The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00489

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Jewish Floridian of South Broward
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Jewish Floridian of North Broward
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Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
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Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
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Jewish Floridian of South County
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Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
ffiJewisti Floridi&m
Couture T/hQ JliewHSfr) HJnity
VOLUME 11.NUMBER 26.
ii
MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JULY 1, 1938
PRICE FIVE CENTB
I
ALL'FOR LABOR
ea-.il>.'
bility
^I.IN, July 1. (WNS)Jewish
Km.nl nl the band* of Nazi
^HbIith loomed as a dread possi-
>r German Jewry when Field
II Goering issued a new and
g decree introducing universal
rm labor conscription for all
and German "state members"
less of race, creed, sex or pres-
upation.
tive July 1st, the degree spe-
ly applies not only to Reich cit-
but to "state members," which
Jews. In view of Propaganda
ter Gocbbels' announcement of
ding measures to eliminate all
from Berlin and other big cities,
leaders here feared that Jews
r forced into the involuntary la-
f the hardest and most menial
as their ancestors were in Egypt
they made bricks for the pyra-
of I'haroah.
al measures to rid Germany of
are being drafted, Propaganda
Ister Joseph Gocbbels told a checr-
en.wd of 120.000 assembled in the
[aspic Stadium for the annual sum-
scholastic exercises. While dis-
proving of the anti-Jewish mob vio-
5, he promised "we will see to it
legal measures are taken so that
Jews will have gone altogether,
will make a law that will see to
hat Jews disappear from B'rl.n
soon." In disowni.ig mob action
In-t Jews. Gocbbels declared: "I
fur solving this problem by means
legal regulations issued by the
J and state, not by action in the
t," and added that while he had
II understanding of the foct that
Berlin population is taking meas-
for its defense "I do not approve
e method."
I the same time he "invited"crit-
of tlie Nazi and anti-Semiiism to
the Jews. "We will willingly
Ihem to their friends in London
Paris." he arid, "and m ireovcr
will deliver them at the frontier,
the Jews take French leave and
London, where those who praise
may pack them in cotton, but
h"ni leave us in pence."
bile repudiating onathorised an-
wi-h measures, lie said "it is a
thing we now know what con-
I are Jewish. Just let the Jews
n their storesnow wo know
re their buslnOMQ* are. We will
to it that legal measures are taken
hat soon Jews will have gone al-
ther. As far as those remaining
concerned. let them remember to
out of the public view. They
beginning to he a nuisance. If the
ign press invokes our human feel-
why we will be glad to present
.lews to them. If people, say,
V the Jews aren't doing anything,'
.v they provoke us by their very
scnee. What do wc care about
I'ign countries anyway? The world
Did leave us alone; we are not
ming anybody "
foreign Uniforms
To Be Outlawed
JXew York, July 2. (WNS) T'ni-
Irmg such as those worn by mem-
)rs of the German-American Bund
id the display of such insignia as
}< swastika would be outlawed in
ew York City under the terms of a
"lution introduced in the city
incil by Councilman Joseph Shnr-
ley. The resolution would ban the
fearing of uniforms or insignia of
kraign nations in the streets of New-
fork unless the wearer is attached
k> the military of that country.
HEAD IS SPEAKER
Harry H. Schaffer. commander-in-
chief of the Jewish War Veterans of
the United States, arrived in Miami
Wednesday afternoon as part of a
tour of the United States. Thirty-
six members of the Freda Markowitz
Post of the Jewish War Veterans led
a motorcade which met Commander
Sehuffer at Biscayne Boulevard at
With Street, and escorted him to the
county courthouse where Mayor It. K.
Williams and Chief of Police Leslie
QuifX extended the official greetings
of the Citjj of Miami. He was nc-
ompanied by Viec-Commander-in-
CbieC Marry Wengrow and members
of Atlanta Post \o. 112. composed of
Mink Frunkrl. adjutant, Robert Spec-
tor. Junior Vice-Commander, Ben
Keisinan, Deputy Chief of Stuff ami J.
B. Levitan Quartermaster. Following
a sightseeing trip through Miami and
Miami Reach the entire parly return
I to the Norman Hotel where they
will remain during their stay heie.
As we go to press the formal in-
stallation of officers of the Freda
Markowitz Post of Miami is being
held at n gala banquet at the
American Legion cluhrooms with J.
Win. Baros as tonstmaster. Repre-
senting Governor Cone of Florida will
he Col. Sidney H. Palmer, a member
of the Governor's staff and active.
member of the Post. Representatives
of all military organizations in this
area are attending the banquet and
all Legionnaires and war vets
Loth Jewish and non-Jewish will be
glltSi* ar the dance which will follow
tue banquet.
Congress Elections
Are Held In Miami
An overwhelming response was giv-
en by Miami Jewry to the call of the
American Jewish Congress. Over 700
people voted at the polls on Sunday
in Miami Beach. At the Miami
Beach polls, in the Beth Jacob con-
gregation, 400 people were registered
for the Congress and submitted their
vote in favor of strengthening the
defense of Jewish rights, through the
proposed Congress means. The dele-
gate elected from the Greater Miami
area was Rabbi Colman A. Zwitmau,
and the alternate Mr. Harry Simon-
hoff.
The first time that American Jew-
ry was given an opportunity to et-
| vi. itself by means of election was
in 1918, when 3.13.000 American citi-
n nil went to the polls nnd elected
llie delegates who formed the firjt
(Continued on Page Eight)
Bund Member To
Face Court-Martial
New York. .Inly 1. (WNS)Trial
by a military court martial faced An-
drew Gimlen. confessed member of the
German-American Bund nnd privoTc
of the First Battalion. 244th Coast
Artillery of the New York National
Guard, after he was arrested on a
charge of threatening President
Roosevelt.
Gimlen was taken before Magis-
trate Capshaw in YorkvWe Court on
the complaint of Dick Voss, a crip-
pled World War veteran, who testi-
fied he heard Gimlen. in full uniform
cry out "kill the Jews. Roosevelt is
a Jew. and we'll get him too." Th"
alleged remarks were made in Union
Square, a few blocks from the 244th
Coast Guard's armory, when Gimlen
and another Nazi guardsman who
escaped, charged into a group of peo-
ple swinging his fists. Magistral"
Capshaw referred the ease to the
National Guard authorities who ire
expected to try Gimlen at a court
martial.
Pittsburgh. July 1, (WNS)Eu-
gene Banco, leader of the Pittsburgh
branch of the German-American
Biiinl. is under arrest here on a charg"
of practicing medicine without n li-
cense. In 19,15 he was convicted of
a similar charge and given a sus-
pended sentence and placed on pro-
bation.
L
RACE PREJUDICE
Wilmington, Del., July 2. (WNSi
A thinly veiled rebuke to the racial
Intolerance prevalent in Europenn
lands was made by Secretary Hull
in an address at exercises here
marking the 900th anniversary of the
landing of the first Swedes and Finns
at Delaware. Addressing an audience
that included Crown Princess Louise
nf Sweden and her son. Prince Bertil.
the Secretary said "at a time when
prejudice, hatred and violence are un-
happily still all too prevalent and
when the resources of civilization give
BUcfa power to these evil inflenees as
to threaten the very destruction of
civilisation itself, the world needs
men- and nations devoted to the prin-
ciples of tolerance, friendship and
justice."
Paying tribute to Sweden and Bin-
land for their tolerance and peace-
loving services, the Secretary declared
the world "needs men and nations
able to meet their most difficult
problems with calmness, reasonable-
ness and common sensemen and no-
tions strong enough ro command re-
spect for their own legitimate rights
and aspiration! tolerant, self-re-
strained, just and wise enough to re-
spect the legitimate rights and aspir-
ations of others."
The assembled diplomats and other
notables saw in the Secretary's re-
marks pointed references to Nazism
ami to Hitler nnd Musolini.
REFUGEE AID TO
DEC IN MEETING
Kviau-les-Uains, France, July 1,
(WNS)All but the opening and
closing sessions of the inter-govern
mental refugee aid conference con-
vening here on July 0th will he held
in camera if the suggestion of Pres-
ident Roosevelt, prime mover of th;1
assembly, is adopted, spokesmen for
the American delegation revealed in
inillining details of the parley.
Acting on personal instructions
from the President, the American del-
egation, headed by Myron C. Taylor,
will propose, a ten or twelve day ses-
sion with u minimum of talk and a
maximum of constructive action. Ono
of the major objectives of the con-
ference, it was learned, is the crea-
tion of a permanent iiiter-governmen-
lal refugee office with headquarters
in Paris and the authority to execute
the decisions of the conference and
to deal with private agencies engaged
in refugee work.
American members of the American
delegation also revealed that many
private organisations had already sub-
mitted memoranda to the President's
advisory committee in New York,
which is headed by James (i. McDon-
ald. Summaries of their proposals
Were laid before the President who
transmitted those be approved t" Mr.
Taylor for inclusion in the confer-
ence agenda. All of tht .participat-
ing governments already have copies
of the agenda which is being kept a
ilov.ly guarded secret. While in
Paris. Mr. Taylor let it he known
that he would nut receive any dele-
gation from European organisations
nor accept their memoranda, empha-
sizing that all proposals must he snb-
miitii] through the governments of
the countries in which the organiza-
tions operate. This policy has been
I...-;.i..,j nnon becanie the conference
' Inter-governmental nnd not private.
ttIB/i
TUNE IN SUNDAY
MORNING AT 9:00
The Jewish, Floridian will
again present another in its
series of weekly broadcasts
this coming Sunday morning
over Station WE AT (1500 k.
c.) at 9:00 o'clock. It's fall
of interesting news and com-
ments and mnsic.
TD
E
Taiinersville. N. V.. July 2. (WNS)
Organisation by the Jewish Theolo-
gical Seminary of America of local
synagogue fund-raising chests from
a.....ng the congregations served by Its
own graduates for the purpose of
raising suppl.......nta] funds for such
overseas agencies as the United Pal-
estine Appeal and the Joint Distri-
bution Committee and to bring pres-
sure on local federations for mote
generous appropriations to Jewish ed-
ucation, was recommended by Rabbi
Ben /ion Bokser in n report of the
Seminary committee, laid before the
B8rh convention of the Rabbinical
Assembly of America. The report
urged that the Seminary as well as
other institutions of Jewish religions
education "re-define their function
as being not merely schools dedicated
to academic research but as institu-
tiiais charged with practical leader-
ship in Jewish life."-- -
To this end the report proposed
that that the Seminary establish an
Information service to make available
to .li'W nnd non-Jew alike any infor-
mation desired about Jewish life:
publish a series of popular tracts on
specific problems in the history, so-
ciology and religion of Jewish life;
sponsor periodic conferences by Scin-
iniirv leaders in local communities;
(Continued Von Page Eight)
GERMAN BUND
GRILLED
New York, July 1. (WNS)Testi-
fying under oath for the first time
regarding the aims of the German-
American Bund, Fritz Kuhn, Its nat-
ional leuder. told a state legislative
committee inquiring into Nazi acti-
vities that "all Jews are enemies of
the I'nited States." that "60 of the
American public officials shown ill
Who's Who arc Jews." that the Bund
aims to "build an Aryan movement
Under the swastika to liberate Amer-
ica from the Jews," that the Bund
does not consider "the Jew as an
American" or "as a man," that Jew*
are Jews first before they are Amer-
icans." and that the Hitler salute "is
the coming salute for the whole Unit-
ed State*.''
Ill the course of a five-hour stay on
the witness stand Kuhn also said that
the Democratic and Republican par-
ties are controlled by the Rothschilds
through Kuhn. Leob & Company nnd
tin- Warburgs. that J. P. Morgan and,
Thomas Lament have Jewish blood,
that the anti-Nazi boycott was dictat-
ed to Samuel I'nterinyer by Moscow,
and that Jews are the master minds
behind the Communist leaders in
America.
Under grilling by Senator John J.
McNabee. chairman of the committee,
Kuhn said the Bund has 1)4 branches,
22 summer camps, four newspapers
anil a business men's league. He tes-
tified that he gets no salary as head
of the Bund hut doe* receive $3,000
a year as head of the German-Amer-
ican Businessmen's T.. ague, which
was organized to combat the anti-
Nazi boycott. He also identified a
picture of himself and Hitler taken
in 1080 on n visit to Germany, charg-
ed thai Germans are being "purged"
from their jobs iii this country only
because they are Germans and claim-
ed that "we do not say anything
against the Jews."
James Wheeler-Hill. 33-year-old
secretary of the Bund, who spoke
with a heavy German accent although
he claimed to have been born in San
Francisco of nn English father and
Russian mother, both of whom wero
killed during the Russian revolution,
told the probers the organization had
no connection with Germany, that h
would resign his job "if there was any
dictation from Germany" nnd that in
the event of a war between Germnnv
ami the United State* he would fight
for the latter even to the extent of
defending American Jews.
Wheeler-Hill also testified that the
organization has 26 branches in New
York State and that membership dues
are .1 cent* a month. After asserting
that the Bund sought to uphold tho
Bill of Bight* and the Constitution,
the Nazi leader insisted that the al-
(Continued on Page Five)
RABBI SUES
NAZI HEAD
New York. July 1. (WNS)A *"..-
000.000 slander suit against Frita
Kuhn. national lender of the German-
American Bund, for his defamation
Of the .lews in this country during
hi- testimony In-fore a state legisla-
tive committee last week was being
started by Dr Emanucl J. Jack of
Yonkers. former rabbi of Temple
manual in Yonkers and former nat-
ional chaplain of the Veterans of
Foreign Wars.
Rabbi Jack said he. began suit
against Kuhn as an individual and
as head of the Bund while acting as an
Individual, Rabbi Jack said he would
ash $3,000,001) damages on the basis
of his action to German refugees.


B>

i.
PAGZ TWO
THE JEWISH FLOBIDIAJ.
FRIDAY. JULY 1, 1J38
Pi
IKWf- (OK
MEH lOKJi
- -j* aaasssser utiw Maa
K>xx hat heee. r_nt rsest f ktr **-
i--*w It' tii Mr*
Eft Mas** fur ta* winter ami wm\
M is. -i ta* '~ warns aha-
* mmmmt at the Usb-

If WE> FOE NORTH
M-- Man mm
- it was* Tsssatay
1" i w ; :
has parents .i w_.i-.a mi w-" 2-
i. -ii
. nil a Jnhwa '--
- sierw
rsssc CWaaer.
MUERItGE 1* AXNUNC*TX>
X' Old Mr*. Sarsenet i. Ki- *1
... y-.t-n. Reara
i : : .-:- : -.1 ~.Lf : "!'-
:j;x:--- M-*. r-* l^jurmu. -i
>."

LEAVE* ON BNjrTM*>wN
Xr i: : -s. Hx-*r-- >:: wtr-j jflft
a M *SSSSBB*B> ry 11- '
; ...... ... : -i; v :-?
. -:>:> ***?* f *
ii: i--~-? Zi-7 w_
- i in. i li.
v.- 5cxws-ix
:^- in -i* Iwiii M-m iiiin En-
BCTTKNfl HOHf
and M.-t Dsrrfal Kiu rwara-j
-tan *r***r*
ii itnsent M
i tat f**ar j
A ;
rew t ---- '
?sj*: CIss- honorary rw r

. .
\* Marsha]
uv.: r---._
J :'
H
I early tr*
..

RET I R.vs 10 f ITT
;:
y fr-jm
* ** Now Xorh wi re
h*y visited relative* and frii

TYKE- TRIP
Mr E. JLlKr: PaSsc i'lililt
-.. ;-:-i: :'. U-
I HE J -*-
. .'- Hnnqasfture. W spenf
r f.-.ea.
LaTALTI CUB
STwNMRB PICNIC
j.' En.-li-

rj J_y 4-J M E
i.-.it ''- i- Swim-
mi mat :^*r.y card xi=>e
I j rfll M Offcfl
'-
I fa *""
I ;

'.- .. -- :.n DUnot |
:j aslt*4
- Mrs. F.
M-- Hrry Morris. Mil*
...-.'i Mr. I'., lil
berg. All XMcten and their
:.ally invittd tob<
PROGRESSIVE GROWTH
in
RESOURCES
Dec. 31, 1934 ...
Dec. 31. 1935...
...| 74.744
.... 510,522
Dw-. 31, 1936 ....
D< 31. 1937 ...
... 1.513.-75
... 2.315^00
)UM 30,1938 S2.500.000
We arc very pleased to again announce
the usual regular
SEMI-ANNUAL DIVIDEND
of
? 4 % Per Annum
? which the Dade Federal directors have
declared as of July 1,1038
A full month's dividend calculated as of the first will be
paid on all acocunts opened before the tenth of the month.
NOW IS THE TIME TO OPEN
YOUR ACCOUNT.
PHONE 3-2652

INJURED SAYINGS
HOMAGE LOANS
DHDE FEDERAL
snvincs qhd lorh nssocmnon
* of mmmi *
Ground Floor Confess Bldo., 109 B. E.Second flvt.
J. M. UPTON, President
?
?
?
?
?I
- : ... .-.-!-. ;ij
..' aataai

T9 T1STT Di
C AJMHJ> V
i SMI Jirt L*oi Zcacstx vfli
-: i.T :' r i **-:%.
-_-:-- -
-_ ja,

HVKEIXc F HXTBMJ
PEBFOBAaXD
7"i.- i!--ii- -' M.s Oar-
mmw. Uatx-.-T '- Mr hbJ Mrc .*an
-- : G* nji Rii:.i i if
y.- ii. >: a i }i.-..- tt n*w
i -; ,-- .>- Sniiy : -i-
haaa* *-f the Wiar'a parcau a4ti
:. -.; K-..--r :':' -. r
aa4 c*iy r*laT_T ia attradaacc.
N. -1 7 Man
Fciabcrf aa4 pi*i sy Lonia Katx.
i :' r .
-. -,. .- -, --.. vUefe ...
"api left i a aoerfiaooe trip tt
New T -i

BHHBBBX >TONE WEDDING
TO BE SOLEMNIZED
tahaai a. K-.-'r will of-
;. :i* w- .raony wa*n
...--: I
'.'-- H H
gf T :!:a. CJa.. will txoome tie
Sum of tfaia city.
1
i ByaagegM and
M -- B Zetaaaaa will bt maid
B hart Blumen-
thai will be best man. The bride
tion in the school*
of Vidalia. The groom i* a native
G and ha been a resi-
dent of Miami where he i engaged
for a Dumber of year*.
; nz the ceremony the couple
will leave for a trip to New Tork.

ANNEAL PICNIC
TO BE HELD
Ai'ordinr to an announcement by
Manuel Bandler chairman of the ar-
rangement- committee, the picnic of
the local B"nai B'rith Lodge will be
ti. f;ne^t events of the cur-
ason at the Las Olas Casino.
Fort Lauderdale onSunday July 17.
Member- of the West Palm Beach
of B'nai B'rith will be the
guests of the local Lodge. A feature
of the day will be the baseball game
n the teams representing both
l will be staged during the day
and refreshments will be served,
will be no charge of any kind
find all member^ '{ B'nai B'rith and
their families are urged to attend.

LEAVES FOB NOBTH
ilia. II -- PaUot and son Richard
trfl for Bethlehem. Pa., where they
'i'l v 'lauzhter and ton-ill-
' and Mr*. Sam Goldstein.

LEAVES FOR VACATION
Mr*. BeaJ. Le Vine accompanied
by her daughters left yesterday for
Chieafjo when will spend the
l.ier.

KETlBNS HOME
Mrs. .1. BaoafieU of 1428 B. w.
11th Terrace, spent two weeks at
Miami Be* h where she stayed at the
President HoteL and now is back at
home in the city.
a
TO VISIT IN NORTH
Mrs. X. Pritaker will leave for
New Haven and Hartford. Conn., and
other points north where she will
visit relatives and friends. She will
return to the city in the fall.

RETURNS TO CITY
Mrs. I. Rr.senzarren returned to
the city from a visit in the north
where he wn the guest of rela-
and friends whom he vi-ited there.
RETTRXfl HSRE ...........
Mr. and || Bpeetor re-
"lr'" from a honeynvx.n
trip to Cuba. Mrs. Bpeetor was for-
merly Miss Ali<-e Rice until her re- |
cent marriage. !
GALA SOCIAL EVENT
I>- HELD
i; ........ :_. .-. i <- ard
Jise social aseet-
I lag of the local B'cai B'rith Idg*
j at tha Nswasan Hotel hut TaesOay
-"-.-.t Mr snrjr Bssna, prtsiaaat
af th- ; resected Leo Eisea-
-teia. easiraua of the entertainsaeat
coasnuttee who was in charge of the
ereaiagr"* procra*&. Mr. Marx Fein-
berg was aaa*tr of eereaaoaies.
As.: gra- wr
Trnaaas L>rd. Hit Peggy Crotner.
Mis* I r.d Marx Feinherg.
mal program danc-
.r_r i yed in the patio of the
hotel and refreshment! were rerred.

TAKES sanaa*
CRADl ATE I HI KK
D* HsaaM Kind, prominent phy-
BSBIf of the T. M. H.
I Daytona Beach where he
wUl take a past graduate course in
Em which i being conducted by
* f h Btwtt Mel a! Society.
H- rstjjti to the citr about Jolr
5th.

FRATEBMTT GIVES
MOONLIGHT OUTING
N re: .-. the way of enttruinmen;
* the moonlight outing pven l.y
> --. I' Fraternity last T"oe-
'z st Greynold's Park.
1 '. *rit* George Ginsberg and Jack
i*rg in charge of arrangements.
Refreshments, dancing and boating
wars featured daring the evening.
Member, of the fraternity attnding
| with their dates were George Gins-
! berg. Jack Somber*. Newton Frish-
| man. Nathan Aronovjtx. Elmer Spec-
tor. Martin Greenberg. Bernie Serkin.
I Gerald Elkin. Ray Cowen, Norman
Somber*. Abe Lehman. Sherwood
Eavine Aaron Goldstein and Irving
Ginsberg.

BETH DAVID TO HOLD
ANNEAL PICNIC
The annual picnic sponsored by
Beth David Sisterhood will be held
at Hardies Casino. Miami Beach on
Sunday. July 24th. beginning at 9 :00
a. m. In charge of arrangement* is
Mrs. J. Engler. chairman.

VISITS IN MIAMI
Mr-. M. Kantor and daughter Hel-
New York are visiting in Mi-
ami as the goest of Mrs. Louis Pal-
j*f I Mn Kantor. They will
for month.
PRELIMINARY OBGAN1ZATIOV
FORMED
Th* first aaeeting of the reeentjy
organised Greater Miami Fec-
of Jewish Welfare Foods wi
at the MraWansj Hotel last .
iiy evening. Mr. Stanley C. M.T*rj
wa naaaed temporary chairaaan. Mr.
- BtassB. temporary 'ecretarT 4:;
Mr J"et4 M. Lipton tassshwary
tr*^rr. A fact findiag cowaai:.
titact committee and rale* aad
regrolation* eoassaittee were a law] ;.>
present report* at the nest aaettiag
of the organisation. Following -j,
preliminary work of the essaautteet
the permanent officers will be elected
by the Board of Directors.
INSTALLATION
CEBEMONTES HELD
I- an impressive candlelight cere-
mony Monday evening-. Mr*. Irriaf
l was installed as pre*:;-:
Miami unit of Junior H;s=.
ah for the cotaing year. TV
lation ceretaonies followed the anneal
banqaet held at Fassa's restaurant ,u
Miami Beach which was attended by
emhrri and their friend*. Mr*.
was presented with a cvrsar*
af rr. -
The officer*' table was be*:-
-ed with roses and can
:.ii wss otj.T*r~l with gold candel-
ib-a. Mrs. Edward S. R->S was
ehairman for the evening an] we|.
ruests. She intro:.- Itrs.
F-i'da Lutsky. honorary preii-:
iitsah. Mrs. La-sky *?
?'a-:mistress for the prograt:
ed the :nt*llation of new -'.
Beers.
Mrs. H th selected as her
I -. cinema aeassatatfca
wh'ch tacal bit -
in; the past year of the Mi?r.: gi
of Junior Hadacsah and its
Mrs. A. E. Freilicb gave a '
<-aroera'- feature of Minn.
which was fo'lnwed by s. dineussion
by Mr-. Gertrude Bersou as '
'-ommentator" fn various phase* of
Junior Hadassah projecu. Mis- Ida
Sfer. retiring president, gar^ tht
president's annual report and was
presented with a gift from memVrs
of the organisation. Others who war*
inducted into office with Mrs. Quer-
ido were: Mrs. Edward S. Roth
and Miss Blle Tanr.en. Tice-pre.ti-
dents: Miss Esther Winer and Mi>i
Rnsaiyn Klein, corresponding *ecre-
--: Miss Jeanette Kronenfeld. r--
cording secretary: Mrs. Marx fsjtn-
berg. financial secretary: Miss Bar-
bara (Joans, treasurer : Miss Harr;-1
Damenstein. historian: Miss Betty
Lassry, Miss Trudy BandeL Miss
Matilda Cohen. Mrs. Aaron Far.-..
M-- Anita Silverman and Miss f
BngeL members of the board of ::-
rectors.
Mrs. Querido called a meetitc
the new officers and director* la-t
v.-ning. June 2J>th. Bt her
home.


FRIDAY, JULY 1, 1938
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
PAGE THREE
wJewtism Florid Ian
FUBL1SHKD EYXKT FIDAY
r. e. Bos art*
PLANT AND OFFICES
21 8. W. Scond Avenue
Phone. 2-1141; 2-1183
J. LOUIS SHOCHET. Editor
FRKD K. BHOCHET. ClrcuUtion MW
--, M cum -s-j^tmAK ffig 0MM "^ "*
ST. PETERSBURG
MRS. ROSE M. RUBIN
IUprnUUT
WEST PALM BEACM
MRS. M. SCHREBN1CK
RprnotlT
ORLANDO
DORIS 8. HELLER
lUpraMntatiT*____
TAMPA
MRS. JAY MARKOWITZ
RprMBtttiT _____
SUBSCRIPTION
Biz Month* .
____tt.es
FRIDAY, JULY 1, 1938
VOLUME 11.NUMBER 26.
Welcome To Miami
Miami Jewry awake to the changing events of the day, real,
izing its duty to itself and their fellow communities throughout
the world, has at all times been willing to extend the hand of
welcome to every one who showed courage and service to his
fellow man.
Harry H. Schaffer, Commander-in-Chief of the Jewish War
Veterans of the United States, has been in the forefront of the
battle for the effective continuation of the German and now
Austrian Boycott; he has been in the very thick of battle against
the Nazis and their subversive propaganda in this country; he
has not hesitated to lead his organization so that everything
that is ideal in American doctrines may be properly protected.
As a Jew, as an American, as one who showed his devotion
to his country, Harry Schaffer has been properly and just hon-
ored with his present office. Under his guidance and leader-
ship the Jewish War Veterans have gained steadily during the
past several years.
It is in the true Jewish spirit of recognition of services hon-
estly rendered to his fellow men in a splendid cause, that of
preserving American democracy, that we of Miami take pleasure
of extending the age old greeting of welcome....."Baruch
Habo,'' blessed be you in your arrival. May you and your staff
imbue your comrades of Miami with the true spirit of Ameri-
canism and Judaism, with the real sense of service to demo-
cracy, that we know imbues the Jewish War Veterans of the
United States.
Can We Make It Work?
With the removal of the referendum question it was thought
that the elections of the American Jewish Congress particularly
in smaller Jewish communities like Miami would indeed be a
funereal event. To the surprise of many (not including the
editor) Miamians turned out in splendid numbers. More than
thirteen hundred Jews and Jewesses registered. Neariy^ seven
hundred voted for delegates, though there were no con.ests and
despite the fact that everything had been previously agreed on.
Truly it showed that there lies dormant a splendid Jewish -
terest. Ours to decide, if we want to make it Work?
Independence
Day
When tin' signing of the Declara-
tion of Independence 1C2 years ago
this July Fourth heralded to the
world the hirth of a new form of gov-
ernment dedicated to the then revolu-
tionary Idea that all men are created
c<|iial and are endowed with inalien-
able rights, including life, liberty and
the pursuit of happiness the signers
of that great document were denounc-
ed in Europe as wild-eyed radicals
asking to overturn the world. Their
ideas of government were branded
as subversive and a danger to man-
kind. To tyrants and autocrats they
Iran I danger, so much so that the
ideas and ideals enunciated in the De-
claration of Independence spread over
the face of the earth.
Today we look around that earth
and once more we see tyrants aud
autocrat!only today we call them
dictator! and fuehrers warring
against the ideals expressed in the
Declaration of Independence. But
this time these ideals are warp and
woof of the political and social tra-
dition of the greatest nation in the
world. When the principles of demo-
cracy are challenged today the chal-
lenge is met with the unanswerable
argument that these principles work
when put into practical effect. They
have operated to the greatest good of
the greatest number whenever ap-
plied. And where one introduced and
then withdrawn misery and suffering
and tragedy have followed. It is this
thought that ought to be uppermost in
uir mind on the eve of Independence
Day. We of America gave the world
a great ideal of government. We
translated that ideal into action and
made it work. Today when that ideal
and all that it implies is under fire
everywhere it is our duty to do every-
thing possible to strengthen demo-
cracy at home so that its foes at home
and abroad may sec that in the birth-
place of democracy faith in its pres-
ent aud future is as unlimited as was
the faith of those who proclaimed it
to the world in 1770.
Plain Talk
AN OPEN LETTER
LASKER GIVES TO
ALIYAH FUND
New York. July 1. (WNS)A
pledge of $.'!.t!0O to Hndassah's Youth
Aliyah campaign from Albert D.
Lnsker. Chicago advertising executive
and former chairman of the U. 8.
Shipping Board, was announced hen'.
Mr. Laskcr's contribution will make
possible the transfer of 10 refugee
children i" Palestine.
Jewish Leader
Warns Country
"Americans must quit taking their
government and its benefits for grant-
ed and begin at once n counter move
to halt the spread of German-Ameri-
can bunds and other subversive prop-
aganda groups." Harry Schaffer, nat-
ional commander of the Jewish War
Veterans of the United States, declar-
ed Wednesday upon his arrival in
Miami.
Schaffer came to Miami from his
home in Pittsburgh for ceremonies last
night at which officers were instal-
led by the Freda Markowitz post of
the organisation, the first Florida
post of Jewish veterans.
1,000 NAZIS IN
NEW PURGE
Only in America, where we lean
over backwards for free speech, could
subversive groups such as the bund,
communists and fascists, carry for-
ward propaganda supporting their
cause," Schaffer declared.
"It seems to be that the best way
to combat the efforts of these groups
is to set in motion a counter propa-
ganda campaign designed to show our
people the superiority of our demo-
cratic doctrine over that which they
expound."
Schaffer pointed out that the Jew-
ish group, second oldest military or-
ganization in America, is co-operat-
ing with the Legion and other patrio-
tic societies in efforts to halt the
pread d mi-American organizations.
Vienna. July 1, (WXS)Recur-
rent reports of mounting dissatisfac-
tion bordering on revolt among Aus-
trian Nazis were confirmed here when
it was lear.....I that some l.(KX) Aus-
trian Nazis have been sent to the Da-
chau concentration camp near Mu-
nich in the hist six weeks.
It is reported on good authority
that a large scale of bloodless purge
of Austrian Nazi ronk was undertak-
en by Josef Buerckel. Reich commis-
sioner for Austria, acting on specific
instructions from Hitler. The clean-
up was intended to eliminate these
Nazis who had expressed openly their
resentment at the failure of Berlin to
give Austrian Nazis a bigger share
of jobs created by the elimination of
.lews since Anschluss.
Internal differences among Nazi
factions were also a factor in a grow-
ing discontent. A major feature of
the purge was the reorganization of
the Austrian detachments of the
Storm Troops. It was also stated in
well-informed quarters that Nazi rad-
| call in Austria wanted freeer hand
with the Jews.
BY AL SKOAL
To the Secretary of Stute,
Washington, D. C.
Dear Mr. Hull:
In writing this I am separating my
identity as a Jew from my identity as
an American. I am trying to write
this only as an American who is
troubled about foreign events and
their relationship to American life.
If I wrote this as a Jew my out-
look might be called too subjective,
since this had to do with the pain
of many of my kinsmen; and the
pain of my kinsmen is au old .old
story anyway.
Not that as an American I can feel
DO compassion for distant victims of
persecution. Whut civilized American
can separate his heart from the events i
in Germany ami look on with cold
eyes that say. this is none of my af-
fair?
Indeed, among all enlightened Amer-
icans these events have caused a deep
loathing and n poignant fear : A
loathing for sadism mat is not tne
outgiving of bereft individuals, but
the deliberate policy of a national
government; a fear for civilization be-
coming infected by savagery.
Your own fine public utterances
have given evidence that you are in
I lie leadership among Americans who
detest the current brutalities that
wear the livery of statesmanship.
Yet among my fellow-Americans I
find a sense of helpless frustration as
of men in the presence of a devastat-
ing conflagration which they can not
1 approach. "Just what can we do
about this?" they ask. "After all. a
domestic policy of the German govern-
ment can be none of the affair of the
American government. Isn*t there
some unwritten law of nations that
enjoins one nation from meddling in
the home affairs of another? Indeed,
we ourselves would be most resentful
if some other nation were to attempt
to tell us what to do or not to do
in a matter of our own business."
This I myself have said until re-
ccntl.v ; with the outraged consciences
of millions of other Americans I have
stood in helpless anger shaking a fu- ,
tile fist at a savagery such as the ad-
vancing frontiers of civilization had
seemed to push into the remotest
abysses.
Hut now it may be asked : Is this
persecution only the business of Ger-
many? When a domestic policy of
one nation brings grievous problems
to others is it still domestic? Docs
a persecution remain in the vacuum of
domestic business when its victims
must seek the shores of other lands to
escape its torments? Is it still not
our affair when we must shelter ami
help find a new way of life for its
victims 1
The President's conference on the
rehabilitation of German exiles itself
suggests the international character of
the Gcrmnn events. Here, indeed, we
are taking a hand in what seems to
be only another nation's domestic bus-
inees; we are already by implication
(which does not reach the impervious
sensibilities of snvages( heaping hot
reproaches on the persecutor's head.
Rut I ask myself, is this enough for
us to do? I* murder settled when the
body is decently buried? We do some-
thing about the murderer. We visit
upon him the mornl abhorrence of so-
ciety. We quarantine him cither by
imprisonment or by death. Thus we
make it known that society is not
tolerating the savagery of murder.
Particularly would we take steps
against a well entrenched murderer
who threw his bodies over the wall
for his neighbor's care.
It seems to me that in the German
situation the question is. how may we
stop this murderer? Since his crimes
have become a problem that affects
our own national economy is it not
now a function of international busi-
ness to stop him?
I, with a great many other Ameri-
cans, have thought what to do with
this criminalto segregate him, to
quarantine him, to teach him. Cer-
tainly, our pious reproaches have been
without any effect: he throws more
and more <>f his victims over the wall
for our care.
How may we surround him. not
with bayonets but with evidence of
our abhorrence that he can under-
stand? I have been thinking of a
great document the T'nited States)
government might writeone. Indeed,
thai shall stand forever an imperish-
able testament of international mor-
ality.
Addressed to the German govern-
ment it might read like this :
"The American government has
viewed with distaste and alarm the
mass persecutions that have been per-
il.hated within the German nations
with the consent and connivance of
the German government.
"In ordinary circumsloneos such
persecutions might not he the official
concern of the American government
but only the cause of moral revulsion
among the American people.
"However, since many of the vic-
tims of these persecutions have been
cast upon our hands for our care, the
American government no longer can
regard itself as a detached onlooker
at German events.
"The German government can not
be unaware of the abhorrence which
the American people and other civil-
ized people have felt in the presence
of these persecutions. Since the Ger-
man government has given no heed to
these manifestations of world opin-
ion, since its expulsion of hundreds
of thousands of its people has brought
new social and economic problems to
the American nation, it becomes nec-
essary for :lie American government
to take steps in defense.
"Therefore, it is the decision of
the American government that on and
after this date all trade relations be-
tween this government and the Ger-
mnn government cease: that no goods
of German manufacture shall be re-
ceived in any American customs
house; that no goods of American
manufacture shall be shipped for ex-
porl to Germany from any American
port. We regret the circumstances
that compel a civilized nation to sep-
arate itself from this commerce.
"These restrictions shall continue
until persecutions by the German gov-
ernment ond the German nation
cease."
This, my dear Mr. Hull, may not be
couched in precise diplomatic lan-
guage but it suggests the means by
which we may segregate, quarantine,
imprison and teach the criminal whose
victims have fallen upon our hands.
Such quarantine would be approv-
ed by every moral-American. There
may be some who will say that it is
none of our business to go in for in-
ternational morality, to be the moral
teacher of others. For them the an-
swer is thnt even if it is good mor-
ality it is also good business for the
nation to defend itself (by the most
peaceful means) against, another nn-
tion whose depredations visit serious
problems upon its economy.
And. after all, righteousness does
exalt a nation.
NEWS OF
BUND WORK
Washington. D. C, July 1. (WNS)
Secret files of the Department of
Justice on the German-American
Bund have, been loaned to the House
Committee investigating un-American
activities. Chairman Dies asked for
and obtained the files on his promise
to keep them secret. The files, con-
taining 8,000 pages, represent evi-
dence compiled by G-men during an It
months probe of Nazi activities.
Albany. N. Y., July 1, (WNS)
Representative Hamilton Fish. Jr.,
chairman of the military affairs com-
mit tit' of the State Constitutional
Convention, revealed that Fritz Kuhn,
German-American Bind leader, had
asked the committee to pay the ex-
pense of himself and the Bund's sec-
retary to Albany in order that they
might testify agaisst a proposed con-
stitutional amendment that prohibited
training individuals for military
purposes." The aim of the omend-
ment is to outlaw Nazi camps.
I Kuhn'i request was denied.


PAGE POUR
PA





THE JEWISH PLOBIDIAJf
BULLETDf
TEMPLE TBRAKT,
a* MIAMI
117 N. E. 1th Strt
Orfic* Phone 2-77*5
FRIDAY, JULY 1, 1933
"ABBI JACOB H. KAPLAN, P O. 93 ULMAN A. Zw:TNAH
MM AftM*, Drfv_--25 & N. c ,. ._,_,,,
Pg Nronr Xo^^.JS^^^ys,- pav *o v,a,T
Mr *r.d Mr J. L M
taiaea" at a formal dinner in honor
f their soa Irwin at the Anchor In=
.- Pas*-*-Grille. He had recently
been Bar MMavak.
Mr. aad Mr? Max Daris m-.red
to Ma-feria B-a--h for the wc
CONGREGATIONAL
T* ** withdraw 4rWJ frsai the
C B**~^sr terrices will be held
Temple Israel tan Friday erea:**.
July bt 19&* at 6 15 p. bl Rabbi
Golsian A. Zwitman wU tj-ak o*
-*\ portion of the week i= an
*'At+** on the aabjaet: Dissenters
Aether Day."
A: the aerrices the r.ames of tie
tb departed L-o J. fretacraib,
fatktf cf Mr. J-i w^Etranb. Jennie
Wetaa, mother of Mr. Jesae Weiss
and DaT;d K:se:=-, husbasd of j
Mrs. Bella Kogelman. will be read. '
and the yahrxeit of Lewis Hersteia. '
fthtr of Mrs. Morris Plant
Mr*. LowJi Zeientx will be commemo-
rated.
REMGIOIS SCHOOL
' Fvn th rebuilding of the Tea
pi* m Jerusalem is not m important
a* the instruction of children."
riai totter has been writ-
." '- '- chillren who are
interested in the study of Hebrew.
Memben of the Temple are urged tot
letter m that the spon- '
I Of a H*-.r-x study group may
n a rital part in the Temple's
The text of the letter
*i:
u
- >.z bas b~- :; ;Urie of tit He-
-* Jeparfei: of ozr Reiigioe*
;-! H report* thai yxir ehCd
*** *rhng HiU(_dosi ;r: -is. as do wt Hebrew
- ---r.-_; the w-i .':. j-;.-
w olaases win be eon*jed
by Mr Fr~4x*E. ante is an eat-
'-? pedagogue, under Temple
anspi*e. Too may pick aty two
riag the week for your c.M .-
If It will add to you-
aaea w. shall hold classes
tha Beach or in the Boatk-
west aertion. Kindly notify us oa
reran card whether you are la-
I in Hebrew instruction for
.n
Sincerely yoon,
Miss Ana Berkhoff of Philadei-
Phis U the boose guest of Mtol M \-
dred Carroll. Miss Berkhoff U re-
tarni**? 10 her home next week snd
Miss CtrroD is ae-ompanying It r
spend her saauaer racarion in Pbil-
M- Mnsbia and her sons of New
I -k -t an r.-.ax the Goldman
'-' '* =..nrh. Before return-
iaf aesae they erfl spend some time
1 Mi-
Mrs. A Robbies and two children
>: T-.~.iif ;,;. rijit reiaciTes ia
JachmariUe.
Mi H- ea Birfill l*ft Taaaiay
for Bastoa hr. she wUl remain the
a- ii --er. Mr. and T
Mn Mac Preaser darinf her nsit
in J :- yesterday
nriiiL< I .- L-: :. :_. .:. >>w Tarb
Haiassah held the bridge
tost 1 .-<-iay afternoon.
Mrs. B. B. Bromberg U in charge of
the tourneys.
Mr. .Sam WVi entertained in her
home at Keptaae Beach Friday with
a luncheon and china shower honor-
r Miss Kate Sachs, bride-elect of
J-J 1". Blisa Sachs was presented
with many lorHy pieces of her chosen
Patter:. -.as gifts from the
x .-'. Pr>ent were : Mrs. M. Chep-
eail Mr-. 1 M. L.bennan. Mrs. J.
Bfeoaa, Mn. M. Ghelerter. Mrs. Ber-
"' Ml*. Rose Grinich, Mrs.
- ilosenson. Mrs. .Si Sobel. Mrs.
Mannie B*xal. M.--. Bl Chepenik.
M Abe Chepaik. Mrs. Meyer Chep-
| ealk, Mrs. RoUnd Krantx. Mrs. J.
B. sTetoB, Mr-. Anna Rippa Mr,.
Harry Sachs. Mis^ Joliet Ghelerter.
Louise Witten and Gertrude Lieber-
Baa.
Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Easrig ,u,
daughter. Mrs. Oscar Fiaawn ha-.
returned from New Orieans hen
they attended the graduation ei
es at Tulane I'r.iTersity. wh*re Dj
I M Ewrix. m>u of Mr. and Mrs*
his menical degree. Dr. Zir.
nt ha just returned from Jaekaoa-
v. 1 where be took the state
tiva in Tampa before returning
.New Orleans where he "will aerre hj
interneship at Touro Infirmary.
"-eat Verkauf left Sunday for Mi-
ami where be will join his wifa waj
ua- been there for the last two weei*
Tlt wiU return together with.a
about two weeks.
Miss Sallye Finman is riaiting ra
Atlanta. Ga.. with friends and rea.
tin a. She plans on returning home
in about a week.
June 28th, 193*.
I>-ar Friend:
' weekly buL'etins begin with
irase: "Eren the re-
I of the Temple in Jerusalem
*s important as the instruc-
We kaov. of
i phrase referred to
:.truct:oa.
OM pas*, year Mr D. Freed-
TEMPLE ISRAEL of Miami.
ST. PETERSBURG
NOTE
By ANNABEL JACOBS
I"1-- 1 ..:h!;ght of the week
was a t-a^h party and picnic g->en
the Ladies' An :.iry at Don Ca-
^ar Bear-h. Q ... ^A swimming
w-re eojosad all afternoon after
which a delicious dinner was serred.
JACKSONVILLE
.M;' n of Charlotte.
S I .-<... !... .^D vi.itir., her un-
c.e and aunt. Mr. and Mrs. R I
M 17 for Miami.
v. ueaday e-eniag the Senior Ha-
^--ab dance was heid and in charge
of rrangements was Mrs. Henry
jK .-.-.- .-- -- i by Mrs. Nat Cohen.
Mrs. Ike W;-.ten aid Mrs L. Bucholx.
Mr. and M.-. Jark We:man fthe
former Sally Rjrkind of this city)
tar. r*r,:n,H from .. .^.^
to Ouadk. They win make their
borne in Tempa.
;: *ss hostess to the
it a card party and
t-a'h sapper it her home on Trae-
- I-:and.
Mr and Mrs. Charles E. Fink as-
certained at Pont. Vedra Fridar
I .:th a w.iner roast honoring;
their daughter, Mtos Raela Fink, who
xrad>ia-- .... ,nth from Roben j-
[r Higt School and Miss Sylria
Fink of New y,,rt q^ ^^ cf M
r ink.
D riag the week Mr. and Mrs.
i :k end their goeat took a motor
Daytons B-aoh. An inform*!
at home wa, b^Id Thursday for mem-
- -be famUy tad their friend^
Mtos Fink hu !, been the gnant of
GREYHOUND LINES
GMTHOTJafD TKBMINAL AT MIAMI BACH
j ALL NOBTHBOUND BUgSBS LEAVE FROM PH D-1812
alo Washington Avenue
^>S-JSSc-SS.irS?.j^^^^^^^^^^^
Do You
Own
Your Home?
There ntver waa a better time
than now to b'uild on*
The Liberal Financing Through
Federal Housing
Administration
Makes It Possible
? me ca!1 ,u, Lthfi ggrff.g the be*t no*:
*.oi* lnfonnat:on as to lu plan.
H. SDIONS
Care Aekerman Ins. Aoeney
10,5..Se>">01^ Bldfl.
Phone 2-3151
TUN NOTES
I Announcement has been made br
Mrs. Samuel Schapiro of the mar-
riage of her daughter Sally Rivkini
81 Petersburg, to Jack B. v. -.
aan. vf Tampa, ion of Mrs. L. Gor-
don. The ceremony took place June
l-'th in Daytona Beach. Dr. A. S
Eeinfeld performed the o-remony!
lb- mmediatelr af:.-r tLi
f poinu of interest in
-ew Tork and Canada. Upon their
"turn they will reside in Tampa
Mr. A. A. Finklestein left Saturday
- for an extended trip to Soata
a. New Tork and other poinu
Of interest in the north. Mr. Fink!--
ttein will return here August 1st.
Mrs. J. Markowitx Mrs. M. J. Kas-
nel and Louis Lubetxky entertain-i
Sunday for their parents. Mr. aal
Mn. I. K. Lubtxky in honor of the..-
silver wedding annirersary. with a
I iffet aanpor at their home. SUJ
N-^ra-ka Avenue.
Guests inrited -r^ Mrs. S. F.
laaaeaoa Mtoa Hannah Iaaen, Mr.
A Negfa, M -- Boaa Kagta, Mr. ani
Mrs. Charles Markow.u. Mr. s 1
Mia, Qeataa H. Laasatt, Miss a::.
and Mr. Qeotfla Jr. L:are:t. Mr. a^;
Mr*. X. Peck^tt, Mr. and Mrs. A.
H-.- vi-z. Mr. a:i Mrs. S. Ber.
Mr. Pailiip VVetoaataa, Mrs. A. Br-^-
I Dr. Bad Mr-. A. Bryan, Mr.
J^wvr, L. M'-ed and other*.
VnOUST BROSL Rlf?
*^ lm .1.. mrrr-w-l *^
tM th0 BEST
THE ROSEDALE INN
IS NOW AT IT8 NEW LOCATION
709 FIFTH AVENUE WEST
HENDERSONVILLE, N. C.
DIETABY LAWS STEICTLY OBSEBVED
UNDEE THE PERSONAL MANAGEMENT OF
MRS. ROSE LIPSITZ
MODEP.NLY EQUIPPED, REASONABLY PRICED
STRICTLY KOSHER"


FRIDAY, JULY 1, 1938
THE JEWISH FLQBIDIAN
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION
1645 8. W. 3rd Street
ABRAHAM A. KELL.NER, Rabbi
RABBI'S RESIDENCE: 919 8. W. 13th Court; Phorw S-5102
SCHEDULE OF SERVICES
Daily: Shachrls at 8 a. m.;
Mlncha at 6:30 p. m.; Maarlv,
15 minutes after sunset.
Sabbath services: Friday
evening at 5:30 p. m.; Satur-
day morning at 9:30 a. m.; Sat-
urday afternoon at 615 p. m.
ANNUAL PICNIC
Tbe annual picnic of the Ladies
Auxiliary will take place in Hardy's
Casino, Sunday July 10th. This af-
fair, arranged by our Ladies Auxil-
iary, is the most important of the
summer and is the main source of
revenue during the months between
May and October. Hence our sincere
appeal to all friends and supporters
of our Synagogue and Hebrew School
to come to our aid in attending this
picnic. The personnel of the com-
mittee is by itself an assurance and
i guarantee that a most enjoyable
time il in store for all. As in the past
the Ladies in charge will prepare for
a full line of food and drinks to sat-
isfy f i\v hungry and thirsty soul.
There are also accommodations for
swimming and games for those inter-
ested. Reasonable prices will pre-
vail and tables will be set up for
families or groups who want to have
their meals together.
IHUJfiUAlKS NAMKD
At the lasi rugulur meeting of the
Congregation Mr. George Chertkof
was named the Congregational Repre-
sentative to the Miami Federation of
Charities. The Congregation also re-
named Mr. J. L. Sli.e-I.et, Mr. H. M.
Drevich and Mr. A. Pepper to rep-
resent the Congregation on the Board
of Directors of the Greater Miami
Jewish Cemetery Association.
CONGRATULATIONS
We extend heartiest Mazel Tov
greetings to Mr. and Mrs. George
Rachlin whose marriage was solemn-
ized last Sunday by Rabbi K.-liner..
MAZEL TOV
Sincere Mazel Tov greetings to Mr.
and Mrs. Henry Sollevoy whose newly
born daughter was named Chaya
Toibe at the services last Monray.
YAHK7.EIT OBSERVED
Tuesray. June 28 was the first
Yahrzeit after the late Mr. Abraham
Jucobs Olov Hasholom who was the
reader in our congregation for years.
Ual.l.i Kellner eulogized him briefly
at the sen-ices. Mr. William Clein,
son-in-law of the late Mr. Jacobs
served Tikkum in his memory.
LADIES AUXILIARY TO MEET
The Ladies Auxiliary will hold a
very important meeting this Tuesday
evening in the Shul and all members
are requested to be present as the
forthcoming picnic plans will be dis-
cussed and completed.
OTlutmL
WjotoA.
By HARRY SCHWARTZ
The nerve of some people's children,
on a honeymoon when one has a Y
column to write. Yep, that's what
Harry Schwartz did. You know Harry
has done such splendid work for the
x in k> many respects that it is as-
tonishing to find out that something
tun ed up more important to him than
'he y. Seriously, however, we do
wish Harry and Sandra the best o*
luck and may their marital ship sail
forevi r on calm waters.
The wedding took place at the Or-
thodox Synagogue. The chupa bear-
rs wi re Arthur Blatt, Al Pallot.
Manny Teitler and myself. Al re-
ceived many "mcrchesens" and we
are all looking forward to seeing the
treat lover become married.
Incidentally. I believe this is the
Ural marriage that resulted from
''."ting of individuals at the Y. It
* f'w more materialize we'll opeu
a matrimonial bureau.
cartoon was shown and Bob explain-
ed how the animation was accom-
plished. The large audience that at-
tended enjoyed his interesting lecture.
It was the first in the series of eul-
turul meetings planned for the Y.
You know ut first we thought that
bemuse the Louis-Schmelling fight
came on the air at the same time
that our guest was to lecture our at-
tendance would be small. Fortunate-
ly as you know, Louis obliged us by
knockiug out Schmelling in 124 sec-
onds and thus we had our usual large
audience.
PAGE FIVE
Our Y diamondball team under the
capable guidance of Dr. Barney Wein-
kle is in second place in the Miami
Beach League. It is odd to note
that the only defeats suffered by the
league leuding team has been at our
hands. Our deepest regrets go to
Frank Rose who broke his ankle slid-
ing into third during a hectic game.
1 am sure he will appreciate visitors
at his home.
We are still discussing the possi-
bility of securing an executive direc-
tor. The Board of Directors and the
Governor's Club are going into the
matter in detail. An early and plea-
sant annouueement may be forthcom-
ing shortly.
For years, the Y. M. and Y. W.
have talked about having installation
banquets. For some unknown reason
none have been held in years. This
year wc are starting on a new foot.
however. Thus it is that on Jidy
10th, there will be held at the Pala-
tial Restaurant a joint installation of
he Y. M. and Y. W. Mrs. Engler
and her committee promise a splen-
did evening's program. Reservations
thoold be made early to avoid the
last minute rush.
Lust Wednesday evening we were
privileged to hear and see Robert Ep-
stein, well known Miami Herald car-
toonist at our clubrooms. A Popeye
With Harry gone to Chicago for
about a month you will have the plea-
sure (?) of reading guest columns.
If you have a favorite columnist sub-
mit his name and we'll try to get
him out of retirement for your enjoy-
ment. Your columnist this week, of
necessity In the emergency, was Mil-
ton A. Friedman. Is everybody
happy?
,11 Mill! Y NEWS
WATERMELON PARTY HELD
The second successful affair of the
summer activities sponsored by the
Junior Division of the Y. M. H. A.
was held last Monday evening in the
form of a watermelon beach party
with Dave Shier in charge of ar-
rangements. A pleasant evening was
enjoyed by all.
The Junior Division of the Y will
hold their regular meeting on Mon-
day evening at the Y clubrooms be-
ginning at 9:00 p. m.. and all boys
and girls are cordially invited to be
present and assist, cooperate and par-
ticipate in the activities planned by
the Junior Y. Membership in the Ju-
nior Division is onlyl a small fee
and all those interested in joining
are requesteo to communicate with
THE WORLD'S WINDOW
-By LUDWIG LEWISOHN-
On July the sixth there will con-
vene at the well-known French wa-
tering place of Eviau representatives
of all these countries which respond-
ed to President Roosevelt's call to
confer concerning the emigration and
resettlement of the victims of political
and religious persecution. It is well
that the purpose of the conference
was so phrased. Actually and prac-
tically the people who must be helped
are the Jews of Germany and Austria
Now since Secretary Hull issued
the invitation for this conference and
thus made the United States by that
action the single keeper of the Chris-
tian conscience remaining in the
world, very grave and very catas-
trophic changes have occurred. It
was clear even then; in fact it has
been clear since 1933 that one of the
aims of the German Government was
the gradual extrusion of the Jews
from the economic order. But that
process had not yet become a violent-
ly retroactive one. It has now be-
come so in both Germany and Aus-
tria. What remains of Jewish prop-
erty is being coldly confiscated. It is,
of course, theft at its brazenest. It
destroys by what it is, the institution
of private propertythe right to pri-
vate propertyas thoroughly as ever
did the confiscations of the Bolshe-
vik revolution. If a state can sud-
denly say: all that Jews have hon-
estly earned in this land can betaken
from them under some foolish or foul
pretext what is to prevent another
fate from saying: all that Catholics
have earned, all that redheaded peo-
ple have earned, all that Mormons or
holy rollers or those of Greek descent
have earned can be taken away from
them on similar pretexts.
It is a fact grimly amusing to con-
template that the countries belong-
ing to the anti-Communist block prac-
tice precisely those measures of Com-
munist policy of which they feign to
stand in the deadliest fear; the regi-
mentation and gradual extinction of
private enterprise, the confiscation of
the property of definite classes, the
extermination of heretic and dissident.
Quite literally there are in this age,
there have been in no age. fools more
grossly self-deceived than those con-
servatives in Britain and elsewhere
who have a sneaking sympathy for the
dictators. The dictators conserve
nothing that belongs to the classical
tradition of civilization, neither pri-
vate property nor private judgment.
It is this situation that will have to
he faced at Evian. It has recently
been estimated that prior to the most
recent confiscations the property held
by German and Austrian Jews who
now number circa 600.000 still
amounted to ten billions of Kei.-hs-
Bob Kaplan, treasurer, or Miriam
Weiutraiib, membership chairman.
JACKSONVILLE
M...,l-
3EACHES
UNFORGE1TABLC
l S.--.-
VACATION
MCKSONVILLE'S
LARGEST md
FINEST HOTEL
300 Booth
MO BmW
&X JACKSONVILLE
FLORIDA
0 Coonintly locittd la lie
downtown buiimii, ihoppinj nd)
' lliMlfr d.ilrid. Every room in outld
mm with print* btlk, (nocoattf
cfoimmg in water, .dlo, tin nt
b.d iwcflhf limp. SiKm of tMrfW
kmtmsm mi hi. Srir muim
-, mi Mtvics in TK. P.tio Grill, mi
{ M Tfct Rooiclt Rtndfivom.
All O.tild. Koomi-.-No Court
' ClfC.UllMf lc Wtr In vcV root*
77 Room-Single wiili PiivtU Bith $2.00-}
44 Room S2.50 SS Room $3.00
66 Room $3.50 S3 Room $4.00
11 Suitti. Pilfer Bedroom Bttk $6.00
S4 Smpk Room will. Privtta Bitk $4.00
Sll>. !. I. Mo It O..UI Occmxmv
Vti> An..ci. W..U < Muttlr iii-J
A Robert R. Meye- Hotel
mark. Not much per capita, but still
enough with which, added to J. D. C,
and U_ P. A., and other funds, to fac-
ilitate enormous emigration and re-
settlement. The representatives of the
powen assembled at Evian will have
ti. consider the question whether in
that world economy which is so close-
ly inter-related, the Nazis have the
right to declare tnat tney will delib-
erately drive 600,000 of their nation-
als to other lands and first reduce
those nationals to the condition of
naked beggars. In other words,
whether they have the right to burden
the economies of other countries with
the poverty of those whom they have
robbed.
I am sorrowfully of the opinion
that the Jews of the free countries,
and especially of our own. have not
and are not giving nearly enough, that
they are not stricken deeply enough
by the fate of their brethren in Ger-
many and Austria. It Is inconceiv-
able that there should still be Jews in
America who do not vicariously suf-
fer and do not give for overseas re-
lief and still argue about Palestine.
It is inconceivable. It is inconceiv-
ably stupid and shameful.
Nevertheless it is necessary, it is
essentinl that the Jewish representa-
tives at Kvian raise with all possible
force and emphasis the question of
international comity involved in (a)
the arbitrary expulsion of nationals
and above all. (h) the prior impover-
ishment of those nationals. And the
Jews have the right and duty to
raise, that question not only as Jews
but as citizens of their respective
states.
It is clear that a much larger
question than even the Jewish ques-
tion is involved here. You cannot ex-
pell your nationals into the void or to
another planet. Fugitives have to
flee somewhere. Somewhere means
another country and another econo-
my. Hence it can be soberly said that
the example of the confiscation of
Jewish property shakes the very basis
of civilization. It is war upon the
world. It is madness and chaos. I
wonder whether this quite fundamen-
tal question is on the agenda of the
Evian conference
GERMAN BUND
LEADER GRILLED
(Continued from Page One) ^
leged policy was consistent with thel
Bund's program of Arianyisni and an-
ti-Semitism. Grilled on the I'.nn 1 i
propaganda linking Jews to Commu-
nism, Wheeler-Hill admitted that the.
top leaders of the Communist Party
are non-Jews and conceded that never-
theless the Bund emphasizes that
Communist is synonymous with Jew.
Asked by Senator McN'abee if the
Bund wasn't dealing in fallacy in.
spreading such propaganda, the wit-
nexs said "I would not Bay that." H
professed ignorance when queried
about Bund membership and how
many members were paying dues. He
denied however that anybody had to
take an oath or that it was a political
organization.
The second witness, Gustave Elmer,
identified as national organizer, said
he was born in Germany and natural-
ized in Jersey City in 1926. He claim-
ed 96 branches of the Bund through-
out the country. He also denied there
is anti-Jewish persecution in Germany
Elmer went so far as to say that
"friends coming back tell us every-
body is working and happy and they;
say how happy the Jewish people'
are." He too insisted the Bund was
an American organization with no
link to Germany.
Two other witnesses, William Lued-
Ike. secretary of the Businesmsan's
League, and Theodore Dinkclacker, an
official of one of the Nazi camps, tes-
tified. Leudtke told the committee
that Senator Wagner did not repre-
sent the German-Americans satisfac-
torily and declared that one of the
aims of the Bund is to elect "German
candidate!." Dinckelacker, leader oe
the Nazi youth movement in this
country, testified that members of the
Bund youth groups are taught anti-
Semitism. He seconded everything
Kuhn said but declared that while he
would fight against Germany he
would not fight for Jews. Assembly-
man Irwin Steingut, member of the
committee, engaged in a sharp ex-
change with the witness while the
packed courtroom cheered and jeered.
MARKET
t^','^flrQ.ii'll[.f!Cli
A Word To The Wise
A LKA-SELTZERIZE
m
EVERYONE SEEMS
TO BE USING
ALKA-SELTZER
THESE DAYS
1J
I SHOULD THINK)
THEY WOULD f
..IT 0OES
WONDERS
FOR ME
L
Millions of users feel that they get quicker, more pleas-
ant, more effective relief from ALKA-SELTZER than from
old-fashioned unpalatable preparations. That's why
ALKA-SELTZER is more in demand than almost any
other single item in the average drug store.
We recommend ALKA-SELTZER for the relief of
Gas on Stomach, Sour Stomach, Headache, Colds,
Morning After," Muscular Pains, and as a Gargli
in Minor Throat Irritations.
We really mean it
Use ALKA-SELTZER for any or all of these discom-
forts. Your money back if it fails to relieve.
In addition to an analgesic (Acetyl-Salicylate
of Soda), each glass of ALKA-SELTZER
contains alkalizers which help to
correct those everyday ailments
due to Hyper-Acidity.
In 30* and 601 packages at your
drug store.
Alka-Seltzer



~k
I
PAGE SIX
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
FRIDAY, JULY 1, 1933
NEW RECORDS
ARE ISSUED
-------
Niw York. July 1A now scries of
1 Ight doable faced phonograph records
ieiaed in the Fall by the Women's
League 'f the I'nited Synagogue, it
was announced by Mrs. Samuel Siiei-
gel, national president. The choice
of musical numbers and artists, she
aid in announcing the project is in
the hands of Mrs. Louis Ginzberg.
An advisory committee composed of
Babbl Israel Goldfarb. Instructor in
Hazanut at the Jewish Theological
Seminary, and Mrs. Ira Eisenstein.
instructor in music at the Jewish
Teachers Institute, is assisting Mrs.
Ginsberg.
The Womeaa' League has previous-
ly issued two double faced records
for both Passover and Chanukab. It
was the remarkable success of these
two series of recordings that prompt-
il (be executive committee to author-
ize the preparation of the new re-
cordings covering Sabbat)) and all the
vther Jewish holidays. Discussing
the project, Mrs. Ginzberg declared:
"The Passover and Chanukab rec-
ords have proven to be of such great
value in teaching young and old the
beautiful traditional Hebrew melodin
that we have decided to make a whole
leriei of new records.
"The first Beriea "ill be a complete
Sabbath record containing the Kid-
<:ii-ii. Shir Hamaaloth. and Sbolem
Aleicbem, u well ai evernl S'miroth
melodies. There will be records for
Shabuoth. Succoth, including Pales-
tinian songs for these festivals. There
will be a record of the blessings
chanted in the synagogue before and
after the reading of the Law and a
few examples or cantillntions of var-
ious Biblical readings.
"We expect the new series of rec-
ords to be a definite educational con-
tribution to the Jewish borne and
school in conformance with the estab-
lished policy of the Women's League:
the desire to foster and encourage
traditional Judaism in America."
New York County
Legion Ousts Nazis
few York. July 1. (WNSiThe
Niw York County American Legion.
largest group in the national organi-
| zatiou. voted to exclude from lnem-
berahip all Nazis. Communists and
Fascists in a resolution adopted at
its 20th annual convention, and voted
in submit the resolution, which was
in the form of an amendment to its
constitution, to the national Legion
convention in Los Angeles in Sep-
tember.
The by-laws were amended "to ex-
clude from membership all individuals
who may at any time be found to be
members of any organization in which
an oath is required of its members
which is in contravention to the oath
of the American Legion."
The convention also attacks Nazis,
('.iiniiiiiiiists and Fascists as foes of
democracy and authorized the creation
of a radio patrol to keep tab on sub-
versive radio broadcasts.
Roosevelt Denounces
Foes Of Liberalism
New York. July 1President
Roosevelt addressing the teachers who
comprise the National Education As-
sociation, spoke of countries where
libraries have been burned, learned
people exiled, universities dispersed
and news, art and literature censor-
ed as having turned back "the clock
of civilization." He did so without
naming any country.
Admonished this country to keep
bright the fires of freedom and civil
liberties, to redouble efforts to main-
tain a free press auh to provide a
safe place for eternal truths.
Declared for state and local control
of schools mid their curricula, with
the federal government supplement-
ing only the resources of the poorer
communities.
Predicted that "the ultimate victory
of tomorrow is with democracy and
Do You Know Why
OLD GOLD Cigarettes
Are Always Fresh?
2 Jackets of Cellophane Seal-in the
FRESHNESS of Prize Crop Tobaccos
THE weak part of any paper pack-
age of cigarettes is at the fold
where the U. S. Revenue Stamp is
affixed. It is impossible to bring the
label of the package over in order to
seal the top of the package as is
done at the bottom of the package.
The single Jacket of Cellophane,
which is found on all paper pack-
ages of cigarettes, closes the package
as best as can be done at the top of
the package. However, every pack-
age of Double-Mellow Old Gold
Cigarettes has 2 Jackets of Cello-
phane instead of one.
By using an extra jacket of Cello-
phane and inverting the outer Jacket
and sealing it completely at the bot-
tom, the top, or weak part of the
package of Old Golds, is made air-
tight and thereby given double pro-
tection for factory freshness. The Out-
er Jacket opens from the bottom
the Inner Jacket opens from the top.
Old Gold Cigarettes are further
protected by the fact that an air
chamber is formed between the 2
Jackets of Cellophane, thus giving
the package of Double-Mellow Old
Gold Cigarettes the best practicable
protection for Factory Freshness.
These 2 Jackets of Cellophane
which axe found only on Old Gold
Cigarettes provide much greater pro-
tection for freshness than any other
paper package of cigarettes.
Double-Mellow Old Gold insures
to smokers its rich quality of Prize
Crop tobacco with a maximum pro-
tection of Factory Freshness at all
times. It is also interesting to know
that on account of this Double Jacket
Cellophane, Old Gold Cigarettes give
the smoker a longer and cooler
smoke.
This is because of the fact that
the Tobacco in Old Gold Cigarettes
is always fresh and not dry. As you
well know, dry grass and dry wood
burn f&jter than green grass and sea-
soned wood. It is the same with to-
bacco. Dry tobacco burns fast and
hot, while fresh tobacco burns slowly
because it has moisture.
Old Gold is a COOLER smoke
than any other cigarette because the
tobacco being Factory-Fresh and con-,
taining moisture burns slowly the
smoker does not draw dry heat into
his mouth.
Since the smoker does not draw in
the dry heat of the tobacco into his
mouth and the smoke is a cool one,
there is no chance for coughing or
throat irritation.
The smoker, therefore, who smokes
Old Gold Cigarettes enjoys a smoke
which lasts longer ... is cooler...
with no throat irritation and cough
. full flavor of the natural fra-
grance of prize-crop tobaccos with-
out heat.
By using 2 Jackets of Cellophane,
Old Gold smokers who live in dry
sections of the country are assured
of a fresh cigarette by retention of
the moisture, whereas Old Gold
smokers in low, damp, or humid
communities are protected from ex-
cessive moisture, which prevents
them from becoming soggy.
You see, the House oT Lorillard
has been making fine tobacco prod-
ucts since George Washington's day.
It is this skill born of 178 years of
experience that enables Lorillard to
select, age and blend the world's fin-
est tobacco leaf into Old Gold Cig-
arettes and keep them always Factory
Fresh for the smoker.
No matter where you buy them,
Double-Mellow Old Golds will reach
you as fresh as they came off the cig-
arette machine. Let a trial package
of Double-Mellow Old Gold Ciga-
rettes tell you the rest of the story.'
Splendid Growth
Shown By Local
Institution
At the semi-annual meeting of 'lie
Hoard of Dlrectore of the Dade Fed-
eral Bavlnf* end Loan Automation of
Miami held yesterday, reports of the
organization were presented to show
thnt the growth in assets and busi-
ness of the institution has been re-
markable si...... its inception anil par-
ticularly during the past six months.
The regular semi-annual dividend at
the rate of four per cent per anuum
was declared and more than forty
thousand dollars was sent to the
stockholders for their dividends.
fhe Dade Federal operates under u
Federal Charter and the individual de-
posits are insured by the Federal
Savings and Loan Insurance Corpor-
ation, an agency of the United States
Government, beginning in December
1884 with asset* of $75,000, the As-
sociation has grown until it now hns
assets in excess of two and a half
million dollars, and has helped in this
area by the conservating extension of
loans to home owners and builders.
The organization is headed by Jos-
eph M. Upton, well known communal
worker and Insurance broker who is
president of the organization. Offi-
ces are on the ground floor of the
Congress Building.
through democracy with education,
tor no people can be kept eternally
enslaved."
COMPLETE
BANKING
FACILITIES
SAVINGS ACCOUNTS Deposits
made on or before July 10th draw
interest from July 1st at the rate of
2% PER ANNUM
This is the highest rate paid by any
commercial bank in Greater Miami
COMMERCIAL ACCOUNTS We
invite your account on the regular
commercial bank service basis.
In addition to the regular hanking
facilities mentioned above,
AMERICAN CHECK SERVICE
offers personal checking account ser-
vice, with the following unusual
ailifltions:
1 No minimum balance
2 No monthly service rharge
3 No charge for deposit*
4 Free Statements and cancelled
checks every 90 days
5 Your name printed on every check
without charge.
Only cost 10c per cheek drawn
(12.00 per book of 20 checks)
St or more opens an Account
Deposits Insured tip to $5,000 by
Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.
SOCIET*
BOAT RIDE
TO i:i. HELD
To raise funds for the German
Children's Aid Fund of the National
Council of Jewish Women a number
of local communal workers are spon-
soring a boat ride on the boat Seven
Seas on next Tuesday evening July
5th, to leave Pier 5 at 9:00 p. m.
In charge of arrangements are Itea-
tlamcs A. Rubin. Ralph Neufeld, Nat
Williams. Elry Stone, Leo R. Kup-
per and Harry Unrnhard. Those de-
siring to aid this splendid cause are
urged to make their reservations with
any member of the committee or with
Mrs. Ida Optner, chairman of the lo-
cal committee of the fund.

INSTALLATION
TO BE HELD
The first, joint formal installation
of the Young Men and Young Wo-
men's Hebrew Association will take
place Sunday. July 10th at 0:30 p.
m.. at the Pnlatial Restaurant.
Mrs. Jake Engler is general chair-
man of arrangements and is being
assisted by Mrs. Joseph Syman. Miss
Rosalind Friedman. Miss Claire
Zwi'itner and Miss Molly Engler.
The invocation will be given by
Rabbi Colman Zwit man and the bene-
diction by Rabbi Abraham Kellner,
Miss Ida Engler will be toastmistress
and Mrs. Lena Simon installing of-
ficer. The program includes songs
by Cantor Louis Hayman. Marx Fein-
herg and piano solos by Miss Jose-
phine Raxin
The public is cordially invited to
attend. Admission will be $1.00 per
plate and reservations must be made
in advance with any member of the
committee or by calling 2-5055 or
2-12fi0.
Officers of the Y. W. H. A. to be
installed are: Mrs. Marian Shindell,
president; Miss Gertrude Mandell,
vice president; Mrs. Albert Reisman,
secretary and Mrs. William Fried-
man, treasurer; of the Y. M. H. A.:
Milton A Friedman, president; Al-
vin Grossman, vice president; Dr.
Harold Rand secretary and Nat
Hlumberg, treasurer.

"Yehuda Halevi. the greatest He-
brew National Poet," was the topic
uf Dr. Wolfson's weekly talk before
i im. \k i. KAUFMAN
tli" Spinoza Group last Saturday af-
ternoon. Dr. Wolfson traced the
life of Halevi from his birth In To-
ledo, Spain, in 1086 to the ttma he
wrote the Sefer Hakuzari, quoting
many of his poems.
Dr. Mark Waldmon. prof .-.Mir 0f
languages in the College of the iity
of New York, read Heine'- ;-m:
Princess Sabbath. Dr WaMman
who is the author of Goethe and the
Jews and a Challenge to IIi\ii>m,
also, delivered an enlighten.:! talk
about current events.
Next Saturday afternoon at 3:00
O'clock the Group will meet ag
the lawn at 1059 Collins Avenue,
Miami Beach. After a brief musical
program, Dr. Wolfson will complete
his story of Yehuda Halevi.
Mr. Mnrgullis. the engineer in
charge of Harry Ricbman's -'state,
will speak briefly on Teclni
All are welcome. There is in.
mini it .mi*
KOSHER ZI0N
SAUSAGE CO.
INC.
37th St. and Normal Ave
CHICAGO, ILL.
Delicious Corned Beef
Pickled, Cooked and Smoked
Meats
NOW OBTAINABLE EVERY- \
WHERE IN FLORIDA
DEMAND IT FROM YOUR
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Road Service PHONE 5-4417 Marfak Lubrication
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Cars Called For and Delivered Free of ChargeMiami Beach. Florida ]
AMERICAN
BANK AND TRUST CO.
139 N. E. First Street, Miami, Florida
Do you "fly all to pieces" when the children are noisy, or
when the vegetables burn, or when the jelly won't "jell?"
Some mothers are just naturally cranky. Some mothers are
cross and impatient because they are nervous.
If you are a natural crank, DR. MILES NERVINE won't
'do much for you. If you are irritable because your nerves
are overtaxed, DR. MILES NERVINE will do a lot for you.
T .Do_.vou suffer from Sleeplessness, Restlessness, Nervou3
Irritability, Nervous Headache, or Nervous Indigestion? Do
you worry over trifles, start at sudden noises? Overtaxed
tSm^mT ?&USe a11 these trubles, and DR. MILES NERV-
INE will help you to relax those overtaxed nerves.
Why don't you give it a trial on our guarantee of satisfac-
r,on EJRIS522SZ back? Your druggist can tell you about
DR MILES NERVINE He has beerfielling it ever since he
started clerking in a drug store. Dr. Miles Nervine comes
m two formsLiquid and Effervescent Tablets.
laW-' Llqu,d Nervwe, Large Bottle $1.01Small Bottle 25*
r Effervescent Tablets. Large Package 75-Small Package 35*
STf^ERVINE
ac


FRIDAY, JULY 1, 1938
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
PAGE SEVEN
Certified Business Directory _
THE ADVERTISERS ON THIS PAGE MERIT YOUR CONSIDERATION AND PAT-
RONAGE BECAUSE OF REPUTATION AND ABILITY......
ACCOUNTANT
V. EDWARDS
Chartered Accountant. All branches
of Accounting. Complete Tax Service.
Olympia Bldg. Phone 8-8831.__________|
AUTOMOBILE SERVICE
General Anto Repairing
WRECKER SERVICE
AUTO PAINTING
Generators, Starters. Ignition, Prompt
Ser?.C''QTJIGIiBY'S GARAGE .. ..
131 Alton Rd., M-Bch., Tel. 5-9138
BATTERIES SERVICE
BATTERIES AUTO AND MARINE
PRICED S2.B5 UP
Recharging, Complete Electrical and
Ignition Service. Motor Winding, Car-
buretor Rebuilding.
ROAD SERVICE
Expert Workmanship
BEST BATTERY COMPANY
1500 W. Flagler St. Tel. 3-3212
CEMETERY SERVICE
MARBLB. Granite and Bronxe mark-
ers, MaiiBolems, cemetery work of
all description. 1351 N. W. 10th Ave.
KULL. Ph. 2-1896. ___________^_
CONSTRUCTION ENGINEER
DRAFTING SERVICE ON HOUSE
PLANS. Etc., reasonable rates,
work guaranteed.
W. PAUL MEREDITH
Construction Engineer, Room 205,
7937H N. E. 2nd Ave, Phone 7-4727.
DRAPERIES
BUILDERS
L. E. EDWARDS, Contractor
Builder of Mornmgside
LBB0Y. S. EDWARDS, Manager
6812 Biscayne Blvd. Phone 7-2168
In Miami Since 1898
"Let's Build a Home"
CONSULT me If that Is your "WISH"
I will make It a "REALITY." Plan-
ning, financing, building, that's my
business.
JESSE E. MARCOUX
IJIen"en*3hop
BETTER DRAPERIES
Phone 7-3881!. 97'h and 2nd Ave. N. B.
FLOWERS SHRUBBERY
BLOOMING Geraniums, bougalnvlllea.
Hibiscus, begonia, vines, crotons,
Beloperone. Many not listed. 10c up.
Best grade top soil 85c yd. Hammock
soil )1.25 yd. Manure $3 yd. Ph. 7-1871.
Osborne Nursery. 2996 N. W. 57 th st.
FURNITURE REPAIRING
PLUMBING
A. L. MERRIFIELD
Plumbing and Gas Fitting
Repairs and Septic Tank Work
All Work Guaranteed
25 TEARS' experience; large ana
small Installations. Ill N. h.. ZOtb
St. Phone 3-3932. __________________
FINE FURNITURE MADE FINER
Upholstering Refinishing Re-
pairing Antiques Restored. Abso-
lute Guarantee. _____
FLAMINGO FURNITURE 8HOP
Back of Grove TheatreGeo. F. Dar-
row. Mgr., 3247 Charles Ave. Phone
4-4880.
ELECTRIC RAZORS
LANDSCAPING SODLS
ELECTRICIANS
IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST!
PULVERIZED SOIL $1.00 a yard.
Muck, Marl or Mixed. Cow Manure,
3 bags $1.00. Phone 4-4804. Agent
will call.
For Years Master Electrician of Larg-
est and Most Famou Office Buildings
in the World
CHARLIE KALB
MASTER ELECTRICIAN
ALTERATIONSHOUSE WIRING
REPAIRS
THANK YOU PHONE 7-2817
1875 B. W. 1st St.
Ph. 4-1428
BUILDING MATERIAL
E i. WARNER A COMPANY
Lumber Sand Rock Brick Tile
Pre.tsedwoed Shingles Roofing
Builders Hardware Dupont Duco
Paints
Everything in BuHdlng Material
3126 N. E. 2nd Ave. Phones 2-1753
3-1754
BUSINESS COLLEGES
ELECTRIC CONTRACTORS
Repairs Contracts Alterations
LYON ELECTRIC CO.
The Oldest Established Electrical
Contractors at Miami Beach
Phone 5-2444 Nite Service 2-6744
COMPLETE Stenographic secretarial
and accounting courses. Member
National Association Accredited Com-
mercial Schools.
MIAMI BUSINESS COLLEGE
Phor*> 2-3801 111 S. Miami Ave.
COMFORT -!- PROTECTION
A WELL VENTILATED ATTIC
MEANS A COOL HOME
BARRON'S "SELFACTION**
LEAK-PROOF VENTILATORS
KEEP OUT BLOWING RAINS
and prevent high pressure formation
In attics. Let as replace your leaky
vents now.
L P. IRELAND COMPANY, INC.
843 N. W. First Court
Phone S-6495
Established Since 1914
BISCAYNE ELECTRIC SUPPLY
CO.
Electrical WiringAny Size Job
Repairing Anything Electrical
Residential and Commercial
815 S. W. 18th Ave. Phone 3-1288
LANDSCAPING AND MAINTEN-
ANCE. Soils and Sod. Fruit Trees
Palms and Shrubbery. Fertilizer for
Flower Beds. Screened Soils for lawn
dresBlnsr. __
MELROSE NURSERY & SOILS CO.
2741 N. W. 27th Ave. Phones 3-8611
3-8612
FLOOR COVERINGS
A COMPLETE Floor Covering Ser-
viceHotels, Apartments, Resi-
dences.
Cleaning and Moth Proofing;
LARVEX ODORLESS PROCESS
Many years of trustworthy service.
All customer's goods insured. MIAMI
CARPET CLEANING k LAYING
Co., John A. Baker, Owner, 120 N.
W, 2Sth St., Tel. 2-2921.______________
FLORISTS
EXOTIC GARDENS, INC.
Flagler and Bridge. Phone 2-6358
2-HS47. Beach Phone 5-2961 607
Lincoln Road. Office 2970 N. W. 17th
Avenue. Phone 2-3105.Finest Assort-
ment of Fresh Cut Flowers In Miami.
FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS
WIRED ANYWHERE
Speaking of Women
By Diana Klotts
ALICE L. SELIGSBERG
It was during the war. To the Ha-
ii.i-.sah office came pleas from Pales-
tine for medical aid. The Holy Land
was the tramping ground for contend-
ing armies. Hordes of locusts had
Bcouraged the countryside and de-
voared what little remained of crops.
The population was destitute, disease
was rife. Doctors and nurses were
few. medical supplies, scarce. Hadas-
sah heard the call, and immediately
set itself to the task. It was not an
easy matter. Diplomatic difficulties
in obtaining permission for the sailing
from American, British, French, Tur-
kish governments, had to be sur-
mounted; personnel and equipment
had to be obtained for a complete
medical unit to be sent on a 0,000
mile journey through perilous subma-
rine lanes across the Atlantic, the
English Channel and the Mediter-
ranean Sea. Nearly $500,000 was
needed for the vast project.
Finally, on June 12, 1918, the
American Zionist Medical Unit, Ha-
dassah'a floating hospital, camouflag-
ed by a pntchquilt of fantastie colors,
secretly sailed out of New York Har-
bor, along with eleven other ships
transiting 30.000 American troops
which were being conveyel across the
MM by cruisers and destroyers. The
unit consisted of 44 persons, includ-
ing physicians, dentists, nurses, civil
and sanitary engineers. The supplies,
weighing 400 tons, included the com-
MISCELLANEOUS
ELECTRIC f HAVER
Specialist
SCHICK AND 8HAVEMA8TER
OIL KITSACCESSORIES
I. A. ANDRESS
131 Shoreland Arcade. Pho. 8-4081
SIGNS
FOR COMMERCIAL WALL-
OUTDOOR SIGNS
TRUCK LETTERING ,
PHONE 3-6615 *,.
RANKIN X
SIGN CO. r 1
118 N. W. 2nd Avenue
STORAGE
REFRIGERATOR REPAIRS
WE MAINTAIN a complete shop in
which practically any make refrig-
erator can be efficiently repaired at
a fair price. A crew of trai.ied mech-
anics on duty day and night. Our
service cars carry everything needed
for ordinary and emergency calls..
Ventilation and Refrigeration Sen-Ice
Co. Phone at 3-3272 or 8-2452
ROOF REPAIRING
EQRY AUTOGRAPHIC REGISTER
Every Business Needs the Egry Sys-
tem. FlatPax Stationery. Carbon Rolls
HENRY E. KOPPLOW
925 N. W. 17th Street Phone 2-1174
OPTOMETRISTS
GLASSES OF DISTINCTION
By Dr. F. H. FISHER. Ontometrlc.
Eye Specialist. 943 Lincoln Road, Ph.
5-3580, Miami Beach. o o
PET ANIMAL HOSPITAL
BOARDING BATHING GROOM
Plucking Modern Boarding Ken-
nels.
KNOWLES PET HOSPITAL
Mrs. V. W. Knowles,
740 N. E. 90th St. 7-2141
PEST EXTERMINATING
WE GUARANTEE
To Exterminate Roaches, Rats, Mice,
Ants. Moths. Bedbugs. Termites.
A Confidential ServiceRates Always
Reasonable. No Charge for Inspec-
tion or Estimates
MIAMI BEACH CHEMICAL CO.
824 First St., Miami Beach. Ph. 5-4353
ROOF TROUBLES CURED
With crack-proof, non-drying white-
cool-tropical coating. Don't draw hett.
CHEAP AS TAR
5 Year Guarantee: Local Proof. Free
Estimate. Phone 2-5703
FIREPROOF BLDG., HEART OF
CITY
SPECIALIZING in personal effects.
Baggage room with free access-
Bags, 50c month ; trunk $1; 2, $1.50
month. Personal stalls, $1.50 month
and up; Furniture racks, $2.50 month
and up; Private rooms, $5 month and
up; Laager amounts of storage, le
cu. ft. Storage Warehouse Co., 13
N. E. 2nd St. Phone 2-1208 and wa
will pick them up.
TERMITE PROOFING
PALMER'S ROOFING COMPANY
16 years in MiamiW. N. Palmer,
Prop.
BARRETT APPROVED ROOFING
Sheet Metal Work Tile Roofing
"Roofs That Last"
15 N. E. 17th Terr. Telephone 2-3429
RUG CLEANING
HAWKINS RUG CLEANERS
Ruga Cleaned. Dyed and Repaired
Moth Proofing
Orientals Our Specialty
60 N. E. 39th StreetTel. 2-7798
SEPTIC TANKS
SUPERIOR
SEPTIC TANK CO.
EDWIN H. O'NEAL. Owner
12 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Don't Say: 'Septic Tanks"
Sav: "Superior Septic Tanks"
REPAIRS A SPECIALTY
Installations Any SizeReasonable
Prices. Phone 7-3220 day or nite, 484
N. E. 57th Street.
John Severin. Mgr.
TERMITE CONTROL SERVICE
Odorless Fireproof Safe
Old or New Buildings
5 YEAR GUARANTEE
Semi-Annual Free Inspection. Hun-
dreds of Satisfied Customers in South,
Florida. Termite Proofing Exclusively.
TERMITE CONTROL CO
Phone 7-2313 120 N. W. 53rd St.
TRANSFER AND STORAGE
JOHN E. WITHERS TRANSFER *
STORAGE COMPANY. INC.
1000 N. E. First Ave.
Local and Long Distance Hauling.
Vaults for Furs. Rugs and Silver.
CRATING PACKINGSHIPPING
Fireproof WarehousesCustom
BondedMoth Proofing
WE move you anywhere In U. S. A.
Bonded and insured carriers. Fhona
2-7188. Suddath Moving and Storage
Co. Office In all principal cities.
TREE MOVING
JOHN H. WHITFIELD
Nursery and Landscaping. Tree mov.
Ing specialist. Best of references. 1211
J. W. 79th St. Phone 7-3727.
SEWING MACHINES
ALL MAKES, repaired by factory ex-
pert. $1.50 ": parts for all ma-
chines. Used machines sold and rent-
ed. Sewing Machine Shop, 71, S. B.
1st St. Phone 2-4024. _______
DR. SANBORN
DENTIST
EX-RAY & GAS EXTRACTIONS
Cor. N. E. First Ave.. at Second St.
Opposite Catholic Church
PHONE 2-1460
Small Monthly Payments
pletc equipment for a hospital of 50
beds, hundreds of cases of drugs, med-
ical instruments and medicines; six
automobiles, two ambulances, two
trucks, an immense quantity of food
supplies and 100 large cases of cloth-
ing.
In charge of the personnel and re-
sponsible for the entire venture was
Miss Alice L. Seligsberg.
This week, speaking before a group
of men and women who were met in
her honor to celebrate the twentieth
anniversary of the embarking of that
floating hospital, the small, gray-
haired woman fondly recalled the
memory upon memory of fear, hard-
ship, anxiety, work, which make these
two the outstanding years in her life
which is dedicated to social work.
Picturesquely she described how, af-
ter four months of interrupted travel
and numerous delays in London,
Paris, and the obscure seaport of
Tarranto. on the Italian peninsula,
they arrived in Alexandria, Egypt.
There they found pestilence, hunger,
misery, chaos. Work began imme-
diately, in spite of hunger. "Many
days wc went hungry," she recalled.
"We lived for a time on malted milk
tablets. Everything seemed to be
seasoned with goafs milk which was
revolting to us."
But progress was rapid, and soon
the unit opened hospitals, dispensar-
ies in Jerusalem, Jaffa, Tiberias, Sa-
ted and Haifa.
That was twenty years ago. To-
day, in Palestine, n vast network of
non-sectarian hospitals, clinics and
welfare renters bear mute testimony
to the success of that venture, the
foundation for which was laid by
Alice L. Seligsberg.
RACIST MEASURES AGAINST
ITALIAN JEWS IN OFFING
Rome. July 1, (WNS)A memo-
randum outlining the need for some
form of radal legislation aimed at
Italian Jews is being drafted by
Propaganda Minister Alfieri for sub-
mission to Premier Mussolini, Alfieri
revealed in a speech in Veenice.. At
the same time the more extremist
Fascist press, notably Vita Italians,
rammed its anti-Jewish campaign.
The papers demand the introduction
of measures forbidding Jews, to em-
ploy non-Jews, to appear in the same
public places with non-Jews and to
sit at the same table with them.
Koolmotor
Gasolene and Oils

4Bi3CH-tl
Distributed By
ORANGE STATE
OIL CO.
I
9


PAGE EIGHT
THE JEWISH FLOBIDIA*
FRIDAY. JULY 1. 1930,
B*NAI B'RITH
BRIEFS
Ej E ALUtKT fkUXll
^
td BH
" v .
waa a r--t fasr ttat
n 1 rahsiiaii o6h. Tkit few wxi
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tan *at;.e
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at esaal was
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pas ed cracr a at paraec
-
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Mr 11.: Mr*. Kshca and fat
arrireii the* lass Tmdi; treat X:-
iiO. Ga_ t riot r?or:i- and
frwaef acre
*
Paaa Bat I
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Arrfaary ef the
aaat ride taa* T
pare? 1* ** <
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-
oath lav.....
jeVataaics from 3* rtatea bar, beta
scrite
*i As*...
atqkM taawfcj
elected, ax re aateifk:
pUa> will be anaoaneed,
kaa Jewry aaay
cjenrarate with those of MU ;
-Vs>>rr>caa Jewish
S- .. r
the poDa were 8td
- l and Xatha
O- irr-
loeal
M at
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li Zw/^ii:
SEMINARY URGED Congress Elections
TO WIDER SCOPE Are Held In Miami
aaaaa
:
West Palm Beach
;.-
Page 1
Jadaitsa
1 '

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reraa laa. It waa the Coauaittre
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Aaaerieaa Jewi. rvnrreas. the Atner-
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of Jewish r!rh*. T C I tr>~-
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- already
acftiVvH. At the 'xtraordinarr ae-
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her, aDd to which 400
LOW
FA RES
Reclining Seat Air-Con-
J/C:-t away from
and itiar naafoi U
-.. Plan yaw
nocnieaJJyia tac
Seaboard'a la tea
Look at these example*
ooe-vay Urea.
tfc* Beat dj
of the hic-h-
tripaecc-
eoanfort of
t type coaches.
flow.
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12B E. Fiajler St. Tei 1 _
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En
"b^ auspices of
Be Ji: at the Jo* h
I Ball haa been post-
Bandar, July :jrd. J
erred after which
Dow,
manager/.'

of \^\\\,,V ,-f HlACkSONVILLE'S'/'
Their ^ f'^-

tad by ui. The
--'rat use by the
under the
I thanks.
^//LEADING^1

DIM good thing aboct
Drama. Color. Interest
The Jewish
Festivals
by HAYYIftl SCHAUSS
Ootcwrt trigrMf fVWawaWwxa,
Colnrful i*t*momUi portrajtd,
aaajaawai art a*fmH iOmnrmfd
$2.50
n UNION OF AMFSJCAM HEB&FV CON-
GJLBGATK3NS Ml II l BUt-. cmawun
AIRCO^^ONS)
THE JEWISH FESTIVALS
CHr-----
SUM'MEU'COMFORT
at CUs modtn. iBBJgaal Betel la t
heart at aawatawi jawaaaaawa Evwy
neat wl* tab oad ahower. aolt wohw.
radio. Irtrj bed wttk aaaawaaaa mat-
asaa and renrltas kssp, awMaWj hsa
soar 00 erwry gaaa
POprjLAB nucn>
COCIT AH LOUNGE and COFTEE SHOP
oat). a rouMO hi
MOHL fATTlH f HOTU OESOTO
Omk
ico.d. a


Full Text

PAGE 1

B> —i. PAGZ TWO THE JEWISH FLOBIDIAJ. FRIDAY. JULY 1, 1J38 Pi IKWf(OK MEH lOKJi -J* aaasssser utiw Maa K>xx hat heee. r_nt rsest f ktr %  **i--*w It' tii Mr* Eft Mas** fur ta* winter ami wm\ M is. -i ta* '~ warns aha* mmmmt at the USB%  If WE> FOE NORTH M-- Man MM it was* Tsssatay 1" • i w ; • • •: has parents .i w_.i-.a mi w-"£ 2i. • -ii nil a Jnhwa %  '-%  sierw rsssc CWaaer. • %  MUERItGE 1* AXNUNC*TX> X' Old Mr*. Sarsenet i. Ki*1 ... y-.t-n. Reara i •! : : %  .-•:-£ :•• -.1 ~.Lf %  : "!• %  '-• :j ; x:--M-*. r-—* l^jurmu. -i >£•." %  • %  LEAVE* ON BNjrTM*>wN Xr i: : *£ -s. Hx-*r->::• wtr-j jflft a M *SSSSBB*B> ry 11— ; ...... ... : -i; v :•-? %  -:>:•> %  ** %  *?* %  f %  %  • %  %  ••-• ii: i--~-? Zi-7 w_ i in. i li. v.- 5cxws-ix : ^in -i* IWIII M-M iiiin EnBCTTKNfl HOHf and M.-t Dsrrfal Kiu rwara-j -tan *r***r* II itnsent M i tat f**ar j A • %  ; rew t --•-' ?SJ*: CIsshonorary • rw %  r %  _• \* %  Marsha] uv.: r---._ J :' H I early tr* .. • RET I R.vs 10 f ITT ;: y fr-jm ** Now Xorh wi re %  h*y visited relative* and frii • • • TYKETRIP Mr E. JLlKr: PaSsc i'lili l t %  -.. ;-—:-i: :'. U- I HE • J -*- .'•-• Hnnqasfture. W spenf r f.-.ea. LaTALTI CUB STwNMRB PICNIC j.' En.-li%  rj J_y 4-J M E ••i.-.it ''i— Swimmi mat :^*r.y card xi=>e I J rfll M Offcfl '-• I fa *""— I ••; %  '.•.. -:.n DUnot | • :j aslt*4 Mrs. F. M-Hrry Morris. Mil* ...-.'i Mr. I'., lil berg. All XMcten and their :.ally invittd tob< PROGRESSIVE GROWTH in RESOURCES Dec. 31, 1934 ... Dec. 31. 1935... ...| 74.744 .... 510,522 Dw-. 31, 1936 .... D< 31. 1937 ... ... 1.513.-75 ... 2.315^00 )UM 30,1938 S2.500.000 We arc very pleased to again announce the usual regular SEMI-ANNUAL DIVIDEND — of — &f 4 % Per Annum &f which the Dade Federal directors have declared as of July 1,1038 A full month's dividend calculated as of the first will be paid on all acocunts opened before the tenth of the month. NOW IS THE TIME TO OPEN YOUR ACCOUNT. PHONE 3-2652 • INJURED SAYINGS HOMAGE LOANS DHDE FEDERAL snvincs QHD LORH nssocmnon OF mmmi Ground Floor Confess Bldo., 109 B. E.Second flvt. J. M. UPTON, President &f &f &f &f &f I — : ... .-.-!-. ;i j ..' aataai • • %  T9 T1STT Di C AJMHJ> V %  i SMI Jirt L*oi Zcacstx vfli -: -• i.T :' r i **%  :%. — •£ -_-:-•% %  •%  ja, %  %  • HVKEIXc F HXTBMJ PEBFOBAaXD 7"i.i!--ii-•' M.s % % %  OarMMW. Uatx-.-T %  'Mr HBJ Mrc .*an -%  :• G* nji Rii:.i %  i if y.ii. >:• A i }i. %  %  -..tt N*W i -; •£,-.>Sniiy •: -ihaaa* *-f the Wiar'a parcau a4ti :. -.•;•• %  K-..--r :':' -. r aa4 c*iy r*laT_T ia attradaacc. N. • • %  • 1 %  7 Man Fciabcrf aa4 pi*i sy Lonia Katx. i :' r -. -,. .-, -•-.. vUefe ... "api left i a aoerfiaooe trip tt New T -i %  • %  BHHBBBX >TONE WEDDING TO BE SOLEMNIZED tahaai A. K-.-'r will of;•. :i* w. .••raony wa*n ...--: I '.'-H H gf T :!:a. CJa.. will txoome tie SUM of tfaia city. • 1 i ByaagegM and M -B Zetaaaaa will bt maid B hart Blumenthai will be best man. The bride tion in the school* of Vidalia. The groom i* a native G and ha been a resident of Miami where he i engaged for a Dumber of year*. ; • %  nz the ceremony the couple will leave for a trip to New Tork. • • • ANNEAL PICNIC TO BE HELD Ai'ordinr to an announcement by Manuel Bandler chairman of the arrangementcommittee, the picnic of the local B"nai B'rith Lodge will be ti. f;ne^t events of the cur•ason at the Las Olas Casino. Fort Lauderdale onSunday July 17. Memberof the West Palm Beach of B'nai B'rith will be the guests of the local Lodge. A feature of the day will be the baseball game n the teams representing both lHELD i; ........ :_ .-. i rd. Hit Peggy Crotner. Mis* I r.d Marx Feinherg. mal program danc.r_r i yed in the patio of the hotel and refreshment! were rerred. • • • TAKES sanaa* CRADl ATE I HI KK D* HsaaM Kind, prominent phy%  BS BIf of the T. M. H. I Daytona Beach where he wUl take a past graduate course in EM which i being conducted by *• f h Btwtt Mel a! Society. H %  %  •rstjjti to the citr about Jolr 5th. • • • FRATEBMTT GIVES MOONLIGHT OUTING N re: .-. the way of enttruinmen; the moonlight outing pven l.y > --. I' Fraternity last T"oe'z st Greynold's Park. 1 '. *rit* George Ginsberg and Jack i*rg in charge of arrangements. Refreshments, dancing and boating wars featured daring the evening. Member, of the fraternity attnding | with their dates were George Gins! berg. Jack Somber*. Newton Frish| man. Nathan Aronovjtx. Elmer Spector. Martin Greenberg. Bernie Serkin. I Gerald Elkin. Ray Cowen, Norman Somber*. Abe Lehman. Sherwood Eavine Aaron Goldstein and Irving Ginsberg. • • • BETH DAVID TO HOLD ANNEAL PICNIC The annual picnic sponsored by Beth David Sisterhood will be held at Hardies Casino. Miami Beach on Sunday. July 24th. beginning at 9 :00 a. m. In charge of arrangement* is Mrs. J. Engler. chairman. • • • VISITS IN MIAMI Mr-. M. Kantor and daughter Hel%  New York are visiting in Miami as the goest of Mrs. Louis Pal•j*f I Mn Kantor. They will • for %  month. PRELIMINARY OBGAN1ZATIOV %  FORMED Th* first aaeeting of the reeentjy organised Greater Miami Fecof Jewish Welfare Foods wi at the MraWansj Hotel last iiy evening. Mr. Stanley C. M.T* r j wa naaaed temporary chairaaan. Mr. BtassB. temporary 'ecretarT 4: ; Mr J"et4 M. Lipton tassshwary tr*^rr. A fact findiag cowaai:. titact committee and rale* aad regrolation* eoassaittee were a law] ;.> present report* at the nest aaettiag of the organisation. Following -j, preliminary work of the essaautteet the permanent officers will be elected by the Board of Directors. INSTALLATION CEBEMONTES HELD Ian impressive candlelight ceremony Monday evening-. Mr*. Irriaf l was installed as pre*:;-: Miami unit of Junior H;s=. ah for the cotaing year. TV lation ceretaonies followed the anneal banqaet held at Fassa's restaurant ,u Miami Beach which was attended by %  emhrri and their friend*. Mr*. %  was presented with a cvrsar* af rr. The officer*' table was be*:-ed with roses and can :.ii wss otj.T*r~l with gold candelib-a. Mrs. Edward S. R->S was ehairman for the evening an] we|. ruests. She intro:.Itrs. F-i'da Lutsky. honorary preii-: iitsah. Mrs. La-sky *••? ?'a-:mistress for the prograt: •ed the :nt*llation of new -•'. Beers. Mrs. H th selected as her • I -. cinema aeassatatfca wh'ch tacal bit in; the past year of the Mi?r.: gi of Junior Hadacsah and its Mrs. A. E. Freilicb gave a <-aroera' feature of Minn. which was fo'lnwed by s. dineussion by Mr-. Gertrude Bersou as '-ommentator" fn various phase* of Junior Hadassah projecu. MisIda Sfer. retiring president, gar^ tht president's annual report and was presented with a gift from memVrs of the organisation. Others who war* inducted into office with Mrs. Querido were: Mrs. Edward S. Roth and Miss Blle Tanr.en. Tice-pre.tidents: Miss Esther Winer and Mi>i Rnsaiyn Klein, corresponding *ecre•-•-: Miss Jeanette Kronenfeld. r-cording secretary: Mrs. Marx %  fsjtnberg. financial secretary: Miss Barbara (Joans, treasurer : Miss Harr;-1 Damenstein. historian: Miss Betty Lassry, Miss Trudy BandeL Miss Matilda Cohen. Mrs. Aaron Far.-.. M-Anita Silverman and Miss f BngeL members of the board of ::rectors. Mrs. Querido called a meetitc the new officers and director* la-t • v.-ning. June 2J>th. Bt her home.



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PAGE POUR PA THE JEWISH PLOBIDIAJf BULLETDf TEMPLE TBRAKT, a* MIAMI 117 N. E. 1th Strt Orfic* Phone 2-77*5 FRIDAY, JULY 1, 1933 "ABBI JACOB H. KAPLAN, P O. 9 3 ULMAN A. Zw:TNAH MM AftM*, Drfv_--25 & N c ,.„ „._,_,,, Pg Nronr Xo^^.JS^^^ys,PAV *o v,a,T Mr *r.d MR J. L M taiaea" at a formal dinner in honor •f their soa Irwin at the Anchor In= .Pas*-*-Grille. He had recently been Bar MMavak. Mr. aad Mr? Max Daris m-.red to Ma-feria B-a--h for the wc CONGREGATIONAL T* ** withdraw 4rWJ frsai the C.z bas b~:; ;Urie of tit He-* Jep arf e i : of ozr Reiigioe* %  ;-•!„ H report* thai yxir ehCd *** *rh ng HiU(_dosi ;r:•: T-.~.ii f ;,;. rijit reiaciTes ia JachmariUe. Mi Hea Bir—fill l*ft Taaaiay for Bastoa hr. she wUl remain the aii %  --er. Mr. and T Mn Mac Preaser darinf her nsit in J %  : yesterday nriiiL< I .L-: :. :_. .:. >>w Tarb • Haiassah held the bridge tost 1 .-<-iay afternoon. Mrs. B. B. Bromberg U in charge of the tourneys. Mr. .Sam WVi entertained in her home at Keptaae Beach Friday with a luncheon and china shower honorr Miss Kate Sachs, bride-elect of J-J 1". Blisa Sachs was presented with many lorHy pieces of her chosen Patter:. -.as gifts from the x .-•'•. Pr>ent were : Mrs. M. Chepeail Mr-. 1 M. L.bennan. Mrs. J. Bfeoaa, Mn. M. Ghelerter. Mrs. Ber"' %  Ml*. Rose Grinich, Mrs. %  ilosenson. Mrs. .Si Sobel. Mrs. Mannie B*xal. M.--. Bl Chepenik. M Abe Chepaik. Mrs. Meyer Chep| ealk, Mrs. RoUnd Krantx. Mrs. J. B. sTetoB, Mr-. Anna Rippa Mr,. Harry Sachs. Mis^ Joliet Ghelerter. Louise Witten and Gertrude LieberBaa. Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Easrig u daughter. Mrs. Oscar Fiaawn ha-. returned from New Orieans %  hen they attended the graduation ei es at Tulane I'r.iTersity. wh*re Dj I M Ewrix. M>U of Mr. and Mrs* %  his menical degree. Dr. Z ir nt ha just returned from Jaekaoav. 1 where be took the state -ar Friend: '• • weekly buL'etins begin with irase: "Eren the reI of the Temple in Jerusalem *s important as the instrucWe kaov. of i phrase referred to %  :£.truct:oa. OM pas*, year Mr D. FreedTEMPLE ISRAEL of Miami. ST. PETERSBURG NOTE By ANNABEL JACOBS I" 1 -1 .•.:h!;ght of the week was a t-a^h party and picnic g->en the Ladies' An :.iry at Don Ca^ar Bear-h. Q ... ^ A swimming w-re eojosad all afternoon after which a delicious dinner was serred. JACKSONVILLE M ;' %  %  n of Charlotte. S I .-< %  %  .. !... .^ D vi.itir., her unc.e and aunt. Mr. and Mrs. R I %  M 17 for Miami. v. ueaday e-eniag the Senior Ha• ^--ab dance was heid and in charge of rrangements was Mrs. Henry jK .-.-..--•i by Mrs. Nat Cohen. Mrs. Ike W;-.te n aid Mrs L. Bucholx. Mr. and M.-. Jark We:man fthe former Sally Rjrkind of this city) tar. r*r, :n ,H from .. .^.^ to Ouadk. They win make their borne in Tempa. ;: %  *ss hostess to the it a card party and t-a'h sapper it her home on Trae•I-:and. Mr and Mrs. Charles E. Fink ascertained at Pont. Vedra Fridar I • : th a w.iner roast honoring; their daughter, Mtos Raela Fink, who xrad>ia-, .... nth from Roben j[ r Higt School and Miss Sylria Fink of New y,, rt Q^ ^^ cf M r ink. D riag the week Mr. and Mrs. i :k end their goeat took a motor Daytons B-aoh. An inform*! at home wa, b^Id Thursday for mem-be famUy tad their friend^ Mtos Fink hu •!, been the gnant of GREYHOUND LINES GMTHOTJafD TKBMINAL AT MIAMI %  BACH j ALL NOBTHBOUND BUgSBS LEAVE FROM PH D-1812 alo Washington Avenue ^•>S-JSSc-SS.irS?.j^^^^^^^^^^^ Do You Own Your Home? There ntver waa a better time than now to b'uild on* The Liberal Financing Through Federal Housing Administration Makes It Possible ? %  £• me *• ca!1 ,u,"> 01 ^ Bldfl. Phone 2-3151 TUN NOTES I Announcement has been made br Mrs. Samuel Schapiro of the marriage of her daughter Sally Rivkini •• 81 Petersburg, to Jack B. v. -. aan. vf Tampa, ion of Mrs. L. Gordon. The ceremony took place June l-'th in Daytona Beach. Dr. A. S Eeinfeld performed the o-remony! lb mmediatelr af:.-r tLi f poinu of interest in -ew Tork and Canada. Upon their "turn they will reside in Tampa Mr. A. A. Finklestein left Saturday for an extended trip to Soata • a. New Tork and other poinu Of interest in the north. Mr. Fink!-ttein will return here August 1st. Mrs. J. Markowitx Mrs. M. J. Kasnel and Louis Lubetxky entertain-i Sunday for their parents. Mr. aal Mn. I. K. Lubtxky in honor of the..silver wedding annirersary. with a I iffet aanpor at their home. SUJ N-^ra-ka Avenue. Guests inrited -r^ Mrs. S. F. laaaeaoa Mtoa Hannah Iaaen, Mr. A Negfa, M -Boaa Kagta, Mr. ani Mrs. Charles Markow.u. Mr. s 1 Mia, Qeataa H. Laasatt, Miss A:: • and Mr. Qeotfla Jr. L:are:t. Mr. a^; Mr*. X. Peck^tt, Mr. and Mrs. A. H-.-— vi-z. Mr. a: „i Mrs. S. Ber. Mr. Pailiip VVetoaataa, Mrs. A. Br-^I Dr. Bad Mr-. A. Bryan, Mr. J^wvr, L. M'-ed and other*. VnOUST BROSL Rlf? *^ lm .1.. mrrr-w-l *^ tM th0 BEST THE ROSEDALE INN IS NOW AT IT8 NEW LOCATION 709 FIFTH AVENUE WEST HENDERSONVILLE, N. C. DIETABY LAWS STEICTLY OBSEBVED UNDEE THE PERSONAL MANAGEMENT OF MRS. ROSE LIPSITZ • MODEP.NLY EQUIPPED, REASONABLY PRICED STRICTLY KOSHER" —


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FRIDAY, JULY 1, 1938 THE JEWISH FLQBIDIAN MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CONGREGATION 1645 8. W. 3rd Street ABRAHAM A. KELL.NER, Rabbi RABBI'S RESIDENCE: 919 8. W. 13th Court; Phorw S-5102 SCHEDULE OF SERVICES Daily: Shachrls at 8 a. m.; Mlncha at 6:30 p. m.; Maarlv, 15 minutes after sunset. Sabbath services: Friday evening at 5:30 p. m.; Saturday morning at 9:30 a. m.; Saturday afternoon at 615 p. m. ANNUAL PICNIC Tbe annual picnic of the Ladies Auxiliary will take place in Hardy's Casino, Sunday July 10th. This affair, arranged by our Ladies Auxiliary, is the most important of the summer and is the main source of revenue during the months between May and October. Hence our sincere appeal to all friends and supporters of our Synagogue and Hebrew School to come to our aid in attending this picnic. The personnel of the committee is by itself an assurance and i guarantee that a most enjoyable time il in store for all. As in the past the Ladies in charge will prepare for a full line of food and drinks to satisfy f i\v hungry and thirsty soul. There are also accommodations for swimming and games for those interested. Reasonable prices will prevail and tables will be set up for families or groups who want to have their meals together. IHUJfiUAlKS NAMKD At the lasi rugulur meeting of the Congregation Mr. George Chertkof was named the Congregational Representative to the Miami Federation of Charities. The Congregation also renamed Mr. J. L. Sli.e-I.et, Mr. H. M. Drevich and Mr. A. Pepper to represent the Congregation on the Board of Directors of the Greater Miami Jewish Cemetery Association. CONGRATULATIONS We extend heartiest Mazel Tov greetings to Mr. and Mrs. George Rachlin whose marriage was solemnized last Sunday by Rabbi K.-liner.. MAZEL TOV Sincere Mazel Tov greetings to Mr. and Mrs. Henry Sollevoy whose newly born daughter was named Chaya Toibe at the services last Monray. YAHK7.EIT OBSERVED Tuesray. June 28 was the first Yahrzeit after the late Mr. Abraham Jucobs Olov Hasholom who was the reader in our congregation for years. Ual.l.i Kellner eulogized him briefly at the sen-ices. Mr. William Clein, son-in-law of the late Mr. Jacobs served Tikkum in his memory. LADIES AUXILIARY TO MEET The Ladies Auxiliary will hold a very important meeting this Tuesday evening in the Shul and all members are requested to be present as the forthcoming picnic plans will be discussed and completed. OTlutmL WjotoA. By HARRY SCHWARTZ The nerve of some people's children, on a honeymoon when one has a Y column to write. Yep, that's what Harry Schwartz did. You know Harry has done such splendid work for the x in K> many respects that it is astonishing to find out that something tun ed up more important to him than 'he y. Seriously, however, we do wish Harry and Sandra the best o* luck and may their marital ship sail forevi r on calm waters. The wedding took place at the Orthodox Synagogue. The chupa bear• rs wi re Arthur Blatt, Al Pallot. Manny Teitler and myself. Al received many "mcrchesens" and we are all looking forward to seeing the treat lover become married. Incidentally. I believe this is the Ural marriage that resulted from %  '."ting of individuals at the Y. It f'w more materialize we'll opeu a matrimonial bureau. cartoon was shown and Bob explained how the animation was accomplished. The large audience that attended enjoyed his interesting lecture. It was the first in the series of eulturul meetings planned for the Y. You know ut first we thought that bemuse the Louis-Schmelling fight came on the air at the same time that our guest was to lecture our attendance would be small. Fortunately as you know, Louis obliged us by knockiug out Schmelling in 124 seconds and thus we had our usual large audience. PAGE FIVE Our Y diamondball team under the capable guidance of Dr. Barney Weinkle is in second place in the Miami Beach League. It is odd to note that the only defeats suffered by the league leuding team has been at our hands. Our deepest regrets go to Frank Rose who broke his ankle sliding into third during a hectic game. 1 am sure he will appreciate visitors at his home. We are still discussing the possibility of securing an executive director. The Board of Directors and the Governor's Club are going into the matter in detail. An early and pleasant annouueement may be forthcoming shortly. For years, the Y. M. and Y. W. have talked about having installation banquets. For some unknown reason none have been held in years. This year wc are starting on a new foot. however. Thus it is that on Jidy 10th, there will be held at the Palatial Restaurant a joint installation of •he Y. M. and Y. W. Mrs. Engler and her committee promise a splendid evening's program. Reservations thoold be made early to avoid the last minute rush. Lust Wednesday evening we were privileged to hear and see Robert Epstein, well known Miami Herald cartoonist at our clubrooms. A Popeye With Harry gone to Chicago for about a month you will have the pleasure (?) of reading guest columns. If you have a favorite columnist submit his name and we'll try to get him out of retirement for your enjoyment. Your columnist this week, of necessity In the emergency, was Milton A. Friedman. Is everybody happy? ,11 Mill! Y NEWS WATERMELON PARTY HELD The second successful affair of the summer activities sponsored by the Junior Division of the Y. M. H. A. was held last Monday evening in the form of a watermelon beach party with Dave Shier in charge of arrangements. A pleasant evening was enjoyed by all. The Junior Division of the Y will hold their regular meeting on Monday evening at the Y clubrooms beginning at 9:00 p. m.. and all boys and girls are cordially invited to be present and assist, cooperate and participate in the activities planned by the Junior Y. Membership in the Junior Division is onlyl a small fee and all those interested in joining are requesteo to communicate with THE WORLD'S WINDOW -By LUDWIG LEWISOHNOn July the sixth there will convene at the well-known French watering place of Eviau representatives of all these countries which responded to President Roosevelt's call to confer concerning the emigration and resettlement of the victims of political and religious persecution. It is well that the purpose of the conference was so phrased. Actually and practically the people who must be helped are the Jews of Germany and Austria Now since Secretary Hull issued the invitation for this conference and thus made the United States by that action the single keeper of the Christian conscience remaining in the world, very grave and very catastrophic changes have occurred. It was clear even then; in fact it has been clear since 1933 that one of the aims of the German Government was the gradual extrusion of the Jews from the economic order. But that process had not yet become a violently retroactive one. It has now become so in both Germany and Austria. What remains of Jewish property is being coldly confiscated. It is, of course, theft at its brazenest. It destroys by what it is, the institution of private property—the right to private property—as thoroughly as ever did the confiscations of the Bolshevik revolution. If a state can suddenly say: all that Jews have honestly earned in this land can betaken from them under some foolish or foul pretext what is to prevent another %  fate from saying: all that Catholics have earned, all that redheaded people have earned, all that Mormons or holy rollers or those of Greek descent have earned can be taken away from them on similar pretexts. It is a fact grimly amusing to contemplate that the countries belonging to the anti-Communist block practice precisely those measures of Communist policy of which they feign to stand in the deadliest fear; the regimentation and gradual extinction of private enterprise, the confiscation of the property of definite classes, the extermination of heretic and dissident. Quite literally there are in this age, there have been in no age. fools more grossly self-deceived than those conservatives in Britain and elsewhere who have a sneaking sympathy for the dictators. The dictators conserve nothing that belongs to the classical tradition of civilization, neither private property nor private judgment. It is this situation that will have to he faced at Evian. It has recently been estimated that prior to the most recent confiscations the property held by German and Austrian Jews who now number circa 600.000 still amounted to ten billions of Kei.-hsBob Kaplan, treasurer, or Miriam Weiutraiib, membership chairman. JACKSONVILLE M...,l-„ 3EACHES UNFORGE1TABLC l S.--.VACATION MCKSONVILLE'S LARGEST md FINEST HOTEL 300 BOOTH MO BMW &X. !••.•• %  I. Mo It O..UI OCCMXMV •Vti> An..ci.• W..U •< Muttlr iii-J A Robert R. MeyeHotel mark. Not much per capita, but still enough with which, added to J. D. C, and U_ P. A., and other funds, to facilitate enormous emigration and resettlement. The representatives of the powen assembled at Evian will have ti. consider the question whether in that world economy which is so closely inter-related, the Nazis have the right to declare tnat tney will deliberately drive 600,000 of their nationals to other lands and first reduce those nationals to the condition of naked beggars. In other words, whether they have the right to burden the economies of other countries with the poverty of those whom they have robbed. I am sorrowfully of the opinion that the Jews of the free countries, and especially of our own. have not and are not giving nearly enough, that they are not stricken deeply enough by the fate of their brethren in Germany and Austria. It Is inconceivable that there should still be Jews in America who do not vicariously suffer and do not give for overseas relief and still argue about Palestine. It is inconceivable. It is inconceivably stupid and shameful. Nevertheless it is necessary, it is essentinl that the Jewish representatives at Kvian raise with all possible force and emphasis the question of international comity involved in (a) the arbitrary expulsion of nationals and above all. (h) the prior impoverishment of those nationals. And the Jews have the right and duty to raise, that question not only as Jews but as citizens of their respective states. It is clear that a much larger question than even the Jewish question is involved here. You cannot expell your nationals into the void or to another planet. Fugitives have to flee somewhere. Somewhere means another country and another economy. Hence it can be soberly said that the example of the confiscation of Jewish property shakes the very basis of civilization. It is war upon the world. It is madness and chaos. I wonder whether this quite fundamental question is on the agenda of the Evian conference GERMAN BUND LEADER GRILLED (Continued from Page One) ^ leged policy was consistent with thel Bund's program of Arianyisni and anti-Semitism. Grilled on the I'.nn 1 i propaganda linking Jews to Communism, Wheeler-Hill admitted that the. top leaders of the Communist Party are non-Jews and conceded that nevertheless the Bund emphasizes that Communist is synonymous with Jew. Asked by Senator McN'abee if the Bund wasn't dealing in fallacy in. spreading such propaganda, the witnexs said "I would not Bay that." H professed ignorance when queried about Bund membership and how many members were paying dues. He denied however that anybody had to take an oath or that it was a political organization. The second witness, Gustave Elmer, identified as national organizer, said he was born in Germany and naturalized in Jersey City in 1926. He claimed 96 branches of the Bund throughout the country. He also denied there is anti-Jewish persecution in Germany Elmer went so far as to say that "friends coming back tell us everybody is working and happy and they; say how happy the Jewish people' are." He too insisted the Bund was an American organization with no link to Germany. Two other witnesses, William LuedIke. secretary of the Businesmsan's League, and Theodore Dinkclacker, an official of one of the Nazi camps, testified. Leudtke told the committee that Senator Wagner did not represent the German-Americans satisfactorily and declared that one of the aims of the Bund is to elect "German candidate!." Dinckelacker, leader oe the Nazi youth movement in this country, testified that members of the Bund youth groups are taught antiSemitism. He seconded everything Kuhn said but declared that while he would fight against Germany he would not fight for Jews. Assemblyman Irwin Steingut, member of the committee, engaged in a sharp exchange with the witness while the packed courtroom cheered and jeered. MARKET t ^' !" '^flrQ.ii'll[.f Cli A Word To The Wise A LKA-SELTZERIZE m EVERYONE SEEMS TO BE USING ALKA-SELTZER THESE DAYS 1 J I SHOULD THINK) THEY WOULD f ..IT 0OES WONDERS FOR ME L Millions of users feel that they get quicker, more pleasant, more effective relief from ALKA-SELTZER than from old-fashioned unpalatable preparations. That's why ALKA-SELTZER is more in demand than almost any other single item in the average drug store. We recommend ALKA-SELTZER for the relief of Gas on Stomach, Sour Stomach, Headache, Colds, Morning After," Muscular Pains, and as a Gargli in Minor Throat Irritations. We really mean it Use ALKA-SELTZER for any or all of these discomforts. Your money back if it fails to relieve. In addition to an analgesic (Acetyl-Salicylate of Soda), each glass of ALKA-SELTZER contains alkalizers which help to correct those everyday ailments due to Hyper-Acidity. In 30* and 601 packages at your drug store. Alka-Seltzer



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PAGE EIGHT THE JEWISH FLOBIDIA* FRIDAY. JULY 1. 1930, B*NAI B'RITH BRIEFS Ej E ALUtKT fkUXll ^ td BH %  •-• v waa a r--t fasr ttat n 1 rahsiiaii O6H. Tkit few wxi : -_i ru-r: • Tana* r.nst has* beta • tan *at;.e ahu rvreay I %  aaaehaai an t-v/ng to 1 %  1 'r> aa • at esaal was Iw -: a* t*i* ?*.> aae ( u: • pas ed cracr a at paraec %  aaaa ia*? yes *c wita nt Mr 11.: Mr*. Kshca and fat arrireii the* lass Tmdi; treat X:iiO. Ga_ t riot r?or:i- and frwaef acre Paaa Bat I ---':•Arrfaary ef the aaat ride taa* T pare? 1* ** < aa4 x. rfga* M --IT % tx-a plot oath lav jeVataaics from 3* rtatea bar, beta • scrite *i As*... atqkM taawfcj elected, ax r e aateifk: pUa> will be anaoaneed, kaa Jewry aaay cjenrarate with those of MU ; %  -Vs>>rr>caa Jewish S.—. %  r %  the poDa were 8td l and Xatha Oirrloeal M at t*^r ?v^i 1 %  li Zw/^ii: SEMINARY URGED Congress Elections TO WIDER SCOPE Are Held In Miami aaaaa : West Palm Beach ;.Page 1 Jadaitsa 1 : _r 1 -: • r a*.e iast Unwdaj "•:.rt : -• beta of I baas the Pain Bear* breach of %  %  :-•• :• %  : : % %  Lodge* sad Prcaaaeat apwairvd cat rtaai afiaa hUrit ,,., -. KB* •-• Wta: !, .-_llfllMt f ,...'. .., : f May Ktfc aad 3 f*~ aee&iJ *** : > T fwhaawa Tat ', < &f%  *•>.* of aucial txcaifkatK* boa enaaantxe* was (Hal --aadpaist of Jcdaisau %  '••''•••'.._•.. 1^ coaaaaitt oa Jia i %  %  t-urmtti. Mfi* t aatf aaaaaa a aiaaari -• iria>n aa.Rracniaf fr ta* f naawimn.' ea Aaraaaai V %  Mi"'-' %  taa aaaaial Orxaaeaatiaa f Aaxriea aakn>4 hs roaatita. -; ; • -t*ay gataaetDr. B<*n Ordn. ta reparoac far tat aoaal jaabec fniaiaiiotm. m% 3Maaalf tv aK af < II K. •.'. 1 a i i %  v.: ••a aw rtMay. Al ; ( it: •. .; aaat rt^a'xaa aataoac J*t J, ti f-_;^ ..... I v.. -•* %  _••••! : ? •.•_•!•_ -' — i• r' % % %  r' '. \a*:; tl-jtz %  %  • %  • k -'. ;• > 1 %  :* %  •••-:> %  •:• "%  %  '?* raateia %  I B • to peri I' Lord %  rrafa. .-. verc 1 ^ th on 0 T tpreaat. ... •' "*• %  %  %  • -• M." ti-"Et %  B nai Brita hT. oa J*wik law. Oreaaaaaac :•that it a*d aeeioed aot to p.~" %  -: aita :i^ -rt %  • r the reaoltitioa aooa*: *: t '. rmm eoareatioa r*_ thc J'jorph 8ei>.Ho> LOOM }. ;-rpoa*d aolotion lit.k: iha Coaajiaaaiaaa taa Afjaah (-le-r^ %  b •. : Berh braei Tae --1: and taa refoca. of Prat %  t :in \isr**s a defti ta rtat .r? ;; •.;.-...._ ( -,-•• %  ',.--•an '-'-C*f* : %  • • ••; .-Twi inab. : ; %  • %  *•••.-—:••' .: %  • aarw Beth El I : v Hall i; %  l; • •:. Aazi -JT} I t to 1 I.-. :.--n in '>nnanr ttir.Tjil) tiit Totttal AUyah aLit> fr'/m mar.y local '' %  .%  A (j rtaied riag a party 1afoaaay at the for f jr-.i'rr ;• tail ttj--1 from MrG .'.'• }' %  Uaaa. hb Bol Robin, Ifn z*r. Mis. Albert Gasper, Hi Birnl MJ Albert 1 y-tr •:. rraat hi -i^ -Ta.k : : atra, Aleaai n S 'ai." IWrc will t>. game. I I'*r-T j %  .* a J'v who niarr. %  Gen:!!! bii ; in a J*-w.h %  rj t It pen "-'• %  • Jeaaal •':.;---41 :: -irf Aatericar. lewiak Ccn8* at tkat atne wa L. Br-a>i. A* a rT:It ;r.'. *a laraaai a Beaaoraadhiai i T*-:*catioB8 apeahiac in tb/-*-* % %  %  %  > Jw. wao amraa' taa rtioB in the treaties nf peace of %  M f*t. ciaows r 1 t caaataaal -*ion to aiiu* troap*. Tkat wa* hi IMS these r* v. j T1 jq BcaaM. T<-dar tb*r r -.. .., !, bi t!l r/Lhd Srat^. .u$-h estimated resnlta oa >b* 'rae elc-rone. d -! %  alaerjai A peat gvaai has alrtadT boa acaiered V/ the <~>rrenrion held ia i .::-:.. %  ;. i.eft led bj M-. Kdxar J. Fuafau ~lirect can*e of this an-. ft Bill Inn J*wrr. T>:st i* ot> already acftiVvH. At the '•xtraordinarr ae1 v, D rr*t which will be %  her, aDd to which 400 LOW FA RES Reclining Seat Air-ConJ/C:-t away from and itiar naafoi U -.• %  Plan yaw nocnieaJJy—ia tac Seaboard'a la tea Look at these example* ooe-vay Urea. tfc* Beat dj of the hic-htripa—ecceoanfort of t type coaches. •flow. Alir- Botcn I -cati Jack.QTiI> ... X*w Orleans .... New Tork Philadelphia Wahinrton J .. : .. J_ T B .. $: • .. m % %  %  .. IS :• D. P A T W LI CKETT. 12B E. Fiajler St. Tei 1 %  %  I'.that dova in %  -.t "Muit AtEn "b^ auspices of %  Be %  Ji: at the Jo* h I Ball haa been post• Bandar, July :jrd. J erred after which Dow, manager/.' %  of \^\\\ ,,V ,-f HlACkSONVILLE'S'/' Their ^ f'^%  tad by ui. The -•-'rat use by the • under the I thanks. ^// %  LEADING^ 1 DIM good thing aboct Drama. Color. Interest The Jewish Festivals by HAYYIftl SCHAUSS Ootcwrt trigrMf fVWawaWwxa, Colnrful i* t* momUi portrajtd, aaajaawai art a*fmH iOmnrmfd $2.50 n UNION OF AMFSJCAM HEB&FV CONGJLBGATK3NS Ml II l BUt-. cmawun AIRCO^^ONS) THE JEWISH FESTIVALS CHr SUM'MEU'COMFORT at CUs modtn. iBBJga al Betel la t heart at a awatawi ja w a aa a a w a Evwy neat wl* tab oad ahower. aolt wohw. radio. Irtrj bed wttk aa a awaaa a matasaa and r e nrlt as kssp, awMaWj hsa soar 00 erwry g aaa POprjLAB nucn> COCIT AH LOUNGE and COFTEE SHOP oat). a rouMO HI MOHL fATTlH f HOTU OESOTO Omk ICO.D. a



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FRIDAY, JULY 1, 1938 THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN PAGE SEVEN CERTIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY THE ADVERTISERS ON THIS PAGE MERIT YOUR CONSIDERATION AND PATRONAGE BECAUSE OF REPUTATION AND ABILITY ACCOUNTANT V. EDWARDS Chartered Accountant. All branches of Accounting. Complete Tax Service. Olympia Bl dg. Phone 8-8831. | AUTOMOBILE SERVICE General Anto Repairing WRECKER SERVICE AUTO PAINTING Generators, Starters. Ignition, Prompt Ser ?. C ''QTJIGIiBY'S GARAGE .. .. 131 Alton Rd., M-Bch., Tel. 5-91 38 BATTERIES SERVICE BATTERIES AUTO AND MARINE PRICED S2.B5 UP Recharging, Complete Electrical and Ignition Service. Motor Winding, Carburetor Rebuilding. ROAD SERVICE Expert Workmanship BEST BATTERY COMPANY 1500 W. Flagler St. Tel. 3-3212 • CEMETERY SERVICE MARBLB. Granite and Bronxe markers, MaiiBolems, cemetery work of all description. 1351 N. W. 10th Ave. KULL. Ph. 2-1896. __^_ CONSTRUCTION ENGINEER DRAFTING SERVICE ON HOUSE PLANS. Etc., reasonable rates, work guaranteed. W. PAUL MEREDITH Construction Engineer, Room 205, 7937H N. E. 2nd Ave, Phone 7-4727. DRAPERIES BUILDERS L. E. EDWARDS, Contractor Builder of Mornmgside LBB0Y. S. EDWARDS, Manager 6812 Biscayne Blvd. Phone 7-2168 In Miami Since 1898 "Let's Build a Home" CONSULT me If that Is your "WISH" I will make It a "REALITY." Planning, financing, building, that's my business. JESSE E. MARCOUX IJIen"en*3hop BETTER DRAPERIES Phone 7-3881!. 97'h and 2nd Ave. N. B. FLOWERS SHRUBBERY BLOOMING Geraniums, bougalnvlllea. Hibiscus, begonia, vines, crotons, Beloperone. Many not listed. 10c up. Best grade top soil 85c yd. Hammock soil )1.25 yd. Manure $3 yd. Ph. 7-1871. Osborne Nursery. 2996 N. W. 57 th st. FURNITURE REPAIRING PLUMBING A. L. MERRIFIELD Plumbing and Gas Fitting Repairs and Septic Tank Work All Work Guaranteed 25 TEARS' experience; large ana small Installations. Ill N. h.. ZOtb St. Phone 3-3932. FINE FURNITURE MADE FINER Upholstering — Refinishing — Repairing — Antiques Restored. Absolute Guarantee. FLAMINGO FURNITURE 8HOP Back of Grove Theatre—Geo. F. Darrow. Mgr., 3247 Charles Ave. Phone 4-4880. ELECTRIC RAZORS LANDSCAPING SODLS ELECTRICIANS IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST! PULVERIZED SOIL $1.00 a yard. Muck, Marl or Mixed. Cow Manure, 3 bags $1.00. Phone 4-4804. Agent will call. For Years Master Electrician of Largest and Most Famou Office Buildings in the World CHARLIE KALB MASTER ELECTRICIAN ALTERATIONS—HOUSE WIRING REPAIRS THANK YOU PHONE 7-2817 1875 B. W. 1st St. Ph. 4-1428 BUILDING MATERIAL E i. WARNER A COMPANY Lumber Sand Rock Brick Tile Pre.tsedwoed Shingles Roofing Builders Hardware Dupont Duco Paints Everything in BuHdlng Material 3126 N. E. 2nd Ave. Phones 2-1753 3-1754 BUSINESS COLLEGES ELECTRIC CONTRACTORS Repairs Contracts Alterations LYON ELECTRIC CO. The Oldest Established Electrical Contractors at Miami Beach Phone 5-2444 Nite Service 2-6744 COMPLETE Stenographic secretarial and accounting courses. Member National Association Accredited Commercial Schools. MIAMI BUSINESS COLLEGE Phor*> 2-3801 111 S. Miami Ave. COMFORT -!PROTECTION A WELL VENTILATED ATTIC MEANS A COOL HOME BARRON'S "SELFACTION** LEAK-PROOF VENTILATORS KEEP OUT BLOWING RAINS and prevent high pressure formation In attics. Let as replace your leaky vents now. L P. IRELAND COMPANY, INC. 843 N. W. First Court Phone S-6495 Established Since 1914 BISCAYNE ELECTRIC SUPPLY CO. Electrical Wiring—Any Size Job Repairing Anything Electrical Residential and Commercial 815 S. W. 18th Ave. Phone 3-1288 LANDSCAPING AND MAINTENANCE. Soils and Sod. Fruit Trees Palms and Shrubbery. Fertilizer for Flower Beds. Screened Soils for lawn dresBlnsr. __ MELROSE NURSERY & SOILS CO. 2741 N. W. 27th Ave. Phones 3-8611— 3-8612 FLOOR COVERINGS A COMPLETE Floor Covering Service—Hotels, Apartments, Residences. Cleaning and Moth Proofing; LARVEX ODORLESS PROCESS Many years of trustworthy service. All customer's goods insured. MIAMI CARPET CLEANING k LAYING Co., John A. Baker, Owner, 120 N. W, 2Sth St., Tel. 2-2921. FLORISTS EXOTIC GARDENS, INC. Flagler and Bridge. Phone 2-6358— 2-HS47. Beach Phone 5-2961 — 607 Lincoln Road. Office 2970 N. W. 17th Avenue. Phone 2-3105.—Finest Assortment of Fresh Cut Flowers In Miami. FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS WIRED ANYWHERE Speaking of Women By Diana Klotts ALICE L. SELIGSBERG It was during the war. To the Haii.i-.sah office came pleas from Palestine for medical aid. The Holy Land was the tramping ground for contending armies. Hordes of locusts had Bcouraged the countryside and devoared what little remained of crops. The population was destitute, disease was rife. Doctors and nurses were few. medical supplies, scarce. Hadassah heard the call, and immediately set itself to the task. It was not an easy matter. Diplomatic difficulties in obtaining permission for the sailing from American, British, French, Turkish governments, had to be surmounted; personnel and equipment had to be obtained for a complete medical unit to be sent on a 0,000 mile journey through perilous submarine lanes across the Atlantic, the English Channel and the Mediterranean Sea. Nearly $500,000 was needed for the vast project. Finally, on June 12, 1918, the American Zionist Medical Unit, Hadassah'a floating hospital, camouflaged by a pntchquilt of fantastie colors, secretly sailed out of New York Harbor, along with eleven other ships transiting 30.000 American troops which were being conveyel across the MM by cruisers and destroyers. The unit consisted of 44 persons, including physicians, dentists, nurses, civil and sanitary engineers. The supplies, weighing 400 tons, included the comMISCELLANEOUS ELECTRIC f HAVER Specialist SCHICK AND 8HAVEMA8TER OIL KITS—ACCESSORIES I. A. ANDRESS 131 Shoreland Arcade. Pho. 8-4081 SIGNS FOR COMMERCIAL — WALLOUTDOOR SIGNS TRUCK LETTERING PHONE 3-6615 *,. RANKIN X SIGN CO. r 1 118 N. W. 2nd Avenue STORAGE REFRIGERATOR REPAIRS WE MAINTAIN a complete shop in which practically any make refrigerator can be efficiently repaired at a fair price. A crew of trai.ied mechanics on duty day and night. Our service cars carry everything needed for ordinary and emergency calls.. Ventilation and Refrigeration Sen-Ice Co. Phone at 3-3272 or 8-2452 ROOF REPAIRING EQRY AUTOGRAPHIC REGISTER Every Business Needs the Egry System. FlatPax Stationery. Carbon Rolls HENRY E. KOPPLOW 925 N. W. 17th Street Phone 2-1174 OPTOMETRISTS GLASSES OF DISTINCTION By Dr. F. H. FISHER. Ontometrlc. Eye Specialist. 943 Lincoln Road, Ph. 5-3580, Miami Beach. o o PET ANIMAL HOSPITAL BOARDING BATHING GROOM Plucking Modern Boarding Kennels. KNOWLES PET HOSPITAL Mrs. V. W. Knowles, 740 N. E. 90th St. 7-2141 PEST EXTERMINATING WE GUARANTEE To Exterminate Roaches, Rats, Mice, Ants. Moths. Bedbugs. Termites. A Confidential Service—Rates Always Reasonable. No Charge for Inspection or Estimates MIAMI BEACH CHEMICAL CO. 824 First St., Miami Beach. Ph. 5-4353 ROOF TROUBLES CURED With crack-proof, non-drying whitecool-tropical coating. Don't draw hett. CHEAP AS TAR 5 Year Guarantee: Local Proof. Free Estimate. Phone 2-5703 FIREPROOF BLDG., HEART OF CITY SPECIALIZING in personal effects. Baggage room with free accessBags, 50c month ; trunk $1; 2, $1.50 month. Personal stalls, $1.50 month and up; Furniture racks, $2.50 month and up; Private rooms, $5 month and up; Laager amounts of storage, le cu. ft. Storage Warehouse Co., 13 N. E. 2nd St. Phone 2-1208 and wa will pick them up. TERMITE PROOFING PALMER'S ROOFING COMPANY 16 years in Miami—W. N. Palmer, Prop. BARRETT APPROVED ROOFING Sheet Metal Work Tile Roofing "Roofs That Last" 15 N. E. 17th Terr. Telephone 2-3429 RUG CLEANING HAWKINS RUG CLEANERS Ruga Cleaned. Dyed and Repaired Moth Proofing Orientals Our Specialty 60 N. E. 39th Street—Tel. 2-7798 SEPTIC TANKS SUPERIOR SEPTIC TANK CO. EDWIN H. O'NEAL. Owner 12 YEARS EXPERIENCE Don't Say: 'Septic Tanks" Sav: "Superior Septic Tanks" REPAIRS A SPECIALTY Installations Any Size—Reasonable Prices. Phone 7-3220 day or nite, 484 N. E. 57th Street. John Severin. Mgr. TERMITE CONTROL SERVICE Odorless Fireproof Safe Old or New Buildings 5 YEAR GUARANTEE Semi-Annual Free Inspection. Hundreds of Satisfied Customers in South, Florida. Termite Proofing Exclusively. TERMITE CONTROL CO Phone 7-2313 120 N. W. 53rd St. TRANSFER AND STORAGE JOHN E. WITHERS TRANSFER STORAGE COMPANY. INC. 1000 N. E. First Ave. Local and Long Distance Hauling. Vaults for Furs. Rugs and Silver. CRATING— PACKING—SHIPPING Fireproof Warehouses—Custom Bonded—Moth Proofing WE move you anywhere In U. S. A. Bonded and insured carriers. Fhona 2-7188. Suddath Moving and Storage Co. Office In all principal cities. TREE MOVING JOHN H. WHITFIELD Nursery and Landscaping. Tree mov. Ing specialist. Best of references. 1211 J. W. 79th St. Phone 7-3727. SEWING MACHINES ALL MAKES, repaired by factory expert. $1.50 "•: parts for all machines. Used machines sold and rented. Sewing Machine Shop, 71, S. B. 1st St. Phone 2-4024. DR. SANBORN DENTIST EX-RAY & GAS EXTRACTIONS Cor. N. E. First Ave.. at Second St. Opposite Catholic Church PHONE 2-1460 Small Monthly Payments pletc equipment for a hospital of 50 beds, hundreds of cases of drugs, medical instruments and medicines; six automobiles, two ambulances, two trucks, an immense quantity of food supplies and 100 large cases of clothing. In charge of the personnel and responsible for the entire venture was Miss Alice L. Seligsberg. This week, speaking before a group of men and women who were met in her honor to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of the embarking of that floating hospital, the small, grayhaired woman fondly recalled the memory upon memory of fear, hardship, anxiety, work, which make these two the outstanding years in her life which is dedicated to social work. Picturesquely she described how, after four months of interrupted travel and numerous delays in London, Paris, and the obscure seaport of Tarranto. on the Italian peninsula, they arrived in Alexandria, Egypt. There they found pestilence, hunger, misery, chaos. Work began immediately, in spite of hunger. "Many days wc went hungry," she recalled. "We lived for a time on malted milk tablets. Everything seemed to be seasoned with goafs milk which was revolting to us." But progress was rapid, and soon the unit opened hospitals, dispensaries in Jerusalem, Jaffa, Tiberias, Sated and Haifa. That was twenty years ago. Today, in Palestine, n vast network of non-sectarian hospitals, clinics and welfare renters bear mute testimony to the success of that venture, the foundation for which was laid by Alice L. Seligsberg. RACIST MEASURES AGAINST ITALIAN JEWS IN OFFING Rome. July 1, (WNS)—A memorandum outlining the need for some form of radal legislation aimed at Italian Jews is being drafted by Propaganda Minister Alfieri for submission to Premier Mussolini, Alfieri revealed in a speech in Veenice.. At the same time the more extremist Fascist press, notably Vita Italians, rammed its anti-Jewish campaign. The papers demand the introduction of measures forbidding Jews, to employ non-Jews, to appear in the same public places with non-Jews and to sit at the same table with them. Koolmotor Gasolene and Oils 4Bi3CH-tl Distributed By ORANGE STATE OIL CO. I 9



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~k I PAGE SIX THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN FRIDAY, JULY 1, 1933 NEW RECORDS ARE ISSUED Niw York. July 1—A now scries of 1 Ight doable faced phonograph records < %  traditional Hebrew music will be ieiaed in the Fall by the Women's League 'f the I'nited Synagogue, it was announced by Mrs. Samuel Siieigel, national president. The choice of musical numbers and artists, she %  aid in announcing the project is in the hands of Mrs. Louis Ginzberg. An advisory committee composed of Babbl Israel Goldfarb. Instructor in Hazanut at the Jewish Theological Seminary, and Mrs. Ira Eisenstein. instructor in music at the Jewish Teachers Institute, is assisting Mrs. Ginsberg. The Womeaa' League has previously issued two double faced records for both Passover and Chanukab. It was the remarkable success of these two series of recordings that prompt• il (be executive committee to authorize the preparation of the new recordings covering Sabbat)) and all the vther Jewish holidays. Discussing the project, Mrs. Ginzberg declared: "The Passover and Chanukab records have proven to be of such great value in teaching young and old the beautiful traditional Hebrew melodin that we have decided to make a whole leriei of new records. "The first Beriea "ill be a complete Sabbath record containing the Kid<:ii-ii. Shir Hamaaloth. and Sbolem Aleicbem, u well ai %  evernl S'miroth melodies. There will be records for Shabuoth. Succoth, including Palestinian songs for these festivals. There will be a record of the blessings chanted in the synagogue before and after the reading of the Law and a few examples or cantillntions of various Biblical readings. "We expect the new series of records to be a definite educational contribution to the Jewish borne and school in conformance with the established policy of the Women's League: the desire to foster and encourage traditional Judaism in America." New York County Legion Ousts Nazis •few York. July 1. (WNSi—The Niw York County American Legion. largest group in the national organi| zatiou. voted to exclude from lnemberahip all Nazis. Communists and Fascists in a resolution adopted at its 20th annual convention, and voted in submit the resolution, which was in the form of an amendment to its constitution, to the national Legion convention in Los Angeles in September. The by-laws were amended "to exclude from membership all individuals who may at any time be found to be members of any organization in which an oath is required of its members which is in contravention to the oath of the American Legion." The convention also attacks Nazis, ('.iiniiiiiiiists and Fascists as foes of democracy and authorized the creation of a radio patrol to keep tab on subversive radio broadcasts. Roosevelt Denounces Foes Of Liberalism New York. July 1—President Roosevelt addressing the teachers who comprise the National Education Association, spoke of countries where libraries have been burned, learned people exiled, universities dispersed and news, art and literature censored as having turned back "the clock of civilization." He did so without naming any country. Admonished this country to keep bright the fires of freedom and civil liberties, to redouble efforts to maintain a free press auh to provide a safe place for eternal truths. Declared for state and local control of schools mid their curricula, with the federal government supplementing only the resources of the poorer communities. Predicted that "the ultimate victory of tomorrow is with democracy and Do You Know Why OLD GOLD Cigarettes Are Always Fresh? 2 Jackets of Cellophane Seal-in the FRESHNESS of Prize Crop Tobaccos T HE weak part of any paper package of cigarettes is at the fold where the U. S. Revenue Stamp is affixed. It is impossible to bring the label of the package over in order to seal the top of the package as is done at the bottom of the package. %  The single Jacket of Cellophane, which is found on all paper packages of cigarettes, closes the package as best as can be done at the top of the package. However, every package of Double-Mellow Old Gold Cigarettes has 2 Jackets of Cellophane instead of one. By using an extra jacket of Cellophane and inverting the outer Jacket and sealing it completely at the bottom, the top, or weak part of the package of Old Golds, is made airtight and thereby given double protection for factory freshness. The Outer Jacket opens from the bottom — the Inner Jacket opens from the top. Old Gold Cigarettes are further protected by the fact that an air chamber is formed between the 2 Jackets of Cellophane, thus giving the package of Double-Mellow Old Gold Cigarettes the best practicable protection for Factory Freshness. These 2 Jackets of Cellophane which axe found only on Old Gold Cigarettes provide much greater protection for freshness than any other paper package of cigarettes. Double-Mellow Old Gold insures to smokers its rich quality of Prize Crop tobacco with a maximum protection of Factory Freshness at all times. It is also interesting to know that on account of this Double Jacket Cellophane, Old Gold Cigarettes give the smoker a longer and cooler smoke. This is because of the fact that the Tobacco in Old Gold Cigarettes is always fresh and not dry. As you well know, dry grass and dry wood burn f&jter than green grass and seasoned wood. It is the same with tobacco. Dry tobacco burns fast and hot, while fresh tobacco burns slowly because it has moisture. Old Gold is a COOLER smoke than any other cigarette because the tobacco being Factory-Fresh and con-, taining moisture burns slowly — the smoker does not draw dry heat into his mouth. Since the smoker does not draw in the dry heat of the tobacco into his mouth and the smoke is a cool one, there is no chance for coughing or throat irritation. The smoker, therefore, who smokes Old Gold Cigarettes enjoys a smoke which lasts longer ... is cooler... with no throat irritation and cough full flavor of the natural fragrance of prize-crop tobaccos without heat. By using 2 Jackets of Cellophane, Old Gold smokers who live in dry sections of the country are assured of a fresh cigarette by retention of the moisture, whereas Old Gold smokers in low, damp, or humid communities are protected from excessive moisture, which prevents them from becoming soggy. You see, the House oT Lorillard has been making fine tobacco products since George Washington's day. It is this skill born of 178 years of experience that enables Lorillard to select, age and blend the world's finest tobacco leaf into Old Gold Cigarettes and keep them always Factory •Fresh for the smoker. No matter where you buy them, Double-Mellow Old Golds will reach you as fresh as they came off the cigarette machine. Let a trial package of Double-Mellow Old Gold Cigarettes tell you the rest of the story.' Splendid Growth Shown By Local Institution At the semi-annual meeting of 'lie Hoard of Dlrectore of the Dade Federal Bavlnf* end Loan Automation of Miami held yesterday, reports of the organization were presented to show thnt the growth in assets and business of the institution has been remarkable si its inception anil particularly during the past six months. The regular semi-annual dividend at the rate of four per cent per anuum was declared and more than forty thousand dollars was sent to the stockholders for their dividends. fhe Dade Federal operates under u Federal Charter and the individual deposits are insured by the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation, an agency of the United States Government, beginning in December 1884 with asset* of $75,000, the Association has grown until it now hns assets in excess of two and a half million dollars, and has helped in this area by the conservating extension of loans to home owners and builders. The organization is headed by Joseph M. Upton, well known communal worker and Insurance broker who is president of the organization. Offices are on the ground floor of the Congress Building. through democracy with education, tor no people can be kept eternally enslaved." COMPLETE BANKING FACILITIES SAVINGS ACCOUNTS — Deposits made on or before July 10th draw interest from July 1st at the rate of 2% PER ANNUM This is the highest rate paid by any commercial bank in Greater Miami COMMERCIAL ACCOUNTS — We invite your account on the regular commercial bank service basis. In addition to the regular hanking facilities mentioned above, AMERICAN CHECK SERVICE offers personal checking account service, with the following unusual ailifltions: 1 No minimum balance 2 No monthly service rharge 3 No charge for deposit* 4 Free — Statements and cancelled checks every 90 days 5 Your name printed on every check without charge. Only cost 10c per cheek drawn (12.00 per book of 20 checks) St or more opens an Account Deposits Insured tip to $5,000 by Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. SOCIET* BOAT RIDE TO I:I. HELD To raise funds for the German Children's Aid Fund of the National Council of Jewish Women a number of local communal workers are sponsoring a boat ride on the boat Seven Seas on next Tuesday evening July 5th, to leave Pier 5 at 9:00 p. m. In charge of arrangements are Iteatlamcs A. Rubin. Ralph Neufeld, Nat Williams. Elry Stone, Leo R. Kupper and Harry Unrnhard. Those desiring to aid this splendid cause are urged to make their reservations with any member of the committee or with Mrs. Ida Optner, chairman of the local committee of the fund. • • • INSTALLATION TO BE HELD The first, joint formal installation of the Young Men and Young Women's Hebrew Association will take place Sunday. July 10th at 0:30 p. m.. at the Pnlatial Restaurant. Mrs. Jake Engler is general chairman of arrangements and is being assisted by Mrs. Joseph Syman. Miss Rosalind Friedman. Miss Claire Zwi'itner and Miss Molly Engler. The invocation will be given by Rabbi Colman Zwit man and the benediction by Rabbi Abraham Kellner, Miss Ida Engler will be toastmistress and Mrs. Lena Simon installing officer. The program includes songs by Cantor Louis Hayman. Marx Feinherg and piano solos by Miss Josephine Raxin The public is cordially invited to attend. Admission will be $1.00 per plate and reservations must be made in advance with any member of the committee or by calling 2-5055 or 2-12fi0. Officers of the Y. W. H. A. to be installed are: Mrs. Marian Shindell, president; Miss Gertrude Mandell, vice president; Mrs. Albert Reisman, secretary and Mrs. William Friedman, treasurer; of the Y. M. H. A.: Milton A Friedman, president; Alvin Grossman, vice president; Dr. Harold Rand secretary and Nat Hlumberg, treasurer. • • • "Yehuda Halevi. the greatest Hebrew National Poet," was the topic uf Dr. Wolfson's weekly talk before i IM. \K i. KAUFMAN tli" Spinoza Group last Saturday afternoon. Dr. Wolfson traced the life of Halevi from his birth In Toledo, Spain, in 1086 to the ttma he wrote the Sefer Hakuzari, quoting many of his poems. Dr. Mark Waldmon. prof .-.Mir 0 f languages in the College of the iity of New York, read Heine';-m: Princess Sabbath. Dr WaMman who is the author of Goethe and the Jews and a Challenge to IIi\ii>m, also, delivered an enlighten.:! talk about current events. Next Saturday afternoon at 3:00 O'clock the Group will meet ag the lawn at 1059 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach. After a brief musical program, Dr. Wolfson will complete his story of Yehuda Halevi. Mr. Mnrgullis. the engineer in charge of Harry Ricbman's -'state, will speak briefly on Teclni All are welcome. There is in. mini IT .mi* KOSHER ZI0N SAUSAGE CO. INC. 37th St. and Normal Ave CHICAGO, ILL. 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ffiJewisti Floridi&m Couture T/hQ JliewHSfr) HJnity VOLUME 11.—NUMBER 26. i i MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JULY 1, 1938 PRICE FIVE CENTB I ALL'FOR LABOR ea-.il>.' bility ^ %  I.IN, July 1. (WNS)—Jewish Km.nl nl the band* of Nazi ^HBIITH loomed as a dread possi>r German Jewry when Field II Goering issued a new and g decree introducing universal rm labor conscription for all and German "state members" less of race, creed, sex or presupation. tive July 1st, the degree spely applies not only to Reich citbut to "state members," which Jews. In view of Propaganda ter Gocbbels' announcement of ding measures to eliminate all from Berlin and other big cities, leaders here feared that Jews r forced into the involuntary laf the hardest and most menial as their ancestors were in Egypt they made bricks for the pyraof I'haroah. al measures to rid Germany of are being drafted, Propaganda Ister Joseph Gocbbels told a checren.wd of 120.000 assembled in the [aspic Stadium for the annual sumscholastic exercises. While disproving of the anti-Jewish mob vio5, he promised "we will see to it legal measures are taken so that Jews will have gone altogether, will make a law that will see to hat Jews disappear from B'rl.n soon." In disowni.ig mob action In-t Jews. Gocbbels declared: "I fur solving this problem by means legal regulations issued by the J and state, not by action in the t," and added that while he had II understanding of the foct that Berlin population is taking measfor its defense "I do not approve e method." I the same time he "invited"critof tlie Nazi and anti-Semiiism to the Jews. "We will willingly Ihem to their friends in London Paris." he arid, "and m ireovcr will deliver them at the frontier, the Jews take French leave and London, where those who praise may pack them in cotton, but h"ni leave us in pence." bile repudiating onathorised anwi-h measures, lie said "it is a thing we now know what conI are Jewish. Just let the Jews n their stores—now wo know re their buslnOMQ* are. We will to it that legal measures are taken hat soon Jews will have gone alther. As far as those remaining concerned. let them remember to out of the public view. They beginning to he a nuisance. If the ign press invokes our human feelwhy we will be glad to present .lews to them. If people, say, V the Jews aren't doing anything,' .v they provoke us by their very scnee. What do wc care about I'ign countries anyway? The world Did leave us alone; we are not ming anybody foreign Uniforms To Be Outlawed JXew York, July 2. (WNS)— T'niIrmg such as those worn by mem)rs of the German-American Bund id the display of such insignia as }<• swastika would be outlawed in ew York City under the terms of a "lution introduced in the city incil by Councilman Joseph Shnrley. The resolution would ban the fearing of uniforms or insignia of kraign nations in the streets of Newfork unless the wearer is attached k> the military of that country. HEAD IS SPEAKER Harry H. Schaffer. commander-inchief of the Jewish War Veterans of the United States, arrived in Miami Wednesday afternoon as part of a tour of the United States. Thirtysix members of the Freda Markowitz Post of the Jewish War Veterans led a motorcade which met Commander Sehuffer at Biscayne Boulevard at With Street, and escorted him to the county courthouse where Mayor It. K. Williams and Chief of Police Leslie QuifX extended the official greetings of the Citjj of Miami. He was nc• ompanied by Viec-Commander-inCbieC Marry Wengrow and members of Atlanta Post \o. 112. composed of Mink Frunkrl. adjutant, Robert Spector. Junior Vice-Commander, Ben Keisinan, Deputy Chief of Stuff ami J. B. Levitan Quartermaster. Following a sightseeing trip through Miami and Miami Reach the entire parly return • I to the Norman Hotel where they will remain during their stay heie. As we go to press the formal installation of officers of the Freda Markowitz Post of Miami is being held at n gala banquet at the American Legion cluhrooms with J. Win. Baros as tonstmaster. Representing Governor Cone of Florida will he Col. Sidney H. Palmer, a member of the Governor's staff and active. member of the Post. Representatives of all military organizations in this area are attending the banquet and all Legionnaires and war vets Loth Jewish and non-Jewish will be glltSi* ar the dance which will follow tue banquet. Congress Elections Are Held In Miami An overwhelming response was given by Miami Jewry to the call of the American Jewish Congress. Over 700 people voted at the polls on Sunday in Miami Beach. At the Miami Beach polls, in the Beth Jacob congregation, 400 people were registered for the Congress and submitted their vote in favor of strengthening the defense of Jewish rights, through the proposed Congress means. The delegate elected from the Greater Miami area was Rabbi Colman A. Zwitmau, and the alternate Mr. Harry Simonhoff. The first time that American Jewry was given an opportunity to et| vi. itself by means of election was in 1918, when 3.13.000 American citin nil went to the polls nnd elected llie delegates who formed the firjt (Continued on Page Eight) Bund Member To Face Court-Martial New York. .Inly 1. (WNS)—Trial by a military court martial faced Andrew Gimlen. confessed member of the German-American Bund nnd privoTc of the First Battalion. 244th Coast Artillery of the New York National Guard, after he was arrested on a charge of threatening President Roosevelt. Gimlen was taken before Magistrate Capshaw in YorkvWe Court on the complaint of Dick Voss, a crippled World War veteran, who testified he heard Gimlen. in full uniform cry out "kill the Jews. Roosevelt is a Jew. and we'll get him too." Th" alleged remarks were made in Union Square, a few blocks from the 244th Coast Guard's armory, when Gimlen and another Nazi guardsman who escaped, charged into a group of people swinging his fists. Magistral" Capshaw referred the ease to the National Guard authorities who ire expected to try Gimlen at a court martial. Pittsburgh. July 1, (WNS)—Eugene Banco, leader of the Pittsburgh branch of the German-American Biiinl. is under arrest here on a charg" of practicing medicine without n license. In 19,15 he was convicted of a similar charge and given a suspended sentence and placed on probation. L RACE PREJUDICE Wilmington, Del., July 2. (WNSi —A thinly veiled rebuke to the racial Intolerance prevalent in Europenn lands was made by Secretary Hull in an address at exercises here marking the 900th anniversary of the landing of the first Swedes and Finns at Delaware. Addressing an audience that included Crown Princess Louise nf Sweden and her son. Prince Bertil. the Secretary said "at a time when prejudice, hatred and violence are unhappily still all too prevalent and when the resources of civilization give BUcfa power to these evil inflenees as to threaten the very destruction of civilisation itself, the world needs men and nations devoted to the principles of tolerance, friendship and justice." Paying tribute to Sweden and Binland for their tolerance and peaceloving services, the Secretary declared the world "needs men and nations able to meet their most difficult problems with calmness, reasonableness and common sense—men and notions strong enough ro command respect for their own legitimate rights and aspiration! — tolerant, self-restrained, just and wise enough to respect the legitimate rights and aspirations of others." The assembled diplomats and other notables saw in the Secretary's remarks pointed references to Nazism ami to Hitler nnd Musolini. REFUGEE AID TO DEC IN MEETING Kviau-les-Uains, France, July 1, (WNS)—All but the opening and closing sessions of the inter-govern mental refugee aid conference convening here on July 0th will he held in camera if the suggestion of President Roosevelt, prime mover of th; 1 assembly, is adopted, spokesmen for the American delegation revealed in inillining details of the parley. Acting on personal instructions from the President, the American delegation, headed by Myron C. Taylor, will propose, a ten or twelve day session with u minimum of talk and a maximum of constructive action. Ono of the major objectives of the conference, it was learned, is the creation of a permanent iiiter-governmenlal refugee office with headquarters in Paris and the authority to execute the decisions of the conference and to deal with private agencies engaged in refugee work. American members of the American delegation also revealed that many private organisations had already submitted memoranda to the President's advisory committee in New York, which is headed by James (i. McDonald. Summaries of their proposals Were laid before the President who transmitted those be approved t" Mr. Taylor for inclusion in the conference agenda. All of tht .participating governments already have copies of the agenda which is being kept a ilov.ly guarded secret. While in Paris. Mr. Taylor let it he known that he would nut receive any delegation from European organisations nor accept their memoranda, emphasizing that all proposals must he snbmiitii] through the governments of the countries in which the organizations operate. This policy has been %  I...-;.i..,j nnon becanie the conference Inter-governmental nnd not private. t t I B/i TUNE IN SUNDAY MORNING AT 9:00 The Jewish, Floridian will again present another in its series of weekly broadcasts this coming Sunday morning over Station WE AT (1500 k. c.) at 9:00 o'clock. It's fall of interesting news and comments and mnsic. TD E Taiinersville. N. V.. July 2. (WNS) —Organisation by the Jewish Theological Seminary of America of local synagogue fund-raising chests from a ng the congregations served by Its own graduates for the purpose of raising suppl nta] funds for such overseas agencies as the United Palestine Appeal and the Joint Distribution Committee and to bring pressure on local federations for mote generous appropriations to Jewish education, was recommended by Rabbi Ben /ion Bokser in n report of the Seminary committee, laid before the B8rh convention of the Rabbinical Assembly of America. The report urged that the Seminary as well as other institutions of Jewish religions education "re-define their function as being not merely schools dedicated to academic research but as institutiiais charged with practical leadership in Jewish life."-To this end the report proposed that that the Seminary establish an Information service to make available to .li'W nnd non-Jew alike any information desired about Jewish life: publish a series of popular tracts on specific problems in the history, sociology and religion of Jewish life; sponsor periodic conferences by Scininiirv leaders in local communities; (Continued Von Page Eight) GERMAN BUND GRILLED New York, July 1. (WNS)—Testifying under oath for the first time regarding the aims of the GermanAmerican Bund, Fritz Kuhn, Its national leuder. told a state legislative committee inquiring into Nazi activities that "all Jews are enemies of the I'nited States." that "60 of the American public officials shown ill Who's Who arc Jews." that the Bund aims to "build an Aryan movement Under the swastika to liberate America from the Jews," that the Bund does not consider "the Jew as an American" or "as a man," that Jew* are Jews first before they are Americans." and that the Hitler salute "is the coming salute for the whole United State*.'' Ill the course of a five-hour stay on the witness stand Kuhn also said that the Democratic and Republican parties are controlled by the Rothschilds through Kuhn. Leob & Company nnd tinWarburgs. that J. P. Morgan and, Thomas Lament have Jewish blood, that the anti-Nazi boycott was dictated to Samuel I'nterinyer by Moscow, and that Jews are the master minds behind the Communist leaders in America. Under grilling by Senator John J. McNabee. chairman of the committee, Kuhn said the Bund has 1)4 branches, 22 summer camps, four newspapers anil a business men's league. He testified that he gets no salary as head of the Bund hut doe* receive $3,000 a year as head of the German-American Businessmen's T.. ague, which was organized to combat the antiNazi boycott. He also identified a picture of himself and Hitler taken in 1080 on n visit to Germany, charged thai Germans are being "purged" from their jobs iii this country only because they are Germans and claimed that "we do not say anything against the Jews." James Wheeler-Hill. 33-year-old secretary of the Bund, who spoke with a heavy German accent although he claimed to have been born in San Francisco of nn English father and Russian mother, both of whom wero killed during the Russian revolution, told the probers the organization had no connection with Germany, that h would resign his job "if there was any dictation from Germany" nnd that in the event of a war between Germnnv ami the United State* he would fight for the latter even to the extent of defending American Jews. Wheeler-Hill also testified that the organization has 26 branches in New York State and that membership dues are .1 cent* a month. After asserting that the Bund sought to uphold tho Bill of Bight* and the Constitution, the Nazi leader insisted that the al(Continued on Page Five) RABBI SUES NAZI HEAD New York. July 1. (WNS)—A *"..000.000 slander suit against Frita Kuhn. national lender of the GermanAmerican Bund, for his defamation Of the .lews in this country during hitestimony In-fore a state legislative committee last week was being started by Dr Emanucl J. Jack of Yonkers. former rabbi of Temple % %  manual in Yonkers and former national chaplain of the Veterans of Foreign Wars. Rabbi Jack said he. began suit against Kuhn as an individual and as head of the Bund while acting as an Individual, Rabbi Jack said he would ash $3,000,001) damages on the basis of his action to German refugees.



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FRIDAY, JULY 1, 1938 THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN PAGE THREE wJewtism Florid Ian FUBL1SHKD EYXKT FIDAY r. e. Bos art* PLANT AND OFFICES 21 8. W. Scond Avenue Phone. 2-1141; 2-1183 J. LOUIS SHOCHET. Editor FRKD K. BHOCHET. ClrcuUtion MW --, M .— %  CUM -s-j^tmAK ffig 0MM "^ "* ST. PETERSBURG MRS. ROSE M. RUBIN IUpr—nUUT WEST PALM BEACM MRS. M. SCHREBN1CK Rpr n otlT ORLANDO DORIS 8. HELLER lUpraMntatiT* TAMPA MRS. JAY MARKOWITZ RprMBtttiT SUBSCRIPTION Biz Month* tt.es FRIDAY, JULY 1, 1938 VOLUME 11.—NUMBER 26. Welcome To Miami Miami Jewry awake to the changing events of the day, real, izing its duty to itself and their fellow communities throughout the world, has at all times been willing to extend the hand of welcome to every one who showed courage and service to his fellow man. Harry H. Schaffer, Commander-in-Chief of the Jewish War Veterans of the United States, has been in the forefront of the battle for the effective continuation of the German and now Austrian Boycott; he has been in the very thick of battle against the Nazis and their subversive propaganda in this country; he has not hesitated to lead his organization so that everything that is ideal in American doctrines may be properly protected. As a Jew, as an American, as one who showed his devotion to his country, Harry Schaffer has been properly and just honored with his present office. Under his guidance and leadership the Jewish War Veterans have gained steadily during the past several years. It is in the true Jewish spirit of recognition of services honestly rendered to his fellow men in a splendid cause, that of preserving American democracy, that we of Miami take pleasure of extending the age old greeting of welcome Baruch Habo,'' blessed be you in your arrival. May you and your staff imbue your comrades of Miami with the true spirit of Americanism and Judaism, with the real sense of service to democracy, that we know imbues the Jewish War Veterans of the United States. Can We Make It Work? With the removal of the referendum question it was thought that the elections of the American Jewish Congress particularly in smaller Jewish communities like Miami would indeed be a funereal event. To the surprise of many (not including the editor) Miamians turned out in splendid numbers. More than thirteen hundred Jews and Jewesses registered. Neariy^ seven hundred voted for delegates, though there were no con.ests and despite the fact that everything had been previously agreed on. Truly it showed that there lies dormant a splendid Jewish terest. Ours to decide, if we want to make it Work? Independence Day When tin' signing of the Declaration of Independence 1C2 years ago this July Fourth heralded to the world the hirth of a new form of government dedicated to the then revolutionary Idea that all men are created c<|iial and are endowed with inalienable rights, including life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness the signers of that great document were denounced in Europe as wild-eyed radicals •asking to overturn the world. Their ideas of government were branded as subversive and a danger to mankind. To tyrants and autocrats they Iran I danger, so much so that the ideas and ideals enunciated in the Declaration of Independence spread over the face of the earth. Today we look around that earth and once more we see tyrants aud autocrat!—only today we call them dictator! and fuehrers — warring against the ideals expressed in the Declaration of Independence. But this time these ideals are warp and woof of the political and social tradition of the greatest nation in the world. When the principles of democracy are challenged today the challenge is met with the unanswerable argument that these principles work when put into practical effect. They have operated to the greatest good of the greatest number whenever applied. And where one introduced and then withdrawn misery and suffering and tragedy have followed. It is this thought that ought to be uppermost in uir mind on the eve of Independence Day. We of America gave the world a great ideal of government. We translated that ideal into action and made it work. Today when that ideal and all that it implies is under fire everywhere it is our duty to do everything possible to strengthen democracy at home so that its foes at home and abroad may sec that in the birthplace of democracy faith in its present aud future is as unlimited as was the faith of those who proclaimed it to the world in 1770. Plain Talk AN OPEN LETTER LASKER GIVES TO ALIYAH FUND New York. July 1. (WNS)—A pledge of $.'!.t!0O to Hndassah's Youth Aliyah campaign from Albert D. Lnsker. Chicago advertising executive and former chairman of the U. 8. Shipping Board, was announced hen'. Mr. Laskcr's contribution will make possible the transfer of 10 refugee children i" Palestine. Jewish Leader Warns Country "Americans must quit taking their government and its benefits for granted and begin at once n counter move to halt the spread of German-American bunds and other subversive propaganda groups." Harry Schaffer, national commander of the Jewish War Veterans of the United States, declared Wednesday upon his arrival in Miami. Schaffer came to Miami from his home in Pittsburgh for ceremonies last night at which officers were installed by the Freda Markowitz post of the organisation, the first Florida post of Jewish veterans. 1,000 NAZIS IN NEW PURGE •Only in America, where we lean over backwards for free speech, could subversive groups such as the bund, communists and fascists, carry forward propaganda supporting their cause," Schaffer declared. "It seems to be that the best way to combat the efforts of these groups is to set in motion a counter propaganda campaign designed to show our people the superiority of our democratic doctrine over that which they expound." Schaffer pointed out that the Jewish group, second oldest military organization in America, is co-operating with the Legion and other patriotic societies in efforts to halt the %  pread d mi-American organizations. Vienna. July 1, (WXS)—Recurrent reports of mounting dissatisfaction bordering on revolt among Austrian Nazis were confirmed here when it was lear I that some l.(KX) Austrian Nazis have been sent to the Dachau concentration camp near Munich in the hist six weeks. It is reported on good authority that a large scale of bloodless purge of Austrian Nazi ronk was undertaken by Josef Buerckel. Reich commissioner for Austria, acting on specific instructions from Hitler. The cleanup was intended to eliminate these Nazis who had expressed openly their resentment at the failure of Berlin to give Austrian Nazis a bigger share of jobs created by the elimination of .lews since Anschluss. Internal differences among Nazi factions were also a factor in a growing discontent. A major feature of the purge was the reorganization of the Austrian detachments of the Storm Troops. It was also stated in well-informed quarters that Nazi rad| call in Austria wanted freeer hand with the Jews. BY AL SKOAL To the Secretary of Stute, Washington, D. C. Dear Mr. Hull: In writing this I am separating my identity as a Jew from my identity as an American. I am trying to write this only as an American who is troubled about foreign events and their relationship to American life. If I wrote this as a Jew my outlook might be called too subjective, since this had to do with the pain of many of my kinsmen; and the pain of my kinsmen is au old .old story anyway. Not that as an American I can feel DO compassion for distant victims of persecution. Whut civilized American can separate his heart from the events i in Germany ami look on with cold eyes that say. this is none of my affair? Indeed, among all enlightened Americans these events have caused a deep loathing and n poignant fear : A loathing for sadism mat is not tne outgiving of bereft individuals, but the deliberate policy of a national government; a fear for civilization becoming infected by savagery. Your own fine public utterances have given evidence that you are in I lie leadership among Americans who detest the current brutalities that wear the livery of statesmanship. Yet among my fellow-Americans I find a sense of helpless frustration as of men in the presence of a devastating conflagration which they can not 1 approach. "Just what can we do about this?" they ask. "After all. a domestic policy of the German government can be none of the affair of the American government. Isn*t there some unwritten law of nations that enjoins one nation from meddling in the home affairs of another? Indeed, we ourselves would be most resentful if some other nation were to attempt to tell us what to do or not to do in a matter of our own business." This I myself have said until reccntl.v ; with the outraged consciences of millions of other Americans I have stood in helpless anger shaking a fu, tile fist at a savagery such as the advancing frontiers of civilization had seemed to push into the remotest abysses. Hut now it may be asked : Is this persecution only the business of Germany? When a domestic policy of one nation brings grievous problems to others is it still domestic? Docs a persecution remain in the vacuum of domestic business when its victims must seek the shores of other lands to escape its torments? Is it still not our affair when we must shelter ami help find a new way of life for its victims 1 The President's conference on the rehabilitation of German exiles itself suggests the international character of the Gcrmnn events. Here, indeed, we are taking a hand in what seems to be only another nation's domestic businees; we are already by implication (which does not reach the impervious sensibilities of snvages( heaping hot reproaches on the persecutor's head. Rut I ask myself, is this enough for us to do? I* murder settled when the body is decently buried? We do something about the murderer. We visit upon him the mornl abhorrence of society. We quarantine him cither by imprisonment or by death. Thus we make it known that society is not tolerating the savagery of murder. Particularly would we take steps against a well entrenched murderer who threw his bodies over the wall for his neighbor's care. It seems to me that in the German situation the question is. how may we stop this murderer? Since his crimes have become a problem that affects our own national economy is it not now a function of international business to stop him? I, with a great many other Americans, have thought what to do with this criminal—to segregate him, to quarantine him, to teach him. Certainly, our pious reproaches have been without any effect: he throws more and more <>f his victims over the wall for our care. How may we surround him. not with bayonets but with evidence of our abhorrence that he can understand? I have been thinking of a great document the T'nited States) government might write—one. Indeed, thai shall stand forever an imperishable testament of international morality. Addressed to the German government it might read like this : "The American government has viewed with distaste and alarm the mass persecutions that have been peril.hated within the German nations with the consent and connivance of the German government. "In ordinary circumsloneos such persecutions might not he the official concern of the American government but only the cause of moral revulsion among the American people. "However, since many of the victims of these persecutions have been cast upon our hands for our care, the American government no longer can regard itself as a detached onlooker at German events. "The German government can not be unaware of the abhorrence which the American people and other civilized people have felt in the presence of these persecutions. Since the German government has given no heed to these manifestations of world opinion, since its expulsion of hundreds of thousands of its people has brought new social and economic problems to the American nation, it becomes necessary for :lie American government to take steps in defense. "Therefore, it is the decision of the American government that on and after this date all trade relations between this government and the Germnn government cease: that no goods of German manufacture shall be received in any American customs house; that no goods of American manufacture shall be shipped for exporl to Germany from any American port. We regret the circumstances that compel a civilized nation to separate itself from this commerce. "These restrictions shall continue until persecutions by the German government ond the German nation cease." This, my dear Mr. Hull, may not be couched in precise diplomatic language but it suggests the means by which we may segregate, quarantine, imprison and teach the criminal whose victims have fallen upon our hands. Such quarantine would be approved by every moral-American. There may be some who will say that it is none of our business to go in for international morality, to be the moral teacher of others. For them the answer is thnt even if it is good morality it is also good business for the nation to defend itself (by the most peaceful means) against, another nntion whose depredations visit serious problems upon its economy. And. after all, righteousness does exalt a nation. NEWS OF BUND WORK Washington. D. C, July 1. (WNS) —Secret files of the Department of Justice on the German-American Bund have, been loaned to the House Committee investigating un-American activities. Chairman Dies asked for and obtained the files on his promise to keep them secret. The files, containing 8,000 pages, represent evidence compiled by G-men during an It months probe of Nazi activities. Albany. N. Y., July 1, (WNS)— Representative Hamilton Fish. Jr., chairman of the military affairs commit tit' of the State Constitutional Convention, revealed that Fritz Kuhn, German-American Bind leader, had asked the committee to pay the expense of himself and the Bund's secretary to Albany in order that they might testify agaisst a proposed constitutional amendment that prohibited %  t raining individuals for military purposes." The aim of the omendment is to outlaw Nazi camps. I Kuhn'i request was denied.