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The Jewish Floridian ( June 25, 1937 )

UFJUD

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U\ <<-J wJewisti Floridian w CESSM Tlhe Jewish tfmBlty P9 Vol. 10—No. 26 MIAMI. FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JUNE 25, 1937 Price Five Cents PROMINENT CANTOR AND SOCIAL WORKER DIES OF HEART ATTACK Cantor Boris Schlachman, executive director of the Young Mens Hebrew Association; active in both Jewish and non-Jewish civic, fraternal and philanthropic organizations throughout the state, died suddenly last Saturday night. Physicians pronounced him the victim of a heart attack. Boris Schlachman, a native of Poland, came to the United States as a boy of 14 after having served as a choir boy in some of the largest synagogues in his native city. After arriving in the United States he made his home in Philadelphia, where his brother lived. He served as cantor in synagogues in Philadelphia, Texas, Louisville, Tampa and Miami. He was engaged for a brief time during 1924 in the mercantile business. He served as cantor of Beth David Synagogue of Miami for several years, then returned to his home in Philadelphia, where he served as cantor until 1930, when he returned to accept the position as cantor of Beth Jacob Congregation, Miami Beach. In 1935 he severed his connections with Beth Jacob Congregation to accept the leadership of the Young Mens Hebrew Association as its executive director, which position he held at the time of his death. He served as cantor of the Miami Jewish Orthodox Congregation during the High Holy days services in 1935, and as cantor of the Orthodox Synagogue in Tampa during the High Holy day services in 1936. Boris Schlachman was one of the organizers and the first secretary of the Hebrew Friendly Inn for several years during its operation here. He was a charter member of the Miami Beach Lodge of the Elks, was a member of the Miami Beach Civic League, the Biscayne Bay Lodge of the Masonic Order, the Sholem Lodge B'nai B'rith and numerous other fraternal, civic and philanthropic organizations. He was an active member of the Greater Miami Zionist District and served as its secretary for several termB. He was active in the political life of Miami Beach, though never aspiring to office. Schlachman was noted for his willingness to aid the needy, and those in trouble. He headed many drives, both public and private, to raise funds for the relief of transients and those in distress. Funeral services in charge of the Carter-Wixsom Funeral Home were held in the clubrooms of the Young Mens Hebrew Association, where the body lay in state from 11 a. m. to 1 p. m. Monday. At 1 o'clock a service was held with Rabbi Abraham A. Kellner of the Miami Jewish Orthodox Congregation, Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan of Temple Israel, Rabbi Adolph Burger of Rodoph Sholom Congregation of Tampa and Rabbi A. S. Kleinfeld of B'nai Israel Congregation, Daytona Beach, officiating, assisted by Cantor l.ouis Dayman of Beth David Congregation. While the body lay in state a guard of honor composed of members of the "Y" and affiliated organizations stood at the four corners of the bier. Following the service at the "Y" the funeral procession went to Beth Jacob Synagogue, Miami Beach, where several thousand Jews and non-Jews crowded the synagogue and the sidewalks surrounding the building. Rabbis Kellner, Kaplan. Burger and Kleinfeld preached eulogies, and Rabbi Burger and Cantor Hayman chanted the Kol Molay Rachmim. Schlachman's life in the community, his beautiful interpretation of true traditional liturgy, his work for the "Y" were eloquently described by the rabbis amid the weeping of many friends. From the synagogue the procession went to the Greater Miami Jewish Cemetery Association section of Woodlawn Cemetery, where final commitment services were led by Rabbis Kellner, Burger and Kleinfeld and the Kol Molay chanted by Cantor Hayman. Palestine earth was strewn over the casket as the body was lowered. Max Felt, a close friend of the deceased, recited the mourners' Kaddish at the graveside. A daily evening service for one week will be held at the Miami Jewish Orthodox Congregation at 7 o'clock each evening in memory of Boris Schlachman for members of the "Y." The "Y" buildings will remain closed for one week. Arrangements were directed by a committee composed of I. L. Mintzer, M. B. Frank and J. Louis Shochet. Active pallbearers were: Max Felt, M. B. Frank, J. L. Shochet, N. Adelman, I. L. Mintzer, Baron de Hirsch Meyer, E. Albert Pallot and Sidney L. Segall. Honorary pallbearers were: Stanley C. Myers, Sidney H. Palmer. F.lry Stone, Philip Berkowitz, Milton, Steinhart, Harry Wllensky, Louis Karlebach, Jos. M. Lipton, Jacob Becker, Al. H. Rosenfeld, Lew Safanowitz, Hyman Rubin, Isaac Levin, Wm. Friedman, Leonard Abess, John Meyer, Sol. S. Goldstrom, David Goldstein, Leo Robinson, Harry Rose, Arthur Blatt, B. Serkln, Ralph C. Pole. Val C. Cleary, Arthur Childers, Claude A. Renshaw, H. V. Yocom, Dan Galen. Paul Martens, Russel Hand, Alex De Brocqe, Van C. Kussrow, James T. Wilson, Alphonsus Bowes, Herbert A. Frink, Isidor Fine. Sgt. Wesley M. Martin and Russell A. Niceley. Judge Dan Galen adjourned Miami Beach Municipal Court Monday in respect to the memory of Mr. Schlachman. JUDGE FLAYS NAZI CAMP PATOCHOGUE, L. I.-(WNS)Camp Siegfried, the Nazi camp at Yaphank, a stone's throw from the war-time military training ground, is not only a threat to law and order, but is bringing Yaphank to "the verge 'of an insurrection,' Justice of • the Peace Gustave Heuss of Yaphank, who is of German ancestry, told the Brookhaven Town Board. Trging drastic measures to curb the activities of the Nazis who visit the camp over each week-end, Heuss told how the Hitlerites poach on strawberry patches, destroy private lawns, invade orchards and steal fruits and disport themselves In public half-nude. He also accused the 5,000 Nazis who throng Yaphank weekly of forcing the local residents out of Y. phauh Lake. Which adjoins the Nazi camp, and of blocking traffic with their parados. "The colony is far from an asset to Yaphank." he said. "When it was first mentioned several years ago, I visualized a group of Germans of my father's type, but they've turned out to he just a bunch of Hitlerites." In response to Heuss' complaint, ihe town board asigned several more police to the Yaphank area. THE WORLD'S WINDOW SUMMING UP By LUDWIG LEWISOHN Thit column it copyrighted by the Seven Arts Feature Syndicate. Reproduction in whole or In part •trictly forbidden. Any infringement will be prosecuted. Court Enforces Charity Pledge NEW YORK — (WNS) — Jewish philanthropic agencies whose hooks are loaded with unpaid and presumably uncollectible pledges are expected to begin a series of suits to collect what may amount to hundreds of thousands of dollars as a result of an Important decision by the appellate division of the New York Supreme Court holding that a pledge of money to charity Is binding and enforceable at 1 aw. The decision was made In the case of Isidore Bainsburg, New York lawyer, who had renlged on a pledge of $5,000 to the Beth Israel Hospital. In reversing the decision of Supreme Court Justice McCook. who had ruled the pledge unenforceable because It was made without receipt of any consideration, the appellate division declared that "the subscriber who fills in a subscription blank and the charity promisee do not contemplate a bargain in the mercantile sense. Nevertheless, where the subscriber agrees to pay for a certain purpose and the promisee thereafter spends the money for that purpose both intend a binding pledge and the former should be compelled to live up to his promise. The acts of the hospital here in reliance upon the pledge made by the defendant as alleged In the complaint furnished the consideration for the promise to pay and created the promissory estoppel." KAHN HONORED BY FRANCE DETROIT—(WNS)—In recogni tion of his services to French architecture, art and literature, Albert Kahn, Detroit architect, was made a member of the French Legion of Honor at exercises presided over by Rene Weiller, French consul-general. We are on the eve of the Con-1 vention of the Zionist Organization \ of America; in a few weeks the Congress of the World Zionist Organization will take place. Meanwhile not without trepidation though with firm resolve we are awaiting the report of the Royal Commission on Palestine, while Arab nationalists, so-called, are Invading the American scene with the help of at least one distinguished member of a great American university. Meanwhile. too, the horror of the war against three millions of our people In Poland is arousing even the New York Times and its very objective correspondent by Its catastrophic proportions. The darkness deepens in all Central and Hasten Europe and the Nazi network Is spreading dangerously in America. (See The Nation of June B). Yet such is the frivolousness of human nature and such the power of self-deception among Jews, the least realistic of peoples, that there are still Jews, cultivated and able people, too, who think of Zionism as just another "movement," probably worthy but for them, and who worry primarily (I don't say they are not to worry at al) about the Spanish war or civil liberties in Puerto Rico. Deep in their subconscious these are, of course, defensive measures; these are mechanisms of fairly primitive magic. By being what they think the world wants them to be these good people are trying, like any primitive magician or medicine man, to master the menacing world and to avert evil from themselves. You may remember the extraordinary words of Theodor Herzl: "If they were to leave us in peace for two or three generations'. But they will not leave us in peace." And why not: Herzl probably knew the answer, too, but I do not remember his expressing this knowledge. They will not leave us in peace, the peoples of the world, they do not leave us in peace for even one whole generation, because we cannot lose our Identity. Or, at least, we cannot lose our Identity fast enough and completely enougli to satisfy the majorities among whom we live and who respond to the stimulus of our mere presence among them with a feeling that ranges from mild moral discomfort to brutal excesses of rage. Such is the fundamental fact; such Is the kernel and crux of the matter. Futile and childish to say: Why are.not men different? We, God knows, mean them no harm. True, we do not. It makes no difference. Futile and childish to say today, though it may not always have seemed to be so: We shall work for a better world for all mankind. History seems to be cyclic and not progressive. Institutions do not improve when manned by the old barbarous men with their old barbarous vices and reactions. Hence he who turns his face from the Jewish people ir. order to build a better world for all substitutes dreams of a probably unattainable end for the immediate succor of his very flesh and blood, memory ami aspiration, good and God. Nor am I, for one, being human and pretending to be no more than that, interested in an inconceivably distant future from which 'he Jewish people will have disappeared. And the Jewish people will disappear in the cataclysms of history unless ns an entire people It gathers its will to live, to persist, to fulfill its function like the other peoples of mankind, now, today, this month and this year. I marvel at those excellent and apparently disembodied souls who are willing —or apparently so—to have the plow of history plow under their seed and the eternal ideas and ideals which that seed has from the beginning embodied, for the sake of a hollow perfectionism represented by blameless robots stabled in stables of marble with nose-bags of silk neighing in unison something about Humanity with a huge capital letter. It is not for me. Is it, is it for you? Wouldn't it be more realistic and more honorable and more loyal and more human and even infinitely Jollier and happier to arise, to put on uli one's might and put forth all one's good will and have the Jewish people "The Jewish question," wrote Theodor Herzl in words once jeered at and now proven a thousand times over by history itself, "the Jewish question is neither a social question nor a religious queston, whether it assumes this or other colorations or not. It is a national question and in order to solve it we must first of all make it a question of world politics which is to be determined In the councils of the civilized peoples." There are, alas, few civilized peoples left today. We have waited long. We have waited almost too long. But there is no other way than that pointed out by Herzl. Shall we plead with the Poles? Of what avail? Shall we cringe to the Nazis and invite an extra jeer? Shall we appeal to feelings of humanity which do not exist —simply do not exist, except in our breasts? The diaspora ot Eastern and Central Europe must be liquidated. It must be liquidated first in order to save the lives of 5,000,000 Jews. It must be liquidated, secondly, in order that its deceased example may not spread and we be faced In twenty-five years by the alternative between extinction and the liquidation of the entire diaspora. But that diaspora of Eastern and Central Europe can in the present state of the world be liquidated only in and through Palestine. There is no other rope. There is no other answer. There Is nothing else to fight for, to struggle for, to hope for. Is Zionism another "movement?"' Hadn't you better quit fretting over Spain and China and Puerto Rico and fret about the Jewish pec(Continued on Page 5)



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—-r ^ar* Ts THE JEWISH FlOBIDtAM Friday. Jtme 25. W37 E 1 n b I g t a d = -: r -: = 1: r Bui IllkBI THitill^ 1 : r •__ '.x %  v %  ; ... — ^ :--: A Meats v :; %  ": .rr : : %  :-.. wtich has lasted to this After discaseing other kM ike spaek'-r pointed out that Israel s et largatf due to the tstt Ike Je* la a good and law* %  • ff: .-a W-.-er ;:; :s A : c: ntrrent Student To Spend Holiday* Here Seymour Kubin, a student in Jonas Hopkins Lniveraiiy, Baltl. more, ha* returned to t^tua tea auioiuer trim his ^arei-is, Mr. tad Mr*. Morris Robin, lTs 0. \v. Klerenth street. Alter leavk.. he weut to i'roudeti.e, K. 1., to attend lae jewelers' et tion with bis Uthe: BBBt .-mi Jeelers Association. • • • Norma Wermccff Ti Be Married In O. Mr. aa4 Mr. Laud Wernicolf are announcing plan* :or ice mar= 1 : :; -J : : %  ~ ; : ~: %  • %  r : he festal s feaae *IMS M '"' %  %  • aaaas/aaaaa waath Half aaaai -i .' ~ t: 1: Kirti :ke gala fiaac* I F mxrae* this we** free* tkcsr ^ Tnos Wor: mat i-: ii j :: -:.--• %  : •i-T Z-Z----.r t'n K~t i-; "": — z %  : :::: i Vs-f. -' >'%  ~W;! 7":L.11 %  _r .;-. :•: ::; A.~:--J. 7;:-L ML"...i•. %  ; :•. .-Tdtm D—iiia wSB h*a£ Backer Creaaar aa* Mrs. J '--*— x aaacBsl mrB>i at ia a* ranker *at-. %  7 %  • lahassee *M ol t:.*r daughter. Miss Ma H ernicoil, and Irving Caller, a ceremony will Ufce pt*i. on June 27. Mis* tYerj Ler mother left Sunday lot Miss We.-ajcofX atteaded the Andrew Jackson High School la e, ffbv, wr.e:e the faroiiy i*. this a -.unced the appoint... :d 'Lenai which .-. .-: r-iie c'. ----. %  ta one of the most fraBan b*-=r. at^ re cotcing to Mia ever*COBMBBBUJI rean ago. Mr. Getter am aaoreaaeat of iaaorAhroc w&ere he :-gaged in business. • • • Bet" David C:r 5 -=aticn ;:.;:-: .; si-.:: flaiBBajl tkl "^ Cn;j*e* Officers Coax. Ike LaA; a meeting of the adnv: .. c.' ZZZLUgregatioai la;-, week. Sidner H ; -r %  -.:.i %  •::---.. z b e giLT iag s: v-5 m tx Oacaar. f — t*^xraac -4 • • • s %  • r;-; : T;:: i-res e ~"> r:_ i;:: • H -;: ^.. a-. tare aBBBBBj ll aaeav •aakraiil Vaatoesi r J#BB*aT Tirt u -a* SaaaBBfte Base .•--: %  rjaaaai he Moaaaaaa EtPf ='• C-ar:eOas :i = ** %  K A ban ?-SJ:C anal • • 5: %  -:-;::;i : 1 '.' : and fraternal leader of —" -J % %  %  i ~:-L .:.::..BBBKt.-: '. C.c.ut area --. '..: — i: BsjaBMSBt Of %  : %  % %  '-' '•" — -*G:: %  :_i.^0. K. fl laa nbet M :~i oamgngHtim. "BB uias:Tc-.-:>-"'-' WoaBeaaCtrj re-ele<-.ed. Rabbi Max Sr^ ^ Deaoc.-a -.tual leader of tke coBgrega-:--;:-:.:•: : uoo, was anaittaoasir rnalii Se-e z' "i >i t;;i:.-u2€i5 w; ::>r tke ^e: year and Jewvoted an increaae in salary, A %  r. : 1 i.-_. •:;:; ;.:.:*r_ ---: ;T toe coming year will be -:-L i —• %  > : i : • • :i-. :z ~ '.tn >. Eizre' %  %  • W t— t* -* %  :>H'*UH JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA I II tj — imn mm !" mm han fJJ-> kui %  im -cat afa> f — %  £ % %  i-a: i—=. Koo -• >m SMS tA Jt zd l 5i-: : • : %  ** a— $;:-* -;:.: c ;: — • Mr. and Mil y.rksz L Lery c£ BBBBBBBBI N. T, aad Mr. aid Mrs. ."_. .---l::-iof I>ea Moiaee. Iowa. I 7*day by airplane for Ha1-ar.i H rtak before goiig by boat BBM to Miurged to attead. -_. :: -:\iz.i .Li e;iisg on Moc_^==^r^=-= -. :• and MUs .5 parr-i Xr= V. %  ... board to the generaj aeeting of :he congregation, which will be held at Betk Darid Talatad Torah Hall oa the first Sudsy in July. T-e coauBittees for tke coming year will be aaaoaaced at thai meeting, which all ambers are M. L. MARCUS CO. Office Sapplie* sad Faraitare Desks. Chairs. Files, Priatiag LOWEST CASH PRICES 41 N. E. First St. Ph. MU1 Maa stt=:•::-;; • MAX'S • DELICATESSEN :..-: W racier Si ?r:=.s UMI : f I : casa—J •. -; : -1 sa-1 se-v% jt er.irwes .r tr • S.WW£ = riont '.-ISSi £-£:-=:. %  5 s fcup-*u IDU -;-!--:-!--.. = etr *aai : 1 WiriVE ci£ r*aiiu •. -r s*-i> aBaaBj talai --::-: iv *iv s = i:^xant : Luncheons 35c Dinners 50c : i Ca-it C' ^s —: Z • : si : • ; 1 I FTAT.rTOW %  aaaAu •V !S>1 p-CM-I Hi Eiaaaat. r~ • "i *TVM Knaak Vice P ieaiaeai: CAKTEX ft WIESOM. lac PfBBBBBl 4,1 ZHXfiCTOKS 514 W. FSBEBBT St. MBBI 50c BurdinQ's



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Friday, June 25, 1937 THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Page Three / PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY by the JEWISH FLORIDIAN PUBLISHING CO. P. O. Box 2C> PLANT AND OFFICES 21 8. W. Second Avenue Phone* 2-1141; 2-1183 J. LOUIS SHOCHET. Editor FRED K. SHOCHET, Circulmtion Manager BERNARD MORGENSTERN Field Representative Entered aa second class matter July 4, 19S0. at the Poat Office at Miami, Florida, under the Act of March 8, 187*. ST. PETERSBURG MBS. ROSE M. RUBIN Representative WEST PALM BEACH MRS. M. SCHREBNICK Representative ORLANDO MRS. B. J. COHEN Representative TAMPA MRS. M. H. KISLER Representative Bix Montha One Yer SUBSCRIPTION ...81.00 .82.00 FRIDAY, JUNE 25, 1937 Vol. 10—No. 26 21 Once Again Once again the Jewish community is shocked. Again the grim angel of death inflicts a wound which will not be easily healed. And again the roll of those who worked for the good of the entire community, whose unselfishness was marked, who lived so that others too might enjoy some of the necessities of life, is depleted. Boris Schlachman, cantor, social worker, civic enthusiast, humble worker for those who were in need, in trouble and in distress whose presence brought sunshine into the hearts of many whose smile illumined everything that came near whose pockets were emptied too often by those he believed needed help who answered the call of those who applied for help entirely too trustingly Boris Schlachman is no longer in the land of the living. He, too, joins the ranks of those workers for the common good who answered the call from which there is no denial. Those who were fortunate enough to attend the last rites for Boris, aa he was so familiarly called by us all, through eyes dimmed with tears rolling down our cheeks could not but stand awed by the presence of so many hundreds, Jews and non-Jews strangers all. for Boris had not a living relative here. County officials, city officials, leaders in the fraternal life of the community, old and young, men and women, all all were gathered to pay tribute in death to him who in life had exemplified generosity forgiveness understanding beyond human ken. He died, as he would have wished ... in action ... in his pockets were several checks for the building fund of the Y. M. H. A. that institution for which he breathed his everything yes, for which he even sacrificed many friendships with him, lists of those he was to call upon those he had talked to and who had promised contributions so that his dream of a real "Y" building might be realised. Boris Schlachman well merited the spontaneous and heartfelt tribute that was paid him Monday. Every honor that was accorded him at the last rites was well earned in life. Boris set an example that many of us might well emulate. And once again, we humbly recite, "God hath given, God hath taken, let the name of God be praised." Tampa Notes Mrs. Daniel Cracowaner announced the engagement o( her daughter. Miss Charlotte Cracowaner, to Dr. Leon Schwartz, son of Mrs. Frank Schwartz. Miss Cracowaner is the youngest daughter of the late Daniel Cracowaner. pioneer merchant of Tampa. She attended the Academy of the Holy Names and was graduated from Hillsborough High School. She attended Florida State College for Women and received a degree from -he University of Tampa For the last year she has been a member of the faculty of Philip Shore School. Dr. Schwartz is a native of Tampa and a graduate of Hillsborough High School. He at .'ended the University of Florida, Ogl.^ thorpe University and was gradu ated from the Atlanta-Southern Dental College. He took a postKraduate course in oral surgery al Fordham Hospital in New York before beginning dental practice in Tii in pa. He is a member of Oniiiron Kappa I'psilon honorary dental fraternity, president of the Tampa Y. M. H. A., vice president of the Tampa Society of Dental Surgeons and a member of the Merry Fellows Club. Rabbi Adolph Burger, rabbi of Rodoph Sholom Congregation, has left on his vacation and will visit various parts of the north. He expects to be gone about a month. Mis. E. M. Bergman and daughter. Mrs. Mollle Barr, have left for New Orleans, where they will visit with Mrs. nergman's son, Dr. S. Bergman. Mrs. Daniel Cracowaner and her daughter. Miss Charlotte Cracowaner, left for New York City, where Miss Cracowaner will purchase clothes for her wedding trousseau. Mrs. Cracowaner will leave the latter part of the month aboard the French liner Champlane for a several months" visit to various European countries. ITUamL VlDiBA. PAPER CALLS FOR POGROMS AGAINST URUGUAYAN JEWS MONTEVIDEO. Uruguay (WNS) Thinly-veiled appeals for pogroms against the Jews of Uruguay are appearing in the La Tribuna Populara of Montevideo. Within the past fortnight the paper has published a series of violently antiSemitic articles in which the Jews are called "swindlers and rascals" and "the most degenerate and foul of all peoples" against whom individual protests are vain. Calling for "action against Jewish aggression," the paper declares that "we must take energetic measures to defend ourselves against Jewish aggression. It is the sacred duty of the Uruguayan people to defend themselves by all possible means against this criminal element. The Jews have gained control of trade .and industry in our country. Patiently and efficiently increasing their activities, the Jews are carrying on a well-thought-out plan. To defeat these enemies individual protests and campaigns like those waged by this newspaper are not enough. What is needed Is collective action to utilize every means and all united efforts. We dare not forget what the Jewish aggression portends for our race and our national progress. We have already seen what measures must be adopted." Hebrew Calendar 5697-1937 Shiva Asar B-Tammuz, Sunday, June 27. Rosh Chodesh Ab, Friday, July 9. Tlsha B'Ab, Sunday, July 18. Rosh Chodesh Elnl, Sunday August 8. Rosh Hashono, Monday, September 6. Society ) By ARTHUR BLATT and LEW SAFAN The passing of our executive director. Boris Schlachman, last Saturday evening, June 19, has left a void that can never be filled. Through his leadership the "Y" obtained sufficient momentum that enabled it to become one of the largest Jewish organizations In the Greater Miami area. Through his efforts sufficient money was raised to enable the Y. M. H. A. to purchase the grounds they now occupy. Through his co-operation and planning the "Y" was successful in every venture undertaken. It is indeed a great loss to Greater Miami Jewry. The doors oi the Young Mens Hebrew Association will remain closed for the balance of the week until Monday night. The kitchen shower which was to have been held the 22nd of June has been I postponed until the 19th. In closing this column let us say of Boris Schlachnian that his memory will live on though he has dren> departed, and as Isaac McLellan wrote in his poem, "The Death of \ii poli-on": Mrs. Harry Fyvolent, Mrs. I. Rippa and Mrs. I. R. Einblnder and their children have taken a cottage at Clearwater Beach. Mrs. Max Brody has left for Gainesville. Fla., where she is taking courses at the University of RESOLUTIONS Whereas, Almighty God hat een fit to remove from our midst a beloved member of the community, CANTOR BORIS SCHLACHMAN, And wiiereas, Cantor Boris Schlachman was a worshiper in our synagogue and for five years served this congregation as its cantor and was at all times a devoted and faithful servant of the synagogue and the community. Be it therefore resolved by the Beth Jacob Congregation of Miami Beach that the heartfelt sympathy of this congregation, its officers, board of directors and members be and they are hereby extended to the family of the deceased and to the Young Mens Hebrew Association, of which the deceased was the executive director at the time of his demise, And be it further resolved that a copy of these resolutions be made a part of the permanent records of this congregation, and copies forwarded to the family of the deceased and the press. LAZARUS ABRAMS, Acting President. M. B. FRANK, Secretary. Aged Resident Dies At Alton Road Hospital Rev. Moses B. Herman, aged 82, and a resident of Miami Beach since 1924, died at the Alton Road Hospital Wednesday evening after a brief Illness. He was a native of Suvalk, Russia, and came to the United States about 50 years ago, Making his home in Birmingham, Ala. There he was the shoched of the community and its spiritual leader until his departure for Miami. Funeral services were held at the home of the deceased Thursday with Rabbi Abraham A. Kellner of the Miami Jewish Orthodox Congregation officiating. Interment was in the Greater Miami Jewish Cemetery Association section of Woodlawn Park Cemetery. Active pallbearers were J. J. Slmonhoff, Lazarus Abrams, I. D. Spivak, B. Silverman and A. Cohen. Honorary pallbearers were Dave Goldstein, I. L. Mlntzer, J. Albert. M. B. Frank, L. O. Bloomfield and Joseph M. Fine. Surviving Rev. Herman 1 are his wife, four daughters. Mrs. M. D. Kirsch and Mrs. Doris Ad! ler. Mrs. Sarah Glickman of Miami i Beach, and Mrs. M. Roseman of. Birmingham; one son, Arthur Herman of New York; two sisters, j Mrs. Bessie Fink and Mrs. Llbby Quadow of Chicago; five grandchildren and two great grandchilHe died at the close of that darksome day, A day that shall live in story; In the rocky lands they placed his clay "And left him alone with his glory." So shall Boris Schlachman's memory remain. ART AND LEW. Used Cave for Glass Work The first glass maker in Scotland was George Hay (1566-1625). He took advantage of a peculiarly formed cave at Wemyss, on the Fife coast, and set up his furnace therein. Florida. Miss Sallye Finman Is visiting relatives and friends in New York City and Hartford. Conn., and expects to be gone several weeks. RESOLUTIONS Whereas, Almighty God, In His infinite wisdom, has seen fit to remove from our midst BORIS SCHLACHMAN, beloved of all in the comtnunlty; And whereas, Boris Schlachman, by his Interpretation and chanting of the traditional liturgy, had lent dignity and beauty to the services of God, and had 1n his capacity as cantor served this congregation during the High Holy Day services in 1935, and on numerous occasions had aided and helped, both morally and financially, by his service and chanting in the work of this congregation. Be it therefore resolved by the Miami Jewish Orthodox Congregation and its Ladies' Auxiliary that their heartfelt sympathy be and is hereby extended to the family of the deceased and to the Young Mens Hebrew Association, of which he was the executive director at the time of his death. J. LOUIS SHOCHET, Acting President. MRS. N. ADELMAN, President of the Auxiliary. ABRAHAM A. KELLNER, Rabbi. Is Patient at Hospital Mrs. Louis O. Bloomfield is a patient at the St. Francis Hospital, where she is under observation. Returns Home Mi. Charles Rosengarten of Waterbury, Conn., prominent Zionist and one of the most active communal workers of New England, who flew to Miami to attend the wedding of his sister last Sunday, returned to his home Tuesday evening, following a brief visit with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. I. Rosengarten of this city. RESOLUTION Be it resolved by the Young Men's Hebrew Association, of Greater Miami, that Whereas, the Supreme Judge in his wisdom has seen fit to preemptorily summon before his divine and everlasting forum of eternal justice, BORIS SCHLACHMAN of Miami, Florida, and. Whereas, the said Boris Schlachman was an honorable, distinguished and beloved member of our community and the executive secretary and one of the leading members of our association, and an Industrious and upright citizen of the community in every respect. Now therefore, be it resolved by the members of the Young Mens Hebrew Association of Greater Miami that this association does hereby record its sincere and heartfelt regrets at the passing of our beloved member and executive secretary, the lamented Boris Schlachman, and by these presents extends to the loved ones who survive Mr. Schlachman the profound sympathy of every member of this association. Be it further resolved, that the secretary transmit copies of this resolution to the member of Mr. Schlachman's family, and to the newspapers, and record same upon the permanent records of this association. Done and ordered this 23rd day of June, 1937. YOUNG MENS HEBREW ASSOCIATION OF GREATER MIAMI. By E. ALBERT PALLOT, President.



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Page Four TH JEWISH FLORIDIAN Friday, June 25, 1937 FOUR DECADES OF ZIONISM PALESTINE MOVEMENT FACES GRAVEST CRISIS IN ITS HISTORY By MORRIS MARGULIES Tomorrow (June 26) the Zionists of America will assemble in New York for the fortieth annual convention of the Zionist Organization of America. What issues will confront the delegates? In this exclusive article Morris Margulies, secretary of the Z. O. A., discusses the problem of the Zionist movement on the eve of the publication of the Royal Commission's report.—The Editor. On the eve of the fortieth annual convention of the Zionist Organization of America all issues have been made subordinate to the report of the Royal Commission on the administration of the Mandate nnd tho future British policy in Palestine. At this writing the report has not yet been issued, but its major recommendations have received such insistent and repeated publicity that the threats of partition, cantonization or crystallization cannot be considered as idle rumors. Nor can they be regarded merely as trial balloons that can be conveniently exploded by the mere pricking of conventional protest. The Zionist Convention which opens in New York City on June 26 will have to take cognizance of the intricate international situation with which the Palestine situation is inseparably tied up. It would be a sad mistake to approach the findings of the Royal Commission with high optimism. During the past four years Germany has ridden rough-shod over her Jewish population and has left the "conscience of the world," the "brotherhood of mankind" and the "sacred pledges of treaties" to the phrasemakers and the helpless onlookers. Whatever the British sympathies for the Jewish people, we must nevertheless be realistic and con stantly mindful of the fact tha only by the most heroic measures can we prevail against the forces that have risen to militate against Jewish rights in Palestine and elsewhere. It is against a threatening international background that the Royal Commission report will make its appearance, and it is the international situation that will to n greater or lesser degree determine the nature of its recommendations for future British policy in Palestine. American Jewry holds the key to the entire situation. Not only is it the only remaining large, free and Independent Jewish community, but it occupies the strategic position of being part and parcel of American democratic ideals, the same democratic ideals which inspired President Woodrow Wilson to take a deep personal interest in the formulation of the Balfour Declaration In 1017, and the same democratic ideals which influenced Congress in 1922 to adopt the Lodge-Fish resolution endorsing the Balfour Declaration and the League of Nations Mandate. Only American Jewry can in this moment of dictatorial chaos in Europe rise to the defense of the treaties and pledges involving Jewish rights in Palestine. The Jews of Europe cannot stand up to defend treaties and pledges that have been many times violated and scrapped by their own governments. The Jews of Europe are, in fact, in no better position to voice their sentiments than they were during the World War. Throughout Europe, except in isolated cases, the rights the Jews obtained as a result of the Versailles Treaty and minority rights treaties have completely disappeared. If the Jew retains any shred of these rights it is only out of the transitory kindness of the regime in power. Under these circumstances, therefore, American Jewry must revert to the role which it played during the World War, when It became the spokesman for world Jewry through such distinguished leaders as Louis D. Brandels, Julian W. Mack and Stephen S. Wise. American Jewry must mobilize all Its strength for a dramatic appeal to the United States government to Influence it to act in behalf of the preservation CAMP A. Z. A. RECEIVES BOYS Jewry seeking to establish itself in a new and strange environment. Anti-Semitism was centered chiefly in Russia, where the pogrom was the only recognized weapon of attack. France, it is true, was being PORT JERVIS, N. Y.—Camp A. torn asunder by the bitter antlZ. A., in this city, is now receiv Semitlsm aroused by the Dreyfus ing more than 500 boys who have case. But the antl Semitlsm genezeen selected as delegates from rated by that trial was only of a their respective cities to the Bar transitory nature. Although Jews Mitzvah convention of the Alepta suffered from cruel persecution Zadik Aleph, Junior Order B'nai under the Czar, this form of antlj B'rith. being held from June 23 to Semitism was regarded by other j June 30. nations as an unfortunate by-i An important feature of the conproduct of the backwardness and i ventlon, which will commemorate barbarism of the Russian people, the thirteenth anniversary of the If Herzl was moved by the Dreyfus founding of the order, are a series case to return to the Jewish fold of forums to be conducted by leading authorities in their respective fields. Inspector L. C. Schilder, chief of the identification division and organize the World Zionist Organization, what program of action of the rights which the Jews ob-1 would a that intense personality tained In Palestine. The Zionist have devised to cope with the far | of the Federal Bureau of Investigaconvention must make it clear to more tragic situation created by lion. Department of Justice, will Great Britain and the League of the rise of Hitler? In the four lead a forum on "Youth and Nations that the United States la decades that have passed since the Crime." not merely a sympathetic observer, i establishment of the Zionist OrRabbi Milton Steinberg of the but an important party to the ganlzatlon of America, anti-SemiPark Avenue Synagogue. New York agreements concerning Palestine I tisin has become a refined an and City, and an editor of The Reconthrough the American-British Con-; pseudo-science elevated to the so structionist. will conduct the forum called cultural level from its crude on "Judaism as a Civilization." Dr. Shcwarts, curator of the Tel Aviv Museum. It has been decided to bring the coat-of-arms into immediate use upon all Keren Hayesod printed material. An announcement was made in the Hebrew press asking the successful competitor to furnish his name and address to the Judges. In the stress of creation he had forgotten to give this information with his submission! *S3fiUST BROS Rv? •* %  /• thm *nr' m Is thmBEST ventlon on Palestine and the LodgeFish resolution. If any definite action is to be taken on the question of the Royal Commission report, the Zionist convention must be prepared to speak In the name of all Jewry, and particularly in the name of those Jewries who have been silenced, not by war, but by a campaign of oppression and extermination far worse than war. The internal Zionist situation In America has greatly improved with a consolidation of Zionist forces and a considerable increase in membership. However, it is to be taken into account that the Zionist position as such has not been strengthened by the developments of the past four years in spite of the fact that during that period many so-called "panic" Zionists were brought into the sphere of Zionist Influence. It is this clement of the periphery, which may be considered only as a temporary ally, that the Zionist Organization of America must permanently integrate. For so long as it remains a weak link it only serves to reduce the strength of the entire organization, since it deludes the main body into the belief that it has gained permanent reinforcement. Another problem that must receive more than cursory attention from the delegates at the fortieth annual convention is the problem of fund-raising for Palestine. The Zionist convention must give serious consideration to the problem of increasing funds for Palestine in order to stimulate the growth and development of the Jewish National Home. In this connection it must take into account the fact that this effort must be adjusted to the situation which exists in many communities where local welfare councils have been established. It must also consider the problem of Palestine propaganda in communities where welfare chests conduct campaigns in which the Palestine funds are included among the beneficiaries. The importance of Zionist propaganda in the raising of funds for Palestine is not to be overlooked in the present critical situation. In 1897, when Herzl convened the First World Zionist Congress in Basle and when shortly thereafter Prof. Richard Gottheil, together with Dr. Stephen S. Wise, founded the Federation of American Zionists, the Jewish community in the United States was hardly more than a disjointed portion of world Abraham Goldberg, the oldest member—III point of service—of the World Zionist Actions Committee and vice president of the will conduct a campfire forum on "Palestine Before and After the War." Principal speaker at the Bar Mitzvah celebration, which will take place on Sunday evening. June 27, will be Alfred M. Cohen, international president of the B'nai B'rith. Still another forum o.nt "Youth and His Responsibility to World Peace" will be conducted by Dr. J. Max Weis, director of the educational department of World Peaceways. form in Czarist Russia. During this period Zionism has been translated from a vague hope to the most forceful reality in Jewish life today. Palestine today'American Jewish Congres has arisen to confound the detractors of the Jewish people and to give new hope to oppressed Jews everywhere.. Because Palestine occupies this focal position in world Jewish affairs, its future development becomes the responsibility not only of Zionists, but of all Jews everywhere, regardless of ideological or political differences; for Palestine to the indestructible will of the Jewish people to survive and their creative abilities under the most trying conditions. The Z. O. A. faces the task of bringing into its ranks the mass of American Jewry in a program of constructive effort for Palestine rebuilding, since today, more than at any other time, Jewry throughout the world needs the inspiration of Palestine to fight off the savage attacks against the Jewish people. Whatever the gravity of the situation in Palestine, the Zionist convention will nevertheless take occasion to celebrate the fortieth anniversary of the founding of the Z. O. A. and to review the role which Zionism has played in American Jewish life and its contribution to Palestine rebuilding dining the past four decades. This review URGE END ANTI-SEMITISM AS AID TO RAPPROCHEMENT LONDON—(WNS)—An appeal to Nazi Germany to end its persecution of the Jews as a means o( bringing about an Anglo-German rapprochement is made in the current Issue of the London Jewish Chronicle in connection with the forthcoming visit to London of Baron Constautin von Neurath, German foreign minister. The Chronicle points out that British resentment against the persecution of the Jews Is one of the major obstacles to an Anglo-German understanding. KEREN HAYESOD SELECTS COAT-OF-ARMS AS SYMBOL *•{ HAD ANY HEADACHES^ —7-^ LATELY?* JERUSALEM — (WNS — Palcor Agency)—Fifty-seven entries were considered by a board of judges appointed by the Keren Hayesod to decide upon the most suitable coatof-arms symbolizing the activity of the fund. The board selected one entry signed "Nemart," a pseudonym of a local artist, who was awarded first prize of $50. The Judges consisted of Dr. A. Goldstein, Dr. Leo Herrmann, secretary to the board of directors of the Keren Hayesod. and Dr. K. tion of its fortieth birthday. His will serve to accentuate the propresence at the helm of the moveWhite Oak Leather LADIES* HEELS 15c HALF SOLES 60c ATLANTIC SHOE SHOP 240 N. E. First Avenue Opp. Cortei Hotel found impress which Zionist ideals and aspirations have made upon Jewish life throughout the United States. The next few months will probably be one of the most decisive periods in the history of Palestine development since the war. In the days to come, when American Zionist leaders will be engaged in vital political action in connection with the Royal Commssion report, we will once again find, as we did in the summer of 1936, Dr. Stephen S. Wise, president of the Z. O. A., summoning all his energy and resources to cope with the problems arising out of that report. It la no more than fitting that Dr. Wise, who stood at the cradle of American Zionism and was its first honorary secretary, should be the president of the Z. O. A. on the celebraDR. R. S. AKERS DENTIST 1764 N. W. 36th St. Closed Saturdays. Ph. 2-2111 1X3 IX ROBBINS ROOFING A SHEET METAL WORKS Inspection and EitimaUi Free MS N. W. Mth 8L Phone 1-1705 ment today is nothing short of providential. The careers of both have been linked In great and unforgettable events. Nurse Thanks Friend for Recommendinq DR.MILES NERVINE A nurse writes that she suffered from frequent headaches. Nothing stopped them until a friend recommended DR. MILES NERVINE. She says Nervine stops headaches before they get a good start Three generations have found DR. MILES NERVINE effective fpr Nervousness, Sleeplessness due to Nervous Irritability, Nervous InW digestion, Headache, Travel Sickness. Get DR. MILES NERVINE at your drug store in liquid or effervescent tablet form. £ Small bottle or package 25 cents Large bottle or package $1.(1 OWN YOUR OWN HOME We are vitally interested in fostering home ownership and have money available to assist YOU In BUYING—BUILDING—REFINANCING AT LOW INTEREST—LONG TERMS WE INVITE YOUR CALL >c OUR CURRENT RATE ON SAVINGS utiiEi sums A %  ••TIME LOUS DADE FEDERAL |l|VUiB8: AH0 LOAN ASSOCIATION Ground Floor Congress Bldg. —109 N. E. SECOND AVENUE— PHONE 3-2652 RUFUS H. DANIEL LEO ROBINSON Vlce-Pres. Vlce-Pre.. J. M. LIPTON President RESOURCES OVER $1,500,000.00



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Friday, June 25, 1937 THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN ^ 9 JEWISH NEWS AROUND THE WORLD JEWISH NATIONAL COUNCIL CO-OPTIONS 30 MEMBERS JERUSALEM — (WNS — Palcor Agency)—The co-option of Jewish representatives of localities on the Assefat Hanivcharim, Jewish Representative Assembly of Palestine, was decided upon at a plenary session of the Vaad Leuml, Jewish National Council, which is the smaller executive body of the assembly. Without calling elections at this time, places in the assembly will be given to 12 representative-.! of Jewish municipalities and urban communities, to 12 represf'.iiiiK local and colony councils and to six from labor settlements. Both chief rabbis of Palestine were also appointed as ex-officio delegates of the assembly. The Vaad Leuml was empowered to decide a date for the 1937 meeting of its parent body. The co-option of additional delegates represents the culmination of negotiations continuing for many years in an effort to make the assembly fully representative. Page Fire MANDATES COMMISSION TO DISCUSS PALESTINE JULY 30 GENEVA — (WNS — Palcor Agency)—The problems of Palestine will be considered at an extraordinary session of the League Mandates Commission on July 30, it was decided at the closing session of that body. Ordinarily Palestine would have been among the other subjects reviewed at the now concluded ordinary session of the commission. Previously, however, the British government had stated that it was unable to have a report of its policies available for the league trustees on Palestine until after the Royal Commission had issued its findings. It indicated that such a report would be readyby the end of July. PAPER BANS PUBLICATIONS OF JEWISH MANIFESTOS ROME — (WNS) — So numerous have been the public denunciations of Zionism by Italian Jews under the pressure of the Fascist press' anti-Zionism crusade, that II Popolo d'lialiii. Mussolini's organ, has announced that it will no longer publish them. For several weeks the Italian press has given a great deal of space to statements by Jews proclaiming their loyalty to Fascism and uncomprlmislng opposition to Zionism. ARABS ASSERT DEPARTURE SHOWS PARTITION REJECTION PERUSALEM — (WNS — Palcor Agency)—The decision of High Commissioner Wauchope to fly to London on June 21 indicates that the Royal Commission is revising its findings to favor the Jews, it is declared by Falastin, Arabic daily. Sir Arthur's departure is also a subject for conjecture In the other Arabic daily papers today. Falastin interprets the event as a sin that partition plans hitherto rumored have been changed. It also sees proof of restoration of proposals whereby Jewish immigration would be increased and land sales to Jews permitted. -It believes, further, that a Legislative Council will be created. According to the Falastin, Jewish immigration into Palestine will be fixed so that the Ylshuv constitutes a perpetual 30 per cent of the population. SETS UP SCHOLARSHIPS FOR JEWISH STUDENTS NEW YORK—(WNS)—An Invitation to Jewish students In foreign lands who are unable to continue their studies because of antiSemitic discrimination to come to Yeshlva College was extended by Dr. Bernard Revel, president of the college, at Its sixth annual commencement exercises. Yeshlva College, he said, had established 10 scholarships for Jewish students living in countries "whose policies tended to restrict study in Jewish culture." The degree of bachelor of arts was conferred upon 48 students who had completed the regular college course In the only Institution of higher learning in America under Jewish auspices. Speakers at the exercises included Mark Eisner, chairman of the New York Board of Higher Education, and Borough President Samuel Levy. The World's Window (Continued from Page 1) pie and the report of tlte"* Royal Commission and ask yourself what you have done and what you are going to do concerning these matters which ultimately will mean life or death to you and your children? Funny reviewers, including some Jews, have recently accused me, and others who share my convictions, of being "obsessed" by Zionism. Let us hope that these ladies and gentlemen will not one fine day in the whirling waters of a deluge wish that they too had been obsessed. It happened in Germany— Just that—Just the other day. J&ti tell the IflM^P rid HERE'S T H E ; PU Uj IT'S that our summer temperatures are lower 1...111 1.1 ;:.. inland states. We know that our tropic scenery is eve. Florida's marvelous summer-time advantages should bo broadcast to the four corners of the world. Everyone should know about the delights of a breeze-cooled lura-, nicr vacation in Florida. Here" U a "wvf In* which we can tell our story and invite prospective visitors to enjoy these advantages with us this summer. We have prepared "Summer-gram" cards, with beautiful Florida* sceneef which can be mailed to any person or more vividly beautiful in summer. Above all, we know that jummer .vacation cost* here are much lower., The*e~arr facta^we can tell to people in less favored climelj\where sweltering heat and tired nerves tak their tell tach summer. Send your "Summer-gram" i viUtionTtoday? They're FREE! pemona you may aelect^Tha "Summer-gram^carde ai* T F I THF W (1 R I H free.lYoumerely"addre8s them; we'll stamp and mail, E L L^ I E'^_ II U H L U %  them forjoa? ^ We'wlio" live" here know that all outdoor sports are equally enjoyable in summer and winter. We know I N 11 KI iWrttri tciMi tl f IKMI. art milF D C t I i tkhittm illicit. Ysi eti write "• %  llfl jwr tea %  trMaHawttajs !•. Yoi A.drau Tke— Wt'il Staap aid Mill The!



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Page Six Society E Orlando Visitor Is Here Miss Gertrude Hainowitz of Orlando is visiting Miss Phyllis Sontag, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Sontag, 1726 S. W. 19th avenue. Both girls are students of the 1'niversity of Oklahoma and affiliated with Sigma Delta Tau Sorority• • • Retiring President Leaves For Summer Mrs. Murry Grossman, retiring president of Junior Hadassah and active club worker, left on Tuesday aboard the S.S. Shawnee for the summer home of rer parents, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Koller, at Parkway-on-the-Wallkill, Walden, N Y. Mr. Grossman will join her in j the fall, when they plan an extensive tour of the New England States and Canada, after which they will return to their residence | in Miami Beach. A formal dinner bon voyage party VM tendered Mrs. Grossman by her uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Koretzky, at their / home. 1552 Collins avenue, and a I larewell dinner party was held in her honor in the home of Mr. and Mrs. I. M. Grossman on Jefferson avenue. • • Welfare Auxiliary Holds Final Meeting The monthly meeting of the Ladies' Auxiliary of the Jewish Welfare, postponed Monday out of respect for the death of Cantor Boris Schlachinan, was held Wednesday on the seventh floor of the Mark Store. This was the final meeting of the summer. Tabulation of receipts of the annual picnic held Sunday showed a sizable increase in the auxiliary's fund for philanthropic purposes, according to Mrs. R. R. Adler, who was in charge of the affair. The committee expressed thanks for the donors of food and prizes. Results of the beauty contest were announced as Mrs. Ida Optner. winner of the married women's contest; Leo Robinson, men's contest, Eileen Friedman, first; Shirley Barnett. second, in the girls' contest, and Pauline Marie Oppenbeim. Natalie Le Vine, Sibil Owen and Patsy Olsen, winners of the children's contest. • • • Long-Time Resident Dies In Local Hospital Mrs. Fannie First, 57. died Tuesday in a Miami hospital following a long illness. She was the wife of Benjamin First, owner of the Eighth Avenue Poultry Market, and same to Miami 13 years ago from New York City. Besides her husband, she leaves a son, Malcolm, Washington, D. C; two daughters, Mrs. R. D. Flato and Mrs. Ruth Brown. Miami; five brothers, Nathan Newman. Newark. N. J.; Edward Newman, Brooklyn. N. Y.; Max Newman. Bronx. N. Y.; Benja %  min Newman, New York City, and Harry Newman, Jamaica, L. I., and two sisters, Mrs. Annie Book and Mrs. J. W. Gottlieb. Brooklyn. Funeral services will be held today %  with interment at Woodlawn Park Cemetery. • • • Synagogue Edifice To Be Completed Members of Beth Jacob Congregation. Miami Beach, unanimously approved the completion of the new synagogue building and directed the building committee to complete the work within two months, at a meeting of the congregation last Wednesday nfght at the synagogue. The members also approved a resolution directing the vacancy in the office of president caused by the recent death of Mr. Philip Liberman be not filled until the expiration of the unexpired term. A By BETTY BARCLAY Reports Indicate that many of us to 7 minutes, depending on the age will be doing a lot of worrying and size of the peas. Pack loosely before long. Food prices are going' to within 1 inch of top into clean up. Our pocketbooks are not keeping pace. The problem "what to serve" Is a real one. Here's a timely hint. At the peak of the season, when prices are lowest, "put up" fruits, berries and vegetables for later use — when prices are high. Early in the season you may jar your peas. glass jars. Fill to within V4 inch of top with water in which vegetable was precooked or boiling water. Add 1 teaspoon of salt and sugar mixture to each pint jar if desired. Put on cap, screwing band firmly tight. Process in pressure cooker, 60 minutes at 10 pounds; or in water bath, ISO minutes; or in Later on, make pickles or a tasty oven, 240 minutes at 250 degrees. vegetable butter from carrots, winter squash or pumpkin. In between, there are plenty of other "goodies" to be taken care of. Stock your preserve closet with row after row of sparkling pint and quart jars of these foods. Through the transparent glass you may see the food and appreciate its quality. When you use it, you will appreciate the saving. The glass jar will do a lot this season to keep upkeep down. Here are two of the many recipes that are enjoying popularity:. Pea* Use only young tender, freshly gathered peas. Shell, wash and sort according to size. Precook 3 Carrot, Winter Squash or Pumpkin Butter 6 lbs. carrots, pumpkin or winter squash lbs. light brown sugar lemons tablespoons ground ginger tablespoons ground cinnamon teaspoon allspice pint water Peel vegetables; chop them fine or put them through food chopper. Add spices and sugar together with lemon juice, and rind put through chopper; let stand over night. In morning add 1 pint water; boil gently until vegetables are clear and soft and mixture thick. Pour into sterilized glass Jars and seal. memorial meeting will be held to honor the memory of Mr. Liberman at the expiration of the "Shloshim" 30-day period of mourning. The congregation also decided to hear Rabbi Solomon N. Barzel of Philadelphia, and applicant for the position of rabbi for the congregation. • • • Chiax Club Names Officers Thursday Evening Officers of the Chiax Club, composed of Jewish girls of this area, were elected at the meeting of the organization last Thursday evening at the home of Miss Eadie Feinberg. Miss Pearl Waldorf was chosen president, Miss Shirley Haimes, secretary, and Miss Evelyn Jacobs, treasurer. Gerry Edelson was named rush captain. Plans for a series of rush parties to be held within the next two weeks were discussed. • • • Rosengarten-Schwartz Nuptials Celebrated Miss Esther Rosengarten. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. I. Rosengarten, prominent in the work of the Miami Jewish Orthodox Congregation, became the bride of Mr. Max Schwartz last Sunday afternoon at the home of the bride's parents in the presence of the immediate members of the family. Mr. and Mrs. Rosengarten, parents of the bride, gave the bride in marriage. Mrs. Sam Schwartz, sister-in-law of the groom, was matron of honor, and Mr. Sam Schwartz, brother of the groom, was best man. with the father of the groom, Mr. I. Schwartz, attendant on the groom. Following the ceremony with the traditional canopy and ring service a dinner was given for the immediate members of the family. Among those attending were Mr. Charles Rosengarten, brother of the bride and one of the most active Jewish communal workers of New England, and Mr. and Mrs. Morris Lefkowitz, brother-in-law and sister of the bride of Orlando, Fla. Mr. Schwartz is the head of the East Coast Fish Company and a prominent business man of this area. The couple left Tuesday for a honeymoon trip through New York, the Catskill Mountains and Connecticut. Ashby-Levy Nuptials Are Impressive Simplicity marked the marriage of Miss Letitia Ashbv and Mortimer S. Levy, son of Mr. and Mrs. Hiram I. Levy of Rochester, N. Y., Sunday at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Walter S. Ashby in Coral Gables. Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan performed the ceremony. Only members of the two families were present. The bride was given in marriage by her father. The bride's sister, Miss Judith Ashby, was her only attendant, and Earle Levy of Rochester, N. Y., cousin of the bridegroom, was best man. A dinner at the Ashby home followed the nuptials. The bridal couple left Tuesday morning by plane for Jamaica and Montague Bay, from there by boat for New York, and they will reside in Rochester where Mr. Levy is asociated with his father in Levy-Adler Clothing ManufacturersIn addition to the bridegroom's parents and cousin, his brother-inlaw and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Julian Brody of Des Moines. Iowa, came to Miami for the wedding. The party was entertained at the Coral Gables Country Club on Saturday night, having arrived here earlier in the day by boat from New York. The bride is a granddaughter of the late Richard Ashby, pioneer Company In the evening? For breakfast? For lunch? It doesn't matter when I The waffle Is America's "all-hour" meal, equally tempting morning, noon or night. And it is the tasty delight that can be prepared on an instant's notice from things always on the kitchen ebelf. That is — if you take care to keep a bottle of rich, golden maple syrup on hand at all times. Without that clear glass container right there on the table. Inviting your guest to eat more and then more even the brownest, crlspest waffles are sometimes not tempting. Let them see the syrup. Here are a few waffle recipes for your "hurry-up" file. Swimming In luscious syrup mmm! You'll say "W" stands for Wonderful, as well as Waffle!. Golden Waff lea *$§* l'i cups flour 3& teaspoon salt 3 teaspoons baking powder 1 cup fresh milk 2 eggs 1 tablespoon butter Mix flour, salt and baking powder, add milk gradually, then eggs which have been beaten very lightly, and melted butter. Be sure both aides of waffle-iron are very hot, and well greased. After bakBY BITTY BARCLAY Ing each waffle, heat Iron a minute before pouring In batter. Rica Waffle* 1 cup rice Va teaspoon salt 1% tablespoons butter 4 cups flour 3 cups fresh mi'..-: 2 eggs 2 teaspoons baking powder Cook rice, drain, and add salt, melted butter, milk and beaten eggs. Mix well. Sift baking powder and flour together and add to first mixture. Bake In hot waffle iron. Cheeae Wafflea 2 cups sifted cake flour 2 teaspoons double-acting baking; powder % teaspoon salt 3 egg yolks, well beaten .,, 1 cup fresh milk 4 tablespoons melted butter 8 egg whites, stiffly beaten 1 cup grated cheese Sift flour once, measure, add baking powder and salt, and sift again. Combine egg yolks, milk and butter. Add to flour, beating until smooth. Fold In egg whites and cheese. Bake In hot waffle Iron. Place a slice of grilled tomato on each, section. Diced uncooked bacon may be sprinkled over batter before closing iron. Makes 4 four-section waffles. Miamian. She attended St. Katherine's Episcopal School in Davenport, Iowa; Columbia Preparatory School in Rochester and spent a year at Cardiff Technical College. Cardiff, Wales. The bridegroom attended Hackley School and is a graduate of Yale University. Prior to the ceremony Rabbi Kaplan conducted the ritual whereby the bride was converted to the Jewish faith. NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE rOf.N'TY JUDGES COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA — IN PROBATE. No. "71. In Re: Estate of BORIS SCHLACHMAX. Deceased. To All Creditors and All Persons Having Claims or Demands Against Said Estate: You. and each of you, are hereby notified and required to present any t-lalms and demands which you, or either of you, may have against the estute of Boris Schlachman. deceased, late of Dade County, Florida, to the Hon. W. F. Blanton, County Judge of Dade County, and file the same In his office In the County Courthouse In Dade County, Florida, within eight calendar months from the date of the first publication hereof. Said claims or demands to contain the legal ddress of the claimant and to be iwo'n to and presented as aforesaid, or same will be barrel. Bee Section 120 of the 1933 Probate Act. Dated June 24th. A. D. 1937. I. L-, MINTZKIt. as Administrator of the Estate of BORIS SCHLACHMAN, Deceased. E. ALBERT PAI.I.OT. Attorney for Administrator. First publication on 8-15. 7—2-9-16—37. Junior Hadasah Will Hold First Informal Meetings Junior Hadassah will hold the first of its summer informal meetings on Monday evening, June 28, at the home of Mrs. Carl Weinkle, 1720 Lenox avenue, Miami Beach, at 8 o'clock. Mrs. L. A. Chaikin is in charge of this meeting. Miss Ida Safer, who was recently installed as president of the Miami unit, will outline her plans for activities-for the coming year and will announce cbairmen of committees. Plans for the annual administration dance to be held the first week in August will be presented before the meeting. • I'M SO NERVOUS I COULD SCREAM ^5? YOU HAVEN'T USED THAT NERVINE I BOUGHT YOUI ONLY SEABOARD OFFERS YOU DE LUXE REGUNIN6 SEAT COOL AIR-CONDITIONED COACHES TO WASHINGTON-NEW YORK-THE.EAST-1 %f PER MILE One-Way Fares from Miami Botton $ 87.98 Jacksonville .. 5.SO New Orle.ni 14.75 New York. ...... ...1 88.48 Norfolk ....,.; 16.30 Philadelphia A 80.68 Richmond .'.' 16.00 Savannah ..•• 8.30 Tellahauee 7.70 Nv*ahinson 17.90 Similar fare* le all other point* • r ^_ CITY TICKET OFFICE OS E. Flagler St." """"*• Telephones 2-S161—2-6104 T. W. Luckett, Div. Pass. Agt n %  yi 7 OR.MILES be \ps to R e / 0v fense Nerves Do you feel tense and keyedup? 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PAGE 1

Friday, June 25, 1937 THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Page Seven! ^ord and Lady Marley, who recently completed a tour of the United States, describing conditions affecting world Jewry. CANTOR AND SOCIAL WORKER WHO DIED, IN FAMILIAR POSES Principal speakers at the Bar Mitzvah celebration of the A. Z. A. at Port Jervis, N. Y. Left to right: Inspector L. C. Schilder of the F. B. I.; Rabbi Milton Steinberg of New York; Alfred M. Cohen, head of B'nai B'rith, and Dr. Abraham Goldberg, noted Zionist. BORIS SCHLACHMAN AS CANTOR [ending and Sewing for their Fellow Refugees C' irish girls who have fled Germany i sewing, and mending as part of training at the training school Irentioned by the Joint Distribul Committee at Nieuwe Sluis. near ringen, Holland. Agriculture, dotfc science, and trades are being tat to hundreds of Jewish young and women preparing to emii to other lands of permanent ref with the aid of the Joint DistribCommittee. Whatever these young people or their parents had in mind for their future careers they realize the necessity of being trained in humble occupations that will make them welcome and self-supporting in the new countries where they hone tn be absorbed. st Plows of Tree Branches Be first farm plows were made crooked tree branches and rked by man power. Red Coral Always Prized I It Is red coral that is and always ( has been prized, not solely for jewelry and buttons, but as a charm to bring safety, health and secrets not revealed to the ordinary person. As ancient Gauls rushed headlong into battle, they trusted their safety to their swords, strength and the "magic" coral imbedded in their shields or helmets. Many Italians and Indians regard coral as protection against the "evil eye." The world's red coral comes from the reefs off the Mediterranean coast of Africa, says the Washington Post, and is obtained chiefly by Italians. Lord Melchett, noted Zionist leader who will take an active part in the deliberations of the World Zionist Congress in Zurich, Switzerland, in August. BORIS SCHLACHMAN AS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR SIDNEY H. PALMER newly-elected president of Beth David Congregation. At the "Nieuwe Sluis" Colony, Wieringen Holland Mi %* On land recently reclaimed from the sea by the Dutch Government, the Joint Distribution Committee supports this center which trains German young men and women refugees in occupations most suitable for the countries to which they will emigrate. The scene above shows Jewish youths IT training for construction work transporting bricks for buildings which they will erect for themselves and i their fellow refugees, *-•' MORRIS MARGULIES secretary of the Zionist Organistion of America, whose fortieth innual convention begins In New York tomorrow. Officiating at the funeral services for Cantor Boris Schlachman last Monday were Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan, Rabbi Abraham A. Kellner Rabbi Adoiph Burger and Rabbi A. 8. Klelnfeld.



PAGE 1

Pace Eirht THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Friday, June 25, 193T Strictly Confidential By PHINEAS J. BIRON Keyholer Abroad London's political whisperers are saying that Sir Herbert Samuel's elevation to the House of Lords was preliminary to his being appointed governor of the Jewish division in the rumored new set-up which the Royal Commission is concoting for Palestine. Sounds funny but there's a Jewish paper in Tel Aviv which is openly supporting the anti-Semitic, Fascist and Nazi rebel General Franco in Spain The paper is the Revisionist "Hayarden" And it says that victory for the "red'' Valencia (Loyalist) government would mean the triumph of Communism in Spain, while the day that government falls ,'would not be a day of grief for Jewry" Hayarden also claims that Jews are not being persecuted by Franco, insisting that this is a lie spread by enemies of the "Nationalists" There's something sardonic about Mussolini's flirtation with antiSemitism in view of the fact that one of the principal financiers of Italian Fascism is a Galiciau Jew by the name of Guieseppe Toplitz. who is the Fritz Thyssen of Italy Paul Weil is the attorney for Haile Selassie in the latter's suit in the French courts to force Italy to permit him to sell his stock in Ethiopia's railway Carlo Cogni, director of the Italian Culture Oflice in Hamburg, is actively seeking to prove the superiority of the Italian rather than the Nordic race ... In stressing the point, he argues that though "the Jewish race is inferior in many respects, the Italian Jews are of a better race"' But he is in accord with the Nazis that "the Jews are the pioneers of Communism" Margaret Fontages, the French siren who tried to shoot up Count de Chambrun, the French ambassador to Rome, because he busted up her Liaison with II Duce, is the daughrer of a French Jewish merchant. You Should Know Our private gumshoes report that the following gentlemen were among the 18 people present at that secret Jewish unity pow-wow at the New York Harmonie Club, which we told you about a fewcolumns back Professors Horace M. Kallen and Jerome Michael, who are affiliated with the American Jewish Congress; Edward Greenebaum of the American Jewish Committee; Louis Fabricant, Henry Monsky and Carl Austrian of the B'nai B'rith, and Judge A. K. Cohen of Boston and Modie Spiegel of Chicago None of the gentlemen represented their organizations ... We hear that the meeting, and others to follow, are an outgrowth of that recent parley <;illed in Chicago by the AntiDefamation League That antiNazi outfit which we reported as being ready to fold got a new lease on life, thanks to some unexpected money obtained from one of its bin shots Marvin Lowenthal. author and globe trotter, now has a cubbyhole in the American Jewish Committee's office There's a movement afoot to draft Harry Schaffer of Pittsburgh for a second term as commander-in-chief of the Jewish War Veterans He's done a swell Job Incidentally, Detroit will probably get the 1938 convention of the J. W. V. All the rabbis who serve as directors of the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundations must be married Which makes it tough on the co-eds Someone who got caught tells us that the latest technique developed by fundraisers for New York's Jewish Federation is to lock the doors at prospect meetings held in hotels and to bar doors and windows by blockading them with furniture when meetings are held at country clubs. Strange But True Pacific Coast Catholics might like to know that Manfred von Killinger, the new German consul in San Francisco, is the man who assasinated Mathias Erzberger, the Centrist minister of finance during the days of the German republic Erzberger, who was a Catholic, was shot from ambush After the killing Killinger (swell name for a killer!) fled to Hungary, where he remained until Hitler came to power ... As a reward the Fuehrer made him a "Statthalter" of Saxony Colonel Edwin Emerson, one-time president of the Society of American Friends of Germany, who fled to Germany in January, 1934, to escape testifying before the Congressional committee on un-American activities about his Nazi propaganda activities, is back in Washington doing a Job for the Nazis John Hamilton, chairman of the Republican National Committee, is in Europe studying the workings of Nazism and Fascism Sunnyside, the model home community in New York's Queens Borough, is facing a serious problem of anti-Semitism as the result of the refusal of the community's directors to permit a rabbi to speak in its public auditorium The rabbi, who lives in Sunnyside, was recently assaulted by a war veteran. Hitler Over Europe One of the Germans who died in the. Zeppelin Ilindonburg disaster was a Nazi military spy An obituary in a Silesian paper let the cat out of the bag when it reported that Fritz Erdmann, one of the casualties, was a "colonel of military aviation, specialist in the intelligence service and commander of the intelligence school of the air forces in Halle" who died while "on duty" German "volunteers" with the rebel forces in Spain are being killed by German-made guns and ammunition freshly imported from Gemany via Danzig by the Loyalists with export permits obtained from Nazi sources Thus the Nazis seem to be selling their citizens to Franco and their guns to the Loyalists The latter even have anti-aircraft guns and machine guns of the latest German manufacture Eugen d'Albert's famous opera, "Tiefland," is playing to capacity houses in the German Opera House in Berlin, although the lyrics are the work of the non-Aryan Rudolf Lothar. About People Long Island's swanky North Shore, where Jews are as rare as rabbis at Hitler's castle is all agog because Prof. Albert Einstein has leased a summer cottage in Huntington Fordham University is a Catholic institution but the highest ranking member of the graduating class of the School of Law was Norma F. Shapiro who copped four of the five senior class prizes Leslie Hore-Belisha England's minister of war has taken to wearing a monocle ... If Press Agent Henry Levy blossoms out as an authority on Jewish religious lore blame It on the fact that he learned plenty while doing a swell Job publicizing the semi-centennial of the Jewish Theological Seminary Hank Greenberg's kid brother, Joe, Is making a bid for the home-run championship of the Texas League ... He plays third base for Fort Worth Hollywood is talking about a permanent Relnhardt theatre patterned after the famous Salzburg Festival Our managing editor, Bernard Postal, is readying a book on Journalism ... Ida Flatow, who has been secretary to more big-shot American Zionists for more years than she'll admit, will celgbrate the fortieth anniversary of the Z. O. A. by taking unto herself a husband Hilly Rose's father is extremely proud of his of his time telling people what a impressarlo son and spends most good nationalist Jew Billy is. UNIOBGIIIABLI k bun VACATION JACKSONVILLE J FLORIDA GARNET! ANDREWS,M.n.jae ENJOY SUMMER COMFORT *t ihto wodarn, fotptool hold in tSt hrt d down. town Jacbionvillt. Etry room wilK tub and •Sower, loll Witt, ctilmg Ian, radio, llaiud aummci doof... Eer Bad wild Innanprinj mattraii and rtadinj lamp. (tormina, ica want on tvtry iloot. AIR CONDITIONED COCKTAIL LOUNGE COMEE SHOP DINING AND MEETING ROOMS R.i.i--Single with FttXM Balh j 78 Room! $2.00 • 80 Room, $3.50 40 Room. $3.00 84 Room. $3.50 I 10 Sampla Room r* fci.ala (a* $4.00 I SI.jtil Irene lor double occupancy Oilie, I I ROUND Hal.l. HOTIL'ATTiN W" HOtlL DISOTO Jacksonville Notes Miss Jacqueline Jeannette Streng, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George G. Streng, was married to Norman Marks, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Marks, in a lovely ceremony last Sunday afternoon in the Jewish Temple Home on St. Johns avenue. Rabbi Israel L. Kaplan officiated and nuptial selections were played on the violin by Elmer Setzer. Miss Streng was given In marriage by her father, and had as her attendant, her sister, Miss Irma Streng. Bernard Marks was best man for his brother. An informal reception from 2:30 to 4:30 o'clock followed the ceremony. Miss Jeanette Ossinsky and Miss Hattie Sloat left last week for Mexico City to attend the University of Mexico. En route they will visit in New Orleans, La., and San Antonio, Texas, for a week where they will be delightfully entertained. ganization and also those who bought shekels In the recent drive participated last Sunday in the elections for delegates to the twentieth World Zionist Congress, to be held in Switzerland in August. Polling places were established in the Jacksonville Jewish Center, the home of Mrs. D. Lasarow, 2314 Post street, and the home of Mrs. Sllverman, 112 Wllkerson avenue,. Jacksonville Beach. The polls were open Sunday from 9 a. m. to 8 p. m. In addition to Mr. Joseph Robin, the members of the local election committee were Max Mlrkls, H. Kline, J. Lapinsky, M. B. Glicksteln, Harry Heyman and Henry Herzenberg. Paid-up members of the Jacksonville Progressive Zionist OrNEW YORK—(WNS)—An appeal to Christian and Jew to Join in the support of the German Protestant churches in their fight for existence and a proposal that American Christians give financial support to anti-Nazi boycott were made here by Samuel Untermyer, president of the Non-Sectarian Anti-Nazi League. He said that such united action "would put the tottering Hitler regime out of business within a few months." Oieaenaoae. Te SHHMI, G*. Notice to Participants OLD The following represent the correct solutions to the first 93 puzzles in the OLD GOLD $200,000.00 CONTEST: 1—Noah Webster 31 —Stephen Crane 2—Geoffrey Chaucer 32—Lillie Langtry 3—John Stuart Mill 33—Victor Hugo 4—Henry Clay 34—Lucy Stone 5:—Juliet Capulet 35—Barbara Frietchie 6—Admiral Dewey 36—Cyrus W. Field 7—Artemus Ward 37—Paul Revere 8—Napoleon Bonaparte 38—James Boswell 9—William Shakespeare 39—John Tyler 10—Charles Lamb 40—Christopher Columbus 11—John J. McGraw 41 —William Gladstone 12—Daniel Boone 42—Enrico Caruso 13—William F. Cody 43—Jeanne Eagels 14—Sam Houston 44 —Knute Rockne IS—Alexander Hamilton 45—Ann Hathaway 16—Betsy Ross 46—Roscoe Arbuckle 17—Caesar Borgia 47—Mark Twain 18—August Belmoat 48—Thomas Hardy 19—Becky Sharp 49—George Sand 20—Anatole France 50—Aaron Burr 21—Montague Glass 51 —King Solomon 22—Andrew Jackson 52—Alexander Graham Bell 23—Rudyard Kipling 53—James Buchanan. 24—Oscar Wilde 54—Anthony Comstock 25—Wallace Reid 55—Aristotle 26—Jefferson Davis 56—Abraham Lincoln 27 —Hetty Green 57—Marquis de Muntcalm 28—Nathaniel Hawthorne 58—Tom Sawyer 29—Alphonse Bertillon 59—Louisa M. Alcott 30—John Quincy Adams 60—John Keats A TOTAL of 1,000 prizes were offered in this contest. In view of the fact thct'more than 1,000 contestants submitted perfect solutions to all of the above listed 90 puzzles, in accordance with the rules, all prizes are reserved for those who solved correctly all of the first 90 puzzles. In accordance with Rule No. 6, governing ties, a tie-breaking set of 90 puzzles has been sent by registered mail to each contestant who correctly solved all of the first 90 puzzles. Any contestant who named all oj the first 90 puzzles correctly, and who Jails to receive a tiebreaking set of puzzles by Wednesday, June 23, should notify OLD GOLD CONTEST, P. O. Box 9, Varick Street Station, New York, N.Y., not later than Midnight oj Saturday, June 26, 1937. No claims postmarked ajter June 26, 1937, will be recognized by the OLD GOLD CONTEST. 61—Eugene Victor Debs 62—Marcus Loew 63—Grover Cleveland 64—William Howard Tail 65—Elbert Hubbard 66—Martin Van Buren 67—Tobias Smollett 68—Benjamin Altmaa 69—Carl Schurz 70—Warren Hastings 71 — David Belasco 7 2 —Chateaubriand 73—Joel Chandler Harris 74—Morgan Dix 75—Maria Chapman 76—Marat 77—Howard Pyle 78—Elias Howe 79—Oliver Wendell Holmes 80—Reginald De Koven 81—De Witt Clinton 82—Jenny Lind 83 —Robert Peel 84—Mithridates 85—Frank Stockton 86—John Noble 87—Jacob Wassermano 88—General Lafayette 89—Garibaldi 90—Cassius In sending a notification, contestant must include full name and address. Any contestant who did not correctly solve all of the first 90 puzzles is unable to win any prize in the contest, in view of the fact that the 1,000 prizes, in accordance with the rules, are reserved for those who are tied with perfect submissions .of 90 correct solutions, and the number of contestants so tied exceeds the number of prizes. If you solved all of the first 90 puzzles correctly and FAIL to receive a tie-breaking set of 90 puzzles by June 2 3, communicate with OLD GOLD CONTEST, P. O. Box 9, Varick Street Station, New York, N. Y., on or before Midnight, Saturday, June 26, 1937. NO CLAIMS POSTMARKED AFTER JUNE 26, 1937, WILL BE RECOGNIZED. Upon the conclusion of the contest, and with the announcement of winners, %  complete explanation of the solution of each puzzle, together with all clues contributing to that solution, will be mailed to each person who participates) in the contest. Names and addresses of all winners likewise will be included. V ^^^^M


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MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
June 25, 1937

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00436

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
June 25, 1937

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00436

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
U\
<<-J
wJewisti Floridian
w
CESSM Tlhe Jewish tfmBlty
P9
Vol. 10No. 26
MIAMI. FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JUNE 25, 1937
Price Five Cents
PROMINENT CANTOR AND SOCIAL
WORKER DIES OF HEART ATTACK
Cantor Boris Schlachman, ex-
ecutive director of the Young Mens
Hebrew Association; active in both
Jewish and non-Jewish civic, fra-
ternal and philanthropic organiza-
tions throughout the state, died
suddenly last Saturday night.
Physicians pronounced him the
victim of a heart attack. ,
Boris Schlachman, a native of
Poland, came to the United States
as a boy of 14 after having served
as a choir boy in some of the
largest synagogues in his native
city. After arriving in the United
States he made his home in Phila-
delphia, where his brother lived.
He served as cantor in synagogues
in Philadelphia, Texas, Louisville,
Tampa and Miami. He was en-
gaged for a brief time during 1924
in the mercantile business. He
served as cantor of Beth David
Synagogue of Miami for several
years, then returned to his home
in Philadelphia, where he served
as cantor until 1930, when he re-
turned to accept the position as
cantor of Beth Jacob Congregation,
Miami Beach. In 1935 he severed
his connections with Beth Jacob
Congregation to accept the leader-
ship of the Young Mens Hebrew
Association as its executive di-
rector, which position he held at
the time of his death. He served
as cantor of the Miami Jewish Or-
thodox Congregation during the
High Holy days services in 1935,
and as cantor of the Orthodox Syn-
agogue in Tampa during the High
Holy day services in 1936.
Boris Schlachman was one of the
organizers and the first secretary
of the Hebrew Friendly Inn for
several years during its operation
here. He was a charter member
of the Miami Beach Lodge of the
Elks, was a member of the Miami
Beach Civic League, the Biscayne
Bay Lodge of the Masonic Order,
the Sholem Lodge B'nai B'rith and
numerous other fraternal, civic and
philanthropic organizations. He
was an active member of the
Greater Miami Zionist District and
served as its secretary for several
termB. He was active in the po-
litical life of Miami Beach, though
never aspiring to office.
Schlachman was noted for his
willingness to aid the needy, and
those in trouble. He headed many
drives, both public and private, to
raise funds for the relief of tran-
sients and those in distress.
Funeral services in charge of
the Carter-Wixsom Funeral Home
were held in the clubrooms of the
Young Mens Hebrew Association,
where the body lay in state from
11 a. m. to 1 p. m. Monday. At 1
o'clock a service was held with
Rabbi Abraham A. Kellner of the
Miami Jewish Orthodox Congrega-
tion, Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan
of Temple Israel, Rabbi Adolph
Burger of Rodoph Sholom Congre-
gation of Tampa and Rabbi A. S.
Kleinfeld of B'nai Israel Congrega-
tion, Daytona Beach, officiating, as-
sisted by Cantor l.ouis Dayman of
Beth David Congregation. While
the body lay in state a guard of
honor composed of members of the
"Y" and affiliated organizations
stood at the four corners of the
bier. Following the service at the
"Y" the funeral procession went
to Beth Jacob Synagogue, Miami
Beach, where several thousand
Jews and non-Jews crowded the
synagogue and the sidewalks sur-
rounding the building. Rabbis
Kellner, Kaplan. Burger and Klein-
feld preached eulogies, and Rabbi
Burger and Cantor Hayman chant-
ed the Kol Molay Rachmim.
Schlachman's life in the commu-
nity, his beautiful interpretation of
true traditional liturgy, his work
for the "Y" were eloquently de-
scribed by the rabbis amid the
weeping of many friends.
From the synagogue the proces-
sion went to the Greater Miami
Jewish Cemetery Association sec-
tion of Woodlawn Cemetery, where
final commitment services were
led by Rabbis Kellner, Burger and
Kleinfeld and the Kol Molay
chanted by Cantor Hayman. Pal-
estine earth was strewn over the
casket as the body was lowered.
Max Felt, a close friend of the de-
ceased, recited the mourners' Kad-
dish at the graveside.
A daily evening service for one
week will be held at the Miami
Jewish Orthodox Congregation at
7 o'clock each evening in memory
of Boris Schlachman for members
of the "Y." The "Y" buildings will
remain closed for one week.
Arrangements were directed by
a committee composed of I. L.
Mintzer, M. B. Frank and J. Louis
Shochet.
Active pallbearers were: Max
Felt, M. B. Frank, J. L. Shochet,
N. Adelman, I. L. Mintzer, Baron
de Hirsch Meyer, E. Albert Pallot
and Sidney L. Segall.
Honorary pallbearers were:
Stanley C. Myers, Sidney H. Palm-
er. F.lry Stone, Philip Berkowitz,
Milton, Steinhart, Harry Wllensky,
Louis Karlebach, Jos. M. Lipton,
Jacob Becker, Al. H. Rosenfeld,
Lew Safanowitz, Hyman Rubin,
Isaac Levin, Wm. Friedman, Leon-
ard Abess, John Meyer, Sol. S.
Goldstrom, David Goldstein, Leo
Robinson, Harry Rose, Arthur
Blatt, B. Serkln, Ralph C. Pole. Val
C. Cleary, Arthur Childers, Claude
A. Renshaw, H. V. Yocom, Dan
Galen. Paul Martens, Russel Hand,
Alex De Brocqe, Van C. Kussrow,
James T. Wilson, Alphonsus Bowes,
Herbert A. Frink, Isidor Fine. Sgt.
Wesley M. Martin and Russell A.
Niceley.
Judge Dan Galen adjourned Mi-
ami Beach Municipal Court Mon-
day in respect to the memory of
Mr. Schlachman.
JUDGE FLAYS
NAZI CAMP
PATOCHOGUE, L. I.-(WNS)-
Camp Siegfried, the Nazi camp at
Yaphank, a stone's throw from the
war-time military training ground,
is not only a threat to law and
order, but is bringing Yaphank to
"the verge 'of an insurrection,'
Justice of the Peace Gustave
Heuss of Yaphank, who is of Ger-
man ancestry, told the Brookhaven
Town Board. Trging drastic meas-
ures to curb the activities of the
Nazis who visit the camp over each
week-end, Heuss told how the Hit-
lerites poach on strawberry patches,
destroy private lawns, invade or-
chards and steal fruits and disport
themselves In public half-nude. He
also accused the 5,000 Nazis who
throng Yaphank weekly of forcing
the local residents out of Y. phauh
Lake. Which adjoins the Nazi camp,
and of blocking traffic with their
parados. "The colony is far from
an asset to Yaphank." he said.
"When it was first mentioned sev-
eral years ago, I visualized a group
of Germans of my father's type,
but they've turned out to he just
a bunch of Hitlerites." In response
to Heuss' complaint, ihe town
board asigned several more police
to the Yaphank area.
THE WORLD'S WINDOW
SUMMING UP
By LUDWIG LEWISOHN
Thit column it copyrighted by the
Seven Arts Feature Syndicate. Re-
production in whole or In part
trictly forbidden. Any infringe-
ment will be prosecuted.
Court Enforces
Charity Pledge
NEW YORK (WNS) Jewish
philanthropic agencies whose hooks
are loaded with unpaid and pre-
sumably uncollectible pledges are
expected to begin a series of suits
to collect what may amount to hun-
dreds of thousands of dollars as a
result of an Important decision by
the appellate division of the New
York Supreme Court holding that
a pledge of money to charity Is
binding and enforceable at 1 aw.
The decision was made In the case
of Isidore Bainsburg, New York
lawyer, who had renlged on a
pledge of $5,000 to the Beth Israel
Hospital. In reversing the decision
of Supreme Court Justice McCook.
who had ruled the pledge unen-
forceable because It was made
without receipt of any considera-
tion, the appellate division de-
clared that "the subscriber who
fills in a subscription blank and
the charity promisee do not con-
template a bargain in the mercan-
tile sense. Nevertheless, where the
subscriber agrees to pay for a cer-
tain purpose and the promisee
thereafter spends the money for
that purpose both intend a binding
pledge and the former should be
compelled to live up to his prom-
ise. The acts of the hospital here
in reliance upon the pledge made
by the defendant as alleged In the
complaint furnished the considera-
tion for the promise to pay and cre-
ated the promissory estoppel."
KAHN HONORED BY FRANCE
DETROIT(WNS)In recogni
tion of his services to French
architecture, art and literature, Al-
bert Kahn, Detroit architect, was
made a member of the French
Legion of Honor at exercises pre-
sided over by Rene Weiller, French
consul-general.
We are on the eve of the Con-1
vention of the Zionist Organization \
of America; in a few weeks the
Congress of the World Zionist Or-
ganization will take place. Mean-
while not without trepidation
though with firm resolve we are
awaiting the report of the Royal
Commission on Palestine, while
Arab nationalists, so-called, are In-
vading the American scene with
the help of at least one dis-
tinguished member of a great
American university. Meanwhile.
too, the horror of the war against
three millions of our people In
Poland is arousing even the New
York Times and its very objective
correspondent by Its catastrophic
proportions. The darkness deep-
ens in all Central and Hasten Eu-
rope and the Nazi network Is
spreading dangerously in America.
(See The Nation of June B).
Yet such is the frivolousness of
human nature and such the power
of self-deception among Jews, the
least realistic of peoples, that
there are still Jews, cultivated and
able people, too, who think of Zion-
ism as just another "movement,"
probably worthy but for them, and
who worry primarily (I don't say
they are not to worry at al) about
the Spanish war or civil liberties
in Puerto Rico. Deep in their sub-
conscious these are, of course, de-
fensive measures; these are mech-
anisms of fairly primitive magic.
By being what they think the world
wants them to be these good peo-
ple are trying, like any primitive
magician or medicine man, to mas-
ter the menacing world and to
avert evil from themselves.
You may remember the extra-
ordinary words of Theodor Herzl:
"If they were to leave us in peace
for two or three generations'. But
they will not leave us in peace."
And why not: Herzl probably knew
the answer, too, but I do not re-
member his expressing this knowl-
edge. They will not leave us in
peace, the peoples of the world, they
do not leave us in peace for even
one whole generation, because we
cannot lose our Identity. Or, at
least, we cannot lose our Identity
fast enough and completely enougli
to satisfy the majorities among
whom we live and who respond to
the stimulus of our mere presence
among them with a feeling that
ranges from mild moral discomfort
to brutal excesses of rage.
Such is the fundamental fact;
such Is the kernel and crux of the
matter. Futile and childish to say:
Why are.not men different? We,
God knows, mean them no harm.
True, we do not. It makes no dif-
ference. Futile and childish to say
today, though it may not always
have seemed to be so: We shall
work for a better world for all man-
kind. History seems to be cyclic
and not progressive. Institutions
do not improve when manned by
the old barbarous men with their
old barbarous vices and reactions.
Hence he who turns his face from
the Jewish people ir. order to build
a better world for all substitutes
dreams of a probably unattainable
end for the immediate succor of
his very flesh and blood, memory
ami aspiration, good and God.
Nor am I, for one, being human
and pretending to be no more than
that, interested in an inconceivably
distant future from which 'he Jew-
ish people will have disappeared.
And the Jewish people will disap-
pear in the cataclysms of history
unless ns an entire people It gath-
ers its will to live, to persist, to
fulfill its function like the other
peoples of mankind, now, today,
this month and this year. I marvel
at those excellent and apparently
disembodied souls who are willing
or apparently soto have the
plow of history plow under their
seed and the eternal ideas and
ideals which that seed has from
the beginning embodied, for the
sake of a hollow perfectionism rep-
resented by blameless robots
stabled in stables of marble with
nose-bags of silk neighing in unison
something about Humanity with a
huge capital letter. It is not for
me. Is it, is it for you? Wouldn't
it be more realistic and more hon-
orable and more loyal and more
human and even infinitely Jollier
and happier to arise, to put on uli
one's might and put forth all one's
good will and have the Jewish people
"The Jewish question," wrote
Theodor Herzl in words once jeered
at and now proven a thousand
times over by history itself, "the
Jewish question is neither a social
question nor a religious queston,
whether it assumes this or other
colorations or not. It is a national
question and in order to solve it we
must first of all make it a ques-
tion of world politics which is to be
determined In the councils of the
civilized peoples." There are, alas,
few civilized peoples left today.
We have waited long. We have
waited almost too long. But there
is no other way than that pointed
out by Herzl. Shall we plead with
the Poles? Of what avail? Shall
we cringe to the Nazis and invite
an extra jeer? Shall we appeal to
feelings of humanity which do not
exist simply do not exist, except
in our breasts?
The diaspora ot Eastern and Cen-
tral Europe must be liquidated. It
must be liquidated first in order
to save the lives of 5,000,000 Jews.
It must be liquidated, secondly, in
order that its deceased example
may not spread and we be faced
In twenty-five years by the alterna-
tive between extinction and the
liquidation of the entire diaspora.
But that diaspora of Eastern and
Central Europe can in the present
state of the world be liquidated only
in and through Palestine. There
is no other rope. There is no other
answer. There Is nothing else to
fight for, to struggle for, to hope
for.
Is Zionism another "movement?"'
Hadn't you better quit fretting
over Spain and China and Puerto
Rico and fret about the Jewish pec-
(Continued on Page 5)



-r
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THE JEWISH FlOBIDtAM
Friday. Jtme 25. W37
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Meats *
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After discaseing other kM
ike spaek'-r pointed out that
Israel s et largatf due to
the tstt Ike Je* la a good and law-
*
ff:------.-a W-.-e-
r;:; :s A : c: ntrrent
Student To Spend
Holiday* Here
Seymour Kubin, a student in
Jonas Hopkins Lniveraiiy, Baltl.
more, ha* returned to t^tua tea
auioiuer trim his ^arei-is, Mr. tad
Mr*. Morris Robin, lTs 0. \v.
Klerenth street. Alter leavk..
he weut to i'roudeti.e, k.
1., to attend lae jewelers' et
tion with bis Uthe:
BBBt .- -mi Jeelers Asso-
ciation.

Norma Wermccff
Ti Be Married In O- .
Mr. aa4 Mr. Laud Wernicolf
are announcing plan* :or ice mar-
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F mxrae* this we** free* tkcsr ^ Tnos Wor-
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lahassee *M ol t:.*r daughter. Miss Ma
H ernicoil, and Irving Caller, a
ceremony will Ufce pt*i.
on June 27. Mis* tYerj
Ler mother left Sunday lot
Miss We.-ajcofX atteaded the An-
drew Jackson High School la
e, ffbv, wr.e:e the faroiiy i*.
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this a -.unced the appoint-
... :d 'Lenai
which
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ta one of the most
fra-
Ban b*-=r. at^ re cotcing to Mia
ever*- cobmbbbUji rean ago. Mr. Getter am
aaoreaaeat of iaaor- Ahroc w&ere he
:-- gaged in business.

Bet" David C:r5-=aticn
;:.;:-: .; si-.:: flaiBBajl tkl "^
Cn;j*e* Officers
Coax. Ike La- A; a meeting of the adnv:
.. c.' Zzzlu- gregatioai la;-, week. Sidner H
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-"'-' WoaBeaaCtrj re-ele<-.ed. Rabbi Max Sr^
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-:--;:-:.:: : uoo, was anaittaoasir rnalii
Se-e z' "i >i t;;i:.-u2i5 w; ::>r tke ^e: year and
Jew- voted an increaae in salary, a
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FLORIDA
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1-ar.i H rtak before goiig by boat
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board to the generaj aeeting of
:he congregation, which will be
held at Betk Darid Talatad Torah
Hall oa the first Sudsy in July.
T-e coauBittees for tke coming
year will be aaaoaaced at thai
meeting, which all ambers are
M. L. MARCUS CO.
Office Sapplie* sad Faraitare
Desks. Chairs. Files, Priatiag
LOWEST CASH PRICES
41 N. E. First St. Ph. MU1
Maa stt- =:::-;;
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MAX'S
DELICATESSEN
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Dinners 50c
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sxd fro-r the body. 3 styles
for sports wear. White and
c:.:r.-
SCARF AND
BELT SETS
Az. inexpensive way to add
::.:: :r ruruner outfits.
SeTfa plain colors, als-o
aUijhBi and prints..
GREYHOUND LINES
GatXTMOCYD TBLMDikX AT MIAMI EEaCM
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CAKTEX ft WIESOM. lac
PfBBBBBl 4,1 ZHXfiCTOKS
514 W. Fsbebbt St.
MbbI
50c
-

BurdinQ's


Friday, June 25, 1937
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Page Three
/
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY
by the
JEWISH FLORIDIAN PUBLISHING CO.
P. O. Box 2C>
PLANT AND OFFICES
21 8. W. Second Avenue
Phone* 2-1141; 2-1183
J. LOUIS SHOCHET. Editor
FRED K. SHOCHET, Circulmtion Manager
BERNARD MORGENSTERN
Field Representative
Entered aa second class matter July 4, 19S0. at the Poat Office at Miami, Florida,
under the Act of March 8, 187*.
ST. PETERSBURG
MBS. ROSE M. RUBIN
Representative
WEST PALM BEACH
MRS. M. SCHREBNICK
Representative
ORLANDO
MRS. B. J. COHEN
Representative
TAMPA
MRS. M. H. KISLER
Representative
Bix Montha......
One Yer-------
SUBSCRIPTION
...81.00
.82.00
FRIDAY, JUNE 25, 1937
Vol. 10No. 26
21
Once Again
Once again the Jewish community is shocked. Again the
grim angel of death inflicts a wound which will not be easily
healed. And again the roll of those who worked for the good
of the entire community, whose unselfishness was marked, who
lived so that others too might enjoy some of the necessities of
life, is depleted.
Boris Schlachman, cantor, social worker, civic enthusiast,
humble worker for those who were in need, in trouble and in
distress whose presence brought sunshine into the hearts
of many whose smile illumined everything that came near
. whose pockets were emptied too often by those he believed
needed help who answered the call of those who applied
for help entirely too trustingly Boris Schlachman is no
longer in the land of the living. He, too, joins the ranks of
those workers for the common good who answered the call
from which there is no denial.
Those who were fortunate enough to attend the last rites
for Boris, aa he was so familiarly called by us all, through
eyes dimmed with tears rolling down our cheeks could not but
stand awed by the presence of so many hundreds, Jews and
non-Jews strangers all. for Boris had not a living rela-
tive here. County officials, city officials, leaders in the fra-
ternal life of the community, old and young, men and women,
all all were gathered to pay tribute in death to him who
in life had exemplified generosity forgiveness under-
standing beyond human ken.
He died, as he would have wished ... in action ... in his
pockets were several checks for the building fund of the Y. M.
H. A. that institution for which he breathed his every-
thing yes, for which he even sacrificed many friendships
. with him, lists of those he was to call upon those he
had talked to and who had promised contributions so that his
dream of a real "Y" building might be realised.
Boris Schlachman well merited the spontaneous and heart-
felt tribute that was paid him Monday. Every honor that was
accorded him at the last rites was well earned in life. Boris
set an example that many of us might well emulate.
And once again, we humbly recite, "God hath given, God
hath taken, let the name of God be praised."
Tampa Notes
Mrs. Daniel Cracowaner an-
nounced the engagement o( her
daughter. Miss Charlotte Craco-
waner, to Dr. Leon Schwartz, son
of Mrs. Frank Schwartz.
Miss Cracowaner is the youngest
daughter of the late Daniel Craco-
waner. pioneer merchant of Tampa.
She attended the Academy of the
Holy Names and was graduated
from Hillsborough High School.
She attended Florida State College
for Women and received a degree
from -he University of Tampa For
the last year she has been a mem-
ber of the faculty of Philip Shore
School.
Dr. Schwartz is a native of
Tampa and a graduate of Hills-
borough High School. He at .'ended
the University of Florida, Ogl.^
thorpe University and was gradu
ated from the Atlanta-Southern
Dental College. He took a post-
Kraduate course in oral surgery al
Fordham Hospital in New York be-
fore beginning dental practice in
Tii in pa.
He is a member of Oniiiron
Kappa I'psilon honorary dental fra-
ternity, president of the Tampa Y.
M. H. A., vice president of the
Tampa Society of Dental Surgeons
and a member of the Merry Fellows
Club.
Rabbi Adolph Burger, rabbi of
Rodoph Sholom Congregation, has
left on his vacation and will visit
various parts of the north. He ex-
pects to be gone about a month.
Mis. E. M. Bergman and daugh-
ter. Mrs. Mollle Barr, have left for
New Orleans, where they will
visit with Mrs. nergman's son, Dr.
S. Bergman.
Mrs. Daniel Cracowaner and her
daughter. Miss Charlotte Craco-
waner, left for New York City,
where Miss Cracowaner will pur-
chase clothes for her wedding
trousseau. Mrs. Cracowaner will
leave the latter part of the month
aboard the French liner Cham-
plane for a several months" visit
to various European countries.
ITUamL
VlDiBA.
PAPER CALLS FOR POGROMS
AGAINST URUGUAYAN JEWS
MONTEVIDEO. Uruguay (WNS)
Thinly-veiled appeals for pogroms
against the Jews of Uruguay are
appearing in the La Tribuna Popu-
lara of Montevideo. Within the
past fortnight the paper has pub-
lished a series of violently anti-
Semitic articles in which the Jews
are called "swindlers and rascals"
and "the most degenerate and foul
of all peoples" against whom indi-
vidual protests are vain. Calling
for "action against Jewish aggres-
sion," the paper declares that "we
must take energetic measures to
defend ourselves against Jewish ag-
gression. It is the sacred duty of
the Uruguayan people to defend
themselves by all possible means
against this criminal element. The
Jews have gained control of trade
.and industry in our country. Pa-
tiently and efficiently increasing
their activities, the Jews are car-
rying on a well-thought-out plan.
To defeat these enemies individual
protests and campaigns like those
waged by this newspaper are not
enough. What is needed Is col-
lective action to utilize every means
and all united efforts. We dare
not forget what the Jewish aggres-
sion portends for our race and our
national progress. We have already
seen what measures must be
adopted."
Hebrew Calendar
5697-1937
Shiva Asar B-Tammuz, Sunday,
June 27.
Rosh Chodesh Ab, Friday, July 9.
Tlsha B'Ab, Sunday, July 18.
Rosh Chodesh Elnl, Sunday
August 8.
Rosh Hashono, Monday, Sep-
tember 6.
Society
)
By ARTHUR BLATT
and LEW SAFAN
The passing of our executive di-
rector. Boris Schlachman, last Sat-
urday evening, June 19, has left
a void that can never be filled.
Through his leadership the "Y"
obtained sufficient momentum that
enabled it to become one of the
largest Jewish organizations In the
Greater Miami area. Through his
efforts sufficient money was raised
to enable the Y. M. H. A. to pur-
chase the grounds they now oc-
cupy. Through his co-operation
and planning the "Y" was success-
ful in every venture undertaken.
It is indeed a great loss to Greater
Miami Jewry.
The doors oi the Young Mens
Hebrew Association will remain
closed for the balance of the week
until Monday night. The kitchen
shower which was to have been
held the 22nd of June has been I
postponed until the 19th.
In closing this column let us say
of Boris Schlachnian that his
memory will live on though he has dren>
departed, and as Isaac McLellan
wrote in his poem, "The Death of
\ii poli-on":
Mrs. Harry Fyvolent, Mrs. I.
Rippa and Mrs. I. R. Einblnder and
their children have taken a cot-
tage at Clearwater Beach.
Mrs. Max Brody has left for
Gainesville. Fla., where she is tak-
ing courses at the University of
RESOLUTIONS
Whereas, Almighty God hat
een fit to remove from our
midst a beloved member of the
community, CANTOR BORIS
SCHLACHMAN,
And wiiereas, Cantor Boris
Schlachman was a worshiper in
our synagogue and for five years
served this congregation as its
cantor and was at all times a
devoted and faithful servant of
the synagogue and the commu-
nity.
Be it therefore resolved by the
Beth Jacob Congregation of Mi-
ami Beach that the heartfelt
sympathy of this congregation,
its officers, board of directors
and members be and they are
hereby extended to the family of
the deceased and to the Young
Mens Hebrew Association, of
which the deceased was the ex-
ecutive director at the time of
his demise,
And be it further resolved that
a copy of these resolutions be
made a part of the permanent
records of this congregation, and
copies forwarded to the family
of the deceased and the press.
LAZARUS ABRAMS, Acting
President.
M. B. FRANK, Secretary.
Aged Resident Dies
At Alton Road Hospital
Rev. Moses B. Herman, aged 82,
and a resident of Miami Beach
since 1924, died at the Alton Road
Hospital Wednesday evening after
a brief Illness. He was a native
of Suvalk, Russia, and came to the
United States about 50 years ago,
Making his home in Birmingham,
Ala. There he was the shoched of
the community and its spiritual
leader until his departure for
Miami. Funeral services were held
at the home of the deceased Thurs-
day with Rabbi Abraham A. Kell-
ner of the Miami Jewish Orthodox
Congregation officiating. Inter-
ment was in the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Cemetery Association section
of Woodlawn Park Cemetery. Active
pallbearers were J. J. Slmonhoff,
Lazarus Abrams, I. D. Spivak, B.
Silverman and A. Cohen. Honor-
ary pallbearers were Dave Gold-
stein, I. L. Mlntzer, J. Albert. M. B.
Frank, L. O. Bloomfield and Joseph
M. Fine. Surviving Rev. Herman
1 are his wife, four daughters. Mrs.
M. D. Kirsch and Mrs. Doris Ad-
! ler. Mrs. Sarah Glickman of Miami
i Beach, and Mrs. M. Roseman of.
Birmingham; one son, Arthur Her-
man of New York; two sisters,
j Mrs. Bessie Fink and Mrs. Llbby
! Quadow of Chicago; five grand-
children and two great grandchil-
He died at the close of that
darksome day,
A day that shall live in
story;
In the rocky lands they placed
his clay
"And left him alone with
his glory."
So shall Boris Schlachman's
memory remain.
ART AND LEW.
Used Cave for Glass Work
The first glass maker in Scotland
was George Hay (1566-1625). He
took advantage of a peculiarly
formed cave at Wemyss, on the Fife
coast, and set up his furnace there-
in.
Florida.
Miss Sallye Finman Is visiting
relatives and friends in New York
City and Hartford. Conn., and ex-
pects to be gone several weeks.
RESOLUTIONS
Whereas, Almighty God, In His
infinite wisdom, has seen fit to
remove from our midst BORIS
SCHLACHMAN, beloved of all in
the comtnunlty;
And whereas, Boris Schlach-
man, by his Interpretation and
chanting of the traditional liturgy,
had lent dignity and beauty to
the services of God, and had 1n
his capacity as cantor served
this congregation during the High
Holy Day services in 1935, and
on numerous occasions had aided
and helped, both morally and fi-
nancially, by his service and
chanting in the work of this con-
gregation.
Be it therefore resolved by the
Miami Jewish Orthodox Congre-
gation and its Ladies' Auxiliary
that their heartfelt sympathy be
and is hereby extended to the
family of the deceased and to
the Young Mens Hebrew Associa-
tion, of which he was the execu-
tive director at the time of his
death.
J. LOUIS SHOCHET, Acting
President.
MRS. N. ADELMAN, President
of the Auxiliary.
ABRAHAM A. KELLNER, Rabbi.
Is Patient at Hospital
Mrs. Louis O. Bloomfield is a
patient at the St. Francis Hospital,
where she is under observation.
Returns Home
Mi. Charles Rosengarten of
Waterbury, Conn., prominent Zion-
ist and one of the most active com-
munal workers of New England,
who flew to Miami to attend the
wedding of his sister last Sunday,
returned to his home Tuesday
evening, following a brief visit with
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. I. Rosen-
garten of this city.
RESOLUTION
Be it resolved by the Young
Men's Hebrew Association, of
Greater Miami, that
Whereas, the Supreme Judge
in his wisdom has seen fit to pre-
emptorily summon before his
divine and everlasting forum of
eternal justice, BORIS SCHLACH-
MAN of Miami, Florida, and.
Whereas, the said Boris Schlach-
man was an honorable, distin-
guished and beloved member of
our community and the executive
secretary and one of the leading
members of our association, and
an Industrious and upright citi-
zen of the community in every
respect.
Now therefore, be it resolved
by the members of the Young
Mens Hebrew Association of
Greater Miami that this associa-
tion does hereby record its sin-
cere and heartfelt regrets at the
passing of our beloved member
and executive secretary, the la-
mented Boris Schlachman, and
by these presents extends to the
loved ones who survive Mr.
Schlachman the profound sympa-
thy of every member of this as-
sociation.
Be it further resolved, that the
secretary transmit copies of this
resolution to the member of Mr.
Schlachman's family, and to the
newspapers, and record same up-
on the permanent records of this
association.
Done and ordered this 23rd
day of June, 1937.
YOUNG MENS HEBREW AS-
SOCIATION OF GREATER
MIAMI.
By E. ALBERT PALLOT, Presi-
dent.


Page Four
TH JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Friday, June 25, 1937

FOUR DECADES
OF ZIONISM
PALESTINE MOVEMENT FACES
GRAVEST CRISIS IN ITS
HISTORY
By MORRIS MARGULIES
Tomorrow (June 26) the Zionists
of America will assemble in New
York for the fortieth annual con-
vention of the Zionist Organiza-
tion of America. What issues
will confront the delegates? In
this exclusive article Morris
Margulies, secretary of the Z. O.
A., discusses the problem of the
Zionist movement on the eve of
the publication of the Royal
Commission's report.The Editor.
On the eve of the fortieth annual
convention of the Zionist Organiza-
tion of America all issues have been
made subordinate to the report of
the Royal Commission on the ad-
ministration of the Mandate nnd
tho future British policy in Pales-
tine. At this writing the report
has not yet been issued, but its
major recommendations have re-
ceived such insistent and repeated
publicity that the threats of parti-
tion, cantonization or crystalliza-
tion cannot be considered as idle
rumors. Nor can they be regarded
merely as trial balloons that can be
conveniently exploded by the mere
pricking of conventional protest.
The Zionist Convention which
opens in New York City on June
26 will have to take cognizance of
the intricate international situa-
tion with which the Palestine
situation is inseparably tied up. It
would be a sad mistake to approach
the findings of the Royal Commis-
sion with high optimism. During
the past four years Germany has
ridden rough-shod over her Jewish
population and has left the "con-
science of the world," the "brother-
hood of mankind" and the "sacred
pledges of treaties" to the phrase-
makers and the helpless onlookers.
Whatever the British sympathies
for the Jewish people, we must
nevertheless be realistic and con
stantly mindful of the fact tha
only by the most heroic measures
can we prevail against the forces
that have risen to militate against
Jewish rights in Palestine and else-
where.
It is against a threatening in-
ternational background that the
Royal Commission report will make
its appearance, and it is the inter-
national situation that will to n
greater or lesser degree determine
the nature of its recommendations
for future British policy in Pales-
tine.
American Jewry holds the key to
the entire situation. Not only is it
the only remaining large, free and
Independent Jewish community, but
it occupies the strategic position of
being part and parcel of American
democratic ideals, the same demo-
cratic ideals which inspired Presi-
dent Woodrow Wilson to take a
deep personal interest in the formu-
lation of the Balfour Declaration
In 1017, and the same democratic
ideals which influenced Congress
in 1922 to adopt the Lodge-Fish
resolution endorsing the Balfour
Declaration and the League of Na-
tions Mandate. Only American
Jewry can in this moment of dicta-
torial chaos in Europe rise to the
defense of the treaties and pledges
involving Jewish rights in Pales-
tine. The Jews of Europe cannot
stand up to defend treaties and
pledges that have been many times
violated and scrapped by their own
governments. The Jews of Europe
are, in fact, in no better position
to voice their sentiments than they
were during the World War.
Throughout Europe, except in iso-
lated cases, the rights the Jews
obtained as a result of the Versail-
les Treaty and minority rights
treaties have completely disap-
peared. If the Jew retains any
shred of these rights it is only
out of the transitory kindness of
the regime in power.
Under these circumstances, there-
fore, American Jewry must revert
to the role which it played during
the World War, when It became the
spokesman for world Jewry through
such distinguished leaders as Louis
D. Brandels, Julian W. Mack and
Stephen S. Wise. American Jewry
must mobilize all Its strength for
a dramatic appeal to the United
States government to Influence it
to act in behalf of the preservation
CAMP A. Z. A.
RECEIVES BOYS
Jewry seeking to establish itself
in a new and strange environment.
Anti-Semitism was centered chiefly
in Russia, where the pogrom was
the only recognized weapon of at-
tack. France, it is true, was being PORT JERVIS, N. Y.Camp A.
torn asunder by the bitter antl- Z. A., in this city, is now receiv
Semitlsm aroused by the Dreyfus ing more than 500 boys who have
case. But the antl Semitlsm gene- zeen selected as delegates from
rated by that trial was only of a their respective cities to the Bar
transitory nature. Although Jews Mitzvah convention of the Alepta
suffered from cruel persecution' Zadik Aleph, Junior Order B'nai
under the Czar, this form of antl- j B'rith. being held from June 23 to
Semitism was regarded by other j June 30.
nations as an unfortunate by-i An important feature of the con-
product of the backwardness and i ventlon, which will commemorate
barbarism of the Russian people, the thirteenth anniversary of the
If Herzl was moved by the Dreyfus founding of the order, are a series
case to return to the Jewish fold of forums to be conducted by lead-
ing authorities in their respective
fields. Inspector L. C. Schilder,
chief of the identification division
and organize the World Zionist Or-
ganization, what program of action
of the rights which the Jews ob-1 would a that intense personality
tained In Palestine. The Zionist have devised to cope with the far | of the Federal Bureau of Investiga-
convention must make it clear to more tragic situation created by lion. Department of Justice, will
Great Britain and the League of the rise of Hitler? In the four lead a forum on "Youth and
Nations that the United States la decades that have passed since the Crime."
not merely a sympathetic observer, i establishment of the Zionist Or- Rabbi Milton Steinberg of the
but an important party to the ganlzatlon of America, anti-Semi- Park Avenue Synagogue. New York
agreements concerning Palestine I tisin has become a refined an and City, and an editor of The Recon-
through the American-British Con-; pseudo-science elevated to the so structionist. will conduct the forum
called cultural level from its crude on "Judaism as a Civilization." Dr.
Shcwarts, curator of the Tel Aviv
Museum.
It has been decided to bring the
coat-of-arms into immediate use
upon all Keren Hayesod printed
material. An announcement was
made in the Hebrew press asking
the successful competitor to fur-
nish his name and address to the
Judges. In the stress of creation
he had forgotten to give this in-
formation with his submission!
*S3fiUST BROS Rv?
* / thm *nr' m
Is thmBEST
ventlon on Palestine and the Lodge-
Fish resolution.
If any definite action is to be
taken on the question of the Royal
Commission report, the Zionist
convention must be prepared to
speak In the name of all Jewry,
and particularly in the name of
those Jewries who have been si-
lenced, not by war, but by a cam-
paign of oppression and extermina-
tion far worse than war.
The internal Zionist situation In
America has greatly improved with
a consolidation of Zionist forces
and a considerable increase in
membership. However, it is to be
taken into account that the Zionist
position as such has not been
strengthened by the developments
of the past four years in spite of
the fact that during that period
many so-called "panic" Zionists
were brought into the sphere of
Zionist Influence. It is this cle-
ment of the periphery, which may
be considered only as a temporary
ally, that the Zionist Organization
of America must permanently in-
tegrate. For so long as it remains
a weak link it only serves to re-
duce the strength of the entire or-
ganization, since it deludes the
main body into the belief that it
has gained permanent reinforce-
ment.
Another problem that must re-
ceive more than cursory attention
from the delegates at the fortieth
annual convention is the problem
of fund-raising for Palestine. The
Zionist convention must give seri-
ous consideration to the problem
of increasing funds for Palestine in
order to stimulate the growth and
development of the Jewish National
Home. In this connection it must
take into account the fact that this
effort must be adjusted to the
situation which exists in many
communities where local welfare
councils have been established. It
must also consider the problem of
Palestine propaganda in communi-
ties where welfare chests conduct
campaigns in which the Palestine
funds are included among the bene-
ficiaries.
The importance of Zionist propa-
ganda in the raising of funds for
Palestine is not to be overlooked
in the present critical situation.
In 1897, when Herzl convened the
First World Zionist Congress in
Basle and when shortly thereafter
Prof. Richard Gottheil, together
with Dr. Stephen S. Wise, founded
the Federation of American Zion-
ists, the Jewish community in the
United States was hardly more
than a disjointed portion of world
Abraham Goldberg, the oldest
memberIII point of serviceof
the World Zionist Actions Commit-
tee and vice president of the
will
conduct a campfire forum on "Pal-
estine Before and After the War."
Principal speaker at the Bar
Mitzvah celebration, which will
take place on Sunday evening. June
27, will be Alfred M. Cohen, inter-
national president of the B'nai
B'rith. Still another forum o.nt
"Youth and His Responsibility to
World Peace" will be conducted by
Dr. J. Max Weis, director of the
educational department of World
Peaceways.
form in Czarist Russia.
During this period Zionism has
been translated from a vague hope
to the most forceful reality in
Jewish life today. Palestine today'American Jewish Congres
has arisen to confound the de-
tractors of the Jewish people and
to give new hope to oppressed Jews
everywhere..
Because Palestine occupies this
focal position in world Jewish af-
fairs, its future development be-
comes the responsibility not only
of Zionists, but of all Jews every-
where, regardless of ideological or
political differences; for Palestine
to the indestructible will of the
Jewish people to survive and their
creative abilities under the most
trying conditions.
The Z. O. A. faces the task of
bringing into its ranks the mass of
American Jewry in a program of
constructive effort for Palestine re-
building, since today, more than at
any other time, Jewry throughout
the world needs the inspiration of
Palestine to fight off the savage
attacks against the Jewish people.
Whatever the gravity of the situa-
tion in Palestine, the Zionist con-
vention will nevertheless take oc-
casion to celebrate the fortieth an-
niversary of the founding of the
Z. O. A. and to review the role
which Zionism has played in Ameri-
can Jewish life and its contribu-
tion to Palestine rebuilding dining
the past four decades. This review
URGE END ANTI-SEMITISM
AS AID TO RAPPROCHEMENT
LONDON(WNS)An appeal to
Nazi Germany to end its persecu-
tion of the Jews as a means o(
bringing about an Anglo-German
rapprochement is made in the cur-
rent Issue of the London Jewish
Chronicle in connection with the
forthcoming visit to London of
Baron Constautin von Neurath,
German foreign minister. The
Chronicle points out that British
resentment against the persecution
of the Jews Is one of the major
obstacles to an Anglo-German un-
derstanding.
KEREN HAYESOD SELECTS
COAT-OF-ARMS AS SYMBOL
*{ HAD ANY HEADACHES^
7-^ LATELY?*
JERUSALEM (WNS Palcor
Agency)Fifty-seven entries were
considered by a board of judges
appointed by the Keren Hayesod to
decide upon the most suitable coat-
of-arms symbolizing the activity of
the fund. The board selected one
entry signed "Nemart," a pseu-
donym of a local artist, who was
awarded first prize of $50. The
Judges consisted of Dr. A. Gold-
stein, Dr. Leo Herrmann, secre-
tary to the board of directors of
the Keren Hayesod. and Dr. K.
tion of its fortieth birthday. His
will serve to accentuate the pro- presence at the helm of the move-
White Oak Leather
LADIES* HEELS......15c
HALF SOLES............60c
ATLANTIC SHOE SHOP
240 N. E. First Avenue
Opp. Cortei Hotel
found impress which Zionist ideals
and aspirations have made upon
Jewish life throughout the United
States.
The next few months will prob-
ably be one of the most decisive
periods in the history of Palestine
development since the war. In the
days to come, when American
Zionist leaders will be engaged in
vital political action in connection
with the Royal Commssion report,
we will once again find, as we did
in the summer of 1936, Dr. Stephen
S. Wise, president of the Z. O. A.,
summoning all his energy and re-
sources to cope with the problems
arising out of that report. It la
no more than fitting that Dr. Wise,
who stood at the cradle of Ameri-
can Zionism and was its first hon-
orary secretary, should be the presi-
dent of the Z. O. A. on the celebra-
DR. R. S. AKERS
DENTIST
1764 N. W. 36th St.
Closed Saturdays. Ph. 2-2111
1X3
IX
ROBBINS ROOFING A SHEET
METAL WORKS
Inspection and EitimaUi Free
MS N. W. Mth 8L Phone 1-1705
ment today is nothing short of
providential. The careers of both
have been linked In great and un-
forgettable events.
Nurse Thanks Friend
for Recommendinq
DR.MILES NERVINE
A nurse writes that she
suffered from frequent
headaches. Nothing stop-
ped them until a friend re-
commended DR. MILES
NERVINE. She says Nerv-
ine stops headaches before
they get a good start
Three generations have
found DR. MILES NERV-
INE effective fpr
Nervousness, Sleepless-
ness due to Nervous Ir-
ritability, Nervous In- W
digestion, Headache,
Travel Sickness.
Get DR. MILES NERV-
INE at your drug store in
liquid or effervescent tab-
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Small bottle or package 25 cents
Large bottle or package $1.(1
OWN YOUR
OWN HOME
We are vitally interested in fos-
tering home ownership and have
money available to assist YOU In
BUYINGBUILDINGREFINANCING
AT
LOW INTERESTLONG TERMS
WE INVITE YOUR CALL
>c
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utiiEi sums
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RUFUS H. DANIEL LEO ROBINSON
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J. M. LIPTON
President
RESOURCES OVER $1,500,000.00


Friday, June 25, 1937
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
^
9
JEWISH NEWS
AROUND THE
WORLD
JEWISH NATIONAL COUNCIL
CO-OPTIONS 30 MEMBERS
JERUSALEM (WNS Palcor
Agency)The co-option of Jewish
representatives of localities on the
Assefat Hanivcharim, Jewish Rep-
resentative Assembly of Palestine,
was decided upon at a plenary ses-
sion of the Vaad Leuml, Jewish
National Council, which is the
smaller executive body of the as-
sembly. Without calling elections
at this time, places in the assembly
will be given to 12 representative-.!
of Jewish municipalities and urban
communities, to 12 represf'.iiiiK
local and colony councils and to
six from labor settlements.
Both chief rabbis of Palestine
were also appointed as ex-officio
delegates of the assembly. The
Vaad Leuml was empowered to de-
cide a date for the 1937 meeting
of its parent body. The co-option
of additional delegates represents
the culmination of negotiations
continuing for many years in an
effort to make the assembly fully
representative.
Page Fire
MANDATES COMMISSION TO
DISCUSS PALESTINE JULY 30
GENEVA (WNS Palcor
Agency)The problems of Pales-
tine will be considered at an ex-
traordinary session of the League
Mandates Commission on July 30,
it was decided at the closing ses-
sion of that body. Ordinarily Pal-
estine would have been among the
other subjects reviewed at the now
concluded ordinary session of the
commission. Previously, however,
the British government had stated
that it was unable to have a report
of its policies available for the
league trustees on Palestine until
after the Royal Commission had
issued its findings. It indicated
that such a report would be ready-
by the end of July.
PAPER BANS PUBLICATIONS
OF JEWISH MANIFESTOS
ROME (WNS) So numerous
have been the public denunciations
of Zionism by Italian Jews under
the pressure of the Fascist press'
anti-Zionism crusade, that II Popolo
d'lialiii. Mussolini's organ, has an-
nounced that it will no longer pub-
lish them. For several weeks the
Italian press has given a great deal
of space to statements by Jews
proclaiming their loyalty to Fascism
and uncomprlmislng opposition to
Zionism.
ARABS ASSERT DEPARTURE
SHOWS PARTITION REJECTION
PERUSALEM (WNS Palcor
Agency)The decision of High
Commissioner Wauchope to fly to
London on June 21 indicates that
the Royal Commission is revising
its findings to favor the Jews, it is
declared by Falastin, Arabic daily.
Sir Arthur's departure is also a
subject for conjecture In the other
Arabic daily papers today. Falastin
interprets the event as a sin that
partition plans hitherto rumored
have been changed. It also sees
proof of restoration of proposals
whereby Jewish immigration would
be increased and land sales to Jews
permitted. -It believes, further, that
a Legislative Council will be cre-
ated. According to the Falastin,
Jewish immigration into Palestine
will be fixed so that the Ylshuv
constitutes a perpetual 30 per cent
of the population.
SETS UP SCHOLARSHIPS
FOR JEWISH STUDENTS
NEW YORK(WNS)An Invi-
tation to Jewish students In for-
eign lands who are unable to con-
tinue their studies because of anti-
Semitic discrimination to come to
Yeshlva College was extended by
Dr. Bernard Revel, president of
the college, at Its sixth annual com-
mencement exercises. Yeshlva Col-
lege, he said, had established 10
scholarships for Jewish students
living in countries "whose policies
tended to restrict study in Jewish
culture." The degree of bachelor
of arts was conferred upon 48 stu-
dents who had completed the regu-
lar college course In the only In-
stitution of higher learning in
America under Jewish auspices.
Speakers at the exercises included
Mark Eisner, chairman of the New
York Board of Higher Education,
and Borough President Samuel
Levy.
The World's
Window
(Continued from Page 1)
pie and the report of tlte"* Royal
Commission and ask yourself what
you have done and what you are
going to do concerning these mat-
ters which ultimately will mean
life or death to you and your chil-
dren?
Funny reviewers, including some
Jews, have recently accused me,
and others who share my convic-
tions, of being "obsessed" by Zion-
ism. Let us hope that these ladies
and gentlemen will not one fine day
in the whirling waters of a deluge
wish that they too had been ob-
sessed. It happened in Germany
Just thatJust the other day. .
J&ti tell the
IflM^P
rid
HERE'S THE; PUUj
IT'S
that our summer temperatures are lower 1...111 1.1 ;:..
inland states. We know that our tropic scenery is eve.
Florida's marvelous summer-time advantages should bo
broadcast to the four corners of the world. Everyone
should know about the delights of a breeze-cooled lura-,
nicr vacation in Florida.
Here" U a "wvf In* which we can tell our story and in-
vite prospective visitors to enjoy these advantages with
us this summer. .
We have prepared "Summer-gram" cards, with beautiful
Florida* sceneef which can be mailed to any person or
more vividly beautiful in summer. Above all, we know
that jummer .vacation cost* here are much lower.,
The*e~arr facta^we can tell to people in less favored
climelj\where sweltering heat and tired nerves tak
their tell tach summer. Send your "Summer-gram" i
viUtionTtoday? They're FREE!
pemona you may aelect^Tha "Summer-gram^carde ai* T F I THF W (1 R I H '
free.lYoumerely"addre8s them; we'll stamp and mail, E L L^ I E'^_ II U H L U
them forjoa? ^
We'wlio" live" here know that all outdoor sports are
equally enjoyable in summer and winter. We know
I N 11 KI iWrttri tciMi tl f IkMi. art mil-
FD C t I i tkhittm illicit. Ysi eti write
"llfl jwr tea trMaHawttajs !.
Yoi A.drau Tke Wt'il Staap aid Mill The!


Page Six
Society
E
Orlando Visitor
Is Here
Miss Gertrude Hainowitz of Or-
lando is visiting Miss Phyllis Son-
tag, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
David Sontag, 1726 S. W. 19th
avenue.
Both girls are students of the
1'niversity of Oklahoma and affili-
ated with Sigma Delta Tau Sorority-

Retiring President
Leaves For Summer
Mrs. Murry Grossman, retiring
president of Junior Hadassah and
active club worker, left on Tues-
day aboard the S.S. Shawnee for
the summer home of rer parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Koller, at
Parkway-on-the-Wallkill, Walden, N
Y. Mr. Grossman will join her in j
the fall, when they plan an exten-
sive tour of the New England
States and Canada, after which
they will return to their residence |
in Miami Beach.
A formal dinner bon voyage
party VM tendered Mrs. Grossman
by her uncle and aunt, Mr. and
Mrs. Harry Koretzky, at their /
home. 1552 Collins avenue, and a I
larewell dinner party was held in
her honor in the home of Mr. and
Mrs. I. M. Grossman on Jefferson !
avenue.

Welfare Auxiliary
Holds Final Meeting
The monthly meeting of the
Ladies' Auxiliary of the Jewish
Welfare, postponed Monday out of
respect for the death of Cantor
Boris Schlachinan, was held Wed-
nesday on the seventh floor of the
Mark Store. This was the final
meeting of the summer.
Tabulation of receipts of the an-
nual picnic held Sunday showed
a sizable increase in the auxiliary's
fund for philanthropic purposes,
according to Mrs. R. R. Adler, who
was in charge of the affair. The
committee expressed thanks for
the donors of food and prizes.
Results of the beauty contest
were announced as Mrs. Ida Opt-
ner. winner of the married women's
contest; Leo Robinson, men's con-
test, Eileen Friedman, first; Shir-
ley Barnett. second, in the girls'
contest, and Pauline Marie Oppen-
beim. Natalie Le Vine, Sibil Owen
and Patsy Olsen, winners of the
children's contest.

Long-Time Resident
Dies In Local Hospital
Mrs. Fannie First, 57. died Tues-
day in a Miami hospital following
a long illness. She was the wife
of Benjamin First, owner of the
Eighth Avenue Poultry Market, and
same to Miami 13 years ago from
New York City. Besides her hus-
band, she leaves a son, Malcolm,
Washington, D. C; two daughters,
Mrs. R. D. Flato and Mrs. Ruth
Brown. Miami; five brothers, Na-
than Newman. Newark. N. J.; Ed-
ward Newman, Brooklyn. N. Y.;
Max Newman. Bronx. N. Y.; Benja
min Newman, New York City, and
Harry Newman, Jamaica, L. I., and
two sisters, Mrs. Annie Book and
Mrs. J. W. Gottlieb. Brooklyn.
Funeral services will be held today
with interment at Woodlawn Park
Cemetery.

Synagogue Edifice
To Be Completed
Members of Beth Jacob Congre-
gation. Miami Beach, unanimously
approved the completion of the new
synagogue building and directed
the building committee to complete
the work within two months, at a
meeting of the congregation last
Wednesday nfght at the synagogue.
The members also approved a reso-
lution directing the vacancy in the
office of president caused by the
recent death of Mr. Philip Liber-
man be not filled until the expira-
tion of the unexpired term. A
By BETTY BARCLAY
Reports Indicate that many of us to 7 minutes, depending on the age
will be doing a lot of worrying and size of the peas. Pack loosely
before long. Food prices are going' to within 1 inch of top into clean
up. Our pocketbooks are not keep-
ing pace. The problem "what to
serve" Is a real one.
Here's a timely hint. At the peak
of the season, when prices are
lowest, "put up" fruits, berries and
vegetables for later use when
prices are high. Early in the
season you may jar your peas.
glass jars. Fill to within V4 inch
of top with water in which vegeta-
ble was precooked or boiling water.
Add 1 teaspoon of salt and sugar
mixture to each pint jar if desired.
Put on cap, screwing band firmly
tight. Process in pressure cooker,
60 minutes at 10 pounds; or in
water bath, ISO minutes; or in
Later on, make pickles or a tasty oven, 240 minutes at 250 degrees.
vegetable butter from carrots, win-
ter squash or pumpkin. In between,
there are plenty of other "goodies"
to be taken care of.
Stock your preserve closet with
row after row of sparkling pint and
quart jars of these foods. Through
the transparent glass you may see
the food and appreciate its quality.
When you use it, you will appre-
ciate the saving.
The glass jar will do a lot this
season to keep upkeep down. Here
are two of the many recipes that
are enjoying popularity:.
Pea*
Use only young tender, freshly
gathered peas. Shell, wash and
sort according to size. Precook 3
Carrot, Winter Squash or Pumpkin
Butter
6 lbs. carrots, pumpkin or winter
squash
lbs. light brown sugar
lemons
tablespoons ground ginger
tablespoons ground cinnamon
teaspoon allspice
pint water
Peel vegetables; chop them fine
or put them through food chopper.
Add spices and sugar together with
lemon juice, and rind put through
chopper; let stand over night. In
morning add 1 pint water; boil
gently until vegetables are clear
and soft and mixture thick. Pour
into sterilized glass Jars and seal.
memorial meeting will be held to
honor the memory of Mr. Liber-
man at the expiration of the
"Shloshim" 30-day period of mourn-
ing. The congregation also decided
to hear Rabbi Solomon N. Barzel
of Philadelphia, and applicant for
the position of rabbi for the con-
gregation.

Chiax Club Names Officers
Thursday Evening
Officers of the Chiax Club, com-
posed of Jewish girls of this area,
were elected at the meeting of the
organization last Thursday evening
at the home of Miss Eadie Fein-
berg. Miss Pearl Waldorf was
chosen president, Miss Shirley
Haimes, secretary, and Miss Eve-
lyn Jacobs, treasurer. Gerry Edel-
son was named rush captain. Plans
for a series of rush parties to be
held within the next two weeks
were discussed.

Rosengarten-Schwartz
Nuptials Celebrated
Miss Esther Rosengarten. daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. I. Rosengarten,
prominent in the work of the Miami
Jewish Orthodox Congregation, be-
came the bride of Mr. Max
Schwartz last Sunday afternoon at
the home of the bride's parents in
the presence of the immediate
members of the family. Mr. and
Mrs. Rosengarten, parents of the
bride, gave the bride in marriage.
Mrs. Sam Schwartz, sister-in-law
of the groom, was matron of honor,
and Mr. Sam Schwartz, brother of
the groom, was best man. with the
father of the groom, Mr. I. Schwartz,
attendant on the groom. Follow-
ing the ceremony with the tradi-
tional canopy and ring service a
dinner was given for the imme-
diate members of the family.
Among those attending were Mr.
Charles Rosengarten, brother of
the bride and one of the most
active Jewish communal workers
of New England, and Mr. and Mrs.
Morris Lefkowitz, brother-in-law
and sister of the bride of Orlando,
Fla. Mr. Schwartz is the head of
the East Coast Fish Company and
a prominent business man of this
area. The couple left Tuesday for
a honeymoon trip through New
York, the Catskill Mountains and
Connecticut.
Ashby-Levy Nuptials
Are Impressive
Simplicity marked the marriage
of Miss Letitia Ashbv and Mortimer
S. Levy, son of Mr. and Mrs. Hiram
I. Levy of Rochester, N. Y., Sun-
day at the home of the bride's par-
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Walter S. Ashby
in Coral Gables. Rabbi Dr. Jacob
H. Kaplan performed the cere-
mony. Only members of the two
families were present.
The bride was given in marriage
by her father.
The bride's sister, Miss Judith
Ashby, was her only attendant, and
Earle Levy of Rochester, N. Y.,
cousin of the bridegroom, was best
man.
A dinner at the Ashby home fol-
lowed the nuptials.
The bridal couple left Tuesday
morning by plane for Jamaica and
Montague Bay, from there by boat
for New York, and they will re-
side in Rochester where Mr. Levy
is asociated with his father in
Levy-Adler Clothing Manufacturers-
In addition to the bridegroom's
parents and cousin, his brother-in-
law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Julian
Brody of Des Moines. Iowa, came
to Miami for the wedding. The
party was entertained at the Coral
Gables Country Club on Saturday
night, having arrived here earlier
in the day by boat from New York.
The bride is a granddaughter of
the late Richard Ashby, pioneer
Company In the evening? For
breakfast? For lunch? It doesn't
matter when I The waffle Is
America's "all-hour" meal, equally
tempting morning, noon or night.
And it is the tasty delight that can
be prepared on an instant's notice
from things always on the kitchen
ebelf.
That is if you take care to
keep a bottle of rich, golden maple
syrup on hand at all times. With-
out that clear glass container right
there on the table. Inviting your
guest to eat more and then
more even the brownest,
crlspest waffles are sometimes not
tempting. Let them see the syrup.
Here are a few waffle recipes for
your "hurry-up" file. Swimming In
luscious syrup mmm! You'll
say "W" stands for Wonderful, as
well as Waffle!.
Golden Waff lea *$*
l'i cups flour
3& teaspoon salt
3 teaspoons baking powder
1 cup fresh milk
2 eggs
1 tablespoon butter
Mix flour, salt and baking
powder, add milk gradually, then
eggs which have been beaten very
lightly, and melted butter. Be sure
both aides of waffle-iron are very
hot, and well greased. After bak-
BY BITTY BARCLAY
Ing each waffle, heat Iron a minute
before pouring In batter.
Rica Waffle*
1 cup rice
Va teaspoon salt
1% tablespoons butter
4 cups flour
3 cups fresh mi'..-:
2 eggs
2 teaspoons baking powder
Cook rice, drain, and add salt,
melted butter, milk and beaten
eggs. Mix well. Sift baking
powder and flour together and add
to first mixture. Bake In hot waffle
iron.
Cheeae Wafflea
2 cups sifted cake flour
2 teaspoons double-acting baking;
powder
% teaspoon salt
3 egg yolks, well beaten .,,
1 cup fresh milk
4 tablespoons melted butter
8 egg whites, stiffly beaten
1 cup grated cheese
Sift flour once, measure, add bak-
ing powder and salt, and sift again.
Combine egg yolks, milk and butter.
Add to flour, beating until smooth.
Fold In egg whites and cheese.
Bake In hot waffle Iron. Place a
slice of grilled tomato on each,
section. Diced uncooked bacon
may be sprinkled over batter before
closing iron. Makes 4 four-section
waffles.
Miamian. She attended St. Kath-
erine's Episcopal School in Daven-
port, Iowa; Columbia Preparatory
School in Rochester and spent a
year at Cardiff Technical College.
Cardiff, Wales. The bridegroom at-
tended Hackley School and is a
graduate of Yale University.
Prior to the ceremony Rabbi
Kaplan conducted the ritual where-
by the bride was converted to the
Jewish faith.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THE rOf.N'TY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA IN PROBATE. No.
"71.
In Re: Estate of BORIS SCHLACH-
MAX. Deceased.
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against
Said Estate:
You. and each of you, are hereby
notified and required to present any
t-lalms and demands which you, or
either of you, may have against the
estute of Boris Schlachman. deceased,
late of Dade County, Florida, to the
Hon. W. F. Blanton, County Judge of
Dade County, and file the same In his
office In the County Courthouse In
Dade County, Florida, within eight
calendar months from the date of the
first publication hereof. Said claims
or demands to contain the legal d-
dress of the claimant and to be iwo'n
to and presented as aforesaid, or same
will be barrel. Bee Section 120 of
the 1933 Probate Act.
Dated June 24th. A. D. 1937.
I. L-, MINTZKIt. as Administrator
of the Estate of
BORIS SCHLACHMAN,
Deceased.
E. ALBERT PAI.I.OT.
Attorney for Administrator.
First publication on 8-15.
72-9-1637.
Junior Hadasah Will Hold
First Informal Meetings
Junior Hadassah will hold the
first of its summer informal meet-
ings on Monday evening, June 28,
at the home of Mrs. Carl Weinkle,
1720 Lenox avenue, Miami Beach,
at 8 o'clock. Mrs. L. A. Chaikin
is in charge of this meeting.
Miss Ida Safer, who was recently
installed as president of the Miami
unit, will outline her plans for
activities-for the coming year and
will announce cbairmen of com-
mittees.
Plans for the annual administra-
tion dance to be held the first week
in August will be presented before
the meeting.
I'M SO
NERVOUS
I COULD
SCREAM
^5?
YOU haven't USED
THAT NERVINE
I BOUGHT YOUI
ONLY SEABOARD OFFERS YOU DE LUXE REGUNIN6
SEAT COOL AIR-CONDITIONED COACHES TO WASH-
INGTON-NEW YORK-THE.EAST-1 %f PER MILE
One-Way Fares from Miami
Botton............... $ 87.98
Jacksonville .. ...... 5.SO
New Orle.ni......... 14.75
New York. ...... ...1 88.48
Norfolk..........,.; 16.30
Philadelphia.......... A 80.68
Richmond...........'.' 16.00
Savannah ....... 8.30
Tellahauee............ 7.70
Nv*ahinson ........ 17.90
Similar fare* le all other point*
*
r ^_ CITY TICKET OFFICE _
OS E. Flagler St." """"*
Telephones 2-S1612-6104
T. W. Luckett, Div. Pass. Agt
n
yi
7
Or.Miles
be\ps to Re/0v
fense Nerves
Do you feel tense and keyed-
up? Do the care of the home and
children, the obligation of social
or community life, the worry of
finances, "get on your nerves"?
"NERVES"
May spell the difference be-
tween happiness and misery for
you and your family.
If you are Nervous, Sleepless,
Irritable, Restless, it may be due
to an overwrought nervous con-
dition. If so, you will find Dr.
Miles Nervine a real help.
Your Druggist has Dr. Miles
Nervine both Liquid and Effer-
vescent Tablets. Why npt get
a bottle or package and start
taking It today?
Large bottle or package $1.*0
Small bottle or package 25



Friday, June 25, 1937
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Page Seven!
^ord and Lady Marley, who recently completed a tour of the
United States, describing conditions affecting world Jewry.
CANTOR AND SOCIAL
WORKER WHO DIED,
IN FAMILIAR POSES
Principal speakers at the Bar Mitzvah celebration of the A. Z. A.
at Port Jervis, N. Y. Left to right: Inspector L. C. Schilder of
the F. B. I.; Rabbi Milton Steinberg of New York; Alfred M. Cohen,
head of B'nai B'rith, and Dr. Abraham Goldberg, noted Zionist.

.
BORIS SCHLACHMAN
AS CANTOR
[ending and Sewing for their Fellow Refugees
C'
irish girls who have fled Germany
i sewing, and mending as part of
training at the training school
Irentioned by the Joint Distribu-
l Committee at Nieuwe Sluis. near
ringen, Holland. Agriculture, do-
tfc science, and trades are being
tat to hundreds of Jewish young
and women preparing to emi-
i to other lands of permanent re-
f with the aid of the Joint Distrib-
Committee. Whatever these
young people or their parents had in
mind for their future careers they
realize the necessity of being trained
in humble occupations that will make
them welcome and self-supporting in
the new countries where they hone tn
be absorbed.
st Plows of Tree Branches
Be first farm plows were made
crooked tree branches and
rked by man power.
Red Coral Always Prized
I It Is red coral that is and always
( has been prized, not solely for jew-
elry and buttons, but as a charm to
bring safety, health and secrets not
revealed to the ordinary person. As
ancient Gauls rushed headlong in-
to battle, they trusted their safety to
their swords, strength and the
"magic" coral imbedded in their
shields or helmets. Many Italians
and Indians regard coral as protec-
tion against the "evil eye." The
world's red coral comes from the
reefs off the Mediterranean coast of
Africa, says the Washington Post,
and is obtained chiefly by Italians.
Lord Melchett, noted Zionist leader who will take an active part
in the deliberations of the World Zionist Congress in Zurich,
Switzerland, in August.
BORIS SCHLACHMAN AS
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
SIDNEY H. PALMER
newly-elected president of Beth
David Congregation.
At the "Nieuwe Sluis" Colony,
Wieringen Holland
Mi
%*
On land recently reclaimed from
the sea by the Dutch Government, the
Joint Distribution Committee sup-
ports this center which trains German
young men and women refugees in
occupations most suitable for the
countries to which they will emigrate.
The scene above shows Jewish youths
IT
training for construction work trans-
porting bricks for buildings which
they will erect for themselves and i
their fellow refugees, *-'
MORRIS MARGULIES
secretary of the Zionist Organi-
stion of America, whose fortieth
innual convention begins In New
York tomorrow.
Officiating at the funeral services for Cantor Boris Schlachman last Monday were Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan, Rabbi Abraham A. Kellner
, Rabbi Adoiph Burger and Rabbi A. 8. Klelnfeld.


Pace Eirht
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Friday, June 25, 193T
Strictly
Confidential
By PHINEAS J. BIRON
Keyholer Abroad
London's political whisperers are
saying that Sir Herbert Samuel's
elevation to the House of Lords
was preliminary to his being ap-
pointed governor of the Jewish
division in the rumored new set-up
which the Royal Commission is
concoting for Palestine. Sounds
funny but there's a Jewish paper
in Tel Aviv which is openly sup-
porting the anti-Semitic, Fascist
and Nazi rebel General Franco in
Spain The paper is the Re-
visionist "Hayarden" And it
says that victory for the "red''
Valencia (Loyalist) government
would mean the triumph of Com-
munism in Spain, while the day
that government falls ,'would not
be a day of grief for Jewry" .
Hayarden also claims that Jews are
not being persecuted by Franco, in-
sisting that this is a lie spread by
enemies of the "Nationalists" .
There's something sardonic about
Mussolini's flirtation with anti-
Semitism in view of the fact that
one of the principal financiers of
Italian Fascism is a Galiciau Jew
by the name of Guieseppe Toplitz.
who is the Fritz Thyssen of Italy
. Paul Weil is the attorney for
Haile Selassie in the latter's suit
in the French courts to force Italy
to permit him to sell his stock in
Ethiopia's railway Carlo Cogni,
director of the Italian Culture Of-
lice in Hamburg, is actively seek-
ing to prove the superiority of the
Italian rather than the Nordic
race ... In stressing the point, he
argues that though "the Jewish
race is inferior in many respects,
the Italian Jews are of a better
race"' But he is in accord with
the Nazis that "the Jews are the
pioneers of Communism" Mar-
garet Fontages, the French siren
who tried to shoot up Count de
Chambrun, the French ambassador
to Rome, because he busted up her
Liaison with II Duce, is the daugh-
rer of a French Jewish merchant.
You Should Know
Our private gumshoes report that
the following gentlemen were
among the 18 people present at
that secret Jewish unity pow-wow
at the New York Harmonie Club,
which we told you about a few-
columns back Professors Horace
M. Kallen and Jerome Michael, who
are affiliated with the American
Jewish Congress; Edward Greene-
baum of the American Jewish Com-
mittee; Louis Fabricant, Henry
Monsky and Carl Austrian of the
B'nai B'rith, and Judge A. K. Cohen
of Boston and Modie Spiegel of
Chicago None of the gentle-
men represented their organiza-
tions ... We hear that the meet-
ing, and others to follow, are an
outgrowth of that recent parley
<;illed in Chicago by the Anti-
Defamation League That anti-
Nazi outfit which we reported as
being ready to fold got a new lease
on life, thanks to some unexpected
money obtained from one of its
bin shots Marvin Lowenthal.
author and globe trotter, now has
a cubbyhole in the American Jew-
ish Committee's office There's
a movement afoot to draft Harry
Schaffer of Pittsburgh for a second
term as commander-in-chief of the
Jewish War Veterans He's done
a swell Job Incidentally, Detroit
will probably get the 1938 conven-
tion of the J. W. V. All the
rabbis who serve as directors of
the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundations
must be married Which makes
it tough on the co-eds Someone
who got caught tells us that the
latest technique developed by fund-
raisers for New York's Jewish Fed-
eration is to lock the doors at pros-
pect meetings held in hotels and to
bar doors and windows by blockad-
ing them with furniture when meet-
ings are held at country clubs.
Strange But True
Pacific Coast Catholics might
like to know that Manfred von
Killinger, the new German consul
in San Francisco, is the man who
assasinated Mathias Erzberger, the
Centrist minister of finance during
the days of the German republic
. Erzberger, who was a Catholic,
was shot from ambush After
the killing Killinger (swell name
for a killer!) fled to Hungary,
where he remained until Hitler
came to power ... As a reward the
Fuehrer made him a "Statthalter"
of Saxony Colonel Edwin Em-
erson, one-time president of the So-
ciety of American Friends of Ger-
many, who fled to Germany in Janu-
ary, 1934, to escape testifying be-
fore the Congressional committee
on un-American activities about his
Nazi propaganda activities, is back
in Washington doing a Job for the
Nazis John Hamilton, chair-
man of the Republican National
Committee, is in Europe studying
the workings of Nazism and
Fascism Sunnyside, the model
home community in New York's
Queens Borough, is facing a serious
problem of anti-Semitism as the re-
sult of the refusal of the commu-
nity's directors to permit a rabbi
to speak in its public auditorium
. The rabbi, who lives in Sunny-
side, was recently assaulted by a
war veteran.
Hitler Over Europe
One of the Germans who died
in the. Zeppelin Ilindonburg dis-
aster was a Nazi military spy .
An obituary in a Silesian paper let
the cat out of the bag when it re-
ported that Fritz Erdmann, one of
the casualties, was a "colonel of
military aviation, specialist in the
intelligence service and commander
of the intelligence school of the air
forces in Halle" who died while "on
duty" German "volunteers"
with the rebel forces in Spain are
being killed by German-made guns
and ammunition freshly imported
from Gemany via Danzig by the
Loyalists with export permits ob-
tained from Nazi sources Thus
the Nazis seem to be selling their
citizens to Franco and their guns
to the Loyalists The latter
even have anti-aircraft guns and
machine guns of the latest German
manufacture Eugen d'Albert's
famous opera, "Tiefland," is play-
ing to capacity houses in the Ger-
man Opera House in Berlin, al-
though the lyrics are the work of
the non-Aryan Rudolf Lothar.
About People
Long Island's swanky North
Shore, where Jews are as rare as
rabbis at Hitler's castle is all agog
because Prof. Albert Einstein has
leased a summer cottage in Hunt-
ington Fordham University is
a Catholic institution but the high-
est ranking member of the gradu-
ating class of the School of Law
was Norma F. Shapiro who copped
four of the five senior class prizes
. Leslie Hore-Belisha England's
minister of war has taken to wear-
ing a monocle ... If Press Agent
Henry Levy blossoms out as an au-
thority on Jewish religious lore
blame It on the fact that he learned
plenty while doing a swell Job pub-
licizing the semi-centennial of the
Jewish Theological Seminary .
Hank Greenberg's kid brother, Joe,
Is making a bid for the home-run
championship of the Texas League
... He plays third base for Fort
Worth Hollywood is talking
about a permanent Relnhardt the-
atre patterned after the famous
Salzburg Festival Our manag-
ing editor, Bernard Postal, is ready-
ing a book on Journalism ... Ida
Flatow, who has been secretary to
more big-shot American Zionists
for more years than she'll admit,
will celgbrate the fortieth anniver-
sary of the Z. O. A. by taking unto
herself a husband Hilly Rose's
father is extremely proud of his
of his time telling people what a
impressarlo son and spends most
good nationalist Jew Billy is.
UNIOBGIIIABLI
k bun
VACATION
JACKSONVILLE
J FLORIDA
GARNET! ANDREWS,M.n.jae
ENJOY SUMMER COMFORT *t ihto
wodarn, fotptool hold in tSt hrt d down.
town Jacbionvillt. Etry room wilK tub and
Sower, loll Witt, ctilmg Ian, radio, llaiud
aummci doof... Eer Bad wild Innanprinj
mattraii and rtadinj lamp. (tormina, ica
want on tvtry iloot.
AIR CONDITIONED
COCKTAIL LOUNGE COMEE SHOP
DINING AND MEETING ROOMS
____R.i.i--Single with FttXM Balh---------j
78 Room! $2.00 80 Room, $3.50
40 Room. $3.00 84 Room. $3.50 I
10 Sampla Room r* fci.ala (a* $4.00 I
___SI.jtil Irene lor double occupancy '
Oilie, I I ROUND Hal.l.
HOTIL'ATTiN W" HOtlL DISOTO
Jacksonville Notes
Miss Jacqueline Jeannette Streng,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George
G. Streng, was married to Norman
Marks, son of Mr. and Mrs. A.
Marks, in a lovely ceremony last
Sunday afternoon in the Jewish
Temple Home on St. Johns avenue.
Rabbi Israel L. Kaplan officiated
and nuptial selections were played
on the violin by Elmer Setzer.
Miss Streng was given In mar-
riage by her father, and had as
her attendant, her sister, Miss Irma
Streng.
Bernard Marks was best man for
his brother.
An informal reception from 2:30
to 4:30 o'clock followed the cere-
mony.
Miss Jeanette Ossinsky and Miss
Hattie Sloat left last week for
Mexico City to attend the Univer-
sity of Mexico. En route they will
visit in New Orleans, La., and San
Antonio, Texas, for a week where
they will be delightfully enter-
tained.
ganization and also those who
bought shekels In the recent drive
participated last Sunday in the
elections for delegates to the twen-
tieth World Zionist Congress, to be
held in Switzerland in August.
Polling places were established
in the Jacksonville Jewish Center,
the home of Mrs. D. Lasarow, 2314
Post street, and the home of Mrs.
Sllverman, 112 Wllkerson avenue,.
Jacksonville Beach. The polls
were open Sunday from 9 a. m. to
8 p. m.
In addition to Mr. Joseph Robin,
the members of the local election
committee were Max Mlrkls, H.
Kline, J. Lapinsky, M. B. Glicksteln,
Harry Heyman and Henry Herzen-
berg.
Paid-up members of the Jack-
sonville Progressive Zionist Or-
NEW YORK(WNS)An ap-
peal to Christian and Jew to Join
in the support of the German
Protestant churches in their fight
for existence and a proposal that
American Christians give financial
support to anti-Nazi boycott were
made here by Samuel Untermyer,
president of the Non-Sectarian
Anti-Nazi League. He said that
such united action "would put the
tottering Hitler regime out of busi-
ness within a few months."
Oieaenaoae. Te
Shhmi, G*.
Notice to Participants
OLD
The following represent the correct solutions to the first 93 puzzles
in the OLD GOLD $200,000.00 CONTEST:
1Noah Webster 31 Stephen Crane
2Geoffrey Chaucer 32Lillie Langtry
3John Stuart Mill 33Victor Hugo
4Henry Clay 34Lucy Stone
5:Juliet Capulet 35Barbara Frietchie
6Admiral Dewey 36Cyrus W. Field
7Artemus Ward 37Paul Revere
8Napoleon Bonaparte 38James Boswell
9William Shakespeare 39John Tyler
10Charles Lamb 40Christopher Columbus
11John J. McGraw 41 William Gladstone
12Daniel Boone 42Enrico Caruso ,
13William F. Cody 43Jeanne Eagels
14Sam Houston 44 Knute Rockne
ISAlexander Hamilton 45Ann Hathaway
16Betsy Ross 46Roscoe Arbuckle
17Caesar Borgia 47Mark Twain
18August Belmoat 48Thomas Hardy
19Becky Sharp 49George Sand
20Anatole France 50Aaron Burr
21Montague Glass 51 King Solomon
22Andrew Jackson 52Alexander Graham Bell
23Rudyard Kipling 53James Buchanan.
24Oscar Wilde 54Anthony Comstock
25Wallace Reid 55Aristotle
26Jefferson Davis 56Abraham Lincoln
27 Hetty Green 57Marquis de Muntcalm
28Nathaniel Hawthorne 58Tom Sawyer
29Alphonse Bertillon 59Louisa M. Alcott
30John Quincy Adams 60John Keats
A TOTAL of 1,000 prizes were offered in
this contest. In view of the fact thct'more
than 1,000 contestants submitted perfect so-
lutions to all of the above listed 90 puzzles, in
accordance with the rules, all prizes are re-
served for those who solved correctly all of
the first 90 puzzles.
In accordance with Rule No. 6, governing
ties, a tie-breaking set of 90 puzzles has been
sent by registered mail to each contestant who
correctly solved all of the first 90 puzzles.
Any contestant who named all oj the first 90
puzzles correctly, and who Jails to receive a tie-
breaking set of puzzles by Wednesday, June 23,
should notify OLD GOLD CONTEST, P. O. Box 9,
Varick Street Station, New York, N.Y., not later
than Midnight oj Saturday, June 26, 1937. No
claims postmarked ajter June 26, 1937, will be
recognized by the OLD GOLD CONTEST.
61Eugene Victor Debs
62Marcus Loew
63Grover Cleveland
64William Howard Tail
65Elbert Hubbard
66Martin Van Buren
67Tobias Smollett
68Benjamin Altmaa
69Carl Schurz
70Warren Hastings
71 David Belasco
7 2 Chateaubriand
73Joel Chandler Harris
74Morgan Dix
75Maria Chapman
76Marat
77Howard Pyle
78Elias Howe
79Oliver Wendell Holmes
80Reginald De Koven
81De Witt Clinton
82Jenny Lind
83 Robert Peel
84Mithridates
85Frank Stockton
86John Noble
87Jacob Wassermano
88General Lafayette
89Garibaldi
90Cassius
In sending a notification, contestant must in-
clude full name and address.
Any contestant who did not correctly solve
all of the first 90 puzzles is unable to win any
prize in the contest, in view of the fact that the
1,000 prizes, in accordance with the rules, are
reserved for those who are tied with perfect
submissions .of 90 correct solutions, and the
number of contestants so tied exceeds the
number of prizes.
If you solved all of the first 90 puzzles cor-
rectly and FAIL to receive a tie-breaking set
of 90 puzzles by June 2 3, communicate with
OLD GOLD CONTEST, P. O. Box 9, Varick
Street Station, New York, N. Y., on or before
Midnight, Saturday, June 26, 1937. NO
CLAIMS POSTMARKED AFTER JUNE 26, 1937,
WILL BE RECOGNIZED.
Upon the conclusion of the contest, and with the announcement of winners,
complete explanation of the solution of each puzzle, together with all clues
contributing to that solution, will be mailed to each person who participates)
in the contest. Names and addresses of all winners likewise will be included.
V
^^^^M