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The Jewish Floridian ( October 23, 1942 )

UFJUD

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^Jewish Florid tin CoaajmiG Ylhe Jew I St) (Umiilty I H VOLUME 15—No. 42 MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1942 PRICE 10 CENTS TO PALESTINE New York (WNS)—The Zionist Organization of America and the Hadassah. meeting in joint session, ended their concurrent conventions here with the adoption of a resolution demanding unrestricted Jewish immigration to Palestine and the establishment of Palestine "as a Jewish Commonwealth integrated into the structure of the new democratic world." The joint session of the two Zionist bodies went on record also as repudiating the program of the recently-established Ichud party, headed by Dr. Judah L. Magnes. president of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, which advocates a bi-national state in Palestine. The resolution, which had been adopted previously by both the ZOA and Hadassah at separate meetings, endorsed "the policy I of friendship and cooperation! with the Arabs of Palestine affirmed by successive Zionist Congresses, and will seek to find every possible avenue to establish good-will and active collaboration between the two peoples." At the closing session of the i ZOA's 45th annual convention, attended by more than 1,000 delegates from all over the coun-' try. Judge Louis E. Levinthal of Philadelphia was elected unanimously for a second term as president. Dr. Harry Friedenwald of Baltimore and Judge Julian Mack were elected honj ary vice presidents. Dr. James. SGT. MEYER LEVIN GETS 2nd DECORATION FOR ATTACK New York (WNS)—Sergeant Meyer Levin of Brooklyn, N. Y.. the Jewish bombardier for the late Captain Colin Kelly, who was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for sinking the Japanese battleship Haruna, has now been awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in an attack of Jap warships in the Coral Sea battle, according to reports from General MacArthur's headquarters In Australia. The official citation describing Sgt. Levin's feat said that despite heavy anti-aircraft fire, "eight 500-pound bombs were dropped, bracketing the low of a 15,000-ton transport and inflicting heavy damage." Both when he flew with Captain Kelly and in the Coral Sea battle, the Jewish ace was forced to bail out. Brooklyn friends and neighbors of the twice-decorated Army Air Force hero have announced that they will celebrate Sergeant Meyer Levin Day on November 1. A feature of the celebration will be the dedication of a plaque in front of the Levin home, 1504 East 33rd Street, Brooklyn. DUTCH JEWS PLEAD INSANE TO ESCAPE DEPORTATION JUGOSLAV GUERRILLA UNIT SETS 900 CHILDREN FREE (CONTINUED ON PAGE 7) Berne (WNS).—A Yugoslavguerrilla unit, composed exclusively of Jewish volunteers, part of General Draja Mikhailovitch's growing anti-Nazi army, raided a Nazi camp for children in Croatia and freed 900 children, including 160 Jewish youngsters. Nazi newspapers published in Croatia, reported this week. The Nazi press said that documents found after the raid showed that Jewish guerrilla fighters had volunteered for the mission to free the children. Civic Leader Proud of Y.M.H.A. Its Many and Varied Activities By E. Albert Pallot Past President Y. M. H. A. I have watched the Y. M. H. A. grow from its infancy and I am very happy that today it can take its place with the outstanding youth-building organizations in America. From a humble beginning to an organization of great magnitude having projects i and activities comparable to any other organization of its kind in 'he country makes me proud that I am a member of this institution. Much has been said in these columns for the past few weeks "Vities and its membership. A great deal has been said about H* "Y," its projects, its ac(•iirying on normal activities in mes of war. but today to keep 'he home-fires burning has an added significance. It means that all the machinery of our government, Federal. State and Local, must work together to strengthen community self-servjce—for health, for recreation, tor education and for family secui "ity. We must make our off*ork ti me happy, worthwhile and interesting, through the Kind of recreation that is. as the *ord itself says, re-creation of, wart and mind and body. The Y. M. H. A. of Miami is f>e place where leisure hours can E. Albert Pallot be spent in a worthwhile manner not only for children and youths, but for adults as well. Its program is so comprehensive that there isn't any person in this Lea who cannot find a program hl Tho membership drive now carried on merits the support of every Jewish citizen. Help the -Y" to help you. RELIGIOUS HEADS A conference of leading Jewish religious and lay leaders has been called for November 8 by Governor Herbert H. Lehman and Dr. Louis Finkelstein, president of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, to discuss the development of a consistent, integrated program for the seminary, in its efforts to strengthen the Jewish faith and democratic tradition. In his call to the conference, addressed to congregations affiliated with the seminary and to prominent members of the American Jewish community. Governor Lehman indicated that the challenge laid down by the enemies of civilization to the Jewish faith is "obviously but one phase of an onslaught of all western religions." "The preservation of Judaism thus becomes, more clearly than ever," the governor asserts, "an essential element in the defense and advancement of civilization." The Seminary Conference will deal with the contribution which the Jews of America can make toward national solidarity and toward overcoming religious bigotry and other forms of group dissension, and will stress the need for raising Jewish moral and spiritual standards. It will especially point to the intimate relationship and spiritual alliance between democratic life and religious tradition. The conference will open with a plenary session and will feature the convening of seminar groups to deal with the various departments and religious functions of the seminary in the light of new war-time conditions. It will mark the opening of Seminary Anniversary Week, commemorating the fifty-fifth anniversary of the founding of the seminary and the fortieth anniversary of its reorganization under Solomon Schechter and Cyrus Adler. Other outstanding events to be held this week include a special Commencement of the Rabbinical School in order to enable the senior class to enter upon pastoral duties in preparation for the Chaplaincy; a Conference of Adult Jewish Education; and a Fifty-fifth Anniversary Dinner. Among the outstanding members of the Miami Jewish Community who has associated himself with the Honorable Herbert H Lehman and Dr. Louis Finkelstein in calling the November 8 Conference is Stanley C. Myers. He is one of close to a hundred Jewish leaders who has undertaken the sponsorship ol the conference. GREATER MIAMI ARMY-NAVY COMMITTEE TO HOLD MEET On Sunday. October 25. at 10 a ii there will be a meeting of the Greater Miami Army-Navy Committee at the Miami Beach Service Men's Center, 1711 Alton Road. Miami Beach. Every member of the committee is urged to be present and attend this important meeting. Stockholm (WNS) — Netherlands Jews are applying to be certified as lunatics and sent to insane asylums in order to avoid deportation to eastern Europe, the pro-German Stockholm newspaper "Aftonbladct," reorted this week. The paper said pnysicians were complying with these requests on the ground that the Jews had become lunatics, "owing to the horrible cruelty" to which they have been subjected. The newspaper denounced the practice as an "insolent imposture," and said that "among those confined are well-known Haarlem people who formerly never showed any signs of mental deficiency." "If they were taken to Poland and not treated over-kindly miraculous recoveries would take place," the pro-German paper said. "Netherlands physicians who so kindly send them to asylums should be sent with them." "Aftonbladet" also recommended that "Jewish lunatics be segregated in separate institutions." IF.L ASKS POSTDESCRIBES NAZI KILLING OP JEWS New York (WNS) — Leland Stowe, noted war correspondent, in a special dispatch to the New York Post and Chicago Daily News, reported this week his meeting with Potya Kaputovski, a 12-year-old soldier serving with the Red Army on the Rzhev front. The youthful soldier, whose father was killed while fighting with a Soviet guerrilla unit and whose mother, brothers and sisters were massacred by the Nazi invaders, described to the American war reported the Nazi slaughter of Jews and guerrilla fighters: "I lived in a village near Kalinin. The Germans came in October. Right away they looked for all Jews and all relative:; of .partisans (guerrillas) in our village. My father and many other men had gone into the forest to be partisans. "The Germans came looking for people in every house. When they came to our house. I hid under the steps with my brother Shura. who is nine. The Fascists took my mother and my two younger brothers and my two sisters. They tied their hands with rope. Then they led them into the biggest house in our village. All the families of partisans and all the Jews they could find they put in the same house. "We were terribly frightened, but we could sec from under the steps. And then, when the Germans had filled the big house with people, they set it on fire— they burned it down." Petya. who later was adopted by a Red Army unit on the Rzhev sector, said that some of the children "couldn't walk and their mothers carried them when ithe Fascist soldiers pushed them into the house." TORONTO — (WNS) — The American Federation of Labor, holding its 47th annual convention in this city, this week adopted a declaration condemning Nazi crimes against the Jews in occupied Europe and demanding that the United States take steps to guarantee freedom and equality to Jews in post-war Europe. The declaration, read by Mathew Woll. vice-president of the American Federation of Labor, urged also that the United Nations guarantee to the Jews "their independence under the Balfour Declaration on the soil of Palestine." It expressed organized labor's sympathy for the persecuted Jews in Europe and extended assurances of support. The adoption of the declaration followed a report by Julius Hochman, vice-president of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union, on Nazi crimes against the civilian populations of the occupied countries. The declaration said: "Traditionally, the American Federation of Labor has affirmed its sympathy with one of the most unjustly and tragically persecuted of all minorities—the Jewish people. At present this unfortunate group of the human brotherhood is enduring not only the usual barbarous and detestable excesses of the Nazis towards conquered people—it is being subjected to a program of systematic extermination which (CONTINUED ON PAGE 3) NAZIS COULD HAVE TAKEN PALESTINE LAST SPRING New York (WNS).—Palestine could have been invaded by the Nazis last May but the danger to the Holy Land. Syria. Cyprus and Turkey is past, at least for the remainder of 1942. according to a dispatch to the New York Times from Smyrna. Turkey. Palestine was said to be temporarily safe because of the withdrawal of Nazi and Italian troops from the Aegean Islands. "Allied military and naval circles say the enemy committed their gravest error since the German failure to attempt an invasion of Britain following the collapse of France in the summer Of 1940 when the Germans and Italians failed last May to attack the weak defenses of Syria at d Palestine simultaneously with their Libyan offensive." the N %  York Times report said. "Only the Turks were ready last May and an operation aimed across Syria at Iraq's oil and into Palestine to sever Allied communications was feasible, according to leading foreign military experts. Fewer than 20 divisions would have sufficed to give the Germans a critical, perhaps fatal, foothold in Syria and Palestine and perhaps even in Cypress whose defenses early last spring were something that Allied military air experts would rather not talk about."



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%  H PAGE TWO +Jewish flcridiian FRIDAY. OCTOBER 23. 1942 Social Personals Clubs • • Organizations Returning to the city recently were Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Cromer, 432 N. E. 26th terrace. They had spent several months in Hendcrsonville, N. C. Miss Flounce Cromer, their daughter, is a freshman at the University of Miami. • • • Dr. and Mrs. Max Pepper and their children, Nancy and Marshall, left Sunday for Jacksonville, where Dr. Pepper, a lieutenant, junior grade, in the navy medical corps, will be stationed at the U. S. Naval hospital. • • • Cantor and Mrs. Louis Hayman arrived in Miami this week from Houston, Texas. • • • Mrs. Nathan Adelman left last Friday to visit her son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Adelman. in Savannah. After a few weeks in Georgia she will visit in the Carolinas. • • • Mrs. Harry Rose is in Cleveland for a three-week visit with her son, Leonard, who is to be featured on the Columbia broadcasting system October 31 from 5 to 6 p. m. as leader of the Cleveland Symphony orchestra. • • • Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Rothberg announce the birth of their son. who was born at Jackson Memorial hospital on Monday. Mr. Rothberg is the U. S. O. representative of the Jewish Welfare board. • • • Hyman Cooperman and Sam Harris of New York are staying at the President Madison hotel, Miami Beach, while here on a Three original plays were presented at the University of Miami Wednesday evening. Authors of the one acts are Renee Greenfield, Dorothy Ann Levin and Bebe Fineman. Miss Greenfield's piece was called "Ham and Borscht." • • • Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Pactro have returned to Miami Beach from Jacksonville to make their home here. Mrs. Paetro is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Max Ellis. • • • Miss Ruth vVoitcowsky will accompany Frank Edwinn, basso, at a musicale, Sunday evening, at 8:30 p. m. at the University of Miami music workshop. Mr. Edwinn recently returned from a year's study at the Julliard School of Music. • • • Alpha Epsilon Phi sorority is pledging Misses June Dcutsch and Shirley Stamen. President of the active chapter is Margery Stark. • • • Dr. Harold Rand has received his commission as captain in the Army Air Force medical corps and will report for duty on October 31. A well-known resident of Miami for some time, he was active in B'nai B'rith and the Y. M. H. A. • • • Hope Ellen Tanenbaum was chosen queen of the biblical bazaar held at the Miami Beach Jewish Community center last Saturday evening and Sunday. Miss Tanenbaum represented Young Judea. Lillian Marcus of Mrs. Ida Spivack Mrs. Ida Spivack. 905 Michigan ave.. Miami Beach, was given a party in honor of her 50th birthday Sunday by her son-inlaw and daughter. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Dccky. The wife of Harry Spivack of the Rome Mattress company. Mrs. Spivack is active in a number of social and philanthropic groups. For the past two years she has been treasurer of the American Women's Home defense group, an organization which she helped to found. Besides being a lieutenant air ,the Young Pioneer Women ra jd warden, she is active in .ombined busmess and pleasure was named lady-in-waiting and Red Cross and holds the record lnp 'awarded second prize. Dorothy j n the Beth Jacob Service league Burnett Roth* president of Gt>rst n ^ 1 d. the bazaar's "Eve." for correspondence to parents of 'nai B'rith. flew in from Tallawas thc rocl P lcnt of an honorservice men stationed in this B'nai B'rith, flew in from Talla hassee for a short stay in Miami. Daniel Roth, 1045 ary prize. In the senior group, area. .Esther Levy, representing •'Red Mrs gpivack also Meridian Cross Sewing, and Mrs. Mane much of her timc tQ ave.. left Monday for JacksonMarbach won highest honors. devotes Russian war relief. Beth Jacob Sisterville. where he will receive 30 .Miss Ruth Brotman was chairhood Worknlcn s circk and thc days training to become a petty man of the affair. women's division of thc Ameriofficer in the shore patrol of the • • • „ „ .„ ,...,, T,,, v ich rnnoroee United States navy. A resident Bo ^ f Scou T 'P • • c wl11 M T ,,^ leave from the Y. M. H. A. 6 at Guests at the birthday party 4 p. m. for a three-day camping included Mr. and Mrs. Morris trip to Snapper Creek. Under Dt'cky. Mrs. Lena Rubinstein, the supervision of Scoutmaster i Mr. and Mrs. P. Lifshitz. Mr. and Alfred Kahn and Committeeman Mrs. Haimovitz and Lieut, and Sylvan Wetstein and Nat Gans. Mrs. J. Stover and the lieuthe various patrols will take tenant's parents. of Miami Beach for 17 years. Roth is esteemed loyal knight. Miami Beach lodge of Elks, and first-aid instructor in the American Red Cross. As* an occupational license inspector for Miami Beach for the past six years, he doubled the cash revenues of the city. New pledges of the Delta Phi Epsilon sorority of the University of Miami are the Misses Lorraine Cooper. Mildred Seitzman. Hilda Hornstein and Irene Butler. Gwendolyn Gordon is president of the active chapter. • • %  Among the many Miami girls in training for the WAVES in Oklahoma is Miss Shirley Levy, daughter of Mrs. Bertha Levy. The Normandy School 3 RESIDENT AND DAY FOR BOYS AND GIRLS 1021 Biaritz Drive Miami Beach REGISTER NOW! PHONE 6-1061 LEO HUBERMAN Headmaster camp equipment and prepare their own meals. I. Quartin has donated a truck for the trip. Patrol leaders are attending a Boy Scout leaders' conference this week-end at Snapper Creek in preparation for the proposed trip. • • • Mr. and Mrs. Sam Silver. 120 S. E. 13th Street, have returned to the city after a four weeks' trip through the North. —Buy War Bonds Today— THE LEAR SCHOOL BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL For Boys and Girls In Session Now 1010 West Avenue PHONE 5-0606 IDA R. LEAR Director s PANISH LANGU 909 SECURITY BUILDINGAG;E STUDIO PHONE 9-2186 FELIX RODRIGUEZ, Director ANNOUNCE THE OPENING of a BRANCH STUDIO IN— Mercantile National Bank Bldg. SUITE 501 PHONE 5-6966 420 Lincoln Road Miami Beach TOWER THEATRE 6. W. 8th St. at 15th AIR-CONDITIONED Fri. and Matinee Only Sat Oct. 23-24 "Spirit of Stanford" WITH FRANKIE ALBERT (All-American Halfback) • • • Starts Sat. Afternoon at 4:30 and Sun. Thru Wed. Oct. 24-28 FROM THE BROADWAY STAGE HIT IT'S A RIOT! "My Sister Eileen" WITH ROSALIND RUSSEL JANET BLAIR BRIAN AHERNE EXTRA! Kate Smith in "AMERICA SINGS" Mr. and Mrs. Abe Berkowitz left Sunday for a honeymoon trip to New York. Mrs. Berkowitz is the former Elaine Bergcr. Thc wedding took place Sunday afternoon at the home of the bride's aunt. 1528 Drexel ave., Miami Beach. For her gown, Mrs. Berkowitz chose a powder blue taffeta with a face veil of blue caught up with a tiara of flowers. Her only attendant was her sister. Toni, who chose a similar gown of chartreuse taffeta. Rabbi Moses Mescheloff performed the ceremony, which was held indoors. Best man for his brother was Al Berkowitz. Following the ceremony, dinner was served in the patio. On their return to Miami, the couple will live at 1050 Sixth St., Miami Beach. Cantor Maurice Mamches assisted thc rabbi in the ceremony. • • • Miss Lyn Hacker of New York City arrived yesterday to spend the week with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Hacker. 1483 N. W. Seventh st. She was accompanied by Mrs. Kay Major, a friend of the Hackers, also of New York City, who will spend some time in Miami. • • • Cantor Abraham D. Wolf of New York and choir will conduct the first late Friday night services of this season at the Miami Beach Jewish Center tonight at 8 p. m. "What Are We Fighting For?" will be thc subject of Dr. Samuel Bension's sermon. Refreshments will be served in the newly-completed social hall. Mrs. Daniel Broad and Mrs. Laura Levin will act as hostesses. • • • The Brith Milah of the son of Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Green, 1127 Euclid Avenue, was held last Sunday at Jackson Memorial Hospital, with Rabbi S. M. Machtei officiating. Rabbi Machtei also officiated at the Brith of the son of Mr. and Mrs. Max Orovitz, 1867 S. W. 11th Terrace, Sunday afternoon at their home, and the Brith of the son of Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell Kanter. 945 Euclid Avenue, Tuesday afternoon at St. Francis Hospital. Post-War World Org anija .. the subject that the MS Sect,on. National Council Jewh Women have selei discussion at their meeting ,£ year. Mrs. Monte Selig.^ dent, announced at the last m 2 jng. Various study gr 0ups being formed to discuss i ntetn tional relations. peaC e prob i and consumer research at Z meetings held the first Wednes day of each month. Volunteer, will staff the council office, as sisting in service to the foreim born. 3 Miss Bess Spanner has been appointed to the staff of the Jewish Welfare Board in Washington, D. C. • • • Capt. Harry J. Pells will in. stall Mrs. Sol Goldstrom as honorary vice president of the Miami Chapter. National Home for Jewish Children, at Denver. Tuesday, Oct. 27. at the Club Bali at 1:30 p. m. Mrs. Goldstrom will install the other officers, who are: President. Mrs. Marion Ross: first vice president. Mrs. Myron Newman; second vice president. Mrs. Perry Bittel; third vice president. Mrs. Hy Friedman; recording secretary, Mrs. Maurice Cohn; corresponding secretary, Mrs. Herman Wronker; financial secretary, Mrs. Lee Goudiss; treasurer, Mrs. Sam Luby; auditor, Mrs, John Feller; parliamentarian. Mrs. Jack Steinberg. • • • Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Rubin returned to Miami Beach yesterday after a summer vacation in the North. WOMEN FOR PART TIME OCCUPATION Can work from their own homes and make surprisingly large earnings. For full details write MAC co P. O. Box 2973, Miami, Florida '''-"' %  3rWH* -• %  > _-•% %  v.."r. &A ^v %  ^ m. m THE 6A ROE N OF MEMORIES mounT IUB0 FLORIDA'S MOST BEAUTIFUL BURIAL ESTATES West Flagler Street at 53rd Avenue ONLY TEN MINUTES FROM THE HEART OF MIAMI WHY LET A STRANGER SELECT YOUR BURIAL SITE? Make sure that your family will be together forever—by providing your own private family plot. No one wants a stranger to make a decision that affects his family. Yet. that is exactly what happens to many families who do not own a private plot. In the moment of shock and sadness, you would leave the choice of a burial plot to the first wellmeaning person who came along. How can such a person make a selection that affects those dear to you? The choice must be yours and yours alone. Don't force your family to buy a plot "blindly." n't leave yourself in the position of having to l. n __ %  A %  ___! _ft ftt_~ wn.*Etnt Don i leave yoursen in me postilion oi nanus %  *• make a most important decision at the moment of greatest sadness. Provide now a family plot in Mount Nebo. beautiful Perpetual Car* Title Insurance Lota may be purehaaed on convenient terma Business Office 1014 Olympic Bldg. 3-5132 A VISIT WILL CONVINCE YOU ^"t-^v. m —* j .-v- %  *>



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FRIDAY OCTOBER 23, 1942 fJenisli noridkiri PAGE THREE MARCHING MEN THE"HONOR ROLL OF GREATER MIAMI ,.. .. ; : feature 1H prepared '!' „ l?hV r.-latlona committee of K.'flJ!r Miami Army and Navy *' %  %  of the National Jewish Commit" e The oomm ittee lnw far W.lli.m' 1. Boxerman. chair eludes nv.ii Benjamin Bronston. Fred K. til Weltzman. Hknr'het and Pa %  Contributions to this .olumn are _iXSm'il oartlcularly in the form of Ern'.'ived here from Greater Blind buys now in the service.) Thumbnail Sketches p v t. William Solomon recently •as transferred to Los Angeles, California. Serving in the infantry Bill was previously stationed at Camp Wolpert, Texas. Maurice Fisher was ambitious to get into "this mess". In April 1941 he enlisted in the Canadian jervice and for six months w u s jtationed in Canada studying radio mechanics. Although his job is secret, we have heard that he is now somewhere in England. Leonard Fisher, a brother of Maurice, went to the Midland Army Flying School back in January He now is 2nd Lt. Leonard Fisher, bombardier, and is stationed at Midlan, Texas. Pvt. Abe Silver has been in the air force since his induction in May He spent six months at Keesler Field, Miss., and is now stationed at the Savannah Air Base, completing his training. Pvt. Robert Levy is a drill instructor on the Beach. Robert was induced into the Air Corps last October and served his first nine months in the army at Tort Knox. Ky. Pvt. Louis Plotfort has been in the Air Corps since July 13. Afti r four days at Camp Blanding he was transferred to St. Petersburg. Pvt. Joseph Fleisher is at Fort Bragg. N. C. in the Engineers Corps He served nine months at Camp Blanding before his recent transfer. Corp. Melvin Schaffer lias seen a good deal of the country since he enlisted in the Air Corps on December 10. 1941. He has been at Camp Blanding. Fla., Sheppard Field, Texas. McDill Field. Fla., Lowry Field. Colorado. Tyndall Field, Panama City, Fla.. and at present is en route to Boise, Idaho. A private when he entered the service he rose to the rank of corporal after graduation from armorers' and air gunnery school. Samuel Schaffer, a brother of Melvin, entered the Naval Reserve last January. He is a ship fitter, second class, and has been on the Key West Shore Patrol duty for the past four months. He was formerly stationed at Mayport. Florida. Corp. Leonard Tobin is now studying at Officers Candidate School on the Beach. Leonard enlisted in the Air Corps last year and served eleven months at Maxwell Field. He has been doing radio work in the Morale Division. Capt. William Levitt is commander of his company which is a branch of map-making. Alter a year at Ft. Benning. Georgia, and six months at Ft. Ord. California, Captain Levitt is now overseas seeing active duty. Ben Levitt, William's brother. now is studying at Annapolis and his present rank is 1 >t Class Midshipman. After he graduates from the United States Naval Academy in '43 he will be a commissioned officer in the navy. First Lt. Edward S. Roth, son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis R. Roth. 1031) Lenox Avenue, now is with the Field Artillery of the Fourth Corps Area in Atlanta. Ga. Lt. Roth had been a 2nd lieutenant due to his R.O.T.C. training and was called to the colors on July 1, 1941. THE Y. M. H. A. NOTES By HARRY SCHWARTZ Leslie Bain to Speak Oct. 28 registrations will be closed very All plans have been completed shortly. for the book review lecture by Leslie Balogh Bain on Wednesday. October 28. at 8:30 p. m., at Abe Berkys Defeat Milsteins "The spirit of the Captain shall lead us on to victory." This was Miss Adele Segall Answering the call for nurses' aides. Miss Adele Segall. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Philip Segall. 631 N. E. 57th St.. recently completed her training course at Johns Hopkins. Baltimore. Md. She is now at the Maryland University hospital, where she is engaged in supply room and nurses' aide work. LFLCHHM ASKS POSH 01 LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN Till-: CCH'NTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND 1-Mll DADE COUNTY, Ki.ui:iii.\. —In Probate. No. 1S302 In Re ESTATE OF LOUISA DAY JAY Deceaned. To All Creditors and All Peraena HavIni Clainm or Demand! Against SHIr the first publication hereof. Said claims or ilemianitK to contain legal address of the claimant "'''l %  !>e sworn to anil presented % %  aforesaid, or same will be barred. we Section 12t> of the 1933 Probate Act. Date October 1st, A. l>. IB4J. "MAI! 1.. JAY, ST.. As Administrator of the Batata of Louisa v..,. a •'">'• Deceased. %  AJf R, SILVER. Attorney for Administrator. ,,.*' Publication on October Bid, U !-S-lS.3 NOTICE TO CREDITORS iv THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT |X AND l.'oR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA.In Probate. No. ISSST '" Re BSTATE OF RUBSEL.Ii G. BOOKMAKER, Deceased. io AH Creditors and All Persons Havii'it Claims or Demands Against Said Estate: |".u. ami each of you, are hereby ''"'i ami required to present any '*hns ,!,.! demands which sou. pr •'yier ot you, may have against the •"•• of RCSSElXc. SHOEMAKER, .'."'' ; '--'l late of Pendleton County. 5*ntueky. to the Hon. W. F. Ulanton. ""inty .1 mm,. of r)a de County, and !", ''"• sa h, his office m the ... "JJs Co iithouse in Hade County. M "|'I*. wlthh, eight lali-ndav months 'lie date of the first puhllraand will the ,'"' h of. s.iid claims or demands ,.' % %  "mam the 1,-ual address of the ..:t" l: '" and to be sworn to j tented as aforesaid, or same 'Barred. See Section 120 of 9 Probate Act. "a ^LNERYINX v For SlMp lmnm Irritability. Haadacfca. and _. when dw to Ni U Uie *ly aa directed, i KEEP 'EM FLYING—By buying Defense Stamps and Bonds. I I



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PAGE FOUR ** Jfn 1st tier Mian FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2^ 942 PLANT AND MAIN OFFICES 21 S. W. SECOND AVENUE P. O. BOX 2973 PHONE 2-1141 Entered as Second Class Matter July 4, 1930, at the Post Office of Miami, Florida, under the Act of March 3, 1879 Fred K. Shochot. Managing Editor One SUBSCRIPTION Year, $2.00 Six Months, $1.00 MIAMI, FLORIDA. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23. 1942 CHESHVAN 12, 5703 VOLUME 15 NUMBER 42 -TIDBITS FROM EVERYWHEREMudfy ConfidentH -By PHTNEAS I. BIRON. THE B'NAI B'RITH The B'nai B'rith entered the hundredth year of its existence this past week. It is an occasion that well deserves commendation and celebration but President Monsky has indicated that the festivities which would ordinarily attend such an event will be postponed to such a time when the country is restored to peace. In 1841, when the oldest of Jewish orders was established, the Jewish population of the United States was about one-fifth or one-sixth of the present Jewish population of Palestine. The whole population of the United States, in fact, was not more than four or five times that of the present Jewish population of the United States. Railroad building on a miniature scale had just begun. There was no telegraph, no electricity. Industry as a whole was just beginning as far as the United States was concerned. "Old Hickory" had but recently left the White House. The country had but a short time previously—in 1837— undergone the depression of Van Buren's administration—and was now beginning to get back into economic shape. The Mexican and Civil Wars had not yet been fought. In the space of this hundred years, not a long time when we consider that individuals who attain the age of one hundred years are to be found here and there, and yet in a society, a century brings an enormous difference. It is a mistake to think that all the revolutions come by arms and blood. Time itself brings about revolutions. It is a tribute to the original soundness of the Order B'nai B'rith that while numerous other orders have risen from time to time, and passed away, the B'nai B'rith has not only grown old with dignity but paradoxically we may say, it has grown younger with the years, if vigor and vitality are the criterions. RELIGION AND DEMOCRACY "Religion, whether it be Protestant, Catholic or Jewish, holds that the individual is fundamentally important because he is the child of God. It maintains that this status gives him inherent rights which no man-made government can deny. "There is great danger that a nation which fails to maintain an active religion will have egually little interest in protecting that individuality of its citizens which is so vital an attribute of democracy. "Without religious idealism to give it character in times of stress, a nation will tend almost inevitably to fall under the sway of totalitarianism as the easiest method of meeting emergencies." —Governor Lehman. ALL-OUT DEVOTION ". All of the ordinary ambitions and occupations of man's normal life pass into the background, and the call is urgent for us to devote ourselves primarily—and well-nigh exclusively—to bringing this barborous conflict to an end, before it shall have wholly destroyed or imprisoned the fundamental principles upon which our free and liberal civilization rests and must rest. "Great as is the responsibility to be borne by the older generation, the responsibility which faces the youth of today is greater still. They, and not their elders, will have to wrestle with the grave problems of a world which must be reconstructed so as to strengthen and protect the underlying principles of freedom and liberal thought. It is the fate of these which is now hanging in the balance. First must come victory and then a world so organized and so strengthened as not only to establish peace, but to protect permanent peace." —Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler. AMERICAN LABOR The recentiy-concluded convention of the American Federation of Labor, which includes in its membership several million American workers, called upon the United Nations to take adeguate steps to guarantee to the Jews freedom and eguality in post-war '< TtrvilCiVV REPORT Europe. The hundreds of union delegates, PALESTINE ANGLE Behind David Ben Gurion's threat to guit his party ik Zionist Laborite group, is his disappointment in his co f leagues, who have shown themselves reluctant to follow him in his political feud against Dr. Chaim Weizmann u)T liam B. Ziff, author of "The Coming Battle of Germany," w a the off-the-record speaker at a dinner given last week at Ne York's Waldorf-Astoria by the Committee for a Jewish Army Yes, that was charming Mrs. Julian Sieroty of Beverly Hills, California, listening so intently to the stirrin address She stands in the vanguard of the fighters fa the Jewish Army idea And that distinguished gentleman sitting next to dinner chairman Louis Nizer was the Honorable Dave Hennen Morris, former American ambassador to Belgium. gathered from all parts of the country, demanded also that the United Nations extend to the Jews assurances of "their independence under the Balfour Declaration on the soil of Palestine." At a time when half the world is plunged in darkness and misery, this directive from organized American labor is a source of courage and inspiration. The AFL's uneguivocal expression of sympathy and support for the Jewish people is in the finest traditions of American labor. It will give renewed courage and strength to the hundreds of thousands of down-trodden Jews in Nazi-occupied Europe who now know that they have gained another powerful ally. The half million Jews standing guard in Palestine will be immeasurably heartened by the announcement that American labor is in complete agreement with their hopes and aspirations. It has been said that weapons alone will not win this war; that ideals and principles are more potent than weapons. The speeches of Hitler & Co. will not win this war. But the sense of decency and justice of the free people, of which the AFL is a notable example, will inevitably balance the scales for an Allied victory. UNITY "We must not only seek unity within our national borders, but we must safeguard that unity with the right motives. Through fear and hatred of a foreign foe we may secure a temporary amity between management and labor, between farm bloc and city consumer, between negro and white, between Jew and Gentile, between Romanist and Protestant. "But fear is a stimulant which eventually weakens, and hatred can easily become a boomerang. If all that unites us now as Americans is the threat of foreign danger, then beware of what will happen when the war is over. Our fears and hatreds may turn in on ourselves and weshall have a revival of the Ku Klux Klanism which disgraced our country after the last war." —Rev. Dr. Ralph W. Sockman. FRENCH CHURCH PROTESTS VICHY POLICY "Without ignoring or misunderstanding the extreme complexity of the situation wherein the authorities find themselves, the Reformed Church of France cannot, however, further remain silent before the sufferings of thousands of human beings who have received asylum on our soil. "The Christian Church would have lost its soul and reason for existence if it did not maintain that divine law is above all human contingencies. And that divine law does not permit that families created by God shall be broken up, children separated from their mothers, the right of asylum and its compassion be unrecognized, the respect of the human person transgressed and beings without defense delivered to tragic fates. "The church demands of the faithful to bend with the compassion of the good before the distress of those who suffer and to intercede without pause before God, who alone can deliver us from all ills." —National Council of the Reformed Church of France. Get in the scrap by giving your scrap, and by buying War Savings Stamps and Bonds regularly. Note to those who still grouse about the hospitality America is showing to refugees from Hitlerism: Sergeant Julius Schellenberg of Brooklyn, who is one of the little group of American heroes awarded the Purple Heart decoration for bravery in the Pacific war theatre, came to this country as a refugee only a few years ago There are any number of little eating places in Manhattan run by refugees from Nazi Germany and Austria, but we know of only one actual night club that belongs to a refugee, and he came here to escape the Nazi in France He's Arthur Lesser, who had had a night club in Paris, and, when the Gestapo marched in, came over here to open "La Vie Parisienne" on East 52nd Street ... All the entertainers in the club are, appropriately enough, from France to Korea. LISTEN HERE Typical of a New York election campaign is the exchange of courtesies between candidate Lieutenant Governor Charles Poletti and Supreme Court Justice Bernard Botein First the Lieutenant Governor gave a party for Yiddish newspapermen to enlist their support for Botein And then the Justice gave a party for Italian newspapermen to enlist their ditto for Poletti You haven't heard much about the War Production Board's Joseph D. Weiner, but he's one of its most important members, serving as deputy director of the Service of Civilian Supply and chairman of the Committee on Concentration, which aims at organization of our war industry at maximum efficiency Hats off to Harry Rosen, Brooklyn restaurateur, for evolving the bright idea that all service men in New York on Thanksgiving Day should get free turkey dinners from the town's eateries Other cities please copy. BOOK NEWS Over a guarter of a million books and more than half a million magazines have been sent to our soldier boys everywhere by the Victory Pastime Committee of the American Women's Voluntary Services, reports Mrs. Zachary Goldstein, who is in charge of'collecting the reading matter in New York ... If you want the real inside story of the first three years of this war, spend two bits for "I Saw It Happen," the Pocket Book people's compilation of eye witness accounts of practically every phase of the conflict, by nineteen people, who know what they're talking about Franz Werfel's "Forty Days of Muso Dagh" was a best seller, too, but we don't believe—though we don't have the figures on handthat it came up to the record set by his "Song of Bernadette," of which 402,000 copies have been printed to date Among the interesting facts that come to light in Andre Maurois' autobiography, "I Remember, I Remember." is the revelation that it was at the reguest of the French censor that he changed his name from the original Herzog The occasion was the publication of his "Colonel Bramble" tales during the first world war The censor felt that the name Herzog was too German to be signed to a French book about an Englishman. BROADWAY LIGHTS The sensation of the Ballet Theatre season at the Metropolitan Opera House is the fantasy "Aleko," with settings and costumes designed by Marc Chagall, who until 1940 was celebrated throughout France as one of her outstanding surrealist artists Ferenc Molnar, famed as a writer of brightly witty comedies, is turning to the serious drama in there serious times, they tell us, and is working on a play about Napoleon The younger generation sure is making its bid for fame The company that's touring New York's subway circuit with the play "Stage Door" includes two actresses rather new to the profession—Maxine Marx, daughter of Chico, and Marily Cantor, daughter of Eddie ... If you want to get the low-down on the career of Second Avenue's Mollie Picon, go uptown to 58th Street, where at the theatre that now bears her name, La Picon is appearing in, of all things, an autobiographical play ... At least, we think we may call it that, since it tells Mollie's life story, though its author is not the star but her husband, Jacob Kalich. ABOUT PEOPLE Summoned to Brazil to teach the doctors of that country the latest technigues of plastic surgery, an art particularly important in war time, is New York's Dr. Maxwell Maltz • • Junior Hadassah-ites throughout the country will be glad to know that Nell Ziff, their former president, is at this writing well on the road to recovery from the illness that has had her hospitalized in Minneapolis Nell, incidentally, will be (CONTINUED ON PAGE )



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rpTDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1942 +Jewish ftoridfon PAGE FIVE With the Houses of W orship of the Greater Miami Area TEMPLE ISRAEL 127 N B. ISth Street Office Phone 2-7745 BiKKI JACOB H. KAPLAN. Ph-D. "^ Rabbi Emeritus ,M6 Indian Creek r>Hvefi-1265 "' Miami Beach 0 B nI ('HUMAN A. ZWITMAN & !" sat eat Rabbi Zwltman win be In the Tem.1, .wry morning. You may consult SitTUrn on mattere concerning the fiSrilh community, 4W your personal fffiumi You will be assured aympr ?h.uc hetrlng and advice, and. SSS to say each matter will be ShiIt. strict confidence. Congregational "Do not withdraw thyself from the congregation."—Hillel. Regular services at Temple Israel. 137 N. E. 19th Street. Friday evening, at 8:15 o'clock. Sabbath Eve Services Friday evening, Oct. 23. 8.15 p. m., guest speaker will be Rev. Paul N. Jewett, minister of the First Methodist Church of South Miami, who will preach on the subject. "Foundations of Fellowship.' Services will be conducted by Rabbi Colman A. Zwitman. Religious School classes on Sunday. Oct. 25 at 10 a. m. Sisterhood Red Cross Our Sisterhood Red Cross Sewing group appeals for more workers. In order to meet fixed quotas on definite delivery dates, many more volunteer workers are needed to supplement the loyal group which has met throughout last year, and who has recently resumed its work. Memrrs (if the congregation and the Sisterhood interested in this project should contact Mrs. Sam Katz. chairman. 3-3991. The sessions for this month will be held in the Sisterhood room, on Tuesday. Oct. 20 and Tuesday. Oct. 2" from 10 a. m. to 4 p. m. Temple Notes Aarrngement for inscription of names on happy or memorial occasions may be made through Mrs. Jack Bernstein, chairman of the "Tree of Life" Sisterhood project Floral offerings for the pulpit may be made through Mrs. Gordon Davis, Sisterhood chairman Inscription of the name of departed for eternal remembrance on the Temple Memorial Plaque may be arranged for by contacting Harry Nevins, chairman of the Temple Memorial Plaque committee, or by calling the Temple office Rabbi Zwitman's current speaking engagements include addresses at the U. S. Government's Morale Victory Parade on Saturday, Oct. 1": at the annual Patrol Leaders' Conference of Dade County Groups of Boy Scouts of America on Oct. 25th: at American Jewish Congress meeting Oct. 26th, and at the Miami Acacia Club on Oct. 30th. In Memoriam "May the Father of Peace send peace to all who mourn, and com'ort the bereaved among us." At the Friday evening services Oct. 23rd the memory of the following will be hallowed: Recently departed: Joseph Zaban, brother of Mrs. Michael A. Cohen; William Solomon, father 01 Mrs. Harold B. Spaet. Yahrzeits: Dianna Bronston, mother of Benjamin E. Bronston and Walter E. Bronston; Tinka ^Plan, aunt of Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan. MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CONG. MIAMI. FLORIDA 590 S. W. 17th Avenue Service Schedule Daily Minyon, 8 a. m.; Mincha. 7 p. m.; Maariv, 7:15 p. m.; Saturday, 9 a. m. Services Daily services at 8 a. m.; Mincha at 6:30 p. m.; Saturday at 9 a. m.; Shalosh Sudas, Saturday at 6. Each week for the next few weeks another individual will be in charge. Congregational A general meeting of the congregation took place Tuesday evening at the synagogue at 8 p. m. The election of officers was held. Sisterhood The sisterhood board, at a meeting held last Tuesday, announced that the sponsorship of a card party on October 25 was indefinitely postponed. CONGREGATION BETH DAYID (Miami's Pioneer Congregation) I3r. N. W. Third Avenue MAX Si IA PI ItO. Rabbi Residence Phone. 2-2176 Mrs. Louis Margulles, Reporting MIAMI BEACH JEWISH CENTER 141 Budld Avenue Miami Beach DR. SAMUEL BBJNSION, Rabbi l."36 Jefferson Avenue Phone 5-47X1 or 5-4782 Miami Beach Schedule of Services Daily at 8 a. m. and 6:30 p. m. Kabbalos Shabbos at 6:30 p. m. on Fridays. Late Friday night services at 8 o'clock. Saturdays at 9 a. m. and Oneg Shabbos at 6:30 p. m. Sundays at 8:30 a. m. Bible Class Morris Gershon. well known Hebrew scholar and grammarian, will resume teaching the Center Bible Class on Saturday. October 25th at 5:30 p. m. Appreciation In recognition of his splendid services to the Center in particular and the community generally, the executive board unanimously voted a gift of S500.00 to Dr. Samuel Bension. The Biblical Bazaar The bazaar was a great moral and financial success. Thanks are due to Miss Ruth Brotman, the initiator and director of the affair, and the officers and members of the Sisterhood, as well as to the generous merchants who donated the articles and refreshments for the bazaar. Spotters We call upon all members of the Center and those of our auxiliaries to answer the call for volunteers to serve as spotters Mr. Edwards at the Miami Beach (CONTINUED nN PAGE 8) Best RIVERMONT PARK SANITARIUM N. w. 7th St. Ph. 8-7301 care for chronic sick, convale nt and elderly people $25 WEEKLY UP %  ^M Large Beautiful Grounds, Permanent Calendar Daily services at 8:00 a. m. and 6:30 p. m.; late Friday evening services. 8:15 p. m.; Sabbath services, 8:30 a. m.; Junior services, Saturday 10:30 a. m.; Sh'losh S'udos, Saturday 6:45 p. m.; Hebrew School, daily 4 to 7 p. m.; Bar Mitzvah group, Sunday 8:30 a. m.; Sunday School 10:00 a. m. Sabbath Services During the services this Saturday morning, Sidney, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Lazar Grossberg, will become bar mitzvah. A reception will follow immediately after the services. Sunday School Registration for Sunday School is continuing and classes arc already in session. Hebrew School If you have not done so as yet. please register your child in one of the Associated Hebrew Schools in this area. Late Friday Evening Services The eleventh consecutive scries of late Friday evening services conducted by Rabbi Max Shapiro will begin the first Friday in November, at 8.15 o'clock. Junior Services The tenth consecutive Junior services will begin Saturday morning. November 7th, at 10:30 o'clock. Radio Hour Rabbi Max Shapiro will conduct the Jewish Hour over WIOD Sunday at 4:30 p. m. Sisterhood Calendar At the regular Sisterhood meeting held last Wednesday, the following program was outlined for the month of November: Annual membership tea. Wednesday afternoon. Nov. 18th: annual food sale, Wednesday. November 25: full details will be mentioned in next week's issue. CONGREGATION SHAARAY TEFILA 440 Espanola Way Miami Beach CONGREGATION SCHAAREI ZEDEK (Gates of Justice) 1545 S. W. Third Street Miami, Florida Services Daily services are held each morning at 8, each evening at 6:30. Saturday morning at 9 with Shalosh Sudas in the afternoon between Mincha and Maariv. Friday Evening Services Regular seasonal Friday evening services will start next Friday evening at the synagogue, 1545 S. W. Third Street. Omitting this week's service, they will continue regular henceforth. Talmud Torah The Talmud Torah classes are held daily, Monday through Friday. Congregational A general meeting will be held Thursday evening, October 29, at which time election of officers will take place. Refreshments will be served after the business is completed. The president has announced that additional nominations may be made at that time. Ladies' Auxiliary A card party will be given Sunday, this coming evening, October 25, at the synagogue with Mrs. Max Mintzer, Mrs. Gershon August and Mrs. Morris Rappaport as hostesses. BETH SHOLOM CENTER 761 41st Street MIAMI BEACH Phone S-9793 S. M. MACHTEI, Rabbi 1450 S. W. 17th Terrace. Miami Phone 2-2579 BETH JACOB CONGREGATION Washington Avenue and Third Street. Miami Reach MOSES MESCHELOFF, Rabbi 711 Lenox Avenue, Phone 5-1328 MAURICE MAMCHES. Cantor 121 Lennox Ave.. Phone 5-7133 Regular Services Daily services are held at Beth Sholom Center at 9 a. m. and 7 p. m. Residents of the area served by the Center will find their Kaddish and Yahrzeit needs satisfied by these services. Sabbath Services Kabbolas Shabbos services will be held at 6:15 p. m. today. The late Friday evening service will begin at 8:15. Rabbi S. M. Machtei will preach on "Sand and Stars." I. Fialkow will lead the congregational singing. At the 9 a. m. service tomorrow, Rabbi Machtei will speak on the weekly portion, using as his subject "My Bar Mitzvah." Minchoh services tomorrow at 5:30 p. m.. followed by the Se'udah Shlishis. Hospitality The hostesses at the social hour to follow the Friday evening service tonight will be Mrs. Henrietta Berger. representing the Beth Sholom Sisterhood, and Miss Eve Naomi Machtei, who will receive the guests attending the anniversary party of her father's bar mitzvah. (Naomi will act as proxy for the rabbi's wife who is visiting in the north.) Mr. and Mrs. S. Lobel will be hosts at the Se'udah Shlishis after Minchah tomorrow. The hostesses for the Beth Sholom "open house" on Sunday night will be Mrs. Kate Greenberg and Mrs. Henrietta Berger. Religious School The Talmud Torah and Sunday school enrollments are increasing. Daily classes start at 3:45 p. m. Sunday school at 10 a. m. YESHIVA EDUCATIONAL CENTER The Yeshiva Educational Center, located at 846 Michigan Ave., Miami Beach, conducts daily services each week day at 8 a. m. and Saturdays at 9. Evening services at 6:30. Sholash Sudas on Saturday afternoon. Rabbi J. Shulman will address the gathering. Services of the Congregation Shaaray Tefila. temporarily located at 440 Espanola Way. are scheduled for Friday at 6:30 p. m. and Saturday at 9 a. m. and 6 p. m. Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky will speak during the Saturday morning services on "The Wanderer." Shalosh S'udos will take place Saturday at 6:15 p. m. Daily services are scheduled for 7:30 a. m. and 6:30 p. m. The Ein Yakov groups meet Sunday, Monday and Tuesday at 645 p. m., and the Shulchon Oruch groups meet Wednesday and Thursday at 6:45 p. m. All are welcome. DRINK mm fhi VITAMIN ^ORINK Made From Fresh OrangeDaily Synagogue Services Shachriss, 8 a. m.; Mincha, 6:30 p. m.; Maariv, 7:15 p. m. Sabbath Shachriss. 9 a. m.; Junior Congregation. 9 a. m.; Mincha. 6:30 p. m.; Shalosh S'oodoss. 6:45 p. m.; Maariv. 7:25 p. m. Sermon Rabbi Mcscheloff will preach Saturday morning. He will speak on "The Portion of the Week" at Shalosh S'oodoss. Cantor Maurice Mamches will chant the morning services. Religious School Sunday sessions. 10 a. m. to noon; faculty meeting, Sunday noon to 12:30 p. m.; daily sessions. 4 to 7 p. m.; registration, daily from 5 to 7 p. m. Service Men's Club Open house and refreshments daily from 7 to 11 p. m. Military minyan, Sunday at 9 a. m. Service Men's Wives' Club, daily from noon to 3 p. m. Grand How-Do-You-Do The entire faculty, board of directors and board of education will meet with the religious school children and their parents Sunday morning at 11 o'clock. A short program and a few brief greetings will precede the serving of refreshments at this informal get-together. The public is invited. Daughters of Israel Daughters of Israel will meet Saturday at 8:30 a. m. to discuss plans for the Women's Club building. This is a Greater Miami organization. All men and women are invited to attend. CONG. BETH ABRAHAM Week-end services will be held Friday at 6:30 p. m. and Saturday at 8:30 a. m. at the synagogue, 535 N. W. Fifth Avenue, with Rabbi H. M. Kagan speaking on "The Wandering Jew." Mincha services at 6 p. m. followed by Shala Sudas in charge of Rabbi H. M. Kagan. Refreshments will follow. Everyone is invited. TEMPLE EMANU-EL 1801 South Andrews Avenue Ft. Lauderdale, Florida RAItBI SAMUEL IIALEVI BARON Telephone 141S 705 S. E. 9th Street Sabbath services Friday at 8 p. m. with sermon by the rabbi. Religious school, Sunday at 10:30 a. m. Sisterhood benefit bridge luncheon Monday at 1 p. m. at the Southern Dairies hostess room. Weekly sewing session for the Red Cross. British War Relief Society, and Bundles for America Tuesday from 12:30 to 5 p. m. Service men are welcome to all Temple services. ENJOY YOURSELF AT THE NORTH MIAMI RIDING ACADEMY GENTLE RIDING HORSES E. J. ALBERT & SON 13575 N. E. 6th Avenue REASONABLE RATES MODERATE COSTS ALWAYS WITHIN THE MEANS OF INDIVIDUAL CIRCUMSTANCES GORDON FUNERAL HOME OTv E '^ I S H FUNERAL H P HO E NE,3431 710 S. W. 12th AVENUE WORTHY AND DESERVES YOUR FULL SUPPORT AND RECOMMENDATION I I '< i



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PAGE SIX +Jeistfk>ridiiftn FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2 ^ ADDITIONAL SOCIETY A special meeting of the Workmen's Circle. Branch 692. will be held Sunday at 25 Washington Avenue. Miami Beach, at 5 p. m. to discuss the sick benefit program of the organization. • 0 • Miss Gertrude Steiner. head of the Girl Scouts of Greater Miami, was recently married to Arthur Crimmons. The couple will make their home in Miami. • • • Mr. and Mrs. Gus Trau returned from the North last week to reopen their home for the winter. • • • "Being Above the Battle and Yet In It" will be the subject of the address by Rabbi Colman \ Zwitman at the meeting of the Greater Miami Chapter. Women's Division, American Jewish Congress, Monday at the Elks Lodge, 720 West Avenue, Miami Beach, at 1:30 p. m. Presiding at the meeting will be Mrs. S. H. Lutsky. vice president of the group. Mrs. Lewis Glasser. program chairman, will present M. Sweitzer, who will play the accordian. Mrs. Bruce Levey will make a brief membership talk. Following the program refreshments will be served. • • • Mr. and Mrs. Louis Baron. 1367 S. W. 18th Street, announce the birth of a son at Jackson Memorial Hospital. STRICTLY Tidbits from Everywhere by PHINEAS J. BIRON CHURCH OFFICIAL RESIGNS POST OVER ANTI-SEMITISM ISTANBUL (WNS>—The patriarch of the Greek Orthodox Church in Rumania. Nikodem, has resigned as head of the church, in protest against the systematic pogroms conducted against the Jews of Rumania, it MRS. JOHN MEYER and FAMILY gratefully acknowledge the receipt of the numerous telegrams and letters of condolence on the loss of our beloved husband and father. Sincerely, MRS. JOHN MEYER, LEO MEYER. BARON De HIRSCH MEYER was reported here this week In recent months. it was learned, Patriarch Nikodem had sent several letters of protest t" anti-Semitic Premier Ion Antonescu in which the church leader pleaded for a modification of Rumania's restrictions against the Jews. He condemned also the practice of seizing Jews during the night for compulsory labor service. Premier Antonescu. whose dictatorship has witnessed the bloodiest anti-Jewish pogroms in modern history, ignored the patriarch's appeals. As a matter oi fact, during this period, the persecution of Jews was intensified. Buy War Bonds and Stamps and Your Tomorrow. Buy War Bonds and Stamps and Your Tomorrow. Buv Deiense Bonds Today. "THREE O'CLOCK AND I HAVEN'T SLEPT A WINK" WAKEFUL NIGHTS —how the time drags! Minutes seem like hours, we worry over things done and left undone. After such a night, we get up in the morning more tired than when we went to bed. Nervous Tension causes many a wakeful night and wakeful nights are likely to cause Nervous Tension. Next time you feel Nervous and Keyed Up or begin to toss, tumble and worry after you get to bed — try DR. MILES NERVINE l Liquid or Effervescent Tablets) DR. MILES NERVINE helps to ease Nervous Tension — to permit refreshing sleep. When you are Keyed I'p. Cranky. Fidgety. Wakeful, take Dr. Miles Nervine. Try it for Nervous Headache and Nervous Indigestion. Get Dr. Miles Nervine at your drug store. Effervescent Tablets. Large Package la*. Small Package 35<; Liquid. Large Bottle S1.00. Small Bottle -o. both equally effective as a sedative, both guaranteed to satisfy or your money back. Read directions and use only as directed. D R MILES (CONTINUED FROM PAGE *1 a arried before the year is over. ti Rabbi Maurice Pekaxsky. head of the Hillel Foundation at ivestern I' n \ v e r s i t y—a young man who has our heartiest Stratu .::. ns Congratulations also I ":': U Kreis'.er. now a full-fledged American ci1 Harry R el ng '.earned. as we told you a few columns ag tl al as the first ; .-.->• ngei : ak< tl i trans-Atlantic plant trip had I : throui %  an aviation circles Air C< rps is 1 and has start* 1 gymnasium to gel the pink of cor But report is thai s far Harry. *'h< isn't quite as y ung as 1 be, has sue a ligament. WEEKLY GIGGLE Winchell relates thi the Nazi in a Berlin resta who ordered a big, ju J with all the trimmings But the waiter interrupted his description "Are you ordering," he asked, "or reminiscing'.'" for SAFETY... and Liberal Returns Place Your Funds In LtAE PEHBIAL or MIAMI A SAVINGS INSTITUTION Which has never paid less than 3"o on insured savings. RESOURCES OVER $6,000,000 J. M. LIPTON. President 45 NORTHEAST FIRST AVENUE Buy Your War Savings Bonds Here Arthur D. Greenleigh Announcement of the resignation of Arthur D. Greenleigh from his position as assistant executive director of the Nationa 1 Refugee Service, to accept an executive post with the operations division of the War Manpower Commission, was made Wednesday, Oct. 14. by William Rosen wa Id, president ot the refugee aid organization. Mr. Greenleigh. who served as acting executive director of tinNational Refugee Service from February. 1941. to July of that year, was a member of the agency's executive staff sinct 1939. In his new post he comes an aide to Gen. Frank McSherry of the War Manpowi i Commission and will direct highly important operatioi facilitating the utilization ot manpower resources in the try's production effort. PAIiMJE] Funeral.Chajpj 200IW, FLAGIER ST. AMBULANCE SERVICE -V* IO% SAVED NOW OR 100% TAKEN BY THE AXIS LATER! BUY WAR BONDS PALM BEACH JEWISH FLORIDIAN OFFICE. 226 S. OLIVE STRFFT IN THE FOX BUILDING MRS. MARY SCHREBNICK, Representative At the first annual meeting of the Beth El Sisterhood committees were appointed and include Mrs. Al Moss, Sunday school; Mrs. Helen Freeman, ways and means committee. Sunday school teachers for the coming year include Mrs. Ben Ryder. Mrs. Ira May. Mrs. J. Sheppard, Mrs. Al Wacksman, Mrs. Jack Kappner and Mrs. Manuel Greenstein. Plans were made for a luncheon to be held Nov. 10. Beth Israel Sisterhood held their monthly card party Sunday night. Mrs. J. Leo Rader served as hostess. Lou Halpern is now at Camp Blanding, where he was inducted as a member of the armed forces. Friday night services at Beth F.l were conducted by Rabbi Manuel Greenstein, assisted by A. Levin as cantor. Mr, and Mrs. J. Leo Rader of Belle Glade spent the week-end at We.-t Palm Beach. s ( rvici s al Beth Israel are conlucted weekly by Dr. Carl N. Herman. Miss Millicent Gruncr Was h rec.pient of a surprise ^ given by her mother at t? Road 0 rCSidCnce on Was hm 6 S Sorority members were guest, at the affair held Oct. 19 R freshments were served *' Friends of Mrs. Esther Halpern will be pleased to lc arn that she is convalescing at St Mary's Hospital following a major operation. Appropriation of $150 f or a milk fund for local needy school children was approved by B'nai B'rith Lodge last Tuesday nigh; Sale of another $1,000 in war bonds was reported, boosting the lodge total to $21,000. An open discussion of current events was participated in by Ezra Brahms. Harry Halpern, Joe Lesser. Sam Linder, Ben Wolfson. Dan Goodmark and Charles Kaimutz. AMBULANCE SERVICE MIZELL SIMON MORTUARY 413 Hibiscus Street Ph. 8121 West Palm Beach, Florida For tho Best in Dairy Products ALFAR CREAMERY CO, WEST PALM BEACH MILK—CREAM—ICE CREAM SOUTHERN DAIRIES — %  Serving Palm Beach County, featuring the CgX-Sg-efe.£. Nationally Famous Southern Dairies Products and Ice Cream. ICE £SiC4U MILK m AS NEAR TO YOU AS YOUR PHONE CORNELIUS INSURANCE AGENCY 318 HARVEY BUILDING PHONE 6093 Writing Fire and all Kindred Line* of Insurance I Left to right: General Frank T. Hines, Administrator of Vet ra "' Affaire, National Commander Benjamin Kaufman, Congressional j of Honor holder, Lieutenant General Brehon 8omervell, Chief of uArmy Services of Supply. Scranton, Pa.—General Brehon SomerTell, chief of the Army Services of Supply, addressing the 47th Annual National Convention of the Jewish War Veteran* of the U. S., characterised aa traitors aad saboteurs those who today preach race •r rliiou. hatred. Oeeral nines. Administrator of Veteran* Affairs, who was ssade an honorary member of J -*\ stressed the seriousness and a termination of the young men no in the armed forces. This convention reelected BW jamln Kaufman as national commander by acclamation sod • on record as favoring reducUo£ If years the %  JnUnum draft •



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fHlDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1942 TO PALESTI N E C0N TINUE D FRO M PAGE 1) r oellcr of Cicinnnati was related chairman of the ZOA's national administrative council. Mrs David de Sola Pool of Mew York City was re-elected as president of Hadassah^ Mrs. Pool who will serve as Hadassah nresi'dcnt for the third consecum-e year, was prevailed upon to i accept the nomination after she -ad announced that she would run for re-election because jhe Hadassah convention had [ adopted the resolution repudiat%  n tbe Ichud program. Mrs. Pool MS one of the Hadassah leaders who sought to have the convention endorse the Ichud program as announced in Palestine. The Hadassah convention I adopted a budget of $1,210,000 for its war emergency and regular health program, child welfare, feeding, refugee and land reclamation work in Palestine. The delegates also voted to send $5,000 as a gift to Miss Henrietta Sz'old, 82-year-old founder of Hadassah, now in Jerusalem, "to be used for any project which she wishes to further there." The joint closing session of the two organizations was addressed by Mayor La Guardia, Mrs. Pool, Louis Lipsky. former president of the ZOA, and Dr. Alexander Loudon. Netherlands ambassador to the United States. Dr. Stephen S. Wise presided. Mr. Loudon told the mass meeting that "in that reconstructed Dutch house after the war, the Jews of Holland, our Jews, will have their place again." Alluding to the Zionist program for a Jewish national home in Palestine, the The United States Government Having Taken Over His Present Offices— DR. JOSEPH B. MARGOLIS announces the REMOVAL OF HIS OFFICE to 311 Lincoln Road Albion Bldg., Suite 309 MIAMI BEACH For the Practice of General Dentistry I WANT MY MILK Estab. 1824 And Be Sure It'i FLORIDA DAIRIES HOMOGENIZED Vitamin "D" MUk "Milk Products" Dacro Protected TEL. 2-2621 Greater Miami Delivery VUit Our Farm at 6200 N. W. 32nd Street | Netherlands diplomat said"We sympathetically understand what a home means; what we can do | we will do." Mr. Lipsky assailed the failure of Britain to fulfill its declarations for the establishment of a Jewish national home in Pairstine. "England," he said, "has used its authority to liquidate its covenant and its promise. It has rejected all appeals from its decision. It has deprived mem. bers of the League of Nations of the right to intervene in an issue in which they were parties. It has acted as sole judge in a matter of self-interest." A call for a "bold and daring | program" on the part of American Zionists that would evisage the settlement in Palestine upon the conclusion of the war. of between two and three million Jews, coupled with the demand for the establishment of Palestine as "an independent and unfettered Jewish Commonwealth" was the major note in the keynote address of Judge Louis E. %  Levinthal, president of the ZOA. In his presidential address. I Judge Levinthal declared that "we must think and speak in | terms of a Palestine in which' full control and supervision of imagination will be in the hands of the Jews and of the Jews alone, for they have shown in Palestine their capacity for selfgovernment. Zionists, he added, demanded the establishment of Palestine as a Jewish Commonwealth, entirely independent and unfettered, bound only by those reservations which the post-war world may determine to apply to all nations." They would not agree, he declared, to any proposals which would place "the Jewish Homeland" in a status of "constitutional inferiority" to other National Homelands. Recent proposals for the setting up of Palestine as a binational state were characterized by Judge Levinthal as but a continuation of the process of "whittling down on the pledges made to the Jewish people." Touching on the proposal for a Jewish army, Judge Levinthal declared that it was "painful" for him as "a sincere admirer of the British people to be compelled to record our keen disappointment. our deep chagrin at the humiliating manner in which the British government has rejected our persistent demand for the right to organize a distinct Jewish military force." The concession made by the British of joint Arab-Jewish battalions or regiments, ho described as "merely a palliative, stop-gap but a grudging admission of the validity of our demand." "We Zionists know that a homeland." said Judge Levinthal. "is not a homeland unless its men and women have the right to fight for it in their own name. The Jews of Palestine do not fear invasion or death, but they claim their right, the most fundamental right of human beings, go down if need be, fighting with flag in hand. But we are proud of the fact that in spite of the cloak of anonymity which has been thrown over the Palestinian Jewish soldiers and sailors, in spite of all the impediments placed in the path of self-defense, the leaders of our movement have permitted no obstacle to curtail Jewish Palestine's all-out war effort." Declaring that "America fighting to make the world a decent place in which to live interested in seeing that the Jewish People shall have the occasion and opportunity to develop their civilization in Palestine." Sena or Alben W. Berkley, majority lead, er of the United States Senate told the delegates that their present labors in Palestine wouM have an influence at the Peace Ta Se senator spoke at a lunch*'JewistiihrkHan PAGE SEVEN JITTERY OVER INVASION NAZIS PERSECUTE JEWS London (WNS)—Nazi authorities in the occupied countries. Jitj tery over the prospects of an j Allie% invasion, have intensified their persecution of Jews, ac1 cording to reports received here. The Free Belgian News Agency | reported this week that 600 Jews had been sent from their homes in Brussels to the French coast, where they were put to work as slave laborers on anti-invasion fortification. Reports from occupied Norway stated that Premier Quisling's anti-Jewish program had taken a violent turn and the Jewish population was said to be in a state of panic. All Jews under treatment in Norwegian sanitariums were ordered expelled from the institutions. Rabbi Max Shapiro By invitation of the executive director of the United Palestine Appeal, Henry Montor, Rabbi Max Shapiro will serve as official representative of the "Speakers' Bureau" in the southeastern area for the coming year for that organization. BEACH CHAPLAIN 1 cial floating of a Zionist $2,500,000 loan for the purchase of new land tracts in Palestine in order to meet the war-time needs of the population and the military forces in the Holy Land and to prepare the ground for largescale Jewish colonization. Speaking of the launching of a S2.500.000 loan for the acquistion of more land in Palestine, Senator Barkeley declared that this was "desirable not only for the immediate benefit of homeless Jews throughout Europe, but it seems to me essential in -the preparation of the case of Palestine and the Jews located there before the peace conference which must ensue following the victory which we anticipate on the part of the United Nations." Stressing the "full support of its membership in the total war effort," the ZOA convention pledged "To continue to increase even further the participation" in all branches of civil defense. Another resolution expressed "pride in the ever-increasing numbers of members of the Zionist Organization of America and the sons and daughters of members now serving in the armed forces of our country." It was resolved that the dues of all such members be waived for the duration of the war. The convention also went on record demanding the creation of a Jewish army in Palestine. Chaplain Camillus Angel, first Jewish Army chaplain to be stationed in this area, arrived here to assume his duties last week. During his rabbinical experiences, Rabbi Angel has served Jewish congregations in such widely scattered points as St. George's Settlement synagogue in London, Mt. Sinai temple in Texarkana, Texas, and St. Charles, La. When commissioned as regimental chaplain in July of this year, he was assigned to the 134th regiment of the 36th BEING MADE OF MAIL DELIVERIES Due to conditions brought about by the war, a reorganization is being made of the city delivery service in the Miami area. The reorganized service will provide: Two deliveries of mail a day in the down-town business area, where the volume of mail is heavy. One delivery of mail a day will be provided in all residential areas. Effective November 1, mail deliveries will be reduced from three to two trips a day in the down-town district. Carriers will leave on the first trip at approximately 8 a. m., and on the second trip at approximately 12:40 p. m. The one delivery in the residential areas will leave the post office at approximately 8 a. m.; mail on approximately 75 per cent of the routes will be delivered by or before 12 noon, the remaining 25 per cent of the routes will receive service in the afternoon. In order to utilize fully the manpower in the city delivery service under the onetrip-a-day arrangement, it is necessary to make a part of the deliveries in the afternoon. Business establishments located in residential territory will have but one delivery of mail each day. If it is necessary for a business establishment or an individual to receive mail more than one time a day. or at an hour infantry division. The proportion of Jewish boys there ran! earlier than the revised delivery about one per cent and most of schedules will provide, it is sughis energies were bent upon mingested that the business estabistering to Catholic and Protesj lishment or individual rent a post tant soldiers. The chaplain was I office box at the post office staon maneuvers shortly before astion or branch nearest his adsuming his new post with headdress, or at the main post office quarters in Town House. Asked about his plans for the Greater Miami area. Chaplain Angel stated that for an indefinite period of time he would conduct services each Friday evening in Beth Jacob Congregation on the Beach. These will be held exclusively for the service men. At a later date, the place of worship will be rotated so that all synagogues on the Beach are utilized. In this manner, a maximum number of men will be reached because of the convenience of each location for a particular group of men. In addition, services will take 53,000 JEWS ARE KILLED IN NAZI INVASION OF AUSTRIA WASHINGTON (WNS)—More than 53,000 Austrian Jews have been killed since the Nazi invasion of Austria, it was reported by Archduke Otto, pretender to the throne of Austria, in an address to the National Council of Jewish Women. The archduke, who said he was confident about the equal status of Jews in post-war Europe, declared: "We Austrians believe that before God and the nation all men are equal. We make no racial or religious distinctions. in Miami. If additional information regarding the reorganized city delivery service is needed, patrons should see the superintendent of the post office station or branch nearest them, or call at Room 103. Federal Building, Miami. It is believed that everyone affected will fully appreciate the urgent need for conservation of manpower, and will readjust their affairs to conform with the new delivery schedules. It will not be possible to deviate from the fixed schedules or to make exceptions that would disturb the general scheme of place at the Roney-Plaza hotel | the reorganized delivery service. each Sunday morning for those — —— at the Beach Replacement center I in the morning so that those who and the Officers' Candidate [must report for regular duty will school. Heretofore no worship. be able to do so without diffihas been possible for the Jewish culty. men of the orthodox faith who wish to meet early Saturday morning. If sufficient interest is manifested. Chaplain Angel will have a minyan at 6 o'clock Chaplain Angel hopes to extend his usefulness beyond the confines of Greater Miami. He will make occasional trips to outside areas. Aik Your Local Delicatessen For the Best • It Costs No More OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE IN FLORIDA KOSHER ZION SAUSAGE CO. PRODUCTS Delicious Corned Beef Pickled, Cooked and Smoked Meats 37th and Normal Ave. Chicago STOCKHOLM (WNS) — Nazi Gestapo Chief Himmler, who visited Italy recently in an attempt to bolster Italy's drooping morale, reproached Premier Mussolini for his "weak" anti-Semitic program, the Swedish newspaper Nydag reported this week. "Butcher" Himmler was reDorted to have complained to II Duce that Italy's anti-Jewish legislation was inadequate and to have demanded that more stringent anti-Jewish laws be introduced immediately. At the Name time Himmler demanded that Mussolini take steps to stamp out the growing sabotage HOME MILK PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION OWNED AND OPERATED BY LOCAL DAIRYMEN ^—Sealed in Cellophane for your protection PREFERRED BY THOUSANDS—MAY WE SERVE YOU? Phon* MIAMI 2-7696-FT. LAUDERDALE 613 loc GRADE "A" PASTEURIZED MILK CREAM SWEET CREAM SWEET CREAM BUTTER SALT BUTTER • COTTAGE CHEESE BUTTERMILK SOUR CREAM SOY ACIDOPHILUS We Sincerely Believe That There la No Better Dairy Product Than HOME MILK I j i II '^^^j^^^m : iBiBKlSS&i^HEiHEfiniiUHfl I HamHHMlBSHHBiHBifiESEl^B !" ^ !"



PAGE 1

PAGE EIGHT vJewlstnoridfon FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23. 1942 FROM THE SWIVEL CHAIR William I. Boxerman The viiw exprtMed by Mr. BoxermAii arc his own and do not necenmrily represent the opinion of Th Jewish Florldlan. "To All the Gallant Men" There are many idealists for whom the world of reality does not exist. There are also a few men of vision who do not alone spin laudable theories but put them to the test in actual practice. To this latter rare company of mortals add the name of Willis Thornton. Who is Thornton and why do we single him out as for mention? Not so many moons ago he was just plain Mr. Willis Thornton, distinguished student of American history and chief editorial writer of Newspaper Enterprise Association. In his love for America and the democratic ideal he recently wrote a book called "Almanac for Americans" which he dedicated, in a spirit characteristic of his faith, "to all the gallant men and women whose past struggles helped to make American life good, and to all those today who seek to make it better." Crowded Story of America We chanced to read Mr. Thornton^ opus and were carried away by the patriotic fervor motivating the author. In reviewing it for the Miami Daily News we had occasion to say. in part: "Almanac for Americans" should have definite value in the public schools and for those civic \ groups, which, as a means of fos-1 tering morale in the war effort,' plan patriotic events We feel j that the writer has achieved his stated purpose, to give to many REAL ESTATE HOMES. MIAMI BEACH WAR BONDS AND REAL ESTATE ALONG WITH WAR BONDS REAL ESTATE IS THE SAFEST WARTIME INVESTMENT. ITS SAFE, profitable and patriotic to own your own home. President Roosevelt says: "Each home has given an American family a stake in its own country." TODAY I am selling more homes than ever before because war conditions and readjustments in Miami Beach compelled a number of owners to sell. My advertisements of these exc'usive listings enabled a good many homeseekers. esJecially loenl business peo. pie, to secure homes they wanted -it pricei way below their true value. NEW EXCLUSIVE listings • re c c rn i n g into my Of• fee J .i l %  -. "liny of them at prices fiat probably will never be duplicated again. MY ADVICE IS BUY NOW ^ the safest investment for todiy and for the years to come. It's SAFE, (-ROFITAQLE and PATRIOTIC to own your own home. Buy War Bonds for Peace Buy a Home for Happiness B. E. BRONSTON REALTOR %  •TRUSTWORTHY SERVICE' 605 Lincoln Road, Ph. 5-5868 the sense of fullness of the crowded story of America And we meant every word of it! This week's mail bag brings us a letter from Willis Thornton, now Corporal Thornton, stationed with the Army Air Force Technical Command at a midwestern training center. He didn't get there via the draft, either. But let part of his letter to us speak for itself. "Dream. Work, and Sweat" "My publisher has just sent on to me a clipping of your review of "Almanac for Americans" I'd like to express my appreciation of a very sympathetic review which divined very clearly just what I was driving at ... I thought it might amuse you to know that I enlisted last February, in the army, although I'm an old dodderer of 42 and a veteran of the other war ... I now am stationed at ---... So my aim. at least, has been to practice what I preach." No, Corporal Thornton, we were not '"amused" when we learned of your presence in the army We were deeply impressed with the depth of your convictions Only men with your spirit can win this war and, what is infinitely more important, the kind of peace that | must follow Only men like 1 you who dream and work and I sweat "to bring to still greater I fruition the bright promise that is America" arc worthy of its heritage. Mirror of the Past Particularly timely during this | anniversary year is "The Jews in Spain," a two-volume history by Dr. Abraham A. Neuman. president of Dropsie College Issued by the Jewish Publication of Philadelphia (S2.50 per volume; S5.00 per set) this gives a graphic picture of the social, political and cultural life of the Jews during the middle ages. Too many histories are written in a dry-as-dust textbook style Notable exceptions are such works as those of Dr. Salo Baron of Columbia University (whom we had as our instructor during graduate school days) and the present account by Dr. Neuman ... As we read, there passes in review a moving panorama of characters and movements in Jewish life of the period under consideration We view men of all classes, scholars and merchants, rabbis and financiers, the good and the bad, wise men and scoundrels, saints and sinners. The Cherem Because of our concern about the internal Jewish problems of today we found especially fascinating those portions of Dr. Neuman's work dealing with the kahal and the Jewish courts We have remarked before that there could be more housecleaning within the Jewish community if some such moral weapons as the cherem of the! middle ages could be resurrected MIAMI JEWISH BEACH CENTER (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 Key Shop, 804 5th St. will be glad to explain the work to anyone calling upon him. Men and women of all ages arc eligible. Service Men Socials With the increased facilities which the new social hall affords the Center. Tuesday night socials and entertainments will be better than ever. Only men in uniform and young ladies willing to serve as dancing partners will be admitted. Refreshments are served through the courtesy of the Sisterhood. Bar Mitzva The bar mitzva of Eugene ChekanOW will be celebrated at jthe Center Synagogue on Saturiday, Oct. 24 at 9 a. m. We extend heartiest congratulations to the boy and his family. Once upon a time in Spain, as Dr. Neuman well points out. the cherem was a powerful means of whipping recalcitrant Jews, who had violated the good taste of the Jewish community into line Invoking the cherem meant virtual excommunication of the culprit by the community. Picture, if you can. the severest form of the cherem in which "no one was permitted to teach the culprit, nor was he permitted to engage in study and have the solace of books: he was not to be engaged for hire by a co-religionist, nor was any Jew permitted to work for him Only if he faced starvation was it permitted to help him with the bare necessities of life The instrument of excommunication served efficiently as a means of discipline of its flexibility ... It could be made severe or light, permanent or temporary." Yes, as Dr. Neuman shows, these internal controls were of inestimable value Those of us in Jewish communal life today can learn much about this and other means of community organization from reading "The Jews in Spain." ^JGUST BROS RV^ 4 Is the BEST' Al iVERTISKMENT KENHOLZ KOSHER MEAT PRODUCTS Incorporated 1343 Washington Avenue Miami Beach PHONE 5-39S2 Is Under the personal supervision of Rabbil Joseph E. Rackoveky a member of Union of Orthodox Ra'-bis of America and the Histadruth Karcbonim Any Jew desiring Kosher Meat may with clear conscience buy of KENHOLZ. in Miami, Florida SUN-RAY PARK HEALTH RESORT ESTABLISHED IN 1M APPROVED PN!T^RrCM With Cheerful H tel At-nosptterr For Host. Convalescent Oronlr end Acute Medical c* r Oraduate N irslng and Dlptetle Staff Resident Pbealeltn Cimn!ie pi • • ThTapv. Fo-;r Arrr* Lend'e^ni Or -indi. Sports, Reere ill A W. Ftl.IS P-M J W r.i .,.. j Q|r 1M 8. W. mih Paarl '-'.ml. Flor!*. Phone 4-1659 We've been remind you of "musts." While there have been a number of volunteer blood donors from Sholem Lodge, there haven't been enough. The group, headed by Louis Heiman, will present themselves to give a pint of blood each. More volunteers are needed. More blood plasma must be stocked. Are you in a position to be a blood donor? Call B'nai B'rith office. 3-6391, and arrange to go with other members of Sholem Lodge when they go. Keys. That should be sufficient reminder that the drive is on in full swing to collect all keys not actually in use for the metals they contain. The A.Z.A.'s are working with Sholem Lodge to collect keys, and if you will call the B.B. office and leave a message, your surplus keys will be picked up. Just leave them in a handy place. Send-Off Party. This is a heading, but it doesn't tell the whole story. Dade County Draft Board No 4 wrote to Mr. Fennell, chairman of the Dade County Defense Council Morale Division that "our" send-off party was conducted in an exemplary manner. ... no man was missed, and there was no confusion. We noted that the reaction of the men was that of the spirit of good comradeship," wrote Mrs. Storm, chief clerk of the board. Mr. Fennell wrote to Louis Hemian and calling attention to the fact that our organization should be pleased with the letter sent by the draft board, a copy of which he included. When he tells us that this was the first letter of its kind received from the draft board, and aded to this is the fact that many organizations take turns in holding send-off parties, you know that Sholem Lodge B'nai B'rith excelled. They want us to do it again. We've written the foregoing items—and we're tired. Not with the effort, because that was slight. We can't put the words i together that will give items I their proper importance. That I is our fault, not yours. If we are too insistent, you will be offended. If we omit matters about i which we have written before. we would be derelict in our duty. • And we are trying to B it > wholehearted support ?£ project that even remotely CO n corns the war. on We can't help mulling over ; events that happened m lnc J few days In retrospect we saw four million men leave homes and go to camps and training sb tions throughout the country w arc going to tell you about one because he is symblic of mil' hons who went before him. and the millions who are to follow We'll probably violate every rule of reporting, for with the facts will go personal feeling. So we're going to tell you about Sol D. Horowitz, a Ben B'rith and probably not a very good one as service to the organization goes; not an intellectual giant. but who amongst us is? And although an associate judge at the age of 26, not a Max D. Steue-r as a lawyer. But were telling you about Sol. because there anso many like him. We've been associated with Sol, and hence shouldn't write about him. We know his virtues and his faults. He never harmed anyone in his life! And he enlisted in the Army. We know his parents, and his wife and child. We have been witness to the stricken, tight-lipped look on his father's face—and viewed the picture of bewilderment, that is his wife. His child is too young to understand. We have seen him set his house in order. We know his pride of ownership, but we have seen his worldly goods scattered, his office left a shell—he has scrapped everything, is leaving everybody near and dear to him. and is going to War. He doesn't know what lies ahead of him. We do know his path is beset with dangers and difficulties, and his life is endangered. But he goes with a smile and a word of good cheer for those he leaves behind. And the spittle has dried in our mouth and there is a lump in our throat. We tell you about Sol because his is the story of millions—because of all the Sols prepared to give everything. We would like to compare the sacrifices the civilians at home! are asked to make with those the Sols of America have made, and are prepared to make. But comparisons are odious! B'nai B'rith Makes Dream Come True For Lame Child For Richer, Greener Lawnt And Shrubbery Try Bi/J'-tiiSEEX n Pturtllnr rea!u ecu b+ obtained from thl rich plant food *hlch rontulni miner.ii. that will help Kal p chinch to.. not of jour laws. bold • irl.i-.l.r 1 h,— HUGHES SEED STORE v Ml t. M ; A i:i vi. HOI[ Mm L. to r.: Sam Stark, Los Angeles Ben B'rith. whose purchase of* bonds won him the right to select the sponsor of a new .L-'D" cargo ship; Lorene Mitchell, 10-year-old crippled Catholic g' rl -"• n was selected by Stark through the Infantile Paralysis Found* to christen the ship and then received a purse of $10,000 from > shipyard workers to provide for her medical care and educa; and Mrs. Ethel Jarrett, war bond chairman of Fidelity Bnai an Women s Auxiliary, who sold Stark the bonds.


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MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
October 23, 1942

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00714

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
October 23, 1942

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00714

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text
^Jewish Florid tin
CoaajmiG Ylhe Jew I St) (Umiilty
I
H
VOLUME 15No. 42
MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1942
PRICE 10 CENTS
TO PALESTINE
New York (WNS)The Zion-
ist Organization of America and
the Hadassah. meeting in joint
session, ended their concurrent
conventions here with the adop-
tion of a resolution demanding
unrestricted Jewish immigra-
tion to Palestine and the estab-
lishment of Palestine "as a Jew-
ish Commonwealth integrated
into the structure of the new
democratic world."
The joint session of the two
Zionist bodies went on record
also as repudiating the program
of the recently-established Ichud
party, headed by Dr. Judah L.
Magnes. president of the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem, which
advocates a bi-national state in
Palestine.
The resolution, which had been
adopted previously by both the
ZOA and Hadassah at separate
meetings, endorsed "the policy I
of friendship and cooperation!
with the Arabs of Palestine af-
firmed by successive Zionist
Congresses, and will seek to find
every possible avenue to estab-
lish good-will and active collabo-
ration between the two peoples." .
At the closing session of the i
ZOA's 45th annual convention,
attended by more than 1,000
delegates from all over the coun-'
try. Judge Louis E. Levinthal of
Philadelphia was elected unani-
mously for a second term as
president. Dr. Harry Frieden-
wald of Baltimore and Judge
Julian Mack were elected hon- j
ary vice presidents. Dr. James.
SGT. MEYER LEVIN GETS 2nd
DECORATION FOR ATTACK
New York (WNS)Sergeant
Meyer Levin of Brooklyn, N. Y..
the Jewish bombardier for the
late Captain Colin Kelly, who
was awarded the Distinguished
Flying Cross for sinking the
Japanese battleship Haruna, has
now been awarded the Silver
Star for gallantry in an attack
of Jap warships in the Coral Sea
battle, according to reports from
General MacArthur's headquar-
ters In Australia.
The official citation describing
Sgt. Levin's feat said that de-
spite heavy anti-aircraft fire,
"eight 500-pound bombs were
dropped, bracketing the low of
a 15,000-ton transport and in-
flicting heavy damage." Both
when he flew with Captain Kelly
and in the Coral Sea battle, the
Jewish ace was forced to bail
out.
Brooklyn friends and neigh-
bors of the twice-decorated Army
Air Force hero have announced
that they will celebrate Sergeant
Meyer Levin Day on November
1. A feature of the celebration
will be the dedication of a
plaque in front of the Levin
home, 1504 East 33rd Street,
Brooklyn.
DUTCH JEWS PLEAD INSANE
TO ESCAPE DEPORTATION
JUGOSLAV GUERRILLA UNIT
SETS 900 CHILDREN FREE
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 7)
Berne (WNS).A Yugoslav-
guerrilla unit, composed exclu-
sively of Jewish volunteers, part
of General Draja Mikhailovitch's
growing anti-Nazi army, raided
a Nazi camp for children in Cro-
atia and freed 900 children, in-
cluding 160 Jewish youngsters.
Nazi newspapers published in
Croatia, reported this week. The
Nazi press said that documents
found after the raid showed that
Jewish guerrilla fighters had vol-
unteered for the mission to free
the children.
Civic Leader Proud of Y.M.H.A.
Its Many and Varied Activities
By E. Albert Pallot
Past President Y. M. H. A.
I have watched the Y. M. H. A.
grow from its infancy and I am
very happy that today it can
take its place with the outstand-
ing youth-building organizations
in America. From a humble be-
ginning to an organization of
great magnitude having projects i
and activities comparable to any
other organization of its kind in
'he country makes me proud that
I am a member of this institu-
tion.
Much has been said in these
columns for the past few weeks
"Vities and its membership. A
great deal has been said about
H* "Y," its projects, its ac-
(iirying on normal activities in
mes of war. but today to keep
'he home-fires burning has an
added significance. It means
that all the machinery of our
government, Federal. State and
Local, must work together to
strengthen community self-serv-
jcefor health, for recreation,
tor education and for family se-
cui"ity. We must make our off-
*ork time happy, worthwhile
and interesting, through the
Kind of recreation that is. as the
*ord itself says, re-creation of,
wart and mind and body.
The Y. M. H. A. of Miami is
f>e place where leisure hours can
E. Albert Pallot
be
spent in a worthwhile man-
ner- not only for children and
youths, but for adults as well.
Its program is so comprehensive
that there isn't any person in this
Lea who cannot find a program
hlTho membership drive now
carried on merits the support of
every Jewish citizen. Help the
-Y" to help you.
RELIGIOUS HEADS
A conference of leading Jewish
religious and lay leaders has
been called for November 8 by
Governor Herbert H. Lehman
and Dr. Louis Finkelstein, presi-
dent of the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America, to discuss
the development of a consistent,
integrated program for the semi-
nary, in its efforts to strengthen
the Jewish faith and democratic
tradition.
In his call to the conference,
addressed to congregations affili-
ated with the seminary and to
prominent members of the Amer-
ican Jewish community. Gover-
nor Lehman indicated that the
challenge laid down by the ene-
mies of civilization to the Jewish
faith is "obviously but one
phase of an onslaught of all
western religions." "The preser-
vation of Judaism thus becomes,
more clearly than ever," the gov-
ernor asserts, "an essential ele-
ment in the defense and advance-
ment of civilization."
The Seminary Conference will
deal with the contribution which
the Jews of America can make
toward national solidarity and
toward overcoming religious big-
otry and other forms of group
dissension, and will stress the
need for raising Jewish moral
and spiritual standards. It will
especially point to the intimate
relationship and spiritual alli-
ance between democratic life and
religious tradition.
The conference will open with
a plenary session and will fea-
ture the convening of seminar
groups to deal with the various
departments and religious func-
tions of the seminary in the light
of new war-time conditions. It
will mark the opening of Semi-
nary Anniversary Week, comme-
morating the fifty-fifth anniver-
sary of the founding of the semi-
nary and the fortieth anniversary
of its reorganization under Solo-
mon Schechter and Cyrus Adler.
Other outstanding events to be
held this week include a special
Commencement of the Rabbin-
ical School in order to enable the
senior class to enter upon pasto-
ral duties in preparation for the
Chaplaincy; a Conference of
Adult Jewish Education; and a
Fifty-fifth Anniversary Dinner.
Among the outstanding mem-
bers of the Miami Jewish Com-
munity who has associated him-
self with the Honorable Herbert
H Lehman and Dr. Louis Finkel-
stein in calling the November 8
Conference is Stanley C. Myers.
He is one of close to a hun-
dred Jewish leaders who has
undertaken the sponsorship ol
the conference.
GREATER MIAMI ARMY-NAVY
COMMITTEE TO HOLD MEET
On Sunday. October 25. at 10
a ii there will be a meeting of
the Greater Miami Army-Navy
Committee at the Miami Beach
Service Men's Center, 1711 Alton
Road. Miami Beach.
Every member of the commit-
tee is urged to be present and
attend this important meeting.
Stockholm (WNS) Nether-
lands Jews are applying to be
certified as lunatics and sent
to insane asylums in order to
avoid deportation to eastern
Europe, the pro-German Stock-
holm newspaper "Aftonbladct,"
reorted this week.
The paper said pnysicians were
complying with these requests
on the ground that the Jews had
become lunatics, "owing to the
horrible cruelty" to which they
have been subjected. The news-
paper denounced the practice as
an "insolent imposture," and
said that "among those confined
are well-known Haarlem people
who formerly never showed any
signs of mental deficiency."
"If they were taken to Poland
and not treated over-kindly mi-
raculous recoveries would take
place," the pro-German paper
said. "Netherlands physicians
who so kindly send them to
asylums should be sent with
them." "Aftonbladet" also recom-
mended that "Jewish lunatics be
segregated in separate institu-
tions."
IF.L
ASKS POST-
DESCRIBES NAZI
KILLING OP JEWS
New York (WNS) Leland
Stowe, noted war correspondent,
in a special dispatch to the New
York Post and Chicago Daily
News, reported this week his
meeting with Potya Kaputov-
ski, a 12-year-old soldier serving
with the Red Army on the Rzhev
front.
The youthful soldier, whose
father was killed while fighting
with a Soviet guerrilla unit and
whose mother, brothers and sis-
ters were massacred by the Nazi
invaders, described to the Ameri-
can war reported the Nazi
slaughter of Jews and guerrilla
fighters:
"I lived in a village near Ka-
linin. The Germans came in Oc-
tober. Right away they looked
for all Jews and all relative:; of
.partisans (guerrillas) in our vil-
lage. My father and many other
men had gone into the forest to
be partisans.
"The Germans came looking
for people in every house. When
they came to our house. I hid
under the steps with my brother
Shura. who is nine. The Fascists
took my mother and my two
younger brothers and my two
sisters. They tied their hands
with rope. Then they led them
into the biggest house in our vil-
lage. All the families of par-
tisans and all the Jews they
could find they put in the same
house.
"We were terribly frightened,
but we could sec from under the
steps. And then, when the Ger-
mans had filled the big house
with people, they set it on fire
they burned it down."
Petya. who later was adopted
by a Red Army unit on the
Rzhev sector, said that some of
the children "couldn't walk and
their mothers carried them when
ithe Fascist soldiers pushed them
into the house."
TORONTO (WNS) The
American Federation of Labor,
holding its 47th annual conven-
tion in this city, this week
adopted a declaration condemn-
ing Nazi crimes against the Jews
in occupied Europe and demand-
ing that the United States take
steps to guarantee freedom and
equality to Jews in post-war
Europe.
The declaration, read by Ma-
thew Woll. vice-president of the
American Federation of Labor,
urged also that the United Na-
tions guarantee to the Jews
"their independence under the
Balfour Declaration on the soil
of Palestine." It expressed or-
ganized labor's sympathy for the
persecuted Jews in Europe and
extended assurances of support.
The adoption of the declara-
tion followed a report by Julius
Hochman, vice-president of the
International Ladies Garment
Workers Union, on Nazi crimes
against the civilian populations
of the occupied countries. The
declaration said:
"Traditionally, the American
Federation of Labor has af-
firmed its sympathy with one of
the most unjustly and tragically
persecuted of all minoritiesthe
Jewish people. At present this
unfortunate group of the human
brotherhood is enduring not
only the usual barbarous and de-
testable excesses of the Nazis to-
wards conquered peopleit is
being subjected to a program of
systematic extermination which
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 3)
NAZIS COULD HAVE TAKEN
PALESTINE LAST SPRING
New York (WNS).Palestine
could have been invaded by the
Nazis last May but the danger to
the Holy Land. Syria. Cyprus
and Turkey is past, at least for
the remainder of 1942. according
to a dispatch to the New York
Times from Smyrna. Turkey.
Palestine was said to be tem-
porarily safe because of the
withdrawal of Nazi and Italian
troops from the Aegean Islands.
"Allied military and naval
circles say the enemy committed
their gravest error since the Ger-
man failure to attempt an inva-
sion of Britain following the col-
lapse of France in the summer
Of 1940 when the Germans and
Italians failed last May to at-
tack the weak defenses of Sy-
ria at d Palestine simultaneously
with their Libyan offensive." the
N York Times report said.
"Only the Turks were ready
last May and an operation aimed
across Syria at Iraq's oil and into
Palestine to sever Allied com-
munications was feasible, accord-
ing to leading foreign military
experts. Fewer than 20 divisions
would have sufficed to give the
Germans a critical, perhaps fatal,
foothold in Syria and Palestine
and perhaps even in Cypress
whose defenses early last spring
were something that Allied mili-
tary air experts would rather not
talk about."
'



H
PAGE TWO
+Jewish flcridiian
FRIDAY. OCTOBER
23. 1942
Social
Personals
Clubs

Organizations
Returning to the city recently
were Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Cro-
mer, 432 N. E. 26th terrace. They
had spent several months in
Hendcrsonville, N. C. Miss Flo-
unce Cromer, their daughter, is
a freshman at the University of
Miami.

Dr. and Mrs. Max Pepper and
their children, Nancy and Marsh-
all, left Sunday for Jacksonville,
where Dr. Pepper, a lieutenant,
junior grade, in the navy medical
corps, will be stationed at the
U. S. Naval hospital.

Cantor and Mrs. Louis Hay-
man arrived in Miami this week
from Houston, Texas.

Mrs. Nathan Adelman left last
Friday to visit her son and
daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Adelman. in Savannah.
After a few weeks in Georgia
she will visit in the Carolinas.

Mrs. Harry Rose is in Cleve-
land for a three-week visit with
her son, Leonard, who is to be
featured on the Columbia broad-
casting system October 31 from
5 to 6 p. m. as leader of the
Cleveland Symphony orchestra.

Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Roth-
berg announce the birth of their
son. who was born at Jackson
Memorial hospital on Monday.
Mr. Rothberg is the U. S. O. rep-
resentative of the Jewish Wel-
fare board.

Hyman Cooperman and Sam
Harris of New York are staying
at the President Madison hotel,
Miami Beach, while here on a
Three original plays were pre-
sented at the University of Miami
Wednesday evening. Authors of
the one acts are Renee Green-
field, Dorothy Ann Levin and
Bebe Fineman. Miss Green-
field's piece was called "Ham and
Borscht."

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Pactro
have returned to Miami Beach
from Jacksonville to make their
home here. Mrs. Paetro is the
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Max
Ellis.

Miss Ruth vVoitcowsky will ac-
company Frank Edwinn, basso,
at a musicale, Sunday evening,
at 8:30 p. m. at the University
of Miami music workshop. Mr.
Edwinn recently returned from
a year's study at the Julliard
School of Music.

Alpha Epsilon Phi sorority is
pledging Misses June Dcutsch
and Shirley Stamen. President
of the active chapter is Margery
Stark.

Dr. Harold Rand has received
his commission as captain in the
Army Air Force medical corps
and will report for duty on Oc-
tober 31. A well-known resi-
dent of Miami for some time, he
was active in B'nai B'rith and
the Y. M. H. A.

Hope Ellen Tanenbaum was
chosen queen of the biblical
bazaar held at the Miami Beach
Jewish Community center last
Saturday evening and Sunday.
Miss Tanenbaum represented
Young Judea. Lillian Marcus of
Mrs. Ida Spivack
Mrs. Ida Spivack. 905 Michigan
ave.. Miami Beach, was given
a party in honor of her 50th
birthday Sunday by her son-in-
law and daughter. Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Dccky. The wife of Harry
Spivack of the Rome Mattress
company. Mrs. Spivack is active
in a number of social and phil-
anthropic groups. For the past
two years she has been treas-
urer of the American Women's
Home defense group, an organi-
zation which she helped to found.
Besides being a lieutenant air
,the Young Pioneer Women rajd warden, she is active in
.ombined busmess and pleasure was named lady-in-waiting and Red Cross and holds the record
lnp- 'awarded second prize. Dorothy jn the Beth Jacob Service league
Burnett Roth* president of Gt>rst'n^1d. the bazaar's "Eve." for correspondence to parents of
'nai B'rith. flew in from Talla- was thc roclPlcnt of an honor- service men stationed in this
B'nai B'rith, flew in from Talla
hassee for a short stay in Miami.
Daniel Roth, 1045
ary prize. In the senior group, area.
.Esther Levy, representing 'Red Mrs gpivack also
Meridian Cross Sewing, and Mrs. Mane much of her timc tQ
ave.. left Monday for Jackson- Marbach won highest honors.
devotes
Russian
war relief. Beth Jacob Sister-
ville. where he will receive 30 .Miss Ruth Brotman was chair- hood Worknlcn-s circk, and thc
days training to become a petty man of the affair. women's division of thc Ameri-
officer in the shore patrol of the ,...,, T,,,vich rnnoroee
United States navy. A resident Bo^f Scou T'P cwl11 M" T ,,^
leave from the Y. M. H. A. 6 at Guests at the birthday party
4 p. m. for a three-day camping included Mr. and Mrs. Morris
trip to Snapper Creek. Under Dt'cky. Mrs. Lena Rubinstein,
the supervision of Scoutmaster i Mr. and Mrs. P. Lifshitz. Mr. and
Alfred Kahn and Committeeman Mrs. Haimovitz and Lieut, and
Sylvan Wetstein and Nat Gans. Mrs. J. Stover and the lieu-
the various patrols will take tenant's parents.
of Miami Beach for 17 years.
Roth is esteemed loyal knight.
Miami Beach lodge of Elks, and
first-aid instructor in the Ameri-
can Red Cross. As* an occupa-
tional license inspector for Miami
Beach for the past six years, he
doubled the cash revenues of the
city.
New pledges of the Delta Phi
Epsilon sorority of the Univer-
sity of Miami are the Misses Lor-
raine Cooper. Mildred Seitzman.
Hilda Hornstein and Irene But-
ler. Gwendolyn Gordon is presi-
dent of the active chapter.

Among the many Miami girls
in training for the WAVES in
Oklahoma is Miss Shirley Levy,
daughter of Mrs. Bertha Levy.
The
Normandy School 3
RESIDENT AND DAY
FOR BOYS AND GIRLS
1021 Biaritz Drive
Miami Beach
REGISTER NOW!
PHONE 6-1061
LEO HUBERMAN
Headmaster
camp equipment and prepare
their own meals. I. Quartin has
donated a truck for the trip.
Patrol leaders are attending a
Boy Scout leaders' conference
this week-end at Snapper Creek
in preparation for the proposed
trip.

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Silver. 120
S. E. 13th Street, have returned
to the city after a four weeks'
trip through the North.
Buy War Bonds Today
THE LEAR SCHOOL
BOARDING AND
DAY SCHOOL
For Boys and Girls
In Session Now
1010 West Avenue
PHONE 5-0606
IDA R. LEAR
Director
s
PANISH LANGU
909 SECURITY BUILDING-
ag;e studio
------PHONE 9-2186
FELIX RODRIGUEZ, Director
ANNOUNCE THE OPENING
of a BRANCH STUDIO IN
Mercantile National Bank Bldg.
SUITE 501 PHONE 5-6966
420 Lincoln Road Miami Beach
TOWER
THEATRE
6. W. 8th St. at 15th
AIR-CONDITIONED
Fri. and Matinee Only Sat
Oct. 23-24
"Spirit of
Stanford"
WITH
FRANKIE ALBERT
(All-American Halfback)

Starts Sat. Afternoon
at 4:30 and Sun. Thru Wed.
Oct. 24-28
FROM THE
BROADWAY STAGE HIT
IT'S A RIOT!
"My Sister
Eileen"
WITH
ROSALIND RUSSEL
JANET BLAIR
BRIAN AHERNE
EXTRA!
Kate Smith
in "AMERICA SINGS"
Mr. and Mrs. Abe Berkowitz
left Sunday for a honeymoon
trip to New York. Mrs. Berko-
witz is the former Elaine Bergcr.
Thc wedding took place Sunday
afternoon at the home of the
bride's aunt. 1528 Drexel ave.,
Miami Beach. For her gown,
Mrs. Berkowitz chose a powder
blue taffeta with a face veil of
blue caught up with a tiara of
flowers. Her only attendant
was her sister. Toni, who chose
a similar gown of chartreuse
taffeta. Rabbi Moses Meschel-
off performed the ceremony,
which was held indoors. Best
man for his brother was Al Ber-
kowitz. Following the ceremony,
dinner was served in the patio.
On their return to Miami, the
couple will live at 1050 Sixth St.,
Miami Beach. Cantor Maurice
Mamches assisted thc rabbi in the
ceremony.

Miss Lyn Hacker of New York
City arrived yesterday to spend
the week with her parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Harry Hacker. 1483 N.
W. Seventh st. She was accom-
panied by Mrs. Kay Major, a
friend of the Hackers, also of
New York City, who will spend
some time in Miami.

Cantor Abraham D. Wolf of
New York and choir will conduct
the first late Friday night serv-
ices of this season at the Miami
Beach Jewish Center tonight at
8 p. m. "What Are We Fighting
For?" will be thc subject of Dr.
Samuel Bension's sermon. Re-
freshments will be served in the
newly-completed social hall. Mrs.
Daniel Broad and Mrs. Laura
Levin will act as hostesses.

The Brith Milah of the son of
Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Green,
1127 Euclid Avenue, was held
last Sunday at Jackson Memorial
Hospital, with Rabbi S. M.
Machtei officiating. Rabbi Mach-
tei also officiated at the Brith
of the son of Mr. and Mrs. Max
Orovitz, 1867 S. W. 11th Ter-
race, Sunday afternoon at their
home, and the Brith of the son
of Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell Kanter.
945 Euclid Avenue, Tuesday
afternoon at St. Francis Hospital.
Post-War World Organija..
the subject that the mS
Sect,on. National Council
Jewh Women have selei ,
discussion at their meeting ,
year. Mrs. Monte Selig.^
dent, announced at the last m2
jng. Various study gr0ups
being formed to discuss intetn.
tional relations. peaCe probi ,
and consumer research at Z
meetings held the first Wednes
day of each month. Volunteer,
will staff the council office, as
sisting in service to the foreim
born. 3
Miss Bess Spanner has been
appointed to the staff of the
Jewish Welfare Board in Wash-
ington, D. C.

Capt. Harry J. Pells will in.
stall Mrs. Sol Goldstrom as hon-
orary vice president of the
Miami Chapter. National Home
for Jewish Children, at Denver.
Tuesday, Oct. 27. at the Club
Bali at 1:30 p. m. Mrs. Gold-
strom will install the other of-
ficers, who are: President. Mrs.
Marion Ross: first vice president.
Mrs. Myron Newman; second vice
president. Mrs. Perry Bittel;
third vice president. Mrs. Hy
Friedman; recording secretary,
Mrs. Maurice Cohn; correspond-
ing secretary, Mrs. Herman
Wronker; financial secretary,
Mrs. Lee Goudiss; treasurer, Mrs.
Sam Luby; auditor, Mrs, John
Feller; parliamentarian. Mrs.
Jack Steinberg.

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Rubin
returned to Miami Beach yester-
day after a summer vacation in
the North.
WOMEN FOR PART
TIME OCCUPATION
Can work from their own
homes and make surprisingly
large earnings. For full de-
tails write
MAC
co P. O. Box 2973,
Miami, Florida
'''-"'3rWH*

-> _-- v.."r.
&A
^v

^
m.
m
THE 6A ROE N OF MEMORIES
mounT IUB0
FLORIDA'S MOST BEAUTIFUL BURIAL ESTATES
West Flagler Street at 53rd Avenue
ONLY TEN MINUTES FROM THE HEART OF MIAMI
WHY LET A STRANGER SELECT
YOUR BURIAL SITE?
Make sure that your family will be together
foreverby providing your own private family
plot.
No one wants a stranger to make a decision
that affects his family.
Yet. that is exactly what happens to many
families who do not own a private plot.
In the moment of shock and sadness, you would
leave the choice of a burial plot to the first well-
meaning person who came along. How can such
a person make a selection that affects those dear
to you? The choice must be yours and yours
alone.
Don't force your family to buy a plot "blindly."
n't leave yourself in the position of having to
l.n ___ __ *_________A___ ___!___ _ft ftt_~ wn.*Etnt
Don i leave yoursen in me postilion oi nanus *
make a most important decision at the moment
of greatest sadness. Provide now a '
family plot in Mount Nebo.

beautiful
Perpetual Car*
Title Insurance
Lota may be purehaaed
on convenient terma
Business Office 1014 Olympic Bldg. 3-5132
A VISIT WILL CONVINCE YOU
^"t-^v.
m

* j .-v- *>


FRIDAY
OCTOBER 23, 1942
fJenisli noridkiri
PAGE THREE
_ MARCHING MEN
THe"hONOR ROLL OF GREATER MIAMI
,.. .. ; : feature 1h prepared
'!' l?hV r.-latlona committee of
K.'flJ!r Miami Army and Navy
*' of the National Jewish
Commit" e The oommittee ln-
w'far W.lli.m' 1. Boxerman. chair
eludes
nv.ii
Benjamin
Bronston. Fred K.
til Weltzman.
Hknr'het and Pa
Contributions to this .olumn are
_iXSm'il oartlcularly in the form of
Ern'.'ived here from Greater
Blind buys now in the service.)
Thumbnail Sketches
pvt. William Solomon recently
as transferred to Los Angeles,
California. Serving in the infan-
try Bill was previously stationed
at Camp Wolpert, Texas.
Maurice Fisher was ambitious
to get into "this mess". In April
1941 he enlisted in the Canadian
jervice and for six months wus
jtationed in Canada studying ra-
dio mechanics. Although his job
is secret, we have heard that he
is now somewhere in England.
Leonard Fisher, a brother of
Maurice, went to the Midland
Army Flying School back in Jan-
uary He now is 2nd Lt. Leonard
Fisher, bombardier, and is sta-
tioned at Midlan, Texas.
Pvt. Abe Silver has been in the
air force since his induction in
May He spent six months at
Keesler Field, Miss., and is now
stationed at the Savannah Air
Base, completing his training.
Pvt. Robert Levy is a drill in-
structor on the Beach. Robert was
induced into the Air Corps last
October and served his first
nine months in the army at Tort
Knox. Ky.
Pvt. Louis Plotfort has been in
the Air Corps since July 13. Af-
ti r four days at Camp Blanding
he was transferred to St. Peters-
burg.
Pvt. Joseph Fleisher is at Fort
Bragg. N. C. in the Engineers
Corps He served nine months
at Camp Blanding before his re-
cent transfer.
Corp. Melvin Schaffer lias seen
a good deal of the country since
he enlisted in the Air Corps on
December 10. 1941. He has been
at Camp Blanding. Fla., Shep-
pard Field, Texas. McDill Field.
Fla., Lowry Field. Colorado.
Tyndall Field, Panama City, Fla..
and at present is en route to
Boise, Idaho. A private when he
entered the service he rose to
the rank of corporal after gradu-
ation from armorers' and air
gunnery school.
Samuel Schaffer, a brother of
Melvin, entered the Naval Re-
serve last January. He is a ship
fitter, second class, and has been
on the Key West Shore Patrol
duty for the past four months.
He was formerly stationed at
Mayport. Florida.
Corp. Leonard Tobin is now
studying at Officers Candidate
School on the Beach. Leonard
enlisted in the Air Corps last year
and served eleven months at Max-
well Field. He has been doing
radio work in the Morale Divis-
ion.
Capt. William Levitt is com-
mander of his company which is
a branch of map-making. Alter
a year at Ft. Benning. Georgia,
and six months at Ft. Ord. Cali-
fornia, Captain Levitt is now ov-
erseas seeing active duty.
Ben Levitt, William's brother.
now is studying at Annapolis and
his present rank is 1 >t Class Mid-
shipman. After he graduates from
the United States Naval Acad-
emy in '43 he will be a commis-
sioned officer in the navy.
First Lt. Edward S. Roth, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Louis R. Roth.
1031) Lenox Avenue, now is with
the Field Artillery of the Fourth
Corps Area in Atlanta. Ga. Lt.
Roth had been a 2nd lieutenant
due to his R.O.T.C. training and
was called to the colors on July
1, 1941.
THE Y. M. H. A.
NOTES
By HARRY SCHWARTZ
Leslie Bain to Speak Oct. 28 registrations will be closed very
All plans have been completed shortly.
for the book review lecture by
Leslie Balogh Bain on Wednes-
day. October 28. at 8:30 p. m., at
Abe Berkys Defeat Milsteins
"The spirit of the Captain shall
lead us on to victory." This was
Miss Adele Segall
Answering the call for nurses'
aides. Miss Adele Segall. daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Philip Se-
gall. 631 N. E. 57th St.. recently
completed her training course at
Johns Hopkins. Baltimore. Md.
She is now at the Maryland Uni-
versity hospital, where she is
engaged in supply room and
nurses' aide work.
LFLCHHM
ASKS POSH
01
LEGAL NOTICES
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN Till-: CCH'NTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND 1-Mll DADE COUNTY,
Ki.ui:iii.\.In Probate.
No. 1S302
In Re ESTATE OF LOUISA DAY
JAY Deceaned.
To All Creditors and All Peraena Hav-
Ini Clainm or Demand! Against ShI Estate:
You. and each of you, are hereby
notified and required t present any
claims and demands whirh von. or
either of you, may have against the
estate nf LOUISA DAY JAY. de-
ceased, lute ..f Miami, Had.- County,
Plorlda, tn the Hon. w. F. Blanton,
County Judge of Hade County, and
file the same in his nffire in the
County Courthouse In Dads County,
Florida, within ei^ht calendar months
'"in ihe date <>r the first publication
hereof. Said claims or ilemianitK to
contain legal address of the claimant
"'''l !>e sworn to anil presented
aforesaid, or same will be barred.
we Section 12t> of the 1933 Probate
Act.
Date October 1st, A. l>. IB4J.
"MAI! 1.. JAY, ST.. As Admin-
istrator of the Batata of Louisa
v..,. "a* '">' Deceased.
AJf R, SILVER.
Attorney for Administrator.
,,.*' Publication on October Bid,
U !-S-lS.3
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
iv THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
|X AND l.'oR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.- In Probate.
, No. ISSST
'" Re BSTATE OF RUBSEL.Ii G.
BOOKMAKER, Deceased.
io ah Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ii'it Claims or Demands Against
Said Estate:
|".u. ami each of you, are hereby
''"'i ami required to present any
'*hns ,!,.! demands which sou. pr
'yier ot you, may have against the
" of RCSSElXc. SHOEMAKER,
.'."'';'--'l late of Pendleton County.
5*ntueky. to the Hon. W. F. Ulanton.
""inty .1 mm,. of r)ade County, and
!", ''" sa..... h, his office m the
... "JJs Co iithouse in Hade County.
,M"|'I*. wlthh, eight lali-ndav months
'lie date of the first puhllra-
and
will
the
,'"' h.....of. s.iid claims or demands
,.' "mam the 1,-ual address of the
..:t"l:'" and to be sworn to
j tented as aforesaid, or same
'Barred. See Section 120 of
9 Probate Act.
"a *AX it sii.vkk. As Ancillary
Administrator of the Bstate of
Russell C. Shoemaker. De-
li iv '"sed
"*X it BILVBR.
itit '"'" Ancillary Admlnis-
0$X* tJUblloatWB on 23rd day of
tW.ll/l.H_________________
Nnry War StamPs and B-ndS
W and give our men in the
armed forces the help they need.
-Buy War Bonds Today
If
JEWS DIE ON 11
TO NAZI GHETTOS
London (WNS).A consider-
able number of the 20.000 Jews
in France, who were deported
from France to the ghettos and
slave labor camps in Bessarabia,
died en route to their destina-
tion, it was reported this week
in "France." official publication
of the Fighting French.
The Fighting French paper
said that the Jewsmen. women
and childrenwere herded like
cattle aboard sealed freight cars
with woefully inadequate food
and water supplies. No provi-
sions were made for sanitary fa-
cilities. The horrible journey
took two weeks.
When the freight cars reached
Bessarabia and the doors opened,
the report continued, many ot
the Jews were found dead. Most
of the others were ill.
Meanwhile, it was reported
that Jews seized in the last fort-
night in unoccupied France for
deportation to Germany and
other Nazi territories were fet-
tered French police tied the
hands of the Jews with rope be-
fore leading them from their
homes to the railroad stations.
(CONTINUED FROM PAO I 1)
BEFORE YOU BUY
LEON ELKIN
with
METROPOLITAN
LIFE INS. CO.
Not B*t Becaus* Biggest
ButBlgo^t Bcuf B*t
puts all its past suffering into
the shade.
"We again reiterate and em-
phasize our profound sympathy
with the Jewish people. We as-
sure them of our warm support
in their just claims to that moral
and practical recognition which
is due to any histronic ethnic and
cultural group.
"We deplore the incredible
brutality which activates the be-
havior of their Nazi oppressors.
We declare our complete sym-
pathy with the national aspira-
tions of the Jewish people to-
wards collective security at the
end of the present war. Since
a start towards such security was
made in the establishment of the
national homeland in Palestine
for the Jewish people, we re-
affirm our belief that the United
Nations owe to them the con-
tinuance and the maintenance of
this homeland as a relief from
their dreadful and inhuman per-
secutions, as a guarantee of their
cultural unity and continuity, as
an instrument for their legal and
international standing in the
court of nations, and as a restitu-
tion for their national dignity,
honor and creative energies.
"In the post-war period of
world reorganization that lies
ahead, when the United Nations
come to the problems of restor-
ing the integrity of nations and
groups now suffering under the
lash of vile tyranny, we urge that
they remember also the claims
and sufferings of the Jewish
people, and take steps to guar-
antee freedom and equality to
them in their adopted countries,
a well as their independence,
under the Balfour declaration, on
the soil of Palestine."
The AFL sent a special greet-
ing to the Histadruth, Jewish
labor federation in Palestine, as-
suring "maximum international
aid for an early reconstruction
of Jewish nationhood in Pales-
tine."
^.J s^s.~s. _w. .---------,....... -- .-
the "Y." Mr. Bain will review'the theme last Monday night
his book entitled "The War of i when one of the Y.M.H.A. bowl-
Confusion." This affair is given | ing teams captained by Ala'
under the auspices of the Book of I Berkowitz defeated the Marty
the Month Club of the Y.W.H.A.,! Milstcin aggregation for the sea-
of which Mrs. Sidney Stepkin is son bowling championship. This
------------------------------------------- was the play-off game to decide
the season's championship. The
, Abe Berkys were the winners of
the first half and the Marty Mil-
steins the winners of the second
half. Abe Berkowitz who is now
on his honeymoon .sent a wire
to his teammates urging them to
| win and with that in mind, the
team, of which Larry Grossberg
, was acting captain, defeated the
, Marty Milsteins thereby making
I the Abe Berky team the champ-
; ions.
Those on Abe Berk's team
are: Larry Grossberg, Nat Blum-
berg, Jules Wilson, Sam Badanes
and Joe Bermann.
Those on Marty Milstein's
team are: Frank Rose. Murray
Apte. Ted Bramson. Harry Muss
and Martin Schwartz.
The new league will be organ-
ized next week.
Army Girls Elect Officers
The Ahmy Club of the Y. M.
H. A. held their election of new
officers at the "Y" last Tuesday
afternoon and the following win
___ elected to office: President,
, ..... ... Marilyn Gcrstein; vice-president,
chairman. In addition to Mr. Machtei; treasurer, Char-
Bam, Miss Virginia Scaggs will Blumberg, and secretary,
render a vocal solo accompanied Rutn rj.irp
on the piano by Mrs. L. M. Hcald. j {hc season W(,.( ,,,..
William Boxerman will act as i ed
moderator. There is no admis- | Flash'
sion The public isi invited Thc annual dance of the y. M.
Children s Recreation Classes ^^ hag becomc an in.
Maurice Grossman executive sUtution jn lhis area will be heW
director, announces that.classes, sometime in Dect.mber, Al Berko-
in dancing and arts andI crafte j chairman of the danee
will commt-nce next Monday af- u announces. Watch
ternoon. October 26. at 4 o clock m,llnin, fnr ful
Leslie Balogh Bain
All mothers of children from 4
years of age and up who desire
to take advantage of these fine
projects are urged to come here-
with their children at the above
time at the "Y" to register. Mrs.
Blanche Meyers who did such
a wonderful job in the Home
Camp with dancing, has been en-
gaged as dancing instructor and
Miss Dorothy Lightman who was
associated with the Beach Home
Camp will be the instructor in
arts and crafts. The meeting on
Monday afternoon will be infor-
mal. Classes will be organized
and sessions will commence im-
mediately thereafter.
This project is open to children
of members. If you want your
children to take advantage of
these projects, please be here as
these columns for further par-
ticulars.
Attention Victory Belles
In appreciation of the services
that are rendered by the Victory
Belles, the young ladies who
come to the "Y" service men's
dances, a gala cocktail party is
being planned for them. Thc
time and place will be announced
next week.
M. FRIEDMAN
Practical Hebrew Teacher
820 Euclid Avenue
Miami Beach
Beginners to Talmud
Individual Instruction
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I
I

!


PAGE FOUR
** Jfn 1st tier Mian
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2^ ,942
PLANT AND MAIN OFFICES
21 S. W. SECOND AVENUE
P. O. BOX 2973 PHONE 2-1141
Entered as Second Class Matter July 4, 1930, at
the Post Office of Miami, Florida, under
the Act of March 3, 1879
Fred K. Shochot. Managing Editor
One
SUBSCRIPTION
Year, $2.00 Six Months, $1.00
MIAMI, FLORIDA. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23. 1942
CHESHVAN 12, 5703
VOLUME 15 NUMBER 42
-TIDBITS FROM EVERYWHERE-
Mudfy ConfidentH
-By PHTNEAS I. BIRON.
THE B'NAI B'RITH
The B'nai B'rith entered the hundredth
year of its existence this past week. It is an
occasion that well deserves commendation
and celebration but President Monsky has in-
dicated that the festivities which would or-
dinarily attend such an event will be post-
poned to such a time when the country is
restored to peace.
In 1841, when the oldest of Jewish orders
was established, the Jewish population of the
United States was about one-fifth or one-sixth
of the present Jewish population of Palestine.
The whole population of the United States, in
fact, was not more than four or five times that
of the present Jewish population of the United
States. Railroad building on a miniature
scale had just begun. There was no tele-
graph, no electricity. Industry as a whole
was just beginning as far as the United States
was concerned. "Old Hickory" had but re-
cently left the White House. The country
had but a short time previouslyin 1837
undergone the depression of Van Buren's ad-
ministrationand was now beginning to get
back into economic shape. The Mexican and
Civil Wars had not yet been fought. In the
space of this hundred years, not a long time
when we consider that individuals who at-
tain the age of one hundred years are to be
found here and there, and yet in a society, a
century brings an enormous difference. It is
a mistake to think that all the revolutions come
by arms and blood. Time itself brings about
revolutions.
It is a tribute to the original soundness of
the Order B'nai B'rith that while numerous
other orders have risen from time to time, and
passed away, the B'nai B'rith has not only
grown old with dignity but paradoxically we
may say, it has grown younger with the years,
if vigor and vitality are the criterions.
RELIGION AND DEMOCRACY
"Religion, whether it be Protestant, Catholic
or Jewish, holds that the individual is funda-
mentally important because he is the child
of God. It maintains that this status gives
him inherent rights which no man-made gov-
ernment can deny.
"There is great danger that a nation which
fails to maintain an active religion will have
egually little interest in protecting that in-
dividuality of its citizens which is so vital an
attribute of democracy.
"Without religious idealism to give it char-
acter in times of stress, a nation will tend al-
most inevitably to fall under the sway of totali-
tarianism as the easiest method of meeting
emergencies."
Governor Lehman.
ALL-OUT DEVOTION
". All of the ordinary ambitions and
occupations of man's normal life pass into
the background, and the call is urgent for us
to devote ourselves primarilyand well-nigh
exclusivelyto bringing this barborous con-
flict to an end, before it shall have wholly
destroyed or imprisoned the fundamental prin-
ciples upon which our free and liberal civiliza-
tion rests and must rest.
"Great as is the responsibility to be borne
by the older generation, the responsibility
which faces the youth of today is greater still.
They, and not their elders, will have to wrestle
with the grave problems of a world which
must be reconstructed so as to strengthen and
protect the underlying principles of freedom
and liberal thought. It is the fate of these
which is now hanging in the balance. First
must come victory and then a world so or-
ganized and so strengthened as not only to
establish peace, but to protect permanent
peace."
Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler.
AMERICAN LABOR
The recentiy-concluded convention of the
American Federation of Labor, which in-
cludes in its membership several million
American workers, called upon the United
Nations to take adeguate steps to guarantee
to the Jews freedom and eguality in post-war '< TtrvilCiVV REPORT
Europe. The hundreds of union delegates,
PALESTINE ANGLE
Behind David Ben Gurion's threat to guit his party ik
Zionist Laborite group, is his disappointment in his cof
leagues, who have shown themselves reluctant to follow him
in his political feud against Dr. Chaim Weizmann u)T
liam B. Ziff, author of "The Coming Battle of Germany," wa
the off-the-record speaker at a dinner given last week at Ne
York's Waldorf-Astoria by the Committee for a Jewish
Army Yes, that was charming Mrs. Julian Sieroty of
Beverly Hills, California, listening so intently to the stirrin
address She stands in the vanguard of the fighters fa
the Jewish Army idea And that distinguished gentleman
sitting next to dinner chairman Louis Nizer was the Honor-
able Dave Hennen Morris, former American ambassador to
Belgium.
gathered from all parts of the country, de-
manded also that the United Nations extend
to the Jews assurances of "their independence
under the Balfour Declaration on the soil of
Palestine." At a time when half the world
is plunged in darkness and misery, this di-
rective from organized American labor is a
source of courage and inspiration.
The AFL's uneguivocal expression of sym-
pathy and support for the Jewish people is in
the finest traditions of American labor. It
will give renewed courage and strength to the
hundreds of thousands of down-trodden Jews
in Nazi-occupied Europe who now know that
they have gained another powerful ally. The
half million Jews standing guard in Palestine
will be immeasurably heartened by the an-
nouncement that American labor is in com-
plete agreement with their hopes and aspi-
rations.
It has been said that weapons alone will
not win this war; that ideals and principles
are more potent than weapons. The speeches
of Hitler & Co. will not win this war. But the
sense of decency and justice of the free people,
of which the AFL is a notable example, will
inevitably balance the scales for an Allied
victory.
UNITY
"We must not only seek unity within our
national borders, but we must safeguard that
unity with the right motives. Through fear
and hatred of a foreign foe we may secure a
temporary amity between management and
labor, between farm bloc and city consumer,
between negro and white, between Jew and
Gentile, between Romanist and Protestant.
"But fear is a stimulant which eventually
weakens, and hatred can easily become a
boomerang. If all that unites us now as Ameri-
cans is the threat of foreign danger, then be-
ware of what will happen when the war is
over. Our fears and hatreds may turn in on
ourselves and we- shall have a revival of the
Ku Klux Klanism which disgraced our country
after the last war."
Rev. Dr. Ralph W. Sockman.
FRENCH CHURCH PROTESTS VICHY POLICY
"Without ignoring or misunderstanding the
extreme complexity of the situation wherein the
authorities find themselves, the Reformed
Church of France cannot, however, further
remain silent before the sufferings of thou-
sands of human beings who have received
asylum on our soil.
"The Christian Church would have lost
its soul and reason for existence if it did not
maintain that divine law is above all human
contingencies. And that divine law does not
permit that families created by God shall be
broken up, children separated from their
mothers, the right of asylum and its compas-
sion be unrecognized, the respect of the human
person transgressed and beings without de-
fense delivered to tragic fates.
"The church demands of the faithful to
bend with the compassion of the good before
the distress of those who suffer and to intercede
without pause before God, who alone can de-
liver us from all ills."
National Council of the Reformed
Church of France.
Get in the scrap by giving your scrap, and
by buying War Savings Stamps and Bonds
regularly.
Note to those who still grouse about the hospitality
America is showing to refugees from Hitlerism: Sergeant
Julius Schellenberg of Brooklyn, who is one of the little
group of American heroes awarded the Purple Heart decora-
tion for bravery in the Pacific war theatre, came to this coun-
try as a refugee only a few years ago There are any num-
ber of little eating places in Manhattan run by refugees from
Nazi Germany and Austria, but we know of only one actual
night club that belongs to a refugee, and he came here to
escape the Nazi in France He's Arthur Lesser, who had
had a night club in Paris, and, when the Gestapo marched in,
came over here to open "La Vie Parisienne" on East 52nd
Street ... All the entertainers in the club are, appropriately
enough, from France to Korea.
LISTEN HERE
Typical of a New York election campaign is the exchange
of courtesies between candidate Lieutenant Governor Charles
Poletti and Supreme Court Justice Bernard Botein First
the Lieutenant Governor gave a party for Yiddish news-
papermen to enlist their support for Botein And then the
Justice gave a party for Italian newspapermen to enlist their
ditto for Poletti You haven't heard much about the War
Production Board's Joseph D. Weiner, but he's one of its
most important members, serving as deputy director of the
Service of Civilian Supply and chairman of the Committee
on Concentration, which aims at organization of our war
industry at maximum efficiency Hats off to Harry Rosen,
Brooklyn restaurateur, for evolving the bright idea that all
service men in New York on Thanksgiving Day should get
free turkey dinners from the town's eateries Other cities
please copy.
BOOK NEWS
Over a guarter of a million books and more than half a
million magazines have been sent to our soldier boys every-
where by the Victory Pastime Committee of the American
Women's Voluntary Services, reports Mrs. Zachary Gold-
stein, who is in charge of'collecting the reading matter in
New York ... If you want the real inside story of the first
three years of this war, spend two bits for "I Saw It Happen,"
the Pocket Book people's compilation of eye witness accounts
of practically every phase of the conflict, by nineteen people,
who know what they're talking about Franz Werfel's
"Forty Days of Muso Dagh" was a best seller, too, but we
don't believethough we don't have the figures on hand-
that it came up to the record set by his "Song of Bernadette,"
of which 402,000 copies have been printed to date Among
the interesting facts that come to light in Andre Maurois'
autobiography, "I Remember, I Remember." is the revelation
that it was at the reguest of the French censor that he
changed his name from the original Herzog The occasion
was the publication of his "Colonel Bramble" tales during
the first world war The censor felt that the name Herzog
was too German to be signed to a French book about an
Englishman.
BROADWAY LIGHTS
The sensation of the Ballet Theatre season at the Metro-
politan Opera House is the fantasy "Aleko," with settings
and costumes designed by Marc Chagall, who until 1940 was
celebrated throughout France as one of her outstanding sur-
realist artists Ferenc Molnar, famed as a writer of brightly
witty comedies, is turning to the serious drama in there se-
rious times, they tell us, and is working on a play about Na-
poleon The younger generation sure is making its bid
for fame The company that's touring New York's subway
circuit with the play "Stage Door" includes two actresses
rather new to the professionMaxine Marx, daughter of
Chico, and Marily Cantor, daughter of Eddie ... If you want
to get the low-down on the career of Second Avenue's Mollie
Picon, go uptown to 58th Street, where at the theatre that now
bears her name, La Picon is appearing in, of all things, an
autobiographical play ... At least, we think we may call it
that, since it tells Mollie's life story, though its author is not
the star but her husband, Jacob Kalich.
ABOUT PEOPLE
Summoned to Brazil to teach the doctors of that country
the latest technigues of plastic surgery, an art particularly
important in war time, is New York's Dr. Maxwell Maltz
Junior Hadassah-ites throughout the country will be glad to
know that Nell Ziff, their former president, is at this writing
well on the road to recovery from the illness that has had her
hospitalized in Minneapolis Nell, incidentally, will be
(CONTINUED ON PAGE )


rpTDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1942
+Jewish ftoridfon
PAGE FIVE
With the Houses of Worship of the Greater Miami Area
TEMPLE ISRAEL
127 N B. ISth Street
Office Phone 2-7745
BiKKI JACOB H. KAPLAN. Ph-D.
"^ Rabbi Emeritus
,M6 Indian Creek r>Hvefi-1265
"' Miami Beach
0,BnI ('HUMAN A. ZWITMAN
& sat eat
Rabbi Zwltman win be In the Tem-
.1, .wry morning. You may consult
SitTUrn on mattere concerning the
fiSrilh community, 4W your personal
fffiumi You will be assured aym-
pr?h.uc hetrlng and advice, and.
SSS to say each matter will be
ShiIt. strict confidence.
Congregational
"Do not withdraw thyself from
the congregation."Hillel.
Regular services at Temple Is-
rael. 137 N. E. 19th Street. Fri-
day evening, at 8:15 o'clock.
Sabbath Eve Services
Friday evening, Oct. 23. 8.15
p. m., guest speaker will be Rev.
Paul N. Jewett, minister of the
First Methodist Church of South
Miami, who will preach on the
subject. "Foundations of Fellow-
ship.' Services will be conduct-
ed by Rabbi Colman A. Zwitman.
Religious School classes on
Sunday. Oct. 25 at 10 a. m.
Sisterhood Red Cross
Our Sisterhood Red Cross Sew-
ing group appeals for more work-
ers. In order to meet fixed quo-
tas on definite delivery dates,
many more volunteer workers
are needed to supplement the
loyal group which has met
throughout last year, and who
has recently resumed its work.
Memrrs (if the congregation and
the Sisterhood interested in this
project should contact Mrs. Sam
Katz. chairman. 3-3991. The ses-
sions for this month will be held
in the Sisterhood room, on Tues-
day. Oct. 20 and Tuesday. Oct.
2" from 10 a. m. to 4 p. m.
Temple Notes
Aarrngement for inscription of
names on happy or memorial oc-
casions may be made through
Mrs. Jack Bernstein, chairman of
the "Tree of Life" Sisterhood pro-
ject Floral offerings for the
pulpit may be made through
Mrs. Gordon Davis, Sisterhood
chairman Inscription of the
name of departed for eternal re-
membrance on the Temple Me-
morial Plaque may be arranged
for by contacting Harry Nevins,
chairman of the Temple Memo-
rial Plaque committee, or by call-
ing the Temple office Rabbi
Zwitman's current speaking en-
gagements include addresses at
the U. S. Government's Morale
Victory Parade on Saturday, Oct.
1": at the annual Patrol Leaders'
Conference of Dade County
Groups of Boy Scouts of America
on Oct. 25th: at American Jewish
Congress meeting Oct. 26th, and
at the Miami Acacia Club on
Oct. 30th.
In Memoriam
"May the Father of Peace send
peace to all who mourn, and com-
'ort the bereaved among us."
At the Friday evening services
' Oct. 23rd the memory of the
following will be hallowed:
Recently departed: Joseph Za-
ban, brother of Mrs. Michael A.
Cohen; William Solomon, father
01 Mrs. Harold B. Spaet.
Yahrzeits: Dianna Bronston,
mother of Benjamin E. Bronston
and Walter E. Bronston; Tinka
^Plan, aunt of Dr. Jacob H.
Kaplan.
MIAMI JEWISH
ORTHODOX CONG.
MIAMI. FLORIDA
590 S. W. 17th Avenue
Service Schedule
Daily Minyon, 8 a. m.; Mincha.
7 p. m.; Maariv, 7:15 p. m.;
Saturday, 9 a. m.
Services
Daily services at 8 a. m.; Min-
cha at 6:30 p. m.; Saturday at 9
a. m.; Shalosh Sudas, Saturday
at 6. Each week for the next
few weeks another individual
will be in charge.
Congregational
A general meeting of the con-
gregation took place Tuesday
evening at the synagogue at 8
p. m. The election of officers
was held.
Sisterhood
The sisterhood board, at a
meeting held last Tuesday, an-
nounced that the sponsorship of
a card party on October 25 was
indefinitely postponed.
CONGREGATION
BETH DAYID
(Miami's Pioneer Congregation)
I3r. N. W. Third Avenue
MAX Si IA PI ItO. Rabbi
Residence Phone. 2-2176
Mrs. Louis Margulles, Reporting
MIAMI BEACH
JEWISH CENTER
141 Budld Avenue
Miami Beach
DR. SAMUEL BBJNSION, Rabbi
l."36 Jefferson Avenue
Phone 5-47X1 or 5-4782
Miami Beach
Schedule of Services
Daily at 8 a. m. and 6:30 p. m.
Kabbalos Shabbos at 6:30 p. m.
on Fridays.
Late Friday night services at
8 o'clock.
Saturdays at 9 a. m. and Oneg
Shabbos at 6:30 p. m.
Sundays at 8:30 a. m.
Bible Class
Morris Gershon. well known
Hebrew scholar and grammarian,
will resume teaching the Center
Bible Class on Saturday. Octo-
ber 25th at 5:30 p. m.
Appreciation
In recognition of his splendid
services to the Center in particu-
lar and the community generally,
the executive board unanimously
voted a gift of S500.00 to Dr.
Samuel Bension.
The Biblical Bazaar
The bazaar was a great moral
and financial success. Thanks are
due to Miss Ruth Brotman, the
initiator and director of the af-
fair, and the officers and mem-
bers of the Sisterhood, as well as
to the generous merchants who
donated the articles and refresh-
ments for the bazaar.
Spotters
We call upon all members of
the Center and those of our aux-
iliaries to answer the call for
volunteers to serve as spotters
Mr. Edwards at the Miami Beach
(CONTINUED nN PAGE 8)
Best
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SANITARIUM
N. w. 7th St. Ph. 8-7301
care for chronic sick, conva-
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$25 WEEKLY UP
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Permanent Calendar
Daily services at 8:00 a. m. and
6:30 p. m.; late Friday evening
services. 8:15 p. m.; Sabbath ser-
vices, 8:30 a. m.; Junior services,
Saturday 10:30 a. m.; Sh'losh
S'udos, Saturday 6:45 p. m.; He-
brew School, daily 4 to 7 p. m.;
Bar Mitzvah group, Sunday 8:30
a. m.; Sunday School 10:00 a. m.
Sabbath Services
During the services this Satur-
day morning, Sidney, the son of
Mr. and Mrs. Lazar Grossberg,
will become bar mitzvah. A re-
ception will follow immediately
after the services.
Sunday School
Registration for Sunday School
is continuing and classes arc al-
ready in session.
Hebrew School
If you have not done so as yet.
please register your child in one
of the Associated Hebrew Schools
in this area.
Late Friday Evening Services
The eleventh consecutive sc-
ries of late Friday evening ser-
vices conducted by Rabbi Max
Shapiro will begin the first Fri-
day in November, at 8.15 o'clock.
Junior Services
The tenth consecutive Junior
services will begin Saturday
morning. November 7th, at 10:30
o'clock.
Radio Hour
Rabbi Max Shapiro will con-
duct the Jewish Hour over WIOD
Sunday at 4:30 p. m.
Sisterhood Calendar
At the regular Sisterhood meet-
ing held last Wednesday, the fol-
lowing program was outlined for
the month of November: Annual
membership tea. Wednesday af-
ternoon. Nov. 18th: annual food
sale, Wednesday. November 25:
full details will be mentioned in
next week's issue.
CONGREGATION
SHAARAY TEFILA
440 Espanola Way
Miami Beach
CONGREGATION
SCHAAREI ZEDEK
(Gates of Justice)
1545 S. W. Third Street
Miami, Florida
Services
Daily services are held each
morning at 8, each evening at
6:30. Saturday morning at 9
with Shalosh Sudas in the after-
noon between Mincha and
Maariv.
Friday Evening Services
Regular seasonal Friday eve-
ning services will start next Fri-
day evening at the synagogue,
1545 S. W. Third Street. Omitting
this week's service, they will
continue regular henceforth.
Talmud Torah
The Talmud Torah classes are
held daily, Monday through Fri-
day.
Congregational
A general meeting will be held
Thursday evening, October 29, at
which time election of officers
will take place. Refreshments
will be served after the business
is completed. The president has
announced that additional nomi-
nations may be made at that
time.
Ladies' Auxiliary
A card party will be given
Sunday, this coming evening,
October 25, at the synagogue
with Mrs. Max Mintzer, Mrs.
Gershon August and Mrs. Mor-
ris Rappaport as hostesses.
BETH SHOLOM
CENTER
761 41st Street
MIAMI BEACH
Phone S-9793
S. M. MACHTEI, Rabbi
1450 S. W. 17th Terrace. Miami
Phone 2-2579
BETH JACOB
CONGREGATION
Washington Avenue and Third
Street. Miami Reach
MOSES MESCHELOFF, Rabbi
711 Lenox Avenue, Phone 5-1328
MAURICE MAMCHES. Cantor
121 Lennox Ave.. Phone 5-7133
Regular Services
Daily services are held at Beth
Sholom Center at 9 a. m. and 7
p. m. Residents of the area
served by the Center will find
their Kaddish and Yahrzeit needs
satisfied by these services.
Sabbath Services
Kabbolas Shabbos services will
be held at 6:15 p. m. today. The
late Friday evening service will
begin at 8:15. Rabbi S. M. Mach-
tei will preach on "Sand and
Stars." I. Fialkow will lead the
congregational singing. At the
9 a. m. service tomorrow, Rabbi
Machtei will speak on the weekly
portion, using as his subject "My
Bar Mitzvah." Minchoh services
tomorrow at 5:30 p. m.. followed
by the Se'udah Shlishis.
Hospitality
The hostesses at the social
hour to follow the Friday evening
service tonight will be Mrs. Hen-
rietta Berger. representing the
Beth Sholom Sisterhood, and Miss
Eve Naomi Machtei, who will re-
ceive the guests attending the an-
niversary party of her father's
bar mitzvah. (Naomi will act as
proxy for the rabbi's wife who is
visiting in the north.)
Mr. and Mrs. S. Lobel will be
hosts at the Se'udah Shlishis af-
ter Minchah tomorrow. The host-
esses for the Beth Sholom "open
house" on Sunday night will be
Mrs. Kate Greenberg and Mrs.
Henrietta Berger.
Religious School
The Talmud Torah and Sunday
school enrollments are increasing.
Daily classes start at 3:45 p. m.
Sunday school at 10 a. m.
YESHIVA
EDUCATIONAL
CENTER
The Yeshiva Educational Cen-
ter, located at 846 Michigan Ave.,
Miami Beach, conducts daily ser-
vices each week day at 8 a. m.
and Saturdays at 9. Evening ser-
vices at 6:30. Sholash Sudas on
Saturday afternoon. Rabbi J.
Shulman will address the gath-
ering.
Services of the Congregation
Shaaray Tefila. temporarily lo-
cated at 440 Espanola Way. are
scheduled for Friday at 6:30 p. m.
and Saturday at 9 a. m. and 6
p. m. Rabbi Joseph E. Rackov-
sky will speak during the Satur-
day morning services on "The
Wanderer." Shalosh S'udos will
take place Saturday at 6:15 p. m.
Daily services are scheduled for
7:30 a. m. and 6:30 p. m.
The Ein Yakov groups meet
Sunday, Monday and Tuesday at
645 p. m., and the Shulchon
Oruch groups meet Wednesday
and Thursday at 6:45 p. m. All
are welcome.
DRINK
mm
fhi VITAMIN
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Made From Fresh Orange-
Daily Synagogue Services
Shachriss, 8 a. m.; Mincha,
6:30 p. m.; Maariv, 7:15 p. m.
Sabbath
Shachriss. 9 a. m.; Junior Con-
gregation. 9 a. m.; Mincha. 6:30
p. m.; Shalosh S'oodoss. 6:45
p. m.; Maariv. 7:25 p. m.
Sermon
Rabbi Mcscheloff will preach
Saturday morning. He will speak
on "The Portion of the Week"
at Shalosh S'oodoss. Cantor Mau-
rice Mamches will chant the
morning services.
Religious School
Sunday sessions. 10 a. m. to
noon; faculty meeting, Sunday
noon to 12:30 p. m.; daily ses-
sions. 4 to 7 p. m.; registration,
daily from 5 to 7 p. m.
Service Men's Club
Open house and refreshments
daily from 7 to 11 p. m.
Military minyan, Sunday at 9
a. m.
Service Men's Wives' Club,
daily from noon to 3 p. m.
Grand How-Do-You-Do
The entire faculty, board of
directors and board of education
will meet with the religious
school children and their parents
Sunday morning at 11 o'clock. A
short program and a few brief
greetings will precede the serv-
ing of refreshments at this in-
formal get-together. The public
is invited.
Daughters of Israel
Daughters of Israel will meet
Saturday at 8:30 a. m. to discuss
plans for the Women's Club
building. This is a Greater Mi-
ami organization. All men and
women are invited to attend.
CONG. BETH ABRAHAM
Week-end services will be held
Friday at 6:30 p. m. and Satur-
day at 8:30 a. m. at the syna-
gogue, 535 N. W. Fifth Avenue,
with Rabbi H. M. Kagan speak-
ing on "The Wandering Jew."
Mincha services at 6 p. m. fol-
lowed by Shala Sudas in charge
of Rabbi H. M. Kagan. Refresh-
ments will follow. Everyone is
invited.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1801 South Andrews Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
RAItBI SAMUEL IIALEVI BARON
Telephone 141S
705 S. E. 9th Street
Sabbath services Friday at 8
p. m. with sermon by the rabbi.
Religious school, Sunday at
10:30 a. m.
Sisterhood benefit bridge lun-
cheon Monday at 1 p. m. at the
Southern Dairies hostess room.
Weekly sewing session for the
Red Cross. British War Relief
Society, and Bundles for America
Tuesday from 12:30 to 5 p. m.
Service men are welcome to all
Temple services.
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I

I
'<
i


PAGE SIX
+Jeistfk>ridiiftn
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2. ^
ADDITIONAL SOCIETY
A special meeting of the
Workmen's Circle. Branch 692.
will be held Sunday at 25 Wash-
ington Avenue. Miami Beach, at
5 p. m. to discuss the sick benefit
program of the organization.
0
Miss Gertrude Steiner. head of
the Girl Scouts of Greater Miami,
was recently married to Arthur
Crimmons. The couple will make
their home in Miami.

Mr. and Mrs. Gus Trau re-
turned from the North last week
to reopen their home for the
winter.

"Being Above the Battle and
Yet In It" will be the subject of
the address by Rabbi Colman \
Zwitman at the meeting of the
Greater Miami Chapter. Women's
Division, American Jewish Con-
gress, Monday at the Elks Lodge,
720 West Avenue, Miami Beach,
at 1:30 p. m. Presiding at the
meeting will be Mrs. S. H. Lut-
sky. vice president of the group.
Mrs. Lewis Glasser. program
chairman, will present M. Sweit-
zer, who will play the accordian.
Mrs. Bruce Levey will make a
brief membership talk. Follow-
ing the program refreshments
will be served.

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Baron.
1367 S. W. 18th Street, announce
the birth of a son at Jackson
Memorial Hospital.
STRICTLY
Tidbits from Everywhere
by PHINEAS J. BIRON
CHURCH OFFICIAL RESIGNS
POST OVER ANTI-SEMITISM
ISTANBUL (WNS>The patri-
arch of the Greek Orthodox
Church in Rumania. Nikodem,
has resigned as head of the
church, in protest against the
systematic pogroms conducted
against the Jews of Rumania, it
MRS. JOHN MEYER
and FAMILY
gratefully acknowledge the
receipt of the numerous
telegrams and letters of
condolence on the loss of
our beloved husband and
father.
Sincerely,
MRS. JOHN MEYER,
LEO MEYER.
BARON De HIRSCH
MEYER
was reported here this week
In recent months. it was
learned, Patriarch Nikodem had
sent several letters of protest t"
anti-Semitic Premier Ion Anto-
nescu in which the church leader
pleaded for a modification of Ru-
mania's restrictions against the
Jews. He condemned also the
practice of seizing Jews during
the night for compulsory labor
service.
Premier Antonescu. whose dic-
tatorship has witnessed the blood-
iest anti-Jewish pogroms in mod-
ern history, ignored the patri-
arch's appeals. As a matter oi
fact, during this period, the per-
secution of Jews was intensified.
Buy War Bonds and Stamps and
Your Tomorrow.
Buy War Bonds and Stamps and
Your Tomorrow.
Buv Deiense Bonds Today.
"THREE O'CLOCK .
AND I HAVEN'T SLEPT A WINK"
WAKEFUL NIGHTS how the time drags!
Minutes seem like hours, we worry over things
done and left undone. After such a night, we get
up in the morning more tired than when we went
to bed. Nervous Tension causes many a wakeful
night and wakeful nights are likely to cause Ner-
vous Tension. Next time you feel Nervous and
Keyed Up or begin to toss, tumble and worry after
you get to bed try
DR. MILES NERVINE
l Liquid or Effervescent Tablets)
DR. MILES NERVINE helps to ease Nervous Tension to permit re-
freshing sleep. When you are Keyed I'p. Cranky. Fidgety. Wakeful, take
Dr. Miles Nervine. Try it for Nervous Headache and Nervous Indigestion.
Get Dr. Miles Nervine at your drug store. Effervescent Tablets. Large
Package la*. Small Package 35<; Liquid. Large Bottle S1.00. Small Bottle
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D R .
MILES
(CONTINUED FROM PAGE *1
a arried before the year is over.
ti Rabbi Maurice Pekaxsky. head
of the Hillel Foundation at
ivestern I' n \ v e r s i t ya
young man who has our heartiest
Stratu .::. ns Congratula-
tions also I ":': U Kreis'.er. now
a full-fledged American ci1
Harry R el ng '.earned.
as we told you a few columns
ag tl al as the first
; .-.-> ngei : ak< tl i trans-At-
lantic plant trip had
I : throui an avi-
ation circles
Air C< rps is 1
and has start* 1
gymnasium to gel
the pink of cor But
report is thai s far Harry. *'h<
isn't quite as y ung as 1
be, has sue
a ligament.
WEEKLY GIGGLE
Winchell relates thi
the Nazi in a Berlin resta
who ordered a big, ju J
with all the trimmings But
the waiter interrupted his de-
scription "Are you ordering,"
he asked, "or reminiscing'.'"
for SAFETY...
and Liberal Returns
Place Your Funds
In
LtAE PEHBIAL
' or MIAMI
A SAVINGS INSTITUTION
Which has never paid less than
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RESOURCES OVER
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J. M. LIPTON. President
45 NORTHEAST FIRST AVENUE
Buy Your War Savings Bonds Here
Arthur D. Greenleigh
Announcement of the resigna-
tion of Arthur D. Greenleigh
from his position as assistant ex-
ecutive director of the Nationa1
Refugee Service, to accept an
executive post with the opera-
tions division of the War Man-
power Commission, was made
Wednesday, Oct. 14. by William
Rosen wa Id, president ot the
refugee aid organization.
Mr. Greenleigh. who served as
acting executive director of tin-
National Refugee Service from
February. 1941. to July of that
year, was a member of the
agency's executive staff sinct
1939. In his new post he
comes an aide to Gen. Frank Mc-
Sherry of the War Manpowi i
Commission and will direct
highly important operatioi
facilitating the utilization ot
manpower resources in the
try's production effort.
PAIiMJE]
Funeral.Chajpj
200IW, FLAGIER ST.
AMBULANCE
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IO% SAVED
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TAKEN BY THE
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BUY WAR BONDS
PALM BEACH
JEWISH FLORIDIAN OFFICE. 226 S. OLIVE STRFFT
IN THE FOX BUILDING
MRS. MARY SCHREBNICK, Representative
At the first annual meeting of
the Beth El Sisterhood commit-
tees were appointed and include
Mrs. Al Moss, Sunday school;
Mrs. Helen Freeman, ways and
means committee. Sunday school
teachers for the coming year in-
clude Mrs. Ben Ryder. Mrs. Ira
May. Mrs. J. Sheppard, Mrs. Al
Wacksman, Mrs. Jack Kappner
and Mrs. Manuel Greenstein.
Plans were made for a luncheon
to be held Nov. 10.
Beth Israel Sisterhood held
their monthly card party Sun-
day night. Mrs. J. Leo Rader
served as hostess.
Lou Halpern is now at Camp
Blanding, where he was inducted
as a member of the armed
forces.
Friday night services at Beth
F.l were conducted by Rabbi
Manuel Greenstein, assisted by
A. Levin as cantor.
Mr, and Mrs. J. Leo Rader of
Belle Glade spent the week-end
at We.-t Palm Beach.
s( rvici s al Beth Israel are con-
lucted weekly by Dr. Carl N.
Herman.
Miss Millicent Gruncr Was ,h
rec.pient of a surprise ^
given by her mother at t?
Road0' rCSidCnce on Washm6S
Sorority members were guest,
at the affair held Oct. 19 R
freshments were served *'
Friends of Mrs. Esther Hal-
pern will be pleased to lcarn
that she is convalescing at St
Mary's Hospital following a major
operation.
Appropriation of $150 for a
milk fund for local needy school
children was approved by B'nai
B'rith Lodge last Tuesday nigh;
Sale of another $1,000 in war
bonds was reported, boosting the
lodge total to $21,000.
An open discussion of current
events was participated in by
Ezra Brahms. Harry Halpern, Joe
Lesser. Sam Linder, Ben Wolf-
son. Dan Goodmark and Charles
Kaimutz.
AMBULANCE SERVICE
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West Palm Beach, Florida
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I

Left to right: General Frank T. Hines, Administrator of Vet'ra"'
Affaire, National Commander Benjamin Kaufman, Congressional j
of Honor holder, Lieutenant General Brehon 8omervell, Chief of u-
Army Services of Supply.
Scranton, Pa.General Brehon
SomerTell, chief of the Army Serv-
ices of Supply, addressing the 47th
Annual National Convention of the
Jewish War Veteran* of the U. S.,
characterised aa traitors aad sabo-
teurs those who today preach race
r rliiou. hatred.
Oeeral nines. Administrator of
Veteran* Affairs, who was ssade
an honorary member of J-*\ "
stressed the seriousness and a
termination of the young men no
in the armed forces.
This convention reelected bw
jamln Kaufman as national com-
mander by acclamation sod
on record as favoring reducUo
If years the JnUnum draft -


fHlDAY,
OCTOBER 23, 1942
TO PALESTINE
,C0NTINUED FROM PAGE 1)
r oellcr of Cicinnnati was re-
lated chairman of the ZOA's
national administrative council.
Mrs David de Sola Pool of
Mew York City was re-elected as
president of Hadassah^ Mrs.
Pool who will serve as Hadassah
nresi'dcnt for the third consecu-
m-e year, was prevailed upon to
i accept the nomination after she
-ad announced that she would
! run for re-election because
jhe Hadassah convention had
[ adopted the resolution repudiat-
n. tbe Ichud program. Mrs. Pool
MS one of the Hadassah leaders
who sought to have the conven-
tion endorse the Ichud program
as announced in Palestine.
The Hadassah convention
I adopted a budget of $1,210,000
for its war emergency and regu-
lar health program, child wel-
fare, feeding, refugee and land
reclamation work in Palestine.
The delegates also voted to send
$5,000 as a gift to Miss Henrietta
Sz'old, 82-year-old founder of
Hadassah, now in Jerusalem, "to
be used for any project which
she wishes to further there."
The joint closing session of the
two organizations was addressed
by Mayor La Guardia, Mrs. Pool,
Louis Lipsky. former president
of the ZOA, and Dr. Alexander
Loudon. Netherlands ambassador
to the United States. Dr. Stephen
S. Wise presided. Mr. Loudon
told the mass meeting that "in
that reconstructed Dutch house
after the war, the Jews of Hol-
land, our Jews, will have their
place again." Alluding to the
Zionist program for a Jewish na-
tional home in Palestine, the
The United States Govern-
ment Having Taken Over His
Present Offices
DR. JOSEPH B. MARGOLIS
announces the
REMOVAL OF HIS OFFICE
to
311 Lincoln Road
Albion Bldg., Suite 309
MIAMI BEACH
For the Practice of
General Dentistry
I WANT MY MILK
Estab.
1824
And Be Sure It'i
FLORIDA
DAIRIES
HOMOGENIZED
Vitamin "D" MUk
"Milk Products"
Dacro Protected
TEL. 2-2621
Greater Miami Delivery
VUit Our Farm at
6200 N. W. 32nd Street
| Netherlands diplomat said- "We
sympathetically understand what
a home means; what we can do
| we will do."
Mr. Lipsky assailed the failure
of Britain to fulfill its declara-
tions for the establishment of a
Jewish national home in Pairs-
tine. "England," he said, "has
used its authority to liquidate its
covenant and its promise. It
has rejected all appeals from its
decision. It has deprived mem.
bers of the League of Nations of
the right to intervene in an issue
in which they were parties. It
has acted as sole judge in a mat-
ter of self-interest."
A call for a "bold and daring |
program" on the part of Ameri-
can Zionists that would evisage
the settlement in Palestine upon
the conclusion of the war. of be-
tween two and three million
Jews, coupled with the demand
for the establishment of Pales-
tine as "an independent and un-
fettered Jewish Commonwealth"
was the major note in the key-
note address of Judge Louis E.
Levinthal, president of the ZOA.
In his presidential address. I
Judge Levinthal declared that
"we must think and speak in |
terms of a Palestine in which'
full control and supervision of
imagination will be in the hands
of the Jews and of the Jews
alone, for they have shown in
Palestine their capacity for self-
government. Zionists, he added,
demanded the establishment of
Palestine as a Jewish Common-
wealth, entirely independent and
unfettered, bound only by those
reservations which the post-war
world may determine to apply
to all nations." They would not
agree, he declared, to any pro-
posals which would place "the
Jewish Homeland" in a status of
"constitutional inferiority" to
other National Homelands.
Recent proposals for the set-
ting up of Palestine as a bi-
national state were characterized
by Judge Levinthal as but a con-
tinuation of the process of "whit-
tling down on the pledges made
to the Jewish people."
Touching on the proposal for
a Jewish army, Judge Levinthal
declared that it was "painful"
for him as "a sincere admirer of
the British people to be com-
pelled to record our keen disap-
pointment. our deep chagrin at
the humiliating manner in which
the British government has re-
jected our persistent demand for
the right to organize a distinct
Jewish military force." The con-
cession made by the British of
joint Arab-Jewish battalions or
regiments, ho described as "mere-
ly a palliative, stop-gap but a
grudging admission of the vali-
dity of our demand."
"We Zionists know that a
homeland." said Judge Levin-
thal. "is not a homeland unless
its men and women have the
right to fight for it in their own
name. The Jews of Palestine do
not fear invasion or death, but
they claim their right, the most
fundamental right of human be-
ings, go down if need be, fight-
ing with flag in hand. But we
are proud of the fact that in
spite of the cloak of anonymity
which has been thrown over the
Palestinian Jewish soldiers and
sailors, in spite of all the impe-
diments placed in the path of
self-defense, the leaders of our
movement have permitted no ob-
stacle to curtail Jewish Pales-
tine's all-out war effort."
Declaring that "America fight-
ing to make the world a decent
place in which to live inter-
ested in seeing that the Jewish
People shall have the occasion
and opportunity to develop their
civilization in Palestine." Sena or
Alben W. Berkley, majority lead,
er of the United States Senate
told the delegates that their
present labors in Palestine wouM
have an influence at the Peace
TaSe senator spoke at a lunch-
*'JewistiihrkHan
PAGE SEVEN
JITTERY OVER INVASION
NAZIS PERSECUTE JEWS
London (WNS)Nazi authori-
ties in the occupied countries. Jit-
j tery over the prospects of an
j Allie% invasion, have intensified
their persecution of Jews, ac-
1 cording to reports received here.
! The Free Belgian News Agency
| reported this week that 600 Jews
had been sent from their homes
in Brussels to the French coast,
where they were put to work
as slave laborers on anti-invasion
fortification.
Reports from occupied Norway
stated that Premier Quisling's
anti-Jewish program had taken
a violent turn and the Jewish
population was said to be in a
state of panic. All Jews under
treatment in Norwegian sani-
tariums were ordered expelled
from the institutions.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
By invitation of the executive
director of the United Palestine
Appeal, Henry Montor, Rabbi
Max Shapiro will serve as official
representative of the "Speakers'
Bureau" in the southeastern area
for the coming year for that or-
ganization.
BEACH CHAPLAIN
1
cial floating of a Zionist $2,500,-
000 loan for the purchase of new
land tracts in Palestine in order
to meet the war-time needs of
the population and the military
forces in the Holy Land and to
prepare the ground for large-
scale Jewish colonization.
Speaking of the launching of
a S2.500.000 loan for the acquis-
tion of more land in Palestine,
Senator Barkeley declared that
this was "desirable not only for
the immediate benefit of home-
less Jews throughout Europe, but
it seems to me essential in -the
preparation of the case of Pales-
tine and the Jews located there
before the peace conference which
must ensue following the victory
which we anticipate on the part
of the United Nations."
Stressing the "full support of
its membership in the total war
effort," the ZOA convention
pledged "To continue to increase
even further the participation"
in all branches of civil defense.
Another resolution expressed
"pride in the ever-increasing
numbers of members of the
Zionist Organization of America
and the sons and daughters of
members now serving in the
armed forces of our country." It
was resolved that the dues of
all such members be waived for
the duration of the war.
The convention also went on
record demanding the creation
of a Jewish army in Palestine.
Chaplain Camillus Angel, first
Jewish Army chaplain to be sta-
tioned in this area, arrived here
to assume his duties last week.
During his rabbinical experi-
ences, Rabbi Angel has served
Jewish congregations in such
widely scattered points as St.
George's Settlement synagogue
in London, Mt. Sinai temple
in Texarkana, Texas, and St.
Charles, La. When commissioned
as regimental chaplain in July
of this year, he was assigned to
the 134th regiment of the 36th
BEING MADE OF
MAIL DELIVERIES
Due to conditions brought
about by the war, a reorganiza-
tion is being made of the city
delivery service in the Miami
area. The reorganized service
will provide:
Two deliveries of mail a day
in the down-town business area,
where the volume of mail is
heavy.
One delivery of mail a day will
be provided in all residential
areas.
Effective November 1, mail
deliveries will be reduced from
three to two trips a day in the
down-town district. Carriers will
leave on the first trip at ap-
proximately 8 a. m., and on the
second trip at approximately
12:40 p. m.
The one delivery in the resi-
dential areas will leave the post
office at approximately 8 a. m.;
mail on approximately 75 per
cent of the routes will be de-
livered by or before 12 noon, the
remaining 25 per cent of the
routes will receive service in the
afternoon. In order to utilize
fully the manpower in the city
delivery service under the one-
trip-a-day arrangement, it is
necessary to make a part of the
deliveries in the afternoon.
Business establishments located
in residential territory will have
but one delivery of mail each
day. If it is necessary for a busi-
ness establishment or an indi-
vidual to receive mail more than
one time a day. or at an hour
infantry division. The propor-
tion of Jewish boys there ran! earlier than the revised delivery
about one per cent and most of schedules will provide, it is sug-
his energies were bent upon min- gested that the business estab-
istering to Catholic and Protes- j lishment or individual rent a post
tant soldiers. The chaplain was I office box at the post office sta-
on maneuvers shortly before as- tion or branch nearest his ad-
suming his new post with head- dress, or at the main post office
quarters in Town House.
Asked about his plans for the
Greater Miami area. Chaplain
Angel stated that for an indefi-
nite period of time he would
conduct services each Friday
evening in Beth Jacob Congre-
gation on the Beach. These will
be held exclusively for the serv-
ice men. At a later date, the
place of worship will be rotated
so that all synagogues on the
Beach are utilized. In this man-
ner, a maximum number of men
will be reached because of the
convenience of each location for
a particular group of men.
In addition, services will take
53,000 JEWS ARE KILLED IN
NAZI INVASION OF AUSTRIA
WASHINGTON (WNS)More
than 53,000 Austrian Jews have
been killed since the Nazi inva-
sion of Austria, it was reported
by Archduke Otto, pretender to
the throne of Austria, in an ad-
dress to the National Council of
Jewish Women.
The archduke, who said he was
confident about the equal status
of Jews in post-war Europe, de-
clared: "We Austrians believe
that before God and the nation
all men are equal. We make no
racial or religious distinctions.
in Miami.
If additional information re-
garding the reorganized city de-
livery service is needed, patrons
should see the superintendent of
the post office station or branch
nearest them, or call at Room 103.
Federal Building, Miami.
It is believed that everyone af-
fected will fully appreciate the
urgent need for conservation of
manpower, and will readjust
their affairs to conform with the
new delivery schedules.
It will not be possible to devi-
ate from the fixed schedules or
to make exceptions that would
disturb the general scheme of
place at the Roney-Plaza hotel | the reorganized delivery service.
each Sunday morning for those ---------------------------------------
at the Beach Replacement center I in the morning so that those who
and the Officers' Candidate [must report for regular duty will
school. Heretofore no worship. be able to do so without diffi-
has been possible for the Jewish culty.
men of the orthodox faith who
wish to meet early Saturday
morning. If sufficient interest
is manifested. Chaplain Angel
will have a minyan at 6 o'clock
Chaplain Angel hopes to ex-
tend his usefulness beyond the
confines of Greater Miami. He
will make occasional trips to
outside areas.
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STOCKHOLM (WNS) Nazi
Gestapo Chief Himmler, who
visited Italy recently in an at-
tempt to bolster Italy's drooping
morale, reproached Premier Mus-
solini for his "weak" anti-Semitic
program, the Swedish newspaper
Nydag reported this week.
"Butcher" Himmler was re-
Dorted to have complained to II
Duce that Italy's anti-Jewish
legislation was inadequate and
to have demanded that more
stringent anti-Jewish laws be
introduced immediately. At the
Name time Himmler demanded
that Mussolini take steps to
stamp out the growing sabotage
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PAGE EIGHT
vJewlstnoridfon
FRIDAY, OCTOBER
23. 1942
FROM THE
SWIVEL
CHAIR
William
I.
Boxerman
The viiw exprtMed by Mr. Boxer-
mAii arc his own and do not nec-
enmrily represent the opinion of
Th Jewish Florldlan.
"To All the Gallant Men"
There are many idealists for
whom the world of reality does
not exist. There are also a few
men of vision who do not alone
spin laudable theories but put
them to the test in actual prac-
tice. To this latter rare company
of mortals add the name of Willis
Thornton.
Who is Thornton and why do
we single him out as for mention?
Not so many moons ago he was
just plain Mr. Willis Thornton,
distinguished student of American
history and chief editorial writer
of Newspaper Enterprise Asso-
ciation. In his love for America
and the democratic ideal he re-
cently wrote a book called "Al-
manac for Americans" which he
dedicated, in a spirit characteristic
of his faith, "to all the gallant
men and women whose past
struggles helped to make Ameri-
can life good, and to all those
today who seek to make it bet-
ter."
Crowded Story of America
We chanced to read Mr. Thorn-
ton^ opus and were carried
away by the patriotic fervor mo-
tivating the author. In review-
ing it for the Miami Daily News
we had occasion to say. in part:
"Almanac for Americans" should
have definite value in the pub-
lic schools and for those civic \
groups, which, as a means of fos-1
tering morale in the war effort,'
plan patriotic events We feel j
that the writer has achieved his ,
stated purpose, to give to many ,
REAL ESTATE
HOMES. MIAMI BEACH
WAR BONDS
AND
REAL ESTATE
ALONG WITH WAR
BONDS REAL ESTATE IS
THE SAFEST WARTIME
INVESTMENT.
ITS SAFE, profitable and
patriotic to own your own
home. President Roosevelt
says: "Each home has given
an American family a stake
in its own country."
TODAY I am selling more
homes than ever before be-
cause war conditions and
readjustments in Miami
Beach compelled a number
of owners to sell. My ad-
vertisements of these ex-
c'usive listings enabled a
good many homeseekers. es-
Jecially loenl business peo.
pie, to secure homes they
wanted -it pricei way below
their true value.
NEW EXCLUSIVE list-
ings re c c rn i n g into my Of
fee ,J.i l -. "liny of them at
prices fiat probably will
never be duplicated again.
MY ADVICE IS BUY
NOW ^ the safest invest-
ment for todiy and for the
years to come. It's SAFE,
(-ROFITAQLE and PATRI-
OTIC to own your own
home.
Buy War Bonds for Peace
Buy a Home for Happiness
B. E. BRONSTON
REALTOR
TRUSTWORTHY
SERVICE'-
605 Lincoln Road, Ph. 5-5868
the sense of fullness of the crowd-
ed story of America And we
meant every word of it!
This week's mail bag brings us
a letter from Willis Thornton,
now Corporal Thornton, stationed
with the Army Air Force Tech-
nical Command at a midwestern
training center. He didn't get
there via the draft, either. But
let part of his letter to us speak
for itself.
"Dream. Work, and Sweat"
"My publisher has just sent on
to me a clipping of your review
of "Almanac for Americans" .
I'd like to express my apprecia-
tion of a very sympathetic re-
view which divined very clearly
just what I was driving at ... I
thought it might amuse you to
know that I enlisted last Febru-
ary, in the army, although I'm
an old dodderer of 42 and a vet-
eran of the other war ... I now
am stationed at ---... So my
aim. at least, has been to prac-
tice what I preach."
No, Corporal Thornton, we
were not '"amused" when we
learned of your presence in the
army We were deeply im-
pressed with the depth of your
convictions Only men with
your spirit can win this war .
and, what is infinitely more im-
portant, the kind of peace that
| must follow Only men like
1 you who dream and work and
I sweat "to bring to still greater
I fruition the bright promise that
' is America" arc worthy of its
heritage.
Mirror of the Past
Particularly timely during this
| anniversary year is "The Jews in
Spain," a two-volume history by
Dr. Abraham A. Neuman. presi-
dent of Dropsie College Is-
sued by the Jewish Publication
of Philadelphia (S2.50 per vol-
ume; S5.00 per set) this gives a
graphic picture of the social, po-
litical and cultural life of the
Jews during the middle ages.
Too many histories are written
in a dry-as-dust textbook style
. Notable exceptions are such
works as those of Dr. Salo Baron
of Columbia University (whom
we had as our instructor during
graduate school days) and the
present account by Dr. Neuman
... As we read, there passes
in review a moving panorama of
characters and movements in
Jewish life of the period under
consideration We view men
of all classes, scholars and mer-
chants, rabbis and financiers, the
good and the bad, wise men and
scoundrels, saints and sinners.
The Cherem
Because of our concern about
the internal Jewish problems of
today we found especially fasci-
nating those portions of Dr.
Neuman's work dealing with the
kahal and the Jewish courts .
We have remarked before that
there could be more house-
cleaning within the Jewish com-
munity if some such moral
weapons as the cherem of the!
middle ages could be resurrected
MIAMI JEWISH BEACH CENTER
(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6
Key Shop, 804 5th St. will be
glad to explain the work to any-
one calling upon him. Men and
women of all ages arc eligible.
Service Men Socials
With the increased facilities
which the new social hall af-
fords the Center. Tuesday night
socials and entertainments will
be better than ever. Only men
in uniform and young ladies will-
ing to serve as dancing partners
will be admitted. Refreshments
are served through the courtesy
of the Sisterhood.
Bar Mitzva
The bar mitzva of Eugene
ChekanOW will be celebrated at
jthe Center Synagogue on Satur-
iday, Oct. 24 at 9 a. m. We ex-
tend heartiest congratulations to
the boy and his family.
. Once upon a time in Spain,
as Dr. Neuman well points out.
the cherem was a powerful
means of whipping recalcitrant
Jews, who had violated the good
taste of the Jewish community
into line Invoking the che-
rem meant virtual excommuni-
cation of the culprit by the com-
munity.
Picture, if you can. the se-
verest form of the cherem in
which "no one was permitted to
teach the culprit, nor was he
permitted to engage in study and
have the solace of books: he was
not to be engaged for hire by a
co-religionist, nor was any Jew
permitted to work for him .
Only if he faced starvation was
it permitted to help him with
the bare necessities of life .
The instrument of excommuni-
cation served efficiently as a
means of discipline of its flexi-
bility ... It could be made se-
vere or light, permanent or tem-
porary."
Yes, as Dr. Neuman shows,
these internal controls were of
inestimable value Those of
us in Jewish communal life to-
day can learn much about this
and other means of community
organization from reading "The
Jews in Spain."
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Al iVERTISKMENT
KENHOLZ
KOSHER MEAT PRODUCTS
Incorporated
1343 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
PHONE 5-39S2
Is Under the personal
supervision of
Rabbil Joseph E. Rackoveky
a member of
Union of Orthodox Ra'-bis
of America
and the
Histadruth Karcbonim
Any Jew desiring Kosher
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1M 8. W. mih Paarl '-'.ml. Flor!*.
Phone 4-1659
We've been
remind you of
"musts."
While there have been a num-
ber of volunteer blood donors
from Sholem Lodge, there haven't
been enough. The group, headed
. by Louis Heiman, will present
themselves to give a pint of blood
each.
More volunteers are needed.
More blood plasma must be
stocked. Are you in a position
to be a blood donor? Call B'nai
B'rith office. 3-6391, and arrange
to go with other members of
Sholem Lodge when they go.
Keys. That should be suffi-
cient reminder that the drive is
on in full swing to collect all keys
not actually in use for the metals
they contain. The A.Z.A.'s are
working with Sholem Lodge to
collect keys, and if you will call
the B.B. office and leave a mes-
sage, your surplus keys will be
picked up. Just leave them in a
handy place.
Send-Off Party. This is a head-
ing, but it doesn't tell the whole
story. Dade County Draft Board
No 4 wrote to Mr. Fennell, chair-
man of the Dade County Defense
Council Morale Division that
"our" send-off party was con-
ducted in an exemplary manner.
" ... no man was missed, and
there was no confusion. We not-
ed that the reaction of the men
was that of the spirit of good
comradeship," wrote Mrs. Storm,
chief clerk of the board.
Mr. Fennell wrote to Louis
Hemian and calling attention to
the fact that our organization
should be pleased with the letter
sent by the draft board, a copy of
which he included. When he
tells us that this was the first
letter of its kind received from
the draft board, and aded to
this is the fact that many organi-
zations take turns in holding
send-off parties, you know that
Sholem Lodge B'nai B'rith ex-
celled. They want us to do it
again.
We've written the foregoing
itemsand we're tired. Not with
the effort, because that was
slight. We can't put the words i
together that will give items I
their proper importance. That I
is our fault, not yours. If we
are too insistent, you will be of-
fended. If we omit matters about i
which we have written before. !
we would be derelict in our duty.
And we are trying to Bit >
wholehearted support ?
project that even remotely COn
corns the war. on"
We can't help mulling over
; events that happened m lnc J
few days In retrospect we saw
four million men leave homes
and go to camps and training sb
tions throughout the country w
arc going to tell you about one
because he is symblic of mil'
hons who went before him. and
the millions who are to follow
We'll probably violate every rule
of reporting, for with the facts
will go personal feeling.
So we're going to tell you about
Sol D. Horowitz, a Ben B'rith
and probably not a very good one
as service to the organization
goes; not an intellectual giant.
but who amongst us is? And al-
though an associate judge at the
age of 26, not a Max D. Steue-r as
a lawyer. But were telling you
about Sol. because there an- so
many like him.
We've been associated with Sol,
and hence shouldn't write about
him. We know his virtues and
his faults. He never harmed
anyone in his life! And he en-
listed in the Army. We know
his parents, and his wife and
child. We have been witness to
the stricken, tight-lipped look on
his father's faceand viewed the
picture of bewilderment, that is
his wife. His child is too young
to understand.
We have seen him set his house
in order. We know his pride of
ownership, but we have seen his
worldly goods scattered, his of-
fice left a shellhe has scrapped
everything, is leaving everybody
near and dear to him. and is go-
ing to War. He doesn't know
what lies ahead of him. We do
know his path is beset with dang-
ers and difficulties, and his life
is endangered. But he goes with
a smile and a word of good cheer
for those he leaves behind.
And the spittle has dried in
our mouth and there is a lump
in our throat.
We tell you about Sol because
his is the story of millionsbe-
cause of all the Sols prepared to
give everything.
We would like to compare the
sacrifices the civilians at home!
are asked to make with those the
Sols of America have made, and
are prepared to make. But com-
parisons are odious!
B'nai B'rith Makes Dream Come True For Lame Child
For Richer, Greener Lawnt
And Shrubbery Try
Bi/J'-tiiSEEX
n
Pturtllnr rea!u ecu b+ obtained
from thl rich plant food *hlch
rontulni miner.ii. that will help
Kal p chinch to.. not of jour laws.
bold irl.i-.l.r1, h,
HUGHES
SEED STORE
v Ml t. m;ai:i vi. hoi[ Mm
L. to r.: Sam Stark, Los Angeles Ben B'rith. whose purchase of*
bonds won him the right to select the sponsor of a new .L-'D" -
cargo ship; Lorene Mitchell, 10-year-old crippled Catholic g'rl-" n
was selected by Stark through the Infantile Paralysis Found*
to christen the ship and then received a purse of $10,000 from >
shipyard workers to provide for her medical care and educa;
and Mrs. Ethel Jarrett, war bond chairman of Fidelity Bnai an
Women s Auxiliary, who sold Stark the bonds.