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The Jewish Floridian ( November 13, 1942 )

UFJUD

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& Jewish florid Ian \% CoM8/wwc The Jewish Unity H VOLUME 15—No. 45 MIAMI, FLORIDA. FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 13. 1942 PRICE 10 CENTS NAZIS ARREST COUNCIL OF. ANTWERP FOR "SABOTAGE", Havana (WNS)—A more liberal policy towards refugees from war zones and lands of oppression in Europe will be applied by the Cuban authorities to those seeking refuge in the Western Hemisphere, especially in allowing refugees temporary shelter pending receipt of permanent immigration visas elsewhere. Assurances to this effect were given Dr. Alexander Vergoda. newly appointed chief of the Cuban Immigration Department, to Isaac Yagodnik, president of the Centro Israelite de Cuba, an affiliate of the HIAS-ICA Emigration Association. An official decree, which will enable refugees from Europe to stay temporarily in Cuba until their immigration visas to South, Central and North American countries are obtained, will be issued soon. The visas for temporary stay will be issued if a satisfactory guarantee is furnished as to the political status of the prospective immigrant and if financial requirements are guaranteed. The new liberal policy was manifested in the recent release of 169 refugees from Triscornia, the concentration station for detained immigrants. The remaining inmates at Trisconia will soon gain their freedom, Dr. Vergoda stated. [ Geneva (WNS)—Nazi authorities in occupied Belgium have I arrested the 12 members of the] Jewish Council of Antwerp on the charge that the Jewish leaders sabotaged the Nazi plan to' deport the Jewish population of Belgium to the Polish ghettos, it was learned here this week. The | Jewish Council had been set up by the Nazis to serve as an intermediary between the Jewish population and the Nazi rulers. Meanwhile, a radio report from Budapest stated that 47 Hungarian Jews are among the 60 persons now being tried in Hungary on charges that they organized a sabotage ring in behalf of Soviet Russia. PUSSES AWAY AT E OP PARENTS Morris Wroobel, Dado County Deputy Sheriff, passed away at his residence last Monday evening, after a long illness. A young E WAR TIE USE IS SEEN FOR E FOR WEEK NOV. 22 Mrs. T. T. Stevens, chairman of the woman's division. Dade War Savings staff, has announced that the women's activities for Minute Women At War Week Will begin Nov. 22, lasting through the 28th. Religious groups in the area are to be requested to permit four-minute addresses from the pulpit that week to be made by uniformed representatives of the armed forces. Mrs. Ralph H. Wooten and Mrs. James L. Kauffman, wives of ranking army and naval officials in the district, have agreed to serve as co-chairmen of the climaxing event when women of the nation will stage a gigantic bond selling campaign. Plans for the occasion have not as yet been made public, but it is understood that preparations provide for the spectacular. Club women of all Greater Miami organizations, as well as individually are invited to take part in the activities. Mrs. Sidney L. Weintraub, Mrs. E. D. Pearce, Mrs. John L. Skinner, Mrs. T. V. Moore, jr.. Mrs. J B. Davidson, Mrs. George N. Corrigan are among the women in charge of divisions of the campaign. New York (WNS)—The possibility that fuller wartime use can now be made of a majority of the 6.000 emigre doctors in the United States, refugees from Hitlerism, was foreseen this week by Dr. Tracy J. Putnam, vice chairman of the National Committee for the Resettlement of Foreign Physicians, in a statement which commented on a recent directive of the Board of Procurement and Assignment Service. The directive pointed out that the army and navy are not in a position to accept such physicians as commissioned officers because they are not citizens, and recommended to chairmen of State Procurement and Assignment Services that use be made of these physicians in essential civilian positions, particularly in critical areas where more physicians are needed. "The stand by the board, that emigre physicians can be of use to the war effort by absorption in essential civilian posts clarifies the way for greater utilization of this group at a time when the nation is desperately short of trained medical men." Dr. Putnam said. He added, "the general public will now appreciate that though emigre doctors are eager to serve with the military medical services, they cannot do so, and that the full utilization of their skills and training must be in other areas — particularly where an emergency exists and they can serve on a basis of temporary placement for the duration of the war." In a limited number of states where foreign-trained physicians are eligible to practice, the warduration arrangement, which Dr. Putnam's committee favors, will make it possible for emigre doctors to fill temporarily, practices vacated by the entrance of American physicians into military service Dr. Putnam stressed the fact that as refugees from Hitler, emigre doctors are most eager to be of fullest service to the country that has given them haven. However, the majority have not been in this country the minimum five years needed to complete citizenship requirements, and thus are not eligible for ar|my medical service. POLISH GOVERNMENT WILL ANSWER RUSSIAN CHARGES London (WNS)—The Polish Government-in-exile will shortly make a formal reply to charges I emanating from Moscow that Pol\ ish army officers in Russia are discriminating against Jews in the Polish legions, it was disclosed this week. The charge was made by Wanda Wasilewska, editor of a Polish Communist paper in Russia, who said that the Polish army was discharging Jews to prevent them from leaving for the Middle East with the Polish forces. In recent months, many Polish divisions have been shifted to the Middle East and soldiers have been permitted to take their families with them. OF MORRIS WROOBEL man of 26. he had gained an enviable reutation among law enforcement groups throughout the area as well as the many others with which he came in contact. A resident of Miami Beach, he came here with his parents, Rev. and Mrs. Nathan Wroobel in 1924. He attended the Beth David Religious School and participated in many of its activities serving as an officer of the first Bar Mitzva Club in this area. A graduate of the Miami Senior High School he was prominent in the work of the National Council of Jewish Juniors. He was a member of the Beth David Congregation Bnai Brith. Y. M. H. A. and Miami Beach Civic League. He served as a member of the Beth David Choir under the direction of Cantor J. Shoulson. Funeral services were held at the Riverside Memorial Chapel. Tuesday to an overflowing Chapel. Rabbis Mescheloff, Shapiro and Machtei officiated assisted by Cantor Maurice Mamches. A guard of honor in uniform of the State Road Patrol in addition to many local public officials were present to pay their respects. Active pallbearers were Fred. K. Shochet, Carl Gardner, Morris Raff. Paul Barnett, Morty Moses, Max Silver. Leo Spiegal, Max Feit. Norman Weiss, Herman Barnett and Abe Berkowitz. A long list of honorary pallbearers included Sheriff D. C. Coleman, A. G. Harkness, Russ Eavenson. Ray Mills. Ray Martens, Judge Ralph Pole, Judge Tom Ferguson, Tom Wood, Joe Conderman, Maurice Grossman, Philip Berkowitz, Sam Silver, Louis Schwartz, Harry Rosen, Milton A. Friedman, M. B. Frank and Jimmie Coleman. Beside his parents he leaves two sisters, Mrs. Esther Spiegal of Miami Beach and Mrs. Helen Bernstein, New York. Following the services at the chapel the funeral cortege led by a motorcycled escort went to the Woodlawn Cemetery. COST OF SETTLING JEWS AFTER BE London (WNS)—Nazi radio stations in Germany and all Axisoccupied countries joined this week in blaming "international Jewry" for the highly successful American invasion of French North Africa. Nazi broadcasters accused the Jews of pacing the way for the landing of American troops by bribing French colonial leaders. The Nazi radio in Stuttgart stated that Jews in Algeria. Morocco and Tunisia had been secretly conducting anti-Vichy political activities in these French colonies and had undermined their resistance to the American invaders. The Nazi announcer said that the Jews had plotted to "betray" the French colonies in revenge for the anti-Jewish policies of the Vichy government. The Na/.i controlled radio in Tunis reported that General Augustc Nogues. pro-Nazi Pierre Laval's resident-general in Morocca, had ordered the arrest of hundreds of Jews in Morocco when informed of the landing of American forces. The Jews were arrested because of their "intense pro-United Nations' feelings." Hundreds of Jews were arrested also in Tunisia upon orders of the Vichy governor who said that the Jews were acting as "American agents." A rigid curfew was imposed on all Jews not arrested, forbidding them to leave their homes from early evening to dawn. It was estimated here that between 150.000 and 200.000 Jews reside in French North Africa. The United States invasion has saved them from falling into Nazi hands and will probably result in their release from internment and slave camps. There are large Jewish communities also in Algeria, particularly in Algiers and Oran, and in Bizerte, Tunisia, where there are many Italian Jews, who suffered equally with the French Jews at the hands of anti-Semitic Vichy officials. London (WNS)—Netherlanders are continuing to defy Nazi antiJewish regulations despite the threats of stern reprisals, according to the Aneta news agency. Syracuse WNS—Hayim Greenberg, noted labor Zionist leader, estimated this week that it would cost three billion dollars to settle 3.000.000 homeless European Jews after the war. Speaking at the 24th annual convention of the Zionist Laborite Party of America. Mr. Greenberg called upon Jews in the United States to raise the first SI.000.000 for this purpose. Advocating international control of Palestine, Mr. Greenberg declared that "a Provisional Condominion over Palestine should be set up. including representatives of the Jews in Palestine, the Arabs in Palestine, the Jewish Agency and the International Mandate." "It is to be clearly understood" the Zionist leader continued, "that this Provisional Condiminion must get into Palestine enough Jews to constitute a majority and thereafter turn the government over to the inhabitants of the country themselves. An Arab Federation is practically out of the question, as the Arabs themselves will not set up one without outside force. The Jews cannot do it for them. The concept of bi-national state is meaningless, especially as applied to Palestine, where the question not only involves the people there but also millions who must come in." J HAS BEEN GIVE! MEDAL \\ KMOX New York (WNS)—Commander Samuel B. Frankel. 37, of Stapleton. Staten Island, has been presented with the Distinguished Service Medal by Secretary of the Navy. Frank Knox. at the latter's office in the Navy Dept. The citation accompanying the decoration lauds Commander Frankel for his "extraordinary initiative and tireless energy" in redeeming men and vessels. The award for "exceptionally meritorious service" was bestowed on the commander for his work as assistant naval attache in Murmansk and Archangel, U. S. S. R.. during the period from Nov., 1941 to Sept., 1942. "Under adverse conditions," the laudatory citation to Commander Frankel reads, "he displayed extraordinary initiative and tireless energy in the direction of repairs to damaged United States vessels, in the salvaging of stranded and abandoned vessels, and in the supervision, rescue, hospitalization and repatriation of survivors of sunken vessels." Commander Frankel is further credited in the navy citation with saving for future service in the war effort certain vessels which would otherwise have been lost. %  I • I



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imm PAGE TWO Jewish ffcrk/ian FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13. 1942 Social Personals Clubs Organizations Mr. and Mrs. Morris Plant announce the engagement of their son Lt. Alfred L. Plant, to Miss Anna Stein. 41-12 41st St., Sunnyside. L. I. The wedding is to take place on Nov. 28th in NewYork City. Lt. Plant, who enlisted in the army February of this year took his basic military training at the Q. M. Replacement Center in Camp Lee. Va., and was commissioned six months later. On entering the school he was rated second highest out of a group of 500 men who applied. He has been assigned to the Technical Training Department of the Quartermaster School, and is working under the direction of Capt. R. DuBrowin, in the Officer Candidates at the school. Actual full size models of equipment used in the combat zones by Quartermaster troops are being constructed. Miniatures showing tactical situations, charts, models and training films are on, ly a few of the aids developed' the United States Army by this division to prepare the Forces, whom she visited in Ohio new officers for the important! while he was temporarily stajob that lies ahead. Before entertioned there. :ng the service Lt. Plant was con! nected with the Doughnut Corp. j of America, serving in the capacity of advertising manager and The membership committee of the Miami Chapter of the Senior Hadassah. headed by Mrs. Harry Platoff, will extend a courtesy tea to the paidup members of the organization Monday. November 16 at 1:30 p. m. at Carl's. 1711 Alton Road. Miami Beach. Games and refreshments will feature the afternoon. Admission will be by membership card and new membership prospects will be welcome. • • • Last Friday Rabbi S. M. Machtei officiated at the brith milah of the son of Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Carl Perry, 227 E. San Marino Drive. Miami Beach, at St. Francis hospital. • • • Miss Rosalind Friedman, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Friedman, has just returned from a two months' vacation in the north. She is the fiance of Lieutenant Leonard D. Heyman, of Air director of public relations, making his headquarters in New York City. He is a native of Miami, having been bom here in 1912. His parents are among the early pioneers of this section of Florida. • • • The family of the late Abraham Pelefsky. formerly of New York but a resident of Miami for the past four years, appreciate the many expressions of condolence received upon the death of Mr. Pelefsky. who passed away October 17. Surviving are his wife. Bertha; son. Seymour Pelefsky; parents. Mr. and Mrs. Philip Pelefsky; two sisters and one brother of New York, and one sister. Mrs. Rose Namoff. of Miami. Services were held at the Gordon Funeral Chapel. • • • The son of Mr. and Mrs. Moshe Massre. 2348 S. W. 10th street, was circumcised by Rabbi S. M. Machtei on Tuesday morning. This afternoon, at St. Frani is hospital, Rabbi Machtei will officiate at the brith milah of the son of Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Romer, 431 W. 29th street. Miami Beach. • • • A supper will be served Sunday. November 15th at 5 p. m. for the benefit of Labor Lyceum of the Workmen's Circle. Branch 690. A farewell for one of the active members. Mr. and Mrs. A. Solomon and son will be observed. Mr. Solomon was active in Branch 692 and when the Lyceum was being built he devoted his entire time towards its completion. • • • Mrs. Max Pepper and children, Marshal] and Nancy, are now residing in Jacksonville. Florida, where Dr. Pepper is Stationed as a senior grade lieutenant at the Naval Hosital. • • • Miss Mildred Lewis returned to New York after a two week stay. While here she was the house guest of Mr. and Mrs. H. Spivack, 905 Washington Avenue. Miami Beach. Naomi Machtei is recuperating at home from an emergency appendectomy performed last Saturday afternoon at Victoria hospital. Mrs. Max Ellis, wife of Dr. Max Ellis of Miami Beach, will return this week-end after spending some time in New York undergoing medical treatment. • • The marriage of Miss Gertrude Bandel to Mr. Raphael Yunes. son of Mrs. R. Yunes. was solemnized last Sunday afternoon at the Miami Beach Jewish Center. Dr. Samuel Bension officiated assisted by Cantor David A. Wolf. The decorated synagogue was filled to capacity. A dinner followed in the social hall. • • • Private Arnold Raxin. stationed at the Marine Station. Lee Field. Jacksonville, is at present confined to the hospital there. • • • Mrs. Nathan Adelman returned to the city after visiting her children. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Adelman in Savannah and relatives in Virginia. • • • Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Romer announce the birth of a son. Thursday, November 5th, at St. Francis hospital, Miami Beach. Buy War Bonds and Stamps and [i sure Your Tomorrow. ONE1AI VITAMIN 2=1 'TWIINK of it! DAY TABLETS Yi ur minimum daily requiremi'nLa of A and D Vitamins or of li Complex Vitamins, in one pleasant tablet. Remember the name ONE-A-DAY (brandI Vitamin Tablet*. DR. MILES NERVINE r|0 TENSE IKTTM make ** you k. -fill. (rankv, RMIIMI? Dr. Miles Nerrine nlpi U> lessen Nervous Tension. Get it at your drug store. Read directions and tue only as directed. Alka-Seltzer XT HEN Headache. Mos" cular Pains sr Simple Nrurslms. Distress after Msals. Gas on Sumach, or "Moraine After"' interfere with your work or spoil your fun. try Alka-Seltzer. PRIVATE HEBREW INSTRUCTION IN PUPIL'S OWN HOME RABBI H. M. KAGAN PHONE 9-2295 SEMINARY OF AMERICA 437 S. W. 15th AVENUE GRADUATE OF RABBINICAL Ask Your Local Delicatessen For the Beit • It Costs No More OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE IN FLORIDA KOSHER ZION SAUSAGE CO. PRODUCTS Delicious Corned Beef Pickled. Cooked and Smoked Meat* 37th and Normal Ave. Chicago Mrs. Max Shapiro Beth David Sisterhood announces their annual membership tea to be held at Beth David auditorium. Wednesday afternoon. November 18th at 2 o'clock. Mrs. Harry Ollphant. president, and Mrs. Norman Jacobs, general chairman, have arranged an excellent program, to which all members and friends are invited. The highlight of the afternoon will be presented by Mrs. Max Shapiro, who will review the recent selection of the Book of the Month Club, the "Seventh Cross," by Ann Seghers. Cantor Louis Hayman will be heard in a number of vocal selections. Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Goldman. 1717 S. W. 13th St.. announce the engagement of their daughter. Harriet, to Charles Jamison. 1401 Alton Rd.. Miami Beach. Miss Goldman is a graduate of Miami Senior High School and Mr. Jamison of Miami Edison. He attended Miami University and the University of Florida and is a member of the TEP Fraternity. The wedding will take place in January. TOWER THEATRE AIR-CONDITIONED S. W. 8th St. at 15th Fri., Nov. 13—Last Day! 2 ATTRACTIONS! "The Man Hitler Feared" "BERLIO CORfifSPODDEM" DANA ANDREWS VIRGINIA GILMORE Plus The Comedy Riot Feature "HBVF00T WITH WILLIAM TRACY JAMES GLEASON • • • Starts Sat at 4:30 P. M. and Sun. and Mon.. Nov. 14-16 [DON'AMECHE!* ~jOA\~I.KNNEfT~ BILLIE BURKE "GIRL TROUBLE" National Children's Cardiac Home. Dade Chapter No. 1. U sponsoring a Dutch Supper at the Home. 4250 West Flagler Street Sunday evening. November 22nd at 5:30 p. m. Admission 75c. The chairman is Mrs. M. Newman and her committee axe planning an interesting evening to include cards, bingo games and prizes. The members of the committee are Mrs. C. Baum. Mrs. B. Rosenblum. Mrs. Sokoloff. Mrs. H. Saffer. Mrs. A. Gelb, Mrs. Suberman. Mrs. H. Wronker. Mrs. J. Zwicker. Mrs. A. Mink, Mrs. A. Eisenberg. Mrs J. Miller. Mrs. R. Levy. Mrs. M. Cohn, Mrs. M. Obler, Mrs. E. Goldberg. Mrs. M. Kleiman, Mrs. B. Wolf. Mrs. J. Berman. Mrs. P. Rabin. Mrs. D. Emmet, Mrs. W. Groner. For reservations phone Mrs. Groner. 2-1648 or Mrs. Radin. 2-4600 not later than Wednesday. Nov. 18th. • • • Lt. Bernard A. Frank is spending a short furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Morris B. Frank. Miami Beach pioneers and active communal workers. Lt. Frank, an attorney, practiced here with offices on the Beach before entering the armed forces. He is at present stationed at Alabama with the Military Police Division, attached to the Provost Marshall Office. • • • Mr. and Mrs. H. Spivack celebrated their 21st wedding anniversary last week with a gathering of relatives and friends. • • a The Sisterhood Chesed Shel Ernes installed officers and board members at a meeting last week. Board members are Mrs. A. Daum, Mrs. M. Kotkin, Mrs. Sol Schwartz, Mrs. N. Pritzker, Mrs. E. Gordon, Mr. N. Alexander. Mr. M. Kotkin. Mrs. A. Pepper. A buffet luncheon was served at the home of Mrs. Wm Clein. scene of the event. ROOM FOR RENT One room furnished, in private home, in northwest section, to Jewish woman or couple. Refer. PHONE 78-3439 The Pioneer Woman' Q zation of Greater Miami Chi %  S o. 1, started their new'year' activities with a luncheon £j literary program held in the ? den of Mrs. I. Shapoff Mr ShV" off spoke at length on Hebrew culture. Others entering mlo discussion were: Henry Seitlin I Rosengarten, D. Friedman ami %  M rs. Henry Seitlin. A reading was given by Mrs. Shubow A meeting of the organization will beheld Wednesay, November 1 • • • ; The marriage of Miss Rhode i Apter, daughter of Mr. and Mrs j Louis Apter of Hartford. Conn' to Lt. Seymour M. Miller. of^ Mr.' and Mrs. Sam Miller of this city, was announced by the I groom's parents upon their return i to the city last week from Mew York where they went to be present at the ceremony. The wedding was an event of Oct. 25th and was solemnized at the Essex House before members of the immediate family and friends. Others present from Miami were Mr. and Mrs. Sam Blank and Mr. and Mrs. Jack Miller, uncles and : aunts of the groom. A dinner followed. Miss Apter. prior to her marriage, held a professorihip at a Connecticut University. Lt. Miller, now stationed at Camp I Pickett. Va.. with the Medical .orps. graduated from the Flor' ida and Tulane Universities with | an M. D. degree. • • • Nat Williams has assumed direction of the Y. M. H. A. orchestra, now in the process of organization. Musicians of various instruments are needed to fill the required number and are asked to contact either Mr. Williams. 3-6264, or the Y. M. H. A.. 3-4012. • • • Under the sponsorship of the Miami Round Table, affiliate of the National Conference of Christians and Jews, a radio program with its theme as an armistice week observance, will be beard | over WIOD. Saturday evening at nine. Participating will be Rabbi | Colman A. Zwitman. Rev. Roger Squire and Father Florence B. Sullivan. The subject will be "What Contribution Can Religion Make to a Just Endurable Peace." &&m -.,'-.; %  z&sm We Sl^vJ f % %  THE G A ROE N OF MEMORIES mourn n(Bo FLORIDA'S MOST BEAUTIFUL BURIAL ESTATES West Flagler Street at 53rd Avenue ONLY TEN MINUTES FROM THE HEART OF MIAMI WHY LET A STRANGER SELECT YOUR BURIAL SITE? Make sure that your family will be together forever—by providing your own private family plot. No one wants a stranger to make a decision that affects his family. Yet. that is exactly what happens to many families who do not own a private plot. In the moment of shock and sadness, you would leave the choice of a burial plot to the first wellmeaning person who came along. How can such a person make a selection that affects those dear to you? The choice must be yours and yours alone. Don't force your family to buy a plot "blindly." Don't leave yourself in the position of having to make a most important decision at the moment of greatest sadness. Provide now a beautiful family plot in Mount Nebo. Perpetual Care Title Insurance • Lots may be purchased on convenient terme Business Office 1014 Olympic! Bldg. 3-5132 A VISIT WILL CONVINCE YOU •: ,.:v-^ H ^ i^"^^^i^^:^iSfe*w*^>^*^.;^



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;•:•• FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13. 1942 vjewistnoridian • i\*rp9*t • \\ PAGE THREE MARCHING MEN THE HONOR ROLL OF GREATER MIAMI (This weekly feature 1B prepared k the public relations committee of SL creater Miami Army and Navy rnmiiiittee of the National Jewish wlriri' Hoard. The committee ln!i,r,l rs William I. Boxerman. chairman benjamin Bronston. Pred K. Soc'het and Haul Weltzman. (Contributions to this column are i !" uied, particularly in the form of utters received here from Greater JJlam'l boys now In the service.) Fortunes of War From the TTS comes this interesting human interest story about Pvt. Sidney Sandier, a former employe of Saks Fifth Avenue on the Beach While a show buyer for the Lincoln Road establishment, he usually ate his lunch under the palms near the ninth hole of, the Municipal golf course Now, through the fortunes of war he is a drill instructor and puts the new recruits through their paces on the identical site. Sandier ate at other places beside the golf course, among them a Beach hotel where as a trainee he later did K P duty ... The army literally caught up with Sandier While at the Beach last spring, the army took over the hotel in which he lived He moved twice thereafter and each time the army occupied his quarters Finally, in June he enlisted while in New York City for a spell and eventually was sent back to the Beach. Proud as Punch A. Sussman is proud as punch FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH TO HEAR DR. J. H. KAPLAN PALMER Funeral Chapel 2008 W. FLAGLER ST. "SOUS? 9-2664 WOMEN FOR PART TIME OCCUPATION Can work from their own homes and make surprisingly large earnings. For full details write MAC c|o P. O. Box 2973. Miami, Florida of the fact that he has reported to the Marine officer training school at Quantico, Virginia For to make the grade as an officer candidate in the marine corps, one must have almost perfect physical and mental health. Sussman will receive three months of training after which he will be classified for a specific type of service. Thumbnail Sketches Harold J. Goldstein, an aviation cadet, is training to be a navigator at the army air force re-flight school at Monroe, La. Morton Levinson has entered a naval training school near Chicago Stanley Davis is a second lieutenant stationed with a tank destroyer battalion at Camp Hood. Texas Joseph I. Davis, lieutenant (jg) in the inshore patrol of the navy, has just been graduated from the indoctrination school for naval officers at Newport. R. I. Sol Dansky. now a corporal in the air corps, is somewhere on combat duty J. H. Davidson, former well-known Beach realtor, now is in OCS on the Beach training for the army air corps. Capt. Anson Dreisen is still at Fort Sill in the army field artillery where according to his mother, "he is sticking to the job he has and doing it well." Joseph J. Drucker. former Beachite, who entered the service in November, 1940, as a private, now is a second lieutenant in the army air corps, stationed at Turner Field. Ga. His brother, David, who enlisted in November, 1939, now is a captain in the marine corps. Bernard Dolgin is in the army medical corps as a private at Camp White, Ore. Capt. Al Dubbin has been transferred from Bowman Field. Ky. to the Florence air base at Florence, S. iC. Private Jacob J. Zion is I at the 34th general hospital. 1 Camp Carson, Colo. Paul Lubin is at the Opa Locka training station as an airplane mechanic Lester I. Abrams. who entered the service last June in the army medical corps now is at Camp Forrest. Tenn. ... He has been accepted for OTC Both he and his parents are keeping their fingers crossed, hoping he'll be sent to train on the Beach. Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan, rabbi emeritus of Temple Israel, will be guest minister at the First Unitarian Church, meeting in Mayfair Theatre, 1600 Biscayne Boulevard, Sunday, November 15, at 11:00 o'clock. His subject THE Y. M. H. A. NOTES By HARRY SCHWARTZ Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan will be "The Meaning of Faith." He will have complete charge of the services. The minister of the church, the Rev. Joseph Barth, will preach Sunday at the First Unitarian Church of Chicago. The services are open to visitors of all faiths. *Let Me Get You Some i Buv War stamps and Bonds MILES S^ NOW and give Ur m '' n ln ,hC AyTi.DAiu M||C ,, ^* > armed forees tne hel P they need W ITH YOUR responsibilities, can you afford to let a Headache, Muscular Pains, Functional Monthly Pains or Simple Neuralgia slow you down? Dr. Miles Anti-Pain Pills have been bringing relief from these common discomforts for nearly sixty years. Countless American housewives consider Anti-Pain Pills almost as much of a necessity in the medicine cabinet, as is flour in the kitchen cupboard. They have Dr. Miles Anti-Pain Pills in the house, many of them carry these little pain relievers in purse or handbag. They are prepared for these minor aches and pains that sometimes occur in almost every family —ARE YOU? Dr. Miles Anti1'ain Pills are pleasant to take and do not upset the stomach. Get Dr. Miles Anti-Pain Pills at your drug store. Regular Package 25 tablets 25*. Economy Package 125 tablets $1.00. Read directions and use only as directed. DEAFENED! SEE AND HEAR THE NEW RADIO EAR • Just released from the laboratories of one of America's oldest hearing aid manufacturers. More features, more convenience, immediate service .more hearing! RADIOEAR OF FLORIDA 209 Congress Bldg., Miami Fla. PHONE 3-2100 R. W. BROWN & CO. FERTILIZER MANUFACTURERS Southern Florida Fertilizer Company TROPICAL BRAND Quality Fertilizer GROWERS' SUPPLIES INSECTICIDES Factory: Gouldi. Florida Phone: Homeetead 5-44M offices: South Miami. Fla PHONE 4.3375 ENJOY YOURSELF AT THE NORTH MIAMI RIDING ACADEMY GENTLE RIDING HORSES E. J. ALBERT A SON 13575 N. E. th Avenue REASONABLE RATES KENHOLZ KOSHER MARKET IN BUSINESS SINCE 1926 The Kenholz Kosher Market located at 1043 Washington Ave.. Miami Beach, was established in that city in 1936. Under the same management of Saul Kenholz, a kosher butcher who has been in the same line for the pasi 32 years, the market is at present under the kashruth supervision of Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky of Miami Beach, a member of the Orthodox Rabbinic organizations. The Kenholz Kosher Market has operated under the policy of giving the public Kashruth. Cleanliness and Quality. MURRAY DEMANDS AN END TO RACIAL DISCRIMINATION Boton (WNS)—-A demand for the abolition of racial discrimination in order to achieve true labor unity was voiced by Philip Murray, president of the CIO. at the opening session of the fifth annual CIO convention. "It is wise to remember." Mr. Murray said, "that any kind of unity must comprehend the complete abolition of all forms of racial discrimination." WAR BONUS Essential in the equipment of every Soldier, Sailor, Marine or Flyer Is a first aid kit consisting of bandages and antiseptics for Instantaneous use. These materials are packed into a compact box and cost about $1.50 each. Miami Service League to Sponsor Card Party on November 16 On Monday evening, November 16 at 8 o'clock, the Miami Service League of the Y.M.H.A. will sponsor a card and Mah Jongg party for men and women at the "Y" club rooms. The proceeds of this affair are devoted to the dances and other services to service men. Men and women are invited and admission is only 50c. Chairman of the committee is Mrs. Fannie Weintraub and is assisted by Mrs. Helen Bloom, Mrs. Sari Furman, Mrs. Lee Shapio, Mrs. Ada Green, and Mrs. Juliette Stone. Refreshments will be served. "Y" Day December Mrs. Al Reisman. president of the Y. W. H. A. announces that the annual "Y" day will be held throughout this area on Wednesday, December 2. The "Y" day event was inaugurated last year. This is a series of card parties held on the same day at different homes throughout the Miami area. The proceeds of these parties go to the Y.W.H.A. fund. The following persons have consented to sponsor parties for the Y.W.H.A. on that day: Mrs. Rose Lubel. 3-8310; Mrs. Al Weiner. 9-2180; Mrs. Al Reiser, 2-0297; Mrs. H. Mandel, 3-8208; Mrs. B. Rosen, 2-8122; Mrs. Dcutsch and Mrs. Chester, 48-1749; Mrs. S. Sanders and Mrs. M. Shankman, 2-7802; Mrs. Bea Stepkin. Mrs. Barnett and Mrs. Pearl Reisman. 4-4126; Mrs. S. Traurig. 3-0213: Mrs. M. Grossman and Mrs. Sager. 2-7979; Mrs. Jennie Levinson. 3-2227: Mrs. Ann Jacobs. 2-4471: Mrs. William Friedman. 2-2803: and Mrs. Belle Siegel, 2-0992. Make your reservations now with any of the above hostesses. Get a party of friends and attend. The committee is composed of Mrs. Berger and Mrs. Rosen. Y. M. and Y. W. H. A. Installation j on Sunday, December 6 "Better late than never" is an old adage and this time it applies to our installation party which will be held at the "Y" on Sunday evening. December 16. Joseh M. Lipton. chairman of the installation committee, is arranging an excellent program for that day. In the meantime, keep this date open. It will be a gala event. 11th Annual Dance Thursday, December 10 Al Bcrkowilz. chairman of the Y.M.H.A. 11th Annual Dance committee, announces that the Coral Gables Country Club has been rented for the night of Thursday. December 10 for the 11th annual dance of the "Y," Cy Washburn and his orchestra will render the music and entertainment will be furnished by the Army Air Corps. Keep this date open and watch these columns for further announcements. Tickets are only $1.10 per person and may be obtained from any member of the committee or from the "Y" office. The committee is composed of Al Berkowitz. chairman, assisted by Larry Grossberg. Al Pallot, Leo Ackerman. Murray Apte, Bernard Sterling and George Rachlin. Thanksgiving Celebration Wednesday Evening. November 25 On Wednesday evening. November 25. the annual "Y" Thanksgiving Party will be held. The feature of the evening will be a talkie entitled "Dream of My People." featuring the late Cantor Joseph Rosenblatt. Watch I these columns for further details. Have you a son or daughter between the ages of 4 and 14? If so, send her to the "Y" danc, ing and crafts classes. For further particulars call the "Y" office. Bowling League News A new bowling league has started. Teams and their members are: Bombardiers: Marty Milstein. captain: Sam Badanes. Sam Weber. Gene Weiss; Izzy Schemer. Myron Newman, substitute. Tigers: Abe Berkowitz. captain: Larry Grossberg, Nat Blumberg. Jules Wilson. Joe Berman. Morton Moses, substitute. Commandos: Hal Levinson. captain: Hal Berkowitz. Jack Apte. Sam Seitlin, Ted Bramson. Marty Schwartz, substitute. Supermen: Allie Berkowitz. captain: Frank Rose, Pete Silverman, Sid Kaplan, Reuben Lubel. Bob Miller, substitute. Hi-Fliers: Al Reisman. captain; Mike Mirelson. Murray Apte. Willie Seigel, Robert Bodin. substitute. Rangers: Geo. Chertkof. captain; Geo. Rachlin, Sam Neufeld. Milton Friedman, Al Weiner. Geo. Cohen, substitute. Substitutes: Harry Gordon. George Grecnberg, Sol Levin, Al Moses. Aaron Edelman, Hank Miller. M. FRIEDMAN Practical Hebrew Teacher 620 Euclid Avenue. Miami Beach Miami Beach PHONE 5-9026 Beginners to Talmud Individual Instruction We need millions ot these first aid kits for emergency treatment They are also used by Red Cross workers, in field hospitals and wherever needed until hospital treatment may be obtained. Even a child could buy one or more of these kits through purchase of War Stamps. Buy War Bonds and Stamps every pay day and invest at least ten percent of your income in these government Securities. y. s. 1 rtoiurv Dipo'lmrnl Don't waste the precious gift of Eyesight! Many msn h.i.t lost the chanct lor military comaimoDi beCOUH ol poor eyssight-bad lighting is one COUII ol syestrain Be sure your lights at home are good snouqh to avoid eysslrain while you study' 11 on IB roi '"•'" •O""" Buy War Stamps and Bonds NOW and give our men in the armed forces the help they need. HOME MILK PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION OWNED AND OPERATED BY LOCAL DAIRYMEN i—Sealed in Cellophane for your protection PREFERRED BY THOUSANDS-MAY WE SERVE YOUJ Phone. MIAMI 2-7696-FT. LAUDERDALE 613 for GRADE "A" PASTEURIZED MILK CREAM SWEET CREAM SWEET CREAM BUTTER SALT BUTTER COTTAGE CHEESE BUTTERMILK SOUR CREAM SOY ACIDOPHILU8 We Sincerely Believe That There, Is No Better Dairy Product Than HOME MILK %  '!.



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PAGE FOUR *Jewlst ncridlar FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 13, 1942 PLANT AND MAIN OFFICES 21 S. W. SECOND AVENUE P. O. BOX 2973 PHONE 2-1141 KnUred as Second Class Matter July 4, 1930, at the Post Office of Miami, Florida, under the Act of March 3, 1879 Fred K. Shochet. Managing Editor One SUBSCRIPTION Year, $2.00 Six Months, $1.00 MIAMI, FLA., FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 13. 1942 KISLEV 4. 5703 VOLUME 15 NUMBER 45 BOY AMERICA RESCUED JOINS U. 5. ARMY THE FAR EAST The Nazis are now doing something of a blitz in reverse in the Near East theatre of the war. Perhaps this is an omen of the day when they will be doing a general blitz backwards throughout Europe. It may be predicted that when they do begin this general blitz backwards, they will run even more speedily backward than they ran forward in the first days of the war. Co-incident with this heartening news in the Near East came another bit of happy news -the arrival of a large contingent of American troops on Palestine soil. The United States has more Jews than any other country in the world. The United States Jews have given more money for the building up of Palestine, yet America has been sadly in the background when it came to determining the policy of Palestine. With the Yanks in Palestine with the Red. White and Blue waving in Jerusalem and Haifa, perhaps another day has come when America will assume the role to which she is entitled. Just what the future holds for Palestine is a matter like many other things in this warshaken world, about which we cannot speak with any preciseness now. We do not know who will hold the Mandate for Palestine nor do we even know that the Mandate system will be maintained, but if it is, it is not an impossibility that America itself as the country with the largest number of Jews, may be entrusted with it. How the American people as a whole would react to this, we cannot say, but it is more than probable the Pilgrim Fathers would have smacked with delight at the idea. THE SHOE FITS Reprinted below is a paragraph from the "Editor's Chair" column of the Jewish Post, Indianapolis Anglo-Jewish Publication. Your editor offers it to the readers, as echoing his same sentiments: Every once in a while I'll be stopped on the street or at meetings by someone who'll start off by declaring their disillusionment and disappointment about me and The Post and our courage. Why didn't you write a scathing editorial about the Talmud Torah situation, or are you afraid to criticize the failure of the Kirshbaum Forum to include Jewish speakers in its schedule, they ask. I don't mind criticism, and I am so used to sticking my chin out, that another clip to that delicate spot won't make me any more groggy But I want to make a declaration. The pages of The Post are open to practices in this community and state. If you guys mean what you say, then how about putting it in writing, signing your name and sending it on. Stick your neck out, if you really are sincere. If I believe your contentions are valid, I may comment myself, but the next time you boil up inside about this or that, don't transfer your anger to me or this paper, just give your own intestinal fortitude a test by deciding whether or not you'd be willing to put your identity to whatever axe you have to grind. Six large ash cans will provide an anti-aircraft director; 17 old radiators, a 75 mm. tank gun; a single wash pail, three bayonets; one copper kettle will yield enough copper for 84 rounds of automatic rifle ammunition. CAPITAL LETTER By CHARLES BENSON Nazi Germany's "Expendables"— the thousands of Jewish men. women and children ruthlessly cast out of their homelands—are taking their place among Uncle Sam's "lndispensables" in tne global struggle against fascism. The elderly, and others excused from military service, are busy on the production lines replenishing democracy's arsenals — jobs for which they are being trained and placed by the National Refugee Service. The younger men, such as the one pictured above saying goodbye at NRS. are Joining the armed forces in increasing numbers. The significance of the above photo lies in the fact that the soldier-to-be Is one of the SOU child refugees from r-" r:nronP!\n countries who have been brought to the United Statei since 1934 and who Have been placed] In carefully supervised foster homes by the Uerman-Jewisb Children's Aid, a child reseat agency administered by the National Refugee Service. As soon as he became ot age, this young refugee registered with his local Selective Service board. A few weeks ago he was called for Induction. "Tomorrow I will be inducted into the Army," he said proudlyhappy In the chance to repay in part his debt to the country whicb Is now hi3 home. The National Refugee Service, together with the Joint Distribution Committee and the United Palestine Appeal, receives its funds from thp United Jrwish Appeal. The President's Committee cm Fair Employment Practice, charged with preventing discrimination against minority groups in war industry, appears to have won a victory, It has now been established as the only agency empowered to act in its field, and although it will continue to operate under the not-too-sympathetic War Manpower Commission. :'. may have a more important part in shaping policy. Tinvictory seems at first to be of the minor bureaucratic variety, the result of the endless intrigue for a few more jobs, a lit-' tie additional authority and one more "operation" thai occupies SO much time in any large administrative system. Inter-office politics, in other words. But sometimes these departmental vendettas reflect a genuine conflict Of policy, and the FEPC does represent a consistent point of view. Formed originally in response to heavy pressure from negro groups who stressed the dangers of disaffection among their people, the FEPC has had considerable support from the White' House and has used its prestige boldly against strong interests. It cited some of the biggest firms in the country for violation of the President's anti-discrimination order and made them promise to mend their ways. It held hearings in Birmingham on discrimination against negroes, and survived the concentrated on• slaught by Southern democrats that followed. It did not survive unscathed, however. Partly as a result of the Birmingham hearings, the, President transferred it from his own immediate supervision in the Office for Emergency Management to Paul V. McNutt's War Manpower Commission. This was a blow to the FEPC. It had been expecting an increased budget, more personnel, new powers, and found itself subordinated instead to an agi ncy that felt us own powers insufficient and already had two branches that approximated the functions of its new baby. So on Aug. 1 when the transfer was announced, some minority groups thought that the FEPC was on its way out. Between that date and the end of October it was not publicly active. but much seems to have gone on behind the scenes. On Oct. 27. the WMC announced that field workers on the Negro Manpower Service and the Minority Groups Service would be transferred to the FEPC, and it appeared that these two rivals of the committee were virtually abolished. The all-important matter of budget and the precise weight the FEPC could swing in shaping WMC policy remain to be determine. Both probably depend on overall plans evolved to solve the manpower problem. Pending the emergence of those plans, the FEPC has been making itself felt as it has not done for several months. It has renewed its interest in the discrimination against Mexican in the southwest. It is talking of hearings to break down alleged prejudice against negroes and Jews in the Post Office Department. It is needling the United States Employment Service to refuse orders from employers who specifythat they want "white" or "Christian" labor. This last activity seems nearest fruition. It also illustrates! the kind of difficulty the FEPC IS most likely to run into. Following the custom of private employment agencies, the USES formerly asked employers to specify the race and religion of the workers they would like to have. This was modified somewhat when the regulations were changed to read that referrals should be made without regard to race, color or creed "except when an employers order includes tl OSe specifications which the employer is not willing to eliminate." Now the FEPC wants this changed. It wants the USES to refuse all help to an employer unless he eliminates discriminatory demands. In the interest of speeding the war effort, the USES would prefer to send an employer whatever workers it has in stock, negro. Jewish, alien. Chinese—as long as they meet the requirements of the work. Then, if the employer obviously discriminates, he would be referred to the FEPC for suitable action. The FEPC maintains that it does more harm to the war effort in the long run for a government agency to refrain from fighting discrimination with any means in its power, than it does to delaysupplying men to employers until they agree not to discriminate. The President may have to decide that one. Just to give you an idea of the complications in what you might have thought was a simple issue: now that the USES has omitted the question of religion from its questionnaires, it's next to imimpossible to ascertain whether employers are discriminating against Jews or Catholics or both, or not, since individual complaints can be adjusted and statistical evidence is no longer available. -TIDBITS FROM EVERYWHEREMuctiy eonpdmticd -By PHINEAS J. BIRONCOMMENT That canard which the United Press circulated last week about the "resignation of Henry Morgenthau was inspired by political gossips who are trying to undermine the Secretary of the Treasury It's true that Morgenthau has evinced a genuine interest in the fate of homeless Jewry ... But the story that he was considering leadership in the Zionist Organization is cut out of whole cloth One of the silliest arguments against a Jewish army of stateless and Palestinian Jews was advanced recently by Major George Fielding Elliot, the military expert who last year predicted Russia's collapse within six weeks The Major says that a Jewish army would reguire time for training and eguipping ... So what? What about the American boys in the American Army? • • Are they born with rifles on their shoulders? IN THE AIR Leonard Lyons reports the story of Monseigneur Chaptal, Auxiliary Bishop of Paris, who insists on wearing a yellow band and the Mogen David on his sleeve as he walks the streets of that Nazi-occupied city The most reverend gentleman's explanation for his voluntary identification with the non-Aryans is that not all of his grandparents were one hundred per cent Aryan Which reminds us of an incident reported by a reader of the Aufbau, the German-language refugee weekly ... It seems that a certain German Jew who had obtained his visa for America was helped greatly, it secretly, by an Aryan friend of long standing ... As the refugee finally was enabled to board the train that would take him out of Naziland, he had a farewell meeting with his friend, and lamented his inability to do anything to express in a tangible way his appreciation for the aid he had received And the Aryan said: "But there is a great favor you could do me ... I would be very grateful to you if you a sell me your Star of David band" Amazed, the Jew replied that of course he'd be glad to leave the "Jew badge with his friend "But what in the world do you want it for?" he asked Replied the other: "After all, there a possibility that Hitler may be overthrown here some day • • • And then this Jew badge will protect all who wear it • • • P. S.: The Aryan insisted on paying two hundred reichmarks for the Mogen David. READER'S GUIDE It's too bad you couldn't read the original manu ? c y ipt |h e S. J. Woolf's article on Weizmann, which appearedJB "> Magazine Section of the New York Times on November (CONTINUED ON PAGE 8)



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FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 13. 1942 +JewisHk>ri


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PAGE SIX vJewisti f/cridfia/n FR IDAY, NOVEM BER 13, 1942 PALM BEACH NOTES JEWISH FLORIDIAN OFFICE. 226 S. OLIVE STREET IN THE FOX BUILDING MRS. MARY SCHREBNICK. Representative Returning from her summer home in Worcester, Mass., this week was Mrs. I. Margolis of Lake Worth. A large group attended the Beth El luncheon and card party held Tuesday at Scher Hall. A business meeting was part of the afternoon's program. Hostesses wire Mrs. Frank Barer. Mrs. H. Freeman. Mrs. S. Dicks. Mrs. H. Kapner Mrs. I. Kapner and Mrs. H. Greenblatt. Mrs. Bessie Rader of Belle Glade spent the week-end at West Palm Beach. Mr. and Mrs Meyers returned to West Palm Beach after spending the summer at Youngston, N. Y. 1 —— "EAT HOLSUM BREAD" Sidney Pepper and Martin Dubbin headed the committee in charge of the annual card party of the B'nai Britli Lodge 1146. held last Thursday at Schwartzberg Hall. For the Best in Dairy Products AMBULANCE SERVICE MIZELL SIMON MORTUARY 413 Hibiscus Street Ph. 8121 West Paltn Beach. Florida ALFAR CREAMERY CO. WEST PALM BEACH MILK—CREAM—ICE CREAM SOUTHERN DAIRIES %  r< -^ Serving Palm Beach County, featuring the VsJ-5****C Nationally Famous Southern Dairies Pro%  < %  CBEAM ducts and Ice Cream. -"lit • AS NEAR TO YOU AS YOUR PHONE [ 318 HARVEY BUILDING PHONE 6093 Writing Fire and all Kindred Lines oi Insurance for SAFETY... and Liberal Returns Place Your Funds In |AE PEHEIUL mr MIAMI A SAVINGS INSTITUTION Which has never paid lest than 3% on insured savings. RESOURCES OVER $6,000,000 J. M. LIPTON. President 45 NORTHEAST FIRST AVENUE Buy Your War Savings Bonds Here RECOMMENDED On this page will appear the advertisements of a group of "above the average" firms and individuals whose product or service has proven Reliability and Dependability. Feel free to call 2-1141 at any time for further information as to any of the advertisements listed below or to fill any of your many needs. Seventeen years of Miami Background will be placed at your disposal. Ask for B. R. Walzer. VIA VI A Multiple-Vitamin Product Also Full Information Upon Request 1454 N. W. 36th Street Call. Write, or PHONE 3-8211 —Buy War Bonds Today— BEFORE YOU BUY see LEON ELKIN with METROPOLITAN LIFE INS. CO. Not Best Because Biggest But—Biggest Because Best —Buy War Savings Bonds— Dr. Frederick R. Frank Chiropractic Physician A COMPLETE HEALTH SERVICE Clinical and Diagnostic Laboratory X-Ray 1138 West Flagler Street 3-5961 Miami —Buy War Bonds Today— ROOFING COMPANY HOLDS ENVIABLE MIAMI POSITION AS ONE OF ITS PIONEERS In a semi-tropical climate such as that enjoyed by South Florida, the roof of any building, regardless of size or construction, bears probably, the brunt of wear and tear of the elements. Hence, it is important that particular attention be given to the roof, gutters and meal work connected with the roof. J. B. (Barney) Hanson, proprietor of the Hanson Roofing Co.. located at 414 S. W. Twenty-Second Street, is one of the pioneer roofers of Miami, having been actively engaged in the roofing and sheet metal business here for more than twenty-five years, and numbers satisfactory jobs by the hundreds. The Hanson Company, bonded roofers, find no roofing problem too large—nor too small to receive their expert solution, and will be pleased to consult with you about your next roofing or sheet metal job. Among the many outstanding contracts fulfilled by Mr. Hanson may be mentioned the Miami Biltmore Hotel, Coral Gables, recently purchased by the government to be used as a base hospital, and the famous Whitehall Hotel, Palm Beach, Florida, an outstanding example of modern architecture. The ornamental metal domes of this win i known hostelry bespeaks the ? t.stry and skill of this M;I craftsman. mi This week the Hanson Roof inE Company was awarded the con tract for extensive repairs to Z roof of the local Young J£ Hebrew Association building. MIAMI'S ONLY KOSHER RESTAURANT! FAGAN'S PALATIAL RESTAURANT 265 N. E. 2nd Street. Miami SERVING THOUSANDS OF PATRONS SINCE 1924 i? Established in Miami Since 1 Hanson Roofing Co. ROOFING AND SHEET METAL CONTRACTORS L PHONE 4-5860 414 S. W. 22nd AVENUE KEEN SIGHT HAVE YOUR EYES EXAMINED by DR. KEENE 221-2-3 Seybold Building Annoyed or Damaged by INSECTS TERMITES RODENTS EXTERMINATING CO. CALL 4-1375 2388 W. FLAGLER ST. FREE ADVICE and INSPECTION AN OPEN LETTER "CARAVAN" COMMITTEE MEET TO TALK OVER PLANS November 11, 1942 Jewish Floridian, Miami. Florida. Due to the sincerity of a great i number of people in Miami, and their many inquiries as to the | status of Kosher butcher stores in Miami, permit me to advise j ihat a careful study will be made immediately, and the findings and recommendations will be submitted to the general public. The problem in a Jewish community has always been, not only in regard to "Kashrus" but to "Chinuch" and other matters as well that too many people are prone, to criticize from the distance but fear to come forward and help in the elimination of "Hefkaerus," or disorganized viI tal Jewish matters. A statement will be forthcoming pertaining to Kashrus as soon as an opinion and recommendation are formulated. Very truly yours, Rabbi Max Shapiro. (uneral Cha 2001 W. FLAGLES ST AMIULANCE SERVICE The Southeastern Salesmen's Caravan, a grou of men who have put up their ears for the duration and travel together in a bus through their territories, are ready to start their second trek through Florida, ending in P, nsacola, where they will arrive December 1. They opened an exhibition of their wares at the Ponce de Leon Hotc unday and today start traveling. Discussing the itinerary are (left '" right seated) D. B. Hays, president of the caravan, an Nat Roth. secretary. Standing (left to right) are Henry M. Arak, chairman ot the Georgia committee; George M. Cohen, transportation chairman. Perry Radin. chairman of the rooming committee. The group has received national commendation for their "war-effort conservation plan. DAILY DELIVERY 11.1 P. M. KOSHER MARKET Made From Fresh Oranges FRESH MEATS. aROCER.Es'.' VEGETABLES AND DELICATESSEN I. PASHKOW „„ w FLA0LER STREET. MIAMI



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FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 13. 1942 +Jewisti fhridian PAGE SEVEN NOTE BSyS5 !" S J/S?S TO NAT IONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE OF BRITH HILLEL FOUNDATIONS AND ALEPH ZADIK ALEPH IT A PALESTINE ARMY Baltimore (WNS) — Arthur Havs Sulzberger. president and publisher of the New York Times, who returned recently from a trip to Britain, this week called upon Jewish and non-Jewish supporters of Zionist aims to drop their demands for the creation of a Jewish Army in Palestine and for the post-war establishment of a Jewish State in the Holy Land. Speaking before the Brotherhood of the Madison Avenue Temple, Mr. Sulzberger stated that the Zionist demands were helping to create problems in the Moslem world which merely add to the difficulties of the United Nations." "Presumably the British government has decided that all other things considered, it will not help win the war to meet the demand for a separate Jewish army." Mr. Sulzberger said. "Furthermore, the United States government has evidently not felt it either wise or expedient to intervene with the British government in this matter. It seems to me. therefore, that since these decisions have been made—and I think made with a conviction that will not be changed, at least during this war—it serves no useful purpose to continue, at (his time, a campaign which not only embarrasses the United Nations, but can be distorted by the Axis in the Arab world. "I wish that I had the ability to set that problem straight and teach my fellow-Americans who are not Jews that it would be wise to examine all the facts in that complicated situation before lending their names to the extreme Zionist cause, or the demand for a Jewish army." Asserting that the Zionist aims did not represent the desires of all Jews, the New York Times publisher added: "If I, as a Jew, can help to impress the world that what Jews want far more than a home of their own is the riKht to call any place their home. that in finding new homes justice must be done those who already dwell where the newcomer would live—then I believe I shall have been faithful to the tradition of justice which is my heritage as an American of Jewish faith," •>.. .—..v.. Nine of the outstanding Jewish educators in the United States have accepted membership on a national advisory committee on education to assist in shaping the national policies of the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundations and the Aleph Zadik Aleph, B'nai B'rith youth organization. The members of the committee are: top left to right, Ben M. Edidin, Jewish Education Committee of New York; Dr. Emanuel Gamoran, educational director, Union of American Hebrew Congregations; Dr. Alexander M. Dushkin, executive director Jewish Education Committee of New York; center left to right Rabbi Samuel L. Blumenfield, director College of Jewish Studies, Chicago; Dr. Leo L. Honor, executive director Board of Jewish Education of Chicago; Dr. Philip L. Seman, director Jewish People's Institute of Chicago; bottom left to right Israel S. Chipkin, associate director Jewish Education Committee of New York; Ben Rosen, director Associated Talmud Torahs of Philadelphia; and Dr. Louis L. Kaplan, director Board of Jewish Education of Baltimore. IN EGYPT PRAISED BY GREAT BRITAIN Cairo (WNS) — High British military authorities this week praised the part played by a Palestine Jewish communications 1 unit in the British Eighth Army's %  smashing defeat of Nazi Fieid Marshal Rommel's Afrika Korps in the Egyptian desert. Despite heavy enemy fire at the outset of the great battle, the Jewish unit maintained constant communication between the advancing British troops and the High Command. Disclosing the achievements of the Jewish unit, British military leaders said that "the Jewish officers and men ave carried out exemplarily a most difficult task." Meanwhile, while allied forces plunged across the Egyptian desert in pursuit of Rommel's beaten troops, the Rome Radio announced that all Jewish men of military age in Tripoli had been arrested and had been moved from '.he city to a concentration camp somewhere in the desert. The Rome Radio said that this action was taken "as a matter of precaution" and charged that the 15,000 Jews in Tripoli, a potential jumping off place for an invasion of Italy, were pro-British. Jewish women and children in the city were forbidden to leave their homes between six o'clock in the evening and dawn. Have you bought your Defense Bonds yet? CIVIC LEADERS OF MIAMI HEAR DR. A. W. GOTTSCHALL Buy War Bonds and Stamps and Insure Your Tomorrow. Dr. A. W. Gottschall, southern region director for the National Council of Christians and Jews, made the principal address at the round table discussion at a luncheon last Thursday before a group of Miami's civic leaders. Mrs. Barbara Southern of this city was in charge of the program. Daniel H. Redfearn is the Protestant co-chairman: Andrew T. Healy, the Catholic co-chairman, and A. A. Ungar, the Jewish co-chairman. The organization aims at the civic fusion of Catholics, Protestants and Jews. Its sponsors stress the fact that no attempt is made to work towards religious unity—that only an elimination of "possible sources of friction and misunderstanding between the sects is sought." Dr. Gottschall, who works out of Washington, pointed out that his mission here involves programs now being readied at army camps, naval and air bases thruout the Miami area. Dr. Gottschall added that his work here has the announced approval of the chaplains of the United States army and navy. BULGARIA TO ESTABLISH GHETTOS FOR MANY CITIES Stockholm (WNS)—The immediate establishment of ghettos in all Bulgarian villages and cities having 50 or more Jewish familios was announced this week by the Bulgarian Commissiariate for Jewish Affairs. The ghettos will be under the control of the Commissiariatc. At the same time it was anannounced that all Jewish institutions and synogogues in communities having less that 150 Jews will be closed. in Miami, Florida SUN-RAY PARK HEALTH RESORT ESTABLISHED IN lat APPROVED SANITARIUM With Cheerful Hotel Atmosphere For Rest. Convalescent. Chronic and Acuie Medical Caeee Graduate Nursing and Dietetic Staff. Resident Physician, complete Physical Therapy. Pour Acres landscaped Orounds. Sports. Recreations. A. W. ELLIS. Pr. 3 W. PLATTH. M.D.. Med. Dtr. It* S. W. 30th Caurt, Missal, PlarMa Phone 4-1659



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PAGE EIGHT JenistRorkUar FRIDAY, NOVEMBER FROM THE SWIVEL CHAIR William I. Boxirmu The views expressed by Mr. Boxerman are his own and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Tho Jewish Floridlan. Gratifying Tis gratifying to get response now and then which indicates that this column is being read. At times we speculate on just how mighty the pen is Then something happens to indicate the efficacy of the printed word. From far off California comes a letter from Harry Kovner who read our recent review of •'Sabotage.'' the dynamic best seller which is going at the rate of 3000 per day. a remarkable record. "Sabotage." it will be recalled, exposes with documented evidence the machinations of Amcrica's Quislings. Mr. Kovner writes in part: "I think it would be a good idea for the B'nai B'rith Lodges to tax their members to present a "Sabotage"' book to their Gentile friends ... All Jewish organizations should (In likewise That's the only way to reach them and to prove to them that the propaganda against the Jews is a diabolic consiracy by enemies of our country. "There are a lot ol yokels and American fascists who still don't believe that the Huns are as black as we paint them : : When they'll see facts then they'll believe ... I see in a recent issue that the ADI. has some copies of Sabotage" Will you be good enough to ask them to mail a few books tn my friends for which I'm mailing check and postage?" Enclosed with the letter was a list of names to whom we sent books in Mr. Kovner's name Perhaps he has started something that others in the community will emulate. "Disciples of Avarice" When last March one or two hotel owners balked at renting their hotels to the United States army, newspapers beat the drums about the lack of all the hotel men on the Beach They were called disciples of avarice" Headlines were not lacking to deREAL ESTATE—MIAMI BEACH Miami Beach Real Estate SALES L EASES B. E. BRONSTON "Trustworthy Serried" 605 Lincoln Road Ph. 5-5868 For Richer, Grssnsr Lawn And Shrsbbsry Try BIAJ-GREEN PLANT FOOD Risrsnnc melts sss bs sktslsr* trass this H<* stoat fsai wMck cantatas sslssxais that will bslp k*B> rhlnrt boss sat at asar laws. Sals sKcloslTCly s T — HUGHES SEED STORE Ml I. MIAMI VI. MMI Mill scribe this "awful blot on the fair name of Miami," this "reflection upon the patriotism of the Miami area." The Associated Press sent stories throughout the country. Feeling in restaurant conversations ran high and a certain "100% American" group began to call the Jewish hotel men with threats to break their windows. Minimum of Cost In view of all this hulabaloo, which made good newspaper copy, it was a source of satisfaction to read a few days ago a report of the House of Representatives military affairs committee, on the army-hotel negotiations This report lauded the leasing and training program and pointed out that all of the transactions had been carried out with such fairness on the part of the hotel men that the average cost per man in training was considerably lower than spent by the war department for the construction of camps: "The efficiency of the army's program here (in Miami Beach) clearly was silhouetted against the per man housing in camps and cantonments when it was pointed out that the average cost per man under the cost-plus-alixed-fee contracts (camps and cantonments) was S684.94 The highest individual camp on this basis was Camp Polk, La., where the cost ran to S1263.ll per man, this against a $20.00 per man figure for Miami Beach" The report further indicated that 90.000 men had been trained to date with a minimum of cost and maximum of efficiency. These facts are worthy of widespread circulation We wonder how many of them will percolate to other parts of the country, where the wire dispatches original ly were sent Since the House report is not sensational enough, we doubt that it will reach the huge audience it should And many who drew false conclusions from the original stories will not have them corrected. At any rate, the record is clear for all who honestly want to examine it If each reader of our column will clip this item and send it to a friend in another part of the country a tremendous amount of good will be clone through the word-of-mouth propaganda that will ensue. Cut Shabbos! STRICTLY Tidbits from Everywhere by PHINEAS J. BIRON (CONTINUED FRtlM PAGE 4) RIVERMONT PARK SANITARIUM 1389 N. W. 7th St. Ph. 3-7301 Be&t care for chronic sick, convalescent and elderly people $25 WEEKLY UP ssssssi Large Beautiful Groundsaassn I WANT MY MILK The published version was only an expurgated, greatly diluted piece Watch out for the forthcoming Saturday Evening Post piece on Justice Samuel Rosenman ... It was written despite has protests The Judge does not like publicity Publishers Simon and Schuster are wondering when they're going to have the complete manuscript of the autobiography Bernard M. Baruch promised them quite some years ago ... So far only a couple of chapters have been turned in to them—no doubt because Baruch is so busy living his life that he has no time to write much about it. MODERN TIMES We wonder whether Michael Nostradamus, the sixteenth-century French Jewish physician who worked up quite a reputation as a soothsayer and prophet of things to come, foresaw that the time would come when a New York hotel would fix up a Nostradamus Room for the edification of its patrons, with the entertainment provided by fortune tellers, astrologers. and such Jacob Fishman. the Jewish morning Journal's popular columnist, is spending some of his spare time these days reading up on his Rambam. to oblige a feminine reader who had learned. through the paper, that the famous philosopher and physician had a cure lor asthma, a disease with which she is afflicted The odd part of it is that the lad) is the widow of a famous lung specialist, and her son is one of Xew York's prominent heart specialists. ABOUT PEOPLE Edward K Grusd. managing editor of The National Jewish Monthly, writes in to warn US igamst claiming for the Jewish fold a couple of U. S. Bomber Command heroes mentioned in recent dispatches from England. They are Aron F. Moses and Ruaolph Tordnsky. neither of whom is Jewish Nor. adds Grusd. may we claim Lieutenant Clarence Lipsky of the U. S. Army, who is a Lithuanian Catholic Distinctively Semitic noses are no rarity in Manhattan, but •.here'.", one that's particularly interesting because it represents its And Be Sure It's FLORIDA DAIRIES HOMOGENIZED Vitamin "D" Milk "Milk Product." Dacro Protected TEL. 2-2621 Greater Miami Delivery Visit Our Farm at 6200 N. W. 32nd Street LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THK COUNTY JIKiK'S COURT IN ANI> KUK DADR COUNTY, KLORIDA.—In Probate. No 13337 in Re: ESTATE nK lirsSKl.I. <;. SHI IEMAKER. Deqeaaed. To -Ml Creditors and All Persona Hav[ iiiK Claims or Demands Affalnst Raid Estate: You. and eHi-h of you, are hereby notified am! required to present any 1 claims and demand* which you, or either of you, mav have against the estate of RUSSELL C. SHOEMAKER, le eased, late ,,f Pendleton County, Kentucky, to the Hon. w v. Blanton. | County .Indue of Dade County, anil rile the same In hi office in tiuCounty Courthouse In Dade County Florida, within eiKht calendar months "ii ih,date ..f the first mil,lieni tlon hereof. Said claims or demands i.. Ionian, the legal address of the claimant and to he sworn to and presented as aforesaid, or same win be haired Bee Neitlon |I0 ,,f t|,,. !!>:::! I'rohaie Act. Date October IB, A. I" 194'' MAX R. SII.VKR. AS Anclllar) Administrator of the Knt.it.„r Russell C. Shoemaker, !>.•reas( d MAN It SII.VKR. Attorney for Ancillary Administrator. First publication on 23rd dav of Ck-lober. 1!M2. tO/ZI-10—ll/l-ll B'nai B'rith N I otc By Paul Weitxman We've sometimes thought that refreshments at meetings brings out the membership, but we've learned the error of this unkind thought. At the last meeting of Sholem Lodge, Tuesday evening, a near record attendance of members and ladies attended. And although refreshments were served, there was no advance notice, so it was the guest speaker., Leslie B. Bain, who filled to capacity the Beth David Talmud Torah. After a brief outline of the latent, in addition to the patent, causes of the present war, Mr. Bain undertook to answer questions. Interesting questions were propounded which were answered by Mr. Bain, according to his own point of view. Only the lateness of the hour compelled the curtailment of the open forum, and not the dearth of questions. Nominations of officers took place in the true tradition of the "solid south." that is to say, nomination now just requires the confirmation of election. And so at the December meeting, Sholem Lodge will confirm, by election. the nomination to the respective offices of the following men: Louis Heiman. president: Milton A. Friedman, first vice-president; Walter C. Kovner. second vicepresident: Harold Turk, recording secretary; S. B. Miller, treasurer: Aaron Edelman. financial secretary; Burnett Roth, monitor; Dr. Alexander Kushner, assistant monitor: Maurice Cromer. warden: Ernest Sussman. guardian: Isaac Levin. Sol S. Goldstrom. E. Albert Pallot. Carl Weinkle. NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME v, LAW Notice is hereby given that the undersiuned. desiring to engage In bustlies* under the fictitious name of SALLY'S BREEZE IN. imend to r, K iater snld name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Pads Countv, Florida. BBNJAaUN FIRESTONE ...... BALLY FIRESTONE I'AI I. WKITZMAN. Attorney U/.-1.V20-27 12/4 A orn owner's chief means of making a livelihood The feature in question belongs to one Harry E. Pfaltz. and if we call it a smeller we aren't slangy, but merely describing it by its main function. For Mr. Pfaltz, who used to be a perfumery expert, is now devoting his talents to the war effort by creating innocuous gases whose smells match those of the vaious poison gases, so that air raid wardens and other Civilian Defene officials can. by inhalinf the harmless smells, familiarize themselves with the odor of the dangerous gases Fritz Kortner, the noted German Jewish actor who has been in this country for quite some years, recently made a screen test for the role of Maxim Litvinoff in the film version of "Mission to Mascow,'' and all the directors who viewed his test declared that he would be excellent for the part. But Warner Brothers vetoed him. on the grounds that it would not be good policy to have a Jew play the part of a Soviet Commissar. Hollywood improving on life, as usual, eh? So the role is being given to Oscar Homolka. who is a Czech, his only Jewish connection being his father-in-law, Washington biggie Eugene Meyer. WEEKLY GIGGLE From the Egyptian battlefront comes this story, credited to a captured Italian officer who was describing II Duce's shortage of manpower ... It seems that a man without arms was called up for military service, and. much to his surprise, was passed by the examining physician ... He was sent to a training camp, where a lieutenant looked him over carefully, and said: "You're just the man we've been looking for." "But what can I do?" asked the armless one ... So the officer took him over to another soldier, who was engaged in filling a gas tank "Your job," he told the newcomer, "is to tell that man when the tank is full ... He can't tell, because he's blind." Isidore Goldstein, trustees i Eisenstein, presently servins trustee for a three ?£** completes the list of office* w ?' Will serve Sholem L^S the ensuing year. g T ^ n ^ Uhs and B !" B'rith Lodges throughout the counS will see visual proof of the work that Sholem Lodge and fc rZ bers are doing in Florida %  •Th. Bnai B'rith News," publls ^ from Washington, and the masa zine "The National Jewish Monthly" carry pictures and stones in the November issues showing presentation and raising of Flag presented to the Supreme Court of the State of Florida and Of "our" carload of scrap metal. The unusually well attended meeting brought out many members who visited with their brethren for the first time in many moons. So overcome did the officers appear to be that a number were asked to rise and they received an ovation. It is nice to see apreciation manifested so vociferously; it must make one feel good to learn that he has been missed. Of course there are many members who might stay away for longer periods and never be missed, and there are others who attend meetings regularly, and you might never know they were present. But we are | going to reserve our applause for those members who attend meting after meeting for they are the backbone of the organization. To one who has hud some experience with parliamentary procedure. Sholem Lodge has been remarkably free Irom points of order, of information, questions of information, previous question, further division, motions to reconsider, or to reconsider an spread upon the minutes. Hence it was doubly startling to witness even the small display of parliamentary pyrotechnics at our last meeting. We liked the free interpretation of motions by Louis Heiman. Acting-and-soon-to-bePresident-in-his-own-right. But nobody could quarrel with his interpretations since he brought the motions down to logical conclusions. Back to the Blood Bank and Donors. Just a reminder that there is a constant need for donors—and an observation that Abe Aronovitz holds a record in Dade County with fourteen blood donations! And we had an idea he was anemic! It does one good to see the reaction of men when a definite need is indicated. A question of financing a worthy project—a request for opinions as to ways and means of financing—no request for contributions. But lo. and behold, the five dollar bills and singles came floating in so fast. that in no time, the money was in the till and the green signal on to the "go ahead." No question of credits or names on honor rolls, just here it is. go ahead. The United States Government Having Taken Over P Present Offices— DR. JOSEPH B. MARGOLIS announces the REMOVAL OF HIS OFFICE to 311 Lincoln Hd Albion BldaSutt* MIAMI BEACH For the Practice of General Dentistry A


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MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
November 13, 1942

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00717

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
November 13, 1942

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00717

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text
& Jewish florid Ian
\%
CoM8/wwc The Jewish Unity
H
VOLUME 15No. 45
MIAMI, FLORIDA. FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 13. 1942
PRICE 10 CENTS
NAZIS ARREST COUNCIL OF.
ANTWERP FOR "SABOTAGE",
Havana (WNS)A more lib-
eral policy towards refugees
from war zones and lands of op-
pression in Europe will be ap-
plied by the Cuban authorities to
those seeking refuge in the West-
ern Hemisphere, especially in al-
lowing refugees temporary shel-
ter pending receipt of permanent
immigration visas elsewhere.
Assurances to this effect were
given Dr. Alexander Vergoda.
newly appointed chief of the Cu-
ban Immigration Department, to
Isaac Yagodnik, president of the
Centro Israelite de Cuba, an af-
filiate of the HIAS-ICA Emi-
gration Association. An official
decree, which will enable refu-
gees from Europe to stay tempo-
rarily in Cuba until their im-
migration visas to South, Cen-
tral and North American coun-
tries are obtained, will be issued
soon.
The visas for temporary stay
will be issued if a satisfactory
guarantee is furnished as to the
political status of the prospect-
ive immigrant and if financial
requirements are guaranteed.
The new liberal policy was
manifested in the recent release
of 169 refugees from Triscornia,
the concentration station for de-
tained immigrants. The remain-
ing inmates at Trisconia will
soon gain their freedom, Dr. Ver-
goda stated.
[
Geneva (WNS)Nazi authori-
ties in occupied Belgium have I
arrested the 12 members of the]
Jewish Council of Antwerp on
the charge that the Jewish lead-
ers sabotaged the Nazi plan to'
deport the Jewish population of
Belgium to the Polish ghettos, it
was learned here this week. The |
Jewish Council had been set up
by the Nazis to serve as an in-
termediary between the Jewish
population and the Nazi rulers.
Meanwhile, a radio report from
Budapest stated that 47 Hun-
garian Jews are among the 60
persons now being tried in Hun-
gary on charges that they or-
ganized a sabotage ring in behalf
of Soviet Russia.
PUSSES AWAY AT
E OP PARENTS
Morris Wroobel, Dado County
Deputy Sheriff, passed away at
his residence last Monday even-
ing, after a long illness. A young
E WAR TIE
USE IS SEEN FOR
E
FOR WEEK NOV. 22
Mrs. T. T. Stevens, chairman
of the woman's division. Dade
War Savings staff, has announced
that the women's activities for
Minute Women At War Week
Will begin Nov. 22, lasting
through the 28th. Religious
groups in the area are to be re-
quested to permit four-minute
addresses from the pulpit that
week to be made by uniformed
representatives of the armed
forces.
Mrs. Ralph H. Wooten and
Mrs. James L. Kauffman, wives
of ranking army and naval offi-
cials in the district, have agreed
to serve as co-chairmen of the
climaxing event when women of
the nation will stage a gigantic
bond selling campaign. Plans for
the occasion have not as yet been
made public, but it is understood
that preparations provide for the
spectacular.
Club women of all Greater
Miami organizations, as well as
individually are invited to take
part in the activities.
Mrs. Sidney L. Weintraub, Mrs.
E. D. Pearce, Mrs. John L. Skin-
ner, Mrs. T. V. Moore, jr.. Mrs.
J B. Davidson, Mrs. George N.
Corrigan are among the women
in charge of divisions of the cam-
paign.
New York (WNS)The possi-
bility that fuller wartime use can
now be made of a majority of the
6.000 emigre doctors in the Unit-
ed States, refugees from Hitler-
ism, was foreseen this week by
Dr. Tracy J. Putnam, vice chair-
man of the National Committee
for the Resettlement of Foreign
Physicians, in a statement which
commented on a recent directive
of the Board of Procurement and
Assignment Service.
The directive pointed out that
the army and navy are not in a
position to accept such physi-
cians as commissioned officers
because they are not citizens, and
recommended to chairmen of
State Procurement and Assign-
ment Services that use be made
of these physicians in essential
civilian positions, particularly in
critical areas where more physi-
cians are needed.
"The stand by the board, that
emigre physicians can be of use
to the war effort by absorption
in essential civilian posts clari-
fies the way for greater utiliza-
tion of this group at a time when
the nation is desperately short of
trained medical men." Dr. Put-
nam said. He added, "the gen-
eral public will now appreciate
that though emigre doctors are
eager to serve with the military
medical services, they cannot do
so, and that the full utilization of
their skills and training must be
in other areas particularly
where an emergency exists and
they can serve on a basis of tem-
porary placement for the duration
of the war."
In a limited number of states
where foreign-trained physicians
are eligible to practice, the war-
duration arrangement, which Dr.
Putnam's committee favors, will
make it possible for emigre doc-
tors to fill temporarily, practices
vacated by the entrance of Amer-
ican physicians into military ser-
vice Dr. Putnam stressed the
fact that as refugees from Hitler,
emigre doctors are most eager
to be of fullest service to the
' country that has given them hav-
en. However, the majority have
! not been in this country the min-
imum five years needed to com-
plete citizenship requirements,
and thus are not eligible for ar-
|my medical service.
POLISH GOVERNMENT WILL
ANSWER RUSSIAN CHARGES
London (WNS)The Polish
Government-in-exile will shortly
make a formal reply to charges
I emanating from Moscow that Pol-
\ ish army officers in Russia are
discriminating against Jews in
the Polish legions, it was dis-
closed this week.
The charge was made by Wan-
da Wasilewska, editor of a Polish
Communist paper in Russia, who
said that the Polish army was
discharging Jews to prevent them
from leaving for the Middle East
with the Polish forces. In recent
months, many Polish divisions
have been shifted to the Middle
East and soldiers have been per-
mitted to take their families with
them.
OF
MORRIS WROOBEL
man of 26. he had gained an en-
viable reutation among law en-
forcement groups throughout the
area as well as the many others
with which he came in contact.
A resident of Miami Beach, he
came here with his parents, Rev.
and Mrs. Nathan Wroobel in 1924.
He attended the Beth David Rel-
igious School and participated in
many of its activities serving as
an officer of the first Bar Mitzva
Club in this area. A graduate of
the Miami Senior High School he
was prominent in the work of
the National Council of Jewish
Juniors. He was a member of
the Beth David Congregation
Bnai Brith. Y. M. H. A. and
Miami Beach Civic League. He
served as a member of the Beth
David Choir under the direction
of Cantor J. Shoulson.
Funeral services were held at
the Riverside Memorial Chapel.
Tuesday to an overflowing Cha-
pel. Rabbis Mescheloff, Shapiro
and Machtei officiated assisted
by Cantor Maurice Mamches. A
guard of honor in uniform of the
State Road Patrol in addition to
many local public officials were
present to pay their respects.
Active pallbearers were Fred. K.
Shochet, Carl Gardner, Morris
Raff. Paul Barnett, Morty Moses,
Max Silver. Leo Spiegal, Max
Feit. Norman Weiss, Herman
Barnett and Abe Berkowitz. A
long list of honorary pallbearers
included Sheriff D. C. Coleman,
A. G. Harkness, Russ Eavenson.
Ray Mills. Ray Martens, Judge
Ralph Pole, Judge Tom Fergu-
son, Tom Wood, Joe Conderman,
Maurice Grossman, Philip Berk-
owitz, Sam Silver, Louis
Schwartz, Harry Rosen, Milton
A. Friedman, M. B. Frank and
Jimmie Coleman.
Beside his parents he leaves
two sisters, Mrs. Esther Spiegal
of Miami Beach and Mrs. Helen
Bernstein, New York.
Following the services at the
chapel the funeral cortege led by
a motorcycled escort went to the
Woodlawn Cemetery.
COST OF SETTLING
JEWS AFTER
BE
London (WNS)Nazi radio sta-
tions in Germany and all Axis-
occupied countries joined this
week in blaming "international
Jewry" for the highly successful
American invasion of French
North Africa. Nazi broadcasters
accused the Jews of pacing the
way for the landing of American
troops by bribing French colonial
leaders.
The Nazi radio in Stuttgart
stated that Jews in Algeria. Mo-
rocco and Tunisia had been se-
cretly conducting anti-Vichy po-
litical activities in these French
colonies and had undermined
their resistance to the American
invaders. The Nazi announcer
said that the Jews had plotted to
"betray" the French colonies in
revenge for the anti-Jewish poli-
cies of the Vichy government.
The Na/.i controlled radio in
Tunis reported that General Au-
gustc Nogues. pro-Nazi Pierre
Laval's resident-general in Mo-
rocca, had ordered the arrest of
hundreds of Jews in Morocco
when informed of the landing of
American forces. The Jews were
arrested because of their "in-
tense pro-United Nations' feel-
ings."
Hundreds of Jews were ar-
rested also in Tunisia upon ord-
ers of the Vichy governor who
said that the Jews were acting as
"American agents." A rigid
curfew was imposed on all Jews
not arrested, forbidding them to
leave their homes from early
evening to dawn.
It was estimated here that be-
tween 150.000 and 200.000 Jews
reside in French North Africa.
The United States invasion has
saved them from falling into
Nazi hands and will probably
result in their release from in-
ternment and slave camps.
There are large Jewish com-
munities also in Algeria, partic-
ularly in Algiers and Oran, and
in Bizerte, Tunisia, where there
are many Italian Jews, who suf-
fered equally with the French
Jews at the hands of anti-Semitic
Vichy officials.
London (WNS)Netherlanders
are continuing to defy Nazi anti-
Jewish regulations despite the
threats of stern reprisals, accord-
ing to the Aneta news agency.
Syracuse WNSHayim Green-
berg, noted labor Zionist leader,
estimated this week that it would
cost three billion dollars to set-
tle 3.000.000 homeless European
Jews after the war. Speaking at
the 24th annual convention of the
Zionist Laborite Party of Ameri-
ca. Mr. Greenberg called upon
Jews in the United States to
raise the first SI.000.000 for this
purpose.
Advocating international con-
trol of Palestine, Mr. Greenberg
declared that "a Provisional Con-
dominion over Palestine should
be set up. including representa-
tives of the Jews in Palestine,
the Arabs in Palestine, the Jew-
ish Agency and the International
Mandate."
"It is to be clearly understood"
the Zionist leader continued,
"that this Provisional Condimin-
ion must get into Palestine
enough Jews to constitute a ma-
jority and thereafter turn the
government over to the inhabit-
ants of the country themselves.
An Arab Federation is practic-
ally out of the question, as the
Arabs themselves will not set
up one without outside force. The
Jews cannot do it for them. The
concept of bi-national state is
meaningless, especially as ap-
plied to Palestine, where the
question not only involves the
people there but also millions
who must come in."
J
HAS BEEN GIVE!
MEDAL \\ KMOX
New York (WNS)Command-
er Samuel B. Frankel. 37, of
Stapleton. Staten Island, has
been presented with the Distin-
guished Service Medal by Secre-
tary of the Navy. Frank Knox.
at the latter's office in the Navy
Dept. The citation accompany-
ing the decoration lauds Com-
mander Frankel for his "extraor-
dinary initiative and tireless en-
ergy" in redeeming men and ves-
sels.
The award for "exceptionally
meritorious service" was be-
stowed on the commander for his
work as assistant naval attache
in Murmansk and Archangel, U.
S. S. R.. during the period from
Nov., 1941 to Sept., 1942. "Un-
der adverse conditions," the lau-
datory citation to Commander
Frankel reads, "he displayed ex-
traordinary initiative and tire-
less energy in the direction of re-
pairs to damaged United States
vessels, in the salvaging of
stranded and abandoned vessels,
and in the supervision, rescue,
hospitalization and repatriation
of survivors of sunken vessels."
Commander Frankel is further
credited in the navy citation
with saving for future service in
the war effort certain vessels
which would otherwise have
been lost.





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PAGE TWO
* Jewish ffcrk/ian
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER
13. 1942
Social
Personals
Clubs
Organizations
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Plant an-
nounce the engagement of their
son Lt. Alfred L. Plant, to Miss
Anna Stein. 41-12 41st St., Sun-
nyside. L. I. The wedding is to
take place on Nov. 28th in New-
York City. Lt. Plant, who en-
listed in the army February of
this year took his basic military
training at the Q. M. Replace-
ment Center in Camp Lee. Va.,
and was commissioned six months
later. On entering the school he
was rated second highest out of
a group of 500 men who applied.
He has been assigned to the
Technical Training Department
of the Quartermaster School, and
is working under the direction of
Capt. R. DuBrowin, in the Of-
ficer Candidates at the school.
Actual full size models of equip-
ment used in the combat zones
by Quartermaster troops are be-
ing constructed. Miniatures show-
ing tactical situations, charts,
models and training films are on- ,
ly a few of the aids developed' the United States Army
by this division to prepare the Forces, whom she visited in Ohio
new officers for the important! while he was temporarily sta-
job that lies ahead. Before enter- tioned there.
:ng the service Lt. Plant was con- !
nected with the Doughnut Corp. j
of America, serving in the ca-
pacity of advertising manager and
The membership committee of
the Miami Chapter of the Senior
Hadassah. headed by Mrs. Harry
Platoff, will extend a courtesy tea
to the paidup members of the or-
ganization Monday. November 16
at 1:30 p. m. at Carl's. 1711 Alton
Road. Miami Beach. Games and
refreshments will feature the af-
ternoon. Admission will be by
membership card and new mem-
bership prospects will be wel-
come.

Last Friday Rabbi S. M. Mach-
tei officiated at the brith milah
of the son of Mr. and Mrs. Theo-
dore Carl Perry, 227 E. San Ma-
rino Drive. Miami Beach, at St.
Francis hospital.

Miss Rosalind Friedman, the
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William
Friedman, has just returned from
a two months' vacation in the
north. She is the fiance of Lieu-
tenant Leonard D. Heyman, of
Air
director of public relations, mak-
ing his headquarters in New
York City. He is a native of Mi-
ami, having been bom here in
1912. His parents are among the
early pioneers of this section of
Florida.

The family of the late Abra-
ham Pelefsky. formerly of New
York but a resident of Miami
for the past four years, appreci-
ate the many expressions of con-
dolence received upon the death
of Mr. Pelefsky. who passed away
October 17. Surviving are his
wife. Bertha; son. Seymour Pel-
efsky; parents. Mr. and Mrs.
Philip Pelefsky; two sisters and
one brother of New York, and
one sister. Mrs. Rose Namoff. of
Miami. Services were held at
the Gordon Funeral Chapel.

The son of Mr. and Mrs.
Moshe Massre. 2348 S. W. 10th
street, was circumcised by Rabbi
S. M. Machtei on Tuesday morn-
ing. This afternoon, at St. Fran-
i is hospital, Rabbi Machtei will
officiate at the brith milah of
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Phillip
Romer, 431 W. 29th street. Miami
Beach.

A supper will be served Sun-
day. November 15th at 5 p. m.
for the benefit of Labor Lyceum
of the Workmen's Circle. Branch
690. A farewell for one of the
active members. Mr. and Mrs. A.
Solomon and son will be ob-
served. Mr. Solomon was active
in Branch 692 and when the Ly-
ceum was being built he devoted
his entire time towards its com-
pletion.

Mrs. Max Pepper and children,
Marshal] and Nancy, are now re-
siding in Jacksonville. Florida,
where Dr. Pepper is Stationed as
a senior grade lieutenant at the
Naval Hosital.

Miss Mildred Lewis returned
to New York after a two week
stay. While here she was the
house guest of Mr. and Mrs. H.
Spivack, 905 Washington Avenue.
Miami Beach.
Naomi Machtei is re-
cuperating at home from an
emergency appendectomy per-
formed last Saturday afternoon
at Victoria hospital.
Mrs. Max Ellis, wife of Dr.
Max Ellis of Miami Beach, will
return this week-end after spend-
ing some time in New York un-
dergoing medical treatment.
*
The marriage of Miss Gertrude
Bandel to Mr. Raphael Yunes.
son of Mrs. R. Yunes. was sol-
emnized last Sunday afternoon at
the Miami Beach Jewish Center.
Dr. Samuel Bension officiated as-
sisted by Cantor David A. Wolf.
The decorated synagogue was
filled to capacity. A dinner fol-
lowed in the social hall.

Private Arnold Raxin. sta-
tioned at the Marine Station. Lee
Field. Jacksonville, is at present
confined to the hospital there.

Mrs. Nathan Adelman returned
to the city after visiting her
children. Mr. and Mrs. Charles
Adelman in Savannah and rela-
tives in Virginia.

Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Romer
announce the birth of a son.
Thursday, November 5th, at St.
Francis hospital, Miami Beach.
Buy War Bonds and Stamps and
[i sure Your Tomorrow.
ONE1AI
VITAMIN 2=1
'TWIINK of it!
DAY
TABLETS
Yi ur min-
imum daily requiremi'nLa
of A and D Vitamins or of
li Complex Vitamins, in one
pleasant tablet. Remember
the name ONE-A-DAY
(brandI Vitamin Tablet*.
DR.
MILES
NERVINE
r|0 TENSE ikttm make
** you k. -fill. (rankv,
RmiImi? Dr. Miles Nerrine
nlpi U> lessen Nervous
Tension. Get it at your drug
store. Read directions and
tue only as directed.
Alka-Seltzer
XT HEN Headache. Mos-
" cular Pains sr Simple
Nrurslms. Distress after
Msals. Gas on Sumach, or
"Moraine After"' interfere
with your work or spoil
your fun. try Alka-Seltzer.
PRIVATE HEBREW INSTRUCTION
IN PUPIL'S OWN HOME
RABBI H. M. KAGAN
PHONE 9-2295
SEMINARY OF AMERICA
437 S. W. 15th AVENUE
GRADUATE OF RABBINICAL
Ask Your Local
Delicatessen
For the Beit

It Costs No More
OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE IN FLORIDA
KOSHER ZION
SAUSAGE CO. PRODUCTS
Delicious Corned Beef
Pickled. Cooked and Smoked Meat*
37th and Normal Ave. Chicago
Mrs. Max Shapiro
Beth David Sisterhood an-
nounces their annual member-
ship tea to be held at Beth
David auditorium. Wednesday
afternoon. November 18th at 2
o'clock.
Mrs. Harry Ollphant. president,
and Mrs. Norman Jacobs, gener-
al chairman, have arranged an
excellent program, to which all
members and friends are invited.
The highlight of the afternoon
will be presented by Mrs. Max
Shapiro, who will review the re-
cent selection of the Book of the
Month Club, the "Seventh Cross,"
by Ann Seghers. Cantor Louis
Hayman will be heard in a num-
ber of vocal selections.
Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Goldman.
1717 S. W. 13th St.. announce the
engagement of their daughter.
Harriet, to Charles Jamison. 1401
Alton Rd.. Miami Beach. Miss
Goldman is a graduate of Miami
Senior High School and Mr. Ja-
mison of Miami Edison. He at-
tended Miami University and the
University of Florida and is a
member of the TEP Fraternity.
The wedding will take place in
January.
TOWER
THEATRE
AIR-CONDITIONED
S. W. 8th St. at 15th
Fri., Nov. 13Last Day!
2 ATTRACTIONS!
"The Man Hitler Feared"
"BERLIO
CORfifSPODDEM"
DANA ANDREWS
VIRGINIA GILMORE
Plus
The Comedy Riot Feature
"HBVF00T
WITH
WILLIAM TRACY
JAMES GLEASON

Starts Sat at 4:30 P. M. and
Sun. and Mon.. Nov. 14-16
[DON'AMECHE!*
~jOA\~I.KNNEfT~
BILLIE BURKE
"GIRL
TROUBLE"
National Children's Cardiac
Home. Dade Chapter No. 1. U
sponsoring a Dutch Supper at the
Home. 4250 West Flagler Street
Sunday evening. November 22nd
at 5:30 p. m. Admission 75c.
The chairman is Mrs. M. New-
man and her committee axe plan-
ning an interesting evening to in-
clude cards, bingo games and
prizes. The members of the com-
mittee are Mrs. C. Baum. Mrs. B.
Rosenblum. Mrs. Sokoloff. Mrs.
H. Saffer. Mrs. A. Gelb, Mrs. Su-
berman. Mrs. H. Wronker. Mrs.
J. Zwicker. Mrs. A. Mink, Mrs. A.
Eisenberg. Mrs J. Miller. Mrs. R.
Levy. Mrs. M. Cohn, Mrs. M. Ob-
ler, Mrs. E. Goldberg. Mrs. M.
Kleiman, Mrs. B. Wolf. Mrs. J.
Berman. Mrs. P. Rabin. Mrs. D.
Emmet, Mrs. W. Groner. For res-
ervations phone Mrs. Groner.
2-1648 or Mrs. Radin. 2-4600 not
later than Wednesday. Nov. 18th.

Lt. Bernard A. Frank is spend-
ing a short furlough with his par-
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Morris B.
Frank. Miami Beach pioneers
and active communal workers.
Lt. Frank, an attorney, practiced
here with offices on the Beach
before entering the armed forces.
He is at present stationed at Ala-
bama with the Military Police
Division, attached to the Provost
Marshall Office.

Mr. and Mrs. H. Spivack cel-
ebrated their 21st wedding anni-
versary last week with a gath-
ering of relatives and friends.
a
The Sisterhood Chesed Shel
Ernes installed officers and board
members at a meeting last
week. Board members are Mrs.
A. Daum, Mrs. M. Kotkin, Mrs.
Sol Schwartz, Mrs. N. Pritzker,
Mrs. E. Gordon, Mr. N. Alexan-
der. Mr. M. Kotkin. Mrs. A. Pep-
per. A buffet luncheon was
served at the home of Mrs. Wm
Clein. scene of the event.
ROOM FOR RENT
One room furnished, in private
home, in northwest section, to
Jewish woman or couple. Refer.
PHONE 78-3439
The Pioneer Woman' Q
zation of Greater Miami Chi
So. 1, started their new'year'
activities with a luncheon j
literary program held in the ?
den of Mrs. I. Shapoff Mr ShV"
off spoke at length on Hebrew
. culture. Others entering mlo *
discussion were: Henry Seitlin I
Rosengarten, D. Friedman ami
Mrs. Henry Seitlin. A reading
was given by Mrs. Shubow a
meeting of the organization will
beheld Wednesay, November 1

; The marriage of Miss Rhode
i Apter, daughter of Mr. and Mrs
j Louis Apter of Hartford. Conn'
to Lt. Seymour M. Miller. ,
of^ Mr.' and Mrs. Sam Miller of
this city, was announced by the
I groom's parents upon their return
i to the city last week from Mew
York where they went to be pres-
ent at the ceremony. The wed-
ding was an event of Oct. 25th
and was solemnized at the Essex
House before members of the im-
mediate family and friends. Oth-
ers present from Miami were Mr.
and Mrs. Sam Blank and Mr. and
Mrs. Jack Miller, uncles and
: aunts of the groom. A dinner
followed. Miss Apter. prior to
her marriage, held a professor-
ihip at a Connecticut University.
Lt. Miller, now stationed at Camp
I Pickett. Va.. with the Medical
.orps. graduated from the Flor-
' ida and Tulane Universities with
| an M. D. degree.

Nat Williams has assumed di-
rection of the Y. M. H. A. orches-
tra, now in the process of organi-
zation. Musicians of various in-
struments are needed to fill the
required number and are asked
to contact either Mr. Williams.
3-6264, or the Y. M. H. A.. 3-4012.

Under the sponsorship of the
Miami Round Table, affiliate of
the National Conference of Chris-
tians and Jews, a radio program
with its theme as an armistice
, week observance, will be beard
| over WIOD. Saturday evening at
' nine. Participating will be Rabbi
| Colman A. Zwitman. Rev. Roger
Squire and Father Florence B.
Sullivan. The subject will be
"What Contribution Can Religion
Make to a Just Endurable Peace."
&&m
-.,'-.;

z&sm
We
Sl^vJ
f '
THE G A ROE N OF MEMORIES
mourn n(Bo
FLORIDA'S MOST BEAUTIFUL BURIAL ESTATES
West Flagler Street at 53rd Avenue
ONLY TEN MINUTES FROM THE HEART OF MIAMI
WHY LET A STRANGER SELECT
YOUR BURIAL SITE?
Make sure that your family will be together
foreverby providing your own private family
plot.
No one wants a stranger to make a decision
that affects his family.
Yet. that is exactly what happens to many
families who do not own a private plot.
In the moment of shock and sadness, you would
leave the choice of a burial plot to the first well-
meaning person who came along. How can such
a person make a selection that affects those dear
to you? The choice must be yours and yours
alone.
Don't force your family to buy a plot "blindly."
Don't leave yourself in the position of having to
make a most important decision at the moment
of greatest sadness. Provide now a beautiful
family plot in Mount Nebo.
Perpetual Care
Title Insurance

Lots may be purchased
on convenient terme
Business Office 1014 Olympic! Bldg. 3-5132
A VISIT WILL CONVINCE YOU



: ,.:v-^

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;:
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13. 1942
vjewistnoridian
i\*rp9*t \\
PAGE THREE
MARCHING MEN
THE HONOR ROLL OF GREATER MIAMI
(This weekly feature 1b prepared
k the public relations committee of
SL creater Miami Army and Navy
rnmiiiittee of the National Jewish
wlriri' Hoard. The committee ln-
!i,r,lrs William I. Boxerman. chair-
man benjamin Bronston. Pred K.
Soc'het and Haul Weltzman.
(Contributions to this column are
iuied, particularly in the form of
utters received here from Greater
JJlam'l boys now In the service.)
Fortunes of War
From the TTS comes this in-
teresting human interest story
about Pvt. Sidney Sandier, a for-
mer employe of Saks Fifth Ave-
nue on the Beach While a
show buyer for the Lincoln Road
establishment, he usually ate his
lunch under the palms near the
ninth hole of, the Municipal golf
course Now, through the for-
tunes of war he is a drill instruc-
tor and puts the new recruits
through their paces on the ident-
ical site.
Sandier ate at other places be-
side the golf course, among them
a Beach hotel where as a trainee
he later did K P duty ... The
army literally caught up with
Sandier While at the Beach
last spring, the army took over
the hotel in which he lived .
He moved twice thereafter and
each time the army occupied his
quarters Finally, in June he
enlisted while in New York City
for a spell and eventually was
sent back to the Beach.
Proud as Punch
A. Sussman is proud as punch
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
TO HEAR DR. J. H. KAPLAN
PALMER
Funeral Chapel
2008 W. FLAGLER ST.
"SOUS? 9-2664
WOMEN FOR PART
TIME OCCUPATION
Can work from their own
homes and make surprisingly
large earnings. For full de-
tails write
MAC
c|o P. O. Box 2973.
Miami, Florida
of the fact that he has reported
to the Marine officer training
school at Quantico, Virginia .
For to make the grade as an of-
ficer candidate in the marine
corps, one must have almost per-
fect physical and mental health.
Sussman will receive three
months of training after which
he will be classified for a spe-
cific type of service.
Thumbnail Sketches
Harold J. Goldstein, an avia-
tion cadet, is training to be a
navigator at the army air force
re-flight school at Monroe, La.
Morton Levinson has entered a
naval training school near Chi-
cago Stanley Davis is a sec-
ond lieutenant stationed with a
tank destroyer battalion at Camp
Hood. Texas Joseph I. Davis,
lieutenant (jg) in the inshore pa-
trol of the navy, has just been
graduated from the indoctrina-
tion school for naval officers at
Newport. R. I.
Sol Dansky. now a corporal in
the air corps, is somewhere on
combat duty J. H. Davidson,
former well-known Beach real-
tor, now is in OCS on the Beach
training for the army air corps.
Capt. Anson Dreisen is still at
Fort Sill in the army field artil-
lery where according to his moth-
er, "he is sticking to the job he
has and doing it well." Joseph
J. Drucker. former Beachite, who
entered the service in November,
1940, as a private, now is a sec-
ond lieutenant in the army air
corps, stationed at Turner Field.
Ga. His brother, David, who
enlisted in November, 1939, now
is a captain in the marine corps.
Bernard Dolgin is in the army
medical corps as a private at
Camp White, Ore. Capt. Al
Dubbin has been transferred
from Bowman Field. Ky. to the
Florence air base at Florence, S.
iC. Private Jacob J. Zion is
I at the 34th general hospital.
1 Camp Carson, Colo. Paul
Lubin is at the Opa Locka train-
ing station as an airplane me-
chanic Lester I. Abrams. who
entered the service last June in
the army medical corps now is at
Camp Forrest. Tenn. ... He has
been accepted for OTC Both
he and his parents are keeping
their fingers crossed, hoping he'll
be sent to train on the Beach.
Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan, rabbi
emeritus of Temple Israel, will
be guest minister at the First
Unitarian Church, meeting in
Mayfair Theatre, 1600 Biscayne
Boulevard, Sunday, November
15, at 11:00 o'clock. His subject
THE Y. M. H. A.
NOTES
By HARRY SCHWARTZ
Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan
will be "The Meaning of Faith."
He will have complete charge of
the services.
The minister of the church,
the Rev. Joseph Barth, will
preach Sunday at the First Uni-
tarian Church of Chicago. The
services are open to visitors of all
faiths.
*Let Me Get You Some i Buv War stamps and Bonds
" miles S^ NOW and give Ur m''n ln ,hC
AyTi.DAiu M||C,,^*> armed forees tne helP they need
WITH YOUR responsibilities,
can you afford to let a Head-
ache, Muscular Pains, Functional
Monthly Pains or Simple Neural-
gia slow you down? Dr. Miles
Anti-Pain Pills have been bring-
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comforts for nearly sixty years.
Countless American housewives
consider Anti-Pain Pills almost
as much of a necessity in the
medicine cabinet, as is flour in the
kitchen cupboard. They have Dr.
Miles Anti-Pain Pills in the house,
many of them carry these little
pain relievers in purse or hand-
bag. They are prepared for these
minor aches and pains that some-
times occur in almost every family
ARE YOU? Dr. Miles Anti-
1'ain Pills are pleasant to take
and do not upset the stomach.
Get Dr. Miles Anti-Pain Pills
at your drug store. Regular
Package 25 tablets 25*. Economy
Package 125 tablets $1.00. Read
directions and use only as direc-
ted.
DEAFENED!
SEE AND HEAR THE NEW
RADIO EAR
Just released from the laborato-
ries of one of America's oldest
hearing aid manufacturers. More
features, more convenience,
immediate service .more
hearing!
RADIOEAR OF FLORIDA
209 Congress Bldg., Miami Fla.
PHONE 3-2100
R. W. BROWN & CO.
FERTILIZER MANUFACTURERS
Southern Florida
Fertilizer Company
TROPICAL BRAND
Quality Fertilizer
GROWERS' SUPPLIES
INSECTICIDES
Factory: Gouldi. Florida
Phone: Homeetead 5-44M
offices: South Miami. Fla
PHONE 4.3375

ENJOY YOURSELF AT THE
NORTH MIAMI
RIDING ACADEMY
GENTLE RIDING HORSES
E. J. ALBERT A SON
13575 N. E. th Avenue
REASONABLE RATES
KENHOLZ KOSHER MARKET
IN BUSINESS SINCE 1926
The Kenholz Kosher Market
located at 1043 Washington Ave..
Miami Beach, was established in
that city in 1936. Under the
same management of Saul Ken-
holz, a kosher butcher who has
been in the same line for the pasi
32 years, the market is at pres-
ent under the kashruth supervis-
ion of Rabbi Joseph E. Rackov-
sky of Miami Beach, a member of
the Orthodox Rabbinic organiza-
tions. The Kenholz Kosher Mar-
ket has operated under the policy
of giving the public Kashruth.
Cleanliness and Quality.
MURRAY DEMANDS AN END
TO RACIAL DISCRIMINATION
Boton (WNS)-A demand for
the abolition of racial discrimina-
tion in order to achieve true la-
bor unity was voiced by Philip
Murray, president of the CIO. at
the opening session of the fifth
annual CIO convention.
"It is wise to remember." Mr.
Murray said, "that any kind of
unity must comprehend the com-
plete abolition of all forms of
racial discrimination."
WAR BONUS
Essential in the equipment of ev-
ery Soldier, Sailor, Marine or Flyer
Is a first aid kit consisting of band-
ages and antiseptics for Instantane-
ous use. These materials are packed
into a compact box and cost about
$1.50 each.
Miami Service League to Sponsor
Card Party on November 16
On Monday evening, November
16 at 8 o'clock, the Miami Ser-
vice League of the Y.M.H.A. will
sponsor a card and Mah Jongg
party for men and women at the
"Y" club rooms. The proceeds
of this affair are devoted to the
dances and other services to ser-
vice men. Men and women are
invited and admission is only 50c.
Chairman of the committee is
Mrs. Fannie Weintraub and is
assisted by Mrs. Helen Bloom,
Mrs. Sari Furman, Mrs. Lee Sha-
pio, Mrs. Ada Green, and Mrs.
Juliette Stone. Refreshments
will be served.
"Y" Day December
Mrs. Al Reisman. president of
the Y. W. H. A. announces that
the annual "Y" day will be held
throughout this area on Wednes-
day, December 2. The "Y" day
event was inaugurated last year.
This is a series of card parties
held on the same day at different
homes throughout the Miami
area. The proceeds of these par-
ties go to the Y.W.H.A. fund.
The following persons have con-
sented to sponsor parties for the
Y.W.H.A. on that day: Mrs. Rose
Lubel. 3-8310; Mrs. Al Weiner.
9-2180; Mrs. Al Reiser, 2-0297;
Mrs. H. Mandel, 3-8208; Mrs. B.
Rosen, 2-8122; Mrs. Dcutsch and
Mrs. Chester, 48-1749; Mrs. S.
Sanders and Mrs. M. Shankman,
2-7802; Mrs. Bea Stepkin. Mrs.
Barnett and Mrs. Pearl Reisman.
4-4126; Mrs. S. Traurig. 3-0213:
Mrs. M. Grossman and Mrs. Sag-
er. 2-7979; Mrs. Jennie Levinson.
3-2227: Mrs. Ann Jacobs. 2-4471:
Mrs. William Friedman. 2-2803:
and Mrs. Belle Siegel, 2-0992.
Make your reservations now
with any of the above hostesses.
Get a party of friends and at-
tend. The committee is com-
posed of Mrs. Berger and Mrs.
Rosen.
Y. M. and Y. W. H. A. Installation j
on Sunday, December 6
"Better late than never" is an
old adage and this time it applies
to our installation party which
will be held at the "Y" on Sun-
day evening. December 16. Jo-
seh M. Lipton. chairman of the
installation committee, is arrang-
ing an excellent program for that
day. In the meantime, keep this
date open. It will be a gala
event.
11th Annual Dance Thursday,
December 10
Al Bcrkowilz. chairman of the
Y.M.H.A. 11th Annual Dance
committee, announces that the
Coral Gables Country Club has
been rented for the night of
Thursday. December 10 for the
11th annual dance of the "Y," Cy
Washburn and his orchestra will
render the music and entertain-
ment will be furnished by the
Army Air Corps. Keep this date
open and watch these columns
for further announcements. Tick-
ets are only $1.10 per person and
may be obtained from any mem-
ber of the committee or from
the "Y" office. The committee
is composed of Al Berkowitz.
chairman, assisted by Larry
Grossberg. Al Pallot, Leo Acker-
man. Murray Apte, Bernard
Sterling and George Rachlin.
Thanksgiving Celebration Wed-
nesday Evening. November 25
On Wednesday evening. No-
vember 25. the annual "Y"
Thanksgiving Party will be held.
The feature of the evening will
be a talkie entitled "Dream of
My People." featuring the late
Cantor Joseph Rosenblatt. Watch
I these columns for further details.
Have you a son or daughter
between the ages of 4 and 14?
If so, send her to the "Y" danc-
, ing and crafts classes. For furth-
er particulars call the "Y" office.
Bowling League News
A new bowling league has
started. Teams and their mem-
bers are:
Bombardiers: Marty Milstein.
captain: Sam Badanes. Sam
Weber. Gene Weiss; Izzy Schem-
er. Myron Newman, substitute.
Tigers: Abe Berkowitz. captain:
Larry Grossberg, Nat Blumberg.
Jules Wilson. Joe Berman. Mor-
ton Moses, substitute.
Commandos: Hal Levinson.
captain: Hal Berkowitz. Jack
Apte. Sam Seitlin, Ted Bramson.
Marty Schwartz, substitute.
Supermen: Allie Berkowitz.
captain: Frank Rose, Pete Silver-
man, Sid Kaplan, Reuben Lubel.
Bob Miller, substitute.
Hi-Fliers: Al Reisman. captain;
Mike Mirelson. Murray Apte. Wil-
lie Seigel, Robert Bodin. substi-
tute.
Rangers: Geo. Chertkof. cap-
tain; Geo. Rachlin, Sam Neufeld.
Milton Friedman, Al Weiner.
Geo. Cohen, substitute.
Substitutes: Harry Gordon.
George Grecnberg, Sol Levin, Al
Moses. Aaron Edelman, Hank
Miller.
M. FRIEDMAN
Practical Hebrew Teacher
620 Euclid Avenue. Miami Beach
Miami Beach
PHONE 5-9026
Beginners to Talmud
Individual Instruction
We need millions ot these first aid
kits for emergency treatment They
are also used by Red Cross work-
ers, in field hospitals and wherever
needed until hospital treatment may
be obtained. Even a child could buy
one or more of these kits through
purchase of War Stamps. Buy War
Bonds and Stamps every pay day
and invest at least ten percent of
your income in these government
Securities. y. s. 1 rtoiurv Dipo'lmrnl
Don't waste the precious gift of
Eyesight! Many msn h.i.t lost the
chanct lor military comaimoDi be-
couh ol poor eyssight-bad lighting
is one couii ol syestrain Be sure
your lights at home are good snouqh
to avoid eysslrain while you study'
11 on ib roi '"'" O"""
Buy War Stamps and Bonds
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.


PAGE FOUR
*Jewlst ncridlar
FRIDAY. NOVEMBER
13, 1942
PLANT AND MAIN OFFICES
21 S. W. SECOND AVENUE
P. O. BOX 2973 PHONE 2-1141
KnUred as Second Class Matter July 4, 1930, at
the Post Office of Miami, Florida, under
the Act of March 3, 1879
Fred K. Shochet. Managing Editor
One
SUBSCRIPTION
Year, $2.00 Six Months, $1.00
MIAMI, FLA., FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 13. 1942
KISLEV 4. 5703
VOLUME 15 NUMBER 45
BOY AMERICA RESCUED
JOINS U. 5. ARMY
THE FAR EAST
The Nazis are now doing something of a
blitz in reverse in the Near East theatre of the
war. Perhaps this is an omen of the day
when they will be doing a general blitz back-
wards throughout Europe. It may be predict-
ed that when they do begin this general blitz
backwards, they will run even more speedily
backward than they ran forward in the first
days of the war.
Co-incident with this heartening news in
the Near East came another bit of happy news
-the arrival of a large contingent of American
troops on Palestine soil.
The United States has more Jews than any
other country in the world. The United States
Jews have given more money for the building
up of Palestine, yet America has been sadly
in the background when it came to determin-
ing the policy of Palestine.
With the Yanks in Palestine with the Red.
White and Blue waving in Jerusalem and Hai-
fa, perhaps another day has come when
America will assume the role to which she is
entitled.
Just what the future holds for Palestine is a
matter like many other things in this war-
shaken world, about which we cannot speak
with any preciseness now. We do not know
who will hold the Mandate for Palestine nor do
we even know that the Mandate system will
be maintained, but if it is, it is not an impossi-
bility that America itself as the country with
the largest number of Jews, may be entrusted
with it. How the American people as a whole
would react to this, we cannot say, but it is
more than probable the Pilgrim Fathers would
have smacked with delight at the idea.
THE SHOE FITS
Reprinted below is a paragraph from the
"Editor's Chair" column of the Jewish Post,
Indianapolis Anglo-Jewish Publication. Your
editor offers it to the readers, as echoing his
same sentiments:
Every once in a while I'll be stopped on
the street or at meetings by someone who'll
start off by declaring their disillusionment and
disappointment about me and The Post and our
courage. Why didn't you write a scathing
editorial about the Talmud Torah situation, or
are you afraid to criticize the failure of the
Kirshbaum Forum to include Jewish speakers
in its schedule, they ask.
I don't mind criticism, and I am so used to
sticking my chin out, that another clip to that
delicate spot won't make me any more groggy
But I want to make a declaration. The pages
of The Post are open to practices in this com-
munity and state. If you guys mean what you
say, then how about putting it in writing, sign-
ing your name and sending it on. Stick your
neck out, if you really are sincere. If I be-
lieve your contentions are valid, I may com-
ment myself, but the next time you boil up in-
side about this or that, don't transfer your an-
ger to me or this paper, just give your own in-
testinal fortitude a test by deciding whether or
not you'd be willing to put your identity to
whatever axe you have to grind.
Six large ash cans will provide an anti-air-
craft director; 17 old radiators, a 75 mm. tank
gun; a single wash pail, three bayonets; one
copper kettle will yield enough copper for 84
rounds of automatic rifle ammunition.
CAPITAL LETTER
By CHARLES BENSON
Nazi Germany's "Expendables"
the thousands of Jewish men. wo-
men and children ruthlessly cast
out of their homelandsare taking
their place among Uncle Sam's
"lndispensables" in tne global strug-
gle against fascism.
The elderly, and others excused
from military service, are busy on
the production lines replenishing
democracy's arsenals jobs for
which they are being trained and
placed by the National Refugee
Service.
The younger men, such as the
one pictured above saying goodbye
at NRS. are Joining the armed
forces in increasing numbers. The
significance of the above photo lies
in the fact that the soldier-to-be Is
one of the SOU child refugees from
r-" r:nronP!\n countries who have
been brought to the United Statei
since 1934 and who Have been
placed] In carefully supervised fos-
ter homes by the Uerman-Jewisb
Children's Aid, a child reseat
agency administered by the Nation-
al Refugee Service.
As soon as he became ot age,
this young refugee registered with
his local Selective Service board.
A few weeks ago he was called for
Induction.
"Tomorrow I will be inducted in-
to the Army," he said proudly-
happy In the chance to repay in
part his debt to the country whicb
Is now hi3 home.
The National Refugee Service,
together with the Joint Distribu-
tion Committee and the United Pal-
estine Appeal, receives its funds
from thp United Jrwish Appeal.
The President's Committee cm
Fair Employment Practice, charg-
ed with preventing discrimination
against minority groups in war
industry, appears to have won a
victory, It has now been estab-
lished as the only agency em-
powered to act in its field, and
although it will continue to op-
erate under the not-too-sympa-
thetic War Manpower Commis-
sion. :'. may have a more import-
ant part in shaping policy.
Tin- victory seems at first to
be of the minor bureaucratic va-
riety, the result of the endless in-
trigue for a few more jobs, a lit-'
tie additional authority and one
more "operation" thai occupies
SO much time in any large admin-
istrative system. Inter-office pol-
itics, in other words. But some-
times these departmental ven-
dettas reflect a genuine conflict
Of policy, and the FEPC does
represent a consistent point of
view.
Formed originally in response
to heavy pressure from negro
groups who stressed the dangers
of disaffection among their peo-
ple, the FEPC has had consider-
able support from the White'
House and has used its prestige
boldly against strong interests. It
cited some of the biggest firms
in the country for violation of
the President's anti-discrimina-
tion order and made them prom-
ise to mend their ways. It held
hearings in Birmingham on dis-
crimination against negroes, and
survived the concentrated on-
slaught by Southern democrats
that followed.
It did not survive unscathed,
however. Partly as a result of
the Birmingham hearings, the,
President transferred it from his
own immediate supervision in
the Office for Emergency Man-
agement to Paul V. McNutt's
War Manpower Commission. This
was a blow to the FEPC. It had
been expecting an increased bud-
get, more personnel, new pow-
ers, and found itself subordinat-
ed instead to an agi ncy that felt
us own powers insufficient and
already had two branches that
approximated the functions of its
new baby.
So on Aug. 1 when the trans-
fer was announced, some minor-
ity groups thought that the FEPC
was on its way out. Between
that date and the end of Octo-
ber it was not publicly active.
but much seems to have gone on
behind the scenes. On Oct. 27.
the WMC announced that field
workers on the Negro Manpower
Service and the Minority Groups
Service would be transferred to
the FEPC, and it appeared that
these two rivals of the commit-
tee were virtually abolished. The
all-important matter of budget
and the precise weight the FEPC
could swing in shaping WMC
policy remain to be determine.
Both probably depend on over-
all plans evolved to solve the
manpower problem.
Pending the emergence of those
plans, the FEPC has been making
itself felt as it has not done for
several months. It has renewed
its interest in the discrimination
against Mexican in the south-
west. It is talking of hearings to
break down alleged prejudice
against negroes and Jews in the
Post Office Department. It is
needling the United States Em-
ployment Service to refuse or-
ders from employers who specify-
that they want "white" or "Chris-
tian" labor.
This last activity seems near-
est fruition. It also illustrates!
the kind of difficulty the FEPC
IS most likely to run into.
Following the custom of pri-
vate employment agencies, the
USES formerly asked employers
to specify the race and religion
of the workers they would like to
have. This was modified some-
what when the regulations were
changed to read that referrals
should be made without regard to
race, color or creed "except when
an employers order includes
tl OSe specifications which the
employer is not willing to elim-
inate."
Now the FEPC wants this
changed. It wants the USES to
refuse all help to an employer
unless he eliminates discriminat-
ory demands. In the interest of
speeding the war effort, the
USES would prefer to send an
employer whatever workers it
has in stock, negro. Jewish, alien.
Chineseas long as they meet
the requirements of the work.
Then, if the employer obviously
discriminates, he would be re-
ferred to the FEPC for suitable
action.
The FEPC maintains that it
does more harm to the war effort
in the long run for a government
agency to refrain from fighting
discrimination with any means in
its power, than it does to delay-
supplying men to employers until
they agree not to discriminate.
The President may have to de-
cide that one.
Just to give you an idea of the
complications in what you might
have thought was a simple issue:
now that the USES has omitted
the question of religion from its
questionnaires, it's next to im-
impossible to ascertain whether
employers are discriminating
against Jews or Catholics or
both, or not, since individual
complaints can be adjusted and
statistical evidence is no longer
available.
-TIDBITS FROM EVERYWHERE-
Muctiy eonpdmticd
-By PHINEAS J. BIRON-
COMMENT
That canard which the United Press circulated last week
about the "resignation of Henry Morgenthau was inspired by
political gossips who are trying to undermine the Secretary
of the Treasury It's true that Morgenthau has evinced a
genuine interest in the fate of homeless Jewry ... But the story
that he was considering leadership in the Zionist Organiza-
tion is cut out of whole cloth One of the silliest arguments
against a Jewish army of stateless and Palestinian Jews was
advanced recently by Major George Fielding Elliot, the mili-
tary expert who last year predicted Russia's collapse within
six weeks The Major says that a Jewish army would re-
guire time for training and eguipping ... So what? What
about the American boys in the American Army? Are
they born with rifles on their shoulders?
IN THE AIR
Leonard Lyons reports the story of Monseigneur Chaptal,
Auxiliary Bishop of Paris, who insists on wearing a yellow
band and the Mogen David on his sleeve as he walks the
streets of that Nazi-occupied city The most reverend gen-
tleman's explanation for his voluntary identification with
the non-Aryans is that not all of his grandparents were one
hundred per cent Aryan Which reminds us of an incident
reported by a reader of the Aufbau, the German-language
refugee weekly ... It seems that a certain German Jew who
had obtained his visa for America was helped greatly, it
secretly, by an Aryan friend of long standing ... As the refu-
gee finally was enabled to board the train that would take
him out of Naziland, he had a farewell meeting with his
friend, and lamented his inability to do anything to express
in a tangible way his appreciation for the aid he had re-
ceived And the Aryan said: "But there is a great favor
you could do me ... I would be very grateful to you if you a
sell me your Star of David band" Amazed, the Jew re-
plied that of course he'd be glad to leave the "Jew badge
with his friend "But what in the world do you want it
for?" he asked Replied the other: "After all, there a pos-
sibility that Hitler may be overthrown here some day
And then this Jew badge will protect all who wear it
P. S.: The Aryan insisted on paying two hundred reichmarks
for the Mogen David.
READER'S GUIDE
It's too bad you couldn't read the original manu?cyipt|he
S. J. Woolf's article on Weizmann, which appearedJB ">
Magazine Section of the New York Times on November
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 8)


FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 13. 1942
+JewisHk>ri PAGE FIVE
With the Houses of Worship
FRIDAY EVENINGS at 6 o'clock; Late Services at 8:15 P. M.
SATURDAYS at 9:00 A. M. and 5:30 P. M.
SUNDAY SCHOOLS at 10:00 A. M.: Religious School. Monday Thursday, 3:45
DAILY SERVICES at the Synagogues. 8 A. M. and 6:15 P. M.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
i1 N K. 19th St. Ph. 2-774a
2bB1 JACOB H. KAPLAN, 1'h.u.
" Rabbi Emeritus
6996 Indian Creek PMVe
-,InS uiiorce Price, Miami Beach
I'hone 6-1 i3S
CONG BETH DAVID
135 N. W. Third Ave., Ml.mu
MAX SHAPIRO, Rabbi
Residence Phone. 2-S t
Lolls HAYMAN, Cain..!
133 N. W. 3rd Aw. l'h. ^-1473
BEACH JEWISH CENTER
141". Euclid Avenue, Miami Heach
DR. SAMUEL BEN8ION, Rabbi
1336 Jefferson Avenue
I'hone 5-4781 or 5-4732
SCHAAREI ZEDEK
(GATES OF JUSTICE)
1343 S. W. Third Street
Miami. Florida
BETH JACOB CONG
Washington Avenue and Third
st:.-.:. Miami Beach
MOSES MBSCHELOFP, Rabbi
711 Iennx Avenue. I'hone 5-1821
MAURICE MAMCHBS. Cantor
621 Lenox Ave. F'h. 3-7133
Sabbath Eve Services
Services will be in observance
of A Z. A. Sabbath, under the
sonsorship of local Youth Groups
of A. Z. A. and B. Z. B. Officers
0f the A.Z.A. will participate in
conducting the services, and the
address will be given by Marvin
Goldman.
A reception for worshipers, un-
der A. Z. A..sponsorship, will fol-
low the services.
Semi-Annual Meeting
The semi-annual meeting of
the membership of Temple Israel
will be held Wednsday evening,
Nov. 18th at 6:30 p. m. in the
(orm of a buffet supper and soc-
ial gathering. Guests of honor
at this meeting will be the new
members of the congregation.
Brief reports on the work of the
congregation and Its affiliate or-
ganizations will be given and
plans for the future outlined.
Members of the Temple are
cordially invited.
Sisterhood Red Cross
Our Sisterhood Red Cross Sew-
ing group appeals for additional
workers, especially for workers
who have their own portable
sewing machines. Members of the
congregation and Sisterhood in-
terested in this project please
contact Mrs. Sam'l Katz. 3-3991.
Sisterhood Red Cross sewing ses-
sions will be held in the Temple
Sisterhood room on Tuesday.
Nov. 17th, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
In Memoriam
"May the Father of Peace send
peace to all who mourn, and
comfort the bereaved among us."
At the services Friday evening.
the memory of the following will
be hallowed:
Recently departed: William
Solomon, father of Mrs. Harold
B. Spaet; Joseph Lang, father of
Mrs Albert E. Rosenthal; Moses
Marks, father of Mrs. Hyman
Kaplan.
Yalirzeits: Jacob Klein, grand-
father of Mrs. E. Max Goldstein:
Goldman, father of Irving
man; Leon Lichtenstetter.
husband of Mrs. Lucille Lichten-
st< tier; Shepard Nicholas Simp-
son, son of Julius Simpson; Pau-
line Weinstein, mother of Mrs.
Tillie Lee, Mrs. Rose Louis and
Isidore Weinstein; Fanny Diam-
ant. mother of Mrs. Rose Raff;
Jacob Shapiro, father of Benj.
Shapiro; Sophie Kahn. mother of
Albert L. Kahn; Harris Lee,
ther of Mrs. Edward A. Klein.
Floral offering in memory of
Jacob Shapiro.
Late Friday Evening Services
The A. Z. A. Chapter of Miami
will conduct the services. In
view of the national A. Z. A.
Sabbath a symposium on the dis-
cussion, "The Core of Israel To-
day," will take piace with four
young men participating. Cantor
Louis Hayman with the Beth Da-
vid choir of 14 boys and girls,
will officiate. Nov. 11 marked
the anniversary ending of the
first World War. In keeping
with the theme Rabbi Max Sha-
piro will present briefly the
problem on the subject. "What
Are Our Soldiers Thinking
About?" Immediately after the
services, Mr. and Mrs. Isidor Co-
hen will serve as hosts at a re-
ception, in honor of their grand-
son. Albert Weintraub's bar-
mitzvah.
Junior Services
Junior congregational services
will be conducted this Saturday
morning at 10:30 by the Junior
congregation. Adults, as well as
children, are invited to partici-
pate in these services. A Kid-
dush is served by the Sisterhood
immediately after the Benedic-
tion.
In Memorium
The following Yahrzeiten of
beloved ones whose names are
inscribed in our Book of Life,
and whose Yahrzeiten occur this
coming week, will be mentioned
from the pulpit during the ser-
vices this Friday night: Chava
Yehudis. daughter of Chas. Jam-
ieson; Mccanccn Mendel, father
of Mrs. Sam Haas and Mrs. Jean
Scitlin: Avrohom. father of Mrs.
Louis Hayman.
Service Men Entertainment
Dance
and
Late Services
Late services will be held Fri-
Miss Lillian Poze will feature day evoning with guest speaker
the entertainment program for j l^s Heiman. president-elect of postponed on account of
Service Men on Tuesday night,. B'nai B'rith and president of the | mpn-s restrictions. The
November 17th. Dancing fol- j Greater Miami Zionist District,
lows the program. Refreshments Refreshments will be served fol-
SHAARAY TEFILA
4 lo Espanola Waj
Miami Beach
YESHIVA CENTER
146 Michigan Avenue
Miami Beach
The Yeshiva Educational Cen-
ter, located at 846 Michigan Ave.,
Miami Beach, conducts daily ser-
vices each week day at 8 a. m.
and Saturdays at 9. Evening ser-
vices at 6:30. Sholash Sudas on
Saturday afternoon. Rabbi J.
Shulman will address the gath-
ering.
KEEP 'EM FLYINGBy buy-
ing Defense Stamps and Bonds.
Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky
will speak during the Saturday
morning services on the subject.
"Hypocrisy."
The Ein-Ya-Akov group meets
Sunday. Monday and Tuesday at
6:30 p. m. and the Shulchan Oruch
group meets Wednesday and
Thursday at 6:30 p. m. All are
invited.
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHDX
:,!in S. W. 17th Ave., Miami. Kla.
LEWIS QREEN, Sexton
1441 S. W. Fifth Street
*vT)G\JST BROS RKJf
Is the BEST.'
Congregational
A regular meeting will be held
Tuesday, Nov. 17 at 8 p. m. Mem-
bers are urged to attend.
Max Rifas, president, an-
nounces that Saturday, Nov. 29
a guest rabbi from the North will
officiate at the services.
Sisterhood
Mrs G. Mendel presided at the
meeting of the Sisterhood last
week with representatives of the
congregation present. Unanimous
decision was made to open the
Talmud Torah and Sunday
school. Enrollment will take
place Sunday morning, Nov. 15th
at 10 at the synagogue.
1 will be served. Only men in un-
iform and young ladies volunteer-
ing to act as dancing partners are
welcome.
Center Community Socials
The first of the Center Com-
munity Socials was held last Sat-
urday night and gave promise of
a very successful season. Mr. and
Mrs. Lew Sims were in charge of
the affair. Among those present
were Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Fried-
land, first vice-president; Mrs.
Freda Newman. Sisterhood pres-
ident; Mrs. M. S. Rubin. Sister-
hood honorary president; Mr.
and Mrs. Nathan Glosser, Mr. and
Mrs. Raymond Rubin. Mrs. J.
Hirsch. Mrs. John Freeman, and
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bodenstein. |
These socials will be held every
Wednesday and Saturday eve-
ning.
Rummage Sale
The Sisterhood will hold its
rummage sale during the com-
ing week. Contributions of cast
off clothing and any other sale-
able articles may be sent to the
Center office.
Religious School Prize Awards
Mrs. Milton Sirkin. president
of the Center Religious School
Parent-Teacher Association, dis-
tributed prizes to the following
children for their efforts in
bringing new pupils into our
school: Ethel Baron. Her! nit
Buchwald. Rachel Habib. Victo-
ria Habib. Phylis Goldstein. How-
ard Horowitz. Miriam Kevlin.
Ann Levin. Gerry' L'1U Rosc- Al-
len Shaw and Gloria Wasserman.
Youth Night at Center Services
Friday night has been desig-
nated as Youth Night. The Re-
ligious services will be conducted
bv the B'nai B"rith Junior organ-
izations, the A. Z. A. and the
B'nai B'rith Girls. The Center
Brotherhood will act as the hosts
on this occasion.
The musical portions of the ser-
vices will be rendered by Cantor
Abraham D. Wolf and the Center
choir. Dr. Samuel Bcnsion will
speak on "Our Sons. Our All.'"
The following A. Z. A. mem-
bers take part in the program:
Murray Bast. Marshall Giller,
Gilbert Jacobs and David Kap-
lan. David Moldafsky. president
of the A. Z. A., will deliver an
address of welcome, and Sey-
mour Brenner will deliver the
scrmonctte. The B'nai B'rith
Girls will serve as the hostesses
at the Reception, which will fol-
low the services at the Social
Hall. Refreshments will be
served. ,
The subject of Dr. Samuel
Bension's sermon Saturday will
be "Religious Racketeers."
lowing the services. Next week
the services will be conducted by
Rev. Simon April.
Talmud Torah and Sunday
School will start classes begin-
ning Nov. 22nd. under Rev.
April's direction.
Sisterhood
The Sisterhood elected officers
at their meeting last week. Those
elected were Mrs. Ida Buckstein.
president: Mrs. Wm. Clein. vice
president: Mrs. P. Sokaloff sec-
ond vice-president: Mrs. S. Stone,
treasurer; Mrs. Chas. Tannen-
baum. financial secretary; Mrs.
E. Golb. recording secretary;
Mrs. S. Miller, corresponding sec-
retary: Mrs. Max Kupferstein.
publicity chairman. Board mem-
bers chosen were Mrs. D. Kleber.
Mrs. S. Kostoff, Mrs. A. Daum.
Mrs. M. Kotkin. Mrs. A. Pepper.
Mrs. B. Traeger. Mrs. S. Swis-
ko and Mrs. Max Mintzer.
A card party will be held Sun-
day evening. Nov. 22 at the syn-
agogue. Hostesses will be Mrs.
S. Stone and Mrs. P. Sokaloff.
BETH SHOLOM CENTER
7<*.i flitt Snort, Miami Beach
Phone S-&793
S M MACHTE1. Rabbi
\v. 17th


Mi.tmi
CONG BETH ABRAHAM
333 N. W. Fifth Ave.. Miami
Buy War Bonds Today-
Rabbi H. M. Kagan will speak
Saturday morning at the services
on the Portion of the Week.
Rabbi Kagan may be reached
at 437 S. W. 15th Ave., phone
9-2295.
Sabbath Services
Sabbath eve service with ser-
mon by Rabbi S. M. Machtei. on
"A Mother's Devotion." The rab-
bi will preach on "Priest and
Prophet," Saturday morning.
At the social period which fol-
lows the 8:15 p. m. service to-
night the following will be host-
esses: Mrs. Benj. Appel and Mi.
Mona Altman. At the "open
house.'' a Beth Sholom Sunday
evening feature, the hostesses will
be the officers of the Sisterhood.
Adult Classes
The adult class in Jewish Sci-j
once meets at 11 a. m. each Sun-
day. The lesson for this week
is, "How Mad Are You?" Classes
in Domestic Science are being
organized. All adult classes are
conducted by Rabbi S. M. Mach-
tei. For information inquire at
the Beth Sholom Center office
on Sunday morning.
Welcome Home
President Alfred B. Rosenstein
will be welcomed at the late
Friday evening service by First
Vice President Dr. Max Ellis.
who was acting president. Mr.
Rosenstein has a message which
he will deliver to the members
at the next regular meeting.
Juniors
The Beth Sholem Center Jun-
iors have been organized and the
following officers elected. Dave
Tobin. president; Nelson Kemp,
vice president; Naomi Machtei,
secretary; Sivie Appel. treasurer.
A meeting will be held at 7:30
Saturday night. November 14th.
at the Center. 761 West 41st St.
The Juniors are planning many
affairs for the winter season and
invite all teen age boys and girls
! to join them.
Armistice Day Service
The late Friday night service
to have been held last week was
service
men's restrictions. The service
will be held this Friday and is
open to civilians as well as ser-
vice men.
The Armistice Day service will
be opened with the presentation
of the colors by J. W. V. com-
rades Sam Brauer and M. P.
Frank. Acting commander of the
Freda Markowitz Post will bring
greetings on the part of the Jew-
ish War Veterans of the area.
Rabbi Moses Mescheloff, state J.
i W. V. chaplain, will speak on
"Jewish War Veterans Past and
Present." Chaplain Camillus An-
gel will conduct the services and
deliver the principal address.
Junior Services
All school boys and girls are
invited to the Junior Congrega-
tional services heid in our Tal-
mud Torah building at 9 A. M.
Saturdays.
Religious School
We congratulate our staff mem-
ber. Miss Betty Smith, on her
forthcoming marriage. Her mar-
riage leaves a vacancy in our
faculty. Applicants are asked to
communicate with Rabbi Mesch-
eloff.
Daughters of Israel
The Daughters of Israel and
Men's Division will meet at Beth
Jacob synagogue this Sunday at
4 P. M. The public is invited.
Radio Hour
Rabbi Mescheloff will speak
this Sunday at 4:30 P. M. over
VVTOD. His subject will be
"Month of Heroism."
Sisterhood Party
Our Sisterhood will hold a
card party at the home of its
president. Mrs. B. H. London on
Tuesday. November 4th. at 1:30
P. M.
Mizrachi Chanukah Concert
The Miami Beach Mizrachi will
present its fourth annual Chan-
ukah Concert on Sunday night.
December 6th. at the Beth Jacob
synagogue. Tickets may be had
at our office.
Beth Jacob Service Club
The service club is open to all
service men every evening from
7 to 11 o'clock. Kosher sand-
wiches are served all day Sun-
day. Game's every Monday night.
A program of professional enter-
tainment will be presented Wed-
nesday night.
The Enlisted Men's Wives Club
meets Tuedays at 2 P. M.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1 sol South Andrews Avenue
Ft, Lauderdale, Florida
RABBI SAMUEL HALEV1 HARON
TOT, S. E. 9th Street Ph. 141*
Sabbath services Friday at 8
p. m.; Religious School Sunday
at 10:30 a. m.; Sisterhood meet-
ing Monday at 8 p. m.; sewing for
war relief Tuesday from 12:30 to
5 p. m. The Sisterhood's annual
benefit pre Thanksgiving spa-
ghetti supper will be served at
the Temple on Thursday, Nov.
19 from 6 to 8 p. m.
Investing in War Bonds today,
means the purchasing of freedom
for tomorrow.
MODERATE COSTS
ALWAYS WITHIN THE MEANS
OF INDIVIDUAL
CIRCUMSTANCES
GORDON FUNERAL HOME
YOUR JEWISH FUNERAL iOMl
710 S. W. 12th AVENUE
PHONE 3-3431
WORTHY AND
DESERVES YOUR FULL
SUPPORT AND
RECOMMENDATION

'


i
'

*


PAGE SIX
vJewisti f/cridfia/n
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13,
1942
PALM BEACH NOTES
JEWISH FLORIDIAN OFFICE. 226 S. OLIVE STREET
IN THE FOX BUILDING
MRS. MARY SCHREBNICK. Representative
Returning from her summer
home in Worcester, Mass., this
week was Mrs. I. Margolis of
Lake Worth.
A large group attended the
Beth El luncheon and card party
held Tuesday at Scher Hall. A
business meeting was part of the
afternoon's program. Hostesses
wire Mrs. Frank Barer. Mrs. H.
Freeman. Mrs. S. Dicks. Mrs. H.
Kapner Mrs. I. Kapner and Mrs.
H. Greenblatt.
Mrs. Bessie Rader of Belle
Glade spent the week-end at
West Palm Beach.
Mr. and Mrs Meyers returned
to West Palm Beach after spend-
ing the summer at Youngston,
N. Y.
1
"EAT
HOLSUM
BREAD"
Sidney Pepper and Martin Dub-
bin headed the committee in
charge of the annual card party
of the B'nai Britli Lodge 1146.
held last Thursday at Schwartz-
berg Hall.
For the Best in Dairy
Products
AMBULANCE SERVICE
MIZELL SIMON
MORTUARY
413 Hibiscus Street Ph. 8121
West Paltn Beach. Florida
ALFAR
CREAMERY CO.
WEST PALM BEACH
MILKCREAMICE CREAM
SOUTHERN DAIRIES
r< -^ Serving Palm Beach County, featuring the
VsJ-5****C Nationally Famous Southern Dairies Pro-
< CBEAM ducts and Ice Cream.
-"lit AS NEAR TO YOU AS YOUR PHONE
[
318 HARVEY BUILDING
PHONE 6093
Writing Fire and all Kindred Lines oi Insurance
for SAFETY...
and Liberal Returns
Place Your Funds
In
|AE PEHEIUL
' mr MIAMI
A SAVINGS INSTITUTION
Which has never paid lest than
3% on insured savings.
RESOURCES OVER
$6,000,000
J. M. LIPTON. President
45 NORTHEAST FIRST AVENUE
Buy Your War Savings Bonds Here
RECOMMENDED
On this page will appear the advertisements of a group of "above the
average" firms and individuals whose product or service has proven Re-
liability and Dependability. Feel free to call 2-1141 at any time for furth-
er information as to any of the advertisements listed below or to fill any
of your many needs. Seventeen years of Miami Background will be
placed at your disposal. Ask for B. R. Walzer.
VIA VI
A Multiple-Vitamin Product Also
Full Information Upon Request
1454 N. W. 36th Street
Call. Write, or PHONE 3-8211
Buy War Bonds Today
BEFORE YOU BUY
see
LEON ELKIN
with
METROPOLITAN
LIFE INS. CO.
Not Best Because Biggest
ButBiggest Because Best
Buy War Savings Bonds
Dr. Frederick R. Frank
Chiropractic Physician
A COMPLETE HEALTH
SERVICE
Clinical and Diagnostic
Laboratory
X-Ray
1138 West Flagler Street
3-5961 Miami
Buy War Bonds Today
ROOFING COMPANY HOLDS
ENVIABLE MIAMI POSITION
AS ONE OF ITS PIONEERS
In a semi-tropical climate such
as that enjoyed by South Florida,
the roof of any building, regard-
less of size or construction,
bears probably, the brunt of
wear and tear of the elements.
Hence, it is important that par-
ticular attention be given to the
roof, gutters and meal work con-
nected with the roof.
J. B. (Barney) Hanson, propri-
etor of the Hanson Roofing Co..
located at 414 S. W. Twenty-Sec-
ond Street, is one of the pioneer
roofers of Miami, having been
actively engaged in the roofing
and sheet metal business here for
more than twenty-five years, and
numbers satisfactory jobs by the
hundreds.
The Hanson Company, bonded
roofers, find no roofing problem
too largenor too small to re-
ceive their expert solution, and
will be pleased to consult with
you about your next roofing or
sheet metal job.
Among the many outstanding
contracts fulfilled by Mr. Han-
son may be mentioned the Mi-
ami Biltmore Hotel, Coral Gables,
recently purchased by the gov-
ernment to be used as a base hos-
pital, and the famous Whitehall
Hotel, Palm Beach, Florida, an
outstanding example of modern
architecture. The ornamental
metal domes of this win i
known hostelry bespeaks the ?
t.stry and skill of this M;I
craftsman. mi
This week the Hanson RoofinE
Company was awarded the con
tract for extensive repairs to Z
roof of the local Young J
Hebrew Association building.
MIAMI'S ONLY KOSHER RESTAURANT!
FAGAN'S PALATIAL RESTAURANT
265 N. E. 2nd Street. Miami
SERVING THOUSANDS OF PATRONS SINCE 1924
i?
Established in Miami Since 1
Hanson Roofing Co.
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL
CONTRACTORS L
PHONE 4-5860
414 S. W. 22nd AVENUE
KEEN SIGHT
HAVE YOUR EYES
EXAMINED
by
DR. KEENE
221-2-3 Seybold Building
Annoyed or Damaged by
INSECTS
TERMITES
RODENTS
EXTERMINATING CO.
CALL 4-1375
2388 W. FLAGLER ST.
FREE
ADVICE and INSPECTION
AN OPEN LETTER
"CARAVAN" COMMITTEE MEET TO TALK OVER PLANS
November 11, 1942
Jewish Floridian,
' Miami. Florida.
Due to the sincerity of a great
i number of people in Miami, and
their many inquiries as to the
| status of Kosher butcher stores
, in Miami, permit me to advise
j ihat a careful study will be made
! immediately, and the findings
and recommendations will be
submitted to the general public.
The problem in a Jewish com-
munity has always been, not on-
ly in regard to "Kashrus" but
to "Chinuch" and other matters
as well that too many people are
prone, to criticize from the dist-
ance but fear to come forward
and help in the elimination of
"Hefkaerus," or disorganized vi-
I tal Jewish matters.
A statement will be forthcom-
ing pertaining to Kashrus as soon
as an opinion and recommenda-
tion are formulated.
Very truly yours,
Rabbi Max Shapiro.
(uneral Cha
2001 W. FLAGLES ST
AMIULANCE .
SERVICE
The Southeastern Salesmen's Caravan, a grou of men who have put
up their ears for the duration and travel together in a bus through
their territories, are ready to start their second trek through Florida,
ending in P, nsacola, where they will arrive December 1. They
opened an exhibition of their wares at the Ponce de Leon Hotc
unday and today start traveling. Discussing the itinerary are (left
'" right seated) D. B. Hays, president of the caravan, an Nat Roth.
secretary. Standing (left to right) are Henry M. Arak, chairman ot
the Georgia committee; George M. Cohen, transportation chairman.
Perry Radin. chairman of the rooming committee. The group has
received national commendation for their "war-effort conservation
plan.
DAILY DELIVERY
11.1 P. M.
KOSHER MARKET
Made From Fresh Oranges
FRESH MEATS. aROCER.Es'.' VEGETABLES AND DELICATESSEN
I. PASHKOW w. FLA0LER STREET. MIAMI


FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 13. 1942
+Jewisti fhridian
PAGE SEVEN
NOTEBSyS5SJ/S?S TO NATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE OF
BRITH HILLEL FOUNDATIONS AND ALEPH ZADIK ALEPH
IT A
PALESTINE ARMY
Baltimore (WNS) Arthur
Havs Sulzberger. president and
publisher of the New York
Times, who returned recently
from a trip to Britain, this week
called upon Jewish and non-Jew-
ish supporters of Zionist aims to
drop their demands for the cre-
ation of a Jewish Army in Pal-
estine and for the post-war es-
tablishment of a Jewish State in
the Holy Land.
Speaking before the Brother-
hood of the Madison Avenue
Temple, Mr. Sulzberger stated
that the Zionist demands were
helping to create problems in the
Moslem world which merely add
to the difficulties of the United
Nations."
"Presumably the British gov-
ernment has decided that all oth-
er things considered, it will not
help win the war to meet the
demand for a separate Jewish ar-
my." Mr. Sulzberger said. "Furth-
ermore, the United States gov-
ernment has evidently not felt it
either wise or expedient to in-
tervene with the British govern-
ment in this matter. It seems to
me. therefore, that since these de-
cisions have been madeand I
think made with a conviction
that will not be changed, at least
during this warit serves no use-
ful purpose to continue, at (his
time, a campaign which not only
embarrasses the United Nations,
but can be distorted by the Axis
in the Arab world.
"I wish that I had the ability to
set that problem straight and
teach my fellow-Americans who
are not Jews that it would be
wise to examine all the facts in
that complicated situation before
lending their names to the ex-
treme Zionist cause, or the de-
mand for a Jewish army."
Asserting that the Zionist aims
did not represent the desires of
all Jews, the New York Times
publisher added: "If I, as a Jew,
can help to impress the world
that what Jews want far more
than a home of their own is the
riKht to call any place their home.
that in finding new homes justice
must be done those who already
dwell where the newcomer
would livethen I believe I
shall have been faithful to the
tradition of justice which is my
heritage as an American of Jew-
ish faith,"
>..------...v.......
Nine of the outstanding Jewish
educators in the United States
have accepted membership on a
national advisory committee on
education to assist in shaping
the national policies of the B'nai
B'rith Hillel Foundations and the
Aleph Zadik Aleph, B'nai B'rith
youth organization. The mem-
bers of the committee are: top
left to right, Ben M. Edidin, Jew-
ish Education Committee of New
York; Dr. Emanuel Gamoran, ed-
ucational director, Union of
American Hebrew Congrega-
tions; Dr. Alexander M. Dush-
kin, executive director Jewish
Education Committee of New
York; center left to right Rabbi
Samuel L. Blumenfield, director
College of Jewish Studies,
Chicago; Dr. Leo L. Honor, ex-
ecutive director Board of Jewish
Education of Chicago; Dr. Philip
L. Seman, director Jewish Peo-
ple's Institute of Chicago; bot-
tom left to right Israel S. Chip-
kin, associate director Jewish
Education Committee of New
York; Ben Rosen, director As-
sociated Talmud Torahs of Phila-
delphia; and Dr. Louis L. Kap-
lan, director Board of Jewish Ed-
ucation of Baltimore.
IN EGYPT PRAISED
BY GREAT BRITAIN
Cairo (WNS) High British
military authorities this week
praised the part played by a Pal-
estine Jewish communications
1 unit in the British Eighth Army's
smashing defeat of Nazi Fieid
Marshal Rommel's Afrika Korps
in the Egyptian desert. Despite
heavy enemy fire at the outset of
the great battle, the Jewish unit
maintained constant communica-
tion between the advancing Brit-
ish troops and the High Com-
mand.
Disclosing the achievements of
the Jewish unit, British military
leaders said that "the Jewish of-
ficers and men ave carried out
exemplarily a most difficult
task."
Meanwhile, while allied forces
plunged across the Egyptian des-
ert in pursuit of Rommel's beat-
en troops, the Rome Radio an-
nounced that all Jewish men of
military age in Tripoli had been
arrested and had been moved
from '.he city to a concentration
camp somewhere in the desert.
The Rome Radio said that this
action was taken "as a matter of
precaution" and charged that the
15,000 Jews in Tripoli, a poten-
tial jumping off place for an in-
vasion of Italy, were pro-British.
Jewish women and children in
the city were forbidden to leave
their homes between six o'clock
in the evening and dawn.
Have you bought your De-
fense Bonds yet?
CIVIC LEADERS OF MIAMI
HEAR DR. A. W. GOTTSCHALL
Buy War Bonds and Stamps and
Insure Your Tomorrow.
Dr. A. W. Gottschall, southern
region director for the National
Council of Christians and Jews,
made the principal address at the
round table discussion at a lunch-
eon last Thursday before a group
of Miami's civic leaders.
Mrs. Barbara Southern of this
city was in charge of the pro-
gram. Daniel H. Redfearn is the
Protestant co-chairman: Andrew
T. Healy, the Catholic co-chair-
man, and A. A. Ungar, the Jew-
ish co-chairman.
The organization aims at the
civic fusion of Catholics, Protest-
ants and Jews. Its sponsors
stress the fact that no attempt is
made to work towards religious
unitythat only an elimination of
"possible sources of friction and
misunderstanding between the
sects is sought."
Dr. Gottschall, who works out
of Washington, pointed out that
his mission here involves pro-
grams now being readied at army
camps, naval and air bases thru-
out the Miami area.
Dr. Gottschall added that his
work here has the announced
approval of the chaplains of the
United States army and navy.
BULGARIA TO ESTABLISH
GHETTOS FOR MANY CITIES
Stockholm (WNS)The imme-
diate establishment of ghettos
in all Bulgarian villages and cit-
ies having 50 or more Jewish
familios was announced this
week by the Bulgarian Commis-
siariate for Jewish Affairs. The
ghettos will be under the con-
trol of the Commissiariatc.
At the same time it was an-
announced that all Jewish insti-
tutions and synogogues in com-
munities having less that 150
Jews will be closed.
. in Miami, Florida
SUN-RAY PARK
HEALTH RESORT
ESTABLISHED IN lat
APPROVED SANITARIUM
With Cheerful Hotel Atmosphere
For Rest. Convalescent. Chronic
and Acuie Medical Caeee
Graduate Nursing and Dietetic Staff.
Resident Physician, complete Physical
Therapy. Pour Acres landscaped
Orounds. Sports. Recreations.
A. W. ELLIS. Pr.
3 W. PLATTH. M.D.. Med. Dtr.
It* S. W. 30th Caurt, Missal, PlarMa
Phone 4-1659









PAGE EIGHT
*JenistRorkUar
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER
FROM THE
SWIVEL
CHAIR
William
I.
Boxirmu
The views expressed by Mr. Boxer-
man are his own and do not nec-
essarily represent the opinion of
Tho Jewish Floridlan.
Gratifying
Tis gratifying to get response
now and then which indicates
that this column is being read.
At times we speculate on just
how mighty the pen is Then
something happens to indicate
the efficacy of the printed word.
From far off California comes
a letter from Harry Kovner who
read our recent review of 'Sabo-
tage.'' the dynamic best seller
which is going at the rate of
3000 per day. a remarkable rec-
ord.
"Sabotage." it will be recalled,
exposes with documented evi-
dence the machinations of Amcr-
ica's Quislings. Mr. Kovner writes
in part:
"I think it would be a good
idea for the B'nai B'rith Lodges
to tax their members to present
a "Sabotage"' book to their Gen-
tile friends ... All Jewish organ-
izations should (In likewise .
That's the only way to reach them
and to prove to them that the
propaganda against the Jews is
a diabolic consiracy by enemies
of our country.
"There are a lot ol yokels and
American fascists who still don't
believe that the Huns are as
black as we paint them : : When
they'll see facts then they'll be-
lieve ... I see in a recent issue
that the ADI. has some copies of
Sabotage" Will you be good
enough to ask them to mail a few
books tn my friends for which
I'm mailing check and postage?"
Enclosed with the letter was a
list of names to whom we sent
books in Mr. Kovner's name .
Perhaps he has started something
that others in the community
will emulate.
"Disciples of Avarice"
When last March one or two
hotel owners balked at renting
their hotels to the United States
army, newspapers beat the drums
about the lack of all the hotel
men on the Beach They were
called disciples of avarice" .
Headlines were not lacking to de-
REAL ESTATEMIAMI BEACH
Miami Beach Real Estate
SALES--------LEASES
B. E. BRONSTON
"Trustworthy Serried"
605 Lincoln Road Ph. 5-5868
For Richer, Grssnsr Lawn
And Shrsbbsry Try
BIAJ-GREEN
PLANT FOOD
Risrsnnc melts sss bs sktslsr*
trass this H<* stoat fsai wMck
cantatas sslssxais that will bslp
k*B> rhlnrt boss sat at asar laws.
Sals sKcloslTCly sT
HUGHES
SEED STORE
Ml I. MIAMI VI. MMI Mill
scribe this "awful blot on the fair
name of Miami," this "reflection
upon the patriotism of the Miami
area." The Associated Press sent
stories throughout the country.
Feeling in restaurant conversa-
tions ran high and a certain
"100% American" group began
to call the Jewish hotel men with
threats to break their windows.
Minimum of Cost
In view of all this hulabaloo,
which made good newspaper
copy, it was a source of satis-
faction to read a few days ago a
report of the House of Represen-
tatives military affairs commit-
tee, on the army-hotel negotia-
tions This report lauded the
leasing and training program and
pointed out that all of the trans-
actions had been carried out with
such fairness on the part of the
hotel men that the average cost
per man in training was consid-
erably lower than spent by the
war department for the construc-
tion of camps:
"The efficiency of the army's
program here (in Miami Beach)
clearly was silhouetted against
the per man housing in camps
and cantonments when it was
pointed out that the average cost
per man under the cost-plus-a-
lixed-fee contracts (camps and
cantonments) was S684.94 .
The highest individual camp on
this basis was Camp Polk, La.,
where the cost ran to S1263.ll
per man, this against a $20.00 per
man figure for Miami Beach" .
The report further indicated that
90.000 men had been trained to
date with a minimum of cost and
maximum of efficiency.
These facts are worthy of wide-
spread circulation We wonder
how many of them will percolate
to other parts of the country,
where the wire dispatches origin-
al ly were sent Since the House
report is not sensational enough,
we doubt that it will reach the
huge audience it should And
many who drew false conclusions
from the original stories will not
have them corrected.
At any rate, the record is clear
for all who honestly want to ex-
amine it If each reader of our
column will clip this item and
send it to a friend in another part
of the country a tremendous
amount of good will be clone
through the word-of-mouth pro-
paganda that will ensue.
Cut Shabbos!
STRICTLY
Tidbits from Everywhere
by PHINEAS J. BIRON
(CONTINUED FRtlM PAGE 4)
RIVERMONT PARK
SANITARIUM
1389 N. W. 7th St. Ph. 3-7301
Be&t care for chronic sick, conva-
lescent and elderly people
$25 WEEKLY UP
ssssssi Large Beautiful Groundsaassn

I WANT MY MILK
The published version was only
an expurgated, greatly diluted
piece Watch out for the forth-
coming Saturday Evening Post
piece on Justice Samuel Rosen-
man ... It was written despite
has protests The Judge does
not like publicity Publishers
Simon and Schuster are wonder-
ing when they're going to have
the complete manuscript of the
autobiography Bernard M. Ba-
ruch promised them quite some
years ago ... So far only a cou-
ple of chapters have been turned
in to themno doubt because Ba-
ruch is so busy living his life
that he has no time to write
much about it.
MODERN TIMES
We wonder whether Michael
Nostradamus, the sixteenth-cen-
tury French Jewish physician
who worked up quite a reputa-
tion as a soothsayer and prophet
of things to come, foresaw that
the time would come when a
New York hotel would fix up a
Nostradamus Room for the edi-
fication of its patrons, with the
entertainment provided by for-
tune tellers, astrologers. and
such Jacob Fishman. the Jew-
ish morning Journal's popular
columnist, is spending some of
his spare time these days reading
up on his Rambam. to oblige a
feminine reader who had learned.
through the paper, that the fam-
ous philosopher and physician
had a cure lor asthma, a disease
with which she is afflicted .
The odd part of it is that the lad)
is the widow of a famous lung
specialist, and her son is one of
Xew York's prominent heart spe-
cialists.
ABOUT PEOPLE
Edward K Grusd. managing ed-
itor of The National Jewish
Monthly, writes in to warn US
igamst claiming for the Jewish
fold a couple of U. S. Bomber
Command heroes mentioned in
recent dispatches from England.
They are Aron F. Moses and Ru-
aolph Tordnsky. neither of whom
is Jewish Nor. adds Grusd.
may we claim Lieutenant Clar-
ence Lipsky of the U. S. Army,
who is a Lithuanian Catholic .
Distinctively Semitic noses are
no rarity in Manhattan, but
.here'.", one that's particularly in-
teresting because it represents its
And Be Sure It's
FLORIDA
DAIRIES
HOMOGENIZED
Vitamin "D" Milk
"Milk Product."
Dacro Protected
TEL. 2-2621
Greater Miami Delivery
Visit Our Farm at
6200 N. W. 32nd Street
LEGAL NOTICES
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THK COUNTY JIKiK'S COURT
IN ANI> KUK DADR COUNTY,
KLORIDA.In Probate.
No 13337
in Re: ESTATE nK lirsSKl.I. <;.
SHI IEMAKER. Deqeaaed.
To -Ml Creditors and All Persona Hav- [
iiiK Claims or Demands Affalnst
Raid Estate:
You. and eHi-h of you, are hereby
notified am! required to present any1
claims and demand* which you, or
either of you, mav have against the
estate of RUSSELL C. SHOEMAKER,
le eased, late ,,f Pendleton County,
Kentucky, to the Hon. w v. Blanton. |
County .Indue of Dade County, anil
rile the same In hi office in tiu-
County Courthouse In Dade County
Florida, within eiKht calendar months
"ii ih,- date ..f the first mil,lien- i
tlon hereof. Said claims or demands !
i.. Ionian, the legal address of the
claimant and to he sworn to and
presented as aforesaid, or same win
be haired Bee Neitlon |I0 ,,f t|,,.
!!>:::! I'rohaie Act.
Date October IB, A. I" 194''
MAX R. SII.VKR. as Anclllar)
Administrator of the Knt.it.- r
Russell C. Shoemaker, !>.-
reas( d
MAN It SII.VKR.
Attorney for Ancillary Adminis-
trator.
First publication on 23rd dav of
Ck-lober. 1!M2.
tO/ZI-10ll/l-ll
B'nai B'rith
N
' I
otc
By Paul Weitxman
We've sometimes thought that
refreshments at meetings brings
out the membership, but we've
learned the error of this unkind
thought. At the last meeting of
Sholem Lodge, Tuesday evening,
a near record attendance of mem-
bers and ladies attended. And
although refreshments were
served, there was no advance
notice, so it was the guest speak-
er., Leslie B. Bain, who filled
to capacity the Beth David Tal-
mud Torah.
After a brief outline of the lat-
ent, in addition to the patent,
causes of the present war, Mr.
Bain undertook to answer ques-
tions. Interesting questions were
propounded which were answered
by Mr. Bain, according to his
own point of view. Only the late-
ness of the hour compelled the
curtailment of the open forum,
and not the dearth of questions.
Nominations of officers took
place in the true tradition of the
"solid south." that is to say, nom-
ination now just requires the con-
firmation of election. And so at
the December meeting, Sholem
Lodge will confirm, by election.
the nomination to the respective
offices of the following men:
Louis Heiman. president: Milton
A. Friedman, first vice-president;
Walter C. Kovner. second vice-
president: Harold Turk, recording
secretary; S. B. Miller, treasurer:
Aaron Edelman. financial secre-
tary; Burnett Roth, monitor; Dr.
Alexander Kushner, assistant
monitor: Maurice Cromer. ward-
en: Ernest Sussman. guardian:
Isaac Levin. Sol S. Goldstrom.
E. Albert Pallot. Carl Weinkle.
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME
v- LAW
Notice is hereby given that the un-
dersiuned. desiring to engage In bust-
lies* under the fictitious name of
SALLY'S BREEZE in. imend to r,K-
iater snld name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Pads Countv, Flor-
ida.
BBNJAaUN FIRESTONE
...... BALLY FIRESTONE
I'AI I. WKITZMAN. Attorney
U/.-1.V20-27 12/4 A"orn
owner's chief means of making a
livelihood The feature in
question belongs to one Harry E.
Pfaltz. and if we call it a smeller
we aren't slangy, but merely de-
scribing it by its main function.
For Mr. Pfaltz, who used to be a
perfumery expert, is now devot-
ing his talents to the war effort
by creating innocuous gases
whose smells match those of the
vaious poison gases, so that air
raid wardens and other Civilian
Defene officials can. by inhal-
inf the harmless smells, familiar-
ize themselves with the odor of
the dangerous gases Fritz
Kortner, the noted German Jew-
ish actor who has been in this
country for quite some years, re-
cently made a screen test for the
role of Maxim Litvinoff in the
film version of "Mission to Mas-
cow,'' and all the directors who
viewed his test declared that he
would be excellent for the part.
But Warner Brothers vetoed him.
on the grounds that it would not
be good policy to have a Jew play
the part of a Soviet Commissar.
Hollywood improving on life, as
usual, eh? So the role is be-
ing given to Oscar Homolka. who
is a Czech, his only Jewish con-
nection being his father-in-law,
Washington biggie Eugene Mey-
er.
WEEKLY GIGGLE
From the Egyptian battlefront
comes this story, credited to a
captured Italian officer who was
describing II Duce's shortage of
manpower ... It seems that a
man without arms was called up
for military service, and. much
to his surprise, was passed by the
examining physician ... He was
sent to a training camp, where
a lieutenant looked him over
carefully, and said: "You're just
the man we've been looking for."
"But what can I do?" asked the
armless one ... So the officer
took him over to another soldier,
who was engaged in filling a gas
tank "Your job," he told the
newcomer, "is to tell that man
when the tank is full ... He
can't tell, because he's blind."
Isidore Goldstein, trustees i
Eisenstein, presently servins
trustee for a three ?**
completes the list of office* w?'
Will serve Sholem L^S
the ensuing year. g
t ^n ^Uhs and B' B'rith
Lodges throughout the counS
will see visual proof of the work
that Sholem Lodge and fc rZ
bers are doing in Florida Th.
Bnai B'rith News," publls^
from Washington, and the masa
zine "The National Jewish
Monthly" carry pictures and sto-
nes in the November issues show-
ing presentation and raising of
Flag presented to the Supreme
Court of the State of Florida and
Of "our" carload of scrap metal.
The unusually well attended
meeting brought out many mem-
bers who visited with their breth-
ren for the first time in many
moons. So overcome did the of-
ficers appear to be that a num-
ber were asked to rise and they
received an ovation. It is nice
to see apreciation manifested so
vociferously; it must make one
feel good to learn that he has
been missed. Of course there
are many members who might
stay away for longer periods and
never be missed, and there are
others who attend meetings regu-
larly, and you might never know
they were present. But we are |
going to reserve our applause for
those members who attend met-
ing after meeting for they are the
backbone of the organization.
To one who has hud some ex-
perience with parliamentary pro-
cedure. Sholem Lodge has been
remarkably free Irom points of
order, of information, questions
of information, previous ques-
tion, further division, motions to
reconsider, or to reconsider an
spread upon the minutes. Hence
it was doubly startling to witness
even the small display of parlia-
mentary pyrotechnics at our last
meeting. We liked the free in-
terpretation of motions by Louis
Heiman. Acting-and-soon-to-be-
President-in-his-own-right. But
nobody could quarrel with his
interpretations since he brought
the motions down to logical con-
clusions.
Back to the Blood Bank and
Donors. Just a reminder that
there is a constant need for don-
orsand an observation that Abe
Aronovitz holds a record in Dade
County with fourteen blood dona-
tions! And we had an idea he
was anemic!
It does one good to see the re-
action of men when a definite
need is indicated. A question of
financing a worthy projecta re-
quest for opinions as to ways and
means of financingno request
for contributions. But lo. and
behold, the five dollar bills and
singles came floating in so fast.
that in no time, the money was
in the till and the green signal
on to the "go ahead." No ques-
tion of credits or names on hon-
or rolls, just here it is. go
ahead.
The United States Govern-
ment Having Taken Over P
Present Offices
DR. JOSEPH B. MARGOLIS
announces the
REMOVAL OF HIS OFFICE
to
311 Lincoln Hd
Albion Blda- Sutt*
MIAMI BEACH
For the Practice of
General Dentistry
A