The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00753

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
4*Jewish FionJian
CBga Yfrie Jewuslh Hi nuty
3Ajl juxri*Jk. VJjudkSLy
H
VOLUME 16No. 30
MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JULY 23, 1943
PRICE TEN CENTS
TROOPS BE KEPT
[
Jerusalem (WNS)A resolution
protesting the sending of Pales-
tine Jewish troops abroad and a
demand that the Allies recognize
the Jewish people as full-fledged
Allies in the war against the Axis
were the high points of the 50th
convention of the Histradruth,
Palestine Federation of Labor,
which concluded this week.
The resolution on the use of
Palestine soldiers in other coun-
tries was passed following an
address by David Ben-Gurion,
chairman of the executive of the
Jewish Agency for Palestine,
who stated that Jewish men and
women recruited in Palestine
should be used only for service
within the country.
The demand for recognition of
the Jews as an equal partner of
the United Nations was voiced
by David Remez, general secre-
tary of the Histadruth. Mr. Remez
also thanked American and Brit-
ish labor for their support of
Zionist aspirations in Palestine.
PROTOCOLS OF ELDERS
OF ZION NOW IN ITALY
Cairo (WNS)The Ital-
ian Ministry of Education
announced this week that
the "Protocols of the Elders
of Zion" will be taught as a
regular required subject in
all schools in Italy, it is re-
ported here by reliable
sources.
The same informant also
revealed that the money
spent by the Ministry of
Education to have the Pro-
tocols translated into Ital-
ia 1 was raised by a special
levy on the Jewish popula-
tion of Italy.
TO PRINT HEBREW BIBLE
FIRST TIME IN HISTORY
BEACH TAKE SITE
SOVIET DELEGATES
SPEAK IN BOSTON;
GIN RECEPTION
Boston (WNS)A plea for
more action now by the United
Nations to help Russia was voiced
here by Eugene D. Kisselev. con-
sul general of the U S. S. R. at
New York. Speaking at the pub-
lic reception in Symphony Hall
honoring the official delegation
from Soviet Russia now touring
this country. Prof. Solomon
Michoels and Lieut. Col. Itzik
Feffer.
An enthusiastic audience of
approximately 2,600 persons at-
tended the meeting sponsored by
the Greater Boston reception
committee of the Jewish Council
for Russian War Relief and the
Committee for Jewish Writers
and Artists.
Prof. Michoels, people's artist
of Soviet Russia, chairman of the
Russian Jewish Anti Fascist
Committee and director and star
of the Moscow Jewish Art Thea-
tre, said in his speech:
"The Red Army is an Anti-
Fascist Army. The victory of the
Red Army will be a death blow
to anti-Semitism, which becomes
the axis of the Nazi plot to en-
slave Germany, Europe and the
world. In this war against Fas-
cism enslavement, our army is
joined by the great armies of our
allies. Together, and only to-
gether, shall we achieve victory."
Lieut. Col. Itzik Feffer, Rus-
sian poet, said the war on Hitlcr-
ism is not only a war of militatry
weapons but also of "reason and
morality."
On the day before the meeting
Prof. Michoels and Lieut. Col.
reffer were the guests of honor
The newly formed Y. M. and
W. H. A. of Miami Beach moved
into action last week, when at
a meeting of its executive com-
mittee, it approved the "dura-
tion" location of the proposed re-
creational and character building
facility.
Harry Zuckcrnick, serving as
chairman untii permanent offi-
cers are elected, presented a pro-
posal of the building committee
through Harry Sirkin and the
site suggested, after inspection
by the committee, the corner of
Collins Ave. and Lincoln Rd.,
was unanimously approved. Ne-
gotiations were made to use the
property for the duration.
The location is directly on the
ocean with a water frontage of
350 feet and extending 150 feet
to Collins Ave. Besides a large
lobby which will be used as an
auditorium, the building on the
property has some fifteen rooms
that will be used. The property
was secured at a minimum rental
through the personal interest of
the owners in the Y project. For-
merly known as the Mansion the
building will be renovated and
cleaned through voluntary ef-
forts. Youth organizations in-
cluding the Beach A. Z. A. will
participate.
Jerusalem (J T A) The
first Bible in Hebrew char-
acters ever to be printed in
Palestine will be issued
here soon, it was disclosed
this week by Dr. Judah L.
Magnes. president of the
Hebrew University.
Palestine, the land in
which most of the Bible
was written, has never pro-
duced a version printed in
Hebrew. The first section
of the Bible to be printed in
Hebrew characters was
published at Bologna, Italy,
in 1477.
ALLIES ANNOUNCE
TO ASSUME DUTIES
Mr. Ben Goldman arrived here
this week to assume his duties as
executive director of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation. Com-
ing here from Buffalo, Mr. Gold-
man served as executive director
of the United Jewish Fund and
director of fund-raising of Jewish
Federation in that city.
At present he is acquainting
himself with the local setup and
will meet with the committees of
Federation to continue the pres-
ent program of the organization.
A native of Cleveland, Mr.
Goldman has lived in Buffalo
since January, 1940, when he be-
came executive director oi the
Jewish Welfare Society. He
served in this capacity until
February 1942, when he assumed
the posts with Federation and
the United Jewish Fund.
Mr. Goldman was associated
with the National Refugee Ser-
vice in New York City in 1938
and 1939, serving as resettlement
secretary, field secretary and ad-
ministrative assistant. During
this period he organized the
Emigre Service Bureau of New
Jersey with state offices in Ne-
wark. From 1933 to 1938 he was
assistant director of the Eden-
wald School for Boys in New
York. He has also held positions
in group work, recreational and
child care agencies.
Mr. Goldman attended the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin and Western by General Sir Harold Alexand-
Reserve University. He did post- er. who has been named military
graduate work at the Graduate | governor of Sicily, was issuance
School for Jewish Social Work' of a statement announcing that
where he held the Lewis J. Warn- j all la
er fellowship. He received his persons Decause oi race, creed or of organizing the forthcoming
Master of Social Service degree'color were annulled and that the American Jewish Conference
trom this school. position of all established relig-
Among his professional affilia- ious institutions would be upheld,
tions, Mr. Goldman is a member j A special squad of "Black
of the executive committee of the t Shirts" rounded up all Jews in
New York State Conference of Sicily soon after the fall of Tun-
Social Work, a member of the isia and deported them to an un-
known destination, according to
reports reaching Lisbon.
The "kidnaping" of 1.500 Jew-
London (WNS)All anti-Jew-
ish laws have been abolished in
the section of Sicily held by the
Allied armies and similar action
will be taken in the rest of the
island as soon as it is occupied
by the Anglo-American forces, it
was reported this week in the
British press.
One of the first actions taken
TEL mil SHOW TO
CEMENT TIES OF
JEWISH PEOPLES
Tel Aviv (WNS)An exhi-
bition aimed at cementing the
ties between the Jews of Pales-
tine and the people of the Soviet
Union was opened here this week
at ceremonies attended by many
notables including Mayor Rokach
of Tel Aviv and leaders of the
Histadruth and other Jewish in-
stitutions.
Entitled "U. S. S. R.Palestine
At War," the exhibition, which
is sponsored by the Victory
League for Russia, consists of
photographs and charts showing
the progress made in Russia since
the Revolution and in Palestine
since the Balfour Declaration.
The hope that the Yishuv and
Russia can work together after
the war was voiced by Zerubavel,
representing the Histadruth at
the opening ceremonies, who
stated that "our ties with Rus-
sia are 600,000 Jewish soldiers in
the Red Army as well as our
common Jewish culture."
DIVISION OE SEATS
BY CONFERENCE IS
DECIDED UPON
New York (WNS)The execu-
ws discriminating against! tive committee which is in charge
s because oi race, creed or of organizing the forthcoming
National T e c h n i c a 1 Advisory
Committee of the National Refu-
gee Service, secretary of the Up-
which is slated to open on Aug-
ust 29, this week announced the
manner in which the 125 seats al-
loted to national membership
organizations have been divided.
Three seats each went to the
American Jewish Committee, the
American Jewish Congress, the
B'nai B'rith, the Zionist Organi-
zation of America, the Free Sons
State New York Region of the ish families who had been living
awu ieWA Fderatlons i for centuries in Sicily took place of Israel, Independent Order Brith
and Welfare Funds and consult-I late at night for fear that the I Abraham, Independent Order of
ing assoaate in the School of people of Sicily might protest Brith Sholom, Jewish National
Social Work of the University of against the removal of their Jew- Workers' Alliance, Jewish War
"/ifa d ff ^Sr- been, a,ctcve )sh nc'8hbors with whom they Veterans, Mizrachi Organizations
with the Buffalo Council of So- had been living in peace for many of America, National Counc of
poinieu io secure an executive
director for the organization, to
set up a budget and finance plan,
and to arrange planning for the
group.
cial Agencies and the Buffalo
War Council.
Prior to his leaving for Miami
years, j Young Israel, National Federa-
BuffaloPa nu Xr of iSotuUons fr?m W"a"0" V Ihoir Italian Orthodox Congregations. United
SaSS*aftsli-dunr ,nwi
tions and other community groups __________
JEWS IN DIVISION NOW
BEING FORMED IN USSR
London (WNS)Reports con-
cerning the Polish Thadeuz Kos-
ciuszko Division which is being
trained in Russia for service
against the Nazis there reveal
that six per cent of the officers
and enlisted men are Jewish, ac-
cording to dispatches from Brit-
ish correspondents in Moscow.
The correspondents write that
the new division has been re-
al an official breakfast tendered ?i^v:,'rT P?0^ rt>lc,fased
by the city of Boston. I fro"? px,lc'n Central Asia, from
Also given three seats were the
Hadassah. the Young Women's
at his leaving, and noting his ser- A*S PRINT BOOK ON Division of the American Jewish
were passed all expressing regret
at his leaving, and noting his
vice to the Buffalo commu
nity ."JEWISH OTIFSTTON" i on8ress- the Women's Supreme
of loyalty and devotion and cit-l B l & gUlgPW Council of B'nai B'rith, the Miz-
ing the affection and esteem of Istanbul (WNS) Arah le-iHor l?. en s Organization, the
the community which he merited KblW-inTa? "encyclopedia",l^'The N^*pi2ft fS
and hcldj________________on Jewish questions as a propa- .Temple> SfaSSSSSS/ttTmS f
SMAirBEACHVOTE IN a^^S^lJlSS'^
ELECTION FOR FUNDS UJ&^wj m > ittrBSK StSSf
I ported to be the editor of the en-
ing-publicity fund.
The proposition passed by a
encyclopedia among Arabs in the BrouPs- received two seats each.
| soldiers who were not evacuated vote f -250-206. City Clerk C. W. j.!' fffcj"^ && I given ^^SK**1"" w*
ITALY CALLS ABLE BODIED ^^^for^ M^le ^^rr^ amounting to Uws, Berlin said** | Th. -Uoi^electi
JEWS FOR WORK ON FORTS
Geneva (JTA)Italian author-
't'es, concerned over the success
of the Allied armies in Sicily,
nave started registering all able-
bodied Jews throughout the coun-
try for the purpose of sending
'nerti to the front for various
Kinds of defense work, it is re-
Ported in Popolo d'ltalia reach-
mg here this week.
East, and former partisans.
WARNS AGAINST INCREASE J pected to return about $68,000.
IN PMCE OF FOODSTUFFS JEW,SH r^o HOUR
Tel Aviv (JTA)A demand
that a civil commission be formed
to assist the Palestine govern-
ment to control food prices was
voiced here this week by the ex-
ecutive committee of the Histad-
ruth, Labor Federation.
--.ion board
$1 on each $1,000 valuation of as- W.RW .raiM sessed property valuation, is ex- WANS AGAINST SENDING ; ?toI_s- <*osen by organizations
PARCELS TO POLISH JEWS j tffn f.M^'nSSl^f So^
Stockholm. (JTA)-A w^inglu^^t'Sr^^rS;
The weekly Jewish Hour pro-
gram will bring its listeners Dr.
Jacob H. Kaplan speaking on
"What is a Religious Education?"
Sunday morning at 9:15 o'clock
over Station WQAM.
against sending parcels to Jews | election of delegates Of thf> 975
in Nazi-held Poland was issued delegates to be chosen by the
here this week by the Swedish i electors, 374 have been elected
General Post Office. German au- The remaining delegate is stm tn
thonties in Poland are confiscat- be chosen in Worcester Ma
in* all such packages addressed where the election has been de-
to Jews- laved because of local conations.


PAGE TWO
+JewistflcrMk*n


FRIDAY, JULY 23. 1943
SOCIAL ITEMS AND
PERSONALS
WEDDINGS
Mr. and Mrs. M. Decky. 1534
Meridian avenue, announce the
marriage of their daughter, Ger-
trude, to Lt. H. Stollerman. of
New York. The wedding took
place in New York's Temple Zion
with Rabbi Rimson officiating.
The bride was given away by
her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs.
J. Silvcrstein.
Lt. and Mrs. H. Stollerman
left New York following the cer-
emony for California where he is
stationed.
BAR MITZVAH
Esther Sief and Navigation Stu-
dent Herbert Feldman were mar-
ried at the home of Rabbi Moses
Mescheloff last Sunday. The
young couple resides in Coral
Gables.
Robert H. Goldman and Miss
Faye Epstein of Philadelphia
were married by Rabbi Moses
Mescheloff at his home last
week.
The wedding of Miss Sylvia
Sir, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Sam Sir of 811 Jefferson Ave.. to
Staff Sgt. Charles M. Freefield,
U. S. A., stationed here with the
408th training group, took place
this week at the home of the
bride's parents.
The couple plans to make its
home here while Sergeant Free-
field is stationed in this area.
ENGAGEMENT
Mr. and Mrs. 1. Oreck of Brem-
erton. Wash., announce the en-
gagement of their daughter. Lois
Miriam, to Charles A. Michaels,
ship's cook, 3rd class, U. S. C. G.
Miss Oreck is the guest of Petty
Officer Michael's parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Arthur Michaels. 1680
S. W. 18th street, and will vaca-
tion here for several weeks.
No date has been set for the
wedding.
MURRY L. LEVRANT
PERSONALS
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Levrant an-
nounce the bar mitzvah of their
son Murry with the ceremony
taking place at Beth Jacob Syn-
agogue, Saturday morning. July
24, at 9:30. Rabbi Moses Mesch-
eloff will respond to the boy's
remarks and Cantor Maurice
Mamches will chant the services
in addition to the rendition of
a special vocal solo in the bar
mitzvah's honor. A reception will
follow. Friends and relatives are
invited to be present.
Murry is the grandson of Mrs.
Jennie Kneger. who was the orig-
inal designer of knitted and cro-
cheted garments for Fleischer &
Baerbrandt Co.. from 1912 until
1930, when the work was taken
over by her son. Jack Levrant
in Miami Beach.
Murry has been an honor stu-
dent since the fourth grade pub-
lic school. He won several med-
als and upon graduation was
awarded the certificate for out-
standing work and citizenship
in a class of sixty-six honor stu-
dents.
Miss Leslie Goldberg, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. George Gold-
berg, is in Hendersonville. N. C.
visiting her aunt, Mrs. Morris
Kalin.
Abe Aronovitz left the city for
a vacation in the Carolinas.
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Kassewitz
left for a short stay at Hender-
sonville. N. C.
TOWER
THEATRE
. w. ith rr. at in*, avi
OPEN AT 1:4* P. M.
Fri., July 23rdLast Day
"CONEY
ISLAND"
IN TECHNICOLOR
WITH
Betty Grable
GEORGE MONTGOMERY
CAESAR ROMERO
CHAS. WINNTNGER
i
Starts Sat. at 4:30 P. M.
and Sun. Thru Tues.
July 24-27
ABBOTT and
COSTELLO
IN
'Hit The Ice'
WITH
GINNY SIMMS
JOHNNY LONG AND
HIS ORCHESTRA
PERSONALS
A summer vacationist in Mi-
ami, Miss Phyllis Pincus. daugh-
ter of Dr. and Mrs. M. J. Pincus,
Chicago. III., is the house guest
of Miss Elyse Newman.
Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Singer and
daughters left today for Wash-
ington, D. C. where they will be
joined by their son who is sta-
tioned in Maryland. From there
Mrs. Singer, accompanied by her
daughters, will visit Boston while
Mr. Singer will continue on a
business trip before returning to
Miami.
Rabbi Simon April, spiritual
leader of Cong. Schaarei Zedek,
left Sunday for a four week va-
cation in New York and Pennsyl-
vania, where he will visit his
brother and friends.
Mrs. Sam Miller is leaving this
week for a month's vacation with
relatives in New York and Con-
necticut. She will spend some
time with her daughter-in-law
in Hartford.
Rev. Maurice Mamches and
daughter, Tamra Elaine, returned
Tuesday evening from a vacation
in Pennsylvania and New York.
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice C. Cohn
and family have returned from a
three months' vacation in Cali-
fornia.
Mrs. Irving H. Miller and
daughter, Leslie Ann. will leave
August 1st for a four week Itay
in Boston. Mr. Miller will join
his family there during the mid-
dle of the month.
Mr and Mrs. Myron Newman
and daughter, Elyse, have re-
turned from a one month s vaca-
tion tour of New York, Chicago
and Boston.
Mayor and Mrs. Mitchell Wolf-
son have returned to Asheville,
N. C, for the remainder of the
summer.
Mrs. Philip Berkowitz left Sun-
day for a visit in Jacksonville,
from where she will journey to
Hendersonville to spend the re-
mainder of her vacation. At Hen-
dersonville. Mrs. Berkowitz will
visit her sons, Harold, who is va-
cationing there now, and Donald,
who is at Camp Osceola, adjacent
to Hendersonville.
Mrs. Nathan Adelman, 1419 N.
W. 1st street, left Sunday for a
vacation in Baltimore, with rela-
tives and friends.
Dr. Barney Weinkle and Mr
Carl Weinkle .have returned from
a trip to Hendersonville, to visit
their parents, Mr. and Mrs. LoUis
Weinkle. While away, both spent
some time with tneir sons
service.
in
Dr. and Mrs. Albert E. Roscn-
thal left Wednesday for a one
month stay in New York and
Connecticut. While in New Yor*
City, Dr. Rosenthal will attend a
short course at Columbia Univer-
sity, after which they will visit
the doctor's brother, Maj. M j
Rosenthal, U. S. A., D. C. re-
tired, at Bridgeport, Conn. They
expect to return to Miami about
August 18th.
Mrs. Sam Seitlin and daughter
Barbara Judith of Miami Beach
are vacationing in Tenesville. N.
Friends of the Philip Berko-
witz family are invited to be
present at services at Congrega-
tion Schaarei Zedek Saturday
morning. July 24, when special
services will take place in honor
of the forthcoming marriage of
their son Al, A reception will
follow.
Mr. and Mrs. Gus Trau left
on their summer vacation to visit
friends and relatives in Pitts-
burgh and New York. While in
New York they will see their son.
Lt. David M. Trau. who is sta-
tioned in that vicinity.
Miss Shirley Pepper, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Morris Pepper
1671 S. W. 17th street, returned
to the city after visiting in New
York.
Miss Eleanor Garvett left Sat-
urday for a vacation in Hender-
sonville, N C.
ALFRED GOTTESMAN
PRESIDENT
MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY
WRITES
< t
A WORD ABOUT THE FUTURE"
TODAY we are fighting a war to win the peace
Not for today, but an everlasting peace for
the FUTURE.
All our efforts are directed with the FUTURE
in mind.
We live not for TODAY but dedicate our lives
with zeal to make the morrow a greater dayOur
world a better placeNot alone for ourselves but
for FUTURE generations.
WE LIVE TODAY WITH AN EYE FOR THE MORROW!
LET US PREPARE TODAY FOR THE DAYS TO COMEI
When the inevitable demands spiritual adjust-
ment in the great sorrow let your thoughts be devoid
of the guestionAM I PREPARED?
Now is the time to select a family plot in Mount
Nebo Cemeterybefore need.
Mount Nebo is well planned and carefully laid
out. There has been provided ample roadways and
more important ample walks between graves. It is
ideally located and easily accessible. Mount Nebo
is beautifully landscaped. It offers perpetual care
and title insurance and convenient term pur-
chase plans. Insuring a firm and sound future Mount
Nebo has a financially strong ownership.
For further information with no obligation, phone
3 5132
a
The Garden of Memories"
Florida s Most Beautiful Burial Estates
MOU.NT NEBO
West Flagler Street at 54th Avenue
BUSINESS OFFICE 1014 OLYMPIA BUILDING


FRIDAY. JULY 23, 1943
+Jcnist) fkrt/iti
ORGANIZATION
.ACTIVITIES
JEWISH CONGRESS
Monday, July 26 at 2 p. m. at
Carls Service Men's Center, at
17th St. and Alton Rd., Miami
Beach, the Greater Miami Chap-
ter of the Women's Division of
the American Jewish Congress
Mrs. Lillian Mills; corresponding
secretary. Mrs. Harry Miller.
Financial secretary is Mrs
Theodore Firestone; treasurer
Mrs. Lee Meyer; auditor, Mrs!
bam Commander; directors, Mrs.
J. Albert, Mrs. Sam Blank, Mrs.
u. Bronston, Mrs. Nathan Glos-
ser, Mrs. Sol Goldstrom, Mrs. B
London, Mrs. Edward Lovitz,
Mrs Leopold Marcus, Mrs. Louis
Miller. Mrs. A. Orovitz, Mrs. Mar-
tin Raff, Mrs. Sadye G. Rose, and
Mrs. Joseph Rose.
Other directors are Mrs. A J
Tobin .Mrs. Charles Tobin. Mrs.
Carl Wemkle, Mrs. I. M Wein-
stein, Mrs. Mitchell Wolfson. and
Mrs. Dora Wolk.
PIONEER WOMEN
PAGE THREE
MRS. S. H. LUTSKY
President, Greater Miami Chap-
ter, Women's Division American
Jewish Congress.
The Russian Kretchme present-
ed by the Pioneer Women's Or-
ganizations last Sunday under
the direction of Mr. and Mrs
Dorf of Miami Beach and New
Jersey, proved a financial and
social success. The president,
Mrs. Henry Seitlin, stated that
the receipts totaled several hund-
red dollars and far exceeded all
expectations. Much praise was
given the chairman of the com-
mittee, Mrs. Lena Mines, and her
co-workers. Mrs. Seitlin ex-
pressed her thanks at the gather-
ing to the workers that made the
alTair possible and to the public
lor its generous support.
Mrs. Muriel Hirsch left for a
trip Friday morning. Among the
people she plans to visit are Am-
bassador and Mme. Maxim Lit-
vinov. Russian envoy to the Unit-
ed States, and his author-wife,
who were friends of Mrs. Hirsch
and her late husband, Dr. Alcan
Hirsch, during the seven years
they spent in Russia in connection
with Dr. Hirsch's work as a con-
sulting chemical engineer. Shir-
ley, her daughter, now Shirley
Hirsch Behrman, and her small
son, Robert, have returned re-
cently from New York, to make
their home with their mother on
Miami Beach. Mrs. Hirsch is go-
ing first to Asheville, N. C, and
also will include New York in
her itinerary. She will return in
September.
GRADUATES TO CONVENE
IN CHICAGO JULY 24 TO 27
Graduates of the Hebrew Theo-
logical College of Chicago and of
the Rabbi Isaac Elchonan YesbJ-
vah of New York, will convene in
Chicago, July 24-27, at the 8th
Annual Convention of the Rab-
binical Council of America.
The convention will convene
at Hotel LaSalle on Sunday for
its meetings.
REAL ESTATEMIAMI BEACH
i........ J
DR. ALBERT E. ROSENTHAL
New President of the Jewish
Welfare Bureau
are holding a "gathering in of
Bundles for Jewish Refugees."
All members and friends are
urged to attend this meeting and
to bring a bundle of clothing, or
shoes and underwear for men,
women or children. The Wo-
men's Division of the American
Jewish Congress is collaborating
with the World Jewish Congress
in its relief campaign for the
gathering of clothing. Agencies
in Europe and in North Africa
are ready to distribute the cloth-
Jn wnen *l arrives.
Ben Goldman, director of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, will be guest speaker. Mrs.
Theodore Firestone is chairman
in charge.
Officers of the Greater Miami
Chapter, Women's Division of the
American Jewish Congress, elect-
ed recently are being announced. I
Mrs. S. H. Lutsky, Miami Beach,
will serve as president.
Honorary president is Mrs.
Moses Krieger; vice presidents.
Mrs. Louis Glasser, Mrs. A. E.
W0Owe' Mrs- Gary Glatt and Mrs-
Meyers; recording secretary.
YOUTH COUNCIL
The weekly dance of the Jew-
ish Youth Council of Greater
Miami will be held Sunday eve-
ning at the Y. M. H. A. Anoth-
er all day affair in the form of
a picnic at Greynolds Park is on
the program for the near future
MIAMI BEACH
ZIONIST
WHEN NERVOUS HEADACHES
PE5TER ME
I FIND THAT MILES NERVINE
HELPS NERVOUS TENSION
TO RELAX
AND LEAVES ME
CALM,$ERENE ,
The importance of sending a
representation from Miami Beach
to the National Zionist conven-
tion was stressed at a board
meeting of the District held in
the home of the vice presient,
Lr. .. I. Sabashin.
Additional tree purchases were
reported in the Marvin Bronner
urove and a committee was
charged with the duty of arrang-
ing some event to bring the pro-
ject to a successful conclusion
in the near future. They will
report at the next meeting of the
general membership
BETH JACOB
WHEN Functional Nervous
Disturbances such as Sleep-
lessness, Crankiness, Excitability,
Restlessness or Nervous Headache
interfere with your work or spoil
your good times, take
Or. Mites Nervine
(Liquid or Effervescent Tablets)
Nervous Tension can make yoa
Wakeful, Jittery, Irritable. Ner-
vous Tension can cause Nervous
Headache and Nervous Indiges-
tion. In times like these, we are
more likely than usual to become
overwrought and nervous and to
Jan for a good sedative. Dr.
Ues Nervine is a good sedetive
mild but effective.
If you do not use Dr. Miles
ShuS* you e*n't know wn*t **
*u do for you. It comes in
JJquid and Effervescent Tablet
jorra, both equally soothing: te
*fnse and over-wrought nerves.
WHY DONT YOU TRY ITT,
J*t it at your dru* mtan,
Wervescent tablets S5# and nt,
Liquid m and $1.00. Read diree-
uons and use only as directed.
Cantor Maurice Mamches has
returned from a six-week vaca-
tion to resume his functions at
Beth Jacob synagogue. He re-
SUniCS, te,aching at the Religious
school which is open from Mon-
day to Friday for classes from 9
t0 "on- There is no tuition fee.
Mid-term examinations were
given this week to all students by
the board of education under the
direction of Rabbi Moses Mesch-
eloff and the chairman, Dr. M J
Safra.
Special tables for service men
at each Saturday afternoon Sha-
losh Soodoss have been filled
each Sabbath and will be con-
tinued throughout the summer.
EASTERN STAY
The Loyalty Club of Emunah
Chapter No. 175 O. E. S.. will
rave a.r^d party at the home of
Mrs. William Friedman, 1037 S.
W. 20th avenue, Wednesday eve-
ning, July 28th at 8 o'clock.
PERSONALS
Mrs. Betty Decky. 1534 Merid-
ian avenue, left for New York
to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
J. Silverstein, and her daughter
and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Sol
Tropp.
Rabbi and Mrs. Moses Meschel-
off and family leave Sunday
morning for a vacation. They
will spend much of their time in
New York and will attend a
number of organizational execu-
tive conferences.
Mrs. Larry Fay, 890 N. E. 75tb
street, spent a few days at the
Barbizon-Plaza in New York City
last week.
After a visit with her daughter
in New York, Mrs. Bert Kliven
2908 Flamingo Drive, has arrived
at the Mayview Manor hotel,
Blowing Rock, N. C. Mr. Kliven
is expected later in the season.
Mrs. Sadie Bishof is spending
a month's vacation in North Ca-
rolina.
Mr. and Mrs. Max Rosenstein
were hosts to the board of direc-
tors of Beth Sholom Center last
pundaynight, at their residence
in the Bonnie Apartments. Miami
Beach. The occasion was the
Kosenstein's 22nd wedding anni-
versary. Rabbi S. M. Machtei
expressed the good wishes of the
Center membership. Mrs. May
Zinnamon presented a gift to the
celebrants in the name of their
friends. A buffet supper was
served.
Lincoln Road Properties
Sales and Lnim
B. E. BRONSTON, Realtor
A Trustworthy fUal Estat* Sarvlos
j 605 Lincoln Road. Ph. 5-5868
Buy War Bonds and Stamps-
Help the soldiers help you.
BIRTHS
Jacob Lurie has received word
of the birth of his seventh grand-
daughter, born last week to Mr.
and Mrs. William Lurie in Bal-
timore.
Buy War Bonds Today
WANTED TO BUY
75-Room Hotel on Beach
4 to 25 Unit Apartment Houses
3 Bedroom. 2 Bathroom
2 Bedroom. 1 Bathroom
Homes on Beach
Have Buyers Ready to Make
Deals Immediately
Wanted Rental Listinqs
For Apartments Try Our New
Method Rental Service
Quicker Results for Owners
Money on 1st and 2nd
Mortgages
M. GILLER
Registered Real Estate Broker
Phone 58-1188 523 Mich. Are.
Miami Beach. Fla.
.* ---^
>v
xv^TlllllLLLl
CLIISI-H A WHIM!
A
FEW Standard Oil Service Stations are "boarded up."
Pumps are empty, drives vacant... the boys have gone to war.
Wherever such a scene of inaction may have replaced
the busy corner of a short time ago, accept it as evidence
that many men of this Company have changed their uni-
forms for a while.
Not far away you will find another Standard Oil
Stationopen, busy, trustworthyworth going an extra
distance to find. If not all Stations in your locality can
overcome the "man-power" question, please understand
that we strive to keep standards hightoo high to permit
indifferent operation.
Soon, we hope, conditions will favor and make possi-
ble old-time operation. Until then let the Station that is
"closed for a while" be a signal to you that Standard Oil
men are in the thick of the fight.
CARE FOR YOUR CAR
FOR YOUR COUNTRY
STANDARD OIL (OMI'WV
INCORPORATED IN k m t
<<


PAGE FOUR
+Jels*tk)rklK*n
FRIDAY. JULY 23. 1943
:

w Jewish FKoriidligiin
PLANT AND MAIN OFFICES
tl S. W. SECOND AVENUE
P.O. BOX 2973 PHONE 2-1141
Fred K. Shochet. Managing Editor
itered as Second Class Matter July 4, 1940, at
the Post Office of Miami Florida, under
the Act of March 3, 1879
SUBSCRIPTION
One Year, $2.00 Six Month*. $1.00
MIAMI, FLORIDA. FRIDAY, JULY 23, 1943
TAMMUZ 20, 5703
VOLUME 16
NUMBER 30
QUEBEC
The action of the City Council of Quebec
in seeking to expropriate the site on which the
Jewish community of the city is building a syn-
agogue is a menacing act which, if allowed to
go unchallenged, would set a dangerous pre-
cedent which could affect minority groups in
every democratic country.
It seems clearly indefensible for a govern-
mental body in a nation which during all its
history has separated the functions of Church
and State to maneuver so as to prevent any re-
ligious group from erecting a house of wor-
ship. That the Quebec Council's claim that
the site is needed for an addition to a nearby
park is specious is indicated very clearly by
its refusal to guarantee that another syna-
gogue site would be provided for the Jews of
Quebec if they agree to sell the present one to
the city.
At a time when our enemies are seeking to
spread racialism and bigotry among us, the
Council's ruling and the activities of those
forces which motivated its action are of great
assistance to the enemy. We do not believe
that the small group of Catholics who have
been the most vociferous objectors to the erec-
tion of a synagogue represent the bulk of the
Catholic community of Quebec. Fair-minded
Catholics will see that such discrimination
against Jewish groups redounds to their own
disadvantage.
We are happy to see that the Canadian
Jewish Congress plans to fight the expropria-
tion order in the courts; and it is to be hoped
that the Canadian jurists will inform the Quebec
legislators in uneguivocal terms that the four
freedoms for which Americans, Canadians and
scores of other folk are fighting are not merely
abstract principles.
We suggest that you keep your eye on
Quebec.
HEBREW UNIVERSITY
This year marks the twenty-fifth anniver-
sary of the establishment of the Hebrew Uni-
versity in Jerusalem. Because of the war.
there will be no official ceremonies, but the
University authorities took occasion of the
anniversary to issue a review of the progress
of the institution.
The beginnings of the Hebrew University
are of a sufficiently recent date to be recalled
by many. It was in 1918, when the roar of the
cannons had not yet ceased in the first World
War, that Dr. Weizmann, in the presence of
the military authorities laid the foundation for
this great institution. The simplicity and great
dignity of that ceremony as it was then report-
ed in the press, struck its highest point, when
Dr. Weizmann simply recited the benediction
which pious Jews repeat at the commence-
ment of every holiday: "Blessed art Thou, O
Lord our God, who hast kept us and estab-
lished us and vouchsafed us to come to this
season."
It was symbolic of the high idealism of
Jewish aspirations that the first notable at-
tempt to do anything towards the fulfillment of
the Balfour Declaration should take the form
of a Hebrew University.
The University may well be proud of its
record. It now has a staff of 138, including
some of the most distinguished exiles in the
world. It has sent out to the world 400 gradu-
ates. It has fostered Jewish scholarship, sci-
ence and the war effort.
It was fitting that at this week of the 25th
anniversary. Dr. Magnes should announce that
the Hebrew University will shortly publish the
first Bible printed in Palestine in Hebrew. One
might think that the land which produced the
Bible should have been the first to print it, but
there was no printing as we understand it,
when Moses exhorted and Isaiah prophesied.
It is a fitting time now to present a version
of the Bible by the people who wrote it in the
land in which it was produced.
Muctfy Confidential
RED CROSS HOSTESSES MUST BE SKILLED COOKS
SD CROS
A Red Cross worker examines the doughnut making machine, part of the equipment of the "club-
mobile" of which she is a crew member in the picture at left. At right: Miss Fern Maddox of Ok-
lahoma City, serves doughnuts to a soldier at an airfield "somewhere in England." Center: Mem-
bers of a Red Cross mobile unit distribute coffee and doughnuts to U. S. Soldiers in the British Isles.
IMPORTANT TO KNOW ....
The formation of a United Nations Commission to com-
pile, sift and eventually submit to the coming Peace Confer-
ence the record of Nazi atrocities against civilized popula-
tions is virtually completed The Commission will sit in
London, but its head may be an American Soviet Russia
will have a representative on it That indefatigable reader
of the Congressional Record, Walter Winchell, has discov-
ered that Mississippi's Congressman John E. Rankin has
caused to be inserted in that privileged publication the
chargequite unproved, of course, because totally false
that those shameful Detroit riots were the work of "commun-
istic Jews and Negroes" Foreign Relief Administrator
Herbert H. Lehman has his plans made for feeding the peo-
ples of Europe after their liberation from the Nazis ... As a
starter he expects to send over 300.000,000 pounds of dried
milk, 500,000,000 bushels of wheat and 1.000,000,000 poundi
of dried eggs The younger generation of Lehmans, inci-
dentally, has 100 per cent representation in our armed forces
now, with the enlistment of Mrs. Hilda L. Lehman Badetzky,
the Colonel's daughter, in the WAC One of her brothers,
Peter Lehman, is in England with the American Air Force,
and her other brother, John, is in a Texas Army camp, while
her husband, Boris Badetzky, is a sergeant in the Signal Corps
and is now stationed in England.
SIDELIGHTS ....
What with Hitler having kittens over events on the Rus-
sian and Sicilian fronts, the U. S. Senate Restaurant cat,
named after the Fuehrer because of its funny-looking little
black mustache, is right on the beam For Washington's
feline Hitler recentlyyou guessed ithad kittens Swed-
ish newspapers, Leonard Lyons tells us, report that the con-
cussion of British and American bombs striking German
cities is so great that for hours afterwards Hitler's pictures
come flying out of windows.
LADIES'CORNER ....
There are rumors that Dorothy Backer, who is the grand-
daughter of Jacob H. Schiff and the owner of the New York
Post, is trying to effect a merger between her paper and PM,
Marshall Field's tabloid Experts think this would make
a powerful combination Not enough credit is being give,
to Anna Center Schneiderman, the active and imaginative
mastermind of the Women's Division of the American Jewish
Congress Mrs. Schneiderman is probably New York's
busiest communal worker Recently we had the pleasure
of meeting Wanda Hurwitz, wife of Vladimir, the great pian-
ist, and daughter of Toscanini Wanda is beautiful and
witty, and possesses a trenchant humor as sharp as a razor
blade.
THIS AND THAT ....
What is said to be the most startling expose of Nazi un-
derground groups on these shores has just been published
by an author who prefers to call himself John Roy Carlson,
and who in his book, entitled "Undercover," calls facts and
people by their right names, which he discovered in years
of patient and persistent investigation One of the most
ambitious features ever presented in an English-Jewish pub-
lication is a series of eight drawings by William Gropper in
the July issue of New Currents The drawings, entitled
"Your Brother's Blood Cries Out," are deeply moving master-
pieces Paul Robeson, the Negro singer, actor and leader,
now has Hebrew and Russian songs on his repertory ... As
some of our readers may still consider the harmonica a
slightly undignified instrument, we hasten to report that Fritz
Kreisler himself has been quoted as saying that he never re-
alized how beautifully his "Caprice Viennois" could be
played until he heard Larry Adler's harmonica version of it-
ABOUT PEOPLE ....
What's this about "Who's Who in America" being unable
to get the birth date of the Democratic National Committee's
publicity genius, Charles Michelson? ... At least, that's
what Washington correspondent John O'Donnell claims, in a
story on Charlie's forthcoming biography Well, if there s
anything to it, we're happy to oblige the editors of "Who's
Who" by revealing that Charlie was born April 18, 1869, our
source of information being the 1926 edition of "Who's Who
in American Jewry" Eddie Cantor, most beloved of
American stage, screen and radio stars, treasures more than
anything else a certificate he recently received from Pales-
tine The certificate states that refugee children whom he
helped save from Hitler's clutches have planted a forest of
20,500 trees in his name Paul Muni is reported to be plan-
ning to return to Hollywood when the Broadway revival of
his "Counsellor-at-law" has finished its run And who can
blame him, when the figures show that for a single film.
"Commandos Strike at Dawn," Paul is cashing in. on a per-
centage basis, to the tune of $400,000? Congratulations to
violin virtuoso Efrem Zimbalist on his marriage to Mrs. Mary
Louise Bok, daughter of the late publisher Cyrus H. K. Curtis
and widow of the famous editor Bok.


FRIDAY. JULY 23. 1943
+Jewlsti fkrkttan
PAGE FIVE
IT UPPOEIWiT WEEK
BY MILTON BROWN
Copyright, 1943, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc.
Ml JEIISIFILM FILK
BY HELEN ZIGMOND
Copyright, 1943, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc.
lETKtlfN III ME
BY BORIS SMOLAR
Copyright, 1943, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc.

(A Weekly Review of Jewish News)
The Jewish news this week largely revolves
about the two lands that represent diametrical poles
as far as solving the Jewish problem is concerned
Russia and Palestine.
Extremes meet, it is said, and they met in New
York this week when a huge reception was tendered
the Jewish Cultural delegation from the Soviet Un-
ion, at which Rabbi Wise and Dr. Nahum Gold-
mann were among the speakers.
"During the war," declared Dr. Goldmann at the
meeting, "we have lost most of the Jewish com-
munity of Eastern Europe and therefore the Russian
Jewish community, which is the second largest Jew-
ish community in the world, will have to pay an im-
portant role in shaping the future of the Jewish
people."
Henry Monsky, president of the B'nai B'rith, in a
statement read at the meeting, declared that "we
should emulate the Russians in the standards which
they set up of equal treatment of races and people."
There can be little doubt that Mr. Monsky's
statement echoes the thoughts of many thousands
of people. Russia has become a model for the
world as far as the policy of equal treatment of
races is concerned.
Palestine represents another attempt at the solu-
tion of the same problem, and if there are objections
to the Russian solution, it must be said there are
also difficulties with the Palestine solution. A flat
statement that there can be no "mutual understand-
ing between Jews and Arabs in Palestine as long as
Zionist aims are not abandoned," was issued this
week in Jerusalem by Auni Abdul Hadi, prominent
Arab Nationalist leader.
Palestine Jewry, of course, is equally adamant
and perhaps a hint of the firmness with which it in-
tends to maintain its stand is to be found in the
statement made this week by the Jewish Agency
that of the 29,000 Palestinian men and women in the
services, some 21,000 are Jews. Added to some
thousands of others in full time local defense for-
mation, Palestine Jewry can boast of 30,000 men in
orms "which is equivalent to a volunteer army of
about 2,500,000 in the United Kingdom."
Perhaps one has no right to read in this state-
ment any threat that the Jews now have something
of a trained army to hold their own ground, but
this is a possible reading, or at any rate, a possible
deducible conclusion.
The reports this week seem to presage the be-
lief that the new Polish Premier will encounter in-
creasingly stronger resistance from Jewish quart-
ers. It had been predicted that the reorganized
cabinet would include a representative of the Jewish
population in Poland, but no such representative
has yet been named and the pleas of Jewish groups
have been ignored.
The resistance of the Warsaw ghetto to the Nazis
aroused world-wide admiration. The full story of
Polish resistance will, of course, not be known
until the war is over, but week by week there come
new reports showing that the Polish Jews have by
no means taken it lying down. This week the Nazi
newspapers in Poland admitted that Jewish gueril-
las operating against the German troops in Poland
have been causing the Nazis no end of trouble.
An interesting story of American soldiers in Pal-
estine came this week. According to this story, a
number of Yank officers and men succeeded in sav-
ing the colony of Givath Brenner from destruction.
While the American soldiers were visiting the set-
tlement, which is located in Judea, a fire broke out,
threatening buildings and crops. With their assist-
ance, the fire soon was extinguished.
Such a little incident is of more than human in-
terest. Matters like these may have historical im-
portance. The fact is that many American soldiers,
Jewish and non-Jewish will return from Polestine and
the Near East at the close of the war with an imme-
diate familiarity of the area. They may become a
force to be reckoned with in the ultimate decision ot
the fate of this territory.
The "deportation" of Jews in the Nazi occupied
regions continues, according to reports from under-
ground sources. The messages declare that prac-
tically all Jews of central Poland are now interned
in three Jewish concentration camps from where
they are moved to forced labor. Because of insuffi-
cient nourishment, the mortality among them is
very high. .,
What appears to be an unusually well authenU-
cated picture of the condition of Rumanian Jewry
was made public by the Joint Distribution Commit-
tee this week. "Every Jew," says the report, must
go to a camp for compulsory work for a certain pe-
riod. This is officially restricted to one to three
The most fabulous production of this war sur-
passing every other artistic or theatrical achieve-
ment ... is Irving Berlin's "This Is the Army." As
a stage piece it has brought millions to the coffers of
the Army Relief Fund. But its beneficence as a pic-
ture will top everything. Warners estimate the
profit to the Fund will be ten million dollars! Credit
for this colossal contribution goes both to the Warn-
ers and Berlin. The Brothers are donating all re-
ceipts, minus only production costs, and in addition
are opening their chain of theaters for a coast-to-
coast premiere, with all admissions of that day go-
ing to the fund. Berlin has given two years of his
energy and his undivided attention to the writing,
direction, production of the show and he's still at
it; Next jumpEngland, then North Africa. What
a morale-builder that will be overseas!

Aside from the thousand volunteer performers
who will take part in the gargantuan memorial Jew-
ish pageant, "We Will Never Die," aid is coming
from unexpected quarters. Archbishop John J.
Cantwell of Los Angeles accepted the co-chairman-
ship, saying, his "indignation of the persecution of
the Jewish race was of long standing!"

Every week two hundred and fifty service men
are given a dinner, a show, and a night's lodging
at the Masquers' Club. Last week Jack Benny
underwrote the entire party and no sooner had
that group departed than he autographed another
piece of currency for the next week's jamboree. (

The major film factories have in readiness forty
features for the OWI to exhibit in invaded territory.
The movies have superimposed titles in Danish,
Dutch, Norwegian, Italian and French. So you can
guess where invasion will take placeNeither can
Adolf!

Director Arthur Lubin's early beginnings were in
a far-flung locale from glamour-town Hollywood.
When he was eight, his family lived on the out-
skirts of an Indian reservation near Jerome Arizona.
One day Arthur heard about a tent show playing in
a small town ten miles away. He ran off without
parental permission ... got a job carrying water for
the snake charmer. He received a sound whipping
when he returned, but the discipline only fanned
that flare for show business which the circus had
sparked. As soon as he was old enough he attend-
ed drama school at Carnegie Tech, then wrote, act-
ed in, and directed plays on Broadway. From thence
the path led to the inevitablethe movies.

Yank News: Charlie Adler, one of the harmon-
izin' Yacht Club Boys, writes from Benghazi, Africa
. and sounds a bit nostalgic for Hollywood.
Phil Berle, brother of Milton, is a member of the
Coast Guard.

Movie-Go-Round: The stork may even now be
flapping over the chimney at the John Garfields'
house. Al Jolson will portray himself in the Gersh-
win saga, "Rhapsody in Blue" will warble his great-
est hit, "Swanee." Oscar Levant also plays a real-
life role in this music-autobiog. When he presented
himself at the makeup department, they looked him
over, decided it wouldn't be too difficult to make
him up as Oscar Levant! A model of the soon-to-be-
built cruiser, "Los Angeles," was presented to the
Navy by Louis B. Mayer. Robin Raymond has a
part in the next Deanna Durbin flicker. Producer
Edward Small is mulling the idea of a feature film
on the subject of the Chicago Maternity Center,
founded by Dr. Joseph Bolivar De Lee thirty years
ago. Max Reinhardt has been contacted to direct
a screen version of G. B. Shaw's "Saint Joan" in
England.

Berlesque: "I went into a night club," jects Mil-
ton, "that was so swanky the busboys speak only
to the waiters; the waiters speak only to the manag-
er; and the manager speaks only to the O.P.A.!"
months but actually there are people who have al-
ready been in camp a year or more. With regard
to compulsory labor, as in everything else, there are
no regulations. Without any reason whatsoever,
and with no system at all, every Jew at any hour of
the day or night may be dragged from his house and
sent to camp to work. Above all, the fate of every
Jew lies in the hands of the nearest police official.
The latter, particularly in the provinces, abuses his
power."
INSIDE AMERICA
Since Pearl Harbor, more than 17 synagogues
in Brooklyn alone have been desecrated The
revitalized agents of anti-Semitism also wrecked the
headquarters of the United Jewish War Effort in
Brooklyn ... In Boston youthful hoodlums have
demolished Jewish religious property at Lake Placid
and Saranac Lake, in New York State Great
quantities of anti-Semitic literature in the form of
printed leaflets are being left with designed care-
lessness on the seats of subways and street cars in
New York Claire Hoffman, a Michigan con-
gressman, saw fit to raise the "racial"issue in Con-
gress when Congressman Dickstein, as chairman of
the House Immigration Committee, informed the
House that Nazi civilians held on Ellis Island are
having a good time there They live there, he
said, as if in a club, receiving three good meals a
day and doing nothing This includes the notor-
ious Nazi Fritz Kuhn What Dickstein wanted was
that these civilian Nazis, who are nothing but spies,
should be interned somewhere in the United States
where life would not be so comfortable for them as
on Ellis Island Congressman Hoffman apparent-
ly did not like the idea and charged Dickstein with
introducing the "racial issue" into Congress too often.
AMERICAN JEWISH DATA
Jewish population studies completed under the
auspices of the Conference of Jewish Relations in
ten cities show that the number of Jews in these cities
will probably decline unless more people move
there These cities are Chicago, Buffalo, Detroit.
San Francisco, Trenton, Pittsburgh, Minneapolis,
Passaic, New London and Norwich The survey
shows that approximately two-thirds of all Jews in
these cities are native born and the foreign born
have lived in the United States on an average of
more than 25 years The Jewish population is ag-
ing and is beginning to approximate the general
American population in the relative number and
proportion of aged persons ... In eight out of the ten
cities, Jews constitute a larger percentage of the lo-
cal population than they do in the national popula-
tion as a whole More than three out of four nat-
ive born Jewish youth complete high school ... At
any one time, Jewish educational programs of Sun-
day and week day schools combined reach less
than half of the children of school age ... In the
larger cities, an appreciable number of Jews is en-
gaged in skilled and unskilled manual labor .
But in the large as well as in the smaller cities,
the occupational distribution of Jews in these cities
varies considerably from the general occupational
pattern ... A high proportion is engaged in mer-
chandising and other forms of business enterprise,
in clerical work and in professional careers ... It
may be said, however, that as far as urban popula-
tions are concerned, the white colar and trade and
professional preferences of Jews may be similar to
the occupational distribution of the native American
population, since industrial employees are usually
composed of the more recent immigrant groups, ne-
groes or native white stock coming from rural areas.
INTERPRETING THE PRESENT
One of the really important books published in
America recently is Harold J. Laski's "Reflection on
the Revolution of Our Time," published by Viking
Press The author, a member of the gifted Laski
family in England (he is the brother of the prominent
Jewish leader Neville Laski), is well known in the
United States as one of the leading political eco-
nomists of our time His book is perhaps the first
mature and all-iound analysis of the events of our
time written from political and social perspectives
by a person of great erudition and clear thinking.
A good part of the book deals with Russia Mr.
La3ki is a socialist who does not believe in the dic-
tatorship of the Communist Party His chapter on
Russia, which is most interesting, is, therefore,
friendly but critical ... It analyzes the strong and
weak points of the Soviet regime The central
theme of the book, however, is the question: "What
are we fighting for?" Laski says that no one
understands the nature of the present war unless he
recognizes that we are fighting the forces of counter-
revolution We are fighting no simple reaction-
aries, but people who are out to introduce a system
of slavery through a program of imposing the will
of a conquering race upon the entire world And
he eloquently explains why Hitler elevates the
claims of race against the demands of mankind .
He also discusses what should be done with Ger-
many after the war and asks for a planned society
now.


PAGE SIX
W M BB GIRLS
ACTIVE III SELLING
BONOS. STUMPS
The Miami Beach Division of
the Dade County War Savings
Committee, with offices at 824
Washington Ave., are planning a
series of events to promote the
sales of War Bonds. Rudy R.
Adler and Jake Felt, vice chair-
men, are in charge of the office
and announced the first of these
events to start Saturday.
Young men of A. Z. A. and
misses of the B. B. Girls, both
.junior organizations of B'nai
B rith. are active this week in
adding to their sales of War
Bonds and Stamps. They would
like it known, they stand ready
at all times to serve in any
capacity to aid in the "all out*
war effort; and they welcome
this opportunity to assist m the
sale of Bonds and Stamps so
necessary to economic support
and control measures. "We
must all be more serious and do
our utmost now in this war
against inhumanities." said Dave
Moldafsky. president of A. Z. A
"Tomorrow. S u n d a y after-
noon and evening our boys and
girls, divided into three hams.
will be at hand to do the rites at
the "spiking" for Shickelgruber.
Tojo and Mussolini too. You
will find us at their caskets in
front of:
Miami Beach Division Head-
quarters of Dade County War
Stamp Savings Committee. 824
Washington Avenue
Beach Theatre at Lincoln Road
and Washington Avenue
Lincoln Theatre at Lincoln
noad and Pennsylvania Avenue
Sheridan Theatre at 41st St
and Sheridan Avenue.
"Saturday. July 24th. the "rack-
et boys" Shickelgruber. Tojo
and Mussolini too, within 3 pine
boxes 2' x 6". will receive the
treatment all the world hopes
and prays they will soon receive
Military band B. T. C. 4. lead
by Warrant Officer Schroedt
conduct the funeral procession
across Lincoln Road and Wash-
ington Avenues, as the happy
pallbearers of the A. Z. A. and
B. B. Girls drop the caskets
and they mean drop theminto
the view positions at the address-
es above mentioned.
Our goal is $20,000 this week
and we are counting on every-
ones support.
Team captains in command of
caskets and sale of bonds and
stamps are A. Rubel, Leonard
Merlin and Martin L. Rosen
Assisting are Sam Silversmith.
Jerry Warner, Yale Binder. Edith
Schulman, Marilyn Brin, Judith
Nelson, Marvin Manheim and
Bob Epstein.
The following helped in stag-
ing the parade and funeral rites
Lt. Wendell Fuller; Gordon Fun-
eral Home and Riverside Memor-
ial Chapel in furnishing caskets;
Taylor Construction Company
and Dade Millwork in supplying
lumber, nails and props, "and
the leader in planning this affair,
Samuel T. Sapiro. Vice-Chair-
man of Miami Beach Division of
Dade County War Savings Com-
mittee.
+Jewlsti ncrkiian
B'nai B'rith
Notes
i
By Paul Weitzmen
LEGAL NOTICES"
NOTICE UNDER 7|CtT^T~"
v,_......NAME LAW TIOuS
LOUIS HEIMAN
Guest Columnist
Hello, folks! I am pinch-hit-
ting for our editor, Paul Wcitz-
man. who has left for a few
the hotel for the Labor Day holi-
day to participate in the Conven-
tion program. Although a War
Service Convention, entertain-
ment to keep up morale will be
NOTICE IS HBUKiJy me unuers Kiied Vl|l ";toi jj^
fr Made QoSSg 5^2*2 "
tloua name. NoitFoi K i'i,SS '
N. W. Stt, street Mi.7^ !',"TRl-
un-
7/23-30 8/6-13-20
"re *ngaKed In",'";
DAVID luuiivv
"AY BROVW* "
' "wners
weeks of a well-earned rest. If provided, including an outstand-
MORRIS GILLER ENTERS
REAL ESTATE BUSINESS
Morris Giller of Miami Beach.
who has been a resident of Flor-
ida since 1912. has entered the
real estate brokerage business.
Mr. Giller was previously en-
gaged m the real estate business
in Florida and most recently
in the real estate rental business
in Washington. D. C.
He will maintain a special ren-
tal department operated under a
new system which gives owners
and managers much quicker ser-
vice in seeming tenants, and will
be glad tO explain the service to
any owner or manager interested
Mr. Giller has a large number
of friends and acquaintances who
are interested to buy or sell real
estate during the present good
demands for desirable invest-
ments, and has opened an office
at 523 Michigan Ave.. Miami
Beach, to handle the sale, lease
and rental of homes, apartment
houses and hotels in the Greater
Miami area. He also has funds
available for
you ever want a real job. just
try meeting these deadlines for a
Floridian column week after
week.
Auxiliary Tea
As we go to press, our Ladies
Auxiliary is about to have its
annual tea at the Miami Women's
Club. The program includes mu-
sical numbers, a talk by Mrs. Ben
Goldman, executive director of
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, a discussion of plans of ac-
tivity for the near future. Next
week, we hope to have a mem-
ber of the Auxiliary as guest col-
umnist to tell you "It was a grand
success. '
State Convention
Work has already started on
the State Convention of B'nai
B rith to be held in Miami Beach
on September 5th and 6th. The
nucleus of the convention com-
mittee has been appointed, con-
sisting of Max Silver. Leo Eisen-
stem. Jennie Rotfort and Har-
old Turk. Others will be added
as it will take lots of work to
make it a successful convention,
tentative plans contemplate hold-
ing ot the convention at the Ver-
sailles Hotel. Miami Beach. Spe-
cial arrangements are being made
for local residents to move in to
ing dinner dance on Sunday
night, Sept. 5th. Convention
guests of honor will include Sol
Fass and Julius Fisher, president
and secretary respectively of
District No. 5. and Mrs. Joe Gold-
stein, president of Women's Dis-
trict Grand Lodge No. 5. Make
a date now for the dates of
Sept. 5th and 6th.
Jewish Floridian Drive
If you haven't already cooper-
ated with the B'nai B'rith special
Jewish Floridian drive now in
progress, please don't delay. Send
in your subscription to the B'nai
B'rith office, 650 Seybold Bldg.
From each subscription, we re-
tain 50 per cent for worthy pur-
poses of B'nai B'rith.
Personals
Welcome to Alexander F. Mil-
ler who has arrived to take charge
of the Florida Regional office of
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith. The office is at 330
Seybold Bldg., and the telephone
is 3-6306 for handling of anti-
the Clerk of the Circuit^Wf mW,lh
for Dade County. Florida n-anu
tioun name. l(IS(-AV\r t," flc"-
;a,:2i., EKJsSsS
In buddies*. pn:aKrt
I>AVII KIIOWN
KAY UKOWN
723-30 8/6-13-20
<>wneri
uJ^SSLtffW:'.SEP to
fee Oars of the Cta^ cESttatS
for Dads County, Florida? the tuSt
Uoui name. PE&SHINa i.otki"^
V lv lt Avenue, Miiunl h,h
under which w. ar? .JESS %
DAVID BROW.N
FAY BROWN
7/M-30 8/S-lt-lo '"n*r
Semitic problems. Welcome, too,
to Ben Goldman, who has arrived
to serve as executive director
ot Federation for the duration
As we carry the fight to the foes
ot democracy, we must not for-
get the home front.
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS^
M NAME LAW
..NOTICE IS IIICKKUY GIVEN thie
the underatcned will renter *uh
ta?Sfi J '"" ''inu" < InXh
tm Dade County, Florida, the ri"ti.
nous name. MIAMI HoiKI.. |y J-
W 1st Avenue, Miami. Florl.U. u*n^
win. h we are rnRaxed in buain.
I'A VII) llk(iw\
KAY BROWN
7/23-30 /6-13-20 >wr,e:,
first and second
p?v of'I8,"'"w111!?"?Vh,e cmiT\\ mortKaRcs on desirably located
esy of Lt. Wendell Fuller, will! apartment buildings.
PALM BEACH NOTES
JEWISH FLORIDIAN OFFICE. 226 S. OUVE STREET
IN THE FOX BUILDING
MRS. MART SCHREBNICX Bii an.laUi.
Abe Dobrow of Pahokee was
in the city on a combined busi-
ness and pleasure trip.
B'nai B'rith Lodge will have as
their guest Tuesday night at Slier
Memorial Hall. Rabbi Max Shap-
iro and Harry Simonhoff of
Miami. The meeting is open to
the public and a symposium will
be held.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Leo Radcr of
Belle Glade, spent the week-end
in the city.
Mrs. Dave Katz and daughters
Liticia and Mignon. left for New
York and the mountains where
they will remain for the balance
ot the summer.
CALENDAR SOON TO
APPEAR IN FLORIDIAN
Shortly to appear in these
columns will be the weekly
presentation of a community
calendar. Listing the dates of
affairs scheduled by various
communal organizations the
preparation of the data will
be under the direction of the
Greater Miami Jewish Feder-
ation. The organization's of-
fices m the Congress Building
will serve as the clearing house
and The Jewish Floridian will
act as the medium for publi-
cizing these activities.
Organizations are asked to
contact Federation office and
list scheduled affairs for pub-
lication. As part of its pro-
gram of community planning
federation is seeking to serve
organizations in eliminating
trussing ot dates.
RETAIL MERCHANTS OF
C OF C NAME OFFICERS
Election of officers and direc-
tors of the Retail Merchants Di-
vision of the Miami Chamber of
Commerce was held Friday New-
ly chosen officers are: C. Gordon
Anderson of Richards, president-
Richard Oelkers, of Oelkers' mil-
linery, vice president, and Henry
Thompson, of Hopkins-Carter
secretary treasurer. Members of
the new board of directors, in ad-
dition to the officers above, are-
Joe Lawson, L. J. McCaffrey
Sam Schatzman, Arthur Berel.'
Eugene Mumpower, Isidore Wein-
stein. Sam Lavine, A. N. Bradv
and R. B. Turner. L. J. McCaff-
rey was the retiring president.
IN COUNTY JUDGE'S COCR
Dade County, Florida
,. -N'" '"302
it.- Estate <>f
LOUISA DAY JAY
. .-_ I >erN*l*y|
APPLICATION FOR FINAL
.. DISCHARGE
ni ."""' Jf ",,r-l,>" K'ven that 1 have
fl;-.i my final report and petluot. for
n.il Diacham as Adininlatnttor of
the -Mat.- of Louisa i>ay jay d,:
.S.-.I. and that on the 24th dav
AuW g. iWniapjS ?o the I ,"
a f.v,\'f P*"?. Oouwy. Florida, fei
ti V "J s""1 fi,,al "'I*'" "><* S
thl V-1l',.rha?rV aH AdmlnlMrator ol
ine Baute or uhmsa hay jay. <]-
i B1U6(]|
This Hat (|av r y|_ ,943
MAX B. WIIA-BR*'AR L- JAY' "
NOTICE
rcA
STALWART SUPPORTER
IS MIAMI BEACH FIRM
Far kM In Dairy
Products
LFAR
Fit.* MERV CO
WEST PALM BEACH
MIU-CHEAM ICE CHEAM
Mrs. Fannie E. Owens, widow
of the late James M. Owens Si-
rs celebrating her 74th birthday
at her home. 2801 South Lake
Ave.. this week. Born in Green-
ville. Tenn., in in 1865. she has
made her home here since 1900.
Mrs. Owens is the mother of
Mayor James M. Owens of Palm
Beach and Edward Owens, who
makes his home with her. is pro-
rn,lm'nt. m the activities of the
Memorial Presbyterian Church
The Fannie Owens Bible Class
of that Church is named in her
honor.
Palm Beach Bottling Works
,_ INCORPORATED
WEST PALM BEACH. FLORIDA
Beverages of Quality Since 1920
VENETIAN BRIDGE CO.
ELECTS NEW PRESIDENT
Mrs. Lila-Lce Hillbom. who
rose from the position of a sten-
ographer to that of vice president
ol the Venetian Bridge Corp
owners of the Venetian causeway'
nas been appointed president of
,the corporation, according to an
the War Bond promotion has nn one firm that is a stalwart sup- Uy act'on of the board of direct-
porter on Miami Beach. They 'ors on July 12, she was elected
never miss a chance to give a Prt's'dent at a meeting in New
boost to an organization that un- York- She has returned to as-
dertakes a drive for a plane or a sume active management of the
tank or even a jeep. corporation.
The latest organization to ben- -,-..11---------------------------
r 'm, lhl' support of chas. RALLY AT VERSAILIFS
SSSET** R's SEUS $75-?^ BONrl
Beach"*Apartment'" AssocmJum' Lifif! 2S" VI'200 worth of war
which got an order for $2 000 m1 oP soJd Sunday when the
Miami Beach division of the
... hCiJ,n-!y War savin8s commit-
FOR APPLICATION
TAX DEED
v .i T"e No- 36722
k-imV. '" IM '''"l,v Ijvaa that ib a
ivs J, ""\n'"<< Woman, holder <
im vf ltv "' Mlan" S3 <-)
K h llTv N,l,"I,,"'re'1 IJOM. lte aid .rtin,.,,,. | my ffl<. d h
'';;'.,;;i'h:';"'""/'",;,x ** KimS
',,.,, "lhl~n><-* the following d-
S5SS. fSSSS-uffSP" ,n ""'^
'' 'I;'".....r Unknown rnlel ra
on on the 25th day of Aukubi. a. D.
ir43.
Dated thla Hal day of July. a. D.
': B. 1-KATIIKK.MAN.
< l.-ik of flr.-ult Court
< ounty, Florida
/..!'v ; '" xtkiikktt n r
- 'JTSii ''""-' Seal)
13-30 8/S-ll-SO
Dude
FERGUSON FUNERAL HOME, Inc.
1201 South Olive Avenue
WEST PALM BEACH
PHONE 5172
SOUTHERN DAIRIES
+c* d lea CMa:^ ""
AJ NEAI TO TOU AS YOWI FBORI
in bonds.
Abe Eisenberg. treasurer of the
oran,zation. said when turning
over the check for the purchase.
im, n'mA u, to Iluch on help-
ng Bond sales an! it's a privi-
lege to take part in putting a
crimp in the Axis."' MUlunR a
TOTOGUDYBACTWE
WAR BOND^ALESLADY
mc?st"'a0/,iUrcl1' ?a',1s newest a"d
most active volunteer salesmen
Stamps Br& frWar BsSffSd
H,?r J?V 1SS Susan"e Cohen.
Her station is in the lobby of the
on aW" ?<,lel WheM tuS
on all her teen age charm to Bain
many dollars with which to buC
machine gun buiiets for our fight"
She says she specializes in ma-'
a littll"". bUik'tS b*auso shSa
a little girl and machine gun bul-
lets are little too. but both are
out to get a job done.
Notiee In
i hereh\
unOar-lened. d,irfnS ensure
''>' itlven that th.-
i Ml B-S-lj-jj 8 aoTWUBTD
tan L.|J I' -----" """"S" VUIIIIIUI-
lee held its second rally at the
Versailles hotel. Max M Ozer
chairman, announced
Necessity of buying war bonds
WUflf.f, !>'SSt;d ^ Mayor Mitchell
Wolfson of Miami Beach, who
opened the program. Shep Fields
and his orchestra were a special
feature of the afternoon. A strip
auction by Renee Villon, night
club dancer at Miami Beach
highlighted the proceedings
wf/'i?*1^ ncr total amount of
war bonds purchased during the
last two weeks to $38,500. Mrs
Samuel T. Sapiro of 2675 Fla-
mingo Drive. M.ami Beacn
ralWhtS0'?? W.rth at Su"day^
rally. On July 4. when the first
rally was held at the hotel "he
MKht $i8'500 Worth Ot bonds
th^thSg500 pcopU'atu>nded
L^ is the BEST.' B
"****** JEWMM LEADER
DIES SUDDENLY AGED 86
m '"VL'.uV jUDca"a CWT
ueaa < ounty. Florida
Jtl B8BLL C. SHOBMAKEHt
APPLICATION FOR FINAU
.. DISCHARGE
filed mv lrh|*"r''l'y KUt" '" I h"v
Mnl uk ^e,>"^, "n'1 Petition for
tetrlto?'!Sha,Sw *" AnelluK Admin-
Shoe, 1.1', '5 '"" "f Ruiell C.
Aunlv t ,k yof Au*f. 1. I will
So ,'hr "T""->l' W. K. nianton.
10? tL '"'**' ot I)^- founty. Flo. -
alni r ,- i,''',r"r> "' Mid final report
Admlni.tr'JSf1 "'"'"nee aa ABOllkry
ell\r affiS1" .f ,n'' K",n* of :""-
Thi. JO h'"J1Hker- l-oeaaed.
inn. loth day of June. I43
MAX It SU,VBitMAX S"'VEIt
Attorn,,, for Anrlllary
7/2. limj,",,,r',0r
tow nrr
>-lOlf ELUR
METHOPOLITAH
UFE INS. CO.
Met


FRIDAY. JULY 23. 1943
Jenisti HcrtdHan
PAGE SEVEN
WITH LOCAL BOYS
CPL. HARRY NEHAM, form-
erly an attorney at Miami Beach,
spent a recent furlough here
with his famijy and friends.
ENSIGN MILTON R. WASMAN
is home on furlough after com-
pleting his course of indoctrina-
tion and will report to the local
Sub Chaser Training Center for
advanced schooling.
PVT. OSCAR RAPPAPORT,
son of Max Rappaport, 1675 S.
W. 15th street, is stationed at Ft.
Sill, Okla. with the field artillery
units.
GREATER MIAMI ARMY-NAVY COMMITTEE
Of The Jewish Welfare Board
SERVICE
A COMMUNITY PROJECT
Help Us Keep a Record of Our Men in Serrice
PARADE!
LEROY LEVY, 1569 Meridian
avenue, Miami Beach, is en-
rolled in the Army Specialized
Training Program at Clemson col-
lege, S. C.
BENJAMIN KOVENSKY. a re-
cent graduate of the University
of Miami, is stationed at John
Jay Hall of Columbia University's
Midshipmen's School.
PVT. BERT LEVY, son of Mrs.
David L. Levy, is home on a 15
day furlough. Pvt. Levy is sta-
tioned with the U. S. Infantry at
Ft. Benning, Ga., and was pre-
viously encamped at Camp Rob-
inson, Ark.
A/S JACK ROSENTHAL. U. S.
N. R., is receiving his V-12 train-
ing at the University of Penn-
sylvania. His brother, ROBERT,
has recently completed boot
training with the U. S. Marine
Corps and has been transferred
to Quantico, Va. Officer Candi-
date School.
HERMAN MARKS, 22, son of
Mr and Mrs. Morris Marks, 1752
N. W. 15th street, recently was
promoted to sergeant coincident
with his graduation from aerial
gunnery school in Kingman,
Ariz.
A former Andrew Jackson stu-
dent, he entered the service last
October. He has a brother, PFC
PAUL MARKS, 20, Marines, who
was with the first troops landing
at Guadalcanal, and a younger
brother, EUGENE D. MARKS.
18. who recently left for the ser-
vice.
PVT. ABE ROSNER, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Martin Rosner. 1127
Euclid avenue, has arrived safely
in North Africa, where he is at-
tached to a paratroop unit.
A brother, PVT MAX ROS-
NER, is with the infantry at
Camp Carson, Colo.
SEYMOUR D. KETIVE, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Ketive,
2424 S. W. 18th avenue, is sta-
tioned at Camp Davis, S. C. Of-
ficer Candidate School, anti-air-
craft division. A recent graduate
of the Engineer and Operations
Corps School at Stillwater, Okla-
home, O/C Ketive received the
Diploma of Honor and Distinc-
tion at the graduation ceremon-
ies.
ROBERT M. DEEHL, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Deehl. 1784
N. W. 36th street, has been ac-
cepted in the Naval Air Corps
and is awaiting call for active
training. Mr. Deehl, a graduate
of Miami Senior High School, at-
tended the University of Florida
before his enlistment.
T/SGT DANIEL GOLDSTEIN,
27, of Brooklyn, a Flying Fort-
ress radio operator and gunner
participating for many months
in the aerial assault on Nazi Eu-
rope, has been awarded his third
decoration, the Distinguished Fly-
ing Cross. Previously he had
received the Air Medal and an
Oak Leaf Cluster.
Sergeant Goldstein received
his D. F. C. for "extraordinary
achievements in the European
Theatre of Operations."
S/SGT. LEROY FELDMAN
flew home for an eight day fur-
lough recently, coming from Ft.
McClellan, Ala., where he is at-
tached to the Medical Division
of the Station Hospital. He spent
his stay at home with his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Feldman, 2160
S. W. 24th Terrace.
CORP. J. M. (Mickey) LUBEL,
of Camp Lee. Va., joined his par-
entts. Mr. and Mrs. Harris Lubel
of Mobile. Ala., in Atlanta for a
week-end the early part of July.
VICTOR N. RUTANSKY. son
of Mr. and Mrs. J. Rutansky, 1040
N. E. Second avenue, graduated
from the B-24 Liberator bomber
mechanics school at Keesler
Field, Biloxi, Miss.
LOUIS ALBERTS, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Joseph Alberts of 1037
Michigan avenue, Miami Beach,
graduated from the radio oper-
ators course at the Weather
School of the AAFTTC, Grand
Rapids. Mich. He is a corporal.
SGT. ALLAN SIGNER, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Signer of
St. Petersburg, has been promot-
ed from the rank of Private First
Class. Sgt. Signer is stationed
with the 3rd A. A. F. Band at
Boca Raton Field, Fla.
AARON WEINKLE of the U. S.
Army Air Corps, returned to his
base at the 36th Street Airport
after spending his furlough vis-
iting in New York and Hender-
sonville. Mr. Weinkle will leave
soon for Camp Lee, Va., where
he will enter Quartermaster Of-
ficers Training School.
CHARLES MICHAELS, SC3/c,
U. S. C. G., spent a one week
leave with his parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Arthur Michaels.
After a five-day furlough with
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joshua
S. Lipkin, 1055 W. 46th street.
Miami Beach, PVT. ROBERT
SIDNEY LIPKIN has returned to
Drew Field, Tampa, where he is
stationed with the Army Signal
Corps.
Pvt. Lipkin studied radio com-
munication at the Embry-Riddle
School of Aviation, and was a
member of the first class gradu-
ating in that subject. He was in-
ducted last February.
JACK ABBOTT
who will receive his commission
as a second lieutenant in the Ar-
my Air Forces Saturday, upon
graduation from Officer Candi-
date School, Miami Beach, Fla.,
class 1943-F.
SEYMOUR GLADSTONE,
AMM3/C, spent three days in
Miami this week coming from his
base at Green Cove Springs,
Florida.
NORMAN WEISS, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Samuel Weiss, 1018
Jefferson Ave., Miami Beach, was
home on furlough from Drew
Field, Tampa, where he is with
the medical detachment.
HOWARD LAVINE, S2/C. U.
S. N. R., son of Mrs. I H. Levine,
2117 S. W. 7th street, has been
made a wing leader at the Jack-
sonville, Fla. Naval Air Station.
CAPT. ROY BRIGHT. 28. of
Eveleth, Minn., joins the roll of
three-medal Jewish fliers with
his receipt of an Air Medal. He
already holds the Distinguished
Flying Cross and the Silver Star.
Honored for completion of dan-
gerous missions over enemy ter-
ritory as well as for gallantry in
action. Captain Bright was on
the first plane which landed on
the Wake Island air field last
September. A navigator, he has
by now piled up enough air mile-
age to equal six times the earth's
circumference.
ONftLLTIEFRONTS
LT. MAX SOLOMON of Turn-
er Falls, Mass., was killed in the
air transport crash in Dutch Gui-
ana last January in which the
noted author, Major Eric M.
Knight, and other notables lost
their lives. A student at North-
eastern College when he enlisted
in the Army Air Corps, Lieuten-
ant Solomon had been in service
one year. His father, David Sol-
omon, lives at 7 Davis street.
RADIOMAN DAVID GOOD-
MAN, 23, of Brooklyn, a member
of the MTB squadron which took
Gen. MacArthur from Corregidor
to Australia, reported missing in
action since last year, is a pris-
oner of the Japanese. Goodman,
who has been decorated with the
Silver Star and Oak Leaf Clust-
er, enlisted in the Navy six years
ago, and was at Pearl Harbor
when the Japanese launched their
attack.
SGT. BARNEY ROSS, former
lightweight and welterweight
boxing champion of the world,
has been awarded the Silver Star
"for conspicuous gallantry in ac-
tion against the enemy" during
the Marines' campaign on Guad-
alcanal.
Now on indefinite hospital fur-
lough for malaria treatment. Ser-
geant Ross won acclaim tor his
bravery on the night ot Nov.
19th when, refusing to be evacu-
ated with his unit from an iso-
lated advanced position, he stood
guard over three wounded men.
All through the night he re-
mained at their side, staving off
enemy approaches by firing close
to 500 rounds of ammunition. He
took a toll of at least seven Jap
snipers that night.
PVT. DAVID MAGOLEFSKY.
20, of Philadelphia, is a prisoner
of the Japanese. Joining the Air
Force right after his high school
graduation, Private Magolefsky
was sent to the Philippines as a
bomber crew member, but the
vessel transporting the planes of
his squadron was sent to the
bottom. Grounded, he fought in
the foxholes of Bataan and man-
aged to leave the country in No-
vember.
HELP WANTED1
to build the most all-inclusive lUt of Jewish men end women
in the armed forces of the United States.
It is essential that every Jew in America make himself a
eommittee of one to transmit information on those in service
or who have been decorated, missing in action, wounded, or
who have given their lives in service. By doing this you will
be aiding in the authentic recording of Jewish participation in
this warnow being compiled by the
BUREAU OF WAR RECORDS. NAT ROTH. Chairman
GREATER MIAMI ARMY-NAVY COMMITTEE
OF THE JEWISH WELFARE BOARD
c/o P. O. BOX 2973. MIAMI, FLORIDA
NORMAN SOMBERG. Aero-
grapher 3/c, U. S. N., is with the
invasion fleet in Southern Sicily.
In a wireless dispatch from Ernie
Pyle, noted foreign correspond-
ent, news of Norman's first com-
bat detail was told. In the lat-
est invasion, Petty Officer Som-
berg shot down one of a group of
German planes that were at-
tacking his ship. In civilian life,
Norman resided with his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Somberg,
at 1448 N. W. 62nd street.
SGT. LOUIS SMULOWITZ. 30
of Wilkes-Barre, Pa., flight en-
gineer on a B-17 bomber, was
killed in action last month in the
European area. He had enlisted
shortly after the outbreak of war.
His brother, Emanuel, also in ser-
vice, is stationed in the South Pa-
cific. His mother is Mrs. Sarah
Smulowitz of 755 No. Washing-
ton street
Buy War Bonds Today
LT. HARLOD ROMM, 28, of
Philadelphia, a Flying Fortress
bombardier, is a prisoner of the
Nazis. A graduate of the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania, he was a
three-letter athlete and was deep-
ly interested as well in art and
music. While stationed at Tam-
pa, Fla., Lieutenant Romm helped
coach the cast of the movie "Air
Force." He asked for combat as-
signment some months ago and
shortly thereafter was shipped
overseas.
SGT. MARTIN BALICK. 26, of
Wilmington, Del., participant in
the African invasion expedition,
has been honored with the Silver
Star "for gallantry in action."
He has written an account of the
action he saw during the cam-
paign.
SGT. MILTON KALTER. 29.
of New York City, recorded in
the Honor Roll last November
for his receipt of an Air Medal,
has been killed in action. Serv-
ing in the Alaskan area. Sergeant
Kalter was decorated in recogni-
tion of "extraordinary achieve-
ment in aerial flight."
PVT. EDWARD K. FLEISCH-
MAN. 18. of San Francisco, lost
his life in the fighting on Attu
Island. A student when he en-
listed in the Army, Private
Fleischman was affiliated with
Congregation Emanu-El. His fath-
er is Edward C. Fleischman of
2076 Vallejo street.
CPL. MORRIS DENMARK. 25.
of Steubenville, Ohio, member of
an anti-tank unit fighting in the
North African campaign, is in a
German prison camp. He had
been on the missing-in-action list
since February.
WAR RECORDS COMMITTEE
NAT ROTH. Chairman
FRED SHOCHET
MRS. GEORGE M. COHEN
MAURICE GROSSMAN
JENNIE H. ROTFORT
NATHAN ROTHBERG
J. W. B. Director
OFFICERS
SAM BLANK, CHAIRMAN
MONTE SELIG, Vice Chairman
JOSEPH A. BERMAN, Sec.
Executive Committee
Mrs. Walter Bronston. Mrs. Max
Dobrin, Maurice Grossman, Louis
Heiman, Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan,
Mrs. Murry Koven, Harry Marko-
witz, Nat Roth, Fred Shochet.
Milton Sirkin, Joseph Stein. Mrs.
Herman Wallach, Carl Weinkle.
George Wolpert.
Fill Out This Coupon and Mail To "WAR RECORDS," Army-
Navy Committee, c/o P. O. Box 2973. Miami 18. Florida
Name-
Address (Home).
Date of Birth-----
.Date of Enlistment.
Name of Nearest Relative-
Address---------------------------
-Relationship-
Branch of Service-
Service Address
Tel. No___________
-Rank-
_Outfit-
Promotions, honors, awards, acts of heroism, casualty or other
events or services:-----------------------------------------------------------
Devoting This Entire Page to the Efforts of
the Co
BARCO'S MEN'S SHOP
245 East Flagler Street
B. E. BRONSTON. Realtor
605 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach
DIXIE SPORTSWEAR CO.
2110 N. W. Miami Court
FLXZIT SYSTEMS. Plumbers
1114 N. E. 2nd Avenue
FLORIDA LINEN SERVICE
100 N. W. 20th Street
FLORIDA WHOLESALE GRO. CO.
82 N. E. 26th Street
LAND-O-SUN DAIRIES. Inc-
101 Alton Road
SOUTHEASTERN SALESMEN'S
CARAVAN
Langford Building
Army-Navy Committee. Made Possible Through
Operation of
MIAMI MILL WORE &
LUMBER CO.
535 N. W. 11th Street
MIAMI PLUMBING SUPPLY CO.
2160 N. W. 27th Avenue
NATIONAL BRANDS. Inc.
690 N. W. 13th Street
W1M RUBIN & SON
LUGGAGE k JEWELRY
31 N. Miami Avenue
MONTEFIORE SELIG
WILLIAM D. SINGER
SUNGAS CO.
1100 West Flagler Street
WOMETCO THEATRES
Mitchell Wolfson Sydney Meyer
MIAMI BOTTLED GAS. Inc. v
1701 N. W. 7th Avenue


PAGE EIGHT
-Jenlsti florid kin
FRIDAY, JULY 23, 1943
RELIGIOUS ANNOUNCEMENTS
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX
0 9. W. 17 Ave.. Miami
JOSEPH E. RACKOVSKY. Kabbl
LEWIS GREEN. Sexton
Services daily 8:30 a. m. and
7:45 p. m.; Saturday, 9 a. m. and
6:30 p. m. Rabbi Joseph E.
Rackovsky conducting services
and addressing the congregation
Saturday morning on "A Man
Above His Generation."
Shalosh S'oodoss, 7:00 p. m.
Rabbi Rackovsky speaking to
the worshipers on "Education
with Egoistic Motive."
Mishnah and Jewish Laws and
Customs group meets daily at
7:15 and 8:00 p. m.
CONG. BETH ABRAHAM
685 N. W. Fifth Ave., Miami
Services: Friday evening, Min-
chaKabbalos Shabos, 7:15 p. m.
Saturday, 9 a. m., Rabbi H. M.
Kagan, preaching.
Daily service morning and eve-
ning.
BETH SHOLOM CENTER
7(1 41st St., Miami Bench
S. M. MACHTEI. Rabbi
Friday, 8:00 p. m., Kabbalos
Shabbos service.
Saturday. 9:30 a. m., service:
Rabbi S. M. Machtei preaching
on weekly portion. Mincha 7
p. m. followed by class in Pirke
Avoth. Service men's Se'udah
Shlishis 7:15 p. m.. Chaplain Har-
old H. Gordon presiding.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
117 N. E. 19th St., Miami
COLMAN A. ZWITMAN. Rabbi
RABBI JACOB H. KAPLAN. PhD
Rabbi Emeritu*
Services will be continued at
Temple Israel during the sum-
mer months on Fridays at 8:15
p. m.
OBITUARIES
Irving Laschower, 44, of 815
S. W. 28th Rd died Friday in a
local hospital. He was a building
contractor and had lived in Mi-
ami five years, coming from New
York.
Surviving are his wife, Mrs.
Jeannette Laschower; two sons,
Arthur and Herbert Laschower,
and a daughter, Leonore Lasch-
ower, all of Miami; two sisters,
Mrs. Irene Hoppe and Mrs. Fran-
ces O'Donnell, and a brother,
Henry Laschower, all of New
York.
Services were conducted Mon-
day at the Gordon Funeral Home
with burial in Woodlawn Memo-
riol Park cemetery.
WW>WW^^W^*W^WWWWWll
CONGREGATION BETH DAVID
139 N W. Third Are., Miami
MAX Sll VPIRO, Rubhl
LOUIS HA Y.MAN. Cantor
Friday. 7 p. m.: Kabbalas Sha-
bos service.
Saturday. 8:30 a. m.: Services:
Junior services, 10:30. Kiddush
will follow. Shalosh Seudos.
6:45 p. m.
Daily services morning and
evening.
SCHAAREI ZEDEK
1545 S. W. Third St.. Miami
SIMON APRIL Rabbi
Services Friday 7:30 p. m.
Sabbath morning services be-
gin at 9 o'clock
Mincha services begin at 6:30
p. m. followed by the study of
the Ethics of the Fathers.
Daily services morning and
evening. Hebrew school 10 a. m.
BEACH JEWISH CENTER
HIS Euclid Ave.. Miami Reach
ABRAHAM D. WOLF. Cantor
Friday, 7:30 p. m Kabalos
Shabos.
Rev. Abraham D. Wolf, cantor,
nd the Center choir will conduct
the musical services.
Saturday morning, services-
Guest Speaker. Saturday Sha-
losh Seudes 7 p. m. Refresh-
ments and community singing.
Daily services mornings and eve-
nings.
BETH JACOB CONGREGATION
Wash. Ave. and 3rd St., Miami H.-.k h
MOSES MESCHELOPF, Rabbi
MAURICE MAMCHBS, Cantor
Saturday 8:30 a. m. Services:
Rabbi Moses Mescheloff preach-
ing. Cantor Maurice Mamches
chanting. Early Sabbath services,
7 a. m. Sabbath afternoon ser-
vices 7:30 p. m., Rabbi Meschel-
off discoursing. Service men's
Shalosh S'oodoss follows.
Mrs. Anna Gordon, 75, of 1015
Lenox Ave, Miami Beach, died
Monday in a local hospital after
a brief illness. She came here
five yean ago from Playficld,
N. J.
She is survived by four sons.
Harry Gordon. Miami attorney;
Clifford, also of Miami; Morris,
of Baltimore; and Milton A. Gor-
don of Chicago.
Funeral services were conduct-
ed Tuesday in the Gordon Fun-
eral Home chapel with Rabbi
Max Shapiro officiating. Burial
was in Woodlawn Park cemetery.
HOME CAMP REVIEW WAS
OUTSTANDING SUCCESS
The first 1943 Mid-Season Re-
view of the Home Camp took
place at the "Y" last Sunday af-
ternoon in the presence of a ca-
pacity audience. It was, by far,
the most sensational and gigantic
production ever undertaken by
,the children of the Camp since
: its inception five years ago. Pro-
duced and directed by Bobby
Rubenstein and Hope Ellen Tan-
nenbaum, of our Home Camp
staff, almost every child in the
Camp was a participant in this
gala event.
The affair was opened by a
Welcome Chorus by the girls of
the Camp, followed by a Cane
Dance by Maxine Bender. The
Moonlight scene and the Bowery
scene were very outstanding. The
THE Y. M. H. A.
NOTES
By HARHY SCHWARTZ
in a wholesome environment
Please encourage the youngsters
to come here. s
"Y" Welcomes New Federation
Director
The officers and directors and
the general membership 0f th
Y. M. H. A. extend a heartyYel
come to Mr. Ben Goldman, newlv
appointed executive director of
the Greater Miami Jewish Fedpr
ation.
Large Crowd at Installation
Despite the hot weather a
large crowd witnessed the ins'tal
lation of officers on Wednesday
July 14. Officers and directors
were installed by Abe Aronovitz
chairman of the installation com-
mittee, who was assisted bv
Nat Roth, Hyland Rifas. and
George Wolpert, Mrs. J. Levin-
son and Mrs. H. Barnett, who rep-
aieut: wuie very ouisianaing. a ne ="'" """ "?{ *iieii, wno rep-
piece de resistance that took the i resented the women's branch on
;iiirli<>nr'* hv trM-m uric n n#\*-4*.ii* the install;]! inn rnmrv*i***(* ?,
REGISTRATION TO START
FOR 2ND SUMMER CLASSES
AT UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1S01 South Andrew* Ave.
Ft. I-auderdnli". Fla.
Reform Synagogue nerving Hollywood.
Ft. iAiiderdale and Kroward County
SAMUEL HA1.KVI HA RON. Rabbi
Services: Friday, 8 p. m.
Religrous School: Sunday, 10
a. m.
Sisterhood business meeting,
Monday, 8 p. m.
Sisterhood night at the Fort
Lauderdale Servicemen's Center
canteen. Wednesday. 6 to 11 d. m.
RIVERMONT PARK
SANITARIUM
IS** N. W. 7th 8t. Ph. 8-7901
Beat car* for chronic sick, conva-
lescent and elderly people
$25 WEEKLY UP
bibb Large Beautiful Grounds_
Upholstery. Slip Cores u
Drapery Shops
Complete Line of Exclusive
Decorative Fabric*
35 N. W. 1st St. Ph. 3 MM
The United States CrO/,_
merit Having Taken Over Hie
Present Offi
I WANT MY MILK
Dlt JOSEPH B. MARGOUS
announces the
MMOYAL OP HIS OITICI
Sll Lincoln Roast
Albion Bldg., Suite 3M
MIAMI BEACH
For the Practice of
General Dentistry
HEALTH RESORT
AMERICAN PLAN HOTEL
CamimUt Ink Miaou Mat,
ifora. Imuw ifaai Cmifc
APPROVEO SANITARIUM
liu4 DMttUa, Gcteiil
Registration Monday, July 26.
will open a second summer ses-
sion at the University of Miami,
conforming with an accelerated
program designed to enable stud-
ents working for bachelor of arts
or bachelor of education degrees
to complete their prescribed
courses in abbreviated time.
Studies have been arranged to !
satisfy requirements of teachers
preparing for state certification, j
and for special war provisional I
certificates designed to meet cer-'
tain growing teacher shortages.
For the first time in University
of Miami history the weekly pub-
lication, the Miami Hurricane,
will be sold to regularly enrolled
students.
Last year the Hurricane was
awarded the National Scholastic
Press Association first class hon-
or rating and has been chosen
Ail-American several times by
the same committee. Editor-in-
chief is Rita Grossman.
NEW C.I.O. LOCAL ELECTS
GOLDWEBER AS PRESIDENT
FLORIDA
DAIRIES
HOMOGENIZED
Vitamin "D" Milk
"Milk Product-"
Dacre Protected
TEL. 2-2621
Greater Miami Delivery
?IsH Our Farm at
MOO H. W. 32nd Btxaert
Emanuel Goldweber was elect-'
ed president of Local 85. United
Olfiee and Professional Workers
(CIO), when the group, chartered
July 1. held its first meeting Sat-1
urday.
Members pledged full support
to the war effort, continuance in
helping to sell bonds and stamps, i
assistance in recruiting drives,
help for all war agencies, and en-
tertainment for servicemen.
Washington. D. CJudge Lou-
is E. Levinthal. president of the -
Zionist Organization of America,
Will leave on a two-week tour of
the communities on the Pacific I
Coast beginning July 26th thru
August 9th, the national Zionist
headquarters announced here this
week.
audience by storm was a portray-
al of a traditional Jewish wed-
ding, with all the traditions and
rituals. The scene opened with
the wedding procession, with the
I bride and groom, in traditional
fashion, being led to the chupa.
The "rabbi" sang the Mo Adir.
The rabbi was oortrayed by Bob-
by Siegel. The bride was Estclle
Greenerg and the groom was
Jerry Fox. After the traditional
prayers were said, the entire
company performed various Jew-
ish folk dances that are legion
with the chassidim. Mrs. Blanche
Meyers directed the dancing.
Addresses were made by Leo
Ackerman, president of the Y. M.
H. A.; Maurice Grossman, execu-
tive director of the Y. M. H. A.;
and Mrs. Joseph Schaffcr, Camp
supervisor. Kenneth Myers act-
ed as master of ceremonies and
Bobby decker was the pianist.
Home Camp Records
We have described, from time
to time, various projects in the
Camp. One of the most important
of these is that of record keep-
ing of campers, and activities in
the Camp. Due credit is hereby
given to Leon Lieberman, whose
painstaking efforts in keeping ac-
curate records has made Camp
data available on a moment's no-
tice. Mr. Liebennan's records
and supervised and parents may
are so concise, accurate and mi-
nute that he can tell you at a
glance what the children had for
dessert three weeks ago Thursday
and what the cost was. In addi-
tion to being Home Camp treas-
urer. Leon Lieberman is secretary
of the Y. M. H. A., a member of
the house committee and a mem-
ber of the Home Camp commit-
tee.
Youth Dances
For the past several weeks,
boys and girls of the ages of 14
and upwards have been meeting
at the "Y" and conducting dances
and entertainment. This is a
much needed project and we urge
the parents to encourage their
youngsters to come here Sunday
nights. Dances are chaperoned
feel safe that their children are
the installation committee Lt
Albert E. JPallot addressed the
audience, as did Rabbi Max Sha-
piro, George Chertkof, Nat Roth
Leo Ackerman. and Pearl Reis-
man. Vocal solos were rendered
by Douglas Brenner, accompanied
at the piano by Miss Shirley
Rose. Sgt. Bela Urban rendered
violin selections and was accom-
panied at the piano by his wife,
Mrs. Virginia Urban.
IVluUlfouBuyWiiu
WAR STAMPS
Much of today's aerial warfare
Is fought at extreme high altitudes
and the sub-zero temperature at
such heights makes flying gloves a
vital part of our airmen's equip-
ment. These gloves cost $1.50 a
pair and must be supplied to each
air fighter.
Each time you buy $1.50 worth
of War Stamps, you are lending
your government enough money to
purchase a pair of gloves to keep
the fingers of one of our fliers warm
and flexible on the controls and
gun triggers. School boys and girls
can't serve actively in the fighting
but they can do their share on the
home front by purchasing War
Stamps regularly. Your Schools At
War program will show you how
best you may do that.
TREATMENT FACILITIES
far Soi4cat %*A "0k<" Qeaw
REASONABLE RATES
w.iti roa honlit
MS S.W. SO'- COUBT
MiAMi-nnmnAl

55^
ALKA SFXTTEH
Ust relief far He. ,
HlapU Nmtl,u. -M.
.*Aiter~. Celd DMtreaa.
tiC atoaeaUr Paku end
Ac 14 Iadicertiea.
* roar Drucgiet
Ceate and M Ceata
Call R. J. WAINWRIGHT. District Manager
SHELBY SALESBOOK CO.
t'rS' Box 6' Miami Springs, Fla. Phone 8-1560
FOR SALESBOOKS and BUSINESS FORMS OF ALL KINDS
Compare Our Prices and Quality"
Dr. Mil*. Nervine ior
Sleepleeeaeaa, N.r-.
Tee Irritability.
KidtaMltfy aad
N*rree Head-
ae directed.
From Freeh Orange*
NERVINE
Get your daily cjboU ed
Vitamin. A and D aad B-
Complex by takina ONE-
A-DAT (brand) VlUeia
T.bl.u. Economi-
cal, convenient. At
year draar etore
for the bis 1 on box.
ONE-e-DAY
OLD SARATOGA
B.scaync Boulevard at 77th Street Phone 7-7725
Dinners From 5 o'Clock Sundays From Noon
Cocktail Lounge Fine Liquors and Wines
TAE BUS II MOM DOWNTOWN MIAMI OR BUS at-Tl FROM MIAMI REACH
CLOSED ON WEDNESDAYS
Ask Your Local
Delicatessen
For the Beet
It Costs No More
OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE IN FLORIDA
KOSHER ZION
SAUSAGE CO. PRODUCTS
c ._, Pelleloua Corned Beef
Pickled, Cooked and Smoked MeaU
7th and Normal Ave.
ChlMfe
MODERATE COSTS
ALWAYS WITHIN THE MEANS
OF INDIVIDUAL
CIRCUMSTANCES
GORDON FUNERAL HOME
YOTTO iriinpn m .. mm > ____________
YOUR JEWISH FUNERAL HOME
710 S.W. 12th AVENUE Wt*AL PHONE 3-3431
WORTHY AND
DESERVES YOUR FULL
SUPPORT AND
RECOMMENDATION


Full Text

PAGE 1

FRIDAY. JULY 23. 1943 +Jewlsti fkrkttan PAGE FIVE IT UPPOEIWiT WEEK BY MILTON BROWN Copyright, 1943, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc. Ml JEIISIFILM FILK BY HELEN ZIGMOND Copyright, 1943, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc. lETKtlfN III ME BY BORIS SMOLAR Copyright, 1943, Jewish Telegraph Agency, Inc. (A Weekly Review of Jewish News) The Jewish news this week largely revolves about the two lands that represent diametrical poles as far as solving the Jewish problem is concerned— Russia and Palestine. Extremes meet, it is said, and they met in New York this week when a huge reception was tendered the Jewish Cultural delegation from the Soviet Union, at which Rabbi Wise and Dr. Nahum Goldmann were among the speakers. "During the war," declared Dr. Goldmann at the meeting, "we have lost most of the Jewish community of Eastern Europe and therefore the Russian Jewish community, which is the second largest Jewish community in the world, will have to pay an important role in shaping the future of the Jewish people." Henry Monsky, president of the B'nai B'rith, in a statement read at the meeting, declared that "we should emulate the Russians in the standards which they set up of equal treatment of races and people." There can be little doubt that Mr. Monsky's statement echoes the thoughts of many thousands of people. Russia has become a model for the world as far as the policy of equal treatment of races is concerned. Palestine represents another attempt at the solution of the same problem, and if there are objections to the Russian solution, it must be said there are also difficulties with the Palestine solution. A flat statement that there can be no "mutual understanding between Jews and Arabs in Palestine as long as Zionist aims are not abandoned," was issued this week in Jerusalem by Auni Abdul Hadi, prominent Arab Nationalist leader. Palestine Jewry, of course, is equally adamant and perhaps a hint of the firmness with which it intends to maintain its stand is to be found in the statement made this week by the Jewish Agency that of the 29,000 Palestinian men and women in the services, some 21,000 are Jews. Added to some thousands of others in full time local defense formation, Palestine Jewry can boast of 30,000 men in orms "which is equivalent to a volunteer army of about 2,500,000 in the United Kingdom." Perhaps one has no right to read in this statement any threat that the Jews now have something of a trained army to hold their own ground, but this is a possible reading, or at any rate, a possible deducible conclusion. The reports this week seem to presage the belief that the new Polish Premier will encounter increasingly stronger resistance from Jewish quarters. It had been predicted that the reorganized cabinet would include a representative of the Jewish population in Poland, but no such representative has yet been named and the pleas of Jewish groups have been ignored. The resistance of the Warsaw ghetto to the Nazis aroused world-wide admiration. The full story of Polish resistance will, of course, not be known until the war is over, but week by week there come new reports showing that the Polish Jews have by no means taken it lying down. This week the Nazi newspapers in Poland admitted that Jewish guerillas operating against the German troops in Poland have been causing the Nazis no end of trouble. An interesting story of American soldiers in Palestine came this week. According to this story, a number of Yank officers and men succeeded in saving the colony of Givath Brenner from destruction. While the American soldiers were visiting the settlement, which is located in Judea, a fire broke out, threatening buildings and crops. With their assistance, the fire soon was extinguished. Such a little incident is of more than human interest. Matters like these may have historical importance. The fact is that many American soldiers, Jewish and non-Jewish will return from Polestine and the Near East at the close of the war with an immediate familiarity of the area. They may become a force to be reckoned with in the ultimate decision ot the fate of this territory. The "deportation" of Jews in the Nazi occupied regions continues, according to reports from underground sources. The messages declare that practically all Jews of central Poland are now interned in three Jewish concentration camps from where they are moved to forced labor. Because of insufficient nourishment, the mortality among them is very high. „ ., What appears to be an unusually well authenUcated picture of the condition of Rumanian Jewry was made public by the Joint Distribution Committee this week. "Every Jew," says the report, must go to a camp for compulsory work for a certain period. This is officially restricted to one to three The most fabulous production of this war surpassing every other artistic or theatrical achievement ... is Irving Berlin's "This Is the Army." As a stage piece it has brought millions to the coffers of the Army Relief Fund. But its beneficence as a picture will top everything. Warners estimate the profit to the Fund will be ten million dollars! Credit for this colossal contribution goes both to the Warners and Berlin. The Brothers are donating all receipts, minus only production costs, and in addition are opening their chain of theaters for a coast-tocoast premiere, with all admissions of that day going to the fund. Berlin has given two years of his energy and his undivided attention to the writing, direction, production of the show and he's still at it; Next jump—England, then North Africa. What a morale-builder that will be overseas! • • • Aside from the thousand volunteer performers who will take part in the gargantuan memorial Jewish pageant, "We Will Never Die," aid is coming from unexpected quarters. Archbishop John J. Cantwell of Los Angeles accepted the co-chairmanship, saying, his "indignation of the persecution of the Jewish race was of long standing!" • • • Every week two hundred and fifty service men are given a dinner, a show, and a night's lodging at the Masquers' Club. Last week Jack Benny underwrote the entire party and no sooner had that group departed than he autographed another piece of currency for the next week's jamboree. ( • • • The major film factories have in readiness forty features for the OWI to exhibit in invaded territory. The movies have superimposed titles in Danish, Dutch, Norwegian, Italian and French. So you can guess where invasion will take place—Neither can Adolf! • • • Director Arthur Lubin's early beginnings were in a far-flung locale from glamour-town Hollywood. When he was eight, his family lived on the outskirts of an Indian reservation near Jerome Arizona. One day Arthur heard about a tent show playing in a small town ten miles away. He ran off without parental permission ... got a job carrying water for the snake charmer. He received a sound whipping when he returned, but the discipline only fanned that flare for show business which the circus had sparked. As soon as he was old enough he attended drama school at Carnegie Tech, then wrote, acted in, and directed plays on Broadway. From thence the path led to the inevitable—the movies. • • • Yank News: Charlie Adler, one of the harmonizin' Yacht Club Boys, writes from Benghazi, Africa and sounds a bit nostalgic for Hollywood. Phil Berle, brother of Milton, is a member of the Coast Guard. • • • Movie-Go-Round: The stork may even now be flapping over the chimney at the John Garfields' house. Al Jolson will portray himself in the Gershwin saga, "Rhapsody in Blue" will warble his greatest hit, "Swanee." Oscar Levant also plays a reallife role in this music-autobiog. When he presented himself at the makeup department, they looked him over, decided it wouldn't be too difficult to make him up as Oscar Levant! A model of the soon-to-bebuilt cruiser, "Los Angeles," was presented to the Navy by Louis B. Mayer. Robin Raymond has a part in the next Deanna Durbin flicker. Producer Edward Small is mulling the idea of a feature film on the subject of the Chicago Maternity Center, founded by Dr. Joseph Bolivar De Lee thirty years ago. Max Reinhardt has been contacted to direct a screen version of G. B. Shaw's "Saint Joan" in England. • • • Berlesque: "I went into a night club," jects Milton, "that was so swanky the busboys speak only to the waiters; the waiters speak only to the manager; and the manager speaks only to the O.P.A.!" months but actually there are people who have already been in camp a year or more. With regard to compulsory labor, as in everything else, there are no regulations. Without any reason whatsoever, and with no system at all, every Jew at any hour of the day or night may be dragged from his house and sent to camp to work. Above all, the fate of every Jew lies in the hands of the nearest police official. The latter, particularly in the provinces, abuses his power." INSIDE AMERICA Since Pearl Harbor, more than 17 synagogues in Brooklyn alone have been desecrated The revitalized agents of anti-Semitism also wrecked the headquarters of the United Jewish War Effort in Brooklyn ... In Boston youthful hoodlums have demolished Jewish religious property at Lake Placid and Saranac Lake, in New York State Great quantities of anti-Semitic literature in the form of printed leaflets are being left with designed carelessness on the seats of subways and street cars in New York Claire Hoffman, a Michigan congressman, saw fit to raise the "racial"issue in Congress when Congressman Dickstein, as chairman of the House Immigration Committee, informed the House that Nazi civilians held on Ellis Island are having a good time there They live there, he said, as if in a club, receiving three good meals a day and doing nothing This includes the notorious Nazi Fritz Kuhn What Dickstein wanted was that these civilian Nazis, who are nothing but spies, should be interned somewhere in the United States where life would not be so comfortable for them as on Ellis Island Congressman Hoffman apparently did not like the idea and charged Dickstein with introducing the "racial issue" into Congress too often. AMERICAN JEWISH DATA Jewish population studies completed under the auspices of the Conference of Jewish Relations in ten cities show that the number of Jews in these cities will probably decline unless more people move there These cities are Chicago, Buffalo, Detroit. San Francisco, Trenton, Pittsburgh, Minneapolis, Passaic, New London and Norwich The survey shows that approximately two-thirds of all Jews in these cities are native born and the foreign born have lived in the United States on an average of more than 25 years The Jewish population is aging and is beginning to approximate the general American population in the relative number and proportion of aged persons ... In eight out of the ten cities, Jews constitute a larger percentage of the local population than they do in the national population as a whole More than three out of four native born Jewish youth complete high school ... At any one time, Jewish educational programs of Sunday and week day schools combined reach less than half of the children of school age ... In the larger cities, an appreciable number of Jews is engaged in skilled and unskilled manual labor But in the large as well as in the smaller cities, the occupational distribution of Jews in these cities varies considerably from the general occupational pattern ... A high proportion is engaged in merchandising and other forms of business enterprise, in clerical work and in professional careers ... It may be said, however, that as far as urban populations are concerned, the white colar and trade and professional preferences of Jews may be similar to the occupational distribution of the native American population, since industrial employees are usually composed of the more recent immigrant groups, negroes or native white stock coming from rural areas. INTERPRETING THE PRESENT One of the really important books published in America recently is Harold J. Laski's "Reflection on the Revolution of Our Time," published by Viking Press The author, a member of the gifted Laski family in England (he is the brother of the prominent Jewish leader Neville Laski), is well known in the United States as one of the leading political economists of our time His book is perhaps the first mature and all-iound analysis of the events of our time written from political and social perspectives by a person of great erudition and clear thinking. A good part of the book deals with Russia Mr. La3ki is a socialist who does not believe in the dictatorship of the Communist Party His chapter on Russia, which is most interesting, is, therefore, friendly but critical ... It analyzes the strong and weak points of the Soviet regime The central theme of the book, however, is the question: "What are we fighting for?" Laski says that no one understands the nature of the present war unless he recognizes that we are fighting the forces of counterrevolution We are fighting no simple reactionaries, but people who are out to introduce a system of slavery through a program of imposing the will of a conquering race upon the entire world And he eloquently explains why Hitler elevates the claims of race against the demands of mankind He also discusses what should be done with Germany after the war and asks for a planned society now.



PAGE 1

PAGE FOUR +Jels*tk)rklK*n FRIDAY. JULY 23. 1943 : w Jewish FKoriidligiin PLANT AND MAIN OFFICES tl S. W. SECOND AVENUE P.O. BOX 2973 PHONE 2-1141 Fred K. Shochet. Managing Editor itered as Second Class Matter July 4, 1940, at the Post Office of Miami Florida, under the Act of March 3, 1879 SUBSCRIPTION One Year, $2.00 Six Mon th*. $1.00 MIAMI, FLORIDA. FRIDAY, JULY 23, 1943 TAMMUZ 20, 5703 VOLUME 16 NUMBER 30 QUEBEC The action of the City Council of Quebec in seeking to expropriate the site on which the Jewish community of the city is building a synagogue is a menacing act which, if allowed to go unchallenged, would set a dangerous precedent which could affect minority groups in every democratic country. It seems clearly indefensible for a governmental body in a nation which during all its history has separated the functions of Church and State to maneuver so as to prevent any religious group from erecting a house of worship. That the Quebec Council's claim that the site is needed for an addition to a nearby park is specious is indicated very clearly by its refusal to guarantee that another synagogue site would be provided for the Jews of Quebec if they agree to sell the present one to the city. At a time when our enemies are seeking to spread racialism and bigotry among us, the Council's ruling and the activities of those forces which motivated its action are of great assistance to the enemy. We do not believe that the small group of Catholics who have been the most vociferous objectors to the erection of a synagogue represent the bulk of the Catholic community of Quebec. Fair-minded Catholics will see that such discrimination against Jewish groups redounds to their own disadvantage. We are happy to see that the Canadian Jewish Congress plans to fight the expropriation order in the courts; and it is to be hoped that the Canadian jurists will inform the Quebec legislators in uneguivocal terms that the four freedoms for which Americans, Canadians and scores of other folk are fighting are not merely abstract principles. We suggest that you keep your eye on Quebec. HEBREW UNIVERSITY This year marks the twenty-fifth anniversary of the establishment of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Because of the war. there will be no official ceremonies, but the University authorities took occasion of the anniversary to issue a review of the progress of the institution. The beginnings of the Hebrew University are of a sufficiently recent date to be recalled by many. It was in 1918, when the roar of the cannons had not yet ceased in the first World War, that Dr. Weizmann, in the presence of the military authorities laid the foundation for this great institution. The simplicity and great dignity of that ceremony as it was then reported in the press, struck its highest point, when Dr. Weizmann simply recited the benediction which pious Jews repeat at the commencement of every holiday: "Blessed art Thou, O Lord our God, who hast kept us and established us and vouchsafed us to come to this season." It was symbolic of the high idealism of Jewish aspirations that the first notable attempt to do anything towards the fulfillment of the Balfour Declaration should take the form of a Hebrew University. The University may well be proud of its record. It now has a staff of 138, including some of the most distinguished exiles in the world. It has sent out to the world 400 graduates. It has fostered Jewish scholarship, science and the war effort. It was fitting that at this week of the 25th anniversary. Dr. Magnes should announce that the Hebrew University will shortly publish the first Bible printed in Palestine in Hebrew. One might think that the land which produced the Bible should have been the first to print it, but there was no printing as we understand it, when Moses exhorted and Isaiah prophesied. It is a fitting time now to present a version of the Bible by the people who wrote it in the land in which it was produced. Muctfy Confidential RED CROSS HOSTESSES MUST BE SKILLED COOKS S€D CROS A Red Cross worker examines the doughnut making machine, part of the equipment of the "clubmobile" of which she is a crew member in the picture at left. At right: Miss Fern Maddox of Oklahoma City, serves doughnuts to a soldier at an airfield "somewhere in England." Center: Members of a Red Cross mobile unit distribute coffee and doughnuts to U. S. Soldiers in the British Isles. IMPORTANT TO KNOW .... The formation of a United Nations Commission to compile, sift and eventually submit to the coming Peace Conference the record of Nazi atrocities against civilized populations is virtually completed The Commission will sit in London, but its head may be an American Soviet Russia will have a representative on it That indefatigable reader of the Congressional Record, Walter Winchell, has discovered that Mississippi's Congressman John E. Rankin has caused to be inserted in that privileged publication the charge—quite unproved, of course, because totally false— that those shameful Detroit riots were the work of "communistic Jews and Negroes" Foreign Relief Administrator Herbert H. Lehman has his plans made for feeding the peoples of Europe after their liberation from the Nazis ... As a starter he expects to send over 300.000,000 pounds of dried milk, 500,000,000 bushels of wheat and 1.000,000,000 poundi of dried eggs The younger generation of Lehmans, incidentally, has 100 per cent representation in our armed forces now, with the enlistment of Mrs. Hilda L. Lehman Badetzky, the Colonel's daughter, in the WAC One of her brothers, Peter Lehman, is in England with the American Air Force, and her other brother, John, is in a Texas Army camp, while her husband, Boris Badetzky, is a sergeant in the Signal Corps and is now stationed in England. SIDELIGHTS .... What with Hitler having kittens over events on the Russian and Sicilian fronts, the U. S. Senate Restaurant cat, named after the Fuehrer because of its funny-looking little black mustache, is right on the beam For Washington's feline Hitler recently—you guessed it—had kittens Swedish newspapers, Leonard Lyons tells us, report that the concussion of British and American bombs striking German cities is so great that for hours afterwards Hitler's pictures come flying out of windows. LADIES'CORNER .... There are rumors that Dorothy Backer, who is the granddaughter of Jacob H. Schiff and the owner of the New York Post, is trying to effect a merger between her paper and PM, Marshall Field's tabloid Experts think this would make a powerful combination Not enough credit is being give, to Anna Center Schneiderman, the active and imaginative mastermind of the Women's Division of the American Jewish Congress Mrs. Schneiderman is probably New York's busiest communal worker Recently we had the pleasure of meeting Wanda Hurwitz, wife of Vladimir, the great pianist, and daughter of Toscanini Wanda is beautiful and witty, and possesses a trenchant humor as sharp as a razor blade. THIS AND THAT .... What is said to be the most startling expose of Nazi underground groups on these shores has just been published by an author who prefers to call himself John Roy Carlson, and who in his book, entitled "Undercover," calls facts and people by their right names, which he discovered in years of patient and persistent investigation One of the most ambitious features ever presented in an English-Jewish publication is a series of eight drawings by William Gropper in the July issue of New Currents The drawings, entitled "Your Brother's Blood Cries Out," are deeply moving masterpieces Paul Robeson, the Negro singer, actor and leader, now has Hebrew and Russian songs on his repertory ... As some of our readers may still consider the harmonica a slightly undignified instrument, we hasten to report that Fritz Kreisler himself has been quoted as saying that he never realized how beautifully his "Caprice Viennois" could be played until he heard Larry Adler's harmonica version of itABOUT PEOPLE .... What's this about "Who's Who in America" being unable to get the birth date of the Democratic National Committee's publicity genius, Charles Michelson? ... At least, that's what Washington correspondent John O'Donnell claims, in a story on Charlie's forthcoming biography Well, if there s anything to it, we're happy to oblige the editors of "Who's Who" by revealing that Charlie was born April 18, 1869, our source of information being the 1926 edition of "Who's Who in American Jewry" Eddie Cantor, most beloved of American stage, screen and radio stars, treasures more than anything else a certificate he recently received from Palestine The certificate states that refugee children whom he helped save from Hitler's clutches have planted a forest of 20,500 trees in his name Paul Muni is reported to be planning to return to Hollywood when the Broadway revival of his "Counsellor-at-law" has finished its run And who can blame him, when the figures show that for a single film. "Commandos Strike at Dawn," Paul is cashing in. on a percentage basis, to the tune of $400,000? Congratulations to violin virtuoso Efrem Zimbalist on his marriage to Mrs. Mary Louise Bok, daughter of the late publisher Cyrus H. K. Curtis and widow of the famous editor Bok.



PAGE 1

PAGE SIX W M BB GIRLS ACTIVE III SELLING BONOS. STUMPS The Miami Beach Division of the Dade County War Savings Committee, with offices at 824 Washington Ave., are planning a series of events to promote the sales of War Bonds. Rudy R. Adler and Jake Felt, vice chairmen, are in charge of the office and announced the first of these events to start Saturday. Young men of A. Z. A. and misses of the B. B. Girls, both .junior organizations of B'nai B rith. are active this week in adding to their sales of War Bonds and Stamps. They would like it known, they stand ready at all times to serve in any capacity to aid in the "all out* war effort; and they welcome this opportunity to assist m the sale of Bonds and Stamps so necessary to economic support and control measures. "We must all be more serious and do our utmost now in this war against inhumanities." said Dave Moldafsky. president of A. Z. A "Tomorrow. S u n d a y afternoon and evening our boys and girls, divided into three hams. will be at hand to do the rites at the "spiking" for Shickelgruber. Tojo and Mussolini too. You will find us at their caskets in front of: Miami Beach Division Headquarters of Dade County War Stamp Savings Committee. 824 Washington Avenue Beach Theatre at Lincoln Road and Washington Avenue Lincoln Theatre at Lincoln noad and Pennsylvania Avenue Sheridan Theatre at 41st St and Sheridan Avenue. "Saturday. July 24th. the "racket boys" —Shickelgruber. Tojo and Mussolini too, within 3 pine boxes 2' x 6". will receive the treatment all the world hopes and prays they will soon receive Military band B. T. C. 4. lead by Warrant Officer Schroedt conduct the funeral procession across Lincoln Road and Washington Avenues, as the happy pallbearers of the A. Z. A. and B. B. Girls drop the caskets— and they mean drop them—into the view positions at the addresses above mentioned. Our goal is $20,000 this week and we are counting on everyones support. Team captains in command of caskets and sale of bonds and stamps are A. Rubel, Leonard Merlin and Martin L. Rosen Assisting are Sam Silversmith. Jerry Warner, Yale Binder. Edith Schulman, Marilyn Brin, Judith Nelson, Marvin Manheim and Bob Epstein. The following helped in staging the parade and funeral rites Lt. Wendell Fuller; Gordon Funeral Home and Riverside Memorial Chapel in furnishing caskets; Taylor Construction Company and Dade Millwork in supplying lumber, nails and props, "and the leader in planning this affair, Samuel T. Sapiro. Vice-Chairman of Miami Beach Division of Dade County War Savings Committee. +Jewlsti ncrkiian B'nai B'rith Notes i By Paul Weitzmen LEGAL NOTICES" NOTICE UNDER 7|CTT^T~" v ,_ NAME LAW TIOu S LOUIS HEIMAN Guest Columnist Hello, folks! I am pinch-hitting for our editor, Paul Wcitzman. who has left for a few the hotel for the Labor Day holiday to participate in the Convention program. Although a War Service Convention, entertainment to keep up morale will be NOTICE IS HBUKiJy AVII KIIOWN KAY UKOWN 723-30 8/6-13-20 <>wneri uJ ^SSLtffW:'.SEP to fee Oars of the Cta^ cESttatS for Dads County, Florida? the tuSt Uoui name. PE&SHINa I.OTKI"^ •V lv lt Avenue, Miiunl H,„H under which w. ar? .JESS £% DAVID BROW.N FAY BROWN 7/M-30 8/S-lt-lo '"n*r Semitic problems. Welcome, too, to Ben Goldman, who has arrived to serve as executive director ot Federation for the duration As we carry the fight to the foes ot democracy, we must not forget the home front. NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS^ M NAME LAW ..NOTICE IS IIICKKUY GIVEN thie the underatcned will renter *uh ta?Sfi J '"" '' inu < In XH tm Dade County, Florida, the ri" t i. nous name. MIAMI HoiKI.. |y JW 1st Avenue, Miami. Florl.U. u* n ^ win. h we are rnRaxed in buain. I'A VII) llk(iw\ KAY BROWN 7/23-30 /6-13-20 >wr,e:, first and second P?V of'I 8 ,"'"w 111 !?"?V h e cmiT \\ mort KaRcs on desirably located esy of Lt. Wendell Fuller, will! apartment buildings. PALM BEACH NOTES JEWISH FLORIDIAN OFFICE. 226 S. OUVE STREET IN THE FOX BUILDING MRS. MART SCHREBNICX BII % %  an.laUi. Abe Dobrow of Pahokee was in the city on a combined business and pleasure trip. B'nai B'rith Lodge will have as their guest Tuesday night at Slier Memorial Hall. Rabbi Max Shapiro and Harry Simonhoff of Miami. The meeting is open to the public and a symposium will be held. Mr. and Mrs. J. Leo Radcr of Belle Glade, spent the week-end in the city. Mrs. Dave Katz and daughters Liticia and Mignon. left for New York and the mountains where they will remain for the balance ot the summer. CALENDAR SOON TO APPEAR IN FLORIDIAN Shortly to appear in these columns will be the weekly presentation of a community calendar. Listing the dates of affairs scheduled by various communal organizations the preparation of the data will be under the direction of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. The organization's offices m the Congress Building will serve as the clearing house and The Jewish Floridian will act as the medium for publicizing these activities. Organizations are asked to contact Federation office and list scheduled affairs for publication. As part of its program of community planning federation is seeking to serve organizations in eliminating trussing ot dates. RETAIL MERCHANTS OF C OF C N AME O FFICERS Election of officers and directors of the Retail Merchants Division of the Miami Chamber of Commerce was held Friday Newly chosen officers are: C. Gordon Anderson of Richards, presidentRichard Oelkers, of Oelkers' millinery, vice president, and Henry Thompson, of Hopkins-Carter secretary treasurer. Members of the new board of directors, in addition to the officers above, areJoe Lawson, L. J. McCaffrey Sam Schatzman, Arthur Berel.' Eugene Mumpower, Isidore Weinstein. Sam Lavine, A. N. Bradv and R. B. Turner. L. J. McCaffrey was the retiring president. IN COUNTY JUDGE'S COCR Dade County, Florida „ ,. N '" '"302 it.Estate <>f LOUISA DAY JAY — .-_ I >erN*l*y| APPLICATION FOR FINAL .. DISCHARGE ni ."""' Jf ", ,r l, >" K'ven that 1 have fl;-.i my final report and petluot. for n.il Diacham as Adininlatnttor of the -Mat.of LOUISA I>AY JAY d ,: %  S.-.I. and that on the 24th dav AuW g. iWniapjS ?o the I ," a f.v,\' f P*"?. Oouwy. Florida, fei ti V "J s "" 1 fi,,al "'I*'" •"><* S thl V-1 l rha ? r V aH AdmlnlMrator ol ine Baute or UHMSA HAY JAY. <]•i B1U6(]| This Hat ( | av „ r y|_ 943 MAX B. WIIA-BR*' AR L JAY %  NOTICE rcA STALWART SUPPORTER IS MIAMI BEACH FIRM Far *• kM In Dairy Products LFAR Fit.* MERV CO WEST PALM BEACH MIU-CHEAM ICE CHEAM Mrs. Fannie E. Owens, widow of the late James M. Owens Sirs celebrating her 74th birthday at her home. 2801 South Lake Ave.. this week. Born in Greenville. Tenn., in in 1865. she has made her home here since 1900. Mrs. Owens is the mother of Mayor James M. Owens of Palm Beach and Edward Owens, who makes his home with her. is prorn lm nt m the activities of the Memorial Presbyterian Church The Fannie Owens Bible Class of that Church is named in her honor. PALM BEACH BOTTLING WORKS ,„_„„ INCORPORATED WEST PALM BEACH. FLORIDA Beverages of Quality Since 1920 VENETIAN BRIDGE CO. ELECTS NEW PRESIDENT Mrs. Lila-Lce Hillbom. who rose from the position of a stenographer to that of vice president ol the Venetian Bridge Corp owners of the Venetian causeway' nas been appointed president of ,the corporation, according to an the War Bond promotion has £ nn< uncement made Saturday one firm that is a stalwart supUy ac t'on of the board of directporter on Miami Beach. They o rs on Jul y 12, she was elected never miss a chance to give a P rt s 'dent at a meeting in New boost to an organization that unYork She has returned to asdertakes a drive for a plane or a sume active management of the tank or even a jeep. corporation. The latest organization to ben-,-..11 R !" m l hl support of chas. RALLY AT VERSAILIFS SSSET** R s SEUS $75 -?^ BONrl Beach"*Apartment'" AssocmJum' Lifif! 2S" VI'2 00 worth of wa r which got an order for $2 000 M1 O P so J d Sun day when the Miami Beach division of the ... h C iJ ,n -! y War savin 8s commitFOR APPLICATION TAX DEED v .i T" e No 36722 k-imV. '" IM ''•'" l ,v Ijvaa that IB a •ivs J, ""\ n '"<< Woman, holder < im v f ltv "' Mlan S3 <•-•) K h llTv %  N l, I ,, "' re 1 IJOM. lte<-* the following dS5SS. fSSSS-uffSP" ,n ""'^ ''• 'I;'" r Unknown rnlel ra on on the 25th day of AUKUBI. A. D. ir43. Dated thla Hal day of July. A. D. %  : %  B. 1-KATIIKK.MAN. < l.-ik of flr.-ult Court < ounty, Florida /..!' v ; '" XTKIIKKTT n r 'JTSii ''•""-' Seal) • 13-30 8/S-ll-SO Dude FERGUSON FUNERAL HOME, Inc. 1201 South Olive Avenue WEST PALM BEACH PHONE 5172 SOUTHERN DAIRIES +c* d lea CMa:^ "•" AJ NEAI TO TOU AS YOWI FBORI in bonds. Abe Eisenberg. treasurer of the oran,zation. said when turning over the check for the purchase. im, n' m A u to Iluch on helpng Bond sales an! it's a privilege to take part in putting a crimp in the Axis."' MUlun R a TOTOGUDYBACTWE WAR BOND^ALESLADY mc?st"'a 0 /,iUr cl1 ? a ,1s newest a "d most active volunteer salesmen Stamps B r& f r War BsSffSd H,?r J?V 1SS Susan "e Cohen. Her station is in the lobby of the on aW" ? <,lel WheM *• tuS on all her teen age charm to Bain many dollars with which to buC machine gun buiiets for our fight" She says she specializes in ma-' a littll"". bU i k tS b *auso shSa a little girl and machine gun bullets are little too. but both are out to get a job done. Notiee In i hereh\ unOar-lened. d,irfn S ,„ ensure ''>' itlven that th.i Ml B-S-lj-jj 8 aoT WUBTD tan L.|J I' """"S" VUIIIIIUIlee held its second rally at the Versailles hotel. Max M Ozer chairman, announced Necessity of buying war bonds W U flf.f, !>' SSt ; d ^ Mayor Mitchell Wolfson of Miami Beach, who opened the program. Shep Fields and his orchestra were a special feature of the afternoon. A strip auction by Renee Villon, night club dancer at Miami Beach highlighted the proceedings wf/'i?* 1 ^ ncr total amount of war bonds purchased during the last two weeks to $38,500. Mrs Samuel T. Sapiro of 2675 Flamingo Drive. M.ami Beacn ralW ht S 0 '?? W rth at Su "day^ rally. On July 4. when the first rally was held at the hotel "he M Kht $ i 8 500 Worth Ot bonds th^thSg 500 pcopU a tu>nded L^ is the BEST.' B "£****** JEWMM LEADER DIES SUDDENLY AGED 86 m '"VL'.uV jUDc a" a CWT ueaa < ounty. Florida Jtl B8BLL C. SHOBMAKEHt APPLICATION FOR FINAU .. DISCHARGE filed mv lr„ h |*" r '' l y KUt '" I h" v Mnl UK ^e,> ^, n 1 Petition for tetrlto?'!S ha ,S w *" AnelluK AdminShoe, 1.1', '5 '""• f Ruiell C. Aunlv t ,K y „ of Au *f. 1. I will So ,' h r T ""->l' W. K. nianton. 10? tL '"'**' ot I) ^founty. Flo. alni r ,i, ''' ,r r > "' Mid final report Admlni.tr'JSf 1 "'"•'"•nee aa ABOllkry %  ell \r affiS 1 f ,n '' K ,n of : ""Thi. JO h'"J 1Hker l-oeaaed. inn. loth day of June. I43 MAX It S U ,VBit MAX S "' VEIt Attorn,,, for Anrlllary 7/2. li m j," ,,,r ,0r TOW nrr >-lOlf ELUR METHOPOLITAH UFE INS. CO. Met



PAGE 1

4*Jewish FionJian CBga Yfrie Jewuslh Hi nuty 3AJL £juxri*Jk. VJjudkSLy H VOLUME 16—No. 30 MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JULY 23, 1943 PRICE TEN CENTS TROOPS BE KEPT [ Jerusalem (WNS)—A resolution protesting the sending of Palestine Jewish troops abroad and a demand that the Allies recognize the Jewish people as full-fledged Allies in the war against the Axis were the high points of the 50th convention of the Histradruth, Palestine Federation of Labor, which concluded this week. The resolution on the use of Palestine soldiers in other countries was passed following an address by David Ben-Gurion, chairman of the executive of the Jewish Agency for Palestine, who stated that Jewish men and women recruited in Palestine should be used only for service within the country. The demand for recognition of the Jews as an equal partner of the United Nations was voiced by David Remez, general secretary of the Histadruth. Mr. Remez also thanked American and British labor for their support of Zionist aspirations in Palestine. PROTOCOLS OF ELDERS OF ZION NOW IN ITALY Cairo (WNS)—The Italian Ministry of Education announced this week that the "Protocols of the Elders of Zion" will be taught as a regular required subject in all schools in Italy, it is reported here by reliable sources. The same informant also revealed that the money spent by the Ministry of Education to have the Protocols translated into Italia 1 was raised by a special levy on the Jewish population of Italy. TO PRINT HEBREW BIBLE FIRST TIME IN HISTORY BEACH TAKE SITE SOVIET DELEGATES SPEAK IN BOSTON; GIN RECEPTION Boston (WNS)—A plea for more action now by the United Nations to help Russia was voiced here by Eugene D. Kisselev. consul general of the U S. S. R. at New York. Speaking at the public reception in Symphony Hall honoring the official delegation from Soviet Russia now touring this country. Prof. Solomon Michoels and Lieut. Col. Itzik Feffer. An enthusiastic audience of approximately 2,600 persons attended the meeting sponsored by the Greater Boston reception committee of the Jewish Council for Russian War Relief and the Committee for Jewish Writers and Artists. Prof. Michoels, people's artist of Soviet Russia, chairman of the Russian Jewish Anti Fascist Committee and director and star of the Moscow Jewish Art Theatre, said in his speech: "The Red Army is an AntiFascist Army. The victory of the Red Army will be a death blow to anti-Semitism, which becomes the axis of the Nazi plot to enslave Germany, Europe and the world. In this war against Fascism enslavement, our army is joined by the great armies of our allies. Together, and only together, shall we achieve victory." Lieut. Col. Itzik Feffer, Russian poet, said the war on Hitlcrism is not only a war of militatry weapons but also of "reason and morality." On the day before the meeting Prof. Michoels and Lieut. Col. reffer were the guests of honor The newly formed Y. M. and W. H. A. of Miami Beach moved into action last week, when at a meeting of its executive committee, it approved the "duration" location of the proposed recreational and character building facility. Harry Zuckcrnick, serving as chairman untii permanent officers are elected, presented a proposal of the building committee through Harry Sirkin and the site suggested, after inspection by the committee, the corner of Collins Ave. and Lincoln Rd., was unanimously approved. Negotiations were made to use the property for the duration. The location is directly on the ocean with a water frontage of 350 feet and extending 150 feet to Collins Ave. Besides a large lobby which will be used as an auditorium, the building on the property has some fifteen rooms that will be used. The property was secured at a minimum rental through the personal interest of the owners in the Y project. Formerly known as the Mansion the building will be renovated and cleaned through voluntary efforts. Youth organizations including the Beach A. Z. A. will participate. Jerusalem (J T A) — The first Bible in Hebrew characters ever to be printed in Palestine will be issued here soon, it was disclosed this week by Dr. Judah L. Magnes. president of the Hebrew University. Palestine, the land in which most of the Bible was written, has never produced a version printed in Hebrew. The first section of the Bible to be printed in Hebrew characters was published at Bologna, Italy, in 1477. ALLIES ANNOUNCE TO ASSUME DUTIES Mr. Ben Goldman arrived here this week to assume his duties as executive director of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. Coming here from Buffalo, Mr. Goldman served as executive director of the United Jewish Fund and director of fund-raising of Jewish Federation in that city. At present he is acquainting himself with the local setup and will meet with the committees of Federation to continue the present program of the organization. A native of Cleveland, Mr. Goldman has lived in Buffalo since January, 1940, when he became executive director oi the Jewish Welfare Society. He served in this capacity until February 1942, when he assumed the posts with Federation and the United Jewish Fund. Mr. Goldman was associated with the National Refugee Service in New York City in 1938 and 1939, serving as resettlement secretary, field secretary and administrative assistant. During this period he organized the Emigre Service Bureau of New Jersey with state offices in Newark. From 1933 to 1938 he was assistant director of the Edenwald School for Boys in New York. He has also held positions in group work, recreational and child care agencies. Mr. Goldman attended the University of Wisconsin and Western by General Sir Harold AlexandReserve University. He did poster. who has been named military graduate work at the Graduate | governor of Sicily, was issuance School for Jewish Social Work' of a statement announcing that where he held the Lewis J. Warnj all la er fellowship. He received his persons Decause oi race, creed or of organizing the forthcoming Master of Social Service degree'color were annulled and that the • American Jewish Conference trom this school. position of all established religAmong his professional affiliaIOUS institutions would be upheld, tions, Mr. Goldman is a member j A special squad of "Black of the executive committee of the t Shirts" rounded up all Jews in New York State Conference of Sicily soon after the fall of TunSocial Work, a member of the isia and deported them to an unknown destination, according to reports reaching Lisbon. The "kidnaping" of 1.500 JewLondon (WNS)—All anti-Jewish laws have been abolished in the section of Sicily held by the Allied armies and similar action will be taken in the rest of the island as soon as it is occupied by the Anglo-American forces, it was reported this week in the British press. One of the first actions taken TEL mil SHOW TO CEMENT TIES OF JEWISH PEOPLES Tel Aviv (WNS)—An exhibition aimed at cementing the ties between the Jews of Palestine and the people of the Soviet Union was opened here this week at ceremonies attended by many notables including Mayor Rokach of Tel Aviv and leaders of the Histadruth and other Jewish institutions. Entitled "U. S. S. R.—Palestine At War," the exhibition, which is sponsored by the Victory League for Russia, consists of photographs and charts showing the progress made in Russia since the Revolution and in Palestine since the Balfour Declaration. The hope that the Yishuv and Russia can work together after the war was voiced by Zerubavel, representing the Histadruth at the opening ceremonies, who stated that "our ties with Russia are 600,000 Jewish soldiers in the Red Army as well as our common Jewish culture." DIVISION OE SEATS BY CONFERENCE IS DECIDED UPON New York (WNS)—The execuws discriminating against! tive committee which is in charge s because oi race, creed or of organizing the forthcoming National T e c h n i c a 1 Advisory Committee of the National Refugee Service, secretary of the Upwhich is slated to open on August 29, this week announced the manner in which the 125 seats alloted to national membership organizations have been divided. Three seats each went to the American Jewish Committee, the American Jewish Congress, the B'nai B'rith, the Zionist Organization of America, the Free Sons State New York Region of the ish families who had been living AWU i eW A F deratlons i for centuries in Sicily took place of Israel, Independent Order Brith and Welfare Funds and consult-I late at night for fear that the I Abraham, Independent Order of ing assoaate in the School of people of Sicily might protest Brith Sholom, Jewish National Social Work of the University of against the removal of their JewWorkers' Alliance, Jewish War "/if a £ D f f ^ S rbeen a ct c ve ) sh nc '8hbors with whom they Veterans, Mizrachi Organizations with the Buffalo Council of Sohad been living in peace for many of America, National Counc of poinieu io secure an executive director for the organization, to set up a budget and finance plan, and to arrange planning for the group. cial Agencies and the Buffalo War Council. Prior to his leaving for Miami years, j Young Israel, National FederaBuffalo PA nu X r of iSotuUons fr ? m W"a"0" V Ihoir Italian Orthodox Congregations. United SaSS*aft S LId unr ,nw i tions and other community groups JEWS IN DIVISION NOW BEING FORMED IN USSR London (WNS)—Reports concerning the Polish Thadeuz Kosciuszko Division which is being trained in Russia for service against the Nazis there reveal that six per cent of the officers and enlisted men are Jewish, according to dispatches from British correspondents in Moscow. The correspondents write that the new division has been real an official breakfast tendered ? !" i^ v :,' r T P? 0 ^ rt>lc, f ased by the city of Boston. I fro "? px,lc n Central Asia, from Also given three seats were the Hadassah. the Young Women's at his leaving, and noting his serA !" *S PRINT BOOK ON Division of the American Jewish were passed all expressing regret at his leaving, and noting his vice to the Buffalo commu nity ."JEWISH OTIFSTTON" i £ on 8 ress the Women's Supreme of loyalty and devotion and cit-l B !" l & gUlgPW Council of B'nai B'rith, the Mizing the affection and esteem of Istanbul (WNS)— Arah le-iHor l?. !" !" en s Organization, the the community which he merited KblW-inTa? "encyclopedia",l^'The N^*pi£2ft fS and hcld j o n Jewish questions as a propa.Temple> SfaSSSSSS/ttTmS f SMAirBEACHVOTE IN a^^S^lJlSS'^ ELECTION FOR FUNDS UJ&^wj m !" > ittrBSK StSSf I ported to be the editor of the ening-publicity fund. The proposition passed by a encyclopedia among Arabs in the Brou P s received two seats each. | soldiers who were not evacuated vote f -250-206. City Clerk C. W. j££.!' fffcj"^ &&£ I given ^^SK** 1 "" w ITALY CALLS ABLE BODIED ^^^for^ M^le ^^rr^ amounting to Uws, Berlin said** | Th. -Uoi^electi JEWS FOR WORK ON FORTS Geneva (JTA)—Italian author't'es, concerned over the success of the Allied armies in Sicily, nave started registering all ablebodied Jews throughout the country for the purpose of sending 'nerti to the front for various Kinds of defense work, it is rePorted in Popolo d'ltalia reachmg here this week. East, and former partisans. WARNS AGAINST INCREASE J pected to return about $68,000. IN PMCE OF FOODSTUFFS JEW SH R^O HO UR Tel Aviv (JTA)—A demand that a civil commission be formed to assist the Palestine government to control food prices was voiced here this week by the executive committee of the Histadruth, Labor Federation. --.ion board $1 on each $1,000 valuation of asW RW raiM 975 in Nazi-held Poland was issued delegates to be chosen by the here this week by the Swedish i electors, 374 have been elected General Post Office. German auThe remaining delegate is stm tn thonties in Poland are confiscatbe chosen in Worcester Ma in* all such packages addressed where the election has been deto Jews laved because of local conations.



PAGE 1

FRIDAY. JULY 23. 1943 Jenisti HcrtdHan PAGE SEVEN WITH LOCAL BOYS CPL. HARRY NEHAM, formerly an attorney at Miami Beach, spent a recent furlough here with his famijy and friends. ENSIGN MILTON R. WASMAN is home on furlough after completing his course of indoctrination and will report to the local Sub Chaser Training Center for advanced schooling. PVT. OSCAR RAPPAPORT, son of Max Rappaport, 1675 S. W. 15th street, is stationed at Ft. Sill, Okla. with the field artillery units. GREATER MIAMI ARMY-NAVY COMMITTEE Of The Jewish Welfare Board SERVICE A COMMUNITY PROJECT Help Us Keep a Record of Our Men in Serrice PARADE! LEROY LEVY, 1569 Meridian avenue, Miami Beach, is enrolled in the Army Specialized Training Program at Clemson college, S. C. BENJAMIN KOVENSKY. a recent graduate of the University of Miami, is stationed at John Jay Hall of Columbia University's Midshipmen's School. PVT. BERT LEVY, son of Mrs. David L. Levy, is home on a 15 day furlough. Pvt. Levy is stationed with the U. S. Infantry at Ft. Benning, Ga., and was previously encamped at Camp Robinson, Ark. A/S JACK ROSENTHAL. U. S. N. R., is receiving his V-12 training at the University of Pennsylvania. His brother, ROBERT, has recently completed boot training with the U. S. Marine Corps and has been transferred to Quantico, Va. Officer Candidate School. HERMAN MARKS, 22, son of Mr and Mrs. Morris Marks, 1752 N. W. 15th street, recently was promoted to sergeant coincident with his graduation from aerial gunnery school in Kingman, Ariz. A former Andrew Jackson student, he entered the service last October. He has a brother, PFC PAUL MARKS, 20, Marines, who was with the first troops landing at Guadalcanal, and a younger brother, EUGENE D. MARKS. 18. who recently left for the service. PVT. ABE ROSNER, son of Mr. and Mrs. Martin Rosner. 1127 Euclid avenue, has arrived safely in North Africa, where he is attached to a paratroop unit. A brother, PVT MAX ROSNER, is with the infantry at Camp Carson, Colo. SEYMOUR D. KETIVE, son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Ketive, 2424 S. W. 18th avenue, is stationed at Camp Davis, S. C. Officer Candidate School, anti-aircraft division. A recent graduate of the Engineer and Operations Corps School at Stillwater, Oklahome, O/C Ketive received the Diploma of Honor and Distinction at the graduation ceremonies. ROBERT M. DEEHL, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Deehl. 1784 N. W. 36th street, has been accepted in the Naval Air Corps and is awaiting call for active training. Mr. Deehl, a graduate of Miami Senior High School, attended the University of Florida before his enlistment. T/SGT DANIEL GOLDSTEIN, 27, of Brooklyn, a Flying Fortress radio operator and gunner participating for many months in the aerial assault on Nazi Europe, has been awarded his third decoration, the Distinguished Flying Cross. Previously he had received the Air Medal and an Oak Leaf Cluster. Sergeant Goldstein received his D. F. C. for "extraordinary achievements in the European Theatre of Operations." S/SGT. LEROY FELDMAN flew home for an eight day furlough recently, coming from Ft. McClellan, Ala., where he is attached to the Medical Division of the Station Hospital. He spent his stay at home with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Feldman, 2160 S. W. 24th Terrace. CORP. J. M. (Mickey) LUBEL, of Camp Lee. Va., joined his parentts. Mr. and Mrs. Harris Lubel of Mobile. Ala., in Atlanta for a week-end the early part of July. VICTOR N. RUTANSKY. son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Rutansky, 1040 N. E. Second avenue, graduated from the B-24 Liberator bomber mechanics school at Keesler Field, Biloxi, Miss. LOUIS ALBERTS, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Alberts of 1037 Michigan avenue, Miami Beach, graduated from the radio operators course at the Weather School of the AAFTTC, Grand Rapids. Mich. He is a corporal. SGT. ALLAN SIGNER, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Signer of St. Petersburg, has been promoted from the rank of Private First Class. Sgt. Signer is stationed with the 3rd A. A. F. Band at Boca Raton Field, Fla. AARON WEINKLE of the U. S. Army Air Corps, returned to his base at the 36th Street Airport after spending his furlough visiting in New York and Hendersonville. Mr. Weinkle will leave soon for Camp Lee, Va., where he will enter Quartermaster Officers Training School. CHARLES MICHAELS, SC3/c, U. S. C. G., spent a one week leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Michaels. After a five-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joshua S. Lipkin, 1055 W. 46th street. Miami Beach, PVT. ROBERT SIDNEY LIPKIN has returned to Drew Field, Tampa, where he is stationed with the Army Signal Corps. Pvt. Lipkin studied radio communication at the Embry-Riddle School of Aviation, and was a member of the first class graduating in that subject. He was inducted last February. JACK ABBOTT who will receive his commission as a second lieutenant in the Army Air Forces Saturday, upon graduation from Officer Candidate School, Miami Beach, Fla., class 1943-F. SEYMOUR GLADSTONE, AMM3/C, spent three days in Miami this week coming from his base at Green Cove Springs, Florida. NORMAN WEISS, son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Weiss, 1018 Jefferson Ave., Miami Beach, was home on furlough from Drew Field, Tampa, where he is with the medical detachment. HOWARD LAVINE, S2/C. U. S. N. R., son of Mrs. I H. Levine, 2117 S. W. 7th street, has been made a wing leader at the Jacksonville, Fla. Naval Air Station. CAPT. ROY BRIGHT. 28. of Eveleth, Minn., joins the roll of three-medal Jewish fliers with his receipt of an Air Medal. He already holds the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Silver Star. Honored for completion of dangerous missions over enemy territory as well as for gallantry in action. Captain Bright was on the first plane which landed on the Wake Island air field last September. A navigator, he has by now piled up enough air mileage to equal six times the earth's circumference. ONftLLTIEFRONTS LT. MAX SOLOMON of Turner Falls, Mass., was killed in the air transport crash in Dutch Guiana last January in which the noted author, Major Eric M. Knight, and other notables lost their lives. A student at Northeastern College when he enlisted in the Army Air Corps, Lieutenant Solomon had been in service one year. His father, David Solomon, lives at 7 Davis street. RADIOMAN DAVID GOODMAN, 23, of Brooklyn, a member of the MTB squadron which took Gen. MacArthur from Corregidor to Australia, reported missing in action since last year, is a prisoner of the Japanese. Goodman, who has been decorated with the Silver Star and Oak Leaf Cluster, enlisted in the Navy six years ago, and was at Pearl Harbor when the Japanese launched their attack. SGT. BARNEY ROSS, former lightweight and welterweight boxing champion of the world, has been awarded the Silver Star "for conspicuous gallantry in action against the enemy" during the Marines' campaign on Guadalcanal. Now on indefinite hospital furlough for malaria treatment. Sergeant Ross won acclaim tor his bravery on the night ot Nov. 19th when, refusing to be evacuated with his unit from an isolated advanced position, he stood guard over three wounded men. All through the night he remained at their side, staving off enemy approaches by firing close to 500 rounds of ammunition. He took a toll of at least seven Jap snipers that night. PVT. DAVID MAGOLEFSKY. 20, of Philadelphia, is a prisoner of the Japanese. Joining the Air Force right after his high school graduation, Private Magolefsky was sent to the Philippines as a bomber crew member, but the vessel transporting the planes of his squadron was sent to the bottom. Grounded, he fought in the foxholes of Bataan and managed to leave the country in November. HELP WANTED1 to build the most all-inclusive lUt of Jewish men end women in the armed forces of the United States. It is essential that every Jew in America make himself a eommittee of one to transmit information on those in service or who have been decorated, missing in action, wounded, or who have given their lives in service. By doing this you will be aiding in the authentic recording of Jewish participation in this war—now being compiled by the BUREAU OF WAR RECORDS. NAT ROTH. Chairman GREATER MIAMI ARMY-NAVY COMMITTEE OF THE JEWISH WELFARE BOARD c/o P. O. BOX 2973. MIAMI, FLORIDA NORMAN SOMBERG. Aerographer 3/c, U. S. N., is with the invasion fleet in Southern Sicily. In a wireless dispatch from Ernie Pyle, noted foreign correspondent, news of Norman's first combat detail was told. In the latest invasion, Petty Officer Somberg shot down one of a group of German planes that were attacking his ship. In civilian life, Norman resided with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Somberg, at 1448 N. W. 62nd street. SGT. LOUIS SMULOWITZ. 30 of Wilkes-Barre, Pa., flight engineer on a B-17 bomber, was killed in action last month in the European area. He had enlisted shortly after the outbreak of war. His brother, Emanuel, also in service, is stationed in the South Pacific. His mother is Mrs. Sarah Smulowitz of 755 No. Washington street —Buy War Bonds Today— LT. HARLOD ROMM, 28, of Philadelphia, a Flying Fortress bombardier, is a prisoner of the Nazis. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, he was a three-letter athlete and was deeply interested as well in art and music. While stationed at Tampa, Fla., Lieutenant Romm helped coach the cast of the movie "Air Force." He asked for combat assignment some months ago and shortly thereafter was shipped overseas. SGT. MARTIN BALICK. 26, of Wilmington, Del., participant in the African invasion expedition, has been honored with the Silver Star "for gallantry in action." He has written an account of the action he saw during the campaign. SGT. MILTON KALTER. 29. of New York City, recorded in the Honor Roll last November for his receipt of an Air Medal, has been killed in action. Serving in the Alaskan area. Sergeant Kalter was decorated in recognition of "extraordinary achievement in aerial flight." PVT. EDWARD K. FLEISCHMAN. 18. of San Francisco, lost his life in the fighting on Attu Island. A student when he enlisted in the Army, Private Fleischman was affiliated with Congregation Emanu-El. His father is Edward C. Fleischman of 2076 Vallejo street. CPL. MORRIS DENMARK. 25. of Steubenville, Ohio, member of an anti-tank unit fighting in the North African campaign, is in a German prison camp. He had been on the missing-in-action list since February. WAR RECORDS COMMITTEE NAT ROTH. Chairman FRED SHOCHET MRS. GEORGE M. COHEN MAURICE GROSSMAN JENNIE H. ROTFORT NATHAN ROTHBERG J. W. B. Director OFFICERS SAM BLANK, CHAIRMAN MONTE SELIG, Vice Chairman JOSEPH A. BERMAN, Sec. Executive Committee Mrs. Walter Bronston. Mrs. Max Dobrin, Maurice Grossman, Louis Heiman, Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan, Mrs. Murry Koven, Harry Markowitz, Nat Roth, Fred Shochet. Milton Sirkin, Joseph Stein. Mrs. Herman Wallach, Carl Weinkle. George Wolpert. Fill Out This Coupon and Mail To "WAR RECORDS," ArmyNavy Committee, c/o P. O. Box 2973. Miami 18. Florida NameAddress (Home). Date of Birth .Date of Enlistment. Name of Nearest RelativeAddress -RelationshipBranch of ServiceService Address— Tel. No -Rank_OutfitPromotions, honors, awards, acts of heroism, casualty or other events or services: —— Devoting This Entire Page to the Efforts of the Co BARCO'S MEN'S SHOP 245 East Flagler Street B. E. BRONSTON. Realtor 605 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach DIXIE SPORTSWEAR CO. 2110 N. W. Miami Court FLXZIT SYSTEMS. Plumbers 1114 N. E. 2nd Avenue FLORIDA LINEN SERVICE 100 N. W. 20th Street FLORIDA WHOLESALE GRO. CO. 82 N. E. 26th Street LAND-O-SUN DAIRIES. Inc101 Alton Road SOUTHEASTERN SALESMEN'S CARAVAN Langford Building Army-Navy Committee. Made Possible Through Operation of MIAMI MILL WORE & LUMBER CO. 535 N. W. 11th Street MIAMI PLUMBING SUPPLY CO. 2160 N. W. 27th Avenue NATIONAL BRANDS. Inc. 690 N. W. 13th Street W1M RUBIN & SON LUGGAGE k JEWELRY 31 N. Miami Avenue MONTEFIORE SELIG WILLIAM D. SINGER SUNGAS CO. 1100 West Flagler Street WOMETCO THEATRES Mitchell Wolfson Sydney Meyer MIAMI BOTTLED GAS. Inc. v 1701 N. W. 7th Avenue



PAGE 1

FRIDAY. JULY 23, 1943 +Jcnist) fkrt/iti ORGANIZATION .ACTIVITIES JEWISH CONGRESS Monday, July 26 at 2 p. m. at Carls Service Men's Center, at 17th St. and Alton Rd., Miami Beach, the Greater Miami Chapter of the Women's Division of the American Jewish Congress Mrs. Lillian Mills; corresponding secretary. Mrs. Harry Miller. Financial secretary is Mrs Theodore Firestone; treasurer Mrs. Lee Meyer; auditor, Mrs! bam Commander; directors, Mrs. J. Albert, Mrs. Sam Blank, Mrs. u. Bronston, Mrs. Nathan Glosser, Mrs. Sol Goldstrom, Mrs. B London, Mrs. Edward Lovitz, Mrs Leopold Marcus, Mrs. Louis Miller. Mrs. A. Orovitz, Mrs. Martin Raff, Mrs. Sadye G. Rose, and Mrs. Joseph Rose. Other directors are Mrs. A J Tobin .Mrs. Charles Tobin. Mrs. Carl Wemkle, Mrs. I. M Weinstein, Mrs. Mitchell Wolfson. and Mrs. Dora Wolk. PIONEER WOMEN PAGE THREE MRS. S. H. LUTSKY President, Greater Miami Chapter, Women's Division American Jewish Congress. The Russian Kretchme presented by the Pioneer Women's Organizations last Sunday under the direction of Mr. and Mrs Dorf of Miami Beach and New Jersey, proved a financial and social success. The president, Mrs. Henry Seitlin, stated that the receipts totaled several hundred dollars and far exceeded all expectations. Much praise was given the chairman of the committee, Mrs. Lena Mines, and her co-workers. Mrs. Seitlin expressed her thanks at the gathering to the workers that made the alTair possible and to the public lor its generous support. Mrs. Muriel Hirsch left for a trip Friday morning. Among the people she plans to visit are Ambassador and Mme. Maxim Litvinov. Russian envoy to the United States, and his author-wife, who were friends of Mrs. Hirsch and her late husband, Dr. Alcan Hirsch, during the seven years they spent in Russia in connection with Dr. Hirsch's work as a consulting chemical engineer. Shirley, her daughter, now Shirley Hirsch Behrman, and her small son, Robert, have returned recently from New York, to make their home with their mother on Miami Beach. Mrs. Hirsch is going first to Asheville, N. C, and also will include New York in her itinerary. She will return in September. GRADUATES TO CONVENE IN CHICAGO JULY 24 TO 27 Graduates of the Hebrew Theological College of Chicago and of the Rabbi Isaac Elchonan YesbJvah of New York, will convene in Chicago, July 24-27, at the 8th Annual Convention of the Rabbinical Council of America. The convention will convene at Hotel LaSalle on Sunday for its meetings. REAL ESTATE—MIAMI BEACH i J DR. ALBERT E. ROSENTHAL New President of the Jewish Welfare Bureau are holding a "gathering in of Bundles for Jewish Refugees." All members and friends are urged to attend this meeting and to bring a bundle of clothing, or shoes and underwear for men, women or children. The Women's Division of the American Jewish Congress is collaborating with the World Jewish Congress in its relief campaign for the gathering of clothing. Agencies in Europe and in North Africa are ready to distribute the clothJn £ wnen l arrives. Ben Goldman, director of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, will be guest speaker. Mrs. Theodore Firestone is chairman in charge. Officers of the Greater Miami Chapter, Women's Division of the American Jewish Congress, elected recently are being announced. I Mrs. S. H. Lutsky, Miami Beach, will serve as president. Honorary president is Mrs. Moses Krieger; vice presidents. Mrs. Louis Glasser, Mrs. A. E. W0O w e Mrs Gary Glatt and Mrs £•Meyers; recording secretary. YOUTH COUNCIL The weekly dance of the Jewish Youth Council of Greater Miami will be held Sunday evening at the Y. M. H. A. Another all day affair in the form of a picnic at Greynolds Park is on the program for the near future MIAMI BEACH ZIONIST WHEN NERVOUS HEADACHES PE5TER ME I FIND THAT MILES NERVINE HELPS NERVOUS TENSION TO RELAX AND LEAVES ME CALM,$ERENE The importance of sending a representation from Miami Beach to the National Zionist convention was stressed at a board meeting of the District held in the home of the vice presient, Lr. £.. I. Sabashin. Additional tree purchases were reported in the Marvin Bronner urove and a committee was charged with the duty of arranging some event to bring the project to a successful conclusion in the near future. They will report at the next meeting of the general membership BETH JACOB W HEN Functional Nervous Disturbances such as Sleeplessness, Crankiness, Excitability, Restlessness or Nervous Headache interfere with your work or spoil your good times, take Or. Mites Nervine (Liquid or Effervescent Tablets) Nervous Tension can make yoa Wakeful, Jittery, Irritable. Nervous Tension can cause Nervous Headache and Nervous Indigestion. In times like these, we are more likely than usual to become overwrought and nervous and to Jan for a good sedative. Dr. %  Ues Nervine is a good sedetive —mild but effective. If you do not use Dr. Miles SHUS* you e n t know wn t ** *u do for you. It comes in JJquid and Effervescent Tablet jorra, both equally soothing: te *fnse and over-wrought nerves. W HY DONT YOU TRY ITT, J£*t it at your dru* mtan, Wervescent tablets S5# and nt, Liquid m and $1.00. Read direeuons and use only as directed. Cantor Maurice Mamches has returned from a six-week vacation to resume his functions at Beth Jacob synagogue. He reSUniCS te achin g at the Religious school which is open from Monday to Friday for classes from 9 t0 "o n There is no tuition fee. Mid-term examinations were given this week to all students by the board of education under the direction of Rabbi Moses Mescheloff and the chairman, Dr. M J Safra. Special tables for service men at each Saturday afternoon Shalosh Soodoss have been filled each Sabbath and will be continued throughout the summer. EASTERN STAY The Loyalty Club of Emunah Chapter No. 175 O. E. S.. will £r ave a .r^ d party at the hom e of Mrs. William Friedman, 1037 S. W. 20th avenue, Wednesday evening, July 28th at 8 o'clock. PERSONALS Mrs. Betty Decky. 1534 Meridian avenue, left for New York to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. Silverstein, and her daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Sol Tropp. Rabbi and Mrs. Moses Mescheloff and family leave Sunday morning for a vacation. They will spend much of their time in New York and will attend a number of organizational executive conferences. Mrs. Larry Fay, 890 N. E. 75tb street, spent a few days at the Barbizon-Plaza in New York City last week. After a visit with her daughter in New York, Mrs. Bert Kliven 2908 Flamingo Drive, has arrived at the Mayview Manor hotel, Blowing Rock, N. C. Mr. Kliven is expected later in the season. Mrs. Sadie Bishof is spending a month's vacation in North Carolina. Mr. and Mrs. Max Rosenstein were hosts to the board of directors of Beth Sholom Center last pundaynight, at their residence in the Bonnie Apartments. Miami Beach. The occasion was the Kosenstein's 22nd wedding anniversary. Rabbi S. M. Machtei expressed the good wishes of the Center membership. Mrs. May Zinnamon presented a gift to the celebrants in the name of their friends. A buffet supper was served. Lincoln Road Properties Sales and LNIM B. E. BRONSTON, Realtor A Trustworthy fUal Estat* Sarvlos j 605 Lincoln Road. Ph. 5-5868 Buy War Bonds and StampsHelp the soldiers help you. BIRTHS Jacob Lurie has received word of the birth of his seventh granddaughter, born last week to Mr. and Mrs. William Lurie in Baltimore. —Buy War Bonds Today— WANTED TO BUY 75-Room Hotel on Beach 4 to 25 Unit Apartment Houses 3 Bedroom. 2 Bathroom 2 Bedroom. 1 Bathroom Homes on Beach Have Buyers Ready to Make Deals Immediately Wanted Rental Listinqs For Apartments Try Our New Method Rental Service Quicker Results for Owners Money on 1st and 2nd Mortgages M. GILLER Registered Real Estate Broker Phone 58-1188 523 Mich. Are. Miami Beach. Fla. .*• • ---^ >v •xv^TlllllLLLl CLIISI-H A WHIM! A FEW Standard Oil Service Stations are "boarded up." Pumps are empty, drives vacant... the boys have gone to war. Wherever such a scene of inaction may have replaced the busy corner of a short time ago, accept it as evidence that many men of this Company have changed their uniforms for a while. Not far away you will find another Standard Oil Station—open, busy, trustworthy—worth going an extra distance to find. If not all Stations in your locality can overcome the "man-power" question, please understand that we strive to keep standards high—too high to permit indifferent operation. Soon, we hope, conditions will favor and make possible old-time operation. Until then let the Station that is "closed for a while" be a signal to you that Standard Oil men are in the thick of the fight. CARE FOR YOUR CAR FOR YOUR COUNTRY STANDARD OIL (OMI'WV INCORPORATED IN K M T „ „ „ <<



PAGE 1

PAGE TWO +JewistflcrMk*n FRIDAY, JULY 23. 1943 SOCIAL ITEMS AND PERSONALS WEDDINGS Mr. and Mrs. M. Decky. 1534 Meridian avenue, announce the marriage of their daughter, Gertrude, to Lt. H. Stollerman. of New York. The wedding took place in New York's Temple Zion with Rabbi Rimson officiating. The bride was given away by her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J. Silvcrstein. Lt. and Mrs. H. Stollerman left New York following the ceremony for California where he is stationed. BAR MITZVAH Esther Sief and Navigation Student Herbert Feldman were married at the home of Rabbi Moses Mescheloff last Sunday. The young couple resides in Coral Gables. Robert H. Goldman and Miss Faye Epstein of Philadelphia were married by Rabbi Moses Mescheloff at his home last week. The wedding of Miss Sylvia Sir, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Sir of 811 Jefferson Ave.. to Staff Sgt. Charles M. Freefield, U. S. A., stationed here with the 408th training group, took place this week at the home of the bride's parents. The couple plans to make its home here while Sergeant Freefield is stationed in this area. ENGAGEMENT Mr. and Mrs. 1. Oreck of Bremerton. Wash., announce the engagement of their daughter. Lois Miriam, to Charles A. Michaels, ship's cook, 3rd class, U. S. C. G. Miss Oreck is the guest of Petty Officer Michael's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Michaels. 1680 S. W. 18th street, and will vacation here for several weeks. No date has been set for the wedding. MURRY L. LEVRANT PERSONALS Mr. and Mrs. Jack Levrant announce the bar mitzvah of their son Murry with the ceremony taking place at Beth Jacob Synagogue, Saturday morning. July 24, at 9:30. Rabbi Moses Mescheloff will respond to the boy's remarks and Cantor Maurice Mamches will chant the services in addition to the rendition of a special vocal solo in the bar mitzvah's honor. A reception will follow. Friends and relatives are invited to be present. Murry is the grandson of Mrs. Jennie Kneger. who was the original designer of knitted and crocheted garments for Fleischer & Baerbrandt Co.. from 1912 until 1930, when the work was taken over by her son. Jack Levrant in Miami Beach. Murry has been an honor student since the fourth grade public school. He won several medals and upon graduation was awarded the certificate for outstanding work and citizenship in a class of sixty-six honor students. Miss Leslie Goldberg, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Goldberg, is in Hendersonville. N. C. visiting her aunt, Mrs. Morris Kalin. Abe Aronovitz left the city for a vacation in the Carolinas. Mr. and Mrs. Harold Kassewitz left for a short stay at Hendersonville. N. C. TOWER THEATRE •. w. ITH rr. AT in*, AVI OPEN AT 1:4* P. M. Fri., July 23rd—Last Day "CONEY ISLAND" IN TECHNICOLOR WITH Betty Grable GEORGE MONTGOMERY CAESAR ROMERO CHAS. WINNTNGER i • • Starts Sat. at 4:30 P. M. and Sun. Thru Tues. July 24-27 ABBOTT and COSTELLO IN 'Hit The Ice' WITH GINNY SIMMS JOHNNY LONG AND HIS ORCHESTRA PERSONALS A summer vacationist in Miami, Miss Phyllis Pincus. daughter of Dr. and Mrs. M. J. Pincus, Chicago. III., is the house guest of Miss Elyse Newman. Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Singer and daughters left today for Washington, D. C. where they will be joined by their son who is stationed in Maryland. From there Mrs. Singer, accompanied by her daughters, will visit Boston while Mr. Singer will continue on a business trip before returning to Miami. Rabbi Simon April, spiritual leader of Cong. Schaarei Zedek, left Sunday for a four week vacation in New York and Pennsylvania, where he will visit his brother and friends. Mrs. Sam Miller is leaving this week for a month's vacation with relatives in New York and Connecticut. She will spend some time with her daughter-in-law in Hartford. Rev. Maurice Mamches and daughter, Tamra Elaine, returned Tuesday evening from a vacation in Pennsylvania and New York. Mr. and Mrs. Maurice C. Cohn and family have returned from a three months' vacation in California. Mrs. Irving H. Miller and daughter, Leslie Ann. will leave August 1st for a four week Itay in Boston. Mr. Miller will join his family there during the middle of the month. Mr and Mrs. Myron Newman and daughter, Elyse, have returned from a one month s vacation tour of New York, Chicago and Boston. Mayor and Mrs. Mitchell Wolfson have returned to Asheville, N. C, for the remainder of the summer. Mrs. Philip Berkowitz left Sunday for a visit in Jacksonville, from where she will journey to Hendersonville to spend the remainder of her vacation. At Hendersonville. Mrs. Berkowitz will visit her sons, Harold, who is vacationing there now, and Donald, who is at Camp Osceola, adjacent to Hendersonville. Mrs. Nathan Adelman, 1419 N. W. 1st street, left Sunday for a vacation in Baltimore, with relatives and friends. Dr. Barney Weinkle and Mr Carl Weinkle .have returned from a trip to Hendersonville, to visit their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lo U i s Weinkle. While away, both spent some time with tneir sons service. in Dr. and Mrs. Albert E. Roscnthal left Wednesday for a one month stay in New York and Connecticut. While in New Yor* City, Dr. Rosenthal will attend a short course at Columbia University, after which they will visit the doctor's brother, Maj. M j Rosenthal, U. S. A., D. C. retired, at Bridgeport, Conn. They expect to return to Miami about August 18th. Mrs. Sam Seitlin and daughter Barbara Judith of Miami Beach are vacationing in Tenesville. N. Friends of the Philip Berkowitz family are invited to be present at services at Congregation Schaarei Zedek Saturday morning. July 24, when special services will take place in honor of the forthcoming marriage of their son Al, A reception will follow. Mr. and Mrs. Gus Trau left on their summer vacation to visit friends and relatives in Pittsburgh and New York. While in New York they will see their son. Lt. David M. Trau. who is stationed in that vicinity. Miss Shirley Pepper, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Morris Pepper 1671 S. W. 17th street, returned to the city after visiting in New York. Miss Eleanor Garvett left Saturday for a vacation in Hendersonville, N C. ALFRED GOTTESMAN PRESIDENT MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY WRITES < t A WORD ABOUT THE FUTURE" TODAY we are fighting a war to win the peace— Not for today, but an everlasting peace for the FUTURE. All our efforts are directed with the FUTURE in mind. We live not for TODAY but dedicate our lives with zeal to make the morrow a greater day—Our world a better place—Not alone for ourselves but for FUTURE generations. WE LIVE TODAY WITH AN EYE FOR THE MORROW! LET US PREPARE TODAY FOR THE DAYS TO COMEI When the inevitable demands spiritual adjustment in the great sorrow let your thoughts be devoid of the guestion—AM I PREPARED? Now is the time to select a family plot in Mount Nebo Cemetery—before need. Mount Nebo is well planned and carefully laid out. There has been provided ample roadways and more important ample walks between graves. It is ideally located and easily accessible. Mount Nebo is beautifully landscaped. It offers perpetual care and title insurance and convenient term purchase plans. Insuring a firm and sound future Mount Nebo has a financially strong ownership. For further information with no obligation, phone 3 5132 a The Garden of Memories" Florida s Most Beautiful Burial Estates MOU.NT NEBO West Flagler Street at 54th Avenue BUSINESS OFFICE 1014 OLYMPIA BUILDING



PAGE 1

PAGE EIGHT -Jenlsti florid kin FRIDAY, JULY 23, 1943 RELIGIOUS ANNOUNCEMENTS MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX 0 9. W. 17 Ave.. Miami JOSEPH E. RACKOVSKY. Kabbl LEWIS GREEN. Sexton Services daily 8:30 a. m. and 7:45 p. m.; Saturday, 9 a. m. and 6:30 p. m. Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky conducting services and addressing the congregation Saturday morning on "A Man Above His Generation." Shalosh S'oodoss, 7:00 p. m. Rabbi Rackovsky speaking to the worshipers on "Education with Egoistic Motive." Mishnah and Jewish Laws and Customs group meets daily at 7:15 and 8:00 p. m. CONG. BETH ABRAHAM 685 N. W. Fifth Ave., Miami Services: Friday evening, Mincha—Kabbalos Shabos, 7:15 p. m. Saturday, 9 a. m., Rabbi H. M. Kagan, preaching. Daily service morning and evening. BETH SHOLOM CENTER 7(1 41st St., Miami Bench S. M. MACHTEI. Rabbi Friday, 8:00 p. m., Kabbalos Shabbos service. Saturday. 9:30 a. m., service: Rabbi S. M. Machtei preaching on weekly portion. Mincha 7 p. m. followed by class in Pirke Avoth. Service men's Se'udah Shlishis 7:15 p. m.. Chaplain Harold H. Gordon presiding. TEMPLE ISRAEL 117 N. E. 19th St., Miami COLMAN A. ZWITMAN. Rabbi RABBI JACOB H. KAPLAN. PhD Rabbi Emeritu* Services will be continued at Temple Israel during the summer months on Fridays at 8:15 p. m. OBI T U A R I E S Irving Laschower, 44, of 815 S. W. 28th Rd„ died Friday in a local hospital. He was a building contractor and had lived in Miami five years, coming from New York. Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Jeannette Laschower; two sons, Arthur and Herbert Laschower, and a daughter, Leonore Laschower, all of Miami; two sisters, Mrs. Irene Hoppe and Mrs. Frances O'Donnell, and a brother, Henry Laschower, all of New York. Services were conducted Monday at the Gordon Funeral Home with burial in Woodlawn Memoriol Park cemetery. WW>WW^^W^*W^WWWW Wl l CONGREGATION BETH DAVID 139 N W. Third Are., Miami MAX Sll VPIRO, Rubhl LOUIS HA Y.MAN. Cantor Friday. 7 p. m.: Kabbalas Shabos service. Saturday. 8:30 a. m.: Services: Junior services, 10:30. Kiddush will follow. Shalosh Seudos. 6:45 p. m. Daily services morning and evening. SCHAAREI ZEDEK 1545 S. W. Third St.. Miami SIMON APRIL Rabbi Services Friday 7:30 p. m. Sabbath morning services begin at 9 o'clock Mincha services begin at 6:30 p. m. followed by the study of the Ethics of the Fathers. Daily services morning and evening. Hebrew school 10 a. m. BEACH JEWISH CENTER HIS Euclid Ave.. Miami Reach ABRAHAM D. WOLF. Cantor Friday, 7:30 p. m„ Kabalos Shabos. Rev. Abraham D. Wolf, cantor, •nd the Center choir will conduct the musical services. Saturday morning, servicesGuest Speaker. Saturday Shalosh Seudes 7 p. m. Refreshments and community singing. Daily services mornings and evenings. BETH JACOB CONGREGATION Wash. Ave. and 3rd St., Miami H.-.K h MOSES MESCHELOPF, Rabbi MAURICE MAMCHBS, Cantor Saturday 8:30 a. m. Services: Rabbi Moses Mescheloff preaching. Cantor Maurice Mamches chanting. Early Sabbath services, 7 a. m. Sabbath afternoon services 7:30 p. m., Rabbi Mescheloff discoursing. Service men's Shalosh S'oodoss follows. Mrs. Anna Gordon, 75, of 1015 Lenox Ave, Miami Beach, died Monday in a local hospital after a brief illness. She came here five yean ago from Playficld, N. J. She is survived by four sons. Harry Gordon. Miami attorney; Clifford, also of Miami; Morris, of Baltimore; and Milton A. Gordon of Chicago. Funeral services were conducted Tuesday in the Gordon Funeral Home chapel with Rabbi Max Shapiro officiating. Burial was in Woodlawn Park cemetery. HOME CAMP REVIEW WAS OUTSTANDING SUCCESS The first 1943 Mid-Season Review of the Home Camp took place at the "Y" last Sunday afternoon in the presence of a capacity audience. It was, by far, the most sensational and gigantic production ever undertaken by ,the children of the Camp since : its inception five years ago. Produced and directed by Bobby Rubenstein and Hope Ellen Tannenbaum, of our Home Camp staff, almost every child in the Camp was a participant in this gala event. The affair was opened by a Welcome Chorus by the girls of the Camp, followed by a Cane Dance by Maxine Bender. The Moonlight scene and the Bowery scene were very outstanding. The THE Y. M. H. A. NOTES By HARHY SCHWARTZ in a wholesome environment Please encourage the youngsters to come here. s "Y" Welcomes New Federation Director The officers and directors and the general membership 0 f th Y. M. H. A. extend a heartyYel come to Mr. Ben Goldman, newlv appointed executive director of the Greater Miami Jewish Fedpr ation. Large Crowd at Installation Despite the hot weather a large crowd witnessed the ins'tal lation of officers on Wednesday July 14. Officers and directors were installed by Abe Aronovitz chairman of the installation committee, who was assisted bv Nat Roth, Hyland Rifas. and George Wolpert, Mrs. J. Levinson and Mrs. H. Barnett, who repaieut: wuie very ouisianaing. a ne •="'" """ "?{ %  %  "• *iieii, wno reppiece de resistance that took the i resented the women's branch on ;iiirli<>nr'* hv trM-m uric n n#\*-4*.ii* the install;]! inn rnmrv*i***(* ?, REGISTRATION TO START FOR 2ND SUMMER CLASSES AT UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI TEMPLE EMANU-EL 1S01 South Andrew* Ave. Ft. I-auderdnli". Fla. Reform Synagogue nerving Hollywood. Ft. iAiiderdale and Kroward County SAMUEL HA1.KVI HA RON. Rabbi Services: Friday, 8 p. m. Religrous School: Sunday, 10 a. m. Sisterhood business meeting, Monday, 8 p. m. Sisterhood night at the Fort Lauderdale Servicemen's Center canteen. Wednesday. 6 to 11 D. m. RIVERMONT PARK SANITARIUM IS** N. W. 7th 8t. Ph. 8-7901 Beat car* for chronic sick, convalescent and elderly people $25 WEEKLY UP % %  BIBB Large Beautiful Grounds—_ Upholstery. Slip Cores u Drapery Shops Complete Line of Exclusive Decorative Fabric* 35 N. W. 1st St. Ph. 3 MM The United States CrO/,_ merit Having Taken Over Hie Present Offi I WANT MY MILK Dlt JOSEPH B. MARGOUS announces the MMOYAL OP HIS OITICI Sll Lincoln Roast Albion Bldg., Suite 3M MIAMI BEACH For the Practice of General Dentistry HEALTH RESORT AMERICAN PLAN HOTEL C am im Ut INK Miaou Mat, ifora. Imuw i fa ai Cm i fc APPROVEO SANITARIUM liu4 YOUR JEWISH FUNERAL HOME 710 S.W. 12th AVENUE Wt A L PHONE 3-3431 WORTHY AND DESERVES YOUR FULL SUPPORT AND RECOMMENDATION


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EWG2OAA6U_EBWK1A INGEST_TIME 2013-05-07T21:50:02Z PACKAGE AA00010090_00753
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES