down in a mountain vil-
lage near the China-Tibet bor-
der. Marooned in the mountain
fastness, the crew received food
and tools from rescue planes ov-
erhead.
Capt. Stanley Arthur Lowen-
berg, 33, of Brooklyn, is missing
in action in the Southwest Pa-
cific. An intelligence officer.
Captain Lowenberg has been on
active duty since June 1941. In
civilian life he was a buyer for a
Brooklyn department store. He
is a graduate of Cornell and Har-
vard Universities.
Lt. Albert E. Weinberg, 23. of
Chicago, bombardier aboard a
plane credited with shooting
down three Japanese planes, has
been missing in action since
April. An all-around athlete, he
is a college graduate and has
been in service 16 months. His
father served in the last war in
the Marine Corps.
GIVES UP CAREER
TO JOIN THE MS
Afc. Sarah Lightman, a Rus-
sian-born American, member of
Class No. 5, WAAC Branch No. 1
Army Administration School at
Nacogdoches, Texas, gave up a
career in the Hebrew field to
enroll in the WAAC.
During her stay in Palestine,
where she did Biblical research
and taught English, she experi-
enced at first hand the Arab ri-
ots of 1936, when the Germans
tried to incite Arabs against
Jews. While she was there, the
king of Ethiopia took refuge with
his family in Jerusalem.
In 1933 Sarah returned to the
United States and established her
home in Florida, where she was
connected with the school of
Temple Israel in Miami. While
doing war relief work, and act-
ing as hostess at the USO club,
she felt she could be of more ser-
vice to the war effort in another
capacity. She learned there that
soldiers welcomed release from
administrative positions and that
their morale was raised by the
work of the WAAC's, whereupon
Afc. Lightman gladly enrolled in
the WAAC. Now she is wishing
for an assignment as a linguist,
after graduation from WAAC
Branch No. 1.
Pvt. William Max. 23, of Allen-
town, Pa., lost his life in action
in the recent North African
fighting. A basketball player on
the Jewish Community Center
team, he was a graduate of Allen-
town High and was working as a
riveter at a structural steel com-
pany when he joined the Army
two years ago. His father. Jacob
Max, a former boxer, is a mem-
ber of the Allentown fire depart-
ment. William's brother, Julius.
is now on duty spmewhere in
North Africa.
Cpl. Edward Chitlik. U.S.M.C.
24. of Milwaukee, Wis., has re-
ceived the Silver Star for "con-
spicuous gallantry and intrepid-
ity during action against the Jap-
anese forces in the Solomon Isl-
ands."
A private first class at the
time, Chitlik went through heavy
enemy shell fire and remained in
great danger to set up two tele-
phone wires, thus restoring com-
munications between headquar-
ters and the front. For this ac-
tion, he was personally cited by
the Secretary of the Navy.
Pvt. Ralph Lewin. 28, of New
York City, was killed in action
in North Africa. He was in ser-
vice three years.
S Sgt. Irvin Singer. 26. of
Reading, Pa., an airman, who
died as a result of wounds re-
ceived in action in the South-
west Pacific, has been posthu-
mously awarded the Purple
Heart.
1st Lt Allan Cotler. 24. of
Brooklyn, has been honored with
the Distinguished Flying Cross
for "extraordinary achievement
while participating in 200 hours
of operational flight missions in
the Southwest Pacific area."
Sgt. Alton Lipkin. 29, of Min-
neapolis, Minn., an infantryman
in the recent heavy fighting on
Northwest New Guinea, has been
awarded the Silver Star for gal-
lantry in action. Sgt. Lipkin
was with a squad manning a ma-
chine gun nest in the face of
heavy enemy fire. One of the
squad, hit by Jap bullets, fell be-
yond the protection of the small
barricade set up by the Ameri-
cans. Sgt. Lipkin, leaning over,
crawled into the Jap line of fire
to rescue the wounded man. Lip-
kin pulled the soldier to safety,
despite the gravest danger to
himself, according to the cita-
tion.
In one of Sgt. Lipkin's recent
letters home he wrote that he
had received "minor shrapnel
wounds" about his face during
another New Guinea battle.
Devoting This Entire Page to the Efforts of Army-Nary Committee. Made Possible Through
the Co-Operation of
BARCO'S MEN'S SHOP
245 East Flagler Street
B. E. BRONSTON, Realtor
605 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach
COWEN'S SHOE STORE
155 E. Flagler St. 822 Lincoln Rd.
DIXIE SPORTSWEAR CO.
2119 If. W. Miami Court
FIXZIT SYSTEMS, Plumbers
1114 N. E. 2nd Avenue
FLORIDA LINEN SERVICE
100 N. W. 20th Street
FLORIDA WHOLESALE GRO. CO.
92 N. E. 28th Street
LAND-O-SUN DAIRIES. Inc
101 Alton Road
MIAMI MILL WORK &
LUMBER CO.
535 N. W. 11th Street
MIAMI PLUMBING SUPPLY CO.
2160 N. W. 27th Avenue
MIAMI WHOLESALE CORP.
118 N. W. 1st Avenue
MIAMI BOTTLED GAS, Inc.
1701 N. W. 7th Avenue
NATIONAL BRANDS, Inc.
690 N. W. 13th Street
NANKIN'S SHOE STORE
159 East Flagler Street
WM. RUBIN & SON
LUGGAGE 8r JEWELRY
31 N. Miami Avenue
SOUTHEASTERN SALESMEN'S
CARAVAN
Langford Building
STANDARD WHOLESALE
GROCERY CO.
149 N. E. 10th Street
MONTEFIORE SELIG
WILLIAM D. SINGER
SUNG AS CO.
1100 West Flagler Street
WEST FLAGLER KENNEL CLUB
West Flagler St. at 37th Avenue
WOMETCO THEATRES
Mitchell Wolfson Sydney Merer


in
PAGE EIGHT
+Jenisii ncr/diar?
FRIDAY, AUGUST 20,
RELIGIOUS ANNOUICEMIS
_n_ru*Ln_run_i-n_n ji_rui_n-ri_'i. *i i-------------------^--... ...... ......
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX
tlO 3. W. 17 AT*.. Miami
JOSKPH E. RACKOVSKY. Kabbi
LEWIS GREEN. Sexton
Services daily 6:30 a. m. and
7:45 p. m.; Saturday, 9 a. m. and
6:30 p. m. Rabbi Joseph E.
Rackovsky conducting services
and addressing the congregation
Saturday morning, on "Success
of War."
Shalosh S'oodoss, 7:00 p. m.
Rabbi Rackovsky speaking to
the worshipers, on '"Silence."
Mishnah and Jewish Laws and
Customs group meets daily at
7:15 and 8.00 p. m.
BETH SHOLOM CENTER
781
S.
41nt St.. Miami Bench
M. MACHTEI. Rabbi
m., Kabbalos
Friday. 8:00 p.
Shabbos service.
Saturday, 9:30 a. m., service:
Rabbi S. M. Machtei preaching
on weekly portion. Mincha 7
p. m. followed by class in Pirke
Avoth. Service men's Se'udah
Shlishis 7:15 p. m., Chaplain Har-
old H. Gordon presiding.
CONGREGATION BETH DAVID
139 N. W. Third Ave., Miami
MAX SHAPIRO. Rabbi
LiOUlS HAYMAN. Cantor
Friday, 7 p. m.: Kabbalas Sha-
bos service.
Saturday, 8:30 a. m.: Services:
Junior services, 10:30. Kiddush
will follow. Shalosh Seudos,
6:45 p. m.
Daily services morning and
evening.
BETH JACOB CONGREGATION
Waxh. Ave. and 3rd St.. Miami Reach
MOSES MES('HFI-OFr\ ltaM>i
MAPRU'K MAMl'HKS, Cantor
Saturday 8:30 a. m.. services,
Cantor Maurice Mamches chant-
ing. Early Sabbath services 7
a. m. Sabbath afternoon services
7:30 p. m. Service men's Shalosh
S'oodoss follows.
Daily services morning and
evening.
OBITUARIES
Meyer Rauzin, 50, widely
known owner of the Standard
Wine and Spirits Co.. died last
Saturday of a heart attack.
Mr. Rauzin came to Miami in
1925 from Atlanta. Ga.. his birth-
place. He was a member of Beth
David and Temple Israel con-
gregations and the Masonic order.
Surviving, besides his brother,
Sidney, are his wife, Mrs. Ida
Rauzin. Miami: another brother,
Joel Rauzin, Atlanta, and two sis-
ters. Mrs. Rose Lipsitz and Mrs.
Rae Willensky, both of Miami.
The body was sent to Atlanta
Sunday by the Gordon Funeral
home tor services and burial.
In addition a memorial was
held in Beth David Synagogue
Monday, conducted by Rabbi Max
Shapiro.
WMWMMMRXMWw^
B'nai B'rith
ttfflfl
N
ot e
By Paul Weitzman
V^ih.C
SCHAAREI ZEDEK
1645 S W. Third St., Miami
SIMON APRIU Rabbi
Services Friday 7:30 p. m.
Sabbath morning services be-
gin at 9 o'clock, with Rabbi Simon
April in charge.
Mincha services begin at 6:30
p. m. followed by the study of
the Ethics of the Fathers.
Daily services morning and
evening. Hebrew school 10 a. m.
Sam W. Cohen. 42. died Satur-
day morning in New York City.
after a short illness. Burial was
at Woodlawn Park Tuesday un-
der the direction of the River-
side Memorial Chapel.
Besides his widow. Ruth Reis-
ner Cohen, he is survived by a
son, Stanley Cohen: three broth-
ers. Joseph, Haryr and Saul Co-
hen of Miami Beach: three sis-
ters. Mrs. Anna Mink, of Miami:
Mrs. Nat Brown, Miami Beach;
and Mrs. A. H. Reichland. Phila-
delphia. He had lived here 22
years.
CONG. BETH ABRAHAM
535 N. W. Fifth Ave.. Miami
Services: Friday evening. Min-
chaKabbalos Shabos, 7:15 p. m.
Saturday. 9 a. m., Rabbi H. M.
i Kagan, preaching.
Daily service morning and eve-
: ning.
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Wl
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E N
E R
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our
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VACATIONS
A day or a week off may do wonders
in refreshing you... but it's time
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them in condition.
If your appliances are not up to par,
don't discard them or store them
away. Have them checked by your
appliance repair dealer, or bring
them to us and we'll help you locate
a repairman.
Your appliances will last longer and
give better service if you take good
care of them.
BEACH JEWISH CENTER
141S Elirlld Avt, Miami Beach
Abraham i>. WOLF, Cantor
Friday, 7:30 p. m., Kabalos
Shabos.
Rev. Abraham D. Wolf, cantor,
and the Center choir will conduct
the musical services.
Saturday morning, services:
Rabbi Irving Lehrman will ad-
dress the worshipers on the topic.
"The First Impressions in a New
Pulpit."
Saturday Shalosh Seudes 7 p.
m. Refreshments and community
singing. Daily services mornings
and evenings.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
13" N i: i Ith rtt., Miami
n'I.man a ZW1TMAN, Rabbi
RABBI JACOB H KAPLAN, Ph.D
Rai>M Emerltui
Services will be continued at
Temple Israel during the sum-
mer months on Fridays at 8:15
p in. with Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan
officiating.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1811 Si.nth Andrew* Ave.
Ft. Lauderdale, fi.-i
Reform Synagogue serving Hollywood,
Ft. Lauderdale and Broward County
BAMUEL HAI.KVl BARON, Rabbi
Services: Friday, 8 p. m.
Religious School: Sunday, 10
a. m.
Sisterhood business meeting.
Monday. 8 p. m.
Sisterhood night at the Fort
Lauderdale Servicemen's Center
canteen, Wednesday. 6 to 11 p. m.
Tins column is conducted by the
I; rate Miami Jew -ii i-v.i. ., i ion in
cooperation with The Jewish Florid-
Ian .i- a communlt) service To Inform
ihi ommunlty of your organisation's
activities and t" avoid conflicts In
phom 3-5411 ami ask for
' 'ummunitj 'alendn i Noi u Ii
must reach Federation no later than
Tuendaj for publication thai week.)
Sun.. Aug. 22. Workmen's Cir-
cle, card party and bingo. !) p. m.
Tues.. Aug. 24. A. D. L. Execu-
tive meeting. 4 p. m.
Sat.. Sept. 4. opening State Con-
vention B'nai B'rith, Versailles
Hotel. 8 p. m.
Thurs.. Sept. 9, Jewish Welfare
Bureau Board meeting. Sunshine
Room. Ingraham Bldg.. 8 p. m.
Sun., Sept. 12. Sun.. Sept. 26.
opening Y. M. H. A. membership
drive.
Tues., Sept. 14. B'nai B'rith
and Auxiliary meeting. 8:15 p. m.
Wed.. Sept. 22. Council of Jew-
ish Women, luncheon meeting.
Sun.. Oct. 10. Miami Y. M. H.
A dance, 8 p. m.
Florida B'nai B'rith Convention
The Florida State Federation
of B'nai B'rith Lodges is to hold
its convention at Miami Beach
this coming Labor Day week-end.
We have the word of Louis
Heiman. president of Sholem
Lodge, that a complete program
of activities has been arranged
to keep delegates and visitors
busy and entertained to an ex-
tent that the Labor Day week-
end will stand out as a memor-
able event.
The Versailles Hotel will be
the center of activities and res-
ervations are now being taken
from out-of-town delegates, and
from local Ben B'riths and their
ladies who will want to be on the
spot throughout the convention.
Reservations are also being
made from those who will want
to attend all sessions of the con-
vention and join in the festivi-
ties. A registration fee of $5
per person will permit this priv-
ilege and will include a luncheon
Sunday, September 5th, and a
formal banquet that evening.
Visit with B'nai B'rith, great
and near-great: enjoy the com-
pany of your brethren and their
ladies; participate in the conven-
tion and help make out-of-town
delegates and guests feel the fra-
I ternal spirit by helping to make
i them welcome.
Call the B'nai B'rith office.
13-6391, and make your reserva-
tions nowattendance at the
banquet will be limited to 200
and making provision to accom-
modate our out-of-town guests
first, reservations will thereafter
be filled in the order of their re-
ceipt.
Floridian Subscription Drive
The Sholem Lodge drive to ob-
tain subscriptions to The Jewish
Floridian will wind up at the
end of this month. The drive was
undertaken to accomplish a num-
ber of objectives. First, to be
mercenary, the obtaining of new
find renewal subscriptions, would
help fill the coffers of Sholem
Lodge, since half of every such
subscription would go to the
Lodge. Secondly, and perhaps
we should have put this first tn
help swell the paid circulation of
The Floridian, which would make
it a better advertising medium
and bring The Floridian into
more Jewish homes.
The worth of The Floridian to
the local Jewish community has
been demonstrated so often that
we hesitate to embark upon a
further explanation. Suffice it to
say that this newspaper has co-
operated, does, and will, coop-
erate in every worthwhile under-
taking and organization project.
B'nai B'rith members and
their friends are urged to renew
their subscriptions now, if sub-
scribersthe renewal will ta)te
effect at the expiration of pres-
ent subscriptions; if not subscrib-
ers, to become subscribers now
for one year at $2, or for three
years at $5.
Milton A. Friedman, chairman
of the drive, reported that the
suscription drive would be a tre-
mendous success if only the mem-
bers would make some effort
From the fact that Milton Fried-
man has obtained 46 subscrip-
tions. Jake Felt 31, Louis Hei-
man 30. Mrs. D. Borenstein 10
and Jennie Rotfort 10, it is evi-
dent that the chairman has some
basis for his contention.
It is not too late, and much
can still be done between now
and the end of the month. At
least each member should see
to it that his own renewal or new
subscription be sent in imme-
diately and then ask your
neighbor. It is as simple as all
that.
A. Z. A. Convention at Tampa
While the State B'nai B'rith
Lodges are disporting themselves
at Miami Beach at their conven-
tion, the State A.Z.A. Chapters
will hold forth with their own
convention at Tampa, during the
Labor Day week-end.
At least thirty A.Z.A. bovsfron
Miami Chapter No. 322,'Sigma
Rho Chapter of Miami and^sd
Palm Chapter of Miami Bc..
are expected to attend the Taq
convention.
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LEON ELKIN
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LIFE INS. CO.
Not Best Because Biggest
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The United States Govern-
ment Having Taken Over Hii
Present Offices
DR. JOSEPH B. MARGOLIS
announces the
REMOVAL OF HIS OFFICE
311 Lincoln Road
Albion Bldg.. Suit* 309
MIAMI BEACH
For the Practice of
General Dentistry
More
FLORIDA
KOSHER ZION
SAUSAGE CO. PRODUCTS
Delicious Corned Beer
Pickled, Cooked and Smoked Meats
nd Normal Ave. Chicago
37th
Call R. J. WAINWRIGHT. District Manager
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FOR SALESBOOKS and BUSINESS FORMS OF ALL KINDS
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Dinners From 5 o Clock Sundays From Noon
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GORDON FUNERAL HOME
YOUR JEWISH FUNERAL HOME
710 S. W. 12th AVENUE PHONE JW431
WORTHY AND
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Full Text

PAGE 1

in PAGE EIGHT +Jenisii ncr/diar? FRIDAY, AUGUST 20, RELIGIOUS ANNOUICEMIS _n_ru*Ln_r un_i-n_n ji_rui_n-r i _' i i i ^--... ...... ...... MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX tlO 3. W. 17 AT*.. Miami JOSKPH E. RACKOVSKY. Kabbi LEWIS GREEN. Sexton Services daily 6:30 a. m. and 7:45 p. m.; Saturday, 9 a. m. and 6:30 p. m. Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky conducting services and addressing the congregation Saturday morning, on "Success of War." Shalosh S'oodoss, 7:00 p. m. Rabbi Rackovsky speaking to the worshipers, on '"Silence." Mishnah and Jewish Laws and Customs group meets daily at 7:15 and 8.00 p. m. BETH SHOLOM CENTER 781 S. 41nt St.. Miami Bench M. MACHTEI. Rabbi m., Kabbalos Friday. 8:00 p. Shabbos service. Saturday, 9:30 a. m., service: Rabbi S. M. Machtei preaching on weekly portion. Mincha 7 p. m. followed by class in Pirke Avoth. Service men's Se'udah Shlishis 7:15 p. m., Chaplain Harold H. Gordon presiding. CONGREGATION BETH DAVID 139 N. W. Third Ave., Miami MAX SHAPIRO. Rabbi LiOUlS HAYMAN. Cantor Friday, 7 p. m.: Kabbalas Shabos service. Saturday, 8:30 a. m.: Services: Junior services, 10:30. Kiddush will follow. Shalosh Seudos, 6:45 p. m. Daily services morning and evening. BETH JACOB CONGREGATION Waxh. Ave. and 3rd St.. Miami Reach MOSES MES('HFI-OFr\ ltaM>i MAPRU'K MAMl'HKS, Cantor Saturday 8:30 a. m.. services, Cantor Maurice Mamches chanting. Early Sabbath services 7 a. m. Sabbath afternoon services 7:30 p. m. Service men's Shalosh S'oodoss follows. Daily services morning and evening. OBITUARIES Meyer Rauzin, 50, widely known owner of the Standard Wine and Spirits Co.. died last Saturday of a heart attack. Mr. Rauzin came to Miami in 1925 from Atlanta. Ga.. his birthplace. He was a member of Beth David and Temple Israel congregations and the Masonic order. Surviving, besides his brother, Sidney, are his wife, Mrs. Ida Rauzin. Miami: another brother, Joel Rauzin, Atlanta, and two sisters. Mrs. Rose Lipsitz and Mrs. Rae Willensky, both of Miami. The body was sent to Atlanta Sunday by the Gordon Funeral home tor services and burial. In addition a memorial was held in Beth David Synagogue Monday, conducted by Rabbi Max Shapiro. WMWMMMRXMWw^ B'nai B'rith ttfflfl N ot e By Paul Weitzman V^ih.C SCHAAREI ZEDEK 1645 S W. Third St., Miami SIMON APRIU Rabbi Services Friday 7:30 p. m. Sabbath morning services begin at 9 o'clock, with Rabbi Simon April in charge. Mincha services begin at 6:30 p. m. followed by the study of the Ethics of the Fathers. Daily services morning and evening. Hebrew school 10 a. m. Sam W. Cohen. 42. died Saturday morning in New York City. after a short illness. Burial was at Woodlawn Park Tuesday under the direction of the Riverside Memorial Chapel. Besides his widow. Ruth Reisner Cohen, he is survived by a son, Stanley Cohen: three brothers. Joseph, Haryr and Saul Cohen of Miami Beach: three sisters. Mrs. Anna Mink, of Miami: Mrs. Nat Brown, Miami Beach; and Mrs. A. H. Reichland. Philadelphia. He had lived here 22 years. CONG. BETH ABRAHAM 535 N. W. Fifth Ave.. Miami Services: Friday evening. Mincha—Kabbalos Shabos, 7:15 p. m. Saturday. 9 a. m., Rabbi H. M. i Kagan, preaching. Daily service morning and eve: ning. "•^• % %  •• % %  •^ %  ^^ %  ^^^•^ %  ^• %  ^^^^• %  ^-^• %  %  ^•^^^ Wl A T E N E R •^ %  ^ %  ^ %  ^^ %  ^ %  ^^ %  ^^^ %  ^ %  •'^ %  '^ %  ^ %  ^^•^ %  ^^•^ %  ^^Sa^e**. our rffrfofautcet DON'T NEED VACATIONS A day or a week off may do wonders in refreshing you... but it's time wasted to a never-tiring electrical appliance. Your appliances thrive on hard work are designed for continuous service. But you must keep them in condition. If your appliances are not up to par, don't discard them or store them away. Have them checked by your appliance repair dealer, or bring them to us and we'll help you locate a repairman. Your appliances will last longer and give better service if you take good care of them. BEACH JEWISH CENTER 141S Elirlld Avt, Miami Beach ABRAHAM i>. WOLF, Cantor Friday, 7:30 p. m., Kabalos Shabos. Rev. Abraham D. Wolf, cantor, and the Center choir will conduct the musical services. Saturday morning, services: Rabbi Irving Lehrman will address the worshipers on the topic. "The First Impressions in a New Pulpit." Saturday Shalosh Seudes 7 p. m. Refreshments and community singing. Daily services mornings and evenings. TEMPLE ISRAEL 13" N i: i Ith rtt., Miami n I.MAN A ZW1TMAN, Rabbi RABBI JACOB H KAPLAN, Ph.D Rai>M Emerltui Services will be continued at Temple Israel during the summer months on Fridays at 8:15 p in. with Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan officiating. TEMPLE EMANU-EL 1811 Si.nth Andrew* Ave. Ft. Lauderdale, FI.-I Reform Synagogue serving Hollywood, Ft. Lauderdale and Broward County BAMUEL HAI.KVl BARON, Rabbi Services: Friday, 8 p. m. Religious School: Sunday, 10 a. m. Sisterhood business meeting. Monday. 8 p. m. Sisterhood night at the Fort Lauderdale Servicemen's Center canteen, Wednesday. 6 to 11 p. m. • Tins column is conducted by the I; rate Miami Jew -ii I-V.I. ., i ion in cooperation with The Jewish FloridIan .ia communlt) service To Inform ihi ommunlty of your organisation's activities and t" avoid conflicts In phom 3-5411 ami ask for 'ummunitj • 'alendn i Noi u Ii must reach Federation no later than Tuendaj for publication thai week.) Sun.. Aug. 22. Workmen's Circle, card party and bingo. !) p. m. Tues.. Aug. 24. A. D. L. Executive meeting. 4 p. m. Sat.. Sept. 4. opening State Convention B'nai B'rith, Versailles Hotel. 8 p. m. Thurs.. Sept. 9, Jewish Welfare Bureau Board meeting. Sunshine Room. Ingraham Bldg.. 8 p. m. Sun., Sept. 12. Sun.. Sept. 26. opening Y. M. H. A. membership drive. Tues., Sept. 14. B'nai B'rith and Auxiliary meeting. 8:15 p. m. Wed.. Sept. 22. Council of Jewish Women, luncheon meeting. Sun.. Oct. 10. Miami Y. M. H. A dance, 8 p. m. Florida B'nai B'rith Convention The Florida State Federation of B'nai B'rith Lodges is to hold its convention at Miami Beach this coming Labor Day week-end. We have the word of Louis Heiman. president of Sholem Lodge, that a complete program of activities has been arranged to keep delegates and visitors busy and entertained to an extent that the Labor Day weekend will stand out as a memorable event. The Versailles Hotel will be the center of activities and reservations are now being taken from out-of-town delegates, and from local Ben B'riths and their ladies who will want to be on the spot throughout the convention. Reservations are also being made from those who will want to attend all sessions of the convention and join in the festivities. A registration fee of $5 per person will permit this privilege and will include a luncheon Sunday, September 5th, and a formal banquet that evening. Visit with B'nai B'rith, great and near-great: enjoy the company of your brethren and their ladies; participate in the convention and help make out-of-town delegates and guests feel the fraI ternal spirit by helping to make i them welcome. Call the B'nai B'rith office. 13-6391, and make your reservations now—attendance at the banquet will be limited to 200— and making provision to accommodate our out-of-town guests first, reservations will thereafter be filled in the order of their receipt. Floridian Subscription Drive The Sholem Lodge drive to obtain subscriptions to The Jewish Floridian will wind up at the end of this month. The drive was undertaken to accomplish a number of objectives. First, to be mercenary, the obtaining of new find renewal subscriptions, would help fill the coffers of Sholem Lodge, since half of every such subscription would go to the Lodge. Secondly, and perhaps we should have put this first tn help swell the paid circulation of The Floridian, which would make it a better advertising medium and bring The Floridian into more Jewish homes. The worth of The Floridian to the local Jewish community has been demonstrated so often that we hesitate to embark upon a further explanation. Suffice it to say that this newspaper has cooperated, does, and will, cooperate in every worthwhile undertaking and organization project. B'nai B'rith members and their friends are urged to renew their subscriptions now, if subscribers—the renewal will ta)t e effect at the expiration of present subscriptions; if not subscribers, to become subscribers now for one year at $2, or for three years at $5. Milton A. Friedman, chairman of the drive, reported that the suscription drive would be a tremendous success if only the members would make some effort From the fact that Milton Friedman has obtained 46 subscriptions. Jake Felt 31, Louis Heiman 30. Mrs. D. Borenstein 10 and Jennie Rotfort 10, it is evident that the chairman has some basis for his contention. It is not too late, and much can still be done between now and the end of the month. At least each member should see to it that his own renewal or new subscription be sent in immediately — and then ask your neighbor. It is as simple as all that. A. Z. A. Convention at Tampa While the State B'nai B'rith Lodges are disporting themselves at Miami Beach at their convention, the State A.Z.A. Chapters will hold forth with their own convention at Tampa, during the Labor Day week-end. At least thirty A.Z.A. bovsfron Miami Chapter No. 322,' Sigma Rho Chapter of Miami and^sd Palm Chapter of Miami Bc.. are expected to attend the Taq convention. RomUon/i and Upholstery. Slip Cover Drapery Shops Complete Line of Exclusive Decorative Fabrics 35 N. W. 1st St. Ph. 3-8959 Tliami for REST CONVALESCENCE .....ICHRONICCASES Sun-Ray Park Health Resort |r;^* ') ,'-r-U^SIMD fOS • OOKltT(" w —Buy War Bonds Today— RIVERMONT PARK SANITARIUM 1388 N. W. 7th St. Ph. 3-7301 Best care for chronic sick, convi lescent and elderly people $25 WEEKLY UP asBsasi Large Beautiful Groundling BUY WAR BONDS! DRINK PLENTY OF C/Zripurc W Water DELIVERED TO YOUR HOME i-GALLON BOTTLE 6 0 CASE OF SIX TABLE BOTTLES J $ Plus Bottle Depotil PHONE 2 4128 BEFORE YOU BUY see LEON ELKIN with METROPOLITAN LIFE INS. CO. Not Best Because Biggest But—Biggest Because Best The United States Government Having Taken Over Hii Present Offices— DR. JOSEPH B. MARGOLIS announces the REMOVAL OF HIS OFFICE 311 Lincoln Road Albion Bldg.. Suit* 309 MIAMI BEACH For the Practice of General Dentistry More FLORIDA KOSHER ZION SAUSAGE CO. PRODUCTS Delicious Corned Beer Pickled, Cooked and Smoked Meats nd Normal Ave. Chicago 37th Call R. J. WAINWRIGHT. District Manager SHELBY SALESBOOK CO. P. O. Box 6. Miami Springs. Fla. Phone 8-1560 FOR SALESBOOKS and BUSINESS FORMS OF ALL KINDS "Compare Our Prices and Quality OLD SARATOGA INN Biu.iync Boulcv.ud at 77th Street Phone 7-7725 Dinners From 5 o Clock Sundays From Noon ( orkt.n! Lounge Fine Liquors and Wines "<1 BUS II FROM DOWNTOWN MIAMI OR BUS M II FROM MIAMI REACH CLOSED ON WEDNESDAYS MODERATE COSTS ALWAYS WITHIN THE MEANS OF INDIVIDUAL CIRCUMSTANCES GORDON FUNERAL HOME YOUR JEWISH FUNERAL HOME 710 S. W. 12th AVENUE PHONE JW431 WORTHY AND DESERVES YOUR FULL SUPPORT AND RECOMMENDATION



PAGE 1

FRIDAY. AUGUST 20. 1943 fJewlsl) flcrkiiar} ORGANIZATION ACTIVITIES .........A.... [ • %  • %  • M ^> rt_ I L •* *iriiniirii>.i__i_ M. B. JEWISH CENTER Saturday afternoon, following Mincha services, a supper reception was arranged in the social hall of the Miami Beach Jewish Center, for Rabbi and Mrs. Irving Lehrman. The committee in charge of arrangements were Daniel M. Broad, executive secretary; Harry Bodenstein, house chairman; Mrs. Esther Levy, Mrs. Marie Balaban, Mrs. Minnie Bloom and Mrs. Helen Josepher. Herman M. Berk introduced Jake Felt, recording secretary of the Center, as toastmaster, who introduced the rabbi. Rabbi Lehrman thanked the Congregation for its gracious welcome and presented an informal statement of his views on the place of the Center and the rabbi in modern Jewish life. Among those who offered greetings were Mayer H. Frankel, honorary life president; Shepard Broad, director of the Center, and president of the Zionist Organization of Miami Beach, and William Weinberger, Gabai. The musicai program was rendered by Cantor Abraham D. Wolf. Tuesday the Greater Miami Rabbinical Association welcomed Rabbi Irving Lehrman as a new member at a meeting held at Temple Israel. An informal at home for members and friends of the Center will be held Sunday afternoon, August 22, 2 to 5, at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Berman, 4310 Nautilus Drive, Miami Beach. PAGE THREE MIZRACHI Rabbi Moses Mescheloff and Rabbi Un Felshin. honorary and fk & P re ?'d ents respectively, of wUK M i ami B £ ach Mizrachi." met with the world president and the national president of the Mizrachi Organization, Rabbi Meir Berlin and Leon Gellman last week. c P l a ns / or the formation of a Southeastern Seaboard Region of the Mizrachi and a convention to be held this winter were discussed. Details are being worked on with the assistance of the New York office. I. E. A. On behalf of the local Jewish Education Association Rabbi Moses Mescheloff has had meetings with Dr. N. Gaffni and Dr. Israel Chipkin. heads of Religious Educational Associations in New York. Recommendations for an educational director for the local association were discussed. I M AND W. H. OF MIAMI BEACH RECEIVE CHARTER M. B. ZIONISTS WAR STAMPS Dr. Z. I. Sabshin will address the Zionist Cultural forum at 3:30 p. m. Saturday in the patio of the home of Dr. Abraham Wolfson, Collins Ave.at 11th St., Miami Beach. The program is open to the public, whose attendance has increased each sucreding week of the Zionist /*urum. SCHAAREI ZEDEK Resumption of Talmud Torah (lasses at Cong. Schaarei Zedek will take place at 10.00 a. m. Monday at the synagogue. All parents, regardless of congregational affiliations, are welcome t'> register their children. Talmud Torah classes are open to ail with free tuition. Buy War Savings Bonds. Low-flying airplanes can create a great deal of damage by strafing troops with their machine-gun fire, A vital weapon in defense against then* is the 50-caliber Anti-aircraft machine gun which can be either mounted or on a mobile base. Only 24 cents in War Savings Stamps will buy one round of ammunition for one of these guns but since thousands of rounds are needed to keep one shooting any length of time it is imperative that every dollar possible be invested in War Savings Stamps and Bonds. HEADACHE IS SUCH A BIG LITTLE THING The charter for the newly formed Y. M. and W. H. A. was formally approved and signed last Friday morning in the chambers of Judge Marshall C. Wisehart when a full committee of the organization was present to witness the significant Miami Beach event. Temporary officers as named in the charter are completing plans for the program of the group and the budgeting for the next period has been set up and approved. They are Harry Zukernick, president; Mrs. Ben Meyers, secretary, and Carl Weinkle, treasurer. Membership groups have been arranged to take care of the entire family under a group plan and applications are now being solicited and accepted. Nat H Hankoff is chairman of the membership committee and is in the process of forming divisions to contact Miami Beach business and professional men and women. The Miami Beach Y has located at No. 1 Lincoln Road and has made available meeting places for various activities of character and recreational needs on the Beach. Directors of the organization are Rudy R. Adler, Morris Alpert, Benjamin Appel. George Bertman. Benjamin E. Bronston. £ ak T e T Felt Nathan Glosscr. Nat. H. Hankoff. Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan Mrs Moses Krieger, A. Louis Mechlowitz, Rabbi Moses Mescheloff. Mrs. Benjamin Meyers. Joseph M. Rose. Alfred B. Rosenstoin. Harry Sirkin. Mrs. Milton Sirkin, Harold Turk. Carl Weinkle, Mitchell Wolfson, Harry Zukernick. y. M. H. A. CONCLUDES HOME CAMP,MOST SUCCESSFUL SINCE INCEPTION The children of America are doing their part to help keep Uncle Sam's tanks rolling, planes flying and guns roaring. Their work, which is being organized and coordinated by the Schools At War Program will be recorded in scrapbooks and exhibited throughout the country. Each school participating in the program will receive a certificate of service from the Treasury Department, and a historic Liberty Brick .will be presented to each state by the Treasury. ''. .S". 7 rcasury Department A LL SET for a good fall day's work when a nigging headache aneaka up on you. You suffer and so does your work. Ready for an eveningof relaxation and enjoyment — a pesky headache interferes with your fun, *et enjoyment or relaxation. DR. BOLES Anti-Pain Pills dually relieve not only Head•che, but Simple Neuralgia, Maa%  ?., Pa,M mBd Factional Monthly Pains. ,.£,ya n Dr. Miles Anti-Pain &f £J tf m Bot wh notT You n et Dr. Miles Anti-Pain Pills at your drugstore in the regular WKage for only a penny apiece ""u m the economy package even cheaper .Why not get a package R-./ T J! Your druggist has them. dWti, lr ^ t,0M and • only as a£ T2& Your mcm *r back if you %  ** ** satisfied. Take Your Watch to Danzig's! FORMER MIAMI RABBI HONORED BY U. OF M. Rabbi Abraham A. Kellner. former spiritual leader of the Miami Jewish Orthodox Congregation, and presently affiliated with the Beth Abraham Cong, of Albany, N. Y.. was recipient of the degree of Master of Arts at the University of Maine where he attended the summer session. While in Maine. Rabbi Kellner officiated as civilian chaplain for the Jewish service men at Dow Field Army Base and also conducted services for the ArI my Specialized Training Units which are based at the University. The Columbia Broadcasting System extended an invitation to the rabbi to broadcast over their nation-wide chain, August 22nd, from 1:00 to 1:30 p. m. Eastern War Time, and he will be heard at that time. SMALLEST.... WATCH MOVEMENTS... PERFECTLY... REPAIRED..... DmlUmtb, mall. Intricate raoremenli or* bandied by' %  with understand lay car* and skill. CASH FOR YOUR DIAMONDS AND OLD GOLD JEWELRY REPAIRING DANZIG'S JEWELERS 236 HALCYON ARCADE 145 E Fliql,-, Si ABESS AGAIN NAMED TO EXAMINING BOARD Reappointment of Leonard L. Abess, of 3701 Chase Ave.. Miami Beach, to the State Bfcard of Accountancy, was annotfneed Wednesday. First appointed to the board by Gov. Dave Sholtz, Abess has served two four-year terms. The State Board of Accountancy is the examining board in Florida for all persons seeking classification as Certified Public Accountants. Senior member in the Miami accounting firm of Abess and Costar. the appointee is also a vice president of the Miami Beach Federal Savings & Loan Association and a trustee of Miami Beach City hospital. MIAMI ARTIST IS HELD OVER AT PROMINENT NIGHT CLUB Miss Phyliss Sharon, talented Miamian. who has been singing, at the Pago-Pago for the pasi four weeks, has been held over by popular demand. REFINED GIRL will share large spacious efficiency apartment. Lincoln Road Section, with business girl. Piano, telef hone, home like atmosphere. f.50 per week, entire season rate. References required. Apartment available September 1st. MRS. GEEMAN c/o P. O. Box 2973 Miami 18. Florida (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1) rector of the Y, the following personnel conducted the activities of the camp this summer: •kssie Shaffer, supervisor; Don McCloskey, chief counselor: Myer Greenbcrg, in charge of boys; Hope Ellen Tannenbaum, in charge of girls and dramatics; Bobby Rubenstein, arts and o ra ul. s; 5 a y Greenberg, dietitian; Bobby Decker, music; Mrs. Leon Lichtenstetter, story hour; Janet Olitf and Harriet Rand, kindergarten. Many civic and community leaders were luncheon guests at Home Camp luncheons this past season. All of them gave their nearty approval and endorsement of the project. Many of them wrote letters congratulating the Y. M. H. A. upon this splendid achievement. .They stated that it was Miami's greatest answer to the problem of juvenile delinquency. Among prominent guests this summer were Mayor Leonard K. Thompson, City Commissioner James A. Dunn, Preston Bird, chairman of the Dade County commissioners; County Commissioner N. P. Lowrey, Postmaster Hugh Emerson, Judge Marshall Wisehart. Chief of Police Leslie Quigg, Asst. County Solicitor Andrew T. Healy, Sam Blank, Monte Selig, and Stanley C. Myers. rfr/ssss//"""""""'" „.,.,„/""''""' W#l • Hull' WANTAGES of a IIAIIE FEDERAL MORTGAGE v •LOW RATES • EASY PAYMENTS • LONG TIME TO PAY • PROMPT SERVICE i • A HOME INSTITb HON Deal With You* LOCAL. FRIENDLY INSTITUTION RESOURCES OVER $7,000,000 IIAIIE FCItCltAL ,, MOIIH I AS T IIS1 JOSEPH M. LIP-TOW. PRESIDENT A V I M H ( j/J////J//MM/um~"" _aHstMM IS*** '//////' mgta -.



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FRIDAY. AUGUST 20. 1943 +Jewlsl)Fk)ridUan PAGE FIVE The Ford Way Of Doing Business In Wartime Ford Methods Save Money And Materials A neir Ford method of quenching tank armor plati eliminate* later straightening. Dies hold the plate during the process. Forty hours are saved on each M-4 medium tank and M -10 tank destroyer hull. Ford i* producing gliders hy mass production %  MltlOd*. Among Ford developments is a process o' quick-drying the glue joints that cut* drying .iiuu from nine hours to one hour on each wing. .4/ Willow Run the top section of the bombardier enclosure, formerly made in 13 hand-formed I,. ,-. — is now made in only i parts —saving M bOUTI in the construction time of each bomber. The airplane landing gear hinge formerly made of nine hand-welded parti, is now cast In one piece, eliminating S* of the tools formerly used. Thus again Ford methods save rime and materials. Four hours In manufacturing time and 5 per cent of steel requirements are saved on each engine by the Ford-developed method of centrifu%  aUy casting the aircraft engine cylinder barrels. Y OU MAY NOT be buying Ford cars today, but you are still a Ford customer. Through your government you are spending your tax dollars and investing in war bonds to buy the bombers, tanks, tank destroyers, jeeps and other material that Ford is building for Victory. And the Ford organization is working for you on these war orders with the same high skill the same eye toward value and economy that governed production of over 30,000,000 peacetime Ford cars and trucks. It always was Ford policy to share the benefits of advanced methods with employees and customers alike. And that policy is still being pursued. You are still getting an honest deal for your money. Keeping Costs Down Ford keeps down costs on war goods in the same way it kept down costs on cars —by using Ford mass-production techniques, advanced methods, highly skilled workers and high management efficiency. Output per employee is high even though thousands of inexperienced new workers—many of them women—have been placed in jobs which demand exacting skill. This quick development of proficiency has been made possible by comprehensive Ford training programs. Equally important in boosting the output and lowering the costs are the working conditions in Ford shop*. They are the best that science and constant care can make them. These factors, coupled with the company's long-known and practiced policy of high wage rates and fair dealing, create an ability and aa attitude toward the job that is reflected in both the quality and quantity of production. Difficult Jobs Done By Ford The jobs we have undertaken were brought to Ford because your government representative* knew we would do our best with them. % Ford is a vofume producer of kemvy horsepower aircraft engines! This is the most exacting type of precision work. % Today Ford is m foremost producer of Liberator bombers! % Ford, in collaboration with government engineers, developed the amphibian jeep-builds this and the famous land jeep, in huge quantities! r Ford builds M-4 medium tanks, M-10 tank destroyers, the Ford tank engine and vast quantities of other war materials. % Today Ford is in full production for Victory. The Ford Motor Company is operating more plant capacity, employing more people, turning out more goods than ever before. What This Means To You Throughout forty years of service to the people Ford has built upon the solid foundation of practical ideals and technical "know howl' Today the Ford way of doing business means more value to you, our customers, and honestly-built materials for our sons at the front. FORD MOTOR COMPANY Ford Mass-Production Lines Deliver Fleets of Weapons M-4 MBDIUM TANKS • M-10 TANK DESTROYERS • PRATT ft WHITNEY AIRCRAFT ENGINES • JEBPS • AMPHIBIAN JEBPS • ARMY TRUCKS • CONSOLIDATED LIBERATOR BOMBERS • TRANSPORT GLIDERS • UNIVERSAL CARRIERS TANK ENGINES • TRUCK AND JEEP ENGINES • ARMOR PLATE • GUN MOUNTS AIRCRAFT GENERATORS • TURBO-SUPERCHARGBRS • MAGNESIUM CASTINGS RATE-OP-CLIMB INDICATORS This list does nor include other important Victory models now in production that cannot be named due to wartime conditions. LMUm to '' Wmltk Tkt W,rU C. '" /fcer, nfrnt 1:00p.m.. E. W.T. M TkBlm, N.twrk. FULL PRODUCTION FOR VICTORY Ford Methods Get The Job Done Quickly %  Gun mount cradleit for tank*, formerly m*de of V parts, are made today at the Ford tank plant of only three castings, reducing production time by two-thirds and facilitating repairs in th Liberators. A forest of automotive-type presses speeds the production of Ford-built Liberator bombers at Willow Run. One huge press alone saves more than 1M hours building wing-tips for these planes. 1 i l



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PAGE TWO +Jewislincrklian FRIDAY, AUGUST 20. 1943 y^^^M l M WW ^^^^ SOCIAL ITEMS AND PERSONALS MaM MNMM MMMMMM%AAl Maurice Grossman will leave today for New York for a two week stay. While there he will confer with national leaders regarding future Y. M. H. A. plans and programs. He is executive director of the Miami Y. M. H. A. Miss Molly Weinstcin. 818 Lincoln Rd., has returned from a combined vacation-business trip to New York. Mr. and Mrs. Irving B. Stern of New York City are spending six weeks at the Versailles. Mrs. Stern is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Reinhard, 1089 N. W. C4th St. Miss Barbara Newmark. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Newmark. 3707 Royal Palm Ave.. Miami Beach, has left for Nashville. Tenn., where she will visit friends. Mrs. Albert Feinbcrg and daughter, Judy, have returned to their home at 1945 N. W. First terrace after a visit in Knoxville. Tenn. Mr. and Mrs. Louis Heiman will leave for a vacation in New York. While there, Mr. Heiman will attend the American Jewish Conference. Rabbi and Mrs. Max Shapiro left this week for New York City where the rabbi will attend the American Jewish Conference as ;i delegate from this area. Mr. and Mrs. Jack Weinkle of Atlanta are visiting in the city and are staying at the Arlington HoteL Mr. and Mrs. Stanley C. Myers left today for a vacation in New York and vicinity. Mrs. A. J. Tobin will arrive home this week-end after spending two months in the North. Mr. and Mrs. Morris Berick and their children Joy and Frank Martin, arrived from Rhode Island this week to take up residence in Miami Beach. They have purchased a home on Royal Palm Avenue. Mr. and Mrs. William Shayne and son are vacationing at Blowing Rock, N. C. Mrs. Charles Rosengarten has returned from a stay at Hendersonville, N. C. Mrs. Carl Weinkle left Monday for Savannah, Ga.. where she will visit her mother. From there Mrs. Weinkle will journey to Baltimore, where her daughter, Ernise, at camp, will join her to go to New York. On her return trip Mrs. Weinkle will visit her son. Julian, who is with the navy at Chapel Hill and will attend the wedding of her neice at Asheville on September 5th. Mrs. R. V. Brandt, Woodmere. L. I., is visiting her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Louis Hartz of this city. Miss Betty Ann Romm of Atlanta. Ga., left today after spending two weeks as the house guest of Miss Sara Rose Schwartz. Mrs. Irving Lee Kanof. the former Elsie Rawlson, is spending several weeks with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Rawlson. before returning to San Francisco where her husband. Lt. Kanof, is stationed. Dr. and Mrs. Albert E. Rosenthal will return tomorrow from a month's vacation in the North. Rabbi Simon April has returned from a trip in the East and is now at home at 1845 S. W. 9th Street, phone 2-55667. Mrs. J. J. Rawlson returned from a short vacation in New York City. Mrs. Sonia Levitt has returned from a visit to Jacksonville. While there she attended the wedding of her son, Ensign Ben Levitt, to Miss Geraldine Blumberg. The marriage was performed in the presence of immediate families and classmates ot Ensign Levitt, who is a graduate of Annapolis. The best man was Ensign Leslie Landau, son of Col. Landau, of New York, who is now with the armed forces in the South Pacific. Miss Marjorie Fisher, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. F. H. Fisher. 5925 LaGorce drive, has returned home after spending the winter at the University of Michigan, where she is a student majoring in art. At the close of school Miss risher visited friends in Utica, N. Y., Youngstown, O.. Jamaica Estates, Long Island and New York City. She will return to the University of Michigan for the fall semester. M. B. APARTMENT BODY WILL NAME DIRECTORS Nomination of 22 directors for the ensuing year will be made at a general membership meeting of Miami Beach Apartment Association, Inc., to be held at 8 p. m. on Tuesday. Sept. 7, at Miami Beach High school auditorium. Election has been set for Monday. Sept. 20 and installation of new officers and directors for Monday, Oct. 4. Albert Kahn is president of the organization. SOCIAL EVENTS Mr and Mrs. Herman Slepian, 2558 S W 20th St., will be hosts at open house Sunday evening. August 22nd, from 7 to 10 o clock The occasion will be in honor ot their moving into their new home. Assisting in serving will be Mrs. Slepian's sisters, Mrs. Max Pepper. Mrs. Joseph Schaffer. and sister-in-law, Mrs. M. bilberstein. No invitations are being sent and friends and relatives of Mr. and Mrs. Slepian are invited. Mrs. Slepian is immediate past president of the Y. W. H. A. and has been active in local organization work. A personal shower complimenting Miss Edith Siegel, bride-elect of Pfc. William Reiser, U.S.A., will be given by her sister-in-law, Mrs. Harold Siegel. at 8 p. m. Saturday in her home. 2761 S. W. Seventh St. Pvt. Reiser is expected to arrive next week from Camp Cook. Cal., for the wedding which will take place Wednesday evening. August 25, in the home of the bride-to-be's parents. Mr. and Mrs. Jacob H. Siegel. 2143 S. W. Sixth St. Graduates of Miami High school, the couple will be attended by Miss Clare Shankman. who will be maid of honor, Mrs. Harold Siegel, matron of honor, and George Siegel, best man. BIRTHS Dr. and Mrs. Herman Mechlowitz of Miami Beach announce the birth of a daughter at St Francis Hospital last Friday. Dr. Abraham Wolfson has received news that his daughter Miriam, now Mrs. Herbert Shapiro of Spartanburg, S. C, gave birth to twin boys. Mrs. Shapiro is a graduate of Columbia University and is the secretary of the Spartanburg Council of Jewish Women. Mr. Shapiro is a graduate of the University of South Carolina and is in business with his father. Myron Levitt is spending some time in Atlanta as the guest of his brother and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Krick. Buy War Stamps and Bonds NOW and give our men in the armed forces the help they need. :m ^ForaBetterDaij HV U.S.WAR BONDS Eleven members of a secret Belgian underground organization responsible for aiding United Nations fliers shot down over German occupied territory were executed by Nazi firing squads recentlv over a 3-day period. They were charged by their German captors with "aiding the enemy." Here in America we can aid in the fight against Hitler without endangering our lives if we do our work diligently and buy War Bonds every pay day. WS3 741Q V. 8. rrmmm D*pt EVERY MISSION URCENT Mrs. Max Kupferstein has joined her husband in Rendersonville, N. C. Joseph Rabin left this week for a three week vacation in Chicago and St. Louis. He will be joined by Mrs. Rabin in New York next week and then both will entrain for Boston to spend the remaining two weeks. Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Bandler and family have returned from their vacation at Roanoke, Va., and vicinity. Miss Ruth Brotman, coloratura soprano and music critic, recently appeared as soloist with the concert orchestra at the Colonial Hotel, Mt. demons, Mich. Miss Brotman will give concerts in Buffalo, Philadelphia, Atlantic City and Baltimore, before returning to her home at Miami Beach. Captain and Mrs. David Koller are visiting Mrs. Roller's parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. Rubin, 1352 S. W. 14th Street. Captain Koller is now stationed at the Birmingham, Ala., army base. Harry Simonhoff left for NewYork where he will attend the American Jewish Conference as a delegate from this area. I WANT MY MILK TOWER THEATRE S.W. 8th St. at 15th AT*. OPEN AT 1:46 P. M. Friday and Matinee Only Saturday, Aug. 20-21 JOHNNY WEISSMULLER FRANCES GIFFORD IN 0^\N fS And Be Bur* It's FLORIDA DAIRIES HOMOGENIZED Vitamin "D" Milk "Milk Product" Dacro Protected TEL. 2-2621 Greater Miami Delivery Visit Our Farm at 8200 N. W. 32nd Straet "TARZAN TRIUMPHS // EXTRA! WALT DISNEY'S "EDUCATION FOR DEATH"


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FRIDAY. AUGUST 20. 1943 rJewisii Fhrkttan PAGE SEVEN LOCAL BOYS Sgt. Samuel A. Miller, son of Mr. and Mrs. John C. Miller. 2234 S W. 36th Ave., was graduated from the armament department of the AAFTTC at Lowry Field, Colo. GREATER MIAMI AxfMY-NAVY COMMITTEE Of The Jewish Welfare Board SERVICE Pic. Norman Weiss, son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Weiss,, 1018 Jefferson Ave., Miami Beach, is spending a fifteen day furlough at home. Coming from MacDill Field, Tampa, he is with a medical detachment. Mr. and Mrs. Sam Schindler. 5912 N. E. 2nd Ave., received word this week that their son, Lt. (jg.) Roland Schindler. USNR. is on his way to overseas duty in Iceland. His wife, the former Miss Ruth Miness of New York City, was with Lt. Schindler until his time of embarkation at which time she returned to New York to stay with her parents for the duration. Lt. Charles Werblow, now a member of the armed forces, stationed with the medical division at Avon Park, Florida, is spending a short furlough here with his wife. Mr. and Mrs. S. Spector. 1575 N. W. Second St., have two sons in the service, Pvt. Bernard Spector. 19, in the infantry at Camp Shennago, Greenville, Pa. A graduate of Miami Senior High school, he entered the service last march. Prt. Aaron Spector, 22, also in the infantry, has been in training at Camp Wheeler. A COMMUNITY PROJECT Help Us Keep • Record of Our Men in Sen-ice PARADE! Second Lt.' Robert L. Siegel. son of Mr. and Mrs. Nate Siegel, 4321 N. W. Sixth Ave., has been promoted to first lieutenant in the Army Air Forces. He has been stationed at Ellington Field, Texas, since graduating from officer candidate school at Miami Beach last December. Lt. Sidney Rabinowitz. 20 son of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Rabinowitz. 4350 Alton Rd., is on duty with an Engineers Boat regiment in North Africa. A graduate of Riverside Military Academy, he attended the University of Miami before entering the service in June, 1942. Pvt. John Jacob Green, whose wife lives at 1225 Collins Ave., has reported to the army air field at Dodge City, Kans., from Sheppard Field, Texas. Lt. Bernard Robbins, 210 First St., Miami Beach, has reported for Army duty in New Orleans. A former Miami Beach business man, he was commissioned following his graduation from officer training school. He and Mrs. Robbins are making their home temporarily at the Roosevelt hotel, Miami Beach. Pfc. Melrin Felt, son of Mrs. Harry Salus, 1945 N. W. 30th St., has qualified for the Army Specialist program and hopes to be assigned to some college for study after completing his course in Chicago. He was high man in his class for the fourth phase of the course. He has a brother, Carl Felt, who has been promotrd to motor machinist's mate 1-c in the Navy, and has seen duty in the South Pacific. Richard B. Erdlitz, son of Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Erdlitz, 192 N. E. 27th St., is commissioned a second lieutenant after completing the course in photography at Yale university. Ens. Howard Schwarti spent a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Schwartz, coming from his station in Philadelphia. WAR RECORDS COMMITTEE NAT ROTH, Chairman FRED SHOCHET MRS. GEORGE M. COHEN MAURICE QROSSMAN JENNIE H. ROTFORT NATHAN ROTHBERQ J. W. B. Director OFFICERS SAM BLANK, CHAIRMAN MONTE SELIG, Vice-chairman JOSEPH A. BERMAN, See. Executive Committee Mra, Walter Bronaton. Mra. Max Dobrln, Maurice Qroaaman. Louie Helman, Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan, Mra. Murry Koven, Harry Markowitz, Nat Roth, Fred Shochet. MUton Sirkln, Joeeph Stein. Mra. Herman Wallach, Carl Wainkle. George Wolpert. Cpl. Kolman Stumacher. 21, of Brooklyn, holds the Silver Star and the Air Medal. Stationed in Hawaii, Corporal Stumacher has participated in the successful bombardment of Japanese island bases. On one occasion, while in air combat, his gun jammed and with Jap Zeroes all about, he was in a desperate plight. He stayer at his sights, however, and pretended to be pumping lead. Greatly to his surprise and relief, the enemy planes dashed off, presumably bluffed by his threatening gestures. Lt (jg.) Mortimer V. Kleinmann. Jr., 23, of New York City, has been decorated with the Silver Star for "conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a pilot of a fighter plane in action against enemy forces in the Guadalcanal area" Lieut. Kleinmann has seen action in most of the naval engagements in the South Pacific since Pearl Harbor, in the Coral Sea, Marshal and Gilbert Islands engagements. Fill Out Thia Coupon and Mail To "WAR RECORDS." ArmyNavy Committee, c/o P. O. Box 2973. Miami 18. Florida NameAddress (Home). Date of Birth .Date of EnlistmentName of Nearest Relative. _RelatknshipAddressBranch of Service. _Rank_ .OutfitService Address TeL No Promotions, honors, awards, acts of heroism, casualty or other events or services: HELP WANTEDI to build the most all-inclusive list of Jewish men and women in the armed forces of the United States. It is essential that every Jew in America make himself a committee of one to transmit information on those in service or who have been decorated, missing in action, wounded, or who have given their lives in service. By doing this you will be aiding in the authentic recording of Jewish participation m this war—now being compiled by the BUREAU OF WAR RECORDS. NAT ROTH. Chairm an GREATER MIAMI ARMY-NAVY COMMITTEE OF THE JEWISH WELFARE BOARD c/o P. O. BOX 2973. MIAMI, FLORIDA WANTS FACILITIES FOR SERVICE MEN Nathan Rothberg, director of the Jewish Welfare BoardUSO organization, is interested in contacting local residents who are in a position to accommodate service men at their homes while these men are on short leaves from nearby camps, at reasonable rates. Mr. Rothberg may be reached at his office in the • Y. M. H. A., 9-13231 Cpl. Maurice Derfler. 23. of Philadelphia, a radioman and auxiliary gunner, is missing in action in the Southwest Pacific. He had been serving on a B-24. Corporal Derfler, in service little more than a year, is a refugee from Germany, the only one of his family to escape from the Reich. He spent two and a half years at the National Farm School, Doylestown, Pa., before joining the Air Forces. [ YEARS TIME A Miami Beach High school graduate has received his promotions from buck private to major within one year. Word has just been received here that Lewis Berner, 27. son of Mrs. Frances Berner. now of 1460 S. W. 14th Ave., Miami, was commissioned a major on July 30. Having specialized in biology at University of Florida, young Berner now is engaged in battling disease on behalf of the army air force, medical division. Berner had been inducted at Camp Blanding in July, 1941, and assigned to artillery. After serving as a private in various camps, he was honorably discharged in Atlanta only to receive a commission as lieutenant in the army air corps on the next day. He went to Africa in September, 1942. He became a captain last January, and now is Major Lewis Berner. Capt. Lloyd H. Aronson. 24. of So. Norwalk, Conn., has been awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross anr the Air Medal. A ferry pilot, Captain Aronson last year figured in an amazing rescue of a British missionary's daughter, when his plane was forced down in a mountain village near the China-Tibet border. Marooned in the mountain fastness, the crew received food and tools from rescue planes overhead. Capt. Stanley Arthur Lowenberg, 33, of Brooklyn, is missing in action in the Southwest Pacific. An intelligence officer. Captain Lowenberg has been on active duty since June 1941. In civilian life he was a buyer for a Brooklyn department store. He is a graduate of Cornell and Harvard Universities. Lt. Albert E. Weinberg, 23. of Chicago, bombardier aboard a plane credited with shooting down three Japanese planes, has been missing in action since April. An all-around athlete, he is a college graduate and has been in service 16 months. His father served in the last war in the Marine Corps. GIVES UP CAREER TO JOIN THE MS Afc. Sarah Lightman, a Russian-born American, member of Class No. 5, WAAC Branch No. 1 Army Administration School at Nacogdoches, Texas, gave up a career in the Hebrew field to enroll in the WAAC. During her stay in Palestine, where she did Biblical research and taught English, she experienced at first hand the Arab riots of 1936, when the Germans tried to incite Arabs against Jews. While she was there, the king of Ethiopia took refuge with his family in Jerusalem. In 1933 Sarah returned to the United States and established her home in Florida, where she was connected with the school of Temple Israel in Miami. While doing war relief work, and acting as hostess at the USO club, she felt she could be of more service to the war effort in another capacity. She learned there that soldiers welcomed release from administrative positions and that their morale was raised by the work of the WAAC's, whereupon Afc. Lightman gladly enrolled in the WAAC. Now she is wishing for an assignment as a linguist, after graduation from WAAC Branch No. 1. Pvt. William Max. 23, of Allentown, Pa., lost his life in action in the recent North African fighting. A basketball player on the Jewish Community Center team, he was a graduate of Allentown High and was working as a riveter at a structural steel company when he joined the Army two years ago. His father. Jacob Max, a former boxer, is a member of the Allentown fire department. William's brother, Julius. is now on duty spmewhere in North Africa. Cpl. Edward Chitlik. U.S.M.C. 24. of Milwaukee, Wis., has received the Silver Star for "conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity during action against the Japanese forces in the Solomon Islands." A private first class at the time, Chitlik went through heavy enemy shell fire and remained in great danger to set up two telephone wires, thus restoring communications between headquarters and the front. For this action, he was personally cited by the Secretary of the Navy. Pvt. Ralph Lewin. 28, of New York City, was killed in action in North Africa. He was in service three years. S Sgt. Irvin Singer. 26. of Reading, Pa., an airman, who died as a result of wounds received in action in the Southwest Pacific, has been posthumously awarded the Purple Heart. 1st Lt Allan Cotler. 24. of Brooklyn, has been honored with the Distinguished Flying Cross for "extraordinary achievement while participating in 200 hours of operational flight missions in the Southwest Pacific area." Sgt. Alton Lipkin. 29, of Minneapolis, Minn., an infantryman in the recent heavy fighting on Northwest New Guinea, has been awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action. Sgt. Lipkin was with a squad manning a machine gun nest in the face of heavy enemy fire. One of the squad, hit by Jap bullets, fell beyond the protection of the small barricade set up by the Americans. Sgt. Lipkin, leaning over, crawled into the Jap line of fire to rescue the wounded man. Lipkin pulled the soldier to safety, despite the gravest danger to himself, according to the citation. In one of Sgt. Lipkin's recent letters home he wrote that he had received "minor shrapnel wounds" about his face during another New Guinea battle. Devoting This Entire Page to the Efforts of Army-Nary Committee. Made Possible Through the Co-Operation of BARCO'S MEN'S SHOP 245 East Flagler Street B. E. BRONSTON, Realtor 605 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach COWEN'S SHOE STORE 155 E. Flagler St. — 822 Lincoln Rd. DIXIE SPORTSWEAR CO. 2119 If. W. Miami Court FIXZIT SYSTEMS, Plumbers 1114 N. E. 2nd Avenue FLORIDA LINEN SERVICE 100 N. W. 20th Street FLORIDA WHOLESALE GRO. CO. 92 N. E. 28th Street LAND-O-SUN DAIRIES. Inc 101 Alton Road MIAMI MILL WORK & LUMBER CO. 535 N. W. 11th Street MIAMI PLUMBING SUPPLY CO. 2160 N. W. 27th Avenue MIAMI WHOLESALE CORP. 118 N. W. 1st Avenue MIAMI BOTTLED GAS, Inc. 1701 N. W. 7th Avenue NATIONAL BRANDS, Inc. 690 N. W. 13th Street NANKIN'S SHOE STORE 159 East Flagler Street WM. RUBIN & SON LUGGAGE 8r JEWELRY 31 N. Miami Avenue SOUTHEASTERN SALESMEN'S CARAVAN Langford Building STANDARD WHOLESALE GROCERY CO. 149 N. E. 10th Street MONTEFIORE SELIG WILLIAM D. SINGER SUNG AS CO. 1100 West Flagler Street WEST FLAGLER KENNEL CLUB West Flagler St. at 37th Avenue WOMETCO THEATRES Mitchell Wolfson Sydney Merer



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if> e Je wist) Florid!iai in CTORY BUY UNITBD •TATll .WAR ONDS AND STAMPS figgga Ylhie Jiewiislh UJmulty p* CTORY BUY VOLUME 16—No. 34 MIAMI. FLORIDA, FRIDAY, AUGUST 20, 1943 PRICE TEN CENTS l-J [ y. HUG. 29 New York (JTA)—The headquarters of the American Jewish Conference announced that the conference will open Sunday afternoon, August 29, and will conclude on Thursday, September 2. The principal speakers at the opening session will be Henry Monsky and Dr. Stephen S. Wise. At the opening session, a recommendation will be made for the election of a general committee of 50 to 55 members to serve as a committee on committees, rules, procedure and co-ordination throughout the sessions. Further recommendations will include election of a praesidium of 14 members, of which 10 are to be named by the various groups at the conference on the basis of one member in the praesidium for every 50 delegations, and four members at large. In order to assure that all the committees which are to be elected for the consideration of the various issues of the conference shall adequately represent the membership of the conference, a system of proportionate representation will be recommended. Delegates will be given an opportunity to designate their affiliations v*Mb any of the existing groups or with groups that may be formed or to state that 'designation is reserved." "The tear expressed in some sections of the press that the American Jewish Conference will devote its deliberations and interest entirely to post-war problems and will disregard the immediate rescue program is shown to be completely unjustified, as a result of the proposed appointment of a special committee, consisting of from 35 to 50 members, which will consider all problems related to rendering immediate help and rescue to the European Jews," the announcement said. The executive has decided to extend to the accredited representatives of Canadian. Central and South American Jewry an invitation to attend the conference as guests. INF OF AMERICA SENDS $500,000 TO PALESTINE New York (WNS)—The sum of $500,000 was cabled by the Jewish National Fund of America to Palestine for new land acquisition, Dr. Israel Goldstein, president of the Jewish National Fund of America, announced today. This represents one of the largest single remittances made in recent years. A total of $3,451.006.74 has been remitted by the Fund since October 1, 1942. In announcing the remittance, Dr. Goldstein stated that there has been an increase of over 40% in the income from the traditional sources. It was also announced that the Jewish National Fund has raised over $1,000,000,000 from its traditional fund raising program. FIKALDETAILSARE BOND SALES TOTAL Washington (WNS) — B'nai B'rith topped the $100,000,000 mark in war bond sales on Aug. 1st with a total of $112,500,000. enough to pay for an armada of more than 300 Flying Fortresses, as a result of the successful culmination of a 70-day bond drive by the Women's Supreme Council of B'nai B'rith during which time the B'nai B'rith women sold $13,397,000 worth, making their total since January ist $19,450,000 Henry Monsky, president of B'nai B'rith and chairman of its National War Service Committee, announced here today. This special campaign, designed to sell enough bonds to pay for 500 pieces of fighting equipment. was directed by Mrs. Benjamin Samuels of Chicago. FOR CONVOCATION Final details are being completed for the annual convocation of the Federation of Florida B'nai B'rith Lodges which will take place here on Labor Day weekend with the Versailles Hotel on Miami Beach as headquarters. Louis Ossinsky, president of the State Federation from Daytona, and Barney J. Cohen, prominent in the Federation activities from Orlando spent this past week-end in Miami conferring with the local committee on arrangements. Dr. Abram L. Sachar, national director of Hillel, will headline the program of prominent speakers and military figures that will make their appearance at the gathering. District officers will all be present to participate. Reservations for the two-day meet, Sunday and Monday, Sept. 5th and 6th, are being received from the entire state. Local residents are invited to spend the week-end at the beach hotel and attend the convention which will formally open Saturday evening. The B'nai B'rith office, phone 3-6391. is in charge of reservation details, which must be made early because of limited room and banquet facilities. NAZIS KILLED MILLIONS OF IEWS IN EUROPE Geneva (WNS)—Neutral observers who have made a study of the Jewish situation in Nazioccupied Europe, revealed here this week that approximately 4,000,000 Jews lost their lives through massacres and executions in the various countries occupied by the Nazis. This, next perhaps to the losses sustained by Russia, is the largest figure of dead suffered by any one people in Europe. The general impression hitherto has been that the Nazis and their satellites exterminated approximately 2,000.000 Jews. Simultaneously, it was reported that representatives of several Agencies are holding conferences on post-war Jewish problems. ARAB TALKS ON FEDERATION APPEAR FRUITLESS JEWISH COMMUNITY PAPER IN TUNISIA IS REPUBLISHED SOLDIERS AT WAILING WALL CONCERTO FOR HARP AND ORCHESTRA'S MUSIC HOUR A performance of international niusical interest will be the American premiere of Reinhold Chore's Concerto for Harp and Orchestra to be played by the NBC Symphony, with Edward Vito as harpist, on the General Motors Symphony of the Air's all-Russian program on Sunday, August 22 (5:00 to 6:00 p. m.. EWT) over the NBC network. Orchestral transcriptions by Frank Black, conductor, of two Preludes by the late, beloved Rachmaninoff, and the brilliant I'oJovetzian Dances from Borodin's "Prince Igor," orchestrated by Rimsky-Korsakov, are other works listed for performance. Rachmaninoff will be represented by his famous Prelude in C Sharp Minor and the G Minor Prelude. GOVERNOR NAMES STATE CHAIRMAN OF WAR FUND Jerusalem (WNS) — Hundreds of Jewish soldiers serving in the Allied forces now stationed in Palestine visited the Wailing Wall in Jerusalem on Tisha B'ab. London (JTA)—The Revue Juive, Jewish community paper in Tunisia, resumed publication in Sfax this week." The report added that a number of Arab anti-Jewish papers in Tunisia have ceased publication. RADIO HOUR Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan of Temple Israel will be the guest speaker on the Rabbinical Association Hour at 9:15 a. m. on Sunday, oxer Station WQAM. GETS OFRAREMTINCS Jerusalem (JTA)—A collection of 220 Jewish marriage contracts from Italy, dating from the beginning of the 16th to the middle of the 19th centuries has been presented to the Jewish National and University Library in Jerusalem by Dr. Ephraim Chamitzer of Haifa. All the manuscripts are written on parchment and beautifully illuminated. This is Dr. Chamitzer's second gift to the library. The first, made some ten years ago. consisted of a rare collection of Hcbraica and Orientalia, which included some very rare works. Both collections came from the library of the donor's lather, the late Dr. Mordechai Ben-David Chamit/.c r, a noted Jewish scholar and Orientalist of Leipzig. Jerusalem (JTA) — Informed Arab circles here indicated that the conferences last week in Cairo between the Egyptian and the Irakian foreign ministers on the question of the proposed formation of a federation of Arab countries, including Palestine, have brought disappointing results. The prospect for the creation of a political Pan-Arab federation in the near future are not bright, these Arab leaders say. Considerable opposition against such political unification exists in the various Arab states, and there seems to be little possibility of overcoming this opposition at present. Arab leaders, however, emphasized that the outlook for cultural—and in some cases even economic—cooperation between the Arab countries is brighter as a result of the Cairo conference. At a conference of leaders of the Jewish Socialist party in Pal1 cstine held at Tel Aviv. David Ben-Gurion. laborite leader, em' phasized that the political attitude of the Jews in Palestine may be summarized in the slogan: i "Help the war as if there were no White Paper, and fight the White paper as if there were no war." E. Dobkin. head of the immi'gration department of the Jewish Agency, addressing the conference, urged the need of a bureau to devote itself to devising work opportunities for all the Jews expected to arrive from Central and Eastern Europe. JEWISH PHILOSOPHER DEAD London (JTA) — Dr. Boris Markhatsh. well-known RussianJewish philosopher and bibliographer, was killed in action on the Russian front, it is reported. AMERICAN NAMED TO REFUGEE COMMITTEE V.M.H.A. CONCLUDES FIFTH ANNUAL HOME CAMP,MOST SUCCESSFUL SINCE INCEPTION The Y. M. H. A. Home Camp closed its fifth and most successful summer session with an elaborate revue and closing exercise Sunday afternoon before an audience exceeding 250. Aside from increasing its average daily attendance to 85 children, almost double the attendance of previous years, the Home Camp gave the children a more interesting and diversified program than ever before. This was accomplished despite critical conditions and many obstacles confronting the organization. This year the government inaugurated a plan to provide nurseries and kindergartens for children of workers and others and the Y. M. H. A. helped this project by offering all of their camp facilities to the government for this purpose without any charge. An average of 30 children attend daily. This is an all year project and will continue to use the Y. M. H. A. as its home. The Home Camp was conducted on a non-sectarian basis, children of all faiths having attended. Scholarships were provided for those unable to pay. Many new features were odded during this past season. Because of the inability to take the children to the beach, outdoor showers were provided on the grounds. In addition to tin many projects provided to entertain and instruct the children, including arts and crafts, athletics, games, tap and ballet dancing, outstanding projects this year were thi' making of model airplanes and the setting up of a miniatuYe Indian village and a model airport. Wholesome and nourishing luncheons were served the children each day. Under the general direction of Maurice Grossman, executive di(CONTINUED ON PACE 3) Washington (JTA)—The appointment of Patrick Malin. a former member of the State Department, to the post of vice-director of the Intergovernmental Committee on Refugees, was announced by the State Department. The selection of Mr. Malin, who. as the State Department noted in its announcement, "has had experience in refugee matters in Europe." was made at a meeting of the executive committee oi the Intergovernmental Committee held in London this month "to consider the rccom[mendations of the Bermuda ConI ference." i Mr. Malin has been one of the I key men in ex-Gov. Lehman's • Office of Foreign Relief and Rehabilitation Operations. Gov. Spessard L. Holland has appointed Horace F. Cordes. Burdine official, as state quota chairman of the Florida War Fund. Inc. Florida's quota will be a share <>f $120,000,000 to be sought as a national goal of the National War Fund Appeal, of which Dr. John J. Tigert is state campaign Chairman. GROUP OF Y. M. H. A. HOME CAMPERS AT A LUNCHEON GET-TOGETHER RUMANIAN IEWS SPUR PLAN FOR SPECIAL UNIT London (JTA)—The question of the formation of a Rumanian unit within the British Army is now under discussion by the British military authorities, it was learned here. A plan for such a contingent is being considered as as result of the number of Rumanian Jewish refugees now serving in the British armed forces. MEETING DENOUNCES ATROCITI ES T O JEWS Berne (WNS)—Catholic circles here disclosed this week that the Conference of German-Catholic Bishops, held at Fulda on August 17, adopted a resolution denouncing Nazi atrocities against Jews. Fulda is a city in central western Germany. Some time ago German-Catholic priests held a conference there and adopted a resolution condemning Nazi antiSemitism. That resolution, however, was a mildly worded one.



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PAGE SIX +Jewlsti Fkrlcttan Ymm w •MMMMMfMWMMWI ^^^^^^^^^^^^WMVMVWWW THE Y. M. H. A. NOTES By HARRY SCHWARTZ %  -*--^^^*-*-*-*-* .„. njyj^ Home Camp Last Sunday afternoon, the closing exercises of the 1943 Home Camp took place amidst a capacity audience. For a detailed account of the activities of the Summer Home Camp, we invite you to read the article elsewhere in this issue. The affair Sunday afternoon was opened by a few remarks from the executive director and the program proceeded, as follows: The Doll Shop, with the following cast: Naomi Lederman, Francine August. Beverly Chester. Rema Rubenstein. Judy Sterling and Elinor Weiner as mechanical dolls; Gale Ackcrman and Linda Kaplan as colored Mammy Dolls; Marjory Wetstein as a China Doll; Nancy Pepper as a Rhumba Doll; Estelle Greenberg and Joan Wilck as Mexican Dolls; Maxine Bender and Jerry Schulinan as Ballet Dolls: Susan Tvlcr as a Singing Doll: Gertrude Sugarman as the owner of the Doll Shop; Kenneth Myers. Felice Bobson. Judith Myers and MuiiStahl as the Customers: Remarks by Mrs. Lewis Chester; a S Shoe Dance by Maxine Bender, Gertrude Sugarman, and Ellen Beck; remarks by Ben Goldman, executive director of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation; skit, "Excuse Me." with the following cast: Felice Bobson, Maxine Bender, Gertrude Sugarman, Estelle Greenberg. Dolores Simons. Pearl Kaplan, Jerry Schulman. Kenneth Myers and Stanley Balish: awarding of prizes, by Mrs. Joseph Schaffer. camp supervisor: grand finale with all the Campers in the cast; the closing of the show was the singing of Hatikvah and the Star Spangled Banner by the entire audience. Bowling A meeting of the Y. M. H. A. Bowling League was held at the "Y" gymnasium on Mondav evening, August 16. Prizes were awarded as follows: First team. Ted Bramson, captain; Sam Badanes. Sid Kaplan. Robert Bodin. Ed Van Daiimi, and Eugene Weiss. Second team: Sol Weinkle, captain; AJLReisman, Frank Rnse. Larry Grossberg. Harrv Moss and Sam Welder. High individual game. Martv Milstein High individual set, Harold BerkIMA HELPS REFUGEE WOMEN FIGHT FOR VICTORY ON HOME AND WAR FRONTS PALM BEACH NOTES JEWISH FLORIDIAN OFFICE, 226 S. OLIVE STREET IN THE FOX BUILDING MRS. MARY SCHREHNICX R.prkMiitcrtiv4> Of interest to many local friends is the marriage of Ens. Moses Schupler. USNR. and Miss Lillian Dave. The couple were united in marriage at the home Of the bridegroom's parents. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Schupler. 3101 Washington Dd. Dr. Carl N. Herman, rabbi of Temple Beth Israel, officated. Guests included a brother of the bridegroom. Pvt. Cv Schupler. of Camp Forrest. Tenn.j his sister and brother-in-law. Mr. and Mrs. Phil Bulesky; and the bride's sister and brother-in-law. Mr. and Mrs. Irving Moss. Through the fund* raised by ihe United Jewish Appeal for Refugees, Overseas Needs and Palestine, Jewish refugee women have been enlisted in the fight for freedom on the home and war fronts in many parts of Ihe world. Photos show (upper left) a scene in a child care institution in Switzerland maintained by the Joint Distribution Committee. A young orphan of the Nazi storm of hate is being fed by a refugee woman supervisor. (Upper right) Home on leave from service on the Middle Eastern front, this Jewish woman soldier of Palestine is planting a tree in a new settlement established by the United Palestine Appeal. (Right) Here in the United States the newcomers are being retrained by the National Refugee Service for the post of nurd's aide to help man the health stations on the home front. Sam Goldman of Florida Avenue has returned aftei a stay of several weeks at Bay Pines Hospital where he was recuperating. Mrs. M. Schrebnick has completed her tour of duty as Bond and Stamp Saleslady at one of the local Five and Ten Cent Stores. Tom Smith and family are spending their summer vacation in Philadelphia. Mr. and Mrs. Leo Rader. Belle Glade, were visitors in the community recently. Far &• lt hi Dairy Products Miss Rose Goodmark, an instructor in the Miami schools, is spending some time with her parents. Mr. and Mrs. J. Goodmark. WEST PALM BEACH MILK—CREAM—ICE CREAM Mrs. R. s. Wells has been the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Chris Erneston, 217 Almeria Kd.. while here to attend the marriage of tier son. Lt. Dail F. Wells, and Miss Elinore Erneston. She left for St. Petersburg for a ten day stay, after which sue will return to her IK. me in Kilgore, Texas. Miss Cathryn Erneston has returned from a ten day visit with friends at Bartow. Jocelyn H. Lee. an officer in the U. S. Merchant Marine, is .spending a few (lavs with his parlents. Mr. and Mrs Harry A. Lee, 1306 Valencia Rd. own/. First hiKh average, Marty Milst. in, George Rachlin, J. LeIblang, Sol Wemkle and Sam Badanes. Most improved bowler, Ruben Lubel. The Bond Tournament was won by Hv Oren. who received a War Bond. Second place went to Ruben Lubel and third place to Harold Berkowil/. A committee corrfbosed of Marty Milstein, Larry Grossberg and Hy Oren was appointed to adjust all differences that might arise among the various members of the Bowling League. The new season will open next Monday night and all members desiring to be present are requested to attend at the Palace Bowling Alleys. Youth Activities Parents of children over the age <>t H years who desire to send them to the "Y" for various activities are requested to register at the Y. M. H. A. office. Classes of various kinds and play activities will commence immediately after Labor Day. There will be supervised play and activities of all kinds for groups of all ages, but in order for a child to attend, he must be registered first. 11th Annual Dance Larry Grossberg was appointed chairman of the 11th Annual Dance of the Y. M. H. A. to beheld some time in October. LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Chapter 17437 A 6333 I NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN THAT '•'• Urlffln holder of Stata and County Tax Certificate No. 18001 lathe 7th day of July. A. I >. 1941, hasi filed Name in my office, and baa man* application foi a tax dead to Is* le thereon. Bald Certificate • mbrace* the following described propIII> In the County of Dade, Bute ol I' loiida, tow it: Lots 23 and 14, Block •!. Swings Addition, ii sui... iMat Book %  % %  Page ISC, in the County of Bade, State of Florida. The assessment of aald property under tinsaid certificate was In the name of: Unknown. Unless N.iid certificate sh.-iii he redeemed according to law, the propertj described therein will be S<>I. ]943 ABRAHAM HINDER As Exei utor of the Last win and Testament ..f Morrla Bindei I %  •ceased. First publication on August 20, 1943 HAROLD KA8SEWITZ Attorney for Abraham Binder, Executor, a SO-27 9 s-10 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HKRKIiY OIVBN that the undersigned will register with tinClerk "f the Circuit Court in and for Dade County, Florida, the rt-ti— tlous name, MIAMI HOTEL. IS3 N \\ 1st Avenue, Miami, Florida, undt-i which we are engaged in bufifness DAVID UROWN KAY UROWN T/M-*0 S/6-13-20 NERVINE •tiua r| O TKNBK Tsnaioa. Gt it .1 "• —if m dlrwtoa. WHKN J l.r rsis. Nrli. IN COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT Dado I'nunty. F'lorida No13302 Re: Estate of LOUISA DAY JAY Deceased NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE APPLICATION FOR FINAL DISCHARGE flu,!".',','' if ".• reD Kiven that I have nied my final report ami iietltWu-for ffl**fl"|i M A-lmhils'tl^o, of the estate ; .f LOUISA DAY JAY deceased; and that on the 24th dav of orabbi \\ P. BUANTON. County Judge of Had.County, Florida, for approval of said final repbrt ad f r t\?, i--J H i" hi,i ; ,! V. 5f, AamlmVratw of Cea-.ii I A AY JAY dr This 21st day of Julv. 1943 MAX R S-ILV,-^*'^ '" JAY %  7/2l 3o i';6 > :i3% A dm "" r -" r NOTICE FOR APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED File No. 36722 Notlcis hereby given that U> 0. Kinder, a married Woman, holdei %  • assignee of City of Miami Tax Certificate Numbered 17088, dated the Mli pay ol June. A. ]>. 1938 has Mrd said Certificate In my office, and has made application for tax deed to issue thereon In accordance with law Said < ••! tiflr.it.embraces the following described property, situated in D d< i .unity, Florida, to-wlt: l-ot IS, Hlock 11. Orapelatid Revised. Plat Itook 3. Page 1>6. In Hie City of Miami, Count! Ol pade, state ..f Florida. i he assesament of said propertv under the Certificate Issued was in the name of Unknown. Unless said Certificate shall he redeemed according to law, tax deed will issue there'"' .'"' the 2".th day of August. A I' ..Dated this 21st day of July. A. DliM.l. F: I! I.KATHERMAN. Clerk of circuit Court. Dade County, Florida. By N. c STERRBTT, D. C. (i Ircult Court Seal) ./23-30 X-6-i:i-20 ..NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersign,,! will register with the Clerk .,. the circuit Court in ami for Dade County, Florida the n titi, .? name, THE JEWISH Y -\i t i<, uunder which I am ..n^Tu*: 8/20-27 J./S-S0-1T" RKI K S,,, KT NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS M NAME LAW NOTICE 18 HERF.BY OIVE.V that the undersigned will register with the Clerk of the Circuit Court in and '"' %  DadefCounty, F'Ueida.. the flctlUoue name. |:Ro\vN HOTELS, Miami. F'lorida. under, which we %  re engaged in business. DAVID BROWN KAY BROWN 7/888/g.lS-M-2T "''' er NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS M NAME LAW NolICK is HKHFJltY tJIVEN that the nuclei signed will register with ihe Clerk .,f the Circuit Court In and for Hade County. Florida, the fictitious name. MIAMI KOSHER MEAT IM|'|/|'KY MARKFrr, 2011 SI Ws

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PAGE FOUR +Jewish ncrktfon FRIDAY, AUGUST 20. 1943 -TIDBITS FROM EVERYWHEREPLANT AND MAIN 21 S. W. SECOND P. O. BOX 2973 OFFICES AVENUE PHONE 2-1141 FRED K. SHOCHET, Managing Editor SUBSCRIPTION One Year, $2.00 Six Months, $1.00 Entered as Second Class Matter July 4, 1940, at the Post Office of Miami, Florida, under the Act of March 3, 1879 MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY. AUGUST 20, 1943 AB 19, 5703 VOLUME 16 NUMBER 34 GLOBAL CONSCIOUSNESS The stories of the presence of large numbers of Allied soldiers, stationed in Palestine, at the religious services held at the Wailing Wall of the Temple in Jerusalem, are of more than casual significance. We shall find that at the end of this war. many American soldiers returning from the Near East will have acquired a living knowledge of conditions in Palestine and in the Near East. From the Zionist standpoint, this will be of no little import. What is true about Palestine is of course true of all parts of the world, though the presence of American soldiers in Palestine undoubtedly will be of more significance, as far as the Jews are concerned. The fact of the matter is that we have become globally conscious. Isolationism has been challenged not only by the fact that we are embroiled in the world struggle itself, but by the fact that Americans in great numbers are now seeing all parts of the world. You can't live all to yourself after you have seen other parts of the world. In an abstract and yet at the same time very real sense, to see or even to hear very often of a country is to become linked with it. To al of us, stay-at-homes even, the map of the world has become vastly more familiar. We have become educated in world geography by the battles taking place in the world—and this education in its deepest sense is not merely a matter of names and words—it has broadened our horizons and linked us to the destinies of the world. SUMNER WELLES The State Department and the nation can ill afford to lose the services of Sumner Welles. Reports, denied by Secretary of State Cordell Hull, have had it that Mr. Welles was slated for a "roving" ambassadorial post as a means of removing him from the State Department. If such a step is actually contemplated and is executed, it will be a severe blow to the cause of constructive liberalism which Mr. Welles has so upheld during his service as Under Secretary of State. An aristocrat by birth and training, yet a realist and fundamentally a liberal through reasoned conviction, Welles has blazoned an enlightened path in the field of international cooperation. His voice, the more impressive for its calm control and dependence on reason rather than passion, has been consistently lifted in support of those great ideals embodied in President Roosevelt's enunciation of the Four Freedoms. If not spectacular, he has been nonetheless effective in his difficult task —a task made more difficult by the gathering strength of the forces of reaction in Washington. For it is no easy thing in these days for a man in a key position such as Welles occupies to hew to a strictly democratic line in the realm of international affairs. Every man of any prominence who raises his voice in support of the "Century of the Common Man" ideal becomes fair game for the wolves of reaction. If Mr. Welles, despite all denials, is removed from his post, repercussions of that action may be vast; they will reach into every United Nations capital, where it may be interpreted as one more significant sign that Washington is being pushed relentlessly back on the road to isolationism as opposed to international collaboration which alone can lead to true world peace. And it will indeed be one more tragic indication that the peace is being lost even as the war is being won. Mudfy eonpdentlcd By PHINEAS I. BIRONVisit Any Cemetery and you will see pathetic sights. Families completely torn apart scattered among strangers—all because the head of the family THOUGHT he had provided properly. The only sure way to keep the entire family together forever, is by having your own private family plot. And having your plot in Mount Nebo assures you of this protection in the finest surroundings at a reasonable cost. Only a small down payment is required ior each grave desired. You are then the complete owner of a beautiful plot at the entrance to Mount Nebo. For further information with no obligation/ phone 3-5132 Florida s Most Beautiful Burial Estates MOUNT NEBO ONLY TEN MINUTES FROM THE HEART OF MIAMI West Flagler Street at 54th Avenue BUSINESS OFFICE 1014 OLYMPIA BUILDING A VISIT WILL CONVINCE YOU YOU SHOULD KNOW The August 1st issue of "The Ghetto Speaks." issued by the American Representation of the General Jewish Workers' Union of Poland, publishes a report called "Tremblinka Death Camp in Poland" .. Now we've read all kinds of descriptions of Nazi atrocities against Jews This report, however, is the most realistic story ever published anywhere, telling how Jews who were shifted to Poland from other countries are asphyxiated wholesale Every American soldier should read this story before going into battle against Hitler's hordes ... If he does, we promise you that he won't take any German prisoners alive Pretty soon the Axis powers will begin to wonder whether they didn't start something they couldn't finish when they called the present conflict a "Jewish war" Now it's 2nd Lt. Pincus Pesso of Brooklyn who made the headlines by leading an American patrol to the end of the Munda airfield, thus ending the Battle of Munda Among the wartime visitors in New York a couple of weeks ago were a dozen or so Greek sailors, here for a wellearned rest after a spell of service with an Allied fleet They found Gothem hospitable, with everybody ready to give them a good time ... But there was one place they liked best of all—so much that they went there daily and could hardly be pried away for the other entertainment provided for them And that place was the Army and Navy Club of the Jewish Welfare Board. JEWISH NEWS Don't take any bets on the presidency of the Zionist Organization of America being a closed matter It's true that Rabbis Israel Goldstein and Abba Hillel Silver have come to an understanding But ii anything is going to interfere with Silver's taking over the leadership of Zionist political affairs in actual fact, and not merely in name, the Silver delegates will take the bit in their teeth and run away at the convention—and Silver may find himself elected, willy-nilly .. Reports to the contrary notwithstanding, and although delegates from various parts of the country are already en route to the American Jewish Conference, that conclave may yet be postponed at the eleventh hour, or curtailed Which is the agency that is cashing in big for palming off free publicity about Henry Ford on the Anglo-Jewish press? Maybe it's because Zionist Herman Shulman was the lawyer who successfully defended the Pepsi-Cola people in the name suit instituted against them by the Coca-Cola Company some time ago—but, anyway, a recent ad of the Coca-Cola "global" series showed American soldiers sharing their cdres with a tribe of Arabs, and titled the picture "How Amenams Make Pals in Palestine." PUTTING NAZIS IN THEIR PLACE The story in these parts, supposed to be straight out ol the mouths of guards in charge of Nazi prisoners, is that the Germans stare incredulously when they steam into New York Harbor and see the famed Manhattan skyline intact seems that for the past year all good Nazis have believed (because Hitler told them so) that the Luftwaffe had razed our skyscrapers One of the things Nazi prisoners like least is the search to which they are subjected when they're taken captive And officers, particularly, are very much annoyed when the search is conducted by mere privates of Uncle Sam's Army ... So, just like that, the American officer in charge of a certain section of the Tunisian theatre is said to have piked Jewish privates to do the searching And our Jewish boys got an additional kick out of the proceedings by telling the haughty Aryans about their "race," and then watching their faces grow still longer. STAGE AND SCREEN ... A new high in something or other was set in Hollywood recently when a draftee was inducted into the Army even though he was wearing an authentic Nazi uniform Yes, the draftee was an actor who couldn't be bothered changing his clothes before reporting to the Army Soon to be made into a motion picture is Marcia Davenport's "Valley of Dec* ion," best-selling novel of many month's standing • •"* Davenport, you remember, is the daughter of the late singer Alma Gluck Also expected to be filmed is Howard Fasts "Citizen Tom Paine," while Rose Feld's character "Sophie Halenczik" will be making her bow on Broadway before long Sleeping in the open fields off one of America's main highways not long ago was none other than Luise Rainer. stage and screen and Academy Award winner • *h .^ casion was Luise's transfer of herself and personal %  *?' from California to the East She got the gas for the trip j>y a special dispensation—but for five of the fifteen nights sn and her secretary were on the road they could get no sleeping accommodations. ABOUT PEOPLE Now we can tell you that Pierre van Paassen's new book will be caUed "The Forgotten Ally" ... It will deal with ^ Jewish problem, with special emphasis on Palestine • • ^ Paassen's new volume is so chockful of dynamite that it blow some British colonial officials sky-high S. Weuipjj • one of America's most distinguished Yiddish poets, P roU „ announces his greatest creation: His wife, Zita, has gi %  birth to a daughter—who has been named Nechemle • • the Middle East to entertain our boys are Comedian I J Benny and harmonica virtuoso Larry Adler Edwar Robinson of the screen, who already can converse m languages, and broadcast in half a dozen of them *J*j. BBC when he was in England, is now adding to hi <*<**" plishments by learning Russian.